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Occupational W Survey
age
ALBANY-SCHENECTADY-TROY,
NEW YORK
Match 1952

Bulletin No. 1108

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Maurice J. Tobin - Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague - Commissioner




Contents
Page
INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................

1

THE AIBANI-SCHENECTADY-TROT METROPOLITAN AREA ................................

1

OCCUPATIONAL WAGE S T R U C T U R E ......................................................

1

TABLESt
Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis A-l
Office occupations .......... ........... •....... •...... • •....... ......... .
A-2
Professional and technical occupations ........ ••••••••••....... ............
A-3
Maintenance and power plant o c c u p a t i o n s ...... .........
A~4
Custodial, warehousing, and shipping o c c u p a t i o n s.....................

3
6
6
7

Average earnings for selected occupations studied on an industry basis B-35
Machinery i n d u s t r i e s ..........
B-40
R a i l r o a d s ..............

9
9

Union wage scales for seleoted occupations C-15
Building construction ........................
C-205
Bakeries ......................................................................
C-2082 Malt liquors ..................................................................
C-27
Printing ........
C-41
Local transit operating employees ..............
C-42
Motortruck drivers and h e l p e r s ....... .........
C-58
R e s t a u r a n t s ...... ......
C-7011 Hotels ........................................................................

10
10
10
10
11
11
11
11

Entrance rates D-l
Minimum entrance rates for plant workers ..................

12

Wage practices E-l
Shift differential p r o v i s i o n s .... •..••••••••••.••.....••••••••••........ .
E-2
Scheduled weekly hours
...................................... ••••••••••
E-3
Paid h o l i d a y s .................................................................
E-4
Paid v a c a t i o n s ..... ............ ....... ........... ....... ....... ••••••••••••
E-5
Paid sick leave .....
E-6
Nonproduotion bonuses »••••••••••*.•••••••••••••».........
E-7
Insurance and pension plans .................................

12
13
13
U
15
17
17

APPENDIX*
Scope and method of survey ...... .............. .....................................

18

I N D E X .......................................................................................

20

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents

August A, 1952

82d Congress, 2d Session

Introduction y
The Albany-Schenectady-Troy area is 1 of 40 major
labor markets in which the Bureau of ikbor Statistics is cur­
rently conducting occupational wage surveys* Occupations common
to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries
were studied on a community-wide basis* Cross-industry methods
of sampling were thus utilised in compiling earnings data for
the following types of occupations! (a) office; (b) professional
and technical;
(c) maintenance and power plant; (d) custodial,
warehousing, and shipping* In presenting earnings information
for such jobs (tables A-l through A-4) separate data have been
provided wherever possible for individual broad industry divi­
sions*
Occupations characteristic of particular, important,
local industries were studied on an industry basis, within the
framework of the community survey* gj Earnings data for these
jobs have been presented in Series B tables* Union scales
(Series C tables)
are presented in lieu of (or supplementing)
occupational earnings for several industries or trades in which
the great majority of the workers are employed under terms of
collective-bargaining agreements, and the contract or minimum
rates are indicative of prevailing pay practices*
Data were collected and summarized on shift operations
and differentials, hours of work, and supplementary benefits
such as vacation and sick leave allowances, paid holidays, non­
production bonuses, and insurance and pension plans*

House Document No. 545
important terminal point, with more than 20,000 employees en­
gaged in land and water transportation* As the capital of New
York State, Albany has political importance* Almost 41,000
workers are in government service in the area* Schenectady,
where maj or producers of electrical apparatus and transportation
equipment are situated, is a durable-goods manufacturing center*
Troy's principal products include men's shirts and other types
of wearing apparel*
Total employment in the area (excluding agriculture,
government, and construction) was 179,500 in March 1952* Of
this number, more than 88,000 were employed in manufacturing,
and approximately 91,000 were engaged in nonmanufacturing indus­
tries*
Among the industry and establishment-size groups with­
in scope of the Bureau's study, three out of four plant workers
were employed in establishments having written agreements with
labor organizations* In the public utilities group virtually
all plant workers were covered by union agreements, and in manu­
facturing approximately 90 percent of the factory workers were
employed in organized plants* In service industries and whole­
sale and retail trade, unionized employees represented 40 per­
cent or less of the total plant employment* Unionization of
office workers was found in establishments employing 20 percent
of the office workers in the area*

Occupational W age Structure

Total population of the Albany-Schenectady-Troy Metro­
politan Area (Albany, Schenectady, and Rensselaer Counties) was
almost 525,000 in March 1952* The three chief cities accounted
for more than 310,000 of the total. This tri-city area is situ­
ated at the junction of the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers* These
waterways, together with the Erie Canal, link the Atlantic
Ocean and the Great Lakes*
Consequently, the Albany area is an

Wage levels in the Albany-Schenectady-Troy area were
affected by a number of general wage increases between January
1950, the base date for the Wage Stabilization Board's "catch­
up" wage increase formula, and March 1952, the date of the
study* Ninety-five percent of the plant workers and 80 percent
of the office workers in manufacturing received wage or salary
adjustments, usually on a cents-per-hour basis* Most of these
increases ranged from 10 to 19 cents. In nonmanuf aoturing
establishments, approximately 55 percent of the plant and 45
percent of the office employees received general increases* In
many establishments, however, wages and salaries were adjusted
on an individual basis rather than by general wage increases*

2 / Prepared in the Bureau's regional office in New York,
N. Y . , by Frank C* Grella and Theodore Allison under the direc­
tion of Frederick W. Mueller, Regional Wage and Industrial Re­
lations Analyst* The planning and central direction of the
program was carried on in the Bureau's Division of Uages and
Industrial Relations*
g/ See appendix for discussion of scope and method of sur­
vey.

More than 80 percent of the area's plant workers were
in establishments which had formalized rate structures for timerated workers* Over 55 percent of the plant workers were em­
ployed in establishments with plans providing a single rate for
each occupation; 25 percent with a formalized range of rates for
each job classification; and the remainder were employed by
firms which determine rates on an individual basis* The last
method was found to an appreciable extent only in trade and
service industries* The rate-range method was predominant only
in public utilities*

The Albany - Schenectady - Troy
Metropolitan Area




Salaries for almost 50 percent of the office workers
were determined on the basis of formal rate ranges* Such plans
were particularly prevalent in utilities and financial insti­
tutions* Formal plans providing single rates for each job
classification affected 20 percent of the clerical workers,
virtually all of wham were in manufacturing establishments*
Individual determination of salaries, affecting the balance of
clerical workers studied, was found primarily in the trade and
services industries*
Virtually all of this area's plant workers were em­
ployed in firms having established minimum entrance rates for
inexperienced plant workers* More than a third of all plant
workers were in firms with minimum rates ranging between $1*15
and $1*25* Such entrance rates were found primarily in large
manufacturing plants* Among smaller manufacturers (250 workers
or less), more than half the factory workers were in firms with
minimum entrance rates of less than $1* Nearly all workers in
public utilities were in firms with a minimum rate of 95 cents or
more* Lowest minimum rates were found in the service industries
and retail trade where 90 percent and 70 percent of the em­
ployees, respectively, were in establishments having minimum
rates of 75 cents or less*
A fifth of all plant workers in manufacturing estab­
lishments were employed on late shifts in March 1952* Virtually
all extra-shift workers were paid a differential over day (firstshift) rates, which was a percentage premium for two-thirds of
the workers and a oents-per-hour premium for the others* Per­
centage differentials for third-shift work were 10 percent of
base pay, whereas those for second-shift work ranged from 5 to
10 percent* Shift differentials paid in oents-per-hour were
most frequently 4 ©r 7 cents for the second shift and 6 cents
for the third*




Supplementary wage benefits granted to office workers
were generally more liberal than those granted to plant workers*
Nearly all plant and office workers were eligible for a paid
vacation* After 1 year of service, 85 peroent of the plant
workers received a 1-week vacation with pay, whereas 75 peroent
of the office workers received 2 weeks* Plant workers, after 5
years of service, were generally granted 2 weeks' vacation with
pay* Six or more paid holidays a year were received by 9 out
of 10 plant workers and by virtually all office workers* One
out of A office workers, in contrast to only 1 out of 13 plant
workers, was employed in an establishment with formal provisions
for paid sick leave after 1 year of service without any waiting
period*

Slightly more than half the plant workers in the
Albany-Schenectady-Troy area were scheduled to work 4.0 hours a
week in March 1952, whereas 40 peroent had work schedules of
more than 44 hours a week* The predominant workweek for women
office workers was 40 hours, though a third had shorter hours,
particularly in the public utilities group and in financial
institutions, where a 37-J-hour week was common*

Wages and salaries of workers in manufacturing indus­
tries were generally higher than those in nonmanufacturing*
In
13 of the 18 office jobs permitting comparison, average salaries
in manufacturing plants exceeded those in nonmanufacturing
establishments* In most of these jobs the differences ranged
from $5 to $7*50 a week* Average hourly earnings for plant
workers studied on a community-wide basis were highest in manu­
facturing in 15 of the 18 occupations where comparison was
possible* Generally, the differences ranged between 10 and 23
cents*

A:

Cross-Industry Occupations
A-l:

O ffice Qcc*tfUitio+ti.

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Albapy-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

$
$
%
*
$
$
$
$
s
Under 3 0 . 0 0 3 2 .5 0 3$5 . 0 0 3 7 . 5 0 b o . 00 1 * 2 .5 0 i* 5 .o o 1 * 7 .5 0 5 0 .0 0 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . o o 5 7 .5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 . 0 0 7 2 . 5 0 7 5 .9 0 8 0 .0 0 8$ . 0 0 9 0 .0 0
5
Weekly
Weekly
hours
earnings
and
(Standard) (Standard) 3 0 .0 0
over
3 2 . 5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 . 5 0 I lO.OO ^ 2 .5 0 L 5 .0 0 1 * 7 .5 0 5 0 . 0 0 5 2 . 5 0 5 5 . 0 0 5 7 . 5 0 6 0 . 0 0 6 2 . 5 0 6 5 . 0 0 6 7 . 5 0 7 0 . 0 0 7 2 . 5 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 . 0 0

Men
130

1*1 .5

6 7 .5 0

.
.

_

_

_

«
.

39
91

3 9 .5
1*2.0

6 1 *.5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 8 .5 0

-

-

-

-

1*0.0

72.50

-

-

-

-

38

-

-

-

36

1*3.0

6 2 .5 0

Clerks, accounting ................... ..
Manufacturing •••••••••••••••••• ..... ..
Nonmanufacturing •«............. .
Wholesale t r a d e ......... ..........
Retail trade .................. •••••

115

1*0.0

5 7 .5 0

60

1*0 .0

6 1 .0 0

3 9 .5
1*0.0

5 3 .50

26
23

3 9 .5

51*.oo

Clerks, o r d e r ............... ............
Manufacturing ............
Nonmanufacturing .......... .

98
39

1*0.5
1*2 .0

59

1*0.0

61*. 5 0
6 3 .5 0
6 5 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

3 9 .0

61*. 0 0

_

-

-

-

-

_

Bookkeepers, h a n d ......... ............. ..
Manufacturing..... .................................................
Nonmanufacturing ...................... .................................
Wholesale trade ......... ............

.......
.....

Clerks, payroll .......................
Manufacturing
..
Nonmanufacturing.... .................

.............

55

5 3 .0 0

-

2

13
7
6

-

2

-

-

-

19

_

-

7

-

-

6

15
-

-

-

-

12
6
2

-

5
5

15

-

-

-

96

1
1

-

-

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

5

1

7

1*

-

1
1

22

2

3

-

13

8

1
1

9
2
7

2
1
1

1*

6
1
5

1
1
1

11
7

22

12

1

3

2

-

1*

17

6

1

3

1
1

_

1*

3

_

1*

1*

-

-

1*

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

1
3

1

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

_

_

11

.

-

18

1 *0 .0

6 3 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

11

3 7 .5

6 U .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

16

21

1*

17

6

2

17
b

-

11

b

■

F --F

-

-

-

_

16

1

3

2
2

7

10

1

9
8

-

16

7
3
1*

7
2

2

9

2
1
1

1

l

1

1
13
12

17

3
10

9

l*
l

7

13

11

7
-

7
5

9

1
X

g

9

-

ll*
11*

11

6

2
2

2_
2

-

.

-

3

3
3

6

-

10
1

1

12

2

-

8

-

9

1

1*

2

3

1

1*
1*

2
2

1

-

-

-

.

.

1

-

-

1

-

5
1*

2

7

— r— r
3

2

2
1
1

1
1

_

_

2

2
1

6

Office boys ........................... .
Manufacturing .........................
Nrmma.rmfarvhniring
r.
F t narir.fi -JHt ...........................................

99
50

3 9 .0

3 8 .5 0

6

H*

3 9 .0

1 * 0 .5 0

-

5

5

1*9
16

3 8 .5
3 8 .5

3 6 .5 0

6

9
7

6

l*
l

6

31*
18

3 9 .0

6 !* .0 0

3 8 .5

6 6 .0 0

1
1
1
X

-

_

3

Tabulating-machine operators ................. ..
Nonmanufacturing .........................................................

3

oca*) fi t.raH o T T t T . T. . TT. T T T T i l t I t

3 3 .5 0

10

3 9 .5

6 7 .5 0

1*7

1*0.5
1*0.0

1 * 7 .0 0

_

21

1*7 .0 0

-

26

1*1 . 0

-

n

-

3
3
O
C
.

9
9

2
2

n
X

1
1

JL

O
c

1

_

0
c

„
_

-

_

_

1*

2
1
1
1

3

1

_

_

_

_

1
1

2

1

_

2

1

Women
Billers, machine (billing machine) ......
Manufacturing ................................... .. ..........
Nonmanufacturing......... .........
Wholesale trade ....................

6

-

_

10

1*0 .0

1 *7 .5 0
51*.o o

Billers, machine (bookkeeping machine)••••
Nonmanufacturing ......................

55
36

3 9 .0

1*1*. 00

3 9 .0

1*1*. 00

Bookkeepers, hand •••••..... .............
Manufacturing .................................................................
Nonmanufacturing .........................................................

130

1*1.0

5 6 .5 0

31

3 9 .0

6 0 .5 0

-

-

-

99

1*1.5
1*1.0

5 5 .5 0
6 3 .0 0

-

-

-

1*1.0

5 0 .5 0

1 .5
*2

5 1 .5 0

UVinl fi<$alfi t . r a r t p __T_ T T T T l t t T t t . r f t

30

Retail trade •••••••••...................... ..

1*6
18

S fim r ir e

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ____ TTTT. r ,

See footnote at end of table.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate.




2

2

2

5
2

1
1

3
2

1*

-

3

-

1
1

*
.

9

8

6

9

3

8

6

3

3

-

_

6

8

5

-

-

-

15
-

-

6

8

5

15

7

1

1*
10

6

_

1

1

1

1
1

1
1

8

8

-

2

15

5

3
12

1*

8

1

2
O
c

3

_

-

l
l*

6
8

c;

15

_
-

-

11

1

7
2
5

1
..

_

_

-

•

1
1

2
2

10

3

30

_

1

8

5

3
O
J

_

_

5

6

3

3
3

3

-

5
25
7

9
3
6
<
0

5
p

_

1
*
1,
h

13

3

2

Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Trqy, N. Y., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Oj^ice Occupation* - Continued

Table A-ls

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. T., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A verage

Sex, occupation, and industry d iv isio n

Number
of
w
orkers

$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
*5
$2
W
eekly Under 3 0 .0 0 3 2 .5 0 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 Uo.oo U2.50 U5.oo U7.50 5 0.00 5 . 5o 55.oo 5 7 .5 0 6 0.00 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 <?7.50 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7*5. oo 8 0 .0 0 8 . oo 9 0 .0 0
W
eekly
earnings $
hours
and
(Standard) (Standard) 3 0 .0 0
?2.5o 3 5 .0 0 3 7 .5 0 Uo.oo U2.50 U5.oo U7.50 50.0 0 5 2 .5 0 55.oo 57.5 0 6 0.00 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 7 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 over

Women - Continued
Bookkeeping-machine o p erato rs,
c la s s A ................................................... .................
Manufacturing .....................................................
Nonmanufacturing ..............................................
Finance # * ...................... ..............................

65
20
U5
20

3 8 .5
3 8 .S
3 9 .0
3 7 .5

5 5 .0 0
5 9 .5 0
5 3 .0 0
5 3 .5 0

-

Eookkeeping-machine o p erato rs,
c la s s B ................................................................ ..
Manufacturing ......................................................
Nonmanufacturing...............................................
Wholesale trad e ............................. ............
T vtanno
N
...

301
53
21*8
50
18U

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

U3.00
5 1 .5 0
U i.50
U9.50
3 9 .0 0

-

%

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

316
162
15U
U9

C lerks, a c c o u n tin g ............................................... ..
Manufacturing ..........•.........................................
Nonmanufacturing...............................................

508
16U
3UU

TSnaiv«A
5
...........
.....
.Q | hoc t i i i T i i i i i r i t i f i s i t i f i i t t i t
o *ir|

3 9 .0
Uo.o
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
Uo.o
p f *P

U9.50
5 3 .0 0
U .0 0
6
50.0 0
38.0 0
no
Up. w

Xf X
26
10

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
Uo.o
1,0 t
U'-'O
3 8 .0
Ul.O

U8.50
5 5 .5 0
U5.S0
U6 .0 0
U2 .0 0
Uo.oo
U5.oo

C lerk s, f i l e , c la s s B ........................ .................
Nonmanufacturing ...............................................
W rt*l ncal o
lh
....
.........
...
Po+o*! 1
...
. . .
!>
jj
n o j g( j t f j f t |t ( f Tr ■r i ■i r i ■■i

285
105
23
•ft
3
Pu
20

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
Uo.o
Uo.5
3 8 .0

U5.oo
37.oo
1,0 <0
3 2 .0 0
35*50

C lerk s, g e n e r a l...................................... .................
Manufacturing ........................................ .............
Nonmanufacturing...............................................
Finance * * ......................................................

328
90
238
89

3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .5

5 6 .5 0
^575S“ h
5 7 .0 0
5 0 .5 0

Clerks, o r d e r ........................................ ..
Manufacturing ......................................................
Nonmanufacturing..... .............
Wholesale t r a d e ....................................

77
18
59
32

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
UO.O

5 0 .0 0
5 5 .5 0
U8 .0 0
5U.50

Clerks, payroll ............................... ........................

362

Manufacturing .........................
Nonmanufacturing........... ..........

2U3
119
36

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
Uo.o

53.oo
5 3.50
52.50
U .0 0
8

U7
13
-O

h2

See footnote at end of table.
** Finance, insurance, and real estate,




-

-

10
10
u

-

9
9
2

2
2
-

5
5
2

12
12
11

-

-

22
22
22

52

5?

32

32
3
29

53
8
Ul

32
2
30
1
26

U2
13
29
-

25
12
13
13

19
7
12
12

31
1
30
9
11
6

16
U
12
6

37
2U
13
6
1
t
p

35
lU
21
5

U
6
37
9
2
]_

65
11
5U
t
p

Uo
n
29
6
it
Xp
k

10U
2U
80
21
1,0
•*7
3

5U
9
U5
7
1
17

38
17
21
3
_

!
!

Calculating-m achine operators
(Comptometer type)
..................................
M an u facturin g................................................... ..
Nonmanufacturing ...............................................
Wholesale trade ...........................................
on 1 +hqH
.
o
. . . . .
................
n o \na XJi
v

Retail trade •••••**••••••••••••••••

-

-

2
2
2

1U
1U !
- !
lU

10
i°

1
1

33
5
28

18

26
2

12

“

10

3
_

7
7
2
1
2
20
2

5

J7

26
26
2

19
19
•
pf

5

17
Xf
7

12

-

-

_

_
-

j

-

-

_

-

_

**

-

6
6

-

-

U
-

U
u
2

20
18
2
2

-

2
1
1
1

2
2
2

-

3U
26
8
2

7
1
6
1

55
U6
9
U

17
6
11
11

3
1
2
1

-

31
7
2U

28
13
15
2

22
5
17

16 i
16
-

u
3
1

20
20
-

!
- !

6
2
U
U

-

-

“

-

3
2
1

-

-

U
U
U

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

10
10
-

10
9
1

-

-

-

1
1
-

_
-

_
.
-

..

-

_
_

_

_
-

-

-

k

27

“
_

12
6
p
2
I
2
2 1
2
|
1
1
-

1
1
-

8

6
6

23
19
5
2
5

18
10
2

11

6
6
6

12
18
6
------ 2"
I
6 1----- T
16
10
12
6
U

27
12
15
9

7

2
2

13
-

7
-

-

11
11
7

11
2
9
9

•

3U
25
9
k

55
30
25
18

39
22
17
8

11
11
13

-

lU
2

17
6
3

I

2

k

~
5
5

-

I

10
10
10

!
-

32
2
28

3
3
-

17
7
10
8

1U3
6
5

2

—

—

1

5
5
-

3
2
1
22
11
11
5

17
12
5
U

6U
35
29
20

22
iU
8
-

36
7
29
6

88
2
86
9

7
U
3
-

-

2
2
-

12
12
12

1
1
-

12
8
U
U

_
-

23
11
12

139
118
21

lU
12
2

3
_

16
U
12

3

7

u

7
-

u
-

-

-

2
2
-

_
-

6

2

_

_

1

2

3
3

-

_

2

-

-

1

1
1

-

1
X

_
_

-

-

Table A-i:

Ofyice Occupation* - Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y.7 by industry division, March 1952)

~y

**

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.




P^iaffedAional and ^technical Occupation^

Table A-2:

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 1/ for selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—
%
$
9
$
9
9

Average
Sex,

occupation,

and industry division

Number
of
workers

Weekly Weekly
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard)

t
9
9
9
$
9
9 5 .0 0 1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 5 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 2 0 .0 0 1 2 5 .0 0 1 3 0 .0 0 1 3 5 .0 0 1110.00 ih 5 .o o 1 5 0 .0 0

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
h 5 .o o 5 0 .0 0 5 5 . 0 0 6 0 ,0 0 6 5 . 0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 5 . 0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 5 . 0 0 9 0 .0 0
u n der

and

L 5 .0 0 5 0 . 0 0 5 5 . 0 0 6 0 .0 0 65..D.Q-, 7Q O & - 7 5 . 0 0 &L.QQ 8 5 .0 0 9 0 . 0 0 9 5 . 0 0 io o .o d 1 0 5 . 0C n o . o q n 5 . n n i ? o .o d 1 2 5 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 1-15.00 1J.O.OO 1115.00 1 5 0 .0 0
]

over

Men
Dr a f t s m e n ,

chief

...............................

la

3 9 .5

1 1 5 .0 0

53
— W —
36

3 9 .5
... 3 ? - . T “
3 8 .5

6 3 .5 0
6 3 .0 0
h 9 .0 0

2

5

_

_

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

1

5

22

2

1

1

2

Women
Nurses, i n d u s t r i a l ( r e g istered) ..... ........
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ...............................
Tr a c e r s ...........................................................................................

1/

_

_

-

n
3
~ ” 3” 1 ~ n
2
16

-

10

5

18

18
lit
-

18

3

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

_

2
----- 2
-

1
1
-

-

-

_
-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_
-

-

_
_

Hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.

T a b le

a

-

3 M aintenance and Poweb Plant Occupation4
j

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Albany-Schenec£ady-Troy, N. Y., by industry division, ?ferch 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
Occupation and industry division

at

workers

s
»
s
$
t
t
S
t
s
$
t
$
$
s
1
9
9
9
1
9
9
9
Aversgs
9
9
hou l
r y Jnder 1.00 i.o5 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 l.itO l M S i.5o 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30
erig d
aaDs *
>
p
and
L.OQ
1.05 I aIGL J-15L 1.2Q.J1*21 1.80 X. 35. l.liQ l.ii5 1.50 I aSS. I j SQl 1 J £ l.IQ„ J a2&. 1.80 1 -85 1.90 1 . , 2.00 ?,10 ?.?n ?.^n ovflr
L
95

216

1.89

168
h8
35

1 .8h

Electricians, maintenance ..........................
Manufacturing ...................................

311

Engineers, stationary ..............................
Manufacturing ...................................

Carpenters, maintenance ............................
Manufacturing ...................................
Nonmanuf acturing ................................
trade aaa(aa,a ,.T...rt .f...... r.T.......

8
h
i
t
I "T" ~T~
t
h
k

-

2
1

-

12
1
11

10
10

15

-

1

12
11
1

-

h
i
t

-

-

2
2

-

l
i

1
1

27
27

lh
lh

_

_

5

_

5
£
5

_
-

6

c

3

5

11

8

~T~

F
-

lh
lt
i
-

18
18

20
6

-

lh
il
l

1

e

............... ...... ....... .. _

-

-

-

-

-

1

301

1.9h
1.5h

-

-

-

-

-

-

8h

1.80

_

_

_

_

_

_

50

1.87

3h

Qawn

-

1.69

18

1.79

2.05

-

2.13

i

c

3

16
6
10

_
-

2

Firemen, stationary b o i l e r ........... *.............
Manufacturing..... ..............................
Nonmanufacturing ................................
Services .....................................

1 .U8
257
i 9 h .. " T37
1.21
63
32
1.05

16
-

2

16

2

15

“

I
t
h
h

Helpers, trades, maintenance ..... ..................
Manufacturing ...................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................
"vVli a n +i1i+ice
Di\
. . ..

3h2
1.55
305.” T7F?
37
1.15
l.5l
22

2

_
-

_
-

Machinists, maintenance ............................
Manufacturing.... ................ ..............

25h

1 .8 3 " ”

Maintenance men, general utility ...................
Manufacturing ...................................

190

1.7h
1.67 ”

1

13

U6

16

6

-

-

3
13
-

1

20

10
10

11
8

1.87

2L6

11

Mechanics, automotive (maintenance) ................
Manufacturing ...................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................
Public utilities * ...................... .
Wholesale trade ..............................

” 138
26U

1.65

59
205
13h

1 .7 0 ” “

h8

1.63
1.67

-

2

-

1

11
2

-

-

hi
5
-

5

ll

2

10
1

10
10

~TT~

3

-

5

-

-

3

27
27
3h

3h
-

3
3
32
29

3

3

2

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

T

8
”

3

-

-

-

-

1

_

13
13

_

_

_

_

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

_
-

-

-

-

1

-

_

1

-

2

-

”

-

12

1 .6 0

_

-

-

-

1

-

26
26

8
2

28
28

16

35
13

12

"

ho
- “T ~
35
19
1
15
18
~

19

7

19

h
h

33
33
33

~

“

-

22

8“

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.

Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy

-

?o
5o
-

17
lh
3

h3
hO
3

-

8

5
5

31
31

1?
17

38
38

13k

_
-

i
i

15

1
1

5
5

19
11

9

7

N.

2h
2h
-

-

-

-

_
-

-

18
18

ho
ho

-

19
17

31
31

31
31

10
10

h7
h6

2
2

6
6

2
2

28

1
1

13
13

16

-

11

-

2
2

-

5
5

3
3
-

22

2
2

hi
hi
-

12h
12h

3
25

IS

138

8
8

30
30
-

3

'

See footnote at end of table.




9
~ 3“
3
3

11
' 10

8
1

3
3

8
-

'

*

-

16

_ 2_

_

5

3
3
-

19

1

1

-

17

9
10
10

13
13

8
6

-

5

1
1

_
-

-

"

2
3

3

_
-

_
-

-

-

67
67

h
h

l?
lh

3
3

-

_

k3
9

3

— :
l

_

-

10

10
10

12
1
11
-

11

March W $ 2
Bureau of Labor Statistics

22
21

h
h
-

2
’

22

h
h
-

h
h
-

6

2

2
2
-

'

_

_

6

6
6
“

_
_

“

M aintenance and Poweb P lant Occupation* - Continued

Table A-3 :

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for men in selected occupations studied on an area
basis in Albary-Schenectady-Trpy, N. Y., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING BTRAIQHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
o
f
workers

Occupation and industry division

1
s
t
t
9
s
$
S
s
Avtreas
hul
o r y Under 1.00 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1 .1 0
*
erig
anns
$
L.00 1 *2£ 1.30
1 J .Q x j ^
1 1 9 , 1*11
.*.
$
_
_
1.87
1
1.86..
"
-

Mechanics, maintenance .............................
Manufacturing ...................................

381*
31*6

Millwrights ........................................

57

86

1.52

Painters, maintenance.... ................... .
Manufacturing ....................................
Nonmanufacturing ................................

132

113

1.7U
i .76

15

1 .6 3

Pipe fitters, maintenance ................ ..........
Manufacturing ...................................

228
226

2.00

Plumbers, maintenance ..............................
Manufacturing ...................................

6*
1
56

1.86
"1767

Tool-and-die makers ................................

61*8

and
1.50- 1* 5 1 1.60 1x61 lt70 1.75 1,80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.10

1.52

Oilers .......... ...................................

9
t
$
s
t
9
s
S
1
9
s
t
t
9
t
1.1*5 i.5o 1.55 i.6o 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30

2.09

1/

22
18
5
22 ~ T T i r

22

25
25

17

106
106

7
n

-

-

6 109
6 109

28
_

_

.

.

2

2

12

2

3

7

18

3

26

2

2

2
2

2

6

7

2

1
1

6
5

6
6

-

2

"

-

1

-

5

"

5
c

2
0

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1
*

-

~T~ "IT
3
-

2

1

2.CO

-

-

16

1
|
1
*

_

_

-

1
*
10
*

3

-

39
1

3
-

9
9

1
1

13
13

7
7

2

_

2

-

6
6

2
2

2

2

2

36
36

8

_

51
20

1
*

13

2
2

“

9
~ T ~

8
8

10

11
1.

8

67

l
*
36 ~ T
1
-

5

37

_
-

_

_

_

5

-

"

-

6 160
6 160

13

9

12

9

8

5

i**
ll

-

1

-

10
10

-

-

-

23

329

16

Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

C ustodial, Wa>ieUou*44U}f and S kippin g O ccupationl

Table k-A z

(Average hourly earnings 1/ for selected occupations 2/ studied on an area basis
in Albany-SchenectacTy-Troy, N. Y., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O c c u p a tio n and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
Average
hourly Under 0 . 7 5 0 .8 0 0 . 8 5 0 .9 0 0 . 9 5 1 .0 0 1 . 0 5 1 .1 0 1 . 1 5 1 . 2 0 1 . 2 5 1 . 3 0
1 . 3 5 1.1*0
eemioga

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

1 . 1*5 1 . 5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 . 6 5 1 . 7 0 1 . 7 5 1 . 8 0 1 . 8 5 1 . 9 0 1 .9 5 2 . 0 0

$

0 .7 5

J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s

(m en)

........................................

1 ,1 8 0
— 5 2 tr~
560
82
1*2
278
79
79

$
1 .1 8
1 .3 5
.9 9
1 .2 9
1 .1 0
•93
1 .0 3
.8 3

50

and

-8 0

-8 5 , .9 .0

50

68
5
63

75
1*
71

1*3

1*
17

1*
5U

.9 5 1-QQ 1 - 0 5 1 -1 0 1 . 1 5 1 . 2 0 1 ,? 5 1 .W
1*0
11*
26

53
5
1*8

0
c
2

18
c
2
■
Ja

6
1 1
X7
20
c
j

10
60
XO
■
a
J

37 _ 8 U
10
36
1*8
27
■
5
5
J
1*
7
1
33
5
16
XO
"
1
X

19
— r
11 *

11
1
10
7

39
29
10

55
13

ia
2

**<
■
■O
5

J7

19
1*
15
15

18

J*l*

18
6
12

1
1*3
37
6

1
*
1
*

10

11

21

1
*
7
5
2

1

25
10
15

101
9
92

0

j

7

1*2

13

165

36

27
13
11*
5
7

0

c

39 _ 6 L
22
50
17
15
8
2
e.\
7
O
f
O
7

1 . 1 5 1 .LO 1 ,l,i 5 1 . 5 0 1 . 5 5
121
97
21*
U

59
22
37
35
1

180
177
3

0
c

ia

83

82

10
8

_

38
3

1

2

-

-

3

21
18
3

n
X

n

1 .6 0 1 -6 5 1 _7f> 1 . 7 5 l .fin 1 . 8 5 1 -QO 1 .9 5 ? . 0 0 o v e r

1

2

-

-

-

-

19
13
6
6

2
7
7

6
6

15

1

_

_

1

-

>

-

-

"

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

_

1

2

X

J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and c l e a n e r s

(women)

..................................

1*58

b?
369
20
1*1*

.9 1
•87
•97
• 79

359
135“
22 3
182
1*1




1 .3 2
1.1*1
1 .2 6
1 .2 8
1 .1 9

256
138
118
91*
21*

See footnotes at end of table.

20

....1 . 0 8 ”

1 .3 5
1.1*0
1 .2 9
1 .3 5
1 .0 6

— ir
20

161

20

7

*
5

u
18

-

_

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

18
18

5

5
2
3

]_

10

5
5

36
8
28

3
3

11
2

6
6

8
8

10

1

3

29
15
11*
9
5

26

13
13

9

7
7

-

-

-

1
1

-

39
21*
15
15

27
12
15
3
12

3
2
1
1

23
7
16
16

1*5
11
3U
31*

32
32

2
2

1*1*
29
15
15

15

-

"

_

_

■
3
J
1*

2
i*
2
2

20
17

3

2

8
5

1
1

13

20

13

21

13

6
11*
8
6

12
1

lb
3
3

3

9
k

1
1

1

26

16
15
1
1
3

3
-

^ 2_
2
11
1 11
*
1 11
*

-

_

-

_

_

-

_

-

_

_

-

-

1
15
15

-

-

-

Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table

k-Ui

G uiiodial, W ateU tuaittf, and SU ipputf OeeupaiituU - G vditm ad
2/

(Average hourly earnings V for selected occupations
studied on an area basis
in Albany-Schenecta3y-Troy, N. Y., by industry division, March 1952)

NUMBER OF WORKER8 RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Occupation and industry division

N ber
um
of
w
orkers

9
f
t
f.7
t s y Under 0 5 0 .8 0 5 .8 5 0 .9 0 0 .9 5 i.o o i .0 5 1.1 0 1 .1 5 1.20 1.25 1 .30 1 .3 5 1.U0 l.it5 1 .5 0 1 .5 5 1 .6 0 1 .6 5 1 .7 0 1 .75 1 .8 0 1 .8 5 $1 .9 0 *1.95 $2 .0 0
earnings 1
and
3.75
1 ,6 0 1 ,6 5 I t 70 JU I 5 1 ,8 0 I t 85 1 .9 0 1 .95 2.00 over
.8 0 .8 5 .9 0 .9 5 1 .0 0 1 .0 5 1 .10 1 .15 1 .2 0 1.25 1 .30 1 .3 5 l.[}0 1,1*5 1 ,50
¥
_
_
_
6
1 .0 1
1
8
16
2it
u
it
it
35
1
2
2h
IT“ 15"
It — V
.87
- — 6”

Packers (women) ................................................................................
Nonmanufacturing........................................................................

102
61

Receiving c l e r k s ..............................................................................
Nonmanufacturing........................................................................
Wholesale trade ...................................................................

256
77
U7
30

1 .5 5
1.3U
l.U t
1 ,2 0

Shipping clerks .................................................................................
M anufacturing..............................................................................
Nonmanufacturing............. .....................................................
Wholesale trade ...................................................................
R e ta il trade ..........................................................................

158
101
57
itO
1it

lolili
1.52
1.29
1.28
1.U0

-

Shipping-and-receiving clerk s ..................................................
M anufacturing..............................................................................
Nom anufacturing........................................................................
Wholesale trade ...................................................................
Rfi+.ai 1 tradA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

120
lit
106
U7
57

l.itO

_
-

Stock handlers and tru ck e rs, h an d ..........................................
Manufacturing ..............................................................................
Nonmanufacturing............................... .............. ..........................
PuM 1c ut-111 tie s * t f . , ...................._____________
Wholesale trade ....................................................................
R e ta il t r a d e ..........................................................................

1,221
607

Truck d riv e rs, lig h t (under l i tons) ...................................
M anufacturing..............................................................................
Nonmanufac tor i n g ........................................................................
Wholesale trade ...................................................................
R etail trade ..........................................................................

233
27
206
55
73

1.27

Truck d riv e rs , medium ( l £ to and including U tons) . . .
Manufacturing ..............................................................................
N om anufacturing........................................................................
^4 aA Jc
f
Wholesale trade ....................................................................

U72
22U
2U8
57
16U
22

1.U9
1 .5 5
l.it5
1 .5 6
1.U1
1.U3

Truck d riv e rs , heavy (over it tons, t r a i l e r type)
Manufacturing ..............................................................................
Nom anufacturing........................................................................
PiiKl 4a ii^4 1 4 +4 asi 4
t»

3U2
55
287
IQ)
±7J

1 .6 3
1.5U
1 .6 5
1.57

8
— 8“

1 .5 2
1.U6
1.U3

8
— 8~

.

.

......

Truck d riv e rs , heavy (over U tons, other
than t r a i l e r type) ......................................................................
Nonmanufacturing ........................................................................

61k
137
270
207

208
""T O "
37

Truckers, power ( f o r k - l i f t ) ......................................................
Manufacturing ..............................................................................
Nonmanufacturing............................................................. ..

1U3
131
12

Watchmen...............................................................................................
M anufacturing..............................................................................
N om anufacturing........................................................................
R e ta il trade ..........................................................................
V4non/»m 4#

280
187
93
32
IQ
A/
on
4V

1/
2/
*
**

l.h l

1.U0
l.U t
1 .35
1 .3 5
1 .3 l
1 .3 5
1 .5 0
1.U2
1.16
1.32
1.U9
1 .3 0

1 .1 k

-

_
-

2
2
2

«.
-

-

-

_
-

3

7
7
3

«.
_

it

_

13
12
1

3
-

it
it

3

_

6

3

-

3

•

6
6
*

16
<r
10
5
5
30

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

10
31
- — S'
10
23

9
3
6

10
5
- ~ T
6
5

18

_
10

23

6

2
3

6
-

.

_

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

50

2lt

~w

12

27

20

11
7

6
2

3
9

2
25

20

6

.

5

2

U6

6
6

-

5
5

2
2

lt6
19
23

.
8
- -----8"
-

8
8

11
5
6

-

8

6

-

6
2
2

23

12
12
“

10
it
6
6
-

11
11
1
10

2
2
2

19
19
5
lit

9
8
1

m

35 201 H46 119
3U “150“ “ 37" “ 5T
l
ltl 109
65

W — j “ 15“

10

7
2
2

7
7
1
6

U6

-

9
3
- 3
«

5
5
-

1
1
1

22

2
2
2

-

-

•

_

k

9
5
5
•
13

3
3
3

a
s

.99

•qA
70
RC
•0?

c
p1

lit
it

5

18
it
lit
U
0

c

19
13
6
6

10

W
2
2

11
21
10 “ T
11
7
1
3
it
5

2
2
-

3
3
it3
21

16

39
6
33
16
lit

5
it
l
-

itO
ItO
-

17
17
15

12

10
6
- — r
6
9

16
16

9
9

3U
27
23
23 1 2 I f
6
2
it

it
2

16

8

r

.
-

6
6
it
1
X

15
15
~

1
1

38
29

-

9

-

7

8
_

U5
1
1

_
_

itO
—

11
3
3 — F
6
6
-

11
11
-

6
it
2
2

2it
2U
“

6
6
-

it
it

8
8
8
_

_
_

1
1
_

9
9
9

2
2
-

56
55“
-

_
-

2
2
-

.
-

“

23
23
10
13

9

7
1
6
2
-

27
3
2U
“

it
It
-

2
2
-

it
it
•

50
11
39

it9
13
36

105
3
102

it
it
-

21
IB
3

6it
6Jt
-

23
13

Ut

-

2

-

39
3
36

202
21
181 ,
181

3
3
-

11
2
9
9

13
13
-

6
6
3

33
21
15

it9
39

53

2
-

11
-

-

iil

W

2

it
1
3

it
it
-

it
U

J
9

2

3
3

39

5

3
3
-

-

18
15“

8
12
lit
10 “ I f — X
12
10

23
23

15
lit
1

18
11
5
ET ----- T ------5
2
it
•

6
6
-

11
6
5

19
1

3
3
_

U7
51
35
35
r & o - ~ 7 6 ~ 2U ----- 5 “
121
7
27
25
15
18
2it
95
26
7
7
3
15
-

16
it
12

2
2

70
12
12
•

169

1

9

8
- ----- 8T
_
8

rw

1
1
“

1 .5 0
S~
6
-

3

1
1

21

1

Ik

16
2
lit
lit
-

2
63

—

Ik

7
7
-

108
l

1 .5 1

12
it
8
3

28
“ W
23
1

25
16

-iZ 2 ~
1.17
1.27
.9 8

5
_

1

5

E x c l u d e s premium p a y f o r o v e r tim e and n ig h t w ork.
S tu d y l i m i t e d t o men w o rk ers e x c e p t w here o th e r w i s e i n d i c a t e d .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n (e x c l u d i n g r a i l r o a d s ) , co m m u n icatio n , and o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




6
6
6

-

52
52
-

_ _

•

_
•

"

•

1
—

_
~

«
-

.
-

-

2
2
2

6
6

-

39
39

-

6
-

■

.
-

“

39
*

-

_
-

-

■

”

2
2
_

-

-

2
1
1

9

9

9

9
-

-

it
it
-

3
2
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

it
it

-

ItO
itO

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
12
3
10 —
~~T
~
*
-

.
“

_

-

“
.
-

“

~

-

-

-

.

_

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

~

-

■

_




B:

Characteristic Industry Occupations
M a clU ttM tU f

Table B -3 5 :

Occupation 2/

of
worker*

At m u i
hourly
earnings

1/

s

1/

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
t
s
t
f
$
t
t
$
9
t
1
9
9

s

9

9

L.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00
and
am
under
L.2? 1,30 l.?5 1,40 J.,45 1,50
55 1,60 1,65 1,70 1.75 1 ,8Q 1.35 3.99 11.95 2.00 over

$

Assemblers, class B L j z . .............................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class A £ / : T o t a l .... ............................
Time ..............................
Incentive .........................
Drill-press operators, radial, class A lj\ > .....................
Engine-lathe operators, class A i j b .......................................
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand screw machine), class A i j a .................................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class B: Total .............................................................................................
Time ........................................................................................
Incentive ...........................................................................
Machine-tool operators, production,
class C: Total .............................................................................................
Time ........................................................................................
Incentive ...........................................................................
Tool-and-die makers (other than tool-and-die
jobbing shops) ijo . .....................................................................................
Welders, hand, class B i j a ......................................................................

97

1.46

37
46

1.62
1.59

a

1.66

9
13

1.57
1.69

13

1.62

138
85
53

1.53
1.47

1
1

1.61

-

23

1.46
1.24
1.56

14
9

1.78
1.62

34

11

22

2

17

3

21

24

3

2

4

3

3
_

_

_

_

_

_

«

3

2
1

32
31

3

1

9
9

2

-

4
3

2

5

1

3

1

5

17
_

1

1

7

_

1

_
_

_

_

1
1

3
_

1

4

1
1

2

1

-

_

-

7

-

1

4

-

_
-

1
1

64
64

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

2

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

3
3
-

10

8

9

7

1

1

7
7
-

4
4
_

_
_

_

-

_

_

-

_

5

1

17

_

1

_

3
_

23

.

3

23

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

10

13

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

10

_

4
5

4

_

3

_

_
_
_
_

i
_

13

25

-

_

_

1

_

3

_
_
_

_

_

_
_
-

i

_

_

25

i

_
_
_

_

_

3

1/ The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the nonelectrical machinery industry (Group 35) as defined in the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual (194-5 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget; machine-tool accessory establishments with 7 or more workers were also included.
Data relate to a December 1951 payroll period.
2/ Data limited to men workers.
2 / Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.

ij

Insufficient data to permit presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment.

j/
j

(a) All or predominantly time workers.
(b) All or predominantly incentive workers.
Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.

Table B^UOt

R<u I a O& cU> V

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Occupation 2/

Number
o
f
workers

9
9
9
9
Average
hourly Under 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 I .55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95
ea n n s %
rig

_

1 /

1.25

lt?0 1,35 1,40 1,45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1*25. 1.90 1£ 1 2.00

%

Carpenters, maintenance .............................
Electricians, maintenance ...........................
Helpers, trades, maintenance ........................
Janitors and cleaners ...............................
Machinists, maintenance .............................
Painters, maintenance ...............................
Stock handlers and truckers, hand ...................
Truck drivers, medium (l£ to and including 4 tons) ....

139
287
1,128
41
214
72
441
62

1.82
1.97
1.69
1.49
1.97
1.80
1.62
1.74

-

1
_

1

-

-

-

_

-

1
-

6
-

16
-

-

1
112
6

50
6

15
-

37

14
1128
146

95
30

62
61
1
7

7
-

55
U
-

13

1
287
214
-

1 / The study covered establishments with more than 20 workers in the railroad industry (Group 4-0) as defined in the Standard Industrial Classifica­
tion Manual (194-9 edition) prepared by the Bureau of the Budget.
2 / Data limited to men workers.
Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y . , March 1952
Excludes premium pay for overtime and night work.
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

218947 0

-

52 - 2

C:

Union W age Scales

(Minimum wage r a t e s and maximum s t r a i g h t - t i m e hours p er week agreed upon through c o l l e c t i v e b a rg a in in g between em ployers and tr a d e u n io n s .
R a te s and hours a re th o se i n e f f e c t i n th e in d ic a te d a re a s on A p r il 1 , 1 9 5 2 .)

T blt c 15s
&
-

Buildinq. Go4*&t>UictiO*l
R ate
p er
hour

C la s s ific a tio n
B r ic k la y e r s :
A lb a n y ..........................................................................
Sch enectad y ..............................................................
T r o y ............................................................................ ..
C a rp e n te rs :
A lb a n y ............ .............................................................
S ch enectad y ..............................................................
T r o y ..............................................................................
E le c tr ic ia n s :
A lb a n y ................... ....................................... .............
S c h e n e c ta d y .............................................................
T r o y ............................................................................ ..
P a in te r s :
Albany ..........................................................................
S c h e n e c ta d y ......................................................... ....
T roy .................................................................................
P la s te r e r s :
Albany ..........................................................................
S c h e n e c ta d y ......................................................... ....
T r o y ...............................................................................
Plum bers:
Albany ..........................................................................
S c h e n e c ta d y ..............................................................
T r o y ...............................................................................
B u ild in g la b o r e r s :
A lb a n y ..........................................................................
S c h e n e c ta d y ..............................................................
T r o y ...............................................................................

Tabla C-205:

Table C-205*

Hours
per
week

40
40
40

2 .4 4 0
2 .4 2 0
2 .3 6 5

40
40
40

2 .7 5 0
2 .7 0 0
2 .7 5 0

40
40
40

2 .0 7 5
2 .2 0 0
2 .0 0 0

40
40
40

2 .8 0 0
2 .8 3 0
2 .7 5 0

40
40
40

2 .5 5 0
2 .5 5 0
2 .5 5 0

40
40
40

1 .7 5 0
1 .7 1 0
1 .6 0 0

40
40
40

R ate
per
hour

Hours
per
week

A lbany-S ch en ectad y-T ro y
Bread and cake - Machine sh o p s:
Agreement A:
Working forem en - cake .............................
M i x e r s ................. .................................................
In g re d ie n t s c a l e r s - cake ......................
Oven o p e r a to r s , oven p e e le r s ...............
Oven fe e d e r s .....................................................
Bench and machine men, r e l i e f men,
cake d e p o s ito r s , cookie-m achin e
o p e ra to rs .......................................................
Oven dumpers - bread ..................................
Wrapping-machine o p e r a to r s - b r e a d ..
Wrapping-machine o p e r a to r s - cake .•




C la s s ific a tio n

Rate
per
hour

Table 0-2082*

Hours
p er
week

M & U JldxfiaonA
R a te
p er
week

C la s s ific a tio n

Hours
p er
week

A lb a n y -S ch e n ecta d y -T ro y
$ 2 ,8 0 0
2 .8 3 0
2 .7 5 0

B oJz& U & l

C la s s ific a tio n

Bak&Uel - Continued

$ 1 ,7 3 5
1 .5 7 5
1 .5 5 0
1 .5 3 5
1 .5 1 0

1 .5 0 5
1 .5 0 0
1 .4 8 0
1 .4 7 5

40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40

A lb any -Sch en ectad y -T ro y - Continued
Bread and cake - Machine shops: - Continued
Agreement A: - Continued
Donut-machine o p e r a to r s .............................
M ix e rs' h e lp e r s , bread r a c k e r s ,
f l o u r b l e n d e r s .............................................
W rapping-machine o p e r a to r s '
h e lp e rs - cake ........................ ....................
Pan g re a s e rs .......................................................
H elpers ...................................................................
F o r e la d ie s ...........................................................
Cake d e c o r a to r s , cookie-m achin e
o p e r a to r s ' and cake
d e p o s ito r s ' h e l p e r s ............................... ..
Donut-machine o p e r a to r s (women) ..........
G en eral h e lp e rs - c a k e :
F i r s t 3 0 days ........................................... ..
Next 60 days ............ ......................... ..
T h e r e a f te r .....................................................
Agreement B :
M ixers .....................................................................
Oven o p e r a to r s - cake ..................................
Oven fe e d e r s .......................................................
Bench and machine men, cake d e p o si­
t o r s , co ok ie-m achin e o p e r a to r s . . . .
Oven dumpers - b r e a d ...................................
Wrapping-machine o p e ra to rs - bread . .
Wrapping-machine o p e ra to rs - cake . . .
Donut-machine o p e r a t o r s ............
Bread r a c k e r s .....................................................
Wrapping-machine o p e r a to r s '
h e lp e rs - cake ..............................................
Pan g r e a s e r s ............ ..........................................
H elpers ................................................................ ..
F o r e la d ie s ............................................................
Cake d e c o r a to r s , cake d e p o s ito r s '
and co ok ie-m ach in e o p e r a to r s '
h e lp e rs ............................. ...............................
G en eral h e lp e r s - c a k e :
F i r s t 30 days .............................................
Next 6 0 d a y s ............ ..............................
T h e r e a fte r .....................................................
Agreement C :
M i x e r s ....................................................................
Oven fe e d e r s .......................................................
Bench and machine m e n ......................
Oven dumpers .......................................................
Wrapping-machine o p e r a t o r s .................
Bread r a c k e r s .................................... ................
Pan g r e a s e r s ......................................................
H elpers ..................................................................

A p p re n tic e s :
F i r s t y e a r ....................................................................
Second y e a r .................................................................
B o t t l e r s ............ ..
Coopers ...................... ...........................................................
E n g in eers

$ 1 ,4 4 5

40

1 .4 2 0

40

1 .3 7 5
1 .3 7 0
1 .3 4 0
1 .3 3 5

40
40
40
40

1 .2 8 5
1 .2 1 0

40
40

1 .1 3 5
1 .1 6 0
1 .1 8 5

40
40
40

Tabla G-27s

1 .5 1 5
1 .4 7 5
1 .4 5 0

40
40
40

C la s s ific a tio n

1 .4 4 5
1 .4 4 0
1 .4 2 0
1 .4 1 5
1 .3 8 5
1 .3 6 0

40
40
40
40
40
40

1 .3 1 5
1 .3 1 0
1 .2 8 0
1 .2 7 5

40
40
40
40

1 .2 2 5

40

F i r s t men i n b o t t l e shop .................................... .. •
F i r s t men i n b r e w e r y ...................................................
K e t t l e , ferm e n tin g room c e l l a r men .................
R a ck e rs and hosemen .....................................................
Wash house m e n ..................................................... ..
Yardmen

$ 5 8 .1 5
6 0 .1 5
6 9 .1 5
7 0 .1 5
7 5 .1 5
7 0 .1 5
7 1 .1 5
7 2 .1 5
7 0 .1 5
7 0 .1 5
7 0 .1 5
6 9 .1 5

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

R a te
p er
hour

Hours
p er
week

P sU tU dtU f

Albany

1 .0 7 5
1 .1 0 0
1 .1 2 5

40
40
40

1 .5 2 0
1 .4 5 5
1 .4 5 0
1 .4 4 5
1 .4 2 5
1 .3 6 5
1 .3 1 5
1 .2 8 5

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

Book and jo b sh o p s:
B o o k b in d ers:
Journeymen - day work . * ................. ..
Journeymen - n ig h t work ...........................
Journeywomen - day work ...........................
Journeywomen - n ig h t work ......................
C o m p osito rs, hand - day work ......................
C o m p osito rs, hand - n ig h t work .................
E le c tr o ty p e r s - day w o r k ...................... ..
E le c tr o ty p e r s - n ig h t work ........................ ..
Machine o p e r a to r s and te n d e r s - day
work
Machine o p e r a to r s and te n d e rs - n ig h t
work ........................ ..............................................
M a ile rs - day w o r k ................. ...........................
M a ile rs - n ig h t work .........................................
P h o toen g rav ers - day work .............................
P h o toen g rav ers - n ig h t work .........................
P r e s s a s s i s t a n t s and f e e d e r s :
C y lin d e r p r e s s h e lp e r s ,
male - day work .........................................
C y lin d er p r e s s h e lp e r s ,
male - n ig h t w o r k ............................. ..
C y lin d er p r e s s h e lp e r s ,
fem a le - day work ....................................
C y lin d er p r e s s h e lp e r s ,
fem ale - n ig h t work .............................

$ 2 ,1 9 3
2 .3 0 0
1 .2 5 3
1 .3 0 6
2 .6 0 5
2 .7 3 8
2 .7 1 4
2 .8 4 8

37
37
37
37
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2 .6 0 5

37 1/2

2 .7 3 8
2 .1 8 6
2 .3 2 0
2 .5 8 6
2 .7 2 0

37
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

2 .1 7 8

37 1/2

2 .2 8 5

37 1/2

1 .5 6 2

37 1/2

1 .6 6 9

37 1/2

Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table C-27*

PsUHtifUj, Qo n tiw i*

Table C-42:

-

C la s s ific a tio n

R ate
p er
hour

Hours
per
week

Albany - Continued

C la s s ific a tio n

Table C-58*

R ate
p er
hour

Hours
per
week

37
37
37
37
:3 ?
37

1/2
1/2
1 /Z
1 /2

1/2

B u ild in g :
Dump tr u c k ...................................................................
E u c lid ............................................................................
M a te r ia l ........................................................................

$ 1 ,7 5 0
1 .9 0 0
1 .5 4 0

40
40
40

B u tte r and eggs ............................... ..............................

1 .6 4 0

40

1 /2 .

Coal and f u e l o i l :
Coal . . ......................................................................... ..
O il ...................................................................................
2 .4 9 3
2 .6 0 0

37 1/2
37 1/2

2 .4 9 3

37 1/2

2 .6 0 0
1 .9 6 0
2 .0 6 6
2 .6 4 0
2 .7 7 3
2 .3 8 6
2 .4 8 0
2 .4 6 6
2 .5 6 0

37
37
37
37
37
37
37
37
37

1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2

ReAjGU4/lG*U4> “ Q o H /tiH ^ sd
R ate
p er
week

C la s s ific a tio n

Hours
p er
week

$ 6 3 .0 0
6 0 .0 0

48
48

2 7 .5 0

48

3 6 .0 0

48

6 1 .5 0

48

3 6 .0 0

45

A lb an y -S ch en ectad y -T ro y - Continued

A lb an y -Sch en ectad y -T ro y

Book and jo b sh o p s: - C ontinued
Pressm en, c y lin d e r - day work ......................... $ 2 ,6 0 5
Pressm en, c y lin d e r - n ig h t work .................... 2 .7 3 8
Pressm en, p la te n - day w o r k ..........................
2 .3 1 7
Pressm en, p la te n - n ig h t w o r k ....................,
2 .4 2 4
S te r e o ty p e r s - day w o r k .....................................
2 .7 1 4
S te r e o ty p e r s - n ig h t work ................................
2 .8 4 8
N ewspapers:
C o m p osito rs, hand - day work .........................
C o m p osito rs, hand - n ig h t w o r k ............... .. •
Machine o p e r a to r s and te n d e r s - day
work .........................................................
Machine o p e r a to r s and te n d e r s - n ig h t
work ........................................................................
M a ile rs - day w o r k .............................................. ..
M a ile rs - n ig h t work ......................................... ..
P h o toen g rav ers - day work ................................
P h o toen g rav ers - n ig h t work ...........................
Pressm en, web p r e s s e s - day w o r k ...............
Pressm en, web p r e s s e s - n ig h t work ..........
S te r e o ty p e r s - day work .....................................
S te r e o ty p e r s - n ig h t work ...................... « . . .

A do£oSltSi44ch
and olf*lp*>U

1 .3 7 0
1 .5 1 0

40
40

C r a c k e r s ........................ ..............................................

1 .4 8 0

40

G eneral f r e i g h t :
C h au ffeu rs .............................................................. ..
H elp ers ....................................................... ..................

1 .5 6 0
1 .4 5 0

40
40

G rocery :
C h au ffeu rs ...................................................................
H e l p e r s .......................................... ..

1 .5 8 0
1 .4 7 0

40
40

Liquor ........................................... .................................. ..

1 .5 2 5

B a r te n d e rs * - Continued
Agreement B ............ .....................................
Agreement C ..............................................................
Bus boys:
Agreement B ..............................................................
D ishw ash ers, p o r t e r s , e t c . :
Agreement B ..............................................................
Counterm en:
Agreement C ..............................................................
M isc ella n eo u s k itc h e n h e lp :
Agreement A ..............................................................

40

Table C-7011*

J 4 o£ z U s
R ate
p er
week

Hours
per
week

B e llm en :
Agreement A ..............................................................
Agreement B ....................................................... ..
Agreement C ................................................................

$ 1 9 .7 0
2 2 .6 0
2 2 .8 0

45
48
48

E le v a t o r o p e r a to r s :
Agreement A .................................................. ..
Agreement B ................................................................
Agreement C ...................... ..........................................

3 1 .0 0
3 7 .4 8
3 5 .5 0

48
45
48

Housemen:
Agreement A ................................................................
Agreement B ........................................ .......................
Agreement C ................................................ ................

3 6 .0 0
3 6 .0 0
4 1 .1 0

48
48
48

M aids:
Agreement A .................................................. ..
Agreement B
. .......... ..
Agreement C ...............................................................

3 3 .0 0
3 3 .0 0
3 4 .5 0

45
42
42

Yardmen:
Agreement A ................................................................
Agreement B ................................................................
Agreement C .........................................................

3 6 .0 0
3 6 .9 0
3 7 .5 0

48
45
45

C la s s ific a tio n

A lb an v -Sch en ectad y -T ro y
Table C-58*

OpetozZUup £*MfUo4fmm&
C la s s ific a tio n

R eA tcU i/M O ttd,

C la s s ific a tio n

R ate
per
hour

Hours
p er
week

R ate
p er
week

Hours
per
week

A lb an v -Sch en ectad y -T ro y
A lb an y -Sch en ectad y -T ro y

B u sse s:
Agreement A:
F i r s t 3 months ...................................................
4 - 6 months ........................................................
7 - 9 months .............................................. ..
A f te r 9 months ...................................................

$ 1 ,3 5 0
1 .4 0 5
1 .4 3 0
1 .4 6 0

48
48
48
48

Agreement B :
F i r s t 6 months ...................................................
A f te r 6 m o n th s ...................... ............................

1 .2 0 0
1 .3 0 0

54
54

Agreement C :
D riv e r s ....................................................................




1 .2 5 0

48

Cooks:
Agreement A ...................................... .........................
Agreement B :
F i r s t cooks ..........................................................
Second cooks ........................................... ..
O ther cooks ..........................................................
Agreement C :
C h ie f cooks ....................................................... .
Cooks .................................................... ..
W a iters and w a itr e s s e s *
Agreement A ................................................................
Agreement B ................................................................
Agreement C ................. ..............................................
B a r te n d e r s :
Agreement A .......................................................

$ 6 7 .0 0

45

7 6 .0 0
6 3 .0 0
6 1 .0 0

48
48
48

8 5 .0 0
8 0 .0 0

48
48

2 4 .0 0
2 3 .5 0
2 2 .0 0

45
48
48

5 7 .5 0

40

D:
Table D -ii
w^

Entrance Rates

Mj*U*tuutt £*tt'uzMce. Rated, fo i plant hUanJeeM 1/

a B = = = = = = = —

= = = = = = = = = = = = *= = = = = = = = = = ^

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

E:

=

Supplementary W a ge Practices

P e rc e n t o f p la n t w orkers i n e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith s p e c i f i e d
minimum r a t e s i n Minimum r a t e ( i n c e n ts )

A ll
in d u s tr ie s
2/

Manufac,tu rin g
e s t a b l j .shments
wit ,h 251 o r
2 1 -2 5 0
more
w orkers
w orkers

T a b le E - l :
P u b lic
u tn itie s *

W holesale
tr a d e

R e ta n
tra d e

S

J t ift

Under A ................................................
O
Over A5 and under 50 ...................
5 0 ..............................................................
Over 50 and under 55 ....................
60 ..............................................................
Over 60 and under 65 ....................
65 ..............................................................
Over 65 and under 70 ...................
7 0 ..............................................................
Over 70 and under 75 ....................
75 ..............................................................
Over 75 and under 80 ...................
8 0 ..............................................................
Over 80 and Tinder 8 5 ....................
85 ..............................................................
Over 85 and under 90 ....................
9 0 ..............................................................
Over 90 and under 95 ....................
95 ..............................................................
Over 95 and under 100 .................
100 ...........................................................
Over 100 and under 105 ...............
1 0 5 ............................................................
Over 105 and under 110 ...............
n o ...........................................................
Over n o and under 1 1 5 ...............
Over 115 and under 120 ...............
120 ...........................................................
Over 120 and under 125 ...............
1 2 5 ............................................................
Over 125 and under 130 ...............
130 ...........................................................
Over 130 and under 135 ...............
Over 135 and under 1A0 ...............
Over 1A0 and under 1A5 ...............
1 A 5 ...........................................................
Over 1A5 and under 1 5 0 ...............
Over 150 ................................................
E sta b lish m e n ts w ith no
e s ta b lis h e d minimum .................

l/
2/
*

1 0 0 .0
O.A
l .A
.7
.9
.A
1 .2
.6
2 .2
2 .1
.8
1 .9
.2
1 5 .A
1 .9
2 .5
.2
.8
2 .6
.6
1 .7
2 .3
A.3
2 .5
1 .9
(2 /)
3 .6
1 .1
1 .0
9 .6
.5
2 6 .2
0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

-

-

-

1 0 0 .0
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

9 .0
2 7 .1
3 .3
5 .8
-

2 .1

.2
2 .3
.1
1 .0
.1
.5
1 .5

3.A
1 .3
A.3
3 .5
.2
1 2 .1
5 .6
A .7
1 .2
A. 6
.2
3 .0
.6
.5
A. 6

1 .0

2 .9

1 .6

1 0 0 .0

l .A
13 .A
1 .3
_
3 .5
1 .9
5 .9
1 .5
2 .0
3 .0
1 5 .9
.7
A3.6

A.O
_
3 .A
2.A
3 6 .2
1 5 .3
3 .3
2 .2
_
-

_
_
6 .3
1 .3
1 7 .9
9 .1
1 0 .7
-

7 .2
.6
A. 5
-

2 .2
3 .6
2 .7
A. 8

1 0 0 .0

7 .6

1 0 .0
5 .6
1 7 .9
A. 8
.
1 9 .A
A .3
7 .2
7 .7
5 .3
7 .0
_
6 .7
.5
.1
.1
-

-

-

-

3 .2
.8
1 .1

6 .9
6 .0
2 .5
A .5

3 .9
3 .8
A.O
1A .1
-

-

1 .2

3 .3

2 .1

3.A

.8

-

-

-

Lowest r a t e s fo r m a lly e s ta b lis h e d f o r h i r i n g 'e i t h e r men o r women p la n t w orkers o th e r th an watchmen.
Exclu des d a ta f o r f i n a n c e , in s u ra n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .
Less th an .0 5 o f 1 p e r c e n t.
T ra n s p o r ta tio n (e x c lu d in g r a i l r o a d s ) , com m unication, and o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .




IU O H ^

A l l m an u factu rin g
in d u s t r i e s
1/
3d o r
2d
o th e r
s h ift
s h ift

Ma.cnin6r y
in d u s tr ie s
2d
s h if t 2/

P e rc e n t o f w orkers on e x t r a s h i f t s .
a l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts .................................................

1 5 .1

6 .6

1 0 .3

R e ce iv in g s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ......................

1 5 .0

6 .6

1 0 .3

Uniform c e n ts (p e r h ou r) ........................
A c e n ts ..........................................................
5 c e n ts ..........................................................
6 c e n ts ..........................................................
7 c e n t s .................................... - ...................
7-2 c e n ts .......................................................
9 c e n ts ..........................................................
1 0 c e n ts .......................................................
Over 1 0 c e n ts ............................................

5 .7
2 .2
.A
.1
1 .0
.1
.6
.3
1 .0

2 .0
.1
1 .1
.1

1 0 .3
.5
-

Uniform p e rce n ta g e .......................................
5 p e rc e n t .....................................................
7 p e rc e n t .....................................................
7 £ p e r c e n t ...................................................
8 p e rc e n t .....................................................
10 p e rc e n t ...................................................

9 .3
1 .3
.1
2 .6
.1
5 .2

A. 6
A.6

R e ce iv in g no d i f f e r e n t i a l .............................

.1

(2 / )
.7

_

9 .8

-

a/)

-

-

-

-

1 2 .1

u

P e rc e n t o f p la n t w orkers employed
on each s h i f t i n -

1 0 0 .0

A .9
2.A
3 .0
2 .9
9 .6
1 2 .1
3 .6
3 .0
2 1 .9
A.O
7 .5
.2
2 .1
1 .6
1 .0
5 .6
1 .8
1 .2
1 .7
.2

m

S e r v ic e s

S h ift d iffe r e n tia l
A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts ........................

P

1/
2/
2 /

In clu d e s d a ta f o r i n d u s t r i e s i n a d d itio n t o th o s e shown s e p a r a t e ly .
No w orkers employed on 3d o r o th e r s h i f t .
Less th an .0 5 o f 1 p e r c e n t.

O ccu p atio n al Wage S u rv ey , A lb a n y -S ch e n ecta d y -T ro y , N. Y. , March 1952
U .S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

Table E-2:

ScU&dul&d W&eJzly cM
ourU
.

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS

Weekly hours

All
industries

All establishments ......................

100*0

Under 3 5 hours .........................
3 5 hours ................................
Over 3 5 and under 3 7 $ hours .............
3 7 $ hours ................... ............
Over 3 7 $ and under UO h o u r s ...... ......
UO h o u r s ........ .......................
Over UO and under UU h o u r s .........................................
Mi hours ...............................................................................................
Over UU and under U8 h o u r s .........................................
U8 hours ...............................................................................................
Over U8 h o u r s .....................................................................••••

0 .3
1 .8
1 .3
2 2 .7
3 .0
6 6 .2

1.0
1.5
1.9
.3
•

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities*

1 0 0 .0

O.u
0 .5
•2
6 .1

•U
9 U .8
-

1 .U
8 9 .7
-

U .U
-

1.3
•3
.5

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

i.U
•
-

0 .6
-

1 1 .5
2 .7
7 2 .3

.7
3 .3

2.3
9.8

-

-

“

“

EM PLO YED I N -

-

78.1
5.U
.8
10.0
.9

-

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

All
. Manufacturing
industries 2 /

1 0 0 .0

-

•2
-

-

8 .5
8 .0
U 2 .6

9.6

8 .U

1 6 .8

32.5
-

51.7
U.5

-

17.U

-

-

•

*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .C

1 0 0 .0

_

0 .2

-

1 0 0 .0

Public
utilities *

-

-

2 .9

U .0

-

-

-

53.9
1.U
1.2
7.9
29.U
2.9

56.9

59.7

{}/)
2.U
3U.8
1.9

-

Services

1 0 0 .0

_
-

-

-

63.6
9.1

U0.3
7.C

37.6

-

6 .0

12«9

-

1U.6
12.1
7.U

5.7
8.1
•6

11.5
25.6
19.1

27*6
17.6
7.5

-

1.3
•1
-

Data r e la te to women workers*
*
Includes d ata for in d u stries in addition to those shown separately*
Less than *05 o f 1 percent*
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s *
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .

P;aid <Jfolida4f4,

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Number o f paid holidays

A ll establishm ents
Establishm ents providing paid holidays * .

1
3

day ..
days .
U days .
5 days .

All
industries

1 0 0 .0

99 .U

Manufacturing

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

99.5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

”

.5

•U

25.6

7 days . .
7$ days .
8 days . .
9 days ..
10 days .
11 days ,
11$ days
12 days .

1U.5
21.5
5.0

Establishm ents providing no
paid h o lid a y s ........................

y
2/
*
**

•

28.7
U2.5

n .5
-

-

-

.7

.6

-

—

5.0

70.7
-

-

2.9
7.5
3.U

.5
-

17.9

.3

2 .0
-

-

-

-

.6

-

-

•

-

.6

.5

-

-

.5

3.6
1 8 .2

-

70 .6

1 .6

13.9

1.9
3.1

Services

..
8 .U
1U.U
6 6 .0
2 .0
U .2

-

AU
industries 1 /

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

85.U

92.8

1.2
6.2
8.9
«*

U9.6

92.U

Includes data fo r in d u stries in addition to those shown sep arately .
Less than *05 of 1 p ercen t.
Transportation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other public u t i l i t i e s .
Finance, insurance, and r e a l e s ta te .




.8

.3

33.U
m

Finance**

1 0 0 .0

•2
•8

Retail trade

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

1 0 0 .0

.1

.2

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

6 days .
6$ days

5 $ d«3T»

Public
utilities*

-

3.0

•2
.9
•

50.0

Manufacturing

Public
utilities *

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

93.1

89.7

98.9

75.9

-

-

”

"

.6
-

U2.1
32.0

7.6
-

-

35.U

77.1

-

«
2 .6
-

23.0
9.3
-

5.7

3.3

3.1

15.3

8 .1
-

•6
.2

-

-

-

~

•

7.2

6.9

1 U .6

Services

88.2

-

2.3

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

5.7

•

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

•* i
vn

Table E -3 :

1 2 .8
-

37.5
-

.8

87.2
-

.1
.6

5*6
12.5
-

57.2
-

5 .5
-

10.3

-

- .5
«•
.1
-

•

3.7

•

1 1 .8

(2/)
-

•

1 .1

2U.1

3.U
#

Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y ., March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-4:

P aid V<uOcUl(Utl (rf-ObmcU P/UHUliOlU)

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Vacation p o licy

A ll establishm ents ...............................................

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

99.1*

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
All , . Manufacturing
industries

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

86.8

9 8 .6

Public
utilities *

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

100.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

81*. 2

.
5 8 .3
3 .2
3 8 .5
•

8 0 .2
1 6 .0
3 .8
“

•
7 8 .8
5 .3
.1

1 year o f se rv ice
Establishments with paid v a c a t i o n s ............
Under 1 w eek..................................••••••••.
1 w eek.............. ............ ............. ....................
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks.......................
2 w eek s.......................................................... ..
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ...........................
•
Over 3 w eek s.......................................... .. • • •
Establishments with no paid vacations . . .

_
23*1
7U 7
1.U
•2

1 3 .7
•
85.8
-

«.
6.1*
9 3 .6
-

.6

•5

•

99.h

9 9.5

1 0 0 .0

_

_

_

_
8 5 .9
11*. 1
-

-

6 6 .3
•
12.1*
8 .1

.1
8U.5
1 .2
1 2 .2
•6
(l f )

•2
90.U
1 .5
6 .9
-

-

3 7.2
6 2 .8
-

_
9 1 .0
9 .0
-

_

-

1 3.2

1.1*

1 .0

86.8

98.6

9 9 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

81*. 2

.1
U5.1
2 9.0
2 2 .3
•6
1 .5

2 8 .3
1 2 .1
1*1*. 3
15.3

1*2.2
3 .2
5U. 6
•

3 6 .7
1 .1
58.1*
3 .8
•

.
61*. 1
*
.1
1 9 .6
.1

-

-

-

1 5 .8

.
1*1.6
58.1*
“

1 5 .8

-

2 y ears o f se rv ice
Establishments with paid vacatio n s • * . . . .
Under 1 w eek............................... ...............
1 w eek..................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 w eek s...........................
2 weeks ................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s.........................
3 weeks ................................. ..............................
Over 3 w eek s.................. .............................. ..

7*8
1*1
8 6 .3
1.1*
2 .6
•2

Establishments with no paid vacations •••

•6

.5

99.U

9 9 .5

5 .5
1 .8
9 2 .1
•1
-

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

3 .2
.6
7 8 .3
17.9
-

2 0 .0
~
7U.9
5 .1
-

1 6 .1
1 .2
8 2 .7
-

_
9 1 .0
9 .0
-

31.3
1.7
1*5.7
8 .1

(2/)

•2
1*7.2
3 9 .1
1 1 .7
.8
-

-

-

-

-

1 3.2

1.U

1 .0

86.6

9 8 .6

9 9 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

81*. 2

6 .7
.3

.
81*. 7
1 5 .3

1 8 .7
3 .2
7 2 .6
5 .5
•

6 .9
8 1 .7
7 .6
3 .8

2 1 .6
6 2 .5
.1

-

1 5 .8

«

5 y ears of serv ice
Establishments with paid vacations ••••••
1 w eek......................... ••••••••..................... ..
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks...........................
2 w eek s................................................. ..
Over 2 and under 3 w eek s...........................
3 w eek s.......................................................... •••
Over 3 w eek s............................................ .. •

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

l*.l*
9 1 .3
U.3
-

_
8U.9
6 .1
9 .0

75.6
8 .1

-

-

5.H
1*6

1 .2
96.1*
1 .9
-

.6

.5

Establishments with paid v a c a tio n s ............

99.1*

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 w eek .............................................................. ..
Over 1 and under 2 w eek s...........................
2 weeks .................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eek s...........................
3 weeks ................................................................
Over 3 weeks ......................................................

2*5

.8
7 9 .6
1 9 .1

.6

i l * .i
5 8 .7
1 3 .3
1 3 .9

l*.l*
5 2 .2
1*3.1*
-

Establishments with no paid vacations •••

2 .7
•
88*8

*9

•6
8 1 .5
1 7 .9
-

12*.l
6 6 .8
1 9 .1
-

-

-

'

3 .1

7 .5
.3
8 5 .6
1 .5
3 .1

88.8

.6

2 .0
1 .2
•

13.2

1.1*

1 .0

8 6 .8

9 8 .6

9 9 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

81*. 2

1 .9
7 6 .8
8 .1

7 .0
•1
6 9 .9
2 .0
1 8 .9

3 2 .8
6 7 .2
-

1 8 .7
3 .2
5 6 .8
1 5 .8
5.5

6 .9
7 0 .8
1 8 .5
3 .8

1 7 .2
•
6 6 .9
-

.7

6 .2
7 3 .6
2 .8
16.1*
-

1.1*

1 .0

*

“

1 5 .8

15 y ears o f serv ice

Establishments with no paid vacatio n s •••

V

63.1*
*7
29*8
3 .0
.6

.5

6 .2
9 3 .2
-

y

Includes data for in d u stries in addition to thosa shown separately*
Less than .0 5 of 1 percent*

*
**

Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
Finance, insurance, and real estate*




100 .0
.
6U.2
l*.l*
2 2 .U
9 .0
•

1 3.2

.1

Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. I*, March 1952
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABCR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Table E-5:

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Provisions for paid sick leave

All establishments .......................

All
industries

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

18.3

18 .6

U .9

32 . U

1 U .5

2 0 .9

2 0 .6

5 .1

U .3

_
-

.8
9 .6
1 .8
2.7
1 6 .9

All
industries 1 / Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

2U .2

6 .9

5 .5

Retail trade

Servioea

6 months of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................

3 d a y s ................................ .
5 days .................................
6 days ..................................
7 days .................................
10 days ................................
11 d a y s ............................... .
12 days ................................
20 days ................................
Over 20 d a y s ...........................

.1
3 .3
1 .5
.3
11.3
.1
.8
.5

_

.7
1 .3

.3

8 .7
2 .3

-

U .8

1 5 .8

-

3 .2

U .6

-

-

-

2 .5

-

-

.U

.6

-

.6

-

-

-

81.7

81 . U

9 5.1

6 7 .6

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................

2 6 .6

22.1

U .9

5 days .................................
6 days .................................

U.5
U .5

1 .3

_

7 days .................................

•7

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................

-

5 .3

-

-

15.7
.3

-

_

_

.3

1 3 .1

.1
3 .U
.6
.1
.3
.2

_
U.o

_

_

-

—
_

( 2/ )

-

-

•U

-

.3

8 5 .5

7 9 .1

79. U

9 U .9

95.7

3 8 .0

2 3 .1

5 2 .3

28.5

7 .7

1 6 .1

U .8

5 .2
1 .1

U.o

3 .5

5 .3
2 1 .0

-

l.U

2.7
1 .8

«
-

5 .5

-

2 .U
_

.

.1

"

-

-

7 5 .8

93.1

9U .5

3 7 .8

1 0 0 .0

U .5

9 .6
6 .6
2 .7
U .5

3 .3
6 .7
3 .8
2 .1
8 .2

_

1 7 .5

1 U .6

1 1 .2
1 2 .6
2 .1
6 .3

1 2 .2
2 .9

U .3
5 .U
U.8

1 year of service

10
11
12
20

-

................................
................................
................................
................................
days ...........................

1 0 .0
.1
2 .6
2.U
1 .8

1 5 .6

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ....................

73 . U

77.9

days
days
days
days
Over 20

.3
3.3

1.0
.6

.3
-

U.6
-

9 5 .1

-

-

3.2

2 .5

8 .1

lU . o

-

-

_

.3
.3
.2
.U
.2

.6

-

9 .0

-

( 2/ )

7 6 .9

U7.7

7 1.5

-

6 2 .0

See footnotes at end of table.
#
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
--• Finance, insurance, and real estate.
«»




8 .9
6 .7

.3
-

1 3 .1

9 2 .3

_

_

_
.

-

-

-

.2
.3

9 5 .5

1 0 0 .0

Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectsdy-Troy, N. Y., March 1952
U.S* DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

_

_

-

2 .U

.1

5.5

_

_

.1

-

-

82.5

85 . U

6 2 .2

P a id S ic J t Jlj&aae. ( $ o *m a l Pao u M oh A ) - G<mtUwmd

Table £ -5 *

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

Provisions for paid sick leave

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance**

Services

All
industries

All establishments .....................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

26.6

22.1

I .9
t

38.0

23.1

52.3

_

16.1

5.3
21.0
l.it
13.1
2.5
9.0

76.9

it7.7

71.5

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Servioes

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

28.5

7.7

it.5

i .8
t
8.9
6.7
8.1
_

5.2
1.1
.3
.2
.2

h .o
-

n .
1/

2 years of service

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

37.8

-

.1
.2
(2/)

_
_
-

-

3.8
it.5
.7
10.6
.1
2.6
.1
2.1t
1.8

16.9
.3
3.3
1.0
.6

.3
ii.6
-

9.6
6.6
2.7
2.9
1.6
lit.O
.6

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

73.it

77.9

95.1

62.0

Establishments with formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

26.6

22.1

U.9

38.0

23.1

52.3

28.5

7.7

it.5

5 days ..............................
6 days ..............................
7 days ..............................
10 days .............................
11 days .............................
12 days .............................
20 days ............................ .
Over 20 days ........................

3.8
it.5
.7
10.0
.1
2.6
1.0
3.9

_
15.6
.3
3.3
1.0
1.9

_

16.1
3.5

5.3
21.0
l.li
13.1

h .S

5.2
1.1
.3
.2
.2

h.O

.3
lt.6
-

9.6
6.6
2.7
2.9
-

16.2

Establishments with no formal provisions
for paid sick leave ..................

73.ii

77.9

95.1

62.0

3.5
.3
3.2
-

-

92.3

.2
.3

95.5

100.0

17.5

lit.6

11.2
12.6
2.1
2.6
3.7
5.5
.1

12.2
2.9
2.1|
_

it.3
5.i
t
i .8
t
.1
.

62.2

82.5

85.ii

37.8

.h

_
_
_

5 days ..............................
6 days ..............................
7 days ..............................
10 days .............................
11 days .............................
12 days .............................
15 days .............................
20 d a y s ............................ .
Over 20 days ........................

17.5

lit.6

11.2
12.6
2.1
2.6
-

12.2
2.9

-

it.3
5.i
t
i .8
t
_
_

2 .h
-

.1
.

-

-

15 years of service

1/
2/

-

.3
3.2

-

-

Includes data fo r in d u stries in addition to those shorn sep a ra tely .
Less than .05 of 1 p e rce n t.

*
Transportation (excluding railroads), communication, and other public utilities.
■H- Finance, insurance, and real estate.
sf




-

-

76.9

-

2.5
9.0

h l .l

8.9
6.7
-

8.1
-

71.5

~

.h
-

.2
.3
-

.3

-

92.3

95.5

_
_
_
_
-

.
-

100.0

-

9.3

62.2

_

-

82.5

-

85.it

*ss*e=*== s= =

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—
Type

of b o n u s

All establishments

..........................

Establishments with nonproduction
b o n u s e s 2/ .............................................................
C h r i s t m a s o r y e a r - e n d ...................
P r o f i t - s h a r i n g ...........................
Other

&04UU€4>

A

Table E-6*

......................................

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Services

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

2 1 .0

5 .5

1*1.1

3 8 .6

1 8 .2

2 1 .6
.8
.8

1 9 .5
.7
.8

_

3 5 .6
7.1*

3 8 .6
-

1 8 .2

5 .5
-

7 6 .8

7 9 .0

9l*.5

5 8 .9

61.1*

81.8

AU „ .
industries 1 / Manufacturing

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

30 .6

1 6 .3

2 .5

1*6.0

3 3 .5

8 3.8

3l*.l*

2 3 .2

2 6 .U
1 .7
3 .8

1U.7
1.1*
.2

1 .0

3 2 .1
1 9 .2

-

7 1 .9
5 .8
1 1 .5

3l*.l*

1 .5
-

69.1*

83.7

9 7 .5

5U.0

6 6 .5

1 6 .2

6 5 .6

-

Retail trade

Finanoe**

Services

33.5
-

-

“

-

-

Establishments w i t h no nonproduction
b o n u s e s .....

1/
y

*
**

- ..............................

In clu des data fo r in d u s tr ie s in add ition to those shown sep a ra tely .
Unduplicated t o t a l .
T ran sp ortation (excludin g r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F in ance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s ta t e .

Table E - 7 :

O s tA d d /U ittC *

O K c l P -C M U O *

(M

an *

PERCENT OF OFFICE WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

PERCENT OF PLANT WORKERS EMPLOYED IN—

All
industries

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Finance ••

Service.

All
industries

All e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ..........................

1 0 0.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h i n s u r a n c e or
p e n s i o n o lan s 2 / ...............................................

9 0 .3

9U.1*

9 9.5

8 2 .8

7 7 .5

89.3

6 9 .1

8 2 .3

8 7 .8

L i f e i n s u r a n c e ...........................
H e a l t h i n s u r a n c e ........................
H o s p i t a l i z a t i o n ........... ..............
R e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n ......................

83.6
70 .6
68.7
67 .2

93.7
81*. 9
89.2
82.5

9 9 .2
7 6 .6
6 .3
9 3 .;-

71*. 8
5 9 .9
5 7 .9
5 6 .3

6 2 .8
5 8 .1
6 1 .3
1 2 .5

6 6 .1
1*7.8
6 9 .3
5 9 .0

6 1 .0
6 .7
2 7 .8
8 .1

7 7 .3
6 6 .1
6 6 .1
5 9 .2

8 6 .8
7 7 .3
7 9 .7
7 0 .8

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h n o i n s u r a n c e or
p e n s i o n p l a n ...............................

9 .7

5 .6

.5

1 7 .2

22.5

1 0 .7

3 0 .9

1 7 .7

1 2 .2

7.1*

Type

1/
2/
*
**

of pla n

In clu des data fo r in d u s tr ie s in add ition to those shown sep a ra tely .
Unduplicated t o t a l .
U .S. DEPARTM
ENT OF LABOR
T ran sp ortation (excluding r a ilr o a d s ), communication, and other p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
Fin ance, in su ran ce, and r e a l e s ta t e .




1/

Manufacturing

Public
utilities*

Wholesale
trade

Retail trade

Sendees

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

9 2 .6

7 2 .8

61*. 0

1*9.5

91.1*
6 1 .6
25.1*
6 7 .2

5 9 .7
1*5.3
1*3.8
3 6 .8

3 8 .6
3 2 .6
3 5 .1
22.1

1*9.1*
1 7 .5
1 8 .8
.1

2 7.2

3 6 .0

5 0 .5

Occupational Wage Survey, Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y ., March 1952
Bureau o f Labor S t a t i s t i c s

18

A p p e n d ix

Scope ar

With the exception of the union scale of rates, in­
formation presented in this bulletin was oolleoted by visits of
field representatives of the Bureau to representative establish­
ments in the area surveyed. In classifying workers by occupa­
tion, uniform job descriptions were used) these are available
upon request.
Six broad Industry divisions were covered in compiling
earnings data for the following types of occupations t (a) office
clerical, (b) professional and technical, (o) maintenance and
power plant, and (d) custodial, warehousing, and shipping (tables
A-l through A -4). The covered industry groupings are i manufac­
turing) transportation (except railroads), communication, and
other public utilities) wholesale trade) retail trade) finance,
insurance, and real estate) and services. Information on work
schedules and supplementary benefits also was obtained in a rep­
resentative group of establishments in each of these industry
divisions. As indicated in the following table only establish­
ments above a certain size were studied. Smaller establishments
were omitted because they furnished insufficient employment In
the occupations studied to warrant their inclusion.

Among the industries in which characteristic jobs were
studied, minimum size of establishment and extent of the area
covered were determined separately for each industry (see fol­
lowing table).
Although size limits frequently varied from
those established for surveying cross-industry office and plant
jobs, data far these jobs were included only far firms meeting
the size requirements of the broad Industry divisions.
A greater proportion of large than of small establish­
ments was studied in order to maximize the number of workers
surveyed with available resources. Each group of establishments




M ethod of Su rvey
of a certain size, however, was given its proper weight in the
combination of data by industry and occupation.
The earnings information excludes premium pay for over­
time and night work. Monproduction bonuses are also excluded,
but cost-of-living bonuses and Incentive earnings, including
ooaeissions far salespersons, are included. Where weekly hours
are reported as for offioe clerical, they refer to the work sched­
ules (rounded to the nearest half-hour) for which the straighttime salaries are paid) average weekly earnings for these occu­
pations have been rounded to the nearest 50 cents. The number
of workers presented refers to the estimated total employment in
all establishments within the soope of the study and not to the
number actually surveyed.
Data are shown for only full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work the establishment's full-time
schedule for the given occupational classification.
Information on wage practices refers to all office
and plant workers as specified in the Individual tables. It is
presented in terms of the proportion of all workers employed in
offices
(or plant departments) that observe the practice in
question, except in the section relating to women office workers
of the table summarizing scheduled weekly hours. Because of eli­
gibility requirements, the proportion actually receiving the
specific benefits may be smaller.
The summary of vacation and
sick leave plans is limited to formal arrangements. It excludes
informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or other supervisor. Siok leave plans
are further limited to those providing full pay for at least
some amount of time off without any provision for a waiting
period preceding the payment of benefits. These plans also ex­
clude health insurance even though it is paid for by employers.
Health insurance is included, however, under tabulation for in­
surance and pension plans.

19

ESTABLISHMENTS A N D WORKERS IN MAJOR INDUSTRY DIVISIONS AND IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN ALBANY-SCHENECTADY-TROY, N. Y . , 1/
AND NUMBER STUDIED BY THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, MAR C H 1952

Item

Minimum number
of workers in
establishments
studied
2/

Number of
establishments
Estimated
total
within
Studied
scope of
study

Employment
Estimated
total
w i thin
scope of
study

In establJLshments
studiLed
Total

Office

Industrv divisions in w h i c h occupations
w e r e surveyed on a n area basis
21
21
21

720
219
501

214
75
139

125,700
86,300
39,400

93,340
72,740
20,600

12,400
7,110
5,290

21
21
21
21
21

All d i v i s i o n s ...... •••••...... ...................
Manufacturing ........................ ........
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ..............................
Transportation (excluding railroads),
communication, and other public
utilities ................................
Wholesale t r a d e ...... ......................
Retail t r a d e ........... .............. .
Finance, insurance, and real estate ......
Services 2 / ........ ............•.•«•••••••

36
129
218
52
66

15
37
44
21
22

7,700
6,200
17,100
4,100
4,300

6,810
2,850
6,420
2,200
2,320

1,800
890
1,110
1,290
200

21
21

12
8

7
7

1,954
14,928

1,140
13,991

99

Industries in w h i c h occupations were
surveyed on an industry basis 4 /
Machinery industries •••••••••.................
R a i l r o a d s .................................... ......

5/

'
2/
2/
2/
profit
4/
2/

Albany-Schenectady-Troy Metropolitan Area (Albany, Rensselaer and Schenectady Counties).
Total establishment employment.
Hotels; personal services; business services; automobile repair shops; radio broadcasting and television; motion pictures; non­
membership organisations; and engineering and architectural services.
Industries are defined in footnotes to wage tables.
Establishments manufacturing machine-tool accessories w i t h 8 or more workers were also included.




20

Index
Page

&£*
Assembler (machinery) ............ .......
Bartender (restaurants) ...••••••••«..... .
Bellman (hotels) ..................•••••••••••
Biller, m a c h i n e ................. ............
Bookbinder (printing) ........ •••••••••.....
Bookkeeper, hand ............... •••••••••••••
Bookkeeping-machine operator .... •••••.....
Bottler (malt l i q u o r s ; ..... ........ •••••.••
Bricklayer (building construction) ........ .
Bus boy (restaurants) .......................
Calculating-machine operator ••••........ .
Carpenter (Building construction) •••••••••••
Carpenter, maintenance •.••••••••••••••••••••
Carpenter, maintenance (railroads) ..... .
Cleaner
Cleaner (railroads) .................... .
Clerk, accounting
Clerk, file .................................
Clerk, g e n e r a l ............. ........ .
Clerk, o r d e r ..... .......... •••••••.........
Clark, payroll ................... ...........
Compositor, hand (printing) ••••••••••••••••.
Cook (restaurants) ...... ........... ........
Cooper (malt l i q u o r s ) ..... ........ .........
Counterman (restaurants) .••••••••••••••••.••
Draftsman ............ ••••••••••...... ...••••
Drill-press operator (machinery) ••••••••••••
Duplieating-machine operator ...... ••••••••••
Electrician (building construction) •••••••••
Electrician, maintenance ................. .
Electrician, maintenance (railroads) .•••••••
Electrotyper (printing) ••••••••........ •••••
Elevator operator ( h o t e l s ) ..... .
Engine-lathe operator (machinery) .........
Engineer (malt liquors) •••••••••••••••••••••
Engineer, stationary ••••••.•••..............
Fireman (malt liquors) ......................
Fireman, stationary boiler •••••••••.... .
Helper (bakeries) .......
••••
Helper, motortruck driver ...................
Helper, trades, mainte n a n c e.................
Helper, trades, maintenance (railroads) •••••
Houseman (hotels) ••••••••...................
Janitor ............................... .......
Janitor (railroads) ••••••••••••••....... .
Key-punch operator •••••........ •••••••••••••
Laborer (building construction) ••••••••••••.
Machine operator (printing) ........ •••••••••
Machine tender (printing) •••••••••••••••••••
Machine-tool operator, production (machinery)
Machinist, maintenance
Machinist, maintenance (railroads)
Maid (hotels) ........................... •••»•




9

11
11
3

10
3
4

10
10

11
4

10

6
9
7
9
3, 4
4
4
3, 4
3, 4

10 , 11

11
10

11

6
9
5

10

6
9

10
11
9

10

6
10

6
10
11

6
9

11
7
9
5

10

10 , 11
10 , 11
9

6
9

11

Mailer (printing) ....... .................... ................... .
Maintenance man, general utility .............••••••••• ................
Mechanic, automotive (maintenance) ................ • • • ................
••
Mechanic , maintenance ............................................... ............
Millwright ••••••............... ........ .............
Mixer (bakeries) ...... .................. ........ ..........
Motortruck driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........
Nurse, industrial (registered) «•••••••••••
...... ................
Office boy ................... .................. •
•
Office girl . .......... .......... . ...............
Oiler ........ ............................................................ ................
Operator (local transit) ............ . . . . . ...................
................
Order filler ...................... .
Packer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . r + . . . . ^ . . . . . . . . . ................
.
Painter (building construction) .............. ........... ..
Painter, maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................
Painter, maintenance (railroads) ............................
Photoengraver (printing) ••••••••....... •
•...........
Pipe fitter, maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................
Plasterer (building construction) .......................
Plumber (building construction)
Plumber, maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Porter ........................ .
Press assistant (printing) ............................ •........
Press feeder (printing) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Pressman (printing) . . . ................... . .............
Receiving clerk ....................................................
Secretary .................... .............................. .............
Shipping clerk .............................. ...................
Shlpplng-and-reoelving clerk . . . ....... ...................
Stenographer .....................................................
Stereotyper (printing) ............ ...............
Stock handler ............ ...............
Stock handler (railroads) ••••••••••••••
...... .
Switchboard operator . . . ...... ........ . . ........ .
,
Switchboard operator-receptionist .••••••••••
....
Tabulating-machine o p e r a t o r ..................... ......... ...,
Tool-and-die maker . . . . ...................................... .
Tool-and-die maker (machinery) ................................
T r a c e r ....................................................................... .
Transoribing-maohlne onerator .............. .................. .
Truck driver ............................ 8
Truck driver (railroads) •
•••......... .................................
Trucker, hand . . .................. ................ .............. .........
Truck*r, haul (railroad*) .................................................... 9
Trucker, c o v e r ............................. . .................................. ......
Turret-lathe operator, hand (machinery) ............. .,
T y p i s t ...................... I.................................................
Waiter (restaurants) ......................................... ............. .
Waitress (restaurants) ..................... ................................. ......
W a t c h m a n ............. .............. ..............
Welder, hand (machinery) •••••»••••••••••...................
Yardman (malt liquors)
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 0— 1952

6
6
7
10
11
6

7
7
7, 8
7

7

9
8
a

il
11

9
10

T H E O C CU P A T I O N A L W A G E S U R V E Y SERIES
I n a d d i t i o n to this bulletin,
similar occupational wage surveys are n o w av ailable f rom the Su per in­
tendent o f D oauments, U.S. Government Printing Office, W a shington 25, D. C. f o r t h e following communitiess
BL S
Bullet in
-JK m

BLS
Bull e t in

tg
_ 2 _ flt
ji

ss
i?
Baltimore, M a r y l a n d
Bridgeport, Conn e ct ic u t
Buffalo, N e w Y o r k
Cincinnati, O h i o
Cleveland, O h i o
Dallas, T e x a s
Dayton, Oh i o
Denver, Col o r a d o
Detroit, M i c h i g a n
Hartford, C o nn e ct ic u t
Houston, T e x a s
Indianapolis, I n d i an a
Kans as City, M i s s o u r i
Los Angeles, Cal i fo rn i a
Memphis, T e n n e s s e e
Min neapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota

1045
10 4 4
1085
1096
1056
1043
10 4 1
1066
1086
1059
1084
1075
1064
10 9 4
10 6 7
1068

20
15
25
20
25
20
20
20
25
20
20
20
20
25
15
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
oents
cents
cents
oents
oents
cents

T h i s report was prepared i n the Bu r e a u' s
dr e s s e d tot
Robert R*
B u r e a u of
341 Ninth
N e w York,

2_

City
N e w a rk - J e rs e y City, N e w J e r s e y
N e w Orleans, Louisiana
Norfolk-Portsmouth, V i r g i n i a
Ok l a h om a City, Oklahoma
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, P e nnsylvania
Portland, O r eg o n
Providenoe, R h o d e Island
Richmond, V i r g i n i a
Rochester, N e w York
Salt Lake City, U t a h
St. Louis, Missouri
S a n F r a n o l B o o -O a k l an d , Ca lif or nia
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Seattle, W a s hi n g t on
Worcester, Massachusetts

Mid dl e At l a n ti c Re g i o na l Office*

1081
1074
10 8 8
107 0
106 0
1082
1042
1071
1058
1087
1069
1095
1076
1078
1057
10 77

Price
25
15
15
15
25
20
20
20
15
20
15
25
25
15
20
20

oents
oents
oents
cents
cents
cents
oents
cents
oents
cents
cents
oents
oents
oents
cents
oents

Communications m a y be ad­

Behlow, R e gi o n a l D i r e c t o r
La b o r Statistics
A v en u e
New York

T h e services of the Bure au o f La b o r Statistics'
regional offices are av ailable for co ns ultation o n
statistics rel a ti ng to wages and industrial relations,
e m p l o y m e n t , prices, labor turn-over, productivity, c o n ­
struction a n d housing, and work injuries.




T h e Middle A t la n t i c R e g i o n includes t he following States!
Delaware
N e w J e rs e y

New York
Pennsy l v a ni a


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102