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NEW YORK , NEW YORK
February 1953

Bulletin No.

1 1 1 6 -1 6

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
M artin P. D urkin - S ecretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Occupational Wage Survey
NEW YORK, NEW YORK




February

1 9 5 3

Bulletin No. III 6-16
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
M artin P. D urkin - S ecretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner
For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents. U. S. Government Printing Office. Washington 25, D . C .' -

Price 25 cents




Contents

Letter

of

Page

Transmittal
INTRODUCTION .............................................
THE NEW TORE A R E A ........................................

The Secretary of Labor:
I hare the honor to transmit herewith a report on
occupational wages and related benefits in New York, N. I.,
during February 1953* Similar studies are being conducted in
a number of other large labor-market areas during the fiscal
year 1953* These studies have been designed to meet a variety
of governmental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide
earnings information for many occupations common to most manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries
of selected supplementary wage benefits* Whenever possible,
separate data have been presented for individual major industry
divisions*
This report was prepared in the Bureau's regional of­
fice in New York, N.Y., by Norman J* Samuels under the direction
of Paul E* Warwick, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
Analyst* The planning and central direction of the program
was carried on in the Bureau's Division of Wages and Industrial
Relations*
Ewan Glague, Commissioner.
Hon* Martin P. Durkin,
Secretary of Labor*




1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE .............................
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D* C., June 4, 1953.

1

1

TABIES i

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupations .......................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ......
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations.....
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations ...........................

10

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis B-2333 Women's and misses' dresses...........
B-2851 Paints and varnishes ......................
B-35
Machinery industries.....................
Paper and printing machinery...........
Machine-tool accessories *..............
B-72U Power laundries ..........................

12
13
13
15
15
16

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction .............
C-205
Bakeries................................
C-27
Printing................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees..........
C-A2
Motortruck drivers and helpers.............

17
17
17
1&
19

Supplementary wage practices D-l
Shift differential provisions
D-2
Scheduled weekly h o u r s .....
D-3
Paid holidays ..............
D-4
Paid vacations ..............
D-5
Insurance and pension plans .

3
7
8

20
20
21
21
2

U

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ..........

25

INDEX

27




O C C U P A T I O N A L

W A G E

N E W

The New York City area is 1 of 20 important industrial
centers in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently con­
ducting occupational wage surveys.
In such surveys, occupations
common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries
are studied on a community-wide basis. 1/ Cross-industry methods
of sampling are thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the
following types of occupations:
(a) Office;
(b) professional and
technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, ware­
housing, and shipping.
In presenting earnings information for such
jobs (tables A-l through A-A)
separate data are provided wherever
possible for individual broad industry divisions.

City A r e a
Occupational

Nonagricultural employment in New York City was at a high
level in February 1953. More than 3,500,000 workers were employed
in the city's factories, stores, and offices. Manufacturing plants
provided more than 1,000,000 jobs of which three-fourths were in
establishments producing nondurable goods. Approximately 350,000
were employed by the apparel industries alone; the printing and
publishing industry employed about 119,000 workers; and the food
processing plants had 79,000 workers. Other industries which em­
ployed large numbers of workers were textiles with 32,000, chem­
icals with 3A,000,
and leather with 35,000 employees. Metal fab­
ricating establishments accounted for more than a fourth of the
250,000 workers employed by establishments producing durable goods.
Plants manufacturing electrical equipment such as radios, tele­
visions, switchboard apparatus, and communication equipment employed

i/

W a g e

Structure

Area wage and salary levels were somewhat higher at the
time of the current study than at the date of the Bureau's last
survey (January 1952), 2 / continuing an upward trend among the rep­
resentative occupations studied. General wage rate changes, af­
fecting groups of workers rather than individuals, contributed sub­
stantially to this rise. Based on an analysis of the larger firms
studied in the area (those employing 200 or more workers), approx­
imately three-fourths of the plant workers in these establishments
had received one or more formal wage adjustments since the previous
survey. The proportion of workers whose earnings were thus affected
was slightly higher in manufacturing than in nonmanufacturing in­
dustries. General wage rate increases for plant workers were usually
on a cents-per-hour basis, with half of these workers receiving

2/ Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin No. 1101, Occupational
Wage Survey, New York, N. Y . , January 1952.

See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.




nonelectrical machinery in­
special industry equipment,

Within New York's diversified business structure, indus­
trial relations were generally formalized by contractual agreements
between management and labor organizations. Wages were collectively
bargained in firms employing more than 80 percent of the plant
workers within scope of the survey. In manufacturing, 9 of 10 plant
workers were employed in establishments having written agreements
with unions; in nonmanufacturing, 7 of 10 were in plants with labor
contracts. More than 90 percent of the plant workers in the public
utilities group were employed in unionized firms, more than 75 per­
cent in wholesale trade and services, and 55 percent in retail
trade. Labor-management agreements covering office workers were
less significant, applying to only about 15 percent of the workers.
However, two.-thirds of the clerical workers in the utilities divi­
sion, and one-third in retail trade were in establishments with
contracts covering office workers.

Data are collected and summarized on shift operations and
differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such as
vacation allowances, paid holidays, and insurance and pension plans.

Y o r k

Y.

As one of the world's foremost trading and commercial
centers, New York employed over 800,000 workers in its wholesale
and retail outlets, and about 335,000 in finance,
insurance, and
real-estate activities. Transportation, communication, and other
public utilities industries had approximately 3A0,000 workers on
their payrolls early in 1953® Establishments furnishing personal
and technical services, and entertainment gave employment to more
than 550,000 workers.

Earnings information for characteristic occupations in
certain more narrowly defined industries is presented in Series B
tables.
Union scales (Series C tables) are presented for selected
occupations in several industries or trades in which the great ma­
jority of the workers are employed under terms of collective-bar­
gaining agreements,
and the contract or minimun rates are believed
to be indicative of prevailing practices.

N e w

N.

over 50,000, and those manufacturing
cluding paper and printing and other
utilized about 36,000 workers.

Introduction

T h e

Y O R K ,

1

2

increases of from 7 to 12 cents. More than half of the office
workers in the larger firms studied received formal salary adjust­
ments during the period, which generally ranged from $2 to $4- a
week.
Individual merit increases also contributed to the continued
upward movement of office workers* earnings in the area*
Wages of four-fifths the plant (nonoffice) workers within
the scope of the survey were based on time rates* Formal ratestructure plans applied to the large majority of these workers*
Plans providing a range of rates for individual occupations were
somewhat more prevalent than those providing a single rate for each
occupational classification. Rate-range plans were predominant for
plant workers in the public utility and retail trade groups of in­
dustries and among central offices; single-rate plans wea» prevalent
among establishments in the services industry group.
Salaries of two-thirds the office workers in the area were
determined on the basis of formalized pay structures. Virtually all
of these plans provided for an upward movement of salaries within
an established range. Salaries were determined on an individual
employee basis for three-fifths the office workers in manufac­
turing and approximately half in wholesale trade and services.

Fixed minimum hiring rates for inexperienced plant workers
were part of the formalized wage structure in most New York firms.
Minima below 75 cents were not reported in the manufacturing, pub­
lic utilities, and wholesale trade groups.
Among manufacturing
firms, the minima varied by size of establishment. Two-thirds of
the workers in the large firms
(500 or more employees) were in es­
tablishments with minimum entrance rates of $1 or more;
in estab­
lishments with 101 to 500 employees, minimum rates of $1 or more
prevailed in manufacturing firms employing only one-third of the
workers. About B0 percent of the workers in public utilities and
wholesale trade were in establishments with minimum rates of $1 or
more.
In retail trade and services the minima were under $1 in
firms employing three-fourths of the workers*




Average salaries of most office occupations studied were
above $50 a week. There was little variation between averages for
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries.
Average
hourly
earnings for plant workers, on the other hand, were more often
higher in the manufacturing industries than in nonmanufacturing.
Among the 29 plant jobs for which comparisons could be made, 15 had
higher hourly rates in manufacturing,
11 in nonmanufacturing, and
3 received the same average rates. The skilled maintenance jobs
were typically higher in manufacturing industries; custodial, ware­
housing, and shipping jobs tended toward higher average hourly
earnings in nonmanufacturing plants.
Establishments employing nearly two-thirds of the manu­
facturing plant workers had provisions for the payment of lateshift work. Practically all such provisions provided a differential
over the day- (first) shift rates. A slightly higher proportion of
workers were in plants providing uniform cents-per-hour differ­
entials than those with uniform percentage differentials. The most
common practice in firms with cents-per-hour additions was 5 cents
for both second and third shifts. However, a significant group of
workers were found to be eligible for a 10 cents-an-hour differ­
ential for third-shift work. At least half of the workers in firms
using the percentage differential method of shift payment would
receive 10 percent more than the base rate for all late-shift work,
with about one-fourth of the workers entitled to 15 percent for
work on the third shift*
The hours of work for women office employees in New York
were among the lowest of any large city in the country. Almost half
of the women clerical workers were on a 35-hour workweek* Few were
on schedules in excess of A0 hours a week. The 35-hour week was
predominant for all industry divisions except retail trade where
nearly A5 percent of the office employees worked 37£ hours. The
predominant schedule for plant workers continued to be A0 hours a
week. About 15 percent of the workers, however, were in establish­
ments which were operating on longer schedules at the time of the
Bureau*s survey.

3

A« Cross-Industry Occupations
Q ty icm

T«u* i - i *

O c Q H p a titm l

(Average straight-tlae uaakly hour* and earnings }/ for selected occupations studied an <
teals in Maw York, N. Y., by industry division, February 1953)

------------r

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Sax, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly ffffnlfiyn
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

hader h .o o

S2.50 35.00

(0.00

35.00 37.50

bo.oo l|2.50 1*5.00 b7.50

32.50

$

t

37.50 io.oo I 2 .5 0 3*5.00 1*7.50 Io.oo

52.50 55.00

S

1

70.00

l

60.00 S 0
5.0

50.00 52.59 55.00 57.50

1
1
»
l
85.00 90.00 100.00 110.00 120.00
and
85.00 90.00 100.00 110.00 120*00 over

75.00 10.00

70.00 75.00 80.00

57.50 60.00 65.00

M
an
16b

37.5

1
55.50

21*3

36.5

66.50
66.00

"

-

•

53.00
53.50

•

■

•

173 36.5
d a rk s , f i l s , class A ............................
Honaaaifacturlng .................................................... ------ 2pr ' 37.0

58.50
59-.ro-

*

*

-

2
2

B illa rs . nacbina (billing nachina)

••••••••••••
◄

1

l

1

lonaanufacturing .....................................................

—

m “ 553“

227
Bookkaaping-nachina oparetora, class B ...............
Konnanufacturing .................. .................................. ------ 178-

36.5
36.0

8

"

m

3

29

20

57

1
1

25
25

b
b

27

2

b

18

72
67

77
73

21*
2b

1
*
“

2
2

”

“

"

“

7
7

9
27

_

_

“

"

“

“

_
“

_

“
21
21

2
1

1
1

_
“

_

-

_
-

1

“

•

"

11
11

5
5

16
16

28
28

y*

s

ft

22

8
•

8
8

10
10

5
1

-

_

m

13

3
1

21
21

39

ft

11
9

26
2b

37

ft

3
3

19

66
6i

11
7

12
6

7
1

6
6

22 _____ 5
9
b

2
2

279
“ TT
198
183
30

362
35
296
251
30

135
121
35

130
3b
8b
73
12

35

68
67
2

15
15
17

32

5

16

a
§
20

-

b
b
2

37
31*
27

62

10 1

-

1*6
bb

66
d

28
2l*
17

112
105
35

32
29

33
32

•
-

.
-

.
-

.
-

3b
3b
-

•
-

21
19
2
“

126
b
112
110
10

33
T
27
23
-

170

67.00
67.00
67.00

71
97
89
2

70
236
7 “ ~TB
186
b9
172
b9
2
lb

37.5
3 7 fr~
37.5
37.5

68.50
62.50
71.00
70.50

-

_
_
-

•
-

1
*
1*
-

-

7
7
-

2
2
-

30
27
3
-

2
2
“

55
37
18
6

31
15
16
b

53
12
31
19

15
3
10

'W
O
38
115
35

75
bo
28
17

97
36
57
bb

lib
12
97
37

593
1*86
183
17b

37.0
36.5
?l O
36.5

U7.00
U7.50
1 7.0 0
.
1*6.00

-

6
6

21
18

6
b

82
70
3b
11

9
6
a
3

b
5

1

12

2
57
20
21

7
6

22

87
78
59
11

21
17

3

25
58
a
1*6

22
18

18

85
78
33
20

53

6

bo
ll*
lb

3

-

1

Eev-Dunch operators ......................................................

111

37.5

51t.oo

_

1

5

21

3

18

2

12

29

9

Jfi

7.365
1,198
5,003
528

36.5
37.0
37.0
37.5
O

39.50
1*0.00

1103
lib
761
25
20b

1609
287
1081
100
b53

713
119
b75
108
225
12
69
61
119

223
38
115
b
88
A
b
13
70

161
22
121
12
56

39
19
3
-

7b
7
1*3
17

25

65
38
27
20

18
6
12
-

-

31
22
18

_
3
17

.
7
-

“

-

1
1

3
3

3
3

116

_
“

-

-

-

106
1?
1 ------ T
12
10b
10
102
2
“

9b

23

92
92
2

23
23

36
lb
20
9

36
10
20
3

51
7
1*1
13

25
3
12
2

6
•
2
-

1
-

-

-

«
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

12

2b

_
“

1

Office bors ••••••..........................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
Monaannfactaring ................................................... .
Public u t i l itia s * ............... ............................
lAiAleeele A
«*e/4* . . . .
........
J.--- »- 4/
Finance « * ................................................. ..

"

d a r k s , f l l a . class B .................................................
Vonaanufacturlng......... ......................................... ..

b63
390
1B6

37.0
37.0
• c
sc
33*?

lilt.50
bb.00
Uv O
ft

d a rk s , order .................................................................
Manufacturing ...........................................................
lonaanufacturing .....................................................
Mholesals trade .................................................
Central o ffices .................................................

2.036
378
1,500
1,380
158

3 7 .0

65.50

36.5
37.5
37.5
35.5

d a r k s . Darrell ....................................... ..
Manufa cta n ia g ............................................................
In w a u f a c ta r ln g ......................... ............................
Public u t i l itia s * ...........................................

830
------ 57T
b75
189

Dsnlicstlna-nachina o p erato rs.................................
Monssnufacturing .....................................................
ULaI
aA
......
................
Services ................................................................

1,6 6 7

07

c

39 .5 0

1*1.00
1*1.00
■ no
ifl
39.00
37.00

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

OA
l,b96
1,061
1,16b

S a c ra ta r ia s ......................................
Monaanufaeturing ..••••••••..................
Cantral o f f i c e s ...........................................

373
177
161

37.0
37.5
36.0

78.50
73.00
82.50

Tabulatlnv-manhlna operators ...................
Monaanufaeturing ..............................
Finanoa * * .......................... ......
Cantral offioaa .........................

2.069
1,532
9U6
bbl

37.0
37.0
37.0
36.0

67.00
66.00
63.50
70.00

Tvnista. class R ...........................
Monssnufacturing............ ............

366
321*

38.0
38.0

L9.00
U8.50

Central o ffices

36.0
36.5
35.5

-

_
?1+
9
1*5
•
6
39

1* .5 0
0

b?5
10.
398
39

816
271
1*21*
27
58

121*
230
1*6

182
122
121

_

<9
07

79

301
172
228

302
15b
21*1

609
71
1*27
7b
189
A
120
38
111

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

*

“

-

-

-

-

-

_
•
-

-

-

_

29

52

-

2b
22

1x7

-

1
1

_

-

2

39
33
8

35
26
17

132
93
68

18

67

•

“

9

67

18
15

-

Sss footnotes st and of table.
•
Transportation (excluding railroads), eoaannlestion, and othar publlo utilitias.
** Finanea, inauranoa, and raal aatate.




33

irn
lb5
1057
161
321
C
A
319
200
169

9

1

29
26

-

-

-

“

19
19

b7

18

33

58
b8

1

77

11
lb
lb

26
-

-

3

225

-

-

-

.

m
m

m
•
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25
i5

71

2

-

10

28

10

11*5

53

105
87
10

102
67
1*2

35
17
18

290
225
15b
1*9

282
192
125
75

287
231
168

76

IO
t

2

9

b

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

33
16
17

58
30
23

1*2

28
1
20

11
3

10L
6

10

6

b

b

316
275
9b
28

133

76

26
b

_

.

23

-

-

-

38

22

-

■

2

76

39

2

-

-

-

1
1

no

1

_

_

-

•
“

3?

i

3*
1

2

39

60
------ 18
10
31
1*1
2b

“ Sr

•

-

_

“

“

•

•

Oocupational Wags Survey, Nov York, N. Y., Fsbruary 1953
U.S. USPARTMEMT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

i
*

Table A-l:

O ^ C C e O c c H fU i/tO tU - G o n t u t M e d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y . , by industry division, February 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A v e rage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
workers

Weekly

Weekly Under
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) 8
30.00

30.00

S
32.50

$
s
35.00 37.50

io.oo

£ ------ $
$
1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 50.00

32.50

35.00

37.50 1*0.00

1*2.50

1*5.00 1*7.50

150.00

52.50

5 2 .5 0

$
$
55.00 57.50

s
60.00

$
65.00

$
70.00 75.00

$
80.00

5 5 .0 0

57.50 60.00

6 5 .0 0

7 0 .0 0

75.00 80.00

85.00

s
85.00

$

s

9 0 .0 0 100.00 1 1 0 .0 0 120.00
and
over

9 0 .0 0 100.00 110.00 1 2 0 .0 0
1
------i

Women
*
51*.oo
55.00
53.50
51*. 50
5i*.50
1*8.00
58.50

Billers, machine (billing machine) ............
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ........... ............. .......
Nonmanufacturing . ............................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Finance * * .................................
Services ...................................
Central offices ..............................

2,l5U
—
395“
1,526
761
Ult3
185
233

37.0
37.0
37.0
37.5
36.0
39.0
36.5

Billers, machine (bookkeeping m a c h i n e ) ........
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .............................
Retail trade 2/ ...........................

1,380
181*
1,196
1*09

36.5
36.0
36.5
38.0

58.50
51*.oo

Bookkeepin e-machine operators, class A ........
.................... .
Manufacturing
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............ ................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Finance ** .................................

1,527
133"
1,301*
256

36.5
37.0
36.5
38.0
36.0

60.00
61*.oo
60.00
62.50
59.00

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ........
Manufacturing .................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .............................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Retail trade 2/ ...........................
Finance a * ................................
S e r v i c e s ...................................
Central offices ..............................

7,370
668
6,092
983
369
1*,323
327
610

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) ............................
Manufacturing ................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .............................
Public utilities * ........................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Retail trade 2/ ...........................
Finance ** ..7.............................
Services ...................................
Central offices ........... ..................
Calculating-machine operators (other than
Comptometer type) .............................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g .......... ..................

835

1
*

8

-

“

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1
*
-

21
12 !
9 i
9 i
i
1
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, 151
i
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6
38
75
28
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k

97

!
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|

4

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18
9
9
9

90
20

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-

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-

5
-

13
-

-

-

-

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5

7

632
23
589
6
9
573
1
20

652
12
611*
1*8
21
538
-

-

-

-

(
j

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_

58.00

-

-

_ I
-

“

-

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l

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21
3
18
-

239
6
221* 1
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18
-

19
201* !
1
9

-

26

78
29
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21*

95
27
68
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11*9
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172
12
159
-

T
V

88

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917
1*6 1
810 !
51* ;
28 j
691* i
20
i
61

-

-

1 ,3 2 0

36.5
37.5
36.5
36.0
37.5
37.0
35.5
37.5
36.0

55.00
5l*.oo
55.oo
59.50
56.50
55.00
53.00
53.oo
56.00

791*
627

36.0
36.0

52.50
51.50

-

tr

36.5
36.5
36.5
37.0
36.5
36.5
36.5
35.5

51*.oo
56.oo
53.50
62.00
56.00
51.50
53.50
57.00

_

36.5
36.5
36.5
37.0
37.5
38.0
36.0

1*3.00
1*1*.00
1*2.00
1 8 .5 0
*
1 1 .00
**
1*2.00
ltl.00
1*2.00
1*6.50

- i
-

-

5,21*1*
#3
3,31*1
265
1,093
61*3
992
31*8

i

-

j

“

-

19
1
18

8
8

792 i
93 0
31* !
75
876 i 61*9 !
105 ! 126 :
36 S
51
725 j u a !
j
16 !
20

h

!

111*
10

! 586
73?
61
|
72
1*32 ; 1*95
!
16 !
17 ;
! 176 i 166
99 :
1
71
i 162
165
1*8 ;
7
82
183

367
22
230

81*5
n5 :
1*92 !

1*35
25
271*
23
61
55
131
1
*
136

153

67
11
**

21*6
20
221
1
10
129
79
5

200
6
187
2
10
106
61
7

296
19
237
1
*
36
152
11*
1*0

222
17
168
1
*
61
73
20
37

31*0
2l*
260
29
58
88
70
56

285
26
211
10
52
U3
31*
1*8

I
i
!
:

327

1000 1532
2356
161
10?
85
852 1370 ; 1973
70
33
3
503
71* i
73
38 1 109 j 105
566 1 1011* j 1101*
!
1
191
171 i H*1
1
77 1 222
!
I

1051
56
855
90
11*8
86
1*32
99
11*0

1036
116
801*
90
268
58
310
78
116

113
**
21

361*
25

265
22

152

371*
1*6
200
18
76

276

170

32
-

_

23
-

32
-

23
-

32

-

-

21*
13
- -----

T

6
1
5

1
*
-

1
-

1
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.

1
.

19
3
16

3
3

5

1
*

1
_

_
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5

8

-

-

-

-

-

1
1 !
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3
3
-

5
£

_

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91
1
85
16

192

i t

-

169
1*7
111*

21 !
8
13 1

30

38
16 1
I

3
12

161
1!
1*5
2 I

1*0

-

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121* :
1*9
75 !

-

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33

k

|

32
20

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-

.
-

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385
76
278
I
118 1
31* 1
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31

139

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713 j
158
110
**
135
33
188
81
115

60
51

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7
3
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800 i 32Q
1*7 ;
1*5
681* ; 212
61
1
1*1*
61* 1
15
111*
356
12
101*
63
69

16?
11*7

9

278 !
3 1
275 ;
55 !

703
7l* !
573
11*5
1*6
31*6 i
31 i
56

63
63

9

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59

7
1

21
18

2 |

11*7

29
77
30
18
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137
16
71 j

1*71*
56
286
9
31
52
11*1*
50
132

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31*

1
1 1*2 !
*
22
390
11
**
291

187
3
136
-

9
3
6

-

18
109
81*
21

21*3
26
206
72
105

107
19
62
36
18
8
26

- !
- !
_

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369
ia
328
31

36"
203
111*
25
31
23

1*6
---- 19"
25 1
13
9 1
_ |

1

29

:

7

161

288
65
159
105
50
1
61*

121
170
11
1
*
159 I 117
25
67

—

37
35

101
30
61*
38
16

282

285

395
109
251
132
61

216
81*
117
2
39

i

531
102
320
30
156
1*2
51
ia
109

i
!

1
!
i
|
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1

716
103
U17

38

i
26
136
107
32
69 !
103 !
11
**
21
71
196
115

65 1
200
89
90
1*8
238 |

61*

15

5

1
-

8
-

5

3
5
-

_

1
_
_

35

1*7
1
30
10
2
1
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13

—

118
1*0

27
39
2
10

_
.
_
_

5
_

1
_
_

„
_

.
_
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7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

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_

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-

-

-

-

-

-

25
5

7
6
-

21*
10
13
-

I

_
_

j

Clerks, file, class A ...........................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ................................
Nonmanufacturing .............................
Public utilities * .......................
Wholesale t r a d e ........................ .
Finance * * ................................
Services ...................................
Central o f f i c e s ....... .......................

2,326
170
1*70
1,100

Clerks, file, class B ....... ....................
Manufacturing .................................
Non m a n u f a c t u r i n g .............................
Public utilities * ........................
Wholesale t r a d e ...........................
Retail trade 2/ ...........................
Finance *» ..7.................. ...........
Services ...................................
Central offices ..............................

9.211
690
7,571*
538
1,389
1*97
l*,26l*
886
91*7

2,991*

2

505
1*22

37.5
36.0

_
_
_

156
H*
130
_ j
_

.
_
_
_

!
!

1*1*6

21
99 j
10 1

10
356
62
13

U i j
S ee footnotes at e nd of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




6
-

109
3
106
1*9
20
10 !
“ !

6
6

36.5
36.0
37.0
38.0
35.5
37.0
36.0

1
*
“

-

36.0

55.50
53.50
1*9.00
58.00
57.oo

30
30
11*
12

•

58.50

5 1 .0 0

21
7
H*
6
-

1
*
-

5
1*28
_
_

52
13
39
20
19
-

31*
1*8
j
1

60
29
31
130
26 !

11
**
31*
18
73
1
73

1*6

3U
31*

35
162
8
100

3l*
251*
9
63
113
59
39

3
18
1*2
36
51*
7l*
9
1*6
21*
-

25
75
22
16
-

22
-

29
8

62
la

9
-

21
-

35?
35
275
39
95
100
ia

206
11
11*9
33
1*1
55
19
1*6

90
12

98
92
27
19
22
21*
6

1*9
131*
39
75
1*0
16
2 I
11 1
6 !

19
_ J L

78
66

j

20

55
7
7
17
23
23

152 ____ 22_
5
21
121
11
1
*
16
9
1
31*
59
26

8
11

Hi
1
*
1
3
-

10

10
2
8
10
-

1

_

_____L

_

-

-

-

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7
6
1

_
_
_
_

_

_

.
_

.

_
_
_
.
_

-

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_
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-

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-

-

5

C b o u p c U io H d r G a tU

k 's u ije d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings V for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, February 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Average
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number

o
f

workers

Weekly

Weekly Under
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) $

3 .0
00

s

s
32.50

32.50 35*00

35.00 37.50

to.00

1*2.50 U5.oo j1*7.50
$

37.50 1*0.00 1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50

Manufacturing ..........
Nonmanufacturing «.......
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade 2/ .......
Services ....7........
Clerks, payroll ............

Manufacturing... ......
Nonmanufacturing........
Public utilities * ....
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade 2/ .......
Finance ** ..7........
Services
Central offices ..........
Duplicating-machine operators

Nonmanufacturing........
Finance *» ............

37.0
37.5
37.0
35.5
36.5
38.0
36.0
37.5
35.5

57.5o
59.oo
58.00
61.50
5 * 50
1.
63.00
56.00
65.50

- ;
- !

1*7U
353
101*

36.5
36.*
35.5

1*8.50
1*9.00
1*9.50

_
- ;

_
-

52.00
36.5
37.0
52.50
5i.oo
36.5
57.00
37.5
5U.00
36.5
1*9.50
37.5
5o.oo
36.5
36.0
36.5 : 55.50

_
- i

_
- !
- ;
- 1
i

1,862
1*16
15U
1,187
311

36.0
36.0
36.5
36.5
36.0
36.5
35.5

; 1*0.50
1*0.00
! l*o.5o
! 1*1.50
i 39.50
I l*o.5o
! l*i.5o

.
150
38 ,
- ; 106
i
6 .
- ! 99
- !
6

29,251
1*,7U0
19,1*93
1,269
5,532
1,026
6,007
5,659
5,018

36.0
36.0
36.5
37.0
36.5
37.5
36.0
36.0
35.5

68.50
67.00
68.00
73.00
69.00
6 * 50
1.
69.00
65.00
70.50

20.876
2,821
ll*,190
1,682
3,975
395
6,267
1,871
3,865

55.00
36.5
5U.00
36.5
55.00
36.5
51t.5o
36.5
57.oo
37.0
53.50
37.5
36.0
5 *.oo
1
37.0 i 51*.oo
35.5 i 56.00

Public utilities * ....
Wholesale trade .......
Retail trade 2/ ......
Finance ** *.7........
Services....... .....
Central offices ..........

551
300
1,859
187
580

Public utilities * ....
Wholesale trade .......

Finance ** ..........
Central offices .........
Secretaries ................

Manufacturing ...........
Nonmanufacturing ..... .
Public u t i l i t i e s * .........
Wholesale trade ......
Retail trade 2/ ........

Finance «* ...........
Services .............
Central offices .........
Stenographers, general .....

Manufacturing ..........
Nonmanufacturing .......
Public utilities * ....
Wholesale trade ......
Retail trade 2/ ......
Finance ** ..7........
Services .............
Central offices .........

*
8

3,335
1,1h
1,953
2
51*
1 3*
*1
376
1* 3
9
396
2
1*5

20
5

2,1*77

W

52.50
52.50
5U.oo

5 .0
00
5i.oo
5 9 .0 0

5 .5
00

1




186
62
109
31
58
12

3
3
_
3
-

1*
1
2
12
_
5
7
-

192
92
98
20
53
13
12
2

j Itt
18
i 85
23
18
32
| 12
n

7
7

3*
1
27
7

126
93
31

39 1
! 17 !
8 :
i

-

-

-

_
-

_
_

16

_ 1
-

16 !
16

220
396
125
3*
1
11*0 ! 225
39 ! 108
32
52
6
65

! 276
1*09
2*
1
;
:
31*8
1 5 i
8*
1
32
12
*
192
167
11
i 21
37
- ! 3*
1

55
l
5*
1
-

-

17
25
2

19

200 ! 61*0 196
262
97
19 1 1 1 I 25
7
123
*
21*0
59
129
563 1 51 9
*
18
8*
1
5
65 ! 2 *
11
30
H*
1* 1 5*
1
1
126
1*70 230
35
75
30
52
121* !
19

j

-

- 1
-

-

-

-

-

_

_

5

-

-

i

112
5
107
8
2
9*
1
3

55

I

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

259726 0 - 53 -2

72
65
7
5
2

2 '
2
2 |

36.5
36.0
37.5
37.0
38.5
38.0

21
2
5
5

_
.
- !
- i

3,303
725
,2,096
I,li31
1*17
1
1*7

1*,113
366
3,11*7

Office girls ..............
Manufacturing ...........
Nonmanufacturing .......

57.50 60.00

65.00 70.00

$
85.0C $ 90.00 $
ioo.oa 110.00 ^20.00
75.00 ^0.00 $

55.00 57.50

6 .0 65.00
00

70.00 75.00

80.00

and

85.00

90.00 100.00 110.00

12 0 over
a 0
1

i

Manufacturing ...........
Nonmanufacturing........

Key-punch operators .........

5 .0 52.50
00

S
52.50 55.00

i

VIonan - Continued

Clerics, order..............

5 .0
00

2
- '
2
~
3 |

_
- |
17
16
15
1
1

1

_

381
207
78
169
201*
125
13
12
69 !
52
H*
28 i
25
*
13 ! 18
*
8
1
*

26
20
8

21 ___17
5
9

2
5

17

:

62
16 !
*
5
!

17 1
*1

! 65 !
! 3
1*7 !
i 15
i 26 i
I 19 ,
*
21*1 ;

16
59

11*6
26
101
9
17
53
19

39
35
21
35
6 : iU

!
|

18
1

61
2

357 i
13
*7
1*93
*
22
18
*
38
67
508 1 351*
391
257
28 | 17 i 20
8
93
25
133 i ia
27
13
73
150
109 ; 280
337
ia 1 3 *
19 ! 15
1
68
61 | 6 *
1
33

17
*

86
7
12
*
2
8
29
37

19
1
16
3

15

5
0

15
12
12
12
5?

220
60
11*2
1
15
*
18
6h
11
*
18

!

___ k6_
7 !
17
1 !
7 i
j
- !
i
6 |

1
!
!

11
**
10
26
7
3
2
a*

3
|

22

8

“

1
1
-

»
-

17 1
*

1!
*

\

2 35
7
9
1-*! 16
1
2 1° i
|

n

28

1

12 |

9
7
7

"
-|

_
_
.
_
-

8 !

-

-

-

-

-

_

1193
135
1085
765
901*

1978
265
1235
112
1*08
25
1
*10
280
17
*8

1258
209
837
6*
1
289
15
*
279
160
212

1686
272
1122
1
1*2
310
15
523
132
292

580
75
379
18
*
11*2
5
1
1*8
36
126

105
1
*
8*
1
2
39
2
35
6
17

28
6
20
_
12
1
.
7
2

1715
277
1089
55
255
62
381
336
31*9

5533
639
3816
167
1229
235
no
1083
1058

1695
121
1211
no
530
10
362
199
363

3325
360
2265
251
890
93
81 9
*
182
700

1985 3025
21
0 * 1*96
1399 2069
21*8
136
291
71
1*
21
93
650
735
216
361*
382
1*60

1608
1
1*9
1075
135
235
20
51 8
*
137
381*

2770
1*73
1689
206
508
50
691
2
31*
608

|

7
1
“

- !
-

-

2

-

5 0 3*11
01 1 *
639
5*
1
31*58
21*
31
280
151

2*
12
2*
1
171*
21
69
56
28
11
**

•
-

2 ! ___ l .
1
2_ 1

_
•
-

12
1
1
*
1
*
7

3
1
*
- ;
12 !

_
-

_

_
-

-

-

-

2
_
_
_
2

_
- i
_ |
_
_

_
.
.
.

- i
-:

_
_
.
_
_
_

-

-

_
_

_ :
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_

-

_
-

_
.
-

1189
239
686
126
130
1
*
250
176
261*

1* 2
6
106
235
17
56
33
100
29
121

1

7
_

-

2553
U07
1671
86
931* 1*99
73
n5
612
763
359
393
6n
1*75

-

-

11
**
2

7

Pill
387
11*28
285
150
56
737
200
296

127
1*85
21
95
102
316
2
8
20
15
95 : 231
*
5 ' 12
7*
1

182 j
31*8
6
17
*
2*
18
121*
5*
1
ia
65
9
n3 !
63
7 !
5
53 1

68
162
3*
1
19
15
90
u

5
n j

1

_

1072
131*
831
88
65
12
581*
82
107

-

13 I __ k9_ !
_
10
37
1 1

2*
15

2
5

5

22
- i
- 1
-

_
_

-

-

501
173 1
277
37
89 I
15 I
*
67 1
39
51

-

3
2

la
la

_
-

36
13
20 *
1
i*ia
83

75
2
3
1

98
1*
1
32
6
31
15
71

127 !
285
11
**
81
37
19
*
7*
1
2*
1

62
35

12
12

_
-

2272
113
**
1573
63
301
122
1*03
681*
256

m

21
0
3
2

k & .I

L

_
6
5

13
2

1

190
355
78
39
208
133
168
U5
15 1
21 i
18

7 ___S2_ ____k_____
7
1
*
5
_
7
11
**

12 1
1
6

105U

-

117
38
60
19
*
10
1

213
168 1 361
156
to
1 51 i 51 ! 187
109 j 161*
99
! 131*
1 16 : 23 ! 18
5
20
I 39 ! 20
H*
22
15
*
I 19 : 28
! 38 | 20
15
| 22 ' 18
6*
1
13
*
10 j 17
28 !
8

600 11*52
96
1*29
1
*91 895
65
2 * 155
1
26
86
106
159
1
*30
335
128
13

16
16
1
15
-

k

U15
15
7*
1
362
11 0
*
295
59
59
- !
2

329
152
161
8
16
*
69
38
16

15
8
7
1
1
5

-

39
0
21
0

281
591*
SC
m*
362
231
159 i 290
63
59
5 ! 9

-

-

2*1
1*
3
7
17
2
26
23
12
*
81
35

159
32
n2
18

_

i
t
26
6*
1
15

10

_
_

8
_
_
_
8

_
_
_
_

.

_

_
_
_
_
_

2

“

“

-

_

_

_
_
_
_

_

6

Table

a- i j

Office OocuptUioHl-G onfauted
y

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings
for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division, February 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$

$

3 .0 3 .5
00 20
10 0
3 .0 32.50 3 .0
50

Weekly
Weekly Under
hus
or
erig
anns
(tnad (tnad
Sadr) Sadr)

$

s
$
s
35.00 37.50
37.50

!
$

$

!

52.50

$
55.00 57.50

55.00

57.5C

;
$

«

00
10 0 12.50 15 0|S17.50 5 .0
.0
.0
10 0 12 0 15.00l 17.50 50.00 52.50
.0 .5

6 .0
00

$

$

6 .0 6 .0 7 .0
00 50 00
65.00

s
$
s
75.00 80.00

8 .0
00

70.00 75.00

85.00

$
$
1
$
$
8.0 9 .0 10 .0 110 0 12 .0
50 0 0 00 .c 00
and
9 .0 10 .0 110 0 120.OC1 over
0 0 0 J .0

.....

j
Women - Continued

Stenographsra. technical ............ ......
Nonmanufacturing...................... .
Central offices ........................

Switchboard operators .................... .
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing ............... ....... .
Public utilities * ............ .
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade y .................... .
Finance * » ................... ......
Services ...........................

Switchboard operator-receptionists........ .
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ................... .
Retail trade y .................... .
Finance * # ........ ........... .
Services.......................... .

Tabulating-machine operators...............
Nonmanufacturing........ ..............
Finance * * ..........................

Tranecribing-machine operators, general .....
Nonmanufacturing.......................
Wholesale trade .....................
Finance * » ....... ..................
Services ..................... ....*••
Central offices ...................... .
Typists, class A ........ ................ .
Manufacturing ......................... .
Nonmanufacturing ..... ...... ...... .....
Public utilities * .....
Wholesale trade .....................
Retail trade 2/ .....................
Finance ** .........................

1.156
816
333

22
8

6,573
630
5,169
193
867
671
1,723
1,715
171
2.615
880
1,651
136
6ll
138
376
387
1.070
893
583
112

-

_
-

62.50
62.00

-

-

-

-

37.5
36.5
38.0
38.5
37.5
10.5
37.0
38.5
35.5

53.50
58.50
52.50
55.50
58.50
53.00
52.50
I

_
•
- j
“

5
5
5
"

_
-

13
13
5
8
-

37.0
37.5
37.0
36.0
37.0
37.0
36.5
38.0

36.5
36.0
36.5
35.5

6 .5
20
6 .0
30

80
.5
5 .0
80

51.oo
53.5o
51.oo

6 .5
00
51.00
51.50
51.50
51.50

59.00
58.oo
56.50
60.50

36.0 I 51.oo
55.00
37.5
36.0 :53.50
36.0
53.50
60.00
36.5
38.0
36.0
51.00
36.0
55.00
35.5

!
- !
•
•
-

36.5
36.5
36.5
38.0
37.0
38.0
36.0
37.5
35.5

1

li*.865
2,127
11,367
831
2,155
538
6,567
1,276
1,371

5 .5
50

17.50
16.50
19.50
50.00
16.00

11.50
16.00
19.50

1
_
1
-

-

1
i

_
-

“

7,790

Central offices ........................

:
- i
- 1

'
_
_
-

-

_
!

-

3
103
6
77
20
“

8

1
-

-

-

h

.
_
-

11
11
10
1

"

6
6
1
2
-

32 ; 156
; 36
23 1 111 ;
« I
101 '
19
!
1
9
9 :

23 !
23 1
21

17
11
11

2 i

289
2
283
72

15

_
_
28 !
2
-

1

15
-

10

1
36
9
-

6
116
19
1
2190
289
2018

10
1
115
13
0
16
7

!
!
|
!1562
i
153

512
22
112
96
117
135
27

571
88
63
90

2 22
108
65

179
33
118
125
237
56
28
2106
228
1723
165
138
58
1196
166
155

16 !
38 1
38

111 !
88~
56
29

2
6

2
6

16
08
10 115
1

1587 1902
218
316
1099 1 U 5
112 101
178
171
28 130
636
522
115 191
210 171

125
W~

5o

2
6

677

379
13
302
509
59
11
62
95
26 | 11
239 I 73
90 ;
18
31
i
|

12
0

7
9

8
1

1008
!1187
83
!
809
815 i 897
90
56
61
1
39 189
28
3 !
13
392
533 ! 591
116
182
221
116
119
175
2755
392
2172
119
530
120
1152
251
191

518
13
108
15
81
18
116
85
67

201
112
372
l?1
11
179
la
131
230
156
130
251
- ; 22
2
27 |
68 i 81 j 29
72
» 1 18
37 ! 17
29 ; 38
25 ; 58
61 ! 6 U | 35

206 I 3P 1 282 1
1
30 ! lo
16
210
i
115
62 '
17
255
126
172 1 110
H I
23
26 ! 61
11
53

13 20
2 2
12
0
10 11

908
__ k2____Zk_ 515
1
127
5
91
66
726
138
; U
_
5
21
12
- i
31
8
310 i 532
12
_
21 ! 78 ; 131
16 |
3
55

10
3
1

2

12 10 1 0 163
2 0
8“ — W0r i s r
2
6
so
2
0 32 31
22

r r ---

0
1007 69 716
3 1 1 110
9 0

557 |
:
'
551
929 !
31
11
21
1
32
97
132
251
516
352
39
1

12
1

3
0
.

_ i

271
11
263
1
10
55
161
■

2
5
13

u
.
_

i !

2

i
306
25
123 i 101
21
126
77
16
169
83
12 ! 63
| 17 j
12 I 16
u !
!
7!
~
~

30
^

•
-

10

7
7 i --- 8“—

“

10
6

1

l !
j

7
7

-

j

-

- :

Typists, class B ........................ .
Manufacturing...... .................. .
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ............... .
Wholesale trade........... ..... .
Retail trade y .................... .
Finance ** ......................... .
Services................. ..........
Central offices........................

.
.

-

36,5 ..5li5o
36.5 ; 51.00
53.00
36.5
37.0
55.50
36.0
51.00
5l.5o
36.5
36.5 j 55.50

5 0
1.0

-

-

"

3iQp.._
2
l*5
2,270
956
1,070
153
568

6,080
619
886
125
3,011
1,109
1,075

_
-

36.5
37.0
37.5
35.5

230
10
179
19
70
32
H
17

6
1

10
9
8J~
12

52

25

71
9

515

167
io6

!?1 I
13
! 129
1
5
!
:
51
1 12
j 19

173

j 95 i

9
0

!

11
10

1
.
.

11

1

1

8
7

2
6

-

_
_
_

_
M

_
-

“

"

-

21 ,
u !
1
6
3 !

15
12
l1
6
- i -

5

-

“

16
11
6
7
1
2

8
3
3
5

2

5

2
2
_

5
•
5

-

228
196
98
58

15
3
35
19

17
11
3
•

10

3

1

H
11
-

1

11
H
H
.
1

_
■
*
I

“

57

3
3

2
.

102

j

-

-

6

!

_
-

-

88
11
31

2.
6
.

I

.
_
_

27
57
.
19
_
H
21
3

_

_

-

'
_
|
1

_
.
_

-

•
_
_

-

_
_
_

-

1
120
115

162
1U
81
13

128
120
93
9

217 ! H 6
15
13
168
313
211
27
112
107
H
U
90
31

233
17
175
101
53
10
n

715 913
80 ' 55
182 j 773
29 | 36
65
171
10
23
216
331
119
225
183
115

117

6
2
9

753
80
573
11
330
18
163
18
100

66?
139
126
58
132
13
201

12
32
2
u
58
5
179
66
83
331
53
218
29
106
2
102

22

9

101

30

157
115
96
5

10
6
36
235
U7
59
18
135

118
122
65
!

66
i 52

i

8 |

1 ia j
j

; 172
■
12
! 110
1 70
30
! 6
50

i

16
*
2
38
27
10

711
38
557
lo
111
7
170
199
119

316
37
211
25
61
77
78
68

6
19

19
21
26

8
8
7

118

191
28
137
56
11
5
32
26

6?
28
13
2
2
9
28

17

5

9
.
-

3
_
_
•
-

9
2

3
2

96

229
39
75
12
53
50
93

5
71
16

2
6

6
I

6

______1 _____
!
_

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




39
7
20
20
12

_

.
_
•
-

2
5
3
3

60
113
10

20

29

Mi
17

110 12

387
71
108
77
102
29
66

38
666
80
210
72
203
101
87
311
119
171
12
113
17
11
21

127

153
117
18
33

•
.
_
_

•
•

_

_

-

-

-

50
H
32
•
28

18
6
lo
-

9
9

3
3

1

1
36
2

2
_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_

_

1

_
_

_

•

_
_

-

“

_

.
-

_
_
_

_
•
_

2

.

_

“
‘

7

Table A -2 *

PtojedAiancU and ^ecAnlccU OcouficMaHd

(Average s tr a ig h t-tim e weekly hours and e a rn in g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o ccu p atio n s s tu d ie d on an a r e a
b a s i s in New Y ork , N. Y . , by in d u stry d i v i s i o n , F eb ru ary 1953)

NUM
BER O W RK
F O ERS RECEIVING STRAIG T-TIM W 'C Y EARN G O
H
E EIR L
IN S F

A erage
v
Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
o
f

s
$
s
$
s
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
?
W ly
eek
W
eekly Uo.oo U5.00 50.00 55.oo 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00! 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 11*0.00 150.00 160.00
and
(Standard) (Standard) unaer
1*5.00 50.00 55.oo 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00! 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 11*0.00 150.00 160.00 over
i
1
j
i
J
1
1
i

M
en
|

i
I
Draftsmen, c h i e f .......................................................
Manufacturing ................................. ..................... ..
Nonaanufac tu r in g ....................................................
Central o f f i c e s ......................................... ••••••

Draftsmen.......................................................................
Manufacturing .........................................................
Nonmanufacturing................
Services .............................................................
Central offices .....................................................

587
ifr
229
133

3,306
81*6
1,721
1,571*
739

38.5
39.0
39.5
37.0

$
130.00
115.50
iia .5 o
135.50

38.0 ; 97.00
88.00
39.0
103.50
39.0
105.00
93.00
36.5

-

-

-

-

2 !

16
1
15
U

" j

38.5 ! 67.00
35.5 1 59.00
39.0
72.50
39.5 : 75.00
72.50
36.5

- i
-

-

i
|

3
- :
3 ;

11
**
11 i
**
-

1 1
1
-

2
2
-

!

23
19
1 i
*

-

7
5
2
2

89
! 51*
i 30
16
! 5

10 ! 18
8 ! 16
2
2 ;

1

120 161,
189
87
95 j 73
12
50 | 1*0
8
9
32
62
13
111

282
108
93
91
81

26 '
21*
- i
2 !

70 ; 1*0 :
36 !
1
*
27 S 12
2k !
7

i

I
36
38 ! 11
**
H* :
7
— m
21* 1
11*
10
! 29
1 16 |

|

|

61*
2l
19
21*

! 131*
9
101*
21

1*7
3li
3
3
10

325
78
162
11*7
85 ;

289
302
376
67 ! 58 ! 31
171* ; 21*8
125
162 : 237
111
97
97
70

1+05
105
180
175
120

! 138
19
112
95
7

31*
15
18

!

‘

5.
3 i

;

981
C07~
If19
351*
155

-

~ !
!

i
|
Draftsmen, ju n io r ................................................. ..
Manufacturing ..................................................... ..
Nonmanufacturing................................................. ..
Services ..............................................................
Central o f f i c e s .....................................................

-

173 | 11*2 155 1 1 5
+
10
10 ! 1*3
2
120
92
11*8
1*1
11*8
119
91
ia
2
15
12
20

55
1
52
1*9
2

71
21
1*6
11
**
1 j
* !

5
1

1
*
1

2
2
2
'

1

109
77
! 28
! 16
;
h

103

112
178
101*
66
1*2 ; 1*2
25 ! 31
32
li

61

23

Hi
!

16

9£
8
51
51
37

!
106 ;
25 1
59
1 59
1 22
!

11
**
1
28
27 !
15

50
1*7 j
2 j 1
38 i 1*0
38
39
6
10

36
36
36

1
*
i*

-

!

-

-

:

j

i
!

**
- 1
:

- |
•
»
!
- !

-

j

-

- ■
•
-

_

•
-

_

.

.

«

I
Tracers ..................................................................... ..

173

39.5

56.50

32

11*

\

1
*

36 i

53 i
!

20

H*
!

W en
om

|

|

!

|
Nurses, industrial (registered) ...........................
Manufacturing....................................................... ..
Nonaanufac tu r in g ....................................... ..
pnKl 4a
^ aa
%
Retail trade 2 / ................................................
Finance « * ................................................... ..
Central offices ............................................. ••••

61*3 —-IL .j— 71.00
69.00
38.0
191
381*
71.00
37.5
72.50
77
37.5
69.00
113
38.5
137
71.50
36.5
68
78.00
35.5

6
•
6

1
1 1 - ! 20
6
lU
7 !
6
1

6

.

-

3

3
2

1+
5
13
32
10
13

li

89
26
57
7
f
7
1*0
li

106
1*2
57
18
11*
15
7

115
37
67
£

11*
31
11

130
25
85
17
1*2
13
20

50
13
28
7
1
*
16
9

35
1
21*
10
10
1
*
10

21*
10 !
11 I
!
7
3

!
i

8
2
t
x
2 i
2

2
-

L __
T ra n sp o rta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




!
j

-

!

-

-

-

.

-

-

•

-

i

2
!

i
i
1 _____ 1 _____ i _____ j ------ i
_
_
_

" Hours r e f l e c t the workweek f o r which em ployees r e c e iv e t h e i r r e g u la r s tr a ig h t-t im e s a l a r i e s and th e e a rn in g s correspond t o th e s e weekly hours,
U
2/ E x clu d e s li m ite d - p r ic e v a r i e t y s t o r e s .
*
**

-

1
-

|
|

I
- — ---- -—
j
-

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., February 1953
U.S. EEPARTHENT OF LAB®
Bureau of Labor Statistics

T able A - 3 :

M

oUtteHGHCe G+td

P<UU&1 P lant ChC44{2xUi04tl

(A verage h o u rly ea rn in g s 1 / f o r men in s e l e c te d o ccu p atio n s stu d ied on an a re a
b a s is in New Yorlc, N. Y . , by in d u s tr y d iv is io n , February 1953)

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, New York, n . y ., February 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

9

Table A -3:

M<U*UenGHCe and Paw&l P lant GhcUpxU*GHd*-Gont4Hd4&ci

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in New Yorlc, N. Y., by industry division, February 1933)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Average
hourly
earnings

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ........
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing.......................
Public utilities * ...................

2,9 0 3
2,1*38
1,721*

*
1.97
2.0 1
1 .9 6
1.91*

Services ........................................................................

131*

Mechanics, maintenance .......................................................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.......... .............

1,9H*
x h r

629
175

Under 1 .2 5
*
1 .2 5
1 .3 0

1 .3 5

5
-

-

1 .3 5

$ .
1.1*0

1.1*5

1 .5 0

i.5 5

1 .6 0

$
1 .6 5

1.70

i .7 5

$ „
1 .8 0

i.8 5

1 .9 0

i.9 5

1 .0 0

1 .1 0

I .20

I .30

U o

1 .5 0

1 .6 0

1 .7 0

1.80

1 .9 0

1.1*0

1.1*5

1.50

1 .5 5

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1.90

1 .9 5

2.00

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2.30

2.1*0

2.50

2 .6 0

2.70

2 .8 0

2.90

3 .0 0

1*

$
1 .3 0

1*

21

15

17

103
3
100
55
19

71*
22
52
1*0

180
18
162
11*6
11*

139
5
131*
16
117
J-M

86
85
1
-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

352
12
31*0
271*
20
1*0

268
11*
253
163
n

-

150
57
93
19
26
1*

153

51*0

182
11*8
31*
23

14*6

17
17

97
9
88
20
(fi.
5U
H*

583
1*3

15
5

21*
13
11
11

-

-

"

-

-

55
1*7
8

67
50
17

92
1*2
50

17U
102
72

159
62
96
1*6
18

79
79
-

6

7
7
-

3
3
-

56

-

10

37
23
11*
H*

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
2

2
2

“

“

*

-

5
5

-

1*
1*

U
1*

21
6

1 .8 5

-

-

-

-

-

15

10

2.02
2.0 1
2 .0 1
?*lli

106

-

18

58

-

7

2

31
31

32

-

7

2

-

3

11*

1*8

H*

g
21

2

3
3

3
3

56

1*6
1*6
“

93
3
87

-

-

169

1 .7 9

Millwrights .................................................................................
Manufacturing.....................................................................

86
77

Oilers ............................................................................................
Manufacturing.................... ................................................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

519
310
209

1 .6 8
1.6l*
1 .7 5

32
19
13

25

IL

13
9
1*

1

Painters, maintenance.................... .
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing...................... .
Retail trade 2/ .....................................................

1,81*7
25T
1,5 6 5
137
832
1*85

1 .8 3
2 .0 6
1 .7 9

•
-

-

56
56

190
3
187

-

“

56

99
88

3

2

1.91*
1 .9 1

Services............... ............

2.16

Pipefitters, maintenance..................
Manufacturing ..........................
N<'nm l ,
f n ifecturing 1-TxtT.-TT----.--.-.....
Public utilities * ..................

m ~

100
56

Plumbers, maintenance ......... ............
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Finance # * ....................................................................

662
60
578
3U1

1 .8 0
2.0 0
1.7 7
1 .8 0

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ..............................
Manufacturing .....................................................................

113
92

1,578
1 , 52 2 '

-

-

-

25

-

62
5i

7

2.07
2.0 6

Tool-and-die makers .............................................................
Manufacturing ....................................................................

2 .3 1
2 .3 1

V
2 /

*
**

2

31

23
23
“

12
12
~

3?
39

57
57

5i

58
3
55

20
20

57

51

11
1*1*

3
H*

1
-

51

m

1*1
15

323
1
322
6
253
59

6

1

2
2

1*
1*

36
36

7
7

30
15
15

12
7

11

5

30
-

-

7

5

1
1
“

95
5

5

90

10

1*7
l*
i
26
3
23

1*7
15
32
11
11
10

181*
29
155
11*5
6

1*3
10

1*2
1
39
1*
35
“

22
2
20
20
“

182
90
92
30
1*6
1

73
20
53
3
1*3
3

-

60
1*

21
18

1*0
21

9
7
2
2

33
16

17

7
3
1*

10

1

331
323
8
g

2

L
*

32
10
21
”

153

121*
59
65
1*2
18

5

16

10

6
6

-

-

-

-

2
2

72
72

"

"

“

“

65
65
1*5

12
-

12
11

37
- •
37
22

7
7
**

50
50
1*
*1

55

20
20

51*

“

21*
7
17
12

3
3

"

**

58
3

153
81*
52
2

1
1

■
a

iu5
g

8

19

1*5
9
36
22

27
3
21*
18

H*
2
12
6

12
12

8

9

21
19

6

6

1*2
1*2

10

1/

5
T"

g

9t
f
CQ

9

7

9

10
3

11*1
57
81*
29

6

8

6

133
120
13

3

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Excludes lim ited-price variety stores*
Transportation (excluding railroad s), communication, and other public u t il i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and re a l estate*




g

11*9
126
23
2
16
1*

2 .0 6
2.01*
2,1 2
2.0 0

1*07

■
5

8

7
7

-

Services ............................

1.77
1 .6 5

1*95
35
10

35
1*11
337
1*2
31

i s *

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
Workers

9

53
27

26

_

36

-

16
16

22
22

-

-

-

-

-

-

162
39
123
19
31
18

61
56
26
27
“

73
23
1*9
26
22
“

9
9
9

.
“

_

51*
10
1*
*1
2
1*2

.
“

-

15
3

6
1*

38
31
7
I

8

_

_

_

_

9
1*

it

.

_

_

•

-

_

_

.

■

“

“

“

-

8

ui

67
10
1*8

ft
0

36
36

9).

1.C
X0

16

5

71*

“

72
69

71
.
63
11

5
“

3
1
1

11
.
11
11

■

1*
1*

7

18

6

3

25
25

12
10

2
2

-

-

-

“

21
19

92
92

192

280
27b

166
166

32
32

21*
21*

1
1

•

3

51
22
13
13

_

i?
*1

2

282
1*31*
“ 355“ 1 5 2 "

2
2

_

1
0

G u d lo d U ilf tyjG A eJtO U di+ U f,G H <t S /U p fU w f O cC M f^ iiO H i

Table A-4:

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in New York, N. Y., by industry division,“February 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$
$
Under 0.85 0.90
$
.90

Crane operators, electric bridge
(under 20 tons) ........................

100

3.577
W
“
2,731*

1.51
1.52
1.51

$
1.05

$
1.10

$
$
1.15 1.20

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.25 1.30 1.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10

1.0
0

1.10

1.15

1.2
0

1.30

1.05

1.25

1.35

1.1*0 1.1*5 l.5o

1.55

1.60

*
1.79

Guards ....... .......................... .
Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing...... ......... .

.95

$
$
0.95 1.00

Finance ** .........................

1,780

1.59

12

-

2
2
22
-

21,1*21*
5,212
15,803
1,1*13
575
2,973
6,365
1,*7
+17
1
*09

1.30
1.32
1.29
1.U5
1.35
1.13
1.1*5
1.10
1.55

363
88
275
115
160
•

372
185“
188
Hi
111*
60
"

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women) .....

9,816
380
9,157
357
6,l|39
1,679
279

1.16
1.17
1.15
1.15
1.18
1.00
i.l*o

266
11
255
19

i.5i
1.50
1.52
1.65
1.31*
1.16

223
197
26
•
26

67
-

376

1U,513
7,116
7,270
3,019
2,333
589

71

Laborers, material handling X j .............
Manufacturing.........................
Nonmanufacturing ...................... .
Retail trade y ............... .
Services ................ ....... .

3,905

1.61
1.55“ '
1.67
1.61*
1.72

Manufacturing........................ .
Nonmamfacturing ..................... .
Wholesale trade......... ...... .
Retail trade y ..............

1,8 1
8

Packers, class A (men) ................ .
Manufacturing......... ............ .
Nonmanufacturing..................... .
Wholesale trade................... .
Retail trade 3 / ........... ..........

1,5?3
61*6
877
285
582

1.1*5
1.U8
lli
.ii
1.1*9
1.1*1

Packers, class B (men) ....... ...........
Manufacturing.........................
Nonmanufacturing ................. •••••••
Wholesale trade............ ....... .

5,181
2,333
2,803
1,286

1.35
1.32
1.38
1.50

Packers, class B (women) ..................................•••••
Manufacturing..............................................................
Nonmanufacturing................................................... ..

2,766
752

2.006
1,706
296

1.2U
1.25
1.18

236
-

.
-

13

73

16
*

53

5?

-

53
-

72
28
Ui
l

51?
3
1*5
172
10
31
131

279
129
150
150
-

20
20
-

7
7
-

17
17
a
a

.
-

32
-

-

39
39

-

“

183
337
30

13
12
1
a

188

-

88

119
113

100

6

25
25

1*66
968
33
68
300
85
18
*2
"

10
*

1079 21*25 1982
Tl
7U
101*7 2350 1925
10
29
15
*
868 2022 1868
12
9
263
131
1
1
30
38

9
7

In
786
27

70
^

1+79
292
180
26
131*
20

581+
372
201
26
125
50

51
Ui

17
*

10
10

IT

29
29

37
8
202
182
61
105
16

17
*
17
*
a
a

381+
150
232
26
176
25
91
19
*
12
*
20
22

85

5
8

55

12
16
*

7

16
*

203
102
101
33

3?5
250
75
53

359

8*
1

269
52
217
61

28
28

58
52

135
129

28
19

97

6

6

9

SA
2*
15

29
9

11
*1
a

166
13
153
k
130

7 * H*7l 1011
11
212
133
335
588 1132
783
6*
1
8*
1
11
**
58
52
11
*
98
2*
1 9 200
681
66
27
1*
1 6 1*77
216
20
16
1
*

11
**

a

}h

1*3*
11

17
*

62
17
15
*

¥+

a

i5
19
-

3
2

3
116

69
13
56
20
36

55

7

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




915
350

50
5

a

See footnotes at end of table.

*
«*

28
815
11
*
163
531*
“

7

32
“

_

a

10
*

XL?

87
6

m

62
•
“

-

71
2

73
"

2++
11

96

106
5

101*
Hi
90
31

17
2

-

10 6
0 3
1
*
2
3

937 121*2 1625 1168
170
569
55
77
862 111*5
998
8
15
13
a
•
20
20
2*
1 0 323
131* 559
12
32
163
2
51i
10
*8
625
53U
20
"
-

32
1
01*
11

376
Hi
72
287
“

2
0

3
0
2
3

a

19
6
11
5*
16
*

69
28

75
2
6
19
*
33
812

16
3

627
91
20
126
252
138
2

121+
29
95
16
*

250

15
8

83

9*
1
63
18
7

10*
I
11 6
*
0

7
7

1+21
78
3*
13
vn
206

929 1539 IO
1997
10
^ 5 c T 6 * “ 286T
825
639
785
*
11
** 123
151
a
59
5U
132
161
67
121* 550
1*75 1086
61
203
15
*
75
10
6
29
7*
1

588
12
*
530
12
*
288
26
16

589
21
561
3*
1
2*
12
32
7

270
10
11
8*
21
151
12
76

1*80
253
219
62
130
2*
1

631+
3G
288
5*
1
152
11
**

1+ 6 65°
9
259^ 1* 7
5
232
189
52
13
92
71
68
3U

382
102
139
1
63 ~ 2 s r 3 *
in
68
319
12
*
312
26
82
7

2
5

90
3U
56
25
n
6
“

203
12
*
161
11*0
21

17?

109
Q
36
a

32
i
,

127

11
167

-

-

-

-

a
a
a
a
“

a
a
a
a
a
“

_
•
a
a
•
a
*

267

11

-

-

27

_
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
“

1
"

1
-

a
12
*

_

809
205
601*
231*
152
20

313
153
11 8
*
79
31
-

91 5 1970
+
103
36l
826 1575
602
587
193
125
“
"

6
1

160
95
65
60

15U
121*
25
21

356
236
1
1*8 T r
186
205
12
1*
18

20
20

-

3
3

111
56

52
16
36

a
-

13

1

101
56
15
*

H
+3

2
1

2

10 *
1
13
*
61
16
35

690
657

-

a

169
76
93
32

16
+
27
19

16
+

17
l*
l
1

a

H+3
19
121*
16
108

35 +
1
330
2*
1

13

276
1
*
272

12
*

271
3
268
183
79

212
65
1*
13
111*

-

1

!50
*
96
6*
1
29

20 *
1
96
107
19
*

-

2

603
1*10
193
155
20

1+96
255
2
31*
11*6

-

13

311
97
211*
186
20

193
89
102
36

1

2

209
122
87
6*
1
23

12
*8
218
208
3*
1

1

2151*
19
*
25

162
50
112
50
62

622
313
307
7*
1

2
2

81
69
12
17
16
20
1
*
21

623
25U
369
326
20

76
6

1

171

866
563
296
161*
80
38

986

20
.5

17

92
218
H*
18
19
135
32
12
*

216
92
92
19

2.20

2.00

356
58
221
6
38
36
133
8
77

10

2.10

1.90

8
1+3
1*2U
381*
211*
3
23
116
28
35

291+5

•

8
19

133
10

19
0

579
8*
1
1* 5
9
120
361*

1

1*5

33

2+
17
57

2

8*
1
95
25
70

2
7

220

3 16
0

282
83
199
Cn

1.80

27
8
19

11
0*
33
71
26

13
+

0
0
0

25 623
5
1713 2297
112 55
*
7 18
0
10 21
*

?2
2
30
12
18

16

352
101
251

1.70

CJ
V
$

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) .......
Manufacturing........................ .
Nonmanofacturing................ ••••••.
Public utilities * ...... ...........
Wholesale trade .................... .
Retail trade " i / ....... .
Finance * * ........... ............ .
Services........................ .
Central offices .................. ..... .

Nonmanufacturing.......................
Retail trade y .....................
UM
jwa ..
. ... ....... ... ...._
_
Services ...........................
Central offices ••••......... ..........

1.65

5

$
$ .
2.30 2.1*0 2.50
a
and
over
2.30 2.1*0

2.20

12
1
5
a
2
a
a
3
6

5
a
3
a
a
2
22

a
a
a
a

_

_

_

_

_

a

a

a

a

a

a
a

3

a

15
*

12

1

a

a

10

5
1

55
10
*
15

5

13
2
ll*
111*
108

_

a
*

a
“

a
"

a

_
1 8*
*1
lg
1
*37
396
11
*
■

95
7
7*
1
6
68
“

311
289
22
10

20
10
10
30

162
162

61*1
61*1

a

a

“

18+
+1
22
1*62
1*13
2t
i

391
391
6
325

19
*
19
*
35
12

10

hi

12

26
21
7
H*

5

a

a

7
7

a
a

a
a

10
*

60
60

a

a

2

a
a

a
a

a

10
*
10
*

a

a
a

“

“

“

“

“

-

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

250
7
233
227

10
6

-

16

16

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

“

“

“

“

17

3

126

a

126
126
•

a

a

17
15
-

a
a
a

a

“

a
a
a

“

a
a
a

-

a
a

”

a

a
a
-

2

10
a

a

a

9

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., February 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF L A B ®
Bureau of Labor Statistics

n
Table k-U *

6 u i t a d i G l ,Q O € r t e U 0 4 4 4 4 H f ,C H U ^ S / U f » f U H f

fin ^ p

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in New York, H. Y., by industry division,“February 1953)

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—

Occupation and industry division

Receiving clerks ..........................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................

Shipping clerks ...........................
Manufacturing..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Retail trade 3/ .....................

Shipping-and-receiving clerks ..............
Manufacturing ....... ..................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Wholesale trade ................ .
Services ...........................

Truck drivers, light (under li tons) ....... .

Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and
Including 1 tons) .............. .........
*
Manufacturing......................... .
Nonmanufacturing .......................
UKa Im e f i l m
_ ...................................................
Retail trade 3/ .....................
Truck drivers, heavy (over 1 tons,
*
UAmafimmf ca+i n rr...... .
.i

....... ...

Number
o
f
Workers

$
Average
hul
o r y Under 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00
erig
anns
0.85
.90
.95 1.00 1.05

m

$
1.30

$
1.35

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.25
1.30

1.35

1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50

92
3*
1
58

119
12
*
77

63
i*
l
19
*

17

13
13

60
la
19

10
*
22
18

29
25
l
*

15
15
-

-

13

19

18

-

-

“

■

.
-

_
-

52
52
“

13
21
20
1

2.01*

_

_

_

1.89
1.86
1.91
I
1.80

_
.
-

_
-

_
_
-

65

1,201
535675
?33
1*15

1.57
1.56”
1.58

-

39
39

-

1.59

-

39

2,035
761
1,229
711*
202

1.69
1.56 H
1.78
1.77
1.71

-

1,009

6,081*
“"i Jb SJ
U.U62

1,6a
1

$
$
1.20

5U
V
17
*

-

333

$
1.15

8*
1
i*
l
70

i.5*
i.5l*

2 13
,0

$
1.10

16 _ 3 0
6
16
2*
1

65

2,057
1,31*8

$
1.05

.9
6

13
13
“

A

_

_
_
-

_
.
-

_
-

5
1
*

1
1

83
29
5*
1
33
21

7?
52
27
13
11

_

_
-

17

1 0 23
0 0
13
13
7
87

66

12
73
20
3*
1

3?
2*
1
15
6
9

32
5

29
28
1
-

5?
ft
1
-

81
51
30
23
1

8
5

•
1

i*
l
i*
l
-

2
3
23
-

30

9
9
-

23
3
20
20

2
7
2
0
3

2

$
$
s
$
$
$
$
1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65

1.70

88
1
85

70
z*
i
16
*

30
1*
1
H*

18
6
12

1*
1

101*
71
33

76
30
15
*

210
81
123
3 * ~IUB~
1
5>
«
1 7 100
*
67

10
0

39

55
30
25
6
19

60
36
23
19
1
*

8*
1
87
73
1*
1

168
108
5*
1
30
-

298
35
263
1
12

29

11

225

18
+

17

119
76
13
*

6

3

1* 3
5
197
256
101
36

13

77
T
ia

12

25

17

18

58
73
25
35
38 - 33
36
33
~

81
132
67
62

18
*
3
15
*
31
10

118
26
92
58
29

13

21

31

1*
1
l
l*
-

275
222
53
20
33

59

2
15

3 2
3

11*0
135
e
p

20
8
12

17
*
33
H*

109
98
11

1.89
1.77
2.07

259

1.98

U.827
1,361
3,101*
571*
352
1*29
1,1*95
561*

1.31
1.27
1.32
1.1*2
1.28
1.16
1.1*2
1.10

2.16
-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

-

6
6

-

_

1

169
171*
78 “138“
36
91
6
6*
1
30
27

71
56
15
6
9

182
37
1
1*5
7
20
12
2*
1
82

32
0
1
*
296
16
*
19
59
66
108

13 19 m s
0 3
113
112 80 3 9
8
2 1
2*
1
u*
11
5
30
3a
1
2
2
21

325
57 ~ W ~
268
15
*
.
73
25
7
_
80
118
30

2
2

287
109
53
35
16
5

119
9
108
1
12
22
59

H
*

12
12

6
6




25
25

196
196

1

_

11

7

53

9

1
*

1*76

1*81
116
361
219
58
58
26

259
121
137
15
3
22
83

226
27
193
21
3
21
131*
1*
1

171
37
133
11
_
10
101*
8

15
*8
29
1*22
1
*

132

288
102
16
*
57
29
5*
1

'

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
%f Title change only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," as reported in previous study.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

50
50

u*

3
1*09
6

9*
1
13
1
2
78

317

13
3
58
nl C
2

79

52
109
U2 --- 35
10
73
10
66

22
5
16

26
2

1
.
1

15
*

.
-

9

1

1

15
*

-

137 226
72
27
65 199
62 185
12
“

21
21
1
20

7
5

7

13
7
2
3
111*
81
29

31

72
79
ft

681
26
Aee

6 115
5
8

7
1

18
*

2*
1
619
285 r~To“
1
331* 1 *

26
2

-

119

6
.
*
*
2

1

1

2

-

-

-

10
*

5

-

u*7

1
-

27
9
--- 57
230
230

-

3
-

96

23
22
-

838
802

_

69
69

1623 655
13 2 *
13
1600 h i *•£
**■ ?

31 +
1
311*

5
5

1155

131

3
0
10
2
0

15

1

11

21

_

35
.8

75
17
*
15
_
11
1
*

8
1
7
_

10
.
_
_
_
_

6
_
6

7

223
217

*
15

13
*
2*
1

88

51

_

79

2.1*0

2
51*

' 57

“

10
*

88
11
77

62
18
*
1*
1

107
87
2
_
16
2

1
13
1 ----1
*
9

39
15
22

2.30

38
77

"T T

and
over

2.30

26
7

170
JL[\J

20
.5

2.20

507 1623 1728
1 0 191
*
113
391* 1583 1520
100 1056
96
78
79

3
3

i,oiU
621
393

3/

171

63
d

Truckers, power (fork-lift) .............
Manufacturing......................... .
Nonmanufacturing......................................................................................

V

13
2
37
93
65
28

20

2.15
2.09

y

71
50
51

131
5V
71

1.70

120
120

U.7U5
797
3,938

Watchmen...........................................................................................................................
Manufacturing • • • • ...............................................................................
Nonmanufacturing.....................................................................................
Public utilities * .....................................................................
Wholesale trade ...............................................................................
Retail trade 3 j ......................
Finance ** ..........................
Services ............................

2.00

1.65

2.06
2.09

Truck drivers, heavy (over 1 tons, other
*
than trailer type) ......................
Manufacturing ..........................
ti g • • • • • • e e « e e e e e e e « e e e # e e t t * *

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) . . . . . . .

1.90

1.60

llT ^

32
18
32 ---5"
12

1.80

210 2.50
*

1.55

62
38

22

$
$
$
$
$
$
$ .
1.80 1.90 2.00 2.30 2.20 2.30
.

51

6
_
_

131

12
3
_
_

_
_
_
_

36

n e eP
JJ -P
82
76
6

.
-

2

_
_
_
_
_
_
*

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
■

1
2
B : Characteristic Industry Occupations
Tawe

B-2333: ^Vonten'A. a n d A f i U e i ' S i ' t e M M

1/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

hourly
earnings
2/

Under $ --- 1 --- ♦
0.75 0.80 0.90
%
0.75
.80
.90 1.99

♦
T 1.00

1.10

$
1.20

$
1.30

*
1.40

*
1.50

*
*
1.60 1.70

$
1.80

*
1.90

*
2.00

*
2.10

*
2.20

♦
2.30

*
2.40

*
2.50

*
2.60

$
2.70

*
2.80

$
2.90

4

3.00

*
3.10

t
3.20

1,19

1,29

1.30

1.40

1.50

1.60

1.70

1.80

1.90

2.00 2.10

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.20

3.30

3533
536
2997

2864
288
2576

3163
168
2995

2708 3012
162
93
2546 2919

3197
168
3029

2793 2906
240
309
2553 2597

2532
291
2241

2155
276
1879

1927
331
1596

1929
398
1531

1818
484
1334

1568
421
1147

1590
544
1046

1495
736
759

1314
638
676

1182
678
504

n/,3
685
457

503
249
254

643
342
301

670
479
191

521
391
130

19
19

10
10

39
34
5
1
281
261
18
243
20
165

100
100

223
218
5

333
323
10

108
108

290
290

177
167
10

63
53
10

109
109

20
20

33
33

118
118

172
172

330
330

95
95
10
85

156
146

%

All plant occupations:

Total ...............
M e n ...............
W omen......... .

52,441
12,003
40,438

1.92
2.70
1.69

1,697
1,617
80
704
5,049
4,747
160
4,587
302
5,566
656
4,910

2.77
2.74
3.42
1.29
3.06
3.11
2.73
3.13
2.13
1.49
1.25
1.52

1,667
300
1,367
26,727
3,275
23,452
3,106
249

134
-

134

449
73
376

1649
164
1485

1706
166
1540

SgtoPtefl P f f t OgSttPftUoBP
jli
Cutters and markers (men) ....................
Time ...................................
Incentive ...............................
Inspectors, final (examiners) (women) 3a/ .....
Pressers, hand (men and women) ..............
Men ....................................
Time .................................
Incentive ....................... .
Women 3 b / ................ ..............
Sewers, hand (finishers) (women) ...... ......
Time ...................................
Incentive ...............................
Sewing-machine operators, section
system (10 men and 1,657 women) ............
Time ...................................
Incentive ............ ...................
Sewing-machine operators, single hand (tailor)
system (men and women) ....................
Men 2Jj/.................................
Women 2 b / ...............................
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (women) 2a/ .......
Work distributors (men and women) ............

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

10

24
10

-

-

-

26
20
20

-

-

-

-

6
93

18
705
152
553

20
649
68
581

30
10
556
23
533

70
20
50

141
50
91

268
60
208

158
40
118

130
50
80

278
10
268
697
28

221

607
30
577
886
98

825
51
774
373
54

-

-

10

10

10
33
10
23

1.44
1.20
1.50

10

70

-

-

10

70

2.02
2.75
1.91
1.00
1.09

20

20

-

20
-

-

20
117
20

95
18

-

-

287
81
206

-

_

-

109
50
40
10
30
10
459
141
318

-

10

-

99

20
-

-

221
676
10

-

-

93
40
30

-

-

-

-

144
20

-

10
10

-

2
20
20
10
10

H4
20
20
-

20
-

-

-

34
60
60
_

60
-

5U
29
482

404
56
348

92
30
62

68

121
20

68

101

50
10
40

1278 1400
15
35
1263 1365
108
206
10

1560
15
1545
41
9

1872
35
1837

1805
79
1726

-

340

22
318

-

30
122
112
_

112
10
358
14
344
61

20
90
80

_

80

120
20
89
10
79

10

121
10

61

111

1954 1697
146
107
1808 1590

43

_

208

_

204
164
_

_

“

-

_

118

164
40
65

_

249
230

_

172

_

330

-

_

33

230
19
20

_

33

60

-

_

165

65

33

31

39

_

146
10

11

_

_

33

60

20

20

-

2

18

21

10

_

_

_

_

_

43

31

39

2

18

21

1156
154
1002

1103
141
962

1108
164
944

891
205
686

789
197
592

_

_

_

_

1391
178
1213

a

8
4

I
179
20
159
5
20

_

1299
88
1211

_

2
10

_

_

80
10
70

a

1737
136
1601

10
163
142
10
132
21
118
20
98

213
194
12
182
19
208

_

323
24
299

-

-

140
120

_

_

-

363
353
_

353
10
10

269
229
40
189
cy

4

_

_

_

11

10

-

1

_

1

_

_

_
_

1

-

1

-

342
89
253

367
87
280

258
91
167

216
126
90

i

i

5.60

5.70 5.80

1 --5.90

10

587
147
440

«.

730
311
419

10

“

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

*
3.30

*
3.40

Total ...............
Men .............,
Women ...........

*
3.60

*
3.70

*
3.80

♦
3.90

$
4.00

*
4.10

t

4.20

3.70

?,$9

3.99

A.00

4.10

A.20

345
274
71

140
98
42

293
203
90

272
160
112

168
143
25

124
84
40

118
114
4

231
199
32

10
10
-

20
20
-

10
10
-

5
5
-

20
10
10

-

1
1
-

4
4
-

80
80
_

189
189
20
169

65
65
_
65

145
145
10
135

97
97

84
84

a

97

84

1
4.30

4.30

3.40
All plant occupations:

$
3.50

3,59

302
239
63

230
143
87

23
13
10
129
129
129

*
4.40

$
4.50

4

4

4

4

4

4.60 4.70 4.80 4.90

4

4

5.00

5.10

5.20 5.30

4

4

1 ---

5.40

5.50

5.70 5.80

_
5.90

56
56

52
52

and

4.50

4,60

4.70

4.39

4.90

5.99

5.10

5.20

5.30

5.40

5.50

5.60

62
60
2

165
162
3

106
96
10

105
95
10

25
23
2

126
122
4

40
36
4

46
36
10

15
5
10

23
23
“

16
16
“

19
9
10

100
98
2

22
22
-

-

10
10
-

26
16
10

2
2
-

-

10
_
10

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

126
126

43
43

103
103

40
40

57
57

9

41

79
79

9

95
95

23
23

3
3

10
10

_
-

9
9

58
58

2
2

16
16

42
42

87
87

a

79

126

43

103

40

57

9

95

23

3

9

58

2

16

42

87

“

"

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

56

44
-

4
4

over
155
143
12

Selected Plant Occupations
Cutters and markers (men) .................
TllD6 ............................. .
Incentive......... ............. ......
Inspectors, final (examiners) (women) 2fl/ ••••
Pressers, hand (men and women) ......... .
Men .......................................
Time
Incentive ..........................
Women 2)2/ •••••••••••••••••••••••»••••••••»
Sewers, hand (finishers) (women) ...........
Time
Incentive .............................
Sewing-machine operators, section
system (10 men and 1,657 women) ..........
Time
Incentive ........................ .
Sewing-machine operators, single hand (tailor)
system (men and women) ..................
Men 3b/ ...............................
Women 3 b / .............................
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (women) 2fi/.....
Work distributors (men and women) ..........

80

-

10
_

“

"

•
_

10

_

“

“

-

“

“

“

“

-

“

“

_

_
“

10

-

-

10

-

-

-

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

130

113

35
31

40
30
10

13
13
-

_

_

4

-

_
-

12
10

4

3
10

16
16

2

13
3
10

13

7

17
13

30

52
49
3

11

4

14
12
2

16
14

112

72
32
40

44

49
90

74
59
15

37

28
85

153
a

53

65
23
42

139

77

71
33
38

2

-

-

10
10
“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

34
10

_

12

1/ The study covered regular (inside) and contract shops employing 8 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of women’s and misses’ dresses (Group 2333) as defined in the Standard Insustrial Classification
Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing housedresses, aprons, smocks, hoovers, and nurses’ and maids' uniforms (Group 2334) were excluded from the study. Data relate to an August
1952 payroll period. Individual reports for regular and contract shops may be obtained from the Bureau’s New York Regional Office.
y
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., February 1953
2/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




13

T able B -2 8 5 1 :

PaUtti G*ut VcMtUltGl l/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —
N u m b er
of
W o rk ers

Occupation and sex

A v erag e
hou rly
earn in gs

2/

$

$

0.85
.90

1.00

0.95
1.00

•95

$

$

$

0.90

$

1.05

$

1.10

$

1.15

$

1.20

$

1.25

$

1.30

$

1.15

1.25

I .30

1.35

6

23

19

n+

13

~

2+
1

16
1
6

6

6
5
12
3

$

$

1.1+5 1.50

1.U0

9

1.10

1.20

12
7

1.05

$

1.U0

1.35

$

1.60

1.55
1.60

1
i«5Q . ,55

$

$

$

1.65

i»65

1.70

20

1.70

3
6
17
3
5
6
3

$

$

1.75

1.80

i»75. 1.80

$

1.85
1.90

$

1.90
i«95

$

1.95

2.00

2.00

2.10

s

2.10

$

2.20

2.20

2.30

$

2.30

and
over

Men
Labelers and packers .......................
Maintenance men, general utility ...........
Mixers ...................................
Technicians ..............................
Tintera ..................................
Varnish makers ............................

259
U
6
273
137
7b
95
73

$
l.i+o
1 IQ

1.75
1.65
1.77

_
“

1.25

7

-

7

“

2

1.71
1.50

-

“

_
"

_
"

_
-

1

16

1

-

T9

_
-

6

“

“

-

-

-

1

25
3
7
22
1
5
1

"

19
2
85
10
8
2

11
++
-

20
97
tf
1
8
7

18
*

6
15

b

1+
6
9

1
9
1
+

b

3
1
16

-

-

-

5
8
6

11

1
+

9

-

-

13
2

3
19
2

2
18
3

b

-

-

-

-

~

8

_

1

1

8

1
16

-

6

7

-

7
3

“

-

3

-

1

-

7

1

Women
Labelers and packers ......................

79

2

9

5

8

9

15

6

7

1 / The stu d y co v ered e s ta b lis h m e n ts em ploying 8 o r more w orkers, p r im a r ily engaged in th e m anufacture o f p a in t s , v a r n is h e s , la c q u e r s , ja p a n s , enamels and s h e lla c (Group 2851) a s defined in the Stand ard I n d u s tr ia l
C l a s s i f i c a t i o n Manual (191+5 e d it io n ) p rep ared by the Bureau o f th e Budget. D ata r e l a t e to a June 1952 p a y r o l l p e rio d .
2/ E xclu d es premium pay f o r o vertim e and n ig h t workj a l l o r a m a jo rity o f workers in e a ch o ccu p atio n re p o rte d were paid on a time b a s i s .

T able B -35:

M

a c k in V u f

U n J U u t fU m A

i/

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F—
N u m b er
of
W o rk ers

Occupation 2 / and sex

A v erage
hou rly
earn in gs

i/

$
Under 1.00
A

1.00

$

1.05

$

1.10

$

$

1.15

1.20

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

-

-

-

-

1

_

96

6

27

21

1
27

$

$

$

$

$

1.30

%

$

1.25

1.35

1.10

1.U5

1.50

1.55

1.35

l.k o

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.6$

6

11

be

6
66

3
35

U
o
39
1
33

1
27
26
1
17

1
51
51

1.30

$

$

1.60

$

$

1.65

1.70

$

$

1.80

1.90

2.00

$

$

2.10

$

$

2.20

2.30

2.1+0 2.50

$

$

$

$

2.70

2.80

and
over

3

1

2.60

2.70

1.70

1.80

1.90

2.00

2.1C

2.20

2.30

36
219
216
3
39

88
195
189
6
25
2
12
56
1

203
123
101
22

266
20

13li
20

22
11

36
2

2U
21

20
1
21
2U
2

20
3

75
26
13
13

6

39
37
2
33

11

2

21

_

_

5

-

-

11

12
37

li

-

-

-

2.80

2. U 2.50
O

2.60

Machinery b /

Men

Assemblers, class A ..........................
Assemblers, class Bt Total ................
Incentive
Assemblers, class C

. . . . . . . . . . .

..

................................................... ...................................

896
858
7m
(UJL
157
561
At
ox

otto

*

2.06
1.80
1 7A
2.00
1.36
2e 10

0 7

Inspectors, class B ...........................................
Inspectors, class C ...........................................................................................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners ...........................................

See f o o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




1.75
1.56
1.31
1 1 .7
x*4i

_

_
-

o 1(
£eX7

177
83
365
1+55

-

_
-

8
in
X\J

_

-

-

22

2

1

1

73

1
1
9

u

f

P

7

£

-

-

_

_

b9

27

3
3
12
0

7

1
b
bb
n
XX

1
3
U
7
91
CL

3

_

2
83
33

21
25
U5
1
9
30

18
20
10

Hi

OAA
tW

79
fc

28

b

7
9
1
10
5
U
o

17
20

b9

12

b

12
83
26

8

27

52

-

-

_

-

_

„

-

-

1

1
6

-

•

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., February 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table B-35:

M

o c Ju H & U f

l/

-Q a * a £ iH t€ ie < t

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E I V I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S O F —

$
1.20

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25

1.30

1.35

l.liO i,U5

3/

Occupation 2/ and sex

Number
o
f
Workers

$
Under 1.00
4
1.00

*
2.0U

”

Average
hul
ory
erig
anns

$
1.05

$
$
1.10 1.15

$

1.U0 1.U5

$
s
$
1.50 1.55 1.60

1.65

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ „ $ , $
1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.U0 2.50 2.60 2.70 *2.80
and

1.50 it 55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.80

2.10 2.20

1.90

2.00

au6

U62

ui8

229
10

2.30

2.U0

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

over

208

173

126

15

19

8

6

-

-

2
2

5

Machinery U / - Continued
Men - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A $/-.............................
Drill-press operators, radial,

2,29h

-

"

■

”

"

"

■

"

■

1

21

23

32

1

3

U7

18

ia

7

1
12

12
13

ao

7

3

9

153

13
86

63

29

52

23
U8

53

-

6
12

18
TT

aa
5U

U8
10U

28
96

U2
53

30
U2

20
3U

8
25

8

55

8
23

12

3

1

5

1

-

-

-

2.07
Drill-press operators, single- or

3

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 5/ .............................
Drill-press operators, radial,

$09

2.03

276
U85

2.06
2.03

103

Engine-lathe operators, class A .........
Grinding-machine operators,
class A ...............................a.
Milling-machine operators, class A ........
Screw-machine operators, automatic,

2.05

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*
21

12

1,706

1.70
1.70

132
251

1.6U
1*69

101
318

1.69
1 7A
X. (O

55

X* I?

228

1.7U

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

a

77

Uo

13U

21a

22

103

101

79

U5

12

227

30a

20U

137

70

37

20

20

22U

13

8

1
*

-

-

-

-

-

7
12

U
U

—

7

6

6
TO
JO

TO
X7

5
3

1

-

1

TO
39

31
37

13
12

3
97

5
25

16
23

2

6

97
c(

9
5

10
U9

23
37

32
TT

2
aa

20

9

3

10

a

10

10

-

5

31

9

-

1

6

8
20

g

ini
.f
UUO

76
Drill-press operators, single- or
multlpie-spinaxe, class d ••••••••••♦*•••
Engine-lathe operators, class B .........
Grinding-machine operators,
class B

107

32

ai

U2

2U

33

22

9
3
g

16

17

17

3

2

1

1

-

-

-

1

1

1

1

1

2

-

“

1

1

-

1

-

-

Screw-machine operators, automatic,
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class B ..........

Machine-tool operators, production
1,186
class C £/ .............................
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple—r ' n i p j nlaRfi C ...............
mirl.
.
259
106
Engine-lathe operators, class C ......... #
Grinding-machine operators,
130
class C ..................... ........
iO/
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class C ..........
115

1.30
1.39
1.U3

Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops ...........................
Tool-and-die makers (other than tool-and-die
jobbing shops) .........................
Welders, hand, class A ....................

1.UU

-

2.28

376
79

1.13
1.U1

109

110

Ill

1U2

6U

13U

82

63

19

5U

ia

2

33
9

58
8

35
13

25
26

12
2

2

17

a

1

3

7
2

1

Uo

20
3

10

-

29
xu

2

26

13

U
JO

20
22

2
3U

7
2

6

16

6
7

-

21

13

13

13

26

9

1U

■

5

-

1

6

15

19

36

■

“

18

30

10

13
13

T
10

k
13

12

"

3

-

-

"

-

-

2.27
1.95

Ull
229

8U
13

1 QA
Xe7U

565

117

38

1

-

191

20

k

l«U5
1 IX0
»
X# )

7

16

20

15

-

-

“

“

■

■

■

”

~

"

“

“

~

10
J-7

1
-

1

-

1

27

U6

10

8

7

18

U1

63

71

115

71

111

8

16

3

8
ao

27
3

35

95
9

1U7
2

36
1

7

2
“

6
-

_

1
1

1

\

-

Women
Assemblers, class C ....... ................
Inspectors, class C .......................

See footnotes at end of table,




6/ 9U

66

UU
18

32
6

22

17
8

56
13

15
6

38
19

1
99

7

7

1

10

2
2

23

1

-

-

15

Table B-35:

M cu Ju H & U f

9 n d i4 A t > U e A

±J

G o ^ lc ^ c & £

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation 2/ and sex

N u m b er
of
W o rk ers

A v erage
hourly
earn in gs

y

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
s
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 i.Uo 1.U5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.1*0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
and
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1-35 1.U0
i.U5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.U0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

Paper and Printing Machinery
Men

Assemblers, class B 7/ ....................
Assemblers, class C T .............. ........

268
227
81
29

$
2.13
1.97
1.57

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
3

1

_

_

1

k
1

9
12

17
17
5

11
3U
23

2

_

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 5/ .............................
Drill-press operators, radial,

756

-

-

-

6

-

-

12

k

8

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

5

~

■

~

~

2.20

-

”

2
1

7
36
k

~

2

0

07
11

3

~

10
16

1
27

5
33

1

6
95

“

11

12

Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 5 / ......................... .
Milling-machine operators, class B 7/ ....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (inducting
hnnH ii i k
nVu
ha ^^ / " p e p T-T-li-tIfll
*|p

67

2.15

91
23U

2.30
2.19

101

2.09

278
133

1.90
1.97

U6

1.60

29

167
176
80

k3k

87
33
32

1.38

71
73

2.05
1.98

565

2.28

~

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.72

239

"

1.65
1.63
1.66

Ml ’ nA«t.nn1
f / hi
prtnm__-itttiiTi*
Tool-and-die makers (other than tool-and-die
jobbing shops) ..........................

128

115

0

7

i
i

1

15

11

k

6

8

2
2

5

"

■

_

_

-

-

7

7

3

9

23

u

12
51

13
39

lu

1

8
U6

3k

8
25

k

5
1

1

25

12

11

7

13

12

3

1

1

_

2.12

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C ................................

92

3

5

1.90

29

7

6

21

0
0

8

1.13

Machine-tool operators, production,
n a i l A cl/____________ ________ .1trT.ltrt
lif
E n g i n e —Tathe operators, nlass A
__
Grinding-machine operators,
class A .................................

92

15

11

15
29

2.30

Assemblers, class C ..........................

139

36
2

8

3

2.15

139

116

g
2

22
11

15
12

1
2

3

1.92

73

65
20

1

1U

12

2
1

h8

Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-ap-1 nrllo rOapcj
Tf______ ' t T. ,
Grinding-machine operators,
class A 7/ ...........................
Milling-machine operators, class A 7/ .....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hanH flrrau mar»VHno ^^
f |T_1irrT11.T
a

18
17

62
58
1
g
26

7

Laborers, material handling ................

69
1
91:

1.83
1.U2
1.53

21

-

~

10
"

8
8

7

-

29
8

O
C
~

-

“

12

k

2

6

2

22

75
32

28
20

20
16

19
17

k

5

9

8

21
6

1

22

1

3

2

1

1

“

55

5

-

-

"

-

-

k

7

1

1

1

1

-

1

-

i

-

3

3

6

2

2

k

7

'

"

"

-

2

-

22
2

-

5

10

U6

62

6

-

2

6

-

2U
20

19
:
1z
lo

Hi
z
0

16
13

6

11
1
*

8

h

3

0

~

“

"

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

71

111

8

16

3

-

-

Machine-tool Accessories
Men

Machine-tool operators, production,
class R 5/
T------------ T -- T -- T- t T tT-rTTEngine-lathe operators, class B .........
Milling—machine operators, class B ........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class B ...........
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C ....................... .........
Machine-tool operators, t.nn1fnnm T.rT1TTTITTI.
Machinists, production.................. ..
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) ..... ................ .

8U

13

0

38

2k

2.05

1U

3u
21

tz

1

lo
9u
39

Q/
7
0*
2L

ou

J

]A
.
UO

22

12

-

k

-

10

10

30

30

-

16

38

8

52

30

8

107
15

10

1
.
u

8

I
.
U

3

-

s

3k

5

u

O

u

1
,
u
I
.
u

18

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
7

U

u

15

8

u

k2

8

28
16

30

18

kl

63

71

115

V
The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (19U5 edition) prepared by the Bureau
of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with more than 7 workers were also included. Data relate to a January 1953 payroll period.
Where data permit, separate averages by method of wage payment are presented; unless otherwise indicated all or a majority of workers in the occupations shown were paid on a time basis.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Includes data for paper and printing machinery (Groups 355U and 3555) and machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3S h 3) fo r which separate data are also presented.
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
Workers were distributed as follows: 26 at $0.85 to $>0.90; 1 2 at $>0.90 to $0.95; 26 at $0.95 to $1.
;
All or predominantly incentive workers.

%
%
%




16

Table B-7211:

2/
3/
hJ
y

£/

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment;
Data limited to men workers.
Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Includes 21 routemen on a 5^-day workweek and 10 routemen on a 6-day workweek.




Ptuu&i JIouhS u u

1/

all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., February 1953
U.S. department cf l a rc h
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17
C : Union

W a g e

Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated. Additional
information is available in reports issued separately for these individual industries or trades.)

Table C-15* B w l d u t lp

Table C-205: /ia k e /U e d - G a s U iH H e t l

C o tU fo s io t iO H

Table C-205:

A c J ie /U e A - G o t t iiH H e d

July 1, 1952
Classification

Rate
per
hour

Bricklayers ##**#*##*****»#****#*a##*##«*e#
$3,550
3.150
Carpenters
3.300
Electricians
Painters ..................................
3.500
Plasterers
Plumbers .
y 3.250
Building laborers

23
.8 0

2 0
.15

3/

Hours
per
week

35
35
35
35
30
35
35

Staten Island S3.300.
Table C-205* B d A & U e d .

C la s s ific a tio n

R ate
p er
hour

Hours
per
week

B read and cake - Hand shopst
Agreement A:
F i r s t h an d s, oven w o rk ers, m ixers . . .
Second h a n d s ................................................... ..
Agreement B :
Foremen ...................................................................
Bench and second hands
...........
T h ird h a n d s ..................................... .....................
Agreement C:
F i r s t h an d s, oven w o rk ers, m ixers . . .
Oven lo a d e r s and dumpers ...........................
W rapping-machine o p e r a t o r s ....................
Agreement D:
F i r s t h an d s, oven w o rk ers, m ixers . . .
Second hands ••••••••••.......... ••••...........
H e l p e r s ....................................................................

$ 2 ,1 0 7
1 .9 9 5

1*0

1 .9 8 7
1 .8 6 3
1 .7 5 8

1*8
1*8
U8

2 .1 0 0
1 .9 1 9
1 .9 7 1

1*0
1*0
1*0

2 .1 1 6
1 .9 6 6
1 .7 3 1

1*0
1*0
1*0

h
o

Hebrew baking - Hand sh o p s:
Agreement A :
Forem en, f i r s t hands . . .................
Second h an d s, t h i r d hands ........................
Agreement B :
F i r s t h an d s, ovenmen .....................................
Second h a n d s ................................ .......................
Agreement C:
Forem en, f i r s t hands .....................................
M ix e rs , o venm en............................... . . . . . • •
Second h a n d s ............. ..........................................

2 .6 2 5

2.500

1*8
18

2 .2 3 3
2 .1 0 0

1*5
1*5

2.21*1*
2 .1 8 1
2 .0 8 1

1*0
1*0
1*0

C la s s ific a tio n

"m e
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Bread and cake - Machine shops - Continued
Agreement A - Continued
Cake department:
Depositors •••••.................................. ..
Ingredient s c a le r s ,
benchmen • • • ..............
General helpers ...................................... ..
Helpers (women) ••••••.............. ••••••
Agreement B:
D iv id e r s ...................................... .................
Flour dumpers.......................................... ••••
Bakery h e l p e r s ................................••••••••
Agreement C:
Oven loaders and dunpers ............................
Head wrappers and s l i c e r s .............. •••••
General helpers • • ...• • ................................
Agreement D:
Tray-oven operators
Icing makers ......................................................
Benchmen, s c a le r s , kitchen
op erators, f i n i s h e r s ............................. ..
Agreement E:
General helpers .................................... •••••
W
omen workers ••••..........................................
Agreement F :
Foremen ................ ............ ...• • • • ...................
Miscellaneous workers ..................................
Agreement G - (bread and doughnuts):
Mixers and head ovenmen ..............................
General h elpers, pan greasers ................
Hand wrappers and packers .........................
Agreement H:
Molders, mixers h elp ers,
ingredient s c a le rs ....................................
S lic e r s , wrappers,and packers ••••••••
Agreement I :
Head ovenmen ..................................
Molder operators, bread ••••••••••••..
General h elp ers, male
Helpers, women.................................. ...............
Agreement J :
Ovenmen, mixers ...........................................
Bench h a n d s .................................... ...................
Helpers .................................................................
Agreement K:
Mixer8 , benchmen, ovenmen ••••••••••..
Second c la s s packers, helpers ••••••«»
Third c la s s p a c k e r s ......................................

$1,705

1*0

1.695
1.555

1 .3 2 0

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.705
1.595
1.555

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.6J*5
1.615
1.555

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.765
1.705




1 .7 9 5
1 .6 9 5
1 .6 1 5

1*0
1*0
1*0

1 .5 6 5

1*0

Hours
per
week

1 .6 6 0
1.3 2 0

1*0
1*0

2.230
1.303

1*0
1*0

1.795
1.597
1.525

1*0
1*0
1*0

1.61*5
1.525

1*0
1*0

1,5 0 10
6 *
*
1.510 10
10
*
1.375
10
*
1.215
10
*
1.105

$

1*0

1.555

Agreement A:
Flour dumpers
Fig and jam mixers,
marshmallow beaters ......... .....
Bake shop general helpers.......
Plate feeders, sugar wafers.....
General helpers (women)
Agreement B:
Baking department:
Mixers ••••............. .
Mixers helpers .................
Utility m e n ......... ..........
Icing and Packing departments:
Mixers ........ .............. .
General helpers (women) ..........

1*0
1*0

1.81*5

1*0

1.555
1.370

1*0
1*0

1.970

1*0
1*0
1*0

1 .6 7 0

1 .8 7 0

1.770
1.800
1.1*00
1 .3 0 0

ho

1*0
1*0
1*0

Hebrew baking - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
F i r s t h a n d s....................... .................................
Second hands •••••*.••»•..........•••••••••
H e lp e r s ........................................................ ..
Agreement B:
F i r s t hands •.••••»••••...................
Second hands ................................................ ..
H e lp e rs ................ ...............* ..............................

Rate
per
hour

Crackers and cookies:

B read and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
B read d ep artm en t:
M ix e rs , ovenmen .........................................
Benchmen ••••••••••••••••••••.••••
Oven lo a d e r s and dumpers ....................
W rappers, head p a ck e rs ,
and c h e c k e r s ............... ......................... ..

Classification

2.368

2.21*5
1.796
2.225
2.092
1.692

1*2
1*2
1*2

1*5
1*5
1*5

1

10
*
10
*
10
*
1.585
1.2* 10
10 *

1.61*0
1.615
1.1*15

LO

Table C-27: ftjU d lt U U f

Classification

■Rati” Hours
per
per
week
hour

Book and job shops:
Bindery women:
Hand collators, stitchers, general
edition workers, sewing-machine
operators, hand coverers, paringmachine operators, hand folders,
drop roll or point foldingmachine feeders, hand pasters,
hand gatherers ...........
$
Pasting-machine operators; guarding-,
stubbing-, and stripping-machine
operators; inserters; wire
stitcher operators; Singer stitcher
or McCain stitcher operators ......
Gathering-machine fillers-in, book
examiners and wrappers .......... .
1.151
Box girls on folding machines .......
.
All other bindery wcmen ..............
1.3U6
Bookbinders:
Agreement A:
Head sheetmen, folding-machine
operators, book trimmers, power
rounders and backers, headbandingand lining-machine operators,
stock cutters, case-making mach­
ine operators, extra forwarders,
gathering-machine stitchers and
covers, sheet and plate cutters,
smashing-machine operators ......
2.1*95

1,3 0
8

36*

1.2
56

36*

1 2*
11

36*
36*
36*

36*

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., February 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

18

T ab le C -2 7 :

T able C -2 7 :

P^UttUUf -QoHflHttecl

P^lUitUUf ~3o*»ti*Ui&£

T able C^41:

JloOcU

Q p e /u z t U t p , £ # t fx lo y e e & - C o * t £ c * U 4 e d
__________J u ly 1 , 19$2

■rarer
C la s s ific a tio n

p er
hour

Book and Job shops - Continued
Bookbinders - Continued
Agreement A - Continued
Bode trimmers ( f l a t or ta b le trim ),
hand rounders and backers, head*
banders and l in e r s , hand case and
s tr e tc h e r makers, hand c a s e rs -in ;
book r e p a ire r s , edge coloring,
sprinkling and general a ll-rou n d
work, a s s is ta n t operators on
gathering machine, s titc h e r s and
covers, sheet cutters ..... .
$2.1-05
Automatic machine feed ers,
unskilled ........................... ..
1.118
Agreement B:
A ssistant operators on combinations
and folding machines, jogging
machine operators
2.103
Blankbook binders, operators of
f l a t machines; die machines; band
cu ttin g machines; gathering,
s titc h in g , or covering machines,
operated as separate units ............
2.36U
Manifold tab le workers .........................
2.339
Operators of Kast inserting and
8titching machines, Dayton 3knife trim m e rs.......................................
2.101:
Compositors, hand ..................................................
2.759
Electrotyp ers ...........................................................
3.160
Machine operators ....................
2.759
Machine tenders (m a c h in is ts ).........................
2.759
Photoengravers ........................................................
3.U85
Press a s s is ta n ts and fee d e rs:
Assistants on Miller 2-color Simplex,
Miehle 2-color No. Ul and U6, small
McKee process— first assistant,
large 2-color flat bed, 2-color
Cottrell rotary (not over U2 inches),
5-color Cottrell (not over 6l
inches)— second assistant, and
perfecting process presses .......
2.327
Assistants on Miehle automatic pony,
Kelly No. 2, Babcock automatic,
Miller Major Simplex, Premier G. F.,
Miehle II , sheet-fed rotary, and
I
double sheet-fed rotary presses ....
Assistants on platen presses, Miehle
vertical or horizontal; Miller Hispeed or Simplex; Kelly A, B, C,
Clipper, or Automatic Jobber; Harris
1 or 2 colors (1$ x 18 inches and 18
x 22 inches); offset presses up to
and including 22 x 3h inches;
Webendorfer; multicolor and C and P
cylind er presses ........................................
1.7U 9
Utility men on web presses; assistants
on cylinder presses over t 2 inches,
i
assistants on McKee and offset
presses 35 x I 5 inches or larger ...
i
2 .2 7 1
Floor help - m e n ......... •••••....
1 .1 9 7
Floor help - w omen......... ••••••••
1 .1 3 5
Pressmen, cylinder:
Permanent provers, sheet-fed rotary
presses with color, presses with
bronzing attachment.......... ..
2.863




Hours
per
week

36*

36*

O cto b er 1 . 1952

__________ J u ly 1 , 1952
Rate

per

C la s s ific a tio n

hour
Book and jo b shops - Continued
Pressm en, c y lin d e r - Continued
1 c y lin d e r and 1 o r 2 hand p la te n
p r e s s e s ; 1 c y lin d e r and 1 au to ­
m a tic p la te n p r e s s , 1 c y lin d e r and
1 au to m atic job c y lin d e r up t o and
in c lu d in g 3 1 in c h e s ; 1 c y lin d e r
and 1 o r 2 au to m atic jo b c y li n d e r ,
22 in ch es and under 29 in c h e s ; 1
c y lin d e r p r e s s o v e r 68 in c h e s ,
s h e e t -f e d r o t a r y p r e s s e s , m u lti­
web t i c k e t p r e s s e s . . ............... ...............
Pressm en, p la t e n :
1 t o 3 p r e s s e s ; 1 au to m atic p r e s s ,
20 in ch es o r under •••••••••••••••.
2 au to m atic p r e s s e s , 20 in c h e s or
u n d er; 2 W ebendorfer p r e s s e s .............

$2,789

Hours
per
week

36*

2.1:25

36*

2.1:71:

36*

2.993
3 .1 3 1
2.993
3 .1 3 1

a
$

2.993

36*

3 .1 3 1
2.381:
2 .6 5 9
3 .2 2 8
3 .5 3 1
2.8 8 3
3.221:
3 .0 9 0
3.U»8
2 .7 2 0
3 .2 3 8

36i36;;
33n
36*
3v
3
37ir
31}

36*

36 *
36*

3

IP

Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work . . . . .
Compositors, hand • night work . . . ,
Machine operators - day w ork ...........
Machine operators - night work . . . .
Machine tenders (m achinists) day work .........................•••••••••»..
Machine tenders (m achinists) night work
....................................
M ailers - day work ..••••••••...........
M ailers - night work .........................
Photoengravers - day work ..................
Photoengravers - night work ..............
Pressmen, web presses - day work . .
Pressmen, web presses - night work
Pressmen-in-charge - day work .........
Pressmen-in-charge - night work . . .
Stereotypers - day work ......................
Stereotypers - night work ............

3
k

36ir

3 6*
T able C-Al* JlocxU

Vsulh &U

Q p & u U i* U f C m

p io fe e i

C la s s i f i c a t i o n

36 *

36*
36*
36*

36*

Subway:
Road motormen:
F i r s t y e a r ........................................ ..
A f t e r 1 y e a r ......... .................. ......................
Yard motormen:
F i r s t y e a r ........................................ ..............
A f t e r 1 y e a r • • • • ..........................................
Conductors:
F ir s t p o s itio n :
F i r s t y e a r ................. ..............................
A f t e r 1 yea r ............................................
Second p o s i t i o n : ..............................• • • • • • •
P latfo rm man:
F i r s t y e a r ........... ................ ....................
A f t e r 1 y e a r ............................. ..............

la te '
p er
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,980
2.01:0

10
UO

1.8 6 0
1.9 2 0

ho
hO

1.6 8 0
1.71:0
1.6 2 0

uo
UO

1.5 6 0
1.600

UO
UO

ho

C lassification
1-man cars:
Brooklyn-Queens T ransit Lines:
F irs t 6 months ••••••••••••............. ..
7 - 12 months
After 1 y e a r .................................................
Busses:
Avenue B and East Broadway
Transit Co.:
F ir s t 6 months
7 - 1 2 months............................. ..................
13 - 2U months ........................................... ..
After 2 y e a r s ......................................
Brooklyn Bus Division, Comprehensive
and East Side Omnibus Corp.,
Queens Bus Division:
F ir s t 6 months............................ ..
7 - 12 months •••••..............................
After 1 y e a r ................. ............................
F ifth Avenue Coach:
Drivers:
F irs t y e a r ......................... ................
Second year ................................. .
After 2 years .........................................
Double decker drivers:
F irs t year ............................................ ..
Second year
After 2 y e a r s ....................... ....•••••
Green Lines:
F ir s t 6 months.........•••••......................
7 - 1 2 months............. ..................................
13 - 18 months •••••.........
After 18 months.........•••••••....................
Jamaica Busses, In c .:
F ir s t 6 months ....................................... ..
7 - 1 2 months ••••.......................................
13 - 18 months .............................................
After 18 months...................
N York Omnibus Co.:
ew
F ir s t 6 months ••••.••••••.......................
7 - 1 2 months.............•••••••••................
13 - 2U months ........................••••••••••
After 2 y e a r s ........... ............. ...................
Queens-Nassau Transit Lines:
F ir s t y e a r .........................................••••••
Second year ••••••••••••••.....................
Schenck Transport Co.:
F ir s t 6 months ••••••••...........................
7 - 1 2 months ...............................................
13 - 2U months ......................................... ..
After 2 years ••••••••••••••••••••••••
Steinway Omnibus and Queensboro
Bridge Ry.:
F ir s t y e a r .....................................................
After 1 year ............... ..................................
Third Avenue Ry.
Transit System:
F ir s t 6 months................... .........................
7 - 1 2 months ........................... ....................
1 3 - 1 8 months ••••••................. .•••••••
19 - 2U months ............................. ................
After 2 years ......................... •••••...........
Tri-Boro Coach Corp.:
F irs t 12 months •••••............................. ..
After 1 year •••••••••......................... .
After 18 months ......................................... ..

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,620
1.7U0
1.860

U
O
Uo
U
O

1.U20
1.500
1.560
1.660

U8
U8
U8
U8

1.620
1.7U0
1.860

U
O
U
O
U
O

1.675
1.685
1.735

U
U
U
U
U
U

1.775
1.785
1.835

U
U
U
U
U
U

1.630
1.680
1.750
1.910

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1.U30
1.U90
1.550
1.660

U8
U8
U8
U8

1.U85
1.585
1.635
1.735

U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U

1.U90
1.660

U8
U8

1.350
1.U20
1.U80
1.670

U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U

1.U90
1.660

U8
U8

1.U10
1.U60
1.510
1.560
1.660

U8
U8
U8
U8
U8

1.U15
1.510
1.660

U8
U8
U8

19

Table C-42: M o fo U to U c A

^ U

Table C-42S M

a e /U

a n d

July 1. 1952
Classification
Beer:
Chauffeurs ••••................... ..............................
Helpers ..........................................................
Trailer and 6-wheel truck:
Hook and unhook .................... ..
Building:
Construction:
D p truck ............................................ ••••
um
6-wheel, 3-axle tracto r and tr a ile r . .
Material:
Lime, brick, cem ent...................... ••••••
Lumber
Sand, gravel, and concrete mix
Secondhand brick ................ .......................
Butter and egg:
Agreement A - Market:
5 t o n s ......................... .............. ...................
Agreement B - Purveyer:
3 tons and under ........................................
U tons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Agreement C - Expressmen and purveyors:
3 tons and under ........................
Ij. tons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Agreement D - Dairy:
Helpers •• • ................... ...............................
Clothing:
Coat, dress, and package delivery .............
Helpers .............................................. ...........
Coal and fuel o i l :
Coal:
Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn,and
water yards in Queens . . ................ ..
Rail yards in Queens.......................... ..
Fuel o il .................................... ........... .............
Department sto re:
Trailer ................. .

Food - Wholesale market:
Agreement A ........................................................
Extra drivers . . . . .................................... ..
Other than U-wheel, single-axle
truck
...........
Extra d r iv e r s ...................... ........... .
Agreement B .........................................................




o to b b u tc A

M

jty U v e /lA

o to U s u tc A

3 y U u e /U

a V e l f z e * l - G < p $ t4 * U £ e e t

July 1 . 1952
"S ite ” Hours
per
per
hour week
$2,070
1.9U5

U0
Uo

2.170
2.210

1:0
1*0

2.000
2.125

1*0
Uo

2.000
1.760
2.000
2.375

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1.8 9 0
1.9 2 0

Uo
Uo

1.788
1.813

Uo
Uo

1.763
1.7 8 8

Uo
Uo

1.623

Uo

1.375
1 .1 0 0

Uo
Uo

2.09U

Uo
Uo
Uo

2.013

Uo

1.307
1.3 5 6

U5
U5

1.61:8
1.1*38
1.713

U5
U5
Uo

2.091:

2.051

C lassification
Fru it and produce:
Market:
3 tons and under .......... ............... •••••••
)| tons
5 tons ..........................................
7j t o n s .......................................................
Purveyors
Helpers « . . . .................................................
General Trucking:
Agreement A:
1 ton auto and under •••••••.........•••••
2 tons . . . TT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U tons
* tons T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . r . . t . . . . . . . . TTT
>
7£ tons ...........................................................
Six-wheel reach- or pole-truck,
tr a c to r -tr a ile r , third -axle truck:
Load or unload .......................................
Do not load or unload .• •• • ............
...........................
H elpers...............................■
Agreement B:
2 tons •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
^ tons r r , Trr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U tons
tons
7 i tons •••.•••...........................................
Six-wheel reach- or pole-truck,
tr a c to r -tr a ile r , third -axle truck:
Load or unload.....................................
D not load or unload . . . . . . . . . . . . .
o
H elpers...........................................................
Agreement C:
1 ton auto and under ............ ...................
2 tons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 tons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U tons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
tons T, . 1 tT. - . . . . . . . . - . TT. T. . . . , . TtT
.
7£ tons ...........................................................
Six-wheel reach- or pole-truck,
tr a c to r -tr a ile r , third -axle truck:
Load or unload ••••••.••.......... . . . . .
Do not load or unload •••••••••••••
H elpers.........................................................

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1*765
1.815
1. 8U
0
1.903
3*875
1.U95

U
0
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1.667
1.692
1.717
1.7U2
1.767
1.830

U
o
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
U
o

1.980
1.830
1.5U2

Uo
Uo
Uo

1.7U3
1.768
I .793
1.818
1.880

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

2.0 3 0

Uo
Uo
Uo

1.7U8
1.773
1.798

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

1.880
1.593

1.823
1.8U8

1.910
2.0 6 0

1.910
1.623

Uo
Uo
Uo

hour

C la s s ific a tio n
Grocery - Wholesale .......................................
Helpers ••.................................. .....................
Laundryi
Cleaning and dyeing - R e ta il .............
Cloth sponging .................................... ..
H e lp e rs .....................................................
Linen supply .................................................
Helpers
O ffice t o w e l ...................................... ..
Linen supply and towels Wholesale ...................................................
S h i r t .............................................................
Meat:
Branch house .................. ............... ..
Hotel Supply:
Agreement A .....................
Agreement B .............................................
Pork d e l i v e r y ................................ ..............
Slaughterhouse t
Agreement A ............................................
Agreement B ...........................................
Milkt
R e ta il:
Foremen .................. ..................................
Route rid e rs
Wholesale:
Foremen
............
Routemen ••••.........................
Transportation (a f te r 6 months) . . . .
Special d eliv ery , a f te r 6 months
Newspaper]
Agreement A:
Day ..............................................................
N ig h t........................................................ .
Agreement B:
D ay....................... ..................................... .
Night ........................................................
Paper and miscellaneous products:
J to 2 t o n s ...................................................
Helpers .................... ..
Private s an itatio n .........................................
H e lp e rs .................................... .......................
Railway express ............................................... .
Helpers . * . . . . . ......... ............... ••••••••.
Money d eliv ery .................. .........................

H0UT8
per
week

$1,817
1.727

U
O
U
O

.980
1 .750

1.667
1.298
1.713

U8
U
O
U
O
U2
U2
38

1.57U
1.UU7

U3
U3

Rate
per

1 .U00

2.0U5

Uo

1.875
2.0U5
2.125

U
O
U
O
U
O

2.0U5
1.9U5

uo
uo

2.263
2.188

uo
uo

2.263
2.363
2.150
1.888

uo
U
O
uo
uo

2.220
2.U0O

uo
Uo

2.300
2 .330

Uo
Uo

1.850
1.U25
1.875
1.700
1.895
1.695
1.9 5 0

Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo
Uo

20

D : Supplementary

W a g e

Practice^

S h i f t j h i f t e A e n l i a i P /u u A U io u l 1 /

Table D-l:

Percent of total plant employment
(a1 ------------By establishment policy in All manufacturing
Machinery
Industries 2/
indixstries
3d or other
2d shift
3d or other
id shift
shift work
work
shift work
work

Shift differential

All workers ........................
Workers in establishments having
provisions for late shifts ........
With shift differential ..........
Uniform cents (per hour) ......
5 cents ...................
6 cents ...................
7 cents ...................
7-1/2, 8 or 9 cents ........
10 cents ..................
12 or 12-1/2 cents .........
13-3A cents ..............
Over 13-3/A cents ..........
Uniform percentage ............
5 percent .................
7 or 7-1/2 percent .........
10 percent ................
12 or 12-1/2 percent.......
15 percent ................
Other ........................
With no shift differential .......
Workers in establishments having
no provisions for late shifts .....

(b)
Actually working on extra shifts in Machinery
All manufacturing
Industries 2/
industries 3/
3d or other
2d shift
2d shift
shift

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

XXX

XXX

XXX

62.2
61.1
31.A
11.0
l.A
3.A
2.0
A.9
2.2
A.6
1.9
28.1
2.3
3.2
17.2
1.3
A.l
1.6
1.1

A9.0
A7.9'
26.6
7.0
.3
2.1
6.5
3.1

6A.5
6A.5
5.7
5.7
-

39.A
39.A
.5
-

2.A
2.2
1.6
.3
-

6.1
6.1
.1
.1

-

-

-

7.6
20.1
3.2
10.2
.8

-

.5
38.9
-

10.0
9.9
7.1
l.A
.3
.5
.3
.9
.5
2.7
.5
2.A
.2
.6

6.0
.A
1.2
.5
3.9
XXX

(2 /)

.3
.3
.2
.5
.5
-

9 .9

.7

11.0
18.0
-

( /)
4

1.2
1.1

58.8
1.3
21.9
12.5
23.1
-

.A
.1

.5
.1
.2

51.0

35.5

60.6

XXX

XXX

5.9

37.8

-

-

(V )

.9

l/ Shift differential data are presented in terms of (a) establishment policy and (b) workers actually employed on late shifts at the time of the
survey. An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met any of the following conditions: (l) Operated late shifts at the time of the
survey, ( ) had union-contract provisions covering late shifts, or (3) had operated late shifts within 6 months prior to the survey.
2
2/ Includes data for machinery industries also shown separately.
2/ No workers on third shift.
i j Less than 0.05 percent.

Table D-2: S c h e d u le d

T V u e k U f J t o u /M

Percent of plant workers employed in *
-

Percent of office workers l/ employed in Weekly hours

All workers ..........................
Under 35 hours .......................
35 hours ................. ............
Over 35 and under 37£ hours ..........
37& hours ............................
Over 37^ and under AO hours ..........
AO hours .............................
Over AO and under AA hours ...........
AA hours ..... ........................
Over AA and under A8 hours ...........
A8 hours .............................
Over A8 hours ........................

1/
2/
2/
*
**

All
Public
Wholesale
Manufacturing
utilities *
trade
industries
100.0

1.3
A8.2
13.5
20.9
3.2
1 2 .6
.1
.1

100.0

56.3
2 .0
2 1 .2

100.0

66 .A
2 .0

17.0

A.3

2 .1

1 6 .1
-

12.5

-

-

.1

.1

-

-

-

100.0

37.7

Retail
trade 2/
100.0

1 1 .8
30 .6

A.9
13.9
AA.2

3.6
16.3

29 .A

6 .2

-

.1

-

1.3
-

Data relate to women workers.
Excludes limited-price variety stores.
Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Central
Finance ** Services
offices
100.0

3.3
A8.8
2A.2
1A.0
2.5
7.2
-

-

100.0

All
Public
Wholesale
Manufacturing
industries 2/
utilities *
trade
100.0

1.3
39 .A

100.0

0 .2

68.0

7.8

-

8 .8

1.5

3.8

3.8
A.A
7.1
.7

-

-

6 .0
-

68.8
.6

65.7

2.3
5.7
A.6
1.3

2.7
5.A

78.7
3.3
-

1.0

1 1 .1

8 .2

12 .A

33.0
1.7
16.9
.A
.A
-

8 .0

"

“

*

100.0

Retail
trade 2/

100.0

100.0

10 0 .0

7.2
.A
A.6
.A
87.A

3.0
18.5
3.5
51.5

Services

10 0 .0
1 .8

6.9

.6

1 .1

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., February

*

5.A

-

-

-

1 .8

13. A
8.3
~

.5
.8

8A.1
3.0
1 .6

3.3
A.9
“

1953

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

21

Paid Jtolidafi.

Table D-3*

Percent of office workers employed in Number of paid holidays

Wholesale
Public
All
trade
industries Manufacturing utilities *

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Central
Finance ** Services offices

All
Public
Wholesale
industries 2/ Manufacturing utilities *
trade

Retail
trade i/

Services

100.0

All workers .......................
Establishments providing paid
holidays 2 / ................... ..
Under 5 days ....................
5 days .........................
6 days ..........................
7 days .........................
8 days ............ .......... .
9 days .........................
10 days .........................
11 days ............. ...........
12 days .........................
13 or more days .................
Establishments providing no paid
holidays .........................

Retail
trade l/

99.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

10Q.Q

. 100.0

1QQ.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9
.3

100.0

98.0

100.0

96.8

100.0

95.9
3.9
2.5
26.2
19.0
25.0
11.3
4 .4
3 .6

86.4

100.0

96.2
7.6

88.1

2 .8
11.5
15.7
11.4
24.2
32.8
1.6

94.0
3.2
1.7
21.0
28.1
14.1
7.8
3.2
14.7
.2

-

-

~

6 .0

-

.1
6.3
19.7
33.0
15.9
14.2
10.4
•4

iy )

3.0
13.8
10.7

6.6

10.9
42.6
11.8
.1

-

.5

~

-

1.3
11.2
2.5
2.2
7 .4
71.9
3.1
-

.1

-

2.5
13.5
17.5
14.1
19.8
25.4
7.2
-

-

-

.7
73.6
2.1
7.3
5.5
8 .6

.4
.7
.5
.3
3.9
66.1
28.1

-

.2

-

2.0

“

-

.5
11.7
27.7
18.4
5.4
10.5
20.2
1.3
1.1
3.2

-

-

4.1

-

2 .4
10.5
10.0
1.5
_
-

62.0
-

13.6

_
-

_

10.4
24.2
13.2
3.8
10.3
38.1

5.2
69.9
1.7
5.6

-

-

-“

3.8

_

6.2

_

2.2
44.4
25.7
8.6
iy )

1.8
5.4
-

11.9

1 / Excludes limited-price variety stores,
2/ Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2/ Paid holidays of less than a full day have been omitted.
I j Less than 0.05 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

Table D-4:

Paid VacaiUmi (tyotmal Psu a m A)
h UU

Percent of office workers employed in Vacation policy

All workers ........................

All
Wholesale
Public
trade
industries Manufacturing utilities *

Retail
trade 1/

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Central
Finance * * Services offices

All
Public
Wholesale
industries 2/ Manufacturing utilities *
trade

Retail
trade 1/

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9
99.6
7.4
.5
91.4
.3
.3

99.5
99.5
17.8
.2
81.0
.5
-

100.0
100.0
4.8
95.2
-

100.0
97.8
1.0
95.5
1.3
2.2

100.0
100.0
50.1
8.4
41.5
-

100.0
100.0
•4
99.4
.2
-

100.0
99.9
14.2
.2
85.5
.1
-

100.0
100.0
2.9
97.1
-

99.8
87.0
47.9
4.6
32.3
2.2
1.9
2.6
8.3

100.0
76.0
56.0
2.8
14.4
2.8
3.9
5.7
14.4

100.0
97.2
24.2
.9
67.9
4.2
2.8

100.0
93.4
16.2
*
69.7
7.5
6.6

100.0
95.7
43.2
6.1
46.4
4.3

98.9
93.5
72.3
1.2
20.0
_
1.8
3.6

.1

.5

After 1 y e y qf
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations ...................
Length-of-time payment......... .
1 week .......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ......
2 weeks ......................
Over 2 weeks .................
Percentage payment y ............
Flat-sun payment ................
Other y ........................
Workers in establishments providing no
paid vacations ...................

iy)

“

See footnotes at erd of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




NOTE:

“

iy)

*
*

.2

*

—

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., February 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABCK
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Estimates are provided separately, according to employer practice in computing vaca­
tion payments (length-of-time, percentage, flat-sum, and other); percentage, flat-sum,
«nii other type payments were converted to equivalent time periods in earlier studies.

-

1.1

2
2

Table D-4:

Paid Vocation*, tyosunal PsuxuAionfi-GoHiintied

Percent of office workers employed in Vacation policy

All
PuDlic
Wholesale
industries Manufacturing utilities *
trade

Retail
trade i/

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Central
Finance ** Services offices

100.0

All workers ........................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0
.A
99.6
-

100.0
97.8
.3
96.2
1.3
2.2

100.0
100.0
.9
90.1
9.0
-

100.0
100.0
.1
.2
97.7
2.0
—
-

100.0
99.9
2.8
8.0
89.1
.1
-

All
Public
Wholesale
industries 2/ Manufacturing utilities *
trade

100.0

Retail
trade 1/

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
93.4
9.5
1.0
75.4
7.5
_
6.6

100.0
95.7
2.6
_
85.1
8.0
.
_
4.3

98.9
93.5
37.5
23.7
32.3

JSflEP p£ gggyjgs
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations ...................
Length-of-time payment...........
1 week .......................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ......
2 weeks ......................
Over 2 weeks .................
Percentage payment 2 / ............
Flat-sum payment ................
Other 5 / ........................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations............ ..

99.9
99.6
1.1
.9
96.2
1.4
.3

99.5
99.5
5.0
.1
93.9
.5
-

.1

.5

99.9
99.6
.6
.1
95.1
1.6
2.2
.3

99.5
99.5
2.9
.1
85.3
11.2
_
-

.1

.5

(& /)

”

“

“

“

(4/)

100.0
100.0
100.0
-

99.8
87.0
21.2
10.9
51.2
3.7
1.9
2.6
8.3

■
*

.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
-

99.8
87.0
11.1
5.2
65*4
3.2
2.1
1.9
2.6
8.3

100.0
76.0
30.4
11.0
31.8
2.8
3.9
5.7
14.4
~

100.0
97.2
14.0
.9
78.1
4.2
_
2.8
“

-

-

1.8
_
3.6
1.1

After 3 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations ...................
Length-of-time payment...........
1 w e e k ........... ...........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ......
2 weeks ......................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ......
3 weeks .............. .......
Over 3 weeks .................
Percentage payment 2 / ............
Flat-sum payment................
Other 2 / ........................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ................

W

100.0
100.0
97.9
2.1
-

100.0
97.8
96.0
1.3
.5
2.2

100.0
100.0
.9
80.9
14.0
4.2
-

100.0
100.0
.1
97.2
1.8
.8
.1
-

100.0
99.9
1.6
.7
97.5
.1
_
.1
(4/)

'

100.0
76.0
15.6
8.0
49.6
.8
2.0
_
3.9
5.7
14.4

100.0
97.2
5.4
.9
86.7
2.0
2.2
_
2.8

100.0
93.4
5.9
1.0
76.0
7.5
3.0
_
6.6

98.9
93.5
22.7
9.3
60.4

4.3

1.8
3.6

“

.2

100.0
95.7
.7
_
80.5
11.5
3.0

1.1

1.1

"

After 5 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations ....................
Length-of-time payment...........
1 w e e k ....... ...............
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ......
2 weeks ......................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ......
3 weeks ......................
Over 3 weeks .................
Percentage payment 2/ ............
Flat-sum payment..... ...........
Other 2 / ........................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations ................

99.9
99.6
.1
79.9
8.1
11.5

w

99.5
99.5
.3
70.7
.3
28.2
-

.3

-

.1

100.0
100.0
94.0
6.0
-

100.0
97.8
95.2
1.3
1.3
-

.5

-

2.2

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0
100.0
.2
71.5
5.0
23.3
-

100.0
100.0
-

100.0
99.9
.3

-

-

68.5
21.0
10.4
.1
-

85.4
.6
13.6
-

.1
(4 /)

100.0
100.0
92.1
7.9
-

99.8
87.0
2.6
.6
72.0
4.8
7.0
1.9
2.6
8.3
.2

100.0
76.0
2.6
1.3
66.5
3.0
2.6
3.9
5.7
14.4

100.0
97.2
5.4

100.0
93.4
-

-

-

84.2
2.0
5.6
2.8

81.8
7.5
4.1
6.6

100.0
95.7
71.8
3.6
20.3
4.3

98.9
93.5
5.5
-

84.3
<&/)

3.7
1.8
3.6
1.1

23

Table D-4:

P<ti(t VoCcUlO^U tyotomol P^UWlUM^ ~GoHliHUBct

Percent of office workers employed in Vacation policy

All workers ..............................

Wholesale
All
Public
Manufacturing
trade
utilities *
industries

Retail
trade 1/

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Central
Finance ** Services
offices

All
Public
Wholesale
Manufacturing
utilities *
industries 2 /
trade

Retail
trade 1 /

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100,0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9
99.6
.1
55.9
7.1
35.1
1.4

100.0
100.0
88.5
9.0
2.5
-

100.0
97.8
68.7
1.3
27.8
2.2

100.0
100.0
.2
53.6
42.0
4.2
-

100.0
100.0
38.8
19.2
41.9
.1
-

100.0
99.9
.3
53.3
45.4
.9
.1
-

100.0
100.0
-

99.8
87.0
2.3
62.8
4.2
16.8
.9
1.9
2.6
8.3

100.0
76.0
2.0
58.0
3.4
12.6

100.0
97.2
5.4
76.0
2.0
12.3
1.5
2.8

100.0
93.4
-

100.0
95.7
53.8
-

98.9
93.5
5.5
83.0
_

.3

99.5
99.5
.3
51.6
.3
40.8
6.5
-

-

38.6
3.3
-

1.8
-

6.6

4.3

3.6

.1

.5

”

“

1.1

99.9
99.6
.1
23.0
1.0
71.0
-

.3

99.5
99.5
.3
35.2
1.0
45.3
17.7
-

.1

.5

99.9
99.6
.1
21.6
.9
64.0
.1
12.9

99.5
99.5
.3
32.6

After 10 Tears of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations .................. ......
Length-of-time payment ..............
1 week ............................ .
2 weeks ............................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks ............................
Over 3 weeks .......................
Percentage payment
...............
Flat-sum n a y m e n t .....................
Other 5 / ..............................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s ........ .............

2/

(it/)

71.9
28.1
-

(it/)

.2

(it/)

3.9
5.7
14.4

~

—

67.7
7.5
18.2

-

5.0

After 15 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations ........................
Length-of-time payment ..............
1 w e e k .............................
2 w e e k s ...........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks ............................
Over 3 end under 4 weeks .........
weeks and over ..................
Percentage payment 2 / ...............
Flat-sum p a y m e n t ....... ..............
Other J / ..............................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations .....................

A

4.5

(Q)

100.0
100.0
11.4
86.1
2.5
”

100.0
97.8
38.2
1.3
58.3
2.2
~

100.0
100.0
.2
41.5
50.5
7.8
~

100.0
100.0
11.2
2.1
83.3
3.4
—

100.0
99.9
.3
42.6
52.8
4.2
.1
(V)

100.0
100.0
12.1
87.9
“

99.8
87.0
2.3
40.9
3.3
38.2
.4
1.9
1.9
2.6
8.3
.2

100.0
76.0
2.0
34.9
1.2
37.0
.9
a/)
3.9
5.7
14.4
“

100.0
97.2
5.4
12.2
2.0
76.1
-

100.0
93.4
-

100.0
95.7
_
50.4
_

98.9
93.5
5.5
77.5
_

36.6
_

10.4
_

8.7
_
_

.1
1.8
-

-

50.3
7.5
35.6
_
_
_
_

2.8

6.6

4.3

3.6

”

”

"

1.1

1.5
-

After 20 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
paid vacations ........................
Length-of-time p a y m e n t .......... .
1 w e e k ....................... .....
2 w e e k s ............ ...............
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........
3 weeks ................... ........
Over 3 and tinder
w e e k s .........
weeks and o v e r ............... .
Percentage payment
...............
Flat-sum payment .....................
Other 2 / ..............................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid vacations .................

A

A
2/ .

46.5
1.1
19.0

100.0
100.0

11.4
86.1
2.5

100.0
97.8
37.7
1.3
58.8
-

53.6
10.0

Ot/)

-

-

-

-

.3

-

-

2.2

-

.1

.5

-

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




100.0
100.0
.2
36.2

100.0
100.0
10.2
2.1
63.9
23.8
-

100.0
99.9
.3
42.6
-

100.0
100.0
9.7
-

48.4
8.6
.1
-

87.6

((J)

2.7
-

99.8
87.0
2.3
38.0
3.1
39.6
1.0
3.0
1.9
2.6
8.3
.2

100.0
76.0
2.0
32.2
.8
37.9
2.2

100.0
97.2
5.4
12.2
2.0
76.1

.9

1.5

_

-

_
_

2.8

6.6

3.9
5.7
14.4

-

100.0
93.4
_
45.2
7.5
40.7
_

100.0
95.7
»
43.0

98.9
93.5
5.5
77.5

40.7

10.0

12.0
_

1.8

_

4.3

_
.5

_

3.6
1.1

2M-

Table D-A =

Paid VacoticuU Wormed Petition*)-Continued
Percent of p
>lant workers! employed in -

Percent of office workers employed in Vacation policy

Wholesale Retail Services
Public
All
Central
Wholesale Retail
All
Manufacturing Public
Services offices industries 2/ Manufacturing utilities * trade
trade 1/
trade l/ Finance **
utilities * trade
industries

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9
99.6

99.5
99.5
.
3
31.1

100.0
100.0

100.0
97.8

100.0
100.0

A5.2
A.l
35.6

36.3

AA.3

100.0
97.2
5.A
12.2
2.0
76.1

98.9
93.5
5.5
76.6

28.3

23.3

10.9

62.9

12.9
.1

29.1

100.0
76.0
2.0
29.8
.8
38.7
2.2
2.5
3.9
5.7

100.0
95.7

63.2

99.8
87.0
2.3
35.5
3.0
36.A
1.0
8.8
1.9
2.6

100.0
93.A

37.7
.7
A7.7

100.0
99.9
.3
A2.A

100.0
100.0

11.3

100.0
100.0
.2
31.8

1.5

8.5

36.1

-

-

-

ia !
a

2.8

6.6

A.3

(V)

~

'

'

After 25 years of service
Workers in establishments providing
Length-of-time payment ...........
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .......
3 weeks .....................
Over 3 and under A weeks .........
A weeks and over .............
Percentage payment 2/ ............
Flat-sum payment ............. .
Other *>/...................... •
Workers in establishments providing

20^5
.1
AA.7
.1
3A.1
(£/)

A7.3
1.1
19.7

8A.A
A.3

11.7

-

-

2.2

.1

1/

.
3

.
5

-

25.7
A2.3

8.8

-

-

7.7

.
2

1*8
3.6
1.1

-

Excises limited-urice variety stores.
Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.

% Percent of annual earnings.
Less than 0.05 percent.

Includes combinations of the listed methods of payment as well as provisions based on number of days worked a year.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

p Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilitie s .
Table D-5s

9n U€* a UCe

gu

d PonA dO U P lo n l

Percent of office workers employed in Type of plan

All workers ......................
Workers in establishments having
insurance or pension plans 2 / ..... Insurance plans 2/ ..............
Life ........................
Accidental death and
dismemberment ..............
Sickness and accident .........
Hospitalization....... ......
Surgical ..... ...............
Medical .....................
Retirement-pension plan ..........
Workers in establishments having
no insurance or pension plans ......

100.0___

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

95.7
92.5
86.3

85.2
82.3
78.5

98.2
96.3
89.2

91.0
86.2
79.6

98.3
98.3
80.0

99.9
96.A
92.2

91.2
88.7
81.0

1C0.0
95.7
89.5

9A.5
92.9
82.3

37.6
A2.2
63.9
55.3
33.0
69.9

31.2
Al.l
56.7
AS.7
3A.3
A7.6

52.1
18.8
A7.2
A6.9
27.0
90.3

36.2
A6.0
61.2
55.9
22.1
6A.A

31.2
50.2
92.A
76.5
23.9
32.9

38.6
AA.3
70.6
58.1
A2.2
80.5

31.8
A5.1
A7.2
36.2
18.7
39.6

38.0
A6.7
70.9
67.3
38.9
93.0

A.3

1A.8

1.8

9.0

1.7

.1

8.8

1/ Excludes limited price variety stores.
2/ Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately,
Unduplicated total.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

2/




Percent of plant workers employed in -

All
All
Wholesale Retail
Wholesale Retail Finance ** Services Central
Manufacturing Public
Manufacturing Public
Services
industries
utilities * trade
trade 1/
offices industries 2/
utilities * trade
trade l/

___1C0.0___

100.0

100.0

100.C

100.0

93.8
93.1
83.3

96.2
92.9
77.1

91.9
91.5
85.A

100.0
98.6
83.0

88.3
85.3
79.5

30.9
50.6
76.2
65.9
3A.6
50.1

25.9
55.A
78.7
70.8
A0.1
50.6

A8.9
28.9
A5.8
A5.A
2A.0
78.5

37.6
A5.1
71.2
66.0
25.2
A1.7

22.1
A5.7
9A.3
78.7
38.9
39.9

36.2
67.A
72.5
A6.1
27.2
38.1

5.5

6.2

3.8

8.1

11.7

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, N. Y., February 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

25

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey

The Bureau's occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a wunrimnin of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources* In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community* Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments*

such jobs were included only for firms meeting the size require­
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
Ainnng establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation. Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data*

The earnings information excludes premium pay far overtime
and night work* Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerioal occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment's full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification*

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau's
field representatives to establishments included in the study*
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) Office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-A). The industry groupings surveyed are: Manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services* Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions* As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied* Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry (see following
table)* Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations*

The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel* "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions* Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded* Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries, these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufacturing industries*
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey* Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: Operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work*
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

26

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift.

office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller*

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the enployer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in New York, N. Y., 1/
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 1953

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establi shments
studied
2/

iWb ► r of
e
establi shments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ........................
Manufacturing ......................
Nonmanufacturing...................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .....................
Wholesale trade .................
Retail trade (except limited-price
variety stores) ..............
Finance, insurance, and real estate •
•
Services 2 / .....................
Central offices ....................
Industries In which occupations wye
ffyrveyed pn ap InduptflT baffU y
Women's and misses1 dresses ............
Contract shops ••••.................
Regular (inside) shops.... ...... .....

Paints and varnishes ..................
Machinery industries... ..... ..•••••••••
Paper and printing machinery.........
Machine-tool accessories ........ ....
Power laundries....... •••••••.........

101
•

4,821
1,372
3,242

568
152
367

1,4%,000
412,100
997,600

555,110
106,070
406,090

169,190
14,370
129,400

101
51

271
950

52
78

254,600
139,900

166,880
19,780

33,010
7,850

101
51
51
51

353
752
916
207

52
76
109
49

183,600
237,100
182,400
81,300

71,850
93,880
53,700
42,950

8,080
66,430
14,030
25,420

8
8
8
8
SJ 21
21
8
21

1,644
1,181
463
93
367
28
144
169

193
126
67
23
57
10
21
27

56,685
33,416
23,269
4,012
29,116
7,704
3,999
13,878

8,521
3,824
4*697
1,758
14,782
6,607
683
3,659

224
2,287
853
44
166

1/ Hew York City Area (Bronx, Kings, Hew York, Queens, and Richmond Counties, N. Y.).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2 / Hotelsj personal services! business services! automobile repair shops! radio broadcasting and television! motion pictures! non—
profit membership organisations! and engineering and architectural services.
4/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables •
5 / Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included.




27

Index
Assembler (machinery), 13, 14, 15
Bench hand (bakeries), 17
Biller, machine, 3, 4
Bookbinder (printing), 17, 18
Bookkeeping-machine operator, 3, 4
Bricklayer (building construction), 17
Calculating-machine operator, 4
Carpenter (building construction), 17
Carpenter, maintenance, 8
Cleaner, 10
Clerk, file, 3, 4
Clerk, order, 3, 5
Clerk, payroll, 3, 5
Clerk, retail receiving (power
laundries), 16
Compositor, hand (printing), 18
Crane operator, electric bridge, 10
Cutter and marker (women's and misses'
dresses), 12
Draftsman, 7
Drill-press operator (machinery), 14, 15
Duplicating-machine operator, 3, 5
Electrician (building construction), 17
Electrician, maintenance, 8

Electrician, maintenance (machinery), 13, 15
Electrotyper (printing), 18
Engine-lathe operator (machinery), 14, 15
Engineer, stationary,. 8
Extractor operator (power laundries), 16

Janitor, 10
Janitor (machinery), 13, 15
Key-punch operator, 3, 5
Labeler and packer (paints
and varnishes), 13
Laborer (building construction), 17
Laborer, material handling, 10
Laborer, material handling
(machinery), 13, 15
Machine operator (printing), 18
Machine tender (printing), 18
Machine-tool operator, production
(machinery), 14, 15
Machine-tool operator, toolroom, 8
Machine-tool operator, toolroom
(machinery), 14, 15
Machinist, maintenance, 8
Machinist, production (machinery), 15
Mailer (printing), 18
Marker (power laundries), 16
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance), 9
Mechanic, maintenance, 9
Milling-machine operator
(machinery), 14, 15
Millwright, 9
Mixer (bakeries), 17
Mixer (paints and varnishes), 13
Molder (bakeries), 17
Motortruck driver, 19
Nurse, industrial (registered), 7

Finisher, flatwork (power laundries), 16
Fireman, stationary boiler, 8
Fireman, stationary boiler
(power laundries), 16
Grinding-machine operator (machinery), 14 , 15
Guard, 10

Office boy, 3
Office girl, 5
Oiler, 9
Operator (local transit), 18
Order filler, 10
Overman (bakeries), 17

Plumber, maintenance, 9
Porter, 10
Press assistant (printing), 18
Press feeder (printing), 18
Presser (women's and misses' dresses), 12
Presser, machine, shirts (power laundries), 16
Pressman (printing), 18
Receiving clerk, 11
Routeman (driver-salesman) (power
laundries), 16
Screw-machine operator, automatic
(machinery), 14
Secretary, 3, 5
Sewer, hand (finisher) (women's
and misses' dresses), 12
Sewing-machine operator (women's
and misses' dresses), 12
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance, 9
Shipping clerk, 11
Shipping-and-receiving clerk, 11
Stenographer, 5, 6
Stereotyper (printing), 18
Switchboard operator, 6
Switchboard operator-receptionist, 6
Tabulating-machine operator, 3, 6
Technician (paints and varnishes), 13
Thread trimmer (cleaner) (women's
and misses' dresses), 12
Tinter (paints and varnishes), 13
Tool-and-die maker, 9
Tool-end-die maker (machinery), 14, 15
Tracer, 7
Transcribing-machine operator, 6
Truck driver, 11
Trucker, power, 11
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery), 14, 15
Typist, 3, 6
Varnish maker (paints and varnishes), 13

Helper (bakeries), 17
Helper, motortruck driver, 19
Helper, trades, maintenance, 8
Identifier (power laundries), 16
Inspector (machinery), 13, 14, 15
Inspector, final (examiner) (women's
and misses' dresses), 12




Packer, 10
Packer (bakeries), 17
Painter (building construction), 17
Painter, maintenance, 9
Photoengraver (printing), 18
Pipefitter, maintenance, 9
Plasterer (building construction), 17
Plumber (building construction), 17

Washer, machine (power laundries), 16
Watchman, 11
Welder, hand (machinery), 14
Work distributor (women's
and misses' dresses), 12
Wrapper (bakeries), 17
Wrapper, bundle (power laundries), 16
U. S. G O V E R N M E N T PRINTING OFFICE: O —

1953







O ffic e .

This r e p o r t was prepared in the B u reau's M iddle A t la n t ic R eg ion al
Communications may be add ressed t o :
R obert R. Behlow, R eg ion a l D ir e c t o r
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s
3A1 Ninth Avenue
Room 1000
New York 1 , New York

The s e r v ic e s o f the Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s ’ r e g io n a l o f f i c e s
a re a v a ila b le f o r c o n s u lt a t io n on s t a t i s t i c s r e la t in g t o wages and in d u s t r ia l
r e l a t i o n s , employment, p r i c e s ,
la b o r tu rn o v e r, p r o d u c t iv it y , work i n j u r i e s ,
c o n s t r u c t io n and h ou sin g.

The Middle A t la n t ic Region in c lu d e s the fo llo w in g S t a t e s :
Delaware
New J e rse y

New York
P ennsylvania


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102