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National Survey of
Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay
Winter 1961-62

Bulletin No. 1346
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

National Survey of
Professional, Administrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay
Winter 1961-62

Accountants an d A uditors
A tto rn e ys
Personnel M a n a g e m e n t
Engineers an d Chem ists
Engineering Technicians
Draftsm en
Office Clerical

Bulletin No. 1346
October 1962

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. W illard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale
 by the Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, W ashington 25, D .C .


Price 40 cents




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
W A S H IN G T O N 25, D .C .

ERRATA

N a tio n a l S u r v e y o f P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d m in is t r a t iv e ,
T e c h n ic a l, and C l e r i c a l P a y , W in te r 1961—62
B u lle tin No. 1346

See page

11,

table

1 (la s t colum n).

The p e r c e n t change fo r

A tto rn e y s II should re a d - 1 . 5 in stead o f 1.5.
See appendix C,
o f le v e ls

d efin itio n fo r T Y P I S T .

The definitions

shown f o r T y p is t I and T y p is t II should be r e v e r s e d .

Issu ed N o v e m b e r




page 54,

1962




P reface

The Bureau o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s p ro v id e s in this b u lletin the resu lts of
the th ird in a s e r ie s o f annual nationw ide s u rvey s o f com pen sation fo r s e le c te d
p ro fe s s io n a l, a d m in is tra tiv e , tech n ica l, and c le r ic a l occupations in p riv a te indu s­
tr y . The data, which re la te to re p r e s e n ta tiv e estab lish m en ts in a b road spectrum
o f A m e r ic a n in du stry in urban a re a s , w e re obtained by p e rs o n a l v is it s o f B ureau
fie ld eco n o m ists.
F o r the m o s t p art, the data r e fle c t s a la r ie s in e ffe c t during
the p e rio d January—June 1962.

The d esign fo r this annual s e r ie s o f su rvey s was d ev elo p ed by the Bureau
o f L a b o r S ta tistics in conjunction with the B ureau o f the Budget and the C iv il
S e r v ic e C om m ission .
The su rveys p ro v id e a fund o f b ro a d ly based in fo rm a tio n
on s a la r y le v e ls and d istrib u tio n s in p r iv a te em ploym en t— that is , on the ra tes o f
com pen sation in the dom inant s e c to r o f the la b o r m a rk e t. A s such, the resu lts
a re u sefu l fo r w id e, g e n e ra l econ om ic a n a lysis. In addition, th ey p ro v id e m o re
in fo rm a tio n than has h ith erto been a v a ila b le on pay in p r iv a te in du stry in a fo r m
suitable fo r use in a p p raisin g the com pen sation o f s a la r ie d e m p lo ye e s in the F e d ­
e r a l c iv il s e r v ic e . (S ee ap p en d ixD .) It should be em p h a sized that these su rvey s,
lik e any oth er s a la ry su rvey s, a re in no sense calcu lated to supply m ech a n ica l
an sw ers to questions o f pay p o lic y .

The lis t o f occupations studied re p re s e n ts a w id e range o f pay le v e ls .
In d ivid u a lly, the occupations s e le c te d w e r e judged to be (a) su rv ey a b le in in du s­
tr y w ithin the fra m e w o rk o f a b road s u rv ey d esign , and (b) re p re s e n ta tiv e o f
occu pational groups which a re n u m e ric a lly im p orta n t in in du stry as w e ll as in
the F e d e r a l s e r v ic e .

O ccu pation al d efin itio n s p re p a re d fo r use in the c o lle c tio n o f the s a la ry
data r e fle c t duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s in in du stry; h o w e v e r, th ey a r e d esign ed to
be tra n sla ta b le to s p e c ific pay g ra d es in the g e n e ra l schedule applyin g to F e d e r a l
C la s s ific a tio n A c t e m p lo y e e s.
T his n ec e s s ita te d lim itin g som e occupations and
w o rk le v e ls to e m p lo ye e s with s p e c ific jo b functions that could be c la s s ifie d uni­
fo r m ly am ong estab lish m en ts. F o r o ffic e c le r ic a l and d ra ftin g occupations, s e ­
le c te d fr o m am ong those included in the Bureau*s p ro g ra m o f lo c a lity o ccu p a­
tio n a l w age s u rv ey s, Bureau o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s jo b d efin itio n s w e r e used.
D efin itio n s fo r a ll oth er occupations studied w e re p re p a re d by the C iv il S e r v ic e
C o m m is s io n s ta ff in c o lla b o ra tio n with the Bureau o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s . (S ee a p ­
p en dix C. )

The second su rvey , conducted in the w in te r o f 1960—61, in c o rp o ra te d a
num ber o f changes in the p r o fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations d efin ed fo r
su rvey, as w e ll as changes in oth er asp ects o f the s u rv e y d esign .
A d d itio n a l
changes in the p re s e n t s u rv ey have been confined to a fe w re v is io n s in w o rk le v e l
d efin itio n s, in vo lvin g two le v e ls o f c h ie f accountants and th re e o f the o ffic e c le r ic a l
occupations (appendix B); and the addition o f en gin eerin g tech n ician s to the lis t
o f occupations.
It has been p o s s ib le , th e r e fo r e , fo r the f ir s t tim e to p res e n t
in this re p o rt an an a lysis o f changes in s a la r y le v e ls during the y e a r fo r the fu ll
range o f occupations re p res en ted in this su rvey that a ls o w e r e c o v e re d a y e a r
e a r lie r .




1U

In addition to the c o lle c tio n o f s a la r y data fo r a ll occupations studied,
lim ite d in fo rm a tio n was obtained in this s u rv ey on the extent to which fo r m a l
s a la r y stru ctu res with a s e r ie s o f estab lish ed pay gra d es applied to w h it e -c o lla r
occupations.
In form a tion on su p plem en tary b en efits such as cash bonuses; paid
vacation s and h olid a ys; and health, in su ran ce, and pen sion plans is not included
in this re p o rt.
Data on su pplem entary cash bonus paym ents to e m p lo ye e s in
p r o fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations w e re p res e n ted in the 1959““60 r e p o rt
(B L S B u lletin 1286) and the extent to which such paym ents w e r e s im ila r in the
fo llo w in g y e a r was shown in the 1960—61 r e p o r t (B L S B u lletin 1310). In fo rm a tio n
on su p plem en tary b en efits such as paid vacation s and h olid a ys and health, in su r­
ance, and p en sion plans re la tin g to o ffic e w o rk e rs has been in c o rp o ra te d in s e p ­
a ra te re p o rts . (S ee o r d e r fo r m at the back o f this b u lle tin .) Data a re p ro v id e d
in su m m ary re p o rts fo r a ll m e tro p o lita n a rea s com bined and by re g io n , and in
s ep a ra te a re a re p o rts fo r each a r e a in which occu pational w age s u rvey s a re
conducted.

The su rv ey could not have been accom p lish ed without the w h oleh earted
c o o p era tio n o f the m any fir m s w hose s a la r y s ca les p ro v id e the b asis fo r the
s ta tis tic a l data p res e n ted in this b u lletin .
The Bureau, on its own b eh alf and
on b eh alf o f the oth er F e d e r a l agen cies that c o lla b o ra te d in planning the su rvey,
w ish es to e x p re s s s in c e re ap p recia tio n fo r the splendid c o o p era tio n it has r e c e iv e d
in this d iffic u lt undertaking.

T his b u lletin was p re p a re d in the B u reau 's D iv is io n o f W ages and In d u stria l
R ela tio n s under the g e n e ra l su p erv is io n o f T o iv o P . Kanninen. Sam uel E. Cohen
d e v is e d the sam pling p ro ce d u re s and s u p ervised the s e le c tio n o f the sam ple, a s ­
sisted by T h eo d o re J. Golonka, who was re s p o n s ib le fo r the p re p a ra tio n o f the e s t i­
m a tes. The an a lysis was p re p a re d by L o u is E. Badenhoop, a s s isted by H a r r y F .
Zem an .
F ie ld w o rk fo r the s u rv ey was d ire c te d by the B u rea u 's A s s is ta n t R e ­
gio n a l D ir e c to r s fo r W ages and In d u stria l R ela tio n s.




IV

Contents
Page
Sum m ary ------------------C h a r a c te ris tic s o f the s u rv ey
____________________________________________________
Changes in s a la ry le v e ls sin ce 1960—61 su rv ey __________________________________
A v e r a g e s a la r ie s , W in ter 1961—62 _________________________________________________
S a la ry d istribu tion s __________________________________________________________________
P a y d iffe r e n c e s by in du stry ________________________________________________________
A v e r a g e w e e k ly hours _______________________________________________________________
S a la ry ra te s y s t e m s __________________________________________________________________

1
1
3
4
7
9
9
10

T a b le s :
1.

2.

3.
4.
5.

6.

7.
8.

E m p loym en t and a v e ra g e s a la r ie s fo r s e le c te d p ro fe s s io n a l,
a d m in is tra tiv e , tech n ical, and c le r ic a l occupations in p riv a te
in du stry, w in te r 1961—62, and p e rc e n t in c r e a s e in a v e ra g e
s a la r ie s fro m w in te r 1960—61 ---------------------------------------------------------P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n o f e m p lo ye e s in s e le c te d p r o fe s s io n a l and
a d m in is tra tiv e occupations by a v e ra g e m onthly s a la r ie s ,
w in te r 1961—62 ______________________________________________________________
P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n o f en g in eerin g techn ician s by a v e ra g e m onthly
s a la r ie s , w in te r 1961—62 __________________________________________________
P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n o f e m p lo yees in s e le c te d d ra ftin g and c le r ic a l
occupations by a v e ra g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s , w in te r 1961—62 _____________
P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n o f e m p lo yees in s e le c te d p r o fe s s io n a l,
a d m in is tra tiv e , tech n ical, and c le r ic a l occupations by in du stry
d iv is io n , w in te r 1961—62 ___________________________________________________
R e la tiv e s a la r y le v e ls fo r s e le c te d p ro fe s s io n a l, a d m in is tra tiv e ,
tech n ical, and c le r ic a l occupations by in du stry d iv is io n ,
w in te r 1961—62
D istrib u tio n o f 75 s e le c te d job c a te g o rie s studied by e m p lo y e e s
a v e ra g e w e e k ly h ou rs, w in ter 1961—62 ________________
P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n o f estab lish m en ts by fo r m a l s a la r y ra te system s
c o v e rin g w h it e - c o lla r occupations, b y m a jo r in du stry d iv is io n s ,
and em p loym en t s iz e o f estab lish m en t, w in te r 1961—62 ______________

11

13
18
19

21

22
23

24

A p p en d ixes:
A.
B.
C.
D.

Scope and m ethod o f s u rv ey ------------------------------------------------------------S u rvey changes in 1961—62 _________________________________________________
O ccu pational d efin ition s ____________________________________________________
C om p arison o f a v e ra g e annual s a la r ie s in p riv a te in d u stry,
w in te r 1961—62, w ith F e d e r a l C la s s ific a tio n A c t s a la r y
ra te r a n g e s __________________________________________________________________




25
29
31

55




National Survey of Professional, Administrative, Technical,
and Clerical Pay, Winter 1961—62
S um m ary
A v e r a g e s a la r ie s ro s e 2. 7 p e rc e n t during the y e a r fo r e m p lo yees in
p ro fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations and 2. 9 p e rc e n t fo r those in c le r ic a l
occupations s u rv ey ed by the Bureau o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s, as o f w in ter 1961—62.
In a m a jo r ity o f the occupation w o rk le v e ls , also s u rv ey ed a y e a r e a r lie r (w in te r
1960—
61), in c re a s e s in s a la r y le v e ls w e re w ith in a 2- to 4 -p e rc e n t range.
Am on g
the 75 p ro fe s s io n a l, a d m in is tra tiv e , tech n ical, and c le r ic a l occupation w ork le v e ls
su rveyed , a v e ra g e (m ean ) m onthly s a la r ie s ranged fr o m $245 fo r c le rk s engaged
in sim p le filin g to $ 1,86 6 fo r attorn eys in ch arge o f le g a l s ta ffs, handling c o m ­
p le x le g a l p ro b lem s but u su ally subordinate to a g e n e ra l counsel o r his im m ed ia te
deputy in la r g e fir m s .
F o r e n g in e e rs, the la r g e s t p r o fe s s io n a l group studied,
a v e ra g e s a la r ie s ranged fro m $559 a month fo r re c e n t c o lle g e graduates in
tra in e e p ositio n s to $1,631 fo r those in the h igh est am ong eigh t le v e ls studied.
M onthly s a la r ie s a v e ra g e d $338 fo r g e n e ra l sten o gra p h ers, the la r g e s t c le r ic a l
group re p re s e n te d in the su rvey . A v e r a g e m onthly s a la r ie s o f e n g in e e rin g te c h ­
n ician s, who w e re included fo r the f ir s t tim e in this annual su rvey, ranged fro m
$392 to $661 am ong fiv e w o rk le v e ls . S a la ry le v e ls in finan ce and r e ta il trad e
in d u stries g e n e ra lly w e re lo w e r than in oth er m a jo r in du stry d ivis io n s r e p r e ­
sented in the su rvey .
C h a r a c te ris tic s o f the S u rvey
This annual s a la r y su rvey , the th ird in a s e r ie s , re la te s to e s ta b lis h ­
m ents em p lo yin g 250 o r m o re w o rk e rs lo ca ted in m e tro p o lita n a re a s . 1 N a tio n ­
w ide e stim a tes o f s a la r y le v e ls and d istrib u tion s a re p ro v id e d fo r 75 occupation
w ork le v e l c a te g o rie s su rv ey ed in the fo llo w in g in d u stries: M anufactu ring; tr a n s ­
p ortation , com m unication, e le c t r ic , gas, and s a n ita ry s e r v ic e s ; w h o lesa le tra d e;
r e ta il tra d e; finan ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l estate; e n g in e e rin g and a r c h ite c tu ra l
s e r v ic e s ; and re s e a rc h , d evelop m en t, and testin g la b o ra to rie s o p era ted on a c o m ­
m e r c ia l b a s is . 2 F o r the m o st p a rt, the cu rren t s u rv ey was conducted b etw een
January and June 1962, and r e fle c ts s a la r ie s in e ffe c t during that p e rio d .
T o m e e t the p r im a r y o b je c tiv e o f the su rvey, it was n e c e s s a ry to e s ­
ta b lish d efin ition s fo r the p ro fe s s io n a l, a d m in is tra tiv e , tech n ical, and c le r ic a l
occupations s e le c te d fo r study that would p e rm it c la s s ific a tio n o f e m p lo yees in ­
cluded in each occupation a c c o rd in g to ap p ro p ria te w o rk le v e ls (o r c la s s e s ).
W ithin each occupation, the w ork le v e ls su rveyed , u su ally d esign ated by Rom an
n um erals with cla ss I assign ed to the lo w e s t le v e l, a re d efin ed in te rm s o f duties
and re s p o n s ib ilitie s .
S p e c ific job fa c to rs d eterm in in g c la s s ific a tio n , h o w e ve r,
v a r ie d fro m occupation to occupation.

1 R esu lts o f the e a r lie r su rveys a re p res e n ted in N a tio n al S u rvey o f P r o ­
fe s s io n a l, A d m in is tra tiv e , T ech n ica l, and C le r ic a l P a y , W in ter 1959—60, B LS
B u lletin 1286 (I9 6 0 ) and in N ation al S u rvey o f P r o fe s s io n a l, A d m in is tr a tiv e ,
T ec h n ic a l, and C le r ic a l P a y , W in ter I960—61, B LS B u lletin 1310 (1961).
2 F o r a d eta ile d d e s c rip tio n o f the scope and m ethod o f su rvey , see a p ­
pendix A .




1

2

The num ber of w o rk le v e ls d efin ed fo r s u rv e y in each occupation ranges
fr o m one fo r o ffic e boys o r g ir ls to eigh t fo r ch em ists and e n g in e e rs .
M ore
than one le v e l o f w o rk was defin ed fo r s u rv ey in m o st o f the occupations; h o w ­
e v e r , som e occupations w e re p u rp o se ly d efin ed to c o v e r a s p e c ific band o f w ork
le v e ls , which w e re not intended to re p re s e n t a ll le v e ls o r a ll w o rk e rs that m ay
be found in those occupations.

E xcep t fo r the addition o f a new s e r ie s o f e n g in e e rin g tech n ician s, the
d efin itio n s used in this s u rv e y w e re the sam e as those used in the p re v io u s s u r ­
v e y fo r m o st o f the o cc u p a tio n s .3 The in d u stria l and ge o gra p h ic c o v e ra g e was
id e n tic a l fo r both p e rio d s .
It was p o s s ib le , th e re fo re , to m e a s u re changes in
a v e ra g e s a la r ie s during the y e a r fo r the fu ll range o f occupations also included
in the p rev io u s su rvey .
Num erous re v is io n s w e re m ade in the d efin ition s fo r
the p r o fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations a fte r the f ir s t su rvey , which
lim ite d com p a riso n s p o s s ib le betw een resu lts o f the f ir s t and second su rvey.

The s e le c te d occupations as defin ed fo r the study accounted fo r n e a rly
950,000 e m p lo ye e s o r about 8 p e rc e n t of the estim a ted total em ploym en t in e s ­
tablish m ents within scope o f the su rvey .
E m ploym en t in the s e le c te d o ccu p a­
tions v a r ie d w id ely, re fle c tin g actu al d iffe r e n c e s in em ploym en t in the variou s
occupations, as w e ll as d iffe r e n c e s in the range of duties and re s p o n s ib ilitie s
c o v e re d by each occupational d efin ition .
A m on g the p ro fe s s io n a l and a d m in is ­
tr a tiv e occupations, the eigh t le v e ls of e n g in eers accounted fo r a to ta l o f n e a rly
250, 000 e m p lo y e e s , w h ereas, fe w e r than 5, 000 w e re em p lo yed in each o f fou r
o f the occupational c a te g o rie s as d efin ed fo r the study (c h ie f accountants, m a n a ­
g e rs o f o ffic e s e r v ic e s , job an alysts, and d ir e c to r s o f p ers o n n e l). In the c le r ic a l
fie ld , th ree occupations (accou nting c le rk s , s ten o gra p h ers, and ty p is ts ) accounted
fo r a lm o s t th re e -fifth s o f the 493, 000 e m p lo yees in those occupations studied.
The s e le c te d d ra ftin g -ro o m occupations had a g g re g a te em p loym en t o f 57, 000,
and the fiv e en g in eerin g tech n ician le v e ls to geth er accounted fo r on ly a few
thousand le s s .

Although w om en accounted fo r n e a rly h alf the to tal em ploym en t in the
occupations studied, th ey w e re la r g e ly em p loyed in c le r ic a l p o s itio n s .
The
c le r ic a l occupations, in which the p ro p o rtio n o f wom en am ounted to m o r e than
90 p e rc e n t o f the em p loym en t in a ll le v e ls studied, included b ook keepin g-m ach in e
o p e ra to rs , f ile c le rk s , keypunch o p e ra to rs , s ten o gra p h ers, sw itch board o p e r a ­
to rs , and ty p ists.
A m on g tabu latin g-m ach in e o p e ra to rs , h o w ever, w om en a c ­
counted fo r only a th ird o f the w ork fo r c e , and o ffic e g ir ls w e re outnum bered
by o ffic e boys in a ra tio o f 3 to 2. In the d ra ftin g occupations, w om en accounted
fo r a th ird o f the tr a c e r s but le ss than 5 p e rc e n t o f the d ra ftsm en .
The r e l ­
a tiv e ly fe w w om en em p lo yees in the p ro fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations
(s lig h tly above 1 p erc e n t) w e re re p o rte d in the f ir s t fe w le v e ls ; those in which
w om en accounted fo r as m any as 10 but le s s than 20 p e rc e n t o f the e m p lo y ­
m ent w e re :
Accountants I, ch em ists I, m a n a gers of o ffic e s e r v ic e s I, and
job an alysts II.
The tim e unit in which s a la r y ra tes w e re e x p re s s e d v a r ie d am ong and
within estab lish m en ts. Although m onthly rates w e re w id e ly re p o rte d in the p r o fe s ­
sion a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations, annual rates w e re not uncom m on, p a r t ic ­
u la r ly am ong the h ig h -s a la rie d p os itio n s . C le r ic a l pay rates w e re com m on ly e x ­
p r e s s e d in w e e k ly te rm s , but oth er tim e units w e re in use in m any estab lish m en ts.
3

For




a

su m m ary

of

changes

m ade

in the

d efin itio n s,

see appendix B.

3

The g e n e ra l le v e l o f s a la r ie s fo r each occupation o r w o rk le v e l is p r e ­
sented in this study as the a rith m e tic m ean o f a ll the in d ivid u al s a la r y ra te s.
M edian s a la r ie s , the amount b elo w and above which the s a la r ie s fo r 50 p e rc e n t
o f the e m p lo ye e s a re found, a re also p res e n ted in table 1.

Changes in S a la ry L e v e ls Since 1960—
61 S u rvey
A v e r a g e s a la r ie s in c re a s e d 2. 7 p e rc e n t fo r a ll e m p lo yees in p ro fe s s io n a l
and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations s u rvey ed and 2. 9 p e rc e n t fo r c le r ic a l em p lo yees as
a group since the p rev io u s s u rv e y (w in te r 1960—61). In a m a jo r ity o f the p r o fe s ­
sion a l and a d m in is tra tiv e w o rk le v e ls and in n e a rly a ll the c le r ic a l le v e ls s u r ­
v e y e d on a com p a rab le b asis in both p e rio d s , in c re a s e s in s a la r y le v e ls w e re
w ithin a 2- to 4 -p e rc e n t range (ta b le 1). A m on g 11 occupations o r groups, in ­
c re a s e s ranged fro m 1.4 to 3.9 p erc e n t, as shown in the fo llo w in g tabulation.
In th ese com p a riso n s, the e ffe c t o f changes in the p ro p o rtio n o f em p lo yees in
v a rio u s w ork le v e ls within each occupational c a te g o ry was e lim in a te d by using
the 1961—62 em ploym en t as a constant em ploym en t w eigh t in both p e rio d s .

Occupation or group
Professional and adm inistrative em ployees ---------------------------A c c o u n ta n ts---------------------------------------------------------------Auditors --------------------------------------------------------------------C hief accountants -------------------------------------------------------Attorneys ------------------------------------------------------------------Managers, o ffice s e r v ic e s ----------------------------------------------Job analysts ---------------------------------------------------------------Directors of p e r so n n e l---------------------------------------------------C h e m ists--------------------------------------------------------------------Engineers ------------------------------------------------------------------Drafting em ployees ---------------------------------------------------------C le rical em ployees ----------------------------------------------------------

Percent increase in
average salaries
2. 7
2. 8
2. 9
2. 6
3. 2
3. 3
1 .4
3 .7
3. 9
2. 6
3. 8
2. 9

The in c r e a s e s in s a la r y le v e ls since the 1960—61 s u rv e y w e re g e n e ra lly
s im ila r to those o c c u rrin g betw een w in ter 1959—60 and w in ter 1960—
61, fo r those
occupations in which com p a riso n could be m ade.
F o r a ll c le r ic a l occupations,
which re p re s e n te d the la r g e s t group o f e m p lo yees fo r whom com p a ra b le data w e re
a v a ila b le fo r both p e rio d s , a v e ra g e s a la r ie s in c re a s e d 2. 9 p e rc e n t during the y e a r
com p a red with 3 p e rc e n t during the p rev io u s p e rio d .
Although the p e rc e n t change in a v e ra g e s a la r ie s during the re ce n t y e a r
d iffe r e d am ong the va rio u s w ork le v e ls studied within p r o fe s s io n a l and a d m in is ­
tr a tiv e occupations, th e re was no c le a r p attern su ggestin g that the r e la tiv e r is e
in s a la r ie s tended to be g r e a t e r at som e le v e ls than at oth ers w ithin these
occupations.
Changes in a v e ra g e s a la r ie s not only r e fle c t g e n e ra l s a la r y in c re a s e s
and m e r it o r oth er in c re a s e s given to individuals w h ile in the sam e w o rk le v e l
c a te g o ry , but they a ls o m a y r e fle c t oth er fa c to rs such as e m p lo y e e tu rn o ver,
expansions o r redu ctions in the w ork fo r c e , and changes in sta ffin g p atterns within
estab lish m en ts with d iffe r e n t s a la r y le v e ls .
F o r exa m p le, an expansion in fo r c e
m a y in c re a s e the p ro p o rtio n o f em p lo yees at the m in im u m o f the s a la r y range
esta b lish ed fo r a w o rk le v e l, which would tend to lo w e r the a v e ra g e , w h ereas,
a redu ction o r a lo w tu rn o ve r in the w o rk fo r c e m a y have the opp osite e ffe c t.
662594 0

-

62 - 2




4

S im ila r ly , y e a r - t o - y e a r p ro m o tio n s o f e m p lo ye e s to h igh er w o rk le v e ls o f p r o ­
fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations m a y a ffe c t a v e ra g e s a la r ie s .
For ex­
a m p le, the estab lish ed s a la r y ranges fo r such occupations a re r e la t iv e ly w id e,
and p ro m o te d e m p lo y e e s , who m a y have been paid the m axim u m o f the s a la ry
s c a le fo r the lo w e r le v e l, a re lik e ly to be re p la c e d by le s s e x p e rie n c e d e m ­
p lo y e e s who m ay be paid the m inim u m ; o r v a c a n cies m a y e x is t at the tim e o f
the r e s u rv e y .
O ccupations m o st lik e ly to r e fle c t such changes in the s a la r y
a v e ra g e s a re the h igh er le v e ls o f p ro fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations
and sin g le-in cu m b en t p ositio n s such as c h ie f accountant, d ir e c to r o f p ers o n n e l,
and m a n a ger o f o ffic e s e r v i c e s . 4

A v e r a g e S a la ries, W in ter 1961—62
A v e r a g e (m ean ) m onthly s a la r ie s am ong the 75 p r o fe s s io n a l, a d m in is ­
tr a tiv e , tech n ica l, and c le r ic a l occupation w o rk le v e ls d efin ed fo r the cu rren t
s u rv e y ranged fro m $245 fo r f ile c le rk s I to $1,866 fo r atto rn eys V II.
T h ese
le v e ls range fr o m c le rk s , who f ile m a te r ia l that has been c la s s ifie d o r is e a s ily
c la s s ifie d into a s im p le s e r ia l c la s s ific a tio n s ystem , to heads o f le g a l staffs w ith
re s p o n s ib ility fo r planning and conducting le g a l studies and m aking re c o m m e n ­
dations on im p orta n t tech n ica l le g a l qu estion s, but who a re u su ally subordinate to
a g e n e ra l cou n sel o r his im m e d ia te deputy in la r g e fir m s . 5 W ithin this b ro a d
ran ge, a v e ra g e m onthly s a la r ie s fo r the 75 d efin ed w o rk le v e ls w e r e d istrib u ted
as fo llo w s :

A verage monthly salary

Number of
work levels

Under $500 -----------------------------------------------------------------$500 and under $750 ---------------------------------------------------$750 and under $ 1 ,0 0 0 --------------------------------------------------$ 1 ,0 0 0 and under $1, 250 -----------------------------------------------$1, 250 and under $1, 500 -----------------------------------------------$ 1 ,5 0 0 and o v e r ------------------------------------------------------------

25
23
13
6
5
3

Am ong the fiv e le v e ls o f accountants su rvey ed , a v e ra g e m onthly s a la r ie s
ranged fr o m $490 fo r accountants I to $906 fo r accountants V. A u d ito rs in the
fou r le v e ls defin ed fo r s u rv e y had a v e ra g e s a la r ie s ranging fr o m $445 a month
fo r au ditors I to $820 fo r au ditors IV.
L e v e l I in both the accounting and au dit­
ing s e r ie s included tra in e e s w ith b a c h e lo r fs d e g re e s in accounting o r the e q u iv a ­
lent in education and e x p e rie n c e com bined. Only at le v e l I w e r e s a la r ie s o f audi­
to rs b e lo w those fo r accountants; at le v e l III, which accounted fo r the la r g e s t
group o f e m p lo ye e s in each s e r ie s , m onthly s a la r ie s a v e ra g e d $661 fo r au ditors
and $618 fo r accountants.
M o re than h a lf the r e la t iv e ly few au ditors I and ap­
p ro x im a te ly a fou rth o f those in the h igh er le v e ls w e r e em p lo yed in fin an ce in ­
d u s trie s , w h e re a s , m o re than fo u r-fifth s o f the accountants at a ll le v e ls w e r e
em p lo yed in m anu facturin g o r p ublic u tilitie s in d u stries. 6
The p ro p o rtio n of
e m p lo y e e s in each m a jo r in du stry d iv is io n w ith in scope o f the s u rv e y is shown
fo r each occupation in table 5.

4 T h ese types o f occupations a ls o m ay be su bject to g r e a t e r sam plin g e r r o r ,
as exp lain ed in the la s t p ara grap h o f appendix A .
C la s s ific a tio n o f e m p lo ye e s in the occupations and w o rk le v e ls s u rv ey ed
w as b ased on fa c to rs d eta ile d in the d efin ition s in appendix C.
6
E stab lish m en ts p r im a r ily engaged in p ro v id in g accounting and auditing
s e r v ic e s w e r e excluded fr o m the su rvey.



5

C h ief accountants w e r e s u rv ey ed s e p a ra te ly fr o m accountants, and only
those w e r e included who m e t s p e c ific re q u irem en ts as to the scope and c o m p le x ity
o f the accounting p r o g r a m and as to the subordinate s ta ff they d ire c te d .
Level
c la s s ific a tio n was d eterm in e d by the extent o f d ele g a ted au th ority and r e s p o n s i­
b ility ; the te c h n ic a l c o m p le x ity o f the system ; and, to a le s s e r d e g r e e , the s iz e
o f the p r o fe s s io n a l s ta ff and the w o rk le v e ls re p re s e n te d .
T h ose w ith p r o fe s ­
sion a l duties and re s p o n s ib ilitie s as d e s c rib e d fo r le v e l I w e r e p aid m onthly
s a la r ie s a v e ra g in g $831 and those m eetin g the much h ig h er re q u irem en ts as s p e c ­
ifie d fo r le v e l I V 7 a v e ra g e d $ 1,26 6 .
N e a r ly th re e -fo u rth s o f the c h ie f account­
ants who m e t the re q u irem en ts o f the d efin itio n s fo r these fo u r le v e ls w e r e e m ­
p loy ed in m anu facturin g in d u stries.
A tto rn e ys c la s s ifie d at le v e l I a v e ra g e d $546 a month.
T h ese w e r e
tra in e e s w ith L L . B. d e g re e s and b a r m e m b ers h ip , who h eld p ositio n s in le g a l
a d v is o ry d epartm ents o f fir m s in which th e ir fu ll p r o fe s s io n a l train in g could be
u t iliz e d . 8 A tto rn e y s V II, the h igh est le v e l su rv ey ed in this s e r ie s , w e r e paid
m on th ly s a la r ie s a v e ra g in g $ 1,866.
L e v e l V II was d efin ed to include attorn eys
in ch a rge o f le g a l staffs handling assign m en ts in one o r m o r e b ro a d le g a l a re a s ,
w ith r e s p o n s ib ility fo r recom m en d ation s which m ay h ave an im p o rta n t b ea rin g on
the com pan y's b u sin ess.
Although this was the h igh est le v e l su rvey ed , such a t­
to rn eys w e r e usually subordinate to a g e n e ra l cou nsel o r his im m e d ia te deputy
in la r g e fir m s .
The fin an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l esta te in d u stries em p loyed the
h igh est p ro p o rtio n o f attorn eys (41 p e rc e n t), com p a red w ith 27 p e rc e n t in m anu­
fa ctu rin g and 21 p e rc e n t in public u tilitie s .
M an agers o f o ffic e s e r v ic e s , as d efin ed fo r the study, inclu ded fou r
le v e ls b ased on the v a r ie ty o f c le r ic a l and oth er o ffic e s e r v ic e s s u p e rv is e d and
the s iz e o f the o rg a n iza tio n s e r v ic e d .
T h ose at le v e l I w e r e re s p o n s ib le fo r
p ro vid in g fou r o r fiv e o f the nine o ffic e s e r v ic e functions en u m erated in the s u r­
v e y d efin itio n fo r a s ta ff o f 300 to 600 e m p lo y e e s , com p a red w ith seven o r eigh t
functions fo r about 1,500 to 3,000 e m p lo y e e s at le v e l IV .
A m on g th ese le v e ls ,
a v e ra g e m on th ly s a la r ie s ranged fr o m $615 to $ 1,02 2 . M anufactu ring in d u stries
accounted fo r about th r e e -fifth s o f the e m p lo y e e s in the fou r le v e ls com bined, and
an addition al fifth w e r e em p loyed in fin an ce in d u strie s.
In the p ers o n n e l m anagem en t fie ld , fou r w o rk le v e ls each o f job analysts
and d ir e c to r s o f p ers o n n e l w e r e s tu d ie d .9
Job an alysts I, d efin ed to include
tra in e e s under im m e d ia te su p erv is io n , a v e ra g e d $508, com p a red w ith $803 fo r
job an alysts IV , who an a lyze and evalu ate a v a r ie ty o f m o r e d iffic u lt job s under
g e n e ra l s u p e rv is io n and who m ay p a rtic ip a te in the d evelo p m en t and in sta lla tio n
o f evalu ation o r com pen sation s y stem s.
D ir e c to r s o f p e rs o n n e l w e r e lim ite d by
d efin itio n to those who had p ro g ra m s that included, at a m in im u m , re s p o n s ib ility
fo r a d m in is te rin g a fo r m a l job evaluation system , em p lo ym en t and p la cem en t, and
e m p lo yee re la tio n s and s e r v ic e s functions.
T h ose w ith r e s p o n s ib ility fo r actu al
con tract n eg otia tion w ith la b o r unions as the p rin c ip a l com pany re p r e s e n ta tiv e
w e r e excluded. P r o v is io n s w e r e m ade in the d efin itio n fo r w eigh in g va rio u s c o m ­
binations o f duties and re s p o n s ib ilitie s to d eterm in e the le v e l c la s s ific a tio n .

7 Although le v e l V o f c h ie f accountant was s u rv ey ed , as d efin ed in appen­
d ix C, too few e m p lo y e e s m e t re q u irem en ts fo r this le v e l to w a rra n t p resen ta tio n
o f s a la r y fig u re s .
8 E stab lish m en ts p r im a r ily engaged in o ffe r in g le g a l a d v ice o r le g a l s e r v ­
ic e s w e r e exclu d ed fr o m the su rvey.
9 Although le v e l V o f d ir e c to r o f p ers o n n e l w as s u rv ey ed , as d efin ed in ap­
pendix C, too fe w e m p lo yees m e t re q u irem en ts f o r this le v e l to w a rra n t p r e s e n ­
tation o f s a la r y fig u re s .



6

A m on g p ers o n n e l d ir e c to r s w ith job functions as s p e c ifie d fo r the fou r le v e ls o f
re s p o n s ib ility , a v e ra g e m onthly s a la r ie s ranged fro m $7 37 fo r le v e l I to $1,258
fo r le v e l IV. M anufacturing in d u stries accounted fo r 80 p e rc e n t o f the job analysts
and 71 p e rc e n t o f the d ir e c to r s o f p ers o n n e l included in the study; the finan ce,
in su ran ce, and r e a l estate in d u stries ranked next, w ith 11 p e rc e n t o f the e m p lo y ­
m ent in each o f th ese occupations.
C h em ists and en gin eers each w e r e s u rv ey ed in eigh t le v e ls . Each s e r ie s
s ta rte d w ith a p ro fe s s io n a l tra in e e le v e l, ty p ic a lly re q u irin g a B. S. d e g r e e o r the
equ ivalen t in education and e x p e rie n c e com bined. The h igh est le v e l s u rv ey ed in ­
v o lv e d e ith e r fu ll re s p o n s ib ility o v e r a v e r y b road and h igh ly c om p lex and d iv e r s i­
fie d en g in eerin g o r c h e m ic a l p ro g ra m , w ith s e v e r a l subordinates each d ire c tin g
la r g e and im p orta n t segm en ts o f the p ro g ra m ; o r in divid u al r e s e a r c h and con su l­
tation in d iffic u lt p ro b le m a rea s w h e re the e n g in eer o r ch em ist was a re c o g n iz e d
au th ority and w h e re solutions would re p re s e n t a m a jo r s c ie n tific o r te c h n o lo g ic a l
advance. 1 A v e r a g e m onthly s a la r ie s ranged fro m $559 fo r en g in eers I to $1,631
0
fo r e n g in e e rs V III, and fro m $510 fo r ch em ists I to $1,582 fo r ch em ists V III.
Although sta rtin g s a la r ie s o f ch em ists w e r e about 9 p e rc e n t b e lo w those o f en­
g in e e rs , the d iffe r e n c e n a rrow ed to 3 p e rc e n t at le v e l IV and did not exceed that
amount in the h igh er le v e ls .
L e v e l IV , the la r g e s t group in each s e r ie s , in ­
cluded p r o fe s s io n a l em p lo yees who w e r e fu lly com petent in a ll tech n ica l asp ects
o f th e ir a ssign m en ts, w o rk ed w ith c o n s id e ra b le independence, and, in som e ca s es ,
s u p erv is ed a fe w p ro fe s s io n a l and tech n ical w o r k e r s .
M anufacturing in d u stries
accounted fo r 81 p e rc e n t o f a ll en g in e e rs and 92 p e rc e n t o f a ll ch em ists; public
u tilitie s , 11 and 2 p erc e n t, r e s p e c tiv e ly ; and the s u rvey ed en g in eerin g and s c ie n ­
t ific s e r v ic e s em p loyed m o s t o f the oth ers.
The f i v e - l e v e l en g in eerin g techn ician s e r ie s in trodu ced in this s u rv ey
was lim ite d , by d efin ition , to em p lo ye e s p ro vid in g tech n ical support to p r o fe s ­
sion al e n g in e e rs engaged in such a rea s as re s e a r c h , d esign , d evelo p m en t, te s t ­
ing o r m anu facturing p ro c e s s im p ro ve m e n t, and w hose w o rk p erta in e d to e le c ­
tr ic a l, e le c tr o n ic , o r m ech a n ica l com ponents o r equipm ent.
T ech n ician s engaged
p r im a r ily in produ ction o r m aintenance w o rk w e r e excluded. E n g in eerin g te c h ­
nicians I, who p e rfo rm e d sim p le routine tasks under c lo s e s u p erv is io n , o r fr o m
d eta ile d p ro c e d u re s , w e re paid m onthly s a la r ie s a v e ra g in g $392.
E n g in eerin g
techn ician s V, the h igh est le v e l su rvey ed , a v e ra g e d $661 a month.
That le v e l
included fu lly e x p e rie n c e d techn ician s p e rfo rm in g m o re com p lex assign m en ts in ­
v o lv in g re s p o n s ib ility fo r planning and conducting a com p lete p r o je c t o f r e la t iv e ly
lim ite d scope, o r a p ortio n o f a m o re d iv e r s e p ro je c t, in accord a n ce with ob­
je c t iv e s , re q u ire m e n ts , and d esign approach es as outlined by the s u p e rv is o r o r
a p r o fe s s io n a l e n g in eer.
A v e r a g e s fo r in te rm e d ia te le v e ls III and IV , at which
a m a jo r ity o f the techn ician s s u rvey ed w e r e c la s s ifie d , w e r e $521 and $589,
r e s p e c tiv e ly .
A s m igh t be exp ected , n e a rly a ll o f the technicians as d efin ed
w e r e em p lo yed in m anufacturing (84 p e rc e n t) o r in the s c ie n tific s e r v ic e s in ­
d u stries studied (12 p erc e n t).
Although the ra tio o f such tech n ician s to e n g i­
n eers studied was about 1 to 5, r e s p e c tiv e ly , in a ll in d u strie s, h igh er ra tio s
o f a p p ro x im a te ly 1 to 4 w e r e found in estab lish m en ts m anu facturing m ech a n ica l
and e le c t r ic a l equipm ent, and 2 to 5 in re s e a r c h , d evelop m en t, and testin g
la b o r a to r ie s .
In the d ra ftin g fie ld , m onthly s a la r ie s among th ree le v e ls o f w o rk a v ­
e ra g e d $550 fo r s en io r (fu lly e x p e rie n c e d ) d ra ftsm en , $425 fo r ju n io r d r a fts ­
m en, and $332 fo r the r e la t iv e ly s m a ll group o f tr a c e r s .
T h ese em p lo yees

1
0
It w as re c o g n iz e d in the d efin itio n that top p ositio n s o f som e com panies
w ith v e r y e x ten s ive and com p lex en g in eerin g o r c h e m ic a l p ro g ra m s w e r e above
that le v e l.



7

w e r e d istrib u ted by in du stry in about the sam e p ro p o rtio n as e n g in e e rs , with
84 p e rc e n t in m anu facturin g, 8 p e rc e n t in public u tilitie s , and v ir tu a lly a ll o f the
oth ers in the s e le c te d en g in eerin g and s c ie n tific s e r v ic e in d u stries studied.
A m on g the 19 c le r ic a l jobs re p re s e n te d in the study, m onthly s a la r ie s
ranged fr o m $245 fo r f ile c le rk s I to $469 fo r tabu latin g-m ach in e o p e ra to rs III,
who w e r e re q u ire d to p e r fo r m , without c lo s e s u p erv is io n , c o m p lete re p o rtin g
assign m en ts by m ach in e, including d iffic u lt w ir in g . A v e r a g e s w ith in a range fro m
$300 to '$400 a month w e r e re c o rd e d fo r 12 o f th ese w o rk le v e ls ; g e n e ra l sten o g­
ra p h ers, the la r g e s t group o f c le r ic a l e m p lo yees studied, a v e ra g e d $338.
O ffic e
boys o r g ir ls , tw o -fifth s o f whom w e r e em p lo yed in m anu facturing in d u stries,
a v e ra g e d $21 a month m o re than f ile c le rk s I, who w e r e m o re h e a v ily r e p r e ­
sented in the finan ce in d u stries.
W om en accounted fo r m o re than n ine-tenths o f
the em p lo ye e s in 13 of the c le r ic a l w o rk le v e ls and the m en accounted fo r h alf
o r m o re in 3 (ta b u latin g-m ach in e o p e ra to rs II and III, and o ffic e boys o r g ir ls ).
Although em ploym en t in m anu facturing e xceed ed that in each o f the fiv e non­
m anu facturing in du stry d ivis io n s w ith in scope o f the s u rv ey in 15 o f the 19 w o rk
le v e ls , in only seven in stan ces did m anu facturing account fo r m o r e than h a lf
the e m p lo y e e s.
A m on g a ll occupations in which two o r m o re w o rk le v e ls w e r e studied,
the r e la tiv e sp read b etw een a v e ra g e s a la r ie s fo r s u c c e s s iv e w o rk le v e ls ranged
fr o m 9. 8 p e rc e n t (betw een s a la r ie s o f accountants I and II) to 36. 2 p e rc e n t (b e ­
tw een s a la r ie s o f attorn eys V I and V II). In a m a jo r ity o f co m p a riso n s, h o w e ve r,
the a v e ra g e fo r the h igh er le v e l was w ith in a range o f 14 to 24 p e rc e n t above
the a v e ra g e fo r the next p rec e d in g lo w e r le v e l studied.
M edian m onthly s a la r ie s (the amount b elo w and above which 50 p e rc e n t o f
the em p lo yees w e r e found) fo r m o st of the w o rk le v e ls w e r e s lig h tly lo w e r than the
w eigh ted a v e ra g e s (means) cited above. The r e la t iv e d iffe r e n c e b etw een the m edian
and the m ean w as le s s than 2 p e rc e n t fo r 45 o f the 75 w o rk le v e ls and as much
as 2 but le s s than 3 p e rc e n t in 20 addition al le v e ls .
The w eigh ted a v e ra g e s a la ­
rie s exceed ed the m edians by m o re than 4 p e rc e n t fo r d ir e c to r s o f p ers o n n e l II
and III (4. 3 and 6. 1 p e rc e n t, r e s p e c t iv e ly ); and fo r attorn eys IV and m a n a ge rs,
o ffic e s e r v ic e s IV (4. 8 p e rc e n t each).
S a la ry D istrib u tion s
P e r c e n t d istrib u tion s o f e m p lo yees by m onthly s a la r ie s a re p res e n ted fo r
the p r o fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations in table 2, and fo r en g in eerin g
techn ician s in table 3; d istrib u tion s by w e e k ly s a la r ie s a re shown fo r em p lo yees
in the d ra ftin g and c le r ic a l occupations in table 4. 1
1 W ithin n e a rly a ll o f the
75 occupation w o rk le v e ls , s a la r y ra tes fo r som e o f the h igh est paid em p lo yees
w e r e tw ice those o f the lo w e s t paid e m p lo y e e s.
A l l occupations in which two
o r m o re le v e ls o f w o rk w e r e su rvey ed showed a substantial d e g r e e o f o verla p p in g
o f in dividu al s a la r ie s betw een w o rk le v e ls in the sam e occupation.
R anges in
s a la ry rates o f e m p lo y e e s in estab lish ed pay gra d es o r w o rk le v e ls w ith in s a la ry
stru ctu res o f in divid u al fir m s a lso exh ib ited substantial o verla p p in g.

g iven
m o st
tent,
w o rk

The absolu te sp read b etw een h igh est and lo w e s t paid w o rk e rs w ithin
w o rk le v e ls tended to w iden w ith each s u c c e s s iv e h ig h er w o rk le v e l fo r
occupations in which two o r m o re le v e ls w e r e su rveyed .
T o a le s s e r e x ­
the r e la t iv e sp read in s a la ry ranges also tended to w iden at the h igh er
le v e ls but th ere was con s id e ra b le v a ria tio n am ong occupations and in m any

1
1
T e c h n ic a l con sid era tio n s d ictated the s u m m a riza tio n o f e m p lo y e e d is t r i­
butions by w e e k ly s a la r ie s in the case o f the d ra ftin g and c le r ic a l jo b s.



8

cases the r e la tiv e sp read was not g r e a te r fo r p ro fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e w o rk
le v e ls than fo r c le r ic a l le v e ls studied.
E x p re s s in g the s a la r y range o f the m id ­
d le 50 p e rc e n t o f em p lo yees as a p e rc e n t o f the m edian s a la r y p e rm itte d c o m ­
p a ris o n s o f s a la ry ranges fo r the v a rio u s w o rk le v e ls on the sam e b a s is , and
a ls o e lim in a te d the e x tre m e low and high s a la r ie s fro m each com p a riso n .

Distribution of work levels (salary range of m iddle
50 percent of em ployees expressed as a
____________ percent of m edian salary)___________

Number of
work
levels

Under
15
percent

15
and
under
20
percent

------------------------

75

4

15

34

18

Accountants ---------------------A u d ito r s--------------------------C h ief accountants -------------A tto rn e y s-------------------------M anagers,
office services ----------------Job a n a ly s t s ----------------------Directors of
personnel ----------------------Chemists -------------------------E n g in e e rs-------------------------Engineering
te c h n ic ia n s --------------------D r a f t in g --------------------------C l e r i c a l ---------------------------

5
4
4
7

3
1

2
3
3
1

1
3

4
4

2
1

2
3

4
8
8

1
4
4

3
1

2

3
2

2

3
1
10

2
8

O ccupational group
A ll levels

5
3
19

20
and
under
25
percent

25
and
under
30
percent

30
percent
and
over
4

Thus, in this com p a riso n , the m id d le range fo r atto rn ey le v e ls am ounted
to 25 p e rc e n t o r m o re o f the c o rresp on d in g m edian in six o f seven le v e ls , w h erea s
the range was le s s than 25 p e rc e n t o f the corresp on d in g m edian fo r seven o f the
eigh t le v e ls o f ch em ists and a ll eigh t le v e ls o f en g in e e rs.
W ith one excep tion ,
the range was betw een 20 and 30 p e rc e n t o f the c orresp on d in g m edian s fo r the
c le r ic a l le v e ls studied.

D iffe re n c e s in the range o f s a la r ie s paid in divid u als w ith in w o rk le v e ls
su rv ey ed undoubtedly r e fle c t a v a r ie ty o f fa c to rs oth er than d iffe r e n c e s in the
range o f duties and re s p o n s ib ilitie s en com p assed by the va rio u s w o rk le v e l d e ­
fin itio n s .
S a la rie s o f in dividu al e m p lo ye e s in the sam e occupation and gra d e
le v e l m ay v a r y c o n s id e ra b ly w ith in estab lish m en ts.
In the p ro fe s s io n a l and ad­
m in is tr a tiv e occupations, in p a rtic u la r, s a la r ie s a re g e n e r a lly d eterm in e d on an
in divid u al b a sis o r under fo r m a liz e d pay plans which c h a r a c te r is tic a lly p ro v id e
fo r a w id e range in s a la r y ra tes fo r each occupation and gra d e le v e l.
A s poin ted
out e a r lie r (and in dicated in table 5), em ploym en t in the v a rio u s in d u stries w ith in
the scope o f the s u rv ey v a r ie s c o n s id e ra b ly fr o m occupation to occupation.
T h ese
v a ria tio n s in em p loym en t a ls o a re r e fle c te d in s a la r y le v e ls and d istrib u tio n s to
the extent that s a la r ie s d iffe r by indu stry, as exp lain ed on the fo llo w in g page.



9

P a y D iffe re n c e s by Industry
The s u rv ey w as planned to p e r m it p u b lication o f national s a la r y e stim a tes
by le v e l o f w o rk fo r the p ro fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations in a ll indus­
tr ie s w ith in scope o f the su rvey.
B y com bining the data fo r a ll le v e ls o f w o rk
studied in each occupation, it w as p o s s ib le , fu rth e r to p re s e n t com p a riso n s betw een
r e la tiv e s a la r y le v e ls in m a jo r in du stry d ivis io n s and a ll in d u stries com bined
(table 6).
T o obtain r e la t iv e s a la r y le v e ls , a g g re g a te s fo r the w o rk le v e ls in
each occupation com bined w e r e com puted fo r a ll in d u stries and fo r each m a jo r
in du stry d ivis io n .
The a ll-in d u s try em ploym en t in each w o rk le v e l w as used as
a constant em ploym en t w eigh t in com puting a g g re g a te s fo r the v a rio u s occupations
by in du stry, to e lim in a te the in flu en ce o f d iffe r e n c e s am ong in du stry d ivis io n s
in the p ro p o rtio n o f em p loym en t in va rio u s w o rk le v e ls .
The a g g re g a te s fo r each
occupation and in du stry d iv is io n w e r e then e x p re s s e d as p e rc e n ta g e s o f lik e groups
in a ll in d u stries com bined.

F o r a ll o f the c le r ic a l occupations studied, and fo r m o s t o f the p r o fe s ­
sion al and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations, in which com p a riso n s could be m ade, r e l ­
a tive s a la r y le v e ls w e r e lo w e r in r e ta il tra d e and in fin a n ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l
estate than in oth er in du stry d ivis io n s (ta b le 6).
It is apparent, th e r e fo r e , that
in those occupations in which r e ta il tra d e and the finance in d u stries account fo r a
substantial p ro p o rtio n o f the total em ploym en t, as shown in table 5, the a v e ra g e
s a la r ie s fo r a ll in d u stries com bined a re lo w e re d and the r e la t iv e le v e ls in indus­
tr ie s such as m anu facturing and p ublic u tilitie s tend to be w e ll above 100 p e rc e n t
o f the a ll-in d u s try le v e l (table 6). F o r exa m p le, r e la tiv e le v e ls fo r b ook keepin gm achine o p e ra to rs o f 114 and 1Z1 p e rc e n t, r e s p e c tiv e ly , in m anu facturing and
public u tilitie s r e fle c t the in flu en ce o f lo w e r s a la r ie s fo r the high p ro p o rtio n
(61 p e rc e n t) o f a ll-in d u s try em ploym en t accounted fo r by the finan ce in d u stries.
The r e la t iv e s a la r y le v e ls fo r p r o fe s s io n a l, a d m in is tra tiv e , and tech n ica l occu p a­
tions tended to be n e a re s t to 100 p e rc e n t o f the a ll-in d u s try le v e ls in m a n u fac­
tu ring in d u stries, which accounted fo r a high p ro p o rtio n o f the total em ploym en t
in m o st o f th ese occupations.

R e la tiv e s a la r y le v e ls fo r a m a jo r ity o f both the c le r ic a l and the p r o ­
fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations, w e r e s lig h tly h ig h er in p ublic u tilitie s
than in m anu facturing in d u stries. F o r e n g in e e rs , h o w e v e r, r e la t iv e s a la r y le v e ls
in u tilitie s w e r e 98 p e rc e n t o f the a ll-in d u s try le v e l, com p a red w ith 100 fo r m anu­
fa ctu rin g, and 101 fo r the s e le c te d s e r v ic e s .
The r e la t iv e s a la r y p o s itio n o f
ch em ists was above that fo r e n g in eers in the s e le c te d s e r v ic e s ; this r e fle c te d the
r e la t iv e ly fe w ch em ists com p a red w ith e n g in eers w ith in this grouping em p lo yed in
en g in eerin g and a rc h ite c tu ra l s e r v ic e s fir m s w h e re s a la r y le v e ls w e r e lo w e r than
in the re s e a r c h , d evelo p m en t, and testin g la b o ra to rie s .

A v e r a g e W eek ly Hours
The length o f the w o rk w eek , upon which the re g u la r s tra ig h t-tim e s a la r y
was based, was obtained fo r in dividu al e m p lo yees in the occupations studied. The
d istrib u tion o f the a v e ra g e w e e k ly hours (rounded to the n e a re s t h a lf h our) is
shown fo r the 75 job c a te g o rie s in table 7.
W orkw eek s a v e ra g e d 40 hours in 1Z
o f these job c a te g o r ie s , 39 V2 hours in 30 addition al c a te g o r ie s , and fr o m 38 to
39 hours in a ll o th ers.
D iffe re n c e s in a v e ra g e w e e k ly hours am ong occupations,
and am ong w o rk le v e ls w ith in occupations, la r g e ly r e fle c t v a ria tio n in the d is ­
tribu tion o f em ploym en t in the va rio u s job c a te g o rie s am ong in d u strie s. W o rk ­
w eeks o f 40 hours w e r e p red om in an t in a ll excep t the finance in d u strie s, in which



10

a m a jo r ity o f the em p lo yees w e r e on schedules o f le s s than 40 hours. 1 A v e r a g e
2
w o rk w e e k s o f 39 hours or le s s fo r a ll le v e ls o f au ditors and attorn eys and s e v e r a l
o f the c le r ic a l c a te g o r ie s , r e fle c t the extent to which they a re em p loyed in f i ­
nance in d u stries. S im ila r ly , the a v e ra g e w e e k ly hours o f 39 V2 o r 40 hours r e ­
co rd ed fo r a ll le v e ls o f ch em ists and en g in eers r e fle c t the high in cid en ce o f the
40-hour w o rk w eek in m anu facturing, public u tilitie s , s c ie n tific re s e a r c h , and
e n g in eerin g s e r v ic e s in d u stries.

S a la ry R ate S ystem s
In addition to s a la ry data, in fo rm a tio n was obtained on the p re v a le n c e
o f fo r m a l s a la ry ra te system s p ro vid in g a s e r ie s o f pay g ra d es (m in im u m s and
m axim u m s s p e c ifie d ) into which job s in the w h it e - c o lla r fie ld w e r e c la s s ifie d .
E stab lish m en ts with such pay system s w e r e sep a ra ted ac c o rd in g to the extent o f
job c o v e ra g e o f the esta b lish ed pay gra d es as e ith er (1) c o v e rin g a ll o r a lm o s t a ll
o ffic e c le r ic a l, p ro fe s s io n a l, and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations, o r (2) c o v e rin g som e
o f th ese types o f occupations only; fo r exa m p le, lim ite d to o ffic e c le r ic a l job s.
S ligh tly m o re than h a lf o f the estab lish m en ts had fo r m a l s a la ry ra te
system s w ith estab lish ed pay gra d e s fo r at le a s t som e o f th e ir w h it e - c o lla r o cc u ­
pations and a lm o s t th re e -fo u rth s o f th ese had such plans c o v e rin g a ll o r a lm ost
a ll o f th e ir w h it e - c o lla r jobs (table 8).
F o r m a l plans w e re m o re p re v a le n t, and
co m p re h en s ive job c o v e ra g e w as m o re com m on ly found in the la r g e r e s ta b lis h ­
m en ts.
About 9 out o f 10 estab lish m en ts w ith 2,500 o r m o re e m p lo ye e s had a
fo r m a l s a la r y rate system m e etin g the s u rv ey c r it e r ia fo r at le a s t som e group
of th e ir w h it e - c o lla r occupations.
A lm o s t nine-ten th s o f these had plans c o v e r ­
ing the fu ll occupational range o f c le r ic a l, p ro fe s s io n a l, and a d m in is tra tiv e jo b s .
F e w e r than h alf o f the estab lish m en ts with 250 to 1,000 e m p lo y e e s had fo r m a l
s a la r y rate system s fo r w h it e - c o lla r occupations and le s s than a th ird had plans
c o v e rin g a ll o r a lm o s t a ll w h it e - c o lla r occupations.
In the 1,000- to 2 ,5 0 0 -s iz e
group, p re v a le n c e and extent o f c o v e ra g e o f the plans w e re g r e a t e r than fo r the
s m a lle r estab lish m en ts but le s s than fo r the 2, 500- and o v e r - s iz e group.
The p ro p o rtio n o f estab lish m en ts w ith fo r m a l s a la ry ra te system s v a r ie d
by industry.
A r e la t iv e ly high p ro p o rtio n o f estab lish m en ts w ith such pay s y s ­
tem s w as found in som e of the nonm anufacturing industry d iv is io n s , as com p a red
w ith the m anufacturing d ivisio n .
T h is was la r g e ly accounted fo r by the g r e a te r
p ro p o rtio n of fo r m a l system s in s m a lle r nonm anufacturing estab lish m en ts, p a r t ic ­
u la rly those having a high p ro p o rtio n o f w h it e - c o lla r occupations. 1 F o r exa m p le,
3
in the finance, in su ran ce, and re a l estate d iv is io n , w e ll o v e r tw o -th ird s of the
estab lish m en ts w ith 250 and under 1,000 em p lo yees had som e kind o f fo r m a l
s a la r y rate s ystem c o v e ra g e m eetin g the su rv ey c r ite r ia .
In con trast, fe w e r
than o n e -h a lf o f the m anufacturing estab lish m en ts in the sam e e m p lo y m e n t-s iz e
group had fo r m a l system s fo r th e ir w h it e - c o lla r e m p lo y e e s.
N e a r ly a ll e sta b ­
lish m en ts with 2, 500 o r m o re e m p lo yees in both o f th ese d ivis io n s had fo r m a l
s a la ry rate system s as defin ed fo r the su rvey.

1 F o r ad d ition al in fo rm a tio n on scheduled w e e k ly hours o f o ffic e w o r k ­
2
e rs em p lo yed in m e tro p o lita n a re a s , see W ages and R ela te d B e n e fits , M e tr o p olitan A r e a s , United States and R eg io n a l S u m m a rie s , 1960—61 (B L S B u lletin
1285-84, 1962).
1 S ize -g ro u p e stim a tes re la te to to ta l em ploym en t, not to w h it e - c o lla r
3
staffs o f s im ila r s iz e .
M ost m anu facturing estab lish m en ts em p lo y fe w e r w h itec o lla r e m p lo yees than a re found in nonm anufacturing estab lish m en ts with c o m p a r­
able total em ploym en t.



11
Ta b le 1.

Em ploym ent and a vera g e s a la rie s fo r s e le c te d p ro fe s s io n a l, a d m in istra tive , tech n ica l, and c le r ic a l occupations
in p riv a te industry, 1 w in te r 1961—
62, and percen t in c re a s e in a v e ra g e s a la rie s fr o m w in ter I960—61 2

Occupation and class
(See definitions
in appendix C)

N um ber
of
e m p lo y ­
ees

M onthly s a la rie s 3

Annual s a la rie s 3
M id dle range 4

M id dle range 4
M ean

M edian

F ir s t
T h ird
q u a rtile qu a rtile

M ean

M edian

F ir s t
T h ird
q u a rtile qu a rtile

Percen t
in c re a s e
in
a v e ra g e
s a la rie s

Accountants and A u d itors

C h ief
C h ief
C hief
C h ief

5
1
0
0
1

232
540
908
504

4, 872
5, 748
6,996
8, 556

5, 736
7, 356
8, 856
10,920

2.
2.
2.
3.

8
0
6
8

9,972
11,460
13,152
15,192

9, 720
11, 172
12, 816
15,072

8, 640
10, 116
11,664
13,032

11,016
12, 624
14, 796
16, 896

4. 3

607
752
938
131
369
536
095

6, 552
8, 016
10,044
11, 844
14,916
16, 440
22, 392

6, 564
7, 824
9, 768
11,304
14,688
16, 056
21,768

5, 856
6, 900
8, 544
10, 056
12, 636
13,236
17, 916

7, 284
9, 024
11,256
13,572
16, 428
18,432
25,140

2.
1.
2.
2.
1.
7.
8.

8
5
4
1
7
2
1

548
661
752
922

676
796
906
1, 125

7, 380
8, 856
10,104
12,264

7, 332
8, 856
10,116
11,700

6, 576
7, 932
9, 024
11,064

8, 112
9, 552
10,872
13,500

1.
4.
3.
2.

8
4
4
0

506
570
660
801

457
520
593
718

559
640
729
874

484
240
116
616

6, 708
7, 680
8, 748
10,488

3.
4.
.
.

0
8
8
2

737
869
1,075
1,258

743
833
1, 013
1, 218

639
737
912
1, 075

181
492
897
004
420
380
781
290

510
576
663
828
998
1, 122
1,377
1,582

511
566
655
810
994
1, 098
1,333
1,537

8, 232
31, 128
6 4 ,111
73,001
42, 177
20, 737
5, 882
1,545

559
624
721
854
990
1, 145
1, 384
1, 631

2, 913
9, 065
16, 107
18,245
6, 704

392
455
521
589
661

$491
532
611
737
885

$449
489
558
673
802

$530
584
668
821
998

351
2, 007
3, 466
1, 935

445
550
661
820

436
545
659
792

406
479
583
713

478
613
738
910

I ______________________
I I _______________________
I I I ______________________
I V ______________________

452
1, 142
669
229

831
955
1,096
1, 266

810
931
1, 068
1, 256

720
843
972
1, 086

918
1,052
1, 233
1,408

215
769
966
1, 262
1, 021
530
446

546
668
837
987
1, 243
1, 370
1,866

547
652
814
942
1, 224
1, 338
1, 814

488
575
712
838
1, 053
1, 103
1, 493

468
648
290
79

615
738
842
1,022

611
738
843
975

132
392
780
544

508
588
667
803

743
1, 759
944
342

1,
3,
6,
7,
4,
2,

accountants
accountants
accountants
accountants

5,
6,
7,
9,

2.
2.
3.
3.
3.

$490
538
618
749
906

I ____________________ ____________
I I _________________________ ______
I I I _________________________________
I V _________________________________

A u d itors
A u d ito rs
A u d itors
A u d ito rs

892
384
332
844
620

$6, 360
7, 008
8, 016
9, 852
11,976

4, 645
8, 062
17, 498
11,807
4, 571

$5, 880
6, 456
7, 416
8, 988
10,872

$5,
6,
7,
8,
10,

388
868
696
076
624

I __ _____________ ______________
II ____________________________
III ____________________________
IV ____________________________
V ____________________________

Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants
Accountants

5,
6,
7,
9,

340
600
932
840

$5,
5,
6,
8,
9,

( 5)
1. 2

A ttorn ey s
A tto rn ey s
A tto rn ey s
A tto rn ey s
A tto rn ey s
A tto rn ey s
A tto rn ey s
A tto rn ey s

I _________________________________
II ________________________________
III -------------------------------------I V _______________________________
V ________________________________
V I -------------------------------------V II
------------------------------------

1,
1,
1,
2,

O ffic e S e rv ic e s
M a n a g ers,
M a n a g ers,
M a n a gers,
M a n a gers,

o ffic e
o ffic e
o ffic e
o ffic e

s e r v ic e s
s e r v ic e s
s e r v ic e s
s e r v ic e s

I _____________
II ---------------I I I ____________
I V ____________

P e r s o n n e l M anagem ent
Job
Job
Job
Job

analysts
analysts
analysts
analysts

D ir e c to r s
D ir e c to r s
D ir e c to r s
D ir e c to r s

of
of
of
of

I ______________________________
I I _____________________________
H I ____________________________
I V ____________________________
p erson n el
p e rson n el
p e rson n el
p erso n n el

I ________________
I I _________________
I I I ________________
I V ________________

096
056
004
636

6,
6,
7,
9,

072
840
920
612

799
966
1, 215
1,416

8, 844
10,428
12,900
15,096

8,
9,
12,
14.

916
996
156
616

7, 668
8, 844
10,944
12,900

9, 588
11,592
14,580
16, 992

1.9
4. 3
3. 7
3.9

468
526
599
731
879
986
1, 171
1,405

547
616
717
920
1, 103
1, 241
1,527
1, 729

6, 120
6, 912
7, 956
9, 936
11,976
13,464
16, 524
18,984

6, 132
6, 792
7, 860
9, 720
11, 928
13,176
15,996
18, 444

5, 616
6, 312
7, 18*8
8, 772
10,548
11,832
14,052
16, 860

6, 564
7, 392
8, 604
11,040
13, 236
14,892
18,324
20,748

6. 0
3. 4
3. 1
4. 5
4. 8
.8
6. 9
3. 9

558
620
716
844
982
1, 137
1, 364
1, 626

533
581
661
766
874
1, 005
1, 217
1,432

586
665
777
931
1,092
1, 278
1,527
1, 811

6, 708
7, 488
8, 652
10,248
11,880
13,740
16, 608
19,572

6, 696
7, 440
8, 592
10,128
11,784
13, 644
16, 368
19,512

6, 396
6, 972
7, 932
9, 192
10,488
12, 060
14,604
17,184

7, 032
7, 980
9, 324
11,172
13,104
15,336
18,324
21,732

2.
2.
2.
2.
3.
2.
.
2.

392
451
519
585
657

357
415
477
548
614

431
492
563
624
709

6,
7,
8,
9,

5,
6,
7,
8,

C hem ists and E n gin eers
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C h em ists

I __________________________________
I I _________________________________
I I I ________________________________
I V ________________________________
V _________________________________
V I ________________________________
V I I _______________________________
V I I I --------------------------------------

E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers

I ________________________________
I I ________________________________
I I I --------- ----------------------------I V _______________________________
V ________________________________
V I _______________________________
V I I ______________________________
V I I I -------------------------------------

0
5
3
6
1
8
8
7

E n gin eerin g Techn icians
E n gin eerin g
E n gin eerin g
E n gin eerin g
E n gin eerin g
E n gin eerin g

technicians
technicians
technicians
technicians
technicians

I ________________
II _______________
III -----------------IV -----------------V
-----------------

See footnotes at end o f table.
662594 0

-

62-3




4,
5,
6,
7,
7,

704
460
252
068
932

4, 704
5,412
6, 228
7, 020
7, 884

4,
4,
5,
6,
7,

284
980
724
576
368

5,
5,
6,
7,
8,

172
904
756
488
508

(* )
( )
( )
( )
( 6)

12
T a b le 1. E m p lo y m e n t and a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s f o r s e l e c t e d p r o fe s s i o n a l , a d m in is t r a t iv e , t e c h n ic a l, and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
in p r iv a t e in d u s try , 1 w in t e r 1961—62, and p e r c e n t in c r e a s e in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s f r o m w in t e r I9 6 0 —61 2----C o n tin u ed

Occupation and class
(See definitions
in appendix C)

N um ber
of
e m p lo y ­
ees

M onthly s a la r ie s 1
2

Annual s a la rie s 3

M id dle range 4
*
5
M ean

M edian

F ir s t
T h ird
q u a rtile q u a rtile

M id d le range 4
M ean

M edian

$4, 966
6, 464
3, 928

F ir s t
T h ird
q u a rtile q u a rtile

P ercen t
in c re a s e
in
a v e ra g e
s a la rie s

D raftsm en
D raftsm en , j u n io r _________________________
D raftsm en , se n io r ________________________
T r a c e r s ____________________________________

18,377
35,863
2, 302

$425
550
332

$413
537
326

$363
477
292

$473
613
364

$5, 112
6, 621
3,995

22, 832
5, 230
50,152
37,580
15,673
22,994
8, 278
29,881
18,657
23,119
68,237
35,036
16, 011
1, 033
11,512
18,573
9, 170
61,951
36, 760

2 #2
354
330
436
245
276
349
310
355
266
338
384
338
372
318
393
469
283
333

275
352
321
430
240
268
342
304
353
257
335
384
342
381
315
394
466
277
328

245
305
275
369
213
236
294
266
313
230
292
344
293
334
271
349
419
248
291

312
401
377
493
269
308
390
352
401
294
381
425
388
412
360
439
518
314
372

3, 396
4, 260
3, 967
5, 241
2, 952
3, 317
4, 199
3, 730
4, 273
3, 201
4, 064
4, 621
4, 063
4, 479
3, 829
4, 728
5, 640
3,403
4, 007

$4, 367
5, 744
3,508

$5, 689
7, 375
4, 383

4. 2
3. 7
1. 6

C le r ic a l
B ook keepin g-m a ch in e o p era to rs I ______
B ook keepin g-m a ch in e o p era to rs II _____
C le rk s , accounting I ______________________
C le rk s , accounting I I _____________________
C le rk s , file I ______________________________
C le rk s , f ile II _____________________________
C le rk s , file III ____________________________
Keypunch o p e ra to rs I _____________________
Keypunch o p era to rs I I ____________________
O ffic e boys o r g i r l s _______________________
S ten ogra ph ers, g e n e ra l -----------------------S ten ogra ph ers, s'enior ___________________
Sw itchboard o p e ra to rs ___________________
Sw itchboard o p e ra to rs , sp ec ia l _________
T a bu latin g-m ach in e o p era to rs I _________
T a bu latin g-m ach in e o p era to rs I I ________
Tabu latin g-m ach in e o p era to rs I I I _______
T y p ists I --------------------------------------------T yp ists II --------------------------------------------

3,
4,
3,
5,
2,
3,
4,
3,
4,
3,
4,
4,
4,
4,
3,
4,
5,
3,
3,

304
232
861
171
883
225
113
663
243
091
033
617
116
579
791
736
608
338
942

2,
3,
3,
4,
2,
2,
3,
3,
3,
2,
3,
4,
3,
4,
3,
4,
5,
2,
3,

948
669
303
438
565
843
534
196
770
763
516
139
523
018
266
204
044
981
505

3,
4,
4,
5,
3,
3,
4,
4,
4,
3,
4,
5,
4,
4,
4,
5,
6,
3,
4,

753
822
537
936
236
701
696
235
823
532
586
109
666
960
330
283
237
781
482

3. 6
3.4
3. 6
2. 4
( 7)
( 7)
( 7)

(*)

( 8)
2. 6

(?)

( 9)
2. 8
2. 2
1. 5
3. 1
2. 5
2. 7
2. 2

1 F o r scope o f study, see table in appendix A .
2 F o r lim ita tio n s of p e rcen t in c re a s e in a v e ra g e s a la rie s as a m ea su re of change in s a la ry sca le, see p. 3 of text.
3 S a la rie s rep o rte d r ela te to the standard s a la rie s that w e re paid fo r standard w ork schedules; i. e. , to the s tra ig h ttim e s a la ry co rresp o n d in g to the em p loyee*s n orm a l w ork schedule excluding o v e r tim e hours.
4 The m id d le range (in te r q u a r tile ) used h e re is the ce n tra l p a rt of the a r r a y excluding the upper and lo w e r fourths o f
the em p lo y ee distribution.
5 R e vis io n s in le v e l defin ition s betw een su rveys lim it co m p arison o f change to ch ief accountants II and III com bined;
a v e ra g e s a la rie s fo r these em p loyees as a group in c re a s ed 2. 5 p e rcen t during the y ea r.
° Not included in the previou s su rvey.
7 R evis io n s in le v e l defin ition s betw een su rveys lim it co m p arison o f change to a ll file c le rk s com bined; a v e r a g e s a la rie s
fo r these em p loy ees as a group in c re a s e d 3. 8 p e rcen t during the y e a r.
8 R e vis io n s in le v e l defin ition s betw een su rveys lim it co m p arison o f change to a ll keypunch o p e ra to rs com bined; a v e ra g e
s a la rie s fo r these em p loyees as a group in c re a s e d 3. 1 p e rcen t during the y ea r.
9 R evis io n s in le v e l definitions betw een su rveys lim it co m p arison o f change to ju n ior and se n io r sten ogra p h ers com bined;
a v e ra g e s a la rie s fo r these em p loyees as a group in c re a s e d 2. 8 p e rcen t during the y ea r.




13
T a b le 2.

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t iv e o c c u p a tio n s
b y a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , w in t e r 1961—62

A u d itors

Accountants

C h ief accountants

A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s

0. 3
1.4
1.9
4. 2

U nder $325 ________________________
$325 and under $350 _____________
$350 and under $375 ----------------$375 and under $400 -----------------

V

I

II

I

III

IV

.

.

.

_

(0 .6 )
1. 2

-

-

II

IV

III

I

III

II

IV

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

0. 3
6. 3
14. 0

(1 .3 )

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
(1 .0 )
1. 6
2. 7

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

--------------------------------_____________
-----------------

6.
11.
14.
17.

1
3
0
1

3.
4.
8.
12.

5
8
0
2

(0 .4 )
1.4
2. 2
3. 0

_
-

_
-

20. 5
21. 4
11.4
8. 5

5.
9.
8.
5.

2
5
0
6

$500
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$525
$550
$575
$600

---------------- ----------------_____________
_____________

16.
10.
6.
3.

6
3
9
7

15.
13.
12.
8.

6
8
2
7

5. 1
9.4
11. 0
11. 6

(0 .9 )
1. 1
2. 0
2. 4

_
-

7.
4.
1.
2.

10.
12.
9.
7.

3
9
2
4

4.
6.
6.
8.

3
5
1
4

(1 .4 )
1. 4

-

-

-

-

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$650
$675
$700

_____________
----------------_____________
_____________

3. 5
1. 0
(1 .6 )
-

5.9
4. 8
2. 7
3. 0

14.
10.
9.
4.

0
2
8
5

5.
5.
7.
8.

.6
1.4
( .3 )
-

10. 8
5. 3
4. 6
2.4

7.
8.
10.
8.

3
5
1
5

.9
4. 8
6. 7
6. 1

3. 1
.7
4. 2
9. 5

_
(0 .4 )
1. 8
.9

-

-

$700
$725
$7 50
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$750
$77 5
$800

_____________
----------------_____________
-----------------

_
-

.9
(2. 1)
-

5.
3.
2.
1.

2
5
9
7

11. 3
9.6
8. 8
6. 8

3.
3.
7.
4.

0
5
2
8

_
-

2. 6
1.9
.7
1. 1

7.
4.
7.
4.

5
7
4
4

7. 3
8. 5
9 .4
4 .9

9.
5.
9.
6.

5
5
3
0

3. 7
1. 4
4. 2
3.9

1. 0
1. 6

-

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$850
$875
$900

_____________
----------------_____________
-----------------

_
-

_
~

1. 2
.9
.9
(1 .2 )

5.
6.
5.
2.

7.
7.
8.
6.

0
7
4
1

_
-

(1 .1 )
-

3.9
2. 3
1. 3
1. 5

6
6
6
8

5.
2.
13.
1.

3
4
9
8

2. 3
9 .4
5. 6
3. 4

4.
7.
1.
1.

2
3
5
6

_
(1 .3 )
3. 9

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$925 ----------------$950 ----------------$975 ----------------$ 1,000 --------------

_
-

_
*

_
-

3. 0
1. 8
1.9
1. 1

7. 2
4 .4
5. 5
4. 6

_
-

_
-

(1 -9 )
-

4. 8
3. 6
2. 8
2.9

5.
2.
3.
6.

1
4
1
0

10.
8.
2.
3.

9
8
8
2

3.
1.
2.
6.

4
8
7
7

.4
3.9
3. 1

_
-

_
-

_
-

1. 3
(1 .1 )

8. 2
4. 6
4. 0
3. 0
1.8

_
-

_
-

_
-

5. 2
2. 5
1. 9
1.4
(1 .7 )

4. 4
6. 2
(1 .5 )
-

12.
7.
3.
3.
4.

1
8
7
3
1

15.
7.
6.
5.
12.

5
2
3
7
6

_
-

_
-

_
-

1. 3
(1 .7 )
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

3. 2
2. 5
(.6 )
-

5. 2
5. 1
1.9
6. 4
(2. 1)

7. 0
8. 7
9 .2
5. 7
2. 2

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

4. 8
2. 6
2. 6
2. 6
.4
2. 6
2. 2

8
6
8
5

4
0
2
6

_
(1 .8 )
1.6
2. 7

1
8
1
3

5.
6.
5.
3.

$ 1,000
$ 1,050
$ 1, 100
$ 1, 150
$1,200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1,050 ________
$ 1, 1 0 0 ________
$ 1, 1 5 0 ----------$ 1,200 ________
$ 1,250 ________

$ 1,250
$ 1,300
$ 1,350
$ 1,400
$1 ,4 50

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1,300
$ 1,350
$ 1,400
$1,450
$ 1,500

________
________
-------------------________

-

$1 ,5 00
$ 1,550
$1,600
$ 1,650
$ 1,700

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
unde r
under

$ 1,550
$ 1,600
$1 ,6 50
$1 ,7 00
$ 1 ,7 50

-----------------------------________
________

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

$1 ,7 50 and under $ 1,800 ________
$1 ,8 00 and o v e r __________________

-

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

4, 571

351

2, 007

3,466

$906

$445

$550

$661

T o ta l -------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N um ber of e m p lo y e e s ----------------

4, 645

8, 062 17,498 11,807

A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s ---------

$490

S ee fo o tn o te s at en d o f t a b le .




$538

100. 0

$618

$749

100. 0

7.
6.
6.
11.
4.

9
1
6
8
4

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1,935

452

1, 142

669

229

$820

$831

$955

$1,096

$1,266

14
T a b le 2.

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t iv e o c c u p a tio n s
b y a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , w in t e r 1961—62— C on tin u ed

A ttorn ey s
A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s
I

II

III

_

IV

U nder $425 ________________________
$425 and under $450 _____________
$450 and under $475 _____________
$475 and under $500 _____________

2.
7.
10.
10.

8
0
2
2

-

$500
$525
$550
$57 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$525
$550
$575
$600

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

10.
10.
7.
1 1.

2
7
4
2

6. 6
5. 5
11.6
13. 4

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$650
$67 5
$700

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

18. 6
2. 8
5. 1
.9

6.
5.
9.
6.

$7 00
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$7 25
$750
$77 5
$800

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

_
1.4
1.4
-

5.
4.
7.
4.

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$850
$875
$900

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

_
-

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$925 _____________
$950 _____________
$975 _____________
$ 1,000 ___________

_

.

-

(1 .0 )

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
2. 4
1. 8
1.9

_
_
(0 .2 )

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
.
.

-

-

-

0
2
9
0

3. 1
3.6
5. 2
4. 5

1. 7
.4
.6
1. 5

_

_

_
_

-

-

2
0
7
8

5.
4.
4.
7.

7
7
8
8

4. 4
3. 4
3. 2
2.9

_
_
2. 2
.5

_
_
_

-

1.6
2. 5
1. 7
2. 5

8.
4.
8.
3.

5
9
3
6

3. 3
7. 0
7.9
3. 8

3.
.
1.
.

0
5
5
3

_
_
_
0. 6

_
-

1.4
(3 .5 )

3. 1
2. 9
2. 3
1.9

7. 3
3. 7
3. 9
2.9

1. 2
.4
2. 1
4. 4

1. 1
.6
.6
1.9

_

-

6.9
3. 4
3. 0
2. 3
1. 3
1. 3
(1 .0 )

-

-

6
1
1
7
6

6.
13.
7.
4.
1.

8
2
0
7
9

_
_
(0 .4 )
1. 6
-

6. 5
1. 5
1.9
.8
.9

8.
10.
2.
2.
2.

0
9
8
7
8

4.
9.
5.
4.
7.

9
1
3
2
4

.4
8. 1
1. 8
5. 2
9. 0

_
_

1. 0
(1 .8 )

-

-

4.
1.
4.
3.
1.

4
0
3
6
1

8.
3.
4.
1.
1.

3
2
2
9
1

4. 7
1. 8
1.6
8. 3
2. 7

_
_
_
_

.
_
_
_

-

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

2. 2
6. 3
3. 4
1. 6
.9

_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
-

1. 1
2. 7
.4
3 14. 1

100 0

.

100 0

$ 1,250
$1 ,3 00
$ 1,350
$ 1,400
$ 1,450

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1,300
$1 ,3 50
$1,400
$ 1,450
$ 1,500

________
________
________
________
________

_

_

-

-

-

$ 1,500
$1 ,5 50
$1 ,6 00
$1 ,6 50
$1 ,7 00

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1,550
$1,600
$1,650
$1,700
$1,750

________
________
________
________
________

_

_

$ 1,750
$ 1,800
$1 ,8 50
$ 1,900
$ 1,950

and
and
and
and
and

under
unde r
under
under
under

$ 1,800
$ 1,850
$1,900
$ 1,950
$ 2,000

________
________
________
________
________

_
-

_
-

$2 ,0 00
$2, 050
$2, 100
$2, 150
$ 2 ,2 00

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2,050 __ ____
$2, 1 0 0 ________
$2, 1 5 0 ________
$2, 200 ________
$2,250 ________

_
-

_
-

-

$2 ,2 50
$ 2 ,3 00
$ 2,350
$ 2 ,4 00

and
and
and
and

under
under
unde r
over

$2,300 ________
$2,350 ________
$2 ,4 00 ________
__________________

_

"

-

T o t a l ----------- ------------------

_______
____

215
$546




at end o f ta b le .

-

-

100. 0

-

8.
7.
7.
6.
9.

$ 1,050 ________
$ 1, 1 0 0 ________
$1, 1 5 0 ________
$ 1,200 ________
$ 1,250 ________

-

-

1
9
8
4
4

under
under
under
under
under

S e e fo o t n o t e s

V II

-

and
and
and
and
and

N um ber o f e m p lo y e e s

VI

-

$1 ,0 00
$ 1, 050
$1, 100
$ 1, 150
$ 1,200

A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s

V

100. 0

-

11.
2.
4.
4.
4.

_

.2
.4
1. 1
(1 .6 )

-

.9
4. 2
2. 1
.6
2. 1
1. 1
(1. 3)
_

3.
2.
6.
2.
6.

8
5
3
9
3

100 0

.

100 0

100 0

769

966

1,262

1 021

530

446

$668

$837

$987

$ 1,243

$ 1,370

$ 1,866

.

.

,

.

15
T a b le 2.

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d p r o fe s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t iv e o c c u p a tio n s 2
b y a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , w in t e r 1961—62— C o n tin u ed

M a n a gers,
o ffic e s e r v ic e s

A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s
I

III

II

Job analysts
IV

II

I

III

Under $350 ________________________
$350 and under $375 _____________
$375 and under $400 _____________

.

.

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

(0 .8 )
6. 8

0. 3
1. 5
-

D ir e c to r s o f p e rson n el
I

IV

II

III

IV

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
(1 .4 )

_
-

(0 .9 )

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

_____________
_____________
_____________
____ ______

1.
1.
6.
2.

1
9
2
4

_
0. 5

_
-

_
-

3.
9.
16.
10.

8
1
7
6

3.
1.
2.
6.

1
5
3
4

$500
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$525
$550
$575
$600

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

6.
7.
7.
12.

4
7
3
4

.8
.2
6. 3
2. 8

_
1. 0
-

_
-

9.
14.
10.
7.

1
4
6
6

12.
13.
11.
10.

5
3
5
7

3.
6.
9.
5.

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$650
$675
$700

_____________
_____________
_______ ____
_____________

10.
5.
13.
10.

9
1
5
7

6.
4.
8.
6.

0
9
0
0

.
3.
4.
4.

7
1
5
5

_
7. 6

5.
2.
1.
1.

3
3
5
5

8.
5.
5.
4.

9
1
1
1

12. 6
6.9
9. 7
8. 5

3.
3.
3.
6.

1
7
9
6

1. 2
9. 6
10. 2
-

4.
2.
2.
3.

0
0
8
2

_
3. 0
-

_
-

$7 00
$725
$7 50
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$750
$775
$800

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

5.
.
2.
.

8
2
8
6

7.
12.
5.
16.

7
7
7
4

2.
7.
7.
3.

8
9
6
4

_
2. 5

_
-

3.
.
1.
1.

6
8
8
8

9.
6.
4.
4.

7
2
7
9

5.
4.
8.
10.

7
0
1
8

6.
6.
13.
10.

1
5
2
1

9.
8.
8.
3.

3
0
1
5

_
.6
1. 2
5. 0

_
-

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$850
$875
$900

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

3.
5.
5.
2.

2
2
2
0

6.
10.
5.
14.

9
7
9
8

3. 8
2. 5
-

_
-

1. 8
.5
1. 8
-

3. 1
1. 9
1.4
.9

12.
7.
5.
5.

7
7
1
7

1.
1.
1.
3.

9
7
2
8

6.
7.
2.
5.

8
8
7
9

1.
1.
7.
2.

1
2
5
2

_
4. 4
1. 8
2. 6

$900
$925
$950
$ 97 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
unde r

$925 _____________
$950 _____________
$97 5 _____________
$ 1,000 ___________

_
-

.5
3. 1
2. 0

6.
.
6.
2.

2
7
6
8

10.
6.
13.
3.

1
3
9
8

_
-

1. 8
-

.4
.6
. 1
1.4

3.
3.
2.
2.

9
5
4
0

4. 4
.3
.5
8. 7

7.
.
4.
3.

6
7
3
2

7.
6.
7.
5.

0
0
4
3

_
2. 0
9. 6

4. 8
2. 1
1.4
1. 0
(•V)

7.
7.
17.
2.
1.

6
6
7
5
3

_
-

_
-

(-4 )
-

3. 5
1. 5
(2 .4 )
-

1. 7
(.5 )

5. 7
4. 8
1.4
1. 6
1. 3

9.
5.
2.
8.
3.

7
2
9
6
9

.3
8. 8
8. 8
7. 3
12. 3

4.
3.
2.
3.
3.

6
4
6
2
5

6.
5.
3.
4.
4.

1. 5
2. 6
(1. 1)

8
7
1
5

0. 4
1. 1
.6
1. 7

4.
6.
3.
3.

2
7
0
5

$1,000
$ 1,050
$1, 100
$ 1, 150
$ 1,200

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1 ,0 50 ________
$ 1, 1 0 0 ________
$1, 1 5 0 ________
$ 1,200 ________
$ 1,250 ________

_
-

(.8 )
-

$1,250
$ 1,300
$ 1,350
$ 1,400
$ 1,450

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1,300
$ 1,350
$ 1,400
$ 1,450
$ 1,500

________
________
________
________
________

_
-

_
-

_
-

6. 3
1. 3
2. 5
2. 5

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2. 2
1. 6
(1 .5 )

$ 1,500
$ 1,550
$1 ,6 00
$ 1,650
$ 1,700

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1,550
$ 1,600
$ 1,650
$ 1,700
$ 1,750

________
___ ___
________
__
________

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1.2
1. 0
(2 .9 )

$ 1,750
$ 1,800
$ 1,850
$ 1,900
$ 1,950

and
and
and
and
and

unde r $1 ,8 00 ________
under $ 1,850 ________
unde r $1 ,9 00 ________
under $ 1,950 ________
o v e r ___________________

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
8
2
7
1

2. 6
3. 2
2. 0
1.2
2. 3
_
1. 8
.3
2. 6
(1 .5 )

T o t a l _________________________

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N um ber of e m p lo y e e s _____________

468

648

290

79

132

392

780

544

743

1,759

944

342

$615

$738

$842

$ 1,022

$508

$588

$667

$803

$737

$869

$ 1,075

$ 1,258

A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s ---------

S ee fo o tn o te s

at end o f ta b le .




16
T a b le 2.

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t iv e o c c u p a tio n s 2
b y a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , w in t e r 1961—62— C o n tin u ed

C hem ists
A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s
III
U nder $375 _______________
$375 and under $400 ____

IV

V III

1. 7
2. 8

$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

____
____
____
____

1. 2
10. 8
11. 7
14. 6

(0 .3 )
1. 3
4. 8

$500
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$525
$550
$575
$600

____
____
____
____

16. 7
17. 5

11.
13.
19.
13.

8
7
0
0

3. 7
3. 7
6. 8
8. 8

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$650
$675
$700

____
____
____
____

3. 3
3. 7

7.
6.
5.
2.

6
9
0
5

11.5
11. 3
10. 3
9. 7

4. 9
5. 1

$7 00
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$7 25
$750
$77 5
$800

____
____
____
____

10. 6
5. 1
4.9
3. 0

7. 7
7. 7
8. 7
8. 1

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$850
$87 5
$900

____
____
____
____

2.9
1. 5
.9

6 0

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$925 .......
$950 ____
$975 ____
$ 1, 000 __

6. 1
7. 2

10
.

(1 .7 )

6. 2

(2. 0)

( 1. 0 )
2. 0
2. 6

6. 1

(1 .3 )
1. 2
2. 4
2. 7

(0 .3 )

5.
5.
5.
5.

6
3
6
7

2. 1
2. 7
2. 4
2. 5

6.
4.
3.
3.

5.
6.
5.
4.

7
2
0
4

3.
5.
4.
4.

6
0
4
4

14. 2
9.4
8. 0
5. 3

11.
11.
8.
9.

2
9
3
5

5. 2
3. 2
1. 8

1.2

(2 . 0 )

5.6
4 .6

8.
5.
5.
3.
3.

0
8
3
9
1

.

3
9
8
6

6. 1

1. 2

$ 1,000
$ 1,050
$1, 100
$ 1, 150

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
unde r

$ 1,050
$ 1, 100
$1, 150
$1,200

$1 ,2 00
$ 1,250
$ 1,300
$ 1,350
$ 1,400
$ 1,450

and
and
and
and
and
and

under
unde r
unde r
under
under
under

$1,250
$1,300
$1,350
$ 1,400
$1,450
$ 1,500

$ 1,500
$1 ,5 50
$1 ,6 00
$1 ,6 50
$ 1,700

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
under
under
under
under

$1,550
$1,600
$1,650
$1,700
$ 1,7 50

$1 ,7 50
$1 ,8 00
$ 1,850
$ 1,900
$ 1 ,9 50

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1,800
$1,850
$ 1,900
$1,950
$ 2,000

1. 7
1. 5

$2 ,0 00
$2 ,0 50
$2 ,1 00
$2, 150
$2 ,2 00
$2,250

and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
over

$2,050
$2 ,1 00
$2,150
$2, 200
$2,250
_________

(2 . 2 )

2. 8

1.2

(1 .4 )

10
.

( 1. 0 )

11
.

1. 9
(2. 3)

5.
4.
9.
11.

5
0
3
7

8. 2

5.
7.
3.
5.
9.

4
4
3
2
5

7.
4.
4.
1.
1.

9
4
6
9
5

10
.
1. 5

10
.

2. 4

10
.

4. 8
7. 9
6. 2
2. 1
7. 6
5. 2
17.
9.
4.
4.
4.

2
0
8
1
8

5. 2
5. 9

10
.
.3

10
.
1.4
1.4

10
.

2. 1
3. 4

10 0
0.

10 0
0.

10 0
0.

10 0
0.

10 0
0.

10 0
0.

N um ber o f e m p lo y e e s ____

1, 181

3,492

6, 897

7, 004

4,420

2, 380

781

290

A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s

$510

$576

$663

$838

$998

1, 122

$ 1,377

M , 582

T o ta l _______________

S e e fo o t n o t e s




at end o f ta b le .

$

10 0
0.

10 0
0.

17
T a b le 2.

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m in is t r a t iv e o c c u p a tio n s 2
b y a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , w in t e r 1961—62— C o n tin u ed

E n gin eers
A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s
II

I
Under $375 ________________________
$37 5 and under $400 _____________
$400
$425
$450
$475

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$650
$675
$700

IV

VI

V

V II

V III

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
(1 .9 )
3. 1

_
(0 .6 )
1. 0

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

(1 .8 )
1. 3
3. 5
4. 0

_
-

_
-

_

7
6
5
5

2.
5.
11.
15.

7
2
8
0

(0 .6 )
1. 0
1.9
3. 3

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

9. 1
4. 0
2. 0
(.6 )

16.
14.
12.
7.

9
2
4
6

6.
7.
10.
11.

5.
2.
2.
1.

1
9
8
1

11.
10.
10.
6.

3
0
6
8

4.
6.
8.
7.

6.
4.
3.
1.

4
5
1
7

8. 5
7. 9
7.9
7. 1

5.
4.
4.
5.

2
4
8
6

(2 .4 )
3. 4
2. 8
2. 6

_
-

_

-

-

6.9
5. 8
4. 5
3. 6

6.
5.
6.
5.

2
3
2
7

2.9
2. 9
3. 3
3. 9

_
(2 .8 )

_
-

12.
9.
7.
5.

9
5
6
6

9.6
9. 7
9. 1
9. 7

2.
3.
5.
7.

8.
8.
5.
4.
3.
3.

8. 4
7. 4
9.9
7. 8
7. 0
8. o

1.
4.
4.
4.
5.
6.

9
7
5
7
5
1

6.
4.
3.
3.
2.

8
6
8
3
4

8.
4.
7.
7.
8.

1
9
6
5
2

2. 0
1.7
.8
1.2
(2. 1)

4.
6.
5.
2.
1.

3
6
6
8
5

$500 and under $525 _____________
$525 and under $550 _____________
$550 and under $575 _____________

$600
$625
$650
$675

III

11.
24.
26.
16.

0
5
5
7

(1. 1)
1.6
2. 6
3. 5

$700
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$750
$775
$800

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

_
-

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$850
$875
$900

_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________

_
-

(.5 )

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$925 _____________
$950 _____________
$975 _____________
$ 1,000 ___________

_
-

_
-

1. 1
(1 .9 )
_
-

5.
3.
2.
1.

-

7
2
1
5

$ 1,000
$ 1,050
$ 1, 100
$ 1, 150

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$1 ,0 50 ________
$ 1, 1 0 0 ________
$ 1, 1 5 0 ________
$1,200 ________

_

-

_
-

$ 1,200
$ 1,250
$ 1,300
$ 1,350
$ 1,400
$1 ,4 50

and
and
and
and
and
and

under
unde r
under
under
under
under

$1,250
$ 1,300
$ 1,350
$1,400
$ 1,450
$ 1,500

________
________
________
________
________
________

_
-

_
-

_
-

(.8 )

$ 1,500
$ 1,550
$ 1,600
$1, 650
$1 ,7 00

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1,550
$ 1,600
$1 ,6 50
$ 1,700
$1 ,7 50

________
________
________
---------________

_
-

_
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

$ 1,750
$1 ,8 00
$ 1,850
$ 1,900
$ 1,950

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
under
unde r
under
under

$1 ,8 00
$1 ,8 50
$1 ,9 00
$ 1,950
$2 ,0 00

________
________
________
________
________

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

$2,000
$2, 050
$2, 100
$2 ,1 50
$2 ,2 00
$2 ,2 50

and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
over

$2 ,0 50 ________
$2, 1 0 0 ----------$2, 1 5 0 ________
$2 ,2 00 ________
$2,250 ________
__________________

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

2
1
1
3

-

3. 6
2. 8
1. 8
1. 1
(1 .0 )
_
-

3
1
9
1
4
1

2. 1
1. 1
(1 .8 )

-

-

-

-

_
_

3
3
8
9

_
-

_
(0 .6 )
2. 3
2. 7

2. 6
3. 0
.3
.4
.9
2. 7

T o ta l ________________________

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N um ber o f e m p lo y e e s _____________

8, 232

31,128

6 4 , 111

73,001

42,177

20,737

5, 882

1,545

A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s ---------

$559

$624

$721

$854

$990

$ 1,145

$1, 384

$1,631

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1 To avoid showing sm a ll p rop ortio n s of em p loyees s c a ttered at or near the ex tre m e s o f the distrib u tion s fo r som e
occupations, the p ercen ta g es o f em p loy ees in these in terva ls have been accum ulated and a re shown, in m ost ca se s, in the
in te rv a l above or below the e x tre m e in te r v a l containing at lea st 1 percen t.
The p e rcen ta g es rep re se n tin g these em p loyees
a re shown in parentheses.
2 F o r scope of study, see table in appendix A .
3 W o rk ers w e r e distrib u ted as fo llo w s : 2.5 p ercen t at $2 ,4 00 to $ 2 ,4 5 0 ; 3.1 p e rcen t at $ 2 ,4 50 to $ 2 ,5 0 0 ; 1.1 percen t
at $2 ,5 00 to $ 2 ,5 5 0 ; 0 .2 p e rcen t at $ 2 ,5 50 to $2 ,6 0 0 ; 0 .2 p e rcen t at $2 ,6 00 to $ 2 ,6 5 0 ; 0 .2 p e rcen t at $2 ,6 50 to $ 2 ,7 0 0 ;
1.1 percen t at $2 ,8 00 to $ 2 ,8 5 0 ; and 5.6 p ercen t at $2 ,9 00 to $2 ,9 5 0 .
NO TE :

B ecau se o f rounding,




sums o f individu al item s m ay not equal 100.

18
T a b le 3.

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u tio n o f e n g in e e r in g t e c h n i c i a n s 1 b y a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , w in t e r 196l-*-62

E n gin eerin g technicians
A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s
I

II

III

IV

V

Under $275 _
$ 27 5 and under $300 _______________

(0 .5 )
1.9

$ 300
$ 325
$ 350
$ 375

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$325
$ 350
$375
$400

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

4.
13.
17.
17.

3
3
7
6

(0 .7 )
1.7
4. 3
9. 3

_
(0 .9 )
1. 8

-

$400
$425
$450
$47 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

15.
17.
7.
2.

7
3
9
4

15.
18.
16.
12.

0
6
8
7

4. 5
6.4
10. 5
13. 6

_
(1 .0 )
2. 4
3. 8

$ 500
$ 525
$ 550
$ 575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$525
$550
$575
$600

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

(1 .4 )
-

8. 7
6. 3
2. 7
1.2

15.9
14. 6
12. 6
7. 9

6. 8
12. 2
16. 3
19.2

$ 600
$625
$ 650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$650
$675
$700

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

_

1. 1
(- 9 )
-

3. 9
4. 0
1. 9
(1 .5 )

13.
9.
6.
3.

$7 00
$725
$7 50
$77 5

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$750
$775
$800

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

_

_

$ 800 and under $825 _______________
$825 and o v e r

-

-

-

_
(0 .5 )
1.
2.
3.
8.

3
7
4
7

5
8
1
4

15.
13.
14.
10.

4
9
3
2

2. 0
2. 0
(1 .5 )

12.
8.
4.
2.

4
3
7
0

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1. 1
1. 1

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

Num ber of e m p lo y e e s ______________

2, 913

9, 065

16,107

18,245

6,704

A v e r a g e m onthly s a la rie s ------------

$392

$455

$521

$589

$661

T o ta l ----

1 F o r scope o f study, see table in appendix A .
In o r d e r to a void showing sm a ll p rop ortio n s of em p loy ees s c a ttered at
or near the ex trem e s o f the distrib u tion s fo r som e occu pations, the p e rcen ta g es o f em p lo y ees in these in te rv a ls have been
accum ulated and a re shown, in m ost ca se s, in the in te r v a l above or b e low the ex tre m e in te r v a l containing at le a s t 1 percen t.
The p ercen ta g es rep resen tin g these em p loy ees a re shown in p a ren th eses.
NOTE:

B ecau se of rounding,




sums o f in dividu al item s m ay not equal 100.

19
T a b le 4.

A v e r a g e w eek ly s a la rie s

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d d r a ft in g and c l e r i c a l
o c c u p a tio n s 2 b y a v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r i e s , w in t e r 1961—62

D raftsm en , D raftsm en ,
T ra ce rs
ju n ior
sen ior

B ook keepin gm achine
o p era to rs
I

U nder $40 ____________________
$40 and under $45 ___________
$45 and under $ 5 0 --------------

II

-

-

-

-

(0. 3)

(0 .5 )
6. 7

_

_

2. 5
7. 5
9 .0
12. 1
17. 2

12.
16.
20.
14.
9.

-

$50
$55
$60
$65
$70

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$55 ___________
$ 6 0 -------------$65 -------------$70 ___________
$75 ___________

(0 .5 )
1. 3
2. 2
4.6

$75
$80
$85
$90
$95

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$80 ___________
$85 ___________
$90 ___________
$95 ___________
$100 ------------

7. 3
11. 8
9.7
11. 8
10. 4

(1 .2 )
1. 1
2. 5
4. 7

_

-

_

C le rk s ,
accounting
I

II

1. 2
4. 5
9. 1
9 .2
11. 6

5.9
7.9
11. 7
12. 2
11. 0

(0 .9 )
1. 6
2.9
4. 4

19.9
20. 9
12.9
6.8
3. 8

15.
17.
17.
12.
8.

5
0
5
4
5

2. 6
6 .4
10. 3
9. 1
10. 5

16. 9
11. 4
6. 2
6 .6
3. 4

6. 5
4.7
3. 3
2. 1
1. 5

11. 3
12.9
10. 1
10. 1
6.9

11.
8.
6.
5.
4.

6.6
8. 3
8. 3
8 .9
9.5

1. 8
2. 4
1. 6
(1 .1 )
-

6.
4.
2.
1.
1.

6
6
7
8
1

13. 3
11.0
11. 0
7. 8
4.6

3. 6
2.9
1. 8
1. 1
(1 .8 )

(1 .5 )

_______
_______
---------_______
_______

9 .4
7. 0
4.9
3. 7
3. 8

6 .4
8. 7
8. 8
8.9
9.5

3. 3
2. 2
(1 .2 )

(1 .5 )

-

-

-

-

6. 2
2. 8
1. 3
1. 4
(1 .4 )

$
$
$
$
$

125
130
135
140
145

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 130
$ 135
$ 140
$ 145
$ 150

_______
_______
------------------_______

3.6
2. 2
1. 1
1.9
1. 5

8.6
7. 1
5. 8
5. 5
4. 7

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 150
$ 160
$ 170
$ 180
$ 190

and
and
and
and
and

under $ 160 --------under $ 170 _______
under $ 180 _______
under $ 190 --------o v e r ---------------------

(1 .2 )

6. 5
4.6
3. 1
1. 3
.9

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

T o t a l -------------------------

100. 0

6
7
7
4
5

_

100. 0

0. 1
2. 3
8. 4

6
3
3
9
1

$ 105
$ 110
$ 115
$ 120
$ 125

-

0. 4
4. 3
24. 0

III

-

under
under
under
under
under

-

II

(0 .5 )
2. 7

-

and
and
and
and
and

-

I

0. 1

$ ICO
$ 105
$ 110
$ 115
$ 120

-

C le r k s , file

-

100. 0

-

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

-

_

8.
9.
7.
6.
4.

6
3
2
1
4

3. 7
2. 3
2. 2
1.8
1. 0
1. 2
(.8 )
100. 0

-

(0 .5 )

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4. 8
2. 8
1. 0
1. 2
(3 .0 )

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N um ber o f e m p lo y e e s ---------

18,377

35,863

2, 302

22, 832

5, 230

50, 152

37,580

15,673

22,994

8, 278

A v e r a g e w eek ly s a l a r i e s -----

$98. 00

$127.00

$7 6.50

$65. 00

$82. 00

$ 7 6.00

$100.50

$56. 50

$63. 50

$80. 50

See footn otes at end o f tab le.
662594 0

-

62-4




20
T a b le 4. P e r c e n t d is t r ib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s 1 in s e le c t e d d r a ft in g and c l e r i c a l
o c c u p a t io n s 2 b y a v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r i e s , w in t e r 1961—62----C o n tin u e d

A v e r a g e w eek ly s a la rie s

Keypunch
o p era to rs
I

Under $40 ____________________
$40 and under $45 ___________
$45 and under $50 ___________

O ffic e
boys
g ir ls

II

(0. 3)
3. 0

Sw itch­
Stenog­ Stenog­
board
rap h ers, rap h ers,
op era ­
g en e ra l sen ior
tors

Sw itch­
board
o p e ra to rs ,
sp ec ia l

T a b u la tin gm achine
o p era to rs
I

T y p ists
I

II

-

(0.8)
6. 1

(0 .4 )

III

II

-

0. 1
1. 2
13. 2

(0 .8 )

-

0. 2
1. 1
2. 3

-

0. 1
1.5

-

$50
$55
$60
$65
$70

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$55
$60
$65
$70
$75

-------------___________
--------------------------___________

6.
11.
14.
13.
13.

4
3
8
4
1

(1 .2 )
2.9
5. 8
9. 2
12. 6

17. 2
21. 0
16. 7
9 .8
5. 5

2.9
5.6
9 .4
12. 5
12. 2

_
(1 .5 )
2. 5
4.6
6. 7

3. 6
5. 2
7 .4
10. 0
10. 1

(0 .9 )
1. 6
4. 0
6. 0
8. 4

6. 0
11. 1
11.9
11.9
13. 7

(0.
1.
2.
4.
6.

3
)
6
4
0
0

_
(0 .5 )
1. 0

11. 3
15.6
20.0
15. 5
11. 2

1. 8
4.9
11. 2
14. 6
15. 2

$75
$80
$85
$90
$95

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$80 ___________
$85 ___________
$90 ___________
$95 -------------$ 100 _________

10.
8.
5.
5.
4.

6
2
7
8
2

15.
11.
10.
12.
11.

4. 2
5. 4
2. 6
1. 5
(1 .5 )

13. 6
12. 1
9.7
7.9
5.5

10. 9
12. 8
15.2
13. 1
12. 5

12.
11.
12.
10.
6.

6
0
6
7
0

9.7
11. 1
14. 4
18. 3
14. 8

12.
11.
6.
5.
3.

0
0
8
7
1

8.9
12. 8
11. 7
12. 8
11.9

2. 6
4. 2
5. 1
7.9
10. 3

7.6
4. 5
4. 0
1. 6
1. 2

13. 5
11. 4
9. 2
6. 5
4.9

3.5
2. 0
1.4
(1 .0 )
-

_
-

4. 4
1.8
(1 .5 )
-

7.9
5. 3
3. 6
1.6
(1 .7 )

4. 3
1. 7
(1 .2 )
-

2.9
1. 6
(.6)
-

9 .4
7. 2
4. 5
2. 8
2. 1

12. 1
11.9
9.7
10. 3
8. 2

(.7)

4. 3
1. 1
(.8 )
-

-

4. 5
3. 5
(2 .8 )
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1. 0
(.6 )

5. 6
4. 2
2. 6
1.7
.8

_
-

_
1 _
-

-

_
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1.0
(.3 )

_
-

_
_
-

1
3
5
5
0

$ 100
$ 105
$ 110
$ 115
$ 120

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 105
$ 110
$ 115
$ 120
$ 125

_______
--------_______
_______
----------

2. 0
(1 .2 )

$125
$ 130
$ 135
$ 140
$ 145

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 130
$ 135
$ 140
$ 145
$ 150

--------------------------------_______

_
-

_
-

$ 150
$ 160
$ 170
$ 180
$ 190

and
and
and
and
and

under $ 160 _______
under $ 170 --------under $ 180 --------under $ 190 --------o v e r ________________

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

Num ber o f e m p lo y e e s _______

29,881 18,657

23, 119

68, 237

35,036

16,011

1, 033

A v e r a g e w eek ly s a l a r i e s ____

$71. 50 $82.00

$61.50

$78.00

$88.50

$78.00

$86.00

T o t a l -------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

-

100. 0

-

-

-

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

11, 512 18,573

9, 170

61, 951 36,760

$73. 50 $90.50 $ io a o o

$65.50 $77.00

100. 0

1 T o a void showing sm a ll prop ortio n s of em p loy ees sc a ttered at or near the ex tre m e s of the d istrib u tion s fo r som e oc cu ­
pations, the p ercen ta g es of em p loy ees in these in te rv a ls have been accum ulated and a re shown in m ost ca se s, in the in te r v a l
above or below the e x tre m e in te r v a l containing at lea st 1 p ercen t.
The p ercen ta g es r e p re s e n tin g these em p loy ees a re shown
in p aren th eses.
2 F o r scope of study, see table in appendix A.
NOTE:

B ecau se o f rounding,




sums o f ind ividu al item s m ay not equal 100.

21
T a b le 5. P e r c e n t d is t r ib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d p r o fe s s i o n a l , a d m in is t r a t iv e ,
t e c h n ic a l, and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s 1 by in d u s try d iv is io n , 2 w in t e r 1961—62

Occupation

M anu­
fa ctu rin g

P u blic
u tilitie s 1
3
2

W h o lesa le
trade

R e ta il
tra d e

F inanee,
insurance,
and
r e a l estate

S elected
s e r v ic e s 4

P r o fe s s io n a l and A d m in is tra tiv e
Accountants ______________ . ________________
_
A u d itors ____________________________________
C h ief acco u n ta n ts__________________________
A tto rn ey s ___________________________________
M a n a g ers, o ffic e s e r v i c e s ________________
Job analysts ________________________________
D ir e c to r s o f person n el ___________________
C h em ists ___________________________________
E n g in eers __________________________________

71
41
71
27
59
80
71
92
81

14
23
9
21
7
6
6
r5)
11

4
5
4
9
8
( 5) '
4
(5 )
( 5)

84
84

4
8

o

25
44
31
46
40
56
40
43
47

(5)
23
11
17
16
16
19
22
8

(?)
(?)
(5)
6
(?)
(5)

6
26
9
41
22
11
11
(5)
(5)

(5)
(5)
(5)
(?)
(?)
(?)
(5)
6
7

( 5)

(?)
(5)

(?)
(5 )

12
6

( 5)
6
5
6
5
4
5
5
4

8
12
10
6
7
( 5)
16
5
6

61
14
42
24
31
19
18
24
33

(?)
(?)
(5)
(?)
(5)
(?)
( )
(?)
( 5)

(5)
4
6

T e ch n ica l
E n gin eerin g tech nicians __________________
D ra fts m en __________________________________

C le r ic a l
B ook keepin g-m ach in e o p era to rs _________
C le r k s , accounting ________________________
C l rks, file ----------------------------------------Keypunch o p era to rs _______________________
O ffic e boys or g ir ls -----------------------------Stenographers ______________________________
Sw itchboard o p era to rs ____________________
Tabu latin g-m ach in e o p era to rs ___________
T y p ists ______________________________________

1 Each occupation includes the w o rk le v e ls , as defined fo r su rvey, fo r which em p loym en t es tim a te s in a ll in d u stries
w ithin scope o f the study a re shown in table 1 .'
2 F o r scope o f study, see table in appendix A .
3 T ra n sp orta tion (lim ite d to ra ilr o a d , lo c a l and suburban p a ssen ger, deep sea w a ter, and a ir tra n sp ortation in d u s tries ),
com m unication, e le c t r ic , gas, and sa n itary s e r v ic e s .
4 E n gin eerin g and a rc h ite c tu ra l s e r v ic e s ; and c o m m e rc ia lly o p erated re s e a rc h , developm en t, and testin g la b o r a to r ie s .
5 L e s s than 4 p e rcen t.




22
T a b le 6.

R e la tiv e sa la ry le v e ls fo r s e le c te d p ro fe s s io n a l, a d m in is tra tiv e , tech n ica l, and c le r ic a l
occupations 1 by industry d iv isio n , 2 w in te r 1961—
62
(A v e r a ge s a la ry fo r each occupation in a ll in d u stries = 100)

Occupation

M anu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 1
3
2

W h olesa le
trade

R e ta il
tra d e

F in a n ce,
insurance,
and
r e a l esta te

S elected
s e r v ic e s 4

P r o fe s s io n a l and A d m in is tra tiv e
Accountants ----------------------------------------A u d ito r s ------------------------------------ -------C h ief acco u n ta n ts---------------------------------A tto rn ey s ___________________________________
M a n a g ers, o f f i c e s e r v i c e s ______________
Job analysts ----------------------------------------D ir e c to r s o f p e rson n el ____________________
C h em ists ___________________________________
E n gin eers ___________________________________

100
104
100
105
99
102
99
100
100

103
105
104
( 5)
108
98
110
( 5)
98

99
100

107
97

(!)

114
106
109
104
103
102
106
106
105

121
102
114
106
109
106
109
99
105

112
104
102
106
99
102
105
106
101

103
97
( 5)
104

(!)
(!)
()
(5)
(5)

95
91
(5)
95
(5 )
96
( 5)
( 5)

91
90
97
97
99
87
102
(5)
( 5)

108
( 5)
( 5)
( )
( )
(?)
( 5)
108
101

(5)
97

(5)
100

102
100

98
86
87
89
93
89
77
94
93

94
87
92
90
93
88
95
92
92

( 5)
103
108
103
97
98
99
107
103

H

T e ch n ica l
E n gin eerin g tech nicians ___________________
D r a fts m e n --------------------------------------------

( 5)

C le r ic a l
B ook keepin g-m ach in e o p e ra to rs _________
C le rk s , a cco u n tin g _________________________
C le rk s , file ________________________________
Keypunch o p e ra to rs _______________________
O ffic e boys o r g ir ls _______________________
Stenographers ______________________________
Sw itchboard o p era to rs _____________________
Ta bu la tin g-m a ch in e o p e ra to rs -------------T y p ists _____________________________________

1 Each occupation includes the w ork le v e ls , as defined fo r su rvey, fo r which data a re p re sen te d in table 1. In com put­
ing r e la tiv e s a la ry le v e ls fo r each occupation by industry d ivision , the tota l em p loym en t in each w o rk le v e l in a ll in d u stries
su rveyed was used as a constant em p loym ent w eight, to elim in a te the e ffe c t o f d iffe re n c e s in the p ro p o rtio n o f em p loym en t in
va riou s w o rk le v e ls w ithin each occupation.
2 F o r scope o f study, see table in appendix A .
3 T ra n sp o rta tio n (lim ite d to ra ilr o a d , lo c a l and suburban p a ss en g e r, deep sea w a te r, and a ir tra n sp ortation in d u s tries ),
com m unication, e le c t r ic , gas, and sa n itary s e r v ic e s .
4 E n gin eerin g and a rc h ite c tu ra l s e r v ic e s ; and c o m m e rc ia lly o p erated r e s e a rc h , d evelopm en t, and testin g la b o r a to r ie s .
5 In su fficie n t em p loym ent in one or m o r e w ork le v e ls to w a rra n t sepa rate p resen ta tio n of data.




23
T a b le 7, D istribu tion o f 75 s e le c te d job c a te g o rie s studied
by em p loy ees a v e ra g e w eek ly h o u rs,1 w in te r 1961—62
N um ber o f job c a te g o r ie s
A vera ge
w eek ly hours 1

P r o fe s s io n a l,
a d m in is tra tiv e ,
and tech n ica l

Job c a teg o ry
C le r ic a l

A ll ca te g o rie s

56

19

38. 0

2

1

A ttorn ey s I and V II
C le rk s , file I

38. 5

6

6

A ttorn ey s II, III, IV , and V
A u d itors I and II
B ook keepin g-m ach in e o p era to rs I
C lerk s , file II and III
O ffic e boys o r g ir ls
Tabu latin g-m ach in e o p e ra to rs I
T y p ists I

12

39. 0

A tto rn ey s V I
A u d itors III and IV
Job analysts II
M a n a g ers, o ffic e s e r v ic e s III and IV
B ook keepin g-m ach in e o p era to rs II
C le rk s , accounting I and II
Keypunch o p era to rs I and II
S ten ogra ph ers, g e n e ra l
S ten ogra ph ers, sen ior
Sw itchboard o p era to rs
Sw itchboard o p e r a t o r s , sp ec ia l
Tabu latin g-m ach in e o p e ra to rs II and III
T y p ists II

39. 5

Accountants I, II, III, IV , and V
C hem ists I, II, III, IV , V, V I, V II, and VIH
C h ief accountants I, III, and IV
D ir e c to r s o f p e rson n el I, III, and IV
E n gin eers IV , V I, V II, and V III
E n gin eerin g tech nicians V
Job analysts I, III, and IV
M a n a g ers, o ffic e s e r v ic e s I and II
T ra ce rs

40. 0

tim e

30

12

C h ief accountants II
D ir e c to r s o f p e rson n el II
D raftsm en , ju n ior
D raftsm en , sen ior
E n gin eers I, II, III, and V
E n gin eerin g technicians I, II, III, and IV

1
sa la ry .




B ased on the scheduled w ork w eek fo r which em p loy ees r e c e iv e th eir r e g u la r stra ig h tThe a v e r a g e fo r each job c a teg o ry was rounded to the n e a res t h a lf hour.

24
T a b le 8.

P e r c e n t distrib u tion o f establishm ents 1 by fo rm a l sa la ry rate sy stem s c o v e rin g w h ite - c o lla r occupations, 2
by m a jo r industry d iv isio n s, and em ploym ent s iz e of establishm ent, w in ter 1961—
62

Indu stry d iv is io n and
em p loym en t s iz e o f
establish m en t

E stablishm ents w ithin
scope of su rvey

F o r m a l system s w ith esta b lish ed
pay g rad es c o v e r in g w h ite c o lla r occupations
L im ite d
covera ge 4

No fo rm a l system ,
o r system did not
p ro v id e pay grad es

N um ber

P ercen t

C om preh en sive
c o v e ra g e 3

12,343

100

38

14

48

9, 477

100

31

14

55

1,912
954

100
100

53
74

17
13

30
14

7, 942

100

38

14

48

6, 087

100

29

14

57

1,209
646

100
100

57
89

17
7

26
4

1,209

100

38

18

43

W h o lesa le t r a d e ---------------------------

628

100

47

19

35

R e ta il tra d e __________________________

1,443

100

18

11

71

F in an ce, insurance, and
r e a l e s ta t e __________________________

1,006

100

56

15

29

S e lected s e r v ic e s 6 __________________

115

100

69

11

20

A ll in d u stries _______________________
250 and under 1, 000
w o r k e r s _________________________
1, 000 and under 2, 500
w o rk e rs _________________________
2, 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e _________
M a n u fa c tu rin g -----------------------------250 and under 1, 000
w o r k e r s _________________________
1, 000 and under 2, 500
w o r k e r s -------------------------------2, 500 w o r k e r s or m o r e _________
P u b lic u tilitie s 5---------------------------

1 F o r scope o f su rvey, see table in appendix A .
2 Includes fo rm a l sa la ry plans p ro v id in g rate ranges (m inim um s and m axim u m s s p e c ifie d ) fo r a s e r ie s o f pay gra d es
o r pay c a te g o rie s into which at le a s t som e o f the w hite c o lla r occupations w e r e c la s s ifie d .
3 F o r m a l sy stem w ith esta b lish ed pay grad es a pplies to a ll, o r a lm o st a ll, w h ite - c o lla r occupations including c le r ic a l,
p r o fe s s io n a l, and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations.
4 F o r m a l system w ith esta b lish ed pay gra d es applies to som e w h ite - c o lla r occu pation s, but a sig n ifica n t group o r groups
o f such occupations w e r e not co vere d .
5 T ra n sp orta tion (lim ite d to r a ilr o a d , lo c a l and suburban p a ss en g e r, deep sea w a te r, and a ir tra n sp ortation in d u s tries ),
com m unication, e le c t r ic , gas, and sa n itary s e r v ic e s .
6 E n gin eerin g and a rc h ite c tu ra l s e r v ic e s ; and c o m m e rc ia lly o p erated r e s e a rc h , develop m en t, and testin g la b o r a to r ie s .
NO TE:

B ecau se o f rounding,




sums o f in d ividu al p ercen ta g es m ay not equal totals.

Appendix A: Scope and Method of Survey
Scope o f S u rvey
Th is su rv ey re la te s to a ll 188 Standard M e tro p o lita n S ta tis tic a l A r e a s in the United
States, excluding H aw aii, as r e v is e d through 1959 by the B ureau o f the Budget.
C o vera ge
w ithin those a rea s was lim ite d to establish m en ts in the fo llo w in g in d u stries: M anufacturing;
tra n sp o rta tio n , com m unication, e le c tr ic , gas, and sa n ita ry s e r v ic e s ; w h o lesa le trade; r e ta il
tra d e ; fin an ce, in su rance, and r e a l esta te; en gin eerin g and a rc h ite c tu ra l s e r v ic e s ; and c o m ­
m e r c ia lly o p era ted re s e a rc h , d evelop m en t, and testin g la b o ra to r ie s .
E stablish m en ts with
fe w e r than 250 w o rk e rs at the tim e o f r e fe r e n c e o f the u n iv e rs e data (in g e n era l, fir s t
q u a rter o f 1961) w e re excluded.
The estim a ted num ber o f establish m en ts and the tota l
em ploym en t w ithin the scope o f the su rvey, and w ithin the sam ple a ctu ally studied, a re
lis te d s e p a ra te ly fo r each m a jo r in du stry d iv is io n in the accom pan yin g table. A s indicated
in the table, and explained la te r in d eta il, the scope o f the study was the sam e fo r a ll o c c u ­
pation s; h o w eve r, the su rvey co n sisted o f two sep ara te p a rts, w ith one sam ple o f e s ta b lis h ­
m ents studied fo r the p r o fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occu pations, 14 and another la r g e r sam ple
fo r d ra ftin g and c le r ic a l occupations.

Establishments and workers within scope o f survey

1 and number studied by industry division, winter 1961—
62

Within scope
o f study 1
Industry division
Number of
establish­
ments

Workers in
establish­
ments

Studied for professional
and administrative
occupations
Number of
Workers in
establish­
establish­
ments
ments

Studied for drafting
and clerica l
occupations ^
Number o f
Workers in
establish­
establish­
ments
ments

A ll divisions s u rv e y e d ---- — ------- ------------------— -

12, 343

11, 961, 400

1,744

4, 363, 301

4,727

6,719,533

Manufacturing ----------------Nonmanufacturing:
Transportation, "^communication,
electric, gas, and sanitary services —— — - —
Wholesale trade
----- ---- R etail trade ---------------— ---- ------------ ------ Finance, insurance, and real estate — — - — •
Services:
Engineering and architectural
services; and com m ercially
operated research, developm ent,
and testing laboratories only — — ----- — —

7, 942

7, 684, 700

1, 169

2, 967, 194

2, 574

3, 867, 879

1, 209
628
1,443
1,006

1, 680,
300,
1, 392,
815,

100
100
300
700

208
50
140
129

699, 905
32, 128
319,037
279, 700

640
229
755
463

88, 500

48

65, 337

66

115

1, 219,
125,
934,
502,

287
100
597
803

69, 867

The study relates to establishments in industries listed em ploying 250 or more workers in the 188 Standard Metropolitan Sta­
tistical Areas in the United States (excluding H aw aii) as revised through 1959 by the Bureau o f the Budget.
The national estimates for the drafting and clerica l occupations were developed from data collected in the Bureau's occu­
pational wage surveys in major labor markets, excluding data for establishments not within the scope o f the survey as determined
for the study o f professional and administrative occupations.
3 Lim ited to railroad, lo c a l and suburban passenger, deep sea water (foreign and dom estic), and air transportation industries
as defined in the 1957 edition o f the Standard Industrial Classification Manual.

L

T im in g o f S u rvey
S a la ry and re la te d data fo r the p r o fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations w e r e c o l ­
le c te d by p e rs o n a l v is its to sam ple establish m en ts during the f i r s t h a lf o f 1962, la r g e ly
betw een F e b ru a ry 1 and M a y 15. The m o st re cen t in fo rm a tio n a v a ila b le at the tim e o f the
v is it was obtained.
F o r the d ra ftin g and c le r ic a l occupations, the su rv ey was design ed to

1 E n gin eerin g tech nician s a lso w e re included in this p a rt of the su rvey.
4




25

26
d ev elo p nationw ide estim a tes fr o m data c o lle c te d in the Bureau* s occu pation al w a ge su rveys
by la b o r m a rk et, conducted betw een August 1961 and June 1962. Although som e o f the a re a s
w e re su rv eyed in 1961, those su rveyed in the f i r s t h a lf of 1962 (w ith the a rea s they r e p r e ­
sented in the nationw ide e s tim a te s ) accounted fo r tw o -th ird s o f the o ffic e em ploym en t w ithin
the scope o f the su rv ey in a ll m e tro p o lita n a rea s com bined.
M ethod o f C o lle c tio n
Data w e r e ' obtained by p e rs o n a l v is its o f Bureau fie ld eco n om ists to re p re s e n ta tiv e
esta b lish m en ts w ithin the scope of the su rvey. 1
5 E m p lo y ees w e r e c la s s ifie d a cco rd in g to
occu pation and le v e l, with the a ssista n ce o f com pany o ffic ia ls , on the b a sis o f u n iform job
d efin itio n s.
In com parin g actual duties and re s p o n s ib ilitie s o f e m p lo y ees w ith those in the
su rv ey d e fin itio n s, ex ten s ive use was m ade of com pany occu pation al d e s c rip tio n s , o r g a n i­
za tio n ch a rts, and oth er p erso n n el r e c o r d s . The occu pation al d efin itio n s used in c la s s ify in g
e m p lo y ees appear in appendix C.
N a tu re of Data C o lle c te d and P r e s e n te d
The a v e r a g e s a la rie s re p o rte d re la te to the standard s a la r ie s that w e r e paid fo r
standard w o rk schedu les; i. e. , to the s tra ig h t-tim e s a la ry co rresp o n d in g to the em p loyee*s
n o rm a l w o rk schedule excluding o v e r tim e hours.
The a v e r a g e s a la r ie s p resen ted re la te to
em p lo y ees fo r whom s a la ry data w e r e a v a ila b le.
U nder esta b lish ed p o lic ie s o f som e com pan ies, o ffic ia ls w e r e not au th orized to p r o ­
v id e in fo rm a tio n re la tin g to s a la rie s fo r a ll occupations studied.
In n e a rly a ll in stan ces,
h o w eve r, in fo rm a tio n was p ro v id e d on the num ber o f such e m p lo y ees and the a p p ro p ria te
occu pation al c la s s ific a tio n .
It was thus p o s s ib le to estim a te the p ro p o rtio n o f e m p lo y ees
fo r whom s a la ry data w e re not a va ila b le .
A s in dicated below , th ese p o lic ie s m o r e often
re la te d to the h ig h er le v e l p o sitio n s, m a in ly becau se o f p o lic ie s not to d is c lo s e pay data
fo r em p loy ees co n s id ere d a p a rt o f the m an agem ent group o r c la s s ifie d in occu pation al le v e ls
in vo lv in g a sin gle em p loy ee.

Number o f
job
categories

Percent o f employees classified in professional
and administrative occupations surveyed for
whom salary data were not available

4

-----------------------------------------------------------------

10 or more percent
Directors of personnel IV (29. 9 percent)
Engineers V III (17. 3 percent)
Directors o f personnel III (16. 1 percent)
C h ief accountants IV (13. 9 percent)

7

----------------------------------------------------------------

5 to 9. 9 percent
C h ief accountants II and III
Attorneys V and V II
Engineers VII
Chemists V III
Directors of personnel I

37

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Less than 5 percent

C om p arison s betw een esta b lish m en ts that p ro v id e d s a la ry data fo r each s p e c ific o c ­
cupational le v e l and those not doing so in dicated that the two c la s s e s of esta b lish m en ts did
not d iffe r m a t e r ia lly in in d u stries re p res en ted , em ploym en t, o r pay stru ctu re fo r o th er jo b s
in this s e r ie s fo r w hich data w e r e a v a ila b le .

1
5
The su rveys in m a jo r la b o r m a rk ets, fr o m w hich nationw ide estim a tes w e r e
velo p ed fo r the d ra ftin g and c le r ic a l occu pations, p r o v id e fo r c o lle c tio n o f data fo r som e
a re a s by a com bin ation o f m a il and p e rs o n a l v is its in a ltern a te y e a r s .
F o r esta b lish m en ts
re p o rtin g by m a il, the occu pation al c la s s ific a tio n s a re based on those m ade on p e rs o n a l
v is its in the p revio u s y e a r .




de­

27
O ccu pational em ploym en t e s tim a tes r e la te to the to ta l in a ll establish m en ts w ithin
the scope o f the study and not the num ber a ctu ally su rveyed .
E m p lo y ees fo r whom s a la ry
data w e r e not a v a ila b le w e r e not taken into account in the e s tim a te s . 1 In addition, the p r o ­
6
fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations w e re lim ite d to e m p lo y ees m e etin g the s p e c ific
c r it e r ia in each su rv ey d efin itio n and w e re not intended to include a ll e m p lo y ees in each
fie ld o f w o r k .1
7 F o r th ese re a s o n s, and becau se o f d iffe r e n c e s in occu pation al stru ctu re
am ong establish m en ts, the e stim a tes o f occu pation al em p loym en t obtained fr o m the sam ple
o f establish m en ts studied s e r v e only to in dicate the r e la t iv e im p orta n ce o f the occupations
and le v e ls as defined fo r the su rv ey.
T h ese q u a lifica tio n s o f the em ploym en t estim a tes do
not m a t e r ia lly a ffe c t the a cc u ra c y o f the earn in gs data.

In the occupations su rveyed , both m en and w om en w e re c la s s ifie d and included in
the occu pation al em ploym en t and earn in gs e s tim a te s .
In the p r o fe s s io n a l, a d m in is tra tiv e ,
and tech n ica l occupations, one o r the oth er sex was s u ffic ie n tly predom in an t to p reclu d e
p resen ta tio n o f sep ara te data by sex. F o r those c le r ic a l occupations in which both m en and
w om en a re com m on ly em ployed, sep ara te data by sex a re a v a ila b le fr o m the occu pation al
w age su rv ey re p o rts by la b o r m a rk et a rea .
The occupations and w o rk le v e ls included in
this study and in which w om en accounted fo r 5 p ercen t o r m o re o f the em ploym en t w e re
d istrib u ted , a cco rd in g to the p ro p o rtio n o f w om en em p lo y ees, as fo llo w s :

Percent women

Occupation and le v e l

90 or m o r e -------------------------A ll levels o f bookkeeping-m achine operators; clerks, file ; keypunch
operators; stenographers; switchboard operators; typists
80 - 84 -------------------------- Clerks, accounting I
50 - 54 -------------------------- Clerks, accounting II; tabulating-m achine operators I
40 - 44 -------------------------- O ffic e boys or girls
30 - 34 -------------------------- Tabulating-m achine operators II; tracers
1 5 - 1 9 -------------------------- Chemists I; engineering technicians I; tabulating-m achine opera­
tors III
1 0 - 1 4 -------------------------- Accountants I; job analysts II; managers, o ffic e services I
5 - 9
-------------------------- Chemists II; job analysts I and III; managers, o ffic e services II and IV

Sam pling and E stim a tin g P r o c e d u re s
Although the published estim a tes r e la te to 188 Standard M e tro p o lita n S ta tis tic a l
A r e a s , as re v is e d by the B ureau o f the Budget through 1959, the su rv ey was conducted
a lm o st e n tir e ly w ithin a sam p le o f 80 a re a s . 1
8 W ithin th ese 80 a re a s , a sam ple o f e sta b ­
lish m en ts was chosen, so that the sam pling plan can be d e s c rib e d as a tw o -s ta g e design .

1 A ls o not taken into account w e re a fe w in stan ces in w hich although s a la ry data w e re
6
a va ila b le fo r em p lo y ees in an occupation, th e re was no s a tis fa c to r y basis fo r c la s s ify in g
such em p lo y ees by the a p p ro p ria te w ork le v e ls .
The occupations in vo lv ed in th ese ca ses
w e re accountants, en gin eers, and en gin eerin g tech nician s.
1 E n g in eers, fo r exam ple, a re defined to p e r m it c la s s ific a tio n o f em p lo y ees engaged
7
in en gin eerin g w o rk w ithin a band o f eight le v e ls , sta rtin g w ith in ex p erien ced en gin eerin g
gradu ates and exclu din g only those w ithin c e rta in fie ld s o f s p e c ia liz a tio n o r in p o sition s
above those c o v e r e d by le v e l V III.
By w ay o f con trast, such occupations as c h ie f accou nt­
ants and d ir e c to r s o f p ers o n n e l a re defin ed to include only those w ith re s p o n s ib ility fo r a
s p e c ifie d p r o g ra m and w ith duties and re s p o n s ib ilitie s as in dicated fo r each o f the m o re
lim ite d num ber o f w o rk le v e ls s e le c te d fo r study.
1 In a fe w in stan ces, establish m en ts outside the 80 a re a s but w ithin the 188 a rea s
8
w e r e added to the sam p le in c e rta in in d u stries when it w as not p o s s ib le to obtain w ithin
the sam pled a re a a re p re s e n ta tiv e esta b lish m en t fo r the stratu m .
662594 0

-

62-5




28

The sam ple o f 80 a rea s was based upon the s e le c tio n o f 1 a re a fr o m a stratu m o f
s im ila r a re a s .
The c r it e r ia o f s tra tific a tio n w e r e re g io n and type o f in d u s tria l a c tiv ity .
Each a re a had a chance o f s e le c tio n rou gh ly p ro p o rtio n a te to its to ta l n o n a gric u ltu ra l e m ­
p loym en t.
Each o f the 35 la r g e s t a rea s fo rm e d a stratum by it s e lf, and w as c e rta in o f
in clu sion in the sam ple.
Each o f th ese a rea s re p res en ted only it s e lf, but each o f the 45 other
a re a s re p re s e n te d it s e lf and s im ila r units.
The d esign used in the se le c tio n of the establish m en ts studied fo r the p r o fe s s io n a l
and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations d iffe r e d fr o m that used in the d ra ftin g and c le r ic a l o ccu p a ­
tion s.
A s explained e a r lie r , data fo r the la tte r occupations w e r e c o lle c te d in the B u reau 's
p r o g ra m o f occu pation al w age su rveys conducted in the 80 a re a s .
The esta b lish m en ts in
those su rveys w e r e chosen to p ro v id e sep ara te a re a e stim a tes , w ith in du stry d iv is io n d eta il,
w h ile the design fo r the su rvey o f p r o fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations was intended
to y ie ld only nationw ide data w ith no in d u stria l breakdown, and hence re q u ire d fe w e r
esta b lish m en ts.
In the ca se o f d raftin g and c le r ic a l occupations, each esta b lish m en t sam ple w ithin
the a re a was s e le c te d independently to p e r m it the p resen ta tio n o f sep a ra te data fo r that
a rea .
T h ese sa m p les w e re s e le c te d fr o m a lis t o f establish m en ts s tra tifie d by s iz e (e m ­
p loym en t) and in du stry.
A g r e a t e r p ro p o rtio n o f the la r g e establish m en ts was s ele cted , but
in com bining the data each esta b lish m en t was g iv en its a p p ro p ria te w eigh t— i. e. , w h ere an
esta b lish m en t was chosen as one o f fo u r, it was given a w eigh t o f fou r.
N a tion w id e estim a tes fo r the d raftin g and c le r ic a l occupations in 4, 700 e s ta b lis h ­
m ents w e r e fo rm e d by applying to each set o f data the w eigh ts needed to expand these into
estim a tes fo r the stratu m re p re s e n te d by the sam ple a re a , and then com bining these stratum
e stim a tes .
In the ca se o f the 35 la r g e s e lf- r e p r e s e n tin g a re a s , th ese w eigh ts w e re one.
In each o f the 45 s m a lle r a re a s , the w eigh t was the ra tio o f the to ta l n o n a gric u ltu ra l e m ­
p loym en t in the stratu m to that in the sam ple a rea .
In the study o f p r o fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occu pation s, the sam pling p ro c e d u re
ca lle d fo r the d eta iled s tra tific a tio n o f the u n iv erse o f 188 a re a s by in du stry and s iz e of
establish m en t.
W h ere one o f s e v e r a l a rea s was s e le c te d fo r study to re p re s e n t a stratu m
o f s e v e r a l a re a s , an estim a te of the u n iv erse fo r that stratu m was d e r iv e d by w eigh tin g
the in du stry and s iz e -o f-e s ta b lis h m e n t em ploym en t totals in the sam p le a re a by the w eigh t
used in the la r g e r su rv ey d e s c rib e d in the p reced in g para gra p h . F r o m this estim a ted u n i­
v e r s e , a sam ple o f a p p ro x im a tely 1, 750 establish m en ts was s e le c te d s y s te m a tic a lly so that
each ge og ra p h ic unit was re p re s e n te d p ro p o rtio n a te ly w ithin the s iz e -o f-e s ta b lis h m e n t and
in du stry c la s s e s . 1 * Although no consciou s e ffo r t was m ade to c o n tro l the re p res en ta tio n
9
fo r each a re a through a ll the in d u stries, a count shows that each a re a contribu tes n e a rly
its p ro p o rtio n a te sh are to the w hole sam ple.
Each in du stry was sam pled s ep a ra te ly , the sam pling ra tes depending on the i m ­
p o rta n ce o f the in du stry as an em p lo y e r o f the job s su rveyed , p a r tic u la r ly in the s c ie n tific
and en gin eerin g s e r ie s .
W ithin each industry, a g r e a t e r p ro p o rtio n o f la r g e establish m en ts
was s e le cted , but as in the c le r ic a l su rv eys, each establish m en t was w eigh ted to re p re s e n t
a ll o th er units o f the sam e cla ss.
E stim a tes o f Sam pling E r r o r
The su rv ey p ro c e d u re y ie ld s estim a tes with w id e ly v a ry in g sam pling e r r o r s , d e ­
pending on the freq u e n cy with which the jo b o ccu rs, and the d is p e rs io n o f s a la ry s ca les ,
Thus, fo r en gin eers III, the r e la tiv e standard e r r o r o f the a v e r a g e s a la ry is 0. 4 p ercen t,
w h erea s fo r ch em ists V III, it is 3. 3 p ercen t.
M o st o f the r e la t iv e e r r o r s a re le s s than
2. 0 p e rc e n t fo r the p r o fe s s io n a l and a d m in is tra tiv e occupations.
The nationw ide estim a tes
fo r the c le r ic a l and d ra ftin g -ro o m occupations, based on the much la r g e r sam ple, a re sub­
je c t to s m a lle r sam pling e r r o r --- le s s than 0.75 p e rc e n t in a ll ca ses and in m any ca ses le s s
than 0. 25 p ercen t.

1 A fe w o f the la r g e s t e m p lo y e rs , to g eth e r em p loyin g n e a rly a m illio n , gave data on
9
a com panyw ide b a sis.
T h ese com pan ies w e re elim in a ted fr o m the u n iv e rs e to which the
p re c e d in g sam pling p ro ce d u re applied.
The sam p le count in clu des the establish m en ts o f
th ese com pan ies w ithin the 188 m e tro p o lita n a rea s.




Appendix B: Survey Changes in 1961—62
The 1961-62 national su rv ey o f p r o fe s s io n a l, a d m in is tra tiv e , tech n ic a l, and c l e r i ­
ca l pay was the sam e in n e a rly a ll re s p e c ts as the 1960-61 su rv e y . 2
0 The in d u stria l and
ge o g ra p h ic scope was the sam e in both s u rv e y s , and the d efin itio n s used in c la s s ify in g e m ­
p lo y e e s a lso w e r e id e n tic a l fo r m o st o f the occupations and w o rk le v e ls c o v e r e d in both
p e r io d s . Changes in the occu pation al d efin ition s w hicji a ffe c te d s u r v e y - t o - s u r v e y co m p a ra ­
b ilit y o f data in vo lv ed two le v e ls o f c h ie f accountants and th ree o f the o ffic e c le r ic a l occu ­
pation s, as explained b elo w .
An en gin eerin g tech n ician s e r ie s , d efin ed in fiv e le v e ls , was
in trod u ced in the 1961-62 su rvey.

Changes in O ccupational D efin ition s

C h ief accountant. — T o fa c ilita te c la s s ific a tio n o f e m p lo y ees by le v e l o f w o rk , the
fa c to rs to be co n sid ered in d eterm in in g le v e ls w e r e a rra n g e d in tabu lar fo rm . (See p. 36. )
In addition, the d efin itio n fo r le v e l II w as r e v is e d to include a th ird a lte rn a tiv e set o f fa c to rs 2
1
to p e r m it c la s s ify in g c h ief accountants re sp o n sib le fo r the accounting p r o g ra m o f a com pany
at this le v e l in som e situations ra th er than at le v e l III.
T h is change re su lte d in m o re ap­
p r o p r ia te c la s s ific a tio n o f som e em p lo y ees in le v e l II who w e r e p r e v io u s ly om itted o r c la s ­
s ifie d in le v e l III and, th e r e fo r e , a ffe c te d the s u r v e y - to - s u r v e y c o m p a ra b ility o f the data
fo r the two le v e ls .

A tto r n e y . — Changes in this s e r ie s w e r e confined to the Rom an n u m era l le v e l d e s ­
ign ation s, as fo llo w s :

1961-62 le v e l d e s ig n a tio n s ____________

I II

III

IV

V

VI

V II

1960-61 co rresp o n d in g le v e ls ________

I II

III

IIIA

IV

IV A

V

F ile c le r k . — The d efin itio n w as r e v is e d to sep a ra te these w o r k e r s into th ree w o rk
le v e l c a te g o rie s in stead o f two.
L e v e ls design ated by Rom an n u m era ls I and II in the p r e ­
viou s s u rv ey , th e r e fo r e , a re not co m p a rab le w ith the co rresp o n d in g le v e l design ations as
defin ed fo r the 1961-62 su rvey.

Keypunch o p e r a to r . — The d efin itio n w as re v is e d to sep a ra te these w o r k e r s into two
w o rk le v e l c a te g o rie s in stead o f a sin gle c a te g o ry .

S te n o g ra p h e r.— The p revio u s d efin ition s sep ara ted these e m p lo y ees into two c a te ­
g o r ie s — g e n e ra l sten og ra p h ers and tech n ical sten ogra p h ers.
T h ese d efin itio n s w e r e r e v is e d
to com bine g e n e ra l sten ogra p h ers p e r fo rm in g the m o re re s p o n s ib le duties with tech n ica l
sten ogra p h ers into a new se n io r sten ogra p h er c a te g o ry ; o th er g e n e r a l sten ograph ers w e re
reta in ed in the o r ig in a l c la s s ific a tio n .

2 M a jo r changes w e r e m ade betw een the in itia l (1959-60) and the 1960-61 su rv ey. F o r
0
a su m m ary o f th ese changes, see appendix B of N a tion a l S u rvey o f P r o fe s s io n a l, A d m in is ­
tr a tiv e , T ec h n ica l, and C le r ic a l P a y , W in ter 1960-61, B L S B u lletin 1310, 1961.
2 See th ird a lte rn a tiv e in the d efin itio n fo r ch ief accountant II in appendix C.
1




29




Appendix C: Occupational Definitions
Th e p r im a r y pu rpose of p re p a rin g job d efin itio n s fo r the
B u rea u ’ s w age su rveys is to a s s is t its fie ld s ta ff in c la s s ify in g into
a p p rop ria te occupations or le v e ls w ithin occu pations, w o r k e r s who
a re em ployed under a v a r ie ty o f p a y r o ll title s and d iffe re n t w ork
a rran gem en ts fr o m esta b lish m en t to esta b lish m en t and fr o m a re a
to a re a .
T h is is e s s e n tia l in o rd e r to p e r m it the grou pin g o f o c ­
cupational w age ra tes re p re s e n tin g com p a rab le jo b content. T o secu re
co m p a ra b ility o f job content,
som e occupations and w o rk le v e ls
a re defined to include only those w o rk e rs m e e tin g s p e c ific c r it e r ia
as to tra in in g , jo b functions, and re s p o n s ib ilitie s .
B ecau se o f
this em phasis on in te resta b lish m e n t and in te r a r e a c o m p a ra b ility o f
occu pation al content, the B u rea u ’ s occu pational d efin itio n s m a y d iffe r
s ig n ific a n tly fr o m those in use in in dividu al esta b lish m en ts or those
p re p a re d fo r oth er p u rp oses.
A ls o see note r e fe r r in g to the d e f­
in ition s fo r the d ra ftin g and c le r ic a l occupations on page 54.

ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS
ACCO UNTANT

P e r fo r m s accounting w o rk re q u irin g p r o fe s s io n a l kn ow ledge o f the th e o ry and p r a c ­
tic e o f re c o rd in g , c la s s ify in g , exam in ing, and a n a lyzin g the data and r e c o r d s o f fin a n cia l
tra n sa ction s.
P e r s o n a lly o r by su p ervisin g oth ers p ro v id e s accounting s e r v ic e to m a n a g e­
m ent by m ain tain in g the books o f account, accu m u lating co st o r oth er s im ila r data, p r e ­
p a rin g re p o rts and statem en ts, and m aintaining the accounting sy stem by in te rp re tin g ,
supplem enting, and r e v is in g the sy stem as n e c e s s a ry .
The w o rk re q u ir e s a p r o fe s s io n a l
know ledge o f accounting and a b a c h e lo r's d e g re e in accounting o r equ ivalen t e x p e rie n c e
and education com bin ed.
(S ee a lso c h ie f accou ntan t.)

A ccountant I

G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s . — A t this beginning p r o fe s s io n a l le v e l, p o sition is d is tin ­
guished fr o m n o n p ro fes sio n a l position s by the v a r ie t y o f a ssign m en ts; ra te and scope o f
d evelop m en t ex p ected o f the incum bent; and the ex isten ce, im p lic it o r e x p lic it, o f a planned
tra in in g p ro g ra m d esign ed to g iv e the beginning accountant p r a c tic a l e x p e rie n c e in the
o p era tio n s o f an esta b lish ed accounting system .
L e a rn s to ap p ly the p r in c ip le s , th e o rie s ,
and concepts o f accounting to a p a rtic u la r accounting sy stem .
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d . — W orks under c lo s e su p ervisio n o f an e x p e rie n c e d accountant.
The guidance and s u p e rv is io n r e c e iv e d a re d ir e c te d p r im a r ily to the develop m en t o f the
accou ntan t's p r o fe s s io n a l a b ility and to the evalu ation o f his p oten tia l fo r advancem ent.
L im it s o f assign m en ts a re c le a r ly defined, m ethods o f p ro ce d u re a re s p e c ifie d , kinds o f
ite m s to be noted and r e fe r r e d to s u p e rv is o r a re d eta iled .
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s . — Many o f the a ssign m en ts w ill include duties
som e o f w hich m a y be n o n p ro fession a l in nature such as p ro v in g a rith m e tic a l a ccu ra cy;
exam in ing standard accounting docum ents fo r co m p le te n es s, in te rn a l a ccu ra cy , and co n ­
fo rm a n c e w ith s p e c ific accounting re q u irem en ts; tra c in g and re c o n c ilin g re c o r d s o f f i ­
n an cial tra n sa ction s; and p re p a rin g d e ta iled statem en ts and sch edu les fo r re p o r ts .
The
p re s e n c e o f such n o n p ro fession a l tasks, p ro vid ed they a re p a rt o f the tra in in g and d e ­
velo p m en t p r o c e s s , do not p reven t the m atching o f a jo b i f it o th e rw is e m e ets this defin ition .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r d ir e c tio n o f o th e r s . — U su a lly none.




31

32

A C C O U N T A N T — Continued

Accountant II

G en era l c h a r a c t e r is t ic s . — A t this continuing d evelop m en ta l le v e l the p r o fe s s io n a l
accountant m akes p r a c tic a l application s o f tech n ical accounting p r a c tic e s and concepts b e ­
yond the m e r e a p p lica tion o f d eta iled ru les and in stru ction s.
A ssig n m en ts a re design ed
to expand his p r a c tic a l e x p e rie n c e and to d evelop his p r o fe s s io n a l judgm ent in the a p p lica tio n
o f basic accounting techniques to sim p le p r o fe s s io n a l p ro b le m s .
He is ex p ected to be c o m ­
petent in the a p p lica tio n o f standard p roced u res and re q u irem en ts to routine tra n sa ction s,
and to r a is e qu estions about unusual o r qu estion able item s and su ggest solu tion s.

D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d . — W ork is r e v ie w e d c lo s e ly to v e r i f y its g e n e ra l a c c u ra c y and
c o v e r a g e o f unusual p ro b le m s , to in su re con form a n ce w ith re q u ire d p ro ce d u res and s p e c ia l
in stru ction s, and to in su re his p r o fe s s io n a l grow th .
H is p r o g r e s s is evalu ated in te rm s
o f his a b ility to a pply his p r o fe s s io n a l know ledge to b a sic accounting p ro b le m s in the
d a y -to -d a y op era tio n s o f an esta b lish ed accounting sy stem .

T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s . — P r e p a r e s routine w ork in g p a p ers, sch edu les,
exh ib its, and su m m a ries in d ica tin g the extent o f his exam in ation and d evelop in g and sup­
p ortin g his fin din gs and recom m en d a tion s.
This in clu des the exam in ation o f a v a r ie t y o f
accounting docum ents to v e r i f y a ccu ra cy o f com putations and to a s c e r ta in that a ll tr a n s ­
action s a re p r o p e r ly supported, a re in a ccord a n ce w ith pertin en t regu la tio n s, and a re
c la s s ifie d and re c o r d e d a cco rd in g to accep ta b le accounting standards.

R e s p o n s ib ility fo r
fe w c le r k s .

d ir e c tio n

o f o th e r s . — U su a lly none,

although m a y

su p e rv is e

a

Accountant III

G en era l c h a r a c t e r is t ic s . — P e r fo r m s p r o fe s s io n a l o p era tin g o r co st accounting w ork
re q u ir in g the sta n d ard ized a p p lica tio n o f w e ll esta b lish ed accounting p r in c ip le s , th e o r ie s ,
con cepts, and p r a c tic e s .
R e c e iv e s d eta iled in stru ction s co n cern in g the o v e r a ll accounting
s y stem and its o b je c tiv e s , the p o lic ie s and p ro ce d u res under w hich it is o p era ted , and the
nature o f changes in the sy stem o r its op era tion .

D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d . — A p r o fe s s io n a l accountant at h igh er le v e l n o r m a lly is a v a ila b le
to fu rn ish a d vice and a ssista n ce as needed.
W ork is exam in ed fo r tech n ic a l a ccu ra cy ,
adequacy o f p r o fe s s io n a l judgm ent, and co m p lia n ce w ith in stru ction s through spot ch ecks,
a p p ra is a l o f re s u lts , subsequent p ro c e s s in g , a n a lysis o f re p o r ts and statem en ts, and o th er
a p p ro p ria te m eans.

T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s . — The p r im a r y r e s p o n s ib ility o f m o st p o sition s
at this le v e l is to in su re that the d a y -to -d a y o p era tio n s o f the segm en t o r sy stem a re
c a r r ie d out in a cco rd a n ce w ith accounting p rin c ip le s and the p o lic ie s and o b je c tiv e s o f
the accounting sy stem .
W ithin lim its o f d elega ted re s p o n s ib ility , the accountant m akes
the d a y -to -d a y d ec isio n s co n cern in g the accounting trea tm e n t o f fin a n cia l tra n sa ctio n s.
He is ex p ected to re co m m en d solutions to co m p le x p ro b le m s and p rop o se changes in the
accou nting sy stem , but he has no a u th ority to effectu ate th ese solutions o r changes.
H is
solutions a re d e r iv e d fr o m his own know ledge o f the a p p lica tio n o f w e ll-e s ta b lis h e d p r in ­
c ip le s and p r a c tic e s o r by r e fe r r in g the p rob lem to his s u p e rio r fo r solution.

R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n o f o th e r s . — In m o st
a subordinate n o n p ro fes sio n a l sta ff.



in stan ces d ir e c ts the w o rk o f

33
A C C O U N T A N T — Continued

Accountant IV

G en era l c h a r a c t e r ic tic s . — P e r fo r m s p r o fe s s io n a l o p era tin g o r co st accounting w ork
w hich re q u ir e s the a p p lica tio n o f w e ll esta b lish ed accounting p r in c ip le s , th e o rie s , concepts
and p ra c tic e s to a w ide v a r ie t y o f d iffic u lt p ro b le m s .
R e c e iv e s in stru ction s co n cern in g
the o b je c tiv e s and o p era tio n s o f the o v e r a ll accounting sy stem .
A t this le v e l, co m p a red
w ith le v e l III, the tech n ica l accounting p rob lem s a re m o re d iffic u lt and a g r e a te r d e g re e
o f co ord in a tio n am ong m o re num erous types o f accounting r e c o r d s and o p era tion s m a y be
e s s e n tia l.

D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d . — A n accountant at h igh er le v e l n o r m a lly is a v a ila b le to fu rn ish
a d v ic e and a ssista n ce as needed.
W ork is r e v ie w e d fo r adequ acy o f p r o fe s s io n a l judgm ent,
com p lia n ce w ith in stru ction s, and o v e r a ll a c c u ra c y and q u a lity by spot checks and a p p ra is a l
o f re s u lts .

T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s . — A s at le v e l III, a p r im a r y c h a r a c te r is tic o f
m o st p o sition s at this le v e l is the re s p o n s ib ility o f o p era tin g an accounting sy stem o r s e g ­
m ent in the intended m an ner.
M akes d a y -to -d a y d ec isio n s co n cern in g the accounting t r e a t ­
m ent o f fin a n cia l tra n sa ctio n s.
He is ex p ected to re co m m en d solutions to c o m p le x p rob le m s
beyond the scope o f his re s p o n s ib ility and to p rop o se changes in the accounting sy stem ,
but he has no a u th ority to act indepen den tly on these p ro b le m s .

R e s p o n s ib ility fo r d ir e c tio n
inclu de p r o fe s s io n a l accountants.

o f o th e r s . — A ccou ntin g

s ta ff su p ervised ,

i f any,

m ay

Accountant V

G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s . — P e r fo r m s p r o fe s s io n a l o p era tin g o r co st accounting w o rk
re q u ir in g the a p p lica tio n o f accounting p rin c ip le s and p r a c tic e s to the solu tion o f v e r y d i f ­
fic u lt p ro b le m s fo r w hich no c le a r p reced en ts ex is t, or to the d evelop m en t o r exten sion
o f th e o rie s and p r a c tic e s to p ro b le m s to w hich they have not been a p p lied p r e v io u s ly .
A ls o
at this le v e l a re position s having m o re than a v e ra g e r e s p o n s ib ility becau se o f the nature,
m agnitude, o r im p a ct o f the a ssig n ed w ork .

Is m o re d ir e c t ly co n cern ed w ith what the sy stem o r segm en t should be, what
o p era tin g accounting p o lic ie s and p ro ce d u res should be esta b lish ed o r r e v is e d , and the
m eaning o f the data in the re p o rts and statem ents fo r w hich he is re s p o n s ib le .

D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d . — A n accountant at h igh er le v e l n o r m a lly is a v a ila b le to fu rn ish
a d vice and a s s ista n ce as needed.
W ork is r e v ie w e d fo r adequ acy o f p r o fe s s io n a l judgm ent,
com p lia n ce w ith in stru ctio n s, and o v e r a ll qu ality.

T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s . — In addition to in su rin g that the sy stem o r
segm en t is o p era ted as intended, is d eep ly in v o lv e d in the fundam ental and c o m p le x te c h ­
n ica l and m a n a g e ria l p ro b le m s .

R e s p o n s ib ility fo r d ir e c tio n o f o th e r s . — A ccou ntin g s ta ff su p ervised , i f any,
p r o fe s s io n a l accountants.



in clu des

34

A U D IT O R

A u dits the fin a n c ia l re c o r d s o f a com pany o r d iv is io n s o r com ponents o f the c o m ­
pany, to a p p ra is e s y s te m a tic a lly and v e r i f y the accounting a c c u ra c y o f the r e c o r d s and
r e p o r ts .
T o the extent d eterm in ed n e c e s s a r y ,
exam in es the tra n sa ction s e n terin g into
the balance sheet and the tra n sa ction s en terin g into in com e, expen se, and co st accounts.
D e term in es ( l ) the ex is te n c e o f re c o r d e d a ssets (in clu din g the o b s e rv a tio n o f the taking
o f p h ysica l in v e n to rie s ) and the a ll in clu siven ess o f r e c o r d e d lia b ilit ie s ; (2) the a c c u ra c y
o f fin a n cia l statem en ts o r re p o r ts and the fa irn e s s o f p resen ta tio n o f fa cts th erein ; (3) the
p r o p r ie ty o r le g a lit y o f tra n sa ction s; and (4) the d e g re e o f co m p lia n ce w ith esta b lish ed
p o lic ie s and p ro ce d u res co n cern in g fin a n cia l tra n sa ction s.
E valu ates the adequ acy o f the
accounting s y stem and in te rn a l fin a n cia l co n tro l.
M akes a p p ro p ria te recom m en d a tion s
fo r im p ro v e m e n t as n e c e s s a r y .
(W o rk ty p ic a lly re q u ir e s a b a c h e lo r's d e g re e in accounting
o r equ ivalen t e x p e rie n c e and education c o m b in e d .)

E xclu ded fr o m the d efin itio n a re position s w hich c a ll fo r auditing duties w hich m a y
re q u ir e d eta ile d kn ow led ge o f the o p era tion s o f a p a rtic u la r com pany, but do not re q u ir e
fu ll p r o fe s s io n a l accounting tra in in g .
F o r exam ple, when the p r im a r y r e s p o n s ib ility o f the
p o sition is to ch eck tra n sa ction s to d eterm in e w hether o r not they c o n fo rm to p r e s c r ib e d
rou tines o r p ro ce d u res, it is excluded.

A u d itor I

A s a tra in e e au ditor at the en terin g p r o fe s s io n a l le v e l, p e r fo rm s a v a r ie t y o f ro u ­
tine assign m en ts under the c lo s e s u p ervisio n o f an e x p e rie n c e d au ditor.

A u d itor II

Th is is the continuing develop m en tal le v e l fo r the p r o fe s s io n a l au ditor.
A s a ju n io r
m e m b e r o f an audit tea m , in dependently p e r fo rm s a ssig n ed portion s o f the audit exam in ation
w hich a re lim ite d in scope and co m p le x ity , such as p h y s ic a lly counting to v e r i f y in v e n to ry
ite m s , checking a ssig n ed su b sid ia ry le d g e r accounts a ga in st supporting b ills o r vo u ch e rs,
ch eckin g and balancing v a rio u s su b sid ia ry le d g e r s again st c o n tro l accounts, o r o th er s im ila r
duties design ed to h elp the tea m le a d e r check, v e r ify , or p ro ve the accounting e n trie s .
R e s p o n s ib ility extends only to the v e r ific a t io n o f a c c u ra c y o f com putations and the d e t e r ­
m in a tion that a ll tra n sa ction s a re p r o p e r ly supported.
A n y tech n ica l p ro b le m s not c o v e r e d
by in stru ction s a re brought to the attention o f a s u p e rio r.

A u d ito r III 1

(1)
A s au ditor in ch a rge o f an audit tea m o r in ch a rge o f in dividu al audits,
pendently conducts r e g u la r r e c u rrin g audits in a cco rd a n ce w ith a p r e s c r ib e d audit p o lic y
o f the accounts o f s m a lle r o r le s s co m p le x com pan ies having g ro s s in com e up to a p p r o x i­
m a te ly $3 m illio n p er y e a r , o r s im ila r s iz e branch o r su b sid ia ry o rga n iza tio n s o f la r g e r
com p a n ies.
U nder m in im u m su p ervisio n , eith er w ork in g alon e, o r w ith the a ssista n ce o f
one o r two su bordinate a u d itors, exam in es tra n sa ction s and v e r ifie s accounts; o b s e r v e s
and evalu ates lo c a l accounting p ro ce d u res and in te rn a l co n tro ls; p re p a re s audit w ork in g
papers and subm its an audit r e p o r t in the re q u ire d pattern containing recom m en d a tion s
fo r needed changes o r im p ro v e m e n ts , o r (2) as a m e m b er o f an audit team auditing a
la r g e r and m o re c o m p le x o rg a n iza tio n (a p p ro x im a te ly $ 4 to $25 m illio n g ro s s in com e p er
y e a r ), in depen den tly p e r fo r m s the audit exam in ation o f a m a jo r segm en t o f the audit such
as the ch eckin g, v e r ific a tio n , and balancing o f a ll accounts re c e iv a b le and accounts payable,
the a n a ly sis and v e r ific a t io n o f a ssets and r e s e r v e s , o r the in sp ectio n and the evalu ation
o f co n tro ls and p r o c e d u re s .



in d e ­

35
A U D IT O R — Continued
A u d ito r IV
(1) A s au ditor in ch a rge o f an audit tea m o r o f in d ivid u a l audits under m in im u m
s u p e rv is io n w ith the a s sista n ce o f a p p ro x im a te ly fiv e subordinate a u d itors, independently
conducts re g u la r r e c u rrin g audits o f a com pany having g r o s s in com e o f a p p ro x im a tely $ 4 to
$25 m illio n per y e a r o£ in com pan ies with much la r g e r g r o s s in co m es, audits o f a c ­
counts o f branch o r su b sid ia ry o rga n iza tio n s o f those com pan ies each o f w hich have g ro s s
in com e o f $4 to $25 m illio n p e r y e a r .
Plan s and conducts the audit and p re p a re s an
audit r e p o r t containing re com m en d a tion s fo r changes o r im p ro v e m e n ts in accounting p r a c ­
tic e s , p ro ce d u res, o r p o lic ie s ; o r (2) as a m e m b er o f an audit tea m auditing the accounts
o f a la r g e r and m o re co m p le x o rg a n iz a tio n (o v e r $30 m illio n g r o s s in com e p er y e a r ), is
a ssig n ed r e la t iv e ly independent re s p o n s ib ility fo r a m a jo r segm en t o f the audit such as the
ch eckin g, v e r ific a tio n , and balancing o f a ll accounts re c e iv a b le and accounts payable, the
a n a ly sis and v e r ific a t io n o f a ssets and r e s e r v e s , o r the in sp ectio n and evalu ation o f co n ­
tr o ls and p ro ce d u res.

C H IE F A C C O U N T A N T

R esp on sib le fo r d ir e c tin g the accounting p ro g ra m fo r a com pany o r fo r an e s ­
ta b lish m en t o f a com pany.
The m in im u m accounting p r o g ra m includes:
( l ) G en era l a c ­
counting (a s s e ts , lia b ilit ie s , in com e, expense, and ca p ita l accounts, including re s p o n s ib ility
fo r p r o fit and lo s s and balance sheet statem en ts); and (2) w ith at le a s t one oth er m a jo r
accounting a c tiv ity , ty p ic a lly tax accounting, co st accounting, p r o p e rty accounting, o r sa les
accounting. It m a y a lso include such oth er a c tiv itie s as p a y r o ll and tim ek eep in g, tabulating
m achine o p era tion , etc.
(R e s p o n s ib ility fo r an in te rn a l audit p ro g ra m is ty p ic a lly not
in clu d ed .)

The r e s p o n s ib ilitie s o f the c h ie f accountant include a ll o f the fo llow in g:
(1)

D evelop in g, adapting,
the o rg a n iza tio n .

o r r e v is in g an accounting

s y s te m to m e et the needs o f

(2)

S u p ervisin g, e ith e r d ir e c t ly o r through subordinate s u p e r v is o rs , the o p era tio n
o f the sy stem w ith fu ll m anagem ent r e s p o n s ib ility fo r the q u a lity and quantity
o f w ork p e r fo rm e d , tra in in g and d evelop m en t o f su bordin ates, w ork scheduling
and r e v ie w , co ord in a tio n with oth er p a rts o f the o rg a n iz a tio n s e rv e d , etc.

(3)

P r o v id in g a d v is o r y s e r v ic e s to the top m an agem ent o ffic ia ls o f the o rg a n iz a tio n
s e r v e d as to:
(a)

The status o f fin a n cia l re s o u r c e s and the fin a n cia l tren ds o r re su lts
o p era tio n s in a m anner that is m ean in gfu l to m anagem ent.

(b)

M ethods fo r im p ro v in g o p era tion s as su ggested by his ex p ert know ledge
o f the fin a n cia l situation, e . g . , p ro p o sa ls fo r im p ro v in g co st co n tro l,
p r o p e rty m anagem ent, c r e d it and c o lle c tio n ,
tax redu ction , o r s im ila r
p rog ra m s.

D efin itio n does
i f they a lso include (as
u rem en t; o rga n iza tio n ,
is ty p ic a l o f position s
fin a n cia l m a n a ger, etc.

of

not c o v e r position s w ith re s p o n s ib ility fo r the accounting p ro g ra m
a m a jo r pa rt o f the job) r e s p o n s ib ility fo r budgeting; w ork m e a s ­
m ethods, o r p roced u res studies, o r s im ila r fu nctions.
Such w ork
s o m etim es title d as c o m p tr o lle r , budget and accounting m an ager,

C h ie f accountant jobs which m e e t the
w o rk in a cco rd a n ce w ith the fo llo w in g :

above

d efin itio n a re

c la s s ifie d by l e v e l 2 o f
2

2 In su ffic ien t data w e r e obtained fo r le v e l V to w a rra n t p resen ta tio n o f a v e r a g e s a la rie s .
2
662594 0

-

62-6




36

C H IE F A C C O U N T A N T — Continued

C las s

A u th o rity
and
re s p o n s ib ility

(M

T e c h n ic a l
c o m p le x ity

(*)

Subordinate s ta ff o f p r o fe s s io n a l accountants in
the sy stem fo r w hich he is r e s p o n s ib le .1
2

I

A R -1

T C -1

Only one or two p r o fe s s io n a l accountants, who
do not ex ceed the accountant II I job defin ition .

II

A R -1

T C -2

About 5 to 10 p r o fe s s io n a l accountants, w ith at
le a s t one o r two m atch in g the accountant IV
jo b d efin itio n .

A R -2

T C -1

About 5 to 10 p r o fe s s io n a l accountants. M ost
o f these m atch the accountant III jo b d efin itio n ,
but one o r two m a y m atch the accountant IV
jo b d efin itio n .

A R -3

T C -1

O nly one o r two p r o fe s s io n a l accountants, who
do not ex ceed the accountant IV jo b d efin itio n .

A R -1

T C -3

About 15 to 20 p r o fe s s io n a l accountants.
At
le a s t one o r two m atch the accountant V jo b
d efin itio n .

A R -2

T C -2

About 15 to 20 p r o fe s s io n a l accountants. M any
o f these m atch the accountant IV jo b d efin itio n ,
but som e m ay m atch the accountant V job
d efin ition .

A R -3

T C -1

About 5
o f these
but one
countant

A R -2

T C -3

About 25 to 40 p r o fe s s io n a l accountants. Many
o f these m atch the accountant V jo b d efin itio n ,
but s e v e r a l m a y ex ceed that le v e l.

A R -3

T C -2

About 15 to 20 p r o fe s s io n a l accountants. M ost
o f these m atch the accountant IV jo b d efin itio n ,
but s e v e r a l m ay m atch accountant V and one
or two m ay ex ceed that le v e l.

A R -3

T C -3

About 25 to 40 p r o fe s s io n a l accountants. M any
o f these m atch the accountant V jo b d efin itio n ,
but s e v e r a l m ay e x ceed that le v e l.

or

or

Ill

or

or

IV

to 10 p r o fe s s io n a l accountants. M ost
m atch the accountant II I jo b d efin itio n ,
o r two m a y m atch as high as a c ­
V.

or

V

1 A R - 1 -2 and -3 and T C - 1 -2 and -3 a r e explained on the fo llo w in g page.
2 The num ber of p r o fe s s io n a l accountants su p ervised , as shown above, is re c o g n iz e d
to
be ar e la t iv e ly crude c r ite r io n fo r distin gu ish in g betw een the va rio u s c la s s e s .
It is to be
co n s id ere d as le s s im p orta n t in the m atching p r o c e s s than the other c r ite r ia . In addition to
the s ta ff of p r o fe s s io n a l accountants in the system fo r which the c h ief accountant is r e ­
spon sible, th e re a r e c le r ic a l, m ach in e operation , bookkeeping, and re la te d p erson n el.



37

C H IE F A C C O U N T A N T — Continued

A R -1 . D ire c ts the accounting p ro g ra m fo r an esta b lish m en t o f a com pany.
Th e
accounting system has been esta b lish ed in co n s id era b le d e ta il at h igh er o rg a n iza tio n a l le v e ls
in the com pany, i. e. , accounts, p ro c e d u re s , and re p o rts to be used have been p r e s c r ib e d .
T h e c h ie f accountant has au th ority, w ithin this p r e s c r ib e d sy stem , to adapt and expand it to
fit the p a rtic u la r needs o f the o rg a n iza tio n s e r v e d , e .g . , to p ro v id e g r e a te r d eta il; to esta b lish
addition al accounting co n tro ls; to p ro v id e sp e c ia l or in te rim re p o r ts and statem ents needed
by the establish m en t m a n a ger fo r d a y -to -d a y o p era tio n s, etc.

A R -2 . D ire c ts the accounting p ro g ra m fo r an esta b lish m en t o f a com pany when the
d ele ga ted au th ority to m o d ify the b a sic accounting sy stem esta b lish ed at h igh er o rg a n iz a tio n a l
le v e ls w ithin the com pany c le a r ly ex ceed s that d e s c rib e d in A R - 1 .
Th e b a sic accounting
sy stem is p r e s c r ib e d only in broad outlines ra th er than in s p e c ific d e ta il, e . g . , w h ile c e r ta in
m a jo r fin a n cia l r e p o r ts , o v e r a ll accounts, ge n era l p o lic ie s , e t c . , a re re q u ire d by the b a sic
s y stem , the c h ie f accountant has b road latitude to d ecid e what s p e c ific m eth ods, p ro c e d u re s ,
accounts, r e p o r ts , e t c . , a re to be used w ithin the o rg a n iza tio n a l segm en t he s e r v e s .
He
has au th ority to evalu ate and take fin a l action on recom m en dation s fo r changes in that p o rtio n
o f the sy stem fo r w hich he is re s p o n s ib le , but he m ust sec u re p r io r a p p ro va l fr o m h igh er
o rg a n iz a tio n a l le v e ls fo r any changes w hich would a ffe c t the b a sic s y s te m p r e s c r ib e d by such
h igh er le v e ls . A ccou n tin g re p o rts and statem ents p re p a re d r e fle c t the events and p r o g r e s s
o f the e n tire o rg a n iz a tio n a l segm en t o f the com pany fo r w hich he is re s p o n s ib le , and u su ally
these re p o rts re p re s e n t con solidation s o f accounting data subm itted by su bordinate segm en ts
o f the o rg a n iza tio n w hich have accounting r e s p o n s ib ilitie s . (T h is d e g re e o f au th ority is m ost
c h a r a c t e r is tic a lly found at an o rg a n iza tio n a l le v e l in the com pany w hich is in te rm e d ia te
betw een the com pany h eadqu arters le v e l (s e e A R -3 ) and the plant le v e l (s e e A R - 1 ).
H ow ­
e v e r , i f a s im ila r d e g re e o f au th ority has been d elega ted to the plant le v e l, the c h ie f a c ­
countant at such a p la ce should be m atched w ith this d e fin itio n .)

A R -3 . D ire c ts the accounting p ro g ra m fo r an en tire com pany w ith or without sub­
ordin ate esta b lish m en ts.
Has co m p le te re s p o n s ib ility fo r esta b lish in g and m ain tain in g the
fr a m e w o r k fo r the b a sic accounting sy stem used in the com pany, su bject only to g e n e ra l
p o lic y guidance and c o n tro l u su ally fr o m a com pany o ffic ia l re s p o n s ib le fo r g e n e ra l fin a n cia l
m anagem ent, freq u e n tly an o ffic e r o f the com pany. Th e c h ie f accountant evalu ates and takes
fin a l action on recom m en dation s fo r b a sic changes in the accounting sy stem , o rig in a tin g fr o m
subordinate units w ithin the sy stem . A ccou ntin g re p o rts and statem en ts p re p a re d r e fle c t the
events and p r o g r e s s o f the’ e n tire com pany, and to the extent that subordinate accounting
segm en ts e x is t, they re p re s e n t con solidation s o f accounting data subm itted by th ese segm en ts.

T C -1 . Th e o rg a n iza tio n which the accounting p r o g ra m s e r v e s has r e la t iv e ly few
functions, p rodu cts, w o rk p r o c e s s e s , e t c ., and th ese tend to be stable and unchanging. Th e
accounting sy stem o p era tes in a cco rd a n ce with w e ll-e s ta b lis h e d p rin c ip le s and p r a c tic e s or
those o f equ ivalen t d iffic u lty w hich a re ty p ic a l of that in du stry.

T C -2 . Th e o rg a n iza tio n w hich the accounting p r o g ra m s e r v e s has a r e la t iv e ly la r g e
num ber o f fu nctions, p rodu cts, w o rk p r o c e s s e s , etc. , re q u irin g su bstantial adaptations o f
the b a sic sy stem to m e et m an agem ent n eeds.

T C -3 . Th e o rg a n iza tio n w hich the accounting p r o g ra m s e r v e s has functions, p r o d ­
u cts, w o rk p r o c e s s e s , e t c ., w hich a r e v e r y num erous, v a r ie d , unique, s p e c ia liz e d or
w hich, fo r s im ila r re a s o n s, puts a h eavy demand on the accounting o rg a n iza tio n fo r s p e ­
c ia liz e d and e x ten s ive adaptations o f the b a sic sy stem to m e e t m an agem en t n eeds. Th e a c ­
counting sy stem , to a co n s id era b le d e g re e is d evelop ed w e ll beyond the esta b lish ed p rin c ip le s
and p ra c tic e s in o rd e r to p ro v id e m ethods fo r the solu tion o f p ro b le m s fo r w hich no c le a r
p reced en ts e x is t o r to p ro v id e fo r the d evelop m en t or exten sion o f th e o rie s and p ra c tic e s
to p rob le m s to w hich they have not been p r e v io u s ly applied.



38

ATTORNEYS
ATTO RNEY
P e r fo r m s w o rk in vo lv ed in p ro vid in g consultation and a d vice to o p era tin g o ffic ia ls
of the com pany w ith re s p e c t to its le g a l rig h ts, p r iv ile g e s , and o b liga tion s. P e r fo r m s such
duties as anticip atin g any le g a l p ro b le m s or ris k s in volvin g the com pany and a d visin g com pany
o ffic ia ls ; p rep a rin g and re v ie w in g va rio u s le g a l in stru m en ts and docum ents, such as con tracts
fo r le a s e s , lic e n s e s , sa les, pu rchases, r e a l esta te, e tc.; keep in g in fo rm e d of p rop osed
le g is la tio n w hich m igh t a ffe c t the com pany and ad visin g the a p p ro p ria te com pany o ffic ia ls ;
exam in ing and checking fo r le g a l im p lica tio n s, public statem ents or a d v e r tis in g m a te r ia l;
advisin g com pany w heth er to p rosecu te or defend law suits; acting as agent of the com pany
in its tra n sa ction s; and applying fo r patents, co p yrigh ts, or r e g is tr a tio n of the com pan y's
produ cts, p r o c e s s e s , d e v ic e s , and tra d em a rk s.
(P a ten t w o rk w hich re q u ir e s tra in in g in
a tech n ical fie ld , e . g . , e n g in eerin g in addition to le g a l tra in in g, is excluded.
C la im s e x ­
am ining, cla im s in vestiga tin g, o r s im ila r w o rk a re exclu ded even though the w o rk is p e r ­
fo rm e d by p erso n s w ith a LJL.B. d e g re e , u nless th ere is c le a r evid en ce that the job a ctu ally
re q u ire s use of fu ll p r o fe s s io n a l le g a l tra in in g such as that of an a tto rn ey who p e r fo r m s
in v e s tig a tiv e duties as a p r e lim in a r y phase of his tota l r e s p o n s ib ility fo r p re p a rin g a case
fo r t r ia l or a ctu a lly try in g a case in cou rt.)
A tto rn e y I
A s a tra in e e (L L .B . w ith m e m b ersh ip in b a r), p e r fo rm s rou tine le g a l w ork , such
as p rep a rin g b r ie fs or draw in g up con tracts fo r r e v ie w and evalu ation b y a ttorn eys of h igh er
grade.
R e c e iv e s im m ed ia te s u p ervisio n in assignm ents design ed to p ro vid e tra in in g in the
application of esta b lish ed m ethods and techniques of le g a l re s e a rc h , d ra ftin g of le g a l in ­
stru m ents, etc.
A tto rn e y II
P e r fo r m s a v a r ie t y o f le g a l a ssign m en ts, e .g ., (1) draw in g up co n tracts w hich
re q u ire som e in gen u ity and an a b ility to evalu ate the le g a l s u ffic ie n c y o f co n tract te rm s ;
(Z) p rep a rin g d ra ft opinions on le g a l questions in vo lv ed in such a rea s as c la im s , g r ie v a n c e s ,
la b or law s, etc., when the le g a l qu estion can be r e s o lv e d r e la t iv e ly e a s ily in the ligh t of
w e ll-e s ta b lis h e d fa cts and c le a r ly a p p lica b le p reced en ts. R e c e iv e s g e n e ra l s u p ervisio n during
assign m en ts, w ith m o st w o rk r e v ie w e d by an a tto rn ey of h igh er gra d e.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r
fin a l action is u su ally lim ite d to m a tte rs w hich a re c o v e r e d by in stru ction s and p r io r a p p rova l
of a su p erior.
A tto rn e y III
P e r fo r m s a v a r ie t y of le g a l assign m en ts, p r im a r ily in the study and a n a lysis of
le g a l questions, p ro b le m s , or ca ses. P r e p a r e s d ra ft opinions or other kinds of le g a l w o rk
on le g a l questions in v o lv e d in such a rea s as c la im s , g r ie v a n c e s , la b or law s, etc., when
the questions a re co m p lic a ted b y the absence of le g a l p reced en ts c le a r ly and d ir e c t ly a p p li­
cable to the ca se, or b y the d iffe re n t p o ssib le constru ction s w hich m igh t be p la ced on e ith er
the fa cts or the law s and p reced en ts in volved . T y p ic a lly s p e c ia liz e s in one le g a l fie ld , e .g .,
labor law, r e a l esta te, con tracts, etc. R e c e iv e s g e n e ra l s u p ervisio n during in itia l and fin a l
stages of assign m en ts, but is ex p ected to conduct w o rk w ith r e la t iv e independence. R e s p o n ­
s ib ility fo r fin a l a ction is u su ally lim ite d to m a tters c o v e r e d b y le g a l p reced en ts and in
w hich little d evia tio n fr o m standard fo rm s and p r a c tic e s is in volved .
A n y d ec isio n s or
actions having a b ea rin g on the com pan y's business a re r e v ie w e d b y a su p erio r. M a y s u p e r­
v is e or r e v ie w the w o rk o f a few assista n ts, n o r m a lly not a ttorn eys.
A tto rn e y IV (IIIA in 1960—
61 s u r v e y )2
3
S im ila r to a tto rn ey III but the w o rk is p e r fo rm e d under c o n s id e ra b ly le s s c lo se
su p ervisio n and d irectio n .
The a tto rn ey is ex p ected to in dependently in v e s tig a te the fa cts,
sea rch out p reced en ts, define the le g a l and factu al issu es, d raft a ll n e c e s s a r y docum ents,
opinions, etc., and p resen t conclusions and recom m en dation s fo r re v ie w .
Guidance fr o m
s u p e rio rs during this p r o c e s s occu rs only if the p ro b le m is c le a r ly m o re d iffic u lt than n o rm a l
fo r this le v e l. The fin a l produ ct is re v ie w e d c a re fu lly , but p r im a r ily fo r o v e r a ll soundness
of le g a l reason in g and co n s isten c y w ith com pany p o lic y , ra th er than fo r a c cu ra cy of te c h ­
n ica l detail.
23

Changes in Rom an n u m eral design ation only.




No change in the defin ition .

39
A T T O R N E Y — Continued
A tto rn e y V (IV in 1960—61 su rvey) 2
4
R es p o n sib le fo r a b roa d le g a l a re a in w hich a ssign m en ts c o v e r a w ide range of
d iffic u lt and co m p le x le g a l questions and p ro b le m s. P r im a r ily s e r v e s in an a d v is o r y capacity,
m aking studies and d evelop in g opinions w hich m a y have an im p ortan t b ea rin g on the conduct
of the com pan y's bu siness ( e . g . , recom m en d in g action to p ro te c t the com pan y's tra d em a rk s
and co p yrigh ts in fo r e ig n co u n tries).
R e c e iv e s a m inim u m of tech n ic a l le g a l su pervision .
M ay s u p ervise a sm a ll sta ff of attorn eys.
A tto rn e y V I (IV A in 1960—
61 s u r v e y )2
4
S im ila r to a tto rn ey V but the le g a l questions and p ro b le m s a re of outstanding d i f f i ­
cu lty and c o m p le x ity or of c r u c ia l im p ortan ce to the w e lfa r e of the company. F o r exam ple,
(1) co m p le x factu al and p o lic y issu es w hich re q u ire ex ten s ive re s e a rc h , a n a lysis, and o b ­
taining and evalu ating ex p ert testim o n y in c o n tr o v e r s ia l a rea s of scie n ce , fin ance, co rp o ra te
stru ctu re, en gin eerin g , e tc .; or (2) ca ses in vo lv e v e r y la rg e sums of m on ey (e .g ., about
$ 1 m illio n ) o r, fo r other re a son s, a re v e r y v ig o r o u s ly contested.
A tto rn e y V II (V in 1960—
61 s u r v e y )2
4
P la n s, conducts, and su p e rv is e s le g a l assignm ents w ith in one or m o re b roa d le g a l
a rea s. S u p ervises a sta ff of a ttorn eys, and has re s p o n s ib ility fo r evalu atin g th eir p e r fo r m ­
ance and approvin g recom m en dation s w hich m ay have an im p ortan t b ea rin g on the conduct
of the com pan y's bu sin ess. R e c e iv e s guidance as to com pany p o lic y but no tech n ic a l su p er­
v is io n or a ssista n ce ex cep t when he m ight requ est ad vice on the m o st d iffic u lt, n ovel, or
im p ortan t tech n ical le g a l questions. U su a lly re p o rts to the g e n e ra l cou nsel or ch ief a tto rn ey
o f the com pany or his im m ed ia te deputy.

OFFICE SERVICES
M A N A G E R , O F F IC E S E R V IC E S
R esp on sib le fo r planning, d irectin g , and c o n tro llin g of o ffic e s e r v ic e s , su bject only
to the m ost g e n e ra l p o lic y su p ervisio n . P la y s an a c tiv e r o le in anticip atin g and planning to
m e et o ffic e s e r v ic e s needs of the o p era tin g o rga n iza tio n served . S u p ervis es a group of e m ­
p lo y ee s engaged in p ro vid in g o ffic e s e r v ic e s of a supporting or "h o u sek e ep in g" nature to the
p r im a r y o p era tio n of a com pany, an establish m en t, or an o rg a n iz a tio n a l unit of a com pany
or establish m en t. (M a y p e r s o n a lly p e r fo r m som e o f the fu n ction s.) O ffic e s e r v ic e s in clu de:
(a)
(b)
(c)

(d)

(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)

(i)

24

Ibid.

R e c e ip t, distribu tion , and dispatch of m a il.
M aintenance of cen tra l file s .
P r in tin g or du plication and d istrib u tio n of fo rm s , pu blications, etc.
(M a y be
lim ite d to o rd e rin g the prin tin g or du plication of item s .
D oes not n e c e s s a r ily
have ch a rge of a printshop or du plication fa c ilit ie s , e s p e c ia lly in la rg e o p e r a ­
tions, but coord in ates the flo w to and fr o m the re p ro d u ctio n units.)
P u rch a sin g o ffic e supplies and equipment.
(M akes d ir e c t purchases of ru n -o fth e - m ill o ffic e supplies. M ay be re sp o n sib le fo r d ir e c t purchase of other item s
fr o m outside su p p liers or m a y re q u is itio n through esta b lish m en t purchasing
d ep artm en ts.)
R e c o rd s co n tro l and disposal.
Com m unications (telephone sw itch board and/or te le ty p e s e r v ic e ).
T yp in g or sten ograph ic pool.
O ffic e equipm ent m aintenance and re p a ir. (M a y have d ir e c t su p ervisio n of m a in ­
tenance and r e p a ir p erso n n el or m a y coordin ate the o rd e rin g of such s e r v ic e s
fr o m outside s e r v ic e su ppliers or fr o m a c e n tra l s e r v ic e unit w ithin the
esta b lish m en t.)
Space c o n tro l o v e r o ffic e fa c ilit ie s — layout and a rra n ge m en t of o ffic e s . (T y p ic a lly
s e r v e s as a s ta ff a ssistan t to m anagem ent o ffic ia ls in p e r fo rm in g this function.)

footnote 23.




40

M ANAGER,

O F F IC E S E R V IC E S — Continued

M an ager,

O ffic e S e rv ic e s I

S u p ervises a sta ff o f em p lo y ees engaged in p e r fo rm in g a fe w (e. g. , fou r or fiv e )
of the above functions as a s e r v ic e to a s m a ll o rga n iza tio n (e. g. , 300 to 600 em p loy ees,
exclu ding n o n su p erviso ry plant w o r k e r s ).
M an ager,

O ffic e S e rv ic e s II

A.
S u p ervises a sta ff of em p lo y ees engaged in p e r fo rm in g a fe w (e. g. , fou r or
fiv e ) o f the above functions as a s e r v ic e to a m o d e ra te ly la r g e o rg a n iza tio n (e. g. , 600 to
1, 500 em p lo y ees, excluding n o n su p erviso ry plant w o r k e r s ).
OR
B.
S u p ervises a sta ff of em p lo y ees engaged in p e r fo rm in g m o st (e. g. , seven or
eight) of the above functions as a s e r v ic e to a s m a ll o rga n iza tio n (e. g. , 300 to 600 e m ­
p lo y ee s, exclu ding n o n su p erviso ry plant w o r k e r s ).
M an ager,

O ffic e S e rv ic e s III

A.
S u p ervises a s ta ff o f em p lo y ees engaged in p e r fo rm in g a few (e. g. , fou r or
fiv e ) o f the functions as a s e r v ic e to a la r g e o rga n iza tio n (e. g. ,
1, 500 to 3, 000 em p loy ees,
excluding n o n su p erviso ry plant w o r k e r s ).
OR
B.
S u p ervises a sta ff of em p loy ees engaged in p e r fo rm in g m o st (e. g. , seven or
eight) of the above functions as a s e r v ic e to a m o d e r a te ly la r g e o rga n iza tio n (e. g. , 600 to
1, 500 em p lo y ees, excluding n on su p erviso ry plant w o r k e r s ).
M an ager,

O ffic e S e rv ic e s IV

S u p ervises a sta ff of em p lo y ees engaged in p e r fo rm in g m o s t (e. g. , seven or eight)
of the above functions as a s e r v ic e to a la r g e o rga n iza tio n (e. g. , 1, 500 to 3, 000 em p loy ees,
exclu ding n o n su p erviso ry plant w o r k e r s ).

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT
JOB A N A L Y S T
P e r fo r m s w o rk in vo lv ed in c o lle c tin g , analyzin g, and d evelop in g occu pation al data
r e la tiv e to jo b s, job q u a lifica tio n s, and w o r k e r c h a ra c te ris tic s as a basis fo r com pensatin g
e m p lo y ees in a fa ir , equ itable, and u n iform m anner. P e r fo r m s such duties as studying and
a n alyzin g jobs and p rep a rin g d es crip tio n s o f duties and re s p o n s ib ilitie s and of the p h ysic a l
and m en ta l re q u irem en ts needed by w o r k e r s ; evalu ating jobs and d eterm in in g a p p rop ria te
w age or s a la r y le v e ls in accordan ce w ith th e ir d iffic u lty and re s p o n s ib ility ; in dependently
conducting or p a rticip a tin g w ith re p re s e n ta tiv e s of other com panies in conducting com pen ­
sation su rveys w ithin a lo c a lity or labor m a rk e t a re a ; a ssistin g in a d m in isterin g m e r it ra tin g
p ro g ra m ; re v ie w in g changes in w a ges and s a la rie s in dicated by su rveys and recom m en d in g
changes in pay s c a le s ; and auditing in dividu al jobs to check the p r o p r ie ty o f evalu ation s and
to apply cu rren t job c la s s ific a tio n s .
Job A n a ly st I
A s a tra in e e , p e r fo rm s w o rk in design ated a rea s and of lim ite d occu pation al scope.
R e c e iv e s im m ed ia te su p ervisio n in a ssign m en ts design ed to p ro vid e tra in in g in the a p p lica tio n
of esta b lish ed m ethods and techniques o f job a n a lysis.
Studies the le a s t d iffic u lt jobs and
p re p a re s re p o rts fo r r e v ie w by a job analyst of h igh er le v e l.
Job A n a ly st II
Studies, d e s c rib e s , and evalu ates jobs in a ccord a n ce w ith esta b lish ed p ro ce d u res.
Is u su a lly a ssign ed to the s im p le r kinds of both w age and s a la rie d jobs in the establish m en t.
W orks indepen den tly on such a ssign m en ts but is lim ite d by in stru ction s of his s u p erio r and
by defin ed a re a of assignm ent.



41
JOB A N A L Y S T — Continued
Job A n a ly st III
A n a ly ze s and evalu ates a v a r ie t y o f w age and s a la rie d jobs in a ccord a n ce w ith
esta b lish ed evalu ation sy stem s and p ro ce d u res. M a y conduct w age su rveys w ithin the lo c a lity
or p a rticip a te in conducting su rveys o f broad com pensation a rea s. M a y a s s is t in d evelop in g
su rv ey m ethods and plans.
R e c e iv e s g e n e ra l su p ervisio n but r e s p o n s ib ility fo r fin a l action
is lim ited .
Job A n a ly st IV
A n a ly ze s and evalu ates a v a r ie t y of jobs in a ccord a n ce w ith esta b lish ed evalu ation
sy stem s and p ro ce d u res, and is g iv en a ssign m en t w hich r e g u la r ly in clu des re s p o n s ib ility fo r
the m o re d iffic u lt kinds o f jo b s.
(" M o r e d iffic u lt" m eans job s w hich con sist of h a rd -to understand w o rk p r o c e s s e s ; e .g ., p ro fe s s io n a l, s c ie n tific , a d m in is tra tiv e , or tech n ical; or
job s in new or e m e rg in g occu pational fie ld s ; or job s w hich a re bein g esta b lish ed as p a rt "of
the cre a tio n of new o rga n iza tio n s ; or w h ere other s p e c ia l co n sid era tio n s of these types apply.)
R e c e iv e s g e n e ra l su p ervisio n , but re s p o n s ib ility fo r fin a l action is lim ite d . M a y p a rticip a te
in the develop m en t and in sta lla tio n o f evalu ation or com pensation sy stem s, w hich m a y include
those fo r m e r it ra tin g p ro g ra m s .
M a y plan su rv ey m ethods and conduct or d ir e c t w age
su rveys w ithin a broad com pensation area.
D IR E C T O R O F P E R S O N N E L *
3
2
1
D ire c ts a p erso n n el m anagem ent p ro g ra m fo r a com pany o r fo r a plant or e s ta b ­
lish m en t of a company. F o r a job to be c o v e r e d by this defin ition , the p erso n n el m a n a ge­
m ent p ro g ra m m ust include re s p o n s ib ility fo r a ll th ree o f the fo llo w in g functions:
(1)

A d m in is te rin g a fo r m a l job evalu ation system ; i.e ., a sy stem in w hich
th ere
a re esta b lish ed p ro ce d u res by w hich jobs a re a n a lyzed and evalu ated on the
basis o f th e ir duties, re s p o n s ib ilitie s , and q u a lifica tio n req u irem en ts in o rd e r
to p ro vid e a foundation fo r equ itable com pensation.
T y p ic a lly , such a sy stem
includes the use of one or m o re sets of job evalu ation fa c to rs and the p r e p a ­
ra tio n o f fo r m a l job d es crip tio n s .
It m a y a lso include such re la te d functions
as w age and s a la ry su rveys o r m e r it ratin g sy stem a d m in istra tion .
The job
evalu ation s y s te m (s ) does not n e c e s s a r ily c o v e r a ll jobs in the o rga n iza tio n ,
but does c o v e r a su bstantial p o rtio n of the orga n iza tio n .

(2)

E m ploym en t and placem en t functions; i.e ., re c ru itin g a c t iv e ly fo r at le a s t som e
kinds of w o r k e r s through a v a r ie t y of sou rces (e .g ., sch ools or c o lle g e s ,
em ­
ploym ent a gen cies , p r o fe s s io n a l s o c ie tie s , e tc .); evalu atin g applicants again st
dem ands o f p a rtic u la r jobs by use of such techniques as jo b a n a lysis to d e t e r ­
m ine re q u ire m e n ts , in te rv ie w s , w ritte n tests of aptitude, kn ow ledge, or s k ill,
r e fe r e n c e checks, ex p e rie n c e evalu ation s, e tc.; recom m en d in g s ele ctio n s and
jo b placem en ts to m anagem ent, etc.

(3)

E m p lo y ee re la tio n s and s e r v ic e s functions; i.e ., functions design ed to m aintain
e m p lo y ees m o ra le and p ro d u c tiv ity at a high le v e l (fo r exa m p le, a d m in isterin g
a fo r m a l or in fo rm a l g rie v a n c e p ro ce d u re; id en tifyin g and recom m en d in g so lu ­
tions fo r p erso n n el p ro b le m s such as absen teeism , high tu rn ove r, low p rod u c­
tiv ity , e tc .; a d m in istra tio n o f b e n e fic ia l su ggestions system , re tir e m e n t, pension,
or insu rance plans, m e r it ra tin g system , etc.; o v e rs e e in g c a fe te r ia operation s,
r e c r e a tio n a l p ro g ra m s , in d u stria l health or s a fety p ro g ra m s , e tc .).

E m p lo y ee tra in in g and d evelop m en t functions m a y or m a y not be part of the p e r ­
sonnel m anagem ent p ro g ra m fo r pu rposes of m atching this defin ition .
L a b o r re la tio n a c tiv itie s , i f any, a re confined m a in ly to the adm in istra tion , in t e r ­
p retation , and app lica tion o f la b or union con tracts and a re e s s e n tia lly s im ila r to those d e ­
s c rib e d under (3) above.
If re s p o n s ib ility fo r actual co n tract n egotiation w ith la b or unions
as the p rin c ip a l com pany re p re s e n ta tiv e is co n s id ere d a s ig n ific a n t one in the job, i.e ., the
one w hich s e r v e s as the p r im a r y basis fo r q u a lifica tio n re q u irem en ts and com pensation, the
job is exclu ded fr o m bein g m atched w ith this definition. P a rtic ip a tio n in ba rga in in g of a le s s
sig n ifica n t nature, e .g ., to n egotiate d eta iled settlem en t of such m a tte rs as s p e c ific ra tes,
job c la s s ific a tio n s , w o rk ru les , h irin g or la y o ff p ro c e d u re s , etc., w ithin the b roa d te rm s
of a g e n e ra l a g reem e n t reach ed at h igh er le v e ls , or to supply a d vice and in fo rm a tio n on
tech n ical points to the com pan y's p rin c ip a l re p re s e n ta tiv e , w ill not have the e ffe c t of e x ­
cluding the job fr o m c o v e ra g e .



42

D IR E C T O R O F P E R S O N N E L — Continued

The d ir e c t o r o f p erso n n el not only d ir e c ts a p erso n n el m an agem ent p r o g ra m of the
in ten sity and scope outlined p re v io u s ly , but (to be a p ro p e r m atch) he is re c o g n iz e d by the top
m an agem ent o ffic ia ls o f the o rga n iza tio n he s e r v e s as the sou rce of a d vice and a ssista n ce
on p erso n n el m an agem ent m a tte rs and p ro b le m s g e n e ra lly .
F o r exam ple, he is ty p ic a lly
consulted on the p erso n n el im p lica tio n s of planned changes in m an agem en t p o lic y or p r o ­
gram , the e ffe c ts on the o rga n iza tio n of econ om ic or m a rk et tren ds, produ ct or produ ction
m ethod changes, etc. ; he re p re s e n ts m an agem ent in ex tern a l contacts w ith other com panies,
tra d e a s so cia tio n s, go vern m en t a gen cies , etc. , when the p r im a r y su bject m a tter of the con ­
tact is on p erso n n el m an agem ent m a tte rs .

T y p ic a lly , the d ir e c to r o f p erso n n el re p o r ts to a com pany o ffic e r or a high m a n a ge­
m ent o ffic ia l who has re s p o n s ib ility fo r the op era tion of a plant or esta b lish m en t of a c o m ­
pany; or, at com pany h ea d q u arters le v e l, he m ay r e p o r t to a com pany o ffic e r in ch a rge of
in d u stria l re la tio n s and p erso n n el m an agem ent a c tiv itie s or a s im ila r o ffic ia l.

D ir e c to r s of p erso n n el jo b s which m e e t the above d efin itio n a re c la s s ifie d by l e v e l 2
5
of w ork in a cco rd a n ce with the fo llo w in g tabulation:

Personnel program
operations le v e l *

Number of employees in
work force serviced
250-750 ----------------------------------------------- ----1,000-5,000 ---------------------------------------6,000-12,000 -------------------------------------------15,000-25,000 - ------- ----------------------------

Organization
serviced—
type A 3
I
Ill

Organization
serviced—
type B 4
II
III
IV
V

Personnel program
developm ent le v e l 2
Organization
serviced—
type A 3
II
III
IV
V

Organization
serviced—
type B 4
III
IV
V
-

1 Personnel program operations le v e l— director o f personnel servicing an organizational segment ( e . g . , a plant)
o f a company, where the basic personnel program policies, plans, objectives, etc. , are established at company head­
quarters or at some other higher le v e l between the plant and the company headquarters le v e l.
Th e personnel d i­
rector's responsibility is to put these into operation at the local le v e l, in such a manner as to most e ffe c tiv e ly serve
the local management needs.
2 Personnel program developm ent le v e l— director o f personnel servicing an entire company (w ith or without sub­
ordinate establishments) where the personnel director plays an important role in establishment o f basic personnel policies,
plans, objectives, etc. , for the company, subject to policy direction and control from company officers.
There may
be instances in which there is such rela tively com plete delegation of personnel program planning and developm ent re­
sponsibility below the company le v e l to an interm ediate organization, e . g . , a subsidiary or a division, that a job of
personnel director for such an organization should be matched as though it were a company le v e l job.
Organization serviced— type A — jobs serviced are (almost exclusively) types which are common in the labor
market generally, and consist o f rela tively easy-to-understand work processes, or for similar reasons do not present
particularly difficu lt recruitment,
job evaluation, or training problems.
Work force, organizational structure, and
other organizational characteristics are rela tively stable.
4 Organization serviced— type B— jobs serviced include a substantial number of types which are la rgely peculiar
to the organization serviced, consist o f hard-to-understand work processes (e. g. , professional, scientific, administra­
tive, or technical), are jobs in new or emerging occupational fields, are in extrem ely short supply, have hard-tomatch skill requirements, or for similar reasons present difficu lt recruitment, job evaluation, or training problems.
Work force, organizational structure, or other organizational characteristics are complicated, unstable, subject to w ide
seasonal fluctuations, etc.
NOTE: There are gaps between different degrees o f a ll three elements used
These gaps have been provided purposely to allow room for judgment in getting the
each job.
Thus, a job which services a work force o f 850 employees should be
personnel program operations le v e l job where the nature of the organization serviced
definition for the type B degree. However, the same job should be matched with le v e l
zation serviced clearly falls w ell
within the definition for the type A degree.

25

to determine job le v e l matches.
best overall job le v e l match for
matched with le v e l II if it is a
seems to fa ll slightly below the
I if the nature of the organi­

In su fficien t data w e re obtained fo r le v e l V to w a rra n t p resen ta tio n o f a v e r a g e s a la r ie s .




43
CHEMISTS AND ENGINEERS
C H E M IS T
P e r fo r m s re s e a rc h , develop m en t, in te r p r e tiv e , and a n a ly tic a l w o rk to d eterm in e the
com p osition , m o le c u la r stru ctu re, and p r o p e rtie s o f substances, to d ev elo p or in vestig a te
new m a te r ia ls and p r o c e s s e s , and to in v e s tig a te the tra n s fo rm a tio n which substances undergo.
W ork ty p ic a lly re q u ir e s a B.S. d e g re e in c h e m is try o r equ ivalen t in education and e x ­
p e rie n c e com bined.

C h em ist I
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— A s the beginning le v e l of p r o fe s s io n a l w o rk in c h e m is try ,
a b a c h e lo r's d e g re e w ith m a jo r study in c h e m is try , o r equ ivalen t is re q u ired .
T y p ic a lly
r e c e iv e s fo r m a l c la s s r o o m o r o n -th e-jo b tra in in g.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— P e r fo r m s w o rk under clo s e s u p ervisio n w ith s p e c ific and d e­
ta ile d in stru ction s as to re q u ire d tasks and resu lts expected.
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— A ssig n m en ts a re planned to p ro v id e ex p e rie n c e
in the a p p lica tion of com m on la b o ra to r y techniques and fa m ilia r iz a t io n with m ethods and
p r a c tic e s in the la b o ra to ry . P e r fo r m s a v a r ie ty of routine a n a lyses, te s ts , and op era tion s,
and a ss is ts ex p erien c ed ch em is ts by c a rr y in g out d eta iled steps of ex p erim en ts.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ire c tio n of o th e r s .— N on e.

C h em ist II
G en era l c h a r a c te r is tic s .— At this continuing d evelop m en tal le v e l fo r p r o fe s s io n a l
ch em ists, w o rk is c h a ra c te riz e d by se le c tio n and application o f g e n e ra l and s p e c ia liz e d
m ethods, techniqu es, and in stru m en ts com m on ly used in the la b o ra to ry . M ay r e c e iv e advanced
o n -th e-jo b tra in in g o r fo r m a l c la s s r o o m in stru ction .
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— S u p ervis o rs esta b lish the nature and extent of a n a lysis r e ­
qu ired, s p e c ify m ethods and c r it e r ia on new types of a ssign m en ts, and r e v ie w w o rk fo r th o r ­
oughness of application of m ethods and a ccu ra cy of resu lts.
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— A n a ly ze s a w id e v a r ie t y of sa m p les fo r which
th e re a re standard o r esta b lish ed m ethods of an alysis or fo r w hich the adaptation of standard
m ethods is obvious o r d eterm in ed by oth ers. Conducts s p e c ifie d phases o f re s e a rc h p r o je c ts
as an a ssista n t to an e x p e rie n c e d ch em ist.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ire c tio n of o th e rs .— M ay su p ervise a fe w tech n ician s or

aids.

C h em ist III
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— P e r fo r m s w o rk re q u irin g a p p lica tio n of kn ow ledge o f a
s p e c ia liz e d fie ld of c h e m is tr y and ingenu ity in the independent evalu ation , s e le c tio n , and
adaptation o f standard m ethods and techniques.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— On routine w ork , su p ervisio n is v e r y g e n e ra l; unusual p ro b le m s
a re r e s o lv e d w ith c lo s e co lla b o ra tio n of s u p e rv is o r. C om p leted w o rk is re v ie w e d fo r a p p li­
cation of sound ju dgm en t in ch oice of m ethods and adequacy of re s u lts .
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— D evelop s d eta ils o f re s e a rc h and d evelop m en t
assignm ents in a cco rd a n ce w ith a lin e of approach su ggested b y the s u p e rv is o r and adapts
m ethods to the s p e c ific re q u irem en ts of assign m en ts. A n a ly ze s sam p les that re q u ir e s p e c ia l­
iz e d tra in in g becau se standard m ethods a re unapplicable, becau se of re q u ire d in te rp r e tiv e
judgm ent of q u ality o f substances, or because of re q u ire d s p e c ia liz e d s k ill in adapting te c h ­
niques such as m ic ro a n a ly s is .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ire c tio n of o th e r s .— M a y su p ervise a fe w tech n ician s o r aids.



44
C H E M IS T — Continued

C h em ist IV
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— P la n s and conducts w o rk in c h e m is tr y re q u irin g m a s te r y
of s p e c ia liz e d techniques o r co n s id era b le in gen u ity in sele ctin g and evalu ating approaches to
u n foreseen o r n ovel p ro b le m s.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— G e n e ra lly w o rk s independently of tech n ical su p ervisio n but r e ­
fe r s p ro p o sed plans and unusually im p orta n t o r co m p le x p ro b le m s to s u p e r v is o r fo r guidance.
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— Conducts re s e a r c h a ssign m en ts re q u irin g the
evalu ation o f a ltern a te m ethods of approach.
Undertakes the m o re co m p lex, and exacting,
o r e s o t e r ic a n a ly tic a l assignm ents re q u irin g a s p e c ia lis t in technique or produ ct. P r e p a r e s
in te r p r e tiv e re p o rts of re su lts and m a y p ro v id e tech n ical a d vice on sig n ific a n c e o f re su lts .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ire c tio n of o th e r s .— M a y su p ervise a sm a ll sta ff o f ch em ists
and tech n ician s.
C h em ist V
G e n e ra l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— P a rtic ip a te s in planning re s e a rc h p ro g ra m s on the basis
of s p e c ia liz e d kn ow ledge o f p ro b le m s and m ethods and probable value of re su lts .
M ay s e r v e
as an ex p ert in a n a rro w s p e c ia lty m aking recom m en d a tion s and conclu sion s w hich s e r v e as
the basis fo r undertaking or r e je c tin g im p ortan t p r o je c ts .
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— U su a lly d iscu sses im p ortan t develop m en ts w ith su p e rv is o r.
S u p ervision r e c e iv e d r e la te s la r g e ly to w o rk o b je c tiv e s and a d m in is tra tiv e asp ects.
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— F r o m broad p ro g ra m o b je c tiv e s , plans, o rg a n ­
iz e s , and s u p ervises o r conducts r e s e a r c h in vestig a tio n s w ith r e s p o n s ib ility fo r defin in g
p r o je c ts and scope and independently s ele ctin g lin es of approach.
A s in dividu al w o r k e r , c a r r ie s out r e s e a r c h p r o je c t re q u irin g o rig in a tio n of new
s c ie n tific techniques and m atu re background of kn ow ledge of re la te d fie ld s of scien ce.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n of o th e r s .— M a y su p ervise a sm a ll group of ch em ists
en gaged in v a r ie d re s e a rc h p r o je c ts o r a la r g e r group on routine a n a ly tic a l w ork.
C h em ist V I
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— P e r fo r m s w o rk re q u irin g lea d ersh ip and ex p ert kn ow ledge
in a s p e c ia liz e d fie ld of c h e m is try .
C o n ceives , plans, and d ir e c ts p r o je c ts o f a p io n e erin g
nature to c re a te new m ethods and techniques o r to r e s o lv e p ro b le m s w hich have p ro ve d
unusually r e fr a c t o r y .
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— S u p ervision r e c e iv e d is e s s e n tia lly a d m in is tra tiv e w ith a s s ig n ­
m ents b ro a d ly in d ica ted in te rm s of o b je c tiv e s .
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— D eterm in es the kinds o f p r o je c ts and data
needed to m e et o b je c tiv e s of p ro g ra m s .
M ain tain s lia is o n w ith re la te d o rga n iza tio n s and
re p re s e n ts the la b o ra to r y in im p ortan t c o n feren ces w ith au th ority to co m m it the o r g a n iz a ­
tion.
M a y s e r v e as a consultant to o th er ch em ists in the s p e c ia lty fie ld .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ire c tio n o f o th e r s .— M a y plan, o rg a n iz e , d ir e c t, and evalu ate
the w o rk of a group of ch em ists.
C h em ist V II
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— S u p e rv is o r— p ro v id e s le a d e rs h ip and s c ie n tific guidance
fo r a broad and d iv e r s ifie d p r o g ra m in c h e m is tr y and re la te d supporting a c tiv itie s such as
to re q u ir e s e v e r a l su bordinate s u p e r v is o rs re s p o n s ib le fo r p ro g ra m s ty p ic a lly id e n tifie d w ith
le v e l VI. R ecom m en ds the fa c ilit ie s , p erso n n el, and funds re q u ire d to c a r r y out p r o g ra m s
and eva lu a tes a ccom p lish m en ts.



45
C H E M IS T — Continued
In divid u al r e s e a r c h e r and consultant— is a n o n su p erviso ry c h em is t of re c o g n iz e d
le a d e rs h ip status and a u th o rita tiven ess in his com pany, in a broad a re a o f s p e c ia liz a ­
tion.
Is consulted e x te n s iv e ly by a sso c ia te s and o th ers w ith a high d e g re e o f re lia n c e
placed on his s c ie n tific in te rp re ta tio n s and a d vice.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— Under g e n e r a l a d m in is tra tiv e d ire c tio n .
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— S u p e rv is o r— is re s p o n s ib le fo r an im p ortan t
segm en t of a ch e m ic a l p r o g ra m o f a com pany w ith ex ten s ive and d iv e r s ifie d s c ie n tific r e ­
q u irem en ts o r the en tire c h e m ic a l p ro g ra m o f a com pany w h e re the p ro g ra m is lim ite d in
scope.
M akes a u th o rita tive tech n ic a l recom m en d a tion s con cern in g the s c ie n tific o b je c tiv e s
and le v e ls o f w o rk which w ill be m ost p ro fita b le in the ligh t o f com pany req u irem en ts and
s c ie n tific and in d u stria l tren ds and d evelop m en ts.
In dividual r e s e a r c h e r and consultant— s e le c ts p rob lem s fo r re s e a r c h and c o n c eives
and plans in vestig a tio n s in which the phenom ena and p rin c ip le s a re not adequ ately u n d e r­
stood, so that outstanding c r e a tiv ity and m atu re judgm ent a re re q u ire d to d e v is e h ypoth­
eses and techniques o f ex p erim en ta tio n and to in te rp re t re su lts .
A d v is e s the head o f a
la rg e la b o ra to r y on co m p le x aspects o f e x tr e m e ly broad and im p ortan t p ro g ra m s with
re s p o n s ib ility fo r ex p lo rin g , ju stifyin g, and evalu ating prop osed and cu rren t p ro g ra m s
and p r o je c ts and fu rn ish ing a d vice on unusually co m p le x and n o v e l p ro b le m s in the s p e ­
c ia lty fie ld .
R e s p o n s ib ility
is t ic s " above.

fo r

the

d ir e c tio n

o f o th e r s .— S u p e rv is o r— see

"gen era l

c h a ra c te r­

C h em ist V III
G e n e ra l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— S u p e rv is o r— p ro v id e s le a d e rs h ip and s c ie n tific guidance
fo r a v e r y broad and h igh ly d iv e r s ifie d p ro g ra m in c h e m is try and re la te d supporting a c t iv ­
itie s re q u irin g s e v e r a l subordinate s u p e rv is o rs re sp o n s ib le fo r p ro g ra m s ty p ic a lly id en tified
with le v e l V II, o r a la r g e num ber o f s u p e rv is o rs o f lo w e r le v e ls .
R ecom m en d s the f a c i l ­
itie s , person n el, and funds re q u ire d fo r p ro g ra m s and evalu ates a cco m p lish m en ts.
In dividual r e s e a r c h e r and consultant— s e r v e s as a consultant to t o p - le v e l m an agem ent
on s c ie n tific questions o f fa r - r e a c h in g s ig n ific a n ce.
Is sought as a consultant by c h e m ­
ists who a re th e m s e lv e s s p e c ia lis ts in the fie ld .
Is a n a tio n a lly re c o g n iz e d r e s e a rc h
le a d e r and consultant fo r his com pany.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .--- R e c e iv e s g e n e r a l a d m in is tra tiv e d ire c tio n .
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— S u p e rv is o r— is re s p o n s ib le fo r an im p orta n t
segm en t o f a c h e m ic a l p ro g ra m of a com pany with v e r y ex ten s ive and h igh ly d iv e r s ifie d s c ie n ­
tific re q u irem en ts o r the e n tire ch e m ic a l p ro g ra m of a com pany w h e re the p ro g ra m is o f
m o d era te scope.
Is re s p o n s ib le fo r decid in g the kind and extent o f c h e m ic a l and re la te d
p ro g ra m needed to a cco m p lis h the o b je c tiv e s of the com pany, fo r ch oosin g the s c ie n tific a p ­
p roa ch es, fo r planning and o rg a n izin g fa c ilit ie s and p ro g ra m s , and fo r in te rp re tin g re su lts .
In divid u al r e s e a r c h e r and consultant— fo rm u la te s and guides the attack on e x c e p tio n ­
a lly d iffic u lt and im p orta n t p rob lem s w hose solution would re p re s e n t a m a jo r s c ie n ­
tific o r te c h n o lo g ic a l advance.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r
is t ic s " above.

the

d ir e c tio n

o f o th e r s .— S u p e rv is o r— see

"gen era l

T h is le v e l does not include the c h ie f ch em ist o f a com pany w ith a
v e r y ex te n s iv e and h igh ly d iv e r s ifie d p ro g ra m ; o r the a ssista n t c h ie f
ch em ist of a com pany with an unusually ex ten s ive and n o v e l c h em ic a l
p ro g ra m .




c h a ra cter­

46
E N G IN E E R
P e r fo r m s w o rk in re s e a rc h , develop m en t, design , testin g, a n a ly sis, produ ction, c o n ­
stru ction , m aintenance, opera tion , planning, su rvey, estim atin g, application , o r s ta n d a rd iz a ­
tion o f en gin eerin g fa c ilit ie s , sy stem s, stru ctu res, p r o c e s s e s , equipm ent d e v ic e s , o r m a ­
t e r ia ls re q u irin g know ledge of the scie n ce and a rt by w hich m a te r ia ls , natural re s o u rc e s , and
pow er a r e m ade useful.
W ork ty p ic a lly re q u ir e s a B.S. d e g re e in en gin eerin g o r the
eq u iva len t in e x p erien c e and education com bined.
(S afety en gin eers, in d u stria l en gin eers,
q u ality co n tro l en gin eers, and sales en gin eers a re to be exclu ded.)
E n gin eer I
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— A s the beginning le v e l of en gin eerin g w ork , a b a c h e lo r’ s
d e g re e in en gin eerin g o r equ ivalen t is re q u ired .
T y p ic a lly r e c e iv e s fo r m a l c la s s r o o m or
on -the - job tra in in g .
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— P e r fo r m s w o rk under c lo s e su p ervisio n w ith s p e c ific and d e ­
ta iled in stru ction s as to re q u ire d tasks and resu lts expected.
W ork is checked during p r o g ­
re s s , and upon co m p letio n is re v ie w e d fo r a ccu ra cy .
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— P e r fo r m s sim p le tasks that a re planned to p r o ­
vid e e x p e rie n c e and fa m ilia r iz a tio n with m ethods and p ra c tic e s of the com pany in the s p e c ia lty
fie ld and to a s c e r ta in the in te re s ts and aptitudes o f the beginning en gin eer.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n of o th e r s .— None.
E n gin eer II
G e n e ra l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— A t this continuing d ev elo p m en ta l le v e l, p e r fo r m s rou tine
en gin eerin g w o rk re q u irin g a p p lica tio n of standard techniqu es, p ro ce d u res, and c r it e r ia in
c a rr y in g out a sequence of re la te d en gin eerin g tasks.
L im ite d e x e r c is e of judgm ent is r e ­
qu ired on d eta ils of w ork.
M ay r e c e iv e advanced o n -th e -jo b o r c la s s r o o m in stru ction s.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— S u p ervis o r screen s assign m en ts to elim in a te d iffic u lt p ro b le m s
and s e le c ts techniques and p ro ce d u res to be applied.
R e c e iv e s c lo s e s u p ervisio n on new
a sp ects o f assign m en ts.
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— U sing p r e s c r ib e d m ethods, p e r fo r m s s p e c ific
and lim ite d portion s of a b ro a d er assign m en t o f an ex p erien c ed en gin eer.
A p p lie s standard
p ra c tic e s and techniques in s p e c ific situations, adjusts and c o r r e la te s data, re c o g n iz e s d i s ­
c re p a n c ie s in re su lts , and fo llo w s o p era tion s through a s e r ie s o f re la te d d eta iled steps o r
processes.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n of o th e r s .— M ay su p ervise a fe w aids or tech nician s.
E n gin eer III
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— W ork re q u ir e s independent evalu ation, s ele ctio n , and a p ­
p lica tio n o f standard en gin eerin g techniqu es, p ro ce d u res, and c r it e r ia , using judgm ent and
in gen u ity in m aking m in o r adaptations and m o d ific a tio n s .
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— R e c e iv e s in stru ction on s p e c ific a ssign m en t o b je c tiv e s , points
o f em phasis, r e fe r e n c e and in fo rm a tio n so u rces, and p o ssib le solutions.
Unusual p ro b le m s
a re so lved jo in tly with s u p e rv is o r, and w ork is re v ie w e d fo r a p p lica tion of sound en gin eerin g
judgm ent.
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— A ssig n m en ts include equipm ent d esign and d e ­
velop m en t, test o f m a te r ia ls , p rep a ra tion of s p e c ific a tio n s , p ro c e s s study, re s e a rc h i n v e s ­
tiga tion s, re p o r t p rep a ra tion , and oth er a c tiv itie s of lim ite d scope re q u irin g kn ow ledge o f
p rin c ip le s , p r a c tic e s , and techniques co m m on ly em ployed in the s p e c ific n a rro w a re a o f
a ssign m en ts.
P e r fo r m s w ork which in v o lv e s con ven tion al types o f plans, in vestig a tio n s,
s u rv ey s, stru ctu res, or equipm ent w ith r e la t iv e ly few c o m p le x fea tu re s fo r which th ere
a re p reced en ts.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n o f o th e r s .— M ay su p ervise
in s p e c to rs , and other tech nician s a ssign ed to a s s is t in the w ork.



the w o rk of d ra fts m en ,

47
E N G IN E E R — Continued
E n gin eer IV
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s ,— W ork re q u ire s o r ig in a lity and ju dgm en t in the independent
evalu ation , s ele ctio n , and su bstantial adaptation and m o d ific a tio n of standard techniques,
p ro ce d u res, and c r ite r ia .
Is re c o g n iz e d as fu lly com petent in a ll conventional a spects of
the su b je c t-m a tte r o r fu nctional a re a of assignm ents.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— R e c e iv e s d ir e c t su p ervisio n and guidance p r im a r ily on n ovel
o r c o n tr o v e r s ia l p ro b le m s o r questions.
M akes independent tech n ica l d ec isio n s on d eta ils
of w o rk c o v e r e d by preced en ts.
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— P la n s, schedules, and co ord in ates d eta iled
phases of the en gin eerin g w o rk in a p a rt o f a m a jo r p r o je c t o r in a tota l p r o je c t of m o d era te
scope.
D e v is e s new approach es to p ro b le m s encountered.
P e r fo r m s w o rk which in v o lv e s
conventional e n gin eerin g p r a c tic e but in clu des a v a r ie ty of co m p lex fea tu res such as c o n flic t­
ing d esign re q u ire m e n ts , u n su itability o f standard m a te r ia ls , and d iffic u lt co ord in atio n r e ­
qu irem en ts.
W ork re q u ir e s a broad know ledge of preced en ts in the s p e c ia lty a rea and a
good kn ow ledge o f p rin c ip le s and p r a c tic e s of re la te d s p e c ia ltie s .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ire c tio n of o th e r s .— M a y su p ervise a few en gin eers or te c h ­
n icians on routine w ork .
E n gin eer V
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— W ork re q u ire s application of in te n siv e and d iv e r s ifie d
kn ow ledge o f en gin eerin g p r in c ip le s and p ra c tic e s in broad a re a s of assignm ents and r e ­
lated fie ld s . M akes d ecision s in dependently on e n gin eerin g p ro b le m s and m ethods, and r e p ­
re sen ts the o rg a n iza tio n in c o n feren ces to r e s o lv e im p ortan t questions and to plan and c o ­
ordin ate w ork.
P o s itio n s m a y be s u p e r v is o ry o r n o n su p erviso ry.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— R e c e iv e s
w o rk o b je c tiv e s and c r it ic a l issu es.

su p ervisio n

and guidance

only in te rm s o f s p e c ific

T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— S u p e rv is o r— plans, d ev elo p s, co ord in a tes, and
d ire c ts a la r g e and im p orta n t en gin eerin g p r o je c t o r a number of sm a ll p r o je c ts w ith m any
co m p le x fea tu res .
N o n s u p e rv is o ry r e s e a r c h e r — c a r r ie s out c o m p le x o r n ovel r e s e a r c h
re q u irin g the d evelop m en t of new o r im p ro v e d techniques and p r o c e d u re s .
N o n s u p e rv is o ry sta ff s p e c ia lis t— d evelop s and evalu ates plans
v a r ie t y of p r o je c ts and a c tiv itie s to be c a r r ie d out by oth ers.

and

assign m en ts

c r it e r ia

fo r a

R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ir e c tio n of o th e r s .— S u p e rv is o r— s u p e rv is e s , co o rd in a tes , and
re v ie w s the w ork of a sm a ll staff of en gin eers and tech nician s. E stim a tes m an pow er needs
and schedules and a ssign s w o rk to m eet com p letio n date.
E n gin eer V I
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— W ork is c h a ra c te riz e d by fu ll tech n ica l r e s p o n s ib ility fo r
in te rp re tin g , o rg a n izin g , execu ting, and coord in atin g assignm ents.
M ain tain s lia is o n w ith
oth er o rga n iza tio n s o r com pan ies.
P o s itio n s m a y be s u p e r v is o ry or n o n su p erviso ry.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— A ssign m en ts a re r e c e iv e d in te rm s of b roa d g e n e ra l o b je c tiv e s
and lim its .
S u p ervision co n cern s a d m in istra tive fea tu res of the w ork.
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— C o n ceives and plans e n gin eerin g p ro je c ts in ­
vo lv in g ex p lo ra tio n of subject a rea , d efin itio n of scope and se le c tio n of p ro b le m s fo r in v e s ­
tiga tion , and d evelop m en t of n ovel concepts and approaches.
S u p e rv is o r— plans, d evelop s, co ord in a tes, and d ir e c ts a num ber
portant p r o je c ts o r a p r o je c t of m a jo r scope and im p orta n ce.

of

la rg e and im ­

N o n s u p e rv is o ry r e s e a r c h e r — plans and conducts re s e a rc h o r oth er w o rk re q u irin g
p io n e erin g in a rea s in w hich la r g e blocks of data a re c o n tr o v e r s ia l o r unknown.



48
E N G IN E E R — Continued
N o n s u p e rv is o ry sta ff s p e c ia lis t— as an e x p e rt in a s p e c ific fie ld , p e r fo r m s a d v is o ry ,
consulting, and re v ie w w ork .
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r d ir e c tio n of o th e r s .— S u p e rv is o r— d ir e c ts a s ta ff of p r o je c t en g i­
n e e rs and a ssista n ts. E valu ates p r o g r e s s of the sta ff and re su lts obtained, and recom m en ds
m a jo r changes to a ch ieve o v e r a ll o b je c tiv e s .
E n g in eer V II
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— W ork is c h a ra c te riz e d by d ec ision s and recom m en dation s
which a re re c o g n iz e d as au th o rita tive and have an im p ortan t im p act on e x ten s ive en gin eerin g
a c tiv itie s .
In itia tes and m aintains ex ten s ive contacts w ith k ey en gin eers and o ffic ia ls of
o th er o rga n iza tio n s and co m pan ies; this re q u ir e s s k ill in p ersu a sion and n egotiation s of
c r it ic a l issu es .
P o s itio n s m a y be s u p e r v is o ry o r n o n su p erviso ry.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— R e c e iv e s g e n e ra l a d m in is tra tiv e d irectio n .
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— D em on stra tes c r e a tiv ity , fo re s ig h t, and m atu re
en gin eerin g judgm ent in an ticipatin g and so lvin g u npreceden ted e n gin eerin g p ro b le m s , d e ­
term in in g p r o g ra m o b je c tiv e s and re q u irem en ts, o rg a n izin g p ro g ra m s and p r o je c ts , and d e ­
v elo p in g standards and guides fo r d iv e r s e en gin eerin g a c tiv itie s .
S u p e rv is o r— plans, d ev elo p s, co ord in a tes, and d ire c ts an en gin eerin g p ro g ra m con ­
sistin g of m any la r g e and im p ortan t p r o je c ts .
N o n s u p e rv is o ry — p e r fo r m s a d v is o ry , consulting,
s p e c ia lis t or e x p e rt in b roa d p r o g ra m a rea s.

and

r e v ie w

w o rk

as a u th o rita tive

R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ire c tio n of o th e r s .— S u p e rv is o r— d ir e c ts a la r g e sta ff of p r o ­
je c t e n g in eers, and en gin eers and scie n tists in supporting functions.
S e v e r a l subordinate
s u p e rv is o rs a re re sp o n sib le fo r p r o je c ts or a c tiv itie s ty p ic a lly id e n tifie d w ith le v e l V I.
E n gin eer V III
G en era l c h a r a c t e r is tic s .— W ork is c h a ra c te riz e d by a u th orita tive d e c isio n s and r e c ­
om m endations which have a fa r - r e a c h in g im p act on ex ten s ive en gin eerin g and re la te d a c ­
t iv it ie s of the com pany.
N e g o tia tes c r itic a l and c o n tr o v e r s ia l issu es w ith top le v e l en ­
g in e e rs and o ffic e r s of oth er o rga n iza tio n s and com pan ies.
P o s itio n s m a y be s u p e r v is o ry
o r n o n su p erviso ry.
D ire c tio n r e c e iv e d .— R e c e iv e s g e n e ra l a d m in is tra tiv e d irectio n .
T y p ic a l duties and r e s p o n s ib ilitie s .— D em on stra tes a high d e g re e o f c r e a tiv ity , f o r e ­
sight, and m atu re en gin eerin g judgm ent in planning, o rg a n izin g , and guiding e x ten s ive e n g i­
n eerin g p ro g ra m s and a c tiv itie s of outstanding n o v e lty and im p orta n ce.
S u p e rv is o r— plans, d ev elo p s, co ord in a tes, and d ir e c ts a h igh ly co m p le x and d iv e r ­
s ifie d en gin eerin g p r o g ra m co n sistin g of m any la r g e and im p ortan t p r o je c ts and su pport­
ing a c tiv itie s .
N o n s u p e rv is o ry — p e r fo rm s a d v is o ry and consulting w o rk fo r his com pan y as a n a­
tio n a lly re c o g n iz e d au th ority fo r broad p r o g ra m a rea s of c o n s id era b le n o v e lty and
im p orta n ce.
R e s p o n s ib ility fo r the d ire c tio n of* o th e r s .— D ire c ts a v e r y la r g e sta ff o f p r o je c t
e n g in eers, and en gin eers and scie n tists in supporting functions. S e v e r a l subordinate su p er­
v is o r s a re re s p o n s ib le fo r p ro g ra m s , p r o je c ts , or a c tiv itie s ty p ic a lly id e n tifie d w ith le v e l V II.

Th is le v e l does not include p osition s o f c h ie f en gin eers o f com pan ies
w ith la r g e en gin eerin g o rga n iza tio n ; e .g ., those engaged in re s e a rc h
and develop m en t on a v a r ie t y o f c o m p le x weapons sy stem s w ith nu­
m ero u s n o ve l com ponents, or of ch iefs of p r im a r y o rg a n iza tio n a l s e g ­
m ents of com pan ies w ith v e r y la r g e en gin eerin g o rga n iza tio n s engaged
in unusually ex ten s ive and d iv e r s ifie d re s e a rc h and develop m en t.




49
ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS
E N G IN E E R IN G T E C H N IC IA N
T o be c o v e r e d by these d efin itio n s, em p loy ees m ust m e et a ll o f the fo llo w in g c r ite r ia :
(1)

P r o v id e s s e m ip ro fe s s io n a l tech n ical support fo r en gin eers w ork in g
a re a s as re s e a rc h , design , d evelop m en t, testin g o r m anu facturing
im p ro vem e n t.

(2)

W ork p ertain s to e le c tr ic a l, e le c tr o n ic , o r m ech a n ica l com ponents o r equipm ent.

(3)

R e q u ire d to have som e know ledge o f scie n ce o r en gin eerin g .

(E x clu d es produ ction o r m aintenance w o r k e r s ,
draftsm en , d e s ig n e rs , and e n g in e e r s .)

q u ality c o n tro l

t e s te r s ,

in such
p ro c e s s

cra fts m en ,

E n gin eerin g T ech n icia n I
P e r fo r m s sim p le rou tine tasks under c lo s e s u p ervisio n o r fr o m d eta iled p ro ce d u res.
W ork is checked in p ro c e s s o r on co m p letion .
P e r fo r m s at this le v e l, one o r a c o m b i­
nation o f such ty p ic a l duties as:
A s s e m b le s o r
connecting.

in s ta lls equipm ent o r parts

re q u irin g sim p le

w irin g ,

P e r fo r m s sim p le o r rou tine tasks o r tests such as te n s ile o r
e r a te s , and adjusts sim p le test equipm ent; re c o r d s te s t data.

s o ld erin g ,

or

h ardness tests; o p ­

G athers and m aintains s p e c ifie d re c o r d s o f en gin eerin g data such as te s ts , and d ra w ­
ings; p e r fo rm s com putations by substituting num bers in s p e c ifie d fo rm u la s; plots
data and draw s sim p le cu rv es and graphs.
E n gin eerin g T ech n icia n II
P e r fo r m s sta n d ard ized o r p r e s c r ib e d a ssign m en ts, in v o lv in g a sequence o f re la te d
o p era tio n s.
F o llo w s standard w o rk m ethods o r e x p lic it in stru ction s; tech n ic a l adequ acy o f
routine w ork is re v ie w e d on com pletion ; nonroutine w o rk m a y a lso be re v ie w e d in p r o c e s s .
P e r fo r m s at this le v e l, one o r a com bin ation o f such ty p ic a l duties as:
A s s e m b le s o r con stru cts sim p le o r standard equipm ent o r p a rts.
r e p a ir sim p le in stru m en ts o r equipm ent.

M ay s e r v ic e o r

Conducts a v a r ie t y o f sta n d ard ized tests; m a y p re p a re te s t sp ecim en s; sets up and
o p era tes standard te s t equipm ent; re c o r d s test data.
E x tra c ts e n g in eerin g data fr o m v a rio u s p r e s c r ib e d so u rces; p r o c e s s e s
fo llo w in g w e ll defin ed m ethods; presen ts the data in p r e s c r ib e d fo rm .

the

data

E n gin eerin g T ec h n icia n III
P e r fo r m s a ssign m en ts that a re not c o m p le te ly sta n d ard ized o r p r e s c r ib e d .
S elects
o r adapts standard p ro ce d u res o r equipm ent.
R e c e iv e s in itia l in stru ctio n s, equipm ent r e ­
q u irem en ts and a d vice fr o m s u p e rv is o r o r en gin eer; tech n ica l adequ acy o f co m p leted w o rk
is checked.
P e r fo r m s at this le v e l, one o r a com bin ation o f such ty p ic a l duties as:
C on stru cts com ponents, subunits o r sim p le m od els
M ay trou b lesh oot and c o r r e c t m alfu n ction s.

o r adapts standard equipm ent.

Conducts va rio u s tests o r ex p erim en ts which m a y r e q u ir e m in o r m o d ific a tio n s in
te s t setups o r p ro ce d u res; s e le c ts , sets up and o p era tes standard te s t equipm ent
and re c o r d s te s t data.
E x tra c ts and co m p ile s a v a r ie ty o f en gin eerin g data; p r o c e s s e s o r com putes data
using s p e c ifie d fo rm u la s and p ro ce d u res.
P e r fo r m s routine a n a ly sis to check a p ­
p lic a b ility , a ccu ra cy , and reason a b len ess o f data.



50
E N G IN E E R IN G T E C H N IC IA N — Continued
E n gin eerin g T ech n icia n IV
P e r fo r m s nonroutine assign m en ts o f substantial v a r ie t y and c o m p le x ity .
R e c e iv e s
o b je c tiv e s and tech n ica l a d vice fr o m s u p e rv is o r o r en gin eer; w o rk is re v ie w e d fo r tech n ica l
adequ acy.
M ay be a s s is te d by lo w e r le v e l tech n ician s.
P e r fo r m s at this le v e l, one o r a
com bin ation o f such ty p ic a l duties as:
W orks on lim ite d segm en t o f d evelop m en t p ro jec t; con stru cts ex p e rim e n ta l o r p r o ­
totype m od els to m e e t en gin eerin g re q u irem en ts; conducts tests o r ex p erim en ts;
r e c o r d s and evalu ates data and re p o rts fin din gs.
Conducts tests o r ex p erim en ts re q u irin g s e le c tio n and adaptation or m o d ific a tio n o f
test equipm ent and test p ro ce d u res; sets up and o p era tes equipm ent; r e c o r d s data;
a n a ly zes data and p re p a re s te s t re p o rts .
C o m p iles and com putes a v a r ie t y o f en g in eerin g data; m a y an a lyze test and d esign
data; d evelop s o r p re p a re s sch em a tics, design s, s p e c ific a tio n s , parts lis ts o r m akes
recom m en d a tion s re g a rd in g these ite m s .
M ay r e v ie w design s o r sp e cific a tio n s fo r
adequacy.
E n g in eerin g T ech n icia n V
P e r fo r m s nonroutine and co m p le x assign m en ts in vo lv in g r e s p o n s ib ility fo r planning
and conducting a com p lete p r o je c t o f r e la t iv e ly lim ite d scope o r a p o rtio n o f a l a r g e r and
m o re d iv e r s e p r o je c t.
S elects and adapts plans, techniqu es, design s o r layou ts.
M ay
co ord in a te portion s o f o v e r a ll assignm ent; r e v ie w s , a n a lyzes and in te g r a te s * the tech n ic a l
w o rk o f o th ers.
S u p ervis o r o r p r o fe s s io n a l en gin eer outlines o b je c tiv e s , re q u irem en ts and
d esign approach es; co m p leted w o rk is r e v ie w e d fo r tech n ica l adequacy and s a tis fa c tio n o f
re q u ire m e n ts .
M ay be a s s is te d by lo w e r le v e l tech n ician s.
P e r fo r m s at this le v e l, one
o r a com bin ation o f such ty p ic a l duties as:
D esign s, d evelop s and con stru cts m a jo r units, d e v ic e s o r equipm ent; conducts tests
o r ex p erim en ts; a n a ly zes re su lts and re d esig n s o r m o d ifie s equipm ent to im p ro v e
p e rfo rm a n c e ; re p o rts re s u lts .
Plan s o r a s s is ts in planning tests to evalu ate equipm ent p e rfo rm a n c e .
D eterm in es
te s t re q u irem en ts, equipm ent m o d ific a tio n and test p ro ce d u res; conducts tests,
a n a lyzes and evalu ates data and p re p a re s re p o rts on findings and re co m m en d a tio n s.
R e v ie w s and a n a lyzes a v a r ie t y o f e n gin eerin g data to d eterm in e re q u irem en ts to
m e et en gin eerin g o b je c tiv e s ; m a y ca lcu la te d esign data; p re p a re s layou ts, d e ta iled
s p e c ific a tio n s , parts lis t s , e stim a tes , p ro c e d u re s , etc.
M ay ch eck and a n a lyze
draw in gs o r equipm ent to d eterm in e adequacy o f draw in gs and design .

DRAFTSMEN
D R A F T S M A N , JU NIO R (A s s is ta n t D raftsm an )
D raw s to sca le units or parts o f draw in gs p re p a re d by d raftsm a n o r oth ers fo r
en gin eerin g , con stru ction , o r m anu facturing pu rp oses.
U ses va rio u s types o f d ra ftin g to o ls
as re q u ire d .
M ay p re p a re draw in gs fr o m sim p le plans o r sketches, o r p e r fo r m oth er duties
under d ir e c tio n o f a draftsm an .
DRAFTSM AN,

SENIO R

P r e p a r e s w ork in g plans and d eta il draw in gs fr o m notes, rough o r d eta iled sketches
fo r en gin eerin g , con stru ction , o r m anu facturing pu rp oses.
D uties in v o lv e a com bin ation o f
the fo llo w in g : P r e p a rin g w ork in g plans, d eta il draw in gs, m aps, c r o s s - s e c tio n s , etc. , to
s ca le by use o f d ra ftin g in stru m en ts; m aking en gin eerin g com putations such as those in v o lv e d
in stren gth o f m a te r ia ls , beam s and tru sse s; v e r ify in g co m p leted w ork, checking dim en sion s,
m a te r ia ls to be used, and qu an tities; w ritin g s p e c ific a tio n s ; and m aking adjustm ents o r
changes in draw in gs o r s p e c ific a tio n s .
M ay ink in lin es and le tte r s on p en cil d raw in gs,
p re p a re d eta il units o f co m p lete d raw in gs, o r tra c e d raw in gs.
W ork is fre q u e n tly in a
s p e c ia liz e d fie ld such as a rc h ite c tu ra l, e le c tr ic a l, m ech a n ica l, o r stru ctu ra l d raftin g.



51
TRACER

C opies plans and draw in gs p re p a re d by oth ers, by p la cin g tra c in g cloth o r paper
o v e r draw in g and tra c in g w ith pen or p en cil. U ses T - s q u a r e , co m p a ss, and oth er d ra ftin g
to o ls . M ay p re p a re sim p le draw in gs and do sim p le le tte rin g .

CLERICAL
B O O K K E E P IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
O p era tes a bookkeepin g m achine (R em in gton Rand, E llio tt F is h e r , Sundstrand, B u r­
rou gh s, N a tio n a l Cash R e g is t e r , with or without a ty p e w r ite r keyb oard ) to keep a r e c o r d o f
business tra n sa ction s.
B o o k k eep in g-M a ch in e O p era to r I
K eeps a re c o r d o f one or m o re phases or section s o f a set o f re c o r d s u su ally r e ­
q u irin g lit t le kn ow ledge o f b a sic bookkeeping. Ph ases o r section s include accounts p a yable,
p a y r o ll, c u s to m e r s ’ accounts (not including a sim p le type o f b illin g d e s c rib e d under b ille r ,
m a ch in e), cost d istrib u tio n , expense d istrib u tio n , in ven to ry c o n tro l, etc. M ay check o r a s s is t
in p re p a ra tio n o f t r ia l balances and p re p a re c o n tro l sheets fo r the accounting dep artm en t.
B ook k eep in g-M a ch in e O p era to r II
K eeps a set o f r e c o r d s re q u irin g a know ledge o f and e x p e rie n c e in b a sic bookkeeping
p rin c ip le s and fa m ila r it y w ith the stru ctu re o f the p a rtic u la r accounting sy stem used. D e t e r ­
m in es p ro p e r re c o r d s and d istrib u tio n o f debit and c re d it item s to be used in each phase o f
the w o rk .
M ay p r e p a re co n solid a ted r e p o r ts , balance sh eets, and oth er re c o r d s by hand.

C L E R K , A C C O U N T IN G
C le rk , A ccou ntin g I
Under s u p ervisio n , p e r fo rm s one or m o re routine accounting operation s such as
postin g sim p le jo u rn a l vou ch ers o r accounts payable vo u ch ers, e n terin g vou ch ers in vou cher
r e g is t e r s ; re c o n c ilin g bank accounts; and postin g su b sid ia ry le d g e rs c o n tro lle d by g e n e ra l
le d g e r s , or postin g sim p le cost accounting data. T h is job does not re q u ir e a kn ow ledge o f
accounting and bookkeeping p r in c ip le s , but is found in o ffic e s in w hich the m o re rou tine a c ­
counting w o rk is subdivided on a functional basis am ong s e v e r a l w o r k e r s .
C le rk , A ccou ntin g II
U nder g e n e ra l d ir e c tio n o f a b o ok keep er o r accountant, has r e s p o n s ib ility fo r keepin g
one or m o re section s o f a co m p lete set o f books o r re c o r d s r e la tin g to one phase o f an
esta b lis h m e n t’ s business tra n sa ctio n s. W o rk in vo lv es postin g and balancing su b sid ia ry le d g e r
or le d g e rs such as accounts re c e iv a b le o r accounts payable; exam in ing and coding in vo ic es
o r vou ch ers w ith p ro p e r accounting distribu tion ; re q u ire s judgm ent and ex p e rie n c e in m aking
p ro p e r assignation s and a llo c a tio n s . M ay a s s is t in p rep a rin g , adjusting, and clo s in g jo u rn a l
e n trie s ; m a y d ir e c t accounting c le rk s I.

C L E R K , F IL E
C le rk , F ile I
P e r fo r m s rou tine filin g o f m a te r ia l that has a lre a d y been c la s s ifie d o r which is
e a s ily c la s s ifie d in a s im p le s e r ia l c la s s ific a tio n sy stem (e. g. , a lp h a b etica l, ch ro n o lo g ic a l,
o r n u m e ric a l). A s req u ested , lo ca tes r e a d ily a v a ila b le m a te r ia l in file s and fo rw a rd s m a ­
t e r ia l; m ay f i l l out w ith d ra w a l ch a rge.
P e r fo r m s sim p le c le r ic a l and m anual tasks re q u ire d
to m ain tain and s e r v ic e file s .



52
C L E R K , F I L E — Continued
C le rk , F ile II
S orts, codes, and file s u n c la s s ifie d m a te r ia l by sim p le (su b ject m a tte r) headings
or p a r tly c la s s ifie d m a te r ia l by fin e r subheadings.
P r e p a r e s sim p le re la te d in dex and
c r o s s - r e fe r e n c e aids. A s requ ested , lo c a te s c le a r ly id e n tifie d m a te r ia l in file s and fo rw a rd s
m a te r ia l.
M a y p e r fo r m re la te d c le r ic a l tasks re q u ire d to m ain tain and s e r v ic e file s .
C le rk , F ile III
In an esta b lish ed filin g sy stem containing a num ber of v a r ie d su bject m a tter file s ,
c la s s ifie s and in dexes file m a te r ia l such as co rresp o n d en ce, re p o r ts , tech n ica l docum ents,
etc.
M a y a ls o file this m a te ria l.
M a y keep r e c o r d s of v a rio u s types in conjunction w ith
the file s .
M a y lea d a sm a ll group of lo w e r le v e l file c le rk s .
KEYPU NC H OPERATOR
Keypunch O p era to r I
U nder c lo se su p ervisio n or fo llo w in g s p e c ific p ro ce d u res or in stru ction s, tra n s c rib e s
data fr o m sou rce documents to punched cards. O p era tes a n u m eric a l and/or alp h ab etica l or
com bination keypunch m achine to keypunch tabulating card s.
M a y v e r i f y card s.
W ork in g fr o m v a rio u s sta n d ard ized sou rce docum ents, fo llo w s s p e c ifie d sequences
w hich have been coded o r p r e s c r ib e d in d eta il and re q u ire lit t le o r no s e le c tin g , codin g, o r in ­
te rp re tin g data to be punched. P r o b le m s a ris in g fr o m erro n eo u s item s or codes, m is s in g
in form a tion , etc., a re r e fe r r e d to s u p e rv is o r.
Keypunch O p era tor II
O p era tes a n u m eric a l and/or alp h ab etica l or com bin ation keypunch m achine to
s c r ib e data fr o m va rio u s sou rce docum ents to keypunch tabulating card s.

tr a n ­

P e r fo r m s sam e tasks as lo w e r le v e l keypunch o p era to r but in addition, w o rk re q u ir e s
a p p lica tio n of coding sk ills and the m aking of som e d eterm in a tio n s, fo r ex a m p le, lo ca te s on
the sou rce docum ent the item s to be punched; ex tra cts in fo rm a tio n fr o m s e v e r a l docum ents;
s ea rch e s fo r and in te rp re ts in fo rm a tio n on the docum ent to d eterm in e in fo rm a tio n to be
punched.
M ay tra in in ex p erien ced o p era to rs.
O F F IC E BO Y OR G IR L
P e r fo r m s va rio u s routine duties such as running erra n d s; operatin g m in or o ffic e
m ach in es, such as s e a le r s or m a ile r s ; opening and d istrib u tin g m a il; and other m in o r
c le r ic a l w ork.
STENOGRAPHER, G EN ERAL
P r im a r y duty is to take d icta tion fr o m one or m o re p erso n s e ith e r in shorthand or
by Stenotype or s im ila r m achine, in vo lv in g a n orm a l routine vo ca b u la ry; tra n s c rib e dictation .
M a y a ls o type fr o m w ritte n copy. M a y m ain tain file s , keep sim p le re c o r d s or p e r fo r m other
r e la t iv e ly rou tine c le r ic a l tasks.
M a y op era te fr o m a sten ograph ic pool. D oes not include
tra n s c rib in g -m a c h in e w o r k .
S T E N O G R A P H E R , SE N IO R
P r im a r y duty is to take d icta tion fr o m one o r m o re p erso n s, e ith er in shorthand or
by Stenotype or s im ila r m achine, in vo lv in g a v a r ie d tech n ical or s p e c ia liz e d v o c a b u la ry such
as in le g a l b r ie fs or re p o rts on s c ie n tific re s e a r c h , and tra n s c rib e dictation . M ay a ls o type
fr o m w ritte n copy.
M a y a ls o set up and m ain tain file s , keep re c o r d s , etc.
OR
P e r fo r m s sten ograph ic duties re q u irin g s ig n ific a n tly g r e a te r independence and r e ­
s p o n s ib ility than sten ogra p h er, g e n e ra l as evid en c ed b y the fo llo w in g ; W ork re q u ir e s high
d e g re e of
sten ograph ic speed and a ccu ra cy ; a thorough w ork in g kn ow ledge of g e n e ra l



53
S T E N O G R A P H E R , S E N IO R — Continued

business and o ffic e p roced u re and of the s p e c ific business o p era tion s, orga n izatio n , p o lic ie s ,
p ro ce d u res, file s , w o rk flo w , etc.
U ses this kn ow ledge in p e r fo rm in g sten ograph ic duties
and re sp o n sib le c le r ic a l tasks such as m aintaining follow u p file s ; a ssem b lin g m a te r ia l fo r
r e p o r ts , m em oran d a,
and le tte r s ; com posin g sim p le le tte r s fr o m g e n e ra l in stru ction s;
read in g and routing in com in g m a il; a n sw erin g routine qu estion s, etc.
D oes not include
tra n s c rib in g -m a c h in e w o r k .
N O T E : T h is job is distin gu ish ed fr o m that of a s e c r e t a r y in that the s e c r e t a r y
n o rm a lly w ork s in a con fid en tia l re la tio n s h ip to only one m a n a ger or ex ecu tive and p e r fo rm s
m o re re sp o n sib le and d is c r e tio n a r y tasks as d e s c rib e d in that jo b definition.

S W IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R
O p era tes a s in g le - or m u ltip le -p o s itio n telephone sw itch board. D uties in vo lv e han­
dling in com ing, outgoing, in traplant, or o ffic e ca lls . M a y handle routine lo n g -d ista n ce ca lls
and r e c o r d s to ll ca lls.
M a y p e r fo r m lim ite d in fo rm a tio n w ork , fo r exam ple, fu rn ish ing
telephone exten sion num bers when a s p e c ific name is fu rn ish ed.
M a y o c c a s io n a lly take
telephone o rd e rs .

S W ITC H B O A R D O P E R A T O R , S P E C IA L
In addition to the w o rk d e s c rib e d above fo r sw itch board o p era to r or as a fu ll- tim e
assignm ent, s e r v e s as a " s p e c ia l" o p era to r who handles the m o re co m p le x lon g -d ista n ce
ca lls (e .g ., co n feren ce, c o lle c t, o v e rs e a s , or s im ila r c a lls ) or p e r fo r m s fu ll telephone in ­
fo rm a tio n s e r v ic e (e .g ., w h e re a know ledge of the w o rk done in d iffe re n t parts of the o rga n ­
iza tio n is re q u ire d ).

T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
Tabu la tin g-M a ch in e O p era to r I
O perates sim p le tabulating or e le c t r ic a l accounting m ach in es, such as the s o r te r ,
rep ro d u cin g punch, c o lla to r, etc., w ith s p e c ific in stru ction s. M a y include the p e rfo rm a n c e
of som e sim p le w irin g fr o m d ia gra m s and som e filin g w ork.
Th e w o rk ty p ic a lly in vo lv es
portion s of a w o rk unit, fo r exa m p le, in dividu al so rtin g or co lla tin g runs, or r e p e titiv e
o peration s.
T a b u la tin g-M a ch in e O p era to r II
O perates m o re d iffic u lt tabulating or e le c t r ic a l accounting m ach in es, such as the
tabu lator and ca lcu la to r, in addition to the s o r te r , re p ro d u c e r, and c o lla to r. T h is w o rk is
p e r fo rm e d under s p e c ific in stru ction s and m a y include the p e rfo rm a n c e o f som e w irin g fr o m
d ia gra m s.
The w o rk ty p ic a lly in v o lv e s , fo r exam ple, tabulations in vo lv in g a r e p e titiv e a c ­
counting e x e r c is e , a co m p lete but sm a ll tabulating study, or parts of a lo n g er and m o re
co m p lex re p o rt. Such re p o r ts and studies a re u su ally of a re c u r r in g nature w h ere the p r o ­
ced u res a re w e ll establish ed. M a y a ls o include the tra in in g of new em p lo y ees in the b a sic
o p era tio n of the m achine.
T a b u la tin g-M a ch in e O p era to r III
O perates a v a r ie t y of tabulating or e le c t r ic a l accounting m ach in es, ty p ic a lly in ­
cluding such m ach in es as the tabu lator, ca lcu la to r, in te rp r e te r, c o lla to r, and oth ers. P e r ­
fo rm s com p lete re p o rtin g assign m en ts without clo se su p ervisio n , and p e r fo rm s d iffic u lt
w irin g as req u ired .
The com p lete re p o rtin g and tabulating assign m en ts ty p ic a lly in volv e a
v a r ie t y of long and c o m p le x re p o rts which often a re of ir r e g u la r or n on rec u rrin g type r e ­
qu irin g som e planning and sequencing of steps to be taken. A s a m o re ex p e rie n c e d o p era to r,
is ty p ic a lly in vo lv ed in tra in in g new o p era to rs in m achine o p era tio n s, or p a r tia lly tra in ed
o p era to rs in w irin g fr o m d ia gra m s and o p era tin g sequences of long and co m p lex re p o rts .
Does not include w ork in g s u p e rv is o rs p e r fo rm in g tabu latin g-m ach in e operation s and d a y -to day s u p ervisio n of the w o rk and produ ction of a group of tabu latin g-m ach in e o p era to rs.



54
T Y P IS T
U ses a ty p e w r ite r to m ake co p ies o f va rio u s m a te r ia ls o r to m ake out b ills a fte r
ca lcu la tion s have been m ade by another person .
M ay include typing o f s te n c ils , m ats, o r
s im ila r m a te r ia ls fo r use in du plicatin g p r o c e s s e s .
M ay do c le r ic a l w ork in v o lv in g lit t le
s p e c ia l tra in in g , such as keepin g sim p le re c o r d s , filin g r e c o r d s and re p o r ts , o r so rtin g
and d istrib u tin g in com in g m a il.
T y p is t I
P e r fo r m s one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g : Typing m a te r ia l in fin a l fo r m when it in ­
v o lv e s com bin in g m a te r ia l fr o m s e v e r a l so u rces o£ r e s p o n s ib ility fo r c o r r e c t sp ellin g , s y l­
la b ica tio n , punctuation, etc. , o f tech n ica l o r unusual w ord s o r fo r e ig n language m a te r ia l;
planning layou t and typing o f c o m p lic a ted s ta tis tic a l ta b les to m ain tain u n ifo rm ity and balance
in spacin g.
M ay type routine fo r m le tte rs , v a ry in g d eta ils to suit circ u m s ta n c e s .
T y p is t II
P e r fo r m s one o r m o re o f the fo llo w in g :
C opy typing fr o m rough o r c le a r d rafts;
rou tine typing o f fo r m s , in su rance p o lic ie s , e t c .; settin g up sim p le standard tabulations,
o r copyin g m o re co m p le x ta b les a lre a d y set up and spaced p r o p e rly .

N O T E : The d efin ition s fo r the d raftin g and c le r ic a l occupations shown in this b u l­
le tin a re the sam e as those used in the B u reau 's p ro g ra m o f la b o r m a rk et occu pation al
w age su rv eys. (S ee the lis t o f a re a s in the o r d e r fo r m at the back o f this b u lle tin .)
The
le v e l design ation s used in this bu lletin , h ow ever, d iffe r fr o m those used in the a re a b u lletin s.
The equ ivalen t le v e l design ations fo r the occupations co n cern ed a re as fo llo w s :

O ccupation

N ation al S u rvey o f
P r o fe s s io n a l, A d m in is tra tiv e ,
T ech n ica l, and C le r ic a l P a y

L a b o r M a rk et
O ccupational
W age S urveys

C le rk , accounting

I
II

B
A

C le rk , file

I
II
III

C
B
A

Keypunch o p e ra to r

I
II

B
A

T a b u la tin g-m a ch in e o p e ra to r

I
II
III

C
B
A

T y p is t

I
II

B
A




Appendix D: Comparison of Average Annual Salaries in Private Industry,
Winter 1961— with Federal Classification Act Salary Rate Ranges
62,
The su rvey was designed, among other uses, to p ro v id e a b a sis fo r com parin g
F e d e r a l s a la r ie s under the C la s s ific a tio n A c t with g e n e ra l pay le v e ls in p r iv a te industry.
D efin ition s fo r the p ro fe s s io n a l, m a n a g eria l, and s u p e rv is o ry occupation w ork le v e ls used
in the su rvey w e re p re p a re d by the C iv il S e r v ic e C o m m issio n staff, in c o lla b o ra tio n with the
Bureau of La b o r S ta tistics, to a ssu re co m p ila tio n of pay data fo r w ork le v e ls that would be
equ ivalen t to the C la s s ific a tio n A c t gra d es. A l l d efin ition s used in the su rvey w e re graded
by the C o m m issio n in a cco rd a n ce w ith the standards esta b lish ed fo r each gra d e under the
C la s s ific a tio n A ct. F o r each o f the occupation w ork le v e ls su rveyed by the Bureau of L a b o r
S ta tistics, the equ ivalen t C la s s ific a tio n A c t grade, as d eterm in ed by the C om m ission , is
id e n tifie d in the fo llo w in g table.




55

56
C om parison o f a vera g e annual s a la rie s in p r iv a te in d u s tr y ,1 w in te r 1961—
62, w ith co rresp o n d in g
F e d e r a l C la s s ific a tio n A c t s a la ry rate ranges 2

O ccupation and cla ss su rveyed by B L.S3

A v e r a g e annual
s a la rie s in
p r iv a te in d u s try 4

F e d e r a l C la s s ific a tio n A c t s a la ry rate ranges 2
G rade 5

M inim um

GS-5
GS-7
GS-9
GS-11
GS-12

$4,565
5, 540
6, 675
8, 045
9,475

M axim um

Accountants and A u d itors
Accountants
Accountants
A ccountants
A ccountants
Accountants
A u d itors
A u d itors
A u d itors
A u d itors
C h ief
C h ief
C h ief
C h ief

I ______________________________________
I I _____________________________________
I I I ____________________________________
I V ---------------------------------------------V _____________________________________

I ----------------------------------------------------II ---------------------------------------------------III ________________________________________
IV ________________________________________

accountants
accountants
accountants
accountants

I ---------------------------------------I I --------------------------------------III _____________________________
IV -------------------------------------

$5 ,8 80
6,456
7,416
8,988
10,872

565
540
675
045

6, 005
7,205
8, 700
10,165

GS-11
GS-12
GS-13
GS-14

8, 045
9,475
11, 150
12,845

10,165
11,995
14,070
16,245

6, 552
8, 016
10,044
11,844
14,916
16,440
22,392

GS-7
GS-9
GS-11
GS-12
GS-13
GS-14
GS-15

5, 540
6, 675
8, 045
9,475
11, 150
12,845
14,565

7,205
8, 700
10,165
11,995
14,070
16,245
17,925

7, 380
8,856
10,104
12,264

GS-9
GS-10
GS-11
GS-12

6, 67 5
7,290
8, 045
9,475

8,700
9,495
10,165
11,995

6, 096
7,056
8, 004
9, 636

GS-5
GS-7
GS-9
GS-11

4,
5,
6,
8,

565
540
675
045

6, 005
7,205
8, 700
10,165

8, 844
10,428
12,900
15,096

GS-11
GS-12
GS-13
GS-14

8, 045
9,47 5
11, 150
12,845

10,165
11,995
14,070
16,245

340
600
932
840

GS-5
GS-7
GS-9
GS-11

9,972
11,460
13,152
15,192

5,
6,
7,
9,

4,
5,
6,
8,

$6,005
7, 205
8, 700
10,165
11,995

A ttorn eys
A tto rn ey s
A tto rn ey s
A tto rn ey s
A ttorn ey s
A tto rn ey s
A tto rn ey s
A ttorn ey s

I ---------------------------------------------------I I ________________________________________
I I I -------------------------------------------------IV ____________________ ________________
V ________________________________________
V I -------------------------------------------------V I I -----------------------------------------------O ffic e S e rv ic e s

M a n a g ers,
M a n a g ers,
M a n a g ers,
M a n a g ers,

o ffic e
o ffic e
o ffic e
o ffic e

s e r v ic e s
s e r v ic e s
s e r v ic e s
s e r v ic e s

I ____________________
II ___________________
III ___________________
IV ------------------------

P e r s o n n e l M anagem ent
Job
Job
Job
Job

analysts
analysts
analysts
analysts

D ir e c to r s
D ir e c to r s
D ir e c to r s
D ir e c to r s

of
of
of
of

I ----------------------------------------------II ---------------------------------------------III --------------------------------------------IV ___________________________________
p e rson n el
p erso n n el
p erso n n el
p e rson n el

I _________________ ______
II ________________________
III -----------------------------IV _______________________

C hem ists and E n gin eers
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists
C hem ists

I _________________________________________
II ________________________________________
III -------------------------------------------------IV _______________________________________
V ________________________________________
V I _______________________________________
V II ______________________________________
V III _____________________________________

6, 120
6,912
7,956
9,936
11,976
13,464
16,524
18,984

GS-5
GS-7
GS-9
GS-11
GS-12
GS-13
GS-14
GS-15

4, 565
5, 540
6,675
8,045
9,475
11, 150
12,845
14,565

6, 005
7,205
8, 700
10,165
11,995
14,070
16,245
17,925

E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers
E n gin eers

I ________________________________________
II -------------------------------------------------III ______________________________________
IV ______________________________________
V -------------------------------------------------V I ------------------------------------------------V II ----------------------------------------------V III ____________________________________

6, 708
7,488
8, 652
10,248
11,880
13,740
16,608
19,572

GS-5
GS-7
GS-9
GS-11
GS-12
GS-13
GS-14
GS-15

4, 565
5, 540
6, 675
8, 045
9,475
11, 150
12,845
14,565

6, 005
7,205
8, 700
10,165
11,995
14,070
16,245
17,925

3, 820
4, 110
4, 565
5, 540
6,675

4, 830
5, 370
6, 005
7,205
8,700

E n gin eerin g Techn icians
E n gin eerin g
E n gin eerin g
E n gin eerin g
E n gin eerin g
E n gin eerin g

technicians
tech nicians
technicians
technicians
tech nicians

I ________________________
I I ----------------------------I I I ---------------------------I V ______________________
V _______________________

See footn otes at end o f table.




4,704
5,460
6, 252
7, 068
7,932

GS-3
GS-4
GS-5
GS-7
GS-9

57
C om parison o f a v e ra g e annual s a la rie s in p r iv a te in d u s tr y ,1 w in te r 1961—
62, w ith co rresp o n d in g
F e d e r a l C la s s ific a tio n A c t s a la ry rate ranges 1 Continued
2—

Occupation and cla ss su rveyed by B L.S3

A v e r a g e annual
s a la rie s in
p r iv a te in d u s try 4

F e d e r a l C la s s ific a tio n A c t s a la ry ra te ran ges 2
G rad e5

M inim um

$5, 112
6, 621
3,995

GS-4
GS-6
GS-3

$4,110
5, 035
3,820

3, 396
4,260
3, 967
5, 241
2, 952
3, 317
4, 199
3, 730
4, 273
3, 201
4, 064
4, 621
4, 063
4,479
3,829
4,728
5, 640
3, 403
4, 007

GS-2
GS-3
GS-3
GS-4
GS-1
GS-2
GS-3
GS-2
GS-3
GS-1
GS-3
GS-4
GS-2
GS-3
GS-2
GS-3
GS-4
GS-2
GS-3

3, 560
3,820
3,820
4, 110
3, 245
3, 560
3, 820
3, 560
3, 820
3,245
3, 820
4, n o
3, 560
3,820
3, 560
3, 820
4, n o
3, 560
3,820

M axim um

D raftsm en
D raftsm en , ju n ior ________________________________
D raftsm en , s e n i o r ----------------------------------------T r a c e r s ____________________________________________

$5, 370
6, 565
4, 830

C le r ic a l
B ook keepin g-m a ch in e o p era to rs I ----------------B ook keepin g-m a ch in e o p era to rs I I ----------------C le rk s , accounting I _____________________________
C le rk s , accounting II ____________________________
C le rk s , file I ______________________________________
C le rk s , file I I _____________________________________
C le rk s , file I I I ____________________________________
Keypunch o p e ra to rs I ____________________________
Keypunch o p e ra to rs II ___________________________
O ffic e boys o r g ir ls ______________________________
S ten ogra ph ers, g e n e ra l --------------------------------S ten o gra p h ers, s e n io r ___________________________
Sw itchboard o p e ra to rs ----------------------------------Sw itchboard o p e r a to r s , s p e c ia l---------------------Ta bu la tin g-m a ch in e o p era to rs I --------------------Ta b u la tin g-m a ch in e o p era to rs II _______________
Ta b u la tin g-m a ch in e o p era to rs III -----------------T y p ists I ___________________________________________
T y p ists I I __________________________________________

4,
4,
4,
5,
4,
4,
4,
4,
4,
4,
4,
5,
4,
4,
4,
4,
5,

4
,
4
,

505
830
830
370
190
505
830
505
830
190
830
370
505
830
505
830
370
505
830

1 F o r scope o f s u rve y , se e table in appendix A .
2 A s r e v is e d under C la s s ific a tio n A c t A m endm ents o f 1962, e ffe c t iv e the fir s t day o f the fi r s t pay p e rio d beginning on
o r a fte r O ctob er 11, 1962.
3 F o r d e fin ition s , see appendix C.
4 Su rvey findings as p re sen te d in table 1 o f this rep o rt.
5 E qu ivalen t gra d es in the g e n e ra l schedule w e r e supplied by the U. S. C iv il S e r v ic e C om m issio n .
Including m inim um
and m axim u m ra te s , the fo llo w in g num ber of sa la ry rates a re s p e c ifie d : G rades 1 through 10— 10 ra te s ; g rad es 11 through
14— 9 ra tes ; and g rad e 15— 8 ra tes . In form ation on the s p e c ific rates w ithin the rate range fo r each g ra d e as w e ll as p r o v i­
sions fo r w ith in -g ra d e in c re a s e s , and on pay sc a le s in sp ec ia l situations, such as sh ortage occupations (including en gin eers and
s c ie n tis ts ), m ay be obtained fr o m the C om m ission .







Order Form
TO :

Superintendent o f Docum ents
U. S. G o vern m en t P rin tin g O ffic e
W ashington 25, D. C.

o£

B ureau o f L a b o r S ta tistics—
18 O liv e r S treet, Boston 10, M a ss.
341 Ninth A ven u e, N ew Y o r k 1, N. Y.
1371 P e a c h tre e S treet, N E . , A tlan ta 9, Ga.
1365 O n tario S tre e t, C le vela n d 14, Ohio
105 W est A dam s S tre e t, C h icago 3, 111.
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P le a s e send m e cop ies o f bu lletin s as indicated.

1960-61 O C C U P A T IO N A L W AG E S U R V E Y S U M M A R Y B U L L E T IN S :

N u m ber
of
cop ies

B u lletin

1285-83.

W ages

and R e la te d

B e n efits ,

82 L a b o r

M a rk e ts ,

1960—
61.

C on solid ates in fo rm a tio n fr o m the in dividu al a re a bu lletin s fo r su rveys made
during the p e r io d July I960 to July 1961.
Contains a v e ra g e w e e k ly earn in gs
fo r o ffic e occu pation s, a vera g e h ou rly earn in gs fo r plant occu pation s, and e s ­
tablish m en t p r a c tic e s and su pplem en tary w age p ro v is io n s b y in du stry d ivis io n
and a rea .
P r ic e 70 cents.

B u lletin 1285-84.
W ages and R e la te d B e n e fits ,
S tates, and R e g io n a l S u m m a ries, 1960—
61.

M etro p o lita n

A rea s,

United

P r e s e n ts in fo rm a tio n on occu pation al ea rn in gs, e m p lo y e r p r a c tic e s , and su pple­
m e n ta ry w age ben efits fo r a ll m e tro p o lita n areas com bin ed and s e p a ra te ly by
in du stry d iv is io n and re gio n .
A ls o p ro v id e s analyses o f w age tren ds, w age d is ­
p e rs io n , in te r c ity pay d iffe re n c e s , and la b o r-m a n a gem en t a greem e n t c o v e r a g e .
P r ic e 40 cents.




(O v e r )

1961-62 O C C U P A T IO N A L W AG E S U R V E Y A R E A B U L L E T IN S :
N u m ber
of
copies

Num ber
of
copies

_________
♦ M ia m i, B u lletin 1303-31
♦A k ro n , B u lletin 1303-81
_________
♦M ilw au k ee, B u lletin 1303-57
♦Alban y—
Schenectady—T r o y ,
B u lletin 1303-56
_________
♦M in n eapolis—
St. P a u l,
B u lletin 1303-36
____________
*
A lb u q u erq u e, B u lletin 1303-67
♦M u skegon— uskegon H eights ,
M
___________
*
A llen tow n —B eth leh em — aston,
E ________
B u lletin 1303-46
B u lletin 1303-68
_________
♦ ♦ ♦ N e w a rk and J e r s e y C ity ,
_________
♦ ♦ ♦ A tlan ta, B u lletin 1303-65
_________
♦ B a ltim o re , B u lletin 1303-28
B u lletin 1303-45
*N e w Haven, B u lletin 1303-34
___________
*
Beaum ont— o r t A rth u r, ________
P
♦N ew O rlea n s, B u lletin 1303-43
B u lletin 1303-78
________
♦ ♦ ♦ N e w Y o rk , B u lletin 1303-58
________
♦ ♦ ♦ B irm in gh a m , B u lletin 1303-59
________
♦ ♦ N o r fo lk — o rtsm o u th and N e w p o rt
P
_________
♦ B o is e , B u lletin 1303-77
__________
♦ ♦♦ B
os ton, B u lletin 1303-16
Ham pton, B u lletin 1303-75
N ew s—
________
♦♦O klah om a C ity , B u lletin 1303-5
♦B u ffa lo , B u lletin 1303-29
___________
♦Om aha,
B u lletin 130 3-14
♦♦B u rlin gton , B u lletin 1303-50
♦ P a te r son—C lifto n —P a s s a ic ,
♦Canton, B u lletin 1303-62
B u lletin 1303-71
♦ C h a rlesto n , 1303-61
_________
♦ ♦ ♦ P h ila d e lp h ia , B u lletin 1303-25
♦C h a rlo tte, B u lletin 1303-60
___________
♦P h o en ix ,
B u lletin 1303-54
♦Chattanooga, B u lletin 1303-4
_________
♦ P itts b u rg h , B u lletin 130 3-35
♦ ♦♦ Chic ago, B u lletin 1303-64
_________
♦ P o rtla n d (M a in e ), B u lletin 130 3-26
* C in cin nati, B u lletin 1303-55
_________
♦ P o rtla n d ( O r e g .), B u lletin 1303-72
♦ C leve la n d , B u lletin 1303-13
♦ P ro v id e n c e —Paw tu cket,
♦C olu m bu s, B u lletin 1303-41
B u lletin 1303-66
___________
♦ R a le ig h ,
B u lletin 1303-10
♦ D a lla s, B u lletin 1303-20
__________
♦♦♦R ich m o n d , B u lletin 130 3-22
* D avenport— ock Is la n d -M o lin e ,
R
__________
♦ ♦♦ R o c k fo rd , B u lletin 130 3-69
B u lletin 1303-17
________
♦St. L o u is, B u lletin 130 3-18
♦Dayton, B u lletin 1303-39
________
♦♦S alt L a k e C ity, B u lletin 1303-32
♦D e n v e r, B u lletin 1303-33
♦San Antonio, B u lletin 1303-63
♦D es M o in es, B u lletin 1303-42
________
*San B e rn a rd in o — iv e r side— n tario,
R
O
♦ D e tro it, B u lletin 1303-38
B u lletin 1303-11
♦ F o r t W orth , B u lletin 1303-19
♦♦♦San F r a n c is c o —
Oakland,
♦ ♦ G reen B ay, B u lletin 1303-2
B u lletin 1303-37
♦ G r e e n v ille , B u lletin 1303-70
_________
♦Savannah, B u lletin 130 3-80
♦Houston, B u lletin 1303-79
________
♦Scranton, B u lletin 1303-8
♦Seattle, B u lletin 130 3-6
♦In dian apolis, B u lletin 1303-27
♦Jackson, B u lletin 1303-44
♦Sioux F a lls , B u lletin 1303-15
♦ J a c k s o n v ille , B u lletin 1303-21
♦South Bend, B u lletin 1303-52
♦♦♦K a n sa s C ity , B u lletin 1303-24
♦ ♦Spokane, B u lletin 1303-73
♦ L aw r e nc e— ave r h i l l ,
H
♦ T o le d o , B u lletin 1303-47
B u lletin 1303-76
♦T ren ton , B u lletin 1303-30
♦ L itt le Rock— o rth L it t le R ock,
N
♦W ashington, B u lletin 1303-12
B u lletin 1303-1
♦W a terb u ry, B u lletin 1303-48
♦ ♦ ♦ L o s A n g e le s —Lon g Beach,
♦ ♦W a te rlo o , B u lletin 1303-23
B u lletin 1303-53
♦♦W ich ita , B u lletin 1303-7
♦ L o u is v ille , B u lletin 1303-51
♦W ilm in gton , B u lletin 130 3-9
♦Lubbock, B u lletin 1303-74
♦ W o rc e s te r, B u lletin 1303-82
♦ ♦M a n ch es ter, B u lletin 1303-3
♦ Y o rk , B u lletin 1303-49
♦M em p h is, B u lletin 1303-40

_________
_________

P r ic e —

♦ 25 cen ts;

♦♦ 20 cen ts;

♦ ♦ ♦ 30 cents

N am e
A d d ress
C ity




Zone

State
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1962

0 — 662594





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102