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C H I C A G O , IL L IN O IS
M a rch 1953

Bulletin

No.

1116-15

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LAB O R STA TISTIC S
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Occupational Wage Survey
C H IC A G O ,




M arch

IL L IN O IS

1953

Bulletin No.

1116-15

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Martin P. Durkin - Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.

Price 25 cents




Contents

Letter of Transmittal

UNITED STATES DEPARTMHJT OF* LABOR,
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s ,
W ashington, D* C*, Hay 28, 1953.
The S e c re ta ry o f Labor:
I have th e honor to tran sm it herew ith a re p o rt on
o ccu p atio n al wages and re la te d b e n e fits in Chicago, 111*, dinring
March 1953* S im ilar s tu d ie s are being conducted in a number o f
o th e r la rg e lab o r-m ark et areas during th e f is c a l y ear 1953*
These s tu d ie s have been designed to meet a v a rie ty o f govern­
m ental and nongovernm ental uses and provide area-w ide earnings
in fo rm atio n fo r many occupations common to most m anufacturing
and nonm anufacturlng in d u s trie s , as w ell as summaries o f se­
le c te d supplem entary wage b en efits* Whenever p o ssib le , sep arate
d a ta have been p resen ted fo r in d iv id u a l major In d u stry d iv isio n s*
T his re p o rt was prepared in th e B ureau's re g io n a l o f­
f ic e in Chicago, 111*, by Woodrow C* Linn under th e d ire c tio n o f
George E* V otava, R egional Wage and In d u stria l R elatio n s Analyst*
The planning and c e n tra l d ire c tio n o f th e program was c a rrie d
on in th e B ureau's D iv isio n o f Wages and In d u s tria l R elations*
Ewan (Hague, Commissioner*
Hon* M artin P* D urkin,
S e c re ta ry o f Labor*




Page
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................
THE CHICAGO AREA...............................................................................................
OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE......................................................................
TABLES:
Average earn in g s fo r se le c te d occupations stu d ied on an
a re a b a sis A -l
O ffice o c c u p a tio n s ...................................... *...............
A-2
P ro fessio n al and te c h n ic a l occupations ..................
A—
3
M aintenance and power p la n t occupations • • • • • • •
A-4
C u sto d ial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations .................................. *......................*•••••
Average earnings fo r se le c te d occupations stu d ied on an
in d u stry b a s is B-2333 Women's and m isses' d r e s s e s ............. *..........................
B-2511 Wood fu rn itu re (o th e r than u p h o lstered ) ................
B-2S51 P a in ts and v arn ish es • * • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
B-35
M achinery in d u s trie s * • • • • * • ...................• • • • • ...........
M achine-tool acc esso ries - production
s h o p s .............. *......................................*......................
M achine-tool acc esso ries - jobbing shops *••
B-7211 Power l a u n d r i e s ...................*..............................................
Union wage sc a le s fo r se le c te d occupations C-15
B uilding co n stru ctio n .....................• • • • ...............••••
C-205 B akeries ........... ........................................*..........................
C-27
P r i n t i n g .................................
C-41
Local t r a n s it o p eratin g employees * • • • • • • ................
C-42
M otortruck d riv e rs and h e l p e r s ...................• ••••••*
Supplementary wage p ra c tic e s D -l
S h ift d if f e r e n tia l p ro v isio n s .....................................
D-2
Scheduled weekly hours
.................
D-3
Paid h o lid a y s .....................................................
D-4
Paid v acatio n s * • • • • • • ...............
D-5
Insurance and pension p lans .......................••••*•••
APPENDIX:
Scope and method o f survey • • • .................*...........*........................
INDEX

1
1
2

U

7
7
9

11
12
13
13
16
17
18
19
19
19
20
20
21
21
22
22
25
26
28




OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY - CHICAGO, ILL.
The c ity i s th e fin a n c ia l c a p ita l o f th e G reat Lakes and Middlewest
reg io ns and th e g ra in c a p ita l of th e country. I t s m ail order cata­
log s a ffo rd m illio n s of American fa m ilie s a "shopping cen ter" in
th e ir own homes*
The p o pu latio n o f th e six-county Chicago m etropolitan
area to t a l s more than 5% m illio n , w ith m illio n concentrated in
Cook County and 3J* m illio n w ith in C hicago's c ity lim its* The
Chicago community wage survey was lim ite d to Cook County, and th e
rem aining d e s c rip tiv e te x t r e la te s to th a t area*
N onagricultural employees in th e area numbered about
2,225,000 in March 1953, inclu d ing approxim ately 825,000 women*
M anufacturing estab lish m en ts provided jobs fo r about 865,000 p er­
sons engaged in producing a number o f h ig h ly d iv e rs ifie d products*
More than 130,000 w orkers were engaged in th e m anufacture of elec­
t r i c a l m achinery, equipment and su p p lies (in clu d in g w iring d ev ices,
e le c tr ic m otors and g e n e ra to rs, ap p lian ces, and communication equip­
m ent). E stablishm ents producing n o n e le c tric a l machinery (such as
a g ric u ltu ra l equipm ent, metalworking machinery and o th er in d u s tria l
m achinery item s) employed approxim ately 120,000 w orkers. Other in ­
d u stry groups of m ajor im portance included food processing w ith
more than 100,000 w orkers, fa b ric a te d m etal products w ith 85*000*
s te e l and o th er prim ary m etal products w ith 68,000, and tran sp o r­
ta tio n equipment w ith 55,000. Employment fo r 75,000 persons was
provided by th e p rin tin g and p u blishin g in d u stry , 42,000 by th e ap­
p a re l in d u s trie s , and 30,000 by the chem icals and a llie d products
in d u stry group.
Nonmanufacturing in d u s trie s in th e area employed approxi­
m ately 1,360,000 w orkers, in clu d in g approxim ately 500,000 in whole­
sale and r e t a i l tra d e . About 200,000 persons were employed by the
tra n s p o rta tio n in d u stry , a tte s tin g to C hicago's im portance as the
N atio n 's m ajor ra ilro a d center* The serv ice in d u s trie s employed
over 200,000 in such d iv erse f ie ld s as h o te ls , th e a tre s , h o s p ita ls ,
rad io and te le v is io n s ta tio n s , ed u catio n al in s titu tio n s , lau n d ries
and dry clean ing estab lish m en ts, and firm s providing business and
te c h n ic a l services* F e d e ral, S ta te , and lo c a l government agencies
rep o rted employment o f 189,000 workers in th e area, and over 125,000
persons were employed in fin an ce, in su ran ce, and re a l e s ta te estab ­
lishm ents* B uilding co n stru ctio n provided jobs fo r another 88,000
workers* Employment in communication and o th e r p u blic u t i l i t i e s
to ta le d over 52,000 a t the tim e o f th e survey.
A ll m ajor m anufacturing in d u stry groups shewed an in ­
crease in employment o r rem ained r e la tiv e ly sta b le during th e 12month p erio d between th e B ureau's l a s t previous study in th e area
and th e c u rre n t survey* The g re a te s t employment gain was rep o rted
by e le c tr ic a l m achinery firm s which added about 20,000 workers
to meet the demand fo r te le v is io n s e ts and r is in g defense produc­
tio n . In creasin g defense requirem ents a lso le d to expanded employ­
ment in fa b ric a te d m etal p ro d u cts, prim ary m etals, and tra n sp o rta tio n

Introduction
The Chicago a re a i s 1 o f 20 im portant in d u s tria l ce n te rs
in which th e Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s conducted occupational wage
surveys d u rin g l a t e 1952 and e a rly 1953* In such surveys, occupa­
tio n s common to a v a rie ty o f m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing in ­
d u s trie s a re stu d ied on a community-wide basis* 1 / C ross-in du stry
methods o f sam pling a re th u s u tiliz e d in com piling earnings d ata
fo r th e fo llo w in g ty p es o f occupations: (a) O ffice; (b) p ro fes­
sio n a l and te c h n ic a l; (c) m aintenance and power p la n t; and (d) cus­
to d ia l, w arehousing, and shipping* In p resen tin g earnings in fo r­
m ation fo r such job s (ta b le s A -l through A-4) sep arate d ata a re
provided w herever p o ssib le fo r in d iv id u al broad in d u stry d iv isio n s*
E arnings inform ation fo r c h a ra c te ris tic occupations in
c e rta in more narrow ly d efin ed in d u s trie s i s presented in S e rie s B
tab le s* Union sc a le s (S eries C ta b le s) a re presented fo r selected
occupations in severed in d u s trie s or tra d e s in which th e g re a t ma­
j o r it y o f th e w orkers a re employed under term s o f c o lle c tiv e -b a r­
g ainin g agreem ents, and th e co n tract o r minimum r a te s are b elieved
to be in d ic a tiv e o f p re v a ilin g pay p ractices*
Data a re c o lle c te d and summarized on s h if t o p eratio n s and
d if f e r e n t ia ls , hours of work, and supplem entary b e n e fits such a s
v acatio n allow an ces, paid h o lid ay s, and insurance and pension plans*

The Chicago Area
Chicago, th e N atio n 's second la rg e s t c ity , i s a lead in g
m anufacturing and d is trib u tio n p o in t. I t produces alm ost every
kind o f consumer and c a p ita l goods; i t s tra d in g a re a , due to i t s
s tr a te g ic lo c a tio n , i s one of the b roadest in th e country* No
sin g le in d u stry dom inates, y e t th e Chicago area lead s a l l o th er
a re a s of th e n a tio n in th e m anufacture of many p ro d u cts, inclu d ing
e le c tr ic a l and n o n e le c tric a l machinery, telephone equipm ent, ra d io s
and te le v is io n s e ts , meat and confectionery p ro d ucts, and ra ilro a d
equipment* C hicago's w idespread w holesale trad e a c t i v it i e s a re th e
lo g ic a l outgrow th of i t s lo c a tio n a t th e N atio n 's crossroads* I t
i s th e b u s ie s t ra ilro a d c e n te r in th e n atio n , handling more fre ig h t
t r a f f i c than New York and St* Louis combined; and i t s highway motor
c a r r ie r se rv ic e i s more ex tensive than th a t of any o th er city *
1 / See appendix fo r d iscu ssio n of scope and method of survey*
D ifferen ces between the scope of th is survey and th e l a s t previous
survey a re in d ic a te d in th e appendix table* The co n stru ctio n and
e x tra c tiv e in d u s trie s and government in s titu tio n s were excluded
from each study*




(1 )

2

equipm ent. Gains in nonm anufacturing employment were rep o rted in
a l l m ajor groups except co n stru c tio n .
Among th e in d u s trie s and e stab lish m en t-size groups in ­
cluded in th e survey, 7 of 10 w orkers in nono ffice jobs were em­
ployed under th e term s of labor-management agreem ents. Almost a l l
p la n t (nonoffice) workers in th e p u b lic u t i l i t i e s group o f indus­
t r i e s were covered by union c o n tra c t p ro v isio n s; in m anufacturing
and serv ices th e p ro p o rtio n o f p la n t w orkers in union e s ta b lis h ­
ments exceeded 70 p e rc e n t. The coverage o f labor-management con­
tr a c ts among o ffic e w orkers was f a r le s s ex ten siv e than fo r p la n t
w orkers, applying to only about 10 p ercen t o f th e w orkers. P ublic
u t i l i t i e s was th e only m ajor group of in d u s trie s stu d ied in which a
s ig n ific a n t p ro p ortio n of o ffic e w orkers were covered by la b o rmanagement c o n tra c ts; more than h a lf o f th e o ffic e employees
in th is group worked under th e term s o f c o lle c tiv e -b a rg a in in g
agreements*.
S alary and ra te le v e ls fo r Chicago area o ffic e workers
and fo r w orkers employed in se le c te d m aintenance, c u s to d ia l, ware­
housing, and shipping jobs ranked fo u rth among 40 m ajor la b o r mar­
k e t area s surveyed by the Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s in 1951-52. 2 /
Among th e a re a s stu d ie d , o ffic e w orkers1 s a la rie s in Chicago were
exceeded only in D e tro it, Los A ngeles, and th e San Francisco-O akland a re a . Rate le v e ls fo r Chicago p la n t w orkers in in d ire c t job s
stu d ied were below San Francisco-O akland, D e tro it, and S e a ttle ; th e
le v e l o f ra te s fo r Los A ngeles was approxim ately th e same a s fo r
Chicago.

Occupational Wage Structure
O ccupational earn in g s rep o rted in th e c u rre n t study were
g en erally h ig h er than tho se shown in a s im ila r study 1 y ear ago.
Mich of th i s in c rease can be a ttrib u te d to "acro ss-th e-b o ard " wage
adjustm ents made since March 1952. Many of th e se rep resen ted ad­
justm ents based on changes in th e c o st o f liv in g . An exam ination
of d ata from th e la rg e r estab lish m en ts in th e a rea (those employing
200 or more w orkers) shows th a t more than f o u r - f if th s o f th e p la n t
workers in th ese firm s had receiv ed one o r more form al wage in ­
creases during th e p erio d . The p ro p o rtio n o f workers whose ra te s
were thu s ad ju sted ranged from about 50 p ercen t in r e t a i l tra d e and
finance and insurance to over 90 p ercen t in th e m anufacturing and
serv ices in d u s trie s .
Formal in c reases fo r p la n t w orkers were predom inantly on
a cen ts-p er-h o u r b a sis and ranged from 5 to 15 cen ts fo r a la rg e
m ajo rity o f th e w orkers. Formal changes in s a la rie s fo r o ffic e
2 / Toivo P. Kanninen, "Wage D ifferen ces Among
k e ts ," Monthly Labor Review. December 1952 (p . 620).




40

Labor Mar-

w orkers occurred le s s ex ten siv ely than wage ad justm ents fo r p la n t
w orkers. Many o ffic e workers in th e la r g e r m anufacturing e sta b ­
lishm ents receiv ed pay ra is e s comparable to th o se given p la n t
w orkers; in o th er estab lish m en ts, however, th e re were sm aller in ­
c re a se s, o fte n on an in d iv id u al b a s is ra th e r than "a c ro s s -th e board."
Average s a la rie s of $55 o r more a week were recorded fo r
about h a lf th e women's o ffic e occupations stu d ied in March 1953*
S e c re ta rie s averaged $69, c la s s A bookkeeping-machine o p erato rs
$64*50, and general stenographers $58.50. In th e low er wage b ra c k e t,
ro u tin e f i l e clerk s were paid an average s a la ry o f $44.50, copy
ty p is ts $49, and ro u tin e bookkeeping-machine o p e ra to rs $52.
Workers in most of th e s k ille d m aintenance job s surveyed
averaged $2.10 or more an hour and sev eral o f th e se c la s s if ic a tio n s
had average earnings o f $2.25 o r more. The l a t t e r included carpen­
t e r s , e le c tr ic ia n s , m a ch in ists, p a in te rs , plum bers, and to o l-a n d d ie m akers. Among th e c u s to d ia l, w arehousing, and shipping jo b s
stu d ie d , men ja n ito rs were paid h o urly r a te s averaging $ 1 .42 , mate­
r i a l handling la b o re rs $1.54, power tru c k e rs ( f o r k - l i f t type) $1.77,
and tru ck d riv e rs from $1.96 to $2.11, depending on tru c k c a p a c ity .
S a la rie s o f o ffic e w orkers in m anufacturing in d u s trie s
were g e n e ra lly h ig h er than those in nonm anufacturing; in 15 of 23
o ffic e c la s s ific a tio n s p erm ittin g com parison, average weekly s a l­
a rie s in m anufacturing estab lish m en ts exceeded th o se in nonmanu­
fa c tu rin g . Wage ra te s fo r se le c te d c u s to d ia l, w arehousing, and
shipping occupations were a ls o h ig h er in m anufacturing in d u s trie s
fo r 11 o f 17 jobs where comparisons were p o s s ib le . Among m ainte­
nance and power p la n t jo b s, however, average r a te s in nonmanufac­
tu rin g in d u s trie s were h ig h er in 9 o f 12 jo b s fo r which comparisons
could be made.
Wages of more than 70 p ercen t o f a l l p la n t workers in th e
Chicago a rea were based on tim e r a t e s , g e n e ra lly determ ined by f o r ­
mal ra te -s tru c tu re p la n s. In m anufacturing estab lish m en ts, wage
p ro g ressio n p lans s e ttin g fo rth a range o f r a te s fo r each tim e­
ra te d job c la s s ific a tio n were somewhat more common (measured by em­
ployment) than plans sp ecify in g a sin g le r a t e . P ie c e -ra te o r bonus
in c en tiv e payment p la n s ap p lied to p la n t job s in which a th ir d of
th e fa c to ry workers in m anufacturing were c la s s if ie d .
Among th e nonm anufacturing groups, s in g le r a te p la n s were
predom inant in the w holesale tra d e , fin a n c e , and serv ices indus­
t r i e s . In cen tiv e wage system s were e ith e r n o n e x isten t o r r e la tiv e ly
in s ig n ific a n t among th e nonm anufacturing in d u s tr ie s , w ith th e ex­
cep tio n o f serv ice establishm ents and r e t a i l tra d e s to re s in which
many w orkers in s a ilin g jobs receiv ed commission paym ents. For­
m alized s a la ry stru c tu re s fo r o ffic e w orkers were rep o rted by e s­
tab lish m en ts employing tw o -th ird s o f th e w orkers; v ir tu a lly a l l of
th ese p la n s provided a range o f s a la r ie s fo r each occupation. A
th ir d o f th e o ffic e workers were employed in estab lish m en ts th a t
determ ined s a la rie s on an in d iv id u al o r p erso n alized b a s is .

3

Wage p o lic ie s re la tin g to th e o p eratio n o f e x tra s h if ts
were re p o rte d in m anufacturing establishm ents employing more than
90 p ercen t o f a l l fa c to ry workers# Nearly a l l o f th ese p lan s pro­
vided premium r a te s fo r work on la te sh ifts# S h ift d if f e r e n tia ls
were expressed e ith e r in term s of a percentage a d d itio n to day
ra te s o r a s cen ts-p e r-h o u r ad d itio ns# Although d if f e r e n tia l pay fo r
n ig h t work v a rie d g re a tly , a su b s ta n tia l p ro p ortio n o f both secondand t h i r d - s h i f t w orkers were receiv in g a d if f e r e n tia l o f 10 p er­
cen t; cen ts-p er-h o u r d if f e r e n tia ls were ty p ic a lly 10 cents# N early
a fo u rth o f a l l m anufacturing p la n t workers were a c tu a lly employed
on l a t e s h if ts in March 1953#
Paid v acatio n s were granted to n e a rly a l l p la n t and
o ffic e workers# V acations u su a lly amounted to 2 weeks a f t e r 1 y ear
o f serv ice fo r o ffic e w orkers, and 1 week a f t e r 1 y ear o f se rv ic e
fo r p la n t workers# A 2-week paid v acatio n f o r p la n t w orkers gener­
a l l y was n o t a p p lic a b le u n til a f te r 3 years o f service# A fte r 15
years* o f s e rv ic e a m ajo rity of o ffic e and p la n t workers were
g ran ted a th ir d week o f v acatio n w ith pay# A f i f t h of th e o ffic e
w orkers and a te n th o f th e p la n t workers received a 4-week v acatio n
a f t e r 25 y ears o f employment#




V irtu a lly a l l p la n t and o ffic e w orkers received some paid
h o lid ay s; th e predom inant area p ra c tic e fo r both groups being 6
h o lid ay s a year# Workers in th e fin an ce and p u b lic u t i l i t i e s groups
ty p ic a lly receiv ed more than 6 days#
Insurance p lan s p roviding l i f e in su ran ce, h e a lth or hos­
p ita liz a tio n b e n e fits were provided by establishm ents employing
more than 90 p ercen t o f th e p la n t and o ffic e workers# The number
of w orkers a ffe c te d by th e v ario u s typ es o f b e n e fits v aried consid­
e ra b ly , w ith most covered by l i f e insurance# In many in stan ces the
employers paid a l l th e c o sts fo r one o r more o f the p o lic ie s ; in
o th ers th e employee shared th e cost# R etirem ent pension plans were
rep o rted by em ployers o f tw o -th ird s o f th e o ffic e workers and h a lf
of th e p la n t workers#
A m a jo rity o f both p la n t and o ffic e workers were sched­
uled to work a 40-hour week in March# While most of the rem aining
p la n t w orkers were on lo n g er sch ed u les, most o f the o th er o ffic e
w orkers were scheduled to work le s s than 40 h o u rs, u su a lly 37-1/2
o r 38-3/4 h o urs.

u

A* Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

Q

jj i c *

C h o H fu M o H l

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings i/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, HI., by industry division, March 1953)

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), comninioation, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational vage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1953
U.S. JDEPARTMENT OF LABQB
Bureau of Labor Statistics

5

Table A-lt

(Stfic* Ghoupatiottd-Go*t<*vtmc(

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings } J for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago* 111.* by industry division* March 1953)

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads)* coomunieation* and other public utilities.
** Finance* insurance* and real estate.
258600 0 - 53 - 2




6




Table A-l:

Offo

*

O c & q ia flO H d - G

oh

I^ H M

bJ

(Average straightstine weekly hours and earnings l/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, HI., by Industry division, March 1953)

7

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry division, March 1953)

A v er a g e
S e x , o c c u p a tio n , a n d in d u s tr y d iv is io n

Number
of
wres
okr

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Weekly 40.00
Weekly
erig
anns
(tnad (tnad u n d e r
Sadr) Sadr)
4 2 .5 0

4 2 .5 0

4 5 .0 0 4 7 .5 0

50.00

5 2 .5 0

5 5 .0 0

$6 0 . 0 0 1 5 . 0 0

7 0 .0 0

7 5 .0 0

$
* 8 0 . 0 0 85.00

90.00

4 5 .0 0

4 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0

5 2 .5 0

5 5 .0 0

60.00

6 5 .0 0 7 0 .0 0

7 5 .0 0

8 0 .0 0

8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0

9 5 .0 0

$
s
$ 9 5 . 0 0 100.00 105.00 110 .0 0 1 1 5 . 0 0 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00
and
100.00 1 0 5 . 0 0 110 .0 0 1 1 5 . 0 0 120.00 125.00 130.00 1 3 5 . 0 0 o v e r

M en
%

D r a f t s m e n , c h i e f ......................................................................................................

214

D r a f t s m e n ..............................................................................................................................

2 ,9 6 8

40.0

D r a f t s m e n , j u n i o r ...................................................................................................

1 ,2 6 7

3 9 .5

T r a c e r s .....................................................................................................................................

185

40.0

777
651

40.0

h "605 ~ '

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

68.00
64.00

3 9 .5

112 .0 0

-

-

-

89.00

1 6 4 .5 0

36

-

-

_

5 4 .0 0

26

-

-

-

-

28

11

21

5

7

57

9

11

6

5

13

41

_

88

298

179

324

372

387

335

306

207

154

105

75

76

32

16

14

133

94

17

16

8

6

_
-

88
66
22

25

15
14

14
15

1

2

3
3
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_

_
-

_
_

_

3

2

'

'

'

'

35

|

107

27

212

252

157

146

i

21

1

_
-

-

-

_

59

4

41

38

8

7

6

3
2

W om en
N u r s e s , i n d u s t r i a l ( r e g i s t e r e d ) ....................................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...............................................................................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ............................................................................................
R e t a i l t r a d e .............................................................................. ...

126

52

3 9 .5

68.00

_
-

_
-

3
3
3

98
13

1

10

198
“ 157“
31
11

160
167
141 — 335“
26
24
8
15

22

3

__________
1/

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours*

Table a -3*

£

Maintenance and Powe Plant Chcufustienl

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry division, March 1953)

Occupation and industry division

Number
o
f
Workers

NUMBER OF
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Average
1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90
hul
o r y Under 1.50 1.55 *1.60 1.65
erig 1
anns
and
1.50 under
1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95

Camenters. maintenance ...................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing.......................
Retail trade ........................

1,861
1,125
736
201

1
2.29
2.08
2.61
2.48

Electricians, maintenance .................
Manufacturing ..........................
Nonmanufacturing .......................
Public utilities * ..................
Retail trade ........................

3,493
2,411
1,082
405
73

2.28
2.1$
2.48
2.25
2.55

_

2
2
_

_

31
16
15
3

36
27
9
9

21
19
2
2

-

2
2

-

_

_

6
6
6

11
11
3

24
18
6
3

_

2
'

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10
and
2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 over

65
57
8
2

87
45
42
14

147
77
70
9

200
192
8
3

151
141
10
10

66
63
3
3

134
123
11
8

80
66
14
12

41
41
_

90
80
10
1

25
20
5
_

41
24
17
17

3
1
2
1

52
31
21
6

14
6
8
_

6
6
_

41
27
14
10

2
2
-

32

35
3^
3
2

151
109
42
23

148

155
141
14
2
2

313
25b
57
10

259
257
2
2

195
166
29
14
6

452
270
182
37
7

187
149
38
38

262
163
99
98
1

348
314
34
24
10

79
62
17
17

223
86
137
118
6

55
44
11

32
32

6
2
4

58
34
24

24
8
3

142
6
5
1

-

_

11

_

”

_

520
61
459
85

_

6
_
6
6

-

449
101
348'

11
9
2

“

25

2

_

-

'

Occupational Vage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

8

Table

a -3 t

M ain ten an ce a n d Pow e* P la n t Ck^difucUlOH i-Continned

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry division, March 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAJGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Engineers, stationary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2,414
1,257
1,157
255

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
o
f
Workers

$
2.24

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
«
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under i.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10
and
$
and
under
1.50
1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3,10- over

2
2
2

24
8
16
-

-

16

-

-

3
3
2

58
29
29
4

19
13
6
6

41
4l
-

55
29
26
26

16

377

2^16

15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

216
65
151
5
i/ 2
4

Firemen, stationary boiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1,454
1,013
441
129

1.82
1.77
1.91
1.97

23
16
7
2

51
47
4
4

50
50
-

127
95
35
3

91
36
55
13

48
23
25
3

199
197
2
2

138
65
73
3

44
30
14
6

44
17
27
-

163
28
135
54

68
66
8
8

31
19
12
-

61
18
43
30

Helpers, trades, maintenance ....... . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Nonmanufacturing ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
+T«Ja
.»r*

2,830
2,389
441
.. 63

1.73
~ T7T3—
1.73
1.83

163
140
23
4

223
509
14

201
183
18
6

432
368
64
2

314
233
81

233
149
84

332
295
34

32
35
-

133
111
22
2

52
45
10

5

32
36
2
2

3
3
-

4

384
368
16
16

55
29
26
12

Machine-tool operators, toolroom. . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2,256
2,256

2.19
2.19

12
12

20
20

46
46

81
81

83
83

172
172

159
159

224
224

175
175

Machinists, maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3,704
3,432
272

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
Public utilities * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

~ Z ^ 7 --

2.21
2.31

191
l
l
2/227

180
4?
6

10
_
10
6

-

2

16

15
15

-

_
-

_
_

_
_

18
1
17
_

2

-

16

-

_
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
.

501
501

205
205

244
244

86
86

132
132

96
96

5
5

15
15

12
96 182
556 158 203
320 137 419
73
94
E P ~ 7 T ~ 92r — 95“" 1 3 2 " “W
" 1 5 7 “ S G T " 3CT“"32 5" 465
30
67
1
13
15
14
~

385
375
10

10
10

3

-

3

•_

38
38
_
_
_
_
-

4

_
-

_
-

_
-

1,994
562
1,432
759
232

2.10
2.05
2.12
2.16
2.15

_
-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

3
3

75
63
12
9
1

17
5
12
6

17
5
12
1
1

102
2$
77
5
-

Mechanics, maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2,367
2,247
120

2.05
2.06
1.88

_
-

2
2

20
20

2
2

3
3

92
90
2

115
109
6

121
90
31

162
156
6

Millwrights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Man uf a ct ur i ng . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.

2.10
2,124
2,033.. T I o —

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2

10
73
10 ~ 1 T

69

O i l e r s...... . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.481
1,334
147

112
109
3

47
47
-

78
78
-

89
86
3

200
197
3

236
234
2

2.32
:m —
2.53

6
6

13
13

1
1

4
4
-

20
20

-

18
17
1

2.23
2.20
2.61

-

_
-

~

-

-

174
5b
118

2.42
” 2727
2.50

_
-

_
“

-

_
-

1
- —
1

Sheet-metal workers, maintenance . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

482
455

2.18
” 5715

-

_
-

2
2

2
5

2
1
2 -- T~

2
2

16
15
15
I P “ i r — T 5”

Tool-and-die makers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4,500
4,490

2.41
" 2 .U

_

_

_

_

_

14
14




_
-

62
46
16

3
3

_
-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and
Workers were distributed as follows:
Workers were distributed as follows:
Transportation (excluding railroads),
Finance, insurance, and real estate.

16
16

210
152
58
53

3
3

-

l/
2/
3/
*
**

15

8
8

154
145
9
1
J
4

267
113
154
103

8
8

_
-

.

-

85
85

63
16

_
-

2.25
2.25
2.27

Plumbers, maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing .. . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.

12

47
5
g
36

-

-

1,401
1,273
128

139
85
54
1

56

_
-

-

Pipefitters, maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

118
97
21
21

69
13
-

-

-

t

169

443
125
318
10
po1
78

_

-

1,206
Painters, maintenance ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " 5 7 5 —
628
Nonmanufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

118
102
16
-

_

-

1.75
1.73
1.87

246
55
191
10

-

-

-

62
62
-

252
310 239
243 " 2 W “ 1ST"
58
52
9

_
-

436
435
1

_
_
-

1
1
-

25
25
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

121
121

48
48

5
5

65
85

8
8

4
4

1
1

70
70

_
_
-

_

_

_

_

18

1

18

1

2
_
2

25
38

_
_
_
_
-

128
50
78
17
4

322
170 185 167
5IS“T 5 T " I T T 164
2
10
4
3

181
177
4

120
100
20

128
125
3

115
114
1

302
302

239
229

307
191 146 258
307 “ 190" 146 “I T T

_
_
-

12
10
2

91
10
81
69
-

104 101
104 " l o r

_
_
_
-

1
1

_
_
_
-

277
93
184
98
86

1
-

12

_

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
-

565
11
554
483
40

123
42
81
12
-

29
29
-

-

170
4
166
6
82

91
29
62
7
5

188
188
_
_
_
_
-

-

279
218
61
27
-

43
7
36
15
1

_
_
-

207
149
123
205 " 1 X 9 “ 55
2
30
68

32
32
-

85
79
6

48
19
29

12
11
1

_
-

63
63

_
-

-

_
_

_
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

29
28
1

81
72
9

40
18
22

49
42
7

117
78
39

35
30
5

32
22
10

43
28
15

65
34
31

55
54
1

22
21
1

7
2
5

7
7
-

50
28
22

4
3
1

41
41
-

445
26
419

3
3

-

7
6
1

10
10
-

93
93
-

38
37
1

42
42
-

308
303
5

137
136
1

66
61
5

66
64
2

119
108
11

131
128
3

47
43
4

26
21
5

83
57
26

25
25
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

138

5
r
-

*
2
- -- T~
-

21
11
2
18
- — r r -- 2 " — n r
21
8
-

4
4

18

4
r
-

_
-

_
-

5
5

2
2
-

7
3
4

_
_
-

24
1
23

_
_

45
10
35

16
14

13
13

80

4
4

2
2

n
11

_
-

_

W

3
1

801
357 1155
357 1 1 5 5 " 801

418
418

227
227

56
58

_

12

ii

53
53

T

15

2
- —
2

1
r—
-

49
49~

44
44

52
47

31
31

65
57

31
29

13
13

96
96

96 177 187 192
86 " IT T" 18T" 192

249
249

381
381

26
22

1
1
_
.

night work.
24 at $1.10} 21 at $1.15; 16 at $1.25 - $1.30; 54 at $1.30 - $1.35; 37 at $1.35 - $1.40; 21 at $1.40 - $1.45; 19 at $1.45 - $1.50.
10 at $1.30 - $1.35} 58 at $1.35 - $1.40; 67 at $1.40 - $1.45; 92 at $1.45 - $1.50.
communication, and other public utilities.

114
24

_

63

_
_
_
_
-

-

2
2
_
16
l8

Table

k-Lt
(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations g/ studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111., by industry division, March 1953)

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), oonaunication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

10

Table A Gu&toduU,TOcfteJtfut&Uuf,and SA ipfU ttf OccHpxUioHd-Cott/tHuecl
-4<
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Chicago, 111*, by industry division, March 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$

%

Under 0.85 0.90
*
0.85
.95
.9Q

0.95

$
1 .0 0

1.05

1.00

1.05

1 .1 0

$

1.30

$
$
1.15 1.20

la l5 - 1.20

Nonmanufacturing........................................ . . . .
Retail tr a d e ..................................................
&iDoing-and-reoeivlnK clerks .••••••••••••••
Manufacturing .................................................. ..
Bonmanofacturing ••...••••••.............• • .....
Retail trade ...................................................
Truck drivers, light (under l£ t o n s ) ...............
Manufacturing.................................................................................
TTT»T- tTTtTTrtT- T. t - - t.TTt
D h V I 4 a n f 4 1 4 f 4 m a At

...............................

....

Trade drivers, medium (1J to and including
L tens) ...................................................................................................................

Iffe n e i^ m ie fn ie l «w» ..................................................
.......................
H A nm vM f
v m _______________________________________
* ttttttitim ir m m
I m Ha r T i r t t f r t i t t t t t t t i t t f t

Track drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
tr a ile r type) .................................................... ..
P n h l l . n f l H M a a * ......................................... .......................

Retell

• (

,

»1 t•

Track drivers, heavy (over 4 tons,
other than tr a ile r type) .......................... ..
tfe v e i# a m fn v « l

.........................................................

»»

...

Trackers, power (fo rk -lift) ........... ... ........... ..
Manufacturing .......................... ..............................................
Voonanufacta r in g ............................ ...
Truckers, power (other than fo rk -lift) ...........
Manufacturing .......................................................
Ifctotesm.......................................................................
Manufacturing .............................................. ..
Nonmanufacturing .......................................•••••
Retail trade .....................................••••••

1.474
--- Qg7--- — 1 3 5 —
1.70
517

_

.

_




$

1340 1.45

1.30

1.35

l.lfO i.lt5

1.50

1.55

1.60 *1.65 *1.70

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1 .8 0

56
30

45
lo

16 7

288
207

1 .2 5

1.30

1.35

3

10

8

9

18
4

170
gy

26

29

80
U5
35

90
4?
143
5
20
18

91
55
36
6
n
19

1.50

-

-

-

1 .3 5 5
511
844
207
1 |2 1
136

1 .7 7
1 .7 4
1 .7 9
l.to
1 .8 9
1 .6 7

.
.

.
-

_

1 .9 4 6
1 ,2 2 1
725
453

2 .0 6
2 .1 6
1 .9 0
1 .9 4

2 .7 1 6
m 1*930
U 83
1 ,0 0 0

1 .7 7
1 .7 5
1 .8 8

3

10

8

9

14

-

-

-

-

-

1

3

10

8

9

14

85
69
16

.

_

.

38
9
29

28
25
3

.U I4
59
55

15
15
-

2
1

2U
22

-

11
8
3

12
6
6
5

1
1
1

26

29

87

938
m r
5 .5 7 2
2 ,0 2 4
3 ,5 4 8
I4 6 9
1* 05

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

18

-

1

18

14
u
10

28
4
2U

6
6
-

1

-

-

-

1

-

1

2U

-

1

2

.

.
-

8
8

3

-

*

_

.

_

_

_

2

?1
7
2 li

1

.

2.50
2.40 $
1.00 $
1.90 *2.00 *2.10 *2.20 ‘2.30 $
end
1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 over
126
96

119

95
u/
8

32
22
5

4 io
1 6 I4
93 “ u y
297
71
26
158
130
37
8
1

232
71
161
U
138
3

33
1
32
1
k
24

702
56
6U 6
443

30
30

38
29
9

67
58
9

53
28
25

78
21
57

a.

m

81
21
60

I4 6 5
201
26U

87

30
30

52
a9

23
13

28
7
21

16
16

5
1
4

10
6

9
7

3

_
-

??3

952

778
632
218
402

66
2*4
I42
20
22

1257
29
1228
934
294

2225
152
207J
1468
487

396

*>
57
33

743
39
704

398
91
307

371
3
368

501
li
497
??
28
4

260

62
— a r
18

1 4 1 --------- f r 30
111
184
48
38
180

-

.

"

•

*

*

.
"

1

.
1

3
3

1
~
1

21*
22
2

28
26
2*

56
56
-

M
1145
1

20k
199
5

179
175
U

201
197
U

878
836
42

985
697
288

299
299
•

231
132

99

77
13
64

17
16

.
“

45
Ik

51
51

26k
253

66
65

165
165

2*4
2U

28*4
270

16

6

112
7
105
li f t
140

4

103
26

77

lif t
140
13

31
10
21
1

129 2290
117
23
106 2173
7|
ft
Q
<
V
O
4
13

35
35
32

18*4
217
io 5 ~ w
112
59
20
op
I4 6
22

206
91
115
2*4
25

331
235
96
07
»1
31

45
35
10

-

142

?2Q
2SU
36
5
6

11?
112
1

52

227
120
107
U5
60

104
85
19

20

272
198
7U
68
2

~

■

■

23
i
22
22

_
-

•

-

-

•

5

m

5

•

-

-

2
2

-

•

.
-

.
-

-

396
92
93

.

9

130
91
39

60
60

205

1 7 ,6
9k
82
22

-

_

198
122
76

6

-

-

983

8

1
1

10
10

602
214
200

ifo

6 ___
8
£

3
a
2

18

2 if
12
12

3
3

17
17
“

$0
J4 8
2

1 .6 7
0 6
1 .2 1
1 .4 2
1 .0 9
1 .1 6
1 I2 9

8
8

$

356
261

81
5k
25

2 .0 6
1799
fc* v f

3 .U 1 2
2 ,0 9 0
522

1

2 .1 1
— 2755—
2 .1 2
7 .1 1
2 .1 0

2 ,1 0 5
m
1 QM

_

1 .9 6
1 .9 2
1 .9 7
2 .0 0
I .9 9

U .0 0 6
? JiQ/
**»
3$ (3 1
2 ,5 1 1 4
91U

_

11

1 .5 9

_

m

317
191

_

V Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
£/ Study limited to men workers except where otherwise indicated.
Title chrnige only, from "Stock handlers and truckers, hand," reported in the March 1952 study.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

ij

1.25

1

HW
—
0
03

Occupation and industry division

289

32

■

*

-

•
.

•
-

-

-

-

-

-

“

•

11

B : Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-2333:

VUotMBHfA and M iAAel' 3btedded. iJ
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

s

s

Coder 0.75

0.80

$
$
0.85 0.90

$
0.95

$

(

1.00

1.05

1

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
«
$
$
$
$
1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80
and
1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1»45
1.60
1.80 1.90 2.00 2,20 2.40 2.60 2.80 over

1,50

0.75

.80

.85

.90

.95

1.00

1.05

2

47

2

47

107
3
104

98
3
95

111
2
109

97
3
94

151
18
133

93
4
89

144
10
134

141
6
135

92
4
88

136
3
133

90
3
87

1
-

6
5
-

5
6
6
~

11
10
10

6

3

5
1
1
14

4

4

-

-

—
8

1
18

1
1
1
15

1,70

1

All plant occupational

Total ..............
M e n .............
Women ...........

3,758
551
3,207

1.69
2.49
1.55

202

2.61

96
290
243
47
472

1.18
2.49
2.77
1.04
1.63

-

8
4

-

-

“

4

2

5
2

5

17

9
3
3
15

5

16
1
1
17

295

1.11

“

4

54

47

17

24

22

13

15

19

9

32

1,508

1.79

”

11

3

13

17

9

18

12

21

49

24

50

73
56
17
14

.97
1.00
.86
1.16

-

12

6

4

4

6

3

6

4

19
15

4

_

_

4

_

1

1

4
2
2

_
.

_

6
5
1

1
1

9

11
10
1
1

2

2

1

2

123
10
113

127
1
126

103
4
99

-

-

2

-

_

_

_

1
1
19

1
1
1
14

2

9
9

39

4

3

5

3

44

62

60

39

1
1

_

3

307
12
295

230
5
225

218
18
200

213
23
190

-

7

10

7

1

6
9
9
_

2
10
8

2
13
13

22
22

133
23
110

276
32
244

179
58
121

146
55
91

134
57
77

260
194
66

8

23

46

37

31

6
29
29

_

9
9

_
18
18

120
120

Selected Plant Occupations
Cutters and markers (men) 3a/ ..............
Inspectors, final (examiners)
(women) 3 a / ............................
Presaers, hand (men and women) 3b/ .........
Men 2 b / ................. .............
Women 2b/ ......... ....... ..............
Sewers, hand (finishers) (women) 3b/ ........
Sewing-machine operators, section
system (women) 3b/ ......................
Sewing-machine operators, single­
hand (tailor) system (10 men and
1,498 women) W ........................
Thread trimmers (cleaners) (3 men and
70 women)} Total .......................
Time .....................
Incentive ..................................................
Work distributors (women) 3a/ ..............

5
-

5

5
2
3

_

_

_

-

5

_

_

50

4
1
62

31

32

10

43

26

20

8

-

16

3

8

10

1

4

-

2

-

-

162

124

137

129

88

166

82

60

62

66

_

_

_

2

_

2

_

3
2

1 / Tb® study covered regular (inside) and contract shops employing 8 or more workers engaged in the manufacture of women's and misses' dresses (Group2333) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
m n u a l (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Establishments manufacturing housedresses, aprons, smocks, hoovers, and nurses' and maids' uniforms (Group
2334) were excluded from the study. Data relate to
an August 1952 payroll period.
y
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1953
y
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF IABOR
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




1
2

Table B-2511:

Wood rf+itoi&Uvw (otkokdUattfyjfiUolAlmbod) 1/
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Oooupation and sex

All plant oocuoationst

Total ..............
M e n .............
Women ...........

Number
o
f
Workers

2,745
2,416
329

Average Under 8.95
hul
ory
erig $
anns
0.95
2/
1.00

$
1.42
1.45
1.17

i.oo

i .05 i.10

i .15 1.20

1.25

1.30

1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35

1.35 1.40 i.45 i.50 I .55 1 . M

1.65 1.70 1.75 *1.80 *1.85 *1.90 1.95 *2.00 *2.10 *2.20 *2.30 1.40
and

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

1.95

2.00

2.10

2.20

2.30

2.40

over

52
18
34

28
12
16

70
40
30

95
57
38

162

112
50

146
111
35

213
197
16

206
177
29

224
208
16

230
215
15

167
154
13

213
207
6

206
194
12

125
123
2

123
117
6

104
98
6

76
73
3

56
55
1

37
37

30
30

32
32

29
29

39
39

27
27

21
20
1

9
9

25
25

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2
-

4
4
-

9
9
-

45
37
8
X

3
1
2
1

17
15
2
g

13
10
3
3

25
21
4
6

18
14
4
-

9
5
4
5

4
2
2
-

4
4
-

1
1
-

7
1
6
-

7
1
6
-

5
5
-

3
3
-

2
1
1
4

3
1
2
1

_
-

_
-

-

1
1
2
1
1

-

8

-

3
-

5
5

3
3

11

2
1

2
2
2

15
13
2
13
13
-

7
2
5
2

_
-

8
4
4
3
15
13

25
18
7
-

_
-

20
16
4
19
17

_
9

1
2

-

_

1

2

_
4

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

24
5

5
4

1
1

-

2

1

-

-

5

1
2

_

_

5

2

1

1

2

1

1
2

Selected Plant Occupations

Men

Assemblers, case goods:

Total .............
Time ...........
Incentive ......
Assemblers, chairs 3a/ ....................
Time ............
Incentive .......

256
162
94
25
7Q
67

12
45
39

Incentive .........
Maintenance men, general utility 3 b / .......
Off-bearers, machine 2 b / ..................
Packers, furniture: Total ................
Tim*
Incentive ..........
Rubbers, hand: Total .....................
T1im
Incentive ..............
Sanders, belt: Total .....................
Time ...................
Incentive ..............
Sanders, hand: Total .....................
Tv*
4ni
Incentive ..............
Shaper operators, hand, set-up and
operate: Total ........................
Incentive ..................
Sprayers: Total .........................
Time ........................
Incentive ...................

6
35
85
96

68
28
107
83
24
107
71
36
183
137
46
53
38
15
133
91
42

1.53
1.47
1.62
1.73
1.48
l!47
1.49
1.35
1.33
ll 52

3
3
_

_

-

1
1
1

_

_

5
-

9
-

14

3

5

3

5

n

3

8
8

1
2

1.68
1.18
1.45
1.33
l!73
1.46
1.37
1.78
1.57
1.47
1.78
1.35
1.24
1.70

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
5

5

6
6

1
1

5

10
10
-

6
3

2

3

4
4.

6
6

-

2
2

15

11

-

-

3
1
6
5
1

12
10
2
2
1
1

23

22
1
11
9
2

8
7
1

3
3

3
3

4
4

8
2
6
10
9
1
8

3

5

56
55

17
17

1.68
1.64

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

l!79

-

-

_
-

_

_
-

-

-

1
2
1
1

5
14

12
2

11
10
1

19
18

1
1

2
2

5
3
3

3

1

-

-

_
-

5

1.60
1.55
1.73

-

1.23
1.08
ll43

2
2

-

2
2

7
2

5
5

1
2

5

1

8
5

1

2
5
7

6
1

6
5
1

1

-

4

_
5

-

1

11
9
2

4

-

-

4

_

2
2

1

_
4

1
21

2
2

X

13

24

12
1

20

13

6

8

11
2
8
6
2

5

7

-

4

3
3

1

-

1

-

-

1

1

-

1
1

_
-

2

-

_
3

_

1
2
1
1
2

3

1

_

4
4

2

5

2

2
2

1

3

_
_
_
_
5

5

_
_
_
-

2

1

_

_

_
_

4
4

1

1

14
7

3

3

1

3

2
1

4

3

A

1

3

1

9

3

3
_
18
13
5

x

12
n

1

1

24

13

22
2

11
2

5
4

8
1
8

5

4
1

8

6

6

7

5

5

5
3

1

1

1

2

5

2

2

1

2

4

2

2

2

1

2

4,

2

1

_

2

4
4

2

3
3

U

3

5

5

-

2

5
/
a

1

_

_

_

2
1

1

1

_

_

_

_
_

4
4

4

1

1

4

1

1

3
x

3
x

3
x

2
10

2
6

2
2

-

4

-

5
4

10

2

2

1

_

_
_
_

_

2

_

2

_

1

5

_

1

8

1

4
4

-

1

_

_

Women

Sanders, hand:

Total .....................
Tim
Trmi»nt1vm

48
28

20

1
1

6
5

1

1
1

6

6

13
13

1 / The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of wood household and office furniture (Groups 2511 and 2521) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Establishments primarily engaged in the manufacture of upholstered furniture, and reed and rattan furniture were excluded from the study. Data relate to a June-July
1952 payroll period.
„
__
y
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago,_111._ March 1953
,
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
y
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.




13

T b e B 2851: PaUttl and VanttUJtel
al -

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
Workers

$
$
Average
hul
o r y Dhder 1.00 1.05
erig f
anns t
and
1.00 under
2/
1.05 1.10

$
1.10

$
1.15

$
1.20

$
1.25

$
1.30

s
1.35

$
1.40

$
1.45

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
$
1.60 1.65

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

5
8
10
-

8
2
12
3

8

13
15
6
1

44

23

13

-

-

-

. 86
15
40
7

27
5
30
47
8
2
1

16
10
25
13
4
3
4

10
12
113
9
11
11
8

1
9
15
11
19
10
15

10
21
12
7
6
12
7

1.90 2.00

2.10

2.20

9
6
11

12

3
5

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

35
.
.

7
58
15

19
4
2

7
10
5

13
4
2

20
_
_

_
_

1
_
_

_
_

2.3Q ,2.40 2.5Q. 2,60 .2,7.0.

Men
Labelers and packers .............. ........
Maintenance men, general utility ...........
Mixers ...................................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ..........
Technicians ..............................
Tinters...... .......... .......... .......
Varnish makers ............................

303
122
335
2H
157
139
82

$
1.56
2.06
1.62
1.53
1.90
1.87
1.79

195

1.28

_
-

-

-

3

-

-

-

1
-

_
-

_

_

-

_
_
-

3
-

5
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

12

4

16

12

16

22

-

17
15
-

_
_

_
_

27

14

19
10
1

3

11
12
10
3
3

4

33
6
3
5
2

7

8

14

41

_

_

_

1

26
9
4
8
17
17
10

-

-

-

-

Women
Labelers and packers ......................

2

1/ The study covered establishments employing 8 or more workers primarily engaged in the manufacture of paints, varnishes, lacquers, japans, enamels, and shellac (Group 2851) as defined in the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all or a majority of workers in each occupation presented were paid on a time basis.

Table B-35*

M acUin&Uf JnJLufaimA

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
Workers

$
$
Average
hul
o r y Under 1.10 1.15
erig 1
anns
1.10
2/
1.15 1.20

$
$
$
1.90 2.00 2.10

$
1.20

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

$
1.40

$
1.45

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

*
1.75

$
1.80

$
1.85

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70

1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90 2.00

16
15
1
288
266
22

45
44
1
211
178
33

94
93
1
175
128
47

1
1
130
122
g
268
228
40

19
18
1
109
100
9
271
182
89

69
44
2
62

6
29
56
8
52

59
54
1
47

8
6
2
161
156
5
70
21
49
1
13
101
57
1
6

$
2.20

$
2.30

$
2.40

$
$
$
2.60 2.70 2.80
and
2.60 2.70 2.80 over
s
2.50

2.10

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

313
247
66
871
61
810
89

327
271
56
n

69
40
29
8

300
264
36
6

38
_
38
2

5
7

n
50

g
26

g
6

2
2

7
1

g

89
95
163
81
8

50
93
168
6

26
14
23
_
-

6
28
n
_

2
4
37
_
_

l
_

_
_
1
_
_

Maohlnexv 3/

*n
Assemblers, olass At

Total ................
Time ..............
Incentive ..........
Assemblers, olass Bt Total ................
Time ..............
Tnesnt.ivs ... ____
Assemblers, class Ct Total ................
Time ..............
Incentive .........
Electrioians, maintenance 4a/ ..............
Inspectors, class A 4a/ ...................
Inspectors, class B £s/ ...................
Inspectors, olass C 4a/ ...................
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 4a/ ........
laborers, material handling 4 a / .......... .

See footnotes at end of table,




1,722
1,458
264
1,944
936
1,008
3,271
2,326
945
312
566
1,008
576
1,340
2,193

$
2.10
2.07
2.24
1.92
1.80
2.04
1.57
1.52
1.68
2.14
2.07
1.89
1.66
1.44
1.54

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

6
6

_
-

_
-

1
1
-

80
40
40

122
101
21

214
190
24

200
125
75

380
280
100

402
296
106

266
231
35

-

-

-

66
30

19
17

8
15

20
64

14
57
15

26
124
55

9
216
135

42
133
140

53
123
258

32
106
195

6
51
120
200

11
39
335
848

36
34
2
250
223
27
71
57
14
2
63
114
27
1

586
578
8
208
110
98
75
2
73
62
77
534
58

5

i

l
_

7
_
7
6

4

9

4
4

9
4

J
4

J
4
3

3
_
_

3
10
3
3

54

Occupational Vage Survey, Chicago, 111., March 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

H

Table B-35?

M cu JU n & U f O n d U tib U eA 1/ -G o ftc H tte d
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

%
of
Workers

Occupation and sex

hourly
earnings

2/

Under 1.10
1
1.10
1.15

$
1.15

$
1.20

$
1.25

$
1.30

$
1.35

1.A0

$
1.A5

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.60

$
1.65

$
1.70

1.75

$
1.80

$
1.85

$
1.90

$
2.00

$
2.10

2.20 2.30 2.A0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80

1.20

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.A0

1.A5

1.50

1.55

1.60

1.65

1.70 1.75

1.80

1.85

1.90

2.00

2.10

2.20

2.30 2.A0 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

%

%

$

$

$

$

«

$

$

and

Machinery 3/ - Continued
Man - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A 5/i Total........... ...........

$
2.1A

T

II** .....*

* * ”

*

Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class A 4b/ .........
Engine-lathe operators,
T

II*

******* *

Grinding-machine operators,
«]«oa A• TA+fll
Time ....................
Milling-machine operators,
class At Total.... .................
T-tm*

9

27
27

2.18

26A
261

1.99

111
90
21

7A1
601
1A0

/

2
2

cc
3?
38
17
Xf

13

2io6

3A5

A9
36
13

2

Incentive ...............
Drill-press operators, radial,

7,325
5,2AA
2,081

1,259
1,191
68

27

2.1A
2.11
2.21

195
131
6A

2.13
2!o 8
2.20

A,A57
3,051
1,A06

1.90
1.8A
2.02

AA5

1.92

591

1.80

6A7
529
118

1.90
1*.88
2.00

571
A10
161
659

1.90
1.8A
2.0A
l.*9A

66
36
30

2.07
2.02
2.13

877
628
2A9

1.91
1.86
2.0A

697
A8A
213

698
900
132

223
95

153
55
98

181
113
68

15

XA

AU

v
4

1A

11

10

4

Time ....................
Incentive ...............
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B jj i Total......................
/
Time ....................
Incentive ...............
Drill-press operators, radial,
nsn B Aa/ - .................. T.... .
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class B Aa/ .........
Engine-lathe operators,
Time ....................
Incentive................
Grinding-machine operators,
Tim*
Tn^Ant.^va
Milling-machine operators, class B Aa/ ....
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
AlAAA R ( Tft+Al
T4im
Incentive ...............
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
class B : Total ......................
Tin*
. .
TnRAntlm

See footnotes at end of table,




36
Q
7
27

A6
13
33

x
~

x

'
~

1

139

9A

A9

7

2

1

-

”

1

9
9

1//
1A2
2

yo f
4^7
/I/
4x4
1^
xp

900
ay 1

70
/7
67
12

160
153
7

A8
A2
i
0

a
0

4
3

“

1a c
X99
86
OQ
97

1* 7
A95
/
133
2A

inn
XUU
7A
94
<D
C

44
21
23

85
Ln
0f
1f
t
XO

8A
4*
09
IQ
AV

23
7
14
AO

10

8

10

7

.
2

O
22
3

P

10

O

3

10

6

9

2
A

n

9
26
26

5

25

61
46
1*

206
151
99

y9i
4*A
209

72
65
7

258
178
an
ou

219
1 /9
A7<;
44

Screw-machine operators, automatic,
Time ....................
Incentive ................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),

46
15
31

25

2.28
2.19
2.A5

1,322
852
A70

OO
O

TOO
1V7
123

2153
1/M
X4o^
670

*

7
7

2.20
2[20
2.21

810
590
220

599

2
2

*

2I13
2.21

1,162
752
/in

2332

Q
7
9

7
f

12
12

01

3
A

21
3

O
K

-

_

”

-

~

“

*
*

~

~

12

6
6

6

37

23

1A6
128
18

■J Q
C
230
129

A83
3A8
135

83
35
A8

9t
f
<9

50

5

3

*67
A0

28

50

5

3

1

525 1635
A32 1220
A15
93

55A
56
A98

163
30
133

A7

A0

34

A

1

1

1

A7

A0

3A

A

1

1

1

23

3

1

3

2

2

1

1

-

-

-

-

_

I
_

I
_

_

“

”

*

-

-

-

I

I

~

26
20
6

A25
383
A2

A3A
381
53

2

16

78

32

119

85

7A

106

17

A3

60

5A

16

129

79

13

23
22
1

A6
A2
A

A? ?
..
129
A

66
57
9

91

90
<\J

255
37

10
A7

8
12

_

3A
32
2
9

69
58
n
A5

86
71
A?
A7

«n
A0
in
XU
15

oa
17
21
93

176
16A
IP
226

*57
91
25

22

g

13

16

99

g

13

16

161

A9

13

^9
94

9

2

3

2

16

3

15
15

1
1

22
21
1

A
1

3

68
6A

4

70
66

83
62
21

7
7

94
<o
c
16
10

281
253
28

3

5

PP

87
76
11

1

5
~

14
10
4

30

139
136
3

3
O
9

5

11
5

6
1

15

38
36
2

13
6
P
*
J

1
c
9

16

7

30
30

J

A3
2

A

“

Q
7

l

59
A3
16

11
g
3

18
1A

19
JC
U
g
6

A21
355
66

75

12

7/

f
4

12

-

16

P
3

_

i

2

J
.

*
2

I

18

12

1

18

19
XC
*

15

M a ciu H & U f 9n dn U > u e& *

Table B- 35
:

i/

~ C o**f< H u e< £

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
o
f
Workers

$

$
$
Average
hul
o r y Under 1.10 1.15
erig 1
anns

2/

1.10

$

$

$

$

$

%

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
and

1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over

1.15

Machinery 3/ - Continued

Men - Continued
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C j> i To t a l ......................
/
Time
-T
Incentive ................
Drill-press operators, radial,
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle , class C t Total ......... .....
Time ............
Incentive .......
Engine-lathe operators,
class Ct Total ......................
Time .................. .
TiMumtlTA --lrT.T__.___ __T
Grinding-machine operators, class C 4b/ ...
Milling-machine operators,
olass Ct Total .......... ..... .......
Time ....................
Incentive ................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine),
olass Ct Total ......................
Time ,tT......... T_T.... T
Incentive ................
Machine-tool operators, toolroom 4 a / ...... .
Tool-end-die makers (tool-end-die jobbing
shops) 4&/ .............................
Tool-end-dle makers (other than tool-and-die
jobbing shops) 4a/ ......................
kavu4
aae A t Tn+al
T i m e ...........
Incentive ......
Uel/^eme kati^ else* P f T t . l
r+e
T i m e ........... .
Incentive ......

2,288
1,913

$
1.70
1.58
1.85

195

1 71

1,110

1.60
1.50
1.73

-

-

-

35
35
-

39
39
-

72
48
24

27

145

12

110

15

35

1.68
1.66

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

2

1.73
1.80

-

-

-

30

45

31

4

-

-

-

-

-

8

1.77

-

1.72

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

4,201

635
475
195
148
47

1,036

1.65

343
235
108

1.60

457
275
182

103
64
39

163

94

42

7

24

_

248

163

94

42

7

24

-

-

1

_

_

_

_

4

_

1

_

_

_

_

121

54

38

2

24

-

-

-

7

1

_

2

_

_

_

_

13

7

1

_

2

_

_

_

32

8

13

20

32

8

13

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

121

90

132

311

46

9

4

-

-

-

8

33

157

288

317

150

82

20

60

130
1AO
117
72
38

168

188
85

136

68

25

15

116
19
97
16

_
19

_
_
L
O

12
11

19

6

11

-

354
215
139

466

438

320

185
51

383
83

368
70

237
83

200
88
112

225
94
131

217
77
140

318
29
289

6

11

39

52

17

4

20

35

3

109
53
56

68

70
42
28

57
25
32

14

40

84

64

6

4

56
32

83
77

21

104
91
13

88

47

14

40

84

64

6

1
1

15

16
3

2

8

5

5

10
1
9

1

1

39

83

65

50

35.

47

37

6
8
22

19
14
49

25

117

118

6
2

24
17
7

55
47
-

31

17

20

13

10

8

9

8

9

6

7

9

11

13
4
9

14

22

70
64

17

4
4

45
40
5

8
6

30
30

5
4

40
33
7

13

35
28
7

41
31

58
51
7

51
44
7

40

20
20

46
17
29

25

10

5
20

y

1

2

16

11

7

240
174

66

85

-

2

2.05
2.24
1.87
1.77

251
947
728
219

1.87

_

1

13

38
30

1

12
3

30
28

62
23

2.30
2.11

586

84
84

6
47
42

14

2.50

811
837

248

1

65
65

2.32

1,056

-

236

2

-

1.61

755

-

-

270
163
107

4

-

1

4

12
1

2

5
6
6

6

6

13

JA
--

077
f

126

267

105

10

21

239
231

8

203
151
52

00

2

53
49
4

12
2

2
20

38

16

28

17
15

2

2

2

66
19
28

_
7
i
4

Q

2

64
64

3

2

2.22

40

QQ
77

38

97

2

30
30

2

2

45
45
"

180
165
15
14

37

23

78

21

13

79

81

27

28

2

37

78

21

13

_

12

6

28
-

_

51

81
-

2

6

79
18

27

22

2
21
6

-

-

-

-

-

25
10
15

30
7
23

26
7
19

43
8
35

10

11

22

13

22

22

1

_

_

_

_

1
9

11

22

13

22

22

1

_

*/
15
1<
C

4

I
7

Women

Assemblers, class Ct

Total ................
Time ..............
Incentive .........
Inspectors, class C 4 a / .......
Machine-tool operators, production,
class Ct To t a l ........... ......... .
Time T TT...................
Incentive ............... .

See footnotes at end of table.




1,467
887

580
565

428
129
299

1.47
1.28
1.76
1.45

6/147
145

1.65
1.42
1.75

18
18

2
-

129
124
5
”

76
75

82
74

74
54

1
1

8
75

20
68

2

1

9

12

4
2

1

5

9
3

86

51
28
23
91

59
27
127

17
14
3

17
9
8

3

26
2

30

25
4

24
7

29
18
11

32
15
17

56

172
149
23
27

27

10
3
7

7
20

28

6
50

16

Table B-35*

M t u J u H & U f U n d u d i^ ie l ±J ~

6

W

^

W

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Number
of
Workers

Occupation

Average
hourly
earnings

y

$
Under 1.35

1 .U0

$
1.U5

$
1.50

$
1.55

$
1.60

1.U5

1 .5 0

1.55

1.60

1.65

$

1.65

$
1.70

$
1.75

1 .8 0

1.85

1 .9 0

1.95

2 .0 0

2 .0 5

2 .1 0

*2.15

1.70

1.75

1 .8 0

1.85

1.90

1.95

2 .0 0

2 .0 5

2 .1 0

2.15

2 .2 0

7

2

u

1
X

2

0
2

f.

0

1
X

5

16

3
5
3

17

ID

5

5

16

2

2

5

10
2
0
1

1U

39

1

$

*

$

s
*2.25

2 .3 0

$
2.35

2 .U0

S
2.U5

*2.50

$ .6 0
2

$
2.70
and

2.25 .2.30

2.35

2 .U 0

2.U5

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2.70

over

2 .2 0

8
1.35

i.Uo

Machine-Tool Accessories - Production
Shops

]/

........................
U6
tb.
39
U1
lit
Laborers, material handling U a / ................

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A
> Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tlim
i

...........

26

58U
901
901

cyx.

_ T T _ Tt
_

30

Grinding-machine operators,
class A W
..............................
.....
Milling-macnine operators, class A

2U 0

a

U b/

Machine-tool operators, production,
class p C/i Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tlnf Tt, tt
,

...........
. . T. Tt. T .

Incentive ...................
Engine-lathe operators, class B Ua/ ........
Qrinding-machine operators,
class B )|*/

%
2.05
1.79
1.58
1.9U
1 .U 1
1.59

6

1U
lU

66

0

10
2

7

t

?
7

O
£
3

1
2,

J

7
1

9.97
9.1<

1 .8 8
1 .8 U

180

1.95
1.95

5

60
25U
57

m

ID

m

m

0
2

13

7
3

2

1 .8 8

69
56
13

8

2

n

u
1

”

~

3U

-

100
70
1/
21
3

35

31

21
1U
2

23
5

16

15

11
O
X

in
J
tu

J

82

X

1.95

5

76
5

J

1 .8 U

Incentive
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class C Uk
............
Engine-lathe operators, class C U a / ........
Grinding-machine operators,
class C U V ••••••••»••»»»«•»••••»••••»••»
Milling-macnine operators, class C U b/.........

...................

j

Machine-tool operators, toolroom U a /

See footnotes a t end o f table,




U89
ofto

CDC

1 .6 0
1 C7
J-Oi

8

58
U3

33
18

V)
Xr

207

1.65

8

15

15

29

U2
U9

1.53
1.63

“

12
"

3
1

211
98

1 .6 0

u

26

U

17

25
3

22

2.0U

1.58

“

-

0

£

0
£

30
25
5

u

on
£U

2

2

22
1

26
2
25
7

39
28
11
10

9
2

2U

6

18

92
75
17

16

10

3

U8
1
.
u

6
J

26

0
7

91

10
3

3

u

9
1
u.
X

30

8

90

5

1
10

16

37

Cf
2

2

10
1

in
XU

27
in
XU
17
Xf

2

2

1

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 5/i T o ta l.................................................

1

1

2 .3 1
2 .2 1

U9U
31U

2

9

X

7

127
91
oX
k

67
31
oX
JO

30
3

JO

7

78
6)
,
ou
111
i4

12

36

lU

31
5

12

Hi
xu

1

19
-

26

U5
U

21
1

3U

lU

9,
)
xu

5

3

5

1

1

5

3

5

1

1

u

2

1

1

*

5

0
3U

26
2U
2
8

u

I
*

3

[4

2

3

9
8

1
2

-

2
1

jy

61

26

19

29
10
19

37
20
17

9
12

u

7
7

6
9

3

1
*

3

u

2

3

2
16

2

3U

22
20

23

22

39
3

13
5

2

1

1

10

8

9

3

1

u

3

3

2

l

1

2

1

1

2

l

_

1

1

1

10
xy

3

5

9

5
1

2

2

2

2

9
6

_
-

n
X

1

2

2U

1

5
_

7

2

1

20

19

2

I
*

2

1

7
3

65
IQ

7

2

7

2

1U

69
UU
25

68

3

u

10

2 .2 U
2 .2 1

92

U
9
£

-

17

Table B-35*

M a c k U ta to f 9 * id u it> u e l 1 /

(? a + i/< * u tc c £

N U M B E R O F W O R K E R S R E C E IV I N G S T R A I G H T -T I M E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S O F —

Occupation

Number
of
Worken

Average
hourly
earnings

y

s

u

1.00
and
under
1.10 1.20

$
1.20

$

$

s

$

$

$

$

s

$

$

$

$

$

1.60

1.70

1.80

1.85

1.95

2.00

2.05

2 .1 5

2.20

2.25

2.30

2.35

2.1*0

$
2.1*5

$
2.50

s

1 .5 0

*
2.10

$

i.uo

$
1.90

$

1 .3 0

2.60

$
2.70

2.80

$
2.90
and

1 .3 0

1.1*0

1 .5 0

1.60

1 .7 0

1.80

1 .8 5

I .9 0

i.?5

2.00

2.05

2.10

2 .1 5

2 .2 0

2.25

2 .3 0

2 .3 5

2.1*0

2*1*5

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

over

7

2

16

-

3

1
*

1

6

1

1

-

1

2

9

17

1

2

3

18
3

39

18

117
51
31*
16

121*
38
6U
2

69
20

31*
21
8

27
8
16

H
*

9

13

6
6
1

_

Machine-tool Accessories - Jobbing
------------ awoSs y : 8/-----------

$
Inspectors, class A ........ ................. .
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Laborers, material handling ...............................

Machine-tool operators, production,
class A S / ..................................................................

1*8
67

12

2.29
1.29
1.1*1*

608
230

c
O

2.30
2.28

Z
O

21

2

3
r
>

i
)
C

3

1
*

*

8
8

3

3

135
50
38

1.89
1.93

18L
1*8

1.66
1.82
1.68

15
*

1,056

27

-

-

-

-

-

5

6

i on

2.50

7

1

1

-

-

9

1
*

21
1
3

U9

18
8

6

3

35
6
11*

12

5

l*

12
6

3

16
12
U

1*8
31

5
5

h

2

U6

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C ^
Grinding-machine operators, class C .......
Milling-machine operators, class C ........

11
**
9

2i8

Machine-tool operators, production,
class B y ..................................................................
Grinding-machine operators, class B .............

1*

5

3

k
2
7

20

6

10
1

h
h

11
**
25

3

u

1*2
3

u

1

10

_

-

3

9

-

17

3

19

n

18

11

12
12

3
8

1

10

23

75

82

189

99

317

150

82

2/ The study covered establishm ents employing more than 20 workers in the machinery (n o n e le ctrica l) Industry (Group 35) ms defined in the Standard In d u strial C la s s ific a tio n Manual (1945 e d itio n ) prepared by the Bureau of
the Budget; m achine-tool accessory establishm ents employing more than 7 workers were a lso included in the study. Data r e la t e to a January 1953 payroll period.
2J Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and night work.
2 / Includes establishm ents producing machine-tool a cce sso rie s fo r which separate data are a lso presented.
j j In s u ffic ie n t data to permit presentation o f separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a ) A ll or predominantly time workers.
(b) A ll or predominantly incentive workers.
Includes data fo r operators o f 6th ar machine to o ls in addition to those shown sep arately .
Workers were d istrib u te d as follow s* 45 a t $0.90 - $0.95; 12 a t $0.95 - $1; 33 a t $1 - $1.05; 57 a t $1.05 - $1.10.
Data limited to men workers.
A ll o f the workers in each occupation presented were paid on a time b a s is .

£




18

h u i

*-7211! P a w e s i £ a u * u t/U e &

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

1

1

0.65 0.70
and
under
.70
.75

0 .7 5

.so

1

1

1
1
1
*
1
1
1
1.15 1.20 1.25
0.95 1.00 1.05 1.1 0

0.80

0.85

0.90

.85

-00

.95

1.00

1
23

2

3

7

1.05

*
1
1
1
1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45

1.20

1.25

1.30

32

4

1
13

14

5

34
17
17

52
37
15
27

38
33

1.10

1.15

49

27

58
49

27
27

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

13

4

1

1.50

1.60

1.70

1.80

1.60

1.70

1.80

1.90

6
5

6
3
8
10
10

2
•
Ja

Men
1

32
203
26

Identifiers1 Total..... .................... .
Time ..........................
Incentive ...............
Washers, machine* Total .............................
Tina______....................
Wrappers, bundle j/ ......................... .

333
195
138
255
222

33
36

1.38
1.12
1.46
1.22
1.16
1.29
1.39
1.39
1.39
1.14

_

_

•
»
_

_

_

3
3

_
_

4
4

6

_
_

6
3
3

_

3

9

3
3

6
2
6

5

12
12

21

12

18

18
25
24
2
6

6
6

4

17

19

5

4

13

29
27

16

17
19
16
■
a
J

21
21

6

2

6

6

2

6

_

9

_
12

9

12

4
6
6

2
9

15

6

18
9
9

19

3
16
26
20
5

24
10
1/

6
18
18

15
15

14
14

Women
Clerks, retail receiving 3 / .......... ..........
fhnyn flfttwopkj i A h A f Totnl --...........
DOlf*
.
Tto
*m
Identifiers* Total ..... ... .............. .
Tim ..........................
Incentive .....................
Markers } / ...................................
Pressers, machine, shirts* Total
T1m
Incentive •»•*•«•••••*.
Wrappers, bundle 2/ ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

110
2,9 2 2

.94
.82

1,689
1,233

.81

178

.83

#6
6

1.0 3

69
109
20
*7
1,060
250
810
231

1.01
1.05
.91
1.05
.97
1.07
.86

Occupation (J

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
earnings
5/

Routemen, retail (driver—salesmen)s Total ... ......
workweek •»••••••••••••••»••••••••••••••••••
b—day workweek

1,972
312
1,660

101.00
101.00
101.00

•
»

6

1
1318

6

871
447

_
_
_
6
6

22

10
12
35
28
10
18
58

22

735
347
388

3
3
12
112
14
98
39

16
406

230
176
24
6
18
56
100
48
52
70

7

16

36

249
125
124
19
10
9

HO

68
10

6
18
18

6
6
6

_

58
15
12

7
7

10

9

16

9

16
3

_

139
20
119

62

90

18

10
52
10

90

18

V

108
46
62
24

82
28
20

20
41
55
46
9

15

3

27
108
12
96
13

35
35

2
*
8
172
44
128
2

19
19

_

6

6
6

_

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF*
%
*
t
4
i
%
Under 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 9 0 .0 0
and
$
60.00 under
65.00 70.(?0 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 9 5 .0 0

|
t
♦
%
*
i
1
*
*
I
*
95.00 100.00 105.00 no. 00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 H 5 .00 150.00 160.00
and
100.00 105.00 n o . 00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 160.00 over

i

4

$
18

25

52

18

25

52

51
6
45

144
18
126

219
30
189

178
33
145

2*0
33

177

140

30
no

172
36
136

206
39
167

112
33
79

81
15
66

89
15
74

84
6
78

37
6
31

21
21

30
6
24

14

40
3

49

n

37

49

3

149
1 / The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers In the power laundries industry (Group 7211} as defined in the Standard Industrial Glassification Manual ( 9 - edition) prepared by the Bureau of the
Budget. Data relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, HI., March 1953
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; all or a majority of workers were paid on a time basis.
U.S. nSPARUMENT <F LABG L
E
Bureau of labor Statistics
4 / Data limited to men workers
£/ Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).

t




19

C ‘ Union Wage Scales
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining
between employers and trade unions. Rates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated. Additional
information is available in reports issued separately for these individual industries or trades.)

Table C-15*

B u ild in g

C o H d ifU io U o H

Table c -2 0 5 :

A p ril 1 . 1953
C la s s if ic a tio n
B rick lay ers .................................................
Carpenters ...................................................... ........................
E l e c t r i c i a n s ......................... ..
..
P ain ters ............................................... M t t t t t l M (
P l a s t e r e r s ....................................................f t M 1 . M I M .
Plumbers ............................... ................... u n i ) i i i i
t
Building l a b o r e r s .................................... ................ r f t ,

Table c -2 0 5 :

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

7 o<n
3*030
2*750
3*175
3*000
2 .1 5 0

A
O
/n
40
A
O
A
O
A
O
40

jB a A e /U e d ,

J u ly 1 . 1952
C la s s if ic a tio n

Rate
per
hour

Bread and cake - Hand shops*
R e ta il - Bread and cake*
Agreement As
F i r a t h a n d s................ . . . . . * . ...........•••••• $1,8 7 0
Second hands ••••••.......................•••••••• 1 .8 2 0
l e e r s , a f t e r 1 y e a r ...................................... 1.425
General bake-shop h e lp ers,
a f t e r 1 y ear * ............•••••...........•••••• 1.3 4 0
Pan clean ers and g re a s e rs ,
a f t e r 6 months •••••••••••••••............ 1 .2 2 0
Agreement Bs
F i r s t hands, spongers, overmen ••••••* 1 .850
Second hands •••••••••••.*•••••••.......... 1.800
Third hands*
F i r s t 6 months •••••••••••••••.......... 1 .1 5 0
6 - 2 4 m on th s...................•••••••••••• 1 .340
24 - 36 months *..........•••••••••••••• 1 .640
Wholesale - Breads
F i r s t hands, m ixers, overmen •••••••••••• 1.760
Second hands, bench o r machine hands,
moldera, d iv id ers ••••••••••••••••••••• 1 .710
Bread and cake - Machine shops*
Agreement As
Foremen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.830
Oven o p erato rs, m ixers •••*•..........•••••••• 1 .720
Bench hands, d iv id er and dep ositor oper­
a t o r s , cookie-machine o p erato rs, oven
feeders and d rap ers, floormen ••••«•••• 1 .670
Molder o p erato rs, wrapping machine s e t up men, dough dum pers...................... * ........... 1 .570
Grease-machine o p e ra to rs, experienced
bake-shop helpers •••*.....................••••••• 1 .4 6 0
General bakery h e l p e r s .............. * .......... ••••• 1 .350
In sp e cto rs, f lo o rla d ie s .........................••••• 1 .3 4 0
Bread and dough pannera, doughnut-tray
packers, han d-ioera, make-up g i r l s •••• 1 .2 7 0
Wrapping-machine fe e d e rs, order f i l l e r s
1 .220
and s e le c to r s , co o le r g i r l s •••..............
Agreement B*
Bread departments
Group leaders ••••••••••.............. ••••••• 1.865
M ixers, overm en................................................ 1 .760
1 .7 1 0
Divider operators ................
Molder men, oven dumpers and fe e d e rs,
bench men, dough dumpers ....................... 1 .6 6 0
1 .5 0 0
Helpers ............................. •••••.................
Inside bakery clean ers ••••••••••••••• 1 .3 9 0




Hours
per
week

42
42
42
42
42
42
42

B a A e /u e d - G o H lin M

Table C -27:

ic l

_________________ Ju ly 1 . 1952___________________
Rate
C la ssifica tio n
per
hour
Bread and cake - Machine shops - Continued
Agreement B - Continued
Cake department:
Cake m ixers, icin g m ixers, doughnutmachine m ixers, overmen,
$ 1 ,7 2 0
f i r a t s c a l e r s ..........••»••••»...............
Bake-shop h elp ers, dumpers ...................... 1 .4 6 0
Inside bakery clean ers ••••••••••••••• 1 .3 5 0
Helpers, women*
F i r s t month .................. .................•••••• 1 .0 6 0
A fter 30 days .................... . . . . . . ........... 1 .1 1 0
A fter 6 months •••••••••••..............
1 .1 6 0
1 .2 1 0
A fter 1 y ear ........................................... .
1 .2 6 0
A fter 3 years ...................................... ..
Doughnut shops*
Doughnut and chocolate enrobingmachine operators ..................................... 1 .5 0 0
Utilitym en
1 .3 0 0
Foremen (women) ............................................... 1 .1 8 0
Packers (women)*
.9 6 0
S ta r t ..............................................................
1 .0 3 0
A fter 6 months
A fter 1 year ................•••••••••••••• 1 .0 8 0
Pie and p astry shops:
Pie shops:
Overmen, cooks, dough mixers •••••• 1 .4 4 0
Dough breakers, f r u i t mixers ............ 1 .2 1 0
Pie-machine o p erators, cream
toppers, oven helpers (women) . . . 1 .0 9 0
Wrappers, cream-pie f i l l e r s ,
f r u i t cle a n e rs, plate washers,
s o r te rs , inspectors ................••••• 1 .0 1 0

Hour8
per
week _

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

42
42
42
40

Table C -27:
_________ Ju ly 1 . 1952

40
C la ssifica tio n
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Rate
per
hour

Book and job shops:
Bindery womens
G atherers, c o lla to r s , s t i t c h e r s , covering
and thread sewers, m ailers, blank
book sewers, paging and numbering
machine operators ••••••••••..........•••••• $ 1 ,525
Automatic s t itc h e r feed ers, folding o r
ru lin g machine fe e d e rs, machine oper­
a t o r s , ro ta ry p erforating and punching
machine o p erators, ta b le workers •••••• 1 .4 8 4
Bookbinders - Commercial o r e d itio n
binding*
Forwarders - c lo th , le a th e r , job;
fin is h e rs ; o p erators: paper c u tte r s ;
paper jo gg ers; sheet stra ig h te n e ra ,
gathering machines, automatic stitch in g
machines, combination gathering and
stitch in g machines, folding machines,
automatic feed ( l ) .......................................... 2 .6 1 2
O peratora-in-charge - stock and cu ttin g
2 .7 1 2
O perators, folding machine
2 .6 8 1

P b U U i*U f-G Q **£ d * PHe t £

___________________Ju ly 1 . 1952_________

Hours
per
week

36*

36*

36*
36*
36*

Hours
per

C la ssifica tio n

...

Book and job shops - Continued
Bookbinders - Commercial o r e d itio n
binding - Continued
Operators in charge o f gathering,
stitch in g and covering machine
combination ..........................................
O perators, folding machine
automatic feed (3 ) . . . . . .
Compositors, hand
E lectro ty p ers ...................... •••••.............••••••<
Machine operators .......................... .................
M ailers ...................... ..
P h otoengravers..............•••••••...............••••••<
Rotogravure ••••••••.............................
Press a s s is ta n ts and feed ers:
Senior a s s is ta n ts :
Presses 25 x 38 inches or larger*
1 2 -c o lo r ; 1 p e rfe ctin g , over
46 x 65 inch bed; 2 automatic
Miehle u n its (29 x 41 inches) .,
Single cy lin d er; in charge of
varnishing machines, o ffs e t . . . ,
1 double impression, 2 sheets to
1 cy lin d er, 1 o r 2 co lo rs •••••<
Folding machines, hand-fed*
F e e d e r s ....................................................
Feeders and o p erators, 1 machine . . . .
Folding machines with automatic sheet­
fed equipment, operators of*
1 m achin e........................................ ..
2 machines ............................... ...................
3 machines ....................................
A ssistan ts on folding machines;
paper jogger ............................................ .
Stock cu tte rs*
On f l a t machines ...................... ..
Men-in-charge .............................................. .
2-o o lo r sh eet-fed ro ta ry presses*
H arris-Claybourn, 47 x 72 inches,
C o ttr e ll, 36 x 4 8 i n c h e s .................... •.,
Single r o ta ry presses*
Single r o ta ry ; autom atic- or sheet­
fed r o ta ry ; Cox Duplex, Goss Comet
and Cox-O-Type single flat-b ed
Color presses*
McKee 4 -c o lo r ( r o l l o r automatic
sh e e t-fe d ); McKee 5 -c o lo r; Claybourn
4 -c o lo r and 5 -co lo r . . . . . ..............
1 0 -co lo r web perfecting*
F i r s t a s s is ta n ts .................... ..
Second and th ird a s s is ta n ts •••
Junior a ss is ta n ts*
Pony Miehle ( 2 ) ; M iller 2 -c o lo r,
22 x 30 inches (2 ) ...........................
Kelly 25 l / 4 x 28 3 /4 inches ( 2 ) ;
Miehle horizontal ( 2 ) ; M iller
Simplex 20 x 26 inches (2 ) .........
K elly, 16 1 /4 x 21 5 /8 inches ( 2 ) ;
Miehle v e r t i c a l (2 )
K elly , 28 1 /2 x 35 l / 2 inches (2 )
Feeders on miscellaneous presses:
Hand-fed platen
......... .,
Hand-fed c y l i n d e r ............................ . . ,
Hand-fed Colt ’ s Armory and
Universal ...................................

12.723
2 .7 6 4
2 .8 0 0
3 .1 6 0
2.8 3 9
2 .483
3 .3 6 4
3 .4 5 7

36*
36^
36; ■
36;:

%
36*
35
35

2 .5 2 4
2 .4 9 7
2.5 7 9
2 .4 9 7
2 .5 5 7
2 .6 1 4
2.6 8 3
2 .7 6 6
2 .5 2 4
2 .6 1 4
2 .7 1 4
2 .5 6 6

36*

2 .5 2 4

36*

2 .5 6 6

36*

2 .6 0 7
2 .5 6 6
2 .0 8 0

36*

2.0 3 9

36*

2.0 3 9
2 .0 6 6
2 .0 3 9
2 .0 8 0
2 .0 5 2

36*

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 1 1 1 ., Msrch 1953
U.S. D RTM T OF IAB0R
EPA
EN
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

20

Table C-27:

Table C -27: P *U 4 ltU U f

Table C -42:

M o t& U b U c A

S btU A eA d

G * fd a t fe lfb e t e - Q a H it U u ije t f
J v t 1 . 1952
O
G lassificatio n

Rate
per
hour

Book and job shops - Continued
Pressmen, cylind er p resses:
Agreement A:
Sh eet-fed , f la t-b e d :
2 sin g le -co lo r, sin gle cy lin d er;
1 2 -c o lo r double cy lin d er; 1
double cylind er p erfectin g ; 1
sin g le -co lo r, sin gle cylinder
and not more than 3 platen job
p resses; 46 x 65 inches and
$ 2 ,8 2 8
............... . . .
under
Bed size over 4.6 x 65 inches ••••••••
2 .8 5 5
Special type p resses:
2 sin g le -co lo r, sin gle cylinder
Miehle u n its , M iller Majors, or
No* 2 Kellys (o r any single
paired with them except Miehle
7 /0 ) ..........................................................
2 .8 5 5
1 o r 2 sin g le -c o lo r, single cy lin ­
d er Miehle 7/ 0*s (74 inch) o r
one 7 /0 and any single
paired with i t ..................................... 2.8 8 3
1 Cox Duplex, Hoe Duplex, Goss
flat-b ed o r Cox-O-Type
(o r any press o f sim ilar
type) ......................................................... 2 .9 2 4
2 .5 0 0
Agreement B ....................
Pressmen, platen presses:
Agreement A:
3 o r le s s ....................................................... ..
2 .6 3 4
2.662
4 , h a n d -fe d .......................................................
5 , hand-fed ....................................................... 2.703
6 , h an d -fe d ....................................
2 .7 4 5
Proofers on 1 job press ••••••••••»••« 2 .8 2 8
2 .3 0 0
Agreement B •»•••••••••............
Pressmen, ro ta ry p resses:
1 2 -c o lo r s h e e t-f e e d ..........•••••••.......... ..
2.993
1 3 -c o lo r sheet-feed •••••••••••••••••••. 3 .0 4 8
1 4 -c o lo r s h e e t-f e e d ......................................
3 .1 3 1
1 5 -co lo r sheet-feed .......................................... 3 .2 1 4
1 sh eet- or web-feed, 70 inches o r over;
3 .1 8 6
1 4 -c o lo r .......................................... ..
1 5 -co lo r .............................................. ••••••••.
3 .269
3 .076
1 Miesel .............................................................. ..
Newspapers:
Compositors, hand - day work . . . .
Compositors, hand - night work ••
Machine operators - day work . . . .
Machine operators - night work ••
Mailers - day w ork.................... ....
Mailers - night work .........................
Photoengravers - day work . . . . . . .
Photoengravers - night work . . . . .
Pressmen, web presses - day work:
Agreement A ......... ............................
Offside colormen and registerm en rotogravure .............................
Agreement B ...................... .....................
Registermen - r o to g r a v u re ................
Pressmen, web presses - night work:
Agreement A ................................................ ..
Offside colormen and registermen r o to g r a v u re ................................... ..
Agreement B ........................ .....................
Registermen - rotogravure ••••••••,
Pressmen-in-charge - day work:
Agreement A ................................... ..................
Rotogravure and co lo r presses . . . . .
Agreement B ................................. .............. ..
Pressmen-in-charge - night work:
Agreement A ........................ ....................... ..
Rotogravure and co lo r presses .........
Agreement B ..........................................




________________ Ju ly 1 , 1952____________

M L .lt 1952

Hours
per
J2SSk_

Rate
per
hour

C la ssifica tio n

Newspapers - Continued
Stereotyp ers - day work:
Agreement A ............................................••••••• $2,760
Agreement B ............................. ..
3.3 3 1
Agreement C ................................. ..
2.9 3 3
Agreement D ...................................................... ..
3 .8 0 0
Agreement E ............................................ ••••••• 2 .960
Stereotyp ers - night work:
Agreement A •••••••••••..............•»•••••••• 3.001
Agreement B .......................................................
3 .6 0 8
Agreement C .................. »•»•••.......... ••••.••• 3 .2 9 7
Agreement D ••••»••••••••••......... •••••••• 3.633

Table C -41:

Hours
per
week

37*
3 2*
35
30
37*
36*
30
32*
30

JZ o C o l ^ A O H d d i

Q p & u U iH f & H fJ o y e e &

36i

October 1 . 1952
Rate
per

C la ssifica tio n

Hours
per

36*

2 .9 2 4
3.076
2 .9 2 4
3.076
2.413
2 .662
3 .1 1 7
3 .3 6 6

36::
36:
36::
36::
3»
36^
36::
36: r

2.589

37*
35
35

2.929

35

M o t& U to U cA

$1,760
1.790
1.810
1.860

40
40
40
40

1 .910
1.960

40
40

1.910
1.9 4 0

40
40

1.737
1.746
1.791
1.746

40
40
40
40

-1.728
1.746
1.728

40
40
40

1 .700
1.710
1.750

40
40
40

1.810
1.860
1.980

40
40
40

S ty U a& M

35

3 .0 0 0
3 .0 8 0
3 .2 7 4

Table C -42:

3 7*

2 .653
2 .7 0 7
2 .8 8 6

2-man o a rs :
F i r s t 3 months
4 - 1 2 months ,
A fte r 1 year .,
Night ca rs . . . .
1-man c a r s :
Day •••••••••.,
N ig h t................ .
1-man busses:
Day •••••••••••......... ..
Night ..........................................
Elevated and subway railw ays:
Motormen:
F i r s t 3 months ••••••••
4 - 1 2 months ••••..........
A fte r 1 year ....................
Conductors (re g u la r) ..........
Conductors ( e x t r a ) :
F i r s t year
A fte r 1 y e a r ......... ••••
Guards (re g u la r) ............
Guards ( e x t r a ) :
F i r s t 3 months ••••••••
4 - 12 months .................. ,
A fte r 1 year .................... .
Motor coaches - 1-man busses:
F i r s t 6 months ..................
Second 6 months ....................
A fter 1 y e a r ................•••••

Ju ly 1 . 1952
C la ssifica tio n

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Baggage:
$1,775
1.665

2 .7 6 0
2.893
2.886

35

3 .1 2 4
3 .2 6 7
3 .2 7 4

35
35
32*

n

1.906
1.945

45
40

1.752

Bakery:
Cracker

40
40

40

1 .4 1 8
1.603

40
40

Brewery and d is tr ib u to r :
H elpers:
B o ttle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • • o . . . .
KAff...............................................................................

C la s s if ic a tio n

Rate
per
hour

Building:
C onstruction:
$ 1 ,9 5 0
4-wheel
2 .0 5 0
6—
wheel
Excavatin g, paving, grading, sewer and
p la s te rin g :
Agreement A:
4—
wheel, 2 tons o r le s s ••••••••••.••• 1 .9 0 0
2 .0 5 0
4-w heel, over 2 t o n s ...........................
6-wheel ................................••••••••••••••• 2 .1 5 0
Agreement B :
4-w heel, 2 tons o r le s s ••••••••••»«•« 1 .8 0 0
4-w heel, over 2 t o n s .........................••••• 1 .9 5 0
6-wheel ................ .................•••••••••••••• 2 .0 5 0
Coal:
1 .8 9 0
1 * tons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 tons ....................................
1 .9 2 0
General:
Cartage:
1 .7 5 0
1 and under 2 tons
2 and under 3 tons •••••...........••••••••••• 1 .8 0 0
3 and under 5 tons ................ •••••••••••••• 1 .8 5 0
5 and under 7 tons ••••••.................................. 1 .9 0 0
7 and under 10 tons ................••••••••••••• 1 .9 5 0
10 and under 20 t o n s ................................••••• 2 .0 0 0
2 .0 5 0
20 tons and over ...............................
Hauling:
South sid e :
1 * tons .......................................................... ..
1 .7 5 0
2 tons ................................................. ................. 1 .8 0 0
3 t o n s ........................... .................•••••••••• 1 .8 5 0
1 .9 0 0
5 tons .............................................
7 tons ...................................................••••••• 1 .9 5 0
10 tons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 .0 0 0
2 .0 5 0
20 tons and o v e r .................................... ..
P arcel d e liv e ry :
Less than 2 tons ............
1 .7 5 0
2 and under 3 tons .............................................
1 .8 0 0
3 - 5 tons ••••••••............•••••••••••••••• 1 .8 5 0
T r a c t o r - t r a i l e r s ........................... ........................ 1 .9 0 0
Meat:
Jobbers - Wholesale ...................................... •••••• 1 .9 4 0
Packinghouse:
Local:
1 ton and tinder ..............•••••............ . . . .
1 .7 9 5
Over 1 and under 3 t o n s .............. ..
1 .8 6 5
3 - 5 tons .................. •••••••••••••••••• 1 .9 4 0
Over 5 tons •••.••..........••••••••••••••• 1 .9 6 0
Helpers - Over 5 tons .......................
1 .6 1 0
C ity t r a c t o r s ••••••••............••••••••• 1 .9 6 0
Dump-cart t r a c t o r ................ ................... ..
1 .6 9 0
D elicatessen and sp e cia l d e liv e ry . . . .
1 .7 9 5
Moving:
Furniture ..................................
1 .9 0 0
Helpers ............................... ..
1 .8 2 0
P i a n o ................................................................................... 2 .0 2 0
Helpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 .9 7 0
Machinery:
1 and under 2 tons ..................
1 .8 5 0
2 and under 3 t o n s .........................
1 .9 0 0
3 and under 5 tons ............................................... 1 .9 5 0
5 and under 7 t o n s ............................................... 2 .0 0 0
7 and under 10 tons ............................................ 2 .0 5 0
10 and under 20 tons .................. ..
2 .1 0 0
20 tons and o v e r .........................•••••••••••• 2 .1 5 0
Newspaper and magazine:
Afternoon papers •••••••............•••••••••••••• 2 .2 5 0
Morning p a p e r s ............
2 .5 2 0
Magazines ....................... ..
2 .2 5 0
Railway express ..............••••....................••••••••••• 1 .8 1 0
Helpers
1 .6 8 0
Soft drink and m ineral w ater:
E x tra d riv e rs •••••............•.••••••••••••••••• 1 .7 5 0
Helpers
1 .2 5 0

H0UT8
per
week

40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
37*
40
40
40
40
A
O

21

D5 Supplementary Wage Practices
Table D-l:

S h tft Sbtfl& io u /Sa/ p A otriliou l 1/
Percent of total plant employment

(a)
By establishment policy in -

Shift differential

All manufacturing
industries 2/
2d shift
3d or other
shift work
work

Machinery
industries
3d or other
2d shift
work
shift work

100.0

100.0

100.0

XXX

XXX

7 9 .5
7 8 .1
3 7 .0

86.1*
86.1*

5 7 .9
5 7 .9
9 .5

1 8 .3
1 7 .7
8.2
.2
1.6

5 .3
5 -1
3 .*
(3 / )
.1

1 5 .3
1 5 .3
1.6
-

1 .5

.2
1.2

.3
-

.6
1 .1
1.1*

1 3 .7

88.2
1+0.6
.8

1 5 .5

-

.2
2.1*
-

7 .7
5 .9
^ .5

1 .7

1 .5

3 .1

-

2.8

2.8

1 .7

3 -7
1 3 .5
1 .7
1*7.6

7 .3
1 1 .5
9 .7
3 7 .8

8.0

.8

.7
.6

!* .5
(3 / )
2 7 .5

3 5 -9
1 .3
1 .1

1 1 .9
.1*
7 0 .8

6 .5
1 .3
1*5.1

1.2

1.2

1*.U
6 3 .3

13.6

2 0 .5

8 .9

-

(3/)

( 3/ )
3 .8

-

.1*

.1

_

1.6
11.6
-

3 .8

( 3/ }

.3

.6

.1*
(3 / )

XXX

(3 / )

XXX

.2

XXX

1*2.1

3 .8
3 .8

( 2 /)

1 .2

(3 / )
.2

-

1

.8

(3/)
(3 / )
7 .1
.2
.3

3 .6

.1
-

1.1*

XXX

.1

-

-

1 .9

XXX

.2

9 .5
1 .9

1*3.6

-

3 .2
3 .3

(3 / )
2 .9

.6
•5
.7
2 .7
.1*

-

-

1.8

XXX

Shift differential data are presented in terms of (a) establishment policy and (b) workers actually employed on late shifts at the time of the survey. An establish­
considered as having a policy if it met any of the following conditions:
(l) Operated late shifts at the time of the survey; (2) had union-contract provisions
late shifts; or (3 ) had operated late shifts within 6 months prior to the survey.
Includes data for machinery industries also shown separately.
Less than 0.05 percent.
Includes such provisions as 8 hours* pay for 7 or 7?- hours worked; and 5 to
percent differential plus full week's pay for reduced hours.

Table D-2x

S c h e d u le d ' k t e e k b f, d lo u tU

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS 1 / EMPLOYED IN—
Weekly hours

Al
l
idsre
nutis

All workers ...........................

100.0

Under 35 hours ........................
35 hours ..............................
Over 35 and under 37| hours ...........
37| hours .................... ........
Over 37§- and under 1*0 hours ...........
1*0 hours ..............................
Over 1*0 and under 11 hours ............
*+
11 hours ..............................
**
Over 11 and under 1*8 hours ............
**
1* hours ..............................
8
Over 1*8 and under 52 hours ............
52 hours and over .....................
Information not available .............

0.2
1.9
3.6
13.1*
13.8
6 3 .6

1.0
.8
.5

1.2
“

|

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

Public
uiii s
tlt e *

Wholesale
trade

R t i trade
eal

Finance**

Srie
evcs

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

0.8

2 .5

-

2.6
•7
91+.2

3 .8
9 .6

3.1
8.3
5.5
5.5
11.8
5I
+.8
^.7
U.6
1.7
"

2.5
1.5
.1
69.5
1.2
3.5
1 .*
*1
10.1*
3.^
2.6
.8

3 .8
1 6 .0
1 7 .7
57.6

2.0
79.7

-

-

1 .6

.5
.9
2 .7

-

3.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(3 /)
6~l
.8
9 0 .2

2.2
.7
-

3 .1
*
6.6
2 3 .1
2 6 .1
*
10 . 5
*

-

Al
l
.
i d s r e 2f Manufacturing
nutis
100.0

Public
uiiis
tlte*

Wholesale
trade

R t i trade
eal

Srie
evos

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

0.1
-

-

-

3 .5

-

2.0
.1
69.5
.3
1+.0

-

_
_

-

0 .5

-

0 .5

1.2
77.3
2.8
.9
12.8
1.2
3.3

_

86.1*
-

7.8
1+.6
3.7

Data relate to women workers.
Occupational Wage Survej, Chicago, 111., March 1953
Includes data for real estate in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Less than 0.05 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




Machinery
industries
3d or other
O L cit- +
CA OUllP
.Q V- v
shift

9 1 .1

Workers in establishments having provisions
for late shifts ..........................
With shift differential .................
Uniform cents (per hour) .............
Under 5 cents .....................
5 cents ...........................
6 cents ...........................
7 or 7 i cents .....................
8 or 8§ cents .....................
9 cents ......... .................
10 cents ..........................
Over 1 0 cents .....................
Uniform percentage ...................
5 or 5^ percent ...................
7 or 7^ percent ...................
8 percent .........................
10 percent ........................
12 or 12-| percent .................
15 percent ........................
Other h j .............................
With no shift differential ..............
Workers in establishments having no
provisions for late shifts ...............

l/
2/
3/
*
**

All manufacturing
industries 2/
3d or other
O l eh -f*+*
?
£A 5X1XX u
C
shift

100.0

All workers ................................

l/
ment was
covering
2/
3/
5/

(* )
Actually working on extra shifts in -

-

1.8
-

11.8

-

7 1 .1

6.2
5.5
5.8
9.7

1.2
_
M
(3/)
(I/)
50.1
1.1
_

1*2.8
_

1.2
-

•5

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

22

Table D -3 :

P

a id

J fo lu t c U

fd ,

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Number of paid holidays

*
**

Finanoe**

Services

. . 1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
.1
8 6 .7
6 .1
6 .8
.3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 8 .6
5 4 .1
2 7 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
8 5 .4
6 .6
3 .4
4 .6
-

9 9 .6
9 8 .4
.8
.4

1 0 0 .0
2 0 .4
1 4 .8
1 2 .0
2 .8
6 .9
4 3 .1

9 8.3
7 6 .6
1 6 .5
4 .2
-

-

-

-

.4

-

AU
industries

,/

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .2
2 .3
8 5 .0
2 .9
6 .7
-

9 0 .2
1 .4
2 5 .9
4 1 .3

9 3 .1
2 .2
7 9 .7
1 0 .7
.5
.

1.0

9 5 .0
5 .3
7 8 .0
5 .4
4 .6
1 .5
_
.2

1 .7

-

1 0 0 .0

5 .0

2 .8

_

.3

9 5 .9
7 .2
8 8 .7
«
.
-

_

_
_

-

-

-

9 .8

6 .9

4 .1

2 1 .6

Services

Retail trade

0

i j

.2

Retail trade

1

1 /

2/

9 9 .8
(2/)
6 8 . 4.
1 2 .1
6 .0
3 .1
1 .7
8 .5

Wholesale
trade

1

g
/

Workers in establishments providing
paid holidays
.......... ........ .
Less than 6 days ........... ..... .
6 days ...........................
7 days ....................... ..
8 days ...........................
9 d a y s ................ ......... .
10 d a y s ............ ..............
11 days .........................
Workers in establishments providing
no paid holidays ...................

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities*

Manufacturing

1

All workers..........................

All
industries

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

10Q.0__

U

7 2 .1
4 7 .4
2 3 .2
.9
.6

.
_
(2 /)

2 7 .9

Includes data fo r r e a l e s ta te in ad d ition to those industry d iv isio n s shown s e p a ra te ly .
Paid holidays o f l e s s than a f u l l day have been em itted*
Less than 0 .0 5 p ercen t.
One or two days*
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s *
F in ance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s ta te *

Table D-41

Paul VooatiosU tyotmol Px h M +C
x m ou)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

V acation p o licy

AU
industries

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

A ll workers ..............................................................

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 .0

Manufacturing

PubUc
utilities*

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 .0
9 0 .0
- '
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 5 .2
7 4 .8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 5 .5
3 3 .9
.6
-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
1 .9
9 8 .0
-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
2 2 .9
7 6 .0
1 .0
-

9 9 .3
9 2 .4
7 6 .2
1 4 .1
2 .1
5 .6
3 .1
2 .5
1 .3

.1

.1

.7

AU
_ .
industries i / Manufacturing

Services

PubUc
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
8 9 .9
8 0 .1
6 .8
3 .0
8 .2
4 .5
3 .7
1 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 8 .1
3 1 .9
-

9 6 .1
9 6 .1
5 9 .4
3 6 .7
-

-

-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
6 4 .2
3 4 .7
1 .1
-

9 1 .3
9 1 .3
7 8 .5
1 2 .6
•2
_
-

-

3 .9

Retail trade

A fter 1 vear o f s e rv ic e
Workers in establishm en ts providing
paid vacations ...................................................
Length-of-tim e paym ent.................. ..
1 week ............................................................
2 weeks .........................................................
Other ..............................................................
Percentage payment 7 j ..................................
2 percent .....................................................
Over 2 percent ........................................ ..
Other-type payment ........................................
Workers in establishm ents providing
no paid v acations .............................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 1 .7
7 7 .5
.8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 0 .6
7 8 .0
1 .4
-

“

(2/)

See foo tn otes a t end o f ta b le .
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ) , communication, and other p ublic u t i l i t i e s *
* * F in ance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .




NOTE:

-

**

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, E L I., March 1953
U .S . DEPARTMENT O LABOR
F
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

Estim ates a re provided sep a ra te ly , according to employer p ra ctice in computing
vacatio n payments (len g th -o f-tim e , percentage o r o th e r); percentage or o th e rtype payments were converted to eq u iv alen t tim e periods in e a r lie r s tu d ie s .

“

8 .7

Table D-A: P c u d V c u z a t i a + U ( ^ o t m c U P 4 6 4 a U £ o * U ) C o n ti n u e d

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V acation p o lic y

A ll workers ............................................................

A
ll
industries

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities*

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

A
U
, anufacturing
Industries 1/ M

W
holesale
trade

Public
utilities*

1 00.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 00.0
1 0 0 .0
2 .6
.2
96.2
1 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3.A
9 5 .2
1.A
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1.A
.6
9 8 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .6
2 .2
9 6 .2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .6
9 7 .8
.6
-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
9 9 .9
-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
9 .5
8 7 .0
3.A
-

99 .A
9 2 .5
A2.1
A.A
A3.8
2 .2
5 .6
l.A
A.2
1 .3

1 0 0 .0
8 9 .9
5 0 .2
6 .1
3 0 .6
3 .0
8 .2
2 .1
6 .1
1 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 0 .9
.A
6 8 .7
-

.1

.1

.6

—

99 .A
9 2 .5
2 3 .8
7 .3
58 .A
3 .0
5 .6
3 .7
1 .3
•6
1 .3

1 0 0 .0
8 9 .9
2 9 .9
10.A
A5.5
A.1
8 .2
5.3
1 .9
1 .0
1 .9

_

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 7 .8
9 7 .8
A5.5
3 .9
A8.A
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 2 .0
8 6 .9
1 .1
-

9 1 .3
9 1 .3
A0.3
1.A
A9.A
•2
-

“

8 .7

Services

A fte r 2 y ears o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v acatio n s .................................................
L en gth-of-tim e paym ent.............................
1 week ..........................................................
Over 1 and tinder 2 weeks ..................
2 weeks ........................................................
Other .................................... ................... ..
Percentage payment 2 / ................................
2 percen t ................................................. ..
Over 2 p e r c e n t ........................................
Other-type payment ....................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s ..........................................

(2 /)

“

2 .2

A fter. 2 jssarg .9 f a sn rtra
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v acatio n s .................................................
Len gth-of-tim e payment .............................
1 week ..........................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ..................
2 weeks ........................................................
Other ................................................. ..
Percentage payment % / ............................. ..
Over 2 but l e s s than 3 percent . . .
A p ercen t ...................................................
Over A percent ........................................
Other-type payment .........................
Workers in estab lishm en ts providing
no paid v acatio n s ...........................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .3
97 .A
1 .3
(2 /)

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .6
9 6.3
2 .1
“

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
l.A
9 8 .6
“

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.7
9 9 .3
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .6
9 7 .8
.6
-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
9 9 .9
-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
3 .2
9 3 .3
3 .A
-

.1

-

.1

•6

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
9 3 .6
6 .3
“
-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
2.A
8 9 .0
8 .5
-

99.A
9 2 .5
2 .3
8A.8
1 .0
3 .6
.8
5 .6
2 .5
3 .1
1 .3

.1

.1

•6

~

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
2 .8
9 7 .2
-

9 7 .8
9 7 .8
2 3 .1
3 .9
7 0 .8
-

—

2 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
”

9 7 .8
9 7 .8
A .l
8 9 .3
.8
.5
3 .1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
11 .A
8 7.5
1 .1
-

9 1 .3
9 1 .3
1 3 .1
l.A
7 6 .6
•2
8 .7

A fte r 5 y ears o f s e r v ic e
Workers in estab lishm en ts providing
paid v acatio n s ...«• • • • ...............................
Len gth-o f-tim e payment .............................
1 week ..........................................................
2 weeks ...................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks . . . . . . . . .
3 weeks ................ .......................................
Other ............................................................
Percentage payment g / ...............................
A percent ...........................................
Over A percent ........................................
O ther-type payment ......................................
Workers in estab lishm en ts providing
no paid v acatio n s ...........................................

100.0
1 0 0 .0
.5
9 3 .2
A.O
2 .2
.1
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.3
9 1 .5
5 .7
2 .3
.2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
- ■
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
95 .A
1 .2
3.A
-

(2/)

See fo o tn o tes a t end o f t a b le .
*
T ran sp ortation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
* * F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .




1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .6
9 5 .1
.6
2 .7
-

1 0 0 .0
8 9 .9
2 .2
8 2 .2
1 .2
3 .3
1 .0
8 .2
3 .7
A«5
1 .9

2 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .6
8 5 .8
1 .1
9 .5
-

91.3
91.3
l.A
89.3
.A
.2
8 .7

Table D-A*

P

a id

V

a c a ilc u t d

t y o /u

n

a l P

axh

U 4a

o h

A )

- C o n iU

tu e d

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
V acation p o licy

A ll workers ............................................................

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

A
ll
industries

M
anufacturing

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
•5
7 9 .6
5 .1
1A.A
•A
-

1 0 0 .0
10 0 .0
.3
8 1 .0
5 .5
1 3 .0
.2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 9 .8
.2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8A.5
1 .2
1 0 .9
3.A
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .6
7 2 .8
1 .9
2 3 .7
-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
7 1 .5
1 2 .1
1 6 .3
■-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
2.A
7 2 .5
2 5 .0
-

99 .A
9 2 .5
1 .7
7 1 .6
2 .3
1 6 .8
.1
5 .6
2 .5
2 .9
.2
1 .3

.1

.1

.6

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
A8.1
2 .8
A7.1
1 .9
-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
2 .3
7 0 .6
2 7 .0
-

99 .A
9 2 .5
1 .7
2 9 .7
1 .9
59.1
.1
5 .6
•6
1 .8
3 .2
1 .3

.1

.1

.6

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
3 8 .3
52 .A
2 .3
A .l
2 .8
-

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
2 .3
6 9 .2
28 .A
-

99.A
9 2 .5
1 .7
2 6 .0
6 0 .0
1 .9
2 .8
.1
5 .6
•6
1 .7
3 .3
1 .3

.1

.1

•6

A
li _ / anufacturing
industries 1 / M

Public
utilities*

W
holesale
trade

Retail trade

Sendees

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
8 9 .9
l.A
6 9 .5
2 .3
1 6 .7
8 .2
3 .7
A .l
•A
1 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 8 .6
l.A
-

9 7 .8
9 7 .8
A .l
8 2 .0
A.9
3 .2
3 .6
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .6
6 5 .1
3 .A
2 7 .9

9 1 .3
9 1 .3
l.A
8 8 .1

-

1 .6
.2
-

2 .2

-

8 .7

A fter 10 years o f se rv ic e
Workers in estab lishm en ts providing
paid vacations .................................................
Length-of-tim e payment .............................
1 w e e k ..........................................................
2 weeks ...............................................••••
Oyer 2 and under 3 w e e k s ..................
3 w e e k s ..................................................... ..
O th e r ............................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ............................. ..
A percent ...................................................
Oyer A p e r c e n t ............................. ..
Other ............................................................
Other-type paym ent......................................
Workers in estab lishm en ts providing
no paid v acatio ns ............................... ....

(2 /)

-

-

-

-

-

-

A fter 15 y ears o f s e r v ic e
Workers in establishm en ts providing
paid vacations ........................... .....................
Length-of-tim e paym ent.............................
1 w e e k ..........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ..................
3 w e e k s ................ .......................................
Other ............................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ................................
A percent ...................................................
Over A but l e s s than 6 percent . . .
6 percent and over ............................. ..
Other-type p aym ent......................................
Workers in establishm en ts providing
no paid v acatio n s ..........................................

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0.0
.5
32.3
A.9
6 1 .5
.8
(2/)

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.3
2 7 .0
5 .6
6 6 .9
.2
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 .7
2 0 .9
70 .A
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 7 .1
5 9 .5
3.A
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .6
18 .A
8 0 .0
-

1 0 0 .0
8 9 .9
l.A
2 6 .8
1 .0
6 0 .7

-

8 .2
.9
2 .7
A.6
1 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
_
6 .1
1 7 .1
7 6 .8
-

9 7 .8
9 7 .8
A .l
3 1 .9
5 8 .2
3 .6
2 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .6
35.A
6 1 .0
-

9 1 .3
9 1 .3
l.A
8 7 .5
_
2 .2
•2
-

“

8 .7

-

A fter 20 years o f s e r v ic e
Workers in establishm en ts providing
paid vacations ................................................
Length-of-tim e payment .............................
1 w e e k ..........................................................
2 weeks ........................................................
3 weeks .................. ...................
Over 3 and under A w e e k s ..................
Ac.weeks and over ....................................
Other ............................................................
Percentage payment 2 / ................................
A percent .................... ..................... ..
Over A but l e s s than 6 percent . . .
6 percent and o v e r .................... ..
Other-type paym ent............................... ..
Workers in establishm en ts providing
no paid v acatio n s ............................. .............

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.5
2 8 .2
6A.3
3 .0
3 .2
.8
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
.3
2 2 .8
73 .A
1 .6
l.A
.5
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
8 .1
7 1 .0
2 0 .9
-

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 5 .5
5 2 .9

-

1 1 .6
-

(2 /)

See foo tn otes a t end o f t a b le .
*
**

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .6
1 7 .7
7A.3
6 .A

-

-

-

1 0 0 .0
8 9 .9
l.A
2 2 .2
6 3 .5
1 .0
1 .8
8 .2
.9
2.A
A.9
1 .9

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

-

5 .7
7 7 .2
1 7 .1
-

9 7 .8
9 7 .8
A .l
2 9 .2
5 7 .7
3 .7
3 .1
2 .2

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
3 .6
3A.3
5 2 .5
9 .6
-

9 1 .3
9 1 .3
l.A
8 3 .6
6 .1
•2
' 8 .7

25

Table D-A*

fic U d ^ G X x U lC U ti (ty o to M tU P a O M U O H ^ -Q o ^ U lH U B ci

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

V acation p o lic y

A ll workers ............................................................

All
industries

100, o_

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

100.0

1 0 0 ,0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0
100.0
.3
22.1
67.8
9 .3
.5

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0
lb o .o

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
1 .6
1 7 .7
1 1 .6
6 9 .1

Manufacturing

_

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Finance**

-

Services

I

industries 2 J

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9
9 9 .9

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
2 .3
6 9 .2
28 .A

99 .A
9 2 .5
1 .7
2 5 .9
5 2 .9
1 1 .9
.1
5 .6
•6
1 .7
3 .3
1 .3

1 0 0 .0
8 9 .9
1.A
2 2 .2
6 0 .0
6 .3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0

Retail trade

.

Servioee

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0
3 .6
3A.3
2 2 .0
A0.1

9 1 .3
91.3
l.A
8 3 .6
6 .1
.2

A fte r 25 y ears o f s e rv ic e
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
paid v acatio n s ........................... .................
Length-of-tim e payment ...................... ..
1 w e e k .......................................... ...............
2 weeks ........................................................
3 weeks .................. ....................................
A weeks and over ...........................................
Other • • • . . . . • .............................. ....................
Percentage payment 2/ .....................................
A percent ...................................................
Over A but l e s s than 6 percent . . .
6 p ercen t and over ................... .................
Other-type paym en t .............................................
Workers in estab lish m en ts providing
no paid v a c a t i o n s ..........................................

1/
2/
2 /

*
**

100.0
100.0
.5
2 6 .2
51 .1
2 1 .6
.6
-

-

-

-

31 .A
5 0.2
18 .A

-

-

-

-

-

3 1 .6
A0.1
2 5 .9
2 .3
-

-

.1

8 .1
6 0 .0
3 1 .9

.1

-

-

(2 /)

-

-

-

-

-

2 4

A.9
1 .9

•6

-

2 .2

-

-

8 .7

P n iU A O H C e C H u t P ^ H d M H P l& K l

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Type o f plan

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Wholesale
trade

100*0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

Retail trade

Services

97.A
9 3 .0
9 1 .7

6 6 .5
6 6 .5
53 .A

9 5.2
9 3 .7
8 5 .0

9 8 .3
9 7 .8
9 0.3

1 0 0 .0
1 0 0 .0
9 9 .8

8 2 .5
8 2 .0
6 8 .8

8 7 .7
8 1 .1
6 7 .1

8 6 .9
8 3 .1
7 7 .0

1 1 .2
a .A
6 8 .9
A2.5
3 1 .7
5A.9

3 7 .9
3 8 .3
72 .A
5 7 .9
5 3 .6
A9.A

5 1 .0
2 6 .0
6 9 .8
6 9 .1
6 0 .8
7 8 .2

18 .A
1 5 .7
A6.0
AA.5
3 2 .9
2A.8

AA.O
7 3 .7
7 7 .0
6 7 .6
A6.8
50.8

5 0 .3
8 0 .0
8 1 .8
7 5 .1
A9.7
5 3.5

6 2 .8
8 8 .9
5 8 .8
5 7 .7
2 2 .6
6 7 .8

1 7 .8
5 1 .6
6 5 .2
3 7 .3
3 8 .0
A3.3

2 2 .2
A7.6
6 9 .3
AA.7
A0.7
A8.1

2 8 .9
6 6 .6
7 6 .2
7 3 .3
6 2 .7
1 7 .6

1 1 .9

1 8 .6

2 .6

3 3 .5

A.8

1 .7

1 7 .5

1 2 .3

1 3 .1

1 0 0 .0

Workers in estab lishm en ts having
insurance o r pension plans 2/ . . . . . . . . .
Insurance plans 2/ ........................................
L ife .................................................................
A ccid ental death and

93.5
9 2 .1
8 7 .8

99.2
9 9.1
9A.0

9 7 .8
9 7 .8
97 .A

8 8 .1
8A.7
8 0 .7

A1.7
50 .9
6 5 .7
58.6
a .9
6 6 .7

A5.0
66.2
6 8.5
6 2 .0
A0. A
70.8

5 6 .3
8 1 .0
A6.1
A6.0
9 .3
8 6 .3
2 .2

..100,t0, .

In clu des data f o r r e a l e s ta te in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep arately ,
Unduplicated t o t a l .
T ran sp ortation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other p ublic u t i l i t i e s .
F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s ta t e .




.

Public
utilities*

Manufacturing

8 1 ,A
7 9 .3
7 5 .5

1 0 0 .0

.8

Services

.-100*0

100.0

6 .5

Finance**

,
2J
.

-.-..100*0,

10 0 .0

Sick n ess and a c c i d e n t .................. ..
H o s p ita liz a tio n ........................................
S u rg ic a l ........................................................
M e d ic a l.................. .......................................
R etirem ent-pension plan .............................
Workers in estab lishm en ts having
no insurance or pension plans ..................

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
All
industries

1 0 0 .0

A ll workers ..............................................................

2/
*
**

-

5 .7
7 2 .3
2 2 .0

In clu des data fo r r e a l e s ta te in add ition to those industry d iv isio n s shown sep a ra te ly .
P ercen t o f annual earn in g s.
Less than 0 .0 5 p e rce n t.
T ran sp ortation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and o th er p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F in an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s t a t e .

Table D-5t

2 /

-

8 .2
.9

9 7 .8
9 7 .8
A .l
2 5 .8
5 3 .0
1 1 .8
3 .1
-

Occupational Wage Survey, Chicago, 1 1 1 ., March 1953
U .S . DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

26

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey
The Bureau’ occupational wage surveys are designed to
s
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources. In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community. Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, and working conditions
among establishments.

such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation. Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment’ full-time schedule for the given
s
occupational classification*

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau’
s
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) Office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-4). The industry groupings surveyed are: Manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.

The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries, these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufacturing industries*
Shift-differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time of the survey. Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they mefy any of
the following conditions: Operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit;
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

27

in terms of total plant employment, whereas proportions in the sec­
ond tabulation represent only those workers actually employed on
the specified late shift.

office workers of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours.
Because of eligibility requirements, the proportion actually re­
ceiving the specific benefits may be smaller.

Information on wage practices other than shift differ­
entials refers to all office and plant workers as specified in the
individual tables. It is presented in terms of the proportion of
all workers employed in offices (or plant departments) that observe
the practice in question, except in the section relating to women

The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal ar­
rangements. It excludes informal plans whereby time off with pay
is granted at the discretion of the employer or other supervisor.
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer.

Establishments and Workers in Major Industry Divisions and in Selected Industries in Chicago, HI., 1/
and Number Studied by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, March 1953

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2 /

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
Studied
within
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis
All divisions ..............................
Manufacturing...........................
Nonmanufacturing ........................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ............ ..............
Wholesale trade .......................
Retail trade ..........................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services 2/ ...........................

2 ,9 2 8
1 0 1

-

1 0 1

51
1 0 1

51
51

1,327
1 ,6 0 1

114
538
203

1,153,800
703,300
450,500

410
163
247

444

98

22

71,360
13,710
103,450
29,390

6 8 ,6 0 0

36

a

2 4 0 ,1 6 0

70,800

33
52
50
45
67

302

5 0 8 ,6 0 0
2 6 8 ,4 4 0

2 2 ,2 5 0

8 9 ,0 0 0

74,100
1 4 8 ,0 0 0

113,540
44,150
69,390
17,840
3,840
2 2 ,1 6 0

19,840
5,710

Industries in which occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis
Women1s and misses9 dresses .................
Weed furniture (other than upholstered) ........
Paints and varnishes .......................
Machinery industries .......................
Machine-tool accessories - production shops .•
Machine-tool accessories - jobbing shops ...
Power laundries .............................

8
2 1
8
5

/ 21
8
8
2 1

60

613
37
159
163

4,204
3,216
7,233

23
10 2

1 0 8 ,6 9 2

6,996
5,174
13,550

1 1

44
32

2,372
2,530
5,385
44,314
5,829
2 ,8 a

3,811

_
_
128
1,218
6,731
639
180
16 0

■

1/ Chicago Area (Cook County).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2/ Hotels} personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
{ j Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
j
2/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories with 8 or more workers were also included.




28

Assembler (m achinery) 13, 15, 16
Assembler (wood f u rn itu re ), 12
Bench hand (b a k e rie s), 19
B ille r , m achine, 4
Bookbinder (p rin tin g ), 19
Bookkeeping-machine o p e ra to r, 4
B rick lay er (b u ild in g c o n stru c tio n ), 19
C alculating-m achine o p erato r, 4 , 5
C arpenter (b u ild in g c o n stru c tio n ), 19
C arpenter, m aintenance, 7
C leaner, 9
C lerk, f i l e , 5
C lerk, o rd er, 4 , 5
C lerk, p a y ro ll, 4 , 5
C lerk, r e t a i l re c e iv in g (power
la u n d rie s ), 18
Compositor, hand (p rin tin g ), 19, 20
Crane o p erato r, e le c tr ic b rid g e, 9
C ut-off-saw o p erato r
(wood f u rn itu re ) , 12
C u tter and marker (women's
and m isses' d re s s e s ), 11
D raftsm an, 7
D rill-p re s s o p erato r (m achinery), 14, 15, 16
D uplicating-m achine o p erato r, 4 , 5
E le c tric ia n (b u ild in g c o n stru c tio n ), 19
E le c tric ia n , m aintenance, 7
E le c tric ia n , m aintenance (m achinery), 13
E le ctro ty p er (p rin tin g ), 19
E ngine-lathe o p erato r
(m achinery), 14, 15, 16, 17
E ngineer, s ta tio n a ry , 8
E x tra cto r o p erato r (power la u n d rie s ), 18
F in ish e r, flatw ork (power la u n d rie s ), 18
Firem an, s ta tio n a ry b o ile r, 8
Firem an, s ta tio n a ry b o ile r
(power la u n d rie s ), 18
G luer, (wood fu rn itu re ), 12
Grinding-machine o p erato r
(m achinery), 14, 15, 16, 17
Guard, 9
H elper (b a k e rie s), 19
H elper, m otortruck d riv e r, 20
H elper, tra d e s , m aintenance, 8
I d e n tifie r (power la u n d rie s ), 18
In sp ecto r (m achinery), 13, 15, 16, 17




Index
In sp ecto r, f in a l (exam iner) (women's
and m isses' d re s s e s ), 11
J a n ito r, 9
J a n ito r (m achinery), 13, 16, 17
Key-punch o p e ra to r, 5
L abeler and packer (p ain ts
and v a rn ish e s), 13
Laborer (b u ild in g c o n stru c tio n ), 19
L aborer, m a te ria l hand lin g , 9
L aborer, m a te ria l handling
(m achinery), 13, 16, 17
Machine o p erato r (p rin tin g ), 19, 20
M achine-tool o p erato r, production
(m achinery), 14, 15, 16, 17
M achine-tool o p e ra to r, toolroom , 8
M achine-tool o p erato r.
toolroom (m achinery), 15, 16
M achinist, m aintenance, 8
M ailer (p rin tin g ), 20
M echanic, autom otive (m aintenance), 8
Mechanic, m aintenance, 8
M illing-m achine o p erato r
(m achinery), 14, 15, 16, 17
M illw rig h t, 8
Mixer (b a k e rie s ), 19
Mixer (p a in ts and v a rn ish e s), 13
Molder (b a k e rie s), 19
M otortruck d riv e r, 20
Nurse, in d u s tr ia l (re g is te re d ), 7
O ff-b earer, machine (wood fu rn itu re ), 12
O ffice boy, 4
O ffice g i r l , 5
O ile r, 8
O perator (lo c a l t r a n s i t ) , 20
Order f i l l e r , 9
Overman (b a k e rie s), 19
Packer, 9
Packer (b a k e rie s), 19
Packer (wood fu r n itu r e ) , 12
P a in te r (b u ild in g c o n stru c tio n ), 19
P a in te r, m aintenance, 8
Photoengraver (p rin tin g ), 19, 20
P ip e f itte r , m aintenance, 8
P la s te re r (b u ild in g c o n stru c tio n ), 19
Plumber (b u ild in g c o n stru c tio n ), 19
Plumber, m aintenance, 8
P o rte r, 9

Press a s s is ta n t (p rin tin g ), 19
Press feed er (p rin tin g ), 19
PTesser (women's and m isses' d re s s e s ), 11
P resser, m achine, s h ir ts (power
la u n d rie s ), 18
Pressman (p rin tin g ), 20
R eceiving c le rk , 9
Routeman (d riv er-salesm an ) (power
la u n d rie s ), 18
Rubber (wood f u r n itu r e ) , 12
Sander (wood f u r n itu r e ) , 12
Screw-machine o p e ra to r, autom atic
(m achinery), 14
S ecretary , 5
Sewer, hand (fin is h e r) (women's
and m isses' d re s s e s ), 11
Sewing-machine o p erato r (women's
and m isses' d re s s e s ), 11
Shaper o p erato r (wood f u r n itu r e ) , 12
Sheet-m etal w orker, m aintenance, 8
Shipping c le rk , 10
S hippin g -an d -receiv in g c le rk , 10
Sprayer (wood f u r n itu r e ) , 12
Stenographer, 6
S tereoty p er (p rin tin g ), 20
Switchboard o p e ra to r, 6
Switchboard o p e ra to r-re c e p tio n is t, 6
Tabulating-m achine o p e ra to r, 4 , 6
Technician (p a in ts and v a rn ish e s ), 13
Thread trim mer (clean er) (women's
and m isses' d re s s e s ), 11
T in ter (p a in ts and v a rn ish e s ), 13
T ool-and-die m aker, 8
T ool-and-die maker (m achinery), 15, 17
T racer, 7
T ranscribing-m achine o p e ra to r, 6
Truck d riv e r, 10
Trucker, power, 10
T u rre t-la th e o p e ra to r, hand
(m achinery), 14, 15, 16
T y p ist, 6
V arnish maker (p a in ts and v a rn ish e s ), 13
Washer, machine (power la u n d rie s ), 18
Watchman, 10
Welder, hand (m achinery), 15
Work d is tr ib u to r (women's
and m isses' d re s s e s ), 11
Wrapper (b a k e rie s ), 19
Wrapper, bundle (power la u n d rie s ), 18
U. S . G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F IC E : O— 1953




Office.

This report was prepared in the Bureau’s
Communications may be addressed to:

North Central

Regional

Adolph 0. Berger, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
105 West Adams Street
10th Floor
Chicago 3, Illinois
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ regional offices
are available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial
relations, employment, prices, labor turnover, productivity, work injuries,
construction and housing.

The North Central Region includes the following States
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Michigan
Minnesota

Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
North Dakota
Ohio
South Dakota
Wisoonsin


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102