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B U F F A L O ,N E W Y O R K
(Erie and N iagara Counties)
A p r il 1 9 5 3

Bulletin N o . 1116-20

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT O F LABOR
M artin P Durkin, Secretary




B U R E A U O F L A B O R STATISTICS
Ewan Clagve, Cin n W ontr




Occupational Wage Survey




B U F F A L O ,N E W Y O R K
( E r ie a n d N i a g a r a

C o u n t ie s )

April 1953

Bulletin No. 1116-20
UN I T E D STATES D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
Martin R Durkin, Secretory
BUREAU O f L A B O R STATISTICS
Ewan Gagti*, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S Government Pri t n Office
.
nig
>
■
Washington 25, D. C. •- Price 20 cents




Contents
Letter of Transmittal

Page
INTRODUCTION ............................................
THE BUFFALO METROPOLITAN A R E A ...........................

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF IABCR
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D. C., July 20, 1953.

1
1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE STRUCTURE .............................

1

TABIESs

The Secretary of Labors
I have the honor to transmit herewith a report on
occupational wages and related benefits in Buffalo, N.T., duriqg
April 1953* Similar studies were conducted in a number of
other large labor-market areas during the fiscal year 1953.
These studies have been designed to meet a variety of govern­
mental and nongovernmental uses and provide area-wide earnings
information for many occupations common to most manufacturing
and nonmanufacturing industries, as well as summaries of selected
supplementary wage benefits. Whenever possible, separate data
have been presented for individual major industry divisions.
This report was prepared in the Bureau^ regional of­
fice in ftnrlork, N. Y., by Theodore Allison under the direction
of Paul £• Warwick, Regional Wage and Industrial Relations
Analyst. The planning and central direction of the program was
carried on in the Bureau's Division of WsLges and Industrial
Relations.

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
area basis A-l
Office occupations..........................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations......
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations.....
k U
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping
occupations ..............................

3
5
6
8

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an
industry basis B-35
Machinery industries •••••••••••........
B-7211
Power laundries ............................

10
11

Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building construction.......................
C-205
Bakeries ..............................
C-27
Printing................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ...........
C-42
Motortruck drivers and h elpers..............

12
12
12
12
12

Supplementary wage practices D-l
Shift differential provisions ...... ••••«••••
D-2
Scheduled weekly h o u r s ........
D-3
Paid holidays ..............................
D-4
Paid vacations .............................
D-5
Insurance and pension plans .................

13
13
H
14
18

Ewan Clague, Commissioner
Hon. Martin P. Durkin,
Secretary of Labor.




APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u rvey...........................

19

I N E E X ...................................................

21




O CCU PATIO NAL W AG E

JRVEY -B U F FA LO , N. Y.
employed in transportation, communication, and other public util­
ities. Employment in other major industry divisions m s about
13*000 in finance, insurance, and real estate; 45*000 in services;
16,000 in contract construction; and 33,000 in government.

Introduction
The Buffalo area is 1 of 20 important industrial centers
in which the Bureau of Labor Statistics is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys. In such surveys, occupations common to
a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries are
studied on a community-wide basis. 1/ Cross-industry methods of
sampling are thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the
following types of occupations: (a) Office; (b) professional and
technical; (c) maintenance and power plant; and (d) custodial, ware­
housing, and shipping. In presenting earnings information for such
jobs (tables A-l through A-4) separate data are provided wherever
possible for individual broad industry divisions.

Erie and Niagara Counties differ markedly in industrial
composition. Industries for which easy access to low-cost water
transportation is important are located near the lakefront in Erie
County - steel mills, automobile factories, and grain processors.
Production of machinery and chemicals is also significant in Erie
County. The hydro-electric power generated at Niagara Palls has
attracted industries which require abundant sources of water and
power, such as producers of chemical and metallurgical products and
paper. In addition to these industries, large manufacturers of
aircraft and electrical equipment are located also in Niagara
County.

Earnings information for characteristic occupations in
certain more narrowly defined industries is presented in series B
tables. Union scales (series C tables) are presented for selected
occupations in several industries or trades in which the great ma­
jority of the workers are employed under terms of labor-management
agreements, and the contract or minimum rates are believed to be
indicative of prevailing pay practices at the time of the partic­
ular survey.

Among establishments within scope of the survey in the
Buffalo Metropolitan Area, 7 out of 8 plant workers were in firms
which had formal agreements with labor unions. In manufacturing and
public utilities, virtually all plant workers were in firms having
labor-management contracts. Only in public utilities* however, were
a substantial proportion of office workers covered by labor-manage­
ment contracts. Three-fourths of the office employees in the public
utilities division were in establishments with union agreements
covering office workers. A sixth of the office workers in manufac­
turing were covered by such agreements.

Data are collected and summarized on shift operations and
differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits such as
vacation allowances, paid holidays, and insurance and pension plans.
These appear as series D tabulations in the report.

The Buffalo Metropolitan Area

Occupational Wage Structure

The Buffalo Metropolitan Area (Erie and .Niagara Counties),
with well over one million inhabitants, is one of the Nation's Im­
portant production centers. Total wage and salary employment, ex­
cluding agricultural workers, was more than 450,000 in April 1953,
an increase of over 23,000 since January 1952, the date of the Bu­
r e a u ^ last occupational wage survey in the area. The bulk of the
increase occurred in manufacturing industries, which employ over
220,000 workers.

Occupational earnings recorded in April 1953 averaged
somewhat higher than those in a similar survey conducted in January
1952. For most plant jobs studied, the averages were from 6 to 12
percent higher and for most office occupations, averages were 7 to
15 percent higher than in the previous study. Much of this upward
movement reflects the influence of general wage increases, such as
the agreement reached in the steel industry during the summer of
1952, and automatic wage adjustments provided for by annual im­
provement or wage escalation clauses in collective-bargaining agree­
ments. An analysis of firms in the area with 200 or more employees,
for which general wage change data were collected, indicates that
more than 90 percent of the plant workers and 70 percent of the
office workers employed in these establishments were granted at
least one general wage increase in the 15-month period. Formal wage
adjustments for plant workers were made most frequently on a centsper-hour basis; across-the-board increases for office workers were
expressed in percentage terms as frequently as in terms of centsper-hour.

Located at the junction of the Erie Canal and* the Great
Lakes, Buffalo is also an important nonmanufacturing center. Dis­
tribution of goods furnished employment to 82,000 workers in whole­
sale and retail trade in April 1953* An additional 41,000 were

1/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of survey.
Differences between the scope of this survey and the last previous
survey of this area (January 1952) are indicated in the appendix
table.




in

Wages of plant workers in the Buffalo area were largelydetermined on the basis of formalized wage structures in the spring
of 1953. Approximately three-fourths of the total plant workers
were employed at time-rated jobs* Wages of more than half these
workers were based on formalized plans providing a single rate for
individual occupations; nearly two-fifths worked tinder plans pro­
viding rate ranges; pay for less than a tenth was determined on an
informal basis* About a fourth of the total plant workers were em­
ployed under incentive systems of pay* 2/ The principal types of
incentive systems reported were piecework and production bonus
plans in manufacturing and commission schedules in retail trade*
More than three-fifths of Buffalo office workers were re­
ported in firms having formal salary ranges for individual classi­
fications* For most of the others, salaries were determined on an
individual basis*
Almost all plants studied had established minimum en­
trance rates for inexperienced plant workers* Firms with minimum
entrance rates over $1.35 an hour employed more than half the plant
workers surveyed in the area*; these establishments were primarily
in manufacturing industries. Minimum rates from $1 to $1.35 an hour
were in effect in establishments employing an additional 25 percent
of the plant workers* Minima below 75 cents an hour were confined
almost exclusively to retail trade and service industries*

2/ Very few of the workers in the jobs for which data are re­
ported in series A tables were employed under incentive systems of
wage payment* Incentive systems are generally limited to production
jobs in manufacturing and to sales positions in trade.




In all the comparable plant and office jobs studied for
which data were available, average earnings in manufacturing ex­
ceeded those in nonmanufacturing. Workers in manufacturing indus­
tries in Niagara County received average wages and salaries which
were generally higher than those received by their counterparts in
Erie County.
The scheduled workweek for most plant workers was 40 hours
in April 1953, although longer work schedules were in effect for a
large proportion of the workers in public utilities, trade, and
service industries. A 40-hour week was the typical schedule for
women office workers in manufacturing, retail trade, and services.
Shorter workweeks prevailed for most women office workers in public
utilities and financial institutions*
About a fourth of the plant personnel in manufacturing
were actually working on extra shifts at premium rates at the time
of the Bureau’ survey* Many additional plants, employing a large
s
number of workers, also had shift premium policies providing for
some form of pay differential over day rates, although they did not
have extra shift work in effect currently. Most commonly reported
differentials were from 5 to 7^ cents an hour for second-shift work
and 9 or 10 cents for third-shift. Premium payments for night work
have been increased by many firms in the Buffalo area since the Bu­
reau’s last survey (January 1952), when the most common differ­
entials were 4 or 5 cents for second-shift and 52* or 6 cents for
third-shift work*
Nonwage benefits were also liberalized during the 15month period. For example, in April 1953, over 70 percent of the
plant and office workers were employed in establishments which pro­
vided 3 weeks’ paid vacation after 15 years’ service, while in Jan­
uary 1952 only about 50 percent of the workers were covered by such
provisions*

A* Cross-Industry Occupations
T»bum

Q tficm G u p a tioMi ko

i

(Average straight-time weekly hours sod earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an
basis in Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. I., by industry division, April 1953)

t

NUMBER OP WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

30.00 12.50
W
eekly W
eekly $7.50 *
earnings and
hours
(Standard) (Standard) under
30.00 32.50 35.00

§5.oo ^7.50 W o o V .5 0 15.00 1*7.50 *$0.00 k .5 0
37.50

1*0.00 1*2.50 15 . oo k7.50
i

50.00

j>5.oo ‘57.50 *60.00 12.50

52.50 55.00

60.00

ST.50

65.00 *67.50 fo.oo $5.oo 10.00 *85.00 *90.00 V s.oa
and
62.50 65.oo 67.50 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 over

Men
kq.o
hD.O
1*0.0
1*0.0

77.00
76.00
71.00

-

C lerks, oavroll ......................................................... ..
Manufacturing
......... .
E rie County
Niagara County..................................................

160
1#
120
36

ltf.0
1*0.0
1*0.0
i*0.0

77.00
77.00
77.50
71*.00

82
55

1*0.0
ko.o

1*3.50
1*6.50

61

39.5

72.00

B ille rs , machine (b illin g machine) •••••••••••
Manufacturing ....................................................... ..
E rie County .#•••........................................... ..
Niagara County..................................................
Nonmanufacturing .....................................• • *...•

266
160
117
1*3
106

39.5
llO.O
1*0.0
1*0.0
39.0

1*7.00
51.00
50.50
52.50
1*1.50

B ille rs . machine (bookkeeping machine) •••••••
Nonmanufacturing .................................................

120
101

39.0
39X

50.50
U8.50

-

BookkeenAng-machl ne op erators, cla ss A *...........
Manufacturing .........................................................
E rie County .................................. ................. ..
Nonmanufacturing ..................................................

139
7r
57
6k

39.0
£p.O
39.5
38.5

5k. 50
63.00
61*.oo
kk.50

-

Booickeeoing-machine operators, cla ss B ••••••.
Manufacturing •••............................. ....................*
E rie County .......................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................................................

538
f it
105
till

39.0
39.5
39.5
39.0

k 3.5°
£ £
51.00
kuoo

-

C alcnlatl ng-nachine operators
(Comntonster type) * ....................... ......................

733

1*0.0 51.00
S i " “&
1*0.0 52.50
1|0.0 59.50
k6.50
39.5

2
•
2

26
------H
11
•
•
7
15

23

39.0

53.00

*

•

11

39.0
39.5
39.5
38.0

51.00
58.00
63.50
1*2.00

XfU

39.5
1*0.O
1*0.0
JOO

kk.00
3>.?v

lk5

1*0.0

50.00

i

276
165
ll|8
111

i

Manufacturing •••»•»••............. ....................
E rie County................................. ......................
NOunanufacturing ...................................................

Manufacturing
Tabulatine-machine operators .................................

-

•
-

-.
-

“

2
2
2
-

•
-

-

20
12
12
8

19
S
16
3

7
7
7
-

2k

3

-

_
“

_
-

-

-

-

-

_
•
-

k
k
2
2

5
F
k
l

•
“

k
k
k
-

7
7
7
-

8
8
5
3

6
2

1
-

5
3

22
5
3 -------S'

7
6

12
12

9
9

5

-

6
5

1
1

3
3

1

30
i5
13
2
15
9

r
s

-

3

f

7
r
5
2

17
33
9 — W
9
17
8
16

U
36
3k
7 -----l T — W
6
10
17
18
16
k

22
26
*k — s r
20
19
2
2

11
u
11
-

6
6
3
3

11
11
k
7

18
18
15
3

15
i5
12
3

Ut
ll*
6
8

8
8
5
3

23 2 / 26
26
19
26
16
3
-

-

-

-

_
-

..
-

_ .
-

_
-

_
-

«
-

•
-

1

11

5

1

7

10

8

9

2

3

1

42
9
1
8
3

34
11
10
1
-

JO
3
6
1

6
6
•
6
-

k
k
2
2

3
-3
3
-

3
3
3
-

2
2
2
-

_
-

-

-

-

11
11

3

6

2
2 ------- 1

-

-

23
16

-

2
-

-

-

-

_
-

_

2

•
2k

15
------ © —
8
5

Woman

B rie County......................................................•
Niagara County..................................................
Nonmanufacturing................... ................................

313
112
308

Calculatin^m achine operators (o th er than
83
C lerks, f i l e , cla s s A ................................................
M anufacturing..........................................................
Niagara County........................... ......................

M anufacturing.........................................................

151
fe
k6
66
508
” “3 3 “
17
7

See footnotes at end of table*




1*6.50

_
-

20
•
20

30
9
9
21

13
5
5
•
8

1|?
Ex
37
k
8

22
16
11
5
6

15
i5
lk
1
2

17

7
•
7

-

2
2

10
10

3
3

26
26

6
2

20
20

1
1

•
-

•
-

6
.
6

12
12

9
9

k

22
1
1
a

k

6

k

6

13
13
3
-

-

6
6
6
-

lk
lk
13

m
/

15
i5
15
-

9
8
k
*

6
6
6
-

jl
k
1
-

6
6
6
-

k

m

2
2
2

-

-

._
“

15

72
72

87
1
1
86

75

15

62
7
7
55

22
9
9
13

%
y f

28
19
8 — lF
6
7
11
13

31*
So
9
2k

18
11
7
7

27
27
27
-

6
6

3
1
1
2

•
•

?
1
1
8

8
k
1
k

.
-

.
•
-

_
“

-

.
“

28
62
12 ----- 5 ?
7
17
2
5
16
1*3

5k
lo
Ik
6
3k

82
56 ” “ 50
1*3
1*3
7
7
32
1*5

k7
22
20
2
25

Ii9
s
38
6
5

73
U8
1*0
8
25

1*3
2k
22
2
19

28
2k
17

23
17
10
6

30
30
18
12
-

20
17
8
9

k

37
37
8
29
-

3

k
•
k

•
-•
—

-

-

•

8

2

8

7

3

6

k

2

16

•

•

-

k
k
1
•

10
10
5
•

3

1
1

8

2
-

-

3
-

30
on
6

a
1
*
1
*

8
-

7

.
•
-

*

8

5

"

•
23

75

7

17
1
1
16

29

20

9f

k

2

25
I

k
1
3

k
2
2

U
11
-

1
1
-

7
5
2
2
?

9
.
9

16
6
8

59
1
1

29

77

$8

kl
07

32
0

1|6
ko
37
6

27
27
25

%
2k
IB

15
i!
9

13
13

3

9

2
1

6

5

2

3

17

20

2J.

12

9

10

9

9
1
1
5

3

1*

%

7

17

7

9

7

8

•
*2

7

3

2
e

1

•

m

3
3
2
“

10
10
8
“

18
18
18
“

.31

2
1
1

.
“

107
107
•

1
1
“

•
“

“

.
•
“

-

.
•

2

1

.

2

.

m

m

.

■

“

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. I., April 1953
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A -l*

6 ty p e *

Ch o M p o /iO H d r G a H tlH ttm d t

(Average straight-time weekly hows and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. I., by industry division, April 1953)

See footnotes at end of table*
• Transportation (excluding railroads), ccamunication, and other public utilities*




Tattle A-lt

O tiC M paiiQ H i r G M liim

md

2/

an

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings
for selected occupations studied on
area
basis In Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. Y., by industry division, April 1953)

Hours refleet the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
26 workers at $95 to $100.
Transportation (excluding railroads), ooammieatidn, and other public utilities.

Tattle A-2*

/ofdoU *
hJUdm Q d

7 « o 4 « W

OGfttOd
oHUiiH

(Average straight-time weekly hours and. earnings i/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis In Buffalo (Brie and Niagara Counties), N. I., by Industry division, April 1953)

265163 0

- 53 - 2




M aU U aw anc* a n d flaum * P la n t Oo o u p atio M

Table 4-3*

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. I., by industry division, April 1953)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O c c u p a tio n a n d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

C a r o e n t e r s . m a i n t e n a n c e .........................• ..............................

E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e ............................................................. ...

N um ber
of
W o rk e rs

A venge
h o u rly
e a rn in g .

1
2 .0 5
2 .0 7
2 .0 5

1*95
W 9
317
92
86

1 .3 5

1 .1 * 0

I .li5

i.5 o

i.5 5

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

i.9 0

1 .9 5

1 .0 0

1 .0 5

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1 .2 0

1 .2 5

1 .3 0

1 .3 5

I.4 0

1 .5 0

1 .6 0
and

1 .3 0

c

i.3 0
1 .3 5

1 .1 ( 0

1 .1 * 5

1 .5 0

1 .5 5

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .7 5

1 .8 0

1 .8 5

1 .9 0

1 .9 5

2 .0 0

2 .0 5

2 .1 0

2 .1 5

2 .2 0

2 .2 5

2 .3 0

2 .3 5

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

over

If

20
•

3

10
10
10

28
13
8

30
30
29

20

3

16
11*
8
g
2

156
152
137
1?
AC
4

25
19
g
2

9

If

51
5l
35
16

2?
38
36
2

106
106
50
JO

a
17
14
3
24

7
7
i
3

32
ll
28

1 .9 5

1 ,2 7 3
1 ,1 7 ?
790
387

1 .2 5

2 .1 3
2 .1 U
2 .1 3
2 .1 5

If

m

_
ll

li

5

F i r e m e n , s t a t i o n a r y b o i l e r .............................................................
M a n u f a c t u r i n g . . . ...................... • .......................... . .......................... ...
E r ie C o u n ty • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
N ia g a ra C o u n ty • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
N o o m a n u f a c tu r in g

738
586
366
214
358

1 .6 9
1 ^ 7 "
1 .7 7
1 .7 9
1 .3 6

72
30
10

If

62,

ll

H e ls e r s . t r a d e s , m a in te n a n c e • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • * .
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...............................................................................................
E r i e C o u n ty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
N ia g a r a C o u n ty

2 .0 9 6
1 ,9 1 6
1 ,5 7 5
3 1 *1
180
156

1 .7 6
1 .7 ?
1 .7 8
1 .7 6
1 .5 5
1 .5 7

22
1
1

8
8

pnH L^e

___ . M f f

M a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r s . t o o l r o o m .................. .......................
E r i e C o u n ty
IH A c im m G a m i e r

_____________________ _

M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e .................. ................................................. ...
M a n u f a c t u r i n g * • • • • • « • • • • • • • • ............................................
E r i e C o u n ty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

662
651
1* 91
360

1 ,0 1 1
1 ,0 0 7
692
315

2 .1 1
233T
2 .1 5
2 .0 2

27
6
8

8

3

21

8

7
7

3f
20
8
35

71
5X
20
27

96

3?

9

19

53
45

19

111*

9

9

21
ll*

5
x

u
7
7
li

1
•
x

x

20
20
12
8

6
1*
ll
2

•

2 .1 2
2 .1 2
2 .0 9
2 .1 8

See footnote at end of table.
• Transportation (excluding railroads), coanunication, and other public utilities*




10
7
7

—
'

10
8“
7
x

3

3

3

2

16
16
16

2

10
10
10

25
20
19
x

1 .9 8
53JF "
2 .0 2
2 .0 7
1 .8 1

fa » ta irt« g

12
10
5“ — 5“
8
8

x
x

693
53 5^ —
369
167
157

E n g i n e e r s , s t a t i o n a r y ...................................................................... . .
M * W I H r > g ••••••* ••••••••••••••••••••••
E r ie C o u n ty • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

—

7

n

3

22
9
2

3
4
3

x

8
8

5

2
3
27

219
209
179
30
10
10

2

22
16
16

1?

2

6

15

51
39
2l*
15
12

3®
29
<
2 lf
9

34
32
16
16
2

18
id
12
6

43
43
29
14

243

85

152

75

305

91
1
/9A

65
10
10
8

326
iO J
279
2b
23
20

28
28

•

•

to

28

8
8
8

43
36
36
7

$2

56

41*

56

16
28
8

iii
X5

121*
T a r
85
131
40
114
u
H

282
582
249
33

249

” 555"

18
lB
li
14

34
8
25

12
12
12

32
32

i.
H

26

20
18
18

73
69

Cl
/A
nft
XO

15

20
4?
19 T T 1
12
44
1.
7
1
u
x
X

130
129
313
16

1 #
x g

X

309
108
65
43

61
44

19

H i
to
3**
to

142
li

47
41
6

77
52
25

32
32
9
23

21
21
0
12

100

288
~ W
288

51
51
5l

•

47

100

59
4i

24
21*
21
4
3

44

1*4
t il
is*

77

99

99
57
•1.0.
*

I?
75
46
26

28
28
26
2

1
— T “

63
^ 1
—
18
1,4
<0
2

182
180
116
fo»*
it

160
158
87

5s
1*9
9
liO
**w
9

18
—'

1

5
5
2

x

1
X

IB

22
22
14
8

132
67
50
1f
i7

85
84
36
lift
1*0

76
76
76

12
12
9
4
3

18
lB
7
V
XX

24
2U
23

11
6
g

15
X5
15

X

9
9
3
g

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

75
75

106
106
106

§7
87
AC
2

-

20
20
on
sU

1
1

71
|X

"

5

x

ll

x

5

27

5

*7
27

2
4
3

9$
96

7<
17
si

92
92

0?

n
l

7$

87

76

87
67

J41.
U
■L o
*.

20

95

94

||A
(*w
»

A7
Of
7

95

94
f

<6
70
10
AJr

159
159
on
/V

A
O
07

&
£

ft
O

0
O

%

160
166
146
i t
■U*

49

49
2x
28

79
79
|i9
l*«
47

3
1

5
5

X

-

”

2
2

-

A

“

34
Ola
3u

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. T., April 1953
U.S. IEPARIMBNT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

TableA-3*

M a in te n a n c e e n d P ow e* P la n t O o c n p atio n l -C o n tin u ed

(Average hourly earnings l/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. I., by industry division, April 1953)

Ocpto adidsr dvso
cuain n nuty iiin

Mcais atmtv (aneac)
ehnc* uooie mitnne....
Nnauatrn ....... .....
omnfcuig
Pbi u . i w *
ulc + n +
.... .
.

N M E O W R E SRCIIGSRIH-IEH U L ERIG O—
U B R F O K R EEVN TAGTTM O R Y ANNS F
Nme Aeae Udr12 $ 3 13 lb lb 15 15 16 i6 17 17 18 18 *.0 \9 *.0 *.5 *.0 *.5 *.0 * * *.5 *.0 * *.0
ubr hrg ne .5 1 0 .5 .O .5 .0 .5 .0 .5 .0 .5 .0 .5 19 .5 20 20 21 21 22 2.25 2.30 23 2b 2.50 26
vr
.
on
l
or eug 8
fs aiy
Wre r s
ok
n
n
12 13 13 lb ib 1 .5 0 15 16 16 1.70 17 1 .8 0 18 1.90 19 2 .0 0 20 2 .1 0 21 2 .2 0 22 2.30 2.35 2 .o 2.50 26 ad
.5 .0 .5 .0 .5
.0 oe
b
.5
.5
.5
.5 .0 .5
.5
.5
.5
vr
b6
8
12 U
9
6
2
8
362

319

Mcais mitnne ............ 1 .5 2 2
ehnc, aneac
1,^)1
Ei Cut ............. . 13|
re ony
,TA
15
8

$
19
.1
19
.8

11

1.87

.

2 .b
1
?1
»U
21
.7
2 *b
0

-

1|06

53
8
5?
5
38
9
19
5

1.7 8

Pitr,m ine____* ....... .*
anes a non n e ...
t a c ....... ...
fia Cnm. .__________ ...
i4 la+v .
«
..
1J4Conntv .a............
. .... ......
Nmauatrn
onnfculg

36
9
287
31
5
136
19
0

b
i

.

•

.

•

.

.

.

.

.

- >
- -

-

-

-

1

-

3 —l
b
r

-

1

inr
I
.81
17
.b
19
.1
2 .l
0
20
.3

8

-

1

21

1

5
1

Poftes m i t n n e
ieitr. a n e a c ..... .... .
n nni'miu i i M m i i i
g
tttitui
Ei Cut ••••••••••.•••
re ony ••••••••••••••
NaaaCut ...
igr ony ...

32
3
29
6
O,
fJ
17
8
7
7

3

2 .1 0
2 .1 0
2 .1 0
2 .1 0

SeAnftftfntr,m i t n n e
hMnfli.tHk _____________
e-ea wres a n e a c ......
tmfl oe
Ei Cut »»•••••••••••• *
re ony •••.•«••••••••
Maa*Cut
igr ony

1

*1
i /
*

2

To-n-i mi r «••
oladde ag s ••......... — 93
k
8
te
983
,OUt t t t t T t m t t t t M
nn y t M r t t t t t t t T i 766
fA**C*t iimMimm n m r r
f gr «ny
i
t t t t 217
•

2#23

or
i

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




38

• b
a »
1
1
,
7
5 3t
8 f
£
b J
8 t
O
61

J
3

2 17,
3 11
2t
O J
4
l 11
b 3
9
» 3
J

3
b 9 1 23 18
7 1 8
b 8 — 3“ 262 138
7 9 5 6
b 5 1 28 110
7 1 1 0
7
3
8
5 2
b 8

-

3 3
6
- — b 30" W 2
0
- T 3 3 s~
0 6
b 30 8 1
7

10
10
10

£ f
i 3*
t u
J *
J
9
h
27
I
t
J
J

1

3 11
1 6
3
1
l 116
b
1 b
7 5

1
8
l
b
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8
8

2
2
2

.

_

2
9 nn 8
3 13 80
0
9
3
l9 3 101 80
b 81 9
2
2
8

•

b

.

177
177

0 b 0 1
7 7 86 9 ll 25 7 10
5 5
7“ r s r “ 0 ~wr " W 7 3
5n
“9"
1 6
5 22 b 7 b 120 b 8
0
5 20 5 8 C 7 2
ot 77 b 0 96 *7 2b
t >
* « i
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87
38
12 116
1
5 b 7 0 m6
7
8 56 3"T 5j 3 12 1i
7
77 n 1 M 3
l
7 LU
2b
1 o 6
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i
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22
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4
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-

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6
2 b
b b
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1 12 T 3 i 22 nr— 3 86 — 3
7
5
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J 7 « TT 8 r
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C -5 16 7 — n -S — ar— Jo j8 — J" j
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1. 7
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20
j
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5 2
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1
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9

22
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21
.6
2.1 7
2.b
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320

8
1
J
i
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i
p
b
o

6
3
9
b 3
6
b 8
2
8

12
l ~ 21 5 6
b sr ° 0
- “IT
b
c h l 7 ^sr W
O
7 u 10. l l 26
f i
7
1
i
d
4
• 1 u J 10 21

1.99
1 .6 6

•

3 1 132,
7 5 1
*
7 £
1
7
. 3 12 18
2
7
2
3 12 18
2

7
y
y

2 .1 0

O l r .................. .
ies
Mnfcuig..... .
auatrn
Oit ttttffimttft
mny ii-tttti.itt
NaaaCut
igr ony

11
8

.

1 .8 6

Mlwihs
i l r g t ................ 108 21
.5
.5
Mnfcuig...... ........ " W “ — 2n r
auatrn
Ei Cut ..t11.Trt.tt.Tt 652
re ony .1tt.........I
. tttTtTTTT
.
21
.8
^

b

1
5 11 1 3 7 60
3 1
-1 -f n —fr 1 7 — 5" " H 11 7 1 0
1
1
10
t
2 ■
lt 8 50
b
“
7

-

1
1
A
1L
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7
7
1
7
1

1
3
i
t
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12
12
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26
2
26
2
22
6

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7 8“
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1
h
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1
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12

12

7 8 6 "1b 9 a 3
2
5 5
a
7 8? — 55 T* — 9~— s 5T
2 7 r JA b r 1
Jr
ic
3 5 3 8 t 1 t
2 o t 6 C J o
7 i 7 C 9
b 7 9 2
j jw j* O J J J
, n
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b I b
O l — J 21
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y l 13 7
b t ,
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7

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3
— 1 b9
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J
t *1 J 1
b
2 J» n n 1*
8 I
* 10 2 ,
.
7 J
± t
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20
2 3
8 8
20
2 Jr
8— i
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x f
t
I o J
d 0 t
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2
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7
9
7
0
%
y
C
l
3*
9
f
t
<0

11

12
12
12

.

7 1 b 11 5
3
3
7 — r — r “1 T •
5
3 _ b 131
9
3
6

10

3

.

8

12
3
I9
t
j.
j
10
9
J

10b
mi
l
J
L
1114
0
9
7
6
X
2

11
5
11
5
17
1
Jl
J.
.
I
o
J
4

17
3
17
9
J1
O
110
J7
U
L
1
8

9
0
7
0
7

15 12b
3
15 12 b
3
00 I
y i
y 9
t
A
J 82
O

b
-b
~
i
,
u

2
2
2

T b e a-» GuUodial,
al i

SluffUHf OcCUfuUiOHd

(Average hourly earnings l/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. Y., by industry division, April 1953)

N U M B E R O F W O R K ER S R EC EIV IN G STR A IG H T-TIM E H O U RLY EA R N IN G S O F—

O ccu pation and in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings

|n d e r 8 .7 5

8.80

8 .8 5

8 .9 0

8 .95

Loo

i.0 5

L

10

i.1 5

i

.20

1 .2 5

i. 3 0

i.3 5

.8 5

.9 0

.9 5

1.0 0

1 .0 5

1 .1 0

1 .1 5

1.2 0

1.2 5

1 .3 0

1 . 3$

it

•80

3U « a
1*81*

11
11

1 .8 1

n

715
293
29

2.788

1.1*5
1 .5 5

1,50 2

1 .5 3
1*6 0
1 .0 9
1 .3 6

tin
671
6 15

1 ,1 7 4
355
229
104
8 lil

1 .0 7
1 ,^ 8

Laborers, m a te r ia l h a n d lin g • • • • • • • • • • .................
M
aTBIf*r»4airjng

7 * U70

1 .5 7
i.§ 9

E r i e County
N ia g ara County
fy pfai*!n g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s * ....................................

4 ,568
1 ,1 6 1
1,7 1*1
821

1 .5 9
1 .5 9
1 .5 0
1 .5 U

___ 6jtL_
Sio
390
209

1*6 2
1 .6 4
1*6 2
1 .5 7

P a c k e r s, c l a s s A (men) ................................................
ffeipiVeefUrlng • t t M t t i u t t t m t m i t t t t r t t t i
E r ie County

1 .3 5
I .li5
.9 5

378
357
353

1

5

52

59

_

|tt1tl- . . t . . t, Tt|tttttTlI,

171
J|
*X

M anufacturing .............................................................
E r ie County

1*203
1 ,1 5 8
673
1*85

1 .2 3
1 .2 4
1*16
1 .3 5

5

10lf

38

4»

52

3?

59

14 1

52

22

52

152

28
1 — IT
11
1

10U

1*8

39

14 1

151

17

12

7

47

2?

3

11

139
16
16
123
1,
**

48
9
9

33

31
1

2
2

16
4

3
1
12

7
7

1
1
1
X

1 .8 0

$
1 .9 0

1.5 5

1 .6 0

1 .6 5

1 .7 0

1 .8 0

1 .9 0

2.00

s

2.00
2 .10

“

_ _ io
-

165

39
19

1

33

19

15
4

14
7
*

106
J6
175
8 “T T — 20" —
8
19
14

56

62

120

133

42
34

95

114
no

12
1

20

46
IF —

10
ID- ■
10

1

11*1
12

7

1*7

29

1 ___ 1
-

4

3

13

11

84

25

52
25"
28

77
52
52

24
4

24

16

24

25
4

1

1

4

3

2

2

1

-

3

m

3

10
10
10

3

12 7
94

7

2

10
10
3

1

“

u

30

41

108

14
2

86

8

—

1

1

W

62
n sr —

30
29
3

10
10
10

4

279
271
261
10
8

t
9

21
sr

j

66

62
62
4

9
5°

w

34
4
12

79

51
48
1*8

235
17 1
117
54
64
50

25
----- 2k
21
•
a

1

2
2

x

9

59
15

134
8

7

10
4

4
6

44

11
11
11

1

48
lili

l

!3
61

90

5
22
10

12 5
X18
67
5X

7

3
3
P

14
-

106
101*

74
70

70
•
V

4
2
2

190

9k

27

186

94
62

16

5
5

16

7

170
AfV
16

9
C

15
15

7
1

8

20
20
20

331

t
o

33 1

070

107
107
2

Tt
r<

14
14
1.

u
TO
IV

S
7
t9

(A
09

62
17
Af

8
x

8

267

343
338
239
99

247
14 3
10 4
20

2 .10

2.20

$
2 .3 0

2.20
2 .3 0

over

39
3f
14
25

, 37

38.

18
xx
8

20
11

10 5

19 5

82
09
O

^1

199
199
A/V

251

268

250
18 3
67
1
X

0
7

218
170

256
256
122
13 4

4
4
x

26
----- 5 5
17
Af

0
7

u
IT
xx

14
14
14

-

-

17
17

158

0
7

8

25l

79

43
4i
IO
Xr

8
8
8

-

1 70
17

0
X
0
X

33
33
33

2
2

m

2

4

388

388

925 1 .1 0 2
706
407

5 79

246
226
20

7
9

4
4

242 I t 564
226 1 , 5 3 7
13 4 1 , 1 4 4
92
393
16
27
7
13

458

360

248

47
695
549

333

37
37
91
P*

12 1
*4
24
97

21
17
17
4

15 5
117
109
38

35

23
23
23

78
78

39
90
PP
35

21
21
38

78
7fl
19

219
18 7

I?
64

8
8
8

20
20
20

— 35

29
29
1

17
17
17

69

*
*
*»
*

5

>*
1.
**

7

14

18
18
h

38
2

i9 1
16 6
25

m

40

74
73

35

69
69

28

8
-

4?

4

x

606
396
381 “ 595322
464

16
12
12

1

2
11
2 ------ g"
2
8

4
19

290
194
163 “ S r
99
241
10
64
39
31
21

9

2

m

70
25
25
2

18
9
0
7

7

1

" ^

62
32
33

38
12
10

44
44

22

16 7

~W r

See footnotes at end of table*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*




30
—
8

1 .6 5
1 .6 8
1 .6 8

57li
------ 557
386

Niagara County

1

1

7
1

1*71*
1 .7 6
1*6 3
Ov?
t. At

M anufacturing
E r ie County
H
<fAgra!**

.70

l
-

1.5 0

J a n it o r s , p o r t e r s , and c le a n e r s (women) • • • • • • •
Muiuifftc t vn,in g
E r ie County
N ia g ara County
Noiimaimrmtur^^g

Nonmanufacturing

1

1 .7 9
1*6 1

109

& d e r _ fille r s
M anufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • • ..................................
Cn^inty* t T # t t t f T t t T T t T t t t T t T t .TTT. Tt t t

i

O
£

1*7 2
1 .7 2

m tittim tu tm tu i

P u b lic U t i l i t i e s *

1 .6 5

1 .9 1

66

J a n it o r s , p o r t e r s , and c le a n e r s (se n ) • • • • • • • • •
M anufacturing
E r i e County
N iagara County * * * . » . . . * « « . • » • • • . • • • • . • • *
ng

1 .6 0

$

668
668

Guards .............................................................. ............... .. . - l i g Z j f M anufacturing ............................. ..............................
1,000

-T __

1 .5 5

1.5 0

40 1 .4 $

437
231

PU bliC

1 .5 0

and

0 .7 5

Crane o p e r a to r s , e l e c t r i c b r id g e
(under 20 to n s ) * * * * * .................................................
M anufacturing • • • • ....................................................

w

1 .4 0

9
9

7

*

2

113
113

11^

7

21
19
17
2

9
9

7

1

2

TO

0
p

687
666

£

613
53
21
16

5X
4

55
55
38

48
32
32
16

57
57 57

161

153

-

-

-

6
6
”

0
1

4

XX

r
**
i,

9

9

12
12

3
5
44
3 -------P — uu
1

19
Afc

X

5

Mi

3
3

-

3
3

2
2

3

2

2

10
10

O
X

6li

21

9

o
\
t

3

32

32
32

16

8

25
aU
X

3

3

16
“I T

25 ;

*

64

18
6

97

<0

34
34
32
2

g
4

21

—

"

2

"
3

Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. Y., April 1953

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-ki

QMi tod iaL,9(jM »Uot*di*tif la*td SU ip fU n f &aaapatio*U -8o *4 imittt

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. I., by industry division, April 1953)

N U M B E R O F W O R K ER S R E C E IV IN G STR A IG H T-TIM E H O U R LY EA R N IN G S OF—

Number
of
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings

3 .8 0

3 .8 5

• 85

*

$
0 .9 5

• 90

0*9 0

$

$

$
1 .1 5

$

$

1 .2 0

1.25

$
1 .3 0

1 ,2 5

1 »30

1 .3 1

%

1*00 1*05

8

1 .6 0

337
2/jl
U>2
Ji9

M a n u f a c t u r in g ...............................................

1 .7 1
1*69
1 .7 7
1 .3 3

9
6

213
191
U ,5

M a n u f a c t u r in g .*••• •• •• • •• • ............................. . . . . .

S h i D t d n e - a n d - r e c e i v i n g c l e r i c s • ••.......................... ..
M a m f a c t o r i n g ............... ..
E r i e C o u n ty *•••••••••••••••••••••••••*
N i a g a r a C o u n ty *••••••••••••••••••••••*
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g •••••••••••••••••••••••••

—

m~
2k
2
T
9
k
$

l.k O

1 .6 6
1 .6 8

81

1 .5 5
1 .6 9
1 .6 3
1*79
1 .1)0

66
36

99
T r u c k d r i v e r s , m edium ( l | t o a n d
I n c l u d i n g it t o n s ) ♦ * . .................................. ........................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ••• ....................................................................
C«*l
fim mhtr . . . . . . . . . . . . a . . . . . . . . . a . . .
N i^ g a r *
v t t T tt ttf tT T ttT T T , fT.tTTt
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g *•••••••*••••••••••••••••
P u b l i c u t i l i t i e s * t . . . ..................

m

T ru ck d r iv e r s , heavy (o v e r k t o n s ,
t r a i l e r t y p e ) ................. . . . . . . . . . ............. ..
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g • •••............ ......................... . . . . . .
P ih ^ c iit iiit i« « *
T ru ck d r iv e r s , h eav y (o v e r U t o n s , o th e r
t h a n t r a i l e r t y p e ) • •••••••••••••••.••••••*

IJtHA (VrtintW A . . . . . __________________ A___
T r u c k e r s * p o w e r ( f o r k - l i f t ) ••••••..................
M a z m f a c tu r ln g •••••••••••••.................. ................

Erie County * ............. ...............................................
gat-a County
t f 111|
y r i i T i a c t o r * •••••••••••••••••••*•••••
w)iy«f

V H * (V ainfar AAAAA..AAAAAAAAAAAA.A...AAA

Niagara County •*•••••••••••••••••••••*

l.lk 3
396

i
»

-

-

-

8

18
k —
i,
*)

lk
IT

6

16

-

l

-

8

.

_

-

-

1

-

1

2

-

-

_

2

l

l

2

2

2
2
2
-

-

-

753

588

1 .8 0

2 .0 0

2.10 2 .2 0

$
2 .3 0

1*55

1*60

i.6 5

1 .7 0

1 .8 0

1 .9 0

2 .0 0

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

and
over

2

27

6

12 ■ i f f
—
19
XU

3

15

13

8

Q

1 _____ k
—

1

1

a

k

k

k
1
,

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»

1

a

-

-

-

-

-

IS

-

-

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26
11
1 ft
XU

-

1

X
15

12
12

10

1ft
xu

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18

22

a

11
X
X
1

_____ k
If
I,
u

8
*
1
X

k

-

7
•
10

ki
9
0
7

10

1

7

8

•

k
i,
4

2

“

-

-

-

a

32

$

-

k

71
2X

17 *
17
1(
X7

-

If
•

-

3

-

S3
38
on
Q

45

30
2k

Q

15
13

1
1?

IF

1*038
970
69k

i> 7 7
1 .7 7
1 .7 6
1 .7 2
1 .7 3

C

9

-

-

-

«

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

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5%
k95
3U3
152

1 .7 8

-

1 .0 8

.

2
2
2

1 .7 9
1*75

1 .3 5
l.k 7
1 .1 )3

-

-

1
1
1

-

17
17
17

-

27
27
27

27
27
n
XX
16

1A
XO

26
26

26
26
1A
XO

8
26

IT

16
2
11
11

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7
9

31
31
j *

309
33
29

1)0
25

20
c
>

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076
07c

cO
f

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2
2
9

c

2
2
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1 .8 6
.

21*

11

10

22

-

3
3

-

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8

10

1-«J6

2k

22

5*

8

8
1)3

32

35

lk
lk

26

18

9

2k
2

28
16
16

16
6
2
i,

27
i5
15

23
23
23

27
20
20

u
12

10

12

7

33

29

67
39
25

19
10

1 It
X4

k

28

28

25
25

o
c

0

73
69
53

16
k

h
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99

88
6k

kk
9 l.
«f

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103

7k
59

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XX

53
31
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k9

39

70

39
25

39

lk

26

70
23

13

k7

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cj
1

71
lift

99
16
xo
23

36
36
77
2/
O
7

27
27
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c

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10
10

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19

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7

19
19

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77
76
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1ft
XU

19

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27
2k

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r
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85

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71
73
12
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36
3 2 -------- F
X

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1 7 . . . 3 2 ____ L
32
9
3
A
0
19
3

a
a
a

17
X2

CO
I

lk o
ho
47

99
4c

52
33

£
3

.
*

33
33

23

118

ll * 2

1)8
7X
20

23

6k
~ 5 T
51
13

.
-

33

30

00
22

11

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16

16

k
T

1.
4
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_
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3
3
•
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.

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—

a
• _

li

_

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•

75
£7
07

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k8

o
c

_

68
68

30

1)
12

0

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“

130
93

**

0

m

198
85
198 ~ B r

102
o4
y©

_

*
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7 lf
*9
33
71
6X
Aft
Ov

337
97ft

i.
U

X
O

22

154

3 7 lf
37

c

77
£4

3

211
8k
8k ~ W

11
8
0
2

5
5
cf
?

1
1

8

20
1

7k ~ 5 T

97
97
97

1 -6 2

1 .1 )5

16
12
16
XO

-

6
6
c
0

-

k

19

18

1*76

222
1|2

1

1)52
Life
4>Z

1 .7 2

lif t

2

i,
4

2 .3 0

-

ifl
37
77
27
1 ft
XU

22
20

$

3
3
3

8
34
3 u ---------8
1A
XO
k
16
xo
4

58
57
10
,
4»
0
y

k52

O
3

276
68

369

9
9
c
?
1
,
4

18
16
it

3

1 .6 2

_

30
25
Of
f

0

-

1 .7 k
1 .7 0

— J S8 9
82

$

IQ

14

c

13

e
m

18

1*68
1 .6 6

1|67

1 .7 0

$
1 .9 0

$

1 .6 5

4

Q

.

lk

I
j
r.66

7U7
553

$
1 .6 0

$

1 .5 5

8

Excludes premium pay for overtine and night work*
Study United to nan workers except where otherwise indicated*
Transportation (excluding railroads), eonmnxication, and other public utilities*




-

1*69
1 .7 1
1 -7 1
*•

286
110

Watchmen ..............................
114a ffone fte*iinrkw ..............................* ........... * ___ *
Nonmanufacturing * .................................................... ..
Public utilities * ••••••••••••••••••••

1

3

532

Truckers* power (other than fork-lift) * . . . . .
Manufacturing •••........... ............................ ................

16

1

1 .5 0

l.U O

8

-

...1 .7 1
1 .7 3
1 .7 7

2d
M a n u f a c t u r in g « . . . ....................................................................
K i> (* C n n n tv

1 .1 5

1 .7 5
1 .7 9
1 .7 9
1 .7 8

U6

N i a g a r a C o u n ty .................................................................

6

1 ,1 0

1
i.k 5

hks-l e $ 0

$
1 .3 5

1 ,2 0

1*00 1.05 1 .1 0

M

0 .7 5
• 80

O c c u p a tio n a n d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

“

“

■

.

3

“

B: Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B-35*

Occupation 2/

Number
of
Workers

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

.............................................
Assemblers, class B: Total ...............
Time......... .
Assemblers, class C

...............................................................

Janitors, porters, and cleaners ..................................
Laborers, material handling ............................*............
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A i j ..............................................................................
Drill-press operators, radial,
class A •••••••••••••••••«•••**•.•.•*.•*«
Drill-press operators, single- or
multiple-spindle, class A ........ .

5$6
398
333
£«
362
59
77
171
412
1,273

MaotmfS A t b y
kt V n u U t
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$
$
«
tfader 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1 .6 0
1.25

1.30 1,35 1 ,4 0

1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1,70 1.75 1.80 1 ,8 5
25

91
1.71
1.69

-

1.70
1.94

4

1

1.82
1.40
1.50

onft
4 (U

1.65
1 OO

96
150

2 .0 1

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class A .........

182
450

we

1.78

Incentive ...................
Drill-press operators, radial,

107

3

-

-

4
1

19
18

2

15

30

67

1

18
12

5
50

1.94

Grinding-machine operators, class A .....

Wi-

00

8
66

21

3

2

29
190

21
121

16

39

2

20

"

”
•

~
—

6

20

19

46

91

18

—

28

-

•
-

*
-

*

18

-

4
27

6

“
-

19
32
7

“

30

*
-

*
-

-

—

1.90

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

21
20
1

3
2
1

Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw machine), class B .........

y

Machine-tool operators, production,
class C
............*.... *.........
Drill-press operators, radial,
Grinding-machine operators, class C .......
_
n

4

m

1

* AA *|»

Tool-end-die makers (tool-end-die
jobbing shops) .......................
Tool-end-die makers (other than tool-end-die
jobbing Shops) ............... *...... .

l
/
y

“

190

1.55

3

15

1
x#ox
1.64

O
H

1

249

“

184
167
139

-

-

-

13

6

-

-

-

10

19

g

13

37

g

-

-

16

A

10

X

89

162

102

134

122

232

114

42

24

17

14

10

6

5

8

3

61

11

8

8

24

14

2

3

1

2

•a

«.

«

—

—

26

x

x

2
1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

4
3

2
1

4

40

15

23

5

20

46

10

5

5

2

58
57

115

13

21
6

7

2

1

2

-

-

6

16
3

28

102

1

13

7

13

15

28

7

2

1

2

.
.

_

3

16

3

x

x

5

3

x

x

x

4
3

2

x

7

-

x

3
3

7

—

15

1

1

2

23

43

39

15

n

26

1

19

-

-

10

9
9

2.09

x

2

5

x

4

4

5
1

3
3

12
11

5

8

4

11

4

x

x

4

x

X

2
6

4,

11

4

x

x

2

2

10

2

1

2

*
“

7

•

7

8

3

2

“

—

”

"

•

-

-

“

2
-

2

2

3

3

28

24

3

23

23

""

3

1

22

5
10

3

x

2
1

18
• 1

-

x

x

2

3

2

x

25
24
x
35

29
29

12

-

K
s

x

"
1

•

x

10
6

g
g

15

-

7

5

42
42

1

5

2

1

g

X*gx

13

X

g

1
6

4

8
6
2
2

Q2

2 .1 1

10
3

3
5

18

20

“

-

1

36
24
15

8

1
-

2

26

26

2.17

LA
MO

X

27

1

4

33

6

20

21

2 *0 1

1.85

8

2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 over

63

2

88

t
y

36

53

18
14

3
3

-

6

21
9

2ilD 2 . 2 0

32

8

81
7

1 91
*•74
1 7Q
x#

•n
a
✓v

5

89
15
9
6
5

17

£

-

1

78
13
7
g
5
4

17

2

-

33
18
15

1.90 1.95 2 .0 0

18

44
41
3

1

19
19

-

66

34
3
14

5
4

1.76

26

$
s „ $
$
$
$
2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3 .0 0

52

2

1 7/
X. /f
Jr

56
"MmA

2 .3 0

30

13

Engine-lathe operators,

70

$

9

1

x.
X. fU

1.93
1^73

2 .2 0

3
28

2

x.ot.

12

2 .1 0

6

33

Drill-press operators, single- or

l
*

2
1
8
6
12

22

9

1 .8 8

^*3 e ..... ...........
B
Grinding-machine operators, class B ......
Milling-machine operators,

79
75
73

—

12

X t
f v
O
O
At
yl
j

84
76

37
56
54
2
2
9

1.95

Machine-tool operators, production,
class B y Total.... .................................................

2

-

“
•»

-

1 .8 8

41

-

26
67
62
5
36

5

9

1.96

183

1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2 .0 0

1

3

37

DO

x
g

3
9

14

9
13

2

12 2

7

2

46

30

90

17

8

28

-

ID

9

22

80
43

18

33

32
16
28

2
2

1
5

4

16

3

8

9

X

-

-

7

The study oovered establishments employing more than 20 workers engaged in the manufacture of nonelectrical machinery (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the
Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Grotqp 3543) employing more than 7 workers were died included* Bata relate to a January 1953 payroll period*
2/ Data relate to men workers. All or a majority of workers in each occupation presented, except class A turret-lathe operators and class B milling-machine operators, were paid on a time basis*
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work*
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. I., April 1953
T . . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JS
Bureau of Labor Statistics




P & U A pl

Table B-7211:

l/

m
Extractor operators 3r / ............... .............
Washers, machine Jfi/V........................ .....

i ---- “1 ---0.80
0.75
and
under
.80
.85

~ 4 ---0.90

.

—

%

Occupation and sex

Average
hourly
earnings
2/

i P 4*
$

N U M B E R OP W O R K ER S R E C E IV IN G STR A IG H T-TIM E H O U R LY EARN IN G S OF—

Number
of
workers

.95

40
31

I
1.09
1.24

*

*
*

“

.79
.86
.85
.87
.95
•82
.79
•88

131
10
10
36
13
12
1

112
18
3
15
11
10
5
5

16
7
5
2
24
6
5
1

f
1.00

1
1.05

1.00

1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

13
3

10
5

10
4

3
3
14
2
2

13
-

2
2
1
-

_
7
3
4
43
3
3

f

r “i—
--- r-f—
1.20
1.30
1.25

1
1.35

1.40

" 1 --1.45

1.25

1.30

1.35

1.40

1.45

1.50

1.55

“

4
5

2
“

•

4

-

!

_
_
2
-

_
_
10

1
5

“

267
54
11
43
191
34
22
12

“ 1--- U 1 --1.10
1.15

---0.95

4
1.50

Women
Finishers, flatwork, machine 3ft/ ......... ...........
Markers: Total.................. ................
Time.......... ......................
Incentive..... .......... ............
Pressers, machine, shirts
.................... .
Wrappers, bundles Total ...........................
Tims.........................
Incentive ............. ....... .

3
p
/

_

8
7
7
29
-

2
-

_
_
_
4
-

_
_
_
_
2
_

_
_

_
_

•

_
_
—

_

'

Occupation 4/

Number
of
workers

ftYOiago
weekly
earnings

N U M B E R O F W O R K ER S R E C E IV IN G STR A IG H T-TIM E W E E K L Y EA R N IN G S O F—

4
1
1---- 4 ---- 1---- 1---- 4---- 4---- 1---- 1 ---- 4---- 4---- 4 ---1--- 4
Under r ~ 1--- 1--- 4--- f--- 4—
50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00
$
50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 100.00 105.00 110.00 115.00 120.00 125.00 130.00 135.00 140.00 145.00 150.00 over

4
Routeman, retail (driver-salesmen) &/s Total........ .
6-day workweek................................ .

226
156

82.50
85.50

15
15

9
4

11
2

11
3

34
26

24
10

24
16

14
12

9
9

21
11

4
3

8
7

11
9

1
1

7
6

7
7

4
4

2
1

3
3

4
4

3
3

The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in the power laundries industry (Group 7211) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1949 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the
Budget. Bata relate to a June 1952 payroll period.
2/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
2/ Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
Occupational Mage Survey, Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. I., April 1953
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OP LABOR
Data limited to men workers.
Bureau of Labor Statistics
5/ Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Includes 40 routemem on a 5nJay workweek and 30 routeman on 5i-day workweek.

(
J
y




O

Union

W a g e

Scales

(Minimum wage rates and warlmim straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between emplcyers
and trade unions* Bates and hours are those in effect on dates indicated, in Brie County, N. I . Conprehansive noting*
of union soales for bakeries, building construction, motortruck drivers and helpers, and printing for July 1, 1952 are
available on request* Similar information for these industries w ill be published for July 1, 1953*)
Table c 27* PtUttUif
-

fi i c i * Building Gonifauaiitm
tbe - 5

-Mar 1.

im

t b e c 4 t Jiacal
al -i
Bate

per

Boors
per

Rate
Classification

V
*

Jl&flL

T b e G-205S
al




Bindery women ...................... .
Bookbinders
........
Conpositors, hand.............
Eleetrotypers *....................
Haehine operators.......................... .
Machine tenders
(machinists) ........................ .
M ailers..............................................
Fhotoengravers.................................
FTess assistants and
feeders!
Cylinder and job cylinder
prese ........................................
Rotary web p re s s .......................
2-color press
Platen and m ultilith
press .......................................
Offset press (over
23$- in ch es).......................... .
Presemen, cylinders
Job cylinder press ...........
2-colar press ••••••••••••••••.
Offset press (over
23$- in ch es)....................
Rotary web p re s s ........................
Pressmen, platen ............................
Stereotypers day work.......................................

Compositors, hand day work ............
Compositors, hand night work .............
Machine operators day work ...............
Machine operators night work •••••••••••.•••.
Machine tenders (machinists)
day work •••••.... .
Machine tenders (machinists)
night work ••••••«.......
Mailers - day woods.......
Mailers - night work .......

Photoengravers -

day work ...............
Fhotoengravers night work ••••••••••••••.
Preswmn, web presses daywork ••••••••••••••••.,
Pressmen, web presses night woods
kesMMP i
s
day woods
resomen i
i
night woods
Stereotypers day woods ....
Stereotypers night woods .
.

37r
2.290 3?r

I
1.210

257
.0
254
.8
257 3$
.0 7
26 3 37$
.Q
2.160
2.600

40
37$

2.040
2.200
2.130

1.780
2.240

2.427
2.610
2.820

2.670

2.620

2.612

2.704 37$2.810 37$
2.704 37$
2 8 0 37$
.1
2.792 37$
2.899 37$
2.160 40
2.439 37$
2.971 37$
3.104 37$
2.612 37$
2.719 37$
2.812 37$
2.917 37$
2.612 37$
2.719 37$
Odcupaticmal

Bussess
First 3
4-12
After 1 year

..... ............ ...........t

I
1.660
1.680
1.710

Hours
per
week

D s S u p p l e m e n t a r y

W a g e

Practices

Table D-li Shift ’hifte^etUitU fiwuUiiOHi 1/
j
Percent of to tal plant employment
All
2d shift
work
All workers ................ ........... .....
Workers in establishments having provisions
for late shifts...... ....... •............
With shift differential ...................
Uniform cents (per hour) ................
Under 5 cents................... .
5 c e n t s......... ...................
6 cents ...................... ..... .
7 c e n t s........... .................
7^ cents ............................ ‘
Over 7$- and under 9 emits............
9 cents .............................
10 c e n t s ............. ............. .
Over 10 and under 12& cents..........
12& c ents.... ........ ...........
Over 12& cents ................. .
Uniform percentage.....................
5 percent...... ....................
percent ......................... .
10 percent..... ....................
Other •••••••...................... .
O t h e r ................................ .
With no shift differential ................
Workers In establishments having no provisions
for late shifts ..................... ..... .

7
k

to
By establishment nolicv in ng
Machinery
tries 2/
istries
3d or other
3d or other
2d shift
shift work
shift work
work

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

92.7
91.4
64.0
3.6
12.0
15.8
8.1
5.6
1.3
1.1
7.2
2.5
5.9
.9
25.7
15.1
8.4
2.2
1.7
1.3

88.5
88.2
54.7
3.2
1.1
5.0
5.5
1.6
14.6
17.1
2.8
1.8
2.0
25.5
14.6
8.5
2.4
8.0
.3

84.3
83.7
73.4
1.6
20.1
12.0
28.5

62.2
62.2
58.5
13.0
25.2
-

7.3

11.5

15.7

-

11.2

-

10.3
7.8
2.5

17.5
2.8
3.7
3.7
-

-

m

37.8

m

21.4
21.2
13.6
.7
2.4
3.8
1.8
1.3
.2
•2
1.2
.5
1.4
.1
7.5
4.8
2.3

-

.6

--------------------- m —
Actually working on extra shifts in Machinery
All manufacturing
ries 2/
Industries
3d or other
2d shift
2d shift 2/
shift

.4

.1
.2
m

7.3
7.3
5.5
.3
.1
.6
.4
.2
2.4
.9
.4
.2
1.3
.2
1.0
.1
.5
(V)
m

XXX

19.3
19.1
17.4
.3
6.4
•
3.8
5.3
1.6
1.7
1.3
.4

.2
XXX

\ Shift differential data are presented in terms of (a) establishment policy and (b) workers actually employed on late shifts at the time of the survey.
f
An establishment was considered as having a policy if i t met any of the following conditions: (l) Operated late shifts at the time of the survey, (2) had unioncontract provisions covering late shifts, or (3) had operated late shifts within 6 months prior to the survey.
2 / Includes data for machinery industries also shown separately.
3 / Ho workers on third shift.
y Less than 0.05 peroent.

Table D-£s SchadttUd ' o kly. JtouM.
t—
Weekly hours
All workers................................ ....................................
Older 3 khours ...................................................
7
37fr hours ......................... ..............................................
Over 37& and under 40 hours.........................................
40 h o u rs............................................................. .............
Over 40 and under 44 hours.........................................
44 hours • • • • .• • • • • • • • • i..............................
44& h o u rs...................•••••••••••.................. ..............
45 h o u rs........ .............................•••••...........................
Over 45 and under 48 hours ............................... ...........
48 hours ............................. ...........................................
Over 48 hours .....................................••••......................

Percent of office workers "jemployed in j
Public
All
Manufacturing u tilitie s *
industries g /
100.0
100.0
100.0
5.2
3.7
1.5
5.0
63.2
16.4
3.9
6.4
30.6
82.8
70.3
1.2
.9
2.4
3.1
2.3
.5
.4
•2
UJ)

Percent of plant workers employed in All
Public
Manufacturing u tilitie s •
industries £ /
100.0
100.0
100.0
1.4
•
2.2
2.3
_
.6
75.8
84.0
59.1
1.8
15.2
3.3
-.7
4.6
2.1
15.5
1.6
1.3
6.8
8.0
8.8
2.1
1.4
1.4

3 / Data relate to women workers.
2 / Includes data for wholesale trade; re ta il trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown
separately.
Includes data for wholesale trade; re ta il trade; real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
Less than 0.05 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u tilitie s .
Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo (Erie and Niagara Counties), N. I ., April 1953
tJ.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics



Table D-3 s

Percent of plant workers employed in -

Percent of office workers employed in H ber of paid holidays
um

A ll
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
u t ilit ie s *

A ll
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
u t il it ie s •

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

9 9 .6

A ll workers ...............................................................

9 9 .7

9 8 .5

9 6 .5

9 7 .7

9 6 .3

.3
6 5 .2
1 5 .6
3 .3
2 .7
3 .2
8 .7

•4
7 7 .8
1 7 .4
3 .9

•6
2 3 .3
9 .0

7 9 .4
1 0 .5
3 .4
.9
.4
1 .3

.4
8 0 .2
1 2 .9
3 .8

4 6 .2
3 .1
7 .8

Workers in establishments providing
paid holidays 2 / .......................................... .
Under 6 days .................................... .
6 days .......................... ................ .......................
7 days ...................................................................
8 days ................. .............. ............................... .
9 days ...................................................................
10 days ...........................................................
11 d a y s ................... .............................................
12 days .............. ......... ........................ .

.6

.4

Workers in establishments providing
no paid h o lid a ys................... . . . . . . * . » ........ ........

•2
•
.3

11.6
20.8
3 3 .8

-

16.2
22.8
-

2 .3

3 .7

.4

1 .5

•2

3 .5

1 / Includes data for wholesale trade; r e ta il trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown
separately.
2/ Znoludes data for wholesale trade; r e ta il trade; real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2/ Bald holidays o f less than a f u l l day base been omitted.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t ilit ie s .

Paid Vacaiia*pl tyobmal PaouMo iA)
s

Table D-4 *

Peroent o f o ffice workers employed in Vacation policy

A ll
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
u t ilit ie s *

Peroent of plant workers employed in A ll
industries g /

Manufacturing

Public
u t il it ie s «

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0

9 9 .9

100.0
88.2

3 1 .8

A ll workers...............................................................

7 7 .3
1 .7

100.0
98.2
48.2

AStar 1 Z M fjrf g m t e
Workers in establishments providing paid
vacations • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ........ • •• •••••••
Length-of-tims payment.............. ........................
1 week • • • • ......................................................
Over 1 sad under 2 weeks ......... ................. .
2 weeks ............................................................
Over 2 sad under 3 weeks • • • • • • .....................
Percentage payment 2 / .........................................
2 percen t.....................................................
Over 2 and under 3 p e rcen t........................
Plat-sun or other-type payment • • • • • • .............. .
Workers in establishments provldii* no
paid vacation s.......................... .......................

100.0

100.0

9 9 .6
2 6 .4

9 9 .3
2 8 .7

1 .1
7 1 .1

1.0
•
•4

-

2.6
65.6
-

7 0 .6

-

90.1
10.6
•5

-

-

-

1 .7

-

.7

8.1
6.0
2 .1
•1

8 2 .0
.9
5 .3

4 .3
4 5 .7

1 .7

—
1.8

•

•

10.1
7 .3

2.8

See footnotes a t end of table.
•
Transportation (exeluding railroads), communication, and other public u t il it ie s .




Occupational W
age Survey, Buffalo ( M e sad Uagara Counties), 1 . 1 . , April 1 9 5 3
U.S. DBPABMR Of Tanas
Bureau o f Labor S ta tis tic s
M TE*
O

Eetlaates are provided separately, according to employer practice in oonputlag vacation
payment# (length-of-tlme, percentage, flat-sun or other-type)}! psroeutags, f la t - sun
and other-type paynents ware converted to equivalent tine periods in s e r lie r studies.

T alle W I

fitU d V c tca ti< l*u W o ^m o l PsU X H ltim C ) -3 o *iti*U 4 *d
Percent o f o ff ic e workers employed in -

Vacation policy

Ail workers •••...•••....... .....................

All
industries 1/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
99.6
14.1
.9
82.1

100.0
99.3
18.1
.6
80.6
,7

100.0
100.0
7.8
92.2
-

|
|

Percent o f plan t workers employed in All
Industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.9
90.1
49.2
15.9
22.4
.6
2.0
8.1
5.3
2.4
.1
.3
1.7

100.0
88.2
54.2
17.7
16.3
10.1
6.8
3.1
.2
1.7

100.0
98.2
7.0
37.2
54.0
1.8

After 2 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid
vacations .....................................
Length-of-time payment...... ......... ........
I week *........... ..... *.................
Over 1 and tinder 2 weeks................ .
2 weeks ................ ..... .
Over 2 and under 3 wee k s ...................
3 w e e k s ............................ .
Percentage payment 2 / .........................
2 percent...... ............ .............
Over 2 and under 3 percent ..................
3 percent..................... ......... .
4 percent .................................
Flat-sum or other-type payment................
Workers in establishments providing no paid
vacations *................................. .

•
A

2.1
-

A

.1

“

After 3 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid
vacations................... .................
Length-of-time payment .......... *.......... .
1 w e e k ........ *..........................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks...................
2 w e e k s......*............................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks..............
3 w e e k s ...... ............................
Percentage payment
......... ...............
2 percent ........ ...... *..................
Over 2 and under 3 percent.................
3 percent.............................. .
percent............. *....... *........•••
Over
and under 6 percent.................
Flat-sum or other-type payment................
Workers in establishments providing no paid
vacations ...................... ..............

J
j

AA

After




100.0
99.3
6.6
7.3
85.4
,
7

100.0
100.0
5.2
94.8
-

99.9
90.1
25.4
15.4
46.7
•6
2.0
8.1
3.5
2.4
.5
1.6
.1
1.7
.1

100.0
88.2
29.2
17.3
41.7
10.1
4.6
3.1
.6
1.6
.2
1.7
_

100.0
98.2
.4
32.9
64.9
1.8
-

p

yearp of, service

Workers in establishments providing paid
vacations.......... ..........................
Length-of-time payment................ .
1 w e e k ........... ................ ........
2 w e e k s ........ ..........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks......•*••••........
3 w e e k s ...................................
weeks and over ........... ...............
Percentage payment 2 / .........................
percent............ ......... .......... .
Over
and under 6 percent.......... ...... .
Flat-sum or other-type payment...............
Workers in establishments providing no paid
vacations.....•••••....... .......... ••••••••••

A
AA

100.0
99.6
4.7
5.0
87.4
.4
2.1
.4

100.0
99.6
.2
93.7
.4
3.6
1.7
•4

100.0
99.3
.1
96.3
2.9
.7

See footnotes at end of table*
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilro a d s ) , communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s *

100.0
100.0
—
99.2
.8
-

100.0
90.2
1.0
83.1
1.0
3.8
1.3
8.1
5.8
2.3
1.7

100.0
88.2
.9
85.4
.9
1.0
10.1
7.2
2.9
1.7

100.0
98.2
94.3
3.9
1.8

Table H i

P a id

V o C o tit U ti {ty o S U tU ll P 4 4 W i4 iO * *i)-G o M ti*IM m d

Percent o f o ff ic e workers employed in
Vacation policy

All workers........... ...... ....... ...........

All
industries 1/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
99.6
.2
79.6
1.9
16.2
1.7
-

100.0
99.3
.1
82.5
2.4
14.3
,
7

100.0
100.0
98.3
.8
.9
-

Percent o f plan t workers employed in All
industries 2/

1
1

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
90.2
.3
75.3
4.1
9.1
1.4
8.1
4.8
2.6
.7
1.7

100.0
88.2
76.5
4.9
6.8
10.1
5.9
3.3
.9
1.7

100.0
98.2
92.7
3.9
1.6
1.8

After 10 years of service
Workers in establishments providing paid
vacations......... ••••••..... ..... ..........
Length-of-time payment......... ...... ...... .
i w e e k ...................................
2 wee k s ....... ..........................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks..................
3 w e e k s .................... .............
4 weeks and o v e r ..........................
Percentage payment £ / ........................
4 percent ........ ....... ....... ..........
Over 4 and under 6 percent........ ........
6 percent and over ••••••••••••...... ......
Flat-sum o r other-type payment.....•••••......
Workers in establishments providing no paid
vacations...... ....... ••••••••••••••.........

.4

-

-

-

After 15 years of_ service ;
Workers in establishments providing paid
Length-of-time payment ••••••.....•••••••.... .
1 week ...................................
2 weeks .......... ................. ...... .
Over, 2 and under 3 w e eks..................
3 w e eks.....••••••................ .......
Over 3 and under 4 wee k s..................
4 weeks and over ................ ..........
Percentage payment 2/ ........................
4 percent ••/•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Over 4 and under 6 percent.................
6 percent and o v e r ............ ..... ......
Flat-sum or other-type payment ................
Workers in establishments providing no paid
vacations........ ................ .......... .

100.0
99.6
.2
23.3
.2
73.8
.1
2.0
.4

100.0
99.3
.1
14.7
.3
84.2
-

100.0
100.0
14.7
84.5
.8
-

.7

100.0
90.2
.3
17.2
.6
70.1
.2
1.8
8.1
1.0
.2
6.9
1.7
-

100.0
88.2
•10.0
•6
77.6
10.1
.9
.2
9.0
1.7
-

100.0
98.2
19.5
74.8
3.9
1.8
-

After 20 vears of service
Workers in establishments providing paid
vacations...................... ...... ..... .
Length-of-time payment................. .
1 w e e k ........... .......................
2 w e eks............ ......................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ..................
3 w e eks............... ...................
Over 3 and under 4 w e eks....... ...........
4 weeks and o v e r ......... ••••••••••••••••••
Percentage payment 2 / ........ ....... ........
4 percent ............................... .
Over 4 and under 6 percent ...... ...........
6 percent and o v e r ........... ............
Flat-sum or other-type payment ................
Workers in establishments providing no paid
vacations.............. ......................

100.0
99.6
.2
21.6
.2
73.2
.1
4.3
.4

100.0
99.3
.1
12.1
.3
85.7
1.1
.7

See footnotes a t end o f ta b le .
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), comnunication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .




100.0
100.0
13.0
86.2
.8
-

100.0
90.2
.3
15.3
.9

70.7
.2
2.8
8.1
1.0
.2
6.9
1.7

100.0
88.2
7 .7
.9

79.6
10.1
.9

.2
9.0
1.7

100.0
98.2
19.1
75.2
3.9
1.8

Table D-A*

P a id *
Uaaatia*U W a tm a l PA onU itutL) -G otU iM uad
Percent of office workers employed in -

Vacation policy

All
industries 1/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
99.6
.2
18 .A
.2
63.7
.1
17.0
►A

100.0
99.3
.1
10.9
.3
76.7
11.3
,7

100.0
100.0
—
13.0
86.2
.8
-

Percent of plant workers employed in All
industries 2/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0
90.2
.3
1A.5
.A
62.8
.2
12.0
8.1
1.0
.2
6.9
1.7

100.0
88.2
—
7.2
.A
70.5
10.1
10.1
.9
.2
9.0
1.7

100.0
98.2
19.1
75.2
3.9
1.8

After 25 vears of service
Workers in establishments providing paid
vacations .....................................
Length-of-time payment...... ............ .
1 w e e k ................................... .
2 weeks ...................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks...................
3 weeks ....................... ...........
Over 3 and under A weeks...................
A weeks and o v e r ...............*...........
Percentage payment 2 / .........................
A percent .............. ••••••••..... .
Over A and under 6 percent ................. .
6 percent and over ....... ..................
Flat-sum or other-type payment................
Workers in establio' ments providing no paid
vacations ....... ......... ..... ...............

1 / I n c it e s date for wholesale trade; r e ta il trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown
separately.
2 / Includes data for wholesale trade; r e ta il trade; real estate; and services in addition to those industry divisions shown separately.
2 / Percent of annual earnings.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public u t il it ie s .




Table D-5*

O tid P tp U o s t P la n t

Percent of o ff ic e workers employed in Type o f plan

A ll
in d u strie s l /

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

Percent o f plan t workers employed in A ll
in d u stries 2 /

Manufacturing

Public
u tilitie s *

1 0 0 .0

All workers .........................................................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Workers in establishm ents having insurance or
pension plans 2 / ..••••••••................ ...................................

9 7 .9

9 9 .2

9 6 .2

9 5 .6

9 9 .2

8 7 .3

Insurance plans 3 / ...................................................................
L ife ............................................................................................
A ccidental death and dismemberment .........................
Sickness and accid ent ............................. ..
H osp italizatio n ...................................................................
S u r g i c a l ..................................................................................
Medical ........................................................... ..
Retirement-pension plan ........................................................

9 7 .1
9 2 .8
A3.A
6 3 .1
7 8 .5
7 3 .1
3 0 .5
68 .A

9 8 .0
95 .A
50.A
7 5 .6
8 6 .0
8 1 .6
3A.0
7 0 .9

9 6 .2
8 7 .6
3 9 .3
6 3 .2
A3.8
A3.8
3 0 .6
8 2 .3

9A.A
8 8 .8
A9.8
7 1 .5
7 7 .8
7 5 .3
3A.1
6 3 .0

9 8 .0
9 5 .7
5 8 .2
81 .A
8 7 .9
8 6 .3
AO.O
6 7 .7

8 7 .3
7 5 .6
2 9 .2
5 0 .2
3 7 .8
3 7 .8
2A .7
6 9 .6

Workers in establishm ents having no insurance or
pension plans .................................... ...........................................

2 .1

A

3 .8

A.A

A

1 2 .7

l / Includes data f o r wholesale tr a d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; fin an ce, insurance, and r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ice s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown
se p a ra te ly .
2 / Includes data f o r wholesale tra d e ; r e t a i l tr a d e ; r e a l e s t a t e ; and se rv ice s in addition to those industry d iv isio n s shown se p a ra te ly .
2 / Unduplicated t o t a l .
*
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and o ther public u t i l i t i e s .




Occupational Wage Survey, Buffalo (Erie and Niagara C ou n ties), N. Y ., A p ril 1953
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

NOTE:

Estim ates r e la tin g to insurance or pension plans a re lim ited to those fo r which a t le a s t a p a rt o f the co s t i s borne
by the employer, and exclude le g a lly required plans such as S o cia l S ecu rity and Workmen' s Compensation. Estim ates
r e la tin g to sickness and accid en t insurance plans r e f e r to employment in establishm ents in which the b e n e fits exceed
th e le g a l minimum o r the employer pays more than the le g a lly required share o f the co sts o f the compulsory temporary
d is a b ility b en efit program. The D isa b ility B en efits Program in New York requires employee contributions with em­
ployers paying ad d itio n al co s ts (above employee co n trib u tio n s) i f any.

19

Appendix - Scope and Method of Survey

The Bureau's occupational wage surveys are designed to
provide a maximum of useful and reliable information with availa­
ble resources. In order to use resources efficiently and to pub­
lish results promptly, the surveys did not cover all establishments
in the community. Although those studied are selected to provide
representative results, no sample can reflect perfectly all differ­
ences in occupational structure, earnings, mid working conditions
among establishments.

such jobs were included only for firms
ments of the broad industry divisions.

Because of the great variation in occupational structure
among establishments, estimates of occupational employment are sub­
ject to considerable sampling fluctuation. Hence, they serve only
to indicate the relative numerical importance of the jobs studied.
The fluctuations in employment do not materially affect the accuracy
of the earnings data.

The earnings information excludes premium pay for overtime
and night work. Nonproduction bonuses are also excluded, but costof-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including commissions for
salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours are reported, as
for office clerical occupations, reference is to work schedules
(rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straight-time sala­
ries are paid; average weekly earnings for these occupations have
been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number of workers pre­
sented refers to the estimated total employment in all establish­
ments within the scope of the study and not to the number actually
surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time workers, i.e., those
hired to work the establishment's full-time schedule for the given
occupational classification.

With the exception of the union rate scales, information
presented in this bulletin was collected by visits of the Bureau's
field representatives to establishments included in the study.
Occupational classification is based on a uniform set of job de­
scriptions designed to take account of interestablishment variation
in duties within the same job; these job descriptions are available
upon request.
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations: (a) Office
clerical; (b) professional and technical; (c) maintenance and power
plant; and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables A-l
through A-4). The industry groupings surveyed are: Manufacturing;
transportation (except railroads), communication, and other public
utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and
real estate; and services. Information on work schedules and supple­
mentary benefits also was obtained in a representative group of es­
tablishments in each of these industry divisions. As indicated in
the following table, only establishments above a certain size were
studied. Smaller establishments were omitted because they fur­
nished insufficient employment in the occupations studied to warrant
inclusion.
Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area cov­
ered were determined separately for each industry (see following
table). Although size limits frequently varied from those estab­
lished for surveying cross-industry office and plant jobs, data for




meeting the size require­

A greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied in order to maximize the number of workers surveyed with
available resources. Each group of establishments of a certain
size, however, was given its proper weight in the combination of
data by industry and occupations.

The term "office workers" referred to in this bulletin
includes all office clerical employees and excludes administrative,
executive, professional, and technical personnel. "Plant workers"
includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including
leadmen and trainees) engaged in nonoffice functions. Administra­
tive, executive, professional and technical employees, and forceaccount construction employees who are utilized as a separate work
force, are excluded. Although cafeteria workers, routemen, and in­
stallation and repair employees are excluded in manufacturing in­
dustries, these work categories are included as plant workers in
nonmanufacturing industries.
Shift—differential data are limited to manufacturing in­
dustries and have been presented both in terms of establishment
policy and according to provisions for workers actually employed
on extra shifts at the time -of the survey. Establishments were
considered as having a shift-differential policy if they met any of
the following conditions: Operated late shifts at the time of the
survey; operated late shifts within 6 months before the field visit
or had a union-contract provision for payment of extra-shift work.
Proportions in the tabulation of establishment policy are presented

20

in terms o f to ta l p la n t employment, whereas proportions in th e sec­
ond tab u la tio n rep resen t only those workers a c tu a lly employed on
the sp ecified la te sh ift*
Inform ation on wage p ra c tic e s o ther than s h if t d iff e r ­
e n tia ls re fe rs to a l l o ffic e and p la n t workers as sp ecified in the
in divid ual tables* I t is presented in term s of the proportion of
a l l workers employed in o ffic e s (or p la n t departm ents; th a t observe
the p ractic e in question, except in th e sectio n re la tin g to women

o ffic e workers o f th e ta b le summarising scheduled weekly hours*
Because o f e lig ib ility requirem ents, th e proportion a c tu a lly re­
ceiving th e sp ecific b en efits may be sm aller*
The summary of vacation plans i s lim ited to form al a r­
rangements* I t excludes inform al plans whereby time o ff w ith pay
i s granted a t the d isc re tio n of" th e employer or other supervisor*
Tabulations of insurance and pension plans have been confined to
those fo r which a t le a s t a p a rt o f th e c o st i s borne by the employer*

Establishm ents and Workers in Major Indu stry D ivisions and in Selected In d u stries in B uffalo, N. Y., 1 /
and Number Studied by th e Bureau of Labor S ta tis tic s , A pril 1953

Item
Industry div isio n s in which occupations
were surveyed on an area b asis
A ll d iv is io n s ..............................................; ..............................
M anufacturing...................................................... .................
Nonm anufacturing.................................................................
T ransportation (excluding ra ilro a d s ),
communication, and other public
u t i l i t i e s .....................................................................
Wholesale trad e .............................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ............. , .............................................
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te ..................
Services 2 / .....................................................................
In d u strie s in which occupations were
surveyed on an in d u stry basis U
Machinery in d u strie s ...............................................................
Power laundries ..........................................................................

Minimum number
o f workers in
establishm ents
studied
2/

Numbsr of
e sta b lii shments __ _
Estim ated
to ta l
w ith in
Studied
scope of
study

Estim ated
to ta l
w ith in
scope o f
study _ ...

Employment
In estab l Ishm snte
stud le d
O ffice
T otal

51
51
51

223
129
94

270,700
201,800
68,900

187,150
148,100
39,050

22,680
15,360
7,320

51
51
51
51
51

5/

746
412
334
61
63
no
37
63

26
H
24
13
17

18,300
6,900
27,900
6,700
9,100

13,710
2,430
14,900
3,470
4,540

2,010
1,160
1,490
1,910
750

21
21

105
22

29
8

16,893
2,052

9,695
1,257

1,464
62

2 / Buffalo M etropolitan Area (E rie and Niagara C ounties).
2 / T otal establishm ent employment* The minimum size o f establishm ent studied in a l l d iv isio n s in th e January 1952 survey was
21 workers.
2 / H otels; personal se rv ices; business serv ices; automobile re p a ir shops; radio broadcasting and te le v is io n ; motion p ic tu re s;
nonprofit membership organ ization s; and engineering and a rc h ite c tu ra l services*
Lj In d u strie s are defined in footnotes to wage ta b le s.
2 / Establishm ents m anufacturing m achine-tool accessories wijbh 8 or more workers were also included*




21

Index

Assembler (m achinery), 10
Bench hand (b a k e rie s), 12
B ille r , machine, 3
Bookbinder (p rin tin g ), 12
Bookkeeping-machine o p erato r, 3
B ricklayer (b u ild in g co n stru c tio n ), 12
C alculating-m achine o p erato r, 3
Carpenter (b u ild in g c o n stru c tio n ), 12
C arpenter, m aintenance, 6
C leaner, 8
C lerk, f i l e , 3
C lerk, o rder, 3
C lerk, p a y ro ll, 3> ^
Compositor, hand (p rin tin g ), 12
Crane o p erato r, e le c tric b rid g e, 8
Draftsm an, 5
D rill-p re ss operator (m achinery), 10
D uplicating-m achine o p erato r, k
E le c tric ia n (b u ild in g c o n stru c tio n ), 12
E le c tric ia n , m aintenance, 6
E le c tric ia n , maintenance (m achinery), 10
E ngine-lathe operator (m achinery), 10
Engineer, sta tio n a ry , 6
E x tracto r operator (power la u n d rie s), 11
F in ish e r, fla tv o rk (power lau n d rie s) , 11
Fireman, sta tio n a ry b o ile r, 6
Grinding-machine operator (m achinery), 10
Guard, 8
Helper (b a k e rie s), 12
H elper, m otortruck d riv e r, 12
H elper, tra d e s , m aintenance, 6




F ain ter (building co n stru ctio n ), 12
Inspector (m achinery), 10
P a in te r, m aintenance, 7
Photoengraver (p rin tin g ), 12
Ja n ito r, 8
Ja n ito r (m achinery), 10
Pipe f i t t e r , maintenance, 7
P la ste re r (building co n stru ctio n ), 12
Plumber (building co n stru ctio n ), 12
Key-punch operator, k
P o rte r, 8
Laborer (building co n stru ctio n ), 12
P ress a s s is ta n t (p rin tin g ), 12
Laborer, m aterial handling, 8
Press feeder (p rin tin g ), 12
Laborer, m aterial handling (m achinery), 10
.P resser, machine, s h irts (power lau n d ries), 11
Pressman (p rin tin g ), 12
Machine operator (p rin tin g ), 12
Machine tender (p rin tin g ), 12
Deceiving c le rk , 9
M achine-tool op erator, production (m achinery), 10 Bouteman (driver-salesm an) (power lau n d ries), 11
M achine-tool o p erator, toolroom , 6
M achine-tool o p erator, toolroom (m achinery), 10
S ecretary , k
Sheet-m etal worker, maintenance, 7
M achinist, m aintenance, 6
M achinist, production (m achinery), 10
Shipping c le rk , 9
Shipplng-and-recelvlng c le rk , 9
Marker (power la u n d rie s), 11
Mechanic, automotive (m aintenance), 7
Stenographer, k
S tereotyper (p rin tin g ), 12
Mechanic, m aintenance, 7
Switchboard op erator, k
M illing-machine operator (m achinery), 10
Switchboard o p e ra to r-re c e p tio n ist, k
M illw right, 7
Mixer (bakeries) , 12
Tabulating-m achine op erator, 3,
Molder (b ak eries), 12
T ool-and-die maker, 7
Motortruck d riv e r, 12
Tool-and-die maker (m achinery), 10
Transcrlblng-m achine op erator, 5
Nurse, in d u stria l (re g is te re d ), 5
Truck d riv e r, 9
T rucker, power, 9
Office boy, 3
T u rre t-la th e op erator, hand (machinery), 10
O ffice g i r l , k
T y p ist, 5
O iler, 7
Operator (lo c a l tr a n s i t) , 12
Washer, machine (power lau n d rie s), 11
Order f i l l e r , 8
Watchman, 9
Ovenman (b ak eries), 12
W elder, hand (m achinery), 10
Wrapper (b ak eries), 12
Packer, 8
Wrapper, bundle (power lau n d rie s), 11
Packer (b ak eries), 12

☆

U. S . GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 - 1 9 5 3







Office.

This report was p r e p a r e d in
the
B u r e a u ’s M i d d l e A t l a n t i c R e g i o n a l
C ommunications m a y b e a d d r e s s e d to:
R o b e r t R. B e h l o w ,

Regional Director

Bureau o f labor Statistics
341 N i nth Avenue
Room 1000
N e w Y o r k 1,

are

New York

The services
o f the
Bureau o f Labor S t a tistics’ regional offices
available for consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial

relations, employment, prices,
const r u c t i o n and housing.

labor turnover,

productivity,

work injuries,

The Middle A t l a n t i c R e g i o n includes the f o l l o w i n g S t a tes:
Delaware

New York

New Jersey

Pennsylvania


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102