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Occupational Wage Survey
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
April 1952

Bulletin No. 1106

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................

1

THE BOSTON *®TROPOLITAN A R E A ...............................................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E ................................................................

2

TABLES:
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations ............................................
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ......................................
9
A-3
Maintenance and power plant occupations ..................................
10
A-4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping occupations ..........................
12
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis* B-2071 Candy and other confectionery products ................ ......... ........
B-2337 Women's and m i s s e s 1 coats and suits .......................................
B-336
Foundries, n o n f e r r o u s ..... .................................................
B-35
Machinery industries:
Machinery ..................................................................
Machine-tool accessories .................................................
B-54-52 Milk dealers ..................................................................
B-63
Insurance c a r r i e r s ....................... .................................
Union wage scales for selected occupations C-15
Building c o n s t r u c t i o n .................................... .................
C-203
Sea-food processing ...........................................................
C-205
Bakeries .......................................................................
C-2082 Malt liquors ..................................................................
C-27
Printing .......................................................................
C-3441 Structural and ornamented iron work .........................................
C-41
Local transit operating employees ...........................................
C-42
Motortruck drivers and helpers ..............................................
C-44Ocean transport - unlicensed personnel ......................................
C-44-6
Stevedoring ...................................................................
C-541
Grocery stores and meat markets .............................................
C-6512 Office building service ....................... ............................
C-7011 Hotels .........................................................................
Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant w o r k e r s ...................................
Wage practices E-l
Shift differential provisions ................................................
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours .......................................................
E-3
Paid holidays .................................................................
E-4
Paid vacations .....................................................
E-5
Paid sick l e a v e .................................................
E-6
Nonproduction b o n u s e s .............................................
E-7
Insurance and pension p l a n s ..............................................

15
16
16
17
19
19
20

21
21
21
21
21
22
22
22
22
23
24
24
24

25

25
26
26
27
28
30
30

APPENDIX:
Scope and method of s u r v e y .......................... ..............................

31

I N D E X ......................................................................................

33

* NOTE - Additional occupational earnings reports
are available upon request for ferrous foundries
(June 1951), and women's and m i s s e s ' cement proc­
ess shoes - conventional lasted (August 1951).
F o r sale by th e Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government P rin tin g Office
W ashington 25, D. C. - Price 25 cents

J«ly 23, 1952

3

H o u s e D o c u m e n t No. 543

82d Congress, 2d Session

almost equally between firms producing durable goods and those
producing nondurable goods, employment in the durable-goods
industries increased about 5 percent over the preceding year
with a corresponding decrease in nondurable-goods employment. 3 /
Employment in the durable-goods industries was dominated by the
electrical machinery group which accounted for almost 15 per­
cent of all manufacturing workers in the area, and reflected
New England *s position as an important center of the growing
electronics industry* Other important durable-goods products
included nonelectrical machinery, aircraft engines and parts,
shipbuilding, structural metal products, and cutlery.

Introduction 1/
The Boston area is 1 of 40 major labor markets in
which the Bureau of Labor Statistics - is currently conducting
occupational wage surveys* Occupations common to, a variety of
manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries were studied on a
community-wide basis* Cross-industry methods of sampling were
thus utilized in compiling earnings data for the following types
of occupations:
(a) office;
(b) professional and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant;
(d) custodial, warehousing,
and shipping. In presenting earnings information for such jobs
(tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been provided wher­
ever possible for individual broad industry divisions*

Among the nondurable-goods industries in the Boston
area, leather and leather products establishments employed some
30,000 workers, of whom about one-half were accounted for by
the area*s large footwear industry. Significant numbers of
workers were employed also in the following nondurable-goods
industries:
apparel, bakery, candy and confectionery, printing
and publishing, canvas and rubber footwear, paperboard con­
tainers and boxes, industrial chemicals, and textile products.

Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey. 7 j Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables*
Union scales
(Series C tables) are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices*

Employment in nonmanufacturing industries in the area
exceeded manufacturing employment by about 50 percent. Boston*s
position as New England’s largest city, leading trading area,
and important financial center was indicated by the concentra­
tion of employment in trade and financial establishments* Some
225,OCX) workers earned their livelihood in wholesale and retail
trade and an additional 75,000 were engaged in a variety of
service industries. The finance, insurance, and real estate
industries employed 60,000 workers, of whom one-third were
accounted for by the a rea’s insurance companies. Also of im­
portance were contract construction with 44,000 workers, and
transportation, communication, and other public utilities which
gave employment to some 60,000 workers, exclusive of the sub­
stantial employment in the railroad industry.

Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

The Boston Metropolitan Area
Total population of the Boston Metropolitan Area, c o n ­
sisting of Suffolk County and parts of Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk,
and Plymouth Counties, was 2#370*500 in 1950, an increase of
nearly 10 percent during the preceding decade. The city of
Boston accounted for one-third of this total, whereas the re­
mainder were distributed among the other 64 cities and towns com­
prising the metropolitan area*

Among the industries and establishment-size groups
included within the scope of the Bureau’s study, about 7 of 10
plant workers were employed by firms in establishments having
written agreements with labor organizations. Union coverage for
plant workers was almost universal among establishments in the
transportation, communication, and other public utilities group.
Approximately 80 percent of the plant workers in manufacturing
were employed in establishments with union contracts. Although
union agreement coverage was less extensive in the nonmanufaoturing industries, more than half the total number of plant
workers in wholesale and retail trade and in finance, insurance,
and real estate establishments were covered by terns of union
contracts.

In April 1952, nonagricultural wage and salary employ­
ment (excluding government) totaled more than 780*000 workers,
of which 304,000 were employed in some 5,BOO manufacturing
establishments* Although manufacturing employment was divided

1 / Prepared in the Bureau* s regional office in Boston, Mass*,
b y Aaron Krute under the direction of Bernard J. Fahres, Re­
gional Wage and Industrial Relations Analyst* The planning and
central direction of the program was carried on in the Bureau* s
Division of Wages and Industrial Relations*
%/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of sur­
vey.




Unionization among office workers in the Boston area
was relatively less significant. About a fourth of the office

2 / See appendix table for listing
able-goods industries.
L)

of durable- and nondur-

workers in manufacturing and a third in the transportation,
communication, and public utility group were covered by union
agreements# In each of the other industry groups, union con­
tract provisions covered less than 1 in 5 white-collar workers#

found in the retail trade and services industries where half the
nonoffice workers in retail trade and a third of those in the
service industries were employed in establishments with minimum
entrance rates of 75 cents an hour or less# In the public utili­
ties industries, a fourth of the plant workers were employed
in establishments with minimum entrance rates of more than $1*20#

Occupational W age Structure

Wages and salaries of office workers in the manufac­
turing industries were usually higher than those in nonmanufac­
turing# In 23 of 25 classifications permitting comparison,
average salaries of office workers in manufacturing establish­
ments exceeded those in nonmanufacturing establishments# Simi­
lar patterns were evident for hourly rated employees in those
categories surveyed on a cross-industry basis# In custodial,
warehousing, and shipping categories, manufacturing rates exrceeded those in nonmanufacturing in 13 of 16 cases where com­
parisons were possible# Average hourly earnings for maintenance
workers were higher in manufacturing for 9 of Li comparable
classifications# In nonmanufacturing, occupational wages and
salaries for plant and office workers were generally highest in
the public utilities and wholesale trade divisions#

Between January 1950, the base period for the Wage
Stabilization B o a r d s "catch-up” wage increase formula, and the
time of the survey, more than four-fifths of the plant workers
in the Boston area had received one or more general wage in­
creases# The number of general wage increases rose sharply
immediately after the outbreak of hostilities in Korea# By
April 1952, nearly all manufacturing plant workers had benefited
from across-the-board wage increases; the majority of these in­
creases were between 10 and 20 cents an hour# A similar pattern
of increases affected nonoffice workers in the public utility
industries# In other nonmanufacturing groups wage advances were
somewhat less extensive during the period; about 7 of 10 plant
workers in these industries had received formal wage adjust­
ments#

General wage adjustments for office workers during
this period were similar to those received by plant workers#
About fo\u>-fifths of the total office employment in manufactur­
ing establishments received general wage increases# In the non­
manufacturing industries, wage increases which were usually ex ­
pressed in percentages, rather than in oents-per-hourf bene­
fited about three of four white-collar workers#
Formalized rate structures for time workers were re­
ported in establishments employing about 85 percent of all plant
workers and 70 percent of all office workers# Such plans were
prevalent in all broad industry groups within the scope of the
survey# Formal plans providing a range of rates affected a
somewhat larger number of plant workers than did plans provid­
ing a single rate for each job# Practically all formal wage
plans for office workers provided a range of rates for indivi­
dual occupations# Individual determination of salary rates for
office workers prevailed in the service industries, however#
Approximately two-fifths of the plant workers in the
manufacturing industries participated in some form of incentive
wage system# Incentive methods of wage payment were negligible
in the nonraanufacturing industries;
commissions paid to sales
persons in retail establishments accounted for practically all
workers in these industries covered by such systems#
Minimum entrance rates for inexperienced piajnt work­
ers were a part of the formalized wage structures of establish­
ments employing nearly nine-tenths of the plant workers in the
area# Although entrance rates were as high as $1.50 an hour,
the majority of workers were employed in establishments with
minimum rates between 75 cents and $1#15*
Lower minima were




Single-shift operations and a 40-hour workweek were
common for plant workers in Boston manufacturing plants.
Approximately 15 percent of all plant workers in the manufac­
turing industries were employed on second or third shifts# Among
durable-goods industries, virtually all extra-shift workers re­
ceived pay differentials, which were usually expressed as a
uniform percentage addition to hourly day rates; a uniform
cents-per-hour addition to day rates was common among nondur­
able-goods establishments# The differentials paid to the largest
number of second-shift workers amounted to 10 percent for d u r ­
able-goods workers and 5 cents for nondurable-goods employees#
Third-shift differentials showed less uniformity.
Forty-hour workweeks were also prevalent among plant
workers in all nonmanufacturing groups studied, with one ex­
ception# Most workers in the service industries had work sched­
ules of between 44 and 46 hours# More than half the office
workers in the Boston area had a scheduled workweek of less
than 40 hours at the time of the survey# However, workweeks of
40 hours or more were most common for office workers in m a n u ­
facturing, wholesale trade, and services# Clerical workers in
the finance, insurance, and real estate group were typically on
schedules of 37J- hours or less#
Supervisory pay systems providing fixed relationships
between supervisory pay rates and rates of pay of workers super­
vised were found to be almost nonexistent in all industry groups
within the scope of the survey, with one exception# In the
durable-goods industries, establishments accounting for 30 per­
cent of all plant workers used some formal method of basing
rates of first-level supervisors (generally designated group
leaders or working foremen) on the rates earned by those super­
vised# In most instances, these plans provided fixed differ­
entials which took the form of specified percentages or centsper-hour additions to the earned rates of the highest paid
workers supervised#

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
Table A-l:

Q tfic* O ccu p a tio n

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Sex, occupation, and ind ustry d iv is io n

Number
of
worker*

$
$
$
t
t
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
t
S
$
*
1
W
eekly Under 30.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.60 50.00 52.60 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.60 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 30.00 35.00 30.00
W
eekly
earnings $
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) 30.00
32.50 55.00 57.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 30.00 35.00 30.00 over

Men
bookkeepers, hand ..................
Durable g o o d s ................• • • • ................... ..

306

38 .0

73
31

"39.0
39.5
V f

in

A

37,5

'XQ Si

Bookkeeping-machine operators, c la s s A • • • •

*
69.00
75700
80.60
67.00

•

.

_

-

-

-

.

-

-

66.00

30

66.60
66.60
71.60

^8 -0

57.50

38.5
38.5
39.0
3 8 .0
38.5
36.5

.
.
.
-

.
_
-

.
-

38.0
37.0
41.5

58.00
62.50
61.50
63.50
56.50
65.00
60.50
59.00
51.00
51.50

3 9 .0
39.0

41.00
40.00

_

2
2

7
6

5
3

3 8.0

67.50
68.50
67.00
80.00
66.50

-

-

.
-

_
-

22

C lerks, general • • • • • • • • • • • ......... .......................
Manufacturing • • • • • ..................................... ..
Nonmanufacturing ............. ..................................
Wholesale trade ............................................
Finanoe *♦ ............................................... ..

285
115
170
35
72

C lerks, o r d e r .............................................................
Manufacturing ........................ ........................... ..
Durable goods ......................................... ..
Nondurable goods • • • • ............• • • • • • • • • •
Nonmanufacturing .......................................
Wholesale trade ............................................
R e ta il trade • • • • • » ......... ......

366

C lerks, p ay ro ll .........................................................
Manufacturing ......................................................
Durable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Nondurable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nonmanufa c t u r in g ..................
Publio u t i l i t i e s * . . . ...................... ..
S ervices ...................................................... ..
Duplicating-m achine operators ....................
Nonmanufaoturing
Finanoe ** ........... .............. ......................... ..
S ervices ........................ ................... ..............

19

98
33
65
268
220

18
116

69
17
52
a

22
11

83
82
54.
22

38 .0

37.5
4 0 .0

35.0

38.0
39.0
39.5
36.5

61.50
60.00
63.00
58.50
62.00
62.00
53.00

3 9.0
39.5
40.0
3 9.0
39.0
38.5
39.0

64.00
68.50
77.00
65.50
57.50
65.00
51.50

37.5
37.5
37.0
38.5

41.50
41.50
38.50
45.50

38.5
38.0
3 8 .0

-

-

4
•

2

2

2

-

-

-

.
-

_
-

_
-

2

_

6
6

6
1

’l
5
5

1

-

-

-

-

77
2
2

75
17
3
38
17

54
5
3
2

49
4
9

112
22
22

•
90
6

33

1

6

35
-

44
1

-

96
27
10

17
69
.
2
66
1

92
9
3
6

83
3
52
_
28
-

7
7
6
6

_

-

1

_
_

-

-

-

_
-

2

_
_
_

2
2

-

g
g
5

8

49
5

.
g
7

g
44
g

1
1

22

1

3
3
.
3
-

6
2

3
-

1

_

2

4
4

13

_
-

.
-

-

10
10
10

3
3

7

1
2

6
6

1

-

1

18
18
16
2

.
10
10

$
4

10

-

•
-

1

3
3
3

83
44
26
18
39

28
15

6

20

5
3

39
8

.
28
3

11
11
Q
9

10

6
1

53
7
46

1

27
5

28
7

34

25

16
16

2

2

3

5

22

21
21

14
3

1

“

AO

8

5
3
26
15
g

4
4
9
c
o
c

13
9
9
C
2
2

1

l
.
l

.
-

m

5
5

2
2

16
6
8

9

9C\
C\j

10

«
/7
5
c

3

33
4
o
6
A
W
67
A
%

22
8

7
1

14

j

1O
AC

Q
o
c
O

24
14
7
7

22

9

Q

62
33

67

21
12

9
12

19
16
3
«

46
16
27
3

21

4

1

1

10

3
18

9

17

1

1

_

1
8

7
1
_

-

-

-

-

-

26
4

20

17

19

27

22

1

6
11

7
5
2

27
14
13
A
A

16

6

17

1

2

1

2

18
4

13
3

21
6
2

12
2

8

_

«.

4
15
.

2
10
10

8
8

-

1

33

13
7

12

2

5

2
2

25
25

4
.
.

6
6

14
14

3
3

6
6

3
-

3
3

A

A

1

2

c
O

-

-

1
1

2
2

A
9

54
oo
66
9
13
%9
06
*
0

4

39

14
13

10
10

7

-

13
5

14
c
O
5

2

1

5

1
1

4

2

2

8

1

17
-

4

19
16
14

3
4

10

6

2

_
_
.
.
.

3
3
“

6

3
3
34

3

7

36

40

22

27

9

34
4
_
4
30
27
3

_
-

2

48

41

10

10
2
8

43

C
O

o
O

_
_
•

7
13

6

20
1

-

23

60
19
9

4

1

-

13
4

1
A
A
A

7
15
26

8

2

-

2

50
10
21
2

12
*
1
A

7

9

2

35
30

10

_

1
A
7Q
09
28
7

12

2
11

13

-

2
1

10

39
16
3
13
23
_
3
_

9

10

3

8

67
17
7

19
17

8
2
6

40
1
X

15

52
13

1

2

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




12
10

g

10

35

C lerks, f i l e , c la s s B .................. ..........................
Nonmanufacturing ................................... • • • • • •

11

30

Clerks, accounting • • • • • • • • . . . ...................... ..
1,028
Manufacturing ...................................
” 292
Durable goods • • • • ........... .............. ............
H5
Nondurable goods ........................ ..
H7
Nonmanufacturing .......................... .....................
736
Public u t i l i t i e s * • • • . • • • • • ........... ..
79
Wholesale trade ........................ ...................
275
R e ta il trade
30
Finanoe ** . . . ..............
3U
Services ............... ..
38

4 0 .0

22
12

10

30
.

3
3
_
-

_
-

2
2

2
1
10
10
10

4
A
•z
O
6

5
1

Q
9

9
5
C
0

2

-

6
6
6

4
4
-

2
2

-

_

11

5
C
O
23
2
2
21
21
10

9
5
4
1
1

«■

A

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

O tfic* Q ccupcdiotU - G ottt Uw d

Table A-l::

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00
Weekly
Weekly
erig $
anns
hus
or
( t n a d ( t n a d 30.00
Sadr) Sadr)
32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00

Sext occupation, and industry division

00
,?
8

Average

Number
o
f
wres
okr

8.
t
o
00

Men - Continued
Offioe bovs .... .......... ...........

917
240
51
189
677
104
34
285

TabulatinK-maohine operators ••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods
Wholesale trade
Finance *♦ . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38,5
39,5
39,0
39*5
38.5
38.5
39.5

a
¥
36.00
39*00

255
25

145
11

196
50

77
26

132
83

11

6
7

21
7
3
4
14

7

2

24
17

2
2

10
5

XX

38*50
35.00

2
22

39.50

20
230
9
11

40
146

6
134

22
51

12

51
7

1

82
49
1
3

2
1
1

37,0

273
79
26
53
194
69
70

39.0
39,5
39,0
39,5
38,5
39,5
38.0

59.00
58.00
54.00
60.00
59.50
67.50
50.00

825
299
79
220
526
36
219
qc
OO
97
OO
09

38,5
38.5
«Q A
Oo «U
38.5
38*5
40 #0
38*5
00*0
35*5

43.50
46.00
A A CA
*ou
45*50
42.00
46*50
44*50
90 no
Oo |UU
40.00
a i cn
;
^fcX *Ov/

4

2

>
*

ee
_

1

4

1

4

1
_
_
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3
2
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5

m

g

15
3
2
1
12

45
20
5
15
25
10
3

15
2
2

2

10

13

5
3
2
1
2

2

10

13

1

11

87
182
40
31
ft
q
5
7
O
25 ! 31
56 j 142
6
61
7j
36
19
9t i
f
bU
lb
39
22
2
49

127
40
12
28
87
2
61
12
8
4

98
54
23
31
44
2
25
11
XX
6

61
11
3
8
50
2
36
3
9

78
34
7
27
44

m

_

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.
-

.
—

•

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2

”
11

10

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*
■

11
10
10

4
7

24
2

$

|85.00 90.00
and
190.00 over

«
.

5
•

5
5

_

5

5

_

5

-

1
_

_

jb
i

•

1

7 _ 2£L_ I2L_ 5X _ 22_______ fi_ _ 12_____ 10-___ S
_ 6____ 2_
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1
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7
9
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1
8
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«
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5
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1
7
1
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.
2
14
5
2
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1

_
_
.
_
.
_

Women
Billers, maohine (billing machine) ••••••••
MAQufAoturifi£ ••••••••••••••••##•#••••••
Nondurable goods ................
ffopnftnufa.oturing .rT..T.................
pubjio uti 1 ities * r.................
Wholesale trade .....................
D^4>e41 4«aAa
*,
Finance
•••••••••••••••••••••■••••

An *

m

27
12
12
15
3
A
T
4
4

26
..

25
C\J

1
4

1
|
i

55
38
12
26
17
11

19
3
2
20

19
5
4
1
14
9

1
5

5

26
10
2
8
16
6
8

1
1
1

3
3

.
_

35
20

3

_

20
15

_
_

j

.

1

-

-

-

a
.

—

—

_

„

_

-

_

_

1
1

_

.

_

15

_
2

_

.

•

.

_

_ j

1

_

1
1

Billers, machine (bookkeeping maohine) ••••
Manufacturing
Nonmanufaeturing T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T .
D«
«V
f441 4 4 a m t
i* 4 i
r
Da4o 41 4ma /a
» 4

266
35
231
OO
1O O
169

38*5
39*0
38*5
77 c
Or* 0
90 A
oo*u

OA
Crk

43*00
49*50
42*00
AC AA
4v* U U
CA
0? *ou
97 CA
0 ( «O U

4

4

14

26

34

4

4

14

A
%

4

26
1
X

%
V

OA
c*±

34
if
t
1U
23
1

_

IX

1
X

85
10
75

31
7
24

39
10

22

70
17
14
3
53

35
5

19
25
9

1
10
19

22
7
15
3
7

5
1
4
4

n

1
10
7
3

______ L ______£_______ L

1

8
4

1

_
_

_ 11.
_
.

9
9

_

_

mm

_

_

«.

11

2

•

I

|

Bookkeepers, hand .......................................................................
Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Durable goods
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
nondurable goods r t f . . f 1 t t t . . . . . . . . f .
Nonmanufaoturing
............
Public utilities * ••••••••••••••••••
Wholesale tirade •*•••••••••••*•••••••
Retail trade ••••••••••••••••••••••••
pinnnoe
rT.TTT..T.__TTTf..TTT.....
Servioes

965
212
94
118
753
44
180
141
129
259

38.0
39.0
38.5
39,0
38.0
38.5
38.0
38.0
37.0
38.0

folder*eping-maohine operators, class A
Manufacturing ,• • • • • * • • • • •••••••••••••••
Durable goods
Nondurable goods «• • • • • • • • • • • • • «• • • • •
Nonmanufacturing

239
121
64
57
118

38.0
38.0
38.0
38.5
38.0

CQ
09

S7 0
O 1

50.00
53.00
50.50
55.00
47.60
46.00

1

56*00
59.00
58.00
60.50
55.00
60.50
58.00
52.00
51.00
56.00

m

_

18
i

_

_
m

1

*

1
8
10

_

_
_

See footnote at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




18
j

_

8
8
8

24

5
30

32
4
4

24

28

XO

90
bO

100
11
8
3
89
42
17
17
13
25
4
4
21
X

61
3
3
58
6
_

8
44
12
7
7
5

109
18
11
7
91
5
22
17
47
74
49
28
21
25
20

81
17
12
5
64
3
9
18
11
23

96
38
14
24
58

5

23
23
10
13

5
3

36
5
1
16

70
16
1
15
54
3

61
5

13
15
23

19
18
8

36
3
9
1
2
21

4

9
9

6
6

5
56
11

44
8
8

m

9
4

6

77
37
1
36
40
6
19

______ 31

3
3

36
4
4
32
1

_

1
14
10
10
7
3

2

2
11

15
4
11
41
3
27

32 ______ 2_
14 !
!
2
14 j
2
18
18

10
3
28
7
1

..
_

____ 15-

1
6

1

_
_

_

11

•
*

mm
mm

_

m.

_

O fac* OoOMfiaiiOHi - GiM ttiHifd

Table A-ls

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A era e
v
g

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
W
eekly Dial il 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 56.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 B0.00 36.00 30.00
W
eekly
% L
1
(Standard) (Standard) 30.00
f ud
li
57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 10.00 36.00 30.00 fivar
32.50 35.00 37.50 AQ.QQ 42..5Q 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50

Women - Continued

Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B ...»
Manufacturing..... .
Durable goods .............. .
Nondurable goods ..... ......... .
Nonmanufacturing..... .......... .
Wholesale trade ••••••••.•••••.....
Finance ** ............... ........

Calculating-machine operators
(Comptometer type) ...................
Manufacturing..................... .
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods •••••••••••••••.••••
Nonmanufacturing ..... ...............
Public utilities * ..................
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade ........................
Finance **
Services
Calculating-machine o perators
(other than Comptometer type) .........
Manufacturing ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Durable goods •••••••••••••••••••••••
Nondurable goods ••••••••■•••••••••••
Nonmanufacturing
Retail trade
Finance *♦ •••«••*•■•••••••••••••••••
Clerks, accounting •••••••........ ......
Manufacturing ........ ..............
Durable goods .......... .........
Nondurable goods .......... .......
Nonmanufacturing ...... ..............
Public utilities * .... ........
Wholesale trade ..................
Retail trade .....................
Finance a* •••••••••••••••••••.••••••

Clerks, file, class A ..................
Manufacturing ......................
Durable goods ...................
Nondurable goods .................
Nonmanufacturing ....................
Wholesale trade ..................
Finance «* ......................
Services .............. .........

1.943
346
119
227
1,597
453
201
860
83

38.5
38.5
38.5
38.5
38.5
39.0
38,0
38.0
37.5

*
43.00
47.00
50.00
45.60
42.00
46.00
41.00
40.50
42.50

1,542
404
114
290
1,1 3 8
122
332
/A(
,/
163
57

38.5
39.0
40.0
38.5
38.5
38.0
39.0
38.0
38.0
40.0

45.00
47.00
51.50
45.00
44.50
48.60
50.50
40.00
43.00
43.00

32
Q7
71

38.0
38.5
38.6
38.6
37.0
39.0
36.5

42.00
45.00
45.00
45.00
39.50
39.00
39.00

3.284
738
372
366
2,546
291
606
315
1,010
324

38.5
39.5
39.6
39.5
38.0
38.5
38.5
38.0
38*0
38,5

45.50
49.00
49.00
49.00
44.50
52.00
44.50
42.00
43.00
44,00

4
4
.
4

379
86
58
28
293
40

38.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
38.5
3 9.0

200

38.0
40.0

A3.50
47.50
45.50
51.50
42.50
51.00
40.50

-

1
•

20
-

1
.
1

20
11
9

4
.
4
.
4

56
2
•
2
54
g
45
.

40

60

40

60

40

5
32
19
4

12
282
15
21
238
8

226
23
2
21
203
18
31
146
8

430
50
5
45
380
131
41
187
21

244
37
8
29
207
58
24
103
22

292
74
32
42
218
76
60
63
19

163
50
20
30
113
70
1
39
3

55
32
14
18
23
5
1
16
1

139
38
38
101
9
6
74
11
1

206
41
3
38
165
17
47
59
31
11

241
54
6
48
187
5
53
97
21
11

154
24
3
21
130
12
39
49
16
14

190
62
16
46
128
17
18
62
28
3

91
28
13
15
63
17
16
16
7
7

127
53
16
37
74
10
15
22
25
2

44
6
2
4
38
6
32

48
10
10

29
26
13
13
3
1
2

21
9
9

38
7
31

42
17
4
13
25
9
16

2

26
18
9
9
8
2
5

42

42.50

6p
15
«
•
15
45
36
1
7
1

7?
46
38
8
26
23

4
—

11
_

4
4

11
2!
9

“

•

1
9
5

_
.

3

107
66
45
21
41
7
23
4
5
2

30
9
9
21
3
16
2

9
1
1

9
9
6
3

7
7
5
2

4
3

4

8
1
7

4
4

6

3

6
6

3
3

_

3
_

4
4
4

m

3
3

_

_

4

61
11
3
8
50
18
29
3

40
8
6
2
32

*
•

_

16
3
1
2
13

10
5
1
4
5

10
1
„
1
9

4
_
_
4

.
3

13

5

9

4

18
5
5
13
5
4
•
4

5
3
.
3
2
2
.
-

•
.
.
_
.
_

7
6
1

•

•

•

-

2
2
2
-

1
1
-

_
_

3

3

_
_
_
_

„

Q

24
2

12

128
22
10
12
106
18
36
48
4

344
22
4
18
322
12
111
42
127
30

302
17
14
3
285
17
54
33
159
22

506
140
70
70
366
20
59
42
179
66

318
59
21
38
259
11
41
17
120
70

470
92
60
32
378
44
89
33
160
52

314
50
18
32
264
10
155
5
79
15

245
109
64
45
136
20
38
22
25
31

122
37
12
25
85
41
5
12
21
6

147
59
30
29
88
19
10
10
45
4

31

23

47
9
9

45
8
2
6
37

52
16
14
2
36

77
14
11
3
43

12
7
7
-

25
12
5
7
13

17
5
2
3

14
1
1
13

5
21
11

2

27
3
3
24
-

8
33

-

-

-

-

-

-

31
28

23
17
6

38
32
6

28

3

20
3

5
3
2

10
1
1

12
5
4
2

•

_

106
46
31
15
60
28
12
1
15
4

94
27
10
17
67
38
1
18
6
4

_

3
1
1

64
64
36
23
5

2

10
1

i

i
245
105
58
47

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




294
12

11 ___ 2_
1
3
1
1
2

8

2

5

-

-

7

5
2

1
1

1

39
20
14
6
19
8
7
3
1
2
2
2
-,

48
29
13
16 1
19
16
3
-

3
1
1
2
.
•
2

8
2
1
1
6

2
-

5

-

2
2

m

_
-

7

1
-

•
•
•

.
.
_
•
*

_
-

“
“
“
-

Otficm QccmpatiOHl - Q antim ttd

Table A-ls

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
!$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
*
$
$
$
$
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
$
and
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

Women - Continued
%

38.5
39.0

36.50
42.50

39*0
38.0
39.0
39.0

42.00
35.50
39.50
35.50

37.5
39.0

35*00
36.50

1.
2Z1
182
127
55
1,059
386
146
49
353
125

38.0
39.0
39.0
39.0
38.0
38.0
39.0
57.0
37.0
38.5

52.00
51.50
52.50
49.50
52.00
54.00
57.00
48.50
50.50
45,50

926
383
108
275
543
298
199
40

39.0
39.0
39.0
39.0
38.5
39.5
37.5
09 .v

44.50
48,00
48.00 N
48.00
42.00
45.50
O( , J
VU
70 A r t
OO.UU

569
121
132
137
84
95

39.0
39.5
39.5
39.0
38.5
38.0
39.0
<o u
O O *n
37.5
39.5

49.50
49.00
52.00
46,50
49.50
52.00
55.00
a
nn
« a. U v
47.50
48.50

• • ...................... ..
223
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •102

39.0
39.5

41.50
44.50

73

o y •©

AA cr\
H r k * D \J

39.5
38.5

44.50
39.00
41.00
38.50
37.50

2.171
308
235
73
1,863
U

249
97
1,131
342

Clerics, general ......................
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonmaoufactiiring
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s

*

. . . . . . . . . . .

Who!esala tra.de .....................
Retail trade ........................
Finance ** •••••••••••••••••••••■••••
Servioes ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Clerks, order ...................... .
Kainifioturing ..........................
durable goods
Nondurable goods
ynrwM imifa

wg

Wholesale trade

Clerks, payroll .......................
M a n u f a c t u r in g

1,38 0
- 533““
-

. . . . . . . . . . . . . a . . . . . . . . 386
.
g o o d s r T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425

Durable goods
N on du rah ^ n

Nonmanufaoturing
P u h lio u t i l i t i e s

Wholesale trade

a t t t r . t t . .......... ..
T t
« • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Finance * *
Servioes

Duplicating-«nachine operators
Manufacturing • • • • • « • • • • •
Nondurable goods

« • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

29
l OC l
1 ±
j

32
54
26

7Q
0 3 . 0C
O

1. o

39.5

46

46

34

_
!
„
i
_

377
20
20
357
2

556
33
18
15
52?
4

242
14

387
90

„

_
_

19
127
5

258
100

91
95

3
65
40

47
_

62
26
14
12
36
10

_
47

_
_
_
_
_

9
_
_
9
9

_
_

_

27
20
8
12
7

32
_
32

103
17
8
9
86

28
4

86

18
8
8

16
12

60
36

10

12
4

9
2

31
14

o
c

TO
XU

7

36
24
23
1

10

7

!

1

3
1

_

4
43;

3
4

4
17
Xf
A
Q
C
P

5

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




262
21
12
9
241
7

542
48
42
6
494
17

36
10

_
26

105
_
_
105
8
19
65
13

53
21
18
3
32
2
3
26
1

67
_
_
67
15
19
5
28

69
24
4
20
45
1
28
i ft
■°
L

169
46
9
37
123
97
13
12

63
44

65
44
14
30
21

189
108
23
85
81
16

109
38
14
24
71
7
33
17

2
13
2
4

17
6

a
o

c
0

4
26
2
14

1
11
5

g

175
48

g

6
21
22
16

44
19
3
4

5

9

52
12
7
5
40

12
4

Q

3
4

16
13

1

3
8

25
7
1
6
18
4
i
13
_

30
13
12
1
17
5
10
2

__24
.
87
79
8
7
1
1

2 ___ 4 .___ L
2
4
2
2
i
2
_
_
1
1

12
41

14
17
22

6
27

146
37
15
22
109
92
17

123
37
20
17
86
85

37
35
8
27
2
2

36
31

116
63
24
39
53
12

147
92
11
81
55
17

6
17
10

16
8

16
9
5
4
7
4

5

4
4
4

_

_
•

•
•

_

4

.
-

•
_

_
_

_

_
.

•

94 _ T L
_
18
19
13
9
6
9
75
53
22
20

5

26
5

2
3

128
74
38
36
54
12
15
13
7
7

181
138
120
18
43
16
9

35
33
31
2
2

4
4
2
2

2

5

8
5

IT3_
39
32
7
134
99
5
1
27
2

52
40
9
31
12
12

108 _
_
22
22
_
86
48
18
19
1

21
20
13
7
1

9
9
„
79
53
10
1
16

_

.

9
9

_
_
_
_
___IX ___5JL_ 12. _ 15 _ 12._ 21. _ _ _ _ _ 5j
_
_
•
6
2
_
.
•
3
_
.
•
•
2
3
27
5
13
5
51
12
19
1
3
8
8
5
10
9
9
19
2

15
19

4

2
2

9
9
4

7

2

5

5

4

3

•
_
.

17

7
7
7

5

•

5
5

•
-

___ a.
2

.
_
.
•

2
•
•

•

_

„
_

7
4

-

_

,
,
„

_

-

-

111
18
16
2
93
40

6

4

5

173
23
9
14
150
49
23
10
43
25

11

__ 4.

_

_

1

134
114
95
19
20
3
5
5

66
36
23
13
30
15

55

15
7
8
40
12
9

14
2
2
12

48
22 1
3
19
26

2
—

2

11
3
2
1
8

4
1
1
„

3

14
4
_

3
1
1

4
10

2
2

_

_

6

5

4

17

1

6

2

9

1
1

3
1

1

2

1

1

4

1
6

6

2
12

3

3
3

1
1

3

1

_

5

3
3

5

m
m

«.

_
m
m

_

Table A - 1 j

(Average straight-time w e e k l y hours and earnings 2 / for selected occupations studied on a n area
basis in Boston, Mass., b y industry division, April 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

Average

Sex, occupation, and ind ustry d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
;$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
>
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.60 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 |85.00 90.00
Weekly
earnings *
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 b o .00 over

Women - Continued
913
319
89
230
624
73
170
36

38.5
39.0
39.0
39.0
38.0
39.0
39.5
38.0
37.5

*
44.00
45.00
47.00
44.00
44.00
42.50
51.00
40.00
40.60

454
128
89
39
326
47
•ac
jj

38 .0

36.00

Z8*.5
39.5
37.5
38.6
38.5
36.5

Secretaries •«•••.••••••••••...... .
Manufacturing •.• •..... ......... .....
Durable goods ............... .....
Nondurable goods........ ........
Nonmanufaoturing ••••....... .........
Public utilities * ...............
Wholesale trade ••••••.............
Retail trade •••••............ .
Finance *♦ •««................. .
Services ••••••••............. •••••

4.218
1,389
882
507
2,829
221
714
217
1,154
523

Stenographers, general .................
Manufacturing ••••••........ ••••••••••
Durable goods ....................
Nondurable goods
Nomanufacturing •............ .
......
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade ..................
Pn+Jl 1 ] frrt,
trTTTT»T»r.»»Tt«I« t ( l t f
Finance * * ................ ............ .........................
Services................................. .. ............. .. ......................
Stenographers, technical • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Manufacture Ti g f t . . ____ T . T . . T _____T - r r » r r r » » »

Kev-ounch o p e r a t o r s .................... ...................
Manufacturing .......................................................
Nondurable goods .........................................
N om a u u fa ctu rin g ..................................... ....
Public
* t t t f f m r t i rr»-r.
W holesale trade ...........................................

O ffice g i r l s ..............................................................
Durable goods • • • • . ...............................
NnnHiinkV)1a
t f . Tr _ . TTri I 1
,
VmnutniifAAf.tiHTitf . . . . . __ _ _____________
Anflla
H
a
Fa4.a1 1 fm H , TTtTtTtTr-rrtiii»trrr««
*
a
IHmknAA aA i , | i | t i i i i n m i

Nondurable goods ............... .. ....................................
Nonmanufaoturing .......... .. ...........................
Finance * * ... • • • • ..... .. ...........................
Switchboard operators ............... ..
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • ............ •••
Nondurable goods • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .
Noxsnanufacturing • • • • • • • • • • • • .........
P i Vhl -i a

ir(;4 H -M a «

*

_______________________ ______

Wholesale trade ......... .........
Retail trade.... .............. .
Finance ** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C AV*”
tr4 AAfl

... ................................

....

120
36
10
26
84
5
0
3

142
42
14
28
100

2
25

118
22
3
19
96
]_
]_
7
]_!
67

158

103

92

41.00
37.50
34.50
34.50
35.00
34.00

17
!
6
3 i 116
10
3
3
79

8
3
92
23
10
42

9
10
73
3
13
34

39
27
15
12
12
1

38.5
39.0
39.0
38.5
38 .0
38.0
39.0
38.0
37.5
38.0

56.00
58.50
57.00
61.00
55.00
67.00
56.00
53.50
53.00
52.50

1

6

32

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

6

-

-

-

-

1

4,123
1,311
678
633
2,812
177
858
251
898
628

38.5
39.0
39.0
38.0
38.0
38.0
3 8.5
38.0
37.5
38.5

46.50
49.50
50.60
48.60
45.50
51.50
49.00
42.00
43.00
44.50

269
106
80
26
163
61

38.0
39 .0
38.5
4 0.0
37.5
3 8.5

49.00
50.00
48.50
56.00
48.50
44.00

866
163
82
83.
703
AO
80
112
249
213

39.0
39.5
40 .0
39.0
3 9.0
39.5
38 .0
38.0
38.0
41.5

46.00
53.50
51.50
55.50
44.00
52.00
46.50
44.50
45.00
40.00

_

3

25
15
15
10
_
g
4

42
5
5
37
10

122
31
14
17
91
20
35
g
30

30
10
6
4
20
5
4
11

11
g
4
2
5

5
3
1
2
2

32
5
3
4
20

75
2
2
73
15
1
56
1

210
21
6
15
189
2
39
22
60
66

176
45
31
14
131

204
zT
17
17
170
7
26
29
61
48

320
57
26
31
263
13
32
21
136
61

_

-

-

-

-

-

1
5
-

31

104

_

.

-

_

-

-

-

31

-

104

-

-

-

.

9
g
13
-

9
23
67
15

“

_

.

.

-

•

-

“

-

4
4

_

1

34

-

-

-

-

-

.

_

-

1

34

75

30
2
68

-

_

-

1

-

-

9
3
2
20

75
-

.

18
21
36

44
28
4
24
16
4
3
2,
g

_

101
43
g
34
58
2
11

50
33
30
3 i
17
13
4

7
3
3
4
3
1

25
5
6
20
20

12
5
5
7
7

5

1
1

5

1
-

5

_

8

14

8

_
14

-

-

14

_

_

8

.

_
.

_

.
_

25
26
22
22

7
7
7

_

.

.

_

_

4

2

50
12
82
86

448
130
107
23
318
4
152
15
91
56

290
110
94
16
180
10
40
16
91
23

434
170
127
43
264
19
37
9
170
29

329
143
96
47
186
6
34
11
104
31

419
169
118
51
250
37
25
41
105
42

194
72
31
41
122
21
42
4
34
21

221
92
48
44
129
14
34
10
34
37

125
54
45
9
71
15
24
3
27
2

139
56
22
34
83
33
21
5
20
4

63
19
8
11
44
14
7
2
17
4

116
51
22
29
65
9
25
3
15
13

54
22
2
20
32
7
14
2
4
5

34
14
2
12
20
8
9
2
1

_

674
229
129
100
445
19
98
57
142
129

423
131
60
71
292
21
156
20
60
35

316
155
61
94
161
10
29
12
47
63

192_
73
28
45
119
16
64
2
11
26

336
271
220
51
65
10
23
4
24
4

151
44
10
34
107
22
47
4
4
30

59
18
7
11
41
10
9

35
16
13
3
19
10
7

53
26
2
24
27
6
21

25

19
6
5
1
13

15
2

10
1
1

12

«•

mm

.

«

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

13
8

_

_

_

2

- 1

32

46
18
16
2
28
3

26
20
13
7
6
4

34
7
4
3
27
1

10
1

23
17
7
10
6

9
3
2
1
6

3
3
2
1

18
16

24
g
5
1
18
4

-

-

73 . 18L
2 ^ T
1
2
5
71
178
6
6
16
13
14
38
40
14
102

75
11
g
5
64
2
2
5
25
30

103
25
19
6
78
2
24
7
41
4

79
20
g
14
59

63
15
g
9
48

48
13
10
3
35

49
29
25
4
20
4
5
5
4
2

38
14
7
7
24
19
2
1
2

8
6

14
1

6
2

1
13
4
7
1'
1

350
120
89
31
230

6
19
101
5

453
90
33
57
363
8
113
33
152
77

782
125
45
80
657
23
178
48
231
177

362
123
54
69
239
1
88
2i
99
30

20
3
3

35
17
17

17
9

.

-

See footnote at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and re a l estate.




107
50
5
45
57
18
11
1
27

4

-

-

11
21
15

-

$

9
17
31
2

1
24
20
3

4
2
23

1
9
5

.

1
1

.
-

25
9
16

1
1

_

13

_

2
13

9

12

-

.

9

12

“

-

“

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_

„

13

•

49
9
X
8
40
14
22
4

_

-

_

3

3

-

•

9
9

10
10

-

•

9

10

•

•

2

_

_

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

_

-

-

1

•

-

2
2

-

.

_

1

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

.

.

•

& C C M fu U iO * U - C o * U iH M » d

Table A-l:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, April 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A vkraoe

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$
$
i; i
/ S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Weekly
Weekly Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62 •50 65.00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00
earnings $
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard)
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 52.50 55.00 57.50 60.00 62.50 65 .00 67.50 70.00 72.50 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 over

Women - Continued
Switchboard operator-receptionists
Manufacturing ...... .......
Durable goods
Nondurable goods ••••••••••.!
Nonmanufaoturing
Wholesale trade .......... ,
Retail trade
Finance * * .............. .
Services ................ .

1,261

----153
215
893
399
82
U8
239

Tabulating-aaohine operators .......
Manufacturing ...............
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Nonmanufaoturing ••••••••••....
Publio utilities * .....
Wholesale trade ••••••••....
Retail trade •••••..........
Finance *•

3A8
91
33
58
257
33
UU

Transoribing«^aaohine operators, general
Manufacturing
Durable goods.... ........... .
Nondurable goods ..............
Nonmanufaoturing •••••••...... .
Wholesale trade •••••••••••••••••
Retail trade ••••••••••••••••••••
Finance ** ...................
Services .....................

853
191

11

169

106

85
662
105
H
432
104

3 8 .5
39 .0
3 9 .5
3 9.0
38.0
38 .5
38 .0
3 7.0
3 7.5

t
44.00
44.50
45.50
43.50
43.50
45.50
40.00

41.50
43.00

3 8.5
39 .0
4 0 .0
39.0
3 8 .5
3 8.5
4 0.0
38 .0
3 8.0

49.50
51.50
53.50
50.50
49.00
52.50
61.50
45.00
45.00

3 7.5
39 .5
3 9.5
3 9 .5
3 9.5
39.5
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
36.5

44.50
47.00
47.50
47.00
43.50
51.00
38.00
42.50
41.00

.
-

31
12

12

19
4
15
3

32
14
14
18
10
8

-

20

2

16

15
38

11

25

19
6

3
•
.
3
1

_
•
_

13*
26
19
7
105
42

“

„
.
•

94
25
7
18
69
28

.
1

_
1

.
-

6

-

13
-

11

2

9
29
29
5
24 i
“

25
25

-

1
12

123
63
„ 1 15
2
13
63
108
10
3
75
29
31
23

338
92
27
66

246
128
9
64
39
26
3
1
2

23
6

4
13
205
20

15

202

42
26
16
160
33
7
25
95
22
2
1
1
20

20

126
51
31

34
30

28

•

35
13
.
13

S3
16

20
8

10
6

5
3

22

17
3
-

12

79
45

12

21

18
97
59
25
5
7

24
34
15
4

11

10

56
7
7
49
9
29
76

68

21

27
18
9
41
4

13

6

20

8

185
24
3
128
30

75

55

8
2

2
1

63

42

2

6

20
8
12

13
.
13

29 ____ L
6
5
4

9

5

9
9
9

6

1

-

23
23

-

8

10

3

3

“

43_
25
13

16

9

6
2

2
1
1

7

-

-

-

-

-

•

5
5

“

•

“

____9____ 10.
10
9

_
-

-

6

4
18

11

54

75 ___ 2 1
31
20
26
3
5
17
44
9
5
5

127
30

37
*
*

1

13
47
18
4
14
29
2
22
2

5
7

1

12

4

18
13
-

10

1

4

7
4
-

10

2
1

n ___ 22.____ ____ fi.
1
10
27
6
17
10
4
1
22
26
4
7
13
7
16
4
6

1

•

2
2

8 ____ L
1

2

-

1

-

8

-

3
-

1
1

4
2

-

“

*

-

6

__5_

-

-

7
-

-

____ 2. ____ 2.
-

7
7

-

3
3

-

3
3

9
-

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

_

5
8

*
*

*
*

2
1

Transcribing-machine operators,
technical ..... ............... .
Nonmanufaoturing ................
Finance **
Typists, class A ................ .
Manufacturing ......•••••........
Durable goods
Nondurable goods •••••••••.••••••
Nonmanufacturing •••••••••...... .
Retail trade.................
Finance **
Services ....................
Typists, class B ........
Manufacturing •••••••,
Durable goods ••••.
Nondurable goods .
c
Nonmanufaoturing ....,
Publio utilities *
Wholesale trade . .
.
Retail trade ••••.,
Finance ** •••••••.
Services •••••.•••<

80

75
67
893
323
256

67
570
17
367
62

4.526
1,084
770
314
3,442
247
663
268

1,925
339

37 .5
38.0
3 7 .5

46.50
46.00
45.50

-

_
“

38.5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8.5
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 8.5

46.50
48.50
48.00
50.00
45.50
49.00
42.00
50.00

_
-

.
“

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
37.5
3 7 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
38 .0
3 8 .5

39.50
42.50
42.50
42.50
38.50
44.50
40.50
36.50
37.00
40.00

3
3
3

329
9
4
5
320

23
76
202

19

2
2
2

3
3
3

9
9
9

5
5
5

8
6
6

89
11
11

93
26
13

-

78

12
68

l?4
40
40
84

-

1

2

63

-

59
“

537
58

1005
135

2

33

88

25
479
41
61
41
312
24

47
870
41
166
35
573
65

|
802
158
129
29
644

7
110
21

448
58

8 ___ 15.
13
8
13
8

95
18
17

21
21
20

102 ___ 21

29
23

44
24

9 ____ L.____ £L
4
9
1
2
4
1
80
25
22

116 ___ A2____ 1L
98
7
9
96
1
3
6
9
18
34
4
4
1

*
**

6

1
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

-

6

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

«
n
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
5
4
3

6

1

1

49
-

71
4

62

57

22

3
55
30

2

7

19

11

3

13

2

1

774
257
206
51
517
24
147
56
213
77

330
155
104
51
175

105
41
18
23
64
25

149
104
84

87

44

6

1

6

20

77

73

11

41
15
72
36

m

83
56
27
197
17
48
19
67
46

m

77

48
29
47
31
5
1
8

2

1

20

1

39

2

21
10

26
4
19

3

6

-

2

44
24
15

5

6

-

m

7 ___ L
6
1

-

10

1

-

-

-

4

10

1

1

m

1

16
18

_10

-

1

2

1

5

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these w e e k l y hours.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, a nd real estate.




m

5
3

'
if

12

12
8

'

'

Table A-2:

P^u^e^Uonal and tech n ica l Occupation*

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, April 1952)

1/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2/ Average weekly earnings, hours, and employment data reported for this classification in the March 1951 Boston Occupational Wage Survey included a number of workers whose primary duties have
been found to be more closely related to "designers. These workers have not been included in this report and consequently the data reported for men draftsmen are not comparable to those published
"
in the 1951 study. Revised data for March 1951 which compare with those in this report are as follows* All industries - 2,4-02 workers, 40*5 hours and $78 average weekly earnings; nonmanufacturing
Industries — 1,202 workers, 41.0 hours and $79.50 average weekly earnings; services industries — 1,096 workers, 41.0 hours and $80 average weekly earnings.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
217527 0- 52 - 2
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of labor Statistics




M c U n te S U + H C e Q*ut Powtk Pla*U OcCMfiatiOHi

Table A-3:

( A v e n g e hourly earnings 1/ for me n in selected occupations studied o n a n area
basis in Boston, Mass., b y industry division, April 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
worker*

Oooupation and industry division

Carpenters, maintenance ...........................
Nondurable goods ........... ....... .
P nhU n li+.-n i H

as

» .........................................................

652
U5
238
177
237
121
00

51

Electricians, maintenance ................ ........
M anufacturing; . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TliirnM p crnnH«
s
................................

Nondurable goods .tT__TrTtttrTT_
_
N o nm anufaoturing . . ir. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P nhU n
* T. TtT. t r t T T ............tT tr t r ____ tf
R e t a i l t r a d e ................... ........................... f f
W m n n n * * . . . . . _____. . . . T . T T T T . . . . . . . T T T T T T T T T . , T

Servioes ............ ............ ..............
Engineers, stationary ............. ................
JkAanufacturing
T inreoW a
Y
1

. t . . . f . . . . . . . . . . . ....... .......... r _____ f ,

e

......................................... ..

Nondurable goods ................................
W om nam ifeeturing . . . . . . . . . . . . r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . r .
Pn^*1 ^ n
I 4+:^ OO * t r t i t r t t t i t t r r r - r i t i i i i i i i i - t
Uhn]
trade t t t r __ . T . , t T i i T f T T - - r » T f r » » » t r » « «
R n ta i1 ■fcrftrie T T . t T T . . . . . . . T . . . T . . . T . t t T . T . r T T T T t r

PinauftB * *
Services

...tttT.ttt....trtttTttf.TfttfttttttTI
. . ttt

Firemen, stationary boiler ....................... ..........
Manufacturing
Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
N ondurable goods T. . . ..............................................................

N r w y i f rhri
n ^ r i f l vu'
Aa

i«4*4

1 A 4*4 a m

a

Wholesale trade ••••••••••••«••*•••••»•••••••••«•
Retail trade • • • • « • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Helpers, trades. m«-i ntenance ....................................
Manufacturing...... ..............................................
Durable goods .................................................
Nondurable goods ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Public utilities * .........................
Wholesale trade ............................
Retail trade ...............................
Finance ** ................................

See footnote at end of table.
*
##

1 ,0 7 6
771

$
S
S
$
t
s
s
$
t
s
$
t
$
f
$
%
$
$
$
s
$
$
s
$
*
$
Average
hourly
earnings Under 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0
and
0 .9 0
.9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 over

*
1 .7 9
1 .7 9
1 .7 8
1 .8 0
1 .8 0
1 .7 3
1 .9 8
1 .9 8
1 .7 1
1 .3 6

299
305
168
62
33
35
552
258
75
183
294
76
29
27
39
123

1 .5 6

354
145
209
328
132
32
50

1 .5 9
1 .5 9
1 .5 8
1 .5 3
1 . 7A
l i*
1 .4 7
1 .5 9
1 .3 4

6i
1 .2 7 8
896
583
313
382
190
54
72
22

1 .5 0
1 .5 4
1 .5 6
1 .5 1
1 .4 1
1 .4 9

2
9

*7

5
15

9

a
w

17

4

5
5

9

10
9
8
8

9
4
2

4

_

_

5

_

4

13
_

x

3
2

2
2

7
5
5
2
1
1

2

2

5
_
_

2

x

22
5
5
17

69
41
12
29
28
2
9
7
10
27
22
g
16
x

1
5
2

5
5

1

40

4
1

20

_

4
X

X
1

40

10
3
4

X

5
1

2

20

3

17
5
5
12

____ 6_
_

_

6

7
6
2
48
22
5
17
26

5

9

x

2
15

2
x

40
5
5

2

12
12

2

36

10

_

5

12

_

2

2

36

10

15
14
4
10
1

2
8

2

10
4
3
1

10
7

60
20
20
40

32

_

-

12
2
2

-

-

-

28

-

10

8

-

13
13

18
14

-

-

-

28
-

4
-

13
-

19
10
10
9
7
2

14

-

6
1
1

4
3
3

56
18
13
5
38
19
9

6
3

10
10
22
15
10
5
7
_

1

O
C

1.46
1 .4 2
1 .3 6

20
5

x

2

3
12
2£
11
1
10
18

33
31
21
10
2

50
29
7
22
21
_

14
1

8
12

79 _ 4 7 _ 128
87
41
a
66
30
30
21
11 11
6 a
38
1 35
13
9
7
4
4
2
1
7

120
79
35

3
4

4

44
41
28
9

4

119
93
56
37
26
7
15
4

71
42
29
28
7
11
8
2

117
87
64
23
30
3
3
20
2
2
163
94
57
37
69
42
9
3
15

104
92
82
10
12
5
4
3

176
112
59
53
64
38
16
6

242L 223
171 157
63 128
108
29
66
76
29
65
3
3
2
34

4
2

50
6

5
1

2
2

6
44

8

1

4
40

8

x

8
_
_

x

2
7

49
18
7
11
31
26

31
9
22
4

36
15
21

x

4

x

2

3

—

x

_

_

35
35

1

4

2

2
2

”

2

51
19
16
3
32
23

37
17
11
6
20
7
8
3

-

55.

29
4
25
6

41
32
9
12
4
2
x

30
x

29
33
25
4
2

4

26 ____11
26
14
_
12
11
_
10

_

_

2

9

_2 2 2 _

14

_ JJL

229
199
30
10

10

13

10

13
2

10

4

6

_____ 2

_

3

_

_

_

_

6

5
5
5

_

.

8

4
2

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

.

.

-

_

-

-

-

_

_

.

_
_

2

_

_

_

4

_

4

_

1

.

_

4.
4

_

_

_

_

_____

m
m

__

8
8

_

3

_
_

_

_

4
2

4

___ 52L ___ 62. ___

X
2

u *s * DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bu r e a u o f Labor Statistics

21
14
2
12
7

330
248
82
57
54

5-6. . 52- 102
15
21
68
4
8
15
60
17
41
32
34
7
4
19
1
2
8
8
7
5
8
25
13

40 JL16. __145_
55
66
31
17
1
39
38
27
30
61
79
9
33
76
9
12
3
2
4
3

25
22
4
18
3

6
5

x

59
41
13
28
18
3
5
5
5

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




5

11
2

1

1 .7 9
1 .9 2
2 .0 1
1 .8 8
1 .6 8
1 .9 9
1 .7 6
1 .7 4
1 .6 1
1 .4 8

682

5

1

1 .8 9
1 .9 2
1 .8 7
2 .0 0
1 .8 0
1 .8 7
1 .7 4
1 .7 7
1 .5 8

m

1
m
a

_

_
.

_

-

Table A-3

:

M aintenance and Powek P la n t O ccupation* - C ontinued

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for m e n in selected occupations studied on a n area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, April 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Manufacturing ........... ......................

Number
o
f
wres
okr

952
893
TIB
575
59
41

$
$
$
s
t
s
S
S
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
s
*
s
t
t
Avenge
t
f
$
h u l Under0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1 .1 0 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
ory
erig $
anns
and
0.90
.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 over
$
1.88
2
12
24 129 228 205 122
52
50
72
28
18
_
_
_
.
.
—
1.88
2
23 119 211 180 117
12
71
62
18
50
28
*
s
c
4
D
46
1.80
11
98
94
46
8
O
O
CQ
IO
2
f1
t
* oy
AP
Pt
f
1
12
8
73 117
82
71
OO
f£
t
XO
60
5
1
25
1.80
10
17
X
5
5
6
1.83
25

1,006
624
141
483
382
28
106
87
104

1.56
1.60
1.58
1.61
1.48
1.7?
1,51
1.50
1.41

778
114
41
73
664
362
125
107

Mechanics, maintenance •••••••.,........... ........ 1.07A
Manufacturing ............. ............ .
822
Thi-raKle goods ,,,............_
497
Nondurable goods .........f......... ....... f
.
325
Nonmanufaoturing ......... .................... .
252
Public utilities * .....................T..r.-rrr
117
Retail trade ........................___........
30
Services ...................... t...T...........t
f
25

1.77
1.75
1.76
I.75
1.85
1.81
1.72
1.25

Millwrights .....................................
Manufacturing
Durable goods......... ..... ... .... r__ ____ T
Nondurable goods ..........TrTTT.TT___T...rTTTT1.

296
288
15
*3
135
329
271
108
163
58
49

1.45
1.43
1.43
1.42
1.55
1.63

Painters, maintenance
............... ...........................................
Manufafttnring . . . . . . . . . . . . . r . f T r T . , r t T t T t T t r . t T t , 1 t T
Durable goods ................................................................i . . . . . ................ ... .............
Nondurable goods .................................... ... ................................................T _ . T f _
Nonmanufacturing ...............................
Pub"If utd 1ities * ..............................
| t
Retail trade
Finance ** ............... .........
Services ...................................

433
186
99
87
247
//
52
65
78

1.59
1.73
1.72
1.74
1.49
1.68
1.65
1.53
1.21

-

-

-

1
-

-

21
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
1

_
-

2
19

3

23

31

9
10

1
2

5
4
14

5
12

15

20

1.79
1.78
1,78
1.78

Oilers.... ......... ....................... .
Manufaoturing ..................................
Durable goods .... .........................
Nondurable goods ....................... .
Nonmanufaoturing
Public utilities * ................... .

2
2
?

1.73
1.84
1,80
1.87
1.71
1.68
1.95
1.67

Maintenance men. general utility
Manufacturing .................. ...............
Nondurable goods.... .......................
Nonmanufacturing ......... .....................
Retail trade ............. ...... ....
Services ........................................
Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ••.... ........ .
M r i f nfttnrlng tft,Ifttl...f..Tt.t,,tr,ir,ttfrttftltt
a|i*
NnflHiifpKla g i H i ..........r...TTltflTtf.TttTTttt
rnf
Nonmanufaoturing ....................... ...........
Put!1c irM 1itl«« * ..............................
IlholA i la trede ............ i..»...tit.t.iiti,i
fa
Retail trade

-

1

23
-

15'

20

78
21
3
18
57

111
25
12
13
86

57

38
7
7

45
9
6

5

27

5

Q
5
7

_
_

-

.

_

_

.
_

•

.

_

4
_

4
4

10
_
10
10

11
11

18
18
18
_

27
12
2
t

14
14
14

19
19
17
2

60 306
40 272
14
52
26 220
34
20
g
5
14
12

27

27
1 ft
iO
Q
5
7

122
122
35
87

_

131
95
16
79
36
2
13
22

4
_

•
•
_! _
_

4

_

_

—

«,

4

'

_

160
28
4
24
67 227 132
33 i 1RA 98
luQ
ln
D
XU
24
62
16
74
66
41
25
8
8

12,

9

35

1?
13
1
12

2

26

9

35
35

9
9
2
,
8

4

15

*

8
8
7
1

25

18
11
2.1
7
6
2

131
83
53
30
48
01
17

2
2
2

15
15
14

27
27
25
2

36
36
8
28

19
19
6
13

28
28
12
16

70
70
55
15

65
45
13
32
18
18

13
13

18
5
5

15
6

9

45

C
O

T ft
XO
£
O
*P
1
1C

A

ft
O

g

9

4

C

-

_

_

_

15

9

See footnote at end o f table.
...
......
*
Transportation ( e x c i s i n g railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, a n d real estate.

_

4

15

_

2

5

2

26

9

‘

2

..

24

9

25
8
17

2
2
“

13
13

8
1

4

73- 111
35
98
g
10
25
90
38
13
16
2
14
6
11

82 230
3
15
2
14

3
3
3

‘




3
.

25

lx
3
4
5

13

82
61
Af\
fU
t
p
c ii

21
19
9

65
31
33
41
16
2
14
25
25

99

50

CO
OO

PA

*f
Oat
oa
<f
St
41
1/
10
13
2

Tn
1t
XA
f
26
XO
g
7
XU

54
cx

2
19
33
27
3
3

40
25
17
8
15 •

3
_
_
3
3

52
25
13
12
27
20

_

77
AQ
06
1/
X7
28
0
23
fty

“

2
3
3

_
_

f

31
1A
Xt
f
3
11
XX
17

35
3
3

11
c
O

32

c
w
6

1*
7

pr\
C\J

_

_

-

_

_

.

_
_

_

_

_
_

1
1

_

_
.

13
1%
XO
4
Q
y

13

A
4
9

PQ
C\7
PO

6

57
25

54
13

13
1

1*
7
Xf
27
X

oc
60
12

XO
21

1
X
12

4
A
f
t
4

14

4
4
4

29

44
17

A
ft

_

.

15

155 300
107 275
At 6 0 0
f
fl AP
t
f<
t5
OX
48
25
•ZA
OC
O t 60
f

104
i*
n*
xuo
42
61

5
2

4

8

_

2
0
c

3

_

_

_

4

_

_

_

_

«•

e«

8

*
0
X

_

_

6

2
4

a
O
2

_

2
•

1
X

13
1?
XO
1p
1C
X

•

9
7
i
X
£
0
2

5

-

"

_
“

“

“

Table A-3

M aintenance and Pawn* P la n t Occupat ion* - C ontinued

:

(Average hourly earnings 1 / for m en in selected occupations studied on a n area
basis in Boston, Mass., b y industry division, April 1952)

f

t

f

$

s
$
t
1.35 1.40 1.45

1.60

i.$o

1.70 1.80

8.90 8.95

i.oo

1.05

1 .1 0

1.15

1.2 0

1.00

1.05

1 .1 0

1.15

1.20

1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45

1.25

1 .3 0

O

$

s

f-*e»

Average
hourly Under
earnings t

O

Number
of
workers

M

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation and industry division

s

t

$

t

t

1.70 1 .80 1.90

$

t

s

f

2 .00 2 .1 0 2.20 2.30 2.40

I

•

2.50

2.60

1

•
2.70 2.80
and

0.90
.95

1.9 0 2,00 2 ,1 0 2 ,20 2 ,3 0 2,40 2.50 2.60

2.70 2.80 over

$
Pipe fitters, maintenance ...............................
Manufacturing ....................................... ..
Durable goods ............................... ......
Nondurable goods ..................................
Nonmanufacturing ......................................
PiiK! - r n . i 11 + p « #
i
+.-1 s

515
4-59
238

56
A3
57
29
28

1.70
1.77
1.64

Sheet-metal w o r k e r s . m a i n t e n a n c e ................. .
Manufacturing ................ ........................
Durable goods ......................................
Nondurable g o o d s .......... .................. .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ......................................

128
108
59

1.84
1.84
1.89
1.79
1.85

1
1
-

12
12
12
-

1.8 8
1.86

Plumbers, m a i n t e n a n c e ............... ....................
Manufacturing .........................................
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ................ .....................

2
2
2

1

1.87
1.36
1.85
1.87

221

A9
20

Tool-and-die makers..... .......................

1,119

Manufacturing .........................................

1,119

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
13
4
9

82
79
44
35
3

2

6
-

-

-

6

-

1

1

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

*

-

—

8
62

131
104
18

86
27
27

12
11

5

2
1
1

12

5

9
3

3

16
12

1

2

4

4

1

1

_

22

1

1

_

1

20
11
9

1

24
15
4

2

2.02
2.02

7
7

-

-

121

3

7

1

-

133
114
7

1

1

1

77
70

-

11
9

4
4

70
70

32
32
13
19

19

4
-

4

12
12
_

12

7

-

-

3

-

4
4

8

-

-

3

6

168 312
168 312

34
31
23

22

_
_

1
10

17
17

5

_
_

181
181

6
6
2

22

-

_
-

-

_

_

_

2

-

-

_

_
-

_
_
_
-

-

-

2

-

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

342
342

35
35

-

-

4
4
4

-

22

-

-

-

.
-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

_
*
_

1/ Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Table A-is

G

u i t o d i a l,

'k la >

io J u u U

in p f

a n d

S

k ip

p

in

g

O c c u p a tio n *

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., by industry division, April 1952)

NUM BER OF WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNING 8 OF—

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
worken

Average
hourly
earnings

f
$
I
$
9
t
S
t
t
*
$
$
1
$
$
$
i
s
%
s
*
$
S
$
$
S
f
0.60 0.65 0.70 0 .75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 L.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30
and
and
under
.-0
*19 L lUL ^*2£L 1*25. 1*20. 1*28.1*40.X A L ls5-lo S S L 1 . 7 0 1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 2.00 -2*12-2*22 -2*32-212L
.66 #7p ,75 ,80 ,85 ,90 ,95 1,00 1,05 1

$
Crane operators, electric bridge (under 20 tons) ......
Manufacturing................................

270
270

1.68

Nonmanufacturing .......... ........... .......
Finance ** ........... ........... .

998
681
503
178
317
247

1.40
1.46
1.45
1.48
1.27
1.28

4,901
1,973
799
1,174
2,928
374
276
590
1,272
416

1.15
1.26
1.27
1.25
1,08
1.32
1.10
1.05
1.09
oc
• OO

Janitors, porters, and cleaners (men)
Manufacturing • • • • • • • • .................................... ................... .......................
Durable goods ............................................................................................
Nondurable goods
............ .
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Public utilities * ...................... .
Wholesale trade ••••..... ..... ..............
Retail trade ........................... .
Finanoe ** ......... .......................

1313
3

34
16
4

28
4
4

1
2
_
-

-

30

14

“

-

15
13

.
30
.

14
-

.

-

.

_

ou

.

1A.

166

142

12

44

1

.
- 12
1
44 154 141
. 14
18
1 52 39
15
5
AX

40

See footnotes at end of table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




10

16

019
O/

OO

10

3

18

"

2

12

176 180
45
23
19
20
20 23 26
153 135
180
- 26
7
14
37
30
12
68
61
19 115

585
185
76
109
400
2
60
140
147

.

220
40

OO

OX
CO

Cl
Ox

24
23

67
31
16
15
36
36

710 360

299

154
59
95
135

7
37
57
140

2Q_

20

-

2 -117
2 117

7 1QSL
7 105

L f 25L
5
306 -40 --182- S 4 L ■.3

184 311 118
59
87 91
97 220 ^59
122 94 69
20 10 41 11
6
14 11
5
2
10 24
48
50
18
88
62

242
107
135
104
13
5
12
74

188

155 109
132
18
23
91
98 • 79
66
69
3
9
3
1
26

121- 1 3 5 —
27 108
44
1
64
26
27
94
21
46
6
8
40

.

-

-

-

-

“

_

_
_

.
-

_

-

-

-

_

_
_

_

_

_

_
-

.
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

39

_

5

_

_

39

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

“
“
“
•

5
5

“
“

"
“
•

•
“

■
“

“
"

*

4
S3 - 3 -. 44-JZ 2 SSL - 7
3 L 5Q _3S_ L44_ - 2 - 5 1
C_
39
47
6 133 227
1
2 30 26 99 11
14
16
5 113 167
10 21 23 99 11
20 60 25 31
1
3
2
9
20 12 45 21 29 11 35 20
18
20
31
8
7 21 29
20 11
14

116
27
89
594
21
38
51
452
32

104
49
55
256

6
6

29
”

.

JLO

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table A-4*

QtUioditUf Wa>iaUoHtenpf and S lu ppin p Oeempa/iO - GottiUmrnd
Hi
(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2 / studied on a n area
basis in Boston, Mass., b y industry division, A p r i l 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

Janitors. Dorters. and cleaners (women) ............
Manufacturing .................................
Durable goods.... .........................

2.252
314

156

9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
$
>
9
9
9
$
t
t
t
t
t
»
$
t
9
9
9
AtM|, s
hul 0
o r y .6<J 0.65 0.70 0.75 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30
and
under
.65 .70 ,75 ,80 •85 .90 •95 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1,20 lf25 1,3Q 1.35
1.45 I .50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 over

&

Number
wwkw

l.H
1.18

158
1,938
176
18
3£5
1,461
118

1.10
.99
1 ,08

Order fillers ....................................
Manufacturing .................................
Durable goods .............. .......... .....
Nondurable goods ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ...............................
Wholesale trade ............................
Retail trade ............... ...... ...... .

2.922

1,405
511

1.32
1.47
1.51
1.42
1.25
1.24
1.28

Packers (men) ...................................
Manufacturing .................................
T
__T-TT-_ t - t
_
T h v p f l Kl a
.T,r-.................
Nondurable goods ............................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Wholesale trade ............................
Retail trade ...............................

1.832
1,066

Packers (women) ...... ... ........................... ... .......................................................................
Manufacturing........................................................................................ ..................................... ...
Durable goods .......................................................................................................................
N'-'ndur&blf*
*-i«i»»«*«-i»i»,T»tt»T»iTti-TTT»ii
Nonmanufactur*ng T T r T 1 . a r t T t t t t , , t . t T T T . r T V t ^. t T . r r Y t

486
352
216
136
134

-

. ...

"1

. T. T. T. T. . t t T t 7 . t t . T. . r . . . 1T. . T- TTtt

Receiving clerks ................................................................................................................................
Manufacturing .................................................................................................................................
Durable goods .......................................................................................................................
Nondurable goods ...........................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................
Wholesale trade ................... ... ..... ...
Retail trade .........................................................................................
S flw f

aaa

.................................................. .. ......................* ..................

Shinning clerics ..........................................................................................................
Manufacturing .......................................................................................................
Durable goods .......................... ....................................................................
M rawlim VilA

. . . ____

____ . . . . . . . _ . . . . ______
_

Nonmanufacturing ...............................................................................................
Vholftssle tT»g^i a . - TTTr i i
Retail trade ......................................................................................... ..
Shipping-and-receiving clerks .....................
Manufacturing.................. ..............
0 gnorl ^ . . . , f ................. ■ T I I r _____ T- t T t t i r .
>
Nnrw?irr«Kl« g o o d s TT. .......................................... .. . r _____

rt

ttt

Nonmanufacturing ... ........................ ..
P n K H ft utilities * .................................................................................
Vholftsalft tradn . . . . . . i r r - ___ TT- . . . . . . . TTT. T. . . . T
P a+ .o^ l f.tmdA

Services

...........

...........................................................................

............................................................................................................

1,000

532

468
1,922

422
644
766
473
275

4

52

-

-

4. 52

1.19

,84
1,00
*84

20

4. 32
-

-

-

-

1.27
1.37

_

-

1.33

_

_
-

1.19

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.42
1.12

1.00

-

114

1.37
1.46
1.41
1.53
1.30

-

-

30
-

Finance, insurance, a n d r eal estate.




2

-

2
60
-

60
10
10
-

2

50
5
5
45
25

20
32

1

1
31
-

10

31

_

-

-

-

40
40
40

30
_

1,269
336
178
158
933
612
273
946
374
96
278
572

20

299

141
112

1.38
1.21

1.22

1.40
1.42

362

30

90
34

28

43

34
56
56

_
28
18

37

6 12
68 109
28 79

43
33

10

10

66
12

10

27

5

-

121

_
43
15
13

-

12
-

12

78

-

13

4

43

10
10

15
15

5

51

2

23

16

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

4

43

49
9
38

-

-

-

-

13

-

10

-

13

4, 20

10
-

-

_

-

-

10

-

10

-

-

2
2

54
14
H

-

5

2
-

5

16
16
-

12

-

-

-

2

2
10

-

16

28

20
16

6
6

2
2

4

12

38
_

_
_

40
-

2

-

11
6

-

40

10

26

38

40

10

16

4

1

68

4

34
_

-

1.50
1.40

1.39
1.55
1.45
1.42
1.18

50

40

-

_

4

4

36

1

34

*6
j3
o
32
18

-

■ “

•

4

34

“

15

11
11

50
50
5
45

4
,

52

26
12
14

26

26

4,

64
52
52

12

6
6
4

2

8
8
8

2
2

-

2

5
5
-

_
-

_
-

222 557 136
138 261 52
102 233 10

24
14
5
9

19

-

-

_
.
-

5

1
1

_

5

1

5

.
-

-

_
_

19
19

2
2

_
_

_
_

.
-

.
-

_
_
-

-

-

12

30
57
4
53
50 305
39 276
11 28

-

-

1.43

1.50

4
,

74 121
6 12

-

.87

1.42
I .59
1.40
1.49

14
4?
?5

37
37

See footnotes at e nd o f table.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities
**

21

71
89

1.00

998
439
253
186
559
293
167
54

30

1.26
1.32
1.25
1.42
1.09

51
25
62

-

123 258 11,08 14
22 34
45 11
6 14
30
3
8
16 20
15
??/t 1057
3
101
1
35 20
94
1
2
3
1
3 2
2
17
92 64 169
960

97 162 117 121
6
36
7
4
?9
2
si 115
97 162

1

59

55

121
10

-

7

-

2 17
2 10

119 188 158
10 87 129
5
34
10 53 124
109 101 29
80 70 24
5
29 31

12 39
9 10
9 10

18
7
7

3 29
3 29

11

22

24
15
15

38
5
-

9
9
-

5
33 13
28
9
2 4

1

10 48
5
4

1

9
4

14 140
55
55
14 85
14 65
-

H

-

72

6a

25
35

12

7
4

20

62
8
5
3
54
50
3

2
1
1

14

12

7

5
2
2
30

10

5
5

94
50

26

9

24
44
5
29
4
,

40
13
13

29
9
9

21

27
19
7

20
1/
•U
fr
2

-

48
16
2
Yi

25

2
2

23

18

1/

4

4
17
71

51
20
52

11
5

Q
7

a

19
12
10

83 171
39
19
44 152
26
33
30
26
-

36 28
84 296
71
73
13 223

422 140 242 127
81
79 119 230
26 118 23 31
1 207 50
53
21 12 46
43
32
20 43 21
3
18

-

-

9

14

29
29
29

62
61

83
83
83

46
46
7
39

16
16

7
54

1
1

88
51
34
17
37
29
7

55
25

16

76
32
27
5
44
35
9

111

106

90

13

10

Q

3

30
28

93

2
53
5

5

K
J

32
10

92

m l_ 197

72
33
19
H
39

1
1

20
10
10

9

5

5 39
36
3

i
Hr

10

10

67 38 111
56 34 105
6
71 4

82 159 _ 22_
16 28
90
15
11
15
84
3
6
13
13
4
67 143
64 272
37 270
54 119
12 24 27
1

48

2

68
21

8

-

8

82
71

11
11

50
34
7
27
16
3
13

36
-

1

75
25

1
1

-

-

86

69

65
43

31
9

13

22

22

24
17

55
39
16

6

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

19
19

31
30

3
-

3
l

28

-

-

_

-

l

13

2

17

68

40

65
35
5
30
30

6

7

28
7

21

19
49

90
42

12

34

38

9

30
J'-'

26

-

-

2
1
1

_

_

3
3

-

-

-

27

11

3

/

2

64

26

-

43

2
-

10
-

2
2

16

_

.

25

7
7

13
13

..

_

5
5
C
>

3
3

-

1

-

-

6
6

18
_

6
25

1

1

9

a

2
2

e

*■
*
16

/

38
28
4

47
4

-

8
8

7

•26

4
/

-

-

7
56
18
3

93
59
47

7

_

_

-

89

29 169 248
1 51 47
1 33 27
18 20
28 118 201
24 61 165
36
33
4

1

_

_
.

26
26

7

7

2

_

-

68 139
97
19
7

/

-

5

-

26

20

6

10
10

101
100

18

35
31
15
16
4

18
18

10

32
18
14
79
75
4

69
46
28
18
23
23
-

42
74
73

-

15

18
18

“

“

Table An4*

C u s to d ia l, W aA *U tM linft aH d S U ip p iitQ OccUfia t iOHi - C on t in u ed
(Average hourly earnings 1 / for selected occupations 2 / studied on an area
basis in Boston, Mass., b y industry division, April 1952)

N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S OF—

Occupation and industry division

Niuubw
worker.

A w i |i
earnings

f
$
f
t
t
<
t
9
S
$
$
%
$
$
9
1
S
9
$
$
9
s
$
t
S
*
0 .6 0 0 .6 5 0 .7 0 0 .7 5 0 .8 0 0 .8 5 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .20 2 .3 0
S

and

under
.6 5 .7 0

and
.7 5

.8 0

.8 5

•90

^5

61
13

24
2

13
48

2
22

89
33
16
17
56
11

.9 5 1 .0 0 1 ,0 5 1 .1 0 1 .1 5 1 .2 0 1 .2 5 1 .3 0 1 .3 5 1 .4 0 1 .4 5 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 over

%

Stock handlers and truckers, hand..... ............

Public utilities * .........................

A. 697
2 ,4 8 9
901
1 ,5 8 8
2 ,2 0 8
683.
847
645

1 .3 7
L.38
1 ,3 4
1 .4 0
1 .3 7
1 ,5 9
1 .3 1
1*22

534
166
73
93
368
i3 3
71
148

1 .4 1
1 .7 4
1 ,4 0
2 ,0 0
1 .2 6
1 .2 0
1 .3 5
1 ,2 6

l f6 l l
442
200
N o n durabl e goods ....................... ............................................. ,
242
N orim anufaoturing ............................r..r.1 . 1 ,1 6 9
.1
p l lift irM ]\ +dAS * t.iiriiiir-ih
r
oo
WhnlAnn 1a tr« d A .TTTTrtT..T..rrrTr.r...ITTtTrtrf.
.
549
R e ta il tra d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
249

1 ,4 9
1*63
1 .5 1
1 ,7 4
1 .4 4
1 .5 6
1 .4 4
1 .3 5

Truck drivers, medium (!§■ to and including 4 tons) . . . .

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type) ••••••
Mnnnfn f t r ng ............................................................................ , a, ,
tul
rh ira h l a gondii t TT_Tr f T r T f t l .T r r r r . I. Tf. TI. r < i r t . t r T r .
N nnriunihl a gnoda . T r r . TTT. TT. t Tr Tr TTTr Tt t Ti f TTTt t
MftmiiAniif**fttiirlrtg
W h o lesal a tra d A . . . . . . . . . . . . . T t t T t t T t T t t r t t t r T . t t
R e t a il t r a d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T
atT. . . . .

tt..TTTTTTtttTrT.f.TTTTlf.(ritrtffTt

Truck drivers, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type) ........... ................ .....
M an u factu rin g
D urah1 e goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
N o ndurable goods

Nonmanufacturing ................. .............
Wholesale trade ...................f.r...........
Retail trade ....................................
Truckers, power (fork-lift) ............................................................
M an u fa c tu rin g ......................................................... ..
D u rab le goods . . T. , r t r r .
.
.
.
.
,,,,,,,
N on durable goods .......................tT.tlT.r.
N o n m an ufacturing . . - . T. . . T. - . - - . . . . . TT. TT. , , , , , , , , , T
Wholesale t r a d e .............................................. .

Truckers, power (other than fork-lift) ........... .
M a n u fa c tu rin g ........................................................................... ...
D u rab le goods r r T T 1 t t t T r r T t t r i r t r T T T t . T t 1 t r T t T r t t
N o ndurable goods - T . T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Watchmen ........... ......................................................................................... ...
Manufacturing ........................................................................
Durable goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nondurable goods ..................................................... .. ............... .......
Nonmanufacturing
Public utilities *
Wholesale trade
Retail trade
F in an c e

**

.............. .

Services..... • • • • • • .......................... .......

1/
2/
*
**

554
128
50
78
42 6
239
174

45

1

_

14

45

2

«
.

8
1

1
11

5

35

.

1
12

124
90
23
67
34
3
15
16

_

_

184
65
20
45
119
116
3

11
10

5

1

5

9
25

11

28

12

11

28

9
2

28

12

•
e

1

2

1

_

_

_

1

1

n
,

12

_

1 .5 9
1 .5 7
1 .5 5
1 .6 0
1 .6 2
1 .4 3

35

188
151
55
96
37
1
27
5

265
63
53
10
202
1
144
57

122
40
14
26
82

5 )2
185
93
92
127

455
332
124
208
123

17
65

92
20

121
2

16
12
7

117

21
3
3

4

117
72

18
18

4

45

.
_

35
5
3
2
30
18
8
4

25
12

8

_

A

_

12
13

8

100
9
3
6
91

9
4

8

22

285
140
91
49
143
16
86
42

505
207
130
77
98

32
22
21
1
10
5
5

47
10
10

.

31

240
236
296
QO

J-4->

1 ,0 4 4
513
323

1 .1 8
1 .2 3
1 .2 5

onQ

04

1 QO
J-/W
COT
0-?-L

1.21
1.12

cn
\>(

35
6
4
1
30

56
8
7
1
48

37
26
7
19
11
5
2

30

.

11

54
35
30
5
19

76 .4 5 1
7
20
5
13
2
7
69 431

11

19

35
19

___11_

319
112

16
28
103
26
18
8
77
10
51
16
1

_

_

7

7

7

7
7

7
7

7
7

z

5

2

2
2

2
2

14
14

59
36

g

14

C
©
5

33
3
3

2
2

2
2

2

2

4
4

2

2

2

2

4

2

58

16
7
7

58

g

29

44
27
26

24

07
«7 1

29

157
65
42
23
72

88
41
26

12

127
30
14
16

1o
XU
An

X
17
X(

X

45
31
7
24
14

4

1.10
1 .0 8
.83

8
41

7

13
11

4
5

4
4

24
13

g

1

Q
5
7

23
16
16

O
c

9

3

36

12

.

4
:
C
O

15

1c
x9

o
O

85

18

2

4 f

c
f
*

2

24
or\
C\J

in
X
U
in
X/
V
A
rx

41
XI
wX
ou
11
XX

1

4

37
8
8

189
22

108
33
IX
X4

5
4

15

1

13

108

63

86

DO
C«
Ov

XI
*kX

19
XC
AX
%0
•ZA
0%

12
22
9

79
fC
Xfi
TO
9X
64r
IX
X4

O

o
C

23

11
o
C

C

90

132
55
46
28
18
7

2
1X
xo

in
XU

2

X
0
c

o

2

8

32

32
4
28

.
_
„

17
10
10
7
7

_

_
.

__ 84
64
•

a
.
6
-

2

64

-

2

2

-

-

§5 ___10 ___82 _____ 1
1
80
46
10
5
36
1
75
10
10
9
19
10
6
9
3
188
15
15
173
16
144

176
14
X
O
1
162
93
58
252
175
134
41
77
5

21
20
20
1

1

48
32
1
X
ox
16
16

159
15
15
124

3 I_
_____ 37

29
3

37

3
25
25

47

73

30

8

112
g

30
17
17

8
65
65

6
106
106

20
o

103

17

181
90
C\7
l
X
90
CO
1 K9
xuc
1 09
XOC

32

”
_

56

x
0
17

^9
OC

_

103
mo
1UO

OO
DO

17
Xf
15

36
3£

56

4

58
34
28
6

68
28
15
13

13

A
V

xn
TV
e

1o
x%

40
40
o
5
7
31

XO

oo

2

75
65
40
25
8

6 ____a _____ 4
4
7
4
7
-

12

2

12

in
Xv
O
o

220
164
23
141
56
26
30

19
19

10
30
22

455
47
12
36
416
365
51

107
69
23
46

42
42
30

A
a

o

n

22
167

10

X

X

4

10

1
X

XX
00

2

IQ
X7
«
7K
rO

29
27
2

75
Iu
lK
O
C

1c9
x

00

43

120
17
12
5
103
98
5

7

7
7

502
166
90
66
346
2
58
21 i

4

24

_

-

39
30
9

10
24

1 .3 1
1 .3 6

101
105
188
80

«
.

507
360
39
321
147
5
6
136

10

1 .6 2
1 .6 1
1 .6 0
1 .6 2

247

37
5

62
36

785
419
129
290
366
235
44
87

34

Excludes premium p ay for overtime and night work.
Study limited to m en workers except where otherwise indicated.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




48

1 .7 0
1 .7 0
1 .5 4
1 .7 6
1 .7 0
1 .7 6
1 .5 7

772
476

15

45

115
102
39
63
13
8

1 .8 0
1 .6 9
1 .6 1
1 .7 4
1 .8 4
2 .0 0
1 .6 1

902
125
35
90
777
534
197

15

15
1

19

“

9
Q
«7

O

2

i
i

“
“

B: Characteristic Industry Occupations
Table B -2071) QatnAtf OH& OtU&l Go*tfrctio*l&Uf. PAoducU 1
/
N U M B E R OF W O R K E R S RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME H O U R L Y E A R N I N G S OF—

Occupation and sax

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

y

< . 5 0.80 0.85 0.90
f7

1 .9 $

10
210
Loo 1.05 Lio i.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1. * 1.U5 i.50 ^.55 \.60 *1.65 1.70 *1.80 i.90 1.00 *2.10 *2.20 *2.30* . *

and
and
undei
.* .*
.*
.8 0 .95 .90 .95 1.90 1.05 1.10 i,i5 lfSP 1.?? 1 .3 0 1.35 1 1 0 1 1 5 1 .5 0 1.55 1.60 1.6 5 1.7C 1.00 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2 .3 0 2 1 0 over

Men

%

Candy makers, c la s s A V * ........................
Candy makers, c la s s B 3/a ........ .
Candy makers' h elp ers ]y a • • ....................
D ippers, machine 3 / a
J a n ito r s , p o r te r s, and clea n ers 3 /s • «
M ach inists, maintenance 3 /a •••.7.....
Maintenance men, gener a l”u t i l i t y 3 /a .
Mogul operators 3 /a
Mogul operators' h elp ers 3 /a .................
Stock handlers and tru ck ers, hand 3/ a
Watchmen 3 /a
..........................................

89
131
213
36
125
10
*
55
32
109
105
8

1.66
1.30
1.15
118
.*
1.11
1.72
1.59
1.52
1.27
1.16
1.10

131
35
96
U3U
285
1*
19
119
29
2*
1
260
708
227
18
*1
268
160
108

1.16
.97
1.23
1.00
.96
1.06
1.10
1.09
.1
9*
.96
1.11
.95
1.18
.98
.96
1.01

1
*
-

-

3

-

-

13
IV 3 *
1
12 18
2 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25

20

37

9

9

23
20
1
*
18

-

-

-

-

-

68
17

1
*
1
1
*

3
6
7

3
19

11

5

15

9

9

11
9

5
6

15
7

9
16

9
•
1*
1
1
8
16

6
1
1

7
1
1

16
15
*

6
18

1
13

18
k

13
2

k

2

n

-

1
*

-

-

27

30

•

-

-

-

•

-

6

-

9

3
6

3
18

18 16
1
*
12 12
3
1
6 l
*
70 99
11
*
20
3U 83
21
36 16
1
31 8
- 1 3
13 57
19 28
*
10 101 72
3
39 18
62 5U
7
16 9 k
*
7
2
22 56
2* 38
1
5

10
6
1
*
19
*
30
19
2*
1
1
*
1
*
22
60
12
18
*
13
*
23
20

8
2
6
80
80
6
9
2
13
98
89
9
36
29
7

-

-

-

3*
1

35

3

5
22

k

li
2
5

17
20
-

9
1
*
1

3
-

1
2

1
*
9
2

6
1
U

5
7
1
9

1
*
3
1

2
6
1

1
*
12
-

21
3
-

9

5

2

1

2

8

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

: -

-

-

-

-

-

9

6

3
1
-

-

-

2
-

2
-

k
l
i
-

3

2
-

28
1

1

-

1
*

7

6

1
*

6

9
18

7

6

1
*

6

•

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

18
-

-

2

18
56

*
5 1
169 12

3
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

56

169 12
6 -

6
1

1

2

2

2

k

1
1 12
6 1
5 10
1
-

-

2
2

Women

Dippers, one hands

Total.....................
Time ................. .
Incentive •••••..«••••....
Dipping-machine operators' helperst Total ••••••••
Time....
Incentive •
Filling-machine operators 3 / a ............................................
.................. ..
Inspectors, candy 3 / a
Janitors, porters, and cleaners 3/a •........ .
Packers, hand, bulk 3 /b ....
Packers, hand, fancys Total............ .......
Time....... .........
Incentive ••••••.......
Wrappers, machines Total............ ........
Time...................
Incentive...............

1
8
8
37
2
-

2
2
0
20

-

1
31
30
1
9
68
66
2
*
-

16
9
8
1

-

6

1

1

1

The study covered establishm ents with 21 or more workers engaged in the manufacture o f candy and other confectionery products (Group 2071) as defined in the Standard In d u str ia l C la s sific a tio n Manual
(1911 e d itio n ) prepared by the Bureau o f the Budget.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and nigh t work.
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, M ass., A pril 1952
I n s u ffic ie n t data to warrant p resen ta tio n o f separate averages by method o f wage payment.
U.S. DEPARTM
ENT O 1ABCR
F
(a) A ll or predominantly time workers.
Bureau o f Labor S t a t is t ic s
(b) A ll or predominantly in c e n tiv e workers.

H




Table b- 3 7 Women*d and Mi44eA>' Qoati and Suit* 1
23:
/
NUM BER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

s
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
t
s
s
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
Average
hourly Jnder 0.80 0.85 0.90 0.95 L.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 l.Uo 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.U0 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.U0 3.60 3.80 U.00
earnings

2/

Ail plant occupations: Total
••••..........
Men ........................
Women ......................

682
U02
280

*
2.05
2.36
1.60

37
73

1.68

2h0

and

_a20_

-jSLlt00

1.10 1.20 1.30 l.Uo 1 . 5 0 I.60 1.70 1.80 I .90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.U0

0 111!
o nli

186

»
D.80

2.36

17

1
*

11
8
3

9

U

2

2

18

11

1
1

6
11

U
,lU

11

16

30
6
2*
1

28

5

19

2U

U7

5

11

1U

U5
12
33

U

11

36

52
13
39

31
10
21

30
18
12

2

11

u

55

8U
79
5

52
50
2

28
28

6

2‘ 9
1u
2

7
8

10
6

3
2

30
2U
6

61

2.60 $.80 1*00 3.20 3.U0 3.60 3.80 U.00 over

1U

11

1U

11

U
U

U
U

.

.

-

-

_

.

_

-

-

-

8

13

9

U

u

3

_

_

-

-

17

16

_

1

5
5
.

Selected Plant Occupations
.

.

.

Cutters and markers (all men; 3/a ....... .
Pressers, hand and machine (all men) 3/b •••••.......
Sewers, hand (finishers) (15 men and
171 women)
a ..•••••••••••<........................
Sewing-machine operators, single-hand (tailor)
system (213 men and 27 women) 3/a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

17

7

20

20

7

27

3U

21

12

7

2

1

U

13

U

11

9

6

1U

12

32

65

_

2

2

3

U

1

3U

21

1

9

_

2

1/ The study covered regular (inside) and contract shops with 8 or more workers in p art of industry group 2337 as defined in the Standard Industrial classification Manual (19U5 edition) prepared
the
Bureau of the Budget,
establishments manufacturing fur coats or single skirts were excluded from the study.
Cutting shops with ! or more workers were included.
i
D a t a relate to a S eptember 19S1 payroll
period.
2/ Excludes premium p a y for overtime and night work.
3/ Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages b y method of wage payment.
(a) A ll or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.

Table B-336s

fy o u

n d t u e i,

fto

n

l*M

*u

A

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
eemingB

2/

A l l plant workers

U56

$

,

1.1*9

,.00
and
onder
L.05

$

$

%
1.05

1.10

1.15

1.20

1.25

1.30 1.3 l.Uo
5

10 2*21 1.20 2*21 Ial0 2*21

22

UU

76

32

l.Uo 2

39

* n

2
5

1.1*5

So

li

i 5 1.55
.o

1.601.65

1.70

aSS

.60

1.6 5 1 . 7 0

2*21

16

10

1.75

1.80

80 1*81

1.85

* 20.

1.90

1.95

2 .0 0

2*21 2.00 1,0£

130

Selected Plant Occupations

Chippers and grinders
Coremakers, hand ....
Coremakers, machine .
Furnace tenders .....
Molders, hand, bench
Molders, floor ......
Molders, machine ....
Shake-out m e n .......

1/
4]

75

U1

1.31

19

1.78

6

1.36

21
6U

1.1*7
1.79
1.85
1.71
1.33

19
37
7

The study covered independent nonferrous foundries (except die-casting foundries) with 8 or more workers.
Data relate to a July
ti_ e
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
Data limited to men workers.
All or a majority of workers in each occupation shown were paid on a time basis.




Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., A p r i l 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

M aekin&uf

Table B-35«

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2/

Machinery

Number
of
workers

$
5
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
:
$
$
$
$
Average
hourly Under 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
earnings
$
and
3/ 1.0 0 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 over

U

|
Assemblers, class A* Total ................. .......
Assemblers, class B: Total ....................... .

562
282
280
766
481
284
302
165
137
67
129
143
109
284

Incentive ................ .
Assemblers, class C: Total........ ...... ..... .
Time ......................
Incentive .................
Electricians, maintenance b/a
Inspectors, class A 6/ a ........ ............... .
Inspectors, class B "s / b . ................... .......
Inspectors, class C s/a ................ ..... .
Janitors, porters, and cleaners £ / a ............
Machine-tool operators, production.
class A 6/: Total..... ........... ............. 1,777
Time ••••..... ............. ......
874
Incentive ••••....................
903
Automatic-lathe operators, class A 5/a .•••••.....
20
Drill-press operators, radial.
class At Total ..............................
138
Time .............. ..... ........
49
Incentive ...................... ..
89
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class A: Total ............... .......
113
Time .................... .
31
Incentive ...............
82
Engine-lathe operators, class A: Total ...........
296
Time .........
161
Incentive ......
135
Grinding-machine operators,
olass At Total .............. ...............
230
Time ................... T__ t,ttl
122
Incentive ............. ...........
108
Milling-machine operators.
class At Total
.... ............ .....
207
Time .......... ..... .............
77
Incentive ........................
130
Screw-machine operators, automatic,
olass At Total
75
Time ..........
47
Incentive .......... ............. .
28
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
sorew machine), olass At Total •...............
341
Time ...••....... .
144
Incentive ..........
197
Machine-tool operators, production.
olass B 6 / x Total .......... .................... 1,374
Time ...... .... ....... •••••...... 1,013
Incentive ........................
361
Automatic-lathe operators, class B 5/a ......... .
24

$
1.79
1.68
1,91
1.57
1*50
1.68
1.43
1*36
1.52
1.71
1.79
1.58
1.32
1.18
1.79
1.66
1.92
1.89

_

_

_

.

_

_

«
.
6
6

_
1
1

_

_

-

14
14

_
9
9

_

11
11

_
12
g
6

20
18
2
23
16
7

1
12
43

10
51

23
18
2
1
1

20

22

2
17

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

1
1

9
39

1
1

1
1

35
28
7
19
11
8

30
18
12
46
41
g

7
27
4
11
44 ! 28
i
-1 9
9
_

_

59
39
20
60
39
21
Q
O
3
15
31
23
8

1.82
1.58
1.96
1.75
1*48
1.85
1.77
1.66
1.89

162
93
to
oy
41
1
40
9

78 247
57 182
21
65

369
244
125
1

399
259
140
10

30
20
10

14
•z
U
11

10
10
_

_

_

_j

_
-

_1
-

-!
!
-;

_
-(

_

_

_

1.79
1.60
2.00

-

-

t
-!

_

.

1.85
1.63
1.98

-

-

-1
i

_
-

_

1

_j

_

_

1
_

9
Q
3
7

_
-

•

_

I
-!

-

-

_

_

_

1
1

_

-:
I

1

_

j

|

1
1

18
12
6
_

_

-

:
-

_

-!

1.85
1.77
2.00

6
c
u
1
1
o
C
2
4
p
C

2
-

-

_

_

_

-

9|
6
3!

1
1
'

9
9
8
5
3

18
17
1
4

32
27
5

42
39
3

154
131
23
4
l
1

183
162
21
3

22
16
6

Q
y
pn
bl
1A
Xf
4c
18

16
6
7
6
9
30 | 110
27
82
3
28

18

13

A
%

6

0
8

XO

8

1f
l
Xq
2

10

8

6

8

2

_

171
62
109
2

120
IQ
xy
101
2

119
1A
XO
104
1

81
o
78
1

39

58

28

18

5

2

_

1

_

39
3

58

28

18

5

2

_

1

_

14

8

13

12

1

11

2

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

_

1

_

«
•

_

_

1

_

1

1

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

4

4

3

2

5

14

11

11

10

188 j 72
11 r
XX7 1

g

6
19
1

11

15
39
io ! O
*
Z
xy
i 12
20

COO

•
i

X

3
X

6

317

_

X

1
X
y

1

_ i OA
r
7 | XO '
t
l 1f |
1
i 8i
I
46
86 ■ 94 |
j A9 i oo
31
15
44 : 39 |

1

1

Q
2
2
1A
XO
An ' 12
ou
c
o

2

X

|

4
9

4
5

3
8

2
4

19

9

5

8

10

15

4

9

7

10

15

4

4
4

3

8

2

1

_

_

8

2

1

_

1

_

11

13

12

11

13

A

A

•Z
3

X

2

3

3

22

12

2

6

1

31 j 17

22

12

2

6

1

3

_

3

_

16

0

10

18

8

1

A
T
C

16

10

18

8

_
_

_

12

8

1

«
■

_

8

6

36

3

7

18 ‘

y

5

9

18

A

_
_

4

2
1f
t
xo
2I 2
1
31
21

66 | 32
i
4

71
3

4

2
2
_

_

_

11

36
if !
t
xo i
18

49

3

1

42
35
7

267
236
31
4

13
y

12

-

15
10
5

14
2

7
”

13

35 ; 42
ox j oo
4
7

2

OO
cc
14

16
8

34
y
PA
bO
10

8

58
•Q
»
oy
19

X

22

59
13
AA
wQ
16

10 I 10
9
o
7« 9
10
37 ! 16
50
OK I
22
12
16
28

j

13
in
XU
3

_

1.75
1.65
1.81
1.52
1.47
1.67
1.51

43 148
29
26
35
94
f
t 54
3
91 262 149
QA
71 198
64
20
55
54
20
22
g
18
14
36
21
3
Q
15
A
7
X
i xc
<
5 16
60
7
16
2

«.

1
_

_
_

1
|

J
____

See footnotes at end of table •

217527 0 - 52 -3




Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

M aclU n otof OndtUbUoA 1/ - C o n tin u e d

Table B-35*

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2/

Machinery

U

Number
o
f
wres
okr

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Aeae
vrg
hul
ory
2.90 3.00
e r i g Gnder 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80
anns
and
? .o o
1 /
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25‘1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 over

- Continued

Machine-tool operators, production,
class B 6/: - Continued
Drill-press operators, radial,

%

g
5
1

1.65
1.43

Drill-press operators, single- or multiple-

Engine-lathe operators, olass B 5/a .............
Grinding-machine operators,
class Bs Total ............... ..............
Tim© ###»«#*§•••• •
•
•
TnAAn+.IT A -TttT-TT_TT-TtTTTTlItttIII
T
Milling-machine operators,
olass B: Total ............... ........ .....
1I Tri_T___r-T-T--rirf|||,,,,
TA
Incentive .......................
Screw-machine operators, automatic, class B 5/a ...
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including handH
«nrmr ma eh!ra J d a«« B ^ *rta | rrttttrttrrtTtiti.
i
Pt
m a ffiTirr
1111
TrinairHtta ttttttftit
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C 6 / t Total .............................
Incentive .......................
An+’ m t H
. f'
n
a^ ia npnwofrtra nlaes P RAi riiiiiiii
V
Drill •pr’
Aim nponn--r* radial nlasa f fiA iiitaria
tn*
.
Drill-press operators, single- or multiplespindle, class
Trvhal _TTTt.
TtTtTTtTttTTT.-tTTtT
TItoa TTTttTTT.-irTTt-.rrrfTr,
Tnnari+itta
Pln^inA-1 ni:hA npArn+nrs nlona D. Tafal TtTT.... f
^mA iirriii
Incentive .....
Grinding-machine operators, class C 5/a .........
Milling-machine operators,
nlftaa P.
] ir»TtrrtttTT-Ttiti» ■
* M n rirriirtitT-tiiirTii
|*A
ai i
i
TnaAn"it t a TTT- - - - __ . . T . . T . T . . t T T r r t t <
h
Screw-machine operators, automatic, olass C 5/a ...
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand
8nrAW mflnhinoJ n]a ^ P . f + i1 T .
. nj
t rrTTTTfTTtTIt,t
l
Tnnfln+itta
___rit
Machine-tool operatorst toolroom 6/a
......
Machinists, product! on f^a ,,tfr,r............
i/
Tool and-die makers (tool-and-die jobbing shops) jj/a ..
Tool-and-die makers (other than jobbing shops) < / ••
ja
Stock- hand! era and trnnlrera Viand f / IttTT-r_-..-T.T
ia
Welders, hand, class 4 5/t ,TTf.T T T _TTT ..........T
T
Welders, hand, olass B lya ............ ...........

See footnotes at end of table.




li
f?
94
58
143

1

$
6

1.50
1,41
1.64
1.52

_

_

_

1.
1
3

179
136
43

1.61
1.46
1.67

-

142
70
72
37

1.58
1.45
1.70
1.61

-

-

.

3

-

_

_

_

3

1.55
1.49
1.68

687
429
158
29
15

1.34
1.27
1.50
1.36
1.54

11
11

73
38
35
26
16
10
41

1.36
1.31
1.41
1.35
1.33
1.37
1.40

3
3

1

83
45
38
16

1.40
1.32
1.49
1.33

70
54
16
99
272
105
202
147
168
197

1.39
1.34
1.53
1.64
1.79
1.89
1.82
1.30
1.69
1.56

-

.

.

j

-

4
4

1
1

15
15

-

1
1

3

:

6
g
1
2
l

3
18
18

12
12

4
4

i

1
!
I
I

38
35
3
4

8
7
i
_
_

1

_

-

1

2

_
6

3
1
2
4

c
o
c
o

_
i

44
36
6

86
74
12

4
1

4
4
3
g
12
4
4

7
2
5
7
;
7
12
X1

j

_

4

2

2
2

2
i

31
24
7
1

1
X

-

_
2

54
53
1
8

2
2

19
17
2

3
3

24
19
5
19

g
9

1

_

228
151
77

4
4

4
1
3

i

"

”

“

7

15

16

2

"

“

3

11

6

3

4

3

3

3

1

3

3
2

3

X
1

3
3

_

_

_

_

.

-

_

_

3

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

2

-

-

_

_

2

25
18
7
22

35
26
9
67

13

6

13
9

3
4

8
5
3

26
23
3

56
49
7

24
19
g

24
20
4

10

5

2

10

g

2

3

20
15
5

25
19
6
1

11
11

15
g
7
16

18

3

2

2

7

1

18
1

3
3

2

2

7

1

5

26
11
15
11

24
23
1

27
23
4

43
36
8

54
48
6

38
21
17

18

7

4

3

4

18 t

7

4

3

4

109
QD
9v
19
3
5

56
33
22
4
1

39
17
22

43
17
26
3
1

22
l
21
2
2

16
6
10
4
2

-

6

-

1

_

6

_

1

2

3

2
1
1

3
1
1

3
6

19
11
8
"
_
2
CO

91
cx

5
5

19
19

4
1
3
14
3
11

15
13
2
3
3

1
10
4
3
3
3
2

1

1

u

x

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

2

“1
j

1

-

2

-

1

-

-

2

-

4
5
-

4

6

11

3

g
3

11

3

2

g

3

9
C

5
22
34

*
o
33
49
10
28

36
53
15
58

95
20
66

2
2
10
21

14
20
19

3
19

110
15

XX
13

13
6

7
3

3
5

2
1

2
3

26
16

4

15
11
4
9

5

31

3

12
2
10

6
3

6

32
27
g

i
\

11

1C
M

04
38
46

18

Q

7

23

21

I

J

!
j

6

XX

91
bX
84

-

3

2

1

2

-

4

1

-

-

_

_

_

1

"

“

“

“

-

“

"

1

M a cJu n H f 9*td*uU i*i V - QrmtiHumd

Table B-35*

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2/

Number
of
workers

$

Average
hourly
earningB

$

$

$

s

$

$

$

$

$

$

s

$

$

%

$

$

s

$

s

$

$

$

s

1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .A0 1.A5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2. A 2.5C 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.0C
C
_
and
1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.A0 1.A5 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.A0 2.5C 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 over

3/
Machine-Tool Accessories
%

Janitors, porters, and cleaners j5/a............
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A * / , £/.......................... .
>a
Grinding-machine operators, class A ^/a .......
Machine-tool operators, production, class B j / , 6/.
>a
Grinding-machine operators, class B j / .......
ja
Machine-tool operators, production, class C jj/ , 6/.,
a
Grinding-machine operators, .class C 5/a .......
Milling-machine operators, class C ji/a.......
Machinists, production j / ....................
>a
Tool-and-die makers (tool-and-die
jobbing shops) £/a ........................

1A

1 .1 2

2

2

2

3

25
18

1 .6 6

_

_

_

1

-

-

6

-

-

-

62

17
95
16

1.67
1.35
1.A5
1.15

_

_

18

7

A

2

1
2

3

2
1

1

A

91

1 .2 1
1 .2 6
1 .6 8

15
3
5

1
6

105

1.89

-

-

-

12

33

-

5
A

-

_

_

13
A
5

3

11

2
1

7

6

6

A

5

2

A

8
8

1

1

1

3
6

-

16

17

31 21

-

-

2
-

-

6

-

10

15 20

10

20

19

5

-

i/
by the
2/
2/

^ study covered establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in nonelectrical machinery industries (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (1945 edition) prepared
Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 3543) with more than 7 workers were also included. Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
Data limited to men workers.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U
Includes data /or machine-tool accessory establishments (Group 354-3) for which separate data are also presented.
Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.
(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
&/ Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
Table B-5452t

M

ilk

jb e c d e M , V

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation 2/

Number Average \ ----- 1 ---- “1----- f ----- 1 ----- 1 ----- *
~4— 4
~ T “ “1
*
1 ----- 1 ---- T - 1 ---- 4
4
4
4
1 ----- 1 ----hourly
of
1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.A0 1.A5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15
workers earnings «nH
1/ under
1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 pU3L 1.40 1.A5 1.50 1.55 1.60 1,65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20

4
E n g i n e e r s , s t a t i o n a r y ................................ <
F i l l i n g - m a c h i n e t e n d e r s ...............................
M e c h a n i c s , a u t o m o t i v e (maintenance) ............... .
P a s t e u r i z e r s ............................................
R e f r i g e r a t o r m e n .............................. ........
S a n i t a r y m e n ...........................................
T r u c k d r i v e r s , m e d i u m (l£- to a n d including A tons)
Tr u c k drivers,
h e a v y (over A tons, trailer type) .
W a s h e r s , b o t t l e , m a c h i n e .................... ...... .
W a s h e r s , can, m a c h i n e ................................ .

23
115
99
41
125
60
32
61
67
17

1.82
1.A6
1.66
1.56
1.46
1.46
1.5A
1.63
1.A5
1.36

-

_

_

_

_

5

_

_

_

-

67

-

-

10

-

-

2

3
7A
50

5

_

-

5

_

_

_
-

_

-

5
5

5

_

_

_

5

_
-

-

5

5

30
11

1
29
7

-

21
6
18
19
1

1
3
2
7

6
6
16
10
1
11
A
7

1
25
1

1

5
26
3

12

A
1

2

1

1

2

5

38
7

-

-

-

2
_

_

_

1
2
31

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

Occupation 2/

Average
Number
weekly
of
workers earnings
u

Routemen (driver-salesmen),
wetail i Total.... ............. .
5-day workweek ............ .... .
M a v uorkvealt ........... .. ... ....
Routemen (driver-salesmen),
wholesale t Total * / ..............
»
5-day workweek

----- T ----- f
60.00
50.00
55.00
and
under
65.00
55.00
60.00

1 ---- " 1 ---- “ 1 ---70.00
75.00
65.00

77.00
77.00
79.00

328
299

74.50
75.00

“ 4--4
90.00
85.00

95.00

----100.00

4
105.00

4
110.00

"1---115.00
120.00

%

70.00

75.00

80.00

85.00

90.00

95.00

100.00

105.00

110.00

115.00

21
13
8

24
10
14

10
1
9

12

5

12

5

5

—
_

—
_

—
_

_

-

—
_

%

1231
1007
224

80.00

%

16
1
15

29
9
20

91
74
17

104
80
24

225
207
18

296
277
19

33A
294
40

59
41
18

_

5

1
1

1
1

156
132

165
165

—
_

_

5

_

_

L _ _
1/
(19A9
2/
2/
f j
y

The study covered retail «-nv dealer establishments with more than 20 workers engaged in the distribution of dairy products (Group 5452) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual
edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work; all workers were paid on a time basis.
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Straight-time earnings (includes commission earnings).
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Includes data for workers on other than 5-day workweek.




9 tU u b C L * U > e G & W U eb& s

Table B-63*

Average

Occupation and sex

2/

Number
of

workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIN
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
o .30.00
:
C
Under 30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 40.00 42.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.0 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95- OOlLOO.OOtLlO. 00(121o.o H
and
1
30.00 32.50 35.00 37.50 Z 0 0 A2.50 45.00 47.50 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.0C 75.QO 80.00 85-.Q 90.00 95.Q0;"in0-00|L10-Q0(l20-QQjl■30.0C- QYer
..0
Q

$

Weekly
Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

1/

$

$

$

i

i

Men

Clerks, accounting ..................
Section heads ........................................
Tabulating-machine operators ..........
Underwriters ..........................................

111
184
54
324

37.5
37.0
37.5
37.5

*
49.00
78.50
51.00
79.00

95
388
79
54
111
906
51
374
351
267
291
299
84
137
923
96

37.0
37.0
36.5
38.0
37.0
38.0
36.5
37.0
38.0
37.5
37.5
37.5
37.5
37.0
37.5
37.0

34.50
43.50
40.00
49.00
41.50
34.00
57.50
39.00
44.50
39.50
57.00
40.50
46.50
41.00
36.50
58.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

!

”

|

-

!

!

3 |

2

7

28

14

-

1

10

5

1

-

1
2

40
4
8
3

1

10
7
19

13 | 1
15 | 13
1
13
23
23

7
8
4
28

25
53

19

23

53

.32

20

13

14

20

17
i 22

Women

Assemblers .................. .....
Clerks, accounting .................
Clerks, actuarial ..................
Clerks, correspondence, class B ........
Clerks, file, class A ...............
Clerks, file, class B ...............
Clerks, general ....................
Clerks, premium-ledger-card .......................................
Clerks, underwriters ..........................................................
Key-punch operators .............................................................
Section heads .............................................................................
Stenographers, general .....................................................
Tabulating-machine operators ....................................
Typlsta, class A rrr-.TTT-.T--Tr.TrtrttI,t,
Typists, class B ..........................
Underwriters ................... .

-

-

55

12
12
4
4
233

-

-

-

20
3
9
-

15
-

.
.

_

3

119

47
23
6
9
370
-

26
25
23
-

21
1
2
198

,

7
25
39 ! 40
16
25
8
10
24
154
34
2
56
134
21
48
66
66
1
62
47
7
3
22
33
293 H I

1
2
50 63
7 1 2
6 11
17 1 16
23 25
2
1
57 36
35 55
45 18
13 12
63 35
6 15
38 12
100 28
6
4

1
47
3
9
20
10
-

19
38
26
18
23
19
20
32
3

45
8
2
2
1
2
11
54
3
22
9
12
4
1
11

54
8
2
3
1
5
8
56
11
64
10
10
6

10
5
5

3
6
1

2
5

-

-

-

22
1
6

7
6
10

7

63
13
10

43
1
1

33

3 1 4
13 | 15

;
!

-

1
25 | 5

2

10

1

l/ The study covered establishments employing more than 20 workers in the insurance industry (Group 63) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (194-9 edition) perpared by the Bureau
of the Budget.
2/ Hours reflect the workweek for which employees received their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.




Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

21

C: Union Wage Scales
(Minimum wage rates and maximum straight-time hours per week agreed upon through collective bargaining between employers
and trade-unions.
Rates and hours are those in effect in Boston on dates indicated.
Comprehensive listings of union
scales of wages and hours for bakeries, building construction, motortruck drivers and helpers,
and printing for July
1951 are available
on request.
Similar
information for these industries will be published for
July 1,
1952.)

Build/tUf. Go4tAtkueUo4l

Table C-15:

Tahie 205: QakvUei - GontUmmd
July 1, 1951

July 1, 1952
Rate
per

Classification

♦3.000
2.625
2.800
2.400
2.970
2.695
2.100

Bricklayers... .
Carpenters ..... .
Electricians ....
Painters ......
Plasterers ....
Plumbers...... .
Building laborers

Table C-203*

Sea- 4

W

Hours
per
jSf.
fSc
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

pAO
&eMtHtj,

May 1, 1952
Classification
Cutters, outter-floormen, wharf-floormen ..
_
Floorman ...___...............__ _ ___ _
Sealers ........... ....... ............
General helpers (fillet room), quickfreeze operators.....................
Quick-freeze packers, wrappers ..........

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦1.613
1.510
1.380

40
40
40

1.290
1.190

Glassification

Table C-2062:

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Table 205:

Bok&Uel

July 1, 1951
Classification
Bread and cake - Hand shops:
Agreement A:
Dough mixers ....................
Ovenmen, bench hands ............
Agreement B<
Ovenmen (bread and pies) ... .....
Mixers .........................
Ovenmen (cakes) .................
Head banchmen.... ...... ........
Benohmen .......................
Agreement C:
Ovenmen, dough mixers ............
Banchmen.....................
Agreement D:
Dough mixers, ovenmen............
Benohmen ........................
Agreement Ei
Dough mixers, benohmen, ovenmen ....




Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

♦1.659
1.549

40
40
40
40
40

1.475
1.420

40
40

Hours
per
week

♦1.843
1.830
1.793
1.780

40
40
40
/n

1.530
1.655
1.830
1.755

40
40
/o
40

48
48

1.370
1.350
1.340
1.320
1.270

First men:
Brewing department .................
Bottling department ................
Brewery workers ......................
Bottlers ............................
Apprentices:
First year ........................
Second year .......................
Drivers...........................
Drivers' helpers .....................

1.285
1.235

40
40

1.360

44

Table C-27:

P/UntitU}

July 1. 1951
Classification
Bpfo

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

196 Pfr9Pf»

Bindery women.... ................
Bookbinders, rulers ................
Compositors, hand ..................
Electrotypers .....................

♦1.200
2.237
2.240
2.400

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Machine operators (linotype and
monotype)...................
♦2.240 37 1/2
Machine tenders (linotype and
monotype).......................
2.240 37 1/2
Photoengravers ...................
2.560 37 1/2
Press assistants and feeders:
Single presses:
Cross feeding presses, under
65 in.} pile feeding presses}
cylinder presses (hand feed­
ing)} job automatic cylinder
presses ..................
1.980 37 1/2
1 two-color press, 1 perfecting
press, cylinder presses with
two-pile feeding machines .....
2.080 37
1 cross feeding machine, over
65 inches ••••••••....... ..... 2.020 37 1/2
Job presses •••••............... 1.320 37
Pressmen, cylinder:
1 perfecting press} 1 two-color
press. 2 high-speed cylinder
presses, 25 x 38 in. or larger .
. 2.407 37
1 cylinder press, over 65 in.}
cylinder presses under 65 in.}
with two-pile feeding machines •• 2.317 37 1/2
Cylinder presses, under 65 in....
2.237 37 1/2
Job cylinder presses: Kelly,
Mlehle (vertical or horizontal),
Miller, Simplex or other types .
. 2.237 37
Pressmen, platen:
2 automatic presses ............
2.117 37
Hand-fed presses ...............
2.027 37 1/2
Stereotypers .....................
2.775 37 1/2

1/2

1/2
1/2

M &lt MdqtVVU
Rate
per
hour

Classification
Book and lob shoos: - Continued

___________ May 1, 1952
Classification

c-27: P/UnUnq. GontiMM*d
July 1, 1951

Bread and cake - Machine shops
Agreement A:
(General Agreement)
Bread:
Mixers ..................... ♦1.640
Head ovenmen..............
1.610
Ovenmen, bench hands.......
1.530
Bench helpers, general
helpers .................
1.400
Cake:
Mixers...................
1.610
Ovenmen ..................
1.550
General helpers ... .......
1.340
Agreement B:
Ovenmen, mixers............... ..
1.430
Bakery helpers .................
1.180
Agreement C:
Mixers........................
1.650
Ovenmen ..................... .
1.550
General bakery helpers ..........
1.430
Pie and pastry shops:
Mixers, ovenmen, banchmen...........
1.510

40
40

Taae
ffl

n

1 /2
37 1/2
37 1/2
40

1/2
1/2

flgwgpfrperg
Compositors, hand - day work....
Compositors, hand - night work .....
Machine operators - day w o r k.......
Machine operators - night work .....
Mailers - day work ................
Mailers - night work ..............
Photoengravers - day work ..........
Tint layers ........... ....... T
Photoengravers - night work ........
Pressmen, web presses - day work:
Agreement A ...................
Agreement B ................. T
T
Pressmen, web presses, night work ....
Pressmen-in-charge - day work:
Agreement A ..................
Agreement B ................. T
Pressmen—in—charge — night v i i TT.T,
e*r
Stereotypers - day work ...........
Stereotypers - night work .........

2.674
2.800
2.674
2.800
2.120
2.270
2.846
3.110
3.030

37
37
37
37
37
35
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2.484
2.609
2.898

42
40
36

2.663
2.796
3.107
2.734
3.022

42
40
36
35
31 2 /3

1/2

1/2

1/2

Occupational Wags Surrey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
U s DEPARTMENT OF LAB®
..
Bureau of labor Statistics

22

St'IM.ctu'ial and
O rnam ental 9 nan *kJo*k

Adaia*t>Utch 7b>UU&U
* * d JfelpobL - Qonttm m d

Table C-3U1:

Table C^2<

May 1, 1952

July 1, 1951
Rate
per
hour

Classification
Working foremen ......................
Lay-out m e n ..........................
Welders and mechanics....... .........
He!pars
...... .

Table

$1,920
1.820
1.540
1.300

Hours
per
week
40
40
40
40

Z-lX'HoCol *7*04*01
Q

p &

u z titu }

C

m

fU

o tp a l

October 1, 1951
Classification
1-nan cars and busses:
First 3 Months •
4 - 6 Months •••
7 - 9 months ...
1 0 - 1 2 months .
After 1 year ...

Rate
Hours
per
per
hour___KfiSk.
11.475
1.590
1.625
1.670
1.765

u
a
a
a

iA
iA
iA
iA

a

iA

1.355
1.475
1.510
1.555

2-man cars:
First 3 months
4 - 6 months •
.
7 - 9 months .
.
1 0 - 1 2 months
After 1 year •
<
Rapid transit lines:
Guards:
First 3 months
4 - 6 months .
7 - 9 months •
10 - 12 months
After 1 year .
Motormen:
Road
Tard

41
41
a
a
a

1/4
1/4
1/4
1/4
i/4

a
a
a
a
a
a
a

iA
i/4
iA
iA
iA
IA
iA

1.650

1.355
1.475
1.510
1.555

1.650
1.710
1.765

Matoabinch TbOaaU

Table 0-42!
July 1.1951
Classification

Building:
Construction:
Euclid tractor .................
Concrete mixer .................
Low-bed trailer ................
Dump truck:
Over 1 1/2 tons ..............
Helpers .....................

See footnotes a t end of table.




OoOOH. ^jAOMdfUtat
- Tdetlicem ud PaM onnal

Tabl® ° ^ 5

J h lp o u
Rate
per
how

$1,850
1.700
1.650
1.595
1.395

Hours
per
week

40
40
40
40
40

Classification
Building: - Continued
Material:
Concrete............. .
Helpers ............ .
Lumber ...................
Helpers ....... ........
Wrecking:
1 1/2 tons or lsss.........
Over 1 1/2 tons...........
Carbonated beverages ............
Helpers .....................
C o a l........ ..................
Helpers .....................
Food service:
Retail:
Under 3 tons ..............
3 tons and ove r ............
Furniture - Retail
Agreement A - Large truck.... .
Light truck.............. .
Helpers .................. .
Agreement B ................. .
Helpers .................. .
Agreement C ................. .
Transfer truck .............
Helpers................... .
Agreement D ................. .
Helpers ...................
Garbage disposal ............... .
Helpers.......... ........
General Freight:
Up to 3 ton s................ .
3 - 5 tons.................. .
5 tons & riggers ............ ,
Helpers .................... .
General Hauling:
Up to 3 tons ................ .
3 - 5 tons......... a.........
5 tons and ove r ............. ,
Helpers .................... .
Grocery:
Chain store................. .
Helpers ..................
Wholesale - 3 1/2 tons and under
Helpers ..................
Laundries - Wholesale ............
Linen supply ....................
Helpers .....................
Movers - Piano and household:
Trailer ..... ................
Regular .....................
Helpers .....................
Newspaper:
D a y .........................
Night .......................
Rendering......... .............
Scrap iron and metal ............

1> 1952
Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Type of ship, department and classification

Rate
per
month

Hours
P«*
weeks/

0/

Dry cargo and passenger vessels 1/
$1,500
1.450
1.390
1.340

40
40
40
40

1.080
1.250
1.380
1.180
1.518
1.406

40
40
44
44
40
40

1.475
1.565

40
40

1.374
1.274
1.218
1.300
1.180
1.380
1.288
1.245
1.294
1.188
1.500
1.500

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
44
44

1.500
1.525
1.600
1.475

40
40
40
40

1.500
1.525
1.600
1.475

40
40
40
40

1.679
1.535
1.438
1.308
1.200
1.342
1.089

48
48
40
40
40
40
40

1.350
1.300
1.200

48
48
48

2.160
2.330
1.555
1.200

42
39
40
40

Deck department:
Day men:
Boatswains:
Vessels of
to 15,000 tons .
.
Vessels under 10,000 tons .......
Vessels under 10,000 tons
(passenger) ..................
Boatswain' mates .................
s
Carpenters:
Vessels of 10,000 to 15,000 tons .
.
Vessels under 10,000 tons .......
Carpenter1 mates .................
s
Storekeepers ......................
Watch men:
Able seamen............... .......
Boatswain1s mates .................
Ordinary seamen...................
Quartermaster .....................
Watchmen .........................
Bagine-room department:
Day men:
Assistant electricians .............
Deck engineers ....................
Electricians ......................
Firemen (coal) ....................
Firemen (oil) .....................
Plumber-machinists ................
Refrigerator engineers .............
Storekeepers ......................
Unlicensed junior engineers (freight
ships) .........................
Wipers ............................
Watch men:
Fireman-watertenders ...............
Oilers ...........................
Oilers (Diesel) ................. .
Unlicensed Junior engineers (freight
ships)..... ............. ..... .
Watertenders ......................
Stewards1 department: 2/
Freighters:
Chief cooks .......................
Chief stewards ....................
Messmen ...........................
Stewards-cooks (coastwise only) ....
Passenger vessels: •
Assistant storekeepers:
Class I and II vessels
Chefs:
Class II vessels ................
Class III vessels ...............
Class IV vessels ................
Chief bakers and confectioners:

10,000

Class III and IV vessels ........

$381.68 40
363.73 40
381.68
324.42

40
40

343.68 40
329.51 40
323.52 40
319.53 40
262.89
277.77
226.26
262.89
262.89

40
40
40
40
40

359.48 40
329.51 40
448.72 40
259.56 40
249.56 40
372.14 40
415.42 40
319.53 40
362.81
274.56

40
40

262.89 40
262.89 40
286.54 40
299.51
262.89

40
40

299.51
325.63
226.26
325.63

40
40
40
40

252.89

40

571.24 40
452.69 40
439.37 40
432.71
382.76

40
40

Table C-4 4 :

O&GGH, ^JKMiAfUVU -

Table C-Ui

Oo&CUt ^A&nifUVU -

fyjtli& enied Pee ionnel Continued

fyjtUceuAed PeeAonnnl Continued

Hay 1, 1952

Table

May 1, 1952

Type of ship, department and classification

Rate
per
month

Hours
Type of ship, department and classification
Tankara

Bnr-Cftrgp D d passenger vessels l/- Continued
Stewards* department! 2/ * Continued
Passenger vessels: - Continued
Chief bartenders................
Chief butchers:
Class I and II vessels ••••••••••
Class H I vessels •••••••.....
Chief crew cooks:
Class H and III vessels «•••••••
Chief linenkeepers •••••••••••••••••
Chief pantrymen:
Class I and II vessels ••••••••••
Class III and IV vessels ••••••••
Chief stewards:
Class II vessels............ .
Class H I and IV vessels ••••••••
Chief storekeepers:
Class I and II vessels.....••••
Deck stewards .•••••••••••••••••••••
Galley utility ..................
General utility ............... .
Headwaiters:
Class II vessels ••••••••••••••••
Messmen .........................
Second stewards:
Class II vessels •••••........ .
Class III and IV vessels ••••••••
Silverman ............ *.........*
Stewardesses....... ........... .
Storekeepers:
Class H and IV vessels ••••....
Third stewards:
Class H I vessels........ .
Valters and waitresses ....... •••••
Yeomen:
Class I and II vessels .........
Class III vessels ....... •••••••

$272.87

40

362*11
343.14

40
40

332.81
272.87

40
40

315.50
299.51

40
40

676.44
459.35

40
40

286*20
226.26
226.26
226.26

40
40
40
40

294.18
226.26

40
40

403.40
315.50
239.58
226.26

40
40
40
40

286.20

40

266.21
226.26

40
40

272.87
252.89

40
40

TAnkara 4 /
Deok department:
Day men:
Boatswains..... *.......... ••••• 5/ 374.49
Carpenters •••........ ....... .
5/ 354.63
Deok maintenance (AB) ..... ...... 5/ 316.19
Watch men:
Able seamen •••••••......... .
266.21
Ordinary seamen •••••............ .
232.92
Quartermasters ....... ..... .....
272.87
See footnotes at end of table,




40
40
40
40
40
40

jj

-

Rate
per
month

week 2/

3/$448.72
1/ 372.13
1/ 322.85
2/ 362.81
274.55

40
40
40
40
40

259.55
266.21
266.21
299.50

40
40
40
40

279.52
312.84
345.62
232.92
226.25
279.52
226.25

40
40
40
40
40
40
40

363.73
262.89
266.21
236.24

40
40
40
40

372.13
272.87
272.87
265.69

40
40
40
40

259.55
242.89
276.10
291.10

40

338.86
302.84
269.53
226.25
226.25

40
40
40
40
40

1*

On all vessels carrying explosives in 50-ton lots
or over, and on all vessels carrying sulphur,
cement, cyanide, etc*, in bulk lots of 1,000 tons
or over, 10£ of basic monthly wages is added
while such cargo is aboard, or is being loaded or
unloaded*
2. On vessels operating in described areas of China
and Korean coastal waters, a per diem allowance
of $2*50 and an "Area Bonus" of 100JC of daily
basic wages is added*
3* On vessels attacked, fired upon or struck by mines
of either belligerents, resulting in physical
damage to the vessel or Injury to a crew member,
a "Vessel Attack Bonus" of $125.00 shall be paid
to each crew member.
The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked
per week at sea* At sea, watch men normally work 56 hours
per week with 16 hours (Saturday and Sunday; paid at the
overtime rate* Day men at sea are given compensation (which
is included in this basic monthly wages) in lieu of Saturday
and Sunday work at the overtime rate* In port both day men
and watch men receive overtime rates for work on Saturday
and Sunday*
2/ The maximum straight-time hours which may be worked
per week at sea and in port* Members of the stewards' de­
partment normally work 56 hours per week at sea with 16
hours (Saturday and Sunday) paid at the overtime rate* In
port overtime is paid for work on Saturday and Sunday*
4/ Vage scales and hours per week are those in effect on
July 15, 1951 as approved by the Vage Stabilisation Board,
(tanker vage scales)
2/ New wage effective 2/15/52. V* S. B* approved: Listed
rate8 include increase of 2/15/52.
£/ New wage effective 3A/52. Vage Stabilisation Board
approved.

40
40

Hours

V* ,
*

V

Colliers £/
Deck department:
Boatswains «•••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Quartermasters ••••••••••*•••••••••••••
Able seamen .................••••••••
Ordinary seamen ...... ...... *.......
Engine department:
Maintenance electricians •••••••••....
Oilers........ ...................
Firemen-watertenders ••.•••••••••••••••
Firemen (coal-burning vessels) ••••••••
Firemen (oil-burning vessels and
automatic stokers; ••••••••••......
Coal passers.............. .
Vipers ....... .......t,tttt
Day men *....... ••••••.............
Stewards' department:
Chief stewards •••••••.............
Chief cooks •••................... .
Second oooks ..•••••••••...... •••••»•
Messmen .*••••••••»•••......
Utilitymen ..... *................. .

-

May 1, 1952

- Continued

Engine department:
Day men:
Electricians ................... .
Machinists •••................ •••
Storekeepers •••••••............ .
Unlicensed junior engineers ....•••
Vipers .........................
Vateh men:
Firemen.............*........ .
Oiler...........................
Vatertenders ••••....... *.......
Unlicensed junior engineers ......
Stewards' department:
Assistant oooks •••••*••..... .......
Chief cooks ...... .... .
Chief stewards ................... .
Galleymen.........................
Messmen......... *................
Second oooks and bakers....... ••••••
Utilitymen •••••....... *......... .

floeon

fynli& enled PeMonnnl Continued

*

-

c-44*

2J

Table C-446:
May 1, 1952

L
f)

l/ Vage aealee and hours per week are those In effect on
Deoonber 16, 1951, for Atlantic and Gulf Coast ship operators
under contracts with the National Maritime Union CIO* De­
tails of changes are given in the footnotes following* The
Vage Stabilisation Board approved similar changes for members
of the Seafarers' International Union, AFL, effective Novem­
ber 1, 1951.

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Longshoremen:
General cargo ................... ...... . $2,100
Bulk cargo, ballast and all coal cargoes,
cement or lime in bags ••••....••••••.... 2.150
Vet hides, creosoted poles, creosoted ties,
creosoted shingles, cashew oil, gasoline,
soda-ash in bags, carbon-black, cottonseed meal in bags ••••...... ......... .
2.250
Refrigerated space cargo (temperature
freesing or lower), grain in bulk ........ 2.300
Bags of scrap mica .................. ••••• 2.350

Hours
per
week

40
40

40
40
40

Table c h u 6 i

Steaedo^in^- Continued

Table C-541:

Cj/H & f Stoked
O eSM

Table C-541*

en d M ead ManJzedd Continued

-

-

May 1, 1952

May 1, 1952
Rate

Classification

per
hour

Longshoremen: - Continued
Casks of pickled skins from Hew Zealand
htv8 Australia ••••••••••••••«•••••••••••• #2.600
!
2.850
Naphthalene in bags
Explosives or damaged cargo *•••••••••••••• 4*100

Hours
per
week

40
40
40

Staked
and M ead Ma/ihedd

Table C-541*

Q/lOCOkif

May 1, 1952
Classification

Rate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

Classification

May 1, 1952
Rate
per
hour

Agreement A: - Continued
Part-time clerks, straight grocery
stores: - Continued
Female:
First 6 months ....... ••••••...... 40.750
•800
After 6 months •••••.......... .
.850
After 1 year •••••••..............
Meat department:
Full-time:
Breakdown meat cutters ••••••••....
Meat cutters ....... .......... .
Poultry cutters....... ..........
Fish cutters ....................
Part-time:
Casemen...................... .
Meat cutters ..... •.............

1.555
1.444
1.444
1.333

Hows
per
week

43
43
43

45
45
45
45

45
45
45
45
45
43
43
43
43
43

Part-time clerks, all stores except
straight grocery service:
Male:
First 30 days ....••••••••....... .
After 30 days ................. .
After 6 months....... ••••••..... .
After 1 year ........... .........
Female:
First 30 days .•••••••••....... .
After 30 days ....................
After 6 months ••••••.... .........
After 1 year •••••........... ••••••

.750
.800
.900
.950

43
43
43
43

.750
.800
.850
.900

43
43
43
43

Part-time clerks, straight grocery stores:
Male:
First 6 months.............•••••••
After 6 months....... ...... .
After 1 y e a r .....................

.750
.800
.850

45
45
45




Clerks, full-time, bakery:
Female:
First 4 months ..................
4 to 8 months.... ..............
8 to 16 months..... ............
16 to 24 months ............... .
After 24 months.................
Clerks, part-time, other than bakery:
Male:
First 3 months....••••.........
3 to 6 months............... .
6 to 12 months ••••..... .........
After 12 months .••••••••••••••••••.
Female:
First 3 months .......... ........
3 to 6 months .................. .
6 to 12 months ..................
After 12 months...............

Hours
per
week

Clerks, part-time, bakery:
Female:
» .750
.780
.800
.830
After 12 months •••••••••.........
Table C-6512:

B uilding Sekvice
Hours
Rate
per
per
hour _ week

45
45

.889
•944
1.000
1.044
1.111

45
45
45
45
45

.837
.884
.930
.953
.977

43
43
43
43
43

.791
.814
.837
•860
.884

43
43
43
43
43

.750
.800
.850
.880

45
45
45
45

.750
.780
•830
.860

43
43
43
43

43
43
43
43

May 1, 1952
Classification

1.170
1.450

Agreement A:
Full-time clerks:
Male:
First 30 days .......... ...... .
#0.933
1.000
After 30 d a y s ........ ..........
After 6 months ....... ............
1.044
After 1 year ......... •••••...... . 1.089
After 2 years ................... . 1.156
Female:
First 30 days
.837
.907
After 30 days ........... ••••••••••
After 6 months ••••.......... ••••••
.953
After 1 year •••••.......... ...... 1.000
After 2 years ••••••••........ ••••• 1.047

Rate
per
hour

Classification
Agreement B: - Continued

Agreement B:
Clerks, full-time, other than bakery:
Male:
First 4 months ............ ..... .
4 to 8 months ...................
8 to 16 months ••••.............
16 to 24 months ..................
After 24 months ..................
Female:
First 4 months ..................
4 to 8 months....... ...........
8 to 16 months •••.•«•••••••••••••••
16 to 24 months ............ ••••••
After 24 months ....... ......... .

Cf/IOOe/IAf Staked

an d M ead Mxvdiedd Continued

Agreement A:
Elevator operators, porters, night
cleaners (women), matrons »••••••...... #1.050
1.025
Watchmen
Agreement B:
Elevator operators, porters, night
1.050
cleaners (women) ....................
Firemen .................................. 1.200
Janitors ................................. 1.100

40
40
40
40
40

Jta teU

Table C-7011:
M»y 1, 1952

Classification

Rate
per
hour

Baggage porters, bellmen, doormen ......... #0.490
Bartenders *
Service bars ...................... •••• 1.489
Public bars ........................... 1.385
Cooks *
First................................ 1.730
Rounds •••••••...... ............ •.... 1.600
.780
Dish men or women (wipers) .............. .
.850
Elevator operators •••••«.................
.850
Housemen....... ••••................... •
.790
Maids..................................
.970
Pot washers ................. ...........
Salad men ..........•••••.... ..•••••••••••• 1.123
Salad women •••........ .
- ..........
.
.950
Telephone operators ..................... .
.898
Valters •••••.•.•••......«.»..«.....
.623
Waitresses........ .............. .
.575
Lobby porters......... ..................
.749
Front office cashiers ........... ..... ••••
.937
Timekeepers ....................
.833

Hours
per
week
48
48
48
40
40
40
48
48
48
40
40
40
45
48
48
48
48
48

D:
Table D-l:

Entrance Rates

M inimum Cnbuznoe Rated fo i Riant W&ikeAd 1/

E:

Supplementary W age Practices

Table E-l:

B

J u ^ t

^ b

i f y e te tU

io

l P

a o o

M

O * U

Percent of plant workers in establishments with specified
minimum rates in Manufacturing
Minimum rate (in cents)

All
industries

y

All establishments ....
Under 60 .............
60 ...................
Over 60 and under 65 ....
65 ...................
Over 65 and under 70 ....
7 0 ...................
Over 70 and under 75 ....
7 5 ...................
Over 75 and under 80 ....
80 ...................
Over 80 and under 85 ••*.
8 5 ......................
Over 85 and under 90 ....
9 0 .......................
Over 90 and under 95 •
9 5 ......................
Over 95 and under 100 ...
1 0 0 .....................
Over 100 and under 105 ••
1 0 5 .....................
Over 105 and under 110 ..
.....................
Over 110 and under 115 ..
1 1 5 .....................
Over U 5 and under 120 ..
1 2 0 .....................
Over 120 and under 125 ..
1 2 5 .....................
Over 125 and under 130 ..
1 3 0 .....................
Over 130 and under 135 ..
135 ......................
Over 135 and under 11*0 ..
11*0.....................
Over UtO and under 11(5 ..
11(5.....................
Over 11*5 and under 150 ..
1 5 0 ......................
Over 150 ................

no

Establishments with no
established minimum ...

100.0
1.2
1.6
.5
1.3
3.3
.8

3.7
9.7
2.3
2.7
2.1
5.2
6.0
2.9
1.9
3.2
.3

k.h
3.U
1.0

Durable
Nondurable
goods
goods
Public Whole­ Retail Serv­
Establishments with
utilities* sale trade ices
trade
501 or
501 or
L01-500 more
101-500 more
workers workers workers workers
100.0

100.0

100.0

12.1

-

-

3.8

1* 6
1.

_
-

-

3.2
-

5.8
5.9
.1
21.7
6.8
«
.

12.3
7.6
1.8
3.8
«

a?

_
_
_

_
_
.
_

28.a
7.2
5.6
2.5

8.a
_

5.5

3.a
-

-

2.1
2.3
.3
2.3

a .5
_

1.1

3.5
5 .5
.6

-

1.9

6.2

a.u

i*.0

6.3

.3
-

1.1
-

-

2.1

6.7

2.9

3.1
5.2

2 .a

a. 2

5.2

2.9

-

-

.7

1.0

.1
.8

(3/)
1.3
.7
1.5
13.7

a. 3
5.3

.
.
-

2.9

2 .a
a.2
.2
-

.2
.3
8.7

_
-

-

1.6
-

-

1.0

9.3

19 .0

3.3

_
-

0.6
_
_

10.5
.8
3.3
1.9
sla

a.5

2.3

i.a

a.a
i3.a
a.a

6.8
13.0

19.8
3.8
.6
2.1
3.0
3.6
5.3
2.2

2.6
5.7

28.9
3.2

3.3
.a
.a

1.0

1.2

.2

_

.5
_

_

2.5

2.0

*

a.9

2.9

_

fm

2 .a

_
-

1.9
2.2
7.5

Durable
goods

Nondurable
goods

Machinery
industries

.......

12 .a

a .2

ia.5

5.2

10.1

3.2

8.7

2.6

3.0

1.6

.a

Receiving shift
differential ..........
U n i f o r m cents
(per hour) .........
a cents ............
5 cents ...........
7 cents ............
7 i cents ..........
8 cents ............
8 ^ cents ...........
9 c e n t s ......... .
1 0 c e n t s ......... .
1 2 ^ cents •••••••••
13 cents ...........
15 c e n t s ........ .
17 cents ...........
18 c e n t s ......... .
1 8£ cents .........

11.7

a .2

ia.5

5.1

8.5

3.2

8.7

2.3

2.3

1.6

a.7
.3
1.8
.2
-

1.6

1.8

.a
~
-

7.9
.7
3.1
.2
-

3.1
_

2.3

.2
_

1.6
-

1.6
-

1.6

1.6
_

.a
.2

.6
.2

_

U n i f o r m percentage ...
5 p e r c e n t ...... .
7 p e r c e n t ...... .
7^ perc e n t .........
8 p e rcent .........
1 0 percent ........
1 2 £ p e r c e n t .......
15 p e r c e n t ........

Full day*s pay for
reduced hours ... .

.2
.1
.1

-

(2/)
(|/)
.2
.3
.1
.6
.1

.3
.1
.1

(2/)

7.0
.5
.5
5.8
.2
-

-

.i
(2/)

-

-

-

.9
.6

-

.6
.1

-

1.1

-

.2
•1
2.6
-

.3
-

-

-

-

-

12.7
.8
1.0

.1
(2/)
71
1.9
io.5
.a
.5
-

a.7
-

.i
(2/)

-

.1
.7
i.a
.7
.2
.2

_
.6
.1

-

.1
(2/)

ih

_
1. 0
.2
.1

-

.3
.2
.1

.1
(2/)

-

.3
_
.6

.1
-

_
_

_
_

-

_
_

_

_
-

_
_

_

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
-

i.a

.1

-

-

-

6.3
.

2.1

.7

-

.
-

-

_

-

.
-

3.6
1.0

.5
-

a.i
2.2

.

-

-

-

i.a

-

-

-

.1

(2/)

-

-

(2/)

(2/)

(2/)

(2/)

-

.7

(2/)

(2/)

.1

.7

i.6

.7

.a

5.a

2.9
1.5
3.1

10.6

9.5

19.1

Receiving no
differential..... .

3.0

1.9

.3

.
7

22.0

11.2

30.6

1/ Lowest rates formally established for hiring either men or women plant workers other than
watchmen.
2/ Excludes data for finance, insurance, and real estate.
3 /
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.




P e rcent of workers
on extra shifts,
all establishments

.
.

.7

1.5

Candy and
other con­
fectionery
products
3d or
3d or
3d or
3d or
3d or
2d
2d
2d
2d
2d
other
other
other
other
other
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift
shift

All
industries

aTa

1.2
1.5
11.9
3.7
1.3
1.3

a .5

1.5

-

a.i

8.0

A l l manufacturing industries 1/

Shi f t differential

100.0

.1

.2

-

2.9
1.1

12.7

100.0 100.0

.a

7.9
2.0
6.7

2.7

•*
1

.5
6.0
3.7

_
.
.
_
_
_
.

2.9
39.9
2.3

2.9
•U
8.7
•U

1.6

100.0

5.a
•
-

6.8
1.9
32.U

1.1*
1.0

100.0

Percent of plant workers employed
on each shift in -

1/ Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
?/ Less than .05 of 1 percent.

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

ScU edul& d W + eJibf

Table E-2s

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS

2/ EMPLOYED

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN

IN -

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

W e e k l y hours

A l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .........................
Under

35

hours

..............................

35 h o u r s ......................................
O v e r 35 a n d u n d e r 37i h o u r s ........... .
37i h o u r s ................................... .
O v e r 37^ a n d u n d e r 1*0 h o u r s ..... ....... .
k O h o u r s ..... ................................
Over

1*0 a n d

under

lib

h o u r s ...............

lili

h o u r s .......... ...........................
O v e r li.li. a n d u n d e r 1*8 h o u r s .............. .
U8 h o u r s ....................... ............. .
O v e r J 8 h o u r s ............................ .
U

AU
indus­
tries

100.0

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

_

0.7
7.5
Hi. 7
18.1
17.lt
38.3
.9
.li

5.6
2.0
lli. 9
7.6
61.5
.6
.2

_

•

2.0

7.6

3.1
li.9
30.5
8.U
52.6

-

3.7
6.8
68.0
1.0
_
_

.5

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

100.0
3.8
.6
5U.3
1.5
39.8
_

100.0
2.1i
3.7
li.O
15.9
lli. 8
56.7
1.6
.9
-

100.0
3.1i
21.1*
13.5
32.3
28.9
.5
.
-

100.0
0.9
10.6
30.0
16.8
25.9
15.8
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13.0

“

Services

All
indus­
tries

AU

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

y

_

7.5

Public
utili­
ties*

~

-

-

100.0
0.2
12.8
7.9
15.2
12.5
li2.7
5.3
2.7
-

*
■

.7

100.0
1.2
.7
.5
li.7
2.9
70.3
3.6
2.9
3.8
7.1i
2.0

0.9
.1
.7
7.1

0.6
C3/)
2.8

1.2
.li
l.li

11.8

-

-

-

77.1*
3.8
l.li
1.9
5.0
1.7

7li.3
7.2
l.li
3.5
7.9
2.3

80.9
-

1.3
-

1 .9
1.1

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

_

_

-

-

-

88.0
-

1.8
3.8
6.1i

-

-

78.1i
3.8
6 .9
1.6
5.7
3.6

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

_

1.8
.7
3.7
16.0
50.6
li.9
6.6
9.0
5.9
.8

5.U
.1
2.1
32.1i
li.9
6.b
12.3
36.1*

‘

Data relate to women workers.
Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .0$ of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

1 /
y
y

Pmid Jfolidayl

Table E-3:

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Nuntoer of paid holidays

All establishments ............. .
Establishments providing
paid holidays ....................
1
5
6
7

to l days .................... .
i
days .........................
days.........................
days .........................
days ............... .........
8 days.................. .......
8£ days........... .............
9 days .........................
9i days ........................
10 days..................... ..
10£ days.......................
11 days ....................... ■„
ll£ days.......................
12 days .........................
13 days ...................... .
l i days .........................
l
15 days ........................
16 days .........................

l\

Establishments providing
no paid holidays .......... .

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Non­
durable
goods

u n i­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

AU

Durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.8

99.lt

99.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

75.2

100.0

AU
indus­
tries

1.5
.9
2.5
2.U
2.3
5.9
.1
5.0
.9
21.2

_
2.3
l.t
il
5.3
8.3
11.5
_
l.
t8
28.0
33.8

1.3
3.6
3.1
13.2
15.0
_
1.6
•
2
3.lt
_
37.8

_
l .o
i
5.7
9.0
5.5
10.1

.6
1.0
.1
.8
.1
.7

.t
I
.6

-

36.0
27.1
•
1.1
1.5

2.2

.6

1.0

“

s s




PubUc
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

100.0

100.0

88.0

100.0
9.5
1.5
30.7
12.1
lli.l
7.0
1.9
16.0
6.0
-

«
-

_
11
.*
18.6
35.7
12.2
11.7
3.6
3.9
.9
-

6.3

12.0

AU
indus-

1
p

•
2.9
1.5
-■
.8
2.7
.3
55.0
36.8
-

3.6
1.7
2.6
.9
11.7
31.3
•
l7l
t.t
.8

ll
.i
3.U
18.3
15.3
.2
16.8
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

Services

AU

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

97.1

87.5

93.7

3.0
1.6
11.3
77.8
1.6
2.6

_
3.2
7.0
i.
t3
13.2
«
11.I
t
3.1
8.1
39.0
~
-

l.
t5
ll
.t
2lt 3
.
2it.6
6.5
12.9
»
5.2
.9
9.6
3.3
-

-

-

7.8

7.0
1.6
17.1*
16.9
3.7
ll.lt
.2
5.0
.6
Ht.6
»
8.8
.3
•
-

2.9

12.5

19.8

1/ Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.

y

Finance**

-

2* 8
1.

-

2.1
-

-

.5

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

88.3

98.1

73.l
i

59.5

l.
t7
l.
t8
8.1
lt.9
1.6
2.8
lt3.8
17.6
-

_
2.8
6.1
li.0
l.
t5
1.6
23.7

22.lt
71
.t
5.5
l* 8
i.
-

2.9
8.1
16.1
8.5
8.5
2.2
.6
2.2
10.lt
-

-

19.lt
3.9
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"
11.7

-

1.2
•

-

21.2
3li.2
-

1.9

26.6

-

-

1*0.5

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
U. S. DEPARTMENT CF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

P a id V& ocUlcm l (fyokm al Pa o4 AIohA)
m

Table E-4*

P E R C E N T O F O F F I C E W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN—
M a n u f a c t u r in g

Vacation policy
All
indus­
tries

A l l establishments

P E R C E N T O F P L A N T W O R K E R S E M P L O Y E D IN

................. ........

All

Durable
goods

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Non­
durable
goods

Public
uii
tl­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

y

Non­
durable
goods

Public
uii
tl­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.6

98.9

99.3

100.0

98.5

100.0

95.5

100.0

9 8 .it

•it
60.1

.7
81.3
it.o
12.6

1.3
85.2
2.2

1 ye a r of service
E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h p a i d v a c a t i o n s .....
U n d e r 1 w e e k ............................ .
1 w e e k .....................................

_

O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ..............
3 w e e k s ............. ............. ........

7.1
.u
86.7
<2 / )
578

O v e r 3 w e e k s .................. ..........

-

Over 1 and under 2 weeks
2 w e e k s ................. ............... .

Establishments with no paid vacations

••

(2/)

10. 7
1.5
8$.5
•

7.9
•
89.8
-

15.5
it.o
78.1
•

_

..

_

1.3
-

9.1
-

16.6
•

1.1

15.2
-

98.7
-

90.9

8 3 .it
•

87.5

73.1
.5
10.8

-

•

2.3

2.3

2. i
t

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

n.it

-

-

.it

2.3
35.3
.7
•1

.7

9.9
l.il

_
76.9
5.9
15.7
.
_

_
18.1
* -

30.0
_

23 . 8
_

71.2
_

81.9

65.5

76.2

23.8
_

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.3
2.1

1.1

.7

-

1.5

-

it. 5

-

1.6

2 years of service
E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h p a i d v a c a t i o n s .....
1 week

.....................................

Over 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ••••••••••••
2 w e e k s ..... ...... .......................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 w e e k s ....................... ............
O v e r 3 w e e k s ............ ... ......... • • • • •
Establishments w i t h no paid vacations

..

100.0

100.0

100.0

loo.o

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.6

99.3

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

95.5

100.0

9 8 .it

2 .3
.6

lt.it
1.8

2 .8
•

6.9
5.0

.it
.8

2.2
•

•it

1.1

3.9
-

itl.l

60.it
21.2

6o.6

15.3

16.0
•

3.1

it2.1
_

89.7

91 . 5
<
»

9U .9

85.7
-

97.8
•

93.9

85.0
-

82.3

i ii.5
t
•

60.0
lit. 8
25.2

8ii.7
-

79.5
-

93.3

52.9
•

-

3.6

(2/)
7T U
(2/)

98.8

-

-

5 .7

.5
12.9

2.3

2.3

2 .it

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12.3

17.7

26.9
11.1

_

1 .3
•1

l.ii

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.3
2.1

•it

.7

-

-

-

-

ii.5

-

1.6

100.0

99.6

99.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.1

100.0

1.1
-

1.1

5.6

5.7

1.1
_

10.9

6.6

3.5

2.7
•

12.8
•

5 ii.7

67.9
.5
30.1

8 0 .it

88.5
2.2

90.7
-

91.0

1.3
12.1

i 9.0
t
-

69.9
_

2.7

* 3.6

U 8.3

13.9

.7

$ y e a r s of service
Establishments with paid vacations

• • • • •

1 w e e k ........ ......................................................................... ...
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ............................ ...
2 w e e k s ................... ................
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ..............
3 w e e k s ...................... .............
Over 3 weeks

.9
m
lk.l
3.0
21.6

100.0

100.0

.8

100.0
2.1

•

-

9 2 .it

97.1
«

1.5
5.3

100.0
*

100.0
.9

•

100.0
.it
.

8ii.5
it.O

99.0
-

9&.1
-

it9 . 8
-

1.0

U 9.8

..

2.9

9 .1
t

1.0

.it

............ ............. .

Establishments with n o paid vacations

100.0

-

-

-

•

-

-

(2/)

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.5
36.5
1.2
-

9ii.6

81.7

3.6

2.9
l.ii

l.lt
6.0

9 8 .it

-

.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

13.6
2.1

.it

.5

-

-

-

-

1.9

-

1.6

99.6

99.5

15 y ears of service
Establishments w i t h paid vacations

.....

1 week

.....................................
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ..............
2 w e e k s ........................ ..........

O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ..............
3 w e e k s • • • • • • • • • ........................
O v e r 3 w e e k s .............................
Establishments wi t h no paid vacations

..

100.0

100.0

100.0
•

.5
-

.8
•

37.5
3.0
5 U .6

50.2

52.9

1.5
i .5
t7

U 7.1

lt.it

100.0
2.1
•

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

98.1

100.0

9 8 .lt

(2/)

-

l 5.8
t
it.0
U8.1
-

.9
•

•it

1.1
.

5.6
•

5.7

1.1
•

10.9
.
.

6.6
•

3.5

2.7

12.8
•

11.2

7 U .6
•

33.8

18.2

it7 . 6

i .2
l9

70.8

25.1

-

-

39.8

1.3
37.3
6.1

69.9
•

26.0

.5
itO.7
9.7

i ii.5
t
-

2it.5

ill. 7
l.ii
ii6.0

69.5
-

88.8

59.5
2.9
36.5

22.6

6.5
73.2
2.1

5i.i
2.2

18.9
33.9

i o .5
5.2

m
e

-

-

«
m

*

•it

.5

-

.

itl.O
-

-

-

-

*
*

-

1.9

1.6

'

V

Includes data for Industries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
*
Transportation (excluding railroads), conimmication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.
2 j




Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

P a id B lo k JHa&ua (tyokm al PAo viU tutf)

Table E—51

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

A
O

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

utili­
ties*
*

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

All
indus­
tries

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Servioes

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

3 .1

28.8

29.3

7 .7

1 3 .6
2 .0

2 .8

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

y

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

37.5

36.9

39.7

32.3

1 .1
*6

38.9

21*. 0

37.0

1
*7.0

8.6

1.5

.9

3.2
12.3
5 .1

l* .l

7.1
*
11.7
3.2
5 .0
3.5
13.2

3.7
1.0
.1
2.0

1 year of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...............
Under 5 days.................... .
5 days............ ..............
6 days .........................
6 days .........................
10 days ........................
11 days ........................ ,
12 days ........................
15 days ........................ .
16 days ............... ........ ,
20 days ........................
Over 20 days ....................
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ................

.2
6.9
1.6
.*
1
1 6 .1

32.1

6 .7
1.1
*

2.3
.9

11*. 2
2.2

17.6

22.5

9.6

8.3

2.7

.5

1 .0
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.9
11*. 8
-

.9
3.3
3 .1
1 .1
2 .)*
1.5

1.
*6
-

-

3.5
2.9

h .h

2.3

1.9
3.9

1*.7

62.5

63.1

60.3

67.7

53.9

6l

. l

37.8

36.9

39.7

32.3

1 .1
*6

3.8
1. 1*

2.3

6. 1
*

-

.9
-

2.2
-

19.3
1.7

17.5

1.9
2.9
-

9.6
-

-

3.1
*
_
-

-

21.3
1.7
l *. l *
2.7
2.8

-

:
.
_
_
-

1 .6

.6

_
.
.
•
.
.7

100.0

-

.3
.5

_

.8

_
_
_
_
_
-

-

6 .8

1.5

_
-

5 .5
.1

96 .9

71 .2

70.7

92.3

3 .1

28.8

33.0

7.7

3 .0

76.0

63.0

53.0

91. 1
*

98.5

1
*0.7

21*. 0

37.0

1 .0
*7

8.9

1.5

.9

6.6

1.9

7. 1
*

.9

.

2.5
1 .0
.1

.8
_
-

_
-

_
_
_

_

_

_

.7

-

.

.1
*

7 .7

.

11.5
_

1 .7

_

lit

.1

_

.3

3 .1
6 .2
1 .6

_
_
_
_
-

_
-

11.2
1.5

:

lit

-

1.3
_

2 .1
85.7

2 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ...............
5 days .........................
6 days ............ ........ .
8 days...... ...................
10 days ........................
11 days........................
12 days........................
15 days ........ ................
16 days ........................
17 days.............. ..........
20 days................. .
Over 20 days.... ............... .
Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave.............. .

i.
tO

1. 1
*
•i
l

18.2

19.5

20.8

•8

-

-

3.8
2.2
1 .1
.1
3.1
2.7

1.7

2. 1
*

U .7
5 .8

61
.*

62.2

63.1

.5
-

-

15. 1
*

ll* .l

.8

-

3.9

6.9

8.3
9 .1

6.9

1.9
3.8

5 .0

13.7
1*.2

_
-

60.3

67.7

53.9

59.3

76.0

_

See footnotes at end of table.
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




-

_

-

23.5
1.7
1 .U
*
2.7
2.8

3.8

3.2
5 .0
2.2
21.0
-

3.0
-

.3
.7

_

_
_

1.1
*

-

3 .0

.6
.7

63.0

53.0

91,1

98.5

_

100.0

1 .6

7. 1
*
2 .0
_

_

2.8
_

15 .8

llt .l

1.7
1 .9

6 .8

_

_

1.5

_
_
-

_
1.1

96 .9

71.2

6 7 .0

l* .l

-

3 .6

li

*.3

3 .1
6 .2
1 .6

_
_

_

1 .3

-

2 .1

92 .3

85.7

-

_

8.2

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

P a id S lc Jt Jt* a o * (O oA m al pAOv iiio H l)

Table £-5:

-

Qtm tiMMad

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

P r o v is io n s fo r p aid s ic k le a v e

A l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s ................ ............... ...............

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

M
anufacturing
Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

3 9 .7

3 2 .3

1 6 .1

1 0 .7

3 5 .1

2 .3
.9

6 .1
2 .2

1 9 .3
-

6 .5
8 .3

-

-

-

-

-

9 .6
.5

6 .1
.8

.9
.9
9 .7
-

3 .5
-

2 2 .1
1 .7
1 .1

1 .9

-

9 .0
_
1 .5

5 .7
_
-

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

3 8 .6

3 6 .9

3 .5
1 .3

3 .8
1 .1
1 5 .8

All
indus­
tries

y

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .6

3 7 .0

1 7 .0

9 .2

1 .9
-

.1
3 .9
3 .2
1 2 .3
2 .2
2 1 .0

2 .3
.8
.1
2 .1
•5
1 .2
_
.2
(2 /)

Finance**

Services

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 .5

3 .1

2 8 .8

3 3 .0

.8
_

7.U
2 .0
_
9 .6

5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
E sta b lish m en ts w ith form al p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s ic k le a v e .........................................
5 days ....................................................................
6 days ....................................................................
8 days ....................................................................
10 days ..................................................................
11 days ..................................................................
12 days ...................................................... ...........
15 days ..................................................................
16 days ..................................................................
18 days ..................................................................
20 d ays ..................................................................
21 days .........................................................
25 days ..................................................................
30 days ..................................................................
Over 30 days .......................................................
E sta b lish m en ts w ith no form al p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s ic k le a v e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.h

1 5.8
.8
3 .8
1 .6
1 .1
2 .8
.1
1 .8
2 .5
3 .1

1 9 .5

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

-

-

-

_
_
_

_

_

_

_
.7

_

_
1 .5

-

1 .7

2 .1

1 .3
.2
2 .9
6 .2
.6

5 .7
.1
8 .5
-

7 .8
2 .2
1 .7

1 0 .6
9 .0
.3

_
1 5 .7

1 1 .1

6 1 .1

6 3 .1

6 0 .3

6 7 .7

5 3 .9

5 9 .3

6 1 .6

6 3 .0

5 3 .0

9 0 .8

9 8 .5

3 8 .6

3 6 .9

3 9 .7 .

3 2 .3

1 6 .1

1 0 .7

3 5 .1

3 7 .0

1 7 .0

9 .2

3.5
1 .3
.3
1 5 .1
.8
3 .8
1 .7
1 .1

3 .8
1 .1

2 .3
.9

6 .1
2 .2

-

-

-

1 5.2
1 .7
-

1 8 .6
2 .1
_

9 .6
.5
_

1 9 .3
lull
_
.8
1 .7
_

.9
.9
9 .7
_
_
9 .0
_

6 .5
8 .3
_
3 .5
_

1 .9
_
2 1 .3
1 .7
1 .1
1 .1
2 .8

.2
3 .8
3 .2
1 2 .3
2 .2
2 1 .0
-

2 .3
.8
.1
2 .1
_
.3
.5

-

_

1 .1
_

_
-

_
1 .3

-

16
.3
1 .3

lit .3
3 .1
3 .0
1 .6
_
_

376

1 .3

_
_

3 .2

_
_

_

1 .7

2 .1
-

_

1 7

_
_

-

2 .8
_
2 .7

9 .5
2 .7
_
1 .5

9 .3

-

1 .6
_
.
_

-

1 0 0 .0

6 .6
1 .5

2 .8
_
13.7
6 ;8
_
_

.k

9 6 .9

7 1 .2

6 7 .0

9 0 .5

8 5.7

1 .5

3 .1

2 8 .8

3 3 .0

9 .5

lit .3

.8
_
.
_
_
_
_

1 .6

7.U
2 .0
9 .6

_

2 .7

2 .8
_
1 3 .7

1 .5

3 .1
3 .0
1 .6
_

_

1 .3

15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
E sta b lish m en ts w ith form al p r o v is io n s
f o r p a id s ic k le a v e .........................................
5 days ....................................................................
6 days ....................................................................
8 d a y s ....................................................................
10 days ..................................................................
11 days ..................................................................
12 days ..................................................................
15 d a y s .................................................................
16 d a y s .............. ...................................................
18 d a y s .............................. ...................................
20 days ..................................................................
21 days ..................................................................
30 days ..................................................................
Over 30 days ..............................................
E sta b lish m en ts w ith no form al p r o v is io n s
fo r p a id s ic k le a v e .........................................

1/

2J
*
#*

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

3 .1
.1
2 .6
1 .9

1 .8
.3
7 .1
2 .3

6 .6
.1
6 .5
2 .0

1 .9

_

1 .5

5 .7

8 .8
2 .9

1 .7
1 5 .2

1 5 .7

1 1 .1

6 1 .1

6 3 .1

6 0 .3

6 7 .7

5 3 .9

5 9 .3

6 1 .6

6 3 .0

«

1 .1

_

Includes data for industries in addition to those shown separately.
Less than .05 of 1 percent.
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




_

_

_
_
-

_

_

_

1 .7
_

_

.2
.6

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_
_

_

_
_
_
.
-

_

_

.

_

_

1 .3

.2
2 .1

.7

9 0 .8

9 8 .5

2 .7
_

5 3 .0

_

6 .8

_
_

.U

_
_

_
_

3 .6

3 .2
_

_

.

_

_

-

1 .5

8 .1

9 .3

1 .7

2 .1
-

9 6 .9

7 1 .2

6 7 .0

9 0 .5

85.7

1 0 0 .0

30

Table E-6:

A

O

H

f

U

O c l u & t i O H .

& 0 4 U i A « 4 >

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Type of bonus

M a n u f a c t u r in g

M a n u f a c t u r in g

All
indus­
tries

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance**

Services

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

19.9

35.1

3. 1
*

50.3

1
*1.7

23.6

21.1
*
It. 3
3.6

15. 1
*
1*.0
2.1

28.1
I t. 7
5.3

3.1
*

1
*6.7

21.2

72.9

80*1

61**9

96.6

All
indus­
tries

All

Durable
goods

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100.0

100*0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Establishments with nonproduction
bonuses
........................

35.6

31.6

21*. 8

1
*3.1

11.9

50.5

33.1

37.8

31*. 2

28.7

27.1

Christmas or year-end ........ .....
Profit-sharing ................. .
Other .......................... *

29.9
1.5
5.0

2l *.0
1*.9
3.9

16.5
5.9
3.0

36.5
3. 1
*
5.3

11.9

iti

.6

32.9
.2

31.9

2l *.6
2.9
2.5

Establishments with no nonproduction
bonuses ............ ............ .

61*. 1
*

68. l t

75.2

56.9

88*1

71.3

All establishments.......... .......

y

4.

y

-

9.0

-

1
*9.5

7.0

31.6
1.3
1.3

66.9

•

62.2

65.8

•

Non­
durable
goods

-

-

39.3
2. 1
*

-

3.6

-

Services

-

2. 1
*

58.3

76. 1
*

Retail
trade

1
*9.7

Services

V

Includes data for Industries in addition to those shown separately.
Unduplicated total*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities*
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*

y

Table E-7*

j

f

o

d

u

A

O

H

O

e

O H c l

P - e t t l i O H

P < l o H l

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED I N -

Type of plan

establishments... ..............

A ll

Establishments with insurance or
pension plans
............... ..

y

Life insurance •••••..... ....... .
Health insurance •••.•••••..... •••••
Hospitalization..................
Retirement pension ••••••..... .
Establishments with no insurance or
pension plana.... ............. .

All
indus­
tries

M a n u f a c t u r in g

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

Retail
trade




Finance**

Services

All

Durable
goods

Non­
durable
goods

100*0

100*0

100*0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100*0

100.0

100.0

92.2

9l *.5

96.1

91.9

92.0

85.5

93.0

96.6

83.6
7l *.3
60*6
63.0

81*.5
85.7
77.1
59.8

89.5
88.1
81*1
*
63. 1
*

76.0
81.7
69.9
53.9

91.7
85.8
31.9
90.2

75.2
1
*9.6
1
*6.8
1
*5.9

79.3
73.8
1 1
*6. *
39.7

7.8

5.5

3.9

8.1

8.0

5

7.0

Includes data for industries in addition to -those shown separately*
Unduplicated total*
* Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities,
** Finance, insurance, and real estate*
\ f

y

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

M a n u f a c t u r in g

H w

All
indus­
tries

Non­
durable
goods

Public
utili­
ties*

Whole­
sale
trade

All

Durable
goods

100.0

100*0

100*0

100.0

100*0

100*0

100.0

100.0

71.9

89.5

93.8

95.5

91.8

88.6

78.1

91.2

7l *.3

92.1
79.6
66.6
75.7

1
*9.7
39.1
29.7
111. 2

7U .8
75.5
58.3
1
*5.5

76.6
81i . l
75.1
50.1

82.9
86.7
77.8
S l *. l »

69.5
81.3
72.1
1
*5.2

86.7
77.8
30. 1
*
77. 1
i

70.1
52.1
*
1
*0.9
1
*0.2

7l *.8
69.7
3U .5
31.8

58.6
51* . l
1
*2*5
8.3

3. 1
*

28.1

io

.5

6.2

8.2

11. 1
*

21.9

8*8

25.7

y

U

.5

Occupational Wage Survey, Boston, Mass., April 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

31

Appendix - Scope
With the exception of the union eoale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was collected by viaits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed* In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used| these are available
upon request*
Six broad industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations * ( ) office
a
clerical, ( ) professional and technical, ( ) maintenance and
b
o
power plant, and ( ) custodial,warehousing, and shipping (t b e
d
als
A-l through A-4)* The covered Industry groupings ares manufac­
turing) transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities) wholesale trade) retail trade) finance,
insurance, and real estate) and services* Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions* As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied* Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment in
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion*
Among the industries inwhich characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table)* Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only for firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad industry divisions*
A greater proportion oflarge than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources* Each group of establishments




Method of Survey
of a oertaln size, however, ms given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Nonproduotion bonuses are also excluded,
bat cost-of-living bonuses and incentive earnings, including
ooamissions for salespersons, are inoludad. Where weekly hours
a r reported as for offioe clerical,they refer to the work sched­
is
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for whiah the straighttime salaries are paid} average weakly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 oents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed. Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wags praotioes refers to all offioa
and plant workers as specified in the individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices (or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question,except in the section relating to women offioe workers
of the table sumnarising scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller. The summary of vaoation and
siok leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Siok leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
soma amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid far by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

32
ESTABLISHMENTS A N D WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN BOSTON, MASS., 1/,
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, APRIL 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Numlber of
establ*Lshments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
within
scope of
study

In establishments
studied
Total

Office

Industry divisions in which occupations
were surveyed on an area basis

101
101
101

2,079
480
183
297
1,599

337
104
46
58
233

436,000
211,100
113,700
97,400
224,900

224,360
116,280
73,040
43,240
108,080

48,330
15,330
10,770
4,560
33,000

101
21
101
21
21

71
568
149
344
467

27
59
38
50
59

34,600
42,800
60,600
30,000
36,900

26,750
9,710
36,090
24,760
10,770

4,350
2,980
4,190
19,430
2,050

21

All divisions ....................................
Manufacturing ...............................
Durable goods 2 / .........................
Nondurable goods i j .....................
Nonmanufacturing ............................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities .............................
Wholesale trade ..........................
Retail trade .............................
Finance, insurance, and real estate ....
Services 2 / ..............................

26

4,712
501
432
14,428
5,016
14,638

315

35
20
139
22

11
20
11
44
9
22

6,322

8
8
21
21
21

Industries in w hich occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 6 J
Candy and other confectionery products ........
W o m e n fs and misses' coats and suits ...........
Foundries, nonferrous ...........................
Machinery industries ............................
Milk dealers .....................................
Insurance carriers ..............................

2/
8/

73

749
557
22,267
5,465
20,165

22
1,957
633
12,108

1/ Boston Metropolitan Area (Suffolk County, 1U communities in Essex County, 28 in Middlesex County, 17 in Norfolk County, and 2 in
Plymouth County).
2/ Total establishment employment.
2 / Metalworking; lumber, furniture, and other wood products; stone, clay, and glass products; instruments and related products; and
mi scellaneous m anufacturing.
4/ Food and kindred products; tobacco; textiles; apparel and other finished textile products; paper and paper products; printing and
publishing; chemicals; products of petroleum and coal; rubber products; and leather and leather products.
2 / Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
profit membership organizations; and engineering and architectural services.
6/ Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
2/ Cutting shops (manufacturing jobbers) with U or more workers were also included.
8/ Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories w i t h 8 or more workers were also included.




33

Index
£u s

Assembler (insurance carriers) ••«••••••...... •........ • •

22,

CM (M

3
,
3 4,
,
CM CM CM

22,
12,
3
,

f'N s ilfN O O 0 > 0 0 > 0 O
H CM H CM H H CM
CM CM CM
CM
CM CM

3 5
, ,
3
,

3
,
3
,

>0 O O H
Ot
CM CM CM W «H rH




20
17
17, 18
CMCMCM

Assembler (machinery) •.......... •.......... •• •
••
Automatio-lathe operator (machinery) ......... .....
Bartender (hotels) •••••••••••••••••••••..... .......
Bellman (hotels) ...... ................ •... .
Bench hand (bakeries) ......... ••.......
Biller, machine .......•••.••... .......... ........
Boatswain (ocean transport) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Bookbinder (printing) ...... •............... •• •
•
Bookkeeper, hand .................... •••••••••••••
Bookkeeping-machine operator •••••.... ••..........•
Bottler (malt liquors) ....•.....
Bravery worker (malt liquors) •••••...••••••••••......
Bricklayer (building construction)
Calculating-machine operator ...••••... ••... ...••••••
Candy maker (candy and other confectionery products)
Carpenter (building construction) ••••.....••••.... ••
Carpenter, maintenance
Carpenter (ocean transport) •••••••••••••••...•...... .
.
Chipper and grinder (nonferrous foundries)
Cleaner
Cleaner (office building service)
Clerk, accounting
....•••••••••••••.
Clerk, accounting (insurance carriers) ...... ••••••••••
Clerk, actuarial (insurance carriers) ... ••... •••••••
Clerk, correspondence (insurance carriers) ••••••••... ••
Clerk, file.................................
Clerk, file (insurance carriers) ••••••••••••••*••••••••••
Clerk, general ...•••••....................... .
Clerk, general (insurance carriers) ...... .... • • •
•••
Clerk (grocery stores and meat markets) •••••••••••••••••.
Clerk, order ... ... ....... ...... ...........
Clerk, payroll ......... ........ •••••••••••.... .
Clerk, premium-ledger-card (insurance carriers)
Clerk, underwriter (insurance carriers) •••••••
Compositor, hand (printing) ...... •••••••••
Cook (hotels) .....••••.......... ......
Coremaker (nonferrous foundries)
Crane operator, electric bridge
... •
Cutter and marker (womens and misses1 coats and suits) ••
Cutter (sea-food processing) ....... ••••••••... • • •
•••
Dipper (candy and other confectionery products) ••••••••••
Draftsman •••••••••••••....... •.... ..... ......
Drill-press operator (machinery)

16
21
15
9
17, 18

Driver (malt liquors) .......... .......... ............. .
21
Duplicating-machine operator ............... ..............
3, 6
Electrician (building construction) ..................
21
Electrician, maintenance ...................................
10
Electrician, maintenance (machinery) ...............
17
Electrician (ocean transport) .......... ............... .
22, 23
Electrotyper (printing)
..... •••••••••......... .
21
Elevator operator (hotels) .............. ............. .
24
Elevator operator (office building service) ..............
24
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) ••••••.... .............
17, 18
Engineer, stationary .................••••••...••••••......
10
Engineer, stationary (milk dealers) ........••••••••••••••
19
Filling-machine operator (candy and other confectionery
products)
...... ........... ..•••••••••••..... .
15
Filling-machine tender (milk dealers) .....................
19
Fireman (ocean transport) ..... ....... .......... •••••••••
22, 23
24
Fireman (office building service) ••••••••••••••••••••••••
Fireman, stationary boiler ......... ............ ..........
10
Furnace tender (nonferrous foundries) •«••••••••••••••••••
16
Grinding-machine operator (machinery) •••••••.•••••••••••• 17, 18, 19
G u a r d ...............................................
Helper (bakeries)
..... .
21
Helper, motortruck d r i v e r ................................ .
22
Helper (structural and ornamental iron work) •••••••••••••
22
Helper, trades, maintenance
.............. .
10
Inspector (candy and other confectionery products) ......
15
Inspector (machinery) ...........................................
Janitor ............ .................... ............... .
12, 13
Janitor (machinery) ..................................
17, 19
Janitor (office building service) ..............................
Key-punch o p e r a t o r .................
7
Key-punch operator (insurance carriers) ......................
Laborer (building construction) ••.•••••••••••••••••••.•••
21
Lay-out man (structural and ornamental iron work) ........
22
Longshoreman (stevedoring) ............. .......... .
23, 24
Machine operator (printing) ........... ...... ........... .
21
Machine tender (printing) ...... .............. ....... •••••
21
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery) ............ 17, 18, 19
Machine-tool operator, toolroom (machinery) .......... ..
18
Machinist, maintenance ..............................
Machinist, maintenance (candy and other confectionery
products) ...................................
Machinist, production ( m a c h i n e r y ) .... .
18, 19
Maid (hotels) .................................

17

24
20

34

Index

C o n tin u e d
£u*

Page
21
Mailer (printing) ...... ••••.••••••••••..... ........... .»
Maintenance man, general utility •••.•••••••••••••...... »
11
Maintenance man, general utility (candy and other
confectionery products)
15
Meat cutter (grocery stores and meat maxkets) .........
24
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ••••••••••.••..... .....
11
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) (milk dealers) ••••»•••
19
Mechanic, maintenance
11
Milling-machine operator (machinery) •..... ••••••..... .
17, Id, 19
11
M i l l w r i g h t .................................................
Mixer (bakeries) .••••••••••..........
21
Mogul operator (candy and other confectionery products) ••
15
Molder (nonferrous foundries) • •••.... ......... ••••••••••
16
Motortruck driver
22
Nurse, industrial (registered) ••••»..••..... ...»..... ...
9
Office b o y ..............................
4
Office girl ..............
7
O i l e r .....................................................
11
Operator (local transit) •••••••••••••.•••.»•.......
22
Order f i l l e r ...........................
13
Overman (bakeries)
21
Packer ...... •••••••••••••............... •••••••........ .
13
Painter (building construction) •••••..... •........ .
21
Painter, maintenance ................. •••»•••••••••••••»...
11
Pasteuriser (milk dealers) ....... •••••••••••.......... .
19
Photoengraver (printing) ..•••••••.........
21
Pipe fitter, maintenance ..................... ..••••••••••.
12
Plasterer (building construction) • ••..........•••••••••••.
21
Plumber (building construction) ••••.•••••••••••••••••••..
21
Plumber, maintenance •••••••••••......
12
Porter ............................ ••••••••••..... ••••••••.
12, 13
Porter (hotels) .........•••••••••••........... .
24
Porter (office building service) •••••••••••••••..»•••.••.
24
Press assistant (printing) ..........
21
Press feeder ( p r i n t i n g ) .... ............................
21
Presser (women’s and misses' coats and suits) ••••••••••••
16
Pressman (printing)
21
Quick-freeze operator (sea-food processing) ••.••••......
21
Quick-freeze packer (sea-food processing) •.....
21
Receiving c l e r k .................
13
Refrigerator m an (milk dealers)
19
Routeman (driver-salesman) (milk dealers) •••••••••..•••..
19
Sanitary man (milk dealers) ••••.......
19
Screw-machine operator, automatic (machinery)
17, 18




Seaman (ocean transport) •••...
Secretary .............. ..... .... ....... .
Section head (insurance carriers) ................
Sewer, hand (finisher) (women's and misses' coats
and s
uits) ...... ................
Sewing-machine operator (women's and misses' coats
and s
uits) ............ .... ••••••...... .
Shake-out man (nonferrous foundries)... ........... .
Sheet-metal worker, maintenance
Shipping olerk ••....••••••••••••... •••••......
Shipping-and-reoeiving olerk ................•••••••«
Stenographer •••».......
••••••••••••
Stenographer (insurance carriers) .............. .
Stereotyper (printing) •••••.•••••••••••.... .
Stock handler ••••••••.... ••...........
Stock handler (candy and other confectionery products) . .
.
Stock handler (machinery)...... ••••••••...... ••••••
•••••
Switchboard operator ..••••••••....
Switchboard operator-receptionist •••••...... ..... .
Tabulating-maohine operator
Tabulating-maohine operator (insurance carriers) ••••...
Telephone operator (hotels) •••....••••••.•••••.... .
Tool-and-die maker ........ .... •«..•••..... .....
Tool-and-die maker (machinery)
.... .
Tracer .......... ........................ .
Transoribing-maohine operator............. ......
Truck driver... ................. .
Truck driver (milk dealers).................. .
Trucker, hand ........ ..... ..................
Trucker, hand (candy and other oonfectionery products) . .
.
Trucker, hand (machinery) .................. •••••••
Trucker, power ....... .
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) •••.••••••••••••••
Typist ................... ..................................

22, 23
7
20

16

16
16
12

13
13
7
20
21

14
15
18
7
8
24
12

18, 19
9
8
14
19
14
15
18
14
17, 18
8

Typist (insurance carriers)
Underwriter (insurance carriers)..... ..........
Waiter (hotels) ......... ••••••.... .... •»•••••.•••
Washer, bottle, machine (milk dealers) •••••••••••••••••••
Washer, c n machine (milk dealers) .••••... ........ .
a,
Watchman
Watchman (office building service) ..... ........ • •
••
Welder (structural and ornamental iron work) .... ....
Welder, hand (machinery) ........................
Wrapper (
candy and other oonfectionery products) •••••••••
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0 — 1952

20
20

24
19
19
14
24
22

18
15







THE OCCUPATIONAL WAGE SURVEY SERIES
In addition to this bulletin, similar occupational wage surveys are now available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C,
for the following communities:

City

BIS Bulletin No.

Baltimore, Maryland
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Dayton, Ohio
Denver, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut
Indianapolis, Indiana
Kansas City, Missouri
Memphis, Tennessee
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Newark-Jersey City, New Jersey
New Orleans, Louisiana
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Portland, Oregon
Providence, Rhode Island
Richmond, Virginia
Salt lake City, Utah
San Francisco-Oakland, California
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Seattle, Washington
Worcester, Massachusetts

20
15
25
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
25
25
15
15
25
20
20
20
15
15
25
15
20
20

1045
1044
1056
1043
1041
1066
1059
1075
1064
1067
1068
1081
1074
1070
1060
1082
1042
1071
1058
1069
1076
1078
1057
1077

This report was prepared in the Bureau’s
cations may be addressed to:

Price
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

New England Regional Office*

Communi­

Wendell D. MacDonald, Regional Director
Bureau of Labor Statistics
261 Franklin Street
Boston 10, Massachusetts
The services of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ regional offices are available for
consultation on statistics relating to wages and industrial relations, employment, prices,
labor turn-over, productivity, construction
housing, and work injuries*




The New England Region includes the following States:
Connecticut
Massachusetts

Maine
New Hampshire

Rhode Island
Vermont


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102