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Occupational Wage Survey
DETROIT, MICHIGAN
December 1951

Bulletin No. 1086

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

Contents
Page

Page

I N T R O D U C T I O N .................................................

1

TABLES: - Continued

THE DETROIT METROPOLITAN A R E A ...............................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE .................................

2

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building c o n s t r u c t i o n ...... •••••••••.......
C-205
B a k e r i e s .......... ••••••....... ......... ••••
C-2082
Malt liquors ....................
C-2A31 M i l l w o r k .......................................
C-27
P r i n t i n g .......................................
C-Al
Local transit operating e m p l o y e e s .........
C-A2
Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s .... .
C-58
Restaurants ............
C-7011
Hotels .......................................

T ABIES:

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on
an area basis A-l
Office occupations ••••••••••••••••••«••••••••
A-la
Office occupations - motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment
.......
A-lb
Office occupations - motor-vehicle parts
and accessories . ••.....................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations •••••..
A-2a
Professional and technical occupations motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment ..••••••••••....... ••.........................
A-2b
Professional and technical occupations motoivvehicle parts and accessories ............
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations.........
A-3a
Maintenance and power plant occupations motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment ••••................................................
A-3b
Maintenance and power plant occupations motor-vehicle parts and accessories ............
AA
—
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations ••••••.••••••••••••••.................
A-Aa
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations - motor vehicles and motorvehicle equipment ................. . . . . . ................
A-Ab
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations - motor-vehicle parts
and accessories ..................
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on
an industry basis* B-336
Foundries, nonferrous ................
B-3391 Forgings, iron and s t e e l ....................
B-3A4A Sheet-metal work ............. ....................
B-3A68 Electroplating, plating, and polishing . . . . . . .
B-35
Machinery industries:
Machinery.........••••••.................. ......... .
Machine-tool accessories - jobbing shops •
•
Machine-tool accessories - production
shops •.............. .. •.........................
B-AO
Railroads .................................................
B-5A52 Milk dealers ......................................................
B-63
Insurance carriers ....................................




3

28
28
28
29
29
29
29
30
30

8
9
11
11
12
12
1A
15
16
19
19

21
21
22
22

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ••••
D-la
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
e q u i p m e n t ..... ............. ...............

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ..............
E-la
Shift differential provisions - motor
vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment .....
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours ••••••••..........
E-2a
Scheduled weekly hours - motor vehicles and
and motor-vehicle equipment ................
E-3
Paid holidays .........
E-3a
Paid holidays - motor vehicles and motorvehicle equipment
........... ••••••••
E-A
Paid vacations ..................
E-Aa
Paid vacations - motor vehicles and motorvehicle e q u i p m e n t ..........
E-5
Paid sick l e a v e .................
E-5a
Paid sick leave - motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment ....................
E-6
Nonproduction bonuses .............
E-6a
Nonproduction bonuses - motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment ......
E-7
Insurance and pension p l a n s ..........
E-7a
Insurance and pension plans - motor vehicles
and motor-vehicle equipment

31

31

32
32
33
33
3A
3A
35
36
37
39
AO
AO
A1
A1

23
2A
25
26
26
27

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y ...... ...... ..............

A2

I N D E X ........... ........................................... .

AA

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports are avail­
able upon request for auto repair shops (June 1951), ferrous
foundries (July 1951), paints and varnishes (May 1951), and
power laundries (May 1951)*
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 25 cents

June 2, 1952

Introduction

1/

The Detroit area is 1 o f 4-0 major labor markets in
which the Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys*
Occupations common to a variety o f
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis*
Cross-industry methods o f sampling were
thus u tilize d in compiling earnings data for the following types
o f occupations?
(a) o f f i c e ; (b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial* warehousing*
and shipping* In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A -l through A- 4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions* 7 j
Occupations ch aracteristic o f particular, important,
lo c a l industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework o f the community survey*
Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables*
Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lie u o f (or supplementing)
occupational earnings fo r several industries or trades in which
the great majority o f the workers are employed under terms o f
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative o f prevailing pay practices*
Data were collected and summarized on s h ift operations
and d iffe r e n tia ls , hours o f work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Detroit Metropolitan Area
The Detroit Metropolitan Area, consisting o f Macomb,
Oakland, and Wayne Counties, ranks fift h in size among the
standard metropolitan areas o f the Nation* The tota l population
o f th is area numbered over 3,000,000 in 1950, representing a
gain o f nearly 30 percent in the previous decade*
During this
period, the population o f Detroit increased 14 percent*
The in it ia l economic e ffe cts o f the Korean co n flict
pushed employment in the Motor City area to a record height of
1,309,000 by October 1950 - topping the World War II peak o f
November 1943 by more than 100,000* An employment decline then*
1 / Prepared In the Bureau1s regional o ffic e in Chicago, 111*,
by Woodrow C* Linn, under the direction o f George E* Totava,
Regional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst.
The planning
and central direction o f the program was carried on in the
Bureau*s Division o f Wages and Industrial Relations.
2 / The construction and extractive industries and government
in stitu tion s were excluded from this study.
See appendix for
discussion o f scope and method o f survey.




followed, but by April 1951 the October 1950 level was approached
when a further decline began.
Wage and salaried employment in
the Detroit area at the time o f the study (December 1951) had
fa llen to 1,211,000, representing a loss o f 88,000 since April
1951® Unemployment was at the highest level in 21 months.
Manufacturing employment - 619,000In December 1951-was
108.000 below the October 1950 le v e l. Despite the sharp reduc­
tion in manufacturing employment resulting from the defense
conversion program, more than h alf the wage and salaried workers
in the area were employed in manufacturing industries in December
1951* Of these, h a lf were employed in the motor vehicles and
equipment Industry. This industry forms the basis o f the area’ s
economy, and fluctuations in it s work force are reflected s ig n ificantly in the area’ s tota l employment. During 1951, employment
in the auto industry in the Detroit area f e l l from a high o f
407.000 In April to 313,000 in December. This loss parallels
closely the national trend for the motor vehicles and equipment
industry in which employment decreased from a postwar peak o f
936.000 in March 1951 to an estimate o f 789,000 for December.
The nonelectrical machinery industries, the next larg­
est manufacturing group in the area, had a to ta l work force o f
78.000 in December 1951, a gain o f 2,000 over the preceding
A pril. Detroit machinery plants manufacture a variety o f prod­
ucts including machine tools and machine-tool attachments,
household appliances, o ffic e machines, and internal combustion
engines (except automobile engines). Among prominent nondura­
ble-goods manufacturing industries, food and kindred products
accounted fo r 23,000 workers; chemicals and petroleum 22,000;
and printing and publishing 14,000.
An estimated 592,000 wage and salary workers were on
the payrolls o f Detroit nonmanufacturing
establishments in
December 1951* This compares with 575,000 in April when factory
employment had reached it s highest level for the year. Retail
ou tlets, with 180,000 workers, added 12,000 workers during
November and December to meet the stimulus o f Christmas buying.
Wholesale trade firms provided employment to an additional
62.000 workers.
Another 84,000 were employed by the various
branches o f the transportation and public u t ilit ie s industry,
including railroads, and the muncipally owned loca l transpor­
tation system. Building construction, in the midst o f a season­
a l decline in December, gave jobs to 47,000 workers* A tota l
o f 169,000 persons, including public school teachers, had em
­
ployment in the finance and services industries*
Among the industry and establishment-size groups stud­
ied , about 95 percent o f a l l factory workers in manufacturing
establishments were employed In union plants* In nonmanufactur­
ing industries the proportion o f nonoffica workers covered by
union agreements ranged from less than a third in financial
institutions to nearly 100 percent in the transportation (except
ra ilroa d s), communication, and public u t ilit ie s group. Union
contracts covered about fo u r-fifth s o f the nonoffice workers in
wholesale trade, three-fourths in services, and more than h alf
in r e ta il trade*

2

More than & sixth of the office workers in the Motor
City area were working under the provisions of union agreements 0
In manufacturing, three-fifths of the office workers were em­
ployed under provisions of collective-bargaining agreements*

Occupational Wage Structure
Detroit is generally recognized as an area with rela­
tively high factory wage rates* In December 1951, gross hourly
earnings (including pay for overtime and night work) for manu­
facturing plant workers in the area averaged $2*01, 29 cents
higher than reported in January 1950, the base period for the
Wags Stabilization Board1s "catch-up” wage-increase formula* A
substantial part of this increase can be attributed to formal
wage adjustments made during the 2-year period* Virtually all
plant workers employed in manufacturing establishments had re­
ceived one, or more, general wage increases between January 1950
and the time of the study* For nearly 90 percent of the workers,
the increases totaled between 20 and 30 cents an hour*
Plant
workers in nonmanufaoturing generally received smaller wage ad­
justments than those given to manufacturing plant workers*

Formal revisions of salaries for office workers were
less extensive than wage adjustments for plant workers* Office
workers in the larger manufacturing establishments frequently
were granted increases comparable to those given plant workers*
In other establishments, however, pay raises for office workers
were less than those for plant workers and in many instances
salaries of office workers were adjusted on an individual basis,
rather than by general increases*

Formalized rate structures for time-rated workers were
reported in establishments employing nearly all Detroit plant
workers* About two-thirds of all plant workers were employed in
establishments which had plans setting forth a single or flat
rate for each job classification* Among the industry groups
studied, single-rate plans were typical of manufacturing and
services* Wage progression plans, providing a range of rates for
each job, were more cannon in the retail trade and transporta­
tion and public utilities groups* Piece-rate or bonus-incentive
payment plans covered about 10 percent of the workers in durable
goods and more than 1$ percent in nondurable-goods manufacturing
plants* Incentive methods of wage payments were either nonex­
istent or relatively insignificant among the ncnmanufacturing
industries *




Virtually all formal wage plans reported for office
occupations provided a range of rates for each job* Very few
office workers were paid salaries based on single rate plans,
and mare than a fifth were in establishments that determined
salaries on an individual basis*
Minimum entrance rates for inexperienced plant workers
were & pert of the formalized wage structures of establishments
employing over 95 percent of the workers in the area* Nine out
of ten manufacturing plant workers were employed in establish­
ments having minimum hiring rates of more than $1*30 an hour*
In durable-goods manufacturing about 80 percent were employed
in firms with a minimum of $1*45 or more* Among nonmanufactur­
ing industries formalized minimum entrance rates were signifi­
cant!y lower*
Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing* In
all but 1 of 32 office classifications permitting comparison,
salaries of workers in manufacturing establishments were higher
than those in noamanufacturing* Average weekly salaries of office
jobs in the motor vehicles and equipment industry slightly ex­
ceeded those for manufacturing industries, and were substantially
higher than the averages for all industries combined* Average
hourly earnings for plant workers studied in all industries were
higher in manufacturing for 27 of 30 job categories for which
comparisons were possible*
About a third of the plant workers in the Detroit area
manufacturing plants were employed on late shifts in December
1951* Almost all these workers were paid shift differentials *
In the durable-goods industries second- and third-shift workers
were usually paid a percentage differential over day-shift
rates — typically $ and 7 ^ percent, respectively* In the nondurable-goods industries shift differential payments were most
commonly expressed in terms of cents per hour*
Reflecting the effects of material supply restrictions
cxi Detroit*s major manufacturing industries, 90 percent of the
plant workers in manufacturing industries were scheduled to
work 40 hours a week in December 1951® In nonmanufacturing in­
dustries, by contrast, about a third of the nonoffice workers
in public utilities, wholesale trade, and services had a work­
week of more than 40 hours* A 48-hour workweek was scheduled
for more than a third of the workers in retail trade* Office
workers in manufacturing and wholesale and retail trade estab­
lishments were generally scheduled to work 40 hours a week©
Shorter workweeks, however, were common for many office workers
in the public utilities, finance, and insurance, and services
divisions*

A:

3

Cross-industry Occupations
Q ^ice OccMfxatitmk

T a b l e A. • it

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y ho u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 1 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d o n a n a r e a
b a s i s i n D e t r o i t , Mic h . , b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , D e c e m b e r 1901)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING !STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A ver a g e

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
^$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 1*0.00 1*2.50 l*5.oo 1*7.50 5 o .o o 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .o o 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) $
3 2 .5 0 3 5 .o o 37*50 1*0.00
1*2.50 1*5.00 1*7.50 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 . 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .00. 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 . 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0

Bookkeepers! hand
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing •«»
Public utilities
Wholesale trade •
Retail trade ••••
.....
Finance
Services ••••••»»
Clerks, accounting
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods ,
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities
Wholesale trade •
Retail trade ....
Finance
.....
Services •<>••••••

12
*9

20B~

130

78

221
26
77
38
39

ia
1.306
952

806

11*6
351*

81
153
27
71

22

6h

Clerks, file, class B
Nonmanufacturing ,

I T

Clerks, general ,
Manufacturing 0,•.•.
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods ,
Nonmanufacturing ...
Wholesale trade .
.
Finance ** ......

869
177

2k0
86
36

Clerks, order ,
Manufacturing ••••••
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing •••
Wholesale trade

572
n

r

95

16
1*61
396

Clerks, payroll. .
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondxirable goods ,
Nonmanufacturing ...
Public utilities
Wholesale trade
Retail trade ••••

$

$

Sex, occupation, and industry division

J
8U.S0
8 6 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
8 3 .0 0
8 2 .5 0
8 2 .0 0
7 8 .5 0
8 0 .0 0
8 0 .5 0
9 5 .0 0

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.5
1*0.0
1*1.0
1*0.0
li0 .5
1*0.0
1*0.0
UOoO
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0. 0
1*0.5
1*0,0

*

$

$

20

-'

•
~

-

.
•
-

-

-

-

.
-

.
•
-

39*5
Uo,o

-

-

-

-

-

1*0.0
1*0.0

! 1*5.50
1 1*1.50

3
3

6
6

15
15

-

1*0*0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0,0
1*0.0
1*0.0
3 9 .5

1 7 1 .0 0
“ TEET
; 7 2 ,0 0
6 7 .5 0
7 0 .0 0
61*. 50
5 6 .0 0

-

•
«
•

•
•
•

-

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
3 9 .5
1*0,0
1*0.0

-

-

»

Office boys .....
Manufacturing
Durable goods •,•
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing

•
•
-

T—

33
19
19
-

-

1
.
1

1
*
3
1

-

-

.

3

.

17
«
17
8
9
-

30
i
1
.

19
8 !
2 !
6
11
1
*
2
;
2
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3
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1*0.0
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3 9 .5
3 7 .0

1*0.50
f 1*3.06
; l*UoOO
1*0.50
3 8 .0 0
3 6 .5 0
3 8 .0 0

21*

351
27
25
2
121*
1 *
*1
25

1*6
19
12

55

-

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102
91
73
18
11
2
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1
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57
36
32
1
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21
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76
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65
8
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126
109
100 ;
9
17
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99
93
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6
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105
100
91
9 !
5;
3 ;

132
115
97
18
17
6
5

115
107
107

7

26
17
10
7
9
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1

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11*

20
2
2
•
18
16

28
3
3
»

30
3
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1
27 i
8 j

1*6
12
12
31*
28

1*3 [

37

93
10

20
13
13

16
11
6

3
27
7
•

35
27
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3
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-

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3
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22
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21*

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205
190
173
17
15
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18
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7
27
15
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31*
18
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21
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1*2
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79
63

11*
11*
1*5
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69
51
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k
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35
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58
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1
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229
139
109
30
90
5
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92
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103

28
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75
72

.

12

3

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5:

,

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Transportation

**

Finance,

(excluding railroads),

insurance,




a n d r e a l es t a t e .

communication, a n d other public utilities,

1
*
1
*
-

13
9

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6

1____ 2 „
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j
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S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d of t a ble,

____2 2 1*7
1*0
7
1*5
8
11*

1*1
21
20
26
1
1
*

169
11*6
138
8
23
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'

2
2
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2
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21*
16
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155
136
118
18
19
8
9

10

?

and

over

1
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118
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58
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1
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21*
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59
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7
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37
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3
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51
33
26

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10

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26
11
15
11*
1
6
-

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31* i
55“
11
13 ;
10
9
1 ;

-

5
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27
9
11
.
6
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58
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27
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.

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18
6
1*7
1
21*
20

6
1

3
13
3
•

9 5 .0 0

_ Z 1 _ ____h£L ____1*5-____ 6 1

27
11*
8
6
13
6

1?
16

15
20
3
11
1
1
*
1

29
13
9

15
lo

13
r
i
«
12
11
1

,

37
10

7

•
-

|

-------

1
*
-

.
-*

h9

Services

3

2
•

-

1*7,50
5 0 .0 0
1*3.50

62
297
117

-

8
r

1
•
•
1
•
1

IiO.O
1*0,0
1*0.0

210

1
-

-

•

L
B
33
15

~77T~

10
2

13
-

1
•
-

569

^Plicatl^£rraachlne_ operators ..........
Manufacturing
Nonmanufacturing

ai.5

-

•

2

1*3.0
1*0.0

12

13
1
*

2
2
1
•

-

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0,0
1*1.0

-

9
2
1
1
7
1
5

k

21

307
23
69
25

-

20

7 6 .0 0
7 7 .5 0
7 8 .0 0
7 1 .5 0
6 8 .0 0
6 5 .0 0
7 0 .5 0
6 5 .0 0

399

JJO

-

3
11

-

11*
3
2
1
11
6
«

5
1
11*

«

20
-

-

7 5 .0 0
? 8 .o o
7 9 .0 0
7 2 .5 0
6 6 .0 0
6 6 ,0 0
6 8 .5 0
j 7 0 .5 0
5 9 .5 0
i 6 5 .5 0

71*. 00
7 9 .5 0
1 8 0 .5 0
7 3 .5 0
7 2 .5 0
7 3 .0 0

20
6

5
5
5

$

_

_

_

_

_

i_

_

_!

|

_

Occ u p a t i o n a l W a g e Survey, Detroit, Mich., D e c e m b e r 1951
U.S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
Bur e a u of Labor Statistics

_

_

_

u

Table A~l*

- 6onti$U4)6&

(Average straight-tiaae weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Detroit, Mich., by industry division, Deceafoer 1951}

See footnotes at end o f table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), comunication, and other public u t ilitie s .
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5

G c e m f u z iit m S , “ G z m t i m m d

Table a -i «

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Detroit, Mich., by industry division, December 1951)

NUMlil

Avbsage
Number
o
f
workers

Sex* occupation* and industry division

Under 3*2.50

Weekly
Weekly
hours
e r ings $
an
(Standard) (Standard) 32,50

S
OF WORKERS RECtdVING i TKAtGHT-TIME WEEf-: y
l

e a r n i n g s of—

$ .
$
3^.00 3^.50 1*0.00 &.50 16V 1*7.50 $>.00 ^2.50 ^5.00 57.50 I d oo &.50 fe.OQ l?.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 fe.OO 90.00 93.00
J0
.

35*00. 32*50, 1*0.00 IiSm L 1*5.00S

sq^ cl

and
over

60^ Q .62*50-65,-00 £l*50_ 70a00
Q-

51a5oj55..0Q_

W en - Continued
om
Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) .................................. *
Manufacturing ........................ .
Durable goods •••••••••••*••••«•••*•
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ................................... ..

2*783
1,785
1,653
132
998

Wholesale trade *••«•••••••••••••••*
Retail trade
.........

190
12
*9
61

1*0.0
1*0.0
1 *0
*0
1 *0
*0
39*5
39.0
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0

253

liQ.5

60

Calculating-machine operators
(other than Comptometer type) ................. ....
Manufacturing ............ .................... T- ■ .
%
Nonmanufacturing «•»••«•••*•••«••••••«•
Wholesale trade ......................
Retail trade .........................................
Clerics* accounting . . • . . a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing ...........
Durable goods *o*e*««««9e..a*.««...«
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing
Public u t ilit ie s *
*«.*
Wholesale trade «»*««*,»»•••«*«•«**««
Retail trade •
Finance
............................................
Services .........
Clerks* file * class A ».*•*««..... ......
Manufacturing..... .
Durable goods •«»«..
Nondurable goods «««»«•
Normanufacturing ............................... .
Wholesale trade ••«•*«*•««•*•««o««««
Finance ## .ea»»«ce«««,<>!»e«o,«.«4««<»
Services »**««••««•««.<**••••,?«*»*•**
Clerks* file * class B «« «« « * * «« « «« • .« «« « »*
Manufacturing «»<44«..
Durable goods
Nondurable goods © . 4 * . * . . * . 4 . « ® * . . . .
Nonmanufacturing *.• • • • ...«• • • • .. . . 4.®®
Public u t ilit ie s #
Wholesale trace
Retail trade ........... . e * 4«e .» .* e .< ».. «
Finance •* *««••«»«««•««*••««•«•.»««
*#
Clerks * general
Manufacturing
Durable goods ***#*««a«««««o*«a«i>«**
Nondurable goods «••*•••«»••«««*«««*
Nonmanufacturing •••••••«••••••••••••••
Wholesale trade
Finance ##
Services ............... ......................... .

170

830
r~ W ^

390
18
*
392
71
116
79

2*596
863

3kh
lWi

113
7*
11
1.3,161
l ,f 1

1,561

200
X,fcG0

j

16 ?

!
j

25?
16
*9
127

11

-

«
»

«

1

*
*
„

11
a

5
6

1

a
m

i

53.00
52.56
53.50
58.00
22.00
**
51*.5o

• __ J

2*0.0

hnh
hio

1*733
37*

1,9.00

51.50
50.50
1*8.50

1

1*0.0
1*1.5
130
**
1*0.0
1*0.0

ii5

138
56
12
2 1
*6 *5
9$5
682
283
1*680
316
380

519

a

56.00
59.00
59.00
51**oo
51*50

60*00

«
«
«
»

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
39*5
10.0
1*0.0
2*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
l*o®
5
10.0
1*0.0
39*5
1*0.0
2*0.0
2*0.0
39.5
38.5
2*0.0
2*1.0
39*5
39*5
1*0.0
1*0.0

39.5
39.0
1*0.0
1*1.0

39.0
39*5

6i.5o
56.50
5i.5o
53.oo
55«5o
1*8.50
1*7.50
55.50
52.50

3(£c x r

31
2
«

2
29
6
19
1
*

1 8 $0
*.

5

l

1

18

__5

1

18

«

«
»

93
3k
28

6
59
3

13
36
7

5

«

-

»

«

-

1
78

-

18

-

«

•
«
*

5
129
13
3
10
116

78
1

«
«

18

«

6

38
37
2
23

12
-

-

5
»

«

«

3

«
*

«
»

3

«

«

97
19
5
Hi

78
20
2
Ik

12
*
-

18

O
B

hk

60

180
1

23
10
130
56

63

56

3

3

60
- i

36
17

1*
16
8
1
7

m
m

121

»

6
8
28k
lol*

-

56
20
1?
16
282
2*
10
106

«
«

h

1*
2

*
«

138
25
?
31
63
12
51
7
1
6
11
**
1
32
8
206
8$
69

7

6
59
35
9
56

T

»

See footnotes at end o f table*
*
Transportation (excluding railroads)* communication* and other public u tilitie s ,
• * Finance* Insurance* and real estate*
a




35
1

50
10
1
27

k

$1*000

1*9.50
63.50

«

6k
Ik
6
8

«

55.50
«
60.00
1*8.00
23
5
«
5o.oo
1*7.00
5
1*2.50
18
5
1*0.50 165 2 1 308
9*
18
1 1 .5
** 0
20
h
1*6.00
10
3
h
«
1*2.00
10
15
38,50 161 276 288
6
32
39*^0 3/ 93
1
*3*50
7
37.00
S 31 32
38*00
6 * 1 * 182
1
19
«
63
56.50
5
5 ®oo
9
•
*
»
59.50

53.50
55.50

59
23
17
6
36

«

16

131
11
**
36
112

125

kk
32
«

12
*
138

33 — e*
33
33
«,
11

92
3

9k
8

58
27

52

*

3*
1
-

1 1 202
3*
59
9k
76
52
7 18
75 108
17
u*
33
15 kk
*
6
5
26
23
3

12
10

300
153
1*
17
6
1*
17
7

63
6?
10

209
m

129
12
68
1
*
21
2*
1
19

1 8 229
*6
222 193
208 186
H*
7
21
6 * 36
5

10
27
1
*

*

10
13

257
237
21
2*
13
20
d
2

7
1
*

216

195
169
26
21
7
1*
1

12
*
15

3 * 38
1
11 n
*
3
22
25
D*
l* — r
2* 19
1
i
9
7
«
«
7 22
7
2
•
3
212 170 356 20li ! 2 * 217 " " W l 60
16
20?
3F~
m
r~ 8 3
3T 109
w
18
58 , 80 : 65
90 62
23
52
12
21 36
!l*
51
H
* 18
53
180 335 2 * no 163 106 109
17
55
18 38
38
10
*
11 31
*
37
1
*
8 5 * 20
1
*
13 13 5 i: 36 6 *
*
1
82
18
n
6
23
59
17
9
30 63
H
* 20
6
16
35
2*
1
k
18
25
7 10 : 18
19
3
92
29
22
58
35 37 229 107
2 128
38
2?
19
5
7* 72
1
2
12?
26
32
17
69
5
7.
3
«
»
6
2j
1
1
3
3
30
20
20
2
35 101 33
31
0
5
1
I
2
10
25
1
^ !
20
22
18
1
*
15
?
«
1
9
9
5
2 1 115
6*
6
52
55
11
*
13
5
5
6
188 ~ W 38
16 10
*
*
13
108
10 26
*
6
52
37
l* 10
80
1; 6
H*
i
k
3
»
*
*
76
Hi
1
59
9
6
16
2
1
39
11
1
*
13
h
2
1
1

21
7

16

9

k

211
337
106

333

275

31
7*
1

8

250
229
21

88 j

71
17 !

3
2lf9
130
80
50

83

187 i

119

33
21

18 I

7

30
35 | 29

17 [ n
83
5i

«

*
-

-

25?

3k?

156

»

6*
1

Ha

ik i

H
*

125
22

33

110
20
3
18

127

171
5
9
35

12

192
177
15
155
22
2
15
18

Ha
11*0
i

15
8

1
3

10
*
39
37
2
1

10

1

»

10
7

Ik
Ik
lit

22
16
16
«

«

«

«

„
«
*

6

a
.

61

51
10
51
8

13
10
1
19
10
*
39
13
26
1
1
„

79

6

3

5

.

5
5

*

»

«

—
5Xj"

17
*
1
*
28
«

6
3
8

n
12
12
12

ia

m

3*
1
6
1
1

«»

»

C

*

58

17
*
11
**

29

3
n
1

„
»
-

«

1
*
1
*

6
6

*

«

58

8

k

_

2

6

»
*

2*
1
5

29
l

30
7
1
10
6
1
1

O
B

96
8
2
79
3
1*
1

2

1

2

B
O

.

*

„

«»
*

„
m

•

i$5

71

96

Ml
kl

72
55
55

30

17

»

»

305

O
B

m

*

O
B

50

8

6

2

23

1

m

la
3

8

m
B
O

•

28
20
20

38

„

3

O
B
B
»

8

«

2

9

16

3

1

6

22
2

1
*

30

„
O
B

«

2

*

<
»

-

56

»
-

2

2

5

6

w
w

6

8

1
1

3

„

6

173
117
in

•

17
23 "
5
18
5
5
12
12
»
5
2
7
35

«
•
m

-

.

M
i
O
,

.

112

„

»

3

«
•

2

-

312

258 157
1 1 155
9*
191 153
2
3
2
6*
1

1

®
2

2

10

«
,

*

19

10

-

-

„

6
-

-

6

O l(ic e O ccu pa iiand

Table A -l:

«

S im iim m d

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1 / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Detroit, Mich., by industry division, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
.
$
U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.5o I d 00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
Under 32.SO 35.00 37.50 bo. 00 b2.50 L5.oo ]
$
and
32.50 35.00 37.50 iiO O L2.50 U5.00 U7.50 1
.O
Q
50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 6S*.QL67.50 70.00 72.50 75*00 ftn-nn 6.5.Q 9Q.00 o5.nr> over
l

Women - Continued

605
320
167
153
285
Ui2
51
33

Clerks, order •••••••... ...... ......
Manufacturing
..... ...
Durable goods 9«....•••... ..••••••
Nondurable goods «••••••••••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing «•••»•••••••••••••••<>»
Wholesale trade
Retail trade
Clerks, payroll
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ••*•»••••«*••••••••
Nonmanufacturing
••••.»
Public utilities #
•••••••
Wholesale trade
......
Retail trade
Finance ** 0.
Services •••••••••••»...

U .O
O
uo.o
Uo.o
U .O
O
U
o„5
Uo.5
39.5
h$*$

192
133
115
18
59
30

Uo.o
U
b.b
U .O
O
Uo.o
U .O
O
U .O
O

Key—
Punch operators
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ............•
Durable goods « • • • • • • » • • • • • • ............
Nondurable goods «**«.•••*•»•••••»•»
Nonmanufacturing ••••«•«•••••••••••••••
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade
Retail trade .......... ....... .
Finance «*

773
iiis
389
ii9
335
81
26
50
1U
5

U .O
O
U0.0
uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.5
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5

Office girls
Manufacturing ............................
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing
Wholesale trade
......
Retail trade ......

387
158
80

39.5
U .O
O
Uo.o
39.5
39.5
Uo.o
U .O
O

Pnhl 1 n n t iT i t .ip .e

trade ........... .
Retail trade
Finance ** o*•••••••«••••••••••••••*
Services ........................................... .. ............... ..

Wholesale

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads),
**

Finance,

insurance,




a n d r e a l e s t ate.

•
»
-

1

-

78

229
22
Sh

3,318

1,577'

1,616
361
i ,3ia
67
293
1U
5
U
66
370

U .O
O
U .O
O
U .O
O
U .O
O
39.5
39.5
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5
39.0

communication,

17

~ w

10

U
--- T
-

7

2
2

-

-

-

7
h

5
2

2

-

-

11
— r
5
«
.
6

•
•
-

-

U6.00
TT73S..
U7.50
U8.00
U2.50
U2.00

1

*
-

.

.3

.5 0
55.56
56.00
5o.5o
5o.5o
53.oo
57.50
U7.50
50.50

U0.50
U3.00
U7.50
38.00
39.00
39.00
37.00

16
5
5
11

1

U .O 59.00
O
l.m
1,026 “W “ "ECW
U .O 62.00
O
859
U .O 56.50
O
167
U .O 5U.50
O
395
U .O 53.00
O
67
101
U .O 58.00
O
113
Uo.5 53.50
U
2 Uo.5 5i.oo
72
Uo.5 55.00

Duplicating-machine operators ••••••••••••
Manufacturing
Durable goods ............... ...
Nondurable goods ............... !
Nonmanufacturing
^
Finance -»-«■

Secretaries.... .......... .... .
Manufacturing
Durable goods
••••••
Nondurbale goods »•••••••...
Nonmanufacturing •

1

52.50
53.00
55.50
50.50
51.50
53.50
U5.00
hi. 50

-

-

1
6

»

-

•

-

-

6

-

-

-

5

5

•

1
U
-

18

5
1
l

21

m

u

32
7
2
25

1*

»

U

17

•

.

1

_

3
1U

53
21
1
20
32
6
16

78
26

50
10
l
9
U
o
6
10

9
•

!
1
i
1
1
67.50 1
TT.W'
71.00
69.50
63.00
7U.50
63.00
6U.00
62.00
62.50

9
:
2
*
-

-

.
•
-

«
-

26
52
3
18

22

9

3
18
10

5

l
15
88
22
9
13
66
1
3

101

9 ~ w
6
1

8
13
6
3
2

U
2 51
18"~ w
6
17
12
7
2U 27
1
1U
3
10
13
9
1
30
12

„

'
|

-'

9
2

13
6 — ir
6
10
2
7
6
5
5

m
6
m
6

65
52
2
50
13

18
77
55
2
2

31
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12
12
7
«

3

66
36
9
21
36
23
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-

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1

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6
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168 250 282 33U 379 299 268
^ r T2T 131 ~5B" 200' ~ m r
35 i l l 100 1U 15U 212 179
9
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116 123 151 119 179 5 5
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30
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a n d o t h e r p u b l i c utilities,

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•dee O cctefb a ttim i - G a n tU u ie d

T a b l e A-lj

(Average s tr a ig h t-t im e w eekly hours and e a rn in g s 1 / f o r s e le c t e d occ u p a tio n s s tu d ie d on an area
b a s is i n D e t r o it , it fo h ., by in d u s tr y d i v i s i o n , December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS R E C E ivm a s'TT? AIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS O F -

N m er
u b
o
f
w rk rs
o e

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
s
j$
i
$
$
$
$
$
!$
a
s
a
>
W
eekly Under 32.50 35.00 37.50 U
W ly
eek
0.00 U2.50 U5.00 U7.50 50.00 52.50 55.oo 57.50 60,00 62.50165.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00
ea in s
rn g
hu
o rs
and
(S n a ) (S n a ) $
ta d rd ta d rd
32.50
37.?o U
0.00 12.50 U5.00 U7,50 50*00 52,5o 55.00 57,50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72*50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over
(

Wanen - Continued
Stenographers, general •••«•.*•••••••••••
Manufacturing
Durable goods o.«»«<>.
Nondurable goods
Notsnanufaoturing .......................... . . .........
Public u tilitie s « ••••••«.••••••••
Wholesale trade •<>.....•••.......... . . .
Retail trade ••••••••••••••••••••••
Finance ** .................................... ..
Services ...........................................
Stenographers, technical

Uo.o
U0.5
Uo.o
Uo.o
UO.O
39.5
UO.O
liOoO
39.5
UO.O
39.5
39.5
38.0

61.00
56.00
52.00
57.00
5U.50
U9.50
U9.00
50.50
66.00
66.00
62.00

929
5W

Nonznanufacturing
Finance * * ...............

1*0.5
Uo.o
1*0.0
1*0.0
u .0
1*0.0
i*0.0
1*0,5
1*1.0
1*2.0

51.50
58.00
58.50
56.00
U7.00
55.50
51.50
U5.50
U6.50
U5.00

1*0.0
1*6.0
1*0.0
Uo.o
1*0.5
1*0.0
1*0.5
39.5
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*6.6
1*0.0
uo.o
39.5
Uo.o
39.5

51.50
5U.oo
5U.50
53.00

Switchboard operators . . . ...............
Manufacturing
Durable goods ..........................
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing . . . ............•

329
66
>3U
U
U
52
139
125
17U

Wholesale trade ••••.••••••••••••••
Retail trade ........................ .
Finance «* .......................................... ••
Services
Switchboard operator-receptionists •••••«
Manufacturing .......................... ..............
Durable goods ................ ................... ..
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••«
Public u t ilitie s * ,•••••••••••••••
Wholesale trade ••«•••••••••••••••«
Retail trade . . 00 .
.
Finance **
Services ••••••••••••••.................

911
—

W~

226
92
593
29
253
70
122
119
319

M
anui1
actur i n g ......................
Durable goods
.......... . . . .
Nondurable goods
o ...o
Noraoanufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••*

113

80
33
206
17
113

tradfi ttttttttMrttttttt it t t i
Finance ** ••••••••••••••••••••••••

Transcribing-machine operators, general .»
Manufacturing .............................. ........... ..
Durable goods .....................................
Nondurable g o o d s............... ...............
Nonmanufacturing .....................................
Whole sale trade •••.••...........
Finance ** ...........................................

U53
111
103
11
339

79

138

.

C O

}£
,

C

2,717 .
2,536
181
l,lU l
125
. .236
O

Typists, class A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing .
.
.
. .
Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nondurable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing........... ..........................
Public u t ilitie s *
Wholesale trade .
.
. . .
. .
Finance .* .............................
*
S e r v ic e s............................................

$
57.50

6,157
37951
3,536
U55
2,166
272
512
219
576
587
389
153
52

.

.

.
661

63

66.50

Uo.o
uo.o.
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5
. 39.5
. Uo.o
.
.
39.5
39.0

-

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2U
.
2U

11
1
1
10
.
1

3
-

-

9
-

15
-

30
*
-

1

U8.50
U8.00
53.50
63.60
6U.50
58.50
U8.50
U8.50
U .00
U

u

50.00

_

-

-

«

11
13
57

-

3

2

2

13

U
U

U8
7
7

U
9
1
1

30
5
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37

U6

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23

8

61

-

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121
.
9
3
6
112

161

230
52 .
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3
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178
1
20
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25

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23

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61

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97

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207
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91
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ft
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Ul
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71
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58
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102
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g.

W

21

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139
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157 1U6
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323
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297
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162

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738
6U
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lU
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115
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1*
109
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399
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53
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U82 ; 26
U 226
— zsr| Z o T
361
212
182
12
18
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U
O
103
25
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2U
25
12
1
2
3
10
10

706
620
589
31
86
2
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Ul
3
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1+8
13
2

12
29
------- 5
6
3
.
1
6
25

17

11

183 332
. - 125
61 106
118
- . 11
U8
35

5

Ul
13
6
7
28

1

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30

22

5

31

1U

la

3

U9.00

1
18

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20
71
_
26
21
8
16

5

29

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2
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10
7
3
6
1
3

uu

19

2U

-

128
57
U
U
13
71
6
Ul

U
7
1
1

1U

1
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1

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90
20
20
.
70
1
U8

«

12
2
10

2o

26

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68
71
39 —
U
2
27
12
3
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29
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10
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9

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15

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8
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U68
33
167
19
32
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63
37
ft
7
7

3
12
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1
13

-

-

U2
U
33
172
29
16
2
60
la

1

-

-

220
58
169
2U
7U
lU
29
28
1

1

2

.

668
501

60
3U2
25
1U
U

33
U
20

13 i
30 i
16
1U
2 ------- -------T

6U7

262
59
575
U5

<

10
16
20

3
9
T

8
96 UU7
321 2tb

106
25
3
22
81
15
2U

89
36
29
7
53
U

7§
15
13
2
63
•
6
10
8

30
1
1

See footnotes &t end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), coMemnleation, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




97
18
10
8
79
6
6
30
21
16

U
1
3

26

-

60
85
21 — T
U
19
2
1
6U
55
1
2
1
9
8
35
5
15
12
31

h

29
1
11 j

1

30

-

108
20

1
5
85

65
11
5
6j
5U
_

5

30

15
1
1U

-

55.00
.
57/50
57.50
56.50
.
56.50
. .
53.50
.
U
6.00
53.50

uu
18
1
2U

3
•
3
-

•

95
17
17
78
2
1
22
26
27

.

8
U
18
-

6
6
2

57.00
57.00
55.00
U7.50
5U.50
U5.50

1U
*

.
30

.
-

51.50

*
-

30

u

-

U9.00
5i.oo

. .

1

261
290
U8 ” I5F
29
8
9
U3
19
158
213
20
17
29
67
Ul
20
88
32
38
19
„
2
_
2
2
-

91

25
17
8
139
5
5
26
5U
U9
.
-

U
Uo
6
5
26
3

lU
.
«
•

239
U
8
5
U3
191
10
U
U
30
97
10
2
2
2

16U

?°

10
6

5
5
15
.
-

U
U
-

•
-

50.00

39.5
uo.o
Uo.o
Uo.o
39.5
Uo.o
39.0

20

9
9
1
8
-

-

-

20
.
20
18
2

16

8
2.
1
1
6

.
.

6
.

.

.

.
_

_

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. .

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16

6

_

.

.

.

-

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6

6

6

•

-

10

*

-

“

-

-

_

8

Table a ~ i j

Office 0ccwp&li&*t4> - Oc&ditmcd

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings 1 / fo r selected occupations studied on an ares
basis in D etroit, Mich., by industry division , December 1951)

1/
2/
3/

¥
**

Hours r e fle c t the workweek for which employees receive th eir regular straight-tim e salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours,
A ll workers at $30 and upder 32.50*
Workers were distributed as follow s: 1 at $27*50 and under 30j $1 at $30 - 32.50.
*2
Transportation (excluding ra ilroa d s), communication, and other public u t i l it i e s ,
Finance, insurance, and peal estate.
Tabi© A -ia i

Office OccMpailamd - Maim VsAidM a*zd Motm-Vehicle S^uipmeni if
(Average s tr a ig h t-tim e weekly hours and earnings 2 / f o r s e le c te d occupations
in the D e tr o it M etropolitan A rea,“ December 1951)

HUM BER OF WORKERS RE CE IV ING ST R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E AR NING S O F -

Occupation and sex

o
f

$ .
!
.0 c 5
o
Weekly Under 37.50 2*0,00 kS.5o &.oo U?.5o 5 *
0
.*2 . o ^5.oo ^7,50 60.00 62.50 65,00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80,00 $5*o q 90.00 95.00 100.00 1
05
0
Weekly
erig $
anns
hoars
and
(tn
S a dard) ( t n
S a dard)
37*50 Uo.oo 1*2.50 US.oo 1*7.50 *0,00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60,00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75*00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100,001
0 over . 0
5
.$

i
s

M
en
Bookkeepers, hand.............................
Clerks, accounting........... ........................
Clerks, payroll ......................... .
Duplicating-machine operators......... .
Office boys ................................

1*
12

uo.o
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0

$
89.00
80,00
79.50
51.00
U5.50

8*
1
U*
232
5U

1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0,0
1*0.0

59,00
81,50
6U.00
56,00

1,33U
35U
261
10
*
U92

1*0.0
UO.O
1*0.0
39.5
1*0.0
Uo.o
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
llO.O
Uo.o
U0.0
Uo.o
uo.o

60.50
65.00
1*8.00
60.00
65.5o
50.50
58.00
72.50
62.50
60.00
55.00
63.00
59.00
58,00
U8.00

80
628
23U
2U

-

»

«
•

13

5

u

-

«
"

«
-

1U
15
*
»
«
1
»
«
3
*

6

>
»
«
l

lU

-

-

2
6
hi

2

U

9

21

Ul

1

3

2
32
5

1
11

«

7

20

2

x
~

"

*

“

*

9

10
27
5

ii
«
27
U

2U
27
8

11
5
30
-

13
Uo
2

U5
3

8
2

8U
13
25

177
21
26

160
36

152
38

U5
9
51
19
37U
35
7
5
10
Ui?
58

136
U2
6
1
U9
1
36

189
35

8
3
7
5
133
22
9
h
U

205
36
10
10
83
2
U2
65
U23
U8
10

1
UU
23
90
305
11
6

»

»
1

hht

n

n

»

3
2

1
U
1

10
107
26

10

15

U7
30

39
1

6
U

-

l

1

”

*
■

*
*

5
-

-

2
-

-

•
5

2

-;

-

-

11

l

-

-

3

113
7

102
-

19

-

-

-

-

-

2
«

«
-

-

1
-

1
-

-

“

lU
1U8

11
98

68

37

*
*

*
*

*
*

»
U

1
6

3

1
2

3U
28

lU
36

16
21

•
12

1
U5

2
U6

61

1
33

1
15U
168
1
2
3
2

105
161
.
1
-

2
101
103
1
1
2
2

131
133
-

»
*

«

U

66
26

7

Women
B illers, machine, billin g machine . . . . . .
Bookkeepers, hand ......................... . . . . . . .
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class A •
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B .
Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type)
Clerks, accounting ............
Clerks, f i l e , class B
Clerks, o r d e r ................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clerks, payroll . . ...........................
Duplicating-machino operators . . . . . . . . . .
Key-punch operators .... ..........
S ecretaries....................... •......................
Stenographers, general .........
Switchboard operators « . . . ..............
Switchboard operator-receptionists ••>«••
Tabulating-machine operators
Transcriblng-machine operators, general
Typists, class A •
Typists, class B 9.
.........

U8

2i*U
1,0*1
2,636
231
72
U7
58
2,1*6
602

1U
.
.
»
«

*
»

13

26

18
«
2
3
1
7
«
»
1
35

5
-

5
-

1

U

3
3

15
l
27
1

26
15
52
»
7
12
8
13
2
11
1
1
13
12U

U3
5
3U
3
7
6
8
»
U2
3
3
1
1
35
109

U
U
11
-

u
1
6
1
1
3
87

i
»
6
13
63
8
30
l

U
U
U
2
93
2
10
2
3
59
67

1
-

u

U

559
55

U

U
7
39
3
50
21
355
30
2

U

U

15
U
331 1 3U1
21
5

318

312
75
5
6
11
256
1

8

U
123
1

3

13
"!

U

-

3
«
D

"

u

«

-

-

-

-

‘

‘

The study covered establishm ents w ith more than 100 workers p rim a r ily engaged in producing motor v e h ic le s and m o to r-ve h icle equipment (Group 3 ? l ) » automobile stampings (Group 3U62), automotive hard­
ware (p a rt o f Group 3U29), c a rb u r e to r s , p is t o n s , and p is to n rin gs (p a rt o f Group 3 599), and e l e c t r i c a l equipment f o r automotive use (p a rt o f Group 361*1). The in d u stry group codes r e f e r t o Standard Indus­
t r i a l C la s s ific a t io n Manual (19U5 e d it io n ) prepared by the Bureau o f the Budget.
2f Hours r e f l e c t the workweek f o r which employees re c e iv e t h e ir reg u la r s tr a ig h t-tim e s a la r ie s and the earnings correspond t o these weekly h ou rs0




O c c u p a t i o n a l W a g e S u r vey, D e t r o i t , Mich., D e c e m b e r 1 951
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
B u r e a u o f L a b o r St a t i s t i c s

0

9

Table A-lb*

Oj^ioe QcGMfH*ti04€& “ MotoA-VlUicU P t d G4td /JpoMO^iml
al.

l/

(Average straight-tine weekly hours and earnings 2/ for selected occupations
in the Detroit Metropolitan Area, December 1951)

See footnotes at end o f table.
210367 0 — 52 ------ 2




Occupational Yage Survey, Detroit, Mich., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10

Table A-lbs

0^lC€- 0C 44fU H - Mot&l-fyeJucle. Po/ltd. Q4ut ^C ^ 4 f^ t4
C *ti& A
V4< /

l/ •

Qo4ttiMM&Jt

(Average straigh t - t i m e w e e k l y h ours and earnings 2/ for s e lected o ccupatio n s
in the Det r o i t M e t r o p o l i t a n Area, D e c e m b e r 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

Occupation, sex, and size of establishment

Number
of
workers

$
i$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 bO.00 h 2 .5 0 b 5.oo b 7 .5 0 50.00 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 80.00 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 95 . 0c 1 0 0 .0 0

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$

$

%

and
under

$

and
15.00 1 7 .5 0 ho . 00 li?. 50 1,5.00 1 7.50 5 0 .0 0 5 2 .5 0 5 5 .0 0 5 7 .5 0 60.00 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100 . oc
,

over

Women - Continued
$

Clerks, order...... ..........
Establishments with 1,001 or more
workers ....... ..........

31

3 9 .5

5 6 .5 0

23

3 9 .5

5 6 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

1

Clerks, payroll .....................

87

b o .o

6 3 .5 0

-

-

_

_

_

2

3

1

b

b

7

10

-

3

1

2

3

2

10

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

6

3

1

9

9

15

11

1

5

6

5

5

1

-

-

3

8

10

10

1

5

-

-

-

-

5

1

-

-

6

5

5

1

1

-

2

-

-

-

-

1

1

Establishments with 101 - 1,000

workers .................
Establishments with 1,001 or more
workers .............. ....

57

bO.O

60.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

5

1

1

8

30

bO.O

68.50

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

2

-

1

1

2b

bO.O

b 8 .5 0

-

-

-

1

3

3

8

-

-

1

6

2

12

b o .o

50.00

-

-

-

1

-

2

3

-

-

-

6

63

bO.O

5 5 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

8

7

b

2

2

7

9

18

3

51

b o .o

5 b .00

-

-

-

-

-

8

7

b

2

2

1

9

lb

3

1

-

-

-

-

-

b o .o

7 0 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

3

15

13

15

17

16

52

50

27

20

6

13b

b o .o

69.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

8

6

7

13

12

bo

25

5

8

b

1

111

b o .o

7 2 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

7

7

8

b

b

12

25

22

12

2

b o .o

5 7 .0 0

_

-

30b

_

3

7

k

8

26

2b

b7

30

63

21

2b

13

3

2

-

155

b o.o

5 6 .5 0

2

25

17

b8

5

b

7

1

-

150

b o .o

5 7 .5 0

-

22

13

15

16

20

6

2

2

Switchboard operators

n

3 9 .5

6 0 .5 0

1

b

3

.

1

-

Switchboard operator-receptionists
Establishments with 101 - 1,000
workers
Establishments with 1,001 or more
workers.....

69

b o.o

51

b o .o

18

b o .o

Tabulating-machine operators

16

Transcribing-machine operators, general

17
202

workers ....... ..........
Establishments with 1,001 or more
workers ........... ......
Typists, class B ,
Establishments with 101 - 1,006
workers ........ .... ....
.establishments with 1,001 or more
workers............. ....

Duplicating-machine operators ...
Establishments with 101 - 1,000
workers ................
Key-punch operators ............
Establishments with 1,001 o r more
workers ..................................................

Secretaries

2b5

\

Stenographers, general

Establishments with 101 - 1,000
workers ..................
Establishments with 1,001 or more
workers ..................

!

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

b

2

-

2

2

b

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

Establishm ents with lO l - l ,0 0 o

workers ................. .
Establishments with 1,001 or more
workers ....... .........

3
-

;

!

-

-

3

3

-

13

15

12

_

_

b

b

6

17

11

12

_

_

-

1

-

1

_

_

-

5U.50

_

_

_

_

.

6

11

3

9

9

7

2

10

5

5

2

-

-

_

_

-

_

53 .o o

-

-

-

-

-

b

11

3

9

7

3

1

7

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 9 .0 0

-

_

-

-

-

2

b

1

3

2

2

2

-

.

1

2

b

2

3

.

_

2

2

_

-

-

-

-

5 7 .5 0

_

2

b o .o

_

-

-

-

-

- 1 -

-

b o .o

5 5 .5 0

-

-

-

-

1

1

1

2

3

3

1

1

3

1

b o.o

5 8 .5 0

- ■ -

-

-

1

3

2

b

25

22

22

13

76

18

9

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

106

b o .o

5 9 .0 0

-

-

-

1

3

2

2

10

9

2

7

59

3

3

5

-

-

-

-

• 1 -

-

96

b o.o

5 8 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

15

13

20

6

17

15

6

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

312

b o .o

b 7 .0 0

-

5

8

22

20

b7

73

k
S

27

Ik

bO

9

1

-

1

-

-

_

-

-

-

.

-

5

7

b

9

13

bo

6

6

36

1

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

1

18

11

3k

33

21

8

b

8

“

~

-

-

1

Typists, class A
Establishments with

I,UUU---

133

b o .o

b a.oo

-

179

b o .o

b 6 .5 0

“

-

-

k
la

-

“

-

-

“

“

1 / Includes a ll establishments grouped in motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment (see footnote to table A-la) other than operations of Ford, Chrysler, General Motors, Hudson, Packard, Briggs, and
Murray; this definition was agreed upon in consultation with the W
age Stabilization Board, Region VT-B.
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Table A-2:

U

Pto^eAAd&Hai and ^JecJuuoal OooupxUio*U

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings l / for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in D etroit, Mich., by industry d ivisio n , December 1951)

N UM BER OF WORKERS R E CEIVING ST R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E AR NING S OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours
(Standard)

Weekly
earnings
(Standard)

is. 00

$
$ _
$
17.50 Io.oo & . 5 0 & .0 0 $7.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 10.00 §5.oo 90.00 95.00 100 .0c 105.00 10.00 115.00 io .o o

hs .oc 130,00
and
50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00
62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72,50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 IOOjO io5.oc 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.0C 130 .0C over
O
Under Io.oo 12.50

$

Men

$
Draftsmen, chief ••••••••..... .........

Draftsmen e.......... ..................
Manufacturing •••«••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods •••••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable g o o d s ..... ..... ••••••
Nonmanufacturing

Pub'll f* nl.IH+.'lfts 4
Services »••••..................... ................

Draftsmen, junior ••••••••••........................
Manufacturing
Durable goods .................. .

179
1
33.
1*8
2,121*
1,576
1,1*83
93
51*8

76
1*21
873

— 729~

1*0.0

129.00

1*0.0

x

129.00

1*0.0
98.50
1 0 .0
*
161.501
102.00
1 0.0
*
1 0 .0 : 97.00
*
1 0 .0 ' 90.00
*
1*0.0
81.00
1*0.0
91.00

1 0.0
*
72.50
£ 0 .0 ■ ■75;50-

Jfnprftifahla gnnH t t t t m t t t t m t i t i
s

682
17
*

UO.O
1*0,0

76.00
69.OO

Tracers .••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Manufacturing ........ ......

189
170

1 0 .0
*

63.50
65.00

518

1*0.0
68.50
W . 0 — tutr
69.00
1*0,0
1*0.0
61*.50
39.O
66.50
69.00
38.5

1*0.0

12

3

fiO.TT" 1?h,50
_
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

_
--- 1
r
.
—
1

1
l*

’

-

h

u

13
10
10

50
22
11
*
1
*
1 * — ET ------ Xi T
1
12
1
9
l*
i

-

5
r —
1
1
*

60
33
26

52
5o
1*0

1*0

5

12
11

17
15

2

17
1*
1

19
9

7

11

7

6

9
r
i
*

%*
35

10

7

23
21

l*

7 ------ IT

H
*
11
8
3
3
1
2

122
----8"
8
.
Ill*
2
111

6

28
11
8
3
17
16
1

108

198

~~W

9*
1
85
9
101*
10
91*

5*
1
9
15
*

23

19

81
?
79 — 5T
76
29

75
7U
69

5

60
60
5*
1
6

13
13

13
13

32
32

67

_
57 _ 2 1
56
25

19
19

5

17
17
-M

c
p

■
ja

19

1-7
J0
“

“

17

83

A
l*
0
J

C
O
37
oj.
<ct
f*
160
118 ‘
118
_
12
*

265
1
*
1*
7

282
270
262
8
12

13

36

11

2*
1

12

79
79
75

11
11
10

10
10
10

k

1*
2

m

1
*
1
*

1*
1
1*
1

.

_
.

•
»
_
.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
7

-

.

.
•

.
-

_
.

_

.

•
_

2W

15

6
6

6

23

20

98
16
31

191*
191*
191*

3

316

11*5

— IT

0

x

239
17u
170
1
*
65

95

ii*5
8
12

112
100
8*
1
16
12

86
78
8
9

86
62
59
3
2*
1

39
36
35
1
3

12

9

2*
1

3

165

153

12
*

_
•

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) ........
Manufacturing •••••••..............................
Durable g o o d s .............. •••••••••••••
Nondurable g o o d s ..............................
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

P 1r nt/f 11 hi ar
iihl .
l/
*

4
*

1*58
37
23
lt
i

6
9

n
- ------ w
5
1
*

18

2
1

2
2

38

17

- ------ T
.
9
-

38
35
3

H
*
3
1
1

2

108
168

99
9

76

U
7

72
63

1*1
1*0
1
6
6

9

66
63
3
1

11
**
12
*
2
1

53
3
l

m 1
____

__

25

3
3

3
3

1

Hours r e fle c t the workweek fo r which employees receive th eir regular straight-tim e salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Transportation (excluding ra ilroa d s), communication, and other public u t i l it i e s .

*0elucle& and M ot&im
f
0'elude £Kjpup*9te4tt 1/

G4td tec h n ic a l Occ&p&iiGHd -

Table A-2aj

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2 / fo r selected occupations
in the Detroit Metropolitan Area, December 1951)

Average

Occupation and sex

Number
of

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$

s

s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly Under 6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 .O -105 £ 0 1 1 0 .0 (1 1 1 5 .O 120 £ 0 125 £C 130.0(1135.odl4Q.OC 1
C
Weekly
C
145. 0c 150. 0 c 155.00
earnings $
hours
(Standard) (Standard)
$

$

6 0 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 300.00 105.00 110.00115.0(^120 .00 125.00 130.00 1 3 5 .00jl4 0.00 jl45.00 150 jO 155.00 1 6 0 .0 0
C
|

1

Men

$

55

4 0 .0

749

4 0 .0

300

51

2

1 3 2 .0 0

4
i

1 0 7 .5 0

_

1

4 0.0

7 8 .0 0

26

4 0 .0

6 7 .5 0

2 /1 5

28 i

64

98

78

78

40

71

61

3

4

4

15

3

_

1

1

2

6

22

11

7

20

17

3

2

_

12 '

7

__

|

j

1

10

3

3

10

___ 3

34

47

15

17

14

_

5

!

_

1

1

4 , 7

- ;

81

1

66

60

-

i. . |

52

!
j

U

1

_

_ _____ _______7 __ i:____-__ i____r —

-

-

i

M sen.
2

Nurses, industrial (registered) .......

j

:

331

40 .0

6 9 .0 0

8

22

90

40

37

78

43

9

4

!

-

;

-

I
.

_
—

■
_— .

;
1
:
. 1
------------ 1

i

-

j

-

_

_

1

-

-

-

!

-

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 100 workers primarily engaged in producing motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment (Group 371), automobile stampings (Group 31*62), automotive hard­
ware (part of Group 31*29), carburetors, pistons, and piston rings (part of Group 3599), and electrical equipment for automotive use (part of Group 361*1). The industry group codes refer to Standard Indus­
trial Classification Manual (191*5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
3/ Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $1*2.50 and under 1*5} 1 at $1*5 - 1*7.50; 1 at $1*7.50 - 50; 1 at $50 - 52.50; 2 at $52.50 - 55; 2 at $55 - 57.50; 1 at $57.50 - 60.
*
*




Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Mich., Decenber 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

12
Table A-2b*

Piajfed&UMuzl and *7ecJut4&al 0ccupatio*t4. - MotM-V*luoU Path and r c m 4 * * 1/
fcAodd
(Average strai g h t - t i m e w e e k l y hours a n d e a rnings 2 / f o r selected o c c u p ations
in the D e t r o i t M e t r o p o l i t a n A r e a , De c e m b e r 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$

.

$

$

$

$

$

$

s

8

$

® -

$

^7.50 lo .o o &.50 15.00 57.50 lo .o o 12.50

70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100 .a 105.0C110.00 1154)0 120.00 1254X2 1304M 135.00

47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00

18

Num
ber
of
w
orkers

Is,

Occupation, sex, and size of establishment

00
. C 25.00 1 C 0 1 5 0 over
*.0 O.O
75.00 30.00 85T 00.00 9 5 0 L O O 1054 x2n o io lisT o o 120 0 1
3LC 3.0

Weekly Under
W
eekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) *

and

Men
$

22

40.0
40.0

4

40.0 115.00

6
6

“

~

“

1

1

4

12

/
___it__

1

_.

12

4

1

-

_

_

-

-

_

113.50

12

_

114.50

10

Draftsmen, chief .... .... .
Establishments with 101 - 1,060

_

2

—

/

/
------ ft-

Establishments with 1,001 or more

Establishments with 101 - 1,000
workers .......................................... . ........... . •• •
Establishments with 1,001 or more
workers ...»......... .

40.0

93.50

_

-

-

.

86

40.0

92.50

-

-

-

-

-

105

40.0

103.50

-

-

-

-

-

91

40.0

70.50

_

1

12

1

3

36

40.0

63.00

-

-

10

-

-

1

40.0

75.00

1

2

1

8

22

Draftsmen, junior .......................................................
Establishments with 101 - 1,000
workers ..................................................................
Establishments with 1,001 or more

191

5
5

Draftsmen........ ...............
Establishments with 101 - 1,000
workers .................................... ..............................
Establishments with 1,001 or more
workers ...................................................................

40.0

53.00

2

1

4

2

11

40.0

54.50

1

1

4

11

40.0

61.50

1

-

-

88

40.0

68.50

_

_

3

-

39

40.0

63.00

_

-

3

-

49

40.0

68.50

“

“

“

2

“■

"
_

1

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

3

7

9

7

1

13

2

-

8

2

3

3

2

-

2

-

~

2

1

3

_

2

13

15

23

17

8

5

-

7

6

8

7

2

4

2

2

6

9

15

10

6

1

-

7
t

2

-

4

L

X

2

4

1

_

2

1

4

17

6

8

2

1

1

-

4

4

7

2

6

_

5

_

_

_

-

1

-

-

-

-

4

-

15

23

39

20

30

4

18

9

19

27

7

20

1

2

6

9

12

13

10

3

16

3

6

2

8

_

-

-

-

_

8

-

-

3

7

-

-

-

_

_

_

--------- H

-

-

2

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

„

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Women
Nurses, industrial (registered) ........
Establishments with 101 - 1,000
workers ..... ...... ..........
Establishments with 1,001 or more
workers ......... .

-

“

-

1 / Includes all establishments grouped in motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment (see footnote to table A-la) other than operations of Ford, Chrysler, General Motors, Hudson, Packard, Briggs, and
Murray; this definition was agreed upon in consultation with the W
age Stabilization Board, Region VI-B.
2 / Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

M(UntoHOHCe O0td PoUtek P lant OcCUpcUuUpl

Table A-3:

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for m in selected occupations studied on an area
en
basis in Detroit, Mich., by industry division, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Num
ber
of
w
orkers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
Average Under $
$
$ , $
hourly
1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0
earnings $
and
1 .3 5
1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 ,6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 over

_

_

-

1
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

10
3
2
1

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

7

%

Carpenters, maintenance
Manufacturing
Durable goods .......
Nondurable goods ..
Nonmanufacturing .......
Public u tilitie s *
Retail trade .........
Finance ** .............
Services ................

1 ,1 8 0
1 ,0 2 9
851
178
151

36
44
57
12

2 .0 8
2 .0 7
2 .0 4
2 ,2 0
1 .9 8
2.4L
2 .1 6

2.39

S e e fo o t n o t e s at end o f table.
*
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (excluding railroads), communication, a n d o t her p u b l i c utilities.
**

Finance, i nsurance, and real estate.




-

36

16
16
20
2

3
7

15

16
13

9
4
3
2
1

34

34
23
11
-

77
64
52
12
13
11

210
197
139
58
13
11

76
-

2

2

2

-

-

1

79
%

3
-

105
93
50
43
12
12
-

345
338
327
11

7

138
137
135
2
1

42
35
35
-

2
1
1
-

7

1

2
2
2
-

_
_
_

30
30

22
10
«

10
_

10
12

20

9

18

3

2

6
1

1

—

1

6

1

“

**

30
“

_
_ _

10
10

_
-

_

20

_

_
~

Occupational W Survey, Detroit, Mich., December 1951
age
U.S. D P R M N O L B R
EAT E T F AO
Bureau of labor Statistics

Table

A-3:

M G4*lteWG#i&® (M ut

p lo w i 0&G64f2&t4&M&

•

Q f^ tiM U eA

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for m in selected occupations studied on an area
en
basis in Detroit, Mich., by industry division, December 1 9 51 )

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Electricians, maintenance
Manufacturing ........
Durable goods •••••
Nondurable goods ••
Nonmanufacturing .....
Public utilities *
Retail trade ••••••
Finance «* ••••«•••
Engineers, stationary .
Manufacturing ......
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Public utilities
Wh olesale trade •
Retail trade ••••
Finance ** ••••••
Services ••••••••

Number
o
f
workers

E,l$E

3,991
3,672
319
163
83
20
39

$
$
Average
$
$
ho ly Jnder £.3$ £.E0 £.U5 L.$0 f.S5 £.60 £.6$ 1.70 L.T5 £.80 £.8$ 1.90 £.95 1.00 1.05
ur
ea n n s ,
rig
\
L.3$
UlO
L.$0 u $ $ L.6C L.6$ L.70 1.7$ L.80 1.8$ 1.90 i*?5 2.00 2.0$ 2.10
i
„
E8
2.16
15
31 113 E17 1E8 2E1
5
5
3
7
~
«
2.16
32
11
30
96 378 T 0 T
•
2.16
E
5
3
83 328 138 210
26
30
8
$0
6
2.1E
27
7
16
1
E
23
2.03
3 ' 7
39
E
$
5
1
.
1
6
1.96
22
E
3
E
5
3
3 i 1
2.01
1
17
1
6
10
1
18
1.87
-

632
2.13
“ W
”
2.2$
271
2.06
181
180
2.01
2.11
55
1.8$
3E
2.02
53
16
1.78
22
2.13

_
-

-

-

-

2
-

11
-

.

.
.
.
.

.
-

.
.
»

2
.
2
.

n
.

11

*

-

*
*

1.81*
1.86
1.8$
1.67
1.79
1.U3
1.81*
l.$8

12
12
fLQ
2

1*
1
.
1*
1
lt
i

3
3
3
-

57
3
.
3
5E
-

2
2
2
.
-

-

- ;
-

—
-

* i

-

Firemen, stationary boiler ,
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Wholesale trade •
Retail trade ....
Services ••••••••

1,092

Helpers, trades, maintenance
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods ,
Nonmanufacturing ...
Retail trade ....

1.68
1,612
1*1*12' r n 5 8
1.68
1,122
290
1.69
200 !1.69
103
1.7$

18
1
1
17
8

.
.
-

15
1$
-

Machine-tool operators, toolroom ,
Manufacturing
Durable goods

3,099
3,098
3,098

2.22

_
.
-

.
-

„
.
-

Machinists, maintenance
Manufacturing .••••••
Durable goods ••••
Nondurable goods .
Nonmanufacturing ....

2,01*3

521
227
3U*
19
19
103

11,697
327
19

Maintenance men, general utility ,
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Wholesale trade •
Retail trade ••••

1,331
9ST”
767
197
367
113
102

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
Manufacturing
Durable goods •••••
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing .....
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ...
Retail trade ......
Services .........

1,1*28
530
1*26
101*
898
578
1QE
202
1E

2.22
2.18
"5718—
2.18
!2.17
2.09
2.01
“2705
2.09
1.96
1.89
2.01*
1.97
2.01
2.02
2.03
1.98
2.01
2.00
1.96
2.07
1.83

2

-

-

-

$5
19
19
36
36

2
-

6
.
-

.
- i
1

2

6

_
.

- !
- ;

2

-

- I

“

59
55
19
*
6
i
t
2
2

1$
1$
15

|

-

-

- !

»
-

- 1
- i
-

-

-

-

1
-

.
-

2
«
«

«
•

7E
-

13
10
10

-

1
-

«
-

2
2

„ I 7U
1
-

-

-

1

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
.
1

-

7
2
5

8
1
5




j
i
|

26
26
26 1
9E
lo 1 23 1 32
19 1
. j k 1 5
1 0 ! 23 18 1 k
16
62
7
3
16 1
I E ! l
- i
18
3
- ! Eo
1
! . ;
1

2

1
E

-

-

! *

u
1
i
n
n

11

*
*

i IE
IE
10
Ei
-!

10
10
10
22
22
3
19
-

21 152

3
2

62
El
17
2E
21
1
12

8

5

23

10

-

-

-!

t
7

IE
3
3

- ;

5
-

23
23 i
-

3
1
2

11
10
1

2
2
2

2

*

“

7$
6E
E7
17!
|
-i
!

21

10

u

E 9 1073 117$ 318
E
"E Sim H 7 1 H5"
E
38$ 100$ 117$ 296
20
61 3
E
2
E
3 3
31!

39 101
39 ! Ido
26 : $5
E5
13
! 1:
; -i
_! -

BO c

1$

20

1$

13

20

28

~TT

129 )
"1ST
16:
113|

12
12

■Sr n i

E6j 107i
8
1 6
291

16 J L J 6
10
15 3l
1$ 19
- 16

25!

-1
-

.
1

.
1

-i

112 177|
IE !
13 1$$ 1 112 ! 171 !
! 9 6 1 10E j 1E9!
13 59 ! 8! 22;
1
3
”!

~ j

17E

71 106 !2?2
E8
8E 10$
38 | 31 1103
10 ! 53 ! 2
Eo
22 167
23
22 11 1 8 92
1 j
1
10
10
62
6 ! 11
. 1 2
7
3

312

159”
78
31
E3
.
38

55
32
32
23
3
2

6

J

i

92
36
E6
29
1

130
B2
56
26
E8i
E8
-

262 j
65| $E
55; 3E!
20!
5
252 ! 208|
2E6| 12E j
51 62 ,
10 ; 601
1! 22

20

,j i ;...k l

2j
U:
3

237

30,

25

227
9

30

20 !

10

17

10

17

-

7

672

59

17j 132

20 !

31
31
-i

672

6

188
1E7
139
8
El
25
16

13
.
13
8
1
6

J .6 1168 U 290 1 5
U7
60
U
2 .8 1167! 1*601 290 1 *
47
15
E87!1167 E6oi 2 0 1E
9| 5
3871 67E 113

113 ! 17 ; 132
911 15

22!

E
8
35”

36

12

I

S'
* : 571 17
13| IE
- EE 3
8
6
1
.
.
1

20
; % - ' 133
20
6$ 133
i 20
65; 133

EO
-

5

2

.$

201 2.20 2 2 2.30 2.3$ 2.E0 2.$01 2.6012.70

70'2.80

38 ! 31
93 ! 9E ! 121
i
i 93 ! 7$ ! 11$ 1 1$ ! 19
15
15 ! 19 ! 1 3 !
! 52 ! 7E I 92
-]
-j
| El
l
23
23
12 ! »
19 ! 6
i
E ! - i 23 ; 12
1 "!

23
E
E
10 19
- J -

27
17
17

~ |
See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

16
12
E
8
| E

98 Ill : 100
EE
32
100
61 " W
8$ 1
29 ! 5E . E8
61 i 15
3 1 7
12 j 37
2
1 E
- j » !
2
12 ! 10 : - 1
i

! 23E
i 199
; 160
i 39
35

5
5
5
-

„
-

-

“

16
6
6
10
2

-

0

“

51
El
16
25
10
- !
- !
10 !

w i
"
!

-

•

6
»

« I
- ,
-

-

-

!

800
36
73
19»
7 T F T ! 27 ! $E
3 660 i 9 ! 8
18
U 117
1*
6
12
19
23 j 9
16
e
-

-

.

;

55 1 68
36
$5
8
15 1 1*
21
7
19
13
E
3
2
15

-

31
23
23
8
8
-

,E L$0 .60
0

2

132

hi

38 20

1

10! 10

-1215
15

Table

a-3*

Maittiemance. a n d P o w e k

Pl<m£

Occupation^ - GantUuscd

(Average hourly earnings 1 / f o r men in s e le cte d occupations studied on an area
basis in Detroit, Mich®, by industry division, December 1951)

Occupation and industry division

Nondurable go©
<J.;
Nonaanufactaring

.......................................... .

2.879
2,787
2,1*7C
309
92
29

.• • • • • • • ,.• ...........

3,^*0

O ile r s .............................................. ... ....................... ..
Manufacturing
rbv>*aK m
l
b lf|r|TT|Tr. rT11- rfr. TIT. . T llT fI11
1T T
goods #«« +*o*»***»*«**ft*««««e*«e*»d»*
Nonmanufacturing ................................................

I»l*6>
1, 1*21
1,279
31*2
11
**

Millwrights

.Painters, maintenance .................................
Manufacturing ............•••••••••......... .......... ..
Nonmanufacturing ••..••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Retail trade ..................................................
Finance **
Pipe f it t e r s , maintenance .......... ...................... ............ . . .
Manufacturing ................ ....................................
^ i i i t m i i i i i t r i r M i f i t i m i m i i
f o /«t in v j n^r n t i i i i t i i i t i t T i n t m i t i ' f m r r r r
a

|lfAnyM

.Plumbers, maintenance
an + in v t r»rr ( i i i t i i t i T i t M I t T t ' r t T i T T H T n l i i n t

........ ..
jEheet-metal workers, maintenance
Manufacturing ...............................................................
T iT^»Vkl a
W
a ( ( ( ( f T ___ 1^t nTT1_TTTT1_-__1 T
(
TT
Nondurable g o o d s .........................................................
.Tool-and-die makers
Manufacturing
~U
y
**

T-Tl ’ H
N J ” R O| W {£RS 1 i’; /' G STRAIC•H
U
F OE
B OURLY EARNINGS O
F—
$
k
!.
$
'.S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
<
|
S
i ¥ f$
$
$
A
verage
hourly 'Jn ?r 5.35 1.1*0 1.1*5 1.50 1-55 i.6 0 |l.65 11.70 ji,75 l.« 0 1.85 !^®90 11,95 2.00 (2.05 |2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2*35 2. 1 2.50 2.60 2.70 $2.80
-*
*0
earnings
and
!
*
l.«Q 1.1*5 L.50 1.55 l. 6 o 1.65 1.70
1*80 U85j. ® l*9sl2.0P 2,Q5 \Z* Q
1
2*22. 2*25. 2*32 2*35 -2. 1 2t50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over
*0
A >:0_
;
1 k 12 1 IS
1 11
1
( 202 3U5 269 1350 U? 71 73
6
!
6
1
1
u
U5_ _2<?
3
3 __J
%
2.16
6
1
1
236
*
S 202 h m
3 12 1 7 '
73
1*3 71
3
i 181 i 132 227
2®17
3 ! 12 ; 36 | H
* 25 211
1*3 1*9 72
v. 1 ?40 20
7 : 21 162
i
2.08
22
10
1
6
1
1
3
9
“ 1
:
1
1.92
1
5
1 11
, 1
3
31
3
33
l
:
1
28
l .?6
1
1
*
241* 1 782 151.5
2.10
8
SO! 15 ' ” 5 1133 1*30
76
k
8
76 I 33 U80 223 2i*i* [762 151*5 76
5°
15
0 0 1 1 1
$ $
HH

Mechanics, maintenance ..............................................
Manufacturing .......... ..............................................«••••*

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

1.79
1.79 ' '
1.80
1.78
1.62

.
"
-

-

-

-

550
179
218
10
39
110

2.00
2.01
2.QU
1.90
1.97
1.88
2.22
1.89

-

-

2,1*59
2,1*29
2,023
1*06
30

2.09
0 9
2.11
2.00
2. 0 *
1

67
1*9
18
532
521*
1*93
31

1.97
2.02
1.81
2.12
2.12
2.12
2.08

6,1*1*3
6,W*3

2.31
2.31

9kI
729

-

“
.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

21
1

7 155
7 T 5T
7 11*0
15
12
35

1
20
1
1

65
62
21*
38
3
2
1
x
1

12 : 35

1

12

1

30

57 121 183 266 373 160
1
57 103 188 j 266 ~17T“1 5 T n
266 361* 112
53
91
£
9 1
12 l8i i
*5
18
3
22
80
66 62
1*5 13
22
80
6l
38
1
*2
5
3
i
36 27
63
2
21 17
38
25 15
8
7
5 20
3
2
2
1
*
6
18

..

10

63
63
63

10

U

21

i

io

x
x
2

20
1

1

39
“

u
5“

_

_

2

„

____ 1 ___ ____ L _ i
_

1

—r r

Ul

32

79

39

30

I
.
-

12
10

15

2
2

-

-

-

-

8

15

-

-

-

-

jf
1
*
2
2

3
3

I
-

“

-

?
9

-

i

39
39

to

1*3
1*3

1
1
x

-

12
12

l*
2
2

_

_

6jt
6* 1
1

-

161

! __ 1
_

_
-




(Average hourly earnings 2 / f o r men in s e le cte d occupations
in the D etroit M etropolitan Area, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$
Average $
hourly 1 .5 0 1 .5 5
earnings
and

$

1.60

$
$
$
■$
$
$
$
$
$
$
^ .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0

$

2.15

$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2.1*0 2.1*5 2 ,5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0

under
l* 5 5 _ 1 ,6 0 i* 6 £ _ 1 .7 0 1 *1 5 . 1*5Q_ 1*£S_ 1 .9 0

Carpenters, maintenance •••*••...........
E le c t r ic ia n s , m aintenance........... ..
Engineers, s t a t io n a r y ................... ..
Firemen, sta tion a ry b o i l e r ••••••..<
H elpers, tra d e s , maintenance o . . . . . <
M achine-tool op era tors, toolroom ..<
M achinists, maintenance ............... « . . .
Maintenance men, gen era l u t i l i t y o.<
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance)
Mechanics, maintenance ................... ....
M illw rights
O ile rs ............... . . . . . . . ................ . . . . . <
P a in te rs, maintenance
........... ..
Pipe f i t t e r s , maintenance
Sheet-m etal workers, maintenance
T ool-a n d -die makers .••••••••••••••

616
2,991*
221
21*3
258
2,61*9
1 ,2 7 5
21*1
351
2 ,1 1 7
2 ,7 6 6
983
1*19
1 ,7 6 9
1*56
5,281*

$
2 .1 1
2 .1 8
2 .2 6
1 .9 6
M

2 .2 2
2 .2 1
2 .0 5
2.01*
2 .2 0
2.11*
1.81*
2 .0 8
2 .1 3
2 .1 3
2 .3 3

12

_
_
13

•
_

-

_
-

-

6

.
.
.

-

.
-

.
-

1

5

12
99

-

-

-

3
h

9
1*6
1
*

-

-

-

-

-

13

20

56

161

227

33
53
8

35
5
5
363
29

-

1*0

1*
2
2
29
-

116
112
19
61
6

|

2 .3 0

2*10
23

23
9?
6

35
8
17

16

139
87
26
1*9
27
10
73
25

11
**
105
5
19

1*6
11*6

131*
13
91*5 1163
12
12
16

1
281*
1*6

2
2
107

1*17 1119
261 607
; 22
27
25
2
111
1*0
162 227 1339
661* 1525
76

301
51

278
3
3

126

-

27

1*9

72

-

-

-

1
762
182
186

1*3
U*
336

52

318
21*5
9
11*

90
25

211
72

-

it
57
85
21
19
69
107

28
11*1
215

-

-

21
61*
30

_

65
12

3 30 77 159
9

Table A-3 aj M a i+ ttettO H ee a n d P oua&i P la n t O c c u p a tio n ^ -M o i& i VelucleA . a n d M o to /i-V eh ic le Z qu lfxm en i y

Number
of
workers

“

3

Excludes premium pay f o r overtime and night work®
A ll a t $1.20 and under 1 .2 $ .
Finance, insurance, and re a l e s t a t e .

Occupation

I
-

1
*
2

22
12

„
183
1*
1
9
183
1*
1
9
Q
li*2 183 1 *
1
s
17
2
H 23 81* 11*6 268 1*92 1162 255? lOLO
*
TSTT 9F UST 2559 10l*0
“ HTS T —
ar
7
7
7
1

-

15
„

2

2
3 22
3 T 8~ — |jj

7
7
l

“

“

-

1
1

1

_

I

,

2

1

83 281 157 238 755 766
6
7l* 275 157 238 n o 1 7 6
65 215
93 160 661 765
9
x
60 6 * 78
1
79
9
6
15

2

_

2

-

-!

95 1W 212
T1
58 11*6
31 137 211
9
27
2
1
37
-

“

28
28
V
25

*i "
_

“

2*
1
2i*
15
9

------- I_L

_

’

5
5
U
1

6
6

1
1

_

1*7
^7
19
8
20
5
6
1

13
13
1
12

•

1

1
*
1
*
k

_

r
3*
1

-

128
11*0
51*
12

l
x
211
623
138
76

5

l
x
-

2
1
7
951* 221*1*

.
-

2
5

.
_

_
.

.

7 12
-

2

-

•
-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

lx

5

132

23

2

l
x
-

-

81*1 j 168 1*06

58

3

i_____

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 100 workers primarily engaged in producing motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment (Group 371), automobile stampings (Group 31*62),
automotive hardware (part of Group 31*29), carburetors, pistons and piston rings (part o f Group 3599), and e le ctrica l equipment fo r automotive use (part of Group 361*1). The industry group
codes refer to Standard Industrial C lassification Manual (191*5 edition) prepared by the Bureau o f the Budget.
2 / Excludes premium pay f o r overtime and night w ork.
Occupational Wage Survey, D e t r o it, M ich., December
1951
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s

3
3

15
T*bie A-3b,

M a in te n a n c e a n d P a tu d

P l a n t O c c u p a t io n * . - M atasi-V etu aU . P gaU a n d / Icca U a tM . y

(Average hourly earnings 2/ fo r men in selected occupations
in the Detroit Metropolitan Area, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS O F -

$
Caroenters. maintenance....... ................
Establishments with 1,001 or more workers .......
Electricians. maintenance ................ .....

103
37
66

2.10
2 i
n
2.10

6

-

-

-

-

Helpers, trades, maintenance ...................................... .
Est b i h e t * w th 1 j () n * m - e unr^prs It, ltllItl.(
a l s m n . ! i . OY r n p
Machine-tool operators, toolroom...................................
Establishments with 101 - 1,000 workers ...................
Establishments with 1^001 or more workers

2.17

69

2 .0 6

21
2S

1.97
? 13

_

99
65
56

1.87
1,87
],88

1

5

26
21

1.80

1

5

315

2 .2 6

160

2.28
2.]
?(

-

3

13

1.86

-

_

_

6

_

?ii
-f

65

Firemen, stationary boiler ......................

371
?1|6

Engineers, stationary .........................
Establishments with 101 - 1,000 workers.... ....

-

_

_

175

Machinists, maintenance ..................... .
Establishments with 101 - 1,000 workers ... ....
Establishments with 1,001 or more workers

102

Maintenance men. general utility ................
Establishments with 101 - 1,000 workers ........

102

3

16

-

“ 5"

-

_

8

5
8

-

6

ii
,
i
9
9

8

_

_

22
22

6

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ..............
F s a l s m p . u t 1O — 1 }
.tbi hets i h ^
OHO workers .T.,TT ,,f.T
Estr b
^ li^hn^nt^ wi’l 1 nn^
ti
’
,

102

11

"Q
1
J*/

Mechanics, maintenance ............................... ............ ... . t | 3o2
Establishments with 101 - 1,000 workers ......... .
158
Establishments with 1,001 or more workers
196

,

—

6

12

Millwrights........................................................................
Establishments with 101 - 1,000 workers.... .
Establishments with 1,001 or more workers .......

332
133
id;

2 .1 3

Oilers ............ ..... ....... .........
Establishments w th I I « 1 ^
i
G
000 m rker T f .
a ft
E t f h I shmpnts w th ]
s.ll
i
n* n n o uni*yorQ , i t t rt i •
r ir
r

152
— 67—
A?
W

1.82

Painters, maintenance ...................
Establishments with 101 - 1 ,0 0 0 workers

,

36
2
7

2.08
2.15
X785~
1.80
2.06

8
8

.

3
3

2

.

.

3
3

Tool-and-die makers .... ............... .
R
’e+aKl ■cW onf q ui fV 1O _ 1 D lC
? m
i l
Cl
7< *5
Establishments with l,00i or more workers .......

6

16

6

3
13

_

6

9

6

5
k

2.13

1.092
2.38
r
>O --- C9i4C
f
505
2.33

_

9

-

6

_

26

9

15
12

6

16

7

9

-

25
25

22
22

5
L

7
7

-

~
-

.
-

_
-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

13

6

m

35

1*
*

6

10

o

20
l6

6

8

1

•
-

_

-

-

_

2

2

7

-- 6H
k 7

_

-

-

_

_

..

2

-

-

_

_

_

-

76 55 113

12
66

20
35

81

8

7
5

6
6

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

32

8

52 33
13 1
39 32

3
3

16
6

2
7
2
7

3
3

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

.
-

.

.
-

-

-

k

8

26

8

-

21

-

21

57
65

7

18

8

-

21

63
69

1
6

10

12

8

72
.
72

16

6

13
13

53 160
63 ~ W
10
96

56

61

5
5

6

2

_

6

-

.

• 16
- -

•

2

5

-

6

21

10

26

5
5

70
1J
^
A
Ci
yj7

2

5

1

..
-

-

2

3

21

-

10

6

J

6

21

6

6

36
36

.

2

52

112

61

_
-

-

51 63 039 186 168 ^86
19 66 62 71 286
5 66 175 162 97

58
58

_

-

_
-

-

6

r

5

7. n

9

2
2

136
63 19
78 117

2

1
1

6

8
8

56
33

161

k

6
6

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance ............ ....
Establishments with 1,001 or more workers T t r t
t1f

39

2
2

8

2

_

6

2

2.13

25
2r

6

2

192
l)|
)|

5

8

61
21
60

28

5
5

2^09

Pips fitters» maintenance... ..................
Establishments with 1,001 or more workers .......

?

2.60 2,65 2,50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90

11

? 11
7 n(
l

2.19

5
5

30

2

5

2.25
2.25
?.2)
|

2.15
2.? 3

5
7

30

°
6

6
2

2.07

168
66

12

16
6

2.15
2.15

30

6

s
$
$
$
$
$
$
2.35 2.60 2.65 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80

U
>
m
• 1 *

Occupation and size of establishment

O
c\
~

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Number A e a e $
vrg
o
f
h u l 1.5 0
ory
1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25
w r e s erig and 1.55
okr
an n s
under
1.55 1.60 1.65 1.7 0 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30

6

£

1

9

16
16

26
11

60

33
jj

80
80

10
10

15

12
12

Q

9

16

6

8

1

62

66

62

1

2
2

.

.

__ 3_
3

*

i /
I n c lu d e s a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s g rou p ed i n m o to r v e h i c l e s and m otor v e h i c l e equipm ent ( s e e f o o t n o t e t o t a b l e A - l a ) o t h e r than o p e r a t i o n s o f F o r d , C h r y s l e r , G en e ra l M o t o r s , H udson,
P a ck a r d , B r i g g s , and M urray; t h i s d e f i n i t i o n was a g r e e d upon i n c o n s u l t a t i o n w ith th e Wage S t a b i l i z a t i o n B oa rd , R eg ion VT-B.
2 / E x clu d e s premium p a y f o r o v e r t im e and n ig h t w ork .




Occupational W
age Survey, Detroit, Mich., December 1951
U.S. D P R M N O LA O
EAT E T F B R
Bureau of Labor Statistics

16

Table A-U:

Qudiodicdf Wan&Uouliwff and SiU pfuw p 0QGMf*atiQ*§&

/

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2 studied on an area
basis in Detroit, Mich., by industry division, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OFNumber
of
w
orkers

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings

$ ^
toder 3.75

Crane operators, electric,bridge (20 tons and over)

621*

3 116
*
2 80
,*
?,$*?
, U
2U3
399
322
13

Guards ..... .
Manufacturing
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...
Finance * * ..... .
Services •

J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s

5?8

x.
1*1*99

(m en)

Manufacturing
Durable goods .....
Nondurable goods ..
Nonmanufac turing ....
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade »..
Retail trade .....
Finance ** ........
Services •••••••«.•

9,691
0 7 6
5,959
917
2,815
101*
21*1
98$
710
1*65

1 .7 7 “
1.78
1.65
1.U5
1.10
1.12

-

.9$ L.00

98

77
77

•
-

-

82
3
13

77

.9 8

1.06

151

jl 5 z
.

**

1.57
1.26
.91*
1.18
1.27
.98
.90
.98

1.71
1.75
1.73
1.83
1.1*1*
1.1*6

-

-

151
-

12
123
16

-

•

"

-

1
*
U

-

<
»

-

“

15?
-

120
-

10?
-

-

-

-

153

120

103

»

•

«

10

51
*

33
53

-

-

-

l

"

112

66

16

16k

125

**

*
■

1*67
5

1*96
22

-

-

-

-

161*
6

12$
12

5
1*62
1

u*
13U
10

7*
1
18
21

17
372
72

_

*
1.0 1.10 1.15 1,20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.101.1*5 i.5o 1.55
$

7
•

7
3
1
*

11*9 179
J5
9
11*9 170
1
3
20
25 106
6
23
18
117

1*83
2

22
2
1 7 * 1*81
*1
1
3

551
-

12

l
«

25
IB

17
-

12
30
30

1
i

18
7
7

-

Uz

211
8
8

286
26
18
2
266
30
11
3
3
50
70
77 15U
28
1*3

203

1*5
8

231*
9

551
2

8
37
8

9
225
-

Ul* 120
377 31*8
10
52

26
283
21*0

19
5
5

7

1
*

1
*

231

26
19
7
26
12
3U8 212
10
32
1
* 29
220
1*5
92 128
•

12
*»
-

88

12

m

17
17

-

10
7
7
-

2 12
2
1 1 -

21
21

-

23
23

-

-

-

-

.

_

-

-

2

1
*
•

2

12
12

1
*

7
1

10

l*

-

7

-

•

12
6
-

8
1
*
3

1
•

1

18
*

51

.
-

18
*
51
3 * — 2T
1
31
2
3
16
*
17
11
**
3
11
3
1
1
*

25

121
30

51
50
•

25
13
8

30
91
70
21

10

60

25

33

23
23
20
3

-

80
-

80
38
12
*

1k
8

3

5
“

”

•
*
■

2

2
1

1
*
*

10
1

7

2
*
*

-

10

“

5

2

211
91
19
72
120
57
7
50
6

2
1

2

39
?
5
22
12
12

-

2U0 188 201 32U
3 136 " T 2 F 21*5
2 132
28
63
1
91 186
*
U
52
237
79
75
1*0
10
56
1
*
10
21
1
26
30
6
9
15
1
1**
11
23
11*
2
2
29

3
2

18
*
1*0

-

!03
96
96
7
7

12
1
*
5

281
281

192
92
92
100
95
5

281

137

12
12

23

8

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




♦90

i
f
“

98
-

1.1*7
1.60
1.61
1.5U
1.16
1.1*0
1.32
1.07
1.22

$

$

$

1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85

1.60 1.55 1.70 1.75 J U

3i*
H*

8
8

53
53

28

-

1,051

hJU

.85

1
1

*

2*303 , 1.58
971
1.71
816
1.73
1.58
155
1,332
1.1*9
1.1*8
221
1.51*

Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ...,
Wholesale trade

.80

1.71*

Order fillers
Manufacturing ......
Durable goods ...
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufacturing ....
Wholesale trade .
,
Retail trade ••••,

3,10*8
3,1*1*8
7.981
2.5U1
1 IiO
tt
j lt67

$
$
$
1.60 1.65

1.90

3,500
73U
627
103
2,770
86
19
1*35
1,661*
566

..................... .......

$

$

S
.1.871.87

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (women)
Manuf ac turing
Durable goods .....
Nondurable goods ..
Nonmanufacturing .....
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ...
Retail trade
Finance ** ........
Services ..........

Packers (men)

s ^ $

*
$
$
$ _
$
* „
1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.10 1.1*5 1.50 1.55
*

1.80 0 8

$
$
1.90

$

2.00 2.10
and

>.75

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons)
Manufacturing •••••••..... ..................

$

$ _ $
. $ 0.90 0.95

60
60

25
25

33
33

6
6

71

10
*
10
*
-

31
31

510

1
102

#
131
7 * 117
1
7*
1
<
_ 15
57
19
52
5

1019
9
08

1232 ?°39
1*32 1063
1013
3U6 1052 2820
86
11 169 105
78 169
50
6
21 137
2
11
22
1
1*3
_
28
10
7
_
„
.
2
16
3
-

-

20
2Tr
U
16

.

2989

80JU55 J L 202+00

1* 19$ 450 2||U
10
* ^ 66 U30 2*1
0
l*

ll

33

?9Z
1*62
332
130
15
*
l

$68
560
519
Ul
8

133

m

1*3

?5
35

38
38

21*7

28

59

9*
1
91*
9l
*
-

Z
Z
1
*

k

6
.

•

-

-

3
3

51 __ 22
77
33
30
77
3
18

•
•

-

« ____ 5L
•
5
-

32
32T
26
6

18

153
89 11*2 161
30" " T o ~ 5 7 rT 5
1
30
67
1*
8
29
13
1*1
33 123
75 118
21
39
1 108
*
95
22
“
25
11*
35
«*

96
96
26
70
-

165
159
159
6

5

537
531
1*18
113
6
6

5

1
7
-

8
8
8
•
-

6

•

.
•

_

-

-

.
•

1
*

—
.
.
_

.

.

.
-

<•
•

18

-

18

.
_
-

-

-

-

a
.
_

•
-

—
.
•

1
*

.

11*

33

-

1
*

75 157 332
61 “157" “
-332T
59 U*9 323
8
2
9
1*
1

127 306
126
12
*
122
2
1*0
1
*
1 261*
• 263

wo
U70

201 977 2$
22
977
200 971 22

815 266
775
1*0
2
1
.
2

23
17
15
2
6

53

over.

621

281

~ws ■ i S T “
1*53 217
30
5
163
3*
1
118
26
*
*
1*3

71*2
71*2
68$
57
-

70
TS1

16
-

51*
50

570 217
56? T 9 7
526 197
37
20
7
20
7

28
22
22
6
6
•

373
373
373
•

- «.
-

19

35

16

-

10
-

-

•
-

9
9
“

35
32
3

38
38

71
69
30
39
2
2

-

75
75

-

- 1/75
•
*

Occupational Wave Survey, Detroit, Mich., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

17

Table

A t Gu&tadicU, *Watelwud'WXf,, and SUipfUnp Oocn^atdond - Continued
-U
(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations £ / studied on an area
basis in Detroit, Mich., by industry division, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

$
$
$
$
$ ^
$ , $
$ ^ $
$
$
S
Average
$ „ $
$ - $
$
$ w $
$ , $
$ «
hourly
0.75 0 .8 0 0 .8 5 0 .9 0 0.9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1.1*0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1.6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1.8 0 1 .8 5 1.90 2.00 2 .1 0
earnings Under
and
$
0 .7 5 .8 0 .8 $
.90 .9 5 1„00 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .1 0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 i f 55 1 .6 0 1 .65 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1.8 0 1 .8 5 I .9 0 2 .0 0 2.10 over

Number
of
workers

O ccupation and se x

$
Packers (women) •.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
M anufacturing .................. ............................ • • • • ................ * *
Nonmanufacturing •. •••................ ..•••••••••••••••••«•

R e ce iv in g c le r k s ........... ............................................... ..
M anufacturing ............................... .............................. ............... ..
D urable goods ................* .......... ..............................
Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••.••••
R e t a i l trade .......................................... ..

1 .3 ?
1.2*1*
1 .0 7
1 .2 5
.9 8

- b m ~
l,3 7 i*
220
79
liil

853
717
691*
23
136
80
ii7

-• f e S - J.. 8 i
1 .8 1
1 .9 3
i.ltS
1*53
1*35

Shipping c le r k s ............................................ ..
M anufacturing ......................................................................... ..
D urable goods
Nondurable goods .................................................
Nonmanuf a ctu r ing ............................... ............................
o t.i*a3A . l t ri Ti r r f t r t m t i n i m i t i i m
R e t a i l tra d e ...........................................................................

1 ,1 3 7
"986
931*
52
151
71
63

1 .8 2
1785
1.81*
1 .9 6
1*67
1.7 9
1.61*

.S h ip p in g-a n d -receiv ing c le r k s ••••••••••••••••••••••«•
Manufacturing
gruvl p f ||||u f n i * ■■i i i i i |i i i i i I i i ■i i i
a
iiiiiitiiiiim m iiiin iM in i
Nonmanufacturing
1r ii+.<"M’f. 1»st « i i m t i i t t t m i m i m i i t T t t D
»
A +
.................... . ........... . . . . .
. ...

820
595
512
83
225
29
160
31

12

If

31

8

l

36

31

8

l

1*33
1*32
1

12

-

3*

12

36

31

8

l

h

-

If
_

_

1
*

.

_

32

17
17
10
7

72
26
1*6
5
la

36
36
6
6

1

32
30
2

6

5

1
*

2

2

_

2

16

2

16
16

l*
1
*

21*
21*

11
5
6
6

119
119

3

1
1

1
*

1
*

-

.
-

.

•

1
*

2

20
—

«»

23
—

1.7 9
1782
1 .8 3
1 .7 8
1 .7 0
1.81*
1 . 71
1.1*7

-

-

-

-

-

1
*

2

2

20
20

2

23
21
2

3
■
a
J

-

1
*

1
*

2

2

2

-

2

6
-

-

-

8
-

*
•
-

-

2
-

15
10
10
5
p

-

91*
91*

7
7

5
5
:

1*6
ll
11
35

7 305
7 “ 299
1 299
*
J
6

JJ
\

25
17
17
8
5

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
*

2

8

6

-

8

~

2

-

-

-

1
*

2

-

6

-

-

-

2

8

11
**
2

26
1
*

2
1*2
2
32
8

3
22
2
20

51 280
1*9 “ 586
39 279
10
X
2
2

-

5

-

11
3
3

2
-

8

2

1*3
21
21
22
10
12

98
82
79
3
16
•
a
P

2

8
1
*
3
1
1
*
0
p
1

171*
172
169
3
2

8

-

12
1
*
1
*

-

-

-

5

1
*

1
*

-

_
-

6

31*8
31*8

2

3
1
*

286
286
6
6

2

12

17

$h

1*1
3i*
20
ll*
7

2!f
7
2
*
p

78
78
78

17

126
120
118
2
6

17

6

-

68
58
1*8
10
10
in
XU

§6 ?
529
528
1
1*0
3ft
PO
2

222
175
n 7V
j-fP

30
21*
22
2
6

8
8
7
1
X

6

63

2*3
1*3
23
15

21
5i
16

-

23
21
ll
101
2
2

1+9
39
30
9
10

10

pot.a 1^

im im ir.titittT im tirttiiitrm

1

•

-

1

•

.

-

.

-

-

-

-

1

8

8

53

17
2

t

21
1
3

10

6
1

1*7

27
17
19
17
X(

1*2
3

lh
5
g
1
3

62,
3?
20r i i r
13 ! 35
0
Q
18
19
5
IQ
n
i.7

i

..

Nonmanufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ..............................................................
W holesale tra d e ..................................................... ..
R e t a il tra d e ...................................................
S e r v ic e s ............................................................... ...................

.Truck d r iv e r s , l i g h t (under 1$ to n s ) ............................. ..
M anufacturing ................................. ................... .••••.••••••
fjtM vliiraVil A £ A /v l s

t»titttitt»«tr-Tt-irfit»ttrrtt»»

Nonmanufacturing .........................................................
TiTV n e a l f i
ir\l
p a fa l ]

f

fr a r l.

Finance

.................................... ..

......... .................... ...

i i i i i i t i i n t i m t t r t i i i i i i T i t r t M t

*- * . . . . . . . . . . , c .

rae

........................
....

11*, 786
11,620
10,283
1 ,3 3 7
3 ,1 6 6
751*
1,1*32
936
35

1.61*
1 .7 0
1 .7 1
1 .6 5
1.1*1*
1 .5 9
1.1*1
1 .3 8
1.11*

1,0 0 7

1 .6 6
TT77

236

S to c k handlers and t r u c k e r s , hand
M anufacturing ..................
TbiT*aKl a
o . . ....... .................................................

1 .7 1
1 ,6 1
1.1*8
1 .6 8
1 .3 3
1.1*1*




100
1*8

85
5

350
5

.

5
286
1
*
252
30
-

17
163
8
67
88
*

1*8
52
8
1*0
1
*
“

5
80
16
51*
10

5
11*5
.
133
12

3U

21

37

36
-

1*9
-

3

28

-

-

•

.
3

22
6

36
20
10
6

1*9
1*3
6

128
.
125
~

105
1*0
1*0
25
~

2

11

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

_

„
-

_

166 31*3
87 " T o F
65
22 208
79 135
1
*
1
*
78
69
53
1
•

730 311 !09l* 816 3672 1808 2297 181*0
37i* 135 835 “ 66H 3320 11*95 2126 1802 339
257
55 668 592 3 2 H 1370 2085 1768 212
60 167
72 109 125
117
1*1
31* 127
16
38
356 196 259 152 352 313 171
30
11* 271
67
7
51 221*
6
157
97
89
63
27
93 101*
25
18 190
10
1*8
10
39
195
1
*
9
1
*
“
“
•
"
•
-

-

-

6

•

6

2

1*3

2

2

7

-

-

-

-

-

10
9
5

_

-

_

2

-

11

2

-

28
20

3

6

g

21
20

31
30

2

1*3
20

2

2

g
.

„

_

See footnotes at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), com unication, and other public utilities.
m
** Finance, insurance, an real estate.
d
210367 0 — 52 ------ 3

180
17

1 - 717
0

93
678
172
1*20
1*3
10

291
5

28
-

-

128

105
-

3
-

-

„

.

2

3

2

3
5

1

1

2

23

1

2

7

3

2
1

1

17
9
0

7

8

3

6
„

285
9
7
1

2
276
261
2

3

1*5
1*5

66
1*2

88
88

1*5

88

“

1*2
21*
6
18
"

-

11*6
7l*

58
57

1
1

i5

p *

1 ,0

■**£

72
ft

27

*

* 0

15
20
20

29

2
72

30
1

"

92
72

220
71

57
89

_

.

.

51*
_

3

ic

3

-

18

Table

a -1*:

G u U o d ifU ,

W

, 0 4 id S A lfL fU H f 0 cC 4 4 fu U l(UU ~ G o*U iM 44a d

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2f studied on an area
basis in Detroit, Mich., by industry division, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2,202
1,193
808
385
l,OOQ
26l
533
187

la 80
1«95
1 ,7 0
? ,? 8
1*61*
la 78
1*50
1*80

2,575
851
751*
97
1 7?1*
681*
828
208

1*80
T7H2
1*8?
la 82
lo 79
1*79
1 .7 8
1*79

ty p e ) V » v . y y « *«*.« •••.:t v v . « i r _ v . »_ 1,01*6
238
M anufacturing .......................................... .......................................
WnTTmarnfactivring
808
W holesale tra d e
338

$
s
$
$
$ . $
$
$ ^ $
$
s
$
$ - $
$ _ $
$ . $
$ $ . $
$ _ 1
$
Under 3.75 3*80 3.85 0.9O 0.95 1.0 0 1.0 5 l . i o 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1.30 1 .3 5 1.1*0 1.1*5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1.6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0
and
$
3.75 .8 0 .8 5 •90
.9 5 1,00 1 .0 5 1.1 0 1 ,1 5 1 ,2 0 1.2 5 1 ,3 0 1.35 1, h0 l.)i5 1 .5 0 1.55 1 .6 0 1 .6 < 1 .7 0 1 .7 < 1 .8 0 ! 1 .8 5 1 -90 ? .0 0 9 .1 0 o ver

1*90
1*89
1*90
lo8i*

O ccupation and sex

$
Truck d r iv e r s , medium ( l £ t o and in clu d in g 1 to n s)
*
M anufacturing ........... ........................................................ ..

W holesale tra d e

Truck d r i v e r s , heavy (o v e r 1 t o n s , t r a i l e r ty p e ) ••••••
*
M anufacturing .................................................................. ..

P u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
e s a lo t.rfldA . t i t t i t r t t t M t t t t i m
R e t a i l trade

100

_

58
20
20

100

115

120

£

90
63
90
oi.
9U

JO

100

115

120

38

97
c
p
22

11*7
•

55
5

tn

TIi7
Uif

_

9
3
J

tjn
JU

_

i
.

120

1 *,7
At* f

. I

115

_

.

.

(5
9
7
A

6
6

£

9

66 131* 61*2 1*89
66 “ 2HH l*l6
3$
on 97d 70ft
77
eU * P 9yo
j r
-P
2
d7
7ft
1*0
A
O
99
77
97
68 99**
l9
99n
79
CCKJ A*
A
**
62
30
20
7ft
77
79
90
cX
A9
ft

92
12
u
g
On
O
U
30
>0

171*
1*8
77
99
A9
70*
AcO
on
yu
7A
90

?? 5
635
)i7 A97
t*A Ot f
g
1,7).
t*U
am O
Ii7n 79li
At a
a fG
1
,
a 391*
122
X*cc

79
66
66
13
9

66
16
16
<n
9G
8
1,9
0t

159
92
a®
i.a
a©
A7
0/

139
3

*
31
7A
9O

1+88

77
Af
1,
19

1*88
7ft
fO

120
’ 120
m
x ix

7

J
1
ljo

228
216

£

V 216
12
JC
u

6

12

1 ox
Uo

17

6

1
*
“

9
9
9

a
“

Truck d r i v e r s , heavy (o v e r 1 t o n s , o th e r than t r a i l e r
*

JTructers, power ( f o r k - l i f t )
M anufacturing •«•••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••«•
D urable goods
. . . . . T>
.TTT. T . tTTT. TT. Trt r r r t T
.
.
Nondurahle goods
Nonmanufactur1ng . . . . . . .
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s ■ t . t . 1t Tt . T f t . M t t t t T 1 , t t M t ) I ( l
» ,
U h olesa le tra d e n . f Tf t t f t t , , t t , n , M , f t t l l l i n i l l
R e t a il tra d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3,971*
3 ,7 5 6
3,6 1 8
138
218
102
57
59

1.2 2 7
1,1 7 1
1,001
170
56
28

1*78
1 .8 0
A* f9
2.0l*
1 .5 3
1 .6 ?
|

Watchmen ............................. ...............................................................
M anufacturing
D urable goods
Nondurable goods «*...«o.«.o...ooo.0oo.«...s.3**.
Norananufacturing .<>••••••••••••••.••••••
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * .............................
W holesale tra d e
R e t a i l tra d e
......... ......
Finance **

2.11*9
837
691*
11*3
1,312
67
130
98
113

1 .3 1
1*66
1.6 8
1 .5 6
1 .0 9
1*23
1.22
1 .2 0
1.09

1/

1/
3/
V
5/
*
**

-

-

15
15

*

-

27
27

5

1.71*
1.7$
le7 5
1 .7 5
1 .6 0
1*66
1 .5 3
1*57

J r u c le r s , power (o t h e r than f o r k - l i f t ) ............................. ..
Mai u fa c t u r ing
JVnrabl n goods t t t i r 1111 n t m n m i i 1 i i i i
i
Wonriurahle goods . . . t t f t t t t f t t M t , , , t l i n , n i , t t (
Itfornnarmfao+.iiring . , . , , , , , , , , , , , ^ , , , , , , , , , , , , , 0 , , , , !
R e t a i l trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

-

6

1

3

1
JL

3

5

-1
X

1
J

15
15
0
9
Jj
C

19
11*
i t*
-U

£

9

1*5
8

a
0

77
9f
1
,
U
90

t

P

10

18

in
XU

18

a
1*0
22
0
0
u*
1ft
AO

91 116
1*7 101
1,0
7ft
fO
9,
O
p
Mi
U
U
A9
1
.
in
AU
U
At
9
28

21
CX — t r
tU
*
0
*1
cX
>y
<
9

115 - 2 . 292
2 l 136
n
7nJi
7ft
Av/t*
9C A90
t?
86
9 a>d

196 1612
121* T58T
79li
Acl* A99 e
90
t?
79
77
9A
77
fA
A9
A

31
77
9A
9d
g

7ft
AO

8 ?}
81*7
ft7n
CJ v
17
j.
a
a

278 1*87
97ft
t fO " W
97ft )<7ft
C (0 Ufo

O
y

805
77ft
r fO
97
«f

rt

*

•
-

-

20
*

26
-

-

•

32

20

26
10

5

1
1

3
1

32

•
-

•

20
12

m

£

-

7

13

63?

l

1

1
*

6

9

633
7

3

3

78
-

189

78
g
2
2
55

189

•

10
1
*
25

22
91
3 ~ T
2
i
5

13?
ll
3
g

3?
33
30

88

121*

2

1*8
17
18

16
3
12
1

18
15
1

7

35
l£ T
•
ii
l
jl
-*
21
1

_
2

18
1

80
T
1*0
9 ),
‘U
16
6
1
*

33
28
28
5
2
.

81
7i*
66
g
7
9

J

k

68 158
60
1*3 ~ w ■ 3 3
1*3
i i 137
f
£ lA
xo
22
17
5
At*

2
1

67
31
9a
2

7

15

1
*

2

_

38
3S"
15
97
O

_
_

66
66
66

23
23

5
5
3

“
~

la
“
“

9

“

0
c
~

“

158
156
770
iiy
70
9y

3
9
3
“

liO
in
Ju
30

•
•

151
151
351

^8
9^
98

_
.

.

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Workers were distributed as follows: $ at $2.2$ and under 2.30; 10 at $2.30 - 2.35; 10 at $2.35 - 2.1*0; 10 at $2.1*0 - 2.1*5; 10 at $2.50 - 2.60; 20 at $2.60 - 2.70; 10 at $2.80 - 2.90.
Workers were distributed as follows: 1$ at $2.15 and under 2.20; 1*6 at $2.$0 - 2.60; 1*9 at $2.60 - 2.70; 102 at $2.80 - 2.90; 1 at $2.90 - 3.
*
All at $2.25 and under 2.30.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




28
28

“■

18

-

~

10
in
xU

97
07
y*
“ 5/ 97
*

_
.

19

Table A-Ua:

Custodial, WateUoud,Uu}f and SUlpfUn/f OooufSuUiOHd - Mot&i VelUcUl and Mot&i-Vehicle ZquipmetU

1/

(Average hourly earnings 2 / fo r selected occupations 3 / in the
D etroit Metropolitan Area, December 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARRINGS OF—
$
1 .1 5

$

1.20

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1.60 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5

1.20

1 .2 5

1.30

1 .3 5

1.40

3

1
2

-

-

2

-

1

-

3

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

4
155
36

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

-

$

O c c u p a t io n

of
workers

hourly
earnings

1.10

and
under
1 .1 5

1 .4 5 3 .5 0 1 .5 5 ' 1 ,6 0 1 ,6 5 1 ,7 0 1 .7 5 1 ,8 0 1 .8 5 1 ,9 0 1 .9 5

$
C rane o p e r a t o r s , e l e c t r i c b r i d g e (u n d e r 20 t o n s ) ...........
G uards .............................. .................................................................................
J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s (men) .....................................
J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s (women) ...................................
P a c k e r s (m en) .............. .. ............... .................. ...................................... ..
P a c k e r s (women) ......................................• • • • • • • • .......................................

952
2 ,0 7 0
4 ,2 4 6
487
553
1 ,8 8 9
644

581
6
T ru ck d r i v e r s , l i g h t (u n d e r 1-f t o n s ) ...........................................
T ru ck d r i v e r s , medium ( l i - t o and i n c l u d i n g 4- t o n s ) . . .
T ru ck d r i v e r s , h ea v y ( o v e r 4 t o n s , t r a i l e r t y p e ) ...........
T r u c k e r s , pow er ( f o r k - l i f t ) ......................................................... ..
T r u c k e r s , p ow er ( o t h e r than f o r k - l i f t ) ..................................
Watchmen . . . . ............. ...................................... .............................................

869
*128
573
687
2,96-7
906
403

1.88
-

1 .8 2
1 .6 1
1 .5 9
I .73
1 /7 5

1.66
1 .8 0
1 72
i!s o
1 .8 0
1 .8 2
1 .7 5
1 .7 7

12

5
17

9 2 2 2 4 5Q
302
125
g

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

-

-

36

3'

9

20

10

6

8

264
235

23

620

2

4
50
17
52

399
593
80
925
37
5
3
1360
278
31

$
2 .0 5

2.10

$

$
$
Is
2 .1 5 2.20 2 .2 5

2 .0 5 ? . i o

2.00

2 .1 5

2 .2 0 12.25 2 .3 0

361

162

368

22

1

33

971

-

-

56

38

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

_

|

1

20

24
84 296
4
80
280 192
272
153 369 2701

-

1 .7 9

8
52
464

$

2.00

90

10

22

408

186
5

282

30

260
156

19

19
40:
38
105
151

1

-

3
30
30
98

2

7

11
1042
16
195
31

686
462

12
1523
53
324
608
694
119

15

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

1

-

J
i

t

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 100 workers primarily engaged in producing motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment (Group 3 7 1 ) , automobile stampings (Group 31.62)9
automotive hardware (part of Group 3 4 2 9 ), carburetors, pistons, and piston rings (part of Group 3 5 9 0 ), and electrical equipment for automotive use (part of Group 3641) . The industry group
codes refer to Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime *md night work.
1/ Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.

Table A-4b;

Custodial, W atehoulint}, and SiUfZfUwf 0c&4f*ati&H& - Mat&i-VehicL PotiU and /Jcceddctied 1/
(Average hourly earnings 2/ for selected occupations
Detroit Metropolitan Area, December 1 9 5 1 )

"Jj in the

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and size of establishment

N um ber
of
workers

Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) .....
Establishments with 101 - 1,000 workers ..........
T
Establishments with 1,001 or more workers - tT, __ T

206
35
171

Guards ..............................................
Establishments with 101 - 1,000 w o r k e r s ....... .
Establishments with 1,001 or more workers ........

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men) ....... .
Establishments with 101 - 1,000 workers ..........
Establishments with 1,001 or more workers ........

See footnotes at end of table.




A verage
hourly
earnings

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.10 1.15 1.2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.6 0 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1,90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2 .10 2.15 2.20 2.25
under
1.15 1.2 0 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1,90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2 .10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30
$

f .86

5
5

1.81

1

271

1 .7 7

4

12

17

101

1.86

.

-

-

170

1.72

-

-

-

1

-

-

2

-

4

9
3

6
11

800

1.6 2
1.63
1.61

1
1

.

3
3

2
2

3

422

1
1

-

1
1

129
51
78

75
51
24

126

378

8
.

2

_

3

.

270
144

2

6

1 t87

52
16
36

83
8

228
96
132

15

10
5

40
6
34

81
3
78

1
1

54

8
46

2
_

2

«
»

87
87

75

16

6
10

28
_

-

28

_

-

-

56
56

_

_

_

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Mich., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

20

Table A-4b:

Custodial, / a>uUuu*U»u}f and S k ip p in g OeCMpattatU - M oto*-VJucle PoaU a*ut AcceiiaMe* U - Go*Uitu4
W
*d
(A v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 2 / f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s 2 / i n t h e
D e t r o i t M e t r o p o l i t a n A r e a , D e c e m b e r 1951)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
O c c u p a t io n and s i z e o f e s t a b lis h m e n t

of
workers

A verage
hourly
earnings

$

1.10

and
under
1 .1 5

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1 .1 5 1 . 2 0 1 . 2 5 1 . 3 0 1 .3 5 1 . 4 0 1 . 4 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 5 5 1 . 6 0 1 .6 5 1 . 7 0 1 .7 5 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 . 1 0 2 .1 5 2

1.20

1 .2 5

1.30

1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5

1.50

1 .5 5

1.60

3
3

13
2

1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5

2.00

2 .0 5

2.10

2 .1 5

$

2 .2 5

2.20 2 .2 5 2 .3 0

%
J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s , (women)
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h l O l - 1 ,0 0 0 w o r k e r s .,
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r more w o rk e rs

56
25"
30

105

1 .6 1

t^ t

-

____ - ____- _____- ____ - ___ 2 ____ - ____4
^
4

...................................................................11

1 .6 1

1 6 ___ 20

5
11

1 .7 7
1 .8 0
1 .7 4

12
8
_£ ____4 0
9
40

24
5
19

10___22

O rd er f i l l e r s ............................... ..........................
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 01 - 1 ,0 0 0 w o rk e rs .
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r m ore w o rk e rs

“ 45"

P a ck e rs ( men) .................... ....................................................
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 101 - 1 ,0 0 0 w o rk e rs . ,
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r m ore w o r k e r s

H3
332

1 ,7 4
1 .7 0
1 .7 5

P a ck e rs (women) ...........................................................
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r m ore w o rk e rs

337
138

1 .6 7
1 .6 3

R e c e i v i n g c l e r k s ...........................: * 1 H * * * V ............
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 101 - 1 , 0 ( 5 0 w o r k e r s .
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r m ore w o r k e r s

41
24
17

16

5

TM

12

-

- 5

1 .8 5

4

5

-

2

15P -i_18l
123 183
22 7
-

,4 !

_6

S t o c k h a n d le r s and t r u c k e r s , hand .......................
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 101 - . 1 , 0 0 0 w o r k e r s .,
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r m ore w o rk e rs

59

445

1 .3 2 9

632

50

.12

78

10

192

71

62

1 .7 8
1 .8 0
1 .7 1

286

391

160

121

1 .8 2
1 .8 2

T ru ck d r i v e r s , medium ( l £ t o and I n c lu d in g 4 t o n s ) . . . .
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 101 - 1 ,0 0 0 w o rk e rs .........................
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r m ore w o rk e rs ....................

39
34

134

1 . 8
1 .8 5
1 . 8

610

"T5

T r u c k e r s , p ow er ( f o r k - l i f t ) .....................................
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 101 - 1 ,0 0 0 w o rk e rs .
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r m ore w o rk e rs

205
W

Watchmen ............................................... ...................................
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 101 - 1 ,0 0 0 w o rk e rs .
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r m ore w o rk e rs

158

1 .6 3
1 .5 7
1 .7 1

2

74

2

A

.......................................................................................
^
-1
.......................................................................................

4

.

_ 7__ 6________ 2____2
_
_

3
3

31
4
27

36

34
18
16

166

3 ____ 9

T

9

8

81

-

20

20

10

10

-

-

- 3

2

-

-

-

“

-

17 ___ z _ _________________17
“
-

-

17

10
10

21

-

-

13

5

-

-

-

1

25

26

1

31

75

21

8

21

17

4

- ___ - __ ____ 1

-

12___ 1___=__
_

299
51 112
115 187

120

- 2

6

16
4

16
5

2

40

120 30

36

3j____3
3
3

30

2___~

3
2

1 .7 7
1 .7 7

149

11

1[-2L

6

1 .7 5

T r u c k e r s , pow er ( o t h e r th a n f o r k - l i f t ) . . . . .
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r more w o rk e rs

270

3_____ _______ 6
3

HT T7t~
5
389

126

7
7

1 .7 5

T ru ck d r i v e r s , h ea v y ( o v e r 4 t o n s , t r a i l e r t y p e ) .
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 101 - 1 ,0 0 0 w o rk e rs ...............
E s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h 1 ,0 0 1 o r m ore w o rk e rs ..........

31
501

78

1 .6 9
1 .6 9

43
29

IQ.

m

176

1.68

Truck drivers, light (under l - tons) ......
j
Establishments with 101 - 1,000 workers

22

42

1.86

697

17 6

10

3

30 __________ r . ____-

13 -

30

-

T
1

r

-

-

-

-

-

-

30___ ____ =___ -

6
-

52
18

31

15

19

-

-

4

34

-

-

A

-

6

-

30

21

15

12

1 / I n c lu d e s a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s g ro u p e d i n m o to r v e h i c l e s and m o t o r - v e h i c l e equ ip m en t ( s e e f o o t n o t e t o t a b l e A - l a ) o t h e r th a n o p e r a t i o n s o f F o r d , C h r y s l e r , G e n e r a l M o t o r s , H udson, P a ck a r d ,
B r i g g s , and M urray; t h i s d e f i n i t i o n w as a g r e e d upon i n c o n s u l t a t i o n w it h t h e Wage S t a b i l i z a t i o n B o a rd , R e g io n V I - B .

2/ Excludes nremium pay for overtime and night work.
2/

S tu d y l i m i t e d t o men w o rk e rs e x c e p t w h ere o t h e r w is e i n d i c a t e d .




21

B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-336*

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation 2/

of
workers

hourly
earnings

$
$
1 .1 x 0 M 5
and j

$

$

$
i.5 o

1 .5 5

1 .6 0

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

1 .6 0

$
1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

2 .0 0

2 .0 5

$
2 .1 0

$
$
$
$
$
$
2 . 1 5 2 . 2 0 2 . 2 5 2.30 2 . 3 5 2 .h 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

2 .0 0

2 .0 5

2 ,1 0

2 .1 5

2 .2 0

17

$
2 .1 x 5

$
2 .5 0

2 .6 0

$
2 .7 0

$ n
2 .8 0

2 . UO 2 .1 x 5

2.50

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

under
3/

1 .1 x 5

1 .5 0

1 .5 5

2 .2 5

2.30

2 .3 5

$

1/
"2 /
3/
5/
“

9

190

1 .8 2

5
-

5

5

-

2

5
18

5

-

15
-

k

1 .9 7

11
-

1x0

83

5

h

7
6

59

2.0lx
2.06

-

-

-

-

-

h

-

h

16

1

1

2

8h

1 .9 2

-

-

-

-

13

_

17

h

5

35
86

Chippers and grinders U/a ....
Coremakers, hand h / a ........ .
Coremakers, machine U / b .... .
Electricians, maintenance h /a
Furnace tenders h / a ......... .
Millwrights h / a ............. .
Molders, floor h / a .......... .
Molders, hand, bench h /a . . . . .
Pourers, metal h /a .,........
Sand mixers h / a .......... .
Shake-out men h / a ........... .
Truckers, power h / b ........

1 .9 8

lk

80

2 . Oh
1 .9 k

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 .7 5

-

-

-

10

2

-

21

1 .6 9

-

2

-

1 .5 7

10

11

15

10

1 .7 6

The study cov ere d independent n o n fe rro u j fo u n d r ie s (e x c e p t d i e - c a s t i n g fo u n d r ie s ) w ith 8 o r more w orkers.
Data limited to m e n workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages b y method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B -

O c c u p a tio n

339x 1 3 K

m

h

2

1

2

5
-

2

1

u
1

2

1

2

1

1

-

1

-

3

k

1

2

-

2

3

-

-

3

-

8

1

-

-

-

1
-

-

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
-

3
1

3
-

5
5

3
-

7

-

-

-

3

1

2

23
9
-

1

-

-

-

2

5

-

2

5

2

h

k

6

-

13

8
6

1

29

-

h

11

12

-

h

1

k

2

15
-

-

-

10

3

-

-

3
-

3
5
-

8

20

18

2

6

-

7

6
10

2
3

2
-

-

10

-

6
13

7

5
19

18

2
12

2
1

17
1

5

hS
8h
3h

22

3

1

1

-

1

Data r e l a t e t o an August 1951 p a y r o ll p e r io d .

and Steel tyobfinfi. 1/

2/

Chippers and grinders h / a ................................... ..........................
Die setters h / a ..... 7 ..'................................
Die sinkers h / a ........... ................ ..............
Drop-hammer operators, board (1,200 lb.
and under) L/b ................... ...........
Drop-hammer operators, board (over 1,200
to 2,000 lb.) h/b .............................
Drop-hammer operators, board (over 2,000 lb.) V b ...
Hammersmiths h/a ........................................................... .7 ................
Heaters, forge, light work lx/b....... .......... ..
Helpers, forge h/a .............................
Inspectors, class A h/a ................................. ................................
Inspectors, class B t / a ............................................ ................... ..
Inspectors, class C §/a .........................
Mechanics, maintenance h / a .................................................
Trim-press operators, c
<51d trim k/a ........................................
Trim-press operators, hot trim d ........... .....
Truckers, power (fork-lift) k/a .................................................

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of iron and steel forgings (Group 3391) as defined in the standard industrial Classification Manual (19k$ edition)
prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2/
3/
5/
""
5/

Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Mich., December 1951
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Workers were distributed as follows?
9 a t $1.1x5 - 1.50; and 1 at $1.$Q - 1.55.




Bureau of Labor Statistics

22

Table B - 3 1 U ?

S h e e t -M d a l W o * k

1/

1 / The study cov e re d establish m en ts w ith more than 20 workers engaged i n the manufacture o f sh e e t-m e ta l p rod u cts (Group 3I14
J I4) as d e fin e d i n the Standard in d u s t r ia l C l a s s i f i c a t io n Manual (191*5 e d i t i o n )
prepared by the Bureau o f the Budget,
2 / Data lim it e d to men w orkers. A ll were p a id on a tim e b a s i s ,
3 / E xcludes premium pay f o r overtim e and n ig h t work,
H / Workers were d is t r ib u t e d as f o l l o w s : 1 a t $ 1,2 0 - l,2 f> ; 3 a t $ 1 . 2 5 - 1 ,3 0 ; 3 a t $ 1,3 5 - 1,1*0; and 1 a t $1,1*0 - 1,1*5.

Table B-34-68:

(Uecbi6fUctiHf, PlotUu},aH& P o iu k ln f 1/

1 / The study covered firm s w ith more than 7 workers engaged in a l l typ es o f e le c t r o p l a t i n g , p la t in g , and m etal p o lis h in g (Group 31*68) as d e fin e d in the Standard I n d u s t r ia l C la s s i f i c a t io n Manual (191*5
e d i t i o n ) prepared by the Bureau o f the B udget.
2 / E xcludes premium pay f o r overtim e and n ig h t work. A ll o r a m a jo r ity o f workers i n each o cc u p a tio n were p a id on a time b a s i s .
O ccupation al Wage Survey, D e t r o it , M ich ., December 1951
U .S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s




23

M o c A U ie 'i t j ^ n d u d fr U e d 1 /

Table B-35:

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

o
f
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
% $
$
$
$
s
$
hourly Under 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.CO 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.903.00
earnings
and
1.40
2/
1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.CO 2.C5 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 over

Machinery 3/
Men
Assemblers, class A t j ..............................
Assemblers, class B J ........................... .............................................
Assemblers, class C L j ................. ............
Electricians, maintenance Lj ........................
Inspectors, class A L j ..............................
Inspectors, class B l j ..............................
Inspectors, class C l j ..............................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners l j ..................
Machine-tool operators, production, class A 4 /, J ...
Automatic-lathe operators, class A J ............
Drill-press operators, radial, class A j j ...... .
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A l j ............................
Engine-lathe operators, class A J ...............
Grinding-machine operators, class A 4/ ...........
Milling-machine operators, class A LJ ............
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class A l j ....
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class A: Total ................
T i m e ..............
Incentive .........
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B
Total ................................
Time ............................ .
Incentive ........ ................
Drill-press operators, radial, class B i j ........
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindlftj ftlnss
Total ...................... ,r .............................
Time .....................
Incentive ................
Engine-lathe operators, class B l j .......... .
Grinding—machine operators, class B L j ....................
Milling-machine operators, class B Q ..............................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
screw machine), class B : Total ...... .. ........
T i m e .... ..........
Incentive .........
Machine-tool operators, production, class C l j , J ...
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class C l j ............................
Engine-lathe operators, class C l j ............... .....................
Grinding-machine operators, class C A / ..... TT1T. T
Milling-machine operators, class C LJ ..............................
Machine-tool operators, toolroom l j ..........................................
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) 4/ . .
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) L J . . . .
Truckers, hand l j .................. .. ...............
Welders, hand, class A J ...........................
Welders, hand, class B j j ...........................

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b l e .




2.15

1,102
1,295
1,480
321
587
638
253
1,321
9,548
47
334

1.85
1.78
2.18
2.20
1.86
1.71
1.60
2.35
2.02
2.14

213
1,435
3,092
1,125
473

1.89
2.32
2.41
2.31
2.11

803
593
210

2.14
2.182.03

4,105
3,564
541
175

1.89
1.87
2.04
1.82

431
303
128
254
1,548
595

1.88
1.84
1.97
1.88
1.93
1.86

772
616
156
904
342
40
179
216
579
3,420
837
999
860
190

6
77
-

13
101
-

_
16
2
84
-

_

43
4
119
-

_

_

6
85
1
23
165
-

7
70
6
37
315
20
20

42
31
7
65
146
2
-

-

-

9
74
51
1
29
36
217
14
-

_

_

198
146
1
1
74
26
15
17
-

599
958
7
3
174
39
40
185
_

„

11
92
45
15
62
51

298
90

205
33

96
34

25
_

70
-

90

16
42
12

19
121
1

52
20
-

72
61
2

16
34
3

22
31

209
17
-

360
1

669
18
81

494
4

340
_
17

547
12
8

414

55
[
1

38
70
10
27
28
182

85
2
21
17

80
9
7
2
3°

20
49
33
62
4

1
101
68
22
28

4
73
152
43
119

5
53
110
61
135

10
29
132
69
24

49
214
107
26

96
159
34
2

39
185
79
65

5
267
474
173
-

385
448
195
10

33
20
13

24
1
23

74
39
35

134
80
54

37
14
23

33 113
27 i101
12
6

35
35
_

20
20
_

76
69
7

79
61
18

31
31
„

207
171
36
15

389
167
222

202
125
77

30
21

19

27

20

8

19

27

20

8

16
10
6

42
26
16
13
96
46

41
50
6
2
7
96
23
42
216
_

i 1
! 2
i 1
1

6

13

6

13

60
60
-

303
277
26
12

274
262
12
19

708
702
6
24

610
607

20

106
88
18
11

10

988
974
14
64

3

5

3

5

95
83
12
3
82
53

40
40

32
32

_

-

7
76
32

123
133
162

11
9
2
38
263
59

82
80
2
20
551
79

22
16
6
30
82
29

90
9
81
16
137
50

132
124
8
9

12
2
10
3

91
81
10

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

-

6
-

-

_

6

-

-

-

6
_
-

-

6

116
116

.

-

_

_

-

10
23

36
42

3

-

_

_

-

1.89
1.85
2.07
1.69

_
_
-

_

_
_
-

.
-

60
60

12

-

-

_

8

14

21

94

13

98

12
86

58
44
14
138

75
69
6
354

60
54
6
44

181
180
1
8

1.70
1.74
1.68
1.72
3.26
2.62
2.27
1.66
2.10
1.94

-

6

11
-

5
1

6
2

5

1

4.

3

9

7
1
25
1

59
5
12
20

21
6
34
21

59
6
35
22

168
10
29
112

4

-

2
3
2
1

_

3

3
19
11

24

4

21

143

155

370

117

130
2
11

31
-

2
2
36

14
16

43
-

30

22
17

20
_

1
31

_
_
_

«
.

193 I113

148

10
21 !

-

4.
2
2
4

5
2
1
13

2

_

6

2
2
17

9

36
4
32

30

441 1289 1545 1012 804 516
_
_
_
2
28
76
10
2 | ~

6

1

_

-

1
22
2

2
8
6

_
30
1
-

144
5
_

35

3 5 : - )

_

_

45
1
-

125

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_ j „ j
1
_ 1
40
40

_

«
.

1

1
„

„

4.

20

18

27

12

6

4
7

20
2

18
1

27

12

6

3
4
46

2
75

127

94
43
280
79

2
2

_

4

49

19

35

136

102
40
230

27
35

324
107

263

7
1

17

12

18

27

O c c u p a t io n a l Wage S u r v e y , D e t r o i t , M ic h . , D ecem ber

230 49
338 403
135 116
30
-

_

-

-

2

21
2

22
86

51

_

3
3
1
1
-

-

75

6

10
6

40

.

-

_
—

_
99
507 1282 816
51
5
3

33

a

2

_

-

-

353
4
-

-

151

_

103

125

6

1951
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B u rea u o f L a bor S t a t i s t i c s

O ccupation and se x

Number
of
workers

Continued.

MacUtitefaf HttSititsiiei y

T a b l e B-35*

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
Average
Under 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5
hourly
earnings $
1 .4 0
2/
1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0

STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ * $
2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 1 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 *3.00
and
2 .0 5 2 .1 0 2 .1 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 over

Machinery 3 / - Continued

Women

%
A ssem blers, c la s s C ij ..................................................................
I n s p e c t o r s , c la s s B I j .................... .............................................
I n s p e c t o r s , c la s s C ij ..................................................................
M a ch in e-tool o p e r a t o r s , p ro d u c tio n , c la s s B Lj, j>/ . . .
T u r r e t -la t h e o p e r a t o r s , hand (in c lu d in g hand
screw m achine), c l a s s B i j ........................................
M a ch in e-tool o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c tio n ,
c la s s C / :
T o ta l .......................................................................
T i m e ..................................................................
In ce n tiv e ........................................................
D r il l - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s , s i n g l e - o r m u lt ip le s p in d le , c la s s C : T o ta l ...................................................
_
Tinwa r . r t . r r r r i r . T_ , ...........
In c e n tiv e ....................................
M illin g-m ach in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s C : T o ta l .......................................................................
Time ...................................................................
In ce n tiv e ........................................................

1,231
127
1 ,0 8 0
64

1 .6 2
1 .7 8
1 .6 3
1 .8 4

2

11

412

14

118

123

21

155

140

_

15
4

371
579

164
30
36
11

99
67
9
7

5

6
3

6

12

5

5

8

1

-

-

15

14

15

14

13

8

19
17
19

7
3
2

-

1

1

2

-

1

13

5

8

1

1

-

.

13

5

8

1

1

_

-

9

4

4

-

-

-

»

8

9

4

4

6

4

1

4

1

1

4

1

4

1

1

-

5

_

67
on
AU
5
1
1

1

i

10

1 .9 4

708
352
356

1 .7 4
1 .7 2
1 .7 6

6
6
-

-

-

11
11

12
4
8

37
15
22

102
75
27

276
137
139

158
111
47

49
4
45

452
228
224

1 .7 4
1 .7 2
1 .7 7

4
4

-

-

3

11
3
8

25
15
10

41
24
17

195
114
81

98
66
32

37
2
35

13

208
93
115

1 .7 5
1 .7 2
1 .7 6

-

-

1
1

12

56
45
11

2

-

71
20
51

10

12

37
27
10

10

2

6

E le c t r ic i a n s , maintenance ij .....................................................
I n s p e c t o r s , c l a s s A i j ............................... ..................................
J a n it o r s , p o r t e r s , and cle a n e r s tj ........................................

23
79
393

2 .4 7
2 .6 1
1 .6 3

6 /5 0

81

56

78

12

26

40

M a ch in e-tool o p e r a t o r s , p ro d u c tio n , c l a s s A Lf , j>/ . . .
11 _pT*o<3c! npora,hriT,< rorlial
a
gqQ A /j /
E n gin e-la th e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A tj .................................
Grinding-m achine o p e r a t o r s , c la s s A U .........................
M illin g-m ach in e o p e r a t o r s , c la s s A Lj ...........................
T u r r e t-la th e o p e r a t o r s , hand (in c lu d in g hand
screw m ach in e), c la s s A ij ...............................................

4,2 1 5
151
717
1,395
461

2 .5 6
2 .3 5
2 .4 6
2 .6 2
2 .4 9

163

2 .4 5

M ach in e-tool o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c tio n , c la s s B LJ . . . . . . .
T o o l-a n d -d ie makers ij ..................................................................
W elders, hand, c l a s s A ij ............................................................

175
3,420
94

2 .1 2
2 .6 2
2 .4 1

-

3

-

2

-

-

2

-

-

45

_

_
_

_

»
-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

112

148

_

_

_
-

-

-

-

5
5

11
1

6
14

62

642

-

-

1
27

21

6

815
in
XU

688

397

178

193
316
107

28
344
95

143

31

35

10
507 1232
11 26

40
816
2

M achine-Tool A c c e s s o r ie s - Jobbing Shops

Men

See fo o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b le .




5

20

-

-

-

;

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

10
1
5

-

20
5

15

5

5

70

15

-

148
168
112

1071
nn
rx
342
187
146

-

32

45

Oft
40

35

_

10
2

1

1

40
5

43
46

„
26

45

125

-

-

-

-

353

151

103

125

-

_

25

Table B-35*

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

Number
of
workers

M a cJU n & >u f S n A iA ltrU ed 1 / - G & *U iem & d

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ „ $
$
$
$
Average
f . 4 o 1.4 5 i . 5 o 1.5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .9 5 2 .0 0 2.05 2 .1 0 2.15 2 .2 0 2.25 2 .3 0 2 ,4 0 2 .5 0 2.60
hourly EJnder
2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2.9 0
earnings
$
1.4 0
y
1.45 i . 5 o 1.5 5 1 .6 o 1.65 1 .7 0 1 .7 5 1 .8 0 1.85 1 .9 0 1.95 2 .0 0 2 .0 5 2f 10 2 ,1 5 2 ,2 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 ,4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2.8 0 2 .9 0 3.00

$
3.00
and
over

M a c h in e -T o o l A c c e s s o r i e s - P r o d u c t io n Shops

Men
%
A s s e m b le r s , c l a s s B 4 / ..................................................................
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m ain ten an ce 4 / .....................................................

I n s p e c t o r s , c l a s s c 11/ ......... ........................................................

M a c h i n e -t o o l o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c t i o n ,
c l a s s A 4 / , 5 / ...............................................................................
E n g in e -l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A 4 / .................................
G rin d in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A 4 / .........................
M illin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A 4 7 ...........................
T u r r e t - l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , hand ( i n d u c t i n g hand
s c r e w m a c h in e ), c l a s s A 4 / ..............................................

M a c h i n e -t o o l o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c t i o n ,
c l a s s B, 4 / , 5 / .....................................................................................
E n g in e -l a t h e ^ o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B 4 / .....................................
G rin d in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B 4 / ...........................
M illin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B 47 • •.........................
T u r r e t - l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , hand ( i n c l u d i n g hand
s c r e w m a c h in e ), c l a s s 8 4 / ....................................................

M a c h i n e -t o o l o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c t i o n ,
c l a s s C, k / , 5 / ......................................................................................
D r ill-p r e s s o p e ra to rs , s in g le - o r m u ltip le s p i n d l e , c l a s s C 4 / ....................................................................
G r in d in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C 4 / ................. ..
M illin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C 4 7 .......... .. ............. ..

T o o i - a n d - d i e m akers 4 / ...................... ........................................... ..

Truckers, hand 4 / . , 7 ........................... ............................ .....................

1 .9 9
2 .0 6
? 09
-j fifl
1 .7 0
1.53

i,5 o 4
232
799
364

2 .2 0
2.17
2 .2 1
2.1 9

79

2.14

1,0 2 1
132
506
340

1 .8 6
1 .9 1
1 .8 7
1 .8 2

»

-

-

-

-

35

1.8 4

"

“

-

■

_

282

1 .6 6

2

14

13

12

8

1
9
1

-

4
3

-

-

-

_

-

-

1
£
16
5

5
3
1
1

18

36

-

-

-

.

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

|

9k

1 .5 ?
1 .6 5

-

122

1 .6 ?

2

6
5
3

70
11

2.28
1 .5 6

2

*
*

59

1 .7 1
1 .7 6

6

_

23

-

-

I

2

3
1
9

4
25

3
26

5
19

15
19

1
1

2
3
15

8
2
1
28

22
3

4

6
2
1
3

5

5
3
8
7

1
5
16
2

4
25

4
3
12

34
6
25
2

55
8
13
22

141
15
72
36

174
27
82
59

10

13

28
14

2

4
1
2
1

•
5
1
21

1

22
39
90
68
65
172

1
1

-

2
2

1
7
2

3
2
2

7
5
;

197
24
88
62

188
25
120
36

158
67
66
20

111
12
69
27

6

22

5

3

2

86
13
52
19

21

l

-

-

3
1

1

163 185
34
7
86 136
35 24

48

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

1

8

4

19
2

x

36
34

121
3
65
48

63
5
31
26

108
23
40
38

208
32
100
56

173
17
79
73

102
25
59
18

“

-

4

1

6

18

4

~

-

46

73

60

2

6

-

1

-

1

5
12
18

5
13
21

1
34
19

-

-

13
41

“

2
1
1

1

7

5
5

8
7

1

-

-

1
5

4
l

-

1

-

12

”

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1
1

5

2

42

6
-

16
25

16.
1
14
l

-

36

71

-

-

10
23

2

n

3

1

-

1

1

1

1

5

6

6

1
1

1
1

11

16

4

21

_

_

_

Women

M a c h i n e -t o o l o p e r a t o r s , p r o d u c t i o n , c l a s s C 4 / , 5 / . .
M illin g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C 4 / . . . . 7 ..................

h9

6
3

23
23

3
3

_

4
4

1
1

I
1 / The s t u d y c o v e r e d e s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h m ore than 20 w o rk e rs en g a g ed i n t h e m a n u fa ctu re o f n o n e l e c t r i c a l m a ch in ery (G roup 3 5 ) as d e f i n e d i n th e S ta n d a rd I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M anual (1 9 4 5 e d i ­
t i o n ) p r e p a r e d b y th e B u rea u o f t h e B u d g e t ; m a c h i n e -t o o l a c c e s s o r y e s t a b lis h m e n t s (G rou p 3 5 4 3 ) w it h more th a n 7 w o rk e rs w ere i n c l u d e d .
2 / E x c lu d e s premium p a y f o r o v e r t im e and n i g h t w o rk .
3/
I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r m a c h i n e -t o o l a c c e s s o r y e s t a b lis h m e n t s f o r w h ic h s e p a r a t e d a ta a r e a l s o p r e s e n t e d .
5/
I n s u f f i c i e n t d a t a t o p e r m it p r e s e n t a t i o n o f s e p a r a t e a v e r a g e s b y m ethod o f wag© paym ent; a l l o r p r e d o m in a n t ly tim e w o r k e r s ,
F / I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r o p e r a t o r s o f o t h e r m a c h i n e -t o o l s i n a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e show n s e p a r a t e l y .
7 j/ W ork ers w ere d i s t r i b u t e d a s f o l l o w s :
25 a t $ 1 .0 5 - 1 . 1 0 ; and 25 a t $ 1 .3 5 - 1 . 4 0 .




-

2
6
Table B-40:

Q & iistA& cld’ 1J

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

Number
of
w o rk e rs

O c c u p a t io n 2 /

*
1 .3 5
and
u n d er
1 .4 0

y

%

40
102
102
52
239
17
691
21 4

C a r p e n t e r s , m a in ten a n ce ................................................. .....................
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e ...................... ...........................................
J a n i t o r s and c l e a n e r s (men) .................... ........................................
J a n i t o r s and c l e a n e r s (women) .................... ............................ ..
M e c h a n ic s , m a in ten a n ce ..........................................................................
P a i n t e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e ...................................................... ..
S t o c k h a n d le r s and t r u c k e r s , hand ...............................................
T ru ck d r i v e r s , medium ( l £ t o and i n c l u d i n g 4 t o n s ) . . .

al

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

1 .4 5

1 .5 0

1 .5 5

1-.6 0

1 .6 5

1
1 .7 0

%

1 .4 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

$
1 .9 0

1 .4 5

1 .5 0

.1*55

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

.
-

1 .7 9
1 .9 3
1 .5 0
1 .4 8
1 .8 7
1 .8 2
1 .6 3
1 .8 8

—
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

40
35
-

~

376

1

45
5
-

3
12

2

9

"

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

90

6
-

“

-

-

-

4
-

“

1 37

_

28

-

4
-

1
102
52
5
-

6
213

181
2
88
”

1 / The s t u d y c o v e r e d e s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h m ore t h a n 1 0 0 w o rk e rs i n t h e r a i l r o a d i n d u s t r y (G rou p 4 0 ) a s d e f i n e d i n t h e S ta n d a rd I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n Manu­
Q .949 e d i t i o n ) p r e p a r e d b y t h e B u rea u o f t h e B u d g e t .
2 / D ata l i m i t e d t o men w o rk e rs e x c e p t w here o t h e r w i s e i n d i c a t e d . A l l w o rk e rs w ere p a id o n a tim e b a s i s .
2 / E x c lu d e s premium p a y f o r o v e r t im e and n i g h t w o rk .

T a b le B -5 4 5 2

Mitt* %
eaU>iA i/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O c c u p a t io n 2 /

Number
of
w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a r n in g s
y

*
1 .1 5

*
1 .2 0

$
1 .2 5

*
1 .3 0

$
1 .3 5

*
1 .4 0

$
1 .4 5

$
1 .5 0

*
1 .5 5

$
1 .6 0

$
1 .6 5

$
1 .7 0

1 .7 5

$
1 .8 0

$
1 .8 5

$
1 .9 0

$
1 .9 5

$
2 .0 0

1
2 .0 5

1 .2 0

$
1 .1 0
and
under
1 .1 5

1 .2 5

1 .3 0

1 .3 5

1 .A 0

. 1 .4 5

1 .5 0

1 .5 5

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

2 .0 0

2 .0 5

2 .1 0 _

26
-

15
-

t

E n g in e e r s , s t a t i o n a r y ..................
F i l li n g - m a c h in e t e n d e r s .............
M e c h a n ic s , a u t o m o t iv e
(m a in t e n a n c e ) ................................
O rd er f i l l e r s .....................................
P a s t e u r i z e r s ........................................
R e f r i g e r a t o r men ..............................
S a n it a r y m e n ........................................
T ru ck d r i v e r s , l i g h t
(u n d e r l £ t o n s ) ............................
T ru ck d r i v e r s , medium ( l £ t o
and i n c l u d i n g 4 t o n s ) .............
T ru ck d r i v e r s , h e a v y ( o v e r 4
t o n s , t r a i l e r t y p e ) ..................
W a sh ers, b o t t l e , m a ch in e ..........
W a sh ers, c a n , m a ch in e ..................

O c c u p a t io n 2 /

R outem en ( d r i v e r - s a l e s m e n )
r e t a i l 5 / ................................
Routem en ( d r i v e r - s a l e s m e n )
w h o le s a l e 2 / .........................

.

48
97

1 .9 4
1 .6 8

89
25
52
22 9
86

1 .9 5
1 .7 1
1 .7 7
1 .7 2
1 .6 9

-

-

-

44

1 .7 5

-

-

-

37

1 .6 7

-

-

-

-

55
73
20

1 .8 0
1 .7 1
1 .6 9

_

_

_

-

-

Number
of
w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
w e e k ly
e a r n in g s

u

3

3

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

3

**

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

3
_

"

-

_

6

-

-

“

-

7

„

_

_

16

53

4
-

-

_

_

-

_

7
3
4
2

68
8

11
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

40

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

3

3

3

-

-

-

19

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

~

3
16

-

3
8

3
3
6
-

3
10
6
188
75

-

-

3

-

~

6
6

-

**

-

•
-

3
12

$

6
5
-

13
3
1

7

30
-

-

-

8
_

34
-

-

-

**

~

~

3
-

-

-

-

54
13

**

1
-

-

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Under

%
7 0 .0 0

%

%

%

%

%

7 0 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0

%
%
%
$
9 5 .0 0 100.00 1 0 5 .0 0 110.00 1 1 5 .0 0 120.00
$

90.00

%

*

125.00

%

*

%

1*

%

%

1 3 0 .0 0 1 3 5 .0 0 140.00 1 4 5 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0 1 5 5 .0 0

%

*

*

160.00 165.00 1 7 0 .0 0 1 7 5 .0 0
and

111*00 120.00 121*00 , 1 3 0 .0 0 131*00 U P . 00 Ik l*oo 1 5 0 .0 0 I ll.PQ 160.00 1 6 5 .0 0 120*00 175.00

7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 9 5 .0 0 100*00

over

*
1 ,2 9 1

116.00

20

19

47

50

53

65

67

98

114

90

100

114

98

85

98

51

32

15

16

10

12

6

31

390

1 2 1 .5 0

22

5

9

1

17

33

24

16

11

24

37

26

28

8

29

13

12

19

11

10

6

5

24

1 / The s t u d y c o v e r e d r e t a i l m ilk d e a l e r e s t a b lis h m e n t s w it h m ore th a n 2 0 w o rk e rs en g a g ed i n t h e d i s t r i b u t i o n o f d a i r y p r o d u c t s (G rou p 5 4 5 2 ) a s d e f i n e d i n t h e S ta n d a rd I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n Manual
(1 9 4 9 e d i t i o n ) p r e p a r e d b y t h e B u rea u o f t h e B u d g e t.

2/
2J
jj
2J

Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Mich., December 1951
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work. All workers were paid on a time basis.
Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Routemen normally work 6-day weekly schedules.




U .S .

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

27

Table B-63:

A vehagi

Number
of
workers

y

N U M B E R OF W O R K ER S R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S OF—

!9
;
$
•
$
Weekly 30.00 32.50 3*5.00 37.50 1)0.00 1)2.50 1)5* -0
Weekly
earnings and
hours
(Standard) (Standard) under
32. ft> 35.00 37.50 liO.OO L2.50 15.QQ- t7 .5 0 50.00

0
0
0
. 1 •
^V\___

Occupation and sex

$
$
$ . 1
J?2.50 1 5 .0 0 17.50 $ 0.0 0 I 2 .5 0 $ 5.0 0 I7 .5 0 70.00 75.00 80.00 $5.00 90.0 0 95 ^
!
55*00. 5 7 .5 0 160.00 6 2 .5 0 65*00 67.5 0 70.00 75*00 80.00 85.00 90.00 ?5 *oo 100. X
I

Men
Clerks, accounting •••••••••.
Section heads ............. .
Tabulating-machine operators
Underwriters.... ......... .

ovei

1
IS
61
21
95

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

$
55.50
81.0 0
59.0 0
68.5 0

1)0.0
3 9 .5
1)0.0
1)0.0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
1)0.0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

36.5 0
15 . oo
i
U6.00
1)1). 00
3 7.0 0
1)7.50
1)2.50
1)1). 50
50.00
1)6.50
62.00
1)6.00
5 3.0 0
1)5.50
1)0.50
60.0 0

39*5

ko.o

1)
-

-

-

-

-

"

2
“

1
1

2

1
2
"

l
2
*

3
6

3
1
1)
11

8
3
1

12

51
3

28
1
10
11
2

7
1)

!

5

3
•
1
)
6

2
2
18

2
8

3
9
1
H)

12
2
10

-

3

3
1
11

2

8

-

-

6

2

13

-

3

-

-

Women
Assemblers ...... ••••••••••••«<
Clerks, accounting ••••••••••••<
Clerks, correspondence, class B
Clerks, file, class A ••.......
Clerks, file, class B .... ....
Clerks, general
Clerks, premium-ledger-card ....
Clerks, underwriter......... .
Key-punch operators •••••••••••<
Premium acceptors •••••••»•••••<
Section heads
Stenographers, general ........
Tabulating-machine operators ..
Typists, class A ......... .....
Typists, class B ..............
Underwriters •••••••......... •<

l/
2/

9
212
28
3h

hh2
273
93
138
82
59
186
191
17
107
790
59

•
.
1)3

k
-

5
7

-

117

-

20

-

1
21
1)

-

100
53
11
13

-

•
•
-

1)

16

•
-

35

-

0

-

5

5

97

127

“

”

30

-

3
82
10
12
10
8
5

-

20

-

16
11)3

3
29
6
10
16
15
9
16
8

20
1
9
69
19
9
15
8
13
2
27
1
19
11)7

3
33
1
25
85

5

”

-

.
26
5
5
10
7
10
\6

5
1
5
23

2
7
120
2

21
7
1)
3
27
5
9
9

-

16
11
1)
6
51

•

33
2
2
2
1)6
5
15
10
7
8
31)
3
12
9
12

•

11
U
9
3

15

-

3

-

11
1

17
6
1

-

5
5
2

7

2

-

.

1

3

2
2
10

•

20

-

1
1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

8

-

-

-

-

33

5
33

-

-

-

6
1

2

1)

1

1

6
2
1
1)
5
21
1)

-

-

-

-

3
2
2

2

-

-

-

-

1)

2

3

17

1

-

3

2

-

-

-

-

-

*

The study covered insurance carriers (Group 63) with more than 20 workers as defined in the Standard Industrial C lassification Manual (19l)9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget*
Hours reflect the workweek for thich employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these hours.
Occupational W
age Survey, Detroit, Mich., December 1951
U.S. D P R M N O LA O
EAT E T F B R
Bureau o f Labor S tatistics




C:

28

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-tim e hours per week agreed upon through c o lle ctiv e bargaining
between employers and trade-unions. Rates and hours are those in e ffe c t on dates indicated.)

Table C-15?

B u ild U tty

Table

G o 4 ld t> l4 4 * c tiO * l

C la ssifica tion

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

B r ick la y e r s ................ .............. •••••••••••.•••.
Carpenters ............ « . . . ...........................................
E lectricians
Painters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plasterers .........................
Plumbers
...........
Building la b o r e r s ........

$3,000
2.750
3.000
2.475
3.000
2.700
2.000

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

B ciJ & eS lie4 ,

July 1, 1951
C lassifica tion
Bread and cake - Machine shops:
Agreement A:
Bread:
Mixers, oven operators ......................
Flour blenders, ingredient scalers,
mixers’ helpers, dividermen,
twisters and panners, benchmen,
oven feeders and dumpers,
m o ld e rs.......... ................ ..
Pan setters* pan rackers* pan
greasers* greasers,fried foods . . .
Bread rackers ....................... ..
Bun panners ........................................
Cake:
Dough mixers, icin g mixers, cooks,
oven o p e ra to r s .......... .......................
Ingredient scalers, depositor
operators, doughnut-machine
operators .............................................
Mixers’ helpers, depositor helpers,
oven feeders and dumpers, ic in g machine o p e r a to r s .......... ..................
Pan greasers, cutters .........................
Decorators ........................... .
Pan washers, a ll other help (men) . .
le e rs, a l l other help (women) . . . . . .
Sweet yeast goods:
Dough mixers, bakers, proofers,
bench leaders
Benchmen, doughnut fryers, doughnut
glazers .................................................
Flour blenders, ingredient scalers,
icin g mixers and cookers,
depositors, and dividermen . . ........
Oven feeders, pan greasers .••*•••••
Dough feeders, scalers
A ll other help (men) .......... •••••••••
Packers, ic e r s , a ll otter help
(women) .........................
Pie:
Pie bakers, cooks #1 ......................... .
Pie dough mixers, icing mixers,
ingredient scalers ...........................
Cooks #2, pie peelers .........................
A ll other help (men)
A ll other help (women) ................... ..




B a h e s U & im G o n i l m

Table

i^

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,680

40

1.580

40

1.530
1.430
1.310

40
40
40

1.680

40

1.580

40

1.530
1.450
1.420
1.410
1.240

hO

40
40
40
40

1.680

40

1.630

40

1.580
1.530
1.470
1.410

40
40
40
40

1.240

40

1.680

40

1.580 40
1.530 40
1.410 40
1.240 40

C lassifica tion

c-205:

B a k e /i i e l - G f m t l m t e d

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

A pril 1, 1952

Table C-205*

c-205;

Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement A: - Continued
Wrapping:
Wrapping-machine set-up men . . . . . . . . $1,580
1.430
Bread wrappers .......................................
1.240
Cake and bun wrappers, packers . . . . .
Shipping, receivin g:
1.530
Checkers........ .......................................
1.470
Packers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.420
Receiving and stockroom men . . . . . . . .
Agreement B:
Bread and r o l l mixers:
Starting rate ......................... ....
1.540
1.690
A fter 2 months ............................... ..
Cake mixers, icin g cookers:
1.520
Starting rate
1.670
After 2 months ............................... .
Doughnut fry ers, a fter 3 m onths.......... ..
1.670
Bakers - expert bench hands, after
2 months ............. . . . . . . . . ........... ..
1.640
Formula men, experienced .........................
1.570
Ovenraen:
1.460
Starting rate ............................ .
After 2 m onths.................................... ..
1.610
Pie crust mixers:
Starting rate ................ .........................
1.490
1.610
After 2 months
1.580
Ingredient scalers
Stockmen receivers ............................. ..
1.580
Bakers all-round, benchmen:
Starting rate ............................... ..
1.450
A fter 2 m onths................ ......................
1.550
Bread divider operators:
1.390
Starting rate .............................
1.530
After 2 months ............................. ..
Bread oven loaders, after 3 months, .
cake depositor operators
1.530
Bread wrapping-machine operators:
1.380
Starting rate .......................
1.520
A fter 2 months ..............
Bread rackers, a fter 3 months ................
1.470
Cake decorators:
1.200
Starting rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After 3 months ......................................
1.360
1.460
After 6 months . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Washing-machine operators, baking
u t ilit y men, shipping-room
1.460
servicem en....................................
Machine operators (not otherwise speci­
fie d ), Habamfa machine operators . . . .
1.430
Bread and r o l l mixer s ’ helpers . •
1.470
Bread panners, a fter 3 months ................
1.470
Pan conditioners, general bakeryworkers, bakery helpers, oven
1.380
helpers ............................... ..
Decorators, fin ishin g department . . . . . .
1.200
Bread packers, shipping room (women):
1.010
Starting rate ................................... . . .
1.060
After 1 month .......................
1.110
After 3 months ................................ .
1.160
After 6 months ............................. ..
Order g i r l s :
1.010
Starting r a t e .......... ............................ .

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement B: - Continued
Order g ir ls : - Continued
After 6 months „ . ........................... .
Finishing department (women) - general
icin g workers, layer-cake ic e r s ,
panners, general bakery workers:
Starting rate
A fter 3 months ••••••.• • o . . . . . . . . . . .
After 6 months .... ............. .
Agreement C:
Bread and r o l l department:
Mixers ............................. .
Moldermen
Bench helpers .......... .
General u t ilit y .....................................
Panners (women) .....................................
Cake department:
Mixers ................................................
Icers ..... ........ .....» . • • • • • • • • • •
Depositors
...........
Depositors’ helpers, ic e r s '
helpers .................................................
Icers (women) ..................................... .
Scaling and flou r blending department:
Oven #1, leaders ................................. ..
Scalers, blenders ...........................
General u t ilit y
Panners (women) . . . . . . . . . . . . ..............
Specialty department:
Decorators ..................................
General u t ilit y
Decorators §1 (women)........ ...............
Decorators #2 (women)........ . •
Decorators #3 (women) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Panners (women) .....................................
Cooky department:
Mixers ................................. ....................
Depositors ............................... .
Packing leaders (women) ...................
Packers (women) • • • »...•••••••o.....
General u t ilit y women •.••••••••••••

Table 2082 s M /C iM
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Rate Hours
per
per
hour week

C lassifica tion

11.160

40

1.010
1.060
1.110
1.160

40
40
40
40

1.810 40
1.630 40
1.510 40
1.380 40
1.175 40
1.810
1.710
1.630

40
40
40

1.510
1.210

40
40

1.860
1.630
1.380
1.175

40
40
40
40

1.910
1.380
1.360
1.250
1.175
1.175

40
40
40 •
40
40
40

1.810 40
1.630 40
1.275 40
1.175 %o
1.130 40

J liC yM Q A A

December 1, 1951
C lassification
Brewing department:
A ll brewers ..................................... .
Apprentices - fir s t year .............. ..
Apprentices - second year
First month temporary employees . . . . . . . . . .
Yeast and grain drying employees
Bottling department:
B ottlers, r e g u la r ................
B ottlers, temporary (a fter 60 days) . . . . . .
B ottlers, temporary ( f ir s t 60 days) ..........

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,975
1.800
1.850
1.865
1.875

40
40
40
40
40

1.850
1.850
1.70 0

40
40
40

Occupational Wage Survey, D etroit, Mich., December 1951
U.S. D PAR EN OF LAB R
E TM T
O
Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics

29

Table C-2A31*

M ilL u W lk

Table C-27'.

P / U filti*U f

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Cabinetmakers •••••••».
Glaziers ................ .
Bench hands
F1 nishera ............ .t........... .
Machinery operators
...... .
Saw filers .... ............. ........ .
Machine repairers .......... ............ .
G r i n d e r s .... ...... .
Stair builders ....... ............... .
Gluers ...... .
Sprayers ......... ............. .
Stainers ............. .
R u b b e r s ...... ........ ................... .
Crosscut sawyers and ripsawyers ........ t....
Sawyers (common) ................ .
Box nailers and frame nailers
Common laborers .....................

$1.82
1.82
1.82
1.82
1.82
1.82
1.82
1.82
1.82
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.70
1.70
1,60
1.50

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

P / U ttlitU f

July 1, 1951

Classification

Book and job shops:
Bindery women .............. .
Combination women ......................
Bookbinders .......... .
Combination men ........ ...............
Compositors, hand:
Agreement A ..... ....... ........ .
Agreement B ......... ...... .
Electrotypers ............................
Machine operators*
Agreement A ............................
Agreement B ................... .
Machine tenders (machinists)*
Agreement A ............a.,....,,......
Agreement B .......••••••........ ••••••
Mailers ................... ...............
Photoengravers ............ .
Rotogravure ............................
Pres8 assistants and feeders:
Cylinder presses, all sizes ...........
Job cylinder p r e s s e s ................ .
Platen p r e s s e s ................... .
Rotary presses
............... .
Pressmen:
Cylinder presses, all s i z e s .... .
Platen presses ................ ••••••••
Rotary presses ....... ......... .
Stereotypers*
Agreement A .........................
Agreement B
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work*
German text ......................... .
English text .............. ........... .




G o tU fr U te d

Table C-42:

Rate
per
hour

$1,150
1.250
2.250
2.400

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40

2.835
2.835
2.920

40
40
37$

2.835
2.835

40
40
37$
37|
37$

2.245
1.865
1.730
2.265

40
40
40
40

Newspapers: - Continued
Compositors, hand - night work*
English text ........ ......... ....... ..
Machine operators - day work:
German text ............................
English t e x t ...... ...................
Machine operators - night work:
English text ................. .
0..
Machine tenders (machinists) - d a y w o r k ..
Machine tenders (machinists) - night
work ................. .......... .
Mailers - day work
Mailers - night work .••••....... .
Photoengravers - d a y work •••••••••••••••.
Shopping n e w s ..... .
Photoengravers - night w o r k .... .
Shopping n e w s ..... ................ .
Pressmen, web presses:
Agreement A:
Pressmen - day work ................
Pressmen - night work
Pressmen-in-charge - d a y wcrk ••••••
Color presses
Pressmen-in-charge - night work ....
Color presses
Agreement B - rotogravure and color
presses*
Pressmen - da y w o r k .... ......
Offside register men .......... .
Pressmen - night work
Offside register men •••••••••••«
Pressmen-in-charge - d a y work ......
Pressmen-in-charge - night work ••••
Stereotypers - d a y w o r k ....... ......... .
Stereotypers - night w o r k ..... ••••••••••

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$3,027

36$

1.700
2.807

40
37$

3.027
2.807

36$
37$

3.027
2.448
2.628
2.956
2.933
3.165
3.343

36 i

2.643
2,863
2.843
2.909
3.078
3.150

37$
35
37$
37$
35
35

2.643
2.709
2.863
2.936
2.909
3.150
2.717
2.942

37$
37$
35
35
37$
35
37$
35

37$
37$
37$
37$
37$
35

40
40

2.835
2.835
2.582
2.800
2.800

Classification

Table C-41*

2.675
2.380
2.760

40
40
40

2.851
2.867

37$
37$

1.700
2.807

40
37$

jE c C a l

October 1, 1951

Classification

2-man cars*
First 6 months ........................ .
7-12 m o n t h s ............................ .
After 1 year ................ ............ .
Night cars .............. ........... .
1-man cars and busses:
First 6 months ............................
7-12 months ........... ......... ...»
After 1 year
Night busses

A f& la ltU 4 c A

jb> U u & ld < l+ tclcM elfl& V i

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

December 1, 1951

Table C-27*

-

W e
per
hour

* 1 .4 7 5

1 .5 1 5
1 .5 7 5
1.675

1.575
1.615
1.675
1.775

Hours
per
week

48
48
48
48

48
48
48
48

Classification

Air reduction ...............................
Helpers ............. ......................
Beer - Distributors*
Case ............................... .
Helpers ........... .........
Freight ............... .....
Helpers .........
Keg ............. ............. ....... .
Helpers
Building:
Construction*
Concrete-mixer truck
Excavating and road construction*
Semi-stake and pick-up .......... .
Dump t r u c k ......... .........
Over 8 cubic y a r d s ..... .
Road construction
Material*
l$-ton truck .
Over 1$ ton ............. ..............
Dump truck
Lumber ............................ .
H e l p e r s ...... ....... ............. .
Semitrailer ...... ............ .
Semi- and double-bottom trailer ....
H a r d w o o d ........ .......
Plumbing and mill supply ........ .
Coal*
Agreement A , ......................... .
Agreement B*
Regular ....... ........... ....... ....T,
,
Semitrailer .......................
Helpers ...............................
Department store ............................
Helpers
Factory:
Automobile:
Agreement A *.... ............... .
Utility d r i v e r s ..... .........
Agreement B*
Light t r u c k ........................
Heavy truck
Trailer truck ................ ......
Agreement C :
Pick-up and store
••••••••
Large road t r u c k ...... .
Agreement D ...... .............. .
Agreement E - After 6 months ........ .
Agreement F*
Minimum, (outside) ...... .......
Maximum (outside after 90 days) ....
Agreement G .......... .......
Agreement H
...... .
Agreement I ........ ...................
Automobile parts*
Agreement A ............ .
Agreement B ............................
Agreement C:
Spring division*
First 6 months ..................
After 6 months ................. .

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

$1,800
1.650

40
40

1.555
1.455
1.810
1.710
1.773
1.660

40
40
40
40
40
40

1.970

40

1.925
1.925
2.000
1.925

40
40
40
40

1.740
1.740
1.790
1.680
1.450
1.740
1.840
1.640
1.600

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

1.640

40

1.660
1,710
1.510
1.740
1.640

40
40
40
45
45

1.805
1,855

40
40

1.730
1.730
1.780

40
40
40

1.755
1.755
1.810
1.730

40
40
40
40

1.460
1.560
1.800
1.735
1.755

40
40
40
40
40

1.750
1.770

40
40

1.620
1.720

40
40

30

Table C-42:

M <UoSlt>Ulck

Table C-42:

<i4td c4elp&U - GotUinued

Table

July 1, 1951

July 1, 1951

Classification

A fatoSlfruicA Sb^Upebd

<and Jfelp&U - Continued

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Classification

December 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Oil: - Continued
Agreement B:
Factory: - Continued
Starting rate ............ .......
$1,800 40
Automobile parts: - Continued
2.010 40
After 18 m o n t h s ..... .
Agreement C: - Continued
Agreemerib C:
Frame division:
First 6 months ...••••••........ .
First 6 months ............ ......
$1,590 40
1.614 40
7-18 months ................. .
1.740 40
1.763 40
After 6 months •••••••••••..... .
After 18 months •••••....... .
1.925 40
Agreement D ...... .
1.815 40
Agreement D:
Agreement £ ....... ......... ......... .
1.835 40
Double unit ......................
1.590 40
1.820 40
Agreement F ............................
Agreement £ ...... ••••••...... ........ .
1.700 40
1.617 40
Agreement G .....................
Agreement F - After 18 m o n t h s .... .
1.810 40
1.800 40
Agreement H ......... ....... ...........
Agreement G:
Steel:
First 6 months ...................
1.703 40
Agreement A ....................... .
1.775 40
7-18 months .........................
1.840 40
1.550 40
Agreement B ................... ........
After 18 months •••••••••••.•••
2.015 40
1.650 40
Agreement C .......... ............... ..
Agreement H:
1.760 40
Agreement D .............
12-18 months •«•••••.... •••••.........
1.870 40
Agreement £ ................
1.935 40
After 18 months »••••••••...... •••••..
Agreement F ...... ........... .
2.015 40
1.775 40
Agreement I:
Tbol and die jobbing:
First 6 months .................... .
1.730 40
1.760 40
Agreement A ...........................
6-12 m o n t h s ....... •••••..... .
Agreement B ........ .............. .. • •
1.750 40
1.795 40
1.860 4 0
12-18 months ................ ......... .
1.850 40
Agreement C .......................
After 18 months •••.••.................
1.790 45
1.995 40
Furniture
1.690 . 45 .
Helpers.
.
.
.
. . ....... ........ . . . . . .
. .
. .
..
..
. .
.
.
.
.
.
.
. Agreement J. : .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
First 6 months •
1.560 40
General freight:
Short r
. .
u.
.
.
.
.n
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.680 . 48. . . .
.. . .. .
.
. .
. .
. .
. .
. .6-18 . months .
. .
.
. .
.
. .
. .
. .
.
. .............. .
.
.
.
.
.1.705 . 40
.
.
.
After 18 months ....................,, „
Local cartage:
1.855 40
Agreement K ........................
1.790 45
1.848 40
Pick-up, \ ton . .............. • • • • • • • • •
Agreement L:
1.790 45
Single-bottom truck
First 30 days ............ ........... .
1.510 4 0
1.840 45
Double-bottom truck . ..... . ........ .
.
After 30 d a y s .... ............ .
1.610 40
Milk:
Agreement M:
Agreement A ...... .
.
.
1.993 52
Single b. o t. t o. m .... . .
52 .
1.510 . 40 .
.
.
.
..
.
.
.1.847 .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Helpers ........... . . . . . .
1.610 4 0
Double bottom .................... •••••
Agreement B:
Branch tractor . .
.
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.730. . 40 . . . . . . . . . .
. . .
. .
..
. . Agreement . N:
.
.
.
1.370 48
Dank truck . .
.
.
.
.
..
..
..
.
.
.
.
. 1.790
.
.
. 48 .
.
.
.
.
.
.
. First 500 . h o u r s ...... . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
...... .
1.470 48
Next 1,000 hours
1.690 40
Supply to factories and schools
Next 1,500 h o u r s ..............
1.570 4 8
Agreement C:
1.460 . . 40 .
1.730 48
Main line and school •
• .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.•
.
.
.
•
. Over . 3,000 hours•
.
•
•
•
•
Produce . ........... ..... ......................
Utility.
.
.
.
.
.
. . . . .
.
.
.
.
. 1 .5 2. 0 . 40
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 1.460 . 40 .
.
.
.
1,410 40
Helpers ............... .
o ^ ^ .
Moving - Local, furniture:
1.640 40
Van drivers .
.
.
. . . . . . .• • • . • • . • • • . • • . • . . . . . . . . 1.700 . . 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terminal .......... ................a......
. . . .
.
. .
.
1.870 40
Railway express ....... ..
e...... 0..........
1.625 40
Helpers
40 .
Piano drivers . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
..
..
. .
.
.
. 1.700
.
.
. 40 .
.
.
.
. Steel . supply ........................*........ .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 1.790.
.
.
40
1.625
Helpers
Newspaper and magazine:
Newspaper:
Agreement A:
Table C-58:
Division street and relief men .
.
.
.
2.868 40.
December 1, 1951
Relay mail drivers
2.478 40
1.930 40
Jumpers ........... .................
Rate Hours
Agreement B:
per
Classification
per
3.128 40
Division street m e n ..............
week week
Day drivers ..
.
.
« . • • .• • • . • • •. • • . • • • . • • .
. 2.868 . 40
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Day relief d r i v e r s .
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.868. . 40 . . . . . . . . . . .
. . .
.
.
.
.
Relay mail drivers ..
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. Class A. Houses . (Hotels, clubs, restaurants, .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
2.543 . 40 .
and night • clubs):
1.930 • 40
Jumpers •
.... • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
•
•
•
Culinary department:
Agreement C:
Broilers ........
$92.50 45
Relay and mail d r i v e r s ..... . ......
.
.
2.606 40
Cooks ...... .a. ................ a a. a... a
90.00 45
2.016 40
Magazine
B u t c h e r s .... ........... ........
90.00 45
Oil:
70.00 45 .
Pie bakers • .......... .......• ...........
2.010 40
Agreement A - After IB months •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
.




c-5*s (leA i^ud/ianti - G & U in u ed

Rate
per
week

Pot washers ......... ........ .
Dishwashers ......................
Kitchen men ....... ...................
Class B Houses (Hotels, clubs, restaurants,
and night clubs):
Culinary:
Cooks
e.•••••*. ...........o.
Counter and steam table .............. .
Pantry 0..#.
Vegetable and kitchen men ........... .
Pot washers .......... ................

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Class C Houses (Restaurants and tea
houses):
Dinner cooks ....................... .
Cooks •••••••••.•«...a
Short order cooks .........................
Apprentice cooks .......... ........ .
.
. Steam . table . c o. o k . s ........ . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Dishwashers .......................
Class D Houses (Hamburger stands and drive
in s ) :
Short order cooks ................. .
Counter grill men or women ............ .
Dishwashers .......... ..... ............ .
.
. Kitchen porters ........ ............ .
Class E Houses (Pizza, kosher and other
specialty houses):
Head pizza men ............. •••••..... .
Second pizza men ................. ........
Third pizza men ......... ................ .
Apprentice pizza men ......................
.
Head kosher m e n .... .................. .
.
Second kosher men .......... ..............
Third kosher men .......... ...............

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

45
45
45
45
45
45

90.00
75.00
70.00
55.00
55.00
.
.
40.00

45
45
45
45
45
45

65.00

.

42.50

45
45
45
45

90.00
85.00
80.00
65.00
90.00
85.00
80.00

t

45
45
45
45
45
45
45

5 0 .0 0
4 0 .0 0

.

Tibl» C-70I1:

(IpAtou/lGStbL

.

45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45

80.00
75.00
50u00
50.50
45.00
42.50

Class A Houses (Hotels, clubs, restaurants,
and night clubs): - Continued
Culinary department: - Continued
Sandwich men „.......... ....... .......
Kitchen stewards ......................
Storeroom m e n ..................... .

Hours
per
week

$70.00
65.00
55.00
50.00
45.00
47.50
42.50
47.50

Classification

eM al&U'

December 1, 1951

Classification

.

.

.

Bar:
Bartenders - Front .......... .
Bartenders - B a c k ..... •»•••••
.
.
.
Hotel service:
Maids ...... ..............................
Housemen . • • . . . . • . • o o o . . . a o . . o o . o o a . o o . . o o
Bellmen • • o a . . « . . . « o o . ....... o o o o . o . o . o . . .
Combination bellmen and elevator
operators ............... ........

Rate
per
week

Hours
per
week

$70.00
72.50

48
48

36.00
39.84
17.50

48
48
48

23.50

48

31

D:

Entrance Rates

lab}* D Minimum fZntbanoe Rated Job Plant Wabkebd 1/
-i*
Percent o f plant workers in establishments with sp ecified
Twiniimm rates in —
Minimum rate (in cents)

All establishments ........

60 or under ...............
Over 60 and under 65 *••••••
65 .......................
Over 65 and under 70 •••••••
7 0 .................. .
75 .......................
Over 75 and under 8 0 ..... .
8 0 .......................
Over 80 and under 85 ......
85 .......................
Over 85 and under 9 0 ......
9 0 .......................
Over 90 and under 9 5 ......
95 .......................
1 0 0 ......................
Over 100 and under 1 0 5 ....
105 ......................
Over 105 and under 1 1 0 ....
n o ......................
Over 110 and under 115 .....
U 5 ......................
Over 115 and under 120 ....
1 2 0 ......................
Over 120 and under 125 ....
125 ......................
Over 125 and under 130 .•.•.
1 3 0 ......................
Over 130 and under 135 ....
Over 135 and under 14-0 .....
1 4 0 ......................
Over 140 and under 145 .....
145 ......................
Over 145 and under 150 ..•••
1 5 0 ......................
Over 150 and under 155 ....
155 ......................
Over 155 and under 160 .....
1 6 0 ......................
Over 160 and under 165 .....
165 and over ..............

Establishments with no
established minimum ......

1/
2/
y

*

All
industries
2J

1

0

1.3
.3
.5
.1
•4
3.1
.2
.5
.5
1.1
2.8
(2/>
.9
.2
2.1
.3
.5
.9
.4
.2
.5
.6
.2
2.5
.3
1.3
.7
2.9
6.9
1.0
3.2
1.8
26.9
2.9
15.2
1.0
3.3
Q/)
6.1
1.9

4.5

Manufac turing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Entabiishments with 251 or
21-250
21-250
more
workers
workers
workers.

..0 1

.0

0.8
_
4.0
.4
2.8
1.1
1.3
9.7
3.2
33.
4
3.6
.7
-

8.0

0

0 100.0
.

0.2
1.9
.2
.7
3.2
7.3
1.1
1.9
2.7
38.8
3.8
22.2
1.1
4.1

0

251 or
more
workers

Public
utilities*

100.0

100.0

100.0

•
5.1
12.0
20.6
4.8
10.0
7.2
1.2
12.6
5.8
5.4

3.8
2.5
1.1
1.9
2.9
1.9
7.6
17.7
28.2
1.0
3.8
14.9
2.8

-

2.9

_
2.9
1.4
3.0
3.1
29.0
2.2
3.7
10.7
4.9
1.5
20.7
1.9
2.1
3.5
3.0
1.7
1.1

-

Table D-ia*

Plant Wabkebd y - M otob Vekicted

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

_100.0

_
0.5
8.2
4.4
1.6
1.1
3.0
6.6
3.3
2.4
4.9
8.6
1.2
_
2.5
2.0
7.4
.8
7.3
3.5
2.0
5.7
.5
3.6
4.8
-

Services

Percent o f plant workers in establish­
ments with specified minimum
rates in -

Minimum rate (in cents) 1 /

_
11.2
1.6
17.5
3.0
4.7
1.6
3.3
2.2
7.3
_
_
.
_

-

A ll motor
vehicle
and motorvehicle
equipment
establish­
ments 2 /

Motor-vehicle parts and
accessories establish­
ments

y

Total

101-1000
workers

A ll establishments ..............

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 3 0 ...........................................
Over 130 and under 135 . . . .
Over 135 and under 140 . . . .
Over I40 and under 145 . . . .
Over 145 and under 150 . . . .
1 5 0 ...........................................
Over 150 and under 155 ••••
Over 155 and under 160 . . . .
Over 160 and under 165 ••••
165 ..........................................
Over 170 and under 175 . . . .

( )
y
.
.8
.3

0.1
.5
4.3
1.9
48.3
3.5
23.8
5.3
10.5
1.1
.2

0.7
3.0
11.7
12.5
12.9
.4
3.8
25.1
17.6
7.4
1.4

2.0
2.2
17.7
12.7
1.1
10.8
15.1
17.6
6.9
4.0

.5

3.5

1001 or
more
workers

9.9

Establishments with no
established minimum . . . . .

-

100.0

3.4
18.1
9.7
13.0
_

30.4
17.6
7.8
~

'
y
Lowest rates formally established fo r hiring either men or
women plant workers other than watchmen,
2 j For d efin ition o f industry, see footnote 1, table A -la,
y
For d efin ition o f industry, see footnote 1, table A -lb,

-

1.4

1.7

and M /otob-VelU ct* S h ipm en t

100.0

13.1
3.5
.2
.3
4.0
21.9
.5
1.5
2.5
4.6
23.2
6.0
•4
1.4
.
_
1.2
.7
1.2
1.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.5

19.8
2.7

8.0
2.0

1.9
“

-

-

-

-

-

7.0

"

-

-

-

3.5

.8

13.4

3.6

12.4

11.0

Lowest rates formally established fo r hiring either men or women plant workers other than watchmen.
Excludes data fo r finance, insurance, and real estate.
Less than .05 o f 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .




Mjsumum Cntbanoe Rated Job

4

6

.

0

Occupational Wage Survey, D etroit, Mich., December 1951
U.S. D PA TM N C LAB®
E R ET F
Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics

E:

Supplementary Wage Practices

Table & -li

S tu fft

J b i^ e A ^ t iU iU

P W H U d iO M d

Percent of plant workers employed on each s h ift in _
Shift differential

All manufacturing industri,es 1/____

All industries

Nondurable goods

Durable goods

3d or
other
shift

2d
shift

25.6 -

6.7

..26.1

Receiving shift differential .....

25.6

6.7

26.1

Uniform cents (per hour) .....
4 cents ............. .
5 cents ........ ......... .
6 cents ..................
7 cents ••..••••••••••.....
7k cents ...........
8 c e n t s .... ..............
8 - cents •••••••••••••••••••
^
9 c e n t s .... .
9^ cents ........ .
10 c e n t s ..... •••••••••••••
Over 10 and under
12^ cents ...............
12& cents and over •••••••••

8.9
1.0
4.5
•4
1.4
.6
.3
.5

Uniform percentage ........ .
5 percent....... ..... .
7 percent •••••.••••••••••••
7j? percent....... •••••••••
10 percent •••.••••••••••••»

16.7
16.2
-

2d
shift
Percent of workers on extra shifts,
all establishments ....... .

O t h e r.... ..... ...... .

Information not available ...... .

(4/)
.2

.5

-

(4/)
(4/)

2.1
.3
.7
.1
.3
.1
(4/)
(4/)
•4

7.9
1.1
3.5
(4/)
1.6
.7
.4
.6

_

3d or
other
shift

4.6
.1
(4/)
4.4
.1
-

3d or
other
shift

21.8

u.6

22.2

2.4

19.5

. 20,3

6.2

21.5

11.3

22.0

19.5

19.8

1.3
.1
.5
.1
.3
.1
.(4/)
.1

18.2
11.3
4*4
.2
.3

10.3
2.2
3.8
-

10.7

(4/)
3.6

2.3
.1
.9
.1
1.9
5.4

2.4
.6
.1
.1
(4/)
(4/)
.1

18.9
18.9

.2
1.8

.1
.6

-

.3
-

3.3
3.0
-

1.0
.5
-

10.8
7.4
.2

1.7
.2
.2
1.1

3.2
.5

.
-

18.2
17.7
-

4.9
.1
4.3

.5

-

(4/)

<fi/)

(4/)
-

. Machine- tool accessories_
Jobbing
Prod uction
shops 2 /
. hops...
a
3d or
2d
2d
other
shift
shift
shift

2d
shift

-

.1
.1

Machinery
indusstries
j
3d or
2d
other
shift
shift

1

Electroplating.
Sheetplating, and
metal
poll shing
work 3/
3d or
2d
2d
other
shift
shift
Shift.. 1
5.6

22.5

2.6

1.9

.4
.4

23.2
8.0
14*3
.9

2.6
1.6
1.0
-

1.5
1.5
-

22.5
21.0
9.1
5.8
6.1
-

3.6

8.0
1.6
.8
5.6

_

„

-

11.8
2.1

-

.6

9.7

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

.2

_
-

-

.6
-

.9
.9

.1

_

-... 3.1

23.2

•4

-

-

.5

3.7

-

-

-

-

-

.3

.5

-

-

.1

.1

•2

-

-

.5

-

1.0

-

.2

.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

Includes data fo r industries other than those 'shown separately.
Includes establishments producing machine-tool accessories also shown separately.
No workers employed on 3d or other s h ifts .

y

I~a

•« o' 1




Iable B
_lai g lo p

2> i{ fc * < u d « a

p A eu U U m i.

- M oto* V JticU i.

&nd Mato*.-'l/jehic-le. Cquipm ent

S hift d iffe r e n tia l

Percent o f workers on extra
s h ifts , a l l establishments . . . . . .

Percenl o f plant workers employed on each s h ift in A ll motor vehicle
M otor-vehicle parts and accessories establishments £ /
and motor-vehicle
equi.patent
101-•1000
1001 or more
Total
estahlis foments 1 /
work:era
workers
3d or
3d or
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
2d
2d
other
other
other
other
s h ift
s h ift
sh ift
sh ift
sh ift
sh ift
s h ift
sh ift
27 .1. .- .— 6*5-

25.8

6 .3

3 .0

26.5

8 .1

27.1

6.5

25.7

6.3

24.3

3 .0

26.5

8.1

Uniform cents (per hour) ••••
5 c e n t s ............ ...................
6 cents ............ ................
7 cents
7k c e n t s ...................
8$ c e n t s ............ .
10 cents •••••••••••»•••••

4.9
2.8

.4
.1
-

15.4
4.1
.1
6.3
4.9

1.5
•4

2 .4
1.0

12.3
3a
3.0
6.2
-

Uniform percentage ••••••••••
5 percent

22.2
22.2

6 .1

21.1
5.8
.4
12.2
2.7
3.2
3.2

-

6 .1

Receiving s h ift d iffe r e n tia l . . .

(2/)

1.3
.8
-

W)
£/
2/

U /)
•2

a/)
.1

-

-

10.3
10.3
.1

3d or
other
shift

1.3

-

1/
2/
3/

2d
shift

1.3 ____24,2

-

(4/)

I Ui gxUga | JLUu
L
and steel

-

.3
•4

(2/)
•4

4.8
4.8
-

-

.7
.4

(2/)
.3

14.2
14.2

-

.6
.6

.3

-

“

.9
-

.5
.4
7.2
7.2

-

For d e fin itio n o f industry, see footnote 1, table A -la .
Far d e fin itio n o f industry, see footnote 1, table A -lb .
Less than *05 o f 1 percent.
Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Mich., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

-

-

-

-

1.5
1.5

3.6
.
1.5
2.1

-

33

T a b le T3-2:

S c h e d u le d t J& & k ly tM ou/ti
k

PER C E N T OF OFFICE W ORKERS l / E M PLO YED I N -

PE R C E N T OF PLANT W O R K E R S E M PLO YE D IN—
M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Weekly hours

All
indus­
tries

100.0

All establishments ............. .
3A hours .................... « ...........
35 hours .............................. ..
Over 35 and under 3 ? £ h o u r s ....... .....
37^ hours ........................ .......
Over 37£ and under A0 hours ....... .
A0 hours .................... ............
Over A0 and under A4 hours ........ ......
AA hours ................. ...............
A8
A9
50
52
53
56

hours
hours
hours
hours
hours
hours
60 hour8

................................
.................................
............................ .
.................... ......... .
................................
................................
................................

0.A
1.6
l.A
9.0
3.3
80.8
1.8
1.0
.5
.2
*

Ail

100.0

Durable
goods

100.0

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

100.0

.

.

-

-

-

100.0

0.5

100.0

.

-

1.2
.A
98 .A
~

9.0
82. A
5.0
2.7
•
-

“

Services

All
indus­
tries

2/

.

2.A
.3
96,0
.9
.A
~

Finance**

-

-

52.3
.8
A3.1
3.2
.1
-

1.5
1.9
83.9
3.A
A.2
A.7
•A
~

-

3.9
1.5
87.1
5.2
1.2
.9
.2
*
*

100.0
2.1
2.1
5.8
8.6
10.6
69.8
1.0
«
-

100.0

........

100.0

100.0

_
13.5
5.7
8.6
63.2
5.0
1.5
1.2
1.3
-

-

-

1.2
.6
.3
8A.7
.1
1.3
2.2
7.1
.1
.3
.1

100.0

m
1.3
.A
93.7
-

.8
( 2 /)
1.2

‘
1/
2/
2/
*
**

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

All

i 100.0
1
--------- -----------

!
l

-

96.9
-

.5

.5

.5
2.1

1.0

(1/)
•A
1.1
-

.A
1.2
-

'

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

.

.

-

-

-

*
»
64.5
1.5
6.A
9.1
13.7
2.A
2.A

l.A
2.6
A2.9
.5
5.6

A.8
.A
63.A
29.1
1.3
-

.

-

-

13.9
A.7
63.2
5.7
12.5
•
-

67.1
«
9. A
1.5
-

-

.8

-

1.0
21.0

1.2

'

Data relate to vomen workers.
Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Table E-2a*

S ch ed u led

eM oull — M atpsi VjeUloled. an d
Percent of office workers

Weekly hours

All establishments
- hours ••.••••••
• h o u r s .... .
A0 hours .........
Ad hours .........

1/

C qu lpm eu t

employed in -

Percent of plant workers employed in -

All motor
All motor
Motor-vehicle parts and accessories |
vehicle and
vehicle and
establishments 2/
motor-vehicle
motor-vehicle
equipment
equipment
101-1000
1001 or
establishments
Total
establi shments
workers more workers!
2/
2/

100,0

100.0

100,0

0.1

1 .0

Motor-vehicla parts and accessories
establishments 2/
Total

101-1000
workers

1001 or
more workers

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.7
.3

98.1
1.9

9A.6

100.0

1.3

.6
00.3

3.7

05.3

93.2

100,0

8.5
91.5

5.A
'

1/
2/
2/

Data relate to women workers.
For definition of industry, see footnote 1, table A-la,
For definition of industry, see footnote 1, table A-lb,

9.9
35.1
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Detroit, Mich., December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1.0

34

Table £-3*

Paid J h lida tfl
PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN-

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN -

Manufacturing

Manufacturing
Number o f paid h olid a ys

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

A
U

Durable
goods

y

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

A ll establishm enta ..........................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments p rovid in g paid
holid a ys ...........................................................

9 6 .4

0 6 .0

95.5

0 9.3

100.0

100.0

9 9 .8

9 9 .8

8 2.4

80.5

8 0.6

79.3

91.9

6 8.0

8 1 .0

9 2.4

66.7

_
6 3.8
8 .9
5.5
4 .2
-

.2
.9
.2
77.3
.1
1 .1
(2 ?)
.5
.1

1
3
5
6

d a y ....................................................... ..
days .............................................................
days .............................................................
days .............................................................
days ...................................... ....................
7 day.................................................................
7 ? days ...........................................................
8 days .............................................................
days .................................. ........................
9 days .............................................................
10 days ...................................... ....................
lO f days .........................................................
11 days ...................................... .............. ..
12 days .........................

Establishments providing no paid
holidays ....................... .

1/
7/
*
**

_

( 2 /)
78.9
1 .9
4 .9
.7
2.8
.3
6 .4
.1
( 2 /)

.
0 5.9

( 2 /)
.1

_
•
6 7.4
5 .0
9 .6
3.8
1 1.0
2 .4
.8
-

_

95.5
-

-

-

-

9 8.6
.2
.5
-

.1
6 2.8
5 .1
32.0
-

9 7 .6
1 .9

_

3 6.0
2.4
5 .0
2.9
1 0.4
.9
4 0.1

_

-

-

-

.2
.2

-

-

-

-

3 .6

4 .0

4 .5

•7

-

_

.6

.7

-

7 8.6

79.9

-

-

.3

-

-

.1

«
.1
-

-

1.0
1*1

-

•
-

-

.2

-

-

-

-

_

.2

-

-

-

-

-

1 7.6

19.5

-

_

9 0.8
1 .1

-

-

*
*

-

20.7

1 9.4

-

8 .1

_

_

»
46.3
20.7
1 .0
-

4 .7
6 4.6
3 .2
4 .7
.9
1 .1
1.8
-

-

-

3 2.0

1 9.0

Includes data for industries ether t h a n those shown separately#
Less t h a n .05 of 1 percent#
Transportation (excluding railroads), cammunication, and other public utilities#
Finance, insurance, a n d real estate#




Table E-3a*

P aid jftUodcUf^ - M oto* Velucl&i G 4 td M oto*”VeJucU
Percent of* office workers employed in All m o t o r
vehicle and
motor-vehicle
equipment
establisfsnents

Number of p a i d holidays

Percent of plant woricers employed in -

Motor-vehicle parts and accessories
establishments 2 /

Total

101-1000
workers

1001 or
more workers

1/

All motor
vehicle and
motor-vehicle
equipment
establishments

Motor-vehicle parts and accessories
establishments 2 /

Total

101-1000
workers

1001 or
mo r e workers

y
100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

9U.1

82.3

92.1

73*1

79.8

57.9

67.1+

52.7

94.1

All establishments ............................

82.3

92.1

73.1

79.8

57.9

67.1+

52.7

5.9

17.7

7.9

26.9

20.2

1*2.1

32.6

1+7.3

100.0

Establishments providing paid

Establishments providing n o paid
Holidays .................................... .

l/

For definition of industry,
For definition of industry,

see footnote 1, table A-la.
see footnote 1, table A-lb.

Occupational Wage Surrey, Detroit, Mich#, December 1951
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Lab o r Statistics

2.5
3 .8

8 1.7
3 .6
-

_

1 .6
6 4.2
•
.4
.5

-

-

.8

-

-

-

7 .6

33.3

35

Paid V&GcUtonl (tyo&mol P/uuUlUml)

Table E-U:

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation p o lic y

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing
All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

Manufacturing
All

y

Public
utili­
ties*

W
hole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

10O.Q

100.0

100.0

100.0
j---------

$9.8

97.9

93.9

?5.i»

78.0

36.8

53.li
Uo.5

*
ii9.7
19,6
26.1
«.

68.1
3.5
6.U

-

-

-

2 .1

6*i

ii.6

22.0

97.9

93.9

100.0

81.6

3 .5
2ii.ii
1 .5
6 8.5
-

21.0
1.7
71.2
-

13.2

58.9
22.2
.5

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

Services

!
A ll establishm ents

100.0

100*0

100*0

100.0

100*0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 00.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
1

1 year o f s e r v ic e
Establishments with paid vacations ••••••
Under 1 week ............. ..
1 week .................................. ..
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ........... ..............
2 weeks . . . . . . . c o . . . . . . . . . . . . ...............
3 weeks . . . . . c . . . , . . . . . . . . , , . , , . . . . . . .
Not s p e c ifie d 2 / . . . . . . . . . . ..................... ..
Establishments with no paid vacations . . .

98.6
«.

100.0

100.0

100.0

13.U
1 .0
8 ii.l
•1
-

•
7.2
.1
92.5
.2
-

5.1t
9ii.il
.2
-

20.2
.9
78.3
.6
-

l.k

-

-

-

100.0

99.ii

100.0

100 .0

82.ii

96.2

100.0

100.0

.6
80.5
3.7
11.1
.5
1*8

06

.6
89.9
1.3
5 .6
_
2.6

1 .8

«.
Uo.3
59.7
-

28.2
71.2
-

52.6
11.9
35.5
•

1 .1
1 .8
97.1
-

-

-

-

13.7
.9
6 7.8
•
-

-

17.6

.6

-

88.1
1 .9
6 .5
.6
2 .3
( 3 /)

-

71.1
7 .9
lit. 7
6 .1
.2

3.5
57.6
-

2 years o f s e rv ice
Establishments with paid va cations

!
|
98.6

100.0

100.0

Under 1 week ..................................o » » .o » « »
1 week ................... .....................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ................... ..
2 w e e k s ................................... ..
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s .........................
3 w e e k s ................................................. ..
Not s p e c ifie d _2/......................... ................ ..

..
U .l
.2
93.U
.3
.6
-

lu7
.1
9 5.0
.2

3.ii
.1
96.3
.2
-

Establishments with no paid vacations . . .

l .i i

-

-

_

100.0
_

lii.O
.2
85.2
.6
•

100.0

99.ii

100.0

.6
99.il
-

100.0

98.9

100.0

100.0

9 9.8

.3
58.8
lii.2
23.3
( 3 /)
75
1 .8

.2

_

7 .0
.9
7ii.5
-

.1
68.7

69.6

10.2
.6
2 ,3

20.0
7.6
2 ,6

1 7.6

l.l

82.ii

_

..

6.U
93.0
.6

10.1
l .l t
88.5
-

9 5.o
1 .8
3.2

-

18.1

( 3 /)

-

58.3
.U
35.0
6 .1
-

.5
86.3
-

-

-

-

-

.2

2 .1

6 .1

-

l8 .ii

5 years o f s e rv ice
Establishments with paid vacations . . . . . .

9 8.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 week ...........................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............... ..
2 w e e k s ............. . . . . . 1 ...................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............... ....
3 weeks ................. ................ ..
Not s p e c ifie d 2 / ..........................................

.3
.1
91.6
.8
5 .8
-

ol
.1
95.1
.1
ii.6
*
*

.1
.1
97.li
2.li
-

78.8
.7
20.5
-

100.0
99.6
.li
-

Establishments with no paid vacations . . .

l.U

-

-

-

-

99.il
92.2
7.2
.6

100.0

100.0

82,h

98.9

100.0

100.0

99.8

97.9

93.9

100.0

81.6

6 .1
6 0.9
33.0
-

->
93.9
2 .9
3 .2
-

69.5
ii.2
8.7
-

.9
1 .2
88.1
1 .1
5 .8
1 .8

.2
1 .1
92.8
1 .3
2 .3
2.3

.2
1 .3
93.2
l.ii
1 .3
2 .6

.7
86.8
.7
11.6
-

3 .0
3 .5
91.ii
-

U.6
8U.7
ii.6
-

.8
6 1.1
38.1
-

71.8
1 .0
2 .9
-

-

*

1 7.6

1 .1

.2

2 .1

6 .1

-

1 8 .li

< !/)

-

5.9

15 years o f s e rv ice
Establishments with paid vacation s . . . . . .

98.6

100.0

100.0

1 week .......................................................... ..
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks ................................................ ..
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .........................
3 weeks ..............................................
Over 3 weeks
Not s p e c ifie d 2 / ....................................... ..

.3
• 29 .9
.8
6 6.6
1 .0
-

.1
20.2
.1
79.6
-

.1
17.6

Establishments with no paid vacations . . .

i.U

1/
y
y
*

**

-

-

82.3
•
-

100.0
•
-

100.0

.7
59.3
•
-

•
111.8
85.2
-

-

-

llO.O

99.li

100.0

100.0

82.ii

98.9

100.0

100.0

99.8

97.9

93.9

100.0

81.6

•
•
57.5

6 .1
•
33.9
•
39.7
20.3
-

_
•
58.9
ii.7
36.ii
-

_
33.6
ii7.9
.9
-

.9
.3
27.6
3.3
6 2.3
2.7
1 .8

.2
21.5
li.3
71.7
2.3

.2
21.6
ii.7
70.9
. 2.6

.7
21.1
.7
77.3
-

3 .0
3 .5
23.7
67.7
-

ii.6
.
59.6
.
29.7
-

.8
i*ii.9
28.0
26.3
-

ii.8
6 8.9
.5
ii.5
2 .9
-

17.6

1 .1

•z

2 .1

b .l

-

l8 .ii

-

la .9
.6

Includes data for industries other than those shown separately.
Identical bonus payments in lieu of time off regardless of individual worker earnings.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Bureau of
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

-

( 3 /)

-

Occupational Vage Survey, Detroit, ItLch., December 1951
u.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Labor Statistics

36




Table E-U«

P aid Vxi&GilaHl (ty& tm ol Paq&MIohA)

VducLl and Moto**VducU equipm ent
Percent of plant workers employed in -

Percent o f o ffic e workers employed in Vacation p olicy

A ll motor
vehicle and
m otor-vehicle
equipment
establish­
ments i f

Motor-vehicle parts and accessories
establishments 2/
Total

101-1000
workers

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99 4

95.8

100.0

2.8
96.6
•

3.2
—
92.6
-

6.5
•
93-5

.6

U.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

2.5
97.5

.9
99.1

1.9
«.
98.1

'

‘

'

1001 or
more workers

A ll motor
vehicle and
motor-vehicle
equipment
establish­
ments i f

Motor-vehicle parts and accessories
establishments 2 /
1001 or
more workers

Total

101-1000
worker s

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

91.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

91.8
-

93*5
•5
24
3.6

9 0 .1
3-3
5.7
•9

71.7
9.5
16 .3
2.5

100.0
-

8 .2

-

-

-

1 year o f service
Establishments with paid vacations •••••
1 week ................................. ...................•«

Establishments with no paid vacations ••

-

-

-

2 years o f service
Establi shmaats with paid vacations
1 week ........................ .
Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 weeks
Not sp ecified 3 / • ........................... . .

-

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

734
20.6
24
3.6

8 9 .3
l+.l
5 .7
•9

6 9 .5
1 1 .7
16.3
2 .5

100.0
-

■

-

■

5 years o f service
Establishments with paid vacations »•••«

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

2 weeks
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ••••»••••••«
3 weeks ...................•» « . .................... ..
Not sp ecified 3 / •• *•••••••............ . . .

99.4

95.8
i*. 2

100.0
”

91.8
8.2

954
1.0
3.6

92.9
6 .2
.9

79.9
17.6
.
2 .5

100.0
“

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

72.9

28.5

6.7
24
87.1
3.6

1+3.8
16.9
384
•9

52.6
12.6
32.3
2.5

3 9 .1
19 .3
1+1.6

.6
—

-

15 years o f service
Establishments with paid vacations
2 weeks .................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks »®«•««•**•«•
3 weeks •••••••••• •••••••••••««••••••

100.0
6.5
93.5
-

I

50.1
-

1+9*9
-

-

27.1
-

-

71.5
-

-

For d efin ition o f industry, see footnote 1, table A -la .
Occupational Wage Survey, D etroit, Mioh®, December 1951
For d e fin itio n o f industry, see footnote 1, table A-lb®
U.S. D PA TM N OF LAB R
E R ET
O
Identical bonus payments in lieu of time o f f regardless o f indi-vidua 1 worker earnings,
Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics

37

Paid §io k Jljeatue (tyosim al Pacu U*o*U>)

Table E-5i

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments....................

M n f c u in
a ua t r g

Mn f c u in
a ua t r g
All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

y

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1(6.1
.1
(2/)
76
8.5
2.3
.2
.6
17.6
2.8
.3
1.7
3.5

52.6

54.7

37.1

55.5
.7

47.9

52.9

35.3

29.8

9.1

3.1

-

Non­
durable

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

2.3

11.2

30.4

2 3 .0

39.5

11.1

Durable

go s
od

go s
od

1 year of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .................................
2 days............. ................................. .
3 days ............. ..................................... .
It days ............. ................................. .
5 days ............................................ .
6 days .................................... .
7 days ........... ..........................................
8 days ..................... ..................
10 days ..................................................................... ..
12 days ............ .. ............................. .. ........................ ..
l i t days .............. ..................................................................
15 days .......................................... ..
20 days ...................................................
21 days .....................................................
22 days ........... ...................... .
24 days .....................................................
25 days ....................................................
30 days............... .. ....................................
$0 days .................................................. .......................... ..
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................................................

8.1*

.2
.3
.2
.2
.6

-

•

1.0

.
-

-

-

-

9.2
.1

8.7

13.3
.7

14.1
3.9
~

•

-

*

.1
25.1(
2.6

26.1
2.8

1.0
20.0
1.5

•

•

•

.1
•
15.1
-

•
17.1
-

-

-

a

.6
-

1.9
.7
3.7
1.1

16.1
4.2
.7

-

-

11.8
5.6

4.9

-

4.5
4.4
3.0

7.6
17.3

-

-

•

-

-

15.4
7.2

11.2
3.9

•
•

3 2 .0

-

2.6

-

-

•*

•
-

*

~

7.1
3.3
~
3.0

~
.
-

io.5
*
-

3.9
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11.9

-

-

51.9

1(7. i
l

45.3

62.9

44.5

52.1

47.1

64.7

70.2

1(8.9

52.6

54.7

37.1

55.5

47.9

52.9
1.0

40.2

29.8

1.9

m

•
7.6
17.1
«

m

11.2

.3
(2/)
3.4
1.5
.1

•
-

2.8
.2
.1

«,

«

-

m

-

-

2a

10.2

7.9

.2

~

-

-

2.4
1.3
6.4
.8

.4
3.9
11.7

-

4.2
5.0
.5

1.0

-

*

•

•

•

-

-

•

-

.5
6.1

3.6
.2

1.4

-

-

•
-

«

.4
.2

-

-

•

«
-

•
-

-

-

«

-

1.0
.1
.1
.1
1.9

-

«
-

90.9

-

20.7
-

-

-

-

-

•
1.9
1.8
1.8

-

-

-

1.8

•

-

-

-

-

96.9

97.7

88.8

69.6

3.1

2.3

11.2

33.5

•
2.8
.2
.1
-

2.1
.2

•

~
•

-

-

-

19.7

-

77.0

60.5

88.9

23.0
2.4
1.3
5.2

46.2

11.1
2.6

2 years of service
Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave .....................................................
3 days.................... .. ...............................................................
k days ........... .......... .
5 days ............................. ...............
6 days ............................... .
7 days ................. .............. .
8 days ....................... .
10 days .......... .....................
12 days....... ............ ...........
H days ...............................
i
15 days ...............................
17 days ...............................
20 days ........ ........... ........
21 days .............................. .
22 days .............. ............ .
2ii days ...............................
25 days ........... ....... ............
30 days ...............................
40 days..................................... .................
50 days ............................... ......................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...................................

•

(2/)
.6
7.2
2.3

.2
.6
18.3
2.5
.3
1.1(
.3

b .l
6.i
t
.7
.3
.5
.2
.i
l
.6

51.1

•

7.3
.1
.1
27.1
2.6
a
.
.2
•1
15.1
•
•

-

47.4

*
m

6.5
•
•
•
»
28.2
2.8
«
•
•
•
,1
17.1
~
•
•
-

13.3
.7
*
*
1.0
18.5

45.3

62.9

1.5
•
2.1
•
•
-

•
-

14.1
3.9
•
•
*
•
»
•

32.0
•

9.4
7.2
•
•
•
7.1
-

.7
2.6
»
2.2

9.3
3.0

•

-

-

-

-

44.5

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s ,
** Finance, insurance, and real esta te.




4.5
4.4
3.0

3.9

.2

•
•
•
>
«
-

o
.

3.7
1.1

12.3
3.5
7.8
2.2
3.5

~

15.1
4.2
.7
•
5.9
-

3.9
«
-

9.9
.2
(2/)
3^4
2.2
.1
•
.5

.2

«
•
•
1.0
-

1.8

-

1.8

-

-

-

19.7

-

77.0

53.8

88.9

-

90.1

59.8

96.9

97.7

2.1
•
1.4
<
•

3.1
•
-

-

70.2

47.1

-

5.0

1.9

6.0

•

“

1.9

3.9
18.2

20.7

-

-

52.1

•
-

.8
•
*1.8

•
•
»
3.6
.4
•
-

.2
•
.1
.1
-

•

-

-

«
»
•

•
«
•
-

2.3

1.9

-

•
•
•
11.9

7.9

1.0
•
Q
•
•

»
•
•
•
»
•
-

•
.

•

«

10.2

.4
•

•
-

88.8

-

66.5

-

1.8

•
•
-

Occupational Wage Surrey, D etroit, Mich., beceaoer 1951
U.S. D PA T E T O L BO
E R MN F A R
Bureau o f Labor S ta tistic s

38

(%o*mcU PaovW m U) • Continued

Table £-5*

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Provisions for paid sick leave

A

l

t

a
3

d a y s

1

.

d a y s
c l

. a

6

d

.

. .

5

7

y s
a

y

d a y s

d a y s

a

l

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

t

d a y s

2 1

d a y s

. .

d a y s

.

2 5

d a y s

.

.

..

.

.

.. .

..

.d.

.

. ..

.

.

.

.

.

.

.
..

.

.
..

. ..

. ..

.
..

.

. ..

..

..

. ..

..

d

3

d

. 5

kO

.
.

.

.
.

.

.
.

..

.

0

3

. .

.

.

. .

.

d.

.

. .

.

. .

. a

.d .

. .

.

.

.

. .

. .

y .

.

2

d a y* s

.

.

.*

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

5 0

d a y s

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

7 2

d a y s

.

.

.

.

.

.

. . . . . . . . . .

O

v e r

7 2

2

. .

d a y s

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave
15

.

.

.

.

.

-.

.

.

.
.

.
.

-

.
.

.. .

.

y .

.
.
.

.. .
.

.s

.
.1 .
15.3 y
. 15.1 .
.
..
-. .
.
..
..
..
..
.5y
y
. .
. - y. .
.
.
..
.
..
.
..
.

. .

. .

.

.

. .

~.

.
.
.
.
..

s
. .
.
.
.
. .
.

• .
- .
-.

.-

-

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

..

.

.

..

-

..

.

..
s

.

l*.l

.

s
.
.
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. .

. .

-.

.

.

-.

.s

.

-.
.

.
.
.
.
..

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. .
.

.

.
.
.

.

..
.

. • .
.
.
32.0
. - .
.• .
*
. 2.6.
.. - ..
. 2.2
.
. - .
. • .
. - .
. - .
. - .
. . .7
. .
.
~.

.

.

.
.
.
.
.
..
.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.

.

.

.

.

- .
.
2.1*
. - .
.
5.9 .
. - .
. . 3.0.
.
.- . .
. 1.5
.
. - .
. 1*.8
.
. 1.8
.
. - .
. - .
.

.

. .

»

.

.
.

.

.

.
.

..

.
.
.
.
.
.
.

e

. .

. .

.
.

.

.
-

.

.

.

.
.

.

..
. -.
. - .
. - .
.. - ..
.
..
. - .
. - .
.
-.
.
-.
.11.9
.
.
-.
.
.
" .

.

.
.

.

.

.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.

. 3.9
.
. 1.0
.
.
13.0
-.
.

.
.
.
.
.

.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.
.
.

.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

.
.

.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.

.

.

.1
.5
.3
-.
*
.
.
1.0
..
.
.1
.
.
.1
. - .
.
•
.
.1
. .1
.
.
1.9
.
.1
. “ .

.

.

.

.

.-

.

.
-

.

.

.
.
.
.

.

*

.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.

23.0
.
2.1* .

e
1*6.2
. .1 .
*

.
.

.

.

.
.
.
.
.

.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

.

.
.

.

-

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

- .
_ .
_ .
. • .
.
- .
. - .
.•
-.
. - .
..
. - .
. - .
. - .
. - .
-.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.
.
.

.
.
.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

.

.
20.7.
. . .
..
. ~ .
.
.
-.
. - .
.
1.8 .
. - .
. - .
. _ .
. 3.1.
.
-.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.
.
.
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.
.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

_
.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.

.

-.
-.
-.

.

52.6
5.7
.1

51*. 7
1*.7
12.7
2.8
•
•
17.3
17.1

37.1
13.3
.7

55.5
-

1*7.9
l*.l*
3.0

52.9
1.0
7.6
16.9

11.2
10.2
1.0

32.0

33.5
7.9
•
.
-

1*6.2
0.1*
3.9
17.9
-

11.2
3.9
.1
*
.

3.1
2.8
.2
.1
-

11.1

9.1*
11.7
•
2.1*

9.9
.1
3.2
2.2
.1
.5
.1*
-

23.0
2.1*

-

29.8
2.1
1*.2
.7
.
1*.9
3.9

2.3
2.1
.2

-

3.6
.7

1.1*
1.6

.

-

1*0.2
1.9
_
3.7
1.0
_
5.1*
3.5
7.1
2.9

-

-

-

-

_

5.9

-

2.1

o

-

-

-

•J

.2
1.9
(2/)

.2
.1

•

7i

-

.6

-

-

.5

.3

.1

-

1.5

5l.l

O i
t
fc.O

3.0

.

.1

-

1
*7.1*

1*5.3

1.5

2.2

-

-

1.5

-

-

1*.8

2.6

-

3.5

-

-

-

•

1 .8

~

9.1

1 *.5
*1

52.1

1*7.1

-

.7

*

62.9

1/ Includes data for industries other than those show separately.
n
? / Less than .05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
**
 Finance, insurance, and real estate.



.
-

-

_

1 1 .9

59.8

13.0

.1
(2/)

-

-

2 .0
.1
.1

-

-

*
*

-

-

9 0 .1

•

-

9 6 .9

-

-

-

-

-

97.7

1**6
3.1

8 8 .8

.

.
_

_
_

.

-

1.8

-

-

_

-

_

-

70.2

20.7

.

1.8

_

-

-

-

.

1.8

•

-

1.9

_
m

_

ik

-

19.7

3.1

-

-

-

-

-

6 6 .$

-

77.0

53.8

.

.

88.9

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

-.
.
.
-

1*8.9
(2/)
.3
5.3
2.3
.2

.1

.
.

.

88.9

1.0

.
.

.

53.8

1.0

.
.

.

77.0

•

.
.
.

66.$

.
-

.
.

.

88.8

•
-

.
.

.

97.7

_
-

.

.

96.9

-

.

.

90.1

-

.

.

70.2

_

.

.

59.8

1.0
15.9
1.5
.6

.

.

.

_.

1*7.1

.1
13.1
2.6
.1
15.2
15.1

.

.

52.1

.6

.

.

.

1 *.5
*1

5.2
.8
.
1.8
7.3
-

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.

. *
.1

.

.

.

-.

_

.

.

62.9

9.3
2.8
.3
1.2
12.3
8.1*
.7

.

_

1*5.3

-

.

.
.

.

1.6
.
1.1*

.

.

1 *
*7.1

3.9
•

.

.
.

.

1*.6
.
3.1

.

.

.
.
19*7

.
.

_.
_.
- .
..
_
.-.
- .
-.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

51.1

li*.l

.

r

.

.

-

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

-.

.

3.9
.
17.9
.
-.
-.
.
. 3.6
.
.7
•

.

-.
. _ .
.
1.8 .
. _ .
1.8
.
. - .
. _ .
. 1.9
.
. - .

.

.

years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...............................
3 days .....................................................
1 days........... .......... .
*
5 days
.................................... . .
6 days............................... ...................
7 days ................................................... ..
8 days ............. ......................................
10 days ...................................................
12 days............. ............................... .
I k days ........................................
15 days .............................................. .
20 days ............... .......... ....................
21 days ..................................... .............
22 days ................................. .................
2k days ...................................................
25 days............................... ............. .
30 days ...............................................
1 0 days ............. ........... ............... ..
*
11 days........................ ..........................
**
50 days ...................... ........... ...............
60 days ............... ................................. .
72 days ...........................................
Over 72 days ..........................................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...............................

.

o

11.1

.

.

1.8.
7.3
.

.

.

.

.

.

-

.

.

.

5.2
.
.8
-.

.

.

.

.

-

.

.
.

.

.

-

_ .
._ .
-. .
..
_ .
.
-.
..
..
. - .
.• .
._ .
..
“.

.

7.9
. .
. . - .
_.
.

.
.

.

.

.

.

-.
-

.

.

f

v

..

.

.
.
100.0

.

e

.

10.2
. - .
. 1.0
.

.
.

.

Services

h

33.5

.

-

-. .
-. .
• .
..
-. .
..
_ .
.
-.
..
-. .
..
..
..
..
- .

.

.

.

.

.
100.0

t

.
-

.

.

•.
._

.

-

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

.
2.1
. .2 .
. - .

.

.

-

.

.

.

.

100.0

c

a
11.2

2.3

.

.
2.8
. .2 .
. .1 .

.

.

.

.
.

.

-.
-.
. -.
-.
-.
-.
-.
-.
.~

i

e

-.

.
.

.1

.

.

-

.

.

.-

.

.

Retail
trade

i

3.1

.

.
3.2
.
2.2

.

.

.
1*.9

.

.

v

l

.

.

.

.

.

.

9.9
.
.1

Whole­
sale
trade

s
100.0

t
j 100.0

w

.

.-

.
.

-.

.
9.8
-.
-.
.
. 2.2
.
.
-.
. . 3.5
.
.
1*.9.
.
-.
. - .
.
-.
.
-.
. 1.9
.
.
-.
.
2.3 .

.

.
2.1 .
.
1*.2 .
. .7 .

.

.

.

.

r

.

. .

.

.

.

-.

.
. .

• .
.
5.1*
.
3.5 .

.

.

.

.
3.7
.
1.1

.

.

.

. .

n
100.0

s

29.8

k

.

1. o

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.
11.2
«.
.
. 3.9
.
..1*
. - .

.
.

.

.

.
.
.

1 *0.2

!

100.0

e

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

All

100.0

:

t

c

.

7^6.
.
.
16.9
. .

.
.
.

.
9.1*
. 11.7
.

.

.
. .
.

-.
-.
«
.

.

.

.

.

.
3.0

.

52.9
.1.0.

.

. *. l
l . *. .

.

.

.
-.
-

m
loo.o

!

s

i
.

-

.
. .

-.
-.

.
.

.

.

3.9.

.

.
.

.6 .
. - .
..
. • .
.. - ..

.

.

. . il*.i . .
. .
.

.
1.0
-.
.
15.9.
. . 1.5
..

.
.

100.0

h

n

1*7.9

s

-

.

. .

.

.

.

.

. .

.
.

.

.

. .

.

..
17.3
.
17.1 .
.
- .
. - .
. .- . .
.1
. .- . .
. - .
. - .
. - .
. . - . .
. •.

.

13.3
.
.
.7

.

.
12.0 .
. . 2.8 .
. ..

.

.

. .

- .

.
.

.
12.5 .
. . 2.6 .
. ..

.

. .

All
indus­
tries

Services

f

55.5

.-

.

5.1*

.

.

.

.

.

. .

.1 .
-

.

.

. .

100.0

e

37.1

.

Finance**

s

m
d

-.

.

. .

.
.

51*. 7
.

.

6.3
.1.

. .

i
100.0

o

h

.

.

. .

.2 .
.6 .

- .
. .
.
.
9.0 .
. . . . . . . 2*8. .
. . .
. a
.
.
.3 .
.
. 1.7 .
.
.
a
12.7
.
.
.
8.1* .
. .. . ..
..
.7 . .
..
.
. .3 .
..
..
..7 . .
.
a 1.3
a
.1
. .
. . a . -.
. .
.
s.
. .3 .
.
.
. .1 .
.
.
. .9 .
. .
. .
. . .1 . .
.
.
. .1 .
*
.

. .

.

5.7
.2.3.

. .

.

.

.

. .

.

..
. .

.

.

.

. ..

.

.

..
. ..

.

100.0 l

s

i

Retail
trade

1/

b
100.0

s

5 2 .6

a
.

.

.

. . .. . . .. . . .. .

.

. ..

.
.

3
3

.

d

.

2 2

.

. .

.

.

r

.

.
. .

..

.

. . .

.

.

..
. .

. .

.

. . .

..

.

. .

. ..

0

2 *2 *

..

.

.

.
.

.

.

.

..

.

. .

.

.
.

.
. . .

.

..

2

.

.
.

.
.

.

.

.
.

.

..

d a y s

.

.
.

s .

.

.

a
100.0

i

1*8.9

p

.

.

.

i

1 5

.

a

l

.

. . . . . . . . . .

.

y

.

.

.

.

d a y s
d

.

.

.

..

1 2

.

.

.

.

1 0

.

.

. .

d a y s

9

.

100.0 t

s

b

.

s .

8

e

a

r

M n f c u in
a ua t r g
Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Durable
goods

All

100.0

e

y

s
f

All
indus­
tries

l

$

E

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN -

M n f c u in
a ua t r g

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

39

Table E-5a:

Paid SicJz Jl&aue (fyobnuU pAXMU&Umi) -M ole* Veiuclu and Moto*-VekicU ZqtUpmuU
P ercen t

P r o v is io n s f o r p a id

s ic k le a v e

A ll m otor
v e h i c l e and
m o t o r -v e h ic le
e q u ip m e n t
e s ta b lis h ­
m e n ts 1/

o f o ffic e

w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d i n -

P e r c e n t o f p l a n t w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d i n -

M o t o r - v e h i c l e p a r t s an d a c c e s s o r i e s
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s 2/

T ota l

101 - 1C00
w ork ers

1001 o r
m ore w o r k e r s

A l l m otor
v e h i c l e and
m o t o r -v e h ic le
e q u ip m e n t
e s t a b lis h ­
m en ts l /

M o t o r - v e h ic le p a r t s and a c c e s s o r i e s
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s 2/

T ota l

101-1000
w ork ers

1

100.0

............................ ..

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

5 9 .8

A l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s

3 1 .2
7 .5
-

3 1 .1
-

3 lJ t
Hi . 7
-

0 .3
-

1.8

1 .0

5*0
5*0
-

1001 o r
m o re w o r k e r s

100.0

y e a r o f s e r v ic e

E s t a b li s h m e n t s -w ith f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s

5

d a y s ........................................................ .. . • . . . . *

-

2 1 .0

2 3 .0

2 .7
-

2 5 .5
5 .6
-

1 6 .7
-

•3
-

1.8

32.8
3 .0

1+0 .2

68.8

68.9

68.6

99*7

98.2

95*0

5 9 -8

31.2

*3

1.8

7 .5
2 1 .0

3 1 .1
-

3 1 *i+

1 .0

-

5*0
-

1.8

5.0

2 5 .5
5 .6
-

16 .7

-

-

-

10

d a y s ....................... .. ................. ......................... • •

21 d a y s ............. ....................................
E s t a b li s h m e n t s w i t h n o f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
2

-

-

100.0

y e a rs o f s e r v ic e

E s t a b li s h m e n t s w i t h f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s

5
6

days
days

............................ .. ........................................... ..
....................... .......................................... ..

-

32.8
1 2 d a y s ....................................
2 1 d a y s •••••••••••••..................... ..

3 .0

2 3 .0

2 .7
-

lU - 7
-

*3
-

-

-

-

-

E s t a b li s h m e n t s w it h n o f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
2+0.2

6 8 .8

6 8 .9

6 8 .6

99*7

9 8 .2

5 9 .8
1 .0
-

31*2

3 1 .1
-

31*U
31+.7
-

*3
-

5 .0
-

23-3
2 3.0

2 .7
-

2 5 .5
5 -6
-

1 6 .7
-

*3
-

1 .8
1 .8
-

i+ 0 .2

6 8 .8

68.9

6 8 .6

99*7

9 8 .2

95*0

59 *8
1 .0
-

3 1 .2

31*1
-

3 1 J*
li+ ,7
-

*3
-

2 5 .5

1 6 .7
-

1 *8
1 .8
-

5*0
5*0
-

95*0

1 0 0 .0

5 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
E s t a b li s h m a a t s w it h

12 d a y s
20 days
21 d a y s

fo rm a l p r o v i s io n s

.......................................................... ...
................................... . . ................. . . . . . .
.............................................• • .• • • • • • • •

E s t a b li s h m e n t s w i t h n o f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a i d s i c k l e a v e • ••• ............. ..

15

years

of

9*5
3*o

7 .5
2 1 .0

-

1 0 0 .0

s e r v ic e

E s t a b li s h m e n t s w i t h f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a i d s i c k l e a v e ..............

9 .5
3 .0

7 .5
2 1 .0

2 3 -3
23 .O

2 .7
-

5.6

........................................................... . . . . . .
....................................................................... .

E s t a b li s h m e n t s w it h n o fo r m a l p r o v i s i o n s
f o r p a i d s i c k l e a v e .................................... . . . .

i+ 0 .2

6 8 .8

68.9

20 days
21 days

5 .0

-

6 8 ,6

’

*3
-

9 8 .2

9 9 ®7

95*0

1 0 0 .0

I
|
1

l/
? /




For d e f i n i t i o n o f in d u s try *
For d e f i n i t i o n o f in d u s try *

see fo o t n o t e 1 , t a b l e A-l&<
s ee f o o t n o t e 1 , t a b le A -lb -

O c cu p a tio n a l Wage S u rvey, D e t r o i t , M ic h ., December 1951
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

A
O

Table £-6;

PERCENT

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Mn f c u in
a ua t r g

Mn f c u in
a ua t r g
All
Indus*
tries

Type o f bonus

Durable
goods

All

OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

Retail
trade

Finance**

All
indus­
tries

Services

All

Durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Non­
durable
goods

1/

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

• • • • • • • .

............ .. .............

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 -0 .0
4

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts

2 7 .7

29.2

1 6 .6

1 0 .1

6 5 .7

58*7

7 7 .3

56.9

2 8 .3

2 2 .6

21+.3

6 .3

1+.6

50.0

7 3 .5

3 5 .9

9 .7

62.9

5 7 .0

7 1 . 1+

56.9

6 .8

3 5 .9

-

.2

7*1+

1 3 .1

1 2 .3

•3
1 5 .7

2 .1
-

6 8 .0

-

5 .0
1 .3

50.0

1 .7
-

15.1+
.8

6 .6

1 .1
1+.6

1 7 .3

1 .1

2 .5

3 .2

5 .5
“

3 U *3

1+1.3

2 2 .7

1+3 .1

7 1 .7

77.1+

7 5 .7

9 3 .7

95*1+

50.0

2 6 .5

E sta b lis h m en ts w ith n o n p ro d u ctio n

28*1

8 .7

8 .5

1 0 .2

•7
1 2 .8

•9

1 8 .5

.1
2 0 .6

6 .5
2 .6

6 0 .0

C hristm as o r y e a r -e n d .............. ..

7 2 .3

70.8

8 3 .1+

“

E sta b lis h m en ts w ith no n o n p ro d u ctio n

l /

? /
*
**

89*9

I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r i n d u s t r i e s o t h e r t h a n t h o s e show n s e p a r a t e l y *
U n d u p lica te d t o t a l *
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( e x c l u d i n g r a i l r o a d s ) , c o m m u n ic a t io n , an d o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and real estate.




Table E-6a*

ft aHfLfUKLcctioH BojuU&b * Moto* Velucl&L and Moto^-VeJucU CqtUfimetU
*
P e r c e n t o f o f f i c e w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d i n A l l m otor
v e h i c l e and
m o to r -v e h i c le
e q u ip m e n t
e s t a b l i shm ents

T yp e o f b o n u s

M b t o r - v e h i o l e p a r t s and a c c e s s o r i e s
e s t a b l i s hm ents

2/

T ota l

V
A l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s

• ••••..............••• • • • .• • «• •

P e r c e n t o f p l a n t w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d i n -

1 0 1 -1 0 0 0
wo r is e r s

1001 o r
m ore wo r k e r s

A l l m otor
v e h i c l e and
m o t o r -v e h ic le
eq u ip m e n t
e s t a b lis h m e n t s

M o t o r -v e h io le p a r t s and a c c e s s o r i e s
e s t a b lis h m e n t s 2 /
T ota l

1/

1 0 1 -1 0 0 0
w ork ers

10 0 1 o r
m ore w o r k e r s

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

2 7.2

3 2 .3

1+5*9

19.6

26.2

1 9 .9

2 k -h

17.1+-

1+5.9
-

19.6

3 .0

1 9 .9

21+.1+

1 7J +

-

-

E s t a b li s h m e n t s w i t h n o n p r o d u c t i o n
b o n u se s 3/
C h r is t m a s o r y e a r - e n d • •• •••••••••••.••
P r o f i t - s h a r i n g . .• • • • • ........................ ..
O th e r ..................................•••••••••••••••••••

1+.2
-

23.0

32 .3
-

-

1 0 0 .0

-

2 3.2

-

-

E s t a b li s h m e n t s w i t h n o n o n p r o d u o t i o n

72.8

6 7 .7

5bol

73 .8

80.1+

8 0 .1

7 5 .6

8 2 .6

-

1/

cf/
2 jf

F or d e f in it io n o f in d u s tr y ,
F or d e f i n i t i o n o f i n d u s t r y ,
U n d u p lica te d t o t a l .

see fo o t n o t e
see fo o tn o te

1,
1,

t a b le A -la .
t a b l e A -lb.

O c c u p a t i o n a l Wage S u r v e y , D e t r o i t , M ic h * , D ecem b er 19 5 1
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B u rea u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s

•1+

61+.1

a

Tabi® £-7 * 9n&*4&a4*&e a m i P-e*$& io*i PJdm»&

P E R C E N T O F OFFICE W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN—

P E R C E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN —

Mn f c u in
a ua t r g

Mn f c u in
a ua t r g
Type of plan

All
indus­
tries

All establishments.................... .

All

100.0

100.0

Nn
o­

Durable
goods

durable
goods

100.0

100.0

Whole­
sale
trade

Public
utili­
te'
is*

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

y

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

All

1

D u rable

j go s
od

1

N on­

dr b
ua le

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

good s

100.0 I 100.0

10 0 .0

Public
utili­
ties*

I----------Establishments with insurance or
pension plans 2/ .......................... .

9U.2

Establishments with no insurance or
pension plans ................................

l/

f

*
**

97.8

93.3

98.5

78.5

81.7

9U.3

86.3

90.6

9U
.0

9ii.li

90 .il

98.6

7U.3

88.5

1*5 *
.1

89.9
79.3
78.3
69.li
Q/>

95.li
93.0
91.9
83.7

97.0
95.U
9k. 3
87.1

83.2
7U.8
73.9
58.0

97.8
58.1
57.7
85.2

63.6

90.3

77.3
66.8

92.8
92*8
91.3
78.9

81.0
70.1
58.5
51i.9

9l*.2
7l*.8
6 I .O
4
68.6

53.5

36.8
38.1
32.1*

-

-

-

~

~

-

-

52.2
3it.7
-

61.7
1*7.6
1*3.3
ii2.0

-

8U.8
82.1
78.5
67.5
-

91*7
90.6
88.1
76.6

-

62.0
1*7*7
37.8
30.9
.2

-

-

$.8

Life insurance .......................................
Health insurance.................................
Hospitalization ............... ....................
Retirement pension ........................ .
Other............................ ................. .

97.3

2.7

2.2

6.7

1.5

21.5

18.3

9*h

6.0

5.6

9.6

i.U

25.7

6 1 .1

57.8
it3.3

6 6 .3

71.7
51.6

6 0 .1

26.7

5.7

13.7

6 3.6

In c lu d e s d ata f o r in d u s t r i e s o th e r +han th o s e shovm s e p a r a t e l y .
TJnduplicated t o t a l .
L ess th a n *05 o f 1 p e r c e n t .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n ( e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) ,
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




com m unication, and o th e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s .

Table E-7&*

9&A44A&n<>e am i P-e*Ui<m PJawd -M o£o* VvUud&l and Mtdm-VmtucU
P e rc e n t o f p la n t w orkers employed. i n -

P e rc e n t o f o f f i c e w orkers em ployed in -

Type o f p la n

A l l m o to r
v e h i c l e and
m o to r -v e h ic le
equipm ent
e s ta b lis h m e n ts
1/
100*0

E sta b lis h m e n ts vrith in s u ra n c e o r
p e n s io n p la n s 3/ ..................... ..
L if e in s u ra n ce ..........................................................
H ea lth in su ra n ce
R etirem en t p e n s io n ••••••»
E sta b lis h m e n ts w ith no in s u ra n c e or
p e n s io n p la n s ................................ ..

1/
2/
7 /

A ll m otor
M o t o r -v e h ic le p a r t s and a c c e s s o r ie s
v e h i c l e and
e s ta b lis h m e n ts 2 /
m o t o r - v e h ic l e
equipm ent
1001 or
101-1000
T ota l
worke rs
m ore w orkers e s ta b lis h m e n ts
. 1/
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

M o t o r -v e h ic le p a r t s and a c c e s s o r ie s
es ta b lis h m e n ts 2 /
T o ta l

101-1000
w orkers

1001 or
more w orkers

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .2

9 7 .2

9l*.2

1 0 0 .0

9 2 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

97 oO
9 6 .7
9 3 -5
9 3 .0

95*6

90*9
8 5 .8
8 5 .8

36 J4
.

9 2 .1
9 1 .8
9 0 .1
8 6 .9

9 9 .1
9 7 .6
95*6
6 5 .1

97.5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

6l*.9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 1 .8

2 .8

2 .8

5 .8

For d e f i n i t i o n o f in d u s t r y , see f o o t n o t e 1 , t a b le A -la ,
For d e f i n i t i o n o f i n d u s t r y , see f o o t n o t e 1 , t a b le A -lb«
U ndupli ca te d t o t a l .

9 3 .1
9 3 -1

“

7 .8

-

9 3 .1
8 7 -5
2 3 .8

-

8 7 .5

"

O c cu p a tio n a l Wage S u rvey, D e t r o i t , M ic h ., December 1951
TJ.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f la b o r S t a t i s t i c s

11.5

l.k

51*.6

42

Appendix — Scope ar

With the exception of the union scale of rates , in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed*
In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were usedj these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A-4)* The covered industry groupings are i manufac­
turing! transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities! wholesale trade! retail trade; finance,
insurance, and real estate; and services*
Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the, following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs*were
strdied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)*
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data for these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




Method of Survey

a

of
certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation*
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work* Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings,
including
commissions for salespersons, are included* Where weekly hours
are reported as for office clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents* The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the scope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed*
Data are shown far only full-time
workers, i*e«, those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification*
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables*
It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours* Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller*
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements* It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor* Sick leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits* These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers*
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans*

U3

ESTABLISHMENTS AND WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN DETROIT, MICH,, l/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, DECEMBER 1951

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establi shments
studied
2/

Numt>er of
establj ;
shments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

76,980
49,070
44,060
5,010
27,910

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All d i v i s i o n s ....... ........................... .
Manufacturing.................... ...........
Durable goods 2/ ..........................
Nondurable goods ij ..................... .
Nonmanufacturing ............. ...............
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ..............................
Wholesale trade ...........................
Retail t r a d e .............. .............. .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services 2 / ............................. • •

101
101
101

1,755
415
302
113
1,340

349
124
81
43
225

472,100
56,900
203,900

539,000
423,700
386,200
37,500
115,300

61

42,700
29,600
67,000
27,600
37,000

35,400
9,100
45,600
14,500
10,700

9,140
2,450
3,450
10,250
2,620

2,365
1,545
1,117
2,504
82,909
58,848
14,981
9,080
14,161
4,883
17,548

2,128
1,405
975
1,906
55,670
45,349
2,960
7,361
12,783
3,814
6,160

72
134
42
96
7,144
5,814
126
1,204
348
3,970

101
21
101
21
21

125
248
484

23
53
40
52
57

8
21
21
8
7/ 21
21
8
8
101
21
21

28
13
15
41
514
157
299
58
12
27
68

14
9
11
14
78
32
24
22
8
12
23

422

732,900

529,000

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6/
Foundries, nonferrous .............. .............
Forgings, iron and steel .........................
Sheet-metal w o r k ....... ..................... .
Electroplating, plating, and p o l i s h i n g ...........
Machinery industries .............................
Machinery ........... .........................
Machine-tool accessories, jobbing shops ....
Machine-tool accessories, production shops ..
R a i l r o a d s ...............................
Milk dealers .....................................
Insurance carriers ...............................

1/ Detroit Metropolitan Area (Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne Counties).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
miscellaneous manufacturing.
4/ Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2/ Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were included.




Index
Page

Assembler (insurance carriers) .............. • ••...... .
Assembler (machinery) ............... .
Automatic-lathe operator (machinery) *...... ...........

27
23, 24# 25
23

Bartender (hotels) • .........••••••••••••••...... .....
30
Bellman (hotels) ................... ...... ...... .
30
28
Bench hand (bakeries) • •...... ...................... .
Biller, machine .......... ........................ .......
4
Biller, machine (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment)
............... .......... ..... ......
8
Biller, machine (motor-vehicle parts and
accessories)
9
Bookbinder (printing) ..........
29
Bookkeeper# h a n d ........................................
3, 4
Bookkeeper, hand (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ••••••••..... * *........... .
8
Bookkeeper, hand (motor-vehicle parts and accessories)«»
9
Bookkeeping-machine operator
4
Bookkeeping-machine operator (motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment) «»««««•
8
Bookkeeping-machine operator (motor-vehicle parts
and accessories) ..••••............ ...... ........... .
9
Bottler (malt liquors) ......
28
Brewer (malt liquors) ....•••• .
...e***....*
28
Bricklayer (building construction)
28
Butcher (restaurants) ........... *..... .......... ..... ..
30
Cabinetmaker (millworlc) .................
29
5
Calculating-machine operator ..................
Calculating-machine operator (motor vehicles
and motor-vehicle equipment) • «..........
8
Calculating-machine operator (motor-vehicle
parts and accessories) ......
9
Carpenter (building construction) «•••••••••••••••••••••
28
Carpenter, maintenance 9»......
12
Carpenter, maintenance (motor-vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment) .......................
14
Carpenter, maintenance (motor-vehicle parts
and acce s s o r i e s ) .... ..............
15
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) • «............
26
Chipper and grinder (iron and steel forgings)
21
21
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries) ........
C l e a n e r .... 16
Cleaner (machinery) ...................
23, 24, 25
Cleaner (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment)
««»
19
Cleaner (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) «•*•«»•»•»
19, 20




00

Page

Cleaner (railroads) ...... .......... ...... *....... •
Cleaner (shest-metal work)
.... .......
Clerk, accounting .....................•...... .......... .
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) •••••••..... ....
Clerk, accounting (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ••••••»•••.............. ...... ,..... .......
Clerk, accounting (motor-vehicle parts and
accessories) ............ ............... ............. .
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) ............ .
Clerk, file ................ ................. ........
Clerk, file (insurance carriers)
.
.
o
Clerk, file (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ......................... ........... .......
Clerk, file (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) .... .
Clerk, general ................ . ....... ,...... ....... .
Clerk, general (insurance carriers)
.........••••••••••
Clerk, general (motor-vehicle parts and accessories)
Clerk, o r d e r .............. .............. ...... ........ .
Clerk, order (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment)
Clerk, order (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) •••••
Clerk, payroll ............. ............. ........ .......
Clerk, payroll (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment)
...... ............................. ..,
Clerk, payroll (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) «#.
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers) ••••••••
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) . . .«•••••••••
Compositor, hand (printing) ........ .......... .
Cook (restaurants) ............ .......... .......... .
Coremaker, hand (nonferrous foundries) ..................
Corem&ker, machine (nonferrous foundries)
. ...o...*.
Crane operator, electric bridge ...............
Gran© operator, electric bridge (motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment)
.
Crane operator, electric bridge (motor-vehicle parts
and accessories) •.». •. *... ..................... .
Die setter (iron and steel forgings)
.
..... .
Die sinker (iron and steel forgings)
.....
Dishwasher (restaurants) ............................
Draftsman ........................
Draftsman (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ......... *...... ......... ............ .
Draftsman (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) ......
Drill-press operator (machinery) ......... .

000000000000 00000 000

00 0

00 00

00000000000000000000000 00.00
00 0.0000 0
0

26

22
3, 5
27

8
9
27
3, 5
27

8
9

3, 5
27
9
,

3 6
8
10
3, 6
8
9, 10
27
27

29
30
21
21
16

19
19
21
21
30
11
H
12

23, 24, 25

Index - G o 4ttlMM0 &
lag®

Drop-hammer operator* board (iron and
steel forgings) .......... ............. ......... ..... .
21
Duplicating-machine operator .............. .
3$ 6
Duplicating-machine operator (motor vehicles and
.................. .
8
motor-vehicle equipment)
Duplicating-machine operator (motor-vehicle parts
and accessories) .............................. ....... .
10
Electrician (building construction)
•••••••••••••»••••••
28
Electrician, maintenance
..... ••.•••»•»•»•»•»«*•«
13
Electrician, maintenance (machinery)
23, 24, 25
Electrician, maintenance (motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment) .............. ............ .
14
Electrician, maintenance (motor-vehicle parts
and accessories) ......... ............ ....... .........
15
Electrician, maintenance (nonferrous foundries) .... .
21
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) .............. .
26
29
Electrotyper (printing) ............................... •«
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ....................
23, 24$ 25
Engineer, stationary ....................
13
Engineer, stationary (milk dealers) ...................
26
Engineer, stationary (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) •»*•«••••»•••»....................................14
Engineer, stationary (motor-vehicle parts and
15
accessories) .........
Filling-machine tender (milk dealers) ......
26
13
Fireman, stationary boiler ........... ....... .
Fireman, stationary boiler (motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment) •
..... ......... ....... .
14
Fireman, stationary boiler (motor-vehicle parts
and accessories) ........... .............. ......... .
15
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries) ........... .
21
Glazier (millwork).... .......
29
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) ............... .
23$ 24$ 25
Guard ...........................................
16
Guard (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment)
19
Guard (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) .........
19
Hammersmith (iron and steel forgings) ........................ 21
Heater, forge (iron and steel forgings) ................
21
Helper (bakeries) ...... ................ ............ •
28
Helper, forge (iron and steel forgings) ••»»<>•••*•••«•••
21
Helper, motortruck driver .............. .
29, 30
Helper, trades, m a i n t e n a n c e ...... *...... .
13
Helper, trades, maintenance (motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment) .....
14




Helper, trades, maintenance (motor-vehicle parts and
15
accessories) ..............
Houseman (hotels) .................
30
Inspector (iron and steel forgings) ...... ............ .
21
23,
, 25
Inspector (machinery) ........... ............ ......... .
Janitor ..........................
16
Janitor (machinery) ..................................... 23, 24$ 25
Janitor (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ............... ............
19
Janitor (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) ..... .
19$ 20
26
Janitor (railroads) .... ...... ......... ........... .....
Janitor (sheet-metal work) .... ........ .............. .
22
Key-punch operator ............... ....... ...............
6
27
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) .............. .
Key-punch operator (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment; ••»•«««•«*»••••............
8
Key-punch operator (motor-vehicle parts and
accessories)
.... ......... ............... ......
10
Laborer (building construction)
28
Lay-out man (sheet-metal work) • •............ •..........
22
Machine operator (printing) ,»»•••..................
29
Machine tender (printing) «••••••••••...........,..... ..
29
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ......... 23, 24, 25
Machine-tool operator, toolroom
13
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) •••»•••••••.
23
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment) ••••«•••••••••»•••...... ....
14
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (motor-vehicle parts
15
and accessories) ................... ......... .
Machinist, maintenance ........... .......... ...».......
13
Machinist, maintenance (motor vehicles and motorvehicle equipment) ..•.•••••••••••••........••..... •••
14
Machinist, maintenance (motor-vehicle parts and
accessories) .................»••••...... ...... .
15
Maid (hotels)
.........•••••••••.......
30
Mailer (printing)
...... ........ ....
29
Maintenance man, general utility .............. •••••••••
13
Maintenance man, general utility (motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment)
••«••«•••»
Maintenance man, general utility (motor-vehicle parts
and accessories; ........... ....... ••»•».••«••••......
15
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance)•.•••••»..•*»•........ .
13
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (motor vehicles
and motor-vehicle equipment)
14

24

14

46

Index - ( o*t£**u*&&
2

Page

Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (motor-vehicle
parts and accessories)
....... ............
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (railroads) ......... „
26
Mechanic, maintenance .............. ........... .........
14
Mechanic, maintenance (iron and steel forgings) ...... .
21
Mechanic, maintenance (motor vehicles and motorvehicle equipment) .............. ......................
14
Mechanic, maintenance (motor-vehicle parts and
accessories) ......................
Mechanic, maintenance (railroads) ........................
26
Milling-machine operator (machinery) •••••••........•••• 23, 24, 25
M i l l w r i g h t ...............................................
14
Millwright (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ••••••.... ............ .................. ...
Millwright (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) •••••••
15
Millwright (nonferrous foundries) .............................21
23
Mixer (bakeries) ................ • •••..... •«••••••••••«•
Molder (bakeries) .........
23
Molder, floor (nonferrous foundries) • •...... ..........
21
Molder, hand, bench (nonferrous foundries) ..............
21
Motortruck d r i v e r .........• ••.............. •••••••••.••
29, 30
Nurse, industrial (registered) ..... ....... •»......... .
11
Nurse, industrial (registered) (motor vehicles and
11
motor-vehicle equipment) ..............................
Nurse, industrial (registered) (motor-vehicle
parts and accessories) ..................... ...... • «•••
12
Office boy ................ ••••••••••••••••.•.«••.......
3
Office boy (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
3
equipment) ••••........... • •••..................... .
Office boy (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) ••••«••
9
Office girl
6
14
Oiler • •...... ................ ......... ........... .....
Oiler (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment) • ••••
14
Oiler (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) ••••«•••••••
15
Operator (local transit) .••••••••••»••.•••...............
29
Order f i l l e r ..................... ............ ......... .
16
Order filler (milk dealers) ....................... ••••••
26
Order filler (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
19
equipment) «••••••..... *•••••••.......... ........... .
Order filler (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) •••••
20
Overman (bakeries) •••••••••»•*.•*.•••.... ........ .....
23
Packer •••••••••••••••••••••»••••»•................. .
16, 17
23
Packer (bakeries) .......... ........................... • •
Packer (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment) ••••
19
Packer (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) •••••••••••
20




15

15

14

Painter (building construction) .........................
28
Painter, maintenance ................
14
Painter, maintenance (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ........... ...... ...........................
14
Painter, maintenance (motor-vehicle parts and
15
accessories) .........*............ ....................
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ....... .............. .
26
Pastetirizer (milk dealers) ..................... .........
26
Photoengraver (printing) ..............
29
14
Pipe fitter, maintenance ................................
Pipe fitter, maintenance (motor vehicles and motorvehicle equipment) ......................
Pipe fitter, maintenance (motor-vehicle parts and
accessories) ................
15
Plasterer (building construction) .......... ...... .
28
Plater (electroplating, plating, and polishing) ••••••••
22
Plater’s helper (electroplating, plating, and
polishing) .......... ............ ...... ........ .
22
Plumber (building construction) ............ ........... .
28
Plumber, maintenance ......................
14
Polisher and buffer, metal (electroplating, plating,
22
and polishing) ....... ............ .....................
Polishing-and-buffing-machine operator (electroplating,
plating, and polishing) ...............................
22
P o r t e r .......................
16
Porter (machinery)..... ................................ 23, 24, 25
Porter (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment) ....
19
19, 20
Porter (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) ...........
Porter (sheet-metal work) ............................. .
22
Pourer, metal (nonferrous foundries) .............. ..
21
Power-brake operator (sheet-metal work) •*••••••••••••••
22
22
Power-shear operator (sheet-metal w o r k ) .... .
Premium acceptor (insurance carriers) ...... ......... ..
27
Press assistant (printing)
29
Press feeder (printing) ........ ......... ........... .
29
Pressman (printing) ............................ ....... .
29
Receiving c l e r k ..... ..............
17
Receiving clerk (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ............
19
Receiving clerk (motor-vehicle parts and
accessories) ....... ..... ....... ...... ...... ...... ..
20
Refrigerator man (milk dealers) ......... .............. .
26
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers) .........
26
Sand mixer (nonferrous foundries) .... . ........ ........
21
Sanitary man (milk dealers) ......................
26

14

ki

index- Q t u U i m t e d
■Efige
Sawyer (millwork)
...... ...... ............. ••«••*•••••
29
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery) ......... .
23
4* 6
Secretary ............................. ........... .......
Secretary (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) .............. ........ ........... .
8
Secretary (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) ••••••••
10
Section head (insurance carriers) .... ...... .
27
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries)
...... •••••«•••
21
14
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance .........................
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment)
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance (motor-vehicle parts
and accessories) ................ ..«••••...... •...... .
Sheet-metal worker, production (sheet-metal work)
22
Shipping clerk ............... •
.
17
Shipping-and-receiving clerk ............
17
Stenographer • *.............
7
27
Stenographer (insurance carriers) ............
Stenographer (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment)
...... ........... ..................«•««««•
8
Stenographer (motor-vehicle parts and accessories)
10
Stereotyper (printing) ......
29
17
Stock handler .................................
Stock handler (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ........
19
Stock handler (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) ••••
20
Stock handler (railroads) .....................
26
Switchboard operator
7
Switchboard operator (motor vehicles and motor8
vehicle equipment) .................
Switchboard operator (motor-vehicle parts and
accessories) •••«•««•••••••••••••••••«•«•«••••••••••••
10
Switchboard operator-receptionist ....... ••••••«.....
7
Switchboard operator-receptionist (motor vehicles
and motor-vehicle equipment) • • • • • • • • « • « . 8
Switchboard operator-receptionist (motor-vehicle
parts and accessories)
........<.•.*•••«•«
10
4, 7
Tabulating-machine operator ...................... .
Tabulating-machine operator (insurance carriers) •««•«•«
27
Tabulating-machine operator (motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment) .....
8
Tabulating-machine operator (motor-vehicle parts
and accessories) ........
10
Tool-and-die maker ......................
14
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ............. ....... .
23, 24, 25




14

15

Page
Tool-and-die maker (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
14
equipment) ........... ......... ............... .
Tool-and-die maker (motor-vehicle parts and
accessories) »• 0
«...... ...... ..... ........
T r a c e r ..... ............
11
Tracer (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment) ,,,,
11
Tracer (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) ...........
12
Transcribing-machine o p e r a t o r .........
7
Transcribing-machine operator (motor vehicles and
motor-vehicle equipment) ...........................
8
Transcribing-machine operator (motor-vehicle parts
and accessories) .................................
10
Trim-press operator (iron and steel forgings) ..........
21
Truck driver ....... ................ ....................
17, 18
Truck driver (mil> dealers) ..................... .
*
26
Truck driver (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ............... .......................
19
Truck driver (motor-vehicle p>arts and accessories) •••««
20
Truck driver (railroads) .................
26
Trucker, h a n d .... .......................
17
Trucker, hand (machinery) ..... ............. ........ .
23, 25
Trucker, hand (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
19
equipment) ..............
Trucker, hand (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) .•••«
20
Trucker, hand (railroads) ••«••••• ....... .
26
Trucker, power ........... ........................ ...... .
18
Trucker, power (iron and steel forgings) ...............
21
Trucker, power (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle
equipment) ..............
19
Trucker, power (motor-vehicle partsand accessories)
20
Trucker, power (nonferrous foundries)
21
23,
, 25
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ...... .
Typist ............. ........ .............................
7, 8
Typist (insurance carriers) ................................... 27
Typist (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment) ,*•«
8
Typist (motor-vehicle parts and accessories) •••«•**••««
10
Underwriter (insurance carriers)
27
Washer, bottle, machine (milk dealers) • o
•
26
26
Washer, can, machine (milk dealers) .............. .
W a t c h m a n .......
18
Watchman (motor vehicles and motor-vehicle equipment) «.
19
Watchman (motor-vehicle parts andaccessories) •••«•«*•«
20
Welder, hand (machinery) ......... •
.... «..... ......
,
Welder, hand (sheet-metalwork)
22
Wrapper (bakeries)
28

15

24

23 24

L. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952
J







TH OCCUPATIONAL W G SURVEY SERIES
E
AE
In addition to th is b u lle tin , sim ilar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent o f Documents, U.S. Government Printing O ffice , Washington 25, D. C.
fo r the follow ing communities;
City

3LS B u lletin No.

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
D allas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Kansas C ity, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
M inneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Oklahoma C ity, Oklahoma
Portland, Oregon
Richmond, V irginia
Salt Lake C ity, Utah
S ea ttle, Washington

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1064
1067
1068
1070
1042
1058
1069
1057

This report was prepared in the
cations may be addressed to :

Price
20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
15
25
15
20
15
15
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

s North Central Regional O ffice .

Communi-

Adolph 0 . Berger, Regional D irector
Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s
226 West Jackson Boulevard
Chicago 6 , I l l i n o i s
The services o f the Bureau o f Labor S ta tistics* regional o ffic e s are available fo r
consultation on s t a t is t ic s relatin g to wages and in d u strial re la tio n s, employment, p rices,
labor turn-over, p rod u ctiv ity, work in ju r ie s , construction and housing.
The North Central Region includes the follow ing States:
Nebraska
I llin o is
Michigan
North Dakota
Indiana
Minnesota
Iowa
Ohio
Missouri
South Dakota
Kansas
Montana
Kentucky
Wisconsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102