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J u ly 2 0 0 3

U.S. D epartm ent of L abor


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REGULAR UNLEADED

U.S. Department of Labor
Elaine L. Chao, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Kathleen P. Utgoff, Commissioner
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MONTHLY LABOR

REVIEW_
Volume 126, Number 7
July 2003

Consumer gasoline prices: an empirical investigation

3

Historical and empirical evidence indicates that price changes
for consumer gasoline is driven by changes in supply and not demand changes
Jonathan Weinhagen

The effects of firm size on wages in Colorado: a case study

li

The Colorado Job Vacancy Surveys provide data that can be used
to examine the effects of firm size on various job vacancies characteristics
Paul Paez

Labor contract negotiations in the airline industry

18

About half of the negotiations in this industry end up in Federal mediation;
the duration of the talks is not attributable to economic conditions
Andrew von Nordenflycht and Thomas A. Kochan

Departments
Labor month in review
Précis
Book reviews
Current labor statistics

2

33

Editor-in-Chief: Deborah P. Klein • Executive Editor: Richard M. Devens • Managing Editor: Anna Huffman Hill • Editors: Brian
I. Baker, Richard Hamilton, Leslie Brown Joyner • Book Reviews: Richard Hamilton • Design and Layout: Catherine D. Bowman,
Edith W. Peters • Contributors: Mary Ellen Ayres, Richard M. Devens


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Labor Month in Review

The J u ly

Review

A ccording to the American Automobile
Association, 37.4 million people expect
to travel 50 miles or more from home the
Fourth o f July weekend— 32.6 million o f
them by m otor vehicle. G iven the
Department o f Transportation’s estimate
that the total fleet o f passenger cars and
light trucks gets an average o f just under
25 miles per gallon, we can set a lower
bound o f about 130 million gallons o f
g a so lin e b ein g so ld to p o w er one
holiday w eekend’s worth o f highway
travel. Thus, Jonathan W einhagen’s
article on gasoline prices is a particularly
timely lead for this m onth’s Review.
Weinhagen develops both historical
and econometric evidence to conclude
price changes o f inputs to gasoline at
the pump significantly affect the CPI for
gasoline, but changes in aggregate
demand have only a marginal impact on
re ta il g aso lin e p ric e s. T hus, says
W einhagen, “ ... the m ajority o f the
forecast variance in consumer gasoline
prices can be explained by price shocks
to inputs, as opposed to shocks to
demand.”
Paul Paez explores a very detailed set
o f local data from the Front Range o f
Colorado to look at the impact o f the
size o f the firm on wages. As has been
the case in other studies o f firm size and
wages, Paez finds that the wage premium
in large firms is statistically significant.
He also finds that the effect o f firm size
on entry-level wages may be smaller
than other characteristics o f the vacancy
being filled. Some o f these character­
istics include experience and education
re q u ire d and th e o c c u p a tio n and
industry o f the job.
A n d re w v o n N o rd e n fly c h t and
Thomas A. Kochan summarize the way
labor negotiations are conducted in the
airline industry. They have found that
the average length o f negotiations, once
started, is about 16 months but there is
wide variation. The minimum is a bit


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July 2003

less than a month; the maximum is more
than 4 years. Much o f the variation,
they add, is due to the particular parties
to the negotiations rather than to the
regulatory regime or economic con­
ditions.

study o f local earnings and how they
vary” by Alan Lacey and Olivia Crosby,

O ccupational O utlook Q uarterly,
spring 2003.
T h e h ig h s c h o o l c l a s s o f

2002
L o c a t io n a n d w a g e s
H ow m uch are earnings w ithin an
occupation affected by location? For the
most part, it seems, not very much. The
local w age decile o f an occupation
exactly m atched its national ranking
about 35 percent o f the time. About 70
percent o f the time, local and national
ranks were within a single decile o f each
other.
Relative earnings were especially
uniform in occupations with very high
or very low earnings. For exam ple,
engineering m anagers m atched their
high national earnings rank in 99.7
percent o f locations studied while dining
room and cafe te ria atten d an ts and
bartender helpers were in the same low
rank in 98.7 percent o f locations.
O th e r o c c u p a tio n s w ith v ery
consistent relative wages were chief
executives, w hich m atched in 99.5
percent o f locations studied; combined
food preparation and serving workers,
98.2 percent; pharmacists, 97.9 percent;
n u c le a r e n g in e e rs, 97.1 p e rc e n t;
dishw ashers, 96.9 percent; cashiers,
except gaming, 96.7 percent; waiters and
waitresses, 96.7 percent; and fast food
cooks and counter attendants (cafeteria,
food concession, and coffee shop), both
94.4 percent.
To o b tain these fin d in g s, o ccu ­
pations were ranked by decile for the
Nation as a whole and for approximately
390 lo c atio n s— the to p -earn in g 10
percent o f occupations were in the first
decile and the lowest earning 10 percent
were in the tenth decile. The occupa­
tions’ local decile ranks were compared
to their national decile ranks. Find out
more in “Whereabouts and wealth: A

Am ong the 2.8 m illion high school
graduates in 2002, 1.8 million (65.2
percent) were enrolled in college the
following October. The college enroll­
ment rate ofyoung women (68.4 percent)
exceeded that for young m en (62.1
percent). The percentage o f women
attending college following high school
graduation has exceeded that o f men in
almost every year since 1988. White
graduates continued to enroll in college
in greater proportions (66.7 percent) than
either black (58.7 percent) or Hispanic
graduates (53.5 percent). Additional
information is available from “College
Enrollment and Work Activity o f 2002
High School Graduates,” news release
USDL 03-330.

E d u c a t io n a n d th e w o rk in g
poor
The incidence o f living in poverty
greatly diminishes as workers achieve
higher levels o f education. In 2001, only
1.5 percent o f college graduates were
counted among the working poor. This
compared with 2.6 percent o f workers
with associate degrees, 4.4 percent o f
those with some college but no degree,
5.8 percent o f high school graduates
with no college, and 13.1 percent o f high
school dropouts.
At all educational attainment levels
other than college graduate, women were
more likely than men to be among the
w o rk in g p o o r. A t all e d u c a tio n a l
attainment levels, blacks were more likely
to be among the working poor than were
whites. For more information see BLS
Report 968, A Profile o f the Working
Poor, 2001.
□

Consumer Gasoline Prices
•i

Consum er gasoline prices:
an em pirical investigation
A structural vector autoregression model
indicates that price changes fo r consumer gasoline
have been driven by changes in supply
rather than changes in demand
Jonathan W einhagen

Jonathan Weinhagen
is an economist in the
Office of Prices and
Living Conditions,
Bureau of Labor
Statistics. The views
expressed in this
article are those of
the author and do
not necessarily reflect
those of the Bureau of
Labor Statistics or the
Department of Labor.

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ccording to the BLS Consumer Expendi­ petroleum and gasoline, the Consum er Price
ture Survey, the average consumer spent Index (CPI) for gasoline, the quantity o f gasoline
approximately $1,300 on gasoline and consum ed dom estically, and the in d u strial
motor oil in 2000, an increase of 22.4 percent over production index. The final section o f the article
the 1999 figure. Over the same period, the average presents its conclusion.
price o f gasoline increased 36.3 percent,1indicating
that price changes within the gasoline market can H istorical e v id e n c e
substantially affect consumers’ expenses. Con­
ventional reasoning suggests that the high level of The impact o f supply shocks on prices at various
volatility for gasoline prices is the result of supply stages o f processing within the gasoline market
forces, as the price of crude petroleum changes rapidly can be analyzed by visually examining historical
due to production decisions of the Organization of price movements for crude petroleum, producer
Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) nations. gasoline, and consumer gasoline. The actions o f
However, shifts in demand also can cause variations the OPEC cartel enable petroleum-based supply
in gasoline prices. The purpose of this article is to shocks to be easily identified and their effects
examine the nature o f price changes for consumer on prices throughout the gasoline market to be
gasoline, using econometric techniques as well as examined. The analysis begins with a historical
historical evidence.
overview o f OPEC.
The second section o f the article analyzes the
impact o f crude-oil supply shocks on prices at O PE C ’s h is to r y . OPEC w as e sta b lis h e d in
various stages o f gasoline production by visually September 1960 at the Baghdad Conference.
exam ining those price changes for crude oil, Initially, the cartel included Iran, Iraq, Kuwait,
producer gasoline, and consumer gasoline which Saudi Arabia, and Venezuela. By the end o f 1971,
occurred subsequent to interruptions in the supply Qatar, Indonesia, Libya, the United Arab Emirates,
o f crude petroleum. The major supply shocks and Nigeria had joined the organization. From
considered are the Yom Kippur War, the Iranian OPEC’s inception until the early 1970s, the cartel
Revolution, the Iran-Iraq War, the Persian G ulf was unable to exert any significant control over
crude-petroleum prices. Prices for crude pe­
War, and a 1999 OPEC production cut.
The article’s third section constructs a structural troleum remained relatively stable in nominal
simultaneous-equations model of the market for terms at around $3.00 per barrel from 1958 to 1970
consumer gasoline to determine the effects of and fell in real terms over the same period.2
During the 1970s, OPEC’s ability to influence
changes in supply and demand on the price of
gasoline. The model developed is a five-variable crude-petroleum prices increased substantially
structural vector autoregression constructed from due to rising demand for petroleum products3
the Producer Price Indexes (PPl’s) for crude and the strength the organization gained from

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Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

3

Consumer Gasoline Prices

the addition o f new members. OPEC’s increasing pow er in the
petroleum market becom es apparent from the effects its supply
decisions have had on petroleum prices since the 1970s.
OPEC su p p ly sh ocks. Chart 1 displays the PPI’s for crude
petroleum and gasoline and the CPI for gasoline. For a simplified
comparison, the three indexes were rebased to March 1973 = 100.
The first major interruption in OPEC’s petroleum supply resulted
from an oil embargo launched in connection with the Yom Kippur
War. As a result, U.S. imports o f crude petroleum fell by
approximately 30 percent while the embargo was in place.4 The
drastic reduction in the supply o f crude petroleum caused
domestic prices to rise 67 percent from October 1973 to the end
o f 1974. Over the same period, domestic prices for wholesale and
consumer gasoline increased 67 and 32 percent, respectively,
indicating a strong pass-through relationship between crudepetroleum prices and gasoline prices. (See chart 1.)
The second crude-petroleum supply shock took place at the
time o f the Iranian revolution, in conjunction with the Iran-Iraq
War. The shock began as a result o f panic in the world oil market
caused by the revolution. The situation worsened when Iran
prohibited oil exports to U.S. firms after the U.S. administration
froze Iranian assets in the United States.5The war between Iran

Chart 1.

N o t e : All

and Iraq exacerbated the crisis, and Iran’s oil production declined
3.9 million barrels a day from 1978 to 1981. Furthermore, the war
caused other Persian G u lf countries to reduce their oil
production. By 1981, OPEC’s oil production fell 7 million barrels
per day, decreasing world oil production by 11.6 percent from its
1978 average.6From November 1978 to October 1981, the price
of crude petroleum rose 172 percent. Increasing prices were
passed forward through the chain o f production, with prices for
wholesale and consumer gasoline rising 150 and 103 percent, re­
spectively, over the same period. (See chart 1.)
The third crude-oil interruption occurred in 1990 as
tensions between Iraq and Kuwait rose. On July 17, 1990,
Iraq accused Kuwait o f overproducing oil and o f stealing oil
from the Iraqi Rumaila oil fields. Iraq invaded Kuwait on
August 2, 1990, and the ensuing G ulf War resulted in a
reduction o f about 4.3 million barrels o f oil per day from Iraq
and Kuwait. This decrease in the oil supply caused world
production to decline by approximately 7.2 percent from its
average 1989 level. However, non-OPEC countries in Central
America, Western Europe, and the Far East, as well as the
United States, supplemented OPEC production to offset some
o f the losses.7 Chart 1 shows that crude-petroleum prices
rose 155 percent between July 1990 and October 1990. Over

Historical price movements and supply shocks, 1973-2001

year labels are for January.


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July 2003

the same period, domestic prices o f gasoline at the wholesale
and consumer levels increased by 45 percent and 26 percent,
respectively, to reflect skyrocketing input costs.
The fourth significant crude-petroleum supply shock took
place in 1999, after OPEC reduced its production o f oil by 1.7
million barrels per day, representing a 2.5-percent decline in world
oil production.8 In addition, U.S oil production decreased
approximately 6 percent from 1998 to 1999.9 Crude-petroleum
prices soared 277 percent from February 1999 to November 2000
in response to drastically reduced supplies. Gasoline prices at
the wholesale and consumer levels rose 114 and 55 percent,
respectively, due to increasing crude-petroleum input prices.
An examination o f historical price movements for crude
petroleum, wholesale gasoline, and consumer gasoline indicates
that the production decisions o f OPEC nations have con­
siderable effects on prices within the gasoline market at all stages
o f production. The historical price trends also suggest that price
volatility resulting from supply shocks diminishes at pro­
gressively more advanced stages o f processing. In three out of
four instances, supply shocks increased prices for crude
petroleum more than they did wholesale gasoline prices, and in
all four instances crude-petroleum prices rose more than
consumer gasoline prices.
M o d e l of g a s o lin e p ric e m o v e m e n ts
To examine the source o f variations in consumer gasoline prices
more rigorously, a five-variable structural vector autoregression
model o f supply and demand within the gasoline market is
presented. Vector autoregressions are an econometric tool used
to study systems o f interrelated time series in which all variables
in a system are expressed as a linear function o f the lagged
values o f every variable in the system.10 A structural vector
autoregression model is developed by imposing theoretically
plausible contemporaneous restrictions on the error terms of
the unrestricted vector autoregression.

U nrestricted vector autoregression. A fiv e-v ariab le
unrestricted vector autoregression model was constructed
with 1974-2001 monthly data o f the PPl’s for crude petroleum
and gasoline, the CPI for gasoline, the quantity o f domesti­
cally consumed gasoline, and the industrial production index.
The PPl’s for crude petroleum and gasoline were included in
the model as supply variables, because both are m ajor inputs
into the production o f consumer gasoline. To account for
shifts in demand, the industrial production index, a major
determinant o f gasoline demand, was included in the model.
All data are seasonally adjusted and were transformed into
percentage growth form by taking the first differences of the
natural logarithms o f the data. Converting data to percentage
growth form usually induces stationarity, indicating that the
mean, variance, and covariance o f the time series are independent


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of time. Estimation of vector autoregressions with nonstationary
data is problematic, because tests used to estimate the significance
of the regressions’ coefficients will not be valid.11Accordingly,
to test for stationarity, the augmented Dickey-Fuller test was
applied to the variables in percentage growth form; this is a onetailed test o f the null hypothesis that the time series is not
stationary. A large negative test statistic rejects the null
hypothesis and implies that the time series is stationary.12 As
the following tabulation shows, the tests suggested that, at the
significance level of/? = 0.01, all five time series were stationary
when they were expressed in percentage growth form:
Augmented
Dickey-Fuller
statistic

Variable

Crude petroleum ................................................................
for g asolin e....................................................................
CPI for gasolin e...................................................................
Quantity o f g a so lin e.........................................................
Industrial production........................................................

ppi

-8 .8 7
-5 .0 2
-5 .2 2
-4.71
-5 .9 7

The Akaike, Schwarz, and Hannan-Quinn information criteria
were implemented to compare the performance o f the vector
autoregression model with various lag length specifications. The
Schwarz and Hannan-Quinn criteria indicated that a vector
autoregression whose equations have two lags is optimal, while
the Akaike criterion suggested a three-lag regression. The twolag specification suggested by the Schwarz and Hannan-Quinn
criterion was chosen, and the unrestricted vector autoregression
was estimated by using ordinary least squares.

Structural vector autoregression.

Innovations within a vector
autoregression are generally contemporaneously correlated with
each other: a random innovation to one variable often occurs
simultaneously with innovations to other variables in the
system.13To recover the contemporaneous relationships among
the vector autoregression’s innovations, allowing for econo­
mically meaningful conclusions, it is necessary to orthogonalize
the residuals from the unrestricted vector autoregression. The
conventional method o f orthogonalization is based on the
Cholesky decomposition, which assumes that the residuals have
a recursive structure.14 However, this approach is often not
supported by economic theory and leads to a series o f orthog­
onal shocks that have no particular meaning. Alternatively, the
structural impulses can be obtained by imposing theoretically
plausible restrictions on the vector autoregression’s residuals.15
The latter o f these two approaches is taken in this article.
The estimated variance-covariance m atrix o f the unre­
stricted vector autoregression’s residuals contains n{n + l)/2
distinct elements. Recovering the structural disturbances
requires the estimation o f an n * n matrix o f parameters.
Therefore, n2-n ( n + l)/2 = n(n - l)/2 additional restrictions
are required to recover the structural disturbances. These

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

5

Consumer Gasoline Prices

additional restrictions can be obtained by letting the co­
efficients o f the structural parameters vanish. Consequently, in
the case o f the five-variable vector autoregression model that
was constructed, identification o f the structural disturbances
requires at least 10 restrictions.
The following structural specification o f the contempo­
raneous interactions am ong the vector autoregression’s
innovations was estimated:
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)

PCP = Pi QIP + uù
PPG - p2PCP + U2,
PCG = p3PCP + p4PPG + w3;
PCG = -PsQ C G + p6QIP + m4;
QIP = u5.

In the preceding equations, PCP, PPQ PCG, QCQ and QIP refer
to the innovations in, respectively, the PPI for crude petroleum,
the PPI for gasoline, the CPI for gasoline, the quantity o f gasoline
consum ed, and the quantity o f industrial production, as
estimated by the unrestricted vector autoregression. The u 's are
uncorrelated error terms. For symmetry purposes, the fourth
equation is normalized to the price o f consumer gasoline.
In all o f the equations, all o f the coefficients are positive, with

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July 2003

the exception o f the coefficient o f QCG . The structure o f the
contemporaneous relationships in the system is derived by
assuming a horizontal supply curve and a downward-sloping
demand curve in the market for consumer gasoline. Under this
framework, shifts in the supply curve affect price and quantity,
whereas shifts in the demand curve change only quantity. The
error terms uv u2, and w3represent supply shocks, u4is a demand
shock, and u5is a simultaneous shock to supply and demand.
Given the assumptions about the slopes of the demand and supply
curves, the following relationships hold: ( 1) crude-petroleum prices
vary as a result of innovations in industrial production, reflecting
shifts in demand due to changes in the level o f production; (2)
producer gasoline prices are affected by innovations to crude
petroleum, which is a major material input to the production of
producer gasoline; (3) consumer gasoline prices vary with
innovations to crude petroleum and producer gasoline, both of
which are inputs to the production o f consumer gasoline; (4)
consumer gasoline prices are affected by innovations to both
the quantities of gasoline consumed and industrial production;
and (5) the quantity o f industrial production is exogenous to the
system and is not affected by innovations to any variables.
To illustrate how shocks to demand and supply affect
consumer gasoline market equilibrium, chart 2 shows the effects

of a shock to u5 (industrial production) on the equilibrium
price and quantity o f consumer gasoline. A shock to industrial
production causes individuals to desire more gasoline and
shifts the demand curve from D0 to Dv In turn, the supply
curve shifts from SQto S,, reflecting increased production
costs as input prices are driven up by the change in industrial
production. The effect on price is positive and results from
the shifting supply curve. The effect on quantity is am ­
biguous and depends on the relative size of shifts in the
demand and supply curves. In the chart, it is clearly seen that
the positive effect on quantity resulting from the shift in
demand outweighs the negative effect on quantity from the
shift in supply.
The results of the estimation of the structural coefficients
are as follows, w here(1) indicates significance at the level of p
= 0 .1 ,(2) indicates significance at the level of p = 0.05, a n d (3)
indicates significance at the level of p = 0.0001:
PCP = 0.36QIP + uy;
PPG = 0.38PCI*3) + w2;
PCG = 0.014PC P+ 0.42PPG(3) + w3;
P C G = -12.5QCG(2) + 3.13QIP(1) + u4;
QIP = u5.
The signs of the estimated coefficients are as anticipated.
Innovations to crude petroleum are positively affected by
shocks to industrial production. Innovations to producer
gasoline prices are positively correlated with crude-petroleum
innovations. Shocks to the cpi for gasoline are positively
affected by innovations to crude petroleum and to the ppi for
gasoline. Innovations to the CPI for gasoline are negatively
correlated with shocks to the quantity of consumer gasoline
and are positively correlated with industrial production
shocks.
The system of structural disturbances is overidentified,
because estimation required only 10 restrictions, whereas 14
were provided. The overidentification of the system allowed
the likelihood ratio (l r ) test for overidentification to be
applied. The l r test is a test of the validity of the system ’s
restrictions, where the null hypothesis is that the identifying
restrictions are valid. A p-value of 0.01 or 0.05 is required to
reject the null hypothesis. The test’s chi-square statistic and
p-value were 4.24 and 0.37, respectively. Therefore, the null
hypothesis was not rejected, and the restrictions were found
to be valid.
Accumulated impulse response functions were constructed
from the vector autoregression’s coefficients with the use of the
orthogonalized set of residuals. Impulse response functions
measure the effect of a one-standard-deviation innovation of a
variable on current and future values of the other variables in a
system of equations.16 Standard error bands demonstrating the
statistical significance of the impulse response functions also


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were constructed, using analytical methods. The impulse
response function is statistically significant when both standard
error bands either are above zero or are below zero on the y-axis.
C hart 3 presents the accum ulated im pulse response
functions. The first row of the chart indicates that, on the one
hand, the ppi for crude petroleum is not significantly affected
by unanticipated changes in the PPI for gasoline, the CPI for
gasoline, or the quantity of consumer gasoline. On the other
hand, shocks to the quantity of industrial pro-duction result
in marginally significant changes in crude-petroleum prices.
The second row su g g ests th at in n o v a tio n s to crudepetroleum prices strongly affect producer gasoline prices and
that unanticipated changes in the CPI for gasoline and the
quantity of industrial production produce only marginal changes
in the ppi for gasoline. By contrast, shocks to the quantity of
gasoline consumed do not affect producer gasoline prices. The
third row indicates that innovations in crude-petroleum prices
and producer gasoline prices produce highly significant changes
in the CPI for gasoline and that shocks to the quantity of
industrial production affect consumer gasoline prices only
marginally. Conversely, unanticipated changes in the quantity
of gasoline consumed do not affect the c p i for gasoline. The
fourth row of the chart shows that price shocks to crude
petroleum, producer gasoline, and consumer gasoline tend to
reduce the quantity of gasoline consumed, whereas innovations
to the quantity of industrial production in-crease the quantity of
gasoline consumed. The last row suggests that none of the
variables in the system significantly affect the quantity of
industrial production.
Variance decompositions were also constructed from the
model. Variance decom positions show the percentage of
forecast variance in one variable of the vector autoregression
caused by innovations in the other variables.17 The variance
decompositions obtained from the analysis are presented in
table 1.
The variance decomposition of the CPI for gasoline implies
that the majority of the forecast error variance in consumer
gasoline prices results from price shocks to production inputs.
Innovations in crude petroleum and in the ppi for gasoline
account for 73.74 percent of the forecast errors in the CPI for
gasoline (40.14 percent from crude petroleum and 33.6 percent
from producer gasoline). Conversely, shocks to the quantities of
gasoline and industrial production account for only 0.11 and
1.82 percent, respectively, of the CPI’s forecast error variance.
T h is

a r t ic le h a s p r e s e n t e d b o t h h is t o r ic a l a n d

in examining the source of price variations
within the gasoline market. The main finding of the article is that
price changes for consumer gasoline have histori-cally been
driven by changes in supply as opposed to demand.
The initial approach taken was to identify historical supply
shocks within the crude-petroleum market and examine how
e m p ir ic a l e v id e n c e

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

7

Consumer Gasoline Prices

Chart 3. Accum ulated impulse response functions
Plus or minus two
standard deviations
Shock to PPI for gasoline

------------------- Response function
Shock to PPI for crude petroleum
Percent
change

Percent
change

Response of
PPI for crude
petroleum

Response of
PPI for
gasoline

Response of
CPI for
gasoline

Response of
quantity of
gasoline

Response of
Industrial
production

Period

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July 2003

Period

Chart 3. Continued— Accum ulated impulse response functions
--------------

Plus or minus two
standard deviations

Response function

Shock to CPI for gasoline

Shock to industrial production

Shock to quantity of gasoline

Percent
change

Percent
change

Percent
change

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

1

2

3

4


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5

6

7

Period

8

9

10

11

12

Period

Period

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

9

Consumer Gasoline Prices

V a r ia n c e d e c o m p o s it io n s a fte r 12 m o n t h s

Percentage of forecast errors due to—
Decomposition
variable

for crude
Petroleum

ppi

for crude petroleum......................
for gasoline..........................
C P i for gasoline..........................
Quantity of gasoline..........................
Industrial production...........................
p p i

PPI

prices at various stages o f processing responded to the shocks.
In all cases examined, interruptions in the supply o f crude
petroleum resulted in significant increases in the prices of crude
petroleum, wholesale gasoline, and consumer gasoline.
To analyze pricing relationships within the gasoline market
more formally, a five-variable structural vector autoregression
model o f the gasoline market was developed, using the ppi ’ s
for crude petroleum and gasoline, the CPI for gasoline, the
quantity o f dom estically consumed gasoline, and the in­

97.82
43.08
40.14
.49
.71

ppi for
gasoline

0.31
52.57
33.60
1.28
.32

CPI for
gasoline

.26
2.42
23.97
.97
.05

Quantity of
gasoline

0.16
.11

.40
92.79
.56

Industrial
production

1.46
1.82
1.88
4.47
98.36

dustrial production index. Im pulse response functions
constructed from the m odel’s coefficients imply that price
changes o f inputs to consumer gasoline (crude petroleum
and PPI gasoline) significantly affect the CPI for gasoline, but
that changes in demand (industrial production) affect gasoline
prices only marginally. In addition, variance decompositions
indicated that the majority of the forecast variance in consumer
gasoline prices can be explained by price shocks to inputs, as
opposed to shocks to demand.
□

N o te s
1 The 36.3-percent figure represents the percent increase in the
annual average of the Consumer Price Index for gasoline from 1999
to 2000.
2 James L. Williams, Energy Economics Newsletter, on the Internet
at h t t p : / /w w w .w t r g .c o m /p r ic e s .h t m ,
3 Ibid.
4 Petroleum Chronology o f Events 1970-2000 (U.S. Department
of Energy, 2002).
5 Williams, Energy Economics Newsletter.
6 Petroleum Chronology o f Events.
1 Ibid.
8 Oil Reserve Fact Sheet (U.S. Department of Energy, 2000).
9 Eleni Xenofondos and William F. Snyders, “Rising producer prices
in 1999 dominated by energy goods,” Monthly Labor Review, August
2000, pp. 15-25.
10 William H. Greene, Econometric Analysis (Upper Saddle River,

10

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July 2003

nj,

Prentice Hall, 1997); see especially pp. 815-16.

11 Philip Hans Franses, Time Series M odels fo r Business and
Economic Forecasting (Cambridge, U.K., and New York, Cambridge
University Press, 1998).
12 Jack Johnston and John DiNardo, Econometric Methods (New
York, McGraw-Hill, 1997); see especially pp. 224-25.
13 Ibid., p. 299.
14 Christopher A. Sims, “Macroeconomics and Reality,” Econometrica, January 1980, pp. 1-48.
15 Ben Bernanke, “Alternative Explanations of the Money-Income
Correlation,” in Karl Brunner and Allan Meitzer (eds.), Real Business
Cycles, Real Exchange Rates, and Actual Policies, Camegie-Rochester
Conference Series on Public Policy, Autumn 1986, pp. 49-99
(Amsterdam, North-Holland, 1986); see also Christopher A. Sims,
“Are Forecasting Models Usable for Policy Analysis,” Federal Reserve
Bank o f Minneapolis Quarterly Review, Winter 1986, pp. 2-16.
16 Johnston and DiNardo, Econometric Methods, pp. 299-300.
17 Ibid., p. 301.

Effects of Firm Size

The effects of firm size
on w ages in Colorado: a ca se study
A unique data set from Colorado s Job Vacancy Surveys
provides a wealth o f employer-reported information
including a wage range fo r jobseekers
and a way to examine the effects o f firm size
on various job vacancy characteristics
Paul Paez

Paul Paez is an
economist
at the Colorado
Departm ent
of Labor and
Employment.

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nformation on firm size and an em ployer’s
willingness to pay more for higher levels of
education and experience are o f value to
jobseekers looking for their highest potential
salary in today’s labor market. The Job Vacancy
S u rv e y s, c o n d u c te d in C o lo rad o by its
D epartm ent o f Labor and Employm ent, help
jobseekers, labor market analysts, economists,
and many others by providing information on
the amount and types o f jobs that are available
and the qualifications that employers demand for
those jobs. Data from the survey allow analysts
to report the proportion o f job vacancies and the
average wages offered, with respect to vacancy
c h a ra c te ris tic s , th ro u g h o u t the State. The
survey also provides data on the wage range
that employers are willing to pay the individual
who is eventually hired.
Also o f value to jobseekers is the knowledge
that larger firms pay higher wages. Economists
and sociologists have postulated many theories
to explain this positive relationship since first
reported in 1911.1
This article uses the abundant unique data
set provided by Job Vacancy Surveys to explore
the relationship between firm size, job vacancy
n eed s and e m p lo y e rs ’ w age o ffers in the
Colorado Front Range. Similar to other research,
this study finds that C olorado’s large firm s
offered higher wages to fill vacancies than smaller
firm s w ith o th e rw ise sim ilar in stitu tio n a l
characteristics and requiring the same levels of

I

both education and experience.
The s iz e -w a g e p rem iu m
In 1989, Charles Brown and James M edoff used
a number o f data sets to investigate possible
explanations for the size-wage premium.2 Thenresearch concludes that the size-wage premium
is “ siz e a b le and o m n ip re s e n t” an d n o t
sufficiently explained by existing th eories.
Brown and M edoff categorize the various sizewage premium theories as either neoclassical or
institutional. Neoclassical explanations include
the labor quality hypothesis, the efficiency wage
explanation, and the theory o f com pensating
wage differentials. The m onopoly pow er ex­
p lan atio n , and the u n io n izatio n avoidance
hypothesis are examples o f institutional explan­
ations.
The labor quality hypothesis states that large
firms tend to hire more skilled workers. A variety
o f ex p lan atio n s for this th eo ry have been
presented. One theory suggests that large firms
em ploy h igh-skilled m anagers w ho tend to
surround themselves with similarly high-skilled
employees. A related theory proposes that large
firms are more capital intensive and require
skilled workers to operate the firms’ complex
machinery. Another explanation that has been
suggested also relates td m anagem ent. The
efficiency wage explanation posits that there is a
trade-off between wages and work intensity. The
Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

11

larger a firm becomes, the more difficult it is for managers to
monitor employees. As a result, employees are more likely to
shirk their duties. Firms offer higher wages as an incentive
for employees to work harder as an alternative to hiring more
managers to monitor employees.
The theory o f compensating wage differentials generally
refers to the need for employers to offer higher wages in
order to attract qualified workers when working conditions
are u n d esirab le. Less flex ib le sched u lin g , inefficien t
hierarchies, m ore rigid regulation, entrepreneurial dis­
couragement, and an impersonal work environment are all
examples o f undesirable characteristics often associated with
large firms.
Institutional explanations include the suggestion that
large firms often have greater market power and gain mono­
poly rents, which they share with employees. Alternatively,
nonunion, large firms may offer union-like compensation
packages as a deterrent to worker unionization.
To the extent that statistical data measure the relevant
worker/firm characteristics, if any o f the explanations hold,
adding variables to control for these characteristics to a
wage-size regression should eliminate the effect o f firm size
on wages. R ecent research in this area has found that
employer size-wage premiums remain largely unexplained.3
Using a variety o f human capital and institutional variables,
this article investigates the influence o f firm size on wages
offered by Colorado employers to fill vacant positions.
J o b V a c a n c y Surveys
In 1999, the Colorado Department o f Labor and Employment
(C olorado L abor D epartm ent or D epartm ent, for short)
received one o f six grants issued by the U.S. Department o f
Labor Employment and Training Administration to conduct a
p ilo t study to determ in e the fe a sib ility o f m easuring
em ployers’ demand for labor through a Job Vacancy Survey.
In cooperation with Arapahoe/Douglas Works,4 the Colorado
Labor Department conducted and issued a report based on
the original Denver Metro Job Vacancy Survey. The report
was so well received in Colorado that subsequent Denver
M etro surveys were conducted and the decision was made
to expand the report throughout the entire State. In April
2001, the Department set up its own survey unit to collect the
n e c e s s a ry v a c a n c y d a ta . U sin g C o m p u te r A ssiste d
Telephone Interview (CATI) technology, the survey unit was
able to collect sample data covering all 11 o f the State’s Job
Vacancy Survey regions by the end o f 2001, a period o f just 9
months! During those 9 months, the Department contacted
approximately 30 percent o f all Colorado employers with at
least five employees.
During the telephone interview, employers are asked how
many workers they currently employ as well as how many
positions they were actively recruiting to fill at the time o f the
12

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July 2003

survey. The ratio o f vacancies to employment, or the job
vacancy rate, is then used to estimate the total number of
v a c a n c ies in th e re g io n .5 In a d d itio n to th is b asic
information, employers that report having vacancies are
asked a number o f questions about those vacancies. For
example, they are asked to provide the job status (that is, full­
time, part-time, permanent, or temporary); a job title; and a
description o f the work performed by the position (to assist
in classifying job vacancies by codes based on the Standard
Occupational Classification). Employers also are asked to
provide a wage range that they are w illing to pay the
individual who eventually fills the position, as well as what
levels o f education and experience they require of an applicant
in order to be considered.6 The employers are asked to
choose from a list o f six education levels and four experience
levels, which best describe the applicant they are seeking.
(An underlying assumption o f this analysis is that the lower
end o f the reported wage range is associated w ith the
education and experience requirem ents reported by the
em ployer and th at hig h er w ages m ay be av ailab le to
applicants exceeding these requirements.) Employers are also
asked whether prospective employees are offered a sign-on
bonus7 or a medical insurance. Those employers offering to
supply access to a medical insurance plan also are asked
whether they pay any, part, or all o f the insurance premium
associated with the plan. In addition to these questions
regarding compensation and human capital, employers are
asked to choose among three categories (not, somewhat, and
very) the level o f difficulty that they experience in hiring for
the particular type o f occupation as well as the amount o f
time the company has been actively recruiting to fill the
vacant position.8
The size o f the labor force and unemployment rate provide
Colorado citizens with an accurate picture o f the current labor
supply situation, however, they do not provide any detailed
information about the skills and knowledge that the labor
pool commands nor the industry or occupations for which
available workers are qualified to work. The Job Vacancy
Survey fills this void by providing useful, tim ely data
regarding the demand for labor by Colorado employers.
This article offers additional analysis o f those data. Using
ordinary least squares regression/ANOVA techniques, the
results found here provide useful wage data by each o f the
v acan cy c h a ra c te ris tic s in c lu d e d , h o ld in g all o th e r
characteristics constant. This adds to the analysis provided
by the Colorado D epartm ent o f Labor and Employm ent
because it means that the wage differential associated with a
particular firm size, for exam ple, is calculated holding
education, experience, and so forth, constant.
The Front R an g e s a m p le
The four Job Vacancy Survey regions investigated in this

article constitute what is commonly referred to as Colorado’s
Front Range, reflecting their proximity to the foothills o f the
Rocky Mountains. The regions, from north to south, are the
Larimer/Weld region, the Denver Metro region, the Pikes Peak
region, and the Pueblo region. The Larimer/Weld region
consists o f Larimer and Weld counties. Each county borders
Wyoming and each contains a M etropolitan Statistical Area
(MSA). Fort Collins is in Larimer County and Greeley is in
Weld County. The population o f this region is approximately
430,000. The D enver M etro reg io n includes A dam s,
Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, Douglas, and Jefferson counties.
This region also contains two MSA’s; Denver and Boulder. It
has the highest concentration o f employers in the State and
a population o f more than 2.3 million. El Paso and Teller
counties make up the Pikes Peak region with a population o f
slightly more than half a million. The Pueblo County region
is 1 o f only 2 one-county Job Vacancy Survey regions in the
State and the sm allest o f the Front Range regions with
slightly fewer than 150,000 residents.
More than half o f the firms in each o f the four Front Range
Job Vacancy Survey regions are classified as either Services
or Retail Trade industries. Although government agencies
make up only a small proportion o f employers in each region,
they rank highly in term s o f numbers employed. Unem­
ployment rates ranged from 2.6 percent in Teller County to
4.7 percent in Pueblo and El Paso Counties at the time o f the
surveys. Seasonal employment in each region peaks in late
summer and slows in the middle o f winter. The surveys used
in this article were conducted in periods o f peak seasonal
employment. (See table 1.)
Between July 31, and November 19,2001, more than 8,000
em ployers were contacted in the four Front Range Job
Vacancy Survey regions. Those employers reported having
nearly half-a-million workers at the time o f the surveys as
well as actively recruiting to fill an additional 8,605 vacant
positions. Upon completion o f the surveys, the Colorado
Labor Department issued summary reports for each region.9
In these reports, the proportion o f vacancies as well as the
average wage range associated with each category o f the
vacancy characteristics surveyed is provided.

The overall average wage offered in the Denver Metro
region was the highest o f the four Front Range regions,
followed by Larimer/Weld, Pikes Peak, and Pueblo County
respectively. What constitutes a large firm varies from one
region to the next. For the purpose o f the Job Vacancy Survey,
the Colorado Labor Department defines large firms as those
accounting for approximately one third o f the region’s total,
private sector employment in firms with at least five workers.10
Large firms in each o f the four Front Range Job Vacancy
Survey regions are defined as: those employing at least 250
employees in Denver Metro, 200 employees in Pikes Peak
and Pueblo County, and 150 employees in Larimer/Weld. In
each region, the wages reported by large firms were higher
than those offered by small to mid-size firms. With few
exceptions, the rep o rted w age ranges in each survey
increased along w ith m easures o f both ed ucation and
experience. Jobseekers who are hired for full-time, permanent
p o sitio n s w ere o ffered the h ig h est w ages am ong the
employment statuses in all four surveys. Those vacancies
o ffe rin g th e h ig h e st w ages also o ffe re d a d d itio n a l
compensation: in each survey, the reported wage ranges
increased along with the em ployer’s contribution to the
medical insurance premium. The wages offered by both
industry and occupational classification varied from one
region to the next.
Employers supplied characteristic information for 4,015
vacancies reported in the four Front Range Job Vacancy
Survey regions.11 Table 2 summarizes these characteristics
for each o f the Front Range regions.
A n alysis of the v a ria n c e
This study compares wages offered by employers to fill open
positions in each o f the four Colorado Front Range Job
Vacancy Survey regions. The differential effects o f firms size
on average wages offered are estim ated holding human
capital and institutional vacancy characteristics constant.
The regression used to test for the differential affects o f each
o f these characteristics is:
3

•

Table 1.

j= 1

Front R a n g e J o b V a c a n c y S u r v e y d e s c r ip t io n ,

2001

4

Total Front Range...
Larimer/Weld........
Denver Metro.......
Pikes Peak..........
Pueblo County......

Start
d a te

End
date

1/1/01 11/19/01
10/8/01 11/6/01
10/23/01 11/19/01
7/31/01
9/7/01
9/6/01 9/24/01

Number
of
Employment
employers represented
co ntacted

8,371
1,960
3,141
2,185
1,085

483,831
91,605
253,462
102,873
35,891

S ource : Job Vacancy Surveys, Colorado Department of Labor and
Employment, 2001.


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3

7

3

ifc=l

/=1

m=1

2

/ 1\

+ Y jn 0CCm+AiTEMIfl + Y ,n0IN-% + 1 \6P UTip ■+£/
n= l

Front Range area

5

ENTRYOFFER, -JU+d.Siz^ + ^ a jLOClJ + ^ / 3 kEDUit + ^ lEXPil + Y ^ (t>JND«,

0= l

(U

p -\

where ENTRYOFFER is the natural logarithm o f the minimum
o f the wage range offered by an employer for the vacancy, /
indexes each o f the vacancies, / / represents the baseline12
average entry-level wage offered, £ is an independent
identically distributed random variable with mean 0, and the
explanatory variables are described in exhibit 1. The indicator
variables representing education, experience, and employer’s
contribution to medical insurance are included to control for
wage variations dependent on measures o f human capital.13
Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

13

Table 2.

S u m m a r y o f v a c a n c y c h a r a c t e r is t ic s b y C o l o r a d o Front R a n g e J o b V a c a n c y S u r r e y r e g io n , 2001

Characteristic

Larimer/ Weld

Denver Metro

Average entry level wage offered..................................
Number of vacancies included..........................................

$12.04
836

$12.15
1,144

$9.39
1,523

$9.24
512

Employer size (in percent)...............................................
Small to mid-size employers.............................................
Large employers.........................................................

46.8
53.2

28.2
71.8

59.2
40.8

71.3
28.7

Education requirements (in percent)
No diploma required.......................................................
High school/GÉD required...............................................
Vocational training/certification required...............................
Two-year degree required................................................
Bachelors degree required...............................................
Advanced degree required...............................................

20.8
33.7
18.2
3.0
17.5
6.8

24.3
37.2
12.8
3.6
20.5
1.5

40.9
42.0
10.0
.7
4.9
1.6

30.5
36.1
17.0
4.3
8.6
3.5

Experience requirements (in percent)
No experience required...................................................
General work experience required.......................................
Experience in a related field required...................................
Experience in this occupation required.................................

33.7
15.8
22.6
27.9

33.3
13.4
23.2
30.2

45.7
17.7
19.1
17.5

50.4
9.8
16.0
23.8

Employer’s industry classification (in percent)
Construction...............................................................
Manufacturing.............................................................
Transportation, communications, and public utilities..................
Wholesale trade...........................................................
Retail trade.................................................................
Finance, insurance, and real estate....................................
Services...................................................................
Public administration.....................................................

7.0
5.5
2.5
3.0
20.6
2.5
33.1
25.8

1.2
8.7
5.8
3.6
19.4
11.9
39.0
10.5

6.1
6.1
10.8
11.4
25.1
7.2
28.1
5.2

2.9
4.1
1.6
3.9
35.0
1.0
42.8
8.8

Standard Occupational Classification category (in percent)
Management, professional, and related occupations.................
Service occupations......................................................
Sales and office occupations............................................
Natural resources, construction, and material moving occupations ..
Production, transportation, and material moving occupations.......

33.6
20.9
23.2
9.8
12.4

36.9
15.1
37.7
4.8
5.5

11.8
29.3
33.6
9.1
16.2

25.8
35.4
19.5
7.4
11.9

Employment status (in percent)
Permanent employment..................................................
Temporary employment...................................................

88.6
11.4

90.0
10.0

97.1
2.9

96.5
3.5

Employer’s offering/contribution to medical insurance (in percent)
No medical insurance offered............................................
Medical insurance offered, but no contribution to premium..........
Partial contribution to insurance premium..............................
Total cost of premium paid...............................................

28.1
3.7
50.7
17.5

23.5
1.1
52.8
22.6

18.8
5.5
52.9
22.8

33.0
4.7
33.2
29.1

Pikes Peak

Pueblo County

N ote: Percentages may not total to 100 in each characteristic by region
due rounding.__________________

S ource : Job Vacancy Surveys, Colorado Department of Labor and
Employment, 2001.

Location, industry and broad occupational category hopefully
explain a large portion o f institutional vacancy characteristics.14
The analysis presented in this article uses 37 categories within
8 vacancy characteristic groups. M aking full use o f the
coefficients estim ated in the regression w ould allow for
thousands o f combinations o f wage differentials. The actual
results o f the regression are provided for anyone wishing to
draw additional conclusions. The purpose o f this article is to
investigate the size-wage premium in each o f Colorado’s Front
Range Job Vacancy Survey regions, therefore, the analysis
provided here concerns only employer size classification as it
relates to human capital and institutional vacancy characteristics.
Because eight groups o f vacancy characteristics were studied
and one less indicator variable than the number o f categories

was used in each group, the regression estimated includes 29
indicator variables. To avoid multicollinearity, a correlation matrix
was analyzed prior to estimation. O f the 416 possible two-way
simple correlations between the 29 variables, only 19 were more
than 0.3 and only five of those more than 0.5, leaving the author
confident that the estimates are not biased due to high correlation
among explanatory variables.


14
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July 2003

Results
The natural logarithm o f the entry-level wages offered by
Colorado Front Range em ployers was regressed against
indicator variables using ordinary least squares regression.
W hite’s test for heteroskedasticity was perform ed on the

Exhib it 1.
V ariable

D u m m y v a r ia b le s u s e d in

anova

re g re ssio n

Description

Variable

Description

SIZl

Large firms

LOCI

Retail trade
Finance, insurance, and real estate
Public administration

LOC2
LOC3

Larimer/Weld Job Vacancy Survey
region
Pikes Peak Job Vacancy Survey region
Pueblo Job Vacancy Survey region

IND5
IND6
IND7
OCC1

EDU1
EDU2
EDU3
EDU4
EDU5
EXP1
EXP2
EXP3

High school/GED required
Vocational/certification required
Two-year degree required
B achelor’s Degree required
Advanced degree required
General work experience required
Experience in a related field required
Experience in this occupation required

Management, professional, and related
occupations
Sales and office occupations
Natural resources, construction, and
maintenance occupations
Production, transportation, and material
moving occupations

IND1
IND2
IND3

Construction
Manufacturing
Transportation, communications, and
public utilities
W holesale trade

IND4

OCC2
OCC3
OCC4

TEMPI

Temporary employment

INS1
INS2
INS3

Medical insurance offered, but no
contribution to premium
Partial contribution to insurance premium
Total cost o f premium paid

OUT1
OUT2

Outliers below minimum wage
Outliers above $34.99 per hour

NOTE: Baseline category— small to m id-size-D enver
M etro-P erm anent-no education-no experience-services
occupation/industry-no insurance.

SOURCE: Job Vacancy Surveys, Colorado Department o f
Labor and Employment, 2001.

resulting error terms and it was determined that the residuals
display ed n onconstant variance, but the source o f the
problem was not apparent. Even if the source o f the problem
had been evident, the traditional corrective measures for this
problem do not make sense given the dichotomous nature o f
the in d ep en d en t v a ria b le s. As an alte rn a tiv e , W hite
h e te ro sk e d a stistic ity — c o n siste n t stan d ard erro rs and
covariances— were used to compensate for the effects on
estimate efficiency.15
Even with the more restrictive standard error calculations,
all but two o f the 29 coefficients and one constant estimated
were statistically significant at the 99 percent level o f
confidence. The remaining coefficients were significant with
more than 90 percent confidence. (See table 3.) In particular, the
coefficient o f the indicator variable representing the wage
differential paid to large firms as opposed to small to mid-size
firms, all else constant, was estim ated to be statistically
significant with over 99 percent confidence. Together, all o f the
characteristics examined explain about 75 percent o f the total
variation in entry-level wages offered by Front Range employers.
Special caution must be taken in interpreting the estimated

coefficients because equation 1 takes the log-linear form.
Robert Halvorsen and Raymon Palmquist suggest that taking
the antilog o f the estimated coefficient and subtracting 1
approximates the relative change in the average value o f the
dependent variable.16Following this methodology, the differential
effects o f each o f the categories within the seven vacancy
characteristic groups investigated are listed in table 4.
Like the overall average wages reported in table 2, wages
in the Denver Metro region were estimated to be higher than
those offered in the other Front Range regions, even while
holding the effects o f education, experience, and the other
vacancy characteristics under consideration constant. The
entry-level wages offered to fill vacancies requiring increasing
levels o f experience were also higher than those requiring no
work experience. The differential effects ranged from 6.42
percent for vacancies requiring general work experience to 28
percent for vacancies requiring experience in the specific
occupation being recruited. Similarly, the entry-level wage
differentials estimated in this article are consistent with traditional
findings that, all else constant, jobs requiring successively
higher levels of education pay higher wages with the exception


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Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

15

T a b le 3.

E m p lo y e r s iz e - w a g e p r e m iu m re g r e s s io n resu lts, b a s e d o n t h e J o b V a c a n c y S u r v e y o f t h e Front R a n g e
C o l o r a d o r e g io n , 2001

[Dependent variable: LOG(ENTRYOFFER)]

Variable

Coefficient

C .......................................

1.829239

0.015631

117.0258

0.0000

SIZ1....................................
LOC1 ..................................
LOC2..................................
LOC3..................................
EDU1 ..................................
EDU2..................................
EDU3..................................
EDU4..................................
EDU5..................................

.032420
-.054828
-.081824
-.148404
.072699
.244181
.275751
.369004
.329138

.009670
.012489
.011008
.014051
.009888
.018383
.036473
.022666
.038606

3.352585
-4.389961
-7.432865
-1.56172
7.352055
13.28324
7.560382
16.27998
8.525669

.0008
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000

EXP1 ..................................
EXP2..................................
EXP3..................................
IND1 ...................................
IND2 ...................................
IND3 ...................................
IND4 ...................................
IND5 ...................................
IND6 ...................................
IND7 ...................................

.062202
.144346
.279997
.217094
.080043
.172037
.151211
-.027378
.078310
.168613

.012325
.013026
.015472
.025381
.016998
.017739
.016230
.012287
.017653
.017838

5.046637
11.08153
18.09748
8.553334
4.708999
9.698103
9.316521
-2.228244
4.436107
9.452297

.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0259
.0000
.0000

OCC1 ..................................
OCC2..................................
OCC3..................................
OCC4..................................
TEMPI .................................
INS1 ...................................
INS2 ...................................
INS3 ...................................
OUT1 ..................................
OUT2..................................

.276592
.099110
.138384
.113382
.102132
.042913
.078433
.138586
-.860916
.966754

.018238
.011250
.021176
.014946
.018099
.022747
.011310
.015215
.030107
.060520

15.16605
8.809611
6.535100
7.585895
5.643087
1.886507
6.934750
9.108718
-28.59503
15.97400

.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0593
.0000
.0000
.0000
.0000

R-squared.............................
Adjusted R-squared..................
S.E. of regression....................
Sumsquared residual................
Log likelihood.........................
Durbin-Watson statistic..............

751394
.247908
244.9121
-82.27527
1.947291

Standard error

Mean dependent variable ..
S.D. dependent variable...
Akaike info criterion.......
Schwarz criterion
F-statistic............................................
Probability (F-statistic).............................

Note : Based on least squares method (White HeteroskedasticityConsistent Standard Errors and Covariance).

T a b le 4.

/-Statistic

Probability

2.244435
497206
.055928
102986
419 3459
.000000

S ource : Job Vacancy Surveys, Colorado Department of Labor and
Employment, 2001.

D iffe re n tia l e f f e c t s o f j o b v a c a n c y c h a r a c t e r is t ic s , b a s e d o n t h e J o b V a c a n c y S u r v e y o f t h e Fro n t R a n g e
C o l o r a d o r e g io n , 2001

[Inpercent]
Variable

Effect

SIZ1...............................................
EXP1 .............................................
EXP2.............................................
EXP3..............................................
TEMPI ............................................
INS1 ..............................................
INS2..............................................
INS3..............................................

3.30
6.42
15.53
32.31
10.75
4.38
8.16
14.86

EDU1 .............................................
EDU2.............................................
EDU3.............................................
EDU4.............................................
EDU5.............................................

7.54
27.66
31.75
44.63
38.98

N o t e : Baseline category—small to mid-size, Denver Metro, no education,
no experience, services occupation/industry, no insurance.


16
Monthly Labor Review
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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

Variable

Effect

LOC1 ...........................................
LOC2...........................................
LOC3...........................................
IND1 ...........................................
I ND3...........................................
IND4...........................................
IND5...........................................
IND6...........................................
IND7...........................................

-5.34
-7.86
-13.79
24.25
18.77
16.32
-2.70
8.15
18.37

OCC1 ..........................................
OCC2..........................................
OCC3..........................................
OCC4..........................................

31.86
10.42
14.84
12.01

S o u r c e : Job Vacancy Surveys, Colorado Department of Labor and
Employment, 2001.

o f w ages paid for advanced degrees, which are slightly lower
than those paid for bachelor’s degrees. The differential effects
o f increasing levels o f educational attainment ranged from 7.27
percent for a high school/GED level o f education to 36.90 percent
for a bachelor’s degree. Vacancies requiring an advanced degree
were offered an average o f 32.91 percent higher w ages than
those requiring no education.
W h il e t h e e s t im a t e d w a g e d if f e r e n t ia l r ela ted to

large firms was statistically significant, the effect o f employer
size on entry-level wages offered by Colorado Front Range
employers was smaller than any other category o f vacancy
characteristic. Similar to previous studies, however, this study
finds that the firm size effect still exists and it is not explained by
human capital or institutional vacancy characteristics. Even
when controlling for the effects o f these characteristics, this
study finds that large firms offered average wages that were
3.30 percent higher than small to mid-size firms.

N o te s
1 H. L. Moore, Laws o f Wages: An Essay in Statistical Economics
(New York, Augustus M. Kelley, 1911).

9 Job Vacancy Survey reports for each region are available on the
Internet at: w w w . c o w o r k f o r c e . c o m / l m i / w r a / h o m e . h t m .

2 Charles Brown, and James Medoff, “The Employer Size-Wage
Effect,” Journal o f Political Economy, 1989, vol. 97, no. 5, pp.
1027-59.

10 To determine region-specific large firms, this study ranks all
firms from largest to the smallest by employment. Employment is
accumulated starting with the largest firm and cuts off when the
aggregate is roughly one-third. That is, large employers in a region
consist of the largest firms accounting for approximately one-third of
the regions total private employment.
All other private sector firms with at least five employees are
referred to as small to mid-size firms. Multiple attempts are made to
contact every large, private sector employer as well as all Federal,
State, and local government agencies in the area. The remaining small
to mid-size private sector employers are then stratified by industry
and a random sample of employers is contacted in each stratum. The
small to mid-size employers in Job Vacancy Survey regions containing
Colorado’s Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA’s) are stratified by
major industry division based on the U.S. Office of Management Budget
Standard Industrial Classification Manual, 1987. Manufacturers are
further divided into durable and nondurable goods-producing categories.
County as well as industry stratify the employers in the six County
Denver Metro Job Vacancy Survey region. In the rural areas of
Colorado, employers are categorized as either goods or service
producing, as there are not a sufficient number of employers in each
region to accurately represent each individual industry with statistical
reliability.

3 For a review of recent research testing these hypotheses, see W. Y.
Oi, and T. L. Idson, “Firm Size and Wages,” Handbook o f Labor
Economics (Elsevier Science, 1999) vol. 3, chapter 33, pp. 2166-2214.
4 Arapahoe/Douglas Works is a cooperative project between
Arapahoe and Douglas Counties, funded by the Workforce Investment
Act passed by Congress in 1996. The goal of this project was to
improve labor market conditions by bringing together compatible
employers/recruiters and jobseekers.
5 Firm-specific effects for multiple vacancy firms is worthy of
further analysis, but for this study, because the firm’s size, industry,
and location are all included in the analysis, vacancies reported by a
particular firm would all have the same characteristics.
6 Although this study does not examine wages other than the lowest
within the range, the author considers this worthy of future research.
The author opines, however, that many employers are only willing to
pay the lower end of the range unless the candidate is overqualified.
Also, many employers only report one wage, rather than a range.
Looking into the size of the range is an interesting idea as well, this
would go well with the firm-specific effects mentioned in the previous
note. Without investigating the size of the wage ranges, however,
using the lower end should provide a lower bound to the size of the
wage premium.
7 Limiting observations to those vacancies providing statistics
regarding sign-on bonuses proved prohibitive relative to the additional
explanatory value they provided.
8 Although both of these measures of how difficult it is to fill the
vacant position probably affect the wages offered by the employer,
the direction of the causation between wages and difficulty to fill a
position is not obvious—that is, employers may offer a higher wage
in order to attract qualified candidates to fill positions the employers
expect may be more difficult to fill or, the vacancies may be more
difficult to fill because the wages offered are insufficient to attract
qualified candidates. Because of this uncertainty and unavailability of
additional information, which might have been used to produce a
system o f sim ultaneous equations accurately describing the
relationship between wages and the difficulty employers experience
recruiting for the vacancies, these measures were not used in the
analysis.


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11 Vacancies reported by employers in the Agriculture and Mining
industries are not included in the sample.
12 The baseline category in this regression represents vacancies in
small to mid-size employers located in the six county Denver Metro
Job Vacancy Survey region that require no education and no experience,
are permanent positions in the service occupations category, and are
offered by employers in the Services industry.
13 Gary S. Becker, Human Capital, 2ndEdition (New York, National
Bureau of Economic Research, 1975).
14 Brown, and Medoff, “The Employer Size-Wage Effect.”
15 The estimated residuals of the regression were also tested against
the normal distribution. The test rejected the null hypothesis of a
normal distribution. This was largely due to a high kurtosis of 4.45.
Given the large sample, however, the estimates should be unbiased and
consistent.
16 Robert Halvorsen and Raymon Palmquist, “The Interpretation
o f Dummy Variables in Semilogarithmic E quations,” American
Economic Review, vol. 70, no. 3, 1980, pp. 474-75.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

17

Labor Contract Negotiations

Labor contract negotiations
in the airline industry
Airline labor negotiations take 1.3 years, on average,
to conclude, and about half go into Federal mediation;
much o f the variance in the duration o f negotiations
can be attributed to which particular airlines and unions
are bargaining, not to economic conditions
Andrew
von Nordenflycht
and
Thomas A. Kochan

Andrew von
Nordenflycht is a
graduate student in
the Sloan School of
M anagem ent,
Massachusetts
Institute of
Technology,
Cambridge, m a ;
Thomas A. Kochan is
George M. Bunker
Professor of
M anagem ent,
Institute for Work and
Employment
Research, Sloan
School of
Managem ent,

n the wake of a sizable slump in demand driven
by the confluence of economic downturn,
terrorism, war, and disease, as well as in­
creased competition from low-cost carriers, many
incumbent U.S. airlines have been attempting a fundam ental restru ctu rin g o f their operations.
Arguably, a central element in this restructuring
involves labor contract negotiations. Yet, even
before the events of September 11,2001, observers
perceived strains in the industry’s labor relations
system, claiming that contracts were taking longer
to negotiate, rank-and-file rejections of tentative
agreements were more frequent, and job actions
were on the rise. Not surprisingly, then, calls for
reform of the Railway Labor Act—the law that has
governed airline collective bargaining since 1933—
have gained momentum.
Recent work has demonstrated that carrier-level
differences in the duration of contract negotiations
are associated with the quality of the labormanagement relationship and, consequently, with
airline productivity, customer service, and profit­
ability.1 Although the mechanisms of cause and
effect are complex, changes in the regulatory
fram ework could enhance the industry’s pro­
ductivity and level of service. However, debate on
reforming the Act has been based largely on anec­
dotal evidence regarding the duration of contract
negotiations and the sources of variance in that
duration. To date, there has been no systematic
analysis of the actual length of time required to
reach agreements in airline labor negotiations and
only limited published information on how airline
labor disputes are actually resolved.

I

18 Monthly Labor Review

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July 2003

This article presents and analyzes data on
contract negotiations between the Nation’s largest
air carriers and unions from 1982 through 2002.
Descriptive statistics are given on the average
duration of contract negotiations and the relative
frequency of mediation and work stoppages; these
averages are compared against National Labor
Relations Act averages; and the effect of industryand carrier-level factors that might be expected to
account for variation in the duration of negotiations
across carriers and over time is analyzed.
The first finding to come out of the analysis is
that airline labor negotiations do take a con­
siderable amount of time, particularly in relation to
contracts negotiated under the National Labor
Relations Act, and that reliance on Federal inter­
vention is high. Further, the duration of nego­
tiations and the reliance on Federal mediation have
increased over time. The second finding is that
higher carrier or industry growth rates may be asso­
ciated with longer negotiations, but that the
financial condition of the carrier does not correlate
with the duration of negotiations. The third and
final finding is that much of the variance in the
duration of negotiations can be attributed to the
specific identity of the airlines and unions involved
in bargaining. Thus, the time required to negotiate
airline labor contracts is not determined by the
regulatory regime or by economic conditions nearly
so much as it is by the relationship between, and
practices of, particular organizations.
The article begins with a background description
of the regulatory framework surrounding airline
labor relations.

B a ck g ro u n d
The Railway Labor Act has a number o f features that distinguish
negotiations and dispute resolution in airlines (and railroads)
from negotiations governed by the National Labor Relations
Act. The regulatory “exception” for airlines and railroads is
intended to minimize the potential for disruption o f the Nation’s
transportation system through work stoppages. This section
gives an overview o f the negotiations process under the Act.
A key difference in the Railway Labor Act is that contracts do
not have fixed expiration dates. Instead, they have “amendable”
dates. After the amendable date, the provisions o f the existing
contract remain in effect until the parties reach a new agreement.
New contract terms cannot be imposed unilaterally, and strikes
or lockouts cannot be initiated, until the parties have progressed
through several steps that are regulated by the National
Mediation Board.
If the parties cannot reach a contract agreement on their own,
either side may then apply for mediation services from the Board.
Once mediation begins, negotiations continue until an agreement
is reached or until the Board declares an impasse. At that point,
the Board offers the option o f voluntary binding arbitration. If
either party rejects the offer, the Board “releases” the parties.
Once released, the parties enter a 30-day “cooling-off period,”
during which time the existing contract provisions remain in
effect. At the end o f the cooling-off period, if the parties still
have not reached an agreement, the Board chooses whether to
let the parties engage in “self-help”— that is, a strike by workers
on the part o f the union or a lockout or unilateral imposition of
new contract terms on the part o f management— or to refer the
case to a Presidential Emergency Board composed o f three
neutral experts appointed by the President. The Presidential
Emergency Board is allowed 30 days to deliberate and to
formulate a recommended settlement. After the Presidential
Emergency Board issues its recommendations, another 30-day
cooling-off period begins. Finally, at the end o f the second
cooling-off period, the parties are free to engage in self-help. As
a final recourse, after the expiration of the second cooling-off
period, the President can refer the case to Congress, requesting
that body to legislate a settlement.
In other words, once a contract becomes amendable, the
parties are legally barred from self-help until the National
Mediation Board releases them and the cooling-off periods
expire. Theoretically, the parties could be prevented from selfhelp indefinitely, because the decision to release them while in
mediation is at the discretion o f the Board. Once the Board
releases the parties, it is still a minimum o f 30 days and amaximum
o f 90 days (the time from the beginning o f the first cooling-off
period, through the period during which the Presidential
Emergency Board deliberates, to the end o f the second coolingoff period) before the parties can strike or impose a lockout. It is
generally recognized that, since deregulation, both Presidential


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Emergency Boards and strikes have become relatively rare.
However, providing data on the actual frequency o f each step—
mediation, arbitration, releases, Presidential Emergency Board
deliberations, and strikes or lockouts— is one o f the contri­
butions of this article.
Data a n d m ethods

Sample.

The data on the duration o f negotiations and the
resolution process are drawn from the Review o f Collective
Bargaining, a bulletin produced by the Airline Industrial Relations
Conference (AIRCON). AlRCON is a nonprofit airline industry
association that collects and distributes information on airline
labor contracts and negotiations for its member carriers. Since
1984, AIRCON has periodically published the Review o f Collective
Bargaining, which updates the status of labor negotiations at
member carriers. In addition to searching the AIRCON archives,
archival searches ofmaj or newspapers (through Lexis/Nexis and
Dow Jones Interactive) were used to fill in missing data points
(for example, ratification dates) wherever possible.
The sample used in this article covers U.S. carriers that were
members of AIRCON and includes contracts ratified between
January 1, 1984, and December 20, 2002 (so that the sample
includes contracts that became amendable as early as 1982,
thus covering negotiating activity from 1982 to 2002). The sample
was limited to contracts covering pilots, flight attendants,
mechanics, fleet service personnel (when noted separately from
m echanics), and clerical/agent personnel. C ontracts for
dispatchers and those in other miscellaneous occupations with
relatively small employee bases were excluded. Next, contracts
for which either an amendable date (for the previous contract) or
a ratification date could not be identified also were excluded
from the sample. This left 265 contracts. Finally, for most o f the
analyses that follow, initial contracts and midterm negotiations
(as described shortly) were excluded. In the end, the core sample
consisted o f 199 contracts across 39 airlines and 17 unions.
How inclusive or representative is this sample o f contracts?
The original data source does not include every airline labor
contract negotiated between 1982 and 2002. The Department of
Transportation’s Form 41 database includes 142 U.S.-certificated
airlines with positive revenue in the 1982-2002 period. O f those,
100 do not appear in the AIRCON bulletins. The average number
of years during which these excluded carriers earned positive
revenue was 5.5. The average number o f contracts per year for
the carriers in the sample used for this article was 0.5. Thus, an
estimated maximum of about 275 contracts (100 x 5.5 x 0.5) are
excluded from the sample. However, the actual number is
probably far lower, because many of the excluded carriers were
likely to have been less unionized than the carriers in the sample.
The average annual revenue was $94 million (standard deviation
of $105 million) for the excluded carriers and $2,016 million
(standard deviation of $3,110 million) for the included carriers.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

19

Labor Contract Negotiations

Thus, the missing carriers are considerably smaller than the
carriers in the sample. As described later, a carrier’s size has a
significant effect on the duration o f negotiations. Hence, the
mean duration reported here is almost certainly higher than the
industry’s overall mean. To get a sense o f the likely magnitude of
this bias, the average duration o f negotiations for small carriers
in the sample was calculated. The maximum revenue of an
excluded carrier was $2.4 billion and o f an excluded passenger
(as opposed to cargo) carrier was $980 million. Two-thirds of the
excluded carriers had a maximum revenue o f less than $500 million.
The average duration o f negotiations for carriers in the sample
with revenues less than those three benchmarks were 10.39,10.86,
and 10.70 months, respectively. Thus, it would be fair to estimate
that the excluded contracts averaged 10.5 months to negotiate,
compared with 14.1 months for the overall sample.
Also, not every contract for the carriers that are in the sample
is reported in the AIRCON bulletins. Nonetheless, there does not
appear to be significant bias in those contracts which are selected
for the bulletins.2Finally, for data on airline characteristics and
industry economic conditions, the article relies on Form 41
filings— the quarterly reports on financial and operating results
that carriers are required to submit to the Department o f
Transportation.3

Measurements.

The central measurement, that o f the duration
o f negotiations, is calculated in two ways. The first method, the
result o f which is captured in the variable durationl, counts the
months elapsed between the date negotiations actually started
and the date the contract was ratified. However, the actual starting
date o f negotiations is available only for about half o f the
contracts in the sample. The second method, the result o f which
is given in the variable duration2, counts the months elapsed
between the amendable date o f the previous contract and the
ratification date o f the contract under negotiation. The average
difference between the starting date o f the negotiations and the
amendable date (for those contracts with an express starting
date) was 1.3 months, with a standard deviation o f 3.1 months.
Thus, the amendable-date measure ( duration2), on average,
underestimates the actual negotiation time (durationl).
One concern in using the amendable-date measure is that
there may be systematic patterns to the difference between
the starting date o f the negotiations and the amendable date.
However, analysis o f the data alleviates most o f this concern.
First, there is no systematic relationship between the overall
duration o f the negotiations and the differences between the
two measures: longer negotiations do not systematically start
earlier or later in relation to the amendable date. Second, there
is no significant trend in the difference between the amendable
date and the starting date o f the negotiations over time, as
long as the year 2000 is excluded. Interestingly, for a number
o f contracts that became amendable in 2000, talks began long
before the amendable date, with the average starting date
20 Monthly Labor Review

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

being almost 6 months before the contract became amendable.
Overall, however, the amendable-date measure should not
exhibit any bias over time. Last, while there is variation in the
average difference betw een the am endable date and the
starting date o f negotiations across carriers and unions, only
one carrier (Pacific Southwest Airlines, PSA) and one union
(the International Association o f Machinists and Aerospace
Workers, iam ) have means that are significantly different from
the overall average. Given this general absence o f systematic
bias in differences between amendable dates and starting
dates, the analyses were conducted with the amendable dates
( duration2) in order to utilize the larger sample.
Two anomalous types o f contracts are worth noting: initial
contracts (or “first contracts”) and midterm negotiations. An
initial contract— the first contract negotiated after an em­
ployee group has unionized— does not have an amendable
date. For these contracts, the duration was calculated as the
number o f months between the first date o f union repre­
sentation (that is, when the National Mediation Board certifies
an election victory) and the ratification date o f the first contract.
This tends to make initial contracts quite long in relation to the
duration o f negotiations for standard contracts. M idterm
negotiations— negotiations begun more than a few months
before the amendable date o f the existing contract and with the
intent of signing a new contract before the amendable date—
typically end up with a very low duration of negotiations, because
(by definition) they begin well before the amendable date and
often are ratified before the amendable date arrives (leading to
negative values, discussed in the next paragraph). Given the
qualitatively different nature of these contracts and their very
different average-duration measures (31.5 months for initial
contracts, -10.7 months for midterm contracts; see table 1), they
are excluded from the analysis, which is performed with only
“standard” contracts (neither initial nor midterm contracts).
A few of the contracts in the sample have negative values (for
example, -1.5 months) for the amendable-date measure. Negative
values result when a new contract is ratified before the existing
contract becomes amendable. This occurs primarily with midterm
negotiations; hence, many of these negative values are excluded
from the analysis. However, a few remain, so the reader is asked
to keep in mind that such results do not represent problems or
errors in the analysis.
For some analyses, we restrict the sample to “major” carriers
only. Carriers identified as major in the sample are Alaska,
American, America West, Continental, Delta, Eastern, Northwest,
Pan American (Pan Am), Southwest, Trans World (TWA), United,
and US Airways.
D e sc rip tiv e results

Durations o f negotiation.

Table 1 summarizes the average
duration o f contract negotiations for various types o f con-

tracts across all carriers and all years from 1982 to 2002. For
“standard” contracts— all those except first contracts and
those sealed through m idterm negotiations— the industry
average over those years was 14.1 m onths betw een the
amendable date of the previous contract and the ratification
date of the negotiated contract. The duration varied from as
low as -11.5 months (agreements reached almost 1 year before
the previous contract became amendable) to as high as 72
months (6 years). Contracts with the major carriers took 20
percent longer, with a 16.5-month average. For about half of
the sample (121 standard contracts), an actual negotiation
starting date, typically 1 or 2 months before the amendable
date, was available. M easured from that date, contracts took
an average of 16.0 months (1.3 years) to negotiate.4
Table 2 shows the distribution of durations of negotiation
relative to the amendable date. For example, 7 percent of the
contracts were ratified before the amendable date of the previous
contract, about half of the contracts were ratified by 1 year after
the amendable date, and 81 percent of the contracts were ratified
by 2 years after the amendable date, leaving 19 percent still in
negotiations after 2 years. The major carriers’ distribution is
shifted further out, with a smaller percentage of completed
negotiations at every period. The two distributions provide a
way to compare the airline industry against industries with
contracts covered under the National Labor Relations Act.

Comparison with other industries. Although no data are
available that allow a direct comparison of the time required to
reach agreements in airline negotiations with the time required to
reach agreements in industries with contracts covered under the
wmtamm
Type of
contract

M e a n d u r a t io n o f n e g o t ia t io n s , in m o n t h s , b y
f y p e 0 f c o n t r a c t , 1 9 8 2 -2 0 0 2

Number

Measured from
amendable date:
All contracts.. 265
Midterm
40
negotiations
Initial contracts 26
Standard
contracts1... 199
Standard
contracts
withmajor
103
carriers.....
Measured from
starting date
of
negotiations:
Standard
contracts1... 121
Standard
contracts
with major
59
carriers....

Mean number Standard
Minimum Maximum
of months
deviation

12.1

17.6

-40.3

73.6

-10.7
31.5

13.3
17.8

-40.3
6.7

34.2
73.6

14.1

13.3

-11.5

72.1

16.5

14.7

11.5

72.1

16.0

12.9

.8

52.8

19.3

13.6

.9

52.8

1Standard contracts exclude midterm negotiations and Initial contracts.


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

T a b l e 2.

P e r c e n t o f c o n t r a c t s , b y d u r a t io n o f n e g o t ia t io n s ,
1 9 8 2 -2 0 0 2

Num ber of months
past am en d ab le d a te

Num ber of
negotiations

Percent of
negotiations

Cumulative
percent
of negotiations

All carriers........
0 or less................
1.........................
3 .........................
6.........................
12.......................
18.......................
24.......................
More than 24...........
Major carriers.....
0 or less................
1.........................
3 .........................
6.........................
12.......................
18.......................

199
14
8
16
21
44
40
19
37
103
4
2
7
11
26
19

100.0
7.0
4.0
8.0
10.6
22.1
20.1
9.6
18.6
100.0
3.9
1.9
6.8
10.7
25.2
18.5

100.0
7.0
11.1
19.1
30.0
51.8
71.9
81.4
100.0
100.0
3.9
5.8
12.6
23.3
48.5
67.0

24.......................
More than 24...........

12
22

11.7
21.4

78.6
100.0

National Labor Relations Act, a partial comparison can be made
from a survey of a nationally representative sample of ne­
gotiations conducted under the Act between 1994-96 and 199799.5 Chart 1 compares the percentage of negotiations completed
within 1 month of the amendable date at all airlines and at major
carriers against the percentage of negotiations completed within
1 month of the expiration date in the National Labor Relations
Act sample. While differences in periods covered by these data,
as well as differences between the legal and institutional settings
in which the negotiations occur, caution against making too much
of the comparisons, the differences are too large to dismiss.
Under the National Labor Relations Act, 74 percent of contracts
were settled before or within 1 month of their expiration date,
compared with 11 percent of the airline contracts. The perception
that negotiations in the airline industry take a long time is thus
borne out by the data.

Frequency o f occurrence o f resolution processes.

Table 3
presents the frequency of occurrence of the various resolution
procedures administered by the National Mediation Board. The
first point to note is that the system does seem to produce
negotiated settlements: strikes (3 percent of cases) and even
Presidential Emergency Boards (1.5 percent of cases) are rare
occurrences.
However, it is not at all uncommon for these settlements to
require an extended process and government intervention: half
of the contracts went into mediation, and one-third of the
mediated contracts (16 percent overall) were declared to be at an
impasse and released into the cooling-off period. In addition, 19
percent of the contracts were initially rejected at least once by
the rank and file.
These events have clear implications as regards the duration
Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

21

Labor Contract Negotiations

Chart 1.

Percent of contracts ratified more than 1 month past their expiration date, National
Labor Relations Act (NLRA) and airlines

Percent

Percent

100

100

Private sector,

Private sector,

Public sector,

1994-96

1997-99

1997-99

(NLRA)

(NLRA)

(NLRA)

All airlines,

All airlines,

Major airlines,

1997-99

1982-2002

1982-2002

Airline Industrial Relations Conference, 1984-2001; Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service National Performance
Review Surveys, 1994-96 and 1997-99.

SOURCES:

of negotiations. Table 3 indicates that mediated contracts take
more than twice as long to reach agreement as those which
settle without mediation (19.2 months, compared with 9.0
m onths), and a rejected tentative agreement adds about 6
m onths to negotiations (18.5 months, as opposed to 13.0
months, a 45-percent increase). (O f course, the negotiations
that went into mediation could have taken even longer— or
had a much higher probability of ending in a strike— without
the a v ailab ility o f m ediation.) Interestingly, voluntary
arbitration is a rare event (3.5 percent of contracts). Clearly,
the parties prefer to seek negotiated settlements.

fidence level. This suggests that, on average, negotiations
took about 19 days longer each successive year. O f course,
as chart 2 indicates, the trend was by no means a smooth
increase. When the sample is restricted to major carriers only,
the trend loses its statistical significance altogether (and
decreases in magnitude). Apparently, then, the temporally
increasing trend is actually the resu lt o f the changing
composition of carriers in the industry (or at least in the
Table 3.

F r e q u e n c y o f o c c u r r e n c e o f re s o lu t io n
p r o c e d u r e s a d m in is t e r e d b y t h e N a t io n a l
M e d ia t io n B o a r d , 1 9 82 -2 0 02

Trends.

Table 4 shows the average duration of all nego­
tiations that began in a given year. (That is, the amendable
date was in that year.) Chart 2 displays these annual averages
graphically. The chart seems to indicate an increase in the
duration of negotiations over time, but certainly not at a steady
rate. To test whether there has been a statistically significant
trend in the duration of negotiations over time, the method of
ordinary least squares was used to regress duration2 on a
time trend variable (equal to unity in 1981 and proceeding by
increments to 20 in 2000). The resulting coefficient o f 0.574 on
the time trend variable was significant at the 99-percent con­
22
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Procedure

Mediation................
Arbitration................
Release..................
Presidential Emergency
Board...................
Strike.....................
Rejected tentative
agreement.............

Frequency
Number
(percent)

Duration of
negotiations,
in months
Mean

Standard
deviation

99
7
31

49.8
3.5
15.6

19.2
5.2
25.5

14.0
14.6
16.5

3
6

1.5
3.0

36.2
20.2

18.3
11.6

38

19.1

18.5

15.6

T a b le 4.

M e a n d u r a t io n o f n e g o t ia t io n s , in m o n th s ,
1 9 8 3 -2 0 0 0

Mean number
Number
of negotiations of months

Year

17
19
26
8
15
10
17
14
4
8
8
6
8
12
11
3
4
8

1983....................
1984....................
1985....................
1986....................
1987....................
1988....................
1989....................
1990....................
1991 ....................
1992....................
1993....................
1994....................
1995....................
1996....................
1997....................
1998....................
1999....................
2000....................

Standard
deviation

6.9
6.9
17.3
15.1
13.2
15.8
14.7
13.6
3.8
9.8
13.4
12.5
14.0
16.0
8.4

13.5
6.4
10.0
10.5
10.9
18.0
14.1
20.1
5.2
19.9
11.7
18.0
19.3
25.3
16.5
21.1
8.3
13.7

11.7

6.6
5.5

sample). Smaller carriers that also had shorter negotiation
times were more prevalent in the early years of the sample
and dropped out in the later years.
Table 5 displays the frequencies of resolution procedures
Chart 2.

in different periods. The sample time frame is broken into five
periods: 1982-85,1986-89,1990-93,1994-97, and 1998-2000.
The table shows a much higher reliance on National Mediation
Board processes after 1997: in 1998-2000, the percentage of
contracts that went into mediation jum ped to 73 percent after
averaging close to 50 percent for the previous four periods.
Arbitration, always rare, did not occur at all in the latest period.
No Presidential Emergency Boards were invoked until after
1993, and there have been three since. Curiously, the per­
centage of released contracts is much lower in the most recent
period, after having jumped up slightly in period 4. To some
degree, this diminution may result from the fact that not all
contracts that becam e am endable in 2000 had been re­
negotiated by the end of the study; hence, those contracts
were not included in the sample and were certainly likely to be
in mediation and perhaps more likely to be released. Overall,
table 5 lends more support to the belief that the labor relations
system is taking longer and relying more heavily on gov­
ernment intervention in the most recent period, relative to
previous periods.

Carrier, occupation, and union averages.

Tables 6 and 7
summarize the mean durations of negotiations by carrier,

Average duration of contract negotiations, by starting year, 1983-2000
Number of
months
30

Number of
months
30

0

■■■■ ■■■

—

......

— - ■■■■—

..................

0

1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000


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Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

23

Labor Contract Negotiations

occupation, and union, sorted from longest to shortest. In table 6,
only carriers with three or more contracts are included, and in table
7, only unions with two or more contracts are included.6 Table 6
indicates that there was substantial variation across carriers in the
average duration of negotiations. World Airways had the longest
average duration, 29.4 months, Western the shortest, 2.6 months.
The major carriers can be relatively naturally divided into three
groups: (1) those who took more than 20 months, on average (US
Airways, TWA, United, and Northwest); (2) those who took about
the average time of 14.1 months (Pan Am, American, Delta, and
Alaska); and (3) those who took less than 12 months (Southwest
and Continental). However, the variation within individual carriers
across contracts is rather high. Thus, only US Airways and
Northwest have means that are statistically different from the
overall mean at greater than 95-percent probability. Note that
Continental’s small number of contracts makes its very low mean
not statistically significantly different from the average.
Table 7 reveals that the differences across occupations are
not as large as those across carriers. When not joined with related
ground crews, mechanics have a very high average, significantly
different from the overall mean despite only four observations.
Pilots have a slightly lower average (11.9 months) than the mean,
one that is significant at the 90-percent confidence level.
There is more variation across unions. The highest average
belongs to the combined International Association of M a­
chinists and A erospace W orkers and A ircraft M echanics
Fraternal Association, or “ ia m -a m f a ,” a designation which
indicates that negotiations were begun by the ia m , but were
concluded by the a m f a after it replaced the i a m . N ot
surprisingly, given the change in union representation, these
negotiations took a long time. The International Brotherhood of
Teamsters, at 20.6 months, is significantly above the average.
The IAM and the Association of Flight Attendants are close to
the average, while the Air Line Pilots Association International
( a l p a ) and the Transport Workers Union of America, at 10.4
months and 8.2 months, respectively, are below the average, but
only a l p a ’s average is statistically significantly different from
the overall mean.

|

F r e q u e n c y o f re so lu tio n p r o c e d u r e , b y p e rio d ,
1 982-2002

[In percent]
Procedure

Contracts
(number).......
Mediation........
Arbitration.......
Release.........
Presidential
Emergency
Board...........
Strike............
Rejected tentative
agreement......

1982-85

1986-89

1990-93

1994-97

1998-2002

63
54
3
16

50
46
4
14

34
41
6
15

37
46
3
22

15
73
0
7

0
5

0
0

0
6

5
3

7
0

14

16

15

35

20

24
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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

Table 6.

M e a n d u r a t io n o f n e g o t ia t io n s , in m o n th s , b y
c a r r ie r , 1 9 8 2 -2 0 0 2

Carrier

Total...................
World......................
Wien.......................
Airborne Express........
US Airways2..............
Trans World2..............
United2.....................
Northwest2................
AirWisconsin..............
United Parcel Service...
Pan American2............
American2.................
Delta2......................
Alaska2....................
Southwest2................
PSA........................
Aloha.......................
Ozark......................
Hawaiian...................
Continental2...............
Piedmont..................
AirCal......................
Frontier (old3) .............
Western...................

Number
Mean number
of
of months
negotiations'

186
3
3
3
13
9
11
15
7
4
7
10
4
16
14
4
20
3
12
3
6
3
6
4

Standard
deviation

13.6
529.4
24.6
22.5
521.9
421.4
420.7
520.7
20.1
19.2
15.9
15.7
15.2
12.8
9.2
9.0
58.3
7.2
55.3
5.1
45.0
4.4
s4.0
42.6

2.1
.0
1.3
14.5
12.9
12.7
16.4
13.6
5.1
25.1
13.1
2.9
17.7
4.9
6.4
6.3
11.1
5.4
5.6
3.5
3.5
9.3
8.3

1At least three contracts.
2Major carrier.
3Ceased to exist in 1986. A new Frontier Ailrines that started up in 1994
is not included in the study.
4p< .10.
6p < .05.
The wide range in the duration of negotiations suggests that
there is nothing inherent in the framework of the Railway Labor
Act that makes long negotiations inevitable. While some carriers
and unions average almost 2 years, others have been able to
average under 1 year. Of particular interest is the fact that the two
major carriers with low averages for the duration of negotiations
are also the two with reputations for the best labor relations
among the majors.7(The Continental contracts are all post-1991,
and four of the five were ratified after 1994). This fact adds
evidence to the idea that contract negotiation durations and
overall labor relations are connected.
Still, many observers would suggest that the duration of
negotiations is driven by factors that are somewhat out of the
control of carrier managements and union leaderships. In
particular, a common notion is that negotiations will be shortest
in bad times, when the survival of the carrier is more likely to be
at stake. The next section tests explicitly whether the duration of
negotiations can be partially explained by economic conditions.
Carrier size a n d e c o n o m ic conditions

Variables and model specification. In order to analyze the effect
of carrier size, carrier-level economic conditions, and industry
economic conditions on the duration of contract negotiations,
detailed financial and operational data from the carriers’ Form 41

filings to the Department of Transportation were used. From this
database, a number o f variables were constructed:

1. Organization size.

To measure carrier size, the carrier’s
annual revenue is used. To measure the number o f employees
covered by the negotiations, the number o f employees in a
given occupation (as reported in the Form 41 filings) at a
given carrier in a year is calculated. (For example, this number
might be the number o f pilots at United in 1984.)

2. Carrier economic conditions.

A carrier’s economic
condition is measured in three ways: by its profit rates
(operating margin), debt levels, and revenue growth rates.
The carrier’s operating margin is calculated as operating
income (earnings before interest and taxes) divided by
revenue. Both the current-period margin and a 3-year average
margin (over times t, t - 1, and t - 2) were used. A carrier’s
leverage is calculated as its total debt divided by total assets.
Higher levels o f debt relative to assets should provide some
indication o f how great the threat o f bankruptcy is. Finally, a
carrier’s growth rate is calculated as the percent change in
revenue from t - 1 to t. As with margin, both a 1-year and a 3year growth rate are posited.

In addition, the square o f the operating margin was employed
to test whether there is a nonmonotonic relationship between
Table 7.

profitability and duration o f negotiations. (That is, an answer
was sought to the question, “Do extremes o f profitability in either
direction have the same impact on negotiations?”)
Finally, anecdotal evidence from the industry suggests that
negotiations become particularly difficult— and hence lengthy—
if the economic conditions facing the bargaining parties change
significantly once bargaining has started. In particular, for
negotiations that start near a peak in profits, but extend into the
beginning of bust years, unions looking back and expecting
wage raises are pitted against managements looking forward
and hoping for wage freezes (or cuts). To test whether changes
in conditions after the start of negotiations had a significant
effect on the duration of the negotiations, the change in operating
margin from the year negotiations began to the next year was
calculated.

3. Industry economic conditions.

Economic measures similar
to those calculated for the carrier were also calculated for the
industry as a whole. Industry-level totals are computed by
summing revenue and operating income for all carriers in the
Form 41 database. With these totals, the various ratios are
calculated. For the industry, operating margin and revenue
growth were measured, and, again, the 1-year and 3-year
average measures were calculated for both. Also, industry
margin is squared, to test for nonmonotonic effects. Finally,
a change in margin was computed to test the “change-in­
conditions” hypothesis.

M e a n d u r a t io n o f n e g o t ia t io n s , in m o n t h s , b y
o c c u p a t io n a n d u n io n , 1982-2002

Results.
Occupation or union

Mean number
Number
of negotiations of months

O ccupation

Total...................
Mechanics only.........
Fleet service............
Flight attendants.......
Agents...................
Mechanics and related ...
Pilots....................
Union1

Total...................
IAM-AMFA...............
APFA.....................
IPA.......................
IBT2......................
APA......................
1AM2......................
AFA2.....................
ALPA2....................
ALEA.....................
TWU2.....................
SAPA.....................
IUFA......................
' At least two contracts.
2Major union.
3p<.10.
4p< .05.
5p< .01.


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Standard
deviation

199
4
6
50
30
40
69

14.1
533.5
19.0
15.5
13.9
13.6
311.9

23.0
9.6
14.0
15.1
11.1
11.9

193
2
3
2
26
3
54
30
54
3
11
3
2

13.9
539.0
327.4
21.8
520.6
19.0
15.2
13.6
410.4
8.7
8.2
7.3
5.4

24.1
11.7
7.2
14.8
11.9
12.4
13.6
12.2
12.3
6.1
1.3
3.8

Summary statistics on the economic variables are
presented in table 8. The method of ordinary least squares was
used to regress the duration of negotiations ( duration2) on the
variables just described, as well as on dummy variables for the
year, airline, occupation, and union. A number o f the variables
had no significant coefficients, either alone or in various
combinations. Carrier size and some measures o f growth yielded
some significant results, but neither the profitability measures
nor the change-in-profitability m easures generated any
significant coefficients.8 The results presented use only those
m easures w hich had sig n ifican t co efficien ts in som e
specifications. Table 9 gives the results of the ordinary leastsquares regressions. Columns 1 through 5 do not include carrier
dummies, whereas columns 6 through 12 do.
The coefficient on the time trend is positive and significant
in every model, except when year dummies are included. This
is true even when carrier dummies are included (columns 6,7,
9, 10, and 11), suggesting that the duration o f negotiations
has increased significantly over time, even after controlling
for changes in the com position o f the sample. However,
adding year dummies to control for idiosyncratic year effects
renders the trend insignificant.
The coefficient on carrier size (that is, revenue) is positive

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

25

Labor Contract Negotiations

p it f M ii

S u m m a r y statistics, e c o n o m i c v a r ia b le s u s e d in a n a ly s is

Variable

Number of
observations

Year....................................
Trend............................
duration2 (amendable).............
Employees (thousands)..............
Revenue (Sbillions)..................
Margin.................................
Three-year margin...................
Margin squared.......................
Debts/assets.........................
Growth................................
Three-year growth...................
Margin change (t+ 1)................
Margin change squared.............
Industry margin......................
Three-year industry margin........
Industry growth......................
Three-year industry growth.........
Industry margin change (t + 1).....
Industry margin change squared...

199
199
199
137
192
192
174
192
192
191
152
181
181
199
181
198
162
191
191

9.6
14.10
4.0
3.2
.03
.03
.006
.34
.10
.10
-.01
.005
.03
.03
.08
.08
.001
.001

and highly significant in columns 1 through 5, which take into
account cross-airline size variation. The revenue coefficient
is insignificant, however, in each model with carrier fixed
effects, implying that the duration of negotiations for a given
carrier does not increase significantly as the carrier grows
larger. N onetheless, in the cross section, in which size
differences among airlines can be quite large, larger airlines
do take longer to negotiate contracts than smaller airlines

Table 9.

Standard
deviation

Mean

Minimum

Maximum

1982
2
-11.53
.0
.02
-.29
-.17
.000
.001
-.64
-.29
-.27
.000
-.02
-.02
-.01
.03
-.051
.000

5.14
13.27
5.0
4.2
.08
.06
.010
.17
.14
.10
.07
.012
.03
.02
.03
.02
.025
.001

2000
20
72 06
26 8
19.3
18
16
084
1.32
.54
.43
.17
.0075
.08
.07
.14
.11
.045
.002

take. The coefficient on carrier size, when it is significant, is
approximately 0.7, implying that a $1 billion size differential
between carriers entails about a 22-day differential in the
duration of negotiations. The difference between the smallest
and largest revenue values is $19.3 billion, which translates
into a maxim um 14-month difference in the duration of
negotiations.
There is some evidence that higher carrier growth rates

O r d in a r y le a s t - s q u a r e s re g r e s s io n s o f d u r a t io n o f n e g o t ia t io n s o n c a r r ie r a n d in d u s try f in a n c ia l c o n d it io n s
a n d w ith o u t f ix e d e f f e c t s

w ith

Model number
V/ithout carrier fixed effects

Independent variable
1

2

3

4

With carrier fixed effects
5

Time trend...................

'0.336 20.376
(.196) (.198)

20.571
(.308)

'0.535 -0.464
(.308) (.275)

Revenue (billions of dollars)

3.700
(.240)

3.683
(.239)

3.703
(.590)

3.683
(.259)

3.698
(.222)

-

7.25
(6.82)

10.96
(8.35)

6.18
(9.26)

One-year carrier growth....
Three-year industry growth
(average, t - 3 to t) .......

-

Fixed effects................

-

-

N ............................................

.082
192

-

.085
191

2p<.05.
3p< .01.

26
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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

-

81.5

— (59.5)
"

Adjusted R ...................

-

July 2003

-

—
.075
155

56.3
(62.4)
-

—
~
.079
155

6

7

30.795
(.206)

20.671
(.304)

_
-

218.86
(8.43)

8

9

10

11

12

0.013
(.508)

20.963
(.403)

20.971
(.403)

20.702
(.294)

0.446
(.509)

.332
(.574)

.261
(.663)

.162
(.677)

.142
(.678)

.198
(-542)

-.205
(.639)

218.36
(8.49)

14.77
(9.80)

_
-

9.77
(10.33)

218.05
(8.01)

'15.60
(9.33)

2128.7
(60.4)

'108.0
(64.3)

_

carrier
-

_

_

carrier
-

carrier
union

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

year
”

carrier carrier
—
—

.206
191

.225
191

year
carrier
-

-

-

year
carrier
union

.221
.249
.215
.214
.329
.350
191
191
155
155
191
191
N o t e : Dash indicates variable not included in regression reported in
column. Numbers in parentheses are estimated standard errors.

lead to longer negotiations, but these results are not robust,
because they depend strongly on the measurement and model
chosen. Both a carrier’s 1-year growth rate and the industry’s
3-year average growth rate have positive coefficients in all
models. However, the significance of those coefficients is not
consistent. For example, a carrier’s 1-year growth rate has a
significant positive coefficient in several of the models with
carrier fixed effects, implying that, as carriers register higher
growth rates, the duration of their contract negotiations gets
longer. However, the coefficient is not significant in the cross
section (without the carrier fixed effects). The same is true for
the 3-year average of industry growth. Furthermore, neither
the carrier-level 3-year average growth nor the industry-level
1-year growth has significant coefficients in any model.
(These results are not shown in table 9). Hence, there is some
evidence that higher growth may lead to a longer duration of
negotiations, but the finding is not robust. Adding fixed
effects for unions (columns 11 and 12) enhances the precision
o f the estim ated coefficien ts o f the other independent
variables, but does not alter any of the basic patterns.
Overall, table 9 indicates that (1) over time, contracts are
taking longer to negotiate, even after controlling for the
composition of the sample and for increasing carrier size; (2)
larger carriers are associated with a longer duration of
negotiations; and (3) higher growth rates, too, may correlate
with a longer duration of negotiations. Surprisingly, none of
the profitability measures, nor the leverage measure, had any
important effect on the duration of negotiations. Neither did
any of the measures of changing economic conditions after
negotiations. These various measures of a carrier’s financial
health are not significantly correlated with the duration of a
carrier’s negotiations.
Looking directly at the fixed effects indicates that the
identities of the bargaining parties help explain much more of
the significance than do objective economic conditions. Table
10 reports the R2 statistics when duration of negotiation is
regressed on various com binations of fixed effects. For
example, fixed effects for years by themselves account for 16
percent of the variation in the duration of negotiations across

contracts (column 1). Including fixed effects for the year,
airline, occupation, and union accounts for more than 60
percent of the variation in duration (column 11). Controlling
only for the identity of the bargaining parties— airline and
union— accounts for 48 percent of the variation (column 6).
Thus, the identity of the bargaining parties provides more
predictive power than does any of the other variables.
D ata o n a l a r g e s a m p l e o f a ir l in e l a b o r c o n t r a c t s

indicate that the industry’s labor negotiations take 1.3 years, on
average, to conclude. Only 11 percent of contracts are concluded
by 1 month after the amendable date, in contrast to 74 percent of
contracts negotiated under the National Labor Relations Act.
Half of airline negotiations go into Federal mediation.
The data presented in this article broadly support the notion
that the industry’s negotiations are lasting longer in recent years,
although the trend over time is not at all monotonic and results
partly from the fact that carriers which survived longer tended to
have longer average negotiations. (That is, carriers with shorter
negotiation times exited the sample over time.) The reliance on
Federal intervention is clearly higher than ever in recent years,
with almost 75 percent of the negotiations begun in 1998 through
2000 going into m ediation and with several Presidential
Emergency Boards being invoked, whereas there had been none
from deregulation until 1994.
Not surprisingly, negotiations take longer at larger airlines.
The average duration of negotiations for major carriers was
20 percent higher than the overall sample average. However,
the data support neither the hypothesis that a carrier’s financial
health affects the duration of negotiations nor the hypothesis
that a significant change in economic conditions after the
start of negotiations adds to the expected duration. There is
limited (but not robust) support for the idea that negotiations
take longer while the carrier or industry is experiencing high
growth rates.
Most interesting is the fact that the identities of the bargaining
parties are the major predictors of the duration of negotiations.
There is noticeable variation across carriers and unions in the
average negotiation time. While one tier of major carriers

O r d in a r y le a s t - s q u a r e s r e g r e s s io n s o f d u r a t io n o f n e g o t ia t io n s o n d u m m y v a r ia b le s fo r y e a r , a irlin e ,
o c c u p a t i o n , a n d u n io n

Number of months betw een ratification and am en d ab le dates
variable

1

Year effects........
Carrier effects.....
Occupation effects.
Union effects.......

Year

Adjusted FP .........

.16
199

N ...................................
Note:

-

-

2

Carrier
-

.337
199

4

3

5

_

_

-

-

Occupation
Union
.059
199

7

6

_

_

Carrier Carrier
Occupation
- Union

.177
199

.404
199

.484
199

9

8

_

11

10

_

Year
Year
Carrier Carrier
Carrier
Occuption Occupation Occupation
Union
Union
Union
-

.203
199

.504
199

.516
199

Year
Carrier
Occupation
Union

.597
199

.608
199

Dash indicates variable not included in regression reported in column.


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Monthly Labor Review

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27

Labor Contract Negotiations

averages almost 2 years to complete negotiations, another tier
averages under 1 year. The examples o f Southwest Airlines and
Continental Airlines are the strongest indications that ne­
gotiations conducted under the Railway Labor Act are neither
“destined” nor “doomed” to last more than a year.
As participants in, and observers of, the airline’s labor re­
lations system discuss proposals to reform the system, the
analysis presented in this article provides useful data-driven input
into that process. It does seem to be the case that the system is
experiencing increasing strains, as is evidenced in long nego-

tiation times and heavy reliance on mediation. However, the
source o f those strains is not necessarily solely the industry's
economic conditions nor the regulatory framework. Some parties
are able to agree on and stick to principles and processes that
generate noticeably shorter negotiation times, which also helps
match their contracts to prevailing economic circumstances.
Future research on the comparative practices o f carriers with
long durations o f negotiation and those with short durations
of negotiation would be valuable in improving the effectiveness
o f the industry’s overall labor relations system.
□

Notes
The authors thank Rob DeLucia at the Airline
Industrial Relations Conference for his insights and generous coop­
eration, as well as for access to the data. Robert McKersie and Jody
Hoffer Gittell offered helpful comments, and Matthew Brooks provided
valuable research assistance. We especially thank the Alfred R Sloan
Foundation and the m i t Global Airline Industry Program for financial
support.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:

1 See Jody Hoffer Gittell, Andrew von Nordenflycht, and Thomas A.
Kochan, “Mutual Gains or Zero Sum? Labor Relations and Firm
Performance in the Airline Industry, “Industrial and Labor Relations
Review, in press; and Thomas A. Kochan, Andrew von Nordenflycht,
Robert B. McKersie, and Jody Hoffer Gittell, “Out of the Ashes: Options
for Rebuilding Airline Labor Relations, “ Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, Sloan School of Management Working Paper, 2003.
2 An investigation o f the average nunber of contracts per occu­
pation suggests that the coverage is reasonably complete and the
exclusions are not systematic. (It does seem, however, that, except
for pilots’ contracts, contracts at Southwest began appearing only
after 1989.)

slightly less time (1.9 - 1.3 = 0.6 month) to negotiate than the set of
contracts for which negotiation starting dates were known. The
difference is small enough that one should be comfortable comparing
the two samples.
5 For a description of the data and the sample, see Joel CutcherGershenfeld, Thomas A. Kochan, and John Calhoun Wells, “How do
labor and management view collective bargaining?” Monthly Labor
Review, October 1998, pp. 23-31.
6 For reasons of spaces, only the abbreviations of the names of the
unions are listed in the table. The abbreviations and the names they
stand for are as follows: i a m —International Association of Machinists
and Aerospace Workers; a m f a — A ircraft M echanics Fraternal
Association; a p f a —Association of Professional Flight Attendants;
i p a —Independent Pilots Association; i b t — International Brotherhood
of Teamsters; a p a — Allied Pilots Association; a f a —Association of
Flight Attendants; a l p a — Air Line Pilots Association; t w u — Transport
Workers Union; s a p a — Southwest Airlines Pilots Association; a l e a —
Airborne Law Enforcement Association; i u f a — Independent Union of
Flight Attendants.

3 The Form 41 data were accessed through a database compiled by
Data Base Products, Inc., of Dallas, Texas.

7 Hoffer Gittell, von Nordenflycht, and Kochan, “Mutual Gains or
Zero Sum,”; see also Jody Hoffer Gittell, The Southwest Airlines Way
(New York: McGraw-Hill, 2003).

4 For the 121-contract sample, the mean difference between the
negotiation starting date and the amendable date was 1.3 months.
However, the 16.0-month average duration of the 121-contract sample
was 2.1 months longer than the 14.1-month average of the 199contract sample. This difference implies that the set of contracts for
which negotiation starting dates were not known took, on average,

8 The coefficient on margin squared comes up significantly negative
in the non-fixed-effects model, but the result is driven by three
observations on small carriers with short negotiation times and large
operating losses (for example, less than -20 percent). The significance
o f this coefficient disappears completely when these three
observations are dropped from the analysis.

28
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July 2003

Precis

lisgi

Banks and factories

Money and happiness

The structure o f the banking system, it
seem s lik ely enough, w ill have an
influence on how industry start, grow,
decline, and die. One thought, according
to Nicola Cetorelli in the Federal Reserve
Bank o f St. Louis Review , is that less
competitive banking might favor new
firms in the expectation that big banks
would be able to secure “rents” when
such firms turn profitable. Or, Cetorelli
points out, more competitive banks might
be the ones to seek out such new business.
C e to re lli uses data from the
L ongitudinal R esearch D atabase the
Census m aintains for m anufacturing
establishments, earlier studies o f bank
deregulation, and data from the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation to study
this issue carefully. The results tended to
favor the second hypothesis. Bank
deregulation has a significant positive
impact on the rate o f job creation in new
establishments and bank concentration
has a significant negative impact on the
growth o f em ploym ent in new firms
relative to total employment. Taken
together, says Cetorelli, this might even
suggest that market power on the part of
banks might be a barrier to entry.
As m anufacturing establishm ents
become “middle aged”— 2 to 10 years
old—banking competition has little effect
on jo b creation, but deregulation is
a sso cia te d w ith low er rates o f jo b
destruction. As manufacturers evolve
into “mature” firms— over 10 years old—
C eto relli finds th at som e o f these
relationships change. Specifically, bank
c o n ce n tra tio n becom es p o sitiv e ly
associated with expansion.
“More competition in banking,” says
Cetorelli, “appears to promote job creation
among industrial establishments at the
start-up stage and to perm it them to
prosper in the immediate wake o f their
entry into the market.” As a result, more
bank competition may tend to encourage
an industrial structure with more new firms
and h ig h er p ro p o rtio n s o f to tal
employment in younger establishments.

E c o n o m ists have g e n e ra lly b een
somewhat leery o f subjective measures
such as “happiness.” However, as Carol
Graham, Andrew Eggers, and Sandip
Sukhtankar point out in “The Effects o f
Income Losses and Gains on Happiness:
Do Temporary Trends Matter?” from the
Brookings Institution Center on Social
and Economic Dynamics, the increasing
availability o f survey data has led to
th e ir in creasing use by econom ists
willing to take into account their margins
o f erro r.
G raham , E g g ers, and
Sukhtankar explore using the permanent
in co m e h y p o th e sis to u n d e rsta n d
changes in the reported well-being—
eco n o m ist-ese for “h ap p in ess”— o f
respondents to the Russian Longitudinal
Monitoring Survey from 1995 to 2000.
Carefully noting that the results are
prelim inary and subject to influences
ran g in g from the v o latile R ussian
economy to the difficulty o f collecting
income data from individuals, the authors
find that their proxy for perm anent
income changes had more influence on
happiness than did their m easure o f
transitory income change. This is in
accord with the general outlines o f the
permanent income approach. They also
fo u n d th a t w h ile incom e loss w as
associated with a decline in happiness,
as one would expect, the size o f the loss
seemed to make little difference. On the
other hand, both income gains and the
size o f the gain had positive effects on
the survey’s measure o f happiness.
According to Graham, Eggers, and
Sukhtankar, “These results suggest that
respondents evaluate income gains in a
more nuanced or sophisticated way than
they do losses. Perhaps people who gain
income were more likely to consider that
income gain as something that they valued
and devoted more time to comparing their
gain with gains made by other people.
People who lost income, by contrast, may
have been more likely to accept the loss as
a one-shot negative shock, and not to
dwell on the extent of their loss. In other


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words, losers were trying not to cry over
spilt milk (or, more accurately, measure the
amount spilt), while gainers were more
interested in— and happy— counting
their gains.”

Recovery began in
November 2001
The Business Cycle Dating Committee of
the N atio n al B ureau o f E conom ic
Research (NBER) determined that a trough
in business activity occurred in the U.S.
economy in November 2001, thus ending
the recession that began in March 2001.
The recession lasted 8 months.
Iden tify in g the tro u g h in v olved
weighing a wide variety o f economic
indicators, with particular emphasis on
real p erso n al incom e and p ay ro ll
employment, since both reflect the entire
economy. Less emphasis is placed on
industrial production and real sales, which
m ainly cover the m anufacturing and
goods-producing sectors, and unofficial
estimates of monthly real GDP.
All the major indicators o f economic
activity were flat or declining through
September 2001. Real GDP then began to
grow and continued growing; this growth
in the most comprehensive measure of
economic activity ruled out the possibility
that the trough came later than the fourth
quarter.
Estimated monthly GDP and the sales
measures reached their lows in Septem­
ber. However, personal income, employ­
ment, and industrial production were all
substan tially low er in O ctober and
November than in September, and some
o f the depressed level o f activity in
September 2001 was the result o f the
events o f September 11, and thus should
be d isc o u n te d . F rom O c to b e r to
November, industrial production and
sales fell, em ploym ent edged down,
perso n al incom e rose slightly, and
m onthly real GDP rose m oderately.
B ased on the balance o f this, NBER
concluded that the economy reached a
trough in November.
□

Monthly Labor Review July 2003

29

Book Reviews

Across-the-pond sports
Transatlantic Sport: The Comparative
Economics o f North American and
European Sports. By Carlos Pestana
Barros, Muradali Ibrahimo, and Stefan
Szymanski, eds. Northampton, MA,
Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc., 2002,
240 pp. $85/hardback.
On the field, sports may be competitive
games, but as is the case wherever very
large sums o f money change hands, the
laws o f economics, labor relations, and
competition policy also come into play.
Transatlantic Sport takes comparative
looks at the way sports leagues and their
team s are organized, financed, and
staffed in European and North Ameri­
can contexts.
The competitive conundrum o f pro­
fessional grade sports springs from the
facts that it takes the joint effort o f two
teams (“firms”) to produce the product;
that there has to be some uncertainty o f
result to make that product interesting;
that results are more uncertain if eco­
nomic resources are more equally dis­
tributed among teams; but that good
teams in rich markets will gather in often
m assively disproportionate shares o f
athletic and economic resources.
In the American model, this conun­
drum has been solved, with varying de­
grees o f success across the major pro­
fessional sports, by some combination
o f labor market restraints and revenue
sh arin g w ithin clo sed p ro fe ssio n a l
leagues. In Europe, a system o f promot­
ing top teams from lower rungs o f the
sporting ladder and relegation o f the
bottom teams from the higher rungs is
seen to provide sufficient spectator in­
terest as new competitors arrive and oth­
ers leave the league.
The book’s paper by Stefan Szyman­
ski and Ron Smith investigates which
model works best. On one hand, as we
so often say in economics, static mea­
sures such as the standard deviations
o f winning percentages are similar for
European soccer leagues and the foot­

30
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July 2003

ball, baseball, and hockey leagues o f
North America. On the other hand, a
dynamic model can explain more o f the
variation in Europe, implying a greater
predictability o f results. As Szymanski
and Smith characterize their findings, “In
short, North American leagues create
equality o f outcome for the select incum­
bents, while European leagues display
equality o f opportunity without equal­
ity o f outcome.”
The papers on the regulation and fi­
nancing o f sports by Peter J. Sloane and
H.F. Moorhouse give some insight into
the domination o f European soccer by a
very few large clubs. Sloane focuses on
regulatory decisions that have imposed
a fairly extreme form o f free agency on
European sport (the Bosman case), and
sometimes awkwardly applied anti-trust
or competition law to professional sport
(the U.K. Monopoly and Mergers Com­
mission investigation o f a proposed ac­
q u isition o f M anchester U nited by
broadcaster BSkyB and the U.K. Restric­
tive Practices Court investigation o f the
collective sale o f television rights by the
English Premier Soccer League). Moor­
house examines the difficulties faced by
very good small-market teams compet­
ing with the financial resources o f me­
diocre teams in bigger markets. His ma­
jo r concern is that “gold-rush” soccer
economics enable those currently in bet­
ter markets to comer the broader market.
Where there was thus a range o f opin­
ions on the economics and regulation of
sport competitions, there was near una­
nimity o f opinion on the economics of
hosting major sports events. Robert A.
Baade and Victor Matheson found that,
with the exception o f the Los Angeles
Games o f 1984, cities often are forced to
settle for negative economic returns on
their substantial investments in hosting
such a mega-event. As one example, they
cite their calculation that under the best
a ssu m p tio n s, A tla n ta sp en t a b o u t
$63,000 per permanent job—full- or parttime— created. In previous public works
programs, a similar expenditure would
have been associated with actual full­

time (or at least full-time equivalent) jobs.
J. J. Gouguet suggests not only that the
economic impacts o f sporting events are
hard to measure and that they may often
be ephemeral, they may not even be the
right thing to measure: “ [Economic im­
pact] only tells us that the project in
question generates a given volume o f
economic activity, o f employment. And
that is all. It does not teach us whether
this project really deserves to be con­
ducted or not.”
As the sport market globalizes, and
the discussion by Wladimir A ndreff and
Paul D. Staudohar of European and North
American sports business models leaves
little doubt that such globalization is al­
ready here, Transatlantic Sport and the
research agenda underlying it will be­
come more and more widely read and
recognized.
— Richard M. Devens
Office of Publications,
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Working-class survival
Laboring Below the Line: A Nerw Eth­
nography o f Poverty, Low-Wage
Work, and Survival in the Global
Economy. Edited by Frank Munger.
New York, Russell Sage Foundation,
2001,319 pp. $42.50/cloth.
“Let me tell you about the poor. They
are not very different from you and me”
(with apologies to F. Scott Fitzgerald),
appears to be the consensus among the
academics represented in Laboring Be­
low the Line. And Frank Munger, pro­
fessor o f law and adjunct professor o f
sociology at the State U niversity o f
New York, Buffalo, and editor o f this
book, concludes that “...the most effec­
tive social policy for ending poverty
begins with the transformation o f the
social environment in which the poor
live” in his final chapter to a compila­
tion o f studies by 14 faculty members in
the United States and one in Canada.

The social environment, o f course, in­
cludes low-wage work.
Producer and headquarter sectors o f
firms are increasingly expanding, con­
solidating, and locating into the eco­
nomic core o f m ajor cities in highly de­
veloped countries. As these companies
turn to telephones and computers as a
cheap and efficient means o f servicing
customers and marketing products, their
low-wage work that employs these tech­
nologies— telem arketing, teleservice,
data entry, and rate or credit checking,
for example— may be located in remote
or offshore areas, where rents, labor, and
other costs are generally lower, and the
workforce comparatively stable, Saskia
Sassen, Ralph Lewis Professor o f Soci­
ology at the U niversity o f Chicago,
points out.
In this kind o f work, it is possible to
monitor every minute o f the employees’
work day and implement productivity
quotas so th at p o o r p erform ers are
weeded out. This work is generally not
unionized, so the worker has little re­
course under adverse circum stances.
And a remote or offshore location may
prevent him or her from either moving
up in the organization or moving on. Not
only teleservicing, but fast-food work,
has becom e routinized, scripted, and
monitored. Although these fast-food
jobs are not generally located in remote
or offshore locations, management also
benefits from— but ignores— the invis­
ible skills and competencies workers
develop as they work, even though those
accomplishments could be transferred if
more widely recognized, observes Carol
Stack, Professor o f Social and Cultural
Studies in Education at the University
o f California, Berkeley.
To complicate things still further, re­
structuring in many firms brings about
a demand for highly specialized and edu­
cated workers— notably in high tech—
alongside a demand for unskilled work­
ers, whether for clerical work, services,
or production jobs. The shrinking de­
mand for intermediate levels o f skill and
training has reduced the need firms have


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for internal labor markets with long pro­
motion lines that function as on-the-job
training mechanisms.
But low-wage work also exists in small
firms. High-income gentrification gen­
erates a demand for goods and services
that, often, are not mass produced nor
sold through mass outlets. Then too,
expansion in the low-income population
also contributes to the proliferation of
small operations to serve them, and lowincom e custom ers move away from
large-scale standardized factories and
chain stores with low-priced goods to
these small businesses. No matter which
market they serve, these small operations
often rely on family and low-wage labor,
and working conditions may fall below
minimum safety and health standards.
They are generally nonunion.
W ho are the low-wage w orkers?
They generally have less than a high
school education. About 25 percent are
immigrants. This leaves natives in 75
percent o f the other low-skill jobs. Be­
cause o f the nature o f the migration pro­
cess, im m igrants generally have far
stronger networks than similarly disad­
vantaged native workers. For this rea­
son, once a few immigrants enter a labor
market they can more easily “colonize”
it than their native counterparts, Sassen
contends.
Some characteristics o f low-wage
work gleaned from Laboring Below the
Line include the following:
1. In the United States, a growing
share o f service workers are in part-time
jobs, and twice as often as the average
worker. Involuntary part-time work has
grown significantly over the past decade.
2. Workers in low-wage jobs dispro­
portionately face nontraditional work
schedules that may include early-morn­
ing, evening, and weekend hours; split
shifts; and frequently changing sched­
ules— particularly difficult for a single
mother.
3. Low-wage work is often plagued
by insecurity. The average unemploy­
ment rates for persons with less than 4
years o f high school— those most likely

to work at low wages— are more than
four times as high as corresponding
rates for persons with 4 or more years
o f college.
Philip Harvey, associate professor of
law and economics at Rutgers School
o f Law, points to the outlooks that have
led to three public policies, and how
those policies approach joblessness:
1. Joblessness is attributed to the
failure o f the jobless to seek and accept
work on available terms. Public assis­
tance is provided, but should be mini­
mal and temporary so as not to discour­
age job search activity. The assumption
is: jobs are available.
2. Joblessness is caused by failure
on the part o f the economy to generate
enough jobs to employ everyone who
wants to work. This view dominated
public policy response to joblessness
during the New Deal era in the 1930s,
and it continues to influence public
policy responses to it during recessions.
3. Access to work is a problem only
for certain population groups. Job short­
ages are not a problem in general, but
barriers to equal employment opportu­
nities limit the ability o f certain groups
to compete for available jobs. These in­
clude employment discrimination, un­
equal access to job training and educa­
tional opportunities, and the geographic
mismatch between available jobs and the
communities where the unemployed live.
This view inspired m ajor reform s in
American employment and social wel­
fare law during the 1960s and early 1970s,
and it has dominated liberal policy posi­
tions since.
Surprisingly little data are available
concerning the number and characteris­
tics o f vacant jobs, contends Harvey in
this book published in 2002 (but presum­
ably researched earlier). In the mean­
time, the Bureau o f Labor Statistics has
created a Job Openings and Labor Turn­
over survey, which provides job open­
ing rates nationally and regionally by
major industry. This may, in part, fill that
void. Job applicants already working are
probably the most attractive to new em-

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

31

Book Reviews

ployers, Harvey asserts. During a 3and caregiver often means that poor
month period in the winter o f 1994-95, a
single mothers with young children must
total o f 5.6 percent o f all wage-and-salcarefully weigh the gain in income from
ary workers actively looked for a new
a p a id jo b , v ersu s the ex pense o f
jo b while still employed, he says, citing
childcare that can amount to 25 percent
Bureau o f Labor Statistics data.
or more o f their earnings. These women
Low-wage workers are likely to find
must also secure housing adequate for
government-mandated subsidies vital to
a family. To do all o f this, they must not
daily survival.
earn too much to disqualify them for
Child support, for example, has be­
subsidies, but enough not to have hous­
come an important supplement to the
ing expenses eat up 50 percent or more
income o f most single mothers. In 1975,
o f their income.
the Federal Government amended the
The median earnings for women have
Social Security Act and mandated that
risen fairly steadily in the past 20 years,
child support be established and en­
writes Sanders Korenman, professor in
forced through thousands o f new State
the School o f Public Affairs at Baruch
child support enforcement agencies. In
College, City University of New York and
crafting the Family Support Act o f 1988,
a former member of the President’s Coun­
Federal legislators tried to address the
cil o f Economic Advisors. Evidence also
ineffectiveness o f child support among
shows that wages at the bottom end of
the welfare poor. An analysis o f the
the wage distribution began to rise in
Current Population Survey shows that
the early 1990s. The reversal o f the de­
the percent o f single mothers receiving
cline coincides with the modest increase
at least some child support increased to
in the minimum wage in the m id-1990s.
34.5 percent in 1996 from 27.6 percent in In addition to rising wages, the Federal
1980, which would seem, to a large de­
Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) was
gree, to be an indication o f this legis­
expanded markedly in the 1990s, boost­
lation’s effectiveness.
ing the earnings o f low-wage workers
For low-income single mothers to get
with children by as much as 40 percent
off and stay off welfare, they must spend
(or by as much as $3,500 annually).
no more than a third o f their income on
Those who leave welfare and find
housing. The role o f the single provider
jobs are likely to earn more than they

32 Monthly Labor Review

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

would receive in welfare benefits— even
if they are able to find only minimumwage jobs— if they receive the EITC, says
Korenman. Moreover, studies find that
mean hourly wages exceed the current
minimum wage by $1 to $3 an hour. In
addition, after adjusting for inflation,
both earnings and family income o f wel­
fare leavers increased appreciably over
time, whereas benefits fell, in real terms,
30 to 40 percent between the early 1970s
and the mid-1990s.
Stereotypes o f the poor serve a vari­
ety o f political purposes, at least one o f
the authors contends. M uch o f the
rhetoric o f welfare reform can be said to
have served the purpose o f reinforcing
the work ethic o f the working class it­
self. Welfare reform reminds the work­
ing class o f its entitlement to respect
for being employed. And although some
o f the chapters in this R ussell Sage
Foundation book represent old wine in
new bottles, and some are repetitive, the
book on the whole provides a variety o f
perceptive insights— such as that one—
collected in a single volume.
— M ary Ellen Ayres
Office of Publications,
Bureau of Labor Statistics

C urrent Labor Statistics

Notes on labor statistics .............

34

Com parative indicators
1. Labor market indicators....................................................
2. Annual and quarterly percent changes in
compensation, prices, and productivity...................
3. Alternative measures o f wages and
compensation changes..................................................

46
47
47

Labor force data
4. Employment status o f the population,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
5. Selected employment indicators,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
6. Selected unemployment indicators,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
7. Duration o f unemployment,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
8. Unemployed persons by reason for unemployment,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
9. Unemployment rates by sex and age,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
10. Unemployment rates by States,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
11. Employment o f workers by States,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
12. Employment o f workers by industry,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
13. Average weekly hours by industry,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
14. Average hourly earnings by industry,
seasonally adjusted........................................................
15. Average hourly earnings by industry.............................
16. Average weekly earnings by industry............................
17. Diffusion indexes o f employment change,
seasonally adjusted.......................................................
18. Establishment size and employment covered under ui,
private ownership, by NAICS supersector.................
19. Annual data establishment, employment, and wages,
covered under ui and ucfe, by ownership................
20. Annual data: Establishments, employment,
and wages covered under ui and ucfe, by S tate......
21. Annual data: Employment and average annual pay o f
Ui- and uCFE-covered workers, by largest counties..
22. Annual data: Employment status o f the population ...
23. Annual data: Employment levels by industry.............
24. Annual data: Average hours and earnings level,
by industry...................................................................


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28. Employment Cost Index, private nonfarm workers,
by bargaining status, region, and area s i z e ......................
29. Participants in benefit plans, medium and large firm s......
30. Participants in benefits plans, small firms
and government........................................................................
31. Work stoppages involving 1,000 workers or m o r e ...........

74
75
76
77

Price d ata
32. Consumer Price Index: U.S. city average, by expenditure
48
49
50
50
51
51
52
52
53
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

category and commodity and service groups...............
33. Consumer Price Index: U.S. city average and
local data, all items.......................................................
34. Annual data: Consumer Price Index, all items
and major groups..........................................................
35. Producer Price Indexes by stage of processing................
36. Producer Price Indexes for the net output of major
industry groups............................................................
37. Annual data: Producer Price Indexes
by stage of processing..................................................
38. U.S. export price indexes by Standard International
Trade Classification.....................................................
39. U.S. import price indexes by Standard International
Trade Classification.....................................................
40. U.S. export price indexes by end-use category................
41. U.S. import price indexes by end-use category...............
42. U.S.international price indexes for selected
categories of services....................................................

78
81
82
83
84
85
85
86
87
87
87

Productivity d ata
43. Indexes o f productivity, hourly compensation,
and unit costs, data seasonally adjusted.........................
44. Annual indexes o f multifactor productivity......................
45. Annual indexes o f productivity, hourly compensation,
unit costs, and p rices.........................................................
46. Annual indexes o f output per hour for selected
industries...............................................................................

88
89
90
91

63
64

International comparisons data

68
69
69

Labor com pensation and collective
bargaining data
25. Employment Cost Index, compensation,
by occupation and industry group...................................
26. Employment Cost Index, wages and salaries,
by occupation and industry group...................................
27. Employment Cost Index, benefits, private industry........

Labor com pensation and collective
bargaining data—continued

47. Unemployment rates in nine countries,
data seasonally adjusted.....................................................
48. Annual data: Employment status o f the civilian
working-age population, 10 countries.............................
49. Annual indexes o f productivity and related measures,
12 countries..........................................................................

94
95
96

Injury and illness data
70
72
73

50. Annual data: Occupational injury and illness
incidence rates......................................................................
51. Fatal occupational injuries by event
or exposure................................................................................

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

97
99

33

Notes on Current Labor Statistics

This section o f the R eview presents the prin­
cipal statistical series collected and calcu­
lated by the Bureau o f Labor Statistics:
series on labor force; employment; unem­
ployment; labor compensation; consumer,
producer, and international prices; produc­
tivity; international comparisons; and injury
and illness statistics. In the notes that fol­
low, the data in each group o f tables are
briefly described; key definitions are given;
notes on the data are set forth; and sources
o f additional information are cited.

G e n e r a l n o te s
The following notes apply to several tables
in this section:
Seasonal adjustment. Certain monthly
and quarterly data are adjusted to eliminate
the effect on the data o f such factors as cli­
m atic con d ition s, industry production
schedules, opening and closing o f schools,
holiday buying periods, and vacation prac­
tices, which might prevent short-term evalu­
ation o f the statistical series. Tables con­
taining data that have been adjusted are iden­
tified as “seasonally adjusted.” (All other
data are not seasonally adjusted.) Seasonal
effects are estimated on the basis o f current
and past experiences. When new seasonal
factors are computed each year, revisions
may affect seasonally adjusted data for sev­
eral preceding years.
Seasonally adjusted data appear in tables
1-14, 16-17, 43, and 47. Seasonally ad­
justed labor force data in tables 1 and 4 -9
were revised in the March 2003 issue o f the
R eview . Seasonally adjusted establishment
survey data shown in tables 1, 12-14 and
16-17 were revised in the July 2003 Review.
A brief explanation o f the seasonal adjust­
ment methodology appears in “Notes on the
data.”
R evisions in the productivity data in
table 49 are usually introduced in the Sep­
tember issue. Seasonally adjusted indexes
and percent changes from month-to-month
and quarter-to-quarter are published for nu­
merous Consumer and Producer Price Index
series. However, seasonally adjusted in­
dexes are not published for the U.S. average
All-Items CPI. Only seasonally adjusted per­
cent changes are available for this series.
Adjustments for price changes. Some
data— such as the “real” earnings shown in
table 14— are adjusted to eliminate the ef­
fect o f changes in price. These adjustments
are made by dividing current-dollar values
by the Consumer Price Index or the appro­
priate component o f the index, then multi­
plying by 100. For example, given a current
hourly wage rate o f $3 and a current price

34
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index number o f 150, where 1982 = 100, the
hourly rate expressed in 1982 dollars is $2
($3/150 x 100 = $2). The $2 (or any other
resulting values) are described as “real,”
“constant,” or “ 1982” dollars.

tional comparisons data, see In te rn a tio n a l
C om parisons o f U nem ploym ent, BLS Bulle­
tin 1979.
Detailed data on the occupational injury
and illness series are published in O ccupa­

S o u rc e s of inform ation

tio n a l In ju ries a n d Illnesses in the U nited
States, by Industry, a BLS annual bulletin.
Finally, the M o n th ly L a b o r R eview car­

Data that supplement the tables in this sec­
tion are published by the Bureau in a variety
o f sources. Definitions o f each series and
notes on the data are contained in later sec­
tions o f these Notes describing each set o f
data. For detailed descriptions o f each data
series, see BLS H a n d b o o k o f M ethods, Bul­
letin 2490. Users also may wish to consult
M ajor P rogram s o f the B ureau o f L abor Sta­
tistics, Report 919. News releases provide

the latest statistical information published
by the Bureau; the major recurring releases
are published according to the schedule ap­
pearing on the back cover o f this issue.
More information about labor force, em­
ployment, and unemployment data and the
household and establishment surveys under­
lying the data are available in the Bureau’s
m onthly publication, E m p lo y m e n t a n d
E arnings. Historical unadjusted and season­
ally adjusted data from the household sur­
vey are available on the Internet:

http://www.bls.gov/cps/
Historically comparable unadjusted and sea­
sonally adjusted data from the establishment
survey also are available on the Internet:

http://www.bls.gov/ces/
Additional information on labor force data
for areas below the national level are pro­
vided in the BLS annual report, G eographic
P rofile o f E m p lo ym en t a n d U nem ploym ent.

For a comprehensive discussion o f the
Employment Cost Index, see E m p lo ym en t
C ost In d exes a n d Levels, 1 9 7 5 -9 5 , BLS Bul­
letin 2466. The most recent data from the
Employee Benefits Survey appear in the fol­
lowing Bureau o f Labor Statistics bulletins:
E m p lo yee B e n e fits in M edium a n d L arge
F irm s; E m ployee B en efits in S m a ll P rivate
E stablishm ents; and E m ployee B en efits in
Sta te a n d L o ca l G overnm ents.

More detailed data on consumer and pro­
ducer prices are published in the monthly
periodicals, The CPI D e ta ile d R e p o rt and
P ro d u cer P rice Indexes. For an overview o f
the 1998 revision o f the CPI, see the Decem­
ber 1996 issue o f the M o n th ly L a b o r R e­
view . Additional data on international prices
appear in monthly news releases.
Listings o f industries for which produc­
tivity indexes are available may be found on
the Internet:

July 2003

http://www.bls.gov/lpc/
For additional information on interna­

ries analytical articles on annual and longer
term developments in labor force, employ­
ment, and unemployment; employee com­
pensation and collective bargaining; prices;
productivity; international comparisons;
and injury and illness data.

S y m b o ls
n.e.c. = not elsewhere classified,
n.e.s. = not elsewhere specified.
p = preliminary. To increase the time­
liness o f some series, prelim inary
figures are issued based on repre­
sentative but incomplete returns,
r = revised. Generally, this revision
reflects the availability o f later
data, but also may reflect other ad­
justments.

Comparative Indicators
(Tables 1-3)
Comparative indicators tables provide an
overview and comparison o f major BLS sta­
tistical series. Consequently, although many
o f the included series are available monthly,
all measures in these comparative tables are
presented quarterly and annually.
Labor market indicators include em­
ployment measures from two major surveys
and information on rates o f change in com­
pensation provided by the Employment
Cost Index (ECl) program. The labor force
participation rate, the em ploym ent-topopulation ratio, and unemployment rates
for major demographic groups based on the
Current Population (“household”) Survey
are presented, while measures o f employ­
ment and average weekly hours by major
industry sector are given using nonfarm pay­
roll data. The Em ploym ent C ost Index
(compensation), by major sector and by bar­
gaining status, is chosen from a variety o f
bls compensation and wage measures be­
cause it provides a comprehensive measure
o f employer costs for hiring labor, not just
outlays for wages, and it is not affected by
employment shifts among occupations and
industries.
Data on changes in com pensation,

prices, and productivity are presented in
table 2. Measures o f rates o f change o f com­
pensation and wages from the Employment
Cost Index program are provided for all ci­
vilian nonfarm workers (excluding Federal
and household workers) and for all private
nonfarm workers. Measures o f changes in
consumer prices for all urban consumers;
producer prices by stage o f processing; over­
all prices by stage o f processing; and overall
export and import price indexes are given.
Measures o f productivity (output per hour
o f all persons) are provided for major sec­
tors.
A lternative measures of wage and
compensation rates of change, which re­
flect the overall trend in labor costs, are sum­
marized in table 3. Differences in concepts
and scope, related to the specific purposes
o f the series,
contribute to the variation in changes among
the individual measures.

Notes on the da ta
Definitions o f each series and notes on the
data are contained in later sections o f these
notes describing each set o f data.

Employment and
Unemployment Data
(Tables 1; 4-2 4 )

H o u se h o ld survey d a ta
Description of the series
E mployment data in this section are ob­
tained from the Current Population Survey,
a program o f personal interviews conducted
monthly by the Bureau o f the Census for
the Bureau o f Labor Statistics. The sample
consists o f about 60,000 households selected
to represent the U.S. population 16 years o f
age and older. Households are interviewed
on a rotating basis, so that three-fourths o f
the sample is the same for any 2 consecutive
months.

Definitions
Employed persons include (1) all those
who worked for pay any time during the
week which includes the 12th day o f the
month or who worked unpaid for 15 hours
or more in a family-operated enterprise
and (2) those who were temporarily ab­
sent from their regular jobs because o f ill­
ness, vacation, industrial dispute, or sim i­
lar reasons. A person working at more than
one job is counted only in the job at which
he or she worked the greatest number o f
hours.
Unemployed persons are those who

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Beginning with data for January 2003,
monthly Current Population Survey (CPS)
estimates appearing in this section are based
on population controls derived from Cen­
sus 2000. (Previously, they were based on
updated 1990 census population controls.)
CPS data back to January 2000 have been
revised to reflect the new population con­
trols. Also, data now are presented for per­
sons who report they are white (and no
other race), black or African American (and
no other race), and of Hispanic or Latino
ethnicity.
In addition, beginning in January 2003,
the CPS adopted the 2002 census industry
and occupational classification systems de­
rived from the 2002 North American In­
dustry Classification System and the 2000
Standard Occupational Classification sys­
tem. These new classification systems cre­
ate breaks in the time series for industry
and occupational data at all levels of aggre­
gation (the former industry and occupa­
tional categories have been discontinued).
For additional information, see “Revisions
to the Current Population Survey Effec­
tive in January 2003,” Employment and
Earnings, February 2003 (Bureau of Labor
Statistics) or the BLS Web site:
h ttp ://w w w .b ls.gov/cp s/

did not work during the survey week, but
were available for work except for tempo­
rary illness and had looked for jobs within
the preceding 4 weeks. Persons who did not
look for work because they were on layoff
are also counted among the unemployed.
The unemployment rate represents the
number unemployed as a percent o f the ci­
vilian labor force.
The civilian labor force consists o f all
employed or unemployed persons in the
civilian noninstitutional population. Persons
not in the labor force are th ose not
classified as employed or unemployed. This
group includes discouraged workers, defined
as persons who want and are available for a
job and who have looked for work sometime
in the past 12 months (or since the end o f
their last job if they held one within the past
12 months), but are not currently looking,
because they b elieve there are no job s
available or there are none for which they
would qualify. The civilian noninstitu­
tional population comprises all persons 16
years o f age and older who are not inmates
o f penal or mental institutions, sanitariums,
or homes for the aged, infirm, or needy. The
civilian labor force participation rate is
the proportion o f the c iv ilia n n o n in ­
stitutional population that is in the labor
force. The employment-population ratio
is employment as a percent o f the civilian

noninstitutional population.

Notes on the d a ta
From time to time, and especially after a de­
cennial census, adjustments are made in the
Current Population Survey figures to correct
for estimating errors during the intercensal
years. These adjustments affect the compara­
bility o f historical data. A description o f these
adjustments and their effect on the various data
series appears in the Explanatory Notes o f
Em ploym ent a n d Earnings.

Effective in January 2003, b ls began us­
ing the X-12 a rim a seasonal adjustment
program to seasonally adjust national labor
force data. This program replaced the X -l 1
arim a program which had been used since
January 1980. See “Revision o f Seasonally
Adjusted Labor Force Series in 2003,” in the
February 2003 issue o f E m p lo y m e n t a n d
E a rn in g s for a discussion o f the introduc­
tion o f the use o f X-12 a rim a for seasonal
adjustment o f the labor force data and the
effects that it had on the data.
At the beginning o f each calendar year,
historical seasonally adjusted data usually
are revised, and projected seasonal adjust­
ment factors are calculated for use during
the January-June period. The historical sea­
sonally adjusted data usually are revised for
only the most recent 5 years. In July, new
seasonal adjustment factors, which incorpo­
rate the experience through June, are pro­
duced for the July-December period, but no
revisions are made in the historical data.
F or ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on na­
tional household survey data, contact the
Division o f Labor Force Statistics: (202)
691-6378.

Establishm ent su rvey d a ta
Description of the series
E mployment ,

ho urs , a n d earning s data

in this section are compiled from payroll
records reported monthly on a voluntary ba­
sis to the Bureau o f Labor Statistics and its
cooperating State agencies by about 160,000
businesses and government agencies, which
represent approximately 400,000 individual
worksites and represent all industries except
agriculture. The active CES sample covers
approximately one-third o f all nonfarm pay­
roll workers. Industries are classified in ac­
cordance with the 2002 North American In­
dustry Classification System. In most in­
dustries, the sampling probabilities are based
on the size o f the establishment; most large
establishments are therefore in the sample.
(An establishment is not necessarily a firm;
it may be a branch plant, for example, or
warehouse.) Self-employed persons and

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

35

Current Labor Statistics
others not on a regular civilian payroll are
outside the scope o f the survey because they
are excluded from establishment records.
This largely accounts for the difference in
employment figures between the household
and establishment surveys.

span are unadjusted. Table 17 provides an in­
dex on private nonfarm employment based on
278 industries, and a manufacturing index
based on 84 industries. These indexes are use­
ful for measuring the dispersion o f economic
gains or losses and are also economic indica­
tors.

Definitions
Notes on the data
An establishment is an economic unit which
produces goods or services (such as a factory
or store) at a single location and is engaged in
one type o f economic activity.
Employed persons are all persons who
received pay (including holiday and sick pay)
for any part o f the payroll period including the
12th day o f the month. Persons holding more
than one job (about 5 percent o f all persons in
the labor force) are counted in each establish­
ment which reports them.
Production workers in the goods-producing industries cover employees, up through
the level o f working supervisors, who engage
directly in the manufacture or construction o f
the establishment’s product. In private ser­
vice-providing industries, data are collected for
nonsupervisory workers, which include most
employees except those in executive, manage­
rial, and supervisory positions. Those work­
ers mentioned in tables 11-16 include produc­
tion workers in manufacturing and natural re­
sources and mining; construction workers in
construction; and nonsupervisory workers in
all private service-providing industries. Pro­
duction and nonsupervisory workers account
for about four-fifths o f the total employment
on private nonagricultural payrolls.
Earnings are the payments production or
nonsupervisory workers receive during the
survey period, including premium pay for
overtime or late-shift work but excluding
irregular b on u ses and other sp ecia l
paym ents. Real earnings are earnings
adjusted to reflect the effects o f changes in
consumer prices. The deflator for this series
is derived from the Consumer Price Index
for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W).

Hours represent the average weekly hours
o f production or nonsupervisoiy workers for
which pay was received, and are different from
standard or scheduled hours. Overtime hours
represent the portion o f average weekly hours
which was in excess o f regular hours and for
which overtime premiums were paid.
The Diffusion Index represents the per­
cent o f industries in which employment was
rising over the indicated period, plus one-half
o f the industries with unchanged employment;
50 percent indicates an equal balance between
industries with increasing and decreasing em­
ployment. In line with Bureau practice, data
for the 1-, 3-, and 6-month spans are season­
ally adjusted, while those for the 12-month

36
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Establishment survey data are annually ad­
justed to comprehensive counts o f employ­
ment (called “benchmarks”). The March 2002
benchmark was made with the release o f data
in May 2003, published in the July issue of
the Review. With the release in May, CES com­
pleted a conversion from the Standard Indus­
trial Classification (SIC) system to the North
American Industry Classification System
(naics ) and completed the transition from its
original quota sample design to a probabilitybased sample design. The industry-coding
update including reconstruction o f historical
estimates in order to preserve time series for
data users. Normally 5 years o f seasonally
adjusted data are revised with each benchmark
revision. However, with this release, the en­
tire new time series history for all CES data
series has been reseasonally adjusted due to
the naics conversion, which results in the re­
vision o f all CES time series history.
Also in June 2003, the CES program intro­
duced concurrent seasonal adjustment. Under
this methodology, the first preliminary esti­
mates for the current reference month and the
revised estimates for the 2 prior months will
be updated with concurrent factors with each
release. Concurrent seasonal adjustment is
more accurate because it incorporates all avail­
able data, including first preliminary estimates
for the most current month, in the adjustment
process. For additional information, see the
the June 2003 issue o f Em ploym ent a n d E arn­
ings.

Revisions in State data (table 11) occurred
with the publication o f January 2003 data.
Beginning in June 1996, the bls uses the
X -12- arima methodology to seasonally ad­
just establishment survey data. This proce­
dure, developed by the Bureau o f the Census,
controls for the effect o f varying survey inter­
vals (also known as the 4- versus 5-week ef­
fect), thereby providing improved measure­
ment o f over-the-month changes and underly­
ing economic trends. Revisions o f data, usually
for the most recent 5-year period, are made
once a year coincident with the benchmark re­
visions.
In the establishment survey, estimates for
the most recent 2 months are based on incom­
plete returns and are published as preliminary
in the tables (12-17 in the Review). When all
returns have been received, the estimates are
revised and published as “final” (prior to any
benchmark revisions) in the third month o f

July 2003

their appearance. Thus, December data are
published as preliminaiy in January and Feb­
ruary and as final in March. For the same rea­
sons, quarterly establishment data (table 1) are
preliminaiy for the first 2 months o f publica­
tion and final in the third month. Thus, fourthquarter data are published as preliminary in
January and February and as final in March.
F or a d d it io n a l inform atio n on es­
tablishment survey data, contact the Division of
Current Employment Statistics: (202) 691-6555.

U nem ploym ent d a ta b y
State
Description of the series
Data presented in this section are obtained from
the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (laus )
program, which is conducted in cooperation with
State employment security agencies.
Monthly estimates o f the labor force, em­
ployment, and unemployment for States and
sub-State areas are a key indicator o f local eco­
nomic conditions, and form the basis for deter­
mining the eligibility o f an area for benefits
under Federal economic assistance programs
such as the Job Training Partnership Act. Sea­
sonally adjusted unemployment rates are pre­
sented in table 10. Insofar as possible, the con­
cepts and definitions underlying these data are
those used in the national estimates obtained
from the cps .

Notes on the data
Data refer to State o f residence. Monthly data
for all States and the District o f Columbia are
derived using standardized procedures
established by b ls . Once a year, estimates are
revised to new population controls, usually
with publication o f January estimates, and
benchmarked to annual average CPS levels.
F or additional information on data in
this series, call (202) 691-6392 (table 10) or
(202) 691-6559 (table 11).

C o v e r e d e m p lo y m e n t a n d
w a g e d a ta (ES-202)
Description of the series
E m p l o y m e n t , w a g e , a n d e s t a b l i s h m e n t d a t a in
this section are derived from the quarterly tax
reports submitted to State employment secu­
rity agencies by private and State and local
government employers subject to State unem­
ployment insurance (ui) laws and from Fed­
eral, agencies subject to the Unemployment
Compensation for Federal Employees ( u c f e )
program. Each quarter, State agencies edit and
process the data and send the information to
the Bureau o f Labor Statistics.

The Covered Employment and Wages data,
also referred as E S-202 data, are the most
complete enumeration o f employment and
wage information by industry at the na­
tional, State, metropolitan area, and county
levels. They have broad econom ic signifi­
cance in evaluating labor market trends and
major industry developments.

Definitions
In general, e s - 2 0 2 monthly employment data
represent the number o f covered workers
who worked during, or received pay for, the
pay period that included the 12th day o f the
month. Covered private industry employ­
ment includes most corporate officials, ex­
ecutives, supervisory personnel, profession­
als, clerical workers, wage earners, piece
workers, and part-time workers. It excludes
proprietors, the unincorporated self-em ­
ployed, unpaid family members, and certain
farm and domestic workers. Certain types
o f nonprofit employers, such as religious
organizations, are given a choice o f coverage
or exclusion in a number o f States. Workers
in these organizations are, therefore, reported
to a limited degree.
Persons on paid sick leave, paid holiday,
paid vacation, and the like, are included. Per­
sons on the payroll o f more than one firm dur­
ing the period are counted by each ui-subject
employer if they meet the employment defini­
tion noted earlier. The employment count ex­
cludes workers who earned no wages during
the entire applicable pay period because of
work stoppages, temporary layoffs, illness,
or unpaid vacations.
Federal employment data are based on
reports o f monthly employment and quar­
terly wages submitted each quarter to State
agencies for all Federal installations with
employees covered by the Unemployment
Compensation for Federal Employees ( u c f e )
program, except for certain national secu­
rity agencies, which are omitted for security
reasons. Employment for all Federal agen­
cies for any given month is based on the
number o f persons who worked during or
received pay for the pay period that included
the 12th o f the month.
An establishment is an economic unit,
such as a farm, mine, factory, or store, that
produces goods or provides services. It is typi­
cally at a single physical location and engaged
in one, or predominantly one, type o f eco­
nomic activity for which a single industrial clas­
sification may be applied. Occasionally, a single
physical location encompasses two or more


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distinct and significant activities. Each activity
should be reported as a separate establishment
if separate records are kept and the various
activities are classified under different four-digit
sic codes.
Most employers have only one establish­
ment; thus, the establishment is the predomi­
nant reporting unit or statistical entity for re­
porting employment and wages data. Most
employers, including State and local govern­
ments who operate more than one establish­
ment in a State, file a Multiple Worksite Re­
port each quarter, in addition to their quarterly
ui report. The Multiple Worksite Report is
used to collect separate employment and wage
data for each o f the employer’s establishments,
which are not detailed on the ui report. Some
very small multi-establishment employers do
not file a Multiple Worksite Report. When the
total employment in an employer’s secondary
establishments (all establishments other than
the largest) is 10 or fewer, the employer gener­
ally will file a consolidated report for all estab­
lishments. Also, some employers either can­
not or will not report at the establishment level
and thus aggregate establishments into one con­
solidated unit, or possibly several units, though
not at the establishment level.
For the Federal Government, the report­
ing unit is the installation: a single location
at which a department, agency, or other gov­
ernment body has civilian employees. Fed­
eral agencies follow slightly different crite­
ria than do private employers when break­
ing down their reports by installation. They
are permitted to combine as a single state­
wide unit: 1) all installations with 10 or fewer
workers, and 2) all installations that have a
combined total in the State o f fewer than 50
workers. Also, when there are fewer than 25
workers in all secondary installations in a State,
the secondary installations may be combined
and reported with the major installation. Last,
if a Federal agency has fewer than five em­
ployees in a State, the agency headquarters
office (regional office, district office) serving
each State may consolidate the employment
and wages data for that State with the data
reported to the State in which the headquarters
is located. As a result o f these reporting rules,
the number o f reporting units is always larger
than the number o f employers (or government
agencies) but smaller than the number of actual
establishments (or installations).
Data reported for the first quarter are tabu­
lated into size categories ranging from worksites
o f very small size to those with 1,000 employ­
ees or more. The size category is determined
by the establishment’s March employment
level. It is important to note that each estab­
lishment o f a multi-establishment firm is tabu­
lated separately into the appropriate size cat­

egory. The total employment level o f the re­
porting multi-establishment firm is not used in
the size tabulation.
Covered employers in most States report
total wages paid during the calendar quarter, re­
gardless o f when the services were performed. A
few State laws, however, specify that wages be
reported for, or based on the period during which
services are performed rather than the period dur­
ing which compensation is paid. Under most State
laws or regulations, wages include bonuses, stock
options, the cash value o f meals and lodging, tips
and other gratuities, and, in some States, em­
ployer contributions to certain deferred com­
pensation plans such as 401(k) plans.
Covered employer contributions for oldage, survivors, and disability insurance ( o a s d i ) ,
health insurance, unemployment insurance,
workers’ compensation, and private pension
and welfare funds are not reported as wages.
Employee contributions for the same purposes,
however, as well as money withheld for in­
come taxes, union dues, and so forth, are re­
ported even though they are deducted from
the worker’s gross pay.
Wages of covered Federal workers rep­
resent the gross amount o f all payrolls for all
pay periods ending within the quarter. This
includes cash allowances, the cash equivalent
o f any type o f remuneration, severance pay,
withholding taxes, and retirement deductions.
Federal employee remuneration generally cov­
ers the same types o f services as for workers
in private industry.
Average annual wages per employee for
any given industry are computed by dividing
total annual wages by annual average employ­
ment. A further division by 52 yields average
weekly wages per employee. Annual pay data
only approximate annual earnings because an
individual may not be employed by the same
employer all year or may work for more than
one employer at a time.
Average weekly or annual pay is affected
by the ratio o f full-time to part-time workers
as well as the number o f individuals in highpaying and low-paying occupations. When
average pay levels between States and indus­
tries are compared, these factors should be
taken into consideration. For example, indus­
tries characterized by high proportions o f parttime workers will show average wage levels
appreciably less than the weekly pay levels o f
regular full-time employees in these industries.
The opposite effect characterizes industries
with low proportions o f part-time workers, or
industries that typically schedule heavy week­
end and overtime work. Average wage data also
may be influenced by work stoppages, labor
turnover rates, retroactive payments, seasonal
factors, bonus payments, and so on.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

37

Current Labor Statistics

Notes on the data
Beginning with the release of data for 2001, pub­
lications presenting data from the Covered Em­
ployment and Wages (CEW) programhave switched
to the 2002 version of the North American Indus­
try Classificatiion System (naics ) as the basis
for the assignment and tabulation o f economic
data by industry, naics is the product o f a
cooperative effort on the part o f the statistical
agencies o f the United States, Canada, and
Mexico. Due to difference in naics and Stan­
dard Industrial Classification (SIC) structures,
industry data for 2001 is not comparable to
the sic-based data for earlier years.
Effective January 2001, the CEW program
began assigning Indian Tribal Councils and re­
lated establishments to local government own­
ership. This bls action was in response to a
change in Federal law dealing with the way
Indian Tribes are treated under the Federal
Unemployment Tax Act. This law requires
federally recognized Indian Tribes to be treated
similarly to State and local governments. In
the past the cew program coded Indian Tribal
Councils and related establishments in the
private sector. As a result o f the new law,
CEW data reflects significant shifts in em­
ployment and wages between the private sec­
tor and local government from 2000 to 2001.
Data also reflect industry changes. Those
accounts previously assigned to civic and
social organizations were assigned to tribal
governments. There were no required indus­
try changes for related establishments owned
by these Tribal Councils. These tribal busi­
ness establishments continued to be coded ac­
cording to the economic activity o f that entity.
To insure the highest possible quality o f
data, State employment security agencies
verify with employers and update, if neces­
sary, the industry, location, and ownership clas­
sification o f all establishments on a 3-year cycle.
Changes in establishment classification codes
resulting from the verification process are in­
troduced with the data reported for the first
quarter o f the year. Changes resulting from
improved employer reporting also are intro­
duced in the first quarter. For these reasons,
some data, especially at more detailed geo­
graphic levels, may not be strictly comparable
with earlier years.
The2000 county data used to calculate the
2000-2001 changes were adjusted for changes
in industry and county classification to make
them comparable to data for 2001. As a result,
the adjusted 2000 data differ to some extent
from the data available on the Internet at:

http://www.bIs.gov/cew/home.htm,
County definitions are assigned according

38
Monthly Labor Review

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to Federal Information Processing Standards
Publications as issued by the National Insti­
tute o f Standards and Technology. Areas
shown as counties include those designated
as independent cities in some jurisdictions
and, in Alaska, those areas designated by the
Census Bureau where counties have not been
created. County data also are presented for
the New England States for comparative pur­
poses, even though townships are the more
common designation used in New England
(and New Jersey).
For additional information on the cov­
ered employment and wage data, contact
the D ivision o f Administrative Statistics
and Tabor Turnover at (202) 6 9 1 -6 5 6 7 .

C o m p e n s a tio n a n d
W a g e D a ta
(Tables 1-3; 2 5 -3 1 )
C o m pensation a n d wage data are gath­
ered by the Bureau from business estab­
lishments, State and local governments,
labor unions, collective bargaining agree­
ments on file with the Bureau, and sec­
ondary sources.

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t Index
Description of the series
The Employment Cost Index (ECl) is a
quarterly measure o f the rate o f change in
compensation per hour worked and includes
wages, salaries, and employer costs o f em­
p loyee benefits. It uses a fixed market
basket o f labor— similar in concept to the
Consumer Price Index’s fixed market basket
o f goods and services— to measure change
over time in employer costs o f employing
labor.
Statistical series on total compensation
costs, on wages and salaries, and on ben­
efit costs are available for private nonfarm
workers excluding proprietors, the selfem ployed, and household workers. The
total compensation costs and wages and
salaries series are also available for State
and local government workers and for the
civilian nonfarm economy, which consists
o f private industry and State and local
government workers combined. Federal
workers are excluded.
The Employment Cost Index probabil­
ity sample consists o f about 4,400 pri­
vate nonfarm establishm ents providing
about 23,000 occupational observations

July 2003

and 1,000 State and local government es­
tablishments providing 6,000 occupational
observations selected to represent total
employment in each sector. On average,
each reporting unit provides w age and
compensation information on five w ellspecified occupations. Data are collected
each quarter for the pay period including
the 12th day o f March, June, September,
and December.
Beginning with June 1986 data, fixed
employment weights from the 1980 Cen­
sus o f Population are used each quarter to
calculate the civilian and private indexes
and the index for State and local govern­
ments. (Prior to June 1986, the em ploy­
ment weights are from the 1970 Census o f
P opulation.) These fixed w eights, also
used to derive all o f the industry and oc­
cupation se ries in d ex es, ensure that
ch an ges in th ese in d ex es reflect on ly
changes in compensation, not employment
shifts among industries or occupations
with different levels o f wages and com ­
pensation. For the bargaining status, re­
gion, and m etropolitan/nonmetropolitan
area series, however, employment data by
industry and occupation are not available
from the census. Instead, the 1980 em ­
ployment weights are reallocated within
these series each quarter based on the cur­
rent sample. Therefore, these indexes are
not strictly comparable to those for the
aggregate, industry, and occupation series.

Definitions
Total compensation costs include wages,
salaries, and the em ployer’s costs for em­
ployee benefits.
Wages and salaries consist o f earn­
ings before payroll deductions, including
production bonuses, incentive earnings,
com m issions, and cost-of-livin g adjust­
ments.
Benefits include the cost to employers
for paid leave, supplemental pay (includ­
ing nonproduction bonuses), insurance, re­
tirement and savings plans, and legally re­
quired benefits (such as Social Security,
workers’ compensation, and unemployment
insurance).
Excluded from wages and salaries and
em ployee benefits are such items as pay­
ment-in-kind, free room and board, and
tips.

N otes on the d a ta
The Employment Cost Index for changes
in wages and salaries in the private non-

farm economy was published beginning in
1975. C hanges in total com p en sation
co st— w ages and salaries and b en efits
combined— were published beginning in
1980. The series o f changes in wages and
salaries and for total compensation in the
State and local government sector and in
the civilian nonfarm econom y (excluding
Federal em p loyees) were published b e­
g in n in g in 1 9 8 1 . H isto r ic a l in d e x e s
(June 1981 = 100) are availab le on the
Internet:

http://www.bls.gov/ect/
on the
Employment Cost Index, contact the Of­
fice o f Compensation Levels and Trends:
(202) 691-6 1 9 9 .
F or

a d d it io n a l inform ation

E m p lo y e e Benefits Survey
Description of the series
Employee benefits data are obtained from
the Employee Benefits Survey, an annual
survey o f the incidence and provisions o f
selected benefits provided by employers.
The survey collects data from a sample o f
approximately 9,000 private sector and
State and local government establishments.
The data are presented as a percentage o f em­
ployees who participate in a certain benefit, or
as an average benefit provision (for example,
the average number o f paid holidays provided
to employees per year). Selected data from the
survey are presented in table 25 for medium
and large private establishments and in table
26 for small private establishments and State
and local government.
The survey covers paid leave benefits
such as holidays and vacations, and personal,
funeral, jury duty, military, family, and sick
leave; short-term disability, long-term dis­
ability, and life insurance; medical, dental,
and vision care plans; defined benefit and
defined contribution plans; flexible benefits
plans; reimbursement accounts; and unpaid
family leave.
A lso, data are tabulated on the in ci­
dence o f several other benefits, such as
severance pay, child-care assistance, wellness
programs, and em ployee assistance
programs.

Definitions
Employer-provided benefits are benefits
that are financed either wholly or partly by
the employer. They may be sponsored by a
union or other third party, as long as there is
some employer financing. However, some
benefits that are fully paid for by the em­


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ployee also are included. For example, long­
term care insurance and postretirement life
insurance paid entirely by the employee are
included because the guarantee o f insurabil­
ity and availability at group premium rates
are considered a benefit.
Participants are workers who are covered
by a benefit, whether or not they use that benefit.
If the benefit plan is financed wholly by
employers and requires employees to complete
a minimum length of service for eligibility, the
workers are considered participants whether or
not they have met the requirement. If workers
are required to contribute towards the cost o f a
plan, they are considered participants only if
they elect the plan and agree to make the required
contributions.
Defined benefit pension plans use pre­
determined formulas to calculate a retirement
benefit (if any), and obligate the employer to
provide those benefits. Benefits are generally
based on salary, years o f service, or both.
Defined contribution plans generally
specify the level o f employer and employee
contributions to a plan, but not the formula for
determining eventual benefits. Instead, indi­
vidual accounts are set up for participants, and
benefits are based on amounts credited to these
accounts.
Tax-deferred savings plans are a type of
defined contribution plan that allow par­
ticipants to contribute a portion o f their sal­
ary to an employer-sponsored plan and defer
income taxes until withdrawal.
Flexible benefit plans allow employees
to choose among several benefits, such as life
insurance, medical care, and vacation days, and
among several levels o f coverage within a given
benefit.

Notes on the data
Surveys o f employees in medium and large
establishments conducted over the 1979-86
period included establishments that employed
at least 50,100, or 250 workers, depending on
the industry (most service industries were
excluded). The survey conducted in 1987
covered only State and local governments with
50 or more employees. The surveys conducted
in 1988 and 1989 included medium and large
establishments with 100 workers or more in
private industries. All surveys conducted over
the 1979-89 period excluded establishments
in Alaska and Hawaii, as well as part-time
employees.
Beginning in 1990, surveys o f State and
lo ca l govern m en ts and sm all private
establishments were conducted in evennumbered years, and surveys o f medium and
large establishments were conducted in odd-

numbered years. The small establishment
survey in clu d es all p rivate nonfarm
esta b lish m en ts w ith few er than 100
w orkers, w h ile the State and local
government survey includes all governments,
regardless o f the number o f workers. All
three surveys include full- and part-time
workers, and workers in all 50 States and
the District o f Columbia.
F or additional information on the Em­
ployee Benefits Survey, contact the Office o f
Compensation Levels and Trends on the
Internet:

http://www.bls.gov/ebs/

Work s to p p a g e s
Description of the series
Data on work stoppages measure the number
and duration o f major strikes or lockouts (in­
volving 1,000 workers or more) occurring dur­
ing the month (or year), the number o f work­
ers involved, and the amount o f work time lost
because o f stoppage. These data are presented
in table 31.
Data are largely from a variety o f pub­
lished sources and cover only establishments
directly involved in a stoppage. They do
not measure the indirect or secondary effect
o f stoppages on other establishments whose
employees are idle owing to material short­
ages or lack o f service.

Definitions
Number of stoppages:

The number o f
strikes and lockouts involving 1,000 workers
or more and lasting a full shift or longer.
Workers involved : The number o f work­
ers directly involved in the stoppage.
Number of days idle: The aggregate
number o f workdays lost by workers involved
in the stoppages.

Days o f idleness as a percent of
estim ated w orking time: A ggregate
workdays lost as a percent o f the aggregate
number o f standard workdays in the period
m ultiplied by total em ploym ent in the
period.

Notes on the data
This series is not comparable with the one
terminated in 1981 that covered strikes in­
volving six workers or more.
F or a dd itio nal information on work
stoppages data, contact the Office o f Com­
pensation and Working Conditions: (202)
691-6282, or the Internet:

________ http:/www.bls.gov/cba/________

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

39

Current Labor Statistics

Price Data

to the table. The area indexes measure only
the average change in prices for each area
since the base period, and do not indicate
differences in the level o f prices among
cities.

(Tables 2; 3 2 ^ 2 )
P rice data are gathered by the Bureau
o f Labor Statistics from retail and pri­
mary markets in the United States. Price in­
dexes are given in relation to a base period—
1982 = 100 for many Producer Price Indexes,
1982-84 = 100 for many Consumer Price In­
dexes (unless otherwise noted), and 1990 =
100 for International Price Indexes.

C o n s u m e r P rice Indexes
Description of the series
The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a mea­
sure o f the average change in the prices
paid by urban consumers for a fixed mar­
ket basket o f goods and services. The cpi
is calculated monthly for two population
groups, one co n sistin g on ly o f urban
households whose primary source o f in­
come is derived from the employment o f
wage earners and clerical workers, and the
other consisting o f all urban households.
The wage earner index (CPI-W) is a continu­
ation o f the historic index that was intro­
duced well over a half-century ago for use
in wage negotiations. As new uses were
developed for the CPI in recent years, the
need for a broader and more representa­
tive index became apparent. The all-urban
consumer index (CPi-U), introduced in 1978,
is representative o f the 199 3 -9 5 buying
habits o f about 87 percent o f the noninstitutional population o f the United States
at that time, compared with 32 percent
represented in the cpi -w . In addition to
wage earners and clerical workers, the cpi u covers professional, managerial, and tech­
nical workers, the self-em ployed, short­
term workers, the unemployed, retirees,
and others not in the labor force.
The cpi is based on prices o f food,
clothing, shelter, fuel, drugs, transporta­
tion fares, doctors’ and dentists’ fees, and
other goods and services that people buy
for day-to-day living. The quantity and
quality o f these items are kept essentially
unchanged between major revisions so that
only price changes will be measured. All
taxes directly associated with the pur­
chase and use o f items are included in the
index.
Data collected from more than 23,000
retail establishments and 5,800 housing
units in 87 urban areas across the country
are used to develop the “U.S. city aver­
age.” Separate estimates for 14 major ur­
ban centers are presented in table 33. The
areas listed are as indicated in footnote 1

40
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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Notes on the d a ta
In January 1983, the Bureau changed the
way in which homeownership costs are
meaured for the CPi-u. A rental equivalence
method replaced the asset-price approach
to homeownership costs for that series. In
January 1985, the same change was made in
the cpi-w . The central purpose o f the change
was to separate shelter costs from the in­
vestment component o f home-ownership so
that the index would reflect only the cost o f
shelter services provided by owner-occu­
pied homes. An updated CPi-u and cpi-w
were introduced with release o f the January
1987 and January 1998 data.
F or a d d it io n a l inform ation , contact
the D ivision o f Prices and Price Indexes:
(202) 6 9 1 -7 0 0 0 .

by mail questionnaire. M ost prices are ob­
tained directly from producing companies
on a voluntary and con fid en tial basis.
Prices generally are reported for the Tues­
day o f the week containing the 13th day
o f the month.
Since Januaiy 1992, price changes for the
various commodities have been averaged
together with im plicit quantity w eights
representing their importance in the total net
selling value o f all commodities as o f 1987.
The detailed data are aggregated to obtain
indexes for stage-of-processing groupings,
com m od ity g ro u p in g s, d u r a b ility -o fproduct groupings, and a number o f special
composite groups. All Producer Price Index
data are subject to revision 4 months after
original publication.
F or ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, contact
the D ivision o f Industrial Prices and Price
Indexes: (202) 6 9 1 -7 7 0 5 .

In tern a tio n a l P ric e In d e x e s
D escription of the series

P ro d u c e r P rice In d ex e s
Description of the series
Producer Price Indexes (ppi ) measure av­
erage changes in prices received by do­
m estic producers o f com m odities in all
stages o f processing. The sample used for
calculating these indexes currently con­
tains about 3,200 commodities and about
80,000 quotations per month, selected to
represent the movement o f prices o f all
commodities produced in the manufactur­
ing; agriculture, forestry, and fishing; min­
ing; and gas and electricity and public utili­
tie s secto rs. The sta g e -o f-p r o c e ssin g
structure o f ppi organizes products by
class o f buyer and degree o f fabrication
(that is, fin ish ed g o o d s, interm ediate
goods, and crude materials). The tradi­
tional comm odity structure o f ppi orga­
nizes products by similarity o f end use or
material com position. The industry and
product structure o f ppi organizes data in
accordance with the Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC) and the product code
extension o f the Sic developed by the U.S.
Bureau o f the Census.
To the extent possible, prices used in
calculating Producer Price Indexes apply
to the first significant commercial transac­
tion in the United States from the produc­
tion or central marketing point. Price data
are generally collected monthly, primarily

July 2003

The International Price Program pro­
duces monthly and quarterly export and
im port price in d e x e s for n on m ilitary
goods and services traded betw een the
United States and the rest o f the world.
The export price index provides a measure
o f price change for all products sold by
U.S. residents to foreign buyers. (“R esi­
dents” is defined as in the national income
accounts; it includes corporations, busi­
nesses, and individuals, but does not re­
quire the organizations to be U .S. owned
nor the individuals to have U.S. citizen­
ship.) The import price index provides a
measure o f price change for goods pur­
chased from other countries by U .S. resi­
dents.
The product universe for both the im­
port and export indexes includes raw ma­
terials, agricultural products, semifinished
manufactures, and finished manufactures,
in clu d in g both cap ital and consum er
goods. Price data for these items are col­
lected primarily by mail questionnaire. In
nearly all cases, the data are collected di­
rectly from the exporter or importer, al­
though in a few cases, prices are obtained
from other sources.
To the extent possible, the data gath­
ered refer to prices at the U .S. border for
exports and at either the foreign border or
the U.S. border for imports. For nearly all
products, the prices refer to transactions
com pleted during the first w eek o f the

month. Survey respondents are asked to
indicate all discounts, allowances, and re­
bates applicable to the reported prices, so
that the price used in the calculation o f
the indexes is the actual price for which
the product was bought or sold.
In addition to general indexes o f prices for
U.S. exports and imports, indexes are also
published for detailed product categories o f
exports and imports. These categories are
defined according to the five-digit level o f detail
for the Bureau o f Economic Analysis End-use
Classification, the three-digit level for the
Standard Industrial Classification (SiTC), and
the four-digit level o f detail for the Harmonized
System. Aggregate import indexes by coun­
try or region o f origin are also available.
BLS p u b lish es in d exes for selected cat­
eg o ries o f internationally traded services,
calculated on an international basis and on
a bala n ce-of-p aym en ts basis.

N otes on the d a ta
The export and import price indexes are
weighted indexes o f the Laspeyres type.
The trade weights currently used to com ­
pute both indexes relate to 2000.
Because a price index depends on the same
items being priced from period to period, it is
necessary to recognize when a product’s
specifications or terms o f transaction have
been modified. For this reason, the Bureau’s
questionnaire requests detailed descriptions of
the physical and functional characteristics o f
the products being priced, as well as informa­
tion on the number o f units bought or sold,
discounts, credit terms, packaging, class o f
buyer or seller, and so forth. When there are
changes in either the specifications or terms o f
transaction o f a product, the dollar value o f
each change is deleted from the total price
change to obtain the “pure” change. Once this
value is determined, a linking procedure is em­
ployed which allows for the continued repric­
ing of the item.
F or a dd itio na l information , contact
the Division o f International Prices: (202)
691-7155.

Productivity Data
(Tables 2; 43-46)

Business

a n d m ajo r sectors

Description of the series
The productivity measures relate real output


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to real input. As such, they encompass a fam­
ily o f measures which include single-factor
input measures, such as output per hour, out­
put per unit o f labor input, or output per
unit o f capital input, as well as measures o f
multifactor productivity (output per unit o f
combined labor and capital inputs). The Bu­
reau indexes show the change in output rela­
tive to changes in the various inputs. The
measures cover the business, nonfarm busi­
ness, manufacturing, and nonfmancial corpo­
rate sectors.
Corresponding indexes o f hourly compen­
sation, unit labor costs, unit nonlabor pay­
ments, and prices are also provided.

Definitions
Output per hour of all persons (labor pro­
ductivity) is the quantity o f goods and ser­
vices produced per hour o f labor input. Out­
put per unit of capital services (capital
productivity) is the quantity o f goods and
services produced per unit o f capital ser­
vices input. Multifactor productivity is the
quantity o f goods and services produced per
combined inputs. For private business and pri­
vate nonfarm business, inputs include labor
and capital units. For manufacturing, inputs
include labor, capital, energy, nonenergy mate­
rials, and purchased business services.
Compensation per hour is total com­
pensation divided by hours at work. Total
compensation equals the wages and salaries
o f employees plus employers’ contributions
for social insurance and private benefit plans,
plus an estimate o f these payments for the
self-employed (except for nonfmancial cor­
porations in which there are no self-em ­
ployed). Real compensation per hour is
com pensation per hour deflated by the
change in the Consumer Price Index for All
Urban Consumers.
Unit labor costs are the labor compen­
sation costs expended in the production o f a
unit o f output and are derived by dividing
compensation by output. Unit nonlabor
payments include profits, depreciation,
interest, and indirect taxes per unit o f out­
put. They are computed by subtracting com­
pensation o f all persons from current-dollar
value o f output and dividing by output.
Unit nonlabor costs contain all the
com ponents o f unit nonlabor payments
except unit profits.
Unit profits include corporate profits
with inventory valuation and capital con­
sumption adjustments per unit o f output.
Hours of all persons are the total
hours at work o f payroll workers, selfem ployed persons, and unpaid fam ily
workers.

Labor inputs are hours o f all persons
adjusted for the effects o f changes in the
education and experience o f the labor force.
Capital services are the flow o f ser­
vices from the capital stock used in pro­
duction. It is developed from measures o f
the net stock o f physical assets— equip­
ment, structures, land, and inventories—
weighted by rental prices for each type o f
asset.
Combined units of labor and capital
in p u ts are d e r iv e d b y c o m b in in g
changes in labor and capital input with
w e ig h ts
w h ic h
rep resen t
ea ch
c o m p o n e n t’s sh a re o f to ta l
co st.
Combined units o f labor, capital, energy,
m a te r ia ls , and p u r c h a se d b u s in e s s
s e r v ic e s are s im ila r ly d e r iv e d by
com bining changes in each input with
w e ig h ts that r e p r e se n t ea ch in p u t’s
share o f total c o sts. T he in d ex es for
each input and for com bined units are
based on changing w eig h ts w hich are
averages o f the shares in the current and
preceding year (the Tornquist indexnumber form ula).

N otes on the d a ta
B u sin ess sector output is an annuallyweighted index constructed by excluding
from real gross domestic product ( g d p ) the
follow in g outputs: general government,
nonprofit institutions, paid em ployees o f
private households, and the rental value
o f owner-occupied dw ellings. Nonfarm
business also excludes farming. Private
business and private nonfarm business
further exclude government enterprises.
The measures are supplied by the U .S. D e­
partment o f Commerce’s Bureau o f E co­
nomic Analysis. Annual estimates o f manu­
facturing sectoral output are produced by
the Bureau o f Labor Statistics. Quarterly
manufacturing output indexes from the
Federal Reserve Board are adjusted to these
annual output measures by the BLS. Com­
pensation data are developed from data o f
the Bureau o f Econom ic A nalysis and the
Bureau o f Labor Statistics. Hours data
are developed from data o f the Bureau o f
Labor Statistics.
The productivity and associated cost
measures in tables 4 3 -4 6 describe the re­
lationship between output in real terms
and the labor and capital inputs involved
in its production. They show the changes
from period to period in the amount o f
goods and services produced per unit o f
input.
Although these measures relate output

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

41

Current Labor Statistics

to hours and capital services, they do not
measure the contributions o f labor, capi­
tal, or any other specific factor o f produc­
tion. Rather, they reflect the joint effect
o f many influences, including changes in
technology; shifts in the composition o f
the labor force; capital investment; level
o f output; changes in the utilization o f
capacity, energy, material, and research
and development; the organization o f pro­
duction; managerial skill; and characteris­
tics and efforts o f the work force.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on this
productivity series, contact the D ivision
o f P roductivity Research: (2 0 2 ) 6 9 1 —
5606.

compensation includes payroll as well as
supplemental payments, including both legally
required expenditures and payments for vol­
untary programs.
Multifactor productivity is derived by
dividing an index o f industry output by an
index o f the combined inputs consumed in pro­
ducing that output. Combined inputs in­
clude capital, labor, and intermediate pur­
chases. The measure o f capital input used
represents the flow o f services from the capi­
tal stock used in production. It is developed
from measures o f the net stock o f physical
assets— equipment, structures, land, and in­
ventories. The measure o f intermediate pur­
chases is a combination o f purchased materi­
als, services, fuels, and electricity.

Industry p ro d u c tiv ity
m e a su re s

Notes on the d a ta

Notes on the d a ta

The industry measures are compiled from
data produced by the Bureau o f Labor Sta­
tistics and the Bureau o f the Census,with
additional data supplied by other govern­
ment agen cies, trade association s, and
other sources.
For most industries, the productivity
indexes refer to the output per hour o f all
employees. For some trade and services
industries, indexes o f output per hour o f
all persons (including self-em ployed) are
constructed. For some transportation in­
dustries, only indexes o f output per em­
ployee are prepared.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on this
series, contact the D ivision o f Industry
Productivity Studies: (202) 6 9 1 -5 6 1 8 .

The adjusted statistics have been adapted to
the age at which compulsory schooling ends
in each country, rather than to the U.S. stan­
dard o f 16 years o f age and older. Therefore,
the adjusted statistics relate to the popula­
tion aged 16 and older in France, Sweden, and
the United Kingdom; 15 and older in Austra­
lia, Japan, Germany, Italy from 1993 onward,
and the Netherlands; and 14 and older in Italy
prior to 1993. An exception to this rule is
that the Canadian statistics for 1976 onward
are adjusted to cover ages 16 and older,
whereas the age at which compulsory school­
ing ends remains at 15. The institutional
population is included in the denominator o f
the labor force participation rates and em­
ployment-population ratios for Japan and
Germany; it is excluded for the United States
and the other countries.
In the U.S. labor force survey, persons on
layoff who are awaiting recall to their jobs
are classified as unemployed. European and
Japanese layoff practices are quite different
in nature from those in the United States;
therefore, strict application o f the U.S. defi­
nition has not been made on this point. For
further information, see M o n th ly L a b o r R e ­
view , December 1981, pp. 8-11.
The figures for one or more recent years
for France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands,
and the United Kingdom are calculated using
adjustment factors based on labor force sur­
veys for earlier years and are considered pre­
liminary. The recent-year measures for these
countries, therefore, are subject to revision
whenever data from more current labor force
surveys become available.
There are breaks in the data series for the
United States (1990,1994,1997,1998,1999,
2000), Canada (1976) France (1992), Ger­
many (1991), Italy (1991, 1993), the Neth­
erlands (1988), and Sweden (1987).

D escription of the series
The BLS industry productivity data
supplement the measures for the business
econom y and major sectors with annual
measures o f labor productivity for selected
industries at the three- and four-digit levels of
the Standard Industrial Classification system.
In addition to labor productivity, the industry
data also include annual m easures o f
compensation and unit labor costs for threedigit industries and measures o f multifactor
productivity for three-digit manufacturing
industries and railroad transportation. The
industry measures differ in methodology and
data sources from the productivity measures
for the major sectors because the industry
measures are developed independently o f the
N ational Income and Product Accounts
framework used for the major sector measures.

International
Comparisons
(Tables 4 7 -4 9 )

Definitions
Output per hour is derived by dividing an
index o f industiy output by an index o f labor
input. For most industries, output indexes are
derived from data on the value o f industry out­
put adjusted for price change. For the remain­
ing industries, output indexes are derived from
data on the physical quantity o f production.
The labor input series consist of the hours of
all employees (production workers and nonpro­
duction workers), the hours o f all persons (paid
employees, partners, proprietors, and unpaid fam­
ily workers), or the number o f employees, de­
pending upon the industry.
Unit labor costs represent the labor com­
pensation costs per unit o f output produced,
and are derived by dividing an index o f labor
compensation by an index o f output. Labor

42
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L a b o r fo rc e a n d
u n e m p lo y m e n t
Description of the series
Tables 47 and 48 present comparative meas­
ures o f the labor force, employment, and unem ploym ent— approximating U .S. con ­
cepts— for the United States, Canada, Aus­
tralia, Japan, and several European countries.
The unemployment statistics (and, to a
lesser extent, employment statistics) pub­
lished by other industrial countries are not,
in most cases, comparable to U.S. unemploy­
ment statistics. Therefore, the Bureau ad­
justs the figures for selected countries, where
necessary, for all known major definitional

July 2003

differences. Although precise comparability
may not be achieved, these adjusted figures
provide a better basis for international com­
parisons than the figures regularly published
by each country. For further information on
adjustments and comparability issues, see
Constance Sorrentino, “International unem­
ployment rates: how comparable are they?”
M onthly L a b o r R eview , June 2000, pp. 3-20.

Definitions
For the principal U.S. definitions o f the labor
force, employment, and unemployment, see
the Notes section on Employment and Unem­
ployment Data: Household survey data.

For the United States, the break in series
reflects a major redesign o f the labor force
survey questionnaire and collection method­
ology introduced in January 1994. Revised
population estimates based on the 1990 cen­
sus, adjusted for the estimated undercount,
also were incorporated. In 1996, previously
published data for the 1990-93 period were
revised to reflect the 1990 census-based
population controls, adjusted for the un­
dercount. In 1997, revised population con­
trols were introduced into the household sur­
vey. Therefore, the data are not strictly
conparable with prior years. In 1998, new
composite estimation procedures and minor
revisions in population controls were intro­
duced into the household survey. Therefore,
the data are not strictly comparable with data
for 1997 and earlier years. See the Notes sec­
tion on Employment and Unemployment
Data o f this R eview .
bls recently introduced a new adjusted
series for Canada. Beginning with the data
for 1976, Canadian data are adjusted to more
closely approximate U.S. concepts. Adjust­
ments are made to the unemployed and labor
force to exclude: (1) 15-year-olds; (2) pas­
sive jobseekers (persons only reading news­
paper ads as their method o f job search); (3)
persons waiting to start a new job who did
not seek work in the past 4 weeks; and (4)
persons unavailable for work due to personal
or family responsibilities. An adjustment is
made to include full-tine students looking for
full-time work. The impact o f the adjust­
ments was to lower the annual average unem­
ployment rate by 0.1-0.4 percentage point
in the 1980s and 0.4-1.0 percentage point in
the 1990s.
For France, the 1992 break reflects the
substitution o f standardized European Union
Statistical Office ( eurostat ) unemployment
statistics for the unemployment data esti­
mated according to the International Labor
Office ( ilo ) definition and published in the
Organization for Economic Cooperation and
Development ( oecd ) annual yearbook and
quarterly update. This change was made be­
cause the eurostat data are more up-to-date
than the oecd figures. Also, since 1992, the
eurostat definitions are closer to the U.S.
definitions than they were in prior years. The
impact o f this revision was to lower the un­
employment rate by 0.1 percentage point in
1992 and 1993, by 0.4 percentage point in
1994, and 0.5 percentage point in 1995.
For Germany, the data for 1991 onward
refer to unified Germany. Data prior to 1991
relate to the former West Germany. The im­
pact o f including the former East Germany
was to increase the unemployment rate from
4.3 to 5.6 percent in 1991.
For Italy, the 1991 break reflects a revi­


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sion in the method o f weighting sample
data. The impact was to increase the un­
em ploym ent rate by approxim ately 0.3
percentage point, from 6.6 to 6.9 percent
in 1991.
In October 1992, the survey methodol­
ogy was revised and the definition o f unem­
ployment was changed to include only those
who were actively looking for a job within
the 30 days preceding the survey and who
were available for work. In addition, the
lower age limit for the labor force was raised
from 14 to 15 years. (Prior to these changes,
BLS adjusted Italy’s published unemploy­
ment rate downward by excluding from the
unemployed those persons who had not
actively sought work in the past 30 days.)
The break in the series also reflects the incor­
poration o f the 1991 population census re­
sults. The impact o f these changes was to
raise Italy’s adjusted unemployment rate by
approximately 1.2 percentage points, from
8.3 to 9.5 percent in fourth-quarter 1992.
These changes did not affect employment
significantly, except in 1993. Estimates by
the Italian Statistical Office indicate that em­
ployment declined by about 3 percent in
1993, rather than the nearly 4 percent indi­
cated by the data shown in table 44. This
difference is attributable mainly to the incor­
poration o f the 1991 population benchmarks
in the 1993 data. Data for earlier years have
not been adjusted to incorporate the 1991
census results.
For the Netherlands, a new survey ques­
tionnaire was introduced in 1992 that allowed
for a closer application o f ilo guidelines.
eurostat has revised the Dutch series back
to 1988 based on the 1992 changes. The 1988
revised unemployment rate is 7.6 percent;
the previous estimate for the same year was
9.3 percent.
There have been two breaks in series in
the Swedish labor force survey, in 1987 and
1993. Adjustments have been made for the
1993 break back to 1987. In 1987, a new
questionnaire was introduced. Questions
regarding current availability were added
and the period o f active workseeking was
reduced from 60 days to 4 weeks. These
changes lowered Sw eden’s 1987 unem­
ploym ent rate by 0.4 percentage point,
from 2.3 to 1.9 percent. In 1993, the mea­
surement period for the labor force sur­
vey was changed to represent all 52 weeks
o f the year rather than one w eek each
month and a new adjustment for popula­
tion totals was introduced. The impact
was to raise the unemployment rate by
approximately 0.5 percentage point, from
7.6 to 8.1 percent. Statistics Sweden re­

vised its labor force survey data for 1987—
92 to take into account the break in 1993.
The adjustment raised the Swedish unem­
ployment rate by 0.2 percentage point in
1987 and gradually rose to 0.5 percentage
point in 1992.
Beginning with 1987, bls has adjusted the
Swedish data to classify students who also
sought work as unemployed. The impact o f
this change was to increase the adjusted un­
employment rate by 0.1 percentage point in
1987 and by 1.8 percentage points in 1994,
when unemployment was higher. In 1998,
the adjusted unemployment rate had risen
from 6.5 to 8.4 percent due to the adjustment
to include students.
The net effect o f the 1987 and 1993
changes and the b l s adjustment for stu­
dents seek in g work low ered S w ed en ’s
1987 unemployment rate from 2.3 to 2.2
percent.
for additional information on this se­
ries, contact the Division o f Foreign Labor
Statistics: (202) 691-5654.

M a n u fa ctu rin g p ro d u ctiv ity
a n d la b o r costs
Description of the series
Table 49 presents comparative indexes o f
manufacturing labor productivity (output per
hour), output, total hours, compensation per
hour, and unit labor costs for the United
States, Canada, Japan, and nine European
countries. These measures are trend compari­
sons— that is, series that measure changes
over time— rather than level comparisons.
There are greater technical problems in com­
paring the levels o f manufacturing output
among countries.
bls constructs the comparative indexes
from three basic aggregate measures— output,
total labor hours, and total compensation.
The hours and compensation measures refer
to all employed persons (wage and salary
earners plus self-employed persons and un­
paid family workers) in the United States,
Canada, Japan, France, Germany, Norway,
and Sweden, and to all employees (wage and
salary earners) in the other countries.

Definitions
Output, in general, refers to value added
in manufacturing from the national ac­
counts o f each country. H owever, the
output series for Japan prior to 1970 is
an index o f industrial production, and the
national accounts measures for the United
Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

43

Current Labor Statistics
Kingdom are essentially identical to their
indexes o f industrial production.
T he 1 9 7 7 -9 7 output data for the
United States are the gross product origi­
nating (value added) measures prepared
by the Bureau o f Economic A nalysis o f
the U .S. Department o f Commerce. Com­
parable manufacturing output data cur­
rently are not available prior to 1977.
U.S. gross product originating is a chaintype annual-weighted series. (For more in­
formation on the U.S. measure, see Robert
E. Yuskavage, “Improved Estim ates o f
Gross Product by Industry, 1 9 5 9 -9 4 ,”
S u r v e y o f C u rre n t B u sin e s s, August 1996,
pp. 1 3 3-55.) The Japanese value added
series is based upon one set o f fixed price
weights for the years 1970 through 1997.
Output series for the other foreign econo­
mies also employ fixed price weights, but
the w eights are updated periodically (for
example, every 5 or 10 years).
To preserve the comparability o f the U.S.
measures with those for other economies, bls
uses gross product originating in manufac­
turing for the United States for these com­
parative measures. The gross product origi­
nating series differs from the manufacturing
output series that bls publishes in its news
releases on quarterly measures o f U.S. pro­
ductivity and costs (and that underlies the
measures that appear in tables 43 and 45 in
this section). The quarterly measures are on
a “sectoral output” basis, rather than a valueadded basis. Sectoral output is gross output
less intrasector transactions.
Total labor hours refers to hours worked
in all countries. The measures are developed
from statistics o f manufacturing employment
and average hours. The series used for France
(from 1970 forward), Norway, and Sweden
are official series published with the national
accounts. Where official total hours series are
not available, the measures are developed by
bls using employment figures published with
the national accounts, or other comprehen­
sive employment series, and estimates o f an­
nual hours worked. For Germany, bls uses
estimates o f average hours worked developed
by a research institute connected to the Ministry o f Labor for use with the national ac­
counts employment figures. For the other
countries, BLS constructs its own estimates
o f average hours.
Denmark has not published estimates o f
average hours for 1994-97; therefore, the bls
measure o f labor input for Denmark ends in
1993.
Total compensation (labor cost) includes
all payments in cash or in-kind made directly
to employees plus employer expenditures for
legally required insurance programs and con­
tractual and private benefit plans. The mea­
sures are from the national accounts o f each
country, except those for Belgium, which are
developed by bls using statistics on employ­

44
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ment, average hours, and hourly compensa­
tion. For Canada, France, and Sweden, com­
pensation is increased to account for other sig­
nificant taxes on payroll or employment. For
the United Kingdom, compensation is reduced
between 1967 and 1991 to account for em­
ployment-related subsidies. Self-employed
workers are included in the all-employed-per­
sons measures by assuming that their hourly
compensation is equal to the average for wage
and salary employees.

fied by Standard Industrial Classification
and size o f employment.

Definitions

Survey of O c c u p a t io n a l
Injuries a n d Illnesses

Under the Occupational Safety and Health
Act, employers maintain records o f nonfatal
work-related injuries and illnesses that in­
volve one or more o f the following: loss o f
consciousness, restriction o f work or motion,
transfer to another job, or medical treatment
other than first aid.
Occupational injury is any injury such as
a cut, fracture, sprain, or amputation that re­
sults from a work-related event or a single, in­
stantaneous exposure in the work environment.
Occupational illness is an abnormal con­
dition or disorder, other than one resulting from
an occupational injury, caused by exposure to
factors associated with employment. It in­
cludes acute and chronic illnesses or disease
which may be caused by inhalation, absorp­
tion, ingestion, or direct contact.
Lost workday injuries and illnesses are
cases that involve days away from work, or
days o f restricted work activity, or both.
Lost workdays include the number o f
workdays (consecutive or not) on which
the employee was either away from work
or at work in some restricted capacity, or
both, because o f an occupational injury or
illness, bls measures o f the number and
incidence rate o f lost workdays were dis­
continued beginning with the 1993 sur­
vey. The num ber o f days aw ay from
work or days o f restricted work activity
does not include the day o f injury or on­
set o f illn ess or any days on w hich the
em ployee w ould not have worked, such
as a Federal holiday, even though able to
work.
Incidence rates are computed as the num­
ber o f injuries and/or illnesses or lost work
days per 100 full-time workers.

Description of the series

Notes on the d a ta

The Survey o f Occupational Injuries and Ill­
nesses collects data from employers about their
workers’ job-related nonfatal injuries and ill­
nesses. The information that employers pro­
vide is based on records that they maintain un­
der the Occupational Safety and Health Act of
1970. Self-employed individuals, farms with
fewer than 11 employees, employers regulated
by other Federal safety and health laws, and
Federal, State, and local government agencies
are excluded from the survey.
The survey is a Federal-State coopera­
tive program with an independent sample
selected for each participating State. A strati­
fied random sample with a Neyman alloca­
tion is selected to represent all private in­
dustries in the State. The survey is strati­

The definitions o f occupational injuries and
illnesses are from R ecordkeeping G uidelines
f o r O ccupational Injuries a n d Illnesses (U.S.
Department o f Labor, Bureau o f Labor Sta­
tistics, September 1986).
Estimates are made for industries and em­
ployment size classes for total recordable cases,
lost workday cases, days away from work
cases, and nonfatal cases without lost work­
days. These data also are shown separately for
injuries. Illness data are available for seven cat­
egories: occupational skin diseases or disorders,
dust diseases o f the lungs, respiratory condi­
tions due to toxic agents, poisoning (systemic
effects o f toxic agents), disorders due to physi­
cal agents (other than toxic materials), disorders
associated with repeated trauma, and all other

Notes on the data
In general, the measures relate to total manu­
facturing as defined by the International Stan­
dard Industrial Classification. However, the
measures for France (for all years) and Italy
(beginning 1970) refer to mining and manu­
facturing less energy-related products, and
the measures for Denmark include mining and
exclude manufacturing handicrafts from 1960
to 1966.
The measures for recent years may be
based on current indicators o f manufacturing
output (such as industrial production in­
dexes), employment, average hours, and
hourly compensation until national accounts
and other statistics used for the long-term
measures become available.
F or additional information on this se­
ries, contact the Division o f Foreign Labor
Statistics: (202) 691-5654._______________

Occupational Injury
and Illness Data
(Tables 50-51)

July 2003

occupational illnesses.
The survey continues to measure the num­
ber o f new work-related illness cases which
are recognized, diagnosed, and reported during
the year. Some conditions, for example, long­
term latent illnesses caused by exposure to car­
cinogens, often are difficult to relate to the
workplace and are not adequately recognized
and reported. These long-term latent illnesses
are believed to be understated in the survey’s
illness measure. In contrast, the overwhelming
majority o f the reported new illnesses are those
which are easier to directly relate to workplace
activity (for example, contact dermatitis and
carpal tunnel syndrome).
Most o f the estimates are in the form o f
incidence rates, defined as the number o f
injuries and illnesses per 100 equivalent
fu ll-tim e w ork ers. For th is p u rp ose,
2 0 0 ,0 0 0 em ployee hours represent 100
em p loyee years (2 ,0 0 0 hours per em ­
ployee). Full detail on the available mea­
sures is presented in the annual bulletin,
O c c u p a tio n a l In ju r ie s a n d Illn e s s e s :
C ounts, R ates, a n d C h a ra cteristics.

Comparable data for more than 40 States
and territories are available from the bls Of­
fice o f Safety, Health and Working Condi­
tions. Many o f these States publish data on
State and local government employees in ad­
dition to private industry data.
Mining and railroad data are furnished to
bls by the Mine Safety and Health Adminis­
tration and the Federal Railroad Administra­
tion. Data from these organizations are in­
cluded in both the national and State data
published annually.
With the 1992 survey, BLS began publish­
ing details on serious, nonfatal incidents re­
sulting in days away from work. Included are
some major characteristics o f the injured and


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ill workers, such as occupation, age, gender,
race, and length o f service, as well as the
circumstances o f their injuries and illnesses
(nature o f the disabling condition, part o f
body affected, event and exposure, and the
source directly producing the condition). In
general, these data are available nationwide
for detailed industries and for individual
States at more aggregated industry levels.
F or additional information on occu­
pational injuries and illnesses, contact the Of­
fice o f Occupational Safety, Health and Work­
ing Conditions at (202) 691-6180, or access
the Internet at:

http://www.bls.gov/iif/

C e n s u s of Fatal
O c c u p a t io n a l Injuries
The Census o f Fatal Occupational Injuries
compiles a complete roster o f fatal job-re­
lated injuries, including detailed data about
the fatally injured workers and the fatal
events. The program collects and cross
checks fatality information from multiple
sources, including death certificates, State
and Federal workers’ compensation reports,
Occupational Safety and Health Administra­
tion and Mine Safety and Health Adminis­
tration records, medical examiner and au­
topsy reports, media accounts, State motor
vehicle fatality records, and follow-up ques­
tionnaires to employers.
In addition to private wage and salary
workers, the self-employed, family members,
and Federal, State, and local government
workers are covered by the program. To be
included in the fatality census, the decedent
must have been employed (that is working
for pay, compensation, or profit) at the time
o f the event, engaged in a legal work activity,

or present at the site o f the incident as a re­
quirement o f his or her job.

Definition
A fatal work injury is any intentional or
unintentional wound or damage to the
body resulting in death from acute expo­
sure to energy, such as heat or electricity,
or kinetic energy from a crash, or from the
absence o f such essentials as heat or oxy­
gen caused by a specific event or incident
or series o f events within a single work­
day or shift. Fatalities that occur during a
person’s commute to or from work are ex­
cluded from the census, as w ell as workrelated illn esses, which can be difficult
to identify due to long latency periods.

N otes on the d a ta
Twenty-eight data elem ents are collected,
coded, and tabulated in the fatality pro­
gram, including information about the fa­
tally injured worker, the fatal incident, and
the machinery or equipm ent in volved.
Summary worker demographic data and
event characteristics are included in a na­
tional news release that is available about
8 months after the end o f the reference
year. The Census o f Fatal Occupational
Injuries was initiated in 1992 as a joint
Federal-State effort. M ost States issue
summary information at the time o f the
national news release.
F or a d d it io n a l inform atio n on the
Census o f Fatal Occupational Injuries con­
tact the bls Office o f Safety, Health, and
Working Conditions at (202) 691 -6 175, or
the Internet at: http://www.bls.gov/iif/

Where to find additional data
Current and historical statistics from Bureau o f Labor Statistics surveys are
available at the addresses listed on the inside back cover o f this Review , or on
the Internet at
http://w w w .bls.gov

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

45

Current Labor Statistics: Comparative Indicators

1. La b o r m a rk e t in d ica tors
Selected indicators

2001

2001

2002
I

II

2002
III

IV

I

II

2003
III

IV

I

Employment data
E m plo ym ent status of th e civilian noninstitutionalized
population (household s urvey):1
L abor force participation ra te ....................................................................

6 6 .8

6 6.6

6 7.2

6 6 .8

6 6 .7

6 6 .8

6 6 .6

6 6 .7

6 6 .6

6 6 .5

6 6 .3

Em plo ym ent-po pulation ratio....................................................................

6 3.7

6 2.7

6 4 ,3

6 3 .8

6 3 .5

6 3 .0

6 2 .8

6 2 .8

6 2 .8

6 2 .5

6 2 .4

U n em p lo ym en t ra te .......................................................................................

4 .7

5.8

4.2

4 .4

4 .8

5.6

5.6

5 .9

5 .8

5 .9

5 .8

M e n ..................................................................................................................

4 .8

5.9

4.2

4 .5

4 .9

5.7

5.7

6.0

5 .9

6.1

6 .0
1 2.4

1 6 to 2 4 y e a rs ............................................................................................

11.4

12.8

10.5

11.2

11.4

12.7

12.9

12.8

13.1

12.5

2 5 y ea rs a n d o v e r....................................................................................

3.6

4 .7

3.1

3 .4

3 .7

4 .4

4 .5

4 .8

4 .7

4 .9

4 .9

W o m e n ............................................................................................................

4 .7

5.6

4.1

4 .3

4 .8

5 .5

5.5

5 .7

5.6

5 .7

5 .5

1 6 to 2 4 y e a rs ............................................................................................

9.6

11.1

8 .6

9.2

10.1

10.7

11.0

11.2

10.9

11.4

11.1

2 5 yea rs a n d o v e r....................................................................................

3.7

4 .6

3 .3

3 .4

3 .8

4 .4

4 .4

4 .8

4 .6

4 .6

4 .4

Em plo ym ent, nonfarm (payroll data), in thou sands:1
T o ta l.....................................................................................................................

1 31 ,92 2

130,791

1 3 2 ,4 3 3

1 3 2 ,1 9 3

1 31 ,9 4 3

1 3 1 ,1 3 0

1 30 ,7 5 9

1 3 0 ,7 0 6

1 3 0 ,8 4 4

1 30 ,7 9 5

1 3 0 ,5 9 9

P rivate s ecto r...................................................................................

1 1 0 ,9 8 9

109,531

1 1 1 ,6 8 7

1 1 1 ,3 3 2

1 10 ,9 3 9

1 1 0 ,0 3 5

1 0 9 ,5 9 4

1 0 9 ,5 0 5

1 0 9 ,5 7 4

1 09 ,4 3 8

1 0 9 ,2 3 7

G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ......................................................................................

2 4 ,9 4 4

2 3 ,8 3 6

2 5 ,4 9 3

2 5 ,1 3 6

2 4 ,7 8 6

2 4 ,3 7 5

2 4 ,0 4 9

2 3 ,8 7 9

2 3 ,7 8 7

2 3 ,6 2 3

2 3,4 91

M a n u fa c tu rin g ........................................................................................

1 7 ,6 9 5

1 6,7 24

1 8,1 96

1 7 ,8 7 2

1 7,5 38

1 7 ,1 7 4

16,8 83

1 6 ,7 7 6

16,691

1 6,5 2 8

1 6 ,3 9 6

S e rv ice -p ro d u c in g .....................................................................................

1 0 6 ,9 7 8

1 06 ,95 5

106,941

1 0 7 ,0 5 7

1 07 ,1 5 7

1 0 6 ,7 5 5

10(^711

1 0 6 ,8 2 7

1 07 ,0 5 7

1 0 7 ,1 7 9

1 0 7 ,1 0 8

A v era g e hours:
P rivate s ecto r................................................................................................

3 4.2

34.2

3 4.2

3 4 .2

34.1

34.1

3 4.2

3 4.2

34.1

3 4 .2

3 2 .4

M a n u fa c tu rin g ............................................................................................

4 0 .7

4 0 .9

4 1 .0

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0 .5

4 0 .8

4 1 .0

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0 .8

O v e rtim e ...................................................................................................

3.9

4.1

4.1

3 .9

3 .9

3 .8

4 .0

4.2

4.1

4.1

4.1

Employment Cost Index2
P ercen t c h an g e in th e E C I, com pensation:
All w orkers (excluding farm , household and F ederal w o rkers)......

4.1

3 .4

1.3

.9

1.2

.8

1.0

.9

.9

.6

1 .4

Private industry w o rke rs...........................................................................

4.2

3.2

1.4

1.0

.9

.8

1.1

1.1

.6

.4

1.7

G oods-producing3..................................................................................

3.8

3.7

1.3

.9

.7

.8

1.2

.9

.6

.9

1.8

S ervice-producing3................................................................................

4 .3

3.1

1.4

1.0

1.0

.8

1.1

1.2

.6

.2

1.5

4.2

4.1

.9

.6

2.1

.6

.6

.4

2 .2

.9

.7

S ta te a n d local g o vernm ent w orkers
W o rkers by bargaining status (private industry):
U n io n ...................................................................................................................

4.2

4.2

.7

1.1

1.0

1.4

1.1

1.0

1.2

.9

1.6

N on u n io n ............................................................................................................

4.1

3.2

1.5

1.0

.9

.7

1.1

1.1

.5

.4

1.6

1 Q u arterly d a ta s easo n ally adju sted.
2 A nnual c h a n g e s a re D e c e m b e r-to -D ec e m b er changes. Q uarterly c hanges a re calculated using the last m onth of e ach quarter.
3 G oods-producing industries include mining, construction, and m anufacturing. Service-producing industries include all other private sector industries.

46 Monthly Labor Review

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July 2003

2. A n n u a l a n d q u a rte rly p e r c e n t c h a n g e s in c o m p e n s a t io n , p ric e s , a n d p ro d u c t iv it y
S e le cte d m e a s u re s

2002

2001

2002

2001

I

II

III

IV

I

II

2003
IV

III

I

Compensation data1,2
E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — c o m p e n s a tio n (w a g e s ,
s a la rie s , b e n e fits ):
C iv ilia n n o n fa rm .......................................................................................

4.1

3 .4

1 .3

0 .9

1 .2

0 .8

1.0

0 .9

0 .9

0 .6

1 .4

P riv a te n o n fa r m ..................................................................................

4 .2

3 .2

1 .4

1 .0

.9

.8

1.1

1.1

.6

.4

1 .7

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — w a g e s a n d s ala rie s :
C iv ilia n n o n fa r m .....................................................................................

3 .7

2 .9

1.1

.9

1 .0

.7

.9

.8

.7

.4

1 .0

P riv a te n o n fa rm ..................................................................................

3 .8

2 .7

1 ,2

1 .0

.8

.8

.9

1 .0

.4

.3

1.1

3 .4

1.2

1 .3

1 .0

.2

-.9

.7

.5

.6

-.1

1 .8

-1 .8

-1 .2

.9

.8

-.3

-3 .2

1.1

.2

.2

-.1

4 .0

-2 .4

-1 .6

1.2

1 .0

-.3

-4 .3

1 .5

.4

.0

-.3

5.1

C a p ita l e q u ip m e n t................................................................................

1 .0

-.4

-.1

-7 .1

-.1

.1

2 .9

-.3

-.7

.6

.7

In te rm e d ia te m a te ria ls , s u p p lie s , a n d c o m p o n e n ts ..................

-.2

-1 .2

.2

.6

-1 .0

-3 .6

.9

1.1

1.1

.1

5 .3

C r u d e m a te ria ls ..........................................................................................

-8 .8

- 1 0 .6

-3 .5

-6 .6

- 1 2 .0

- 1 2 .2

8 .0

3 7.1

1 .9

6 .5

2 9 .3

2 .2

Price data1
C o n s u m e r P ric e In d e x (All U rb a n C o n s u m e rs ): All Ite m s .......
P ro d u c e r P ric e In d e x :
F in is h e d g o o d s ..........................................................................................

Productivity data3
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e rso n s :
B u s in e s s s e c to r..........................................................................................

1.1

4 .8

-1 .5

-.2

1 .8

7 .6

8 .3

1 .8

5 .8

.3

N o n fa rm b u s in e s s s e c to r.......................................................................
4
N o n fin a n c ia l c o rp o ra tio n s ....................................................................

1.1

4 .8

-1 .5

-.1

2.1

7 .3

8 .6

1 .7

5 .5

.7

1 .6

1 .4

5 .5

-2 .6

2 .2

3 .2

1 0 .7

4 .7

5 .8

3 .4

5 .0

2 .9

1

Annual

changes

a re

D e c e m b e r-to -D e c e m b e r

c a lc u la te d u s in g th e la s t m o n th o f e a c h q u a rte r.

changes.

Q u a rte rly

changes

a re

C o m p e n s a tio n a n d price d a ta a re not

s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d , a n d th e price d a ta a r e n o t c o m p o u n d e d .
2

3 A n n u a l ra te s

of c h a n g e

a re

c o m p u te d

by c o m p a rin g

a n n u al a v e ra g e s .

Q u a rte rly p e rc e n t c h a n g e s re fle c t a n n u a l ra te s o f c h a n g e in q u a rte rly in d e x e s .
T h e d a ta a re s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .

E x c lu d e s F e d e r a l a n d p riva te h o u s eh o ld w o rke rs .

4 O u tp u t p e r h our of all e m p lo y e e s .
NOTE: D a s h in d ica te s d a ta not a va ila b le .

3. A lt e r n a t iv e m e a s u r e s o f w a g e a n d c o m p e n s a t io n c h a n g e s
Q ua rte rly averag e

F o u r q u arters en din g

2002

C o m p o n e n ts
II

1

2002

2003
III

IV

I

II

I

2003
III

IV

1

A v e r a g e hourly c o m p e n s a tio n :1
All p e rso n s , b u s in es s s e c to r...........................................................................

3 .0

4 .3

2 .2

3 .6

3 .9

1 .4

2 .4

2 .7

3 .3

3 .5

2 .9

4 .0

1 .8

3 .9

3 .5

1 .4

2 .3

2 .5

3 .2

3 .3

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — c o m p e n s a tio n :
C iv ilia n n o n fa rm 2 ..................................................................................................

1 .0

.9

.9

.6

1 .4

3 .9

4 .0

3 .7

1.1

1.1

.6

.4

1 .7

3 .9

4 .0

3 .7

3 .2

3 .8

4 .5

4 .7

4 .2

4 .7

4 .7

3 .9

U n io n ...................................................................................................................

1.1

1 .0

.9

1 .6

N o n u n io n .............................................................................................................

1.1

1.1

.5

.4

1 .6

3 .8

3 .9

3 .5

3 .2

3 .6

.6

.4

2 .2

.9

.7

3 .9

3 .6

3 .8

4.1

4 .2

.9

.8

.7

.4

1.0

3 .5

3 .5

3 .2

2 .9

2 .9

.9

1.0

.4

.3

1.1

3 .5

3 .6

3 .2

2 .7

3 .0

.7

.9

1 .0

.8

.5

4 .4

4 .2

4 .3

3 .5

3 .3

N o n u n io n ...........................................................................................................

1 .0

1 .0

.4

.3

1 .2

3 .4

3 .5

3.1

2 .7

2 .9

S ta te a n d local g o v e rn m e n ts ......................................................................

.5

.3

1 .8

.6

.4

3 .4

3 .2

3.1

3 .2

3.1

S ta te a n d local g o v e rn m e n ts ......................................................................

1 .2

3 .4

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — w a g e s a n d sala rie s :
C iv ilia n n o n fa rm 2 ..................................................................................................

U n io n .....................................................................................................................

1 S e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d . "Q u a rte rly a v e ra g e " is p e rc e n t c h a n g e fro m a q u a rte r a g o , a t a n a n n u a l ra te .
2 E x c lu d e s F e d e ra l a n d h o u s eh o ld w o rk e rs .


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

47

Current Labor Statistics:

4.

Labor Force Data

E m p lo y m e n t status of th e p o p u la tio n , b y sex , a g e , r a c e , a n d H is p a n ic origin, m o n th ly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d

[Numbers in thousands]
Em ploym ent status

Annual average

2002

2003

2001

2002

May

Jun e

Ju ly

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

p o p u la tio n 1...............................

2 1 5 ,0 9 2

2 1 7 ,5 7 0

2 1 7 ,1 9 8

2 1 7 ,4 0 7

2 1 7 ,6 3 0

2 1 7 ,8 6 6

2 1 8 ,1 0 7

2 1 8 ,3 4 0

2 1 8 ,5 4 8

2 1 8 ,7 4 1

2 1 9 ,8 9 7

2 2 0 ,1 1 4

2 2 0 ,3 1 7

2 2 0 ,5 4 0

2 2 0 ,7 6 8

Civilian lab o r fo rc e.................

1 4 3 ,7 3 4

1 4 4 ,8 6 3

144,911

1 4 4 ,8 5 2

1 4 4 ,7 8 6

1 4 5 ,1 2 3

1 4 5 ,6 3 4

1 4 5 ,3 9 3

1 4 5 ,1 8 0

1 4 5 ,1 5 0

1 4 5 ,8 3 8

1 4 5 ,8 5 7

1 4 5 ,7 9 3

1 4 6 ,4 7 3

1 4 6 ,4 8 5

Participation ra te ..........

6 6 .8

6 6 .6

6 6 .7

6 6 .6

6 6 .5

6 6 .6

6 6 .8

6 6 .6

6 6 .4

6 6 .4

6 6 .3

6 6 .3

6 6 .2

6 6 .4

6 6 .4

E m p lo y e d ............................

1 3 6 ,9 3 3

1 3 6 ,4 8 5

1 3 6 ,4 8 7

1 3 6 ,3 8 3

1 3 6 ,3 4 3

1 3 6 ,7 5 7

1 3 7 ,3 1 2

1 3 6 ,9 8 8

1 3 6 ,5 4 2

1 3 6 ,4 3 9

1 3 7 ,5 3 6

1 3 7 ,4 0 8

1 3 7 ,3 4 8

1 3 7 ,6 8 7

1 3 7 ,4 8 7

TOTAL
Civilian noninstitutional

E m p lo ym e n t-p o p ulation ratio2................

6 3 .7

6 2 .7

6 2 .8

6 2 .7

6 2 .6

6 2 .8

6 3 .0

6 2 .7

6 2 .5

6 2 .4

6 2 .5

6 2 .4

6 2 .3

6 2 .4

6 2 .3

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

6 ,801

8 ,3 7 8

8 ,4 2 4

8 ,4 6 9

8 ,4 4 3

8 ,3 6 6

8 ,321

8 ,4 0 5

8 ,6 3 7

8,711

8 ,3 0 2

8 ,4 5 0

8 ,4 4 5

8 ,7 8 6

8 ,9 9 8

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ....

4 .7

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .7

5 .8

5 .9

6 .0

5 .7

5 .8

5 .8

6 .0

6.1

N o t in th e lab o r fo rc e .........

7 1 ,3 5 9

7 2 ,7 0 7

7 2 ,2 8 7

7 2 ,5 5 6

7 2 ,8 4 4

7 2 ,7 4 3

7 2 ,4 7 3

7 2 ,9 4 7

7 3 ,3 6 9

7 3,5 91

7 4 ,0 5 9

7 4 ,2 5 7

7 4 ,5 2 4

7 4 ,0 6 7

7 4 ,2 8 3

p o p u la tio n 1...............................

9 5,1 81

9 6 ,4 3 9

9 6 ,2 0 5

9 6 ,3 7 5

9 6 ,4 6 8

9 6 ,5 5 2

9 6 ,7 3 2

9 6 ,8 6 0

9 7 ,0 2 2

9 7 ,1 3 9

9 7 ,6 3 5

9 7 ,7 6 2

9 7 ,8 6 9

9 7 ,9 7 9

9 8 ,0 8 3

Civilian labo r fo rc e .................

7 2 ,8 1 6

7 3 ,6 3 0

7 3 ,7 6 6

7 3 ,6 8 9

7 3 ,6 7 0

7 3 ,8 0 2

7 4 ,1 0 8

7 3 ,8 8 3

7 3 ,7 7 0

7 3 ,7 4 4

7 3 ,9 9 3

7 4 ,2 5 4

7 4 ,2 3 6

7 4,5 7 1

7 4 ,5 0 6

Men, 20 years and over
C ivilian noninstitutio nal

Participatio n r a te ..........

7 6 .5

7 6 .3

7 6 .7

7 6 .5

7 6 .4

7 6 .4

7 6 .6

7 6 .3

7 6 .0

7 5 .9

7 5 .8

7 6 .0

7 5 .9

76.1

7 6 .0

E m p lo y e d ............................

6 9 ,7 7 6

6 9 ,7 3 4

6 9 ,9 1 8

6 9 ,7 3 9

6 9 ,7 9 2

6 9 ,8 9 5

7 0 ,2 1 3

69,9 21

6 9 ,6 1 7

6 9 ,6 0 0

6 9 ,9 6 7

7 0 ,2 9 3

7 0 ,2 9 3

7 0 ,3 6 4

7 0 ,1 4 4

E m p lo ym e n t-p o p ulation ratio2................

7 3 .3

7 2 .3

7 2 .7

7 2 .4

7 2 .3

7 2 .4

7 2 .6

7 2 .2

7 1 .8

7 1 .6

7 1 .7

7 1 .9

7 1 .8

7 1 .8

7 1 .5

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

3 ,0 4 0

3 ,8 9 6

3 ,8 4 8

3 ,9 5 0

3 ,8 7 9

3 ,9 0 6

3 ,8 9 5

3 ,9 6 2

4 ,1 5 3

4 ,1 4 5

4 ,0 2 6

3 ,9 6 2

3 ,9 4 4

4 ,2 0 7

4 ,3 6 2

U n e m p lo ym e n t ra te ....

4 .2

5 .3

5 .2

5 .4

5 .3

5 .3

5 .3

5 .4

5 .6

5 .6

5 .4

5 .3

5 .3

5 .6

5 .9

2 2 ,3 6 5

2 2 ,8 0 9

2 2 ,4 3 9

2 2 ,6 8 6

2 2 ,7 9 7

2 2 ,7 5 0

2 2 ,6 2 3

2 2 ,9 7 7

2 3 ,2 5 2

2 3 ,3 9 4

2 3 ,6 4 2

2 3 ,5 0 8

2 3 ,6 3 2

2 3 ,4 0 8

2 3 ,5 7 7

Not in th e lab o r fo rc e .........

Women, 20 years and over
Civilian noninstitutio nal
p o p u la tio n 1...............................

1 0 3 ,9 8 3

1 0 5 ,1 3 6

1 0 4 ,9 7 7

1 0 5 ,0 8 9

1 0 5 ,1 9 0

1 0 5 ,3 3 4

1 05 ,42 1

1 0 5 ,5 0 9

1 0 5 ,5 9 4

1 0 5 ,6 7 8

1 0 6 ,2 3 5

1 0 6 ,3 2 2

1 06 ,41 1

1 0 6 ,5 1 0

1 0 6 ,6 1 3

C ivilian labo r fo rc e ................

6 3 ,0 1 6

6 3 ,6 4 8

6 3,5 51

6 3 ,5 5 6

6 3 ,5 3 4

6 3 ,7 6 0

6 3 ,8 5 8

6 3 ,9 7 5

6 3,9 21

6 4 ,0 3 6

6 4 ,4 7 9

6 4 ,3 1 0

6 4 ,4 7 7

6 4 ,6 7 7

6 4 ,7 3 3

P articipatio n ra te ..........

6 0 .6

6 0 .5

6 0 .5

6 0 .5

6 0 .4

6 0 .5

6 0 .6

6 0 .6

6 0 .5

6 0 .6

6 0 .7

6 0 .5

6 0 .6

6 0 .7

6 0 .7

E m p lo y e d ............................

6 0 ,4 1 7

6 0 ,4 2 0

6 0 ,2 6 2

6 0 ,3 2 0

6 0 ,2 6 2

60,5 81

6 0 ,6 7 5

6 0 ,6 6 8

6 0 ,6 9 7

6 0 ,6 7 6

6 1 ,4 4 3

6 1 ,0 7 3

6 1 ,2 2 7

6 1,4 0 1

6 1 ,4 3 6

E m p lo ym e n t-p o p ulation ratio2................

58.1

5 7 .5

5 7 .4

5 7 .4

5 7 .3

5 7 .5

5 7 .6

5 7 .5

5 7 .5

5 7 .4

57 8

5 7 .4

5 7 .5

5 7 .6

5 7 .6

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

2 ,5 9 9

3 ,2 2 8

3 ,2 8 9

3 ,2 3 6

3 ,2 7 2

3 ,1 8 0

3 ,1 8 4

3 ,3 0 8

3 ,2 2 4

3 ,3 6 0

3 ,0 3 5

3 ,2 3 7

3 ,2 5 0

3 ,2 7 6

3 ,2 9 7

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ....

4.1

5.1

5 .2

5.1

5.1

5.0

5 .0

5 .2

5 .0

5 .2

4 .7

5 .0

5 .0

5.1

5.1

4 0 ,9 6 7

4 1 ,4 8 8

4 1 ,4 2 6

4 1 ,5 3 3

4 1 ,6 5 6

4 1 ,5 7 4

4 1 ,5 6 3

4 1 ,5 3 3

4 1 ,6 7 3

4 1 ,6 4 2

4 1 ,7 5 7

4 2 ,0 1 3

4 1 ,9 3 3

4 1 ,8 3 4

4 1 ,8 8 0

p o p u la tio n 1...............................

1 5 ,9 2 9

1 5 ,9 9 4

1 6 ,0 1 7

1 5 ,9 4 3

1 5 ,9 7 2

1 5 ,9 8 0

1 5 ,9 5 4

1 5,971

1 5 ,9 3 3

1 5 ,9 2 5

1 6 ,0 2 7

1 6 ,0 3 0

1 6 ,0 3 8

16,051

1 6 ,0 7 2

C ivilian lab o r fo rc e .................

7 ,9 0 2

7 ,5 8 5

7 ,5 9 4

7 ,6 0 7

7,581

7 ,561

7 ,6 6 7

7 ,5 3 5

7 ,4 8 9

7 ,3 6 9

7 ,3 6 6

7 ,2 9 3

7 ,0 7 9

7 ,2 2 6

7 ,2 4 6

Not in th e labo r fo rc e .........

Both sexes, 16 to 19 years
Civilian noninstitutio nal

Participatio n r a te ..........

4 9 .6

4 7 .4

4 7 .4

4 7 .7

4 7 .5

4 7 .3

48.1

4 7 .2

4 7 .0

4 6 .3

4 6 .0

4 5 .5

44.1

4 5 .0

45.1

E m p lo y e d .............................

6 ,7 4 0

6 ,3 3 2

6 ,3 0 7

6 ,3 2 4

6 ,2 8 9

6 ,2 8 0

6 ,4 2 5

6 ,4 0 0

6 ,2 2 8

6 ,1 6 4

6 ,1 2 5

6 ,0 4 2

5 ,8 2 9

5 ,9 2 3

5 ,9 0 7

E m p lo ym e n t-p o p ulation ratio2...............

4 2 .3

3 9 .6

3 9 .4

3 9 .7

3 9 .4

3 9 .3

4 0 .3

40.1

39.1

3 8 .7

3 8 .2

3 7 .7

3 6 .3

3 6 .9

3 6 .8

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

1 ,1 6 2

1 ,2 5 3

1 ,2 8 7

1 ,2 8 3

1 ,2 9 2

1 ,2 8 0

1 ,2 4 3

1 ,1 3 5

1,261

1 ,2 0 6

1,241

1,251

1,251

1 ,3 0 3

1 ,3 3 9

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ....
Not in th e labo r fo rc e .........

1 4 .7

1 6.5

1 7 .0

16.9

1 7.0

1 6.9

1 6.2

15.1

1 6 .8

1 6.4

1 6 .8

17.1

1 7 .7

1 8 .0

1 8 .5

8 ,0 2 7

8 ,4 0 9

8 ,4 2 2

8 ,3 3 7

8 ,391

8 ,4 1 9

8 ,2 8 7

8 ,4 3 6

8 ,4 4 4

8 ,5 5 5

8,6 6 1

8 ,7 3 6

8 ,9 5 9

8 ,8 2 5

8 ,8 2 6

White3
Civilian noninstitutio nal
p o p u la tio n 1...............................

178 ,11 1

1 7 9 ,7 8 3

1 7 9 ,5 2 4

1 7 9 ,6 6 5

1 7 9 ,8 1 6

1 7 9 ,9 7 9

1 8 0 ,1 4 6

1 8 0 ,3 0 6

1 8 0 ,4 5 0

1 8 0 ,5 8 0

1 8 0 ,4 6 0

1 8 0 ,5 9 9

1 8 0 ,7 2 8

1 8 0 ,8 7 3

1 8 1 ,0 2 1

Civilian lab o r fo rc e .................

1 1 9 ,3 9 9

1 2 0 ,1 5 0

1 2 0 ,1 9 7

1 2 0 ,1 5 2

1 2 0 ,2 7 2

1 2 0 ,4 4 9

1 2 0 ,5 0 2

1 2 0 ,4 7 9

1 2 0 ,3 4 5

1 2 0 ,0 9 3

1 2 0 ,0 8 4

1 2 0 ,1 6 6

1 2 0 ,2 0 0

1 2 0 ,5 7 5

1 2 0 ,4 2 0

P articipatio n r a te ..........

6 7 .0

6 6 .8

6 7 .0

6 6 .9

6 6 .9

6 6 .9

6 6 .9

6 6 .8

6 6 .7

6 6 .5

6 6 .5

6 6 .5

6 6 .5

6 6 .7

6 6 .5

E m p lo y e d ............................

1 1 4 ,4 3 0

1 1 4 ,0 1 3

1 1 4 ,0 0 3

113 ,95 1

1 1 4 ,0 0 8

1 1 4 ,2 5 0

1 1 4 ,3 7 3

1 1 4 ,2 9 4

1 1 4 ,1 2 8

1 1 3 ,9 1 0

1 1 3 ,9 9 5

1 1 4 ,1 3 5

1 1 4 ,0 8 9

1 1 4 ,2 8 6

1 1 3 ,8 8 2

E m p lo ym e n t-p o p ­
ulation ratio2...............

6 4 .2

6 3 .4

6 3 .5

6 3 .4

6 3 .4

6 3 .5

6 3 .5

6 3 .4

6 3 .2

63.1

6 3 .2

6 3 .2

63.1

6 3 .2

6 2 .9

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

4 ,9 6 9

6 ,1 3 7

6 ,1 9 5

6 ,201

6 ,2 6 4

6 ,1 9 9

6 ,1 2 9

6 ,1 8 4

6 ,2 1 8

6 ,1 8 4

6 ,0 8 9

6 ,031

6,1 1 1

6 ,2 8 9

6 ,5 3 9

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ....

4 .2

5.1

5 .2

5 .2

5 .2

5.1

5.1

5.1

5 .2

5.1

5.1

5.0

5.1

5 .2

5 .4

5 8 ,7 1 3

5 9 ,6 3 3

5 9 ,3 2 7

5 9 ,5 1 3

5 9 ,5 4 5

5 9 ,5 3 0

5 9 ,6 4 4

5 9 ,8 2 8

6 0 ,1 0 4

6 0 ,4 8 7

6 0 ,3 7 6

6 0 ,4 3 2

6 0 ,5 2 8

6 0 ,2 9 8

6 0 ,6 0 1

p o p u la tio n 1...............................

2 5 ,1 3 8

2 5 ,5 7 8

2 5 ,5 1 4

2 5 ,5 5 2

25,5 91

2 5 ,6 3 3

2 5 ,6 7 5

2 5 ,7 1 7

2 5 ,7 5 1

2 5 ,7 8 4

2 5 ,4 8 4

2 5 ,5 1 9

2 5 ,5 5 2

2 5 ,5 8 7

2 5 ,6 2 4

Civilian labo r fo rc e .................

16,421

1 6 ,5 6 5

1 6 ,6 1 0

1 6 ,5 7 0

1 6 ,3 9 0

16,541

1 6 ,7 8 9

1 6 ,6 8 2

1 6 ,5 4 0

1 6 ,7 0 6

1 6 ,3 7 4

1 6 ,3 9 5

1 6 ,2 9 6

1 6,521

1 6 ,6 1 8

Participatio n r a te ..........

6 5 .3

6 4 .8

65.1

6 4 .8

6 4 .0

6 4 .5

6 5 .4

6 4 .9

6 4 .2

6 4 .8

6 4 .3

6 4 .2

6 3 .8

6 4 .6

6 4 .9

E m p lo y e d ............................

1 5 ,0 0 6

1 4 ,8 7 2

1 4 ,9 2 8

1 4 ,8 1 6

1 4 ,7 6 3

1 4 ,9 0 7

1 5 ,1 4 8

1 5 ,0 2 7

1 4 ,7 5 4

1 4 ,8 2 7

1 4 ,6 8 4

1 4 ,6 6 9

14,641

1 4 ,7 2 3

1 48

N o t in th e lab o r fo rc e .........

Black or African American3
Civilian noninstitutional

E m p lo ym e n t-p o p ulation ratio2................

5 9 .7

58.1

5 8 .5

5 8 .0

5 7 .7

5 8 .2

5 9 .0

5 8 .4

5 7 .3

5 7 .5

5 7 .6

5 7 .5

5 7 .3

5 7 .5

5 7 .8

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

1 ,4 1 6

1 ,6 9 3

1 ,6 8 2

1 ,7 5 4

1 ,6 2 7

1 ,6 3 4

1,641

1 ,6 5 6

1 ,7 8 6

1 ,8 7 9

1 ,6 9 0

1 ,7 2 6

1 ,6 5 5

1 ,7 9 7

1 ,7 9 9

U n e m p lo ym e n t ra te ....

8 .6

1 0.2

10.1

1 0 .6

9 .9

9 .9

9 .8

9 .9

1 0 .8

11.2

1 0 .3

1 0 .5

1 0 .2

1 0 .9

1 0 .8

N ot in th e labo r fo rc e ......... .

8 ,7 1 7

9 ,0 1 3

8 ,9 0 3

8 ,9 8 2

9,201

9 ,0 9 2

8 ,8 8 6

9 ,0 3 4

9,2 1 1

9 ,0 7 8

9 ,1 1 0

9 ,1 2 4

9 ,2 5 6

9 ,0 6 6

9 ,0 0 7

S e e fo o tn o tes a t e n d of ta b le.

Monthly Labor Review
Digitized for48
FRASER
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

4. C o n t in u e d — E m p lo y m e n t status of th e p o p u la tio n , b y sex , a g e , r a c e , a n d H isp a n ic origin, m o n th ly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d

[Numbers in thousands] _______________________________________________________________________________
Em ploym ent status

Annual average

2002

2003

2001

2002

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov

Dec.

Jan.

Feb

Mar.

Apr.

May

H ispanic or Latino
ethnicity
Civilian noninstitutional
2 4 ,9 4 2

2 5 ,9 6 3

2 5 ,8 2 7

2 5 ,9 1 7

2 6 ,0 0 8

2 6 ,0 9 6

2 6 ,1 8 4

2 6 ,2 7 2

2 6 ,3 5 5

2 6 ,4 3 6

2 6 ,9 9 4

28

2 7 ,1 9 1

2 7 ,2 9 1

2 7 ,2 9 1

Civilian lab o r fo rc e .................

1 7 ,3 2 8

1 7 ,9 4 3

1 7 ,8 4 3

17,891

1 8 ,0 4 5

1 8 ,0 3 0

1 8 ,1 0 3

1 8 ,0 4 9

1 8 ,1 6 9

1 8 ,1 3 4

1 8 ,6 1 4

1 8 ,6 5 8

1 8 ,6 1 4

1 8 ,8 3 6

18,8 11

Participation r a te ...........

6 9 .5

69.1

69.1

6 9 .0

6 9 .4

69.1

69.1

6 8 .7

6 8 .9

6 8 .6

6 9 .0

6 8 .9

6 8 .5

6 9 .0

6 8 .7

1 6,1 90

1 6 ,5 9 0

16,581

1 6 ,5 7 3

1 6 ,6 8 5

1 6 ,6 6 4

1 6 ,7 3 9

1 6 ,6 3 7

1 6 ,7 5 5

1 6 ,7 0 8

1 7 ,1 5 5

1 7 ,2 2 3

1 7 ,2 1 5

1 7 ,4 2 8

1 7 ,2 6 4

E m p lo ym e n t-p o p 6 4 .9

6 3 .9

6 4 .2

6 3 .9

6 4 .2

6 3 .9

6 3 .9

6 3 .3

6 3 .6

6 3 .2

6 3 .5

6 3 .6

6 3 .3

6 3 .9

6 3 .0

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

1 ,1 3 8

1 ,3 5 3

1,261

1 ,3 1 8

1 ,3 6 0

1 ,3 6 6

1 ,3 6 3

1 ,4 1 2

1 ,4 1 4

1 ,4 2 5

1 ,4 5 9

1 ,4 3 6

1 ,3 9 9

1 ,4 0 8

1 ,5 4 8

U n e m p lo ym e n t ra te ....

6 .6

7 .5

7.1

7 .4

7 .5

7 .6

7 .8

7 .9

7 .8

7 .7

7 ,6 1 4

8 .0 2 0

7 .9 8 4

8 .0 2 6

7 ,9 6 3

8 .0 6 6

8 ,3 0 3

8 .3 8 0

8 .4 3 6

N o tin th e lab o r fo rc e ...........

1 T h e population figures a re not seaso nally adjusted.

7 .5
8 ,0 8 2

7 .8
8 ,2 2 3

8 .1 8 6

7 .5

8 .2

7 .5

8 .5 7 7

8 .4 5 5

8 ,5 8 0

N O T E : E stim ates for the ab o ve ra ce groups (w hite and black or African Am erican) do not sum

2 Civilian em p lo y m e n t a s a percent of the civilian noninstitutional population.

to totals because d a ta a re not presented for all races. In addition, persons w h o s e ethnicity is
identified as Hispanic or Latino m ay be of an y race and, therefore, a re classified by ethnicity as

3 B eginning in 2 0 0 3 , perso n s w h o s ele cted this race group only; persons w ho selected

well as by race.

m ore than o n e ra ce gro u p a re not included. Prior to 2 0 0 3 , persons w h o reported m ore
th an one ra ce w e re included in th e group they identified as th e m ain race.

5.

S e le c t e d e m p lo y m e n t in d ica to rs, m o n th ly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d

[Inthousands]
Selected categories

2002

Annual average

2003

2001

2002

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

E m p lo ye d , 1 6 y e a rs a n d o ver..

1 3 6 ,9 3 3

1 3 6 ,4 8 5

1 3 6 ,4 8 7

1 3 6 ,3 8 3

1 3 6 ,3 4 3

1 3 6 ,7 5 7

1 3 7 ,3 1 2

1 3 6 ,9 8 8

1 3 6 ,5 4 2

1 3 6 ,4 3 9

1 3 7 ,5 3 6

1 3 7 ,4 0 8

1 3 7 ,3 4 8

1 3 7 .6 8 7

1 3 7 ,4 8 7

M e n ...............................................

7 3 ,1 9 6

7 2 ,9 0 3

7 3 ,0 9 3

7 2 ,8 9 3

72,931

7 3 ,0 2 3

7 3 ,4 0 2

7 3,151

7 2 ,7 7 3

7 2 ,6 9 0

7 2 ,9 9 4

7 3 ,2 4 9

7 3 ,0 6 4

7 3 ,1 8 2

7 2,9 81

W o m e n .........................................

6 3 ,7 3 7

6 3 ,5 8 2

6 3 ,3 9 4

6 3 ,4 9 0

6 3 ,4 1 2

6 3 ,7 3 4

6 3 ,9 1 0

6 3 ,8 3 7

6 3 ,7 6 9

6 3 ,7 4 9

6 4 ,5 4 2

6 4 ,1 5 9

6 4 ,2 8 4

6 4 ,5 0 5

6 4 ,5 0 6

M a rried m e n , spouse
p re s e n t......................................

4 4 ,0 0 7

4 4 ,1 1 6

4 4 ,3 0 6

4 4 ,0 3 7

4 4 ,1 5 0

4 4 ,2 3 5

4 4 ,1 2 9

4 4 ,2 4 5

4 4 ,0 9 3

4 4 ,0 0 5

4 4,4 01

4 4 ,5 8 7

4 4 ,4 1 5

4 4 ,5 5 2

4 4 ,5 4 2

3 4 ,3 2 2

3 4 ,2 6 4

3 4 ,1 8 9

3 4 ,5 2 5

3 4 ,6 2 0

3 4 ,5 6 9

3 4 ,6 8 5

3 4 ,4 4 3

Characteristic

M a rried w o m e n , spouse
p re s e n t......................................

3 4 ,1 5 3

3 4 ,1 5 3

3 4 ,0 1 5

3 4 ,0 5 0

3 4 ,0 3 5

3 4 ,2 7 8

3 4 ,4 7 9

3 ,7 1 5

4 ,2 1 3

4 ,0 9 7

3 ,9 8 2

4 ,1 3 9

4 ,3 0 8

4 ,3 5 6

4 ,3 4 3

4 ,3 2 9

4 ,2 7 3

4 ,6 4 3

4 ,8 0 7

4 ,6 9 6

4 ,8 4 0

4 ,5 9 2

2 ,3 9 6

2 ,7 8 8

2 ,6 8 5

2 ,7 0 3

2 ,7 6 0

2,811

2 ,8 1 4

2 ,8 8 8

2 ,8 5 5

2 ,8 9 3

3 ,0 2 7

3 ,1 5 2

3 ,1 2 3

3 ,221

3 ,0 5 8

Persons at work part time1
All industries;
P art tim e for e conom ic
S la c k w o rk o r business
Co u ld only find p art-tim e
1 ,0 0 6

1 ,1 2 4

1 ,1 1 0

1 ,0 9 7

1 ,1 1 3

1 ,1 5 3

1 ,1 7 7

1 ,1 3 3

1 ,1 5 9

1 ,1 1 0

1 ,2 9 7

1 ,2 7 5

1 ,1 9 2

1 ,2 6 6

1 ,2 6 5

1 8 ,7 9 0

1 8 ,8 4 3

1 8 ,9 8 8

19,251

1 9 ,1 4 3

1 9,0 47

1 8 ,9 2 8

1 8,6 85

1 8 ,7 2 7

1 8 ,5 5 5

1 9 ,3 1 4

18,421

1 8 ,8 8 8

1 8 ,8 8 6

1 9 ,0 8 3

3 ,6 2 7

4 ,1 1 9

3 ,9 8 3

3 ,8 8 7

4 ,0 2 5

4 ,1 8 5

4 ,2 6 6

4 ,2 7 4

4 ,2 7 2

4 ,2 1 9

4 .4 9 6

4 ,6 7 5

4 ,5 8 7

4 ,7 2 8

4 .4 7 8

2 ,3 4 0

2 ,7 2 6

2,611

2 ,6 2 9

2 ,6 8 9

2 ,8 0 6

2 ,7 5 5

2 ,8 5 7

2 ,8 1 6

2 ,8 5 4

2 ,9 4 7

3 ,0 6 2

3 ,0 4 8

3 ,1 4 0

3 ,0 0 3

997

1 ,1 1 4

1 ,0 8 7

1 ,0 9 9

1 ,1 0 3

1 ,1 4 3

1 ,1 7 2

1 ,1 2 2

1 ,1 5 8

1 ,0 9 7

1 ,2 6 7

1 ,2 5 7

1 ,1 7 8

1 ,2 5 8

1 ,2 3 4

1 8 .4 1 5

1 8.4 87

1 8.6 36

1 8.9 85

18.741

1 8 .6 6 8

1 8 .5 5 5

1 8 .3 4 7

18.361

1 8 .1 9 7

1 8 .9 8 4

1 8 .1 3 4

1 8 .5 2 9

1 8 .5 0 3

1 8 .6 6 4

P art tim e for n oneco nom ic
Nonagricultural industries:
P art tim e for e conom ic
S la c k w o rk or business
conditions............................
C o u ld only find part-tim e
P art tim e for n oneco nom ic
re a s o n s ....................................

1 E xcludes p ersons "with a jo b but not at work" during the survey period for such reasons as vacation, illness, or industrial disputes.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

49

Current Labor Statistics:

6.

Labor Force Data

S e le c t e d u n e m p lo y m e n t in d ic a t o rs , m o n t h ly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju s t e d

[Unemployment rates]
A n n u a l a ve rag e

2002

2003

S e le cte d ca te g o rie s
2001

M ay

2002

Jun e

J u ly

Aug.

Sept.

O ct.

Nov.

Jan.

Dec.

Mar.

Feb.

A p r.

M ay

Characteristic
T o ta l, 1 6 y e a rs a n d o v e r ....................................

4 .7

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .7

5 .8

5 .9

6 .0

5 .7

5 .8

5 .8

6 .0

6.1

B oth s e x e s , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s ..........................

1 4 .7

1 6 .5

1 7 .0

1 6 .9

1 7 .0

1 6 .9

1 6 .2

15.1

1 6 .8

1 6 .4

1 6 .8

17.1

1 7 .7

1 8 .0

1 8 .5

M e n , 2 0 y e a rs a n d o v e r .................................

4 .2

5 .3

5 .2

5 .4

5 .3

5 .3

5 .3

5 .4

5 .6

5 .6

5 .4

5 .3

5 .3

5 .6

5 .9

W o m e n , 2 0 y e a rs a n d o v e r..........................

4.1

5.1

5 .2

5.1

5.1

5 .0

5 .0

5 .2

5 .0

5 .2

4 .7

5 .0

5 .0

5.1

5.1

W h ite , to ta l1........................................................

4 .2

5.1

5 .2

5 .2

5 .2

5.1

5.1

5.1

5 .2

5.1

5.1

5 .0

5.1

5 .2

5 .4

1 2 .7

1 4 .5

1 4 .6

1 4 .8

1 5 .6

1 4 .8

1 4 .2

1 3 .9

1 4 .5

1 3 .8

1 5 .2

1 5 .5

1 5 .6

1 5 .4

1 5 .3

M e n , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s ..............................

1 3 .9

1 5 .9

1 5 .5

1 6 .6

1 7 .9

17.1

1 5 .6

1 4 .7

1 5 .8

1 4 .9

1 6 .2

1 7 .3

1 8 .0

1 7 .7

1 7 .0

W o m e n , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a rs .......................

1 1 .4

13.1

1 3 .8

1 3 .0

13.1

1 2 .4

1 2 .7

13.1

1 3 .0

1 2 .7

1 4 .2

1 3 .7

13.1

1 3 .2

1 3 .7

M e n , 2 0 y e a rs a n d o v e r ..........................

3 .7

4 .7

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

5 .0

4 .9

4 .9

4 .6

4 .7

5 .0

5 .2

W o m e n , 2 0 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................

3 .6

4 .4

4 .5

4 .4

4 .4

4 .4

4 .4

4 .4

4 .2

4 .4

4.1

4 .2

4 .4

4 .3

4 .6

B la c k o r A fric a n A m e ric a n , to ta l1.............

8 .6

1 0 .2

10.1

1 0 .6

9 .9

9 .9

9 .8

9 .9

1 0 .8

1 1 .2

1 0 .3

1 0 .5

1 0 .2

1 0 .9

1 0 .8

2 9 .0

2 9 .8

2 9 .9

3 0.1

2 7 .1

3 0.1

2 8 .0

2 3 .9

3 0 .5

3 3 .2

3 0 .4

3 0 .2

3 3 .4

33.1

3 7 .0

M e n , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s ..............................

3 0 .4

3 1 .3

3 6.1

3 0 .8

2 2 .7

3 1 .3

3 4 .4

2 4 .9

3 0 .0

3 4 .5

3 3 .2

3 8.1

4 5 .2

3 7 .7

4 3 .1

W o m e n , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s .......................

2 7 .5

2 8 .3

2 2 .2

2 9 .3

3 1 .4

2 8 .9

2 1 .5

2 2 .7

3 1 .0

3 2 .1

2 8 .0

2 2 .2

2 3 .1

2 9 .3

3 2 .0

M e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r..........................

8 .0

9 .5

8 .7

1 0 .3

9 .2

9.1

9 .4

9 .9

1 0 .6

1 0 .5

1 0 .3

10.1

9 .3

1 0 .4

1 1 .2

W o m e n , 2 0 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...................

7 .0

8 .8

9 .3

8 .8

8 .9

8 .5

8.1

8 .5

9 .0

9 .7

8 .4

9 .0

8 .7

9 .2

8 .0

H is p a n ic o r L a tin o e th n ic ity ........................

6 .6

7 .5

7.1

7 .4

7 .5

7 .6

7 .5

7 .8

7 .8

7 .9

7 .8

7 .7

7 .5

7 .5

8 .2

M a rrie d m e n , s p o u s e p r e s e n t...................

2 .7

3 .6

3 .6

4 .0

3 .5

3 .5

3 .6

3 .6

3 .6

3 .7

3 .5

3 .6

3 .8

3 .7

3 .9

M a r r ie d w o m e n , s p o u s e p re s e n t............

3.1

3 .7

3 .9

3 .8

3 .8

3 .6

3 .6

3 .8

3 .8

3 .8

3 .3

3 .6

3 .7

3 .6

3 .7

F u ll-tim e w o r k e r s ............................................

4 .7

5 .9

5 .9

6 .0

5 .9

5 .8

5 .8

5 .9

6.1

6.1

5 .8

5 .9

5 .9

6.1

6 .3

P a rt-tim e w o r k e r s ............................................

5.1

5 .3

5 .4

5 .0

5 .4

5 .4

5 .3

5 .2

5.1

5 .3

5 .4

5 .5

5 .5

5 .4

5 .6

9 .2

Educational attainment2
L e s s th a n a high s ch o o l d ip lo m a ...................

7 .2

8 .4

8 .4

8 .0

8 .6

8 .5

7 .9

8 .7

9 .0

9 .0

8 .5

8 .8

8 .5

8 .2

H ig h s ch o o l g ra d u a te s , no c o lle g e 3...............

4 .2

5 .3

5 .5

5 .5

5.1

5 .2

5 .0

4 .9

5 .3

5 .3

5.1

5 .4

5 .5

5 .7

5 .5

S o m e c o lle g e o r a s s o c ia te d e g r e e ................

3 .3

4 .5

4 .7

4 .6

4 .4

4 .3

4 .6

4 .7

4 .8

5 .0

4 .8

4 .7

4 .8

4 .7

4 .8

B a c h e lo r's d e g r e e a n d h ig h e r4........................

2 .3

2 .9

3 .0

3 .0

3 .0

2 .8

2 .9

3 .0

2 .9

2 .9

3 .0

3 .0

3.1

3.1

3.1

1

B e g in n in g in 2 0 0 3 , p e rs o n s w h o s e le c te d this ra c e g ro u p only; p e rs o n s w h o

2 D a ta re fe r to p e rs o n s 2 5 y e a rs a n d ov er.

s e le c te d m o re th a n o n e ra c e g ro u p a r e not in clu d e d . P rior to 2 0 0 3 , p e rs o n s w h o
3 In clu d e s high sch o o l d ip lo m a or e q u iv a le n t.

re p o rte d m o re th a n o n e ra c e w e r e in clu d e d in th e g ro u p th e y id en tified a s th e

4 In clu d e s p e rs o n s w ith b a c h e lo r's , m a s te r's , p ro fe s sio n a l, a n d do c to ra l d e g re e s .

m a in ra c e .

7.

D u ra tio n o f u n e m p lo y m e n t , m o n t h ly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju s t e d

[Numbers in thousands]
W e e k s of

A n n u a l a ve rag e

u n em p lo y m en t

2001

2002

2002
M ay

Jun e

J u ly

2003

Aug.

Sept.

O ct.

N ov.

Dec.

Ja n .

Feb.

Mar.

A p r.

M ay

L e s s th a n 5 w e e k s ..................................

2 ,8 5 3

2 ,8 9 3

2 ,9 0 0

2 ,7 8 6

2 ,9 0 3

2 ,8 9 5

2 ,7 8 2

2 ,7 9 7

2 ,9 1 2

2 ,8 6 0

2 ,7 7 2

2 ,7 4 9

2 ,7 8 0

2 ,8 1 4

3 ,0 5 6

5 to 1 4 w e e k s ............................................

2 ,1 9 6

2 ,5 8 0

2 ,5 6 6

2 ,8 0 3

2 ,5 2 0

2 ,5 0 5

2 ,5 5 8

2 ,5 1 5

2 ,5 3 2

2 ,5 4 7

2 ,5 7 7

2 ,5 6 5

2 ,4 7 3

2 ,6 3 0

2 ,6 0 5

1 5 w e e k s a n d o v e r ..................................

1 ,7 5 2

2 ,9 0 4

2 ,9 1 1

3 ,0 4 5

2 ,9 5 5

2 ,8 9 1

3 ,0 1 9

3 ,0 9 9

3 ,1 4 3

3 ,2 9 6

3 ,1 4 0

3 ,1 5 5

3 ,1 0 4

3 ,2 9 4

3 ,2 5 0

1 5 to 2 6 w e e k s ......................................

951

1 ,3 6 9

1 ,3 2 8

1 ,4 1 9

1 ,3 8 1

1,3 6 1

1 ,3 5 9

1 ,3 7 4

1 ,3 1 7

1 ,3 9 2

1 ,4 5 7

1 ,2 8 1

1 ,3 1 6

1 ,3 9 2

1 ,3 2 1

2 7 w e e k s a n d o v e r ..............................

801

1 ,5 3 5

1 ,5 8 3

1 ,6 2 6

1 ,5 7 3

1 ,5 3 0

1 ,6 6 0

1 ,7 2 4

1 ,8 2 6

1 ,9 0 4

1 ,6 8 3

1 ,8 7 4

1 ,7 8 8

1 ,9 0 3

1 ,9 3 0

M e a n d u ra tio n , in w e e k s ......................

13.1

1 6 .6

1 6 .8

17.1

1 6 .6

1 6 .3

1 7 .8

1 7 .6

1 7 .9

1 8 .4

1 8 .4

1 8 .6

1 8 .0

1 9 .6

1 9 .2

M e d ia n d u ra tio n , in w e e k s .................

6 .8

9.1

9 .6

1 1 .6

8 .9

8 .7

9 .5

9 .6

9 .4

9 .6

9 .8

9 .4

9 .6

1 0 .2

10.1

Monthly Labor Review
50FRASER
Digitized for
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

8.

U n e m p lo y e d p e rs o n s b y r e a s o n for u n e m p lo y m e n t , m o n t h ly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju s t e d

[Numbers in thousands]
A n n u a l a ve rag e

R e a s o n fo r
un em p lo y m en t

2001

2002

2002

M ay

Jun e

J u ly

2003

Aug.

Sept.

O ct.

Nov.

D ec.

Ja n .

Feb.

Mar.

A p r.

M ay

4 ,7 5 6

4 ,6 1 3

4 ,7 6 5

5 ,0 7 4

J o b lo s e rs 1.................................................

3 ,4 7 6

4 ,6 0 7

4 ,6 3 4

4 ,6 5 0

4 ,6 1 3

4 ,6 0 7

4 ,6 0 8

4 ,8 2 8

4 ,8 3 3

4 ,8 6 3

4 ,5 8 3

O n te m p o ra ry la y o ff...........................

1 ,0 6 7

1 ,1 2 4

1 ,1 1 4

1,1 0 1

1 ,2 3 6

1 ,1 5 8

1 ,0 4 4

1 ,0 9 8

1 ,0 6 9

1 ,1 1 0

1 ,0 8 0

1 ,1 4 2

1 ,1 5 7

1 ,1 0 1

1 ,2 2 6

N o t o n te m p o r a ry la y o ff....................

2 ,4 0 9

3 ,4 8 3

3 ,5 2 0

3 ,5 5 0

3 ,3 7 7

3 ,4 4 9

3 ,5 6 5

3 ,7 2 9

3 ,7 6 4

3 ,7 5 3

3 ,5 0 3

3 ,6 1 4

3 ,4 5 6

3 ,6 6 4

3 ,8 4 8

J o b le a v e r s ..................................................

835

866

892

844

840

844

808

850

834

862

825

772

794

829

772

R e e n tr a n ts ..................................................

2 ,0 3 1

2 ,3 6 8

2 ,4 0 0

2 ,3 7 9

2 ,3 9 0

2 ,3 2 6

2 ,3 2 1

2 ,3 8 6

2 ,3 9 4

2 ,4 6 2

2 ,3 3 1

2 ,3 9 5

2 ,3 9 1

2 ,5 5 8

2 ,4 9 9

N e w e n tra n ts ..............................................

459

536

503

544

547

587

542

494

586

534

616

579

626

642

634

J o b lo s e rs 1.................................................

5 1.1

5 5 .0

5 5 .0

5 5 .2

5 5 .0

55.1

5 5 .7

5 6 .4

5 5 .9

5 5 .8

5 4 .9

5 5 .9

5 4 .8

5 4 .2

5 6 .5

O n te m p o ra ry la y o ff...........................

1 5 .7

1 3 .4

1 3 .2

13.1

1 4 .7

1 3 .8

1 2 .6

1 2 .8

1 2 .4

1 2 .7

1 2 .9

1 3 .4

1 3 .7

1 2 .5

1 3 .7

N o t o n te m p o ra ry la y o ff....................

3 5 .4

4 1 .6

4 1 .8

4 2 .2

4 0 .2

4 1 .2

4 2 .1

4 3 .6

4 3 .5

4 3 .0

4 1 .9

4 2 .5

4 1 .0

4 1 .7

4 2 .9

Percent of unemployed

J o b le a v e r s ..................................................

1 2 .3

1 0 .3

1 0 .6

1 0 .0

1 0 .0

10.1

9 .8

9 .9

9 .6

9 .9

9 .9

9.1

9 .4

9 .4

8 .6

R e e n tr a n ts ..................................................

2 9 .9

2 8 .3

2 8 .5

2 8 .3

2 8 .5

2 7 .8

2 8 .0

2 7 .9

2 7 .7

2 8 .2

2 7 .9

2 8 .2

2 8 .4

2 9 .1

2 7 .8

N e w e n tra n ts ..............................................

6 .8

6 .4

6 .0

6 .5

6 .5

7 .0

6 .5

5 .8

6 .8

6.1

7 .4

6 .8

7 .4

7 .3

7.1

2 .4

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .3

3 .3

3 .4

3.1

.6

.6

.6

.6

.6

.6

.5

.6

.6

.6

1 .4

1 .6

1 .7

1 .6

1 .7

1 .6

1 6

1 6

.3

.4

.3

.4

.4

.4

.4

.3

Percent of civilian
labor force
J o b lo s e rs 1.................................................
J o b le a v e r s ..................................................

N e w e n tra n ts ..............................................

3 .3

3 .2

3 .3

3 .5

.6

.5

.5

1 6

17

1 6

1 .6

1 6

.6
1 7

.5
1 7

.4

.4

.4

.4

.4

.4

.4

' In c lu d e s p e rs o n s w h o c o m p le te d te m p o ra ry jo b s.

9.

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te s b y s e x a n d a g e , m o n th ly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju s t e d

[Civilian workers]
S ex and age

2002

A n n u a l ave rag e
2001

2002

M ay

Jun e

J u ly

Aug.

2003

Sept.

O ct.

N ov.

D ec.

Ja n .

Feb.

Mar.

T o ta l, 1 6 y e a rs a n d o v e r .......................

4 .7

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .8

5 .7

5 .8

5 .9

6 .0

5 .7

5 .8

5 .8

1 6 to 2 4 y e a rs .......................................

1 0 .6

1 2 .0

1 1 .8

1 2 .0

12.1

12.1

1 1 .9

1 1 .8

1 2 .2

1 1 .9

1 1 .8

1 1 .9

1 1 .7

1 4 .7

1 6 .5

1 7 .0

1 6 .9

1 7 .0

1 6 .9

1 6 .2

15.1

1 6 .8

1 6 .4

1 6 .8

17.1

1 7 .7

1 6 to 1 7 y e a r s ...............................

1 7 .2

1 8 .8

2 0 .4

1 9 .6

1 9 .7

1 9 .3

1 9 .4

1 6 .2

1 9 .4

1 7 .6

1 8 .3

1 7 .9

1 6 .7

1 8 to 1 9 y e a r s ...............................

1 7 .7

13.1

15.1

1 5 .3

1 5 .3

1 5 .5

1 6 .2

1 4 .0

1 4 .3

1 5 .3

1 5 .5

1 5 .9

1 5 .9

2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ...................................

8 .3

9 .7

9.1

9 .4

9 .6

9 .6

9 .6

10.1

9 .8

9 .7

9 .3

9 .3

8 .9

2 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...............................

3 ,7

4 .6

4 .8

4 .8

4 .7

4 .6

4 .6

4 .7

4 .8

4 .8

4 .6

4 .7

4 .7

2 5 to 5 4 y e a r s ...............................

3 .8

4 .8

4 .9

4 .9

4 .8

4 .7

4 .7

4 .9

5.1

5 .0

4 .7

4 .9

5 .0

5 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r.......................

3 .0

3 .8

4.1

4.1

3 .8

4 .0

3 .9

3 .9

3 .7

4 .2

4.1

3 .8

3 .8

4 .8

5 .9

5 .9

6 .0

5 .9

5 .9

6 .2

1 6 to 2 4 y e a r s ....................................

1 1 .4

1 2 .8

1 2 .7

1 2 .6

1 2 .8

1 3 .3

13.1

1 2 .3

1 2 .8

1 2 .6

1 2 .4

1 2 .5

1 2 .4

1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s ................................

1 6 .0

18.1

1 8 .8

1 8 .6

1 8 .9

1 9 .3

1 8 .3

1 6 .0

1 8 .0

1 7 .5

1 8 .2

1 9 .5

2 0 .8

1 6 to 1 7 y e a r s ............................

19.1

2 1 .1

2 3.1

2 2 .0

2 2 .2

2 3.1

2 1 .5

1 7 .2

2 1 .2

1 8 .5

1 9 .3

19.1

1 8 .0

1 8 to 1 9 y e a rs ............................

1 4 .0

1 6 .4

1 6 .4

1 6 .6

1 6 .6

18.1

1 6 .3

1 5 .2

16.1

1 6 .7

1 7 .6

1 9 .3

2 1 .5

9 .0

1 0 .2

9 .6

9 .6

9 .7

1 0 .3

1 0 .5

1 0 .4

1 0 .2

1 0 .2

9 .7

9 .2

8 .7

3 .6

4 .7

4 .8

4 .9

4 .7

4 .7

4 .6

4 .8

5.1

5 .0

4 .9

4 .9

4 .9

3 .7

4 .8

4 .8

5 .0

4 .9

4 .8

4 .7

4 .9

5 .3

5 .2

5 .0

5 .0

5 .0

3 .2

4.1

4 .4

4 .4

4 .0

4.1

4.1

4 .0

4 .0

4 .4

4 .4

4 .2

4 .3

2 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r............................
2 5 to 5 4 y e a rs ............................

W o m e n , 1 6 y e a rs a n d o v e r ...............

6 .0

5 .9

6 .2

6 0

6 .0

6 .0

4 .7

5 .6

5 .7

5 .6

5 .7

5 .5

5 .5

5 .7

5 .6

5 .8

5 .3

5 .6

5 .5

9 .6

11.1

1 0 .8

1 1 .2

1 1 .4

1 0 .7

1 0 .5

1 1 .3

1 1 .5

1 1 .3

11.1

1 1 .3

1 1 .0
1 4 .6

1 3 .4

1 4 .9

1 5 .0

1 5 .0

15.1

1 4 .4

1 4 .0

14.1

1 5 .6

1 5 .2

1 5 .5

1 4 .8

1 6 to 1 7 y e a rs

1 5 .2

1 6 .6

1 7 .4

1 7 .2

17.1

1 5 .5

1 7 .4

1 5 .2

1 7 .4

1 6 .6

1 7 .3

1 6 .8

1 5 .5

1 8 to 2 4 y e a rs

1 2 .2

1 3 .8

14.1

1 4 .0

1 4 .3

14.1

1 1 .5

1 3 .3

1 4 .4

1 4 .2

14.1

1 2 .3

1 3 .7

2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ................................

7 .5

9.1

8 .6

9 .2

9 .4

8 .8

8 .7

9 .8

9 .4

9 .3

8 .8

9 .5

9.1

2 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r ............................

3 .7

4 .6

4 .8

4 .6

4 .6

4 .5

4 .5

4 .6

4 .5

4 .6

4 .2

4 .5

4 .6

2 5 to 5 4 y e a rs ............................

3 .9

4 .8

5 .0

4 .8

4 .8

4 .6

4 .7

4 .8

4 .8

4 .8

4 .4

4 .8

4 .9

5 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r '...................

2 .7

3 .6

3.1

3 .9

3 .8

4 .3

3 .6

3 .5

3 .2

3 .8

4.1

3 .3

3 .3

' D a ta a r e n o t s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

51

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

10. U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te s b y S ta te , s e a s o n a lly a d ju s t e d

State

A p r.

Mar.

A p r.

2002

2003p

2003p

State

A p r.

Mar.

A p r.

2002

2003p

2003p

A la b a m a ....................................................................

5.9

5.9

5.8

5 .5

5 .5

5 .0

A la s k a ........................................................................

7.6

7 .4

7.2

4 .6

4 .8

4 .0
3 .9

M issouri

A r iz o n a ......................................................................

6.1

6.2

6.0

3 .7

3 .6

A r k a n s a s ...................................................................

5.6

5.5

5.3

5 .7

6.0

5 .5

C a lifo rn ia ..................................................................

6.6

6.6

6.8

4 .6

4 .5

4 .0

C o lo r a d o ...................................................................

5.7

5.8

5.9

5 .8

5 .7

5 .8

C o n n e c tic u t..............................................................

4.2

4.1

5.3

5 .5

5 .4

5 .9

D e la w a r e ...................................................................

4 .4

4.2

4.3

6.1

6.0

D is trict o f C o lu m b ia .............................................

6.5

6.4

7.3

6 .9

6 .9

6.1
6.0

F lo rid a .........................................................................

5.5

5.6

5.3

4.1

3 .9

3 .4

G e o r g ia ......................................................................

5.1

5.1

4 .7

5 .9

5 .8

6 .3

H a w a ii.........................................................................

4 .4

4.6

3.8

4 .6

4 .5

5.1

Id a h o ...........................................................................

5.8

5.9

5.6

7 .8

7 .9

8.0

Illin o is..........................................................................

6.5

6 .4

6.3

5 .5

5 .5

5 .9

In d ia n a .......................................................................

5.3

5.2

5.1

4 .9

4 .9

5 .3

Io w a ............................................................................

4.0

3.9

4.2

5 .9

6.1

6.1

K a n s a s .......................................................................

5.1

5.0

4.8

3 .3

3 .4

3 .2

K e n tu c k y ...................................................................

5.7

5.7

5.8

5 .3

5 .4

5 .0

6 .3

6 .3

6.6

6 .3

6.2

5 .3

6.2

6.0

6.2

M a in e ..........................................................................

4 .3

4 .3

4.8

M a r y la n d ...................................................................

4 .6

4.5

4 .4

3 .8

3 .8

4 .2

M a s s a c h u s e tts .......................................................

5.3

5.1

5.5

4 .4

4 .2

4 .3

M ic h ig a n ....................................................................

6.3

6.3

6.6

7 .7

7 .5

7 .3

M in n e s o ta ................................................................

4 .6

4 .5

4.3

6.1

5 .9

6.0

7.0

6.7

6.6

5 .5

5 .7

5 .4

4 .4

4 .2

4 .0

U ta h .................................................................

W y o m in g ...................................................................
p - p re lim in a ry
D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

11. E m p lo y m e n t o f w o rk e rs o n n o n fa r m p a y r o lls b y S ta te , s e a s o n a lly a d ju s t e d

[Inthousands]
State

A p r.

Mar.

A p r.

2002

2003p

2003p

State

A p r.

Mar.

A p r.

2002

2003p

2003p

Alabama...................

1 ,8 9 9 .1

1 ,8 7 3 .9

1 ,8 7 2 .2

M is so u ri...................................................

2 ,6 9 3 .1

2 ,6 3 2 .5

2 .6 4 5 .6

Alaska......................

2 9 0 .6

2 9 7 .5

2 9 6 .7

M o n ta n a ...................................................

3 9 4 .5

3 9 3 .5

3 9 7 .3

Arizona.....................

2 ,2 4 3 .4

2 ,2 7 3 .4

2 ,2 7 8 .4

N e b r a s k a .................................................

9 1 1 .0

9 0 3 .1

9 0 6 .9

Arkansas..................

1 ,1 5 2 .8

1 ,1 4 7 .2

1 ,1 4 8 .6

1 ,0 6 8 .6

1 ,0 6 0 .1

1 .0 6 2 .3

California..................

1 4 ,6 6 7 .7

1 4 ,4 7 4 .1

1 4 ,4 6 0 .5

6 2 7 .4

6 1 7 .3

6 1 5 .3

Colorado...................

2 ,1 9 5 .6

2 ,1 6 5 .5

2 ,1 6 8 .5

4 ,0 1 0 .7

4 ,0 0 1 .9

4 .0 1 2 .4

Connecticut.............

1 ,6 7 3 .6

1 ,6 5 5 .2

1 ,6 5 5 .7

7 6 0 .9

7 7 7 .0

7 7 8 .9

4 1 4 .6

4 0 9 .3

4 1 0 .2

8 ,5 3 4 .5

8 ,3 9 0 .2

8 .3 8 6 .2

3 ,8 7 7 .2

3 ,8 2 9 .8

3 .8 4 0 .9

3 2 9 .6

3 2 9 .0

3 2 8 .9

5 ,5 2 0 .9

5 3 8 1 .5

5 .4 0 3 .4

Delaware..................
District of Columbia.

6 5 1 .6

6 6 7 .7

6 6 8 .0

Florida......................

7 ,1 9 1 .6

7 ,2 5 3 .1

7 ,2 8 1 .7

Georgia....................

3 ,8 8 0 .2

3 ,9 1 3 .5

3 ,9 0 2 .0

N e w J e r s e y ............................................

N o rth D a k o ta ........................................

Hawaii......................

5 4 4 .8

5 6 3 .1

5 6 2 .8

O k la h o m a ...............................................

1 ,5 2 0 .6

1 ,4 7 1 .2

1 .4 7 9 .5

Idaho........................

5 6 9 .8

5 6 3 .3

5 6 7 .3

O re g o n ......................................................

1 ,5 7 6 .6

1 ,5 7 2 .0

1 .5 5 9 .0

Illinois.......................

5 ,9 1 6 .3

5 ,8 5 4 .7

5 ,8 4 3 .0

Indiana.....................

2 ,9 0 2 .6

2 ,8 7 1 .7

2 ,8 6 3 .7

5 ,6 4 5 .1

5 6 2 3 .2

5 .6 2 9 .1

R h o d e Is la n d .........................................

4 8 3 .3

4 7 9 .6

4 7 9 .9
1 .7 9 5 .9

Iowa......................... .

1 ,4 6 1 .4

1 ,4 4 1 .6

1 ,4 4 3 .6

S o u th C a ro lin a ......................................

1 ,8 2 8 .6

1 ,8 0 5 .9

Kansas.....................

1 ,3 5 8 .1

1 ,3 3 4 .1

1 ,3 3 2 .0

S o u th D a k o ta ........................................

3 7 8 .1

3 7 5 .1

3 7 5 .6

Kentucky..................

1 ,8 2 3 .6

1 ,7 8 4 .3

1 ,7 7 4 .6

T e n n e s s e e ..............................................

2 ,7 0 7 .5

2 ,6 6 3 .9

2 .6 7 2 .2

Louisiana.................

1 ,9 3 0 .4

1 ,8 9 7 .4

1 ,8 9 6 .5

T e x a s ........................................................

9 ,4 5 8 .7

9 ,4 2 6 .4

9 .4 3 7 .5

Maine.......................

6 0 9 .9

6 0 4 .7

6 0 5 .2

U ta h ..........................................................

1 0 6 9 .2

1 073 4

1 .0 7 5 .2

Maryland..................

2 ,4 5 4 .2

2 ,4 7 4 .9

2 ,4 8 8 .3

2 9 5 .6

3 0 1 .8

3 0 3 .4

Massachusetts........

3 ,2 9 9 .2

3 ,2 0 3 .0

3 ,2 0 9 .5

V ir g in ia .....................................................

3 ,4 9 4 .8

3 ,4 8 3 .0

3 ,4 9 3 .4

Michigan..................

4 ,5 5 4 .4

4 ,4 1 9 .3

4 ,4 0 7 .6

W a s h in g to n ............................................

2 ,6 4 8 .3

2 ,6 6 2 .1

2 .6 5 7 .0

Minnesota............... .

2 ,6 5 5 .7

2 ,6 3 5 .3

2 ,6 3 9 .0

W e s t V irg in ia ..........................................

7 3 4 .2

7 3 4 .2

7 3 1 .1

Mississippi...............

1 ,1 3 1 .4

1 ,1 2 7 .3

1 ,1 2 8 .0

W is c o n s in ...............................................

2 ,8 2 1 .8

2 ,7 7 5 .7

2 .7 7 6 .0

W y o m in g .................................................

2 4 7 .2

2 4 8 .4

2 4 8 .3

p = p re lim in a ry .
NO TE: S o m e d a ta in th is ta b le m a y d iffe r fro m d a ta p u b lish ed e ls e w h e re b e c a u s e o f th e c o n tin u a l u p d a tin g o f th e d a ta b a s e .

52 FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
Digitized for
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

12. E m p lo y m e n t o f w orkers o n n on fa rm p a yro lls b y industry, m on th ly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju ste d

[Inthousands]

TOTAL NONFARM..........
TOTAL PRIVATE................
300DS-PR0DUCING
Natural resources and
mining.............................
Logging..........................................
M in in g ..................................................

2003

2002

Annual average
Industry

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

1 3 0 ,4 0 9

1 30 ,1 9 8

1 3 0 ,3 5 6

1 3 0 ,2 3 5

1 3 0 ,3 8 4

1 3 0 ,0 6 2

1 2 9 ,9 8 6

1 0 8 ,8 6 9

1 08 ,6 4 2

1 0 8 ,7 8 0

1 0 8 ,6 4 7

1 0 8 ,5 3 7

1 0 8 ,5 3 6

1 0 8 ,5 0 2

2 2 ,4 0 9

2 2 ,3 2 3

2 2 ,2 8 8

2 2,191

2 2 ,1 5 9

2 2 ,1 1 9

2 2 ,0 9 8

2001

2002

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

1 3 1 ,8 2 6

1 30 ,3 7 6

130,411

1 3 0 ,3 8 3

1 30 ,2 0 4

1 3 0 ,2 2 4

1 3 0 ,2 8 9

1 30 ,4 0 8

1 1 0 ,7 0 7

1 08 ,8 8 6

1 0 8 ,9 0 7

108,891

1 08 ,7 5 6

1 08 ,7 4 5

1 0 8 ,7 6 3

1 08 ,8 6 4

2 3 ,8 7 3

2 2 ,6 1 9

2 2 ,6 6 7

2 2 ,6 3 9

2 2 ,5 8 8

2 2 ,5 2 7

2 2 ,4 9 7

2 2 ,4 3 5

5 84

5 80

5 76

5 75

7 0 .5

69.2

6 7 .9

6 7 .3

6 7 .5

6 6 .7

6 7 .6

6 7 .9

67.1

6 6 .6

6 4 .6

6 4 .3

6 4 .8

508.1

5 0 5 .7

5 0 5 .7

5 0 5 .0

5 0 3 .6

5 0 0 .5

502.1

5 0 0 .4

4 9 9 .8

5 0 1 .4

6 0 6 .0

5 8 1 .0

7 3 .5

69.1

5 3 2 .5

5 1 1 .9

5 1 3 .8

5 1 1 .2

5 0 8 .0

5 73

5 72

573

5 72

5 68

564

5 65

5 69

566

Oil a m d g a s e xtraction...............

1 23 .7

1 22 .5

1 22.9

1 22 .8

1 22 .0

1 22 .0

1 21 .4

1 21 .5

1 22 .0

1 21.6

122.1

1 2 1 .8

1 22 .9

1 2 4 .4

1 2 5 .2

M ining, e xcep t oil a n d g a s l ....

2 1 8 .7

212.1

2 1 2 .9

212.1

2 1 0 .9

2 1 0 .6

2 1 0 .7

2 0 9 .7

2 0 9 .3

208.1

2 0 6 .9

2 0 6 .3

2 0 6 .9

2 0 7 .5

2 0 8 .2

7 4 .3

7 4 .9

7 5 .3

7 4 .8

7 4 .4

7 4 .4

7 4 .3

7 3 .6

7 3 .8

7 3 .3

7 2 .2

7 2 .3

7 2 .3

7 2 .7

7 2 .6

S upport activities fo r m in in g ....

190.1

1 77 .2

1 78 .0

176 .3

175.1

175 .5

1 73.6

1 74 .5

173 .7

1 73 .9

1 7 1 .5

1 74 .0

1 70 .6

1 6 7 .9

1 6 8 .0

Construction......................

6 ,8 2 6 .0

6 ,7 3 2 .0

6 ,7 1 6 .0

6 ,7 2 5 .0

6 ,7 0 3 .0

6 ,7 1 9 .0

6 ,7 2 8 .0

6 ,7 2 0 .0

6 ,7 4 5 .0

6 ,7 3 1 .0

6 ,7 3 8 .0

6 ,7 0 0 .0

6 ,7 2 0 .0

6 ,7 6 0 .0

6 ,7 8 6 .0

Construction of buildings..........

1 ,5 8 8 .9

1 ,5 8 3.9

1 ,5 8 0.4

1 ,5 7 9 .6

1 ,5 7 2 .9

1 ,5 8 5.3

1 ,5 8 7 .9

1 ,5 8 8 .0

1 ,6 0 2.9

1 ,5 9 5 .3

1 ,5 9 7.7

1 ,5 9 4 .4

1 ,6 0 5 .6

1 ,6 1 5 .8

1 ,6 1 5 .0

H e a v y a n d civil e n g in e e rin g ....

9 5 3 .0

9 2 9 .9

9 2 8 .4

9 3 0 .0

9 2 2 .8

9 2 1 .0

9 1 9 .3

918.1

9 1 5 .2

9 1 5 .3

9 1 6 .8

9 1 2 .5

8 9 5 .0

8 9 8 .4

9 0 2 .8
4 2 6 7 .8

C o al m ining.................................

4 ,2 1 5 .0

4 207.1

4 2 1 2 .9

4 2 2 0 .7

4 2 1 4 .2

4 2 2 6 .4

4 2 2 0 .7

4 2 2 3 .8

4 1 9 3 .2

4 2 1 9 .5

4 2 4 5 .5

1 5,3 67

1 5,3 34

1 5,3 09

1 5,2 33

1 5 ,1 9 6

1 5,1 43

15,091

1 5 ,0 2 0

1 4 ,9 8 2

14,9 22

1 4 ,8 7 4

1 4 ,7 9 5

1 4 ,7 4 6

1 0,8 36

1 0,8 18

1 0,8 04

1 0,7 40

1 0 ,7 1 5

1 0,6 85

1 0,6 48

1 0,5 95

1 0 ,5 6 4

1 0,5 16

1 0 ,4 4 7

1 0 ,3 7 9

1 0 ,3 4 2

9 ,5 1 7

9 ,5 6 7

9,541

9 ,5 1 6

9 ,4 7 2

9 ,4 3 5

9 ,4 0 0

9 ,3 6 2

9 ,3 1 6

9 ,2 8 2

9 ,2 3 6

9 ,2 0 3

9 ,1 4 7

9 ,1 1 4

7 ,1 6 3

6,551

6 ,5 8 2

6 ,5 6 5

6 ,5 5 0

6 ,5 1 7

6 ,4 9 2

6 ,4 7 4

6 ,4 4 7

6 ,4 1 7

6 ,3 9 2

6 ,3 5 5

6 ,3 1 4

6 ,2 6 7

574.1

5 5 6 .8

5 5 7 .9

5 5 7 .2

5 56

5 56

5 5 4 .5

5 5 4 .2

5 5 2 .3

548.1

5 4 9 .2

5 4 8 .5

5 4 4 .4

546

5 4 4 .9

5 0 4 .8

5 0 5 .1 .

491.1

4 8 6 .4

Speciality tra d e c o n tractors.....

4 2 8 3 .9

4 2 1 7 .9

4 2 0 6 .7

Manufacturing....................

16,441

1 5,3 06

Production w o rke rs .................

1 1 ,6 7 7

1 0 ,7 9 9

Durable goods..................

1 0,3 35

Production w o rk e rs ................
W o o d products.............................
Nonm etallic m ineral products

5 4 4 .5

5 19

5 1 8 .8

5 1 8 .6

5 1 8 .8

518.1

5 1 7 .9

516.1

5 1 3 .6

5 1 0 .8

5 0 7 .9

5 0 5 .9

5 0 6 .7

5 0 3 .3

4 9 9 .7

500.1

4 9 6 .5

4 9 4 .7

6 ,2 4 4

513.1

511.1

509.1

5 0 7 .5

5 0 4 .4

F a b ric a te d m etal products........

1 ,6 7 4 .4

1 ,5 4 7 .8

1,5 5 6.7

1 ,5 5 3 .6

1,5 4 9.2

1 ,5 4 2.3

1 ,5 3 7 .8

1 ,5 3 2 .0

1 ,5 2 3.7

1 ,5 1 6 .0

1 ,5 0 8 .0

1 ,4 9 7 .5

1 ,4 9 5 .3

1 ,4 8 9 .4

1 ,4 8 2 .3

M a c h in e ry .......................................

1 ,3 6 8 .3

1 ,2 3 7 .4

1 ,2 4 2.5

1 ,2 3 8.7

1 ,2 3 5.2

1 ,2 2 8.7

1 ,2 2 3.8

1 ,2 1 9.6

1,216.1

1 ,2 1 2 .4

1 2 .6 .5

1 ,2 0 1 .6

1 ,1 9 4 .8

1 ,1 8 7 .4

1 ,1 8 1 .2

1 ,7 4 8 .8

1 ,5 2 1 .3

1 ,5 3 7 .5

1 ,5 2 7 .4

1 ,5 1 7.3

1 ,5 0 3 .5

1 ,4 9 2 .9

1 ,4 8 3 .9

1 ,4 7 7.0

1 ,4 6 2.2

1 ,4 4 8 .5

1 ,4 3 8.2

1,432.1

1 ,4 2 3 .6

1 ,4 1 3 .0

2 3 4 .4

2 3 0 .9

2 2 9 .8

2 3 0 .5

2 2 6 .7

P rim ary m e ta ls ..............................

5 7 0 .9

5 1 0 .9

510.1

C o m p u ter a n d electronic
p r o d u c ts l......................................
C o m p u ter and periph eral
e q u ip m en t..................................

2 8 6 .2

2 4 9 .8

2 5 3 .3

2 5 0 .2

2 4 8 .2

2 4 3 .9

2 4 3 .3

2 4 2 .0

2 4 1 .8

2 4 1 .0

C o m m unication s e q u ip m ent..

2 3 3 .9

1 90 .9

194.1

1 90 .8

1 89 .0

187.1

1 86.0

1 85 .5

182 .0

180.1

1 77 .6

1 77 .8

1 76 .5

1 7 5 .5

1 7 4 .4

S em iconductors and
electronic com p o n en ts..........

6 4 5 .4

5 3 1 .4

5 3 9 .7

535.1

531.1

5 2 5 .5

5 1 9 .2

5 1 3 .9

5 0 7 .6

5 0 3 .7

4 9 8 .8

4 9 6 .0

494.1

4 9 2 .0

4 8 7 .7

Electronic in strum ents............

475.1

4 5 0 .6

4 5 3 .3

4 5 2 .3

4 4 8 .8

4 4 7 .2

4 4 5 .8

444.1

4 4 2 .5

4 4 1 .3

4 4 1 .4

4 3 8 .7

4 3 6 .5

4 3 3 .5

4 3 1 .5

4 8 2 .4

4 7 9 .8

4 7 7 .5

4 7 4 .8

4 6 9 .3

1 ,8 0 6 .5

1 ,8 0 0 .7

1 ,7 9 2 .5

1 ,7 7 1 .9

1 ,7 7 7 .6

Electrical eq u ip m en t and
Tran sp o rtatio n e q u ip m en t........

5 5 6 .9

4 9 8 .9

5 0 1 .7

4 9 9 .6

5 0 0 .4

4 9 4 .9

4 9 2 .0

489.1

4 8 6 .8

4 8 5 .2

1 ,9 3 7 .9

1 ,8 2 5 .5

1 ,8 3 6.4

1 ,8 3 2.9

1 ,8 2 7.8

1 ,8 2 4.0

1 ,8 1 8 .0

1 ,8 1 5.5

1 ,8 0 8.7

1 ,8 0 4 .7

Furniture and related
M is ce lla n e o u s m anufacturing

Nondurable goods..............

6 4 2 .4

6 0 4 .6

609.1

6 0 9 .4

6 0 9 .0

6 0 4 .3

5 9 9 .8

5 9 6 .9

5 94 .2

589.1

5 8 7 .0

5 8 2 .9

5 8 2 .0

5 7 6 .4

5 7 6 .4

7 1 4 .5

6 9 1 .9

6 9 3 .0

692.1

6 9 2 .2

6 9 1 .4

6 9 0 .9

6 8 8 .3

691.1

6 8 7 .9

6 8 6 .0

6 8 4 .5

6 8 3 .0

6 8 2 .0

6 7 7 .8

6 ,1 0 7

5 ,7 8 9

5 ,8 0 0

5 ,7 9 3

5 ,7 9 3

5,761

5,761

5 ,7 4 3

5 ,7 2 9

5 ,7 0 4

5 ,7 0 0

5 ,6 8 0

5,671

5 ,6 4 8

5 ,6 3 2

4 ,5 1 4

4 ,2 4 9

4 ,2 5 4

4 ,2 5 3

4 ,2 5 4

4 ,2 2 3

4 ,2 2 3

4 ,211

4,201

4 ,1 7 8

4 ,1 7 2

4,161

4 ,1 3 3

4 ,1 1 2

4 ,0 9 8

1 ,5 5 1 .2

1,525.1

1 ,5 2 3.7

1 ,5 2 3 .8

1 ,5 2 0.3

1 ,5 1 4.5

1 ,5 1 8 .0

1 ,5 2 0.0

1 ,5 2 0.0

1 ,5 1 8 .5

1,517.1

1 ,5 1 4.7

1 ,5 1 3 .3

1 ,5 1 2 .3

1 ,5 1 2 .4

products.......................................

2 0 9 .0

2 0 5 .4

2 0 7 .4

2 0 6 .8

2 0 6 .0

2 0 5 .0

2 0 5 .3

203.1

2 0 0 .2

2 0 0 .2

1 9 9 .0

1 98.2

196.1

1 94 .6

1 9 5 .4

T e xtile m ills....................................

3 3 2 .9

2 9 3 .2

294.1

2 9 3 .0

2 9 4 .2

2 9 1 .3

2 8 9 .6

2 8 7 .5

2 8 6 .8

2 8 4 .9

2 8 5 .2

2 8 3 .7

2 8 1 .6

2 7 7 .8

2 7 2 .7

1 95 .4

1 95 .9

1 93.7

1 91 .7

1 92.6

1 92.6

1 9 0 .6

1 8 8 .7

3 4 6 .7

3 43 .2

3 3 7 .2

3 3 1 .8

3 2 5 .9

322.1

3 1 8 .4

3 1 3 .2

Production w o rk e rs ................
Fo o d m an u factu rin g ...................
B e ve ra g e and tobacco

T e xtile product m ills....................

2 0 5 .7

196.1

1 97.0

1 96 .3

196.1

1 95.6

195.2

4 2 6 .5

3 5 7 .6

3 6 1 .2

3 6 1 .5

3 5 7 .9

3 54 .2

3 5 2 .0

L e ath er a n d allied products.....

5 8 .0

4 9 .9

5 0 .6

4 9 .9

5 1.5

4 8 .9

4 8 .7

4 8 .6

4 7 .7

4 7 .3

4 6 .7

4 6 .0

4 5 .8

4 4 .8

4 4 .4

P a p e r a n d p a p er products........

5 7 7 .6

5 4 9 .8

5 5 0 .9

5 5 0 .4

5 4 9 .5

5 4 8 .9

5 4 7 .7

5 4 5 .6

5 44 .6

5 4 1 .5

5 3 9 .7

5 3 8 .5

535.1

534.1

5 3 1 .9

7 6 8 .4

7 0 9 .9

713.1

7 1 0 .5

7 0 9 .4

7 04 .2

7 0 2 .4

701.3

6 9 7 .5

6 8 9 .8

6 9 4 .5

6 9 4 .6

6 9 6 .4

6 9 4 .8

6 9 5 .3

121.1

119.1

1 18 .7

1 18.3

118 .7

1 18.6

119.2

1 18 .7

1 19.4

119 .7

1 2 0 .4

1 20 .4

1 20 .3

1 19 .2

1 1 9 .3

9 5 9 .0

9 2 9 .5

930.1

9 2 9 .2

9 2 8 .4

9 2 6 .7

9 3 0 .5

925.1

9 2 4 .7

9 2 5 .8

9 2 6 .0

9 2 4 .2

9 2 2 .5

9 2 1 .7

9 2 0 .6

Printing a n d related support
Petroleum a n d coal products..

Plastics a n d rubber products..

897

854

8 53

854

861

8 53

852

851

8 50

845

8 48

8 47

845

839

838

RVICE-PROVIDING............
RIVATE SERVICEPROVIDING.....................
ade, transportation,

1 0 7 ,9 5 2

1 0 7 ,7 5 7

1 0 7 ,7 4 4

1 0 7 ,7 4 4

1 07 ,6 1 6

1 07 ,6 9 7

1 07 ,7 9 2

1 0 7 ,9 7 3

1 08 ,0 0 0

1 0 7 ,8 7 5

1 08 ,0 6 8

1 0 8 ,0 4 4

1 0 7 ,9 2 5

1 0 7 ,9 4 3

1 0 7 ,8 8 8

8 6 ,8 3 4

8 6 ,2 6 7

8 6 ,2 4 0

8 6 ,2 5 2

8 6 ,1 6 8

8 6 ,2 1 8

8 6 ,2 6 6

8 6 ,4 2 9

8 6 ,4 6 0

8 6 ,3 1 9

8 6 ,4 9 2

8 6 ,4 5 6

8 6 ,3 7 8

8 6 ,4 1 7

8 6 ,4 0 4

2 5 ,9 8 3

2 5 ,4 9 3

2 5 ,5 3 6

2 5 ,5 3 0

2 5 ,5 1 3

2 5 ,4 5 8

2 5 ,4 3 0

2 5 ,4 3 9

2 5 ,4 0 6

2 5 ,3 7 8

2 5 ,3 7 6

2 5 ,3 4 6

2 5 ,3 3 8

2 5,321

2 5 ,2 8 2

5 ,7 7 2 .7

5 ,6 4 1 .0

5 ,6 5 0 .7

5 ,6 4 9 .8

5 ,6 4 1 .5

5 ,6 2 4 .4

5 ,6 2 5 .2

5 ,6 1 8 .9

5 ,6 0 4 .9

5 ,6 0 3 .9

5 ,5 9 6 .0

5 ,5 9 6 .2

5 ,5 9 4 .0

5 ,5 9 0 .8

5 ,5 8 2 .0

3 ,1 3 0

3 ,0 0 7

3 ,0 1 3 .6

3 ,0 1 1 .6

3,006.1

2,991.1

2 ,9 9 5 .7

2 ,9 9 0 .8

2 ,9 8 4 .3

2 ,9 7 8 .7

2 ,9 6 7 .9

2 ,9 6 7 .0

2 ,9 6 1 .2

2 ,9 5 7 .7

2 ,9 5 2 .2

2,031

2 ,0 1 5

2 0 1 6 .7

2 0 1 8 .2

2 0 1 7 .2

2 0 1 5 .7

2 0 1 3 .3

2 010.1

2 0 0 4 .3

2 0 0 9 .6

2 0 1 1 .5

2 0 1 0 .7

2 0 1 3 .6

2 0 1 3 .3

2 0 0 9 .9

N o n d u rab le g o o d s.....................
Electronic m a rkets and
agen ts a n d bro k ers.................

611.1

6 1 8 .8

6 2 0 .4

6 2 0 .0

6 1 8 .2

6 1 7 .6

6 16 .2

6 1 8 .0

6 1 6 .3

6 1 5 .6

6 1 6 .6

6 1 8 .5

6 1 9 .2

6 1 9 .8

6 1 9 .9

fetal 1trade......................

1 5 ,2 3 6 .6

1 5 ,0 4 7 .2

1 5 ,0 6 9 .0

1 5 ,0 6 5 .0

1 5,0 6 1 .9

1 5 ,0 3 3 .3

1 5 ,0 1 6 .0

1 5 ,0 25 .2

1 5 ,0 14 .0

1 5 ,0 05 .6

1 5 ,0 09 .2

1 4 ,9 8 7 .3

1 4 ,9 9 4 .7

1 4 ,9 99 .6

1 4 ,9 7 9 .0

d e ale rs 1 .......................................

1 ,8 5 4.6

1 ,8 7 9.2

1 ,8 8 1.4

1 ,8 8 3 .3

1,8 8 4.2

1,8 8 3.2

1 ,8 8 2 .6

1,8 8 6.8

1,8 8 3.8

1 ,8 7 8 .9

1 ,8 7 6 .8

1 ,8 7 4 .9

1 ,8 7 5 .5

1 ,8 7 5 .4

1 ,8 7 9 .2

Autom obile d e a le rs ..................

1,225.1

1,2 5 0.4

1 ,2 5 1.7

1,251.1

1,2 5 2.4

1 ,2 5 2.4

1 ,2 5 3 .0

1,2 5 4.9

1,255.0

1 ,2 4 9 .6

1 ,2 4 5 .5

1,242.1

1 ,2 4 1 .5

1 ,2 4 2 .0

1 ,2 4 4 .3

541 .2

5 39 .8

536.1

5 3 7 .8

540 .2

5 41 .8

5 4 3 .5

5 46.8

5 48.7

5 48 .4

5 4 9 .9

5 5 2 .0

5 4 7 .6

5 49 .2

5 4 5 .4

5 24 .6

526.4

529.3

5 29 .8

5 3 1 .6

5 26 .9

5 2 4 .8

5 25 .2

5 2 3 .8

M o to r vehicles a n d parts

Furniture and hom e
furnishings s to res....................
Electronics a n d a ppliance
s to res............................................

554.5

528 .8

5 26 .7

5 27 .6

527.C

525 .0

S e e notes at e n d of ta b le.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

53

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

12. C o n tin u e d — E m p lo y m e n t of w orkers o n n on farm p a yro lls b y industry, m o n th ly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju ste d

[Inthousands]_______________________________________________________________________
Annual average

2002

2003

Industry
2001

2002

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

Building m aterial and garden
supply stores...............................

1 ,1 5 1 .8

1,179.1

1 ,1 8 1 .3

1 ,1 8 2 .6

1 ,1 8 6 .9

1 ,1 8 5.2

1 ,1 8 2.2

1 ,1 8 4.2

1 ,1 8 4.2

1 ,1 8 3 .9

1 ,1 9 0 .6

1 ,1 8 3.6

1 ,1 8 1 .8

1 ,1 8 9 .0

1 ,1 8 8 .5

Food and b e ve rag e stores.......

2 ,9 5 0 .5

2 ,8 7 1 .6

2,8 7 8.1

2 ,8 7 2 .0

2 ,8 5 8 .7

2,8 5 7.1

2 ,8 5 1 .7

2 ,8 5 2 .5

2 ,8 4 2 .5

2 ,8 3 3 .5

2 ,8 2 7 .0

2 ,8 2 0 .2

2 ,8 2 2 .9

2 ,8 2 2 .0

2 ,8 2 2 .5

H ealth a n d personal care
s tores.............................................

9 5 1 .5

9 4 6 .6

9 4 3 .0

9 4 4 .7

9 4 7 .0

9 4 7 .7

9 4 9 .7

9 4 9 .2

9 4 9 .5

9 5 2 .5

9 5 6 .8

960.1

9 6 2 .6

9 6 6 .2

9 6 5 .7

G as o lin e stations..........................

9 2 5 .3

9 0 3 .6

9 0 2 .7

9 0 2 .4

9 0 2 .9

9 0 2 .2

9 0 3 .6

9 0 3 .6

9 0 3 .7

9 0 4 .2

9 0 5 .2

9 0 5 .0

907.1

9 1 0 .9

9 0 8 .8

1 ,2 8 2 .8

1 ,2 8 8 .3

1 ,2 8 0 .7

C lothing and clothing
a ccessories s to r e s ..................

1,321.1

1 ,3 0 7 .8

1 ,3 0 8 .3

1 ,3 0 7.8

1 ,3 1 3 .0

1 ,3 1 1 .7

1 ,3 0 4.4

1 ,3 0 7 .4

1 ,3 0 4 .5

1 ,3 0 8.5

1 ,2 9 1 .2

1 ,2 7 9.7

book, a n d m usic s tores...........

6 7 9 .2

660.1

6 6 7 .9

6 6 8 .4

6 6 5 .6

6 6 2 .7

6 5 7 .8

6 5 5 .3

650.1

6 3 7 .8

6 5 3 .5

6 5 2 .6

6 5 0 .8

6 4 6 .3

6 4 5 .2

G e n e ra l m erch an d ise s to r e s l.

2 ,8 4 2 .2

2 ,8 2 0 .7

2 ,8 3 4 .6

2 ,8 2 7 .5

2 ,8 2 8 .3

2 ,8 0 9 .0

2 ,8 0 9 .2

2,8 0 9.1

2 ,8 1 7 .5

2 ,8 2 7 .6

2 ,8 3 4 .2

2 ,8 3 8 .8

2 ,8 4 6 .4

2 ,8 3 5 .8

2 ,8 3 3 .1

D e o a rtm en t s tores....................
M is ce lla n e o u s store re taile rs...

1 ,7 6 8 .3

1 ,7 0 9 .8

1 ,7 1 4.2

1 ,7 0 6 .8

1 ,7 0 5 .7

1 ,6 9 5 .0

1 ,6 9 4.5

1 ,6 9 6 .6

1 ,7 1 2 .0

1 ,7 2 7.5

1 ,7 2 0 .9

1 ,7 1 8.6

1 ,7 1 0 .6

1 ,6 9 5 .5

1 ,6 9 0 .3

9 9 3 .3

9 6 2 .5

9 6 0 .6

9 6 3 .7

962.1

9 6 1 .0

9 6 0 .8

9 6 0 .8

9 5 7 .2

9 5 4 .6

9 5 2 .4

949.1

9 4 9 .8

9 4 8 .6

944 .1

N onstore re taile rs ........................

4 7 3 .5

4 4 7 .3

4 4 8 .3

4 4 7 .2

4 4 6 .0

4 4 6 .7

4 4 5 .9

443.1

4 4 3 .0

4 4 5 .9

4 4 0 .0

4 4 4 .4

4 4 2 .6

4 4 2 .7

4 4 2 .0

Transportation and
warehousing...................

4 ,3 7 2 .0

4 ,2 0 5 .3

4 ,2 1 5 .2

4 ,2 1 4 .4

4 ,2 0 9 .0

4 ,2 0 0 .4

4 ,1 8 8 .4

4 ,1 9 4 .6

4 ,1 8 8 .9

4 ,1 7 0 .7

4 ,1 7 4 .6

4 ,1 6 6 .7

4 ,1 5 3 .8

4 ,1 3 6 .3

4 ,1 2 9 .0

Air trans p o rta tio n ..........................

6 1 5 .3

5 5 9 .3

5 6 2 .4

5 6 5 .2

5 6 4 .0

561.1

5 5 9 .0

5 5 6 .3

5 5 6 .3

5 5 3 .9

5 5 1 .3

5 4 5 .8

5 3 7 .3

5 2 5 .6

5 1 6 .4

R ail trans p o rta tio n .......................

2 2 6 .7

218.1

2 1 7 .5

2 1 5 .0

216.1

2 1 6 .3

2 1 5 .5

215.1

2 1 6 .8

2 1 6 .3

2 1 5 .7

2 1 5 .3

2 1 5 .3

2 1 6 .5

216 .1

S porting goods, hobby,

W a te r trans p o rta tio n ..................

5 4 .0

5 1 .6

5 2 .4

5 1 .3

5 0 .7

5 0 .8

5 0 .4

5 0 .4

5 0 .3

5 0 .3

5 0 .6

5 0 .5

50.1

4 9 .9

5 0 .3

1 ,3 8 6 .8

1,339.1

1 ,3 4 2 .7

1 ,3 3 9 .9

1 ,3 3 4.5

1 ,3 3 2 .9

1 ,3 3 0.4

1 ,3 3 6 .2

1 ,3 3 3.2

1 ,3 3 1 .9

1 ,3 2 7 .6

1 ,3 2 4.3

1,328.1

1 ,3 2 4 .4

1 ,3 2 4 .4

tra nsportation..............................

3 7 4 .8

3 7 1 .5

3 7 5 .0

3 7 4 .0

3 7 7 .4

3 7 2 .7

3 6 4 .7

365.1

3 6 3 .3

3 6 0 .8

3 5 8 .0

3 5 7 .5

6 5 1 .9

3 5 3 .0

3 5 0 .4

Pip eline tran sp o rtatio n...............

4 5 .4

4 1 .5

4 1 .9

4 1 .5

41.1

4 0 .7

4 0.5

4 0 .4

4 0 .2

4 0 .2

4 0 .0

3 9 .8

4 0 .2

4 0 .3

4 0 .3

2 5 .6

27.1

2 8 .5

29.1

T ru c k trans p o rta tio n ....................
T ransit a n d ground p a ssenger

S ce n ic and sig htseein g
tra nsportation..............................

29.1

2 5 .9

2 5 .8

2 6 .2

2 6 .7

2 6 .9

2 6 .7

2 6 .2

2 5 .7

2 5 .6

2 4 .0

5 3 9 .2

5 2 6 .7

5 2 4 .9

531.1

5 2 8 .2

5 2 7 .6

525.1

528.1

5 2 8 .2

5 3 1 .2

5 2 7 .7

S u p p o rt activities for
tra nsportation..............................

5 2 7 .9

5 2 5 .9

5 2 2 .7

C o u rie rs a n d m e s s e n g ers ........

5 8 7 .0

5 5 8 .0

5 6 1 .8

5 5 9 .4

5 5 9 .0

5 5 6 .8

5 5 8 .6

5 5 7 .5

5 5 6 .3

5 4 5 .0

5 6 1 .4

5 5 8 .9

5 6 3 .3

5 6 1 .6

5 6 0 .8

W a re h o u sin g a n d storage

5 1 3 .8

5 1 3 .6

5 1 0 .8

5 1 0 .8

5 1 1 .3

5 1 4 .6

5 1 7 .5

5 1 9 .3

5 1 8 .6

5 1 5 .5

5 1 8 .3

521.1

5 1 4 .6

5 1 3 .8

5 1 2 .9

5 9 9 .4

5 9 9 .8

6 0 0 .7

6 0 0 .9

6 0 0 .5

6 0 0 .0

600.1

6 0 0 .6

5 9 8 .3

5 9 7 .3

5 9 6 .4

5 9 5 .9

5 9 5 .3

5 9 4 .6

5 9 2 .3

3629

3420

3434

3424

3410

3410

3383

3 39 2

3 38 2

3353

3328

3308

3305

3303

3294
9 4 7 .2

Utilities............................
Information........................

5 2 7 .8

Publishing industries, except
In te rn et..........................................

1 ,0 2 0 .7

9 6 4 .4

9 6 8 .4

9 6 7 .3

9 6 7 .6

9 6 6 .9

965.1

9 6 4 .7

9 6 2 .6

9 6 2 .2

9 5 4 .0

9 5 5 .3

9 5 3 .5

9 5 0 .8

recording industries..................

3 7 6 .8

387.1

3 8 9 .5

3 8 9 .8

3 8 6 .0

387.1

3 8 4 .0

3 9 4 .7

3 9 4 .3

3 8 1 .6

3 7 7 .8

3 6 7 .0

3 6 9 .3

371 .1

3 7 3 .4

Broadcasting, excep t Internet..

3 4 4 .6

3 3 3 .8

3 3 4 .3

3 3 5 .0

3 3 3 .2

3 3 2 .0

3 3 0 .5

3 3 0 .3

3 3 1 .0

332.1

3 2 7 .2

3 2 5 .0

3 2 5 .7

3 2 5 .0

3 2 4 .4

M otio n picture a n d sound

In tern et publishing and
b ro ad castin g ................................

4 5 .5

3 4 .8

3 4 .8

3 4 .7

3 4 .3

3 4 .9

3 3 .9

3 4 .2

3 3 .0

3 2 .9

3 3 .0

3 3 .3

3 3 .6

3 3 .8

3 3 .5

T e le c om m unications..................

1,302.1

1 ,2 0 0 .9

1 ,2 1 1 .5

1 ,2 0 3 .2

1 ,1 9 5 .4

1 ,1 8 8 .8

1 ,1 8 0.2

1 ,1 7 7 .7

1 ,1 7 4 .9

1 ,1 6 2.5

1 ,1 5 8 .7

1 ,1 5 1 .4

1 ,1 4 6 .9

1 ,1 4 5 .0

1,1 3 8.1
4 3 4 .4

IS P s , s earch portals, and
4 9 3 .6

4 4 7 .4

4 4 8 .4

4 4 6 .9

4 4 5 .2

4 4 4 .5

443.1

4 4 4 .0

439.1

4 3 5 .8

4 3 0 .3

4 2 9 .5

4 3 0 .4

4 3 1 .3

O th e r in form ation s erv ices......

46.1

4 6 .6

4 6 .8

4 6 .8

4 7 .8

4 7 .2

4 6 .3

4 6 .5

4 6 .9

4 5 .8

4 6 .5

4 6 .3

4 6 .0

4 6 .0

4 5 .5

Financial activities...............

7 ,8 0 7

7 ,8 4 3

7 ,8 2 5

7 ,8 3 0

7 ,8 3 0

7 ,8 3 0

7,851

7 ,8 7 2

7 ,8 8 0

7 ,8 8 9

7 ,9 0 2

7 ,9 1 6

7 ,9 3 0

7 ,9 5 6

7,9 7 1

Fin a n ce and in su ra n c e .................

5 7 7 3 .1 .

5 ,8 1 4 .9

5,7 9 8.1

5 ,7 9 9 .3

5 ,8 0 2 .2

5 ,8 0 4 .0

5 ,8 2 0 .8

5,841.1

5,851.1

5 ,8 6 1 .0

5 ,8 7 2 .4

5 ,8 8 5 .2

5 ,8 9 4 .8

5 ,9 1 2 .0

5 ,9 2 3 .2

2 3 .0

23.1

2 3 .3

2 3 .2

2 3 .2

23.1

2 3 .0

2 2 .9

2 3 .0

2 2 .7

2 2 .7

2 2 .3

2 2 .3

2 2 .2

2 2 .2

d a ta pro cessin g ..........................

M o n e ta ry authorities—
central b a n k .................................
C redit interm ediation and
2 ,5 9 7 .7

2 ,6 8 2 .3

2 ,6 6 3 .8

2 ,6 6 7 .9

2 ,6 7 7 .5

2 ,6 8 2 .3

2 ,6 9 6 .5

2 ,7 1 4 .0

2 ,7 2 2 .8

2,729.1

2 ,7 3 4 .9

2 ,7 4 1 .9

2 ,7 5 2 .3

2 ,7 6 5 .8

2 ,7 8 1 .8

in te rm e d ia tio n !........................

1,7 0 1.2

1 ,7 3 8.2

1 ,7 3 5 .0

1 ,7 3 5 .3

1 ,7 3 7 .7

1 ,7 3 9 .6

1 ,7 4 1 .4

1 ,7 4 5 .6

1 ,7 4 8 .3

1 ,7 5 1 .3

1,755.1

1,751.1

1 ,7 6 2 .3

1 ,7 6 4 .4

1 ,7 6 7 .9

C o m m ercial b an kin g ............

1 ,2 5 8 .4

1 ,2 8 4.7

1 ,2 8 2.9

1 ,2 8 3 .0

1 ,2 8 4 .3

1 ,2 8 5 .3

1 ,2 8 5.7

1 ,2 8 8 .8

1 ,2 9 1.2

1 ,2 9 2.8

1,296.1

1 ,2 9 7.5

1 ,3 0 0 .4

1 ,3 0 0 .6

1 ,3 0 2 .4

8 0 2 .3

803.1

7 9 9 .3

7 9 8 .8

7 9 6 .9
2 ,2 3 9 .1

related a c tiv itie s l.....................
Depository credit

S ecurities, com m odity
8 3 0 .5

8 0 0 .8

8 0 4 .0

8 0 3 .4

7 9 7 .2

7 9 5 .7

7 9 7 .6

7 9 6 .9

7 9 8 .2

7 9 9 .4

2 ,2 3 3 .7

2,2 2 3.1

2 ,2 2 0 .9

2 ,2 1 9 .3

2,2 1 9.1

2 ,2 1 8 .5

2 ,2 1 9 .0

2 ,2 2 2 .2

2 ,2 2 2 .7

2 ,2 2 5 .7

2 ,2 2 8 .5

2 ,2 3 3 .9

2 ,2 3 6 .8

2 ,2 4 1 .8

8 8 .3

8 5 .6

86.1

8 5 .5

8 5 .2

8 4 .4

8 4 .7

85.1

8 4 .4

84.1

8 4 .0

8 4 .0

84.1

8 3 .4

8 2 .9

a n d lea s in g ....................................

2 ,0 3 4 .5

2 ,0 2 7 .8

2 ,0 2 7 .3

2 ,0 3 1 .0

2,0 2 8.1

2 ,0 2 6 .0

2 ,0 3 0 .4

2,0 3 1.1

2 ,0 2 9 .2

2 ,0 2 8 .3

2 ,0 2 9 .2

2 ,0 3 0 .6

2 ,0 3 4 .7

2 ,0 4 4 .2

2 ,0 4 7 .8

R e al e s ta te ....................................

1 ,3 3 9 .5

1 ,3 4 7.7

1 ,3 4 3 .7

1 ,3 4 5 .0

1 ,3 4 2.2

1 ,3 4 2.3

1 ,3 5 0.7

1 ,3 5 4 .4

1 ,3 5 7.3

1 ,3 5 5 .7

1 ,3 5 3 .8

1 ,3 5 6 .9

1 ,3 5 9 .9

1 ,3 6 6 .4

1 ,3 6 7 .3

6 6 6 .3

6 5 2 .3

6 5 5 .3

657.1

6 5 6 .9

6 5 5 .7

652.1

6 4 8 .9

6 4 4 .9

6 4 5 .8

6 4 8 .7

6 4 6 .7

6 4 7 .0

6 4 9 .4

6 5 1 .4

2 8 .7

2 7 .8

2 8 .3

2 8 .9

2 9 .0

2 8 .0

2 7 .6

2 7 .8

2 7 .0

2 6 .8

2 6 .7

2 7 .0

2 7 .8

2 8 .4

29.1

1 6,4 76

1 6,0 10

1 6,0 35

1 6,0 26

1 5 ,9 7 3

1 6,0 08

1 6,0 08

1 6,0 36

1 6 ,0 1 4

15,9 72

1 6 ,0 1 5

1 6 ,0 4 3

1 5 ,9 8 0

1 5 ,9 8 9

1 6 ,0 0 2

6 .9 0 2 .2

6 ,7 1 5 .0

6 ,7 0 8 .0

6 ,6 9 3 .6

6 ,6 9 0 .5

6 ,7 0 4 .8

6 ,7 1 4 .8

6 ,7 3 8 .3

6 ,7 3 1 .9

6 ,7 1 6 .9

6 ,7 4 5 .3

6 ,7 9 0 .5

6 ,7 5 8 .4

6 ,7 4 2 .2

6 ,6 9 8 .1

1 .0 9 1 .3

1 ,1 1 1.8

1 ,1 0 9 .9

1 ,1 0 8 .3

1 ,1 0 7 .8

1 ,1 1 1 .0

1 ,1 1 6.2

1 ,1 2 1 .7

1 ,1 2 0.6

1 ,1 2 0.2

1 ,1 1 9 .8

1,124.1

1 ,1 2 5 .7

1 ,1 2 7 .5

1 ,1 2 5 .6

8 7 2 .2

867.1

8 7 5 .3

8 6 8 .9

8 6 7 .3

873.1

8 7 6 .4

8 8 2 .7

8 8 4 .3

8 7 2 .6

9 1 0 .6

9 4 1 .2

9 1 3 .5

8 9 9 .3

8 6 6 .0

1 ,2 7 4 .7

1,251.1

1 ,2 5 1.2

1 ,2 4 7.8

1 ,2 4 7 .7

1 ,2 4 8 .5

1 ,2 4 8 .8

1 ,2 5 1 .3

1,252.1

1 ,2 5 2.5

1 ,2 3 8 .6

1 ,2 4 7 .9

1 ,2 4 6 .0

1 ,2 4 2 .9

1 ,2 4 1 .4

contracts, inve s tm e n ts ............
In su ran ce c arriers and
related activities........................
Fu n d s trusts, a n d other
financial veh ic le s .......................
R e al e state a n d rental

R e n ta l a n d leasing services
Lessors of nonfin ancial
in tangible a s s e ts .......................

Professional and business
services.......................
Professional a n d technical
Legal serv ice s .............................
A ccounting a n d bookkeeping
s e rv ice s .......................................
Architectural a n d e ngineering
serv ice s ......................................
S e e notes at end of ta b le .

Monthly Labor Review
Digitized for 54
FRASER
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

12. C o n tin u e d — E m p lo y m e n t of w orkers o n n on tarm p a yro lls b y industry, m on th ly d a ta s e a s o n a lly a d ju ste d

[Inthousands]_______________________________________________________________________
2002

Annual average

2003

Industry
2001

2002

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

1 ,2 9 7 .8

1 ,1 6 2.7

1 ,1 6 1 .9

1 ,1 5 7 .9

1,162.1

1 ,1 5 4 .5

1 ,1 5 0.7

1 ,1 5 3 .4

1,150.1

1 ,1 4 2.7

1 ,1 4 2 .8

1 ,1 4 4.3

1 ,1 4 4 .5

1 ,1 5 1 .9

1 ,1 4 6 .6

7 4 6 .2

7 3 1 .8

7 2 9 .9

727.1

7 2 3 .6

7 3 5 .8

736.1

7 3 4 .0

7 3 3 .4

7 3 9 .8

7 3 4 .8

7 3 6 .2

7 3 5 .5

7 3 2 .9

7 3 4 .0

1 ,7 7 9 .0

1 ,7 1 1 .0

1 ,7 1 0.3

1 ,7 1 2 .5

1 ,7 0 7 .3

1 ,7 0 4.6

1 ,7 0 6.0

1 ,7 0 3 .9

1 ,6 9 9 .0

1 ,6 9 4.2

1 ,6 9 6 .8

1,697.1

1 ,6 9 7 .9

1 ,6 9 7 .0

1 ,6 9 6 .0

7 ,7 9 4 .9

7 ,5 8 3 .8

7,617.1

7 ,6 2 0 .3

7 ,5 7 4 .7

7 ,5 9 8 .2

7 ,5 8 7 .3

7 ,5 9 4 .0

7 ,5 8 3 .0

7 ,5 6 1 .0

7 ,5 7 2 .9

7 ,5 5 5 .7

7 ,5 2 3 .3

7 ,5 4 9 .4

7 ,6 0 8 .3

7 ,2 5 7 .4

C o m p u ter system s design
a n d re la te d s e rv ice s...............
M a n a g e m e n t a n d technical
consulting services
M a n a g e m e n t of com p an ie s
a n d e n te rp ris e s .............................
Adm inistrative a n d w as te
serv ice s ............................................
Adm inistrative a n d support
7 ,3 0 0 .8

7 ,3 0 3 .5

7 ,2 8 1 .6

7 ,2 7 3 .6

7 ,2 0 7 .8

7 ,2 3 0 .5

Em plo ym ent s e r v ic e s l............

3,437.1

3 ,2 4 8 .8

3 ,2 7 3 .2

3 ,2 8 3 .4

3 ,2 4 6 .5

3 ,2 6 8 .8

3 ,2 5 5 .2

3 ,2 6 0 .8

3 ,2 5 6 .8

3 ,2 5 9 .2

3 ,2 9 2 .7

3 ,2 8 7 .8

3 ,2 4 5 .9

3 ,2 4 2 .2

3 ,2 9 1 .7

T e m p o ra ry help s erv ice s......

2 ,3 3 7 .7

2 ,1 8 5 .7

2 ,2 1 4 .4

2 2 2 .3

2 ,1 7 2 .8

2 ,2 1 9.1

2,202.1

2 ,1 9 2 .6

2 ,1 7 4 .4

2 ,1 5 9 .4

2 ,1 7 0 .2

2 ,1 5 1 .6

2 ,1 3 5 .9

2 ,1 3 1 .2

2 ,1 7 7 .6

7 7 9 .7

7 5 7 .0

759.1

7 4 7 .3

7 4 7 .8

7 4 3 .0

7 4 2 .8

749.1

7 5 5 .8

7 5 7 .0

746.1

7 4 3 .8

7 4 6 .5

748.1

7 4 7 .9

1 ,6 0 6.2

1 ,5 9 7 .3

1 ,5 9 6 .3

1 ,6 0 0 .8

1 ,6 0 4.3

1 ,6 0 4 .6

1 ,6 1 1.0

1 ,6 0 6 .7

1 ,6 0 1.0

1 ,5 9 1.7

1 ,5 8 5 .8

1 ,5 8 0 .4

1 ,5 7 6 .4

1 ,5 8 7 .4

1 ,5 9 6 .3

3 1 7 .3

3 1 6 .9

3 1 6 .3

3 1 6 .8

3 1 7 .3

3 1 6 .6

3 1 3 .7

3 1 4 .8

3 1 1 .9

316.1

3 1 7 .4

3 1 5 .8

3 1 5 .5

3 1 8 .9

3 1 9 .7

s e r v ic e s l......................................

Business support services..

7 ,4 7 7 .6

7 ,2 6 6 .8

7 ,2 7 9 .2

7,271.1

7 ,2 4 4 .9

7 ,2 5 5 .5

7 ,2 3 9 .9

7 ,2 8 8 .6

S erv ice s to buildings
a n d d w ellin g s...........................
W a s te m a n a g e m e n t and
rem ediation serv ice s...............

Educational and health
services..........................

1 5,6 45

1 6,1 84

1 6 ,1 3 0

1 6,1 83

1 6,1 94

16,241

16,2 73

1 6,3 15

1 6 ,3 5 7

1 6,3 73

1 6 ,5 0 4

1 6 ,4 3 0

1 6,4 52

1 6 ,4 8 3

1 6 ,5 0 9

2 ,5 1 0 .6

2 ,6 5 0 .6

2 ,6 4 1 .4

2 ,6 5 9 .5

2 ,6 6 2 .5

2 ,6 6 5 .5

2 ,6 7 1 .3

2 ,6 8 1 .3

2 ,6 9 0 .3

2,695.1

2 ,7 0 0 .0

2 ,7 0 7 .4

2 ,7 1 1 .5

2 ,7 0 8 .8

2 7 1 8 .1

1 3 ,1 3 4 .0

1 3 ,5 3 3 .2

1 3 ,4 8 8 .6

1 3 ,5 2 3 .4

1 3 ,5 31 .9

1 3 ,5 7 5 .4

1 3 ,6 0 1 .4

1 3 ,6 33 .3

1 3 ,6 6 6 .5

1 3 ,6 7 7 .5

1 3 ,7 0 4 .5

1 3 ,7 2 2 .6

1 3 ,7 4 0 .5

1 3 ,7 7 4 .2

s e r v ic e s l......................................

4 ,4 6 1 .5

4 ,6 3 3 .4

4 ,6 1 2 .2

4 ,6 2 1 .7

4 ,6 2 4 .9

4 ,6 4 9 .4

4 ,6 7 5 .0

4 ,6 9 2 .0

4 ,7 0 8 .5

4 ,7 1 2 .5

4 ,7 1 8 .5

4 ,7 2 7 .6

4,7 3 9.1

4 ,7 5 3 .7

4 ,7 6 4 .8

O ffices of physicians...............

1 ,9 1 1 .2

1 ,9 8 2 .6

1 ,9 6 7 .9

1 ,9 7 1 .8

1 ,9 8 4 .7

1 ,9 9 3 .0

2 ,0 0 1 .3

2 ,0 0 9 .0

2 ,0 1 7 .7

2,0 2 2.1

2 ,0 2 3 .4

2 ,0 3 1 .5

2 ,0 3 7 .4

2 ,0 4 1 .7

2 ,0 4 5 .9
4 13.1

E ducational serv ice s .....................
H e alth care a n d social
a ss istan c e .......................................

13,791

A m bularory health care

O u tpatient c are c e n te rs ..........

3 9 9 .7

4 0 9 .7

409.1

4 0 7 .7

4 0 9 .3

4 0 9 .5

411.1

4 1 2 .2

4 1 2 .3

4 1 2 .2

4 1 2 .0

4 1 1 .8

4 12.1

4 1 2 .8

H o m e health c a re serv ice s...

6 3 8 .6

675.1

6 7 2 .8

678.1

6 7 2 .3

6 7 4 .5

6 8 1 .9

6 8 7 .9

6 8 9 .6

6 9 3 .0

6 9 4 .2

6 9 3 .0

6 9 8 .6

7 0 2 .9

7 0 5 .3

H o spitals.........................................

4 ,0 5 0 .9

4,1 5 3.1

4 ,1 4 1 .6

4 ,1 4 9 .7

4 ,1 5 9 .6

4 ,1 6 5 .4

4 ,1 7 3 .7

4 ,1 7 9 .0

4 ,1 8 7 .0

4 ,1 9 0 .4

4 ,1 9 7 .8

4 ,2 0 4 .7

4 ,2 1 0 .9

4 ,2 1 4 .0

4 ,2 1 8 .1

Nursing a n d residential
c a re fa c ilitie s l.............................

2 ,6 7 5 .8

2 ,7 4 3 .2

2 ,7 3 7 .0

2 ,7 3 9 .3

2 ,7 4 0 .8

2,7 4 6.1

2 ,7 5 1 .7

2,757.1

2 ,7 6 3 .4

2,7 6 6.1

2,7 7 0.1

2 ,7 7 0 .8

2 ,7 7 6 .4

2 ,7 8 4 .4

2 ,7 8 7 .9

Nursing care facilities..............

1 ,5 4 6 .8

1 ,5 7 3 .7

1 ,5 7 1.9

1 ,5 7 2 .4

1 ,5 7 3.4

1 ,5 7 5 .0

1 ,5 7 9 .6

1 ,5 8 0.8

1 ,5 8 0 .9

1 ,5 7 9 .2

1 ,5 8 2.0

1 ,5 8 2 .5

1 ,5 8 2 .7

1 ,5 8 6 .2

1 ,5 8 7 .0

Social assistance 1 .......................

1 ,9 4 5 .9

2 ,0 0 3 .5

1 ,9 9 7 .8

2 ,0 1 2 .7

2 ,0 0 6 .6

2 ,0 1 4 .5

2 ,0 0 1 .0

2 ,0 0 5 .2

2 ,0 0 7 .6

2 ,0 0 8 .5

2,0 1 8.1

2 ,0 1 9 .5

2 ,0 1 4.1

2,0 2 2.1

2 ,0 1 9 .9

Child d a y care serv ice s ...........

7 1 4 .6

7 3 4 .2

7 6 9 .3
1 1,9 18

7 4 0 .8
1 1,9 40

7 26 .2

727.1

1 1,9 75

1 2 ,0 3 2

7 2 5 .9
1 2,0 69

7 2 5 .2

11,9 69

7 4 3 .2
1 1 ,9 0 4

7 2 5 .7

1 2,0 36

7 3 0 .3
1 1,9 22

1 2,0 19

12,1 32

729
1 2 ,0 8 4

7 2 4 .5
1 2,0 50

7 2 4 .9
1 2 ,0 4 3

1 2 ,0 2 6

1 ,8 2 4 .4

1 ,7 7 8 .0

1 ,7 5 8 .3

1 ,7 4 9 .9

1 ,7 4 1 .4

1 ,7 5 1.2

1 ,7 7 2.9

1,790.1

1 ,8 0 6.2

1 ,8 1 7.8

1 ,8 3 5 .6

1 ,8 0 9 .5

1 ,7 8 1 .8

1 ,7 6 4 .8

1 ,7 5 9 .2

3 8 2 .3

3 5 7 .9

3 5 1 .9

342.1

3 3 0 .7

3 4 2 .9

3 5 3 .6

3 6 0 .9

369.1

3 6 7 .2

3 5 8 .7

3 5 8 .4

3 5 9 .0

3 5 6 .7

3 4 8 .8

Leisure and hospitality.........

7 2 4 .9

Arts, e n te rtain m e n t,
a n d re cre atio n ...............................
Perform ing arts a n d
spectator s ports..........................
M u s e u m s, historical sites,
zoos, a n d p a rk s ..........................

1 15 .0

1 12 .5

1 12 .9

1 13 .0

1 12 .0

110.7

1 11 .4

111 .2

1 11.2

110 .5

1 11.6

1 11 .2

1 09.9

1 08 .4

1 09 .8

1,327.1

1 ,3 0 7.6

1 ,2 9 3 .5

1 ,2 9 4 .8

1 ,2 9 8.7

1 ,2 9 7 .6

1 ,3 0 7.9

1 ,3 1 8.0

1 ,3 2 5 .9

1,340.1

1 ,3 6 5 .3

1 ,3 3 9.9

1 ,3 1 2 .9

1 ,2 9 9 .7

1 ,3 0 0 .0

1 0 ,2 1 1 .3

1 0 ,1 9 1 .2

1 0 ,1 6 4

1 0,1 54

1 0,1 76

1 0,1 89

1 0,202

1 0 ,2 4 2

1 0 ,2 6 3

10,201

1 0,2 96

1 0,2 75

1 0,2 68

1 0 ,2 7 9

1 0 ,2 6 7

1 ,8 5 2.2

1 ,7 7 9 .4

1 ,7 7 3 .9

1 ,7 6 7 .4

1,759.1

1 ,7 6 2 .4

1,7 7 8.2

1,789.1

1 ,8 0 2 .3

1 ,8 0 5.2

1 ,8 1 2 .0

1 ,8 0 1 .7

1 ,7 8 8 .4

1 ,7 6 9 .0

1 ,7 6 3 .6

8,3 5 9.1

8 ,4 1 1 .7

8 ,3 8 9 .8

8 ,3 8 6 .5

8 ,4 1 7 .3

8 ,4 2 6 .8

8 ,4 2 3 .5

8 ,4 5 2 .5

8 ,4 6 0 .6

8 ,3 9 5 .6

8,4 8 4.1

8,473.1

8 ,4 7 9 .3

8 ,5 0 9 .6

8 ,5 0 3 .1

A m u s em e n ts , gam bling, and
re cre atio n......................................
A c co m m od ations and
food s ervices.................................
A cco m m o d atio n s ..........................
Food services a n d drinking
p la c e s ............................................

Other services...................

5 ,2 5 8

5 ,3 4 8

5 ,3 5 8

5 ,3 5 5

5 ,3 3 0

5 ,3 4 0

5 ,3 4 6

5 ,3 4 3

5 ,3 5 2

5 ,3 3 3

5 ,3 3 4

5 ,3 2 9

5 ,3 2 3

5 ,3 2 2

5 ,3 2 0

R e p a ir and m a in te n a n c e ...........

1 ,2 5 6 .5

1 ,2 4 0 .6

1 ,2 4 3 .4

1 ,2 4 6 .5

1 ,2 4 0.0

1 ,2 3 7 .5

1 ,2 3 3 .4

1 ,2 3 0 .4

1 ,2 3 6 .3

1 ,2 2 4 .3

1 ,2 1 8 .6

1 ,2 1 5 .3

1 ,2 1 3 .8

1 ,2 1 5 .6

1,2 1 5.1

P ersonal a n d laundry services

1 ,2 5 5.0

1 ,2 4 6 .7

1 ,2 5 2 .4

1,251.1

1 ,2 4 7.0

1 ,2 4 7 .5

1 ,2 4 0.0

1 ,2 3 7.5

1 ,2 3 6.2

1 ,2 3 2 .7

1 ,2 3 5 .0

1 ,2 3 4 .8

1 ,2 2 9 .5

1 ,2 2 7.0

1 ,2 2 6 .3

o rg a n izatio n s..............................

2 ,7 4 6 .4

2 ,8 6 0 .7

2 ,8 6 2 .2

2 ,8 5 7 .6

2 ,8 4 3 .3

2 ,8 5 4 .8

2 ,8 7 1 .9

2 ,8 7 5 .3

2 ,8 7 9 .7

2 ,8 7 8 .2

2 ,8 7 9 .4

2 ,8 7 9 .0

2 ,8 8 0 .0

2 ,8 7 9.1

2 ,8 7 8 .7

Government......................

2 1 ,1 1 8

2 1 ,4 8 9

2 1 ,5 0 4

2 1 ,4 9 2

2 1 ,4 4 8

2 1 ,4 7 9

2 1 ,5 2 6

2 1 ,5 4 4

2 1 ,5 4 0

2 1 ,5 5 6

2 1 ,5 7 6

2 1 ,5 8 8

2 1 ,5 4 7

2 1 ,5 2 6

2 1 ,4 8 4

2 ,7 6 4

2 ,7 6 7

2 ,7 8 0

2 ,7 7 9

2,761

2 ,7 6 5

2 ,7 7 4

2,781

2 ,7 8 2

2 ,7 7 8

2 ,7 8 6

2,791

2 ,7 8 9

2 ,7 6 9

2,7 6 1

1 ,8 9 1 .0

1 ,9 2 2.5

1 ,9 0 9 .6

1 ,9 1 6 .6

1,920.1

1 ,9 2 6 .9

1 ,9 3 7.7

1 ,9 4 7 .5

1 ,9 5 4.2

1 ,9 5 6.4

1 ,9 6 0 .3

1 ,9 6 6 .2

1 ,9 6 4 .8

1 ,9 4 6 .0

1 ,9 3 7 .0

8 4 4 .8

8 7 0 .7

8 6 1 .9

8 4 0 .8

8 3 8 .4

836.1

8 3 3 .6

8 2 7 .3

8 2 1 .7

8 2 5 .3

8 2 4 .8

8 2 3 .9

8 2 3 .0

8 2 3 .6

5 ,0 2 3

5 ,0 1 9

5 ,0 1 5

5 ,0 1 3

4 ,9 9 3

4 ,9 8 4

4 ,9 8 3

4 ,9 8 4

4 ,9 7 4

4 ,9 7 9

4 ,9 5 8

4 ,9 5 2

4,9 4 1

M e m b e rs h ip associations and

F e d e ra l...............................................
F ed era l, e xcep t U .S . Postal
S e rv ic e ..........................................
U .S . Postal Service
S ta te ....................................................
E d u catio n .......................................

1

8 7 3 .0
4 ,9 0 5

5 ,0 0 6

2 ,1 1 2 .9

2 ,2 1 8 .8

2 ,2 3 1 .0

2 ,2 3 4 .3

2 ,2 3 6 .4

2 ,2 3 2 .5

2 ,2 1 2 .5

2 ,2 0 3 .0

2 ,2 0 3 .0

2 ,2 0 2 .5

2 ,1 9 6 .8

2,2 0 5.1

2 ,1 8 8 .7

2 ,1 5 6 .5

2 ,1 8 0 .8

2 ,7 9 1 .8

2 ,7 8 7 .4

2,2 9 2.1

2 ,7 8 4 .3

2 .7 7 8 .8

2 ,7 8 0 .3

2 ,7 8 0 .5

2 ,7 8 0 .8

2 ,7 8 0 .0

2 ,7 8 1 .0

2 ,7 7 7 .3

2 ,7 7 3 .4

2 ,7 6 9 .7

2 ,7 6 5 .3

2 ,7 5 9 .9

L o cal....................................................

1 3,4 49

1 3 ,7 1 6

13,701

1 3 ,6 9 4

13,6 72

13,701

1 3,7 59

1 3,7 79

1 3 ,7 7 5

1 3 ,7 9 4

1 3,8 16

1 3 ,8 1 8

1 3 ,8 0 0

1 3 ,8 0 5

1 3 ,7 8 2

E d ucation.......................................

7 ,4 7 9 .3

7 ,6 5 7 .2

7 ,6 3 9 .3

7 ,6 4 8 .2

7 ,6 6 1 .3

7 ,6 7 3 .7

7 ,6 8 3 .9

7 ,6 9 1 .5

7 ,6 9 7 .0

7,698.1

7 ,7 0 8 .5

7 ,7 1 2 .4

7 ,6 9 3 .6

7 ,7 0 3 .5

7 ,6 8 9.1

O th e r local g o v ern m e n t.............

5 ,9 7 0 .0

6 ,0 5 8 .5

6 ,0 6 1 .7

6 ,0 4 6 .2

6 ,0 1 1 .0

6 ,0 2 7 .3

6,075.1

6 ,0 8 7 .7

6 ,0 7 7 .9

6 ,0 9 5 .8

6 ,1 0 7 .6

6 ,1 0 5 .7

6 ,1 0 6 .5

6,1 0 1.1

6 ,0 9 2 .6

D a ta include o th e r industries, not shown separately.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

N o t e : D a ta reflect the conversion to th e 2 0 0 2 version of the North A m erican industry
Classification System (N A IC S ), replacing the Standard Industrial Classification (S IC ) system .
N A IC S -b as ed d a ta by industry are not com parable with S IC -b a se d data. S e e "N otes on the
data" for a description of the m ost recent benchm ark revision.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

55

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

13. A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs o f p r o d u c t io n o r n o n s u p e rv is o ry w o rk e rs o n p riv a t e n o n fa r m p a y ro lls , b y in d u stry, m o n th ly
d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju s t e d
In d u s try

2002

A n n u a l a v e ra g e
2001

TOTAL PRIVATE..........................

2002

M ay

June

J u ly

Aug.

2003

Sept

O ct.

Nov.

D ec.

Jan.

Feb.

M a r.

A p r.

M ay

34.0

33.9

33.9

34.0

33.8

33.9

33.9

33 .8

33.8

33 .8

33.8

33.7

33 .8

3 3 .7

33.7

GOODS-PRODUCING1.......................

39.9

39.9

39.9

40.1

39.8

39.9

40.0

39 .7

39.7

39 .8

40 .0

39.6

39 .9

3 9 .5

39 .7

N a tu ra l re s o u rc e s a n d m in in g ..................

44 .6

43.2

43 .2

43 .4

43.0

43 .3

4 3 .0

43.0

42 .3

43.0

43.1

4 3 .3

44.2

4 3 .4

43 .8

C o n s tru c tio n ....................................................

38.7

38 .4

38.2

38.5

38.2

38.5

38.7

38.2

38.0

38.2

38.9

37 .6

38.7

37 .9

38.5

M a n u fa c tu rin g .................................................

40 .3

40 5

40 6

40 7

40 4

40 8

O v e r tim e h o u rs ...........................................

4.0

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.3

4 .3

4 .4

4 .3

4.1

4.0

4.0

D u ra b le g o o d s ..................................................

40 .6

40 .8

40 .8

41.0

40 .6

40 .7

40.8

40 .6

40 .6

40 .9

40.8

40.7

40.6

4 0 .3

40 .6

4 .3

4 .4

4.3

4.1

4 .0

4.1

O v e r tim e h o u rs ...........................................

3.9

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.3

4.3

W o o d p ro d u c ts ...............................................

40.2

39.9

39 9

40 0

39 8

39 8

89 9
41 9

39 §

N o n m e ta llic m in e ra l p ro d u c ts ................

41 .6

42.0

42.0

42.6

42 1

42.1

39 9
42.0

P rim a ry m e ta ls ...............................................

4 2 .4

42 .4

42 .6

42.8

42.2

42 .3

42.1

42 .4

42.2

42.6

4 2 .4

4 2 .5

42 .6

4 2 .2

42 .3

F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts .......................

40 .6

40 .6

40 .7

40.8

40 .7

40 .7

4 0 .7

40 .6

4 0 .4

40 .5

40.6

4 0 .5

40 .5

4 0 .3

40 .7

M a c h in e r y ........................................................

40 .9

40 .5

40 .6

40.7

40 .5

40 .6

4 0 .5

40 .5

40 .6

40 .5

40 .5

4 0 .9

40 .5

4 0 .6

40 .7

C o m p u te r a n d e le c tro n ic p ro d u c ts .......

39.8

39.7

39.7

40 .0

39 .3

39.6

4 0 .3

39 .3

40.2

40 .5

39.9

39.8

40 .3

40.1

4 0 .6

E le c tric a l e q u ip m e n t a n d a p p lia n c e s ..

39.8

40.1

40.2

40.6

40.0

40.2

40.0

39 .9

40 .2

40.6

40 .3

4 0 .8

40 .6

4 0 .0

4 0 .4

T ra n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t....................... .

41 .9

4 2 .5

42 .7

42 .7

42.0

42 .4

4 2 .6

42 .4

42.2

4 2 .4

42 .5

42.2

4 1 .4

4 1 .2

41 .2

F u rn itu re a n d re la te d products

38 .3

39.2

39.3

39.1

39.3

38.8

38.8

38.7

38.7

39.9

38.8

38.6

38.2

3 7 .9

38.3

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g ................

38.8

38.6

38.6

39.3

38.5

38 .4

38.5

38.8

38.6

38.8

38.9

3 8 .6

38 .3

38.0

38.1

N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ..........................................

39.1
4.1

40.1
4 .2

4 .3
4 .3

4.3
4 .3

4.2

4.3
4.3

4.1

4.1
4.1

4.2
4.2

4 .4

4 .3
4 .3

4.2
4.2

3.9

4.4

4.3
4.3

4.1

4.2

4.1

4.0
3 9 .4

O v e r tim e h o u rs ...........................................
F o o d m a n u fa c tu rin g ....................................

39 .6

39.6

4 .3

39.7

39.8

39.6

39.6

39.4

39 .4

39 .5

39 .4

39.1

39.1

39.6

3 9 .4

B e v e r a g e a n d to b a c c o p ro d u c ts ...........

40.9

39.4

39.0

39.5

39.7

39 .4

3 7 .9

39 .4

39.0

38.5

39 .3

39.3

39 .4

3 9 .6

39.0

T e x tile m ills .....................................................

4 0 .0

4 0 .7

41.1

40 .9

40 .8

40 .5

40.2

40.0

40.1

40 .4

39.2

40 .0

39.5

39.1

38 .5

A p p a r e l..............................................................

36.0

36.7

36.9

37.1

37.2

36.9

3 6 .9

35.8

36.5

36.3

36.2

36.0

35.9

3 5 .6

35 .4

L e a th e r a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts ....................

36 .4

3 7 .5

‘ 37.1

37.2

37.2

37.9

37.9

38.5

38.9

39.0

39.3

3 9 .4

39.7

39.3

39.1

P a p e r a n d p a p e r p ro d u c ts .......................

42.1

4 1 .9

42.2

4 2 .0

41 .8

41 .9

41.8

4 1 .5

4 1 .5

41.8

41 .6

41 .8

4 1 .8

41 .6

4 1 .4

P rin tin g a n d re la te d su p p o rt
a c tiv itie s ..........................................................

38.7

3 8 .4

38.5

38.6

38.2

38.5

3 8 .4

3 8 .5

38.4

38.5

38.5

38.3

3 8 .5

38.0

37.9

P e tro le u m a n d c o al p ro d u c ts ..................

4 3 .8

43.0

4 2 .7

43.1

42 .7

42 .7

42 .9

43.5

4 3 .6

44.0

43 .9

45.1

4 5 .8

44 .3

44 .2

C h e m ic a ls ........................................................

4 1 .9

4 2 .3

42.2

4 2 .4

42.2

42 .5

42 .5

4 2 .5

4 2 .6

4 2 .3

42 .3

42 .8

4 2 .7

4 2 .4

41 .9

P la s tic s a n d ru b e r p ro d u c ts .....................

40.0

4 0 .6

4 0 .8

40 .9

40 .6

40 .7

4 0 .4

4 0 .5

4 0 .3

40.3

40.2

40 .3

40.2

40 .0

40 .3

32.5

3 2 .5

32.5

32 .5

32 .4

32 .5

32.6

32.5

32.5

32.5

32 .4

32 .4

3 2 .5

3 2 .4

32 .4

u tilitie s .............................................................

33.5

33.6

33.7

33.7

33 .5

33.5

33.7

33.6

33.6

33.5

33 .5

33.6

3 3 .6

33.6

33 .7

W h o le s a le tr a d e ..............................................

3 8 .4

38.0

38.0

38.2

37 .9

38.0

38.0

3 7 .8

37.9

3 7 .8

37 .6

37 .7

3 7 .8

37.8

37.8

R e ta il tr a d e ........................................................

30.7

3 0 .9

31.0

31.0

30 .9

30.8

30.9

30.9

30.8

30 .8

30.8

30 .7

3 0 .9

30.8

30.8

P R IV A T E S E R V IC E P R O V ID IN G 2 ................................................
T ra d e , tra n s p o rta tio n , an d

T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d w a re h o u s in g ........... .

36.7

3 6 .8

36.8

36.8

36 .6

36.6

37.1

3 6 .9

37.0

37.0

36.9

36 .7

3 6 .8

3 6 .5

36 .5

U tilitie s ..................................................................

4 1 .4

4 0 .9

41.1

4 1 .0

40 .8

40 .9

41 .0

41.0

41.1

41.2

41.2

41.2

4 1 .4

41 .0

40 .9

In fo rm a tio n ........................................................

36.9

3 6 .5

36.7

36.8

36.4

36.4

3 6 .3

36.5

36.6

36 .4

35.9

36.2

3 6 .3

36.2

36 .4

F in a n c ia l a c tiv itie s ........................................

35.8

3 5 .6

35.6

35.6

35 .5

35.6

35.6

3 5 .5

35.6

35 .7

35.6

35 .6

3 5 .6

35.5

35 .6

32 .5

3 2 .5

32.5

32.5

31 .9

3 1 .9

31 .8

31.8

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d b u s in e s s
s e rv ic e s ............................................................

34.2

34.2

342

342

34 0

34 ?

E d u c a tio n a n d h e a lth s e rv ic e s ................

32.3

3 2 .4

3 2 .4

32.5

32 .4

32.6

32.5

3 2 .5

32.5

32 .4

32.5

L e is u re a n d h o s p ita lity ...............................

2 5 .8

25 .8

2 5 .7

25 7

25 6

25 7

25 9

25 9

25 9

25 8

25 8

O th e r s e rv ic e s ..................................................

3 2 .3

32.0

32.0

32.1

32.0

32.0

32.1

32.0

32.0

31.9

31 .8

1 D a ta re la te to p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs in n a tu ra l re s o u rc e s a n d m ining a n d m a n u ­

84 p

try C la ss ifica tio n S y s te m (N A IC S ), re p la c in g th e S ta n d a rd industrial C la s s ific a tio n

fa c tu rin g a n d to co n stru ctio n w o rk e rs in c o nstruction .

(S IC ) s y s te m .

2 D a ta re la te to n o n s u p e rvis o ry w o rk e rs .

d a ta . S e e "N o te s on th e d a ta " for a d e sc rip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a rk

N O T E : D a ta re fle c t th e c o n ve rs io n to th e 2 0 0 2 v e rs io n o f th e N o rth A m e ric a n Indus

revisio n .

56
Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

N A IC S -b a s e d d a ta by industry a re n o t c o m p a ra b le w ith S IC -b a s e d

14. A v e r a g e h ou rly e a rn in g s of p ro d u c tio n or n o n su p e rviso ry w o rk ers o n p riv a te n o n fa rm p a yro lls, b y industry,
m o n th ly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d
2003

2002

Annual average
Industry
2001

2002

May

Jun e

July

Aug

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr

May

C u rre n t d o llars .....................................

$ 1 4 .5 3

$ 1 4 .9 5

$ 1 4 .8 6

$ 1 4 .9 3

$ 1 4 .9 7

$ 1 5 .0 2

$ 1 5 .0 5

$ 1 5 .1 0

$ 1 5 .1 4

$ 1 5 .2 0

$ 1 5 .2 2

$ 1 5 .2 9

$ 1 5 .2 9

$ 1 5 .3 0

$ 1 5 .3 5

C o n s ta n t (1 9 8 2 ) d o llars ....................

8.11

8 .2 4

8.21

8 .2 3

8 .2 3

8 .4 2

8 .4 2

8 .2 6

8 .2 7

8 .3 0

8 .2 8

8 .2 6

8 .2 2

8 .2 7

8.31

GOODS-PRODUCING1....................

1 5.7 8

1 6 .3 3

1 6 .2 5

1 6.2 9

16.31

1 6 .3 8

1 6.4 4

1 6.4 8

1 6 .5 2

1 6.6 0

1 6 .6 3

1 6 .6 5

1 6 .6 8

16.71

1 6 .7 6

Natural resources and mining.........

1 7.0 0

1 7 .2 2

1 7 .1 7

1 7 .1 7

1 7.1 6

1 7 .2 7

1 7.2 9

17.21

1 7 .4 8

1 7 .3 7

1 7 .4 5

1 7 .4 5

1 7 .5 4

1 7 .6 7

1 7 .5 5

1 8.0 0

18.51

1 8.4 2

1 8 .4 5

1 8 .5 5

1 8 .5 7

1 8.6 5

1 8.6 6

1 8.69

18.81

1 8 .7 7

1 8.8 4

1 8 .8 3

1 8 .9 0

1 8 .9 5

Manufacturing.............................

1 4.7 6

1 5.2 9

1 5 .2 3

1 5.2 7

1 5.2 7

1 5 .3 4

1 5 .3 8

1 5 .4 5

1 5 .4 8

1 5 .5 5

1 5 .5 9

1 5 .6 3

1 5 .6 4

1 5 .6 3

1 5 .6 8

E xcluding o v e rtim e ...............................

1 4 .0 6

1 4 .5 4

1 4 .4 8

1 4.5 2

1 4.5 2

1 4 .5 8

1 4.6 2

1 4 .6 8

1 4 .7 0

1 4 .7 7

1 4 .7 8

1 4 .8 4

1 4 .8 8

1 4 .8 9

1 4 .9 2

D u ra b le g o o d s ..............................................

1 5 .3 8

16.01

1 5.9 6

1 5.9 9

1 5 .9 7

1 6 .0 8

1 6.1 2

1 6.1 9

1 6.2 5

1 6 .2 8

1 6 .3 3

1 6 .3 5

1 6 .3 4

1 6 .3 3

1 6 .3 7

N o n d u ra b le g o o d s ......................................

1 3 .7 5

1 4 .1 5

1 4.0 9

14.1 3

1 4.1 7

1 4.1 9

1 4.2 2

1 4.2 9

1 4.2 9

14.41

1 4 .4 4

1 4 .5 0

1 4 .5 5

1 4.5 6

14.61

PRIVATE SERVICEPROVIDING2...............................

1 4.1 6

1 4.5 6

1 4.4 7

1 4.5 4

1 4.59

1 4 .6 3

1 4.6 7

1 4.7 2

1 4.7 6

14.81

1 4.8 2

1 4.9 2

14.91

14.91

1 4 .9 7

1 3.7 0

1 4.0 2

1 3.9 6

14.01

14.01

1 4.0 6

1 4.1 0

1 4.1 3

1 4.1 7

1 4.1 9

14.21

1 4.2 9

1 4 .2 6

1 4 .2 4

14.31

1 6 .7 7

1 6 .9 7

1 6.9 4

1 6.9 4

1 6.9 5

1 7.0 2

1 7 .0 5

1 7.0 9

1 7 .1 4

1 7 .1 3

1 7 .1 6

1 7 .2 5

1 7 .2 2

1 7 .2 5

1 7 .2 9

1 1.2 9

1 1 .6 7

11.61

1 1.6 6

1 1.6 7

11.71

1 1 .7 5

1 1 .7 7

1 1.7 9

1 1 .8 3

1 1 .8 5

1 1 .8 8

1 1 .8 5

1 1 .8 3

1 1 .8 9

Tran sp o rtatlo n a n d w a re h o u s in g .........

1 5 .3 3

1 5.7 7

1 5.6 9

1 5.7 6

1 5 .7 8

1 5 .8 0

1 5 .8 3

1 5.9 2

1 6.0 2

1 6.0 2

1 6 .0 5

1 6.2 2

1 6 .2 2

1 6 .1 8

1 6 .2 5

U tilities...........................................................

2 3 .5 8

2 3 .9 4

2 3 .8 5

2 3 .9 9

2 3 .9 5

2 4 .0 8

2 4 .0 9

2 3 .9 6

2 4 .0 2

2 4 .0 9

2 4 .0 5

2 4 .1 9

2 4 .3 6

2 4 .3 3

2 4 .4 8

TOTAL PRIVATE

Trade,transportation, and
utilities..............................
W h o le s a le tr a d e ..........................................

Information.................................

1 9.8 0

2 0 .2 3

20.1 1

2 0 .3 2

2 0 .2 0

2 0 .1 3

2 0 .4 3

2 0 .4 9

2 0 .5 5

2 0 .7 4

2 0 .7 0

2 0 .7 9

2 0 .9 0

2 0 .9 7

2 1 .0 9

1 5.5 9

1 6 .1 7

1 5.9 9

1 6.1 0

16.21

1 6 .3 4

1 6.40

16.51

16.51

1 6.5 6

1 6 .6 9

1 6 .7 7

1 6 .7 8

1 6 .9 3

1 7 .0 2

1 6 .3 3

16.81

1 6 .6 7

1 6.7 8

1 6.8 8

1 6.8 6

1 6.8 9

1 6.9 9

1 7.0 4

1 7.0 9

1 7.0 2

1 7 .1 7

1 7 .2 0

1 7 .2 3

1 7 .2 4

1 4 .6 4

1 5.2 2

1 5.0 9

1 5 .1 5

1 5 .2 3

1 5 .3 3

1 5.3 6

1 5.4 2

1 5.4 5

1 5.5 2

1 5 .5 7

15.61

1 5 .6 3

1 5 .5 7

1 5 .6 4

8 .3 5

8 .5 7

8 .5 4

8 .5 6

8 .5 9

8 .6 0

9.61

8 .6 2

8 .6 6

8 .7 3

8.71

8 .7 7

8 .7 2

8.71

8 .7 3

1 3 .2 7

1 3 .7 2

1 3.62

1 3.6 9

1 3.7 5

1 3 .8 0

13.81

1 3.86

1 3.89

1 3 .9 4

1 3 .9 8

1 4 .0 3

1 4 .0 2

1 3 .9 8

1 3 .9 7

Professional and business
Education and health

Other services............................

1 D a ta re la te to production w orkers in natural resources and mining a nd m anufac­

dustry Classification S ystem

turing a n d to constructio n w orkers in construction.

system . N A IC S -b as ed d a ta by Industry a re not com p ara b le with S IC -b a s e d data.

2 D a ta re la te to nonsupervisory w orkers.

S e e "N otes on the data" for a description of th e m ost recent ben ch m a rk revision. D ash indicates

NO TE:

d a ta not available.

D a ta reflect th e conversion to the 2 0 0 2 version of the North A m erican in-


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

(N A IC S ), replacing the S ta n d ard Industrial Classification

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

(S IC )

57

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

15. A v e r a g e h o u rly e a r n in g s o f p r o d u c t io n o r n o n s u p e rv is o ry w o rk e rs o n p riv a t e n o n fa r m p a y ro lls , b y in d u stry
A n n u a l a ve rag e

2002

Industry

2001
T O T A L P R IVA TE ...........................

$ 1 4 .5 3

Seasonally adjusted.......................
G O O D S -PR O D U CIN G 1 .............................
Natural re so u rces and mining

2002
$ 1 4 .9 5

-

-

1 5 .7 8

1 6 .3 3

1 7 .0 0

1 7 .2 2

M ay

Ju n e

J u ly

Aug.

$ 1 4 .8 3

$ 1 4 .8 8

$ 1 4 .8 6

$ 1 4 .9 2

1 4 .8 6

1 4 .9 3

1 4 .9 7

1 5 .0 2

S ept.

2003
O ct.

N ov.

Dec.

Ja n .

F eb .

Mar.

A p r.

M ay

$ 1 5 .1 1

$ 1 5 .1 2

$ 1 5 .1 6

$ 1 5 .2 6

$ 1 5 .2 7

$ 1 5 .3 5

$ 1 5 .3 4

$ 1 5 .3 1

$ 1 5 .3 0

1 5 .0 5

1 5 .1 0

1 5 .1 4

1 5 .2 0

1 5 .2 2

1 5 .2 9

1 5 .2 9

1 5 .3 0

1 5 .3 5

1 6 .2 0

1 6 .2 7

1 6 .3 7

1 6 .4 2

1 6 .5 3

1 6 .5 5

1 6 .5 5

1 6 .6 6

1 6 .5 6

1 6 .5 4

1 6 .5 9

1 6 .6 6

1 6.7 1

1 7 .1 3

1 7 .1 0

1 7 .1 8

1 7 .1 8

1 7 .3 2

1 7 .2 5

1 7 .4 5

1 7 .4 0

1 7 .4 9

1 7 .4 3

1 7 .5 8

1 7 .7 6

1 7 .5 3

C o n stru ctio n ............................................

1 8 .0 0

18.51

18.3 1

1 8 .3 8

1 8 .6 0

1 8 .6 4

1 8 .7 9

1 8 .7 9

1 8 .7 0

1 8 .9 0

1 8 .6 8

1 8 .6 9

1 8 .7 3

1 8 .8 3

1 8 .8 5

M anufacturing.........................................

1 4 .7 6

1 5 .2 9

1 5 .2 0

1 5 .2 4

1 5 .2 3

1 5 .3 0

1 5.41

1 5 .4 5

1 5.51

1 5 .6 5

15.6 1

1 5 .6 2

1 5 .6 2

1 5 .6 3

1 5 .6 4

Durable goods.......................................

1 5 .3 8

16.0 1

1 5 .9 2

1 5 .9 7

1 5 .8 8

1 6 .0 4

1 6 .1 6

1 6 .2 0

1 6 .2 9

1 6 .3 9

1 6 .3 4

1 6 .3 4

1 6 .3 3

1 6 .3 0

Wood products...................................

1 6 .3 4

1 2 .4 9

1 2 .3 3

1 2 .2 7

1 2 .3 3

1 2 .4 4

1 2 .4 2

1 2 .4 2

1 2 .3 7

1 2 .4 3

1 2 .4 9

1 2 .5 2

12.5 1

1 2.5 1

Nonmetallic mineral products..........

1 2 .4 8

1 2 .5 6

1 4 .8 6

1 5 .3 9

1 5 .7 2

1 5 .3 7

1 5 .4 7

1 5 .5 3

1 5 .4 4

1 5 .5 4

1 5 .5 9

1 5 .4 6

1 5 .5 5

1 5 .6 2

1 5 .4 8

Primary m etals...................................

1 5 .5 2

1 5 .6 9

1 7 .0 6

1 7 .6 8

1 7 .5 5

1 7 .6 2

1 7 .8 3

1 7 .6 9

1 7 .8 4

1 7 .9 3

1 7 .9 9

1 8 .0 9

1 8 .0 5

1 7 .9 6

1 7 .8 6

1 8 .0 3

1 7 .9 7

Fabricated metal products................
M achinery..........................................

1 4 .1 9

1 4 .6 8

14.61

1 4 .6 5

1 4 .7 0

1 4 .7 0

1 4 .7 9

1 4 .7 8

1 4 .8 5

1 4 .9 7

1 4 .9 5

1 4 .9 2

1 4 .9 7

1 4 .9 4

1 4 .9 3

1 5 .4 9

1 5 .9 3

1 5 .8 6

15.9 1

1 5 .8 9

1 5 .9 2

1 6 .0 5

1 5 .9 7

1 6 .0 6

1 6 .2 0

16.11

1 6 .1 6

1 6 .1 9

Computer and electronic products ...

1 6 .2 0

1 6 .2 4

1 5 .4 2

1 6 .1 9

1 6 .1 6

1 6 .2 4

1 6 .3 2

1 6.31

1 6 .3 4

1 6 .2 4

1 6 .2 6

16.4 1

1 6 .3 2

1 6 .5 5

1 6 .5 5

Electrical equipment and appliances

1 6 .5 9

1 6 .5 8

1 3 .7 8

1 3 .9 7

1 3 .8 9

1 3 .9 0

1 3 .9 4

1 3 .9 6

1 4 .0 4

1 4 .0 2

1 4 .0 3

1 4 .1 6

1 4 .0 8

1 4 .1 8

1 4 .2 5

1 4 .2 5

1 4 .2 5

Transportation equipm ent................

1 9 .4 8

2 0 .6 4

2 0 .4 1

2 0 .4 8

2 0 .0 4

2 0 .6 1

2 0 .8 3

2 1 .1 3

2 1 .4 1

2 1 .4 2

2 1 .2 2

2 1 .1 6

2 1 .0 7

2 0 .9 4

2 1 .0 8

Furniture and related products.........

1 2 .1 4

1 2 .6 2

1 2 .4 9

1 2 .5 9

1 2 .6 7

1 2 .7 5

1 2 .7 7

1 2 .7 4

1 2 .7 9

1 2 .9 3

1 2 .9 3

12.9 1

1 2 .9 3

1 2 .8 9

1 2 .8 8

Miscellaneous manufacturing..........

1 2 .4 6

12.9 1

1 2 .8 2

1 2 .8 7

1 2 .9 9

1 2 .9 9

1 3 .0 5

1 3.01

1 3 .0 6

1 3 .0 8

1 3 .1 2

1 3 .1 4

1 3 .2 2

1 3 .2 0

1 3 .1 9

Nondurable goods................................

1 3 .7 5

1 4 .1 5

1 4 .0 5

1 4 .0 9

1 4 .2 3

1 4 .1 5

1 4 .2 5

1 4 .2 7

1 4.31

1 4 .4 8

1 4 .4 7

1 4 .4 9

1 4 .5 3

1 4 .5 7

1 4 .5 5

Food manufacturing..........................

1 2 .1 8

1 2 .5 4

1 2 .4 6

1 2 .5 3

1 2 .6 7

1 2 .5 8

12.6 1

1 2 .6 6

12.61

1 2.81

1 2 .7 0

1 2 .6 6

1 2 .7 0

1 2 .7 2

1 2 .7 1

Beverages and tobacco products....

1 7 .6 7

1 7 .6 8

17.8 1

1 7 .7 4

17.7 1

1 7 .4 0

17.6 1

1 7 .6 2

1 7 .6 0

1 8 .0 4

1 7 .6 8

1 7 .5 3

1 7 .6 9

1 7 .7 0

1 7 .9 4

Textile m ills........................................

1 1 .4 0

1 1 .7 3

1 1 .7 2

1 1 .7 2

1 1 .8 2

1 1 .8 0

1 1 .7 6

1 1 .7 0

1 1.71

1 1 .8 3

1 1 .9 9

1 1 .9 2

1 1 .9 2

1 1 .9 5

1 1 .9 6

Textile product m ills..........................

1 0 .6 0

1 0 .9 6

1 0 .9 9

1 0 .9 0

1 1 .0 8

1 1 .0 9

11.11

1 1 .0 2

1 1 .0 7

1 1 .2 0

1 1 .1 2

1 1.11

1 0 .9 8

1 1 .1 4

A p p a rel...............................................

1 1 .1 0

8 .8 2

9 .1 0

9 .0 7

9 .0 5

9 .1 4

9 .1 3

9 .1 6

9 .1 5

9 .1 9

9 .3 0

9 .3 0

9 .3 3

9 .4 5

9 .4 7

9 .4 8

Leather and allied products.............

1 0 .6 9

11.0 1

1 0 .9 7

10.91

11.1 1

1 1 .0 0

1 0 .8 7

11.0 1

1 1 .2 3

11.5 1

1 1 .5 3

1 1 .6 2

1 1 .6 2

Paper and paper products................

1 1 .7 6

1 1 .6 9

1 6 .3 8

1 6 .8 9

1 6 .8 5

1 6 .8 9

1 7 .1 3

1 6 .9 2

1 7 .0 9

1 7 .0 9

1 7 .0 9

1 7 .2 6

17.2 1

1 7 .2 2

1 7 .2 2

1 7 .3 8

1 7 .3 9

Printing and related support activities

1 4 .4 8

1 4 .9 3

1 4 .7 8

1 4 .7 8

1 4 .8 5

15.01

1 5 .1 5

1 5 .1 5

1 5 .1 9

1 5 .3 5

1 5 .2 8

1 5 .3 2

1 5 .3 3

1 5 .3 5

1 5 .2 6

Petroleum and coal products...........

2 2 .9 0

2 3 .0 6

2 2 .4 8

2 2 .7 8

2 2 .8 8

2 2 .9 7

2 3 .3 3

2 3 .4 6

2 3 .3 5

2 3 .6 5

2 3 .5 8

2 4 .2 9

2 4 .1 7

2 3 .9 2

2 3 .3 9

C h e m ica ls...........................................

1 7 .5 7

1 7 .9 7

1 7 .7 3

1 7 .9 0

1 8 .0 2

1 7 .9 4

1 8.11

1 8 .0 0

1 8 .2 9

1 8 .3 4

1 8 .2 8

1 8 .2 9

1 8 .3 3

1 8 .3 5

1 8.4 1

Plastics and rubber products............

13.21

1 3 .5 5

1 3 .4 5

1 3 .4 3

1 3 .5 9

1 3 .5 2

1 3 .6 2

1 3 .6 6

1 3 .7 0

1 3.81

1 3.91

1 3 .9 5

1 4 .0 0

1 4 .0 7

1 4 .0 8

1 4 .1 6

1 4 .5 6

1 4 .4 4

1 4 .4 9

1 4 .4 4

1 4 .4 9

1 4.71

1 4 .7 2

1 4 .7 7

1 4 .8 8

1 4 .9 2

1 5 .0 4

1 5 .0 0

1 4 .9 4

1 4 .9 2

P RIVA TE SE R V IC E ­
PROVIDING? ..................................
Trade, transportation and
utilities....................................................

1 3 .7 0

1 4 .0 2

1 3 .9 6

1 3 .9 9

1 3 .9 2

1 3 .9 8

1 4 .1 7

1 4 .1 3

1 4 .1 2

1 4 .1 2

1 4 .2 4

1 4 .3 6

1 4 .3 4

1 4.3 1

1 4 .2 8

Wholesale tra d e ...................................

1 6 .7 7

1 6 .9 7

1 6 .9 0

1 6 .9 3

1 6 .8 9

1 6 .9 4

1 7 .1 2

1 7 .0 5

1 7 .1 4

1 7 .2 2

1 7 .1 8

1 7 .3 2

1 7 .2 9

1 7 .2 6

1 7 .2 3

Retail tra d e ..........................................

1 1 .2 9

1 1 .6 7

1 1 .6 2

1 1 .6 5

1 1 .6 0

1 1 .6 4

11.8 1

1 1 .7 8

1 1 .7 3

1 1 .7 6

1 1 .8 8

1 1 .9 2

1 1 .9 0

1 1 .9 0

1 1 .8 8

Transportation and w arehousing....

1 5 .3 3

1 5 .7 7

1 5 .6 6

1 5 .7 4

1 5 .7 5

1 5 .7 9

1 5 .8 6

1 5 .9 4

1 6 .0 3

1 6 .0 4

1 6 .0 2

1 6 .2 6

1 6 .2 3

1 6 .2 1

1 6 .1 9

Utilities..................................................

2 3 .5 8

2 3 .9 4

2 3 .8 8

2 3 .9 3

2 3 .7 8

2 3 .8 4

2 4 .2 8

2 3 .9 3

2 4 .1 2

2 4 .2 6

2 4 .0 2

2 4 .1 6

2 4 .4 1

2 4 .4 7

1 9 .8 0

2 0 .2 3

2 0 .0 2

2 0 .2 2

2 0 .0 0

2 0 .0 0

2 0 .5 6

2 0 .5 9

2 0 .6 7

2 0 .9 0

2 0 .7 9

2 0 .8 8

2 0 .8 8

2 0 .9 8

1 5 .5 9

1 6 .1 7

1 5 .9 8

1 6 .1 0

1 6 .0 7

1 6 .2 5

1 6 .4 7

1 6 .4 8

1 6 .4 9

1 6 .6 4

1 6 .7 0

1 6 .9 5

1 6 .8 9

1 6 .9 3

1 6 .9 6

1 6 .3 3

16.81

1 6 .5 9

1 6 .8 2

1 6 .7 7

1 6 .6 8

16.9 1

1 6 .8 9

1 7.01

1 7 .2 8

1 7 .1 4

1 7 .4 0

1 7 .3 6

1 7 .2 1

1 7 .1 9

1 5 .5 9

Financial a ctivities...........................

2 4 .5 5
2 1 .0 2

P ro fessional and b u s in e s s
se rv ic e s..................................................
E ducation and health
se rv ic e s..................................................

1 4 .6 4

1 5 .2 2

1 5 .0 2

1 5 .1 2

1 5 .2 3

15.3 1

1 5 .3 9

1 5 .4 2

1 5 .4 2

1 5 .4 6

1 5 .5 5

1 5.61

1 5.6 1

1 5 .5 6

Leisure and h o sp ita lity .........................

8 .3 5

8 .5 7

8 .5 4

8 .5 1

8 .4 9

8 .5 2

8 .6 2

8 .6 5

8 .6 9

8.81

8 .7 4

8 .8 0

8 .7 3

8 .6 9

8 .7 1

Other se rv ic e s.........................................

1 3 .2 7

1 3 .7 2

1 3 .6 6

1 3 .7 0

1 3 .6 8

1 3 .7 4

1 3 .8 4

1 3 .8 6

1 3 .8 8

14.0 1

1 4 .0 0

1 4 .0 2

1 4 .0 2

1 3 .9 9

1 3 .9 9

1 D a ta re la te to p ro d u c tio n w o rke rs in n a tu ra l re s o u rc e s a n d m ining a n d m a n u fa ctu rin g a n d

N A IC S -b a s e d d a ta by in d u sty a re n o t c o m p a ra b le w ith S IC -b a s e d d a ta . S e e

to c o n s tru c tio n w o rk e rs in c onstruction .

"N o te s on th e d a ta " fo r a d e sc rip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a rk re v is io n .

2 D a ta re la te to n o n s u p e rvis o ry w o rk e rs .

C la s s ific a tio n S y s te m (N A IC S ), re p la c in g th e S ta n d a rd Ind u s trial C la s s ific a tio n
(S IC ) s ystem .

N o t e : D a ta re fle c t th e c o n v e rs io n to th e 2 0 0 2 v ers io n o f th e N o rth A m e ric a n Industry

58

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta not a v a ila b le .

16. A v e r a g e w e e k ly ea rn in g s o f p ro d u c tio n or non supervisory w orkers o n private n on farm p ayrolls, b y industry
2003

2002

A n n u a l a v e ra g e

7 7 1 .3 2

7 08.01

7 3 1 .3 8

629.71

6 4 4 .7 8

6 2 5 .9 6

6 2 6 .3 6

6 2 9 .4 9

6 2 3 .6 4

6 2 8 .7 3

6 6 4 .6 3

6 8 1 .8 2

6 6 1 .7 7

6 6 0 .1 4

6 6 3 .0 0

6 5 5 .2 6

6 6 3 .4 0

4 9 7 .2 7

4 9 0 .9 9

4 9 9 .6 0

4 9 0 .7 8

4 9 0 .3 9

4 9 7 .9 0

4 9 7 .9 5

504 .91

6 5 9 .4 6

6 4 3 .1 4

6 4 5 .3 3

6 4 0 .4 2

6 3 4 .6 8

6 5 1 .8 4

6 5 5 .8 4

6 7 2 .8 2

7 6 0 .8 4

6 5 2 .8 3

6 6 4 .1 8

6 5 9 .3 4

4 9 3 .8 7

4 9 9 .2 8

5 0 4 .2 5

6 60 .03

6 5 7 .7 4

6 6 6 .6 7

7 4 5 .2 9

7 46 .52

6 3 5 .2 0

4 8 1 .3 6

4 9 1 .9 8

4 9 4 .4 8

5 0 0 .6 0

6 1 8 .7 9

6 4 6 .7 4

648.61

6 6 9 .8 5

7 2 3 .9 5

7 4 9 .0 8

Prim ary m e ta ls ...............................

7 6 5 .4 6

7 1 5 .4 9

6 2 5 .7 3

6 5 9 .5 6

Nonm etallic m ineral products....

7 7 7 .0 0

6 7 8 .4 5

6 2 8 .7 3

6 5 1 .1 3

W o o d p ro d u c ts ..............................

7 4 7 .7 5

7 0 7 .9 7

7 0 6 .8 6

6 5 2 .8 3

6 2 4 .5 4

7 4 3 .3 3

7 1 0 .6 4

7 3 2 .9 0

6 2 1 .1 8

D urable go o d s ...................................

7 4 8 .2 0

7 4 8 .6 5

6 0 7 .6 8

6 1 8 .8 7

6 6 5 .0 6

7 2 7 .1 7

6 2 3 .3 2

5 9 5 .1 9

6 5 4 .7 4

7 5 3 .4 2

6 1 5 .6 0

7 0 3 .1 0

6 5 8 .6 2

7 3 8 .4 5

7 2 3 .5 5

7 3 8 .3 0

711.61

6 4 5 .0 6

6 6 8 .0 7

7 5 0 .7 7

743.11

6 9 5 .8 9

6 5 4 .1 2

6 5 7 .0 4

7 2 3 .5 4

7 57 .92

5 1 7 .3 0

6 6 2 .0 0

7 3 8 .7 4

657.31

5 1 4 .0 8

515.61

667.81

7 1 8 .6 6

6 4 6 .3 8

5 1 1 .3 5

5 1 6 .8 0

5 1 3 .7 6

7 5 2 .4 0

6 5 1 .6 0

5 1 8 .4 9 .

5 2 0 .3 7

5 1 1 .7 3

6 6 0 .0 8

6 3 0 .0 4

5 1 7 .3 0
5 1 5 .2 7

5 1 0 .8 9

5 1 0 .3 8

6 49 .89

5 07 .62

510.01

5 11 .06

5 1 0 .2 0

5 1 0 .2 6
5 0 9 .1 8

5 1 1 .8 7

5 0 3 .7 5

5 1 4 .4 4

5 16 .76

5 03 .75

5 01 .25

-

-

A p r.

Dec.

5 05 .99

5 06 .22

4 9 3 .2 0

M a r.

Nov.

S e p t.

June

2002

Feb.

O c t.

Aug.

M ay

2 00 1

J u ly

Jan.

M ay

TOTAL PRIVATE
C urrent dollars........................
S ea s o n ally a d ju sted...........

GOODS-PRODUCING1............
Natural resources
and mining........................
Construction.......................
Manufacturing.....................

7 6 0 .8 7

7 4 5 .8 8

7 5 7 .6 6

7 5 8 .2 0

7 5 8 .4 4

7 6 2 .7 8

7 65 .32

759.71

F a bricated m etal products..........

5 7 6 .6 0

5 9 6 .4 4

5 9 3 .1 7

6 0 0 .6 5

5 9 0 .9 4

5 9 8 .2 9

604.91

6 0 1 .5 5

6 0 4 .4 0

6 1 9 .7 6

6 0 5 .4 8

6 0 1 .2 8

6 0 4 .7 9

5 9 9 .0 9

6 0 7 .6 5

M a c h in e ry .........................................

6 3 2 .7 7

645.81

6 4 5 .5 0

6 4 9 .1 3

6 3 5 .6 0

6 4 4 .7 6

6 5 0 .0 3

6 45 .19

6 5 3 .6 4

6 7 0 .6 8

6 5 0 .8 4

657.71

6 5 8 .9 3

6 5 4 .4 8

6 6 2 .5 9

6 1 3 .0 7

6 4 2 .8 6

6 3 5 .0 9

6 5 1 .2 2

6 31 .58

642.61

6 6 1 .7 7

6 3 9 .8 6

6 6 0 .1 6

6 8 1 .0 2

6 4 7 .9 0

6 5 7 .0 4

6 6 8 .6 2

6 6 0 .2 8

6 6 9 .8 3

7 8 3 .3 0

7 6 0 .1 3

C o m p u ter a n d electronic
products.........................................
Electrical eq u ip m en t and applia
a p pliances......................................

5 4 8 .0 0

5 6 0 .0 9

5 55 .60

5 6 5 .7 3

5 4 9 .2 4

5 5 7 .0 0

5 6 1 .8 0

5 62 .20

5 71 .02

5 9 1 .8 9

564.61

575.71

5 7 7 .1 3

5 7 0 .0 0

5 7 4 .2 8

Transportation e q u ip m en t..........

8 1 7 .0 8

8 7 7 .8 4

8 7 7 .6 3

8 8 6 .7 8

8 13 .62

8 7 5 .9 3

8 95 .69

8 98 .03

9 0 1 .3 6

9 2 1 .0 6

8 9 5 .4 8

8 8 6 .6 0

874.41

8 6 4 .8 2

872 .71

4 6 4 .5 7

4 9 4 .1 4

4 8 8 .3 6

4 9 3 .5 3

4 9 6 .6 6

4 9 8 .5 3

499.31

4 9 1 .7 6

4 9 4 .9 7

5 22 .37

4 9 3 .9 3

4 9 4 .4 5

4 9 3 .9 3

4 8 8 .5 3

4 9 0 .7 3

Furniture and related
products..........................................
M iscellaneous
m anufacturing..............................

4 8 3 .4 4

4 9 9 .0 9

4 9 6 .1 3

5 0 5 .7 9

4 9 3 .6 2

4 98 .82

5 03 .73

5 0 6 .0 9

5 0 6 .7 3

5 1 5 .3 5

5 05 .12

5 0 4 .5 8

5 0 8 .9 7

5 0 0 .2 8

5 0 2 .5 4

Nondu rable goods...........................

548.41

567.11

5 6 2 .0 0

5 6 9 .2 4

5 6 6 .3 5

5 7 0 .2 5

5 7 5 .7 0

5 72 .23

5 7 6 .6 9

5 8 6 .4 4

5 7 1 .5 7

5 7 2 .3 6

5 7 9 .7 5

5 7 5 .5 2

5 7 4 .7 3

Food m anufacturing.....................

4 8 1 .6 7

4 9 6 .7 8

4 9 0 .9 2

4 9 7 .4 4

5 00 .47

5 0 3 .2 0

5 06 .92

5 0 5 .1 3

5 0 5 .6 6

5 1 3 .6 8

4 9 1 .4 9

4 87.41

4 9 6 .5 7

4 9 3 .5 4

4 9 6 .9 6

B eve ra g e a n d tobacco
products.........................................

7 2 1 .6 8

6 9 7 .0 9

701.71

7 1 6 .7 0

7 1 1 .9 4

6 9 0 .7 8

6 7 9 .7 5

6 9 5 .9 9

6 8 9 .9 2

6 9 9 .9 5

6 7 5 .3 8

6 6 9 .6 5

6 8 6 .3 7

6 95.61

7 0 3 .2 5

T extile mills.....................................

4 5 6 .6 4

4 7 6 .7 0

4 8 4 .0 4

4 8 2 .8 6

4 7 3 .9 8

4 8 0 .2 6

4 7 6 .2 8

4 6 6 .8 3

4 6 9 .5 7

4 8 0 .3 0

467.61

4 7 2 .0 3

4 7 3 .2 2

4 7 2 .0 3

4 6 1 .6 6

4 0 8 .5 6

4 2 9 .4 9

433.01

4 3 8 .1 8

431.01

4 3 5 .8 4

4 3 1 .0 7

4 2 6 .4 7

4 2 6 .2 0

4 4 9 .1 2

4 3 1 .4 6

4 2 9 .9 6

4 31.51

4 3 1 .1 2

4 2 7 .3 5

A p p a re l.............................................

3 1 7 .1 5

L eather a n d allied products......

3 8 8 .8 3
6 9 0 .0 6

3 3 3 .7 7
4 1 3 .0 5

3 35 .59
4 0 6 .9 9

3 4 0 .2 8
4 10 .22

3 39 .09
4 0 4 .4 0

3 38 .72
4 1 2 .5 0

3 3 8 .0 0
4 1 3 .0 6

3 2 7 .5 7
4 2 6 .0 9

3 3 7 .2 7
4 40 .22

3 38 .52
4 5 1 .1 9

332.01
4 4 7 .3 6

3 3 3 .0 8
4 5 6 .6 7

3 4 0 .2 0
4 6 3 .6 4

3 3 6 .1 9
4 6 8 .0 5

3 3 6 .5 4
4 55 .91

7 0 7 .3 6

7 06 .02

7 09 .38

712.61

7 07 .26

7 2 4 .6 2

7 1 2 .6 5

7 16 .07

7 3 5 .2 8

7 1 4 .2 2

7 1 1 .1 9

7 1 6 .3 5

7 1 7 .7 9

7 1 4 .7 3

P ap e r and p ap er products.........
Printing and related
support activities..........................

5 6 0 .8 9

5 7 3 .4 2

5 6 4 .6 0

5 6 6 .0 7

5 62 .82

5 80 .89

5 9 0 .8 5

586.31

5 8 7 .8 5

5 9 7 .1 2

5 8 0 .6 4

5 8 2 .1 6

5 9 1 .7 4

5 8 0 .2 3

5 7 3 .7 8

1 ,0 0 3.3 4

9 9 2 .0 5

9 5 3 .1 5

9 8 8 .6 5

9 9 0 .7 0

9 7 1 .6 3

1 ,0 1 4 .8 6

1 ,0 2 2.8 6

1 ,0 2 5.0 7

1 ,0 4 0.6 0

1 ,0 3 9 .8 8

1 ,0 9 5 .4 8

1 ,1 0 9.4 0

1 ,0 5 2 .4 8

1,0 08.11

7 3 5 .5 4

7 5 9 .5 7

748.21

7 6 2 .5 4

7 5 6 .8 4

7 6 0 .6 6

7 7 3 .3 0

7 6 5 .0 0

7 8 4 .6 4

7 8 6 .7 9

7 6 9 .5 9

7 8 0 .9 8

7 8 0 .8 6

776.21

7 6 9 .5 4

5 2 8 .6 9

5 4 9 .5 7

5 4 8 .7 6

5 53 .32

5 43 .60

548.91

5 5 4 .3 3

5 5 4 .6 0

552.11

566.21

5 5 6 .4 0

5 5 8 .0 0

5 6 1 .4 0

5 6 1 .3 9

5 6 8 .8 3

4 6 0 .3 2

4 7 3 .1 0

4 6 7 .8 6

4 7 8 .1 7

4 7 0 .7 4

4 7 5 .2 7

4 8 2 .4 9

4 7 6 .9 3

4 7 8 .5 5

4 8 8 .0 6

4 7 7 .4 4

4 8 8 .8 0

4 8 7 .5 0

4 8 1 .0 7

4 8 1 .9 2

Petroleum and coal
C h e m ica ls ........................................
Plastics a n d rubber
products........................................

PRIVATE SERVICEPROVIDING2.............
Trade transportation

4 5 9 .5 3

4 7 1 .0 9

4 7 0 .4 5

4 7 9 .8 6

4 7 3 .2 8

4 7 5 .3 2

4 8 1 .7 8

4 7 3 .3 6

4 7 0 .2 0

4 7 8 .6 7

4 6 7 .0 7

4 7 6 .7 5

4 7 8 .9 6

4 7 5 .0 9

4 7 8 .9 5

W h o le s ale tra d e ..............................

6 4 3 .4 5

6 4 3 .9 9

640.51

6 5 3 .5 0

6 4 0 .1 3

645.41

657.41

6 4 2 .7 9

649.61

6 5 7 .8 0

6 3 9 .1 0

6 5 4 .7 0

6 5 5 .2 9

6 4 7 .2 5

6 5 1 .2 9

R etail tra d e ........................................

3 4 6 .1 6

3 6 0 .5 3

3 60 .22

3 6 8 .1 4

3 6 7 .7 2

3 6 5 .5 0

3 6 8 .4 7

3 6 1 .6 5

3 5 7 .7 7

366.91

3 5 6 .4 0

3 6 2 .3 7

3 6 4 .1 4

3 6 2 .9 5

3 6 5 .9 0

Transportation and
w are h o u s in g ..................................

5 6 2 .7 0

5 8 0 .6 8

5 7 6 .2 9

5 88 .68

5 7 8 .0 3

5 8 2 .6 5

5 9 1 .5 8

5 86 .59

593.11

6 0 3 .1 0

5 8 1 .5 3

5 9 3 .4 9

5 9 5 .6 4

5 8 6 .8 0

5 9 0 .9 4

Utilities.................................................

9 7 7 .1 8

9 7 8 .4 4

9 8 1 .4 7

9 83 .52

9 7 0 .2 2

9 7 5 .0 6

1 ,0 0 5.1 9

9 85 .92

9 9 6 .1 6

9 9 7 .0 9

9 8 7 .2 2

9 9 2 .9 8

1 ,0 0 3 .2 5

1 ,0 0 5 .7 2

1 ,0 0 1 .6 4

731.11

739.41

7 2 6 .7 3

7 4 8 .1 4

7 28 .00

7 3 0 .0 0

7 5 4 .5 5

7 5 3 .5 9

7 5 8 .5 9

7 69 .12

7 4 2 .2 0

7 6 0 .0 3

7 5 7 .9 4

7 5 3 .1 8

7 5 8 .8 2

5 5 8 .0 2

5 7 5 .4 3

5 6 4 .0 9

5 8 4 .4 3

5 68 .88

5 7 6 .8 8

596.21

5 8 1 .7 4

5 8 5 .4 0

6 0 4 .0 3

5 8 7 .8 4

6 1 1 .9 0

6 0 8 .0 4

5 9 5 .9 4

5 9 8 .6 9

5 5 7 .8 4

5 7 4 .5 9

5 65 .72

5 8 5 .3 4

5 7 0 .1 8

5 73 .79

5 8 5 .0 9

5 7 7 .6 4

5 8 0 .0 4

5 96 .16

5 7 9 .3 3

5 9 8 .5 6

5 9 7 .1 8

5 8 5 .1 4

5 8 4 .4 6

4 7 3 .3 9

4 93 .02

4 8 5 .9 0

4 9 4 .4 2

4 9 3 .4 5

499.11

5 0 3 .2 5

499.61

5 02 .45

5 0 6 .9 3

5 0 7 .3 3

5 0 8 .8 9

509.21

5 0 2 .5 9

5 0 3 .5 6

2 2 7 .3 0

2 1 7 .6 3

2 2 4 .4 0

2 2 4 .3 6

2 1 9 .8 6

2 22 .11

4 4 9 .7 2

4 4 2 .4 0

4 4 5 .8 4

4 4 7 .2 4

4 4 2 .0 8

4 4 3 .4 8

Professional and
Educational and
2 1 5 .1 9

Other services....................

4 2 8 .6 4

2 2 1 .1 5
4 3 9 .6 5

2 18 .62
4 3 5 .7 5

2 2 4 .6 6
442.51

2 2 4 .9 9

2 2 6 .6 3

2 2 4 .1 2

222.31

2 2 1 .6 0

4 3 9 .1 3

4 4 2 .4 3

4 4 5 .6 5

4 4 3 .5 2

4 4 2 .7 7

1 D a ta relate to production w orkers in natural resouces and mining and m anufacturing and
construction w orkers in construction.
2 D a ta relate to nonsupervisory workers.
NOTE:

D a ta reflect th e conversion to the 2 0 0 2 version of the North Am erican Industry Classi­


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

fication System (N A IC S ), replacing th e S tandard Industrial Classifification System (S IC ) system .
N A IC S -b as ed data by industry are not com parable with S IC -b a se d data. S e e "Notes on the data"
for a description of the m ost recent benchm ark revision.
Dash indicates data not available.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

59

Current Labor Statistics:

17.

Labor Force Data

D iffu s io n in d e x e s o f e m p lo y m e n t c h a n g e , s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d

[In percent]
Timespan and year

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug. Sept.

Oct.

Nov

Dec.

6 4 .4

Private nonfarm payrolls, 278 industries
O v e r 1 -m o n th s p an :
1 9 9 9 ............................................................

5 6 .3

6 4 .7

5 6 .7

6 5 .8

6 4 .2

6 1 .9

6 3 .3

5 9 .9

5 7 .6

6 4 .4

6 9.1

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

6 5 .5

6 0 .3

6 5 .5

5 8 .8

4 7 .7

6 1 .7

6 5 .5

5 2 .9

5 2 .3

54.1

5 7 .7

5 3 .2

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

5 2 .3

4 9 .6

4 8 .6

3 6 .5

4 1 .4

38.1

3 5 .6

3 8 .5

3 9 .0

3 5 .6

3 7 .8

3 6 .0

2 0 0 2 .............................................................

4 0 .5

3 7 .0

3 7 .6

4 1 .0

4 1 .7

4 3 .7

3 9 .0

4 1 .7

4 3 .3

4 3 .9

4 2 .4

3 7 .2

2 0 0 3 .............................................................

4 4 .2

3 6 .7

4 4.1

4 6 .9

4 3 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 9 .6

O v e r 3 -m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 9 ............................................................

6 1 .5

6 4 .9

6 1 .0

6 5 .8

6 6 .4

6 9.1

6 6 .9

6 4 .4

6 2 .2

6 2 .9

6 6 .7

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

70.1

6 6 .0

6 8 .3

6 8 .3

5 8 .5

5 6 .3

58.1

6 2 .2

5 5 .9

53.1

5 4 .0

5 8 .3

2 0 0 1 .............................................................

5 4 .9

5 0 .7

5 0 .5

4 3 .5

3 7 .2

3 6 .0

3 6 .2

3 5 .8

3 4 .5

3 2 .2

3 1 .7

3 0 .9

2 0 0 2 .............................................................

3 4 .4

3 8 .3

3 6 .5

3 5 .4

3 6 .7

3 8 .8

3 9 .7

4 1 .4

38.1

3 9 .0

3 7 .8

3 4 .9

2 0 0 3 .............................................................

3 6 .0

3 5 .6

3 6 .0

4 1 .2

4 4.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O v e r 6 -m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 9 ............................................................

6 6 .9

6 4 .9

6 3 .7

6 4 .0

6 5 .6

6 5 .8

6 6 .7

6 6 .2

6 9 .4

6 8 .7

6 6 .4

6 6 .5

2 0 0 0 .............................................................

6 7 .6

6 8 .7

7 1 .4

7 1 .9

6 8 .5

6 6 .2

6 7 .3

6 0 .4

5 8 .3

5 5 .0

6 1 .0

5 5 .2

2 0 0 1 .............................................................

5 3 .2

5 1 .4

5 0 .7

4 7 .1

4 2 .8

3 8 .8

3 7 .6

3 4 .5

3 1.1

3 2 .9

3 1 .3

3 1 .7

2 0 0 2 .............................................................

3 0 .6

2 9 .9

3 1.1

3 1 .3

3 3 .3

3 5 .8

3 6 .9

3 7 .4

3 7 .8

3 9 .9

3 8 .3

3 5 .8

2 0 0 3 .............................................................

3 7 .4

3 6 .5

35.1

3 4 .7

3 8 .3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O v e r 1 2 -m o n th s p an :
1 9 9 9 .............................................................

7 0 .5

6 8 .7

6 8 .2

6 8 .0

6 8 .3

6 8 .0

6 7 .8

6 9.1

6 8 .3

6 9 .1

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

7 0 .9

6 9 .2

7 3 .2

7 1 .0

6 9 .8

7 1 .0

7 0 .0

7 0 .3

7 0 .3

6 5 .6

6 3 .8

6 2 .1

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

5 9 .5

5 9 .5

5 3 .4

4 9 .3

4 8 .6

4 5 .0

4 3 .3

4 3 .9

3 9 .9

3 7 .8

37.1

3 4 .9

2 0 0 2 .............................................................

3 3 .6

3 1 .7

3 0 .2

3 0 .2

3 0 .4

3 0 .6

3 0 .8

3 1 .8

3 1 .5

3 0 .0

3 3 .5

3 3 .3

2 0 0 3 .............................................................

3 3 .8

3 3 .3

3 4 .5

3 5 .4

3 6 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 8 .3

6 8 .0

Manufacturing payrolls, 84 industries
O v e r 1-m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 9 ............................................................

4 2 .3

3 8 .7

3 3 .3

3 9 .3

5 2 .4

3 4 .5

5 0 .0

4 0 .5

4 1 .7

5 0 .6

5 6 .0

5 1 .8

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

5 0 .6

5 3 .6

5 4 .8

4 2 .9

3 9 .9

5 3 .6

6 2 .5

2 8 .6

2 4 .4

3 5.1

4 1 .1

3 8 .7

2 0 0 1 .............................................................

2 4 .4

2 2 .0

2 4 .4

1 4 .3

1 4 .3

1 9 .6

1 4 .3

1 3 .7

1 7 .9

1 6 .7

1 6 .7

9 .5

2 0 0 2 .............................................................

1 9 .0

2 2 .6

2 0 .8

3 3 .9

3 0 .4

3 2.1

3 4 .5

2 5 .0

3 1 .0

1 9 .6

2 1 .4

2 5 .0

2 0 0 3 .............................................................

3 6 .3

1 9 .0

2 7 .4

2 0 .2

2 9 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O v e r 3 -m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 9 ............................................................

3 3 .9

4 0 .5

3 7 .5

3 5 .7

4 1 .7

4 3 .5

4 2 .3

38.1

41.1

4 4 .6

4 9 .4

5 6 .5

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

5 4 .2

5 4 .8

5 8 .3

5 1 .8

4 1 .7

41.1

5 4 .8

4 8 .2

2 9 .2

2 5 .6

2 5 .0

4 2 .3

2 0 0 1 .............................................................

3 4 .5

2 4 .4

1 7 .9

1 4 .3

1 1 .9

1 4 .3

1 0 .7

7 .7

8 .3

9 .5

8 .9

8 .3

2 0 0 2 .............................................................

1 1 .9

1 1 .9

1 6 .7

2 0 .2

2 1 .4

2 0 .2

2 8 .6

2 5 .6

2 5 .6

1 7 .9

1 4 .9

1 0 .7

2 0 0 3 .............................................................

1 4 .9

1 5 .5

1 9 .6

1 6 .7

1 9 .0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O v e r 6 -m o n th s p an :
1 9 9 9 ............................................................

3 7 .5

3 2 .7

3 0 .4

3 3 .3

3 6 .9

38.1

3 8.1

3 4 .5

4 0 .5

4 6 .4

4 1.1

4 8 .2

2 0 0 0 .............................................................

4 7 .0

5 1 .2

5 6 .5

5 7.1

4 9 .4

4 7 .6

5 6 .0

4 4 .0

3 6 .9

35.1

3 4 .5

3 1 .0

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

2 3 .8

2 4 .4

2 0 .8

1 7 .9

1 4 .9

1 1 .9

1 3 .7

9 .5

8 .3

6 .5

6 .5

6 .0

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

7.7

8 .9

7.7

8 .9

1 2 .5

1 6 .7

1 9 .6

1 9 .6

2 3 .8

1 7 .9

1 6 .7

1 3 .7

2 0 0 3 ............................................................

1 3 .7

1 4 .3

1 2 .5

1 1 .9

1 2 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O v e r 1 2 -m o n th s p an :
1 9 9 9 ............................................................

3 5 .7

3 2.1

2 9 .8

3 2.1

3 2 .7

3 2.1

3 4 .5

3 2.1

33.3

3 9 .3

4 1.1

4 2 .9

2 0 0 0 .............................................................

4 1 .7

3 9 .3

4 7 .0

5 0 .0

4 6 .4

5 2 .4

5 1 .8

4 9 .4

4 6 .4

4 0 .5

3 5.1

33.3

2 0 0 1 .............................................................

2 9 .8

3 2.1

2 0 .8

13.1

1 2 .5

1 0 .7

1 1 .9

1 1 .9

10.1

8 .3

6 .0

2 0 0 2 .............................................................

7.1

6 .0

6 .0

7.1

7.7

5 .4

6 .0

8 .9

7.7

9 .5

13.1

13.1

2 0 0 3 .............................................................

1 3 .7

1 5 .5

1 6 .7

13.1

16.1

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

NO TE: Figures are the percent of industries with employment
increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged

1 9 .0

See the "Definitions” in this section. Se e "Notes on the data" for
a description of the most recent benchmark revision.

employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance
between

industries

with

inceasing

and

decreasing

employment.

60
Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

Dash indicates data not available.

18.

E s t a b lis h m e n t s iz e a n d e m p lo y m e n t c o v e r e d u n d e r U l, p riv a te o w n e r s h ip , b y S u p e r s e c t o r , firs t q u a rte r 2001
S ize o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts
In d u s try , e s ta b lis h m e n ts , a n d
e m p lo y m e n t

Total

Few er than
5 w o rk e rs 1

5 to 9
w o rk e rs

10 to 19
w o rk e rs

2 0 to 49
w o rkers

5 0 to 99
w o rkers

100 to 249
w o rk e rs

250 to 499
w o rk e rs

5 0 0 to 999
w o rk e rs

1 ,000 or
m o re
w o rk e rs

T o ta l all in d u s trie s 2
......................

7 ,6 6 5 ,9 6 8

4 ,5 2 6 ,0 6 2

1 ,3 0 4 ,7 4 1

8 5 8 ,6 0 6

5 9 8 ,4 3 8

2 0 8 ,0 8 4

1 2 1 ,1 8 9

3 1 ,1 4 9

1 1 ,6 7 8

6 ,0 2 1

.......................................

1 0 8 ,9 3 2 ,8 0 4

6 ,8 8 6 ,7 5 2

8 ,6 3 3 ,3 3 7

1 1 ,5 8 8 ,2 2 0

1 8 ,1 0 4 ,0 6 1

1 4 ,3 2 3 ,0 6 0

1 8 ,1 5 8 ,2 7 6

1 0 ,6 1 1 ,5 5 6

7 ,9 1 7 ,0 6 5

1 2 ,7 1 0 ,4 7 7

E s ta b lis h m e n ts , first q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a r c h

N a tu ra l re s o u rc e s a n d m in ing
......................

1 2 7 ,9 6 9

7 4 ,6 4 4

2 3 ,3 0 4

1 5 ,1 6 9

9 ,5 0 1

2 ,9 3 5

1 ,7 0 0

499

167

50

.......................................

1 ,5 6 6 ,1 0 4

1 1 0 ,9 4 2

1 5 4 ,1 9 9

2 0 3 ,8 4 5

2 8 5 ,4 8 6

2 0 0 ,3 6 0

2 5 4 ,3 5 8

1 7 2 ,0 1 1

1 0 9 ,9 7 3

7 4 ,9 3 0

......................

7 6 5 ,6 4 9

4 9 4 ,2 5 4

1 2 7 ,0 1 7

7 5 ,9 8 3

4 7 ,2 3 0

1 3 ,5 9 1

6 ,0 4 0

1 ,1 7 6

293

65

.......................................

6 ,4 8 1 ,3 3 4

7 1 4 ,9 9 2

8 3 2 ,9 7 8

1 ,0 2 0 ,9 8 2

1 ,4 1 0 ,1 3 1

9 2 5 ,1 7 8

8 9 0 ,2 8 2

3 9 0 ,6 3 0

1 9 7 ,1 4 6

9 9 ,0 1 5

2 2 ,4 9 0
3 ,4 5 6 ,6 2 0

7 ,6 3 6

3 ,1 9 8

1 ,4 7 9

2 ,6 2 2 ,5 1 2

2 ,1 6 6 ,3 5 2

3 ,1 7 5 ,0 7 5

E s ta b lis h m e n ts , first q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

C o n s tru c tio n
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , first q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

M a n u fa c tu rin g
......................

3 9 8 ,8 3 7

1 4 8 ,6 8 2

6 7 ,5 1 0

6 0 ,2 6 7

5 8 ,9 4 2

2 8 ,6 3 3

.......................................

1 6 ,8 0 6 ,4 5 2

2 5 5 ,3 7 6

4 5 3 ,7 5 0

8 3 0 ,6 8 5

1 ,8 3 6 ,8 5 8

2 ,0 0 9 ,2 2 4

E s ta b lis h m e n ts , first q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a r c h

T ra d e , tra n s p o rta tio n , a n d u tilitie s
.....................

1 ,8 4 0 ,1 0 4

9 6 9 ,7 6 0

3 7 6 ,5 7 8

2 4 4 ,8 9 0

1 5 3 ,4 5 0

5 3 ,1 1 0

3 2 ,8 9 8

6 ,9 7 0

1 ,8 1 3

635

.......................................

2 5 ,5 1 8 ,4 3 0

1 ,6 2 9 ,6 2 6

2 ,5 0 7 ,9 0 6

3 ,2 7 8 ,0 7 4

4 ,6 3 0 ,6 1 1

3 ,6 7 0 ,3 6 3

4 ,8 8 8 ,0 3 3

2 ,3 4 3 ,7 9 4

1 ,1 9 1 ,8 9 4

1 ,3 7 8 ,1 2 9

E s ta b lis h m e n ts , first q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a r c h

In fo rm a tio n
......................

1 5 0 ,8 5 5

8 4 ,6 7 2

2 0 ,6 3 6

1 7 ,1 1 9

1 4 ,7 7 2

6 ,6 9 8

4 ,4 7 5

1 ,4 7 6

674

333

.......................................

3 ,6 9 2 ,9 4 8

1 1 3 ,8 1 2

1 3 7 ,4 2 6

2 3 4 ,4 9 2

4 5 7 ,2 3 6

4 6 5 ,5 6 7

6 8 5 ,7 4 6

5 0 7 ,0 6 3

4 6 2 ,5 3 3

6 2 9 ,0 7 3

......................

7 1 6 ,8 0 8

4 5 8 ,3 9 0

1 2 8 ,2 6 6

7 1 ,6 1 5

3 7 ,5 2 9

1 ,8 0 8

897

488

7 ,6 2 3 ,1 2 6

7 5 0 ,4 2 1

8 4 3 ,3 1 1

9 5 2 ,1 9 8

1 ,1 2 1 ,8 2 5

1 1 ,7 3 1
8 0 1 ,9 9 4

6 ,0 8 4

.......................................

9 1 7 ,2 5 0

6 2 1 ,2 4 0

6 0 9 ,1 9 9

1 ,0 0 5 ,6 8 8

1 ,2 3 8 ,2 6 7

8 2 5 ,6 1 7

7 3 ,8 0 7

5 ,6 5 4

2 ,1 7 7

1 ,4 5 1 ,9 3 2

2 ,2 4 5 ,7 2 9

2 9 ,1 3 9
2 ,0 2 2 ,7 4 5

1 9 ,4 0 5

1 ,1 7 0 ,0 9 8

1 7 3 ,7 7 3
1 ,1 4 0 ,7 7 2

1 0 7 ,6 9 4

1 6 ,4 4 1 ,2 8 9

2 ,9 5 1 ,8 7 3

1 ,9 3 3 ,6 6 8

1 ,4 8 0 ,8 7 8

1 ,0 0 1
2 ,0 4 3 , 5 9 4

1 ,6 9 0
1 ,1 7 8 ,7 2 7

3 ,5 2 6 ,9 4 3

E s ta b lis h m e n ts , firs t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

F in an cial a c tiv itie s
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , firs t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

P ro fe s s io n a l a n d b u s in e s s s e rvices
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , first q u a rte r ......................
E m p lo y m e n t, M a r c h .......................................

E d u c a tio n a n d h ea lth s e rv ic e s
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , first q u a rte r ......................
E m p lo y m e n t, M a r c h .......................................

6 7 9 ,7 6 2

3 2 1 ,4 2 8

1 5 5 ,3 3 3

9 6 ,1 2 1

6 1 ,0 9 7

2 2 ,7 8 9

1 5 ,9 8 9

3 ,7 2 1

1 4 ,7 1 2 ,8 2 9

6 0 3 ,4 7 0

1 ,0 2 7 ,9 1 3

1 ,2 9 1 ,6 0 5

1 ,8 3 6 ,7 9 9

1 ,5 8 9 ,8 0 9

2 ,3 8 3 ,4 4 3

1 ,2 7 4 ,1 2 0

1 ,5 9 4

L e is u re a n d h o s p ita lity
......................

6 2 7 ,8 7 5

2 4 9 ,5 4 2

1 0 4 ,5 4 8

1 1 0 ,3 7 4

1 1 7 ,2 6 4

3 3 ,9 3 9

9 ,4 6 3

1 ,7 2 5

667

353

.......................................

1 1 ,5 9 0 ,0 4 8

3 9 0 ,2 5 8

7 0 5 ,2 2 2

1 ,5 4 2 ,7 6 0

3 ,5 6 0 ,7 1 5

2 ,2 6 3 ,9 3 5

1 ,3 4 4 ,2 1 7

5 8 6 ,2 6 9

4 5 3 ,7 0 3

7 4 2 ,9 6 9

......................

9 5 4 ,6 2 7

5 5 ,7 5 6

2 4 ,2 5 4

5 ,4 9 8

7 5 2 ,6 8 9

7 3 4 ,9 8 0

7 0 3 ,6 8 7

3 7 2 ,4 9 9

2 ,6 3 0
3 8 4 ,0 4 4

484

4 ,1 8 7 ,7 4 0

7 5 0 ,2 6 1
9 7 7 ,8 7 1

1 1 5 ,6 1 9

.......................................

1 6 0 ,2 4 9

102
6 6 ,6 6 0

23
3 5 ,0 6 1

E s ta b lis h m e n ts , first q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a r c h

O th e r s e rv ic e s
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , first q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

'

In c lu d e s e s ta b lis h m e n ts th a t re p o rte d n o w o rk e rs in M a rc h 2 0 0 1 .

2 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r u n c la s s ifie d e s ta b lis h m e n ts , n o t s h o w n s e p a ra te ly .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

N O T E : D e ta il m a y n o t a d d to to tals d u e to rou n d in g . D a ta re flec t th e m o v e m e n t of
In d ian T rib a l C o u n c il e sta b lis h m e n ts fro m p riva te industry to th e p ublic s e c to r. S e e
N o te s o n C u rre n t L a b o r S tatistics.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

61

Current Labor Statistics:

19.

Labor Force Data

A n n u a l d a ta : e s t a b lis h m e n t s , e m p lo y m e n t, a n d w a g e s c o v e r e d

Y ear

A v erag e
es ta b lis h m e n ts

A v erag e
a nn ual
em p lo y m e n t

un d er Ul and U C F E

T otal a nn ual w ag es
(in th o u s a n d s )

b y o w n e r s h ip

A v e ra g e ann ual
w ages
p e r e m p lo yee

A v e ra g e
w eekly
w ag e

To tal c ov ered (Ul an d U C FE )
1 9 9 2 .................................................................

6 ,5 3 2 ,6 0 8

1 0 7 ,4 1 3 ,7 2 8

$ 2 ,7 8 1 ,6 7 6 ,4 7 7

1 9 9 3 ..................................................................
1 9 9 4 .................................................................

6 ,6 7 9 ,9 3 4

1 0 9 ,4 2 2 ,5 7 1

2 ,8 8 4 ,4 7 2 ,2 8 2

2 6 ,3 6 1

507

6 ,8 2 6 ,6 7 7

1 1 2 ,6 1 1 ,2 8 7

3 ,0 3 3 ,6 7 6 ,6 7 8

2 6 ,9 3 9

518

$ 2 5 ,8 9 7

$498

1 9 9 5 .................................................................

7 ,0 4 0 ,6 7 7

1 1 5 ,4 8 7 ,8 4 1

3 ,2 1 5 ,9 2 1 ,2 3 6

2 7 ,8 4 6

536

1 9 9 6 .................................................................

7 ,1 8 9 ,1 6 8

1 1 7 ,9 6 3 ,1 3 2

3 ,4 1 4 ,5 1 4 ,8 0 8

2 8 ,9 4 6

557

1 9 9 7 .................................................................

7 ,3 6 9 ,4 7 3

1 2 1 ,0 4 4 ,4 3 2

3 ,6 7 4 ,0 3 1 ,7 1 8

3 0 ,3 5 3

584

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

614

7 ,6 3 4 ,0 1 8

1 2 4 ,1 8 3 ,5 4 9

3 ,9 6 7 ,0 7 2 ,4 2 3

3 1 ,9 4 5

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

7 ,8 2 0 ,8 6 0

1 2 7 ,0 4 2 ,2 8 2

4 ,2 3 5 ,5 7 9 ,2 0 4

3 3 ,3 4 0

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

7 ,8 7 9 ,1 1 6

1 2 9 ,8 7 7 ,0 6 3

4 ,5 8 7 ,7 0 8 ,5 8 4

3 5 ,3 2 3

679

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

7 ,9 8 4 ,5 2 9

1 2 9 ,6 3 5 ,8 0 0

4 ,6 9 5 ,2 2 5 ,1 2 3

3 6 ,2 1 9

697

$493

641

Ul c ov ered
1 9 9 2 ..................................................................

1 0 4 ,2 8 8 ,3 2 4

$ 2 ,6 7 2 ,0 8 1 ,8 2 7

$ 2 5 ,6 2 2

1 9 9 3 ..................................................................

6 ,6 3 2 ,2 2 1

1 0 6 ,3 5 1 ,4 3 1

2 ,7 7 1 ,0 2 3 ,4 1 1

2 6 ,0 5 5

501

1 9 9 4 ..................................................................

6 ,7 7 8 ,3 0 0
6 ,9 9 0 ,5 9 4

1 0 9 ,5 8 8 ,1 8 9

2 ,9 1 8 ,6 8 4 ,1 2 8

1 1 2 ,5 3 9 ,7 9 5

3 ,1 0 2 ,3 5 3 ,3 5 5

2 6 ,6 3 3
2 7 ,5 6 7

530

1 9 9 5 ..................................................................
1 9 9 6 ..................................................................

6 ,4 8 5 ,4 7 3

512

7 ,1 3 7 ,6 4 4

1 1 5 ,0 8 1 ,2 4 6

3 ,2 9 8 ,0 4 5 ,2 8 6

2 8 ,6 5 8

551

1 9 9 7 ..................................................................

7 ,3 1 7 ,3 6 3

1 1 8 ,2 3 3 ,9 4 2

3 ,5 5 3 ,9 3 3 ,8 8 5

3 0 ,0 5 8

578

1 9 9 8 ..................................................................

7 ,5 8 6 ,7 6 7

1 2 1 ,4 0 0 ,6 6 0

3 ,8 4 5 ,4 9 4 ,0 8 9

1 9 9 9 ..................................................................

7 ,7 7 1 ,1 9 8

1 2 4 ,2 5 5 ,7 1 4

4 ,1 1 2 ,1 6 9 ,5 3 3

3 1 ,6 7 6
3 3 ,0 9 4

636

2 0 0 0 .................................................................
2 0 0 1 ..................................................................

7 ,8 2 8 ,8 6 1

1 2 7 ,0 0 5 ,5 7 4

4 ,4 5 4 ,9 6 6 ,8 2 4

3 5 ,0 7 7

675

7 ,9 3 3 ,5 3 6

1 2 6 ,8 8 3 ,1 8 2

4 ,5 6 0 ,5 1 1 ,2 8 0

3 5 ,9 4 3

691

$ 2 ,2 8 2 ,5 9 8 ,4 3 1
2 ,3 6 5 ,3 0 1 ,4 9 3

$ 2 5 ,5 4 7
2 5 ,9 3 4

$ 49 1

2 6 ,4 9 6
2 7 ,4 4 1

510

609

P rivate in d u stry c ov ered
1 9 9 2 ..................................................................
1 9 9 3 ..................................................................
1 9 9 4 ..................................................................

6 ,3 0 8 ,7 1 9
6 ,4 5 4 ,3 8 1

8 9 ,3 4 9 ,8 0 3
9 1 ,2 0 2 ,9 7 1

6 ,5 9 6 ,1 5 8

9 4 ,1 4 6 ,3 4 4

2 ,4 9 4 ,4 5 8 ,5 5 5

1 9 9 5 ..................................................................

6 ,8 0 3 ,4 5 4

9 6 ,8 9 4 ,8 4 4

499

1 9 9 6 ..................................................................

6 ,9 4 6 ,8 5 8

9 9 ,2 6 8 ,4 4 6

2 ,6 5 8 ,9 2 7 ,2 1 6
2 ,8 3 7 ,3 3 4 ,2 1 7

2 8 ,5 8 2

550

1 9 9 7 ..................................................................

7 ,1 2 1 ,1 8 2

1 0 2 ,1 7 5 ,1 6 1

3 ,0 7 1 ,8 0 7 ,2 8 7

3 0 ,0 6 4

578

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

1 0 5 ,0 8 2 ,3 6 8

3 ,3 3 7 ,6 2 1 ,6 9 9

3 1 ,7 6 2

611

1 9 9 9 ..................................................................

7 ,3 8 1 ,5 1 8
7 ,5 6 0 ,5 6 7

1 0 7 ,6 1 9 ,4 5 7

3 ,5 7 7 ,7 3 8 ,5 5 7

3 3 ,2 4 4

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

7 ,6 2 2 ,2 7 4

1 1 0 ,0 1 5 ,3 3 3

3 ,8 8 7 ,6 2 6 ,7 6 9

3 5 ,3 3 7

639
680

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

7 ,7 2 4 ,9 6 5

1 0 9 ,3 0 4 ,8 0 2

3 ,9 5 2 ,1 5 2 ,1 5 5

3 6 ,1 5 7

695

528

S ta te g o v e rn m e n t c ov ered
1 9 9 2 ..................................................................

5 8 ,8 0 1

4 ,0 4 4 ,9 1 4

1 9 9 3 ..................................................................
1 9 9 4 ..................................................................

5 9 ,1 8 5
6 0 ,6 8 6

4 ,0 8 8 ,0 7 5
4 ,1 6 2 ,9 4 4

$ 1 1 2 ,4 0 5 ,3 4 0

$ 2 7 ,7 8 9

$534

1 1 7 ,0 9 5 ,0 6 2

2 8 ,6 4 3
2 9 ,5 1 8
3 0 ,4 9 7

551
568

3 1 ,3 9 7

604

3 2 ,5 2 1

625
646
667

1 9 9 5 ..................................................................

6 0 ,7 6 3

4 ,2 0 1 ,8 3 6

1 2 2 ,8 7 9 ,9 7 7
1 2 8 ,1 4 3 ,4 9 1

1 9 9 6 ..................................................................
1 9 9 7 ..................................................................

6 2 ,1 4 6
6 5 ,3 5 2

4 ,1 9 1 ,7 2 6
4 ,2 1 4 ,4 5 1

1 3 1 ,6 0 5 ,8 0 0
1 3 7 ,0 5 7 ,4 3 2

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

6 7 ,3 4 7

4 ,2 4 0 ,7 7 9

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

7 0 ,5 3 8

4 ,2 9 6 ,6 7 3

2 0 0 0 ..................................................................

6 5 ,0 9 6

2 0 0 1 ..................................................................

6 4 ,5 8 3

4 ,3 7 0 ,1 6 0
4 ,4 5 2 ,2 3 7

586

1 4 2 ,5 1 2 ,4 4 5
1 4 9 ,0 1 1 ,1 9 4

3 3 ,6 0 5
3 4 ,6 8 1

1 5 8 ,6 1 8 ,3 6 5

3 6 ,2 9 6
3 7 ,8 1 4

698

$ 2 5 ,4 3 4

$489

1 6 8 ,3 5 8 ,3 3 1

727

Local g o v e rn m e n t c ov ered
1 9 9 2 .................................................................

1 1 7 ,9 2 3

1 0 ,8 9 2 ,6 9 7

$ 2 7 7 ,0 4 5 ,5 5 7

1 9 9 3 .................................................................

1 1 8 ,6 2 6

1 1 ,0 5 9 ,5 0 0

2 8 8 ,5 9 4 ,6 9 7

2 6 ,0 9 5

502

1 9 9 4 .................................................................

1 1 ,2 7 8 ,0 8 0

3 0 1 ,3 1 5 ,8 5 7

2 6 ,7 1 7

514

1 9 9 5 .................................................................

1 2 1 ,4 2 5
1 2 6 ,3 4 2

2 7 ,5 5 2

530

1 2 8 ,6 4 0

1 1 ,4 4 2 ,2 3 8
1 1 ,6 2 1 ,0 7 4

3 1 5 ,2 5 2 ,3 4 6

1 9 9 6 .................................................................

3 2 9 ,1 0 5 ,2 6 9

1 9 9 7 .................................................................

1 1 ,8 4 4 ,3 3 0

3 4 5 ,0 6 9 ,1 6 6

2 8 ,3 2 0
2 9 ,1 3 4

545
560

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

1 3 0 ,8 2 9
1 3 7 ,9 0 2

1 2 ,0 7 7 ,5 1 3

3 6 5 ,3 5 9 ,9 4 5

3 0 ,2 5 1

582

1 2 ,3 3 9 ,5 8 4

3 8 5 ,4 1 9 ,7 8 1

3 1 ,2 3 4

601

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

1 4 0 ,0 9 3

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

1 4 1 ,4 9 1

1 2 ,6 2 0 ,0 8 1

4 0 8 ,7 2 1 ,6 9 0

3 2 ,3 8 7

623

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

1 4 3 ,9 8 9

1 3 ,1 2 6 ,1 4 3

4 4 0 ,0 0 0 ,7 9 5

3 3 ,5 2 1

645

$ 3 5 ,0 6 6
3 6 ,9 4 0
3 8 ,0 3 8

$674

741

F ed eral G o v e rn m e n t co v e re d (U C FE )
1 9 9 2 .................................................................
1 9 9 3 .................................................................
1 9 9 4 .................................................................
1 9 9 5 .................................................................
1 9 9 6 .................................................................
1 9 9 7 .................................................................
1 9 9 8 .................................................................

4 7 ,1 3 6
4 7 ,7 1 4

3 ,1 2 5 ,4 0 4

$ 1 0 9 ,5 9 4 ,6 5 0
1 1 3 ,4 4 8 ,8 7 1

4 8 ,3 7 7

3 ,0 7 1 ,1 4 0
3 ,0 2 3 ,0 9 8

5 0 ,0 8 3
5 1 ,5 2 4

2 ,9 4 8 ,0 4 6
2 ,8 8 1 ,8 8 7

1 1 3 ,5 6 7 ,8 8 1
1 1 6 ,4 6 9 ,5 2 3

3 8 ,5 2 3
4 0 ,4 1 4

5 2 ,1 1 0
4 7 ,2 5 2

2 ,8 1 0 ,4 8 9

1 2 0 ,0 9 7 ,8 3 3
1 2 1 ,5 7 8 ,3 3 4

4 2 ,7 3 2

822

2 ,7 8 2 ,8 8 8

4 3 ,6 8 8

840
852

1 1 4 ,9 9 2 ,5 5 0

1 9 9 9 .................................................................
2 0 0 0 .................................................................

4 9 ,6 6 1

2 ,7 8 6 ,5 6 7

1 2 3 ,4 0 9 ,6 7 2

4 4 ,2 8 7

5 0 ,2 5 6

2 ,8 7 1 ,4 8 9

1 3 2 ,7 4 1 ,7 6 0

4 6 ,2 2 8

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

5 0 ,9 9 3

2 ,7 5 2 ,6 1 9

1 3 4 ,7 1 3 ,8 4 3

4 8 ,9 4 0

710
731
777

889
941

N O TE: Detail may not add to totals due to rounding. Data reflect the movement of Indian Tribal Council establishments from private industry to
the public sector. See Notes on Current Labor Statistics.

62
Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

20.

A n n u a l d a ta: e s t a b lis h m e n t s , e m p lo y m e n t, a n d w a g e s c o v e r e d u n d e r Ul a n d U C F E , b y S ta te
A v erag e ann ual
em p lo y m e n t

A v erag e
e s ta b lis h m e n ts
S tate
2001

T o ta l U n ite d S ta te s

200 02001
c ha nge

2001

To tal ann ual w ag es
(in tho u sa n d s)

20002001
change

2001

A v e ra g e w e e k ly
w age

20002001
c ha nge

200 0 2001
ch a n g e

2001

...........

7 ,9 8 4 ,5 2 9

1 5 4 ,5 4 0

1 2 9 ,6 3 5 ,8 0 0

- 1 8 5 ,7 7 9

$ 4 ,6 9 5 ,2 2 5 ,1 2 3

$ 1 0 9 ,8 8 4 ,9 2 0

$697

$18

A l a b a m a ...................................

1 1 2 ,3 5 6

30

1 ,8 5 4 ,4 6 2

-2 3 ,5 0 0

5 5 ,8 2 2 ,0 9 7

1 ,2 8 4 ,0 8 8

579

21
20

A l a s k a .......................................

1 9 ,2 8 7

467

2 8 3 ,0 3 3

7 ,4 7 9

1 0 ,2 3 7 ,2 9 2

5 5 3 ,2 3 7

696

A r i z o n a ......................................

1 1 8 ,7 0 6

3 ,5 4 6

2 ,2 4 3 ,6 5 2

2 2 ,9 4 2

7 4 ,9 6 3 ,0 7 2

2 ,5 4 6 ,2 4 8

643

16

A r k a n s a s ..................................

7 2 ,8 1 4

587

-3 ,7 3 1
1 3 8 ,2 8 4

3 0 ,7 2 5 ,5 9 2

9 6 3 ,8 6 2

524

18

C a lif o r n ia ..................................

1 ,0 6 5 ,6 9 9

7 4 ,6 4 5

1 ,1 2 7 ,1 5 1
1 4 ,9 8 1 ,7 5 7

6 1 9 ,1 4 6 ,6 5 1

7 ,4 9 7 ,4 7 6

795

3

C o l o r a d o ..................................

1 5 3 ,8 2 4

5 ,3 4 7

2 ,2 0 1 ,3 7 9

1 4 ,7 2 8

8 3 ,5 4 7 ,6 0 2

2 ,2 7 4 ,6 6 9

730

15

C o n n e c t ic u t ............................

1 0 8 ,2 0 1

414

1 ,6 6 5 ,6 0 7

-9 ,1 2 1

7 8 ,2 7 2 ,0 9 9

2 ,0 9 5 ,2 4 3

904

29

D e l a w a r e ..................................

505

4 0 6 ,7 3 6

482

1 5 ,6 2 9 ,6 3 6

7 8 7 ,0 6 7

739

36
56

D is trict o f C o l u m b i a ............

2 5 ,2 5 3
2 8 ,4 1 4

-1 ,5 3 5

3 5 ,5 4 3 ,5 5 9

1 ,7 9 0 ,0 8 6

4 5 4 ,0 7 7

9
9 ,3 6 7

6 3 5 ,7 4 9

F l o r i d a .......................................

7 ,1 5 3 ,5 8 9

9 2 ,6 0 6

2 2 5 ,7 1 3 ,7 0 1

9 ,9 3 3 ,3 5 6

1 ,0 7 5
607

G e o r g i a ....................................

2 3 0 ,2 3 2

5 ,2 1 9

3 ,8 7 1 ,7 6 3

-1 0 ,9 4 1

1 3 6 ,0 3 9 ,4 3 8

3 ,1 9 5 ,9 2 6

676

H a w a i i .......................................

3 5 ,4 3 9

1 ,4 1 2

5 5 7 ,1 4 6

4 6 9 ,2 6 6

6 01

4 6 ,4 8 0

1 ,0 8 4

5 7 1 ,3 1 4

3 ,9 6 1
8 ,1 3 7

1 7 ,4 1 2 ,2 1 0

I d a h o ..........................................

1 5 ,8 6 4 ,5 1 0

2 6 3 ,8 3 2

534

1

Illin o is ........................................

3 1 9 ,5 8 8

-2 ,7 2 3

5 ,8 8 6 ,2 4 8

-5 4 ,2 5 9

2 3 0 ,0 5 4 ,8 3 5

4 ,0 5 0 ,8 1 1

752

19
18
12

I n d i a n a ......................................

1 5 1 ,3 7 6

-1 ,3 2 8

2 ,8 7 1 ,2 3 6

-6 3 ,3 9 2

9 1 ,2 4 6 ,1 8 9

1 8 3 ,5 2 0

6 11

20
14

I o w a ...........................................

9 1 ,0 0 6

-5 ,8 2 5

1 ,4 2 9 ,5 4 3

-1 3 ,4 3 2

4 1 ,2 2 3 ,5 3 4

9 1 9 ,4 9 2

555

18

K a n s a s ......................................

8 0 ,5 2 1

52

1 ,3 1 9 ,6 6 7

5 ,9 8 4

3 9 ,7 9 2 ,1 1 4

1 ,2 2 1 ,3 8 7

580

K e n t u c k y ..................................

1 0 8 ,0 2 5
1 1 5 ,8 0 7

302

1 ,7 3 6 ,5 7 5
1 ,8 6 9 ,9 6 6

5 4 ,4 7 3 ,1 4 6

1 ,3 6 7 ,0 2 8
2 ,3 4 5 ,8 7 1

M a i n e ........................................

4 6 ,2 0 6

-2 ,3 8 6
1 ,3 4 4

-2 6 ,1 6 0
827

5 2 ,1 3 3 ,4 1 7

L o u i s ia n a ................................

5 9 3 ,1 6 6

2 ,4 7 2

1 7 ,0 9 2 ,0 4 3

7 5 0 ,8 8 6

22

736

36

M a s s a c h u s e t t s ......................

1 9 1 ,8 2 4

6 ,8 4 8

3 ,2 7 6 ,2 2 4

2 1 ,1 0 4

1 4 7 ,3 4 8 ,2 3 4

3 ,5 7 4 ,4 9 4

865

2 5 9 ,5 5 6

4 ,4 7 6 ,6 5 9

-1 0 7 ,8 8 0

1 6 7 ,3 8 5 ,1 2 9

1 5 6 ,0 3 1

2 ,6 0 9 ,6 6 9

1 ,3 2 5

9 5 ,4 7 9 ,1 8 8

-2 ,2 9 5 ,1 5 8
3 ,1 0 7 ,3 9 6

719
704

16
7

M i n n e s o t a ...............................

5 ,8 0 9
487

M is sis sip p i ..............................

6 3 ,2 0 7

-7 4 8

1 ,1 1 1 ,2 5 5

-2 5 ,5 2 0

2 8 ,8 0 6 ,8 6 9

1 5 1 ,3 8 5

499

23
14

M is so u ri ...................................

1 6 3 ,1 2 1
4 0 ,4 7 7

138

2 ,6 5 2 ,8 7 6

2 ,0 0 0 ,4 3 8

623

19

2 ,1 3 6

3 8 3 ,9 0 5

-2 3 ,9 6 0
4 ,8 6 2

8 6 ,0 0 9 ,6 9 4

M o n t a n a ...................................

9 ,6 7 2 ,3 7 1

4 7 2 ,1 1 2

485

18

1 4 7 ,1 5 8

2 ,4 2 1 ,8 9 9

1 6 ,3 9 2

23
24

M ic h ig a n ..................................

M a r y l a n d .................................

622

15

577
560
554

9 2 ,6 4 4 ,8 7 3

5 ,0 9 6 ,0 1 6

N e b r a s k a ................................

5 2 ,6 5 3

836

8 8 3 ,9 2 0

1 ,5 1 6

2 5 ,0 8 3 ,2 9 3

6 4 6 ,7 4 5

4 9 ,6 3 5

1 ,7 7 0

1 ,0 4 3 ,7 4 8

2 5 ,9 1 9

3 4 ,5 6 9 ,5 0 6

1 ,7 1 7 ,0 6 3

546
637

13

N e v a d a ....................................
N e w H a m p s h ir e ...................

4 6 ,0 7 0

171

6 1 0 ,1 9 2

3 ,6 8 5

2 1 ,6 5 0 ,2 6 7

5 8 2 ,7 5 4

682

14

- 1 3 ,7 9 3
522

3 ,8 7 6 ,1 9 4

-1 ,2 2 1

1 7 1 ,7 9 3 ,6 4 2

2 ,4 4 3 ,6 1 8

852

12

7 2 9 ,4 2 2

2 0 ,9 3 5 ,8 2 5
3 9 3 ,5 9 8 ,6 6 6

1 ,2 1 6 ,1 9 1
9 ,3 8 3 ,3 4 6

552
899

23
27

616
494

19

16

N e w J e r s e y ............................

2 5 6 ,5 3 6

N e w M e x ic o ...........................
N e w Y o r k ................................

4 8 ,4 3 9
5 3 8 ,8 9 8

9 ,8 2 2

8 ,4 2 3 ,3 1 2

1 2 ,2 9 3
-4 7 ,4 4 6

N o rth C a r o l in a .......................

2 2 4 ,4 2 6

2 ,2 0 8

N o rth D a k o t a .........................

2 3 ,3 2 6

38

3 ,8 0 5 ,4 9 8
3 1 1 ,6 3 2

-5 7 ,2 7 2
2 ,4 1 2

1 2 1 ,8 6 6 ,0 0 7
8 ,0 1 1 ,0 8 5

1 ,8 5 8 ,8 7 2
3 7 8 ,5 1 0

O h i o ...........................................

2 8 5 ,5 6 7

4 ,7 0 5

5 ,4 3 4 ,7 6 9

-7 7 ,8 6 5

1 8 0 ,8 8 5 ,1 5 4

1 ,6 8 1 ,2 9 9

640

15

O k la h o m a ...............................
O r e g o n ......................................

9 0 ,6 0 3
1 1 1 ,0 7 3

1 ,5 7 4

1 ,4 6 3 ,6 2 2

1 1,7 71

4 1 ,0 0 4 ,2 5 0

1 ,5 9 6 ,7 5 3

-1 1 ,1 7 5

5 3 ,0 1 8 ,3 6 5

1 ,8 2 1 ,7 4 3
3 1 7 ,0 9 8

539
639

20

2 ,1 5 0

P e n n s y lv a n ia ........................

3 3 1 ,4 0 5

1 6 ,1 8 7

5 ,5 5 2 ,3 6 6

-5 ,5 3 5

1 9 4 ,2 1 1 ,6 9 6

5 ,1 5 8 ,6 3 2

673

19

19

9

R h o d e Is l a n d ..........................

3 3 ,6 3 6

311

4 6 8 ,9 5 2

1,351

1 5 ,7 5 8 ,3 6 9

5 0 7 ,6 1 0

646

19

S o u th C a r o l i n a .....................
S o u th D a k o t a ........................

1 1 4 ,9 7 9

5 ,6 1 3
221

1 ,7 8 6 ,8 9 9

-3 3 ,2 1 0
598

5 2 ,2 7 5 ,6 7 9
9 ,3 3 7 ,0 1 4

9 8 6 ,9 6 7
3 0 6 ,3 0 2

563
492

21
15

2 7 ,3 6 5

3 6 4 ,7 1 5

T e n n e s s e e .............................

1 2 5 ,1 6 5

140

2 ,6 2 5 ,7 4 6

1 ,2 7 5 ,6 4 1

606

18

4 9 4 ,0 8 8

4 ,5 0 9

9 ,3 5 0 ,7 7 0

- 4 1 ,0 0 5
6 2 ,4 3 7

8 2 ,7 6 2 ,4 0 2

T e x a s ........................................

3 3 7 ,0 4 7 ,9 6 2

693

21

U t a h ...........................................

6 8 ,6 0 7

2 ,4 7 0

1 ,0 5 0 ,6 7 4

6 ,5 5 1

3 1 ,6 0 0 ,7 1 5

1 2 ,4 8 4 ,2 2 3
1 ,0 8 2 ,2 0 4

V e r m o n t ...................................

2 4 ,1 5 6

287

1 ,5 5 8
8 ,411

9 ,0 1 1 ,4 6 8
1 2 6 ,2 2 2 ,3 5 0

5 ,6 6 2 ,7 7 9

4 3 9 ,4 9 2

578

16

5 81
706

25

1 9 5 ,6 3 9

3 ,0 4 8

2 9 8 ,0 2 0
3 ,4 3 6 ,1 7 2

2 2 1 ,4 5 0

1 ,7 7 5

2 ,6 8 9 ,5 0 7

-1 4 ,9 2 1

1 0 0 ,7 4 6 ,6 6 3

4 1 3 ,7 4 0

720

30
7

W e s t V ir g in ia ..........................
W is c o n s in ...............................

4 6 ,6 2 0
1 4 8 ,2 2 7

-1 8 6
2 ,3 7 4

6 8 5 ^ 7 54

-8 4 5

1 9 ,1 8 7 ,8 3 2

2 ,7 1 7 ,6 6 0

-1 8 ,3 8 8

8 5 ,7 1 3 ,7 2 5

7 2 6 ,8 3 6
1 ,7 3 3 ,6 2 9

538
607

21
17

W y o m i n g ..................................

2 1 ,2 8 8

429

2 3 7 ,2 7 8

6 ,4 4 6

6 ,6 5 4 ,0 9 2

4 5 9 ,5 9 6

539

23

P u e rto R i c o ............................

5 1 ,7 3 3
3 ,2 3 6

-6 3 3

1 ,0 0 7 ,9 1 9

- 1 8 ,2 3 4

1 9 ,8 8 4 ,3 8 1

5 7 8 ,1 7 3

379

17

-1 7

4 4 ,3 3 0

1,981

1 ,2 9 4 ,8 8 5

1 2 0 ,9 3 6

562

29

V ir g i n i a ......................................

V irg in I s l a n d s ........................

N O T E : D e ta il m a y not a d d to to tals d u e to rounding.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

63

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

21.

A n n u a l d a ta: E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e a n n u a l p a y fo r a ll w o rk e rs
c o v e r e d u n d e r Ul a n d U C F E

in th e 249 la rg e s t U .S . c o u n t ie s

E m p lo ym en t
C o u n ty 1
2001

P e rc ent
change,
20 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

A v e ra g e a nn ual pay
R a nked by
perce nt
cha nge,
20 0 0 -2 0 0 1 3

2001

P e rc ent
change,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

U n ite d S ta te s 4 ........................

1 2 9 ,6 3 5 ,8 0 0

-.1

-

3 6 ,2 1 9

2 .5

J effers o n , A L .........................
M a d is o n , A L ............................
M o b ile , A L ................................
M o n tg o m e ry , A L ...................
A n c h o ra g e , À K .....................
M a ric o p a , A Z .........................
P im a , A Z ...................................
P u las ki, A R .............................
A la m e d a , C A .........................
C o n tra C o s ta , C A ................

3 8 0 ,6 8 0
1 5 6 ,1 6 9
1 6 7 ,0 0 0
1 2 9 ,8 7 8
1 3 3 ,8 4 2
1 ,5 6 1 ,7 7 3
3 2 6 ,9 1 7
2 4 0 ,7 5 4
6 9 7 ,1 8 1
3 3 7 ,4 4 4

- 1 .0
1 .3
- 1 .5
-.9
3.1
1.2
-.6
-.7
-.1
.7

197
54
212
192
16
61
170
175
135
80

3 5 ,4 5 3
3 7 ,0 8 9
2 9 ,5 0 2
2 9 ,9 7 9
3 7 ,9 9 8
3 5 ,6 8 9
3 0 ,6 9 0
3 2 ,2 6 1
4 6 ,4 8 9
4 4 ,7 4 4

4 .2
3 .5
3.1
3 .8
3 .7
1.6
5.1
4 .7
3.1
5 .7

F re s n o , C A .............................
K e rn , C A ...................................
Los A n g e le s , C A ...................
M a rin , C A .................................
M o n te re y , C A .........................
O ra n g e , C A .............................
P la c er, C A ...............................
R iv e rs id e , C A .........................
S a c ra m e n to , C A ...................
S a n B e rn ard in o , C A ............

3 2 2 ,0 8 4
2 4 2 ,2 3 2
4 ,1 0 3 ,3 7 0
1 1 1 ,9 3 9
1 6 6 ,1 8 6
1 ,4 1 1 ,9 4 4
1 1 6 ,1 8 5
4 9 1 ,5 3 5
5 8 8 ,4 2 6
5 4 5 ,1 1 3

-.1
1 .5
.6
1 .3
.8
1.6
6.1
4 .2
3 .0
2 .8

136
49
87
55
75
46
1
8
18
21

2 7 ,8 7 8
3 0 ,1 0 6
4 0 ,8 9 1
4 3 ,5 4 7
3 1 ,7 3 5
4 0 ,2 5 2
3 4 ,7 7 3
2 9 ,9 7 1
3 9 ,1 7 3
3 0 ,9 9 5

6 .5
5 .3
3.1
2 .2
5 .9
2 .6
4.1
2 .8
3 .8
3 .6

S a n D ie g o , C A .......................
S a n F ra n cis co , C A ...............
S a n J o a q u in , C A ...................
S a n M a te o , C A .....................
S a n ta B a rb a ra , C A .............
S a n ta C la ra , C A ....................
S a n ta C ru z , C A .....................
S o la n o , C A .............................
S o n o m a , C A ...........................
S ta n is la u s , C A .......................

1 ,2 1 8 ,9 8 2
5 8 6 ,0 8 5
2 0 4 ,5 0 4
3 6 9 ,8 6 8
1 7 7 ,2 3 4
1 ,0 0 2 ,6 3 7
1 0 2 ,6 6 9
1 2 1 ,4 0 2
1 9 4 ,9 2 2
1 6 4 ,4 7 3

2 .0
-3 .3
1.9
.1
.8
-2 .3
.9
3 .0
2.1
2 .2

37
246
39
1 20
76
233
64
19
32
30

3 8 ,4 1 8
6 1 ,0 6 8
3 0 ,8 1 8
6 2 ,2 8 8
3 3 ,6 2 6
6 5 ,9 3 1
3 5 ,0 2 2
3 3 ,4 9 6
3 6 ,1 4 5
2 9 ,5 9 1

2 .3
6.1
5 .3
-7 .2
3 .2
- 1 3 .5
-2 .2
5 .7
1.1
4 .9

T u la re , C A ...............................
V e n tu ra , C A ............................
A d a m s , C O .............................
A ra p a h o e , C O ........................
B o u ld e r, C O ............................
D e n v e r, C O .............................
El P as o , C O ............................
J e ffe rs o n , C O ........................
L a rim e r, C O ............................
F a irfie ld , C T ............................

1 3 2 ,8 7 8
2 9 3 ,2 0 8
1 4 6 ,0 4 3
2 8 5 ,9 6 3
1 8 4 ,7 5 5
4 6 1 ,9 9 6
2 4 0 ,1 0 0
2 1 0 ,3 7 5
1 2 1 ,8 8 0
4 2 1 ,2 1 1

.0
1 .5
.6
-.2
3 .2
-.6
.9
.1
2 .3
-1 .0

130
50
88
144
13
171
65
121
29
198

2 4 ,7 3 2
3 7 ,7 8 3
3 4 ,7 5 3
4 4 ,9 9 9
4 4 ,3 1 0
4 6 ,1 3 4
3 4 ,3 9 1
3 7 ,8 1 9
3 3 ,2 4 8
6 3 ,1 6 3

4 .2
1 .9
4 .0
-2 .7
-2 .8
4 .0
4.1
4 .5
2 .6
3 .3

H a rtfo rd , C T ............................
N e w H a v e n , C T ....................
N e w L o ndon , C T ...................
N e w C a s tle , D E ....................
W a s h in g to n , D C ...................
A la c h u a , F L ............................
B re va rd , F L .............................
B ro w a rd , F L ............................
C o llier, F L ................................
D u v a l, F L .................................

4 9 7 ,2 8 0
3 6 3 ,2 6 5
1 2 4 ,6 8 4
2 8 2 ,3 1 8
6 3 5 ,7 3 4
1 1 9 ,1 4 8
1 8 4 ,7 2 5
6 6 3 ,9 5 4
1 1 0 ,2 3 0
4 3 6 ,6 6 3

-.5
-1 .1
1 .6
.2
-.2
.7
1 .7
2.1
5 .9
1 .8

163
2 01
47
112
145
81
43
33
2
41

4 5 ,0 5 0
3 9 ,4 8 3
3 8 ,5 0 5
4 2 ,8 4 9
5 5 ,9 0 9
2 6 ,9 1 7
3 2 ,7 9 8
3 3 ,9 6 6
3 0 ,8 3 9
3 3 ,7 2 1

3 .2
2 .9
4 .8
5 .8
5 .6
2 .9
2 .2
2 .2
2 .9
2 .9

E s c a m b ia , F L .........................
H illsb o ro u g h , F L ...................
L e e , F L .....................................
Le o n , F L ...................................
M a n a te e , F L ...........................
M ia m i-D a d e , F L ....................
O ra n g e , F L .............................
P a lm B e a c h , F L ....................
P in ellas , F L .............................
P olk, F L ....................................

1 2 1 ,2 8 5
5 9 5 ,7 6 8
1 7 1 ,9 0 2
1 42 ,9 8 1
1 1 8 ,7 8 8
9 9 3 ,8 3 4
6 0 2 ,6 6 8
4 9 9 ,6 8 8
4 4 8 ,7 8 8
1 84 ,4 7 1

.8
1 .8
4 .5
.9
5 .2
1.6
.2
3 .9
3 .3
.1

77
42
5
66
4
48
113
9
12
122

2 8 ,6 1 0
3 2 ,8 7 4
2 9 ,4 3 2
3 0 ,2 8 7
2 6 ,6 2 9
3 4 ,5 2 4
3 2 ,2 1 8
3 5 ,9 5 7
3 1 ,7 4 2
2 8 ,8 9 0

7.1
3 .7
4 .6
3 .5
4 .4
3 .6
3 .5
2.1
1.5
3 .6

S a ra s o ta , F L ...........................
S e m in o le , F L .........................
V o lu s ia , F L ...............................
C h a th a m , G A .........................
C la y to n , G A ............................
C o b b , G A .................................
D e k a lb , G A .............................
F u lto n , G A ...............................
G w in n e tt, G A .........................
R ic h m o n d , G A .......................

1 4 7 ,2 0 6
1 4 5 ,1 4 7
1 4 2 ,4 7 8
1 2 2 ,6 0 8
1 1 4 ,9 8 2
3 0 1 ,5 2 0
3 0 5 ,9 0 3
7 5 4 ,8 7 0
2 8 9 ,5 3 ?
1 0 4 ,6 9 4

4 .5
2 .2
-.2
-.2
-.3
-.1
-.7
.1
2 .9

6
31
146
147
151
137
176
123
20
193

2 9 ,0 3 0
3 1 ,9 5 1
2 6 ,0 6 4
3 0 ,5 4 9
3 8 ,3 0 1
4 0 ,1 7 4
3 9 ,6 4 8
4 7 ,7 6 1
3 9 ,4 0 5
2 9 ,4 3 1

1.9
3 .6
3 .9
3 .0
4 .2
3 .6
2 .7
1.5
.9
2 .9

64
Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le.

July 2003

-.9


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

21.

C o n t in u e d — A n n u a l d a ta : E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e a n n u a l p a y fo r
all w o rk e rs c o v e r e d u n d e r U l a n d U C F E

in th e 249 la rg e s t U .S .

c o u n t ie s
A v erag e a nn ual pay

E m p lo y m e n t
C o u n ty 1
2001

P e rc en t
change,
200 0-2 0 0 1 2

R a nked by
p erce nt
change,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 3

2001

P e rc ent
c ha nge,
20 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

H o n o lu lu , H I ............................
A d a , I D .......................................
C o o k , IL ....................................
Du P a g e , I L .............................
K a n e , I L ....................................
L a k e , I L .....................................
P e o ria , I L ..................................
S a n g a m o n , I L ........................
W ill, I L ........................................
W in n e b a g o , I L .......................

4 0 9 ,6 6 9
1 8 2 ,3 0 9
2 ,6 3 0 ,7 6 8
5 8 0 ,9 3 8
1 9 4 ,3 7 4
3 1 6 ,1 5 0
1 0 2 ,7 6 4
1 4 5 ,1 9 5
1 4 5 ,5 7 0
1 3 9 ,8 1 5

.4
2 .7
- 1 .5
-.2
-.1
-.3
- 1 .8
.2
.1
-2 .9

99
23
213
148
138
152
223
114
124
2 41

3 2 ,5 3 1
3 3 ,0 8 1
4 4 ,1 0 8
4 3 ,4 7 0
3 3 ,3 6 2
4 3 ,9 7 0
3 3 ,2 8 8
3 6 ,2 5 9
3 4 ,2 8 0
3 1 ,9 5 1

2.1
-4 .0
2 .8
2.1
3 .7
3 .2
6.1
4 .3
6.1
1 .4

A lle n , I N ....................................
E lk h a rt, I N ................................
L a k e , IN ....................................
M a rio n , I N ................................
S t. J o s e p h , I N ........................
V a n d e rb u rg h , IN ...................
Linn, IA .....................................
P olk, I A .....................................
Jo h n so n , K S ...........................
S e d g w ic k , K S ........................

1 8 3 ,3 2 9
1 1 3 ,5 2 4
1 9 4 ,6 2 4
5 9 1 ,4 0 6
1 2 4 .9 6 7
1 0 9 ,4 1 8
1 1 9 ,9 1 4
2 6 3 ,4 6 9
2 9 2 ,9 8 4
2 4 9 ,8 6 3

- 2 .3
- 6 .8
-1 .9
- 1 .3
-3.1
.1
-1 .7
-.2
2 .4
.1

234
249
226
210
244
125
219
149
27
126

3 2 ,8 3 0
3 0 ,7 9 7
3 2 ,0 1 7
3 7 ,8 8 5
3 0 ,7 6 9
3 0 ,4 9 4
3 4 ,6 4 9
3 4 ,9 4 4
3 7 ,2 0 4
3 3 ,9 3 7

1 .7
1 .5
1 .4
3 .8
3 .7
3.1
1 .6
3 .8
-.1
3 .8

S h a w n e e , K S .........................
F a y e tte , K Y .............................
J e ffe rs o n , K Y ..........................
C a d d o , L A ................................
E a s t B a to n R o u g e , L A .......
J e ffe rs o n , LA .........................
L a fa y e tte , LA .........................
O rle a n s , L A .............................
C u m b e rla n d , M E ...................
A n n e A ru n d e l, M D ...............

1 0 0 ,4 6 2
1 6 7 ,7 1 4
4 3 1 ,3 4 7
1 2 0 ,8 7 7
2 4 3 ,3 9 2
2 1 3 ,9 1 1
1 1 9 ,2 9 4
2 6 3 ,4 2 7
1 6 8 ,1 4 7
2 0 0 ,1 7 4

.3
- 2 .4
- 1 .7
1 .3
-1 .1
-.4
4 .5
.1
1 .3
2 .8

105
237
220
56
202
1 60
7
127
57
22

3 0 ,5 1 3
3 2 ,2 3 7
3 4 ,6 8 8
2 9 ,3 5 4
3 0 ,3 9 7
2 9 ,3 2 6
3 2 ,3 6 4
3 2 ,8 8 0
3 2 ,3 2 7
3 7 ,1 9 0

3 .9
5 .0
4.1
2 .0
3 .9
4 .6
8 .2
3 .7
5.1
4 .9

B a ltim o re, M D ........................
H o w a rd , M D ............................
M o n tg o m e ry , M D ..................
P rin c e G e o rg e s , M D ...........
B a ltim o re C ity , M D ...............
Bristol, M A ...............................
E s s e x, M A ...............................
H a m p d e n , M A ........................
M id d le s e x , M A .......................
N o rfo lk, M A .............................

3 6 0 ,1 2 8
1 3 2 ,9 3 5
4 4 9 ,8 8 1
3 0 4 ,0 2 2
3 8 1 ,1 5 5
2 1 8 ,8 1 8
3 0 6 ,1 1 1
2 0 4 ,8 2 4
8 5 0 ,2 9 5
3 2 7 ,0 6 7

.2
1 .3
.9
.5
.4
-1 .1
.2
.9
1 .4
.7

115
58
67
94
100
203
116
68
52
82

3 6 ,2 4 0
4 0 ,1 9 1
4 5 ,8 9 3
3 8 ,9 8 6
4 0 ,5 0 8
3 2 ,0 1 2
3 9 ,2 4 2
3 3 ,3 5 7
5 1 ,7 3 4
4 4 ,1 7 3

6 .2
6.1
5 .0
5 .2
5 .0
4.1
.5
3 .6
.0
2 .2

P ly m o u th , M A ........................
S u ffo lk , M A .............................
W o rc e s te r, M A .......................
G e n e s e e , M l ...........................
In g h a m , M l ...............................
K a la m a z o o , M l .......................
K e n t, M l ....................................
M a c o m b , M l ............................
O a k la n d , M l ............................
O tta w a , M l ...............................

1 6 6 ,4 7 1
6 0 2 ,9 8 3
3 2 1 ,0 4 4
1 6 0 ,4 4 2
1 7 4 ,2 9 0
1 1 6 ,7 2 8
3 3 9 ,5 1 0
3 2 6 ,6 0 0
7 5 5 ,4 5 1
1 1 5 ,8 8 0

.8
.1
.3
-3 .0
-.3
- 1 .7
- 1 .8
-3 .2
- 1 .4
- 2 .5

78
128
106
242
153
221
224
245
211
239

3 4 ,9 2 9
5 8 ,9 0 6
3 7 ,2 9 9
3 5 ,9 9 5
3 5 ,7 5 3
3 3 ,9 0 8
3 4 ,5 7 0
4 0 ,4 8 1
4 5 ,0 3 8
3 2 ,2 4 6

3 .4
4 .0
-.9
-.9
2 .3
3 .8
1 .7
-1 .0
1 .2
.9

W a s h te n a w , M l .....................
W a y n e , M l ...............................
A n o k a , M N ...............................
D a k o ta , M N .............................
H e n n e p in , M N ........................
R a m s e y , M N ...........................
H in d s , M S ................................
G re e n e , M O ............................
J a c k s o n , M O ...........................
S t. L ouis, M O .........................

1 9 5 ,5 6 2
8 4 8 ,4 6 3
1 0 9 ,5 2 1
1 5 5 .6 6 2
8 6 3 ,6 7 4
3 3 3 ,3 8 0
1 3 4 ,2 8 5
1 4 0 ,7 3 9
3 8 4 ,9 4 2
6 4 1 ,1 5 1

.2
-2 .4
-.3
1 .3
-.8
.0
-.9
-.9
- 2 .3
-.8

117
238
154
59
186
131
194
195
235
187

4 0 ,2 4 9
4 2 ,9 6 8
3 4 ,5 8 5
3 5 ,6 8 3
4 5 ,4 9 5
4 0 ,4 0 0
3 1 ,1 3 8
2 8 ,0 6 5
3 7 ,4 0 5
3 8 ,9 2 9

.2
1.2
1.9
3 .8
3 .8
3 .4
1 .8
4.1
3 .7
2.1

S t. Lo u is C ity , M O ................
D o u g la s , N E ...........................
L a n c a s te r, N E ........................
C la rk , N V ..................................
W a s h o e , N V ...........................
H illsb o ro u g h , N H .................
R o c k in g h a m , N H .................
A tla n tic , N J .............................
B e rg e n , N J ...............................
B u rlington, N J ........................

2 4 5 ,1 9 2
3 2 5 ,6 2 9
1 4 8 ,2 0 0
7 2 0 ,1 8 4
1 9 3 ,5 7 1
1 9 2 ,7 1 2
1 3 0 ,9 1 7
1 4 1 ,2 4 0
4 5 3 ,6 2 6
1 8 7 ,3 9 8

-2 .2
-.7
.9
3 .2
2 .4
.0
.7
.9
1 .5
3 .6

231
177
69
14
28
132
83
70
51
11

4 0 ,8 3 4
3 2 ,8 6 6
2 9 ,3 5 2
3 2 ,6 4 8
3 4 ,2 3 1
3 9 ,3 2 0
3 6 ,6 4 2
3 2 ,5 5 5
4 6 ,8 2 8
3 8 ,7 7 6

5 .8
1 .6
2 .9
1 .6
4 .5
.3
2 .3
4 .8
1.1
3.1

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

65

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

21.

C o n t in u e d — A n n u a l d a ta : E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e a n n u a l p a y fo r
all w o rk e rs c o v e r e d u n d e r U l a n d U C F E

in th e 249 la rg e s t U .S .

c o u n t ie s
E m p lo ym en t
C o u n ty 1
2001

A v erag e ann ual pay

P e rc ent
change,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

R a nked by
perce n t
change,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 3

2001

P e rc en t
change,
20 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

H o n o lu lu , H I ............................
A d a , I D .......................................
C o o k , IL ....................................
D u P a g e , I L .............................
K a n e , Ï L ....................................
L a k e ,IL .....................................
P eo ria , I L .................................
S a n g a m o n , I L ........................
W ill, I L ........................................
W in n e b a g o , IL .......................

4 0 9 ,6 6 9
1 8 2 ,3 0 9
2 ,6 3 0 ,7 6 8
5 8 0 ,9 3 8
1 9 4 ,3 7 4
3 1 6 ,1 5 0
1 0 2 ,7 6 4
1 4 5 ,1 9 5
1 4 5 ,5 7 0
1 3 9 ,8 1 5

.4
2 .7
-1 .5
-.2
-.1
-.3
- 1 .8
.2
.1
-2 .9

99
23
213
148
138
152
223
114
124
2 41

3 2 ,5 3 1
3 3 ,0 8 1
4 4 ,1 0 8
4 3 ,4 7 0
3 3 ,3 6 2
4 3 ,9 7 0
3 3 ,2 8 8
3 6 ,2 5 9
3 4 ,2 8 0
3 1 ,9 5 1

2.1
-4 .0
2 .8
2.1
3 .7
3 .2
6.1
4 .3
6.1
1 .4

A llen , I N ....................................
E lkh art, I N ................................
L a k e ,IN ....................................
M a rio n , I N ................................
S t. J o s e p h , I N ........................
V a n d e rb u rg h , IN ...................
Linn, IA .....................................
P olk, I A .....................................
J o h n so n , K S ...........................
S e d g w ic k , K S ........................

1 8 3 ,3 2 9
1 1 3 ,5 2 4
1 9 4 ,6 2 4
5 9 1 ,4 0 6
1 2 4 ,9 6 7
1 0 9 ,4 1 8
1 1 9 ,9 1 4
2 6 3 ,4 6 9
2 9 2 ,9 8 4
2 4 9 ,8 6 3

- 2 .3
-6 .8
-1 .9
-1 .3
-3 .1
.1
- 1 .7
-.2
2 .4
.1

234
249
226
210
244
125
219
149
27
126

3 2 ,8 3 0
3 0 ,7 9 7
3 2 ,0 1 7
3 7 ,8 8 5
3 0 ,7 6 9
3 0 ,4 9 4
3 4 ,6 4 9
3 4 ,9 4 4
3 7 ,2 0 4
3 3 ,9 3 7

1 .7
1 .5
1.4
3 .8
3 .7
3.1
1.6
3 .8
-.1
3 .8

S h a w n e e , K S .........................
F a y e tte , K Y .............................
J effers o n , K Y .........................
C a d d o , L A ................................
E a s t B a to n R o u g e , L A .......
J effers o n , LA .........................
L a fa y e tte , LA .........................
O rle a n s , L A .............................
C u m b e rla n d , M E ...................
A n n e A ru n d e l, M D ...............

1 0 0 ,4 6 2
1 6 7 ,7 1 4
4 3 1 ,3 4 7
1 2 0 ,8 7 7
2 4 3 ,3 9 2
2 1 3 ,9 1 1
1 1 9 ,2 9 4
2 6 3 ,4 2 7
1 6 8 ,1 4 7
2 0 0 ,1 7 4

.3
-2 .4
-1 .7
1 .3
-1 .1
-.4
4 .5
.1
1 .3
2 .8

105
237
220
56
202
160
7
127
57
22

3 0 ,5 1 3
3 2 ,2 3 7
3 4 ,6 8 8
2 9 ,3 5 4
3 0 ,3 9 7
2 9 ,3 2 6
3 2 ,3 6 4
3 2 ,8 8 0
3 2 ,3 2 7
3 7 ,1 9 0

3 .9
5 .0
4.1
2 .0
3 .9
4 .6
8 .2
3 .7
5.1
4 .9

B a ltim o re, M D ........................
H o w a rd , M D ............................
M o n tg o m e ry , M D .................
P rin c e G e o rg e s , M D ...........
B a ltim o re C ity , M D ...............
Bristol, M A ...............................
E s s e x , M A ...............................
H a m p d e n , M A ........................
M id d le s e x , M A .......................
N orfolk, M A .............................

3 6 0 ,1 2 8
1 3 2 ,9 3 5
4 4 9 ,8 8 1
3 0 4 ,0 2 2
3 8 1 ,1 5 5
2 1 8 ,8 1 8
3 0 6 ,1 1 1
2 0 4 ,8 2 4
8 5 0 ,2 9 5
3 2 7 ,0 6 7

.2
1 .3
.9
.5
.4
-1 .1
.2
.9
1 .4
.7

115
58
67
94
100
203
116
68
52
82

3 6 ,2 4 0
4 0 ,1 9 1
4 5 ,8 9 3
3 8 ,9 8 6
4 0 ,5 0 8
3 2 ,0 1 2
3 9 ,2 4 2
3 3 ,3 5 7
5 1 ,7 3 4
4 4 ,1 7 3

6 .2
6.1
5 .0
5 .2
5 .0
4.1
.5
3 .6
.0
2 .2

P ly m o u th , M A ........................
S u ffo lk, M A .............................
W o rc e s te r, M A .......................
G e n e s e e , M l ...........................
In g h a m , M l ...............................
K a la m a z o o , M l .......................
K e n t, M l ....................................
M a c o m b , M l ............................
O a k la n d , M l ............................
O tta w a , M l ..............................

1 6 6 ,4 7 1
6 0 2 ,9 8 3
3 2 1 .0 4 4
1 6 0 ,4 4 2
1 7 4 ,2 9 0
1 1 6 ,7 2 8
3 3 9 ,5 1 0
3 2 6 ,6 0 0
7 5 5 ,4 5 1
1 1 5 ,8 8 0

.8
.1
.3
-3 .0
-.3
- 1 .7
- 1 .8
-3 .2
- 1 .4
- 2 .5

78
128
106
242
153
221
224
245
2 11
239

3 4 ,9 2 9
5 8 ,9 0 6
3 7 ,2 9 9
3 5 ,9 9 5
3 5 ,7 5 3
3 3 ,9 0 8
3 4 ,5 7 0
4 0 ,4 8 1
4 5 ,0 3 8
3 2 ,2 4 6

3 .4
4 .0
-.9
-.9
2 .3
3 .8
1 .7
-1 .0
1 .2
.9

W a s h te n a w , M l .....................
W a y n e , M l ...............................
A n o k a , M N ...............................
D a k o ta , M N .............................
H e n n e p in , M N ........................
R a m s e y , M N ...........................
H in d s , M S ................................
G re e n e , M O ............................
J a c k s o n , M O ...........................
S t. Louis, M O .........................

1 9 5 ,5 6 2
8 4 8 ,4 6 3
1 0 9 ,5 2 1
1 5 5 ,6 6 2
8 6 3 ,6 7 4
3 3 3 ,3 8 0
1 3 4 ,2 8 5
1 4 0 ,7 3 9
3 8 4 ,9 4 2
6 4 1 ,1 5 1

.2
- 2 .4
-.3
1 .3
-.8
.0
-.9
-.9
-2 .3
-.8

117
238
154
59
186
131
194
195
235
187

4 0 ,2 4 9
4 2 ,9 6 8
3 4 ,5 8 5
3 5 ,6 8 3
4 5 ,4 9 5
4 0 ,4 0 0
3 1 ,1 3 8
2 8 ,0 6 5
3 7 ,4 0 5
3 8 ,9 2 9

.2
1.2
1 .9
3 .8
3 .8
3 .4
1 .8
4.1
3 .7
2.1

S t. Louis C ity, M O ................
D o u g la s , NE’ ...........................
L a n c a s te r, N E ........................
C la rk , N V .................................
W a s h o e , N V ...........................
H illsb o ro u g h , N H .................
R o c k in g h a m , N H .................
A tlan tic, NJ ......................
B e rg e n , N J .......................
B urlington, N J ..................

2 4 5 ,1 9 2
3 2 5 ,6 2 9
1 4 8 ,2 0 0
7 2 0 ,1 8 4
1 9 3 ,5 7 1
1 9 2 ,7 1 2
1 3 0 ,9 1 7
1 4 1 ,2 4 0
4 5 3 ,6 2 6
1 8 7 ,3 9 8

-2 .2
-.7
.9
3 .2
2 .4

2 31
177
69
14
28
132
83
70
51
11

4 0 ,8 3 4
3 2 ,8 6 6
2 9 ,3 5 2
3 2 ,6 4 8
3 4 ,2 3 1
3 9 ,3 2 0
3 6 ,6 4 2
3 2 ,5 5 5
4 6 ,8 2 8
3 8 ,7 7 6

5 .8
1.6
2 .9
1.6
4 .5

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le.

66
Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

.0
.7
.9
1 .5
3 .6

.3
2 .3
4 .8
1.1
3.1


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

21.

C o n t in u e d — A n n u a l d a ta : E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e a n n u a l p a y fo r
all w o rk e rs c o v e r e d u n d e r U l a n d U C F E

in th e 249 la rg e s t U .S .

c o u n t ie s
E m p lo y m e n t
C o u n ty 1
2001

A v e ra g e a nn ual pay

P e rc en t
change,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

R a nked by
perce n t
change,
200 0-2 0 0 1 3

2001

P e rc en t
c ha nge,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

C a m d e n , N J ............................
E s s e x , N J ................................
H u d s o n , N J .............................
M e rc e r, N J ...............................
M id d le s e x , N J ........................
M o n m o u th , N J .......................
M orris, N J ................................
O c e a n , N J ................................
P a s s a ic , N J .............................
S o m e rs e t, N J ..........................

1 9 9 ,8 6 9
3 6 1 ,5 6 9
2 3 7 ,2 5 3
2 1 5 ,5 2 4
3 9 9 ,3 3 2
2 4 0 ,7 5 7
2 7 7 ,6 5 3
1 3 3 ,6 5 7
1 7 5 ,1 0 8
1 7 6 ,7 1 3

.5
-.5
.0
2 .6
1 .3
3 .2
.4
3 .7
-1.1
1 .7

95
164
133
25
60
15
101
10
204
44

3 6 ,5 3 0
4 6 ,5 2 6
4 7 ,6 3 8
4 6 ,8 3 1
4 7 ,7 2 6
4 0 ,3 9 9
5 3 ,8 2 9
3 1 ,0 3 4
3 9 ,1 9 2
5 5 ,7 6 9

4 .0
4 .2
.4
4 .9
2 .7
1 .8
-1 1 .0
1 .9
3 .8
1 .8

U n io n , N J ..................................
B ern alillo , N M ........................
A lb a n y , N Y ...............................
B ronx, N Y ................................
D u tc h e s s , N Y .........................
E rie , N Y ....................................
K ings, N Y .................................
M o n ro e , N Y ............................
N a s s a u , N Y ............................
N e w Y o rk, N Y ........................

2 3 6 ,6 0 9
3 0 9 ,1 6 6
2 2 9 ,9 5 7
2 1 4 ,2 2 7
1 1 2 ,9 1 2
4 5 4 ,8 3 9
4 3 9 ,3 4 3
3 9 3 ,7 8 3
5 9 3 ,3 6 8
2 ,3 4 2 ,3 3 8

-.1
.7
-.5
.4
2 .5
-1.1
-.1
-.7
-.8
-1 .5

139
84
165
102
26
205
140
178
188
214

4 6 ,2 0 4
3 1 ,6 6 3
3 7 ,8 4 8
3 4 ,2 4 8
3 8 ,7 4 8
3 2 ,1 0 3
3 1 ,9 5 2
3 6 ,5 9 7
4 0 ,5 9 9
7 4 ,8 8 3

2 .0
4 .9
5 .7
4 .3
7 .4
1.9
3 .9
3 .3
1 .4
3 .2

O n e id a , N Y .............................
O n o n d a g a , N Y .......................
O ra n g e , N Y .............................
Q u e e n s , N Y ............................
R o c k la n d , N Y ..........................
S u ffo lk , N Y ...............................
W e s tc h e s te r, N Y ...................
B u n c o m b e , N C ......................
C u m b e rla n d , N C ...................
D u rh a m , N C ............................

1 0 8 ,6 8 6
2 4 9 ,7 5 4
1 2 0 ,9 0 3
4 7 8 ,6 6 1
1 0 7 ,3 4 8
5 8 1 ,9 3 8
4 0 4 ,9 7 4
1 0 5 ,3 7 8
1 0 6 ,3 8 1
1 6 9 ,6 0 9

- 1 .8
-1.1
.7
-.7
.4
.1
-.4
-.3
- 2 .8
.3

225
206
85
179
103
129
161
155
240
107

2 8 ,3 8 1
3 3 ,4 6 9
3 0 ,2 1 8
3 6 ,9 6 3
3 8 ,7 2 0
3 8 ,7 0 6
4 8 ,7 1 6
2 8 ,7 0 1
2 6 ,9 8 1
4 8 ,0 7 6

4 .0
3 .0
2 .9
5 .7
3 .9
3 .5
3 .8
3 .3
-2 .6

Fo rs yth , N C ............................
G u ilfo rd , N C ............................
M e c k le n b u rg , N C ..................
W a k e , N C ................................
B utler, O H ................................
C u y a h o g a , O H .......................
F ra n klin , O H ...........................
H a m ilto n , O H .........................
Lo ra in , O H ...............................
L u c as , O H ................................

1 8 0 ,1 5 5
2 7 4 ,0 7 7
5 1 4 ,0 3 6
3 8 5 ,7 7 7
1 2 6 ,8 6 3
7 9 6 ,3 5 3
7 0 2 ,6 2 8
5 5 9 ,8 5 2
1 0 3 ,1 1 5
2 3 4 ,6 7 8

- .7
-2 .0
.3
.9
- .5
-1 .6
.2
-1 .1
- 3 .5
-1 .7

180
229
108
71
166
217
118
207
247
222

3 4 ,6 9 3
3 3 ,2 1 7
4 1 ,7 7 5
3 6 ,9 9 6
3 2 ,3 2 5
3 7 ,5 3 3
3 6 ,0 9 0
3 8 ,3 3 9
3 2 ,1 9 4
3 3 ,0 8 8

2 .0
3.1
3.1
4 .6
2 .6
2 .8
3 .2
2 .0
.6
2 .6

M a h o n in g , O H .......................
M o n tg o m e ry , O H ..................
S ta rk , O H .................................
S u m m it, O H ............................
O k la h o m a , O K .......................
T u ls a , O K ..................................
C la c k a m a s , O R ....................
L a n e , O R ..................................
M a rio n , O R .............................
M u ltn o m a h , O R ....................

1 0 8 ,7 6 9
2 9 8 ,9 8 2
1 7 3 ,8 8 8
2 6 1 ,0 9 8
4 1 5 ,5 0 7
3 4 2 ,5 0 2
1 3 3 ,9 9 7
1 3 7 ,5 7 4
1 2 6 ,9 9 9
4 4 4 ,3 9 3

- 3 .7
- 1 .5
- 1 .6
-2 .1
.4
.6
-.2
- 1 .9
-.6
-1 .1

248
215
218
230
104
89
150
227
172
208

2 6 ,8 6 0
3 4 ,7 8 3
2 9 ,1 9 7
3 3 ,4 1 6
3 0 ,1 6 1
3 2 ,7 7 1
3 3 ,6 9 9
2 8 ,9 8 3
2 8 ,7 8 5
3 7 ,6 6 8

3 .5
.7
2 .4
2.1
3 .2
5 .2
3 .7
4 .0
2 .4
2 .4

W a s h in g to n , O R ...................
A lleg h en y , P A ........................
B e rks , P A .................................
B ucks, P A ................................
C h e s te r, P A ............................
C u m b e rla n d , P A ...................
D a u p h in , P A ...........................
D e la w a re , P A .........................
E rie , P A ................ ....................
L a n c a s te r, P A ........................

2 2 8 ,4 5 3
7 1 1 ,5 3 2
1 6 5 ,2 6 3
2 4 6 ,4 9 1
2 1 7 ,1 4 8
1 2 2 ,6 4 9
1 7 3 ,2 9 2
2 1 4 ,1 0 6
1 2 8 ,8 9 3
2 1 8 ,4 1 5

1 .4
.3
-.7
.6
.6
-.6
.3
1 .0
-2 .3
-.3

53
109
181
90
91
173
110
63
236
156

4 2 ,2 2 2
3 8 ,0 8 6
3 2 ,8 0 7
3 5 ,2 3 9
4 4 ,2 1 6
3 3 ,9 9 6
3 4 ,8 5 5
3 8 ,4 9 4
2 9 ,2 9 3
3 1 ,4 9 3

-5 .0
3 .7
2 .5
3 .5
1.0
3 .6
3 .5
4 .5
3 .3
2 .2

L e h ig h , P A ...............................
L u z e rn e , P A ............................
M o n tg o m e ry , P A ...................
P h ila d e lp h ia , P A ...................
W e s tm o re la n d , P A ...............
Y o rk , P A ...................................
P ro v id e n c e , R l .......................
C h a rle s to n , S C ......................
G re e n v ille , S C .......................
R ic h la n d , S C ...........................

1 7 2 ,8 6 0
1 4 1 ,9 4 4
4 8 5 ,8 2 2
6 5 8 ,8 2 7
1 3 4 ,1 2 8
1 6 5 ,8 7 9
2 8 8 ,6 5 0
1 8 0 ,7 1 1
2 2 6 ,3 6 2
2 0 5 ,8 4 1

.2
-.8
.5
-.7
-.4
- 1 .0
-.7
- 1 .0
-3 .0
-.5

119
189
96
182
162
199
183
200
243
167

3 5 ,5 6 4
2 8 ,9 2 4
4 4 ,3 6 6
4 0 ,8 1 3
2 8 ,8 2 7
3 1 ,9 3 6
3 4 ,5 6 6
2 9 ,0 1 3
3 2 ,6 2 2
3 0 ,5 9 1

.8
3 .8
1 .3
2 .8
3 .0
3 .3
3 .5
4 .8
4 .3
3 .3

2.2

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

67

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

21.

C o n t in u e d — A n n u a l d a ta : E m p lo y m e n t a n d a v e r a g e a n n u a l p a y fo r
all w o rk e rs c o v e r e d u n d e r U l a n d U C F E

in th e 249 la rg e s t U .S .

c o u n t ie s
E m p lo y m e n t
C o u n ty 1
2001

A v erag e a nn ual pay

P e rc ent
change,
2 0 0 0 -2 0 0 1 2

R a nked by
perce n t
cha nge,
20 0 0 -2 0 0 1 3

2001

P e rc ent
change,
200 0-2 0 0 1 2

S p a rta n b u rg , S C ...................
M in n e h a h a , S D .....................
D a vid s o n , T N .........................
H a m ilto n , T N ...........................
K n o x, T N ...................................
S h e lb y , T N ..............................
B e xa r, T X .................................
C a m e ro n , T X .........................
C ollin , T X .................................
D a lla s , T X ................................

1 1 7 ,2 6 2
1 0 6 ,7 1 7
4 3 4 ,0 0 6
1 8 7 ,7 2 4
2 0 3 ,4 7 0
4 9 6 ,6 4 7
6 5 5 ,1 9 5
1 1 1 ,3 7 4
1 8 1 ,0 0 7
1 ,5 5 0 ,8 3 5

-2 .2
1.1
-.1
-.3
.6
-.5
.9
2.1
5 .7
-.6

232
62
141
157
92
168
72
34
3
174

3 1 ,8 5 6
2 9 ,2 0 5
3 5 ,5 0 9
3 1 ,2 4 0
3 0 ,7 6 5
3 5 ,7 9 1
3 1 ,0 3 2
2 2 ,1 4 2
4 1 ,3 3 8
4 4 ,9 0 9

4.1
3 .5
1.9
2 .2
2 .2
4 .2
3 .7
2 .7
2 .0
1.2

D e n to n , T X .............................
El P a s o , T X .............................
H arris , T X ................................
H id a lg o , T X .............................
J e ffe rs o n , T X .........................
Lub b o ck, T X ...........................
N u e c e s , T X .............................
T a rra n t, T X .............................
T ra v is , T X ................................
S a lt L a k e , U T .........................

1 2 2 ,5 5 2
2 4 8 ,4 0 7
1 ,8 6 4 ,1 0 0
1 6 8 ,6 1 0
1 1 8 ,7 6 4
1 1 8 ,0 4 2
1 4 3 ,4 7 0
7 0 9 ,1 6 2
5 3 4 ,8 6 1
5 3 0 ,4 9 7

.9
-1 .2
1 .7
3.1
-1 .9
2.1
.7
.5
-.7
-.1

73
209
45
17
228
35
86
97
184
142

3 0 ,7 8 8
2 5 ,8 4 7
4 3 ,7 5 1
2 2 ,3 1 3
3 2 ,5 7 0
2 6 ,5 7 7
2 9 ,4 0 6
3 7 ,2 8 7
4 1 ,6 9 8
3 3 ,2 1 0

5.1
3.1
4 .5
2 .8
4.1
1.1
4 .3
5 .2
.9
3 .2

U ta h , U T ...................................
A rlington, V A ...........................
C h e s te rfie ld , V A ....................
F a irfax , V A ...............................
H e n rico , V A ............................
N orfolk, V A .............................
R ic h m o n d , V A ........................
V irg in ia B e a c h , V A ...............
C la rk , W A ................................
K ing, W A ...................................

1 4 3 ,4 2 3
1 5 9 ,1 7 0
1 0 7 ,7 2 1
5 4 2 ,9 8 4
1 6 9 ,8 2 7
1 4 6 ,4 1 4
1 6 4 ,9 0 6
1 6 6 ,0 0 7
1 1 4 ,7 1 6
1 ,1 4 6 ,1 9 1

.5
.3
-.1
2 .7
2 .0
.8
-.7
.9
2.1
-.9

98
111
143
24
38
79
185
74
36
196

2 8 ,2 6 6
5 5 ,3 9 0
3 2 ,9 5 7
5 2 ,6 4 1
3 7 ,8 6 9
3 3 ,5 0 4
4 0 ,1 7 3
2 6 ,7 5 0
3 3 ,1 2 5
4 7 ,1 8 6

1 .3
4 .8
3 .4
2.1
4 .8
4.1
4 .0
5 .3
3 .0
-.6

P ie rc e, W A ...............................
S n o h o m is h , W A ....................
S p o k a n e , W A .........................
K a n a w h a , W V ........................
B row n, W l ................................
D a n e , W l ...................................
M ilw a u k e e , W l .......................
W a u k e s h a , W l .......................

2 3 8 ,6 0 0
2 0 9 ,6 5 7
1 9 0 ,0 5 7
1 1 1 ,5 5 2
1 4 1 ,9 5 0
2 7 9 ,2 0 8
5 2 2 ,0 2 2
2 2 4 ,7 2 1

-1 .5
-.3
.0
-.8
-.3
1 .9
-.8
.6

216
158
134
190
159
40
191
93

3 1 ,2 6 1
3 6 ,3 8 8
2 9 ,3 1 0
3 1 ,6 0 1
3 2 ,6 3 1
3 4 ,0 9 7
3 5 ,7 3 6
3 7 ,0 9 2

4 .7
3 .6
-1 .5
4 .8
3 .5
3 .9
2 .9
3 .7

S a n J u a n , P R ........................

3 2 4 ,7 9 1

-.5

169

2 2 ,1 7 9

4.1

' In clu d e s a r e a s n o t officially d e s ig n a te d a s
c o u n tie s.
See
N o te s on C u rre n t L a b o r
S ta tistic s .

4
T o ta ls for th e U n ite d S ta te s d o not in clu d e
d a ta fo r P u erto R ico.
N o te: D a ta p e rta in to w o rk e rs c o v e re d by
U n e m p lo y m e n t
In s u ra n c e
(U l)
and
U n e m p lo y m e n t
C o m p e n s a tio n
fo r
F e d e ra l
E m p lo y e e s (U C F E ) p ro g ra m s. T h e 2 4 8 U .S .
c o u n tie s c o m p ris e 6 6 .2 p e rc e n t o f th e total
c o v e re d w o rk e rs in th e U n ite d S ta te s .

2 P e rc e n t c h a n g e s w e r e c o m p u te d from
a n n u a l e m p lo y m e n t a n d p a y d a ta a d ju s te d fo r
n o n e co n o m ic co u n ty re cla ss ifica tio n s .
See
N o te s on C u rre n t L a b o r S tatistics.
3 R a n k in g s
fo r
p e rc e n t
change
in
e m p lo y m e n t a re b a s e d on th e 2 4 9 c o u n tie s th a t
a r e c o m p a ra b le o v e r th e y e a r.

22.

A n n u a l d a ta :

E m p lo y m e n t sta tu s o f th e p o p u la t io n

[Numbers in thousands]____________________________
E m p lo y m e n t sta tu s

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n al p o p u la tio n ..............

1 9 4 ,8 3 8

1 9 6 ,8 1 4

1 9 8 ,5 8 4

2 0 0 ,5 9 1

2 0 3 ,1 3 3

2 0 5 ,2 2 0

2 0 7 ,7 5 3

2 1 2 ,5 7 7

2 1 5 ,0 9 2

2 1 7 ,5 7 0

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ..........................................

1 2 9 ,2 0 0

1 3 1 ,0 5 6

1 3 2 ,3 0 4

1 3 3 ,9 4 3

1 3 6 ,2 9 7

1 3 7 ,6 7 3

1 3 9 ,3 6 8

1 4 2 ,5 8 3

1 4 3 ,7 3 4

1 4 4 ,8 6 3

L a b o r fo rc e p a rtic ip a tio n r a te ..................

6 6 .3

6 6 .6

6 6 .6

6 6 .8

6 7 .1

6 7 .1

6 7.1

6 7 .1

6 6 .8

6 6 .6

E m p lo y e d ......................................................

1 2 0 ,2 5 9

1 2 3 ,0 6 0

1 2 4 ,9 0 0

1 2 6 ,7 0 8

1 2 9 ,5 5 8

1 3 1 ,4 6 3

1 3 3 ,4 8 8

1 3 6 ,8 9 1

1 3 6 ,9 3 3

1 3 6 ,4 8 5

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p u la tio n ra tio ...........

6 1 .7

6 2 .5

6 2 .9

6 3 .2

6 3 .8

6 4.1

6 4 .3

6 4 .4

6 3 .7

6 2 .7

U n e m p lo y e d ................................................

8 ,9 4 0

7 ,9 9 6

7 ,4 0 4

7 ,2 3 6

6 ,7 3 9

6 ,2 1 0

5 ,8 8 0

5 ,6 9 2

6 ,8 0 1

8 ,3 7 8

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ..............................

6 .9

6.1

5 .6

5 .4

4 .9

4 .5

4 .2

4 .0

4 .7

5 .8

N o t in th e la b o r fo r c e ......................................

6 5 ,6 3 8

6 5 ,7 5 8

6 6 ,2 8 0

6 6 ,6 4 7

6 6 ,8 3 6

6 7 ,5 4 7

6 8 ,3 8 5

6 9 ,9 9 4

7 1 ,3 5 9

7 2 ,7 0 7

68
Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

23.

A n n u a l d a ta :

E m p lo y m e n t le v e ls b y in d u stry

[Inthousands]
1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

T o ta l e m p lo y m e n t.....................................................

Industry

1 1 0 ,7 1 3

1 1 4 ,1 6 3

1 1 7 ,1 9 1

1 1 9 ,6 0 8

1 2 2 ,6 9 0

1 2 5 ,8 6 5

1 2 8 ,9 1 6

1 3 1 ,7 2 0

1 3 1 ,9 2 2

1 3 0 ,7 9 3

P riv a te s e c to r..........................................................

9 1 ,8 7 2

9 5 ,0 3 6

9 7 ,8 8 5

1 0 0 ,1 8 9

1 0 3 ,1 3 3

1 0 6 ,0 4 2

1 0 8 ,7 0 9

1 1 1 ,0 1 8

1 1 0 ,9 8 9

1 0 9 ,5 3 1

G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ..............................................

2 3 ,3 5 2

2 3 ,9 0 8

2 4 ,2 6 5

2 4 ,4 9 3

2 4 ,9 6 2

2 5 ,4 1 4

2 5 ,5 0 7

2 5 ,6 6 9

2 4 ,9 4 4

2 3 ,8 3 6

M in in g .................................................................

610

601

581

580

596

590

539

543

565

557

C o n s tru c tio n ....................................................

4 ,6 6 8

4 ,9 8 6

5 ,1 6 0

5 ,4 1 8

5 ,6 9 1

6 ,0 2 0

6 ,4 1 5

6 ,6 5 3

6 ,6 8 5

6 ,5 5 5

M a n u fa c tu rin g .................................................

1 8 ,0 7 5

1 8 ,3 2 1

1 8 ,5 2 4

1 8 ,4 9 5

1 8 ,6 7 5

1 8 ,8 0 5

1 8 ,5 5 2

1 8 ,4 7 3

1 7 ,6 9 5

1 6 ,7 2 5

S e rv ic e -p ro d u c in g ............................................

8 7 ,3 6 1

9 0 ,2 5 6

9 2 ,9 2 5

9 5 ,1 1 5

9 7 ,7 2 7

1 0 0 ,4 5 1

1 0 3 ,4 0 9

1 0 6 ,0 5 1

1 0 6 ,9 7 8

1 0 6 ,9 5 7

T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d public u tilities..........

5 ,8 1 1

5 ,9 8 4

6 ,1 3 2

6 ,2 5 3

6 ,4 0 8

6 ,6 1 1

6 ,8 3 4

7 ,0 3 1

7 ,0 6 5

6 ,7 7 3

W h o le s a le tr a d e ............................................

5 ,9 8 1

6 ,1 6 2

6 ,3 7 8

6 ,4 8 2

6 ,6 4 8

6 ,8 0 0

6 ,9 1 1

6 ,9 4 7

6 ,7 7 6

6 ,6 7 1

1 9 ,7 7 3

2 0 ,5 0 7

2 1 ,1 8 7

2 1 ,5 9 7

2 1 ,9 6 6

2 2 ,2 9 5

2 2 ,8 4 8

2 3 ,3 3 7

2 3 ,5 2 2

2 3 ,3 0 6

R e ta il tr a d e ........................................................
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re al e s ta te ....
S e r v ic e s ............................................................

F e d e r a l...........................................................

L o c a l...............................................................
N O TE :

6 ,7 5 7

6 ,8 9 6

6 ,8 0 6

6 ,9 1 1

7 ,1 0 9

7 ,3 8 9

7 ,5 5 5

7 ,5 7 8

7 ,7 1 2

7 ,7 6 1

3 0 ,1 9 7

3 1 ,5 7 9

3 3 ,1 1 7

3 4 ,4 5 4

3 6 ,0 4 0

3 7 ,5 3 3

3 9 ,0 5 5

4 0 ,4 5 7

4 0 ,9 7 0

4 1 ,1 8 4

1 8 ,8 4 1

1 9 ,1 2 8

1 9 ,3 0 5

1 9 ,4 1 9

1 9 ,5 5 7

1 9 ,8 2 3

2 0 ,2 0 6

2 0 ,7 0 2

2 0 ,9 3 3

2 1 ,2 6 2

2 ,9 1 5

2 ,8 7 0

2 ,8 2 2

2 ,7 5 7

2 ,6 9 9

2 ,6 8 6

2 ,6 6 9

2 ,7 7 7

2 ,6 1 6

2 ,6 1 9

4 ,4 8 8

4 ,5 7 6

4 ,6 3 5

4 ,6 0 6

4 ,5 8 2

4 ,6 1 2

4 ,7 0 9

4 ,7 8 6

4 ,8 8 5

4 ,9 4 7

1 1 ,4 3 8

1 1 ,6 8 2

1 1 ,8 4 9

1 2 ,0 5 6

1 2 ,2 7 6

1 2 ,5 2 5

1 2 ,8 2 9

1 3 ,1 3 9

1 3 ,4 3 2

1 3 ,6 9 5

S e e "N o te s o n th e d a ta " fo r a d e sc rip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a rk revisio n .

24. A n n u a l d a t a : A v e r a g e h o u rs a n d e a r n in g s o f p r o d u c t io n o r n o n s u p e rv is o ry w o rk e rs o n n o n fa r m
p a y r o lls , b y in d u stry
Industry

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

P rivate sector:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs .............................................................

3 4 .5

3 4 .7

3 4 .5

3 4 .4

3 4 .6

3 4 .6

3 4 .5

3 4 .5

3 4 .2

3 4 .1

A v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )................................

1 0 .8 3

1 1 .1 2

1 1 .4 3

1 1 .8 2

1 2 .2 8

1 2 .7 8

1 3 .2 4

1 3 .7 6

1 4 .3 2

1 4 .7 7

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )..............................

3 7 3 .6 4

3 8 5 .8 6

3 9 4 .3 4

4 0 6 .6 1

4 2 4 .8 9

4 4 2 .1 9

4 5 6 .7 8

4 7 4 .7 2

4 8 9 .7 4

5 0 3 .6 6

M ining:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................

4 4 .3

4 4 .8

4 4 .7

4 5 .3

4 5 .4

4 3 .9

4 3 .2

4 3 .1

4 3 .5

4 2 .9

A v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs ).............................

1 4 .6 0

1 4 .8 8

1 5 .3 0

1 5 .6 2

1 6 .1 5

16.9 1

1 7 .0 5

1 7 .2 2

1 7 .5 6

1 7 .7 6

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )...........................

6 4 6 .7 8

6 6 6 .6 2

6 8 3 .9 1

7 0 7 .5 9

7 3 3 .2 1

7 4 2 .3 5

7 3 6 .5 6

7 4 2 .1 8

7 6 3 .8 6

7 6 1 .9 0

C o n s tru c tio n :
3 8 .5

3 8 .9

3 8 .9

3 9 .0

3 9 .0

3 8 .9

3 9.1

3 9 .3

3 9 .3

3 8 .8

A v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )............................

1 4 .3 8

1 4 .7 3

1 5 .0 9

1 5 .4 7

1 6 .0 4

1 6.6 1

1 7 .1 9

1 7 .8 8

1 8 .3 4

1 8 .8 7

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )...........................

5 5 3 .6 3

5 7 3 .0 0

5 8 7 .0 0

6 0 3 .3 3

6 2 5 .5 6

6 4 6 .1 3

6 7 2 .1 3

7 0 2 .6 8

7 2 0 .7 6

7 3 2 .1 6

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................

M an u factu rin g :
4 1 .4

4 2 .0

4 1 .6

4 1 .6

4 2 .0

4 1 .7

4 1 .7

4 1 .6

4 0 .7

4 0 .9

A v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )............................

1 1 .7 4

1 2 .0 7

1 2 .3 7

1 2 .7 7

1 3 .1 7

1 3 .4 9

1 3 .9 0

1 4 .3 7

1 4 .8 3

1 5 .3 0

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )...........................

4 8 6 .0 4

5 0 6 .9 4

5 1 4 .5 9

5 3 1 .2 3

5 5 3 .1 4

5 6 2 .5 3

5 7 9 .6 3

5 9 7 .7 9

6 0 3 .5 8

6 2 5 .7 7

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................

T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilities:
3 9 .3

3 9 .7

3 9 .4

3 9 .6

3 9 .7

3 9 .5

3 8 .7

3 8 .4

3 8 .2

3 8 .3

A v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )............................

1 3 .5 5

1 3 .7 8

1 4 .1 3

1 4 .4 5

1 4 .9 2

1 5.3 1

1 5 .6 9

16.2 1

1 6 .7 9

1 7 .2 9

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )...........................

5 3 2 .5 2

5 4 7 .0 7

5 5 6 .7 2

5 7 2 .2 2

5 9 2 .3 2

6 0 4 .7 5

6 0 7 .2 0

6 2 2 .4 6

6 4 1 .3 8

6 6 2 .2 1

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................

W h o le s a le tra de:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs .........................................................

3 8 .2

3 8 .4

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .4

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .5

3 8 .2

3 8 .4

1 1 .7 4

1 2 .0 6

1 2 .4 3

1 2 .8 7

1 3 .4 5

1 4 .0 7

1 4 .5 9

1 5 .2 2

1 5 .8 6

1 6 .2 1

4 4 8 .4 7

4 6 3 .1 0

4 7 6 .0 7

4 9 2 .9 2

5 1 6 .4 8

5 3 8 .8 8

5 5 8 .8 0

5 8 5 .9 7

6 0 5 .8 5

6 2 2 .4 6

R e tail trade:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................

2 8 .8

2 8 .9

2 8 .8

2 8 .8

2 8 .9

2 9 .0

2 9 .0

2 8 .9

2 8 .9

2 9 .0

A v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )............................

7 .2 9

7 .4 9

7 .6 9

7 .9 9

8 .3 3

8 .7 4

9 .0 9

9 .4 6

9 .7 7

1 0 .0 4

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )...........................

2 0 9 .9 5

2 1 6 .4 6

2 2 1 .4 7

2 3 0 .1 1

2 4 0 .7 4

2 5 3 .4 6

2 6 3 .6 1

2 7 3 .3 9

2 8 2 .8 2

2 9 1 .1 6

F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d real estate:
3 5 .8

3 5 .8

3 5 .9

3 5 .9

3 6.1

3 6 .4

3 6 .2

3 6 .4

3 6.1

3 6 .1

A v e r a g e ho u rly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )............................

1 1 .3 5

1 1 .8 3

1 2 .3 2

1 2 .8 0

1 3 .3 4

1 4 .0 7

1 4 .6 2

1 5 .1 4

1 5 .8 0

1 6 .3 5

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )...........................

4 0 6 .3 3

4 2 3 .5 1

4 4 2 .2 9

4 5 9 .5 2

4 8 1 .5 7

5 1 2 .1 5

5 2 9 .2 4

5 5 1 .1 0

5 7 0 .3 8

5 9 0 .2 4

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................

S e rv ices :
3 2 .5

3 2 .5

3 2 .4

3 2 .4

3 2 .6

3 2 .6

3 2 .6

3 2 .7

3 2 .7

3 2 .6

A v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )............................

1 0 .7 8

1 1 .0 4

1 1 .3 9

1 1 .7 9

1 2 .2 8

1 2 .8 4

1 3 .3 7

1 3 .9 3

1 4 .6 7

1 5 .2 4

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s (in d o lla rs )...........................

3 5 0 .3 5

3 5 8 .8 0

3 6 9 .0 4

3 8 2 .0 0

4 0 0 .3 3

4 1 8 .5 8

4 3 5 .8 6

4 5 5 .5 1

4 7 9 .7 1

4 9 6 .8 2

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

69

Current Labor Statistics:

25.

Compensation & Industrial Relations

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d ex , c o m p e n s a t io n ,1 b y o c c u p a t io n a n d industry g r o u p

[June 1989 =100]
2001
S e rie s

Mar.

Ju n e

2002

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

Ju n e

2003

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

Percent c h a n g e
3 m o nths

12 m onths

ended

ended

Mar. 2003
C iv ilia n w o r k e r s 2.............................................................................

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .8

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .0

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .8

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .3

1 6 2 .2

1 6 4 .5

1.4

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .9

1 6 0 .5

162.1

1 6 3 .5

1 6 4 .3

1 6 6 .7

1.5

3 .9

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .3

1 6 1 .4

1 6 2 .4

164.1

1.0

3 .5

3 .9

W o rk e rs , b y o c c u p a tio n a l group:
W h ite -c o lla r w o rk e rs ......................................................................
P ro fe ss io n al s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l.........................................
E x e c u tiv e , a d m in ltra tlv e, a n d m a n a g e ria l...............................

1 5 6 .6

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .6

1 6 1 .2

1 6 3 .7

1 6 5 .6

1 6 6 .3

1 6 6 .7

171.1

2 .6

4 .5

A d m in istrativ e s u p p o rt, including c le rica l................................

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .8

1 5 8 .8

1 6 0 .0

1 6 2 .0

1 6 3 .3

1 6 4 .9

166.1

1 6 8 .3

1 .3

3 .9

B lu e -c o lla r w o rk e rs ..............................................................................

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .3

151.1

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .7

155.1

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .8

1.5

4 .0

S e rv ic e o c c u p a tio n s ............................................................................

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .3

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .4

1 6 1 .3

1 6 2 .2

164.1

1.2

3 .6

W o rk e rs , by in dustry division:
G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ...................................................................................

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .7

163.1

1.8

4 .4

M a n u fa c tu rin g ......................................................................................

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .6

158.1

159.1

1 6 0 .5

1 6 4 .0

2 .2

4 .7

S e rv i c e -p ro d u c in q ................................................................................

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .6

159.1

1 6 0 .7

1 6 2 .2

1 6 2 .8

1 6 5 .0

S e rv ic e s ................................................................................................
H e a lth s e rv ic e s ..................................................................................

1 5 8 .7

1 6 9 .2

1.4

3 .7

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .4

158.1

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .2

161.1

1 6 3 .2

1 6 3 .9

1 6 5 .3

.9

3 .2

1 5 2 .5

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .8

163.1

1 6 4 .5

1 6 6 .4

1.2

3 .7

H o s p ita ls ............................................................................................

1 5 3 .2

1 5 5 .6

1 5 8 .2

1 6 0 .0

1 6 2 .3

1 6 3 .8

1 6 5 .7

1 6 7 .6

1 6 9 .9

1.4

4 .7

E d u c a tio n a l s e rv ic e s ......................................................................

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .2

156 .1

1 5 6 .6

157.1

1 5 7 .4

1 6 1 .6

1 6 2 .8

1 6 3 .6

.5

4.1

P u b lic a d m in is tra tio n 3........................................................................

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .5

1 6 0 .2

1 6 1 .7

1 6 3 .4

1.1

4 .4

1 5 2 .6

1 5 4 .0

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .7

1 6 0 .2

1 6 1 .7

1 6 2 .4

1 6 4 .5

1 .3

3 .7

P r iv a te in d u s t r y w o r k e r s ....................................................................

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .9

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .6

1 6 2 .3

1 6 5 .0

1.7

3 .8

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .......................................................

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .2

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .6

1 6 2 .4

165.1

1.7

3 .8

W h ite -c o lla r w o rk e rs ..........................................................................

1 5 5 .7

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .7

160.1

1 6 1 .9

1 6 3 .8

1 6 4 .6

1 6 5 .2

168.1

1 .8

3 .8

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ....................................................

1 5 6 .5

158.1

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .3

1 6 5 .3

1 6 5 .9

169.1

1 .9

3 .9

1 6 2 .5

1 6 3 .6

1 6 4 .4

1 6 6 .5

1.3

3.1

172.1

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ....................................................................

W o rk e rs , b y o c c u p a tio n a l group:

P ro fe ss io n al s p ec ialty a n d tech n ical o c cu p a tio n s ............

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .3

1 6 1 .5

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itra tiv e, a n d m a n a g e ria l o c cu p a tio n s ..

1 5 7 .3

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .2

1 6 1 .8

1 6 4 .4

1 6 6 .6

1 6 7 .0

1 6 7 .2

2 .9

4 .7

S a le s o c c u p a tio n s ...........................................................................

1 5 2 .3

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .7

1 6 1 .6

1 6 1 .6

1 6 1 .9

1 6 3 .5

1 .0

3 .7

A d m in istrativ e s u p p o rt o ccu p atio n s, including c le ric a l...

1 56.1

1 5 7 .7

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .8

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .2

1 6 5 .6

1 6 6 .7

1 6 9 .0

1.4

3 .8

B lu e -c o lla r w o rk e rs ............................................................................

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .3

1 5 1 .0

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .6

155.1

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .3

1 5 9 .7

1 .5

4 .0

P rec isio n pro d u c tio n , w a ft, a n d re p air o c cu p a tio n s .........

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .8

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .7

1 5 6 .9

1 5 7 .8

1 6 0 .0

1.4

4.1

M a c h in e o p e ra to rs , a s s e m b le rs , a n d in sp ecto rs...............

1 4 8 .3

149.1

1 5 0 .4

1 5 1 .5

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .7

1 5 5 .4

1 5 6 .7

1 5 9 .9

2 .0

4.1

T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d m a terial m oving o c cu p a tio n s .............

1 4 2 .6

1 4 3 .9

1 4 5 .6

1 4 6 .3

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .6

1 5 1 .0

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .2

.9

3 .0

H a n d le rs , e q u ip m e n t c le a n e rs , h e lp ers , a n d lab o re rs ....

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .7

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .4

1 6 2 .9

1 6 4 .9

1.2

3 .9

S e rv ic e o c c u p a tio n s ..........................................................................

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 4 .8

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .4

1 5 9 .0

1 5 9 .8

1 6 1 .7

1.2

3 .4

P roduction a n d n o n s u p ervisory occu p a tio n s 4.....................

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .5

157.1

1 5 8 .7

1 5 9 .7

1 6 0 .5

1 6 2 .6

1.3

3 .5

G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ................................................................................

1 5 0 .7

152.1

153.1

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .2

1 5 7 .6

1 5 8 .6

160.1

1 6 3 .0

1 .8

4 .4

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c cu p a tio n s ................................................

150.1

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .9

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .2

1 6 2 .4

2 .0

4 .4
4 .8

W o rk e rs , by in dustry division:

W h ite -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ...........................................................

1 5 4 .5

1 5 6 .5

1 5 6 .8

158.1

160.1

1 6 1 .9

1 6 2 .9

1 6 4 .3

1 6 7 .8

2.1

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c cu p a tio n s ................................................

1 5 3 .0

1 5 5 .0

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .4

1 6 0 .2

161.1

1 6 2 .3

1 6 6 .3

2 .5

5 .0

B lu e -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ..............................................................

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .3

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .3

1 5 9 .9

1.7

4.1

C o n s tru c tio n ......................................................................................

1 4 8 .2

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .0

154.1

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .9

159.1

.8

3 .2

M a n u fa c tu rin g ...................................................................................

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .6

158.1

159.1

1 6 0 .5

1 6 4 .0

2 .2

4 .7

W h ite -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ...........................................................

1 5 4 .2

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .9

159.1

161.1

1 6 2 .2

1 6 3 .3

167.1

2 .3

5 .0

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c cu p a tio n s ................................................

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .0

1 5 3 .8

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .7

165.1

2 .7

5 .4

B lu e -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ..............................................................

1 49.1

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 6 1 .6

2.1

4 .5

D u ra b le s ...............................................................................................

1 5 1 .8

153.1

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .3

1 5 8 .9

1 6 0 .6

1 6 4 .4

2 .4

4 .8

N o n d u ra b le s .......................................................................................

1 5 0 .4

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .2

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .3

163.1

1.7

4 .6

S e rv ic e -p ro d u c in g ................................................................................

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .8

1 6 2 .7

163.1

1 6 5 .6

1.5

3 .6

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c cu p a tio n s ................................................

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .8

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .4

1 6 3 .5

1 6 4 .0

1 6 6 .6

1.6

3 .5

W h ite -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ............................................................

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .4

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .3

162.1

1 6 4 .0

1 6 4 .7

165.1

1 6 7 .9

1.7

3 .6

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c cu p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 7 .5

159.1

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .2

164.1

1 6 5 .6

1 6 6 .5

1 6 7 .0

1 6 9 .9

1.7

3 .5

B lu e -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ..............................................................

1 4 7 .7

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 1 .4

1 5 3 .2

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .6

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .7

1.1

3 .6

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .8

3 .3

S e rv ic e o c c u p a tio n s ....................................................................

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .0

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .3

161.1

1.1

1 5 0 .5

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .9

1 6 0 .8

1 6 1 .7

1 6 3 .2

.9

3 .8

T ra n s p o rta tio n .................................................................................

1 4 5 .4

1 4 6 .9

1 4 8 .2

151.1

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .4

156.1

1 5 7 .8

1.1

3 .5

P u b lic u tilities.........................................................................

1 5 7 .3

1 5 9 .8

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .5

1 6 3 .9

1 6 5 .5

1 6 8 .2

1 6 9 .2

1 7 0 .5

.8

4 .0

C o m m u n ic a tio n s ........................................................................

1 5 8 .3

161.1

1 6 2 .8

1 6 3 .4

1 6 6 .0

166.1

1 6 9 .0

170.1

1 7 1 .3

.7

3 .2

E le c tric, g a s, a n d s an itary s e rv ic e s ..................................

1 5 6 .0

158.1

158.1

159.1

1 6 1 .3

1 6 4 .8

1 6 7 .2

168.1

1 6 9 .5

.8

5.1

W h o le s a le a n d retail tr a d e ...........................................................

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .5

1 5 9 .5

1 5 9 .6

1 5 9 .7

1 6 1 .3

1 .0

3.1

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .4

157.1

1 5 7 .5

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .3

1 6 0 .4

1 6 1 .8

.9

2 .7

W h o le s a le tr a d e .............................................................................

4 .7

T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d public utilities............................................

1 55.1

1 5 7 .8

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .5

1 6 1 .9

1 6 6 .3

1 6 5 .9

1 6 6 .7

1 6 9 .5

1.7

E xcluding s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .6

1 6 2 .3

1 6 4 .4

166.1

1 6 7 .2

1 6 8 .4

.7

3 .8

R e ta il tr a d e .......................................................................................

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 3 .2

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .0

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .6

.5

2 .0

G e n e ra l m e rc h a n d is e s to re s .................................................

1 4 7 .3

1 4 9 .4

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .4

1 5 4 .2

156.1

155.1

1 5 6 .4

.8

2 .6

F o o d s to re s ...................................................................................

146.1

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .9

1 5 4 .5

1 5 6 .3

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .5

.8

3 .0

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d of ta b le .

70 Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

25. C o n t in u e d — E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x , c o m p e n s a t io n , 1 b y o c c u p a t io n a n d in d u stry g r o u p

[June 1989 =100]

S e rie s

Mar.

Jun e

2002

2002

2001
Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

Jun e

Sept.

D ec.

Mar.

P e rce n t c h a n g e
3 m o n th s

12 m o n th s

en d ed

en d ed

Mar. 2003
7 .0

F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te .........................................

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .9

1 6 1 ,3

1 6 5 .2

1 6 7 .3

1 6 8 .0

1 6 8 .5

1 7 6 .7

4 .9

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 6 1 .2

1 63.1

1 6 4 .7

1 6 5 .0

1 6 9 .8

1 7 1 .3

1 72 .1

1 73 .1

1 8 2 .0

5.1

7 .2

B a n k in g , s a v in g s a n d lo an , a n d o th e r c re d it a g e n c ie s .

1 7 0 .8

1 7 2 .7

1 7 5 .4

1 7 4 .5

1 82.1

1 8 4 .2

1 8 4 .6

1 8 5 .3

2 0 4 .3

1 0 .3

1 2 .2

In s u ra n c e .............................................................................................

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .3

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .3

1 6 4 .0

1 66.1

1 67 .1

1 6 7 .9

172 .1

2 .5

4 .9

S e r v ic e s ..................................................................................................

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .8

1 6 0 .0

1 6 1 .0

1 6 2 .6

1 6 3 .7

1 6 4 .9

1 6 5 .4

1 6 7 .1

1 .0

2 .8

.6

1 .3

H e a lth s e rv ic e s ................................................................................

1 6 0 .5

1 6 3 .0

1 6 5 .2

1 6 6 .2

1 6 6 .3

1 6 6 .6

1 6 7 .2

1 6 7 .5

1 6 8 .5

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .8

1 5 8 .4

1 6 0 .6

1 6 2 .0

1 6 3 .2

1 6 4 .4

1 6 6 .5

1 .3

3 .7
4 .9

H o s p ita ls ...........................................................................................

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 8 .4

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .5

1 6 6 .2

1 68 .1

1 7 0 .8

1 .6

E d u c a tio n a l s e r v ic e s .....................................................................

1 6 2 .3

1 6 2 .6

1 6 6 .4

1 6 7 .6

1 6 8 .5

1 6 9 .0

1 7 3 .5

1 7 5 .2

1 7 6 .3

.6

4 .6

C o lle g e s a n d u n iv e rs itie s .........................................................

1 6 2 .2

1 6 2 .6

1 6 6 .2

1 6 7 .5

1 68.1

1 6 8 .4

1 7 2 .0

1 7 3 .7

1 7 4 .5

.5

3 .8

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g .............................................................................

1 53.1

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .3

1 61 .1

1 6 2 .0

1 6 2 .5

1 6 4 .9

1 .5

3 .5

W h ite -c o lla r w o r k e r s ......................................................................

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .5

1 6 2 .2

1 64 .1

1 6 4 .8

1 6 5 .3

1 6 8 .0

1 .6

3 .6

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 5 7 .5

1 59 .1

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .3

1 6 4 .2

1 6 5 .7

1 6 6 .6

1 67 .1

1 7 0 .0

1 .7

3 .5

B lu e -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ................................................................

1 4 6 .9

1 48 .1

1 5 0 .2

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

1 .0

3 .5

S e r v ic e o c c u p a tio n s ......................................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .7

1 52 .1

1 54.1

1 5 5 .9

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .2

1 61 .1

1 .2

3 .3

S ta te a n d local g o v e rn m e n t w o rk e rs ..........................................

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .2

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .2

156 .1

1 5 6 .7

1 60.1

1 6 1 .5

1 6 2 .6

.7

4 .2

W h ite -c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .2

1 5 5 .7

1 5 9 .3

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .7

.6

4 .2

P ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l..........................................

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .2

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .2

1 5 3 .6

1 54 .1

1 58 .1

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .2

.5

4 .3

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in is tra tiv e , a n d m a n a g e ria l............................

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .5

1 5 9 .6

1 6 2 .3

1 6 3 .8

1 6 5 .3

.9

3 .6

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .6

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .0

1 6 1 .0

1 6 2 .4

1 6 3 .8

.9

4 .4

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .0

1 5 1 .5

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .0

1 5 4 .7

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .8

1 6 1 .3

.9

4 .7

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l group:

W o rk e rs , b y in d u s try division:
S e r v ic e s ...................................................................................................

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .6

1 5 4 .4

1 5 4 .9

1 5 5 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 9 .7

1 6 0 .9

1 6 1 .8

.6

4 .1

S e rv ic e s e x c lu d in g s c h o o ls 5 .........................................................

1 50 .1

1 5 1 .9

1 5 4 .5

1 56 .1

1 5 7 .9

1 5 8 .7

1 6 1 .0

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .0

.7

3 .9

H e a lth s e r v ic e s .................................................................................

1 52 .1

1 5 4 .4

1 57 .1

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .4

1 6 1 .4

1 6 3 .5

1 6 5 .5

1 6 6 .4

.5

3 .7

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .7

1 5 7 .4

1 59.1

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .8

1 64 .1

1 6 6 .2

1 6 7 .0

.5

3 .9

1 4 9 .6

1 50 .1

1 54 .1

1 5 4 .5

1 5 4 .8

1 55.1

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .3

161 .1

.5

4.1

.4

4.1

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 4 .4

1 5 4 .8

1 55 .1

1 5 5 .4

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .4

E le m e n ta ry a n d s e c o n d a ry .................................................

1 4 8 .5

1 4 9 .0

1 5 2 .8

1 53 .1

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .6

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .8

1 5 9 .4

.4

3 .9

C o lle g e s a n d u n iv e rs itie s .....................................................

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .4

1 6 4 .7

1 6 5 .8

1 6 7 .0

.7

4 .4

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .9

1 6 0 .2

1 6 1 .7

1 6 3 .4

1.1

4 .4

1 C o s t (c e n ts p e r h o u r w o rk e d ) m e a s u re d in th e E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x consists of
w a g e s , s a la rie s , a n d e m p lo y e r c o s t o f e m p lo y e e b e n efits.
2 C o n s is ts o f p riv a te in dustry w o rk e rs (e x clu d in g fa rm a n d h o u s eh o ld w o rk e rs ) a n d
S ta te a n d lo ca l g o v e r n m e n t (e x clu d in g F e d e ra l G o v e rn m e n t) w o rk e rs .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

3 C o n s ists o f leg is lativ e , ju d icial, a d m in is tra tive , a n d re g u la to ry activ ities .
4 T h is s e rie s ha s th e s a m e industry a n d o c c u p a tio n a l c o v e ra g e a s th e H o u rly
E a rn in g s in d e x, w h ich w a s d isc o n tin u ed in J a n u a ry 1 9 8 9 .
6 In clu d e s , for e x a m p le , library, social, a n d h e alth s e rv ice s.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

71

Current Labor Statistics: Compensation & Industrial Relations

26.

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x , w a g e s a n d s a la rie s , b y o c c u p a t i o n a n d in d u stry g r o u p

[June 1989 =100]___________
2001

2002

2003

S e rie s
Mar.

Jun e

S ept.

D ec.

Mar.

Jun e

Sept.

D ec.

Mar.

P e rce n t c h a n g e
3 m o n th s

12 m o n th s

en d ed

en d ed

Mar. 2003
C iv ilia n w o rk e rs 1...........................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .8

1 56 .1

1 5 7 .2

1 5 7 .8

1 5 9 .3

1 .0

2 .9

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l group:
W h ite -c o lla r w o rk e rs .........................................................

1 5 1 .7

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .6

1 5 7 .0

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .6

1 60 .1

1 6 1 .9

1.1

3.1

P ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l..........................................

1 51.1

1 5 2 .-

1 5 4 .2

1 55 .1

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .2

1 5 8 .0

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .3

.4

2 .4

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itra tiv e , a n d m a n a g e ria l...............................

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .7

1 58 .1

1 6 0 .7

1 6 2 .6

1 6 3 .5

1 6 3 .8

1 6 7 .9

2 .5

4 .5

A d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o rt, including c le ric a l.................................

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .7

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .6

1 6 1 .8

.7

2 .9

B lu e -c o lla r w o r k e r s ................................................................................

1 4 4 .7

1 4 6 .0

1 4 7 .6

1 4 8 .5

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .0

1 5 1 .9

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .8

.8

2 .7

S e r v ic e o c c u p a tio n s .................................................................

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .2

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .2

1 55.1

‘ 5 6 .2

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .0

.7

2 .5

W o rk e rs , b y in d u s try division:
G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ..................................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ........................................................................................
S e rv ic e -p ro d u c in g ..................................................................
S e r v ic e s ....................................................................................................
H e a lth s e r v ic e s .........................................................................

1 4 7 .0

1 4 7 ,6

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .8

1 53 .1

1 5 3 .9

1 55 .1

1 5 6 .3

.8

3 .0

1 4 8 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .7

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .4

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .0

1 .0

3 .2

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .5

1 4 9 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .2

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .8

1 6 0 .5

1.1

3 .0

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .6

1 5 6 .2

1 57 .1

1 58 .1

1 5 8 .8

1 6 0 .7

1 61 .1

1 6 1 .9

.5

2 .4

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .0

.7

3 .0

1 4 8 .8

1 5 1 .2

1 5 .5

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .2

1 6 3 .5

.8

4 .0

E d u c a tio n a l s e rv ic e s ....................................................................

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .0

1 5 4 .6

1 55 .1

1 5 5 .3

1 5 5 .6

1 5 9 .3

1 60 .1

1 6 0 .4

.2

3 .3

P u b lic a d m in is tra tio n 2 ......................................................................

1 4 7 .6

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .2

.9

3.1
3 .0

H o s p ita ls ...........................................................................................

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ..................................................................................

1 4 9 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .0

1 5 9 .6

1 .0

P rivate in d u s try w o rk e rs ................................................................

1 4 9 .4

1 5 0 .9

1 52 .1

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .0

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .3

1.1

3 .0

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ........................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .9

1 56 .1

1 5 7 .0

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .4

1 .2

2 .9

W h ite -c o lla r w o rk e rs ...........................................................................

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 5 4 .8

1 56.1

1 5 7 .7

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .4

1 6 2 .6

1 .4

3.1

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .....................................................

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .7

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .0

1 6 9 .8

1 6 0 .8

1 6 3 .6

1 .4

3 .2

P ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s .............

1 5 2 .1

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .9

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .2

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .5

.6

1 .8

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itra tiv e , a n d m a n a g e ria l o c c u p a tio n s ..

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 6 1 .3

1 6 3 .6

1 6 4 .3

1 6 4 .5

1 69.1

2 .8

4 .8

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l group:

S a le s o c c u p a tio n s .............................................................................

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .5

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .6

1 5 7 .0

1 5 6 .9

1 5 6 .8

1 58 .1

.8

2 .9

A d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o rt o c cu p a tio n s , including c le ric a l...

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .3

1 6 1 .3

1 6 2 .6

.8

2 .8

B lu e -c o lla r w o r k e r s .............................................................................

1 4 4 .6

1 4 5 .9

1 4 7 .5

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .9

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .6

.8

2 .7

P re c is io n p ro d u c tio n , craft, a n d re p a ir o c c u p a tio n s ........

1 4 4 .6

1 4 5 .7

1 4 7 .7

1 4 8 ,4

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .0

1 5 1 .8

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .4

.7

2 .8

M a c h in e o p e ra to rs , a s s e m b le rs , a n d in sp ec to rs ...............

1 4 5 .6

1 4 6 .9

1 4 8 .1

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .7

1 .0

2 .8

T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d m a te ria l m o v in g o c c u p a tio n s .............

1 3 9 .5

1 4 0 .7

1 42 .1

1 4 2 .8

1 4 4 .8

1 4 5 .2

1 4 6 .3

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .8

.6

2 .1

H a n d le rs , e q u ip m e n t c le a n e rs , h e lp ers , a n d la b o re rs ....

1 4 8 .0

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .4

1 5 4 .2

1 55 .1

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .4

.8

2 .7

S e rv ic e o c c u p a tio n s ............................................................................

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .5

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .0

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .9

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .5

.6

2 .3

P ro d u c tio n a n d n o n s u p e rvis o ry o c cu p a tio n s 3 .....................

1 4 7 .7

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .0

1 5 4 .7

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .4

.8

2 .4

G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ..................................................................................

1 4 7 .0

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 53.1

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .3

.8

3 .0

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .8

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .4

.9

3 .0

W h ite -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ............................................................

1 5 0 .5

1 5 2 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .6

1 5 7 .9

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .0

.9

3 .2

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .9

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .4

1 5 6 .3

1 5 8 .0

1.1

3 .3

B lu e -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ...............................................................

1 4 4 .7

1 46.1

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .8

.8

2 .8

1 4 3 .9

2 .4

W o rk e rs , b y in d u s try division:

C o n s tru c tio n .........................................................................................

1 42.1

1 4 5 .1

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .0

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .2

1 5 0 .6

.3

M a n u fa c tu rin g .....................................................................................

1 4 8 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .7

1 53.1

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .4

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .0

1 .0

3 .2

W h ite -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ............................................................

1 51 .1

1 5 2 .7

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .6

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .6

1 60 .1

.9

3 .4

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .0

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .7

1 .2

3 .5

B lu e -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ...............................................................

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .8

1 49 .1

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .3

1 .0

3 .0

D u r a b le s .................................................................................................

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .8

1 .0

3 .2

N o n d u ra b le s .....................................................................................

1 4 7 .5

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .3

1 5 3 .9

1 5 1 .9

153 .1

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .6

.9

3.1

S e rv ic e -p ro d u c in g ..................................................................................

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .2

1 5 1 .9

1 56.1

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .4

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .6

1 .3

2 .9

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 4 .2

1 56.1

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .3

1 5 9 .6

1 6 1 .7

1 .3

2 .9

W h ite -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s .............................................................

1 5 2 .5

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .2

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .9

1 6 0 .5

1 6 0 .7

1 6 3 .0

1 .4

3 .0

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .6

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .2

1 6 0 .4

1 6 1 .6

1 6 2 .5

1 6 2 .8

1 6 5 .3

1 .5

3.1

B lu e -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ................................................................

1 4 4 .3

1 4 5 .3

1 4 7 .5

1 48.1

1 4 9 .4

1 51.1

1 5 1 .8

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .2

.8

2 .5

S e rv ic e o c c u p a tio n s .......................................................................

146 .1

1 4 7 .2

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .4

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .5

1 54.1

1 55.1

.6

2 .3

T ra n s p o rta tio n a n d p u b lic utilities..............................................

1 4 3 .7

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .7

1 4 9 .2

1 5 0 .5

1 52.1

1 5 3 .4

1 54.1

1 5 4 .8

.5

2 .9

T r a n s p o r ta tio n ...................................................................................

1 3 9 .8

1 4 1 .6

1 4 2 .6

1 4 5 .7

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .6

1 50.1

1 5 0 .5

.3

2.1

P u b lic u tilities .....................................................................................

1 4 8 .7

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .3

1 6 0 .4

.7

4 .0

C o m m u n ic a tio n s ..........................................................................

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .3

1 5 5 .2

1 5 5 .3

157 .1

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .9

.7

4 .2

E le c tric, g a s , a n d s a n ita ry s e rv ic e s ...................................

1 48 .1

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .4

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .0

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .6

.8

3 .7

W h o le s a le a n d re ta il tr a d e ............................................................

1 4 8 .4

150 .1

1 5 0 .6

1 52.1

1 5 3 .0

1 5 5 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .7

.8

2 .4

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .9

1 53.1

-

-

_

-

_

_

W h o le s a le tr a d e ..............................................................................

1 5 1 .6

1 5 4 .5

1 54 .1

1 5 4 .8

1 5 7 .2

1 6 1 .3

1 6 0 .4

1 6 1 .0

1 6 3 .4

1 .5

3 .9
2 .8

_

_

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .4

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .4

1 6 1 .2

1 6 2 .6

1 6 3 .7

1 6 3 .9

.1

R e ta il tr a d e .........................................................................................

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .8

1 4 8 .8

1 5 0 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .7

1 5 2 .9

1 5 2 .7

153 .1

.3

1 .5

G e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to re s ..................................................

1 4 3 .8

1 4 5 .5

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .5

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .9

1 50.1

1 4 9 .2

1 4 9 .8

.4

1 .3

F o o d s to re s .....................................................................................

1 4 3 .3

1 4 4 .5

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .7

1 4 8 .0

1 4 8 .9

1 50.1

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .0

.5

2 .0

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

72 Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

26.

C o n t in u e d — E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x , w a g e s a n d s a la rie s , b y o c c u p a t io n a n d in d u stry g r o u p

[June 1989 =100]________________________________________________________________
2002

2001

2003

P e rce n t c h a n g e

S e rie s
Mar.

Jun e

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

Jun e

Sept.

Mar.

Dec.

3 m o n th s

12 m o n th s

en d ed

en d ed

Mar. 2003
F in a n c e , in s u ra n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te .........................................

1 5 3 .9

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .0

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .0

1 6 2 .4

1 6 2 .6

1 71 .1

5 .2

6 .7

E xc lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 6 .6

1 5 7 .6

159 .1

159 .1

1 6 4 .5

1 6 5 .7

1 66 .1

1 6 7 .3

1 7 6 .7

5 .6

7 .4

B a n k in g , s a v in g s a n d lo an , a n d o th e r c re d it a g e n c ie s .

1 6 9 .4

1 7 0 .8

1 7 3 .2

1 7 1 .7

1 8 1 .2

1 8 2 .8

1 8 2 .7

1 8 3 .9

2 0 6 .4

1 2 .2

1 3 .9

In s u ra n c e ............................................................................................

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .3

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .0

1 57 .1

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .6

1 59 .1

1 6 1 .6

1 .6

2 .9

S e r v ic e s .................................................................................................

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .0

157 .1

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .3

1 6 1 .5

1 6 1 .7

1 6 2 .8

.7

2.1

B u s in e s s s e r v ic e s ..........................................................................

1 5 8 .2

1 6 0 .8

1 6 2 .8

1 6 3 .7

1 6 4 .0

1 6 4 .0

1 6 4 .6

1 6 4 .8

1 6 5 .6

.5

1 .0

H e a lth s e rv ic e s ................................................................................

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .4

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .9

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .9

.7

2 .9

H o s p ita ls ...........................................................................................

1 4 8 .5

1 5 1 .0

1 5 3 .3

1 5 5 .4

1 57.1

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .2

1 62 .1

1 6 3 .6

.9

4.1

1 5 5 .4

1 56 .1

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .2

1 6 1 .2

1 6 5 .2

1 6 6 .5

1 6 7 .1

.4

3 .7

1 54 .1

1 5 5 .0

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .6

1 5 9 .9

1 5 9 .9

1 63.1

1 6 4 .3

1 6 4 .4

.1

2 .8
2 .8

E d u c a tio n a l s e rv ic e s ....................................................................
C o lle g e s a n d u n iv e rs itie s .........................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g .............................................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .2

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .4

1 .2

W h ite -c o lla r w o r k e r s ......................................................................

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .0

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .2

1 6 0 .5

1 6 2 .8

1 .4

3 .0

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .3

1 60 .1

1 6 1 .3

1 62.1

1 6 2 .5

1 6 4 .9

1 .5

3 .0
2 .4

B lu e -c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ................................................................

1 4 2 .8

1 4 3 .9

1 4 5 .8

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .5

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .8

1 5 0 .2

1 51 .1

.6

S e r v ic e o c c u p a tio n s ......................................................................

1 4 6 .0

1 47.1

1 4 8 .2

1 50.1

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .0

.6

2 .4

S tate a n d local g o v e rn m e n t w o rk e rs ..........................................

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .2

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .2

1 56.1

1 5 6 .7

1 60.1

1 6 1 .5

1 6 2 .6

.4

3.1

W h ite -c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .8

1 5 2 .7

1 5 3 .3

1 5 3 .9

1 5 4 .4

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .4

1 5 8 .9

.3

3 .2

P ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l..........................................

1 49.1

1 4 9 .8

1 5 3 .0

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .6

1 54 .1

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .4

1 5 8 .8

.3

3 .4

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in is tra tiv e , a n d m a n a g e ria l..............................

1 5 0 .1

1 5 1 .5

1 5 3 .9

1 55.1

1 5 6 .6

1 5 6 .8

1 5 9 .0

1 60 .1

1 6 0 .9

.5

2 .7

W o rk e rs , b y o c c u p a tio n a l group:

A d m in is tra tiv e s u p p o rt, including c le ric a l................................

1 4 7 .0

1 4 7 .6

1 4 9 .8

1 5 0 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 5 2 .8

1 55 .1

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .9

.6

3 .3

1 4 6 .0

1 4 6 .5

1 49.1

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .6

1 52 .1

1 5 4 .5

155 .1

1 5 6 .2

.7

3 .0

W o rk e rs , b y in d u s try division:
S e r v ic e s ............................................................................ ........................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .2

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .2

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .0

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .2

1 5 9 .5

.2

3 .2

S e r v ic e s e x c lu d in g s c h o o ls .........................................................

1 49.1

1 5 0 .7

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .3

1 59 .1

1 6 0 .3

1 6 1 .4

.7

3 .0

H e a lth s e rv ic e s ........................................................ .......................

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .8

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .5

1 6 2 .2

1 6 2 .9

.4

3 .2

H o s p ita ls ..........................................................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .8

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .7

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .8

1 6 0 .6

1 6 2 .5

1 63 .1

.4

3 .4

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .0

1 5 4 .2

1 5 4 .5

158 .1

1 5 8 .9

1 59 .1

.1

3 .2

S c h o o ls .............................................................................................

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .2

1 5 3 .8

154 .1

1 5 4 .3

1 5 4 .6

1 5 8 .3

1 5 9 .0

1 5 9 .2

.1

3 .2

E le m e n ta ry a n d s e c o n d a ry .................................................

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .5

1 5 2 .8

1 53 .1

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .6

1 5 7 .4

1 58 .1

1 5 8 .2

.1

3.1

C o lle g e s a n d u n iv e rs itie s .....................................................

1 5 1 .4

1 5 1 .8

1 5 6 .5

1 5 6 .7

1 5 6 .8

1 5 7 .3

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .6

1 62 .1

.3

3 .4

P u b lic a d m in is tra tio n .........................................................................

1 4 7 .6

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .2

.9

3.1

1 C o n s is ts of p riv a te in d ustry w o rk e rs (e x clu d in g fa rm a n d h o u s eh o ld w o rk e rs ) a n d
S ta te a n d lo ca l g o v e r n m e n t (e x clu d in g F e d e ra l G o v e rn m e n t) w o rk e rs .

E arn in g s in d e x, w h ich w a s d isc o n tin u ed in J a n u a ry 1 9 8 9 .

2 C o n s is ts o f le g is la tiv e , ju d icial, a d m in is tra tive , a n d re g u la to ry activities.

27.

3 T h is s e rie s ha s th e s a m e industry a n d o c cu p a tio n a l c o v e ra g e a s th e H o u rly

4 In clu d es, for e x a m p le , library, socia l, a n d h e alth s e rv ice s.

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x , b e n e fits , p riv a te in d u stry w o rk e rs b y o c c u p a t io n a n d in d u stry g r o u p

[June 1989 =100]_________________________________________________________________
2001

2002

2003

S e rie s
Mar.

Jun e

S ept.

Dec.

Mar.

Jun e

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

P e rce n t c h a n g e
3 m o n th s

12 m o n th s

en d ed

en ded

Mar. 2003
1 6 1 .5

1 6 3 .2

1 6 5 .2

1 6 6 .7

1 6 9 .3

1 7 1 .6

1 73 .1

1 7 4 .6

1 7 9 .6

2 .9

6.1

W o rk e rs , b y o c c u p a tio n a l group:
1 6 5 .2

1 6 7 .4

1 6 9 .5

1 7 1 .2

1 7 3 .5

1 76.1

1 7 7 .2

1 7 8 .5

1 8 3 .6

2 .9

5 .8

1 5 5 .7

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 5 9 .2

1 6 2 .2

1 6 4 .0

1 6 6 .2

1 6 7 .8

1 7 2 .7

2 .9

6 .5

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .8

1 6 2 .6

1 6 5 .8

1 6 7 .4

1 6 8 .8

1 7 1 .0

1 7 8 .0

4.1

7 .4

1 6 2 .6

1 6 4 .6

1 67.1

1 6 8 .4

1 7 0 .7

1 7 3 .3

1 7 4 .9

1 7 5 .9

1 7 9 .9

2 .3

5 .4

157 .1

1 5 7 .9

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .4

1 6 3 .7

1 6 5 .5

1 6 6 .8

1 6 8 .9

1 7 6 .9

4 .7

8.1

1 6 2 .9

1 6 4 .9

1 6 7 .4

1 6 8 .6

1 71.1

1 7 3 .5

1 7 5 .2

1 7 6 .3

1 8 0 .3

2 .3

5 .4

W o rk e rs , b y in d u s try division:

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g .................................................................................


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Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

73

Current Labor Statistics: Compensation & Industrial Relations

28. E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x , p r iv a t e n o n fa r m w o rk e rs b y b a r g a in in g status, re g io n , a n d a r e a s ize

[June 1989 =100] ___________
2001

2002

2003

S e rie s
Mar.

Jun e

S ept.

Dec.

Mar.

Jun e

Sept.

D ec.

Mar.

P e rc e n t c h a n g e
3 m o n th s

12 m o n th s

en d e d

ended

Mar. 2003
C O M P E N S A T IO N
W o rk e rs , b y b a rg a in in g s ta tu s 1
U n io n ........................................................................................................
G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ......................................................................................

1 4 7 .9

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .0

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .8

1 5 6 .3

1 58 .1

1 5 9 .5

1 62 .1

1 .6

4 .7

1 4 7 .9

1 4 9 .3

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .6

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .2

1 5 7 .8

1 6 1 .4

2 .3

5 .2

1 4 7 .6

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .2

1 5 4 .2

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .9

1 61 .1

1 6 2 .6

.9

4 .2

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .8

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .4

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .9

1 6 2 .3

2 .8

5 .8

1 4 9 .4

1 51 .1

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .6

1 5 8 .8

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .4

.9

4 .1

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .8

1 5 9 .6

1 6 1 .4

1 6 2 .5

1 6 2 .8

1 6 5 .4

1 .6

3 .6

1 5 1 .6

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .3

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .8

1 6 3 .6

1 .7

4 .1

S e r v ic e -p r o d u c in g .............................................................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ...........................................................................................
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ...................................................................................

1 4 7 .3

N o n u n io n ...................................................................................................
G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ......................................................................................
S e r v ic e -p r o d u c in g .................................................................................

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .2

1 6 2 .9

1 6 3 .3

1 6 5 .9

1 .6

3 .5

M a n u fa c tu rin g ...........................................................................................

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .6

1 59 .1

1 60 .1

1 6 1 .3

1 6 4 .5

2 .0

4 .4

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ...................................................................................

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .4

1 5 7 .0

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .7

1 6 2 .4

1 6 2 .9

1 6 5 .4

1 .5

3 .4

W o rk e rs , b y re g io n 1
N o r th e a s t..........................................................................................................

1 5 1 .6

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .3

1 5 8 .3

1 5 9 .9

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .3

1 6 3 .8

1 .5

3 .5

S o u th .................................................................................................................

1 51 .1

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .2

1 5 7 .6

1 5 8 .9

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .6

1 .0

2 .8

M id w e s t (fo rm e rly N o rth C e n tr a l) ........................................................

1 5 4 .8

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .6

1 61 .1

1 6 2 .2

1 6 3 .5

1 6 4 .6

1 6 9 .0

2 .7

4 .9

W e s t.........................................................................................................

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .4

1 6 2 .9

1 6 3 .8

1 6 5 .0

1 6 7 .3

1 .4

4 .3

W o rk e rs , b y area s iz e 1
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s .......................................................................................

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .4

1 59 .1

1 6 0 .9

1 6 1 .8

1 6 2 .5

1 6 5 .2

1 .7

3 .8

O th e r a r e a s .....................................................................................................

1 5 2 .1

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .6

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .0

1 6 9 .8

1 6 3 .5

1 .7

3 .8

W A G E S A N D S A L A R IE S
W o rk e rs , by b a rg a in in g s ta tu s 1
U n io n ...................................................................................................................

1 42 .1

1 4 3 .7

1 45 .1

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .3

.5

3 .3

G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ......................................................................................

1 4 2 .4

1 4 4 .2

1 4 5 .3

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .4

.8

3 .5

S e r v ic e -p ro d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 4 2 .2

1 4 3 .7

1 4 5 .4

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .9

1 54 .1

1 5 4 .6

.3

3.1

M a n u fa c tu rin g ............................................................................................

1 4 3 .9

1 4 5 .5

1 4 6 .7

1 4 8 .0

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .6

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .6

1 .0

3 .8

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ...................................................................................

1 41 .1

1 4 2 .7

1 4 4 .3

1 47 .1

1 48 .1

1 4 9 .6

1 51 .1

152 .1

1 5 2 .5

.3

3 .0

N o n u n io n ...........................................................................................................

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .1

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .4

1 .2

2 .9

G o o d s -p ro d u c in g ......................................................................................

1 4 8 .8

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .1

1 52 .1

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .6

1 5 7 .8

.8

2 .8

S e rv ic e -p ro d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .1

1 55 .1

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 5 8 .9

1 5 9 .0

1 6 1 .2

1 .4

2 .9

M a n u fa c tu rin g .............................................................................................

1 5 0 .1

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .2

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .7

156 .1

1 5 6 .8

1 5 7 .8

1 5 9 .3

1 .0

3 .0

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g ....................................................................................

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

1 58 .1

1 5 8 .3

1 6 0 .4

1 .3

2 .9

2 .5

W o rk e rs , b y re g io n 1
N o r th e a s t..........................................................................................................

1 4 7 .3

1 4 9 .2

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .9

1 55 .1

1 5 5 .7

1 5 7 .3

1 .0

S o u th .................................................................................................................

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .3

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .7

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .3

.5

1 .8

M id w e s t (fo rm e rly N o rth C e n tr a l).........................................................

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .7

1 57 .1

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .2

1 64 .1

2 .4

4 .5

W e s t .................................................................................................................

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .9

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .7

1 5 9 .3

1 60 .1

1 6 1 .3

.7

W o rk e rs , b y area s iz e 1

3.1
2 .9

M e tro p o lita n a r e a s .......................................................................................

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 55 .1

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .4

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .6

1.1

3 .4

O th e r a r e a s ......................................................................................................

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .8

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .8

1 5 4 .8

1 5 6 .8

1 .3

2 .9

1 T h e in d e x e s a r e c a lc u la te d d iffe re n tly fro m th o s e fo r th e o c c u p a tio n a n d industry g ro u p s . F o r a d e ta ile d d escrip tio n o f th e in d e x c a lc u la tio n , s e e th e M o n th ly L a b o r R e v ie w
T e c h n ic a l N o te , "E s tim a tio n p ro c e d u re s fo r th e E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d ex," M a y 1 9 8 2 .

74 Monthly Labor Review

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

29. P e rc e n t of fu ll-tim e e m p lo y e e s p a rtic ip a tin g in e m p lo y e r - p r o v id e d b e n e fit p la n s, a n d in s e le c t e d fe a tu re s w ithin p la n s,

Ite m
S c o p e o f surve y (in 0 0 0 's )....................................................

1984

1982

1980
2 1 ,3 5 2

2 1 ,0 4 3

3 1 ,1 6 3

3 2 ,4 2 8

3 1 ,0 5 9

2 1 ,3 0 3

2 1 ,0 1 3

1997

1995

1993

1 99 1

1989

1988

1986

2 8 ,7 2 8

3 3 ,3 7 4

3 8 ,4 0 9
2 9 ,3 4 0

N u m b e r of e m p lo y e e s (in 0 0 0 ’s):
W ith m e d ic a l c a r e .................................................................

20,7 11

2 0 ,4 1 2

2 0 ,3 8 3

2 0 ,2 3 8

2 7 ,9 5 3

2 9 ,8 3 4

2 5 ,8 6 5

2 3 ,5 1 9

2 5 ,5 4 6

W ith life in s u ra n c e ................................................................

2 0 ,4 9 8

2 0,2 01

2 0 ,1 7 2

2 0,4 51

2 8 ,5 7 4

3 0 ,4 8 2

2 9 ,2 9 3

2 6 ,1 7 5

2 9 ,0 7 8

3 3 ,4 9 5

1 7,231

1 6 ,1 9 0

1 9 ,5 6 7

2 0 ,4 3 0

1 8 ,3 8 6

1 6 ,0 1 5

1 7 ,4 1 7

1 9 ,2 0 2

-

W ith d e fin e d b e n efit p la n ...................................................

1 7 ,9 3 6

1 7 ,6 7 6

Tim e-o ff plans
P articip an ts w ith:
P a id lu nch tim e ........................................................................

10

9

9

10

11

10

8

9

_

A v e ra g e m in u tes p e r d a y .................................................

-

25

26

27

29

26

30

29

_

-

P aid rest tim e ...........................................................................

75

76

73

72

72

71

67

68

_

-

A v e ra g e m in u te s p e r d a y .................................................

-

25

26

26

26

26

28

26

P a id fu n e ra l le a v e ..................................................................

-

-

-

88

85

84

80

83

_
80

_
81

3 .2

3.3

3.3

3 .0

3.3

3 .7

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r o c c u rre n c e ........................................

-

-

-

3 .2

P a id h o lid ay s ............................................................................

99

99

99

99

96

97

92

91

89

89

1 0.0

9 .4

9 .2

1 0.2

9 .4

9.1

9 .3

A v e ra g e d a y s per y e a r ......................................................

10.1

P aid p erso n al le a v e ...............................................................

20

24

23

25

24

22

21

21

22

20

A v e ra g e d a ys per y e a r ......................................................

-

3 .8

3 .6

3 .7

3.3

3.1

3.3

3.1

3.3

3 .5

P a id v a c a tio n s ..........................................................................

1 00

99

99

100

98

97

96

97

96

95

62

67

67
_

70
_

69

68

67

65

58

56

33

37

37

60

U n p a id pate rn ity le a v e .........................................................

-

-

-

-

16

18

26

53

U n p a id fa m ily l e a v e ..............................................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

84

93

97

97

97

95

90

92

83

82

77

76

_

1 0.0

_

9 .8

-

Insurance plans
P articipants in m ed ical c a re p la n s .....................................
P erc en t o f participants w ith c o v e rag e for:
H o m e h e alth c a r e .................................................................

-

-

46

66

76

75

81

86

78

85

58

62

62

70

79

80

80

82

73

78

8

18

28

28

30

42

56

63

_

_

P e rc e n t o f particip a n ts w ith e m p lo yee
contribution re q u ire d for:
26
A v e ra g e m onthly co n trib u tio n......................................
46

27
51

A v e ra g e m ontm y c o n tribution.......................................
P articip an ts in life in su ran ce p la n s ...................................

36

43

44

47

51

61

67

69

$ 1 1 .9 3

$ 1 2 .8 0

$ 1 9 .2 9

$ 2 5 .3 1

$ 2 6 .6 0

$ 3 1 .5 5

$ 3 3 .9 2

$ 3 9 .1 4

58

63

64

66

69

76

78

80

$ 3 5 .9 3

$ 4 1 .4 0

$ 6 0 .0 7

$ 7 2 .1 0

$ 9 6 .9 7

$ 1 0 7 .4 2

$ 1 1 8 .3 3

$ 1 3 0 .0 7

96

96

96

96

92

94

94

91

87

87

69

72

74

72

78

71

71

76

77

74

10

8

7

6

5

7

6

41

37

33

42

43

53

55

P e rc e n t of p articipants with:
A ccidental d e ath a n d d ism e m b e rm e n t

_

_

64

64

59

49

42

44

43

47

48

42

45

40

41

P articipants in lo n g -term disability
40
P articipants in sic kness a n d a ccident
54

51

P articipants in s h ort-term disability plans 1....................

51

49

46

43

45

44

-

-

-

-

-

-

82

76

63

63

59

56

52

50

52

52
95

R etirem ent plans
P articip an ts in d e fin e d benefit pension p lan s ..............

84

84

P erc en t of p a rticipants with:
E arly re tirem e n t a v a ila b le ................................................

55

58

63

64

59

62

55

52

98

97

97

98

98

97

98

95

96

47

35

26

22

7

6

4

10

57

55

64

56

61

58

56

53

52

54

45

45

56

P articipants in d e fin e d contribution p lan s ......................

62

62

63

54

48

51

49

60

45

48

48

49

55

57

33

36

41

44

43

54

55

P articipants in plan s w ith ta x -d e fe rre d savings
a rra n g e m e n ts ........................................................................

O the r b enefits
E m p lo y e e s eligible for:
2

5

9

10

12

12

13

5

12

23

36

52

38
5

32
7

I

1 T h e definitions for p aid sick lea v e a n d short-term disability (previously sic kness and
a cc id en t in su ra n c e) w e r e c h a n g e d for th e 1 9 9 5 survey.

P aid sick le a v e now includes only

plan s th a t specify e ith er a m a xim u m n u m b er of d ays per y e a r or unlim ited days.

S hort-

2

Prior to

1 9 9 5 , reim b u rsem en t accounts included

p rem ium conversion

plans, w hich

specifically allow m edical plan participants to pay required plan pre m iu m s with p retax

te rm s disability n o w includes all insured, self-insured, and S ta te -m a n d a te d plans available

dollars.

on a p e r-disability basis, a s w ell as th e u nfu nded per-disability plans previously reported as

ta b u lated s eparately.

Also, re im bursem ent accounts that w e re

part of flexible benefit

plan s w e re

sick le a v e . S ic k n es s a n d acc id ent insu rance, reported in y ea rs prior to this survey, included
only insu red, s elf-in s u re d , a n d S ta te -m a n d a te d plan s provid ing per-disability b e n e -


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Note : Dash indicates data not available.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

75

Current Labor Statistics:

Compensation & Industrial Relations

30. P e rc e n t of fu ll-tim e e m p lo y e e s p a rtic ip a tin g in e m p lo y e r - p ro v id e d b e n e fit p la n s, a n d in s e le c t e d fea tu re s
within p la n s , s m a ll p riv a te e sta b lish m e n ts a n d State a n d lo c a l g o v e rn m e n ts , 1987, 1990, 1 9 92,1994, a n d 1996
Sm all private establishm ents

Item
1990

1992

1994

State and local governm ents

1996

1987

1990

1992

1994

S c o p e of su rve y (in 0 0 0 ’s )....................................................

3 2 ,4 6 6

3 4 ,3 6 0

3 5 ,9 1 0

N u m b e r of e m p lo y e e s (in 0 0 0 ’s):
W ith m edical c a r e ...............................................................

2 2 ,4 0 2

2 4 ,3 9 6

2 3 ,5 3 6

2 5 ,5 9 9

9 ,5 9 9

1 2 ,0 6 4

1 1 ,2 1 9

1 1 ,1 9 2

2 0 ,7 7 8

2 1 ,9 9 0

2 1 ,9 5 5

2 4 ,6 3 5

8 ,7 7 3

1 1 ,4 1 5

1 1 ,0 9 5

1 1 ,1 9 4

6 ,4 9 3

7 ,5 5 9

5 ,4 8 0

5 ,8 8 3

9 ,5 9 9

1 1 ,6 7 5

1 0 ,8 4 5

1 1 ,7 0 8

17

11

10

34

36

34

W ith life in s u ra n c e ..................................................
W ith d efin ed benefit p la n ..................................................

3 9 ,8 1 6

10,321

1 2 ,9 7 2

1 2 ,4 6 6

1 2 ,9 0 7

Tim e-o ff plans
P articipants with:
P aid lu nch tim e ......................................................................
A v e ra g e m inutes per d a y .................................................

8

9

37

37

_

_

48

49

-

_

27

26

P aid rest tim e ..........................................................................
A v e ra g e m in u tes p e r d a y .................................................

47

50

50

51

56

63

65

62

2 .9

3 .0

3.1

3 .0

3 .7

3 .7

3 .7

3 .7

84

82

82

80

81

74

75

73

A v e ra g e d a ys per y e a r ’ ....................................................
P aid p ersonal le a v e .......................................................

9 .5

9 .2

7 .5

7.6

10.9

13.6

1 4.2

1 1 .5

11

12

13

14

38

39

P aid funeral le a v e ..........................................................
A v e ra g e d a ys p e r o c cu rre n ce........................................
P aid ho lid ay s ....................................................................

58

56

53

29

29

29

38

38

A v e ra g e d ays p e r y e a r .....................................................

2 .8

2 .6

2 .6

3.0

2 .7

2 .9

2 .9

3 .0

P aid v a c a tio n s .........................................................................

88

88

88

86

72

67

67

66

P aid sick l e a v e 2....................................................................

47

53

50

50

97

95

95

94

U n p a id le a v e .................................................................

17

18

-

-

57

51

59

30

33

44

U n p a id p a ternity le a v e ........................................................

8

U n p a id fa m ily le a v e ..............................................................

“

7
47

48

-

-

93

Insurance plans
P articipants in m edical c a re plan s.....................................

69

71

66

64

93

93

90

87

79

80

-

_

76

82

87

84

-

-

P erc en t of participants w ith c o ve rag e for:
H o m e h e alth c a r e ................................................................
E xten d e d c a re fa c ilitie s ....................................................

83

84

Physical e x a m ......................................................................

26

28

78

79

84

81

36

36

47

55

P erc en t of p articip an ts w ith em ployee
contribution req u ired for:
S e lf c o v e ra g e .......................................................................

42

47

52

52

35

38

43

47

A v e ra g e m onthly contribution......................................

$ 2 5 .1 3

$ 36 .51

$ 4 0 .9 7

$ 4 2 .6 3

$ 1 5 .7 4

$ 2 5 .5 3

$ 2 8 .9 7

$ 3 0 .2 0

67

73

76

75

71

65

72

71

A v e ra g e m onthly contribution......................................

$ 1 0 9 .3 4

$ 1 5 0 .5 4

$ 1 5 9 .6 3

$ 1 8 1 .5 3

$ 7 1 .8 9

$ 1 1 7 .5 9

$ 1 3 9 .2 3

$ 1 4 9 .7 0

P articip an ts in life insu rance plan s ....................................

64

64

61

62

85

88

89

87

Fam ily c o v e ra g e .................................................................

P erc en t of participants with:
A ccidental d e ath a n d d ism em berm ent
in s u ra n c e ...............................................................................

78

76

79

77

67

67

1

1

2

1

1

1

74
1

64

S u rvivor in co m e b e n efits ...................................................
R e tire e protection a v a ila b le ..............................................

19

25

20

13

55

45

46

46

19

23

20

22

31

27

28

30

6

26

26

14

21

22

21

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20

22

15

15

93

90

87

91

N orm al re tirem e n t prior to ag e 6 5 ................................

54

50

_

47

92

89

92

92

Early re tirem e n t a v a ila b le ................................................

95

95

-

90

88

89

87

2

P articipants in lo ng-term disability
in su ran ce p lan s .....................................................................
P articipants in sickness a n d accident
in su ran ce p la n s ..............................................................
P articip an ts in short-term disability p la n s 2....................

29

Retirem ent plans
P articipants in d e fin ed benefit pension plan s ..............
P erc en t of participants with:

7

4

-

92
-

33

16

10

13

T e rm in a l e arn in g s fo rm u la ......................................

58

54

-

53

1 00

1 00

1 00

99

B enefit coord in ated w ith S ocial S ecu rity ....................

49

46

-

44

18

8

10

49

P articipants in d efin ed contribution plan s .......................

31

33

34

38

9

9

9

9

17

24

23

28

28

45

45

24

Ad hoc pension incre a se in last 5 y e a rs .....................

P articipants in plan s with ta x -d e ferre d savings
a rra n g e m e n ts .........................................................................

O ther benefits
E m p lo ye es eligible for:
Flexible benefits p lan s ........................................................

1

2

3

4

5

5

5

5

R e im b u rse m en t a c c o u n ts 3...............................................

8

14

19

12

5

31

50

64

P rem iu m conversion plans .............................................

7

1 M e th o d s used to c alc u la te th e a v e ra g e num ber of paid holidays w e re revised

S ickness and accident insurance, reported in y ea rs prior to this survey,

in 1 9 9 4 to count partial d a ys m ore precisely. A v era g e holidays for 1 99 4 are

included only insured, self-insured, a nd S ta te -m an d ate d plans providing p e r-

not c o m p a ra b le w ith th o se reported in 1 99 0 and 1 9 9 2.

disability benefits at less than full pay.

2

T h e definitions for paid sick lea v e a nd short-term

disability (previously

sickness a n d a ccid en t in su rance) w ere ch an g ed for th e 1 9 9 6 survey. P aid sick
le a v e now includes only plans that specify eith er a m axim um num ber of days
p e r y e a r or unlim ited d ays. Short-term disability now includes all insured, self-

3 Prior to 1 9 9 6, reim bursem ent accounts included prem ium conversion plans,
w hich

specifically

allow

m edical

plan

flexible benefit plans w e re tab u lated separately.

insu red, a n d S ta te -m a n d a te d plans available on a per-disability basis, as well
a s th e u n fu nded per-disability plans previously reported as sick leave.

76 Monthly Labor Review

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

participants

to

pay

required

plan

prem ium s with pretax dollars. Also, reim bursem ent accounts that w ere part of

Note : Dash indicates data not available.

2002

2001

2003p

2002

A n n u al totals
M easure

N ov.

O ct.

Sept.

Aug.

Ju ly

June

May

Jan.

Dec.

Mar.

Feb.

M ay

A p r.

N u m b e r o f s to p p a g e s :
B eg in n in g in p e rio d .....................................

29

19

3

1

3

1

3

1

2

1

1

0

In e ffe c t durin g p e rio d ...............................

30

20

5

3

4

3

3

3

2

1

2

0

W o rk e rs invo lved:
B e g in n in g in p e rio d (in th o u s a n d s )....

99

46

5.1

1.5

6 .7

3 .5

1 3 .7

12

4 .3

1.4

1 7 .5

.0

4 .0

4 .0

4 .0

1 02

47

9 .2

5 .3

8 .2

6 .2

1 3 .7

1 3 .5

4 .3

1 .4

1 8 .8

.0

4 .0

4 .0

4 .0

In e ffe c t d u rin g p e rio d (in th o u sa n d s ).

1,151

6 ,5 9 6

1 3 8 .2

3 6 .0

5 4 .0

5 0 .6

4 0 .3

1 3 3 .4

2 3 .9

2 8 .6

4 8 .8

0.0

1 8 .5

4 0 .0

4 0 .0

.0 0

.0 0

.0 0

.0 0

.0 0

(2)

.0 0

.0 0

.0 0

D a y s idle:

.0 0
n y iio u u u id l

auu

iju r e m iiK m o m |« u ;o o a o io u i « » u w

.0 0
. . ..V

.0 0

.0 0

.0 0

------------- --------- - - - = >

.00
r

-----

-

-

_c

th e m e a s u re m e n t o f id le n e s s a s a p e rc e n ta g e of th e total tim e w o rke d is fo u n d i n " T o ta l e c o n o m y ’ m e a s u re s of strike id leness," M o n th ly L a b o r R e v ie w , O c to b e r 1 9 6 8 , pp. 5 4 — 5 6 .

2 Less th a n 0.005.
p = p re lim in a ry .


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

77

Current Labor Statistics:

32.

Price Data

C o n s u m e r Price Indexes for A ll U rban C o n su m e rs a n d for Urban W a g e Earners a n d C le ric a l Workers: U.S. c ity a v e r a a e
b y e x p e n d itu re c a te g o ry a n d c o m m o d ity or s e rv ice g ro u p
* ’

[1982-84 =100, unless otherwise indicated!
Annual average

Series

2001

2002

2002
May

June

July

Aug.

2003

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX
FOR ALL URBAN CONSUMERS
All item s.....................................

Food and b e ve rag es................

179.

179.Í

179. 3

180.

180.

181.

181.0

181.:

538.f

5 3 8 ..

538.

539.«

541.

542.

5 43.2

543.

176.Í

176.-;

176.

176.E

176.Í

176.<

177.1

Ö
00

All item s (1 9 6 7 = 1 0 0 )...............

Apr.

May

181. 7

183.

184.,

183.

183 .5

541.

5 44 .

548.

551 .f

5 50 .

5 4 9 .7

177.-

177.

173 1

178.

178.

176.:

175 .Í

179.:

179.

175.

179 .4

176.C

176.C

176.-

176.5

176.6

177..

177.

173.4

178.,

175.E

178.6

175.5

178.-

175.

1 78 .8

175.2

174.S

175.2

175.1

175.E

C e rea ls a n d bakery products.........

176.

176.

177.(

193.8

177.-

198.C

1 77.:

1 9 8 .Í

198.

1 77.8

198.7

198.6

198.-

198.9

M e ats, poultry, fish, and eggs...........

1 98 .:

197.:

199.Í

161.3

201.6

162.1

202.1

162.4

201 .S

161.«

1 62 .:

2 0 3 .0

1 62 .Í

161.6

161.3

162.1

Food............................................
Food a t h o m e ............................

162.-

161 .f

1 6 4 .'

164.E

Dairy and related products1..........

167.1

1 65.:

1 64 .7

168.1

169.C

168.C

167.6

167.2

166.:

Fruits a n d veg e ta b les .................

166.5

167.1

1 67.:

2 12 .2

166.-

220.S

167.2

221 .C

167.1

217.-:

217.4

1 6 5 .Í

165 .4

217.C

218.4

2 17 .4

219.6

224.E

2 27 .

2 2 3 .:

223.6

2 2 1 .:

2 2 6 .2

139.2

139.2

138.0

1 3 7 .Í

138.3

137.6

140.2

140.5

139.1

139.6

140.E

159.6

140.8

140.3

160.8

160.0

140.5

160.E

140 .3

161.0

160.6

160.6

160.9

161.1

161.1

161.6

155.7

162.2

159.0

162.8

157.9

162.1

162.1

158.C

160.2

159.9

159.6

159.9

158.5

159.1

169.7

161.8

162.5

161.4

162 .3

155.9

153.4

152.8

155.8

158.7

157.5

156.1

1 57 .6

Nonalcoholic beve rag es and beverag e
m aterials.............................
O ther foods a t h o m e........................
S u g ar and s w e e ts ............................
Fats a n d oils.......................................

155.7

155.4

155.9

1 5 4 .E

154.9

154.1

154.1

O ther foods.....................

176.0

177.1

176.1

177.4

177.3

176.9

177.0

177.0

178.3

178.2

178.2

177.9

178.6

178.5

108.9

1 77 .8

109.2

108 .9

109.0

110.1

109.3

109.7

109.8

110.3

110.2

109.7

110.5

110.1

110.4

110.1

O ther m iscellaneous foods1'2.....
Food a w ay from h o m e 1...........
O ther food a w a y from h o m e1'2......
Alcoholic b e ve rag es ..................

173.9

178.3

1 77 .6

178.2

1 787.5

178.8

179.2

179.6

179.8

180.1

179.9

180.7

113.4

181.0

117.7

181.1

117.1

181 .5

117.6

117.7

118.1

118.8

119.1

119.7

119.8

119.9

179.3

120.2

183.6

120.4

183 .3

120.4

183.5

1 20 .5

183.8

184.2

183.9

184.7

185.1

184.9

185.8

185.9

1 86.6

186 .4

180.3

179.7

1 86 .7

180.7

181.2

2 0 9 .6

181.5

181.4

181.2

181.1

182.3

2 00 6

183.2

208.1

1 84.3

184.1

2 0 7 .5

208.1

1 84 .5

2 0 8 .8

2 00 .2

2 0 9 .2

2 01 .3

2 0 9 .6

2 0 9 .5

2 1 0 .9

2 1 1 .6

212.1

212.1

199.7

2 1 2 .8

1 98.8

199.3

199.8

2 0 0 .2

2 0 0 .7

2 0 1 .3

2 02 .0

11ft fi

2 0 2 .5

2 0 3 .3

2 0 3 .7

204.1

118.3

2 0 4 .5

120.1

2 0 4 .9

120 .9

121.7

123.6

117.6

117.0

113.2

109.2

1 14.3

117.6

119 .7

1 18 .7

1 21.4

2 16 .2

2 1 6 .8

2 1 7 .3

2 1 7 .9

2 1 8 .5

2 1 8 .7

2 1 8 .9

2 1 8 .9

219.1

H ousing...............................
S h elte r..................................
R ent of prim ary re sidence..................
Lodging a w ay from h o m e .........................
O w ners' equivalent rent of primary residence3

2 0 6 .3

2 14 .7

2 1 3 .7

2 1 4 .3

2 1 4 .9

2 15 .4

T e n a n ts ’ and household insurance1,2

106.2

108.7

107.6

1 07.8

108.6

109.6

110.0

110.0

111.4

1 12 .3

150.2

113 .9

114.1

143.6

1 41.5

114.0

146.2

114 .2

146.8

1 14 .3

146.8

147.2

144.4

143.6

144.2

146.1

135 4

148.3

127.2

154 .5

125.1

153.1

1 30.3

1 53 .7

130.8

130.7

131.0

127.9

127.0

127.5

Fuel oil and other fuels........................

1 29.5

131 .9

129.3

138 .5

115.5

136.8

114.4

137 .5

112.7

111.6

112.1

115.2

119.3

121.8

1 25.6

1 36.6

G as (piped) and electricity..............................

156.3

142.4

169.0

134.4

1 47 .9

132.1

137 .0

138.0

138.6

138.5

138.7

134.9

1 44 .5

Fuels a n d utilities........................
Fuels..........................................

Household furnishings and operations......

129.1

A p p a r e l.........................................

133.7

134.1

1 35.6

1 36.9

1 43.5

128.3

1 28.9

143 .0

128.7

128.6

128.1

128.1

128.0

127.8

127.0

127.4

127.7

127.1

127 .2

1 26 .3

124.0

127.1

1 22.7

118.7

120.5

124.6

126.8

125.5

121 .5

118.1

120.6

1 23.6

121.7

123 .9

1 24.3

1 22 .5

120 .8

118.4

118.3

120.1

122.8

123.2

1 19.3

116.1

117.3

121 .0

2 29 .4

1 20 .8

119 .5

113 .7

107.6

111.0

118.0

120.5

1 18.0

113.1

1 07.6

112.4

117.2

117 .8

1 15 .5

M en 's and boys' a p p are l.................

125.7

W o m e n 's and girls' a p p are l..............

119 3

115.8

Infants' a n d toddlers’ a p p arel1......

129.2

126.4

F o o tw e a r..............................
Transportation.............................

127.4

124.9

122.9

124.3

126.2

127.7

1 27.5

1 25.3

121.1

122.3

124.1

123 .4

121.4

1 23.6

1 24.5

121.2

118.5

119.7

121.6

123.0

122.7

120.7

119 .7

119.8

152.9

119.8

153.8

119 .9

1 19 .7

153.4

153.7

153.9

154.0

154.9

155.2

154.2

155 .5

158.9

161.0

1 59 .3

157 .2

1 51.8

155.3

157 .3

155.5

153.1

Private transportation....................

150 0

148.8

149.5

149.1

149.5

149.7

150.0

151.1

151.5

150.4

N e w a n d used motor vehicles2

101.3

9 9.2

99.1

9 8 .8

9 8.8

9 8.7

98.7

9 8.9

98.8

9 8.7

98.2

98.0

9 8.0

140.0

9 7 .8

9 7 .4

1 39.8

139.2

138.7

138.1

138.7

139.5

140.4

140.6

1 39.7

139.2

1 58.7

1 39.3

138 .7

152.0

138.1

1 51.8

152.2

1 52.7

153.4

152.2

150.7

148.8

116.6

148.4

121.4

148.5

120.1

148 .4

120.8

147 .9

121.5

121 .7

124.5

124.4

1 19.7

126 .3

140.4

124.0

148.1

116.0

140 .6

120.8

1 31 .3

119 .5

120.3

120.9

121.1

123.9

123.8

119.1

1 25.7

1 39.7

147.4

1 39 .9

130 .6

107 .9

107 .7

1 07.8

N e w vehicles...........................
U sed cars and trucks1............
M otor fuel..................................
G asoline (all ty p e s)..................................................

148 .5

148 .3

M otor vehicle parts and e q uipm ent....

104.8

106.9

106 .8

1 06.7

107.4

107.7

107.4

106.9

M otor vehicle m ain tenance and repair......

107.2

107.0

1 07.8

108.2

183.5

190.2

189.9

190.0

189.8

191.0

191.4

191.8

192.8

193.3

193 .7

1 94.5

Public transportation............................

2 1 0 .6

M edical c a re ...................................
M edical care com m odities..............

2 4 7 fi

M edical care services................................
Professional services............................
Hospital and related services..............

33ft 3

207 .4

1 94.3

194 .6

2 1 1 .3

1 94.9

2 1 1 .3

2 0 9 .7

2 09 .4

2 06 .5

2 03 .4

2 0 2 .3

2 0 3 .0

2 0 2 .2

2 0 3 .6

206.1

2 0 7 .2

2 1 1 .6

2 8 5 .6

284.1

2 8 4 .7

2 86 .6

2 8 7 .3

2 8 7 .7

2 89 .2

2 9 0 .5

2 9 1 .3

2 9 2 .6

2 9 3 .7

2 9 4 .2

2 56 .4

2 9 4 .6

2 5 5 .4

2 9 5 .5

2 56 .4

2 5 7 .5

2 5 7 .7

2 57 .9

2 5 8 .3

259.1

2 5 9 .5

2 6 0 .3

2 60 .4

2 61 .4

2 9 2 .9

2 6 1 .6

2 9 1 .2

2 6 1 .8

2 9 1 .7

2 93 .8

2 9 4 .7

2 95 .2

297.1

2 9 8 .5

2 99 .4

3 0 0 .8

3 0 2 .3

3 0 2 .6

2 53 .9

2 5 2 .9

303.1

2 5 3 .2

3 0 4 .2

2 55 .0

2 5 4 .9

2 5 4 .8

2 56 .0

2 5 6 .5

2 5 7 .0

2 5 7 .8

2 5 8 .8

259.1

2 5 9 .8

3 67 .8

261.1

3 6 4 .5

3 6 5 .3

3 67 .6

3 71 .3

3 7 3 .3

3 76 .7

3 80 .7

3 82 .4

3 8 8 .9

3 8 5 .7

3 88 .2

3 8 8 .7

3 8 8 .7

104.9

1-6.2

106.4

106 .2

106.2

106.3

106.2

106.4

106.4

106.5

1 06.9

107.2

107.4

107 .4

101.5

107 .6

V id eo and a u d io 1,2.......................

102.6

103.1

103.0

102.6

102.4

102.3

102.6

103.0

1 03.2

103.4

103.8

103 .7

103 .8

105.2

1 03.8

Education and com m unication2......

107.9

106.6

1 06.9

107.6

108.9

109.5

109.4

109.3

109.2

109 .7

1 09.7

109.4

109 .0

1 08.6

118.5

126.0

1 23.5

124.3

124.8

127.1

129.6

129.9

130.0

130 .0

130 .6

2 9 5 .9

131.0

3 17 .6

131.1

3 15 .6

131.2

3 17 .4

131.4

3 1 8 .3

3 19 .6

3 23 .2

3 23 .2

3 24.0

3 2 3 .3

3 2 9 .5

3 3 2 .8

3 3 3 .2

341.1

3 3 2 .3

362.1

3 3 2 .5

3 5 4 .6

3 5 6 .8

3 58 .3

3 65 .6

3 72 .8

3 73 .8

374.1

3 7 4 .0

3 7 5 .5

3 76 .3

93.3

9 2 .3

3 7 6 .5

377.1

9 1 .9

3 7 7 .7

9 1 .8

92.6

93.2

92.5

9 2.2

9 1 .8

9 1 .8

8 9 .8

R ecreation2............................

Education2....................
Educational books and supplies................
Tuition, other school fees, and child c a re .............
C om m unication1,2....................
Information and information processing1,2...........
T e le p h o n e services1,2.....

9 2.0

9 1.9

9 1.3

9 0 .5

92.3

9 0.8

9 0 .7

9 0.6

90.8

9 1.5

9 0.7

90.4

90.0

9 0.0

9 0.3

90.1

8 9 .5

8 8 .6

9 9.3

8 7 .9

9 9 .7

99.3

9 9.2

9 9.5

100.6

100.1

9 9 .9

9 9.8

9 9 .9

100.4

100 .5

9 9 .7

9 8 .7

98.1

18.5

18.4

18.4

18.3

17.8

17.7

17.3

17.2

17.1

16.9

16.8

16.7

16.4

Information and information processing
other than teleDhone services1,4......

2 1.3

18.3

2 9 .5

2 2 .2

2 3 .0

2 2 .6

2 2 .3

2 2.0

21.1

2 0 .7

2 0 .0

19.7

19.5

19.1

19.0

18.7

2 9 3 .2

1 8.0

2 9 1 .5

2 9 4 .4

2 9 4 .5

2 9 5 .9

2 97 .0

295 .4

2 9 5 .6

2 9 5 .8

2 9 6 .5

2 9 7 .5

2 9 7 .3

298.1

298.1

4 6 1 .5

4 4 9 .0

4 6 7 .4

4 67 .2

4 78 .2

4 85 .8

4 7 0 .6

4 7 0 .4

4 7 2 .5

4 7 2 .4

4 7 2 .7

4 6 5 .6

Personal com puters and peripheral
eq u ip m en t1,2........................
O ther goods and services...................
T o b acco a n d sm oking products..............

4 2 5 .2

4 6 7 .2

4 6 7 .9

170.5

174.7

174 .7

174 .9

175.0

174.9

174.9

175.3

175.5

175.4

1 75 .9

176.7

1 77.2

1 77 .7

Personal c a re products1......

1 77 .9

155.1

154.7

1 54.8

155.4

154.6

154.3

154.4

154.6

154.2

153.4

1 53.0

153.3

1 53.3

154.1

Personal c are s ervices1...........

1 53 .6

184.31

188.4

188.3

1 88.3

188.7

189.1

189.2

189.3

189.9

189 .9

190.6[

190.9

1 91.7

192 .5

193 .0

P ersonal c a re 1.....................

S e e footnotes at end of table.

78

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

32.

C o n tin u e d — C o n s u m e r Price Ind ex es for A ll U rb an C o n su m e rs a n d for Urban W a g e Earners a n d C le r ic a l W orkers: U.S. city
a v e r a g e , b y e x p e n d itu re c a t e g o r y a n d c o m m o d it y or s e rv ice g ro u p

[1982-84 =100, unless otherwise indicated]
2003

Annual average
Series

2001
263.1

2002
2 7 4 .4

May
2 74 .2

June

July

Aug.

2 7 4 .6

275.1

2 7 5 .4

Sept.
2 7 5 .2

Oct.
2 7 6 .0

Nov.

Dec.

2 7 6 .6

2 7 6 .9

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

278.1

2 8 0 .4

2 8 1 .4

2 8 2 .0

2 8 2 .7

1 50 .9

Com m odity a n d service group:
1 50.7

149.7

150.5

149.8

1 49.3

1 49.6

150.2

150.7

150.6

149 .7

1 50.0

1 52 .0

153.1

1 52.2

173 .6

1 76.8

1 76.4

1 76.4

1 76.6

176 .6

176 .9

177.1

177 .4

1 77.8

178.1

1 78.9

1 79.2

1 79.0

1 79 .0

137.2

134.2

1 35.4

134.4

1 33.6

1 34 .0

1 34 .8

135.5

135 .2

1 33.6

133 .9

1 36 .4

1 38 .0

1 36 .7

1 34 .6

147.1

145.1

1 47.4

145.7

1 44 .4

1 45.4

147.2

148 .4

1 48.0

145.2

146.1

1 51.2

1 54 .5

152 .3

1 48 .9

1 27.3

1 24.0

127.1

122 .7

118 .7

1 20 .5

1 24.6

126.8

1 25.5

121 .5

118.1

120 .6

1 23 .6

1 23 .9

1 22 .5

169 .2

N ondu rables less food, b e verages,
163 .4

1 62.2

164.1

164.0

1 64.3

164.8

165.2

1 66.0

1 66.0

1 63.9

167 .4

174.1

1 77 .8

1 73 .9

124 .6

121 .4

121.7

121.3

121.1

120.7

1 20.6

1 20.6

120 .5

1 20.2

119 .9

1 19.7

1 19 .5

1 19 .2

1 18 .5

2 0 3 .4

2 0 9 .8

2 0 8 .8

2 0 9 .8

2 1 0 .7

2 1 1 .5

2 1 1 .5

2 1 1 .7

2 1 1 .8

2 1 1 .9

213.1

2 1 4 .0

215.1

215.1

2 1 5 .9

2 0 8 .9

2 1 6 .7

216.1

2 16 .8

2 1 7 .4

2 1 8 .3

2 1 7 .9

2 1 8 .4

2 1 8 .2

218.1

2 1 9 .5

2 2 0 .3

2 2 0 .9

2 2 0 .8

2 2 1 .5

2 0 1 .9

209.1

2 0 8 .9

2 0 9 .0

2 0 9 .6

210.1

210.1

2 1 0 .9

2 1 2 .0

2 1 2 .0

2 1 2 .3

2 1 3 .4

2 1 4 .2

2 1 5 .3

2 1 6 .3

2 3 8 .0

2 4 6 .4

2 4 4 .5

245.1

2 4 6 .4

2 4 8 .2

249.1

2 4 9 .7

2 4 9 .9

2 5 0 .2

2 5 1 .4

2 5 2 .4

2 5 2 .6

2 5 2 .5

2 5 2 .8

Special indexes:
177 .8

180 .5

180.4

180.6

1 80.8

1 81.5

1 81.8

182.2

182.1

1 81.6

1 82 .4

183 .9

1 85.2

1 84.7

1 8 4 .3

169.7

170 .8

1 70.9

170 .9

170 .9

1 71.3

1 71,9

1 72.2

1 72.3

171 .7

1 72.3

1 74 .0

175 .3

174 .7

174.1

1 71.9

1 74.3

1 74.2

174.4

1 74 .5

1 75 .0

175 .3

175 .6

1 75 .6

175.1

1 75.9

1 77.3

1 78 .4

1 78 .0

177 .7

138.9

1 36.0

137 .3

136.3

1 35.5

1 35.9

136 .7

1 37 .3

1 37.0

1 35.6

135 .8

1 38 .3

1 39.8

1 38.6

1 36 .5

149.1

147 .4

149 .5

148.0

1 46.7

147.7

1 49.3

1 50.6

150.2

1 47.6

1 48 .4

1 53 .3

1 56 .5

1 54.3

151.1

164.1

163 .3

1 65.0

164.9

1 65.2

165 .8

166.1

1 66.9

166 .9

1 65.0

168.2

1 74 .4

1 77 .7

1 74.2

1 69 .9

1 60.6

161.1

162.1

161.2

160 .6

161 .2

162.2

163 .0

162 .9

1 61.6

1 62.2

1 65 .3

167 .2

165 .9

1 64 .3

2 1 2 .3

2 1 7 .5

2 1 6 .0

2 1 7 .5

2 1 8 .6

2 1 9 .5

2 2 0 .0

2 1 9 .9

2 2 0 .2

2 2 0 .5

2 2 1 .6

2 2 2 .8

2 2 4 .4

2 2 4 .6

2 2 5 .5

1 96.6

2 0 2 .5

2 01 .6

2 0 2 .6

2 0 3 .2

2 0 4 .2

204.1

2 0 4 .2

2 0 4 .3

2 0 4 .3

2 0 5 .5

2 0 6 .4

2 0 7 .4

2 0 7 .5

2 0 8 .2

1 29.3

121.7

122 .9

124.9

1 25 .5

125 .8

126.1

1 25.8

125 .3

123 .3

1 27.5

1 35.4

1 42.6

138.1

1 34 .0

1 83.5

1 87.7

1 87.4

1 87.3

1 87.5

188.1

1 88 .4

188.8

188 .9

1 88.6

189 .0

1 89.7

190.2

1 90.2

1 90 .3

186.1

190 .5

190.2

190.1

1 90.3

1 91.0

1 91.3

1 91.8

191.8

191 .4

191 .8

1 92 .5

1 93.0

193.1

1 93 .2

145 .3

143.7

144.4

143 .4

1 42 .5

1 42.8

1 43.6

1 43.9

1 43.6

142 .5

1 41 .7

142.1

1 42 .6

1 42.5

1 41 .7

125.2

117.1

1 21.6

120 .3

120 .9

1 21 .5

122 .0

124 .8

1 24.9

120 .7

1 27.5

142.1

150.1

141 .7

1 32 .3

2 0 9 .6

2 1 7 .5

2 1 6 .6

2 1 7 .2

2 1 8 .0

2 1 9 .0

2 1 8 .9

2 1 9 .5

2 1 9 .8

2 1 9 .8

2 2 1 .0

2 2 1 .9

2 2 2 .4

2 2 2 .5

223.1

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR URBAN
WAGE EARNERS AND CLERICAL WORKERS
All item s (1 9 6 7 - 1 0 0 )......................................................

1 73.5

175.9

1 75.8

1 75.9

176 .0

1 76 .6

1 77.0

177 .3

1 77.4

1 77.0

1 77.7

179 .2

1 80 .3

179 .8

1 7 9 .4

5 1 6 .8

5 2 3 .9

5 2 3 .6

5 24 .0

5 2 4 .5

5 2 6 .0

5 2 7 .3

5 28 .2

5 2 8 .4

5 27 .2

5 29 .2

5 3 3 .7

537.1

5 3 5 .5

5 3 4 .3

1 73.0

176.1

175.7

175 .7

1 76.0

1 75.9

1 76.2

1 76.3

1 76.6

177.1

1 77 .4

1 78 .3

1 78.5

1 78.3

1 78 .7

1 72.5

1 76.5

175.1

175.2

1 75 .4

175 .3

175 .7

1 75.7

176.0

1 76.5

176 .8

1 77.7

1 77 .9

1 77 .7

178.1

172 .4

175.1

1 74.4

174.1

1 74.3

1 74 .0

1 74 .3

174.2

1 74 .5

175.1

175 .7

1 76.7

1 76.8

1 76 .4

1 76 .8

193 .6

197.1

198.2

198.6

1 98.7

1 98 .5

1 98.4

1 98.9

198.2

197.1

199 .9

2 0 1 .9

202.1

2 0 1 .8

2 0 2 .9

161.2

162 .0

162.1

161.8

1 62.2

1 62.0

1 61 .5

1 61.2

162.1

162 .3

1 61.5

164 .5

1 64 .8

1 65.2

1 6 4 .6

167.1

167.2

168.7

167 .8

1 67 .4

1 67 .0

166.1

1 66 .4

1 66.9

167 .2

1 66 .3

167.1

166 .7

165 .6

165.1

2 1 0 .8

2 2 2 .9

219.1

2 1 6 .4

2 1 6 .4

2 1 6 .2

2 1 7 .5

2 1 6 .2

2 1 8 .0

2 2 2 .9

2 2 5 .7

2 2 1 .8

2 2 2 .2

2 2 0 .0

2 2 4 .3

138 .4

138.6

137 .3

136.9

1 37.6

136 .9

1 39.6

1 39.9

138 .6

139.1

1 39.9

140.1

1 39.5

139.6

1 39 .7

159.1

160 .4

159.7

1 60.4

1 6 0 .5

160.1

1 60 .3

1 60 .3

160 .7

1 60.6

1 61.3

161 .9

162.1

1 61.7

1 6 1 .7

1 55.6

158.8

1 57.6

1 58.8

159 .9

1 59.6

1 59.5

159 .5

158.2

158.9

1 60 .4

1 61.3

162.1

1 60 .9

162.1

1 55 .4

1 55.3

155.7

154 .3

1 54.7

1 54.0

1 55.2

1 55.8

1 53 .4

152 .9

1 55.7

1 58.7

1 57 .7

156 .2

1 5 7 .6

Nonalcoholic b e ve rag es and beverag e

12

12

2
O w n ers ’ equivalent rent of prim ary residence
12

177.6

176.7

177 .9

1 77.6

177 .3

177 .2

177.2

178 .8

1 78.5

1 78.5

1 78.5

1 78.9

1 79 .0

187.1

109.7

109.5

1 09.6

1 10 .8

109 .9

110.1

110.1

111 .0

1 10.7

110.1

1 10.9

1 10 .5

1 10.9

1 1 0 .5

173 .8

178.2

1 77.5

1 78.0

1 78 .4

178.7

1 79.0

1 79.4

179.7

1 80 .0

1 79 .8

180 .5

1 81 .0

1 81 .0

1 8 1 .4

113 .6

118.1

1 17.7

118.1

118.2

118.9

1 19.3

119 .6

1 20.0

120.1

1 20.2

1 20 .4

120 .7

1 20.8

1 2 0 .8

1 78.8

183 .3

183.1

183.2

183 .6

1 83.8

183.4

184 .3

1 84.6

184.7

1 85 .5

1 85.7

186 .8

186 .6

1 86 .8

172.1

175.7

175.1

176.1

176 .5

176.9

177.0

176.9

1 76.9

176.9

177 .9

1 78.7

1 79.9

179 .7

1 80 .0

194.5

2 01 .9

2 01.2

20.7

2 0 2 .3

2 02 .9

2 03 .0

2 03 .5

2 03 .7

2 03 .9

2 0 4 .9

2 0 5 .5

2 0 5 .9

2 0 5 .9

2 0 6 .4

191.5

199.0

98.1

198.7

199.2

199.6

2 00.0

2 00 .6

2 0 1 .3

201 .9

2 0 2 .6

2 0 3 .0

2 0 3 .4

2 0 3 .7

204.1

118.4

118.4

120.7

120.4

121.3

122.9

117.7

117.7

1 14.0

109.6

114.3

118 .0

120.4

1 19.0

1 22 .2

187.6

195.1

194.2

194.7

195.2

195.7

196.4

196.9

1 97.4

198.0

198.5

198.6

198.8

198.8

1 9 9 .0

106.4

108.7

107.6

107.9

108.7

109.7

110.1

110.1

111.2

112.3

113.7

113.9

113.8

114.0

1 14 .0

149.5

142.9

140.7

145.6

146.1

146.2

146.6

143.6

143.0

143.6

145.3

147.4

153.6

152.4

1 5 3 .0

134.2

126.1

123.9

129.1

129.6

129.6

129.9

126.7

126.0

126.4

128.3

130.5

137.0

135.7

1 36 .3

129.2

115.C

114.C

112.9

110.9

111.6

114.6

118.6

121.0

125.C

135.8

155.7

167.9

146.9

136.1
1 4 3 .5

141.5

133.4

131 -C

136.9

137.6

137.4

137.6

133.6

132.9

133.2

134.7

136.C

142.6

142.3

125.6

124.4

125.C

124.6

124.7

124.2

123.9

123.9

123.7

123.C

123.2

123.5

122.8

122.8

1 22 .0

126.1

123.1

126.2

122.6

118.C

119.6

123.6

125.6

124.6

120.S

117.C

119.4

122.5

122.8

1 2 1 .5

125.6

121.7

124.6

121.

118.6

118.2

119.6

122.6

122.7

118.6

115.7

116.8

120.6

120.4

119.1

1 17 .:

114.6

118.2

112."

106.6

109.6

116.6

1 19.:

117.2

112.:

106.7

111.C

116.4

116.4

1 14 .2

130.6

128.6

129.S

127.6

125.6

126.6

1 2 8 .'

129.6

129.7

127.2

122.':

123.6

125.6

125.5

1 25 .7

123.

121.2

124 .'

121.6

118.2

119.6

1 2 1 .'

122.:

122.6

120.6

119.6

119.3

119.6

119.6

1 19 .9

153.6

151.6

152 .'

152 .'

1 5 2 .'

153.6

153.

154.C

154.2

153.(

154.6

158.2

160.:

158.6

156 .2

150.6

149.6

149.6

149.

149.«

150.:

150.

1 5 1 .'

151.6

150 .'

152.6

1 5 5 .'

157.6

155.«

153 .3

101.«

9 9 .'

99.

99.

99.

99.C

9 8 .'

98.

CO
05

2
N e w and used m otor v e h ic le s ..........................

1 76.3
109.1

9 7 .’

9 6.9

99.

99.

97.6

98.()|

S e e footnotes a t end of table.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

79

Current Labor Statistics:

32.

Price Data

C o n t in u e d - C o n s u m e r Price Indexes for A ll U rb an C o n su m e rs a n d for Urban W a g e Earners a n d C le r ic a l Workers- U S citv
a v e r a g e , b y e x p e n d itu re c a t e g o ry a n d c o m m o d it y or s e rv ic e g ro u p

[1982-84 =100, unless otherwise indicated] ________
Annual average

Series

2001
N e w veh ic le s ..............................
U s ed cars a n d trucks1......................
M otor fu e l.......................................
G asoline (all ty p e s )................................
M otor vehicle parts and equipm ent...................
M otor vehicle m a intenance a nd repair......
Public transportation................................
M edical c a re .......................................

2002

2002
May

June

July

Aug.

2003

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

141.1

140.S

140.C

139.6

139.1

139.5

140.7

141.6

141.7

140.6

140.C

140.4

139.7

139.1

159.6

152.6

152.7

153.C

153.6

154.2

153.1

151.6

149.7

149.3

149.6

149.6

149.6

149.2

1 48 .7

124.2

117.C

121.8

120.4

121.2

121.6

122.1

124.9

124.8

120.0

126.7

140.9

148.5

1408

131 5

124.2

116.4

121.2

119.S

120.6

121.2

121.5

124.4

124.3

119.4

126.1

140.3

147.8

140 2

1 30 9

104.C

106.1

106.0

105.9

106.7

107.C

106.7

106.5

106.5

106.3

107.1

107.5

107.2

107

1 07 ?

193.C

194.3

195.0

195.4

196.2

196.C

196 3

1 96 5

185.-

191.7

191.4

191.5

191.4

192.5

192.9

2 0 4 .Î

202.6

2 06 .3

2 05.9

204.7

204.5

2 01 .9

199.2

198.5

1 99.2

198.1

199.8

202.C

203.C

2 0 8 .5

2 86 .7

288.3

289 .6

2 9 0 .6

291.8

2 93.0

2 93.5

2 93 .7

294 6
256 4

271 .8

284.6

2 8 2 .9

2 83.6

285 .5

286.3

M e dical c a re com m odities......................

2 4 2 ./

251.1

2 5 0 .3

2 51.3

2 52 .3

252 .3

2 52 .5

252 .8

M e dical c a re s ervices...........................

2 53 .5

2 5 4 .0

2 54.8

255.1

256.1

2 78 .5

2 5 6 .2

2 92.5

2 9 0 .6

2 91 .3

2 93 .5

294 .5

2 9 4 .9

296 .9

2 98 .4

Professional services......................

2 9 9 .5

3 00.9

3 02 .3

3 02.7

2 48 .7

3 0 3 .0

304 1

2 56 .0

2 5 5 .3

2 55 .3

2 57 .2

2 56 .9

2 5 6 .8

258 .2

2 5 8 .7

2 5 9 .2

Hospital and related s ervices..................

2 60 .0

2 6 1 .0

2 6 1 .3

261 9

263 3

333. £

3 63.2

3 5 9 .4

3 60 .6

3 63 .2

367.1

3 6 8 .9

372 .6

3 76 .7

379.1

3 82 .2

3 8 4 .8

3 85 .3

3 8 4 .9

3 8 5 .0

103 .6

104.6

1 04.9

104.6

104 .6

104.7

104 .4

194.6

104 .5

1 04.7

105.1

1 05.4

1 05.4

1 05 .4

1 05 .5

102 .4

102.7

103.0

1 02.9

1 03 .0

1 0 3 .0

108 .4

1 08 .0

R ecreation2..................................
V id eo a n d a u d io 1'2...........................

100.2

102.0

102 .3

102.2

101 .8

101 .6

1 01 .4

101.8

1 02.2

Education and com m unication2..........

105.3

1 07.6

106 .5

106.7

107 .4

108 .6

109.1

109 .0

1 08.8

108 .8

109.2

109.2

1 08 .9

1 24.8

1 26 .9

1 29 .3

129.6

1 29.7

1 29.7

1 30.3

1 30 .7

130 8

E ducation2...............................................

118.7

125.9

1 23.5

1 24.4

Educational books and supplies.............

2 9 9 .9

3 1 8 .5

3 16 .3

3 18 .2

319.1

3 2 0 .4

3 2 3 .9

3 2 4 .2

3 2 5 .0

3 2 4 .5

3 3 0 .6

3 3 3 .6

3 3 3 .9

Tuition, other school fees, and child c a re ......

3 3 3 .4

333 6

3 34 .7

3 54 .8

3 4 7 .7

3 5 0 .3

3 5 1 .4

3 5 7 .7

3 6 4 .9

3 6 5 .7

3 6 6 .0

3 6 6 .0

3 67 .2

3 6 8 .0

3 6 8 .2

3 6 8 .8

3 6 9 .3

C o m m unication1,2...............................
Inform ation and inform ation processing1,2
T e le p h o n e services1,2........................

9 4.5

9 3 .7

9 3 .3

93.1

9 3.9

9 4 .6

9 3 .9

9 3.6

9 3 .3

9 3.2

9 3 .5

9 3 .4

9 2 .8

9 2 .0

9 1 .3

93.8

92.7

9 2.5

9 2 .4

9 2.7

9 3 .4

9 2 .4

9 2 .4

92.0

9 3.0

9 2 .3

9 2.2

9 1 .6

9 0 .7

99.4

9 0 .0

9 9 .9

9 9 .4

9 9.3

9 9 .7

100 .8

1 00.3

1 00.2

100.1

100.1

1 00.7

100 .7

99 9

98 9

22.1

19.0

19.2

19.1

19.1

18.9

18.5

18.3

17.9

17.8

17.7

17.5

17.4

1 7 .4

17 0

29.1

2 1 .8

2 2 .7

2 2 .3

18 5

17 fi

4 6 4 .8

Inform ation and information processing
o ther th an teleD hone services1,4...........
P ersonal com puters and peripheral
e q u ip m en t1,2....................................

22.1

2 1 .7

2 0 .8

2 0 .4

19.7

19.3

19.1

18.6

18.6

2 8 9 .5

3 02 .0

299.1

3 0 3 .5

3 0 3 .5

3 0 6 .0

3 0 7 .8

3 0 4 .9

3 0 5 .0

T o b a cc o a n d sm oking products....................

305.1

3 0 5 .6

3 0 6 .4

426.1

305 6

4 63 .2

450.1

4 6 8 .7

4 6 8 .8

4 8 0 .7

4 8 8 .4

473.1

4 7 2 .8

4 7 4 .3

4 7 4 .3

4 7 4 .8

469.1

P ersonal c a re 1..........................

4 6 9 .8

170 .3

174.1

1 74.0

1 74 .4

1 74 .4

1 74.3

1 74 .4

1 74.8

174 .9

1 74.7

175.2

175 .7

176.1

1 76 .7

P ersonal c a re products1........................

155.7

1 76 .9

1 55.5

1 55.4

156.2

155 .3

155.1

155 .2

155.5

1 55.0

154.2

154 .8

154 .0

1 53.8

1 54 .6

P ersonal c a re s ervices1...........................

1 84.9

1 5 4 .2

189.1

189.1

1 89.0

1 89 .4

1 89.8

190 .0

190.1

1 90.6

1 90.7

189.1

M iscellaneous personal services...............

1 91.6

1 92 .4

193 .2

193 6

2 6 2 .8

2 7 4 .0

2 7 3 .6

274.1

2 7 4 .7

2 7 5 .2

2 7 4 .9

2 7 5 .9

2 7 6 .6

2 7 6 .7

2 7 7 .9

2 7 9 .9

281.1

2 8 1 .6

2 8 2 .4

O th e r goods and services..........................

Com m odity a n d service group:
C o m m o d ities................................

1 51.4

1 50 .4

1 51.2

150 .5

150.1

150 .4

1 51 .0

1 51.4

151.3

Food a n d b e v e ra g e s ...........................

150.3

150 .7

152 .8

1 54 n

173.0

176.1

1 75.7

175.7

2 7 5 .7

1 75 .9

176 .2

176.3

176 .6

177.1

1 77 .4

Com m odities less food a n d be ve rag es ...............

1 78.3

1 78 .5

178 3

138.7

135 .5

136.8

1 35.9

135.2

1 35.6

1 36 .4

136.9

136 .5

1 35.0

135 .5

1 38.0

1 39.6

138 2

149 .0

147.0

149 .3

1 47.8

146 .5

1 47.7

1 49 .4

159.6

150.2

147 .3

148.3

1 53 .8

1 57.3

1 5 4 .8

126.1

151.1

123.1

126.2

122.0

118 .0

119.6

1 23.5

125.5

1 24.6

120 .9

1 17.3

1 19 .4

1 22.5

122 .8

1 2 1 .5

Nondu rables less food and b e ve rag es ......
A p p a r e l.......................................
Nondu rables less food, beverages,

1 36 0

a n d a p p a re l.........................................

166 .3

165.3

167.2

1 67.3

1 67.6

1 68 .5

169.1

169.7

169.6

167.2

D u ra b les ....................................................

1 71.0

178 .7

182 .6

1 7 8 .3

1 7 3 .0

125 .3

121.8

122.0

121.6

1 21.5

1 21.3

121.1

121.0

120.6

1 20.4

120.1

119 .9

1 19.8

1 1 9 .4

1 18 .8

199.6

2 0 5 .9

2 0 4 .8

2 0 5 .8

2 0 6 .6

2 0 7 .3

2 0 7 .6

2 0 7 .8

208.1

2 0 8 .3

2 0 9 .4

2 1 0 .2

2 1 1 .2

2 1 1 .3

2 1 2 .0

1 94.5

193.9

194.3

194 .8

1 95.5

195 .5

196.1

196.2

1 96.3

197.3

1 97.9

1 98.3

1 98 3

S erv ic e s ............................................
R ent of shelter3....................

1 87.3

T ra n s p o rta tio n s ervices..........................................

199.1

2 0 7 .7

207.1

2 0 7 .3

2 0 8 .0

2 0 8 .6

2 0 8 .8

2 1 0 .0

2 1 1 .4

O th e r s ervices.....................................

2 1 1 .7

2 1 2 .2

2 1 3 .2

2 1 3 .9

2 3 3 .7

2 1 5 .0

216 .1

2 4 1 .6

2 3 9 .7

2 4 0 .4

2 4 1 .6

2 4 3 .4

244.1

2 4 4 .6

2 4 4 .8

245.1

2 4 6 .2

247.1

2 4 7 .0

2 4 6 .8

2 4 6 .8

S pecial indexes:
All item s less fo o d .............................

173.6

175 .8

1 75.8

175 .9

176.1

176 .7

177.1

1 77.5

All item s less s h elter..........................

1 77.5

1 77 .0

177 .7

179 .3

1 80.6

180 0

1 79 5

167 .6

168.3

1 68.4

168 .4

1 68.4

1 68.9

169 .5

169.7

169.7

169.1

All item s less m edical c a re .................

169 .7

1 71.5

1 72.9

1 72 .2

171 4

169.1

171.1

171 .0

171.2

171 .3

1 71.8

1 72.2

1 72.5

172 .5

172.1

172.7

C om m odities less food...........................

174.2

1 75 .4

174 8

174 4

140.2

137.3

138 .5

1 37.6

136 .9

1 37.4

138.1

138.6

138.3

Nondu rables less food........................

136 .8

137.1

1 39 .7

1 41 .4

140 .0

1 37 9

1 50.8

149.2

151 .4

1 50.0

1 48.7

149 .8

1 51.5

152 .6

1 52.3

149.6

150.5

N ondu rables less food a n d a p p are l...

1 55.8

159.2

156 fi

166 .7

166.1

1 67.9

168.0

1 68.3

1 69.2

1 69.6

179 .3

170.2

1 68.0

1 71.6

N on d u ra b le s .................................

178 .7

182 .3

178 .4

161 .4

161 .4

162.9

162.2

161.6

1 62.2

163.2

1 63.9

163 .9

162.6

163.2

166 .5

1 68 .5

167.1

1 65 .3

Serv ice s less rent of shelter3.....................

1 88.5

193.1

1 81.6

193.2

194.1

1 94 .9

195 .3

195.2

195.6

1 95.9

196 .9

1 97.9

S ervices less m edical care services............

1 99.5

1 99 .7

2 0 0 .4

193.1

198.9

197.9

198.9

1 99 .6

2 0 0 .4

2 0 0 .6

2 0 0 .7

2 0 0 .9

201.1

202.1

128.7

2 0 2 .9

1 20.9

2 0 4 .0

122 .2

2 0 4 .0

124.1

2 0 4 .7

1 24.7

1 25.0

1 25 .3

125.2

124.8

All item s less e n erg y ........................

122.6

126.9

135.1

142 .2

137 .7

179.8

1 33 2

183.6

183.3

183.2

1 83.3

183 .8

1 84.3

184.7

1 84.8

184 .6

184.8

1 85.5

185 .9

185 .8

1 85 9

1 81.7

185.6

185 .4

185 .3

1 85 .4

186 .0

1 86.5

186.9

1 87.0

186.7

1 86.9

C om m odities less food and e n erg y ..............

187 .5

188 .0

1 88 .0

1 88 0

146.1

144 .4

1 45.0

144.2

143.2

1 43.7

1 44 .4

144.5

144.1

143.1

Energy com m odities....................................

142.2

142 .6

143.1

143 0

142 2

125 .3

17.3

121.9

1 20.5

121 .2

1 21.8

122.2

125.1

125.2

1 20.7

127 .6

142.1

1 50.0

1 41 .7

2 0 6 .0

1 3 2 .3

2 1 3 .9 1

2 1 3 .0 1

2 1 3 .3

2 1 4 .3

215.1

2 1 5 .4

216.1

2 1 6 .5

2 1 6 .7

2 1 7 .7

2 1 8 .5

2 1 8 .8

2 1 9 .0

2 1 9 .6

All Item s less food and e n erg y ........................

S erv ice s less e n e rg y .................................
Not seaso nally adju sted.

4 indexes on a D ecem ber 1 98 8 - 100 base.

2 In d exes on a D e ce m b e r 1 9 9 7 = 1 00 base.
3 In d exes on a D e ce m b e r

80

May

143.2

Dash indicates d a ta not available.

1982 - 1 00 b ase.

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

No t e : Index applied to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.

July 2003

1 7 3 .5

33.

C o n s u m e r P r ic e In d e x : U.S. c it y a v e r a g e a n d a v a ila b l e lo c a l a r e a d a t a : a ll ite m s

[1982-84 =100, unless otherwise indicated]
U rb a n W a g e E a rn e rs

A ll U rban C o n s u m e rs

P ricin g
s ch e d -

2002

ule1

Dec.

2002

2003
Ja n .

A p r.

Mar.

Feb.

2003
Ja n .

Dec.

M ay

A p r.

Mar.

F eb .

M ay

M

1 8 0 .9

1 8 1 .7

183.1

1 8 4 .2

1 8 3 .8

1 8 3 .5

1 7 7 .0

1 7 7 .7

1 7 9 .2

1 8 0 .3

1 7 9 .8

1 7 9 .4

N o rth e a s t u r b a n .........................................................................................

M

1 8 9 .6

1 9 0 .5

1 9 1 .7

1 9 3 .0

1 9 2 .6

1 9 2 .7

1 8 6 .6

1 8 7 .2

1 8 8 .6

1 8 9 .8

1 8 9 .4

1 8 9 .2

S iz e A — M o r e th a n 1 ,5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .......................................................

M

1 9 1 .4

1 9 2 .2

1 9 3 .5

1 9 4 .6

1 9 4 .4

1 9 4 .6

1 87 .1

1 8 7 .7

1 89 .1

1 9 0 .0

1 8 9 .8

1 8 9 .8

M

1 1 2 .6

1 13 .1

1 1 3 .8

1 1 5 .0

1 1 4 .4

1 1 4 .2

1 1 2 .7

1 1 3 .2

1 1 4 .0

1 1 5 .2

1 1 4 .5

1 1 4 .2

M

1 7 5 .5

1 7 6 .2

1 7 7 .8

1 7 8 .6

1 7 7 .8

1 7 7 .7

1 7 1 .0

1 7 1 .8

1 7 3 .3

1 74 .1

1 7 3 .1

1 7 2 .9

M

1 7 7 .8

1 7 8 .2

1 8 0 .0

1 8 0 .7

1 7 9 .7

1 7 9 .7

1 7 2 .4

1 7 2 .9

1 7 4 .6

1 7 5 .4

1 7 4 .3

1 7 4 .2

M

1 1 1 .4

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .8

1 1 3 .6

1 1 3 .2

1 1 3 .0

1 1 1 .0

1 1 1 .7

1 1 2 .5

1 13 .1

1 1 2 .6

1 1 2 .4

S iz e D— N o n m e tro p o lita n (le ss th a n 5 0 ,0 0 0 ) .........................

M

1 6 9 .5

1 7 0 .7

1 7 2 .5

1 7 3 .0

1 7 1 .7

1 7 1 .7

1 6 7 .2

1 6 8 .4

1 70 .1

1 7 0 .6

1 6 9 .3

1 6 9 .3

S o u th u r b a n ................................................................................................

M

1 7 4 .6

1 75.1

1 7 6 .4

1 7 7 .5

1 7 7 .4

1 7 6 .8

1 7 2 .0

1 7 2 .5

1 7 3 .9

1 7 5 .0

1 7 4 .7

1 7 4 .0

S iz e A — M o r e th a n 1 ,5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .......................................................

M

1 7 5 .9

1 7 6 .7

1 7 8 .3

179 .1

1 7 8 .9

1 7 8 .6

173 .1

1 7 4 .0

1 7 5 .7

1 7 6 .5

1 7 6 .3

1 7 5 .7

M

1 1 1 .6

1 1 1 .7

1 1 2 .5

1 1 3 .3

1 1 3 .3

1 1 2 .8

1 1 0 .8

1 1 0 .9

1 1 1 .7

1 1 2 .5

1 1 2 .3

1 1 1 .8

S iz e D— N o n m e tro p o lita n (le ss th a n 5 0 ,0 0 0 ) .........................

M

1 7 2 .3

1 7 3 .2

1 7 4 .8

1 7 5 .4

1 7 5 .5

1 7 4 .7

1 7 2 .6

1 7 3 .2

1 7 4 .8

1 7 5 .7

1 7 5 .4

1 7 4 .6

W e s t u r b a n ..................................................................................................

M

1 8 5 .5

1 8 6 .6

1 88.1

1 8 9 .3

1 8 8 .8

1 8 8 .5

1 8 0 .8

1 8 1 .5

1 8 3 .2

1 8 4 .7

1 8 4 .2

1 8 3 .8

S iz e A — M o r e th a n 1 ,5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .......................................................

M

1 8 8 .0

1 8 9 .2

1 9 0 .9

1 92 .1

1 9 1 .7

1 9 1 .2

1 8 1 .6

1 8 2 .5

1 8 4 .4

1 8 5 .9

1 8 5 .4

1 8 5 .0

M

1 13.1

1 1 3 .8

1 1 4 .5

1 1 5 .4

1 1 4 .9

1 1 4 .7

1 1 2 .9

1 1 3 .2

1 1 4 .0

1 15 .1

1 1 4 .7

1 1 4 .4

U .S . c ity a v e r a g e ..............................................................................
R e g io n a n d a r e a s iz e 2

S iz e B /C — 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 .5 0 0 .0 0 0 3 .................................................
4

M id w e s t u rb a n ..........................................................................................
S iz e A — M o r e th a n 1 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .......................................................
S iz e B /C — 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 3 .................................................

S iz e B /C — 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 3 .................................................

S iz e B /C — 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 .5 0 0 .0 0 0 3 .................................................
S iz e c la s s e s :

M

1 6 5 .4

166 .1

1 6 7 .5

1 6 8 .4

1 6 8 .0

1 6 7 .9

1 6 3 .7

1 6 4 .3

1 6 5 .8

1 6 6 .8

1 6 6 .3

1 6 6 .1

M

1 1 1 .9

1 1 2 .3

1 13.1

1 1 4 .0

1 1 3 .7

1 1 3 .4

1 1 1 .4

1 1 1 .8

1 1 2 .6

1 1 3 .5

1 13 .1

1 1 2 .7

M

1 7 3 .8

1 7 4 .6

1 7 6 .0

1 7 6 .9

1 7 6 .3

1 76.1

1 7 2 .5

1 7 3 .2

1 7 4 .7

1 7 5 .6

1 7 4 .9

1 7 4 .5

C h ic a g o - G a r y - K e n o s h a , IL—IN —W l ................................................

M

1 8 2 .4

1 8 2 .7

184 .1

1 8 4 .8

1 8 3 .4

1 8 3 .4

1 7 6 .0

1 7 6 .4

1 78 .1

1 7 9 .0

1 7 7 .4

1 7 7 .3

L o s A n g e le s - R iv e r s id e - O r a n g e C o u n ty , C A .............................

M

1 8 3 .7

1 8 5 .2

1 8 6 .5

1 8 8 .2

1 8 7 .6

1 8 6 .4

1 7 6 .7

1 7 7 .8

1 7 9 .6

1 8 1 .6

1 8 0 .9

1 7 9 .9

N e w Y o rk , N Y - N o r t h e r n N J -L o n g Isla n d , N Y - N J - C T - P A .

M

1 93.1

1 9 4 .7

1 9 6 .2

1 97.1

1 9 6 .7

1 9 6 .8

1 8 8 .7

1 8 9 .7

1 9 1 .3

1 92 .1

1 9 1 .8

1 9 1 .7

B o s to n - B r o c k to n -N a s h u a , M A - N H - M E - C T .............................

1

-

1 9 9 .8

-

2 0 2 .3

-

1 9 9 .3

2 0 2 .3

-

2 0 1 .8

A 5 .................................................................................................................
A

B /C ............................................................................................................

S e le c te d local areas *

C le v e la n d - A k r o n , O H .............................................................................

1

F t W o rth T X ..............................................................................

1

H a lla «

W a s h in q to n -B a ltim o r e , D C - M D - V A - W V 7 .................................
A tla n ta , G A ................................................................................................................

1
2

-

2 0 2 .8

-

-

1 7 3 .5

-

1 7 5 .4

-

1 75 .1

-

1 6 5 .3

-

1 67 .1

-

1 6 6 .3

_

1 7 4 .0

_

1 7 6 .8

-

1 7 6 .9

-

1 7 3 .3

-

1 7 6 .5

-

1 7 6 .4

-

1 1 4 .6

-

1 1 5 .9

-

1 1 5 .7

-

1 14.1

-

1 1 5 .5

-

1 1 5 .1

-

178 .1

-

1 7 7 .3

1 8 0 .7

-

1 82.1

1 7 4 .6

1 7 9 .2

2

1 7 9 .7

1 8 2 .4

1 8 2 .2

1 7 4 .4

1 7 6 .8

1 7 6 .4

H o u s to n - G a lv e s to n - B r a z o r ia , T X ...................................................

2

1 5 9 .8

164

1 6 2 .5

1 5 8 .0

1 6 1 .7

1 6 0 .9

M ia m i- F t . L a u d e r d a le , F L .............................................................................

2

1 7 7 .9

1 8 0 .3

1 8 0 .6

1 7 5 .3

178

1 7 8 .4
1 8 6 .3

P h ila d e lp h ia -W ilm in g to n -A tla n tic C ity , P A - N J - D E - M D . . . .

2

1 8 5 .3

1 8 6 .6

1 8 7 .2

1 8 4 .9

1 8 5 .9

S a n F ra n c is c o - O a k la n d —S a n J o s e , C A ......................................

2

1 9 3 .2

1 9 7 .7

1 9 7 .3

1 8 9 .6

1 9 3 .7

S e a tt le - T a c o m a - B r e m e r t o n , W A ....................................................

2

1 9 0 .0

1 9 1 .3

1 9 2 .3

1 8 4 .6

1 8 6 .2

1

F o o d s , fu e ls , a n d s e v e ra l o th e r ite m s p rice d e v e ry m o n th in all a re a s ; m o s t o th e r A K ;

C in c in n a t i

M in n e a p o lis -S t.

g o o d s a n d s e rv ic e s p ric e d a s in d icated :

|

O H - K Y - IN ;
P au l,

M N - W I;

Kansas

C ity ,

P itts b u rg h ,

PA;

-

1 9 3 .6

I

M O -K S ;

1 87
M ilw a u k e e -R a c in e ,

P o r t-la n d -S a le m ,

M — E v e ry m o n th .

M O - IL ; S a n D ie g o , C A ; T a m p a - S t . P e te r s b u r g -C le a r w a te r , F L .

1—

J a n u a ry , M a rc h , M a y , July, S e p te m b e r, a n d N o v e m b e r.

7 In d e x e s on a N o v e m b e r 1 9 9 6 = 1 0 0 b a s e .

2—

F e b ru a ry , A pril, J u n e , A u g u s t, O c to b e r, a n d D e c e m b e r.

NO TE:

O R -W A ;

Lo c al a r e a C P I in d e x e s a re byp ro d u c ts o f th e n a tio n a l C P I p ro g ra m .

W l;

S t L ouis,

E a c h lo cal

in d e x h as a s m a lle r s a m p le s iz e a n d is, th e re fo re , s u b je c t to s u b stan tia lly m o re s a m p lin g

2 R e g io n s d e fin e d a s th e fo u r C e n s u s reg io n s.

a n d o th e r m e a s u re m e n t e rro r. A s a result, local a r e a in d e x e s s h o w g re a te r vola tility th a n

3 In d e x e s o n a D e c e m b e r 1 9 9 6 = 1 0 0 b a s e .
4 T h e "N o rth C e n tra l" re g io n h a s b e e n re n a m e d th e "M id w est" re g io n b y th e C e n s u s

th e n a tio n a l in d e x, a lth o u g h th e ir lo n g -te rm tre n d s a re sim ilar.

T h e re fo re , th e B u re a u of

L a b o r S tatistics strongly u rg e s u s ers to c o n s id e r a d o p tin g th e n a tio n a l a v e r a g e C P I fo r

B u re a u . It is c o m p o s e d o f th e s a m e g e o g ra p h ic en tities .

u s e in th e ir e s c a la to r c la u s e s .
5 In d e x e s o n a D e c e m b e r 1 9 8 6 = 1 0 0 b a s e .

In d e x a p p lie s to a m o n th a s a w h o le , n o t to a n y s p ec ific

d a te .

8 In a d d itio n , th e fo llo w in g m e tro p o litan a r e a s a re p u b lish ed s em ia n n u a lly a n d a p p e a r in
ta b le s 3 4 a n d 3 9 of th e J a n u a ry a n d Ju ly iss u e s of th e CPI D e ta ile d R e p o r t:


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

A n c h o ra g e ,

D a s h in d ica te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

81

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

34. A n n u a l d a t a : C o n s u m e r P r ic e In d e x , U.S. c it y a v e r a g e , a ll ite m s a n d m a jo r g r o u p s

[19 8 2 -8 4 = 100]
S e rie s

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

C o n s u m e r P ric e In d e x fo r All U rb a n C o n s u m e rs :
All Ite m s :
In d e x ........................................................................

1 4 4 .5

P e r c e n t c h a n g e ...............................................

1 4 8 .2

1 5 2 .4

1 5 6 .9

1 6 0 .5

1 6 3 .0

1 6 6 .6

1 7 2 .2

1 7 7 .1

1 7 9 .9

3 .0

.

2 .6

2 .8

3 .0

2 .3

1 .6

2 .2

3 .4

2 .8

1 .6

1 4 1 .6

1 4 4 .9

1 4 8 .9

1 5 3 .7

1 5 7 .7

161 .1

1 6 4 .6

1 6 8 .4

1 7 3 .6

1 7 6 .8

2.1

2 .3

2 .8

3 .2

2 .6

2 .2

2 .2

2 .3

3.1

1 .8

1 4 1 .2

1 4 4 .8

1 4 8 .5

1 5 2 .8

1 5 6 .8

1 6 0 .4

1 6 3 .9

1 6 9 .6

1 7 6 .4

1 8 0 .3

2 .7

2 .5

2 .6

2 .9

2 .6

2 .3

2 .2

3 .5

4 .0

2 .2

1 3 3 .7

1 3 3 .4

1 3 2 .0

1 3 1 .7

1 3 2 .9

1 3 3 .0

1 3 1 .3

1 2 9 .6

1 2 7 .3

1 2 4 .0

1 .4

-.2

-1 .0

-.2

.9

.1

-1 .3

-1 .3

-1 .8

-2 .6

1 3 0 .4

1 3 4 .3

1 39 .1

1 4 3 .0

1 4 4 .3

1 4 1 .6

1 4 4 .4

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .3

1 5 2 .9

3.1

3 .0

3 .6

2 .8

0 .9

-1 .9

2 .0

6 .2

0 .7

-.9

2 0 1 .4

2 1 1 .0

2 2 0 .5

2 2 8 .2

2 3 4 .6

2 4 2 .1

2 5 0 .6

2 6 0 .8

2 7 2 .8

2 8 5 .6

5 .9

4 .8

4 .5

3 .5

2 .8

3 .2

3 .5

4.1

4 .6

4 .7

1 9 2 .9

1 9 8 .5

2 0 6 .9

2 1 5 .4

2 2 4 .8

2 3 7 .7

2 5 8 .3

2 7 1 .1

2 8 2 .6

2 9 3 .2

5 .2

2 .9

4 .2

4.1

4 .4

5 .7

8 .7

5 .0

4 .2

3 .8

1 42 .1

1 4 5 .6

1 4 9 .8

1 54 .1

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .7

1 6 3 .2

1 6 8 .9

1 7 3 .5

1 7 5 .9

2 .8

2 .5

2 .9

2 .9

2 .3

1 .3

2 .2

3 .5

2 .7

1 .4

Fo o d a n d b e v e ra g e s :
In d e x ....................................................................
P e r c e n t c h a n g e ....................................................................
H o u s in g :
In d e x ........................................................................
P e r c e n t c h a n g e .........................................................
A p p a re l:
In d e x ........................................................................................
P e r c e n t c h a n g e ...........................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n :
In d e x ...................................................................
P e r c e n t c h a n g e .......................................................
M e d ic a l c a re :
In d e x ......................................................................
P e r c e n t c h a n g e ......................................................
O th e r g o o d s a n d s e rv ic e s :
In d e x ..........................................................................
P e r c e n t c h a n g e ..................................................................
C o n s u m e r P ric e In d e x fo r U rb a n W a g e E a rn e rs
a n d C le ric a l W o rk e rs :
All Ite m s :
In d e x ..................................................................
P e rc e n t c h a n g e .......................................................

82

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

35.

P ro d u c e r P rice In d ex es, b y s ta g e o f p ro c e s s in g

[1982 = 100]

2001

2002

2003

2002

Annual average
Grouping
May

Jun e

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.p

A p r.p

M a/

1 3 9 .7

1 39 .0

1 4 0 .8

1 4 2 .3

1 4 4 .5

142.1

142.1

1 4 0 .7

1 3 8 .8

1 38 .6

1 3 9 .0

1 3 8 .8

1 38 .8

139.1

1 4 0 .7

1 4 1 .5

1 3 9 .4

139.1

1 3 9 .6

1 39 .6

1 39 .6

1 40 .0

1 41 .6

1 40 .4

1 39 .6

1 4 1 .9

1 44 .0

1 4 6 .7

1 4 3 .7

1 4 3 .6

1 4 1 .3

1 40 .0

140.1

1 3 9 .4

1 3 9 .8

1 3 9 .3

1 38 .7

1 3 9 .2

1 39 .2

1 3 9 .5

1 4 2 .0

1 4 2 .3

1 4 2 .6

1 4 3 .9

1 4 4 .5
1 4 2 .9

F in sh ed c o n su m e r goods
1 4 1 .4

1 3 8 .8

1 38 .6

1 3 9 .3

139.1

1 3 9 .3

1 40 .2

1 42 .2

1 40 .5

1 3 9 .3

1 4 1 .6

1 4 4 .4

1 4 7 .9

1 4 3 .3

1 4 2 .8

1 3 9 .8

1 3 9 .5

140 .6

1 41 .0

1 41 .5

1 4 2 .8

1 43 .8

1 42 .0

1 40 .6

1 4 3 .8

1 47 .9

1 5 2 .5

1 4 6 .4

146.1

1 3 3 .9

1 3 3 .0

1 3 3 .0

1 32 .8

1 3 1 .5

1 31 .0

131.1

1 3 4 .8

1 33 .6

1 3 2 .8

1 3 3 .2

133.1

1 3 4 .5

1 3 2 .8

1 3 2 .6

140.1

1 3 9 .4

1 3 9 .4

1 3 6 .2

1 3 3 .2

1 3 2 .5

1 3 9 .7

139.1

139.1

1 39 .0

1 3 8 .4

1 38 .2

1 38 .3

1 3 9 .9

1 39 .5

139.1

1 3 9 .3

1 39 .2

1 2 8 .7

1 2 7 .8

127.1

1 27 .7

128.1

1 2 8 .4

1 2 9 .3

1 2 9 .7

1 29 .7

1 2 9 .4

1 3 1 .2

1 3 3 .5

Interm ediate m aterials,

M a te rials a n d c o m ponen ts
1 2 7 .4

126.1

1 2 5 .5

1 25 .9

1 2 6 .3

1 26 .5

126 .9

1 2 7 .4

1 27 .6

1 27 .2

1 2 7 .9

1 2 9 .5

1 2 9 .9

1 2 9 .5

1 2 9 .2

1 2 4 .3

1 2 3 .2

1 21 .2

122.1

1 2 2 .7

123.1

1 23 .9

1 2 4 .3

1 25 .0

1 26 .9

1 2 8 .9

1 29 .6

1 2 8 .9

1 2 9 .7

1 3 0 .8

M a te rials for no n d u rab le m anufacturing..,

1 3 1 .8

1 2 9 .2

128.1

1 28 .8

1 2 9 .7

1 3 0 .3

1 3 1 .5

1 3 2 .9

1 3 2 .8

1 3 1 .4

1 3 3 .4

138.1

1 3 9 .2

1 3 7 .9

1 3 6 .6

M a te rials fo r d u rab le m an u facturing ..........

1 25 .2

1 2 4 .7

124.1

1 2 4 .7

1 2 5 .3

1 2 5 .3

1 25.9

1 2 5 .9

1 2 6 .3

1 2 6 .2

126.1

1 2 6 .8

1 2 7 .0

1 2 7 .0

1 2 6 .9
126.1

1 2 6 .3

126.1

1 2 6 .2

126.1

1 2 6 .0

1 25 .9

1 25 .9

1 2 5 .8

1 2 6 .0

1 25 .9

1 2 5 .8

1 2 5 .8

126.1

1 2 6 .0

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .3

1 51 .4

1 5 1 .5

1 5 1 .7

152.1

152.1

1 5 1 .7

1 51 .2

151.1

1 5 1 .4

152.1

1 5 2 .2

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .0

1 0 4 .5

9 6 .3

9 4 .8

9 6 .4

9 7 .3

9 7 .6

1 00 .6

1 01 .6

1 0 1 .2

1 00 .9

1 0 6 .9

1 13 .6

1 2 5 .4

1 1 0 .9

108.1

153.1

152.1

1 51 .0

1 5 1 .3

1 51 .4

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .3

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .2

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .7

154.1

1 5 4 .0

1 5 4 .2

1 3 8 .6

1 3 8 .9

1 3 8 .4

1 3 8 .7

139.1

1 39 .3

1 39.6

1 3 9 .5

1 39 .6

1 39 .6

140.1

1 4 0 .7

1 41 .2

1 4 1 .4

1 4 1 .5

1 3 0 .9

M a te rials a n d c o m ponen ts

Crude m aterials fo r further
1 2 1 .3

108.1

1 09 .9

1 05 .7

1 06 .8

1 0 8 .7

1 10.9

1 1 2 .6

116.1

118.1

1 2 7 .3

1 3 4 .0

1 5 2 .7

1 2 7 .8

1 0 6 .2

9 9 .5

9 8 .2

9 6 .8

9 8 .0

9 9 .7

1 00 .7

9 9 .9

9 9 .4

1 0 0 .5

1 0 5 .6

1 0 6 .3

1 0 5 .2

106.1

1 1 0 .7

1 2 7 .3

1 1 1 .4

1 15 .6

1 09.2

1 1 0 .2

112.1

1 15 .4

1 1 9 .0

1 2 5 .3

1 28 .2

1 4 0 .4

1 5 1 .7

1 8 5 .7

1 4 0 .8

1 4 2 .7

1 4 0 .4

1 3 8 .3

1 38 .2

1 38 .6

1 3 8 .3

1 38 .4

139 .0

1 4 0 .8

1 39 .6

1 38 .7

1 4 0 .3

142.1

1 4 4 .7

1 4 1 .4

1 4 1 .2

9 6 .8

8 8 .8

8 8 .4

8 9 .8

9 0 .5

9 1 .3

9 3 .0

9 4 .5

9 1 .3

9 0 .7

9 5 .3

1 0 1 .7

1 0 7 .5

9 9 .6

1 4 7 .5

1 4 7 .3

147.1

1 47 .3

1 46 .7

1 4 6 .5

1 46 .4

1 4 7 .9

1 47 .6

1 4 7 .0

1 4 7 .9

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .9

1 4 8 .2

1 4 8 .4

1 5 2 .0

1 5 2 .3

Special groupings:
9 8 .9

F in ish ed c o n su m e r goods less e n e rg y .......

1 5 0 .8

1 5 0 .8

1 5 0 .5

1 50 .7

1 5 0 .3

1 5 0 .0

1 49 .9

1 5 1 .3

1 51 .0

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .5

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .7

Finished goods less food a nd e n e rg y .........

1 5 0 .0

1 5 0 .2

1 50 .2

1 50 .2

1 4 9 .5

1 49 .3

1 49 .5

1 5 1 .3

1 5 0 .9

1 49 .9

1 5 0 .3

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .5

150.1

150.1

1 56 .9

1 5 7 .6

1 57 .7

1 57 .8

157.1

1 56 .8

157.1

159.1

1 58 .6

1 5 7 .2

1 5 7 .7

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .2

1 5 7 .3

1 5 7 .3

175.1

1 7 7 .5

1 77 .6

1 78 .0

1 7 7 .9

1 77 .9

1 78 .3

1 7 8 .5

1 78 .9

1 76 .7

1 7 7 .4

1 7 7 .3

1 7 9 .2

1 7 7 .0

1 7 7 .3

1 3 0 .5

1 2 8 .5

1 27 .9

1 2 8 .4

1 2 8 .8

1 29 .0

1 30.0

1 3 0 .4

1 30 .3

1 30 .0

1 3 1 .7

1 34 .2

137.1

1 3 3 .9

133.1

1 1 5 .9

1 1 5 .5

1 12 .9

114 .2

1 1 5 .8

1 1 6 .8

1 18 .0

1 1 7 .4

1 1 7 .5

1 1 8 .8

1 2 0 .4

1 2 1 .2

1 2 1 .0

1 2 1 .2

1 2 2 .7

1 0 1 .6
1 3 5 .4

1 01 .0

1 00 .0

1 0 5 .8

1 1 3 .2

1 2 4 .8

1 1 0 .3

107.1

1 3 5 .5

1 3 5 .5

136.1

137.1

1 3 7 .4

1 3 7 .4

1 3 7 .4

1 3 6 .5

1 36 .6

1 3 6 .7

1 36 .6

137.1

138.1

1 3 8 .5

1 3 8 .5

1 3 8 .4

Finished c o n su m e r go o d s less food
C o n s u m e r no n d u rab le go o d s less food

In te rm ed ia te m ateria ls less foods

104.1

9 5 .9

9 4 .6

9 6 .2

9 6 .7

9 7 .0

1 0 0 .4

135.1

1 3 4 .5

1 3 4 .0

1 3 4 .4

1 3 4 .8

1 35 .0

1 35 .3

In te rm e d ia te m a teria ls less foods
1 3 6 .4

C ru d e nonfood m a teria ls less e n e rg y ........


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

1 3 5 .8

1 3 5 .4

1 35 .7

1 36 .0

1 36 .2

1 2 2 .8

1 0 2 .0

1 08 .3

9 7 .8

98.1

1 01 .2

1 05 .9

1 1 1 .3

1 20 .0

1 2 4 .0

140.1

1 5 3 .9

2 0 2 .0

139.1

1 4 2 .6

1 1 2 .2

1 0 8 .7

1 0 7 .5

1 0 7 .4

1 08 .9

1 10 .0

1 10 .6

1 09 .9

1 09 .8

1 1 0 .5

115.1

1 16 .9

116.1

1 1 6 .4

1 1 9 .2

1 4 8 .3

1 4 6 .7

1 4 4 .8

1 3 0 .6

1 3 5 .7

1 34 .9

1 38 .6

1 4 1 .0

1 4 0 .3

1 40 .0

1 3 9 .3

1 3 9 .8

1 39 .9

1 4 3 .0

1 4 8 .3

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

83

Current Labor Statistics:

36.

Price Data

P ro d u c e r P rice in d e x e s for the net outpu t of m a jo r industry g ro u p s

[December 1984 =100, unless otherwise indicated]
SIC

Annual average

Industry

2001
—

T o ta l m in in g in d u s trie s ...........................................

2002

2002
May

114 a

2003

June

Ju ly

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.p

Apr.p

Mayp

9 3 .5

90 *0

9 5 .9

100.1

1 04.5

1 10 .5

1 13 .8

126 .2

1 37 .4

1 70 .8

1 23 .9

1 2 7 .3

73.2

7 3 .6

7 2 .8

7 4 .2

7 4 .5

7 8 .5

7 7 .3

7 5 .2

7 4 .7

9 3 .4

9 2 .8

9 3 .4

9 3 .6

93.1

9 3 .2

9 3 .4

9 4 .0

9 4 .8

9 3 .8

1 06.0

112 .8

1 19 .5

128 .8

1 33 .9

1 52 .5

170 .2

2 2 2 .6

1 4 9 .0

1 5 4 .7

10

M e ta l m ining..........................................

7 0 ft

12

C o a l m ining (1 2 /8 5 = 1 0 0 )...................

91 3

93 Q

13

Oil a n d g as extraction (1 2 /8 5 - 1 0 0 )................

1 27.5

1 07 .0

1 12.7

101 .7

1 02 .0

14

M ining a n d quarrying of nonm etallic
m inerals, e xcep t fuels .................................

1 41 .0

143 .5

143 .6

1 43.7

1 43.7

1 43.5

143 .5

143 .7

1 43 .8

144.2

1 44 .9

1 4 5 .4

1 46 .3

146 .2

1 4 6 .4

T o ta l m a n u fa c tu r in g in d u s trie s ...........................

134 fi

133 C

133 .7

1 35 .0

1 35 .6

1 34.6

1 34 .0

1 35 .7

1 37 .6

1 38 .9

1 3 6 .4

1 35 .8

_

20

7 8.0 .

Food a n d kin dred products...................

132 .8

1 32.0

1 30.9

1 31 .3

131 .5

131 .3

136.1

21

131.6

1 31.6

1 32 .6

T o b a cc o m anu fa ctures ......................................

1 33 .9

1 34 .5

1 34.7

386.1

1 3 5 .0

1 35 .7

4 0 1 .9

4 0 8 .0

4 0 8 .2

4 0 8 .6

4 0 8 .5

22

4 0 8 .5

4 0 8 .6

4 0 9 .2

T extile mill products.............................

3 8 0 .3

3 7 9 .7

3 7 9 .8

4 0 9 .6

1 16.9

3 7 5 .8

3 7 6 .4

1 15 .8

1 15.5

1 15.8

115 .7

1 15 .5

1 15 .6

1 15.6

1 15.8

116.1

1 15 .3

115 .2

1 14 .8

115.1

1 1 4 .8

1 25.8

125.1

125.1

125 .2

1 25.3

1 25.3

125.1

125.1

125.1

124 .8

1 24 .7

124 .7

1 25 .5

125.1

1 2 4 .8
1 56 .5

23

A pparel a n d o ther finished products
m a d e from fabrics and sim ilar m aterials......

24

L u m ber a n d w ood products,
156.2

1 55 .3

156 .0

155 .3

1 55 .5

1 55 .9

1 55 .3

25

154 .6

154.1

Furniture a n d fixtures...............................

1 54.2

154 .4

1 55 .7

1 55 .3

145.1

156.1

1 46 .3

1 45 .9

146.1

1 46.6

146 .6

1 47 .0

1 47.2

26

1 47 .0

P a p e r a n d allied products.........................

1 46.8

1 47 .0

147.1

1 47 .3

1 46.2

1 4 7 .3

143 .7

1 47 .5

1 42.5

1 42.8

1 42.9

143 .5

144.1

1 44.6

145.1

1 44.9

1 44 .8

1 44 .9

1 43 .9

1 4 4 .4

1 45 .2
1 97 .3

exc ep t furnitu re.............................................

27

Printing, publishing, and allied industries........

1 88.7

1 93 .0

1 92.6

1 92.9

193.1

1 93.2

193 .4

1 93.6

1 94.0

194.1

1 9 6 .4

1 96.7

28

1 96 .5

1 96 .9

C h e m ica ls a n d allied products...........................

1 5 8 .4

1 57.3

1 56.3

157 .0

1 58 .5

1 58.6

1 58.7

29

1 59 .5

1 59 .7

Petroleum refining a nd related products..........

1 59.3

1 60 .9

1 62.3

1 63 .7

1 05 .3

1 6 7 .0

9 8 .8

9 9 .7

1 65 .5

9 8 .9

101.1

1 03.2

1 09.6

30

1 17.5

106 .7

1 0 2 .4

116 .5

R u b b e r a n d m iscellaneous plastics products.

1 38 .0

1 46 .0

1 25.9

1 1 8 .7

1 25 .5

1 1 0 .9

1 25.3

125 .8

1 25 .5

1 25 .9

1 26.3

1 26.3

125 .8

125 .8

31

L e ath er a n d lea th er products.......................

127 .2

1 28 .3

1 2 9 .3

1 2 9 .4

1 41.3

141.1

1 40.6

140 .9

1 41 .4

1 42 .0

1 41 .9

32

141 .8

142.1

142 .5

1 4 2 .4

S to n e , clay, glass, and concrete products......

1 42 .4

143.1

143.1

1 36 .0

137.1

137.1

1 4 2 .8

1 37.2

1 37 .0

1 37 .4

1 37 .6

1 37 .4

33

1 37 .3

137 .3

P rim ary m etal industries........................................

1 37 .6

126 .3

1 37 .8

1 37 .6

1 3 8 .1

1 3 8 .1

116.1

116 .2

1 15 .4

1 16.3

1 16.9

1 1 7 .1

1 1 7 .9

34

118 .0

1 18 .3

118.1

1 17 .9

Fabric a te d m etal products,

1 18 .0

1 17 .8

1 1 7 .8

1 1 8 .0

excep t m achinery and transportation
e q u ip m en t...................................
35

M a chinery, e xcep t ele ctrical................................

36

Electrical a n d electronic m achinery,

37

T ra n sp o rtatio n ......................................................

38

M e a su rin g a n d controlling instruments;

39

M is ce lla n e o u s m anufacturing industries

e q uipm ent, a n d supplies......................................

1 31 .0

1 31.7

1 31 .4

1 31.6

131 .9

132 .0

132.1

132.1

1 32 .0

1 32 .2

1 32 .4

1 32 .5

1 32 .7

1 3 2 .6

1 3 2 .7

1 18 .0

1 17.2

1 17 .6

1 17 .4

1 17.2

1 16 .8

1 16.8

1 16.8

1 16.6

1 16 .5

1 16.5

116 .2

1 16.2

1 1 6 .3

1 16 .2

107 .0

1 05.7

105 .9

105 .8

1 05.5

1 05.5

1 05 .4

105.1

1 05 .0

1 04 .3

104 .2

103 .8

104.1

1 0 4 .3

137 .9

1 0 3 .6

1 37 .3

137.1

137 .0

1 35.5

1 35.0

135.1

1 39 .4

138 .3

1 37 .6

138.1

1 38 .3

1 39 .8

1 3 7 .8

1 3 7 .5

photographic, m edical, and optical
goods; w atch e s and clocks.................................
industries (1 2 /8 5 = 1 0 0 )...................................

1 27.3

128 .5

1 28.2

128.3

1 28.3

128 .4

1 28 .7

1 28 .8

1 28 .8

1 28 .8

1 29 .4

1 29 .8

1 29 .9

1 3 0 .0

1 2 9 ..9

1 32.4

1 33 .3

133.1

1 33 .3

1 33 .4

133 .4

1 33 .5

1 33 .6

1 33.5

1 33 .8

1 33 .7

1 34 .0

1 34 .0

1 3 4 .0

1 3 3 .9

S e r v ic e in d u s trie s :

84

42

M otor freight transportation
a n d w areh o u sin g (0 6 /9 3 = 1 0 0 ).........................

123.1

1 24.5

124.1

124 .3

1 24 .3

1 25 .0

125.1

43

1 25.5

125 .9

1 25 .9

U .S . Postal S ervice (0 6 /8 9 = 1 0 0 ).......................

1 26 .5

126 .8

1 27 .3

1 2 7 .4

1 43 .4

150 .2

1 2 7 .3

1 45 .4

1 45 .4

155.0

1 55 .0

1 55.0

44

1 55.0

1 55 .0

155 .0

1 55 .0

W a te r transportation (1 2 /9 2 = 1 0 0 ).....................

1 55 .0

1 55 .0

1 5 5 .0

129 .8

1 5 5 .0

134 .6

131 .7

1 34.0

1 35 .4

1 35.3

139 .0

141 .0

45

1 41 .3

1 42.2

1 42 .9

Transportation by air (1 2 /9 2 = 1 0 0 )....................

1 40 .7

1 40 .9

140.1

1 57 .2

1 4 7 .9

1 57 .8

1 56.2

1 56 .8

1 57.9

1 58.0

158 .6

160.1

46

1 59 .4

1 59 .8

1 6 1 .4

P ipelines, exc ep t natural oas (1 2 /9 2 = 1 00 )....

1 60.2

1 60 .3

1 6 1 .0

1 6 1 .4

1 10 .3

1 11.9

1 11 .5

1 11 .5

1 12 .3

1 12 .5

1 12 .5

112 .7

1 12 .3

1 11.8

1 10.6

1 10.6

1 11 .2

1 1 1 .6

1 1 1 .8

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

37.

A n n u a l d a ta :

P r o d u c e r P r ic e I n d e x e s , b y s t a g e o f p r o c e s s in g

[1982 = 100]
Index

1994

1993

1997

1996

1995

1998

Finished goods

1999

2002

2001

2000

124.7
125.7
78.0
135.8

125.5
126.8
77.0
137.1

127.9
129.0
78.1
140.0

131.3
133.6
83.2
142.0

131.8
134.5
83.4
142.4

130.7
134.3
75.1
143.7

133.0
135.1
78.8
146.1

138.0
137.2
94.1
148.0

140.7
141.3
96.8
150.0

138.8
140.0
88.8
150.2

116.2
115.6
84.6
123.8

118.5
118.5
83.0
127.1

124.9
119.5
84.1
135.2

125.7
125.3
89.8
134.0

125.6
123.2
89.0
134.2

123.0
123.2
80.8
133.5

123.2
120.8
84.3
133.1

129.2
119.2
101.7
136.6

129.7
124.3
104.1
136.4

127.8
123.3
95.9
135.8

102.4
108.4
76.7
94.1

101.8
106.5
72.1
97.0

102.7
105.8
69.4
105.8

113.8
121.5
85.0
105.7

111.1
112.2
87.3
103.5

96.8
103.9
68.6
84.5

98.2
98.7
78.5
91.1

120.6
100.2
122.1
118.0

121.3
106.2
122.8
101.8

108.1
99.5
101.8
100.8

Intermediate materials, supplies, and
components

Crude materials for further processing

Other..............................................

38.

U.S. e x p o rt p r ic e in d e x e s b y S ta n d a rd International T ra d e C la s s ifica tio n

[2000 = 100]
2003

2002

S IT C

Industry

R ev. 3

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

0

F o o d a n d liv e a n im a ls ....................................................................

9 9 .7

9 9 .8

101.1

1 03 .4

1 07 .7

1 06 .4

1 0 5 .5

1 0 8 .0

01

M e a t a n d m e a t p re parations......................................................

9 1 .6

9 0 .0

8 7 .8

8 8 .7

8 9 .8

89.1

8 7 .8

9 0 .3

9 0 .4

9 5 .4

9 6 .4

9 7 .9

1 0 1 .5

1 2 6 .3

1 2 3 .0

1 2 3 .2

1 22 .2

120.1

1 2 4 .3

9 8 .3

1 00 .6

9 7 .4

95.1

9 6 .0

9 6 .9

1 0 6 .7

1 0 5 .8

1 05 .6

106.1

1 05 .9

04

C e re a ls a n d c e re a l prep aratio n s..............................................

1 03 .8

1 0 6 .5

1 12 .7

1 19 .9

1 33 .4

1 30 .5

1 31 .7

05

V e g e ta b le s , fruit, a nd nuts, p rep ared fresh or dry.............

1 0 3 .8

9 9 .0

9 8 .0

98.2

9 8 .9

9 7 .8

9 8 .9

2

C r u d e m a te r ia ls , in e d ib le , e x c e p t fu e ls .................................

9 0 .9

9 5 .3

9 9 .8

9 7 .9

9 7 .3

9 6 .8

9 8 .3

9 8 .5

9 9 .8

1 0 1 .0

1 0 2 .3

1 0 3 .9

1 0 4 .7

22

O ils e e d s a n d o leag inous fruits..................................................

95.1

102 .9

1 17 .0

1 1 3 .5

114.1

1 07 .2

1 16 .9

1 16 .2

1 1 9 .4

1 1 6 .6

1 16 .6

1 18 .9

1 2 7 .4

9 0 .7

9 0 .3

9 0 .9

91.1

9 1 .2

9 1 .3

9 1 .0

24

C o rk a n d w o o d ................................................................................

8 7 .4

87.1

88.1

8 8 .8

9 0 .0

9 0 .7

25

Pulp a n d w a s te p a p e r..................................................................

8 1 .0

8 9 .3

9 6 .5

8 9 .6

8 6 .5

8 8 .5

8 7 .8

8 5 .2

8 2 .6

8 6 .4

8 9 .3

9 0 .7

9 0 .2

26

T e xtile fibers a n d their w a s te .....................................................

8 4 .9

8 8 .6

9 4 .6

93.1

9 4 .2

9 4 .2

9 6 .4

9 8 .3

1 00 .2

1 0 1 .6

1 0 5 .0

1 06 .0

1 0 4 .2

28

M e talliferous o re s and m etal scra p .........................................

9 8 .9

9 9 .8

9 9 .6

9 7 .9

9 3 .9

94.1

9 1 .8

9 6 .3

9 9 .6

1 0 4 .6

1 0 5 .8

1 0 7 .8

1 0 5 .4

9 9 .5

1 12 .0

1 2 3 .8

130.1

1 0 7 .4

102.1
1 1 2 .2

3

M in e ra l fu e ls , lu b r ic a n ts , a n d re la te d p r o d u c ts ................

9 5 .4

9 3 .9

97.1

9 7 .3

1 0 2 .8

1 0 9 .3

1 04 .5

32

C o a l, coke, a n d b riquettes...........................................................

1 1 1 .4

110 .9

1 14 .3

1 1 4 .3

1 14 .0

1 1 4 .0

1 14 .0

1 1 3 .7

1 1 3 .7

1 1 3 .7

1 13 .9

1 1 1 .8

33

P etro le u m , p e troleum products, a nd related m aterials....

9 0 .2

8 7 .9

9 1 .6

9 2 .0

9 8 .0

1 0 5 .8

9 9 .6

9 2 .2

108.1

1 2 2 .9

1 3 0 .2

1 0 2 .8

9 6 .4

9 9 .2

1 00 .6

1 0 1 .8

1 0 1 .6
1 0 3 .9

5

C h e m ic a ls a n d re la te d p r o d u c ts , n .e .s .................................

95.1

9 5 .4

96.1

9 6 .4

9 6 .8

97.1

9 6 .8

9 6 .6

9 7 .9

54

M edicinal and p h a rm aceu tical products................................

1 0 0 .2

1 00 .4

1 00 .8

1 0 1 .3

1 0 1 .3

1 0 1 .3

1 01 .2

1 01 .2

102.1

104.1

104.1

1 03 .9

9 7 .5

9 7 .4

9 7 .3

9 7 .2

9 7 .3

9 5 .4

9 6 .0

9 6 .2

9 5 .3

9 5 .3

9 2 .9

9 7 .3

9 3 .5

9 2 .9

95.1

97.1

9 9 .5

1 0 3 .7

1 0 0 .6

55

E ssential oils; polishing a nd cleanin g preparations..........

97.1

9 7 .3

97.1

57

Pla stics in prim ary fo r m s ............................................................

9 2 .2

9 2 .5

93.1

93.1

58

Pla stics in n onprim ary form s......................................................

9 5 .6

9 6 .0

9 6 .4

9 6 .5

9 6 .9

9 7 .6

9 7 .7

9 5 .9

97.1

9 7 .5

9 7 .2

9 8 .4

9 8 .5

59

C h e m ica l m a teria ls and products, n .e .s ................................

9 7 .4

9 7 .5

9 7 .3

9 8 .2

9 8 .3

9 8 .6

9 8 .5

9 8 .8

1 00 .6

1 0 0 .6

1 0 0 .7

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .0

6

M a n u fa c tu r e d g o o d s c la s s ifie d c h ie fly b y m a te ria ls .....

9 7 .4

9 8 .0

9 8 .7

9 9 .0

99.1

99.1

9 9 .0

9 9 .0

9 9 .0

9 9 .4

9 9 .4

9 9 .5

9 9 .4

62

R u b b e r m a n u fa ctu res, n .e .s .......................................................

1 0 1 .5

1 0 2 .7

1 03 .8

105.1

2 0 5 .9

1 0 5 .7

1 05 .4

1 05 .6

107.1

1 0 8 .8

1 08 .4

1 08 .6

1 0 8 .5

64

P ap e r, pap erb o a rd , a nd articles of paper, pulp,
a n d p a p e rb o a rd ............................................................................

93.1

9 4 .8

9 5 .7

9 6.2

9 6 .3

9 6 .8

9 6.6

9 6 .8

9 7 .3

9 7 .2

9 6 .7

9 6 .9

9 7 .2

66

N o n m etallic m ineral m anufactures, n .e .s .............................

1 02 .0

1 02 .2

1 02 .2

1 02 .2

1 0 2 .2

1 01 .4

1 0 1 .3

1 0 1 .3

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .3

1 0 0 .3
7 9 .4

68
7

M a c h in e r y a n d t r a n s p o r t e q u ip m e n t.......................................

72

M a c h in e ry s p ec ialized for particular industries..................

74

G e n e ra l industrial m achines and parts, n.e.s.,

75

C o m p u te r e q u ip m ent and office m ach in es..........................

76

T e le c o m m u n ica tio ns and sound recording and

78
87

8 6 .5

8 5 .3

8 5 .2

8 4 .9

8 4 .4

8 3 .4

8 3 .2

8 3 .5

8 2 .2

8 3 .3

8 4 .3

8 2 .0

9 9 .3

9 8 .9

9 8 .7

9 8 .8

9 8 .7

9 8 .7

9 8 .7

9 8 .5

9 8 .6

9 8 .6

9 8 .5

9 8 .6

9 8 .6

1 04 .6

1 04 .5

1 04 .5

1 04.6

1 04 .6

1 04 .7

1 05 .2

105.1

1 0 6 .5

1 06 .8

1 06 .9

1 0 7 .2

1 0 7 .2

1 02 .0

1 0 1 .8

102.1

1 02 .0

1 01 .8

1 0 1 .8

1 01 .7

1 0 1 .7

1 0 2 .2

1 0 2 .2

1 02 .2

1 0 2 .5

1 0 2 .5

1 0 2 .3

1 0 2 .2

1 02 .3

1 02 .3

102.1

1 02 .3

1 0 2 .3

1 02 .2

1 02 .3

1 01 .6

1 02 .0

1 0 2 .3

102.1

9 1 .7

9 0 .4

9 0 .4

9 0 .3

8 9 .3

89.1

8 8 .6

8 8 .6

8 8 .8

89.1

8 8 .6

8 8 .7

8 8 .9

9 7 .8

9 7 .7

9 6.2

9 6 .3

9 6 .4

9 6 .3

9 6 .3

9 6 .2

9 5 .4

9 5 .4

9 5 .0

9 4 .2

9 4 .0

9 4 .6

9 3 .9

9 3 .3

9 3 .5

9 3 .6

9 3 .3

9 3 .4

9 2 .9

9 2 .3

92.1

9 2 .2

9 2 .3

9 2 .2

1 00 .4

1 00 .3

1 00 .4

1 00.6

1 00 .6

1 00 .9

1 00 .9

1 0 1 .0

1 01 .2

101.1

1 0 0 .9

101.1

1 0 1 .0

1 0 1 .3

1 01 .3

1 01 .4

1 0 1 .5

1 01 .4

1 01 .6 I

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .7

1 01 .9

1 01 .9

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .9

P r o fe s s io n a l, s c ie n tific , a n d c o n tro llin g
in s t r u m e n t s a n d a p p a r a tu s ......................................................


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

85

Current Labor Statistics:

39.

Price Data

U.S. im p o rt p r ic e in d e x e s b y S ta n d a rd International T ra d e C la s s ifica tio n

[2000 = 100]

0

2002

Industry

R ev. 3

May
F o o d a n d liv e a n im a ls ..........................................................

01

M e a t a n d m e a t preparations..................................................

03

Fish a n d crustaceans, m ollusks, and other
aq u atic in v e rte b ra tes ...............................

05

V e g e ta b le s , fruit, and nuts, p rep ared fresh or dry............

07

C o ffe e , te a , cocoa, spices, a nd m anufactures
th e re o f...........................................................

1
11
2

B e v e r a g e s a n d t o b a c c o ..............................................................
B e v e ra g e s .......................................................................
C r u d e m a te r ia ls , in e d ib le , e x c e p t fu e ls ................................

Ju ly

2003

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

9 6 .4

9 4 .5

9 6 .3

9 6 .6

9 8 .8

9 7 .6

9 7 .6

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 01 .2

1 0 1 .5

9 9 .7

1 05 .4

1 04 .0

1 05 .9

1 05 .4

1 03 .4

1 02 .0

1 01 .2

1 0 6 .8

1 0 1 .7

1 0 7 .4

1 08 .5

1 0 8 .7

1 1 1 .2

8 0 .0

7 9 .8

8 1 .9

8 3 .0

8 4 .9

8 1 .4

8 2 .0

8 2 .5

81.1

8 2 .0

8 1 .4

8 4 .2

83 3

108.1

1 02 .2

1 05 .0

1 05 .0

1 0 6 .7

1 0 7 .5

1 06 .2

1 05 .6

1 1 1 .5

1 0 4 .7

1 1 0 .7

1 0 8 .4

103 7

8 3 .8

8 4 .6

8 4 .2

8 4 ,5

9 3 .5

9 4 .3

9 8 .6

9 9 .9

1 04 .0

1 0 6 .7

1 00 .2

1 0 0 .5

9 9 .0

1 02 .7

1 03 .0

1 02 .7

1 0 2 .5

1 02 .6

1 0 2 .4

1 02 .5

1 0 2 .7

1 03 .0

1 0 3 .3

1 04 .0

1 0 4 .5

1 0 4 .6

1 02 .4

1 02 .8

1 02.4

1 02 .2

1 0 2 .2

102.1

1 02 .2

1 02 .4

1 02 .3

1 0 2 .7

1 03 .0

1 0 3 .6

1 0 3 .8

9 7 .0

9 6 .4

9 6 .8

9 6 .8

9 6 .4

9 5 .7

9 4 .9

9 4 .5

9 5 .2

9 7 .4

9 8 .5

9 8 .4

9 9 .2

9 4 .0

9 4 .7

9 6 .8

9 5 .0

9 3 .4

94 0

7 7 .9

8 0 .3

8 6 .5

9 2 .6

96 5

24

C o rk a n d w o o d ........................................................

1 0 5 .2

103.1

1 03 .4

1 0 1 .8

9 8 .3

9 6 .3

9 6 .0

25

P ulp a n d w as te p a p e r...........................................

7 4 .7

77.1

8 0 .2

8 2 .3

8 2 .3

8 2 .3

28

8 0 .5

7 8 .9

M e ta llife ro u s ores and m etal scrap........................

9 5 .6

9 5 .9

9 6 .4

9 5 .2

9 3 .3

9 3 .8

9 3 .9

9 4 .7

29

9 5 .5

99.1

9 9 .9

C ru d e anim al a n d veg etab le m aterials, n .e .s ......................

9 9 .5

99 3

1 0 3 .8

9 2 .8

9 1 .0

9 7 .5

1 0 4 .0

1 01.6

9 9 .9

1 0 1 .4

1 03 .6

1 0 2 .3

1 0 2 .6

1 0 2 .3

1 0 3 .5

101 7

95 7

3

M in e ra l fu e ls , lu b ric a n ts , a n d r e la te d p ro d u c ts ................

8 9 .0

8 6 .0

66.1

91.1

9 6 .3

9 7 .0

9 0 .4

33

9 4 .9

1 09 .6

1 2 1 .2

P etro le u m , petroleum products, a n d related m aterials...

1 26 .0

89.1

8 5 .9

8 8 .9

9 2 .9

9 7 .8

9 7 .7

34

8 9 .8

9 4 .2

108.1

1 1 9 .8

G a s , natural a n d m an u factu red ...................................

118.1

98 7

9? ?

8 4 .3

8 3 .6

7 7 .7

7 2 .7

81.1

8 7 .3

92.1

9 7 .0

1 1 7 .8

1 2 9 .3

1 8 5 .9

1 2 0 .5

1 1 9 .0

5

C h e m ic a ls a n d r e la te d p ro d u c ts , n .e .s ..................................

9 7 .5

9 7 .0

9 8 .7

9 8 .3

9 8 .0

9 8 .2

Inorganic c h em icals....................................................

98 5

98 6

9 8 .6
mn n

9 8 .9

52
53

D ying, ta nning, and coloring m aterials...................................

9 5 .6

9 6 .2

9 6 .4

9 6 .8

9 6 .6

54

9 5 .8

9 5 .9

9 6 .7

9 6 .5

M ed icin al a n d p harm aceutical products................

9 7 .5

9 7 .6

97 8

98 0

9 6 .7

9 8 .0

9 8 .7

1 00 .0

9 9 .6

55

9 9 .5

9 9 .3

9 9 .2

1 0 1 .8

E ssential oils; polishing and cleaning preparations..........

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .3

101 5

m i ?

99.1

9 9 .9

100 .4

1 01.2

9 8 .4

9 8 .4

9 8 .8

9 9 .2

9 7 .2

9 7 .9

9 8 .4

9 9 .2

9 9 .2

57

Plastics in prim ary form s ..............................................

58

Plastics in n onprim ary fo rm s .........................................

59
6

99.1

... .

9 9 .8

101.1

1 0 0 .4

99 1

1 0 6 .5

1 1 0 .8

1 0 7 .5

1 0 5 .8

91.1

9 1 .8

9 6 ,4

9 7 .9

9 6 .4

9 6 .0

9 4 .8

9 7 .3

9 7 .9

9 9 .3

9 9 .5

1 0 1 .7

1 0 1 .8

1 00 .3

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

9 9 .5

9 9 .4

9 9 .5

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .2

100.1

1 0 0 .4

C h e m ic a l m aterials and products, n .e .s ................................

1 0 0 .6

100 8

9 4 .3

9 3 .6

9 3 .5

9 3 .5

9 2 .4

9 1 .0

9 0 .8

9 1 .6

92.1

93.1

9 7 .6

9 6 .7

9 3 .2

M a n u fa c tu r e d g o o d s c la s s ifie d c h ie fly b y m a te ria ls .....

9 2 .3

9 2 .8

9 3 .0

93.1

9 3 .5

9 3 .5

9 3 .6

9 3 .7

9 3 .2

9 4 .2

94.1

94.1

9 3 .7

98.1

9 8 .2

9 8 .2

9 8 .2

9 9 .3

9 9 .3

9 9 .4

9 9 .3

99.1

9 9 .0

9 9 .2

99 1

99 1

9 6 .6

62

R u b b e r m an u factures, n .e .s .................................

64

P a p e r, p a p erb o a rd , a n d articles of paper, pulp,
9 1 .9

9 1 .7

9 1 .7

9 2 .7

9 3 .7

9 3 .3

9 3 .3

9 3 .0

66

9 2 .6

9 2 .6

9 3 .0

N o n m etallic m ineral m anufactures, n .e .s .............................

9 3 .7

93 4

9 7 .0

9 7 .0

9 7 .2

9 7 .5

9 7 .5

9 7 .6

9 7 .6

9 7 .7

68

9 7 .6

9 7 .7

N o nferrous m e ta ls ................................................

9 7 .6

9 7 .5

9 7 .4

7 9 .7

7 9 .7

7 9 .2

7 7 .7

7 6 .4

7 6 .0

7 6 .6

69

7 7 .3

76.1

7 9 .2

M a n u fa c tu re s of m etals, n .e .s .........................................

8 0 .0

7 8 .5

7 5 .9

9 8 .3

9 8 .3

9 8 .3

9 8 .6

9 8 .6

9 8 .5

9 8 .3

9 8 .3

9 7 .5

9 8 .0

9 7 .9

9 7 .5

9 7 .5

a n d p a p e rb o a rd ...............................................

7

M a c h in e r y a n d tr a n s p o r t e q u ip m e n t.......................................

9 7 .0

97.1

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 6 .7

9 6 .4

9 6 .2

96.1

9 6 .0

9 5 .9

9 5 .8

9 5 .8

72

9 5 .6

M a c h in e ry s p ec ialized for particular industries...................

9 8 .8

9 9 .0

9 8 .7

9 9 .2

9 8 .3

9 8 .5

9 8 .7

74

9 9 .2

9 9 .4

1 0 0 .3

1 0 0 .7

G e n e ra l industrial m achines a nd parts, n .e.s.,

1 0 0 .6

100 7

a n d m ach in e p arts.........................................
75

C o m p u ter eq u ip m ent and office m a ch in e s ...........................

76

T e le c o m m u n ica tions and sound recording and

77

Electrical m ach in ery and e q u ip m en t.......................

78

R o a d v eh ic le s....................................................

85

F o o tw e a r.......................................................

88

P hotographic a p paratus, equipm ent, and supplies,

reproducing a p p ara tu s and eq u ip m en t...............................

a n d optical ooods, n .e .s .............................................

86

Jun e

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

9 7 .4

9 7 .8

98.1

9 8 .4

9 8 .4

9 8 .5

9 8 .6

9 8 .6

9 8 .6

9 9 .4

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .0

8 8 .0

8 7 .8

8 7 .2

86.9

8 6 .4

8 4 .9

8 4 .6

8 4 .2

8 3 .9

8 3 .3

8 2 .7

82 8

100 1
81 R
89 4

9 4 .5

9 4 .4

9 4 .0

93.1

9 2 .8

9 2 .3

91.1

9 2 .0

9 1 .7

9 0 .4

9 0 .0

89 5

97.1

97.1

9 6 .6

9 6 .7

9 6 .5

9 6 .0

9 5 .9

9 5 .6

9 5 .4

9 5 .7

9 5 .3

9 5 .5

9 5 .0

1 00 .0

1 0 0 .2

1 00 .3

1 0 0 .3

1 0 0 .3

1 0 0 .8

1 00 .5

1 00 .5

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .6

1 00 .6

1 0 0 .6

1 0 0 .7

99.1

9 9 .2

9 9 .3

9 9 .5

9 9 .4

9 9 .4

9 9 .4

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

9 9 .6

9 9 .8

9 9 .6

9 9 .7

9 7 .4

9 7 .8

9 8 .4

9 8 .8

9 8 .4

9 8 .5

9 8 .3

9 8 .5 I

9 8 .8

9 9 .2

9 9 .4

9 9 .5

9 9 .3

40.

U.S. e x p o r t p r ic e in d e x e s b y e n d - u s e c a t e g o r y

[2000 = 100]
2003

2002
C a te g o ry
M ay

Jun e

J u ly

Sept.

Aug.

O ct.

N ov.

A p r.

Mar.

Feb.

Ja n .

Dec.

M ay

A LL C O M M O D IT I E S ......................................................................

9 8 .0

9 8 .0

9 8 .3

9 8 .5

9 8 .8

9 8 .7

9 8 .8

9 8 .6

9 8 .9

9 9 .5

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

9 9 .7

F o o d s , fe e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s .................................................

1 0 0 .4

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .0

1 06 .1

1 0 9 .8

1 0 7 .6

1 0 9 .6

1 0 8 .7

1 0 8 .7

1 0 8 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 0 8 .5

1 1 1 .9

A g ric u ltu ra l fo o d s , fe e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s .....................

1 0 0 .9

1 0 1 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .7

1 1 0 .7

1 0 8 .2

1 1 0 .4

1 0 9 .5

1 0 9 .4

1 0 8 .8

1 08 .1

1 0 8 .6

1 1 2 .1

N o n a g rlc u ltu ra l (fis h , b e v e ra g e s ) fo o d p ro d u c ts .......

96.1

1 0 0 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .7

1 0 1 .3

1 02 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 2 .3

1 0 2 .8

1 0 4 .6

1 1 0 .0

1 0 8 .1

1 1 0 .4

In d u s trial s u p p lie s a n d m a te ria ls ..........................................

9 3 .8

9 4 .6

9 5 .6

9 5 .5

9 5 .9

9 6 .4

96.1

9 6 .0

9 7 .3

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .6

1 00 .1

9 9 .4

A g ric u ltu ra l in d u s trial s u p p lie s a n d m a te ria ls .............

9 3 .0

9 5 .8

9 7 .9

9 7 .7

9 8 .4

9 8 .4

1 00.1

1 0 1 .9

1 0 3 .3

1 0 3 .8

1 0 4 .8

1 0 4 .9

1 0 3 .8

F u e ls a n d lu b ric a n ts ................................................................

8 7 .9

8 6 .7

8 8 .3

8 8 .0

9 2 .9

9 4 .0

9 1 .6

9 1 .3

9 6 .2

1 0 3 .8

1 0 8 .0

9 6 .3

9 2 .4

e x c lu d in g fu e l a n d b u ilding m a te ria ls ..........................

9 4 .8

9 5 .7

9 6 .7

9 6 .5

9 6 .4

9 6 .8

9 6 .5

9 6 .4

9 7 .3

9 8 .8

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .7

1 ,0 0 2 .0

S e le c te d b u ild in g m a te r ia ls ..................................................

9 4.1

9 4 .2

9 5 .0

9 5 .4

9 6 .2

9 6 .6

9 6 .6

9 6 .2

9 6 .1

9 6 .5

9 6 .4

9 6 .6

9 6 .5

9 9 .2

9 8 .7

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

9 8 .4

9 8 .3

9 8 .3

9 8.1

9 8 .2

9 8 .4

9 8 .3

9 8 .3

9 8 .3

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .0

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .0

1 0 2 .0

1 02 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 1 .9

1 0 1 .9

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .7

9 7 .3

9 6 .5

9 6 .2

9 6 .2

9 6 .0

9 5 .8

9 5 .7

9 5 .4

9 5 .4

9 5 .7

9 5 .6

9 5 .6

9 5 .5

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .9

1 01 .1

101 .1

1 0 1 .4

1 0 1 .4

1 0 1 .3

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .5

9 9 .0

9 9.1

9 9.1

9 9 .3

9 9 .3

9 9 .4

9 9 .3

9 9 .3

9 9.1

9 9 .4

9 9 .4

9 9 .3

9 9 .4

9 8 .3

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

9 8 .7

9 8 .7

9 8 .8

9 8 .6

9 8 .7

9 8 .2

9 8 .9

9 8 .7

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

9 9 .2

9 9 .4

9 9 .5

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

9 9 .6

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

9 9 .6

9 9 .7

9 9 .8

9 9 .9

1 0 8 .3

1 0 7 .9

1 0 7 .5

1 0 7 .9

1 1 0 .7

9 9.1

9 9 .0

9 8 .8

A p r.

M ay

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l s u p p lie s a n d m a te ria ls ,

C o n s u m e r g o o d s , e x c lu d in g a u to m o tiv e ................... .

D u ra b le s , m a n u fa c tu r e d .......................................................
A g ric u ltu ra l c o m m o d itie s ...........................................................

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .7

1 0 3 .4

1 0 5 .2

1 0 8 .6

1 0 6 .6

1 0 8 .7

1 0 8 .2

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l c o m m o d itie s .................................................

9 7 .8

9 7 .8

9 7 .9

9 7 .9

9 8 .0

9 8.1

9 8 .0

9 7 .8

9 8 .2

9 8 .8

J u ly

Aug.

Sept.

O ct.

N ov.

D ec.

Ja n .

Feb.

41.

U.S. im p o rt p r ic e in d e x e s b y e n d - u s e c a t e g o r y

[2000 = 100]

2002

2003

C a te g o ry
M ay
A L L C O M M O D IT I E S ......................................................................

9 4 .4

June
9 4.1

9 4 .5

9 5 .5

9 4 .8

Mar.

9 5 .5

9 4 .6

9 5 .2

9 6 .9

9 8 .5

9 9 .1

9 6 .0

9 5 .2

1 0 0 .2

1 0 1 .3

1 0 1 .2

1 0 2 .6

1 0 2 .5

1 0 1 .4

F o o d s , fe e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s ............................................... .

9 7 .2

9 6 .2

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9

A g ric u ltu ra l fo o d s , fe e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s .....................

1 0 2 .7

1 0 1 .3

1 0 2 .4

1 0 2 .0

1 0 5 .4

1 06.1

1 0 5 .8

1 0 6 .0

1 0 7 .9

1 0 7 .8

1 0 9 .6

1 0 8 .8

1 0 7 .6

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l (fish, b e v e ra g e s ) fo o d p ro d u c ts .......

8 5 .2

85.1

8 5 .0

8 6 .0

8 7 .3

8 6 .6

8 7.1

8 7 .5

8 6 .8

9 7 .4

8 6 .9

8 8 .5

8 8 .4

9 4 .6

1 0 1 .3

1 0 7 .4

1 0 9 .7

9 7 .6

9 5 .2

9 9 .4

9 4 .6

In d u s tria l s u p p lie s a n d m a te ria ls ..........................................
F u e ls a n d lu b ric a n ts ................................................................
P e tro le u m a n d p e tro le u m p ro d u c ts ............................

9 0 .8

8 9 .8

9 1 .3

9 5 .4

9 5 .2

9 2 .6

9 2 .3

8 8 .5

8 5 .8

8 8.1

9 0 .7

9 6 .2

9 6 .7

8 9 .8

9 4 .7

1 09 .1

1 2 0 .9

1 2 5 .2

8 8 .4

8 5 .3

8 8 .5

9 1 .8

9 7.1

9 7 .0

8 9 .0

9 4 .0

1 0 7 .7

1 1 9 .9

1 1 8 .6

9 6 .4

9 1 .2

8 9 .2

9 1 .0

9 3 .5

9 4 .5

1 0 3 .1

8 6 .7

8 7.1

8 8 .0

8 9 .3

9 0 .5

90.1

8 9 .7

8 9.1

8 8 .6

M a te ria ls a s s o c ia te d w ith n o n d u ra b le
s u p p lie s a n d m a te r ia ls ........................................................

9 7 .4

9 7 .1

98.1

9 9.1

9 9 .4

9 9 .7

9 9 .7

1 00 .1

1 0 1 .5

1 0 2 .4

1 0 4 .2

1 0 3 .6

S e le c te d b u ild in g m a te ria ls ................................................ .

9 9 .6

9 9.1

9 9 .9

9 9 .2

9 7 .6

9 6 .9

9 6 .4

9 5 .0

9 5 .6

9 6 .9

9 6 .3

9 5 .4

9 6 .2

U n fin is h e d m e ta ls a s s o c ia te d w ith d u ra b le g o o d s ..

8 6 .6

8 8 .5

8 9 .4

8 8 .6

8 9 .7

8 9 .9

9 0 .5

9 1 .5

9 0 .5

9 3 .3

9 2 .8

9 1 .7

8 9 .9

N o n m e ta ls a s s o c ia te d w ith d u ra b le g o o d s .................

9 6 .8

9 6 .7

97.1

9 7 .0

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 7.1

9 6 .9

9 7 .4

9 7 .9

9 7 .1

9 7 .3

95.1

9 5.1

9 4 .8

9 4 .9

9 4 .7

9 4 .0

9 4 .0

9 3 .9

9 3 .9

9 3 .8

9 3 .7

9 3 .8

9 3 .4

9 5 .0

9 5.1

9 5 .3

9 5 .9

9 5 .7

9 5 .2

9 4 .8

9 4 .9

9 5 .3

9 5 .5

9 5 .5

9 5 .6

9 5 .8

9 4 .4

9 4 .4

9 3 .8

9 3 .9

9 3 .7

9 2 .9

9 2 .9

9 2 .8

9 2 .7

9 2 .6

9 2 .5

9 2 .5

9 2 .0

9 9 .9

1 00.1

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .3

1 0 0 .7

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .3

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .6

9 8 .2

98.1

9 8 .2

9 8 .2

98.1

98.1

9 7 .9

9 8 .0

9 8 .0

9 7 .9

9 7 .9

9 7 .9

9 7 .9

9 9.1

9 9.1

9 9 .3

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

9 9 .5

9 9 .3

9 9 .7

9 9 .7

9 9 .5

9 9 .7

9 9 .9

9 9 .8

9 7 .2

9 7 .2

9 7 .3

9 7 .0

9 6 .8

9 6 .8

9 6 .7

9 6 .5

9 6 .4

9 6 .4

9 6 .2

9 6 .1

9 6 .1

9 7 .6

9 5 .6

9 5 .3

9 5 .6

9 5 .4

9 5 .4

9 5 .2

9 5 .4

9 5 .5

9 5 .5

9 5 .7

9 5 .6

9 5 .6

N o n e le c tric a l m a c h in e ry .......................................................

C o n s u m e r g o o d s , e x c lu d in g a u to m o tiv e .........................

N o n m a n u fa c tu re d c o n s u m e r g o o d s ...............................

42.

U.S. in te rn a tio n a l p r ic e I n d e x e s for s e le c t e d c a t e g o r ie s o f s e r v ic e s

[2000 = 100]
2003

2002

2001
C a te g o ry
Mar.

O c e a n lin er fre ig h t (in b o u n d ).....................................................


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

June

Sept.

Mar.

Dec.

Jun e

S ept.

D ec.

Mar.
1 0 8 .9

9 7 .9

9 5.1

9 4 .9

9 5 .2

9 3 .9

9 8 .3

1 0 0 .3

1 0 5 .8

1 00.1

9 8 .0

9 7 .6

9 7 .9

9 5 .9

9 8 .4

9 7 .3

9 5 .4

9 7 .2

1 0 1 .9

1 0 6 .4

1 0 7 .6

1 0 3 .5

1 0 3 .3

1 1 0 .7

1 1 4 .3

1 0 7 .9

1 1 2 .0

1 0 0 .7

1 0 3 .8

1 1 0 .2

1 0 0 .8

9 9 .4

1 1 0 .9

1 1 8 .5

1 0 7 .2

1 1 1 .7

1 0 2 .8

1 0 0 .8

9 8.1

9 3 .6

9 1 .7

9 0 .3

9 3 .5

9 3 .3

9 5 .5

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

87

Current Labor Statistics: Productivity Data

43.

I n d e x e s o f p ro d u c t iv it y , h o u rly c o m p e n s a t io n , a n d unit c o s ts , q u a rte rly d a t a s e a s o n a lly a d ju s t e d

[1992 =100]
O
O

Item

2C
I

II

2001
III

IV

I

II

2002
III

IV

I

II

2003
III

IV

I

1 2 5 .7

B u sin ess
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f all p e r s o n s .......

1 1 5 .3

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r....................
R e a l c o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r..........
U n it la b o r c o s ts .....................................

1 1 0 .5
1 1 4 .0

1 1 7 .2

1 1 7 .3

1 1 7 .9

1 1 7 .5

1 1 7 .4

1 1 7 .9

1 20 .1

1 2 2 .5

1 23.1

1 2 4 .8

1 2 4 .9

1 3 2 .4

1 3 5 .0

1 3 6 .3

1 3 7 .3

1 3 7 .5

1 3 7 .8

1 3 8 .3

1 3 9 .3

1 4 0 .8

1 4 2 .7

1 4 2 .8

1 4 4 .2

1 1 0 .5

1 1 1 .7

1 1 1 .9

1 1 1 .8

1 1 1 .0

1 11 .1

1 1 1 .6

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .3

1 1 3 .2

1 1 2 .7

1 1 2 .7

1 1 3 .0

1 15 .1

1 1 5 .6

1 1 6 .9

1 17 .1

1 1 6 .8

1 15 .1

1 1 3 .7

1 1 4 .4

1 1 3 .4

1 1 4 .3

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n ts ....................

1 1 4 .7

1 1 0 .7

1 14.1

1 1 1 .2

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .3

1 1 3 .6

1 1 5 .5

1 1 7 .2

1 1 9 .9

1 1 9 .3

1 2 1 .4

1 2 0 .9

Im p lic it p ric e d e fla to r..........................

1 2 1 .6

1 1 2 .8

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .7

1 1 4 .3

1 1 5 .2

1 1 5 .8

1 1 6 .4

1 1 5 .9

1 1 6 .0

1 1 6 .2

1 1 6 .3

1 1 6 .8

1 1 7 .3

N o n fa rm b u s in e s s
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f all p e rs o n s ................

1 1 4 .7

1 1 6 .6

1 17 .1

1 1 6 .7

1 1 6 .6

1 1 7 .2

1 1 9 .3

1 2 1 .8

1 2 2 .3

1 2 3 .9

1 2 4 .2

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r..............................

1 2 4 .8

1 3 0 .8

1 3 1 .5

1 3 4 .3

1 3 5 .3

1 3 6 .3

1 3 6 .3

1 3 6 .7

1 3 7 .2

1 38 .1

1 3 9 .5

1 40.1

R e a l c o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r....................

1 4 1 .5

1 4 2 .7

1 1 0 .0

1 0 9 .8

111 .1

1 1 6 .4

1 1 1 .2

1 1 0 .9

1 10.1

1 1 0 .2

1 1 0 .7

1 11 .1

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .2

1 1 1 .7

U n it la b o r c o s ts ...............................................

1 1 1 .6

1 1 4 .0

1 1 3 .0

1 1 5 .2

1 1 5 .6

1 1 6 .8

1 1 6 .9

1 1 6 .6

1 1 5 .0

1 1 3 .4

1 14.1

1 13 .1

1 1 3 .9

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n ts ..............................

1 1 4 .4

1 1 2 .3

1 1 5 .6

1 1 2 .8

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .8

1 1 5 .3

1 1 7 .2

1 1 9 .2

1 2 1 .7

1 2 1 .7

1 2 3 .5

Im p lic it p ric e d e fla to r .....................................

1 2 3 .1

1 2 3 .6

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .9

1 1 4 .3

1 1 4 .8

1 1 5 .7

1 1 6 .3

1 1 6 .8

1 1 6 .5

1 1 6 .4

1 1 6 .8

1 1 6 .9

1 1 7 .3

1 1 7 .7

N o n fln a n c ia l c o rp o ra tio n s
O u tp u t p e r h o u r of all e m p lo y e e s ...................

1 1 7 .8

1 1 8 .3

1 1 9 .5

1 1 9 .5

1 1 8 .8

1 1 9 .4

1 2 0 .4

1 2 3 .5

1 2 4 .9

1 2 6 .7

1 2 7 .7

1 2 9 .3

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r.......................................

1 3 0 .2

1 2 6 .9

1 2 7 .8

1 3 0 .4

1 3 1 .7

1 3 1 .3

1 3 1 .9

1 3 2 .7

1 3 3 .6

1 3 4 .7

1 3 6 .2

1 3 7 .2

1 3 8 .8

R e a l c o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r.............................

1 4 0 .4

1 0 6 .7

1 0 6 .6

1 0 7 .9

1 0 8 .2

1 0 6 .9

1 0 6 .5

1 0 7 .0

1 0 7 .8

1 0 8 .4

1 0 8 .6

1 0 8 .8

1 0 9 .6

T o ta l u n it c o s ts ........................................................ .

1 0 9 .8

1 0 6 .9

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 1 0 .8

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .7

1 0 9 .8

1 0 9 .5

1 0 9 .4

U n it la b o r c o s ts ......................................................

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .3

1 0 9 .6

1 0 7 .8

1 0 8 .0

109 .1

1 1 0 .2

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .4

1 1 0 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 0 7 .9

1 0 7 .5

1 0 7 .4

U n it n o n la b o r c o s ts ..............................................

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .8

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .3

1 07 .1

1 0 8 .9

1 1 1 .6

1 1 3 .5

1 1 5 .5

1 14.1

1 1 4 .0

1 1 4 .5

1 1 5 .4

1 1 4 .7

U n it p ro fits ...................................................................

1 1 4 .3

1 1 9 .5

1 1 8 .8

1 0 9 .5

9 8 .6

9 3.1

9 5 .4

9 7 .9

1 0 7 .6

1 0 7 .6

1 0 7 .8

1 0 4 .6

1 0 9 .7

1 1 0 .3

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n ts .......................................

1 0 8 .4

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .7

1 0 6 .3

1 0 6 .9

1 0 8 .9

1 1 1 .0

1 1 2 .4

1 1 2 .4

1 1 2 .8

1 1 2 .6

1 1 3 .4

Im p lic it p ric e d e fla to r.............................................

1 1 3 .3

1 0 8 .0

1 0 8 .5

1 0 8 .6

1 0 8 .9

1 0 9 .3

1 0 9 .9

1 1 0 .5

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .4

1 0 9 .3

109 .1

1 0 9 .4

1 0 9 .6

M an u fa c tu rin g
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f all p e rs o n s ............

1 3 3 .6

1 3 4 .9

1 3 5 .4

1 3 5 .9

1 3 5 .4

1 3 5 .4

1 3 6 .4

1 3 7 .6

1 40.1

1 4 1 .5

1 4 3 .4

1 4 3 .3

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r..........................

1 4 3 .9

1 3 1 .4

1 2 9 .3

1 3 2 .2

1 3 1 .5

1 3 2 .0

1 3 3 .0

1 3 3 .3

1 3 4 .3

1 3 5 .6

1 3 7 .2

1 3 7 .7

1 3 9 .5

1 4 1 .1

R e a l c o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r................

1 1 0 .5

1 0 7 .9

1 0 9 .4

1 0 8 .0

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .3

109 .1

1 0 9 .4

1 0 9 .2

1 1 0 .1

U n it la b o r c o s ts ............................................

1 1 0 .3

9 8 .4

9 5 .9

9 7 .7

9 6 .7

9 7 .5

9 8 .2

9 7 .8

9 7 .6

9 6 .8

9 6 .9

9 6 .0

9 7 .4

9 8 .0

88

Monthly Labor Review


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

44.

A n n u a l in d e x e s o f m u ltifa c to r p r o d u c t iv it y a n d r e la t e d m e a s u r e s , s e le c t e d y e a r s

[1996 =100, unless otherwise indicated]
Ite m

1960

1970

1980

1990

1991

1992

1994

1993

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

P rivate b u s in e s s
P ro d u ctivity:
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f all p e rs o n s ................................................

4 5 .6

6 3 .0

7 5 .8

9 0 .2

9 1 .3

9 4 .8

9 5 .4

9 6 .6

9 7 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .0

1 0 4 .8

1 0 4 .8

O u tp u t p e r u n it o f c a p ita l s e rv ic e s ........................................

1 1 0 .4

1 11 .1

1 0 1 .5

9 9 .3

96.1

9 7 .7

9 8 .5

1 0 0 .3

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .1

M u ltifa c to r p ro d u c tiv ity ................................................................

6 5 .2

8 0 .0

8 8 .3

9 5 .3

9 4 .4

9 6 .6

9 7.1

9 8 .1

9 8 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .1

1 0 2 .6

1 0 2 .6

O u tp u t.....................................................................................................

2 7 .5

4 2 .0

5 9 .4

8 3 .6

8 2 .6

8 5 .7

8 8 .5

9 2 .8

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 5 .2

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .6

Inputs:
L a b o r in p u t........................................................................................

5 4 .0

6 1 .0

7 1 .9

8 9 .4

8 8 .3

8 9 .3

9 1 .8

9 5 .6

9 8 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 6 .4

1 0 6 .4

C a p ita l s e r v ic e s ..............................................................................

2 4 .9

3 7 .8

5 8 .6

8 4 .2

8 6 .0

8 7 .7

8 9 .8

9 2 .6

9 6 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .7

1 1 0 .4

1 1 0 .4

C o m b in e d u nits o f la b o r a n d c a p ita l in p u t........................

4 2 .3

5 2 .4

6 7 .3

8 7 .7

8 7 .5

8 8 .8

9 1.1

9 4 .6

9 7 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .0

1 0 7 .7

1 0 7 .7

C a p ita l p e r h o u r o f all p e rs o n s ..................................................

4 1 .3

5 6 .7

7 4 .7

9 0 .8

9 5 .0

9 7 .0

9 6 .8

9 6 .3

9 7 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .7

1 0 4 .7

1 0 4 .5

P riv a te n o n fa rm b u s in e s s
P ro d u ctivity:
4 8 .7

6 4 .9

7 7 .3

9 0 .3

9 1 .4

9 4 .8

9 5 .3

9 6 .5

9 7 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .7

1 0 4 .5

O u tp u t p e r u n it o f c a p ita l s e rv ic e s ........................................

1 20.1

1 1 8 .3

1 0 5 .7

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .6

9 7 .9

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .3

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .2

9 9 .8

9 9 .8

M u ltifa c to r p ro d u c tiv ity ................................................................

6 9.1

8 2 .6

9 0 .5

9 5 .6

9 4 .7

9 6 .6

97.1

9 8 .1

9 8 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .4

1 0 2 .4

O u tp u t.....................................................................................................

2 7 .2

4 1 .9

5 9 .6

8 3 .5

8 2 .5

8 5 .5

8 8 .4

9 2 .6

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 05 .1

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .6

In puts:
L a b o r in p u t.......................................................................................

5 0.1

5 9 .3

7 0 .7

8 9 .2

8 8 .0

8 9 .0

9 1 .8

9 5 .4

9 7 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .8

1 0 6 .6

1 0 6 .6

C a p ita l s e r v ic e s ..............................................................................

2 2 .6

3 5 .5

5 6 .4

8 3 .5

8 5 .4

8 7 .3

8 9 .5

9 2 .3

9 5 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .9

1 1 0 .8

1 1 0 .8

C o m b in e d u n its of la b o r a n d c ap ita l in p u t........................

3 9 .3

5 0 .7

6 5 .9

8 7 .3

8 7.1

8 8 .4

9 1 .0

9 4 .4

9 7 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .2

1 0 8 .0

1 0 8 .0

C a p ita l p e r h o u r of all p e rs o n s ..................................................

4 0 .5

5 4 .8

7 3.1

9 0 .3

9 4 .7

9 6 .8

9 6 .5

9 6 .3

9 7 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .7

1 0 4 .7

1 2 4 .3

M a n u fa c tu rin g ( 1 9 9 2 = 1 0 0 )
P ro d u ctivity:
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f all p e rs o n s ...............................................

M u ltifa c to r p ro d u c tiv ity ................................................................
O u tp u t...................................................................................................

4 1 .8

5 4 .2

7 0.1

9 2 .8

9 5 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .9

1 0 5 .0

1 0 9 .0

1 1 2 .8

1 1 7 .1

1 2 4 .3

1 2 4 .3

1 1 6 .5

1 0 0 .9

1 0 1 .6

9 7 .5

1 0 0 .0

101 .1

1 0 4 .0

1 0 5 .0

1 0 4 .5

1 0 5 .6

1 0 6 .5

7 2 .7

8 4 .4

8 6 .6

9 9 .3

9 8 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .4

1 0 2 .6

1 0 5 .0

1 06 .1

1 0 9 .8

1 1 3 .2

1 1 3 .2
1 3 0 .7

3 8 .5

5 6 .5

7 5 .3

9 7 .3

9 5 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .3

1 0 8 .7

1 0 6 .5

1 1 3 .4

1 1 6 .9

1 2 3 .5

1 3 0 .7

1 0 5 .2

Inputs:
H o u rs o f all p e rs o n s .....................................................................

9 2 .0

1 0 4 .2

1 0 7 .5

1 0 4 .8

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .4

1 0 3 .6

1 0 4 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 5 .5

1 0 5 .2

C a p ita l s e r v ic e s ..............................................................................

3 0 .9

4 8 .5

7 4 .7

9 5 .8

9 7 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .2

1 0 4 .5

1 0 8 .0

1 1 1 .9

1 1 6 .9

1 2 2 .8

1 2 2 .8

E n e r g y .................................................................................................

5 1 .3

8 5 .4

9 2 .5

9 9 .9

1 00 .1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 7 .3

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .0

1 0 3 .9

1 0 9 .2

1 0 9 .2

3 8 .2

4 4 .8

7 5 .0

9 2 .5

9 3 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 5 .7

1 1 1 .3

1 1 2 .8

1 2 0 .4

1 2 0 .4

1 2 7 .2

1 2 7 .2

P u rc h a s e d b u s in e s s s e rv ic e s ..................................................

2 8 .2

4 8 .8

7 3 .7

9 2 .5

9 2.1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .0

1 0 5 .1

1 1 0 .0

1 0 8 .9

1 1 4 .2

1 1 6 .8

1 1 6 .8

C o m b in e d u n its o f all fa c to r in p u ts .......................................

5 2 .9

6 7 .0

8 7 .0

9 8 .0

9 7 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .9

1 0 6 .0

1 0 7 .9

1 1 0 .2

1 1 2 .5

1 1 5 .5

1 1 5 .5


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

89

Current Labor Statistics:

45.

Productivity Data

A n n u a l in d e x e s o f p r o d u c tiv ity , h o u rly c o m p e n s a t io n , unit c o s ts , a n d p ric e s , s e le c t e d y e a r s

[1992 =100]
Item

1960

1970

1980

1990

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

B u sin ess
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f all p e rs o n s ...................................................

4 8 .8

6 7 .0

8 0 .4

9 5 .2

1 0 1 .9

1 0 2 .6

1 0 5 .4

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .6

1 1 3 .5

1 1 6 .9

1 1 8 .2

1 2 3 .8

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r...............................................................

1 3 .7

2 3 .5

5 4 .2

9 0 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .7

110 .1

1 1 3 .5

1 1 9 .7

1 2 5 .2

1 3 3 .8

1 3 7 .7

1 4 1 .8

R e a l c o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r......................................................

5 9 .8

7 8 .6

8 9 .2

9 6 .3

9 9 .9

9 9 .6

100 .1

1 0 1 .0

1 0 5 .0

1 0 7 .6

1 1 1 .2

1 1 1 .4

1 1 2 .3

U n it la b o r c o s ts ........................................................................

2 8 .0

3 5.1

6 7 .4

9 5 .3

1 0 2 .6

1 04 .1

1 0 4 .5

1 0 5 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 1 0 .3

1 1 4 .4

1 1 6 .5

1 1 3 .9

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n ts ................................................................

2 5 .2

3 1 .6

6 1 .5

9 3 .9

1 0 6 .4

1 0 9 .4

1 1 3 .3

1 17 .1

1 1 4 .5

1 1 3 .9

1 1 2 .0

1 1 4 .7

1 2 0 .4

Im p lic it p ric e d e fla to r ..................................................................

2 7 .0

3 3 .9

6 5 .2

9 4 .8

1 0 4 .0

1 0 6 .0

1 0 7 .7

1 0 9 .7

1 1 0 .6

1 1 1 .8

1 1 3 .5

1 1 5 .8

1 1 6 .3

N o n fa rm b u s in e s s
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f all p e rs o n s ...................................................

5 1 .9

6 8 .9

8 2 .0

9 5 .3

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .8

1 0 5 .4

1 0 7 .5

1 1 0 .3

1 1 2 .9

1 1 6 .2

1 1 7 .5

1 2 3 .1

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r................................................................

1 4 .3

2 3 .7

5 4 .6

9 0 .5

1 0 4 .3

1 0 6 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 13 .1

1 19 .1

1 2 4 .3

1 3 3 .0

1 3 6 .6

1 3 9 .8
1 1 1 .3

R e a l c o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r.......................................................

6 2 .6

7 9 .2

8 9 .8

9 6 .2

9 9 .7

9 9 .4

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .6

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .8

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .5

U n it la b o r c o s ts ..................................................................................

2 7 .5

3 4 .4

6 6 .5

9 5 .0

1 0 2 .5

1 0 3 .7

1 0 4 .2

1 0 5 .2

1 0 8 .0

1 10 .1

1 1 4 .4

1 1 6 .3

1 1 3 .6

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n ts ................................................................

2 4 .6

3 1 .3

6 0 .5

9 3 .6

1 0 6 .9

1 1 0 .4

1 1 3 .5

1 1 8 .0

1 1 5 .7

1 1 5 .5

1 1 3 .5

1 1 6 .4

1 2 2 .5

Im p lic it p ric e d e fla to r ......................................................................

2 6 .5

3 3 .3

6 4 .3

9 4 .5

1 04 .1

1 06.1

1 0 7 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 1 0 .8

1 1 2 .1

1 14 .1

1 1 6 .3

1 1 6 .9

N o n fin a n c ia l co rp o ra tio n s
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f all e m p lo y e e s ............................................

5 5 .4

7 0 .4

8 1 .1

9 5 .4

103 .1

1 0 4 .2

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .4

1 1 1 .7

1 1 4 .7

1 1 8 .8

1 2 0 .5

1 2 7 .1

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r................................................................

1 5 .6

2 5 .3

5 6 .4

9 0 .8

1 0 4 .2

1 0 6 .2

1 0 9 .0

1 1 0 .3

1 1 6 .0

1 21 .1

1 2 9 .2

1 3 2 .4

1 3 6 .7

R e a l c o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r......................................................

68.1

8 4 .4

9 2 .9

9 6 .5

9 9 .6

9 9 .0

9 9 .0

98.1

1 0 1 .7

1 04 .1

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .0

1 0 8 .8

T o ta l u n it c o s ts ..................................................................................

2 6 .8

3 4 .8

6 8 .4

9 5 .9

1 01 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 1 .2

1 0 1 .5

1 0 3 .3

1 0 5 .1

1 0 8 .2

1 1 0 .9

1 0 9 .5

U n it la b o r c o s ts ...............................................................................
U n it n o n la b o r c o s ts .......................................................................

2 8 .1

3 5 .9

6 9 .6

9 5 .2

1 0 1 .0

1 0 1 .9

1 0 1 .4

1 0 1 .8

1 0 3 .8

1 0 5 .6

1 0 8 .8

1 0 9 .9

1 0 7 .5

2 3 .3

3 1 .9

6 5 .1

9 8 .0

1 0 1 .3

1 0 2 .2

1 0 0 .6

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .2

1 0 3 .5

1 0 6 .7

1 1 3 .7

1 1 4 .6

U n it p ro fits .....................................................................................

5 0 .2

4 4 .4

6 8 .8

9 4 .3

1 3 1 .7

1 3 9 .0

1 5 2 .2

1 5 6 .9

1 4 1 .7

1 3 1 .7

1 1 1 .6

9 8 .5

1 0 7 .4

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n ts ...............................................

3 0 .2

3 5.1

6 6 .0

9 7.1

1 0 9 .0

1 1 1 .6

1 1 3 .8

1 1 5 .2

1 1 2 .3

1 1 0 .7

1 0 8 .0

Im p lic it p ric e d e fla to r ......................................................................

1 0 9 .8

1 1 2 .8

2 8 .8

3 5 .6

6 8 .4

9 5 .8

1 0 3 .7

1 05.1

1 0 5 .5

1 0 6 .2

1 0 6 .6

1 0 7 .3

1 0 8 .5

1 0 9 .8

1 0 9 .3

1 4 2 .1

M an u fa c tu rin g
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f all p e rs o n s ...................................................

4 1 .8

5 4 .2

7 0 .1

9 2 .9

1 0 5 .0

1 0 9 .0

1 1 2 .8

1 1 7 .6

1 2 3 .3

1 2 9 .7

1 3 4 .9

1 3 6 .0

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r................................................................

1 4 .9

2 3 .7

5 5 .6

9 0 .8

1 0 5 .6

1 0 7 .9

1 0 9 .4

1 1 1 .5

1 1 7 .4

1 22 .1

1 31 .1

1 33 .1

1 3 7 .5

R e a l c o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r......................................................

6 5 .0

7 9 .2

9 1 .4

9 6 .4

1 0 1 .0

1 0 0 .6

9 9 .4

9 9.1

1 0 3 .0

1 0 4 .9

1 0 9 .0

1 0 7 .7

1 0 9 .4

U n it la b o r c o s ts .......................................................................

3 5 .6

4 3 .8

7 9 .3

9 7 .8

1 0 0 .7

9 9 .0

9 6 .9

9 4 .1

9 7 .2

9 7 .9

2 6 .8

2 9 .3

8 0 .2

9 9 .8

1 0 2 .8

1 0 6 .9

1 0 9 .9

1 1 0 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 0 7 .0

_

9 6 .8

U n it n o n la b o r p a y m e n ts ................................................................
Im p lic it p ric e d e fla to r ......................................................................

3 0 .2

3 5 .0

7 9 .9

9 9 .0

1 0 2 .0

1 0 3 .9

1 0 4 .8

104 .1

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .7

1 0 3 .2

-

-

D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

90 Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

9 4 .8

9 5 .2

46.

A n n u a l in d e x e s o f o u tp u t p e r h o u r f o r s e le c t e d 3 -d ig it S I C in d u s t r ie s

[1987=100]
Industry

SIC

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

M in ing
C o p p e r o r e s ...............................................................................

102

1 0 2 .7

1 0 0 .5

1 1 5 .2

1 18 .1

1 2 6 .0

1 1 7 .2

1 1 6 .5

1 1 8 .9

1 1 8 .3

1 1 0 .0

1 2 2 .6

G o ld a n d s ilv e r o r e s ..............................................................

104

1 2 2 .3

1 2 7 .4

1 4 1 .6

1 5 9 .8

1 6 0 .8

1 4 4 .2

1 3 8 .3

1 5 8 .5

1 8 7 .6

1 9 7 .5

2 3 9 .9

B itu m in o u s c o a l a n d lig n ite m in in g ................................

122

1 1 8 .7

1 2 2 .4

1 3 3 .0

1 4 1 .2

1 48.1

1 5 5 .9

1 6 8 .0

1 7 6 .6

1 8 8 .0

1 9 4 .9

2 0 7 .0

C r u d e p e tro le u m a n d n a tu ra l g a s ...................................

131

9 7 .0

9 7 .9

1 02.1

1 0 5 .9

1 1 2 .4

1 1 9 .4

1 2 3 .9

1 2 5 .2

1 2 7 .5

1 3 4 .5

1 4 2 .5

C ru s h e d a n d b ro k e n s to n e ................................................

142

1 0 2 .2

9 9 .8

1 0 5 .0

1 0 3 .6

1 0 8 .7

1 0 5 .4

1 0 7 .2

1 1 2 .6

1 1 0 .2

1 0 5 .0

1 0 1 .9

M an u fa ctu rin g
M e a t p ro d u c ts ...........................................................................

2 01

97.1

9 9 .6

1 0 4 .6

1 0 4 .3

1 0 1 .2

1 0 2 .3

9 7 .4

1 0 2 .5

1 0 2 .3

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .9

D a iry p ro d u c ts ...........................................................................

202

1 0 7 .3

1 0 8 .3

1 1 1 .4

1 0 9 .6

1 1 1 .8

1 1 6 .4

1 1 6 .0

1 1 9 .3

1 1 9 .3

1 1 2 .7

1 1 3 .5

P r e s e r v e d fru its a n d v e g e ta b le s .....................................

203

9 5 .6

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .5

1 0 6 .8

1 0 7 .6

1 09 .1

1 0 9 .2

1 1 0 .7

1 1 7 .8

1 2 0 .4

1 2 3 .5

G r a in mill p ro d u c ts .................................................................

204

1 0 5 .4

1 0 4 .9

1 0 7 .8

1 0 9 .2

1 0 8 .4

1 1 5 .4

1 0 8 .0

1 1 8 .2

1 2 6 .2

1 2 9 .3

1 2 7 .5

B a k e ry p ro d u c ts .......................................................................

205

9 2 .7

9 0 .6

9 3 .8

9 4 .4

9 6 .4

9 7 .3

9 5 .6

9 9 .1

1 0 0 .9

1 0 6 .4

1 0 7 .6

S u g a r a n d c o n fe c tio n e ry p ro d u c ts ..................................

206

1 0 3 .2

1 0 2 .0

9 9 .8

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .2

1 1 3 .7

1 1 6 .7

F a ts a n d o ils ...............................................................................

207

1 18 .1

1 20 .1

1 14 .1

1 1 2 .6

1 1 1 .8

1 2 0 .3

1 10 .1

1 2 0 .2

1 3 7 .3

1 5 4 .4

1 5 1 .4

1 3 5 .0

1 3 5 .5

1 3 6 .4

1 2 9 .7

1 2 8 .6

1 0 8 .3

1 2 3 .0

1 2 7 .0

1 3 0 .5

B e v e r a g e s ...................................................................................

208

1 1 7 .0

1 2 0 .0

1 27 .1

1 2 6 .4

1 30.1

1 3 3 .5

M is c e lla n e o u s fo o d a n d k in d re d p ro d u c ts ..................

209

9 9 .2

1 0 1 .7

1 0 1 .5

1 0 5 .2

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .9

1 09 .1

1 0 4 .0

1 1 2 .4

1 1 3 .9

1 1 6 .3

C ig a r e t te s ...................................................................................

2 11

1 1 3 .2

1 0 7 .6

1 1 1 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 2 6 .6

1 4 2 .9

1 4 7 .2

1 4 7 .2

1 5 2 .2

1 3 7 .7

1 3 9 .1

1 4 0 .2

B ro a d w o v e n fa b ric m ills, c o tto n .......................................

2 21

1 03.1

1 1 1 .2

1 1 0 .3

1 1 7 .8

1 22 .1

1 3 4 .0

1 3 7 .3

1 3 1 .2

1 3 6 .2

1 3 9 .3

B ro a d w o v e n fa b ric m ills, m a n m a d e ..............................

222

1 1 1 .3

1 1 6 .2

1 2 6 .2

1 3 1 .7

1 4 2 .5

1 4 5 .3

1 4 7 .6

1 6 2 .2

1 6 8 .6

1 7 5 .3

1 6 7 .4

N a r r o w fa b ric m ills ..................................................................

224

9 6 .5

9 9 .6

1 1 2 .9

1 1 1 .4

1 20.1

1 1 8 .9

1 2 6 .3

1 1 0 .8

1 1 7 .7

1 2 4 .9

1 1 7 .1

K n ittin g m ills ...............................................................................

225

1 0 7 .5

1 1 4 .0

1 1 9 .3

1 2 7 .9

1 34.1

1 3 8 .3

1 5 0 .3

1 3 8 .0

1 3 5 .9

1 4 6 .6

1 5 5 .6

T e x t ile fin is h in g , e x c e p t w o o l...........................................

226

8 3 .4

7 9 .9

7 8 .6

7 9 .3

8 1 .2

7 8 .5

7 9 .2

9 4 .3

9 3 .7

9 4 .4

9 7 .2

C a r p e ts a n d r u g s .....................................................................

227

9 3 .2

8 9 .2

9 6.1

9 7 .1

9 3 .3

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .3

1 0 2 .3

9 6 .0

1 0 3 .0

Y a r n a n d th r e a d m ills ...........................................................

228

1 1 0 .2

1 1 1 .4

1 1 9 .6

1 2 6 .6

1 3 0 .7

1 3 7 .4

1 4 7 .4

1 5 0 .4

1 5 3 .0

1 5 7 .6

1 5 5 .4

M is c e lla n e o u s te x tile g o o d s ...............................................

229

1 0 9 .2

1 0 4 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 1 0 .4

1 1 8 .5

1 2 3 .7

123 .1

1 1 8 .7

1 2 0 .1

1 2 8 .0

1 3 4 .4

M e n 's a n d b o y s ' fu rn is h in g s ..............................................

232

102 .1

1 0 8 .4

109 .1

1 0 8 .4

1 1 1 .7

1 2 3 .4

1 3 4 .7

1 62 .1

1 7 4 .8

1 9 0 .9

2 0 0 .3

W o m e n 's a n d m is s e s ' o u te rw e a r.....................................

233

104 .1

1 0 4 .3

1 0 9 .4

1 2 1 .8

1 2 7 .4

1 3 5 .5

1 4 1 .6

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 7 3 .9

1 8 9 .9

W o m e n 's a n d c h ild re n 's u n d e rg a rm e n ts .....................

234

1 02.1

1 1 3 .7

1 1 7 .4

1 2 4 .5

1 3 8 .0

1 6 1 .3

1 7 4 .5

2 0 8 .9

2 1 6 .4

2 9 4 .7

3 5 2 .3

H a ts , c a p s , a n d m illin e ry .....................................................

235

8 9 .2

9 1.1

9 3 .6

8 7 .2

7 7 .7

8 4 .3

8 2 .2

8 7 .1

9 8 .7

9 9 .3

1 0 6 .1

M is c e lla n e o u s a p p a r e l a n d a c c e s s o rie s .....................

238

9 0 .6

9 1 .8

9 1 .3

9 4 .0

1 0 5 .5

1 1 6 .8

1 20 .1

1 0 1 .5

1 0 8 .0

1 0 5 .8

1 1 1 .3

M is c e lla n e o u s fa b ric a te d te x tile products

239

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .7

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .5

1 0 7 .8

1 0 9 .2

1 0 5 .6

1 1 9 .2

1 1 7 .3

1 2 8 .8

1 3 2 .5

S a w m ills a n d p la n in g m ills ..................................................

242

9 9 .8

1 0 2 .6

1 08.1

1 0 1 .9

1 0 3 .3

1 1 0 .2

1 1 5 .6

1 1 6 .9

1 1 8 .7

1 2 5 .4

1 2 4 .4

M illw o rk , p ly w o o d , a n d s tru c tu ral m e m b e r s .............

243

9 8 .0

9 8 .0

9 9 .9

9 7 .0

9 4 .5

9 2 .7

9 2 .4

89.1

9 1 .3

8 9 .2

9 1 .4

W o o d c o n ta in e r s .....................................................................

244

1 1 1 .2

1 13 .1

1 0 9 .4

100 .1

1 0 0 .9

1 06 .1

1 0 6 .7

1 0 6 .2

1 0 6 .5

1 0 3 .9

1 0 4 .6

1 0 0 .3

9 4 .6

9 8 .3

9 7 .0

9 6 .7

1 0 0 .3

9 9 .2

1 0 3 .0

249

1 0 7 .7

1 1 0 .5

1 1 4 .2

1 1 5 .3

1 1 1 .8

1 1 5 .4

1 1 4 .4

1 2 3 .4

1 3 1 .2

1 4 0 .7

1 4 6 .5

H o u s e h o ld fu rn itu re ................................................................

251

1 0 4 .5

1 07.1

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .6

1 1 2 .5

1 1 6 .9

1 2 1 .6

1 2 1 .3

1 2 5 .7

1 2 8 .9

1 2 8 .4

O ffic e fu rn itu re ..........................................................................

252

9 5 .0

9 4 .1

1 0 2 .5

1 0 3 .2

1 0 0 .5

1 01 .1

1 0 6 .4

1 1 8 .3

1 13 .1

1 0 8 .9

1 1 1 .2

P u b lic b u ild in g a n d re la te d fu rn itu re .............................

253

1 1 9 .8

1 2 0 .2

1 4 0 .6

1 6 1 .0

1 5 7 .4

1 7 3 .3

1 8 1 .5

2 1 4 .9

2 0 7 .6

2 2 2 .4

2 0 2 .0

P a rtitio n s a n d fix tu re s ...........................................................

254

9 5 .6

9 3 .0

1 0 2 .7

1 0 7 .4

9 8 .9

1 0 1 .2

9 7 .5

1 2 1 .1

1 2 5 .6

1 2 5 .9

1 3 1 .9

M is c e lla n e o u s fu rn itu re a n d fix tu re s .............................

259

1 0 3 .5

1 02 .1

9 9 .5

1 0 3 .6

1 0 4 .7

1 1 0 .0

1 1 3 .2

1 1 0 .7

1 2 1 .9

1 19 .1

1 1 0 .5

P u lp m ills .....................................................................................

261

1 1 6 .7

1 2 8 .3

1 3 7 .3

1 2 2 .5

1 2 8 .9

1 3 1 .9

1 3 2 .6

8 2 .3

8 6 .6

8 4 .8

7 8 .8

245

1 03 .1

1 0 3 .8

1 03 .1

M is c e lla n e o u s w o o d p ro d u c ts ..........................................

W o o d b u ild in g s a n d m o b ile h o m e s ................................

P a p e r m ills ..................................................................................

262

1 0 2 .3

9 9 .2

1 0 3 .3

1 0 2 .4

1 1 0 .2

1 1 8 .6

1 1 1 .6

1 1 2 .0

1 1 4 .8

1 2 6 .2

1 3 3 .5

P a p e r b o a r d m ills .....................................................................

263

1 0 0 .6

1 0 1 .4

1 0 4 .4

1 0 8 .4

1 1 4 .9

1 1 9 .5

1 1 8 .0

1 2 6 .7

1 2 7 .8

1 3 4 .9

1 3 5 .3

P a p e r b o a r d c o n ta in e rs a n d b o x e s ................................ .

265

1 0 1 .3

1 0 3 .4

1 0 5 .2

1 0 7 .9

1 0 8 .4

1 05 .1

1 0 6 .3

1 0 9 .7

1 1 3 .5

1 1 1 .9

1 1 2 .9

M is c e lla n e o u s c o n v e rte d p a p e r p ro d u c ts ...................

267

1 0 1 .4

1 0 5 .3

1 0 5 .5

1 0 7 .9

1 1 0 .6

1 1 3 .3

1 1 3 .6

1 1 9 .5

1 2 3 .0

1 2 6 .0

1 2 8 .3

N e w s p a p e r s ...............................................................................

2 71

9 0 .6

8 5 .8

8 1 .5

7 9 .4

7 9 .9

7 9 .0

7 7 .4

7 9 .0

8 3 .6

8 6 .0

8 8 .3

1 0 0 .1

1 1 2 .2

1 1 1 .2

1 0 9 .9

P e rio d ic a ls ..................................................................................

272

9 3 .9

8 9 .5

9 2 .9

8 9 .5

8 1 .9

8 7 .8

8 9.1

B o o k s .............................................................................................

273

9 6 .6

1 0 0 .8

9 7 .7

1 0 3 .5

1 0 3 .0

1 0 1 .6

9 9 .3

1 0 2 .6

1 0 0 .9

1 0 6 .1

1 0 6 .1

M is c e lla n e o u s p u b lis h in g ...................................................

274

9 2 .2

9 5 .9

1 0 5 .8

1 0 4 .5

9 7 .5

9 4 .8

9 3 .6

1 1 4 .5

1 1 9 .4

1 2 7 .2

1 2 7 .8

C o m m e rc ia l p rin tin g ..............................................................

275

1 0 2 .5

1 0 2 .0

1 0 8 .0

1 0 6 .9

1 0 6 .5

1 0 7 .2

1 0 8 .3

1 0 8 .8

1 0 9 .9

1 1 5 .0

1 1 8 .7

M a n ifo ld b u s in e s s fo rm s .....................................................

276

9 3 .0

8 9.1

9 4 .5

9 1.1

8 2 .0

7 6 .9

7 5 .2

7 7 .9

7 6 .7

7 0 .6

6 9 .4

G r e e tin g c a r d s ..........................................................................

277

1 0 0 .6

9 2 .7

9 6 .7

9 1 .4

8 9 .0

9 2 .5

9 0 .8

9 2 .2

1 04 .1

1 0 9 .3

1 0 5 .1

B a n k b o o k s a n d b o o k b in d in g ...........................................

278

9 9 .4

9 6.1

1 0 3 .6

9 8 .7

1 0 5 .4

1 0 8 .7

1 1 4 .5

1 1 4 .2

1 1 6 .5

1 2 3 .8

1 2 6 .2

P rin tin g tra d e s e r v ic e s ..........................................................

279

9 9 .3

1 0 0 .6

1 1 2 .0

1 1 5 .3

1 1 1 .0

1 1 6 .7

1 2 6 .2

1 2 3 .3

1 2 6 .7

1 2 1 .5

1 1 9 .6

In d u s tria l in o rg a n ic c h e m ic a ls ..........................................

2 81

1 0 6 .8

1 0 9 .7

1 0 9 .7

1 0 5 .6

1 0 2 .3

1 0 9 .3

1 10 .1

1 1 6 .8

1 4 5 .8

1 4 8 .5

1 4 1 .3

P la s tic s m a te ria ls a n d s y n th e tic s ...................................

282

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 7 .5

1 1 2 .0

1 2 5 .3

1 2 8 .3

1 2 5 .3

1 3 5 .4

1 4 2 .2

1 4 8 .6

1 5 1 .0

D ru g s ............................................................................. ................

283

1 0 3 .8

1 0 4 .5

9 9 .5

9 9 .7

1 0 4 .6

1 0 8 .7

1 1 2 .5

1 1 2 .4

1 0 4 .3

1 0 5 .6

1 0 6 .2

S o a p s , c le a n e r s , a n d to ile t g o o d s ..................................

284

1 0 3 .8

1 0 5 .3

1 0 4 .4

1 0 8 .7

1 1 1 .2

1 1 8 .6

1 2 0 .9

1 2 6 .4

1 2 2 .7

1 1 4 .8

1 2 4 .8

P a in ts a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts ..................................................

285

1 0 6 .3

1 0 4 .3

1 0 2 .9

1 0 8 .8

1 1 6 .7

1 1 8 .0

1 2 5 .6

1 2 6 .4

1 2 6 .8

1 2 2 .7

1 2 4 .6

In d u s tria l o rg a n ic c h e m ic a ls .............................................

286

1 0 1 .4

9 5 .8

9 4 .6

9 2 .2

9 9 .9

9 8 .6

9 9 .0

1 1 1 .3

1 0 5 .7

1 2 0 .6

1 2 7 .8

A g ric u ltu ra l c h e m ic a ls ..........................................................

287

1 0 4 .7

9 9 .5

9 9 .5

1 0 3 .8

1 0 5 .0

1 0 8 .5

1 1 0 .0

1 1 9 .8

1 1 8 .0

1 0 4 .6

1 1 2 .0

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

91

Current Labor Statistics: Productivity Data

46. C o n t in u e d - A n n u a l in d e x e s o f o u tp u t p e r h o u r f o r s e le c t e d 3 -d ig it S I C in d u s t r ie s

[1987=100]
Industry

SIC

M is c e lla n e o u s c h e m ic a l p ro d u c ts ...................................

289

P e tro le u m re fin in g .................................................................

2 91

A s p h a lt p a v in g a n d ro o fin g m a te ria ls ...........................

295

M is c e lla n e o u s p e tro le u m a n d co al p ro d u c ts .............
T ir e s a n d in n e r tu b e s ...........................................................

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

9 7 .3

9 6.1

1 0 1 .8

1 07.1

1 0 5 .7

1 0 7 .8

110 .1

1 2 0 .3

1 2 0 .8

1 2 3 .3

1 2 5 .6

1 0 9 .2

1 0 6 .6

1 1 1 .3

1 20.1

1 2 3 .8

1 3 2 .3

1 4 2 .0

1 4 9 .2

1 5 5 .8

1 7 0 .2

1 8 0 .2

9 8 .0

9 4.1

1 0 0 .4

1 0 8 .0

1 0 4 .9

1 1 1 .2

1 13 .1

1 23 .1

1 2 4 .7

1 2 3 .4

1 2 6 .1

299

9 4 .8

9 0 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .2

9 6 .3

8 7 .4

8 7.1

9 6 .5

9 8 .5

8 6 .5

8 2 .9

3 01

1 0 3 .0

1 0 2 .4

1 0 7 .8

1 1 6 .5

1 24 .1

1 31 .1

1 3 8 .8

1 49 .1

1 44 .1

1 42 .1

1 4 5 .9

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

H o s e a n d b e ltin g a n d g a s k e ts a n d p a c k in g ...............

305

96.1

9 2 .4

9 7 .8

9 9 .7

1 0 2 .7

1 0 4 .6

1 0 7 .4

1 1 3 .5

1 1 2 .7

1 1 0 .6

1 1 5 .4

F a b r ic a te d r u b b e r p ro d u c ts , n .e .c ..................................

306

1 0 9 .0

1 0 9 .9

1 1 5 .2

1 23 .1

1 19 .1

1 2 1 .5

1 2 1 .0

1 2 5 .3

1 3 2 .3

1 3 6 .9

1 4 4 .7

M is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro d ucts, n .e .c ........................

308

1 0 5 .7

1 0 8 .3

1 1 4 .4

1 1 6 .7

1 2 0 .8

1 2 1 .0

1 2 4 .7

1 2 9 .9

1 3 3 .8

1 4 0 .9

1 4 5 .4

F o o tw e a r, e x c e p t ru b b e r .....................................................

314

1 01.1

9 4 .4

1 0 4 .2

1 0 5 .2

1 1 3 .0

1 17 .1

126 .1

1 2 1 .4

1 1 0 .9

1 3 2 .6

1 4 6 .2

F la t g la s s .....................................................................................

321

8 4 .5

8 3 .6

9 2 .7

9 7 .7

9 7 .6

9 9 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 7 .6

1 1 4 .0

1 2 9 .4

1 4 0 .4

G la s s a n d g la s s w a re , p re s s e d o r b lo w n .....................

322

1 0 4 .8

1 0 2 .3

1 0 8 .9

1 0 8 .7

1 1 2 .9

1 1 5 .7

1 3 5 .2

1 3 9 .3

1 3 5 .8

P ro d u c ts of p u rc h a s e d g la s s .............................................

323

9 2 .6

9 7 .7

1 0 1 .5

1 0 6 .2

1 0 5 .9

1 06.1

1 2 2 .0

1 25 .1

1 2 2 .0

1 3 0 .2

1 3 7 .2

C e m e n t, h y d ra u lic ...................................................................

324

1 1 2 .4

1 0 8 .3

115 .1

1 1 9 .9

1 2 5 .6

1 2 4 .3

1 2 8 .7

1 33 .1

1 34 .1

S tru c tu ra l c la y p ro d u c ts .......................................................

325

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 1 1 .4

1 0 6 .8

1 1 4 .0

1 1 2 .6

1 1 9 .6

1 1 1 .9

1 1 4 .8

1 2 3 .5

1 2 4 .8

P o tte ry a n d re la te d p ro d u c ts .............................................

326

9 8 .7

9 5 .9

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .3

1 0 8 .5

1 0 9 .4

1 1 9 .4

1 2 4 .2

1 2 7 .4

1 2 2 .0

1 2 1 .2

C o n c r e te , g y p s u m , a n d p la s te r p ro d u c ts .....................

327

1 0 2 .3

1 0 1 .2

1 0 2 .5

1 0 4 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .5

1 0 7 .3

1 0 7 .6

1 1 2 .8

1 11 .1

1 0 5 .1

M is c e lla n e o u s n o n m e ta llic m in eral p ro d u c ts .............

329

9 5 .4

9 4 .0

1 0 4 .3

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .3

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .4

1 1 4 .7

1 1 4 .9

1 1 3 .3

1 1 6 .1
1 6 0 .1

1 2 1 .4

1 2 8 .3

1 3 8 .6

1 3 6 .9

B la s t fu rn a c e a n d b a s ic s te e l p ro d u c ts ........................

331

1 0 9 .7

1 0 7 .8

1 1 7 .0

1 3 3 .6

1 4 2 .4

1 4 2 .6

1 4 7 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 1 .0

1 5 5 .6

Iro n a n d s te e l fo u n d r ie s .......................................................

332

1 06.1

1 0 4 .5

1 0 7 .2

1 12 .1

1 1 3 .0

1 1 2 .7

1 1 6 .2

1 2 0 .8

1 21 .1

1 2 8 .9

1 32 .1

P rim a ry n o n fe rro u s m e ta ls ..................................................

333

1 0 2 .3

1 1 0 .7

1 0 1 .9

1 0 7 .9

1 0 5 .3

1 1 1 .0

1 1 0 .8

1 1 2 .0

1 1 8 .9

1 1 7 .7

1 1 1 .9

N o n fe rro u s ro llin g a n d d r a w in g ........................................

335

9 2 .7

9 1 .0

9 6 .0

9 8 .3

1 0 1 .2

9 9 .2

1 0 4 .0

1 1 1 .3

1 1 5 .7

1 2 1 .4

1 1 8 .0

N o n fe rro u s fo u n d rie s (c a s tin g s ).......................................

336

1 0 4 .0

1 0 3 .6

1 0 3 .6

1 0 8 .5

1 12 .1

1 1 7 .8

1 2 2 .3

1 2 7 .0

1 3 1 .5

1 2 9 .8

1 2 9 .7

M is c e lla n e o u s p rim a ry m e tal p ro d u c ts .........................

339

1 1 3 .7

109 .1

1 1 4 .5

1 1 1 .3

1 3 4 .5

1 5 2 .2

1 4 9 .6

1 3 6 .2

1 4 0 .0

1 4 9 .0

1 5 4 .3

M e ta l c a n s a n d s h ip p in g c o n ta in e rs ..............................

341

1 1 7 .6

1 2 2 .9

1 2 7 .8

1 3 2 .3

1 4 0 .9

1 4 4 .2

1 5 5 .2

1 6 0 .3

1 6 3 .8

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .5

C u tle ry , h a n d to o ls , a n d h a r d w a re ...................................

342

9 7 .3

9 6 .8

100 .1

1 0 4 .0

1 0 9 .2

1 1 1 .3

1 1 8 .2

1 1 4 .6

1 1 5 .7

1 2 1 .9

1 2 5 .4

P lu m b in g a n d h e a tin g , e x c e p t e le c tric ..........................

343

1 0 2 .6

1 0 2 .0

9 8 .4

1 0 2 .0

1 09.1

1 0 9 .2

1 1 8 .6

1 2 7 .3

1 3 0 .5

1 2 5 .7

1 3 2 .2

F a b ric a te d s tru c tu ral m e ta l p ro d u c ts .............................

344

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .9

1 0 4 .8

1 0 7 .7

1 0 5 .8

1 0 6 .5

1 1 1 .9

1 1 2 .7

1 1 2 .8

1 1 2 .8

M e ta l fo rg in g s a n d s ta m p in g s ...........................................

346

9 5 .6

9 2 .9

1 0 3 .7

1 0 8 .7

1 0 8 .5

1 0 9 .3

1 1 3 .6

1 2 0 .2

1 2 5 .9

1 2 8 .3

1 2 9 .8

M e ta l s e rv ic e s , n .e .c ..............................................................

347

1 0 4 .7

9 9 .4

1 1 1 .6

1 2 0 .6

1 2 3 .0

1 2 7 .7

1 2 8 .4

1 2 4 .4

1 2 7 .3

1 26 .1

1 3 5 .7

O r d n a n c e a n d a c c e s s o rie s , n .e .c ...................................

348

8 2.1

8 1 .5

8 8 .6

8 4 .6

8 3 .6

8 7 .6

8 7 .5

9 3 .7

9 6 .6

9 1 .0

9 2 .8

M is c e lla n e o u s fa b ric a te d m e tal p ro d u c ts ...................

349

9 7 .5

9 7 .4

101 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 3 .2

1 0 6 .6

1 0 8 .3

1 0 7 .7

1 1 1 .6

1 0 9 .3

1 0 9 .2

E n g in e s a n d tu r b in e s .............................................................

351

1 0 6 .5

1 0 5 .8

1 0 3 .3

1 0 9 .2

1 2 2 .3

1 2 2 .7

1 3 6 .6

1 3 6 .9

1 46 .1

1 5 1 .5

1 6 4 .5

F a r m a n d g a rd e n m a c h in e ry .............................................

352

116 5

112 9

113 9

1 1 8 fi

n

C o n s tru c tio n a n d re la te d m a c h in e ry .............................

353

1 0 7 .0

9 9.1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 8 .2

1 1 7 .7

1 22.1

1 2 3 .3

1 3 2 .5

1 3 7 .6

1 3 3 .6

1 3 9 .8

M e ta lw o rk in g m a c h in e ry ......................................................

354

101 .1

9 6 .4

1 0 4 .3

1 0 7 .4

1 0 9 .9

1 1 4 .8

1 1 4 .9

1 1 9 .2

1 1 9 .8

1 2 3 .0

1 2 9 .8

1 7 2 .2

S p e c ia l in d u s try m a c h in e ry ................................................

355

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .3

1 0 6 .0

1 1 3 .6

1 2 1 .2

1 3 2 .3

1 3 4 .0

1 3 1 .7

1 2 4 .5

1 3 8 .6

G e n e r a l in d u s tria l m a c h in e ry ............................................

356

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .6

1 0 4 .8

1 0 6 .7

1 0 9 .0

1 0 9 .4

1 1 0 .0

1 1 1 .2

1 13 .1

1 1 8 .7

C o m p u te r a n d o ffic e e q u ip m e n t......................................

357

1 38 .1

1 4 9 .6

1 9 5 .7

2 5 8 .6

3 2 8 .6

4 6 9 .4

6 8 1 .3

9 6 0 .2

1 3 5 6 .6

1 8 6 2 .5

2 1 7 2 .0

R e frig e ra tio n a n d s e rv ic e m a c h in e ry .............................

358

1 0 3 .6

1 0 0 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 0 8 .6

1 1 0 .7

1 1 2 .7

1 1 4 .7

1 1 5 .0

1 2 1 .4

1 2 4 .0

1 2 2 .3

In d u s tria l m a c h in e ry , n .e .c ..................................................

359

1 0 7 .3

1 0 9 .0

1 1 7 .0

1 1 8 .5

1 2 7 .4

1 3 8 .8

1 4 1 .4

1 2 9 .3

1 2 7 .5

1 3 5 .8

1 4 1 .8

E le c tric d is trib u tio n e q u ip m e n t..........................................

361

1 0 6 .3

1 1 9 .6

1 2 2 .2

1 3 1 .8

1 4 2 .8

1 4 7 .5

1 4 8 .9

1 5 5 .4

E le c tric a l In d u s tria l a p p a r a tu s ...........................................

362

1 0 7 .7

1 07.1

1 17.1

1 3 2 .9

1 3 4 .9

1 5 0 .8

1 5 4 .3

1 6 4 .2

1 6 2 .3

1 5 8 .3

1 5 7 .0

H o u s e h o ld a p p lia n c e s ..........................................................

363

1 0 5 .8

1 0 6 .5

1 0 6 .5

1 1 5 .0

1 2 3 .4

1 3 1 .4

1 2 7 .3

1 2 7 .4

1 4 2 .9

1 4 3 .0

1 4 3 .9

1 5 0 .2

1 4 9 .5

1 6 2 .4

E le c tric lig h tin g a n d w irin g e q u ip m e n t..........................

364

9 9 .9

9 7 .5

1 0 5 .7

1 0 7 .8

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .7

1 1 6 .9

1 2 1 .8

1 2 9 .2

1 3 2 .4

1 3 4 .8

C o m m u n ic a tio n s e q u ip m e n t..............................................

366

1 2 3 .8

129 .1

1 5 4 .9

163 .1

1 8 6 .4

2 0 0 .7

2 2 9 .5

2 7 5 .4

2 8 4 .5

3 7 1 .9

4 4 8 .8

E le c tro n ic c o m p o n e n ts a n d a c c e s s o rie s .....................

367

1 3 3 .4

1 5 4 .7

1 8 9 .3

2 1 7 .9

2 7 4 .0

4 0 1 .5

5 1 5 .0

6 1 3 .4

7 6 8 .6

1 0 6 2 .6

1 4 4 0 .1

M is c e lla n e o u s e le c tric a l e q u ip m e n t & s u p p lie s ...

369

9 0 .6

9 8 .6

1 0 1 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 1 0 .5

114 .1

1 23.1

1 2 8 .3

1 3 5 .3

1 4 7 .2

1 5 6 .0

M o to r v e h ic le s a n d e q u ip m e n t..........................................

371

1 0 2 .4

9 6 .6

1 0 4 .2

1 0 6 .2

1 0 8 .8

1 0 6 .7

1 0 7 .2

1 1 6 .3

1 2 5 .2

1 3 6 .7

1 2 7 .1

A irc ra ft a n d p a r ts .....................................................................

372

9 8 .9

1 0 8 .2

1 1 2 .3

1 1 5 .2

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .8

1 13 .1

1 1 4 .7

140 .1

1 38 .1

1 3 2 .2

S h ip a n d b o a t b u ild in g a n d re p a irin g ...........................

373

1 0 3 .7

9 6 .3

1 0 2 .7

1 0 5 .9

1 0 3 .8

9 8.1

9 9 .3

1 0 5 .5

1 0 2 .5

1 13 .1

1 2 1 .6

R a ilro a d e q u ip m e n t................................................................

374

1 41 .1

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .9

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 4 8 .3

1 8 4 .2

189 .1

2 1 2 .8

2 1 8 .4

M o to rc y c le s , b ic y c le s , a n d p a rts .....................................

375

9 3 .8

9 9 .8

1 0 8 .4

1 3 0 .9

1 25.1

1 2 0 .3

1 2 5 .5

1 2 0 .4

1 2 7 .7

1 2 2 .4

1 1 9 .4

G u id e d m is s ile s , s p a c e v e h ic le s , p a rts ........................

376

1 1 6 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 9 .4

1 1 4 .9

1 1 6 .9

1 25 .1

1 3 3 .6

1 3 8 .9

1 56 .1

1 1 3 .3

S e a r c h a n d n a v ig a tio n e q u ip m e n t..................................

381

1 1 2 .7

1 1 8 .9

1 22.1

1 29 .1

1 32.1

1 4 9 .5

1 4 2 .2

1 4 9 .5

149 .1

1 4 9 .6

1 6 3 .7

M e a s u rin g a n d co n tro llin g d e v ic e s ................................

382

1 0 6 .4

1 13 .1

1 1 9 .9

1 2 4 .0

1 3 3 .8

1 4 6 .4

1 5 0 .5

1 4 2 .4

1 4 3 .5

1 5 2 .4

1 5 8 .5

M e d ic a l in s tru m e n ts a n d s u p p lie s ..................................

384

1 1 6 .9

1 1 8 .7

1 2 3 .5

1 2 7 .3

1 2 6 .7

1 3 1 .5

1 3 9 .8

1 4 7 .4

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .4

1 6 7 .0

O p h th a lm ic g o o d s ...................................................................

385

1 2 1 .2

1 25 .1

1 4 4 .5

1 5 7 .8

1 6 0 .6

1 6 7 .2

1 8 8 .2

1 9 6 .3

1 9 9 .0

2 3 5 .2

2 5 0 .2

386

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .2

1 6 9 .4

P h o to g ra p h ic e q u ip m e n t & s u p p lie s ..............................

1 1 6 .4

1 2 6 .9

1 3 2 .7

1 2 9 .5

1 2 8 .7

1 2 1 .5

1 2 8 .0

1 6 0 .6

J e w e lry , s ilv e rw a re , a n d p la te d w a r e ...........................

391

9 9 .3

9 5 .8

9 6 .7

9 6 .7

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .2

1 0 2 .6

1 1 4 .2

113 .1

1 3 4 .3

1 4 4 .9

M u s ic a l in s tru m e n ts ................................................................

393

9 7.1

9 6 .9

9 6 .0

9 5 .6

8 8 .7

8 6 .9

7 8 .8

8 2 .9

8 1 .4

9 7 .1

1 0 5 .3

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

92 Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

46. C o n t in u e d - A n n u a l in d e x e s o f o u tp u t p e r h o u r f o r s e le c t e d 3 -d ig it S I C in d u s t r ie s

[1987=100]
Industry

S IC

1990

1991

1992

T o y s a n d s p o rtin g g o o d s .....................................................

394

108.1

1 0 9 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 1 4 .2

1 0 9 .7

1 1 3 .6

1 1 9 .9

1 2 5 .7

1 3 1 .6

1 2 6 .6

1 4 0 .4

P e n s , p e n c ils , o ffic e , a n d a rt s u p p lie s ..........................

395

1 1 8 .2

1 1 6 .8

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .6

1 2 9 .9

1 3 5 .2

144 .1

1 2 7 .5

1 3 2 .5

1 2 3 .4

1 2 4 .9

C o s tu m e je w e lry a n d n o tio n s ...........................................

396

1 0 5 .3

1 0 6 .7

1 1 0 .8

1 1 5 .8

1 2 9 .0

1 4 3 .7

1 4 2 .2

1 1 8 .0

1 3 1 .2

1 3 0 .8

1 4 5 .3

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu re s .............................................

399

1 0 6 .5

1 0 9 .2

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .7

1 06.1

1 08.1

1 1 2 .8

1 0 9 .4

1 0 8 .5

1 1 4 .9

1 1 5 .9

R a ilro a d tra n s p o rta tio n ........................................................

4011

1 1 8 .5

1 2 7 .8

1 3 9 .6

1 4 5 .4

1 5 0 .3

1 5 6 .2

1 6 7 .0

1 6 9 .8

1 7 3 .3

1 8 2 .5

1 9 5 .8

T ru c k in g , e x c e p t l o c a l ' ........................................................

4213

111 .1

1 1 6 .9

1 2 3 .4

1 2 6 .6

1 2 9 .5

1 2 5 .4

1 3 0 .9

1 3 2 .4

1 2 9 .9

1 3 1 .6

1 3 1 .2

u n ite a s ta te s p o s ta l s e r v ic e - ...........................................

431

1 0 4 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 07.1

1 0 6 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 0 4 .7

1 0 8 .3

1 0 9 .8

1 1 0 .9

1 1 3 .6

9 2 .9

9 2 .5

9 6 .9

1 0 0 .2

1 0 5 .7

1 0 8 .6

111 .1

1 1 1 .6

1 0 8 .4

1 09 .1

1 1 0 .7

4 81

1 1 3 .3

1 1 9 .8

1 2 7 .7

1 3 5 .5

1 4 2 .2

1 48 .1

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .9

1 70 .1

1 8 6 .3

2 0 1 .3

483

1 0 4 .9

106 .1

1 0 8 .3

1 0 6 .7

110 .1

1 0 9 .6

1 0 5 .8

1 0 1 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 0 8 .4

1 0 9 .9

484

9 2 .6

8 7 .6

8 8 .5

8 5 .3

8 3 .4

8 4 .5

8 1 .9

8 4 .7

86 1

8 5 .0

87 6

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

T ra n sp o rta tio n

A ir tr a n s p o rta tio n ..................................................................... 4 5 1 2 ,1 3 ,2 2 (p ts .)

utilities
R a d io a n d te le v is io n b ro a d c a s tin g .................................

E le c tric u tilitie s ..........................................................................

4 9 1 ,3 (p ts .)

1 10.1

1 1 3 .4

1 1 5 .2

2 4.1

5 0 .5

8 0 .8

1 1 6 .8

1 5 0 .0

1 5 9 .6

1 6 2 .0

1 6 9 .6

G a s u tilitie s ................................................................................

4 9 2 ,3 (p ts .)

1 0 5 .8

1 0 9 .6

1 11.1

1 2 1 .8

1 2 5 .6

1 37.1

1 4 5 .9

1 5 8 .6

1 4 4 .4

1 4 7 .2

1 6 0 .6

T ra d e
L u m b e r a n d o th e r b u ild in g m a te ria ls d e a le rs ............

521

1 0 4 .3

1 0 2 .3

1 0 6 .4

1 1 1 .4

1 1 8 .9

1 1 7 .8

1 2 1 .6

1 2 1 .8

1 3 4 .2

1 4 3 .0

1 4 4 .2

P a in t, g la s s , a n d w a llp a p e r s to re s ..................................

523

1 0 6 .8

1 0 0 .4

1 0 7 .6

1 1 4 .2

1 2 7 .8

1 3 0 .9

1 3 3 .5

1 3 4 .8

1 6 3 .5

165 .1

1 7 0 .1

H a r d w a r e s to r e s ......................................................................

525

1 1 5 .3

1 0 8 .7

1 1 5 .2

1 1 3 .9

1 2 1 .2

1 1 5 .6

1 1 9 .5

1 1 9 .0

1 3 7 .9

1 4 7 .6

1 4 5 .7

R e ta il n u rs e rie s , la w n a n d g a rd e n s u p p ly s to re s ...

526

8 4 .7

8 9 .3

1 0 1 .2

107 .1

1 1 7 .0

1 1 7 .4

1 3 6 .4

1 2 7 .5

1 3 3 .7

1 5 0 .4

1 5 4 .5
1 6 0 .4

D e p a rtm e n t s to r e s ..................................................................

531

9 6 .8

1 0 2 .0

1 0 5 .4

1 1 0 .4

1 1 3 .5

1 16 .1

1 2 3 .8

1 29 .1

1 3 5 .8

1 4 6 .0

V a r ie ty s to re s .............................................................................

533

1 5 4 .6

1 5 9 .0

1 7 3 .9

1 9 1 .9

1 9 7 .9

2 1 2 .4

2 4 0 .4

2 6 0 .1

2 7 1 .2

3 1 5 .0

3 3 0 .9

M is c e lla n e o u s g e n e ra l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s .............

539

1 1 8 .6

1 2 4 .8

1 4 0 .4

1 6 4 .3

1 6 4 .8

1 6 7 .4

1 6 7 .7

1 7 0 .4

1 8 5 .9

1 9 9 .6

2 2 4 .3

G r o c e ry s to r e s ..........................................................................

541

9 6 .6

9 6 .3

9 6 .5

9 6 .0

9 5 .4

9 3 .9

9 2.1

9 1 .7

9 2 .2

9 5 .3

9 6 .1

M e a t a n d fish (s e a fo o d ) m a rk e ts .....................................

542

9 8 .9

9 0 .8

9 9 .2

9 7 .7

9 5 .7

9 4 .4

8 6 .4

9 0 .8

9 5 .7

9 7 .4

1 1 0 .0

R e ta il b a k e r ie s ..........................................................................

546

9 1 .2

9 6 .7

9 6 .5

8 6 .5

8 5 .3

8 3 .0

7 5 .9

6 7 .6

68.1

8 3 .1

8 8 .4

N e w a n d u s e d c a r d e a le r s ..................................................

551

1 0 6 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 0 7 .4

1 0 8 .6

1 0 9 .7

108 .1

1 09.1

1 0 8 .8

1 0 8 .7

1 1 1 .6

1 1 2 .5

A u to a n d h o m e s u p p ly s to re s ...........................................

553

1 0 3 .7

1 0 0 .2

1 0 1 .6

1 0 0 .8

1 0 5 .3

109 .1

1 0 8 .2

1 08 .1

1 13 .1

1 1 5 .5

1 1 9 .3

G a s o lin e s e rv ic e s ta tio n s ...................................................

554

1 0 3 .0

1 0 4 .8

1 1 0 .2

1 1 5 .9

121 .1

1 2 7 .2

1 26.1

1 26 .1

1 3 3 .9

1 4 1 .7

1 3 9 .0

M e n 's a n d b o y ’s w e a r s to re s .............................................

561

1 1 5 .6

1 2 1 .9

1 2 2 .3

1 1 9 .5

1 2 1 .7

1 2 1 .4

1 2 9 .8

1 3 6 .3

1 4 5 .2

1 5 4 .5

1 6 5 .0

W o m e n ’s c lo th in g s to re s .....................................................

562

1 0 6 .6

1 1 1 .2

1 2 3 .6

1 3 0 .0

1 3 0 .4

1 3 9 .9

1 5 4 .2

1 5 7 .3

1 7 6 .0

1 9 0 .2

2 0 5 .7

F a m ily c lo th in g s to re s ...........................................................

565

1 0 7 .8

1 1 1 .5

1 1 8 .6

1 2 1 .5

1 2 7 .7

1 4 1 .8

1 4 6 .9

1 5 0 .2

1 53 .1

1 5 5 .9

1 6 0 .4

S h o e s to r e s ................................................................................

566

1 0 7 .9

1 0 7 .8

1 1 5 .5

1 1 7 .3

1 3 0 .7

1 3 9 .2

1 5 1 .9

1 4 8 .4

1 4 5 .0

1 5 2 .9

1 6 0 .2

F u rn itu re a n d h o m e fu rn is h in g s s to re s ..........................

571

1 0 4 .6

1 0 5 .4

1 1 3 .9

1 1 3 .3

1 1 4 .7

1 1 7 .4

1 2 3 .6

1 2 4 .2

1 2 7 .3

1 3 4 .5

1 4 1 .1

H o u s e h o ld a p p lia n c e s to re s ..............................................

572

1 0 4 .6

1 0 7 .2

116 .1

1 1 8 .7

1 2 2 .4

1 3 9 .6

1 4 2 .2

1 5 5 .2

1 8 4 .2

1 8 6 .4

2 0 9 .3

R a d io , te le v is io n , c o m p u te r, a n d m u sic s to re s ........

573

1 2 0 .8

1 2 9 .3

1 3 9 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 7 8 .2

1 98.1

2 0 6 .6

2 1 6 .8

2 5 8 .3

3 0 9 .1

3 5 9 .4

E a tin g a n d d rin k in g p la c e s .................................................

581

1 0 4 .5

1 0 3 .8

1 0 3 .4

1 0 3 .8

102 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 0 .6

1 0 1 .6

1 0 2 .0

1 0 4 .0

1 0 7 .3

D ru g a n d p ro p rie ta ry s to re s ...............................................

591

1 0 6 .3

1 0 8 .0

1 0 7 .6

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .9

1 11.1

1 1 3 .9

1 1 9 .8

1 2 5 .7

1 2 9 .8

1 3 6 .9

L iq u o r s to re s .............................................................................

592

1 0 5 .9

1 0 6 .9

1 0 9 .6

1 0 1 .8

1 00 .1

1 0 4 .7

1 1 3 .8

1 0 9 .9

1 1 6 .5

1 1 4 .5

1 2 7 .7

U s e d m e rc h a n d is e s to re s ...................................................

593

1 0 3 .0

1 0 2 .3

1 1 5 .7

1 1 6 .7

1 1 9 .5

1 2 0 .6

1 3 2 .6

1 4 0 .3

1 6 3 .6

1 8 3 .2

2 1 6 .7

M is c e lla n e o u s s h o p p in g g o o d s s to re s .........................

594

1 0 7 .4

1 0 9 .3

1 0 7 .9

1 1 1 .7

1 1 7 .3

1 2 3 .2

1 2 5 .3

1 2 9 .4

1 3 8 .7

1 4 3 .7

1 5 0 .6

N o n s to re re ta ile r s ...................................................................

596

1 11 .1

1 1 2 .5

1 2 6 .5

1 3 2 .2

1 4 9 .0

1 5 2 .5

1 7 3 .5

1 8 6 .8

2 0 8 .3

2 2 0 .6

2 6 3 .2

F u e l d e a le r s ...............................................................................

598

8 4 .6

8 5 .3

8 4 .3

9 1 .9

9 9 .0

1 1 1 .4

1 1 2 .5

1 09 .1

1 0 5 .8

1 1 5 .2

1 1 7 .3

R e ta il s to re s , n .e .c ..................................................................

599

1 1 4 .5

1 0 4 .0

1 1 2 .5

1 18.1

1 2 5 .8

1 2 7 .0

1 4 0 .2

1 4 7 .8

1 5 7 .4

1 6 2 .5

1 6 8 .1

C o m m e rc ia l b a n k s ..................................................................

602

1 0 7 .7

1 10 .1

1 1 1 .0

1 1 8 .5

1 2 1 .7

1 2 6 .4

1 2 9 .7

1 3 3 .0

1 3 2 .6

1 3 5 .9

1 4 3 .2

H o te ls a n d m o te ls ...................................................................

7 01

9 6 .2

9 9 .3

1 0 8 .0

1 0 6 .5

1 0 9 .9

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .0

1 0 8 .2

1 0 8 .2

1 0 9 .9

1 1 4 .1

L a u n d ry , c le a n in g , a n d g a rm e n t s e rv ic e s ..................

7 21

1 0 2 .3

9 9 .9

9 9 .3

9 9 .9

1 0 5 .0

1 0 6 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 0 9 .0

1 1 6 .0

1 2 0 .8

1 2 3 .6

P h o to g ra p h ic s tu d io s , p o rtra it..........................................

722

9 8 .2

92.1

9 5 .8

1 0 1 .8

1 0 8 .3

1 1 6 .2

1 1 0 .7

1 14 .1

1 2 1 .6

1 0 7 .7

1 1 2 .0

B e a u ty s h o p s .............................................................................

723

9 7 .5

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .9

9 7 .0

1 01.1

1 0 4 .8

1 0 7 .6

1 0 8 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 3 .4

1 1 4 .5

1 2 9 .9

F in a n c e a n d s e rv ic e s

B a r b e r s h o p s .............................................................................

724

1 0 0 .7

9 4 .9

1 1 3 .2

1 2 1 .9

1 1 8 .8

1 1 5 .7

1 2 8 .8

1 5 0 .4

1 5 7 .4

1 3 2 .8

F u n e r a l s e rv ic e s a n d c re m a to rie s ..................................

726

9 1 .2

8 9 .9

1 0 3 .8

9 8 .7

1 0 4 .3

1 0 0 .2

9 7 .6

1 0 1 .9

1 0 4 .2

1 0 0 .2

9 3 .9

A u to m o tiv e r e p a ir s h o p s .....................................................

753

1 0 7 .9

1 00.1

105 .1

1 0 5 .7

1 1 4 .3

1 2 1 .6

1 16.1

1 1 7 .2

1 2 4 .9

1 2 6 .4

1 2 8 .5

M o tio n p ic tu re th e a te rs ........................................................

783

118 .1

1 1 8 .2

1 1 4 .8

1 1 3 .8

1 1 0 .4

1 0 5 .0

1 04.1

1 0 3 .4

106 .1

1 0 8 .7

1 1 2 .3

H e te rs to o u tp u t p e r e m p lo y e e .

n .e .c . = n o t e ls e w h e re c la s sifie d

■ H e te rs to o u tp u t p e r run-tim e e q u iv a le n t e m p lo y e e y e a r on tis ca i oa sis .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

93

Current Labor Statistics:

International Comparison

4 7 . U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te s, a p p r o x im a t in g U.S. c o n c e p t s , in n in e c o u n tr ie s , q u a rte rly d a t a
s e a s o n a lly a d ju s t e d
A n n u a l a ve rag e
C o u n try

2001

2001

2002

I

II

2002
III

IV

1

II

III

IV

U n ite d S ta te s .........

4 .7

5 .8

4 .2

4 .4

4 .8

5 .6

5 .6

5 .9

5 .8

5 .9

C a n a d a ......................

6 .4

7 .0

6 .2

6 .3

6 .5

6 .8

7.1

6 .9

7 .0

6 .9

A u s tra lia ...................

6 .7

6 .3

6 .5

6 .8

6 .8

6 .6

6 .3

6 .2

5.1

5 .4

4 .8

4 .9

5 .2

5 .5

5 .3

5 .4

5 5

5 .5

F r a n c e 1......................

8 .5

8 .8

8 .5

8 .4

8 .5

8 .6

8 .7

8 .7

8 .9

8 .9

G e r m a n y 1................

8 .0

8 .4

7 .9

8 .0

8 .0

8.1

8 .2

8 .4

8 .5

8 .6

Ita ly 2 ........................

9 .6

9.1

1 0 .0

9 .7

9 .5

9 .4

9 .2

9.1

9.1

9 .0

S w e d e n 1...................

5 .0

5 .2

5.1

5 .0

5 .0

5.1

5 .0

5 .0

5 .2

5 .4

U n ite d K in n d o m 1

5.1

5 .2

5.1

5 .0

5.1

5 .2

5.1

5 .2

5 .3

5.1

1 P re lim in a ry fo r 2 0 0 2 fo r J a p a n , F ra n c e , G e rm a n y , S w e d e n , a n d
th e U n ite d K in g d o m .

Q u a r te r ly fig u re s fo r F ra n c e a n d G e rm a n y a r e c alc u la te d

b y a p p ly in g

a n n u a l a d ju s tm e n t fa c to rs to

a n d th e r e fo r e s h o u ld

6.1

S e e "N o te s o n th e d a ta " fo r in fo rm a tio n on b re a k s in s e rie s .

For

fu rth e r qua lific a tio n s a n d historical d a ta , s e e C o m p a ra tiv e C ivilian

2 Q u a r te r ly ra te s a r e fo r th e first m o n th of th e q u a rte r.
N O TE :

6 .8

c u rre n t p u b lish ed d a ta ,

b e v ie w e d a s les s

p re c is e

in d ica to rs of

u n e m p lo y m e n t u n d e r U .S . c o n c e p ts th a n th e a n n u a l fig u re s.

94 Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

L a b o r F o rc e S tatistics, T e n C o u n trie s , 1 9 5 9 - 2 0 0 2 (B u re a u o f L a b o r
S tatistics, A p r. 1 4 , 2 0 0 3 ) , on th e In te rn e t a t

h ttp ://w w w .b ls .g o v /fls /h o m e .h tm
M o n th ly a n d q u a rte rly u n e m p lo y m e n t ra te s , u p d a te d m o n th ly , a re
a ls o on this site.

48.

A n n u a l d a ta : E m p lo y m e n t status of th e w o rk in g - a g e p o p u la tio n , a p p ro x im a tin g U.S. c o n c e p t s , 10 c o u n trie s

[Num bers in thousands]____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Em ploym ent status and country

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Civilian labor force
U n ite d S ta te s ..................................................................................

1 2 8 ,1 0 5

1 2 9 ,2 0 0

1 3 1 ,0 5 6

1 3 2 ,3 0 4

1 3 3 ,9 4 3

1 3 6 ,2 9 7

1 3 7 ,6 7 3

1 3 9 ,3 6 8

1 4 2 ,5 8 3

1 4 3 ,7 3 4

1 4 4 ,8 6 3

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

1 4 ,1 7 7

1 4 ,3 0 8

1 4 ,4 0 0

1 4 ,5 1 7

1 4,6 69

1 4 ,9 5 8

1 5 ,2 3 7

1 5 ,5 3 6

1 5 ,7 8 9

1 6 ,0 2 7

1 6 ,4 7 5

A u s tra lia ............................................................................................

8 ,5 5 7

8 ,6 1 3

8,771

8 ,9 9 5

9 ,1 1 5

9 ,2 0 4

9 ,3 3 9

9 ,4 6 6

9 ,6 7 8

9 ,8 1 7

9 ,9 6 4

J a p a n .................................................................................................

6 5 ,0 4 0

6 5 ,4 7 0

6 5 ,7 8 0

6 5 ,9 9 0

6 6 ,4 5 0

6 7 ,2 0 0

6 7 ,2 4 0

6 7 ,0 9 0

6 6 ,9 9 0

6 6 ,8 7 0

6 6 ,2 4 0

2 4 ,4 4 0

2 4 ,4 8 0

2 4 ,6 7 0

2 4 ,7 5 0

2 5 0 00

2 5 1 30

25 440

2 5 800

26 050

26 340

39 010

3 9 ,1 0 0

39 070

38 980

39 140

39 4 2 0

39 750

3 9 8nn

39 750

3 9 7 80

2 2 ,9 1 0

2 2 ,5 7 0

2 2 ,4 5 0

2 2 ,4 6 0

2 2 ,5 7 0

2 2 ,6 8 0

2 2 ,9 6 0

2 3 ,1 3 0

2 3 ,3 4 0

2 3 ,5 4 0

N e th e rla n d s ....................................................................................

6 ,9 2 0

7 ,0 2 0

7 ,1 5 0

7 ,2 0 0

7 ,3 9 0

7 ,5 3 0

7 ,6 1 0

7 ,8 3 0

8 ,1 3 0

8 ,2 9 0

_

S w e d e n .............................................................................................

4 ,5 2 0

4 ,4 4 3

4 ,4 1 8

4 ,4 6 0

4 ,4 5 9

4 ,4 1 8

4 ,4 0 2

4 ,4 3 0

4 ,4 8 9

4 ,5 3 0

4 ,5 4 2

U n ited K in g d o m .............................................................................

2 8 ,4 1 0

2 8 ,0 5 0

2 7 ,9 9 0

2 8 ,0 4 0

2 8 ,1 4 0

2 8 ,2 7 0

2 8 ,3 8 0

2 8 ,6 1 0

2 8 ,7 8 0

2 8 ,8 7 0

-

2 3 ,7 5 0

Participation rate1
U n ited S ta te s .................................................................................

6 6 .4

6 6 .3

6 6 .6

6 6 .6

6 6 .8

67.1

67.1

67.1

67.1

6 6 .8

6 6 .9

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

6 5 .9

6 5 .5

6 5 .2

6 4 .9

6 4 .7

6 5 .0

6 5 .4

6 5 .8

6 5 .9

6 6 .0

6 6 .8

A u s tra lia ........................................................................... ................

6 3 .9

6 3 .5

6 3 .9

6 4 .6

6 4.6

6 4 .3

6 4 .3

6 4 .2

6 4 .7

6 4 .7

6 4 .7

J a p a n .................................................................................................

6 3 .4

6 3 .3

63.1

6 2 .9

6 3 .0

6 3 .2

6 2 .8

6 2 .4

6 2 .0

6 1 .6

6 0 .8

5 5 .6

5 5 .4

5 5 .5

5 5 .4

556

5 5 .5

55 9

56 3

5 6 .5

5 6 .8

5 8 .2

5 7 .7

5 7 .4

57.1

57.1

5 7 .3

5 7 .7

5 7 .6

5 7 .4

57

4 7 .5

4 7 .9

4 7 .3

47.1

47.1

4 7 .2

4 7 .6

4 7 .8

48.1

4 8 .3

G e rm a n y ..........................................................................................

-

4 8 .6

N e th e rla n d s ....................................................................................

5 7 .5

5 8 .0

5 8 .6

5 8 .7

6 0 .0

6 0 .8

6 1 .0

6 2 .4

6 4 .4

6 5 .4

-

S w e d e n .............................................................................................

6 5 .7

6 4 .5

6 3 .7

64.1

6 4 .0

6 3 .3

6 2 .8

6 2 .8

6 3 .8

6 3 .7

6 3 .6

U n ited K in q d o m .............................................................................

63.1

6 2 .5

6 2 .3

6 2 .3

6 2 .3

6 2 .4

6 2 .5

6 2 .7

6 2 .8

6 2 .7

-

Em ployed
U n ited S ta te s ..................................................................................

1 1 8 ,4 9 2

1 2 0 ,2 5 9

1 2 3 ,0 6 0

1 2 4 ,9 0 0

1 2 6 ,7 0 8

1 2 9 ,5 5 8

1 3 1 ,4 6 3

1 3 3 ,4 8 8

136 ,89 1

1 3 6 ,9 3 3

1 3 6 ,4 8 5

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

1 2 ,6 7 2

1 2 ,7 7 0

1 3 ,0 2 7

13,271

1 3 ,3 8 0

1 3 ,7 0 5

1 4 ,0 6 8

1 4 ,4 5 6

1 4 ,8 2 7

1 4 ,9 9 7

1 5 ,3 2 5

A u s tra lia ............................................................................................

7 ,6 6 0

7 ,6 9 9

7 ,9 4 2

8 ,2 5 6

8 ,3 6 4

8 ,4 4 4

8 ,6 1 8

8 ,8 0 8

9 ,0 6 8

9 ,1 5 7

9 ,3 3 4

J a p a n .................................................................................................

6 3 ,6 2 0

6 3 ,8 1 0

6 3 ,8 6 0

6 3 ,8 9 0

6 4 ,2 0 0

6 4 ,9 0 0

6 4 ,4 5 0

6 3 ,9 2 0

6 3 ,7 9 0

6 3 ,4 7 0

6 2 ,6 5 0

F ra n c e ..............................................................................................

2 2 ,0 0 0

2 1 ,7 1 0

2 1 ,7 5 0

2 1 ,9 5 0

2 2 ,0 4 0

2 2 ,1 7 0

2 2 ,5 8 0

2 3 ,0 7 0

2 3 ,6 7 0

2 4 ,1 0 0

_

G e rm a n y ..........................................................................................

3 6 ,3 9 0

3 5 ,9 9 0

3 5 ,7 6 0

3 5 ,7 8 0

3 5 ,6 4 0

3 5 ,5 1 0

3 6 ,0 6 0

3 6 ,3 6 0

3 6 ,5 4 0

3 6 ,5 9 0

-

2 1 ,2 3 0

2 0 ,2 7 0

1 9 ,9 4 0

1 9,8 20

1 9,9 20

1 9 ,9 9 0

2 0 ,2 1 0

2 0 ,4 6 0

2 0 ,8 4 0

2 1 ,2 7 0

2 1 ,5 8 0

N e th e rla n d s ....................................................................................

6 ,5 5 0

6 ,5 7 0

6 ,6 6 0

6 ,7 3 0

6 ,9 5 0

7 ,1 6 0

7 ,3 1 0

7 580

7 900

8 090

S w e d e n .............................................................................................

4 ,2 6 5

4 ,0 2 8

3 ,9 9 2

4 ,0 5 6

4 ,0 1 9

3 ,9 7 3

4 ,0 3 4

4 ,1 1 7

4 ,2 2 9

4 ,3 0 3

U n ited K in g d o m .............................................................................

2 5 ,5 3 0

2 5 ,1 2 0

2 5 ,3 2 0

2 5 ,6 0 0

2 5 ,8 5 0

2 6 ,2 9 0

2 6 ,6 0 0

2 6 ,8 9 0

2 7 ,2 0 0

2 7 ,4 0 0

4 ,3 0 8
-

E m ploym ent-population ratio2
U n ite d S ta te s ..................................................................................

6 1 .5

6 1 .7

6 2 .5

6 2 .9

6 3 .2

6 3 .8

64.1

6 4 .3

6 4 .4

6 3 .7

6 2 .7

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

5 8 .9

5 8 .5

5 9 .0

5 9 .4

59.1

5 9 .7

6 0 .4

6 1 .3

62.1

6 1 .9

6 2 .4

A u s tra lia ............................................................................................

5 7 .2

5 6 .8

5 7 .8

5 9 .2

5 9 .3

5 9 .0

5 9 .3

5 9 .8

6 0 .6

6 0 .4

6 0 .6

J a p a n .................................................................................................

6 2 .0

6 1 .7

6 1 .3

6 0 .9

6 0 .9

6 1 .0

6 0 .2

5 9 .4

5 9 .0

5 8 .4

5 7 .5

50.1

49.1

49 0

49.1

49 0

49 0

49 6

50 4

51 4

51 9

5 4 .2

5 3 .2

5 2 .6

52 4

5 2 .0

51 6

52 3

52 6

52 7

52 6

4 4 .0

4 3 .0

4 2 .0

4 1 .5

4 1 .6

4 1 .6

4 1 .9

4 2 .3

4 2 .9

4 3 .6

5 4 .5

5 4 .2

5 4 .6

5 4 .9

5 6 .4

5 7 .8

58 6

60 4

62 6

63 9

44.1

S w e d e n ............................................................................................

6 2 .0

5 8 .5

5 7 .6

5 8 .3

5 7 .7

5 6 .9

5 7 .6

5 8 .4

60.1

6 0 .5

6 0 .3

U n ited K inqdom .............................................................................

5 6 .7

5 6 .0

5 6 .4

5 6 .9

5 7 .3

58.1

5 8 .6

5 9 .0

5 9 .4

5 9 .5

-

Unem ployed
U n ited S ta te s ..................................................................................

9 ,6 1 3

8 ,9 4 0

7 ,9 9 6

7 ,4 0 4

7 ,2 3 6

6 ,7 3 9

6 ,2 1 0

5 ,8 8 0

5 ,6 9 2

6,801

8 ,3 7 8

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

1 ,5 0 5

1 ,5 3 9

1 ,3 7 3

1 ,2 4 6

1 ,289

1 ,2 5 2

1 ,1 6 9

1 ,0 8 0

9 62

1,031

1 ,1 5 0

A u s tra lia ............................................................................................

897

914

829

7 39

751

760

721

658

611

661

629

J a p a n .................................................................................................

1 ,4 2 0

1 ,660

1 ,920

2 ,1 0 0

2 ,2 5 0

2 ,3 0 0

2 ,7 9 0

3 ,1 7 0

3 ,2 0 0

3 ,4 0 0

3 ,5 9 0

2 ,4 3 0

2 ,7 7 0

2 9 20

2 ,8 0 0

2 970

2 9 60

2 870

2 730

2 380

2 240

2 ,6 2 0

3 ,1 1 0

3 ,3 2 0

3 200

3 ,5 1 0

3 9 10

3 690

3 440

3 210

3 190

1 ,6 8 0

2 ,3 0 0

2 ,5 1 0

2 ,6 4 0

2 ,6 5 0

2 ,6 9 0

2 ,7 5 0

2 ,6 7 0

2 ,5 0 0

2 ,2 7 0

370

440

490

480

440

3 70

300

250

220

200

S w e d e n ............................................................................................
U n ited K ingdom .............................................................................

2 ,1 6 0

255

415

426

404

440

445

368

313

260

227

234

2 ,8 8 0

2 ,9 3 0

2 ,6 7 0

2 ,4 4 0

2 ,2 9 0

1 ,9 8 0

1 ,7 8 0

1 ,7 2 0

1 ,5 8 0

1 ,4 7 0

-

U nem ploym ent rate
U n ite d S ta te s ..................................................................................

7 .5

6 .9

6.1

5 .6

5 .4

4 .9

4 .5

4 .2

4 .0

4 .7

5 .8

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

1 0.6

1 0 .8

9 .5

8 .6

8 .8

8 .4

7 .7

7 .0

6.1

6 .4

7 .0

A u s tra lia ...........................................................................................

1 0.5

7 .0

6 .3

6 .7

6 .3

J a p a n .................................................................................................

2 .2

2 .5

2 .9

3 .2

3 .4

3 .4

4.1

4 .7

4 .8

5.1

9.9

1 1.3

11.8

11.3

11.9

11.8

1 1 .3

1 0.6

9.1

8 .5

8 .8

6 .7

8 .0

85

8 .2

9 .0

9 9

9 3

8 6

8 1

80

84

7 .3

1 0.2

11.2

11.8

11.7

11.9

1 2.0

1 1 .5

1 0 .7

9 .6

9.1

5 .3

6 .3

6 .9

6 .7

6 .0

4.9

3 .9

3 .2

2 .7

24

1 0.6

9 .4

8 .2

8 .2

8 .3

7 .7

5 .4

S w e d e n ............................................................................................

5 .6

9 .3

9 .6

9.1

9 .9

10.1

8 .4

7.1

5 .8

5 .0

5 .2

U n ited K ingdom .............................................................................

10.1

1 0.4

9 .5

8 .7

8.1

7 .0

6 .3

6 .0

5 .5

5.1

5 .2

1 L abor force a s a percent of the w orking-age population.

For further qualifications and historical d ata, see C o m p arative Civilian L a b o r Force

2 E m p lo ym en t a s a percent of th e w orkin g -ag e population.

S ta tistic s , T en Countries, 1 9 5 9 -2 0 0 1 (B ureau of Labor Statistics, Apr. 14, 2 0 0 3 ),
on th e Internet at http://w w w .bls.gov/fls/hom e.htm

N O T E : S e e notes on the d a ta for inform ation on breaks in series.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

D ash indicates da ta a re not a vailab le.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

95

Current Labor Statistics:

49.

International Comparison

Annual indexes of m anufacturing productivity an d related measures, 12 countries

[1992 =100]
Ite m a n d c o u n tr y

1960

1970

1980

1990

1991

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

O u tp u t p e r h o u r
United S tates..................................................................

-

-

117.0

121.3

135.3

142.9

C a n a d a ..............................................................................
Jap a n .................................................................................

37.8

54.9

72.9

93.4

95.3

105.8

110.8

112.4

109.7

113.5

113.1

116.0

118.4

116.1

13.8

37.5

63.2

94.4

99.0

101.7

103.3

111.0

116.1

121.0

121.2

126.9

134.1

128.1

129.2
_

129.5

133.4

134.1

Belgiu m.............................................................................

18.0

32.9

70.5

65.4

96.9

96.8

97.9

99.1

102.1

102.5

D enm ark............................................................................

2 9.9

52.7

90.4

99.1

99.4

100.8

France................................................................................

22.0

43.1

66.8

93.8

97.0

100.6

107.3

108.4
-

108.2

113.8

113.2
_

117.0
_

127.0
_

113.9

114.6

121.9

126.5

132.7

142.5

G erm any...........................................................................

29.2

52.0

77.2

96.0

98.3

101.8

109.5

112.2

113.9

119.4

120.3

120.4

127.9

128.2

Italy......................................................................................

23.6

44.3

74.2

95.8

95.9

101.4

104.9

108.0

108.1

109.9

110.0

109.9

113.0

Netherlands......................................................................

37.9

68.8

98.5

99.6

101.6

113.2

118.2

125.0

128.5

133.8

N orw ay..............................................................................

18.5
37.4

115.0
_

58.8

77.5

97.6

98.2

99.6

99.6

100.7

102.5

102.0

99.9

27.3

52.2

73.1

94.6

95.5

107.3

119.4

121.9

124.5

132.3

139.5

103.6
149.7

104.5

S w e d e n.............................................................................

158.0

160.4

United Kingdom...............................................................

30.0

43.2

54.3

89.2

93.8

103.9

107.1

104.9

103.8

105.2

107.0

111.6

118.0

119.8

120.2

122.3

127.7

_

145.6

146.3

105.3

O u tp u t
United S tates....................................................................

-

75.8

101.6

98.3

103.5

111.1

118.4

133.1

141.2

147.0

141.3

C a n a d a ...............................................................................
Jap a n .................................................................................

33.4

58.9

83.6

106.0

99.0

105.9

114.1

119.6

119.6

127.7

132.8

141.0

148.8

143.9

10.7

39.2

60.4

97.1

102.0

96.3

94.9

98.9

103.0

106.5

100.2

-

121.3

127.9

101.9

107.6

Belgiu m..............................................................................

30.7

57.6

78.2

101.0

100.7

97.0

101.4

104.2

106.6

113.8

116.4

118.0

122.2

121.7

D enm ark............................................................................

40.8

68.0

91.4

102.8

101.5

95.6

105.6

111.6

106.7

115.2

115.7

115.1

122.9

126.7

64.1

88.7

95.7

100.3

104.9

104.6

109.7

124.1

126.3

99.1

F ran ce................................................................................

31.0

99.1

99.8

41.5

70.9

85.3

99.1

102.3

92.4

95.1

95.2

92.5

95.7

115.0
97.2

118.7

G erm any............................................................................

95.8

101.7

101.8

Italy......................................................................................

23.0

48.1

84.4

99.4

99.3

96.5

102.4

107.2

105.4

108.8

110.7

110.5

113.9

N etherlands......................................................................

31.5

59.1

76.8

99.9

100.4

98.4

104.6

108.1

108.7

111.5

114.8

118.1

123.7

114.6
_

N orw ay...............................................................................

57.4

90.6

104.4

100.9

99.0

107.3

110.3

114.2

113.7

101.7

104.6

113.6

110.2

S w e d e n ..............................................................................

45.9

80.7

90.7

110.1

104.1

101.9

117.1

128.4

131.1

138.0

147.6

157.8

168.7

167.4

United Kingdom...............................................................

67.3

90.2

87.2

105.4

100.0

101.4

106.1

107.8

108.5

109.9

110.8

111.1

113.3

110.7

108.9

T o ta l h o u rs
United States....................................................................

92.1

104.4

107.5

104.8

100.4

101.4

103.6

104.0

103.6

105.4

105.2

104.4

102.8

97.1

C a n a d a ...............................................................................

88.3

107.1

114.6

113.5

103.9

100.1

103.0

106.4

109.0

112.4

117.5

121.5

125.6

123.9

J ap a n ..................................................................................

77.8

104.4

102.9

103.1

94.7

91.9

89.1

88.7

88.0

82.7

80.3

80.2

77.4

Belgiu m ...............................................................................

170.7

174.7

95.6
119.7

104.3

101.5

94.7

93.6

92.0

129.0

101.1

103.7

102.1

94.8

-

89.6
_

90.1
_

91.1
_

90.7

136.5

91.1
-

91.7

D enm ark............................................................................
France................................................................................

140.8

148.5

132.9

105.6

102.9

95.1

92.7

92.1

91.3

90.0

G erm a n y............................................................................

142.3

136.3

110.5

100.1

104.1

90.8

86.8

84.9

81.2

80.1

80.7

79.6

79.5

78.8

Italy......................................................................................

97.6

108.5

113.8

103.7

103.6

95.2

97.6

99.3

97.5

99.0

100.6

100.5

100.7

N etherlands......................................................................

170.5

156.1

111.7

101.4

100.9

96.8

92.4

91.5

90.4

91.1

91.8

92.0

92.5

99.7
_

100.8

102.1

105.0

Nonway...............................................................................

153.6

153.9

134.7

103.4

-

106.6

107.6

112.0

90.0

89.4

_

87.1

86.3

113.7

109.6

105.4

103.4

S w e d e n ...............................................................................

168.3

154.7

124.0

116.4

109.0

94.9

98.1

105.3

105.3

104.3

105.8

105.4

106.8

104.3

United Kingdom...............................................................

224.6

208 .8

160.5

118.1

106.6

97.6

99.1

102.7

104.5

104.5

103.6

99.6

96.0

92.4

C o m p e n s a tio n p e r h o u r
United S tates....................................................................

14.9

23.7

102.7

105.6

107.9

109.4

111.5

117.4

122.1

131.1

133.1

C a n a d a ...............................................................................

10.0

17.1

47.6

88.3

95.0

102.0

103.7

106.0

107.0

109.3

110.5

112.3

113.9

117.8

Jap a n ..................................................................................

4.3

16.4

58.5

90.5

96.4

102.8

104.9

108.3

109.2

112.9

115.8

115.2

114.5

115.0

109.2
_

110.9
_

114.9
_

116.6
_

118.3

121.1

125.9

5 5.6

90.8

95.6

Belgiu m..............................................................................

5.4

13.7

52.5

90.1

97.3

104.8

106.1

D enm ark............................................................................

4.6

49.6

92.7

95.9
96.4

104.6

-

102.6

_

_

France................................................................................

4.3

13.3
10.4

G erm a n y ............................................................................

8.1

20.7

53.6

89.4

111.7

117.5

122.3

124.7

126.5

129.3

133.5

137.7

1.8

5.3

30.4

87.6

91.5
94.2

106.4

Italy......................................................................................

105.7

106.8

111.3

119.0

123.0

122.2

124.6

127.8
131.0

132.6
_

40.9

90.9

106.0

110.0

112.1

112.0

112.6

116.3

120.8

126.6

N etherlands......................................................................

6.4

20.2

64.4

90.9

95.3

103.8

108.2

110.7

113.0

115.8

120.6

124.0

Nonway..............................................................................

4.7

11.8

39.0

92.3

97.5

101.5

104.4

109.2

113.6

118.7

125.7

133.0

S w e d e n..............................................................................

4.1

10.7

37.3

87.8

95.5

97.4

100.0

106.5

114.4

119.4

124.4

129.3

131.8

137.2

United Kingdom...............................................................

3.0

6.1

32.1

82.9

93.8

104.6

106.7

107.9

109.5

113.9

120.5

129.6

135.2

140.4

78.8

93.7

97.6

100.6

140.0

147.6

U n it la b o r c o s ts : National currency basis
United S tates....................................................................
C a n a d a ..............................................................................

98.5

94.8

93.5

91.9

92.8

90.2

91.7

91.4

26.4

31.1

65.2

94.6

99.6

96.4

93.6

94.3

97.5

96.2

97.7

96.8

96.1

101.5

Jap a n ..................................................................................

31.3

92.5

95.9

97.4

101.1

101.5

Belgiu m..............................................................................

30.1

4 3.8
41.7

80.3

93.0

98.1

102.3

97.9

97.6
96.4

94.0
94.7

90.5

90.2

90.8
91.4

9 0.8

93.9

D enm ark...........................................................................

15.4

25.2

54.9

93.5

96.5

103.7

96.2

96.4

103.7

99.7

102.9

105.4

101.8

101.7

-

-

93.3

95.5

85.4

89.8

France................................................................................

19.4

24.0

97.9

96.6

87.7

84.8

86.5

G erm an y............................................................................

27.8

39.8

69.4

90.3

93.1

104.5

102.0

104.7

107.4

104.4

105.2

107.4

104.4

Italy......................................................................................

7.5

11.9

41.0

91.5

98.2

104.3

101.9

103.0

110.0

111.9

111.1

113.4

106.6
115.4

61.3

96.9

99.3

101.9

97.8

91.9

88.2

113.1

_

N etherlands......................................................................

34.6

53.3

93.7

92.3

95.6

102.1

95.6

93.7

94.0

94.7

96.5

96.6

97.9

N orw ay..........................................................................

12.7

20.1

50.3

94.6

99.2

101.9

104.8

108.4

110.8

116.4

125.7

128.4

134.0

S w e d e n ..............................................................................

15.0

20.6

51.0

92.9

100.0

90.8

83.8

87.4

91.9

90.2

89.2

85.5

9.8

14.1

59.0

92.9

100.1

100.8

99.7

102.9

105.5

108.2

112.7

86.3
116.2

83.4

United Kingdom...............................................................

114.5

117.2

140.1

U n it la b o r c o sts: U .S . dollar basis
United S tates....................................................................

-

-

93.7

97.6

100.6

98.5

94.8

93.5

91.9

92.8

90.2

91.7

91.4

C a n a d a ...............................................................................

32.9

36.0

67.4

98.0

105.1

90.3

82.8

83.0

86.4

8 4.0

79.6

78.8

78.2

79.2

Jap a n ..................................................................................

11.0

15.5

51.8

83.8

91.7

115.4

125.9

131.7

109.6

97.7

92.4

101.2

100.4

78.8

93.6

Belgium ..............................................................................

19.4

27.0

88.3

89.5

92.3

95.1

94.2

105.2

98.4

81.2

79.9

77.6

66.8

67.0

Denm ark............................................................................

13.4

20.2

58.8

91.2

91.0

96.5

91.4

104.0

108.0

91.0

92.7

91.0

75.9

73.7

France................................................................................

2 1.0

103.5

101.2

79.1

75.4

63.2

62.5

10.4

2 3.0
17.1

93.4

G erm any............................................................................

59.6

87.3

87.5

98.7

98.2

114.2

111.5

94.0

93.3

91.4

76.9

76.2

Italy......................................................................................

15.0

23.3

59.0

76.8

94.1

94.1

97.5

81.6

77.9

77.9

87.9

80.9

78.8

76.9

66.4

85.3
102.1

85.5

82.1

72.1

65.7
_

103.5

102.2

94.5

96.8

93.1

95.2

83.3

Netherlands......................................................................

16.1

25.9

82.9

89.1

89.9

96.6

92.4

102.7

98.1

Norw ay...............................................................................
S w eden..............................................................................

11.1

17.5

63.3

94.0

95.0

89.2

106.4

106.6

16.9

23.1

70.2

91.3

96.3

67.8

92.3
63.2

71.3

79.8

68.8

65.3

60.8

53.0

48.2

United Kingdom...............................................................

15.6

19.1

77.7

93.9

100.1

85.6

86.4

91.9

93.2

100.4

105.7

106.4

98.3

95.5

N O T E : Data for G erm any for years before 1991 are for the former W est Germany. Data for 1991 onward are for unified Germ any. Dash indicates data not available.

96 Monthly Labor Review

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

July 2003

50.

O c c u p a t io n a l injury a n d illness ra tes b y industry,' U n ited States
In c id e n c e r a te s p e r 1 0 0 f u ll- tim e w o r k e r s 3

Industry and type of ca se
1989 1

1990

1991

1992

1993 4 1994 4 1995 4 1996 4 1997 4 1998 4 1999 4 2000 4

P R IV A T E S E C T O R 5
T o ta l c a s e s ........................................................................................................

8 .6

8 .8

8 .4

Lost w o rkd ay c a s e s ........................................................................................

4 0

4 1

3 9

8 .9
3.9

Lost w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

78 7

8 4 .0

8 6 .5

9 3 .8

A g r ic u ltu re , fo re s try , a n d fis h in g 5
T o tal c a s e s .....................................................................

10 9

11 fi
5 ,9

m ft

11 6

5 .7

5 4

.6 4

1 00.9

1 12 .2

1 0 8 .3

1 2 6 .9

Lost w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................
Lost w o rkd a y s .....................................................................................

8 .5
3 ft

8 .4

8.1

7 .4

7.1

6 .7

6 .3

6.1

3 .8

3 .6

3 .4

3 .3

3.1

3 .0

3 .0

5 .0

4 .7

4 .3

3 .9

4.1

3 .9

3 .4

3 .6

M in in g
T o ta l c a s e s .......................................................................................................
Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s ........................................................................................

6 .8

6 .3

6 .2

5 .4

5.9

4 .9

4 .4

4 .7

50

7 .4
4 .5

7 .3

4 .8

4 1

3.9

3 .9

3 .9

3 .2

3 .7

2 .9

2 .7

3 .0

1 37 .2

8 .5

1 1 9 .5

8 .3

1 29 .6

2 0 4 .7

C o n s tru c tio n
T o ta l c a s e s ........................................................................................................

14.3

14.2

12.2

11.8

1 0.6

9 .9

9 .5

8 .8

8 .6

6 7

13.0
6.1

13.1

6 8

5 ft

5 .5

5 .5

4 .9

4 .5

4 .4

4 .0

4 .2

8 .3
A 1

Lost w o rk d a y s ......................................................................................

1 43.3

1 4 7 .9

148.1

1 6 1 .9

G e n e ra l building contractors:
T o ta l c a s e s ..........................................................................................

13 9

1 3,4

12 n

12 2

6 5

64

5 ,5

5 .4

5.1

5.1

4 .4

4 .0

3 .7

3 .9

3 .7

3 .9

1 3 7 .3

1 37 .6

1 32 .0

1 4 2 .7

13 8

13.8

12 ft

6 5

6 3

6 .0

5 4

5.1

5.0

4 .8

4 .3

4 .3

4.1

3 .8

3 .7

147 1

1 4 4 .6

160.1

1 6 5 .8

5 .8

5 .0

4 .8

4 .7

4.1

4 .4

4 .3

5 .5

5 .3

4 .9

4 .8

4 .7

4 .6

4 .5

Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s ...............................................................................

Lost w o rk d a y c a s e s .........................................................................................
Lost w o rk d a y s .................................................................................................
H e a v y constructio n, e xcep t buildinq:
T otal c a s e s ..........................................................................
Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s .........................................................................................
Lost w o rk d a y s .............................................................................
S p ec ial tra d e s contractors:
T o ta l c a s e s .............................................................................................

14 6

14 7

13 5

13 ft

12 ft

Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s .........................................................................................

6.9

6 .9

6 .3

6.1

5 .8

Lost w o rkd a y s ...................................................................................................

1 44.9

153.1

1 5 1 .3

1 6 8 .3

M a n u fa c tu rin g
T o ta l c a s e s .................................................................................

13 1

13 ?

12 7

12 5

12 1

Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s .........................................................................................

5 .8

5 8

5 ,6

5 4

5 .3

Lost w o rk d a y s ...................................................................................................

1 13.0

1 2 0 .7

1 21 .5

1 2 4 .6

14 1

142

13 ft

13 4

13 1

6 0

6 0

5 .7

5 5

5 .4

5 .7

5 .6

5.1

5.1

5 .0

4 .8

1 16 .5

1 2 3 .3

1 22 .9

1 2 6 .7

16 3
7 .6

7 .7

7 .0

6 .8

6 .5

6 .8

6 .7

6.1

6 .5

7 .0
-

6 .4

5 .4

5 .9

5 .9

-

5 .8
_

5 .7

-

D u ra b le goods:
T o ta l c a s e s .........................................................................................
Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s .........................................................................................
Lost w o rk d a y s ..................................................................................................
L u m b e r a n d w o o d products:
T o ta l c a s e s ..........................................................................................

184

18 1

16 ft

Lost w orkd a y c a s e s .....................................................................................

9 .4

88

83

7 .6

Lost w o rk d a y s ...............................................................................................

1 77 .5

1 72 .5

1 72 .0

1 6 5 .8
14 ft

Furniture a n d fixtures:
T o ta l c a s e s ..............................................................................................

16 1

16.9

15 9

Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s .....................................................................................

7 .2

7 .8

7 .2

6 .6

Lost w o rk d a y s ................................................................................................

-

-

1 2 8 .4

S to n e , clav, a n d q lass products:
T o ta l c a s e s ....................................................................................................

15.5

1 5.4

14.8

1 3.6

1 3.8

13.2

1 2.3

1 2 .4

1 1.8

1 1 .8

1 0.7

1 0 .4

Lost w orkd a y c a s e s .....................................................................................

7 .4

7 .3

6 .8

6.1

6 .0

5 .7

1 49 .8

1 6 0 .5

1 56 .0

1 5 2 .2

6 .5
-

5 .7

Lost w o rkd a y s ................................................................................................

6 .3
-

6 .0
-

5 .4
_

5 .5
_

P rim ary m e tal industries:
T o ta l c a s e s ....................................................................................................

18.7

1 9.0

-

-

-

-

17.7

1 7.5

17.0

16.8

1 6 .5

15.0

1 5.0

14.0

12.9

1 2 .6

Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s .....................................................................................

8.1

8.1

7 .4

7.1

7 .3

7 .2

7 .2

Lost w o rk d a y s ................................................................................................

1 6 8 .3

1 8 0 .2

169.1

1 7 5 .5

-

-

-

6 .8
-

7.2
-

7 .0
-

6 .3
_

6 .3
_

F a b ric a te d m e tal products:
T o tal c a s e s ....................................................................................................

18.5

1 8.7

17.4

1 6.8

16.2

1 6.4

1 5.8

1 4.4

14.2

13.9

1 2.6

1 1 .9

Lost w orkd a y c a s e s .....................................................................................

7 .9

7 .9

7.1

6 .6

1 47 .6

1 5 5 .7

1 46 .6

1 4 4 .0

6 .7
-

6 .9
-

6 .2
-

6 .4

Lost w o rkd a y s ................................................................................................

6 .7
-

6 .5
_

6 .0
_

5 .5
-

-

Industrial m a ch in e ry and equipm ent:
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

12.1

12.0

11.2

11.1

11.1

11.6

1 1.2

9 .9

10.0

9 .5

8 .5

8 .2

Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s .....................................................................................

4 .8

4 .7

4 .4

4 .2

4 .2

4 .4

4 .4

4 .0

Lost w o rk d a y s ................................................................................................

8 6 .8

8 8 .9

8 6 .6

8 7 .7

-

-

-

4.1
-

4 .0
-

3 .7
-

3 .6
-

Electronic a n d o th e r ele ctrical equipm ent:
T o ta l c a s e s ....................................................................................................

9.1

9.1

-

8 .4

8 .3

8 .3

7 .6

6 .8

6.6

5 .9

5 .7

5 .7

Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s .....................................................................................

3 .9

3 .8

3 .7

3 .6

3 .5

7 7 .5

7 9 .4

8 3 .0

8 1 .2

-

3 .6
-

3 .3

Lost w o rk d a y s ................................................................................................

-

3.1
-

3.1
-

2 .8
-

2 .8
_

2 .9
_

Tran sp o rtatio n equipm ent:
T o ta l c a s e s ....................................................................................................

17.7

17.8

1 8.3

1 8 .7

1 8.5

19.6

18.6

1 6 .3

15.4

1 4.6

13.7

1 3 .7

Lost w orkd a y c a s e s .....................................................................................

6 .8

6 .9

7 .0

7.1

7.1

7 .8

7.9

7 .0

Lost w o rk d a y s ................................................................................................

1 38 .6

1 5 3 .7

166.1

1 86 .6

-

6.6
-

6 .6
-

6 .4
-

6 .3
_

8.6

-

-

-

In strum ents a n d re la ted products:
T o ta l c a s e s ....................................................................................................

5 .6

5 .9

6 .0

5 .9

5 .6

5 .9

5 .3

5.1

4 .8

4 .0

4 .0

4 .5

Lost w o rkd a y c a s e s .....................................................................................

2 .5

2 .7

2 .7

2 .7

2 .5

2 .7

2 .4

2 .3

Lost w o rkd a y s ................................................................................................

5 5 .4

5 7 .8

6 4 .4

6 5 .3

-

-

-

-

2 .3
-

1.9
-

1.8
-

2 .2
_

M iscellaneous m anufacturinq industries:
Total c a s e s .....................................................................................................

11.1

11.3

1 1.3

1 0.7

1 0.0

9 .9

9.1

9 .5

8.9

8.1

8 .4

7 .2

Lost w orkday c a s e s .....................................................................................

5.1

5.1

5.1

5 .0

4 .6

4 .5

4 .3

4 .4

4 .2

3 .9

4 .0

3 .6

Lost w o rkd ays................................................................................................

9 7 .6

113.1

1 04 .0

1 0 8 .2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

See footnotes at end of table.


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

97

C u r r e n t L ab or S t a t i s t i c s :

50.

Injury a n d I l l n e s s

C o n tin u ed — O c c u p a tio n a l injury a n d illness rates by industry,1 United States
In c id e n c e r a te s p e r 1 0 0 w o r k e r s 3

industry and type of case

1989

1

1990

1991

1992

Nondurable goods:
Total c a s e s .....................................................................................
Lost workday cases.........................................................................
Lost workdays..................................................................................
Food and kindred products:
Total c a s e s ...................................................................................
Lost workday cases......................................................................
Lost workdays...............................................................................

9 .3

9 .9

9 .9

1 7 4 .7

2 0 2 .6

2 0 7 .2

Textile mill products:
Total c a s e s ...................................................................................
Lost workday cases......................................................................
Lost workdays...............................................................................
Apparel and other textile products:
Total c a s e s ...................................................................................
Lost workday cases......................................................................
Lost workdays...............................................................................
Paper and allied products:
Total c a s e s ...................................................................................
Lost workday cases......................................................................
Lost workdays...............................................................................
Printinq and publishinq:
Total c a s e s ...................................................................................
Lost workday cases......................................................................
Lost workdays...............................................................................
Chemicals and allied products:
Total c a s e s ...................................................................................
Lost workday cases......................................................................
Lost workdays................................................................................
Petroleum and coal products:
Total c a s e s ...................................................................................
Lost workday cases......................................................................
Lost workdays................................................................................
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products:
Total c a s e s ...................................................................................
Lost workday cases......................................................................
Lost workdays..............................................................................
Leather and leather products:
Total c a s e s ...................................................................................
Lost workday cases......................................................................
Lost workdays..............................................................................

1998 4

1999

4

2000 4

11.6

11.7

11.5

11.3

10.7

10.5

9 .9

9.2

8.8

8.2

7 .8

5.5

5 .6

5 .5

5.3

5.0

5.1

4 .6

4 .4

4 .3

4 .2

1 07 .8

1 16 .9

119 .7

121 .8

-

-

4 .9

-

-

-

-

-

-

18.8

17.6

17.1

16.3

1 5.0

14.5

13.6

1 2.7

1 2.4

9.5

8.9

9.2

8 .7

8 .0

8 .0

7 .5

7.3

7 .3

2 1 1 .9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

18.5

Tobacco products:
Total c a s e s ...................................................................................
Lost workday cases......................................................................
Lost workdays...............................................................................

1993 4 1994 4 19954 1996 4 1997 4

2 0 .0

19.5

-

8 .7

7 .7

6 .4

6.0

5.8

5 .3

5.6

6 .7

5.9

6 .4

5.5

6.2

3 .4

3.2

2 .8

2 .4

2 .3

2 .4

2 .6

2 .7

3 .4

2 .2

3.1

6 4 .2

6 2 .3

5 2 .0

4 2 .9

-

-

-

2 .8

-

-

-

-

-

10.3

9 .6

10.1

9 .9

9.7

8.7

8.2

7 .8

6.7

7 .4

6 .4

6 .0

4.2

4 .0

4 .4

4.2

4.1

4 .0

4.1

3 .6

3.1

3 .4

3.2

3.2

8 1 .4

85.1

8 8 .3

87.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8.6

8 .8

9.2

9 .5

9 .0

8.9

8.2

7 .4

7.0

6.2

5.8

6.1

3.8

3 .9

4 .2

4 .0

3 .8

3.9

3 .6

3 .3

3.1

2 .6

2 .8

3 .0

8 0 .5

92.1

9 9 .9

1 04 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12.7

12.1

11.2

11.0

9 .9

9 .6

8 .5

7 .9

7.3

7.1

7 .0

6 .5

5.8

5 .5

5 .0

5.0

4 .6

4 .5

4.2

3 .8

3.7

3 .7

3 .7

3 .4

1 32 .9

1 24.8

1 22.7

1 25.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 .9

6 .9

6 .7

7.3

6.9

6.7

6 .4

6 .0

5.7

5 .4

5.0

5.1

3 .3

3 .3

3 .2

3.2

3.1

3.0

3 .0

2 .8

2 .7

2 .8

2 .6

2 .6

6 3 .8

6 9 .8

7 4 .5

7 4 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7 .0

6 .5

6 .4

6.0

5.9

5.7

5.5

4 .8

4 .8

4.2

4 .4

4 .2

3.2

3.1

3.1

2 .8

2.7

2 .8

2 .7

2 .4

2.1

2 .3

2 .2

6 1 .6

6 2 .4

6 4 .2

-

-

-

-

2 .3

6 3 .4

-

-

-

-

6 .6

6.6

6 .2

5 .9

5.2

4.7

4 .8

4 .6

4 .3

3.9

4.1

3 .7

3 .3

3.1

2 .9

2 .8

2 .5

2 .3

2 .4

2 .5

2.2

1.8

1.8

1.9

68.1

7 7 .3

6 8 .2

71.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16.2

16.2

15.1

14.5

13.9

14.0

12.9

1 2.3

11.9

11.2

10.1

10.7

8 .0

7 .8

7.2

6.8

6 .5

6.7

6 .5

6 .3

5.8

5.8

5.5

5 .8

1 47 .2

1 51 .3

1 50 .9

1 53 .3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12.1

12.1

12.1

12.0

1 1.4

10.7

10.6

9.8

1 0.3

9 .0

6 .5

5 .9

5 .9

5 .4

5.5

5.3

4 .8

4 .5

4 .3

4 .5

5.0

4 .3

1 3 0 .4

1 3.6

1 52 .3

1 40 .8

1 2.5

1 28 .5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Transportation and public utilities

Total c a s e s .....................................................................................
Lost workday cases.........................................................................
Lost workdays..................................................................................

9.1

9 .5

9.3

9.1

8 .7

8.2

7 .3

7 .3

-

5.3

5 .5

5 .4

5.1

5 .4

5.5

5.2

5.1

4 .8

4 .3

4 .4

4 .3

1 2 1 .5

134.1

1 40 .0

1 44 .0

-

9.2

9 .6

9 .3

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

W holesale and retail trade

Total c a s e s .....................................................................................
Lost workday cases.........................................................................
Lost workdays.................................................................................
Wholesale trade:
Total c a s e s .....................................................................................
Lost workday cases.........................................................................
Lost workdays.................................................................................
Retail trade:
Total c a s e s .....................................................................................
Lost workday cases.........................................................................
Lost workdays.................................................................................

8.4

8.1

7.9

7 .5

6 .8

6.7

6 .5

6.1

3 .6

3 .5

3 .4

3 .5

3 .4

3 .4

3.2

2 .9

3.0

2 .8

2.7

6 3 .5

6 5 .6

7 2 .0

80.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 .8

8.0

7 .9

7 .6

7.7

7 .4

7.2

7.6

7.8

7.7

7 .5

6 .6

6.5

6 .5

6.3

4 .0

3.7

3 .7

3 .6

3 .7

3.8

3 .6

3 .4

3.2

3.3

3.3

-

7 1 .9

7 1 .5

79.2

8 2 .4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8.1

8.1

7 .7

8.7

8.2

7.9

7.5

6 .9

6.8

6.5

6.1

3 .4

3 .4

3 .3

3 .4

3.3

3 .3

3 .0

2 .8

2 .9

2 .7

2 .5

6 0 .0

63.2

69.1

79.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

2 .0

2 .4

2 .4

2 .9

2 .9

2 .7

2 .6

2 .4

2 .2

.7

1.8

1.9

.9

1.1

1.1

1.2

1.2

1.1

1.0

.9

.9

.5

.8

.8

17.6

2 7 .3

24.1

3 2 .9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Finance, insurance, and real estate

Total c a s e s .....................................................................................
Lost workday cases.........................................................................
Lost workdays..................................................................................
Services

Total c a s e s .....................................................................................
Lost workday cases.........................................................................
Lost workdays..................................................................................

7.1

6.7

6.5

6 .4

6 .0

5.6

5.2

4 .9

4 .9

2 .7

2 .8

2 .8

3.0

2 .8

2 .8

2 .8

2 .6

2 .5

2 .4

2.2

2 .2

5 1 .2

5 .5

5 6 .4

6 .0

6 0 .0

6 8 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 D a ta for 1 9 8 9 a n d s u b sequent years are based on the S ta n d ard Industrial C lass­

6.2

N = num ber of injuries and illnesses or lost workdays;

ification M a n u a l, 1 9 8 7 Edition. F or this reason, they a re not strictly com parable with data

EH = total hours w orked by all em ployees during the c alen d ar year; and

for th e y e a rs 1 9 8 5 - 8 8 , w hich w ere based on the S ta n d ard Industrial Classification

2 0 0 ,0 0 0 = b ase for 1 00 full-tim e equivalent w orkers (workin g 4 0 hours per w eek, 50

M a n u a l, 1 97 2 Edition, 1 9 7 7 S upplem ent.

w eeks per year).

2 B eginning with th e 1 9 9 2 survey, the annual survey m easures only nonfatal injuries and

4 Beginning with th e 1 99 3 survey, lost workday estim ates will not be g en erated . As of

illn esses, w hile past surveys covered both fatal and nonfatal incidents. T o better address

199 2, BLS began generating percent distributions and the m edian num ber of d ays a w ay

fatalities, a basic e le m e n t of w orkplace safety, BLS im plem ented th e C ensus of Fatal

from w ork by industry and for groups of w orkers sustaining sim ilar w ork disabilities.

O ccupational Injuries.

5 Excludes farm s with fe w er than 11 em ployees since 197 6.

3 T h e incidence rates re present the num ber of injuries and illnesses or lost w orkdays per
100

full-tim e

w o rkers

and

w ere

calculated

98 Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

as

(N /E H )

July 2003

X

2 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,

w here:

Dash indicates data not available.


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

51. F a ta l o c c u p a t io n a l in ju ries b y e v e n t o r e x p o s u r e , 1996-2001
Fatalities
E ve n t o r e x p o s u re 1

1996-2000

20002

A v e ra g e

N um b er

2001 3
N u m b er

P e rce n t

6 ,0 9 4

5 920

5 900

Transportation incidents.................................................

2 ,6 0 8

2 ,5 7 3

2 ,5 1 7

43

H ig h w a y in c id e n t...................................................................................................

1 ,4 0 8

1 ,3 6 5

1 ,4 0 4

24

C ollision b e tw e e n v eh ic le s , m o b ile e q u ip m e n t...................................

685

696

723

12

117

136

142

2

247

243

256

4

151

154

137

2

V e h ic le stru c k s ta tio n ary o b je c t o r e q u ip m e n t....................................

289

279

295

5

N oncollision in cid e n t.......................................................................................

372

356

339

6

J a c k k n ife d o r o v e rtu rn e d — no collisio n..............................................

298

304

273

5
5

M o v in g in o p p o s ite d irectio n s, o n c o m in g ..........................................

N o n h ig h w a y (farm , industrial p re m is e s ) in cid e n t.................................

100

378

399

324

O v e rtu rn e d ...........................................................................................................

212

213

157

3

A irc ra ft.......................................................................................................................

263

280

247

4

W o rk e r struck by a v e h ic le ..............................................................................

376

370

383

6

W a te r v e h ic le in cid e n t.......................................................................................

105

84

90

2

R a ilw a y ......................................................................................................................

71

71

62

1

Assaults and violent acts................................................

1 ,0 1 5

930

902

15

H o m ic id e s ................................................................................................................

766

677

639

11

S h o o tin g ...............................................................................................................

617

533

505

9

S ta b b in g ...............................................................................................................

68

66

58

1

O th e r, including b o m b in g ............................................................................

80

78

76

1

S elf-in flic te d in ju rie s .............................................................................................

216

2 21

228

4

Contact with objects and equipment..................................

16

1 ,0 0 5

1 ,0 0 6

962

S tru c k by o b je c t....................................................................................................

567

571

553

9

S tru c k by falling o b je c t...................................................................................

364

357

343

6

S tru c k by flying o b je c t....................................................................................

57

61

60

1

C a u g h t in or c o m p re s s e d by e q u ip m e n t or o b je c ts .............................

293

294

266

5

C a u g h t in running e q u ip m e n t or m a c h in e ry ........................................

157

157

144

2

128

123

122

2

714

734

808

14

636

659

698

12

Falls............................................................................
F a ll from la d d e r..................................................................................................

106

110

122

2

F a ll fro m ro o f......................................................................................................

153

150

159

3
2

F a ll fro m scaffo ld , s ta g in g ............................................................................

90

85

91

Fall on s a m e le v e l................................................................................................

55

56

84

1

Exposure to harmful substances or environments...............

535

4 81

499

8

C o n ta c t w ith e le c tric c u rre n t............................................................................

290

256

285

5

C o n ta c t w ith o v e rh e a d p o w e r lin e s ..........................................................

132

128

124

2

35

C o n ta c t w ith te m p e ra tu re e x tre m e s ............................................................

O x y g e n d e fic ie n c y ................................................................................................

Other events or exposures4.............................................
1 B ased

on th e

1992

bls

O c c u p a tio n a l Injury a n d

Illness

29
100

96

1
2

57

48

49

1

92

94

83

73

75

59

1
1

196

177

188

3

20

19

24

3 T o ta l e x c lu d e s 2 ,8 8 6 w o rk -re la te d fa ta litie s resu ltin g from
e v e n ts o f S e p te m b e r 11.

C la ss ifica tio n S tru c tu re s.
2 T h e BLS n e w s r e le a s e issued A u g . 1 4 , 2 0 0 1 , re p o rte d a total
o f 5 ,9 1 5 fa ta l w o rk injuries fo r c a le n d a r y e a r 2 0 0 0 .

40
112

S in c e th e n ,

4 In clu d e s th e c a te g o ry "B odily re a c tio n a n d e x e rtio n ."
NOTE:

T o ta ls

fo r

m a jo r

c a te g o rie s

m ay

in clu d e

sub­

a n ad d itio n al five jo b -re la te d fa ta litie s w e re iden tified , bringing

c a te g o rie s not s h o w n s e p a ra te ly .

P e rc e n ta g e s m a y n o t a d d

th e total jo b -re la te d fa ta lity c o u n t for 2 0 0 0 to 5 ,9 2 0 .

to to tals b e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g . D a s h in d ica te s les s th a n 0 .5
p e rce n t.

Monthly Labor Review

July 2003

99

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