View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

POPULATION

NATIONAL ATLAS

POPULATION DISTRIBUTION

S U P E/ii

242

URBAN POPULATION

15.000.000

.

1 000.000
0
5,000,000
-2,500,000
1
,000,000
—500,000
—250,000
— 50,000
Area of circles is proportional
to population, 1960

Principal Islands of
HAWAII

Urban places over 50,000
------- 25,000-50,000
------- 10,000-25,000
------- 2,500-10,000

POPULATION DISTRIBUTION , URBAN AN D R UR AL: 1960
A
daptedfro U Bureau o the C su Population distribution,
m .S.
f
en s,
urban and rural, in the United States: I960, G
E-50, n . 1
o ,
W
ashington, U G Prin Off.,1 6 , m 1 ,0 0 0
.S. ovt. t.
9 3 ap :5 0 ,0 0

:7 0 ,0 0
,5 0 0
ALASKA
l:7000 0
1, .0 0

RURAL POPULATION
1,000-2,500
500 persons

NATIONAL ATLAS

POPULATION TRENDS

0-9.9

PERCENT LOSS

244

20 or more

!•:.= • i 10-19-9
I

I °-9-9

POPULATION MIGRATION

WEST

N O R TH
, T L A ^ T lC

V n Ta i n

MIGRANTS

IN THOUSANDS
900 and over

WEST
74 and under
Number of I960 residents that
lived in another State in 1955

P A C IF IC

ORIGIN
BY CENSUS DIVISION

Principal Islands of
HAWAII
SCAU 1 7 0 ,0 0
:1 ,0 0 0

PA C IF IC

PATTERNS OF MIGRATION: 1960

0 1 1 4 6 8 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 01 0 !00
0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 6 8

NATIONAL ATLAS

PO PULATIO N STRUCTURE

NATIONAL ATLAS

MOBILITY STATUS
This m ap shows the percent o f the 1960 population 5 years o f
age or older that did not live in the same house in 1955
The graph shows the percent o f the United States 1960
population by 5 year age groups that did not live in the same
house in 19S5

NATIVE POPULATION
Native population comprises persons bom in the U nited States
or its possessions, and those bom abroad or at sea who have
at least one native American parent

248

POPULATION MOBILITY

FAMILY CHARACTERISTICS

DEPENDENCY RATIO
T h e dependency ratio is the ratio o f the population aged under 18 and
over 65 to those aged betw een 18 and 65

FAMILY
A fam ily consists o f two o r m ore persons living in the same housing unit
w ho are related to each oth er by blood, marriage o r adoption

POPULATION NOT IN FAMILIES
Population n o t in families includes unrelated individuals living in house­
holds and persons in group q uarters such as room ing and boarding houses,
m ilitary barracks, college dorm itories, and institutions

NATIONAL ATLAS

MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE

250

Compiled from U.S. Bureau of the Census, Census of population: 1960, v. I, individual State reports,
Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1961, table 28, and U.S. Public Health Service, Vital statistics
of the United States, v. Ill, Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1964, table 5-1
Virginia county data adjusted to include independent cities

BIRTHS

T R EN D S IN BIR T H S A N D DEATHS

FE TILITYR TE(LIVEB TH T FE A S A E 15-44 Y .)
R
A
IR S O M LE . G S
R
1
i

-- -

__

V \

>

N ,^ \

t
\

The following presentation of vital statistics, health manpower, and hospitals largely
uses rates rather than frequencies. These rates are expressed per 1,000 or 100,000 persons
o f the appropriate category, such as total population or persons 35-54 years o f age. Most
o f the vital statistics are for the 3 years 1959-61, and the population is that of the 1960
census (multiplied by three).
Most o f the rates have not been adjusted statistically for age, color, sex, health, or
other population differences. These crude rates have the advantage of indicating the actual
probability of the condition measured in a population. Thus, a State with a high propor­
tion of its population over 60 years of age can be expected to have a higher crude death
rate than a State with a predominantly youthful population.
When a comparative interpretation of rates is desired, such as measurement of
relative health of population groups rather than the total probability of death, crude
rates usually should be replaced by specific rates (as for definite age groups) or should be
adjusted by basing all calculations on a standard population (as the total 1940 population
of the United States).
Rates on the maps generally are shown in six class intervals—
three above and three
below the mean for the country as a whole. The National mean rate is the lower limit of
the third category. The standard deviation, which is a measure of dispersion of values
about the mean, was found for each map and used to sort the respective rates into six
class intervals conforming to six equal areas of the standard normal curve. If a rate was
produced entirely by the interaction of a large number of nearly equal factors, very nearly
the same number of States would fall into each class interval. While this technique is
preferred to use o f arbitrary class intervals, it is not assumed that any o f the phenomena
should be normally distributed.

NU BERO EB TH
M
FLIV IR S
/ «_ _
_

D ATHR T (A EA JUSTED T 1940 P P LAT N
E
AE G D
O
O U IO )

Complete reporting of all births and deaths for
the entire United States began in 1933. The
number of births and rate of fertility for 19091932 are estimates prepared by P K Whelpton.
. .

/

N M RO D A S
U BE F E TH

The death rate for 1900-1932 isan estimate based
■entire United States in 1933.

Compiled from information provided by U.S. Public Health Service, 1967

YEAR OF ACE

Between 1940 and 1960 the country’s fertility rates by color
increased by about one-half. Live births per 1,<X)0 white women
15-44 years of age rose from 77 to 113 annually, while the
rate for Negro and other races rose from 102 to 153. There
were important differences between the two, however, as the
m aps by State show.

71.4-71.9
70.5-71.3

1

69.9-70.4

.......... .. M
EAN
69.4-69.8
68.6-69.3
66.4-68.5

NATIONAL ATLAS

DEATHS, MEDICAL EDUCATION & M A N PO W ER

MEDICAL SERVICES

NATIONAL ATLAS

HOSPITAL STATISTICS: 1965

PER100,000 CIVILIANS

PROFESSIONAL NURSES: 1962
ACTIVE

LONG-TERM HOSPITALS

SHORT-TERM HOSPITALS
1
State&lo l g v
ca o t.
G n ra
ee l
1
Non-profit; operated by foundations, religiousorgan
Privately-ow operatedfor profit by individuals, f
ned;

Graph and 1:34,000,000 maps below compiled from information provided by American Hospital Association, 1965

PER 100,000 CIVILIANS
P 100,000 CIVILIANS
ER

W M 517-827

357-427
- M
EAN
285-356

254
HOSPITAL BEDS: 1965
GENERAL AND SPECIAL,
NON-FEDERAL

HOSPITAL BEDS: 1965
MENTAL, NON-FEDERAL

P 100,000 CIVILIANS
ER
448-622

HOSPITAL CENSUS: 1965
GENERAL AND SPECIAL,
NON-FEDERAL
A
veragedaily cen
sus.

323-353
- M
EAN
292-322

HOSPITAL CENSUS: 1965
MENTAL, NON-FEDERAL
A
veragedailycensus,
patients inhospitals

NEED , U T IL IZ A T IO N , A N D
C O ST O F M E D IC A L SERVICES
The maps cover the noninstitutionalized civilian population of
the United States for the indicated years, by census regions.
Though some o f the differences may appear to be small,
they are fairly consistent. Thus, if the areas on each map are
ranked from 1 to 4, with the lowest number standing for the
most favorable situation healthwise (for example, fewer days
of restricted activity and bed disability), the regions obtain
the following average ranks:
Northeast
1.7
North-Central 2.4
West
2.1
South
3.7
Relatively few of the individual values depart much from this
PERCENT OF POPULATION
CONSULTING A PHYSICIAN

PERCENT OF CHILDREN
UNDER 1 YEAR WITH
7
S
ROUTINE CHECK-UP
IN 1 6
94

/
PER
CENT
/ EX EN ON
P SE
Other
P
hysicia
DAYS OF SCHOOL LO
SS
P RCHILD (6-16 YEAR
E
S)
P R YEAR IN 1 6
E
95

ETHNIC POPULATION

255

NATIONAL ATLAS

256

INDIAN POPULATION

NATIONAL ATLAS

258

ETHNIC POPULATION

FAMILY INCOME

259

RELIGIONS

NATIONAL ATLAS

■ H

Baptist 50+%
Baptist 25-50%

■ ■
i

Congregational 50+%

i Congregational

25-50%

■ ■

Disciples of Christ 50+%

□

Disciples of Christ 25-50%
Episcopal 50+%
Episcopal 25-50%
Jewish 50+%

□

Lutheran 50+%

□

Lutheran 25-50%
M ethodist 50+%
M ethodist 25-50%
M ormon 50+%
1 M ormon 25-50%
Presbyterian 50+%
| Presbyterian 25-50%

" O

Roman Catholic 50+%
No comparable
information available
for Alaska or Hawaii

n n

| Roman Catholic 25-50%

The “50 + %” above indicates that the designated
denomination accounts for at least 50% of the reported
church membership in that county. The " 2 5 -5 0 % ”
indicates that the designated denomination accounts for
at least 25% of the reported church membership in that
county. If two or more denominations have a member­
ship of 25% or over in a given county, the largest is shown.
White areas on the map indicate that no denomination
accounts for more than 25% of the reported church mem­
bership

264

The principal source for data on religious denominations
and church membership is the National Council o f
Churches. The most recent study conducted by the Council
is based upon 1952 data collected for 114 religious bodies
in the conterminous States. Although this national religious
census is incomplete, the coverage is substantial enough
to provide significant distributional patterns on a national
scale.
The reporting organizations accounted for 49% of the
total population of the United States, whereas the total
church membership is estimated to be about 60% of the
population. In some sections of the country, reporting
was less complete than in others, but subsequent analysis

of those areas indicates that the basic patterns on the map
o f “Leading Religious Denominations” would be rein­
forced rather than changed by a complete census o f church
membership.
The map of “Church Membership Compared with
the Population” is based on statistics which were adjusted
to compensate for differences in membership definition
used by the various reporting organizations. Some counted
all baptized persons, including infants, and others counted
only those who obtained full membership.
In addition, several Negro religious groups, especially
those in the southeastern section of the country, have not
maintained centralized records of individual church mem­

bership. For purposes of comparison it has been necessary
to subtract the Negro population reported in the 1950
census from the total population in order that a reason­
ably accurate ratio between church membership and total
population be maintained.
REFERENCES
Gaustad, Edwin S., Historical atlas o f religion in America, New York,
Harper and Row, 1962.
National Council of Churches, Churches and church membership in
the United States, ser. A— New York, 1956—1958.
E,
Zelinsky, Wilbur, “An approach to the religious geography of the
United States: Patterns o f church membership in 1952, Annals of
the Assoc, o f Am. Geographers, v. 51, no. 2, 1961, p. 139-193.

CRIME AND LAW ENFORCEMENT

NATIONAL ATLAS

266

EDUCATION

HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS
INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION
i 1
?
0 1
5

g»

-=
2

ta
£SS

a:

:s

”“ S
'

]§
■1
•s

'S 5
B 3
J 2

* 5
5

-tss
£s

JSS

1
1

H-&
ssc:

: ?
as"

i!

£ S

■S

ES
J- *

: s

is s s is -.

j IS
“ i!
: !!
is

ig

SS U T cS *

!

»

£ gj

S is

ssssr
£ S 5 S rt.“

j ?

O
vinity S
c*

!

nJ

i:

B
e*«iyU ofl.
>leC

°s ?

-ss

9

!

Bd
ni

is

l
S

II
s r

58
52

r OF COLUMBIA

:s
«

b~

267

ip
i

T
ts
McnfSS

J I

;s

2i

J 30

i i
Si

i i?

‘*s&
“ ss
£S

5 if

Fo L u e a
rt e d rd le

e
i^

^

P lo H
e * eight*

SS

«S£
“j £

'NStateTchre. Coll.
— ,
B ll
e

if

s

i :?
i i2

j
: j
s s

■>=8

'-a s

I!

:3

! !?

■=§
t j;£ E

sse
s^ s:

Si

Ii

ass

M 4
B 5
0 2

s g r

R mn
ich o d
E a s ille
v nv
F rt Wyn
o a e

tS S tc

i f

s a a r/c s r

a sr* .

—

a b r -

SSS1.C

is
IP ” sS
!r

' am.
s
T p
a

U
If
aabashColl.t
sss
W

d a

% ss

z : ‘

S xC
iou enter

A
nnaM n.v
U

« £

S B

i J3
SSL
5 V
,

I !!

t 5
5

I 1
5

■I

tzs

! ^

S :
&3s

i I

“1

s i s -

NATIONAL ATLAS

HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS
15
DENVER

22b

22a
BOSTON

14
PORTLAND
16
MINNEAPOLISST. PAUL

17
MILWAUKEE

20
CINCINNAT I

Lb Lb 18
KANSAS CITY

J 19
ST. LOUIS

PROVIDENCE

CUYAHO
GA
21
CLEVELAND

'
23
DETROIT

NEW YORK CITY
AREA

W H
ESTC ESTER

24
BUFFALO

NEBfr,
BRONX

JCIeve'and\'
©•® 0 \,

' LakU-

QUEENS COUNTY

ndianapo'1
^

268

1a
NEW YORK CITY
13
SAN FRANCISCOOAKLAND
ijlashville

PITTSBURGH
BALTIMORE

WASHINGTON

MONTGOMERY

.D
aytona I

10
CHICAGO

NASHVILLE

11
SAN DIEGO

NEW ORLEANS

C piled b H ard E H Brid ater StateC
om
y ow . irt, gew
ollege
andSaul B C
. ohen, C U
lark niversity, 1 6
94
R
evisedfro U O
m .S. fficeof Edu n Education directory, 1964-1965,
catio ,
W
ashington, U Govt P t. O 1 6 ,p 3 p 2128
.S.
rin ff., 9 5 t. , . 1-1

TYPE OF INSTITUTION

SCALE 1 ,5 0 0
:7 0 ,0 0

D
ALASKA

Awarding Doctorate

NATIONAL ATLAS

270

HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102