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May 2003

REVIEW
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Department of Labor

B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta tistic s

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U.S. Department of Labor
Elaine L. Chao, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Kathleen P. Utgoff, Commissioner
The Monthly Labor Review ( usps 9 8 7 -8 0 0 ) is published
m onthly by the Bureau o f Labor S tatistics o f the U .S.
Department o f Labor. The Review w elcom es articles on the
lab or fo r c e , la b o r-m a n a g em en t r e la tio n s , b u s in e ss
c o n d itio n s , in d u stry p r o d u c tiv ity , c o m p e n s a tio n ,
occupational safety and health, demographic trends, and
other econom ic developments. Papers should be factual
and analytical, not polemical in tone. Potential articles, as
w ell as com m unications on editorial matters, should be
submitted to:
Editor-in-C hief

Monthly Labor Review
Bureau o f Labor Statistics
Washington, DC 20212
Telephone: (202) 6 9 1-5900
E-mail: mlr@bls.gov
Inquiries on subscriptions and circulation, including address
changes, should be sent to: Superintendent o f Documents
G overn m en t P rin tin g O ffic e W ash in gton , DC 2 0 4 0 2
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Single copy— $13 domestic; $18.20 foreign. Make checks
payable to the Superintendent o f Documents.
Subscription prices and distribution policies for the Monthly
Labor Review ( issn 0 0 9 8 -1 8 1 8 ) and other government
publications are set by the Government Printing Office, an
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The Secretary o f Labor has determined that the publication o f
this periodical is necessary in the transaction o f the public
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U nless sta ted o th e r w ise , a r tic le s ap pearin g in this
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cite the specific issue o f the Monthly Labor Review as the
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MONTHLY LABOR

R E V I E W _____________________ _ _ _ _ _
V olum e 126, N u m b e r 5
M ay 2003

Consumer expenditures for selected items, 1999 and 2000

3

R ecent C onsum er Expenditure surveys provide inform ation on w hat consum ers spend
th eir m oney on and the trends th at shape U .S. buying habits

Abby Duly, George Janini, Eric J. Keil, Laura Paszkiewicz, Geoffrey Paulin, and Neil Tseng

Regulatory reform and labor outcomes inthe electricity sector

10

A lthough em ploym ent reductions have been associated w ith deregulation o f the sector,
red u ctio n s in earnings have not; prem ium and real w eekly earnings have risen

M. Scott Niederjohn

Disability and the characteristicsof employment

20

Persons w ith disabilities have different rates and term s o f em ploym ent than those w ithout
disabilities; how ever, once on the jo b , their situations do not differ fundam entally

Edward H. Yelin and Laura Trupin

Departments
L abor m onth in review
P récis
Book review
P u b lications received
C u rren t labor statistics

2
32
33
34
37

Editor-in-Chief: Deborah P. Klein • Executive Editor: Richard M. Devens • Managing Editor: Anna Huffman Hill • Editors: Brian
I. Baker, Richard Hamilton, Leslie Brown Joyner • Book Reviews: Richard Hamilton • Design and Layout: Catherine D. Bowman,
Edith W. Peters • Contributor: Horst Brand


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The M ay Review
This issue starts off with a special section
of briefings on specific categories of
consumer expenditures. As is the case with
so many surveys, the Consumer Expendi­
ture Survey gets more interesting, cer­
tainly, and probably more useful, as it is
given tighter focus by an experienced
analyst: Abby Duly looks at spending on
the necessities o f food, housing and
apparel; George Janini examines travel
expenditures; Eric J. Keil gives an account
on out-of-pocket spending on medical
services under different insurance plans;
L aura P aszkiew icz details the ways
different consumers finance vehicle pur­
chases; Geoffrey Paulin analyzes expendi­
tures on beverage alcohol; and Neil Tseng
outlines entertainment budgets.
Edward Yelin and Laura Trupin present
information from the California Work and
Health Survey on employment conditions
of workers with disabilities. They find that
persons with disabilities were less likely
to have jobs, more likely to have a parttime job if they were employed, and more
likely to have had experienced a recent
job loss. However, employees with dis­
abilities did not differ much, in terms of
specific working conditions, from em­
ployees without disabilities.
M. Scott Niederjohn looks at regulation,
deregulation, employment, and earnings
in the electricity sector. He finds that
employment has been much more affected
than earnings.

Mass layoff statistics
restored
Publication of data from the Mass layoff
Statistics programs resumed with news
release u s d l 03-165, “Mass Layoffs in
January-F ebruary 2003 and A nnual
Averages for 2002” on April 9,2003. The
m ls program had been discontinued on
December 31,2002, due to lack of fund­
ing. In that release, the Bureau of Labor
Statistics reported that 20,269 m ass
layoff events occurred in the N ation in
2002, resulting in 2,244,631 initial claims
2

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May 2003

filings for unem ploym ent insurance.
Both measures were lower than in 2001.
The number of initial claims filed in 2002
due to mass layoffs was higher in the
West, 745,638, than in any other region.
The smallest number of mass-layoff initial
claims was reported in the Northeast
region, 338,965. Over the year, however,
decreases in mass-layoff initial claims
occurred in each of the four regions, with
the largest decline in the Midwest.
M an u factu rin g accounted for 35
percent of all mass layoff events and 40
percent of initial claims filed during 2002.
A year earlier, manufacturing accounted
for 42 percent of such events and 49
percent of claims. Within manufacturing,
filings were most numerous in trans­
portation equipment, food production,
machinery manufacturing, and computer
and electronic products.
The related report, which covers mass
layoffs extending longer than 30 days,
resumed publication on April 18,2003. In
that release, “Extended Mass Layoffs in
the Fourth Quarter of 2002 and Annual
Averages for 2002,” bls reported that
employers conducted 7,163 extended
mass layoff actions, affecting almost 1.5
million workers in 2002. These totals were
down from 8,350 events and slightly more
than 1.75 million separations in 2001.
In 2002, seasonal work continued to be
the m ost cited reason for layoff, ac­
counting for 32 percent of all layoff events
and 37 percent of all separations. Layoff
activity due to internal company restruc­
turing was at a level exceeded only in 2001
and occurred largely among general mer­
chandise stores. In all, employers cited this
reason in 1,654 events, about 23 percent
of the total, resulting in the separation of
375,593 workers, or 25 percent of all
extended mass layoffs.

Drop in multifactor
productivity
M ultifactor productivity— measured as
output per unit of combined labor and
capital inputs— fell by 1.0 percent in the
private nonfarm business sector in 2001.

This was the first decrease since 1991.
The multifactor productivity decline in
2001 reflected a 0.1-percent decrease in
output and a 1.0-percent increase in the
combined inputs of capital and labor.
Capital services grew by 4.1 percent,
while labor input fell by 0.4 percent.
Multifactor productivity measures the
joint influences on economic growth of
technological change, efficiency improve­
ments, returns to scale, reallocation of
resources, and other factors. Multifactor
productivity, therefore, differs from the
labor productivity (output per hour)
measures that are published quarterly.
Additional information is available in
“Multifactor Productivity Trends, 2001,”
news release usd l 03-158.

Klein Award winners
announced
Each year since 1969, the Lawrence R.
K lein A w ard has h o n o red th e best
articles appearing in the Monthly Labor
Review. The award was established in
honor of Lawrence R. Klein, who retired
in 1968 after 22 years as editor-in-chief
of the Review and established a fund to
encourage the highest levels of analysis
and writing in the journal’s pages.
This year, from the articles written by
b ls a u th o rs, th e tru ste e s selected
“Labor force experience of women from
‘Generation X ’” by Marisa DiNatale and
Stephanie Boraas of the Office of E m ­
ployment and Unemployment Statistics
(March 2002 issue).
From the articles by authors outside
bls , the trustees selected three articles:
“Work shifts and disability: a national
view” by Harriet B. Presser of the Uni­
versity of Maryland and Barbara Altman
of the National Center for Health Statistics.
(September 2002 issue); “Labor Force
participation of older women: retired?
working? both?” by Elizabeth T. Hill of
T he P enn sy lv an ia State U niversity
(September 2002 issue); and “What is an
employee? The answer depends on the
law” by Charles J. M uhl of Goldberg,
Kohn, Bell, Black, Rosenbloom & Moritz,
Ltd. (January 2002 issue).

Consumer Expenditures, 1999 and 200®

Consumer expenditures for selected items,
1999 and 2000
Recent Consumer Expenditure Surveys provide information on what
consumers spend their money on; from spending on necessities to
entertainment to alcohol, the Consumer Expenditure Survey examines
the trends that shape U.S. buying habits
\he current Consumer Expenditure (CE) Survey program
began in 1980, The survey is conducted by the Census
Bureau for the Bureau o f Labor Statistics. The principal
objective o f the survey is to collect information on the buying
habits o f American consumers. The survey consists o f two
components:

T

• A Diary, or recordkeeping, survey completed by participating
consumer units for two consecutive 1-week periods.
• A n Interview survey in w hich expenditures of consumer
units are obtained in five interviews conducted every 3
months.
Survey participants record dollar amounts for goods and
services purchased during the reporting period, regardless of
whether payment is made at the time of purchase. Expenditure
amounts include all sales and excise taxes for all items purchased
by the consumer unit for itself or for others. Excluded from both
surveys are all business-related expenditures and expenditures
for which the consumer unit is reimbursed.
Each component of the survey queries an independent sample
of consumer units that is representative of the U.S. population.
In the Diary survey, about 7,500 consumer units are sampled
each year. Each consumer unit keeps a diary for two 1-week
periods, yielding approximately 15,000 diaries a year. The
interview sample is selected on a rotating-panel basis, surveying
about 7,500 consumer units each quarter. Each consumer unit is
interviewed once per quarter, for five consecutive quarters. Data
are collected on an ongoing basis in 105 areas of the United
States.
The brief reports that make up this article present data obtained from
recent Consumer Expenditure Surveys. Detailed articles, along with
supporting statistics, are published in the Consumer Expenditure Survey
Anthology (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2003).


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The Interview survey is designed to capture expenditure data
that respondents can reasonably recall for a period of 3 months
or longer. In general, the data captured report relatively large
expenditures, such as spending on real property, automobiles,
and major appliances, or expenditures that occur on a regular
basis, such as spending on rent, utilities, and insurance pre­
miums. Including global estimates of spending for food, it is
estimated that about 95 percent of expenditures are covered in
the Interview survey. Expenditures on nonprescription drugs,
household supplies, and personal care items are excluded. The
Interview survey also provides data on expenditures incurred
on leisure trips.
The Diary survey is designed to capture expenditures on
small, frequently purchased items that are normally difficult
for respondents to recall. Detailed records of expenses are
kept for food and beverages—both at home and in eating
places— tobacco, housekeeping supplies, nonprescription
drugs, and personal care products and services. Expenditures
incurred away from home overnight or longer are excluded
from the Diary survey. Although the diary was designed to
collect information on expenditures that could not be recalled
easily over a given period, respondents are asked to report
all expenses (except overnight travel expenses) th at the
consumer unit incurs during the survey week.

Interpreting the data
Expenditures are averages for consumer units with specified
characteristics, regardless of whether a particular unit incurred
an expense for a specific item during the recordkeeping period.
The average expenditure for an item may be considerably lower
than the expenditure by those consumer units which actually
purchased the item. The less frequently an item is purchased,
the greater is the difference between the average for all

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

3

Consumer Expenditures, 1999 and 2000

consumer units and the average o f those purchasing the item.
Also, an individual consumer unit may spend more or less
than the average, depending on its particular characteristics.
Factors such as income, the ages o f family members, geo­
graphic location, taste, and personal preference also influence
expenditures. Furthermore, even w ithin groups with similar
ch aracteristics, the d istrib u tio n o f ex penditures varies
substantially. These points should be considered in relating
reported averages to individual circumstances.

In addition, sample surveys are subject to two types of
errors: sampling and nonsampling. Sampling errors occur
because the data are collected from a representative sample
rather than the entire population. Nonsampling errors result
from the inability or unwillingness of respondents to provide
correct information, differences in interview ers’ abilities,
mistakes in recording or coding, or other processing errors.
The box on this page gives the official bls definitions of
some terms used in the ce survey.

Glossary of Consumer Expenditure Survey terms

Consumer unit. M em bers o f a household
related by blood, marriage, adoption, or some other
legal arrangement; a single person living alone or
sharing a household with others, but who is financially
independent; or two or more persons living together
who share responsibility for at least two out o f the
three major types o f expenses: food, housing, and
other expenses. Students living in university-sponsored
housing also are included in the sample as separate
consumer units.
Reference person. The first member mentioned
by the respondent when asked to “Start with the name
o f the person or one o f the persons who owns or
rents the home.” It is with respect to this person that
the relationship o f other members o f the consumer
unit is determined.
Total expenditures. The transaction costs,
including excise and sales taxes, o f goods and
services acquired during the 3-m onth Interview
period. Estimates include expenditures for gifts and
contributions and payments for pensions and personal
insurance.
Income. The combined income earned by all con­

4

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May 2003

sumer unit members 14 years or older during the 12
months preceding the interview. The components o f
income are wages and salaries; self-employment
income; Social Security and private and government
retirement income; interest, dividends, and rental and
other property income; unemployment and workers’
co m p en sa tio n an d v e te ra n s ’ b en e fits; p u b lic
assistance, supplemental security income, and food
stamps; rent or meals or both as pay; and regular
contributions for support, such as alimony and child
support.

Complete income reporters. In general, a
consumer unit that provides quantitative data on at
least one o f the major sources o f its income, such as
wages and salaries, self-employment income, and
Social Security income. Even com plete income
reporters may not provide a full accounting o f all
income from all sources.
Quintiles of income before taxes. Five
groups w ith the sam e num ber o f com plete income
reporters, ranked in ascending order o f income.
Incomplete income reporters are not ranked and
are shown separately in the quintiles-of-incom e
tables.

Consumer spending
for necessities
Abby Duly
he proportion o f household spend­
ing used to purchase basic necessi­
ties is of interest to policymakers and
social researchers as an elem entary
indicator o f economic well-being. There
are several complexities, however, in this
application of the data; for example, the
definition of “well-being” itself is not
necessarily universal, and, once defined,
the criteria upon which to evaluate well­
being are also subjective and debatable.
This report does not attempt to address
these complexities; rather, data on con­
sumer spending for necessities are pre­
sented in a manner that may be interpreted
by a variety of readers for a variety of
uses.
The discussion that follows uses the
expenditure shares tables published by
the c e survey program . These tables
provide the proportions of average annual
expenditures (or total spending) allocated
to various categories of items. The cate­
gories of interest here are those desig­
nated to be necessities: food, housing,
and apparel. It is important to note that
while it is certainly reasonable to define
these categories as necessities in 2000,
there have been changes to them over
time. For example, within the necessity
category of food, the allocation among
subcomponents has shifted such that the
share of the food dollar spent on food
away from home (including meals at
restaurants or fast food, carryout, and
home delivery) has grown from 3.0 percent
in 1909, to 29.0 percent in 1987, to 41.0
percent in 2000.
W hereas data on food and apparel
are taken directly from the published c e
tables, the housing category is con­
structed specifically out o f two m ain
subcomponents: shelter and utilities.

T

Abby Duly is an economist in the Branch of
Information and Analysis, D ivision o f
Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor
Statistics.


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This is an important deviation from the
published data. The reason is that, ar­
guably, shelter and utilities are the actual
necessities of housing and that other
components used in the c e survey, such
as household furnishings and equipment,
are not, in fact, basic goods.
In the next paragraph, necessity shares
are compared across income quintiles.
Then, data are presented to provide a
broad overview of necessity spending by
additional demographic groups: homeowners and renters, urban consumers and
rural consumers, black households and
white and other households, Hispanic
and non-Hispanic households, consumer
units living in different regions, and
consumer units living in different regions.
In the c e survey, the share of average
annual expenditures used to purchase
food declines from 14.9 percent to 11.6
percent as income increases from the third
quintile to the fifth quintile. However,
consumer units in the first quintile allocate
a smaller proportion of total spending to
food (14.9 percent) than do consumer
units in the second quintile (15.7 percent).
Expenditure shares for housing clearly
decline across income quintiles. While
consumer units in the highest income
quintile devote 22 percent of their total
spending to shelter and utility costs,
those in the lowest income quintile spend
almost 30 percent. The shares of average
annual expenditures allocated to apparel
are barely discernible from one another.
In fact, the range of apparel shares is less
than 1 percentage point, from 4.7 percent
spent by those in the lowest income
quintile to 5.3 percent spent by those in
the highest income quintile.
Consumer units that rent their homes
devote a greater share of their total
expenditures to food (15.0 percent) and
apparel (5.4 percent) th an do th eir
homeowning counterparts (13.1 percent
and 4.7 percent, respectively).
U rban consum ers spend a higher
portion of their total expenditures on
housing than do consumers living in rural
areas. Food, however, makes up a slightly
greater proportion of total spending by

rural households than th at by urban
households.
Black consumer units spend higher
shares of total expenditures on all three of
the necessity categories than do white
and other (Native American, Alaskan
Native, Asian, and Pacific Islander) con­
sumer units. The same is true for Hispanic
households in com parison w ith nonH ispanic households, alth o u g h the
relevant housing shares are not very
different.
A m ong consum er u n its liv in g in
different regions, necessity shares vary
little from each other. For exam ple,
expenditure shares used to purchase food
range from 13.4 percent in the West and
Midwest to 13.8 percent in the Northeast.
(H ouseholds in th e South spen d a
com parable 13.6 p ercen t on food).
Housing shares across regions are more
variable, w ith consum er units in the
Midwest having the lowest share, 23.3
percent of total spending, and consumer
units in the Northeast region having the
highest share, 27.7 percent.

Travel expenditures in 2000
George Janini
onsumer units that went on trips in
2000 spent an average of $875 on
travel for the year. A ltogether, such
consumer units had roughly $32 billion
in travel expenditures. Travel expendi­
tures are broken down into expendi­
tures for transportation, food, lodging,
entertainment, and gifts. Transportation
expenditures include all costs incurred
traveling to and from the destination,
as well as other transportation costs
incurred while on the trip. Food expendi­
tures encompass all costs for food and
alcohol consumed on the trip. Lodging
expenses include the costs for hotels,
m otels, cottages, tra ile r camps, and
other types of lodging. Entertainm ent

C

George Janini is an economist in the Branch
o f Information and A nalysis, D ivision o f
Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau o f
Labor Statistics.

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

5

Consumer Expenditures, 1999 and 2000

expenditures take into account all types
of entertainment, such as admission to
sporting events, parks, museums, and
tours, as well as any type of fees related
to these events. Gift expenditures include
all gifts purchased on the trip for persons
other than those in the consumer unit.
Overall, consumer units that traveled
in 2000 spent an average o f $352 on
transportation, $204 on food, $66 on
entertainment, $76 on gifts, and $177 on
lodging. This amounted to an aggregate
o f about $13 b illion spent on tran s­
portation, $7.6 billion on food, $2.4 billion
on entertainment, $ 2.8 billion on gifts, and
$6.5 billion on lodging. Out of approxi­
mately 109 million consumer units, 37
million, or 34 percent, reported taking a
trip or vacation in 2000.
The highest percentage of trip takers,
38 percent, was posted by those 45 to 54
years of age, the lowest, 27 percent, by
those 65 and older. The latter group,
however, had the highest average travel
expenditures of any of the age groups.
Interestingly, the group spent an average
of 4 percent of its total average annual
expenditures on trips and vacations,
about twice that spent by most o f the
other age groups. However, the 65-andolder age group did not account for the
highest aggregate travel expenditures in
2000: the 45- to 54-year age group ac­
counted for 24 percent of aggregate travel
expenditures, followed by the 35- to 44year age group, with 23 percent; then
came the 65-and-older group, with 19
percent.
Fully 58 percent of consumer units with
reported annual incomes of more than
$50,000 took a trip or vacation in 2000,
almost double that of consumer units with
reported incomes of less than $25,000.
Consumer units in the highest income
bracket, $75,000 or more, outspent each
of the other income groups. The highestincom e group also accounted for 41
percent o f aggregate trip expenditures in
2000, well above the 22 percent spent on
travel by the next-highest group, those
with incomes from $50,000 to $75,000.
Overall, consumer units with incomes of

6

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May 2003

$35,000 or more accounted for 76 percent
of total travel expenditures.

Out-of-pocket spending
for private health insurance
EricJ.Keil
1otal out-of-pocket medical spending
was significantly higher, on average,
for consumer units with fee-for-service
insurance ($2,315 per year) than for
consum er units covered by a health
maintenance organization ($1,789). For
health care insurance alone, consumer
units with fee-for-service insurance paid
$1,029, on average, while those covered
by a health maintenance organization paid
$870. Other significant differences in
spending were for physicians’ services
($210 for those w ith fee-for-service
coverage, $129 for those with health
m aintenance organization coverage),
laboratory tests and x rays ($38, compared
with $15), hospital services other than
room ($68 and $37, respectively), prescrip­
tions drugs and medicines ($329 and
$236), and dental services ($311 and $265).
The percentage reporting m edical
expenditures in several categories also
was higher for fee-for-service consumer
units. (The percentage rep o rtin g is
defined as the percentage of all consumer
units reporting at least one, but possibly
more, expenditures during the year they
were interviewed.) Significant differences
existed in the percentage reporting ex­
penditures for laboratory tests and x rays
(23 percent for those with fee-for-service
coverage, 13 percent for those covered
by a health maintenance organization),
hospital services other than room (16
percent, com pared w ith 13 percent),
prescription drugs and medicines (80
percent and 75 percent, respectively),
dental care (51 percent and 48 percent),
purchases of medical or surgical equip­
ment (4 percent and 2 percent), and eye

T

Eric J. Keil is an economist in the Branch of
Information and Analysis, D ivision o f
Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

exams, treatment, or surgery (32 percent
and 28 percent).
Although the percentage reporting
was higher for the fee-for-service group
in every category of medical expenditure,
the number of reported expenditures per
item was generally higher for the health
maintenance organization group. Sig­
nificant differences in receipts for services
performed appeared in the following
categories: physicians’ services (13.1
million receipts reported by those with
health maintenance organization cover­
age, 11.2 million reported by those with
fee-for-service coverage), prescription
drugs (26.9 million, compared with 24.1
million), dental care (6.4 million and 5.7
million, respectively), and eyeglasses and
accessories (2.4 million and 1.9 million).
The fee-for-service group had signif­
icantly higher expenditures only for
laboratory tests and x rays (1.5 million,
compared with 0.9 million).
The two groups o f insureds w ere
similar with respect to age, income, family
size, and the number of children living in
the consum er u n it. A nnual incom e
averaged $43,226 for those with health
maintenance organization coverage and
$43,728 for those with fee-for-service
insurance. The fee-for-service group had
an average age of 50, the health main­
tenance o rg anization group 48. O n
average, fee-for-service consumer units
were composed of 2.6 persons, of which
0.80 was a child, while health maintenance
organization consumer units comprised
2.7 persons, of which 0.91 was a child.
The demographic differences between
the two groups likely are not large enough
to be a contributing factor in expenditure
differences.
More consumer units in the 25-to-54year age group had health maintenance
organization insurance than had fee-forservice insurance, but more in the upper
age categ o ries h ad fe e-fo r-serv ice
coverage than had health maintenance
organization coverage. More consumer
units with no children had fee-for-service
coverage than had health maintenance
organization coverage.

The costs and demographics
of vehicle acquisition
Laura Paszkiewicz
n 1999-2000, 81 percent of those who
purchased new vehicles financed their
purchases, compared with 56 percent of
those who purchased used vehicles. O f
those who financed, 87 percent of newvehicle purchasers and 79 percent of
used-vehicle purchasers had payments
remaining. On average, lessees paid $868
as a down payment, only about 76 percent
of what a used-vehicle purchaser paid as
a down payment ($1,147), and only 30
percent of what a new-vehicle purchaser
paid ($2,914).
Among the factors that play a role in
deciding whether to lease, buy new, or
buy a used v ehicle are th e average
monthly payment and the amount of time
it takes to pay off a loan or to complete a
lease. The average monthly payment was
$353 for lessees, $399 for purchasers of
new vehicles, and $273 for purchasers of
used vehicles; the average number of
m onthly paym ents m ade w as 39 by
lessees, 54 by new-vehicle buyers, and 43
by used-vehicle buyers.
The demographic analysis that follows
looks at the en tire sam ple o f those
acquiring a vehicle in 1999 or 2000, either
through an outright purchase or with
financing. Among the factors examined
are income, gender, geographic region,
and race.
Consumer units that purchased used
vehicles had the least income, on average.
The average income of someone who
bought a used vehicle was $48,004, com­
pared with $72,992 for lessees and $69,875
for new-vehicle purchasers. Those in the
lowest income quintile were the most
likely to buy a used car, with 80.9 percent
of the group doing so. In comparison, 54.1
percent of those in the highest income
quintile bought used vehicles. W ith

I

Laura Paszkiew icz is an economist in the
Branch o f Information Analysis, Division of
Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of
Labor Statistics.


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regard to purchasing a new vehicle, the
situation was essentially reversed: almost
36 percent of those in the highest income
quintile bought a new car, a figure more
than 20 percentage points above that for
those in the lowest income quintile who
bought a new vehicle.
O f those acquiring vehicles in 1999 and
2000,28 percent were in the 35- to 44-yearold age bracket, although that group made
up a lesser 22 percent of the population.
The 25- to 34-year-old and 45- to 54-yearold age groups each posted more than 20
percent of all acquisitions, yet made up
less than that percentage of the popu­
lation. The oldest group (75 and older)
acquired the fewest vehicles, with only
2.6 percent of acquisitions.
M en, w ith 54 percent of the total
population, acquired 58 percent of all
vehicles. M en and wom en acquired
vehicles differently. Single men leased
vehicles 9.6 percent of the time, bought
new vehicles 20.6 percent of the time, and
bought used vehicles 69.9 percent of the
time. Single women leased vehicles 11.5
percent of the time, bought new vehicles
36.9 percent of the time, and bought used
vehicles 51.5 percent of the time.
Consumer units in the South and the
Northeast acquired a smaller percentage
of vehicles than their population shares
in 1999 and 2000. Southern consumer
units, with 35 percent of the total U.S.
population, had 31 percent of acqui­
sitions, while those in the Northeast,
making up 19 percent of the U.S. popu­
lation, had 16 percent of total vehicle
acquisitions. In contrast, consumer units
in the Midwest and the West accounted
for 27 percent and 25 percent, respectively,
of vehicle acquisitions, while making up
24 percent and 22 percent, respectively,
of the total U.S. population. Consumers
acquiring vehicles in the Northeast were
more likely to lease an auto than those in
the West; consumer units in the West
were more likely to buy a used vehicle. In
the Northeast and the West, about 30
percent of those who acquired a new
vehicle purchased it. In the Midwest, 9
percent of the vehicle-acquiring popu­

lation leased, 23 percent purchased new
cars, and 69 percent bought used cars. In
the South, the corresponding figures were
8 percent, 25 percent, and 67 percent.
The Consumer Expenditure Survey has
four race categories: white; black; Asian
or Pacific Islander; and American Indian,
Aleut, or Eskimo. Asians and Pacific
Islanders accounted for 3.1 percent of the
population acquiring vehicles. A little
more than half of the group bought a used
vehicle, 42 percent bought a new vehicle,
and the remaining 7 percent leased a
vehicle. The white population accounted
for 88 percent of those acquiring vehicles,
with 65.5 percent buying used vehicles,
26.5 percent buying new, and 8 percent
leasing vehicles.
The black population and the American
Indian, Aleut, and Eskimo population were
most different from Asians and Pacific
Islanders, and similar to each other, in their
choice of a method of acquisition. O f the
consumer units acquiring vehicles in the
black population, 5.3 percent leased, 19.6
percent purchased a new vehicle, and 75.2
percent purchased a used vehicle. O f
those acquiring a vehicle in the American
Indian, Aleut, and Eskimo population, 4.2
percent leased a vehicle, 16.5 percent
purchased a new vehicle, and 79.4 percent
purchased a used vehicle.

Consumer expenditures
for alcohol in 2000
Geoffrey Paulin
According to the U.S. D epartm ent of
Agriculture, in 2000 average per capita
consumption of alcohol was 24.9 gallons,
mostly in the form of beer (21.7 gallons).
That same year, the average consumer
unit reported expenditures of $372 for
alcoholic beverages. About 1 dollar was
spent on alcohol for every 8 dollars spent
on food at home. On the basis of either
m ean weekly expenditure or percent
reporting alcohol purchases, beer is the
Geoffrey Paulin is a senior economist in the
Branch of Information and Analysis, Division
o f Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of
Labor Statistics.

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

I

7

Consumer Expenditures, 1999 and 2000

most popular form of alcohol purchased
by the average consumer unit. However,
on the basis of mean weekly expenditure
for those reporting alcohol purchases, a
figure that can be calculated by dividing
m ean weekly expenditure by percent
reporting, the largest average expenditure
for all consumer units is for wine at home.
As one might expect, expenditures for
alcohol increase with income, regardless
o f the type of alcohol purchased and
regardless of whether the expenditure is
for alcohol at home or alcohol away from
home. Overall, the fifth income quintile
spends about 3.5 tim es as m uch for
alcohol as does the first income quintile—
2.7 times as much for alcohol at home and
more than 7.1 times as much for alcohol
away from home. As regards which type
of alcohol, the ratios of the fifth to the first
income quintile range from 1.6 for beer at
home to 9.2 for other alcohol away from
home.
Expenditures for alcohol away from
home rise with age up to 35 to 44 years old
and then decline. Expenditures for wine
follow the pattern, except that they peak
for those aged 45 to 54. Expenditures for
beer at home actually decline with age,
ranging from a high of $5.48 per week for
the under-25 group to a low of $0.65 per
week for the 75-and-older group. Most
other expenditures for alcoholic bever­
ages follow a sim ilar pattern for the
percent reporting, peaking either for the
under-25 group or the 25- to-34-year-old
group. The lone exception is expenditures
for wine, which peak with the 45- to-54year-old group and reach a low point with
the 75-and-older group.
The predicted probability of purchase
of alcohol, based on logit regressions, is
hig h est for the youngest group (46
percent) and lowest for the oldest group
(22 percent). Similarly, the probability of
purchase is lowest for the first quintile (29
percent) and highest for the fifth quintile
(50 percent).
Hispanic, as opposed to non-Hispanic,
ethnicity appears to have little relationship
to the probability o f purchasing alcohol
in general. However, race appears to

8

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É

May 2003

play a role: black and Asian consumers
have much lower probabilities of pur­
chase th a n w hite consum ers have.
Occupation apparently plays a role as
well: among salaried (or wage-earning)
workers, those in technical, sales, or serv­
ice positions and those in agricultural
fields (forestry and fanning), for example,
are more likely to purchase alcohol than
are managers and professionals.
The probability of purchasing beer is
strongly related to age, declining from 29
percent for the youngest group (under 25)
to 10 percent for the oldest group (75 and
older). The probability of purchase for the
lowest income quintile is 17 percent,
compared with 27 percent for the highest
quintile. Single men are the most likely to
purchase beer (23 percent), single women
(12 percent) and single m others (9
percent) the least likely. Among salaried
workers, members of the armed services
(38 percent), blue-collar workers (30
percent), agricultural workers (35 percent),
and technical, sales, and service workers
(28 percent) have the highest predicted
probabilities of purchasing beer. Retirees
have a higher probability of purchase than
wage and salary w orkers have. The
p u rc h a se o f w ine or o th er alcohol
strongly increases the probability of pur­
chasing beer. However, the purchase of
both wine and other alcohol does not
significantly increase the probability of
purchase.
The probability of purchasing wine is
m uch low er th an the probability of
purchasing beer, and age does not appear
to be strongly related to the purchase of
wine. The probability of purchase in­
creases with income, and ethnicity is, at
best, only weakly related to purchasing.
However, as with alcohol in general, race
is a factor: blacks and Asians are less likely
to purchase wine than are whites. Occu­
pation plays little, if any, role, although, of
all working consumers, blue-collar work­
ers have the lowest predicted probability
of purchasing wine. Similarly, those who
are not working for reasons other than
retirement or unemployment have a lower
probability than other groups. Both the

purchase of beer and the purchase of
other alcohol separately increase the
probability of purchasing wine. Never­
theless, purchasing both beer and other
alcohol adds little to the probability of
purchasing above what purchasing beer
or other alcohol alone adds.
As with wine, the predicted probability
for the purchase of other alcohol is, in
general, low. A lthough age is not a
statistically significant factor in the
probability of purchase of other alcohol,
income is: consumer units in the fourth
income quintile and those in the fifth
income quintile are more likely to purchase
than are consumer units in the middle
income quintile. Consumer units headed
by w om en have a low er p red icted
probability of purchasing other alcohol
than households headed by single men
have. Hispanics and Asians have lower
predicted probabilities than white nonHispanics have.

Expenditures
on entertainment
Neil Tseng
n the Consumer Expenditure Survey,
e n te rta in m e n t e x p e n d itu re s are
divided into four categories: fees and
adm issions; television, rad ios, and
so und eq u ip m e n t; p e ts, toys, an d
p la y g ro u n d eq u ip m e n t; a n d o th e r
entertainment supplies, equipment, and
services. Fees and admissions include
expenses for out-of-town trips, fees for
recreational lessons, and admission to
sporting events, cultural and theatrical
events, the movies, and special events,
such as five musical performances. The
category of television, radios, and sound
equipment includes color televisions,
digital videodisc players, videocassette
recorders, compact disc players, video
game consoles and software, videotapes
and discs, speakers, and various other

I

Neil Tseng is an economist in the Branch o f
Production and Control, D ivision o f
Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau o f
Labor Statistics.

home theater sound systems. The cate­
gory o f pets, toys, and play g ro u n d
equipm ent includes toys, games, and
p lay g ro u n d equipm ent; hobbies and
tricycles; and pet food, veterinary services,
and pet services. O ther entertainment
supplies, equipment, and services include
more “volatile” expenditures, such as the
rental or purchase of recreational vehicles
and the purchase of boats.
In 2000, those under age 35 spent 22
percent o f the $203 billion that was
allocated on entertainm ent that year,
whereas those 55 and older spent 25
percent of the total entertainment amount.
The 35- to-54-year-old age group (with
ju s t 42 p e rc e n t o f th e p o p u latio n )
accounted for more than half of the total
$203 billion spent on entertainment.
Consumer units with reference persons
w ho did not g rad u ate from college
accounted for 60.5 percent of the aggre­
gate expenditures on entertainm ent,
whereas college graduates accounted for
39.5 percent. O f those who did not grad­
uate from college, the group that did not
graduate from high school spent 8 percent
of the aggregate $203 billion on enter-


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

tainment, high school graduates spent 24
percent, and high school graduates with
some college accounted for 20 percent.
Average incomes for the four education
groups were as follows: those who did
not graduate from high school, $23,329;
high school graduates, $36,134; high
school graduates w ith some college,
$38,837; and associate’s degree, $50,060.
Among the college graduates, those with
a bachelor’s degree and those with ad­
vanced degrees had aggregate expendi­
ture shares of 25 percent and 15 percent,
respectively.
The proportion of aggregate expendi­
tures allocated to entertainment ranged
from 9 percent by the lowest income
quintile to 40 percent by the highest. Not
surprisingly, consum er u n its in the
highest quintile contributed the most to
each o f the four categories of enter­
tainment expenditure, spending more than
$22 b illion on fees and adm issions;
approximately $ 17 billion on televisions,
radios, and sound equipment; $10 billion
on pets, toys, and playground equipment;
and $13 billion on other entertainment
supplies, equipment, and services. The

$22 billion spent by the highest quintile
on fees and admissions was more than
twice the amount spent by consumers in
the fourth income quintile and almost 7
times the amount spent by those in the
first quintile.
The proportion o f total aggregate
entertainment expenditures allocated to
fees and admissions ranged from nearly 7
percent for those in the lowest quintile to
more than 50 percent for those in the
highest quintile. For pets, toys, and
playground equipm ent, the range of
expenditures was 7 percent for those in
the lowest quintile to 37 percent for those
in the highest quintile. Total entertainment
expenditures allocated to other enter­
tain m en t supplies, eq u ip m en t, and
services ranged from 8 percent in the
lowest quintile to almost 38 percent for
those in the highest quintile. The 11
percent that the lowest quintile con­
tributed toward televisions, radios, and
sound equipment was the largest share of
their expenditures on entertainm ent,
indicating that the category may be the
main form of entertainment for those in
that income quintile.
□

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

9

U.S. Electricity Sector

Regulatory reform and labor outcomes
in the U.S. electricity sector
Although employment reductions have been associated
with deregulation o f the U.S. electricity sector,
reductions in earnings have not; in fact,
premium and real weekly earnings
for electricity-sector employees have risen
M. Scott Niederjohn

M. Scott Niederjohn
is an economics
doctoral candidate
at the University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
E-mail:
niederjs@uwm .edu

10

he last 10 years have seen many States
aggressively pursuing the restructuring of
their electric utilities. These reforms were
motivated by a number of Federal Energy Regu­
latory Commission ( ferc ) orders that encouraged
competitive markets for wholesale electric power.1
While the effects o f these reforms on the product
market (and competition) have been widely stud­
ied, there is a dearth o f research examining the
effect o f regulatory reform on the U.S. electricity
sector’s labor market, which employs more than
300,000 highly skilled workers. This heavily
unionized workforce operates and maintains the
country’s critical electrical infrastructure that
both families and businesses rely on for their daily
activities.
This study explains the effect o f electricity
deregulation on this sector’s workforce by ad­
dressing several factors. After initially reviewing
the recent history o f the U.S. electricity sector’s
regulatory movement, the study briefly reviews
some o f the theoretical background on regula­
tory reform. Then, data is analyzed on employ­
ment, earnings, and unionization in the U.S. elec­
tricity sector—before and during the regulatory
reform movement, which is still underway. These
results are compared with similar results for other
previously restructured industries.
The data for the electricity sector reveal em­
ploym ent reductions that are associated with
regulatory reform. The findings also indicate that
earnings have not been negatively affected by

T

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May 2003

this restructuring, unlike other sectors examined.
In fact, when compared with the earnings o f simi­
lar workers, the industry earning premiums for
electricity-sector employees have actually in­
creased, while the level o f unionization in this
sector has drifted down. These results are par­
ticularly significant, as this is the first deregu­
lated industry to show such contrasting earn­
ings and employment patterns.

Deregulation and competition
The electricity sector has historically been in­
volved in the generation, transm ission, and
distribution o f electricity. Generation involves
the production o f electricity at pow er plants.
Transmission involves the delivery o f electricity
to distribution facilities over a system o f high
voltage power lines. Once the power arrives at
the distribution center, it is “stepped dow n” to
a voltage that can be distributed. The distribu­
tion system is then responsible for delivering
power from the transmission system to hom es
and businesses using a netw ork o f w ires and
transform ers.
Historically, the electric utility sector consisted
o f vertically integrated firms that were involved
in the generation, transmission, and distribution
o f electricity. This internal firm structure was
viewed as an efficient approach toward provid­
ing electricity service to customers. State gov­
ernments, though, restricted state-wide entry into

this sector and extended these state monopolies with a legal
right (and obligation) to distribute electricity to the customers
in their geographic area at prices typically set by State public
service commissions. While the transmission and distribu­
tion components o f electricity production are still considered
natural monopolies (although transmission is subject to some
limited regulatory reform), many have recently begun to rec­
ognize that the generation sector may benefit from a more
competitive environment— through competition between gen­
erators. This enhanced competition is meant to create a busi­
ness environment that promotes lower electricity prices and
more efficient means o f generation. In essence, consumers
and businesses will be able to choose from a variety o f com­
petitive electricity suppliers. This separation o f related ser­
vices is similar to the regulatory reform models applied to
other network industries, such as natural gas and telecommu­
nications, in the past.

Current status of restructuring
The effort to restructure the U.S. electricity sector and de­
velop markets for wholesale electric power has slowed signifi­
cantly. This slowing is partly the result o f the 2001 power
crisis in California that some attribute, at least in part, to
California’s deregulation o f their electric utilities.2 Chart 1
shows the regulatory status o f each State as o f December

2002.
Comprehensive reform began in a number o f States from
1990 to 1997. These States include Massachusetts, Rhode
Island, New York, Maine, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Connecticut,
California, New Jersey, and Delaware. Several other States
have recently implemented restructuring including Arizona,
Ohio, Maryland, Michigan, New Hampshire, and Texas. There
are also a number o f States that have passed restructuring
legislation and then suspended action. These States include

Chart 1. The current status of U.S. electricity-sector restructuring, December 2002

I___ I Restructuring active
I

1 Restructuring delayed

I

1 Restructuring suspended

I

I Restructuring not active

NOTE: This map is maintained and updated monthly by the Energy Information Administration on the Internet at http://
www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/chg_str/regmap.html.


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Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

11

U.S. Electricity Sector

Nevada, Montana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.
Large industrial customers were the driving force behind the
regulatory reform movement. These heavy users o f electric
power were interested in decreasing the rates they pay, which
competition was predicted to encourage. This demand from
industrial users helps explain why much o f the early restruc­
turing effort progressed quickly in Northeastern and Mid­
western States, given the concentration o f industrial firms in
these regions.
Another trend in the product market has been the merger
and consolidation o f investor-owned electric utilities. For
instance, from 1997 to 2000 there were 23 mergers of investorowned electric utilities with assets valued at $0.5 billion or
greater.3 Consolidating and increasing the size o f firms is a
common approach used by company owners to enhance their
com pany’s competitive advantage in a deregulated environ­
ment. Such business strategy can improve business perfor­
mance by creating economies o f scale. However, these econo­
mies are commonly achieved through the elimination o f re­
dundant activities (and possibly jobs). This is only one ex­
ample o f the many ways in which regulatory reform might
affect the labor market for electricity workers. Such policy can
also place downward pressure on earnings and unionization.

Regulatory reform and labor markets
There have been a number o f studies that have investigated
the effect o f regulatory reform on labor markets in transporta­
tion and telecommunications.4 However, no detailed study
has investigated this topic in the electricity sector.5 Although
the effect o f industry reform on employment, earnings, and
unionization cannot be determined, a priori , with certainty
(as demonstrated later), there are a number o f economic theo­
ries that can help guide our expectations.
Many have found that increased competition in a labor
market has a negative effect on employee earnings.6 This is
typically attributed to the fact that regulation, and its restric­
tion on competitive firm entry, allows for relative ease o f
unionization. Employees tend to have a significant bargain­
ing advantage when negotiating with utilities, because the
per-worker costs o f unionization are low in industries with a
few large firms. It is thought that the removal o f the barrier to
entry in these markets creates a major obstacle to unions as
new, often nonunion, firms compete for customers in the pre­
viously protected industry. It has also been postulated that
rate-of-retum regulated firms, like electric utilities, have less
incentive to contest the earnings demands made by unions
because much o f the costs are often passed on to consumers
in the form o f higher utility bills.7
The effect o f regulatory reform on employment is more
ambiguous. It seems that the method by which an industry’s

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May 2003

workforce is transformed by deregulation is a function o f how
efficient the employees in that industry were before the re­
form movement. In a relatively inefficient industry, job cuts
would prevail as firms attempt to become more competitive in
the face o f new firm entrants. If, instead, an industry were
efficient in labor supply before regulatory reform, it seems
less likely that job cuts would be required to address steppedup competition. Even though the incentive to enhance effi­
ciency influences industry employment patterns when firms
face greater competition, union demands for job security limit
the extent to which firms can easily lay off workers or employ
nonunion replacement workers. The employment constraint
that electric utility owners face is especially significant given
the relatively large percentage o f workers in this industry who
are represented by a union. Another cause o f this ambiguity
may be the source o f industry inefficiency. For example, if
inefficiencies were to due to the failure o f the regulated firm to
invest in plant and equipment, deregulation may lead to in­
vestment rather than job cuts.

Other Industry experiences
Since the late 1970s there have been a number o f highly orga­
nized industries that have undergone some type o f regulatory
reform. This section reviews four o f these industries: truck­
ing, railroads, airlines, and telecommunications. Such a re­
view helps provide insight on the expected labor-market ef­
fects o f electricity utility deregulation. Table 1, based on the
Current Population Survey, presents data on percent union­
ization, total employment, and real weekly earnings for each
o f these industries.8 The post-deregulation period for truck­
ing, railroads and airlines began in 1978, while this period
began in 1983 for telecommunications. There are both com­
mon and distinct trends among these industries.
In the trucking industry,9 a large reduction in union mem­
bership has taken place since deregulation was implemented.
While union membership fell by a modest 3 percentage points
from 1973 to 1978, it has fallen 27 percentage points since the
policy shift o f regulatory reform. In contrast to this union
employment pattern, deregulation has caused large employ­
ment gains in trucking overall, particularly from 1983 to 1988.
Trucking employment gains have continued in this industry
to the present. Real weekly earnings, however, declined dur­
ing most o f the post-deregulation period.
In the railroad industry,10 there has been little impact on
union membership. The percentage o f union workers in the
railroad industry fell only from 79 percent in 1978 to 71 percent
in 2001— a smaller decrease throughout the overall labor mar­
ket. The relatively small union membership declines in rail are
attributable in large part to the lack o f new nonunion entrants
into this naturally oligopolistic industry. The substantial em-

Table 1. Unionization, employment, and earnings in restructured industries, selected years
industry

1973

1978

1983

1988

1991

Trucking1
Union membership rate.................................................
Employment (in thousands)..........................................
Weekly earnings (1983/1984 dollars)..........................

.49
997
$499

.46
1,111
$491

.38
1,117
$404

.25
1,544
$386

.25
1,617
$405

.23
1,907
$353

.19
2,113
$368

Railroad1
Union membership rate..................................................
Employment (in thousands)..........................................
Weekly earnings (1983/1984 dollars)..........................

.83
587
$475

.79
580
$491

.83
428
$507

.81
363
$490

.78
286
$494

.74
282
$470

.71
257
$432

Airlines1
Union membership rate.................................................
Employment (in thousands)..........................................
Weekly earnings (1983/1984 dollars)..........................

.46
368
$499

.45
465
$498

.43
464
$455

.42
683
$420

.37
696
$443

.36
800
$435

.39
1245
$453

Telecommunications2
Union membership rate.................................................
Employment (in thousands)..........................................
Weekly earnings (1983/1984 dollars)..........................

.59
949
$399

.55
1,075
$442

.55
1,060
$457

.44
1,114
$447

.42
1,107
$458

.29
1,126
$488

.24
2,065
$679

All wage and salary employees
Union membership rate.................................................
Employment (in thousands)..........................................
Weekly earnings (1983/1984 dollars)..........................

.24
75,519
$315

.23
84,968
$301

.20
88,290
$273

.17
101,407
$267

.16
102,786
$255

.15
111,960
$256

.14
120,708
$273

S ource : Union membership rates were provided by Barry Hirsch
and David Macpherson at http://www.trinity.edu/bhirsch/unionstats/.
Information on employment and earnings was taken from the Current
Population Survey Files.

ployment declines (more than 55 percent decline in employ­
ment from 1978 to 2001) suggest that this continued collective
bargaining power was not enough to protect employees’ jobs.
Nonetheless, railroad unions were able to negotiate less sub­
stantial earning declines than those that were prevalent in the
trucking sector.
The labor market changes in the airline industry11 also re­
veal interesting post-deregulation earning and employment
patterns. Although unionization levels among airline workers
have had some declines, the decreases have not been nearly
as extensive as those in trucking. Post-deregulation changes
in airline unionization levels more closely resemble that o f rail.
Past research attributes the small unionization decline in air­
lines to the industry’s continued domination by a handful of
large union carriers following deregulation.12 The post-de­
regulation period has also been one o f major employment in­
creases for the airline industry.13 Some o f these employment
gains can be attributed to increased demand from passengers
responding to discount fares offered along high-density
routes following deregulation. Avoiding significant reduc­
tion in union membership during this trend o f increasing air
travel helped create a labor market environment that allows
for the maintenance o f high earnings. Indeed, the earning
patterns presented in table 1 reveal that earnings for airline
workers in 2001 were about the same as in 1983, declining only
slightly following deregulation.


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1996

2001

1 The post-deregulation period for trucking, railroads and airlines
began in 1978.
2The post-deregulation period for telecommunications began in 1983.

In contrast to the union membership trends reported for
railroad and airlines workers, table 1 indicates that union mem­
bership in telecommunications14 has declined significantly
since the 1984 divesture o f AT&T. Union membership rates
in this sector fell from 55 percent in 1983 to 24 percent in 2001.
Whereas employment growth had been moderate from 1983
to 1996, the telecommunications bubble from 1996 to 2001 is
associated with significant employment increases. Employ­
ment in this sector climbed from 1,126,000 employees in 1996
to 2,065,000 employees in 2001.15 Real earnings followed a
similar path as employment in this sector, increasing almost 40
percent over this same time period.16
Examination o f data on all wage and salaried employees in
the United States suggests that declining unionization re­
ported for deregulated industries is part o f an overall trend in
the U.S. labor market. For instance, since 1973, the percent­
age of all employees in labor unions has fallen from 24 percent
to 14 percent. The findings in table 1 also indicate that the
overall U.S. labor force has expanded by 60 percent, and real
earnings have fallen during much o f this period. These
econom y-wide earnings and em ploym ent patterns more
closely resemble those found in trucking compared with those
o f other deregulated industries.
By comparison, union membership in the electricity sector
has also fallen over this time period but not as dramatically as
the overall labor market. As the following text tabulation

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

13

U.S. Electricity Sector

shows, electricity-sector unionization has fallen from 47 per­
cent in 1973 to 30 percent in 2001. However, the electricity
sector continues to be significantly more unionized than the
overall labor market.
Year

1973
1978
1983
1988
1991
1996
2001

Union
Employment
membership rate (in thousands)

.................47
.................46
.................44
.................37
................. 38
................. 31
.................30

Weekly earnings
(1983/1984 dollars)

321
354
433
452
448
383
360

$ 522
558
572
600
592
652
726

Comparing earnings and employment trends in the U.S. labor
market with trends in deregulated industries reveals clear and
distinct effects from regulatory reform in these industries’ la­
bor markets. Predicting these changes is difficult. For ex­
ample, whereas the major impact o f restructuring in the truck­
ing industry was a pronounced decline in unionization and
earnings, the railroad industry experienced a major decline in
employment while unionization and earnings remained steady.
The telecommunications industry saw large employment gains
in the post-deregulation period along with steady declines in
unionization. The experiences o f these industries shed some

Chart 2.

light on what could take place in the electricity-sector labor
market as a result o f restructuring. However, it is not clear, a
priori, what the precise impact will be on unionization, earn­
ings, and employment.

Employment trends in the electricity sector
Data on the U.S. electricity sector,17taken from the Bureau o f
Labor Statistics Covered Employment and Wages (CEW) sur­
vey, is used to investigate earnings and employment trends in
the electricity sector following deregulation. Employment
trends in chart 2 show that the number o f employees in the
electricity sector has fallen to about 339,000 employees (or
about 24 percent) since 199018— a change from the upward
trend that had prevailed up until then. As mentioned earlier,
1990 is the year in which regulatory reform was implemented
in various States. This post-deregulation employment de­
cline represents more than 105,000 electric utility workers.
Such a sectoral employment decline is not unique to the United
States, as deregulation had a similar effect on the electricitysector labor force in the United Kingdom.19
Chart 3 suggests that this employment effect differs by
regulation status o f States. Employment in the States classi­
fied as “restructuring active”20 (called “deregulated” in chart 3)

Employment in the U.S. electricity sector, 1975-2000

Number of employees

Number of employees
5 0 0 .0 0 0
4 5 0 .0 0 0
4 0 0 .0 0 0
3 5 0 .0 0 0
3 0 0 .0 0 0
2 5 0 .0 0 0

200.000
1 5 0 .0 0 0

100. 0 0 0
5 0 ,0 0 0

0
S o u r c e : Data are available from the
www.bls.gov/cew/home.htm.

14 Monthly Labor Review

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May 2003

bls

Covered Employment and Wages

(c e w )

survey on the Internet at http://

Chart 3.

Employment by regulation status as of December 2002 in the U.S. electricity sector, 1975-2000

Number of employees

S o u r c e : Data are available from the
www.bls.gov/cew/home.htm.

Number of employees

bls

Covered Employment and Wages

by the U.S. Energy Information Administration has fallen by
nearly 29 percent from 1990 to 2000, compared with employ­
ment in the States categorized as “restructuring not active”21
(called “regulated”), which has fallen by about 19 percent
over the same time period. This suggests that both regula­
tory reform, as well as the expectation o f regulatory reform,
have an impact on employment. The States that have delayed
or suspended discussion o f regulatory reform o f their electric
utilities show little appreciable change in employment.
As suggested earlier, it is likely that these employment
declines are the result o f significant consolidation and merger
o f electric investor-owned utilities underway since 1992.
Many o f these firms have publicly stated that the motivation
for their mergers was the need to get bigger, and therefore,
more competitive. Their hope was to achieve economies o f
scale by eliminating redundant activities across multiple utili­
ties. For example, marketing and human resource departments
may be eliminated at one o f the firms, cutting employment and
costs. It is also likely that larger utilities can obtain better
pricing from their input suppliers.

Unionization and weekly earnings
Earnings data taken from the BLS Covered Em ploym ent
and Wages (CEW) program are used to exam ine earnings


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(c e w )

survey on the Internet at http://

trends in the electricity sector. The im pact on real earn­
ings in this sector, since the deregulation m ovem ent b e­
gan, stands in sharp contrast to that o f employment. Chart
4 shows that real earnings o f production w orkers in the
electricity sector have actually increased since 1992.22
From 1992 to 2000, real weekly earnings rose from S482 per
week to $529 per week in this sector. This is an increase o f
alm ost 10 percent in real w eekly earnings. C hart 4 also
shows real w eekly earnings for all nonsupervisory tran s­
portation and public-utility sector em ployees. Interest­
ingly, while the electricity-sector em ployees saw an earn­
ings increase, this broader sector experienced very little
earnings change over the 1992-2000 tim e period. In fact,
the general trends in these two data sets follow ed very
sim ilar paths until the early 1990s.
To determine whether this earnings discrepancy was due
to individual-worker characteristic differences between the
two cohorts, Current Population Survey data was analyzed
from 1983 to 2000.23 This analysis found no significant differ­
ences in education levels or hours worked for these two
groups. Productivity data, only available for electric and gas
utilities from BLS, was also compared with all nonfarm busi­
nesses. No substantial difference in productivity between
these two groups was found to explain these earnings in­
creases, as can be seen in chart 5.

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

15

U.S. Electricity Sector

Chart 4.

Real weekly earnings for electricity-sector production workers, com pared with all
transportation and public utility workers, 1975-2000

Real weekly earnings
[in 1982 dollars]

Real weekly earnings
[jn 1982 dollars]

S o u r c e : Data are available from the
ces/home.htm.

Chart 5.

Current Employment Statistics survey (National) on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/

bls

Multifactor productivity index, 1975-98

Index
[1992 = 100]

Index
[1996 = 100]
120

100

80

-

60

40

20

S o u r c e : Data are available from the
surveymost?mp.

16 Monthly Labor Review

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bls

Major Sector Multifactor Productivity Index on the Internet at http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/

M ay 2003

Examination o f chart 6 suggests that regulatory reform is
also associated with electricity-sector earnings. Whereas earn­
ings in States that are currently deregulated have historically
been higher than those in currently regulated States, this pre­
mium has increased significantly in recent years.24 In the pre­
deregulation period from 1975 to 1989, the average real-earn­
ings premium in the now deregulated States averaged $48 per
week. In the post-deregulation period, covering the years
1990 to 2000, this premium jum ps to about $87 per week.
Chart 7 shows union-membership rates in the electricity,
telecommunications, trucking and airline industry, as well as
the entire labor market. While the unionization decline in the
telecommunications and trucking industries is apparent, the
electricity-sector story is similar with some interesting intrica­
cies. Overall, union membership in the electricity sector has
fallen from 37 percent to 30 percent over the period o f regula­
tory reform. Although 2001 was a continuation o f the down­
ward trend, there were slight increases in unionization that
started in 1992 and 1996.

Collective bargaining
The majority o f unionized U.S. electricity-sector employees
belong to either the International Brotherhood o f Electrical


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Workers (I.B.E.W.) or the Utility Workers Union o f America
(U.W.U.A.). The I.B.E.W. is by far the largest union, repre­
senting more than 83 percent o f the organized utilities in the
United States and Canada and 70 percent o f the unionized
Investor Owned Utilities.25 They represent all types o f elec­
tricity-sector employees including: meter readers, linepersons,
electrical installers, electricians, and many more. A summary
o f 2002 labor contract negotiations between the I.B.E.W. and
electric utilities provide further evidence o f contrasting earn­
ings and employment patterns in this industry.26 For instance,
the I.B.E.W. and Arizona Public Service negotiated a 9.25percent wage increase over a 3-year contract for approximately
1,800 employees in April 2002.27 The I.B.E.W. and Dominion
Resources settled on a 13.8-percent wage increase over a 5year contract in September 2002 for 4,700 workers.28 Wage
increases of 9 percent over a 3-year period were negotiated
for 1,500 workers at PSI Energy in May 2002.29 General wage
increases were also negotiated at Georgia Power for 3,800
workers in September 2002.30 Georgia Power employees also
agreed to incentive plans based on job performance. Lastly,
workers at Florida Power Corporation agreed to 3-percent
raises beginning in December 2002.31
Employment negotiations at these electric utility compa­
nies indicate that worker attrition was primarily achieved

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

17

U.S. Electricity Sector

Chart 7.

S

ource:

Union membership rates in selected industries, 1983-2001

Data are available from the

bls

Current Population Survey

through early retirements. For instance, Ameren Corporation
announced a voluntary retirement program for 1,000 workers
in November 2002.32 Dominion Resources, as part o f the con­
tract discussed earlier, also offered an early retirement supple­
ment. Utilities have been attempting to cut their employ­
ment, as well as labor costs, by encouraging early retirement
o f some o f their highest wage earners. While doing this, they
continue to offer wage increases to the employees that are
retained.

Conclusions
Regulatory reform is well underway in the U.S. electricity sec­
tor. While the impact on the product market— namely prices
and competition— has been studied in detail, little attention
has been paid to the impact o f this restructuring on the labor
market. This article finds that significant employment de­
creases are sometimes associated with this regulatory reform.
Overall electricity-sector employment has fallen by more than

18 Monthly Labor Review

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May 2003

(c p s )

on the Internet at http://www.bls.census.gov/cpsmain.htm.

24 percent since the regulatory reform movement began in
1990. By analyzing these data by State regulatory status, it is
quite conclusive that these employment declines are strongly
correlated with regulatory reform. Employment in States where
restructuring is currently active saw a 29-percent employment
decline, far larger than the 19 percent observed in States that
have not yet undergone any regulatory reform.
This study also finds that at least through 2001 electric­
ity-sector regulatory reform has not had any negative impact
on earnings. Rather, employees in this sector have seen in­
creases in both their real weekly earnings, as well as their
earnings premium, compared with other utility workers. It is
postulated that union contracts, and the fact that this reform
is still underway, have helped to maintain earnings premi­
ums. It is apparent that electric utilities have cut costs, and
become more competitive, through employment declines as
opposed to earnings actions. This is reinforced through the
study o f a handful o f recently negotiated union contracts in
this sector.
□

Notes
A cknowledgment: The author is grateful to James Peoples, Keith

10 Census Industry Code 400.

Bender, and David McDermott for helpful comments.

11 Census Industry Code 421.

1 These regulatory orders include the following: 1978 purpa Act,
which mandated that utilities must purchase electricity from nonutilities
at their avoided cost; 1992 epact Act, which opened the transmission
system to nonutilities; 1996 ferc Order 888 and 889, which established
wholesale electricity markets for competition.
2 Paul Joskow explains many o f the reasons for this slowdown in
“Electricity Competition in the U.S. where do we go from here?” a
presentation available from the mit Center for Energy and Environ­
mental Policy Research (November 2001) on the Internet at http://

econ-www.mit.edu/faculty/pjoskow/papers.htm,
3 J. Anderson, “Making Operation Sense o f Mergers and Acquisi­
tions,” The Electricity Journal, 1999, Vol. 12, No. 7.
4 A number o f these studies can be found in the following: James
Peoples, Regulatory Reform and Labor Markets (Boston, ma, Kluwer
Academic Publishers, 1997). The following article also provides a good
review o f the literature in this area: Clifford Winston, “Economic
Deregulation: Days o f Reckoning for Microeconomists,” Journal o f
Economic Literature, September 1993, Vol. 31, pp. 1263-89.
5 See David McDermott, “Employment and other trends in the
electric services industry,” Monthly Labor Review, September 1999, pp.
3-8. McDermott mentions a general employment decline in the U.S.
electricity sector.
6 For airlines: Nancy Brown Johnson, “Airline Workers’ Earnings
and Union Expenditures under Deregulation,” Industrial Labor Rela­
tions Review, October 1991, Vol. 45, No. 1, pp. 154-65; and Pierre
Cremieux, “The Effect of Deregulation on Employee Earnings: Pilots,
Flight Attendants, and Mechanics, 1959-1992,” Industrial and Labor
Relations Review, 1996, Vol. 49, No. 2, 223-42. For railroads: Clifford
Winston et al, The Economic Effects o f Surface Freight Deregulation
(Washington, DC, The Brookings Institution, 1990); Wayne K. Talley
and Ann V. Schwartz-Miller, “Railroad Deregulation and Union Labor
Earnings,” in James Peoples, ed., Regulatory Reform and Labor Mar­
kets (Boston, ma, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997); and Michael
Belzer, “Commentary on Railroad Deregulation and Union Labor Earn­
ings,” in James Peoples, ed., Regulatory Reform and Labor Markets
(Boston, ma, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997). For trucking: Nancy
L. Rose, “Labor Rent Sharing and Regulation: Evidence from the
Trucking Industry,” Journal o f Political Economy, December 1987,
Vol. 93, No. 6, pp. 1146-78; Barry T. Hirsch and David A. Macpherson,
“Earnings and Employment in Trucking: Deregulating a Naturally
Competitive Industry,” in James Peoples, ed., Regulatory Reform and
Labor Markets (Boston, ma, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997); and
Clifford Winston et al, The Economic Effects o f Surface Freight De­
regulation (Washington, DC, The Brookings Institution, 1990).
7 This theory is described in the following: Ronald G. Ehrenberg,
The Regulatory Process and Labor Earnings (New York, Academic
Press, 1979).

8 cps data are available on the Internet at http://www.bls.census.gov/
cps/cpsmain.htm. Summary o f cps data on unionization is available
from the Hirsch/Macpherson reference used in table 1.
9 Census Industry Code 410.


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12 cps data are availab le on the Internet at h ttp ://
www.bls.census.gov/cps/cpsmain.htm. Summary o f cps data on
unionization is available from the Hirsch/M acpherson reference
used in table 1.
13 It is expected that employment declines will be seen in the future
as a result o f the dramatic events in this industry since the terrorist
attacks of 2001. The precarious financial position of many airlines has
led to union, earnings, and employment pressure.
14 Census Industry Code 441.
15 cps data are available on the Internet at http://

www.bls.census.gov/cps/cpsmain.htm,
16 Ibid.
17 Standard Industrial Code 491.
18 This trend was discussed in the following: David McDermott,
“Employment and other trends in the electric services industry,”
Monthly Labor Review, September 1999, pp. 3-8. These data have
been updated.
19 David Newberry and Michael Pollitt, “The Restructuring and
Privatization o f the cegb: Was it worth it?,” Journal o f Industrial
Economics, 1997, Vol. 45, No. 3, pp. 269-304.
20 These States include: Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, District of
Columbia, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New
Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Texas, and Virginia.
21 These States include: Alabama, Alaska, Colorado, Florida, Geor­
gia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minne­
sota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota,
South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Washing­
ton, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.
22 Electricity-sector production workers were used because total elec­
tricity-sector weekly earnings actually increased by a significantly larger
amount. It is possible that this large increase is due to bonus or stock
payments related to the mergers in this industry. Production workers
are a more appropriate measure o f the actual impact o f regulatory
reform on worker earnings.
23 cps

data

are

available

on

the

Internet

at

http://

www.bls.census.gov/cps/cpsmain.htm,
24 Likely due to higher costs o f living and union participation in the
deregulated Northeastern States.
25 Data are available on the Internet at http://ibew.org.
26 The author reviewed utility contracts in 2002 from Labor Rela­
tions Week published by the Bureau o f National Affairs.
27 Labor Relations Week, May 22, 2002.
28 Labor Relations Week, September 12, 2002.
29 Labor Relations Week, June 27, 2002.
30 Labor Relations Week, October 10, 2002.
31 Labor Relations Week, January 2, 2003.
32 Labor Relations Week, November 7, 2002.

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

19

Disability and Employment

Disability and the characteristics
of employment
An analysis o f the California Work and Health Survey
indicates that persons with disabilities have
lower employment rates and less secure kinds of employment
than those without disabilities; once on the job, however,
the two groups do not differ fundamentally
in the nature o f their working conditions
Edward H.Yelin
and
Laura Trupin

Edward H. Yelin is a
professor of medicine
and health policy,
and Laura Trupin is a
research associate,
at the University of
California, San
Francisco, California.
E-mail:
yelin2@itsa.ucsf.edu.

l his article examines the work situation of
persons with disabilities— their employ­
m ent rates, the strength o f th eir con­
nection to the labor force, the terms with which
they are hired, and the specific conditions o f their
jobs. The article is based on an analysis o f the
California Work and Health Survey, a telephone
survey designed to be representative o f the adult
population in California. The survey, conducted
annually for 3 years beginning in 1998, combines
the features o f Federal labor market surveys, such
as the Current Population Survey and its supple­
ments, with health surveys like the National Health
Interview Survey, thereby allowing the two kinds
o f information to be integrated into a single data
source.
The California Work and Health Survey was
initiated in June 1998 with 1,771 respondents,
interviewed in English or Spanish. Respondents
were selected from a random digit dialing sample
o f Californians aged 18 or older, with oversamples
o f person with disabilities, African-Americans,
and A sians and Pacific Islanders. The 1999
survey included interviews with 2,040 adults in
the State, o f whom 909 were part o f the 1998
survey and another 1,131 were new respondents,
including oversamples o f African-Americans,
A sians and P acific Islanders, persons w ith
disabilities, and persons aged 45 to 70 years. The
2000 survey included interview s w ith 2,168
California adults, o f whom 627 were part o f the
1998 and 1999 surveys, 63 8 were part o f the 1999

T

20 Monthly Labor Review

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May 2003

survey alone, and another 903 were new respond­
ents. The new respondents included oversamples
of African-Americans, Asians and Pacific Islanders,
and Hispanics. In what follows, we analyze re­
sponses from all participants between the ages of
18 and 64 who were interviewed in 1999, as well as
those who were added to the survey in 2000: a total
of 2,417 individuals.
To account for the oversampling, and to ensure
that the results reported are representative of the
California adult population, all estimates presented
here make use of proportional sampling weights. The
weights are developed in two stages. The first stage
adjusts for differences in the probability of selection
of different types of individuals— differences that
are attributable to the sampling design (that is, the
oversampling of certain populations). The second
stage adjusts for differences in contact and
response rates of different subpopulations defined
by age, gender, race or ethnicity, household size,
and region of the State. The weighting targets are
based on California Department of Finance annual
population estimates. The use of proportional
weights guarantees that the total sample size is not
artificially inflated when the statistical significance
of the relationship between disability status and
employment outcomes is estimated.

Definitions of variables
Disability.

In the results reported in the analysis
that follows, a respondent is considered to have a

disability if he or she answ ered the follow ing question
affirmatively: “Are you limited in any way in any activities
because of a long-term physical or mental impairment or medical
condition?” If necessary, a long-term condition is defined for the
respondent as “[a condition] which has already lasted three
months, or if it began less than three months ago, can be
expected to last that long.” This measure is based on the National
Health Interview Survey activity limitation status variable1and
is consistent with the definition of disability established by the
Americans with Disabilities Act.
In the California survey, 14.9 percent of respondents reported
at least one limitation in their activity, based on the National
Health Interview Survey measure. For comparison purposes, in
2000, nationwide, 9.6 percent of National Health Interview Survey
respondents aged 18 through 64 reported such limitation. The
analogous rates may be higher in the California survey because
of its sampling universe, in which any adults in the household
who were at home at the time of contact or upon up to six followup
calls were deemed respondents. Persons with disabilities are
more likely to be home than are persons without disabilities,
increasing the share of the total sample with disabilities than
would be the case if all adults in the household had been
interviewed.

Health measures.

In addition to being classified by disability
status, respondents were disaggregated according to their
physical and mental health status and the presence or absence
of chronic illness. Respondents’ overall health status was
measured by their responses to the question, “In general, would
you say your health is excellent, very good, good, fair or poor?”
This widely used measure of self perceived health has been
show n to be related to functional status, morbidity, and
mortality.2 Mental health status was measured by the Short
Geriatric Depression Scale, a 15-item battery of questions that
has been validated for use with general adult populations.3 A
score of 7 or higher was the cutoff point; such high levels of
depressive symptoms are considered to be indicative of clinical
depression.4 Respondents were asked whether a doctor had
ever diagnosed them with any of a list of 12 major chronic
conditions. In the results that follow, this variable has been
recoded to indicate the presence of zero, one, or two or more
conditions.

Labor market outcomes.

The labor market section of the
California survey included information on the respondent’s
current employment situation, such as his or her employment
status, self-employment, num ber of jobs, hours o f work per
week, and weeks o f work per year. Respondents who were
not working were asked about their jobseeking activities,
reasons for not working, and work history. Respondents who
were w orking were asked about their job characteristics (for
example, occupation, industry, tenure, size of firm, union


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status, and benefits) and work arrangements (for instance, work
schedule and flexibility, contingent employment, and whether
they worked from home), as well as about the physical and
psychological demands of their work.
Later in the article, the employment status of persons with
disabilities and of those without disabilities is described, with a
focus on whether the individual was employed for pay during
the week prior to the interview. The analysis is then limited to
those with current or recent employment, in order to zero in on a
num ber of labor m arket outcomes. W ith regard to those
individuals who worked within the past year, the following
variables are defined: involuntary job loss in the past year,
defined as having been laid off from a job or having left a job
because one expected to be laid off; part-tim e, part-year
employment, defined as working fewer than 50 weeks per year
and fewer than 35 hours per week; and episodic employment,
defined as working fewer than 40 weeks in the past year. For
those participants who reported working during the past week,
an additional set of labor market outcomes is defined: the terms
of employment, including involuntary part-time employment,
defined as working fewer than 35 hours per week due to slack
business conditions or the inability to find full-time work; parttime employment from all causes; contingent employment,
defined as having a job that is not expected to last more than
12 months; receiving a promotion or a better job w ithin the
past 12 months; poverty despite employment, defined as
being currently employed for pay, but nonetheless having a
household income below 125 percent of the Federal poverty
level; and job tenure of 1 year or less.

Working conditions. As regards currently employed partic­
ipants, a number of characteristics of employment were ex­
amined, including occupation and industry, self-employment,
work shift, supervisory status, union membership, flexibility of
work hours, work from home, the psychological demands of the
job, whether the job requires more or less education than one
has received, and whether the job involves physical labor. In
addition, four synthetic measures of working conditions were
defined. The first, traditional employment, was designed to
capture the characteristics of “old-economy” jobs— what one
might call typical “nine-to-five” jobs: simultaneously working
full time for the full year; being an employee (that is, not being
self-employed or an independent contractor) paid by the firm
for which one works; having only one job; working day shifts;
having a permanent job (that is, a job which is not contingent);
and not working from home.5 The second measure is the
employment continuum developed by J. Grzywacz and D. Doo­
ley,6which arrays employment along a spectrum from employed
in poorly remunerated positions, to employed in positions with
barely adequate remuneration, to employed in economically
adequate jobs, and, finally, to employed in jobs that are
optimal in both economic and psychological terms. Exhibit 1

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

21

Disability and Employment

Stages-of-Employment Continuum

____________ ____ ___ ________
Stage of employment

Criteria

Inadequate

Working, but having a total household income below 125 percent of the
Federal poverty line.

Barely adequate

Household income above 125 percent of the Federal poverty line and meets
only one o f the following economic criteria:
1. is earning $20,000 per year or more
2. has stable employment: no job loss in past year, fewer than 15 weeks’
unemployment in year, and no contingent employment
3. has employer sponsored health insurance.

Economically good

Household income above 125 percent o f the Federal poverty line and meets two
or more o f the preceding economic criteria, but only one o f the following
psychological criteria:
1. has decision latitude greater than the sample mean
2. has job demands lower than the sample m ean
3. has two or more close friends at work.

Optimal

Household income above 125 percent of the Federal poverty line and meets two
or more of the preceding economic criteria and two or more of the preceding
psychological criteria.

Source: Adapted from J. Grzywacz and D. Dooley, ‘“Good Jobs’
to ‘Bad Jobs’: Replicated Evidence o f an Employment Continuum

lists the specific criteria for each stage o f the continuum. The
third measure is a combination of the first two: jobs that meet the
criteria for traditional and optimal employment simultaneously.
Finally, the fourth measure is based on the job-scoring system
developed by R. Karasek and colleagues,7which classifies jobs
according to the conjoint presence of psychological demands
and autonomy ; jobs with high levels of demands and low levels
of autonomy are said to exact a toll on one’s health status as a
result of stress.

Demographic and socioeconomic variables.

In addition
to the foregoing em ploym ent and health m easures, the
California survey includes basic dem ographic and socio­
economic characteristics. M any o f the results presented are
stratified or adjusted by the following variables: age (18-24,
25-44, 45-54, and 55-64), gender, country of birth, race or
ethnicity (non- Hispanic white, non-Hispanic African-American,
Asian-American, and Hispanic), education (some high school
or less, high school graduate, some college or vocational
education, college graduate, and graduate degree), marital status
(married or living with a partner; widowed, separated, or
divorced; and never married), urban or rural residence, and
region of the State (Los Angeles, other Southern California,
San Francisco Bay area, and other).
22

Monthly Labor Review


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

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from Two Large Surveys,” Social Science and Medicine, April 2003,
pp. 1749-60.

Analysis
The following analysis examines the relationship of a person’s
disability status to the labor market outcomes defined in the
previous section: current employment status, job loss, part-time
orpart-year employment, involuntary part-time employment and
part-time employment from all causes, more than full-time em­
ployment, episodic employment, contingent employment,
remaining in poverty despite employment, having a short job
tenure, and receiving a promotion within a job or receiving a
better job. The proportion of persons with and without dis­
abilities who have each outcome is tallied, with and without
adjustment for demographic variables. In addition, the relative
frequency of individual working conditions and the synthetic
employment measures among persons with and without dis­
abilities are exam ined. The unadjusted results give the
proportion o f persons w ith and w ithout disabilities who
experience each outcome, along with 95-percent confidence
intervals to indicate the reliability of the estimates. A ratio of
those proportions for persons with disabilities compared with
those without is calculated.
In order to adjust for the different characteristics of persons
with and without disabilities, multivariate logistic regression
models are developed in which each outcome is a function of

disability status and a set of independent variables, including
the entire set of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics
described earlier, as well as the number of chronic conditions
the individual reports and his or her overall health status.
Because of the multiple categories of employment, a multinomial
logistic regression was used to estimate the impact of disability
status and the other independent variables on the employment
continuum.
To provide comparable presentations for both the unadjusted
and adjusted results, the adjusted proportions and 95-percent
confidence intervals from the logistic regression results were
calculated, along with the ratio of these proportions for persons
with and without disabilities. For each cell in the tables that
follow, the adjusted proportion was developed by calculating
the predicted probability of the outcome for all observations,
but setting the covariates that defined a given cell to the value
corresponding to that cell, as if, for example, all participants were
nondisabled men.8 The variance associated with the adjusted
proportion was calculated with a Taylor series approximation.9
In the analysis that follows, the sample size varies from 2,417
when the universe includes all persons aged 18 to 64, to 1,987
when the dependent variable refers only to those working at
any point during the year prior to the interview, and to 1,599
w hen the dependent variable concerns ju st the currently
employed population. In addition, for some of the measures, the
sample size was further decreased from these values by 1 to 5
percent because of missing data.

Limitations
One potential limitation— perhaps the principal one— of the
California survey is that its health and disability measures are
based on self-reports. Accordingly, those reporting disability or
poor health may have done so to legitimize their withdrawal from
employment. Moreover, the health of such persons may not meet
the definition of disability necessary to qualify for Social Security
Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income, both of
which require diagnostic certainty and proofofan inability to engage
in substantial gainful activity Still, the disability measures used in
this article are those used in most research having to do with
employment among persons with disabilities.
Another limitation of the California Survey is that it was
conducted only in that State and therefore may not be representa­
tive of the situation elsewhere in the United States. There is
evidence th at m any em erging labor m arket practices—
particularly contingent forms of employment and short job
tenures in fast-growth, high-wage industries— may be used
more frequently in California than in the remainder of the
country.10N evertheless, there is also evidence that these
practices are becoming m ore w idespread throughout the
N ation.11


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Results
Table 1 summarizes the differences in health and demographic
characteristics and in socioeconomic status between persons
with disabilities and those without disabilities. Persons with
disabilities were 4 times more likely to report being in only fair
or poor health (42.1 percent, compared with 10.1 percent) and
to have high levels of depressive symptoms (21.4 percent, as
opposed to 4.9 percent) and more than twice as likely to report
musculoskeletal (66.3 percent, as against 26.2 percent) and
circulatory (35.8 percent, com pared w ith 15.3 percent)
conditions as persons w ithout disabilities. Persons w ith
disabilities also were more likely to report having two or more
chronic conditions (55.4 percent, compared with 18.7 percent).
Almost half of persons with disabilities were 45 to 64 years of
age, but only about a quarter of those without disabilities
were. R eflecting these age distributions, persons w ith
disabilities were less likely to be foreign born than were
persons without disabilities (17.3 percent, as opposed to 30.9
percent), were more likely to be white and not from a Hispanic
background (70.3 percent, compared with 54.2 percent), and
were almost twice as likely to be widowed, separated, or
divorced (27.9 percent, as against 15.6 percent). Such persons
also were more likely to reside in rural areas (10.3 percent,
compared with 6.8 percent). In contrast to many previous
studies, in this one the two groups did not differ in the
proportions with various levels of education.
The California Work and Health Survey results reported in
this article were from 1999 and 2000, two of the strongest
years for the State’s economy in the past quarter century.
Accordingly, more than two-thirds of the adult population of
the State reported being employed in the week prior to the
interview. (See table 2.) However, despite the strength of the
economy, the results of the survey are consistent with those
of other studies in showing substantially lower employment
rates among persons with disabilities. On an unadjusted basis,
such persons were only 58 percent as likely as those without
disabilities to be employed in the week prior to the interview
(42.6 percent, compared with 73.2 percent). Even after adjustment
for health status, comorbidity, and demographic characteristics,
the difference in employment rates between persons with and
those without disabilities remained, suggesting that disability
itself, rather than the characteristics of persons with disabilities,
accounts for the relatively low employment rates of such
persons.
Table 2 also provides an indication of how disability status
and other characteristics combine to affect the employment
status of persons with disabilities. Persons w ith disabilities
who are in excellent, very good, or good health certainly have
lower employment rates than their counterparts w ithout
disabilities (on an adjusted basis, they were 73 percent as
likely to be employed), but the gap was greater for those in
Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

23

Disability and Employment

Table 1.

Health status and demographic characteristics of persons aged 18-64 years, by disability status, 1999-2000

[In percent]
Health status and demographics

Total
(n= 2,417)

Disability
(n = 411;14.9 percent of total)

All persons............................................
Health status:
Fair or poor self-assessed health1....................
Depressive symptoms1......................................
Musculoskeletal conditions1 ...............................
Circulatory conditions1......................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

14.9
7.4
32.2
18.4

42.1
21.4
66.3
35.8

10 1
49
26 2
15.3

48.7
26.9
24.2

17.8
26.8
55.4

54 4
26 9
18.7

15.5
53.6
19.2
11.7

7.7
45.8
27.6
19.0

16.8
54.9
17.8
10.5

Male...............................................................

51.4

50.1

51.6

Foreign born1.................................................
Race or ethnicity:1
White, non-Hispanic.......................................
African-American, non-Hispanic.......................
Asian-American, non-Hispanic...........................
Hispanic..........................................................

28.8

17.3

30.9

56.6
6.2
9.7
27.5

70.3
8.4
2.9
18.3

542
58
10 9
29.2

Education:
Less than high school..............................
High school graduate.........................................
Some college......................................
College graduate.................................................
Postgraduate..................................................

13.6
18.9
35.1
21.7
10.7

13.1
22.0
36.6
16.7
11.5

137
18 4
34 8
22 6
10.6

Marital status:1
Married or living with partner...........................
Separated, divorced, or widowed......................
Never married.....................................

50.4
17.5
32.1

43.0
27.9
29.2

51 7
15 6
32.7

7.3

10.3

6.8

29.3
29.1
21.0
20.6

24.2
30.5
22.7
22.6

30 2
28 9
20 7
20*2

Chronic conditions:1
No chronic conditions.............................
One chronic condition.......................................
Two or more chronic conditions.........................
Age:1
18-24...................................................
25-44...............................................
45-54.......................................................
55-64.......................................................

Rural residence2...........................................
Region:
Los A ngeles........................................
Other Southern California...................................
San Francisco Bay area.....................................
Other California...........................................

' Distribution of characteristic differs by disability status (p < .01).
2 Distribution of characteristic differs by disability status (p < .05).

fair or poor health (on an adjusted basis, persons w ith
disabilities reported employment rates o f 38 percent of those
without disabilities). Similarly, persons with disabilities who
reported two or more chronic conditions fared more poorly in
employment relative to those without disabilities than did
those with no chronic conditions or with one.
Among individuals 18 to 24 years, on an unadjusted basis,
persons with disabilities and those without disabilities reported
essentially the same employment rates. However, with each
increment of age, the ratio of the employment rates of the two
groups declined, a phenomenon consistent with the hypothesis
that persons with disabilities exit the labor market earlier than
those without disabilities. After adjustment, the gap between
the employment rates of persons 18 to 24 years with and without
disabilities widened, an effect not seen in the other age groups.

24

Monthly Labor Review


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

S ource :

No disability
(n = 2,006; 85.1 percent of total)

California Work and Health Survey 1999-2000

This widening suggests that persons with disabilities in this
age group actually have higher employment rates than would be
expected of persons with their health status, level of comorbidity,
and demographic characteristics.
Although persons with disabilities at each level of edu­
cation were less likely to be employed than those without
disabilities, the disparity was greater for those with lower
levels o f education. Thus, although persons w ith disabilities
who had some college or less had about half the employment
rate of such persons without disabilities, am ong those who
were college graduates or who had had postgraduate training,
persons with disabilities were more than three-quarters as
likely to be employed. The paradox is that persons with
disabilities experienced greater returns from increased levels
of education than did those without disabilities. Accordingly,

Table 2.

Employment rates among persons aged 18-64 years, by disability status, with and without adjustment for
health status and demographic characteristics, 1999-2000
Adjusted employment rate'

Unadjusted employment rate
Health status
and demographics

All
persons

With
disability
Percent

Without
disability

95-percent
confidence Percent
interval

With
disability

95-percent
confidence
Interval

Ratio

Without
disability

95-percent
95-percent
Percent confidence Percent confidence
interval
Interval

Ratio

68.6

42.6

37.8-47.4

73.2

71.2-75.1

0.58

43.0

37.2-48.8

73.1

70.9-75.4

0.59

72.7
45.3

55.7
24.6

49.2-62.3
18.4-30.9

74.6
60.3

72.6-76.6
53.7-66.9

.75
.41

54.1
25.8

46.5-61.7
18.1-33.5

73.9
67.7

71.6-76.3
60.4-74.9

.73
.38

71.8
71.6
58.8

46.9
48.6
38.4

32.9-60.9
38.9-58.4
32.4-44.4

73.2
75.6
69.4

70.5-75.9
72.0-79.3
64.9-73.9

.64
.64
.55

45.9
47.5
38.5

30.5-61.2
37.1-57.9
30.9-46.2

72.6
75.7
71.5

69.5-75.7
71.6-79.8
66.6-76.4

.63
.63
.54

18-24...............................
25-44...............................
45-54...............................
55-64...............................

58.2
73.6
72.7
52.8

57.1
49.6
38.7
25.7

35.2-79.0
41.1-58.2
30.7-46.6
17.3-34.1

58.3
77.1
82.0
61.3

53.1-63.5
74.3-79.9
78.6-85.4
55.7-67.0

.98
.64
.47
.42

57.0
51.3
33.9
23.4

38.9-75.1
42.3-60.2
23.9-43.9
14.9-31.8

65.3
77.4
79.4
56.1

59.0-71.7
74.4-80.3
75.1-83.7
48.7-63.4

.87
.66
.43
.42

Gender:3
Male.................................
Female...........................

75.3
61.5

42.1
43.1

35.0-49.3
36.6-49.7

81.0
64.8

78.5-83.5
61.9-67.7

.52
.67

43.5
40.9

34.9-52.0
33.3-48.5

81.1
64.7

78.3-84.0
61.4-68.0

.54
.63

Nativity:
Foreign born...................
U.S. born........................

65.2
70.0

29.4
45.4

17.6-41.3
40.2-50.6

68.7
75.1

65.1-72.4
72.9-77.4

.43
.60

31.9
45.6

19.0-44.8
39.0-52.3

69.0
74.9

63.9-74.1
72.2-77.7

.46
.61

70.2

45.8

39.7-51.8

75.7

73.0-78.5

.61

43.0

35.6-50.4

72.6

68.8-76.3

.59

62.1

31.7

20.7-42.7

69.9

64.2-75.7

.45

32.2

19.9-44.5

68.0

60.8-75.2

.47

72.3
65.5

27.4
38.2

.0-55.5
25.5-50.9

74.4
68.5

69.6-79.2
64.4-72.6

.37
.56

31.5
46.6

4.2-58.9
34.2-59.1

72.6
75.1

66.3-78.9
70.7-79.5

.43
.62

53.5
63.4
67.8
76.4
84.0

26.2
32.0
38.8
60.4
68.3

12.7-39.8
22.4-41.6
31.2-46.3
48.1-72.6
54.2-82.5

58.1
70.0
73.1
78.5
87.0

52.0-64.2
65.4-74.6
69.8-76.5
74.7-82.3
82.7-91.4

.45
.46
.53
.77
.79

26.1
32.6
36.2
61.7
67.9

12.5-39.7
21.0-44.2
26.5-45.9
48.7-74.8
51.1-84.7

59.3
71.3
73.3
77.8
86.1

52.1-66.4
65.9-76.6
69.6-77.0
73.1-82.4
80.5-91.7

.44
.46
.49
.79
.79

Total (n = 2,417)2 .......
Self-assessed health
status:3
Excellent, very good, or
good............................
Fair or poor.....................

>

CQ
CD

Chronic conditions:
No conditions.................
One condition.................
Two or more conditions ..

Race or ethnicity:
White, non-Hispanic.....
African-American,
non-Hispanic...............
Asian-American,
non-Hispanic...............
Hispanic.........................
Education:
Less than high school....
High school graduate....
Some college.................
College graduate............
Postgraduate..................
Marital status:3
Married or living with
partner........................
Separated, divorced, or7
widowed......................
Never married.................

69.1

50.7

43.8-57.5

71.8

69.1-74.5

.71

52.6

44.8-60.4

71.4

68.3-74.5

.74

71.2
66.4

37.1
36.1

28.3-46.0
25.8-46.5

81.9
71.1

77.6-86.2
67.5-74.8

.45
.51

41.6
32.6

30.4-52.7
21.7-43.5

83.9
70.0

79.7-88.2
65.2-74.8

.50
.47

Residence:3
Rural................................
Urban..............................

59.1
69.4

23.1
44.9

9.1-37.2
39.8-50.0

68.6
73.5

60.5-76.8
71.5-75.5

.34
.61

25.8
44.1

9.5-42.1
37.9-50.2

70.1
73.5

60.5-79.6
71.2-75.8

.37
.60

67.9

37.6

28.8-46.5

72.2

68.6-75.7

.52

39.2

28.3-50.1

72.8

68.8-76.8

.54

70.5

52.1

41.9-62.3

73.9

70.0-77.7

.71

49.0

37.7-60.3

73.9

69.5-78.2

.66

71.9
63.6

51.6
26.3

41.7-61.6
17.3-35.2

75.8
70.9

71.9-79.7
66.6-75.3

.68
.37

49.0
29.7

36.6-61.3
18.8-40.5

72.7
73.3

67.6-77.8
68.4-78.3

.67
.41

Region:3
Los A ngeles...................
Other Southern
California....................
San Francisco Bay
area..............................
Other California.............

1All models are adjusted for gender, age, nativity, race or ethnicity,
3 Relationship between disability and employment differs significantly
marital status, rural residence, region of the State, and education.
(p< .05) among the categories of the covariate in both the unadjusted and
2 Ratios of unadjusted and adjusted employment rates are significantly
the adjusted model.
different from 1.0 (p < .05).
____________________S ource: California Work and Health Survey, 1999-2000.__________


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M onthly L abor R e v ie w

M ay 2 0 0 3

25

Disability and Employment

on an unadjusted basis, persons w ith disabilities who had
postgraduate training were more than two-and-a-half times
more likely to be employed than such persons w ith less than
a high school education; among persons without disabilities,
those with postgraduate training were only one-and-a-half
times as likely.
News reports have noted that high rates of job loss no longer
are limited to periods of economic contraction.12The data from
the California survey are consistent with this observation, with
about 10 percent of adult Californians who reported some
employment in the year prior to the interview indicating that
they had lost jobs during that time. (See table 3.) Although certain
individuals (namely, those in fair or poor health, younger workers,
African-Americans and Hispanics, and those with less than a
high school education) reported higher rates of displacement,
no group would appear to be immune. Thus, almost 9 percent of
persons aged 45 to 54, the peak earning years, reported losing a
job in the 12 months prior to the interview, as did about 11 percent
of college graduates and even 6 percent of those with post­
graduate training.
Persons with disabilities were almost twice as likely as those
without disabilities to report having experienced a job loss in the
year prior to the interview (17.5 percent, compared with 9.1
percent); adjustment had little effect on the gap in the rates of
job loss (19.0 percent and 9.0 percent, respectively), indicating
that disability itself, rather than the characteristics of persons
with disabilities, accounted for the higher rates of displacement.
The results presented in tables 2 and 3 indicate that persons
with disabilities have lower employment rates and higher rates
of job loss than those without disabilities. The results in table 4
suggest that, when employed, persons in the one group have
terms of employment that are substantially different from those
in the other group. Among all persons who reported any
employment in the year prior to the interview, those with
disabilities were much more likely than those without disabilities
to report part-time, part-year employment: on an unadjusted
basis, 11.6 percent of the former, but only 6.9 percent of the
latter, reported such employment. Similarly, greater proportions
of persons with disabilities reported episodic employment: on
an unadjusted basis, 29.4 percent of the former, but only 19.6
percent o f the latter, reported that kind o f employment.
Disparities between persons with and without disabilities in rates
of part-time, part-year employment and episodic employment
did not change substantially after adjustment for health and
demographic characteristics, suggesting that disability, rather
than the kinds of persons who report disability, accounts for the
association with those forms of employment.
Among persons who had been employed when interviewed,
on both an unadjusted and an adjusted basis, those with
disabilities experienced higher rates of involuntary part-time
employment than did those without disabilities, although the
difference between the two groups did not meet the traditional

26

Monthly Labor Review


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\ of St. Louis
Federal Reserve Bank
\

May 2003

criterion for statistical significance. The groups did differ
significantly in the rates of part-time employment for any reason.
(Persons with disabilities were about 50 percent more likely to
work part time.) Interestingly, the two groups did not differ
significantly in the proportion working more than full time (about
30 percent of each group reported working in excess of 45 hours
per week), in the proportion with contingent employment
(slightly more than a tenth of each group had contingent jobs),
or in the proportion with job tenures of a year or less (roughly, a
fifth of each group.)
Persons with disabilities were more likely to have household
incomes below 125 percent of the Federal poverty levels than
were persons without disabilities, a difference that did meet the
traditional criterion for statistical significance after adjustment.
They were also much less likely to report a promotion within a
job or a better job in the 12 months prior to the interview. Thus,
persons with disabilities did not appear to benefit from the strong
labor market of the time in terms of job mobility.
Table 5 reports the frequency w ith w hich em ployed
Californians experienced specific working conditions and
then compares the frequency of the conditions experienced
by persons w ith and without disabilities. The results are
consistent with the model outlined by P. Osterman in which
employers are granting increasing levels of autonomy, but
also imposing increasing levels of dem ands.13 That is to say,
relatively large proportions of California’s workers indicated
that they had flexible working conditions, worked at home
some or all of the time, and worked nonstandard shifts. Also,
large proportions reported having the freedom to decide how to
do their own work (74.6 percent), having learning opportunities
on the job (89.6 percent), being able to make their own decisions
(82.5 percent), and having enough time to get their job done
(78.0 percent), while a smaller proportion indicated that its jobs
did not require working fast without taking breaks (57.8 percent).
W hen queried about the cognitive demands of their jobs,
relatively large proportions indicated that the jobs required them
to concentrate for long periods of time (83.7 percent), interact
with other people (97.1 percent), or use computers (74.3 percent).
By contrast, almost 3 times as many workers indicated that their
jobs required less education than they had than reported that
the job required more (34.7 percent and 12.9 percent, respec­
tively). This gap suggests that, despite relatively high levels of
autonomy and demands and high rates of mobility, many
workers were not intellectually satisfied with their jobs.
In opposition to the findings with respect to the terms of
employment, once employed, with a few exceptions, persons
with and without disabilities did not differ in fundamental ways
in their working conditions. Thus, the two groups reported
relatively similar rates of self-employment, working a regular day
shift, having flexible work hours, working at home some or all of
the time, supervising others at work, being a member of a union,
being required to perform physical labor as part of their jobs,

Table 3.

Rates of job loss in the year prior to the interview among persons aged 18-64 years, by disability status, with
and without adjustment for health status and demographic characteristics, 1999-2000
Adjusted job loss rate1

Unadjusted job loss rate
Health status
and demographics

All
persons

Without
disability

With
disability

With
disability

95-percent
Percent confidence Percent
interval

95-percent
confidence
interval

Ratio

Without
disability

—— —

95-percent
95-percent
Percent confidence Percent confidence
interval
interval

Ratio

Total employed in year
prior to interview
(n = 1,987)2..............
Self-assessed health
status:
Excellent, very good, or
good.............................
Fair or poor.....................

10.1

17.5

12.8-22.2

9.1

7.8-10.5

1.92

19.0

12.9-25.1

9.0

7.4-10.6

2.11

8.6
21.5

11.6
30.1

6.6-16.5
20.6-39.7

8.3
17.6

6.9-9.7
11.7-23.4

1.40
1.71

32.0
12.6

19.4-44.7
6.6-18.6

14.4
8.4

7.0-21.8
6.8-10.0

2.22
1.50

Chronic conditions:
No conditions.................
One condition.................
Two or more conditions ..

9.5
10.0
11.6

22.3
12.0
18.7

9.0-35.6
4.3-19.8
12.3-25.1

8.8
9.8
9.1

7.0-10.7
7.1-12.4
6.1-12.2

2.53
1.22
2.05

21.5
13.1
21.8

9.5-33.6
2.5-23.7
12.4-31.2

8.4
10.0
9.6

6.2-10.5
7.1-12.9
5.7-13.5

2.56
1.31
2.27

Age:
18-24...............................
25-44...............................
45-54 ...............................
55-64 ...............................

17.2
9.5
8.6
5.6

22.9
19.1
15.2
11.8

1.4-44.4
11.2-27.1
7.6-22.8
2.8-20.8

16.7
8.3
7.4
4.4

12.4-21.0
6.4-10.3
5.0-9.9
1.7-7.1

1.37
2.30
2.05
2.68

26.4
18.9
15.9
12.0

3.9-49.0
10.5-27.1
4.8-27.0
.0-24.7

15.4
8.2
7.9
4.6

9.7-21.2
6.1-10.4
4.9-11.0
1.2-8.0

1.71
2.30
2.01
2.61

Gender:
Male.................................
Female.............................

10.2
10.0

20.2
14.6

13.0-27.3
8.6-20.7

9.0
9.4

7.1-10.8
7.4-11.4

2.24
1.55

20.9
16.9

12.0-29.8
8.7-25.2

8.6
9.5

6.6-10.7
7.1-12.0

2.43
1.78

Nativity:
Foreign born...................
US born..........................

11.3
9.6

28.0
15.6

12.1-43.9
10.8-20.4

10.2
8.7

7.6-12.8
7.1-10.3

2.75
1.79

17.3
26.3

10.5-24.1
9.8-42.7

8.8
9.5

6.8-10.8
5.8-13.3

1.97
2.77

8.9

13.3

8.2-18.3

8.2

6.3-10.1

1.62

15.3

7.8-22.9

9.0

6.5-11.6

1.70

12.5

20.3

6.5-34.1

11.4

7.1-15.7

1.78

21.5

5.2-37.9

10.4

5.4-15.4

2.07

6.2
13.6

.0
35.3

19.2-51.5

6.4
11.7

3.5-9.2
8.5-14.9

3.02

.0
33.9

17.3-50.4

5.8
10.0

1.6-10.0
6.7-13.4

3.39

17.0
10.1
8.9
10.6
5.6

34.0
18.0
17.7
11.4
11.4

12.5-55.5
7.1-28.9
10.1-25.2
1.8-21.1
.8-22.0

14.9
9.0
7.7
10.5
4.6

9.8-20.1
5.9-12.1
5.6-9.9
7.5-13.5
1.8-7.4

2.28
2.00
2.30
1.09
2.48

32.8
17.2
19.0
13.8
12.7

13.0-52.7
7.1-27.2
8.5-29.6
.0-28.6
.0-27.1

12.4
7.5
7.6
12.0
6.2

7.0-17.8
4.6-10.5
5.2-10.0
7.7-16.4
2.0-10.4

2.65
2.29
2.50
1.15
2.05

Race or ethnicity:3
White, non-Hispanic.....
African-American,
non-Hispanic...............
Asian-American,
non-Hispanic...............
Hispanic..........................
Education:
Less than high school....
High school graduate ....
Some college..................
College graduate............
Postgraduate..................
Marital status:3
Married or living with
partner........................
Separated, divorced, or
widowed......................
Never married.................

8.0

9.0

4.1-13.8

7.8

6.1-9.6

1.15

9.9

4.2-15.5

8.2

5.9-10.5

1.21

11.1
12.8

23.5
25.8

13.2-33.9
13.4-38.2

8.4
11.4

5.1-11.7
8.7-14.2

2.80
2.26

29.5
25.3

14.4-44.6
11.6-39.0

9.4
9.8

5.4-13.4
6.4-13.3

3.14
2.58

Residence:
Rural................................
Urban.............................

9.9
10.1

25.0
16.7

5.8-44.1
11.9-21.5

7.1
9.3

2.1-12.0
7.9-10.7

3.52
1.80

18.4
25.3

11.9-24.8
6.9-43.7

9.1
7.9

7.4-14.6
1.2-14.6

2.02
3.20

10.4

17.4

8.2-26.7

9.7

7.1-12.2

1.79

19.2

7.2-31.3

8.5

5.8-11.3

2.26

8.9

16.7

7.3-26.2

7.7

5.1-10.3

2.17

16.4

4.8-27.9

7.5

4.7-10.4

2.19

10.4
11.2

8.1
29.2

1.4-14.7
17.2-41.1

10.7
8.7

7.7-13.7
5.8-11.7

.76
3.36

9.8
32.9

1.3-18.4
18.2-47.6

11.9
9.2

7.9-15.8
5.5-13.0

0.82
3.58

Region:3
Los A ngeles...................
Other Southern
California.....................
San Francisco Bay
area..............................
Other California..............

1All models are adjusted for gender, age, nativity, race or ethnicity,
marital status, rural residence, region of the State, and education.
2 Ratios of unadjusted and adjusted job loss rates are significantly
different from 1.0 (p < .05).


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3 Relationship between disability and job loss differs significantly
(p< .05) among the categories of the covariate in both the unadjusted and
the adjusted model.
S ource : California Work and Health Survey, 1999-2000.

M onthly Labor Review

M ay 2003

27

Disability and Employment

Table 4.

Terms of employment among persons aged 18-64 years, by disability status, with and without adjustment
for demographic characteristics, 1999-2000
Unadjusted

Terms of employment

Among all persons
employed in past year
(n = 1,886):
Part-time, part-year
employment...................
Episodic employment.....
Among currently
employed (n = 1,599).....
Involuntary part-time
employment................
Part-time employment
for any reason.............
Greater than full-time
employment................
Contingent
employment................
Job tenure 1 year or
l e s s ...............................
Poverty despite
employment.................
Promotion or
better jo b .....................

All
persons

With
disability

Adjusted'
Without
disability

95-percent
Percent confidence Percent
interval

95-percent
confidence
Interval

Ratio

95-percent
95-percent
confidence Percent confidence
Interval
interval

Ratio

11.6
29.4

7.4-15.8
23.4-35.4

6.9
19.6

5.7-8.1
17.7-21.5

21.68
31.50

11.4
31.0

6.1-16.7
23.6-38.5

6.9
19.4

5.6-8.3
17.2-21.6

1.65
31.60

4.0

6.3

2.6-10.0

3.8

2.8-4.7

1.66

6.0

1.5-10.5

3.8

2.7-4.9

1.58

18.4

26.7

19.8-33.6

17.6

15.6-19.6

31.52

25.8

17.8-33.7

17.6

15.3-19.9

21.47

31.9

29.4

22.3-36.5

32.2

29.7-34.6

.91

29.3

20.4-38.2

32.2

29.2-35.1

.91

10.9

11.6

6.7-16.5

10.8

9.2-12.4

1.07

12.1

6.2-18.0

10.8

8.8-12.7

1.12

19.4

20.1

14.0-26.3

19.3

17.3-21.4

1.04

21.3

13.0-29.5

19.2

16.8-21.6

1.11

13.7

16.3

10.6-22.0

13.4

11.6-15.3

1.22

22.0

14.3-29.8

13.0

11.0-15.1

21.69

37.5

24.0

17.5-30.5

38.9

36.3-41.4

3.62

27.3

18.9-35.7

38.5

35.5-41.5

2.71

and having specific psychological and cognitive job demands.
Most importantly, persons with disabilities were about as likely
as those without disabilities to report having wide latitude to
make decisions and sufficient time to get their jobs done, as well
as being required to concentrate for long periods, having the
opportunity to interact with others, and being required to use
computers on the job. The results with respect to the proportion
working a regular day shift are consistent with a recent study
using a national data source.14
Among the exceptions to the finding of relatively similar
working conditions, a greater proportion o f persons with
disabilities reported working entirely from home, while a smaller
proportion indicated that their jobs required more education than
they had. (Neither of these findings, however, reached the
traditional criterion for statistical significance.) Nevertheless, on
the preponderance of the measures of working conditions,
persons with and without disabilities did not report differences.
Labor m arket analysts have been developing synthetic
measures of employment to assess access to employment, terms
of employment, and specific working conditions simultaneously.
In 1999-2000, only a third of California’s adults had jobs that
fulfilled the criteria for “traditional employment’’(see table 6),
defined as working full time, full year, in a permanent position for
a single employer on a day shift, and not being hired as a
28

Percent

Without
disability

7.4
20.6

1Adjusted for gender, age, nativity, race or ethnicity, marital status,
rural residence, region of the State, and education.
2 Employment characteristic differs by disability status (p < .05).

Monthly Labor Review


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

With
disability

May 2003

3 Employment characteristic differs by disability status (p < .01).
S ource :

California Work and Health Survey, 1999-2000.

consultant. Similarly, only about a third were in jobs that met the
criteria for “optimal employment,” defined as working in a
psychologically and economically rewarding job, and only about
1 in 6 had jobs that simultaneously met the criteria for both
traditional and optimal employment. In contrast, relatively few
workers (14.5 percent) experienced job strain as a result of having
jobs with high levels of demands and low levels of control.
Although table 4 indicates that persons with and without
disabilities differed in many of their terms of employment and in
mobility, table 5 shows that they did not differ in most specific
working conditions. Table 6 reveals that when the two sets of
measures are integrated, persons with disabilities were less likely
than those without disabilities to be in jobs that met the criteria
for traditional or optimal employment or for the combination of
the two. (Differences in the first and third measures reached
statistical significance.) Indeed, fewer than 1 in 10 persons with
disabilities had jobs that met the criteria for “traditional employ­
ment” and were economically and psychologically rewarding;
on an unadjusted and an adjusted basis, they were, respectively,
only 57 percent and 50 percent as likely to hold such jobs as
were persons without disabilities.
W r it in g a l m o s t t h r e e d e c a d e s a g o , Harry Braverman
predicted that the continued mechanization of industry would

Table 5.

Working conditions among persons aged 18-64 years, by disability status, with and without adjustment
for demographic characteristics, 1999-2000
Adjusted1

Unadjusted

Working conditions
among currently
employed (n= 1,599)

Without
disability

With
disability
All
persons

Without
disability

With
disability

Ratio
95-percent
Percent confidence Percent
Interval

95-percent
confidence
Interval

Size of firm:
Small firm (fewer than
50 people)...................
Large firm
(500 or more people)...

38.9

34.7

27.0-42.4

39.3

36.6-42.0

61.1

65.3

57.6-73.0

60.7

Self-employed...................

12.2

14.4

9.0-19.8

12.0

Work regular day shift.....

78.1

74.4

67.7-81.1

Have flexible work hours .

56.0

55.3

47.6-62.9

Work at home all the
time.................................

5.8

8.6

4.3-12.9

Work at home some
of the time.....................

32.1

33.5

Supervise others at work ...

51.4

47.7

Member of a union............

24.8

Percent

95-percent
95-percent
confidence Percent confidence
Interval
Interval

Ratio

0.88

35.2

25.9-44.6

39.3

36.1-42.5

0.90

58.0-63.4

1.08

64.8

55.4-74.1

60.7

57.5-63.9

1.07

10.3-13.7

1.20

12.4

7.3-17.5

12.2

10.2-14.1

1.02

78.5

76.3-80.6

.95

71.8

63.3-80.2

78.7

76.1-81.3

.91

56.1

53.5-58.7

.99

54.0

44.7-63.2

56.2

53.1-59.3

.96

5.5

4.3-6.7

1.57

8.5

3.5-13.4

5.5

4.2-6.9

1.55

26.2-40.8

31.9

29.5-35.4

1.05

29.4

21.9-37.0

32.3

29.4-35.3

.91

40.0-55.4

51.7

49.1-54.3

.92

46.3

36.9-55.6

51.9

48.8-55.0

.89

26.5

19.7-33.3

24.7

22.4-26.9

1.07

24.5

17.1-31.8

24.9

22.2-27.6

.98

48.4

50.6

42.9-58.3

48.1

45.5-50.7

1.05

52.6

42.6-62.5

47.9

44.8-51.0

1.10

74.6

75.0

68.3-81.7

74.5

72.2-76.8

1.01

70.9

62.0-79.8

74.9

72.2-77.6

.95

57.8

58.6

51.0-66.3

57.7

55.1-60.3

1.02

57.9

48.5-67.3

57.8

54.7-60.9

1.00

89.6

94.5

91.0-98.0

89.1

87.5-90.7

21.06

93.9

89.2-98.5

89.2

87.4-91.1

1.05

82.5

83.9

78.2-89.6

82.4

80.4-84.4

1.02

79.4

71.8-87.1

82.8

80.5-85.1

.96

78.0

76.3

69.7-82.9

78.1

76.0-80.3

.98

77.2

70.0-84.4

78.1

75.4-80.7

.99

83.7

82.6

76.0-89.2

83.9

81.7-86.1

.98

80.8

73.0-88.5

84.1

81.5-86.6

.96

97.1
74.3
64.9

98.8
76.8
70.9

96.9-100.0
69.5-84.1
63.0-78.8

96.9
74.0
64.2

95.8-97.9
71.4-76.7
61.3-67.1

1.02
1.04
1.10

98.1
71.1
64.8

95.3-100.0
63.2-79.1
56.3-73.3

97.0
74.7
64.9

95.8-98.1
71.7-77.7
61.6-68.2

1.01
.95
1.00

12.8

10.2

5.0-15.5

13.2

11.1-15.2

.77

10.4

5.1-15.6

13.1

10.9-15.4

.79

34.7

37.1

28.7-45.5

34.4

31.5-37.3

1.08

36.7

25.9-47.5

34.5

31.1-37.8

1.06

Physical labor is part
o f w o r k ......................................

Psychological demands:
Have the freedom
to decide how to do
own work.....................
Job does not require
working fast without
taking breaks.............
• Job requires learning
new things..................
Job allows own decision
making........................
Have enough time to get
the job done...............
Cognitive job demands3
Concentrate for long
periods of tim e.........
Interact with other
people........................
Use computers..............
All of the preceding......
Job requires more
education3 ..................
Job requires less
education3 ..................

1Adjusted for gender, age, nativity, race or ethnicity, marital status,
rural residence, region of the State, and education.
2 Employment characteristic differs by disability status (p < .05).


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

3 Data for these characteristics collected in 2000 only.
S ource :

California Work and Health Survey, 1999-2000.

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

29

Disability and Employment

necessarily result in a reduction in the range of tasks and skill
levels required to perform jobs as firms sought to reduce labor
costs.15Although, certainly, the number of low-skilled jobs has
risen, there is more evidence in support of an increase, rather
than a reduction, in the skill demands of the majority of jobs.16
Braverman wrote principally about manufacturing and was
criticized for ignoring the growth in services. Paradoxically, the
increase in the skill demands of jobs is perhaps most pronounced
in the manufacturing sector. If workers two generations ago did
most of the manufacturing by hand or nearly so, a generation
ago machines provided most of the force to make things. Today,
in much of manufacturing, workers monitor production that is
run by computers, rather than either supplying power themselves
or operating machines that do the physical work.17
There is also m uch evidence that the range of tasks in
individual jobs has increased over time as firms have moved to
flatten hierarchies and deploy workers more flexibly in response
to international competition.18Fewer workers do the exact same
tasks day in and day out, even on so-called assembly lines.
Finally, there is much evidence that jobs requiring high levels of
cognitive and communicative skills have expanded faster than
jobs not requiring those kinds of skills,19 at the same time that
many workers are provided relatively high levels of flexibility to
do their jobs when, and even where, they please and are also
provided autonomy in how they perform their jobs.
The results presented here from the California survey indicate
that solid majorities of the State’s workers have jobs requiring

Table 6.

high levels of cognitive skills and are provided flexible
conditions and high levels of autonomy to carry out their work
tasks, although roughly 1 in 3 indicated that he or she had more
education than was required to do the job.
These generally salutary changes in working conditions,
however, have been accompanied by a loss of job security. Even
during the boom period of 1999-2000, roughly 1 in 10 workers in
the California survey reported either losing a job in the year prior
to the survey or currently being on contingent employment,
roughly 1 in 5 either had been in his or her main job for a year or
less or had episodic employment (or both), and roughly 1 in 6 did
not earn enough to lift his or her household above 125 percent of
the Federal poverty line.
Certainly, some individuals profited from the rapid turnover in
jobs that have become the norm: more than a third of California’s
workers reported receiving a promotion within a job or a better
job in the year prior to the interview. Thus, for many, working
conditions are satisfactory and there are ample opportunities for
upward mobility. Nevertheless, for others, employment and its terms
are less than optimal, and for still others, work remains poorly
remunerated and working conditions are stressful. Only about 1
in 3 of California’s workers has a job that meets the criteria for
being a “traditional” job or that is both psychologically and eco­
nomically rewarding; only 1 in 6 has a job that meets the criteria
for being both “traditional” and “optimal” simultaneously.
To sum up the findings presented in this article, persons with
disabilities would appear to experience different rates and terms

Synthetic measures of employment among currently employed persons aged 18-64 years, by disability
status, with and without adjustment for demographic characteristics, 1999-2000
Unadjusted
With
disability

Employment measure
applied to those
currently employed
(n= 1,599)

All
persons

Traditional employment.....

33.5

29.2

22.3-36.2

33.6

30.

29.6

Adjusted'
Without
disability

With
disability

Without
disability

95-percent
confidence
Interval

Ratio

34.0

31.5-36.4

0.86

28.0

18.2-37.8

34.0

32.0-36.0

2.82

23.7-37.8

33.9

31.5-36.4

.91

28.0

20.2-35.8

34.0

32.0-36.0

.82

28.4

21.5-35.3

29.7

27.3-32.1

.96

27.0

19.2-34.8

30.0

28.0-32.0

.90

11.1
12.6
13.1

15.3
9.7
15.9

9.8-20.8
5.2-14.2
10.3-21.5

10.6
12.9
12.8

9.0-12.2
11.2-14.7
11.1-14.5

1.44
.75
1.24

13.0
10.0
22.0

7.1-18.9
4.1-15.9
14.2-29.8

11.0
13.0
12.0

9.0-13.0
11.0-15.0
10.0-14.0

1.18
.77
1.83

Traditional and optimal
employment....................

16.6

9.9

5.3-14.4

17.3

15.3-19.2

3.57

8.8

4.3-13.2

17.5

15.1-19.8

2.50

Job strain (high demands
and low control).............

14.5

13.4

8.1-18.6

14.6

12.8-16.5

.92

15.9

8.9-22.9

14.4

12.3-16.5

1.10

Employment continuum:
job Is—
Optimal...........................
Economically
adequate......................
Psychologically
adequate......................
Barely adequate...........
Inadequate.....................

95-percent
Percent confidence Percent
interval

1Adjusted for gender, age, nativity, race or ethnicity, marital status, rural
residence, region of the State, and education.
2 Employment characteristic differs by disability status (p < .01 ).

30
Monthly Labor Review

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

Percent

95-percent
95-percent
confidence Percent confidence
Interval
Interval

Ratio

3 Employment characteristic differs by disability status (p < .05).
S ource :

California Work and Health Survey, 1999-2000.

of employment than those without disabilities. However, once
employed, those with disabilities do not differ in systematic ways
in specific working conditions from those without disabilities.
Accordingly, persons with disabilities were about twice as likely
to report losing a job in the year prior to the interview, 50 percent
more likely to report part-time part-year, involuntary part-time, or
episodic employment, and 70 percent more likely to earn too
little to lift their households above 125 percent of the Federal
poverty line. They were much less likely to report promotions
within jobs or receiving better jobs. Once employed, however,
they differed from persons without disabilities in only two
specific working conditions: they were less likely to hold jobs

requiring more education than they had, and they were more
likely to work at home exclusively (perhaps as an accommodation
to the disability). O f note, persons with disabilities were equally
as likely as persons without disabilities to report wide latitude in
making decisions, high levels of cognitive demands, and flexible
work hours. Finally, after integration of the measures of the terms
of employment and specific working conditions, persons with
disabilities were shown to be in jobs that were less likely to meet
the criteria for “traditional” or “optimal” employment, or for both
simultaneously, but they did not differ in the proportion reporting
job stress—the combination of high levels of demands and low
levels of control.
□

Notes
A CK NO W LEDG M EN T!
This article was supported by grants from the
California Wellness Foundation under the aegis o f The Work and
Health Initiative and from the Social Security Administration via the
Disability Research Institute o f the University o f Illinois, UrbanaChampaign, Illinois.

1 S. Botman, T. Moore, C. Moriarity, and V. Parsons, Design and
Estim ation fo r the N ational H ealth Interview Survey, 1995-2004,
Vital Health Statistics series 2, no. 130 (Department o f Health and
Human Services, Centers for D isease Control and Prevention,
National Center for Health Statistics, 2000).
2 E. Idler, “Self-ratings o f Health: Mortality, Morbidity, and
M eaning,” in S. Schechter, ed., P ro ceed in g s o f the 1993 NCHS
Conference on the Cognitive Aspects o f Self-reported Health Status,
nch s working paper 36-59, series no. 10 (Department of Health and
Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 1994).
3 J. Sheikh and J. Yesavage, “Geriatric Depression Scale ( g ds ):
Recent Evidence and Development o f a Shorter Version,” Clinical
Gerontologist, June 1986, pp. 165-73; B. Rule, H. Harvey, and A.
Dobbs, “Reliability o f the Geriatric Depression Scale for Younger
Adults, Clinical Gerontologist, July 1989, pp. 37-43; and J. Cwikel
and K. Ritchie, “Screening for Depression among the Elderly in Israel:
An Assessment of the Short Geriatric Depression Scale ( s- gds ), Israel
Journal o f M edical Science, March 1989, pp. 131-37.
4 Cwikel and Ritchie, “Screening for Depression.”
5 I. Yen, L. Trupin, and E. Yelin, Two Way Street: The Relationship
between Health and Employment in California, 1999-2000, Report
to the Institute for Labor and Employment o f the U niversity o f
California (San Francisco, University o f California, Institute for
Health Policy Studies, 2002).
6 J. Grzywacz and D. Dooley, ‘“ Good Jobs’ to ‘Bad Jobs’: Replicated
Evidence o f an Employment Continuum from Two Large Surveys,”
Social Science and M edicine, April 2003, pp. 1749-60.
7 R. Karasek, J. Schwartz, and T. Theorell, Job Characteristics,
Occupation, and Coronary H eart Disease, Final Report to National
Institute o f Occupational Safety and Health (New York, Columbia
University Press, 1982).
8 See D. Pasta, M. Cisternas, and C. Williamson, “Estimating
Standard Errors of Treatment Effects for Probit Models and for Linear
Models o f Log-Transformed Variables Using PROC IML,” Proceedings
o f the 6th Annual Western Users o f SAS Software Conference (Oakland,
Western Users o f s a s Software, 1998), pp. 2 1 1-16, for a detailed


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explanation o f this method.
9 Maureen P. M. H. Rutten-van Molken, Eddy K. A. van Doorslaer,
and Rene C. J. A. van Vliet, “Statistical Analysis of Cost Outcomes in
a Randomized Controlled C linical T rial,” H ealth E conom ics,
September-October 1994, pp. 333-45.
10 C. Benner, B. Brownstein, and A. Dean, Walking the Lifelong
Tightrope: Negotiating Work in the New Economy (San Jose, Working
Partnerships, Inc., 1999).
11 P. Osterman, Securing Prosperity: The American Labor Market:
H ow It H as C han ged and What to D o abou t It (Princeton, NJ,
Princeton University Press, 1999).
12 See, for example, Don Lee and Nancy Cleeland, “State’s Boom
Brings More Job Insecurity, Study Says,” Los Angeles Times, May 25,
1999, pp. C l, C l 6; Steve Lohr, “Though Upbeat on the Economy,
People Still Fear for Their Jobs,” The N e w York Times, Dec. 29, 1996,
pp. 1, 15; and Michael Weinstein, “Cream in Job Market’s Churn:
Losses and Nirvana,” The New York Times, July 22, 1999, pp. C l, CIO.
13 P. Osterman, Employment Futures: Reorganization, Dislocation,
and Public P olicy (New York, Oxford University Press, 1988).
14 H. Presser and B. Altman, “Work shifts and disability: a national
view,” Monthly Labor Review, September 2002, pp. 11-24.
15 Harry Braverman, L abor and M o n opoly C a pital: The
Degradation o f Work in the Twentieth Century (New York, Monthly
Review Press, 1975).
16 See Daniel E. Hecker, “Occupational employment projections
to 2 0 1 0 ,” M onthly L abor R eview , November 2 001, pp. 5 7 -8 4 ;
L. Hirschhorn, “Stresses and Patterns o f Adjustm ent in the
Postindustrial Factory,” in G. Green and F. Baker, eds., Work, Health,
and P ro d u ctivity (N ew York, Oxford U niversity Press, 1991);
Osterman, Securing P rosperity, Benner, Brownstein, and Dean,
Walking the Lifelong Tightrope; and E. Yelin and L. Trupin, “Persons
with Disabilities and Demands o f the Contemporary Labor Market,”
in G. Wunderlich, D. Rice, and N. Amado, eds., The D ynam ics o f
Disability: Measuring and Monitoring D isability fo r Social Security
Programs, Report o f the Committee to Review the Social Security
Administration’s Disability Decision Process Research (Washington,
DC, National Academy Press, 2002), pp. 303-33.
17 S. Zuboflf, In the Age o f the Smart Machine: The Future o f Work
and Power (New York, Basic Books, 1988).
18 Osterman, Securing Prosperity.
19 Hecker, “Occupational employment projections.”

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

31

Uncertainty and labor
turnover
It should be widely known that the change
in employment reported every month is
the net o f two much larger flows into
(hires) and out o f (separations) employers’
payrolls. The Cleveland Federal Reserve
B ank in clu d ed in th e ir A p ril 2003
Economic Trends bulletin an analysis of
the new data from the BLS Job Openings
and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) that
illustrated that fact. They point out that
the over-the-year comparisons o f hiring
rates between the months o f2002 and 2001
were generally downward: “ ... in every
month o f2002 except December, the hiring
rate was lower than or equal to the rate for
the same month a year earlier.” According
to the table in the report, the overall
hiring rate in private industry fell from
3.9 percent o f employment to 3.5 percent.
The separation rate also fell, however,
moving from 4.0 percent in 2001 to 3.5
percent in 2002. The decline, according
to th e C lev elan d F e d ’s rep o rt, was
m ostly the result o f a lower quit rate
while the layoff rate declined barely 0.1
p e rc e n ta g e p o in t. “ T he p a tte rn o f
w eaker hiring and fewer separations,
which is repeated across the full range
o f private industry,” the report con­
cludes, “may be another example o f how
uncertainty is slowing the recovery.”

In his recent NBER working paper (no.
9619), “Is B usiness Cycle Volatility
C o stly ? E v id en ce from Surveys o f
Subjective Well-being,” Wolfers regresses
unemployment and inflation on measures
o f satisfaction for 16 European nations
d eriv ed from the E uropean U nionsponsored Eurobarometer survey. The
results confirm that both inflation and
unemployment lower reported levels of
satisfaction. The impact o f unemployment
seems to be much greater. Likewise,
volatility in unemployment and inflation
have negative impacts on satisfaction,
with current levels of variability having
perhaps the same impact as raising the
level o f the unemployment rate by about a
quarter of a percentage point.
The use of subjective data is rare among
economists, but perhaps less so than in
the past. As Richard A. Easterlin remarks
in his Journal o f Economic Literature
review of Bruno S. Frey and Alois Stutzer’s
recent book, Happiness and Economics:

How the Economy and Institutions Affect
Well-Being, “Economists are trained to
turn a cold shoulder to what people say
about their well-being.” However, such
information can be quite useful, even to
economists, as evidenced by the recent
writings o f Wolfers, Frey, and Stutzer,
E a ste rlin him self, on grow th and
happiness, and Sharon DeVaney and
Sandy Chen, on job satisfaction in the
B ureau’s Compensation and Working

Cyclical well-being

Conditions On-line.

Although some economists might argue
the long-term effect o f business cycles on
consumers’ is rather small (especially if
well-being is measured as consumption),
most economists agree with the general
public that p reventing recessions is
important, even to the point o f being
willing to absorb some costs o f counter­
cyclical policies. Justin W olfers has
examined the direct effect o f the business
cycle variables o f unemployment and
inflation on self-reported data on sub­
jective well-being.

Innovative workplaces and
their workers

32 M onthly Labor Review

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May

2003

One response to intense econom ic
competition has been to adopt innovative
practices in the workplace with a view
toward increasing the performance of the
w orkforce. Such “high-perform ance
workplace” innovations might include,
either singly or, more effectively, in
combination, such practices as job rota­
tion, self-m anaged team s, extensive
worker training, widespread diffusion of

com puter technologies, or employee
participation in problem-solving groups.
While some research has suggested that
such p ractices can increase the
productivity o f establishments, Sandra E.
B lack, L isa M. Lynch, and A nya
Krivelyova investigate the impact of these
practices on the workers.
They make three sets o f findings in
their recent National Bureau o f Economic
Research working paper (no. 9569), “How
Workers Fare When Employers Inno­
vate.” First, at least some workers, often
supervisory w orkers, receiv e som e
com pensation for being involved in
workplaces with specific combinations of
high performance work practices. This
effect w as m ost often seen in the
interaction o f unionization and practices
such as self-managed teams or labormanagement problem-solving groups.
Second, many high performance prac­
tices tend to raise wage inequality, once
other characteristics have been controlled
for. Say the authors, “Both the count
measures and the index o f workplace
p ractices suggest th a t th ese high
performance workplace practices actually
increase within-establishment inequality.”
Third, Black, Lynch, and Krivelyova
found mixed evidence on the impact of
high performance practices on employ­
ment. Firm s that had adopted profit
sharing and self-managed teams tended
to be more likely to have had a large layoff
between 1993 and 1996. Firms with prob­
lem-solving m eetings in a unionized
context or with a large share o f employees
engaged in job rotation were less likely to
have had a maj or j obs cutback.
□

We are interested in your feedback
on this column. Please let us know
w hat you have found m ost interesting
and w hat essential readings we may
have m issed. W rite to: E xecutive
Editor, Monthly Labor Review, Bureau
o f Labor Statistics, W ashington, DC,
20212, or e-mail, mlr@ bls.gov_______

Book Review
Security for care workers
Care Work: The Questfo r Security. By
M ary Daly, ed. Geneva, Interna­
tional Labour Office, 2001,261 pp.,
paperback.
A common theme o f the essays compos­
ing this book is the decline in unpaid
homecare rendered to the elderly, the dis­
abled, and to young children— rendered
almost invariably by women. It is a de­
cline in the “gift relationship,” as Rich­
ard Titmuss, one o f the foremost British
analysts o f the welfare state, termed it.
The essays discuss the reasons for the
decline, and agree that this relationship
is unlikely to be restored in m odem so­
ciety. Its place has been increasingly
taken by paid care workers, whose as­
signments to care receivers are mediated
by nonprofit organizations or for-profit
firms. In addition, their expenses are de­
frayed by social insurance, social assis­
tance, or other public or private agency.
The essays cover care in the ad­
vanced industrial countries and in a few
developing ones. A key argument that
has evidently spurred the publication o f
the book is that care, having the status
o f “decent work,” becomes the subject
o f economic analysis (even when not
compensated)— matters for which the
essays’ authors insistently call. In the
context o f recent ILO programs, decent
work is defined as, first o f all, “security”
that encompasses stable jobs; skills and
abilities that can be used productively;
an adequate income, including provi­
sions for old age and disability; and
health insurance. Care workers hardly
enjoy any such security, as it is not men­
tioned by any o f the authors.
Thus, Nancy Folbre in “Accounting
for care in the United States” analyzes
the prevalence o f women in the care in­
dustries generally (health, educational,
and social services), but she has noth­
ing to say about their security (as de­
fined). She reports that in many cases,
“Bedside nurses have been replaced by
unlicensed care ‘tech n ician s’,” that


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“ .. .reimbursements to home health care
workers have been cut back.” In addi­
tio n , m anagerial scrutiny has been
ratcheted up, which, together with finan­
cial tightening, contribute to the (dete­
riorating) “moral world o f care giving—
im pinging on quality and quantity.”
Developments such as these m n very
much counter to the “decent work” idea
propagated by ILO and one o f its senior
program directors, Guy Standing, a con­
tributor to this book.
Standing and Mary Daly also empha­
size the idea o f “occupation,” as against
“jo b ” or “labor.” They write that “care
work is intrinsically a social relationship,
in which moral sentiments, such as af­
fection, altruism, mutual respect and dig­
nity and deeply meaningful reciproci­
ties come into play.” Standing and Daly
ask a commitment difficult to carry out
in an environment o f “marketization”
and bureaucratization o f care, such as
outlined by Folber, and the near absence
o f a collective to help sustain such a
commitment. The book’s contributors
frequently complain about the loosen­
ing o f solidaristic provision and the
“cancerousness o f individualism ” o f
w hich R.N. Bellah has w ritten, and
w hich a highly commercialized society
promotes.
It is true that the decline in unpaid
care, hence o f the gift relationship it im­
plies, spells a shrinking moral space
within which it occurs. But a premise of
unpaid care work was the male bread­
winner model o f the welfare state as it
was conceived during much o f the 20th
century, a “model” that held during the
preceding period as well. But it has been
eroded over the past 20-30 years by the
rising labor force participation of women,
discussed in some detail in the book. As
a proportion o f the working-age popula­
tion (aged 15-64), women’s labor force
participation rose to 71 percent in 1994
from 43 percent in 1960 in the United
States; to 62 percent from 49 percent in
Germany; to 62 percent from 46 percent
in the United Kingdom; and to 74 per­
cent from 50 percent in Sweden.

Jane Lewis, author o f one o f the most
thoughtful essays in the book, cites lit­
erature holding that women’s rising earn­
ing power disrupts “the balance in the
gendered division of labor a n d ... [threat­
ens] the stability o f the family.” Insta­
bility o f the family arising from women’s
earning power is likely to be mitigated,
however, by the relatively high incidence
o f part-time work performed by women
(27 percent o f all employed women in
the United States in 1995; 44 percent in
the United Kingdom; 40 percent in Swe­
den). Family stability has no doubt also
been affected historically by wom en’s
attainm ent o f property and political
rights on par with men, and it also re­
quires needed mutual adjustments be­
tween the genders.
A factor that induced women to join
the labor force has been their ability to
space pregnancies as new birth control
technologies became available. Citing
Richard Titmuss, Lewis writes that the
average working-class British woman,
marrying in the 1890s, spent 15 years in
pregnancy and nursing, compared with
4 years spent by her counterpart after
World War II. However this develop­
ment may affect, or may have affected,
fam ily stability, it surely enlarged
women’s personal freedom.
The erosion o f the male breadwinner
model, however, also entailed growing
so cial and econom ic p re ssu re s on
women to work. Unfortunately, the wide­
spread need o f women to contribute to
family income by their earnings is not
discussed in the book. There is men­
tion, however, o f the emergence o f the
“adult worker model” during the 1980s,
by which it became a citizen obligation
to work for pay (and which legitimized
welfare-to-work rules and subsequent
reforms). These changes raised, and
continue to raise, urgent questions o f
childcare. “The obligation to engage in
paid work” was argued in an environ­
ment that equally emphasized “the obli­
gation to care.”
European welfare states go far in
helping women and men to meet this ob-

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

33

Book Reviews

ligation. Public financing for childcare
is “high” in 12 o f the 17 countries listed
in M ary D aly’s essay, for children 3-6
years old. It is “low” to “medium” for
children up to 3 years old in most o f
these countries. All offer parental leave
paid in full, although the number o f paid
weeks varies.
Public financing for the care o f the
elderly is medium or high— these terms
denote relative levels o f generosity— in
10 o f 16 countries listed; the share o f eld­
erly receiving home services is medium
or high in 12 o f these countries; and the
share receiving institutional care is me­
dium to high in 8 o f the 16 countries.
As Daly notes, the relative generos­
ity reflected in the classification o f child
and elderly care is “intimately related to
the prevailing ideology surrounding the
family” in the countries listed. In the
Nordic countries, child and elderly care
is a right o f social citizenship, but in Eu­
ropean continental countries, care is to
be provided in the first instance by the
family. In Greece, Portugal, and Spain,
care is more or less left to the family. Eld­
erly care in the United Kingdom is clas­
sified as “high” not least because “the
ideology o f family solidarity, especially
as it pertains to intergenerational rela­
tions among adults, is weak.” Thus, re­
sources otherwise (or elsewhere) pro­
vided by family may be required.
A m ong the a d v an ced in d u stria l
countries, the United States is an “out­
lier” in terms o f the sparse public sup­
port for the care o f dependents, writes
Nancy Folbre. For example, parental
leave is unpaid, and restricted to employ­
ers with 50 or more workers. States have
indeed raised their spending on childcare
50 percent since welfare reform in 1996,
but only 15 percent o f eligible families
receive it. Vouchers have been widely
distributed but at dollar levels too low
for high-quality care. Tax exemptions
and tax credits play a larger role in fund­
ing childcare (and other dependent care)
but yield small or no benefits to families
paying low or no taxes. Folbre is very
much concerned with the inequities and

34

Monthly Labor Review


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

distributional effects o f government tax
expenditures. For example, the exemp­
tion o f em ployer-provided pensions
costs the government an estimated $80
billion (in 1998)— a subsidy two-thirds
o f which benefit the top one-third of
wage and salary earners; while Head Start,
the early childhood education program
for poorer children, costs $4 billion.
A section o f the book is devoted to
the representation, voice, and (to a lesser
extent) working conditions of care givers.
A chapter deals with the “carers’ move­
ment” in England. Although it is con­
cerned only with unpaid care givers for
elderly and disabled younger persons
dependent upon homecare, the move­
ment is of considerable interest in that it
gained voice and financial aid over the
years under England’s National Health
Service (NHS). It brought carers (most of
whom were women) out o f their isolation,
and gradually gained visibility and a
modest degree of political clout. This en­
abled them to persuade the NHS that by
giving care at home, they saved it funds
that otherwise would have had to be
spent on institutional care, providing the
rationale for the payments allowed them.
The isolation o f paid homecare work­
ers from one another; the lack o f a regu­
lar employment relationship; the wide­
spread practice o f codifying them as “in­
dependent contractors” (or “indepen­
dent practitioners”); and low wages have
characterized the working conditions of
these workers in the United States as
“some o f the w o rst... to be found across
formal sector employment.” Jess Walsh
focuses on the Service Employees In­
ternational U nion’s (SEIU) efforts, cen­
tered in the Los Angeles area, which
proved ultim ately successful. A fter
years o f campaigning, the union finally
organized 74,000 homecare workers by
1999. It overcame such problems (not
usually faced by unions) as the absence
o f a common worksite and o f a chain of
employment responsibility. Care receiv­
ers retained the right to control how their
care was to be organized; care workers
had no right to a specific job but did

have the right to work at any available
worksite. The union got State legisla­
tors to set up public authorities under
county supervision, resulting in repre­
sentational and work security. The union
also became involved in training its mem­
bers for professional advancement in
such fields as home healthcare and prac­
tical nursing, so they would have the
prospect o f escaping poverty.
Although limited in coverage, the
volume presents a series o f informative
discussions, readily accessible to the
reader, about a field o f work and o f care
that needs more searching analysis and
attention.
— Horst Brand
formerly with the
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Publications Received
Economic and social statistics
Beaudry, Paul, Fabrice Collard, and David
A. Green, Decomposing the Twin-Peaks
in the World Distribution o f Output-perWorker. Cambridge, ma , National Bu­
reau of Economic Research, Inc., 2002,
43 pp. (WorkingPaper 9240) $10 per
copy, plus $10 for postage and handling
outside the United States.
Moretti, Enrico, Human Capital Spillovers
in Manufacturing: Evidence from PlantLevel Production Functions. Cambridge,
ma , National Bureau of Economic Re­
search, Inc., 2002, 48 pp. (Working Pa­
per 9316) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.

Economic growth
and development
Chiquiar, Daniel and Gordon H. Hanson,
International Migration, Self-Selection,
and the Distribution o f Wages: Evidence
from Mexico and the United States. Cam­
bridge, ma , National Bureau of Economic
Research, Inc., 2002, 55 pp. (Working
Paper 9242) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the
United States.
Chun, Hyunbae and M. Ishaq Nadiri, De­
composing Productivity Growth in the

U.S. Computer Industry. Cambridge, MA,
National Bureau of Economic Research,
Inc., 2002,36 pp. (Working Paper 9267)
$10 per copy, plus $10 for postage and
handling outside the United States.

ity. Cambridge, ma , National Bureau of
Economic Research, Inc., 2002, 34 pp.
(Working Paper 9206) $10 per copy, plus
$10 for postage and handling outside the
United States.

Cohen, Malcolm S. and Mahmood A. Zaidi, Global Skill Shortages. Northampton,
ma , Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc., 2002,
139 pp., $60/cloth.

Peters, Alan H. and Peter S. Fisher, State
Enterprise Zone Programs: Have They
Worked? Kalamazoo, Ml, W.E. Upjohn
Institute for Employment Research,
2002,325 pp., $40/cloth; $22/paperback.

The Development Dimensions of Trade.
Paris, Organisation for Economic Co-op­
eration and Development, 2002,153 pp.,
softcover.
GATS: The Case fo r Open Services Mark­

ets. Paris, Organisation for Economic Co­
operation and Development, 2002, 97
pp., softcover.
Heckman, James J., Flexibility and Job
Creation: Lessons fo r Germany. Cam­
bridge, ma, National Bureau of Economic
Research, Inc., 2002, 57 pp. (Working
Paper 9194) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.
Kuhn, Peter J., ed., Losing Work Moving
On. Kalamazoo, Ml, W.E.Upjohn Insti­
tute for Employment Research, 2002,560
pp., $45/cloth, $28/paper.

Education
Angrist, Joshua D. and Kevin Lang, How
Important Are Classroom Peer Effects?
Evidence from Boston s Metco Program.
Cambridge, ma , National Bureau of Eco­
nomic Research, Inc., 2002,39 pp. (Work­
ing Paper 9263) $10 per copy, plus $10
for postage and handling outside the
United States.
Linsenmeier, David M., Harvey S. Rosen,
and Cecilia Elena Rouse, Financial Aid
Packages and College Enrollment Deci­
sions: An Econometric Case Study. Cam­
bridge, ma, National Bureau of Economic
Research, Inc., 2002, 51 pp. (Working
Paper 9228)-$10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.

Industry and government
organization
Flynn, Patrice and Virginia A. Hodgkinson,
Measuring the Impact o f the Nonprofit
Sector. New York, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2001,299 pp., $90/hardback, $39.95/paperback.
Gowrisankaran, Gautam and Robert Town,
Competition, Payers, and Hospital Qual­


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Research, Inc., 2002, 49 pp. (Working
Paper 9234) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.
Jepsen, Maria, David Foden, and Martin
Hutsebaut, eds., Active Strategies fo r
Older Workers. Brussels, European
Trade Union Institute, 2002, 523 pp.,
softcover.

Labor organizations
International economics

G ifford, Court, ed., D irectory o f U.S.
Labor Organizations 2002 Edition. Wash­
ington, DC, BNA Books, The Bureau of
National Affairs, Inc., 2002, 292 pp.,
$105/softcover.

Feenstra, Robert C., Gordon H. Hanson,
and Songhua Lin, The Value o f Informa­
tion in International Trade: Gains to
Outsourcing through Hong Kong. Cam­
bridge, ma, National Bureau of Economic
Research, Inc., 2002, 37 pp. (Working
Paper 9328) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.

Wheeler, Hoyt N., The Future o f the Amer­
ican Labor Movement. New York, Cam­
bridge University Press, 2002, 276 pp.,
$65/hardback; $23/paperback.

Managem ent and organization
theory

Ingham, Hilary and Mike Ingham, eds., eu
Expansion to the East: Prospects and
Problems. Northampton, ma , Edward
Elgar Publishing, Inc., 2002,274 pp., $85/
cloth.

Bruhn, John G, Trust and the Health o f
Organizations. New York, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2001,222 pp.,
$69.50/hardcover.

Warner, Andrew M., ed., The European
Competitiveness and Transition Report
2001-200 2 : R atings o f A ccession
Progress, Competitiveness, and Eco­
nomic Restructuring o f European and
Transition Economies. New York, Ox­
ford University Press, 2002, 136 pp.,
sotftcover.

Cappelli, Peter, Why Do Employers Pay
fo r College? Cambridge, MA, National
Bureau of Economic Research, Inc., 2002,
44 pp. (Working Paper 9225) $10 per
copy, plus $10 for postage and handling
outside the United States.

World Investment Report 2002: Transna­
tional Corporations and Export Competi­
tiveness. New York and Geneva, United
Nations, 2002, 350 pp., softcover.

Rogovsky, Nikolai and Emily Sims, Cor­
porate Success through People: Making
International Labour Standards Workfo r
You. Geneva, International Labour Of­
fice, 2002, 129 pp., softcover.

Labor and economic history

Monetary and fiscal policy

Green, Archie, Tin Men. Urbana and Chi­
cago, IL, University of Illinois Press, 2002,
202 pp., $29.95/cloth.

Gentry, William M., The Effects o f Prog­
ressive Income Taxation on Job Turnover.
Cambridge, ma , National Bureau of Eco­
nomic Research, Inc., 2002,44 pp. (Work­
ing Paper 9226) $10 per copy, plus $10
for postage and handling outside the
United States.

Poliak, Robert A., Gary Becker’s Contribu­
tions to Family and Household Econom­
ics. Cambridge, ma , National Bureau of
Economic Research, Inc., 2002, 47 pp.
(Working Paper 9232) $ 10 per copy, plus
$ 10 for postage and handling outside the
United States.

Labor force
Fernandez, Raquel, Alessandra Fogli, and
Claudia Olivetti, Marrying Your Mom:
Preference Transmission and Women’s
Labor and Education Choices. Cam­
bridge, ma, National Bureau of Economic

Hoffman, Saul D. and Laurence S. Seidman, Helping Working Families: The
Earned Income Tax Credit. Kalamazoo,
mi, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employ­
ment Research, 2002,245 pp., $36/cloth;
$18/paperback.

Prices and living conditions
Hausman, Jerry, Sources o f Bias and Solu­
tions to Bias in the CPI. Cambridge, MA,

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

35

Book Reviews

National Bureau of Economic Research,
Inc., 2002,37 pp. (Working Paper 9298)
$10 per copy, plus $10 for postage and
handling outside the United States.

Productivity and technological
change
Aghion, Philippe, Nicholas Bloom, Rich­
ard Blundell, Rachel Griffith, and Peter
Howitt, Competition and Innovation: An
Innovated U Relationship. Cambridge,
ma , National Bureau of Economic Re­
search, Inc., 2002, 69 pp. (Working Pa­
per 9269) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.

L ichtenberg, Frank R., The E ffect o f
Changes in Drug Utilization on Labor
Supply and Per Capita Output. Cam­
bridge, ma, National Bureau of Economic
Research, Inc., 2002, 44 pp. (Working
Paper 9139) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.

Social institutions and
social change
Kimmel, Jean and Emily P. Hoffman, The
E conom ics o f Work and F am ily.
Kalamazoo, Ml, W.E. Upjohn Institute for
Employment Research, 2002, 191 pp.,
$35/cloth; $15/paperback.

Agrawal, Ajay, Iain M. Cockburn, Uni­
versity Research, Industrial R&D, and the
Anchor Tenant Hypothesis. Cambridge,
MA, National Bureau of Economic Re­
search, Inc., 2002, 44 pp. (Working Pa­
per 9212) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.

Sacerdote, Bruce, Slavery and the Intergenerational Transmission o f Human Capi­
tal. Cambridge, ma , National Bureau of
Economic Research, Inc., 2002, 62 pp.
(Working Paper 9227) $ 10 per copy, plus
$10 for postage and handling outside the
United States.

Forman, Chris, Avi Goldfarb, and Shane
Greenstein, Digital Dispersion: An Indus­
trial and Geographic Census o f Commer­
cial Internet Use. Cambridge, ma, Na­
tional Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.,
2002, 57 pp. (Working Paper 9287) $10
per copy, plus $10 for postage and han­
dling outside the United States.

Wages and compensation

Freeman, Richard B., The Labour Market
in the New Information Economy. Cam­
bridge, MA, National Bureau of Economic
Research, Inc., 2002, 36 pp. (Working
Paper 9254) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.
Jovanovic, Boyan and Peter L. Rousseau,
Mergers as Reallocation. Cambridge, MA,
National Bureau of Economic Research,
Inc., 2002, 25 pp. (Working Paper 9279)
$10 per copy, plus $10 for postage and
handling outside the United States.
Kirkman, Geoffrey S., Peter K. Cornelius,
Jeffrey D. Sachs, and Klaus Schwab, The
Global Information Technology Report:
Readiness fo r the Networked World,
2001-2002. New York, Oxford Univer­
sity Press, 2002, 385 pp., sotftcover.
Lemer, Josh and Jean Tirole, Efficient Pat­
ent Pools. Cambridge, ma , National Bu­
reau of Economic Research, Inc., 2002,
45 pp. (Working Paper 9175) $10 per
copy, plus $10 for postage and handling
outside the United States.

36

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May 2003

Abrego, Lisandro and John Whalley, De­
composing Wage Inequality Change Us­
ing General Equilibrium Models. Cam­
bridge, ma, National Bureau of Economic
Research, Inc., 2002, 31 pp. (Working
Paper 9184) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.

Welfare programs and
social insurance
Bhattacharya, Jayantha, Janet Currie and
Steven Haider, Food Insecurity or Pov­
erty? Measuring Need-Related Dietary
Adequacy. Cambridge, ma , National Bu­
reau of Economic Research, Inc., 2002,
34 pp. (Working Paper 9003) $10 per
copy, plus $10 for postage and handling
outside the United States.
Bound, John, Julie Berry Cullen, Austin
Nichols, and Lucie Schmidt, The Welfare
Implications o f Increasing Disability In­
surance Benefit Generosity. Cambridge,
ma , National Bureau of Economic Re­
search, Inc., 2002, 71 pp. (Working Pa­
per 9155) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.
G ruber, Jonathan and Jeffrey K ubik,
Health Insurance Coverage and the Dis­
ability Insurance Application Decision.

Cambridge, ma , National Bureau of Eco­
nomic Research, Inc., 2002,38 pp. (Work­
ing Paper 9148) $10 per copy, plus $10
for postage and handling outside the
United States.
Gustman, Alan L. and Thomas L. Steinmeier, The New Social Security Commission
Personal Accounts: Where Is the Invest­
ment Principal? Cambridge, ma , National
Bureau of Economic Research, Inc., 2002,
19 pp. (Working Paper 9045) $10 per
copy, plus $10 for postage and handling
outside the United States.
Hurd, Michael D., James P. Smith, and
Julie M. Zissimopoulos, The Effects o f
Subjective Survival on Retirement and
Social Security Claiming. Cambridge, MA,
National Bureau of Economic Research,
Inc., 2002, 36 pp. (Working Paper 9140)
$10 per copy, plus $10 for postage and
handling outside the United States.
Krueger, Alan B. and Bruce D. Meyer,
Labor Supply Effects o f Social Insurance.
Cambridge, ma , National Bureau of Eco­
nomic Research, Inc., 2002, 100 pp.
(Working Paper 9014) $ 10 per copy, plus
$10 for postage and handling outside the
United States.
Stephens, Melvin Jr., “3rd o f Tha Month ”:
Do Social Security Recipients Smooth
Consumption Between Checks?. Cam­
bridge, MA, National Bureau of Economic
Research, Inc., 2002, 37 pp. (Working
Paper 9135) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.

Worker training and
development
Heckman, James J., Carolyn Heinrich and
Jeffrey Smith, The Performance o f Per­
formance Standards. Cambridge, MA,
National Bureau of Economic Research,
Inc., 2002, 48 pp. (Working Paper 9002)
$10 per copy, plus $10 for postage and
handling outside the United States.
Heckman, James J., Lance Lochner, and
Ricardo Cossa, Learning-by-Doing vs.
On-the-Job Training: Using Variation
Induced by the E1TC to Distinguish Be­
tween Models o f Skill Formation. Cam­
bridge, ma , National Bureau of Economic
Research, Inc., 2002, 64 pp. (Working
Paper 9083) $10 per copy, plus $10 for
postage and handling outside the United
States.

C urrent Labor Statistics

■

Notes on labor statistics .............

38

Labor compensation and collective
bargaining data—continued

Comparative indicators
1. Labor market indicators.................................................
2. Annual and quarterly percent changes in
compensation, prices, and productivity..................
3. Alternative measures of wages and
compensation changes................................................

50
51
51

Labor force data
4. Employment status of the population,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
5. Selected employment indicators,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
6. Selected unemployment indicators,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
7. Duration of unemployment,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
8. Unemployed persons by reason for unemployment,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
9. Unemployment rates by sex and age,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
10. Unemployment rates by States,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
11. Employment of workers by States,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
12. Employment of workers by industry,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
13. Average weekly hours by industry,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
14. Average hourly earnings by industry,
seasonally adjusted.....................................................
15. Average hourly earnings by industry............................
16. Average weekly earnings by industry...........................
17. Diffusion indexes of employment change,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
18. Establishment size and employment covered under ui,
private ownership, by NAICS supersector................
19. Annual data establishment, employment, and wages,
covered under ui and UCFE, by ownership...............
20. Annual data: Establishments, employment,
and wages covered under ui and ucfe, by S tate.....
21. Annual data: Employment and average annual pay of
ui- and uCFE-covered workers, by largest counties ..
22. Annual data: Employment status of the population ...
23. Annual data: Employment levels by industry.............
24. Annual data: Average hours and earnings level,
by industry................................................................

76
77
78
79

Price data
52
53
54
54
55
55
56
56
57
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

32. Consumer Price Index: U.S. city average, by expenditure
category and commodity and service groups................ 80
33. Consumer Price Index: U.S. city average and
local data, all item s........................................................... 83
34. Annual data: Consumer Price Index, all items
and maj or groups.............................................................. 84
35. Producer Price Indexes by stage of processing................. 85
36. Producer Price Indexes for the net output o f major
industry groups................................................................ 86
37. Annual data: Producer Price Indexes
by stage of processing...................................................... 87
38. U.S. export price indexes by Standard International
Trade Classification......................................................... 88
39. U.S. import price indexes by Standard International
Trade Classification......................................................... 89
40. U.S. export price indexes by end-use category................. 90
41. U.S. import price indexes by end-use category................ 90
42. U.S.international price indexes for selected
categories of services........................................................ 90

Productivity data
43. Indexes of productivity, hourly compensation,
and unit costs, data seasonally adjusted........................ 91
44. Annual indexes of multifactor productivity....................... 92
45. Annual indexes of productivity, hourly compensation,
unit costs, and p rices....................................................... 93
46. Annual indexes of output per hour for selected
industries........................................................................... 94

66
67
70
71
71

Labor compensation and collective
bargaining data
25. Employment Cost Index, compensation,
by occupation and industry group................................. 72
26. Employment Cost Index, wages and salaries,
by occupation and industry group................................. 74
27. Employment Cost Index, benefits, private industry........ 75


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28. Employment Cost Index, private nonfarm workers,
by bargaining status, region, and area s iz e ....................
29. Participants in benefit plans, medium and large firm s.....
30. Participants in benefits plans, small firms
and government....................................................................
31. Work stoppages involving 1,000 workers or m o re...........

International comparisons data
47. Unemployment rates in nine countries,
data seasonally adjusted..................................................
48. Annual data: Employment status of the civilian
working-age population, 10 countries............................
49. Annual indexes of productivity and related measures,
12 countries.......................................................................

97
98
99

Injury and illness data
50. Annual data: Occupational injury and illness
incidence rates.................................................................. 100
51. Fatal occupational injuries by event
or exposure............................................................................ 102

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

37

Notes on Current Labor Statistics

This section o f the .Review presents the prin­
cipal statistical series collected and calcu­
lated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics:
series on labor force; employment; unem­
ployment; labor compensation; consumer,
producer, and international prices; produc­
tivity; international comparisons; and injury
and illness statistics. In the notes that fol­
low, the data in each group of tables are
briefly described; key definitions are given;
notes on the data are set forth; and sources
of additional information are cited.

General notes
The following notes apply to several tables
in this section:
Seasonal adjustment. Certain monthly
and quarterly data are adjusted to eliminate
the effect on the data of such factors as cli­
m atic conditions, industry production
schedules, opening and closing of schools,
holiday buying periods, and vacation prac­
tices, which might prevent short-term evalu­
ation of the statistical series. Tables con­
taining data that have been adjusted are iden­
tified as “ seasonally adjusted.” (All other
data are not seasonally adjusted.) Seasonal
effects are estimated on the basis of past
experience. When new seasonal factors are
computed each year, revisions may affect
seasonally adjusted data for several preced­
ing years.
Seasonally adjusted data appear in tables
1-14, 16-17, 43, and 47. Seasonally ad­
justed labor force data in tables 1 and 4-9
were revised in the February 2002 issue of
the Review. Seasonally adjusted establish­
ment survey data shown in tables 1, 12-14
and 16-17 were revised in the July 2002
Review and reflect the experience through
March 2002. A brief explanation of the sea­
sonal adjustment methodology appears in
“Notes on the data.”
Revisions in the productivity data in
table 49 are usually introduced in the Sep­
tember issue. Seasonally adjusted indexes
and percent changes from month-to-month
and quarter-to-quarter are published for nu­
merous Consumer and Producer Price Index
series. However, seasonally adjusted in­
dexes are not published for the U.S. average
All-Items CPI. Only seasonally adjusted per­
cent changes are available for this series.
Adjustments for price changes. Some
data— such as the “real” earnings shown in
table 14—are adjusted to eliminate the ef­
fect o f changes in price. These adjustments
are made by dividing current-dollar values
by the Consumer Price Index or the appro­
priate component of the index, then multi­
plying by 100. For example, given a current

38

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hourly wage rate of $3 and a current price
index number of 150, where 1982 = 100, the
hourly rate expressed in 1982 dollars is $2
($3/150 x 100 = $2). The $2 (or any other
resulting values) are described as “real,”
“constant,” or “ 1982” dollars.

Sources of information
Data that supplement the tables in this sec­
tion are published by the Bureau in a variety
of sources. Definitions o f each series and
notes on the data are contained in later sec­
tions of these Notes describing each set of
data. For detailed descriptions of each data
series, see BLS Handbook ofM ethods, Bul­
letin 2490. Users also may wish to consult
Major Programs o f the Bureau o f Labor Sta­
tistics, Report 919. News releases provide
the latest statistical information published
by the Bureau; the major recurring releases
are published according to the schedule ap­
pearing on the back cover of this issue.
More information about labor force, em­
ployment, and unemployment data and the
household and establishment surveys under­
lying the data are available in the Bureau’s
m onthly publication, E m ploym ent and
Earnings. Historical unadjusted and season­
ally adjusted data from the household sur­
vey are available on the Internet:
http://www. bis. gov/cps/
Historically comparable unadjusted and sea­
sonally adjusted data from the establishment
survey also are available on the Internet:
h ttp://www. bis. gov/ces/
Additional information on labor force data
for areas below the national level are pro­
vided in the BLS annual report, Geographic
Profile o f Employment and Unemployment.
For a comprehensive discussion of the
Employment Cost Index, see Employment
Cost Indexes and Levels, 1975-95, BLS Bul­
letin 2466. The most recent data from the
Employee Benefits Survey appear in the fol­
lowing Bureau of Labor Statistics bulletins:
Employee Benefits in Medium and Large
Firms; Employee Benefits in Small Private
Establishments; and Employee Benefits in
State and Local Governments.
More detailed data on consumer and pro­
ducer prices are published in the monthly
periodicals, The CPI Detailed Report and
Producer Price Indexes. For an overview of
the 1998 revision of the C P I , see the Decem­
ber 1996 issue of the Monthly Labor Re­
view. Additional data on international prices
appear in monthly news releases.
Listings o f industries for which produc­
tivity indexes are available may be found on
the Internet:
http://www. bis. gov/lpc/

May 2003

For additional information on interna­
tional comparisons data, see International
Comparisons o f Unemployment, BLS Bulle­
tin 1979.
Detailed data on the occupational injury
and illness series are published in Occupa­
tional Injuries and Illnesses in the United
States, by Industry, a BLS annual bulletin.
Finally, the Monthly Labor Review car­
ries analytical articles on annual and longer
term developments in labor force, employ­
ment, and unemployment; employee com­
pensation and collective bargaining; prices;
productivity; international comparisons;
and injury and illness data.

Symbols
n.e.c. = not elsewhere classified,
n.e.s. = not elsewhere specified.
p = preliminary. To increase the time­
liness of some series, preliminary
figures are issued based on repre­
sentative but incomplete returns,
r = revised. Generally, this revision
reflects the availability o f later
data, but also may reflect other ad­
justments.

Comparative Indicators
(Tables 1-3)
Comparative indicators tables provide an
overview and comparison of major BLS sta­
tistical series. Consequently, although many
o f the included series are available monthly,
all measures in these comparative tables are
presented quarterly and annually.
Labor market indicators include em­
ployment measures from two major surveys
and information on rates of change in com­
pensation provided by the Employm ent
Cost Index (E C l) program. The labor force
participation rate, the em ploym ent-topopulation ratio, and unemployment rates
for major demographic groups based on the
Current Population (“household”) Survey
are presented, while measures of employ­
ment and average weekly hours by major
industry sector are given using nonfarm pay­
roll data. The Em ploym ent Cost Index
(compensation), by major sector and by bar­
gaining status, is chosen from a variety of
BLS compensation and wage measures be­
cause it provides a comprehensive measure
of employer costs for hiring labor, not just
outlays for wages, and it is not affected by
employment shifts among occupations and
industries.

D ata on changes in com pensation,
prices, and productivity are presented in
table 2. Measures of rates of change of com­
pensation and wages from the Employment
Cost Index program are provided for all ci­
vilian nonfarm workers (excluding Federal
and household workers) and for all private
nonfarm workers. Measures of changes in
consumer prices for all urban consumers;
producer prices by stage of processing; over­
all prices by stage of processing; and overall
export and import price indexes are given.
Measures of productivity (output per hour
o f all persons) are provided for major sec­
tors.
A lternative measures of wage and
compensation rates of change, which re­
flect the overall trend in labor costs, are sum­
marized in table 3. Differences in concepts
and scope, related to the specific purposes
o f the series,
contribute to the variation in changes among
the individual measures.

Notes on the data
Definitions of each series and notes on the
data are contained in later sections of these
notes describing each set of data.

Employment and
Unemployment Data

not work during the survey week, but were
available for work except for temporary ill­
ness and had looked for jobs within the pre­
ceding 4 weeks. Persons who did not look
for work because they were on layoff are
also counted among the unemployed. The
unemployment rate represents the num­
ber unemployed as a percent of the civilian
labor force.
The civilian labor force consists of all
employed or unemployed persons in the
civilian noninstitutional population. Persons
not in the labor force are those not
classified as employed or unemployed. This
group includes discouraged workers, defined
as persons who want and are available for a
job and who have looked for work sometime
in the past 12 months (or since the end of
their last job if they held one within the past
12 months), but are not currently looking,
because they believe there are no jobs
available or there are none for which they
would qualify. The civilian noninstitu­
tional population comprises all persons 16
years of age and older who are not inmates
of penal or mental institutions, sanitariums,
or homes for the aged, infirm, or needy. The
civilian labor force participation rate is
the
proportion
o f the
civilian
noninstitutional population that is in the
labor force. The employment-population
ratio is employ-ment as a percent o f the
civilian nonin-stitutional population.

(Tables 1; 4-24)

Notes on the data

Household survey data

From time to time, and especially after a
decennial census, adjustments are made in
the Current Population Survey figures to
correct for estimating errors during the
intercensal years. These adjustments affect
the comparability of historical data. A de­
scription of these adjustments and their ef­
fect on the various data series appears in the
Explanatory N otes o f Em ploym ent and
Earnings.
Labor force data in tables 1 and 4 -9 are
seasonally adjusted. Since January 1980,
national labor force data have been season­
ally adjusted with a procedure called X -l 1
arima which was developed at Statistics
Canada as an extension of the standard X -l 1
method previously used by bls . A detailed
description of the procedure appears in the
X -ll ARIMA Seasonal Adjustment Method,
by Estela Bee Dagum (Statistics Canada,
Catalogue No. 12-564E, January 1983).
At the beginning of each calendar year,
historical seasonally adjusted data usually
are revised, and projected seasonal adjust­
ment factors are calculated for use during
the January-June period. The historical sea­
sonally adjusted data usually are revised for
only the most recent 5 years. In July, new
seasonal adjustment factors, which incorpo­

Description of the series
E mployment data in this section are ob­

tained from the Current Population Survey,
a program of personal interviews conducted
monthly by the Bureau of the Census for
the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The sample
consists of about 60,000 households selected
to represent the U.S. population 16 years of
age and older. Households are interviewed
on a rotating basis, so that three-fourths of
the sample is the same for any 2 consecutive
months.

Definitions
Employed persons include (1) all those
who worked for pay any time during the
week which includes the 12th day of the
month or who worked unpaid for 15 hours
or more in a family-operated enterprise and
(2) those who were temporarily absent from
their regular jobs because of illness, vaca­
tion, industrial dispute, or similar reasons. A
person working at more than one job is
counted only in the job at which he or she
worked the greatest number of hours.
Unemployed persons are those who did


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rate the experience through June, are pro­
duced for the July-December period, but no
revisions are made in the historical data.
For additional information on na­
tional household survey data, contact the
Division o f Labor Force Statistics: (202)
691-6378.

Establishment survey data
Description of the series
E mployment, hours, and earnings data

in this section are compiled from payroll
records reported monthly on a voluntary ba­
sis to the Bureau o f Labor Statistics and its
cooperating State agencies by about 300,000
establishments representing all industries
except agriculture. Industries are classified
in accordance with the 1987 Standard In­
dustrial Classification (SIC) Manual. In most
industries, the sampling probabilities are
based on the size o f the establishment; most
large establishments are therefore in the
sample. (An establishment is not necessar­
ily a firm; it may be a branch plant, for ex­
ample, or warehouse.) Self-employed per­
sons and others not on a regular civilian pay­
roll are outside the scope of the survey
because they are excluded from establish­
ment records. This largely accounts for the
difference in employment figures between
the household and establishment surveys.

Definitions
An establishm ent is an economic unit
which produces goods or services (such as a
factory or store) at a single location and is
engaged in one type of economic activity.
Employed persons are all persons who
received pay (including holiday and sick
pay) for any part of the payroll period in­
cluding the 12th day of the month. Persons
holding more than one job (about 5 percent
of all persons in the labor force) are counted
in each establishment which reports them.
Production workers in manufacturing
include working supervisors and nonsupervisory workers closely associated with pro­
duction operations. Those workers men­
tioned in tables 11-16 include production
workers in manufacturing and mining; con­
struction workers in construction; and
nonsupervisory workers in the following in­
dustries: transportation and public utilities;
wholesale and retail trade; finance, insur­
ance, and real estate; and services. These
groups account for about four-fifths of the
total employment on private nonagricultural payrolls.
Earnings are the payments production
or nonsupervisory workers receive during
the survey period, including premium pay

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

39

Current Labor Statistics
for overtime or late-shift work but exclud­
ing irregular bonuses and other special
paym ents. Real earnings are earnings
adjusted to reflect the effects of changes in
consumer prices. The deflator for this series
is derived from the Consumer Price Index
for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W).

Hours represent the average weekly
hours o f production or nonsupervisory
workers for which pay was received, and
are different from standard or scheduled
hours. Overtime hours represent the por­
tion o f average weekly hours which was in
excess of regular hours and for which over­
time premiums were paid.
The D iffusion Index represents the
percent of industries in which employment
was rising over the indicated period, plus
one-half of the industries with unchanged
employment; 50 percent indicates an equal
balance between industries with increasing
and decreasing employment. In line with Bu­
reau practice, data for the 1-, 3-, and 6-month
spans are seasonally adjusted, while those
for the 12-month span are unadjusted. Data
are centered within the span. Table 17 pro­
vides an index on private nonfarm employ­
ment based on 356 industries, and a manu­
facturing index based on 139 industries.
These indexes are useful for measuring the
dispersion of economic gains or losses and
are also economic indicators.

Notes on the data
Establishment survey data are annually ad­
justed to comprehensive counts of employ­
ment (called “benchmarks”). The latest ad­
justment, which incorporated March 2001
benchmarks, was made with the release of
May 2002 data, published in the July issue
of the Review. Coincident with the bench­
mark adjustment, historical seasonally ad­
justed data were revised to reflect updated
seasonal factors. Unadjusted data from April
2000 forward and seasonally adjusted data
from January 1997 forward were revised
with the release of the May 2002 data.
In addition to the routine benchmark re­
visions and updated seasonal factors intro­
duced with the release of the May 2002
data, the first estimates for the transporta­
tion and public utilities; retail trade; and fi­
nance, insurance, and real estate industries
were published from a new probabilitybased sample design. These industries are
the third group to convert to a probabilitybased sample under a 4-year phase-in plan
o f a sample redesign project. The comple­
tion o f the phase-in for the redesign, in June
2003 for the services industry, will coincide
with the conversion of national establish­
ment survey series from industry coding
based on the 1987 Standard Industrial Clas­
sification (SIC) system to the North Ameri­

40
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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

can Industry Classification System (NAICS).
For additional information, see the the June
2002 issue of Employment and Earnings.
Revisions in State data (table 11) oc­
curred with the publication of January 2002
data.
Beginning in June 1996, theBLS uses the
X -12- arima methodology to seasonally ad­
just establishment survey data. This proce­
dure, developed by the Bureau of the Cen­
sus, controls for the effect of varying sur­
vey intervals (also known as the 4- versus
5-week effect), thereby providing improved
measurement of over-the-month changes and
underlying economic trends. Revisions of
data, usually for the most recent 5-year pe­
riod, are made once a year coincident with
the benchmark revisions.
In the establishment survey, estimates
for the most recent 2 months are based on
incomplete returns and are published as pre­
liminary in the tables (12-17 in th qReview).
When all returns have been received, the es­
timates are revised and published as “final”
(prior to any benchmark revisions) in the
third month of their appearance. Thus, De­
cember data are published as preliminary in
January and February and as final in March.
For the same reasons, quarterly establish­
ment data (table 1) are preliminary for the
first 2 months of publication and final in the
third month. Thus, fourth-quarter data are
published as preliminary in January and
February and as final in March.
F or additional information on estab­
lishment survey data, contact the Division
of Current Employment Statistics: (202)
691-6555.

Unemployment data by
State
Description of the series
Data presented in this section are obtained
from the Local Area Unemployment Statis­
tics (LAUS) program, which is conducted in
cooperation with State employment secu­
rity agencies.
Monthly estimates of the labor force,
employment, and unemployment for States
and sub-State areas are a key indicator of
local economic conditions, and form the ba­
sis for determining the eligibility of an area
for benefits under Federal economic assis­
tance programs such as the Job Training
Partnership Act. Seasonally adjusted unem­
ployment rates are presented in table 10.
Insofar as possible, the concepts and defini­
tions underlying these data are those used in
the national estimates obtained from the CPS.

Notes on the data
Data refer to State o f residence. Monthly

May 2003

data for all States and the D istrict o f
Columbia are derived using standardized
procedures established by bls . Once a year,
estimates are revised to new population
controls, usually with publication of January
estim ates, and benchm arked to annual
average cps levels.
F or additional information on data
in this series, call (202) 691-6392 (table 10)
or (202) 691-6559 (table 11).

Covered em ploym ent and
wage data (ES-202)
Description of the series
E mployment, wage, and establishment data

in this section are derived from the quarterly
tax reports submitted to State employment
security agencies by private and State and
local government employers subject to State
unemployment insurance ( u i) laws and from
Federal, agencies subject to the Unemploy­
ment Compensation for Federal Employees
(ucfe) program. Each quarter, State agencies
edit and process the data and send the infor­
mation to the Bureau o f Labor Statistics.
The Covered Employment and Wages
data, also referred as ES-202 data, are the
most complete enumeration of employment
and wage information by industry at the na­
tional, State, metropolitan area, and county
levels. They have broad economic signifi­
cance in evaluating labor market trends and
major industry developments.

Definitions
In general, es-202 monthly employment data
represent the number of covered workers
who worked during, or received pay for, the
pay period that included the 12 th day of the
month. Covered private industry employ­
ment includes most corporate officials, ex­
ecutives, supervisory personnel, profession­
als, clerical workers, wage earners, piece
workers, and part-time workers. It excludes
proprietors, the unincorporated self-em­
ployed, unpaid family members, and certain
farm and domestic workers. Certain types
of nonprofit employers, such as religious
organizations, are given a choice of coverage
or exclusion in a number of States. Workers
in these organizations are, therefore, reported
to a limited degree.
Persons on paid sick leave, paid holiday,
paid vacation, and the like, are included. Per­
sons on the payroll of more than one firm
during the period are counted by each uisubject employer if they meet the employ­
ment definition noted earlier. The employ-

ment count excludes workers who earned no
wages during the entire applicable pay period
because of work stoppages, temporary lay­
offs, illness, or unpaid vacations.
Federal employment data are based on
reports of monthly employment and quarterly
wages submitted each quarter to State agencies
for all Federal installations with employees
covered by the Unemployment Com pensa­
tion for Federal Employees (ucfe) program,

except for certain national security agen­
cies, which are omitted for security rea­
sons. Employment for all Federal agencies for
any given month is based on the number of
persons who worked during or received pay
for the pay period that included the 12th of
the month.
An establishment is an economic unit,
such as a farm, mine, factory, or store, that
produces goods or provides services. It is typi­
cally at a single physical location and engaged
in one, or predominantly one, type of eco­
nomic activity for which a single industrial clas­
sification may be applied. Occasionally, a single
physical location encompasses two or more
distinct and significant activities. Each activity
should be reported as a separate establishment
if separate records are kept and the various
activities are classified under different four­
digit sic codes.
Most employers have only one establish­
ment; thus, the establishment is the predomi­
nant reporting unit or statistical entity for re­
porting employment and wages data. Most
employers, including State and local govern­
ments who operate more than one establish­
ment in a State, file a Multiple Worksite Re­
port each quarter, in addition to their quarterly
ui report. The Multiple Worksite Report is
used to collect separate employment and wage
data for each of the employer’s establishments,
which are not detailed on the ui report. Some
very small multi-establishment employers do
not file a Multiple Worksite Report. When the
total employment in an employer’s secondary
establishments (all establishments other than
the largest) is 10 or fewer, the employer gener­
ally will file a consolidated report for all estab­
lishments. Also, some employers either can­
not or will not report at the establishment level
and thus aggregate establishments into one con­
solidated unit, or possibly several units, though
not at the establishment level.
For the Federal Government, the reporting
unit is the installation: a single location at
which a department, agency, or other govern­
ment body has civilian employees. Federal agen­
cies follow slightly different criteria than do
private employers when breaking down their
reports by installation. They are permitted to
combine as a single statewide unit: 1) all instal­
lations with 10 or fewer workers, and 2) all


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installations that have a combined total in the
State of fewer than 50 workers. Also, when
there are fewer than 25 workers in all second­
ary installations in a State, the secondary in­
stallations may be combined and reported with
the major installation. Last, if a Federal agency
has fewer than five employees in a State, the
agency headquarters office (regional office,
district office) serving each State may consoli­
date the employment and wages data for that
State with the data reported to the State in
which the headquarters is located. As a result
of these reporting rules, the number of report­
ing units is always larger than the number of
employers (or government agencies) but
smaller than the number of actual establish­
ments (or installations).
Data reported for the first quarter are tabu­
lated into size categories ranging from worksites
of very small size to those with 1,000 em­
ployees or more. The size category is deter­
mined by the establishment’s March employ­
ment level. It is important to note that each
establishment of a multi-establishment firm is
tabulated separately into the appropriate size
category. The total employment level of the
reporting multi-establishment firm is not used
in the size tabulation.
Covered employers in most States report
total wages paid during the calendar quarter,
regardless of when the services were per­
formed. A few State laws, however, specify
that wages be reported for, or based on the
period during which services are performed
rather than the period during which compen­
sation is paid. Under most State laws or regu­
lations, wages include bonuses, stock options,
the cash value of meals and lodging, tips and
other gratuities, and, in some States, employer
contributions to certain deferred compensa­
tion plans such as 401(k) plans.
Covered employer contributions for oldage, survivors, and disability insurance (oasdi),
health insurance, unemployment insurance,
workers’ compensation, and private pension
and welfare funds are not reported as wages.
Employee contributions for the same pur­
poses, however, as well as money withheld
for income taxes, union dues, and so forth, are
reported even though they are deducted from
the worker’s gross pay.
Wages of covered Federal workers rep­
resent the gross amount of all payrolls for all
pay periods ending within the quarter. This
includes cash allowances, the cash equivalent
of any type of remuneration, severance pay,
withholding taxes, and retirement deductions.
Federal employee remuneration generally cov­
ers the same types of services as for workers
in private industry.
Average annual wages per employee for
any given industry are computed by dividing

total annual wages by annual average employ­
ment. A further division by 52 yields average
weekly wages per employee. Annual pay data
only approximate annual earnings because an
individual may not be employed by the same
employer all year or may work for more than
one employer at a time.
Average weekly or annual pay is affected
by the ratio of full-time to part-time workers
as well as the number of individuals in highpaying and low-paying occupations. When
average pay levels between States and indus­
tries are compared, these factors should be
taken into consideration. For example, indus­
tries characterized by high proportions of parttime workers will show average wage levels
appreciably less than the weekly pay levels of
regular full-time employees in these industries.
The opposite effect characterizes industries
with low proportions of part-time workers, or
industries that typically schedule heavy week­
end and overtime work. Average wage data also
may be influenced by work stoppages, labor
turnover rates, retroactive payments, seasonal
factors, bonus payments, and so on.

Notes on the data
Beginning with the release of data for 2001,
publications presenting data from the Covered
Employment and Wages (CEW) program have
switched to the 2002 version of the North
American Industry Classificatiion System
(NAICS) as the basis for the assignment and
tabulation of economic data by industry, naics
is the product of a cooperative effort on the
part of the statistical agencies of the United
States, Canada, and Mexico. Due to difference
in NAICS and Standard Industrial Classifica­
tion (SIC) structures, industry data for 2001 is
not comparable to the sic-based data for ear­
lier years.
Effective January 2001, the cew program
began assigning Indian Tribal Councils and re­
lated establishments to local government own­
ership. This bls action was in response to a
change in Federal law dealing with the way
Indian Tribes are treated under the Federal
Unemployment Tax Act. This law requires
federally recognized Indian Tribes to be treated
similarly to State and local governments. In
the past the cew program coded Indian Tribal
Councils and related establishments in the
private sector. As a result of the new law,
cew data reflects significant shifts in em­
ployment and wages between the private sec­
tor and local government from 2000 to 2001.
Data also reflect industry changes. Those
accounts previously assigned to civic and
social organizations were assigned to tribal
governments. There were no required indus­
try changes for related establishments owned

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

41

Current Labor Statistics

by these Tribal Councils. These tribal busi­
ness establishments continued to be coded ac­
cording to the economic activity of that entity.
To insure the highest possible quality of
data, State employment security agencies
verify with employers and update, if neces­
sary, the industry, location, and ownership clas­
sification of all establishments on a 3-year cycle.
Changes in establishment classification codes
resulting from the verification process are in­
troduced with the data reported for the first
quarter of the year. Changes resulting from
improved employer reporting also are intro­
duced in the first quarter. For these reasons,
some data, especially at more detailed geo­
graphic levels, may not be strictly comparable
with earlier years.
The2000 county data used to calculate the
2000-2001 changes were adjusted for changes
in industry and county classification to make
them comparable to data for 2001. As a result,
the adjusted 2000 data differ to some extent
from the data available on the Internet at:
h ttp://www. bis. gov/cew/home. htm.
County definitions are assigned according
to Federal Information Processing Standards
Publications as issued by the National Insti­
tute o f Standards and Technology. Areas
shown as counties include those designated
as independent cities in some jurisdictions
and, in Alaska, those areas designated by the
Census Bureau where counties have not been
created. County data also are presented for
the New England States for comparative pur­
poses, even though townships are the more
common designation used in New England
(and New Jersey).
For additional information on the covered
employment and wage data, contact the Divi­
sion of Administrative Statistics and Labor
Turnover at (202) 691-6567.

Compensation and
Wage Data
(Tables 1-3; 25-31)
Compensation and wage data are gathered

by the Bureau from business establishments,
State and local governments, labor unions, col­
lective bargaining agreements on file with the
Bureau, and secondary sources.

pensation per hour worked and includes
wages, salaries, and employer costs of em­
ployee benefits. It uses a fixed market
basket of labor—similar in concept to the Con­
sumer Price Index’s fixed market basket of
goods and services—to measure change over
time in employer costs of employing labor.
Statistical series on total compensation
costs, on wages and salaries, and on benefit
costs are available for private nonfarm work­
ers excluding proprietors, the self-employed,
and household workers. The total compensa­
tion costs and wages and salaries series are
also available for State and local government
workers and for the civilian nonfarm economy,
which consists of private industry and State
and local government workers combined. Fed­
eral workers are excluded.
The Employment Cost Index probability
sample consists of about 4,400 private non­
farm establishments providing about 23,000
occupational observations and 1,000 State and
local government establishments providing
6,000 occupational observations selected to
represent total employment in each sector. On
average, each reporting unit provides wage and
compensation information on five well-speci­
fied occupations. Data are collected each quar­
ter for the pay period including the 12th day
of March, June, September, and December.
Beginning with June 1986 data, fixed em­
ployment weights from the 1980 Census of
P opulatio n are used each q u arter to
calculate the civilian and private indexes and
the index for State and local governments.
(P rior to June 1986, the em ploym ent
weights are from the 1970 Census o f Popu­
lation.) These fixed weights, also used to
derive all of the industry and occupation
series indexes, ensure that changes in these
indexes reflect only changes in compensa­
tion, not employment shifts among indus­
tries or occupations with different levels of
wages and compensation. For the bargaining
status, region, and metropolitan/non-metropolitan area series, however, employment
data by industry and occupation are not
available from the census. Instead, the 1980
employment weights are reallocated within
these series each quarter based on the cur­
rent sample. Therefore, these indexes are not
strictly comparable to those for the aggre­
gate, industry, and occupation series.

Definitions

Employment Cost Index
Description of the series
The Employment Cost Index (ECI) is a quar­
terly measure of the rate of change in com­

42

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Total compensation costs include wages,
salaries, and the employer’s costs for em­
ployee benefits.
Wages and salaries consist of earnings
before payroll deductions, including produc­

May 2003

tion bonuses, incentive earnings, commis­
sions, and cost-of-living adjustments.
Benefits include the cost to employers
for paid leave, supplemental pay (includ­
ing nonproduction bonuses), insurance, retire­
ment and savings plans, and legally required
benefits (such as Social Security, workers’ com­
pensation, and unemployment insurance).
Excluded from wages and salaries and em­
ployee benefits are such items as payment-in­
kind, free room and board, and tips.

Notes on the d ata
The Employment Cost Index for changes in
wages and salaries in the private nonfarm
economy was published beginning in 1975.
Changes in total compensation cost—wages
and salaries and benefits combined— were
published beginning in 1980. The series of
changes in wages and salaries and for total
compensation in the State and local govern­
ment sector and in the civilian nonfarm
economy (excluding Federal employees) were
published beginning in 1981. Historical in­
dexes (June 1981=100) are available on the
Internet:
http://www. bis. gov/ect/
F or additional information on the
Employment Cost Index, contact the Office
of Compensation Levels and Trends: (202)
691-6199.

Employee Benefits Survey
Description of the series
Employee benefits data are obtained from
the Employee Benefits Survey, an annual
survey of the incidence and provisions of
selected benefits provided by employers.
The survey collects data from a sample of
approximately 9,000 private sector and
State and local government establishments.
The data are presented as a percentage of em­
ployees who participate in a certain benefit, or
as an average benefit provision (for example,
the average number of paid holidays provided
to employees per year). Selected data from the
survey are presented in table 25 for medium
and large private establishments and in table
26 for small private establishments and State
and local government.
The survey covers paid leave benefits
such as holidays and vacations, and personal,
funeral, jury duty, military, family, and sick
leave; short-term disability, long-term dis­
ability, and life insurance; medical, dental,
and vision care plans; defined benefit and
defined contribution plans; flexible benefits
plans; reimbursement accounts; and unpaid
family leave.
Also, data are tabulated on the inci-

dence o f several other benefits, such as
severance pay, child-care assistance, well-ness
program s, and em ployee assistance
programs.

Definitions
Employer-provided benefits are benefits
that are financed either wholly or partly by
the employer. They may be sponsored by a
union or other third party, as long as there is
some employer financing. However, some
benefits that are fully paid for by the em­
ployee also are included. For example, long­
term care insurance and postretirement life
insurance paid entirely by the employee are
included because the guarantee o f insurabil­
ity and availability at group premium rates
are considered a benefit.
Participants are workers who are covered
by a benefit, whether or not they use that benefit.
If the benefit plan is financed wholly by
employers and requires employees to complete
a minimum length of service for eligibility, the
workers are considered participants whether or
not they have met the requirement. If workers
are required to contribute towards the cost of a
plan, they are considered participants only if
they elect the plan and agree to make the required
contributions.
Defined benefit pension plans use pre­
determined formulas to calculate a retirement
benefit (if any), and obligate the employer to
provide those benefits. Benefits are generally
based on salary, years of service, or both.
Defined contribution plans generally
specify the level of employer and employee
contributions to a plan, but not the formula for
determining eventual benefits. Instead, indi­
vidual accounts are set up for participants, and
benefits are based on amounts credited to these
accounts.
Tax-deferred savings plans are a type of
defined contribution plan that allow par­
ticipants to contribute a portion of their sal­
ary to an employer-sponsored plan and defer
income taxes until withdrawal.
Flexible benefit plans allow employees
to choose among several benefits, such as life
insurance, medical care, and vacation days, and
among several levels of coverage within a given
benefit.

Notes on the data
Surveys of employees in medium and large
establishments conducted over the 1979-86
period included establishments that employed
at least 50,100, or 250 workers, depending on
the industry (most service industries were
excluded). The survey conducted in 1987


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covered only State and local governments with
50 or more employees. The surveys conducted
in 1988 and 1989 included medium and large
establishments with 100 workers or more in
private industries. All surveys conducted over
the 1979-89 period excluded establishments
in Alaska and Hawaii, as well as part-time
employees.
Beginning in 1990, surveys of State and
local govern m en ts and sm all private
establishments were conducted in evennumbered years, and surveys of medium and
large establishments were conducted in oddnumbered years. The small establishment
survey includes all private nonfarm
establishm en ts w ith few er than 100
w orkers, w hile the State and local
government survey includes all governments,
regardless of the number of workers. All
three surveys include full- and part-time
workers, and workers in all 50 States and
the District of Columbia.
Foradditional information on the Em­
ployee Benefits Survey, contact the Office of
Compensation Levels and Trends on the
Internet:
http://www.bls.gov/ebs/

Work stoppages
Description of the series
Data on work stoppages measure the number
and duration of major strikes or lockouts (in­
volving 1,000 workers or more) occurring dur­
ing the month (or year), the number of work­
ers involved, and the amount of work time lost
because of stoppage. These data are presented
in table 27.
Data are largely from a variety of pub­
lished sources and cover only establishments
directly involved in a stoppage. They do
not measure the indirect or secondary effect
of stoppages on other establishments whose
employees are idle owing to material short­
ages or lack of service.

Definitions
Number of stoppages: The number of
strikes and lockouts involving 1,000 workers
or more and lasting a full shift or longer.
Workers involved : The number of work­
ers directly involved in the stoppage.
Number of days idle: The aggregate
number of workdays lost by workers involved
in the stoppages.
Days of idleness as a percent of
estim ated w orking time: A ggregate
workdays lost as a percent of the aggregate
number of standard workdays in the period
multiplied by total employment in the period.

Notes on the data
This series is not comparable with the one
terminated in 1981 that covered strikes in­
volving six workers or more.
F or additional information on work
stoppages data, contact the Office of Com­
pensation and Working Conditions: (202)
691-6282, or the Internet:
http:/www.bls.gov/cba/

Price Data
(Tables 2; 32-42)
P rice data are gathered by the Bureau

o f Labor Statistics from retail and pri­
mary markets in the United States. Price in­
dexes are given in relation to a base period—
1982 = 100 for many Producer Price Indexes,
1982-84 = 100 for many Consumer Price In­
dexes (unless otherwise noted), and 1990 =
100 for International Price Indexes.

Consumer Price indexes
Description of the series
The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a mea­
sure o f the average change in the prices paid
by urban consumers for a fixed market bas­
ket of goods and services. The CPI is calcu­
lated monthly for two population groups,
one consisting only o f urban households
whose primary source of income is derived
from the employment of wage earners and
clerical workers, and the other consisting of
all urban households. The wage earner index
(CPI-W) is a continuation of the historic in­
dex that was introduced well over a halfcentury ago for use in wage negotiations. As
new uses were developed for the cpi in re­
cent years, the need for a broader and more
representative index became apparent. The
all-urban consumer index (CPI-U), introduced
in 1978, is representative of the 1993-95
buying habits o f about 87 percent of the
noninstitutional population o f the United
States at that time, compared with 32 per­
cent represented in the CPI-W. In addition to
wage earners and clerical workers, the cpi-u
covers professional, managerial, and techni­
cal workers, the self-employed, short-term
workers, the unemployed, retirees, and oth­
ers not in the labor force.
The CPI is based on prices o f food, cloth­
ing, shelter, fuel, drugs, transportation fares,
doctors’ and dentists’ fees, and other goods
and services that people buy for day-to-day
living. The quantity and quality of these
items are kept essentially unchanged between
major revisions so that only price changes
will be measured. All taxes directly associ-

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

43

Current Labor Statistics

ated with the purchase and use of items are
included in the index.
Data collected from more than 23,000 re­
tail establishments and 5,800 housing units
in 87 urban areas across the country are used
to develop the “U.S. city average.” Separate
estimates for 14 major urban centers are pre­
sented in table 33. The areas listed are as
indicated in footnote 1 to the table. The area
indexes measure only the average change in
prices for each area since the base period, and
do not indicate differences in the level of
prices among cities.

Notes on the d ata
In January 1983, the Bureau changed the
way in which homeownership costs are
meaured for the cpi-u . A rental equivalence
method replaced the asset-price approach
to homeownership costs for that series. In
January 1985, the same change was made in
the CPI-W. The central purpose of the change
was to separate shelter costs from the in­
vestment component of home-ownership so
that the index would reflect only the cost of
shelter services provided by owner-occu­
pied homes. An updated cpi-u and cpi-w
were introduced with release of the January
1987 and January 1998 data.
F or ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, contact
the Division o f Prices and Price Indexes:
(202)691-7000.

Producer Price Indexes
Description of the series
Producer Price Indexes (PPi) measure av­
erage changes in prices received by domestic
producers of commodities in all stages of
processing. The sample used for calculating
these indexes currently contains about 3,200
commodities and about 80,000 quotations
per month, selected to represent the move­
ment of prices of all commodities produced
in the manufacturing; agriculture, forestry,
and fishing; mining; and gas and electricity
and public utilities sectors. The stage-ofprocessing stru ctu re o f ppi organizes
products by class o f buyer and degree of
fabrication (that is, finished goods, inter­
mediate goods, and crude materials). The
traditional commodity structure o f ppi or­
ganizes products by similarity o f end use
or material composition. The industry and
product structure o f PPI organizes data in
accordance with the Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC) and the product code
extension of the sic developed by the U.S.
Bureau of the Census.
To the extent possible, prices used in
44
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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

calculating Producer Price Indexes apply to
the first significant commercial transaction
in the United States from the production or
central marketing point. Price data are gen­
erally collected monthly, primarily by mail
questionnaire. Most prices are obtained di­
rectly from producing companies on a vol­
untary and confidential basis. Prices gener­
ally are reported for the Tuesday of the week
containing the 13th day of the month.
Since January 1992, price changes for the
various commodities have been averaged
together with implicit quantity weights
representing their importance in the total net
selling value of all commodities as of 1987.
The detailed data are aggregated to obtain
indexes for stage-of-processing groupings,
commodity groupings, durability-of-product
groupings, and a number of special composite
groups. All Producer Price Index data are
subject to revision 4 m onths after original

spondents are asked to indicate all discounts,
allowances, and rebates applicable to the re­
ported prices, so that the price used in the
calculation of the indexes is the actual price for
which the product was bought or sold.
In addition to general indexes of prices for
U.S. exports and imports, indexes are also
published for detailed product categories of
exports and imports. These categories are
defined according to the five-digit level of
detail for the Bureau of Economic Analysis
End-use Classification, the three-digit level
for the Standard Industrial Classification
(SITC), and the four-digit level of detail for the
Harm onized System. A ggregate im port
indexes by coun-try or region of origin are
also available.
bls publishes indexes for selected catego­
ries o f internationally traded services, calcu­
lated on an international basis and on a balance-of-payments basis.

publication.
For additional information, contact
the Division of Industrial Prices and Price
Indexes: (202) 691-7705.

international Price Indexes
Description of the series
The International Price Program produces
monthly and quarterly export and import
price indexes for nonmilitary goods and ser­
vices traded between the United States and
the rest o f the world. The export price index
provides a measure of price change for all
products sold by U.S. residents to foreign
buyers. (“Residents” is defined as in the na­
tional income accounts; it includes corpora­
tions, businesses, and individuals, but does
not require the organizations to be U.S.
owned nor the individuals to have U.S. citi­
zenship.) The import price index provides a
measure of price change for goods purchased
from other countries by U.S. residents.
The product universe for both the import
and export indexes includes raw materials,
agricultural products, semifinished manufac­
tures, and finished manufactures, including
both capital and consumer goods. Price data
for these items are collected primarily by mail
questionnaire. In nearly all cases, the data are
collected directly from the exporter or im­
porter, although in a few cases, prices are
obtained from other sources.
To the extent possible, the data gathered
refer to prices at the U.S. border for exports
and at either the foreign border or the U.S.
border for imports. For nearly all products,
the prices refer to transactions completed dur­
ing the first week of the month. Survey re­

May 2003

Notes on the d ata
The export and import price indexes are
weighted indexes of the Laspeyres type. The
trade weights currently used to compute both
indexes relate to 2000.
Because a price index depends on the same
items being priced from period to period, it is
necessary to recognize when a product’s
specifications or terms of transaction have
been modified. For this reason, the Bureau’s
questionnaire requests detailed descriptions of
the physical and functional characteristics of
the products being priced, as well as informa­
tion on the number of units bought or sold,
discounts, credit terms, packaging, class of
buyer or seller, and so forth. When there are
changes in either the specifications or terms of
transaction of a product, the dollar value of
each change is deleted from the total price
change to obtain the “pure” change. Once this
value is determined, a linking procedure is em­
ployed which allows for the continued repric­
ing of the item.
For additional information, contact
the Division of International Prices: (202)
691-7155.

Productivity Data
(Tables 2; 43-46)

Business and major sectors
Description of the series
The productivity measures relate real output
to real input. As such, they encompass a fam-

ily of measures which include single-factor
input measures, such as output per hour, out­
put per unit of labor input, or output per
unit of capital input, as well as measures of
multifactor productivity (output per unit of
combined labor and capital inputs). The Bu­
reau indexes show the change in output rela­
tive to changes in the various inputs. The
measures cover the business, nonfarm busi­
ness, manufacturing, and nonfmancial corpo­
rate sectors.
Corresponding indexes of hourly compen­
sation, unit labor costs, unit nonlabor pay­
ments, and prices are also provided.

Definitions
Output per hour of all persons (labor pro­
ductivity) is the quantity of goods and ser­
vices produced per hour of labor input. Out­
put per unit of capital services (capital
productivity) is the quantity of goods and
services produced per unit of capital ser­
vices input. Multifactor productivity is the
quantity of goods and services produced per
combined inputs. For private business and pri­
vate nonfarm business, inputs include labor
and capital units. For manufacturing, inputs
include labor, capital, energy, non-eneigy ma­
terials, and purchased business ser-vices.
Compensation per hour is total com­
pensation divided by hours at work. Total
compensation equals the wages and salaries
of employees plus employers’ contributions
for social insurance and private benefit plans,
plus an estimate of these payments for the
self-employed (except for nonfmancial cor­
porations in which there are no self-em­
ployed). Real compensation per hour is
com pensation per hour deflated by the
change in the Consumer Price Index for All
Urban Consumers.
Unit labor costs are the labor compen­
sation costs expended in the production of a
unit of output and are derived by dividing
compensation by output. Unit nonlabor
payments include profits, depreciation,
interest, and indirect taxes per unit of out­
put. They are computed by subtracting com­
pensation of all persons from current-dollar
value of output and dividing by output.
Unit nonlabor costs contain all the
com ponents o f unit nonlabor payments
except unit profits.
Unit profits include corporate profits
with inventory valuation and capital con­
sumption adjustments per unit of output.
H ours o f all persons are the total
hours at work o f payroll w orkers, selfem ployed persons, and unpaid fam ily
workers.
Labor inputs are hours o f all persons
adjusted for the effects o f changes in the

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education and experience of the labor force.
Capital services are the flow of ser­
vices from the capital stock used in pro­
duction. It is developed from measures of
the net stock of physical assets— equip­
ment, structures, land, and inventories—
weighted by rental prices for each type of
asset.
Combined units of labor and capital
inputs are derived by combining changes
in labor and capital input with weights
which represent each component’s share
of total cost. Combined units o f labor,
capital, energy, materials, and purchased
business services are similarly derived by
com bining changes in each input with
weights that represent each input’s share
of total costs. The indexes for each input
and for com bined units are based on
changing weights which are averages of the
shares in the current and preceding year
(the Tornquist index-number formula).

Notes on the d a ta
B usiness sector output is an annuallyweighted index constructed by excluding
from real gross domestic product ( g d p ) the
following outputs: general government,
nonprofit institutions, paid employees of
private households, and the rental value
o f owner-occupied dwellings. Nonfarm
business also excludes farming. Private
business and private nonfarm business
further exclude government enterprises.
The measures are supplied by the U.S. De­
partment of Commerce’s Bureau of Eco­
nomic Analysis. Annual estimates of manu­
facturing sectoral output are produced by
the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Quarterly
m anufacturing output indexes from the
Federal Reserve Board are adjusted to these
annual output measures by the bls . Com­
pensation data are developed from data of
the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Hours data
are developed from data of the Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
The productivity and associated cost
measures in tables 4 3 -4 6 describe the re­
lationship between output in real terms
and the labor and capital inputs involved
in its production. They show the changes
from period to period in the amount of
goods and services produced per unit of
input.
Although these measures relate output
to hours and capital services, they do not
measure the contributions of labor, capi­
tal, or any other specific factor of produc­
tion. Rather, they reflect the joint effect
o f many influences, including changes in

technology; shifts in the composition of
the labor force; capital investment; level
o f output; changes in the utilization of
capacity, energy, material, and research
and development; the organization o f pro­
duction; managerial skill; and characteris­
tics and efforts of the work force.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION On this
productivity series, contact the Division
o f P roductivity R esearch: (202) 6 9 1 5606.

Industry productivity
measures
Description of the series
The b l s in d u s try p ro d u c tiv ity d ata
supplement the measures for the business
economy and major sectors with annual
measures of labor productivity for selected
industries at the three- and four-digit levels
of the Standard Industrial Classification
system. In addition to labor productivity,
the industry data also include annual
measures o f compensation and unit labor
c o sts for th re e -d ig it in d u s trie s and
measures o f multifactor productivity for
three-digit manufacturing industries and
railro ad tra n sp o rta tio n . The in d u stry
measures differ in methodology and data
sources from the productivity measures
for the major sectors because the industry
measures are developed independently of
the National Income and Product Accounts
fram ew ork used for th e m ajor sector
measures.

Definitions
Output per hour is derived by dividing
an index of industry output by an index of
labor input. For most industries, output
indexes are derived from data on the value
o f in d u stry o u tp u t ad ju sted for price
change. For the remaining industries, out­
put indexes are derived from data on the
physical quantity of production.
The labor input series consist o f the
hours of all employees (production workers
and nonproduction workers), the hours of all
persons (paid employees, partners, propri­
etors, and unpaid family workers), or the
number of employees, depending upon the
industry.
Unit labor costs represent the labor
com pensation costs per unit o f output
produced, and are derived by dividing an
index of labor compensation by an index
o f output. Labor compensation includes
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45

Current Labor Statistics

ments, including both legally required ex­
penditures and paym ents for voluntary
programs.
M ultifactor productivity is derived
by dividing an index o f industry output
by an index o f the combined inputs con­
sumed in producing that output. Com­
bined inputs include capital, labor, and
intermediate purchases. The measure of
capital input used represents the flow of
services from the capital stock used in
production. It is developed from measures
o f the net stock o f physical asse ts—
equipment, structures, land, and invento­
ries. The measure o f intermediate pur­
chases is a combination o f purchased ma­
terials, services, fuels, and electricity.

Notes on the d a ta
The industry measures are compiled from
data produced by the Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics and the Bureau o f the Census,with
additional data supplied by other govern­
m ent agencies, trade associations, and
other sources.
For most industries, the productivity
indexes refer to the output per hour of all
employees. For some trade and services
industries, indexes of output per hour of
all persons (including self-employed) are
constructed. For some transportation in­
dustries, only indexes o f output per em­
ployee are prepared.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on this
series, contact the Division o f Industry
Productivity Studies: (202) 691-5618.

International
Comparisons
(Tables 47-49)

Labor force and
unem ploym ent
Description of the series
Tables 47 and 48 present comparative meas­
ures o f the labor force, employment, and un­
em ploym ent— approxim ating U.S. con­
cepts^—for the United States, Canada, Aus­
tralia, Japan, and several European countries.
The unem ployment statistics (and, to a
lesser extent, employment statistics) pub­
lished by other industrial countries are not,
in most cases, comparable to U.S. unemploy­
ment statistics. Therefore, the Bureau ad­
justs the figures for selected countries, where
necessary, for all known major definitional
46
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differences. Although precise comparability
may not be achieved, these adjusted figures
provide a better basis for international com­
parisons than the figures regularly published
by each country. For further information on
adjustments and comparability issues, see
Constance Sorrentino, “International unem­
ployment rates: how comparable are they?”
Monthly Labor Review, June 2000, pp. 3-20.

reflects a major redesign of the labor force
survey questionnaire and collection method­
ology introduced in January 1994. Revised
population estimates based on the 1990 cen­
sus, adjusted for the estimated undercount,
also were incorporated. In 1996, previously
published data for the 1990—93 period were
revised to reflect the 1990 census-based
population controls, adjusted for the un­
dercount. In 1997, revised population con­
trols were introduced into the household sur­
Definitions
vey. Therefore, the data are not strictly
For the principal U.S. definitions of the labor conparable with prior years. In 1998, new
force, employment, and unemployment, see composite estimation procedures and minor
the Notes section on Employment and Unem­ revisions in population controls were intro­
duced into the household survey. Therefore,
ployment Data: Household survey data.
the data are not strictly comparable with data
for 1997 and earlier years. See the Notes sec­
Notes on the d ata
tion on Employment and Unemployment
Data of this Review.
The adjusted statistics have been adapted to
bls recently introduced a new adjusted
the age at which compulsory schooling ends series for Canada. Beginning with the data
in each country, rather than to the U.S. stan­ for 1976, Canadian data are adjusted to more
dard of 16 years o f age and older. Therefore, closely approximate U.S. concepts. Adjust­
the adjusted statistics relate to the popula­ ments are made to the unemployed and labor
tion aged 16 and older in France, Sweden, and force to exclude: (1) 15-year-olds; (2) pas­
the United Kingdom; 15 and older in Austra­ sive jobseekers (persons only reading news­
lia, Japan, Germany, Italy from 1993 onward, paper ads as their method of job search); (3)
and the Netherlands; and 14 and older in Italy persons waiting to start a new job who did
prior to 1993. An exception to this rule is not seek work in the past 4 weeks; and (4)
that the Canadian statistics for 1976 onward persons unavailable for work due to personal
are adjusted to cover ages 16 and older, or family responsibilities. An adjustment is
whereas the age at which compulsory school­ made to include full-tine students looking for
ing ends remains at 15. The institutional full-time work. The impact o f the adjust­
population is included in the denominator of ments was to lower the annual average unem­
the labor force participation rates and em­ ployment rate by 0.1-0.4 percentage point
ployment-population ratios for Japan and in the 1980s and 0.4-1.0 percentage point in
Germany; it is excluded for the United States the 1990s.
and the other countries.
For France, the 1992 break reflects the
In the U.S. labor force survey, persons on substitution of standardized European Union
layoff who are awaiting recall to their jobs Statistical Office (eurostat) unemployment
are classified as unemployed. European and statistics for the unemployment data esti­
Japanese layoff practices are quite different mated according to the International Labor
in nature from those in the United States; Office ( ilo) definition and published in the
therefore, strict application of the U.S. defi­ Organization for Economic Cooperation and
nition has not been made on this point. For Development (oecd) annual yearbook and
further information, see Monthly Labor Re­ quarterly update. This change was made be­
view, December 1981, pp. 8-11.
cause the eurostat data are more up-to-date
The figures for one or more recent years than the oecd figures. Also, since 1992, the
for France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, eurostat definitions are closer to the U.S.
and the United Kingdom are calculated using definitions than they were in prior years. The
adjustment factors based on labor force sur­ impact of this revision was to lower the un­
veys for earlier years and are considered pre­ employment rate by 0.1 percentage point in
liminary. The recent-year measures for these
1992 and 1993, by 0.4 percentage point in
countries, therefore, are subject to revision
1994, and 0.5 percentage point in 1995.
whenever data from more current labor force
For Germany, the data for 1991 onward
surveys become available.
refer to unified Germany. Data prior to 1991
There are breaks in the data series for the relate to the former West Germany. The im­
United States (1990,1994,1997,1998,1999, pact of including the former East Germany
2000), Canada (1976) France (1992), Ger­ was to increase the unemployment rate from
many (1991), Italy (1991, 1993), the Neth­ 4.3 to 5.6 percent in 1991.
erlands (1988), and Sweden (1987).
For Italy, the 1991 break reflects a revi­
For the United States, the break in series sion in the method of weighting sample data.

May 2003

The impact was to increase the unemploy­
ment rate by approximately 0.3 percentage
point, from 6.6 to 6.9 percent in 1991.
In October 1992, the survey methodol­
ogy was revised and the definition of unem­
ployment was changed to include only those
who were actively looking for a job within
the 30 days preceding the survey and who
were available for work. In addition, the
lower age limit for the labor force was raised
from 14 to 15 years. (Prior to these changes,
BLS adjusted Italy’s published unemploy­
ment rate downward by excluding from the
unemployed those persons who had not
actively sought work in the past 30 days.)
The break in the series also reflects the incor­
poration of the 1991 population census re­
sults. The impact of these changes was to
raise Italy’s adjusted unemployment rate by
approximately 1.2 percentage points, from
8.3 to 9.5 percent in fourth-quarter 1992.
These changes did not affect employment
significantly, except in 1993. Estimates by
the Italian Statistical Office indicate that em­
ployment declined by about 3 percent in
1993, rather than the nearly 4 percent indi­
cated by the data shown in table 44. This
difference is attributable mainly to the incor­
poration o f the 1991 population benchmarks
in the 1993 data. Data for earlier years have
not been adjusted to incorporate the 1991
census results.
For the Netherlands, a new survey ques­
tionnaire was introduced in 1992 that allowed
for a closer application of ilo guidelines.
EUROSTAT has revised the Dutch series back
to 1988 based on the 1992 changes. The 1988
revised unemployment rate is 7.6 percent;
the previous estimate for the same year was
9.3 percent.
There have been two breaks in series in
the Swedish labor force survey, in 1987 and
1993. Adjustments have been made for the
1993 break back to 1987. In 1987, a new
questionnaire was introduced. Questions
regarding current availability were added
and the period o f active workseeking was
reduced from 60 days to 4 weeks. These
changes lowered Sweden’s 1987 unem­
ployment rate by 0.4 percentage point,
from 2.3 to 1.9 percent. In 1993, the mea­
surement period for the labor force sur­
vey was changed to represent all 52 weeks
o f the year rather than one week each
month and a new adjustment for popula­
tion totals was introduced. The impact
was to raise the unem ployment rate by
approximately 0.5 percentage point, from
7.6 to 8.1 percent. Statistics Sweden re­
vised its labor force survey data for 198792 to take into account the break in 1993.
The adjustment raised the Swedish unem­


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ployment rate by 0.2 percentage point in
1987 and gradually rose to 0.5 percentage
point in 1992.
Beginning with 1987, BLS has adjusted the
Swedish data to classify students who also
sought work as unemployed. The impact of
this change was to increase the adjusted un­
employment rate by 0.1 percentage point in
1987 and by 1.8 percentage points in 1994,
when unemployment was higher. In 1998,
the adjusted unemployment rate had risen
from 6.5 to 8.4 percent due to the adjustment
to include students.
The net effect of the 1987 and 1993
changes and the BLS adjustment for stu­
dents seeking w ork lowered Sw eden’s
1987 unemployment rate from 2.3 to 2.2
percent.
FORADDITIONAL INFORMATION on this se­
ries, contact the Division of Foreign Labor
Statistics: (202) 691-5654.

Manufacturing productivity
and labor costs
Description of the series
Table 49 presents comparative indexes of
manufacturing labor productivity (output per
hour), output, total hours, compensation per
hour, and unit labor costs for the United
States, Canada, Japan, and nine European
countries. These measures are trend compari­
sons—that is, series that measure changes
over time—rather than level comparisons.
There are greater technical problems in com­
paring the levels of manufacturing output
among countries.
BLS constructs the comparative indexes
from three basic aggregate measures—output,
total labor hours, and total compensation.
The hours and compensation measures refer
to all employed persons (wage and salary
earners plus self-employed persons and un­
paid family workers) in the United States,
Canada, Japan, France, Germany, Norway,
and Sweden, and to all employees (wage and
salary earners) in the other countries.

Definitions
Output, in general, refers to value added
in manufacturing from the national ac­
counts o f each country. However, the
output series for Japan prior to 1970 is
an index of industrial production, and the
national accounts measures for the United
Kingdom are essentially identical to their
indexes of industrial production.
The 1 9 7 7 -9 7 o u tp u t data for the
United States are the gross product origi­

nating (value added) measures prepared
by the Bureau of Economic Analysis o f
the U.S. Department of Commerce. Com­
parable manufacturing output data cur­
rently are not available prior to 1977.
U.S. gross product originating is a chaintype annual-weighted series. (For more in­
formation on the U.S. measure, see Robert
E. Yuskavage, “Improved Estim ates of
Gross P roduct by Industry, 1 9 5 9 -9 4 ,”
Survey o f Current Business, August 1996,
pp. 133—55.) The Japanese value added
series is based upon one set o f fixed price
weights for the years 1970 through 1997.
Output series for the other foreign econo­
mies also employ fixed price w eights, but
the weights are updated periodically (for
example, every 5 or 10 years).
To preserve the comparability of the U.S.
measures with those for other economies, BLS
uses gross product originating in manufac­
turing for the United States for these com­
parative measures. The gross product origi­
nating series differs from the manufacturing
output series that BLS publishes in its news
releases on quarterly measures of U.S. pro­
ductivity and costs (and that underlies the
measures that appear in tables 43 and 45 in
this section). The quarterly measures are on
a “sectoral output” basis, rather than a valueadded basis. Sectoral output is gross output
less intrasector transactions.
Total labor hours refers to hours worked
in all countries. The measures are developed
from statistics of manufacturing employment
and average hours. The series used for France
(from 1970 forward), Norway, and Sweden
are official series published with the national
accounts. Where official total hours series are
not available, the measures are developed by
BLS using employment figures published with
the national accounts, or other comprehen­
sive employment series, and estimates of an­
nual hours worked. For Germany, BLS uses
estimates of average hours worked developed
by a research institute connected to the Min­
istry of Labor for use with the national ac­
counts employment figures. For the other
countries, BLS constructs its own estimates
of average hours.
Denmark has not published estimates of
average hours for 1994-97; therefore, the BLS
measure of labor input for Denmark ends in
1993.
Total compensation (labor cost) includes
all payments in cash or in-kind made directly
to employees plus employer expenditures for
legally required insurance programs and con­
tractual and private benefit plans. The mea­
sures are from the national accounts of each
country, except those for Belgium, which are
developed by bls using statistics on employ-

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

47

Current Labor Statistics
ment, average hours, and hourly compensa­
tion. For Canada, France, and Sweden, com­
pensation is increased to account for other sig­
nificant taxes on payroll or employment. For
the United Kingdom, compensation is reduced
between 1967 and 1991 to account for em­
ployment-related subsidies. Self-employed
workers are included in the all-employed-persons measures by assuming that their hourly
compensation is equal to the average for wage
and salary employees.

Notes on the d ata
In general, the measures relate to total manu­
facturing as defined by the International Stan­
dard Industrial Classification. However, the
measures for France (for all years) and Italy
(beginning 1970) refer to mining and manu­
facturing less energy-related products, and
the measures for Denmark include mining and
exclude manufacturing handicrafts from 1960
to 1966.
The measures for recent years may be
based on current indicators of manufacturing
output (such as industrial production in­
dexes), employment, average hours, and
hourly compensation until national accounts
and other statistics used for the long-term
measures become available.
F ORadditional information on this se­
ries, contact the Division of Foreign Labor
Statistics: (202) 691-5654.

Occupational Injury
and Illness Data
(Tables 50-51)

Survey of Occupational
Injuries and Illnesses
Description of the series
The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Ill­
nesses collects data from employers about their
workers’ job-related nonfatal injuries and ill­
nesses. The information that employers pro­
vide is based on records that they maintain un­
der the Occupational Safety and Health Act of
1970. Self-employed individuals, farms with
fewer than 11 employees, employers regulated
by other Federal safety and health laws, and
Federal, State, and local government agencies
are excluded from the survey.
The survey is a Federal-State coopera­
tive program with an independent sample

48

Monthly Labor Review


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selected for each participating State. A strati­
fied random sample with a Neyman alloca­
tion is selected to represent all private in­
dustries in the State. The survey is strati­
fied by Standard Industrial Classification
and size of employment.

Definitions
Under the Occupational Safety and Health
Act, employers maintain records of nonfatal
work-related injuries and illnesses that in­
volve one or more of the following: loss of
consciousness, restriction of work or motion,
transfer to another job, or medical treatment
other than first aid.
Occupational injury is any injury such as
a cut, fracture, sprain, or amputation that re­
sults from a work-related event or a single, in­
stantaneous exposure in the work environment.
Occupational illness is an abnormal con­
dition or disorder, other than one resulting
from an occupational injury, caused by expo­
sure to factors associated with employment.
It includes acute and chronic illnesses or dis­
ease which may be caused by inhalation, ab­
sorption, ingestion, or direct contact.
Lost workday injuries and illnesses
are cases that involve days away from work,
or days of restricted work activity, or both.
Lost workdays include the number of
workdays (consecutive or not) on which
the employee was either away from work
or at work in some restricted capacity, or
both, because of an occupational injury or
illness, bls measures of the number and
incidence rate o f lost workdays were dis­
continued beginning with the 1993 sur­
vey. The num ber o f days away from
work or days o f restricted work activity
does not include the day o f injury or
onset o f illness or any days on which
the employee would not have worked,
such as a Federal holiday, even though
able to work.
Incidence rates are computed as the num­
ber of injuries and/or illnesses or lost work
days per 100 full-time workers.

Notes on the data
The definitions of occupational injuries and
illnesses are from Recordkeeping Guidelines
fo r Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (U. S.
Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics, September 1986).
Estimates are made for industries and em­
ployment size classes for total recordable cases,
lost workday cases, days away from work
cases, and nonfatal cases without lost work­
days. These data also are shown separately for

May 2003

injuries. Illness data are available for seven cat­
egories: occupational skin diseases or disorders,
dust diseases of the lungs, respiratory condi­
tions due to toxic agents, poisoning (systemic
effects of toxic agents), disorders due to physi­
cal agents (other than toxic materials), disorders
associated with repeated trauma, and all other
occupational illnesses.
The survey continues to measure the num­
ber of new work-related illness cases which
are recognized, diagnosed, and reported during
the year. Some conditions, for example, long­
term latent illnesses caused by exposure to car­
cinogens, often are difficult to relate to the
workplace and are not adequately recognized
and reported. These long-term latent illnesses
are believed to be understated in the survey’s
illness measure. In contrast, the overwhelming
majority of the reported new illnesses are those
which are easier to directly relate to workplace
activity (for example, contact dermatitis and
carpal tunnel syndrome).
Most of the estimates are in the form of
incidence rates, defined as the number of inju­
ries and illnesses per 100 equivalent full-time
workers. For this purpose, 200,000 employee
hours represent 100 employee years (2,000
hours per employee). Full detail on the avail­
able measures is presented in the annual bulle­
tin, Occupational Injuries and Illnesses:
Counts, Rates, and Characteristics.
Comparable data for more than 40 States
and territories are available from the bls Of­
fice of Safety, Health and Working Condi­
tions. Many of these States publish data on
State and local government employees in ad­
dition to private industry data.
Mining and railroad data are furnished to
bls by the Mine Safety and Health Adminis­
tration and the Federal Railroad Administra­
tion. Data from these organizations are in­
cluded in both the national and State data
published annually.
With the 1992 survey, bls began publish­
ing details on serious, nonfatal incidents re­
sulting in days away from work. Included are
some major characteristics o f the injured and
ill workers, such as occupation, age, gender,
race, and length of service, as well as the cir­
cumstances of their injuries and illnesses (na­
ture of the disabling condition, part of body
affected, event and exposure, and the source
directly producing the condition). In general,
these data are available nationwide for de­
tailed industries and for individual States at
more aggregated industry levels.
F or additional information on occu­
pational injuries and illnesses, contact the Of­
fice of Occupational Safety, Health and Work­
ing Conditions at (202) 691-6180, or access
the Internet at: http://www.bls.gov/iif/

Census of Fatal
Occupational Injuries
The Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries
compiles a complete roster of fatal job-re­
lated injuries, including detailed data about
the fatally injured workers and the fatal
events. The program collects and cross
checks fatality information from multiple
sources, including death certificates, State
and Federal workers’ compensation reports,
Occupational Safety and Health Administra­
tion and Mine Safety and Health Adminis­
tration records, medical examiner and au­
topsy reports, media accounts, State motor
vehicle fatality records, and follow-up ques­
tionnaires to employers.
In addition to private wage and salary
workers, the self-employed, family members,
and Federal, State, and local government
workers are covered by the program. To be
included in the fatality census, the decedent


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must have been employed (that is working
for pay, compensation, or profit) at the time
of the event, engaged in a legal work activity,
or present at the site of the incident as a re­
quirement of his or her job.

Definition
A fatal work injury is any intentional or
unintentional wound or damage to the
body resulting in death from acute expo­
sure to energy, such as heat or electricity,
or kinetic energy from a crash, or from the
absence of such essentials as heat or oxy­
gen caused by a specific event or incident
or series of events within a single work­
day or shift. Fatalities that occur during a
person’s commute to or from work are ex­
cluded from the census, as well as workrelated illnesses, which can be difficult
to identify due to long latency periods.

Notes on the d ata
Twenty-eight data elements are collected,
coded, and tabulated in the fatality pro­
gram, including information about the fa­
tally injured worker, the fatal incident, and
the m achinery or equipm ent involved.
Summary worker demographic data and
event characteristics are included in a na­
tional news release that is available about
8 months after the end of the reference
year. The Census of Fatal Occupational
Injuries was initiated in 1992 as a joint
Federal-State effort. M ost States issue
summary information at the time o f the
national news release.
F or additional information on the
Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries con­
tact the bls Office of Safety, Health, and
Working Conditions at (202) 691-6175, or
the Internet at:
http://www.bls. gov/iif/

Where to find additional data
Current and historical statistics from Bureau of Labor Statistics surveys are
available at the addresses listed on the inside back cover of this Review , or on
the Internet at

http://www.bls.gov

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

49

Current Labor Statistics:

Comparative Indicators

1. Labor market indicators
Selected indicators

2001

2001

2002
I

II

2002
III

IV

I

II

2003
III

IV

I

Employm ent data
E m p lo y m e n t s ta tu s o f th e c iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a liz e d
p o p u la tio n (h o u s e h o ld s u rv e y ):’
L a b o r fo rc e p a rtic ip a tio n ra te ............................................

6 6 .8

6 6 .6

6 7.2

6 6 .8

6 6 .7

6 6 .8

6 6 .6

6 6.7

6 6 .6

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p u la tio n ra tio ..... ......................................

6 6 .5

6 6 .3

6 3 .7

6 2 .7

6 4 ,3

6 3 .8

6 3 .5

6 3 .0

6 2 .8

6 2.8

6 2 .8

6 2 .5

6 2 .4

U n e m p lo y m e n t r a te ...............................................................

4 .7

M e n ..........................................................................................

5 .8

4.2

4 .4

4 .8

5.6

5 .6

5.9

5 .8

5 .9

5 .8

4.8

5.9

4 .2

4 .5

4 .9

5 .7

5.7

6 .0

1 6 to 2 4 y e a r s ....................................................................

5 .9

6 .1

6 .0

11.4

1 2 .8

10.5

1 1 .2

1 1.4

12.7

12.9

1 2 .8

2 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r .............................................................

13.1

1 2 .5

1 2 .4

3.6

4 .7

3.1

3 .4

3 .7

4 .4

4 .5

4.8

4 .7

4 .9

4 .9

4.7

5 .6

4.1

4 .3

4 .8

5 .5

5.5

5.7

5 .6

5 .7

5 .5

9.6

1 1 .1

8 .6

9.2

1 0 .1

10.7

1 1 .0

1 1 .2

10.9

1 1 .4

1 1 .1

3.7

4 .6

3 .3

3 .4

3 .8

4 .4

4 .4

4.8

4 .6

4 .6

4 .4

W o m e n ....................................................................................
1 6 to 2 4 y e a r s ....................................................................
2 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r .............................................................
E m p lo y m e n t, n o n fa rm (p a y ro ll d a ta ), in th o u s a n d s :1
T o ta l..............................................................................................

1 31 ,92 2

130,791

1 3 2 ,4 3 3

1 3 2 ,1 9 3

1 31 ,94 3

1 31 ,13 0

1 3 0 ,7 5 9

1 30 ,70 6

1 3 0 ,8 4 4

1 3 0 ,7 9 5

1 3 0 ,5 9 9

1 10 ,98 9

109,531

1 1 1 ,6 8 7

1 11 ,3 3 2

1 1 0 ,9 3 9

1 10 ,0 3 5

1 0 9 ,5 9 4

1 0 9 ,5 0 5

1 0 9 ,5 7 4

G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ...............................................................

1 0 9 ,4 3 8

1 0 9 ,2 3 7

2 4 ,9 4 4

2 3 ,8 3 6

2 5 ,4 9 3

2 5 ,1 3 6

2 4 ,7 8 6

2 4 ,3 7 5

2 4 ,0 4 9

2 3 ,8 7 9

2 3 ,7 8 7

M a n u fa c tu rin g .................................................................

2 3 ,6 2 3

2 3 ,4 9 1

17,6 95

16,7 24

1 8,1 96

1 7,8 72

1 7,5 38

1 7,1 74

1 6 ,8 8 3

1 6,7 76

16,691

1 6,5 2 8

1 6 ,3 9 6

1 06 ,97 8

1 06 ,9 5 5

106,941

1 0 7 ,0 5 7

1 07 ,1 5 7

1 06 ,75 5

106,711

1 06 ,8 2 7

1 0 7 ,0 5 7

1 0 7 ,1 7 9

1 0 7 ,1 0 8

P riv a te s e c to r...........................................................

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g .............................................................
A v e ra g e h o u rs :
P riv a te s e c to r........................................................................

3 4.2

3 4 .2

3 4.2

3 4.2

34.1

34.1

3 4 .2

34.2

34.1

M a n u fa c tu rin g .....................................................................

3 4 .2

3 2 .4

4 0 .7

4 0 .9

4 1 .0

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0 .5

4 0 .8

4 1.0

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0 .8

3.9

4.1

4.1

3 .9

3 .9

3 .8

4 .0

4.2

4.1

4.1

4.1

O v e r tim e ..................................................................

Employm ent Cost Index2
P e rc e n t c h a n g e in th e E C I, c o m p e n s a tio n :
A ll w o rk e rs (e x c lu d in g fa rm , h o u s e h o ld a n d F e d e ra l w o rk e rs )..

4.1

3 .4

1.3

.9

1 .2

.8

1 .0

.9

.9

.6

P riv a te in d u s try w o rk e rs ......................................................................

1 .4

4.2

3 .2

1.4

1 .0

.9

.8

1.1

1.1

.6

.4

1.7

G o o d s -p ro d u c in g 3 .............................................................................

3.8

3 .7

1.3

.9

.7

.8

1 .2

.9

.6

.9

1 .8

4.3

3.1

1.4

1 .0

1 .0

.8

1.1

1 .2

.6

.2

4.2

1 .5

4.1

.9

.6

2 .1

.6

.6

.4

2 .2

.9

.7

U n io n ................................................................................................................

4.2

4 .2

.7

1.1

1 .0

1.4

1.1

1 .0

1 .2

N o n u n io n ........................................................................................................

.9

1 .6

4.1

3.2

1.5

1 .0

.9

.7

1.1

1.1

.5

.4

1 .6

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g 3 ............................................................................
S ta te a n d lo c a l g o v e rn m e n t w o rk e rs
W o rk e rs b y b a r g a in in g s ta tu s (p riv a te in d u stry):

1

Q u a rte rly d a ta s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .
A n n u a l c h a n g e s a re D e c e m b e r-to -D e c e m b e r c h a n g e s . Q u a rte rly c h a n g e s a re c a lc u la te d u s in g th e last m o n th o f e a c h q u a rte r.
G o o d s -p ro d u c in g in d u s trie s in c lu d e m in in g , c o n s tru c tio n , a n d m a n u fa c tu rin g . S e rv ic e -p ro d u c in g in d u s trie s in c lu d e a ll o th e r p riv a te s e c to r in d u s trie s .

50
Monthly Labor Review

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

2. Annual and quarterly percent changes in compensation, prices, and productivity
IV

III

II

I

2003

2002

2001

Selected measures

IV

III

II

I

I

C o m p e n s a tio n d a ta 1,2
E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — c o m p e n s a tio n (w a g e s ,
s a la r ie s , b e n e fits ) :
4.1

3 .4

1 .3

0 .9

1 .2

0 .8

1 .0

0 .9

0 .9

0 .6

1 .4

4 .2

3 .2

1 .4

1 .0

.9

.8

1 .1

1 .1

.6

.4

1 .7

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s :
3 .7

2 .9

1.1

.9

1 .0

.7

.9

.8

.7

.4

1 .0

3 .8

2 .7

1 ,2

1 .0

.8

.8

.9

1 .0

.4

.3

1 .1

3 .4

1 .2

1 .3

1 .0

.2

-.9

.7

.5

.6

-.1

1 .8

Price d a ta 1
C o n s u m e r P r ic e In d e x ( A ll U rb a n C o n s u m e rs ) : A ll I te m s .......
P r o d u c e r P ric e In d e x :
- 1 .8

- 1 .2

.9

.8

-.3

-3 .2

1 .1

.2

.2

- .1

4 .0

-2 .4

- 1 .6

1 .2

1 .0

-.3

-4 .3

1 .5

.4

.0

-.3

5.1

1 .0

-.4

- 7 .1

-.1

.1

2 .9

-.3

-.7

.6

.7

-.2

- 1 .2

.2

.6

- 1 .0

-3 .6

.9

1 .1

1 .1

.1

5 .3

- 8 .8

- 1 0 .6

-3 .5

- 6 .6

- 1 2 .0

- 1 2 .2

8 .0

3 7.1

1 .9

6 .5

2 9 .3

1 .1

4 .8

-1 .5

-.2

1 .8

7 .6

8 .3

1 .8

5 .8

.3

2 .2

1.1

4 .8

-1 .5

-.1

2 .1

7 .3

8 .6

1 .7

5 .5

.7

1 .6

1 .4

5 .5

- 2 .6

2 .2

3 .2

1 0 .7

4 .7

5 .8

3 .4

5 .0

-.1

P ro d u c tiv ity d a ta 3
O u t p u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s :

4
N o n fin a n c ia l c o r p o r a t io n s ....................................................................
1

A nnual

changes

a re

D e c e m b e r - to - D e c e m b e r

c a lc u la te d u s in g t h e la s t m o n th o f e a c h q u a rte r.

changes.

Q u a rte rly

changes

3 Annual

a re

of change

a re

c o m p u te d

b y c o m p a r in g

annual

a ve ra g e s .

Q u a rte rly p e r c e n t c h a n g e s r e fle c t a n n u a l ra te s o f c h a n g e in q u a r te r ly in d e x e s .

C o m p e n s a tio n a n d p ric e d a ta a re n o t

T h e d a ta a re s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .

s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d , a n d t h e p ric e d a ta a re n o t c o m p o u n d e d .
2

ra te s

4 O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f a ll e m p lo y e e s .

E x c lu d e s F e d e r a l a n d p riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o r k e r s .

NO TE: D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

3. Alternative measures of w age and compensation changes
Quarterly average

Four quarters ending

Components
1

IV

III

II

IV

III

II

I

1

2003

2002

2003

2002

I

A v e r a g e h o u rly c o m p e n s a tio n : 1
A ll p e r s o n s , b u s in e s s s e c to r ...........................................................................

3 .0

4 .3

2 .2

3 .6

3 .9

1 .4

2 .4

2 .7

3 .3

3 .5

2 .9

4 .0

1 .8

3 .9

3 .5

1 .4

2 .3

2 .5

3 .2

3 .3

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — c o m p e n s a tio n :
1 .0

.9

.9

.6

1 .4

3 .9

4 .0

3 .7

3 .4

3 .9

P r iv a te n o n fa r m ..................................................................................................

1 .1

1.1

.6

.4

1 .7

3 .9

4 .0

3 .7

3 .2

3 .8

U n io n .....................................................................................................................

1 .1

1 .0

1 .2

.9

1 .6

4 .7

4 .5

4 .7

4 .2

4 .7

N o n u n io n .......................................................... ..................................................

1.1

1 .1

.5

.4

1 .6

3 .8

3 .9

3 .5

3 .2

3 .6

.6

.4

2 .2

.9

.7

3 .9

3 .6

3 .8

4.1

4 .2

2 .9

C iv ilia n n o n fa r m 2 ..................................................................................................

S ta te a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n ts ......................................................................
E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — w a g e s a n d s a la rie s :

.9

.8

.7

.4

1 .0

3 .5

3 .5

3 .2

2 .9

.9

1 .0

.4

.3

1.1

3 .5

3 .6

3 .2

2 .7

3 .0

.7

.9

1 .0

.8

.5

4 .4

4 .2

4 .3

3 .5

3 .3

N o n u n io n ............................................................................................................

1 .0

1 .0

.4

.3

1 .2

3 .4

3 .5

3.1

2 .7

2 .9

S ta te a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n ts ......................................................................

.5

.3

1 .8

.6

.4

3 .4

3 .2

3.1

3 .2

3.1

C iv ilia n n o n fa r m 2 ..................................................................................................

U n io n ...................................................................................................................

1 S e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .

"Q u a r te r ly a v e r a g e " is p e r c e n t c h a n g e fr o m a q u a r te r a g o , a t a n a n n u a l ra te .

2 E x c lu d e s F e d e ra l a n d h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs .


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

51

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

4. Employment status of the population, by sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin, monthly data seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Annual average

Employment status

2002

2003

2001

2002

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

p o p u la tio n 1...........................

2 1 5 ,0 9 2

2 1 7 ,5 7 0

2 1 6 ,8 2 3

2 1 7 ,0 0 6

2 1 7 ,1 9 8

2 1 7 ,4 0 7

2 1 7 ,6 3 0

2 1 7 ,8 6 6

2 1 8 ,1 0 7

2 1 8 ,3 4 0

2 1 8 ,5 4 8

2 1 8 ,7 4 1

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ............. ...

2 1 9 ,8 9 7

2 2 0 ,1 1 4

1 4 3 ,7 3 4

2 2 0 ,3 1 7

1 4 4 ,8 6 3

1 4 4 ,3 6 7

1 4 4 ,7 6 3

144 ,911

1 4 4 ,8 5 2

1 4 4 ,7 8 6

1 4 5 ,1 2 3

1 4 5 ,6 3 4

1 4 5 ,3 9 3

1 4 5 ,1 8 0

6 6 .8

1 4 5 ,1 5 0

1 4 5 ,8 3 8

6 6 .6

6 6 .7

1 4 5 ,8 5 7

6 6 .6

6 6 .7

1 4 5 ,7 9 3

6 6 .6

6 6 .5

6 6 .6

6 6 .8

6 6 .6

E m p lo y e d ......................... ... 1 3 6 ,9 3 3

6 6 .4

6 6 .4

1 3 6 ,4 8 5

6 6 .3

1 3 6 ,1 4 3

6 6 .3

1 3 6 ,1 9 6

1 3 6 ,4 8 7

66.2

1 3 6 ,3 8 3

1 3 6 ,3 4 3

1 3 6 ,7 5 7

1 3 7 ,3 1 2

1 3 6 ,9 8 8

1 36 ,5 4 2

1 3 6 ,4 3 9

1 3 7 ,5 3 6

1 3 7 ,4 0 8

1 3 7 ,3 4 8

TO TAL
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu lio n a l

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te ........
E m p lo y m e n t-p o p ­
u la tio n ra tio 2.............

6 3 .7

6 2 .7

6 2 .8

6 2 .8

6 2 .8

6 2 .7

62.6

6 2 .8

6 3 .0

6 2 .7

6 2 .5

U n e m p lo y e d ....................

6 2 .4

6,801

6 2 .5

6 2 .4

8 ,3 7 8

8 ,2 2 4

6 2 .3

8 ,5 6 7

8 ,4 2 4

8 ,4 6 9

8 ,4 4 3

8 ,3 6 6

8,321

8 ,4 0 5

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te .

8 ,6 3 7

8,711

4.7

8 ,3 0 2

5 .8

5 .7

8 ,4 5 0

5.9

8 ,4 4 5

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .7

5 .8

5 .9

6 .0

7 1 ,3 5 9

7 2 ,7 0 7

5 .7

7 2 ,4 5 6

5 .8

7 2 ,2 4 3

7 2 ,2 8 7

6.0

7 2 ,5 5 6

7 2 ,8 4 4

7 2 ,7 4 3

7 2 ,4 7 3

7 2 ,9 4 7

7 3 ,3 6 9

7 3,5 91

7 4 ,0 5 9

7 4 ,2 5 7

7 4 ,5 2 4

N o t in th e la b o r fo r c e ..... . ..

Men, 20 years and over
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
p o p u la tio n 1........................
C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e .........

..

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te ....
E m p lo y e d ......................

.

9 5,1 81

9 6 ,4 3 9

9 5 ,9 9 9

9 6 ,1 1 6

9 6 ,2 0 5

9 6 ,3 7 5

9 6 ,4 6 8

9 6 ,5 5 2

9 6 ,7 3 2

9 6 ,8 6 0

9 7 ,0 2 2

9 7 ,1 3 9

9 7 ,6 3 5

9 7 ,7 6 2

9 7 ,8 6 9

7 2 ,8 1 6

7 3 ,6 3 0

7 3 ,3 0 7

7 3 ,5 2 5

7 3 ,7 6 6

7 3 ,6 8 9

7 3 ,6 7 0

7 3 ,8 0 2

7 4 ,1 0 8

7 3 ,8 8 3

7 3 ,7 7 0

7 3 ,7 4 4

7 6 .5

7 3 ,9 9 3

7 6 .3

7 6 .4

7 4 ,2 5 4

7 6 .5

7 4 ,2 3 6

7 6 .7

7 6 .5

7 6 .4

7 6 .4

7 6 .6

7 6 .3

7 6 .0

6 9 ,7 7 6

7 5 .9

6 9 ,7 3 4

7 5 .8

6 9 ,5 1 7

7 6 .0

6 9 ,6 2 7

7 5 .9

6 9 ,9 1 8

6 9 ,7 3 9

6 9 ,7 9 2

6 9 ,8 9 5

7 0 ,2 1 3

6 9,921

6 9 ,6 1 7

6 9 ,6 0 0

6 9 ,9 6 7

7 0 ,2 9 3

7 0 ,2 9 3

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p ­
u la tio n ra tio 2.........

7 3 .3

7 2 .3

7 2 .4

7 2 .4

7 2 .7

7 2 .4

7 2 .3

7 2 .4

7 2 .6

7 2 .2

7 1 .8

U n e m p lo y e d .................

7 1 .6

7 1 .7

3 ,0 4 0

7 1 .9

3 ,8 9 6

7 1 .8

3 ,7 8 9

3 ,8 9 8

3 ,8 4 8

3 ,9 5 0

3 ,8 7 9

3 ,9 0 6

3 ,8 9 5

3 ,9 6 2

4 ,1 5 3

4.2

4 ,1 4 5

4 ,0 2 6

5 .3

3 ,9 6 2

5.2

3 ,9 4 4

5 .3

5.2

5 .4

5 .3

5 .3

5 .3

5 .4

5 .6

5 .6

2 2 ,3 6 5

5 .4

2 2 ,8 0 9

2 2 ,6 9 2

5 .3

2 2,5 91

5 .3

2 2 ,4 3 9

2 2 ,6 8 6

2 2 ,7 9 7

2 2 ,7 5 0

2 2 ,6 2 3

2 2 ,9 7 7

2 3 ,2 5 2

2 3 ,3 9 4

2 3 ,6 4 2

2 3 ,5 0 8

2 3 ,6 3 2

1 0 3 ,9 8 3

1 0 5 ,1 3 6

1 0 4 ,7 5 2

104,871

1 0 4 ,9 7 7

1 05 ,0 8 9

1 05 ,1 9 0

1 0 5 ,3 3 4

105,421

1 0 5 ,5 0 9

1 0 5 ,5 9 4

1 0 5 ,6 7 8

1 0 6 ,2 3 5

1 0 6 ,3 2 2

1 06 ,41 1

6 3 ,0 1 6

6 3 ,6 4 8

6 3 ,3 1 4

6 3 ,6 1 6

63,551

6 3 ,5 5 6

6 3 ,5 3 4

6 3 ,7 6 0

6 3 ,8 5 8

6 3 ,9 7 5

6 0 .6

6 3,921

6 0 .5

6 4 ,0 3 6

6 0 .4

6 4 ,4 7 9

6 0 .7

6 4 ,3 1 0

6 0 .5

6 0 .5

6 0 .4

6 0 .5

6 0 .6

6 0 .6

6 0 .5

6 0 ,4 1 7

6 0 .6

6 0 .7

6 0 ,4 2 0

6 0,161

6 0 .5

6 0 ,2 3 7

6 0 .6

6 0 ,2 6 2

6 0 ,3 2 0

6 0 ,2 6 2

6 0,5 81

6 0 ,6 7 5

6 0 ,6 6 8

6 0 ,6 9 7

6 0 ,6 7 6

6 1 ,4 4 3

6 1 ,0 7 3

6 1 ,2 2 7

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ..
N o t in th e la b o r fo rc e .

.

C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
p o p u la tio n 1........................
C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ..........

..

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te ....
E m p lo y e d ......................

.

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p ­

6 4 ,4 7 7

u la tio n r a tio 2..........

58.1

5 7 .5

5 7 .4

5 7 .4

5 7 .4

5 7 .4

5 7 .3

5 7 .5

5 7 .6

5 7 .5

5 7 .5

5 7 .4

U n e m p lo y e d .................

5 7 .8

2 ,5 9 9

5 7 .4

3 ,2 2 8

5 7 .5

3 ,1 5 3

3 ,3 7 9

3 ,2 8 9

3 ,2 3 6

3 ,2 7 2

3 ,1 8 0

3 ,1 8 4

3 ,3 0 8

3 ,2 2 4

4.1

3 ,3 6 0

5.1

3 ,0 3 5

5.0

3 ,2 3 7

5 .3

3 ,2 5 0

5 .2

5.1

5.1

5.0

5 .0

5 .2

5 .0

4 0 ,9 6 7

5 .2

4 1 ,4 8 8

4 .7

4 1 ,4 3 8

5 .0

4 1 ,2 5 5

5 .0

4 1 ,4 2 6

4 1 ,5 3 3

4 1 ,6 5 6

4 1 ,5 7 4

4 1 ,5 6 3

4 1 ,5 3 3

4 1 ,6 7 3

4 1 ,6 4 2

4 1 ,7 5 7

4 2 ,0 1 3

4 1 ,9 3 3

N o t in th e la b o r fo rc e ..

.

Both sexes, 16 to 19 years
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
p o p u la tio n 1.......................

1 5 ,9 2 9

1 5 ,9 9 4

1 6 ,0 7 3

1 6,0 19

1 6 ,0 1 7

1 5 ,9 4 3

1 5,9 72

1 5 ,9 8 0

1 5 ,9 5 4

15,971

1 5 ,9 3 3

1 5 ,9 2 5

1 6 ,0 2 7

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ........

1 6 ,0 3 0

1 6 ,0 3 8

7 ,9 0 2

7 ,5 8 5

7 ,7 4 6

7 ,6 2 2

7 ,5 9 4

7 ,6 0 7

7,581

7,561

7 ,6 6 7

7 ,5 3 5

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te ...

7 ,4 8 9

7 ,3 6 9

4 9 .6

4 7 .4

7 ,3 6 6

7 ,2 9 3

4 8 .2

7 ,0 7 9

4 7 .6

4 7 .4

4 7 .7

4 7 .5

4 7 .3

48.1

4 7 .2

E m p lo y e d .....................

4 7 .0

4 6 .3

6 ,7 4 0

6 ,3 3 2

4 6 .0

6 ,4 6 4

4 5 .5

44.1

6,331

6 ,3 0 7

6 ,3 2 4

6 ,2 8 9

6 ,2 8 0

6 ,4 2 5

6 ,4 0 0

6 ,2 2 8

6 ,1 6 4

6 ,1 2 5

6 ,0 4 2

5 ,8 2 9

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p ­
u la tio n r a tio 2........

4 2 .3

3 9 .6

4 0 .2

3 9 .5

3 9 .4

3 9 .7

3 9 .4

3 9 .3

4 0 .3

40.1

39.1

3 8 .7

U n e m p lo y e d ................

3 8 .2

1 ,1 6 2

3 7 .7

1 ,2 5 3

1,2 8 2

3 6 .3

1 ,2 9 0

1 ,2 8 7

1 ,2 8 3

1 ,2 9 2

1 ,2 8 0

1 ,2 4 3

1 ,1 3 5

1,261

1 4 .7

1 ,2 0 6

1,241

1 6.5

1,251

16.6

1,251

16.9

17.0

16.9

17.0

16.9

16.2

15.1

16.8

1 6 .4

8 ,0 2 7

1 6.8

8 ,4 0 9

17.1

8 ,3 2 7

1 7 .7

8 ,3 9 7

8 ,4 2 2

8 ,3 3 7

8,391

8 ,4 1 9

8 ,2 8 7

8 ,4 3 6

8 ,4 4 4

8 ,5 5 5

8,661

8 ,7 3 6

8 ,9 5 9

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ...

W hite3
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
p o p u la tio n 1..............................

178 ,11 1

1 7 9 ,7 8 3

1 7 9 ,2 7 9

1 7 9 ,3 9 8

1 7 9 ,5 2 4

1 7 9 ,6 6 5

1 7 9 ,8 1 6

1 7 9 ,9 7 9

1 8 0 ,1 4 6

1 8 0 ,3 0 6

1 8 0 ,4 5 0

1 8 0 ,5 8 0

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ................

1 8 0 ,4 6 0

1 8 0 ,5 9 9

1 1 9 ,3 9 9

1 8 0 ,7 2 8

1 2 0 ,1 5 0

1 1 9 ,8 6 3

1 2 0 ,0 5 9

1 2 0 ,1 9 7

1 20 ,1 5 2

1 2 0 ,2 7 2

1 2 0 ,4 4 9

1 2 0 ,5 0 2

P a rtic ip a tio n r a te ..........

1 2 0 ,4 7 9

6 7 .0

1 2 0 ,3 4 5

1 2 0 ,0 9 3

1 2 0 ,0 8 4

6 6 .8

6 6 .9

6 6 .9

1 2 0 ,1 6 6

6 7 .0

6 6 .9

120,200

6 6 .9

6 6 .9

6 6 .9

E m p lo y e d ............................

6 6 .8

6 6 .7

1 1 4 ,4 3 0

6 6 .5

1 1 4 ,0 1 3

113,871

6 6 .5

1 1 3 ,8 3 4

6 6 .5

6 6 .5

1 1 4 ,0 0 3

113,951

1 1 4 ,0 0 8

1 1 4 ,2 5 0

1 1 4 ,3 7 3

1 1 4 ,2 9 4

1 1 4 ,1 2 8

1 1 3 ,9 1 0

1 1 3 ,9 9 5

1 1 4 ,1 3 5

1 1 4 ,0 8 9

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p ­
u la tio n r a tio 2................

6 4 .2

6 3 .4

6 3 .5

6 3 .5

6 3 .5

6 3 .4

6 3 .4

6 3 .5

6 3 .5

6 3 .4

6 3 .2

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

63.1

4 ,9 6 9

6 3 .2

6 3 .2

6 ,1 3 7

6 3 .2

5 ,9 9 2

6 ,2 2 5

6 ,1 9 5

6 ,2 0 1

6 ,2 6 4

6 ,1 9 9

6 ,1 2 9

6 ,1 8 4

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ...

6 ,2 1 8

4.2

6 ,1 8 4

5.1

6 ,0 8 9

5.0

6,031

5 .2

5 .2

6,111

5 .2

5 .2

5.1

5.1

5.1

5 8 ,7 1 3

5 .2

5.1

5 9 ,6 3 3

5.1

5 9 ,4 1 6

5 .0

5 9 ,3 3 9

5 9 ,3 2 7

5.1

5 9 ,5 1 3

5 9 ,5 4 5

5 9 ,5 3 0

5 9 ,6 4 4

5 9 ,8 2 8

6 0 ,1 0 4

6 0 ,4 8 7

6 0 ,3 7 6

6 0 ,4 3 2

6 0 ,5 2 8

2 5 ,5 5 2

N o t in th e la b o r fo r c e .........

Black or African Am erican3
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
p o p u la tio n 1...............................

2 5 ,1 3 8

2 5 ,5 7 8

2 5 ,4 4 4

2 5 ,4 7 8

2 5 ,5 1 4

2 5 ,5 5 2

2 5,591

2 5 ,6 3 3

2 5 ,6 7 5

2 5 ,7 1 7

2 5,7 51

2 5 ,7 8 4

2 5 ,4 8 4

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e .................

2 5 ,5 1 9

16,421

1 6 ,5 6 5

1 6 ,4 5 4

1 6 ,6 3 8

1 6,6 10

1 6 ,5 7 0

1 6,3 90

16,541

1 6 ,7 8 9

1 6 ,6 8 2

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te ...........

1 6 ,5 4 0

6 5 .3

1 6 ,7 0 6

1 6 ,3 7 4

6 4 .8

6 4 .7

1 6 ,3 9 5

6 5 .3

65.1

6 4 .8

6 4 .0

6 4 .5

6 5 .4

6 4 .9

6 4 .2

6 4 .8

1 5 ,0 0 6

1 4,8 72

6 4 .3

1 4,7 46

6 4 .2

1 4 ,8 4 3

6 3 .8

1 4,9 28

1 4 ,8 1 6

1 4,7 63

1 4 ,9 0 7

1 5 ,1 4 8

1 5 ,0 2 7

1 4 ,7 5 4

1 4 ,8 2 7

1 4 ,6 8 4

1 4 ,6 6 9

14,6 41

E m p lo y e d ............................
E m p lo y m e n t-p o p ­
u la tio n ra tio 2................

5 9 .7

58.1

5 8 .0

5 8 .3

5 8 .5

5 8 .0

5 7 .7

5 8 .2

5 9.0

5 8 .4

5 7 .3

5 7 .5

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

5 7 .6

5 7 .5

1 ,4 1 6

5 7 .3

1 ,6 9 3

1 ,708

1 ,7 9 5

1 ,682

1 ,7 5 4

1 ,6 2 7

1 ,6 3 4

1,641

1 ,6 5 6

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ....

1,7 8 6

1 ,8 7 9

1 ,6 9 0

8 .6

10.4

1 ,7 2 6

1 0 .2

1 ,6 5 5

1 0 .8

1 0 .1

1 0 .6

9 .9

N o t in th e la b o r fo r c e ...........

8 ,7 1 7

9 ,0 1 3

8 ,9 9 0

8 ,8 4 0

8 ,9 0 3

8 ,9 8 2

9,201

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

52

1 6 ,2 9 6

Monthly Labor Review


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

9.9
9 ,0 9 2 !

9 .8
8 ,8 8 6

9.9
9 ,0 3 4 I

1 0 .8

1 1 .2

1 0.3

1 0 .5

10.2

9,211

9 ,0 7 8

9 ,1 1 0

9 ,1 2 4

9 ,2 5 6

4. Continued—Employment status of the population, by sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin, monthly data seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Employment status

2003

2002

Annual average

Feb

Mar.

2001

2002

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov

Dec.

Jan.

2 4 ,9 4 2

2 5 ,9 6 3

2 5 ,6 5 5

2 5 ,7 3 9

2 5 ,8 2 7

2 5 ,9 1 7

2 6 ,0 0 8

2 6 ,0 9 6

2 6 ,1 8 4

2 6 ,2 7 2

2 6 ,3 5 5

2 6 ,4 3 6

2 6 ,9 9 4

28

2 7 ,1 9 1

1 7 ,3 2 8

1 7 ,9 4 3

1 7 ,6 9 7

1 7 ,9 1 3

1 7,8 43

17,891

1 8,0 45

1 8 ,0 3 0

1 8,1 03

1 8,0 49

1 8 ,1 6 9

1 8 ,1 3 4

1 8 ,6 1 4

1 8 ,6 5 8

1 8 ,6 1 4

6 8 .9

6 8 .6

6 9 .0

6 8 .9

6 8 .5

1 6 ,7 5 5

1 6 ,7 0 8

1 7 ,1 5 5

1 7 ,2 2 3

1 7 ,2 1 5

Hispanic or Latino
ethnicity
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e .................
P a rtic ip a tio n r a te ..........

6 9 .5

69.1

6 9 .0

6 9 .6

69.1

6 9 .0

6 9 .4

69.1

69.1

6 8 .7

1 6 ,1 9 0

1 6 ,5 9 0

1 6 ,4 0 5

1 6 ,4 9 8

16,581

1 6 ,5 7 3

1 6,6 85

1 6,6 64

1 6,7 39

1 6 ,6 3 7

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p u la tio n ra tio 2................

6 4 .9

6 3 .9

6 3 .9

64.1

6 4 .2

6 3.9

6 4 .2

6 3.9

6 3 .9

6 3 .3

6 3 .6

6 3 .2

6 3 .5

6 3 .6

6 3 .3

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

1 ,1 3 8

1 ,3 5 3

1 ,2 9 2

1 ,4 1 5

1,261

1 ,3 1 8

1 ,3 6 0

1 ,3 6 6

1 ,3 6 3

1 ,4 1 2

1 ,4 1 4

1 ,4 2 5

1 ,4 5 9

1 ,4 3 6

1 ,3 9 9

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ....
___N o t in th e la b o r fo r c e ..........

7 .5

6 .6

7 .6 1 4

8 .0 2 0

7.3

7 .9

7.1

7 .9 5 9

7 .8 2 7

7 ,9 8 4

7 .4
8 .0 2 6

7 .5

7 .6

7 .5

7 ,9 6 3

8 ,0 6 6

8 ,0 8 2

7 .8
8 ,2 2 3

7 .7

7 .8

7 .9

7 .8

8 ,1 8 6

8 ,3 0 3

8 ,3 8 0

7 .5

8 .4 3 6

8 ,5 7 7

1 T h e p o p u la tio n fig u r e s a re n o t s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .

N O T E : E s tim a te s fo r th e a b o v e ra ce g ro u p s (w h ite a n d b la c k o r A fric a n A m e ric a n ) d o n o t s u m

2 C iv ilia n e m p lo y m e n t a s a p e rc e n t o f th e c iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l p o p u la tio n .

to to ta ls b e c a u s e d a ta a re n o t p re s e n te d fo r a ll ra c e s . In a d d itio n , p e rs o n s w h o s e e th n ic ity is
id e n tifie d a s H is p a n ic o r L a tin o m a y be o f a n y ra ce a n d , th e re fo re , a re c la s s ifie d b y e th n ic ity a s

3 B e g in n in g in 2 0 0 3 , p e r s o n s w h o s e le c te d th is ra c e g ro u p o nly; p e rs o n s w h o s e le c te d

w e ll a s b y ra ce .

m o re th a n o n e ra c e g ro u p a re n o t in c lu d e d . P rio r to 2 0 0 3 , p e rs o n s w h o re p o rte d m o re
th a n o n e ra c e w e re in c lu d e d in th e g ro u p th e y id e n tifie d a s th e m a in ra ce .

5. Selected employment indicators, monthly data seasonally adjusted

[In thousands]
Selected categories

2003

2002

Annual average

Aug.

Sept.

Oct

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

2001

2002

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

1 3 6 ,9 3 3

1 36 ,48 5

136 ,14 3

136 ,19 6

136 ,48 7

136 ,38 3

1 36 ,3 4 3

1 36 ,75 7

1 37 ,31 2

1 36 ,9 8 8

1 36 ,5 4 2

1 36 ,4 3 9

1 37 ,5 3 6

1 3 7 ,4 0 8

1 3 7 ,3 4 8

7 3 ,1 9 6

7 2,9 03

7 2,7 19

7 2,7 80

7 3,0 93

7 2 ,8 9 3

7 2,931

7 3 ,0 2 3

7 3,4 02

73,151

7 2 ,7 7 3

7 2 ,6 9 0

7 2 ,9 9 4

7 3 ,2 4 9

7 3 ,0 6 4

6 3 ,7 3 7

6 3,5 82

6 3,4 23

6 3 ,4 1 6

6 3 ,3 9 4

6 3 ,4 9 0

6 3 ,4 1 2

6 3 ,7 3 4

6 3 ,9 1 0

6 3 ,8 3 7

6 3 ,7 6 9

6 3 ,7 4 9

6 4 ,5 4 2

6 4 ,1 5 9

6 4 ,2 8 4

4 4,3 06

4 4 ,0 3 7

4 4 ,1 5 0

4 4 ,2 3 5

4 4 ,1 2 9

4 4 ,2 4 5

4 4 ,0 9 3

4 4 ,0 0 5

44,401

4 4 ,5 8 7

4 4 ,4 1 5

Characteristic
E m p lo y e d , 16 y e a rs a n d o v e r..

M a rrie d m e n , s p o u s e
4 4 ,0 0 7

4 4,1 16

4 4,1 90

44,021

3 4 ,1 5 3

3 4 ,1 5 3

3 4 ,0 7 4

3 4,0 52

3 4,0 15

3 4 ,0 5 0

3 4 ,0 3 5

3 4 ,2 7 8

3 4 ,4 7 9

3 4 ,3 2 2

3 4 ,2 6 4

3 4 ,1 8 9

3 4 ,5 2 5

3 4 ,6 2 0

3 4 ,5 6 9

3 ,7 1 5

4 ,2 1 3

4 ,1 3 2

4 ,2 1 0

4 ,0 9 7

3 ,982

4 ,1 3 9

4 ,3 0 8

4 ,3 5 6

4 ,3 4 3

4 ,3 2 9

4 ,2 7 3

4 ,6 4 3

4 ,8 0 7

4 ,6 9 6

2 ,3 9 6

2 ,7 8 8

2 ,7 4 4

2 ,7 5 2

2 ,6 8 5

2 ,7 0 3

2 ,7 6 0

2,811

2 ,8 1 4

2 ,8 8 8

2 ,8 5 5

2 ,8 9 3

3 ,0 2 7

3 ,1 5 2

3 ,1 2 3

1 ,006

1,1 2 4

1,0 7 5

1,140

1 ,1 1 0

1,097

1,1 1 3

1,1 5 3

1 ,177

1 ,1 3 3

1 ,159

1 ,1 1 0

1 ,297

1 ,2 7 5

1 ,1 9 2

1 8 ,9 2 8

1 8 ,6 8 5

1 8,7 27

1 8 ,5 5 5

1 9 ,3 1 4

18,421

1 8 ,8 8 8

4 ,2 6 6

4 ,2 7 4

4 ,2 7 2

4 ,2 1 9

4 ,4 9 6

4 ,6 7 5

4 ,5 8 7

2 ,8 1 6

2 ,8 5 4

2 ,9 4 7

3 ,0 6 2

3 ,0 4 8

M a rrie d w o m e n , s p o u s e

Persons at work part time1
A ll in d u s trie s :
P a rt tim e f o r e c o n o m ic
S la c k w o rk o r b u s in e s s
C o u ld o n ly fin d p a rt-tim e
P art tim e fo r n o n e c o n o m ic
18,7 90

1 8,843

18,711

1 8,933

1 8,988

19,251

19,1 43

1 9,0 47

3 ,6 2 7

4 ,1 1 9

4 ,0 5 0

4 ,1 3 2

3 ,9 8 3

3 ,8 8 7

4 ,0 2 5

4 ,1 8 5

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s trie s :
P art tim e fo r e c o n o m ic
S la c k w o rk o r b u s in e s s
2 ,3 4 0

2 ,7 2 6

2 ,6 8 6

2 ,6 9 0

2,611

2 ,6 2 9

2 ,6 8 9

2 ,8 0 6

2 ,7 5 5

2 ,8 5 7

997

1 ,114

1,059

1,129

1,087

1,099

1,103

1,1 4 3

1 ,172

1 ,1 2 2

1 ,1 5 8

1 ,0 9 7

1 ,267

1 ,2 5 7

1 ,1 7 8

1 8,415

1 8.487

1 8,359

1 8.560

1 8.636

1 8,9 85

18.741

1 8.6 68

1 8,5 55

18.3 47

18,361

18,1 97

1 8.9 84

1 8 ,1 3 4

1 8 .5 2 9

C o u ld o n ly fin d p a rt-tim e
P a rt tim e fo r n o n e c o n o m ic
re a s o n s ...................................

1 E x c lu d e s p e rs o n s "w ith a jo b b u t n o t a t w o rk " d u rin g th e su rve y p e rio d fo r su ch re a s o n s a s va c a tio n , illn e ss, o r in d u s tria l d ispu tes.


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

53

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

6. Selected unemployment indicators, monthly data seasonally adjusted
[Unemployment rates]
Annual average

Selected categories

2001

2002

2002
Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

200 3

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

C h a racteristic
T o ta l, 1 6 y e a r s a n d o v e r ....................................

4 .7

5 .8

5 .7

5 .9

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .7

5 .8

B o th s e x e s , 1 6 to 19 y e a r s ..........................

5 .9

6 .0

5 .7

5 .8

5 .8

1 4 .7

1 6 .5

1 6 .6

1 6 .9

1 7 .0

1 6 .9

1 7 .0

1 6 .9

1 6 .2

15.1

1 6 .8

M e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ................................

1 6 .4

1 6 .8

17.1

1 7 .7

4 .2

5 .3

5 .2

5 .3

5 .2

5 .4

5 .3

5 .3

5 .3

5 .4

5 .6

W o m e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ........................

5 .6

5 .4

5 .3

4.1

5 3

5.1

5 .0

5 .3

5 .2

5.1

5.1

5 .0

5 .0

5 .2

5 .0

5 .2

4 .7

5 .0

5 .0

4 .2

5.1

5 .0

5 .2

5 .2

5 .2

W h ite , t o t a l 1........................................................

5 .2

5.1

5.1

5.1

5 .2

5.1

B o th s e x e s , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s ...................

5.1

5 .0

5.1

1 2 .7

1 4 .5

1 4 .5

1 4 .3

1 4 .6

1 4 .8

1 5 .6

1 4 .8

1 4 .2

1 3 .9

1 4 .5

M e n , 1 6 t o 1 9 y e a r s ..............................

1 3 .8

1 5 .2

1 5 .5

1 3 .9

1 5 .6

1 5 .9

1 6 .3

1 5 .7

1 5 .5

1 6 .6

1 7 .9

17.1

1 5 .6

1 4 .7

1 5 .8

1 4 .9

W o m e n , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s .......................

1 6 .2

1 7 .3

1 8 .0

1 1 .4

13.1

1 2 .7

1 2 .8

1 3 .8

1 3 .0

13.1

1 2 .4

1 2 .7

13.1

1 3 .0

M e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ..........................

1 2 .7

1 4 .2

1 3 .7

13.1

3 .7

4 .7

4 .6

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

5 .0

4 .9

4 .9

W o m e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ...................

4 .6

4 7

3 .6

4 .4

4 .3

4 .5

4 .5

4 .4

4 .4

4 .4

4 .4

4 .4

4 .2

4 .4

4.1

4 .2

4 .4

B la c k o r A fr ic a n A m e r ic a n , t o t a l 1.............

8 .6

1 0 .2

1 0 .4

1 0 .8

1 0 .1

1 0 .6

9 .9

9 .9

9 .8

9 .9

1 0 .8

1 1 .2

1 0 .3

1 0 .5

1 0 .2

B o th s e x e s , 1 6 t o 1 9 y e a r s ...................

2 9 .0

2 9 .8

3 1 .7

3 5 .2

2 9 .9

30.1

27.1

30.1

2 8 .0

2 3 .9

3 0 .5

3 3 .2

M e n , 1 6 t o 1 9 y e a r s ..............................

3 0 .4

3 0 .2

3 3 .4

3 0 .4

3 1 .3

3 5 .9

3 5 .3

3 6.1

3 0 .8

2 2 .7

3 1 .3

3 4 .4

2 4 .9

3 0 .0

3 4 .5

W o m e n , 1 6 t o 1 9 y e a r s .......................

3 3 .2

3 8.1

4 5 .2

2 7 .5

M e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ..........................

2 8 .3

2 7 .2

3 5 .0

2 2 .2

2 9 .3

3 1 .4

2 8 .9

2 1 .5

2 2 .7

3 1 .0

3 2.1

2 8 .0

2 2 .2

2 3 .1

8 .0

9 .5

9 .4

9.1

8 .7

1 0 .3

9 .2

9.1

9 .4

9 .9

1 0 .6

1 0 .5

W o m e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ...................

1 0 .3

1 0 .1

9 .3

7 .0

8 .8

8 .9

9 .5

9 .3

8 .8

8 .9

8 .5

8 .1

8 .5

9 .0

9 .7

8 .4

9 .0

8 .7

H is p a n ic o r L a tin o e th n ic ity ........................

6 .6

7 .5

7 .3

7 .9

7.1

7 .4

7 .5

7 .6

7 .5

7 .8

7 .8

7 .9

7 .8

7 .7

7 .5

3 .9

3 .6

4 .0

3 .5

3 .5

3 .6

3 .6

3 .6

3 .7

3 .5

3 .6

3 8
3 .7

M a r r ie d m e n , s p o u s e p r e s e n t ...................

2 .7

3 .6

3 .5

M a r r ie d w o m e n , s p o u s e p r e s e n t .............

3.1

3 .7

3 .7

3 .9

3 .8

3 .8

3 .6

3 .6

F u ll- tim e w o r k e r s ........................................

3 .8

3 .8

3 .8

3 .3

4 .7

3 6

5 .9

5 .8

6 .1

5 .9

6 .0

5 .9

5 .8

5 .8

5 .9

6 .1

6 .1

P a r t- tim e w o r k e r s ............................................

5 .8

5 9

5.1

5 .3

5 .2

5.1

5 .4

5 .0

5 .4

5 .4

5 .3

5 .2

5.1

5 .3

5 .4

5 .5

L e s s th a n a h ig h s c h o o l d ip lo m a ....................

7 .2

8 .4

8 .1

8 .8

8 .4

8 .0

8 .6

8 .5

7 .9

8 .7

9 .0

9 .0

8 .5

8 .8

8 .5

H ig h s c h o o l g r a d u a te s , n o c o lle g e 3 ..............

4 .2

5 .3

5 .4

5 .5

5 .5

5 .5

5.1

5 .2

5 .0

4 .9

5 .3

5 .3

5.1

5 4

5 5

3 .8

5 .5

E d u c a tio n a l a tta in m e n t2

S o m e c o lle g e o r a s s o c ia te d e g r e e ................

3 .3

4 .5

4 .3

4 .6

4 .7

4 .6

4 .4

4 .3

4 .6

4 .7

4 .8

5 .0

4 .8

4 .7

4 .8

B a c h e lo r ’s d e g r e e a n d h ig h e r 4 ........................

2 .3

2 .9

2 .8

3 .0

3 .0

3 .0

3 .0

2 .8

2 .9

3 .0

2 .9

2 .9

3 .0

3 .0

3.1

B e g in n in g in 2 0 0 3 , p e r s o n s w h o s e le c te d th is r a c e g ro u p o n ly ; p e r s o n s w h o

2 D a ta r e fe r to p e r s o n s 2 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r.

s e le c t e d m o r e th a n o n e r a c e g r o u p a re n o t in c lu d e d . P rio r to 2 0 0 3 , p e r s o n s w h o
3 In c lu d e s h ig h s c h o o l d ip lo m a o r e q u iv a le n t.

r e p o r t e d m o r e t h a n o n e ra c e w e re in c lu d e d in th e g ro u p th e y id e n tifie d a s th e
m a in r a c e .

7.

4 In c lu d e s p e r s o n s w ith b a c h e lo r 's , m a s te r's , p r o fe s s io n a l, a n d d o c to ra l d e g re e s .

Duration of unemployment, monthly data seasonally adjusted

[Numbers in thousands]
Weeks of
unemployment

2001

2002

2002
Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

2003

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

L e s s th a n 5 w e e k s ..................................

2 ,8 5 3

2 ,8 9 3

3 ,0 4 1

2 ,9 3 4

2 ,9 0 0

2 ,7 8 6

2 ,9 0 3

2 ,8 9 5

2 ,7 8 2

2 ,7 9 7

2 ,9 1 2

2 ,8 6 0

5 t o 1 4 w e e k s ............................................

2 ,7 7 2

2 ,7 4 9

2 ,7 8 0

2 ,1 9 6

2 ,5 8 0

2 ,4 8 9

2 ,8 5 1

2 ,5 6 6

2 ,8 0 3

2 ,5 2 0

2 ,5 0 5

2 ,5 5 8

2 ,5 1 5

2 ,5 3 2

2 ,5 4 7

1 5 w e e k s a n d o v e r ..................................

2 ,5 7 7

2 ,5 6 5

2 ,4 7 3

1 ,7 5 2

2 ,9 0 4

3 ,6 8 5

2 ,8 1 0

2 ,9 1 1

3 ,0 4 5

2 ,9 5 5

2 ,8 9 1

3 ,0 1 9

3 ,0 9 9

3 ,1 4 3

3 ,2 9 6

1 5 to 2 6 w e e k s ......................................

3 ,1 4 0

3 ,1 5 5

3 ,1 0 4

951

1 ,3 6 9

1 ,3 6 6

1 ,3 6 4

1 ,3 2 8

1 ,4 1 9

1,3 8 1

1 ,361

1 ,3 5 9

1 ,3 7 4

1 ,3 1 7

1 ,3 9 2

2 7 w e e k s a n d o v e r ..............................

1 ,4 5 7

1 ,2 8 1

1 ,3 1 6

801

1 ,5 3 5

1 ,3 1 9

1 ,4 4 6

1 ,5 8 3

1 ,6 2 6

1 ,5 7 3

1 ,5 3 0

1 ,6 6 0

1 ,7 2 4

1 ,8 2 6

1 ,9 0 4

1 ,6 8 3

1 ,8 7 4

1 ,7 8 8

13.1

1 6 .6

1 5 .4

1 6 .3

1 6 .8

17.1

1 6 .6

1 6 .3

1 7 .8

1 7 .6

1 7 .9

1 8 .4

1 8 .4

1 8 .6

1 8 .0

6 .8

9.1

8 .3

8 .8

9 .6

1 1 .6

8 .9

8 .7

9 .5

9 .6

9 .4

9 .6

9 .8

9 .4

9 .6

M e a n d u r a tio n , in w e e k s ......................
M e d ia n d u r a tio n , in w e e k s .................

54

Annual average

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

8.

Unemployed persons by reason for unemployment, monthly data seasonally adjusted

[Numbers in thousands]
Reason for
unemployment

2002

2001

2003

2002

Annual average
Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.
4 ,6 1 3

J o b lo s e r s 1 ..................................................

3 ,4 7 6

4 ,6 0 7

4 ,3 3 9

4 ,5 9 9

4 ,6 3 4

4 ,6 5 0

4 ,6 1 3

4 ,6 0 7

4 ,6 0 8

4 ,8 2 8

4 ,8 3 3

4 ,8 6 3

4 ,5 8 3

4 ,7 5 6

O n t e m p o r a r y la y o f f............................

1 ,0 6 7

1 ,1 2 4

1 ,1 0 2

1 ,1 2 1

1 ,1 1 4

1 ,1 0 1

1 ,2 3 6

1 ,1 5 8

1 ,0 4 4

1 ,0 9 8

1 ,0 6 9

1 ,1 1 0

1 ,0 8 0

1 ,1 4 2

1 ,1 5 7

N o t o n t e m p o r a r y la y o f f ....................

2 ,4 0 9

3 ,4 8 3

3 ,2 3 7

3 ,4 7 8

3 ,5 2 0

3 ,5 5 0

3 ,3 7 7

3 ,4 4 9

3 ,5 6 5

3 ,7 2 9

3 ,7 6 4

3 ,7 5 3

3 ,5 0 3

3 ,6 1 4

3 ,4 5 6

J o b le a v e r s ..................................................

835

866

876

1 ,0 0 2

892

844

840

844

808

850

834

862

825

772

794

R e e n t r a n t s ...................................................

2 ,0 3 1

2 ,3 6 8

2 ,4 3 8

2 ,4 1 2

2 ,4 0 0

2 ,3 7 9

2 ,3 9 0

2 ,3 2 6

2 ,3 2 1

2 ,3 8 6

2 ,3 9 4

2 ,4 6 2

2 ,3 3 1

2 ,3 9 5

2 ,3 9 1

N e w e n t r a n ts ..............................................

459

536

539

530

503

544

547

587

542

494

586

534

616

579

626

5 4 .8

P e rc en t of u n e m p lo y e d
5 1.1

5 5 .0

5 3 .0

5 3 .8

5 5 .0

5 5 .2

5 5 .0

55.1

5 5 .7

5 6 .4

5 5 .9

5 5 .8

5 4 .9

5 5 .9

O n t e m p o r a r y la y o f f ...........................

1 5 .7

1 3 .4

1 3 .5

13.1

1 3 .2

13.1

1 4 .7

1 3 .8

1 2 .6

1 2 .8

1 2 .4

1 2 .7

1 2 .9

1 3 .4

1 3 .7

N o t o n t e m p o r a r y la y o f f....................

3 5 .4

4 1 .6

3 9 .5

4 0 .7

4 1 .8

4 2 .2

4 0 .2

4 1 .2

4 2.1

4 3 .6

4 3 .5

4 3 .0

4 1 .9

4 2 .5

4 1 .0

J o b le a v e r s ..................................................

N e w e n t r a n ts ..............................................

1 2 .3

1 0 .3

1 0 .7

1 1 .7

1 0 .6

1 0 .0

1 0 .0

1 0 .1

9 .8

9 .9

9 .6

9 .9

9 .9

9.1

9 .4

2 9 .9

2 8 .3

2 9 .8

2 8 .2

2 8 .5

2 8 .3

2 8 .5

2 7 .8

2 8 .0

2 7 .9

2 7 .7

2 8 .2

2 7 .9

2 8 .2

2 8 .4

6 .8

6 .4

6 .6

6 .2

6 .0

6 .5

6 .5

7 .0

6 .5

5 .8

6 .8

6 .1

7 .4

6 .8

7 .4

2 .4

3 .2

3 .0

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .3

3 .3

3 .4

3.1

3 .3

3 .2

.6

.6

.6

.7

.6

.6

.6

.6

.5

.6

.6

.6

.6

.5

.5

1 .4

1 .6

1 .7

1 .7

1 .7

1 .6

1 .7

1 .6

1 .6

1 .6

1 .6

1 .7

1 .6

1 .6

1 .6

.4

.4

P e rc e n t o f c ivilian
la b o r fo rc e

N e w e n tr a n ts ............................................
'

.3

.4

.4

.4

.3

.4

.4

.4

.4

.3

.4

.4

.4

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

I n c lu d e s p e r s o n s w h o c o m p le te d te m p o r a r y jo b s .

9. Unemployment rates by sex and age, monthly data seasonally adjusted
[Civilian workers]
Sex and age

2001

2002

2003

2002

Annual average
Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Feb.

Mar.

4 .7

5 .8

5 .7

5 .9

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .7

5 .8

5 .9

6 .0

5 .7

5 .8

5 .8

1 0 .6

1 2 .0

1 2 .3

1 2 .3

1 1 .8

1 2 .0

1 2 .1

1 2 .1

1 1 .9

1 1 .8

1 2 .2

1 1 .9

1 1 .8

1 1 .9

1 1 .7

1 6 t o 1 9 y e a r s ....................................

1 4 .7

1 6 .5

1 6 .6

1 6 .9

1 7 .0

1 6 .9

1 7 .0

1 6 .9

1 6 .2

15.1

1 6 .8

1 6 .4

1 6 .8

17.1

1 7 .7

1 6 t o 1 7 y e a r s ...............................

1 7 .2

1 8 .8

18.1

1 9 .5

2 0 .4

1 9 .6

1 9 .7

1 9 .3

1 9 .4

1 6 .2

1 9 .4

1 7 .6

1 8 .3

1 7 .9

1 6 .7

1 8 t o 1 9 y e a r s ...............................

13.1

15.1

1 5 .2

1 5 .5

1 5 .3

1 5 .3

1 5 .5

1 6 .2

1 4 .0

1 4 .3

1 5 .3

1 5 .5

1 5 .9

1 5 .9

1 7 .7

2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ...................................

8 .3

9 .7

1 0 .1

9 .9

9.1

9 .4

9 .6

9 .6

9 .6

1 0 .1

9 .8

9 .7

9 .3

9 .3

8 .9

2 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r ...............................

3 ,7

4 .6

4 .5

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

4 .7

4 .6

4 .6

4 .7

4 .8

4 .8

4 .6

4 .7

4 .7

2 5 t o 5 4 y e a r s ...............................

3 .8

4 .8

4 .7

4 .9

4 .9

4 .9

4 .8

4 .7

4 .7

4 .9

5.1

5 .0

4 .7

4 .9

5 .0

5 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r .......................

3 .0

3 .8

3 .5

4 .0

4.1

4.1

3 .8

4 .0

3 .9

3 .9

3 .7

4 .2

4.1

3 .8

3 .8

T o ta l, 1 6 y e a r s a n d o v e r ........................
1 6 t o 2 4 y e a r s .......................................

4 .8

5 .9

5 .9

6 .0

5 .9

6 .0

5 .9

6 .0

5 .9

5 .9

6 .2

6 .2

6 .0

6 .0

1 1 .4

1 2 .8

1 3 .5

1 3 .0

1 2 .7

1 2 .6

1 2 .8

1 3 .3

13.1

1 2 .3

1 2 .8

1 2 .6

1 2 .4

1 2 .5

1 2 .4

1 8 .2

1 9 .5

2 0 .8

6 .0

1 6 .0

18.1

1 8 .6

1 8 .4

1 8 .8

1 8 .6

1 8 .9

1 9 .3

1 8 .3

1 6 .0

1 8 .0

1 7 .5

19.1

2 1 .1

2 0 .9

2 0 .2

2 3.1

2 2 .0

2 2 .2

2 3.1

2 1 .5

1 7 .2

2 1 .2

1 8 .5

1 9 .3

19.1

1 8 .0

16.1

1 6 .7

1 7 .6

1 9 .3

2 1 .5

1 4 .0

1 6 .4

1 6 .6

1 7 .2

1 6 .4

1 6 .6

1 6 .6

18.1

1 6 .3

1 5 .2

9 .0

1 0 .2

1 0 .9

1 0 .3

9 .6

9 .6

9 .7

1 0 .3

1 0 .5

1 0 .4

1 0 .2

1 0 .2

9 .7

9 .2

8 .7

2 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r ............................

3 .6

4 .7

4 .5

4 .7

4 .8

4 .9

4 .7

4 .7

4 .6

4 .8

5.1

5 .0

4 .9

4 .9

4 .9

2 5 t o 5 4 y e a r s ............................

3 .7

4 .8

4 .7

4 .8

4 .8

5 .0

4 .9

4 .8

4 .7

4 .9

5 .3

5 .2

5 .0

5 .0

5 .0

5 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r ....................

3 .2

4.1

3 .6

4 .2

4 .4

4 .4

4 .0

4.1

4.1

4 .0

4 .0

4 .4

4 .4

4 .2

4 .3

W o m e n , 1 6 y e a r s a n d o v e r ...............

4 .7

5 .6

5 .5

5 .9

5 .7

5 .6

5 .7

5 .5

5 .5

5 .7

5 .6

5 .8

5 .3

5 .6

5 .5

9 .6

1 1 .1

1 1 .0

1 1 .5

1 0 .8

1 1 .2

1 1 .4

1 0 .7

1 0 .5

1 1 .3

1 1 .5

1 1 .3

1 1 .1

1 1 .3

1 1 .0

1 3 .4

1 4 .9

1 4 .4

1 5 .5

1 5 .0

1 5 .0

15.1

1 4 .4

1 4 .0

14.1

1 5 .6

1 5 .2

1 5 .5

1 4 .8

1 4 .6

1 6 to 1 7 y e a r s

1 5 .2

1 6 .6

1 5 .4

1 8 .7

1 7 .4

1 7 .2

17.1

1 5 .5

1 7 .4

1 5 .2

1 7 .4

1 6 .6

1 7 .3

1 6 .8

1 5 .5

1 8 tO 2 4 y e a r s

1 2 .2

1 3 .8

1 3 .6

1 3 .7

14.1

1 4 .0

1 4 .3

14.1

1 1 .5

1 3 .3

1 4 .4

1 4 .2

14.1

1 2 .3

1 3 .7

7 .5

9.1

9 .2

9 .4

8 .6

9 .2

9 .4

8 .8

8 .7

9 .8

9 .4

9 .3

8 .8

9 .5

9.1

3 .7

4 .6

4 .5

4 .9

4 .8

4 .6

4 .6

4 .5

4 .5

4 .6

4 .5

4 .6

4 .2

4 .5

4 .6

3 .9

4 .8

4 .7

4 .9

5 .0

4 .8

4 .8

4 .6

4 .7

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

4 .4

4 .8

4 .9

2 .7

3 .6

3 .6

3 .4

3.1

3 .9

3 .8

4 .3

3 .6

3 .5

3 .2

3 .8

4.1

3 .3

3 .3

5 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r '...................
1 D a ta a re n o t s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

55

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

10. Unemployment rates by State, seasonally adjusted
Feb.
2002

State
A la b a m a ...

Jan

Feb.

2003p

2003p

Feb.
2002

State

5 .8

5 .6

5 .5

M is s o u ri

5 .4

A la s k a .......

7.1

6 .9

7 .0

M o n ta n a ..............................................

4 .6

A r iz o n a .....

6 .3

Jan.

Feb.

2003p

2003p

5.1

4 .7
4 .0

5 .6

5 .7

N e b r a s k a ..................................................................

3 .6

A rk a n s a s ..

5 .4

4 .9

4 .9

N e v a d a ...................................................

fi ?

C a lifo r n ia ..

6 .5

6 .5

6 .7

N e w H a m p s h ir e ....................................................

4 .4

C o lo r a d o .......................

5 .7

5 .4

5 .5

N e w J e r s e y ........................................................

5 .5

C o n n e c tic u t ..................

4.1

4 .8

5 .0

N e w M e x ic o ....................................................

5 .4

5 .8

5 .8

D e la w a r e .......................

3 .9

3 .4

3 .7

N e w Y o r k ........................................................

6 .0

fi 3

6.1

D is tr ic t o f C o lu m b ia .,

6 .5

6 .1

6 .6

N o rth C a ro lin a .......................................................

6 .8

6 .0

5 .8

F lo r id a ............................

5 .7

5 .3

5 .3

N o rth D a k o ta .....................................

3 fi

G e o r g ia ..

5 .0

4 .6

4 .5

O h io .........................................................................

5 .5

6.1

fi n

5 .2

6.2
5 .2

3 .3

3 .5
5 .0

4 .4

3 .9

5*5

5 .7

3 .7

H a w a ii....

4 .7

3 .6

3 .0

O k la h o m a ..........................................................

5 .6
4 .5

Id a h o ..

5 .9

5 .7

5 .2

O r e g o n ..............................................................

8 .1

Illin o is .........................

6 .2

6 .3

6 .5

P e n n s y lv a n ia ..................................................

5 .5

7 .5
fi 1

7 .3

I n d ia n a ......................

5 .3

4 .8

4 .9

R h o d e Is la n d ...........................................................

4 .9

5.1

I o w a ............................

3 .8

3 .8

4 .0

S o u th C a ro lin a .......................................................

5 .0

4 .7

4 .6

S o u th D a k o ta ...........................................

5 .9
a 5

6 .3

K a n s a s ......................
K e n t u c k y ...................

5 .6

5 .3

5 .7

T e n n e s s e e ...............................................................

5 .3

4 .6

4 .8

5 .3

6.2
3.1

L o u is ia n a ..................

6 .1

5 .3

5 .7

T e x a s ..............................................................

fi ?

M a in e ..........................

4 .2

4 .6

4 .6

U ta h .............................................................................

6 .1

5 .4

6.6

M a r y la n d ...................

4 .4

4 .0

4 .2

M a s s a c h u s e t t s .......

5 .0

5 .2

5 .4

V ir g in ia ...................................................................

4 .3

4.1

4.1

M ic h ig a n ...................

6 .1

6 .2

6 .6

W a s h in g to n ..........................................................

7 .3

6 .6

6 .9

M in n e s o t a ................

4 .5

4 .3

4 .3

W e s t V ir g in ia ...................................................

5 7

fi 4

M is s is s ip p i...............

6.0

6 .5

6 .4

6 .0

W is c o n s in .........................................................

5 .7

5 .4

5 .3

W y o m in g ...................................................................

4.1

4 .0

4.1

4 .0

p = p r e lim in a r y

11. Employment of workers on nonfarm payrolls by State, seasonally adjusted
[In thousands]__________
State

Feb.
2002

Jan.

Feb.

2003p

2003p

State

Feb.
2002

Feb.
2003p

A la b a m a ......................

1 ,9 0 0 .4

1 ,8 8 0 .3

1 ,8 7 6 .3

M is s o u r i..................................................

2 ,6 9 9 .2

2 ,6 2 9 .8

A la s k a ...........................

2 9 2 .8

2 9 7 .6

2 9 7 .8

M o n ta n a ..................................................

3 9 4 .5

3 9 6 .5

A r iz o n a ........................ .

2 ,2 4 2 .2

2 ,2 7 3 .1

2 ,2 7 0 .4

N e b r a s k a .................................................

9 0 9 .2

8 9 9 .4

9 0 0 .8

A r k a n s a s ......................

1 ,1 5 4 .2

1 ,1 4 9 .7

1 ,1 4 7 .1

N e v a d a ....................................................

1 ,0 6 0 .5

1 ,0 5 6 .9

1 ,0 5 7 .4

N e w H a m p s h ire ...................................

6 2 6 .9

6 1 6 .6

6 1 5 .9
3 ,9 8 0 .1

2 ,6 3 8 .1
3 9 4 .8

C a lif o r n ia .................... .

1 4 ,6 6 4 .6

1 4 ,4 9 3 .4

1 4 ,4 7 8 .2

C o lo r a d o ......................

2 ,1 9 4 .9

2 ,1 6 8 .8

2 ,1 6 5 .3

N e w J e r s e y ............................................

4 ,0 1 6 .7

3 ,9 8 6 .9

C o n n e c tic u t................

1 ,6 7 5 .8

1 ,6 6 2 .1

1 ,6 5 5 .0

N e w M e x ic o ..........................................

7 6 2 .6

7 7 3 .0

7 7 6 .7

D e la w a r e .....................

4 1 5 .8

4 1 1 .2

4 0 9 .3

N e w Y o r k ................................................

8 ,5 4 7 .9

8 ,4 1 4 .7

8 ,4 0 0 .5

D is tr ic t o f C o lu m b ia .

6 4 9 .4

6 6 0 .0

6 6 4 .5

N o rth C a ro lin a ......................................

3 ,8 8 0 .6

3 ,8 2 8 .3

3 ,8 2 7 .5

F lo r id a ...........................

7 ,1 7 4 .2

7 ,2 5 0 .7

7 ,2 5 9 .3

N o rth D a k o ta ........................................

3 3 0 .7

3 2 9 .7

3 2 8 .4

G e o r g ia ........................

3 ,8 7 3 .5

3 ,8 9 7 .1

3 ,8 9 9 .4

O h io ...........................................................

5 ,5 4 3 .5

5 ,4 0 3 .9

5 ,3 8 9 .8

H a w a ii...........................

5 4 7 .3

5 6 5 .6

5 6 4 .1

O k la h o m a ...............................................

1 ,5 1 0 .4

1 ,4 7 1 .8

1 ,4 7 5 .8

I d a h o ..............................

5 6 9 .3

5 6 3 .5

5 6 3 .8

O r e g o n ......................................................

1 ,5 7 7 .6

1 ,5 7 2 .3

1 ,5 7 2 .0

Illin o is ............................

5 ,9 3 9 .3

5 ,9 0 3 .0

5 ,8 7 2 .1

P e n n s y lv a n ia ........................................

5 ,6 5 8 .3

5 ,6 3 2 .3

5 ,6 2 3 .2

In d ia n a ..........................

2 ,9 0 7 .6

2 ,8 8 3 .3

2 ,8 7 1 .9

R h o d e Is la n d .........................................

4 7 9 .7

4 7 9 .4

4 7 9 .6

Io w a ................................

1 ,4 6 4 .4

1 ,4 4 5 .6

1 ,4 4 7 .6

1 ,8 0 5 .9

S o u th C a r o lin a ......................................

1 ,8 3 0 .0

1 ,8 0 4 .1

K a n s a s ..........................

1 ,3 5 8 .7

1 ,3 3 3 .6

1 ,3 3 7 .2

S o u th D a k o ta ........................................

3 7 6 .1

3 7 5 .1

3 7 5 .1

K e n t u c k y ......................

1 ,8 2 8 .0

1 ,7 9 0 .4

1 ,7 8 5 .3

T e n n e s s e e ..............................................

2 ,7 1 9 .1

2 ,6 6 4 .5

2 ,6 6 3 .9

L o u is ia n a ......................

1 ,9 2 9 .0

1 ,9 0 5 .1

1 ,8 9 7 .9

T e x a s ........................................................

9 ,4 5 5 .5

9 ,4 2 8 .4

9 ,4 2 6 .4

M a in e .............................

6 0 9 .0

6 0 5 .4

6 0 3 .6

U ta h ............................................................

1 ,0 7 9 .9

1 ,0 7 6 .1

1 ,0 7 3 .4

M a r y la n d .......................

2 ,4 5 6 .3

2 ,4 7 0 .0

2 ,4 6 9 .8

V e r m o n t....................................................

2 9 6 .5

3 0 2 .4

3 0 1 .8

M a s s a c h u s e t t s ..........

3 ,3 0 5 .7

3 ,2 1 4 .0

3 ,2 0 9 .1

V ir g in ia .....................................................

3 ,4 9 3 .8

3 ,4 8 9 .0

3 ,4 8 3 .0
2 ,6 6 2 .1

M i c h ig a n .......................

4 ,5 5 7 .2

4 ,4 4 5 .7

4 ,4 3 7 .0

W a s h in g to n ............................................

2 ,6 5 9 .4

2 ,6 6 5 .5

M in n e s o t a ....................

2 ,6 5 9 .3

2 ,6 4 1 .2

2 ,6 3 9 .2

W e s t V ir g in ia ..........................................

7 3 6 .8

7 3 2 .2

7 3 4 .2

M is s is s ip p i...................

1 ,1 3 1 .2

1 ,1 2 5 .4

1 ,1 2 5 .2

W is c o n s in ...............................................

2 ,8 1 3 .8

2 ,7 7 0 .7

2 ,7 7 5 .7

W y o m in g ..................................................

2 4 8 .0

2 4 8 .1

2 4 8 .4

p = p r e lim in a r y .
N O TE : S o m e d a t a in th is ta b le m a y d iffe r fro m d a ta p u b lis h e d e ls e w h e re b e c a u s e o f th e c o n tin u a l u p d a tin g o f th e d a ta b a s e .

56

Jan.
2003p

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

12. Employment of workers on nonfarm payrolls by industry, monthly data seasonally adjusted
[In t h o u s a n d s ]

2003

Annual average
2001

2002

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.p

Mar.p

TO TAL.....................................
PRIVATE SECTO R....................

131 ,92 2

1 30 ,79 3

130,701

1 30 ,6 8 0

130 ,70 2

1 30 ,73 6

1 30 ,79 0

1 30 ,91 3

1 30 ,8 2 9

1 30 ,89 8

1 3 0 ,8 1 7

1 3 0 ,6 7 0

1 30 ,87 3

1 3 0 ,5 2 0

1 3 0 ,3 9 6

1 10 ,98 9

109,531

1 09 ,50 5

1 09 ,4 9 5

1 09 ,49 6

1 09 ,52 5

109,562

1 0 9 ,6 2 4

1 09 ,5 3 6

1 09 ,5 4 9

1 09 ,45 3

109,311

1 09 ,50 6

1 0 9 ,1 3 6

1 0 9 ,0 4 8

G OODS-PRODUCING....................
M in in g '............................................

2 4 ,9 4 4

2 3 ,8 3 6

2 3 ,9 7 5

2 3 ,9 0 5

2 3 ,8 7 0

23,861

2 3,8 12

23,801

2 3 ,7 4 8

2 3 ,6 8 8

2 3,631

23,551

2 3 ,5 6 3

2 3 ,4 6 3

2 3 ,4 3 9

5 65

5 57

5 60

5 64

5 58

5 55

551

5 55

552

5 52

551

5 53

5 52

555

555

M e ta l m in in g .....................................

36

32

32

32

32

32

33

32

32

32

32

32

32

32

32

O il a n d g a s e x tr a c tio n ...................

3 38

334

336

3 39

3 34

3 33

3 29

3 33

3 30

331

332

335

3 35

339

341

N o n m e ta llic m in e ra ls ,
e x c e p t fu e ls ...................................

111

11 1

111

112

112

110

110

111

111

111

109

108

107

106

1 04

Construction..................................

6 ,6 8 5

6 ,5 5 5

6 ,5 9 3

6,541

6,541

6 ,5 4 9

6 ,5 1 9

6 ,5 5 6

6 ,5 5 6

6 ,5 4 4

6 ,5 4 3

6 ,5 4 4

6 ,5 6 4

6 ,5 1 9

6 ,5 3 8

G e n e ra l b u ild in g c o n tra c to r s ......

1,462

1,462

1,4 6 2

1,4 5 2

1 ,4 5 4

1 ,4 5 4

1,445

1,450

1 ,469

1,4 7 5

1,4 8 0

1,476

1,471

1 ,4 6 4

1,471

8 80

897

880

871

4 ,1 7 5

4 ,1 9 6

H e a v y c o n s tru c tio n , e x c e p t
b u ild in g ...........................................

922

9 00

9 08

901

9 08

910

899

8 98

898

8 93

8 85

S p e c ia l tra d e s c o n tra c to r s ..........

4 ,3 0 0

4 ,1 9 4

4 ,2 2 3

4 ,1 8 8

4 ,1 7 9

4 ,1 8 5

4 ,1 7 5

4 ,1 9 8

4 ,1 8 9

4 ,1 7 6

4 ,1 7 8

4 ,1 8 8

4 ,1 9 6

Manufacturing...............................

1 7,695

1 6,725

16,8 22

16,8 00

1 6,7 58

1 6 ,7 5 7

16,742

1 6,690

1 6,6 40

16,5 92

1 6,5 37

1 6,4 54

1 6,4 47

1 6,3 89

1 6 ,3 4 6

P ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs ................

1 1,933

11,2 17

1 1,2 64

11,2 50

1 1,2 45

1 1,2 36

1 1,247

1 1 ,2 1 2

1 1 ,1 6 4

1 1,1 34

1 1,0 88

1 1,0 30

1 1,0 45

1 0 ,9 9 0

1 0 ,9 4 8

Durable goods............................

10,6 36

9 ,9 0 7

9 ,9 7 6

9 ,9 7 6

9 ,9 6 3

9 ,9 4 4

9 ,9 2 2

9 ,8 8 9

9 ,8 3 2

9 ,8 0 0

9 ,7 5 7

9 ,6 9 9

9 ,6 8 9

9 ,6 3 8

9 ,6 0 9

P ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs ................

7 ,1 2 6

6 ,5 8 7

6 ,6 2 5

6 ,6 2 0

6 ,6 1 9

6 ,6 0 3

6 ,6 0 9

6,591

6 ,5 3 9

6 ,5 2 2

6 ,4 8 7

6 ,4 4 5

6 ,4 5 6

6 ,4 0 9

6 ,3 7 6

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p ro d u c ts .....

7 86

7 67

7 69

7 67

770

7 67

7 66

768

7 64

7 64

761

7 58

7 60

759

756

F u rn itu re a n d fix tu r e s ..................

5 19

491

491

4 97

494

495

4 95

4 95

4 88

4 88

4 86

480

479

476

473

5 49

5 52

5 54

557

5 58

5 57

5 56

5 53

5 56

553

549

S to n e , c la y, a n d g la s s
p ro d u c ts .......................................

571

5 54

5 50

551

P rim a ry m e ta l in d u s trie s ...........

6 56

592

5 96

5 98

5 97

5 93

5 89

5 89

5 86

5 82

5 82

5 79

581

576

576

F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts ........

1,483

1,418

1,422

1 ,4 2 5

1,4 2 8

1 ,425

1,428

1,418

1,4 1 2

1,4 0 9

1,4 0 0

1,391

1 ,387

1 ,3 7 4

1 ,3 7 6

2 ,0 1 0

1 ,824

1 ,846

1,842

1,8 2 6

1 ,8 2 9

1,826

1,810

1,801

1 ,7 9 7

1 ,7 9 0

1,781

1,770

1 ,7 5 8

1 ,7 5 0

3 43

3 04

3 15

3 13

308

3 04

301

2 96

296

2 95

2 93

291

2 87

284

282

1,631

1,419

1 ,445

1 ,443

1 ,437

1,4 2 8

1,426

1,408

1,392

1,381

2 ,3 6 8

1,3 6 0

1,355

1 ,3 4 4

1 ,3 3 9

5 36

532

5 28

523

521

1,6 4 8

1,638

1 ,640

1 ,6 4 3

1 ,6 3 7

In d u s tria l m a c h in e ry a n d
e q u ip m e n t...................................
C o m p u te r a n d o ffic e
e q u ip m e n t................................
E le c tro n ic a n d o th e r e le c tric a l
e q u ip m e n t...................................
E le c tro n ic c o m p o n e n ts a n d
a c c e s s o rie s ...............................

661

5 58

5 66

566

567

566

5 63

5 55

5 50

5 44

T ra n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t........

1 ,760

1 ,667

1 ,6 7 4

1,671

1 ,675

1 ,679

1,661

1,675

1,661

1,6 5 9

M o to r v e h ic le s a n d
e q u ip m e n t..................................

9 47

9 12

9 15

912

9 14

9 20

9 05

9 18

9 12

9 14

9 09

9 00

911

906

907

A irc ra ft a n d p a r ts .......................

461

4 10

4 19

4 16

416

411

4 09

4 07

4 00

3 96

3 92

3 92

3 89

386

384

793

7 92

7 90

7 92

788

786

In s tru m e n ts a n d re la te d
p ro d u c ts ......................................

8 30

8 04

8 13

811

8 07

8 05

803

7 99

7 98

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g
in d u s trie s ......................................

3 80

3 72

3 70

371

3 72

371

3 74

3 70

372

3 70

374

3 69

3 69

367

367

7 ,0 5 9

6 ,8 1 8

6 ,8 4 6

6 ,8 2 4

6 ,8 0 8

6 ,8 1 3

6 ,8 2 0

6,801

6 ,8 0 8

6 ,7 9 2

6 ,7 8 0

6 ,7 5 5

6 ,7 5 8

6,751

6 ,7 3 7

P ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs ................

4 ,8 0 8

4 ,6 3 0

4 ,6 3 9

4 ,6 3 0

4 ,6 2 6

4 ,6 3 3

4 ,6 3 8

4,621

4 ,6 2 5

4 ,6 1 2

4,601

4 ,5 8 5

4 ,5 8 9

4 ,5 8 5

4 ,5 7 2

F o o d a n d k in d re d p ro d u c ts ......

1,691

1 ,689

1 ,6 8 5

1 ,689

1 ,687

1,691

1,687

1,683

1 ,6 9 4

1 ,690

1 ,687

1,689

1,6 9 5

1 ,6 9 4

1 ,6 9 2

T o b a c c o p ro d u c ts ........................

34

35

34

33

34

34

35

38

37

37

36

36

34

34

33

T e x tile m ill p ro d u c ts ....................

478

432

4 40

436

434

4 32

429

4 27

4 26

426

4 22

4 22

420

419

415

A p p a re l a n d o th e r te x tile
5 23

5 20

5 22

5 25

5 24

5 16

5 10

5 09

5 04

5 07

504

5 02

p ro d u c ts ......................................

566

521

5 27

P a p e r a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts ........

8 34

6 15

6 20

6 15

612

6 12

6 12

6 13

6 12

6 14

6 13

6 07

6 06

604

6 02

1,4 0 7

1 ,405

1,406

1,401

1 ,403

1,401

1 ,4 0 0

1 ,393

1,3 9 5

1 ,3 9 8

1 ,3 9 5
1 ,0 0 0

P rin tin g a n d p u b lis h in g ..............

1,490

1,410

1 ,419

1 ,4 1 3

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts

1 ,0 2 2

1,008

1 ,0 1 0

1 ,008

1,0 0 6

1 ,0 0 8

1,008

1,006

1 ,0 1 0

1 ,0 0 6

1 ,0 0 7

1,007

1,0 0 6

1 ,0 0 5

P e tro le u m a n d c o a l p ro d u c ts ..

126

125

126

125

125

125

126

125

126

125

126

125

125

1 25

125

9 16

9 19

917

917

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s
p la s tic s p ro d u c ts .......................

9 58

9 27

9 29

927

9 28

9 29

9 36

9 29

9 27

9 26

9 25

L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ..

60

56

56

55

55

55

56

555

57

57

55

53

54

51

52

106 ,97 8

106 ,95 7

1 06 ,72 6

1 06 ,77 5

1 06 ,83 2

1 06 ,8 7 5

106 ,97 8

1 07 ,11 2

107,081

1 0 7 ,2 1 0

1 0 7 ,1 8 6

1 0 7 ,1 1 9

1 07 ,3 1 0

1 0 7 ,0 5 7

1 0 6 ,9 5 7

SERVICE-PRODUCING................
Transportation and public

R a ilro a d t r a n s p o rta tio n ..............

7 ,0 6 5

6 ,7 7 3

6 ,8 1 4

6 ,7 9 9

6 ,7 9 3

6 ,7 9 0

6 ,7 8 0

6 ,7 6 5

6 ,7 2 5

6 ,7 2 7

6,721

6 ,6 8 6

6 ,6 9 4

6 ,6 5 5

6 ,6 4 6

4 ,4 9 7

4 ,3 1 7

4 ,3 3 0

4 ,3 3 0

4 ,3 2 8

4 ,3 3 4

4 ,3 2 8

4 ,3 2 3

4 ,2 9 3

4 ,3 0 0

4 ,3 0 0

4 ,2 7 3

4,301

4 ,2 7 7

4 ,2 6 5

2 30

2 28

229

2 27

2 28

2 26

225

225

225

224

224

224

234

2 29

2 33

L o c a l a n d in te ru rb a n
p a s s e n g e r tra n s it......................

4 80

4 72

4 78

4 76

475

472

471

4 66

4 69

471

4 67

4 66

465

468

463

T ru c k in g a n d w a re h o u s in g ......

1,848

1,8 2 6

1 ,8 1 9

1,8 3 0

1,8 2 7

1 ,829

1,834

1,827

1 ,8 1 6

1 ,826

1 ,829

1 ,827

1 ,825

1 ,8 1 0

1 ,8 1 6
1 87
1 ,1 4 4

W a te r tra n s p o rta tio n ..................

192

190

186

190

193

193

192

190

189

189

192

191

191

1 90

1,266

1,162

1,172

1,1 6 2

1,1 6 5

1 ,172

1,167

1,176

1 ,160

1 ,156

1,151

1,127

1,1 5 8

1,151

P ip e lin e s , e x c e p t n a tu ra l g as..

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

16

16

T ra n s p o rta tio n s e rv ic e s ..........

4 62

423

4 27

4 27

4 25

424

4 22

421

4 18

4 18

421

4 22

423

418

415

2 ,5 7 0

2 ,4 5 6

2 ,4 8 4

2 ,4 6 9

2 ,4 6 5

2 ,4 5 6

2 ,4 5 2

2 ,4 4 2

2 ,4 3 2

2 ,4 2 7

2,421

2 ,4 1 3

2 ,3 9 3

2 ,3 7 8

2,381

1,7 1 6

1,614

1,6 4 3

1,6 2 8

1 ,6 26

1 ,6 1 5

1,608

1,597

1,5 8 8

1 ,5 8 4

1 ,5 8 3

1,576

1 ,559

1 ,5 4 7

1 ,5 4 9

C o m m u n ic a tio n s a n d p u b lic
C o m m u n ic a tio n s .........................
E le c tric , g a s , a n d s a n ita ry

Retail trade....................................

852

842

841

841

8 39

841

8 44

8 45

8 44

8 42

8 38

8 37

834

831

8 32

6 ,7 7 6

6,671

6,681

6 ,6 7 8

6,681

6,681

6 ,6 7 9

6,671

6 ,6 6 3

6 ,6 5 7

6 ,6 4 3

6 ,6 3 7

6 ,6 3 9

6 ,6 3 6

6 ,6 3 6

2 3 ,5 2 2

2 3,3 06

2 3 ,3 3 2

2 3 ,3 4 5

2 3 ,3 2 7

2 3 ,3 0 8

2 3,3 39

1 3,295

23,291

2 3 ,2 8 9

2 3 ,2 4 7

2 3 ,1 5 2

2 3,271

2 3 ,1 5 0

2 3 ,1 1 7

B u ild in g m a te ria ls a n d g a rd e n
1,044

1,065

1 ,053

1,061

1 ,068

1,066

1,067

1,066

1,0 6 7

1,071

1 ,0 7 8

1,077

1 ,083

1,0 7 8

1 ,0 7 5

G e n e ra l m e rc h a n d is e s to re s ....

2 ,8 9 7

2 ,8 6 8

2,901

2 ,9 1 5

2 ,8 9 7

2 ,8 8 4

2 ,8 8 5

2 ,8 5 0

2 ,8 5 6

2,851

2 ,8 2 8

2,821

2,831

2 ,8 5 8

2 ,8 5 4

D e p a rtm e n t s to re s .....................

2 ,5 5 9

2 ,5 2 9

2 ,5 6 0

2 ,5 7 5

2 ,5 6 0

2 ,5 4 2

2 ,5 4 4

2 ,5 1 3

2 ,5 1 5

2 ,5 0 6

2,491

2 ,4 8 8

2 ,4 9 8

2 ,5 2 3

2 ,5 0 8

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

57

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

12. Continued—Employment of workers on nonfarm payrolls by industry, monthly data seasonally adjusted
[I n t h o u s a n d s ] ________________________________

Industry

Annual average
2001

F o o d s to re s .....................................

2002

2003
Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.p

Mar.p

3,541

3 ,3 9 4

3 ,3 9 2

3 ,3 9 2

3 ,3 9 7

3 ,3 9 4

3 ,3 8 8

3 ,392

3 ,392

3 ,3 8 0

3 ,3 8 2

3 ,3 6 5

3 ,3 7 0

3 ,3 6 3

3 ,3 6 7

2 ,4 2 5

2 ,4 3 2

2 ,4 2 6

2 ,4 2 9

2 ,4 3 4

2 ,4 3 2

2 ,4 3 7

2 ,4 4 3

2 ,4 3 8

2 ,4 3 8

2 ,4 3 0

2 ,4 2 0

2 ,4 1 6

2 ,4 1 2

2 ,4 1 3

N e w a n d u s e d c a r d e a le rs ......

1 ,1 2 1

1,130

1,131

1 ,129

1 ,1 3 3

1,1 2 8

1 ,1 2 7

1,130

1,131

1,131

1 ,1 2 8

1 ,1 2 3

1 ,1 1 8

1 ,1 1 6

1 ,116

A p p a re l a n d a c c e s s o ry s to re s ...

1 ,1 8 9

1,174

1,175

1 ,1 7 0

1 ,1 6 9

1,1 7 3

1 ,1 7 8

1,177

1,171

1,174

1,1 7 2

1 ,1 7 4

1 ,1 7 4

1 ,1 5 6

1,1 5 8

s to r e s .............................................

1,141

1,151

1,143

1,141

1,1 4 6

1,1 4 8

1,1 5 3

1,1 5 4

1,153

1,156

1,1 6 5

1 ,1 7 5

1 ,1 6 6

1 ,1 5 3

1,151

E a tin g a n d d rin k in g p la c e s .........

8 ,2 5 6

8 ,1 4 3

8 ,1 5 4

8 ,1 5 2

8 ,1 3 0

8 ,1 2 1

8 ,1 4 4

8 ,1 2 5

8 ,1 2 9

8 ,1 4 0

8 ,1 2 9

8 ,0 6 3

8 ,1 4 6

8 ,0 4 7

8 ,0 1 6

3 ,1 1 8

3 ,0 7 9

3 ,0 8 8

3 ,0 8 5

3 ,0 8 6

3 ,0 9 0

3 ,0 8 7

3 ,0 8 8

3 ,0 8 5

3 ,0 7 3

3 ,0 6 3

3 ,0 5 7

3 ,0 8 5

3 ,0 8 3

3 ,0 8 3

A u to m o tiv e d e a le rs a n d
s e rv ic e s ta tio n s ..........................

F u rn itu re a n d h o m e fu rn is h in g s

M is c e lla n e o u s re ta il
e s ta b lis h m e n ts ...........................

Finance, insurance, and
real estate.........................

7 ,7 1 2

7 ,7 6 0

7 ,7 4 0

7 ,7 4 3

7 ,7 3 2

7 ,7 3 3

7 ,7 3 7

7 ,7 4 5

7 ,7 7 3

7 ,8 0 3

7 ,8 0 7

7 ,8 1 6

7 ,8 1 7

7 ,8 2 9

7 ,8 3 6

F in a n c e ..............................................

3 ,8 0 0

3 ,8 2 8

3 ,8 0 9

3 ,8 1 3

3 ,8 1 3

3 ,8 1 9

3 ,8 1 9

3 ,8 2 2

3 ,8 3 7

3 ,8 5 3

3 ,8 5 4

3,861

3 ,8 6 9

3 ,8 7 6

3 ,8 8 2

D e p o s ito ry in s titu tio n s ...............

2 ,0 5 3

2 ,0 7 6

2 ,0 7 4

2 ,0 7 5

2 ,0 7 3

2,071

2 ,0 7 3

2 ,0 7 5

2 ,0 7 8

2 ,0 8 0

2 ,0 8 2

2 ,0 7 9

2 ,0 8 3

2 ,0 8 4

2 ,0 8 9

C o m m e rc ia l b a n k s ...................

1 ,4 5 5

1 ,4 3 4

1,448

1,447

1 ,446

1 ,446

1 ,4 4 4

1,4 4 5

1,448

1,450

1,452

1,451

1 ,4 4 9

1 ,453

1 ,4 5 3

S a v in g s in s titu tio n s ...................

256

263

2 64

264

264

264

2 63

263

264

2 63

261

261

260

262

262

N o n d e p o s ito ry In s titu tio n s ........

7 20

772

7 53

756

7 56

7 62

7 67

7 73

783

797

801

8 09

8 16

823

824

769

7 18

722

723

7 23

7 23

7 18

7 14

7 14

713

7 09

7 09

711

711

707

o ffic e s ............................................

2 57

261

260

259

261

2 63

261

260

2 62

2 63

262

2 64

259

258

262

In s u ra n c e .........................................

2 ,3 6 9

2 ,3 7 0

2 ,3 7 5

2 ,3 7 4

2 ,3 6 9

2 ,3 6 6

2 ,3 6 5

2 ,3 6 6

2 ,3 6 6

2,371

2 ,3 7 3

2 ,3 7 5

2 ,3 7 8

2 ,3 8 0

2 ,3 7 8

In s u ra n c e c a rrie rs .......................

1 ,595

1,582

1,591

1 ,989

1 ,5 8 3

1,5 7 9

1 ,5 7 6

1,5 7 4

1,577

1,578

1,5 7 8

1 ,5 7 8

1 ,5 8 2

1 ,5 8 5

1 ,585

7 73

788

7 84

785

7 86

7 87

789

792

7 89

7 93

795

7 97

7 96

795

793

R e al e s ta te ......................................

1 ,5 4 4

1,562

1,556

1,5 5 6

1,5 5 0

1 ,5 4 8

1 ,553

1,557

1,570

1 ,579

1 ,5 8 0

1,5 8 0

1 ,5 7 0

1 ,5 7 3

1 ,5 7 6

S e r v ic e s '..........................................

4 0 ,9 7 0

4 1 ,1 8 3

4 0 ,9 6 3

4 1 ,0 2 5

4 1 ,0 9 3

4 1 ,1 5 2

4 1 ,2 1 5

4 1 ,3 4 7

4 1,3 36

4 1,3 85

4 1 ,4 0 4

4 1 ,4 6 9

4 1 ,5 2 2

4 1 ,4 0 3

4 1 ,3 7 4

A g ric u ltu ra l s e rv ic e s ......................

8 49

867

872

857

8 56

862

862

863

8 74

8 74

880

8 80

8 82

878

H o te ls a n d o th e r lo d g in g p la c e s

1 ,870

1,798

1,811

1 ,7 9 6

1 ,7 8 9

1,801

1 ,7 9 5

1,788

1,782

1,791

1 ,792

1 ,8 0 7

1,811

1 ,7 9 4

1 ,7 7 9

P e rs o n a l s e rv ic e s ..........................

1 ,269

1,286

1,289

1 ,286

1 ,279

1 ,2 8 5

1 ,282

1,285

1,287

1,288

1 ,283

1 ,292

1,281

1 ,2 7 5

1,2 7 2

B u s in e s s s e rv ic e s ..........................

9 ,5 7 2

9 ,2 4 0

S e c u rity a n d c o m m o d ity
b ro k e rs .........................................
H o ld in g a n d o th e r in v e s tm e n t

In s u ra n c e a g e n ts , b ro k e rs ,
a n d s e rv ic e ..................................

9 ,3 0 5

9 ,2 3 7

9 ,3 1 2

9 ,3 3 0

9 ,3 3 2

9 ,3 2 5

9 ,3 9 5

9 ,3 3 0

9 ,3 2 4

9 ,3 0 9

866

9,311

9 ,2 9 2

9 ,2 6 7

S e rv ic e s to b u ild in g s ..................

1 ,016

1,031

121

1 ,027

1 ,0 2 3

1 ,0 2 3

1 ,0 3 4

1,041

1,042

1,041

1 ,0 4 5

1 ,0 4 4

1 ,0 4 4

1 ,0 3 8

P e rs o n n e l s u p p ly s e rv ic e s .......

3 ,4 4 6

3 ,1 6 9

3,1 0 7

3 ,1 7 5

3 ,1 9 8

3 ,2 0 5

3 ,1 9 6

3 ,2 5 7

3 ,1 8 8

3 ,1 7 8

3 ,1 5 2

3 ,1 7 5

3 ,1 7 3

3 ,1 6 3

3,131

H e lp s u p p ly s e rv ic e s ...............

3 ,0 8 4

2 ,8 5 2

2 ,7 9 5

2 ,8 5 7

2 ,8 8 8

2 ,9 0 2

2 ,8 7 5

2 ,9 2 5

2 ,8 6 9

2 ,8 6 5

2 ,8 3 8

2 ,8 6 6

2,871

2 ,8 7 5

2,821

1,041

C o m p u te r a n d d a ta
p ro c e s s in g s e rv ic e s ..................

2 ,2 2 5

2 ,1 9 5

2 ,1 9 8

2 ,1 9 0

2 ,1 9 0

2,191

2 ,1 9 3

2,191

2 ,1 9 0

2 ,1 9 6

2 ,1 9 5

2 ,1 8 7

2 ,1 8 3

2 ,18 1

2 ,1 6 9

a n d p a r k in g ...................................

1,2 5 7

1,263

1,260

1,261

1 ,262

1 ,2 6 5

1,2 6 6

1,266

1,266

1,262

1 ,263

1 ,268

1 ,2 7 4

1 ,2 6 3

1 ,2 6 8

M is c e lla n e o u s re p a ir s e rv ic e s ...

374

3 77

3 77

377

3 75

3 78

3 79

3 77

3 78

3 78

378

3 76

378

374

3 72

M o tio n p ic tu re s ...............................

5 83

5 83

572

574

5 78

581

5 84

5 88

5 95

591

590

5 83

581

582

580

A u to re p a ir s e rv ic e s

A m u s e m e n t a n d re c re a tio n
s e rv ic e s .........................................

1,721

1,642

1,6 3 5

1,611

1,621

1,631

1,6 4 9

1,662

1,638

1,640

1,6 3 0

1 ,6 5 3

1 ,6 5 9

1 ,6 3 7

1,6 2 7

H e a lth s e rv ic e s ...............................

10,381

1 0,6 73

1 0,602

10,611

1 0,6 26

1 0,6 60

1 0,6 87

10,711

1 0,729

1 0,755

1 0,7 77

1 0,7 87

1 0,8 05

10,801

1 0 ,8 2 0

2 ,0 8 8

2 ,0 9 2

2 ,0 8 9

2 ,0 9 4

2 ,0 9 4

O ffic e s a n d c lin ic s o f m e d ica l
d o c to rs ..........................................

2 ,0 0 2

2 ,0 6 4

2 ,0 4 6

2 ,0 4 4

2 ,0 5 0

2,061

2 ,0 6 7

2 ,0 7 5

2 ,0 7 9

2 ,0 8 5

fa c ilitie s .........................................

1 ,8 4 7

1,889

1,879

1 ,8 8 3

1 ,8 8 6

1 ,887

1 ,8 8 8

1,893

1,896

1,899

1,9 0 5

1 ,9 0 4

1 ,9 0 5

1,9 0 2

1 ,9 0 3

H o s p ita ls .........................................

4 ,0 9 6

4 ,2 2 5

4 ,1 9 3

4 ,1 9 9

4 ,2 0 7

4,221

4 ,2 3 3

4 ,2 4 4

4 ,2 4 7

4 ,2 5 6

4 ,2 6 7

4 ,2 6 9

4 ,2 7 8

4 ,2 8 3

4,291

H o m e h e a lth c a re s e rv ic e s ......

6 36

6 47

6 43

643

6 44

6 43

6 46

6 46

651

6 55

656

6 57

6 58

659

662

1 ,0 7 9

1,081

1 ,087

1,091

1 ,093

N u rs in g a n d p e rs o n a l c a re

L e g a l s e rv ic e s ..................................

1,0 3 7

1,966

1,056

1 ,059

1 ,066

1 ,0 6 5

1,0 6 5

1,065

1,072

1,077

E d u c a tio n a l s e rv ic e s .....................

2 ,4 3 3

2 ,5 2 6

2 ,4 8 9

2,501

2 ,5 1 8

2,511

2 ,5 2 9

2 ,5 3 8

2 ,5 5 0

2 ,5 6 0

2 ,5 7 4

2 ,5 8 2

2,611

2 ,5 8 0

2 ,5 8 8

S o c ia l s e rv ic e s ................................

3 ,0 5 7

3 ,1 7 7

3 ,162

3 ,1 6 7

3 ,1 6 4

3 ,1 6 5

3,181

3 ,2 0 3

3 ,1 9 9

3,201

3 ,2 0 8

3 ,2 0 9

3 ,2 2 2

3 ,2 1 7

3 ,2 2 4

C h ild d a y c a re s e rv ic e s .............

7 16

7 26

7 23

925

7 22

7 26

7 26

7 36

731

7 30

728

7 25

7 30

729

729

R e s id e n tia l c a re ............................

8 64

9 04

902

903

901

9 04

9 04

906

9 06

909

912

9 15

9 12

915

919

M u s e u m s a n d b o ta n ic a l a nd
z o o lo g ic a l g a rd e n s .....................

110

108

109

1 09

108

109

109

108

108

107

1 07

106

107

107

1 05

M e m b e rs h ip o rg a n iz a tio n s ..........

2 ,4 6 8

2 ,4 7 7

2 ,4 7 0

2 ,4 7 7

2 ,4 8 0

2 ,4 8 4

2 ,4 7 6

2 ,4 7 2

2 ,4 7 8

2 ,4 8 0

2 ,4 7 8

2 ,4 7 6

2 ,4 7 5

2 ,4 7 3

2 ,4 7 6

3 ,5 9 3

3 ,6 4 5

3,631

3 ,6 3 6

3 ,6 4 9

3 ,6 3 6

3 ,6 3 4

3 ,6 3 4

3 ,6 5 9

3 ,6 6 6

3 ,6 6 7

3 ,6 6 9

3 ,6 6 8

3 ,6 7 5

3 ,6 7 6

1 ,053

1,036

1,044

1,041

1 ,042

1 ,0 3 4

1,032

1,030

1,029

1,027

1 ,0 2 8

1 ,0 2 8

1 ,0 2 2

1 ,0 2 1

1 ,0 1 7

re la tio n s .......................................

1 ,166

1 ,2 1 0

1,191

1 ,2 0 2

1 ,209

1 ,2 0 4

1 ,2 1 4

1 ,2 1 1

1 ,224

1,226

1 ,2 2 8

1 ,232

1 ,2 3 5

1 ,2 3 4

1 ,2 3 7

G o v e r n m e n t .......................................

2 0 ,9 3 3

2 1 ,2 6 0

2 1 ,1 9 6

2 1 ,1 8 5

2 1 ,2 0 6

2 1 ,2 1 1

2 1 ,2 2 8

2 1 ,2 8 9

2 1 ,2 9 3

2 1 ,3 4 9

2 1 ,3 6 4

2 1 ,3 5 9

2 1 ,3 6 7

2 1 ,3 8 4

2 1 ,3 4 8

2 ,6 1 6

2 ,6 2 0

2 ,6 0 8

2,611

2 ,6 0 0

2,601

2 ,6 0 7

2,611

2,621

2 ,6 4 9

2,661

2 ,6 6 4

2 ,6 6 5

2,66 1

2 ,6 5 4

1 ,767

1,803

1,782

1 ,784

1 ,7 7 7

1 ,7 8 3

1 ,790

1,792

1,810

E n g in e e rin g a n d m a n a g e m e n t
s e rv ic e s ..........................................
E n g in e e rin g a n d a rc h ite c tu ra l
s e rv ic e s .........................................
M a n a g e m e n t a n d p u b lic

F e d e ra l..............................................
F e d e ra l, e x c e p t P osta l
S e rv ic e .........................................

1 ,8 5 3

1 ,8 5 6

1 ,8 5 8

1,8 5 3

4 ,8 8 5

4 ,9 4 7

4 ,9 4 0

4 ,9 4 2

4 ,9 4 5

4 ,9 3 5

4 ,9 5 0

4 ,9 4 8

4 ,9 5 8

4 ,9 5 5

4,961

4 ,9 5 3

4 ,9 3 0

4 ,9 5 9

4 ,9 5 5

E d u c a tio n ........................................

2 ,0 9 6

2 ,1 4 7

2 ,1 3 3

2 ,1 3 5

2,141

2 ,1 3 5

2 ,1 5 5

2 ,1 4 5

2 ,1 6 3

2 ,1 6 0

2 ,1 6 5

2 ,1 6 6

2 ,1 4 4

2 ,1 7 4

2 ,1 7 4

1 ,8 5 5

O th e r S ta te g o v e rn m e n t...........

2 ,7 8 9

2 ,8 0 0

2 ,8 0 7

2 ,8 0 7

2 ,8 0 4

2 ,8 0 0

2 ,7 9 5

2 ,8 0 3

2 ,7 9 5

2 ,7 9 5

2 ,7 8 6

2 ,7 8 7

2 ,7 8 6

2 ,7 8 5

2,781

L o c a l...................................................

13,4 32

1 3,694

1 3,617

13,6 45

13,661

1 3,6 75

13,671

1 3,7 30

1 3,714

1 3,745

1 3,7 42

1 3,7 42

13,7 72

1 3 ,7 6 4

1 3 ,7 3 9

E d u c a tio n ........................................

7 ,6 4 6

7 ,7 9 9

7 ,7 6 7

7 ,7 5 4

7 ,7 7 0

7 ,7 5 5

7 ,7 8 8

7 ,837

7 ,808

7 ,8 2 9

7 ,8 2 0

7 ,8 1 3

7 ,8 4 2

7 ,8 3 8

7 ,8 1 9

O th e r lo c a l g o v e rn m e n t.............

5 ,7 8 6

5 ,8 9 5

5 ,8 7 8

5 ,8 7 9

5,891

5 ,9 2 0

5 ,8 8 3

5 ,8 9 3

5 ,9 0 6

5 ,9 1 6

5 ,9 2 2

5 ,9 2 9

5 ,9 3 0

5 ,9 2 6

5 ,9 2 0

' In c lu d e s o th e r in d u s trie s n o t sh ow n s e p a ra te ly .
p = p re lim in a ry .

NOTE: See "Notes on the data" for a description of the most recent benchmark revision.

58

1,840

S ta te ...................................................

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

13. Average weekly hours of production or nonsupervisory workers on private nonfarm payrolls, by industry, monthly
data seasonally adjusted
Industry

2001
P R IV A T E S E C T O R .........................................

3 4 .2

2002
2 4.1

2003

2002

Annual average
Mar.

Apr.

May

June

3 4 .2

3 4 .2

3 4 .2

3 4 .3

Sept

July

Aug.

3 4 .0

3 4 .1

3 4 .2

Nov.

Dec.

3 4 .2

3 4 .2

3 4.1

3 4 .3

34.1

3 4 .3

4 0 .1

3 9 .9

4 0 .2

4 0 .5

3 9 .9

4 0 .3

Oct.

Jan.

Feb.p Mar.p

G O O D S - P R O D U C I N G .........................................

4 0 .4

4 0 .3

4 0 .5

4 0 .4

4 0 .3

4 0 .5

4 0 .0

4 0 .3

4 0 .3

M I N I N G ......................................................................

4 3 .5

4 2 .9

4 3 .3

4 2 .4

4 3 .0

4 3 .3

4 2 .7

4 3 .3

4 2 .8

4 2 .7

4 3 .1

4 2 .1

4 2 .8

4 2 .8

4 3 .1

M A N U F A C T U R I N G ............................................

4 0 .7

4 0 .9

4 1 .0

4 0 .9

4 0 .9

4 1 .1

4 0 .7

4 0 .9

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0 .6

4 0 .9

4 0 .9

4 0 .8

4 0 .8

O v e r tim e h o u r s .............................................

3 .9

4.1

4.1

4 .2

4 .2

4 .3

4 .0

4 .2

4.1

4.1

4 .0

4 .2

4.1

4.1

4 .0

D u r a b l e g o o d s ..................................................

4 1 .0

4 1 .3

4 1 .3

4 1 .4

4 1 .3

4 1 .5

4 1 .0

4 1 .2

4 1 .3

4 1 .2

4 0 .9

4 1 .3

4 1 .4

4 1 .3

4 1 .1

O v e r tim e h o u r s ...........................................

3 .9

4.1

4.1

4.1

4.1

4 .2

3 .9

4.1

4.1

4 .2

4 .0

4 .2

4.1

4.1

4 .0

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s ....................

4 0 .6

4 1 .0

4 1 .1

4 0 .8

4 0 .8

4 1 .0

4 1 .2

4 1 .0

4 1 .1

4 1 .0

4 0 .6

4 1 .2

4 1 .1

4 0 .9

4 0 .9

F u r n itu r e a n d f ix t u r e s ..................................

3 9 .0

4 0 .2

4 0 .6

4 0 .8

4 0 .4

4 0 .2

4 0 .1

4 0 .3

4 0 .2

3 9 .6

3 9 .5

4 0 .7

4 0 .3

3 9 .9

3 9 .7

S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c ts ............

4 3 .6

4 3 .5

4 3 .6

4 3 .8

4 3 .4

4 3 .7

4 3 .2

4 3 .3

4 3 .4

4 3 .4

4 2 .9

4 3 .1

4 3 .5

4 3 .2

4 3 .9

P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s t r ie s ...........................

4 3 .6

4 4 .3

4 4 .4

4 4 .3

4 4 .1

4 4 .6

4 4.1

4 4 .3

4 4 .2

4 4 .7

4 4 .3

4 4 .7

4 4 .3

4 4 .8

4 5 .1

4 5 .4

4 6 .5

4 4 .8

4 5 .1

4 5 .6

B la s t f u r n a c e s a n d b a s ic s te e l
p r o d u c t s ........................................................

4 4 .6

4 5 .6

4 5 .5

4 5.1

4 5 .6

4 6 .1

4 5 .5

4 5 .8

4 6 .0

4 6 .2

F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c t s .......................

4 1 .4

4 1 .7

4 1 .7

4 1 .6

4 1 .9

4 2 .0

4 1 .7

4 1 .7

4 1 .6

4 1 .6

4 1 .2

4 1 .2

4 1 .6

4 1 .4

4 1 .1

In d u s tr ia l m a c h in e r y a n d e q u ip m e n t...

4 0 .6

4 0 .6

4 0 .5

4 0 .6

4 0 .7

4 0 .9

4 0 .3

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0 .5

4 0 .3

4 0 .6

4 1 .0

4 1 .3

4 1 .0

3 9 .0

3 8 .5

3 8 .9

3 8 .7

E le c tr o n ic a n d o th e r e le c tr ic a l
e q u ip m e n t .....................................................

3 9 .4

3 9 .0

3 9 .4

3 9 .5

3 9 .4

3 9 .4

3 8 .7

3 8 .7

3 8 .8

3 8 .3

3 8 .7

T r a n s p o r t a tio n e q u ip m e n t ........................

4 1 .9

4 2 .6

4 2 .4

4 2 .6

4 2 .3

4 3 .5

4 1 .7

4 2 .2

4 2 .6

4 2 .6

4 2 .2

4 2 .5

4 3 .1

4 2 .2

4 1 .5

M o t o r v e h ic le s a n d e q u ip m e n t............

4 2 .7

4 4 .2

4 3 .9

4 4 .4

4 4 .2

4 4 .1

4 2 .9

4 3 .8

4 4 .3

4 4 .4

4 4 .0

4 4 .4

4 5 .2

4 3 .5

4 2 .7

In s tr u m e n ts a n d r e la te d p r o d u c ts ........

4 0 .9

4 0 .7

4 0 .6

4 0 .4

4 0 .4

4 0 .9

4 0 .4

4 0 .7

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0 .6

4 0 .9

4 0 .7

4 0 .5

4 0 .6

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g ................

3 7 .9

3 8 .7

3 8 .8

3 8 .8

3 8 .8

3 9 .6

3 8 .4

3 8 .5

3 8 .6

3 8 .9

3 8 .5

3 8 .8

3 8 .9

3 8 .1

3 8 .6

4 0 .5

4 0 .2

4 0 .1

4 0 .1

4 0 .4

4 0 .1

4 0 .3

4 0 .3

4 0 .2

N o n d u r a b le g o o d s ..........................................

4 0 .3

4 0 .3

4 0 .4

4 0 .3

4 0 .4

4 0 .6

O v e r tim e h o u r s ...........................................

4 .0

4 .2

4 .2

4 .3

4 .3

4 .3

4 .2

4 .2

4 .0

4.1

4 .0

4 .2

4 .0

4.1

4 .0

4 1 .3

4 0 .8

4 0 .8

4 1 .0

4 1 .4

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 1 .2
4 0 .3

F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s ......................

41.1

4 1 .2

4 1 .4

4 1 .2

4 1 .2

4 1 .6

4 1 .0

T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s .....................................

3 9 .9

4 1 .2

4 1 .4

4 1 .5

4 1 .4

4 1 .5

4 1 .6

4 1 .8

4 1 .2

4 1 .9

4 0 .9

4 1 .2

4 0 .5

4 0 .7

A p p a r e l a n d o th e r t e x tile p r o d u c ts .......

3 7 .3

3 6 .9

3 7 .4

3 7.1

3 7 .0

3 7 .0

3 6 .8

3 6 .8

3 6 .9

3 6 .6

3 6 .6

3 6 .7

3 6 .6

3 5 .5

3 6 .4

P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ........................

4 1 .6

4 1 .6

4 1 .5

4 1 .6

4 1 .9

4 1 .6

4 1 .2

4 1 .7

4 1 .4

4 1 .3

4 1 .5

4 1 .8

4 1 .8

4 2 .2

4 1 .8

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c ts ...............

3 8.1

3 7 .5

3 7 .5

3 7 .2

3 7 .5

3 7 .7

3 7 .3

3 7 .7

3 7 .5

3 7 .4

3 7.1

3 7 .7

3 8 .0

3 8 .3

3 8 .0

4 2 .3

4 2 .2

4 2 .0

4 1 .8

4 2 .3

4 2 .5

42.1

4 2 .6

4 2 .4

4 2 .2

4 2 .2

4 2 .1

4 1 .8

4 2 .4

4 2 .3

4 0 .7

4 1 .0

4 1.1

4 1 .6

4 1 .2

4 1 .3

4 1 .0

4 1 .2

4 0 .8

4 0 .9

4 0 .7

4 0 .8

4 0 .6

4 0 .4

4 0 .5

3 6 .3

3 6 .8

3 7 .3

3 7 .5

3 6 .7

3 6 .8

3 6 .7

3 5 .7

3 5 .6

3 6 .3

3 7 .0

3 7.1

3 7 .0

3 7 .0

3 6 .9

3 2 .7

3 2 .7

3 2 .8

3 2 .7

3 2 .8

3 2 .8

3 2 .6

3 2 .7

3 2 .8

3 2 .8

3 2 .9

3 2 .8

3 2 .9

3 2 .8

3 2 .9

3 8 .2

3 8 .3

3 8 .2

3 8 .3

3 8 .4

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .4

3 8 .5

3 8 .4

3 8 .5

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .2

3 8 .6

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s
p la s tic s p r o d u c t s .........................................
L e a th e r a n d le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ................
S E R V I C E - P R O D U C IN G ......................................
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N A N D
P U B L I C U T I L IT IE S ........................................
W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ......................................

3 8 .2

3 8 .4

3 8 .4

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .6

3 8 .4

3 8 .5

3 8 .5

3 8 .6

3 8 .5

3 8 .5

3 8 .4

3 8 .4

3 8 .4

R E T A IL T R A D E ...................................................

2 8 .9

2 9 .0

2 9 .1

2 9 .0

2 9.1

2 9 .1

2 8 .8

2 8 .9

2 9 .0

2 9 .1

2 9 .2

2 9 .2

2 9 .3

2 9 .1

2 9 .3

p = p r e lim in a r y .
NO TE : S e e " N o t e s o n t h e d a ta " f o r a d e s c r ip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a r k re v is io n .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

59

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

14. Average hourly earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers on private nonfarm payrolls, by industry,
seasonally adjusted
Industry

Annual average

2002

2003

2001

2002

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

PRIVATE S ECTO R (in current dollars)..

$ 1 4 .3 2

$ 1 4 .7 7

$ 1 4 .6 4

$ 1 4 .6 6

$ 1 4 .6 9

$ 1 4 .7 4

$ 1 4 .7 6

$ 1 4 .8 3

$ 1 4 .8 5

$ 1 4 .9 0

$ 1 4 .9 3

$ 1 4 .9 8

G oods-produ cing......................................

1 5.9 2

16.41

1 6 .2 9

1 6 .3 2

1 6 .3 5

1 6.3 9

1 6.3 8

1 6.44

1 6 .4 8

1 6 .5 4

1 6 .5 4

M in in g ..............................................................

1 7 .5 6

1 7 .7 6

1 7 .7 2

1 7 .6 3

1 7 .8 7

1 7 .7 0

1 7.7 8

1 7.8 7

1 7 .8 2

1 7 .8 3

C o n s tr u c tio n .................................................

1 8 .3 4

1 8 .8 7

1 8 .7 4

1 8 .8 3

1 8 .7 7

18.81

1 8.8 7

1 8.90

1 8 .9 8

M a n u fa c tu rin g ..............................................

1 4 .8 3

1 5 .3 0

1 5 .1 9

1 5 .1 9

1 5 .2 7

15.31

1 5.2 8

1 5.3 4

1 5 .3 5

E x c lu d in g o v e r tim e .................................

1 4 .1 5

1 4 .5 7

1 4 .4 5

1 4 .4 3

1 4 .5 3

1 4.5 6

1 4.5 7

14.5 9

1 4 .6 2

S e rvice-producing.....................................

1 3 .8 5

1 4 .3 0

1 4 .1 8

1 4 .1 9

1 4 .2 3

1 4.2 7

14.31

1 4.3 7

T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........

1 6.7 9

1 7.2 9

17.21

17.21

1 7 .2 6

17.31

1 7.2 7

1 7.2 8

W h o le s a le t r a d e ..........................................

1 5 .8 6

16.21

1 6 .2 3

16.11

1 6 .1 2

1 6 .1 5

1 6 .1 4

1 6.2 8

R e ta il t r a d e ....................................................

9 .7 7

1 0 .0 4

9 .9 5

9 .9 7

9 .9 9

1 0.0 6

1 0.0 5

1 0.09

Feb.p

Mar.p

$ 1 4 .9 9

$ 1 5 .0 8

$ 1 5 .0 9

16.61

1 6 .6 4

1 6.6 6

16.71

1 7 .8 9

1 7 .7 8

17.91

1 8.10

1 8 .1 7

1 9 .0 0

1 9 .0 0

1 9 .1 4

1 9.04

1 9.1 7

1 9 .1 6

1 5.4 4

1 5 .4 4

1 5 .4 8

1 5 .5 3

1 5.56

1 5 .5 9

1 4 .7 0

14.71

1 4 .7 2

1 4.7 9

1 4 .8 3

1 4 .8 5

1 4 .4 0

1 4 .4 4

1 4 .5 0

1 4 .5 3

1 4.5 3

1 4.6 5

1 4 .6 5

1 7.3 6

1 7 .3 8

17.51

1 7 .4 5

1 7.4 4

1 7.5 9

17.61

1 6 .2 9

16.31

1 6.3 2

1 6 .3 7

1 6.36

16.51

1 6 .4 7

1 0 .1 0

1 0 .1 2

1 0 .1 4

1 0 .1 8

1 0 .1 5

1 0 .2 1

1 0 .2 5

F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ....

1 5 .8 0

1 6 .3 5

1 6 .1 4

1 6 .1 8

1 6 .1 7

1 6 .2 7

1 6.3 8

1 6.4 3

1 6 .5 3

1 6 .5 7

16.71

1 6 .7 3

1 6 .7 7

16.81

1 6 .8 5

S e r v ic e s ..........................................................

1 4 .6 7

1 5 .2 4

1 5 .0 8

1 5 .1 3

1 5.1 6

1 5 .1 9

15.2 6

1 5.3 0

1 5 .3 4

1 5 .4 0

1 5.4 6

1 5.4 9

15.51

1 5 .6 5

1 5 .6 5

8 .0 0

8 .2 4

8 .1 2

8 .0 9

8 .1 1

8 .1 3

8 .1 2

8 .1 4

8 .1 3

8 .1 5

8 .1 5

8 .1 8

8 .1 6

8 .1 5

8 .1 1

PRIVATE S ECTO R (in constant (1982)
dollars )...........................................................

p = p re lim in a ry . D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .
N o t e : S e e "N o te s o n th e d a ta " fo r a d e s c rip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a rk re v is io n .

60

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

15. Average hourly earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers on private nonfarm payrolls, by industry
Industry
P R IV A T E S E C T O R ..........................................
M IN IN G .................................................................

2003

2002

Annual average
2001

2002

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

$ 1 4 .3 2

$ 1 4 .7 7

$ 1 4 .6 7

$ 1 4 .6 9

$ 1 4 .6 7

$ 1 4 .6 8

$ 1 4 .6 5

$ 1 4 .7 0

$ 1 4 .9 2

$ 1 4 .9 2

$ 1 4 .9 7

$ 1 5 .0 4

$ 1 5 .0 7

$ 1 5 .1 6

$ 1 5 .1 5

1 7 .7 3

1 7 .7 0

1 7 .7 4

1 7 .6 5

1 7 .7 6

1 7.71

1 7 .8 0

1 7.81

1 7.81

1 7 .8 5

1 8 .0 4

1 8 .1 4

1 8 .2 0

1 7 .5 6

1 7 ,7 6

Feb.p Mar.p

C O N S T R U C T IO N .............................................

1 8 .3 4

1 8 .8 7

1 8 .6 6

1 8 .7 0

1 8 .6 7

1 8 .7 4

1 8 .9 0

1 8 .9 7

1 9 .1 0

1 9 .1 4

1 9 .0 6

1 9 .2 3

1 9 .0 3

1 9 .0 5

1 9 .0 9

M A N U F A C T U R IN G ..........................................

1 4 .8 3

1 5 .3 0

1 5 .1 6

1 5 .2 0

1 5 .2 3

1 5 .2 8

1 5 .2 6

1 5 .3 2

1 4 .4 0

1 5 .4 2

1 5 .4 8

1 5 .5 8

1 5 .5 5

1 5 .5 4

1 5 .5 6

D u ra b le g o o d s ...............................................

1 5 .2 8

1 5 .7 8

1 5 .6 3

1 5 .6 6

1 5 .6 8

1 5 .7 4

1 5 .6 6

15.81

1 5 .8 9

1 5 .9 5

1 6.01

1 6 .0 9

1 6 .0 6

1 6 .0 3

1 6 .0 4

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c ts ....................

1 2 .2 6

1 2 .5 0

1 2 .3 5

1 2 .3 3

1 2 .4 3

1 2 .5 3

1 2 .5 8

1 2 .5 7

1 2 .6 3

1 2 .6 0

1 2 .5 7

1 2 .6 6

1 2.6 1

1 2 .6 8

1 2 .6 6

F u r n itu r e a n d f ix t u r e s ..................................

1 2 .2 4

1 2 .6 6

1 2 .5 7

1 2 .5 4

1 2 .5 9

1 2 .6 2

1 2 .5 5

12.7 1

1 2 .7 4

1 2 .6 8

1 2 .7 8

1 2 .8 3

1 2 .7 8

1 2 .7 9

1 2 .7 6

1 5 .0 0

1 5 .4 9

1 5 .1 2

1 5 .3 5

1 5 .4 3

1 5 .4 8

1 5 .6 2

1 5 .5 2

1 5 .6 9

1 5 .7 9

1 5 .6 9

1 5 .7 5

1 5 .7 6

1 5 .6 6

1 5 .7 7

1 6 .9 2

1 7 .7 3

1 7 .2 0

1 7 .2 5

1 7 .3 6

1 7 .4 6

1 7 .6 0

1 7 .4 9

1 7 .5 4

1 7 .6 0

1 7 .6 4

1 7 .6 4

1 7 .6 7

1 7 .6 3

1 7 .5 7

p r o d u c t s ........................................................

2 0 .4 1

2 0 .8 8

2 0 .6 6

2 0 .6 9

2 0 .8 1

2 0 .9 2

2 1 .0 7

2 0 .9 0

2 0 .9 6

2 1 .0 2

2 1 .0 5

2 1 .0 9

2 1 .2 6

2 1 .2 6

2 1 .2 0

F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c t s .......................

1 4 .2 5

1 4.7 1

1 4 .6 0

1 4 .6 6

1 4 .6 4

14.71

14.6 1

1 4 .6 9

1 4 .8 0

1 4 .8 4

1 4 .9 0

1 4 .9 8

1 4 .9 7

1 4 .9 7

1 5 .0 2

1 6 .5 5

1 6 .5 8

1 6 .5 3

1 6 .5 5

1 6 .6 6

1 6 .6 6

1 6 .6 5

1 6 .6 8

S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p r o d u c ts ............

B la s t f u r n a c e s a n d b a s ic s te e l

1 5 .8 9

1 6 .4 4

1 6.31

1 6 .3 0

1 6 .3 5

1 6 .3 6

1 6 .4 7

e q u ip m e n t .....................................................

1 4.51

1 5 .0 0

1 4 .9 3

1 4 .8 7

14.91

1 5 .0 4

1 5 .0 5

1 5 .0 6

1 5 .0 5

1 5 .0 6

1 5 .0 8

1 5 .1 9

1 5.1 1

1 5 .2 2

1 5 .2 3

T r a n s p o r t a tio n e q u ip m e n t ........................

1 9 .0 6

1 9 .8 9

1 9 .6 5

1 9 .6 8

1 9 .6 5

1 9 .7 5

1 9 .3 7

1 9 .8 6

2 0 .0 4

2 0 .3 1

2 0 .5 3

2 0 .5 5

2 0 .3 7

2 0 .2 3

2 0 .2 4

M o t o r v e h ic le s a n d e q u ip m e n t ............

1 9 .4 0

2 0 .5 0

2 0 .0 9

2 0 .2 2

2 0 .1 7

2 0 .3 6

1 9 .7 6

2 0 .5 6

2 0 .7 1

2 1 .1 2

2 1 .4 2

2 1 .4 0

2 1 .1 1

2 0 .8 7

2 0 .9 0

I n s tr u m e n ts a n d r e la te d p ro d u c ts ........

1 4.8 1

1 5 .2 5

1 5 .1 2

15.11

1 5.11

1 5 .1 4

1 5 .2 4

1 5 .2 8

1 5 .4 0

1 5 .4 4

1 5 .4 4

1 5 .5 3

1 5.51

1 5 .5 5

1 5 .5 7

1 2 .1 6

1 2 .4 0

1 2 .3 9

1 2 .3 6

1 2 .3 7

1 2 .2 8

1 2 .3 0

1 2 .3 9

1 2 .4 4

1 2 .4 2

1 2 .4 5

1 2 .5 4

1 2 .5 2

1 2 .4 9

1 2 .5 6

In d u s tr ia l m a c h in e r y a n d e q u ip m e n t...
E le c tr o n ic a n d o th e r e le c tr ic a l

N o n d u ra b le g o o d s .......................................

1 4 .1 6

1 4.6 1

1 4 .4 6

1 4 .5 3

1 4 .5 5

1 4 .6 0

1 4 .6 9

1 4 .6 0

1 4 .6 9

1 4 .6 6

14.7 1

1 4 .8 4

1 4 .8 2

1 4 .8 4

1 4 .8 7

F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c ts ......................

1 2 .8 9

1 3 .2 3

1 3 .1 0

1 3 .1 8

1 3 .2 5

1 3 .2 9

1 3 .3 4

1 3 .2 4

1 3 .2 6

1 3.21

1 3 .2 6

1 3 .4 0

1 3 .3 2

1 3 .2 5

1 3 .3 1
2 2 .5 8

T o b a c c o p r o d u c t s ........................................

2 1 .5 0

2 1 .6 5

2 2 .4 7

2 2 .8 0

2 3 .0 9

2 3 .2 6

2 3 .3 4

2 0 .8 3

2 0 .6 1

2 0 .3 5

2 0 .3 7

2 0 .7 0

2 1 .0 9

2 1 .7 6

T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s ....................................

1 1 .3 5

1 1 .7 4

1 1 .6 5

1 1 .6 5

1 1 .7 3

1 1 .6 9

1 1 .7 4

1 1 .7 5

1 1 .8 0

1 1 .7 4

11.8 1

1 1 .8 4

1 1.91

1 1 .8 5

1 1 .8 3

A p p a r e l a n d o th e r t e x tile p r o d u c ts .......

9 .4 3

9 .9 1

9 .8 2

9 .9 3

9 .9 3

9 .9 5

9.91

9 .9 5

9 .9 4

9 .9 7

9 .9 8

1 0 .1 1

1 0 .0 6

9 .9 4

1 0 .0 0

P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ........................

1 6 .8 7

1 7 .4 9

1 7 .2 5

1 7 .3 3

17.51

1 7 .5 3

1 7 .7 3

1 7 .5 5

1 7 .6 6

1 7 .5 8

1 7 .6 3

1 7 .8 3

1 7 .7 4

1 7 .7 6

1 7 .7 5

P r in tin g a n d p u b lis h in g ...............................

1 4 .8 2

1 5 .1 8

1 5 .1 2

1 5.11

1 5 .0 5

1 5.11

1 5 .1 5

1 5 .1 8

1 5 .3 2

1 5 .3 0

1 5 .3 4

1 5 .4 5

1 5 .3 7

1 5 .4 6

1 5 .5 2

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c ts ...............

18.6 1

1 9 .1 8

1 8 .9 3

1 9.01

1 8 .9 6

1 9 .1 4

1 9 .3 2

1 9 .2 8

1 9 .4 5

1 9 .3 2

19.4 1

1 9 .4 4

1 9 .4 5

1 9 .4 9

1 9 .5 0

P e tr o le u m a n d c o a l p r o d u c ts ..................

2 2 .0 8

2 2 .3 3

2 2 .3 9

2 2 .3 9

2 2 .0 2

2 2 .1 5

2 2 .2 2

2 2 .1 1

2 2 .4 6

2 2 .4 8

2 2 .5 7

2 2 .7 5

2 2 .5 8

2 2 .9 5

2 2 .8 9

p la s t ic s p r o d u c t s .........................................

1 3 .3 9

1 3 .7 3

1 3.61

1 3 .6 8

1 3 .6 9

1 3 .6 6

1 3 .7 6

1 3.71

1 3 .7 4

1 3 .7 7

1 3 .7 9

1 3 .9 7

1 4 .0 0

1 4 .0 2

1 4 .0 5

L e a t h e r a n d le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ..................

10.3 1

1 0 .3 0

1 0 .4 0

1 0 .3 9

1 0 .4 3

1 0 .2 7

1 0 .3 7

1 0 .2 7

1 0 .0 4

1 0 .0 8

1 0 .2 5

1 0.51

1 0.4 1

1 0 .3 7

1 0 .2 7

1 6 .7 9

1 7 .2 9

1 7 .1 9

1 7 .2 6

1 7 .1 8

1 7 .2 4

1 7 .2 8

1 7 .2 6

1 7 .4 0

1 7 .3 8

1 7 .5 2

1 7 .4 8

1 7 .5 0

1 7 .6 4

1 7 .5 9

15 8 6

1 1 .6 2

1 1 .5 7

1 1 .5 8

1 1 .5 4

1 1 .5 7

1 1 .5 2

1 1 .5 8

1 1 .7 5

1 1.71

1 1 .7 2

1 1 .7 6

1 1 .8 4

1 1 .9 0

1 1 .8 7

9 .7 7

1 0 .0 4

9 .9 8

1 0 .0 0

9 .9 8

1 0 .0 0

9 .9 8

1 0 .0 1

1 0 .1 5

1 0 .1 4

1 0 .1 5

1 0 .1 8

1 0 .2 3

1 0 .2 5

1 0 .2 4

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s

T R A N S P O R T A T IO N A N D
P U B LIC U T IL IT IE S ......................................
W H O L E S A L E T R A D E .....................................
R E T A IL T R A D E ................................................
F IN A N C E , IN S U R A N C E ,
A N D R E A L E S T A T E ....................................

1 5 ,8 0

1 6 .3 5

1 6 .1 7

1 6 .2 3

1 6 .1 8

1 6 .2 7

1 6 .2 5

16.31

1 6 .5 7

1 6 .5 3

1 6 .6 8

1 6 .8 2

1 6 .7 8

1 6 .9 8

1 7.0 1

S E R V IC E S ...........................................................

1 4 .6 7

1 5 .2 4

1 5 .1 6

1 5 .1 6

1 5 .1 2

1 5 .0 8

1 5 .0 2

1 5 .0 5

1 5 .3 6

1 5 .4 0

1 5 .6 2

1 5 .6 8

1 5 .6 5

1 5.81

1 5 .7 8

p = p r e lim in a r y .
N O TE : S e e " N o t e s o n t h e d a ta " f o r a d e s c r ip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a r k re v is io n .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

61

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

16. Average weekly earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers on private nonfarm payrolls, by industry
Industry

Annual average
2001

2002

$ 4 8 9 .7 4

$ 5 0 3 .6 6

2002
Mar.

2003

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.p

Mar.p

$ 5 1 7 .3 8

$ 5 0 7 .8 6

$ 5 1 5 .4 4

$ 5 1 8 .1 3

PRIVATE SECTOR
C u rre n t d o lla r s ..................................

$49 7.3 1

$ 4 9 7 .9 9

$ 5 0 0 .2 5

$ 5 0 9 .4 0

$ 50 1 .0 3

$ 5 0 5 .6 8

$ 5 1 4 .7 4

$ 5 0 8 .7 7

$ 5 0 8 .9 8

5 0 0 .6 9

5 01 .37

5 0 2 .4 0

5 0 5 .5 8

5 01 .84

5 05 .70

5 0 7 .8 7

5 0 9 .5 8

5 1 0 .9 5

5 10 .82

5 14 .16

5 14 .2 3

5 1 7 .5 9

2 7 5 .8 2

2 7 4 .5 3

2 7 5 .7 7

2 8 0 .6 6

2 7 5 .7 5

2 7 7 .5 4

2 8 1 .7 4

2 7 8 .0 2

2 7 7 .9 8

2 8 3 .1 9

276.91

2 7 8 .7 7

278 .41

7 6 1 .9 0

7 5 7 .0 7

7 5 0 .4 8 .

7 6 6 .3 7

7 6 7 .7 8

7 63 .68

768.61

7 68 .96

7 65 .83

7 64 .05

7 55 .06

7 5 7 .6 8

7 63 .6 9

7 7 5 .3 2

7 3 2 .1 6

7 1 6 .5 4

7 23 .69

7 2 8 .1 3

7 4 0 .2 3

7 40 .88

749 .32

7 54 .45

7 4 6 .4 6

7 24 .28

7 26 .89

7 2 3 .1 4

6 9 7 .2 3

7 3 3 .0 6

6 3 1 .0 6

6 14 .98

6 29 .65

6 36 .02

6 30 .68

6 33 .15

6 4 6 .5 7

6 31 .33

6 2 7 .8 2

6 3 3 .2 9

3 4 7 .6 9

3 38 .46

3 45 .58

3 48 .12

3 44 .63

3 45 .78

3 53 .90

3 4 4 .2 4

3 3 9 .5 5

3 4 0 .3 0

6 34 .23

6 5 4 .5 3

662.61

6 5 8 .7 4

659.61

6 7 4 .1 7

6 5 8 .4 6

6 5 5 .6 3

6 5 7 .6 4

5 2 0 .0 0

5 17 .04

5 1 9 .1 4

5 2 6 .6 7

5 2 0 .3 8

5 1 1 .6 0

5 2 0 .3 3

5 0 5 .6 6

5 0 9 .7 4

5 1 4 .0 0

5 0 8 .5 9

4 4 9 .4 9

5 1 6 .0 3

5 1 9 .7 9

5 0 2 .1 3

504.81

5 2 9 .8 8

5 0 8 .6 4

5 0 6 .4 8

5 0 6 .5 7

S e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .................
C o n s ta n t (1 9 8 2 ) d o lla rs ..............

2 7 3 .4 5

M INING................................................

7 6 3 .8 6

CO NSTRUCTION..............................

7 2 0 .7 6

C u rre n t d o lla r s ................................

6 0 3 .5 8

6 2 5 .7 7

6 2 0 .0 4

6 20 .16

622.91

C o n s ta n t (1 9 8 2 ) d o lla rs ...............

337.01

-

3 4 3 .8 9

3 41 .87

3 4 3 .3 9

Durable goods..................................

6 2 6 .4 8

651.71

6 4 5 .5 2

6 46 .76

6 4 9 .1 5

6 5 6 .3 6

5 04 .30

5 1 0 .8 7
5 0 4 .8 6

2 8 3 .3 7

MANUFACTURING

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p ro d u c ts ......

4 9 7 .7 6

5 1 2 .5 0

5 0 3 .8 8

F u rn itu re a n d fix tu re s ...................

4 7 7 .3 6

5 0 8 .6 3

5 0 9 .0 9

p ro d u c ts ........................................

6 5 4 .0 0

6 7 3 .8 2

6 4 5 .6 2

6 6 7 .7 3

6 7 5 .8 3

687.31

6 8 2 .5 9

6 8 4 .4 3

6 9 9 .7 7

6 93 .18

6 7 6 .2 4

6 7 2 .5 3

6 6 3 .5 0

P rim a ry m e ta l in d u s trie s ............

6 5 7 .7 2

678.11

7 37.71

7 7 2 .1 5

7 5 8 .5 2

7 6 2 .4 5

767.31

782.21

7 69 .12

774.81

7 8 0 .5 3

7 84 .96

788.51

8 0 0 .8 6

7 8 2 .7 8

7 8 2 .7 7

7 8 8 .8 9

s te e l p ro d u c ts ............................

9 1 0 .2 9

9 5 2 .1 3

9 3 3 .8 3

9 3 7 .2 6

9 5 1 .0 2

9 7 2 .7 8

965.01

9 57 .22

9 7 2 .5 4

964 .82

9 64 .09

9 76 .47

9 50 .32

F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts .........

9 6 2 .4 8

9 5 0 .3 2

5 8 9 .9 5

613.41

6 0 7 .3 6

6 06 .92

6 1 1 .9 5

6 1 9 .2 9

599.01

6 14 .04

620 .12

620.31

6 2 1 .3 3

6 3 2 .1 6

6 1 8 .2 6

6 1 3 .7 7

6 1 5 .8 2

6 4 5 .1 3

6 6 7 .4 6

6 6 3 .8 2

6 60 .15

6 6 5 .4 5

6 6 9 .1 2

6 58 .80

6 7 1 .9 3

6 76 .46

667.41

6 70 .68

6 8 8 .0 6

6 8 1 .3 9

6 8 5 .9 8

6 8 7 .2 2
5 8 9 .4 0

5 06 3 1 /5 0

S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s

B la st fu rn a c e s a n d b a s ic

In d u s tria l m a c h in e ry a n d
e q u ip m e n t...................................
E le c tro n ic a n d o th e r e le c tric a l
e q u ip m e n t....................................

5 7 1 .6 9

5 8 5 .0 0

5 8 8 .2 4

5 81 .42

5 8 2 .9 8

5 9 2 .5 8

5 71 .90

5 84 .33

5 89 .96

579.81

5 9 1 .1 4

6 06 .08

5 8 1 .7 4

T ra n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t..........

589.01

798.61

847.31

8 3 5 .1 3

8 44 .27

8 4 2 .9 9

8 4 7 .2 8

780.61

8 48 .02

8 63 .72

8 69 .27

8 72 .95

8 9 1 .8 7

8 6 9 .8 0

845.61

8 4 1 .9 8

e q u ip m e n t..................................

8 2 8 .3 8

9 0 6 .1 0

8 8 3 .9 6

9 0 7 .8 8

9 0 5 .6 3

9 1 0 .0 9

8 10 .16

9 14 .92

9 31 .95

9 3 9 .8 4

947.21

9 69 .42

9 3 7 .2 8

8 9 9 .5 0

8 9 4 .5 2

In s tru m e n ts a n d re la te d
p ro d u c ts ........................................

6 0 5 .7 3

6 2 0 .6 8

6 1 6 .9 0

6 07 .42

6 0 7 .4 2

6 2 0 .7 4

6 09 .60

6 20 .37

628 .32

628.41

6 3 1 .5 0

6 4 6 .0 5

6 2 8 .1 6

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g ....

6 2 9 .7 8

4 6 0 .8 6

6 3 5 .2 6

4 7 9 .8 8

4 83.21

4 7 9 .5 7

4 7 9 .9 6

4 8 5 .0 6

4 6 8 .6 3

4 7 9 .4 9

4 8 0 .1 8

4 8 3 .1 4

4 8 0 .5 7

4 9 1 .5 7

4 7 8 .2 6

4 7 3 .3 7

4 8 8 .5 8

5 97 .88

Nondurable goods.........................

5 7 0 .6 5

5 8 8 .7 8

5 8 1 .2 9

5 8 2 .6 5

5 8 6 .3 7

5 9 2 .7 6

5 8 7 .6 0

5 92 .76

5 90 .80

5 95 .76

6 06 .96

5 9 1 .3 2

5 9 0 .6 3

5 9 6 .2 9

F o o d a n d k in d re d p ro d u c ts ........

5 2 9 .7 8

5 4 5 .0 8

5 3 3 .1 7

5 3 3 .7 9

5 4 3 .2 5

550.21

5 4 6 .9 4

5 53 .43

5 54 .27

5 46 .89

5 5 1 .6 2

5 61 .46

5 3 8 .1 3

5 2 8 .6 8

T o b a c c o p ro d u c ts ..........................

5 3 9 .0 6

8 5 1 .4 0

8 8 3 .3 2

9 1 2 .2 8

9 32 .52

9 6 2 .8 5

9 8 3 .9 0

982.61

8 39 .45

8 2 8 .5 2

826.21

8 0 8 .6 9

8 3 0 .0 7

845.71

T e x tile m ill p ro d u c ts ......................

8 7 0 .4 0

9 0 3 .2 0

4 5 2 .8 7

4 8 3 .6 9

4 8 3 .4 8

485.81

4 8 6 .8 0

4 89.81

4 8 0 .1 7

4 9 4 .6 8

4 8 9 .7 0

4 7 7 .8 2

484.21

4 9 2 .5 4

4 8 1 .1 6

4 7 8 .7 4

4 7 7 .9 3
3 6 5 .0 0

A p p a re l a n d o th e r te x tile
p ro d u c ts ........................................

3 5 1 .7 4

3 6 5 .6 8

3 6 8 .2 5

3 6 9 .4 0

3 6 9 .4 0

3 7 3 .1 3

362.71

3 6 6 .1 6

3 6 4 .8 0

362.91

3 66 .27

3 7 5 .0 8

3 6 4 .1 7

3 6 1 .8 2

P a p e r a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts ...........

7 0 1 .7 9

7 2 7 .5 8

7 1 3 .4 3

7 1 7 .4 6

7 2 8 .4 2

7 2 7 .5 0

7 2 8 .7 0

7 3 0 .0 8

7 4 3 .4 9

7 2 9 .5 7

7 40 .46

7 5 7 .7 8

7 4 1 .5 3

7 38 .8 2

7 3 6 .6 3

P rin tin g a n d p u b lis h in g ................

5 6 4 .6 4

5 6 9 .2 5

568.51

5 6 0 .5 8

5 5 9 .8 6

5 6 3 .6 0

5 6 2 .0 7

5 73 .80

5 82 .16

5 75 .28

5 78 .32

5 9 1 .7 4

577.91

5 8 5 .9 3

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts ..

591 .31

7 8 7 .2 0

8 0 9 .4 0

7 9 3 .1 7

7 94 .62

8 00.11

8 1 5 .3 6

809.51

8 19 .40

830 .52

8 15 .30

8 2 1 .0 4

8 2 8 .1 4

813.01

P e tro le u m a n d c o a l p ro d u c ts .....

8 2 2 .4 8

8 2 2 .9 0

9 4 5 .0 2

9 2 4 .4 6

9 2 0 .2 3

9 00 .23

887.41

917.01

9 28 .80

9 04 .30

9 6 8 .0 3

946.41

9 4 1 .1 7

9 4 1 .8 5

9 50 .62

9 7 7 .6 7

9 8 6 .5 6

p la s tic s p ro d u c ts ..........................

5 4 4 .9 7

5 6 2 .9 3

5 5 9 .3 7

5 64 .98

5 6 4 .0 3

5 69 .62

5 54 .53

5 63 .48

564.71

5 63 .19

5 62 .63

5 7 9 .7 6

5 6 5 .6 0

L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ....

5 6 3 .6 0

5 6 9 .0 3

3 7 4 .2 5

3 7 9 .0 4

3 8 6 .8 8

3 8 8 .5 9

3 8 2 .7 8

3 8 4 .1 0

3 73 .32

3 69 .72

3 58 .43

3 67 ,92

3 8 2 .3 3

3 8 9 .9 2

381.01

3 81 .6 2

3 7 7 .9 4

6 6 1 .5 0

6 7 2 .0 8

6 7 3 .7 0

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s

TRANSPO RTATION AND
PUBLIC UTILITIES........................

6 4 1 .3 8

6 62.21

6 5 1 .5 0

6 54 .15

6 5 7 .9 9

668.91

6 63 .55

6 6 7 .9 6

6 76 .86

6 65 .65

6 7 2 .7 7

6 78 .22

W HOLESALE TRADE......................

6 0 5 .8 5

6 2 2 .4 6

6 1 4 .5 5

6 1 5 .4 0

6 1 5 .8 6

6 3 0 .6 3

6 1 6 .6 3

6 23 .32

6 36 .40

6 24 .77

628.71

6 41 .07

6 2 3 .2 0

6 3 6 .7 9

6 3 4 .8 7

RETAIL TRADE..................................

2 8 2 .3 5

2 9 1 .1 6

2 8 6 .4 3

2 8 7 .0 0

2 8 9 .4 2

2 9 7 .0 0

295.41

2 9 5 .3 0

2 9 5 .3 7

2 9 3 .0 5

2 9 2 .3 2

300.31

2 9 0 .5 3

2 9 6 .2 3

2 9 7 .9 8

FINANCE, INSURANCE,
AND REAL ESTATE......................

5 7 0 .3 8

5 9 0 .2 4

5 8 0 .5 0

5 8 1 .0 3

5 7 7 .6 3

597.11

5 81 .75

5 88 .79

6 08 .12

5 9 1 .7 7

6 00 .48

6 17 .29

6 0 4 .0 8

6 2 8 .2 6

6 2 9 .3 7

SERVICES...........................................

4 79.71

4 9 6 .8 2

4 9 2 .7 0

4 9 1 .1 8

4 8 9 .8 9

4 9 7 .6 4

4 8 9 .6 5

4 9 3 .6 4

5 05 .34

5 0 2 .0 4

5 0 5 .9 5

5 1 4 .3 0

5 0 5 .5 0

5 1 8 .5 7

5 1 7 .5 8

p - p re lim in a ry .

NOTE:

62

S e e "N o te s o n th e d a ta " fo r a d e s c rip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a rk re v is io n . D ash in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a va ila b le .

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

17.

Diffusion indexes of employment change, seasonally adjusted

[In percent]
Timespan and year

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug. Sept.

Oct.

Nov

Dec.

Private nonfarm payrolls, 347 industries
O v e r 1-m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 8 ............................................................

6 2 .4

5 7 .5

59.1

6 0 .2

5 7 .5

5 6 .8

5 4 .6

5 9.1

5 7 .2

5 3 .0

5 7 .9

5 6 .8

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

5 5 .3

5 8 .6

5 3 .6

5 8 .4

5 5 .5

5 7 .8

5 7.1

5 4 .8

5 7 .1

5 7 .2

6 0 .4

5 8 .1

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

5 5 .9

5 7 .5

5 7 .9

5 1 .2

5 0.1

5 5 .8

5 7 .8

5 1 .4

5 2 .4

5 2 .4

5 3 .2

5 2 .7

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

4 9 .4

4 5 .7

5 0 .3

4 2 .4

4 7 .3

4 3 .2

4 4 .5

4 2 .5

4 2 .4

4 0 .5

3 9 .3

4 4 .1

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

4 7 .3

4 1 .4

4 9 .7

4 7 .8

5 0 .9

4 9 .4

4 8 .6

4 8 .8

4 9 .3

4 8 .3

4 5 .8

4 5 .5

2 0 0 3 ............................................................

4 9 .4

3 8 .5

4 8 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 9 9 8 ............................................................

6 5 .3

6 6 .3

6 5 .3

6 5 .9

6 2 .7

5 8 .2

5 8 .9

59.1

5 9 .8

5 7 .9

5 7 .1

5 8 .8

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

5 9 .2

5 7 .6

5 9 .5

5 5 .2

6 0 .2

5 7 .2

5 9 .4

5 9 .2

5 9 .7

5 8 .9

6 1 .2

6 0 .7
5 1 .6

O v e r 3 -m o n th s p a n :

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

6 0 .4

6 1 .4

5 9 .4

5 3 .2

5 2 .4

5 5 .5

5 6 .6

5 6 .2

5 1 .2

5 1 .0

5 3 .2

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

4 5 .5

4 6 .1

4 0 .8

4 3 .4

3 7 .8

4 3 .2

3 9 .3

3 8 .0

3 5 .3

3 3 .7

3 6 .3

3 8 .9

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

4 0 .1

4 3 .2

4 2 .5

4 6 .5

4 8 .0

5 0 .1

4 7 .1

4 5 .1

4 7 .3

4 5 .1

4 2 .7

4 5 .5

2 0 0 3 ............................................................

3 9 .6

3 9 .9

3 9 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O v e r 6 -m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 8 ............................................................

7 0 .2

6 7 .4

6 4 .7

6 1 .5

6 4.1

6 2.1

5 9.1

5 8 .8

5 7 .5

6 0 .2

5 9 .2

5 8 .4

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

6 0 .2

5 8 .9

5 8 .5

5 9 .7

5 7 .2

6 0 .8

6 1 .2

6 2 .5

6 2 .7

6 1 .8

6 1 .2

6 2 .8

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

6 1 .1

5 9 .4

5 8.1

5 7 .9

5 4 .2

5 2 .4

5 2 .9

5 4 .2

5 2 .4

4 8 .7

4 5 .7

4 6 .5

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

4 4 .7

4 2 .7

3 9 .5

4 0.1

4 0 .8

3 5 .8

3 7 .0

3 2 .4

3 4 .3

33.1

3 4 .1

3 5 .6

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

3 7 .0

4 1 .6

4 3 .4

4 4 .4

4 6 .5

4 6 .0

4 6 .5

4 3 .1

4 0 .8

4 3 .1

3 7 .6

3 6 .9

2 0 0 3 ............................................................

3 8 .9

-

-

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 9 9 8 ............................................................

6 9 .9

6 7 .9

6 7 .6

6 5 .6

6 4.1

6 2 .7

6 1 .7

6 2 .2

6 0 .8

5 9 .4

6 0 .8

5 8 .9

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

6 1 .2

6 0.1

5 8 .2

6 1 .0

6 0 .7

6 1 .6

6 2 .2

61.1

6 3 .8

6 2 .2

5 9 .7

6 0 .5

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

6 1 .4

5 9 .9

5 8 .8

5 6 .2

5 5 .3

5 3 .6

5 3 .0

5 1 .0

4 7 .7

4 5 .2

4 4 .5

4 2 .9

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

4 1 .5

4 1 .5

3 8 .9

3 7 .5

3 7 .3

3 6 .2

3 4.1

3 3 .6

3 4 .4

3 3 .9

3 3 .3

3 4 .4

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

3 5 .2

3 6 .0

3 7 .3

3 8 .3

4 0 .5

3 9 .9

4 0 .1

3 7 .2

3 8 .5

3 8 .3

-

-

2 0 0 3 ............................................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O v e r 1 2 - m o n th s p a n :

Manufacturing payrolls, 136 Industries
O v e r 1-m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 8 ............................................................

5 7 .0

5 2 .6

5 2 .2

5 2 .9

4 4 .9

4 7 .4

3 8 .2

5 2 .9

4 4 .9

3 8 .6

4 2 .3

4 1 .5

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

4 7 .4

4 1 .2

4 2 .6

4 6 .0

4 6 .3

4 3 .4

5 0 .0

4 2 .6

4 6 .0

4 5 .6

5 1 .5

4 9 .3

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

4 4 .9

5 2 .2

4 9 .3

4 6 .0

4 9 .3

5 0 .7

5 7 .4

3 6 .8

3 9 .0

4 2 .3

4 7 .1

4 0 .8

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

3 4 .9

2 6 .8

3 8 .2

2 9 .0

2 8 .3

3 0 .5

3 4 .9

2 5 .7

3 1 .6

3 1 .3

2 5 .0

3 0 .9

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

3 5 .3

3 7 .9

4 0 .4

4 7 .4

4 7 .1

4 0 .4

4 8 .9

4 1 .9

4 0 .1

4 0 .4

4 0 .1

3 7 .1

2 0 0 3 ............................................................

4 7 .1

3 5 .7

4 1 .2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O v e r 3 - m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 8 ............................................................

5 9 .2

5 7 .0

5 4 .8

5 1 .8

4 8 .2

3 8 .2

4 1 .9

4 3 .0

4 3 .0

3 8 .2

3 2 .7

4 0 .4

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

3 9 .3

3 9 .3

3 9 .7

4 0 .1

4 1 .2

4 3 .8

4 4 .1

4 6 .3

4 2 .3

4 4 .1

4 7 .8

4 5 .2

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

4 8 .2

4 8 .9

4 8 .9

4 4 .5

4 6 .7

5 2 .2

4 6 .0

3 8 .6

2 9 .0

3 4 .2

3 9 .0

3 6 .0

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

2 1 .3

2 1 .3

1 8 .4

2 3 .5

1 9 .9

2 3 .2

1 7 .3

19.1

1 6 .2

1 8 .0

1 8 .4

1 8 .0

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

2 4 .6

30.1

37.1

3 8 .6

4 0 .1

4 1 .2

3 8 .6

3 4 .6

3 2 .4

3 2 .0

2 9 .8

3 2 .4

2 0 0 3 ............................................................

2 7 .9

3 3 .5

2 5 .4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O v e r 6 - m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 8 ............................................................

6 0 .7

5 4 .4

4 9 .3

4 0 .1

4 5 .2

4 2 .6

3 9 .0

3 8 .2

3 4 .6

4 1 .2

3 5 .7

3 3 .1

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

3 6 .4

3 6 .0

3 7 .5

4 0 .4

3 7 .5

4 2 .3

4 3 .0

4 4 .5

4 8 .2

4 3 .0

4 4 .5

4 7 .4

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

4 7 .8

4 5 .2

4 4 .5

5 0 .0

4 1 .9

3 7 .9

3 6 .0

3 5 .3

3 2 .4

2 6 .1

2 1 .3

2 1 .7

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

2 0 .2

1 6 .9

1 4 .0

1 6 .2

1 6 .5

1 3 .2

1 4 .7

1 1 .8

1 4 .0

1 3 .2

1 7 .6

1 6 .5

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

1 9 .9

2 6 .8

2 9 .8

3 8 .2

3 6 .4

3 4 .2

3 1 .6

2 6 .8

2 4 .6

2 6 .8

2 3 .5

2 2 .4

2 0 0 3 ............................................................

2 3 .2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O v e r 1 2 - m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 8 ............................................................

5 4 .8

5 2 .2

5 1 .8

4 6 .7

4 0 .4

4 0 .1

3 8 .2

3 7 .5

3 6 .4

3 4 .6

3 5 .7

3 4 .2

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

3 8 .6

3 4 .6

3 2 .4

3 6 .0

3 7 .9

3 9 .0

4 0 .1

4 0 .4

4 4 .5

4 4 .5

4 3 .4

4 4 .5

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

4 9 .3

44.1

3 9 .3

3 6 .8

3 5 .3

3 4 .2

3 3 .8

2 8 .7

2 2 .1

1 9.1

1 7 .6

1 4 .0

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

1 3 .6

1 3 .6

1 3 .6

1 5 .4

1 2 .1

1 1 .0

1 1 .0

1 1 .0

1 2 .9

1 2 .9

1 4 .0

1 4 .0

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

1 8 .0

1 8 .0

2 0 .2

2 0 .2

2 4 .6

2 2 .1

2 5 .0

2 2 .1

2 1 .3

1 6 .9

-

-

2 0 0 3 ............................................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NO TE:

F ig u re s a re th e p e r c e n t o f in d u s trie s w ith e m p lo y m e n t

in c re a s in g

p lu s

e m p lo y m e n t,

o n e -h a lf

w h e re

50

of

th e

in d u s trie s

w ith

p e r c e n t in d ic a te s a n

unchanged

e q u a l b a la n c e

b e tw e e n in d u s trie s w ith in c e a s in g a n d d e c r e a s in g e m p lo y m e n t.

D a ta fo r th e 2 m o s t r e c e n t m o n th s s h o w n in e a c h s p a n a re
p re lim in a ry . S e e th e ''D e fin itio n s " in th is s e c tio n . S e e " N o t e s o n
th e

d a ta "

fo r

a

d e s c r ip tio n

of

th e

m ost

re c e n t b e n c h m a rk

re v is io n .
D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

63

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

18. Establishment size and employment covered under Ul, private ownership, by Supersector, first quarter 2001
S ize o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts
In d u s try , es ta b lis h m e n ts , and
em p lo y m e n t

Total

F e w e r than
5 w o rk e rs 1

5 to 9
w o rk e rs

10 to 19
w o rkers

20 to 49
w o rk e rs

5 0 to 99
w o rk e rs

100 to 249
w o rk e rs

250 to 499
w o rk e rs

5 0 0 to 999
w o rk e rs

1,000 or
m ore
w o rk e rs

To tal all in d u s trie s 2
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r ......................
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h .......................................

7 ,6 6 5 ,9 6 8
1 0 8 ,9 3 2 ,8 0 4

4 ,5 2 6 ,0 6 2

1 ,3 0 4 ,7 4 1

8 5 8 ,6 0 6

5 9 8 ,4 3 8

2 0 8 ,0 8 4

1 2 1 ,1 8 9

3 1 ,1 4 9

1 1 ,6 7 8

6 ,0 2 1

6 ,8 8 6 ,7 5 2

8 ,6 3 3 ,3 3 7

1 1 ,5 8 8 ,2 2 0

1 8 ,1 0 4 ,0 6 1

1 4 ,3 2 3 ,0 6 0

1 8 ,1 5 8 ,2 7 6

1 0 ,6 1 1 ,5 5 6

7 ,9 1 7 ,0 6 5

1 2 ,7 1 0 ,4 7 7

N a tu ra l re s o u rc e s an d m in ing
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

......................

1 2 7 ,9 6 9

7 4 ,6 4 4

2 3 ,3 0 4

1 5 ,1 6 9

9 ,5 0 1

2 ,9 3 5

1 ,7 0 0

499

167

50

.......................................

1 ,5 6 6 ,1 0 4

1 1 0 ,9 4 2

1 5 4 ,1 9 9

2 0 3 ,8 4 5

2 8 5 ,4 8 6

2 0 0 ,3 6 0

2 5 4 ,3 5 8

1 7 2 ,0 1 1

1 0 9 ,9 7 3

7 4 ,9 3 0

C o n s tru c tio n
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t,

M a rc h

......................

7 6 5 ,6 4 9

4 9 4 ,2 5 4

1 2 7 ,0 1 7

7 5 ,9 8 3

4 7 ,2 3 0

1 3,5 91

6 ,0 4 0

1 ,1 7 6

293

65

.......................................

6 ,4 8 1 ,3 3 4

7 1 4 ,9 9 2

8 3 2 ,9 7 8

1 .0 2 0 ,9 8 2

1 ,4 1 0 ,1 3 1

9 2 5 ,1 7 8

8 9 0 ,2 8 2

3 9 0 ,6 3 0

1 9 7 ,1 4 6

9 9 ,0 1 5

M an u fa c tu rin g
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

......................

3 9 8 ,8 3 7

1 4 8 ,6 8 2

6 7 ,5 1 0

6 0 ,2 6 7

5 8 ,9 4 2

2 8 ,6 3 3

2 2 ,4 9 0

7 ,6 3 6

3 ,1 9 8

1 ,4 7 9

.......................................

1 6 ,8 0 6 ,4 5 2

2 5 5 ,3 7 6

4 5 3 ,7 5 0

8 3 0 ,6 8 5

1 ,8 3 6 ,8 5 8

2 ,0 0 9 ,2 2 4

3 ,4 5 6 ,6 2 0

2 ,6 2 2 ,5 1 2

2 ,1 6 6 ,3 5 2

3 ,1 7 5 ,0 7 5

T ra d e , tra n s p o rta tio n , a n d u tilities
.....................

1 ,8 4 0 ,1 0 4

9 6 9 ,7 6 0

3 7 6 ,5 7 8

2 4 4 ,8 9 0

1 5 3 ,4 5 0

5 3 ,1 1 0

3 2 ,8 9 8

6 ,9 7 0

1 ,8 1 3

635

.......................................

2 5 ,5 1 8 ,4 3 0

1 ,6 2 9 ,6 2 6

2 ,5 0 7 ,9 0 6

3 ,2 7 8 ,0 7 4

4 ,6 3 0 ,6 1 1

3 ,6 7 0 ,3 6 3

4 ,8 8 8 ,0 3 3

2 ,3 4 3 ,7 9 4

1 ,1 9 1 ,8 9 4

1 ,3 7 8 ,1 2 9

E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r .....................
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h .......................................

1 5 0 ,8 5 5

8 4 ,6 7 2
1 1 3 ,8 1 2

2 0 ,6 3 6
1 3 7 ,4 2 6

1 7 ,1 1 9
2 3 4 ,4 9 2

1 4 ,7 7 2
4 5 7 ,2 3 6

6 ,6 9 8
4 6 5 ,5 6 7

4 ,4 7 5
6 8 5 ,7 4 6

1 ,4 7 6

674

333

3 ,6 9 2 ,9 4 8

5 0 7 ,0 6 3

4 6 2 ,5 3 3

6 2 9 ,0 7 3

1 1 ,7 3 1
8 0 1 ,9 9 4

6 ,0 8 4

1 ,8 0 8

897

488

9 1 7 ,2 5 0

6 2 1 ,2 4 0

6 0 9 ,1 9 9

1 ,0 0 5 ,6 8 8

1 9 ,4 0 5
2 ,9 5 1 ,8 7 3

5 ,6 5 4

2 ,1 7 7

1 ,0 0 1

1 ,9 3 3 ,6 6 8

1 ,4 8 0 ,8 7 8

2 ,0 4 3 , 5 9 4

E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

In fo rm a tio n

F in an cial a c tiv itie s
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

......................

7 1 6 ,8 0 8

4 5 8 ,3 9 0

1 2 8 ,2 6 6

7 1 ,6 1 5

3 7 ,5 2 9

.......................................

7 ,6 2 3 ,1 2 6

7 5 0 ,4 2 1

8 4 3 ,3 1 1

9 5 2 ,1 9 8

1 ,1 2 1 ,8 2 5

1 ,2 3 8 ,2 6 7

8 2 5 ,6 1 7

7 3 ,8 0 7

2 9 ,1 3 9

1 ,1 7 0 ,0 9 8

1 7 3 ,7 7 3
1 ,1 4 0 ,7 7 2

1 0 7 ,6 9 4

1 6 ,4 4 1 ,2 8 9

1 ,4 5 1 ,9 3 2

2 ,2 4 5 ,7 2 9

2 ,0 2 2 ,7 4 5

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d b u s in e s s s e rvices
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , f ir s t q u a rte r ......................
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h .......................................

E d u c a tio n a nd health s e rvices
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r

......................

6 7 9 ,7 6 2

3 2 1 ,4 2 8

1 5 5 ,3 3 3

9 6 ,1 2 1

6 1 ,0 9 7

2 2 ,7 8 9

1 5 ,9 8 9

3 ,7 2 1

1 ,6 9 0

1 ,5 9 4

.......................................

1 4 ,7 1 2 ,8 2 9

6 0 3 ,4 7 0

1 ,0 2 7 ,9 1 3

1 ,2 9 1 ,6 0 5

1 ,8 3 6 ,7 9 9

1 ,5 8 9 ,8 0 9

2 ,3 8 3 ,4 4 3

1 ,2 7 4 ,1 2 0

1 ,1 7 8 ,7 2 7

3 ,5 2 6 ,9 4 3

E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a r te r .....................
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h .......................................

6 2 7 ,8 7 5

2 4 9 ,5 4 2

1 0 4 ,5 4 8

1 1 0 ,3 7 4

1 1 7 ,2 6 4

3 3 ,9 3 9

9 ,4 6 3

1 ,7 2 5

667

353

1 1 ,5 9 0 ,0 4 8

3 9 0 ,2 5 8

7 0 5 ,2 2 2

1 ,5 4 2 ,7 6 0

3 ,5 6 0 ,7 1 5

2 ,2 6 3 ,9 3 5

1 ,3 4 4 ,2 1 7

5 8 6 ,2 6 9

4 5 3 ,7 0 3

7 4 2 ,9 6 9

9 5 4 ,6 2 7

7 5 0 ,2 6 1
9 7 7 ,8 7 1

1 1 5 ,6 1 9
7 5 2 ,6 8 9

5 5 ,7 5 6
7 3 4 ,9 8 0

2 4 ,2 5 4
7 0 3 ,6 8 7

5 ,4 9 8

2 ,6 3 0
3 8 4 ,0 4 4

484
1 6 0 ,2 4 9

102

23

3 7 2 ,4 9 9

6 6 ,6 6 0

3 5 ,0 6 1

E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

L e is u re a n d h o s p itality

O th e r se rv ic e s
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r ......................
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h .......................................

'

4 ,1 8 7 ,7 4 0

I n c lu d e s e s ta b lis h m e n ts th a t re p o rte d n o w o r k e r s in M a rc h 2 0 0 1 .

2 In c lu d e s d a ta f o r u n c la s s ifie d e s ta b lis h m e n ts , n o t s h o w n s e p a ra te ly .

Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

NO TE:

D e ta il m a y n o t a d d to to ta ls d u e to ro u n d in g .

D a ta r e fle c t th e m o v e m e n t o f

In d ia n T rib a l C o u n c il e s ta b lis h m e n ts fro m p riv a te in d u s try to th e p u b lic s e c to r .
N o te s o n C u r r e n t L a b o r S ta tis tic s .

S ee


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

19. Annual data: establishments, employment, and wages covered under Ul and UCFE by ownership
Year

A v e ra g e
e s t a b lis h m e n t s

A v e ra g e

T o ta l a n n u a l w a g e s

annual
e m p lo y m e n t

(in t h o u s a n d s )

A v e ra g e a n n u a l
w ages

A v e ra g e
w e e k ly

p e r e m p lo y e e

w age

T o ta l c o v e r e d (U l a n d U C F E )

1 9 9 2 .................................................................

6 ,5 3 2 ,6 0 8

1 0 7 ,4 1 3 ,7 2 8

$ 2 ,7 8 1 ,6 7 6 ,4 7 7

$ 2 5 ,8 9 7

1 9 9 3 .................................................................

6 ,6 7 9 ,9 3 4

1 0 9 ,4 2 2 ,5 7 1

2 ,8 8 4 ,4 7 2 ,2 8 2

2 6 ,3 6 1

1 9 9 4 .................................................................

6 ,8 2 6 ,6 7 7

1 1 2 ,6 1 1 ,2 8 7

3 ,0 3 3 ,6 7 6 ,6 7 8

2 6 ,9 3 9

518

1 9 9 5 .................................................................

7 ,0 4 0 ,6 7 7

1 1 5 ,4 8 7 ,8 4 1

3 ,2 1 5 ,9 2 1 ,2 3 6

2 7 ,8 4 6

536

1 9 9 6 .................................................................

3 ,4 1 4 ,5 1 4 ,8 0 8

2 8 ,9 4 6

$498
507

7 ,1 8 9 ,1 6 8

1 1 7 ,9 6 3 ,1 3 2

1 9 9 7 .................................................................

7 ,3 6 9 ,4 7 3

1 2 1 ,0 4 4 ,4 3 2

3 ,6 7 4 ,0 3 1 ,7 1 8

3 0 ,3 5 3

584

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

7 ,6 3 4 ,0 1 8

1 2 4 ,1 8 3 ,5 4 9

3 ,9 6 7 ,0 7 2 ,4 2 3

3 1 ,9 4 5

614

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

7 ,8 2 0 ,8 6 0

1 2 7 ,0 4 2 ,2 8 2

4 ,2 3 5 ,5 7 9 ,2 0 4

3 3 ,3 4 0

641

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

7 ,8 7 9 ,1 1 6

1 2 9 ,8 7 7 ,0 6 3

4 ,5 8 7 ,7 0 8 ,5 8 4

3 5 ,3 2 3

679

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

7 ,9 8 4 ,5 2 9

1 2 9 ,6 3 5 ,8 0 0

4 ,6 9 5 ,2 2 5 ,1 2 3

3 6 ,2 1 9

697

557

U l c o v e re d

1 9 9 2 .................................................................

6 ,4 8 5 ,4 7 3
6 ,6 3 2 ,2 2 1

1 0 4 ,2 8 8 ,3 2 4

$ 2 ,6 7 2 ,0 8 1 ,8 2 7
2 ,7 7 1 ,0 2 3 ,4 1 1

$ 2 5 ,6 2 2

$493

1 0 6 ,3 5 1 ,4 3 1

2 6 ,0 5 5

501

1 0 9 ,5 8 8 ,1 8 9

2 ,9 1 8 ,6 8 4 ,1 2 8

1 1 2 ,5 3 9 ,7 9 5

1 9 9 6 .................................................................

7 ,1 3 7 ,6 4 4

1 1 5 ,0 8 1 ,2 4 6

3 ,1 0 2 ,3 5 3 ,3 5 5
3 ,2 9 8 ,0 4 5 ,2 8 6

2 6 ,6 3 3
2 7 ,5 6 7

512

1 9 9 5 .................................................................

6 ,7 7 8 ,3 0 0
6 ,9 9 0 ,5 9 4

1 9 9 7 .................................................................

7 ,3 1 7 ,3 6 3

1 1 8 ,2 3 3 ,9 4 2

3 ,5 5 3 ,9 3 3 ,8 8 5

1 9 9 3 .................................................................
1 9 9 4 .................................................................

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

530

2 8 ,6 5 8

551

3 0 ,0 5 8

578

7 ,5 8 6 ,7 6 7

1 2 1 ,4 0 0 ,6 6 0

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

7 ,7 7 1 ,1 9 8

1 2 4 ,2 5 5 ,7 1 4

4 ,1 1 2 ,1 6 9 ,5 3 3

3 3 ,0 9 4

636

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

7 ,8 2 8 ,8 6 1

1 2 7 ,0 0 5 ,5 7 4

4 ,4 5 4 ,9 6 6 ,8 2 4

3 5 ,0 7 7

675

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

7 ,9 3 3 ,5 3 6

1 2 6 ,8 8 3 ,1 8 2

4 ,5 6 0 ,5 1 1 ,2 8 0

3 5 ,9 4 3

691

3 ,8 4 5 ,4 9 4 ,0 8 9

3 1 ,6 7 6

609

P r iv a t e i n d u s t r y c o v e r e d

1 9 9 2 .................................................................

6 ,3 0 8 ,7 1 9

8 9 ,3 4 9 ,8 0 3

$ 2 ,2 8 2 ,5 9 8 ,4 3 1

$ 2 5 ,5 4 7

$491

1 9 9 3 .................................................................
1 9 9 4 .................................................................

6 ,4 5 4 ,3 8 1
6 ,5 9 6 ,1 5 8

9 1 ,2 0 2 ,9 7 1

2 ,3 6 5 ,3 0 1 ,4 9 3
2 ,4 9 4 ,4 5 8 ,5 5 5

2 5 ,9 3 4

499

9 4 ,1 4 6 ,3 4 4

1 9 9 5 .................................................................

6 ,8 0 3 ,4 5 4

9 6 ,8 9 4 ,8 4 4

2 ,6 5 8 ,9 2 7 ,2 1 6

2 6 ,4 9 6
2 7 ,4 4 1

528

1 9 9 6 .................................................................
1 9 9 7 .................................................................

6 ,9 4 6 ,8 5 8

9 9 ,2 6 8 ,4 4 6

2 ,8 3 7 ,3 3 4 ,2 1 7

7 ,1 2 1 ,1 8 2

1 0 2 ,1 7 5 ,1 6 1

3 ,0 7 1 ,8 0 7 ,2 8 7

2 8 ,5 8 2
3 0 ,0 6 4

578

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

7 ,3 8 1 ,5 1 8
7 ,5 6 0 ,5 6 7

1 0 5 ,0 8 2 ,3 6 8
1 0 7 ,6 1 9 ,4 5 7

3 ,3 3 7 ,6 2 1 ,6 9 9
3 ,5 7 7 ,7 3 8 ,5 5 7

3 1 ,7 6 2
3 3 ,2 4 4

6 11
639

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

510
550

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

7 ,6 2 2 ,2 7 4

1 1 0 ,0 1 5 ,3 3 3

3 ,8 8 7 ,6 2 6 ,7 6 9

3 5 ,3 3 7

680

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

7 ,7 2 4 ,9 6 5

1 0 9 ,3 0 4 ,8 0 2

3 ,9 5 2 ,1 5 2 ,1 5 5

3 6 ,1 5 7

695

$534

S ta te g o v e r n m e n t c o v e r e d

1 9 9 2 .................................................................

5 8 ,8 0 1

4 ,0 4 4 ,9 1 4

5 9 ,1 8 5

4 ,0 8 8 ,0 7 5

$ 1 1 2 ,4 0 5 ,3 4 0
1 1 7 ,0 9 5 ,0 6 2

$ 2 7 ,7 8 9

1 9 9 3 .................................................................

2 8 ,6 4 3

551

1 2 2 ,8 7 9 ,9 7 7

2 9 ,5 1 8

568

1 9 9 4 .................................................................

6 0 ,6 8 6

4 ,1 6 2 ,9 4 4

1 9 9 5 .................................................................

6 0 ,7 6 3

4 ,2 0 1 ,8 3 6

1 2 8 ,1 4 3 ,4 9 1

3 0 ,4 9 7

586

1 9 9 6 .................................................................
1 9 9 7 .................................................................

6 2 ,1 4 6
6 5 ,3 5 2

4 ,1 9 1 ,7 2 6
4 ,2 1 4 ,4 5 1

1 3 1 ,6 0 5 ,8 0 0
1 3 7 ,0 5 7 ,4 3 2

3 1 ,3 9 7
3 2 ,5 2 1

604
625

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

6 7 ,3 4 7

4 ,2 4 0 ,7 7 9

1 4 2 ,5 1 2 ,4 4 5

3 3 ,6 0 5

646

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

7 0 ,5 3 8

4 ,2 9 6 ,6 7 3

1 4 9 ,0 1 1 ,1 9 4

3 4 ,6 8 1

667

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

6 5 ,0 9 6

4 ,3 7 0 ,1 6 0

1 5 8 ,6 1 8 ,3 6 5

3 6 ,2 9 6

698

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

6 4 ,5 8 3

4 ,4 5 2 ,2 3 7

1 6 8 ,3 5 8 ,3 3 1

3 7 ,8 1 4

727

$489
502

L o c a l g o v e rn m e n t c o v e re d

1 9 9 2 .................................................................
1 9 9 3 .................................................................
1 9 9 4 .................................................................
1 9 9 5 .................................................................
1 9 9 6 .................................................................
1 9 9 7 .................................................................

1 1 7 ,9 2 3
1 1 8 ,6 2 6
1 2 1 ,4 2 5
1 2 6 ,3 4 2
1 2 8 ,6 4 0

1 0 ,8 9 2 ,6 9 7

$ 2 7 7 ,0 4 5 ,5 5 7
2 8 8 ,5 9 4 ,6 9 7

$ 2 5 ,4 3 4

1 1 ,0 5 9 ,5 0 0
1 1 ,2 7 8 ,0 8 0

3 0 1 ,3 1 5 ,8 5 7

1 1 ,4 4 2 ,2 3 8
1 1 ,6 2 1 ,0 7 4

2 6 ,7 1 7
2 7 ,5 5 2

530

3 2 9 ,1 0 5 ,2 6 9

545
560

3 1 5 ,2 5 2 ,3 4 6

2 6 ,0 9 5

514

1 3 0 ,8 2 9

1 1 ,8 4 4 ,3 3 0

3 4 5 ,0 6 9 ,1 6 6

2 8 ,3 2 0
2 9 ,1 3 4

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

1 3 7 ,9 0 2

3 6 5 ,3 5 9 ,9 4 5
3 8 5 ,4 1 9 ,7 8 1

582

1 4 0 ,0 9 3

1 2 ,0 7 7 ,5 1 3
1 2 ,3 3 9 ,5 8 4

3 0 ,2 5 1

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

3 1 ,2 3 4

601

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

1 4 1 ,4 9 1

1 2 ,6 2 0 ,0 8 1

4 0 8 ,7 2 1 ,6 9 0

3 2 ,3 8 7

623

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

1 4 3 ,9 8 9

1 3 ,1 2 6 ,1 4 3

4 4 0 ,0 0 0 ,7 9 5

3 3 ,5 2 1

645

F e d e r a l G o v e r n m e n t c o v e r e d (U C F E )

1 9 9 2 .................................................................
1 9 9 3 .................................................................
1 9 9 4 .................................................................
1 9 9 5 .................................................................
1 9 9 6 .................................................................
1 9 9 7 .................................................................
1 9 9 8 .................................................................
1 9 9 9 .................................................................

4 7 ,1 3 6
4 7 ,7 1 4

3 ,1 2 5 ,4 0 4

$ 1 0 9 ,5 9 4 ,6 5 0

$ 3 5 ,0 6 6

$674

3 ,0 7 1 ,1 4 0

1 1 3 ,4 4 8 ,8 7 1

3 6 ,9 4 0

710

4 8 ,3 7 7

3 ,0 2 3 ,0 9 8

1 1 4 ,9 9 2 ,5 5 0

3 8 ,0 3 8

731

5 0 ,0 8 3
5 1 ,5 2 4

2 ,9 4 8 ,0 4 6

1 1 3 ,5 6 7 ,8 8 1

3 8 ,5 2 3

7 41

2 ,8 8 1 ,8 8 7

1 1 6 ,4 6 9 ,5 2 3

4 0 ,4 1 4

777

5 2 ,1 1 0
4 7 ,2 5 2

2 ,8 1 0 ,4 8 9

1 2 0 ,0 9 7 ,8 3 3
1 2 1 ,5 7 8 ,3 3 4

4 2 ,7 3 2

822

2 ,7 8 2 ,8 8 8

4 3 ,6 8 8

840

4 9 ,6 6 1

2 ,7 8 6 ,5 6 7

852

5 0 ,2 5 6

2 ,8 7 1 ,4 8 9

1 2 3 ,4 0 9 ,6 7 2
1 3 2 ,7 4 1 ,7 6 0

4 4 ,2 8 7

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

4 6 ,2 2 8

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

5 0 ,9 9 3

2 ,7 5 2 ,6 1 9

1 3 4 ,7 1 3 ,8 4 3

4 8 ,9 4 0

889
941

NO TE:

D e ta il m a y n o t a d d to to ta ls d u e to ro u n d in g .

D a ta r e fle c t th e m o v e m e n t o f In d ia n T rib a l C o u n c il e s ta b lis h m e n ts fro m p riv a te in d u s tr y to

th e p u b lic s e c to r. S e e N o te s o n C u r r e n t L a b o r S ta tis tic s .

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

65

Current Labor Statistics:

20.

Labor Force Data

Annual data: establishments, employment, and wages covered under Ul and UCFE, by State
A v e ra g e

A v e ra g e a n n u a l

T o ta l a n n u a l w a g e s

A v e r a g e w e e k ly

e s t a b lis h m e n t s

e m p lo y m e n t

(in t h o u s a n d s )

w age

S ta t e

20002001

2000-

2001

2001

change

T o ta l U n ite d S ta te s

...........

A l a b a m a ...................................

7 .9 8 4 ,5 2 9

2001

30

2001

20002001

2001

change

1 2 9 ,6 3 5 ,8 0 0

- 1 8 5 ,7 7 9

$ 4 ,6 9 5 ,2 2 5 ,1 2 3

1 ,8 5 4 ,4 6 2

-2 3 ,5 0 0

5 5 ,8 2 2 ,0 9 7

$ 1 0 9 ,8 8 4 ,9 2 0
1 ,2 8 4 ,0 8 8

change

$697

$18

579

21

A l a s k a .......................................

1 9 ,2 8 7

467

2 8 3 ,0 3 3

7 ,4 7 9

1 0 ,2 3 7 ,2 9 2

5 5 3 ,2 3 7

696

20

A r i z o n a ......................................

1 1 8 ,7 0 6

3 ,5 4 6

2 ,2 4 3 ,6 5 2

2 2 ,9 4 2

7 4 ,9 6 3 ,0 7 2

2 ,5 4 6 ,2 4 8

643

16

A r k a n s a s .................................

7 2 ,8 1 4

587

1 ,1 2 7 ,1 5 1

9 6 3 ,8 6 2

524

18

1 ,0 6 5 ,6 9 9

7 4 ,6 4 5

1 4 ,9 8 1 ,7 5 7

-3 ,7 3 1
1 3 8 ,2 8 4

3 0 ,7 2 5 ,5 9 2

C a li f o r n i a .................................

6 1 9 ,1 4 6 ,6 5 1

7 ,4 9 7 ,4 7 6

795

3

C o l o r a d o .................................

1 5 3 ,8 2 4

5 ,3 4 7

1 4 ,7 2 8

8 3 ,5 4 7 ,6 0 2

2 ,2 7 4 ,6 6 9

1 0 8 ,2 0 1

414

7 8 ,2 7 2 ,0 9 9

2 ,0 9 5 ,2 4 3

730
904

15

C o n n e c t i c u t ............................

2 ,2 0 1 ,3 7 9
1 ,6 6 5 ,6 0 7

D e la w a r e .................................

2 5 ,2 5 3
2 8 ,4 1 4

505

4 0 6 ,7 3 6

482

1 5 ,6 2 9 ,6 3 6

7 8 7 ,0 6 7

739

D is tr ic t o f C o lu m b ia ............

9

6 3 5 ,7 4 9

-1 ,5 3 5

3 5 ,5 4 3 ,5 5 9

1 ,7 9 0 ,0 8 6

1 ,0 7 5

36
56

607

19

-9 ,1 2 1

29

F l o r i d a .......................................

4 5 4 ,0 7 7

9 ,3 6 7

7 ,1 5 3 ,5 8 9

9 2 ,6 0 6

2 2 5 ,7 1 3 ,7 0 1

9 ,9 3 3 ,3 5 6

G e o r g i a ....................................

2 3 0 ,2 3 2

1 3 6 ,0 3 9 ,4 3 8

3 ,1 9 5 ,9 2 6

676

18

3 5 ,4 3 9

3 ,8 7 1 ,7 6 3
5 5 7 ,1 4 6

-1 0 ,9 4 1

H a w a i i .......................................

5 ,2 1 9
1 ,4 1 2

3 ,9 6 1

1 7 ,4 1 2 ,2 1 0

4 6 9 ,2 6 6

6 01

12

I d a h o ..........................................

4 6 ,4 8 0

1 ,0 8 4

5 7 1 ,3 1 4

8 ,1 3 7

1 5 ,8 6 4 ,5 1 0

2 6 3 ,8 3 2

534

1

I l l i n o i s ........................................

3 1 9 ,5 8 8

-2 ,7 2 3

5 ,8 8 6 ,2 4 8

-5 4 ,2 5 9

2 3 0 ,0 5 4 ,8 3 5

4 ,0 5 0 ,8 1 1

752

20

I n d i a n a ......................................

1 5 1 ,3 7 6

- 1 ,3 2 8

2 ,8 7 1 ,2 3 6

-6 3 ,3 9 2

9 1 ,2 4 6 ,1 8 9

1 8 3 ,5 2 0

6 11

14

I o w a ...........................................

9 1 ,0 0 6

-5 ,8 2 5

1 ,4 2 9 ,5 4 3

-1 3 ,4 3 2

4 1 ,2 2 3 ,5 3 4

9 1 9 ,4 9 2

555

18

K a n s a s ......................................
K e n tu c k y ..................................

8 0 ,5 2 1
1 0 8 ,0 2 5

52
302

1 ,3 1 9 ,6 6 7
1 ,7 3 6 ,5 7 5

5 ,9 8 4
-2 6 ,1 6 0

3 9 ,7 9 2 ,1 1 4
5 2 ,1 3 3 ,4 1 7

1 ,2 2 1 ,3 8 7
1 ,3 6 7 ,0 2 8

580
577

15
23

L o u i s i a n a ................................
M a i n e ........................................

1 1 5 ,8 0 7

-2 ,3 8 6

1 ,8 6 9 ,9 6 6

827

5 4 ,4 7 3 ,1 4 6

2 ,3 4 5 ,8 7 1

24

4 6 ,2 0 6

1 ,3 4 4

5 9 3 ,1 6 6

2 ,4 7 2

1 7 ,0 9 2 ,0 4 3

7 5 0 ,8 8 6

560
554

22

M a r y l a n d ..................................

1 4 7 ,1 5 8
1 9 1 ,8 2 4

622

1 6 ,3 9 2

9 2 ,6 4 4 ,8 7 3

5 ,0 9 6 ,0 1 6

736

36

6 ,8 4 8

2 ,4 2 1 ,8 9 9
3 ,2 7 6 ,2 2 4

2 1 ,1 0 4

1 4 7 ,3 4 8 ,2 3 4

3 ,5 7 4 ,4 9 4

865
719

16

704

23

499

14

M a s s a c h u s e t t s .....................
M ic h ig a n ..................................

2 5 9 ,5 5 6

- 1 0 7 ,8 8 0

1 6 7 ,3 8 5 ,1 2 9

1 5 6 ,0 3 1

5 ,8 0 9
487

4 ,4 7 6 ,6 5 9

M in n e s o ta ...............................

2 ,6 0 9 ,6 6 9

1 ,3 2 5

9 5 ,4 7 9 ,1 8 8

-2 ,2 9 5 ,1 5 8
3 ,1 0 7 ,3 9 6

M is s is s ip p i ..............................

6 3 ,2 0 7

-7 4 8

1 ,1 1 1 ,2 5 5

-2 5 ,5 2 0

2 8 ,8 0 6 ,8 6 9

1 5 1 ,3 8 5

M is s o u r i ...................................

1 6 3 ,1 2 1
4 0 ,4 7 7

138

2 ,6 5 2 ,8 7 6

-2 3 ,9 6 0

8 6 ,0 0 9 ,6 9 4

2 ,0 0 0 ,4 3 8

M o n t a n a ...................................

2 ,1 3 6

3 8 3 ,9 0 5

4 ,8 6 2

9 ,6 7 2 ,3 7 1

4 7 2 ,1 1 2

485

18

N e b r a s k a ................................
N e v a d a ....................................

5 2 ,6 5 3
4 9 ,6 3 5

836
1 ,7 7 0

8 8 3 ,9 2 0

1 ,5 1 6

2 5 ,0 8 3 ,2 9 3

6 4 6 ,7 4 5

546

1 ,0 4 3 ,7 4 8

2 5 ,9 1 9

1 ,7 1 7 ,0 6 3

637

N e w H a m p s h i r e ...................

4 6 ,0 7 0

171

6 1 0 ,1 9 2

3 ,6 8 5

3 4 ,5 6 9 ,5 0 6
2 1 ,6 5 0 ,2 6 7

13
16

5 8 2 ,7 5 4

682

14

N e w J e r s e y ............................

2 5 6 ,5 3 6

1 7 1 ,7 9 3 ,6 4 2

2 ,4 4 3 ,6 1 8

623

7

19

852

12

4 8 ,4 3 9

- 1 3 ,7 9 3
522

3 ,8 7 6 ,1 9 4

N e w M e x i c o ...........................

7 2 9 ,4 2 2

1 2 ,2 9 3

2 0 ,9 3 5 ,8 2 5

1 ,2 1 6 ,1 9 1

552

N e w Y o r k ................................

5 3 8 ,8 9 8

9 ,8 2 2

8 ,4 2 3 ,3 1 2

-4 7 ,4 4 6

3 9 3 ,5 9 8 ,6 6 6

9 ,3 8 3 ,3 4 6

899

23
27

3 ,8 0 5 ,4 9 8
3 1 1 ,6 3 2

-5 7 ,2 7 2

1 2 1 ,8 6 6 ,0 0 7

1 ,8 5 8 ,8 7 2

2 ,4 1 2

8 ,0 1 1 ,0 8 5

3 7 8 ,5 1 0

616
494

19

5 ,4 3 4 ,7 6 9

-7 7 ,8 6 5

1 8 0 ,8 8 5 ,1 5 4

1 ,6 8 1 ,2 9 9

640

15

1 ,4 6 3 ,6 2 2

1 1 ,7 7 1

4 1 ,0 0 4 ,2 5 0

1 ,8 2 1 ,7 4 3

539

20

N o rth C a r o l i n a .......................

2 2 4 ,4 2 6

2 ,2 0 8

N o rth D a k o t a .........................

2 3 ,3 2 6

38
4 ,7 0 5
1 ,5 7 4

O h i o ...........................................

2 8 5 ,5 6 7

O k la h o m a ...............................
O r e g o n ......................................

9 0 ,6 0 3

- 1 ,2 2 1

19

1 1 1 ,0 7 3

2 ,1 5 0

1 ,5 9 6 ,7 5 3

-1 1 ,1 7 5

5 3 ,0 1 8 ,3 6 5

3 1 7 ,0 9 8

639

9

P e n n s y lv a n ia ........................

3 3 1 ,4 0 5

1 6 ,1 8 7

5 ,5 5 2 ,3 6 6

-5 ,5 3 5

673

19

3 3 ,6 3 6

311

4 6 8 ,9 5 2

1,3 5 1

1 9 4 ,2 1 1 ,6 9 6
1 5 ,7 5 8 ,3 6 9

5 ,1 5 8 ,6 3 2

R h o d e I s l a n d ..........................

5 0 7 ,6 1 0

646

19

-3 3 ,2 1 0

5 2 ,2 7 5 ,6 7 9

9 8 6 ,9 6 7

S o u th C a r o l i n a ......................

1 1 4 ,9 7 9

5 ,6 1 3

2 7 ,3 6 5

221

3 6 4 ,7 1 5

598

9 ,3 3 7 ,0 1 4

3 0 6 ,3 0 2

563
492

21

S o u th D a k o t a ........................
T e n n e s s e e ..............................

1 2 5 ,1 6 5

140

2 ,6 2 5 ,7 4 6

8 2 ,7 6 2 ,4 0 2

1 ,2 7 5 ,6 4 1

606

18

T e x a s ........................................

4 9 4 ,0 8 8

4 ,5 0 9

9 ,3 5 0 ,7 7 0

-4 1 ,0 0 5
6 2 ,4 3 7

3 3 7 ,0 4 7 ,9 6 2

1 2 ,4 8 4 ,2 2 3

693

21

U ta h ...........................................

6 8 ,6 0 7

2 ,4 7 0

1 ,0 5 0 ,6 7 4

6 ,5 5 1

3 1 ,6 0 0 ,7 1 5

1 ,0 8 2 ,2 0 4

578

16

V e r m o n t ...................................

2 4 ,1 5 6

287

2 9 8 ,0 2 0

1 ,5 5 8

9 ,0 1 1 ,4 6 8

4 3 9 ,4 9 2

581

25

1 ,7 8 6 ,8 9 9

15

V i r g i n i a ......................................

1 9 5 ,6 3 9

3 ,0 4 8

3 ,4 3 6 ,1 7 2

8 ,4 1 1

1 2 6 ,2 2 2 ,3 5 0

5 ,6 6 2 ,7 7 9

706

W a s h in g t o n ............................

2 2 1 ,4 5 0

1 ,7 7 5

-8 4 5

4 1 3 ,7 4 0
7 2 6 ,8 3 6

7

-1 8 6

1 0 0 ,7 4 6 ,6 6 3
1 9 ,1 8 7 ,8 3 2

720
538

21

W is c o n s in ...............................

4 6 ,6 2 0
1 4 8 ,2 2 7

2 ,6 8 9 ,5 0 7
6 8 5 ,7 5 4

-1 4 ,9 2 1

W e s t V i r g i n i a .........................

2 ,3 7 4

2 ,7 1 7 ,6 6 0

-1 8 ,3 8 8

8 5 ,7 1 3 ,7 2 5

1 ,7 3 3 ,6 2 9

607

17

W y o m i n g ..................................

2 1 ,2 8 8

429

2 3 7 ,2 7 8

6 ,4 4 6

6 ,6 5 4 ,0 9 2

4 5 9 ,5 9 6

539

23

P u e rto R i c o ............................

5 1 ,7 3 3
3 ,2 3 6

-6 3 3
-1 7

1 ,0 0 7 ,9 1 9

- 1 8 ,2 3 4

1 9 ,8 8 4 ,3 8 1

5 7 8 ,1 7 3

379

17

4 4 ,3 3 0

1 ,981

1 ,2 9 4 ,8 8 5

1 2 0 ,9 3 6

562

29

V ir g in I s l a n d s ........................

N O T E : D e ta il m a y n o t a d d to to ta ls d u e to ro u n d in g .

66

2001

change

1 5 4 ,5 4 0

1 1 2 ,3 5 6

2000-

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

30


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

21. Annual data: Employment and average annual pay for all workers
covered under Ul and UCFE in the 249 largest U.S. counties
E m p lo ym en t
C o u n ty 1
2001

Percent
change,
20 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

U n ite d S ta te s 4 ........................

1 2 9 ,6 3 5 ,8 0 0

- .1

J e ffe rs o n , A L .........................
M a d is o n , A L ............................
M o b ile , A L ................................
M o n tg o m e r y , A L ...................
A n c h o ra g e , A K .....................
M a ric o p a , A Z ..........................
P im a , A Z ...................................
P u la s k i, A R .............................
A la m e d a , C A .........................
C o n tr a C o s ta , C A ................

3 8 0 ,6 8 0
1 5 6 ,1 6 9
1 6 7 ,0 0 0
1 2 9 ,8 7 8
1 3 3 ,8 4 2
1 ,5 6 1 ,7 7 3
3 2 6 ,9 1 7
2 4 0 ,7 5 4
6 9 7 ,1 8 1
3 3 7 ,4 4 4

- 1 .0
1 .3
-1 .5
-.9
3.1

F re s n o , C A .............................
K e rn , C A ...................................
L o s A n g e le s , C A ...................
M a rin , C A .................................
M o n te re y , C A .........................
O ra n g e , C A .............................
P la c e r, C A ...............................
R iv e rs id e , C A .........................
S a c r a m e n to , C A ...................
S a n B e r n a rd in o , C A ............

3 2 2 ,0 8 4
2 4 2 ,2 3 2
4 ,1 0 3 ,3 7 0
1 1 1 ,9 3 9
1 6 6 ,1 8 6
1 ,4 1 1 ,9 4 4
1 1 6 ,1 8 5
4 9 1 ,5 3 5
5 8 8 ,4 2 6
5 4 5 ,1 1 3

-.1

S a n D ie g o , C A .......................
S a n F ra n c is c o , C A ...............
S a n J o a q u in , C A ...................
S a n M a te o , C A .....................
S a n ta B a rb a ra , C A .............
S a n ta C la ra , C A ....................
S a n ta C r u z , C A .....................
S o la n o , C A .............................
S o n o m a , C A ...........................
S ta n is la u s , C A .......................

1 ,2 1 8 ,9 8 2
5 8 6 ,0 8 5
2 0 4 ,5 0 4
3 6 9 ,8 6 8
1 7 7 ,2 3 4
1 ,0 0 2 ,6 3 7
1 0 2 ,6 6 9
1 2 1 ,4 0 2
1 9 4 ,9 2 2
1 6 4 ,4 7 3

T u la re , C A ...............................
V e n tu r a , C A ............................
A d a m s , C O .............................
A ra p a h o e , C O ........................
B o u ld e r, C O ............................
D e n v e r, C O .............................
E l P a s o , C O ............................
J e ffe rs o n , C O ........................
L a r im e r, C O ............................
F a irfie ld , C T ............................

1 3 2 ,8 7 8
2 9 3 ,2 0 8
1 4 6 ,0 4 3
2 8 5 ,9 6 3
1 8 4 ,7 5 5
4 6 1 ,9 9 6
2 4 0 ,1 0 0
2 1 0 ,3 7 5
1 2 1 ,8 8 0
4 2 1 ,2 1 1

H a rtfo r d , C T ............................
N e w H a v e n , C T ....................
N e w L o n d o n , C T ...................
N e w C a s tle , D E ....................
W a s h in g to n , D C ...................
A l a c h u i F L ............................
B re v a rd , F L .............................
B ro w a r d , F L ............................
C o llie r, F L ................................
D u v a l, F L .................................

4 9 7 ,2 8 0
3 6 3 ,2 6 5
1 2 4 ,6 8 4
2 8 2 ,3 1 8
6 3 5 ,7 3 4
1 1 9 ,1 4 8
1 8 4 ,7 2 5
6 6 3 ,9 5 4
1 1 0 ,2 3 0
4 3 6 ,6 6 3

E s c a m b ia , F L .........................
H ills b o ro u g h , F L ...................
L e e , F L .....................................
L e o n , F L ...................................
M a n a te e , F L ...........................
M ia m i-D a d e , F L ....................
O ra n g e , F L .............................
P a lm B e a c h , F L ....................
P in e lla s , F L .............................
P o lk , F L ....................................

1 2 1 ,2 8 5
5 9 5 ,7 6 8
1 7 1 ,9 0 2
1 4 2 ,9 8 1
1 1 8 ,7 8 8
9 9 3 ,8 3 4
6 0 2 ,6 6 8
4 9 9 ,6 8 8
4 4 8 ,7 8 8
1 8 4 ,4 7 1

S a r a s o ta , F L ...........................
S e m in o le , F L .........................
V o lu s ia , F L ...............................
C h a th a m , G A .........................
C la y to n , G A ............................
C o b b , G A ..................................
D e k a lb , G A .............................
F u lto n , G A ...............................
G w in n e tt, G A .........................
R ic h m o n d , G A .......................

1 4 7 ,2 0 6
1 4 5 ,1 4 7
1 4 2 ,4 7 8
1 2 2 ,6 0 8
1 1 4 ,9 8 2
3 0 1 ,5 2 0
3 0 5 ,9 0 3
7 5 4 ,8 7 0
2 8 9 ,5 3 8
1 0 4 ,6 9 4

1 .2
- .6

-.7
- .1

.7

1 .5
.6

1 .3
.8
1 .6

A v erag e a nn ual pay
R a nked by
perce n t
cha nge,
20 0 0 -2 0 0 1 3
-

3 6 ,2 1 9

2 .5

3 5 ,4 5 3
3 7 ,0 8 9
2 9 ,5 0 2
2 9 ,9 7 9
3 7 ,9 9 8
3 5 ,6 8 9
3 0 ,6 9 0
3 2 ,2 6 1
4 6 ,4 8 9
4 4 ,7 4 4

4 .2
3 .5
3.1
3 .8
3 .7

212

192
16
61
170
175
135
80
136
49
87
55
75
46

6 .1

1
8

18

2 .8

21

2 .0

-3 .3
1 .9

37
246
39

.1

120

.8

76
233
64
19
32
30

2 .1
2 .2

1 .5

130
50

.6

88

-.2

.0

.9

144
13
171
65

.1

121

2 .3
- 1 .0

29
198

-.5

163

- 1.1

201

3 .2
- .6

1 .6

47

.2

112

-.2

2 .1

145
81
43
33

5 .9

2

1 .8

41

.8
1 .8

77
42
5

.7
1 .7

4 .5
.9
5 .2
1 .6
.2

3 .9
3 .3
.1

66

4
48
113
9
12
122

4 .5

6

2 .2

.1

31
146
147
151
137
176
123

2 .9
-.9

193

- .2
- .2

-.3

-.1

-.7

P e rc en t
c ha nge,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

197
54

4 .2
3 .0

-2 .3
.9
3 .0

2001

20

2 7 ,8 7 8
3 0 ,1 0 6
4 0 ,8 9 1
4 3 ,5 4 7
3 1 ,7 3 5
4 0 ,2 5 2
3 4 ,7 7 3
2 9 ,9 7 1
3 9 ,1 7 3
3 0 ,9 9 5
3 8 ,4 1 8
6 1 ,0 6 8
3 0 ,8 1 8
6 2 ,2 8 8
3 3 ,6 2 6
6 5 ,9 3 1
3 5 ,0 2 2
3 3 ,4 9 6
3 6 ,1 4 5
2 9 ,5 9 1

1 .6

5.1
4 .7
3.1
5 .7
6 .5
5 .3
3.1
2 .2

5 .9
2 .6

4.1
2 .8

3 .8
3 .6
2 .3
6 .1

5 .3
-7 .2
3 .2
-1 3 .5
-2 . 2
5 .7
1.1

4 .9

2 4 ,7 3 2
3 7 ,7 8 3
3 4 ,7 5 3
4 4 ,9 9 9
4 4 ,3 1 0
4 6 ,1 3 4
3 4 ,3 9 1
3 7 ,8 1 9
3 3 ,2 4 8
6 3 ,1 6 3

4 .2
1 .9
4 .0
-2 .7
-2 .8
4 .0
4.1
4 .5

4 5 ,0 5 0
3 9 ,4 8 3
3 8 ,5 0 5
4 2 ,8 4 9
5 5 ,9 0 9
2 6 ,9 1 7
3 2 ,7 9 8
3 3 ,9 6 6
3 0 ,8 3 9
3 3 ,7 2 1

3 .2
2 .9
4 .8
5 .8
5 .6
2 .9

2 .6

3 .3

2 .2
2 .2

2 .9
2 .9

2 8 ,6 1 0
3 2 ,8 7 4
2 9 ,4 3 2
3 0 ,2 8 7
2 6 ,6 2 9
3 4 ,5 2 4
3 2 ,2 1 8
3 5 ,9 5 7
3 1 ,7 4 2
2 8 ,8 9 0

7.1
3 .7
4 .6
3 .5
4 .4
3 .6
3 .5

2 9 ,0 3 0
3 1 ,9 5 1
2 6 ,0 6 4
3 0 ,5 4 9
3 8 ,3 0 1
4 0 ,1 7 4
3 9 ,6 4 8
4 7 ,7 6 1
3 9 ,4 0 5
2 9 ,4 3 1

1 .9
3 .6
3 .9
3 .0
4 .2
3 .6
2 .7
1 .5
.9
2 .9

2 .1

1 .5
3 .6

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

67

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data


Monthly Labor Review
68
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

21. Continued—Annual data: Employment and average annual pay for
all workers covered under Ul and UCFE in the 249 largest U.S.
counties
E m p lo ym en t
C o u n ty 1
2001

P ercent
change,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

A v erag e a nn ual pay
R a nked by
p erce nt
change,
200 0-2 0 0 1 3

H o n o lu lu , H I ............................
A d a , I D .......................................
C o o k , I L ....................................
D u P a g e , I L .............................
K a n e , Ï L ....................................
L a k e , I L .....................................
P e o ria , I L .................................
S a n g a m o n , I L ........................
W ill, I L ........................................
W in n e b a g o , I L .......................

4 0 9 ,6 6 9
1 8 2 ,3 0 9
2 ,6 3 0 ,7 6 8
5 8 0 ,9 3 8
1 9 4 ,3 7 4
3 1 6 ,1 5 0
1 0 2 ,7 6 4
1 4 5 ,1 9 5
1 4 5 ,5 7 0
1 3 9 ,8 1 5

A lle n , I N ....................................
E lk h a rt, I N ................................
L a k e , IN ....................................
M a rio n , I N ................................
S t. J o s e p h , I N ........................
V a n d e rb u rg h , IN ...................
L in n , IA .....................................
P o lk , I A .....................................
J o h n s o n , K S ...........................
S e d g w ic k , K S ........................

1 8 3 ,3 2 9
1 1 3 ,5 2 4
1 9 4 ,6 2 4
5 9 1 ,4 0 6
1 2 4 ,9 6 7
1 0 9 ,4 1 8
1 1 9 ,9 1 4
2 6 3 ,4 6 9
2 9 2 ,9 8 4
2 4 9 ,8 6 3

-2 .3
-6 .8
-1 .9
-1 .3
-3.1

S h a w n e e , K S .........................
F a y e tte , K Y .............................
J e ffe rs o n , K Y .........................
C a d d o , L A ................................
E a s t B a to n R o u g e , L A .......
J e ffe rs o n , L A .........................
L a fa y e tte , L A .........................
O rle a n s , L A .............................
C u m b e r la n d , M E ...................
A n n e A ru n d e l, M D ...............

1 0 0 ,4 6 2
1 6 7 ,7 1 4
4 3 1 ,3 4 7
1 2 0 ,8 7 7
2 4 3 ,3 9 2
2 1 3 ,9 1 1
1 1 9 ,2 9 4
2 6 3 ,4 2 7
1 6 8 ,1 4 7
2 0 0 ,1 7 4

.3
-2 .4
-1 .7
1 .3
- 1.1
-.4
4 .5

2 .8

22

B a ltim o r e , M D ........................
H o w a rd , M D ............................
M o n tg o m e r y , M D ..................
P rin c e G e o rg e s , M D ...........
B a ltim o r e C ity , M D ...............
B ris to l, M A ...............................
E s s e x , M A ...............................
H a m p d e n , M A ........................
M id d le s e x , M A .......................
N o rfo lk , M A .............................

3 6 0 ,1 2 8
1 3 2 ,9 3 5
4 4 9 ,8 8 1
3 0 4 ,0 2 2
3 8 1 ,1 5 5
2 1 8 ,8 1 8
3 0 6 ,1 1 1
2 0 4 ,8 2 4
8 5 0 ,2 9 5
3 2 7 ,0 6 7

.2

115
58
67
94

P ly m o u th , M A ........................
S u ffo lk , M A .............................
W o rc e s te r , M A .......................
G e n e s e e , M l ...........................
In g h a m , M l ...............................
K a la m a z o o , M l .......................
K e n t, M l ....................................
M a c o m b , M l ............................
O a k la n d , M l ............................
O tta w a , M l ...............................

1 6 6 ,4 7 1
6 0 2 ,9 8 3
3 2 1 ,0 4 4
1 6 0 ,4 4 2
1 7 4 ,2 9 0
1 1 6 ,7 2 8
3 3 9 ,5 1 0
3 2 6 ,6 0 0
7 5 5 ,4 5 1
1 1 5 ,8 8 0

W a s h te n a w , M l .....................
W a y n e , M l ...............................
A n o k a , M N ...............................
D a k o ta , M N .............................
H e n n e p in , M N ........................
R a m s e y , M N ...........................
H in d s , M S ................................
G re e n e , M O ............................
J a c k s o n , M O ...........................
S t. L o u is , M O .........................

1 9 5 ,5 6 2
8 4 8 ,4 6 3
1 09 ,5 2 1
1 5 5 ,6 6 2
8 6 3 ,6 7 4
3 3 3 ,3 8 0
1 3 4 ,2 8 5
1 4 0 ,7 3 9
3 8 4 ,9 4 2
6 4 1 ,1 5 1

S t. L o u is C ity , M O ................
D o u g la s , N E ...........................
L a n c a s te r, N E ........................
C la rk , N V .................................
W a s h o e , N V ...........................
H ills b o ro u g h , N H .................
R o c k in g h a m , N H .................
A tla n tic , N J .............................
B e rg e n , N J ...............................
B u r lin g to n , N J ........................

2 4 5 ,1 9 2
3 2 5 ,6 2 9
1 4 8 ,2 0 0
7 2 0 ,1 8 4
1 9 3 ,5 7 1
1 9 2 ,7 1 2
1 3 0 ,9 1 7
1 4 1 ,2 4 0
4 5 3 ,6 2 6
1 8 7 ,3 9 8

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

May 2003

.4
2 .7
-1 .5
-.2
-.1

-.3
- 1 .8
.2
.1

-2 .9

.1

-1 .7
-.2

2 .4
.1

.1

1 .3

1 .3
.9
.5
.4
- 1.1

99
23
213
148
138
1 52
223
114
124
241

3 2 ,5 3 1
3 3 ,0 8 1
4 4 ,1 0 8
4 3 ,4 7 0
3 3 ,3 6 2
4 3 ,9 7 0
3 3 ,2 8 8
3 6 ,2 5 9
3 4 ,2 8 0
3 1 ,9 5 1

234
249
226

3 2 ,8 3 0
3 0 ,7 9 7
3 2 ,0 1 7
3 7 ,8 8 5
3 0 ,7 6 9
3 0 ,4 9 4
3 4 ,6 4 9
3 4 ,9 4 4
3 7 ,2 0 4
3 3 ,9 3 7

210

244
125
219
149
27
126
105
237
220

56
202

1 60
7
127
57

100

.2

203
1 16

.9
1.4
.7

52
82

.8
.1

.3
-3 .0
-.3
-1 .7
- 1 .8
-3 .2
-1 .4
-2 .5
.2

-2 .4
-.3
1 .3
-.8
.0

-.9
-.9
-2 .3
- .8

-2 .2
-.7
.9
3 .2
2 .4
.0

.7
.9
1 .5
3 .6

2001

68

78
128
1 06
242
153

3 0 ,5 1 3
3 2 ,2 3 7
3 4 ,6 8 8
2 9 ,3 5 4
3 0 ,3 9 7
2 9 ,3 2 6
3 2 ,3 6 4
3 2 ,8 8 0
3 2 ,3 2 7
3 7 ,1 9 0
3 6 ,2 4 0
4 0 ,1 9 1
4 5 ,8 9 3
3 8 ,9 8 6
4 0 ,5 0 8
3 2 ,0 1 2
3 9 ,2 4 2
3 3 ,3 5 7
5 1 ,7 3 4
4 4 ,1 7 3

239

3 4 ,9 2 9
5 8 ,9 0 6
3 7 ,2 9 9
3 5 ,9 9 5
3 5 ,7 5 3
3 3 ,9 0 8
3 4 ,5 7 0
4 0 ,4 8 1
4 5 ,0 3 8
3 2 ,2 4 6

117
238
1 54
59
186
131
194
1 95
235
187

4 0 ,2 4 9
4 2 ,9 6 8
3 4 ,5 8 5
3 5 ,6 8 3
4 5 ,4 9 5
4 0 ,4 0 0
3 1 ,1 3 8
2 8 ,0 6 5
3 7 ,4 0 5
3 8 ,9 2 9

231
177
69
14
28
132
83
70
51

4 0 ,8 3 4
3 2 ,8 6 6
2 9 ,3 5 2
3 2 ,6 4 8
3 4 ,2 3 1
3 9 ,3 2 0
3 6 ,6 4 2
3 2 ,5 5 5
4 6 ,8 2 8
3 8 ,7 7 6

221

224
245
211

11

P e rc ent
change,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

2 .1

-4 .0
2 .8
2 .1

3 .7
3 .2
6 .1

4 .3
6 .1

1 .4
1 .7
1 .5
1 .4
3 .8
3 .7
3.1
1 .6

3 .8
-.1

3 .8
3 .9
5 .0
4.1
2 .0

3 .9
4 .6
8 .2

3 .7
5.1
4 .9
6 .2
6 .1

5 .0
5 .2
5 .0
4.1
.5
3 .6
.0
2 .2

3 .4
4 .0
-.9
-.9
2 .3
3 .8
1 .7
- 1 .0
1 .2

.9
.2
1 .2

1 .9
3 .8
3 .8
3 .4
1 .8

4.1
3 .7
2 .1

5 .8
1 .6

2 .9
1 .6

4 .5
.3
2 .3
4 .8
1.1

3.1


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

21. Continued—Annual data: Employment and average annual pay for
all workers covered under Ul and UCFE in the 249 largest U.S.
counties
E m p lo ym en t
C o u n ty 1
2001

P ercent
change,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

C a m d e n , N J ............................
E s s e x , N J ................................
H u d s o n , N J .............................
M e rc e r, N J ...............................
M id d le s e x , N J ........................
M o n m o u th , N J .......................
M o rris , N J ................................
O c e a n , N J ................................
P a s s a ic , N J .............................
S o m e r s e t, N J .........................

1 9 9 ,8 6 9
3 6 1 ,5 6 9
2 3 7 ,2 5 3
2 1 5 ,5 2 4
3 9 9 ,3 3 2
2 4 0 ,7 5 7
2 7 7 ,6 5 3
1 3 3 ,6 5 7
1 7 5 ,1 0 8
1 7 6 ,7 1 3

U n io n , N J .................................
B e r n a lillo , N M ........................
A lb a n y , N Y ..............................
B ro n x , N Y ................................
D u tc h e s s , N Y .........................
E rie , N Y ....................................
K in g s , N Y .................................
M o n ro e , N Y ............................
N a s s a u , N Y ............................
N e w Y o rk , N Y ........................

2 3 6 ,6 0 9
3 0 9 ,1 6 6
2 2 9 ,9 5 7
2 1 4 ,2 2 7
1 1 2 ,9 1 2
4 5 4 ,8 3 9
4 3 9 ,3 4 3
3 9 3 ,7 8 3
5 9 3 ,3 6 8
2 ,3 4 2 ,3 3 8

O n e id a , N Y .............................
O n o n d a g a , N Y .......................
O ra n g e , N Y .............................
Q u e e n s , N Y ............................
R o c k la n d , N Y ..........................
S u ffo lk , N Y ...............................
W e s tc h e s te r , N Y ...................
B u n c o m b e , N C .....................
C u m b e r la n d , N C ...................
D u rh a m , N C ............................

1 0 8 ,6 8 6
2 4 9 ,7 5 4
1 2 0 ,9 0 3
4 7 8 ,6 6 1
1 0 7 ,3 4 8
5 8 1 ,9 3 8
4 0 4 ,9 7 4
1 0 5 ,3 7 8
1 0 6 ,3 8 1
1 6 9 ,6 0 9

- 1 .8
- 1.1
.7
-.7
.4

F o rs y th , N C ............................
G u ilfo r d , N C ............................
M e c k le n b u rg , N C .................
W a k e , N C ................................
B u tle r, O H ................................
C u y a h o g a , O H .......................
F ra n k lin , O H ...........................
H a m ilto n , O H .........................
L o ra in , O H ...............................
L u c a s , O H ................................

1 8 0 ,1 5 5
2 7 4 ,0 7 7
5 1 4 ,0 3 6
3 8 5 ,7 7 7
1 2 6 ,8 6 3
7 9 6 ,3 5 3
7 0 2 ,6 2 8
5 5 9 ,8 5 2
1 0 3 ,1 1 5
2 3 4 ,6 7 8

-.7

M a h o n in g , O H .......................
M o n tg o m e r y , O H .................
S ta rk , O H .................................
S u m m it, O H ............................
O k la h o m a , O K .......................
T u ls a , O K .................................
C la c k a m a s , O R ....................
L a n e , O R .................................
M a rio n , O R .............................
M u ltn o m a h , O R ....................

1 0 8 ,7 6 9
2 9 8 ,9 8 2
1 7 3 ,8 8 8
2 6 1 ,0 9 8
4 1 5 ,5 0 7
3 4 2 ,5 0 2
1 3 3 ,9 9 7
1 3 7 ,5 7 4
1 2 6 ,9 9 9
4 4 4 ,3 9 3

-3 .7
-1 .5
- 1 .6
- 2 .1
.4

W a s h in g to n , O R ...................
A lle g h e n y , P A ........................
B e rk s , P A .................................
B u c k s , P A ................................
C h e s te r, P A ............................
C u m b e r la n d , P A ...................
D a u p h in , P A ...........................
D e la w a re , P A .........................
E rie , P A ....................................
L a n c a s te r, P A ........................

2 2 8 ,4 5 3
7 1 1 ,5 3 2
1 6 5 ,2 6 3
2 4 6 ,4 9 1
2 1 7 ,1 4 8
1 2 2 ,6 4 9
1 7 3 ,2 9 2
2 1 4 ,1 0 6
1 2 8 ,8 9 3
2 1 8 ,4 1 5

1 .4
.3
-.7

L e h ig h , P A ...............................
L u z e rn e , P A ............................
M o n tg o m e r y , P A ...................
P h ila d e lp h ia , P A ...................
W e s tm o re la n d , P A ...............
Y o rk , P A ...................................
P ro v id e n c e , R l .......................
C h a r le s to n , S C .....................
G re e n v ille , S C .......................
R ic h la n d , S C ...........................

1 7 2 ,8 6 0
1 4 1 ,9 4 4
4 8 5 ,8 2 2
6 5 8 ,8 2 7
1 3 4 ,1 2 8
1 6 5 ,8 7 9
2 8 8 ,6 5 0
1 8 0 ,7 1 1
2 2 6 ,3 6 2
2 0 5 ,8 4 1

.5
-.5
.0
2 .6

1 .3
3 .2
.4
3 .7

A v erag e a nn ual pay
R a nked by
perce nt
change,
200 0 -2 0 0 1 3

95
164
133
25
60
15
101
10

- 1.1
1 .7

204
44

-.1

139
84
165

2001

3 6 ,5 3 0
4 6 ,5 2 6
4 7 ,6 3 8
4 6 ,8 3 1
4 7 ,7 2 6
4 0 ,3 9 9
5 3 ,8 2 9
3 1 ,0 3 4
3 9 ,1 9 2
5 5 ,7 6 9

26
205
140
178
188
214

4 6 ,2 0 4
3 1 ,6 6 3
3 7 ,8 4 8
3 4 ,2 4 8
3 8 ,7 4 8
3 2 ,1 0 3
3 1 ,9 5 2
3 6 ,5 9 7
4 0 ,5 9 9
7 4 ,8 8 3

225
206
85
179
103
129
161
155
240
107

2 8 ,3 8 1
3 3 ,4 6 9
3 0 ,2 1 8
3 6 ,9 6 3
3 8 ,7 2 0
3 8 ,7 0 6
4 8 ,7 1 6
2 8 ,7 0 1
2 6 ,9 8 1
4 8 ,0 7 6

180
229
108
71
166
217
118
207
247
222

3 4 ,6 9 3
3 3 ,2 1 7
4 1 ,7 7 5
3 6 ,9 9 6
3 2 ,3 2 5
3 7 ,5 3 3
3 6 ,0 9 0
3 8 ,3 3 9
3 2 ,1 9 4
3 3 ,0 8 8

248
215
218
230
104
89
1 50
227
1 72
208

2 6 ,8 6 0
3 4 ,7 8 3
2 9 ,1 9 7
3 3 ,4 1 6
3 0 ,1 6 1
3 2 ,7 7 1
3 3 ,6 9 9
2 8 ,9 8 3
2 8 ,7 8 5
3 7 ,6 6 8

- .6

53
109
181
90
91
173

.3

110

1 .0

63
236
156

4 2 ,2 2 2
3 8 ,0 8 6
3 2 ,8 0 7
3 5 ,2 3 9
4 4 ,2 1 6
3 3 ,9 9 6
3 4 ,8 5 5
3 8 ,4 9 4
2 9 ,2 9 3
3 1 ,4 9 3

.7
-.5
.4
2 .5
- 1 .1
-.1

-.7
- .8

-1 .5

.1

-.4
-.3
-2 . 8
.3

-2 .0
.3
.9
-.5
- 1 .6
.2

- 1.1
-3 .5
-1 .7

.6
- .2

-1 .9
- .6

- 1.1

.6
.6

-2 .3
-.3
.2
- .8

.5
-.7
-.4
- 1 .0
-.7
- 1 .0
-3 .0
-.5

102

119
189
96
1 82
1 62
199
183
200

243
167

3 5 ,5 6 4
2 8 ,9 2 4
4 4 ,3 6 6
4 0 ,8 1 3
2 8 ,8 2 7
3 1 ,9 3 6
3 4 ,5 6 6
2 9 ,0 1 3
3 2 ,6 2 2
3 0 ,5 9 1

P e rc en t
c ha nge,
20 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

4 .0
4 .2
.4
4 .9
2 .7
1 .8

- 1 1 .0
1 .9
3 .8
1 .8
2 .0

4 .9
5 .7
4 .3
7 .4
1.9
3 .9
3 .3
1 .4
3 .2
4 .0
3 .0
2 .9
5 .7
3 .9
2 .2

3 .5
3 .8
3 .3
-2 .6
2 .0

3.1
3.1
4 .6
2 .6
2 .8

3 .2
2 .0
.6
2 .6

3 .5
.7
2 .4
2 .1

3 .2
5 .2
3 .7
4 .0
2 .4
2 .4
-5 .0
3 .7
2 .5
3 .5
1 .0

3 .6
3 .5
4 .5
3 .3
2 .2
.8

3 .8
1 .3
2 .8

3 .0
3 .3
3 .5
4 .8
4 .3
3 .3

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

69

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

21. Continued—Annual data: Employment and average annual pay for
all workers covered under Ul and UCFE in the 249 largest U.S.
counties
E m p lo ym en t
C o u n ty 1

P ercent
change,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

2001

S p a rta n b u r g , S C ...................
M in n e h a h a , S D ......................
D a v id s o n , T N .........................
H a m ilto n , T N ...........................
K n o x , T N ...................................
S h e lb y , T N ...............................
B e x a r, T X ..................................
C a m e ro n , T X ..........................
C o llin , T X ..................................
D a lla s , T X ................................

1 1 7 ,2 6 2
1 0 6 ,7 1 7
4 3 4 ,0 0 6
1 8 7 ,7 2 4
2 0 3 ,4 7 0
4 9 6 ,6 4 7
6 5 5 ,1 9 5
1 1 1 ,3 7 4
1 8 1 ,0 0 7
1 ,5 5 0 ,8 3 5

-2 . 2

D e n to n , T X .............................
E l P a s o , T X .............................
H a rris , T X ................................
H id a lg o , T X .............................
J e ffe rs o n , T X ..........................
L u b b o c k , T X ...........................
N u e c e s , T X .............................
T a rra n t, T X .............................
T r a v is , T X ................................
S a lt L a k e , U T ..........................

1 2 2 ,5 5 2
2 4 8 ,4 0 7
1 ,8 6 4 ,1 0 0
1 6 8 ,6 1 0
1 1 8 ,7 6 4
1 1 8 ,0 4 2
1 4 3 ,4 7 0
7 0 9 ,1 6 2
5 3 4 ,8 6 1
5 3 0 ,4 9 7

.9

U ta h , U T ...................................
A rlin g to n , V A ...........................
C h e s te rfie ld , V A ....................
F a irfa x , V A ...............................
H e n ric o , V A ............................
N o rfo lk , V A .............................
R ic h m o n d , V A ........................
V irg in ia B e a c h , V A ...............
C la rk , W A ................................
K in g , W A ...................................

1 4 3 ,4 2 3
1 5 9 ,1 7 0
1 0 7 ,7 2 1
5 4 2 ,9 8 4
1 6 9 ,8 2 7
1 4 6 ,4 1 4
1 6 4 ,9 0 6
1 6 6 ,0 0 7
1 1 4 ,7 1 6
1 ,1 4 6 ,1 9 1

P ie rc e , W A ...............................
S n o h o m is h , W A ....................
S p o k a n e , W A .........................
K a n a w h a , W V ........................
B ro w n , W l ................................
D a n e , W l ...................................
M ilw a u k e e , W l .......................
W a u k e s h a , W l .......................

2 3 8 ,6 0 0
2 0 9 ,6 5 7
1 9 0 ,0 5 7
1 1 1 ,5 5 2
1 4 1 ,9 5 0
2 7 9 ,2 0 8
5 2 2 ,0 2 2
2 2 4 ,7 2 1

-1 .5
-.3

S a n J u a n , P R ........................

3 2 4 ,7 9 1

1.1
-.1

-.3
.6

-.5
.9
2 .1

5 .7
- .6

- 1 .2
1.7
3.1
-1 .9
2 .1

.7
.5
-.7
-.1

.5
.3

A v erag e a nn ual pay
R a nked by
perce n t
c ha nge,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 3

2001

232
62
141
157
92
168
72
34
3
174

3 1 ,8 5 6
2 9 ,2 0 5
3 5 ,5 0 9
3 1 ,2 4 0
3 0 ,7 6 5
3 5 ,7 9 1
3 1 ,0 3 2
2 2 ,1 4 2
4 1 ,3 3 8
4 4 ,9 0 9

73
209
45
17
228
35

3 0 ,7 8 8
2 5 ,8 4 7
4 3 ,7 5 1
2 2 ,3 1 3
3 2 ,5 7 0
2 6 ,5 7 7
2 9 ,4 0 6
3 7 ,2 8 7
4 1 ,6 9 8
3 3 ,2 1 0

86

97
184
142
98

P e rc en t
c ha nge,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

4.1
3 .5
1 .9
2 .2
2 .2

4 .2
3 .7
2 .7
2 .0
1 .2

5.1
3.1
4 .5
2 .8

4.1
1.1

4 .3
5 .2
.9
3 .2

143
24
38
79
185
74
36
196

2 8 ,2 6 6
5 5 ,3 9 0
3 2 ,9 5 7
5 2 ,6 4 1
3 7 ,8 6 9
3 3 ,5 0 4
4 0 ,1 7 3
2 6 ,7 5 0
3 3 ,1 2 5
4 7 ,1 8 6

.6

216
158
134
190
159
40
191
93

3 1 ,2 6 1
3 6 ,3 8 8
2 9 ,3 1 0
3 1 ,6 0 1
3 2 ,6 3 1
3 4 ,0 9 7
3 5 ,7 3 6
3 7 ,0 9 2

4 .7
3 .6
-1 .5
4 .8
3 .5
3 .9
2 .9
3 .7

-.5

169

2 2 ,1 7 9

4.1

-.1

2 .7
2 .0
.8

-.7
.9
2 .1

-.9

.0
- .8

-.3
1 .9
- .8

1 In c lu d e s a re a s n o t o ffic ia lly d e s ig n a te d a s
c o u n tie s .
See
N o te s o n
C u rre n t L a b o r
S ta tis tic s .

111

1 .3
4 .8
3 .4
2 .1

4 .8
4.1
4 .0
5 .3
3 .0
-.6

4
T o ta ls fo r th e U n ite d S ta te s d o n o t in c lu d e
d a ta fo r P u e rto R ic o .

N o te : D a ta p e r ta in to w o rk e rs c o v e r e d b y
U n e m p lo y m e n t
In s u ra n c e
(U l)
and
U n e m p lo y m e n t
C o m p e n s a tio n
fo r
F e d e ra l
E m p lo y e e s (U C F E ) p ro g ra m s .
T h e 2 4 8 U .S .
c o u n tie s c o m p ris e 6 6 . 2 p e r c e n t o f th e to ta l
c o v e r e d w o rk e rs in th e U n ite d S ta te s .

2 P e r c e n t c h a n g e s w e re c o m p u te d fro m
a n n u a l e m p lo y m e n t a n d p a y d a ta a d ju s te d fo r
n o n e c o n o m ic c o u n ty re c la s s ific a tio n s .
See
N o te s o n C u r r e n t L a b o r S ta tis tic s .
3 R a n k in g s
fo r
p e rc e n t
change
in
e m p lo y m e n t a re b a s e d o n th e 2 4 9 c o u n tie s th a t
a re c o m p a ra b le o v e r th e y e a r.

22. Annual data: Employment status of the population
[Numbers in thousands]_____________________________________
Employment status

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

C iv ilia n n o n in s tltu tio n a l p o p u la tio n ..............

1 9 4 ,8 3 8

1 9 6 ,8 1 4

1 9 8 ,5 8 4

2 0 0 ,5 9 1

2 0 3 ,1 3 3

2 0 5 ,2 2 0

2 0 7 ,7 5 3

2 1 2 ,5 7 7

2 1 5 ,0 9 2

2 1 7 ,5 7 0

C iv ilia n la b o r f o r c e ......................................... .

1 2 9 ,2 0 0

1 3 1 ,0 5 6

1 3 2 ,3 0 4

1 3 3 ,9 4 3

1 3 6 ,2 9 7

1 3 7 ,6 7 3

1 3 9 ,3 6 8

1 4 2 ,5 8 3

1 4 3 ,7 3 4

1 4 4 ,8 6 3

L a b o r fo r c e p a r tic ip a tio n r a te ..................

6 6 .3

6 6 .6

6 6 .6

6 6 .8

6 7.1

6 7.1

67.1

6 7 .1

6 6 .8

6 6 .6

E m p lo y e d ......................................................

1 2 0 ,2 5 9

1 2 3 ,0 6 0

1 2 4 ,9 0 0

1 2 6 ,7 0 8

1 2 9 ,5 5 8

1 3 1 ,4 6 3

1 3 3 ,4 8 8

1 3 6 ,8 9 1

1 3 6 ,9 3 3

1 3 6 ,4 8 5

E m p lo y m e n t- p o p u la tio n r a tio ...........

6 1 .7

6 2 .5

6 2 .9

6 3 .2

6 3 .8

6 4.1

6 4 .3

6 4 .4

6 3 .7

6 2 .7

U n e m p lo y e d ...............................................

8 ,9 4 0

7 ,9 9 6

7 ,4 0 4

7 ,2 3 6

6 ,7 3 9

6 ,2 1 0

5 ,8 8 0

5 ,6 9 2

6 ,8 0 1

8 ,3 7 8

U n e m p lo y m e n t r a t e ..............................

6 .9

6 .1

5 .6

5 .4

4 .9

4 .5

4 .2

4 .0

4 .7

5 .8

N o t in th e la b o r f o r c e ......................................

6 5 ,6 3 8

6 5 ,7 5 8

6 6 ,2 8 0

6 6 ,6 4 7

6 6 ,8 3 6

6 7 ,5 4 7

6 8 ,3 8 5

6 9 ,9 9 4

7 1 ,3 5 9

7 2 ,7 0 7

Monthly Labor Review
Digitized for 70
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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

23. Annual data: Employment levels by industry
[In thousands]
Industry
T o ta l e m p lo y m e n t....................................................

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

1 1 0 ,7 1 3

1 1 4 ,1 6 3

1 1 7 ,1 9 1

1 1 9 ,6 0 8

1 2 2 ,6 9 0

1 2 5 ,8 6 5

1 2 8 ,9 1 6

1 3 1 ,7 2 0

1 3 1 ,9 2 2

1 3 0 ,7 9 3

P r iv a te s e c to r .........................................................

9 1 ,8 7 2

9 5 ,0 3 6

9 7 ,8 8 5

1 0 0 ,1 8 9

1 0 3 ,1 3 3

1 0 6 ,0 4 2

1 0 8 ,7 0 9

1 1 1 ,0 1 8

1 1 0 ,9 8 9

1 0 9 ,5 3 1

G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ..............................................

2 3 ,3 5 2

2 3 ,9 0 8

2 4 ,2 6 5

2 4 ,4 9 3

2 4 ,9 6 2

2 5 ,4 1 4

2 5 ,5 0 7

2 5 ,6 6 9

2 4 ,9 4 4

2 3 ,8 3 6

M in in g .................................................................

610

6 01

5 81

580

596

590

539

543

565

557

C o n s t r u c t io n ....................................................

4 ,6 6 8

4 ,9 8 6

5 ,1 6 0

5 ,4 1 8

5 ,6 9 1

6 ,0 2 0

6 ,4 1 5

6 ,6 5 3

6 ,6 8 5

6 ,5 5 5

M a n u f a c tu r in g .................................................

1 8 ,0 7 5

1 8 ,3 2 1

1 8 ,5 2 4

1 8 ,4 9 5

1 8 ,6 7 5

1 8 ,8 0 5

1 8 ,5 5 2

1 8 ,4 7 3

1 7 ,6 9 5

1 6 ,7 2 5

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g .............................................

8 7 ,3 6 1

9 0 ,2 5 6

9 2 ,9 2 5

9 5 ,1 1 5

9 7 ,7 2 7

1 0 0 ,4 5 1

1 0 3 ,4 0 9

1 0 6 ,0 5 1

1 0 6 ,9 7 8

1 0 6 ,9 5 7

T r a n s p o r t a tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........

5 ,8 1 1

5 ,9 8 4

6 ,1 3 2

6 ,2 5 3

6 ,4 0 8

6 ,6 1 1

6 ,8 3 4

7 ,0 3 1

7 ,0 6 5

6 ,7 7 3

W h o le s a le t r a d e ............................................

5 ,9 8 1

6 ,1 6 2

6 ,3 7 8

6 ,4 8 2

6 ,6 4 8

6 ,8 0 0

6 ,9 1 1

6 ,9 4 7

6 ,7 7 6

6 ,6 7 1

R e ta il t r a d e ......................................................

1 9 ,7 7 3

2 0 ,5 0 7

2 1 ,1 8 7

2 1 ,5 9 7

2 1 ,9 6 6

2 2 ,2 9 5

2 2 ,8 4 8

2 3 ,3 3 7

2 3 ,5 2 2

2 3 ,3 0 6

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ....

N O TE :

6 ,7 5 7

6 ,8 9 6

6 ,8 0 6

6 ,9 1 1

7 ,1 0 9

7 ,3 8 9

7 ,5 5 5

7 ,5 7 8

7 ,7 1 2

7 ,7 6 1

S e r v ic e s ............................................................

3 0 ,1 9 7

3 1 ,5 7 9

3 3 ,1 1 7

3 4 ,4 5 4

3 6 ,0 4 0

3 7 ,5 3 3

3 9 ,0 5 5

4 0 ,4 5 7

4 0 ,9 7 0

4 1 ,1 8 4

G o v e r n m e n t....................................................

1 8 ,8 4 1

1 9 ,1 2 8

1 9 ,3 0 5

1 9 ,4 1 9

1 9 ,5 5 7

1 9 ,8 2 3

2 0 ,2 0 6

2 0 ,7 0 2

2 0 ,9 3 3

2 1 ,2 6 2

F e d e r a l...........................................................

2 ,9 1 5

2 ,8 7 0

2 ,8 2 2

2 ,7 5 7

2 ,6 9 9

2 ,6 8 6

2 ,6 6 9

2 ,7 7 7

2 ,6 1 6

2 ,6 1 9

S ta t e ................................................................

4 ,4 8 8

4 ,5 7 6

4 ,6 3 5

4 ,6 0 6

4 ,5 8 2

4 ,6 1 2

4 ,7 0 9

4 ,7 8 6

4 ,8 8 5

4 ,9 4 7

L o c a l...............................................................

1 1 ,4 3 8

1 1 ,6 8 2

1 1 ,8 4 9

1 2 ,0 5 6

1 2 ,2 7 6

1 2 ,5 2 5

1 2 ,8 2 9

1 3 ,1 3 9

1 3 ,4 3 2

1 3 ,6 9 5

S e e " N o te s o n th e d a ta " f o r a d e s c r ip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a r k re v is io n .

24. Annual data: Average hours and earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers on nonfarm
payrolls, by industry
Industry

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Private sector:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s .............................................................

3 4 .5

3 4 .7

3 4 .5

3 4 .4

3 4 .6

3 4 .6

3 4 .5

3 4 .5

3 4 .2

3 4 .1

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...............................

1 0 .8 3

1 1 .1 2

1 1 .4 3

1 1 .8 2

1 2 .2 8

1 2 .7 8

1 3 .2 4

1 3 .7 6

1 4 .3 2

1 4 .7 7

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ..............................

3 7 3 .6 4

3 8 5 .8 6

3 9 4 .3 4

4 0 6 .6 1

4 2 4 .8 9

4 4 2 .1 9

4 5 6 .7 8

4 7 4 .7 2

4 8 9 .7 4

5 0 3 .6 6

Mining:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................

4 4 .3

4 4 .8

4 4 .7

4 5 .3

4 5 .4

4 3 .9

4 3 .2

4 3 .1

4 3 .5

4 2 .9

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

1 4 .6 0

1 4 .8 8

1 5 .3 0

1 5 .6 2

1 6 .1 5

1 6.91

1 7 .0 5

1 7 .2 2

1 7 .5 6

1 7 .7 6

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

6 4 6 .7 8

6 6 6 .6 2

6 8 3 .9 1

7 0 7 .5 9

7 3 3 .2 1

7 4 2 .3 5

7 3 6 .5 6

7 4 2 .1 8

7 6 3 .8 6

7 6 1 .9 0

Construction:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ..........................................................

3 8 .5

3 8 .9

3 8 .9

3 9 .0

3 9 .0

3 8 .9

3 9 .1

3 9 .3

3 9 .3

3 8 .8

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

1 4 .3 8

1 4 .7 3

1 5 .0 9

1 5 .4 7

1 6 .0 4

1 6.61

1 7 .1 9

1 7 .8 8

1 8 .3 4

1 8 .8 7

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

5 5 3 .6 3

5 7 3 .0 0

5 8 7 .0 0

6 0 3 .3 3

6 2 5 .5 6

6 4 6 .1 3

6 7 2 .1 3

7 0 2 .6 8

7 2 0 .7 6

7 3 2 .1 6

Manufacturing:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ..........................................................

4 1 .4

4 2 .0

4 1 .6

4 1 .6

4 2 .0

4 1 .7

4 1 .7

4 1 .6

4 0 .7

4 0 .9

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

1 1 .7 4

1 2 .0 7

1 2 .3 7

1 2 .7 7

1 3 .1 7

1 3 .4 9

1 3 .9 0

1 4 .3 7

1 4 .8 3

1 5 .3 0

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

4 8 6 .0 4

5 0 6 .9 4

5 1 4 .5 9

5 3 1 .2 3

5 5 3 .1 4

5 6 2 .5 3

5 7 9 .6 3

5 9 7 .7 9

6 0 3 .5 8

6 2 5 .7 7

Transportation and public utilities:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ..........................................................

3 9 .7

3 9 .4

3 9 .6

3 9 .7

3 9 .5

3 8 .7

3 8 .4

3 8 .2

3 8 .3

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

1 3 .5 5

1 3 .7 8

1 4 .1 3

1 4 .4 5

1 4 .9 2

1 5.31

1 5 .6 9

16.2 1

1 6 .7 9

1 7 .2 9

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

5 3 2 .5 2

3 9 .3

5 4 7 .0 7

5 5 6 .7 2

5 7 2 .2 2

5 9 2 .3 2

6 0 4 .7 5

6 0 7 .2 0

6 2 2 .4 6

6 4 1 .3 8

6 6 2 .2 1

Wholesale trade:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs .........................................................

3 8 .2

3 8 .4

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .4

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .5

3 8 .2

3 8 .4

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) .............................

1 1 .7 4

1 2 .0 6

1 2 .4 3

1 2 .8 7

1 3 .4 5

1 4 .0 7

1 4 .5 9

1 5 .2 2

1 5 .8 6

1 6 .2 1

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

4 4 8 .4 7

4 6 3 .1 0

4 7 6 .0 7

4 9 2 .9 2

5 1 6 .4 8

5 3 8 .8 8

5 5 8 .8 0

5 8 5 .9 7

6 0 5 .8 5

6 2 2 .4 6

Retail trade:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ..........................................................

2 8 .8

2 8 .9

2 9 .0

2 8 .9

2 8 .9

2 9 .0

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) .............................

7 .2 9

7 .4 9

7 .6 9

7 .9 9

8 .3 3

8 .7 4

9 .0 9

9 .4 6

9 .7 7

1 0 .0 4

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

2 0 9 .9 5

2 1 6 .4 6

2 2 1 .4 7

2 3 0 .1 1

2 4 0 .7 4

2 5 3 .4 6

2 6 3 .6 1

2 7 3 .3 9

2 8 2 .8 2

2 9 1 .1 6

2 8 .8

2 8 .8

2 8 .9

2 9 .0

Finance, insurance, and real estate:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................

3 5 .8

3 5 .8

3 5 .9

3 5 .9

36.1

3 6 .4

3 6 .2

3 6 .4

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) .............................

1 1 .3 5

1 1 .8 3

1 2 .3 2

1 2 .8 0

1 3 .3 4

1 4 .0 7

1 4 .6 2

1 5 .1 4

1 5 .8 0

1 6 .3 5

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

4 0 6 .3 3

4 2 3 .5 1

4 4 2 .2 9

4 5 9 .5 2

4 8 1 .5 7

5 1 2 .1 5

5 2 9 .2 4

5 5 1 .1 0

5 7 0 .3 8

5 9 0 .2 4

3 6 .1

3 6 .1

Services:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................

3 2 .5

3 2 .5

3 2 .4

3 2 .4

3 2 .6

3 2 .7

3 2 .7

3 2 .6

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) .............................

1 0 .7 8

1 1 .0 4

1 1 .3 9

1 1 .7 9

1 2 .2 8

1 2 .8 4

1 3 .3 7

1 3 .9 3

1 4 .6 7

1 5 .2 4

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

3 5 0 .3 5

3 5 8 .8 0

3 6 9 .0 4

3 8 2 .0 0

4 0 0 .3 3

4 1 8 .5 8

4 3 5 .8 6

4 5 5 .5 1

4 7 9 .7 1

4 9 6 .8 2


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3 2 .6

3 2 .6

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

71

Current Labor Statistics:

Compensation & Industrial Relations

25. Employment Cost Index, compensation,1by occupation and industry group
[June 1989 = 100]__________________________________
2001
Series

Mar.

June

2002

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

2003

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

Percent change
3 months
ended

12 months
ended

Mar. 2003
C iv ilia n w o rk e rs 2...................................................................................

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .8

1 5 8 .4

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .9

P r o fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l..........................................

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .5

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itr a tiv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l................................

1 5 6 .6

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .6

1 6 1 .2

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .3

1 6 2 .2

1 6 4 .5

1 6 0 .5

162 .1

1 6 3 .5

1 6 4 .3

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .3

1 6 1 .4

1 6 2 .4

1 6 3 .7

1 6 5 .6

1 6 6 .3

1 6 6 .7

1 6 3 .3

164 9
156 4

1 .4

3 .9

1 6 6 .7

1 .5

3 .9

1 64.1

1 .0

3 .5

1 71.1

2 .6

4 .5

166 1

168 3

1 3

3 9

157 5

159 8

1 5

4 0

1 .2

3 .6

4 .4

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .8

1 5 8 .8

1 6 0 .0

1 6 2 .0

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .3

1 51.1

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .7

155 1

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .3

1 5 5 .0

156 9

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .4

1 6 1 .3

1 6 2 .2

1 64.1

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :
G o o d s - p r o d u c in q .....................................................................................

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .7

1 6 9 .2

1 63.1

1 .8

M a n u f a c tu r in g ........................................................................................

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .6

158 .1

1 59.1

1 6 0 .5

1 6 4 .0

2 .2

4 .7

S e r v i c e - p r o d u c in q ...................................................................................

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .1

1 6 0 .7

1 6 2 .2

1 6 2 .8

1 6 5 .0

1 .4

3 .7

S e r v ic e s ....................................................................................................

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .4

158 .1

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .2

161 .1

1 6 3 .2

1 6 3 .9

1 6 5 .3

.9

3 .2

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ....................................................................................

1 5 2 .5

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .8

1 63.1

1 6 4 .5

1 6 6 .4

1 .2

3 .7

H o s p ita ls ..............................................................................................

1 5 3 .2

1 5 5 .6

1 5 8 .2

1 6 0 .0

1 6 2 .3

1 6 3 .8

1 6 5 .7

1 6 7 .6

1 6 9 .9

1 .4

4 .7

E d u c a tio n a l s e r v ic e s ........................................................................

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .2

156 .1

1 5 6 .6

1 5 7 .1

1 5 7 .4

1 6 1 .6

1 6 2 .8

1 6 3 .6

.5

4.1

P u b lic a d m in is tr a t io n 3 ..........................................................................

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .5

1 6 0 .2

1 6 1 .7

1 6 3 .4

1.1

4 .4

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in q ..................................................................................

1 5 2 .6

1 5 4 .0

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .7

1 6 0 .2

1 6 1 .7

1 6 2 .4

1 6 4 .5

1 .3

3 .7

P rivate in d u s try w o rk e rs ................................................................

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .9

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .6

1 6 2 .3

1 6 5 .0

1 .7

3 .8

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ........................................................

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .2

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .6

1 6 2 .4

1 65.1

1 .7

3 .8

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a t io n a l g ro u p :
W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ...........................................................................

1 5 5 .7

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .7

1 60.1

1 6 1 .9

1 6 3 .8

1 6 4 .6

1 6 5 .2

1 68.1

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .....................................................

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .1

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .3

1 6 5 .3

1 6 5 .9

1 69.1

1 .9

3 .9

P ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s .............

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .3

1 6 1 .5

1 6 2 .5

1 6 3 .6

1 6 4 .4

1 6 6 .5

1 .3

3.1

1 .8

3 .8

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itr a tiv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l o c c u p a tio n s ..

1 5 7 .3

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .2

1 6 1 .8

1 6 4 .4

1 6 6 .6

1 6 7 .0

1 6 7 .2

1 72.1

2 .9

4 .7

S a le s o c c u p a t io n s .............................................................................

1 5 2 .3

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .7

1 6 1 .6

1 6 1 .6

1 6 1 .9

1 6 3 .5

1 .0

3 .7

A d m in is tr a t iv e s u p p o r t o c c u p a tio n s , in c lu d in g c le r ic a l...

1 56 .1

1 5 7 .7

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .8

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .2

1 6 5 .6

1 6 6 .7

1 6 9 .0

1 .4

3 .8

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .3

1 5 1 .0

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .6

155 .1

1 5 6 .3

157 3

1 5 9 .7

1 .5

4 0
4.1

P r e c is io n p r o d u c tio n , c ra ft, a n d r e p a ir o c c u p a tio n s .........

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .8

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .7

1 5 6 .9

1 5 7 .8

1 6 0 .0

1 .4

M a c h in e o p e r a to r s , a s s e m b le rs , a n d in s p e c to r s ...............

1 4 8 .3

1 49 .1

1 5 0 .4

1 5 1 .5

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .7

1 5 5 .4

1 5 6 .7

1 5 9 .9

2 .0

4.1

T r a n s p o r t a tio n a n d m a te r ia l m o v in g o c c u p a tio n s .............

1 4 2 .6

1 4 3 .9

1 4 5 .6

1 4 6 .3

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .6

1 5 1 .0

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .2

.9

3 .0

H a n d le r s , e q u ip m e n t c le a n e rs , h e lp e rs , a n d la b o re rs ....

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .7

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .4

1 6 2 .9

1 6 4 .9

1 .2

3 .9

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ............................................................................

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 4 .8

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .4

1 5 9 .0

1 5 9 .8

1 6 1 .7

1 .2

3 .4

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .5

1 57 .1

1 5 8 .7

1 5 9 .7

1 6 0 .5

1 6 2 .6

1 .3

3 .5

4

P r o d u c tio n a n d n o n s u p e rv is o ry o c c u p a tio n s .....................
W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :
G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ..................................................................................

1 52 .1

153 .1

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .2

1 5 7 .6

1 5 8 .6

1 60.1

1 6 3 .0

1 .8

4 .4

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .9

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .2

1 6 2 .4

2 .0

4 4
4 8

1 5 4 .5

1 5 6 .5

1 5 6 .8

158 .1

1 60 .1

1 6 1 .9

1 6 2 .9

1 6 4 .3

1 6 7 .8

2 .1

1 5 3 .0

1 5 5 .0

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .4

1 6 0 .2

1 61.1

1 6 2 .3

1 6 6 .3

2 5

5 0

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .3

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .3

1 5 9 .9

1 .7

4.1

C o n s t r u c t io n .........................................................................................

1 4 8 .2

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .0

1 54 .1

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .9

1 59 .1

.8

3 .2

M a n u f a c tu r in g .....................................................................................

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .6

1 58 .1

159 .1

1 6 0 .5

1 6 4 .0

2 .2

4 .7

1 5 4 .2

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .9

1 59 .1

161 .1

1 6 2 .2

1 6 3 .3

1 67.1

2 3

5 0

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .0

1 5 3 .8

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .7

1 65 .1

2 .7

5 .4

1 49.1

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .7

158 3

161 6

2 .1

4 5
4 .8

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

D u r a b le s .................................................................................................

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .1

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .3

1 5 8 .9

1 6 0 .6

1 6 4 .4

2 .4

N o n d u r a b le s ........................................................................................

1 5 0 .4

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .2

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .3

1 63 .1

1 .7

4 .6

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g .................................................................................

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .8

1 6 2 .7

163.1

1 6 5 .6

1 .5

3 .6

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .8

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .4

1 6 3 .5

164 0

166 6

1 6

3 5

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .4

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .3

1 62 .1

1 6 4 .0

1 6 4 .7

165 .1

1 6 7 .9

1 .7

3 6

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .1

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .2

1 6 4 .1

1 6 5 .6

1 6 6 .5

1 6 7 .0

1 6 9 .9

1 .7

3 5

1 4 7 .7

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 1 .4

1 5 3 .2

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .6

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .7

1.1

3 .6

1 4 9 .6

1 5 5 .9

161 1

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .2

1 5 7 .0

1 5 8 .5

159 3

1.1

3 3

1 5 0 .5

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .9

1 6 0 .8

1 6 1 .7

1 6 3 .2

.9

3 .8

1 4 5 .4

1 4 6 .9

1 4 8 .2

151 .1

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .4

156 .1

1 5 7 .8

1.1

3 .5

P u b lic u tilitie s .....................................................................................

1 5 7 .3

1 5 9 .8

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .5

1 6 3 .9

1 6 5 .5

1 6 8 .2

1 6 9 .2

1 7 0 .5

.8

4 .0

C o m m u n ic a t io n s ..........................................................................

1 5 8 .3

1 61 .1

1 6 2 .8

1 6 3 .4

1 6 6 .0

1 66.1

1 6 9 .0

170 .1

1 7 1 .3

.7

3 .2

1 5 6 .0

1 58 .1

1 58.1

1 59.1

1 6 1 .3

1 6 4 .8

1 6 7 .2

168 .1

1 6 9 .5

.8

5.1

W h o le s a le a n d re ta il tr a d e ............................................................

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .5

1 5 9 .5

1 5 9 .6

1 5 9 .7

1 6 1 .3

1 .0

3.1

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .4

1 57.1

1 5 7 .5

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .3

1 6 0 .4

1 6 1 .8

.9

2 .7

W h o le s a le tr a d e ...............................................................................

1 55.1

1 5 7 .8

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .5

1 6 1 .9

1 6 6 .3

1 6 5 .9

1 6 6 .7

1 6 9 .5

1 .7

4 .7

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .6

1 6 2 .3

1 6 4 .4

166 .1

1 6 7 .2

1 6 8 .4

.7

3 .8

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 3 .2

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .0

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .6

.5

2 .0

G e n e r a l m e r c h a n d is e s to r e s ...................................................

1 4 7 .3

1 4 9 .4

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .4

1 5 4 .2

1 56 .1

155 .1

1 5 6 .4

.8

2 .6

F o o d s t o r e s .....................................................................................

1 46.1

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .9

1 5 4 .5

1 5 6 .3

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .5

.8

3 .0

T r a n s p o r t a tio n ...................................................................................

R e ta il t r a d e ........................................................................................

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b le .

72

1 5 0 .7
1 50.1

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

25. Continued—Employment Cost Index, compensation,1by occupation and industry group
[June 1989 = 100]
2001
Series

Mar.

June

2002

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

2002

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

Percent change
3 months
ended

12 months
ended

Mar. 2003
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te .........................................

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .9

1 6 1 ,3

1 6 5 .2

1 6 7 .3

1 6 8 .0

1 6 8 .5

1 7 6 .7

4 .9

7 .0

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 6 1 .2

1 63 .1

1 6 4 .7

1 6 5 .0

1 6 9 .8

1 7 1 .3

1 72 .1

1 73 .1

1 8 2 .0

5.1

7 .2

B a n k in g , s a v in g s a n d lo a n , a n d o th e r c re d it a g e n c ie s .

1 7 0 .8

1 7 2 .7

1 7 5 .4

1 7 4 .5

1 82.1

1 8 4 .2

1 8 4 .6

1 8 5 .3

2 0 4 .3

1 0 .3

1 2 .2

I n s u r a n c e ............................................................................................

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .3

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .3

1 6 4 .0

166 .1

1 67.1

1 6 7 .9

1 72.1

2 .5

4 .9

S e r v ic e s ..................................................................................................

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .8

1 6 0 .0

1 6 1 .0

1 6 2 .6

1 6 3 .7

1 6 4 .9

1 6 5 .4

1 67.1

1 .0

2 .8

B u s in e s s s e r v ic e s ...........................................................................

1 6 0 .5

1 6 3 .0

1 6 5 .2

1 6 6 .2

1 6 6 .3

1 6 6 .6

1 6 7 .2

1 6 7 .5

1 6 8 .5

.6

1 .3

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ................................................................................

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .8

1 5 8 .4

1 6 0 .6

1 6 2 .0

1 6 3 .2

1 6 4 .4

1 6 6 .5

1 .3

3 .7

H o s p ita ls ...........................................................................................

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 8 .4

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .5

1 6 6 .2

1 68 .1

1 7 0 .8

1 .6

4 .9

E d u c a tio n a l s e r v ic e s .....................................................................

1 6 2 .3

1 6 2 .6

1 6 6 .4

1 6 7 .6

1 6 8 .5

1 6 9 .0

1 7 3 .5

1 7 5 .2

1 7 6 .3

.6

4 .6

C o lle g e s a n d u n iv e r s itie s .........................................................

1 6 2 .2

1 6 2 .6

1 6 6 .2

1 6 7 .5

1 68 .1

1 6 8 .4

1 7 2 .0

1 7 3 .7

1 7 4 .5

.5

3 .8

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g .............................................................................

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .3

161 .1

1 6 2 .0

1 6 2 .5

1 6 4 .9

1 .5

3 .5

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ......................................................................

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .5

1 6 2 .2

1 64 .1

1 6 4 .8

1 6 5 .3

1 6 8 .0

1 .6

3 .6

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ...............................................

1 5 7 .5

1 59.1

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .3

1 6 4 .2

1 6 5 .7

1 6 6 .6

1 67 .1

1 7 0 .0

1 .7

3 .5

B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s ...............................................................

1 4 6 .9

1 48 .1

1 5 0 .2

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

1 .0

3 .5

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ......................................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .7

1 52 .1

1 54.1

1 5 5 .9

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .2

1 61 .1

1 .2

3 .3

S tate a n d lo c a l g o v e rn m e n t w o rk e rs ..........................................

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .2

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .2

1 56 .1

1 5 6 .7

1 60.1

1 6 1 .5

1 6 2 .6

.7

4 .2

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .2

1 5 5 .7

1 5 9 .3

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .7

.6

4 .2

P r o fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l..........................................

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .2

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .2

1 5 3 .6

154 .1

1 58.1

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .2

.5

4 .3

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in is tr a tiv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l..............................

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .5

1 5 9 .6

1 6 2 .3

1 6 3 .8

1 6 5 .3

.9

3 .6

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .6

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .0

1 6 1 .0

1 6 2 .4

1 6 3 .8

.9

4 .4

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .0

1 5 1 .5

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .0

1 5 4 .7

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .8

1 6 1 .3

.9

4 .7

S e r v ic e s ....................................................................................................

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .6

1 5 4 .4

1 5 4 .9

1 5 5 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 9 .7

1 6 0 .9

1 6 1 .8

.6

4 .1

S e r v ic e s e x c lu d in g s c h o o ls 5 .........................................................

150 .1

1 5 1 .9

1 5 4 .5

1 56.1

1 5 7 .9

1 5 8 .7

1 6 1 .0

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .0

.7

3 .9

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ................................................................................

152 .1

1 5 4 .4

1 57.1

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .4

1 6 1 .4

1 6 3 .5

1 6 5 .5

1 6 6 .4

.5

3 .7

H o s p ita ls ..........................................................................................

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .7

1 5 7 .4

1 59.1

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .8

1 64.1

1 6 6 .2

1 6 7 .0

.5

3 .9

1 4 9 .6

1 50.1

1 54.1

1 5 4 .5

1 5 4 .8

155 .1

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .3

1 61.1

.5

4.1

S c h o o ls ............................................................................................

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 4 .4

1 5 4 .8

1 55.1

1 5 5 .4

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .4

.4

4.1

E le m e n ta r y a n d s e c o n d a r y .................................................

1 4 8 .5

1 4 9 .0

1 5 2 .8

1 53.1

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .6

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .8

1 5 9 .4

.4

3 .9

C o lle g e s a n d u n iv e r s itie s .....................................................

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .4

1 6 4 .7

1 6 5 .8

1 6 7 .0

.7

4 .4

P u b lic a d m in is tr a t io n 3 .........................................................................

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .9

1 6 0 .2

1 6 1 .7

1 6 3 .4

1 .1

4 .4

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :

1 C o s t (c e n ts p e r h o u r w o rk e d ) m e a s u re d in th e E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x c o n s is ts o f

w a g e s , s a la r ie s , a n d e m p lo y e r c o s t o f e m p lo y e e b e n e fits .
2

C o n s is ts o f p r iv a te in d u s tr y w o r k e r s ( e x c lu d in g fa r m a n d h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs ) a n d

S ta t e a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t (e x c lu d in g F e d e ra l G o v e rn m e n t) w o rk e rs .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

3 C o n s is ts o f le g is la tiv e , ju d ic ia l, a d m in is tr a tiv e , a n d r e g u la to r y a c tiv itie s .
4

T h is s e rie s h a s th e s a m e in d u s try a n d o c c u p a tio n a l c o v e r a g e a s th e H o u r ly

E a rn in g s in d e x , w h ic h w a s d is c o n tin u e d in J a n u a r y 1 9 8 9 .
6 In c lu d e s , fo r e x a m p le , lib ra ry , s o c ia l, a n d h e a lth s e rv ic e s .

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

73

Current Labor Statistics:

Compensation & Industrial Relations

26. Employment Cost Index, wages and salaries, by occupation and industry group
[June 1989 = 100]_____________________________
2001

2002

2003

Series
Mar.

June

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

Percent change
3 months
ended

12 months
ended

Mar. 2002
C iv ilia n w o rk e rs 1......................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .8

1 56.1

1 5 7 .2

1 5 7 .8

1 5 9 .3

1 .0

2 .9

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :
W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

1 5 1 .7

153 .1

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .6

1 5 7 .0

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .6

1 60.1

1 6 1 .9

1.1

3.1

P r o fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d t e c h n ic a l..........................................

151 .1

1 5 2 .-

1 5 4 .2

1 55.1

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .2

1 5 8 .0

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .3

.4

2 .4

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itr a t lv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l...............................

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .7

156 1

1 fin 7

1fi? fi

163 5

167 6

1 6 ft 4

1 55 .1

A d m in is tr a t iv e s u p p o r t, in c lu d in g c le r ic a l.................................

1 5 1 .6

152 7

154 6

155 7

B lu e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ................................................................................

1 4 4 .7

146 0

147 6

146 5

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ...................................................................

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .2

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .2

.7
‘ 5 6 .2

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .0

W o r k e r s , b y In d u s tr y d iv is io n :
G o o d s - p r o d u c in g .....................................................................................

1 4 7 .0

1 4 7 ,6

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .8

153 .1

1 5 3 .9

155 .1

1 5 6 .3

.8

3 .0

M a n u f a c tu r in g ........................................................................................

1 4 8 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .7

153.1

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .4

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .0

1 .0

3 .2

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ..................................................................................

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .2

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .8

1 4 9 .5

1 6 0 .5

1 .1

3 .0

S e r v ic e s ....................................................................................................

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .6

1 5 6 .2

1 57.1

158 .1

1 5 8 .8

1 6 0 .7

1 61 .1

1 6 1 .9

.5

2 .4

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ....................................................................................

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .0

.7

3 .0

H o s p ita ls ..............................................................................................

1 4 8 .8

1 5 1 .2

1 5 .5

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .2

1 6 3 .5

.8

4 .0

150 5

151 0

154 6

155 1

166 3

E d u c a tio n a l s e r v ic e s .......................................................................
2

P u b lic a d m in is tr a tio n ..........................................................................

1 4 7 .6

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .2

.9

3.1

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ..................................................................................

1 4 9 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .0

1 5 9 .6

1 .0

3 .0

Private in d u s try w o rk e rs ................................................................

1 4 9 .4

1 5 0 .9

1 52 .1

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .0

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .3

1.1

3 .0

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ........................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .9

156 .1

1 5 7 .0

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .4

1 .2

2 .9

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :
W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ...........................................................................

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 5 4 .8

1 56.1

1 5 7 .7

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .4

1 6 2 .6

1 .4

3.1

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .....................................................

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .7

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .0

1 6 9 .8

1 6 0 .8

1 6 3 .6

1 .4

3 .2

P r o fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s .............

1 52.1

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .9

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .2

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .5

.6

1 .8

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itr a tlv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l o c c u p a tio n s ..

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 6 1 .3

1 6 3 .6

1 6 4 .3

1 6 4 .5

1 69.1

2 .8

4 .8

S a le s o c c u p a t io n s .............................................................................

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .5

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .6

1 5 7 .0

1 5 6 .9

1 5 6 .8

1 58.1

.8

2 .9

A d m in is tr a t iv e s u p p o r t o c c u p a tio n s , in c lu d in g c le r ic a l...

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .3

1 6 1 .3

1 6 2 .6

.8

2 .8

B lu e - c o lla r w o r k e r s .............................................................................

1 4 4 .6

1 4 5 .9

1 4 7 .5

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .9

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .6

.8

2 .7

P r e c is io n p r o d u c tio n , c ra ft, a n d r e p a ir o c c u p a tio n s .........

1 4 4 .6

1 4 5 .7

1 4 7 .7

1 4 8 ,4

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .0

1 5 1 .8

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .4

.7

2 .8

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .7

1 .0

2 .8
2 .1

M a c h in e o p e r a to r s , a s s e m b le rs , a n d In s p e c to rs ...............

1 4 5 .6

1 4 6 .9

148.1

1 4 9 .0

T r a n s p o r t a tio n a n d m a te r ia l m o v in g o c c u p a tio n s .............

1 3 9 .5

1 4 0 .7

142 .1

1 4 2 .8

1 4 4 .8

1 4 5 .2

1 4 6 .3

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .8

.6

H a n d le r s , e q u ip m e n t c le a n e rs , h e lp e rs , a n d la b o re rs ....

1 4 8 .0

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .4

1 5 4 .2

1 55.1

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .4

.8

2 .7

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ............................................................................

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .5

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .0

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .9

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .5

.6

2 .3

P r o d u c tio n a n d n o n s u p e rv is o ry o c c u p a tio n s 3 .....................

1 4 7 .7

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .0

1 5 4 .7

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .4

.8

2 .4

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :
G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ..................................................................................

1 4 7 .0

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 53.1

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .3

.8

3 .0

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .8

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .4

.9

3 .0

W h it e - c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s .............................................................

3 .2

1 5 0 .5

1 5 2 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .6

1 5 7 .9

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .0

.9

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .9

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .4

1 5 6 .3

1 5 8 .0

1.1

3 .3

B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ...............................................................

1 4 4 .7

146.1

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .8

.8

2 .8

C o n s t r u c t io n .........................................................................................

142 .1

1 4 3 .9

1 45.1

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .0

1 4 8 .2

2 .4

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .2

1 5 0 .6

.3

M a n u f a c tu r in g .....................................................................................

1 4 8 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .7

1 53.1

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .4

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .0

1 .0

3 .2

W h it e - c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s .............................................................

151.1

1 5 2 .7

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .6

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .6

160.1

.9

3 .4

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .0

1 5 7 .7

1 .2

3 .5

B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s ...............................................................

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .8

149 .1

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .3

1 .0

3 .0

D u r a b le s .................................................................................................

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .8

1 .0

3 .2

N o n d u r a b le s .........................................................................................

1 4 7 .5

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .3

1 5 3 .9

1 5 1 .9

153 .1

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .6

.9

3.1

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ..................................................................................

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .2

1 5 1 .9

156 .1

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .4

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .6

1 .3

2 .9

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 4 .2

1 56.1

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .3

1 5 9 .6

1 6 1 .7

1 .3

2 .9

W h it e - c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s .............................................................

1 5 2 .5

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .2

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .9

1 6 0 .5

1 6 0 .7

1 6 3 .0

1 .4

3 .0

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .6

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .2

1 6 0 .4

1 6 1 .6

1 6 2 .5

1 6 2 .8

1 6 5 .3

1 .5

3.1

B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s ...............................................................

1 4 4 .3

1 4 5 .3

1 4 7 .5

148.1

1 4 9 .4

1 51.1

1 5 1 .8

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .2

.8

2 .5

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ......................................................................

146 .1

1 4 7 .2

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .4

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .5

1 54.1

155 .1

.6

2 .3

T r a n s p o r ta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s .............................................

1 4 3 .7

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .7

1 4 9 .2

1 5 0 .5

1 52.1

1 5 3 .4

1 54.1

1 5 4 .8

.5

2 .9

T r a n s p o r t a tio n ...................................................................................

1 3 9 .8

1 4 1 .6

1 4 2 .6

1 4 5 .7

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .6

1 50.1

1 5 0 .5

.3

2 .1

P u b lic u tilitie s .....................................................................................

1 4 8 .7

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .3

1 6 0 .4

.7

4 .0

C o m m u n ic a t io n s ..........................................................................

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .3

1 5 5 .2

1 5 5 .3

1 57.1

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .9

.7

4 .2

E le c tr ic , g a s , a n d s a n ita r y s e r v ic e s ...................................

148 .1

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .4

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .0

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .6

.8

3 .7

W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ............................................................

1 4 8 .4

1 50.1

1 5 0 .6

152.1

1 5 3 .0

1 5 5 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .7

.8

2 .4

-

_

1 5 4 .8

1 5 7 .2

1 6 1 .3

1 6 0 .4

1 6 1 .0

1 6 3 .4

1 .5

3 .9

1 5 7 .4

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .4

1 6 1 .2

1 6 2 .6

1 6 3 .7

1 6 3 .9

.1

2 .8

1 4 8 .8

1 5 0 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .7

1 5 2 .9

1 5 2 .7

1 53.1

.3

1 .5

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .9

153.1

W h o le s a le t r a d e ...............................................................................

1 5 1 .6

1 5 4 .5

1 54.1

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .5

R e ta il t r a d e ........................................................................................ .

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .8

-

-

-

-

-

_

G e n e r a l m e r c h a n d is e s t o r e s ..................................................

1 4 3 .8

1 4 5 .5

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .5

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .9

1 50.1

1 4 9 .2

1 4 9 .8

.4

1 .3

F o o d s t o r e s .....................................................................................

1 4 3 .3

1 4 4 .5

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .7

1 4 8 .0

1 4 8 .9

1 50.1

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .0

.5

2 .0

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b le .

74

1 5 5 .9

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

26. Continued—Employment Cost Index, wages and salaries, by occupation and industry group
[June 1989 = 100]____________________________________________________________________________________
2002

2001

2003

Series
Mar.

June

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

Percent change
3 months
ended

12 months
ended

Mar. 2003
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta t e .........................................

1 5 3 .9

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .0

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .0

1 6 2 .4

1 6 2 .6

1 71 .1

5 .2

6 .7

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 6 .6

1 5 7 .6

1 59 .1

1 59.1

1 6 4 .5

1 6 5 .7

166 .1

1 6 7 .3

1 7 6 .7

5 .6

7 .4
1 3 .9

B a n k in g , s a v in g s a n d lo a n , a n d o th e r c r e d it a g e n c ie s ..

1 6 9 .4

1 7 0 .8

1 7 3 .2

1 7 1 .7

1 8 1 .2

1 8 2 .7

1 8 3 .9

2 0 6 .4

1 2 .2

I n s u r a n c e ............................................................................................

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .3

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .0

157 .1

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .6

1 59 .1

1 6 1 .6

1 .6

2 .9

S e r v ic e s ..................................................................................................

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .0

1 57.1

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .3

1 6 1 .5

1 6 1 .7

1 6 2 .8

.7

2 .1

1 5 8 .2

1 6 0 .8

1 6 2 .8

1 6 3 .7

1 6 4 .0

1 6 4 .0

1 6 4 .6

1 6 4 .8

1 6 5 .6

.5

1 .0

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ................................................................................

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .4

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .9

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .9

.7

2 .9
4.1

1 8 2 .8

H o s p ita ls ...........................................................................................

1 4 8 .5

1 5 1 .0

1 5 3 .3

1 5 5 .4

157 .1

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .2

1 6 2 .1

1 6 3 .6

.9

E d u c a tio n a l s e r v ic e s .....................................................................

1 5 5 .4

156 .1

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .2

1 6 1 .2

1 6 5 .2

1 6 6 .5

1 67 .1

.4

3 .7

C o lle g e s a n d u n iv e r s itie s .........................................................

1 54.1

1 5 5 .0

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .6

1 5 9 .9

1 5 9 .9

1 63.1

1 6 4 .3

1 6 4 .4

.1

2 .8

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ............................................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .2

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .4

1 .2

2 .8

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ......................................................................

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .0

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .2

1 6 0 .5

1 6 2 .8

1 .4

3 .0

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ...............................................

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .3

1 60.1

1 6 1 .3

1 6 2 .1

1 6 2 .5

1 6 4 .9

1 .5

3 .0

B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s ................................................................

1 4 2 .8

1 4 3 .9

1 4 5 .8

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .5

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .8

1 5 0 .2

1 51 .1

.6

2 .4

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ......................................................................

1 4 6 .0

1 47.1

1 4 8 .2

150 .1

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .0

.6

2 .4

S tate a n d lo c a l g o v e rn m e n t w o rk e rs ..........................................

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .2

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .2

1 56.1

1 5 6 .7

1 60 .1

1 6 1 .5

1 6 2 .6

.4

3.1

3 .2

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :
1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .8

1 5 2 .7

1 5 3 .3

1 5 3 .9

1 5 4 .4

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .4

1 5 8 .9

.3

P r o fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l..........................................

1 49.1

1 4 9 .8

1 5 3 .0

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .6

1 54 .1

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .4

1 5 8 .8

.3

3 .4

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in is tr a tiv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l.............................

1 50 .1

1 5 1 .5

1 5 3 .9

1 55 .1

1 5 6 .6

1 5 6 .8

1 5 9 .0

1 60 .1

1 6 0 .9

.5

2 .7

1 4 7 .0

1 4 7 .6

1 4 9 .8

1 5 0 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 5 2 .8

1 55.1

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .9

.6

3 .3

1 4 6 .0

1 4 6 .5

149 .1

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .6

1 52.1

1 5 4 .5

1 55 .1

1 5 6 .2

.7

3 .0

S e r v ic e s .....................................................................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .2

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .2

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .0

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .2

1 5 9 .5

.2

3 .2

S e r v ic e s e x c lu d in g s c h o o ls .........................................................

1 49.1

1 5 0 .7

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .3

1 59 .1

1 6 0 .3

1 6 1 .4

.7

3 .0

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ................................................................................

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .8

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .5

1 6 2 .2

1 6 2 .9

.4

3 .2

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .8

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .7

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .8

1 6 0 .6

1 6 2 .5

1 63 .1

.4

3 .4

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .0

1 5 4 .2

1 5 4 .5

1 58 .1

1 5 8 .9

1 59 .1

.1

3 .2

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .2

1 5 3 .8

1 54 .1

1 5 4 .3

1 5 4 .6

1 5 8 .3

1 5 9 .0

1 5 9 .2

.1

3 .2

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :

H o s p ita ls ..........................................................................................
E d u c a tio n a l s e r v ic e s ....................................................................
S c h o o ls .............................................................................................

'

E le m e n ta r y a n d s e c o n d a r y .................................................

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .5

1 5 2 .8

1 53 .1

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .6

1 5 7 .4

1 58 .1

1 5 8 .2

.1

3.1

C o lle g e s a n d u n iv e r s itie s .....................................................

1 5 1 .4

1 5 1 .8

1 5 6 .5

1 5 6 .7

1 5 6 .8

1 5 7 .3

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .6

1 62 .1

.3

3 .4

P u b lic a d m in is tr a tio n ..........................................................................

1 4 7 .6

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .2

.9

3.1

C o n s is ts o f p riv a te in d u s try w o rk e rs ( e x c lu d in g fa r m a n d h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs ) a n d

S ta t e a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t (e x c lu d in g F e d e ra l G o v e rn m e n t) w o rk e rs .

3

T h is s e rie s h a s th e s a m e in d u s try a n d o c c u p a tio n a l c o v e r a g e a s th e H o u r ly

E a rn in g s In d e x , w h ic h w a s d is c o n tin u e d in J a n u a r y 1 9 8 9 .

2 C o n s is ts o f le g is la tiv e , ju d ic ia l, a d m in is tr a tiv e , a n d r e g u la to r y a c tiv itie s .

4 In c lu d e s , fo r e x a m p le , lib ra ry , s o c ia l, a n d h e a lth s e rv ic e s .

27. Employment Cost Index, benefits, private industry workers by occupation and industry group
[June 1989 = 100]_____________________________________________________________________________________
2002

2001

2003

Series
Mar.

June

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

Percent change
3 months
ended

12 months
ended

Mar. 2003
Private In d u s try w o rk e rs ..................................................................

1 6 1 .5

1 6 3 .2

1 6 5 .2

1 6 6 .7

1 6 9 .3

1 7 1 .6

1 73 .1

1 7 4 .6

1 7 9 .6

2 .9

6 .1

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :
W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

1 6 5 .2

1 6 7 .4

1 6 9 .5

1 7 1 .2

1 7 3 .5

176 .1

1 7 7 .2

1 7 8 .5

1 8 3 .6

2 .9

5 .8

1 5 5 .7

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 5 9 .2

1 6 2 .2

1 6 4 .0

1 6 6 .2

1 6 7 .8

1 7 2 .7

2 .9

6 .5

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :
G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .8

1 6 2 .6

1 6 5 .8

1 6 7 .4

1 6 8 .8

1 7 1 .0

1 7 8 .0

4.1

7 .4

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ..................................................................................

1 6 2 .6

1 6 4 .6

1 67.1

1 6 8 .4

1 7 0 .7

1 7 3 .3

1 7 4 .9

1 7 5 .9

1 7 9 .9

2 .3

5 .4

M a n u f a c tu r in g ..........................................................................................

1 57 .1

1 5 7 .9

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .4

1 6 3 .7

1 6 5 .5

1 6 6 .8

1 6 8 .9

1 7 6 .9

4 .7

8 .1

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g .................................................................................

1 6 2 .9

1 6 4 .9

1 6 7 .4

1 6 8 .6

1 71.1

1 7 3 .5

1 7 5 .2

1 7 6 .3

1 8 0 .3

2 .3

5 .4


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May 2003

75

Current Labor Statistics:

Compensation & Industrial Relations

28. Employment Cost Index, private nonfarm workers by bargaining status, region, and area size
[June 1989 = 100]

_______________
2000

2001

Percent change

2002

Series
Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

Dec.

3 months
ended

12 months
ended

Dec. 2002
C O M P E N S A T IO N
W o r k e r s , b y b a r g a in in g s t a t u s 1
U n io n ..........................................................................................

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .9

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .0

1 53.1

1 5 4 .8

1 5 6 .3

158 .1

1 5 9 .5

0 .9

G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ...................................................................................

1 4 7 .3

1 4 7 .9

1 4 9 .3

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .6

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .2

1 5 7 .8

1 .9

4 .0

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ...................................................................................

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .6

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .2

1 5 4 .2

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .9

1 61 .1

.8

4 .5

4 .2

M a n u f a c tu r in g ..............................................................................

1 4 7 .4

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .8

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .4

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .9

1 .3

4 .3

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ...................................................................................

1 4 6 .2

1 4 7 .3

1 4 9 .4

1 51.1

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .6

1 5 8 .8

1 5 9 .9

.7

4 .2

N o n u n io n ....................................................................................................
G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ...................................................................................

1 5 1 .6

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .8

1 5 9 .6

1 6 1 .4

1 6 2 .5

1 6 2 .8

.4

3 .2

1 4 9 .3

1 5 1 .6

1 53.1

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .3

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .8

.8

3 .5

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ...................................................................................

1 5 2 .3

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .2

1 6 2 .9

1 6 3 .3

.2

3 .0

M a n u f a c tu r in g ............................................................................................

1 4 9 .9

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .1

1 60.1

1 6 1 .3

.7

3 .7

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ...................................................................................

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .4

1 5 7 .0

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .7

*

1 6 2 .4

3 .0

W o r k e r s , b y r e g io n 1
N o r t h e a s t .......................................................................................................

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .6

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .3

1 5 8 .3

1 5 9 .9

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .3

.5

3 .2

S o u t h .................................................................................................

1 4 8 .6

1 51 .1

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .2

1 5 7 .6

1 5 8 .9

1 5 9 .0

.1

2 .8

M id w e s t ( fo r m e r ly N o r th C e n tr a l) ........................................................

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .8

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .6

1 61 .1

1 6 2 .2

1 6 3 .5

1 6 4 .6

.7

W e s t ................................................................................................

3 .8

1 5 1 .8

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .4

1 6 2 .9

1 6 3 .8

1 6 5 .0

.7

3 .5

W o r k e r s , b y a r e a s iz e 1
M e tr o p o lita n a r e a s .......................................................................................

1 5 1 .0

153 .1

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .4

1 59 .1

1 6 0 .9

1 6 1 .8

1 6 2 .5

.4

3 .2

O th e r a r e a s .................................................................................................

1 5 0 .3

1 52 .1

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .6

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .0

1 6 9 .8

.5

3 .3

W A G E S A N D S A L A R IE S
W o r k e r s , b y b a r g a in in g s t a t u s 1
U n io n ...........................................................................................................

1 4 1 .2

1 42 .1

1 4 3 .7

1 45 .1

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .5

.8

3 .5

G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ......................................................................................

1 4 1 .3

1 4 2 .4

1 4 4 .2

1 4 5 .3

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .2

.8

3 .3

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 4 1 .5

1 4 2 .2

1 4 3 .7

1 4 5 .4

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .9

1 54.1

.8

3 .5

M a n u f a c tu r in g .............................................................................................

1 4 2 .6

1 4 3 .9

1 4 5 .5

1 4 6 .7

1 4 8 .0

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .6

1 53 .1

1 .0

3 .4

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ....................................................................................

1 4 0 .4

1 41 .1

1 4 2 .7

1 4 4 .3

1 47 .1

1 48.1

1 4 9 .6

1 51 .1

1 52 .1

.7

3 .4

N o n u n io n .....................................................................................................

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

1 58.1

1 5 8 .5

.3

G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ......................................................................................

1 4 6 .8

1 4 8 .8

1 5 0 .3

1 51.1

1 52.1

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .6

.7

3 .0

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 4 9 .6

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .7

1 54.1

1 55.1

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 5 8 .9

1 5 9 .0

.1

2 .5

2 .7

M a n u f a c tu r in g .............................................................................................

1 4 8 .0

1 50.1

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .2

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .1

1 5 6 .8

1 5 7 .8

.6

3.1

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ...................................................................................

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

158 .1

1 5 8 .3

.1

2 .5

W o r k e r s , b y r e g io n 1
N o r t h e a s t .............................................................................................

1 4 6 .0

1 4 7 .3

1 4 9 .2

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .9

1 55 .1

1 5 5 .7

S o u t h .........................................................................................................

1 4 6 .3

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .3

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .7

1 5 4 .6

M id w e s t ( f o r m e r ly N o rth C e n tr a l) ..........................................................

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .7

1 57.1

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .2

.6

3 .6

W e s t ..........................................................................................

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .9

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .7

1 5 9 .3

1 60.1

.5

2 .6

.4
-.1

2 .6
2 .2

W o r k e r s , b y a r e a s iz e 1
M e tr o p o lita n a r e a s ........................................................................................

1 4 8 .0

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 55.1

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .4

1 5 7 .9

.3

2 .7

O th e r a r e a s ......................................................................................................

1 4 6 .0

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .8

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .8

1 5 4 .8

.7

2 .9

' T h e in d e x e s a re c a lc u la te d d iffe re n tly fro m t h o s e fo r th e o c c u p a tio n a n d in d u s try g r o u p s . F o r a d e ta ile d d e s c r ip tio n o f th e in d e x c a lc u la tio n , s e e th e
T e c h n ic a l N o te , " E s tim a tio n p r o c e d u r e s fo r th e E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x ," M a y 1 9 8 2 .

76

Monthly Labor Review


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

Monthly Labor Review

29. Percent of full-time employees participating in employer-provided benefit plans, and in selected features within plans,
medium and large private establishments, selected years, 1980-97_____________________________________________
Ite m

1980

1984

1982

1986

1988

2 1 ,0 1 3

1993

199 1

1997

1995

3 1 ,0 5 9

3 2 ,4 2 8

3 1 ,1 6 3

2 8 ,7 2 8

3 3 ,3 7 4

3 8 ,4 0 9

2 0 ,2 3 8

2 7 ,9 5 3

2 9 ,8 3 4

2 5 ,8 6 5

2 3 ,5 1 9

2 5 ,5 4 6

2 9 ,3 4 0

20,451

2 8 ,5 7 4

3 0,4 82

2 9 ,2 9 3

2 6 ,1 7 5

2 9 ,0 7 8

3 3 ,4 9 5

19,5 67

2 0,4 30

1 8,3 86

1 6,0 15

1 7 ,4 1 7

1 9,2 02

2 1 ,3 0 3

2 1 ,3 5 2

2 1 ,0 4 3

W ith m e d ic a l c a re ...............................................................

2 0,711

2 0 ,4 1 2

2 0 ,3 8 3

W ith life in s u r a n c e ..............................................................

2 0 ,4 9 8

2 0 ,2 0 1

2 0 ,1 7 2
17,231

1 6,1 90

S c o p e o f s u rv e y (in 0 0 0 's )..................................................

1989

N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s (in 0 0 0 ’s):

W t h d e fin e d b e n e fit p la n .................................................

17,9 36

1 7,6 76

Tim e-off plans
P a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
P a id lu n c h t im e ......................................................................

10

9

9

10

11

10

8

9

A v e ra g e m in u te s p e r d a y ................................................

-

25

26

27

29

26

30

29

P a id re s t tim e .........................................................................

75

76

73

72

72

71

67

68

A v e ra g e m in u te s p e r d a y ................................................

-

25
-

26
-

26

26

26

28

26

P a id fu n e ra l le a v e ................................................................

88

85

84

80

83

80

8?

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r o c c u r re n c e .......................................

-

-

-

3.2

3.2

3.3

3 .3

3 .0

3 .3

3 .7

P a id h o lid a y s ..........................................................................
A v e ra g e d a y s p e r y e a r ....................................................

99

99

99

99

96

97

92

91

89

89

1 0 .1

1 0 .0

9.8

1 0 .0

9.4

9.2

1 0 .2

9 .4

9.1

9 .3

P a id p e rs o n a l le a v e .............................................................

20

24

23

25

24

22

21

21

22

20

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r y e a r ....................................................

-

3 .8

3 .6

3 .7

3.3

3.1

3 .3

3.1

3 .3

3 .5

P a id v a c a tio n s .......................................................................

100

99

99

100

98

97

96

97

96

95

62

67

67

70

69

68

67

65

58

56

U n p a id m a te rn ity le a v e ......................................................

-

-

-

-

33

37

37

60

U n p a id p a te rn ity le a v e .......................................................

-

-

-

16

18

26

53

U n p a id fa m ily le a v e ............................................................

_
_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

84

97

97

97

95

90

92

83

82

77

93

76

Insurance plans
P a rtic ip a n ts in m e d ic a l c a re p la n s ....................................
P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith c o v e ra g e for:
H o m e h e a lth c a r e .............................................................

-

-

46

66

86

78

85

E x te n d e d c a re fa c ilitie s ...................................................

58

62

62

70

79

80

80

82

73

78

8

18

28

28

30

42

56

63

76

75

81

P e rc e n t o f p a r tic ip a n ts w ith e m p lo y e e
c o n trib u tio n re q u ire d fo r:
26

27

46

51

A v e ra g e m o n th ly c o n trib u tio n .....................................
A v e ra g e m o n tm y c o n trib u tio n .....................................

36

43

44

47

51

61

67

69

$ 1 1 .9 3

$ 1 2 .8 0

$ 1 9 .2 9

$25.31

$ 2 6 .6 0

$ 3 1 .5 5

$ 3 3 .9 2

$ 3 9 .1 4

58

63

64

66

69

76

78

80

$ 3 5 .9 3

$ 4 1 .4 0

$ 6 0 .0 7

$ 7 2 .1 0

$ 9 6 .9 7

$ 1 0 7 .4 2

$ 1 1 8 .3 3

$ 1 3 0 .0 7

96

96

96

96

92

94

94

91

87

87

69
-

72
-

74
-

72

78

71

71

76

77

74

S u rv iv o r in c o m e b e n e fits .................................................

10

8

7

6

5

7

6

R e tire e p ro te c tio n a v a ila b le ............................................

-

64

64

59

49

42

44

41

37

33

40

43

47

48

42

45

40

41

42

43

in s u ra n c e p la n s ....................................................................

54

51

51

49

46

43

45

44

P a rtic ip a n ts in s h o rt-te rm d is a b ility p la n s ' ....................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

53

55

84

84

82

76

63

63

59

56

52

50

P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
A c c id e n ta l d e a th a n d d is m e m b e rm e n t
in s u r a n c e .............................................................................

P a rtic ip a n ts in lo n g -te rm d is a b ility
in s u ra n c e p la n s ...................................................................
P a rtic ip a n ts in s ic k n e s s a n d a ccide n t

_

_

Retirement plans
P a rtic ip a n ts in d e fin e d b e n e fit p e n sio n p la n s .............
P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
N o rm a l re tire m e n t p rio r to a g e 6 5 ...............................

55

58

63

64

59

62

55

52

52

52

98

97

97

98

98

97

98

95

96

95

47

35

26

22

7

6

4

A d h o c p e n s io n in c re a s e in la st 5 y e a rs ...................
B e n e fit c o o rd in a te d w ith S o c ia l S e c u rity ..................
P a rtic ip a n ts in d e fin e d c o n trib u tio n p la n s ......................

10

53

52

54

57

55

64

56

61

58

56

45

45

56

62

62

63

54

48

51

49

-

-

-

60

45

48

48

49

55

57

33

36

41

44

43

54

55

P a rtic ip a n ts in p la n s w ith ta x -d e fe rre d s a v in g s
a rra n g e m e n ts ......................................................................

-

-

-

_

_
_

_
_

Other benefits
E m p lo y e e s e lig ib le fo r:

2

5

9

10

12

12

13

5

12

23

36

52

38
5

32
7

P re m iu m c o n v e rs io n p la n s ..............................................
1

T h e d e fin itio n s fo r p a id s ic k le a v e a n d s h o rt-te rm d is a b ility (p re v io u s ly s ic k n e s s a n d

a c c id e n t in s u ra n c e ) w e re c h a n g e d fo r th e 199 5 s u rv e y . P a id s ic k le a v e n o w in c lu d e s o n ly
p la n s th a t s p e c ify e ith e r a m a x im u m n u m b e r o f d a y s p e r y e a r o r u n lim ite d d a ys.

S h o rt-

te r m s d is a b ility n o w in c lu d e s all in s u re d , s e lf-in s u re d , a n d S ta te -m a n d a te d p la n s a va ila b le
o n a p e r-d is a b ility b a s is , a s w e ll a s th e u n fu n d e d p e r-d is a b ility p la n s p re v io u s ly re p o rte d a s

fits a t le ss th a n full pay.
2

P rio r to

199 5, re im b u rs e m e n t a c c o u n ts in c lu d e d

p re m iu m c o n v e rs io n

p lan s, w h ic h

specifically allow medical plan participants to pay required plan premiums with pretax
dollars. Also, reimbursement accounts that were part of flexible benefit plans were
tabulated separately.

s ic k le a v e . S ic k n e s s a n d a c c id e n t in s u ra n c e , re p o rte d in y e a rs p rio r to th is su rve y, in c lu d e d
o n ly in s u re d , s e lf-in s u re d , a n d S ta te -m a n d a te d p la n s p ro v id in g p e r-d is a b ility b e n e -


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Note: Dash indicates data not available.

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

77

Current Labor Statistics:

Compensation & Industrial Relations

30. Percent of full-time employees participating in employer-provided benefit plans, and in selected features
within plans, small private establishments and State and local governments, 1987, 1990, 1992, 1994, and 1996
Small private establishments

Item
1990

1992

1994

State and local governments
1996

1987

1990

1992

1994

S c o p e o f s u rv e y (in 0 0 0 's )...................................................

3 2 ,4 6 6

N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s (in 0 0 0 's ):
W ith m e d ic a l c a re ...............................................................

2 2,4 02

2 4,3 96

2 3 ,5 3 6

2 5 ,5 9 9

9 ,5 9 9

1 2,0 64

1 1,2 19

1 1 ,1 9 2

W ith life in s u r a n c e ..............................................................

2 0 ,7 7 8

2 1 ,9 9 0

2 1 ,9 5 5

2 4 ,6 3 5

8 ,7 7 3

1 1,4 15

1 1,0 95

1 1 ,1 9 4

W ith d e fin e d b e n e fit p la n .................................................

6 ,4 9 3

7 ,559

5 ,4 8 0

5 ,8 8 3

9 ,5 9 9

1 1,6 75

1 0,8 45

1 1 ,7 0 8

3 4 ,3 6 0

3 5 ,9 1 0

3 9 ,8 1 6

10,321

1 2,9 72

1 2,4 66

1 2,9 07

Tim e-off plans
P a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
-

17

11

10

A v e ra g e m in u te s p e r d a y ................................................

37

37

-

-

34

36

34

_
_

P a id re s t tim e .........................................................................

48

49

-

-

_

P a id lu n c h tim e ....................................................................

-

9

8

58

56

53

A v e ra g e m in u te s p e r d a y ................................................

27

26

-

_

29

29

29

_

P a id fu n e ra l le a v e ................................................................

47

50

50

51

56

63

65

62
3 .7

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r o c c u r re n c e .......................................

2 .9

3.0

3.1

3.0

3 .7

3 .7

3 .7

P a id h o lid a y s ..........................................................................

84

82

82

80

81

74

75

73

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r y e a r 1...................................................
P a id p e rs o n a l le a v e .............................................................

9.5

9.2

7.5

7.6

10.9

1 3.6

14.2

11.5

11

12

13

14

38

39

38

38

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r y e a r ....................................................

2 .8

2 .6

2 .6

3.0

2 .7

2 .9

2 .9

3 .0

P a id v a c a tio n s .......................................................................

88

88

88

86

72

67

67

66

P a id s ic k le a v e 2...................................................................

47

53

50

50

97

95

95

94

U n p a id le a v e ..........................................................................

17

18

_

_

57

51

59

U n p a id p a te rn ity le a v e .......................................................

8

U n p a id fa m ily le a v e .............................................................

7

-

-

30

33

44

_

~

47

48

“

~

-

93

Insurance plans

"

P a rtic ip a n ts in m e d ic a l c a re p la n s ....................................

69

71

66

64

93

93

90

87

79

80

-

-

76

82

87

84

-

-

78

79

84

81

36

36

47

55

P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith c o v e ra g e for:
H o m e h e a lth c a r e ..............................................................
E x te n d e d c a re fa c ilitie s ...................................................

83

84

P h y s ic a l e x a m ....................................................................

26

28

P e rc e n t o f p a r tic ip a n ts w ith e m p lo y e e
c o n trib u tio n re q u ire d fo r:
S e lf c o v e r a g e ......................................................................
A v e ra g e m o n th ly c o n trib u tio n ......................................

42

47

52

52

35

38

43

47

$ 2 5 .1 3

$36.51

$ 4 0 .9 7

$ 4 2 .6 3

$ 1 5 .7 4

$ 2 5 .5 3

$ 2 8 .9 7

$ 3 0 .2 0

F a m ily c o v e r a g e .................................................................

67

73

76

75

71

65

72

71

A v e ra g e m o n th ly c o n trib u tio n .....................................

$ 1 0 9 .3 4

$ 1 5 0 .5 4

$ 1 5 9 .6 3

$ 1 8 1 .5 3

$ 7 1 .8 9

$ 1 1 7 .5 9

$ 1 3 9 .2 3

$ 1 4 9 .7 0

P a rtic ip a n ts in life in s u ra n c e p la n s ..................................

64

64

61

62

85

88

89

87

64

P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
A c c id e n ta l d e a th a n d d is m e m b e rm e n t
in s u r a n c e .............................................................................

78

76

79

77

67

67

74

S u rv iv o r in c o m e b e n e fits ..................................................

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

2

R e tire e p ro te c tio n a v a ila b le .............................................

19

25

20

13

55

45

46

46

19

23

20

22

31

27

28

30

14

P a rtic ip a n ts in lo n g -te rm d is a b ility
in s u ra n c e p la n s ....................................................................
P a rtic ip a n ts in s ic k n e s s a n d a ccid e n t
in s u ra n c e p la n s .....................................................................
P a rtic ip a n ts in s h o rt-te rm d is a b ility p la n s 2 ....................

6

26

26

-

-

-

29

21

22

21

-

-

-

-

93

90

87

91

Retirement plans
P a rtic ip a n ts in d e fin e d b e n e fit p e n sio n p la n s ..............

20

22

15

15

N o rm a l re tire m e n t p rio r to a ge 6 5 ...............................

54

50

-

47

P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
92

89

92

92

E a rly re tire m e n t a v a ila b le ................................................

95

95

89

87

4

92
-

88

7

-

90

A d h o c p e n s io n in c re a s e in la st 5 y e a rs ....................

33

16

10

13

T e rm in a l e a rn in g s fo r m u la ..............................................

58

54

-

53

100

100

100

99
49

B e n e fit c o o rd in a te d w ith S o cia l S e c u rity ....................

49

46

-

44

18

8

10

P a rtic ip a n ts in d e fin e d c o n trib u tio n p la n s ......................

31

33

34

38

9

9

9

9

17

24

23

28

28

45

45

24

P a rtic ip a n ts in p la n s w ith ta x -d e fe rre d s a v in g s
a rra n g e m e n ts ........................................................................

Other benefits
E m p lo y e e s e lig ib le for:
F le x ib le b e n e fits p la n s .........................................................

1

2

3

4

5

5

5

5

R e im b u rs e m e n t a c c o u n ts 3 ..............................................

8

14

19

12

5

31

50

64

P re m iu m c o n v e rs io n p la n s .............................................

7

' M e th o d s u s e d to c a lc u la te th e a v e ra g e n u m b e r o f p a id h o lid a y s w e re re v is e d

S ic k n e s s a n d a c c id e n t in s u ra n c e , re p o rte d in y e a rs p rio r to th is su rve y,

in 1 9 9 4 to c o u n t p a rtia l d a y s m o re p re cise ly. A v e ra g e h o lid a y s fo r 1 9 9 4 a re

in c lu d e d o n ly in s u re d , s e lf-in s u re d , a n d S ta te -m a n d a te d p la n s p ro v id in g p e r-

n o t c o m p a ra b le w ith th o s e re p o rte d in 1 99 0 a n d 1992.
2

T h e d e fin itio n s fo r p a id s ic k le a v e a n d sh o rt-te rm

d is a b ility b e n e fits a t le ss th a n fu ll pay.
d is a b ility (p re vio u sly

3 P rio r to 1996, re im b u rs e m e n t a c c o u n ts in c lu d e d p re m iu m c o n v e rs io n p lan s,

s ic k n e s s a n d a c c id e n t in s u ra n c e ) w e re c h a n g e d fo r th e 199 6 su rv e y . P aid s ick

w h ic h

le a v e n o w in c lu d e s o n ly p la n s th a t s p e c ify e ith e r a m a x im u m n u m b e r o f d a y s

p re m iu m s w ith p re ta x d o lla rs . A lso , re im b u rs e m e n t a c c o u n ts th a t w e re p art o f

p e r y e a r o r u n lim ite d d a y s . S h o rt-te rm d is a b ility n o w in c lu d e s a ll in su re d , se lf-

fle x ib le b e n e fit p la n s w e re ta b u la te d se p a ra te ly.

s p e c ific a lly

a llo w

m e d ic a l

p lan

in s u re d , a n d S ta te -m a n d a te d p la n s a v a ila b le on a p e r-d is a b ility b asis, a s w e ll
a s th e u n fu n d e d p e r-d is a b ility p la n s p re v io u s ly re p o rte d a s s ic k leave.

78

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

Note:

D a sh in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a va ila b le .

p a rtic ip a n ts

to

pay

re q u ire d

plan

31. Work stoppages involving 1,000 workers or more
Measure

Annual totals
2001

2002

2002
Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Nov.

Oct.

Dec.

2003p
Feb.

Jan.

Mar.

N u m b e r o f s to p p a g e s :
B e g in n in g in p e r io d ....................................

29

19

1

2

3

1

3

1

3

1

2

1

1

0

2

In e ffe c t d u rin g p e r io d ..............................

30

20

1

3

5

3

4

3

3

3

2

1

2

0

2

W o rk e rs in v o lv e d :
B e g in n in g in p e rio d (in th o u s a n d s ) ....

99

46

2 .9

4.1

5.1

1.5

6 .7

3 .5

1 3 .7

1.2

4 .3

1.4

1 7 .5

.0

4 .0

In e ffe c t d u rin g p e rio d (in th o u s a n d s ).

102

47

2 .9

7 .0

9 .2

5.3

8 .2

62

1 3.7

1 3 .5

4 .3

1.4

1 8.8

.0

4 .0

1,151

6 ,5 9 6

4 3 .5

8 0 .7

1 38 .2

3 6.0

5 4 .0

5 0 .6

3 9 .3

1 3 3 .4

2 3 .9

2 8 .6

4 8 .8

0 .0

1 8 .5

.00

.00

.00

.00

.00

.00

.00

.00

.00

.00

.00

.00

.00

(2)

.00

D a y s id le :

P e rc e n t o f e s tim a te d w o rk in a tim e 1....

1 A g r ic u ltu ra l a n d g o v e rn m e n t e m p lo y e e s a re in c lu d e d in th e to ta l e m p lo y e d a n d to ta l w o rk in g tim e ; p riv a te h o u s e h o ld , fo re s try , a n d fis h e ry e m p lo y e e s a re e x c lu d e d . A n e x p la n a tio n o f
th e m e a s u re m e n t o f id le n e s s a s a p e rc e n ta g e o f th e to ta l tim e w o rk e d is fo u n d i n " T o ta l e c o n o m y ' m e a s u re s o f s trik e id le n e s s ,"

Monthly Labor Review , O c to b e r

1 9 6 8, p p . 54— 56.

2 L e s s th a n 0 .0 0 5 .
p = p re lim in a ry .


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

79

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

32. Consumer Price Indexes for All Urban Consumers and for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers: U.S. city average,
by expenditure category and commodity or service group
[1982-84 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]_____
Annual average

Series

2001

2002

2002

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

2003

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

C O N S U M E R P R IC E IN D E X
FOR A L L U RBAN CO NSUM ERS
A ll ite m s ....................................................

177.1

1 79 .9

178.8

179.8

179.8

179.9

180.1

180.7

181.0

181.0

181.3

180.9

181.7

183.1

184 .2

A ll Ite m s ( 1 9 6 7 = 1 0 0 )......................................

530 .4

5 3 8 .8

5 35 .5

5 38 .6

5 38 .5

5 38 .9

539 .5

5 41.2

542.1

5 43 .2

543.1

5 4 1 .9

5 44.2

5 48 .5

5 5 1 .8

F o o d a n d b e v e ra g e s .............................................

1 73.6

1 76.8

176.6

176.7

176.4

176.4

176.6

176.6

176.9

177.1

177.4

177.8

178.1

1 78.9

179 .2

F o o d .........................................................................

173.1

176.2

176.1

176.2

175.8

175.8

176.0

176.0

176.4

176.5

176.8

177.3

177.5

1 78.3

178 .6

F o od a t h o m e ......................................................

173.4

1 75 .6

176.3

176.4

175.5

175.0

175.2

174.9

175.2

175.1

175 .5

176.1

176.7

1 77.6

177 .7

C e re a ls a n d b a k e ry p ro d u c ts ..................................

193.E

1 98.0

197.0

198.1

198.2

198.7

198.7

198.6

198.4

198.9

198.3

197.3

199.8

2 0 1 .8

202.1

M e a ts , p o u ltry , fish , a n d e g g s .....................................

161.2

162.1

162.8

162.5

162.4

161.9

162.3

162.2

1 61.8

161.3

162.1

162.4

161.6

1 64.7

1 64 .8

D a iry a n d re la te d p ro d u c ts 1.......................................

167.1

168.1

169.4

168.7

169.0

168.0

167.6

167.2

166.3

166.5

167.1

167.3

166.4

167.2

167.1

F ru its a n d v e g e ta b le s ....................................................

2 12 .2

2 2 0 .9

2 25 .8

2 23 .4

2 2 1 .0

2 17 .4

2 17.4

2 17 .0

218 .4

2 17 .4

2 1 9 .8

2 2 4 .9

227.1

2 2 3 .3

2 2 3 .6

N o n a lc o h o lic b e v e ra g e s a n d b e v e ra g e
m a te ria ls ......................................................
O th e r fo o d s a t h o m e ............................................

139.2

139 .2

140.1

140.1

138.0

137.5

138.3

137.6

140.2

140.5

139.1

139.8

1 40.6

140 .8

1 40 .3

159.6

160 .8

159.9

161.5

160.0

160.8

161.0

160.6

160.8

160.9

161.1

161.1

1 61.8

1 62 .2

162 .6

S u g a r a n d s w e e ts ........................................................

155.7

159.0

157.2

159.6

157.9

158.0

160.2

159.9

159.6

159.9

158.5

159.1

1 69.7

1 61 .8

1 62 .5

F a ts a n d o ils ...........................................................

155.7

155.4

156.4

156.5

155.9

154.6

154.9

154.1

154.1

155.9

153.4

152.8

1 55 .8

1 58 .7

157 .5

110.1

O th e r fo o d s .....................................................................
O th e r m is c e lla n e o u s fo o d s 1,2...............................
F o o d a w a y fro m h o m e 1...................... .............
O th e r fo o d a w a y fro m h o m e 1'2................................
A lc o h o lic b e v e ra g e s ..................................................
H o u s in g .......................................................................

176.0

177.1

175.9

177.8

176 1

170 0

170 0

_ -

108.9

1 09.2

107.8

108.0

108.9

109.0

110.1

109.3

109.7

109.8

1 1 0 .3

1 1 0 .2

1 09 .7

1 10 .5

173.9

1 78.3

177.1

177.2

177.6

178.2

1 787.5

178.8

179.2

179.6

179.8

180.1

1 79.9

1 80 .7

181 .0

113.4

1 17.7

116.3

116.9

117.1

117.6

117.7

118.1

118.8

119.1

119.7

119 .8

1 19 .9

120 .2

1 20.4

179.3

183 .6

182.5

182.9

183.3

183.5

183.8

184.2

183.9

184.7

185.1

184.9

1 85 .8

185 .9

1 86 .6

2 09 .6

181.5

181.4

181.2

181.1

182 .3

183 .2

1 84.3

176.4

180 .3

179.1

179.5

179.7

180.7

181.2

S h e lte r...................................................................................

2 0 0 .6

208.1

2 0 7 .0

2 0 7 .5

2 0 7 .5

208.1

2 08 .8

2 00 .2

2 09 .2

2 0 1 .3

2 0 9 .6

2 09 .5

2 1 0 .9

2 1 1 .6

212.1

R e nt o f p rim a ry re s id e n c e ............................................

192.1

1 99 .7

198.2

1 98.5

198.8

199.3

199.8

2 00 .2

2 00 .7

2 01 .3

2 0 2 .0

2 0 2 .5

2 0 3 .3

2 0 3 .7

204.1

L o d g in g a w a y fro m h o m e .............................................

118.6

1 18.3

121.9

122.1

120.1

120.9

121.7

123.6

117.6

117.0

113.2

109.2

1 14.3

1 17 .6

1 19 .7

O w n e rs ’ e q u iv a le n t re n t o f p rim a ry re s id e n c e 3.....

2 06 .3

2 1 4 .7

2 12 .8

2 13 .3

2 13 .7

2 1 4 .3

2 14 .9

2 15 .4

2 16 .2

2 16 .8

2 1 7 .3

2 1 7 .9

2 1 8 .5

2 1 8 .7

2 1 8 .9

T e n a n ts ’ a n d h o u s e h o ld in s u ra n c e 1,2......................

106.2

1 08.7

106.8

107.2

107.6

107.8

108.6

109.6

110.0

110.0

111.4

1 12.3

1 13 .9

114.1

114 .0

150.2

1 43 .6

140.2

140.3

141.5

146.2

146.8

146.8

147.2

144.4

143.6

144.2

146.1

1 48.3

1 54 .5

135.4

1 27.2

123.8

123.8

125.1

130.3

130.8

130.7

131.0

127.9

127.0

127.5

1 29 .5

1 31.9

1 38 .5

F u e l o il a n d o th e r fu e ls .............................................

129.3

1 15.5

112.8

115.1

114.4

112.7

111.6

112.1

115.2

119.3

121.8

125.6

136 .6

1 56 .3

169 .0

G a s (p ip e d ) a n d e le c tric ity .......................................

142.4

134.4

130.7

130.6

132.1

138.0

138.6

138.5

138.7

134.9

133.7

134.1

135 .6

1 36 .9

143 .5

F u e ls a n d u tilitie s .....................................................
F u e ls ..................................................................................

H o u s e h o ld fu rn is h in g s a nd o p e ra tio n s .....................
A p p a r e l...............................................................................

129.1

1 28 .3

128.7

128.9

128.9

128.7

128.6

128.1

128.1

128.0

127.8

127.0

1 27.4

127 .7

127.1

127.3

124 .0

128.2

128.8

127.1

122.7

118.7

120.5

124.6

126.8

125.5

121.5

118.1

120 .6

1 23 .6

M e n 's a nd b o y s ' a p p a r e l...............................................

125.7

121 .7

125.2

125.6

124.3

120.8

118.4

118.3

120.1

122.8

123.2

119.3

116.1

1 17 .3

121 .0

W o m e n 's a n d g irls ' a p p a re l.........................................

119.3

115 .8

1 21.3

122.2

2 29 .4

113.7

107.6

111.0

118.0

120.5

118.0

113.1

1 07.6

112 .4

117 .2

In fa n ts ' a n d to d d le rs ' aDDarel1.....................................

129.2

126.4

1 29.9

198.9

127.4

124.9

122.9

124.3

126.2

127.7

127.5

1 25.3

121.1

122 .3

124.1

118.5

119.7

121.6

123.0

122.7

120.7

1 19 .7

119 .8

1 19 .8

F o o tw e a r............................................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n .......................................................................
P riv a te tra n s p o rta tio n .......................................................

123.0

1 21.4

123.5

124.5

124.5

121.2

154.3

1 52.9

150.5

153.7

153.8

153.4

153.7

153.9

154.0

154.9

155.2

154.2

1 55.5

1 58 .9

161 .0

150.0

1 48.8

146.3

149.6

149.5

149.1

149.5

149.7

150.0

151.1

151.5

150.4

1 51.8

1 55 .3

157 .3

N e w a n d u s e d m o to r v e h ic le s 2....................................

101.3

9 9.2

99.6

9 9.3

99.1

98.8

9 8 .8

98.7

9 8.7

9 8.9

98.8

98.7

9 8 .2

9 8.0

9 8.0

N e w v e h ic le s ...................................................................

142.1

140 .0

140.7

140.4

139.8

139.2

138.7

138.1

138.7

139.5

140.4

140.6

139 .7

139 .2

1 39 .3

U se d c a rs a n d tru c k s 1.................................................
M o to r fu e l........................................................................

158.7

152 .0

152.1

152.8

151.8

152.2

152.7

153.4

152.2

150.7

148.8

148.5

148 .3

148 .4

1 48 .5

124.7

116 .6

107.7

121.4

121.4

120.1

120 .8

121.5

121.7

124.5

124.4

119.7

126 .3

140 .4

148.1

G a s o lin e (a ll ty p e s ).......................................................

124.0

116.0

107.1

120.8

120.8

119.5

120.3

120.9

121.1

123.9

123.8

119.1

1 25 .7

1 39 .7

147.4

M o to r v e h ic le p a rts a n d e q u ip m e n t...........................

104.8

106 .9

106.5

106.8

106.8

106.7

107.4

107.7

107.4

106.9

107.2

107.0

1 07 .8

108.2

1 07 .9

M o to r v e h ic le m a in te n a n c e a nd re p a ir.....................

183.5

1 90.2

188.5

189.0

189.9

190.0

189.8

191.0

191.4

191.8

192.8

193.3

1 93.7

1 94 .5

194 .3

P u b lic tra n s p o rta tio n .........................................................

2 1 0 .6

2 0 7 .4

2 0 7 .9

2 0 9 .7

2 1 1 .3

2 1 1 .3

2 0 9 .7

2 09 .4

2 06 .5

2 03 .4

2 0 2 .3

2 03 .0

2 0 2 .2

2 0 3 .6

206.1

M e d ic a l c a re ...........................................................................

2 72 .8

2 8 5 .6

2 82 .0

2 83 .2

284.1

2 84 .7

2 86 .6

2 8 7 .3

2 8 7 .7

2 89 .2

2 90 .5

2 9 1 .3

2 9 2 .6

2 9 3 .7

2 9 4 .2

M e d ic a l c a re c o m m o d itie s .............................................

2 47 .6

2 5 6 .4

254.1

2 5 4 .8

2 55 .4

2 56 .4

2 57 .5

2 57 .7

2 5 7 .9

2 5 8 .3

259.1

2 5 9 .5

2 6 0 .3

2 6 0 .4

2 6 1 .4

M e d ic a l c a re s e rv ic e s ......................................................

2 7 8 .8

2 9 2 .9

2 8 8 .9

2 90 .2

2 91 .2

2 91 .7

2 9 3 .8

2 94 .7

2 95 .2

297.1

2 98 .5

2 99 .4

3 0 0 .8

3 0 2 .3

3 0 2 .6

P ro fe s s io n a l s e rv ic e s ...................................................

2 4 6 .5

2 5 3 .9

2 5 1 .9

2 52 .5

2 5 2 .9

2 5 3 .2

2 55 .0

2 5 4 .9

2 54 .8

2 56 .0

2 5 6 .5

2 57 .0

2 5 7 .8

2 5 8 .8

259.1
3 8 8 .7

H o s p ita l a nd re la te d s e rv ic e s .......................................

3 3 8 .3

3 6 7 .8

3 59 .4

3 62.4

3 64.5

3 65 .3

3 67 .6

371 .3

3 73 .3

3 76 .7

3 80 .7

382 .4

3 8 5 .7

3 88 .2

R e c re a tio n 2.............................................................................

104.9

1-6.2

106.1

106.5

106.4

106.2

106.2

106.3

106.2

106.4

106.4

106.5

1 06.9

107.2

107 .4

V id e o a n d a u d io 1,2............................................................

101.5

1 02 .6

102.9

102.9

103.1

103.0

102.6

102.4

102.3

102.6

103.0

103.2

103.4

103 .8

103 .7

E d u c a tio n a n d c o m m u n ic a tio n 2.......................................

105.2

107 .9

106.6

106.2

106.6

106.9

107.6

108.9

109.5

109.4

109.3

109.2

1 09 .7

1 09 .7

109 .4

E d u c a tio n 2...........................................................................

118.5

126 .0

123.3

123.3

123.5

124.3

124.8

127.1

129.6

129.9

130.0

130.0

1 30.6

131 .0

131.1

E d u c a tio n a l b o o k s a n d s u p p lie s ..............................

2 95 .9

3 1 7 .6

3 14 .2

314 .4

3 15 .6

3 17 .4

3 18 .3

3 19 .6

3 23.2

3 23 .2

3 24.0

3 2 3 .3

3 2 9 .5

3 3 2 .8

3 3 3 .2

T u itio n , o th e r sch o o l fe e s, a nd c h ild c a re .............

341.1

362.1

354.1

354.1

3 54 .6

3 56 .8

3 58 .3

3 65 .6

3 72 .8

3 73 .8

374.1

3 74.0

3 7 5 .5

3 7 6 .3

3 7 6 .5

93.3

9 2 .3

92.0

9 1.2

91.9

9 1.8

9 2 .6

93.2

9 2.5

92.2

9 1.8

9 1.8

9 2 .0

9 1 .9

9 1 .3

In fo rm a tio n a n d in fo rm a tio n p ro c e s s in g 1,2...........

92.3

9 0 .8

90.8

9 0.0

90.7

9 0.6

9 0 .8

9 1.5

9 0.7

90.4

90.0

90.0

9 0 .3

90.1

8 9 .5

T e le p h o n e s e rv ic e s 1,2.............................................

99.3

9 9 .7

99.1

98.2

99.3

99.2

9 9 .5

100.6

100.1

9 9.9

9 9.8

9 9.9

100 .4

100 .5

9 9.7

2 1.3

18.3

18.8

18.6

18.5

18.4

18.4

18.3

17.8

17.7

17.3

17.2

17.1

16.9

16.8

e q u ip m e n t1,2.......................................................

2 9.5

2 2 .2

23.1

2 2.9

2 3.0

2 2.6

2 2 .3

2 2.0

21.1

2 0 .7

2 0.0

19.7

19.5

19.1

19.0

O th e r g o o d s a nd s e rv ic e s ...................................................

2 8 2 .6

2 9 3 .2

2 88 .5

2 92 .9

2 91 .5

2 94 .4

2 94 .5

2 95 .9

2 97 .0

2 95 .4

2 95 .6

2 95 .8

2 9 6 .5

2 9 7 .5

2 9 7 .3

T o b a c c o a n d s m o k in g p ro d u c ts ....................................

4 2 5 .2

4 6 1 .5

433 .4

4 61 .4

4 4 9 .0

4 67 .4

467 .2

4 78 .2

4 8 5 .8

4 7 0 .6

4 70 .4

4 7 2 .5

4 7 2 .4

4 7 2 .7

4 6 7 .2

P e rs o n a l c a re 1.....................................................................

170 .5

174 .7

174.1

174.4

174.7

174.9

175.0

174.9

174.9

175.3

175.5

175.4

1 75.9

1 76 .7

177 .2

P e rs o n a l c a re p ro d u c ts 1...............................................

155.1

1 54.7

155.1

155.4

154.8

155.4

154.6

154.3

154.4

154.6

154.2

153.4

153 .0

1 53.3

1 53 .3

P e rs o n a l c a re s e rv ic e s 1................................................

184.3

1 88.4

187.3

187.9

188.3

188 .3|

188.7

189.1

189.2

189.3

189.9

1 89.9

1 90 .6

1 90.9

191 .7

C o m m u n ic a tio n 1’2.....................................................

In fo rm a tio n a nd in fo rm atio n pro cessin g
o th e r th a n tele D h o n e s e rv ic e s 1,4.......................
P e rs o n a l c o m p u te rs a n d p erip h e ra l

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e nd o f ta b le .

80

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

32.

Continued—Consumer Price Indexes for All Urban Consumers and for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers: U.S. city
average, by expenditure category and commodity or service group

[1982-84 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]
2001

M is c e lla n e o u s p e rs o n a l s e rv ic e s .........................

263.1

2002
2 7 4 .4

2003

2002

Annual average
Series

Mar.

Apr.

2 72 .9

May

2 7 3 .2

2 7 4 .2

June
2 7 4 .6

July
275.1

Aug.
2 7 5 .4

Sept.
2 75 .2

Oct.
2 76 .0

Nov.
2 7 6 .6

Dec.
2 7 6 .9

Jan.
278.1

Feb.

Mar.

2 8 0 .4

2 8 1 .4

C o m m o d ity a n d s e rv ic e g ro u p :
C o m m o d itie s .....................................................................

150.7

149.7

149.4

1 51.0

1 50.5

1 49.8

1 49.3

149.6

150.2

150.7

150 .6

1 49.7

1 50 .0

1 52 .0

153.1

F o o d a n d b e v e ra g e s ...................................................

173.6

176 .8

176.6

1 76.7

176 .4

1 76 .4

1 76.6

176.6

1 76.9

177.1

1 77 .4

1 77 .8

178.1

1 78 .9

1 79 .2

C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d a n d b e v e ra g e s ................

137.2

134.2

133.7

136 .0

135 .4

1 34 .4

1 33 .6

134.0

134.8

135 .5

1 35 .2

1 33 .6

1 33.9

1 3 6 .4

1 3 8 .0

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d a n d b e v e ra g e s ...............

147.1

145.1

143.6

1 48.4

1 47 .4

1 45.7

1 44 .4

145.4

147.2

1 48.4

1 48.0

145 .2

146.1

1 51.2

1 5 4 .5

A p p a r e l.......................................................................

1 27.3

1 24.0

128.2

128 .8

127.1

1 22.7

118 .7

120.5

124.6

1 26.8

1 25 .5

1 21 .5

118.1

1 20 .6

1 2 3 .6

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d , b e v e ra g e s ,
a n d a p p a r e l..............................................................

163 .4

162.2

157.3

1 64.7

164.1

164 .0

1 64.3

164.8

165.2

166.0

166 .0

1 63.9

1 67 .4

174.1

1 7 7 .8

D u ra b le s ........................................................................

124.6

121 .4

122.1

1 21.9

1 21 .7

121 .3

121.1

120.7

120 .6

1 20.6

1 20 .5

1 20.2

1 19 .9

1 19 .7

1 1 9 .5

S e r v ic e s ..............................................................................

2 0 3 .4

2 0 9 .8

2 0 8 .0

2 0 8 .4

2 0 8 .8

2 0 9 .8

2 1 0 .7

2 11 .5

2 1 1 .5

2 1 1 .7

2 1 1 .8

2 1 1 .9

213.1

2 1 4 .0

215 .1

2 08 .9

2 16 .7

2 1 5 .6

216.1

216.1

2 1 6 .8

2 1 7 .4

2 1 8 .3

2 17 .9

2 1 8 .4

2 1 8 .2

218.1

2 1 9 .5

2 2 0 .3

2 2 0 .9

T ra n s p o ra ta tio n s e rv ic e s ..........................................

2 01 .9

209.1

2 07 .3

2 0 7 .9

2 0 8 .9

2 0 9 .0

2 0 9 .6

210.1

210.1

2 1 0 .9

2 1 2 .0

2 1 2 .0

2 1 2 .3

2 1 3 .4

2 1 4 .2

O th e r s e rv ic e s ..............................................................

2 38 .0

2 4 6 .4

2 4 3 .6

2 4 3 .8

2 4 4 .5

245.1

2 4 6 .4

2 48.2

249.1

2 4 9 .7

2 4 9 .9

2 5 0 .2

2 5 1 .4

2 5 2 .4

2 5 2 .6

A ll ite m s le s s f o o d .......................................................

177.8

1 80.5

179.2

1 80.4

1 80 .4

180 .6

1 80 .8

181.5

181.8

182.2

182.1

1 81 .6

1 82 .4

1 8 3 .9

1 8 5 .2

A ll ite m s le s s s h e lte r...................................................

169.7

170.8

169.7

1 70.9

1 70.9

1 70 .9

1 70.9

1 71.3

171,9

172.2

1 72 .3

1 71.7

1 72 .3

1 74 .0

1 7 5 .3

A ll ite m s le s s m e d ic a l c a r e ......................................

171.9

174.3

173.3

1 74.3

1 74.2

1 74.4

1 74.5

175.0

175.3

175.6

175 .6

175.1

1 75 .9

1 7 7 .3

1 7 8 .4

C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d ..............................................

138.9

136.0

135.6

1 37.8

1 37 .3

1 36.3

1 35 .5

135.9

136.7

137 .3

1 37 .0

1 35 .6

1 35 .8

1 38 .3

1 3 9 .8

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d ...............................................

149.1

147 .4

145.9

150 .4

149 .5

1 48.0

146.7

147.7

149.3

150.6

150 .2

147 .6

1 48 .4

1 53 .3

1 5 6 .5

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d a n d a p p a re l......................

164.1

163 .3

158.7

165 .5

165 .0

1 64.9

165 .2

165.8

166.1

166.9

1 66.9

165 .0

1 68.2

1 74 .4

1 7 7 .7

N o n d u ra b le s ..................................................................

160.6

161.1

160.2

162 .7

162.1

1 61.2

160 .6

161.2

162.2

1 63.0

1 62 .9

1 61 .6

162 .2

1 65 .3

1 6 7 .2

S p e c ia l in d e x e s :

2 1 2 .3

2 17 .5

2 1 4 .8

215.1

2 1 6 .0

2 1 7 .5

2 1 8 .6

2 19 .5

2 2 0 .0

2 1 9 .9

2 2 0 .2

2 2 0 .5

2 2 1 .6

2 2 2 .8

2 2 4 .4

S e rv ic e s le s s m e d ic a l c a re s e rv ic e s .....................

196.6

2 0 2 .5

2 00 .8

2 0 1 .2

2 0 1 .6

2 0 2 .6

2 0 3 .2

2 04 .2

204.1

2 04 .2

2 0 4 .3

2 0 4 .3

2 0 5 .5

2 0 6 .4

2 0 7 .4

E n e rg y .............................................................................

129.3

121.7

115.6

1 22.2

1 22 .9

124 .9

1 25 .5

125.8

126.1

1 25.8

1 25 .3

1 23 .3

1 2 7 .5

1 3 5 .4

1 4 2 .6

A ll ite m s le s s e n e rg y ..................................................

183.5

187.7

187.1

1 87 .5

1 87 .4

1 87 .3

1 87.5

188.1

1 88.4

188.8

1 88.9

188 .6

1 89 .0

1 89 .7

1 90 .2

A ll ite m s le s s fo o d a n d e n e rg y .............................

186.1

190.5

189.8

1 90.3

190 .2

190.1

1 90.3

191.0

1 91.3

191.8

1 91.8

1 91 .4

1 91 .8

1 9 2 .5

1 9 3 .0

C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d a n d e n e rg y .................

145.3

143.7

144.6

145.1

1 44.4

1 43 .4

142 .5

142.8

143.6

143.9

1 43.6

1 42.5

1 41 .7

142.1

1 4 2 .6

E n e rg y c o m m o d itie s ...........................................

125.2

117.1

108.6

1 21 .6

1 21.6

120 .3

120 .9

1 21.5

122.0

124.8

1 24.9

1 20.7

1 27 .5

142.1

150.1

S e rv ic e s le s s e n e rg y .............................................

2 09 .6

2 1 7 .5

2 1 5 .9

2 1 6 .3

2 1 6 .6

2 1 7 .2

2 1 8 .0

2 1 9 .0

2 18 .9

2 19 .5

2 1 9 .8

2 1 9 .8

2 2 1 .0

2 2 1 .9

2 2 2 .4

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR URBAN
WAGE EARNERS AND CLERICAL WORKERS
A ll ite m s ................................................................................

173.5

175.9

174.7

1 75.8

1 75 .8

1 75.9

1 76 .0

176.6

177.0

177.3

1 7 7 .4

1 77 .0

1 77.7

1 79.2

1 8 0 .3

A ll ite m s (1 9 6 7 - 1 0 0 )......................................................

5 16 .8

5 23 .9

5 20 .2

5 2 3 .7

5 2 3 .6

5 2 4 .0

5 2 4 .5

5 26 .0

5 27 .3

5 28.2

5 2 8 .4

5 2 7 .2

5 2 9 .2

5 3 3 .7

537 .1

F o o d a n d b e v e ra g e s .......................................................

173.0

176.1

176.1

176.1

175 .7

1 75.7

1 76 .0

175.9

176.2

1 76.3

1 76 .6

177.1

1 77 .4

1 78 .3

1 7 8 .5

172.5

176.5

175.6

175 .5

175.1

1 75.2

1 75 .4

175.3

175.7

175.7

1 76 .0

1 76 .5

1 76 .8

1 77 .7

1 7 7 .9

172.4

175.1

175.5

1 75 .3

1 74 .4

174.1

1 74.3

174.0

174.3

174.2

174 .5

175.1

1 75 .7

1 76 .7

1 76 .8

193.6

197.1

197.0

1 97.9

1 98.2

198 .6

1 98.7

198.5

198 .4

198.9

198 .2

197.1

1 99.9

2 0 1 .9

202.1

161.2

162.0

162.7

162.1

162.1

161 .8

162.2

162.0

161.5

161.2

162.1

1 62 .3

1 61 .5

1 64 .5

1 6 4 .8

167.1

167.2

169.2

168.7

168 .7

1 67.8

1 67 .4

167.0

166.1

166 .4

1 66.9

167 .2

166 .3

167.1

1 66 .7

2 1 0 .8

2 2 2 .9

2 2 4 .9

2 2 2 .0

219.1

2 1 6 .4

2 1 6 .4

2 16 .2

2 1 7 .5

2 16 .2

2 1 8 .0

2 2 2 .9

2 2 5 .7

2 2 1 .8

2 2 2 .2

138.4

138.6

139.7

139 .4

1 37.3

1 36 .9

137 .6

136.9

139.6

139.9

1 38.6

139.1

1 39 .9

140.1

1 3 9 .5

159.1

160.4

159.6

161 .0

1 59 .7

1 60 .4

1 60 .5

160.1

160.3

1 60.3

1 60 .7

1 60 .6

1 61 .3

1 61 .9

162.1

155.6

158.8

157.1

1 53 .4

1 57.6

158 .8

1 59.9

159.6

159.5

159.5

158.2

1 58 .9

1 60 .4

1 61.3

162.1

155 .4

1 55.3

1 56.3

156.2

1 55.7

1 54.3

1 54.7

1 54.0

155.2

155.8

1 53 .4

1 52 .9

1 55 .7

1 58 .7

1 57 .7

176.3

177.6

176.5

178.2

1 76.7

1 77.9

1 77 .6

177.3

177.2

177.2

1 78 .8

1 78 .5

1 78 .5

1 78.5

1 7 8 .9

F ru its a n d v e g e ta b le s ...............................................
N o n a lc o h o lic b e v e ra g e s a n d b e v e ra g e

O th e r fo o d s a t h o m e ................................................

12

12

2
L o d q in q a w a y fro m h o m e ....................................
O w n e rs ’ e q u iv a le n t re n t o f p rim a ry re s id e n c e 3
12

2
N e w a n d u s e d m o to r v e h ic l e s ...........................

109.1

109.7

108.3

1 08.5

109 .5

1 09.6

110 .8

109.9

110.1

110.1

1 11.0

1 10 .7

110.1

1 10 .9

1 1 0 .5

173.8

178.2

1 77.0

177.1

1 77 .5

1 78.0

1 78 .4

178.7

1 79.0

1 79.4

1 79 .7

1 80 .0

1 79 .8

180 .5

1 8 1 .0

113.6

118.1

116.8

1 17 .4

1 17 .7

118.1

118.2

118.9

119.3

119.6

1 20 .0

120.1

120 .2

1 20 .4

1 2 0 .7

178.8

1 83.3

182.2

1 82.8

183.1

1 83.2

1 83.6

1 83.8

183.4

184.3

184 .6

1 84.7

1 85 .5

1 85 .7

1 8 6 .8

172.1

175.7

174.4

1 74.8

175.1

176.1

1 76.5

176.9

177 .0

176.9

1 76 .9

1 76 .9

1 77 .9

1 7 8 .7

1 79 .9

194.5

2 01 .9

2 00.6

2 0 1 .0

2 0 1 .2

2 0 .7

2 0 2 .3

2 02 .9

2 0 3 .0

2 0 3 .5

2 0 3 .7

2 0 3 .9

2 0 4 .9

2 0 5 .5

2 0 5 .9

191.5

199.0

197.5

1 97.8

98.1

198 .7

1 99.2

199.6

2 00 .0

2 00 .6

2 0 1 .3

2 0 1 .9

2 0 2 .6

2 0 3 .0

2 0 3 .4

1 18.4

118.4

122.2

1 22.0

1 20 .7

1 20.4

1 21.3

122.9

117.7

117.7

1 14 .0

109 .6

114 .3

118 .0

1 2 0 .4

187.6

195.1

193.3

193.9

194.2

1 94.7

195.2

195.7

196 .4

196.9

1 97.4

198.0

198 .5

198 .6

1 9 8 .8

106.4

108.7

106.9

107.5

1 07.6

107.9

108.7

109.7

110.1

110.1

1 11.2

112.3

113.7

113 .9

1 1 3 .8

149.5

142.9

139.6

139.6

1 40.7

145.6

146.1

146.2

146.5

143.6

1 43.0

143.5

145.3

147.4

1 5 3 .6

134.2

126.1

122.8

122.7

123.9

129.1

129.6

129.6

129.9

126.7

126.0

126.4

128.3

130.5

1 3 7 .0
1 6 7 .9

129.2

115.0

112.7

114.7

114.0

112.2

110.9

111.3

114.5

118.6

121.0

125.0

135.8

155.7

141.5

133.4

129.8

129.6

131.0

136.9

137.5

137.4

137.6

133.8

132.9

133.2

134.7

136.C

1 4 2 .6

125.8

124.4

124.9

125.1

125.0

124.8

124.7

124.2

123.9

123.9

123.7

123.C

123.2

123.5

1 2 2 .8
1 22 .5

126.1

123.1

126.9

127.9

126.2

1 2 2 .C

118.C

119.6

123.5

125.6

124.6

120.9

117.2

119.4

125.8

121.7

125.2

125.8

124.6

121.1

118.6

118.2

119.8

122.C

122.7

118.6

115.7

116.6

1 20 .6

117.3

114.6

119.7

120.9

118.2

112.7

106.6

109.6

116.8

119.C

117.2

1 1 2 .:

106.7

111.C

1 16 .4

130.9

128.6

131.7

131.7

129.8

127.6

125.C

126.6

128.4

129.5

129.7

127.2

122.4

123.5

1 2 5 .8

123.1

121.2

122.6

124.4

124.4

1 2 1 .C

118.2

119.6

121.4

122.C

122.6

120.6

119.5

1 1 9 .:

1 1 9 .6

153.6

151.6

149.2

152.7

152.7

152.4

152.7

153.C

153.1

154.C

154.2

153.C

i5 4 .e

158.2

1 60 .3

150.6

149.C

146 .;

149.6

149.6

149.6

149.6

150.2

150.4

151.4

151.6

1 5 0 .;

152.C

155.7

1 5 7 .8

101.9

99.^

99.6

99.C

99.1

99.1

99.1

99.C

99.C

98.7

98.6

98.2

97.6

9 8 .0

9 9 .7 1

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

81

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

32. Continued—Consumer Price Indexes for All Urban Consumers and for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers- U.S. city
average, by expenditure category and commodity or service group
[1982-84 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]
Series

Annual average
2001

N e w v e h ic le s .......................................................
U s e d c a rs a n d tru c k s 1......................................

2002

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept

Oct

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

1 43.2

141.1

141.6

141.6

140.£

140.C

139.6

139.1

139.6

140.7

141.5

141.7

140.9

140.C

140.4

1 59.8

152.6

153.C

152.6

152.7

153.C

153.6

154.2

153.1

151.6

149.7

149.3

149.2

149.2

149.2

M o to r f u e l................................................................

1 24 .9

117.C

108.C

121.7

121.6

120.4

121.2

121.6

122.1

G a s o lin e (a ll t y p e s )............................................

124.9

124.6

120.C

126.7

1 24 .2

140.9

116.4

107.6

148.5

121.2

121.2

119.9

120.6

1 2 1 .C

121.6

124.4

124.C

119.4

126.1

140.2

1 04 .0

106.1

147.8

105.7

106.C

1 0 6 .C

105.9

106.7

107.C

106.7

106.2

106.5

106.3

107.1

107.«

107 .2

195.4

196.2

196 .0

M o to r v e h ic le p a rts a n d e q u ip m e n t................
M o to r v e h ic le m a in te n a n c e a n d re p a ir..........

185.1

191.7

189.9

190.6

191.4

191.6

191.4

192.5

192.9

P u b lic tra n s p o rta tio n ...............................................

193.3

194.3

195.0

2 0 4 .9

2 02.6

2 03.0

204.6

206 .2

2 05.9

2 04.7

204.5

201 .9

199.2

198.5

199.2

198.1

199.E

2 0 2 .0

2 88 .3

2 89.6

2 90 .6

2 91 .8

293.C

2 9 3 .5

M e d ic a l c a re ..................................................................

2 7 1 .8

2 84 .6

2 80 .9

2 81.9

282 .9

2 83.6

2 85 .5

2 86.3

286 .7

M e d ic a l c a re c o m m o d itie s ....................................

2 4 2 .7

251.1

2 4 9 .0

2 49.6

2 50 .3

2 51 .3

2 52 .3

2 52 .3

2 52 .5

M e d ic a l c a re s e rv ic e s .............................................

2 52 .8

2 53 .5

2 54 .0

2 5 4 .8

255.1

2 7 8 .5

256.1

2 9 2 .5

2 8 8 .4

2 89 .6

2 90 .6

2 91 .3

2 9 3 .5

2 94 .5

2 94 .9

P ro fe s s io n a l s e rv ic e s ...........................................

2 9 6 .9

2 98 .4

2 9 9 .5

3 0 0 .9

2 4 8 .7

3 0 2 .C

3 0 2 .7

2 5 6 .0

2 5 4 .0

2 54 .6

2 5 5 .3

2 5 5 .3

2 5 7 .2

2 56 .9

2 5 6 .8

2 58 .2

H o s p ita l a n d re la te d s e rv ic e s ............................

2 58 .7

2 59 .2

2 6 0 .0

2 61 .

3 3 3 .8

2 6 1 .3

3 6 3 .2

3 5 4 .3

357.1

3 59 .4

3 6 0 .6

3 6 3 .2

367.1

3 68 .9

3 72 .6

3 76 .7

379.1

3 82 .2

384.8

3 8 5 .3

1 03.6

1 04.6

1 04 .6

1 05.0

104 .9

1 04.6

1 04 .6

1 04.7

104 .4

194.6

104.5

104.7

105.1

105.4

105.4

1 00.9

1 02.0

102.1

1 02.2

102 .3

102.2

1 01 .8

1 01.6

101 .4

101.8

102.2

102 .4

102 .7

103.C

1 02.9

R e c re a tio n 2..................................................................
V id e o a n d a u d io 12 ..................................................
E d u c a tio n a n d c o m m u n ic a tio n 2.............................

1 05.3

1 07 .6

1 06 .5

1 06 .0

1 06.5

1 06.7

1 07 .4

1 08.6

109.1

1 09.0

108.8

108.8

109.2

109.2

108.9

E d u c a tio n 2.................................................................

1 18 .7

125 .9

1 23.3

123 .3

1 23.5

1 24 .4

1 24.8

126 .9

E d u c a tio n a l b o o k s a n d s u p p lie s ....................

129.3

129.6

129.7

129.7

2 9 9 .9

130.3

130.7

3 1 8 .5

315.1

130.8

3 1 5 .3

3 1 6 .3

3 1 8 .2

319.1

3 2 0 .4

3 2 3 .9

3 24.2

3 2 5 .0

3 24 .5

3 3 0 .6

T u itio n , o th e r sc h o o l fe e s, a n d c h ild c a re ..

3 33.6

3 33 .9

3 3 4 .7

3 5 4 .8

3 4 7 .2

3 4 7 .2

3 4 7 .7

3 5 0 .3

3 5 1 .4

3 5 7 .7

3 64 .9

3 65 .7

3 66 .0

3 6 6 .0

3 67 .2

3 68.0

9 3 .7

3 68.2

C o m m u n ic a tio n 1,2...................................................

9 4 .5

9 3 .3

9 2 .6

9 3 .3

93.1

9 3 .9

9 4 .6

9 3 .9

93.6

9 3.3

9 3.2

9 3.5

93.4

92.8

In fo rm a tio n a n d in fo rm a tio n p ro c e s s in g 1,2..

9 3 .8

9 2 .7

9 2 .6

9 1 .7

9 2 .5

9 2 .4

9 2 .7

9 3 .4

9 2 .4

9 2.4

9 2.0

9 3.0

92.3

92.2

T e le p h o n e s e rv ic e s 1,2....................................

9 9 .4

91.6

9 9 .9

9 9 .3

9 8 .4

9 9 .4

9 9 .3

9 9 .7

1 00.8

100.3

100.2

100.1

100.1

1 00.7

1 00.7

9 9 .9

o th e r th a n te le p h o n e s e rv ic e s 1 4..............
P e rs o n a l c o m p u te rs a n d p e rip h e ra l

22.1

19.0

19.5

19.3

19.2

19.1

19.1

18.9

18.5

18.3

17.9

17.8

17.7

17.5

17.4

e q u ip m e n t1,2.............................................

29.1

2 1 .8

2 2 .8

2 2 .5

2 2 .7

2 2 .3

22.1

2 1 .7

In fo rm a tio n a n d in fo rm a tio n p ro c e s s in g

2 0 .8

2 0 .4

19.7

O th e r g o o d s a n d s e rv ic e s .........................................

19.3

19.1

18.6

2 8 9 .5

18.6

3 0 2 .0

2 9 5 .2

3 0 1 .7

299.1

3 0 3 .5

3 0 3 .5

3 0 6 .0

3 07 .8

3 04 .9

T o b a c c o a n d s m o k in g p ro d u c ts ...........................

3 05 .0

305.1

3 05 .6

426.1

3 0 6 .4

4 6 3 .2

434.1

3 05 .6

4 6 2 .7

450.1

4 6 8 .7

4 6 8 .8

4 8 0 .7

4 8 8 .4

473.1

4 7 2 .8

4 7 4 .3

4 7 4 .3

4 7 4 .8

P e rs o n a l c a r e 1............................................................

469.1

1 70 .3

174.1

1 73 .7

1 73.9

1 74.0

174 .4

1 74 .4

1 74 .3

1 74.4

174.8

174.9

174 .7

175.2

175.7

P e rs o n a l c a re p ro d u c ts 1.....................................

1 55.7

176.1

1 55.5

156 .0

1 56.2

1 55 .4

1 56.2

155 .3

155.1

155.2

155.5

155.0

154.2

1 54.8

1 54.0

1 53.8

P e rs o n a l c a re s e rv ic e s 1..................................... .

1 84 .9

189.1

1 88.0

1 88.7

189.1

1 89 .0

1 89 .4

1 89.8

190.0

190.1

190.6

1 90.7

M is c e lla n e o u s p e rs o n a l s e rv ic e s ....................

189.1

191.6

1 92.4

2 6 2 .8

2 7 4 .0

2 7 2 .5

2 7 2 .6

2 7 3 .6

274.1

2 7 4 .7

2 7 5 .2

2 7 4 .9

2 7 5 .9

2 7 6 .6

2 7 6 .7

2 7 7 .9

2 7 9 .9

281.1

C o m m o d ity a n d s e rv ic e g ro u p :
C o m m o d itie s ..................................................................

1 51.4

1 50.4

1 49.8

151 .7

151 .2

1 50.5

150.1

1 50 .4

151 .0

151.4

F o o d a n d b e v e ra g e s ................................................

151.3

150.3

150 .7

152 .8

1 73 .0

176.1

176.1

176.1

154.0

175 .7

1 75.7

2 7 5 .7

1 75 .9

176.2

1 76.3

C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d a n d b e v e ra g e s .............

176.6

177.1

177 .4

1 38.7

178.3

1 35.5

178 .5

134 .7

1 37.5

136 .8

135.9

135 .2

1 35.6

136.4

136.9

136.5

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d a n d b e v e ra g e s ............

135.0

135.5

1 38.0

1 49 .0

139.6

1 47 .0

144 .8

150 .5

1 49.3

1 47.8

146 .5

1 47 .7

1 49.4

A p p a r e l....................................................................

159.6

150.2

147.3

126.1

148.3

123.1

153.8

1 57.3

1 26.9

127 .9

126.2

1 22.0

1 18 .0

119 .6

123.5

125.5

124.6

120.9

117.3

119 .4

122 .5

1 66.3

1 65.3

1 59 .4

168.1

167.2

1 67 .3

1 67 .6

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d , b e v e ra g e s ,
a n d a p p a r e l..........................................................
D u ra b le s .....................................................................
S e r v ic e s .........................................................

1 68.5

169.1

169.7

169.6

167.2

1 71.0

1 78.7

1 25.3

1 82.6

1 21.8

122 .3

122.1

1 22.0

1 21.6

121 .5

1 21.3

121.1

1 21.0

120.6

120.4

120.1

119.9

119.8

199 .6

2 0 5 .9

2 0 3 .9

2 0 4 .2

2 0 4 .8

2 0 5 .8

2 0 6 .6

2 0 7 .3

2 0 7 .6

2 0 7 .8

208.1

2 0 8 .3

2 0 9 .4

2 10 .2

2 1 1 .2

1 93.2

1 93 .7

1 93 .9

194 .3

1 94.8

1 95.5

1 95.5

196.1

196.2

196.3

197.3

197.9

R e n t o f s h e l t e r ...........................................

1 87 .3

1 94 .5

T r a n s p o r t a tio n s e rv ic e s .........................

199.1

2 0 7 .7

2 0 5 .6

2 0 6 .2

207.1

2 0 7 .3

2 0 8 .0

2 0 8 .6

2 0 8 .8

O th e r s e rv ic e s ..............................................

2 1 0 .0

2 1 1 .4

2 11 .7

2 12 .2

2 1 3 .2

2 3 3 .7

2 1 3 .9

2 4 1 .6

2 3 8 .8

2 3 8 .9

2 3 9 .7

2 4 0 .4

2 4 1 .6

2 4 3 .4

244.1

2 4 4 .6

2 4 4 .8

245.1

2 4 6 .2

247.1

2 4 7 .0

S p e c ia l in d e x e s :

198.3

A ll ite m s le s s fo o d ......................................

1 73 .6

1 75.8

174 .3

1 75 .7

1 75 .8

1 75.9

176.1

1 76.7

177.1

A ll ite m s le s s s h e lte r................................. .

177.5

177.5

177.0

1 77.7

1 79.3

1 67 .6

1 80.6

168 .3

167.1

168 .5

1 68 .4

1 68.4

168 .4

1 68.9

169.5

169.7

169.7

169.1

169.7

169.1

171.1

1 71.5

1 72.9

1 70.0

171.1

1 71.0

171 .2

1 71.3

171 .8

172.2

172.5

172.5

172.1

172.7

174.2

175 .4

136.8

137.1

139.7

141.4

A ll ite m s le s s m e d ic a l c a r e ......................
C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d ..............................

1 40.2

1 37 .3

1 36 .5

139.1

1 38.5

137 .6

1 36.9

137 .4

138.1

N o n d u ra b le s le s s f o o d ..............................

138.6

138.3

1 50.8

1 49.2

147 .0

1 52.5

1 51.4

150 .0

148 .7

1 49.8

151.5

152.6

152.3

149.6

150.5

155.8

1 59.2

169.6

179.3

170.2

168.0

171.6

178.7

182.3

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d a n d a p p a re l.....

1 66 .7

166.1

160 .7

168.7

167.9

1 68.0

168 .3

169.2

N o n d u ra b le s .................................................

1 61 .4

161 .4

1 60.8

1 63.7

162 .9

162.2

1 61.6

1 62.2

163.2

163.9

163.9

162.6

163.2

1 66.5

168.5

S e rv ic e s le s s re n t o f s h e lte r3..................

1 88 .5

193.1

1 90.5

1 90.7

181.6

193 .2

194.1

1 94.9

1 95.3

195.2

S e rv ic e s le s s m e d ic a l c a re s e rv ic e s ....

195.6

195.9

1 96.9

197.9

193.1

199 .5

1 98.9

2 0 4 .0

1 97.0

1 97 .4

1 97.9

198 .9

E n e rg y .............................................................

1 99.6

2 0 0 .4

2 0 0 .6

2 00 .7

2 00 .9

1 28 .7

201.1

202.1

1 20 .9

1 14 .7

2 0 2 .9

1 21 .6

122 .2

124.1

1 24.7

125 .0

A ll ite m s le s s e n e rg y ..................................

125 .3

125.2

124.8

122.6

126 .9

1 79.8

135.1

1 83.6

142.2

182 .9

1 83 .4

183 .3

183.2

1 83.3

1 83.8

184.3

184.7

A ll ite m s le s s fo o d a n d e n e rg y .............

184.8

184.6

184.8

1 81.7

185.5

1 85.6

185.9

184 .9

1 85.5

1 85 .4

1 85 .3

1 85 .4

1 86.0

186.5

186.9

C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d a n d e n e rg y ..

187.0

186.7

186.9

146.1

1 44 .4

1 87.5

1 45 .0

188.0

145 .8

1 45.0

144.2

1 43.2

1 43 .7

144.4

E n e rg y c o m m o d itie s ............................

144.5

144.1

143.1

142.2

125 .3

1 42.6

143.1

17.3

1 08.7

121 .9

1 21.9

120 .5

1 21.2

121 .8

122.2

S e rv ic e s le s s e n e rg y ............. ................

125.1

125.2

1 20.7

127.6

2 0 6 .0

142.1

2 1 3 .9

212.1

150.0

2 1 2 .6

2 1 3 .0

2 1 3 .3

2 1 4 .3 |

215.1

2 1 5 .4

216.1

2 1 6 .5

2 1 6 .7

2 1 7 .7

2 1 8 .5

2 1 8 .8

N o t s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .

In d e xe s on a D e c e m b e r 198 8 = 100 base.

In d e x e s on a D e c e m b e r 1997 - 1 00 base.

D ash in d ic a te s d a ta not a v a ila b le .

In d e x e s on a D e c e m b e r 1982 - 100 base.

N o t e : In d e x a p p lie d to a m onth a s a w h o le , n o t to a n y s p e c ific d ate .

82
Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

33.

Consumer Price Index: U.S. city average and available local area data: all items

[ 1 9 8 2 - 8 4 = 1 00 , unless o therw ise indicated]

U .S . c ity a v e r a g e .........................................................................

M

2003

2002

schedule1

Urban Wage Earners
2002

All Urban Consumers

Pricing
Sept.

Nov.

Oct.

Feb.

Jan.

Dec.

181.0

1 81 .3

181.3

180 .9

1 81 .7

Mar.

Nov.

Oct.

Sept.

183.1

1 84.2

1 77 .0

1 77 .3

2003
Jan.

Dec.

Mar.

Feb.

177 .4

1 77.0

1 77.7

179.2

1 8 0 .3

Region and area size2
N o rth e a s t u rb a n ...................................................................................

M

189.5

1 89.9

190.1

189 .6

1 90 .5

191.7

1 93 .0

1 86.2

186 .5

186.9

186.6

187.2

188 .6

1 8 9 .8

S iz e A — M o re th a n 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...................................................

M

191.2

191 .5

191.7

1 91.4

1 92.2

193.5

1 94.6

186 .7

1 86 .9

1 87.3

187.1

187.7

189.1

1 9 0 .0

M

1 12.6

113 .0

113.1

1 12.6

113.1

113.8

1 15.0

112 .0

1 12.9

113.1

112.7

113.2

1 14.0

1 15 .2

M

176.2

176 .3

176.1

1 75 .5

176.2

177.8

178 .6

171 .7

1 71.8

171.6

171 .0

1 71.8

1 73.3

174.1

S iz e A — M o re th a n 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...................................................

M

178.2

178 .7

178.3

1 77.8

178 .2

1 80.0

180 .7

1 73.4

1 73.3

173.0

172.4

172.9

1 74.6

1 7 5 .4

S iz e B /C — 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 3..............................................

M

111 .5

1 11.9

111.7

1 11.4

1 12 .0

112.8

1 13 .6

111.1

1 11 .4

111.3

111.0

111.7

1 12.5

113.1

S iz e D— N o n m e tro p o lita n (le s s th a n 5 0 ,0 0 0 ).......................

M

170.0

170.2

170.4

169 .5

170.7

172.5

1 73.0

1 67 .8

168.1

168.2

167.2

1 68 .4

170.1

1 7 0 .6

S o u th u rb a n ..........................................................................................

M

174.2

1 74.9

174.9

174 .6

175.1

176.4

1 77 .5

1 71 .7

172 .3

172.4

172.0

172.5

1 73.9

1 7 5 .0

S iz e A— M o re th a n 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...................................................

M

175.7

1 76.9

176.1

175 .9

1 76.7

178.3

179.1

1 72.9

173 .7

173.3

173.1

1 74.0

175.7

1 7 6 .5

1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 3..............................................

M

111.2

1 11.6

111.9

111 .6

1 11 .7

112.5

1 13 .3

1 11 .5

1 10 .9

111.1

110 .8

1 10.9

111 .7

1 1 2 .5

S iz e D— N o n m e tro p o lita n (le s s th a n 5 0 ,0 0 0 )......................

M

172.6

173.9

173.0

1 72.3

173.2

174.8

1 75 .4

173 .0

173 .2

173.4

172.6

173.2

1 74 .8

1 7 5 .7

W e s t u rb a n ...........................................................................................

M

185.7

185.8

185.8

1 85.5

186 .6

188.1

1 89 .3

180 .7

1 80.6

181.0

180.8

1 81.5

183.2

1 84 .7

S iz e A— M o re th a n 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ...................................................

M

188.2

188 .4

188.4

1 88.0

189.2

190.9

192.1

181 .7

1 81.7

181.9

181.6

182.5

1 84 .4

1 8 5 .9

M

113.1

113 .3

113.1

113.1

1 13.8

114.5

1 15 .4

1 12,7

1 12 .9

112 .9

112.9

113.2

114 .0

115.1

M

165.5

1 65.8

165.7

1 65.4

166.1

167.5

1 68.4

1 63 .8

1 64 .0

164.0

163.7

164.3

165 .8

1 6 6 .8

M

111.8

112.1

112.2

1 11 .9

1 12.3

113.1

1 14.0

111 .3

1 11.6

1 11.7

111.4

1 11.8

112.6

1 1 3 .5

172.5

173.2

1 74.7

1 7 5 .6

S iz e B /C — 5 0 .0 0 0 to 1 .5 0 0 .0 0 0 3..............................................

ñ¡7f> R/C — 5 0

non tn

S iz e B /C — 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 .5 0 0 .0 0 0 3..............................................
S iz e c la s s e s :
A5
B /C 3.....................................................................................................
D
.................................................................................................

M

174.3

174.3

174.5

1 73.8

1 74.6

176.0

1 76.9

172 .9

173.1

1 73.0

Selected local areas6
C h ic a g o -G a ry -K e n o s h a , IL—IN —W l ............................................

M

182.1

182 .8

183.2

1 82.4

182 .7

184.1

184 .8

1 75.8

1 76.5

176.9

176.0

176 .4

178.1

1 7 9 .0

L o s A n g e le s - R iv e rs id e - O ra n g e C o u n ty , C A ...........................

M

183 .4

183 .7

184.0

1 83.7

185.2

186.5

188 .2

1 76.3

1 76.5

177.0

176.7

177 .8

1 79.6

1 8 1 .6

N e w Y o rk , N Y -N o rth e r n N J - L o n g Isla nd , N Y -N J - C T -P A .

M

193.3

1 93.7

193.4

193.1

1 94.7

196.2

197.1

B o s to n - B r o c k to n - N a s h u a , M A - N H - M E - C T ..........................

1

199.1

-

2 0 0 .4

-

1 99.8

1 88 .5

188 .8

188.8

188.7

189.7

191 .3

192.1

-

2 02 .8

1 97.7

-

199.2

-

1 99.3

-

2 0 2 .3

C le v e la n d -A k ro n , O H .......................................................................

1

174.6

-

173.4

-

1 73 .5

-

1 75.4

1 65.7

-

164.9

-

165.3

-

167.1

D a lla s -F t W o rth , T X ..........................................................................

1

173.2

-

173.6

-

174 .0

-

176.8

172 .9

-

1 73.0

-

1 73.3

-

1 7 6 .5

W a s h in q to n -B a ltim o re , D C - M D - V A - W V 7...............................

1

114.0

-

114.0

-

114 .6

-

115.9

113 .7

-

1 13.5

-

114.1

-

1 1 5 .5

A tla n ta , G A ............................................................................................

2

-

1 79 .4

-

1 77.3

-

180.7

-

-

1 76 .3

-

174.6

-

178.1

-

D e tro it-A n n A r b o r -F lin t, M l............................................................

2

-

180 .4

-

1 79.7

-

1 82.4

-

-

1 75 .0

-

1 74.4

-

176.8

-

H o u s to n - G a lv e s to n -B ra z o ria , T X ................................................

2

-

162 .6

-

159 .8

-

164

-

-

160 .3

-

158.0

-

161 .7

-

-

-

174 .5

-

175.3

-

-

1 85.6

-

1 84.9

M ia m i-F t. L a u d e rd a le , F L ...............................................................

2

-

1 77 .0

-

177 .9

-

180.3

P h ila d e lp h ia -W ilm in g to n -A tla n tic C ity, P A - N J - D E - M D ....

2

-

1 85.8

-

185 .3

-

186.6

S a n F ra n c ls c o - O a k la n d - S a n J o s e , C A .....................................

2

-

1 94.3

-

193 .2

-

197.7

1 90.0

-

189.6

S e a ttle - T a c o m a -B re m e rto n , W A ................................................

2

-

1 90.9

-

1 90.0

-

191.3

1 85.5

-

184.6

1 Foods, fuels, and several other items priced every month in all areas; most other

Cindnnatti,

M in n e a p o lis -S t.

g o o d s a n d s e rv ic e s p ric e d a s in d ica te d :

2

AK;

O H -K Y -IN ;

Kansas

P au l, M N -W I;

P itts b u rg h ,

City,

MO -KS;

“

193.7

-

186.2

Milwaukee-Racine,

PA; P o rt-la n d -S a le m ,

178
1 85 .9

O R -W A ;

S t Lou is,

M — E v e ry m o n th .

M O -IL ; S an D iego, C A ; T a m p a -S t. P e te rs b u rg -C le a rw a te r, FL.

1—

J a n u a ry , M a rc h , M a y , J u ly , S e p te m b e r, a n d N o vem be r.

7

2—

F e b ru a ry , A p ril, J u n e , A u g u s t, O c to b e r, a n d D e ce m b e r.

N O T E : L o ca l a re a CPI in d e x e s a re b y p ro d u c ts o f th e n a tio n a l C P I p ro g ra m . E ach lo cal

1996 -

a n d o th e r m e a s u re m e n t e rro r. A s a re su lt, lo ca l a re a in d e x e s s h o w g re a te r v o la tility th a n

1 00 b ase .

4 T h e "N o rth C e n tra l" re g io n h a s b ee n re n a m e d th e "M id w e s t" re g ion b y th e C e n s u s

1986 »

u s e in th e ir e s c a la to r c la u s e s .

34 a n d 39 o f th e

J a n u a ry a n d J u ly is s u e s o f th e


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Ind e x a p p lie s to a m o n th a s a w h o le , n o t to a n y s p e c ific

100 b ase .
date .

6 In a d d itio n , th e fo llo w in g m e tro p o lita n a re a s a re p u b lis h e d s e m ia n n u a lly a n d a p p e a r in
ta b le s

th e n a tio n a l in de x, a ltho ug h th e ir lo n g -te rm tre n d s a re s im ila r. T h e re fo re , th e B urea u o f
L a b o r S ta tistics stro n g ly u rg e s u se rs to c o n s id e r a d o p tin g th e n a tio n a l a v e ra g e C PI fo r

B u re a u . It is c o m p o s e d o f th e s a m e g e o g ra p h ic e n titie s.
5 In d e x e s o n a D e c e m b e r

In d e x e s on a N o v e m b e r 199 6 - 100 b ase .

in d e x h a s a s m a lle r s a m p le s ize a n d is, th e re fo re , s u b je c t to s u b s ta n tia lly m o re s a m p lin g

R e g io n s d e fin e d a s t h e fo u r C e n s u s re g ion s.

3 In d e x e s on a D e c e m b e r

-

Wl;

CPI

Detailed Report-.

D a sh in d ic a te s d a ta not a vailab le .

A nch o ra g e ,

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

83

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

34. Annual data: Consumer Price Index, U.S. city average, all items and major groups
[1982-84 = 100]____________
Series

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

C o n s u m e r P ric e In d e x f o r A ll U rb a n C o n s u m e rs :
A ll Ite m s :
In d e x .........................................................

1 5 6 .9

P e r c e n t c h a n g e ....................................

3 .0

1 6 0 .5

1 6 3 .0

1 6 6 .6

1 7 2 .2

1 77 .1

1 7 9 .9

2 .3

1 .6

2 .2

3 .4

2 .8

1 .5

1 5 7 .7

1 61 .1

1 6 4 .6

1 6 8 .4

1 7 3 .6

1 7 6 .8

2 .6

2 .2

2 .2

2 .3

3.1

1 .8

1 5 6 .8

1 6 0 .4

1 6 3 .9

1 6 9 .6

1 7 6 .4

1 8 0 .3

2 .6

2 .3

2 .2

3 .5

4 .0

2 .2

1 3 2 .9

1 3 3 .0

1 3 1 .3

1 2 9 .6

1 2 7 .3

1 2 4 .0

.9

.1

-1 .3

-1 .3

-1 .8

-2 .6

1 4 4 .3

1 4 1 .6

1 4 4 .4

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .3

1 5 2 .9

0 .9

-1 .9

2 .0

6 .2

0 .7

-.9

2 3 4 .6

2 4 2 .1

2 5 0 .6

2 6 0 .8

2 7 2 .8

2 8 5 .6

2 .8

3 .2

3 .5

4.1

4 .6

4 .7

2 2 4 .8

2 3 7 .7

2 5 8 .3

2 7 1 .1

2 8 2 .6

2 9 3 .2

4 .4

5 .7

8 .7

5 .0

4 .2

3 .8

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .7

1 6 3 .2

1 6 8 .9

1 7 3 .5

1 7 5 .9

2 .3

1 .3

2 .2

3 .5

2 .7

1 .4

F o o d a n d b e v e ra g e s :
In d e x .................................................

1 5 3 .7

P e r c e n t c h a n g e ...................................

2.1

2 .3

H o u s in g :
In d e x .........................................................

1 4 1 .2

P e r c e n t c h a n g e ....................................

2 .7

2 .5

A p p a re l:
In d e x ..........................................

.0

1 3 3 .7

P e r c e n t c h a n g e ........................................

1 .4

_

-.2

T r a n s p o r ta tio n :
In d e x ...............................................

. . . .

1 3 0 .4

P e r c e n t c h a n g e ......................................

3.1

3 .0

M e d ic a l c a re :
In d e x ..........................................................

2 0 1 .4

P e r c e n t c h a n g e ....................................

5 .9

4 .8

O th e r g o o d s a n d s e r v ic e s :
In d e x .....................................................

1 9 2 .9

P e r c e n t c h a n g e ....................................

5 .2

2 .9

C o n s u m e r P ric e In d e x f o r U rb a n W a g e E a r n e rs
a n d C le r ic a l W o r k e r s :
A ll ite m s :
In d e x ......................................................

84

Monthly Labor Review


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

_

1 42 .1

P e r c e n t c h a n g e ...................................

2 .8

May 2003

2 .5

2 .9

2 .9

35.

Producer Price Indexes, by stage of processing

[1982 = 100]
Grouping

2001

2002

2003

2002

Annual average
Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.p

Mar.p

Finished g o o d s .................................................

1 4 0 .7

1 3 8 .8

1 3 8 .7

1 3 8 .8

1 38 .6

1 39 .0

1 3 8 .8

1 3 8 .8

139.1

1 40 .6

1 39.6

139.1

1 4 1 .2

1 4 2 .5

1 4 4 .5

F in is h e d c o n s u m e r g o o d s ..............................

1 4 1 .5

1 3 9 .3

1 38 .9

1 39 .2

139.1

1 39.6

1 39 .6

1 39 .6

1 40 .0

1 4 1 .5

1 40 .3

1 3 9 .8

1 4 2 .5

1 4 4 .3

1 4 6 .7

F in is h e d c o n s u m e r fo o d s ............................

1 4 1 .3

1 40 .0

1 4 3 .4

1 3 9 .2

1 3 9 .4

1 39 .8

1 3 9 .8

1 3 9 .3

1 3 8 .7

139.1

1 39.2

1 3 9 .6

1 4 1 .7

1 4 2 .3

1 4 2 .6

F in s h e d c o n s u m e r g o o d s
e x c lu d in g fo o d s .............................................

1 4 1 .4

1 3 8 .7

1 36 .9

1 38 .9

1 38 .6

1 39 .3

139.1

1 3 9 .3

1 4 0 .2

142.1

1 40 .3

1 3 9 .6

1 4 2 .4

1 4 4 .8

1 4 7 .9

N o n d u ra b le g o o d s le s s f o o d ...................

1 4 2 .8

1 3 9 .8

1 3 6 .7

1 3 9 .8

1 3 9 .5

140 .6

1 41 .0

1 4 1 .5

1 4 2 .8

1 4 3 .9

1 41 .8

1 4 1 .3

1 4 4 .7

1 4 8 .7

1 5 2 .5

D u ra b le g o o d s ...............................................

1 3 3 .9

1 32 .9

1 3 3 .6

1 33 .5

1 33 .0

1 32 .8

1 3 1 .5

1 3 1 .0

131.1

1 3 4 .5

1 3 3 .5

132.1

1 3 3 .8

1 3 2 .7

1 3 4 .5

C a p ita l e q u ip m e n t..........................................

1 3 9 .7

139.1

1 3 9 .5

1 3 9 .3

139.1

1 39.0

1 3 8 .4

1 3 8 .2

1 3 8 .3

1 3 9 .7

1 39 .3

1 38 .6

1 3 9 .6

139.1

140.1

supplies, and com ponents.........................

1 2 8 .7

1 2 7 .8

126.1

1 2 7 .2

127.1

1 27 .7

128.1

1 2 8 .4

1 2 9 .3

1 2 9 .7

1 29.8

1 2 9 .4

1 3 1 .2

1 3 3 .6

1 3 6 .2

M a te ria ls a n d c o m p o n e n ts
fo r m a n u fa c tu rin g ..............................................

1 2 7 .4

126.1

125.1

1 2 5 .5

1 2 5 .5

1 25.9

1 2 6 .3

1 2 6 .5

1 2 6 .9

1 2 7 .3

1 27 .8

1 2 7 .3

1 2 7 .9

1 2 9 .6

1 2 9 .9

M a te r ia ls fo r fo o d m a n u fa c tu rin g ................

1 2 4 .3

1 2 3 .3

1 22 .9

1 2 1 .8

1 21 .2

122.1

1 2 2 .7

123.1

1 2 3 .9

1 2 4 .3

1 25 .3

1 2 7 .2

1 2 8 .9

1 2 9 .6

1 2 8 .9

M a te r ia ls fo r n o n d u ra b le m a n u fa c tu rin g ...

1 3 1 .8

1 2 9 .3

1 2 6 .5

1 2 8 .0

128.1

1 28 .8

1 2 9 .7

1 3 0 .3

1 3 1 .5

1 3 2 .8

1 33 .3

1 3 1 .5

1 3 3 .5

1 3 8 .2

1 3 9 .2

M a te r ia ls fo r d u ra b le m a n u fa c tu rin g ......... .

1 2 5 .2

1 2 4 .7

1 2 3 .5

1 23 .7

124.1

124 .7

1 2 5 .3

1 2 5 .3

1 25 .9

1 2 5 .7

1 26 .4

1 2 6 .3

1 2 6 .3

1 2 7 .2

1 2 7 .0

C o m p o n e n ts fo r m a n u fa c tu rin g ...................

1 2 6 .3

126.1

1 2 6 .4

1 2 6 .3

1 2 6 .2

126.1

1 26 .0

1 25 .9

1 2 5 .9

1 2 5 .8

126.1

1 2 6 .0

1 2 5 .8

1 2 5 .9

126.1

f o r c o n s tru c tio n ..................................................

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .3

1 5 0 .7

151.1

1 5 1 .4

1 51 .5

1 5 1 .7

152.1

152.1

1 5 1 .8

151.1

151.1

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .2

1 5 2 .2

P ro c e s s e d fu e ls a n d lu b r ic a n ts ......................

1 0 4 .5

9 6 .2

9 1 .3

9 5 .3

9 4 .8

9 6 .4

9 7 .3

9 7 .6

1 0 0 .6

1 0 1 .6

101.1

1 0 0 .4

1 0 7 .0

1 1 4 .3

1 2 5 .4

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .6

1 5 3 .9

154 .1

Interm ediate m aterials,

M a te ria ls a n d c o m p o n e n ts

C o n ta in e r s ..............................................................

153.1

1 52 .2

1 5 1 .7

1 51 .2

1 5 1 .0

1 51 .3

1 5 1 .4

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .5

1 5 3 .8

1 38 .7

139.1

1 3 9 .3

1 39 .6

1 3 9 .6

1 39 .7

1 3 9 .7

1 4 0 .0

1 4 0 .5

1 4 1 .2

1 1 0 .9

1 11 .6

117.1

1 1 9 .4

1 2 7 .9

134.1

1 2 7 .8

1 38 .6

1 3 8 .9

1 3 8 .3

1 3 8 .5

1 3 8 .4

processing......................................................

1 2 1 .3

108.1

1 0 3 .7

1 0 8 .3

1 0 9 .9

1 05 .7

1 0 6 .8

1 0 8 .7

F o o d s tu ffs a n d fe e d s tu ffs ..................................

1 06 .2

9 9 .5

1 0 2 .8

9 6 .5

9 8 .2

9 6 .8

9 8 .0

9 9 .7

1 00 .7

9 9 .7

9 9 .4

1 0 0 .4

1 0 5 .7

1 0 6 .3

1 0 5 .2

1 1 7 .4

1 27 .3

1 3 0 .6

1 4 1 .3

1 5 1 .9

1 8 5 .7

1 4 4 .7

S u p p lie s ....................... ...........................................

Crude m aterials for further

C r u d e n o n fo o d m a te r ia ls ...................................

1 2 7 .3

1 1 1 .2

1 0 0 .9

1 1 4 .0

1 15 .6

1 09.2

1 1 0 .2

112.1

1 1 5 .4

Special groupings:
1 4 0 .4

1 3 8 .3

1 37 .2

1 3 8 .5

1 38 .2

1 38.6

1 3 8 .3

1 3 8 .4

1 3 9 .0

1 4 0 .7

1 39 .5

1 3 8 .7

1 4 0 .9

1 4 2 .3

F in is h e d e n e rg y g o o d s .....................................

9 6 .8

8 8 .8

8 5 .0

8 8 .8

8 8 .4

8 9 .8

9 0 .5

9 1 .3

9 3 .0

9 4 .4

91.1

9 0 .4

95.1

1 0 1 .5

1 0 7 .5

F in is h e d g o o d s le s s e n e r g y ............................

1 4 7 .5

1 4 7 .3

1 48 .2

1 4 7 .3

147.1

1 47.3

1 4 6 .7

1 4 6 .5

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .8

1 47 .5

147.1

1 4 8 .5

1 4 8 .2

1 4 8 .9

F in is h e d c o n s u m e r g o o d s le s s e n e rg y ......

1 5 0 .8

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .9

1 50 .6

1 50 .5

1 50.7

1 5 0 .3

1 50 .0

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .2

151 .0

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .3

152.1

1 5 2 .7

F in is h e d g o o d s le s s fo o d a n d e n e rg y .........

1 5 0 .0

1 5 0 .2

1 50 .2

1 5 0 .4

1 50 .2

1 50.2

1 4 9 .5

1 4 9 .3

1 4 9 .5

1 51 .2

1 50 .8

150.1

1 5 1 .2

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .5

F in is h e d c o n s u m e r g o o d s le s s fo o d
a n d e n e rg y ...........................................................

1 5 6 .9

1 5 7 .7

1 57 .4

1 5 7 .9

1 5 7 .7

157 .8

157.1

1 5 6 .8

157.1

1 59 .0

1 58 .6

1 5 7 .8

159.1

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .2

C o n s u m e r n o n d u ra b le g o o d s le s s fo o d
a n d e n e r g y ........................................................

175.1

1 7 7 .7

1 7 6 .3

1 77 .6

1 77 .6

178 .0

1 7 7 .9

1 7 7 .9

1 7 8 .3

1 7 8 .7

1 78 .8

1 7 8 .8

1 7 9 .6

1 7 9 .3

1 7 9 .2

1 3 0 .5

1 2 8 .5

1 2 6 .8

1 27 .9

1 2 7 .9

1 28 .4

1 2 8 .8

1 29 .0

1 3 0 .0

1 3 0 .4

1 30 .5

1 3 0 .0

1 3 1 .8

1 3 4 .3

137.1

1 15 .9

1 1 5 .6

1 1 4 .3

1 13 .6

1 12 .9

1 14.2

1 1 5 .8

1 1 6 .8

1 1 8 .0

1 1 7 .4

1 17 .7

119.1

1 2 0 .3

1 2 1 .2

1 2 1 .0

9 7 .0

1 0 0 .4

1 0 1 .6

1 01 .0

9 9 .5

1 0 5 .9

1 1 3 .8

1 2 4 .8

1 3 5 .3

1 3 5 .4

1 35 .7

1 3 5 .6

136.1

137.1

1 3 7 .4

F in is h e d g o o d s , e x c lu d in g fo o d s ...................

In te rm e d ia te m a te ria ls le s s fo o d s

104.1

9 5 .9

9 0 .9

9 4 .9

9 4 .6

9 6 .2

9 6 .7

In te rm e d ia te g o o d s le s s e n e rg y ....................

135.1

1 3 4 .6

1 3 3 .8

1 34 .0

1 3 4 .0

134 .4

1 3 4 .8

1 35 .0

In te rm e d ia te m a te r ia ls le s s fo o d s
a n d e n e rg y ..........................................................

1 3 6 .4

1 3 5 .8

1 35 .0

1 3 5 .4

1 3 5 .4

1 35 .7

1 3 6 .0

1 3 6 .2

1 3 6 .5

1 3 6 .6

136 .9

1 3 6 .7

1 3 7 .2

1 3 8 .2

1 3 8 .5

8 9 .9

1 0 7 .3

1 0 8 .3

9 7 .8

98.1

1 01 .2

1 0 5 .9

1 08 .9

1 23 .2

1 2 7 .6

1 4 1 .6

1 5 4 .8

2 0 2 .0

C r u d e n o n fo o d m a te ria ls le s s e n e rg y .........


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

1 2 2 .8

1 0 1 .8

1 1 2 .2

1 08 .6

1 0 9 .3

1 0 5 .5

1 07 .5

1 07 .4

1 08 .9

1 1 0 .0

1 1 1 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 0 9 .5

1 1 0 .4

1 1 5 .0

1 1 6 .6

116.1

1 30 .6

1 35 .6

1 29 .0

1 3 1 .8

1 34 .9

1 38.6

1 4 1 .0

1 4 0 .3

1 4 0 .0

1 3 9 .4

139.1

1 3 9 .7

1 4 2 .5

1 4 6 .7

1 4 8 .3

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

85

Current Labor Statistics:

36.

Price Data

Producer Price Indexes for the net output of major industry groups

[December 1984 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]
SIC

Annual average

Industry

2001
-

Total m ining industries...............................

10

M e ta l m in in g ...................................

12

C o a l m in in g (1 2 /8 5 = 1 0 0 )....

13
14

114 fi

O il a n d g a s e x tra c tio n (1 2 /8 5 = 1 0 0 )....

8 7 .5

127.5

1 06.5

9 2 .7

1 11.9
-

14 1 n

,

134 fi

F o o d a n d k in d re d p ro d u c ts ..............

132 fi

21

T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s ....................

386.1

134 .7

22

T e x tile m ill p ro d u c ts ................

116.9

115.7

May

June

July

125.8

125 .3

156.2

25

F u rn itu re a n d fix tu re s ....................

26

P a p e r a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts ..................

146.2

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

102.7

Jan.

Feb.p Mar.p

9 3 .5

9 3 .5

9 5 .9

100.1

112.3

115.6

126.2

137 .4

170.8

7 3 .9

7 6 .9

7 4 .7

7 3.2

73.6

7 2.5

72.6

7 3.7

7 6.7

7 8 .4

9 4 .4

7 7 .3

9 3 .7

9 3 .9

9 3 .4

9 2.8

9 4.0

9 3.7

9 3.0

9 3.5

9 2 .7

1 12 .7

9 4 .0

101 .7

1 02.0

1 06.0

1 12 .8

116.5

131.7

136.8

153 .0

170 .4

2 2 2 .6

1 43.6

1 43.7

143 .7

1 43.5

1 43.5

143.5

143.8

144.4

145.0

1 45 .6

145 .3

133 .5

1 33 .6

1 33.6

133 .7

1 35.0

135.6

134.7

134.1

135.9

137 .8

1 38 .9

1 30 .9

131 .3

1 31.5

131 .3

136.1

131.6

131.7

132.8

1 33.8

4 0 7 .8

134 .8

134 .7

4 0 8 .0

4 0 8 .2

4 0 8 .6

4 0 8 .5

4 0 8 .5

4 08 .5

4 09 .2

4 0 9 .0

4 0 8 .5

4 0 8 .7

1 15.8

4 0 9 .6

1 15.5

1 15.8

115.7

1 15.5

115 .6

115.6

116.0

1 15.4

115 .9

115.2

114 .8

1 25.2

125 .0

125.1

1 25.2

1 25.3

125 .3

125.1

126.0

125.8

125.3

125.2

125 .2

125 .5

155 .3

1 56 .7

156.8

156 .0

1 55.3

1 55 .5

1 55.9

155 .3

154.8

154.1

154.2

1 54.4

155 .7

1 45 .9

1 55.3

146.1

1 46.6

1 46.6

147 .0

146.7

146.9

146.5

1 43 .7

146.9

147.1

1 42.9

143 .3

1 47.3

1 42.5

142 .8

142.9

1 43.5

144.1

144.6

145.3

145.0

145.0

145.2

143 .9

3 92 .2

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p ro d u cts,
e x c e p t fu r n itu re ..............................

2003

Aug.

1 00.3

A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts
m a d e fro m fa b ric s a n d s im ila r m a te ria ls ......

24

Apr.

M in in g a n d q u a rry in g o f n o n m e ta llic
m in e ra ls , e x c e p t fu e ls ............

23

2002

Mar.

91 3

Total m anufacturing industries......................
20

2002

27

P rin tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d in d u s trie s ........

188.7

1 93.0

192.1

192.6

192 .6

1 92.9

193.1

193 .2

28

1 93.4

193.8

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts ................

194.0

194.2

195.7

196 .3

158.4

196 .5

157 .3

155.1

1 55.9

29

1 56 .3

157 .0

1 58.5

P e tro le u m re fin in g a n d re la te d p ro d u c ts ...

158 .6

1 58 .7

159.5

160.6

105.3

159.6

9 8 .8

1 60.8

8 9 .2

162.0

100.5

163 .7

9 9 .7

9 8 .9

101.1

30

1 03.2

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro d u cts..

109 .6

117.6

107.1

125.9

102.4

1 25.4

116.3

124 .6

138.2

1 24.8

146 .0

31

1 25 .3

1 25.8

L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ................

125 .5

1 25.9

126 .3

1 26.3

141.3

125.7

141.1

125.6

126 .4

140.1

126.9

S to n e , c la y , g la s s , a n d c o n c re te p ro d u c ts ......

136.0

137 .0

1 36.3

136 .6

1 40.9
1 37.2

141 .4

33

1 40.6
137.1

128 .3

32

140 .0

P rim a ry m e ta l in d u s trie s .........................

1 37.0

142 .0
137 .4

1 41.9
1 37.6

137.5

116.1

142.3
136.9

116.1

137.2

1 1 4 .4

142.3
1 37.6

114 .7

1 42 .8
137 .8

1 15 .4

143.1
137 .6

1 16.3

1 16.9

117.1

117 .9

117.6

118.2

117.9

1 17.5

117 .9

1 17 .8

34

35

F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u cts,

141.7

142.4

e x c e p t m a c h in e ry a n d tra n s p o rta tio n
e q u ip m e n t...................................

131.0

1 31 .7

1 31.2

131 .3

1 31.4

1 31.6

131 .9

1 32.0

132.1

132.1

132.3

1 32.3

1 32 .4

1 32 .5

1 32 .7

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e le c tric a l...................

1 18.0

117 .2

1 17.7

117 .6

117 .6

1 17.4

1 17.2

116 .8

1 16.8

116.7

1 16.6

116 .6

116.6

116 .3

1 16 .2

107 .0

1 05 .7

1 06 .6

106.1

1 05.9

105 .8

1 05 .5

1 05.5

1 05 .4

105.1

137.9

104.9

1 37.2

104.5

137 .9

104.3

1 37.7

137.1

1 04 .0

104.1

137 .0

135 .5

1 35.0

135.1

139.2

138.3

136.8

138 .5

1 37 .5

1 39 .8

127.3

128 .5

1 28.9

128.2

128 .2

1 28.3

1 28.3

1 28 .4

1 28 .7

128 .7

1 28.8

1 28.9

129.8

130 .2

129 .9

132.4

133.2

1 32 .9

1 33 .3

133.1

133 .3

1 33 .4

1 33 .4

133 .5

133.4

132.7

133.7

133.9

133 .8

1 34 .0

36

E le c tric a l a n d e le c tro n ic m a c h in e ry ,

37

T ra n s p o rta tio n ..............................

38

M e a s u rin g a n d c o n tro llin g in s tru m e n ts ;

e q u ip m e n t, a n d s u p p lie s .................................

p h o to g ra p h ic , m e d ic a l, a n d o p tica l
g o o d s ; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s ...................
39

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s trie s
in d u s trie s (1 2 /8 5 = 1 0 0 )...............

Service industries:
42

M o to r fre ig h t tra n s p o rta tio n
123.1

124 .5

1 23.5

1 23.7

43

U .S . P o s ta l S e rv ic e (0 6 /8 9 = 100)....

125 .0

125.1

125.4

143.4

125.9

1 50.2

125.9

1 45 .4

1 26.5

1 45 .4

126.8

1 45 .4

145 .4

127 .3

44

1 55.0

W a te r tra n s p o rta tio n (1 2 /9 2 = 1 0 0 ).........

1 55 .0

1 55 .0

155.0

155 .0

129.8

1 34.0

1 55.0

128 .7

155.0

1 27.9

1 55 .0

1 55 .0

1 31.7

1 34 .0

1 35 .4

1 35.3

139 .0

a n d w a re h o u s in g (0 6 /9 3 = 1 0 0 )...........

124.1

1 24 .3

1 24.3

1 38.4

141.0

142.3

142 .4

45

T ra n s p o rta tio n b y a ir (1 2 /9 2 = 1 0 0 )...............

157.2

1 58.0

1 56 .8

1 56 .3

140.8

156.2

140 .9

46

1 56.8

157 .9

P ip e lin e s , e x c e p t n a tu ra l a a s (1 2 /9 2 = 1 0 0 )..

1 58 .0

1 58 .6

159.6

160.3

110.3

160.7

111 .9

160.6

1 11.6

111 .5

159.8

1 60 .3

1 11.3

1 11 .5

1 12.3

1 12 .5

1 12.5

112.7

112.3

112.3

111.2

111.2

111 .2

86
Monthly Labor Review

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

37.

Annual data: Producer Prie© Indexes, by stag© of processing

[1982 = 100]
Index

1993

1994

1995

1996

1998

1997

1999

2000

2001

2002

Finished goods
1 2 4 .7

1 2 5 .5

1 2 7 .9

1 3 1 .3

1 3 1 .8

1 3 0 .7

1 3 3 .0

1 3 8 .0

1 4 0 .7

1 3 8 .8

1 2 5 .7

1 2 6 .8

1 2 9 .0

1 3 3 .6

1 3 4 .5

1 3 4 .3

1 35.1

1 3 7 .2

1 4 1 .3

1 4 0 .0

7 8 .0

7 7 .0

78.1

8 3 .2

8 3 .4

7 5.1

7 8 .8

9 4.1

9 6 .8

8 8 .8

1 3 5 .8

137.1

1 4 0 .0

1 4 2 .0

1 4 2 .4

1 4 3 .7

146 .1

1 4 8 .0

1 5 0 .0

1 5 0 .2

Intermediate materials, supplies, and
components
1 1 6 .2

1 1 8 .5

1 2 4 .9

1 2 5 .7

1 2 5 .6

1 2 3 .0

1 2 3 .2

1 2 9 .2

1 2 9 .7

1 2 7 .8

1 1 5 .6

1 1 8 .5

1 1 9 .5

1 2 5 .3

1 2 3 .2

1 2 3 .2

1 2 0 .8

1 1 9 .2

1 2 4 .3

1 2 3 .3

8 4 .6

8 3 .0

84.1

8 9 .8

8 9 .0

8 0 .8

8 4 .3

1 0 1 .7

1 04 .1

9 5 .9

1 2 3 .8

1 27.1

1 3 5 .2

1 3 4 .0

1 3 4 .2

1 3 3 .5

1 33 .1

1 3 6 .6

1 3 6 .4

1 3 5 .8

1 0 8 .1

Crude materials for further processing

O t h e r ...................................................................................................


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

1 0 2 .4

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .7

1 1 3 .8

1 11 .1

9 6 .8

9 8 .2

1 2 0 .6

1 2 1 .3

1 0 8 .4

1 0 6 .5

1 0 5 .8

1 2 1 .5

1 1 2 .2

1 0 3 .9

9 8 .7

1 0 0 .2

1 0 6 .2

9 9 .5

7 6 .7

72.1

6 9 .4

8 5 .0

8 7 .3

6 8 .6

7 8 .5

1 22 .1

1 2 2 .8

1 0 1 .8

94.1

9 7 .0

1 0 5 .8

1 0 5 .7

1 0 3 .5

8 4 .5

91.1

1 1 8 .0

1 0 1 .8

1 0 0 .8

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

87

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

38. U.S. export price indexes by Standard International Trade Classification
[2 0 0 0 = 1 0 0 ]

SITC

2002

Industry

Rev. 3

Mar.
Food and live anim als...................................................
M e a t a n d m e a t p re p a ra tio n s .........................................

Cereals and c e re a l

p re p a ra tio n s ..................................

V e g e ta b le s , fru it, a n d n u ts , p re p a re d fre s h o r dry..

Crude materials, inedible, except fuels....................

1 00 .3

Apr.
100.6

2003

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept,

9 9.7

9 9.8

101.1

103 .4

107.7

Oct.
1 06 .4

Nov.

Dec.

1 06 .7

1 05 .8

Jan.
1 05.6

Feb.

Mar.

106.1

1 05 .9

93.2

92.0

91.6

9 0.0

8 7.8

8 8.7

8 9 .8

89.1

8 7 .8

9 0 .3

105 .4

9 0 .4

105.2

9 5 .4

103.8

9 6 .4

106.5

112.7

1 19.9

1 33.4

1 30.5

1 3 1 .7

1 26 .3

1 23 .0

1 02 .5

1 23.2

1 03.7

103.8

122.1

9 9.0

9 8.0

98.2

9 8 .9

9 7 .8

9 8 .9

9 8 .3

100.6

9 7 .4

9 5 .2

8 7.7

89.7

9 0.9

95.3

9 9.8

97.9

9 7 .3

9 6 .8

O ils e e d s a n d o le a g in o u s fru its ......................................

9 8 .3

9 8 .5

9 2.0

9 9 .8

93.8

95.1

101.0

102.2

102.9

117.0

C o rk a n d w o o d ....................................................................

113.5

114.1

1 07.2

1 16 .9

1 16 .2

1 19 .4

87.2

8 7.3

1 16 .6

87.1

88.1

1 1 6 .6

8 7 .4

P u lp a n d w a s te p a p e r................................................

88.8

9 0 .0

9 0 .7

9 0 .7

74.1

9 0 .3

77.1

9 0 .9

8 1.0

89.3

96.5

T e x tile fib e rs a n d th e ir w a s te .........................................

8 9.6

8 6 .5

8 8 .5

86.2

8 7 .8

86.8

8 5 .2

88.6

8 2 .6

8 6 .4

8 4.9

8 9 .3

94.6

93.1

9 4.2

9 4 .2

9 6 .4

9 8 .3

8 7 .3

100.2

9 1.7

9 8.9

101.6

1 0 5 .0

99.8

99.6

9 7.9

9 3 .9

94.1

9 1 .8

9 6 .3

9 9 .6

1 04 .6

1 0 4 .4

89.8

99.7

95.4

93.9

97.1

C o a l, c o k e , a n d b riq u e tte s ......................................................

9 7.3

110.8

102.8

1 09 .3

1 04 .5

9 9 .5

111.4

112.0

1 23 .8

111.4

1 3 0 .7

1 10.9

114.3

114.3

P e tro le u m , p e tro le u m p ro d u c ts , a n d re la te d m a te ria ls.

114.0

1 14 .0

1 14.0

1 13 .7

1 13 .7

8 3.6

9 5.8

1 1 3 .7

90.2

1 1 3 .9

8 7.9

9 1.6

9 2.0

9 8 .0

1 05 .8

9 9 .6

9 2 .2

108.1

1 22 .9

1 30 .2

9 3.2

9 4.8

95.1

9 5.4

96.1

9 6.4

M e d ic in a l a n d p h a rm a c e u tic a l p ro d u c ts .............................

9 6 .8

97.1

9 6 .8

9 6 .6

1 00 .5

99.1

1 00.3

100.2

9 7 .9

100 .4

100.8

100.1

101.3

E s s e n tia l o ils ; p o lis h in g a n d c le a n in g p re p a ra tio n s ........

1 01.3

1 01 .3

101.2

101.2

9 7.6

102.1

104.1

97.5

97.1

104.1

9 7.3

97.1

97.5

9 7 .4

9 7 .3

9 7 .2

9 7 .3

9 5 .4

9 6 .0

9 6 .2
9 9 .5

M e ta llife ro u s o re s a n d m e ta l s c ra p .............................

Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related products............

Chem icals and related products, n.e.s............................,

91.1

9 1 .2

P la s tic s in p rim a ry f o r m s ........................................................

8 7.6

90.5

92.2

9 2.5

93.1

93.1

9 2 .9

P la s tic s in n o n p rim a ry fo rm s ..................................................

9 7 .3

9 3 .5

9 2 .9

95.1

97.1

9 5 .8

9 5.3

9 5.6

9 6.0

9 6.4

96.5

C h e m ic a l m a te ria ls a n d p ro d u c ts , n .e .s ..............................

9 6 .9

9 7 .6

9 7 .7

9 5 .9

97.1

98.0

9 7 .4

9 7.4

9 7 .5

9 7 .2

97.5

97.3

98.2

9 8 .3

9 8 .6

9 8 .5

9 8 .8

100.6

100.6

100.8

Manufactured goods classified chiefly by m aterials...

9 6.7

9 7 .4

9 7 .4

9 8.0

98.7

99.0

99.1

99.1

9 9 .0

9 9 .0

9 9 .0

R u b b e r m a n u fa c tu re s , n .e .s ...................................................

9 9 .4

9 9 .5

100.8

101.1

101.5

102.7

103.8

105.1

2 0 5 .9

1 05 .7

1 0 5 .4

105.6

107.1

1 0 8 .8

1 0 8 .4

P a p e r, p a p e rb o a rd , a n d a rtic le s o f p a p e r, p ulp,

and paperboard...................................................................

9 2.5

9 2.9

93.1

94.8

95.7

96.2

N o n m e ta llic m in e ra l m a n u fa c tu re s , n .e .s ...........................

9 6 .3

9 6 .8

102.1

9 6 .6

102.0

9 6 .8

102.2

9 7 .3

101.9

9 7 .2

102.2

9 6 .7

102.2

102.2

1 01 .4

1 01.3

101 .3

85.1

1 00.5

1 0 0 .4

8 6.5

1 0 0 .5

86.5

8 5.3

8 5.2

8 4.9

8 4 .4

8 3 .4

8 3 .2

8 3 .5

8 2 .2

8 3 .3

8 4 .3

9 9.5

99.5

99.3

9 8.9

9 8.7

9 8.8

9 8 .7

9 8 .7

9 8 .7

9 8 .5

9 8 .6

9 8 .6

9 8 .5
1 0 6 .9

N o n fe rro u s m e ta ls ..................................................

M achinery and transport equipm ent....................
P o w e r g e n e ra tin g m a c h in e ry a n d e q u ip m e n t.....

1 04.6

104.6

104.6

104.5

104.5

104.6

M a c h in e ry s p e c ia liz e d fo r p a rtic u la r in d u strie s...

104.6

104 .7

1 05.2

101.1

105.1

102.0

101.8

1 06 .5

1 01.4

1 06 .8

102.1

102.0

101.8

101.8

1 01 .7

101 .7

102.2

102.2

102.2

102.2

102.1

102.3

102.3

102.1

102.3

102.3

102.2

102 .3

93.1

91.7

102.1

9 0.4

90.4

90.3

8 9 .3

89.1

88.6

102.0
88.8

1 02 .3

92.5

101.6
88.6

89.1

8 8 .5

9 7.5

97.8

9 7.8

97.7

96.2

96.3

9 6 .4

9 6 .3

9 6 .3

9 6.2

9 6 .2

9 5 .3

G e n e ra l in d u s tria l m a c h in e s a n d p arts, n .e .s.,
a n d m a c h in e p a r ts ......................................................
C o m p u te r e q u ip m e n t a n d o ffic e m a c h in e s ..........
T e le c o m m u n ic a tio n s a n d s o u n d re c o rd in g a nd
re p ro d u c in g a p p a ra tu s a n d e q u ip m e n t...............

9 5 .3

E le c tric a l m a c h in e ry a n d e q u ip m e n t.......................

9 4.7

9 4.8

9 4.6

93.9

93.3

9 3.5

9 3 .6

R o a d v e h ic le s .................................................................

9 3 .3

9 3 .4

9 2 .9

9 2 .3

92.1

1 00 .3

100.3

100.4

9 2 .0

100.3

100 .4

100.6

100.6

1 00.9

1 00.9

101.0

101.2

101.1

1 0 0 .9

101.3

1 01.4

101.5

1 01 .9

1 01 .9

1 0 1 .9

Professional, scientific, and controlling
instrum ents and apparatus....................................

88

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

101.3

39. U.S. import price indexes by Standard International Trade Classification
[2000

=

100]

SITC

Industry

Rev. 3

2003

2002
Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

0

Food and live anim als..............................................................

9 6 .4

9 7 .0

9 6 .4

9 4 .5

9 6 .3

9 6 .6

9 8 .8

97.6

9 7 .6

9 8.8

1 00.4

9 9.8

1 00 .8

01

M e a t a n d m e a t p re p a ra tio n s ..... ...............................................

1 09.8

110.1

1 05 .4

1 04.0

1 05 .9

1 05 .4

1 03 .4

1 02 .0

101.2

106.8

1 01.7

1 07.4

106.8

03

Fish a n d c ru s ta c e a n s , m o llu s k s , a nd o th e r
a q u a tic in v e rte b ra te s ................................................................

8 0 .4

80.1

8 0 .0

7 9 .8

8 1 .9

8 3 .0

8 4 .9

8 1.4

82.0

8 2 .5

81.1

81.1

8 0 .5

05

V e g e ta b le s , fru it, a n d n uts, p re p a re d fre sh o r d ry .............

1 04.0

104 .9

108.1

102.2

1 05 .0

1 05.0

1 06.7

1 07 .5

106.2

105 .6

111 .5

104 .7

110 .8

07

C o ffe e , te a , c o c o a , s p ice s, a n d m a n u fa c tu re s
8 3 .3

8 8 .5

8 3 .8

8 4 .6

8 4 .2

8 4 ,5

9 3 .5

94.3

98.6

99.9

102 .0

106 .7

100 .2

1 02 .4

1 02.5

102.7

103.0

1 03.3

103 .8

102.1

102.2

1 02.4

1 02.3

1 02.7

102 .8
9 8 .5

th e r e o f.............................................................................................
1

Beverages and tobacco...........................................................

102.1

1 02 .0

1 02 .7

103 .0

1 02 .7

102 .5

1 02.6

11

B e v e ra g e s .......................................................................................

1 02 .5

1 02.3

1 02 .4

102 .8

1 02 .4

102 .2

102.2

2

Crude materials, inedible, except fuels..............................

9 5 .8

9 6 .3

9 7 .0

9 6 .4

9 6 .8

9 6 .8

9 6 .4

95.7

9 4.9

9 4.5

95.2

9 7 .4

24

C o rk a n d w o o d ...............................................................................

1 06.6

108.1

105.2

103.1

1 03 .4

1 01.8

9 8 .3

9 6.3

9 6.0

9 4.0

94.7

9 6.8

9 5 .0

25

P u lp a n d w a s te p a p e r..................................................................

7 4 .9

7 3 .4

7 4 .7

77.1

8 0.2

8 2 .3

8 2 .3

8 2.3

8 0.5

7 8.9

7 7 .9

80.1

8 6 .5

94.7

9 5.5

99.1

9 9 .9

101 .4

103 .6

102 .3

102 .6

28

M e ta llife ro u s o re s a n d m e tal s c ra p ........................................

9 3 .7

9 5 .0

9 5 .6

9 5 .9

9 6 .4

95.2

9 3 .3

93.8

9 3.9

29

C ru d e a n im a l a n d ve g e ta b le m a te ria ls , n .e .s .....................

9 2 .3

9 0 .5

1 03 .8

9 2 .8

9 1.0

9 7 .5

1 04.0

1 01 .6

9 9.9

7 6 .4

87.1

8 9 .0

8 6 .0

66.1

91.1

9 6 .3

9 7.0

9 0 .4

9 4 .9

109 .6

1 21 .4

127 .2

33

P e tro le u m , p e tro le u m p ro d u c ts , a nd re la te d m a terials....

7 7 .4

8 6 .8

89.1

8 5 .9

8 8 .9

9 2 .9

9 7 .8

9 7.7

89.8

9 4.2

108.1

1 20.0

1 19 .6

34

G a s , n a tu ra l a n d m a n u fa c tu re d ...............................................

6 4 .8

8 6 .0

8 4 .3

8 3 .6

7 7 .7

7 2 .7

81.1

87.3

92.1

9 7.0

1 17.8

1 29.3

185.2

99.1

9 9.8

1 01 .0
110 .8

3

9 7 .0

9 8 .6

9 8.9

9 8 .7

98.3

9 8.0

9 8.2

In o rg a n ic c h e m ic a ls ......................................................................

9 7 .8

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

9 8 .6

100 .0

100 .2

100.1

1 01 .5

1 02.5

102 .5

104.2

106.7

53

D yin g , ta n n in g , a n d c o lo rin g m a te ria ls ..................................

97.2

9 5 .6

9 5 .6

96.2

9 6 .4

9 6 .8

9 6 .6

9 5.8

95.9

9 6.7

9 6 .5

9 7.5

9 7 .6

54

M e d ic in a l a n d p h a rm a c e u tic a l p ro d u c ts ...............................

9 6 .0

9 6 .6

9 6 .7

9 8 .0

9 8.7

1 00.0

9 9 .6

9 9.5

99.3

9 9.2

101 .8

101 .5

101.1

55

E s s e n tia l o ils ; p o lis h in g a n d c le a n in g p re p a ra tio n s ..........

9 9 .8

9 8 .9

99.1

9 9 .9

1 00.4

101.2

9 8 .4

9 8 .4

98.8

99.2

57

P la s tic s in p rim a ry fo rm s ............................................................

9 1 .5

9 1 .4

91.1

9 1 .8

9 6 .6

9 6 ,4

9 7 .9

9 6.4

9 6.0

94.8

9 7 .3

9 7.9

9 9 .3

9 9.5

99.6

100.2

100.1

1 0 0 .4

9 0.8

91.6

92.1

92.8

9 7 .3

5
52

58

Chem icals and related products, n.e.s..............................

P la s tic s in n o n p rim a ry fo rm s ....................................................

9 6 .3

9 7 .3

9 7 .5

100 .6

1 01.8

1 01 .8

100 .3

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

9 9 .5

9 9.4

9 4 .5

9 4 .3

9 3 .6

9 3 .5

9 3 .5

9 2 .4

9 1.0

9 7.2

9 7.9

9 8 .4

59

C h e m ic a l m a te ria ls a n d p ro d u c ts , n .e .s ...............................

9 3 .6

6

Manufactured goods classified chiefly by m aterials.....

9 2 .2

9 2 .6

9 2 .3

9 2 .8

9 3 .0

93.1

9 3 .5

9 3.5

9 3.6

9 3.7

93.2

94.2

9 4 .3

9 7 .6

9 7 .9

98.1

9 8.2

9 8.2

9 8 .2

9 9 .3

9 9.3

9 9.4

9 9.3

99.1

9 9.0

9 9 .0

62
64

P ap e r, p a p e rb o a rd , a n d a rtic le s o f p a p e r, pulp,
9 3 .4

9 2 .5

9 1 .9

9 1.7

9 1 .7

9 2 .7

9 3 .7

9 3.3

93.3

93.0

9 2.6

9 2.6

9 3 .0

66

N o n m e ta llic m in e ra l m a n u fa c tu re s , n .e .s .............................

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 7 .0

9 7 .0

9 7 .2

9 7 .5

9 7 .5

9 7.6

9 7.6

9 7.7

9 7 .6

9 7.7

9 7 .6

68

N o n fe rro u s m e ta ls .......................................................................

7 6 .9

7 9 .2

7 9 .7

7 9 .7

7 9.2

7 7.7

7 6 .4

7 6.0

7 6.6

7 7.3

76.1

79.2

8 0 .0

69

M a n u fa c tu re s o f m e ta ls , n .e .s ..................................................

9 8 .5

9 8.2

9 8 .3

9 8 .3

9 8 .3

9 8 .6

9 8 .6

9 8.5

9 8.3

9 8.3

9 7 .5

9 8.0

9 7 .8

9 7 .2

9 7 .0

97.1

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 6 .7

96.4

96.2

96.1

9 6 .0

9 5 .9

9 5 .8

M achinery and transport equipm ent...................................

97.1

72

M a c h in e ry s p e c ia liz e d fo r p a rtic u la r in d u s trie s ..................

9 8 .5

9 8 .6

9 8 .8

9 9 .0

9 8 .7

9 9 .2

9 8 .3

98.5

9 8.7

9 9.2

9 9 .4

1 00.3

100 .7

74

G e n e ra l in d u s tria l m a c h in e s a n d p arts, n.e.s.,
9 7 .5

9 7 .6

9 7 .4

97.8

98.1

9 8 .4

9 8 .4

98.5

98.6

9 8.6

9 8 .6

9 9 .4

9 9 .8

75

C o m p u te r e q u ip m e n t a n d o ffice m a c h in e s .........................

88.1

8 8.2

8 8 .0

8 7 .8

8 7.2

8 6 .9

8 6 .4

8 4.9

84.6

8 4.2

8 3.9

8 3.3

8 2 .7

76

T e le c o m m u n ic a tio n s a n d s o u n d re co rd in g a nd
9 2 .8

9 2.3

91.1

9 2 .0

9 1.7

9 0 .4

9 0 .0

7

77

9 6.8

9 7 .0

9 4 .5
97.1

97.1

9 6 .6

93.1
9 6.7

9 6 .5

96.0

95.9

95.6

9 5 .4

9 5.7

9 5 .6

78

100.1

100.2

1 00 .0

100.2

1 00 .3

100 .3

1 00.3

1 00 .8

100.5

100.5

1 00.4

100.6

1 00 .6

9 9 .5

9 9 .0

99.1

9 9.2

9 9 .3

9 9 .5

9 9 .4

9 9.4

9 9 .4

99.6

99.5

9 9.6

9 9 .8

9 7.2

97.2

9 7 .4

9 7 .8

9 8 .4

9 8 .8

9 8 .4

9 8.5

9 8.3

9 8.5

98.8

99.2

9 9 .4

re p ro d u c in g a p p a ra tu s a n d e q u ip m e n t..............................

85
88

9 4 .8

9 4 .8

9 4 .4

9 4 .0

P h o to g ra p h ic a p p a ra tu s , e q u ip m e n t, a n d su p p lie s,
a n d o p tic a l q o o d s . n .e .s ..........................................................


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

89

Current Labor Statistics:

40.

Price Data

U.S. export price indexes by end-use category

[2000 = 100]
2002

Category
Mar.
A L L C O M M O D IT IE S ..

Apr.

2003

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

9 7 .6

9 8 .0

9 8 .0

9 8 .0

9 8 .3

9 8 .5

9 8 .8

9 8 .7

9 8 .8

9 8 .6

9 8 .9

9 9 .5

9 9 .7

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .3

1 0 0 .4

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .0

106 .1

1 0 9 .8

1 0 7 .6

1 0 9 .6

A g r ic u ltu r a l f o o d s , fe e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s ...............

1 0 8 .7

1 0 8 .7

1 0 8 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .8

1 0 0 .9

1 0 1 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .7

1 1 0 .7

1 0 8 .2

1 1 0 .4

N o n a g r ic u ltu r a l (fis h , b e v e ra g e s ) fo o d p ro d u c ts .

1 0 9 .5

1 0 9 .4

1 0 8 .8

9 8 .3

1 08 .1

9 6 .2

9 6.1

1 0 0 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .7

1 0 1 .3

1 02.1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 2 .3

1 0 2 .8

1 0 4 .6

1 1 0 .3

F o o d s , fe e d s ,

and

b e v e r a g e s ...........................................

In d u s tr ia l s u p p lie s a n d m a te r ia ls ....................................

9 1 .9

9 3 .4

9 3 .8

9 4 .6

9 5 .6

9 5 .5

9 5 .9

9 6 .4

96.1

9 6 .0

9 7 .3

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .6

A g r ic u ltu r a l in d u s tr ia l s u p p lie s a n d m a te r ia ls ........

9 3 .6

9 3 .6

9 3 .0

9 5 .8

9 7 .9

9 7 .7

9 8 .4

9 8 .4

100 .1

1 0 1 .9

1 0 3 .3

1 0 3 .8

1 0 4 .8

9 6 .2

1 0 3 .7

1 0 8 .4

F u e ls a n d lu b r ic a n t s ..........................................................

8 5 .6

9 0 .3

8 7 .9

8 6 .7

8 8 .3

8 8 .0

9 2 .9

9 4 .0

9 1 .6

9 1 .3

e x c lu d in g f u e l a n d b u ild in g m a te r ia ls ......................

9 2 .6

9 4 .0

9 4 .8

9 5 .7

9 6 .7

9 6 .5

9 6 .4

9 6 .8

S e le c te d b u ild in g m a t e r ia ls ............................................

9 6 .5

9 6 .4

9 7 .3

9 8 .8

9 4 .2

9 9 .9

9 4 .3

94.1

9 4 .2

9 5 .0

9 5 .4

9 6 .2

9 6 .6

9 6 .6

9 6 .2

9 6.1

9 6 .5

9 6 .4

N o n a g r ic u ltu r a l s u p p lie s a n d m a te ria ls ,

C a p ita l g o o d s .................................................................... .

9 9 .4

9 9 .5

9 9 .2

9 8 .7

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

9 8 .4

9 8 .3

E le c tr ic a n d e le c tr ic a l g e n e r a tin g e q u ip m e n t..

9 8 .3

98.1

9 8 .2

9 8 .4

1 02 .1

9 8 .2

1 0 1 .8

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .0

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .0

N o n e le c tr ic a l m a c h in e r y ............................................

1 0 2 .0

1 02 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 1 .9

1 0 1 .9

9 7 .5

1 0 1 .5

9 7 .6

1 0 1 .5

9 7 .3

9 6 .5

9 6 .2

9 6 .2

9 6 .0

9 5 .8

9 5 .7

9 5 .4

9 5 .4

9 5 .7

9 5 .5

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .7

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .9

1 01.1

1 01.1

1 0 1 .4

1 0 1 .4

1 0 1 .3

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .5

A u to m o tiv e v e h ic le s , p a r ts , a n d e n g in e s .
C o n s u m e r g o o d s , e x c lu d in g a u to m o tiv e ..

9 9.1

9 8 .9

9 9 .0

99.1

9 9.1

9 9 .3

9 9 .3

9 9 .4

9 9 .3

N o n d u r a b le s , m a n u f a c tu r e d .......................

9 9 .3

9 9.1

9 9 .4

98.1

9 9 .4

9 8 .2

9 8 .3

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

9 8 .7

9 8 .7

9 8 .8

D u r a b le s , m a n u f a c tu r e d .............................. .

9 8 .6

9 8 .7

9 8 .2

9 9 .7

9 8 .9

9 8 .7

9 9 .3

9 9 .2

9 9 .4

9 9 .5

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

9 9 .6

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

9 9 .6

9 9 .7

9 8 .9

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .7

1 0 3 .4

1 0 5 .2

1 0 8 .6

1 0 6 .6

1 0 8 .7

1 0 8 .2

1 0 8 .3

1 0 7 .9

9 7 .5

1 0 7 .5

9 7 .8

9 7 .8

9 7 .8

9 7 .9

9 7 .9

9 8 .0

9 8.1

9 8 .0

9 7 .8

9 8 .2

9 8 .8

9 9 .1

A g r ic u ltu r a l c o m m o d itie s ..........
N o n a g r ic u ltu r a l c o m m o d itie s .

41.

U.S. import price indexes by end-use category

[2000 =

100]
2003

Category
Mar.
A L L C O M M O D IT IE S ..
F o o d s , f e e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s ..........................................

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

9 2 .8

9 4 .3

9 4 .4

94.1

9 4 .5

9 4 .8

9 5 .5

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

9 5 .5

9 4 .6

9 5 .2

9 6 .9

9 8 .5

9 9 .2

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

9 5 .0

9 6 .0

9 7 .2

9 6 .2

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

A g r ic u ltu r a l fo o d s , fe e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s ...............

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .2

1 0 1 .3

1 0 1 .2

9 9 .5

1 0 2 .4

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .7

1 0 1 .3

1 0 2 .4

1 0 2 .0

1 0 5 .4

106 .1

1 0 5 .8

N o n a g r ic u ltu r a l (fis h , b e v e ra g e s ) fo o d p ro d u c ts .,

1 0 6 .0

1 0 7 .9

1 0 7 .8

1 0 9 .6

8 5 .5

8 5 .5

8 5 .2

85.1

8 5 .0

8 6 .0

8 7 .3

8 6 .6

8 7.1

8 7 .5

8 6 .8

8 6 .9

8 6 .4

8 4 .9

9 0 .3

9 0 .8

8 9 .8

9 1 .3

9 2 .6

9 5 .2

9 5 .4

9 2 .3

9 4 .6

1 0 1 .3

1 0 7 .5

1 1 0 .2

F u e ls a n d lu b r ic a n t s .............................................................

7 6 .4

8 7.1

8 8 .5

8 5 .8

8 8.1

9 0 .7

9 6 .2

9 6 .7

P e tr o le u m a n d p e tr o le u m p r o d u c ts ...........................

8 9 .8

9 4 .7

1 09.1

1 2 1 .0

7 6 .9

8 6 .7

1 2 6 .3

8 8 .4

8 5 .3

8 8 .5

9 1 .8

97.1

9 7 .0

8 9 .0

9 4 .0

1 0 7 .7

1 2 0 .0

1 1 9 .9

88.0

8 7 .0

8 6 .7

8 7.1

8 8 .0

8 9 .3

9 0 .5

90.1

8 9 .7

89.1

8 8 .6

8 9.1

9 1 .0

s u p p lie s a n d m a t e r ia ls ......................................................

9 5 .9

9 7 .4

9 7 .4

9 7.1

9 8.1

99.1

9 9 .4

9 9 .7

S e le c te d b u ild in g m a t e r ia ls ...............................................

9 9 .7

1 00.1

1 0 1 .5

1 0 2 .4

1 0 0 .7

1 0 4 .2

1 0 1 .0

9 9 .6

99.1

9 9 .9

9 9 .2

9 7 .6

9 6 .9

9 6 .4

U n fin is h e d m e ta ls a s s o c ia te d w ith d u r a b le g o o d s .

9 5 .0

9 5 .6

9 6 .9

8 3 .8

8 6 .2

8 6 .6

8 8 .5

8 9 .4

8 8 .6

8 9 .7

8 9 .9

9 0 .5

9 1 .5

9 0 .5

9 7 .2

9 3 .3

9 3.1

9 7 .6

9 6 .8

9 6 .7

97.1

9 7 .0

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

97.1

9 6 .9

9 7 .4

9 7 .9

In d u s tr ia l s u p p lie s a n d m a te r ia ls ....................................

P a p e r a n d p a p e r b a s e s to c k s ..........................................
M a te r ia ls a s s o c ia te d w ith n o n d u ra b le

N o n m e ta ls a s s o c ia te d w ith d u r a b le g o o d s ................

9 6 .3

C a p ita l g o o d s ...............................................................................

9 5 .2

9 5 .2

95.1

9 5.1

9 4 .8

9 4 .9

9 4 .7

9 4 .0

E le c tr ic a n d e le c tr ic a l g e n e r a tin g e q u ip m e n t............

9 4 .0

9 3 .9

9 3 .9

9 5 .5

9 3 .9

9 5 .3

9 3 .8

9 5 .0

95.1

9 5 .3

9 5 .9

9 5 .7

9 5 .2

9 4 .8

9 4 .9

9 5 .3

9 4 .4

9 5 .5

9 5 .5

9 4 .5

9 4 .4

9 4 .4

9 3 .8

9 3 .9

9 3 .7

9 2 .9

9 2 .9

9 2 .8

9 2 .7

9 2 .6

9 2 .6

9 9 .9

100.1

9 9 .9

100.1

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .2

100.3

1 0 0 .7

100.4

100.5

1 0 0 .3

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .5

N o n e le c tr ic a l m a c h in e r y .....................................................
A u to m o tiv e v e h ic le s , p a r ts , a n d e n g in e s ........................
C o n s u m e r g o o d s , e x c lu d in g a u to m o tiv e ........................ .

9 8 .2

98.1

9 8 .2

9 8.1

9 8 .2

9 8 .2

98.1

98.1

N o n d u r a b le s , m a n u f a c tu r e d ............................................. .

9 7 .9

9 8 .0

9 8 .0

9 9 .2

9 7 .9

99.1

9 7 .9

99.1

99.1

9 9 .3

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

D u r a b le s , m a n u f a c tu r e d ......................................................

9 9 .5

9 9 .3

9 9 .7

9 9 .7

9 9 .5

9 7 .3

9 7 .2

9 9 .7

9 7 .2

9 7 .2

9 7 .3

9 7 .0

9 6 .8

9 6 .8

N o n m a n u fa c tu r e d c o n s u m e r g o o d s ..............................

9 6 .7

9 6 .5

9 6 .4

96.1

9 6 .4

9 5 .8

9 6 .2

9 7 .6

9 5 .6

9 5 .3

9 5 .6

9 5 .4

9 5 .4

9 5 .2

9 5 .4

9 5 .5

9 5 .5

9 5 .7

42.

U.S. international price indexes for selected categories of services

[2000 = 100]___________

2001

Category
Mar.
A ir f r e ig h t ( in b o u n d ) .......................................

June

2002
Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

2003

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

9 7 .9

9 5.1

9 4 .9

9 5 .2

9 3 .9

A ir f r e ig h t ( o u tb o u n d ) ...........................................

9 8 .3

1 0 0 .3

1 0 5 .8

1 00.1

9 8 .0

9 7 .6

9 7 .9

9 5 .9

9 8 .4

9 7 .3

9 5 .4

9 7 .2

A ir p a s s e n g e r fa r e s (U .S . c a r r ie r s ) ...................................

1 0 1 .9

1 0 6 .4

1 0 7 .6

1 0 3 .5

1 0 3 .3

1 1 0 .7

1 1 4 .3

1 0 7 .9

112 0

108 0

A ir p a s s e n g e r f a r e s (fo r e ig n c a r r ie r s ) ............................

1 0 0 .7

1 0 3 .8

1 1 0 .2

1 0 0 .8

9 9 .4

1 1 0 .9

1 1 8 .5

107 2

111 7

O c e a n lin e r f r e ig h t ( i n b o u n d ) ...............................

1 0 2 .8

1 0 0 .8

98.1

9 3 .6

9 1 .7

9 0 .3

9 3 .5

9 3 .3

9 5 .5

90

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43.

Indexes of productivity, hourly compensation, and unit costs, quarterly data seasonally adjusted

[1992 = 100]

1

II

III

IV

I

II

2003

2002

2001

2000

Item

IV

III

I

IV

II

III
1 2 4 .8

1

B u s in e s s
1 2 4 .9

1 2 5 .7

1 1 5 .3

1 1 7 .2

1 1 7 .3

1 1 7 .9

1 1 7 .5

1 1 7 .4

1 1 7 .9

1 20.1

1 2 2 .5

1 23.1

1 3 1 .4

1 3 2 .4

1 3 5 .0

1 3 6 .3

1 3 7 .3

1 3 7 .5

1 3 7 .8

1 3 8 .3

1 3 9 .3

1 4 0 .8

1 4 2 .7

1 4 2 .8

1 4 4 .2

1 1 2 .7

1 1 2 .7

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 1 .7

1 1 1 .9

1 1 1 .8

1 1 1 .0

1 11 .1

1 1 1 .6

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .3

1 1 3 .2

1 1 4 .0

1 1 3 .0

1 15.1

1 1 5 .6

1 1 6 .9

1 17 .1

1 1 6 .8

1 15.1

1 1 3 .7

1 1 4 .4

1 1 3 .4

1 1 4 .3

1 1 4 .7

1 1 0 .7

114 .1

1 1 1 .2

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .3

1 1 3 .6

1 1 5 .5

1 1 7 .2

1 1 9 .9

1 1 9 .3

1 2 1 .4

1 2 0 .9

1 2 1 .6

1 1 2 .8

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .7

1 1 4 .3

1 1 5 .2

1 1 5 .8

1 1 6 .4

1 1 5 .9

1 1 6 .0

1 1 6 .2

1 1 6 .3

1 1 6 .8

1 1 7 .3

N o n f a r m b u s in e s s
1 1 4 .7

1 1 6 .4

1 1 6 .6

117 .1

1 1 6 .7

1 1 6 .6

1 1 7 .2

1 1 9 .3

1 2 1 .8

1 2 2 .3

1 2 3 .9

1 2 4 .2

1 2 4 .8

1 3 0 .8

1 3 1 .5

1 3 4 .3

1 3 5 .3

1 3 6 .3

1 3 6 .3

1 3 6 .7

1 3 7 .2

1 38 .1

1 3 9 .5

1 40 .1

1 4 1 .5

1 4 2 .7

1 1 0 .0

1 0 9 .8

111 .1

1 1 1 .2

1 1 0 .9

1 10 .1

1 1 0 .2

1 1 0 .7

1 11 .1

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .2

1 1 1 .7

1 1 1 .6

1 1 4 .0

1 1 3 .0

1 1 5 .2

1 1 5 .6

1 1 6 .8

1 1 6 .9

1 1 6 .6

1 1 5 .0

1 1 3 .4

1 14 .1

1 13 .1

1 1 3 .9

1 1 4 .4

1 1 2 .3

1 1 5 .6

1 1 2 .8

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .8

1 1 5 .3

1 1 7 .2

1 1 9 .2

1 2 1 .7

1 2 1 .7

1 2 3 .5

1 23 .1

1 2 3 .6

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .9

1 1 4 .3

1 1 4 .8

1 1 5 .7

1 1 6 .3

1 1 6 .8

1 1 6 .5

1 1 6 .4

1 1 6 .8

1 1 6 .9

1 1 7 .3

1 1 7 .7

N o n f in a n c i a ! c o r p o r a t io n s
1 1 7 .8

1 1 8 .3

1 1 9 .5

1 1 9 .5

1 1 8 .8

1 1 9 .4

1 2 0 .4

1 2 3 .5

1 2 4 .9

1 2 6 .7

1 2 7 .7

1 2 9 .3

1 3 0 .2

1 2 6 .9

1 2 7 .8

1 3 0 .4

1 3 1 .7

1 3 1 .3

1 3 1 .9

1 3 2 .7

1 3 3 .6

1 3 4 .7

1 3 6 .2

1 3 7 .2

1 3 8 .8

1 4 0 .4
1 0 9 .8

1 0 6 .7

1 0 6 .6

1 0 7 .9

1 0 8 .2

1 0 6 .9

1 0 6 .5

1 0 7 .0

1 0 7 .8

1 0 8 .4

1 0 8 .6

1 0 8 .8

1 0 9 .6

1 0 6 .9

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 1 0 .8

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .7

1 0 9 .8

1 0 9 .5

1 0 9 .4

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .3

1 0 9 .6

1 0 7 .8

1 0 8 .0

109 .1

1 1 0 .2

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .4

1 1 0 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 0 7 .9

1 0 7 .5

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .8

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .3

107 .1

1 0 8 .9

1 1 1 .6

1 1 3 .5

1 1 5 .5

114 .1

1 1 4 .0

1 1 4 .5

1 1 5 .4

1 1 4 .7

1 1 4 .3

1 1 9 .5

1 1 8 .8

1 0 9 .5

9 8 .6

9 3.1

9 5 .4

9 7 .9

1 0 7 .6

1 0 7 .6

1 0 7 .8

1 0 4 .6

1 0 9 .7

1 1 0 .3

1 0 8 .4

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .7

1 0 6 .3

1 0 6 .9

1 0 8 .9

1 1 1 .0

1 1 2 .4

1 1 2 .4

1 1 2 .8

1 1 2 .6

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .3

1 0 8 .0

1 0 8 .5

1 0 8 .6

1 0 8 .9

1 0 9 .3

1 0 9 .9

1 1 0 .5

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .4

1 0 9 .3

109 .1

1 0 9 .4

1 0 9 .6

M a n u f a c t u r in g

U n it la b o r c o s ts ..................................................................................


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

1 3 3 .6

1 3 4 .9

1 3 5 .4

1 3 5 .9

1 3 5 .4

1 3 5 .4

1 3 6 .4

1 3 7 .6

1 40.1

1 4 1 .5

1 4 3 .4

1 4 3 .3

1 4 3 .9

1 3 1 .4

1 2 9 .3

1 3 2 .2

1 3 1 .5

1 3 2 .0

1 3 3 .0

1 3 3 .3

1 3 4 .3

1 3 5 .6

1 3 7 .2

1 3 7 .7

1 3 9 .5

1 4 1 .1

1 1 0 .5

1 0 7 .9

1 0 9 .4

1 0 8 .0

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .3

109 .1

1 0 9 .4

1 0 9 .2

1 10 .1

1 1 0 .3

9 8 .4

9 5 .9

9 7 .7

9 6 .7

9 7 .5

9 8 .2

9 7 .8

9 7 .6

9 6 .8

9 6 .9

9 6 .0

9 7 .4

9 8 .0

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

91

Current Labor Statistics:

44.

Productivity Data

Annual indexes of multifactor productivity and related measures, selected years

[1996 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]
Item

1960

1970

1980

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

Private business
P r o d u c tiv ity :
O u t p u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s .....................................
O u tp u t

per unit of c a p ita l

s e r v ic e s ..................................

M u ltifa c to r p r o d u c t iv it y ...................................................
O u t p u t ................................................................

4 5 .6

6 3 .0

7 5 .8

9 0 .2

9 1 .3

9 4 .8

9 5 .4

9 6 .6

9 7 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .0

1 0 4 .8

104 8

1 1 0 .4

1 11.1

1 0 1 .5

9 9 .3

96.1

9 7 .7

9 8 .5

1 0 0 .3

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .5

1 00.1

100 1

6 5 .2

8 0 .0

8 8 .3

9 5 .3

9 4 .4

9 6 .6

9 7.1

98.1

9 8 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 01.1

1 0 2 .6

1 0 2 .6

2 7 .5

4 2 .0

5 9 .4

8 3 .6

8 2 .6

8 5 .7

8 8 .5

9 2 .8

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 5 .2

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .6

5 4 .0

6 1 .0

In p u ts :
L a b o r in p u t ...........................................................

7 1 .9

8 9 .4

8 8 .3

8 9 .3

9 1 .8

9 5 .6

9 8 .0

C a p ita l s e r v ic e s ..............................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 6 .4

1 0 6 .4

2 4 .9

3 7 .8

5 8 .6

8 4 .2

8 6 .0

8 7 .7

8 9 .8

9 2 .6

9 6 .0

C o m b in e d u n its o f la b o r a n d c a p ita l in p u t ........................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .7

1 1 0 .4

110 4

4 2 .3

5 2 .4

6 7 .3

8 7 .7

8 7 .5

8 8 .8

91.1

9 4 .6

9 7 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .0

1 0 7 .7

1 0 7 .7

4 1 .3

5 6 .7

7 4 .7

9 0 .8

9 5 .0

9 7 .0

9 6 .8

9 6 .3

9 7 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .7

1 0 4 .7

104 5

C a p ita l p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s ............................................

Private nonfarm business
P ro d u c tiv ity :
O u t p u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s .....................................

4 8 .7

6 4 .9

7 7 .3

9 0 .3

9 1 .4

9 4 .8

9 5 .3

9 6 .5

9 7 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .7

1 0 4 .5

120 .1

1 1 8 .3

1 0 5 .7

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .6

9 7 .9

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .3

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .2

99 8

99 8

69.1

8 2 .6

9 0 .5

9 5 .6

9 4 .7

9 6 .6

97.1

98.1

9 8 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .4

1 0 2 .4

2 7 .2

4 1 .9

5 9 .6

8 3 .5

8 2 .5

8 5 .5

8 8 .4

9 2 .6

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .0

105 .1

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .6

50.1

5 9 .3

7 0 .7

8 9 .2

8 8 .0

8 9 .0

9 1 .8

9 5 .4

9 7 .8

C a p ita l s e r v ic e s .....................................................

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .8

1 0 6 .6

1 0 6 .6

2 2 .6

3 5 .5

5 6 .4

8 3 .5

8 5 .4

8 7 .3

8 9 .5

9 2 .3

9 5 .9

1 0 0 .0

C o m b in e d u n its o f la b o r a n d c a p ita l in p u t ........................

1 0 4 .9

1 1 0 .8

110 8

3 9 .3

5 0 .7

6 5 .9

8 7 .3

87.1

8 8 .4

9 1 .0

9 4 .4

9 7 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .2

1 0 8 .0

1 0 8 .0

4 0 .5

5 4 .8

7 3.1

9 0 .3

9 4 .7

9 6 .8

9 6 .5

9 6 .3

9 7 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .7

1 0 4 .7

O u t p u t p e r u n it o f c a p ita l s e r v ic e s ...................................
M u ltifa c to r p r o d u c t iv it y ..........................................

In p u ts :
L a b o r in p u t .........................................................

C a p ita l p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s .....................................
M a n u f a c t u r in g ( 1 9 9 2 = 1 0 0 )
P r o d u c tiv ity :
O u t p u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s ..............................................
O u t p u t p e r u n it o f c a p ita l s e r v ic e s ........................................
M u ltifa c to r p r o d u c t iv it y ................................................
O u t p u t ..........................................................................

4 1 .8

5 4 .2

70.1

9 2 .8

9 5 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .9

1 0 5 .0

1 0 9 .0

1 1 2 .8

1 17.1

1 2 4 .3

1 2 4 .3

1 2 4 .3

1 1 6 .5

1 0 0 .9

1 0 1 .6

9 7 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 01.1

1 0 4 .0

1 0 5 .0

1 0 4 .5

1 0 5 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 0 6 .5

7 2 .7

8 4 .4

8 6 .6

9 9 .3

9 8 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .4

1 0 2 .6

1 0 5 .0

106 .1

1 0 9 .8

1 1 3 .2

1 1 3 .2

3 8 .5

5 6 .5

7 5 .3

9 7 .3

9 5 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .3

1 0 8 .7

1 1 3 .4

1 1 6 .9

1 2 3 .5

1 3 0 .7

1 3 0 .7

In p u ts :
H o u r s o f a ll p e r s o n s ...................................................

9 2 .0

1 0 4 .2

1 0 7 .5

1 0 4 .8

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .4

1 0 3 .6

1 0 4 .0

C a p ita l s e r v ic e s ..................................................

1 0 3 .7

1 0 5 .5

1 0 5 .2

3 0 .9

4 8 .5

7 4 .7

9 5 .8

9 7 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .2

1 0 4 .5

1 0 8 .0

E n e r g y ........................................................................

1 1 1 .9

1 1 6 .9

1 2 2 .8

1 2 2 .8

5 1 .3

8 5 .4

9 2 .5

9 9 .9

1 00.1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 7 .3

1 0 9 .5

N o n e n e r g y m a t e r ia ls ................................................

1 0 7 .0

1 0 3 .9

1 0 9 .2

109 2

3 8 .2

4 4 .8

7 5 .0

9 2 .5

9 3 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 5 .7

1 1 1 .3

1 1 2 .8

1 2 0 .4

1 2 0 .4

P u r c h a s e d b u s in e s s s e r v ic e s ............................

1 2 7 .2

1 2 7 .2

2 8 .2

4 8 .8

7 3 .7

9 2 .5

92.1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .0

105.1

1 1 0 .0

1 0 8 .9

C o m b in e d u n its o f a ll f a c t o r in p u ts ....................................

1 1 4 .2

1 1 6 .8

116 8

5 2 .9

6 7 .0

8 7 .0

9 8 .0

9 7 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .9

1 0 6 .0

1 0 7 .9

1 1 0 .2

1 1 2 .5

1 1 5 .5

1 1 5 .5

92

Monthly Labor Review


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

1 0 5 .2

45.

Annual indexes of productivity, hourly compensation, unit costs, and prices, selected years

[1992 = 100]
Item

1960

1970

1980

1990

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2002

2001

B u sin ess
O u t p u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s ...................................................

4 8 .8

6 7 .0

8 0 .4

9 5 .2

1 0 1 .9

1 0 2 .6

1 0 5 .4

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .6

1 1 3 .5

1 1 6 .9

1 1 8 .2

1 2 3 .8

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r ................................................................

1 3 .7

2 3 .5

5 4 .2

9 0 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .7

1 10.1

1 1 3 .5

1 1 9 .7

1 2 5 .2

1 3 3 .8

1 3 7 .7

1 4 1 .8

R e a l c o m p e n s a t io n p e r h o u r ......................................................

5 9 .8

7 8 .6

8 9 .2

9 6 .3

9 9 .9

9 9 .6

1 00.1

1 0 1 .0

1 0 5 .0

1 0 7 .6

1 1 1 .2

1 1 1 .4

1 1 2 .3

U n it la b o r c o s ts ..................................................................................

2 8 .0

35.1

6 7 .4

9 5 .3

1 0 2 .6

104 .1

1 0 4 .5

1 0 5 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 1 0 .3

1 1 4 .4

1 1 6 .5

1 1 3 .9

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n t s ................................................................

2 5 .2

3 1 .6

6 1 .5

9 3 .9

1 0 6 .4

1 0 9 .4

1 1 3 .3

1 17.1

1 1 4 .5

1 1 3 .9

1 1 2 .0

1 1 4 .7

1 2 0 .4

I m p lic it p r ic e d e f la t o r ......................................................................

2 7 .0

3 3 .9

6 5 .2

9 4 .8

1 0 4 .0

1 0 6 .0

1 0 7 .7

1 0 9 .7

1 1 0 .6

1 1 1 .8

1 1 3 .5

1 1 5 .8

1 1 6 .3

N o n fa rm b u s in es s
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s ...................................................

5 1 .9

6 8 .9

8 2 .0

9 5 .3

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .8

1 0 5 .4

1 0 7 .5

1 1 0 .3

1 1 2 .9

1 1 6 .2

1 1 7 .5

1 23 .1

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r ................................................................

1 4 .3

2 3 .7

5 4 .6

9 0 .5

1 0 4 .3

1 0 6 .6

1 0 9 .8

113 .1

1 19.1

1 2 4 .3

1 3 3 .0

1 3 6 .6

1 3 9 .8

R e a l c o m p e n s a t io n p e r h o u r ......................................................

6 2 .6

7 9 .2

8 9 .8

9 6 .2

9 9 .7

9 9 .4

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .6

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .8

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .5

1 1 1 .3

U n it la b o r c o s t s ..................................................................................

2 7 .5

3 4 .4

6 6 .5

9 5 .0

1 0 2 .5

1 0 3 .7

1 0 4 .2

1 0 5 .2

1 0 8 .0

1 10.1

1 1 4 .4

1 1 6 .3

1 1 3 .6

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n t s ................................................................

2 4 .6

3 1 .3

6 0 .5

9 3 .6

1 0 6 .9

1 1 0 .4

1 1 3 .5

1 1 8 .0

1 1 5 .7

1 1 5 .5

1 1 3 .5

1 1 6 .4

1 2 2 .5

Im p lic it p ric e d e f la t o r .......................................................................

2 6 .5

3 3 .3

6 4 .3

9 4 .5

104 .1

106 .1

1 0 7 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 1 0 .8

1 12 .1

114 .1

1 1 6 .3

1 1 6 .9

5 5 .4

7 0 .4

8 1.1

9 5 .4

103 .1

1 0 4 .2

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .4

1 1 1 .7

1 1 4 .7

1 1 8 .8

1 2 0 .5

1 27 .1

1 5 .6

2 5 .3

5 6 .4

9 0 .8

1 0 4 .2

1 0 6 .2

1 0 9 .0

1 1 0 .3

1 1 6 .0

1 21.1

1 2 9 .2

1 3 2 .4

1 3 6 .7
1 0 8 .8

N o n fin a n c ia l c o rp o ra tio n s

68.1

8 4 .4

9 2 .9

9 6 .5

9 9 .6

9 9 .0

9 9 .0

9 8.1

1 0 1 .7

1 04 .1

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .0

2 6 .8

3 4 .8

6 8 .4

9 5 .9

1 01.1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 1 .2

1 0 1 .5

1 0 3 .3

105 .1

1 0 8 .2

1 1 0 .9

1 0 9 .5

U n it la b o r c o s t s ...............................................................................

2 8.1

3 5 .9

6 9 .6

9 5 .2

1 0 1 .0

1 0 1 .9

1 0 1 .4

1 0 1 .8

1 0 3 .8

1 0 5 .6

1 0 8 .8

1 0 9 .9

1 0 7 .5

U n it n o n la b o r c o s ts .......................................................................

2 3 .3

3 1 .9

65.1

9 8 .0

1 0 1 .3

1 0 2 .2

1 0 0 .6

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .2

1 0 3 .5

1 0 6 .7

1 1 3 .7

1 1 4 .6

5 0 .2

4 4 .4

6 8 .8

9 4 .3

1 3 1 .7

1 3 9 .0

1 5 2 .2

1 5 6 .9

1 4 1 .7

1 3 1 .7

1 1 1 .6

9 8 .5

1 0 7 .4

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n t s ................................................................

3 0 .2

35.1

6 6 .0

97.1

1 0 9 .0

1 1 1 .6

1 1 3 .8

1 1 5 .2

1 1 2 .3

1 1 0 .7

1 0 8 .0

1 0 9 .8

1 1 2 .8

I m p lic it p r ic e d e f la t o r .......................................................................

2 8 .8

3 5 .6

6 8 .4

9 5 .8

1 0 3 .7

105 .1

1 0 5 .5

1 0 6 .2

1 0 6 .6

1 0 7 .3

1 0 8 .5

1 0 9 .8

1 0 9 .3

R e a l c o m p e n s a t io n p e r h o u r .......................................................

M a n u fa c tu rin g
4 1 .8

5 4 .2

70.1

9 2 .9

1 0 5 .0

1 0 9 .0

1 1 2 .8

1 1 7 .6

1 2 3 .3

1 2 9 .7

1 3 4 .9

1 3 6 .0

1 4 2 .1

1 4 .9

2 3 .7

5 5 .6

9 0 .8

1 0 5 .6

1 0 7 .9

1 0 9 .4

1 1 1 .5

1 1 7 .4

122 .1

1 31.1

1 33.1

1 3 7 .5

R e a l c o m p e n s a t io n p e r h o u r ......................................................

6 5 .0

7 9 .2

9 1 .4

9 6 .4

1 0 1 .0

1 0 0 .6

9 9 .4

99.1

1 0 3 .0

1 0 4 .9

1 0 9 .0

1 0 7 .7

1 0 9 .4

U n it la b o r c o s ts ..................................................................................

3 5 .6

4 3 .8

7 9 .3

9 7 .8

1 0 0 .7

9 9 .0

9 6 .9

9 4 .8

9 5 .2

94.1

9 7 .2

9 7 .9

9 6 .8

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n t s ................................................................

2 6 .8

2 9 .3

8 0 .2

9 9 .8

1 0 2 .8

1 0 6 .9

1 0 9 .9

1 1 0 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 0 7 .0

-

-

104 .1

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .7

1 0 3 .2

“

“

O u t p u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s ...................................................

I m p lic it p r ic e d e f la t o r ......................................................................

3 0 .2

3 5 .0

7 9 .9

9 9 .0

1 0 2 .0

1 0 3 .9

1 0 4 .8

D a s h in d ic a te s d a t a n o t a v a ila b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

93

Current Labor Statistics:

46.

Productivity Data

Annual indexes of output per hour for selected 3-digit SIC industries

[1987=100]
Industry

SIC

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

Mining
C o p p e r o r e s ...................................................

102

1 0 2 .7

1 0 0 .5

1 1 5 .2

1 18.1

Gold and silver ores .......................................

1 2 6 .0

1 1 7 .2

1 1 6 .5

1 1 8 .9

1 1 8 .3

1 1 0 .0

1 2 2 .6

104

1 2 2 .3

1 2 7 .4

1 4 1 .6

1 5 9 .8

1 6 0 .8

1 4 4 .2

1 3 8 .3

1 5 8 .5

B itu m in o u s c o a l a n d lig n it e m in in g ...........................

1 8 7 .6

1 9 7 .5

239 9

122

1 1 8 .7

1 2 2 .4

1 3 3 .0

1 4 1 .2

148 .1

1 5 5 .9

1 6 8 .0

1 7 6 .6

1 8 8 .0

1 9 4 .9

2 0 7 .0

C r u d e p e tr o le u m a n d n a tu r a l g a s .......................

131

9 7 .0

9 7 .9

102 .1

1 0 5 .9

1 1 2 .4

1 1 9 .4

1 2 3 .9

1 2 5 .2

C r u s h e d a n d b r o k e n s t o n e ......................................

1 2 7 .5

1 3 4 .5

142 5

142

1 0 2 .2

9 9 .8

1 0 5 .0

1 0 3 .6

1 0 8 .7

1 0 5 .4

1 0 7 .2

1 1 2 .6

1 1 0 .2

1 0 5 .0

1 0 1 .9

Manufacturing
M e a t p r o d u c t s ...................................................

201

9 7.1

9 9 .6

1 0 4 .6

1 0 4 .3

1 0 1 .2

1 0 2 .3

9 7 .4

D a ir y p r o d u c t s ...........................................................

1 0 2 .5

1 0 2 .3

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .9

202

1 0 7 .3

1 0 8 .3

1 1 1 .4

1 0 9 .6

1 1 1 .8

1 1 6 .4

1 1 6 .0

1 1 9 .3

P re s e r v e d f r u it s a n d v e g e t a b le s .....................................

1 1 9 .3

1 1 2 .7

113 5

203

9 5 .6

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .5

1 0 6 .8

1 0 7 .6

109 .1

1 0 9 .2

1 1 0 .7

G r a in m ill p r o d u c t s .............................................

1 1 7 .8

1 2 0 .4

204

1 0 5 .4

1 0 4 .9

1 0 7 .8

1 0 9 .2

1 0 8 .4

1 1 5 .4

B a k e r y p r o d u c t s ..................................................

1 0 8 .0

1 1 8 .2

1 2 6 .2

1 2 9 .3

1 2 7 .5

205

9 2 .7

9 0 .6

9 3 .8

9 4 .4

9 6 .4

9 7 .3

9 5 .6

99.1

1 0 0 .9

1 0 6 .4

1 0 7 .6

1 3 0 .5

S u g a r a n d c o n f e c tio n e r y p r o d u c ts ...............................

1 2 3 .5

206

1 0 3 .2

1 0 2 .0

9 9 .8

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .2

1 0 8 .3

1 1 3 .7

1 1 6 .7

1 2 3 .0

F a ts a n d o ils ................................................

1 2 7 .0

207

1 18.1

120 .1

114.1

1 1 2 .6

1 1 1 .8

1 2 0 .3

1 10 .1

1 2 0 .2

B e v e r a g e s ....................................................

1 3 7 .3

1 5 4 .4

1 5 1 .4

208

1 1 7 .0

1 2 0 .0

127.1

1 2 6 .4

130.1

1 3 3 .5

1 3 5 .0

1 3 5 .5

1 3 6 .4

1 2 9 .7

M is c e lla n e o u s fo o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c ts ..................

1 2 8 .6

209

9 9 .2

1 0 1 .7

1 0 1 .5

1 0 5 .2

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .9

1 0 9 .1

C ig a r e tt e s ...............................................................

1 0 4 .0

1 1 2 .4

1 1 3 .9

1 1 6 .3

2 11

1 1 3 .2

1 0 7 .6

1 1 1 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 2 6 .6

1 4 2 .9

1 4 7 .2

1 4 7 .2

1 5 2 .2

1 3 7 .7

1 39 .1

B r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m ills , c o tto n ......................................

221

1 03.1

1 1 1 .2

1 1 0 .3

1 1 7 .8

122.1

1 3 4 .0

1 3 7 .3

1 3 1 .2

1 3 6 .2

B r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m ills , m a n m a d e .............................

1 3 9 .3

1 4 0 .2

222

1 1 1 .3

1 1 6 .2

1 2 6 .2

1 3 1 .7

1 4 2 .5

1 4 5 .3

1 4 7 .6

1 6 2 .2

N a r r o w f a b r ic m i lls .............................................

1 6 8 .6

1 7 5 .3

1 6 7 .4

224

9 6 .5

9 9 .6

1 1 2 .9

1 1 1 .4

1 20.1

Knitting m i lls ......................................................

1 1 8 .9

1 2 6 .3

1 1 0 .8

1 1 7 .7

1 2 4 .9

117 .1

225

1 0 7 .5

1 1 4 .0

1 1 9 .3

1 2 7 .9

134.1

1 3 8 .3

1 5 0 .3

1 3 8 .0

T e x tile fin is h in g , e x c e p t w o o l...........................

1 3 5 .9

1 4 6 .6

1 5 5 .6

226

8 3 .4

7 9 .9

7 8 .6

7 9 .3

8 1 .2

7 8 .5

7 9 .2

9 4 .3

9 3 .7

9 4 .4

9 7 .2

C a r p e ts a n d r u g s ........................................................

227

9 3 .2

8 9 .2

96.1

9 7 .1

9 3 .3

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .3

1 0 2 .3

Y a r n a n d th r e a d m ills ........................................................

9 6 .0

1 0 3 .0

228

1 1 0 .2

1 1 1 .4

1 1 9 .6

1 2 6 .6

1 3 0 .7

1 3 7 .4

1 4 7 .4

1 5 0 .4

M is c e lla n e o u s t e x tile g o o d s .............................................

1 5 3 .0

1 5 7 .6

1 5 5 .4

229

1 0 9 .2

1 0 4 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 1 0 .4

1 1 8 .5

1 2 3 .7

1 23 .1

1 1 8 .7

1 20.1

1 2 8 .0

M e n 's a n d b o y s ' f u r n is h in g s ..............................................

1 3 4 .4

232

102 .1

1 0 8 .4

1 09.1

1 0 8 .4

1 1 1 .7

1 2 3 .4

1 3 4 .7

1 62.1

1 7 4 .8

W o m e n 's a n d m is s e s ' o u t e r w e a r .......................

1 9 0 .9

2 0 0 .3

233

104 .1

1 0 4 .3

1 0 9 .4

1 2 1 .8

1 2 7 .4

1 3 5 .5

1 4 1 .6

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 7 3 .9

1 8 9 .9

W o m e n 's a n d c h ild r e n 's u n d e r g a r m e n ts .....................

234

102.1

1 1 3 .7

1 1 7 .4

1 2 4 .5

1 3 8 .0

1 6 1 .3

1 7 4 .5

2 0 8 .9

2 1 6 .4

2 9 4 .7

H a ts , c a p s , a n d m illin e r y ...................................................

3 5 2 .3

235

8 9 .2

9 1.1

9 3 .6

8 7 .2

7 7 .7

8 4 .3

8 2 .2

87.1

9 8 .7

9 9 .3

M is c e lla n e o u s a p p a r e l a n d a c c e s s o r ie s .....................

1 06 .1

238

9 0 .6

9 1 .8

9 1 .3

9 4 .0

1 0 5 .5

1 1 6 .8

1 2 0 .1

1 0 1 .5

1 0 8 .0

1 0 5 .8

1 1 1 .3

M is c e lla n e o u s f a b r ic a t e d t e x tile p ro d u c ts

239

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .7

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .5

1 0 7 .8

1 0 9 .2

1 0 5 .6

1 1 9 .2

1 1 7 .3

S a w m ills a n d p la n in g m ills ..................................................

1 2 8 .8

1 3 2 .5

242

9 9 .8

1 0 2 .6

1 08.1

1 0 1 .9

1 0 3 .3

1 1 0 .2

1 1 5 .6

1 1 6 .9

1 1 8 .7

1 2 5 .4

1 2 4 .4

M illw o r k , p ly w o o d , a n d s tr u c tu ra l m e m b e r s ...............

243

9 8 .0

9 8 .0

9 9 .9

9 7 .0

9 4 .5

9 2 .7

9 2 .4

89.1

9 1 .3

W o o d c o n t a in e r s ........................................................

8 9 .2

9 1 .4

244

1 1 1 .2

1 13.1

1 0 9 .4

100.1

1 0 0 .9

106.1

1 0 6 .7

1 0 6 .2

1 0 6 .5

W o o d b u ild in g s a n d m o b ile h o m e s ................................

1 0 3 .9

1 0 4 .6

245

1 03.1

1 0 3 .0

103.1

1 0 3 .8

9 8 .3

9 7 .0

9 6 .7

1 0 0 .3

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .3

9 4 .6

M is c e lla n e o u s w o o d p r o d u c ts ................................

249

1 0 7 .7

1 1 0 .5

1 1 4 .2

1 1 5 .3

1 1 1 .8

1 1 5 .4

1 1 4 .4

1 2 3 .4

1 3 1 .2

1 4 0 .7

H o u s e h o ld f u r n itu r e ...........................................................

1 4 6 .5

251

1 0 4 .5

1 07.1

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .6

1 1 2 .5

1 1 6 .9

1 2 1 .6

1 2 1 .3

1 2 5 .7

1 2 8 .9

1 2 8 .4

O ffic e f u r n itu r e .......................................................

252

9 5 .0

94.1

1 0 2 .5

1 0 3 .2

1 0 0 .5

101.1

1 0 6 .4

1 1 8 .3

1 13.1

1 0 8 .9

P u b lic b u ild in g a n d r e la t e d f u r n itu r e .............................

1 1 1 .2

253

1 1 9 .8

1 2 0 .2

1 4 0 .6

1 6 1 .0

1 5 7 .4

1 7 3 .3

1 8 1 .5

2 1 4 .9

2 0 7 .6

P a r titio n s a n d f ix t u r e s .......................................................

2 2 2 .4

2 0 2 .0

254

9 5 .6

9 3 .0

1 0 2 .7

1 0 7 .4

9 8 .9

1 0 1 .2

9 7 .5

1 21 .1

1 2 5 .6

1 2 5 .9

1 3 1 .9

M is c e lla n e o u s f u r n itu r e a n d f ix tu r e s ..............................

259

1 0 3 .5

1 02.1

9 9 .5

1 0 3 .6

1 0 4 .7

1 1 0 .0

1 1 3 .2

1 1 0 .7

1 2 1 .9

P u lp m i lls ...........................................................

119 .1

1 1 0 .5

2 61

1 1 6 .7

1 2 8 .3

1 3 7 .3

1 2 2 .5

1 2 8 .9

1 3 1 .9

1 3 2 .6

8 2 .3

8 6 .6

8 4 .8

7 8 .8

P a p e r m ills ............................................................

262

1 0 2 .3

9 9 .2

1 0 3 .3

1 0 2 .4

1 1 0 .2

1 1 8 .6

1 1 1 .6

1 1 2 .0

1 1 4 .8

1 2 6 .2

1 3 3 .5

P a p e r b o a r d m i lls ........................................................
P a p e r b o a r d c o n t a in e r s a n d b o x e s ................................

263

1 0 0 .6

1 0 1 .4

1 0 4 .4

1 0 8 .4

1 1 4 .9

1 1 9 .5

1 1 8 .0

1 2 6 .7

1 2 7 ,8

1 3 4 .9

1 3 5 .3

265

1 0 1 .3

1 0 3 .4

1 0 5 .2

1 0 7 .9

1 0 8 .4

105.1

1 0 6 .3

1 0 9 .7

1 1 3 .5

1 1 1 .9

1 1 2 .9

M is c e lla n e o u s c o n v e r te d p a p e r p r o d u c ts ...................

267

1 0 1 .4

1 0 5 .3

1 0 5 .5

1 0 7 .9

1 1 0 .6

1 1 3 .3

1 1 3 .6

1 1 9 .5

N e w s p a p e r s ..................................................................

1 2 3 .0

1 2 6 .0

1 2 8 .3

2 71

9 0 .6

8 5 .8

8 1 .5

7 9 .4

7 9 .9

7 9 .0

7 7 .4

7 9 .0

8 3 .6

8 6 .0

8 8 .3

P e r io d ic a ls ..................................................................

272

9 3 .9

8 9 .5

9 2 .9

8 9 .5

8 1 .9

8 7 .8

89.1

100.1

1 1 2 .2

1 1 1 .2

B o o k s ........................................................................

1 0 9 .9

273

9 6 .6

1 0 0 .8

9 7 .7

1 0 3 .5

1 0 3 .0

1 0 1 .6

9 9 .3

1 0 2 .6

1 0 0 .9

1 06.1

106 .1

M is c e lla n e o u s p u b lis h in g ...................................................

274

9 2 .2

9 5 .9

1 0 5 .8

1 0 4 .5

9 7 .5

9 4 .8

9 3 .6

1 1 4 .5

1 1 9 .4

C o m m e r c ia l p r in t in g ................................................

1 2 7 .2

1 2 7 .8

275

1 0 2 .5

1 0 2 .0

1 0 8 .0

1 0 6 .9

1 0 6 .5

1 0 7 .2

1 0 8 .3

1 0 8 .8

1 0 9 .9

1 1 5 .0

M a n ifo ld b u s in e s s f o r m s ..............................................

1 1 8 .7

276

9 3 .0

8 9.1

9 4 .5

9 1 .1

8 2 .0

7 6 .9

7 5 .2

7 7 .9

7 6 .7

7 0 .6

6 9 .4

G r e e tin g c a r d s ..........................................................................

277

1 0 0 .6

9 2 .7

9 6 .7

9 1 .4

8 9 .0

9 2 .5

9 0 .8

9 2 .2

104 .1

1 0 9 .3

B la n k b o o k s a n d b o o k b in d in g .......................................

1 05.1

278

9 9 .4

9 6.1

1 0 3 .6

9 8 .7

1 0 5 .4

1 0 8 .7

1 1 4 .5

1 1 4 .2

P r in tin g t r a d e s e r v ic e s .............................................

1 1 6 .5

1 2 3 .8

1 2 6 .2

279

9 9 .3

1 0 0 .6

1 1 2 .0

1 1 5 .3

1 1 1 .0

1 1 6 .7

1 2 6 .2

1 2 3 .3

1 2 6 .7

1 2 1 .5

In d u s tr ia l in o r g a n ic c h e m ic a ls ..........................................

1 1 9 .6

281

1 0 6 .8

1 0 9 .7

1 0 9 .7

1 0 5 .6

1 0 2 .3

1 0 9 .3

1 10 .1

1 1 6 .8

1 4 5 .8

1 4 8 .5

P la s tic s m a te r ia ls a n d s y n th e tic s ...................................

1 4 1 .3

282

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 7 .5

1 1 2 .0

1 2 5 .3

1 2 8 .3

1 2 5 .3

1 3 5 .4

1 4 2 .2

1 4 8 .6

1 5 1 .0

D r u g s ......................................................................................

283

1 0 3 .8

1 0 4 .5

9 9 .5

9 9 .7

1 0 4 .6

1 0 8 .7

1 1 2 .5

1 1 2 .4

1 0 4 .3

1 0 5 .6

1 0 6 .2

S o a p s , c le a n e r s , a n d t o i le t g o o d s ..................................

284

1 0 3 .8

1 0 5 .3

1 0 4 .4

1 0 8 .7

1 1 1 .2

1 1 8 .6

1 2 0 .9

1 2 6 .4

1 2 2 .7

P a in ts a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s .................................................

1 1 4 .8

1 2 4 .8

285

1 0 6 .3

1 0 4 .3

1 0 2 .9

1 0 8 .8

1 1 6 .7

1 1 8 .0

1 2 5 .6

1 2 6 .4

1 2 6 .8

1 2 2 .7

1 2 4 .6

In d u s tr ia l o r g a n ic c h e m ic a ls .............................................

286

1 0 1 .4

9 5 .8

9 4 .6

9 2 .2

9 9 .9

9 8 .6

9 9 .0

1 1 1 .3

1 0 5 .7

1 2 0 .6

A g r ic u ltu r a l c h e m ic a ls ...........................................................

1 2 7 .8

287

1 0 4 .7

9 9 .5

9 9 .5

1 0 3 .8

1 0 5 .0

1 0 8 .5

1 1 0 .0

1 1 9 .8

1 1 8 .0

1 0 4 .6

1 1 2 .0

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b le .

94

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

46. Continued - Annual indexes of output per hour for selected 3-digit SIC industries
[1987=100]
Industry

SIC

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

M is c e lla n e o u s c h e m ic a l p r o d u c ts ...................................

289

9 7 .3

96.1

1 0 1 .8

1 07.1

1 0 5 .7

1 0 7 .8

1 10 .1

1 2 0 .3

1 2 0 .8

1 2 3 .3

1 2 5 .6

P e tr o le u m r e f in in g ...................................................................

2 91

1 0 9 .2

1 0 6 .6

1 1 1 .3

1 20.1

1 2 3 .8

1 3 2 .3

1 4 2 .0

1 4 9 .2

1 5 5 .8

1 7 0 .2

1 8 0 .2

A s p h a lt p a v in g a n d r o o fin g m a te r ia ls ...........................

295

9 8 .0

94.1

1 0 0 .4

1 0 8 .0

1 0 4 .9

1 1 1 .2

113 .1

1 23 .1

1 2 4 .7

1 2 3 .4

1 26 .1

M is c e lla n e o u s p e tr o le u m a n d c o a l p r o d u c ts .............

299

9 4 .8

9 0 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .2

9 6 .3

8 7 .4

8 7.1

9 6 .5

9 8 .5

8 6 .5

8 2 .9

T ir e s a n d in n e r t u b e s .............................................................

3 01

1 0 3 .0

1 0 2 .4

1 0 7 .8

1 1 6 .5

124.1

1 31 .1

1 3 8 .8

1 49 .1

1 44.1

1 42 .1

1 4 5 .9

H o s e a n d b e lt in g a n d g a s k e ts a n d p a c k in g ...............

305

96.1

9 2 .4

9 7 .8

9 9 .7

1 0 2 .7

1 0 4 .6

1 0 7 .4

1 1 3 .5

1 1 2 .7

1 1 0 .6

1 1 5 .4

F a b r ic a te d r u b b e r p r o d u c ts , n .e .c ..................................

306

1 0 9 .0

1 0 9 .9

1 1 5 .2

123.1

1 19.1

1 2 1 .5

1 2 1 .0

1 2 5 .3

1 3 2 .3

1 3 6 .9

1 4 4 .7

M is c e lla n e o u s p la s t ic s p ro d u c ts , n .e .c ........................

308

1 0 5 .7

1 0 8 .3

1 1 4 .4

1 1 6 .7

1 2 0 .8

1 2 1 .0

1 2 4 .7

1 2 9 .9

1 3 3 .8

1 4 0 .9

1 4 5 .4

F o o tw e a r , e x c e p t r u b b e r .....................................................

314

101.1

9 4 .4

1 0 4 .2

1 0 5 .2

1 1 3 .0

1 17 .1

126.1

1 2 1 .4

1 1 0 .9

1 3 2 .6

1 4 6 .2

F la t g la s s .....................................................................................

3 21

8 4 .5

8 3 .6

9 2 .7

9 7 .7

9 7 .6

9 9 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 7 .6

1 1 4 .0

1 2 9 .4

1 4 0 .4

G la s s a n d g la s s w a r e , p re s s e d o r b lo w n .....................

322

1 0 4 .8

1 0 2 .3

1 0 8 .9

1 0 8 .7

1 1 2 .9

1 1 5 .7

1 2 1 .4

1 2 8 .3

1 3 5 .2

1 3 9 .3

1 3 5 .8

P r o d u c ts o f p u r c h a s e d g la s s .............................................

323

9 2 .6

9 7 .7

1 0 1 .5

1 0 6 .2

1 0 5 .9

1 06 .1

1 2 2 .0

1 25.1

1 2 2 .0

1 3 0 .2

1 3 7 .2

C e m e n t, h y d r a u lic ...................................................................

324

1 1 2 .4

1 0 8 .3

1 15 .1

1 1 9 .9

1 2 5 .6

1 2 4 .3

1 2 8 .7

1 33.1

134 .1

1 3 8 .6

1 3 6 .9

S tr u c tu r a l c la y p r o d u c t s .......................................................

325

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 1 1 .4

1 0 6 .8

1 1 4 .0

1 1 2 .6

1 1 9 .6

1 1 1 .9

1 1 4 .8

1 2 3 .5

1 2 4 .8

P o tte r y a n d r e la t e d p r o d u c ts .............................................

326

9 8 .7

9 5 .9

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .3

1 0 8 .5

1 0 9 .4

1 1 9 .4

1 2 4 .2

1 2 7 .4

1 2 2 .0

1 2 1 .2

C o n c r e te , g y p s u m , a n d p la s te r p r o d u c ts ...................

327

1 0 2 .3

1 0 1 .2

1 0 2 .5

1 0 4 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .5

1 0 7 .3

1 0 7 .6

1 1 2 .8

1 11.1

1 05 .1

M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m e t a llic m in e ra l p r o d u c ts ...........

329

9 5 .4

9 4 .0

1 0 4 .3

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .3

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .4

1 1 4 .7

1 1 4 .9

1 1 3 .3

1 1 6 .1

B la s t f u r n a c e a n d b a s ic s te e l p ro d u c ts ........................

3 31

1 0 9 .7

1 0 7 .8

1 1 7 .0

1 3 3 .6

1 4 2 .4

1 4 2 .6

1 4 7 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 1 .0

1 5 5 .6

1 60 .1

332

106.1

1 0 4 .5

1 0 7 .2

112.1

1 1 3 .0

1 1 2 .7

1 1 6 .2

1 2 0 .8

1 21 .1

1 2 8 .9

1 32 .1

333

1 0 2 .3

1 1 0 .7

1 0 1 .9

1 0 7 .9

1 0 5 .3

1 1 1 .0

1 1 0 .8

1 1 2 .0

1 1 8 .9

1 1 7 .7

1 1 1 .9

P rim a ry n o n fe r r o u s m e ta ls .................................................

N o n fe r r o u s r o llin g a n d d r a w in g ........................................

335

9 2 .7

9 1 .0

9 6 .0

9 8 .3

1 0 1 .2

9 9 .2

1 0 4 .0

1 1 1 .3

1 1 5 .7

1 2 1 .4

1 1 8 .0

N o n fe r r o u s f o u n d r ie s ( c a s tin g s ) .......................................

336

1 0 4 .0

1 0 3 .6

1 0 3 .6

1 0 8 .5

112 .1

1 1 7 .8

1 2 2 .3

1 2 7 .0

1 3 1 .5

1 2 9 .8

1 2 9 .7

M is c e lla n e o u s p r im a r y m e ta l p r o d u c ts ........................

339

1 1 3 .7

109.1

1 1 4 .5

1 1 1 .3

1 3 4 .5

1 5 2 .2

1 4 9 .6

1 3 6 .2

1 4 0 .0

1 4 9 .0

1 5 4 .3

M e ta l c a n s a n d s h ip p in g c o n t a in e r s .............................

3 41

1 1 7 .6

1 2 2 .9

1 2 7 .8

1 3 2 .3

1 4 0 .9

1 4 4 .2

1 5 5 .2

1 6 0 .3

1 6 3 .8

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .5

C u tle r y , h a n d to o ls , a n d h a r d w a r e ..................................

342

9 7 .3

9 6 .8

1 00.1

1 0 4 .0

1 0 9 .2

1 1 1 .3

1 1 8 .2

1 1 4 .6

1 1 5 .7

1 2 1 .9

1 2 5 .4

1 2 5 .7

1 3 2 .2
1 1 2 .8

P lu m b in g a n d h e a tin g , e x c e p t e le c t r ic ..........................

343

1 0 2 .6

1 0 2 .0

1 2 7 .3

1 3 0 .5

F a b r ic a te d s tr u c tu r a l m e ta l p r o d u c ts .............................

344

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .9

1 0 4 .8

1 0 7 .7

1 0 5 .8

1 0 6 .5

1 1 1 .9

1 1 2 .7

1 1 2 .8

1 0 8 .7

1 0 8 .5

1 0 9 .3

1 1 3 .6

1 2 0 .2

1 2 5 .9

1 2 8 .3

1 2 9 .8

9 8 .4

1 0 2 .0

109.1

1 0 9 .2

1 1 8 .6

M e ta l f o r g in g s a n d s t a m p in g s ...........................................

346

9 5 .6

9 2 .9

1 0 3 .7

M e ta l s e r v ic e s , n .e .c .............................................................

347

1 0 4 .7

9 9 .4

1 1 1 .6

1 2 0 .6

1 2 3 .0

1 2 7 .7

1 2 8 .4

1 2 4 .4

1 2 7 .3

1 26 .1

1 3 5 .7

O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o rie s , n .e .c ...................................

348

82.1

8 1 .5

8 8 .6

8 4 .6

8 3 .6

8 7 .6

8 7 .5

9 3 .7

9 6 .6

9 1 .0

9 2 .8

M is c e lla n e o u s f a b r ic a t e d m e ta l p r o d u c ts ...................

349

9 7 .5

9 7 .4

1 01 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 3 .2

1 0 6 .6

1 0 8 .3

1 0 7 .7

1 1 1 .6

1 0 9 .3

1 0 9 .2

E n g in e s a n d t u r b i n e s ............................................................

3 51

1 0 6 .5

1 0 5 .8

1 0 3 .3

1 0 9 .2

1 2 2 .3

1 2 2 .7

1 3 6 .6

1 3 6 .9

146 .1

1 5 1 .5

1 6 4 .5

F a r m a n d g a r d e n m a c h in e r y .............................................

352

1 1 6 .5

1 1 2 .9

1 1 3 .9

1 1 8 .6

1 2 5 .0

1 3 4 .7

1 3 7 .2

1 4 1 .2

1 4 8 .5

1 2 8 .6

1 3 9 .6

C o n s t r u c t io n a n d r e la te d m a c h in e r y .............................

353

1 0 7 .0

99.1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 8 .2

1 1 7 .7

1 22 .1

1 2 3 .3

1 3 2 .5

1 3 7 .6

1 3 3 .6

1 3 9 .8

M e ta lw o r k in g m a c h in e r y .....................................................

354

101 .1

9 6 .4

1 0 4 .3

1 0 7 .4

1 0 9 .9

1 1 4 .8

1 1 4 .9

1 1 9 .2

1 1 9 .8

1 2 3 .0

1 2 9 .8

S p e c ia l in d u s t r y m a c h in e r y ................................................

355

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .3

1 0 6 .0

1 1 3 .6

1 2 1 .2

1 3 2 .3

1 3 4 .0

1 3 1 .7

1 2 4 .5

1 3 8 .6

1 7 2 .2

G e n e r a l in d u s t r ia l m a c h in e r y ............................................

356

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .6

1 0 4 .8

1 0 6 .7

1 0 9 .0

1 0 9 .4

1 1 0 .0

1 1 1 .2

1 13.1

1 1 8 .7

C o m p u t e r a n d o ff ic e e q u ip m e n t......................................

357

138 .1

1 4 9 .6

1 9 5 .7

2 5 8 .6

3 2 8 .6

4 6 9 .4

6 8 1 .3

9 6 0 .2

1 3 5 6 .6

1 8 6 2 .5

2 1 7 2 .0

R e fr ig e r a tio n a n d s e r v ic e m a c h in e r y ...........................

358

1 0 3 .6

1 0 0 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 0 8 .6

1 1 0 .7

1 1 2 .7

1 1 4 .7

1 1 5 .0

1 2 1 .4

1 2 4 .0

1 2 2 .3

In d u s tr ia l m a c h in e r y , n .e .c .................................................

359

1 0 7 .3

1 0 9 .0

1 1 7 .0

1 1 8 .5

1 2 7 .4

1 3 8 .8

1 4 1 .4

1 2 9 .3

1 2 7 .5

1 3 5 .8

1 4 1 .8

1 4 8 .9

1 5 5 .4

E le c tr ic d is t r ib u t io n e q u ip m e n t ........................................

361

1 0 6 .3

1 0 6 .5

1 1 9 .6

1 2 2 .2

1 3 1 .8

1 4 3 .0

1 4 3 .9

1 4 2 .8

1 4 7 .5

E le c tr ic a l in d u s t r ia l a p p a r a tu s ..........................................

362

1 0 7 .7

107 .1

1 17 .1

1 3 2 .9

1 3 4 .9

1 5 0 .8

1 5 4 .3

1 6 4 .2

1 6 2 .3

1 5 8 .3

1 5 7 .0

1 2 7 .3

1 2 7 .4

1 4 2 .9

1 5 0 .2

1 4 9 .5

1 6 2 .4

H o u s e h o ld a p p lia n c e s ..........................................................

363

1 0 6 .5

1 1 5 .0

1 2 3 .4

E le c tr ic lig h tin g a n d w ir in g e q u ip m e n t..........................

364

9 9 .9

9 7 .5

1 0 5 .7

1 0 7 .8

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .7

1 1 6 .9

1 2 1 .8

1 2 9 .2

1 3 2 .4

1 3 4 .8

C o m m u n ic a tio n s e q u ip m e n t ..............................................

366

1 2 3 .8

129 .1

1 5 4 .9

1 63.1

1 8 6 .4

2 0 0 .7

2 2 9 .5

2 7 5 .4

2 8 4 .5

3 7 1 .9

4 4 8 .8

E le c tr o n ic c o m p o n e n ts a n d a c c e s s o r ie s .....................

367

1 3 3 .4

1 5 4 .7

1 8 9 .3

2 1 7 .9

2 7 4 .0

4 0 1 .5

5 1 5 .0

6 1 3 .4

7 6 8 .6

1 0 6 2 .6

1 4 4 0 .1

M is c e lla n e o u s e le c tr ic a l e q u ip m e n t & s u p p lie s . ..

369

9 0 .6

9 8 .6

1 0 1 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 1 0 .5

1 14 .1

1 23.1

1 2 8 .3

1 3 5 .3

1 4 7 .2

1 5 6 .0

M o to r v e h ic le s a n d e q u ip m e n t..........................................

3 71

1 0 2 .4

9 6 .6

1 0 4 .2

1 0 6 .2

1 0 8 .8

1 0 6 .7

1 0 7 .2

1 1 6 .3

1 2 5 .2

1 3 6 .7

1 27 .1

A ir c r a f t a n d p a r ts .....................................................................

372

9 8 .9

1 0 8 .2

1 1 2 .3

1 1 5 .2

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .8

113 .1

1 1 4 .7

140 .1

138 .1

1 3 2 .2

S h ip a n d b o a t b u ild in g a n d r e p a ir in g ...........................

373

1 0 3 .7

9 6 .3

1 0 2 .7

1 0 5 .9

1 0 3 .8

98.1

9 9 .3

1 0 5 .5

1 0 2 .5

113 .1

1 2 1 .6

1 0 5 .8

1 3 1 .4

R a ilr o a d e q u ip m e n t ................................................................

374

1 41.1

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .9

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 4 8 .3

1 8 4 .2

189.1

2 1 2 .8

2 1 8 .4

M o to r c y c le s , b ic y c le s , a n d p a r ts .....................................

375

9 3 .8

9 9 .8

1 0 8 .4

1 3 0 .9

1 25 .1

1 2 0 .3

1 2 5 .5

1 2 0 .4

1 2 7 .7

1 2 2 .4

1 1 9 .4

G u id e d m is s ile s , s p a c e v e h ic le s , p a r ts .......................

376

1 1 6 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 9 .4

1 1 4 .9

1 1 6 .9

125 .1

1 3 3 .6

1 3 8 .9

1 56 .1

1 1 3 .3

S e a r c h a n d n a v ig a tio n e q u ip m e n t..................................

381

1 1 2 .7

1 1 8 .9

1 22 .1

129.1

132 .1

1 4 9 .5

1 4 2 .2

1 4 9 .5

1 49.1

1 4 9 .6

1 6 3 .7

M e a s u r in g a n d c o n t r o llin g d e v ic e s ................................

382

1 0 6 .4

1 13 .1

1 1 9 .9

1 2 4 .0

1 3 3 .8

1 4 6 .4

1 5 0 .5

1 4 2 .4

1 4 3 .5

1 5 2 .4

1 5 8 .5

384

1 1 6 .9

1 1 8 .7

1 2 3 .5

1 2 7 .3

1 2 6 .7

1 3 1 .5

1 3 9 .8

1 4 7 .4

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .4

1 6 7 .0

O p h t h a lm ic g o o d s ..................................................................

385

1 2 1 .2

125.1

1 4 4 .5

1 5 7 .8

1 6 0 .6

1 6 7 .2

1 8 8 .2

1 9 6 .3

1 9 9 .0

2 3 5 .2

2 5 0 .2
1 6 9 .4

P h o t o g r a p h ic e q u ip m e n t & s u p p lie s .............................

386

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .2

1 1 6 .4

1 2 6 .9

1 3 2 .7

1 2 9 .5

1 2 8 .7

1 2 1 .5

1 2 8 .0

1 6 0 .6

J e w e lr y , s ilv e r w a r e , a n d p la te d w a r e ...........................

3 91

9 9 .3

9 5 .8

9 6 .7

9 6 .7

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .2

1 0 2 .6

1 1 4 .2

113 .1

1 3 4 .3

1 4 4 .9

M u s ic a l in s t r u m e n t s ..............................................................

393

97.1

9 6 .9

9 6 .0

9 5 .6

8 8 .7

8 6 .9

7 8 .8

8 2 .9

8 1 .4

97.1

1 0 5 .3

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

95

Current Labor Statistics:

Productivity Data

46. Continued - Annual indexes of output per hour for selected 3-digit SIC industries
[1987=100]
Industry

SIC

1990

T o y s a n d s p o r tin g g o o d s .....................................................

394

108 .1

P e n s , p e n c ils , o ffic e , a n d a r t s u p p lie s ..........................

395

1 1 8 .2

Costume jewelry

a n d n o t io n s ...........................................

396

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r e s ...........................................

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

1 0 9 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 1 4 .2

1 0 9 .7

1 1 3 .6

1 1 9 .9

1 2 5 .7

1 3 1 .6

1 2 6 .6

1 4 0 .4

1 1 6 .8

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .6

1 2 9 .9

1 3 5 .2

144 .1

1 2 7 .5

1 3 2 .5

1 2 3 .4

1 2 4 .9

1 0 5 .3

1 0 6 .7

1 1 0 .8

1 1 5 .8

1 2 9 .0

1 4 3 .7

1 4 2 .2

1 1 8 .0

1 3 1 .2

1 3 0 .8

1 4 5 .3

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .7

1 06.1

1 08.1

1 1 2 .8

1 0 9 .4

1 0 8 .5

1 1 4 .9

1 1 5 .9

399

1 0 6 .5

1 0 9 .2

R a ilr o a d tr a n s p o r t a t io n ........................................................

4011

1 1 8 .5

1 2 7 .8

1 3 9 .6

1 4 5 .4

1 5 0 .3

1 5 6 .2

1 6 7 .0

1 6 9 .8

1 7 3 .3

1 8 2 .5

1 9 5 .8

T r u c k in g , e x c e p t l o c a l ' ........................................................

4213

1 11.1

1 1 6 .9

1 2 3 .4

1 2 6 .6

1 2 9 .5

1 2 5 .4

1 3 0 .9

1 3 2 .4

1 2 9 .9

1 3 1 .6

1 3 1 .2

431

1 0 4 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 07 .1

1 0 6 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 0 4 .7

1 0 8 .3

1 0 9 .8

1 1 0 .9

1 1 3 .6

9 2 .9

9 2 .5

9 6 .9

1 0 0 .2

1 0 5 .7

1 0 8 .6

1 11.1

1 1 1 .6

1 0 8 .4

1 09 .1

1 1 0 .7

Transportation

u m t e o s t a te s p o s ta l s e r v ic e

..........................................

A ir t r a n s p o r t a t io n .....................................................................

4 5 1 2 ,1 3 ,2 2 ( p ts .)

Utilities
T e le p h o n e c o m m u n ic a t io n s ...............................................

481

1 1 3 .3

1 1 9 .8

1 2 7 .7

1 3 5 .5

1 4 2 .2

1 48.1

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .9

1 70 .1

1 8 6 .3

2 0 1 .3

R a d io a n d t e le v is io n b r o a d c a s tin g ................................

483

1 0 4 .9

1 06.1

1 0 8 .3

1 0 6 .7

1 10.1

1 0 9 .6

1 0 5 .8

1 0 1 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 0 8 .4

1 0 9 .9

C a b le a n d o th e r p a y T V s e r v ic e s ....................................

484

9 2 .6

8 7 .6

8 8 .5

8 5 .3

8 3 .4

8 4 .5

8 1 .9

8 4 .7

86.1

8 5 .0

8 7 .6

E le c tr ic u t i lit ie s ..................................................................

4 9 1 ,3 (p ts .)

1 10.1

1 1 3 .4

1 1 5 .2

2 4 .1

5 0 .5

8 0 .8

1 1 6 .8

1 5 0 .0

1 5 9 .6

1 6 2 .0

1 6 9 .6

G a s u tilit ie s .......................................................................

4 9 2 ,3 ( p ts .)

1 0 5 .8

1 0 9 .6

111 .1

1 2 1 .8

1 2 5 .6

137 .1

1 4 5 .9

1 5 8 .6

1 4 4 .4

1 4 7 .2

1 6 0 .6

Trade
L u m b e r a n d o th e r b u ild in g m a te r ia ls d e a le r s ...........

5 21

1 0 4 .3

1 0 2 .3

1 0 6 .4

1 1 1 .4

1 1 8 .9

1 1 7 .8

1 2 1 .6

1 2 1 .8

1 3 4 .2

1 4 3 .0

1 4 4 .2

P a in t, g la s s , a n d w a llp a p e r s to r e s ..................................

523

1 0 6 .8

1 0 0 .4

1 0 7 .6

1 1 4 .2

1 2 7 .8

1 3 0 .9

1 3 3 .5

1 3 4 .8

1 6 3 .5

1 65.1

1 70 .1

H a r d w a r e s t o r e s ......................................................................

525

1 1 5 .3

1 0 8 .7

1 1 5 .2

1 1 3 .9

1 2 1 .2

1 1 5 .6

1 1 9 .5

1 1 9 .0

1 3 7 .9

1 4 7 .6

1 4 5 .7

R e ta il n u r s e r ie s , la w n a n d g a r d e n s u p p ly s to r e s ...

526

8 4 .7

8 9 .3

1 0 1 .2

1 07.1

1 1 7 .0

1 1 7 .4

1 3 6 .4

1 2 7 .5

1 3 3 .7

1 5 0 .4

1 5 4 .5

D e p a r tm e n t s t o r e s ..................................................................

531

9 6 .8

1 0 2 .0

1 0 5 .4

1 1 0 .4

1 1 3 .5

1 16.1

1 2 3 .8

1 29.1

1 3 5 .8

1 4 6 .0

1 6 0 .4

V a r ie t y s t o r e s ...........................................................................

533

1 5 4 .6

1 5 9 .0

1 7 3 .9

1 9 1 .9

1 9 7 .9

2 1 2 .4

2 4 0 .4

2 6 0 .1

2 7 1 .2

3 1 5 .0

3 3 0 .9

M is c e lla n e o u s g e n e r a l m e r c h a n d is e s to r e s ..............

539

1 1 8 .6

1 2 4 .8

1 4 0 .4

1 6 4 .3

1 6 4 .8

1 6 7 .4

1 6 7 .7

1 7 0 .4

1 8 5 .9

1 9 9 .6

2 2 4 .3

G r o c e r y s t o r e s ..........................................................................

541

9 6 .6

9 6 .3

9 6 .5

9 6 .0

9 5 .4

9 3 .9

92.1

9 1 .7

9 2 .2

9 5 .3

9 6 .1

M e a t a n d f is h ( s e a fo o d ) m a r k e ts .....................................

542

9 8 .9

9 0 .8

9 9 .2

9 7 .7

9 5 .7

9 4 .4

8 6 .4

9 0 .8

9 5 .7

9 7 .4

1 1 0 .0

R e ta il b a k e r ie s ..........................................................................

546

9 1 .2

9 6 .7

9 6 .5

8 6 .5

8 5 .3

8 3 .0

7 5 .9

6 7 .6

68.1

8 3.1

8 8 .4

N e w a n d u s e d c a r d e a le r s ..................................................

551

1 0 6 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 0 7 .4

1 0 8 .6

1 0 9 .7

1 08.1

1 09.1

1 0 8 .8

1 0 8 .7

1 1 1 .6

1 1 2 .5

A u to a n d h o m e s u p p ly s t o r e s ...........................................

553

1 0 3 .7

1 0 0 .2

1 0 1 .6

1 0 0 .8

1 0 5 .3

1 09.1

1 0 8 .2

108 .1

113 .1

1 1 5 .5

1 1 9 .3

G a s o lin e s e r v ic e s t a t io n s ...................................................

554

1 0 3 .0

1 0 4 .8

1 1 0 .2

1 1 5 .9

1 21 .1

1 2 7 .2

126 .1

126 .1

1 3 3 .9

1 4 1 .7

1 3 9 .0

M e n 's a n d b o y 's w e a r s t o r e s .............................................

561

1 1 5 .6

1 2 1 .9

1 2 2 .3

1 1 9 .5

1 2 1 .7

1 2 1 .4

1 2 9 .8

1 3 6 .3

1 4 5 .2

1 5 4 .5

1 6 5 .0

W o m e n 's c lo t h in g s t o r e s .....................................................

562

1 0 6 .6

1 1 1 .2

1 2 3 .6

1 3 0 .0

1 3 0 .4

1 3 9 .9

1 5 4 .2

1 5 7 .3

1 7 6 .0

1 9 0 .2

2 0 5 .7

F a m ily c lo t h in g s t o r e s ...........................................................

565

1 0 7 .8

1 1 1 .5

1 1 8 .6

1 2 1 .5

1 2 7 .7

1 4 1 .8

1 4 6 .9

1 5 0 .2

1 53.1

1 5 5 .9

1 6 0 .4

S h o e s t o r e s ................................................................................

566

1 0 7 .9

1 0 7 .8

1 1 5 .5

1 1 7 .3

1 3 0 .7

1 3 9 .2

1 5 1 .9

1 4 8 .4

1 4 5 .0

1 5 2 .9

1 6 0 .2

F u r n itu r e a n d h o m e fu r n is h in g s s to r e s ..........................

571

1 0 4 .6

1 0 5 .4

1 1 3 .9

1 1 3 .3

1 1 4 .7

1 1 7 .4

1 2 3 .6

1 2 4 .2

1 2 7 .3

1 3 4 .5

141 .1

H o u s e h o ld a p p lia n c e s t o r e s ..............................................

572

1 0 4 .6

1 0 7 .2

1 16.1

1 1 8 .7

1 2 2 .4

1 3 9 .6

1 4 2 .2

1 5 5 .2

1 8 4 .2

1 8 6 .4

2 0 9 .3

198 .1

2 0 6 .6

2 1 6 .8

2 5 8 .3

3 0 9 .1

3 5 9 .4

1 0 7 .3

R a d io , t e le v is io n , c o m p u te r , a n d m u s ic s to r e s ........

573

1 2 0 .8

1 2 9 .3

1 3 9 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 7 8 .2

E a tin g a n d d r in k in g p la c e s .................................................

5 81

1 0 4 .5

1 0 3 .8

1 0 3 .4

1 0 3 .8

1 02 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 0 .6

1 0 1 .6

1 0 2 .0

1 0 4 .0

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .9

1 11 .1

1 1 3 .9

1 1 9 .8

1 2 5 .7

1 2 9 .8

1 3 6 .9

1 0 4 .7

1 1 3 .8

1 0 9 .9

1 1 6 .5

1 1 4 .5

1 2 7 .7

D ru g a n d p r o p r ie t a r y s t o r e s ..............................................

591

1 0 6 .3

1 0 8 .0

1 0 7 .6

L iq u o r s t o r e s ..............................................................................

592

1 0 5 .9

1 0 6 .9

1 0 9 .6

1 0 1 .8

100 .1

U s e d m e r c h a n d is e s t o r e s ...................................................

593

1 0 3 .0

1 0 2 .3

1 1 5 .7

1 1 6 .7

1 1 9 .5

1 2 0 .6

1 3 2 .6

1 4 0 .3

1 6 3 .6

1 8 3 .2

2 1 6 .7

M is c e lla n e o u s s h o p p in g g o o d s s to r e s ..........................

594

1 0 7 .4

1 0 9 .3

1 0 7 .9

1 1 1 .7

1 1 7 .3

1 2 3 .2

1 2 5 .3

1 2 9 .4

1 3 8 .7

1 4 3 .7

1 5 0 .6

N o n s to r e r e t a ile r s ...................................................................

596

1 11 .1

1 1 2 .5

1 2 6 .5

1 3 2 .2

1 4 9 .0

1 5 2 .5

1 7 3 .5

1 8 6 .8

2 0 8 .3

2 2 0 .6

2 6 3 .2

F u e l d e a le r s ..............................................................................

598

8 4 .6

8 5 .3

8 4 .3

9 1 .9

9 9 .0

1 1 1 .4

1 1 2 .5

1 09.1

1 0 5 .8

1 1 5 .2

1 1 7 .3

R e ta il s to r e s , n .e . c ..................................................................

599

1 1 4 .5

1 0 4 .0

1 1 2 .5

1 18.1

1 2 5 .8

1 2 7 .0

1 4 0 .2

1 4 7 .8

1 5 7 .4

1 6 2 .5

1 68 .1

C o m m e r c ia l b a n k s ..................................................................

602

1 0 7 .7

1 10.1

1 1 1 .0

1 1 8 .5

1 2 1 .7

1 2 6 .4

1 2 9 .7

1 3 3 .0

1 3 2 .6

1 3 5 .9

1 4 3 .2

H o te ls a n d m o t e ls ...................................................................

7 01

9 6 .2

9 9 .3

1 0 8 .0

1 0 6 .5

1 0 9 .9

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .0

1 0 8 .2

1 0 8 .2

1 0 9 .9

1 14 .1

L a u n d r y , c le a n in g , a n d g a r m e n t s e r v ic e s ...................

7 21

1 0 2 .3

9 9 .9

9 9 .3

9 9 .9

1 0 5 .0

1 0 6 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 0 9 .0

1 1 6 .0

1 2 0 .8

1 2 3 .6

P h o t o g r a p h ic s tu d io s , p o r tr a it...........................................

722

9 8 .2

92.1

9 5 .8

1 0 1 .8

1 0 8 .3

1 1 6 .2

1 1 0 .7

1 14 .1

1 2 1 .6

1 0 7 .7

1 1 2 .0

B e a u ty s h o p s ......................................................................

723

9 7 .5

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .9

9 7 .0

101 .1

1 0 4 .8

1 0 7 .6

1 0 8 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 3 .4

1 1 4 .5

1 2 9 .9

Finance and services

B a r b e r s h o p s .............................................................................

724

1 0 0 .7

9 4 .9

1 1 3 .2

1 2 1 .9

1 1 8 .8

1 1 5 .7

1 2 8 .8

1 5 0 .4

1 5 7 .4

1 3 2 .8

F u n e r a l s e r v ic e s a n d c r e m a to r ie s ..................................

726

9 1 .2

8 9 .9

1 0 3 .8

9 8 .7

1 0 4 .3

1 0 0 .2

9 7 .6

1 0 1 .9

1 0 4 .2

1 0 0 .2

9 3 .9

A u to m o tiv e r e p a ir s h o p s ......................................................

753

1 0 7 .9

100 .1

105 .1

1 0 5 .7

1 1 4 .3

1 2 1 .6

116 .1

1 1 7 .2

1 2 4 .9

1 2 6 .4

1 2 8 .5

M o tio n p ic tu r e t h e a te r s ........................................................

783

1 18.1

1 1 8 .2

1 1 4 .8

1 1 3 .8

1 1 0 .4

1 0 5 .0

1 04 .1

1 0 3 .4

1 06.1

1 0 8 .7

1 1 2 .3

neiers to output per employee.
Heters to output per run-time equivalent employee year on riscai Dasis.

96

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

n.e.c. = not elsewhere classified


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

47. Unemployment rates, approximating U.S. concepts, in nine countries, quarterly data
seasonally adjusted
Annual average
Country

2000

2000
I

2001

II

2001
IV

III

I

II

III

IV

U n ite d S ta te s ..........

4 .0

4 .8

4 .0

4 .0

4.1

4 .0

4 .2

4 .5

4 .8

5 .6

C a n a d a ......................

6 .1

6 .4

6 .1

6 .1

6 .1

6 .1

6 .2

6 .3

6 .4

6 .8

6 .3

6 .7

6 .5

6 .4

6 .1

6 .2

6 .5

6 .9

6 .8

6 .8

48
9 .4

5.1
8 .7

4 .8
9 .9

4 .7
9 .5

4 .7
9 .3

4 .8
9 .0

4 .8
8 .6

4 .9
8 .5

5 .2
8 .7

5 .5
8 .9

8 .1

8 .0

8 .3

8 .1

8 .0

7 .8

7 .9

8 .0

8 .0

8 .1

.. . 1,2
Ita ly
........................

1 0 .7

9 .6

1 1 .2

1 0 .9

1 0 .5

1 0 .1

1 0 .0

9 .7

9 .5

9 .3

S w e d e n 1 ...................

5 .8

5 .0

6 .6

6 .0

5 .6

5 .2

5.1

5 .0

5 .0

5.1

United Kingdom1...

5 .5

-

5 .8

5 .5

5 .4

5 .3

5.1

5 .0

5.1

-

F r a n c e 1 .....................

1 P re lim in a ry fo r 2 0 0 1 f o r J a p a n , F ra n c e , G e r m a n y , Ita ly , S w e d e n ,

NOTE:

Q u a rte rly fig u r e s fo r F ra n c e a n d G e r m a n y a re c a lc u la te d
a n n u a l a d ju s tm e n t fa c to rs to

a n d th e re fo r e

s h o u ld

be

For

Comparative Civilian
Labor Force Statistics, Ten Countries, 1959-2001 (Bureau o f L a b o r

2 Q u a r te r ly ra te s a re f o r th e f ir s t m o n th o f th e q u a rte r.

b y a p p ly in g

S e e " N o te s o n th e d a ta " f o r in fo r m a tio n o n b r e a k s in s e r ie s .
fu r th e r q u a lific a tio n s a n d h is to r ic a l d a ta , s e e

a n d th e U n ite d K in g d o m .

v ie w e d

as

le s s

c u r r e n t p u b lis h e d d a ta ,
p re c is e

in d ic a to rs

u n e m p lo y m e n t u n d e r U .S . c o n c e p ts th a n th e a n n u a l fig u re s .

of

S ta tis tic s , M a r. 2 5 , 2 0 0 2 ) , o n th e In te rn e t a t

http://www.bls.gov/fls/home.htm
M o n th ly a n d q u a r te r ly u n e m p lo y m e n t ra te s , u p d a te d m o n th ly , a re
a ls o o n th is s ite .

D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

97

Current Labor Statistics:

International Comparison

48. Annual data: Employment status of the working-age population, approximating U.S. concepts, 10 countries
[Numbers in thousands]______ _______ __________________
Employment status and country

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

1 2 8 ,1 0 5

1 2 9 ,2 0 0

1 3 1 ,0 5 6

1 3 2 ,3 0 4

1 3 3 ,9 4 3

1 3 6 ,2 9 7

1 3 7 ,6 7 3

1 3 9 ,3 6 8

1 4 0 ,8 6 3

1 4 1 ,8 1 5

1 4 ,1 7 7

1 4 ,3 0 8

1 4 ,4 0 0

1 4 ,5 1 7

1 4 ,6 6 9

1 4 ,9 5 8

1 5 ,2 3 7

1 5 ,5 3 6

1 5 ,7 8 9

1 6 ,0 2 7

8 ,5 5 7

8 ,6 1 3

8 ,7 7 1

8 ,9 9 5

9 ,1 1 5

9 ,2 0 4

9 ,3 3 9

9 ,4 6 6

9 ,6 7 8

9 ,8 1 7

J a p a n .....................................................................................

6 5 ,0 4 0

6 5 ,4 7 0

6 5 ,7 8 0

6 5 ,9 9 0

6 6 ,4 5 0

6 7 ,2 0 0

6 7 ,2 4 0

6 7 ,0 9 0

6 6 ,9 9 0

6 6 ,8 7 0

F r a n c e ....................................................................................

2 4 ,5 7 0

2 4 ,6 4 0

2 4 ,7 8 0

2 4 ,8 3 0

2 5 ,0 9 0

2 5 ,2 1 0

2 5 ,5 2 0

2 5 ,8 3 0

2 5 ,9 8 0

_

G e r m a n y ............................................................................................

3 9 ,0 1 0

3 9 ,1 0 0

3 9 ,0 7 0

3 8 ,9 8 0

3 9 ,1 4 0

3 9 ,4 2 0

3 9 ,7 5 0

3 9 ,8 0 0

3 9 ,7 5 0

_

Ita ly ...................................................................................................

2 2 ,9 1 0

2 2 ,5 7 0

2 2 ,4 5 0

2 2 ,4 6 0

2 2 ,5 7 0

2 2 ,6 8 0

2 2 ,9 6 0

2 3 ,1 3 0

2 3 ,3 4 0

6 ,9 5 0

7 ,1 0 0

7 ,1 9 0

7 ,2 6 0

7 ,3 7 0

7 ,5 3 0

7 ,6 9 0

7 ,9 0 0

8 ,0 5 0

2 3 ,5 4 0
_

Civilian labor force
U n ite d S ta te s ..................................................................................
C a n a d a ...............................................................................
A u s tr a lia .....................................................................................

N e th e r la n d s ...................................................................
S w e d e n ............................................................................
U n ite d K in g d o m ..............................................................................

4 ,5 2 0

4 ,4 4 3

4 ,4 1 8

4 ,4 6 0

4 ,4 5 9

4 ,4 1 8

4 ,4 0 2

4 ,4 3 0

4 ,4 8 9

2 8 ,4 1 0

2 8 ,4 3 0

2 8 ,4 4 0

2 8 ,5 6 0

2 8 ,7 2 0

2 8 ,9 1 0

2 9 ,0 4 0

2 9 ,3 0 0

2 9 ,4 5 0

4 ,5 3 7

Participation rate1
U n ite d S ta te s .............................................................................

6 6 .4

6 6 .3

6 6 .6

6 6 .6

6 6 .8

67.1

67.1

C a n a d a ..............................................................................................

6 5 .9

6 5 .5

6 5 .2

6 4 .9

6 4 .7

6 5 .0

6 5 .4

6 5 .8

6 5 .9

6 6 .0

A u s tr a lia ................................................................................

6 3 .9

6 3 .5

6 3 .9

6 4 .6

6 4 .6

6 4 .3

6 4 .3

6 4 .2

6 4 .7

6 4 .7
6 1 .6

67.1

6 7 .2

J a p a n ...................................................................................................

6 3 .4

6 3 .3

63.1

6 2 .9

6 3 .0

6 3 .2

6 2 .8

6 2 .4

6 2 .0

F r a n c e ..............................................................................................

5 5 .9

5 5 .8

5 5 .8

5 5 .6

5 5 .8

5 5 .7

56.1

5 6 .4

5 6 .4

G e r m a n y ............................................................................................

5 8 .2

5 7 .7

5 7 .4

57.1

57.1

5 7 .3

5 7 .7

5 7 .6

5 7 .5

Ita ly ..........................................................................................

4 7 .5

4 7 .9

4 7 .3

47.1

47.1

4 7 .2

4 7 .6

4 7 .8

48.1

N e th e r la n d s ..................................................................................

5 7 .8

5 8 .6

5 9 .0

5 9 .2

5 9 .8

6 0 .8

6 1 .7

6 2 .8

6 3 .5

S w e d e n .....................................................................................

6 5 .7

6 4 .5

6 3 .7

64.1

6 4 .0

6 3 .3

6 2 .8

6 2 .8

6 3 .8

U n ite d K in q d o m ..............................................................................

63.1

6 2 .8

6 2 .7

6 2 .7

6 2 .8

6 2 .9

6 2 .9

6 3 .2

6 3 .3

6 6 .9

_
_
6 4 .2
_

Employed
U n ite d S ta te s ....................................................................................

1 1 8 ,4 9 2

1 2 0 ,2 5 9

1 2 3 ,0 6 0

1 2 4 ,9 0 0

1 2 6 ,7 0 8

1 2 9 ,5 5 8

1 3 1 ,4 6 3

1 3 3 ,4 8 8

1 3 5 ,2 0 8

1 3 5 ,0 7 3

1 2 .6 7 2

1 2 ,7 7 0

1 3 ,0 2 7

1 3,271

1 3 ,3 8 0

1 3 ,7 0 5

1 4 ,0 6 8

1 4 ,4 5 6

1 4 ,8 2 7

1 4 .9 9 7

7 ,6 6 0

7 ,6 9 9

7 ,9 4 2

8 ,2 5 6

8 ,3 6 4

8 ,4 4 4

8 ,6 1 8

8 ,8 0 8

9 ,0 6 8

9 ,1 5 7

J a p a n ......................................................................................

6 3 ,6 2 0

6 3 ,8 1 0

6 3 ,8 6 0

6 3 ,8 9 0

6 4 ,2 0 0

6 4 ,9 0 0

6 4 ,4 5 0

6 3 ,9 2 0

6 3 ,7 9 0

6 3 ,4 7 0

F r a n c e .........................................................................................

2 2 ,0 2 0

2 1 ,7 4 0

2 1 ,7 2 0

2 1 ,9 1 0

2 1 ,9 6 0

2 2 ,0 9 0

2 2 ,5 1 0

2 2 ,9 4 0

2 3 ,5 3 0

_

G e r m a n y ............................................................................................

3 6 ,3 9 0

3 5 ,9 9 0

3 5 ,7 6 0

3 5 ,7 8 0

3 5 ,6 4 0

3 5 ,5 1 0

3 6 ,0 6 0

3 6 ,3 6 0

3 6 ,5 4 0

_
2 1 ,2 8 0

C a n a d a ..........................................................................................
A u s tr a lia ..............................................................................................

2 1 ,2 3 0

2 0 ,2 7 0

1 9 ,9 4 0

1 9 ,8 2 0

1 9 ,9 2 0

1 9 ,9 9 0

2 0 ,2 1 0

2 0 ,4 6 0

2 0 ,8 4 0

N e th e r la n d s ......................................................................................

6 ,5 6 0

6 ,6 3 0

6 ,6 7 0

6 ,7 6 0

6 ,9 0 0

7 ,1 3 0

7 ,3 8 0

7 ,6 4 0

7 ,8 1 0

S w e d e n ...............................................................................................

4 ,2 6 5

4 ,0 2 8

3 ,9 9 2

4 ,0 5 6

4 ,0 1 9

3 ,9 7 3

4 ,0 3 4

4 ,1 1 7

4 ,2 2 9

U n ite d K in g d o m ..............................................................................

2 5 ,5 3 0

2 5 ,4 5 0

2 5 ,7 2 0

2 6 ,0 7 0

2 6 ,3 8 0

2 6 ,8 8 0

2 7 ,2 1 0

2 7 ,5 3 0

2 7 ,8 3 0

_

4 ,3 0 9
_

Employment-population ratio2
U n ite d S ta te s ....................................................................................

6 1 .5

6 1 .7

6 2 .5

6 2 .9

6 3 .2

6 3 .8

64.1

6 4 .3

6 4 .5

6 3 .8

C a n a d a ...............................................................................................

5 8 .9

5 8 .5

5 9 .0

5 9 .4

59.1

5 9 .7

6 0 .4

6 1 .3

62.1

6 1 .9

A u s tr a lia ..............................................................................................

5 7 .2

5 6 .8

5 7 .8

5 9 .2

5 9 .3

5 9 .0

5 9 .3

5 9 .8

6 0 .6

6 0 .3

J a p a n ...................................................................................................

6 2 .0

6 1 .7

6 1 .3

6 0 .9

6 0 .9

6 1 .0

6 0 .2

5 9 .4

5 9 .0

5 8 .4

F r a n c e .................................................................................................

50.1

4 9 .2

4 8 .9

4 9 .0

4 8 .8

4 8 .8

4 9 .5

50.1

51.1

_

G e r m a n y .............................................................................................

5 4 .2

5 3 .2

5 2 .6

5 2 .4

5 2 .0

5 1 .6

5 2 .3

5 2 .6

5 2 .8

_

4 4 .0

4 3 .0

4 2 .0

4 1 .5

4 1 .6

4 1 .6

4 1 .9

4 2 .3

4 2 .9

-

5 4 .5

5 4 .7

5 4 .7

55.1

5 6 .0

5 7 .5

59 2

6 0 .8

6 1 .6

_
6 1 .0

N e th e r la n d s .....................................................................................
S w e d e n ...............................................................................................

6 2 .0

5 8 .5

5 7 .6

5 8 .3

5 7 .7

5 6 .9

5 7 .6

5 8 .4

60.1

U n ite d K in q d o m ..............................................................................

5 6 .7

5 6 .2

5 6 .7

57 2

5 7 .6

5 8 .5

5 8 .9

5 9 .4

5 9 .4

_

Unemployed
U n ite d S ta te s ....................................................................................

9 ,6 1 3

8 ,9 4 0

7 ,9 9 6

7 ,4 0 4

7 ,2 3 6

6 ,7 3 9

6 ,2 1 0

5 ,8 8 0

5 ,6 5 5

6 ,7 4 2

C a n a d a ...............................................................................................

1 ,5 0 5

1 .5 3 9

1 ,3 7 3

1 ,2 4 6

1 ,2 8 9

1 ,2 5 2

1 ,1 6 9

1 ,0 8 0

962

1.031

A u s tr a lia ..............................................................................................

897

914

829

739

751

760

721

658

611

661

J a p a n ...................................................................................................

1 ,4 2 0

1 ,6 6 0

1 ,9 2 0

2 ,1 0 0

2 ,2 5 0

2 ,3 0 0

2 ,7 9 0

3 ,1 7 0

3 ,2 0 0

3 ,4 0 0

F r a n c e .................................................................................................

2 ,5 5 0

2 ,9 0 0

3 ,0 6 0

2 ,9 2 0

3 ,1 3 0

3 ,1 2 0

3 ,0 2 0

2 ,8 9 0

2 ,4 5 0

_

G e r m a n y .............................................................................................

2 ,6 2 0

3 ,1 1 0

3 ,3 2 0

3 ,2 0 0

3 ,5 1 0

3 ,9 1 0

3 ,6 9 0

3 ,4 4 0

3 ,2 1 0

_
2 ,2 7 0

1 ,6 8 0

2 ,3 0 0

2 ,5 1 0

2 ,6 4 0

2 ,6 5 0

2 ,6 9 0

2 ,7 5 0

2 ,6 7 0

2 ,5 0 0

N e th e r la n d s .............................................................................

390

470

520

5 00

470

400

310

270

240

S w e d e n ...............................................................................................

255

415

426

404

440

445

368

313

260

228

U n ite d K in g d o m ..............................................................................

2 ,8 8 0

2 ,9 8 0

2 ,7 2 0

2 ,4 9 0

2 ,3 4 0

2 ,0 3 0

1 ,8 3 0

1 ,7 7 0

1 ,6 2 0

-

_

Unemployment rate
U n ite d S ta te s ....................................................................................

7 .5

6 .9

6 .1

5 .6

5 .4

4 .9

4 .5

4 .2

4 .0

C a n a d a ...............................................................................................

1 0 .6

1 0 .8

9 .5

8 .6

8 .8

8 .4

7 .7

7 .0

6 .1

6 .4

A u s tr a lia ..............................................................................................

1 0 .5

1 0 .6

9 .4

8 .2

8 .2

8 .3

7 .7

7 .0

6 .3

6 .7

J a p a n ..................................................................................................

2 .2

2 .5

2 .9

3 .2

3 .4

3 .4

4.1

4 .7

4 .8

5.1

F r a n c e .................................................................................................

1 0 .4

1 1 .8

1 2.3

1 1 .8

1 2 .5

1 2 .4

1 1 .8

1 1 .2

9 .4

8 .7

G e r m a n y .............................................................................................

6 .7

8 .0

8 .5

8 .2

9 .0

9 .9

9 .3

8 .6

8 .1

8 .0

7 .3

1 0 .2

1 1 .2

1 1 .8

1 1.7

1 1 .9

1 2 .0

1 1 .5

1 0 .7

9 .6

N e th e r la n d s ......................................................................................

5 .6

6 .6

7 .2

6 .9

6 .4

5 .3

4 .0

3 .4

3 .0

S w e d e n ...............................................................................................

5 .6

9 .3

9 .6

9.1

9 .9

1 0 .1

8 .4

7.1

5 .8

U n ite d K in g d o m ..............................................................................

1 0 .1

1 0 .5

9 .6

8 .7

8.1

7 .0

6 .3

6 .0

5 .5

1 L a b o r fo r c e a s a p e r c e n t o f th e w o rk in g -a g e p o p u la tio n .

F o r fu r th e r q u a lific a tio n s a n d h is to ric a l d a ta , s e e

2 E m p lo y m e n t a s a p e r c e n t o f th e w o rk in g -a g e p o p u la tio n .

Statistics, Ten Countries,

N O T E : S e e n o te s o n th e d a ta fo r in fo rm a tio n o n b re a k s in s e rie s .

^ a s h in d ic a te s d a ta a re n o t a v a ila b le .

o n th e In te rn e t a t

98

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

Comparative Civilian Labor Force

1 9 5 9 -2 0 0 1 (B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s , M a r. 2 5 ,2 0 0 2 ),

http://www.bls.gov/fls/home.htm

4 .8

_

5 .0

49. Annual indexes of manufacturing productivity and related measures, 12 countries
[1 9 9 2 = 1 0 0 ]

Item and country

1960

1970

1980

1990

1991

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

Output per hour
U n ite d S ta te s .....................................................................

-

-

70.5

C a n a d a ................................................................................

3 7.8

5 4.9

72.9

J a p a n ....................................................................................

13.8

3 7.5

63.2

96.9
93.4
94.4

97.9

1 0 2 .1

107.3

95.3

105.8

1 1 0 .8

99.0

113.8
112.4

117.0
109.7

1 21.3

1 26 .5

1 35.3

142.9

145 .6

1 13 .5

113.1

116 .0

118.4

116.1

101.7

103.3

1 1 1 .0

116.1

1 2 1 .0

1 2 1 .2

126.9

134.1

128.1

B e lg iu m ...............................................................................

18.0

3 2.9

65.4

96.8

99.1

102.5

D e n m a rk ..............................................................................

2 9.9

52.7

90.4

99.1

99.4

1 0 0 .8

108.4
-

113.2
-

117.0
-

127.0
-

1 29.2
-

1 29.5
-

133.4
-

134.1
-

F ra n c e ..................................................................................

2 2 .0

43.1

6 6 .8

93.8

97.0

1 0 0 .6

108.2

113.9

114.6

1 21.9

1 27 .7

132.7

1 42.5

146 .3

G e rm a n y ..............................................................................

2 9.2

52.0

77.2

99.0

98.3

1 0 1 .8

109.5

1 1 2 .2

113.9

119.4

1 20 .3

120.4

1 27.9

128 .2

Ita ly ........................................................................................

115 .0
-

2 3.6

44.3

74.2

9 5.8

95.9

101.4

104.9

108.0

108.1

1 09 .9

1 1 0 .0

1 09.9

113.0

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

18.5

37.9

6 8 .8

9 8.5

99.6

1 0 1 .6

113.2

118.2

1 2 0 .2

1 22 .3

1 25.0

1 28.5

1 33.8

N o rw a y ................................................................................

37.4

58.8

77.5

9 7.6

98.2

99.6

99.6

100.7

102.5

1 0 2 .0

S w e d e n ...............................................................................

2 7.3

52.2

73.1

94.6

9 5.5

107.3

119.4

121.9

124.5

1 32.3

1 39 .5

149.7

1 58.0

160.4

U n ite d K in g d o m ................................................................

3 0.0

43.2

54.3

8 9.2

93.8

103.9

107.1

104.9

103.8

105.2

1 07.0

1 1 1 .6

1 18.0

119 .8

1 41 .3

9 9 .9

1 03.6

1 04.5

105 .3

Output
-

-

75.8

1 0 1 .6

98.3

103.5

1 1 1 .1

118.4

121.3

1 27.9

133.1

141.2

1 47.0

C a n a d a ................................................................................

33.4

83.6
60.4

99.0

105.9

114.1

119.6

119.6

1 27.7

1 32 .8

141.0

148.8

10.7

58.9
39.2

106.0

J a p a n ....................................................................................

97.1

1 0 2 .0

9 6.3

94.9

9 8 .9

103.0

1 06.5

1 0 0 .2

101.9

1 07.6

99.1

B e lg iu m ...............................................................................

3 0.7

57.6

78.2

1 0 1 .0

100.7

97.0

101.4

104.2

106.6

1 13.8

1 16.4

118.0

1 2 2 .2

1 21 .7

D e n m a rk ..............................................................................

4 0.8

6 8 .0

91.4

1 0 2 .8

101.5

9 5.6

105.6

1 1 1 .6

106.7

115.2

1 15 .7

115.1

1 22.9

126 .7

U n ite d S ta te s .....................................................................

F ra n c e ..................................................................................

143 .9

64.1

88.7

99.1

9 9.8

9 5.7

100.3

104.9

104.6

1 09.7

1 15.0

118.7

124.1

1 26 .3

G e rm a n y ..............................................................................

4 1 .5

70.9

8 5.3

99.1

102.3

92.4

95.1

9 5.2

9 2 .5

9 5 .7

9 7 .2

9 5.8

1 01.7

1 0 1 .8

Ita ly ........................................................................................

2 3.0

48.1

84.4

99.4

9 9.3

31.0

9 6.5

102.4

107.2

105.4

1 08.8

1 10 .7

110.5

1 13.9

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

3 1.5

59.1

76.8

99.9

100.4

98.4

104.6

108.1

108.7

1 11 .5

1 14.8

118.1

123.7

1 14 .6
-

N o rw a y ................................................................................

57.4

90.6

104.4

100.9

99.0

101.7

104.6

107.3

110.3

114 .2

1 13 .7

113.6

1 1 0 .2

1 08 .9

S w e d e n ...............................................................................

4 5.9

80.7

90.7

1 1 0 .1

104.1

101.9

117.1

128.4

131.1

138.0

1 47 .6

157.8

1 68.7

167.4

U n ite d K in g d o m ................................................................

6 7.3

90.2

87.2

105.4

1 0 0 .0

101.4

106.1

107.8

108.5

1 09.9

1 1 0 .8

1 1 1 .1

113.3

110 .7

Total hours
U n ite d S ta te s .....................................................................

92.1

104.4

107.5

100.4

101.4

103.6

104.0

103.6

105 .4

1 05.2

104.4

1 0 2 .8

97.1

C a n a d a ................................................................................

8 8.3

107.1

114.6

113.5

103.9

1 0 0 .1

103.0

106.4

109.0

112 .4

1 17 .5

121.5

1 25.6

123 .9

J a p a n ....................................................................................

77.8

104.4

95.6

102.9

103.1

9 4.7

91.9

89.1

8 8 .7

8 8 .0

8 2 .7

8 0.3

80.2

7 7.4

93.6
-

9 2 .0
-

91.1
-

8 9 .6
-

90.1
-

91.1
-

91.7
-

9 0 .7
-

104.8

B e lg iu m ................................................................................

170.7

174.7

119.7

104.3

101.5

94.7

D e n m a rk ..............................................................................

136.5

129.0

1 0 1 .1

103.7

1 0 2 .1

94.8

132.9

105.6

F ra n c e ..................................................................................

140.8

148.5

G e rm a n y ..............................................................................

142.3

1 36.3

110.5

1 0 0 .1

104.1

90.8

8 6 .8

8 4 .9

8 1.2

80.1

8 0 .7

7 9.6

7 9 .5

7 8 .8

Ita ly ........................................................................................

9 7.6

108.5

113.8

103.7

103.6

95.2

97.6

9 9 .3

9 7 .5

9 9 .0

1 0 0 .6

100.5

100.7

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

170.5

156.1

111.7

101.4

100.9

9 6.8

92.4

9 1 .5

9 0.4

91.1

9 1 .8

9 2.0

9 2 .5

9 9 .7
-

102.9

95.1

92.7

92.1

9 1 .3

9 0 .0

9 0 .0

89.4

87.1

8 6 .3

N o rw a y ................................................................................

153.6

153.9

134.7

103.4

1 0 0 .8

1 0 2 .1

105.0

106.6

107.6

1 1 2 .0

1 13.7

109.6

105.4

103 .4

S w e d e n ................................................................................

168.3

154.7

124.0

116.4

109.0

9 4.9

98.1

105.3

105.3

104 .3

1 05.8

105.4

106.8

1 04 .3

99.1

102.7

104.5

104 .5

1 03.6

9 9.6

96.0

9 2.4

U n ite d K in g d o m ................................................................

2 24 .6

2 08 .8

160.5

118.1

106.6

9 7.6

Compensation per hour
U n ite d S ta te s .....................................................................

14.9

2 3.7

55.6

90.8

95.6

1 02.7

105.6

107.9

109.4

1 11 .5

117.4

1 2 2 .1

131.1

133.1

C a n a d a ................................................................................

1 0 .0

17.1

4 7.6

8 8.3

95.0

1 0 2 .0

103.7

106.0

107.0

109 .3

1 10 .5

112.3

1 13.9

1 17 .8

J a p a n ....................................................................................

4.3

16.4

58.5

9 0.5

96.4

1 0 2 .8

104.9

108.3

109.2

112 .9

1 15.8

115.2

1 14.5

115 .0

B e lg iu m ................................................................................
D e n m a rk ..............................................................................

5.4

13.7

90.1
92.7

9 7.3
9 5.9

104.8
104.6

106.1
-

109.2
-

110.9
-

1 14 .9
-

1 16 .6
-

118.3
-

1 2 1 .1

-

1 25 .9
126 .6

13.3

52.5
4 9.6

F ra n c e ..................................................................................

4.3

10.4

4 0.9

9 0.9

96.4

1 0 2 .6

106.0

1 1 0 .0

1 1 2 .1

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .6

1 16.3

1 2 0 .8

G e rm a n y ..............................................................................

8.1

2 0.7

5 3.6

89.4

9 1.5

106.4

111.7

117.5

122.3

1 24 .7

1 26 .5

1 29.3

1 33.5

137 .7

Ita ly ........................................................................................

1 .8

5.3

30.4

8 7.6

94.2

105.7

106.8

1 11.3

119.0

123 .0

1 2 2 .2

1 24.6

127.8

6.4

2 0 .2

4.6

9 5.3

103.8

1 2 0 .6

124.0

131.0

132 .6
-

N o rw a y ................................................................................

4.7

1 1 .8

39.0

9 2.3

9 7.5

101.5

104.4

109.2

113.6

1 18 .7

1 25.7

1 33.0

140.0

1 47 .6

S w e d e n ................................................................................

4.1

10.7

37.3

87.8

9 5.5

97.4

1 0 0 .0

106.5

114.4

119 .4

1 24.4

129.3

131.8

137.2

U n ite d K in g d o m ................................................................

3.0

6.1

32.1

8 2.9

9 3.8

104.6

106.7

107.9

109.5

1 13 .9

1 20 .5

1 29.6

1 35.2

140.4

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

64.4

90.9

108.2

110.7

113.0

1 15 .8

Unit labor costs: N a tion a l c u rre n c y b asis
U n ite d S ta te s .....................................................................

-

-

78.8

9 3.7

97.6

1 0 0 .6

98.5

9 4 .8

9 3 .5

9 1 .9

9 2 .8

9 0.2

9 1.7

9 1.4

C a n a d a ................................................................................

26.4

31.1

65.2

94.6

99.6

96.4

93.6

9 4 .3

9 7 .5

9 6 .2

9 7 .7

96.8

96.1

101 .5

97.4

1 0 1 .1

101.5

9 4.0

9 3 .3

98.1

102.3

97.9

9 6.4

9 4.7

9 0 .5

9 0 .2

9 1.4

9 0.8

9 3 .9

103.7

96.2

9 6.4

103.7

9 9 .7

1 02.9

105.4

1 0 1 .8

101 .7

J a p a n ....................................................................................

3 1.3

4 3.8

92.5

9 5.9

B e lg iu m ................................................................................

30.1

4 1.7

80.3

93.0

D e n m a rk ..............................................................................

15.4

2 5.2

54.9

93.5

96.5

9 7 .6

9 5 .5

9 0.8

8 5.4

8 9 .8

F ra n c e ..................................................................................

19.4

2 4.0

6 1.3

96.9

9 9.3

101.9

9 7 .8

9 1 .9

8 8 .2

8 7.7

8 4.8

8 6 .5

G e rm a n y ..............................................................................

2 7.8

3 9.8

69.4

90.3

93.1

104.5

1 0 2 .0

104.7

107.4

104.4

105 .2

107.4

104.4

106 .6

Ita ly ........................................................................................

7.5

11.9

4 1.0

9 1.5

98.2

104.3

101.9

103.0

1 1 0 .0

111 .9

1 1 1 .1

113.4

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

3 4.6

5 3.3

9 3.7

92.3

95.6

1 0 2 .1

95.6

9 3 .7

9 4.0

9 4 .7

9 6 .5

9 6.6

97.9

115.4
-

N o rw a y ................................................................................

12.7

2 0 .1

5 0.3

94.6

99.2

101.9

104.8

108.4

1 1 0 .8

116.4

1 25 .7

128.4

134.0

140.1

15.0

2 0 .6

51.0

92.9

1 0 0 .0

90.8

83.8

8 7.4

9 1.9

9 0.2

8 9.2

86.3

8 3.4

8 5 .5

9.8

14.1

59.0

92.9

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .8

99.7

102.9

105.5

108.2

1 12 .7

116.2

1 14.5

117.2

1 0 0 .6

U n ite d K in g d o m ................................................................

97.9

9 6 .6

113.1

Unit labor costs: U.S. d o lla r b a s is
U n ite d S ta te s .....................................................................

-

-

78.8

93.7

97.6

C a n a d a ................................................................................

3 2.9

36.0

67.4

98.0

105.1

90.3

82.8

8 3.0

8 6.4

8 4 .0

7 9 .6

7 8.8

7 8.2

7 9.2

J a p a n ....................................................................................

1 1 .0

15.5

51.8

83.8

91.7

115.4

125.9

131.7

109.6

9 7 .7

9 2.4

1 0 1 .2

100.4

9 3 .6

B e lg iu m ................................................................................

19.4

98.5

9 4 .8

105.2

9 3 .5

9 1 .9

9 2 .8

90.2

91.7

9 1.4

2 7.0

88.3

89.5

9 2.3

95.1

94.2

9 8.4

8 1 .2

7 9 .9

7 7.6

6 6 .8

D e n m a rk ..............................................................................

13.4

2 0 .2

91.0

104.0

108.0

7 3 .7

93.1

93.4

103.5

1 0 1 .2

79.1

91.0
75.4

7 5 .9

94.1

9 1 .0
8 3 .3

9 2 .7

2 3.0

96.5
95.2

91.4

2 1 .0

58.8
76.8

91.2

F ra n c e ..................................................................................

63.2

6 2 .5

G e rm a n y .............................................................................

10.4

17.1

5 9.6

87.3

8 7.5

98.7

98.2

114.2

111.5

9 4 .0

9 3 .3

91.4

76.9

7 6.2

Ita ly ........................................................................................

15.0

2 3.3

59.0

94.1

97.5

81.6

77.9

7 7 .9

8 7.9

8 0.9

7 8 .8

7 6.9

66.4

6 5 .7
-

6 7.0

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

16.1

2 5.9

82.9

8 9.9

9 6.6

92.4

102.7

98.1

8 5 .3

8 5 .5

82.1

N o rw a y ................................................................................

1 1 .1

17.5

63.3

94.0

95.0

89.2

92.3

106.4

106.6

1 0 2 .1

1 03.5

1 0 2 .2

94.5

9 6.8

S w e d e n ................................................................................

16.9

23.1

70.2

9 1.3

96.3

67.8

63.2

7 1 .3

7 9 .8

6 8 .8

6 5 .3

6 0.8

5 3.0

4 8 .2

U n ite d K in g d o m ................................................................

15.6

19.1

77.7

93.9

1 0 0 .1

8 5.6

86.4

9 1 .9

9 3 .2

100.4

1 05.7

106.4

9 8 .3

9 5 .5

89.1

72.1

N O T E : D a ta fo r G e rm a n y fo r ye a rs b e fo re 1991 a re fo r th e fo rm e r W e s t G e rm a n y. D ata fo r 1991 o n w a rd a re fo r u n ifie d G e rm a n y. D ash in d ica te s d a ta n o t availab le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

99

Current Labor Statistics:

50.

Injury and Illness

O ccupational injury and illness rates by industry,1 United States
Industry and type of case2

1989 1 1990

1991

Incidence rates per 100 full-time workers
1992 19934 1994 4 1995 4 1996 4 1997 4 1998 4 1999 4 2000 4

PRIVATE SECTOR
T o ta l c a s e s ................
L o s t w o rk d a y s ..

Agriculture, fore

8.4

8 .9

8 .5

8 .4

8.1

7.4

7.1

6.7

6.3

6.1

4.0

4.1

3.9

3 .9

3 .8

3 .8

3.6

3.4

3.3

3.1

3.0

3.0

7 8 .7

8 4.0

8 6.5

9 3 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8 .6

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s ..

8 .8

y, and fishing

T o ta l c a s e s ...................................

10.9

1 1 .6

1 1 .2

1 0 .0

9.7

8.7

8.4

7.9

7.3

7.1

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s ....................

5.7

5 .9

5.4

5 .4

5.0

4 .7

4.3

3.9

4.1

3.9

3.4

3.6

L o s t w o rk d a y s ...............................

1 00.9

1 1 2 .2

1 08.3

126 .9

-

-

-

-

1 1 .6

1 0 .8

-

Mining
T o ta l c a s e s ...................................................

8 .5

8 .3

7 .4

7 .3

6 .8

6 .3

6 .2

5.4

5.9

4.9

4.4

4.7

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s ......................................

4 .8

5.0

4 .5

4.1

3 .9

3 .9

3.9

3.2

3.7

2.9

2.7

3.0

L o s t w o rk d a y s ................................................

1 37.2

119 .5

1 29.6

2 0 4 .7

-

-

-

-

-

-

Construction
T o ta l c a s e s ...................................................

14.3

14.2

13.1

1 2 .2

1 1 .8

1 0 .6

9.9

9.5

8 .8

8 .6

8.3

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s ......................................

6 .8

6 .7

6.1

5 .8

5 .5

5 .5

4.9

4.5

4.4

4.0

4.2

4.1

L o s t w o rk d a y s ................................................

1 43.3

147 .9

148.1

1 61 .9

-

-

-

-

-

-

13.9

13.4

1 2 .0

1 2 .2

11.5

10.9

9.8

9.0

8.5

8.4

8 .0

7.8

3.7

3.9

3.7

3.9

-

-

-

G e n e ra l b u ild in g c o n tra c to rs :
T o ta l c a s e s ...................................................

13.0

-

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s ......................................

6 .5

6.4

5 .5

5 .4

5.1

5.1

4.4

4.0

L o s t w o rk d a y s ............................................... .

1 37 .3

1 37 .6

132 .0

1 42.7

-

-

-

-

13.8

13.8

1 2 .8

1 2 .1

1 1 .1

1 0 .2

9.9

9.0

8.7

8 .2

7.8

7.6

4.1

3.8

3.7

-

-

H e a v y c o n s tru c tio n , e x c e p t b uildin g :
T o ta l c a s e s ...................................................
L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s ......................................

6 .5

6 .3

6 .0

5 .4

5.1

5.0

4.8

4.3

4.3

L o s t w o rk d a y s ................................................

147.1

1 44 .6

160.1

1 65.8

-

-

-

-

-

S p e c ia l tra d e s c o n tra c to rs :
T o ta l c a s e s ...................................................

13.8

1 2 .8

12.5

1 1 .1

10.4

1 0 .0

9.1

8.9

8 .6

Lost workday cases.............................

6.9

6.9

6 .3

6.1

5 .8

5.8

5.0

4.8

4.7

4.1

4.4

4.3

L o s t w o rk d a y s ................................................

144 .9

14.6

153.1

14.7

151 .3

1 68.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

13.1

13.2

12.7

1 3.5

Manufacturing
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................

12.5

1 2 .1

1 2 .2

1 1 .6

1 0 .6

10.3

9.7

9.2

9.0

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................

5.8

5 .8

5 .6

5 .4

5.3

5 .5

5.3

4.9

4.8

4.7

4 .6

4.5

L o s t w o rk d a y s ..................................................

113 .0

1 20.7

121 .5

1 24.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................

14.1

14.2

13.6

1 3.4

13.1

13.5

1 2 .8

1 1 .6

11.3

10.7

1 0 .1

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................

6 .0

6 .0

5 .7

5 .5

5 .4

5 .7

5.6

5.1

5.1

5.0

4.8

-

L o s t w o rk d a y s ..................................................

116 .5

1 23.3

1 22 .9

1 26.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

D u ra b le g o o d s :

_

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p ro d u c ts :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................

18.4

16.3

15.9

15.7

14.9

14.2

13.5

13.2

13.0

1 2 .1

L o st w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................

9 .4

8 .8

8.3

7 .6

7 .6

7 .7

7.0

6 .8

6.5

6 .8

6.7

6.1

L o st w o rk d a y s ..............................................

1 77 .5

1 72 .5

18.1

1 72.0

16.8

1 65.8

-

-

-

-

F u rn itu re a n d fix tu re s :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................

16.1

16.9

1 5.9

14.8

14.6

15.0

13.9

1 2 .2

L o st w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................

7.2

7 .8

7.2

6 .6

6 .5

7.0

6.4

L o st w o rk d a y s ..............................................

-

-

1 2 .0

11.4

11.5

1 1 .2

5.4

5.8

5.7

5.9

5.9

-

1 28.4

S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................

15.5

15.4

14.8

13.6

13.8

13.2

12.3

12.4

1 1 .8

1 1 .8

10.7

10.4

L o st w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................

7.4

7.3

6 .8

6.1

6.3

6.5

5.7

6 .0

5.7

6 .0

5.4

5.5

L ost w o rk d a y s ..............................................

1 49.8

160 .5

1 56.0

152.2

-

-

-

-

P rim a ry m e ta l In d u s trie s :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................

18.7

19.0

17.7

17.5

17.0

16.8

16.5

15.0

15.0

14.0

12.9

1 2 .6

6.3

6.3

-

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................

8.1

8 .1

7 .4

7.1

7 .3

7 .2

7.2

6 .8

7.2

7.0

L ost w o rk d a y s ..............................................

1 68.3

180 .2

169.1

1 75 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................

18.5

18.7

17.4

-

16.8

16.2

16.4

15.8

14.4

14.2

13.9

1 2 .6

11.9

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................

7.9

7 .9

7.1

6 .6

6 .7

6 .7

6.9

6 .2

6.4

6.5

6 .0

5.5

L ost w o rk d a y s ..............................................

1 47.6

155 .7

1 46.6

144 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

In d u s tria l m a c h in e ry a n d equl|
T o ta l c a s e s .......................

1 2 .1

1 1 .1

1 1 .1

1 1 .6

1 1 .2

9.9

1 0 .0

9.5

8.5

8 .2

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ........

4 .8

4 .7

4 .4

4 .2

4 .2

4 .4

4.4

4.0

4.1

4.0

3.7

3.6

L o st w o rk d a y s ..................

8 6 .8

8 8 .9

8 6 .6

8 7 .7

-

-

-

-

9.1

9.1

8 .6

8.4

8 .3

8 .3

7.6

6 .8

6 .6

3 .6

3.1

E le c tro n ic a n d o th e r e le c tric a l e q u ip m e n t:
T o ta l c a s e s ......................................................

1 2 .0

1 1 .2

-

-

5.9

5.7

5.7

2 .8

2 .8

2.9

"

-

-

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ........................................

3 .9

3 .8

3 .7

3 .6

3 .5

3.3

3.1

L ost w o rk d a y s ...................................................

7 7 .5

7 9.4

83.0

8 1 .2

-

-

-

-

17.7

17.8

18.3

18.7

18.5

19.6

18.6

16.3

15.4

14.6

13.7

13.7

T ra n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t:
T o ta l c a s e s ......................................................
L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ........................................

6 .8

6 .9

7.0

7.1

7.1

7.8

7.9

7.0

6 .6

6 .6

6.4

6.3

L ost w o rk d a y s ...................................................

1 38.6

1 53 .7

166.1

186 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 .6

5 .9

6 .0

5 .9

5 .6

5 .9

5.3

5.1

4.0

4.5

1 .8

2 .2

In s tru m e n ts a n d re la te d p ro du cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ......................................................

4.8

4.0

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ........................................

2 .5

2 .7

2 .7

2 .7

2 .5

2 .7

2.4

2.3

2.3

1.9

L ost w o rk d a y s ...................................................

5 5 .4

5 7 .8

6 4 .4

6 5 .3

-

-

-

-

-

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g Ind u strie s:
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................

10.7

1 0 .0

9 .9

9.1

9.5

8.9

8.1

8.4

7.2

L o st w o rk d a y c a s e s .....................................

5.1

5.1

5.1

5.0

4 .6

4 .5

4.3

4.4

4.2

3.9

4.0

3.6

L o st w o rk d a y s ................................................

9 7 .6

113.1

104.0

108.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 1 .1

S e e fo o tn o te s at e n d o f ta b le .

100

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

May 2003

11.3

-

1 1.3

-

50. Continued—Occupational injury and illness rates by industry,1United States
Incidence rates per 100 workers3
In d u s tr y a n d ty p e o f c a s e
1989 1

1990

1991

1992

1993 4

1994 4

19954

19964

1997 4

1 99 8 4

1999 4

2000 4

N o n d u ra b le g o o d s :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

11 6

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s ......................................................................................
L o s t w o rk d a y s ............................................................................................

11 7

5 .5

5 6

5 ,5

5 3

1 07.8

1 16 .9

1 19.7

1 2 1 .8

Ft n
_

F o o d a n d k in d re d p ro d u c ts :
T o ta l c a s e s .................................................................................................

18.5

2 0 .0

17.6

17.1

16.3

15.0

14.5

13.6

12.7

9 .3

9 9

19.5
9 ,9

18.8

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ..................................................................................

9 5

8.9

9.2

8.7

8 .0

8 .0

7.5

7.3

L ost w o rk d a y s .............................................................................................

1 74.7

2 0 2 .6

2 0 7 .2

2 1 1 .9

T o b a c c o p ro d u c ts :
T o ta l c a s e s .................................................................................................

8.7

L o st w o rk d a y s .............................................................................................

7.7

1 2 .4

5.8

5.3

5.6

6.7

5.9

6 .4

5.5

6 .2

3.2

6 .4
? fi

6 .0

3 4

P4

2.3

2 .4

2 .6

2 .8

2.7

3 .4

2 .2

3.1

6 4 .2

6 2 .3

5 2 .0

4 2 .9

10 3

9.6

m 1

QQ

4.2

4 0

4 4

4 .2

4.1

4.0

4.1

3.6

3.1

3.4

3.2

3 .2

8 1 .4

85.1

8 8 .3

87.1
Q5
3.8

3.9

3.6

3.3

3.1

2 .6

2 .8

3 .0

9.9

9.6

8.5

7.9

7.3

7.1

7.0

6 .5

T e x tile m ill p ro d u c ts :
L o st w o rk d a y c a s e s ..................................................................................

A p p a re l a n d o th e r te x tile p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................

8 6

8J3

9 P

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

3 .8

3 .9

4 .2

4 .0

L ost w o rk d a y s .............................................................................................

80 5

92.1

9 9 .9

104 .6

P a p e r a n d a llie d p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s .................................................................................................

12.7

L ost w o rk d a y s ........................................................................................
P rin tin q a n d p u b lish in q :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

1 2 .1

1 1 .2

1 1 .0

5 8

5.5

5 n

Ft n

1 32.9

1 24.8

1 22.7

1 25 .9

6 .9

6 .7

7 .3

6.9

6.7

6.4

6 .0

5.7

5.4

5.0

5.1

3 .3

3.3

3.2

3.2

3.1

3.0

3.0

2 .8

2 .7

2 .8

2 .6

2 .6

L ost w o rk d a y s .............................................................................................

63 8

6.9

6 9 .8

7 4 .5

7 4 .8

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

7.0

6 .5

6 .4

6 .0

5.9

5.7

5.5

4.8

4.8

4.2

4 .4

4 .2

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

3.2

3.1

3.1

2 .8

2.7

2 .8

2.7

2 .3

2.1

6 3 .4

6 1 .6

6 2 .4

6 4 .2

-

-

-

2 .3
-

2 .2

L o s t w o rk d a y s .............................................................................................

2 .4
-

P e tro le u m a n d co a l p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

6 .6

6 .6

6 .2

5 .9

5.2

4.7

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ....................................................................................

-

-

-

4.8

4.6

4.3

3 .9

4.1

3 .7

L o st w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

3.3

3.1

2 .9

2 .8

2.5

1 .8

1 .8

1.9

7 7 .3

6 8 .2

7 1.2

-

-

2 .5
-

2 .2

6 8 .1

2.3
-

2 .4

L o st w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

-

-

-

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro du cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

16.2

16.2

-

15.1

14.5

13.9

14.0

12.9

12.3

11.9

1 1 .2

1 0 .1

1 0 .7

L o st w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

8 .0

7.8

7.2

6 .8

6.5

6.7

6.5

6.3

5.8

5.8

L o st w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

147.2

151 .3

150 .9

-

5.5
-

5 .8
_

L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

13.6

1 2 .1

L o st w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

6 .5

5 .9

L o st w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

1 30 .4

1 52 .3

1 53 .3

-

-

-

-

-

12.5

1 2 .1

12 .1

1 2 .0

11.4

10.7

1 0 .6

9.8

10.3

9 .0

5 .9

5 .4

5.5

5.3

4.8

4 .3

140 .8

1 28.5

-

-

-

4.5
-

4.5
-

5.0
-

4 .3
-

-

T r a n s p o r ta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilit ie s
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

9.2

9 .6

9.3

9.1

9.5

9.3

9.1

8.7

8 .2

7.3

7.3

_

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

5.3

5 .5

5 .4

5.1

5.4

5.5

5.2

5.1

4 .4

121 .5

1 40.0

1 44 .0

-

-

-

-

4 .8
-

4.3

134.1

-

-

4 .3
-

L o s t w o rk d a y s ..................................................................................................
W h o le s a le a n d re ta il tra d e
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

7.9

_

7 .6

8 .4

8.1

7.9

7.5

6 .8

6.7

6.5

6.1

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

3 .6

3 .5

3 .4

3 .5

3.4

6 5 .6

7 2 .0

3.2
-

2 .9
_

3.0
-

2 .7
_

_

6 3 .5

3.4
-

2 .8

L o s t w o rk d a y s .................................................................................................

5 .8
_

8 .0

80.1

-

_

W h o le s a le tra d e :
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

7 .7

7 .4

7.2

7 .6

7.8

7.7

7.5

6 .6

6.5

6.5

6.3

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

4 .0

3 .7

3 .7

3.6

3.7

L o s t w o rk d a y s ..................................................................................................

7 1 .9

7 1 .5

7 9.2

8 2 .4

-

3.8
-

3.6
-

3.4
-

3.2
_

3.3
_

3 .3
_

8.1

8 .1

7 .7

8 .7

R e ta il tra d e :
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

_

_

8 .2

7.9

7.5

6.9

6 .8

6.5

6.1

_

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

3 .4

3 .4

3.3

3 .4

3.3

6 0 .0

63.2

69.1

7 9.2

-

3.3
-

3.0
-

2 .8

L o s t w o rk d a y s ..................................................................................................

2 .9
-

2 .7
-

2 .5
_

_

T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

2 .0

2 .4

2 .4

2 .9

2.9

2.7

2 .6

2 .4

2.2

.7

1 .8

1.9

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s ......................................................................................

.9

1.1

1.1

1 .2

1.2

1.1

1 .0

17.6

2 7 .3

24.1

3 2 .9

-

-

-

.9
-

.9
-

.5
_

T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

5.5

6 .0

6 .2

7.1

6.7

6.5

6.4

6 .0

2 .7

2.8

5.6

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

2.8

3.0

2 .8

2 .8

2 .8

2 .6

2.5

L o s t w o rk d a y s ..................................................................................................

51.2

6 8 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te

L o s t w o rk d a y s ..................................................................................................

.8

.8

-

_

5.2

4 .9

4 .9

2 .4

2.2

2.2

-

-

Services

1 D a ta fo r 1 98 9 a n d s u b s e q u e n t y e a rs a re b a s e d on th e

ification Manual,

Standard Industrial Class­

198 7 E dition . F o r th is re a so n , th e y a re n o t stric tly c o m p a ra b le w ith d a ta

fo r th e y e a rs 1 9 8 5 -8 8 , w h ich w e re b a s e d on th e

Manual,

5 6 .4

Standard Industrial Classification

1 9 7 2 E d ition , 1 97 7 S u p p le m e n t.

6 0 .0

N = n u m b e r o f in ju rie s a n d illn e s s e s o r lost w o rk d a y s ;
E H - to ta l h o u rs w o rk e d b y all e m p lo y e e s d u rin g th e c a le n d a r y e a r; a n d
2 0 0 ,0 0 0 = b a s e fo r 100 fu ll-tim e e q u iv a le n t w o rk e rs (w o rkin g 4 0 h o u rs p e r w e e k , 5 0
w e e k s p e r ye a r).

2 B e g in n in g w ith th e 199 2 su rv e y , th e a n n u a l su rv e y m e a s u re s o n ly n o n fa ta l in ju rie s a nd

4 B e g in n in g w ith th e 199 3 su rve y, lo st w o rk d a y e s tim a te s w ill not b e g e n e ra te d . A s o f

illn e s s e s , w h ile p a s t s u rv e y s c o v e re d both fa ta l a n d n o n fa ta l in cid e n ts. T o b e tte r a d d re s s

1992, B LS b eg an g e n e ra tin g p e rc e n t d is trib u tio n s a n d th e m e d ia n n u m b e r o f d a y s a w a y

fa ta litie s , a b a s ic e le m e n t o f w o rk p la c e s a fe ty, B LS im p le m e n te d th e C e n s u s o f F atal

fro m w o rk b y in d u s try a n d fo r g ro u p s o f w o rk e rs s u s ta in in g s im ila r w o rk d isab ilitie s .

O c c u p a tio n a l In ju ries.

5 E x c lu d e s fa rm s w ith fe w e r th a n 11 e m p lo y e e s s in c e 1976.

3 T h e in c id e n c e ra te s re p re s e n t th e n u m b e r o f in ju rie s a n d illn e s s e s o r lo st w o rk d a y s p er

100

fu ll-tim e


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w o rk e rs

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X

2 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,

w h e re :

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Monthly Labor Review

May 2003

101

Current Labor Statistics:

Injury and Illness

51. Fatal occupational injuries by event or exposure, 1996-2001
Fatalities
Event or exposure1

1996-2000

20002

Average

Number

20013
Number

Percent

T o t a l..................................................................................................................

6 ,0 9 4

5 ,9 2 0

5 ,9 0 0

incidents.......................................................

2 ,6 0 8

2 ,5 7 3

2 ,5 1 7

43

H ig h w a y in c id e n t ...................................................................................................

1 ,4 0 8

1 ,3 6 5

1 ,4 0 4

24

C o llis io n b e tw e e n v e h ic le s , m o b ile e q u ip m e n t ...................................

685

696

723

12

117

136

142

2

247

243

256

4

151

154

137

2

V e h ic le s tr u c k s t a t io n a r y o b je c t o r e q u ip m e n t....................................

289

279

295

5

N o n c o llis io n in c id e n t ........................................................................................

372

356

339

6

J a c k k n ife d o r o v e r tu r n e d — n o c o llis io n ..............................................

298

304

273

5

T r a n s p o r t a t io n

M o v in g in o p p o s ite d ire c tio n s , o n c o m in g ..........................................

100

N o n h ig h w a y (fa rm , in d u s tria l p re m is e s ) in c id e n t...................................

378

399

324

5

O v e r tu r n e d ............................................................................................................

212

213

157

3
4

263

280

247

W o r k e r s t r u c k b y a v e h ic le ................................................................................

376

370

383

6

W a te r v e h ic le in c id e n t .........................................................................................

105

84

90

2

71

71

62

1

Assaults and violent acts......................................................

1 ,0 1 5

930

902

15

H o m ic id e s .................................................................................................................

766

677

639

11

S h o o tin g ................................................................................................................

617

533

505

9

S t a b b in g ................................................................................................................

68

66

58

1

O th e r , in c lu d in g b o m b in g .............................................................................

80

78

76

1

S e lf- in flic te d in ju r ie s .............................................................................................

216

221

228

4
16

1 005

1 006

Q6?

S tr u c k b y o b je c t ......................................................................................................

567

571

553

9

S tr u c k b y f a llin g o b je c t....................................................................................

364

357

343

6

S tr u c k b y f ly in g o b je c t.....................................................................................

57

61

60

1

C a u g h t in o r c o m p r e s s e d b y e q u ip m e n t o r o b je c ts .............................

293

294

266

5

C a u g h t in r u n n in g e q u ip m e n t o r m a c h in e r y .........................................

157

157

144

2

128

123

122

2

714

734

808

14

636

659

698

12

106

110

122

2

153

150

159

3

90

85

91

2

Falls............................................................................................................
F a ll f r o m la d d e r ..................................................................................................

F a ll f r o m s c a ffo ld , s t a g in g ............................................................................
F a ll o n s a m e le v e l.................................................................................................

55

56

84

1

Exposure to harmful substances or environments.....................

535

4 81

499

8

C o n t a c t w it h e le c t r ic c u r r e n t.............................................................................

290

256

285

5

C o n t a c t w it h o v e r h e a d p o w e r lin e s ..........................................................

132

128

124

2

C o n t a c t w it h te m p e r a t u r e e x tr e m e s .............................................................

40

29

35

1

E x p o s u r e t o c a u s tic , n o x io u s , o r a lle rg e n ic s u b s ta n c e s ....................

112

100

96

2

57

48

49

1

O x y g e n d e f ic ie n c y .................................................................................................

92

94

83

1

73

75

59

1

Fires and exp lo sio n s...........................................................................

196

177

188

3

Other events or exposures4................................................................

20

19

24

'

B ased

on

th e

1992

BLS O c c u p a tio n a l

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and

Illn e s s

C la s s if ic a t io n S tr u c t u r e s .

3

T o ta l e x c lu d e s

2 T h e BLS n e w s r e le a s e is s u e d A u g . 1 4 , 2 0 0 1 , re p o rte d a to ta l

o f 5 ,9 1 5 fa ta l w o r k In ju r ie s fo r c a le n d a r y e a r 2 0 0 0 .

S in c e th e n ,

w o rk -r e la te d

fa ta litie s

r e s u ltin g fro m

4 In c lu d e s th e c a te g o r y " B o d ily re a c tio n a n d e x e r tio n ."

N0TE:

a n a d d itio n a l fiv e jo b - r e la te d fa ta litie s w e re Id e n tifie d , b rin g in g

n° t

th e t o ta l jo b - r e la t e d fa t a lit y c o u n t fo r 2 0 0 0 to 5 ,9 2 0 .

because

102
Monthly Labor Review

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2 ,8 8 6

e v e n ts o f S e p te m b e r 11.

May 2003

T o ta ls

show n
of

fo r m a jo r c a te g o r ie s

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ro u n d in g .

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D ash

in d ic a te s

m ay
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not
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to

to ta ls

p e rc e n t.

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E m p lo y m en t a n d u n em p lo y m en t

Employment, hours, and earnings:
National
State and local
Labor force statistics:
National
Local
Ul-covered employment, wages
Occupational employment
Mass layoffs
Longitudinal data
P r ic e s a n d liv in g c o n d itio n s

Consumer price indexes
Producer price indexes)
Import and export price indexes
Consumer expenditures
C o m p e n sa tio n a n d w o r k in g c o n d itio n s

National Compensation Survey:
Employee benefits
Employment cost trends
Occupational compensation
Occupational illnesses, injuries
Fatal occupational injuries
Collective bargaining
P r o d u ctiv ity

Labor
Industry
Multifactor
P r o je c tio n s

Employment
Occupation
In te r n a tio n a l
R e g io n a l c e n te r s

Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Kansas City
New York
Philadelphia
San Francisco
O t h e r F e d e r a l s ta tis tic a l a g e n c ie s


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Schedule of release dates for BLS statistical series
Series

Release
date

Period
covered

Release
date

Period
covered

Productivity and costs

May 1

1st quarter

June 4

1st quarter

Employment situation

May 2

April

June 6

May

July 3

June

1; 4-24

U.S. Import and Export
»Price Indexes

May 14

April

June 12

May

July 10

June

38-42

Producer Price Indexes

May 15

April

June 13

May

July 11

June

2; 35-37

Consumer Price indexes

May 16

April

June 17

May

July 16

June

2; 32-34

Real earnings

May 16

April

June 17

May

July 16

June

14-16, 24

July 31

2nd quarter

Employment Cost Indexes


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Release
date

Period
covered

MLR table
number
2; 43-46

1-3; 25-28