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36 70

National Survey
Professional,
Administrative
Technical,
and Clerical
,

,

J u n e 1969

Dayton & Montgomery Co.
Public Library

MAR i 01970
D O C U M E N T CO LLECTIO N

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Bulletin 1654
February 1970

National Survey of
Professional,
Administrative,

,

Technical,
and Clerical
June

y
a
P

I960
Accountants and Auditors
Attorneys
Personnel Management
Buyers
Engineers and Chemists
Engineering Technicians
Draftsmen
Office Clerical

U.S. Department of Labor
George P. Shultz, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner
Bulletin 1654
February

1970

For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office



Washington, D.C., 20402— 75 cents




Preface
This bulletin summarizes the results of the Bureau’ s annual salary survey
of selected professional, administrative, technical, and clerical occupations in
private industry. The nationwide salary information, which relates to June 1969.
is representative of establishments in a broad spectrum of industries throughout
the United States, except Alaska and Hawaii.
The survey was designed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in cooperation
with the Bureau of the Budget and the Civil Service Commission.
It provides
a fund of broadly based information on salary levels and distributions in private
employment.
As such, the results are useful as a guide for salary adminis­
tration purposes and for general economic analysis.
In addition, the survey
provides information on pay in private industry in a form suitable for use in
appraising the compensation of salaried employees in the Federal civil service
(appendix D).
It should be emphasized that this survey, like any other salary
survey, is in no sense calculated to supply mechanical answers to pay policy
questions.
The occupations studied span a wide range of duties and responsibilities.
Individually, the occupations selected were judged to be (a) surveyable in indus­
try within the framework of a broad survey design and (b) representative of oc­
cupational groups which are numerically important in industry as well as in the
Federal Service.
Occupational definitions used in the collection of the salary data (appendix C)
reflect duties and responsibilities in private industry; however, they are also
designed to be translatable to specific pay grades in the General Schedule applying
to Federal Classification Act employees. This necessitated limiting some occu­
pations and work levels to specific elements that could be classified uniformly
among establishments.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Civil Service
Commission collaborated in the preparation of the definitions.
The scope of the survey, in terms of industrial, geographic, and minimum
establishment-size coverage remained the same as in the 1968 survey.
The
definitions for attorneys and directors of personnel were revised and managers
of office services were not surveyed (see appendix B).
The other definitions
were the same as used in the 1968 survey.
The survey could not have been accomplished without the cooperation of the
many firms whose salary data provide the basis for the statistical information
presented in this bulletin.
The Bureau, on its own behalf and on behalf of the
other Federal agencies that collaborated in planning the survey, wishes to ex­
press sincere appreciation for the cooperation it has received.




Hi

Preface— Continued
This study was conducted in the Bureau's Office of Wages and Industrial
Relations by the Division of Occupational Wage Structures.
The analysis was
prepared by Stephen H. Perloff. Field work for the survey was directed by the
Bureau's Assistant Regional Directors, Division of Operations.

Although only nationwide salary data are presented in this bulletin, clerical
and drafting occupation salary data are available for each of the 89 metropolitan
areas in which the Bureau conducts area wage surveys. These area reports
also include information on such supplementary benefits as paid vacations,
holidays, and health, insurance, and pension plans relating to nonsupervisory
office workers.
(See the areas listed in the order form at the back of this
bulletin. )




iv

Contents
Page

S u m m a r y --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------C h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f th e s u r v e y _________________________________________________
C h a n g e s in s a l a r y l e v e l s . ________ ______ _________ . . . _________ ___________ ______ _
A v e r a g e s a l a r i e s , J u n e 1969 __________________________________________________
S a l a r y le v e ls in m e t r o p o l it a n a r e a s __________________________________________
S a l a r y l e v e ls in la r g e e s t a b lis h m e n t s --------------------------------------------------------------------S a l a r y d is t r ib u t io n s ______________________________________ ______________________
P a y d if f e r e n c e s b y i n d u s t r y ___________________________________________________
A v e r a g e s c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s — -------------- — ---------- -------------- --------. . . ---------- -—
T a b le s :

Average salaries:
1. United States_______________ -______________________________-_____________________ _
2. Metropolitan areas ______________________________________________________________
3. Establishments employing 2, 500 or m ore___________________ —
_________________

15
17
19

Employment distribution by salary:
4. Professional and administrative occupations_________________________________ —
5. Engineering technicians---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------6. Drafting and clerical occupations-------------------------------------------------------------------------

21
26
27

7.
8.
9.

29
29
30

Occupational employment distribution: By industry division______________________
Relative salary levels : Occupation by industry division.__________________________
Average scheduled weekly hours: Occupation by industry division______________

Charts:
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,

Rise in average (mean) salaries for selected occupational
groups, 1961 to 1969— -------------------- -------—
______ -_______ — _____ -_________ — __ —
Rates of salary changes for selected occupational groups, 1961-69______________
Salaries in professional and technical occupations, June 1969_____ -____________ Salaries in administrative and clerical occupations, June 1969____ _____________
Relative employment in selected occupational groups by
industry division, June 1969— -------------- -------- -____—
________________ _____________

3
5
11
12
13

Appendixes:
A.
B.
C.
D.

Scope and method of survey________________________________________________ ________
Survey changes in 1969 — --------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---- -_____
Occupational definitions-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Comparison of average annual salaries in private industry,
June 1969. with corresponding salary rates for Federal
employees under the General Schedule________________________ __________________




v

31
37
39
77




N atio n al Survey o f Professional, Adm inistrative,
Technical, and Clerical Pay, June 1969
Summary
Average salaries of workers in the occupations covered by this survey increased at a
higher rate between 1968 and 1969 than for any year since the study was initiated.
The
5.7 average percent increase for all white-collar occupations combined was slightly higher
than the year earlier.
Increases for 9 of 10 professional, administrative, and technical
support occupations ranged from 5 .4 to 7 .2 percent, and averaged 5 .8 percent. The average
of the increases for clerical occupations was 5. 5 percent, with 8 of the 9 advancing between
4. 7 and 5. 9 percent. 1
Average monthly salaries for the 78 occupational work levels varied from $324 for
clerks engaged in routine filing to $ 2 ,452 for the highest level in the attorney series. For
engineers, the largest professional occupation surveyed, salaries ranged from $805 a month
for recent college graduates in trainee positions to $ 2 ,0 0 2 for engineers VIII, whose typical
responsibilities could include the direction of a highly complex and diversified engineering
program consisting of many large and important projects. Monthly salaries averaged $412
for accounting clerks I, $489 for secretaries I, $549 for secretaries II, $433 for general
stenographers, and $371 for typists I, the largest clerical groups represented in the survey.
Average monthly salaries of engineering technicians ranged from $495 to $860 among five
work levels. For most of the occupations, salary levels in metropolitan areas and in large
establishments were higher than in all establishments within the full scope of the survey.
Salary levels in finance and retail trade industries generally were lower than in other major
industry divisions represented in the survey.
Reported average scheduled weekly hours
were also generally lower in the finance industries.
Characteristics of the Survey
This survey, the tenth in an annual series, provides nationwide salary averages and
distributions for 78 work level categories covering 12 broad occupational groups. 2 It relates
to establishments in all areas of the United States except Alaska and Hawaii in the following
industries: Manufacturing; transportation, communication, electric, gas, and sanitary serv­
ices; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; engineering and
architectural services; and research, development, and testing laboratories operated on a
commercial basis. 3 The minimum size of establishment requirements varied by industry
division roughly equalizing minimum size scope in terms of white-collar employment. These
requirements ranged from 50 employees in the finance, insurance, and real estate division,
which is almost entirely composed of white-collar workers, to 250 employees in the manu­
facturing and retail trade divisions. 4
Definitions for the occupations included in this study provide for classification of em ­
ployees according to appropriate work levels (or classes).
Within each occupation, the
work levels surveyed, usually designated by Roman numerals with class I assigned to the
lowest level, are defined in terms of duties and responsibilities. Specific job factors deter­
mining classification, however, varied from occupation to occupation.

* To obtain the increase for all white-collar occupations, the average of increases for the 9 clerical occupations and for the
10 professional, administrative, and technical support occupations were averaged. This method differed from that used to compute
increases in the tabulation on p. 4 for the clerical occupations. A forthcoming article in the Monthly Labor Review will further explain
the method of computation and present similar information for the 1961-69 period.
2 Results of the earlier survey reports were presented under the title: National Survey of Professional. Administrative. Technical.
and Clerical Pay. Winter 1959-60 (BLS Bulletin 1286, 1960); Winter 1960-61 (BLS Bulletin 1310, 1961); Winter 1961-62 (BLS Bulletin
1346, 1962); February-March 1963 (BLS Bulletin 1387, 1963); February-March 1964 (BLS Bulletin 1422, 1964); February-March 1965
(BLS Bulletin 1469, 1965); February-March 1966 (BLS Bulletin 1535, 1966); lune 1967 (BLS Bulletin 1585, 1968); and June 1968 (BLS
Bulletin 1617, 1969).
3 February-March 1964 and earlier surveys were limited to establishments in metropolitan areas. For a full description of the
scope of the 1969 survey, see appendix A.
4 February-March 1965 and earlier surveys were limited to establishments having 250 employees or more.




1

2
The number of work level definitions for each occupation varies from one for office
boys or girls to eight each for chemists and engineers. More than one level of work was
defined for survey in most of the occupations; however, some occupations were purposely
defined to cover specific bands of work levels, which were not intended to represent all
levels or all workers that may be found in those occupations.
The survey was designed to permit separate presentation of data for metropolitan
areas.
Coverage in metropolitan areas includes the 227 Standard Metropolitan Statistical
Areas in the United States except Alaska and Hawaii, as revised through April 1967 by the
Bureau of the Budget, the same number represented in the previous survey.
About fourfifths of the total employment and almost nine-tenths of the employment in professional,
administrative, clerical, and related occupations within scope of this survey were accounted
for by establishments located in metropolitan areas.
Almost nine-tenths of the employees
in the selected occupations studied also were employed in metropolitan areas. The propor­
tions varied more for the professional and administrative occupations than for the clerical
and drafting occupations.
The selected occupations accounted for more than 1,638,000 employees or almost onefourth of the estimated total employment in professional, administrative, clerical, and related
occupations in all establishments within scope of the survey.
Employment in the selected
occupations varied widely, reflecting actual differences in employment in the various occu­
pations, as well as differences in the range of duties and responsibilities covered by each
occupational definition.
Among the professional and administrative occupations, the eight
levels of engineers accounted for a total of 397, 131 employees, whereas, fewer than 5,000
were employed in each of three of the occupational categories as defined for the study (chief
accountants, job analysts, and directors of personnel). (See table 1. ) Four occupations at
all work levels studied (accounting clerks, secretaries, stenographers, and typists) accounted
for about 70 percent of the 889, 00 3 employees in the clerical occupations studied.
The
selected drafting room occupations had aggregate employment of 90, 300 and the five engi­
neering technician levels together accounted for about 99, 000.
Although women accounted for approximately one-half of the total employment in the
occupations studied, they were employed largely in clerical positions. The clerical occupa­
tions in which the proportion of women amounted to more than 90 percent of employment
at each level were file clerks, keypunch operators, secretaries, stenographers, switchboard
operators, and typists. Among tabulating-machine operators, women accounted for 57 per­
cent at level I, 39 percent at level II, and 25 percent at level III. Office girls (47 percent)
were outnumbered by office boys (5 3 percent). Women accounted for almost 25 percent of
the draftsmen-tracers, but less than 5 percent of the three draftsmen levels combined.
Engineering technicians at level I included almost 25 percent women, whereas levels II
through V combined included only 3 percent. Women employees in the professional and ad­
ministrative occupations usually were reported in the first few levels; those in which women
accounted for as many as 10 but less than 40 percent of the employment were: Accountants I;
job analysts I and II; chemists I and II; and buyers I.
The general level of salaries for each occupation or work level is presented in this
study as the arithmetic mean of all the individual salary rates. Median salaries, the amount
below and above which the salaries for 50 percent of the employees are found, are also
presented in tables 1, 2, and 3.
Changes in Salary Levels
The following tabulation presents the salary increases that occurred between annual
surveys since 1961 for the levels representing each of 12 occupational groups. 5 To deter­
mine the increases for each group, all levels of the occupation were combined using em­
ployment in the most recent year as a constant employment weight in both years to eliminate
the effects of changes in the proportion of employees in the various work levels. Changes
in the scope of the survey or in the occupational definitions were incorporated into the
series as soon as two comparable periods were available. The increases were then linked
together to obtain the changes that had occurred since this series began and to compute
average annual rates of increase. The 1961—
69 percent increases for selected occupations
are shown in chart 1.
® The increases since 1965 relate to establishments in metropolitan areas and nonmetropolitan counties; all others relate to
metropolitan areas only. Establishments employing fewer than 250 workers were excluded before 1966.




3

Chart 1. Rise in Average (Mean) Salaries
for Selected Occupational Groups, 1961 to 1969
PERCENT
O C C U P A TIO N A L
GROUPS




0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

4

Average
annual
rate of
increase

Percent increases in average salaries
1968
to
1969

1967
to
1968

1966
to
1967

1965
to
1966

1964
to
1965

1963
to
1964

1962
to
1963

1961
to
1962

1961
to
1969

Accountants---------------------------------------- --------Auditors------------------------------------------------------Chief accountants------------------------------- --------Attorneys ------------------------------------------- --------Buyers------------------------------------------------- •
..........
Job analysts---------------------------------------- --------Directors of personnel--------------------------------Chemists ----------------------------------------------------Engineers--------------------------------------------■
..........
Engineering technicians---------------------- •
..........

7 .0
7 .2
5.8
(2)
6 .6
2.1
5 .4
6 .5
6 .2
5.8

5.7
5 .5
5 .5
5.3
4 .9
7 .0
5.4
5.1
5 .4
5.1

4 .6
4 .8
5.1
3 .2
4 .2
3 .4
3.8
4 .4
4 .3

3. 8
3. 8
3. 3
4 .0

3 .5
3 .9
3. 9
4. 2

2.8
3.1
4 .8
3 .3

3.3
3 .6
2.8
4 .6

2.8
2. 9
2 .6
3. 2

4 .2
4 .3
4. 2

( 3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

<2 )
(3)

5 .4
3. 6
4 .8
3 .7

4. 3
3 .5
3 .9
3. 2

3 .5
4 .6
3 .3
2 .9

2.6
3 .0
3.8
4 .4

1.4
3 .7
3 .9
2.6

3.7
4. 1
4 .5
4. 1

5.8
5.3

5.3
5.0

3.7
3.5
4.6

2.8
1.5
3.0

2.3
(5)
2.4

3.6
2.6
2.9

2.9
3.6
2.6

( 4)

4 3. 8

D r a f t i n g --------------------------------------------------------------C l e r i c a l -------------------------------------------------------...........

3.8
2.9

3.6

Occupational group

(5)

1 T h e 1 9 6 6 -6 7 percent increases shown in the 1968 survey report have been prorated to a 12-m onth period.
A change in survey tim in g in 1967 resulted in changes over a 1 6-m o n th period for c le r ic a l and drafting occupations,
and a 1 5-m o n th period for a ll others. T h e a ctu al survey-to-survey increases were: A ccountants— 5 .8 ; auditors— 6 .0 ;
c h ie f accountants— 6 .4 ; a tto rn e y s --4 . 0 ; buyers— 5 .2 ; jo b analysts— 4 .2 ; directors o f p e rs o n n e l--4 . 7; chem ists— 5 .5 ;
e n g in e e rs --5 . 4; engineering tech nicians— 4 . 6; d ra ftin g — 4 . 6; and c le r ic a l— 6. 1.
2 Com parison over this period was not possible for attorneys because of changes in the num ber and definitions of
work levels in 1969.
3 Buyers were not surveyed before 1966.
4 Engineering technicians were not surveyed before 1962; therefo re, the average annual rate o f increase relates
to the 1962 to 1969 period.
5 Com parison over this
period was not possible for draftsm en because of changes in definitions o f work
levels in 1965.

In the 1968—
69 period, increases in average salaries for 10 of the 11 occupational
groups in which comparisons could be made ranged from 5. 3 to 7 .2 percent.
Increases
were generally higher than had been recorded for any other year period since 1961—
62,
when the Bureau began measuring occupational wage trends on a national basis.
To examine the changes in salaries that have occurred since 1961 for different levels
of work, all of the occupational classifications were grouped into the three broad categories
described in the tabulation which follows.
The year-to-year percent increases for each
Percent increases in average salaries

Work level categories 1
Group A (GS grades 1 -4
in appendix D )________________________
Group B (GS grades 5-10
in appendix D )________________________ —
Group C (GS grades 11-15
in appendix D ) ____________________________

1968
to
1969

1967
to
1968

5.5

5.1

6 .5
5. 9

1966
to
1967 2

1965
to
1966

1964
to
1965

1963
to
1964

1962
to
1963

1961
to
1962

1961
to
1969

4 .5

2 .9

2. 2

2.7

2.7

2.8

32. 2

5.8

4 .8

3 .7

3. 3

2.6

4 .0

2. 6

38. 5

4 .7

4. 1

4. 2

4. 2

3 .5

3 .7

3 .5

39.3

3 Work levels used for computing 1968 to 1969 increases are:
Group A —All levels of accounting clerks, file clerks, keypunch operators, stenographers, switchboard operators,
tabulating-machine operators, and typists; and office boys or girls, secretaries I, draftsmen-tracers, draftsmen I, and
engineering technicians I and II.
Group B—Accountants I, II, and III; auditors I, II, and III; buyers I, II, and III; chemists I, II, and III; draftsmen
II and III; engineers I, II, and III; engineering technicians III, IV, and V; job analysts II and III; and secretaries
II, III, and IV.
Group C —Accountants IV and V; auditors IV; buyers IV; chemists IV, V, VI, VII, and VIII; chief accountants I, II,
III, and IV; directors of personnel I, II, III, and IV; engineers IV, V, VI, VII, and VIII; and job analysts IV.
2 The 1966-67 percent changes shown in the 1968 survey report have been prorated to reflect a 12-month period.
Because of the change in survey timing in 1967, survey-to-survey percent changes related to a period of more than 1 year
(see footnote 1 of the preceding tabulation). The percent increases for each of the 3 groups based on the full period be­
tween surveys were:
Group A — 6 .0 ; group B --6 .0 ; and group C — 5 .1 . The 1961-69 increases were obtained by linking together the
eight 12-month increases.




5
group were determined by adding average salaries for all occupations in the group for 2 con­
secutive years, and dividing the later sum by the earlier sum. The resultant relative, less
100, shows the percent of increase. Changes in the scope of the survey or in the occupa­
tional definitions were incorporated into the series as soon as two comparable periods were
available.
The 8-year trends were obtained by linking changes for the individual periods.
From 1961 through 1966, average salaries increased more for group C than for groups
A and B.
Beginning with 1966—
67, however, while all three groups showed successively
higher year-to-year increases, group B reported larger increases than either group A or C.
Beginning with the 1965—
66 period, pay for entry and developmental level professional
and administrative positions increased at a faster pace than for clerical, technical support, or
experienced professional and administrative positions, and is at a higher level relative to the
1961 base than salaries for the other groups. By grouping survey occupational levels into the
four categories mentioned above, differences in the rate of change in average salaries since
1961 can be illustrated.6 Relative salary levels were computed in the same manner as the
percent increases in the foregoing table and were plotted using a ratio scale. (See chart 2.)

Chart 2. Rates of Salary Changes for Selected Occupational Groups, 1961-69
Occupational indexes (1961 = 100)

150

Ratio scale

Technical support
Clerical

140

Beginning and developmental
professional and administrative
Experienced professional
and administrative

120

110

100

1961

1963

1965

1967

1969

Average salaries of clerical and technical support workers increased over the 8-year
period by practically identical percentage amounts, but have not maintained pace with salaries
for the two professional and administrative occupational groups. For the clerical and technical
^ Work levels used for computing 1968-69 increases were:
Clerical - All clerical levels for which data are shown in table 1.
Technical support - All levels of draftsmen and engineering technicians for which data are shown in table 1.
Beginning and developmental professional and administrative - Accountants I and II; auditors I and II; job analysts II; chemists
I and II; and engineers I and II.
Experienced professional and administrative - Accountants III, IV, and V; auditors III and IV; chief accountants I, II, III, and IV; job
analysts III and IV; directors of personnel I, II, III, and IV; chemists III, IV, V, VI, VII, and VIII; and engineers III, IV, V, VI, VII, and VIII.
A few survey levels, not readily identifiable with any of the four occupational categories, were not used.
The 1966-67 increases were prorated to a 12-month period. A change in survey timing in 1967 resulted in a longer period
between surveys.




6
support groups, salaries increased at an average annual rate of 3 .6 percent over the
period.
For the two professional and administrative categories, the average rates of in­
crease were 4. 2 percent for the experienced group and 4. 6 percent for the beginning and
developmental employee group.
Changes in average salaries reflect not only general salary increases and merit or
other increases given to individuals while in the same work level category, but they also
may reflect other factors such as employee turnover, expansions or reductions in the work
force, and changes in staffing patterns within establishments with different salary levels.
For example, an expansion in force may increase the proportion of employees at the mini­
mum of the salary range established for a work level, which would tend to lower the average,
whereas, a reduction or a low turnover in the work force may have the opposite effect.
Similarly, year-to-year promotions of employees to higher work levels of professional and
administrative occupations may affect average salaries, lowering or raising the average.
For example, the established salary ranges for such occupations are relatively wide, and
promoted employees, who may have been paid the maximum of the salary scale for the
lower level, are likely to be replaced by less experienced employees who may be paid the
minimum; or vacancies may exist at the time of the resurvey. Occupations most likely to
reflect such changes in the salary averages are the higher levels of professional and admin­
istrative occupations and single-incumbent positions such as chief accountant and director
of personnel. 7
Average Salaries, June 1969
Average monthly salaries for the occupations included in this report ranged from $324
for file clerks I to $2 ,4 5 2 for the top level of attorney surveyed (table 1). These extremes
reflect the wide range of duties and responsibilities represented by the occupational work
levels surveyed. Average salaries for the occupational levels, and a brief indication of the
duties and responsibilities they represent, are summarized in the following paragraphs. 8
Among the five levels of accountants surveyed, average monthly salaries ranged from
$667 for accountants I to $1, 198 for accountants V.
Auditors in the four levels defined
for survey had average salaries ranging from $697 a month for auditors I to $ 1,094 for
auditors IV.
Level I in both the accounting and auditing series included trainees who had
bachelor*s degrees in accounting or the equivalent in education and experience combined.
At each corresponding level, average salaries were higher for auditors than for accountants.
For level III, the most heavily populated group in both series, monthly salaries averaged
$836 for accountants and $894 for auditors. Whereas almost 70 percent of the accountants
were employed in manufacturing, this industry division employed slightly less than 40 per­
cent of the auditors. 9 Other industry divisions which accounted for large numbers of
auditors were finance, insurance, and real estate (29 percent), and public utilities (17 per­
cent).
The proportion of employees in each major industry division within scope of the
survey is shown by occupation in table 7 and presented graphically in chart 5, page 13.
Chief accountants were surveyed separately from accountants and included those who
develop or adapt and direct the accounting program for a company or an establishment (plant)
of a company. Level classification was determined by the extent of delegated authority and
responsibility; the technical complexity of the system; and, to a lesser degree, the size of
the professional staff directed.
Chief accountants at level I, who have authority to adapt
the accounting system, established at higher levels, to meet the needs of an establishment
of a company with relatively few and stable functions and work processes (directing one or
two accountants), averaged $1, 101 a month. Chief accountants IV, 1 who have authority to
0
establish and maintain the accounting program, subject to general policy guidelines, for a

^ These types of occupations also may be subject to greater sampling error, as explained in the last paragraph of appendix A.
8 Classification of employees in the occupations and work levels surveyed was based on factors detailed in the definitions in
appendix C.
9 Establishments primarily engaged in providing accounting and auditing services were excluded from the survey.
10 Although level V was surveyed, as defined in appendix C, too few employees met requirements for this level to warrant
presentation of salary figures.




7

company with numerous and varied functions and work processes (directing as many as
40 accountants), averaged $1,716 a month.
Almost three-fifths of the chief accountants
who met the requirements of the definitions for these four levels were employed in manu­
facturing industries and one-sixth were in the finance, insurance, and real estate division.
Attorneys were classified into six levels based upon the difficulty of their assignments
and their responsibilities. 1 Attorneys I which included new law graduates with bar member­
1
ship and those performing work that was relatively uncomplicated due to clearly applicable
precedents and well established facts averaged $918 a month.
Attorneys in the top level
surveyed, level VI, earned an average of $ 2 ,4 5 2 a month. 12 These attorneys dealt with
legal matters of critical importance to their organizations, and were usually subordinate
only to the general counsel or his immediate deputy in very large firms. Finance, insur­
ance, and real estate industries employed almost one-half of the attorneys; manufacturing
industries employed one-fourth; and a high proportion of the remainder were employed in
public utilities (almost one-fifth).
Buyers averaged $656 a month at level I, which included those who purchased "o ffthe-shelf" and readily available items and services from local sources.
Buyers III, who
purchased specialized and technical items, materials, or services were paid monthly salaries
averaging $912. Buyers V, who averaged $ 1,306, purchased unusually large quantities, or
items of extraordinary technical complexity or unusually high value. Manufacturing industries
accounted for 86 percent of the buyers in the five levels.

In the personnel management field, four work levels of job analysts and five levels of
were studied. 1 Job analysts I, defined to include trainees under imme­
3
diate supervision, averaged $678, compared with $ 1,069 for job analysts IV, who analyze
and evaluate a variety of the more difficult jobs under general supervision and who may
participate in the development and installation of evaluation or compensation systems. Di­
rectors of personnel were limited by definition to those who had programs that included,
at a minimum, responsibility for administering a job evaluation system, employment and
placement functions, and employee relations and services functions. Those with significant
responsibility for actual contract negotiation with labor unions as the principal company
representative were excluded. Provisions were made in the definition for weighing various
combinations of duties and responsibilities to determine the level classification.
Among
personnel directors with job functions as specified for the four levels of responsibility,
average monthly salaries ranged from $987 for level I to $1,715 for level IV. Manufacturing
industries accounted for 7 1 percent of both the job analysts and directors of personnel included
in the study; the finance, insurance, and real estate industries ranked next, with 18 percent
of the job analysts and 12 percent of the directors of personnel.

directors of personnel

Chemists and engineers each were surveyed in eight levels.
Both series started with a
professional trainee level, typically requiring a B. S. degree. The highest level surveyed
involved either full responsibility over a very broad and highly complex and diversified
engineering or chemical program, with several subordinates each directing large and im ­
portant segments of the program; or individual research and consultation in difficult problem
areas where the engineer or chemist was a recognized authority and where solutions would
represent a major scientific or technological advance. 1
4 Average monthly salaries ranged
from $805 for engineers I to $ 2 ,0 0 2 for engineers VIII, and from $728 for chemists I to
$2,258 for chemists VIII. Although, at level I, the average salaries of engineers exceeded
those for chemists by 11 percent, at level IV the difference narrowed to 4 percent, and at
level VIII, the average salaries of chemists exceeded those for engineers by 13 percent.
Level IV, the largest group in each series, included professional employees who were fully
competent in all technical aspects of their assignments, worked with considerable independ­
ence, and, in some cases, supervised a few professional and technical workers.
Manufac­
turing industries accounted for 80 percent of all engineers and 91 percent of all chemists;
public utilities, 9 and less than 2 percent, respectively; and the surveyed engineering and
scientific services employed virtually all of the others.

** Establishments primarily engaged in offering legal advice or legal services were excluded from the survey.
12 See appendix B for changes in attorney definitions adopted in the current survey.
13 Although directors of personnel V were surveyed, as defined in appendix D, too few employees met requirements for this
level to warrant presentation of salary figures.
14 It was recognized in the definition that top positions of some companies with unusually extensive and complex engineering
or chemical programs were above that level.




8
By definition, the five-level series for engineering technicians was limited to employees
providing semiprofessional technical support to engineers engaged in such areas as research,
design, development, testing, or manufacturing process improvement, and whose work per­
tained to electrical, electronic, or mechanical components or equipment. Technicians en­
gaged primarily in production or maintenance work were excluded. Engineering technicians I,
who performed simple, routine tasks under close supervision, or from detailed procedures,
were paid monthly salaries averaging $495.
Engineering technicians V, the highest level
surveyed, averaged $860 a month.
That level included fully experienced technicians per­
forming more complex assignments involving responsibility for planning and conducting a
complete project of relatively limited scope, or a portion of a larger and more diverse
project, in accordance with objectives, requirements, and design approaches as outlined by
the supervisor or a professional engineer. Averages for intermediate levels III and IV, at
which a majority of the technicians surveyed were classified, were $670 and $775, respec­
tively.
As might be expected, nearly all of the technicians as defined were employed in
manufacturing (76 percent) and in the scientific services industries studied (17 percent).
Although the ratio of such technicians to engineers studied was about 1 to 4 in all manufac­
turing industries, higher ratios of approximately 1 to 3 were found in establishments manu­
facturing mechanical and electrical equipment and 1 to 2 in research, development, and
testing laboratories.
In the drafting field, the definitions used in the survey covered four levels of work—
draftsmen-tracers, and draftsmen I, II, and III.
Monthly salaries averaged $442 for
draftsmen-tracers and ranged from $538 to $813 among the three levels of draftsmen.
Draftsmen-tracers copy plans and drawings prepared by others or prepare simple or re­
petitive drawings of easily visualized items. The three draftsmen levels as defined ranged
from employees preparing detail drawings of single units or parts (level I) to those who,
working in close support with the design originator, plan the graphic presentation of complex
items having distinctive design features, and either prepare or direct the preparation of the
drawings (level III). The drafting employees were distributed by industry in about the same
proportion as engineers, with 78 percent in manufacturing, 7 percent in public utilities, and
13 percent in the selected engineering and scientific services industries studied.
Among the 21 clerical jobs included in this study, average monthly salaries for secretaries,
the most heavily populated clerical occupation studied, ranged from $489 at level I to $641
at level IV. For other large groups, average salaries of $433 and $490 were reported for
general and senior stenographers; $412 and $537 for accounting clerks land II; and the two
levels of typists averaged $371 and $430. Generally, average salaries for clerical workers
were highest in public utilities and manufacturing industries and lowest in the finance, in­
surance, and real estate, and retail trade divisions. Employment in manufacturing exceeded
that in any of the nonmanufacturing divisions within scope of the survey in 16 of the 21
clerical work levels; highest employment totals in the other five levels were in the finance,
insurance, and real estate division. Women accounted for 95 percent or more of the em­
ployees in 14 of the clerical work levels, and men accounted for one-half or more in three
(tabulating-machine operators II and III, and office boys or girls).
Median monthly salaries (the amount below and above which 50 percent of the employees
were found) for most of the work levels were slightly lower than the weighted averages
(means) cited above (i. e. , the salaries in the upper halves of the arrays had a greater effect
on the averages than did the salaries in the lower halves). The relative difference between
the median and the mean was less than 3 percent for 60 of the 78 work levels and as much
as 3 but less than 5 percent in 17 additional levels.
The weighted average salary for
chemist VIII exceeded the median by 6. 6 percent.
Salary Levels in Metropolitan Areas
In most of the occupational work levels, average salaries for employees in metropolitan
areas (table 2) were either identical to or slightly higher than average salaries for employees
in all establishments within full scope of the survey (table 1).
Employment in the survey
occupations in metropolitan areas accounted for almost nine-tenths of the total nationwide
employment reported in these occupations. The proportions varied, however, among occu­
pations and work levels.
Nearly all of the attorneys at each level, for example, were
employed in metropolitan areas, whereas the proportion of chief accountants and directors




9

of personnel for all levels combined was approximately four-fifths and seven-tenths, re­
spectively, with a smaller proportion at the lowest levels.
In 63 of the 78 work levels
studied, 85 percent or more of the employment was in metropolitan areas. It is apparent,
therefore, that although average salaries usually were lower in the nonmetropolitan counties,
in those work levels in which nearly all of the employment was in metropolitan areas, non­
metropolitan counties could have little effect upon the averages for all establishments com­
bined. Only in five of the 78 work levels studied were average salaries more than 1.5 (but
not more than 3. 0) percent higher in metropolitan areas than in all areas combined; in all
of these cases the proportion of the total employment within nonmetropolitan counties ranged
approximately between one-tenth and one-third.
Increases in average salaries in metropolitan area establishments from June 1968 to
June 1969 were within one-half percentage point of increases reported for all areas studied
in 58 of the 70 levels for which year-to-year increases were reported.
The year-to-year
increases in metropolitan areas compared with all areas were larger for 40, smaller for
25 levels, and the same for five.
Salary Levels in Large Establishments
It was possible to present separate data for 72 of the 78 occupation work levels for
all establishments with 2,500 employees or more (table 3). Comparisons between employ­
ments and relative salary levels in these establishments and all establishments combined
also are presented. Establishments employing 2, 500 or more accounted for almost threeeighths of the total employment in professional, administrative, supervisory, and clerical
occupations within scope of the survey, and nearly two-fifths of total employment in the
selected occupations studied.
Large establishments accounted for varying proportions of
total employment in the 72 occupational work levels shown in table 3, ranging from 16 to
75 percent (directors of personnel III and job analysts IV, respectively).
The salary levels in large establishments, expressed as a percent of levels in all
establishments combined ranged from 99 for buyers IV, job analysts III, and chemists VII
and VIII to 116 for directors of personnel III. As shown in the following tabulation, salary
averages for large establishments exceeded the all establishment averages by 5 percent or
more in 19 of 21 clerical jobs, but in only 19 of 51 nonclerical jobs.

Number of job categories
Pay levels in large
establishments as
percent of all
establishment average

Professional,
administrative,
and technical

Clerical

T o t a l -----------------------------------------------

51

21

95-100 ------------------------------ -------- --------------1 0 1 -1 0 4 ........................................- ...................
105-109 - .............................................................
110 and o v e r ---------------------------------------------

4
28
13
6

2
11
8

The relative salary levels in large establishments tended to be highest for work levels
in which such establishments accounted for the smallest proportion of the total employment.
Thus, while the degree of employment concentration in large establishments ranged from
17 to 43 percent for clerical jobs, these firms contributed 40 percent or more of the em ­
ployment in almost three-fifths of the nonclerical jobs.
Salary Distributions
Percent distributions of employees by monthly salaries are presented for the profes­
sional and administrative occupations in table 4, and for engineering technicians in table 5;
distributions by weekly salaries are shown for employees in drafting and clerical occupations




10

in table 6. 1 Within almost all of the 78 occupation work levels, salary rates for some of
5
the highest paid employees were twice those of the lowest paid employees.
The absolute
spread between highest and lowest paid workers within given work levels tended to widen
with each successive work level for most occupations in which two levels or more were
surveyed.
All occupations in which two levels or more of work were surveyed showed a
substantial degree of overlapping of individual salaries between work levels in the same occu­
pation. Ranges in salary rates of employees in established pay grades or work levels within
salary structures of individual firms also exhibited substantial overlapping.
The middle 50 and 80 percent of the range, and the median salary for each occupation
work level have been charted (charts 3 and 4) to point up occupational pay relationships as
well as the typically greater degree of salary dispersion associated with the higher work
levels in each occupational series.
Distribution of work levels by degree of dispersion
(salary range of middle 50 percent of employees
expressed as a percent of median salary)_____

Occupational group
All levels----------------------------Accountants----------------------------------Auditors---------------------------------------Chief accountants-------------------------Attorneys--------------------------------------Buyers-------------------------------------------Job analysts----------------------------------Directors of personnel------------------Chemists -------------------------------------Engineers-------------------------------------Engineering technicians----------------Drafting---------------------------------------Clerical ----------------------------------------

Total
78
5
4
4
6
5
4
4
8
8
5
4
21

Under
15
3

15
and
under
20

20
and
under
25

23

33

4

1
4
3
3
4
1
2
1
1
1
2
10

1
3

3

5
4
4
1
1

25
and
under
30
18

30
and
over
i

1
3

2
1

i

1
10

Expressing the salary range of the middle 50 percent of employees in each work level
as a percent of the median salary permitted comparison of salary ranges on the same basis
and eliminated extreme low and high salaries from each comparison. As shown in the tab­
ulation, the degree of dispersion was between 15 and 30 percent of the median salary in all
but four work levels (8. 9, 10. 9, and 14. 9 for engineers I, II, and III, respectively, and
33. 1 for chemists VIII).
This relative spread tended to be smaller for the professional,
administrative, and engineering technician work levels than for the clerical and drafting
levels studied.
Differences in the range of salaries paid individuals within work levels surveyed re­
flect a variety of factors other than differences in the range of duties and responsibilities
encompassed by the various work level definitions. Two of these factors are salary struc­
tures within establishments which provide for a range of rates for each grade level and
regional variations, particularly in the clerical levels (clerical employees are usually re­
cruited locally, while the job field tends to be broader regionally, often national in scope,
for the professional and administrative occupations). 1 As pointed out earlier (and indicated
6
in table 7 and chart 5), employment in the various industries within the scope of the survey
varies considerably from occupation to occupation.
These variations in employment are
reflected also in salary levels and distributions to the extent that salaries differ by industry,
as explained in the following section.

15

Technical considerations dictated the summarization of employee distributions by weekly salaries in the case of the drafting
and clerical jobs.
For an analysis of interarea pay differentials in clerical salaries, see Wages and Related Benefits. Part II: Metropolitan
Areas. United States and Regional Summaries. 1967-68 (BLS Bulletin 1575-87, 1969).




11

Chart 3. Salaries in Professional and Technical Occupations, June 1969
Median Monthly Salaries and Ranges Within Which Fell 50 Percent and 80 Percent of Employees
0




$500

$1,000

$1,500

$2,000

$2,500

$3,000

12

Chart 4. Salaries in Administrative and Clerical Occupations, June 1969




Median Monthly Salaries and Ranges Within Which Fell 50 Percent and 80 Percent of Employees
0

$400

$800

$1,200

$1,600

$2,000

$2,400

$2,800

13

Chart 5. Relative Employment in Selected Occupational Groups
by Industry Division, June 1969

OCCUPATIONAL
GROUPS

PERCENT
0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Accountants and
chief accountants

Auditors

Attorneys

Buyers

Directors of personnel
and job analysts

Chemists

Engineers
Engineering
technicians
and draftsmen
Clerical employees




iliill

Manufacturing
Public Utilities

Finance, Insurance,
and Real Estate
■ Trade and
I Selected Services

14
Pay Differences by Industry
The survey was planned to permit publication of national salary estimates by level of
work.
By combining the data for all levels of work studied in each occupation, it was
possible to present comparisons between relative salary levels in major industry divisions
and all industries combined (table 8).
To obtain relative salary levels, the all-industry
employment in each work level was used as a constant employment weight to compute
aggregates in each industry division to eliminate the influence of differences among industry
divisions in the proportion of employment in various work levels.
The industry division
aggregates for work levels within an occupation were combined and expressed as percentages
of the corresponding aggregates in all industries combined.
The relative salary levels for most of the professional, administrative, engineering
technician,and drafting occupations tended to be nearest 100 percent of the all-industry levels
in manufacturing industries which had 58 to 91 percent of the employees in 9 of the 11 occu­
pations. Relative salary levels in public utilities and manufacturing industries generally kept
pace. For engineers, however, the figures were 96 percent for public utilities, 101 percent
for manufacturing, and 97 percent for selected services. Conversely, for engineering tech­
nicians, public utilities showed a relative salary of 106, while manufacturing reported 99,
and selected services were 101. Relative salary levels for 8 of the 9 clerical occupations
were highest in the public utilities industries.
For all of the clerical occupations studied, and for a majority of the professional and
administrative occupations in which comparisons could be made, relative salary levels were
lower in retail trade and in finance, insurance, and real estate than in other industry divi­
sions.
It is apparent, therefore, that in those occupations in which retail trade and the
finance industries include a substantial proportion of the total employment, the average
salaries for all industries combined are lowered, and the relative levels in industries such
as manufacturing and public utilities tend to be well above 100 percent of the all-industry
level.
For example, relative pay levels for file clerks of 108 percent in manufacturing
and 120 percent in public utilities reflect the influence of lower salaries for the high pro­
portion (55 percent) of all-industry employment included in the finance industries.
The
finance industries, however, also reported lower average scheduled weekly hours than in
the other industries surveyed, as shown in table 9.
Average Scheduled Weekly Hours
The length of the scheduled workweek, on which the regular straight-time salary was
based, was obtained for individual employees in the occupations studied.
When individual
weekly hours were not available, particularly for some higher level professional and admin­
istrative positions, the predominant workweek of the office work force was used as the
scheduled workweek.
The distribution of average weekly hours (rounded to the nearest
half hour) is presented in table 9 for all work levels of each occupation combined in major
industry divisions surveyed. Average weekly hours were lower in finance, insurance, and
real estate than in the other industry divisions.
Thus, in finance industries, workweeks
averaged 38 hours for a majority of the occupations, compared to 39 or 39. 5 hours in the
remaining industries surveyed. 1
7

17

For additional information on scheduled weekly hours of office workers employed in metropolitan areas, see Wages and
Related Benefits, Part I: 85 Metropolitan Areas, 1967-68 (BLS Bulletin 1575-87, 1969).




15

Table 1.

Average Salaries:

United States

( E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s f o r s e le c te d p r o f e s s io n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , te c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s in
p r iv a t e i n d u s t r y , 1 U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, J u n e 1969,
a n d p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in m e a n s a l a r i e s d u r in g th e y e a r 2)
M o n th ly s a l a r i e s 4
O c c u p a tio n a n d c la s s
(See d e fin itio n s in a p p e n d ix C)

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s 3

A nnual s a la r ie s 4

M id d le r a n g e 5
M ean

M e d ia n

F irs t
q u a r t i le

T h ir d
q u a r t i le

$617
683
750

$717
820

M id d le r a n g e 5
M ean

M e d ia n

F irs t
q u a r t i le

T h ird
q u a r t i le

$ 8 , 604
9, 840
10, 920
12, 996
1 5 ,7 3 2

P ercen t
in c r e a s e
in
m ean
s a la rie s 2

A c c o u n ta n ts a n d a u d it o r s
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A u d ito rs
A u d ito r s
A u d ito r s
A u d ito rs
C h ie f
C h ie f
C h ie f
C h ie f

$668

1 . . . ____ . . . . . . . . . . . . ____ ____. . . . . . . .
I I ________________________________
I I I _______________________________
I V _______________________________
V ________________________________

5, 579
11, 138
2 4 ,5 5 0
16, 629
6 ,4 5 1

$667
751
836
997
1, 198

750
825
990
1, 187

1 ,0 6 5

I ___ ______________________________
I I ____________________________________
I I I ___________________________________
I V ___________________________________

719
1, 848
4, 193
2, 295

697
774
894
1, 094

673
750
875
1, 083

625
691
793
982

731

1, 288

1, 101
1, 220

756
325

1 ,4 7 6
1 ,7 1 6

1, 052
1, 208
1 ,4 6 5
1, 740

958
1, 085
1, 300
1, 500

568
1, 316
1, 640
1, 626
655
469

918
1, 065
1, 323
1 ,5 9 7
1, 974
2 ,4 5 2

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,

a c c o u n ta n ts
a c c o u n ta n ts
a c c o u n ta n ts
a c c o u n ta n ts

I __________________________
I I --------------------------------------I I I _________________________
I V --------------------------------------

1, 083
1, 311

$ 8 ,0 0 2
9, 013
1 0 ,0 2 9
11, 967
1 4 ,3 7 3

$8,
9,
9,
11,
14,

016
000
900
880
244

$ 7 ,4 0 4
8, 196
9, 000
1 0 ,8 0 0
12, 780

778
850
976
1, 200

8,
9,
10,
13,

367
287
726
125

8, 076
9, 000
1 0 ,5 0 0
12, 996

7, 500
8, 292
9, 516
1 1 ,7 8 4

1,
1,
1,
1,

250
333
625
848

13, 212
1 4 ,6 3 7
17, 714
20, 586

12, 624
1 4 ,4 9 6
17, 580
20, 880

824
916
150
337
749
042

999
1, 195
1 ,4 5 8
1, 749
2, 166
2, 750

11,020

10, 500

583
685
817
978
1, 181

1, 000
1, 208

900

910

7 .4

8. 9
7. 1

6. 2
6. 2

11, 712
14, 400

9 .4
6. 7
7. 5
6. 7

1 1 ,4 9 6
1 3 ,0 2 0
15, 600
1 8 ,0 0 0

15, 000
15, 996
1 9 ,5 0 0
22, 176

7.
3.
6.
8.

9,
10,
13,
16,
20,
24,

11, 988
14, 340
1 7 ,4 9 6
20, 988
25, 992
33, 000

(‘ )
(‘)
(‘)
(*)
*)
(‘)

9, 804
1 1 ,7 3 6
1 4 ,1 7 2

8, 580
10, 104
12, 000
1 4 ,4 9 6
16, 848

7. 3
7. 0
6. 6
5. 8
(T)

12, 924

7, 200
8, 340
9, 600
1 1 ,5 5 6

9,
10,
11,
13,

120
020
556
980

( 7)
3. 0
1. 9
2. 0

11,
13,
16,
19,

10,200
12, 240
1 4 ,5 3 2
17, 892

12,
15,
18,
23,

924
000
900
100

7 .4
5 .4
4. 6
4 .4

9, 336

10,200

5
6
9
1

A tto r n e y s
A tto rn e y s
A tto rn e y s
A tto rn e y s
A tto rn e y s
A tto rn e y s
A tto rn e y s

I___________________________________
I I ___ _________ _________ _____
III -----------------------------------------------I V ______ ________ _______________
V __________________________________
V I _____________________________ __

875
050
309
570
920
395

1,
1,
1,
2,

12, 600

12, 780
15, 879
19, 163
23, 685
2 9 ,4 2 1

15,
18,
23,
28,

708
840
040
740

1, 404

7, 877
9 ,2 6 9
10, 942
13, 151
15, 675

7,
9,
10,
12,
15,

800
120
824
960
000

760
835
963
1, 165

8, 137
9 ,0 8 1
1 0 ,5 9 5
12, 830

1,
1,
1,
1,

077
250
575
925

11,
13,
16,
20,

785
860

1, 235
1, 470
1, 683
2, 083
2, 616

8, 736
9, 626
1 1 ,0 6 3
13, 359
1 6 ,0 8 0
18, 529
2 2 ,4 7 3
27, 092

8, 820
9, 600
1 0 ,8 0 0
13, 140
1 5 ,9 9 6
1 8 ,4 8 0
21, 660
2 5 ,4 1 6

9, 662
1 0 ,4 5 5
1 1 ,7 0 1
13, 893
16, 107
18, 5 77
21, 199
2 4 ,0 2 0

9, 696
10, 4 2 8
11, 700
1 3 ,8 0 0
15, 960
1 8 ,4 8 0
21, 060
2 3 ,4 0 0

5 ,9 4 2
7 ,0 1 1
8, 040
9, 300
10, 321

5,
6,
7,
9,
10,

888
992
800
044
988
504

B u y ers
B u y e rs
B u y e rs
B u y e rs
B u y ers
B u y e rs

I ______________________________________
I I _____________________________________
III ............................................ .... ..................
I V ________________________________ —
V
----------------------------------------------------

2,
9,
13,
4,

650
760

708
884
809
909
234

656
772
912

902

1 ,0 9 6
1, 306

1, 080
1, 250

129
319
648
573

678
757
883
1 ,0 6 9

890
1, 077

600
695
800
963

1, 101
2, 105
1, 142
409

987
1, 160
1, 395
1, 715

980
1, 125
1, 355,
1, 666

850
1, 020
1, 211
1 ,4 9 1

735
800

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,

728
802
922
113
340
544
873
258

660
733
833
990
1, 208
1 ,3 9 9
1, 627
1, 916

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,

805
871
975
158
342
548
767
002

715
842

6 ,9 9 6

8, 220

P e rso n n e l m anagem ent
Jo b
Jo b
Job
Job

a n a ly s t s
a n a ly s t s
a n a ly s t s
a n a ly s t s

I _______________________________
I I ------- -------------------------------------I I I _______________________________
I V . ____________________________

D ire c to rs
D ire c to rs
D ire c to rs
D ire c to rs

of
of
of
of

p e rso n n e l
p e rso n n e l
p e rs o n n e l
p e rs o n n e l

I _____________________
I I ------------------------------I I I ___ ______________
I V ___________________

C h e m is t s
C h e m is ts
C h e m is t s
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is t s
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts

I ____ ______________________________
I I --------------------------------------- ----------I I I ---------------------------------------------------I V _______________ _________________ _
V ___________________________________
VI ____________ __________ __________
V I I --------------------------------------------------V I I I ------------- ------- -----------------------

1 ,9 4 9
4, 577
9, 084
1 1 ,0 5 9
8, 797
4 ,4 8 6
1, 848
534

E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs

I ----------------- ------- ----------------------I I ------------ ------------------------------------III -----------------------------------------------I V _________________________________
V _______ _________________ _________
V I _________________________________
V I I -------------------------------------------------VIII -------------- — ----------------------

13, 848
34, 224
88, 587
121, 882
79, 139
4 1 , 032
1 4 ,9 5 3
3 ,4 6 6

683
750

847
925
738
585

8, 196
9, 000

10, 680
760
500
260
992

C h e m is ts a n d e n g in e e r s

900

1, 000

1,
1,
1,
1,
2,

095
333
540
805
118

1,
1,
1,
1,
1,

808
869
975
150
330
540
755
950

1 ,0 5 4
1 ,2 1 6
1 ,4 0 0
1, 586
1, 761

845
919
1, 045
1, 251
1 ,4 5 1
1, 680
1, 926
2, 173

498
582
665
765
850

443
526
608
704
791

547
633
726
840
925

773
824

900

7, 920

8, 796
9, 996
1 1 ,8 8 0
1 4 ,4 9 6
1 6 ,7 8 8
19, 524

22,992
9, 276
9, 888

10, 800

12, 648
1 4 ,5 9 2
16, 800
1 9 ,0 3 2
21, 132

9 ,4 2 0
10, 320
12, 000
14, 820
17, 640
20, 196
2 4 ,9 9 6
31, 392
10, 140
11, 028
12, 540
15, 012
1 7 ,4 1 2
20, 160
23, 112
26, 076

8 .4
7. 8

8. 6

4. 8
5 .4
7. 0
9. 3
6. 6
7. 1
7. 0

6. 7
6. 1
5. 8
7 .0
4. 9
3. 2

E n g in e e r in g te c h n ic ia n s
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g

te c h n i c ia n s
te c h n i c ia n s
te c h n i c ia n s
te c h n ic ia n s
te c h n i c ia n s

I ___ _ — ________
II
_______________
I I I __ — ---------------I V --------------------------V — ---------------------

S ee fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .




6,
15,
28,
32,
16,

100
752
185
337
903

495
584
670
775
860

976
984
980
180
200

5, 316
6 ,3 1 2
7 ,2 9 6
8 ,4 4 8
9 ,4 9 2

6, 564
7 ,5 9 6
8, 712
1 0 ,0 8 0
11, 100

6 .4
5. 3
5. 8
6. 1
5 .4

16

Table 1.

Average Salaries:

United States— Continued

( E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s f o r s e le c te d p r o f e s s io n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , te c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s in
p r iv a t e i n d u s t r y , 1 U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, J u n e 1969,
a n d p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in m e a n s a l a r i e s d u r in g th e y e a r 2)
M o n th ly s a l a r i e s 4
O c c u p a tio n a n d c l a s s
(S ee d e f in itio n s in a p p e n d ix C)

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s 3

A nnual s a la r ie s 4

M id d le r a n g e 5
M ean

M e d ia n

M id d le r a n g e 5
M ean

M e d ia n

F irs t
q u a r t i le

T h ir d
q u a r t i le

$382
4 66
591
723

$491
598
735
878

$ 5, 301
6 ,4 54
7, 988
9, 755

$5,
6,
7,
9,

350
458
293
317
374
348
403
313
433
482
505
551
374
4 25
346
416
360
435
546
326
378

453
607
34 5
388
500
435
504
384
54 3
614
655
725
481
553
452
528
465
565
673
400
470

4 , 941
6 ,4 4 8
3, 883
4 , 328
5, 320
4 , 797
5 ,4 8 2
4 , 279
5, 869
6, 586
7, 032
7, 697
5, 192
5, 884
4 , 822
5, 689
5, 021
6, 060
7, 371
4 ,4 5 1
5, 155

4,
6,
3,
4,
5,
4,
5,
4,
5,
6,
7,
7,
5,
5,
4,
5,
4,
5,
7,
4,
5,

F irs t
q u a r t i le

T h ir d
q u a r t i le

131
361
913
542

$ 4 , 579
5, 589
7, 091
8, 674

$5,
7,
8,
10,

739
299
754
171
159
640
396
119
798
518
008
560
084
759
693
631
823
927
24 3
328
005

4 , 199
5 ,4 9 5
3, 519
3, 806
4 , 4 84
4 , 171
4 , 839
3, 754
5, 191
5, 788
6, 059
6, 611
4 ,4 8 4
5, 106
4 , 151
4 , 991
4 , 317
5, 219
6, 550
3, 911
4 , 536

P ercen t
in c re a se
in
m ean
s a la r ie s 2

D r a f ts m e n
D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s --------------------------------D r a f ts m e n I ____________________ — -------------D r a f ts m e n II __________________________________
D r a f ts m e n I I I _________________________________

5, 818
21, 501
3 4 ,2 9 2
28, 689

$442
538
813

$428
530
659
795

89, 004
5 7 , 324
3 1 , 134
2 9 ,4 8 8
8, 978
62, 838
4 5 , 568
28, 066
87, 275
82, 602
4 8 , 037
1 5 ,0 5 1
7 1 , 379
56, 212
1 4 ,0 3 5
10, 826
5, 297
10, 130
5, 058
8 5 , 292
4 5 ,4 0 9

412
537
324
361
443
400
457
357
489
549
586
641
433
490
402
4 74
418
505
614
371
430

395
525
313
34 8
430
387
450
343
483
543
584
630
424
480
391
469
402
494
604
361
417

666

897
175
818
532

7.
5.
5.
5.

1
6
8
7

C le ric a l
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g I ---------------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g II ------------------------------------C l e r k s , f ile I --------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , f ile I I ________________________________
C l e r k s , f ile i n ________________________________
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I -------- ---- -------------------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I I ------------------------------------O ffic e b o y s o r g i r l s ----------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I ------------- — --------------- —
S e c r e t a r i e s II ----------------- -----------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s III — ---- ------- —
------- —
S e c r e t a r i e s I V ___________ ____ ________ ___
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ----------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n io r _______________________
S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s I ______________________
S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s II -------------------------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s I --------------------T a b u l a tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s I I ------------------T a b u l a tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s I I I -----------------T y p i s ts I ---------------------------------------------------------T y p i s ts I I _____________________________________

5 ,4 3 6
7, 285
4 , 139
4 , 661
5, 996
5, 219
6, 048
4 , 609
6, 518
7, 366
7, 863
8, 698
5, 771
6, 631
5 ,4 2 3
6, 340
5, 579
6, 782
8, 082
4 , 799
5, 639

4. 9
4. 4
5. 7
5. 3
5. 2
5. 1
5. 6
6. 7
5. 5
5. 0
5. 1
5. 9
6. 8
4. 8
5. 1
4. 5
6. 8
4. 9
5. 2
5. 8
5. 4

1 F o r s c o p e of s tu d y , s e e ta b le in a p p e n d ix A .
2 F o r l i m it a ti o n s of p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s a s a m e a s u r e o f c h a n g e in s a l a r y s c a l e s , s e e p . 6 o f te x t.
3 O c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e l a t e to th e t o ta l in a l l e s ta b l is h m e n t s w ith in s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y a n d n o t to th e n u m b e r a c tu a l ly s u r ­
veyed.
F o r f u r t h e r e x p la n a tio n , s e e p . 33.
4 S a l a r i e s r e p o r t e d r e l a t e to th e s ta n d a r d s a l a r i e s t h a t w e r e p a id f o r s ta n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u le s ; i . e . , th e s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y c o rr e s p o n d in g
to th e e m p l o y e e 's n o r m a l w o r k s c h e d u le e x c lu d in g o v e r t i m e h o u r s . N o n p r o d u c tio n b o n u s e s a r e e x c lu d e d , b u t c o s t- o f - l iv i n g p a y m e n ts a n d in c e n tiv e
e a r n i n g s a r e in c lu d e d .
* T h e m id d le r a n g e ( in t e r q u a r ti le ) u s e d h e r e is th e c e n t r a l p a r t o f th e a r r a y e x c lu d in g th e u p p e r a n d lo w e r f o u r t h s o f th e e m p lo y e e d i s t r ib u t io n .
6 B e c a u s e o f c h a n g e s in th e n u m b e r a n d d e fin itio n s of le v e l s b e tw e e n s u r v e y s , y e a r - t o - y e a r c o m p a r is o n s f o r a tt o r n e y s c o u ld n o t be p r e s e n t e d .
7 N o t r e p o r t e d in 1968.




17
Table 2.

Average Salaries:

Metropolitan Areas

(E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s f o r s e le c te d p r o f e s s io n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
in p r iv a t e i n d u s t r y , m e t r o p o li ta n a r e a s , 1 J u n e 1969)
M o n th ly s a l a r i e s 3
O c c u p a tio n a n d c l a s s
(See d e fin itio n s in a p p e n d ix C)

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s 2

A nnual s a la r ie s 3

M id d le r a n g e 4
M e an

M e d ia n

4 ,7 5 9
9 ,9 2 5
2 0 ,9 4 9
1 4 ,2 9 6
5 ,6 2 1

$670
754
840
999
1, 199

$675
750
826
990
1, 191

1 ,0 7 1

654
1 ,7 4 1
3, 904
2, 110

708
776
895
1 ,0 9 7

680
750
875
1 ,0 8 3

635
691
793
983

615
951
695
288

1, 107
1 ,2 3 2
1 ,4 8 5
1 ,7 1 4

1 ,0 5 2
1 ,2 3 5
1 ,4 7 5
1 ,7 4 9

565
1 ,2 2 6
1 ,5 7 3
1 ,5 3 9
631
463

919
1 ,0 6 4
1 ,3 2 5
1 ,5 9 0
1 ,9 7 7
2 ,4 5 4

875
1 ,0 3 6
1, 304
1, 542

2, 311
7 ,7 7 2
1 1 ,4 3 0
4 ,5 0 6
230

F irs t
q u a r t i le

T h ird
q u a rtile

M id d le r a n g e 4
M ean

F irs t
q u a r t i le

T h ir d
q u a r t i le

$ 8 , 100

$ 7 , 500

9 ,9 1 2
1 1 ,8 8 0
1 4 ,2 9 2

1 0 ,8 0 0
1 2 ,8 5 2

$ 8 ,6 1 6
9 , 900
1 0 ,9 9 2
1 3 ,0 3 2
15, 756

8, 160
9,000

A c c o u n ta n ts a n d a u d it o r s
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A u d ito r s
A u d ito r s
A u d ito rs
A u d ito r s
C h ie f
C h ie f
C h ie f
C h ie f

I
I I ______________________________
I I I _____________________________
I V _____________________________
V ______________________________

I
_ _
II
__
I I I __________________________________
I V __________________________________

a c c o u n ta n ts
a c c o u n ta n ts
a c c o u n ta n ts
a c c o u n ta n ts

I
I I _________________________
I I I ________________________
IV

$625
685
750

$7 1 8
825
916
1 ,0 8 6
1 ,3 1 3

$ 8 ,0 4 4
9 ,0 4 2
1 0 ,0 7 5
1 1 ,9 9 4
1 4 ,3 9 4

789
850
976

8, 292

10,200

1,200

8 ,4 9 5
9 , 316
1 0 ,7 4 4
1 3 ,1 6 1

1 0 ,5 0 0

12,996

9 , 516
1 1 ,7 9 6

1 1 ,7 1 2
1 4 ,4 0 0

958
1, 100
1 ,3 0 0
1 ,4 8 4

1 ,2 5 0
1 ,3 3 3
1 ,6 4 4
1 ,7 9 1

13, 285
1 4 ,7 8 6
1 7 ,8 2 6
2 0 ,5 6 8

12, 624
1 4 ,8 2 0
1 7 ,7 0 0
2 0 ,9 8 8

1 1 ,4 9 6
13, 200
1 5 ,6 0 0
1 7 ,8 0 8

1 5 ,0 0 0
1 5 ,9 9 6
1 9 ,7 2 8
2 1 ,4 9 2

999
1, 195
1 ,4 6 7
1 ,7 5 0
2, 171
2, 772

1 1 ,0 2 8
1 2 ,7 6 2
1 5 ,9 0 6
1 9 ,0 7 6
2 3 , 721
2 9 ,4 5 2

1 0 ,5 0 0
12, 432
15, 648
1 8 ,5 0 4
2 3 ,0 4 0

9 , 888
1 0 ,9 9 2
13, 692
1 5 ,9 9 6

1 1 ,9 8 8
1 4 ,3 4 0
1 7 ,6 0 4

20,988

2 ,4 0 8

824
916
1, 141
1 ,3 3 3
1 ,7 4 9
2, 042

28,896

2 4 , 504

663
784
914
1 ,0 9 8
1, 305

652
775
904
1 ,0 8 1
1 ,2 5 0

595
700
821
978
1, 181

1,000

723
852

1 ,2 0 7
1 ,4 0 4

7 , 955
9 ,4 0 8
1 0 ,9 6 6
13, 174
1 5 ,6 6 4

7 ,8 2 4
9 , 300
1 0 ,8 4 8
1 2 ,9 7 2
1 5 ,0 0 0

7, 140
8 ,4 0 0
9 ,8 5 2
1 1 ,7 3 6
1 4 ,1 7 2

1 4 ,4 8 4
1 6 ,8 4 8

682
750

582
695
795
965

744
835
965
1, 171

8, 018
9 ,0 8 2
1 0 ,5 8 5
1 2 ,8 5 2

8, 184
9,000
12,888

6, 984
8, 340
9 ,5 4 0
1 1 ,5 8 0

1 1 ,5 8 0
1 4 ,0 5 2

1, 100

1 1 ,8 2 0
1 3 ,6 2 0
1 6 ,2 0 0
1 9 ,9 9 2

900

9,000

8,220
9,000

7, 620

9 ,4 6 8

A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto rn e y s
A tto rn e y s
A tto r n e y s

I
...
II
_
_
I I I ________________________________
IV ______________________ ____
V _________________________________
V I ________________________________

1,920

21,000
2 6 ,0 5 2
3 3 ,2 6 4

B u y e rs
B u y e rs
B u y ers
B u y ers
B u y e rs
B u y e rs

I
__
I I _____________________ ____ _______
III
IV
__
V ____________________________________

8, 676
10, 224
12, 000

P e rso n n el m anagem ent
Job
Job
Jo b
Job

a n a ly s t s
a n a ly s t s
a n a ly s t s
a n a ly s t s

D ire c to rs
D ire c to rs
D ire c to rs
D ire c to rs

of
of
of
of

I
I I ___
III
IV

_ ______
_________________________

p e rs o n n e l
p e rs o n n e l
p e rs o n n e l
p e rs o n n e l

I
_ ____ _
_
I I ___________________
III
IV

122

668

318
576
497

757
882
1 ,0 7 1

723
1 ,5 1 7
891
316

1 ,0 1 3
1, 180
1 ,4 0 5
1 ,7 3 0

985
1, 135
1, 350

1,666

875
1 ,0 3 3
1 ,2 1 5
1 ,5 0 0

1 ,2 9 9
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,9 3 4

1 2 ,1 5 8
1 4 ,1 5 8
1 6 ,8 5 5
2 0 ,7 6 1

890

1 ,0 7 4

1 0 ,6 8 0

1 0 ,5 0 0

12,3 9 6
1 4 ,5 8 0
1 8 ,0 0 0

8 ,9 2 8

10,020

13, 200
1 5 ,5 8 8
19, 2 0 0
2 3 , 208

C h e m is ts a n d e n g in e e r s
C h e m is t s
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is t s
C h e m is t s
C h e m is t s

I
I I _________________________________
III
_ _ ___
IV
.
V __________________________________
VI
__ _
VII
VIII
_
_ _
_ ...

1 ,5 6 6
3 ,8 2 0
7, 677
8 ,9 7 2
7, 538
3, 970
1 ,6 0 6
490

736
807
930
1 ,1 1 7
1, 340
1 ,5 4 7
1 ,8 9 6
2, 275

748
800
912
1, 100
1, 333
1, 541
1 ,8 3 3
2, 124

680
743
833
999
1 ,2 0 8
1 ,4 0 2
1 ,6 4 5
1 ,9 1 6

790
869
1 ,0 0 8
1 ,2 4 8
1 ,4 6 9
1 ,6 8 3
2, 122
2 , 633

8 ,8 2 7
9 , 682
11, 154
1 3 ,4 0 0
1 6 ,0 7 8
1 8 ,5 6 0
2 2 ,7 4 7
2 7 ,3 0 1

8, 976
9 , 600
1 0 ,9 4 4
13, 200
1 5 ,9 9 6
1 8 ,4 9 2
2 1 ,9 9 6
2 5 ,4 8 8

E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs

I
_
_
II
_ __ _
III
. .......
IV
V
VI
V I I _______________________________
VIII

1 2 ,7 2 3
3 1 ,6 9 4
7 9 ,4 7 9
1 0 7 ,5 7 5
7 1 ,1 5 0
3 6 ,5 6 4
13, 583
3, 038

806
873
980
1. 166
1, 350
1 .5 5 4
1 ,7 6 9
2 ,0 1 5

808
870
978
1, 155
1, 336
1 ,5 4 3
1 ,7 6 0
1 ,9 6 4

774
825
908
1 ,0 6 6
1 ,2 2 5
1 ,4 0 5
1 ,6 0 0
1 ,7 7 0

845
920
1 ,0 4 9
1 ,4 6 0
1 ,6 8 3
1 ,9 2 5
2, 181

9 , 675
1 0 ,4 7 1
1 1 ,7 5 7
1 3 ,9 9 4
1 6 ,2 0 2
1 8 ,6 4 3
2 1 ,2 3 2
2 4 ,1 8 0

9 ,6 9 6
1 0 ,4 4 0
1 1 ,7 3 6
13, 860
1 6 ,0 3 2
1 8 ,5 1 6
21, 120
2 3 , 568

5, 182
1 2 ,7 7 2
2 3 , 539
29, 111
1 5 ,0 7 7

501
589
672
779
862

501
586
669
768
850

456
530
610
706
791

550
639
7 30
846
928

6, 018
7, 068
8 ,0 6 8
9 , 348
1 0 ,3 4 0

8, 028

1,260

8, 160
8 ,9 1 6
9 ,9 9 6
1 1 ,9 8 8
1 4 ,4 9 6
1 6 ,8 2 4
1 9 ,7 4 0
2 2 ,9 9 2

9 ,4 8 0
1 0 ,4 2 8

12,096

1 4 ,9 7 6
1 7 ,6 2 8
2 0 ,1 9 6
2 5 ,4 6 4
3 1 ,5 9 6

2 1 ,2 4 0

1 0 ,1 4 0
1 1 ,0 4 0
1 2 ,5 8 8
1 5 ,1 2 0
1 7 ,5 2 0
2 0 ,1 9 6
2 3 , 100
2 6 ,1 7 2

5 ,4 7 2
6 ,3 6 0
7 , 320
8 ,4 7 2
9 ,4 9 2

6, 600
7, 668
8 ,7 6 0
1 0 ,1 5 2
11, 136

9 , 288
9 , 900
1 0 ,8 9 6
1 2 ,7 9 2
1 4 ,7 0 0
1 6 ,8 6 0
1 9 ,2 0 0

E n g in e e r in g t e c h n i c ia n s
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g

t e c h n i c ia n s
te c h n i c ia n s
te c h n i c ia n s
t e c h n i c ia n s
t e c h n i c ia n s

I
II
III
IV
V

__

S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d of ta b l e .




6,012
7 ,0 3 2
9 ,2 1 6

10,200

18
Table 2.

Average Salaries:

Metropolitan Areas— Continued

( E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s f o r s e le c te d p r o f e s s io n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
in p r iv a t e i n d u s t r y , m e t r o p o li ta n a r e a s ,
J u n e 1969)
M o n th ly s a l a r i e s 3
O c c u p a tio n a n d c l a s s
(S ee d e f in itio n s in a p p e n d ix C)

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s 2

A nnual s a la r ie s 3

M id d le r a n g e 4
M ean

M e d ia n

F irs t
q u a rtile

T h ir d
q u a r t i le

M id d le r a n g e 4
M e an

M e d ia n

F irs t
q u a r t i le

T h ir d
q u a r t i le

D r a f ts m e n
D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s __________________________
D r a f ts m e n I ________________ _____________
D r a f ts m e n II
_ _
D r a f ts m e n I I I ______ _______________________

4 ,9 2 2

1 7 ,9 0 1
2 9 ,1 4 4
2 5 ,7 2 2

$428
540
666
804

$382
475
600
730

$494

672
822

600
739
890

$ 5 , 338
6, 519
8 ,0 6 0
9, 860

$ 5 , 135
6 ,4 7 8
7 ,9 8 8
9 ,6 4 6

$ 4 ,5 8 8
5 ,6 9 9
7, 198
8 ,7 6 0

$ 5 , 923
7, 198
8 ,8 6 4
1 0 ,6 7 8

416
541
327
363
445
406
462
357
494
553
593
652
437
495
406
477
419
504
617
373
431

400
526
317
348
435
391
453
345
489
549
587
645
425
486
392
472
404
492
605
365
419

355
462
295
318
374
349
410
313
435
487
520
565
375
433
348
420
360
435
546
330
380

461
608
348
391
506
443
508
385
546
617
660
7 34
488
557
456
530
463
565
682
404
473

4 ,9 9 7
6 ,4 9 4
3, 924
4 , 358
5, 344
4 ,8 7 1
5, 540
4 ,2 9 0
5 ,9 3 0
6 ,6 3 5
7, 119
7 ,8 2 7
5 ,2 3 9
5, 936
4 ,8 6 6
5, 718
5, 031
6 ,0 5 4
7 ,4 0 8
4 ,4 8 1
5, 173

4 ,7 9 9
6, 309
3, 800
4 , 171
5 ,2 1 4
4 ,6 9 3
5 ,4 3 5
4 ,1 3 9
5 ,8 6 7
6, 593
7 ,0 4 8
7 ,7 3 8
5, 106
5 ,8 3 1
4 ,7 0 6
5 ,6 6 9
4 ,8 4 9
5 ,9 0 9
7, 263
4 , 379
5, 025

4 ,2 5 9
5, 548
3, 546
3 ,8 1 3
4 ,4 8 4
4 , 183
4 ,9 1 9
3, 754
5, 214
5, 840
6 , 239
6, 778
4 , 505
5, 195
4 ,1 7 1
5, 039
4 , 319
5, 215
6 , 549
3 ,9 5 9
4 ,5 5 9

5, 527
7, 300
4 , 171
4 ,6 9 3
6 ,0 6 6
5, 315
6, 095
4 ,6 1 9
6 ,5 5 0
7 ,4 0 7
7 ,9 2 1
8 ,8 0 6
5, 855
6 ,6 8 3
5 ,4 6 7
6 , 364
5, 561
6 ,7 8 2
8, 186
4 ,8 4 9
5, 674

$445
543

C le ric a l
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g I ________________________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g I I _______________________
C l e r k s , f ile I
C l e r k s , f ile II
. . . . . . . . . . .... . - __________
C l e r k s , f ile I I I .............................................................
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I ______________ ____ _
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I I __ __ _____________
O ffic e b o y s o r g i r l s ___ ____________________
S e c r e t a r i e s I __________________ _________ _
S e c r e t a r i e s II _______________________________
S e c r e t a r i e s I I I _________________________ __
S e c r e t a r i e s I V ______________________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ____________ ____ _
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n io r ______________________
S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s I ____________________
S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s I I ___________________
T a b u l a tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s I ____________
T a b u l a tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s I I ___________
T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s I I I __________
T y p i s ts I ____________________________________
T y p i s ts II ____________________________________

7 6 ,2 4 6
4 9 ,0 6 3
2 6 ,1 0 2
2 5 ,6 6 5
8, 185
5 3 ,8 9 1
3 9 ,8 8 7
2 5 ,8 2 4
7 7 ,7 8 1
7 4 ,2 2 1
4 3 , 382
1 3 ,5 8 3
6 2 ,5 0 3
4 9 ,1 4 2
1 2 ,5 6 6
9 ,8 6 6
4 ,7 6 0
9 ,2 5 8
4 , 557
7 4 ,4 5 3
4 1 ,3 1 7

F o r s c o p e of stu d y , s e e ta b le in a p p e n d ix A .
O c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e l a t e to th e t o ta l in a l l e s ta b l is h m e n t s w ith in s c o p e o f th e s u rv e y a n d n o t to th e n u m b e r a c tu a l ly s u r ­
F o r f u r t h e r e x p la n a tio n , s e e p. 3 3 .
3 S a l a r i e s r e p o r t e d r e l a t e to th e s ta n d a r d s a l a r i e s t h a t w e r e p a id f o r s ta n d a r d w o rk s c h e d u l e s ; i. e . , th e s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y c o r r e s p o n d in g
to th e e m p l o y e e 's n o r m a l w o rk s c h e d u le e x c lu d in g o v e r t i m e h o u r s .
N o n p ro d u c tio n b o n u s e s a r e e x c lu d e d , b u t c o s t- o f - l iv i n g p a y m e n ts a n d in c e n tiv e
e a r n i n g s a r e in c lu d e d .
4 T h e m id d le r a n g e ( in t e r q u a r ti le ) u s e d h e r e i s th e c e n t r a l p a r t of th e a r r a y e x c lu d in g th e u p p e r a n d lo w e r f o u r t h s of th e e m p lo y e e d i s t r ib u t io n .
1
2

veyed.




19
Table 3.

Average Salaries:

Establishments Employing 2,500 or More

(E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s f o r s e le c te d p r o f e s s io n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t iv e , t e c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s in p r iv a t e i n d u s t r y 1
in e s ta b l is h m e n t s e m p lo y in g 2, 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e , 2 U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, J u n e 1969, p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in m e a n
s a l a r i e s d u r in g th e y e a r , 3 a n d c o m p a r is o n w ith le v e l s in a ll e s ta b l is h m e n t s c o m b in e d )
M o n th ly s a l a r i e s 5
N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s 4

O c c u p a tio n a n d c l a s s
(See d e fin itio n s in a p p e n d ix C)

M id d le r a n g e 6
M ean

M e d ia n

F irs t
q u a r t i le

T h ir d
q u a r t i le

P ercen t
in c re a se
in
m ean
s a la r ie s 3

L e v e ls in l a r g e e s ta b l is h m e n t s
e x p r e s s e d a s p e r c e n t o f th o s e
in a ll e s ta b l is h m e n t s c o m b in e d
E m p lo y m e n t

M e an
s a la r ie s

A c c o u n ta n ts a n d a u d ito r s
509
961
164
187
574

$698
783
880
1 ,0 3 6
1 ,2 1 7

$700
784
875
1, 030
1 ,2 0 8

$652
717
791
934
1 ,0 9 8

$740
855
968
1, 125
1, 346

7 .4
8. 8
8. 5
7. 0
5 .9

I
II
I I I _____ _____ _________________ ______ ___
I V ---------------------------------------------------------

368
820
1 ,5 6 4
1 ,1 1 9

765
831
920
1, 100

775
810
900
1 ,0 9 1

687
726
800
987

846
933
1 ,0 3 0
1 ,2 0 8

C h ie f a c c o u n ta n ts III
—
- C h ie f a c c o u n ta n ts IV____________________________

195
116

1 ,6 0 4
1 ,7 9 3

1 ,5 7 1
1 ,7 4 6

1 ,4 1 6
1 ,5 4 7

162
404
576
512
284
236

1, 012
1, 181
1 ,4 2 8
1 ,6 5 8
2 ,0 4 8
2 ,5 2 5

999
1. 167
1 ,4 1 6
1 ,6 2 4
2 , 013
2 ,4 9 9

— —
— -

805
3 ,2 3 6
5 ,6 9 8
2 , 917

722
812
934
1 ,0 8 8

J o b a n a ly s t s I I ---------------------------------------------------J o b a n a ly s t s I I I --------- -------- --------------------------J o b a n a ly s t s I V ---------------------------------------------------

155
407
429

D ire c to rs of p e rs o n n e l III- ---D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l I V ------------------- —-----------

A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A c c o u n ta n ts
A u d ito rs
A u d ito rs
A u d ito rs
A u d ito r s

I ----------------------------------------------------II _ ---- _
-------------------- ---— - — —
III
_ -----IV --------------------- ------- V
—
- -

45
54
33
31
40

105
104
105
104
102

8. 5
7. 6
6. 7

51
44
37
49

110
107
103
101

1 ,8 8 2
1 ,9 8 1

6 .4
5. 8

26
36

109
104

881
1 ,0 2 0
1 ,2 5 0
1 ,4 5 8
1 ,7 9 1
2, 180

1, 100
1 ,3 0 4
1 ,5 8 0
1 ,8 3 3
2 , 332
2 ,7 7 3

(*)
< >
(*)
< >
< >
( ')

29
31
35
31
43
50

110
111
108
104
104
103

710
804
925
1 ,0 6 9

649
720
826
965

783
875
1 ,0 3 5
1, 190

4.
7.
7.
4.

0
0
0
8

30
33
41
59

110
105
102
99

769
881
1 ,0 7 6

760
875
1 ,0 7 5

699
800
980

840
953
1, 165

-. 3
- .4
2 .9

49
63
75

102
99
101

181
144

2,
5,
8,
5,
2,

1 ,6 2 4
1 ,8 8 4

1 ,7 0 0
1 ,9 0 0

1 ,4 3 4
1 ,6 4 7

1 ,8 0 4
2 , 058

3. 0
2. 3

16
35

116
110

C)

A tto rn e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto r n e y s
A tto rn e y s

I
II _ ----—
— -----III —
—
- - — IV — _
_________
_ _ _
V _
V I -----------------------------------------------------B u y e rs

Piiy«=r<3
B u y e rs
B u y e rs
B u y e rs

T
II
__
— - - - -------- — ----- ------- — ----III ---- -------I V ------------- ----- --------------------------P e rso n n el m anagem ent

C h e m is ts a n d e n g in e e r s
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts
C h e m is ts

I --------------------------------------------------------II -------------------------------------------------------III —
IV
V
VI
VII _
VIII
__ -

548
1 ,7 5 8
3 ,2 8 9
4 , 163
2, 941
1 ,7 2 0
688
271

777
845
976
1, 168
1, 392
1 ,5 7 9
1 ,8 5 6
2 ,2 4 9

775
843
975
1, 155
1 ,3 8 0
1 ,5 5 5
1 ,8 0 4
2 , 122

730
779
883
1, 045
1, 254
1 ,4 2 0
1 ,6 4 0
1 ,9 5 0

825
907
1 ,0 5 1
1 ,2 9 0
1, 508
1 ,7 1 2
2 ,0 0 9
2, 533

6. 8
6 .9
8 .4
6. 3
7. 1
8. 8
7. 1
4. 1

28
38
36
38
33
38
37
51

107
105
106
105
104
102
99
99

E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e r s
E n g in e e rs
E n g in e e r s
E n g in e e r s
E n g in e e r s

I
—
II -----------------------------------------------------III _
- — - —
IV ___
V -----_
_
V I_______ ___ ___________ _________ __
VII ______________ ___ ________________
V III __

7, 848
2 1 ,3 0 6
5 3 ,1 7 6
7 4 ,7 4 3
4 6 ,5 9 6
2 2 , 939
7 ,5 1 4
1 ,7 7 0

812
876
993
1, 184
1 ,3 7 2
1, 592
1 ,8 2 3
2 , 076

815
873
991
1, 174
1, 365
1 ,5 8 3
1 ,8 1 3
2, 010

775
829
924
1, 090
1, 255
1 ,4 5 0
1 ,6 5 0
1 ,8 3 0

850
922
1 ,0 5 5
1 ,2 7 4
1 ,4 7 6
1 ,7 1 6
1 ,9 7 7
2, 255

6.
6.
6.
6.
6.
8.
4.
5.

7
7
5
4
7
3
6
0

57
62
60
61
59
56
50
51

101
101
102
102
102
103
103
104

2 ,4 2 6
7 ,4 7 8
1 4 ,2 4 1
18, 563
1 0 ,7 3 0

521
600
688
787
870

521
597
685
782
856

478
548
630
721
804

568
648
745
850
939

7.
6.
6.
7.
6.

9
1
8
0
8

40
47
51
57
63

105
103
103
102
101

E n g in e e r in g te c h n ic ia n s
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g
E n g in e e r in g

te c h n ic ia n s
te c h n ic ia n s
te c h n ic ia n s
te c h n ic ia n s
te c h n ic ia n s

I
II--------------------------------I I I ------------------------------IV -------------------------------V --------------------------------

S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le ,




20
Table 3.

Average Salaries:

Establishments Employing 2,500 or More— Continued

( E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s f o r s e l e c t e d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s in p r iv a t e i n d u s t r y 1
in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p lo y in g 2, 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e , 2 U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, J u n e 1969, p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in m e a n
s a l a r i e s d u r in g th e y e a r , 3 a n d c o m p a r is o n w ith le v e l s in a ll e s ta b l is h m e n t s c o m b in e d )
M o n th ly s a l a r i e s 5
O c c u p a tio n a n d c la s s
(See d e f in itio n s in a p p e n d ix C)

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s 4

M id d le r a n g e 6
M ean

M e d ia n

F irs t
q u a r t i le

T h ird
q u a r t i le

P e rce n t
in c re a se
in
m ean
s a la rie s 3

L e v e ls in l a r g e e s ta b l is h m e n t s
e x p r e s s e d a s p e r c e n t o f th o s e
in a ll e s ta b l is h m e n t s c o m b in e d
E m p lo y m e n t

M e an
s a la r ie s

D r a f ts m e n
D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s _____________________________
D r a f ts m e n I -------------------------------------------------------D r a f ts m e n I I ------------------------------------------------------D r a f ts m e n I I I ------------------------------------------------------

2, 327
7, 961
12, 112
1 2 ,2 5 9

$475
567
691
845

$469
564
681
821

$410
506
624
745

$534
620
752
920

8.
5.
5.
4.

0
2
3
8

40
37
35
43

107
105
104
104

1 6 ,8 2 5
13, 357
5, 263
6 , 990
2, 972
1 6 ,1 2 5
1 4 ,4 1 5
7 ,6 4 1
2 5 , 049
3 2 ,7 8 4
1 2 ,7 3 9
3, 559
2 3 ,9 5 7
2 1 ,9 1 9
2, 942
3, 506
1 ,8 9 5
4 , 062
2 , 150
1 9 ,5 7 2
1 6 ,5 1 0

458
588
360
401
492
440
491
380
519
587
659
714
464
522
426
505
461
520
642
404
449

448
582
348
390
489
426
485
361
515
587
655
700
456
522
417
508
450
517
633
391
434

387
504
325
350
418
371
430
330
467
522
587
635
405
46 0
36 3
443
394
449
573
356
391

524
666
383
443
564
504
554
413
570
642
725
785
521
592
478
561
521
586
717
439
501

5.
2.
6.
5.
5.
4.
5.
5.
6.
5.
5.
5.
7.
5.
6.
4.
9.
6.
5.
5.
4.

1
5
2
9
4
6
5
3
2
1
2
3
3
2
5
2
5
2
6
9
6

19
23
17
24
33
26
32
27
29
40
27
24
34
39
21
32
36
40
43
23
36

111
109
111
111
111
110
107
106
106
107
112
111
107
107
106
107
110
103
105
109
104

C le ric a l
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g I ___________________________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g I I ----------------------------------------C l e r k s , f ile I____________________________________
C l e r k s , f ile I I __________________________________
C l e r k s , f ile III _________________________________
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s T___________________________
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I I __________________________
O ffic e b o y s o r g i r l s _________________________ -—
S e c r e t a r i e s I ------------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I I ----------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I I I ------------------ --------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s I V ------------------------------------------- -----S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r __________________________
S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s I------------------------------------S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s I I ----------------------------------T a b u la tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s I ---------------------T a b u la tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s I I ---------------------T a b u la tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s I I I --------------------T y p i s ts I ------------------------------------------------------------T y p i s ts I I _______________________ _____________

1 F o r s c o p e o f s tu d y , s e e ta b le in a p p e n d ix A.
2 In c lu d e s d a ta f o r a few e s ta b l is h m e n t s w ith l e s s th a n 2, 500 e m p lo y e e s o f 6 l a r g e c o m p a n ie s s tu d ie d t h a t p r o v id e d c o m p a n y w id e d a ta u n id e n ­
t if ie d by s iz e of e s ta b l is h m e n t .
T h is a p p lie s o n ly to d a ta f o r o c c u p a tio n s o t h e r th a n d r a f tin g a n d c l e r i c a l .
3 F o r lim it a ti o n s o f p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s a s a m e a s u r e o f c h a n g e in s a l a r y s c a l e s , s e e p . 6.
4 O c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e l a t e to th e to ta l in a ll e s ta b l is h m e n t s w ith in s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y a n d n o t to th e n u m b e r a c tu a l ly s u r v e y e d .
F o r f u r t h e r e x p la n a tio n , s e e p . 33.
5 S a l a r i e s r e p o r t e d r e l a t e to th e s ta n d a r d s a l a r i e s t h a t w e r e p a id fo r s ta n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s ; i . e . , th e s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y c o rr e s p o n d in g
to th e e m p l o y e e 's n o r m a l w o r k s c h e d u le e x c lu d in g o v e r t i m e h o u r s . N o n p r o d u c tio n b o n u s e s a r e e x c lu d e d , b u t c o s t- o f - l iv i n g p a y m e n ts an d in c e n tiv e
e a r n i n g s a r e in c lu d e d .
° T he m id d le r a n g e ( in t e r q u a r ti le ) u s e d h e r e is th e c e n t r a l p a r t o f th e a r r a y e x c lu d in g th e u p p e r a n d lo w e r f o u r th s o f th e e m p lo y e e d i s t r ib u t io n .
7 N o t r e p o r t e d in 1968.
8 B e c a u s e of c h a n g e s in th e n u m b e r a n d d e fin itio n s o f le v e l s b e tw e e n s u r v e y s , y e a r - t o - y e a r c o m p a r is o n s f o r a tt o r n e y s c o u ld n o t b e p r e s e n t e d .




21
Table 4.

Employment Distribution by Salary:

Professional and Administrative Occupations

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d p r o f e s s i o n a l an d a d m i n i s t r a t iv e o c c u p a t i o n s , b y a v e r a g e
m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , U n ited S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a an d H a w a ii, 1 J u n e 1969)

U n d e r $ 4 7 5 --------------------------------------$ 4 7 5 a n d u n d e r $ 5 0 0 ------------------------

II

IV

III

V

i

( 0 .1 )
1 .0
5
6
4
8

II

( 1 .9 )
_
( 1 .2 )
1 .2
1 .6

i

II

"

~

-

-

-

1.
3.
4.
6.

3
2
7
8

( 0 .4 )
1. 3
1. 1

-

-

-

-

( 1 .5 )
1 .2
3. 4
2 .9

_
-

_
-

4.
8.
19.
6.

5
6
1
8

3. 6
3. 7
1 0 .5
5. 8

_
( 3 .1 )

-

_
-

3
0
9
3

( 1 .4 )
1 .7
1. 7

_
-

1 0 .0
3 .9
3. 5
5. 1

12. 8
7 .0
9 .4
6. 2

5
4
5
6

_
( 0 .7 )
1 .0

6
1
4
2

2. 8
4 .9
6. 7
5 .0

_
( 1 .3 )
1 .7

4. 2
4 .0
2. 8
6. 8

7 .7
4. 7
8 .0
3. 8

6. 1
8 .9
7. 8
8. 3

5 .9
4. 3
4. 2
2 .9

8 .0
7. 2
6. 3
6 .4

2. 8
1 .0
2. 3
2. 7

( 2 .8 )
-

2. 1
2. 2
1 .9
1. 1

3
0
8
7
8

10. 1
9. 6
9 .8
1 1 .0
8. 6

.
-

2. 2
1 .8
( 1 .1 )

12. 2
5 .9
6. 4
5. 1
2. 6

-

-

-

_

_

_

under
under
under
under

$525
$55 0
$575
$60 0

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2.
2.
6.
5.

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$6 5 0
$675
$7 0 0

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

8. 1
1 1 .2
14. 3
1 1 .6

$700
$725
$ 75 0
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$75 0
$775
$80 0

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

14.
7.
7.
3.

1
2
0
2

1 0 .7
8 .9
1 1 .7
8. 2

8.
6.
9.
7.

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825
$850
$875
$900

------------------------------------------------------------------— -------------------

2. 3
1. 1
( 1 .5 )
-

7. 0
6 .0
5. 1
7 .9

8.
9.
7.
6.

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 ----------------------$95 0 ----------------------$ 9 7 5 ----------------------$ 1 ,0 0 0 -------------------

_
-

1 .9
1. 2
( 1 .9 )
-

$ 1 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0
$ 1 ,2 5 0

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

6. 8
1 .9
1. 1
( 1 .2 )
-

$ 1 ,2 5 0
$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0
$ 1 ,5 0 0

------------------------------— --------------------------------------

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 1 ,5 0 0
$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0
$ 1 ,7 5 0

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_

_

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0
$ 2 ,0 0 0

$ 2 ,0 0 0
$ 2 ,0 5 0
$ 2 , 100
$ 2 , 150
$ 2 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 ,2 5 0
$ 2 , 300
$ 2 ,3 5 0
$ 2 ,4 0 0
$ 2 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

15.
10.
8.
4.
3.

-

*

IV

iii

-

and
and
and
and

5
8
5
7

IV

ni

_
-

$ 50 0
$525
$ 55 0
$575

5.
3.
8.
7.

C h ie f a c c o u n ta n ts

A u d ito rs

A c c o u n ta n ts
I

■

“

.
-

"
"

_
'

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2. 2
2. 1
1 .6
3. 8

_
( 0 .7 )
7. 8
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

7. 2
5 .0
4 .9
4 .9

4.
3.
4.
4.

1 .6
7 .0
1 1 .2
1. 5

1 .3
.5
2. 7
6. 4

_
-

_
-

-

-

5. 5
( 1 .4 )
-

7 .0
4. 6
3 .9
2. 5
1 .6

1 3 .9
1 3 .0
8. 7
9 .5
10. 0

8
1
1
7
5

8. 2
5 .9
1 1 .4
1 1 .7
6 .9

_
(1 . 3)
3. 7
2 .9
3 .8

_
( 1 .2 )
1 .8

_
-

_
-

( 1 .3 )
-

-

-

-

5 .4
5. 1
2. 6
1 .8
1. 1

12. 7
1 0 .9
1 .0
1 .0
.5

14. 5
1 1 .9
5. 5
3. 4
2. 5

12.
12.
5.
4.
13.

2. 2
1 .0
1. 1
( 2 .8 )
-

4.
3.
8.
6.

2
1
5
3

14.
14.
3.
7.
2.

-

-

-

1 .0
( .4 )

1 .0
( 1 .0 )

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
5. 8
.6
5. 8
7. 7

7 .9
6. 3
4. 6
6 .6
3. 7

6. 5
7. 7
3 .4
5. 5
5. 8

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3. 2
1. 2
.5
1 .4
(-4 )

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2 ,0 5 0
$ 2 ,1 0 0
$ 2 , 150
$ 2 , 200
$ 2 ,2 5 0

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2 ,3 0 0
$ 2 , 350
$ 2 ,4 0 0
$ 2 ,4 5 0
$ 2 ,5 0 0

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

.

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2 ,5 0 0 a n d u n d e r $ 2 ,5 5 0 ---------------$ 2 ,5 5 0 a n d u n d e r $ 2 ,6 0 0 ---------------$ 2 ,6 0 0 a n d o v e r -------------------------------

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
2
2
0
5

_

3.
.
.
3.
.

3
5
8
6
5

22. 2
.9
6. 8
.6
5. 8

2. 1
( 1 .1 )

1 .8
1 .5
2. 2
.9
.3

_

-

.

.
1 .2
_

.9
.6
.9

_
-

-

1 .2

T o t a l ---------------------------------------

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s ----------------------

5 ,5 7 9

1 1 ,1 3 8

2 4 ,5 5 0

1 6 ,6 2 9

6 ,4 5 1

719

1 ,8 4 8

4 ,1 9 3

2 ,2 9 5

731

1 ,2 8 8

756

325

A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s ----------------

$667

$751

$836

$997

$ 1 ,1 9 8

$697

$774

$894

$ 1 ,0 9 4

$ 1 ,1 0 1

$ 1 ,2 2 0

$ 1 ,4 7 6

$ 1 ,7 1 6

S e e f o o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




1 0 0 .0

22
Table 4.

Employment Distribution by Salary:

Professional and Administrative Occupations— Continued

( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o c c u p a t i o n s , b y a v e r a g e
m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a an d H a w a ii, 1 J u n e 1969)
B u y e rs

A tto r n e y s
A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s
II

i
U n d e r $ 4 7 5 --------------------------------------------$ 4 7 5 a n d u n d e r $ 5 0 0 -------------- ----------

IV

III

V

.

.

.

_

_
"
_
( 0 .5 )
1. 1
.9

-

$500
$525
$55 0
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 5 2 5 -----------------------------$ 5 5 0 ------- -----------------$ 5 7 5 -----------------------------$ 6 0 0 -----------------------------

$600
$625
$65 0
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 6 2 5 -----------------------------$ 6 5 0 -----------------------------$ 6 7 5 -----------------------------$ 7 0 0 ------------------------------

_
-

$700
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 7 2 5 ----------------------------$ 7 5 0 -----------------------------$ 7 7 5 -----------------------------$ 8 0 0 ------------------------------

(2. 3)
1 .4
4. 2
7. 9

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 8 2 5 -----------------------------$ 8 5 0 -----------------------------$ 8 7 5 -----------------------------$ 9 0 0 ------------------------------

10.
12.
4.
14.

0
1
0
4

2.
3.
5.
3.

7
7
5
3

_
0 .9
1 .9
.4

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 -----------------------------$ 9 5 0 -----------------------------$ 9 7 5 -----------------------------$ 1 ,0 0 0 -------------------------

14.
1.
2.
1.

1
2
5
2

9.
7.
2.
4.

6
3
7
9

.5
.1
.4
2. 6

9 .2
4. 2
3. 3
2. 1
.7

7 .4
1 0 .5
8. 0
9 .8
3. 2

4.
8.
5.
5.
5.

1
8
2
5
7

1 .4
(3. 5)
_
-

7 .9
3. 9
1 .9
1 .7
.9

1 1 .0
13. 1
6. 3
6. 8
5. 1

9. 6
1 1 .6
3. 8
4. 2
8. 3

_
_
_
( 1 .4 )
1. 2
3. 2

1 .0
( 1 .6 )
-

6 .0
3. 0
2. 1
3. 2
2. 6

5 .4
4. 8
4. 4
10. 6
6. 4

1. 5
2. 4
2 .9
9. 5
3. 2

3.
3.
2.
4.
2.

4. 7
1 3 .9
2. 1
7. 6
3. 5

-

1. 1
1 .5
(2. 3)
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

and
and
and
and
and

under
unde r
under
under
under

$ 1 , 0 5 0 ---------------------$ 1 , 1 0 0 ---------------------$ 1 , 1 5 0 ---------------------$ 1 , 2 0 0 ---------------------$ 1 , 2 5 0 ----------------------

$ 1 ,2 5 0
$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

$ 1 ,5 0 0
$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,5 5 0
- ------$ 1 , 6 0 0 ---------------------$ 1 ,6 5 0 ---------------------$ 1 , 7 0 0 ---------------------$ 1 , 7 5 0 ----------------------

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
under
under
under
under

$ 1 , 8 0 0 ---------------------$ 1 , 8 5 0 ---------------------$ 1 , 9 0 0 ---------------------$ 1 , 9 5 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 0 0 0 ----------------------

$ 2 ,0 0 0
$ 2 ,0 5 0
$ 2 , 100
$ 2 ,1 5 0
$ 2 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
unde r
under

$ 2 , 0 5 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 1 0 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 1 5 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 2 0 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 2 5 0 ------------------ —

$ 2 ,2 5 0
$ 2 ,3 0 0
$ 2 ,3 5 0
$ 2 ,4 0 0
$ 2 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
unde r

$ 2 , 3 0 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 3 5 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 4 0 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 4 5 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 5 0 0 ----------------------

-

-

-

$ 2 ,5 0 0
$ 2 ,5 5 0
$ 2 ,6 0 0
$ 2 ,6 5 0
$ 2 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 , 5 5 0 ---------------------$ 2, 6 0 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 6 5 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 7 0 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 7 5 0 ----------------------

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

$ 2 ,7 5 0
$ 2 ,8 0 0
$ 2 ,8 5 0
$ 2 ,9 0 0
$ 2 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 , 8 0 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 8 5 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 9 0 0 ---------------------$ 2 , 9 5 0 ---------------------$ 3 , 0 0 0 ----------------------

-

_
-

-

$ 3 ,0 0 0
$ 3 ,0 5 0
$ 3 ,1 0 0
$ 3 ,1 5 0
$ 3 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
unde r
under

$ 3 , 0 5 0 ---------------------$ 3 ,1 0 0 ---------------------$ 3, 1 5 0 ---------------------$ 3 ,2 0 0 ---------------------$ 3 , 2 5 0 —-----------———

-

_
-

-

$ 3 ,2 5 0
$ 3, 300
$ 3 ,3 5 0
$ 3 , 400
$ 3 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 , 3 0 0 -------------------$ 3, 3 5 0 -------------------$ 3 , 4 0 0 — ---------— —
—
$ 3 , 4 5 0 -------------------$ 3 , 5 0 0 --------------------

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

$ 3 ,5 0 0 a n d o v e r ---------------------------------

_

.
-

2
1
2
3
4

1. 3
1 .6
1. 1
2. 2
.9
.5
.2
.2
. 3
.1
.
1. 3
( .1 )

i
_

"
_
( 0 .6 )
1 .0
2. 0
2. 2

$ 1 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0

1 , 3 0 0 ---------------------1 , 3 5 0 ---------------------1 , 4 0 0 ---------------------1 , 4 5 0 ---------------------1 , 5 0 0 ----------------------

VI

( 1 .0 )
3. 8

III

IV

_

_

-

6
3
5
7

( 0 .7 )
1 .0
1 .5
1 .5

9.
8.
14.
7.

1
7
3
7

3. 1
5 .7
7. 5
7. 0

"
~
( 1 .7 )
1 .8
1 .4

7.
4.
5.
3.

_
-

5
2
8
0

8. 2
7. 2
1 0 .7
6. 8

2. 8
2 .9
4. 2
5 .0

2. 7
1. 2
1 .9
1. 1

( 1 .5 )
5. 8
2. 1
3
3
4
1
0

( 3 .0 )
_
-

_
-

"
-

-

3
3
1
4

( 2 .7 )
1 .7
2. 4
3 .0

3. 6
1 .8
1 .5
1. 2

8. 1
6. 6
6. 4
5 .9

4. 5
4. 5
5. 3
5 .0

2. 3
.9
1 .0
( .9 )
-

9 .4
5. 4
4. 7
2 .9
1. 5

7.
7.
6.
4.

7
8
3
2

6.
7.
7.
7.

V
_

3.
7.
5.
8.

-

1.
1.
3.
1.
7.

II

( 1 .1 )
-

12.
12.
10.
8.
9.

9
3
6
8
0

5. 5
5. 6
1 .7
1 .9
1 .0

_
_
3. 4
3. 8
6. 4
3. 4
1 1 .5
10. 7
19.
8.
6.
5.
3.

7
5
0
1
8

_
-

_
-

( 1 .6 )
"
_
-

4. 7
2. 1
4. 3
.4
2. 6
.9
1 .7
.9
_
-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

1 .9
2. 8
2. 1
5. 5
2. 3

_
-

1. 5
2. 1
2. 7
2. 7
1 .8

5.
3.
2.
4.
2.

8
4
8
3
8

_
-

-

-

-

-

2.
.
1.
1.
.

2.
3.
2.
5.
3.

8
2
8
3
4

_
-

.
-

_

_

_

-

_
_
-

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

2. 3
2. 3
1 .3
1. 1
.4

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.
7.
2.
2.
4.

6
5
7
4
6

4
3
2
1
2

_
-

.6
1. 1
( 1 .1 )

-

-

-

-

_

.

_

_

.

-

.6

.

.

1. 3
1. 1
.9
3. 2

-

-

.
-

.

_

_

.
-

_

_

-

_
_
-

_

_

.

_

_

_

-

_

-

3 .0
4. 3
.4
.4
.2

.

-

-

-

.
-

-

2. 6

-

_

_

_

-

_

-

_

_
_
_
_

-

T o tal -----------------------------------------

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

N u m ber of e m p lo y e e s --------------------------

568

1 ,3 1 6

1 ,6 4 0

1 ,6 2 6

655

469

2 ,7 0 8

9 ,8 8 4

1 3 ,8 0 9

4 ,9 0 9

234

A v erag e m onthly s a l a r i e s -------------------

$918

$ 1 ,0 6 5

$ 1 ,3 2 3

$ 1 ,5 9 7

$ 1 ,9 7 4

$ 2 ,4 5 2

$656

$772

$912

$ 1 ,0 9 6

$ 1 ,3 0 6

S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b l e .




1 0 0 .0

23
Table 4.

Employment Distribution by Salary:

Professional and Administrative Occupations— Continued

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t iv e o c c u p a t i o n s , by a v e r a g e
m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, 1 J u n e 1969)
J o b a n a ly s ts
I

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

( 1 .7 )
2. 3
.9

1. 2

-

-

“

-

8
5
7
3

4. 8
1 .7
7 .4
6. 0

.2
1. 2
1 .4
4. 2

_
4. 1
6. 8

-

-

-

8
5
6
4

6 .9
7. 7
7 .9
5. 6

.7
1 .2
3. 8
2. 3

.2
1 1 .6
4. 6
7. 4

( 0 .5 )
2. 4
.7
1 .8

-

-

6 .9
1. 3
( 2 .5 )
-

7. 7
5. 6
1 1 .9
5. 4

3.
3.
2.
4.

7
8
6
2

4. 5
1 .9
6. 8
5 .9

7 .0
.8
1 .4
.7

-

-

-

_
-

1 1 .0
3. 2
1 .2
( 1 .1 )
-

9 .9
17. 6
12. 6
9. 4
6. 3

18. 3
8. 0
3. 2
2. 3
4 .9

18. 4
7 .9
14. 7
7. 0
5. 8

( 3 .0 )
7. 5
4. 3
5 .7
9 .6

( 1 .5 )

_
-

_
-

4. 4
3. 8
2. 4
1 .4
( 1 .6 )

2. 2
4. 2
2. 3
( .8 )

8. 8
5 .0
3. 8
3. 8
2. 1

10. 0
8 .9
7 .9
5. 3
3. 8

5. 1
4. 2
3 .9
5 .4
5. 1

-

_

3. 3
1 .6
.4
. 2
.6

7.
4.
6.
3.
2.

1
5
8
2
2

9 .0
6. 1
5 .9
8. 1
3 .9

3. 1
2. 3
1. 3
.6
1 .1

2. 4
7. 1
2 .9
7. 8
4. 2
4 .9
4. 2
2 .0
. 7
. 5

-

$500
$525
$550
$575

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 5 2 5 ---------------------------------------$ 5 5 0 ---------------------------------------$ 5 7 5 ---------------------------------------$ 6 0 0 -------- -------------------------------

3 .9
7. 0
6. 2
1 .6

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 6 2 5 ---------------------------------------$ 6 5 0 ---------------------------------------$ 6 7 5 ---------------------------------------$ 7 0 0 ----------------------------------------

1 .6
5. 6
4. 1
4. 1

$700
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 7 2 5 ------------------------ — -----$ 7 5 0 --------------------------------------$ 7 7 5 ---------------------------------------$ 8 0 0 ----------------------------------------

5. 4
5. 4
3 .9
6. 2

7.
13.
9.
5.

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 8 2 5 ------------------- ------------------$ 8 5 0 ---------------------------------------$ 8 7 5 ---------------------------------------$ 9 0 0 ---------------------------------------

2. 3
5. 4
7. 0
( 3 .1 )

8.
8.
6.
3.

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 --------------------------------------$ 9 5 0 --------------------------------------$ 9 7 5 --------------------------------------$ 1 , 0 0 0 ------------------------------------

$ 1 ,2 5 0
$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 , 3 0 0 -------------------------------$ 1 ,3 5 0 -------------------------------$ 1 ,4 0 0 -------------------------------$ 1 , 4 5 0 -------------------------------$ 1 , 5 0 0 --------------------------------

$ 1 ,5 0 0
$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,5 5 0 -------------------------------$ 1 ,6 0 0 -------------------------------$ 1 ,6 5 0 -------------------------------$ 1 , 7 0 0 -------------------------------$ 1 , 7 5 0 --------------------------------

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 ,0 0 0
$ 2 ,0 5 0
$ 2 , 100
$ 2 , 150
$ 2 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

$ 2 , 250
$ 2 , 300
$ 2 ,3 5 0
$ 2 ,4 0 0
$ 2 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

10.
2.
9.
15.

1
3
3
5

_
-

_

.
-

IV

_
-

2. 3
3. 1

.
-

III

-

$ 4 2 5 --------------------------------------$ 4 5 0 --------------------------------------$ 4 7 5 --------------------------------------$ 5 0 0 ----------------------------------------

$ 1 ,0 5 0 -------------------------------$ 1 , 1 0 0 -------------------------------$ 1 ,1 5 0 -------------------------------$ 1 , 2 0 0 -------------------------------$ 1 , 2 5 0 --------------------------------

II

( 1 .9 )
2. 8
1. 3
4. 4

under
under
under
under

under
under
under
under
under

I

-

and
and
and
and

and
and
and
and
and

IV
.
-

$400
$425
$450
$475

$ 1 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0

D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l

III

II

.
-

.
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

$ 1 ,8 0 0 -------------------------------$ 1 , 8 5 0 -------------------------------$ 1 , 9 0 0 -------------------------------$ 1 , 9 5 0 -------------------------------$ 2 , 0 0 0 --------------------------------

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

"

1 .0
( .3 )
-

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 , 0 5 0 -------------------------------$ 2 , 1 0 0 -------------------------------$ 2 , 1 5 0 -------------------------------$ 2 , 2 0 0 -------------------------------$ 2 , 2 5 0 --------------------------------

_

_

_

-

-

-

( 1 .8 )

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 , 3 0 0 -------------------------------$ 2 , 3 5 0 -------------------------------$ 2 , 4 0 0 -------------------------------$ 2 , 4 5 0 ----------------- ;-------------$ 2 , 5 0 0 --------------------------------------------

_

-

_

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2 ,5 0 0 a n d u n d e r $ 2 , 5 5 0 -------------------------------------------$ 2 ,5 5 0 a n d o v e r --------------------------------------------------------------

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

. 5
1 .0
. 7
. 5
. 2
1 . 2
( .9 )

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 . 0

1 0 0 .0

---------------------------------------------------

129

319

648

573

1 ,1 0 1

2 , 105

1 ,1 4 2

409

A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s -------------------------------------------

$678

$757

$883

$ 1 ,0 6 9

$987

$ 1 ,1 6 0

$ 1 ,3 9 5

$ 1 ,7 1 5

T o ta l

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s

S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d of ta b le .




1 0 0 . 0

1 0 0 .0

24
Table 4.

Employment Distribution by Salary:

Professional and Administrative Occupations— Continued

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d p r o f e s s i o n a l an d a d m i n i s t r a t iv e o c c u p a tio n s , b y a v e r a g e
m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, 1 J u n e 1969)
C h e m is ts
A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s
I
U n d e r $ 550 --------------$5 5 0 a n d u n d e r $57 5
$575 and u n d e r $b00

II
( 0 .7 )
2. 4
1 .7

III

IV

V

VI

.

.

.

“

_

“

VII

VIII

.
“

$600
$625
$650
$675

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$625
$6 5 0
$675
$7 0 0

6.
8.
7.
5.

3
5
4
7

( 1 .4 )
4. 7
5. 2

( 1 .0 )
1. 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$700
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$7 5 0
$775
$8 0 0

10. 8
13. 2
12. 7
1 0 .0

9. 1
6 .9
12. 2
9. 8

1 .8
1 .9
4 .9
5. 4

_
( 1 .7 )

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

$8 0 0
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 8 2 5 -----$ 8 5 0 -----$ 8 7 5 -----$ 9 0 0 ------

6. 8
6. 6
4. 5
1 .4

11.
8.
9.
6.

2
6
7
4

6 .9
6. 6
9 .8
9 .0

1.
2.
2.
2.

1
0
0
0

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 -----$ 9 5 0 -----$ 9 7 5 -----$ 1 ,0 0 0 —

( 1 .3 )

5. 3
3. 3
2. 0
1 .6

8. 7
5 .9
6. 1
5. 4

3.
3.
5.
4.

7
7
5
3

_
( 2 .4 )

_
-

_
-

_
-

1 .8
( .6 )

1 2 .9
11. 6
1 1 .0
8. 0
6. 6

2. 1
4. 2
6. 3
7. 7
9 .0

_
( 1 .8 )
1. 3
1 .5
3. 4

_
-

_
-

1 1 .0
10. 5
10. 6
7. 5
8. 3

4.
5.
7.
7.
10.

2
5
4
8
3

9.
7.
9.
7.
7.

4
5
3
3
5

-

$ 1 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
unde r
under
under
under

$ 1 ,0 5 0 $ 1 ,1 0 0 $ 1 ,1 5 0 $ 1 ,2 0 0 $ 1 ,2 5 0 -

_
-

-

9. 6
5. 7
3. 7
1 .9
1 .9

$ 1 ,2 5 0
$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,3 0 0 $ 1 ,3 5 0 $ 1 ,4 0 0 $ 1 ,4 5 0 $ 1 ,5 0 0 -

_
-

_
-

1 .4
( 1 .2 )
-

-

-

-

7. 5
6. 0
4. 5
2. 7
1 .9

$ 1 ,5 0 0
$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

1 1 ,5 5 0 1 1 ,6 0 0 1 1 ,6 5 0 1 1 ,7 0 0 1 1 ,7 5 0 -

_
-

_
-

_
-

( 1 .5 )
-

-

-

-

-

6. 8
5 .0
3 .9
1. 5
1. 2

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

1 ,8 0 0 1 1 ,8 5 0 1 1 ,9 5 0 -

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

( 1 .9 )
-

12, 0 0 0 -

-

-

-

-

$ 2 ,0 0 0
$ 2 ,0 5 0
$ 2 ,1 0 0
$ 2 ,1 5 0
$ 2 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 ,0 5 0 $ 2 ,1 0 0 $ 2 , 150$ 2 ,2 0 0 $ 2 ,2 5 0 -

_

_

_

_

$ 2 ,2 5 0
$ 2 , 300
$ 2 ,3 5 0
$ 2 ,4 0 0
$ 2 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 ,5 0 0
$ 2 ,5 5 0
$ 2 ,6 0 0
$ 2 ,6 5 0
$ 2 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

$ 2 ,7 5 0
$ 2 ,8 0 0
$ 2 ,8 5 0
$ 2 ,9 0 0
$ 2 ,9 5 0

11, 9 0 0 -

-

-

-

5.
4.
7.
6.
8.

6
4
9
1
4

1. 1
.6
.9
4. 5
4. 5

( 2 .4 )

2. 3
5. 6
1 .9
2. 1
4. 0

8 .4
3. 7
4. 7
3 .9
1. 3

4 .0
2. 7
.8
2. 4
.7

2. 6
2. 8
2. 4
.6
1 .7

.
.
.
.
1.

5
2
2
9
2

2. 2
2. 1
3. 2
1. 7
1 .9

1. 1
( .4 )

1. 3
4. 3
.9
.9
1. 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2 ,3 0 0 $ 2 , 350$ 2 ,4 0 0 $ 2 ,4 5 0 $ 2, 50 0 -

_
_
-

_
_
-

-

-

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 ,5 5 0 $ 2 ,6 0 0 $ 2 ,6 5 0 $ 2 ,7 0 0 $ 2 ,7 5 0 -

_
_
-

_
_
-

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 ,8 0 0 $ 2 ,8 5 0 $ 2 ,9 0 0 $ 2 ,9 5 0 $ 3 ,0 0 0 -

$ 3 ,0 0 0
$ 3 ,0 5 0
$ 3, 100
$ 3 ,1 5 0
$ 3 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
unde r
under
under

$ 3 ,0 5 0 $ 3, 10 0 $ 3 ,1 5 0 $ 3 ,2 0 0 $ 3 ,2 5 0 -

$ 3 ,2 5 0
$ 3, 300
$ 3 ,3 5 0
$ 3 ,4 0 0

and
and
and
and

u n d e r $ 3 ,3 0 0 u n d e r $ 3, 35 0 u n d e r $ 3 ,4 0 0 o v e r --------------

-

-

-

_

_
-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
( 1 .3 )

4.
3.
4.
7.
5.

-

-

_
( 2 .4 )
1 .4
6. 5

5. 6
6. 5
4 .9
5. 8
3. 5

-

_
_

-

4. 1
3. 7
2. 3
1 .9
1. 5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

:

:

-

:

:
-

1
4
1
3
2

.4
:
:

:

-

:

-

:

-

-

:

:

4. 3
. 6
.7

-

3 .9

:

1. 1
1 0 0 .0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s --------------------------------------

1 ,9 4 9

4 ,5 7 7

9 ,0 8 4

1 1 ,0 5 9

8 ,7 9 7

4 ,4 8 6

1 ,8 4 8

534

A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s -------------------------------

$728

$802

$922

$ 1 ,1 1 3

$ 1 ,3 4 0

$ 1 ,5 4 4

$ 1 ,8 7 3

$ 2 ,2 5 8




1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

T o ta l

25
Table 4.

Employment Distribution by Salary:

Professional and Administrative Occupations— Continued

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n of e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d p r o f e s s io n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t iv e o c c u p a tio n s , b y a v e r a g e
m o n th ly s a l a r i e s , U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a an d H a w a ii, 1 J u n e 1969)
E n g in e e r s
A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s
I

II

III

VI

V

IV

VII

VIII

-

-

U n d e r $ 625 --------------$ 6 2 5 and u n d e r $ 6 5 0 $650 and u n d e r $ 6 7 5 $675 and u n d er $ 700-

( 1 .2 )
1 .0
1 .8
1 .7

-

-

( 1 .8 )

:

-

-

-

-

-

$700
$725
$750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725$750$775$800-

3 .9
6. 3
1 0 .5
14. 5

1. 2
1 .9
4. 2
5. 8

_

_

_

_

-

-

( 1 .0 )
1 .1
1. 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$800
$825
$850
$875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$825$850$875$900-

18.
17.
10.
6.

.

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

$900
$925
$950
$975

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 9 2 5 ---$ 9 5 0 ---$ 9 7 5 ---$ 1 ,0 0 0 -

3. 3
1 .8
( 1 .4 )
-

$ 1 ,0 0 0
$ 1 ,0 5 0
$ 1 ,1 0 0
$ 1 ,1 5 0
$ 1 ,2 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,0 5 0 $ 1 ,1 0 0 $ 1 ,1 5 0 $ 1 ,2 0 0 $ 1 ,2 5 0 -

$ 1 ,2 5 0
$ 1 ,3 0 0
$ 1 ,3 5 0
$ 1 ,4 0 0
$ 1 ,4 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,3 0 0 $ 1 ,3 5 0 $ 1 ,4 0 0 $ 1 ,4 5 0 $ 1 ,5 0 0 -

$ 1 ,5 0 0
$ 1 ,5 5 0
$ 1 ,6 0 0
$ 1 ,6 5 0
$ 1 ,7 0 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,5 5 0 $ 1 ,6 0 0 $ 1 ,6 5 0 $ 1 ,7 0 0 $ 1 ,7 5 0 -

$ 1 ,7 5 0
$ 1 ,8 0 0
$ 1 ,8 5 0
$ 1 ,9 0 0
$ 1 ,9 5 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 ,8 0 0 $ 1 ,8 5 0 $ 1 ,9 0 0 $ 1 ,9 5 0 $ 2 ,0 0 0 -

4
4
1
8

_
-

-

10.
13.
14.
13.

1
1
1
6

8
4
1
2

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

( 1 .8 )

-

-

-

9. 4
12. 2
14. 4
12. 8
1 1 .1

2. 5
3 .9
6. 0
7. 3
9. 2

_

_

_

( l.D
1 .4
1 .9
2. 7

-

-

( 0 .7 )
1 .0

11. 5
1 1 .9
10. 4
9. 6
7. 5

4. 7
6. 4
6. 5
7 .9
9. 1

1. 3
1 .9
2. 7
3 .6
4. 4

( 1 .0 )
1. 2

5.
3.
3.
2.
1.

8
8
0
0
3

10. 2
8 .9
8. 7
7. 8
6. 2

5 .0
5. 6
6. 4
8. 4
7. 5

2. 7
2. 5
5. 6
4. 6
5 .9

8 .0
8. 4
6. 3
6. 3
6. 1

5.
7.
5.
7.
7.

6
3
7
3
0

3. 6
2 .9
2. 1
1 .8
1 .4

5.
6.
5.
4.
2.

2
4
1
1
6

( 1 .9 )
1. 2

1 1 .9
7. 2
4 .9
4. 3

8 .9
8. 0
9. 5
9. 1

2.
2.
3.
3.

0
2
2
4

3. 4
1 .6
( .8 )
-

17. 4
1 1 .4
6. 5
3. 3
1 .9
( .6 )

-

-

2.
4.
6.
6.

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

9. 7
6. 2
4. 1
2. 5
1 .9

_

_

_

( 1 .8 )

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1 .0
( 1 .7 )

-

_
-

-

-

4. 8
3. 3
2. 3
1. 8
1 .4

_
-

_
-

( 2 .9 )
-

'

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

000
050
100
150
200

and u n d e r $ 2 , 0 5 0 and u n d e r $ 2 , 1 0 0 and u n d er $ 2 ,1 5 0 a n d u n d e r $ 2 ,2 0 0 and u n d e r $ 2 ,2 5 0 -

_
-

_
-

_
-

250
300
350
400
450

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 ,3 0 0 $ 2 , 350$ 2 ,4 0 0 $ 2 ,4 5 0 $ 2 ,5 0 0 -

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

500
550
600
650
700

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 ,5 5 0 $ 2 ,6 0 0 $ 2 ,6 5 0 $ 2 ,7 0 0 $ 2 ,7 5 0 -

-

-

1 .2
1 .0
( 2 .6 )

:

_
-

3. 5
4. 4
1 .8
1. 4
1. 5
1 .6

:

:

:

:

:

:
:

$ 2 ,7 5 0 and o v e r --------------T o ta l

-

-

!5
.4
.7
( 4 .1 )

100. 0

N u m b e r of e m p l o y e e s ------A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s ■

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1 3 ,8 4 8

3 4 ,2 2 4

8 8 ,5 8 7

1 2 1 ,8 8 2

7 9 ,1 3 9

4 1 ,0 3 2

1 4 ,9 5 3

3 ,4 6 6

$ 805

$ 871

$ 975

$ 1 ,1 5 8

$ 1 ,3 4 2

$ 1 ,5 4 8

$ 1 ,7 6 7

$ 2 ,0 0 2

100. 0

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

F o r s c o p e of s tu d y , s e e t a b le in a p p e n d ix A. T o a v o id sh o w in g s m a l l p r o p o r t io n s of e m p lo y e e s s c a t t e r e d a t o r n e a r th e e x t r e m e s o f th e d i s ­
tr i b u ti o n f o r s o m e o c c u p a tio n s , th e p e r c e n t a g e s of e m p lo y e e s in th e s e i n t e r v a l s h a v e b e e n a c c u m u la te d an d a r e sh o w n in th e i n t e r v a l a b o v e o r b e lo w th e
e x tr e m e i n t e r v a l c o n ta in in g a t l e a s t 1 p e r c e n t .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n ti n g t h e s e e m p lo y e e s a r e sh o w n in p a r e n t h e s e s .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l 100.

26
Table 5.

Employment Distribution by Salary:

Engineering Technicians

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f e n g in e e r in g t e c h n i c ia n s , b y a v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s ,
U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii,
J u n e 1969)
E n g in e e r in g t e c h n ic ia n s
A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s
i

U n d e r $ 3 2 5 -----$ 325 a n d u n d e r $ 3 5 0 .......................................
$ 350 a n d u n d e r $ 375 ___________________
$ 375 a n d u n d e r $ 4 0 0 ___________________
$400
$425
$450
$475
$
$
$
$

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$425
$450
$475
$500

___ _____________
___________________
. ..................................
___________________

II

(0.
2.
2.
4.
8.
9.
11.
12.

8)
0
5
0
2
3
1
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

(1 .4 )

-

-

.

.

(1 .4 )
1. 1
1. 5

-

12.
9.
7.
4.

2
0
3
5

11.
11.
11.
10.

1
1
9
0

2.
4.
5.
6.

7
0
9
2

-

3.
1.
1.
(1.

7
7
1
9)

10.
7.
6.
4.

2
9
1
7

9.
10.
10.
9.

5
2
5
1

3.
3.
6.
8.

5
9
4
9

........
........................
___________________
___________________
.......................................

_

_

-

-

-

-

2. 8
1. 9
(2. 3)

-

-

7.
7.
6.
4.

8
3
6
7

11.
10.
10.
8.

0
8
4
2

$ 9 2 5 ----------------------------$ 9 5 0 __________ _______
$ 975 ___________________
$ 1, 000 _________________

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

"

-

3.
2.
2.
1.

6
1
0
0

6.
5.
4.
5.

3
1
1
2

u n d e r $ 1, 050 ---------------------u n d e r $ 1, 1 0 0 ---------------------u n d e r $ 1, 1 5 0 ---------------------o v e r ---------------------------- — -

_

_

_

-

-

-

under
under
under
under

$ £25
$ 6 5 0 .......................................
$ 6 7 5 ___________________
$ 7 0 0 - ....................................

$ 700
$ 725
$ 750
$775

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$725
$750
$775
$800

. _________________
____ _____________
.................................. —
.......................................

.

$ 800
$825
$ 850
$ 875

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 825
$850
$875
$900

under
under
under
under

and
and
and
and

.

5. 3
2. 5
1. 0
( .4 )

and
and
and
and

000
050
100
150

-

.

4
6
1
3

$ 600
$ 625
$ 650
$ 675

1,
1,
1,
1,

-

2.
3.
6.
6.

$525
$ 550
$575
$600

$
$
$
$

-

_

0
5
6
4

-

-

5
4
4
7

under
under
under
under

and
and
and
and

-

(1 .0 )
1.
1.
3.
6.

V

10.
10.
12.
11.

and
and
and
and

900
925
950
975

-

IV

4
7
3
1

___________________
___________________
_____________ ____
___________ ______

16.
8.
9.
6.

500
525
550
575

$
$
$
$

in

-

-

.4
. 6
1. 3
(•4 )

-

.

(1. 5)
1. 4
2. 1

7. 1
2. 4
1. 0
(. 2 1 ___

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s ----------------------------

6, 100

1 5 ,7 5 2

2 8 ,1 8 5

3 2 ,3 3 7

16, 903

A v e r a g e m o n th ly s a l a r i e s ----------------------

$495

$584

$670

$775

$860

T o ta l

1
F o r s c o p e of s tu d y , s e e ta b le in a p p e n d ix A . T o a v o id s h o w in g s m a l l p r o p o r t io n s o f e m p lo y e e s s c a t t e r e d a t o r n e a r
th e e x t r e m e s of th e d i s t r ib u t io n s f o r s o m e o c c u p a tio n s , th e p e r c e n t a g e s o f e m p lo y e e s in t h e s e i n t e r v a l s h a v e b e e n a c c u m u la te d
a n d a r e sh o w n i n th e i n t e r v a l a b o v e o r b e lo w th e e x tr e m e i n t e r v a l c o n ta in in g a t l e a s t 1 p e r c e n t . T h e p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n ti n g
t h e s e e m p lo y e e s a r e sh o w n in p a r e n t h e s e s .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l 100.

27
Table 6.

Employment Distribution by Salary:

Drafting and Clerical Occupations

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n of e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d d r a f tin g a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s , b y a v e r a g e
w e e k ly s a l a r i e s , U n ite d S t a te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, 1 J u n e 1969)

II

U nder $60$ 6 0 a n d unde r $ 6 5________
$ 6 5 a n d unde r $ 7 0 -----------$ 7 0 a n d u n d e r $ 7 5 ________

0. 7
1. 2
2. 0

-

$ 8 0 -----------$ 8 5 -----------$ 9 0 — __
$ 9 5 ________
$ 1 0 0 -----------

3. 6
1 2 .4
7. 7
1 2 .9
10. 7

$75
$80
$85
$90
$95

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

-

-

-

( 0 .5 )
1. 1
2. 2
4. 3
4. 3

_
-

_
-

( 1 .4 )
1. 0
2. 2
2. 8
3. 9

_
-

under
unde r
un de r
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1 0 5 -------1 1 0 -------1 1 5 -------1 2 0 -------1 2 5 --------

8. 9
9. 1
7. 7
6. 1
5 .4

8.
7.
7.
9.
9.

3
5
5
1
0

$
$
$
$
$

125
130
135
140
145

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1 3 0 _____
1 3 5 -------1 4 0 -------1 4 5 _____
1 5 0 --------

3. 8
1. 7
1. 4
1. 7
.9

8.
8.
7.
5.
5.

4
6
8
6
0

$
$
$
$
$

150
160
170
180
190

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 6 0 -------$ 1 7 0 _____
$ 1 8 0 -------$ 190 —-----$ 2 p 0 _____

1. 3
( .6 )

4. 8
3. 1
1. 7
( 1 .4 )
-

$200
$210
$220
$230
$240

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$210
$220
$230
$240
$250

_
-

_

-

4.
7.
7.
7.
8.

7
0
6
9
2

II

15. 7
1 5 .9
12. 0
6 .9
4. 6

6. 5
9. 7
10. 7
9 .5
9. 4

1 1 .2
14. 1
13. 1
10. 8
9. 7

2.
5.
8.
10.
12.

7
7
1
5
0

15. 8
1 5 .4
10. 7
6. 2
4. 4

3.
2.
1.
1.
1.

9. 9
6. 3
6. 8
5. 3
4 .4

8 .4
4. 7
3 .9
2. 3
2. 1

13. 1
10. 4
8. 8
6. 8
5 .9

3. 0
1. 9
2 .7
1. 4
1. 1

3. 7
4. 2
3 .7
1. 4
( 2 .8 )

2 .6
1. 7
( 2 . 0)

4. 8
3. 9
2. 9
1. 4
( 1 .3 )

( 1 .3 )
-

_
-

_
-

-

*
_
_

( 2 .7 )

( 1 .1 )
1. 1
1. 2
2. 8
2 .6

2. 7
2. 1
1. 7
1. 0
( 1 .7 )

6.
6.
6.
5.
4.

8
1
2
0
0

_
-

( 1 .7 )
-

-

-

6. 8
4. 7
2. 2
(2. 1)
*

_

_

.

_
_

.

-

0. 3
5. 7
1 1 .5
18. 5

9
5
6
3
0

_
-

-

( 0 .3 )
1. 3

6.
8.
6.
9.
8.

0
3
5
7
6

-

( 0 .9 )
3. 4
9. 3

7. 7
5. 0
4. 3
3. 4
2 .6

9.
5.
4.
2.
2.

-

( 0 .5 )
1. 2
3 .9

14.
10.
6.
3.
1.

2. 1
1 .0
( .6 )

-

( 0 .5 )
2. 4
10. 5
19. 3

( 1 .2 )
1. 8
3. 6
4. 8
5 .6

_

-

III

10. 3
1 1 .9
12. 3
11. 8
9. 5

8
8
6
5
7

_

n

-

7.
12.
13.
16.
11.

_

i

2. 1
.9
1 .7

6
4
1
2
9

-

6
6
8
5
0

-

i

O ffic e
boys
or
g irls

( 1 .3 )
14. 0
22. 1
2 3 .7

i

( 1 .0 )
3. 9
7. 1

'

K eypunch
o p e ra to rs

C le rk s ,
f ile

1 5 .2
13. 8
10. 3
6 .4
4. 0

_

$ 2 5 0 a n d u n d e r $ 2 6 0 _____
$ 2 6 0 a n d u n d e r $ 2 7 0 _____
$ 2 7 0 a n d unde r $ 2 8 0 _____

i

-

and
and
and
and
and

_____
-----------------------------

III

-

$ 100
$ 105
$ 110
$115
$ 120

-

C le rk s ,
a c c o u n tin g

D r a f ts m e n

D r a f ts m e n tra c e rs

A v e r a g e w e e k ly
s a la r ie s

II

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
_
-

.

.

.

.

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

.
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

_

.

_

.

_

-

-

-

_
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

.

Total________

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s ____

5, 818

2 1 ,5 0 1

3 4 ,2 9 2

2 8 ,6 8 9

8 9 ,0 0 4

5 7 ,3 2 4

3 1 , 134

2 9 ,4 8 8

8, 978

6 2 ,8 3 8

4 5 ,5 6 8

2 8 , 066

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r i e s __

$ 101.50

$ 1 2 4 . 00

$ 1 5 3 . 00

$ 1 87. 00

$ 9 5 . 00

$1 2 3 . 50

$7 4 . 50

$ 8 3 . 00

$ 102. 00

$92. 00

$ 1 0 5 . 00

$82. 00

See fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le ,




28
Table 6.

Employment Distribution by Salary:

Drafting and Clerical Occupations— Continued

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d d r a f tin g a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s , b y a v e r a g e
w e e k ly s a l a r i e s , U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, 1 J u n e 1969)
S e c re t a rie s

S te n o g ­
rap h e rs,
g e n e ra l

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r i e s
i

U n d e r $ 6 0 --------------------------------------$ 6 0 and u n d er $65 _ _
$ 6 5 a n d un d e r $ 7 0 ------------------------$ 7 0 a n d un d e r $ 7 5
$ 75
$80
$85
$90
$ 95

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
under
under
under
unde r

$ 8 0 ------------------------$ 8 5 ________________
$90
—
$ 9 5 ________________
$ 100 __

$ 100
$ 105
$110
$ 11 5
$ 120

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
un d e r
under
under

$ 1 0 5 ______________
$ 1 1 0 ____ ___ —
$ 1 1 5 -----------$ 1 2 0 ----- ----$ 1 2 5 ---------------------

$
$
$
$
$

125
130
135
140
145

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

$
$
$
$
$

150
160
170
180
190

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 160
$ 1 7 0 --------------------$ 1 8 0 _____________
$ 1 9 0 ______________
$ 2 0 0 — —_________

1 3 0 --------------------135 140 1 4 5 --------------------150

$ 2 0 0 a n d u n d e r $ 2 1 0 --------------------$ 21 0 a n d u n d e r $ 220
_______
$ 2 2 0 and o v e r
T o ta l

.

.

.

N u m b e r o f e m p l o y e e s ---------------------

ii

-

in

IV

-

-

-

5
3
7
8
1

( 1 .2 )
1. 0
1. 5
2. 9
3. 8

( 0 .5 )
1 .5
1. 3
2. 5
3. 1

_
( 2 .6 )
1 .7

11. 1
9 .9
9 .0
10. 2
8. 7

5. 9
6. 1
7. 8
9 .4
9 .2

4. 6
3. 7
3 .9
7. 3
6. 5

2.
2.
3.
3.
4.

6. 7
6. 1
4. 2
3 .6
1. 9

8.
8.
7.
7.
5.

6
2
2
9
4

8 .4
7. 7
7. 5
7. 7
6. 4

1. 9
(1. 1)

7.
4.
1.
(1.

3
0
5
1)

-

( 1 .3 )
1.
3.
4.
6.
8.

-

_
-

_
-

11.
7.
4.
2.
1.

-

1. 0
-

( 0 .9 )

( 0 .4 )
1. 6
4. 6

-

1
0
5
5
5

S te n o g ­
rap h ers,
s e n io r

6.
9.
11.
11.
11.

S w itc h b o a r d
o p e ra to rs

T a b u la tin g - m a c h in e
o p e ra to rs

i

II

( 0 .5 )
3. 3
4. 3
9. 3

_
( 0 .8 )
1. 4

0. 1
3. 5
4. 2

7.
11.
11.
12.
8.

1. 1
4. 7
6 .6
7. 9
10. 4

10. 9
13. 5
1 0 .6
9 .2
9 .4

1.
2.
3.
5.
8.

7
6
3
7
5

II

T y p is ts

in

.
( 0 .7 )

i

.

1.
3.
5.
7.
9.

3
6
3
9
0

2
3
2
8
3

9 .6
8. 3
5. 9
5. 5
4. 3

10.
9.
8.
7.
7.

2
9
2
7
5

7. 9
4. 6
5. 2
5. 1
3 .4

10.
10.
8.
8.
9.

3
7
8
8
1

9.
7.
5.
3.
3.

6
9
0
8
1

9.
8.
10.
8.
6.

9
6
8
3
7

2.
3.
2.
7.
5.

7. 3
7. 4
7. 2
7. 4
5 .6

3. 9
3. 5
1. 8
( 1 .9 )
-

6.
6.
7.
2.
2.

5
3
4
9
2

2. 4
1. 6
( 1 .4 )

6.
4.
4.
1.
1.

0
6
3
9
2

2.
3.
1.
(2.

5
2
5
0)

6.
8.
4.
3.
3.

5
1
8
1
0

9 .2
9. 9
9. 1
9. 5
6. 9

11. 1
11. 7
8. 5
5. 4
3 .4

_
-

1. 1
( .4 )
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2. 5
1. 2
(1. 1)

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

-

-

2. 4
( .8 )
-

-

_
-

-

-

4. 9
1 .8
(. 8)

_
_
( 1 .2 )
1. 1

11.
9.
5.
2.
1.

II

0. 2
1 .4
6. 9
13. 8

_
-

2
0
3
1
2

-

7
4
6
2
1

i

0
3
7
5
7

_
( 0 .9 )
2. 8

1 5 .6
17. 0
14. 2
10. 0
7. 3

5 .6
9. 7
13. 3
13. 6
12. 6

4.
2.
1.
1.
.

9
6
7
5
8

1. 2
( .7 )
-

11.
7.
5.
5.
3.

3
8
5
3
3

2. 5
2. 8
1. 5
( 1 .7 )

.

2
0
3
7
6

_
_
_
-

-

1. 1
1. 0
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

8 7 ,2 7 5

8 2 ,6 0 2

4 8 ,0 3 7

1 5 ,0 5 1

7 1 ,3 7 9

5 6 ,2 1 2

1 4 ,0 3 5

10, 826

5 ,2 9 7

1 0 ,1 3 0

5, 058

85, 292

4 5 ,4 0 9

$ 9 9 . 50

$ 1 13. 00

$9 6 . 50 $ 1 16. 00 $ 1 4 1 . 50

$ 8 5 . 50

$99. 00

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r i e s --------------- $ 1 1 2 . 50 $ 1 26. 50 $1 3 5 . 00 $ 1 47. 50

$92. 50 $ 1 0 9 .0 0

1 F o r s c o p e o f s tu d y , s e e ta b le in a p p e n d ix A.
T o a v o id sh o w in g s m a l l p r o p o r t io n s o f e m p lo y e e s s c a t t e r e d a t o r n e a r th e e x t r e m e s o f th e
d i s t r i b u t i o n f o r s o m e o c c u p a tio n s , th e p e r c e n t a g e s of e m p lo y e e s in t h e s e i n t e r v a l s h a v e b e e n a c c u m u la te d a n d a r e sh o w n in th e i n t e r v a l a b o v e o r
b e lo w th e e x tr e m e i n t e r v a l c o n ta in in g a t l e a s t 1 p e r c e n t . T h e p e r c e n t a g e s r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e s e e m p lo y e e s a r e sh o w n in p a r e n t h e s e s .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l 100.

29
Table 7.

Occupational Employment Distribution:

By Industry Division

( P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d p r o f e s s io n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s , 1
b y in d u s t r y d iv is io n , 2 U n ite d S t a te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, J u n e 1969)
M anu­
fa c tu rin g

O c c u p a tio n

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

W h o le s a le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

F in a n c e ,
in su ra n c e ,
and
r e a l e s ta t e

S e le c te d
se rv ic e s 4

P r o f e s s io n a l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t iv e
A c c o u n t a n t s ____ _____ __________________________
A u d ito r s ___________________ ____ ________________
C h ie f a c c o u n ta n ts
_
____
A t t o r n e y s _______________ ____ __________________
B u y e r s __________________________________________
J o b a n a l y s t s ____________________________________
D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l _________________________
C h e m is t s
_ _ _ __ ________ _
E n g in e e rs
_
__

69
39
58
25
86
71
71
91
80

11
17
7
18
6
4
(5)
(5)
9

7
8
8
6
(!)
(5)
6
(! )
(5 )

(5)
6
7
(*)
( !)
(5)
6
(5)
(5)

8
29
16
47
(5 )
18
12
(!)
<5 )

(!)
(!)
( !)
(!)
(5)
5
(5)
7
11

76
78

7
7

( !)
(5 )

(?)
(5)

(5)

17
13

40
23
42
36
51
52
32
39
41

16
5
11
12
9
13
13
20
7

12
7
12
9
7
8
7
10
5

12
9
8
4
5
(5 >
15
5
4

20
55
26
36
24
22
31
25
41

(5 )
( !)
(!)
(5 )
4
( !)
!
(5 )
(! )

T e c h n ic a l
E n g in e e r in g te c h n i c ia n s _______________________
D r a f t s m e n ______________________________________
C le ric a l
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g ____________ _______________
C l e r k s , f ile
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s ____________ -______________
O ffic e b o y s o r g i r l s ____________________________
S e c r e t a r i e s _____________________________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s __________________________________
S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s _________ _________ __
T a b u la tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s _______________
T y p i s t s ---------------------------------------------------------------

1 E a c h o c c u p a tio n in c lu d e s th e w o r k l e v e l s , a s d e fin e d f o r th e s u r v e y , f o r w h ic h e m p lo y m e n t e s t i m a t e s in a ll i n d u s t r i e s w ith in s c o p e o f th e s tu d y
a r e sh o w n in ta b le 1.
2 F o r s c o p e of s tu d y , s e e t a b le in a p p e n d ix A .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( lim ite d to r a i l r o a d , lo c a l a n d s u b u rb a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r , a n d a i r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n i n d u s t r i e s ) , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s .
4 E n g in e e r in g a n d a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; a n d c o m m e r c i a ll y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p m e n t, a n d t e s t in g l a b o r a t o r i e s o n ly .
5 L e s s th a n 4 p e r c e n t .

Table 8.

Relative Salary Levels:

Occupation by Industry Division

( R e la tiv e s a l a r y l e v e l s f o r s e le c te d p r o f e s s io n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s 1
by in d u s t r y d iv is io n , 2 U n ite d S t a te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, J u n e 1969)
J A v e r a g e ^ s a la r ^ f o r ^ e a c h ^ c c u g a ti o i^ i ^ a d l ^ j n d u s tr ie s ^ O O )
O c c u p a tio n

M anu­
f a c tu r in g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

W h o le s a le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

f in a n c e ,
in su ra n c e ,
and
r e a l e s ta t e

S e le c te d
se rv ic e s 4

P r o f e s s i o n a l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t iv e
A c c o u n ta n ts
A u d ito r s
_ .... .
..... ... _. .
C h ie f a c c o u n t a n ts __ ____________________________
_____
A tto rn e y s
B u y ers
Job a n a ly s ts .
D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l _________________________
C h e m is ts
E n g in e e rs _

100
103
103
105
100
102
100
100
101

102
101
100
103
102
103

99
100

106
99

104
108
102
104
102
103
105
106
104

105
120
109
111
106
107
114
99
105

no
(5 )
96

98
108
(5 )
(5 )
108
(5 )
102
(! )
(*)

98
101
(5 )
98
(5 )
(5)
98
(5 )
(5 )

97
93
97
95
(! )
91
106
(5 )
(s )

100
112
93
(5 )
99
(5 )
103
105
97

(*)
98

(5)
98

(s )
96

101
100

91
94
97
96
92
93
86
95
97

91
95
94
94
94
91
96
94
95

104
108
104
100
105
98
105
101
102

T e c h n ic a l
E n g in e e r in g t e c h n i c i a n s _______________________
D r a f ts m e n
_ _
_
C le ric a l
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g
C l e r k s , f ile
_
_
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s _______ _____________________
O ffic e b o y s o r g i r l s
_ _ _
S e c re ta rie s
_ _ _ ___
_
S te n o g ra p h e rs
S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s __________________
T a b u la tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s
_____
T y p i s t s ---------------------------------------------------------------

104
101
101
97
100
101
103
103
100

1 E a c h o c c u p a tio n i n c lu d e s th e w o r k l e v e l s , a s d e fin e d f o r th e s u r v e y , f o r w h ic h d a ta a r e p r e s e n t e d in ta b l e 1. In c o m p u tin g r e l a t i v e s a l a r y l e v e ls
f o r e a c h o c c u p a tio n by in d u s t r y d iv is io n , th e t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t in e a c h w o r k le v e l in a l l i n d u s t r i e s s u r v e y e d w a s u s e d a s a c o n s ta n t e m p lo y m e n t w e ig h t
to e li m in a te th e e ff e c t of d i f f e r e n c e s in th e p r o p o r t io n of e m p lo y m e n t in v a r i o u s w o r k l e v e l s w ith in e a c h o c c u p a tio n .
2 F o r s c o p e of s tu d y , s e e ta b l e in a p p e n d ix A .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( li m i te d to r a i l r o a d , lo c a l a n d s u b u rb a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r , a n d a i r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n i n d u s t r i e s ) , c o m m u n ic a tio n , e l e c t r i c ,
g a s , a n d s a n it a r y s e r v i c e s .
4 E n g in e e r in g a n d a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; a n d c o m m e r c i a ll y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p m e n t, a n d t e s t in g l a b o r a t o r i e s o n ly .
5 I n s u f f ic ie n t e m p lo y m e n t in 1 w o r k le v e l o r m o r e to w a r r a n t s e p a r a te p r e s e n t a t i o n o f d a ta .




30
Table 9-

Average Scheduled Weekly Hours:

Occupation by Industry Division

(A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s 1 f o r e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d p r o f e s s i o n a l , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , t e c h n i c a l , a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s 2
b y i n d u s t r y d i v is io n , 3 U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, J u n e 1969)

O c c u p a tio n

M anu­
f a c tu r in g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 4

W h o le s a le
tra d e

R e ta il
tr a d e

F in a n c e ,
in su ra n c e ,
an d
r e a l e s ta t e

S e le c te d
s e rv ic e s

P r o f e s s i o n a l and a d m i n i s t r a t iv e
A c c o u n ta n ts ----------------A u d i t o r s ----------------------C h ie f a c c o u n t a n t s -------A tto r n e y s --------------------B u y e r s -------------------------J o b a n a l y s t s ----------------D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l
C h e m i s t s ---------------------E n g i n e e r s ---------------------

0
0
5
0
0
5
0
5
0

39. 5
39. 5
39. 5
39. 5
39. 5
39. 5
39. 5
(6)
39. 5

39. 5
39. 5
(?)
(6 )
39. 0
(6)
3 9 .0
(?)
(6)

39. 5
40. 0
(6)
40. 0
(?)
(6)
40. 5
(?)
(6)

38. 0
3 8 .0
38. 0
37. 5
(6)
38. 0
38. 5
(?)
(6 )

39. 5
39. 5
40. 0
(‘ )
39. 5
(6 )
40. 0
39. 5
39. 5

40. 0
40. 0

39. 5
39. 5

(6)
39. 0

(6)
38. 0

(6)
3 8 .0

39. 5
39. 5

39. 5
39. 0
39. 5
39. 0
39. 0
39. 5
39. 5
39. 5
3 9 .5

39. 5
39. 0
39. 5
38. 5
3 9 .0
39. 5
39. 5
39. 0
3 9 .0

3 9 .5
39. 0
39. 5
3 9 .0
38. 5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
39. 5
39. 0

39.
39.
39.
38.
39.
39.
39.
39.
39.

38. 5
38. 0
38. 0
38. 0
3 8 .0
38. 5
38. 5
37. 5
38. 0

39.
39.
39.
39.
39.
39.
39.
39.
39.

40.
39.
39.
39.
40.
39.
40.
39.
40.

T e c h n ic a l
E n g in e e r in g te c h n ic ia n s
D r a f ts m e n --------------------C le ric a l
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g -----------------C l e r k s , f ile ----------------------------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s ----------------O ffic e b o y s o r g i r l s --------------S e c r e t a r i e s -----------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s ------------------------S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s ------------T a b u la tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s
T y p is ts -----------------------------------

5
0
5
5
0
0
0
0
0

5
0
5
0
5
5
5
5
5

1 B a s e d on th e s c h e d u le d w o rk w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y .
If s c h e d u le d h o u r s w e r e n o t a v a il a b le ,
th e s c h e d u le d h o u r s a p p lic a b le f o r a m a j o r i t y o f th e o f fic e w o rk f o r c e in th e e s ta b l is h m e n t w e r e u s e d .
T h e a v e r a g e f o r e a c h jo b c a te g o r y w a s
r o u n d e d to th e n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r .
2 E a c h o c c u p a tio n in c lu d e s th e w o rk l e v e l s , a s d e fin e d f o r th e s u r v e y , f o r w h ic h d a ta a r e p r e s e n t e d in ta b le 1.
3 F o r s c o p e o f s tu d y , s e e ta b le in a p p e n d ix A.
4 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n ( lim ite d to r a i l r o a d , lo c a l an d s u b u r b a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r , an d a i r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n i n d u s t r i e s ) , c o m m u n ic a tio n ,
e l e c t r i c , g a s , and s a n i t a r y s e r v i c e s .
5 E n g in e e r in g a n d a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s ; a n d c o m m e r c i a ll y o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p m e n t, an d t e s t in g l a b o r a t o r i e s o n ly .
6 I n s u f f ic ie n t e m p lo y m e n t in 1 w o r k le v e l o r m o r e to w a r r a n t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n o f d a ta .




Appendix A.

Scope and Method of Survey

Scope of Survey
The survey relates to establishments in the United States except Alaska and Hawaii
in the following industries: Manufacturing; transportation, communication, electric, gas,
and sanitary services; wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate;
engineering and architectural services; and commercially operated research, development,
and testing laboratories.
Excluded are establishments employing fewer than the minimum
number of workers, as indicated in the accompanying table for each industry division, at
the time of reference of the universe data (generally, first quarter of 1968).
The variable
minimum employment size, which was adopted in the 1966 survey, more nearly equalizes
the minimum white-collar employment of establishments among the various industry divisions.
The estimated number of establishments and the total employment within scope of this
survey, and within the samples actually studied, are shown for each major industry division
in the accompanying table.
These estimates also are shown separately for establishments
employing 2, 500 workers or more and those located in Standard Metropolitan Statistical
A r e a s .1
As indicated in the table, the scope of the study was the same for all occupations;
however, the clerical and drafting occupations were studied in a larger number of establish­
ments than were the professional, administrative, and engineering technician occupations.
The sampling methods used for studying each of these occupational groups are described
in detail under Sampling and Estimating Procedures.

T im in g o f S urvey

Survey data collection was planned so that the data would reflect an average reference
period of June 1969. 2 The data for the professional, administrative, and engineering tech­
nician occupations were obtained from a nationwide sample of establishments contacted largely
between March and September.
The average reference month for clerical and drafting occupations was also June 1969.
Data for these occupations were obtained from two sources: The Bureau's occupational
wage studies in 47 m e t r o p o l i t a n areas which had reference dates of March through
September 1969; and in all other areas, from the same sample of establishments that were
visited for the professional and administrative occupations.
M ethod of C o lle c tio n
Data w e r e o b t a i n e d b y B u r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s , l a r g e l y by p e r s o n a l v i s i t s , f r o m r e p ­
r e s e n t a t i v e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith in the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y . 3
E m p loy ees w e re cla s s ifie d
a c c o r d i n g to o c c u p a t i o n and l e v e l , with the a s s i s t a n c e o f c o m p a n y o f f i c i a l s , on the b a s i s o f
the B L S j o b d e f i n i t io n s w h ic h a p p e a r in a p p e n d ix C. In c o m p a r i n g a c tu a l d u tie s and r e s p o n ­
s i b i l i t i e s o f e m p l o y e e s with t h o s e in the s u r v e y d e f i n i t i o n s , e x t e n s i v e u s e w a s m a d e o f c o m ­
p a n y o c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s , o r g a n i z a t i o n c h a r t s , and o t h e r p e r s o n n e l r e c o r d s .

T h e m etrop olitan area data in the 1969 survey re la te to a ll 227 SMSA's (w ith in the 48 States surveyed) as revised through
A p ril 1967 by the Bureau o f the Budget. E a rlie r surveys represented SMSA's ranging in numbers from 188 in 1962 and e a rlie r surveys
to 221 in the 1966 survey.
2 Prior to the 1967 study, the average reference period for c le ric a l and drafting jobs was February, and it was M arch for a ll
other occupations.
U n til 1963, reports listed "W in ter" as the reference period.
From 1963 through 1966, the m ore specific desig­
nation, "F ebruary-M arch, " was used.
Beginning w ith 1967, the reference period was changed to June.
3 T h e surveys in m etrop olitan areas, used to develop the nationw ide estimates for the drafting and c le ric a l occupations,
vide for c o lle c tio n by a com bin ation of m a il and personal visits in a ltern ate years.




31

pro­

32
N u m b e r o f E s t a b l i s h m e n ts a n d W o r k e r s W ith in S c o p e o f S u r v e y 1 an d N u m b e r S tu d ie d b y I n d u s t r y D iv is io n , J u n e 1969
W ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y 1

I n d u s t r y d i v is io n

M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t
in e s t a b ­
l is h m e n t s
in s c o p e of
s u rv e y

N um ber
of e s t a b ­
l is h m e n t s

T o ta l

P ro fe s s io n a l,
a d m in is tr a tiv e ,
s u p e rv is o ry ,
and c le r ic a l 3

S tu d ie d f o r p r o f e s s i o n a l
o c c u p a tio n s
N um ber
of e s ta b ­
l is h m e n t s

T o ta l
w o rk ers
in e s t a b ­
l is h m e n t s

S tu d ie d f o r d r a f tin g
and c le r ic a l
o c c u p a tio n s 2
N um ber
of e s ta b ­
l is h m e n t s

T o ta l
w o rk e rs
in e s t a b ­
lis h m e n t s

3 1 ,6 4 8

1 9 ,7 2 3 , 125

7, 2 2 1 ,6 2 2

3, 045

6, 95 9 , 092

5, 652

8 , 3 2 9 ,7 4 0

250

13, 625

1 2 ,6 3 0 ,5 1 4

3 ,5 1 5 , 726

1, 832

4, 77 0 , 727

2, 812

5 ,2 6 7 ,4 9 2

100
100
250

2, 794
4, 000
2, 333

2, 110, 043
8 9 9 ,2 9 1
2, 0 8 2 ,3 8 8

9 8 4 ,9 2 0
4 3 9 ,3 5 7
4 4 1 , 019

306
178
225

979, 932
7 8 , 118
5 3 8 ,2 1 5

655
524
650

1, 190, 760
180, 284
94 8 , 443

50

8, 396

1 ,7 5 0 , 733

1 ,6 7 4 , 757

406

4 4 5 , 136

862

588, 803

100

500

2 5 0 ,1 5 6

1 6 5 ,8 4 3

98

1 4 6 ,9 6 4

149

1 5 3 ,9 5 8

U n ite d S t a te s — a ll i n d u s t r i e s 1 -----------------M a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------- ---------------N onm an u f a c t u r i n g :
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , 4 c o m m u n ic a tio n ,
e le c tr ic , g a s , and s a n ita ry
s e r v i c e s ---------------------------------------W h o le s a le t r a d e ----------------------------R e t a il t r a d e -----------------------------------F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , an d
r e a l e s t a t e -----------------------------------S e r v ic e s :
E n g in e e r in g a n d a r c h i t e c t u r a l
s e r v i c e s ; a n d c o m m e r c i a ll y
o p e ra te d r e s e a r c h ,
d e v e lo p m e n t, a n d te s tin g
l a b o r a t o r i e s o n l y --------------------

W o r k e r s in e s ta b l is h m e n t s

2 4 ,5 6 9

15, 82 5 , 986

6, 34 7 , 582

2, 452

6,2 2 1 ,5 3 3

5, 059

7 ,5 9 2 ,1 8 1

250

9, 096

9, 30 3 , 776

2, 9 1 2 ,3 4 3

1 ,3 4 5

4 ,0 8 9 ,7 6 6

2, 325

4 , 5 8 6 ,5 3 1

100
100
250

2, 048
3, 550
2, 076

1 ,9 1 3 , 782
81 8 , 480
1, 95 0 , 041

91 3 , 765
4 0 8 ,0 8 7
4 1 8 , 601

272
162
213

96 3 , 999
73, 886
5 2 9 ,4 2 2

621
508
638

1 ,1 7 4 ,8 2 7
1 7 6 ,0 5 2
9 3 9 ,6 5 0

50

7, 313

1 ,6 1 5 , 172

1, 543, 983

371

4 3 8 ,7 7 1

827

5 8 2 ,4 3 8

100

486

2 2 4 ,7 3 5

150, 803

89

125, 689

140

1 3 2 ,6 8 3

1, 133

M a n u f a c tu r i n g ------------------------------------N onm a n u f ac t u r in g :
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , 4 c o m m u n ic a tio n ,
e le c tr ic , g a s, and s a n ita ry
s e r v i c e s ---------------------------------------W h o le s a le tr a d e ---------------------------R e t a il t r a d e ------------------------------------F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , an d
r e a l e s t a t e -----------------------------------S e r v ic e s :
E n g in e e r in g a n d a r c h i t e c t u r a l
s e r v i c e s ; a n d c o m m e r i c a ll y
o p e r a t e d r e s e a r c h , d e v e lo p ­
m e n t , a n d t e s t in g
l a b o r a t o r i e s o n l y -------------------

6, 8 8 4 ,3 4 2

2 ,6 1 7 , 336

5, 31 9 , 497

793

5, 1 6 6 ,4 9 4

763

4 , 7 7 2 ,4 5 0

1 ,5 7 2 ,9 8 0

3, 73 5 , 165

500

3, 530, 060

E s t a b l i s h m e n ts e m p lo y in g 2, 500
M a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------------------------

-

470

1 T h e s tu d y r e l a t e s to e s ta b l is h m e n t s in i n d u s t r i e s l i s t e d , w ith t o ta l e m p lo y m e n t a t o r a b o v e th e m in im u m l im it a ti o n i n d ic a te d in th e f i r s t
c o lu m n ,

in th e U n ite d S ta te s e x c e p t A la s k a an d H a w a ii.

2 T he d r a f t in g a n d c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s w e r e s tu d ie d in th e s a m e s a m p le o f e s ta b l is h m e n t s a s w e r e th e p r o f e s s io n a l a n d a d m i n i s t r a t iv e o c c u p a ­

tio n s , e x c e p t in SM SA rs .
F o r th e s e a r e a s , th e d r a f tin g a n d c l e r i c a l d a ta w e r e o b ta in e d f ro m th e B u r e a u 's m o r e i n te n s iv e l y s a m p l e d s u r v e y s of
s e p a r a t e m e t r o p o li ta n a r e a s .
( F o r a m o r e d e ta ile d e x p la n a tio n , s e e S a m p lin g a n d E s t im a ti n g P r o c e d u r e s , p. 34.)
3 I n c lu d e s e x e c u tiv e , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , p r o f e s s io n a l , s u p e r v i s o r y , a n d c l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s , b u t e x c lu d e s t e c h n i c ia n s a n d d r a f t s m e n , a n d s a le s
p e rs o n n e l.
4 L i m ite d to r a i l r o a d , lo c a l a n d s u b u r b a n p a s s e n g e r , d e e p s e a w a t e r ( fo r e ig n a n d d o m e s t ic ) , a n d a i r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n i n d u s t r i e s a s d e fin e d in
th e 1967 e d itio n o f the S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f ic a ti o n M a n u a l.
5 S ta n d a r d M e tr o p o lita n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a s in th e U n ite d S t a te s , e x c e p t A la s k a a n d H a w a ii, a s r e v i s e d th r o u g h M ay 1967 b y th e B u r e a u o f the
B u d g e t.




33
Nature of Data Collected and Presented
The reported salaries relate to standard salaries paid for standard work schedules,
i. e. , to the straight-time salary corresponding to the employee's normal work schedule
excluding overtime hours.
Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but cost-of-living payments
and incentive earnings are included.
The average salaries presented relate to full-time
employees for whom salary data were available.
About 4 percent of the establishments asked to supply data on professional, administra­
tive, and technical occupations would not do so. These corresponded to an estimated total
in the universe studied of approximately 935,000 workers, about 4 .7 percent of 19, 723, 000.
A lower refusal rate was found in the surveys of clerical and drafting occupations. The non­
cooperating units were replaced by others in the same industry-size-location classes. Where
no such substitutes were available, since all similar units were already in the sample, the
weights of the included establishments were increased to account for the missing units.

Under established policies of some companies, officials were not authorized to pro­
vide information relating to salaries for all occupations studied.
In nearly all instances,
however, information was provided on the number of such employees and the appropriate
occupational classification.
It was thus possible to estimate the proportion of employees
for whom salary data were not available. These policies more often related to the higher
level positions, mainly because of policies not to disclose pay data for employees considered
a part of the management group or classified in occupational levels involving a single
employee.

N um ber of job categories

Percent o f employees classified in professional,
adm in istra tiv e , and engineering te ch n ic ia n
occupations surveyed for whom salary
data were not a v a ila b le

1 -------------------------------------------------

10 percent or more
Directors of personnel IV (1 6 percent)

2

5 to 9. 9 percent
Attorneys V I
Directors of personnel I I I

---------------------------------------------- --

1 6 -----------------------------------------------

1 to 4. 9 percent

3 4 -----------------------------------------------

Less than 1 percent

Comparisons between establishments that provided salary data for each specific oc­
cupation level and those not doing so indicated that the two classes of establishments did
not differ materially in industries represented, employment, or pay structure for other jobs
in this series for which data were available.
Occupational employment estimates relate to the total in all establishments within the
scope of the survey and not the number actually surveyed. Employees for whom salary data
were not available were not taken into account in the estimates. 4 These estimates were
derived by weighting full-time employees in the occupations studied in each sample establish­
ment in proportion to the number of establishments it represented within the scope of the
survey. For example, if the sample establishment was selected from a group of four estab­
lishments with similar employment in the same industry and region, each full-time employee
found in an occupation studied was counted as four employees in compiling the employment

Also not ta ke n into account were a few instances in which salary data were a v a ila b le for employees in an occupation, but
where there was no satisfactory basis for classifying the employees by the appropriate work levels.




34

estimates for the occupations. In addition, the professional and administrative occupations
were limited to employees meeting the specific criteria in each survey definition and were
not intended to include all employees in each field of work. 5 For these reasons, and
because of differences in occupational structure among establishments, the estimates of
occupational employment obtained from the sample of establishments studied serve only to
indicate the relative importance of the occupations and levels as defined for the survey.
These qualifications of the employment estimates do not materially affect the accuracy of
the earnings data.
In the occupations surveyed, both men and women were classified and included in the
occupational employment and earnings estimates.
In the professional, administrative, and
technical occupations, men were sufficiently predominant to preclude presentation of separate
data by sex.
For those clerical occupations in which both men and women are commonly
employed, separate data by sex are available from the area wage survey reports compiled
by metropolitan area. The occupations and work levels included in this study, and in which
women accounted for 5 percent or more of the employment, were distributed according to
the proportion of women employees, as follows:

Women (percent)
95 or m o re -----------------90-94 -----------------------65-69 -----------------------55-59 -----------------------45-49 -----------------------35-39 -----------------------25-29 -----------------------20-24 -----------------------1 5 - 1 9 -----------------------1 0 - 1 4 -----------------------5- 9 ------------------------

Occupation and level
File clerks I and II, all levels of keypunch operators,
secretaries, stenographers, switchboard operators,
and typists
Accounting clerks I and file clerks III
Accounting clerks II
Tabulating-machine operators I
Office boys or girls
Tabulating-machine operators II and job analysts I
Tabulating-machine operators III and job analysts II
Engineering technicians I and draftsmen-tracers
Chemists I and II
Accountants I and buyers I
Accountants II, auditors I, attorneys I, job analysts III,
directors of personnel I, chemists III, engineering
technicians II, and draftsmen I

Sampling and Estimating Procedures
As indicated earlier, this survey relates to all establishments in the United States,
except Alaska and Hawaii, within the industry and minimum size scope. Although one sample
of establishments was selected for studying the professional, administrative, and engineering
technician occupations, and another for the drafting and clerical occupations, both relate
to the same population of geographic, industry, and size-of-establishment characteristics.
The procedures used for selecting samples for these two groups of occupations are explained
in the following paragraphs.
Professional, Administrative, and Engineering Technician Occupations.
The sam­
pling procedures called for the detailed stratification of all establishments within scope
of the survey by location, industry, and size of employment.
From this universe, a
nationwide sample of about 3, 000 establishments (not companies) was selected systemat­
ically. 6
Each industry was sampled separately, the sampling rates dependent on the im ­
portance of the industry as an employer having the survey jobs.
Within each industry, a
5 Engineers, for example, are defined to permit classification of employees engaged in engineering work within a band of
eight levels, starting with inexperienced engineering graduates and excluding only those within certain fields of specialization or in
positions above those covered by level VIII.
By way of contrast, such occupations as chief accountants and directors of personnel
are defined to include only those with responsibility for a specified program and with duties and responsibilities as indicated for each
of the more limited number of work levels selected for study.
6 A few of the largest employers, together employing approximately one and a quarter million workers, gave data on a company­
wide basis. These companies were eliminated from the universe to which the preceding procedure applies. The sample count includes
the establishments of these companies within the scope of the survey.




35
greater proportion of large than of small establishments was included.
In combining the
data, each establishment was weighted according to its probability of selection, so that un­
biased estimates were generated.
To illustrate the process, where one establishment out
of four was selected, it was given a weight of 4, thus representing itself plus three others.
In instances where data were not available for the original sample member, an alternate
of the same original probability of selection was chosen in the same industry-size classifi­
cation.
Where there was no suitable substitution for the original sample member, the
missing unit was accounted for by assigning additional weight to an existing sample member
that was as nearly similar as possible to the missing unit.
Clerical and Drafting Occupations. The nationwide estimates for the clerical and draft­
ing occupations are, in large part, a byproduct of the Bureau's surveys of these occupations
in 89 metropolitan areas.
Data from 47 of these area wage surveys were adjusted to the
scope of the national survey and were included to represent themselves. 7 The sampling
of establishments within each of these areas was designed to yield estimates of the area
as a whole, and for major industry divisions within the area.
As described in the pre­
ceding section, the establishments were stratified by industry and employment size, and
sample members selected at random for each stratum.
For all remaining areas, clerical and drafting data were obtained from the same nation­
wide sample of establishments used for the professional, administrative, and engineering
technician occupations. Within this sample there were approximately 750 establishments in
areas where locality studies had been done between October 1968 and February 1969. Where
possible, clerical and drafting data reported in these studies were updated to reflect general
increases occurring to the time professional and administrative data were collected. In all
other establishments, clerical and drafting data were collected in conjunction with profes­
sional and administrative data.
Conversion of Salary Rates
Salary data for the selected occupations were collected in the form in which it was
most readily available from company records, i. e. , on a weekly, biweekly, semimonthly,
monthly, or annual basis. For the initial tabulations, the salary data were first converted
to a weekly basis for the clerical and drafting occupations and to a monthly basis for the
professional, administrative, and engineering technician occupations.
The factors used to
convert these data for the two groups of occupations were as follows:

Time interval
represented by
salary
W eekly---------------------Biweekly-------------------Semimonthly------------M onthly-------------------Annual ------------- -

Salaries for clerical and
drafting occupations to
weekly basis
1.0000

. 5000
.4602
.2301
.0192

Salaries for professional
and administrative occupa^
tions and for engineering
technicians to
monthly basis

4.3450
2. 1725
2.0000

1.0000

.0833

Average monthly salaries presented in tables 1, 2, and 3 and annual salaries presented in
tables 1 and 2 for the clerical and drafting occupations are derived from the average weekly
salaries (to the nearest penny) by use of factors 4. 345 and 52. 14, respectively, and round­
ing results to the nearest dollar. Average weekly salaries for these occupations, presented
in table 6, are rounded to the nearest half dollar. Average monthly salaries presented in
tables 1, 2, and 3 for the professional and administrative occupations and for engineering
technicians are rounded to the nearest dollar.
To obtain the annual salaries, average
monthly salaries (to the nearest penny) are multiplied by 12 and rounded to the nearest dollar.
These were the 47 area wage surveys (excluding Cleveland and San Jose) which had payroll reference dates of March through
September 1969, and were, therefore, representative of the same collection time period that applied for the national survey.




36

Method of Determining Median and Quartile Values
Median and quartile values presented in this report were derived from distributions
of employees by salary using $ 1 class intervals. Weekly salary class intervals were used
for draftsmen and clerical occupations and monthly salary class intervals were used for all
other occupations.
The weekly values were multiplied by 4. 345 to obtain monthly values
and by 52. 14 to obtain annual values.
The annual values for other than draftsmen and
clerical occupations were obtained by multiplying monthly values by 12.
Estimates of Sampling Error
The survey procedure yields estimates with widely varying sampling errors, depending
on the frequency with which the job occurs, and the dispersion of salaries. Thus, for the
professional and administrative and engineering technician occupation work levels, the rela­
tive sampling errors of the average salaries were distributed as follows:
35 were under
2 percent; 14 were 2 and under 4 percent; 2 were 4 and under 6 percent; and 2 were 6 per­
cent and over. 8 The nationwide estimates for the clerical and drafting room occupations,
based on the much larger sample, are subject to smaller sampling error— 2 percent or less
in all cases except for secretaries IV (2. 1 percent), accounting clerks I (2. 3 percent),
tabulating-machine operators II (2. 5 percent), and tabulating-machine operators 1(6. 2 percent).
These sampling errors measure the validity of the band within which the true average is
likely to fall. Thus, for an occupation with a sample average monthly salary of $ 1,000 and
a sampling error of 4 percent, the changes are 19 out of 20 that the true average lies within
the band from $960 to $ 1,040.

8 The 6 percent and over group included:




Chief accountants I— 7 percent and chemists VIII— 6. 5 percent.

Appendix B.

Survey Changes in 1969

Changes in Occupational Coverage and Definitions
The four-level managers, office services occupation was dropped from the survey
and changes were made in the definitions for directors of personnel and attorneys as de­
scribed below.
Directors of Personnel. The survey definition for this occupation was re­
vised slightly, mostly by rearranging certain portions of the definition and
making some minor changes in wording.
The changes were designed to
clarify the intent of the definition and facilitate uniform interpretation by
data collectors, respondents, and users. There were no substantive changes
and each level represents the same types of positions as in 1968.
Com­
parisons of data for trend purposes, therefore, were not affected.
Attorneys. The survey definition for this occupation was revised, reducing
the number of levels from seven to six so that survey data could be re­
lated by the Civil Service Commission to new standards for Federal attorney
positions. Although the current six-level definition includes essentially the
same range of difficulty and responsibility coverage as the former defini­
tion, comparability of data between surveys for individual levels was not
maintained.
The reduction in the number of levels was accomplished by consolidating
much of the content of former levels I and II into new level I and modi­
fying the experience required statement in former level III (current level II).
The wording of levels III through VI in the revised definition is the same
as for former levels IV through VII, respectively. Evaluation of the sur­
vey data and collection experience indicated that in addition to the rematch­
ing required for current levels I and II, some reevaluation of prior matches
apparently occurred in other levels.
The extent of rematching and the
effect on average salaries could not be measured; therefore, comparisons
of data for trend purposes were not reported.




37




Appendix C.

Occupational Definitions

The primary purpose of preparing job definitions for the
Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into
appropriate occupations, or levels within occupations, workers who
are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work
arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to
area.
This permits the grouping of occupational wage rates repre­
senting comparable job content.
To secure comparability of job
content, some occupations and work levels are defined to include
only those workers meeting specific criteria as to training, job
functions, and responsibilities.
Because of this emphasis on inter­
establishment and interarea comparability of occupational content,
the Bureau's occupational definitions may differ significantly from
those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other
purposes. Also see note referring to the definitions for the drafting
and clerical occupations on page 75.

ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS
ACCOUNTANT
Performs professional accounting work requiring knowledge of the theory and prac­
tice of recording, classifying, examining, and analyzing the data and records of financial
transactions.
The work generally requires a bachelor's degree in accounting or, in rare
instances, equivalent experience and education combined. Positions covered by this definition
are characterized by the inclusion of work that is analytical, creative, evaluative, and ad­
visory in nature.
The work draws upon and requires a thorough knowledge of the funda­
mental doctrines, theories, principles, and terminology of accountancy, and often entails
some understanding of such related fields as business law, statistics, and general manage­
ment.
(See also chief accountant.)
Professional responsibilities in accountant positions above the entry and develop­
mental levels include several such duties as:
Analyzing the effects of transactions upon account relationships;
Evaluating alternative means of treating transactions;
Planning the manner in which account structures should be developed or modified;
Assuring the adequacy
management;

of the accounting system as

the basis for reporting to

Considering the need for new or changed controls;
Projecting accounting data to show the effects of proposed plans on capital invest­
ments, income, cash position, and overall financial condition;
Interpreting the meaning of accounting records,

reports,

and statements;

Advising operating officials on accounting matters; and
Recommending improvements,
and procedures.

adaptations, or revisions in the accounting system

(Entry and developmental level positions provide opportunity to develop ability to perform pro­
fessional duties such as those enumerated above.)




39

40
ACCOUNTANT— Continued
In addition to such professional work, most accountants are also responsible for
assuring the proper recording and documentation of transactions in the accounts.
They,
therefore, frequently direct nonprofessional personnel in the actual day-to-day maintenance
of books of accounts, the accumulation of cost or other comparable data, the preparation
of standard reports and statements, and similar work. (Positions involving such supervisory
work but not including professional duties as described above, are not included in this
description.)
Excluded are accountants whose principal or sole duties consist of designing or
improving accounting systems or other nonoperating staff work, e. g. , financial analysis,
financial forecasting, tax advising, etc. (The criteria that follow for distinguishing among
the several levels of work are inappropriate for such jobs.) Note, however, that profes­
sional accountant positions with responsibility for recording or reporting accounting data
relative to taxes are included, as are operating or cost accountants whose work includes,
but is not limited to, improvement of the accounting system.
Some accountants use electronic data processing equipment to process, record, and
report accounting data.
In some such cases the machine unit is a subordinate segment of
the accounting system; in others it is a separate entity or is attached to some other organi­
zation.
In either instance, providing the primary responsibility of the position is profes­
sional accounting work of the type otherwise included, the use of data processing equipment
of any type does not of itself exclude a position from the accountant description nor does it
change its level.
Accountant I
General characteristics. At this beginning professional level, the accountant learns
to apply the principles, theories, and concepts of accounting to a specific system.
The
position is distinguishable from nonprofessional positions by the variety of assignments; rate
and scope of development expected of the incumbent; and the existence, implicit or explicit,
of a planned training program designed to give the entering accountant practical experience.
(Terminal positions are excluded.)
Direction received. Works under close supervision of an experienced accountant
whose guidance is directed primarily to the development of the trainee's professional ability
and to the evaluation of his potential for advancement.
Limits of assignments are clearly
defined, methods of procedure are specified, and kinds of items to be noted and referred
to supervisor are identified.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Performs a variety of accounting tasks such
as: Examining a variety of financial statements for completeness, internal accuracy, and
conformance with uniform accounting classifications or other specific accounting require­
ments; reconciling reports and financial data with financial statements already on file, and
pointing out apparent inconsistencies or errors; carrying out assigned steps in an accounting
analysis, such as computing standard ratios; assembling and summarizing accounting litera­
ture on a given subject; preparing relatively simple financial statements, not involving prob­
lems of analysis or presentation; and preparing charts, tables, and other exhibits to be used
in reports.
In addition to such work, may also perform some nonprofessional tasks for
training purposes.
Responsibility for direction of others.

Usually none.

Accountant II
General characteristics. At this continuing developmental level the professional
accountant makes practical applications of technical accounting practices and concepts beyond
the mere application of detailed rules and instructions. Assignments are designed to expand
his practical experience and to develop his professional judgment in the application of basic



41

AC COUN TAN T— Continued
accounting techniques to simple professional problems. He is expected to be competent in
the application of standard procedures and requirements to routine transactions, to raise
questions about unusual or questionable items, and to suggest solutions. (Terminal positions
are excluded.)
Direction received. Work is reviewed closely to verify its general accuracy and
coverage of unusual problems, to insure conformance with required procedures and special
instructions, and to assure his professional growth. His progress is evaluated in terms of
his ability to apply his professional knowledge to basic accounting problems in the day-to-day
operations of an established accounting system.
Typical duties and responsibilities.
Performs a variety of accounting tasks, e. g. ,
prepares routine working papers, schedules, exhibits, and summaries indicating the extent of
his examination, and presenting and supporting his findings and recommendations. Examines
a variety of accounting documents to verify accuracy of computations and to ascertain that
all transactions are properly supported, are in accordance with pertinent policies and proce­
dures, and are classified and recorded according to acceptable accounting standards.
Responsibility for direction of others.
a few clerks.

Usually none,

although he may supervise

Accountant HI
General characteristics. Performs professional operating or cost accounting work
requiring the standardized application of well established accounting principles, theories,
concepts, and practices.
Receives detailed instructions concerning the overall accounting
system and its objectives, the policies and procedures under which it is operated, and the
nature of changes in the system or its operation. Characteristically, the accounting system
or assigned segment is stable and well established (i. e. , the basic chart of accounts, clas­
sifications, the nature of the cost accounting system, the report requirements, and the pro­
cedures are changed infrequently).
Depending upon the workload involved, the accountant may have such assignments
as supervision of the day-to-day operation of: (a) The entire system of a subordinate e s­
tablishment, or (b) a major segment ( e. g. , general accounting; cost accounting; or financial
statements and reports) of a somewhat larger system, or (c) in a very large and complex
system, may be assigned to a relatively narrow and specialized segment dealing with some
problem, function, or portion of work which is itself of the level of difficulty characteristic
of this level.
Direction received. A
to furnish advice and assistance
quacy of professional judgment,
praisal of results, subsequent
appropriate means.

higher level professional accountant normally is available
as needed. Work is reviewed for technical accuracy, ade­
and compliance with instructions through spot checks, ap­
processing, analysis of reports and statements, and other

Typical duties and responsibilities.
The primary responsibility of most positions
at this level is to assure that the assigned day-to-day operations are carried out in accord­
ance with established accounting principles, policies, and objectives. The accountant performs
such professional work as: Developing nonstandard reports and statements ( e. g. , those con­
taining cash forecasts reflecting the interrelations of accounting, cost budgeting, or compa­
rable information); interpreting and pointing out trends or deviations from standards; pro­
jecting data into the future; predicting the effects of changes in operating programs; or
identifying management informational needs, and refining account structures or reports
accordingly.




42

AC COUN TAN T— C ontinued
Within the limits of his delegated responsibility, makes day-to-day decisions con­
cerning the accounting treatment of financial transactions. Is expected to recommend solu­
tions to complex problems and propose changes in the accounting system for approval at
higher levels. Such recommendations are derived from his own knowledge of the application
of well-established principles and practices.
Responsibility for the direction of others.
of a subordinate nonprofessional staff.

In most instances he directs the work

Accountant IV
General characteristics.
Performs professional operating or cost accounting work
which requires the application of well-established accounting principles, theories, concepts,
and practices to a wide variety of difficult problems. Receives instructions concerning the
objectives and operations of the overall accounting system.
At this level, compared with
level III, the accounting system or assigned segment is more complex, i. e. , (a) is relatively
unstable, (b) must adjust to new or changing company operations, (c) serves organizations
of unusually large size, £r (d) is complicated by the need to provide and coordinate separate
or specialized accounting treatment and reporting (e. g. , cost accounting using standard cost,
process cost, and job order techniques) for different operations or divisions of company.
Depending upon the workload and degree of coordination involved, the accountant IV
may have such assignments as the supervision of the day-to-day operation of: (a) The entire
accounting system of a subordinate establishment, or (b) a major segment (e. g. , general
accounting; cost accounting; or financial statements and reports) of an accounting system
serving a larger and more complex establishment, or (c) the entire accounting system of
a large ( e .g ., employing several thousand persons) subordinate establishment which in other
respects has an accounting system of the complexity that characterizes level III.
Direction received. A higher level accountant normally is available to furnish advice
and assistance as needed.
Work is reviewed by spot checks and appraisal of results for
adequacy of professional judgment, compliance with instructions, and overall accuracy and
quality.
Typical duties and responsibilities. As at level III, a primary characteristic of
most positions at this level is the responsibility of operating an accounting system or major
segment of a system in the intended manner.
The accountant IV exercises professional judgment in making frequent appropriate
recommendations for: New accounts; revisions in the account structure; new types of ledgers;
revisions in reporting system or subsidiary records; changes in instructions regarding the
use of accounts; new or refined account classifications or definitions; etc. He also makes
day-to-day decisions concerning the accounting treatment of financial transactions and is
expected to recommend solutions to complex problems beyond the scope of his responsibility.
Responsibility for' direction of others.
include professional accountants.

Accounting staff he supervises, if any, may

Accountant V
General characteristics. Performs professional operating or cost accounting work
which is of greater than average professional difficulty and responsibility because of the
presence of unusual and novel problems or the unusual magnitude or impact of the accounting
program. Typically this level of difficulty arises from (a) the large size of the accounting
and operating organization, (b) the atypical nature of the accounting problems encountered,
or (c) the unusually great involvement in accounting systems design and development.
Examples of assignments characteristic of this level are the supervision of the
day-to-day operation of: (a) The entire accounting system of a subordinate establishment
having an unusually novel and complex accounting system, or (b) the entire accounting system
of a large ( e .g ., employing several thousand persons) subordinate establishment which in



43
ACCOUNTANT— Continued
other respects has an accounting system of the complexity that characterizes level IV, or
(c) the entire accounting system of a company or corporation that has a relatively stable
and conventional accounting system and employs several thousand persons and has a few
subordinate establishments which include accounting units, or (d) a major segment of an
accounting system that substantially exceeds the characteristics described in any one of the
preceding examples.
Direction received. An accountant of higher level normally is available to furnish
advice and assistance as needed.
Work is reviewed for adequacy of professional judgment,
compliance with instructions, and overall quality.
Typical duties and responsibility. The work is characterized by its unusual difficulty
or responsibility. Accountants V typically are directly concerned on a relatively continuous
basis with what the nature of the accounting system should be, with the devising or revising
of the operating accounting policies and procedures that are necessary, and with the mana­
gerial as well as the accounting meaning of the reports and statements for which he is re­
sponsible.
Accountahts V are necessarily deeply involved in fundamental and complex ac­
counting matters and in the managerial problems that are affected.
£

Responsibility for direction of others,
eludes professional accountants.

Accounting staff he supervises generally in-

AUDITOR
Performs professional auditing work requiring a bachelor's degree in accounting or,
in rare instances, equivalent experience and education combined. Audits the financial records
and practices of a company, or of divisions or components of the company, to appraise
systematically and verify the accounting accuracy of records and reports and to assure the
consistent application of accepted accounting principles. Evaluates the adequacy of the ac­
counting system and internal financial control.
Makes appropriate recommendations for
improvement as necessary. To the extent determined necessary, examines the transactions
entering into the balance sheet and the transactions entering into income, expense, and cost
accounts. Determines:
(1) The existence of recorded assets (including the observation of the taking of
physical inventories) and the all-inclusiveness of recorded liabilities.
(2) The accuracy of financial statements or reports and the fairness of presentation
of facts therein.
(3)

The propriety or legality of transactions.

(4) The degree of compliance with established policies and procedures concerning
financial transactions.
Excluded are positions which do not require full professional accounting training
because the work is confined on a relatively permanent basis to repetitive examinations of
a limited area of company operations and accounting processes, e. g ., only accounts payable
and receivable; demurrage records and related functions, or station operations only of a rail­
road company; branch offices which do not engage in the full range of banking and accounting
activities of the main bank; warehouse operations only of a mail order company; checking
transactions to determine whether or not they conform to prescribed routines or procedures.
(Examinations of such repetitive or limited nature normally do not require or permit pro­
fessional audit work to be performed.)



44

AUDITOR— Continued
Auditor I
General characteristics. As a trainee auditor at
performs a variety of routine assignments.
Typically, he
tasks under a planned training program designed to provide
the principles, theories, and concepts of accounting and
(Terminal positions are excluded.)

the entering professional level,
is rotated through a variety of
practical experience in applying
auditing to specific situations.

Direction received. Works under close supervision of an experienced auditor whose
guidance is directed primarily to the development of the trainee1s professional ability and to
the evaluation of his potential for advancement. Limits of assignments are clearly defined,
methods of procedure are specified, and kinds of items to be noted and referred to super­
visor are identified.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Assists in making audits by performing such
tasks as: Verification of the accuracy of the balances in various records; examination of
a variety of types of documents and vouchers for accuracy of computations; checking trans­
actions to assure they are properly documented and have been recorded in accordance with
correct accounting classifications; verifying the count of inventories; preparing detailed
statements, schedules, and standard audit working papers; counting cash and other assets;
preparing simple reconciliations; and similar functions.
Auditor II
General characteristics. At this continuing developmental level the professional
auditor serves as a junior member of an audit team, independently performing selected por­
tions of the audit which are limited in scope and complexity. Auditors at this level typically
have acquired knowledge of company operations, policies, and procedures. (Terminal posi­
tions are excluded.)
Direction received. Detailed instructions are furnished and the work is reviewed
to the extent necessary to verify its general accuracy and coverage of unusual problems, to
insure conformance with required procedures and special instructions, and to assure the
auditor's professional growth.
Any technical problems not covered by instructions are
brought to the attention of a superior. His progress is evaluated in terms of his ability to
apply his professional knowledge to basic auditing situations.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Applies knowledge of accounting theory and
audit practices to a variety of relatively simple professional problems in his audit assign­
ments, including such tasks as: The verification of reports against source accounts and
records to determine their reliability; reconciliation of bank and other accounts and veri­
fying the detail of recorded transactions; detailed examinations of cash receipts and disburse­
ment vouchers, payroll records, requisitions, work orders, receiving reports, and other
accounting documents to ascertain that transactions are properly supported and are recorded
correctly from an accounting or regulatory standpoint; or preparing working papers, sched­
ules, and summaries.
Auditor III
General characteristics. Work at this level consists of the audit of operations and
accounting processes that are relatively stable, well-established, and typical of the industry.
The audits primarily involve the collection and analysis of readily available findings; there is
previous audit experience that is directly applicable; the audit reports are normally prepared
in a prescribed format using a standard method of presentation; and few if any major prob­
lems are anticipated. The work performed requires the application of substantial knowledges
of accounting principles and practices, e. g. , bases for distinguishing among capital main­
tenance and operating expenses; accruing reserves for taxes; and other accounting considera­
tions of an equivalent nature.




45
AUDITOR— Continued
Direction received. Work is normally within an established audit program and
supervision is provided by a higher level auditor who outlines and discusses assignments.
Work is spot-checked in progress.
Completed assignments are reviewed for adequacy of
coverage, soundness of judgment, compliance with professional standards, and adherence
to policies.
Typical duties and responsibilities. The auditor examines transactions and verifies
accounts; observes and evaluates accounting procedures and internal controls; prepares audit
working papers and submits an audit report in the required pattern containing recommenda­
tions for needed changes or improvements.
He is usually responsible for selecting the de­
tailed audit methods to follow, choosing the audit sample and its size, determining the extent
to which discrepancies need to be investigated, and deciding the depth of the analyses required
to support reported findings and conclusions.
Examples of assignments involving work of this level:
(1) As a team leader or working alone, independently conducts audits of the com­
plete accounts and related operations of smaller or less complex companies (e .g ., in­
volving a centralized accounting system with few or no subordinate, subsidiary, or branch
accounting records) or of comparable segments of larger companies.
(2) As a member of an audit team independently accomplishes varied audit assign­
ments of the above described characteristics, typically major segments of complete
audits, or assignments otherwise limited in scope of larger and more complex companies
( e .g ., complex in that the accounting system entails cost, inventory, and comparable
specialized systems integrated with the general accounting system).
Illustrative of such assignments are the audit and initial review of accounting treatment and
validity of reporting of overhead expenses in a large manufacturing or maintenance organi­
zation (e .g ., major repair yard of a railroad); or, the checking, verification, and balancing
of all accounts receivable and accounts payable; or, the analysis and verification of assets
and reserves; or, the inspection and evaluation of accounting controls and procedures.
Auditor IV
General characteristics. Auditors at this level are experienced professionals who
apply thorough knowledge of accounting principles and theory in connection with a variety of
audits.
Work at this level is characterized by the audit of organizations and accounting
processes which are complex and difficult because of such factors as: Presence of new or
changed programs and accounting systems; existence of major specialized accounting functions
(e. g. , cost accounting, inventory accounting, sales accounting), in addition to general ac­
counting; need to consider extensive and complicated regulatory requirements; lack of or
difficulty in obtaining information; and other similar factors. Typically, a variety of different
assignments are encountered over a period of time, e .g ., 1 year. The audit reports prepared
are comprehensive, explain irregularities, cite rules or regulations violated, recommend
remedial actions, and contain analyses of items of special importance or interest to company
management.
Direction received.
Within an established audit program, have responsibility for
independently planning and executing audits. Unusually difficult problems are discussed with
the supervisor who also reviews completed assignments for adherence to principles and
standards and the soundness of conclusions.
Typical duties and responsibilities. Auditors at this level have full responsibility
for planning the audit, including determination of the aspects to emphasize, methods to be
used, development of nonstandard or specialized audit aids such as questionnaires, etc.,
where previous audit experience and plans are of limited applicability.



46

AUDITOR— Continued
Included in the scope of work that characterizes this level are such functions as:
Evaluation of methods used for determining depreciation rates of equipment; evaluation of
assets where original costs are unknown; evaluation of the reliability of accounting and re­
porting systems; analysis of cost accounting systems and cost reports to evaluate the basis
for cost and price setting; evaluation of accounting procurement and supply management
records, controls, and procedures; and many others.
Examples of assignments involving work at this level:
(1) As a team leader or working alone, independently plans and conducts audits of
the complete accounts and related operations of relatively large and complex companies
( e .g ., complex in that the accounting system entails cost, inventory, and comparable
specialized accounting systems integrated with the general accounting system) or of com­
pany branch, subsidiary, or affiliated organizations which are individually of comparable
size and complexity, or
(2) As a member of an audit team independently plans and accomplishes audit a s­
signments that constitute major segments of audits of very large and complex organiza­
tions, for example, those with financial responsibilities so great as to involve specialized
subordinate, subsidiary, or affiliate accounting systems that are complete in themselves.
NOTE: Excluded from level IV are auditors who, as team leader or working alone,
conduct complete audits of very large and complex organizations, for example, those with
financial responsibilities so great as to involve specialized subordinate, subsidiary, or af­
filiate accounting systems that are complete in themselves; or are team members assigned
to major segments of audits of even larger or more complex organizations.
CHIEF ACCOUNTANT
As the top technical expert in accounting, is responsible for directing the accounting
program for a company or for an establishment of a company.
The minimum accounting
program includes: (l) General accounting (assets, liabilities, income, expense, and capital
accounts, including responsibility for profit and loss and balance sheet statements); and
(2) at least one other major accounting activity, typically tax accounting, cost accounting,
property accounting, or sales accounting. It may also include such other activities as payroll
and timekeeping, and mechanical or electronic data processing operations which are an adjunct
of the accounting system.
(Responsibility for an internal audit program is typically not
included. )
The responsibilities of the chief accountant include all of the following:
(1) On own responsibility, developing or adapting or revising an accounting system
to meet the needs of the organization.
(2) Supervising, either directly or through subordinate supervisors, the operation
of the system with full management responsibility for the quality and quantity of work
performed, training and development of subordinates, work scheduling and review, co­
ordination with other parts of the organization served, etc.
(3) Providing directly or through an official such as a comptroller, advisory serv­
ices to the top management officials of the organization served as to:
(a) The status of financial resources and the financial trends or results of
operations as revealed by accounting data, and selecting a manner of presentation
that is meaningful to management.
(b) Methods for improving operations as suggested by his expert knowledge
of accounting, e. g. , proposals for improving cost control, property management,
credit and collection, tax reduction, or similiar programs.



47

CHIEF ACCOUNTANT— Continued
Excluded are positions with responsibility for the accounting program if they also
include (as a major part of the job) responsibility for budgeting; work measurement; organi­
zation, methods and procedures studies; or similar nonaccounting functions.
(Positions of
such breadth are sometimes titled comptroller, budget and accounting manager, financial
manager, etc.)
Some positions responsible for supervising general accounting and one or more other
major accounting activities but which do not fully meet all of the responsibilities of a chief
accountant specified above may be covered by the descriptions for accountant.
Chief accountant jobs which meet the above characteristics are classified by level1
of work according to (a) authority and responsibility and (b) technical complexity, using the
chart which follows the definitions below.
Authority and Responsibility
A R -1. The accounting system (i. e. , accounts, procedures, and reports to be used)
has been prescribed in considerable detail by higher levels in the company or organization.
The chief accountant has final, unreviewed authority within the prescribed system, to expand
it to fit the particular needs of the organization served, e. g ., in the following or compa­
rable ways;
Provides greater detail in accounts and reports or financial statements;
Establishes
records; and

additional accounting controls,

accounts,

subaccounts, and subsidiary

Provides special or interim reports and statements needed by the manager respon­
sible for the day-to-day operations of the organization served.
A R -2 .
The basic accounting system is prescribed in broad outlines rather than in
specific detail. While certain major financial reports, overall accounts, and general policies
are required by the basic system, the chief accountant has broad latitude and authority to
decide the specific methods, procedures, accounts, reports, etc.— to be used within the
organizational segment served. He must secure prior approval from higher levels for only
those changes which would basically affect the broad requirements prescribed by such higher
levels.
Typical responsibilities include:
Evaluating and taking final action on recommendations proposed by subordinate e s ­
tablishments for changes in aspects of the accounting system or activities not prescribed
by higher authority;
Extending cost accounting operations to areas not previously covered;
Changing from one cost accounting method to another;
Expanding the utilization of computers within the accounting process; and
Preparing accounting reports and statements reflecting the events and progress of
the entire organization for which he is responsible; often consolidating data submitted by
subordinate segments.
This degree of authority is most typically found at intermediate organizational levels such as
regional offices, or division or subsidiary headquarters. It is also found in some company
level situations where the authority of the chief accountant is less extensive than is described
in AR -3. More rarely it is found in plant level chief accountants who have been delegated
more authority than usual for such positions as described in A R -1.
1

In su fficient data were obtained for le v e l V to w arrant presentation of average salaries.




48

CHIEF ACCOUNTANT— Continued
A R -3 . Has complete responsibility for establishing and maintaining the framework
for the basic accounting system used in the company, subject only to general policy guidance
and control from a higher level company official responsible for general financial manage­
ment. Typical responsibilities include:
Determining the basic characteristics of the company's accounting system and the
specific accounts to be used;
Devising and preparing accounting reports and statements required to meet manage­
ment's needs for data;
Establishing basic accounting policies, interpretations, and procedures;
Reviewing and taking action on proposed revisions to the company's accounting sys­
tem suggested by subordinate units; and
Taking final action on all technical accounting matters.
Characteristically, participates extensively in broad company management processes
by providing accounting advice, interpretations, or recommendations based on data accumu­
lated in the accounting system and on his professional judgment and experience.
Technical Complexity
T C -1. The organization which the accounting program serves has relatively few
functions, products, work processes, etc., and these tend to be stable and unchanging. The
accounting system operates in accordance with well-established principles and practices or
those of equivalent difficulty which are typical of that industry.
TC- Z. The organization which the accounting program serves has a relatively large
number of functions, products, work processes, etc., which require substantial and frequent
adaptations of the basic system to meet management needs (e.g., adoption of new accounts,
subaccounts, and subsidiary records; revision of instructions for the use of accounts; im­
provement or expansion of methods for accumulating and reporting cost data in connection
with new or changed work processes).
T C -3 . The organization which the accounting program serves puts a heavy demand
on the accounting organization for specialized and extensive adaptations of the basic system
to meet management needs. Such demands arise because the functions, products, work
processes, etc., of the organization are very numerous, diverse, unique, or specialized, or
there are other comparable complexities. Consequently, the accounting system, to a consid­
erable degree, is developed well beyond established principles and accounting practices in
order to:
Provide for the solution of problems for

which no clear

precedents exist;

or

Provide for the development or extension of accounting theories and practices to
deal with problems to which these theories and practices have not previously been applied.
Subordinate Staff
In the chart that follows, the number of professional accountants supervised is rec­
ognized to be a relatively crude criterion for distinguishing between various classes. It is
to be considered less important in the matching process than the other criteria. In addition
to the staff of professional accountants in the system for which the chief accountant is re ­
sponsible, there are clerical, machine operation, bookkeeping, and related personnel.



CHIEF ACCOUNTANT— Continued

Class

Authority
and
responsibility *

T echnical
complexity *

Subordinate staff of professional accountants in
the system for which he is responsible.

I

AR-1

TC-1

Only one or two professional accountants, who
do not exceed the accountant III job definition.

II

AR-1

TC-2

About 5 to 10 professional accountants, with at
least one or two matching the accountant IV
job definition.

AR-2

TC-1

About 5 to 10 professional accountants. Most
of these match the accountant III job definition,
but one or two may match the accountant IV
job definition.

AR-3

TC-1

Only one or two professional accountants, who
do not exceed the accountant IV job definition.

AR-1

TC-3

About 15 to 20 professional accountants.
At
least one or two match the accountant V job
definition.

AR-2

TC-2

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. Many
of these match the accountant IV job definition,
but some may match the accountant V job definition.

AR-3

TC-1

About 5 to 10 professional accountants. Most of
these match the accountant III job definition, but
one or two may match as high as accountant V.

AR-2

TC-3

About 25 to 40 professional accountants. Many
of these match the accountant V job definition,
but several may exceed that level.

AR-3

TC-2

About 15 to 20 professional accountants. Most of
these match the accountant IV job definition, but
several may match the accountant V and one or
two may exceed that level.

AR-3

TC-3

About 25 to 40 professional accountants. Many
of these match the accountant V job definition,
but several may exceed that level.

or

or

III

or

or

IV

or

V

A R -1 ,

-2 ,

and -3 ; and T C - 1 ,




-2 ,

and - 3 are e xp lained on the preceding pages.

50
ATTORNEYS

ATTORNEY 2

P e r f o r m s c o n s u l t a t i o n and a d v i s o r y w o r k and c a r r i e s out the l e g a l p r o c e s s e s n e c ­
e s s a r y to e f f e c t the r i g h t s , p r i v i l e g e s , and o b l i g a t i o n s o f the c o m p a n y .
The w o r k p e r fo r m e d
r e q u i r e s c o m p l e t i o n o f la w s c h o o l with an L L . B . d e g r e e ( o r the e q u iv a le n t) and a d m i s s i o n
to the b a r .
R e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s o r f u n c t io n s i n c l u d e one o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g o r c o m p a r a ­
ble d u tie s:
P r e p a r i n g and r e v i e w i n g v a r i o u s l e g a l i n s t r u m e n t s and d o c u m e n t s , s u c h a s c o n t r a c t s ,
le a s e s , lic e n s e s , p u rch a se s, sa le s , re a l estate, e t c .;
A ctin g

as a g e n t o f the c o m p a n y in it s t r a n s a c t i o n s ;

E x a m in in g m a t e r i a l ( e . g . , a d v e r t i s e m e n t s , p u b l i c a t i o n s , e t c . ) f o r l e g a l i m p l i c a ­
t i o n s ; a d v i s i n g o f f i c i a l s o f p r o p o s e d l e g i s l a t i o n w h i c h m i g h t a f f e c t the c o m p a n y ;
A p p l y in g f o r p a te n ts , c o p y r i g h t s , o r r e g i s t r a t i o n o f c o m p a n y ' s p r o d u c t s , p r o c e s s e s ,
d e v i c e s and t r a d e m a r k s ; a d v is i n g w h e t h e r to in s t i g a t e o r d e fe n d l a w s u i t s ;
C o n d u c tin g p r e - t r i a l p r e p a r a t i o n s ; d e fe n d in g the c o m p a n y in l a w s u i t s ;
A d v isin g

officia ls

E xclu d ed fr o m

and

on tax m a t t e r s , G o v e r n m e n t r e g u l a t i o n s , a n d / o r c o r p o r a t e r i g h t s .

th is d e fi n i t io n a r e :

P a t e n t w o r k w h i c h r e q u i r e s p r o f e s s i o n a l t r a in in g in a d d it i o n t o l e g a l t r a i n i n g ( t y p ­
i c a l l y , a d e g r e e in e n g i n e e r i n g o r in a s c i e n c e ) ;
C l a i m s e x a m i n i n g , c l a i m s in v e s t i g a t i n g o r s i m i l a r w o r k f o r w h i c h p r o f e s s i o n a l l e g a l
tr a i n i n g and b a r m e m b e r s h i p is n o t e s s e n t i a l ;
A t t o r n e y s , f r e q u e n t l y ti t le d " g e n e r a l c o u n s e l " (and t h e i r i m m e d i a t e f u l l a s s o c i a t e s
o r d e p u t i e s ) , w h o s e r v e a s c o m p a n y o f f i c e r s o r the e q u iv a le n t and a r e r e s p o n s i b l e f o r
p a r t i c i p a t i n g in the o v e r a l l m a n a g e m e n t and f o r m u l a t i o n o f p o l i c y f o r the c o m p a n y in
a d d itio n to d i r e c t i n g its l e g a l w o r k .
(T h e d u tie s and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s o f s u c h p o s i t i o n s
e x c e e d l e v e l VI a s d e s c r i b e d b e l o w . )
A ttorn ey jo b s w hich m e e t
a c c o r d a n c e w ith the c h a r t b e l o w .
D ifficu lty le v e l
of legal w ork*
I

the a b o v e

R esp on sib ility
le v e l o f job *

T h i s is the e n t r y l e v e l .
T he d u ties
and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s a f t e r in itia l o r i ­
e n ta tion and tr a i n i n g a r e t h o s e d e ­
s c r i b e d in D - l and R - l .

D -l

II

R -2

III
—

N)

0
1

or

2

d e f i n i t i o n s a r e to be c l a s s i f i e d

D -2
D -3

R- 1

R -2
R -l

E xp e rie n ce req u ired
C o m p l e t i o n o f la w s c h o o l w ith an L L . B .
o r J . D . d e g r e e plus a d m i s s i o n to the
bar.

S u ffic i e n t p r o f e s s i o n a l e x p e r i e n c e (at
l e a s t 1 y e a r , u s u a l l y m o r e ) at the " D - l "
l e v e l to a s s u r e c o m p e t e n c e as an a t ­
torney

A t le a s t 1 y e a r , u su a lly m o r e , o f p r o f e s s i o n a l e x p e r i e n c e at the " D - 2 " l e v e l .

See appendix B for description of revisions in the number and definition of work levels.




and c o d e d in

51
A T T O R N E Y ---- C on tin u ed

D ifficu lty le v e l
of legal w ork *

C la s s

R esp on sib ility
le v e l o f job *

E x p e rie n ce requ ired

D -2
D -3

R -3
R -2

E x t e n s i v e p r o f e s s i o n a l e x p e r i e n c e at the
" D - 2 " o r a h ig h er lev el.

V

D -3

R -3

E x t e n s i v e p r o f e s s i o n a l e x p e r i e n c e at the
" D - 3 " level.

VI

D -3

R -4

E x t e n s i v e p r o f e s s i o n a l e x p e r i e n c e at the
" D - 3 " and " R - 3 " l e v e l s .

IV
—

* D -l, D-2, D-3, and R - l, R-2, R-3, and R-4 are explained below.
NOTE: In the table above, Roman numeral designations do not identify the same attorney levels as in the 1968 and earlier
surveys. (See appendix B. )

D - 1. L e g a l q u e s t i o n s a r e c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y: F a c t s that a r e w e l l - e s t a b l i s h e d ; c l e a r l y
a p p l i c a b l e l e g a l p r e c e d e n t s ; and m a t t e r s n ot o f s u b s t a n t ia l i m p o r t a n c e to the o r g a n i z a t i o n .
( U s u a l ly r e l a t i v e l y l i m i t e d s u m s o f m o n e y , e . g . , a few th o u s a n d d o l l a r s , a r e i n v o l v e d . )
E xa m p les

of D - 1 w ork:

(a) L e g a l i n v e s t i g a t i o n , n e g o t i a t i o n , and r e s e a r c h p r e p a r a t o r y to d e fe n d in g the o r ­
g a n i z a t i o n in p o t e n t i a l o r a c t u a l la w s u i t s in v o l v i n g a l l e g e d n e g l i g e n c e w h e r e the f a c t s
ca n b e f i r m l y e s t a b l i s h e d and t h e r e a r e p r e c e d e n t c a s e s d i r e c t l y a p p l i c a b l e to the
s itu a tion .
(b) S e a r c h i n g c a s e r e p o r t s , l e g a l d o c u m e n t s , p e r i o d i c a l s , t e x t b o o k s , and o t h e r l e g a l
r e f e r e n c e s , and p r e p a r i n g d r a ft o p in io n s on e m p l o y e e c o m p e n s a t i o n o r b e n e f i t q u e s t i o n s
w h en t h e r e is a s u b s t a n t ia l a m o u n t o f c l e a r l y a p p l i c a b l e s t a t u t o r y , r e g u l a t o r y , and c a s e
m aterial.
(c ) D r a w in g up c o n t r a c t s and o t h e r l e g a l d o c u m e n t s in c o n n e c t i o n w ith r e a l p r o p e r t y
t r a n s a c t i o n s r e q u i r i n g the d e v e l o p m e n t o f d e t a i l e d i n f o r m a t i o n but n o t in v o l v i n g s e r i o u s
q u e s t i o n s r e g a r d i n g t i t l e s to p r o p e r t y o r o t h e r m a j o r f a c t u a l o r l e g a l i s s u e s .
D -Z .
L e g a l w o r k is r e g u l a r l y d i f f i c u l t b y r e a s o n o f one o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g :
T he a b s e n c e o f c l e a r and d i r e c t l y a p p l i c a b l e l e g a l p r e c e d e n t s ; the d i f f e r e n t p o s s i b l e i n t e r ­
p r e t a t i o n s that c a n b e p l a c e d on e i t h e r the f a c t s , the l a w s , o r the p r e c e d e n t s i n v o l v e d ; the
s u b s t a n t ia l i m p o r t a n c e o f the l e g a l m a t t e r s to the o r g a n i z a t i o n ( e . g . , s u m s as l a r g e a s $100,000
a r e g e n e r a l l y d i r e c t l y o r i n d i r e c t l y i n v o l v e d ) ; the m a t t e r i s b e in g s t r o n g l y p r e s s e d o r c o n ­
t e s t e d in f o r m a l p r o c e e d i n g s o r in n e g o t i a t i o n s b y the i n d i v i d u a l s , c o r p o r a t i o n s , o r G o v e r n ­
m ent a g e n c ie s in v olv ed .
E xa m p les

of D -2 w ork :

(a) A d v i s i n g on the l e g a l i m p l i c a t i o n s o f a d v e r t i s i n g r e p r e s e n t a t i o n s w h en the f a c t s
s u p p o r t in g the r e p r e s e n t a t i o n s and the a p p l i c a b l e p r e c e d e n t c a s e s a r e s u b j e c t to d i f ­
fe re n t in te rp re ta tio n s.
(b) R e v i e w i n g and a d v is i n g
orga n iza tion .

on the i m p l i c a t i o n s

o f n e w o r r e v i s e d la w s a f f e c t i n g the

(c) P r e s e n t i n g the o r g a n i z a t i o n ' s d e f e n s e in c o u r t in a n e g l i g e n c e l a w s u i t w h i c h is
s t r o n g l y p r e s s e d b y c o u n s e l f o r an o r g a n i z e d g r o u p .
(d) P r o v i d i n g l e g a l c o u n s e l on tax q u e s t i o n s c o m p l i c a t e d b y the a b s e n c e
dent d e c i s i o n s that a r e d i r e c t l y a p p l i c a b l e to the o r g a n i z a t i o n ' s s itu a tio n .



of p r e c e ­

52

A T T O R N E Y — C o n tin u e d

D - 3. L e g a l w o r k i s t y p i c a l l y c o m p l e x and d i f f i c u l t b e c a u s e o f one o r m o r e o f the
f o l l o w i n g : T h e q u e s t i o n s a r e u n iq u e and r e q u i r e a h ig h o r d e r o f o r i g i n a l and c r e a t i v e l e g a l
e n d e a v o r f o r t h e i r s o lu t i o n ; the q u e s t i o n s r e q u i r e e x t e n s i v e r e s e a r c h and a n a l y s i s and the
ob ta in in g and e v a lu a tin g o f e x p e r t t e s t i m o n y r e g a r d i n g c o n t r o v e r s i a l i s s u e s in a s c i e n t i f i c ,
f i n a n c i a l , c o r p o r a t e o r g a n i z a t i o n , e n g i n e e r i n g , o r o t h e r h ig h ly t e c h n i c a l a r e a ; the l e g a l m a t t e r
is o f c r i t i c a l i m p o r t a n c e to the o r g a n i z a t i o n and is b e in g v i g o r o u s l y p r e s s e d o r c o n t e s t e d
( e . g . , sum s such as $1 m illio n o r m o r e are g e n e r a lly d ir e c t ly o r in d ir e c t ly in v olv ed ).
E xa m p le s

of D -3 w ork :

(a) A d v i s i n g on the l e g a l a s p e c t s and i m p l i c a t i o n s o f F e d e r a l a n t i t r u s t la w s to p r o ­
j e c t e d g r e a t l y e x p a n d e d m a r k e t i n g o p e r a t i o n s i n v o lv i n g j o i n t v e n t u r e s w ith s e v e r a l o t h e r
o rg a n iza tion s.
(b) P la n n in g l e g a l s t r a t e g y and r e p r e s e n t i n g a u tility c o m p a n y in r a te o r G o v e r n ­
m e n t f r a n c h i s e c a s e s i n v o lv i n g a g e o g r a p h i c a r e a in c l u d i n g p a r t s o r a l l o f s e v e r a l S ta te s.
(c ) P r e p a r i n g and p r e s e n t i n g a c a s e b e f o r e an a p p e l l a t e c o u r t w h e r e the c a s e is
h ig h ly i m p o r t a n t to the fu tu re o p e r a t i o n o f the o r g a n i z a t i o n and is v i g o r o u s l y c o n t e s t e d
by v e r y d i s t i n g u i s h e d ( e . g . , h a v in g a b r o a d r e g i o n a l o r n a t io n a l r e p u ta tio n ) l e g a l ta le n t.
(d) S e r v i n g a s the p r i n c i p a l c o u n s e l to the o f f i c e r s and s t a f f o f an i n s u r a n c e c o m ­
pany on the l e g a l p r o b l e m s in the s a l e , u n d e r w r i t i n g , and a d m i n i s t r a t i o n o f g r o u p c o n ­
t r a c t s in v o l v i n g n a tio n w id e o r m u lt is t a t e c o v e r a g e s and l a w s .
(e) P e r f o r m i n g the p r i n c i p a l l e g a l w o r k in a n o n r o u t i n e m a j o r
p a n y 's c h a r t e r o r in e ff e c t u a t i n g n e w m a j o r fi n a n c i n g s t e p s .

r e v i s i o n o f the c o m ­

R - 1.
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r fi n a l a c t i o n is u s u a l l y l i m i t e d t o m a t t e r s c o v e r e d b y l e g a l
p r e c e d e n t s and in w h ic h little d e v i a t i o n f r o m s t a n d a r d p r a c t i c e is i n v o l v e d .
Any d ecision s
o r a c t i o n s h a v in g a s i g n i f i c a n t b e a r i n g on the o r g a n i z a t i o n ' s b u s i n e s s a r e r e v i e w e d .
(is
g i v e n g u id a n c e in the in i t ia l s t a g e s o f h is a s s i g n m e n t (e. g. , in p lan n in g and o r g a n i z i n g l e g a l
r e s e a r c h and s t u d i e s ) . A s s i g n m e n t s a r e then c a r r i e d out w ith m o d e r a t e i n d e p e n d e n c e a lt h o u g h
g u i d a n c e i s g e n e r a l l y a v a i l a b l e and is so u g h t f r o m t i m e - t o - t i m e on p r o b l e m p o in t s . )
R - 2.
U s u a l ly w o r k s in d e p e n d e n t l y in i n v e s t i g a t in g the f a c t s , s e a r c h i n g l e g a l p r e c ­
e d e n t s , d e fin in g the l e g a l and fa c t u a l i s s u e s , d r a ftin g the n e c e s s a r y l e g a l d o c u m e n t s and
d e v e l o p i n g c o n c l u s i o n s and r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s . D e c i s i o n s h a v in g an i m p o r t a n t b e a r i n g on the
o r g a n iz a tio n 's b u s in e s s a re re v ie w e d .
(R e c e iv e s in form a tion f r o m s u p e r v is o r rega rd in g
u n u s u a l c i r c u m s t a n c e s o r i m p o r t a n t p o l i c y c o n s i d e r a t i o n s p e r t a i n i n g to a l e g a l p r o b l e m .
If t r i a l s a r e i n v o l v e d , m a y r e c e i v e g u id a n c e f r o m a s u p e r v i s o r r e g a r d i n g p r e s e n t a t i o n ,
lin e o f a p p r o a c h , p o s s i b l e lin e o f o p p o s i t i o n to b e e n c o u n t e r e d , e t c .
In the c a s e o f n o n ­
r o u t in e w r i t t e n p r e s e n t a t i o n s the fin a l p r o d u c t is r e v i e w e d c a r e f u l l y , but p r i m a r i l y f o r o v e r ­
a l l s o u n d n e s s o f l e g a l r e a s o n i n g and c o n s i s t e n c y w ith o r g a n i z a t i o n p o l i c y .
S o m e , but n ot
a l l a t t o r n e y s , m a k e a s s i g n m e n t s to one o r m o r e l o w e r l e v e l a t t o r n e y s , a i d s , o r c l e r k s . )
R -3 .
C a r r i e s out a s s i g n m e n t s in d e p e n d e n t l y and m a k e s fin a l l e g a l d e t e r m i n a t i o n s
in m a t t e r s o f s u b s t a n t ia l i m p o r t a n c e to h is o r g a n i z a t i o n .
S u ch d e t e r m i n a t i o n s a r e s u b ­
j e c t to r e v i e w o n ly f o r c o n s i s t e n c y w ith c o m p a n y p o l i c y , p o s s i b l e p r e c e d e n t e f f e c t , and
o v e r a l l e f f e c t i v e n e s s . T o c a r r y out h is a s s i g n m e n t s he d e a ls r e g u l a r l y w ith c o m p a n y o f f i ­
c e r s and to p l e v e l m a n a g e m e n t o f f i c i a l s and c o n fe .r s o r n e g o t i a t e s r e g u l a r l y w ith s e n i o r
a t t o r n e y s and o f f i c i a l s in o t h e r c o m p a n i e s o r in G o v e r n m e n t a g e n c i e s on v a r i o u s a s p e c t s
o f h is a s s i g n e d w o r k . ( R e c e i v e s little o r n o p r e l i m i n a r y i n s t r u c t i o n on l e g a l p r o b l e m s and
a m i n i m u m o f t e c h n i c a l l e g a l s u p e r v i s i o n . M a y a s s i g n and r e v i e w w o r k o f a fe w a t t o r n e y s ,
but th is is n o t a p r i m a r y r e s p o n s i b i l i t y . )
R -4 .
C a r r i e s out a s s i g n m e n t s w h ic h e n t a il in d e p e n d e n t l y p la n n in g i n v e s t i g a t i o n s
and n e g o t i a t i o n s on l e g a l p r o b l e m s o f the h i g h e s t i m p o r t a n c e to h is o r g a n i z a t i o n and d e v e l ­
op in g c o m p l e t e d b r i e f s , o p i n i o n s , c o n t r a c t s , o r o th e r l e g a l p r o d u c t s .
T o c a r r y out h is
a s s i g n m e n t s he r e p r e s e n t s h is o r g a n i z a t i o n at c o n f e r e n c e s , h e a r i n g s , o r t r i a l s , and p e r s o n ­
a l l y c o n f e r s and n e g o t i a t e s w ith t o p a t t o r n e y s and t o p - r a n k i n g o f f i c i a l s in p r i v a t e c o m p a n i e s
o r in G o v e r n m e n t a g e n c i e s .
On v a r i o u s a s p e c t s o f h is a s s i g n e d w o r k m a y g i v e a d v i c e



53
A T T ORN E Y---- C on tinu e d

d i r e c t l y and p e r s o n a l l y to c o r p o r a t i o n o f f i c e r s
the g e n e r a l c o u n s e l o f the c o m p a n y in a d v i s i n g
i n s t r u c t i o n on l e g a l p r o b l e m s .
On m a t t e r s
a t t o r n e y s o r o t h e r s p e c i a l i s t s , is r e s p o n s i b l e
w o r k o f the a t t o r n e y s i n v o l v e d . )

and top l e v e l m a n a g e r s , o r m a y w o r k t h r o u g h
o f f ic e r s . (G en era lly r e c e iv e s no p r e lim in a r y
r e q u i r i n g the c o n c e n t r a t e d e f f o r t s o f s e v e r a l
f o r d i r e c t i n g , c o o r d i n a t i n g and r e v i e w i n g the

OR

A s a p r i m a r y r e s p o n s i b i l i t y , d i r e c t s the w o r k o f a s t a f f o f a t t o r n e y s , o n e , but u s u a l l y
m o r e , of whom reg u la rly p e r fo r m D -3 lega l w ork.
W ith r e s p e c t to the w o r k d i r e c t e d ,
g i v e s a d v i c e d i r e c t l y to c o r p o r a t i o n o f f i c e r s and t o p m a n a g e r i a l o f f i c e r s , o r m a y g iv e
s u c h a d v i c e th ro u g h the g e n e r a l c o u n s e l .
( R e c e i v e s g u id a n c e a s t o o r g a n i z a t i o n p o l i c y
but n o t e c h n i c a l s u p e r v i s i o n o r a s s i s t a n c e
e x c e p t w h en he m i g h t r e q u e s t a d v i c e f r o m ,
o r b e b r i e f e d on, the o v e r a l l a p p r o a c h to the m o s t d i f f i c u l t , n o v e l o r i m p o r t a n t l e g a l
q u e s t i o n s , b y the g e n e r a l c o u n s e l . U s u a l l y r e p o r t s to the g e n e r a l c o u n s e l o r h is d e p u t y . )

BUYERS

BUYER

P u r c h a s e s m a t e r i a l s , s u p p l i e s , e q u ip m e n t , and s e r v i c e s ( e . g . , u t i l i t i e s , m a i n t e n a n c e ,
and r e p a i r ) . In s o m e i n s t a n c e s i t e m s a r e o f t y p e s that m u s t b e s p e c i a l l y d e s i g n e d , p r o d u c e d ,
o r m o d i f i e d b y the v e n d o r in a c c o r d a n c e w ith d r a w i n g s o r e n g i n e e r i n g s p e c i f i c a t i o n s .
S o l i c i t s b i d s , a n a l y z e s q u o ta tio n s r e c e i v e d , and s e l e c t s o r r e c o m m e n d s s u p p l i e r .
M ay in te rv ie w p r o s p e c t i v e v e n d o r s .
P u r c h a s e s i t e m s and s e r v i c e s at the m o s t f a v o r a b l e
p r i c e c o n s i s t e n t w ith q u a lit y , q u a n tity , s p e c i f i c a t i o n r e q u i r e m e n t s , and o t h e r f a c t o r s . P r e ­
p a r e s o r s u p e r v is e s p r e p a r a tio n o f p u r c h a s e o r d e r s f r o m r e q u is itio n s . M ay expedite d e liv e r y
and v i s i t v e n d o r s ' o f f i c e s and p la n t s .
N o r m a l l y , p u r c h a s e s a r e u n r e v i e w e d w h en th e y a r e c o n s i s t e n t w ith p a s t e x p e r i e n c e ,
and a r e in c o n f o r m a n c e w ith e s t a b l i s h e d r u l e s and p o l i c i e s . P r o p o s e d p u r c h a s e t r a n s a c t i o n s
that d e v ia t e f r o m the u s u a l o r f r o m p a s t e x p e r i e n c e in t e r m s o f p r i c e s , q u a lit y o f i t e m s ,
q u a n t it i e s , e t c . , o r that m a y s e t p r e c e d e n t s f o r fu tu r e p u r c h a s e s , a r e r e v i e w e d b y h ig h e r
a u t h o r it y p r i o r to f i n a l a c t i o n .
In a d d it i o n to the w o r k d e s c r i b e d a b o v e , s o m e (but not all) b u y e r s d i r e c t the w o r k
o f o n e o r a f e w c l e r k s w h o p e r f o r m r o u t in e a s p e c t s o f the w o r k . A s a s e c o n d a r y and s u b ­
s i d i a r y du ty, s o m e b u y e r s m a y a l s o s e l l o r d i s p o s e o f s u r p l u s , s a l v a g e , o r u s e d m a t e r i a l s ,
e q u ip m e n t , o r s u p p l i e s .

NOTE:
S o m e b u y e r s a r e r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the p u r c h a s i n g o f a v a r i e t y o f i t e m s and
m a teria ls.
W h en the v a r i e t y i n c l u d e s i t e m s and w o r k d e s c r i b e d at m o r e than on e o f the
f o l l o w i n g l e v e l s , the p o s i t i o n s h o u ld b e c o n s i d e r e d to e q u a l the h ig h e s t l e v e l that c h a r a c t e r i z e s
at l e a s t a s u b s t a n t ia l p o r t i o n o f the b u y e r ' s t i m e .

E xclu d ed a re:
(a)
B u y e r s o f ite m s fo r d ir e c t s a le , eith er w h o le s a le o r reta il;
(b)
B r o k e r s and d e a l e r s b u y in g f o r c l i e n t s o r f o r in v e s t m e n t p u r p o s e s ;
(c)
P o s i t i o n s that s p e c i f i c a l l y r e q u i r e p r o f e s s i o n a l e d u c a t i o n and q u a l i f i c a t i o n s
a p h y s i c a l s c i e n c e o r in e n g i n e e r i n g ( e . g . , c h e m i s t , m e c h a n i c a l e n g i n e e r ) ;




in

54
B U Y E R — C o n t in u e d

(d)
B u y e r s w h o s p e c i a l i z e in p u r c h a s i n g a s i n g l e o r a fe w r e l a t e d i t e m s o f h ig h ly
v a r i a b l e q u a lit y s u c h a s r a w c o t t o n o r w o o l , t o b a c c o , c a t t l e , o r l e a t h e r f o r s h o e u p p e r s ,
etc.
E x p e r t p e r s o n a l k n o w l e d g e o f the i t e m is r e q u i r e d to ju d g e th e r e l a t i v e v a lu e o f
th e g o o d s o f f e r e d , and to d e c i d e th e q u a n tity , q u a lit y , and p r i c e o f e a c h p u r c h a s e in
t e r m s o f its p r o b a b l e e f f e c t on the o r g a n i z a t i o n ' s p r o f i t and c o m p e t i t i v e sta t u s ;
(e )
B u y e r s w h o s e p r i n c i p a l r e s p o n s i b i l i t y is th e s u p e r v i s i o n o f o t h e r b u y e r s o r the
m an agem en t, d ire ctio n , o r su p erv ision o f a pu rchasin g p ro g ra m ;
(f)
P e r s o n s p r e d o m i n a n t l y c o n c e r n e d w ith c o n t r a c t o r s u b c o n t r a c t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ;
(g)
P e r s o n s w h o s e m a j o r d u tie s c o n s i s t o f o r d e r i n g , r e o r d e r i n g , o r r e q u i s i t i o n i n g
i t e m s u n d e r e x i s t i n g c o n t r a c t s ; and
(h)
P o s i t i o n s r e s t r i c t e d t o the c l e r i c a l f u n c t io n s o r to p u r c h a s e e x p e d it i n g w o r k .

Buyer I

p lies,

P u r c h a s e s " o f f - t h e - s h e l f " types o f r e a d ily a v a ila b le , c o m m o n ly u sed m a t e r i a l s , s u p ­
to o ls , fu rn itu re , s e r v i c e s , e tc.

T r a n s a c tio n s u su a lly in v o lv e lo c a l
t u r e r s ' sa les re p re se n ta tiv e s.

re ta ile rs,

w h o le sa le rs,

jo b b e rs,

and

m a n u fa c­

Q u a n t i t ie s p u r c h a s e d a r e g e n e r a l l y s m a l l a m o u n t s , e . g. , t h o s e a v a i l a b l e f r o m

lo ca l

sources.
E x a m p l e s o f i t e m s p u r c h a s e d in c l u d e : C o m m o n s t a t i o n e r y and o f f i c e s u p p l i e s ; s t a n d ­
a r d t y p e s o f o f f i c e f u r n i t u r e and f i x t u r e s ; s t a n d a r d n u ts, b o l t s , s c r e w s ; j a n i t o r i a l and
c o m m o n b u il d i n g m a i n t e n a n c e s u p p l i e s ; and c o m m o n b u il d i n g m a i n t e n a n c e o r c o m m o n
utility s e r v i c e s .

B u y e r II
P urchases "off-th e-sh elf"
m a t e r i a l s , and s e r v i c e s .

jo b b e rs,

T ra n sa ction s
etc.

u su a lly

types o f

in v olv e

standard,

d e a li n g

d irectly

g en era lly

w ith

ava ila ble

tech n ica l

m a n u fa ctu rers,

Q u a n titie s o f i t e m s and m a t e r i a l s p u r c h a s e d m a y b e r e l a t i v e l y l a r g e ,
in the c a s e o f c o n t r a c t s f o r c o n t in u in g s u p p ly o v e r a p e r i o d o f t i m e .

ite m s,

d istrib u tors,

p a rticu la rly

M a y b e r e s p o n s i b l e f o r lo c a t i n g o r p r o m o t i n g p o s s i b l e n e w s o u r c e s o f s u p p ly . U s u ­
a l l y is e x p e c t e d to k e e p a b r e a s t o f m a r k e t t r e n d s , c h a n g e s in b u s i n e s s p r a c t i c e s in the
a s s i g n e d m a r k e t s , n e w o r a l t e r e d t y p e s o f m a t e r i a l s e n t e r in g the m a r k e t , e t c .
E x a m p l e s o f i t e m s p u r c h a s e d i n c l u d e : I n d u s t r ia l t y p e s o f h a n d t o o l s ; e l e c t r o n i c tube
and c o m p o n e n t t e s t i n s t r u m e n t s ; s t a n d a r d e l e c t r o n i c p a r t s and c o m p o n e n t s ; e l e c t r i c
m o t o r s ; g a s o l i n e s e r v i c e s t a t io n e q u ip m e n t ; P B X o r o t h e r s p e c i a l i z e d t e l e p h o n e s e r v i c e s ;
and r o u t in e p u r c h a s e s o f c o m m o n r a w m a t e r i a l s s u c h a s s t a n d a r d g r a d e s and s i z e s o f
s t e e l b a r s , r o d s , and a n g l e s .
A l s o in c l u d e d at th is l e v e l a r e b u y e r s o f m a t e r i a l s o f the ty p e s d e s c r i b e d f o r b u y e r I w h en
the q u a n t itie s p u r c h a s e d a r e l a r g e s o that l o c a l s o u r c e s o f s u p p ly a r e g e n e r a l l y in a d e q u a te
and the b u y e r m u s t d e a l d i r e c t l y w ith m a n u f a c t u r e r s on a b r o a d e r than l o c a l s c a l e .

B u y e r III
P u r c h a s e s i t e m s , m a t e r i a l s , o r s e r v i c e s o f a t e c h n i c a l and s p e c i a l i z e d n a t u r e . T h e
i t e m s , w h i l e o f a c o m m o n g e n e r a l t y p e , a r e u s u a l l y m a d e , a l t e r e d , o r c u s t o m i z e d to m e e t
the u s e r ' s s p e c i f i c n e e d s and s p e c i f i c a t i o n s .



55
B U Y E R — C o n t in u e d

T r a n s a c t i o n s u s u a l l y r e q u i r e d e a li n g w ith m a n u f a c t u r e r s . T h e n u m b e r o f p o t e n t i a l
v e n d o r s i s l i k e l y to b e s m a l l and p r i c e d i f f e r e n t i a l s o f t e n r e f l e c t i m p o r t a n t f a c t o r s (q u a li t y ,
d e l i v e r y d a t e s , and p l a c e s , e t c . ) that a r e d i f f i c u l t t o e v a lu a t e .
T h e q u a n t itie s p u r c h a s e d o f a n y i t e m o r

s e r v ic e m a y be la rg e.

M a n y o f the p u r c h a s e s i n v o l v e o n e o r m o r e o f
that d e t a i l , in t e c h n i c a l t e r m s , the r e q u i r e d p h y s i c a l ,
r a b l e p r o p e r t i e s ; s p e c i a l t e s t in g p r i o r to a c c e p t a n c e ;
a w a r d s ; s p e c i a l i z e d p r o c e s s i n g , p a c k i n g , o r p a c k a g in g
p ort d ifferen tials; etc.

such co m p lica tio n s as: S p ecifica tion s
ch e m ic a l, e le c t r ic a l, or other c o m p a ­
g r o u p in g o f i t e m s f o r lot b id d i n g and
req u irem en ts; export packs; o v e r s e a s

Is e x p e c t e d to k e e p a b r e a s t o f m a r k e t and p r o d u c t d e v e l o p m e n t s .
to l o c a t e n e w s o u r c e s o f s u p p ly .
S o m e p o s i t i o n s m a y i n v o l v e a s s i s t i n g in the t r a i n i n g o r
buyers or cle rk s.

M ay be req u ired

su p erv isin g o f lo w e r le v e l

E xa m p le s o f ite m s p u r c h a s e d include: C a stin g s; s p e c ia l extru ded shapes o f n o r m a l
s i z e and m a t e r i a l ; s p e c i a l f o r m u l a p a in t s ; e l e c t r i c m o t o r s o f s p e c i a l sh a p e o r s p e e d ;
s p e c i a l p a c k a g in g o f i t e m s ; and r a w m a t e r i a l s in s u b s t a n t ia l q u a n t it i e s .
B u y e r IV

P u r c h a s e s h ig h ly c o m p l e x and t e c h n i c a l i t e m s , m a t e r i a l s , o r s e r v i c e s , u s u a l l y t h o s e
s p e c i a l l y d e s i g n e d and m a n u f a c t u r e d e x c l u s i v e l y f o r the p u r c h a s e r .
T r a n s a c t i o n s r e q u i r e d e a li n g w ith m a n u f a c t u r e r s and o f t e n i n v o l v e p e r s u a d i n g p o t e n ­
t i a l v e n d o r s to u n d e r t a k e the m a n u f a c t u r i n g o f c u s t o m d e s i g n e d i t e m s a c c o r d i n g to c o m p l e x
and r i g i d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s .
Q u a n titie s o f i t e m s and m a t e r i a l s p u r c h a s e d a r e o f t e n l a r g e in o r d e r to s a t i s f y the
r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r an e n t i r e l a r g e o r g a n i z a t i o n f o r an e x t e n d e d p e r i o d o f t i m e .
C om p lex
s c h e d u l e s o f d e l i v e r y a r e o f t e n i n v o l v e d . B u y e r d e t e r m i n e s a p p r o p r i a t e q u a n t itie s to b e c o n ­
t r a c t e d f o r at a n y g i v e n p e r i o d o f t i m e .
T r a n s a c t i o n s a r e o ft e n c o m p l i c a t e d b y th e p r e s e n c e o f on e o r m o r e s u c h m a t t e r s as
i n c l u s i o n o f: R e q u i r e m e n t s f o r s p a r e p a r t s , p r e p r o d u c t i o n s a m p l e s and t e s t i n g , o r t e c h n i c a l
l i t e r a t u r e ; o r patent and r o y a l t y p r o v i s i o n s .
K e e p s a b r e a s t o f m a r k e t and p r o d u c t d e v e l o p m e n t s .

D e v e l o p s n e w s o u r c e s o f s u p p ly .

In a d d it i o n to the w o r k d e s c r i b e d a b o v e , a fe w p o s i t i o n s m a y a l s o r e q u i r e s u p e r v i s i o n
o v e r a fe w l o w e r l e v e l b u y e r s o r c l e r k s . (N o p o s i t i o n is in c l u d e d in th is l e v e l s o l e l y b e c a u s e
s u p e r v i s o r y d u tie s a r e p e r f o r m e d . )
E x a m p l e s o f i t e m s p u r c h a s e d in c l u d e : S p e c i a l p u r p o s e h ig h c o s t m a c h i n e t o o l s and
p r o d u c t i o n f a c i l i t i e s ; r a w m a t e r i a l s o f c r i t i c a l l y im p o r t a n t c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o r q u a lit y ;
p a r t s , s u b a s s e m b l i e s , c o m p o n e n t s , e t c . , s p e c i a l l y d e s i g n e d and m a d e to o r d e r ( e . g . ,
c o m m u n i c a t i o n s e q u ip m e n t f o r i n s t a l l a t i o n in a i r c r a f t b e i n g m a n u f a c t u r e d ; c o m p o n e n t
a s s e m b l i e s f o r m i s s i l e s and r o c k e t s ; and m o t o r v e h i c l e f r a m e s ) .
B uyer V 3

P u r c h a s e s i t e m s o r m a t e r i a l s , e i t h e r t e c h n i c a l o r n o n t e c h n i c a l , in s u c h u n u s u a lly
l a r g e q u a n titie s that i n d iv i d u a l p u r c h a s e s c a n a f f e c t the o v e r a l l m a r k e t p r i c e o f the c o m ­
m odity.
(N O T E : O n ly the v e r y l a r g e s t o r g a n i z a t i o n s , e . g . , t h o s e e m p l o y i n g m o r e than
1 0 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s , a r e a b le to b u y in the q u a n t itie s c o n t e m p l a t e d in th is p a r a g r a p h . E v e n in
the v e r y l a r g e o r g a n i z a t i o n s th is l e v e l o f b u y in g is o ft e n a b s e n t and e v e n w h e n p r e s e n t , is
r e s t r i c t e d to a v e r y fe w b u y e r s o r is a s s i g n e d , n ot to a b u y e r but to s o m e h i g h e r ra n k in g
o ffic ia l.)
3 In su fficient data were obtained fo r le v e l V to w arrant presentation o f average salaries.




56

B U Y E R — C o n t in u e d

A l t e r n a t i v e l y , m a y p u r c h a s e i t e m s o f e x t r a o r d i n a r y t e c h n i c a l c o m p l e x i t y ( e . g. , m i s ­
s i l e g u i d a n c e s y s t e m s ; i t e m s that i n v o l v e th e o u t e r m o s t l i m i t s o f the p h y s i c a l s c i e n c e s o r
e n g i n e e r i n g ) o r o f u n u s u a ll y h ig h in d iv i d u a l v a lu e ( e . g . , m u lt ie n g in e j e t a i r c r a f t ; l a r g e c a ­
p a c i t y c o m p u t e r s ; and h ig h c a p a c i t y t u r b i n e - g e n e r a t o r s ) .
U s u a l l y is r e q u i r e d to id e n t i f y and c o n s i d e r a l l p o s s i b l e

sources

o f s u p p ly .

T h e t r a n s a c t i o n s a r e s o l a r g e that t h e y o f t e n a f f e c t a c o n s i d e r a b l e p o r t i o n o f the
in d u s t r y o r t r a d e c o n c e r n e d , r e s u l t i n g in c o m p l e x s c h e d u l in g and d i f f i c u l t y in n e g o t ia t in g
m u t u a ll y a c c e p t a b l e a r r a n g e m e n t s .

fa ctu rers

F r e q u e n t l y is r e q u i r e d to d e v e l o p n e w s o u r c e s o f s u p p ly t h r o u g h p e r s u a s i o n o f m a n u ­
o r o t h e r c o n c e r n s to e x p a n d o r c o n v e r t p la n ts and f a c i l i t i e s .

In a d d it i o n to the w o r k d e s c r i b e d a b o v e , a f e w p o s i t i o n s m a y a l s o r e q u i r e s u p e r ­
v i s i o n o v e r a f e w l o w e r g r a d e b u y e r s o r c l e r k s . (N o p o s i t i o n is in c l u d e d in th is l e v e l s o l e l y
b e c a u s e s u p e r v i s o r y d u tie s a r e p e r f o r m e d . )

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

JOB A N A L Y S T
P e r f o r m s w o r k i n v o l v e d in c o l l e c t i n g , a n a ly z in g , and d e v e l o p i n g o c c u p a t i o n a l data
r e l a t i v e to j o b s , j o b q u a l i f i c a t i o n s , and w o r k e r c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s a s a b a s i s f o r c o m p e n s a t i n g
e m p l o y e e s in a f a i r , e q u it a b l e , and u n i f o r m m a n n e r . P e r f o r m s s u c h d u tie s a s s tu d y in g and
a n a ly z in g j o b s and p r e p a r i n g d e s c r i p t i o n s o f d u tie s and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s and o f the p h y s i c a l
and m e n t a l r e q u i r e m e n t s n e e d e d b y w o r k e r s ; ev a lu a tin g j o b s and d e t e r m i n i n g a p p r o p r i a t e
w a g e o r s a l a r y l e v e l s in a c c o r d a n c e w ith t h e i r d i f f i c u l t y and r e s p o n s i b i l i t y ; in d e p e n d e n t l y
c o n d u c t in g o r p a r t i c i p a t i n g w ith r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s o f o t h e r c o m p a n i e s in c o n d u c t i n g c o m p e n ­
s a t i o n s u r v e y s w ith in a l o c a l i t y o r l a b o r m a r k e t a r e a ; a s s i s t i n g in a d m i n i s t e r i n g m e r i t ra tin g
p r o g r a m ; r e v i e w i n g c h a n g e s in w a g e s and s a l a r i e s in d ic a t e d b y s u r v e y s and r e c o m m e n d i n g
c h a n g e s in p a y s c a l e s ; and a u d itin g in d iv i d u a l j o b s to c h e c k the p r o p r i e t y o f e v a lu a t i o n s and
to a p p ly c u r r e n t j o b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s .

J ob A nalyst I
A s a t r a i n e e , p e r f o r m s w o r k in d e s i g n a t e d a r e a s and o f l i m i t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l s c o p e .
R e c e i v e s i m m e d i a t e s u p e r v i s i o n in a s s i g n m e n t s d e s i g n e d to p r o v i d e t r a i n i n g in the a p p l i c a t i o n
o f e s t a b l i s h e d m e t h o d s and t e c h n i q u e s o f j o b a n a l y s i s .
S tu d ies the l e a s t d i f f i c u l t j o b s and
p r e p a r e s r e p o r t s f o r r e v i e w b y a j o b a n a ly s t o f h ig h e r l e v e l .

J o b A n a l y s t II
S t u d ie s , d e s c r i b e s , and e v a lu a t e s j o b s in a c c o r d a n c e w ith e s t a b l i s h e d p r o c e d u r e s .
Is u s u a l l y a s s i g n e d to the s i m p l e r k in d s o f b o t h w a g e and s a l a r i e d j o b s in the e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t l y on s u c h a s s i g n m e n t s but is l i m i t e d b y i n s t r u c t i o n s o f h is s u p e r i o r and
b y defined a r e a o f a ssign m e n t.

J o b A n a l y s t III
A n a l y z e s and e v a lu a t e s a v a r i e t y o f w a g e and s a l a r i e d j o b s in a c c o r d a n c e w ith
e s t a b l i s h e d e v a lu a t i o n s y s t e m s and p r o c e d u r e s . M a y c o n d u c t w a g e s u r v e y s w ith in th e l o c a l i t y
o r p a r t i c i p a t e in c o n d u c t in g s u r v e y s o f b r o a d c o m p e n s a t i o n a r e a s .
M a y a s s i s t in d e v e l o p i n g
s u r v e y m e t h o d s and p l a n s . R e c e i v e s g e n e r a l s u p e r v i s i o n but r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r fi n a l a c t i o n
is l i m i t e d .




57

J O B A N A L Y S T — C on tin u ed

J o b A n a l y s t IV
A n a l y z e s and e v a l u a t e s a v a r i e t y o f j o b s in a c c o r d a n c e with e s t a b l i s h e d e v a lu a t i o n
s y s t e m s and p r o c e d u r e s , and i s g i v e n a s s i g n m e n t w h i c h r e g u l a r l y i n c l u d e s r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r
the m o r e d i f f i c u l t k in d s o f j o b s .
( " M o r e d iffic u lt " m ean s jo b s which c o n s is t o f h a r d - t o u n d e r s t a n d w o r k p r o c e s s e s ; e. g. , p r o f e s s i o n a l , s c i e n t i f i c , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , o r t e c h n i c a l ; o r
j o b s in n e w o r e m e r g i n g o c c u p a t i o n a l f i e l d s ; £ r j o b s w h i c h a r e b e in g e s t a b l i s h e d as p a r t o f
the c r e a t i o n o f n e w o r g a n i z a t i o n s ; o r w h e r e o th e r s p e c i a l c o n s i d e r a t i o n s o f th e s e ty p e s a p p l y . )
R e c e i v e s g e n e r a l s u p e r v i s i o n , but r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r fi n a l a c t i o n is l i m i t e d . M a y p a r t i c i p a t e
in the d e v e l o p m e n t and i n s t a l l a t i o n o f e v a lu a t i o n o r c o m p e n s a t i o n s y s t e m s , w h i c h m a y in c l u d e
t h o s e f o r m e r i t r a tin g p r o g r a m s .
M a y p lan s u r v e y m e t h o d s and c o n d u c t o r d i r e c t w a g e
s u r v e y s w ith in a b r o a d c o m p e n s a t i o n a r e a .

D IR E C T O R OR P E R S O N N E L 4

D ire cts a p erson n el m anagem ent p r o g r a m for a com pany or a segm en t of a com pany.
S e r v e s to p m a n a g e m e n t o f f i c i a l s o f the o r g a n i z a t i o n a s the s o u r c e o f a d v i c e and a s s i s t a n c e
on p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t m a t t e r s and p r o b l e m s g e n e r a l l y ; is t y p i c a l l y c o n s u l t e d on the
p e r s o n n e l i m p l i c a t i o n s o f p la n n e d c h a n g e s in m a n a g e m e n t p o l i c y o r p r o g r a m , the e f f e c t s on
the o r g a n i z a t i o n o f e c o n o m i c o r m a r k e t t r e n d s , p r o d u c t o r p r o d u c t i o n m e t h o d c h a n g e s , e t c . ;
r e p r e s e n t s m a n a g e m e n t in c o n t a c t s w ith o th e r c o m p a n i e s , t r a d e a s s o c i a t i o n s , g o v e r n m e n t
a g e n c i e s , e t c . , d e a lin g p r i m a r i l y w ith p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t m a t t e r s .
T y p i c a l l y the d i r e c t o r o f p e r s o n n e l f o r a c o m p a n y r e p o r t s to a c o m p a n y o f f i c e r in
c h a r g e o f i n d u s t r i a l r e l a t i o n s and p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t a c t i v i t i e s o r an o f f i c e r o f s i m i l a r
lev el.
B e l o w the c o m p a n y l e v e l the d i r e c t o r o f p e r s o n n e l t y p i c a l l y r e p o r t s to a c o m p a n y
o f f i c e r o r a h igh m a n a g e m e n t o f f i c i a l w h o h a s r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the o p e r a t i o n o f a p lan t,
e s t a b l i s h m e n t , o r o t h e r s e g m e n t o f the c o m p a n y .
F o r a j o b to be c o v e r e d b y th is d e fi n i t io n , the p e r s o n n e l m a n a g e m e n t p r o g r a m
i n c l u d e r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r a l l t h r e e o f the f o l l o w i n g fu n c t io n s ;

m ust

(1) A d m i n i s t e r i n g a j o b e v a lu a t i o n s y s t e m ; i. e. , a s y s t e m in w h i c h t h e r e a r e e s ­
t a b l i s h e d p r o c e d u r e s b y w h i c h j o b s a r e a n a l y z e d and e v a lu a t e d on the b a s i s o f t h e ir
d u t i e s , r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s , and q u a l i f i c a t i o n r e q u i r e m e n t s in o r d e r to p r o v i d e a fo u n d a tio n
f o r e q u ita b le c o m p e n s a t i o n . T y p i c a l l y , s u c h a s y s t e m in c l u d e s the u s e o f one o r m o r e
s e t s o f j o b e v a lu a t i o n f a c t o r s and the p r e p a r a t i o n o f f o r m a l j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s .
It m a y
a l s o in c l u d e su ch r e l a t e d f u n c t io n s a s w a g e and s a l a r y s u r v e y s o r m e r i t r a tin g s y s t e m
a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . T h e j o b e v a lu a t i o n s y s t e m ( s ) d o e s n o t n e c e s s a r i l y c o v e r a l l j o b s in the
o r g a n i z a t i o n , but d o e s c o v e r a s u b s t a n t ia l p o r t i o n o f the o r g a n i z a t i o n .
(2) E m p l o y m e n t and p l a c e m e n t fu n c t i o n s ; i. e. , r e c r u i t i n g a c t i v e l y f o r at l e a s t s o m e
k in d s o f w o r k e r s t h r o u g h a v a r i e t y o f s o u r c e s ( e . g . , s c h o o l s o r c o l l e g e s , e m p l o y m e n t
a g e n c i e s , p r o f e s s i o n a l s o c i e t i e s , e t c . ) ; e v a lu a tin g a p p l i c a n t s a g a in s t d e m a n d s o f p a r t i c ­
u l a r j o b s by u s e o f s u c h t e c h n i q u e s a s j o b a n a l y s i s to d e t e r m i n e r e q u i r e m e n t s , i n t e r ­
v i e w s , w r i t t e n t e s t s o f a p titu d e , k n o w l e d g e , s k i l l , r e f e r e n c e c h e c k s , e x p e r i e n c e e v a l u ­
a t i o n s , e t c . ; r e c o m m e n d i n g s e l e c t i o n s and j o b p l a c e m e n t s to m a n a g e m e n t , e t c .
(3) E m p l o y e e r e l a t i o n s and s e r v i c e s f u n c t i o n s ; i. e . , fu n c tio n s d e s i g n e d to m a i n t a in
e m p l o y e e s ' m o r a l e and p r o d u c t i v i t y at a h igh l e v e l ( f o r e x a m p l e a d m i n i s t e r i n g a f o r m a l
o r i n f o r m a l g r i e v a n c e p r o c e d u r e ; id e n t i fy in g and r e c o m m e n d i n g s o l u t i o n s f o r p e r s o n n e l
p r o b l e m s s u c h a s a b s e n t e e i s m , h ig h t u r n o v e r , lo w p r o d u c t i v i t y , e t c . ; a d m i n i s t r a t i o n o f
b e n e f i c i a l s u g g e s t i o n s s y s t e m , r e t i r e m e n t , p e n s i o n , o r i n s u r a n c e p l a n s , m e r i t ra tin g
s y s t e m , e t c . ; o v e r s e e i n g c a f e t e r i a o p e r a t i o n s , r e c r e a t i o n a l p r o g r a m s , i n d u s t r i a l h e a lth
and s a f e t y p r o g r a m s , e t c . ) .
4

D e fin itio n revised for 1969 survey.




See appendix B for an exp lanation of changes m ade.

58
D I R E C T O R OR P E R S O N N E L --- C o n tin u e d
In a d d i t i o n , p o s i t i o n s c o v e r e d by th is d e f in i t i o n m a y , but do no t n e c e s s a r i l y , in c lu d e
r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s in the f o l l o w i n g a r e a s :
a.

E m p lo y e e train in g and d ev elo p m en t

b. L a b o r r e l a t i o n s a c t i v i t i e s w h ic h a r e c o n f i n e d m a i n l y to the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , i n t e r ­
p r e t a t i o n , a n d a p p l i c a t i o n of t h o s e a s p e c t s of l a b o r u n ion c o n t r a c t s th a t a r e e s s e n t i a l l y
o f the ty p e d e s c r i b e d u n d e r (3) a b o v e .
M a y a l s o p a r t i c i p a t e in b a r g a i n i n g o f a s u b ­
o r d i n a t e n a t u r e , e . g . , to n e g o t i a t e d e t a i l e d s e t t l e m e n t o f s u c h m a t t e r s a s s p e c i f i c r a t e s ,
j o b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s , w o r k r u l e s , h i r i n g o r l a y o f f p r o c e d u r e s , e t c . , w ith in the b r o a d
t e r m s o f a g e n e r a l a g r e e m e n t r e a c h e d a t h i g h e r l e v e l s , o r to s u p p l y a d v i c e a n d i n f o r ­
m a t i o n on t e c h n i c a l p o i n t s to the c o m p a n y ' s p r i n c i p a l r e p r e s e n t a t i v e .
E x c l u d e d a r e p o s i t i o n s in w h ich r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r a c t u a l c o n t r a c t n e g o t i a t i o n with
l a b o r u n i o n s a s the p r i n c i p a l c o m p a n y r e p r e s e n t a t i v e i s a s i g n i f i c a n t a s p e c t of the j o b , i . e. ,
a r e s p o n s i b i l i t y w h ich s e r v e s a s a p r i m a r y b a s i s f o r q u a l i f i c a t i o n r e q u i r e m e n t s a n d c o m ­
p en sation .
D i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l j o b s w h ic h m e e t the a b o v e d e f in i t i o n a r e
of w o r k in a c c o r d a n c e w ith the fo l l o w i n g t a b u la t io n :

"Operations level"
personnel program
Number of employees in
work force serviced
250-750----------------------------------------1.000- 5 ,0 0 0 ............................ .....................—
6 .0 0 0 12,000-15.000- 25 ,0 0 0 -----------------------------

"Type A"
organization
serviced3
I
II
III
IV

c l a s s if i e d by le v e l

"Development level"
personnel program^

"Type B"
organization
serviced*
II
III
IV
V

"Type A"
organization
serviced3
II
III
IV
V

"Type B'
organizati:
serviced ‘
III
IV
V
-

1 " Operations level" personnel program—director of personnel servicing an organizational segment ( e .g ., a plant) of a com­
pany, where the basic personnel program policies, plans, objectives, e tc ., are established at company headquarters or at some other
higher level between the plant and the company headquarters level. The personnel director's responsibility is to put these into oper­
ation at the local level, in such a manner as to most effectively serve the local management needs.
2 " Development level" personnel program— either:
—
(a) Director or personnel servicing an entire company (with or without subordinate establishments) where the personnel
director plays an important role in establishment of basic personnel policies, plans, objectives, e tc ., for the company, sub­
ject to policy direction and control from company officers, or
(b) Director of personnel servicing an intermediate organization below the company level, e .g ., a division or a sub­
sidiary, to which a relatively complete delegation of personnel program planning and development responsibility is made. In
this situation only basic policy direction is given by the parent company and local officers. The director of personnel has
essentially the same degree of latitude and responsibility for establishment of basic personnel policies, plans, objectives, e tc .,
as described above in paragraph (a).
3

" Type A" - organization serviced—most jobs serviced do not present particularly difficult or unusual recruitment, job evalu­
ation, or training problems because the jobs consist of relatively easy-to-understand work processes, and an adequate labor supply
is available. These conditions are most likely to be found in organizations in which the work force and organizational structure are
relatively stable.
* "Type B" - organization serviced— a substantial number of jobs present difficult recruitment, job evaluation, or training prob­
lems because the jobs: Consist of hard-to-understand work processes (e. g . , professional, scientific, administrative, or technical);
have hard-to-match skill requirements; are in new or emerging occupations; or are extremely hard to fill. These conditions are most
likely to be found in organizations in which the work force, organizational structure, work processes or functions, e tc ., are comp­
licated or unstable.
NOTE: There are gaps between different degrees of all three elements used to determine job level matches. These gaps have
been provided purposely to allow room for judgment in getting the best overall job level match for each job. Thus, a job which
services a work force of 850 employees should be matched with level II if it is a personnel program operations level job where the
nature of the organization serviced seems to fall slightly below the definition for the type B degree. However, the same job should
be matched with level I if the nature of the organization serviced clearly falls well within the definition for the type A degree.




59

C H EM IST S AND E N G IN E E R S
C H EM IST
P e r f o r m s p r o f e s s i o n a l w o r k in r e s e a r c h , d e v e l o p m e n t , i n t e r p r e t a t i o n , a n d a n a l y s i s
t o d e t e r m i n e the c o m p o s i t i o n , m o l e c u l a r s t r u c t u r e , a n d p r o p e r t i e s of s u b s t a n c e s ; to d e v e l o p
o r i n v e s t i g a t e n ew m a t e r i a l s a n d p r o c e s s e s ; a n d to i n v e s t i g a t e th e t r a n s f o r m a t i o n w h ich
su b sta n ces undergo.
W o rk t y p i c a l l y r e q u i r e s a B . S . d e g r e e in c h e m i s t r y o r e q u i v a l e n t in
a p p r o p r i a t e a n d s u b s t a n t i a l c o l l e g e l e v e l s tu d y o f c h e m i s t r y p l u s e x p e r i e n c e .
C h em ist I
G eneral c h a ra c te ristic s.
T h i s i s the e n t r y l e v e l of p r o f e s s i o n a l w o r k r e q u i r i n g a
b a c h e l o r * s d e g r e e in c h e m i s t r y a n d no e x p e r i e n c e , o r the e q u i v a l e n t (to a d e g r e e ) in a p p r o ­
p r ia t e ed u catio n and e x p e r ie n c e .
P e r f o r m s a s s i g n m e n t s d e s i g n e d to d e v e l o p p r o f e s s i o n a l
c a p a b i l i t i e s a n d to p r o v i d e e x p e r i e n c e in the a p p l i c a t i o n o f t r a i n i n g in c h e m i s t r y a s it r e l a t e s
to th e c o m p a n y ' s p r o g r a m s .
M a y a l s o r e c e i v e f o r m a l c l a s s r o o m o r s e m i n a r ty p e t r a i n i n g .
( T e r m in a l p o sitio n s a r e ex clu d ed . )
D irectio n re c e iv e d .
W orks under c lo se su p e rv isio n .
R e c e iv e s s p e c ific and d e ta ile d
i n s t r u c t i o n s a s to r e q u i r e d t a s k s a n d r e s u l t s e x p e c t e d .
W o rk i s c h e c k e d d u r i n g p r o g r e s s ,
a n d i s r e v i e w e d f o r a c c u r a c y up on c o m p l e t i o n .
T y p ic a l d u ties and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
P e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y of r o u t i n e t a s k s th a t a r e
p l a n n e d to p r o v i d e e x p e r i e n c e a n d f a m i l i a r i z a t i o n w ith the c h e m i s t r y s t a f f , m e t h o d s , p r a c ­
t i c e s a n d p r o g r a m s o f the c o m p a n y .
T h e w o r k i n c l u d e s a v a r i e t y of r o u t i n e q u a l i t a t i v e a n d
q u a n t i t a t i v e a n a l y s e s ; p h y s i c a l t e s t s to d e t e r m i n e p r o p e r t i e s s u c h a s v i s c o s i t y , t e n s i l e s t r e n g t h ,
a n d m e l t i n g p o in t; a n d a s s i s t i n g m o r e e x p e r i e n c e d c h e m i s t s to g a i n a d d i t i o n a l k n o w le d g e t h r o u g h
p e r s o n a l o b s e r v a tio n and d is c u s s io n .
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the d i r e c t i o n of o t h e r s .

U su a lly none.

C h e m i s t II
G e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . A t t h i s c o n tin u in g d e v e l o p m e n t a l l e v e l , p e r f o r m s r o u t i n e
c h e m ic a l w o rk r e q u ir in g se le c tio n and a p p lic a tio n of g e n e r a l and s p e c ia l iz e d m e th o d s , t e c h ­
n i q u e s , an d i n s t r u m e n t s c o m m o n l y u s e d in the l a b o r a t o r y a n d th e a b i l i t y to c a r r y out i n ­
s t r u c t i o n s w hen l e s s c o m m o n o r p r o p o s e d m e t h o d s o r p r o c e d u r e s a r e n e c e s s a r y .
R e q u ire s
w o r k e x p e r i e n c e a c q u i r e d in a n e n t r y l e v e l p o s i t i o n , o r a p p r o p r i a t e g r a d u a t e l e v e l s tu d y .
F o r t r a i n i n g a n d d e v e l o p m e n t a l p u r p o s e s , a s s i g n m e n t s m a y in c l u d e s o m e w o r k t h a t i s t y p i c a l
of a h igh e r le v e l.
( T e r m in a l p o sitio n s a r e ex clu d ed . )
D irectio n r e c e iv e d .
S u p e r v i s o r e s t a b l i s h e s th e n a t u r e an d e x te n t of a n a l y s i s r e ­
q u i r e d , s p e c i f i e s m e t h o d s a n d c r i t e r i a on n e w t y p e s of a s s i g n m e n t s , a n d r e v i e w s w o r k f o r
t h o r o u g h n e s s o f a p p l i c a t i o n of m e t h o d s a n d a c c u r a c y of r e s u l t s .
T y p i c a l d u t i e s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
C a r r i e s out a w i d e v a r i e t y o f s t a n d a r d i z e d
m e th o d s, t e s t s , and p r o c e d u r e s .
In a c c o r d a n c e w ith s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t i o n s m a y c a r r y out
p r o p o s e d an d l e s s c o m m o n o n e s .
I s e x p e c t e d to d e t e c t p r o b l e m s in u s i n g s t a n d a r d i z e d p r o ­
c e d u r e s b e c a u s e o f the c o n d i t io n o f the s a m p l e , d i f f i c u l t i e s w ith the e q u i p m e n t , e t c .
Rec­
o m m e n d s m o d i f i c a t i o n s of p r o c e d u r e s , e . g . , e x t e n d i n g o r c u r t a i l i n g the a n a l y s i s o r u s i n g
a l t e r n a t e p r o c e d u r e s , b a s e d on h i s k n o w le d g e of the p r o b l e m a n d p e r t i n e n t a v a i l a b l e l i t e r a ­
t u r e . C o n d u c t s s p e c i f i e d p h a s e s o f r e s e a r c h p r o j e c t s a s a n a s s i s t a n t to an e x p e r i e n c e d c h e m i s t .
R esp o n sib ility
tech n ician s.

for

the

d irectio n

of

oth ers.

M ay

be

assisted

by a

fe w

aid s

or

C h e m i s t III
G eneral c h a ra c te ristic s.
P e r f o r m s a b r o a d r a n g e of c h e m i c a l t e s t s an d p r o c e ­
d u r e s u t i l i z e d in the l a b o r a t o r y , u s i n g j u d g m e n t in the in d e p e n d e n t e v a l u a t i o n , s e l e c t i o n ,
and a d ap tatio n of sta n d a rd m e th o d s and te c h n iq u e s.
M ay c a r r y thro ugh a c o m p le te s e r i e s
o f t e s t s on a p r o d u c t in i t s d i f f e r e n t p r o c e s s s t a g e s .
Som e a ssig n m e n ts req u ire a s p e ­
c i a l i z e d k n o w le d g e o f one o r tw o c o m m o n c a t e g o r i e s o f r e l a t e d s u b s t a n c e s .
P erfo rm an ce
a t t h i s l e v e l r e q u i r e s d e v e l o p m e n t a l e x p e r i e n c e in a p r o f e s s i o n a l p o s i t i o n , o r e q u i v a l e n t
g r a d u a te le v e l e d u catio n .



60

C H E M I S T — C o n tin u e d
D irectio n r e c e iv e d .
On r o u t i n e w o r k , s u p e r v i s i o n i s v e r y g e n e r a l . A s s i s t a n c e i s
f u r n i s h e d on u n u s u a l p r o b l e m s a n d w o r k i s r e v i e w e d f o r a p p l i c a t i o n of so u n d p r o f e s s i o n a l
ju d gm en t.
T y p i c a l d u t i e s a n d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s . In a c c o r d a n c e w ith i n s t r u c t i o n s a s to the n a t u r e
of the p r o b l e m , s e l e c t s s t a n d a r d m e t h o d s , t e s t s o r p r o c e d u r e s ; w hen n e c e s s a r y , d e v e l o p s
o r w o r k s out a l t e r n a t e o r m o d i f i e d m e t h o d s with s u p e r v i s o r ^ c o n c u r r e n c e . A s s i s t s in r e ­
s e a r c h by a n a l y z i n g s a m p l e s o r t e s t i n g new p r o c e d u r e s th a t r e q u i r e s p e c i a l i z e d t r a i n i n g
b e c a u s e (a) s t a n d a r d m e t h o d s a r e i n a p p l i c a b l e , (b) a n a l y t i c a l f i n d i n g s m u s t b e i n t e r p r e t e d
in t e r m s o f c o m p l i a n c e o r n o n c o m p l i a n c e w ith s t a n d a r d s , o r (c) s p e c i a l i z e d a n d a d v a n c e d
eq u ip m en t and te c h n iq u e s m u s t be a d a p te d .
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the d i r e c t i o n o f o t h e r s .
M a y s u p e r v i s e o r c o o r d i n a t e th e w o r k
o f a fe w t e c h n i c i a n s o r a i d s , a n d be a s s i s t e d b y l o w e r l e v e l c h e m i s t s .
C h e m i s t IV
G eneral c h a ra c te ristic s.
A s a f u l ly c o m p e t e n t c h e m i s t in a l l c o n v e n t i o n a l a s p e c t s
o f the s u b j e c t - m a t t e r o r the f u n c t i o n a l a r e a o f the a s s i g n m e n t s , p l a n s a n d c o n d u c t s w o r k
r e q u i r i n g (a) m a s t e r y o f s p e c i a l i z e d t e c h n i q u e s o r in g e n u ity in s e l e c t i n g a n d e v a l u a t i n g a p ­
p r o a c h e s to u n f o r e s e e n o r n o v e l p r o b l e m s , a n d (b) a b i l i t y to a p p l y a r e s e a r c h a p p r o a c h to
the s o l u t i o n of a w id e v a r i e t y o f p r o b l e m s a n d to a s s i m i l a t e the d e t a i l s a n d s i g n i f i c a n c e of
c h e m ic a l and p h y sic a l a n a l y s e s , p r o c e d u r e s , and t e s t s .
R e q u ir e s su fficien t p r o fe s s io n a l
e x p e r i e n c e to a s s u r e c o m p e t e n c e a s a f u l ly t r a i n e d w o r k e r ; o r , f o r p o s i t i o n s p r i m a r i l y of
a r e s e a r c h n a tu r e , c o m p le tio n of a ll r e q u ir e m e n t s fo r a d o c to r a l d e g r e e m a y be su b stitu te d
for exp erien ce.
D i r e c t i o n r e c e i v e d . I n d e p e n d e n tl y p e r f o r m s m o s t a s s i g n m e n t s with i n s t r u c t i o n s a s
to the g e n e r a l r e s u l t s e x p e c t e d .
R e c e i v e s t e c h n i c a l g u i d a n c e on u n u s u a l o r c o m p l e x p r o b ­
l e m s a n d s u p e r v i s o r y a p p r o v a l on p r o p o s e d p l a n s f o r p r o j e c t s .
T y p i c a l d u t i e s a n d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s . C o n d u c t s l a b o r a t o r y a s s i g n m e n t s r e q u i r i n g the
d e t e r m i n a t i o n a n d e v a l u a t i o n o f a l t e r n a t i v e p r o c e d u r e s a n d the s e q u e n c e of p e r f o r m i n g t h e m .
P e r f o r m s c o m p le x , e x a c tin g , o r u n u su al a n a ly t ic a l a s s i g n m e n t s r e q u ir in g s p e c ia liz e d k n ow l­
ed ge of te c h n iq u e s or p r o d u c ts.
I n te r p r e ts r e s u l t s , p r e p a r e s r e p o r t s , and m a y p ro v id e
t e c h n i c a l a d v i c e in h i s s p e c i a l i z e d a r e a .
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the d i r e c t i o n o f o t h e r s .
and te c h n ic ia n s.

M ay s u p e r v i s e a s m a l l s ta ff of c h e m i s t s

C h em ist V
G e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . P a r t i c i p a t e s in p la n n in g l a b o r a t o r y p r o g r a m s on the b a s i s
o f s p e c i a l i z e d k n o w le d g e o f p r o b l e m s a n d m e t h o d s a n d p r o b a b l e v a l u e o f r e s u l t s . M a y s e r v e
a s a n e x p e r t in a n a r r o w s p e c i a l t y (e . g . , c l a s s of c h e m i c a l c o m p o u n d s , o r a c l a s s o f p r o d ­
u c t s ) , m a k i n g r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s a n d c o n c l u s i o n s w h ich s e r v e a s the b a s i s f o r u n d e r t a k i n g
or r e je c tin g im p o rta n t p r o je c t s .
D e v e l o p m e n t of the k n o w le d g e a n d e x p e r t i s e r e q u i r e d f o r
t h i s l e v e l o f w o r k u s u a l l y r e f l e c t s p r o g r e s s i v e e x p e r i e n c e t h r o u g h c h e m i s t IV.
D i r e c t i o n r e c e i v e d . S u p e r v i s i o n a n d g u i d a n c e r e l a t e s l a r g e l y to o v e r a l l o b j e c t i v e s ,
c r i t i c a l i s s u e s , new c o n c e p t s , a n d p o l i c y m a t t e r s .
C o n s u l t s w ith s u p e r v i s o r c o n c e r n i n g
u n u su a l p r o b le m s and d e v e lo p m e n ts.
T y p ic a l d u tie s and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .

(One o r bo th of the fo l l o w i n g . )

(1) In a s u p e r v i s o r y c a p a c i t y p l a n s , o r g a n i z e s , a n d d i r e c t s a s s i g n e d l a b o r a t o r y
p r o g r a m s . In d e p e n d e n tly d e f i n e s s c o p e a n d c r i t i c a l e l e m e n t s of the p r o j e c t s a n d s e l e c t s
a p p r o a c h e s to be t a k e n . A s u b s t a n t i a l p o r t i o n o f the w o r k s u p e r v i s e d i s c o m p a r a b l e to
th a t d e s c r i b e d f o r c h e m i s t IV.
(2) A s in d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r o r w o r k e r , c a r r i e s out p r o j e c t s r e q u i r i n g d e v e l o p ­
m e n t o f n e w o r h ig h ly m o d i f i e d s c i e n t i f i c t e c h n i q u e s a n d p r o c e d u r e s , e x t e n s i v e k n o w l ­
e d g e o f h i s s p e c i a l t y , a n d k n o w le d g e o f r e l a t e d s c i e n t i f i c f i e l d s .



6
1

C H E M I S T - — C on tinue d
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the d i r e c t i o n of o t h e r s .
S u p e r v i s e s , c o o r d in a t e s , and r e v ie w s
th e w o r k o f a s m a l l s t a f f of c h e m i s t s a n d t e c h n i c i a n s e n g a g e d in v a r i e d r e s e a r c h a n d d e ­
v e lo p m e n t p r o j e c t s , or a l a r g e r g ro u p p e r fo r m in g routin e a n a ly t ic a l w ork . E s t i m a t e s m a n ­
p o w e r n e e d s a n d s c h e d u l e s an d a s s i g n s w o r k to m e e t c o m p l e t i o n d a t e .
O r, a s in dividu a l
r e s e a r c h e r o r w o r k e r , m a y be a s s i s t e d on p r o j e c t s b y o t h e r c h e m i s t s o r t e c h n i c i a n s .
C h e m i s t VI
G eneral c h a r a c te r istic s.
P e r f o r m s w ork re q u ir in g l e a d e r s h ip and e x p e rt kn o w l­
e d g e in a s p e c i a l i z e d f i e l d , p r o d u c t , o r p r o c e s s .
F o r m u l a t e s and condu cts a s y s t e m a t i c
a t t a c k on a p r o b l e m a r e a o f c o n s i d e r a b l e s c o p e a n d c o m p l e x i t y w h ich m u s t be a p p r o a c h e d
t h r o u g h a s e r i e s of c o m p l e t e a n d c o n c e p t u a l l y r e l a t e d s t u d i e s , o r a n u m b e r of p r o j e c t s of
l e s s e r scope.
T h e p r o b l e m s a r e c o m p l e x b e c a u s e th e y a r e d i f f i c u l t to d e fin e a n d r e q u i r e
u n c o n v e n t i o n a l o r n o v e l a p p r o a c h e s o r h a v e o t h e r d i f f i c u l t f e a t u r e s . M a i n t a i n s l i a i s o n w ith
i n d i v i d u a l s a n d u n i t s w ith in a n d o u t s i d e h i s o r g a n i z a t i o n with r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r a c t i n g i n ­
d e p e n d e n t ly on t e c h n i c a l m a t t e r s p e r t a i n i n g to h i s f i e l d . W o rk a t t h i s l e v e l u s u a l l y r e q u i r e s
e x t e n s i v e p r o g r e s s i v e e x p e r i e n c e i n c l u d in g w o r k c o m p a r a b l e to c h e m i s t V.
D i r e c t i o n r e c e i v e d . S u p e r v i s i o n r e c e i v e d i s e s s e n t i a l l y a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , w ith a s s i g n ­
m e n t s g i v e n in t e r m s o f b r o a d g e n e r a l o b j e c t i v e s a n d l i m i t s .
T y p ic a l d u tie s and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .

(One o r both o f the f o l l o w i n g . )

(1) In a s u p e r v i s o r y c a p a c i t y (a) p l a n s , d e v e l o p s , c o o r d i n a t e s , a n d d i r e c t s a n u m ­
b e r of la r g e and im p o rta n t p r o j e c t s or a p r o je c t of m a j o r sc o p e and im p o r ta n c e , or
(b) i s r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the e n t i r e c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m o f a c o m p a n y , w hen the p r o g r a m i s
of lim ite d c o m p le x ity and sc o p e .
A c t i v i t i e s u n d e r h i s l e a d e r s h i p a r e of a s c o p e th at
th e y r e q u i r e a fe w (3 to 5) s u b o r d i n a t e s u p e r v i s o r s o r t e a m l e a d e r s w ith a t l e a s t one
in a p o s i t i o n c o m p a r a b l e to l e v e l V.
(2) A s in d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r o r
p r o j e c t s of m a j o r i m p o r t a n c e to the
in g e n u ity in a d a p t i n g , e x t e n d i n g , a n d
n i q u e s in to o r i g i n a l c o m b i n a t i o n s a n d
c h e m i s t s in h i s s p e c i a l t y .

w o rk e r d e te r m in e s , c o n c e iv e s, p la n s, and con d ucts
c o m p a n y . A p p l i e s a h igh d e g r e e of o r i g i n a l i t y a n d
sy n th esizin g e x istin g th eo ry , p r in c ip le s , and te c h ­
c o n f i g u r a t i o n s . M a y s e r v e a s a c o n s u l t a n t to o th e r

R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the d i r e c t i o n of o t h e r s . P l a n s , o r g a n i z e s , a n d s u p e r v i s e s th e w o r k
o f a s t a f f of c h e m i s t s a n d t e c h n i c i a n s . E v a l u a t e s p r o g r e s s o f the s t a f f a n d r e s u l t s o b t a i n e d ,
a n d r e c o m m e n d s m a j o r c h a n g e s to a c h i e v e o v e r a l l o b j e c t i v e s . O r , a s i n d i v i d u a l w o r k e r o r
r e s e a r c h e r m a y be a s s i s t e d on i n d i v i d u a l p r o j e c t s by o t h e r c h e m i s t s o r t e c h n i c i a n s .
C h e m i s t VII
G e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . M a k e s d e c i s i o n s an d r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s th at a r e r e c o g n i z e d
a s a u t h o r i t a t i v e a n d h a v e an i m p o r t a n t i m p a c t on e x t e n s i v e c h e m i c a l a c t i v i t i e s .
I n i t i a t e s and
m a i n t a i n s e x t e n s i v e c o n t a c t s with k e y c h e m i s t s a n d o f f i c i a l s o f o t h e r o r g a n i z a t i o n s a n d c o m ­
p a n i e s , r e q u i r i n g s k i l l in p e r s u a s i o n a n d n e g o t i a t i o n of c r i t i c a l i s s u e s . A t t h i s l e v e l i n d i ­
v i d u a l s w i ll h a v e d e m o n s t r a t e d c r e a t i v i t y , f o r e s i g h t , a n d m a t u r e j u d g m e n t in a n t i c i p a t i n g
a n d s o l v i n g u n p r e c e d e n t e d c h e m i c a l p r o b l e m s , d e t e r m i n i n g p r o g r a m o b j e c t i v e s an d r e q u i r e ­
m e n t s , o r g a n i z i n g p r o g r a m s a n d p r o j e c t s , a n d d e v e l o p i n g s t a n d a r d s an d g u i d e s f o r d i v e r s e
ch em ical a c tiv itie s.
D irectio n r e c e iv e d .

R e c e iv e s g e n e ra l a d m in istra tiv e d irectio n .

T y p ic a l d u tie s and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .

(One o r both of the f o l l o w i n g . )

(l)
In a s u p e r v i s o r y c a p a c i t y i s r e s p o n s i b l e f o r (a) a n i m p o r t a n t s e g m e n t of a
c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m of a c o m p a n y w ith e x t e n s i v e an d d i v e r s i f i e d s c i e n t i f i c r e q u i r e m e n t s ,
o r (b) the e n t i r e c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m of a c o m p a n y w h e r e the p r o g r a m i s m o r e l i m i t e d
in s c o p e .
T h e o v e r a l l c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m c o n t a i n s c r i t i c a l p r o b l e m s the s o l u t i o n of
w h ich r e q u i r e s m a j o r t e c h n o l o g i c a l a d v a n c e s a n d o p e n s the w ay f o r e x t e n s i v e r e l a t e d
d evelop m en t.
M a k e s a u t h o r i t a t i v e t e c h n i c a l r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s c o n c e r n i n g the s c i e n t i f i c



62
C H E M I S T — C o n tin u e d
o b j e c t i v e s a n d l e v e l s of w o r k w h ich w i l l b e m o s t p r o f i t a b l e in th e l ig h t o f c o m p a n y r e ­
q u ir e m e n ts and sc ie n tific and in d u s t r ia l tr e n d s and d e v e lo p m e n ts.
Recom m ends fac il­
i t i e s , p e r s o n n e l , a n d fu n d s r e q u i r e d .
(2)
A s i n d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r an d c o n s u l t a n t s e l e c t s p r o b l e m s f o r r e s e a r c h
f u r t h e r the c o m p a n y ' s o b j e c t i v e s .
C o n c e i v e s an d p l a n s i n v e s t i g a t i o n s in w h i c h the
p h e n o m e n a a n d p r i n c i p l e s a r e not a d e q u a t e l y u n d e r s t o o d , a n d w h e r e fe w o r c o n t r a ­
d ic to r y sc ie n tific p r e c e d e n t s o r r e s u l t s a r e a v a ila b le fo r r e f e r e n c e . O u tstan d in g c r e a ­
t i v i t y a n d m a t u r e j u d g m e n t a r e r e q u i r e d to d e v i s e h y p o t h e s e s a n d t e c h n i q u e s o f e x p e r i ­
m e n t a t i o n a n d to i n t e r p r e t r e s u l t s .
A s a l e a d e r a n d a u t h o r i t y in h i s c o m p a n y , in a
b r o a d a r e a o f s p e c i a l i z a t i o n , o r in a n a r r o w b u t i n t e n s e l y s p e c i a l i z e d o n e , a d v i s e s the
h e a d o f a l a r g e l a b o r a t o r y o r c o m p a n y o f f i c i a l s on c o m p l e x a s p e c t s o f e x t r e m e l y b r o a d
and im p o rta n t p r o g r a m s .
H a s r e s p o n s ib ility fo r e x p lo rin g , ev a lu a tin g , and ju stify in g
p r o p o s e d a n d c u r r e n t p r o g r a m s a n d p r o j e c t s a n d f u r n i s h i n g a d v i c e on u n u s u a l l y c o m p l e x
a n d n o v e l p r o b l e m s in th e s p e c i a l t y f i e l d .
T y p i c a l l y w i l l h a v e c o n t r i b u t e d i n n o v a t io n s
( e . g . , t e c h n i q u e s , p r o d u c t s , p r o c e d u r e s ) w h ich a r e r e g a r d e d a s s i g n i f i c a n t a d v a n c e s
in th e f i e l d .
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r th e d i r e c t i o n o f o t h e r s . D i r e c t s s e v e r a l s u b o r d i n a t e s u p e r v i s o r s
o r t e a m l e a d e r s , s o m e o f w h o m a r e in p o s i t i o n s c o m p a r a b l e to c h e m i s t VI; o r , a s i n d i ­
v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r a n d c o n s u l t a n t , m a y b e a s s i s t e d on i n d i v i d u a l p r o j e c t s b y o t h e r c h e m i s t s
and te c h n ic ia n s.
C h e m i s t VIII
G e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . M a k e s d e c is io n s and r e c o m m e n d a tio n s that a r e au th o rita tiv e
a n d h a v e a f a r - r e a c h i n g i m p a c t on e x t e n s i v e c h e m i c a l a n d r e l a t e d a c t i v i t i e s o f th e c o m p a n y .
N e g o t i a t e s c r i t i c a l a n d c o n t r o v e r s i a l i s s u e s w ith to p l e v e l c h e m i s t s a n d o f f i c e r s o f o t h e r
o r g a n i z a t i o n s a n d c o m p a n i e s . I n d i v i d u a l s a t t h i s l e v e l h a v e d e m o n s t r a t e d a h ig h d e g r e e of
c r e a t i v i t y , f o r e s i g h t , a n d m a t u r e j u d g m e n t in p la n n i n g , o r g a n i z i n g , a n d g u id in g e x t e n s i v e
c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m s an d a c t i v i t i e s o f o u t s t a n d i n g n o v e l t y a n d i m p o r t a n c e .
D irectio n re c e iv e d .

R e c e iv e s g e n e ra l a d m in istr a tiv e d irectio n .

T y p ic a l d u tie s and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .

(One o r b o th o f th e f o l l o w i n g . )

(1) In a s u p e r v i s o r y c a p a c i t y i s r e s p o n s i b l e f o r (a) the e n t i r e c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m o f
a c o m p a n y w h ic h i s o f m o d e r a t e s c o p e , o r (b) a n i m p o r t a n t s e g m e n t o f a c h e m i c a l p r o ­
g r a m o f a c o m p a n y w ith v e r y e x t e n s i v e a n d h ig h ly d i v e r s i f i e d s c i e n t i f i c r e q u i r e m e n t s ,
w h e r e p r o g r a m s a r e o f s u c h c o m p l e x i t y a n d s c o p e th a t th e y a r e o f c r i t i c a l i m p o r t a n c e
to o v e r a l l o p e r a t i o n s a n d i n c l u d e p r o b l e m s o f e x t r a o r d i n a r y d i f f i c u l t y th a t h a v e r e s i s t e d
solu tion .
D e c i d e s the kind an d e x t e n t o f c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m s n e e d e d to a c c o m p l i s h the
o b j e c t i v e s o f the c o m p a n y , f o r c h o o s i n g th e s c i e n t i f i c a p p r o a c h e s , f o r p la n n in g an d
o rg a n iz in g f a c i li t ie s and p r o g r a m s , and fo r in te rp re tin g r e s u l t s .
(2) A s in d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r a n d c o n s u l t a n t f o r m u l a t e s a n d g u i d e s th e a t t a c k on
p r o b l e m s o f e x c e p t i o n a l d if f i c u l t y a n d m a r k e d i m p o r t a n c e to th e c o m p a n y a n d / o r i n ­
d u stry.
P r o b l e m s a r e c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y th e l a c k o f s c i e n t i f i c p r e c e d e n t s a n d s o u r c e
m a t e r i a l s , o r th e l a c k o f s u c c e s s o f p r i o r r e s e a r c h an d a n a l y s i s s o t h a t t h e i r s o l u t i o n
w o u ld r e p r e s e n t a n a d v a n c e o f g r e a t s i g n i f i c a n c e a n d i m p o r t a n c e .
P e r fo r m s ad v iso ry
a n d c o n s u l t i n g w o r k f o r the c o m p a n y a s a r e c o g n i z e d a u t h o r i t y f o r b r o a d p r o g r a m a r e a s
o f c o n s i d e r a b l e n o v e lty a n d i m p o r t a n c e . H a s m a d e c o n t r i b u t i o n s s u c h a s n ew p r o d u c t s
o r t e c h n i q u e s , d e v e l o p m e n t o f p r o c e s s e s , e t c . , w h ic h a r e r e g a r d e d a s m a j o r a d v a n c e s
in th e f i e l d .
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r th e d i r e c t i o n o f o t h e r s .
S u p e r v ise s s e v e r a l su bordin ate s u p e r ­
v i s o r s o r t e a m l e a d e r s s o m e o f w h o s e p o s i t i o n s a r e c o m p a r a b l e to c h e m i s t VII o r i n d i v i d u a l
r e s e a r c h e r s s o m e o f w h o s e p o s i t i o n s a r e c o m p a r a b l e to c h e m i s t VII a n d s o m e t i m e s c h e m i s t
V III. A s a n i n d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r a n d c o n s u l t a n t m a y b e a s s i s t e d on i n d i v i d u a l p r o j e c t s by
oth er c h e m ists o r te c h n ician s.



to

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C H E M I S T — C o n tin u e d
—
N O T E : I n d i v i d u a l s in c h a r g e o f a c o m p a n y ' s c h e m i c a l p r o g r a m m a y m a t c h an y o f
s e v e r a l o f the s u r v e y j o b l e v e l s , d e p e n d i n g on the s i z e a n d c o m p l e x i t y o f c h e m i c a l p r o ­
gram s.
E x c l u d e d f r o m l e v e l VIH a r e c h e m i s t s in c h a r g e o f p r o g r a m s s o e x t e n s i v e a n d
c o m p l e x ( e . g . , c o n s i s t i n g o f h ig h ly d i v e r s i f i e d o r u n u s u a l l y n o v e l p r o d u c t s a n d p r o c e d u r e s )
t h a t on e o r m o r e s u b o r d i n a t e s u p e r v i s o r y c h e m i s t s a r e p e r f o r m i n g a t l e v e l VIII.
A lso
e x c l u d e d f r o m l e v e l VIII a r e i n d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r s a n d c o n s u l t a n t s who a r e r e c o g n i z e d a s
n a t i o n a l a n d / o r i n t e r n a t i o n a l a u t h o r i t i e s a n d s c i e n t i f i c l e a d e r s in v e r y b r o a d a r e a s o f s c i e n t i f i c
in te r e s t and in v estig atio n .
E N G IN EER
P e r f o r m s p r o f e s s i o n a l w o r k in r e s e a r c h , d e v e l o p m e n t , d e s i g n , t e s t i n g , a n a l y s i s ,
p ro d u c tio n , c o n str u c tio n , m a in te n a n c e , o p e ra tio n , p lan n in g, s u r v e y , e s t im a t in g , a p p lic a tio n ,
o r sta n d a r d iz a tio n o f e n g in e e rin g f a c i l i t i e s , s y s t e m s , s t r u c t u r e s , p r o c e s s e s , eq u ip m en t
d e v i c e s , o r m a t e r i a l s r e q u i r i n g k n o w le d g e o f the s c i e n c e a n d a r t b y w h ic h m a t e r i a l s , n a t u r a l
r e s o u r c e s , and p ow er a r e m a d e u se fu l.
W ork t y p i c a l l y r e q u i r e s a B . S. d e g r e e in e n g i ­
n e e r i n g o r the e q u i v a l e n t in c o m b i n e d e d u c a t i o n a n d e x p e r i e n c e . ( E x c l u d e d a r e : S a f e t y e n g i ­
n e e r s , in d u s t r ia l e n g i n e e r s , qu ality c o n tro l e n g i n e e r s , s a l e s e n g i n e e r s , and e n g in e e r s w h o se
p r i m a r y r e s p o n s i b i l i t y i s to b e in c h a r g e o f n o n p r o f e s s i o n a l m a i n t e n a n c e w o r k . )
E n gin eer I
G en eral ch aracteristics.
T h i s i s the e n t r y l e v e l o f p r o f e s s i o n a l w o r k r e q u i r i n g a
b a c h e l o r * s d e g r e e in e n g i n e e r i n g a n d no e x p e r i e n c e , o r the e q u i v a l e n t (to a d e g r e e ) in a p ­
p r o p r i a t e e d u c a t i o n an d e x p e r i e n c e . P e r f o r m s a s s i g n m e n t s d e s i g n e d to d e v e l o p p r o f e s s i o n a l
w o rk k n o w le d g e s and a b i l i t i e s . M ay a l s o r e c e iv e f o r m a l c l a s s r o o m o r s e m i n a r type tr a in in g .
(T e r m in a l p o sitio n s a r e e x c lu d e d .)
D ire ctio n r e c e i v e d . W orks u n d er c lo s e s u p e r v is io n . R e c e iv e s s p e c ific and d e taile d
i n s t r u c t i o n s a s to r e q u i r e d t a s k s a n d r e s u l t s e x p e c t e d .
W o rk i s c h e c k e d d u r i n g p r o g r e s s ,
and i s re v ie w e d fo r a c c u r a c y upon co m p letio n .
T y p ic a l d u tie s and r e s p o n s i b i li t ie s .
P e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y o f r o u t i n e t a s k s th a t a r e
p la n n e d to p r o v i d e e x p e r i e n c e a n d f a m i l i a r i z a t i o n w ith the e n g i n e e r i n g s t a f f , m e t h o d s , p r a c ­
t i c e s , an d p r o g r a m s o f th e c o m p a n y .
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the d i r e c t i o n of o t h e r s .

U su a lly none.

E n g i n e e r II
G eneral ch aracteristics.
At t h i s c o n tin u in g d e v e l o p m e n t a l l e v e l , p e r f o r m s r o u ti n e
e n g i n e e r i n g w o r k r e q u i r i n g a p p l i c a t i o n o f s t a n d a r d t e c h n i q u e s , p r o c e d u r e s , a n d c r i t e r i a in
c a r r y i n g out a s e q u e n c e o f r e l a t e d e n g i n e e r i n g t a s k s .
L im it e d e x e r c i s e of ju d gm en t is
r e q u i r e d on d e t a i l s o f w o r k a n d in m a k i n g p r e l i m i n a r y s e l e c t i o n s a n d a d a p t a t i o n s o f e n g i ­
n eerin g a lte r n a tiv e s.
R e q u i r e s w o r k e x p e r i e n c e a c q u i r e d in a n e n t r y l e v e l p o s i t i o n , o r
a p p r o p r ia te g ra d u a te le v e l study.
F o r train in g and d e v e lo p m e n ta l p u r p o s e s , a s s i g n m e n t s
m a y in c l u d e s o m e w o r k th a t i s t y p i c a l o f a h i g h e r l e v e l . ( T e r m i n a l p o s i t i o n s a r e e x c l u d e d . )
D irectio n re c e iv e d .
S u p e r v is o r s c r e e n s a s s i g n m e n t s fo r u n u su al o r d ifficu lt p r o b ­
l e m s a n d s e l e c t s t e c h n i q u e s a n d p r o c e d u r e s to b e a p p l i e d on n o n r o u ti n e w o r k .
R eceiv es
c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n on new a s p e c t s o f a s s i g n m e n t s .
T y p ic a l d u ties and r e s p o n s i b i li t ie s .
U sin g p r e s c r i b e d m e th o d s, p e r f o r m s sp e c ific
and lim ite d p o rtio n s of a b r o a d e r a s s ig n m e n t of an e x p e r ie n c e d e n g in e e r. A p p lie s sta n d a rd
p r a c t i c e s a n d t e c h n i q u e s in s p e c i f i c s i t u a t i o n s , a d j u s t s a n d c o r r e l a t e s d a t a , r e c o g n i z e s d i s ­
c r e p a n c i e s in r e s u l t s , an d f o l l o w s o p e r a t i o n s t h r o u g h a s e r i e s o f r e l a t e d d e t a i l e d s t e p s o r
processes.
R e sp o n sib ility
tech n ician s.



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64

E N G I N E E R — C o n tin u e d
E n g i n e e r III
G en eral c h a ra c te ristic s.
I n d e p e n d e n tl y e v a l u a t e s , s e l e c t s , a n d a p p l i e s s t a n d a r d
e n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i q u e s , p r o c e d u r e s , a n d c r i t e r i a , u s i n g j u d g m e n t in m a k i n g m i n o r a d a p t a ­
tio n s and m o d ific a tio n s .
A s s i g n m e n t s h a v e c l e a r a n d s p e c i f i e d o b j e c t i v e s a n d r e q u i r e the
in v e stig atio n of a lim ite d n um ber of v a r ia b le s . P e r fo r m a n c e at th is le v e l r e q u ir e s d e v e lo p ­
m e n t a l e x p e r i e n c e in a p r o f e s s i o n a l p o s i t i o n , o r e q u i v a l e n t g r a d u a t e l e v e l e d u c a t i o n .
D i r e c t i o n r e c e i v e d . R e c e i v e s i n s t r u c t i o n s on s p e c i f i c a s s i g n m e n t o b j e c t i v e s , c o m ­
p le x f e a t u r e s , and p o s s i b le so lu tio n s.
A s s i s t a n c e i s f u r n i s h e d on u n u s u a l p r o b l e m s an d
w o r k i s r e v i e w e d f o r a p p l i c a t i o n o f so u n d p r o f e s s i o n a l j u d g m e n t .
T y p ic a l d u ties and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
P e r f o r m s w o r k w h ich i n v o l v e s c o n v e n t io n a l
t y p e s o f p l a n s , i n v e s t i g a t i o n s , s u r v e y s , s t r u c t u r e s , o r e q u i p m e n t w ith r e l a t i v e l y fe w c o m ­
p l e x f e a t u r e s f o r w h ic h t h e r e a r e p r e c e d e n t s . A s s i g n m e n t s u s u a l l y i n c l u d e on e o r m o r e of
the fo l l o w i n g :
E q u ip m en t d e s ig n and d e v e lo p m e n t, t e s t of m a t e r i a l s , p r e p a r a t i o n of s p e c i ­
fic a tio n s , p r o c e s s stu dy, r e s e a r c h in v e s t ig a t io n s , r e p o r t p r e p a r a t io n , and o th e r a c t iv it ie s
o f l i m i t e d s c o p e r e q u i r i n g k n o w le d g e o f p r i n c i p l e s a n d t e c h n i q u e s c o m m o n l y e m p l o y e d in the
sp e c ific n arro w a r e a of a s s ig n m e n ts .
of

R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r th e d i r e c t i o n o f o t h e r s .
M a y s u p e r v i s e o r c o o r d i n a t e the w o r k
d r a f t s m e n , t e c h n i c i a n s , a n d o t h e r s who a s s i s t in s p e c i f i c a s s i g n m e n t s .
E n g i n e e r IV

G e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . A s a fu l ly c o m p e t e n t e n g i n e e r in a l l c o n v e n t io n a l a s p e c t s
o f the s u b j e c t - m a t t e r o r the f u n c t i o n a l a r e a o f the a s s i g n m e n t s , p l a n s a n d c o n d u c t s w o r k
r e q u i r i n g j u d g m e n t in the i n d e p e n d e n t e v a l u a t i o n , s e l e c t i o n , a n d s u b s t a n t i a l a d a p t a t i o n a n d
m o d i f i c a t i o n of s t a n d a r d t e c h n i q u e s , p r o c e d u r e s , a n d c r i t e r i a .
D e v i s e s new a p p r o a c h e s
to p r o b l e m s e n c o u n t e r e d . R e q u i r e s s u f f i c i e n t p r o f e s s i o n a l e x p e r i e n c e to a s s u r e c o m p e t e n c e
a s a fu l ly t r a i n e d w o r k e r ; o r , f o r p o s i t i o n s p r i m a r i l y o f a r e s e a r c h n a t u r e , c o m p l e t i o n o f a l l
r e q u ir e m e n ts fo r a d o c to ra l d e g re e m ay be su b stitu ted fo r e x p e rie n c e .
D i r e c t i o n r e c e i v e d . I n d e p e n d e n t l y p e r f o r m s m o s t a s s i g n m e n t s w ith i n s t r u c t i o n s a s
to th e g e n e r a l r e s u l t s e x p e c t e d .
R e c e i v e s t e c h n i c a l g u i d a n c e on u n u s u a l o r c o m p l e x p r o b ­
l e m s a n d s u p e r v i s o r y a p p r o v a l on p r o p o s e d p l a n s f o r p r o j e c t s .
T y p i c a l d u t i e s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .
P la n s , sc h e d u le s, con d u cts, o r co o rd in ate s
d e t a i l e d p h a s e s o f the e n g i n e e r i n g w o r k in a p a r t o f a m a j o r p r o j e c t o r in a t o t a l p r o j e c t
of m od erate scop e.
P e r f o r m s w o r k w h ic h i n v o l v e s c o n v e n t i o n a l e n g i n e e r i n g p r a c t i c e but
m a y in c l u d e a v a r i e t y o f c o m p l e x f e a t u r e s s u c h a s c o n f l i c t i n g d e s i g n r e q u i r e m e n t s , u n s u i t a ­
b i l i t y o f s t a n d a r d m a t e r i a l s , an d d i f f i c u l t c o o r d i n a t i o n r e q u i r e m e n t s . W o r k r e q u i r e s a b r o a d
k n o w le d g e o f p r e c e d e n t s in the s p e c i a l t y a r e a a n d a g o o d k n o w le d g e o f p r i n c i p l e s a n d p r a c ­
tic e s of related sp e c ia ltie s.
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the d i r e c t i o n o f o t h e r s .
n i c i a n s on a s s i g n e d w o r k .

M a y s u p e r v i s e a few e n g i n e e r s o r t e c h ­

E n gin eer V
G e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . A p p l i e s i n t e n s i v e an d d i v e r s i f i e d k n o w le d g e of e n g i n e e r i n g
p r i n c i p l e s a n d p r a c t i c e s in b r o a d a r e a s o f a s s i g n m e n t s a n d r e l a t e d f i e l d s . M a k e s d e c i s i o n s
in d e p e n d e n t l y on e n g i n e e r i n g p r o b l e m s a n d m e t h o d s , a n d r e p r e s e n t s th e o r g a n i z a t i o n in c o n ­
f e r e n c e s to r e s o l v e i m p o r t a n t q u e s t i o n s a n d to p la n a n d c o o r d i n a t e w o r k . R e q u i r e s th e u s e
o f a d v a n c e d t e c h n i q u e s a n d the m o d i f i c a t i o n a n d e x t e n s i o n o f t h e o r i e s , p r e c e p t s a n d p r a c ­
t i c e s o f h i s f i e l d a n d r e l a t e d s c i e n c e s a n d d i s c i p l i n e s . T h e k n o w le d g e a n d e x p e r t i s e r e q u i r e d
f o r t h i s l e v e l o f w o r k u s u a l l y r e s u l t s f r o m p r o g r e s s i v e e x p e r i e n c e , in c l u d in g w o r k c o m p a r a b l e
to e n g i n e e r IV .
D i r e c t i o n r e c e i v e d . S u p e r v i s i o n a n d g u i d a n c e r e l a t e s l a r g e l y to o v e r a l l o b j e c t i v e s ,
c r i t i c a l i s s u e s , new c o n c e p t s , a n d p o l i c y m a t t e r s .
C o n s u l t s w ith s u p e r v i s o r c o n c e r n i n g
u n u s u a l p r o b l e m s an d d e v e l o p m e n t s .



65
E N G I N E E R — C o n tin u e d
T y p ic a l d u ties and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .

(One o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g . )

(1) In a s u p e r v i s o r y c a p a c i t y p l a n s , d e v e l o p s , c o o r d i n a t e s , a n d d i r e c t s a l a r g e
a n d i m p o r t a n t e n g i n e e r i n g p r o j e c t o r a n u m b e r o f s m a l l p r o j e c t s w ith m a n y c o m p l e x
f e a t u r e s . A s u b s t a n t i a l p o r t i o n o f th e w o r k s u p e r v i s e d i s c o m p a r a b l e to th a t d e s c r i b e d
f o r e n g i n e e r IV .
(2) A s i n d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r o r w o r k e r c a r r i e s out c o m p l e x o r n o v e l a s s i g n m e n t s
r e q u i r i n g th e d e v e l o p m e n t o f new o r i m p r o v e d t e c h n i q u e s a n d p r o c e d u r e s . W o r k i s e x ­
p e c t e d to r e s u l t in the d e v e l o p m e n t o f new o r r e f i n e d e q u i p m e n t , m a t e r i a l s , p r o c e s s e s ,
p ro d u c ts, a n d /o r scien tific m eth ods.
(3)
A s s t a f f s p e c i a l i s t d e v e l o p s a n d e v a l u a t e s p l a n s a n d c r i t e r i a f o r a v a r i e t y of
p r o j e c t s a n d a c t i v i t i e s to b e c a r r i e d out by o t h e r s . A s s e s s e s the f e a s i b i l i t y a n d s o u n d ­
n e s s o f p r o p o s e d e n g i n e e r i n g e v a l u a t i o n t e s t s , p r o d u c t s , o r e q u i p m e n t w hen n e c e s s a r y
d ata a r e in su ffic ie n t o r c o n firm a tio n by te stin g i s a d v is a b le .
U su ally p e r fo r m s a s a
s t a f f a d v i s o r a n d c o n s u l t a n t a s to a t e c h n i c a l s p e c i a l t y , a ty p e o f f a c i l i t y o r e q u ip m e n t ,
o r a p r o g r a m f u n c tio n .
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the d i r e c t i o n of o t h e r s .
S u p e r v i s e s , c o o r d in a te s , and re v ie w s
the w o r k o f a s m a l l s t a f f o f e n g i n e e r s a n d t e c h n i c i a n s ; e s t i m a t e s m a n p o w e r n e e d s a n d s c h e d ­
u l e s a n d a s s i g n s w o r k to m e e t c o m p l e t i o n d a t e . O r , a s i n d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r o r s t a f f s p e ­
c i a l i s t m a y b e a s s i s t e d on p r o j e c t s b y o t h e r e n g i n e e r s o r t e c h n i c i a n s .
E n g i n e e r VI
G e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . H a s fu ll t e c h n i c a l r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r i n t e r p r e t i n g , o r g a n i z ­
in g , e x e c u t i n g , a n d c o o r d i n a t i n g a s s i g n m e n t s . P l a n s a n d d e v e l o p s e n g i n e e r i n g p r o j e c t s c o n ­
c e r n e d w ith u n iq u e o r c o n t r o v e r s i a l p r o b l e m s w h ic h h a v e a n i m p o r t a n t e f f e c t on m a j o r c o m ­
p a n y p r o g r a m s . T h i s i n v o l v e s e x p l o r a t i o n o f s u b j e c t a r e a , d e f in i t i o n o f s c o p e a n d s e l e c t i o n
of p r o b le m s fo r in v e stig a tio n , an d d ev e lo p m e n t of n ovel c o n c e p ts and a p p r o a c h e s . M a in tain s
l i a i s o n w ith i n d i v i d u a l s a n d u n i t s w ith in o r o u t s i d e h i s o r g a n i z a t i o n w ith r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r
a c t i n g i n d e p e n d e n t l y on t e c h n i c a l m a t t e r s p e r t a i n i n g to h i s f i e l d . W o rk a t t h i s l e v e l u s u a l l y
r e q u i r e s e x t e n s i v e p r o g r e s s i v e e x p e r i e n c e in c l u d in g w o r k c o m p a r a b l e to e n g i n e e r V.
D i r e c t i o n r e c e i v e d . S u p e r v i s i o n r e c e i v e d i s e s s e n t i a l l y a d m i n i s t r a t i v e , w ith a s s i g n ­
m e n t s g iv e n in t e r m s o f b r o a d g e n e r a l o b j e c t i v e s a n d l i m i t s .
T y p i c a l d u t i e s an d r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .

(One o r

m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g . )

(1) In a s u p e r v i s o r y c a p a c i t y (a) p l a n s , d e v e l o p s , c o o r d i n a t e s , a n d d i r e c t s a n u m ­
b e r o f l a r g e and im p o rta n t p r o j e c t s o r a p r o je c t of m a j o r sc o p e and im p o r ta n c e , or
(b) i s r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the e n t i r e e n g i n e e r i n g p r o g r a m o f a c o m p a n y w h en th e p r o g r a m
i s o f l i m i t e d c o m p l e x i t y a n d s c o p e . T h e e x te n t o f h i s r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s g e n e r a l l y r e q u i r e
a few (3 to 5) s u b o r d i n a t e s u p e r v i s o r s o r t e a m l e a d e r s w ith a t l e a s t one in a p o s i t i o n
c o m p a r a b l e to l e v e l V.
(2)
A s i n d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r o r w o r k e r c o n c e i v e s , p l a n s , and c o n d u c t s r e s e a r c h in
p r o b le m a r e a s of c o n s id e r a b le sc o p e and c o m p le x ity . The p r o b le m s m u s t be a p p ro a c h e d
t h r o u g h a s e r i e s o f c o m p l e t e a n d c o n c e p t u a l l y r e l a t e d s t u d i e s , a r e d if f i c u l t to d e f i n e , r e ­
q u ir e un con ven tion al o r n ovel a p p r o a c h e s ; and r e q u ir e s o p h is t ic a t e d r e s e a r c h te c h n iq u e s.
A v a i l a b l e g u i d e s a n d p r e c e d e n t s c o n t a in c r i t i c a l g a p s , a r e o n ly p a r t i a l l y r e l a t e d to the
p r o b l e m , o r m a y b e l a r g e l y l a c k i n g d ue to the n o v e l c h a r a c t e r o f the p r o j e c t . A t t h i s
l e v e l , th e i n d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r g e n e r a l l y w i l l h a v e c o n t r i b u t e d i n v e n t i o n s , new d e s i g n s ,
o r t e c h n i q u e s w h ic h a r e o f m a t e r i a l s i g n i f i c a n c e in th e s o l u t i o n o f i m p o r t a n t p r o b l e m s .
(3) A s a s t a f f s p e c i a l i s t s e r v e s a s the t e c h n i c a l s p e c i a l i s t f o r the o r g a n i z a t i o n
( d i v i s i o n o r c o m p a n y ) in the a p p l i c a t i o n o f a d v a n c e d t h e o r i e s , c o n c e p t s , p r i n c i p l e s , an d
p r o c e s s e s f o r a n a s s i g n e d a r e a o f r e s p o n s i b i l i t y ( i . e . , s u b j e c t m a t t e r , fu n c tio n , ty p e
o f f a c i l i t y o r e q u i p m e n t , o r p r o d u c t ) . K e e p s a b r e a s t o f new s c i e n t i f i c m e t h o d s a n d d e ­
v e l o p m e n t s a f f e c t i n g h i s o r g a n i z a t i o n f o r the p u r p o s e o f r e c o m m e n d i n g c h a n g e s in e m ­
p h a s i s o f p r o g r a m s o r new p r o g r a m s w a r r a n t e d b y s u c h d e v e l o p m e n t s .



66
E N G I N E E R — C o n tin u e d
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r th e d i r e c t i o n o f o t h e r s .
P l a n s , o r g a n i z e s , a n d s u p e r v i s e s the
w o rk of a s ta ff o f e n g in e e r s and te c h n ic ia n s.
E v a l u a t e s p r o g r e s s o f the s t a f f a n d r e s u l t s
o b t a i n e d , a n d r e c o m m e n d s m a j o r c h a n g e s to a c h i e v e o v e r a l l o b j e c t i v e s .
O r , a s in d i v i d u a l
r e s e a r c h e r o r s t a f f s p e c i a l i s t m a y b e a s s i s t e d on i n d i v i d u a l p r o j e c t s b y o t h e r e n g i n e e r s o r
tech n ician s.
E n g i n e e r VII
G e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . M a k e s d e c is io n s and r e c o m m e n d a tio n s that a r e re c o g n iz e d
a s a u t h o r i t a t i v e a n d h a v e an i m p o r t a n t i m p a c t on e x t e n s i v e e n g i n e e r i n g a c t i v i t i e s . I n i t i a t e s
a n d m a i n t a i n s e x t e n s i v e c o n t a c t s w ith k e y e n g i n e e r s a n d o f f i c i a l s o f o t h e r o r g a n i z a t i o n s a n d
c o m p a n i e s , r e q u i r i n g s k i l l in p e r s u a s i o n a n d n e g o t i a t i o n o f c r i t i c a l i s s u e s .
At th is le v e l
i n d i v i d u a l s w i l l h a v e d e m o n s t r a t e d c r e a t i v i t y , f o r e s i g h t , an d m a t u r e e n g i n e e r i n g j u d g m e n t
in a n t i c i p a t i n g a n d s o l v i n g u n p r e c e d e n t e d e n g i n e e r i n g p r o b l e m s , d e t e r m i n i n g p r o g r a m o b ­
j e c t i v e s a n d r e q u i r e m e n t s , o r g a n i z i n g p r o g r a m s a n d p r o j e c t s , a n d d e v e l o p i n g s t a n d a r d s an d
g u id e s fo r d iv e r s e en g in eerin g a c t i v it ie s .
D irectio n r e c e iv e d .

R e c e iv e s g e n e r a l a d m in istr a tiv e d irectio n .

T y p ic a l d u tie s and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .

(One o r b o th o f the f o l l o w i n g . )

(1) In a s u p e r v i s o r y c a p a c i t y i s r e s p o n s i b l e f o r (a) a n i m p o r t a n t s e g m e n t o f the
e n g i n e e r i n g p r o g r a m o f a c o m p a n y w ith e x t e n s i v e a n d d i v e r s i f i e d e n g i n e e r i n g r e q u i r e ­
m e n t s , o r (b) th e e n t i r e e n g i n e e r i n g p r o g r a m o f a c o m p a n y w h en it i s m o r e l i m i t e d in
s c o p e . T h e o v e r a l l e n g i n e e r i n g p r o g r a m c o n t a i n s c r i t i c a l p r o b l e m s the s o l u t i o n o f w hich
r e q u i r e s m a j o r t e c h n o l o g i c a l a d v a n c e s a n d o p e n s the w a y f o r e x t e n s i v e r e l a t e d d e v e l o p ­
m e n t. The extent of h is r e s p o n s i b i li t ie s g e n e r a lly r e q u ir e s e v e r a l su b o rd in a te o r g a n i­
za tio n al se g m e n ts o r t e a m s .
R e c o m m e n d s f a c i l i t i e s , p e r s o n n e l , a n d fu n d s r e q u i r e d to
c a r r y ou t p r o g r a m s w h ic h a r e d i r e c t l y r e l a t e d w ith a n d d i r e c t e d t o w a r d f u l f i l l m e n t of
o v e r a ll com pany o b je c tiv e s.
(2) A s i n d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r a n d c o n s u l t a n t i s a r e c o g n i z e d l e a d e r a n d a u t h o r i t y
in h i s c o m p a n y in a b r o a d a r e a o f s p e c i a l i z a t i o n o r in a n a r r o w but i n t e n s e l y s p e c i a l i z e d
field .
S e l e c t s r e s e a r c h p r o b l e m s to f u r t h e r th e c o m p a n y ' s o b j e c t i v e s .
C o n c e i v e s and
p l a n s i n v e s t i g a t i o n s o f b r o a d a r e a s of c o n s i d e r a b l e n o v e l t y a n d i m p o r t a n c e f o r w h ich
e n g i n e e r i n g p r e c e d e n t s a r e l a c k i n g in a r e a s c r i t i c a l to th e o v e r a l l e n g i n e e r i n g p r o g r a m .
I s c o n s u l t e d e x t e n s i v e l y b y a s s o c i a t e s a n d o t h e r s w ith a h ig h d e g r e e o f r e l i a n c e p l a c e d
on h i s s c i e n t i f i c i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s a n d a d v i c e . T y p i c a l l y , w i ll h a v e c o n t r i b u t e d i n v e n t i o n s ,
new d e s i g n s , o r t e c h n i q u e s w h ic h a r e r e g a r d e d a s m a j o r a d v a n c e s in the f i e l d .
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the d i r e c t i o n o f o t h e r s . D i r e c t s s e v e r a l s u b o r d i n a t e s u p e r v i s o r s
o r t e a m l e a d e r s , s o m e o f w h o m a r e in p o s i t i o n s c o m p a r a b l e to e n g i n e e r VI; o r , a s i n d i ­
v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r and c o n s u l t a n t , m a y b e a s s i s t e d on i n d i v i d u a l p r o j e c t s b y o t h e r e n g i n e e r s
and te c h n ic ia n s.
E n g i n e e r VIII
G e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s . M a k e s d e c i s i o n s a n d r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s th a t a r e r e c o g n i z e d
a s a u t h o r i t a t i v e a n d h a v e a f a r - r e a c h i n g i m p a c t on e x t e n s i v e e n g i n e e r i n g a n d r e l a t e d a c t i v i t i e s
o f the c o m p a n y .
N e g o t i a t e s c r i t i c a l an d c o n t r o v e r s i a l i s s u e s w ith top l e v e l e n g i n e e r s and
o f f i c e r s o f o t h e r o r g a n i z a t i o n s a n d c o m p a n i e s . I n d i v i d u a l s a t t h i s l e v e l d e m o n s t r a t e a h ig h
degree
o f c r e a t i v i t y , f o r e s i g h t , a n d m a t u r e j u d g m e n t in p la n n i n g , o r g a n i z i n g , a n d g u id in g
e x te n s iv e e n g in e e rin g p r o g r a m s and a c t i v i t i e s of o u tstan d in g no velty and im p o r ta n c e .
D irectio n re c e iv e d .

R e c e iv e s g e n e ra l a d m in istr a tiv e d ire c tio n .

T y p ic a l d u ties and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s .

(One o r bo th o f the f o l l o w i n g . )

(l)
In a s u p e r v i s o r y c a p a c i t y i s r e s p o n s i b l e f o r (a) a n i m p o r t a n t s e g m e n t o f a v e r y
e x t e n s i v e a n d h ig h ly d i v e r s i f i e d e n g i n e e r i n g p r o g r a m o f a c o m p a n y , o r (b) the e n t i r e
e n g i n e e r i n g p r o g r a m o f a c o m p a n y w h en th e p r o g r a m i s o f m o d e r a t e s c o p e . T h e p r o ­
g r a m s a r e o f s u c h c o m p l e x i t y a n d s c o p e t h a t th e y a r e o f c r i t i c a l i m p o r t a n c e to o v e r a l l
o b j e c t i v e s , i n c l u d e p r o b l e m s o f e x t r a o r d i n a r y d i f f i c u l t y th a t o fte n h a v e r e s i s t e d s o l u t i o n ,
and c o n s is t of s e v e r a l se g m e n ts req u irin g su b o rd in ate s u p e r v i s o r s . Is r e sp o n sib le for



67

E N G I N E E R — C o n tin u e d
d e c i d i n g th e kind a n d e x t e n t o f e n g i n e e r i n g a n d r e l a t e d p r o g r a m s n e e d e d to a c c o m p l i s h
th e o b j e c t i v e s o f the c o m p a n y , f o r c h o o s i n g the s c i e n t i f i c a p p r o a c h e s , f o r p la n n in g a n d
o rg a n iz in g f a c i li t ie s and p r o g r a m s , and fo r in te rp re tin g r e s u l t s .
(2) A s i n d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r a n d c o n s u l t a n t f o r m u l a t e s a n d g u i d e s the a t t a c k on p r o b ­
l e m s o f e x c e p t i o n a l d i f f i c u l t y a n d m a r k e d i m p o r t a n c e to th e c o m p a n y o r i n d u s t r y . P r o b ­
l e m s a r e c h a r a c t e r i z e d by t h e i r l a c k o f s c i e n t i f i c p r e c e d e n t s a n d s o u r c e m a t e r i a l , o r
l a c k o f s u c c e s s o f p r i o r r e s e a r c h a n d a n a l y s i s s o t h a t t h e i r s o l u t i o n w o u l d r e p r e s e n t an
ad v a n ce of g r e a t sig n ific a n c e and im p o r ta n c e .
P e r f o r m s a d v i s o r y and con su ltin g w ork
f o r the c o m p a n y a s a r e c o g n i z e d a u t h o r i t y f o r b r o a d p r o g r a m a r e a s o r in a n i n t e n s e l y
s p e c ia l iz e d a r e a of c o n s id e r a b le n ovelty and im p o r ta n c e .
R e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r the d i r e c t i o n o f o t h e r s .
S u p e r v is e s s e v e r a l su bo rdin ate s u p e r ­
v i s o r s o r t e a m l e a d e r s s o m e o f w h o s e p o s i t i o n s a r e c o m p a r a b l e to e n g i n e e r VII, o r i n d i ­
v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r s s o m e o f w h o s e p o s i t i o n s a r e c o m p a r a b l e to e n g i n e e r VII a n d s o m e t i m e s
e n g i n e e r VIII.
A s a n in d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r a n d c o n s u l t a n t m a y b e a s s i s t e d on i n d i v i d u a l
p r o je c t s by other e n g in e e rs o r te c h n icia n s.
N O T E : I n d i v i d u a l s in c h a r g e o f a c o m p a n y ' s e n g i n e e r i n g p r o g r a m m a y m a t c h a n y
o f s e v e r a l o f the s u r v e y j o b l e v e l s d e p e n d i n g on th e s i z e a n d c o m p l e x i t y o f e n g i n e e r i n g p r o ­
gram s.
E x c l u d e d f r o m l e v e l VIII a r e e n g i n e e r s in c h a r g e o f p r o g r a m s s o e x t e n s i v e an d
c o m p l e x ( e . g . , c o n s i s t i n g o f r e s e a r c h a n d d e v e l o p m e n t on a v a r i e t y o f c o m p l e x p r o d u c t s o r
s y s t e m s w ith n u m e r o u s n o v e l c o m p o n e n t s ) t h a t on e o r m o r e s u b o r d i n a t e s u p e r v i s o r y e n g i ­
n e e r s a r e p e r f o r m i n g a t l e v e l V III. A l s o e x c l u d e d f r o m l e v e l VIII a r e i n d i v i d u a l r e s e a r c h e r s
a n d c o n s u l t a n t s who a r e r e c o g n i z e d a s n a t i o n a l a n d / o r i n t e r n a t i o n a l a u t h o r i t i e s a n d s c i e n t i f i c
l e a d e r s in v e r y b r o a d a r e a s o f s c i e n t i f i c i n t e r e s t a n d i n v e s t i g a t i o n .

E N G IN E E R IN G T E C H N IC IA N S
E N G IN E E R IN G T EC H N IC IA N
T o b e c o v e r e d by t h e s e d e f i n i t i o n s , e m p l o y e e s m u s t m e e t a l l o f the fo l l o w i n g c r i t e r i a ;
as

( 1 ) P r o v i d e s s e m i p r o f e s s i o n a l t e c h n i c a l s u p p o r t f o r e n g i n e e r s w o r k i n g in s u c h a r e a s
r e s e a r c h , d e s ig n , d ev e lo p m e n t, testin g o r m an u fa c tu rin g p r o c e s s im p ro v e m e n t.
(2)

W o r k p e r t a i n s to e l e c t r i c a l , e l e c t r o n i c , o r m e c h a n i c a l c o m p o n e n t s o r e q u i p m e n t .

(3)

R e q u i r e d to h a v e s o m e k n o w le d g e o f s c i e n c e o r e n g i n e e r i n g .

(E x c lu d e s p ro d u ctio n o r m a in te n a n c e w o r k e r s ,
d r a f t s m e n , d e s i g n e r s , an d e n g i n e e r s . )

q u ality

con trol

testers,

craftsm en ,

E n g in e e rin g T ech n ic ia n I
P e r f o r m s s im p le routine t a s k s u n d er c lo s e s u p e r v is io n o r fro m d e taile d p r o c e d u r e s .
W o r k i s c h e c k e d in p r o c e s s o r on c o m p l e t i o n .
P e r f o r m s a t t h i s l e v e l , one o r a c o m b i n a ­
tio n o f s u c h t y p i c a l d u t i e s a s :
A s s e m b l e s o r in s t a l ls e q u ip m en t o r p a r t s r e q u ir in g
conn ecting.

sim p le

w irin g ,

so ld e rin g,

or

P e r f o r m s sim p le o r routine ta s k s o r t e s t s su ch a s te n sile o r h a r d n e s s t e s t s ; o p ­
e r a t e s , and a d ju s t s s im p le t e s t eq u ip m en t; r e c o r d s t e s t d a ta .
G a t h e r s an d m a i n t a i n s s p e c i f i e d r e c o r d s o f e n g i n e e r i n g d a t a s u c h a s t e s t s , and
d r a w i n g s ; p e r f o r m s c o m p u t a t i o n s by s u b s t i t u t i n g n u m b e r s in s p e c i f i e d f o r m u l a s ; p l o t s
d a t a an d d r a w s s i m p l e c u r v e s a n d g r a p h s .




68
E N G IN EER IN G

T E C H N I C I A N — C o n tin u e d

E n g i n e e r i n g T e c h n i c i a n II
P e r f o r m s s t a n d a r d i z e d o r p r e s c r i b e d a s s i g n m e n t s , in v o l v i n g a s e q u e n c e o f r e l a t e d
o p eratio n s.
F o llo w s sta n d a rd w o rk m eth od s or e x p lic it in stru c tio n s; tech n ical adeq u acy of
r o u t i n e w o r k i s r e v i e w e d on c o m p l e t i o n ; n o n r o u t i n e w o r k m a y a l s o b e r e v i e w e d in p r o c e s s .
P e r f o r m s a t t h i s l e v e l , on e o r a c o m b i n a t i o n o f s u c h t y p i c a l d u t i e s a s :
A s s e m b l e s o r c o n s t r u c t s s im p le o r s t a n d a r d e q u ip m en t o r p a r t s .
r e p a i r s im p le in s tr u m e n ts o r eq u ip m en t.

M ay se rv ic e or

C o n d u c t s a v a r i e t y o f s t a n d a r d i z e d t e s t s ; m a y p r e p a r e t e s t s p e c i m e n s ; s e t s u p and
o p e r a t e s s ta n d a r d t e s t eq u ip m en t; r e c o r d s t e s t d ata.
E x t r a c t s e n g i n e e r i n g d a t a f r o m v a r i o u s p r e s c r i b e d s o u r c e s ; p r o c e s s e s the d a t a f o l ­
lo w in g w e l l d e f i n e d m e t h o d s ; p r e s e n t s the d a t a in p r e s c r i b e d f o r m .
E n g i n e e r i n g T e c h n i c i a n III
P e r f o r m s a s s i g n m e n t s th a t a r e n o t c o m p l e t e l y s t a n d a r d i z e d o r p r e s c r i b e d .
S e le c ts
o r a d a p ts s t a n d a r d p r o c e d u r e s o r eq u ip m en t.
R e c e iv e s in itia l in s t r u c t io n s , eq u ip m e n t r e ­
q u i r e m e n t s an d a d v i c e f r o m s u p e r v i s o r o r e n g i n e e r ; t e c h n i c a l a d e q u a c y o f c o m p l e t e d w o r k
is checked.
P e r f o r m s a t th is l e v e l , on e o r a c o m b i n a t i o n o f s u c h t y p i c a l d u t i e s a s :
C o n str u c ts c o m p o n e n ts, su bu n its o r sim p le m o d e ls o r ad ap ts
M ay tro u b le sh o o t and c o r r e c t m alfu n c tio n s.

stan dard

eq u ip m en t.

C o n d u c t s v a r i o u s t e s t s o r e x p e r i m e n t s w h i c h m a y r e q u i r e m i n o r m o d i f i c a t i o n s in
t e s t s e t u p s o r p r o c e d u r e s ; s e l e c t s , s e t s up an d o p e r a t e s s t a n d a r d t e s t e q u i p m e n t and
r e c o r d s te s t d ata.
E x t r a c t s an d c o m p i l e s a v a r i e t y o f e n g i n e e r i n g d a t a ; p r o c e s s e s o r c o m p u t e s d a t a
u s i n g s p e c i f i e d f o r m u l a s an d p r o c e d u r e s .
P e r f o r m s r o u t i n e a n a l y s i s to c h e c k a p p l i ­
c a b i l i t y , a c c u r a c y , an d r e a s o n a b l e n e s s o f d a t a .
E n g i n e e r i n g T e c h n i c i a n IV
P e r f o r m s n o n r o u t i n e a s s i g n m e n t s o f s u b s t a n t i a l v a r i e t y an d c o m p l e x i t y .
R eceiv es
o b je c tiv e s and te c h n ic a l ad v ic e fr o m s u p e r v i s o r o r e n g in e e r; w o rk is re v ie w e d fo r te c h n ic a l
adequacy.
M ay be a s s i s t e d by low er le v e l te ch n ician s.
P e r f o r m s a t t h i s l e v e l , on e o r a
c o m b in atio n o f su c h t y p ic a l d u tie s a s :
W o r k s on l i m i t e d s e g m e n t o f d e v e l o p m e n t p r o j e c t ; c o n s t r u c t s e x p e r i m e n t a l o r p r o ­
to ty p e m o d e l s to m e e t e n g i n e e r i n g r e q u i r e m e n t s ; c o n d u c t s t e s t s o r e x p e r i m e n t s ; r e c o r d s
and e v a lu a te s d a ta and r e p o r t s fin d in g s.
C o n d u c t s t e s t s o r e x p e r i m e n t s r e q u i r i n g s e l e c t i o n and a d a p t a t i o n o r m o d i f i c a t i o n o f
t e s t e q u i p m e n t and t e s t p r o c e d u r e s ; s e t s u p and o p e r a t e s e q u i p m e n t ; r e c o r d s d a t a ; a n a ­
l y z e s d a t a an d p r e p a r e s t e s t r e p o r t s .
C o m p i l e s an d c o m p u t e s a v a r i e t y o f e n g i n e e r i n g d a t a ; m a y a n a l y z e t e s t a n d d e s i g n
d ata; d evelop s or p r e p a r e s s c h e m a t ic s , d e s ig n s , sp e c ific a tio n s, p a r t s lis t s o r m a k e s
re c o m m e n d a tio n s re g a rd in g th ese ite m s.
M ay re v ie w d e s ig n s o r s p e c ific a t io n s for
adequacy.
E n g in e e rin g T ech n ic ia n V
P e r f o r m s n o n r o u t i n e and c o m p l e x a s s i g n m e n t s in v o lv in g r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r p la n n in g
an d c o n d u c t in g a c o m p l e t e p r o j e c t o f r e l a t i v e l y l i m i t e d s c o p e o r a p o r t i o n o f a l a r g e r and
m o re d iv e rse p ro je ct.
S e l e c t s an d a d a p t s p l a n s , t e c h n i q u e s , d e s i g n s o r l a y o u t s .
M ay c o ­
o r d i n a t e p o r t i o n s o f o v e r a l l a s s i g n m e n t ; r e v i e w s , a n a l y z e s and i n t e g r a t e s the t e c h n i c a l w o r k



69

E N G I N E E R I N G T E C H N I C I A N — C o n tin u e d
of o th e rs.
S u p e r v i s o r o r p r o f e s s i o n a l e n g i n e e r o u t l i n e s o b j e c t i v e s , r e q u i r e m e n t s an d d e s i g n
a p p r o a c h e s ; c o m p l e t e d w o r k i s r e v i e w e d f o r t e c h n i c a l a d e q u a c y an d s a t i s f a c t i o n o f r e q u i r e ­
m en ts.
M a y b e a s s i s t e d by l o w e r l e v e l t e c h n i c i a n s .
P e r f o r m s a t t h i s l e v e l , on e o r a c o m ­
bination of su ch ty p ic a l d u ties a s :
D e s i g n s , d e v e l o p s a n d c o n s t r u c t s m a j o r u n i t s , d e v i c e s o r e q u ip m e n t ; c o n d u c t s t e s t s
o r e x p e r i m e n t s ; a n a l y z e s r e s u l t s and r e d e s i g n s o r m o d i f i e s e q u i p m e n t to i m p r o v e p e r ­
form an ce; re p o rts r e s u lts .
P l a n s o r a s s i s t s in p la n n in g t e s t s to e v a l u a t e e q u i p m e n t p e r f o r m a n c e .
D e te rm in e s
t e s t r e q u i r e m e n t s , e q u i p m e n t m o d i f i c a t i o n an d t e s t p r o c e d u r e s ; c o n d u c t s t e s t s , a n a l y z e s
an d e v a l u a t e s d a t a an d p r e p a r e s r e p o r t s on f i n d i n g s an d r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s .
R e v i e w s and a n a l y z e s a v a r i e t y o f e n g i n e e r i n g d a t a to d e t e r m i n e r e q u i r e m e n t s to
m e e t en gin eerin g o b je c tiv e s; m a y c a lc u la te d e sig n d ata; p r e p a r e s la y o u ts, d e taile d s p e c i ­
fic a tio n s, p a r t s l i s t s , e s t im a t e s , p r o c e d u r e s , etc.
M a y c h e c k and a n a l y z e d r a w i n g s
o r e q u i p m e n t to d e t e r m i n e a d e q u a c y o f d r a w i n g s an d d e s i g n .
DRAFTSM EN
D raftsm an -tracer
C o p i e s p l a n s and d r a w i n g s p r e p a r e d b y o t h e r s b y p l a c i n g t r a c i n g c l o t h o r p a p e r
o v e r d r a w i n g s an d t r a c i n g w ith p e n o r p e n c i l .
( D o e s no t in c l u d e t r a c i n g l i m i t e d to p l a n s
p r i m a r i l y c o n s i s t i n g o f s t r a i g h t l i n e s an d a l a r g e s c a l e no t r e q u i r i n g c l o s e d e l i n e a t i o n . )
an d /or
P r e p a r e s sim p le or rep etitiv e d raw in gs of e a s ily v isu a liz e d it e m s .
v is e d du rin g p r o g r e s s .

W o rk i s c l o s e l y s u p e r ­

D raftsm an I
P r e p a r e s d e t a i l d r a w i n g s o f s i n g l e u n its o r p a r t s f o r e n g i n e e r i n g , c o n s t r u c t i o n ,
m an u factu rin g, or r e p a ir p u r p o se s.
T y p e s o f d r a w i n g s p r e p a r e d in c l u d e i s o m e t r i c p r o j e c ­
t i o n s ( d e p i c t i n g t h r e e d i m e n s i o n s in a c c u r a t e s c a l e ) an d s e c t i o n a l v i e w s to c l a r i f y p o s i t i o n i n g
o f c o m p o n e n t s an d c o n v e y n e e d e d i n f o r m a t i o n .
C o n s o l i d a t e s d e t a i l s f r o m a n u m b e r of s o u r c e s
and a d ju s ts o r t r a n s p o s e s s c a l e a s r e q u ir e d .
D r a f t s m a n II
P e r f o r m s n o n r o u ti n e and c o m p l e x d r a f t i n g a s s i g n m e n t s th a t r e q u i r e the a p p l i c a t i o n
o f m o s t o f the s t a n d a r d i z e d d r a w i n g t e c h n i q u e s r e g u l a r l y u s e d . D u t i e s t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e s u c h
w ork a s:
P r e p a r e s w o r k i n g d r a w i n g s o f s u b a s s e m b l i e s w ith i r r e g u l a r s h a p e s , m u l t i p l e
f u n c t i o n s , an d p r e c i s e p o s i t i o n a l r e l a t i o n s h i p s b e t w e e n c o m p o n e n t s ; p r e p a r e s a r c h i t e c t u r a l
d r a w i n g s f o r c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a b u i ld i n g in c l u d in g d e t a i l d r a w i n g s o f f o u n d a t i o n s , w a l l s e c t i o n s ,
f l o o r p l a n s , an d r o o f .
U s e s a c c e p t e d f o r m u l a s a n d m a n u a l s in m a k i n g n e c e s s a r y c o m p u ­
t a t i o n s to d e t e r m i n e q u a n t i t i e s o f m a t e r i a l s to b e u s e d , l o a d c a p a c i t i e s , s t r e n g t h s , s t r e s s e s ,
etc.
R e c e i v e s i n i t i a l i n s t r u c t i o n s , r e q u i r e m e n t s , and a d v i c e f r o m s u p e r v i s o r .
C o m p le te d
w o rk is checked fo r tech n ical adeq uacy.
D r a f t s m a n III
P l a n s the g r a p h i c p r e s e n t a t i o n o f c o m p l e x i t e m s h a v in g d i s t i n c t i v e d e s i g n f e a t u r e s
that d iffe r sig n ific a n tly fr o m e s t a b lis h e d d ra ftin g p r e c e d e n t s .
W o r k s in c l o s e s u p p o r t w ith
the d e s i g n o r i g i n a t o r , and m a y r e c o m m e n d m i n o r d e s i g n c h a n g e s .
A n a l y z e s the e f f e c t o f
e a c h c h a n g e on the d e t a i l s o f f o r m , f u n c t i o n , an d p o s i t i o n a l r e l a t i o n s h i p s o f c o m p o n e n t s and
p arts.
W o r k s w ith a m i n i m u m o f s u p e r v i s o r y a s s i s t a n c e .
C o m p le te d w o rk is re v ie w e d by
d e s i g n o r i g i n a t o r f o r c o n s i s t e n c y w ith p r i o r e n g i n e e r i n g d e t e r m i n a t i o n s . M a y e i t h e r p r e p a r e
d r a w i n g s , o r d i r e c t t h e i r p r e p a r a t i o n by l o w e r l e v e l d r a f t s m e n .



70

C L E R IC A L
CLERK,

A C C O U N TIN G

C lerk ,

A c c o u n tin g I

U n d e r s u p e r v i s i o n , p e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e r o u t i n e a c c o u n t i n g o p e r a t i o n s s u c h a s
p o s t i n g s i m p l e j o u r n a l v o u c h e r s o r a c c o u n t s p a y a b l e v o u c h e r s , e n t e r i n g v o u c h e r s in v o u c h e r
r e g i s t e r s ; r e c o n c i l i n g b a n k a c c o u n t s ; an d p o s t i n g s u b s i d i a r y l e d g e r s c o n t r o l l e d b y g e n e r a l
l e d g e r s , o r p o stin g sim p le c o s t accou nting d ata.
T h i s j o b d o e s n o t r e q u i r e a k n o w le d g e o f
a c c o u n t i n g an d b o o k k e e p in g p r i n c i p l e s , b u t i s foun d in o f f i c e s in w h ic h the m o r e r o u t i n e a c ­
c o u n tin g w o r k i s s u b d i v i d e d on a f u n c t i o n a l b a s i s a m o n g s e v e r a l w o r k e r s .
C lerk ,

A c c o u n t in g II

U n d e r g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o f a b o o k k e e p e r o r a c c o u n t a n t , h a s r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r k e e p in g
on e o r m o r e s e c t i o n s o f a c o m p l e t e s e t o f b o o k s o r r e c o r d s r e l a t i n g to on e p h a s e o f an
e s t a b li s h m e n t 's b u s i n e s s t r a n s a c t io n s . W ork in v o lv e s p o stin g and b a la n cin g s u b s i d i a r y le d g e r
o r l e d g e r s s u c h a s a c c o u n t s r e c e i v a b l e o r a c c o u n t s p a y a b l e ; e x a m i n i n g an d c o d in g i n v o i c e s
o r v o u c h e r s w ith p r o p e r a c c o u n t i n g d i s t r i b u t i o n ; r e q u i r e s j u d g m e n t an d e x p e r i e n c e in m a k i n g
p r o p e r a s s i g n a t i o n s an d a l l o c a t i o n s . M a y a s s i s t in p r e p a r i n g , a d j u s t i n g , and c l o s i n g j o u r n a l
e n t r i e s ; m a y d i r e c t a c c o u n t i n g c l e r k s I.
CLERK,

FIL E

C lerk ,

F ile I

P e r f o r m s r o u t i n e fi li n g o f m a t e r i a l th at h a s a l r e a d y b e e n c l a s s i f i e d o r w h ic h i s
e a s i l y c l a s s i f i e d in a s i m p l e s e r i a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s y s t e m ( e . g. , a l p h a b e t i c a l , c h r o n o l o g i c a l ,
or n u m e rical).
A s r e q u e s t e d , l o c a t e s r e a d i l y a v a i l a b l e m a t e r i a l in f i l e s a n d f o r w a r d s m a ­
t e r i a l ; m a y f i l l o u t w i t h d r a w a l c h a r g e . P e r f o r m s s i m p l e c l e r i c a l and m a n u a l t a s k s r e q u i r e d
to m a i n t a i n a n d s e r v i c e f i l e s .
C lerk ,

F i l e II

S o r t s , c o d e s , and f i l e s u n c l a s s i f i e d m a t e r i a l b y s i m p l e ( s u b j e c t m a t t e r ) h e a d i n g s
or partly
c l a s s i f i e d m a t e r i a l by f i n e r s u b h e a d i n g s .
P r e p a r e s s im p le r e la t e d in dex
and
c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e a i d s . A s r e q u e s t e d , l o c a t e s c l e a r l y id e n t i f i e d m a t e r i a l in f i l e s an d f o r w a r d s
m a te ria l.
M a y p e r f o r m r e l a t e d c l e r i c a l t a s k s r e q u i r e d to m a i n t a i n
and s e r v i c e f i l e s .
C lerk ,

F i l e III

In an e s t a b l i s h e d fi li n g s y s t e m c o n t a in i n g a n u m b e r o f v a r i e d s u b j e c t m a t t e r f i l e s ,
c l a s s i f i e s an d i n d e x e s f i l e m a t e r i a l s u c h a s c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , r e p o r t s , t e c h n i c a l d o c u m e n t s ,
etc.
M ay a l s o file th is m a t e r i a l .
M ay keep r e c o rd s
o f v a r i o u s t y p e s in c o n j u n c t i o n w ith
the f i l e s .
M ay le a d a s m a l l g ro u p of lo w er le v e l file c l e r k s .
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Keypunch O p erato r I
U n d e r c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n o r fo llo w in g s p e c i f i c p r o c e d u r e s o r i n s t r u c t i o n s , t r a n s c r i b e s
d a t a f r o m s o u r c e d o c u m e n t s to p u n c h e d c a r d s .
O p erates a n u m e rical an d /o r alp h abetical or
c o m b i n a t i o n k e y p u n c h m a c h i n e to k e y p u n c h t a b u l a t i n g c a r d s .
M ay verify c a r d s .
W o r k in g
fr o m v a r io u s s ta n d a r d iz e d s o u r c e d o c u m e n ts , follow s s p e c ifie d s e q u e n c e s w hich have b een
c o d e d o r p r e s c r i b e d in d e t a i l an d r e q u i r e l i t t l e o r no s e l e c t i n g , c o d i n g , o r i n t e r p r e t i n g o f
d a t a to be p u n c h e d . P r o b l e m s a r i s i n g f r o m e r r o n e o u s i t e m s o r c o d e s , m i s s i n g i n f o r m a t i o n ,
e t c . , a r e r e f e r r e d to s u p e r v i s o r .



71

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R — C o n tin u e d
K e y p u n c h O p e r a t o r II
O p e r a t e s a n u m e r i c a l a n d / o r a l p h a b e t i c a l o r c o m b i n a t i o n k e y p u n c h m a c h i n e to t r a n ­
s c r i b e d a t a f r o m v a r i o u s s o u r c e d o c u m e n t s to k e y p u n c h t a b u l a t i n g c a r d s .
P e rfo rm s sam e
t a s k s a s l o w e r l e v e l k e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r b u t in a d d i t i o n , w o r k r e q u i r e s a p p l i c a t i o n o f c o d in g
s k i l l s an d the m a k i n g o f s o m e d e t e r m i n a t i o n s , f o r e x a m p l e , l o c a t e s o n the s o u r c e d o c u m e n t
the i t e m s to b e p u n c h e d ; e x t r a c t s i n f o r m a t i o n f r o m s e v e r a l d o c u m e n t s ; s e a r c h e s f o r and
i n t e r p r e t s i n f o r m a t i o n on the d o c u m e n t to d e t e r m i n e i n f o r m a t i o n to b e p u n c h e d .
M ay train
in e x p e rie n c e d o p e r a t o r s .
O F F I C E BOY OR G IR L
P e r f o r m s v a r i o u s r o u t i n e d u t i e s s u c h a s ru n n in g e r r a n d s ; o p e r a t i n g m i n o r o f f i c e
m a c h i n e s , s u c h a s s e a l e r s o r m a i l e r s ; o p e n in g an d d i s t r i b u t i n g m a i l ; an d o t h e r m i n o r
c le r ic a l w ork.
SECRETARY
A s s i g n e d a s p e r s o n a l s e c r e t a r y , n o r m a l l y to one i n d i v i d u a l .
M a i n t a i n s a c l o s e and
h i g h l y r e s p o n s i v e r e l a t i o n s h i p to the d a y - t o - d a y w o r k a c t i v i t i e s o f the s u p e r v i s o r .
W orks
f a i r l y in d e p e n d e n t l y r e c e i v i n g a m i n i m u m o f d e t a i l e d s u p e r v i s i o n a n d g u i d a n c e .
P erfo rm s
v a r i e d c l e r i c a l an d s e c r e t a r i a l d u t i e s , u s u a l l y in c lu d in g m o s t o f the fo l l o w i n g :
(a)
R e c e i v e s te l e p h o n e c a l l s , p e r s o n a l c a l l e r s , an d in c o m i n g m a i l , a n s w e r s r o u t i n e
i n q u i r i e s , a n d r o u t e s the t e c h n i c a l i n q u i r i e s to the p r o p e r p e r s o n s ;
(b)
E s t a b l i s h e s , m a i n t a i n s , and r e v i s e s the s u p e r v i s o r ' s f i l e s ;
(c)
M a i n t a i n s the s u p e r v i s o r ' s c a l e n d a r a n d m a k e s a p p o i n t m e n t s a s i n s t r u c t e d ;
(d)
R e l a y s m e s s a g e s f r o m s u p e r v i s o r to s u b o r d i n a t e s ;
(e)
R e v i e w s c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , m e m o r a n d a , a n d r e p o r t s p r e p a r e d by o t h e r s f o r the
s u p e r v i s o r ' s s i g n a t u r e to a s s u r e p r o c e d u r a l a n d t y p o g r a p h i c a c c u r a c y ;
(f)
P e r f o r m s s t e n o g r a p h i c a n d ty p in g w o r k .
M a y a l s o p e r f o r m o t h e r c l e r i c a l an d s e c r e t a r i a l t a s k s o f c o m p a r a b l e n a t u r e an d
d ifficu lty .
T h e w o r k t y p i c a l l y r e q u i r e s k n o w le d g e o f o f f i c e r o u t i n e and u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f the
o r g a n i z a t i o n , p r o g r a m s , a n d p r o c e d u r e s r e l a t e d to the w o r k o f the s u p e r v i s o r .
E xc lu sio n s
N o t a l l p o s i t i o n s t h a t a r e t i t l e d " s e c r e t a r y " p o s s e s s the a b o v e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s .
E x a m p l e s o f p o s i t i o n s w h i c h a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m the d e f i n i t i o n a r e a s f o l l o w s :
(a)
P o s i t i o n s w h ic h do n o t m e e t the " p e r s o n a l " s e c r e t a r y c o n c e p t d e s c r i b e d a b o v e ;
(b)
S t e n o g r a p h e r s no t f u l ly t r a i n e d in s e c r e t a r i a l ty p e d u t i e s ;
(c)
S t e n o g r a p h e r s s e r v i n g a s o f f i c e a s s i s t a n t s to a g r o u p o f p r o f e s s i o n a l , t e c h n i c a l ,
or m an agerial p erso n s;
(d)
S e c r e t a r y p o s i t i o n s in w h ic h the d u t i e s a r e e i t h e r s u b s t a n t i a l l y m o r e r o u t i n e o r
s u b s t a n t i a l l y m o r e c o m p l e x an d r e s p o n s i b l e th an t h o s e c h a r a c t e r i z e d in the d e f in i t i o n ;
(e)
A s s i s t a n t ty p e p o s i t i o n s w h i c h in v o l v e m o r e d i f f i c u l t o r m o r e r e s p o n s i b l e t e c h ­
n ic a l, a d m in i s t r a t i v e , s u p e r v i s o r y , o r s p e c ia l iz e d c l e r i c a l d u tie s w hich a r e not ty p ic a l
of s e c r e t a r i a l w ork.
N O T E : T h e t e r m " c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r , " u s e d in the l e v e l d e f i n i t i o n s f o l l o w i n g , r e f e r s
to t h o s e o f f i c i a l s who h a v e a s i g n i f i c a n t c o r p o r a t e - w i d e p o l i c y m a k i n g r o l e w ith r e g a r d to
m a jo r com pany a c tiv itie s.
T h e t i t l e " v i c e p r e s i d e n t , " th o u g h n o r m a l l y i n d i c a t i v e o f t h i s
r o l e , d o e s not in a l l c a s e s i d e n t i f y s u c h p o s i t i o n s .
V ice p r e s id e n ts w h ose p r im a r y r e s p o n ­
s i b i l i t y i s to a c t p e r s o n a l l y o n i n d i v i d u a l c a s e s o r t r a n s a c t i o n s ( e . g . , a p p r o v e o r d e n y i n d i ­
v id u a l lo an o r c r e d it a c tio n s ; a d m in is t e r in d iv id u a l t r u s t a c c o u n ts; d ir e c t ly s u p e r v i s e a c l e r i ­
c a l s t a f f ) a r e no t c o n s i d e r e d to b e " c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r s " f o r p u r p o s e s o f a p p ly i n g the f o llo w in g
le v e l d efin ition s:



72

S E C R E T A R Y — C o n tin u e d
Secretary I
(a)
S e c r e t a r y to the s u p e r v i s o r o r h e a d o f a s m a l l o r g a n i z a t i o n a l u n i t ( e . g . , f e w e r
th an a b o u t 25 o r 30 p e r s o n s ) ; o r
( b ) S e c r e t a r y to a n o n s u p e r v i s o r y s t a f f s p e c i a l i s t , p r o f e s s i o n a l e m p l o y e e , a d m i n i s ­
tra tiv e o ffic e r , o r a s s i s t a n t , sk ille d tech n ician o r e x p e rt.
(N O TE:
M any c o m p an ie s a s s ig n
s t e n o g r a p h e r s , r a t h e r th an s e c r e t a r i e s a s d e s c r i b e d a b o v e , to t h i s l e v e l o f s u p e r v i s o r y o r
n o n su p erv iso ry w o rk e r.)
S e c r e t a r y II
(a)
S e c r e t a r y to a n e x e c u t i v e o r m a n a g e r i a l p e r s o n w h o s e
e q u i v a l e n t to on e o f the s p e c i f i c l e v e l s i t u a t i o n s in the d e f i n i t i o n f o r l e v e l
o rd in a te s t a f f n o r m a lly n u m b e r s at l e a s t s e v e r a l d ozen e m p lo y e e s and is
o r g a n i z a t i o n a l s e g m e n t s w h ic h a r e o f t e n , in t u r n , f u r t h e r s u b d i v i d e d .
t h i s l e v e l i n c l u d e s a w id e r a n g e o f o r g a n i z a t i o n a l e c h e l o n s ; in o t h e r s ,

r e s p o n s i b i l i t y i s not
III, b u t w h o s e s u b ­
u s u a l l y d i v i d e d into
In s o m e c o m p a n i e s ,
o n ly on e o r tw o; o r

( b ) S e c r e t a r y to the h e a d o f a n i n d i v i d u a l p la n t , f a c t o r y , e t c . , ( o r o t h e r e q u i v a l e n t
l e v e l o f o f f i c i a l ) t h a t e m p l o y s , in a l l , f e w e r th a n 5, 000 p e r s o n s .
S e c r e t a r y III

in a l l ,

(a)
S e c r e t a r y to the c h a i r m a n o f the b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t o f a c o m p a n y t h a t e m p l o y s ,
f e w e r th an 100 p e r s o n s ; o r

( b ) S e c r e t a r y to a c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r ( o t h e r th an c h a i r m a n o f the b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t )
o f a c o m p a n y t h a t e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 100 b u t f e w e r th an 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r
(c)
S e c r e t a r y to the h e a d ( i m m e d i a t e l y b e lo w the o f f i c e r le v e l ) o v e r e i t h e r a m a j o r
c o r p o r a te - w id e fu n ction al ac tiv ity ( e . g . , m a r k e t in g , r e s e a r c h , o p e r a t io n s , in d u s t r ia l r e l a ­
t io n s , e tc .) or a m a jo r geograp h ic or o rg a n iz atio n al se g m e n t ( e .g . , a re g io n al h e a d q u a rte rs;
a m a j o r d i v i s i o n ) o f a c o m p a n y t h a t e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 5 , 0 0 0 b u t f e w e r th an 2 5 , 0 0 0
em p lo y ees; or
(d)
S e c r e t a r y to the h e a d o f a n i n d i v i d u a l p l a n t , f a c t o r y ,
l e v e l o f o f f i c i a l ) t h a t e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r

etc.

(or oth er eq u ivalen t

(e)
S e c r e t a r y to the h e a d o f a l a r g e a n d i m p o r t a n t o r g a n i z a t i o n a l s e g m e n t ( e . g . ,
a m i d d l e m a n a g e m e n t s u p e r v i s o r o f a n o r g a n i z a t i o n a l s e g m e n t o f t e n in v o l v i n g a s m a n y a s
s e v e r a l h u n d r e d p e r s o n s ) o f a c o m p a n y t h a t e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 2 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s .
S e c r e t a r y IV

in a l l ,

dent)
m a jo r

(a)
over

of

S e c r e t a r y to the c h a i r m a n o f the b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p l o y s ,
100 b u t f e w e r th an 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r

(b)
S e c r e t a r y to a c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r ( o t h e r th an the c h a i r m a n of the b o a r d o r p r e s i ­
a c o m p a n y th a t e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 5, 000 b u t f e w e r th an 25, 000 p e r s o n s ; o r

(c)
S e c r e t a r y to the h e a d , i m m e d i a t e l y b e lo w the c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r l e v e l , o f a
s e g m e n t o r s u b s i d i a r y o f a c o m p a n y t h a t e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 2 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s .




73

STENOGRAPHER,

GENERAL

P r i m a r y d uty i s to t a k e an d t r a n s c r i b e d i c t a t i o n f r o m on e o r m o r e p e r s o n s e i t h e r
in s h o r t h a n d o r b y S te n o t y p e o r s i m i l a r m a c h i n e , in v o l v i n g a n o r m a l r o u t i n e v o c a b u l a r y .
M a y a l s o ty p e f r o m w r i t t e n c o p y . M a y m a i n t a i n f i l e s , k e e p s i m p l e r e c o r d s o r p e r f o r m o t h e r
r e la t iv e ly routine c l e r i c a l t a s k s . M ay o p e r a te fr o m a ste n o g ra p h ic pool.
D o e s no t in c l u d e
tra n sc rib in g -m a c h in e w ork.

STENOGRAPHER,

SEN IO R

P r i m a r y d u ty i s to ta k e a n d t r a n s c r i b e d i c t a t i o n f r o m on e o r m o r e p e r s o n s e i t h e r
in s h o r t h a n d o r by S te n o t y p e o r s i m i l a r m a c h i n e , in v o l v i n g a v a r i e d t e c h n i c a l o r s p e c i a l i z e d
v o c a b u l a r y s u c h a s in l e g a l b r i e f s o r r e p o r t s o n s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h .
M a y a l s o ty p e f r o m
w ritten copy.
M ay a l s o s e t up and m a in ta in f i l e s , k e e p r e c o r d s , etc.
OR
P e r f o r m s s t e n o g r a p h i c d u t i e s r e q u i r i n g s i g n i f i c a n t l y g r e a t e r i n d e p e n d e n c e an d r e ­
s p o n s i b i l i t y th an s t e n o g r a p h e r , g e n e r a l a s e v i d e n c e d b y the f o l l o w i n g : W o r k r e q u i r e s h ig h
d e g r e e o f s t e n o g r a p h i c s p e e d and a c c u r a c y ; a t h o r o u g h w o r k i n g k n o w le d g e o f g e n e r a l b u s i n e s s
an d o f f i c e p r o c e d u r e and o f the s p e c i f i c b u s i n e s s o p e r a t i o n s , o r g a n i z a t i o n , p o l i c i e s , p r o ­
c e d u r e s , f i l e s , w o rk flo w , e tc .
U s e s t h i s k n o w le d g e in p e r f o r m i n g s t e n o g r a p h i c d u t i e s and
r e s p o n s i b l e c l e r i c a l t a s k s s u c h a s m a i n t a i n i n g fo llo w u p f i l e s ; a s s e m b l i n g m a t e r i a l f o r r e ­
p o r t s , m e m o r a n d u m s , an d l e t t e r s ; c o m p o s i n g s i m p l e l e t t e r s f r o m g e n e r a l i n s t r u c t i o n s ;
r e a d i n g an d r o u t i n g i n c o m i n g m a i l ; a n s w e r i n g r o u t i n e q u e s t i o n s , e t c .
D o e s not in c l u d e
tran scrib in g -m ac h in e w o rk .
N O T E : T h i s j o b i s d i s t i n g u i s h e d f r o m th a t o f a s e c r e t a r y in th a t the s e c r e t a r y
n o r m a l l y w o r k s in a c o n f i d e n t i a l r e l a t i o n s h i p to o n ly on e m a n a g e r o r e x e c u t i v e an d p e r f o r m s
m o r e r e s p o n s i b l e an d d i s c r e t i o n a r y t a s k s a s d e s c r i b e d in t h a t j o b d e f in i t i o n .

SW ITC H BO A R D O P E R A T O R
Sw itch b o ard O p e ra to r I
O p e r a t e s a s i n g l e - o r m u l t i p l e - p o s i t i o n t e l e p h o n e s w i t c h b o a r d h a n d lin g i n c o m i n g ,
ou tgo in g, in trap lan t o r o ffic e c a l l s .
M a y h a n d le r o u t i n e lo n g d i s t a n c e c a l l s an d r e c o r d t o l l s .
M a y p e r f o r m lim ite d telephone in fo r m a tio n s e r v i c e .
( " L i m i t e d " telephone in fo r m a tio n s e r v ­
i c e o c c u r s if the f u n c t i o n s o f the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e r v i c e d a r e r e a d i l y u n d e r s t a n d a b l e f o r
t e l e p h o n e i n f o r m a t i o n p u r p o s e s , o r if the r e q u e s t s a r e r o u t i n e , e . g . , g iv in g e x t e n s i o n n u m b e r s
w h e n s p e c i f i c n a m e s a r e f u r n i s h e d , o r i f c o m p l e x c a l l s a r e r e f e r r e d to a n o t h e r o p e r a t o r . )
S w i t c h b o a r d O p e r a t o r II
O p e r a t e s a s i n g l e - o r m u l t i p l e - p o s i t i o n te l e p h o n e s w i t c h b o a r d h a n d lin g i n c o m i n g ,
o u tg o in g , in tr a p la n t o r o ffic e c a l l s .
P e r f o r m s fu l l t e l e p h o n e i n f o r m a t i o n s e r v i c e o r h a n d l e s
c o m p l e x c a l l s , s u c h a s c o n f e r e n c e , c o l l e c t , o v e r s e a s , o r s i m i l a r c a l l s , e i t h e r in a d d it i o n
to d oin g r o u t i n e w o r k a s d e s c r i b e d f o r s w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r I, o r a s a f u l l - t i m e a s s i g n ­
m ent.
( " F u l l " t e l e p h o n e i n f o r m a t i o n s e r v i c e o c c u r s w h e n the e s t a b l i s h m e n t h a s v a r i e d f u n c ­
ti o n s t h a t a r e n o t r e a d i l y u n d e r s t a n d a b l e f o r te l e p h o n e i n f o r m a t i o n p u r p o s e s , e . g . , b e c a u s e
o f o v e r l a p p i n g o r i n t e r r e l a t e d f u n c t i o n s , and c o n s e q u e n t l y p r e s e n t f r e q u e n t p r o b l e m s a s to
w hich e x te n sio n s a r e a p p r o p r ia t e fo r c a l ls .)




74
T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R

T a b u la tin g -M a c h in e O p e r a t o r I
O p e r a t e s s im p le ta b u la tin g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n tin g m a c h in e s , s u c h as the s o r t e r ,
r e p r o d u c in g p u n c h , c o l l a t o r , e t c . , w ith s p e c i f i c in s t r u c t io n s .
M a y in c lu d e the p e r f o r m a n c e
o f s o m e s im p le w ir in g fr o m d ia g r a m s and s o m e filin g w o r k .
T h e w o r k t y p ic a l ly in v o lv e s
p o r t io n s o f a w o r k u n it, f o r e x a m p le , in d iv id u a l s o r tin g o r c o lla t in g r u n s , o r r e p e t it iv e
o p e r a tio n s .

T a b u la tin g -M a c h in e O p e r a t o r II

O p e r a t e s m o r e d if f ic u lt ta b u la tin g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n tin g m a c h in e s , s u c h a s the
ta b u la to r and c a l c u l a t o r , in a d d itio n to the s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c e r , and c o l l a t o r .
T h is w o r k is
p e r f o r m e d u n d e r s p e c i f i c in s t r u c t io n s and m a y in c lu d e the p e r fo r m a n c e o f s o m e w ir in g fr o m
d ia g r a m s .
T h e w o r k t y p ic a lly i n v o l v e s , f o r e x a m p le , ta b u la tio n s in v o lv in g a r e p e t i t iv e a c ­
co u n tin g e x e r c i s e , a c o m p le t e bu t s m a ll ta b u la tin g s tu d y , o r p a r ts o f a lo n g e r and m o r e
co m p le x r e p o r t.
S u ch r e p o r t s and s tu d ie s a r e u s u a lly o f a r e c u r r in g n a tu re w h e r e the p r o ­
c e d u r e s a r e w e l l e s t a b lis h e d .
M a y a ls o in c lu d e the tr a in in g o f n ew e m p lo y e e s in the b a s ic
o p e r a t io n o f the m a c h in e .

T a b u la tin g -M a c h in e O p e r a t o r III

O p e r a t e s a v a r ie t y o f ta b u la tin g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n tin g m a c h in e s , t y p ic a lly in ­
clu d in g s u c h m a c h in e s as the t a b u la t o r , c a l c u l a t o r , i n t e r p r e t e r , c o l l a t o r , and o t h e r s .
P er­
f o r m s c o m p le t e r e p o r t in g a s s ig n m e n t s w ith o u t c l o s e s u p e r v is io n , and p e r f o r m s d if f ic u lt
w ir in g as r e q u ir e d .
T h e c o m p le t e r e p o r t in g and ta b u la tin g a s s ig n m e n ts t y p ic a lly in v o lv e a
v a r ie t y o f lo n g and c o m p l e x r e p o r t s w h ic h o ft e n a r e o f ir r e g u la r o r n o n r e c u r r in g ty p e r e ­
q u ir in g s o m e p la n n in g and s e q u e n c in g o f s te p s to b e ta k e n .
A s a m o r e e x p e r ie n c e d o p e r a t o r ,
is t y p ic a lly in v o lv e d in tr a in in g new o p e r a t o r s in m a c h in e o p e r a t i o n s , o r p a r t i a lly tr a in e d
o p e r a t o r s in w ir in g fr o m d ia g r a m s and o p e r a t in g s e q u e n c e s o f lo n g and c o m p l e x r e p o r t s .
D o e s n ot in c lu d e w o r k in g s u p e r v i s o r s p e r f o r m i n g ta b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t io n s and d a y - t o d a y s u p e r v is io n o f the w o r k and p r o d u c t io n o f a g r o u p o f ta b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s .

T Y P IS T

U s e s a t y p e w r it e r to m a k e c o p ie s o f v a r io u s m a t e r ia ls o r to m a k e o u t b i l l s a ft e r
c a lc u la t io n s h a v e b e e n m a d e b y a n o th e r p e r s o n .
M a y in c lu d e ty p in g o f s t e n c i l s , m a t s , o r
s im il a r m a t e r ia ls f o r u s e in d u p lic a t in g p r o c e s s e s .
M a y do c l e r i c a l w o r k in v o lv in g little
s p e c i a l t r a in in g , s u c h as k e e p in g s im p le r e c o r d s , filin g r e c o r d s and r e p o r t s , o r s o r t in g
and d is t r ib u t in g in c o m in g m a i l.

T y p is t I
P e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e o f the f o l lo w in g : C o p y ty p in g f r o m r o u g h o r c l e a r d r a f t s ;
r o u tin e ty p in g o f f o r m s , in s u r a n c e p o l i c i e s , e t c . ; se ttin g up s im p le sta n d a r d ta b u la t io n s ,
o r c o p y in g m o r e c o m p l e x ta b le s a lr e a d y s e t up and s p a c e d p r o p e r l y .

T y p is t II
P e r f o r m s o n e o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g :
T y p in g m a t e r ia l in fin a l f o r m w h e n it in ­
v o lv e s c o m b in in g m a t e r ia l f r o m s e v e r a l s o u r c e s o r r e s p o n s ib i lit y f o r c o r r e c t s p e ll in g , s y l ­
la b i c a t io n , p u n c tu a tio n , e t c . , o f t e c h n ic a l o r u n u su a l w o r d s o r f o r e i g n la n g u a g e m a t e r ia l;
p la n n in g la y o u t and ty p in g o f c o m p l ic a t e d s t a t is t i c a l ta b le s to m a in ta in u n ifo r m it y and b a la n c e
in s p a c in g .
M a y ty p e r o u tin e f o r m l e t t e r s , v a r y in g d e ta ils to s u it c i r c u m s t a n c e s .



75

NOTE:
T he d e fin it io n s f o r the d r a ftin g and c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t io n s sh ow n in th is b u l­
le t in a r e the s a m e as th o s e u s e d in the B u r e a u 's p r o g r a m o f o c c u p a t io n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in
m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s .
(S e e the l i s t o f a r e a s in the o r d e r fo r m at the b a c k o f th is b u ll e t in .)
T he le v e l d e s ig n a tio n s u s e d in th is b u lle t in , h o w e v e r , d if f e r f r o m th o s e u s e d in the a r e a
b u lle t in s .
T he e q u iv a le n t le v e l d e s ig n a tio n s f o r the o c c u p a t io n s c o n c e r n e d a r e a s f o l lo w s :

O c c u p a t io n

N a tio n a l S u r v e y o f
P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d m in is t r a t iv e , T e c h n i c a l, and
C le r ic a l P ay

O c c u p a tio n a l
W age S u r v e y s in
M e t r o p o lit a n
A reas

D r a ft s m a n ____________________________

I
II
III

C
B
A

C le r k , a c c o u n t in g ___________________

I
II

B
A

C le r k , f i l e ___________________________

I
II
III

C
B
A

K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r __________________

I
II

B
A

S e c r e t a r y _____________________________

I
II
III
IV

D
C
B
A

S w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r ______________

I
II

B
A

I
II
III

C
B
A

I
II

B
A

T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e
o p e r a t o r ___________

T y p is t







Appendix D. Comparison of Average Annual Salaries in Private
Industry, June 1969, with Corresponding Salary Rates for
Federal Employees Under the General Schedule
T he s u r v e y w a s d e s ig n e d , a m o n g o th e r u s e s , to p r o v id e a b a s is f o r c o m p a r in g F e d e r a l
s a la r i e s u n d e r the G e n e r a l S ch e d u le w ith g e n e r a l p a y l e v e l s in p r iv a te in d u s tr y . T o a s s u r e
c o m p ila t io n o f p a y d ata f o r w o r k le v e l s that w o u ld b e e q u iv a le n t to the F e d e r a l g r a d e s , the
C iv il S e r v ic e C o m m is s io n c o ll a b o r a t e d w ith the B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s to p r e p a r e the
o c c u p a t io n w o r k le v e l d e fin itio n s u s e d in the s u r v e y . D e fin itio n s w e r e g r a d e d b y the C o m ­
m i s s i o n a c c o r d in g to s ta n d a r d s e s t a b lis h e d f o r e a c h g r a d e .
E a c h o c c u p a t io n w o r k le v e l
s u r v e y e d b y the B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t is t ic s and c u r r e n t ly c o n s id e r e d b y the C o m m is s io n to
b e e q u iv a le n t to a G e n e r a l S ch e d u le g r a d e is id e n tifie d in the fo llo w in g ta b le .




77

78
C o m p a r i s o n of A v e r a g e A n n u a l S a l a r i e s in P r i v a t e I n d u s t r y , 1 J u n e 1969, With S a l a r y R a t e s
f o r F e d e r a l E m p l o y e e s U n d e r t h e G e n e r a l S c h e d u le 2
Average
annual
sa laries
in private G ra de 5
industry 4

O ccupation and c la s s
s u r v e y e d by BL S 3

S a l a r y r a t e s f o r F e d e r a l e m p l o y e e s u n d e r t h e G e n e r a l Sc h e d u le
P e r annum r a t e s and s t e p s 0
i

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

C l e r k s , fil e I _________________________________
Of fic e bo y s o r g i r l s __________________________

$3,883
4,279

GS 1

$3,889
3,889

$4,019
4,019

$ 4 , 149
4, 149

$ 4 , 279
4,279

$4,408
4,408

$ 4 , 538
4, 538

$4,668
4,668

$ 4 , 798
4, 798

$4,928
4, 928

$ 5 , 057
5,057

C l e r k s , f il e I I ________ ____ ______ ________
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s I ___________ ____________
S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s I ____________ _ _______
T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s 1 . . _________ .
T y p i s t s I ____________________ __________________

4, 328
4,797
4,822
5,021
4,451

GS 2

4, 231
4, 360

4,372
4, 505

4,513
4, 650

4,655
4,795

4,796
4, 940

4,937
5, 085

5,078
5,230

5, 219
5, 375

5, 360
5, 520

5, 501
5,665

C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g 1 ---------- -------------------------C l e r k s , fil e III ................................................................
D r a f t s m e n - t r a c e r s ........................ .......................... .
E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s I .........................................
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s II _______________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l _____________________
S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s I I _____________________
T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s II ____________
T y p i s t s I I ............................................................................

4,941
5, 320
5, 301
5,942
5,482
S, 192
5,689
6,060
5, 155

GS 3

4,600
4,917

4, 753
5, 081

4,907
5,245

5,060
5,409

5,214
5, 573

5, 367
5,737

5, 521
5,901

5, 674
6, 065

5,828
6,229

5,981
6, 393

C l e r k s , a c c o u n t i n g I I _______________________
D r a f t s m e n I ..................................................................... .
E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s I I _________ ________
S e c r e t a r i e s I _________________ _____________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r _________________ ____
T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s I I I ____________

6,448
6,454
7,011
5, 869
5,884
7, 371

GS 4

5, 145
5, 522

5, 316
5, 706

5,487
5,890

5, 658
6,074

5, 829
6, 258

6,000
6,442

6, 171
6,626

6, 342
6,810

6, 513
6,994

6,684
7, 178

A c c o u n t a n t s I ___ ____ __________
________
A uditors I . .
.
__ . ______________
B u y e r s I ________________________________ .
C h e m i s t s I ___________
___________________
D r a f t s m e n I I _ _____________
_
— _______
—
E n g i n e e r s I __________________________ . . ..
E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s III ____ _
_ ___
J o b a n a l y s t s I _____________________________
S e c r e t a r i e s II . . . ___ ____________ ______

8,002
8, 367
7,877
8, 736
7,988
9, 662
8, 040
8, 137
6,586

GS 5

5, 732
6, 176

5,924
6, 382

6, 115
6, 588

6, 307
6, 794

6,498
7,000

6,690
7, 206

6, 881
7,412

7,073
7, 618

7,265
7,824

7,456
8, 030

______

7,032

GS 6

A c c o u n t a n t s I I __________________________
.
A u d i t o r s I I _____________________ ___________
B u y e r s II ___________
. _____ ________
C h e m i s t s II _____________________ _______
D r a f t s m e n I I I _______________________ _____

9,013
9, 287
9,269
9,626
9,755
10,455
9, 300
9,081
7,697

GS 7

6, 321
6, 882
6,981
7,639

6, 532
7, 111
7,214
7,894

6,743
7, 340
7,447
8, 149

6,955
7, 569
7,680
8,404

7, 166
7, 798
7,913
8,659

7, 377
8,027
8, 146
8,914

7,588
8,256
8, 379
9, 169

7,799
8,485
8,612
9, 424

8,010
8,714
8,845
9,679

8, 221
8,94 3
9.078
9,934

1 0, 0 2 9
11,020
10,726
1 0, 9 4 2
11,063
1 1, 701
1 0, 321
1 0, 5 9 5

GS 9

8,462
9, 320

8, 744
9, 631

9,026
9.942

9, 308
10,253

9,590
10,564

9,872
10,875

10,154
11,186

10,436
11,497

10,718
11,808

1 1, 0 00
12, 119

11,967
12,780
13, 125
13, 151
13, 359
13, 212
11,847
13, 893
1 2, 8 3 0

GS 11

10,203
11,233

10,543
11,607

10,883

11,981

11,223
1 2 ,3 5 5

11, 563
1 2 ,7 2 9

11,903
13, 103

12, 243
13,477

12,583
1 3 ,8 51

12,923
14,225

13, 263
14 ,5 99

S e c r e t a r i e s I I I ___________________ . . .

E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s I V _________________
J o b a n a l y s t s II __________ _____ _____________
S e c r e t a r i e s IV __________________________ .
A c c o u n t a n t s I I I _____________________________
A u d i t o r s III ________________________________
B u y e r s III ______________ __________ ________
C h e m i s t s III ______________ _________________
E n g i n e e r s III ___________________________ ___
E n g i n e e r i n g t e c h n i c i a n s V ___________________
J o b a n a l y s t s III ____________________________
A c c o u n t a n t s I V _______________________ ______
A u d i t o r s IV ___________ ________ _____ ______
B u y e r s IV ............................. ......................................
C h e m i s t s IV _______________________________
C h i e f a c c o u n t a n t s I ________________________
D i r e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l I ___________________
E n g i n e e r s IV ______________________________
J o b a n a l y s t s IV ______ _____________________

S e e fo o tn o te s at end of ta b le .




79
C o m p a r i s o n of A v e r a g e A n n u a l S a l a r i e s in P r i v a t e I n d u s t r y , 1 J u n e 1969, With S a l a r y R a t e s
f o r F e d e r a l E m p l o y e e s U n d e r th e G e n e r a l S c h e d u le 2— C o n t in u e d

O ccupation and c la s s
s u r v e y e d by BL S 3

Average
annual
sa laries
in p r i v a t e G r a d e 5
industry 4

S a l a r y r a t e s f o r F e d e r a l e m p l o y e e s u n d e r t h e G e n e r a l S c h e d u le
P e r annum r a te s and steps 6
i

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Accountants V
A t t o r n e y s I I I ______
_
_
__
_ _ .
C h em ists V
_
________
C h ie f a c c o u n ta n ts II __________________________
D ir e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l II ___ ____ _ _ ___
E n g in e e r s V ___________
_ _ _ _ _

$ 1 4 , 373
1 5, 8 7 9
1 6, 0 8 0
1 4, 6 3 7
13, 925
1 6, 1 0 7

GS 12

A tto r n e y s I V .....................................................................
C h e m is ts VI
___________________________
C h ie f a c c o u n ta n ts III _________________________
D ir e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l III ________________ ___
E n g in e e r s V I __________________________________

19,163
1 8, 5 2 9
1 7, 7 1 4
1 6, 7 3 8
1 8, 5 7 7

GS 13

1 4, 4 0 9
1 5, 8 1 2

1 4, 8 8 9
1 6, 3 3 9

1 5 ,3 6 9
16,866

15,849
17,393

16,329
17,920

16,809
18,447

17,289
18,974

1 7 ,7 6 9
19,5 01

18,249
20,028

18,729
20,555

A tto r n e y s V .............. ........... ........................... ...............
C h e m ists V I I . . ..................... ...........................................
C h ie f a c c o u n ta n ts IV —_____ __________________
D ir e c t o r s of p e r s o n n e l IV ___________________

23,685
22,473
20,586
20,585
21, 199

GS 14

1 6, 9 4 6
1 8, 53 1

17,5 11
19, 149

18,076
19,767

1 8 ,6 4 1
20,385

19,206
21,003

1 9 ,7 71
21,621

20,336
22,239

20,901
22,857

21,466
23,475

22,031
24,093

A tto r n e y s V I __ ______ . ___________________
C h e m i s t s VIII _____ ____________ _____ ____ _
E n g in e e r s V I I I ________________________________

29,421
27,092
24,020

GS 15

1 9, 7 8 0
21,589

20,439
22, 309

21,098
23,029

21,757
23,749

22,416
24,469

23,075
25,189

23, 734
25,909

24,393
26,629

25,052
27,349

25,711
28,069

$ 1 2 , 174 $ 1 2 , 580 $ 1 2 , 9 8 6 $ 1 3 , 392 $ 1 3 , 7 9 8 $ 14 , 2 0 4 $ 1 4 , 6 1 0 $ 1 5 , 0 1 6 $ 1 5 , 4 2 2 $ 1 5 , 8 2 8
13, 835
1 3, 3 8 9
1 4, 28 1
15,173
14,727
16,065
1 6 ,5 11
17,403
1 5 ,6 1 9
16,957

1 F o r s c o p e of s u r v e y , s e e a p p e n d i x A.
2 F i r s t lin e— s a l a r y r a t e s p r o m u l g a t e d by E x e c u t i v e O r d e r 11413 i s s u e d u n d e r th e a u t h o r i t y of S e c t i o n 212 of th e F e d e r a l S a l a r y A c t of 1967
w h i c h w e r e in e ff e c t in J u n e 1969, th e r e f e r e n c e d a te f o r t h e BL S s u r v e y ; a n d s e c o n d l in e — s a l a r y r a t e s p r o m u l g a t e d by E x e c u t i v e O r d e r 11474
i s s u e d u n d e r th e a u t h o r i t y of S e c t i o n 212 of t h e F e d e r a l S a l a r y A c t of 1967 w h i c h b e c a m e e f f e c t i v e on th e f i r s t d a y of t h e f i r s t p a y p e r i o d b e g in n i n g
on o r a f t e r J u l y 1, 1969.
3 F o r d e f i n i t i o n s , s e e a p p e n d ix C.
Due to a r e v i s i o n of t h e C i v il S e r v i c e C o m m i s s i o n s t a n d a r d s f o r a t t o r n e y p o s i t i o n s in th e F e d e r a l S e r v i c e ,
t h e n u m b e r of o c c u p a t i o n a l l e v e l s s t u d i e d h a s b e e n r e d u c e d f r o m 7 t o 6.
T h e a t t o r n e y s e r i e s n ow s p a n s GS 9 - 1 5 r a t h e r t h a n GS 7 - 1 5 a s in 1968.
S e e a p p e n d i x B f o r e x p l a n a t i o n of c h a n g e s in t h e a t t o r n e y d e f i n i ti o n .
4 S u r v e y fi n d i n g s a s s u m m a r i z e d in t a b l e 1 of t h i s r e p o r t .
5 C o r r e s p o n d i n g g r a d e s in th e G e n e r a l S c h e d u le w e r e s u p p l i e d b y t h e U . S . C i v il S e r v i c e C o m m i s s i o n .
6 S e c t i o n 5335 of t i t l e 5 of t h e U . S . C od e p r o v i d e s f o r w i t h i n - g r a d e i n c r e a s e s on c o n d it i o n t h a t th e e m p l o y e e ' s w o r k i s of a n a c c e p t a b l e l e v e l
of c o m p e t e n c e a s d e fi n e d by t h e h e a d of th e a g e n c y .
F o r e m p l o y e e s wh o m e e t t h i s c o n d it i o n , t h e s e r v i c e r e q u i r e m e n t s a r e 52 c a l e n d a r w e e k s e a c h
f o r s a l a r y r a t e s 1, 2, a n d 3; 104 w e e k s e a c h f o r s a l a r y r a t e s 4, 5, a n d 6; a n d 156 w e e k s e a c h f o r s a l a r y r a t e s 7, 8, a n d 9.
S e c t i o n 5336 p r o v i d e s
t h a t a n a d d i t i o n a l w i t h i n - g r a d e i n c r e a s e m a y be g r a n t e d w i t h in a ny p e r i o d of 52 w e e k s in r e c o g n i t i o n of h i g h q u a l i t y p e r f o r m a n c e a b o v e t h a t o r d i n a r i l y
f ou nd in t h e t yp e of p o s i t i o n c o n c e r n e d .

U n d e r S e c t i o n 5303 of t i t l e 5 of t h e U . S . C o d e , h i g h e r m i n i m u m r a t e s (but n o t e x c e e d i n g th e m a x i u m s a l a r y r a t e
p r e s c r i b e d in th e G e n e r a l S c h e d u le f o r th e g r a d e o r l ev e l ) a n d a c o r r e s p o n d i n g n e w s a l a r y r a n g e m a y be e s t a b l i s h e d f o r
positions o r oc cupations under c e rt a in conditions.
T h e c o n d i t i o n s i n c l u d e a f in d in g t h a t t h e s a l a r y r a t e s in p r i v a t e i n d u s t r y
a r e so s u b s t a n t i a l l y a b o v e t h e s a l a r y r a t e s of th e s t a t u t o r y pay s c h e d u l e s a s t o h a n d i c a p s i g n i f i c a n t l y t h e G o v e r n m e n t ' s
r e c r u i t m e n t o r r e t e n t i o n of w e l l - q u a l i f i e d p e r s o n s .
Su c h s p e c i a l pay s c a l e s ha v e b e e n e s t a b l i s h e d f o r s p e c i f i c g r a d e s o r
l e v e l s of c e r t a i n o c c u p a t i o n s (in c l u d in g a c c o u n t a n t s , a u d i t o r s , c h e m i s t s , a n d e n g i n e e r s ) .
I n f o r m a t i o n on s p e c i a l h i g h e r
pay s c a l e s c u r r e n t l y in e f f e c t, a n d t h e o c c u p a t i o n s a n d a r e a s t o w h i c h t h e y a p p l y , m a y be o b t a i n e d f r o m t h e U . S . C i v il
S e r v i c e C o m m i s s i o n , W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . 204 15, o r i t s r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s .







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1967-68 AREA WAGE SURVEY SUMMARY BULLETINS

Bulletin 1575-87.
1967-68 (1969).

Wages and Related Benefits. Part I: 85 Metropolitan Areas.

Consolidates information from the individual area bulletins for surveys made during
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Contains average w eekly earnings for o ffic e o c ­
cupations, average hourly earnings for plant occupations, and establishment practices
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Wages and Related Benefits, Part II:
United States and R egional Summaries. 1967-68 (1969).

Metropolitan Areas,

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cents)

Akron (July 1 9 6 9 ) ---------------Albany-Schenectady-Troy
(Mar. 1 9 6 9 ) --------------------Albuquerque (Apr. 1 9 6 9 )----Allentown-Be thlehem-Easton
(May 1 9 6 9 ) ----------------------Atlanta (May 1969)-------------Baltimore (Aug. 1 9 6 9 )-------Beaumont-Port ArthurOrange (May 1969)-----------Binghamton (July 1969)-------Birmingham (Apr. 1 9 6 9 ) -----

1625-89

35

1625-56
1625-67

35
30

1625-86
1625-77
1660-11

30
35
35

1625-75
1660-5
1625-65

35
30
35

Boise City (July 1968)---------Boston (Aug. 1 9 6 9 )-------------Buffalo (Nov. 1 9 6 8 ) -----------Burlington (Mar. 1969)-------Canton (May 1 9 6 9 )-------------Charleston (Apr. 1969)-------Charlotte (Mar. 1 9 6 9 ) -------Chattanooga (Sept. 1969)----Chicago (Apr. 1969)------------

1625-6
1660-16
1625-35
1625-54
1625-73
1625-71
1625-61
1660-9
1625-82

35
45
50
35
30
30
30
30
65

Area and payroll period

Cincinnati (Mar. 1 9 6 9 ) -----Cleveland (Sept. 1 9 6 8 ) -----Columbus (Oct. 1 9 6 8 ) -------Dallas (Nov. 1 9 6 8 )-------------Davenport-Rock IslandMoline (Oct. 1 9 6 8 ) ---------Dayton (Jan. 1 9 6 9 )-------------Denver(Dec. 1968) ------------

1625-63
1625-19
1625-24
1625-28

45
50
35
50

1625-16
1625-42
1625-39

30
35
30

Des Moines (Mar. 1969)-----Detroit (Jan. 1 9 6 9 )-------------Fort Worth (Nov. 1 9 6 8 ) -----Green Bay (July 1969)---------Greenville (May 1 9 6 9 )-------Houston (May 1 9 6 9 ) -----------Indianapolis (Dec. 1 9 6 8 )---Jackson (Feb. 1 9 6 9 ) ------------

1625-62
1625-58
1625-27
1660-8
1625-70
1625-83
1625-40
1625-45

30
50
35
30
35
45
35
35

Jacksonville (Jan. 1969)-----Kansas City (Sept. 1 9 6 9 )---Lawrence-Haverhill
(June 1969) ----------------------Little Rock-North Little
Rock (July 1 9 6 9 ) -------------Los Angeles-Long Beach and
Anaheim-Santa AnaGarden Grove
(Mar. 1 9 6 9 ) ---------------------

1625-37
1660-10

35
35

1625-79

30

1660-2

50

Louisville (Nov. 1 9 6 8 )-------Lubbock (Mar. 1 9 6 9 ) ---------Manchester (July 1 9 6 9 ) -----Memphis (Nov. 1968)---------Miami (Dec. 1968)-------------Midland and Odessa
(Mar. 1 9 6 9 ) ...................—
Milwaukee (Apr. 1 9 6 9 ) -----Minneapolis-St. Paul
(Jan. 1 9 6 9 ) -----------------------

1625-33
1625-53
1660-3
1625-30
1625-29

30
30
30
30
35

1625-49
1625-66

25
35

1625-47

35

_
_
—

—

BLS
bulletin
number

Price
(in
cents)

1625-80

30

1625-46
1625-38
1625-51
1625-88

40
30
35
60

1575-85
1625-9

30
30

1660-12

30

1625-87
1625-48
1625-60
1625-59
1625-20
1625-76

35
50
30
35
30
30

1625-74

35

Raleigh (Aug. 1 9 6 9 ) ---------------Richmond (Mar. 1969)-------------Rochester (July 1 9 6 9 )---------------Rockford (May 1 9 6 9 ) ---------------St. Louis (Mar. 1969)---------------Salt Lake City (Dec. 1968)-----San Antonio (June 1 9 6 9 ) ------—
San Bernardino-RiversideOntario (Oct. 1 9 6 8 )----------------

1660-6
1625-69
1660-4
1625-72
1625-64
1625-36
1625-85

30
30
30
30
50
30
35

1625-25

40

___

San Diego (Nov. 1968)-------------San Francisco-Oakland
(Oct. 1 9 6 8 )----------------------------San Jose (Sept. 1 9 6 8 )---------------Savannah (May 1 9 6 9 )---------------Scranton (July 1 9 6 9 )-----------------Seattle-Everett (Nov. 1 9 6 8 ) ----Sioux Falls (Sept. 1969)------------

1625-32

30

___

1625-44
1625-21
1625-68
1660-15
1625-43
1660-14

35
30
30
30
35
25

South Bend (Mar. 1 9 6 9 )-----------Spokane (June 1 9 6 9 )---- ------------Syracuse (July 1 9 6 9 )----------------Tampa-St. Petersburg
(Aug. 1 9 6 9 ) --------------------------Toledo (Feb. 1969)------------------Trenton (Oct. 1 9 6 8 )------------------

1625-55
1625-81
1660-13

30
30
30

1660-7
1625-57
1625-18

35
35
35

Utica-Rome (July 1969)
Washington, D. C.
(Sept. 1 9 6 8 ) -------------Waterbury (Mar. 1969)
Waterloo (Nov. 1 9 6 8 )-Wichita (Dec. 1968)----Worcester (May 1969) York (Feb. 1969) -------Y oungstown-Wa rre n
(Nov. 1968)----------------

1660-1

30

1625-22
1625-50
1625-31
1625-41
1625-84
1625-52

35
30
35
30
30
30

1625-34

30

Area and payroll period
Muskegon-Muskegon Heights
(May 1 9 6 9 ) ----------------------------Newark and Jersey City
(Jan. 1 9 6 9 ) ----------------------------New Haven (Jan. 1 9 6 9 ) -----------New Orleans (Feb. 1 9 6 9 )---------New York (Apr. 1 9 6 9 ) -------------Norfolk-Portsmouth and Newport
News- Hampton
(June 1968) ----------------------------Oklahoma City (July 1 9 6 8 ) ------

Number
of
copies

—

—

—

—

30

1625-78

Number
of
copies

—

—

—

—

___

Omaha (Sept. 1 9 6 9 )-----------------Paterson- Clifton- Passaic
(May 1 9 6 9 ) ----------------------------Philadelphia (Nov. 1968)---------Phoenix (Mar. 1 9 6 9 ) ---------------Pittsburgh (Jan. 1969)---------------Portland (Maine) (Nov. 1968) —
Portland (Oreg. ) (May 1 9 6 9 )----Provi de nee - Pawtuck etWarwick (May 1 9 6 9 ) --------------

—

_
_

—

—

—

_
_

—

—

—

—

—

* Bulletins dated prior to July 1965 were entitled "Occupational Wage Surveys.

Nam e____________________________________________________________________________________
Address __________________________________________________________________________________
City________________________________________ State_____________________________ ZIP Code




* U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING O F FIC E : 1970 O - 375-578




B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T I S T I C S R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S

R egion I
R egion II
341 Ninth Ave.
1603-B Federal Building
New York, N. Y. 10001
Governm ent Center
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

R egion III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

R egion IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
A tlan ta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region V
Region VI
219 South Dearborn St.
337 M ayflower Building
C hicago, 111. 60604
411 North Akard St.
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)
D allas, Tex. 75201
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions VII and VIII
Federal Office Building
911 W alnut St. , 10th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X
450 G olden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

* Regions VII and VIII will be serviced by Kansas City.
** Regions IX and X w ill be serviced by San Francisco.




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON, D.C.

20212

OFFICIAL BUSINESS




T H IR D CLASS M A IL


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102