View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

January 2003

U.S. Department of Labor

Bureau o f Labor Statistics

C hanges in legislation in 2002 for

State labor
Workers' compensation
Unemployment insurance


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

U.S. Department of Labor
Elaine L. Chao, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Kathleen P. Utgoff, Commissioner
The Monthly Labor Review ( usps 987-800) is published
monthly by the Bureau o f Labor Statistics o f the U.S.
Department o f Labor. The Review welcomes articles on the
labor force, labor-m anagem ent relations, bu siness
con d ition s, industry productivity, com pensation,
occupational safety and health, demographic trends, and
other economic developments. Papers should be factual
and analytical, not polemical in tone. Potential articles, as
well as communications on editorial matters, should be
submitted to:
Editor-in-Chief
Monthly Labor Review
Bureau o f Labor Statistics
Washington, dc 20212
Telephone: (202) 691-5900
E-mail: mlr@bls.gov
Inquiries on subscriptions and circulation, including address
changes, should be sent to: Superintendent of Documents
Government Printing O ffice W ashington, dc 20402
Telephone: (202) 512-1800
Subscription price per year— $45 domestic; $63 foreign.
Single copy— $13 domestic; $18.20 foreign. Make checks
payable to the Superintendent o f Documents.
Subscription prices and distribution policies for the Monthly
Labor Review ( issn 0098-1818) and other government
publications are set by the Government Printing Office, an
agency o f the U.S. Congress.
The Secretary o f Labor has determined that the publication of
this periodical is necessary in the transaction o f the public
business required by law o f this Department. Periodicals
postage paid at Washington, dc, and at additional mailing
addresses.
U nless stated otherw ise, articles appearing in this
publication are in the public domain and may be reprinted
without express permission from the Editor-in-Chief. Please
cite the specific issue o f the Monthly Labor Review as the
source
Information is available to sensory impaired individuals
upon request:
Voice phone: (202) 691-5200
Federal Relay Service: 1-800-877-8339.
P ostmaster :
Send address changes to Monthly Labor
Review, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, dc
20402-0001.

Cover designed by Keith Tapscott


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

MONTHLY LABOR

REVIEW
Volume 126, Number 1
January 2003

Changes in State laws during 2002:
Labor
Major enactments included limits on overtime for nurses,
workplace security, and military re-employment rights
Richard R. Nelson

Workers’ compensation

3

25

New laws expanded coverage for rescue workers whose health was affected
or whose life was terminated by the events of September 11,2001
Glenn Whittington

Unemployment insurance

30

Many States increased their maximum weekly benefit amounts;
three Federal enactments affected State unemployment insurance
Loryn Lancaster and Anne Vogel

Departments
Ô

Labor month in review
Précis
Book review
Current labor statistics

2
42
43
45

Editor-in-Chief: Deborah P. Klein • Executive Editor: Richard M. Devens • Managing Editor: Anna Huffman Hill • Editors: Brian
I. Baker, Richard Hamilton, Leslie Brown Joyner • Book Reviews: Richard Hamilton • Design and Layout: Catherine D. Bowman,
Edith W. Peters • Contributor: Ellen Messing


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Labor Month in Review

The January Review
The legal m atrix o f the labor m arket is a
key to understanding industrial relations,
collective bargaining, and labor force
trends. As usual, our summaries o f State
la b o r law ch an g es in le g isla tio n are
p re se n te d in th ree sectio n s: g en e ral
em ploym ent law, unem ploym ent insur­
ance legislation, and legislative develop­
m ents in w orkers’ compensation.
Richard R. N elson again summarizes
legislative enactments in State em ploy­
m ent law. As has been the case in m ost
years, States’ minimum w ages received
w idespread attention. M ost m inim um
w a g e le g is la tio n in v o lv e d sp e c ific
increases in the statutory rate, but as is so
o ften is the case, the excep tio n s are
in te restin g . O ne S tate p ro h ib ite d its
jurisdictions from establishing a minimum
w age that exceeds the Federal standard,
w hile another w as the first to legislate
an indexed m inim um wage. (O ne State’s
rate had earlier been indexed by m eans
o f a ballot initiative.)
G lenn W hittington outlines develop­
m ents in w o rk e rs’ com pensation law,
including provisions in N ew Jersey and
N e w Y o rk to e x p a n d c o v e r a g e o f
w orkers involved in the terrorist attacks
o f Septem ber 11,2001.
L o ry n L a n c a ste r and A nne V ogel
review unem ploym ent insurance legis­
lation. W hile there were m any changes at
th e S ta te le v e l, p e rh a p s th e m o st
im portant legislative actions were those
by the Federal Government in establishing
a program to provide additional weeks o f
benefits to unem ployed workers.

One in four volunteer
A bout 59 m illion people did volunteer
w ork at some point from September 2001
to Septem ber2002. Slightly more than 1 in
4 persons age 16 and older volunteered.
The incidence o f volunteering was higher
am ong w om en (31.1 percent) than among


2 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

men (23.8 percent). This relationship held
across age groups, education levels, and
other m ajor characteristics.
C olleg e g rad u ates h ad the h ig h est
v o lu n te e r r a te a m o n g e d u c a tio n a l
attainm ent groups. A m ong persons 25
years o f age and older, 43.6 percen t o f
college graduates v o lu n teered during
the year. T his w as double the volunteer
rate o f high school graduates w ith no
college experience and m ore than four
tim es the rate o f high school dropouts.
V o lu n te ers sp e n t a m e d ia n o f 52
hours doing volunteer activities, w ith
m o st v o lu n te e rs p ro v id in g se rv ic e s
through or for one or tw o organizations.
The m ain organization— the group for
w hich the volunteer w orked the m ost
hours during the year— for the m ajority
o f volunteers w as either religious (33.9
p e r c e n t) o r e d u c a tio n a l o r y o u th service related (27.2 percent). A nother
12.1 percen t o f volunteers perform ed
activities mainly for social or community
service organizations, and 8.6 percent
v o lu n te e r e d th e m o s t h o u r s f o r
hospitals or oth er health organizations.

High and low paying jobs
in 2001
T he h ig h e st p ay in g m a jo r g ro u p s o f
occupations in 2001 were the m anage­
m ent occupations group and the legal
occu p atio n s group. W age and salary
w orkers in m anagement occupations had
a mean hourly wage o f $34.04, while those
in legal occupations had an average wage
o f $33.19. The next highest paid groups
were computer and mathematical ($29.02),
architecture and engineering ($27.08), and
b u s in e s s a n d fin a n c ia l o p e ra tio n s
($24.32).
T he o cc u p atio n al g ro u p s w ith the
lowest average wages in 2001 were the
food p rep a ra tio n and serv in g related
o c c u p a tio n s , fa rm in g , fis h in g , an d
fo re s try o c c u p a tio n s , b u ild in g an d

January 2003

g ro u n d s c le a n in g an d m a in te n a n c e
o c c u p a tio n s, an d p e rso n a l c a re an d
service occupations. Three o f these four
groups had average wages o f less than
$10.00 per hour. Food preparation and
serving jo b s averaged $8.04 p er hour.
Farming, fishing, and forestry w orkers
ea rn ed $ 9 .4 4 p e r h o u r an d th o se in
b u ild in g an d g ro u n d s c le a n in g an d
m aintenance averaged $9.80. Personal
care and service jobs paid $ 10.10 per hour.
In each o f these four groups except for
b u ild in g an d g ro u n d s c le a n in g a n d
maintenance, more than half o f all workers
earned less than $8.50 per hour.

Work experience in 2001
Overall, 152.3 million persons w orked or
looked for w ork at some tim e in 2001. O f
these, a total o f 150.3 m illion persons
w orked at some point during the year,
so m e w h at few er th a n in 2 0 0 0 . T h e
proportion o f the w orking age population
that was em ployed at some point during
the year was 69.3 percent, down from 70.4
percent in 2000. Among men, 76.1 percent
worked at some point during 2001, dow n
from 77.2 percent. A m ong w om en, the
share experiencing employment fell to 63
percent in 2001 from 64 percent.
O f those w ho participated in the labor
force in 2 0 0 1 ,1 5 .8 m illion experienced
some unem ploym ent during the year, 2.8
m illion m ore than the y ear before. The
“w ork-experience unem ploym ent rate”
in 2001 was 10.4 percent, 1.8 percentage
points higher than in 2000. A m ong those
who experienced unem ployment in 2001,
the m edian num ber o f w eeks unem ploy­
ed was 13.7, up from 12.4 weeks the year
before. A bout 2 m illion o f those w ho
had looked for a jo b in 2001 did not w ork
at all during the year. O f the 13.8 m illion
p erso n s w ho w o rk ed d u rin g the y ear
and also ex p erien ced unem ploym ent,
about one in four had tw o or m ore spells
o f job lessn ess.
□

State Labor Laws, 2002

State labor legislation
enacted in 2002
Minimum wage rate increases, limits on overtime
fo r nurses, paid family and medical
leave, workplace security, and military re-employment rights
were among major legislation enacted during the year
Richard R. Nelson
ta te s e n a c te d im p o rta n t la b o r le g isla tio n in 20 0 2
covering a variety o f em ploym ent standards. M inim um
w age rates w ere increased in a num ber o f States, a firstin-the-N ation law provided for paid fam ily and m edical leave,
changes w ere m ade in several child labor law s including a
revised prohibition on door-to-door sales, and several States
enacted legislation to protect the jo b s o f reserve o r guard
m em bers returning from active duty.
T rends continued w ith additional States placing lim its on
m a n d a to ry o v e rtim e fo r n u rs e s , b a n n in g e m p lo y m e n t
d isc rim in a tio n on the basis o f genetic testin g , pro v id in g
im m unity from liability for furnishing inform ation on jo b
perform ance, providing jo b protection for crim e victim s and
victim s o f sexual assault, and addressing issues o f w orkplace
violence and security.
Six State legislatures did not m eet in regular session in
2002, and som e m et only for budget purp o ses.1
T his article sum m arizes significant State labor legislation
enacted in 2002. It does not, how ever, cover legislation on
o ccupational safety and health, em ploym ent and training,
labor relations, em ployee background clearance, econom ic
d ev elo p m en t, and local liv in g w age o rdinances. A rticles
r e p o rtin g on c h a n g e s in u n e m p lo y m e n t in su ra n c e and
w o rk e rs’ com pensation law s appear elsew here in this issue.

S

Wages. M inim um w age rates increased as the result o f new
legislation in A laska and C onnecticut and as the result o f a
Richard R. Nelson is a State standards advisor in the Division o f
External Affairs, Wage and Hour D ivision, Employment Standards
Administration, U.S. Department o f Labor.
E-mail:_rrn@fenix2. dol-esa.gov


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

successful ballot measure in Oregon. Rates also increased in
California, Connecticut, H awaii, and M aine as the result o f
previous laws, and in Washington as the result o f a prior ballot
measure. A laska becam e the first State to provide for an indexed
minimum w age rate through legislation (the Washington rate is
indexed as the result o f a 1998 ballot measure). The Oregon
initiative also provides for an indexed rate.
As o f January 1, 2003, m inim um w age rates w ere higher
than the Federal standard in A laska, C alifornia, C onnecticut,
D e la w a re , th e D is tr ic t o f C o lu m b ia , H a w a ii, M a in e ,
M a s s a c h u s e tts , O re g o n , R h o d e I s la n d , V e rm o n t, a n d
W ashington. O f the 43 States w ith m inim um w age law s, only
3 have rates low er than the F ederal rate o f $5.15 p er hour.2
A law prohibiting political subdivisions from establishing
a m inim um w age that exceeds the Federal m inim um w age w as
enacted in South C arolina.
H aw aii in c re a se d th e am o u n t o f g u a ra n te e d m o n th ly
com pensation required to exem pt an individual from m inim um
w age, overtim e, and recordkeeping requirem ents, and N ew
York am ended its m inim um w age and paym ent o f w ages laws
to cover lim ited liability com panies.
P r e v a ilin g w a g e la w s p e r ta in in g to p u b lic w o rk s
co n stru ctio n p ro jects cu rren tly ex ist in 32 S tates and th e
F ederal G overnm ent. Several m easures w ere enacted in 2002
w ith som e strengthening and w ith others w eakening existing
legislation. Law s enacted in N ew Jersey and W est Virginia,
an d b a llo t m e a su re s a p p ro v e d in C a lifo rn ia , e x p a n d e d
co verage to include ad d itio n al au th o rities or agencies. A
separate m easure am ended the C alifornia law to p rovide a
new exem ption. The dollar threshold am ount for coverage
w as increased adm inistratively in W isconsin.

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

3

State Labor Laws, 2002

A law was enacted in G uam providing for prevailing wages
and benefits under service and other contracts let by the
Territory.
O ther significant actions include issuance o f an executive
order in N ew Jersey authorizing project labor agreem ents,
p ro v isio n in C onnecticut for prev ailin g w age rates to be
adjusted annually, provision in M aryland for contractors and
subcontractors to be jo in tly and severally liable for paym ent
v io la tio n s , an d th e a d o p tio n o f m o re c o m p re h e n s iv e
regulations in M ontana.
A m en d m en ts w ere also m ade c o n c e rn in g d eb a rm en t
provisions in N ew York, frequency o f surveys in W ashington,
co ntractor com pliance requirem ents in H aw aii, and hearing
and recordkeeping requirem ents in Illinois.
A new equal pay law was adopted in Vermont, and W yoming
authorized a study o f the disparity o f wages and benefits.
O ther im portant w age legislation included a K entucky law
th at allow s com pensatory tim e in lieu o f paid overtim e for
co unty em ployees; new overtim e paym ent excep tio n s in
Illinois, Kentucky, and M aine; new or increased penalties for
violation in N ew York, O klahom a, and the V irgin Islands; a
revision in enforcem ent authority in R hode Island; and a
requirem ent in C alifornia for a m inim um level o f w ages for
em ployees to be inclu d ed in p erso n a l services co n tracts
entered into by State agencies.

Overtime limits. A recent trend is continuing w ith M aiyland,
M innesota, N ew Jersey, and W ashington placing lim its on
m a n d ato ry overtim e fo r n urses. T hese law s jo in sim ilar
m easures enacted in M aine and O regon in 2001.
F a m ily issues.

In a g r o u n d - b r e a k in g le g is la tiv e
developm ent, C alifornia becam e the first State to provide for
p aid fam ily and m edical leave. B ills o f this kind have been
in tro d u c ed in a n u m b e r o f S tates o v er the last 3 years,
including som e in 2002, but the C alifornia m easure is the first
to be enacted. M aine and N ew M exico enacted legislation
calling for studies o f the benefits and costs o f providing paid
fam ily and m edical leave.
In other developm ents, G uam enacted a paternity leave
provision and em ployers in Puerto R ico are to give priority in
p rocessing flexible w ork schedule requests to w om en w ith
m inor children and to single parents w ith custody o f their
ch ildren. S ig n ifican t am endm ents w ere m ade ex p an d in g
coverage o f the W ashington law requiring em ployers to allow
use o f sick leave in the event o f fam ily m em bers’ serious
health conditions. Separate m easures enacted in M aine add
organ donation to the reasons allow ed for fam ily leave, and
provide leave to atten d to m ed ical trea tm e n t fo r a victim o f
v io le n ce w ho is an em ployee’s child, parent, or spouse.

Child labor.

Child labor continued as a m ajor subject o f
legislative concern, w ith bills introduced in m ore than one
4 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

h a lf o f the States. Several im portant changes w ere m ade in
th e W est V irg in ia law, in clu d in g co n fo rm in g th e h o u rs,
nightw ork, and p rohibited hazardous occupations orders to
Federal law and increasing penalties for violations. M issouri
now prohibits door-to-door sales by m inors under age 16.
Such sales also w ill be p ro h ib ited in P ennsylvania unless
certain conditions are met. A n O hio law revises certificate
requirem ents and requires the electronic filing o f age and
schooling certificates. K entucky ad o p ted new regulations
changing perm itted hours o f em ploym ent and req u irin g that
hours restrictions apply to school dropouts u nder age 18.
Laws easing restrictions w ere enacted in Illinois perm itting
12- and 13-year-olds to be em ployed to officiate certain youth
sports activities, in M assachusetts perm itting the operation
o f g o lf carts on g o lf courses, and in A laska w here em ployers
m ay now get advance approval for hiring m inors in lieu o f
individual advance w ritten authorization.

A griculture.

A co m p re h en siv e farm la b o r c o n tra c to r
registration act w as p assed in Idaho. Several revisions w ere
m ade in the N eb rask a law including changes p ertaining to
exem ptions and application and renew al fees and addition o f
a requirem ent th at a bilingual em ployee be available u nder
certain circum stances. F lo rid a placed new restrictio n s on
d e d u c tio n s fro m w a g e s f o r a n y to o ls , e q u ip m e n t,
transportation, or recruiting fees th at are for the b enefit o f
the em ployer.

Apparel industry.

The apparel industry continues to be an
area o f interest and concern. The g overnor in N ew Jersey
issu ed an ex ecu tiv e o rd e r sp ecify in g th a t p u b lic b o d ies
p u rch asin g ap p arel are to req u ire th at all p ro d u c tio n be
perform ed in the U nited States and that all labor laws are
com plied with. A N ew York State A pparel W orkers Fair Labor
C onditions and P rocurem ent A ct also req u ires th at labor
standards and w orking conditions be co n sidered by State
a g e n c ie s, u n iv e rs itie s , an d co m m u n ity c o lle g e s w h en
purchasing apparel. N ew York also enacted requirem ents for
the posting, at the w orksite, o f w age paym ent requirem ents
and labor departm ent contact inform ation.

Equal employment opportunity. H aw aii, U tah, and V irginia
jo in e d th e m o re th a n o n e -h a lf o f th e S tate s w ho h av e
p r e v io u s ly e n a c te d le g is la tio n b a n n in g e m p lo y m e n t
d is c r im in a tio n a g a in s t in d iv id u a ls b a s e d on g e n e tic
ch aracteristics, g en etic in fo rm atio n , or te s t resu lts. T he
existing law in R hode Island w as am ended.
A m ong other m easures th at w ere enacted banning various
form s o f em ploym ent discrim ination, changes w ere m ade in
A riz o n a ’s civ il r ig h t’s law s a d d in g v ario u s p ro te c tio n s
provided by Federal law and adding m ental im pairm ent to the
definition o f disability, N ew York m ade am endm ents to its law
protecting the right o f em ployees to practice th eir religion,

and N ew Jersey and N ew Y ork m ade it unlaw ful for an
em ployer to discrim inate against an em ployee for w earing
the A m erican flag or displaying it at his or her w ork station.

reg u la tin g co m m ercial em p lo y m en t ag e n cies an d in th e
M in n eso ta law reg u la tin g su p p lem en tal n u rsin g serv ices
agencies.

Worker privacy.
Law s w ere enacted pro v id in g for the
confidentiality o f em ployee information for reproductive health
care services providers in California, for dependents o f State
employees in Minnesota, and for at-risk government employees
in U tah. W ashington m ade it unlaw ful to sell, publish or
otherwise release the home address or other private information
o f any law enforcem ent-related em ployee or volunteer.
M easures authorizing the disclosure o f information about a
current or former em ployee to a prospective employer were
enacted in M innesota, and California now allows current or
form er em ployers to answer w hether or not they would rehire
someone.
C onnecticut m ade it unlaw ful for an em ployer to require
an em ployee or applicant to disclose the existence o f any
arrest, crim inal charge, or conviction, the records o f w hich
h a v e b e e n e ra s e d . L ic e n s e d h e a lth c a re f a c ilitie s in
M ississippi w ere protected from liability for requiring felony
conviction inform ation from em ployees and applicants.

Plant closing/displaced workers.

Workplace violence and security.
In an em erging area
addressing issues o f w orkplace violence and security, Florida
counties and m unicipalities w ere authorized to require the
screening o f em ployees or applicants in positions critical to
security or public safety. California extended time limits for filing
a com plaint under the law providing that State residents have
the right to be free from any violence com mitted because o f
factors including race, color, or religion. Guam and N ew Jersey
established task forces to study w orkplace violence and, in
Virginia, an em ployee who reports threatening conduct by a co­
worker will be immune from all civil liability that might otherwise
be incurred because o f making such a report.
E m ployee leasing.

T he te rm “p ro fe ssio n a l e m p lo y er
org anization” has replaced “em ployee leasing firm ” in som e
recent legislation. N ew com prehensive professional em ployer
reg istration acts w ere enacted in N ew York and O klahom a.
Several am endm ents w ere m ade to the U tah law including
rem oving references to “ em ployee leasing com pany” and
“ leased em ployee.” Tennessee am ended its law to specify
that a client w ill be join tly liable w ith a sta ff leasing com pany
for State unem ploym ent insurance prem ium s.

P rivate em ploym ent agencies.

A law w as e n a cted in
M a ssac h u setts to lim it th e am o u n t o f fees th a t staffin g
agencies m ay charge em ployees for transportation. A m ong
am endm ents to other laws, coverage o f the Illinois day labor
se rv ic e s ac t w as ex p a n d e d to in c lu d e te m p o ra ry la b o r
services, and several changes were made in the Hawaii law


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

C alifornia em ployers o f
75 or m ore em ployees m ust now give 60 days w ritten notice
o f a m ass layoff, relocation, or term ination involving 50 or
m ore persons. A nother C alifornia m easure provides th at the
jo b s o f laid -o ff w orkers are not to be filled w ith w elfare-tow ork program participants. The departm ent o f labor in M aine
is to a d o p t ru le s to im p le m e n t th e law g o v e rn in g th e
severance pay paid by em ployers w ho close o r relocate.

W h istleb lo w ers.
A m o n g w h is tle b lo w e r p r o te c tio n
m easures enacted, a com p reh en siv e H ealth C are W orker
W histleblow er P rotection A ct w as adopted in M aryland, and
a section relating to the prohibition o f retaliato ry personnel
actions against health care em ployees w as ad d ed to the N ew
York labor law.
Military re-employment rights.

F ollow ing the events o f
Septem ber 11,2001, several States enacted legislation related
to reinstatem ent rights o f reserve or guard m em bers returning
from active duty. M any o f these m easures am ended law s to
p ro v id e S tate g u a rd m e m b ers w ith th e sam e rig h ts as
provided to those called for F ederal duty.

State labor departm ents.

In C a lifo rn ia , a L a b o r an d
W orkforce D evelopm ent A gency w as created consisting o f
the D ep artm en t o f In d u strial R elatio n s, th e E m ploym ent
D evelopm ent D epartm ent, the A gricultural L abor R elations
B oard, and the W orkforce Investm ent Board. A D epartm ent
o f W o rk fo rce S e rv ic e s w as c re a te d in W y o m in g to be
r e s p o n s ib le fo r p ro g ra m s in c lu d in g d is p la c e d w o rk e r
ed u c atio n and train in g , p u b lic em p lo y m en t o ffic es, and
v eteran ’s em ploym ent services. The F lorida D epartm ent o f
L ab o r and E m p lo y m en t S ecu rity w as elim in ated and its
responsibilities and functions transferred to other agencies.

Other laws.
A m o n g o th e r law s en a cted , jo b p ro te c tio n
fo r elec tio n o fficers on elec tio n day w as p ro v id e d fo r in
D elaw are and a sim ila r law w as am en d ed in A lab am a. Job
p ro te c tio n w as also p ro v id e d in C o n n e c tic u t fo r crim e
v ictim s w ho atten d co u rt p ro ce ed in g s, in C a lifo rn ia fo r
victim s o f sexual assault, and in K en tu ck y fo r rescue squad
m e m b e r s , p e a c e o f f i c e r s , a n d e m e r g e n c y m e d ic a l
te c h n ic ia n s . P u e rto R ic o e s ta b lis h e d a s p o rts le a v e w ith o u t-p ay p o licy fo r ath letes in train in g an d for train ers.
U tah w ill p ro v id e p aid leav e fo r S tate em p lo y ees w ho
are organ or b one m arrow donors, and V erm ont estab lish ed
a d i s a s t e r r e l i e f w o r k e r s f u n d to p r o v i d e w a g e
reim bursem ent.
N ew laws in C alifornia provide th at local labor standards

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

5

State Labor Laws, 2002

be enforced on projects receiving assistance from a State
agency, that employees may disclose information regarding their
working conditions, and that labor laws are to be enforced without
regard to an individual’s immigration status. West Virginia made

Alabama
Plant closing.

A resolution was adopted
in response to the l t v Steel Corp. filing for
bankruptcy. The resolution urges l t v
Corp. officials to honor all contractual
obligations including, but not limited to,
continued health insurance coverage to its
employees and former employees. Other
laws. The State enacted a law extending
active duty military rights and protections
to members of the State National Guard
called or ordered by the Governor to State
active duty for 30 or more consecutive days
for emergencies, or called or ordered by the
Governor to federally funded duty for
homeland security. The law states that the
provisions o f the Federal Soldiers and
Sailors Civil Relief Act and the Federal
U niform ed Services Em ploym ent and
Reem ployment Rights Act apply when
members of the State Guard are called up in
the above circumstances. Additionally, when
any public employee is called to active
service during the war on terrorism, which
com m enced in S eptem ber 2001, the
employee shall receive from his or her
em p loying d epartm ent or agency
com pensation equal to the difference
between the lower active duty pay and the
higher public salary which they would have
received if not called to active service. While
on active service, employees may continue
th e ir in dividual or dependent health
insu rance coverage under the health
insurance plan of the public employer and
are considered active and contributing
members of their retirement system.
The law concerning time off for election
officials on election day was amended.
E m ployees shall be excused w ithout
penalty or loss of time for election day only
in order to perform the duties o f their
appointed position. The law now will
apply to employers with more than 25
employees rather than to those with more
than 50 as before, and it was specified that
the law does not require an employer to
compensate an employee while he or she is
performing election-day duties.
The law requiring reim bursem ent o f
tra in in g costs by the new em ployer
whenever a municipal court clerk, municipal
co u rt m ag istrate, am bulance service
operator, ambulance driver or attendant,
emergency medical technician, water or
w astew ater operator, law enforcem ent

6 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

it unlawful to employ an alien who is not authorized to w ork by
immigration laws or the U.S. Attorney General.
T he follow ing is a summ ary, by ju risd ictio n , o f labor
legislation enacted in 2002.

officer, certified corrections officer, or
firefighter is employed by another public
entity within 24 months of the completion
of training, was amended to specify that
costs, in ad d itio n to salary, include
transportation costs paid for travel to and
from the training facility, room, board,
tuition, overtime paid to other employees
who fill in for the trainee during his or her
absence, and any other related training
expenses.

Alaska
Wages. New legislation increased the
State minimum wage rate from $5.65 to
$7.15 per hour on Jan. 1, 2003, and
provided for th ereafter adjusting the
minimum wage annually for inflation
effective January 1 o f each year. The
minimum wage, to be determined by the
Department o f Labor, by regulation, by
September 30 of each calendar year, will be
either the most recent wage adjusted for
100 percent of the rate o f inflation based
on the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
C onsum er P rice Index for all U rban
Consumers ( c p i -u ) for Anchorage, Alaska,
prepared by the U.S. Bureau o f Labor
Statistics, or $1 more than the Federal
minimum wage, whichever is greater. The
d ep a rtm en t w ill ro u n d th e ad ju ste d
minimum wage up to the nearest one cent.
Child labor. The section of the child labor
law requiring minors under age 17 to have
w ritten au th o rizatio n from the labor
com m issioner as a co n d itio n o f em ­
ployment was amended to allow employers
of minors to obtain broad approval of a
group of duties or jobs to be performed by
minors. Possession o f this advance ap­
proval from the commissioner for a specific
job consisting o f listed duties permits
employers to hire and employ minors, of at
least age 14 w ithout having the prior
individual approval as long as the employer
does not change any of the duties of the
pre-approved jobs. A dditionally, the
employer must have written consent from
the parent or g uardian o f the m inor
perm itting the em ployment in the job
specified in the consent. The w ritten
consent is to be on a form provided by the
department and is valid for the calendar year
in which it is issued, except that a consent

January 2003

executed in December may be valid for the
next calendar year as well. Employers must
notify the department within 7 calendar
days after a minor has been employed.

Arizona
Equal employment opportunity. Technical
and substantive changes were made in the
State’s civil right’s laws adding various
protections provided by Federal law.
M ental im pairm ent was added to the
definition of disability making it unlawful
for employers to fail or refuse to hire or
discharge individuals On this basis if the
employer can act without undue hardship
on the conduct of the business. Employers
may not discriminate against persons with
disabilities who, with or without reasonable
accommodation are capable of performing
essential job functions. Employers may
determine what functions are considered
essential as long as a written description is
completed prior to advertising or inter­
view ing for a po sitio n in cluding ap ­
prenticeship or training programs. Employ­
ers may not participate in contracts that
subject persons to discrim ination, use
standards that cause discrimination, exclude
persons from jobs or benefits, use quali­
fications that discriminate (unless they are
based upon business necessity, for ex­
ample, the health or safety of other em­
ployees is at risk) or use tests (medical and
nonmedical) in a biased manner because of
a person’s disability.

California
Wages. As the result o f previous action
by the State Industrial Welfare Commission,
the State minimum wage rate increased from
$6.25 per hour to $6.75 per hour on
January 1, 2002.
The State prevailing wage law was
amended so that several provisions of the law
that were scheduled to be repealed on
January 1, 2003, will now be retained as a
resu lt o f d eletio n o f the rep eal im ­
plementation wording.
Voters in the November general election
approved both The K indergarten-U n­
iversity Public Education Facilities Bond
Act of 2002 (Proposition 47), and The
Water Security, Clean Drinking Water,
Coastal and Beach Protection Act of 2002

(Proposition 50). As part of these measures,
the body awarding any contract for a public
works project funded under either act is to
adopt and enforce a labor com pliance
program that includes paym ent o f the
prevailing wage rate.
The prevailing wage law was amended
to exempt from coverage the construction,
expansion, or rehabilitation of privately
owned residential projects that are self-help
housing projects, operated on a not-forp ro fit basis as housing for hom eless
persons, or that provide for housing assist­
ance. This provision and amendments made
by prior law do not preempt local ordin­
ances requiring the payment of prevailing
wages on housing projects.
A resolution was adopted urging that
Apr. 16, 2002, be proclaimed “Equal Pay
Day” in California, recognizing the full
value of women’s skills and significant
contributions to the labor force.
The Labor and Workforce Development
Agency is to contract with a nonprofit,
nonpartisan
independent
research
organization, with a proven record of
conducting objective research on labor and
employment issues in the State, to study the
most effective and efficient means of enforcing
wage and hour laws. The study also will
identify available Federal and State resources
that may be used to enforce wage and hour
laws. The study is to be completed and
submitted to the legislature by Dec. 31,2003.
Personal services contracts entered into
by a State agency for persons providing
ja n ito rial and housekeeping services,
custodians, food service workers, laundry
workers, window cleaners, and security
guard services must include provisions for
em ployee wages and benefits that are
valued at no less than 85 percent of the
State employer cost of wages and benefits
provided to State employees for performing
similar duties.

Family issues.

The State Unemployment
Insurance Law was amended to provide for
paid family and medical Leave. Employees
now may take off up to 6 weeks of paid
family leave over a 12-month period to care
for a newborn, a newly adopted child, or a
seriously ill family member or domestic
partner. Employees will be eligible to
receive 55 percent of their wages during
their absence, up to a maximum payment
of $728 per week in 2004. The benefits will
rise to a maximum of $840 per week in 2005
and will be indexed to the State average
weekly wage thereafter. Workers will be
permitted to start taking time off beginning
July 1,2004. Benefits provided by the law
will be funded entirely by employee payroll


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

deductions, averaging about $27 per year
and ranging up to $70 per year for those
earning more than $72,000 annually. These
employee deductions will begin on Jan. 1,
2004. Unlike the State Family Rights Act,
all employers are covered by this legislation,
reg ard less o f num ber o f em ployees.
However, employers with fewer than 50
employees are not required to hold a job for
an employee who goes on paid family leave.
Employees may be required to use up to 2
weeks of accrued leave prior to the receipt
of paid family leave.
An employer who maintains an absence
control policy that counts sick leave used
to attend to an illness of a child, parent,
spouse, or domestic partner as a basis for
d iscip lin e, dem otion, discharge, or
suspension will be considered to be in
violation of the law prohibiting employer
retaliation against an employee who uses
sick leave for these purposes.

Agriculture.

A resolution was adopted
directing that a privately-funded A gri­
cultural Worker Health and Housing Com­
mission be established composed of equal
numbers of members representing growers
and agricultural workers. The commission
is to report to the legislature regarding the
agricultural industry’s ability to compete
in the global marketplace and the com­
m ission’s recom m endations o f how to
improve the housing and health conditions
of agricultural workers.

Equal employment opportunity. A 2001
court decision (Esberg v. Union Oil Co. o f
California ) held that it was permissible
under the Fair Employment and Housing
Act ( f e h a ) for employers to discriminate
on the basis of age in employee training
programs. In response, existing provisions
of the f e h a which made it an unlawful
employment practice for any employer to
refuse to hire or employ, or to discharge,
dismiss, reduce, suspend, or demote any
individual older than age 40 on the basis of
age were repealed. A prohibition on age
discrimination was added to a separate code
section which addresses the other pro­
hibited bases of discrimination, resulting in
age d iscrim in atio n being expressly
prohibited in training programs and in other
term s, co n d itio n s, and p riv ileg es o f
employment. Age was also added to the
existing bases of discrimination prohibited
for labor organizations.
Provisions of the f e h a requiring that an
individual wishing to pursue a civil action
file suit within 1 year of a right-to-sue
notice from the Department of Fair Em­

ployment and Housing, were amended to
toll the limitation period within which the
civil action must be filed, in cases where the
department has deferred its investigation
of the individual’s complaint to the U.S.
Equal Employm ent O pportunity Com ­
mission (EEOC) or where after an investi­
gation by the department, the e e o c agrees
to perform a substantial weight review of
the determination o f the department or
conducts its own investigation. The time
for commencing an action for which the
statute of limitations is tolled will expire
when the Federal right-to-sue period to
commence a civil action expires, or 1 year
from the date of the right-to-sue notice by
the department, whichever is later.
Sections o f the E ducation Code per­
ta in in g to com m unity co lleges w ere
amended to repeal provisions relating to
affirmative action hiring that had been
invalidated by the California Court o f
A ppeal. An E qual E m ploym ent O p­
portunity Fund is established to be ad­
ministered by the Board of Governors of
the California Community Colleges for the
purpose of promoting equal employment
opportunity in hiring and promotion.

Worker privacy.
An A ddress C o n ­
fidentiality for Reproductive Health Care
Services Providers, Employees, Volunteers,
and Patients program was created to protect
the confidentiality o f home address in­
formation of these individuals. Under the
program, the Secretary of State will be re­
quired to approve an application of a quali­
fied program participant for a substitute
address to be designated by the Secretary.
State and local agencies are required to use
the substitute address at the request of a
program participant.
The law extending a qualified immunity
from slander or libel suits to statements by
current or former employers about the job
p erform ance or q u alifica tio n s o f an
ap p lican t for em ploym ent, w hen the
statements are based on credible evidence,
made without malice, and made to and at
the request of the prospective employer,
was am ended to extend the qualified
imm unity to inform ation provided on
applicants for em ploym ent as w ell as
employees, and to authorize a current or
former employer to answer whether or not
he or she would rehire a current or former
employee.
An employer who receives a request
from a current or former em ployee to
inspect or copy his or her payroll records
is to comply with the request as soon as

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

7

State Labor Laws, 2002

possible, but no later than 21 calendar days
from the date of the request. A violation of
this provision entitles the current or former
employee or the labor commissioner to
recover a $750 penalty from the employer.
An employee may also bring an action for
injunctive relief to ensure compliance, and
in such an action is entitled to an award of
costs and reasonable attorney’s fees.
The portion o f the State penal code
relating to the personnel records and records
maintained by any State or local agency on
peace officers was amended. The infor­
mation disclosure prohibition was amended
to delete the confidentiality limitation to
disclosure by the department or agency that
employs the peace officer. The peace
officer personnel records and records
maintained by any State or local agency, or
information obtained from these records,
rem ain confidential and shall not be
disclosed in any criminal or civil pro­
ceeding except by discovery pursuant to
sections of the State Evidence Code. This
change returns the language to that in effect
prior to a 2000 amendment and removes a
potential confidentiality situation where
personal records are in the custody of an
outside entity.
The law requiring those agencies that
em ploy peace officers to establish a
procedure for the investigation o f com­
p la in ts by th e p u b lic ag a in st peace
officers, to provide for the confidentiality
o f peace officer personnel records, and to
provide discovery procedures for peace
o ffic er p erso n n e l rec o rd s and other
records, was amended to also apply to
custodial officers. A custodial officer is a
p u b lic o ffic e r, n o t a p eace o ffic er,
employed by a law enforcement agency
o f San Diego County, Fresno County,
K ern C ounty, S ta n is la u s C ounty,
Riverside County, Santa Clara County, or
a county having a population o f 425,000
or few er in h a b ita n ts th a t has the
a u th o rity and re s p o n s ib ility fo r
maintaining custody o f prisoners and that
performs tasks related to the operation of
a local detention facility.

Workplace violence/security. State re­
sidents have the right to be free from any
violence, or intim idation by threat o f
violence, committed because of their race,
color, religion, ancestry, national origin,
political affiliation, sex, sexual orientation,
age, disability, or position in a labor dispute,
or because another person perceives them
to have one or more of those characteristics.
The 1-year deadline, for filing a verified
complaint with the Department o f Fair
Digitized for 8FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Employment and Housing alleging vio­
lations o f this law, was redefined to be
for a period not to exceed 1 year from the
date the person aggrieved by an alleged
violation becomes aware o f the identity
of a person liable for the alleged violation,
but in no case exceeding 3 years from the
date o f the alleged violation if during that
period the aggrieved person is unaware of
the identity o f any person liable for the
alleged violation.

Plant closing.

An employer of 75 or more
em ployees m ust give 60 days written
notice o f a mass layoff, relocation, or
termination involving 50 or more persons,
to employees, the Employment D evel­
opment Department, the local workforce
investment board, and the chief elected
official o f each affected city and county
government. Such notice is not required
if the action is necessitated by physical
calamity or act o f war. The law exempts
employers in the broadcasting, motion
picture, and construction industries if the
closing or layoff is the result o f the com­
pletion o f a particular project. Also ex­
empted are employers whose employees
were hired with the understanding that
th e ir em ploym ent was seaso n al and
temporary, and employers who qualify
under the faltering business exception. An
em p lo y er w ho fa ils to p ro v id e th e
required notices will be subject to civil
p en a lties and w ill be liab le to each
em p lo y ee w ho lo st h is or h er
em p lo y m en t fo r b ack pay and lo st
benefits.

Displaced workers.

The Employment
Development Department is to establish
standards to ensure that no participant in
w elfare-to -w o rk jo b p rep aratio n and
training programs under the unemployment
insurance law fills a job when any other
individual is on layoff from the same or a
substantially equivalent job or when the
employer has terminated the employment
o f any regular em ployee or otherwise
reduced its workforce with the intention of
filling the resulting vacancy with a program
participant. In addition, employers are
specifically prohibited from replacing laidoff seasonal construction workers with
welfare-to-work participants.

Preference.

A resolution was adopted
expressing the State policy that it is the
preference of the State, consistent with the
Federal and State constitutions, that the
tasks and duties necessary for the rendering

January 2003

of local telephone service within the State
be performed by residents of California.

Inmate labor.

Amendments were made
to law sections relating to the employment
o f prison inmates and juvenile offenders.
The list of specifically included types of
p ersonal in form ation to w hich these
individuals are denied access was expanded
from addresses, telephone numbers, credit
card numbers, Social Security numbers, and
drivers license inform ation. Now also
included are health insurance, taxpayer,
school, or employee identification numbers;
mothers’ maiden names; demand deposit
account, debit card, savings, or checking
account num bers, p i n s , or passw ords;
places of employment; dates of birth; alien
registration numbers; passport numbers;
unique biometric data, such as fingerprints,
facial scan identifiers, voice prints, retina
or iris images, or other similar identifiers;
unique electronic identification numbers;
and telecom m unication identifying in­
formation or access devices. Law coverage
now also will include persons performing
community service in lieu o f a fine or
custody.

Whistleblower. It was made unlawful for
a private patrol operator to discharge,
demote, threaten, or otherwise discriminate
against an em ployee in the term s and
conditions o f employment, because he or
she discloses information to a government
or law enforcement agency relating to
failure to meet registration standards. A
private patrol operator intentionally in
violation will be liable in an action for
damages brought by the injured party. A
p erso n who has been d isc h arg ed or
discriminated against may bring a claim
against the private patrol operator within
3 years o f the date o f the discharge,
demotion, threat, or discrimination.
Other laws. Under a G overnor’s Re­
organization Plan, a Labor and Workforce
Development Agency was created in State
government consisting of the Department
of Industrial Relations, the Employment
Development Department, the Agricultural
Labor Relations Board, and the California
Workforce Investment Board. The agency
w ill be under the su pervision o f the
Secretary o f Labor and Workforce Devel­
opment who will be appointed by the
governor.
When a city, county, district, or local
agency expends funds that have been
provided to it by a State agency, or operates

a program or engages in an activity that has
received assistance from a State agency,
those labor standards established by the
local jurisdiction will be enforced with
regard to the expenditure, program, or
activity, as long as they are not in conflict
with or preempted by State law. A State
agency may not require as a condition of
receiving State funds or assistance that a
local jurisdiction refrain from applying its
labor standards to expenditures, programs,
or activities supported by the State funds
or assistance.
Provisions were added to the Labor
Code, the Civil Code, the Government
Code, and the Health and Safety Code
relative to enforcement actions relating to
the rights o f employees. The new language
specifies that all protections, rights and
remedies available under State law, except
for any reinstatement remedy prohibited
by' F ederal law, are available to all
individuals regardless of immigration status
who have applied for employment, or who
have been em ployed in the State. For
purposes o f enforcing State labor and
employment laws, a person’s immigration
status is irrelevant to the issue of liability,
and in proceedings or discovery undertaken
to enforce those laws no inquiry will be
perm itted into a person’s im m igration
status except where the person seeking to
make this inquiry has shown that the
inquiry is necessary to comply with Federal
immigration law.
The law that prohibits employers from
d isc h arg in g or taking other adverse
employment actions against victims of
domestic violence who take time off from
work to attend to issues arising as the result
o f the domestic violence was amended to
extend these protections to victims of
sexual assault.
The law providing that an employer
may not require that an employee refrain
from disclosing the amount of his or her
wages was amended to extend this pro­
tection to the release of information regard­
ing working conditions. It was specified
that the law does not permit an employee
to disclose proprietary information, trade
secret information, or information that is
otherwise subject to a legal privilege with­
out employer consent.
A resolution was adopted recognizing
March 31 as Cesar Chavez’s birthday and
calling on all Californians to participate in
appropriate observances to rem em ber
Cesar Chavez as a symbol of hope and
justice to all citizens.
The first week of April each year is to
be designated as Labor History Week.
Schools are encouraged to commemorate

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

this week with appropriate educational
exercises that make pupils aware o f the
role that the labor movement has played
in shaping C alifornia and the U nited
States.

Colorado
Wages. R e so lu tio n s w ere ad o p ted
urging that Apr. 16, 2002, be proclaimed
“Equal Pay Day” in Colorado, recognizing
the full value o f women’s skills and their
significant contributions to the labor
force. April 16 symbolizes the day on
which wages paid to an American woman
catch up to the wages paid to a man from
the previous year.
Other laws. A resolution was adopted
recognizing Apr. 28, 2002, as Workers
Memorial Day in honor o f all workers
killed, injured, and disabled on the job.
Connecticut
Wages. As the result o f prior legislation,
the State minimum wage rose to $6.70 per
hour, from $6.40, on January 1, 2002.
New legislation was adopted raising the
State minimum wage rate to $6.90 per hour,
from $6.70, on Jan. 1, 2003, with a further
increase to $7.10 per hour scheduled for
Jan. 1, 2004.
A new provision was enacted con­
cerning annual adjustments to prevailing
wages. Each contractor awarded a contract
that is subject to the State prevailing wage
law is to contact the Labor Commissioner
by July 1 o f each year, for the duration of
the contract, to ascertain the prevailing
rate of wages on an hourly basis and the
amount o f payment or contributions paid
or payable on behalf of each mechanic,
laborer, or worker employed under the
contract. Necessary adjustments for each
employee are to be made effective July 1
o f each year.

agency under the Freedom of Information
Act.
It was made unlawful for an employer
to require an employee or prospective
employee to disclose the existence of any
arrest, criminal charge, or conviction, the
records of which have been erased. It is also
unlaw ful to deny em ploym ent or to
discharge or otherwise discriminate against
an individual with a prior arrest, criminal
charge, or conviction, the records o f which
have been erased.

Whistleblower. The law concerning State
employee and contractor whistleblowing
com plaints was amended to revise the
com plaint procedure in the event o f a
violation.
Other laws. Employment protection will
now be afforded to any employee who
attends a court proceeding or participates
in a police investigation related to a criminal
case in which the employee is a crime
victim. Protection will also apply where
either a restraining order or a protective
order has been issued on the employee’s
behalf by a court.

Delaware

Child labor.

Drug and alcohol testing. The Depart­
ment of Education provides for drug and
alcohol testing of public school bus drivers
with termination from employment in the
event of a positive test result. A new act
clarifies that the purpose o f the testing
program is to assist the employers of public
school bus drivers to comply with current
Federal laws relating to such testing, and
removes language which provided for test
procedures and penalties for positive tests
which were inconsistent with the pro­
visions o f Federal law and beyond the
authority o f the department to enforce.
Refusal to submit to testing, including the
provision of a substituted or adulterated
test sample, will be deemed to be a positive
test result.

Worker privacy. Members or employees
of the Commission on Human Rights and
Opportunities were added to the list o f
those in d iv id u als w hose resid en tial
addresses are not to be disclosed by a public

Other laws. It was made unlawful for an
employer to fire an employee, or to threat­
en or otherwise coerce an employee because
he or she is serving as an election officer on
an election day, provided the employee has
vacation time accrued and available for use
and is not in a critical need position. A
critical need position is one in the field of
public safety, corrections, transportation,
health care, utilities, a small business
employing fewer than 20 persons, or is

The provision of the child
labor law, permitting the employment of
15-year-old minors in mercantile estab­
lishments as baggers, cashiers or stock
clerks, w hich was due to ex p ire on
S ept.30, 2002, was extended to Sept. 30,
2007.

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

9

State Labor Laws, 2002

otherw ise necessary for a business or
industry to be in service or operation on
election day. An employer in violation will
be subject to both civil and crim inal
penalties.

Florida
Agriculture.

Farm labor contractors now
are prohibited from making any charge or
d eduction from w ages for any tools,
equipment, transportation, or recruiting
fees that are for the benefit of the employer
unless in compliance with the Federal Fair
Labor Standards Act.

Drug and alcohol testing.

The State
law re la tin g to d ru g -free w orkplace
program s was am ended. C onstruction
contractors, electrical contractors, and
alarm system contractors who contract
to perform construction work under State
contracts for educational facilities, public
properties, publicly owned buildings or
S tate co rrec tio n a l fa c ilitie s now are
re q u ire d to im p lem e n t d ru g -fre e
workplace programs.

Workplace violence/security. Counties
and m unicipalities were authorized to
require, by ordinance, the screening of an
employee, appointee, or applicant to a
position that is critical to security or public
safety. Screening is also authorized for any
co n tractor, vendor, repair person, or
delivery person who has access to public
facilities that are critical to security or
public safety.
Other laws. The Department of Labor
and Employment Security was eliminated,
effective June 30, 2002, and its re s­
ponsibilities and functions transferred to
other agencies. Am ong these, offices
responsible for child labor enforcement,
farm labor, and labor organizations were
transferred to the Department of Business
and Professional Regulation. The Office of
Civil Rights, the labor law issues office, and
unemployment claims responsibility were
transferred to the Agency for Workforce
Innovation. The D ivision o f W orkers’
C om pensation was transferred to the
Department of Insurance.
An act relating to health care union
organizing activities prohibits participation
by a nursing home employee in any activity
that assists, prom otes, deters, or d is­
courages union organizing during any time
the employee is counted in staffing cal­
culations for minimum staffing standards.

Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Georgia
Wages. A resolution was adopted re­
cognizing Tuesday, Apr. 16, 2002, as
“Equal Pay Day,” expressing support of
the efforts of the National Committee for
Pay Equity to find solutions which will
result in economic justice for women and
people of color. Tuesday is symbolic of the
point in the week that a woman must work
to earn the wages paid to a man in the
previous week.
Guam
Wages. Prevailing wages and benefits
were established for employees of private
contractors awarded service and other
contracts by the government o f Guam.
Where such contracts are entered into, the
contractor is to pay each employee in
accordance with the most recent wage
determination for Guam and the Northern
M ariana Islan d s issued by the U.S.
Department of Labor for such labor as is
employed in the direct delivery of contract
deliverables to the government of Guam. In
the event of a renewal clause, the wage
determination promulgated on a date most
recent to the renewal date will apply.
Contracts will also contain provisions
mandating health and similar benefits for
employees. The benefits are to have a
minimum value as detailed in the U.S.
Department of Labor wage determination, and
are to contain provisions guaranteeing a
minimum of 10 paid holidays a year. The
Guam Department of Labor is to develop
rules and regulations for enforcement of the
law and may assess monetary penalties for
violation ranging from $ 100 to $1,000 per day
in addition to back wages and benefits due.
A contractor in violation may also be barred
from receiving a new contract for 1 year.

Family issues.

F athers w ill now be
provided with paternity leave upon the
birth or adoption of a child similar to the
leave granted to mothers under the ma­
ternity leave law. The paternity leave is not
to exceed 20 days, encompassing the date
of childbirth or adoption o f a child 5 years
or younger. Any additional leave taken for
such purpose may be charged against
accumulated sick leave, or may be unpaid
leave at the option of the employee. Total
leave, whether paternity, sick, or unpaid
leave is not to exceed 6 months without
approval of the employee’s supervisor.
Any school v o lu n teers under the
Rainbows for All Children-Guam program

January 2003

responding to a request for peer support,
guidance, and/or suicide intervention
services in the public schools w ill be
granted adm inistrative leave when the
volunteer’s time is needed during his or her
work schedule. Such leave will be limited to
40 hours per school year. Additional hours
may be granted w ith approval. Leave
requests are to be made 3 days prior to the
date o f the leave with the exception of
emergency cases.

Workplace violence. A Task Force on
Workplace Violence was established to
stu d y th e m o st e ffe c tiv e m ean s to
prevent w orkplace violence. The task
fo rce is to rev iew th e in c id e n c e o f
w orkplace violence, based upon data
obtained from health, labor, and law
enforcement agencies o f the government
o f Guam and the Federal Government;
co n d u c t an an a ly sis o f th e ex istin g
p o lic ie s and re g u la tio n s g o v e rn in g
prevention o f workplace violence; and
make recommendations concerning laws,
re-gulations or incentives necessary for
increased security in the workplaces, and
protection o f employees, including any
draft legislation deemed appropriate.
Other laws. M ilitary reserv ists and
national guard members employed by the
g o vernm ent o f G uam are allow ed a
maximum o f 15 working days of military
leave of absence with pay. A new provision
allows these individuals who are called up
for more than 15 days of active duty service
to participate in the government o f Guam
leave sharing program whereby leave can
be donated for their use.
Hawaii
Wages. As the result of prior legislation,
the State minimum wage rate rose from
$5.25 per hour to $5.75 on Jan. 1, 2002,
and to $6.25 per hour on January 1, 2003.
The amount o f guaranteed monthly
compensation required to exempt an in­
dividual from minimum wage, overtime and
recordkeeping requirements was increased
from $1,250 to $2,000.
A new section was added to the public
contracts and expenditure of public money
law. Now, before bidding on a public works
construction project in excess of $2,000,
which is subject to the prevailing wage law,
a contractor must certify that individuals
working on the contract on the jobsite will
be paid not less than the wages that the

Director of Labor and Industrial Relations
has determined to be prevailing for cor­
resp o n d in g classes o f laborers and
m echanics em ployed on public works
projects; will receive overtime compensation
at 1-1/2 times the basic hourly rate plus fringe
benefits; and will comply with all applicable
Federal and State workers’ compensation,
unemployment compensation, payment of
wages, and safety laws. Enforcement will be
by the governmental contracting agency
awarding the contract. Additionally, clarifying
changes were made in the prevailing wage law,
which includes most o f these same
requirements. Failure by the contracting
agency to include prevailing wage payment
provisions in the contract or specifications
will not be a defense of the contractor or
subcontractor for noncompliance with the law.

Genetic testing.

It is now an unlawful
discriminatory practice for an employer to
consider an individual’s genetic information,
including the genetic information of any
family member of the individual, or the
individual’s refusal to submit to a genetic
test as a condition of initial or continued
employment.

Private employment agencies.

Several
changes were made in the law regulating
commercial employment agencies including
eliminating the licensing requirement for
agency branch offices, elim inating the
bonding requirement for employer-paid fee
agencies, permitting initial and amended
filings of placement fee schedules rather
than annual filings, and eliminating the
requirement that a new license be issued
when an agency changes its address. Other
changes specify that an em ploym ent
agency may not send unsolicited resumes
to prospective em ployers; codify the
prohibition on employment agency op­
erations in homes, apartments, and hotel
rooms; and codify the requirement that
license applicants possess a reputation for
honesty, financial integrity, and not have
felony convictions related to the operation
of a commercial employment agency. Every
employment agency is to employ a licensed
principal agent who is responsible for the
direct management of the agency. A fine of
up to $1,000 per violation may be imposed
by the Director of Commerce and Con­
sumer Affairs.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Whistleblower. The Whistleblower Pro­
tection Act was amended to extend protec­
tion to those individuals who are about to
report a violation to their employer. The law
also was expanded to add coverage for reports
of violations of ordinances, regulations, or
contracts executed by the State, a political
subdivision of the State, or the United States.
The statute of limitations for bringing a
complaint of retaliation was extended to 2
years from 90 days after the alleged violation.
The penalty for each violation was increased
from a maximum of $500 to a minimum of
$500 and a maximum of $5,000.

Idaho
Agriculture.

A comprehensive farm labor
contractor law was enacted requiring
individuals performing farm labor con­
tracting activities to have a valid State
license and to pay an annual licensing fee of
$250. These licensed contractors are
required to carry vehicle insurance for all
vehicles used in the business operation,
carry workers’ compensation coverage for
all employees, and post a surety bond of
$10,000 if they em ploy 20 or few er
employees and $30,000 if they employ
more than 20 employees. These licensed
contractors are required to provide to all
employees, at the time o f hiring, recruiting,
soliciting, or supplying such employee, a
written statement in the employee’s native
language which describes the terms and
co n d itio n s o f em ploym ent, rate o f
compensation, and method of computing
same. The department may deny, revoke,
suspend, or refuse to renew a license when
the applicant or holder fails to meet certain
conditions. Agricultural employers who use
the services o f a licensed and bonded
contractor will not be held jointly and
severally liable for any unpaid wages
determined to be due and owing to any
employee of the contractor who performed
work for the agricultural employer.

Drug and alcohol testing. An executive
order established an alcohol and drug-free
workplace for all employees of the State of
Idaho.V io latio n s w ill be cause for
management/supervisor intervention and
may re su lt in re fe rra l to trea tm e n t,
including participation in the Employee
Assistance Program.

Illinois
Wages. Employees who are employed as
crew members of any uninspected towing
vessel, as defined in the Vessels and Seamen
chapter of the U.S. Code dealing with
shipping, operating in any navigable waters
in or along the boundaries of Illinois will
not be subject to the State overtime and
One Day Rest in Seven acts.
Two additions were made to the prevailing
wage law. One provides that two or more
investigatory hearings on the issue o f
establishing a new prevailing wage
classification for a particular craft or type of
worker will be consolidated in a single hearing
before the departm ent o f labor. The
consolidation will occur w hether each
separate investigatory hearing is conducted
by a public body or the department. The
party requesting a consolidated invest­
igatory hearing has the burden of establishing
that there is no existing prevailing wage
classification for the particular craft or type
of worker in any of the localities under
consideration. The second addition requires
that any contractor or subcontractor that
maintains its principal place o f business
outside the State must make the required wage
records or accurate copies of the records
available within the State at all times.
Child labor.

The child labor law was
amended to permit 12- and 13-year-olds to
be employed to officiate youth sports
activities for not-for-profit youth clubs,
park districts, or m unicipal parks and
recreations departments. The law requires
that a parent or guardian be present while
the minor is officiating; that the employer
obtain an employment certificate from the
minor’s school or school district; that the
minor work no more than 3 hours per day
on school days and a maximum of 4 hours
per day on nonschool days, not more than
10 hours a week, and not later than 9 p.m.;
and that the minor must be at least 3 years
older than the children participating in the
youth sports activity unless an individual
16 years or older is also officiating the same
activity.

Private employment agencies.

The title of
the Day Labor Services Act was changed to
the Day and Temporary Labor Services Act
and changes were made throughout to re­
flect this expanded coverage. Among other

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

11

State Labor Laws, 2002

changes, the fee for registering agencies
with the department o f labor may be paid
by ch eck or m oney o rd e r and the
department may not refuse to accept a
check on the basis that it is not a certified
check or a cashier’s check. An additional
fee may be charged for a returned check.
The department o f labor is to enforce the
law and will have the power to conduct
investigations, hold hearings, and to visit
and inspect any places covered by the
law. The department may (1) issue and
cause to be served cease and desist orders,
(2) take affirmative or other action as
deemed reasonable to eliminate the effect
o f the violation, (3) deny, suspend, or
revoke any registration under the act, and
(4) determ ine the amount o f any civil
penalty allowed by the law. In addition
to civil p en alties, w hoever w illfully
v io la te s th e law or o b s tru c ts the
department, its inspectors or deputies,
or any other person authorized to inspect
places o f employment, will be guilty o f a
C lass A m isdem eanor. The A ttorney
General will have authority to prosecute
all re p o rte d v io la tio n s . A ll m onies
received as fees and civil penalties will be
deposited into the Child Labor and Day
and Temporary Labor Enforcement Fund.

Other laws. The State M ilitary Code
was am ended by enacting an Illinois
National Guard Employment Rights Law.
Guard members called to State Active
Duty by the governor are entitled to re­
employment rights and benefits if 1) when
possible, the employer received advance
notice of the active service, 2) the member
reports back to work, or applies within
specified time frames, and 3) his or her
service was deemed honorable. Members
re-employment rights include 1) prompt
re-employment with the same increases
in status, seniority, wages, and benefits
(for example, insurance and other) as
earned by those who did not serve, 2) if
now disabled and incapable of performing
d u tie s o f the p rev io u s p o sitio n , the
em ployee will be placed in a position
with duties for which they are qualified
and able to perform, and 3) those rejected
for active duty shall be restored to their
previous position with the same status,
seniority, and wage increases as earned
by employees who did not serve. These
rights do not apply to members if the
e m p lo y e r ’s c irc u m sta n c e s h av e so
changed as to make re-employment o f an
employee impossible or unreasonable or
if the re-employment would impose an
undue hardship on the employer.
Digitized for
12FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Kansas
Drug and alcohol testing.

The law es­
tablishing a drug screening program for
certain State officers and employees and
for certain applicants for State employment
was amended. Added to the list o f in­
dividuals subject to drug screening based
upon a reasonable suspicion o f illegal drug
use are employees o f the Kansas State
School for the Blind, the Kansas State
School for the Deaf, and a State veteran’s
home operated by the Kansas Commission
on Veteran’s Affairs. “ Safety sensitive
positions” for purposes of coverage was
expanded to include State parole officers.

Kentucky
Wages. The section o f the State minimum
wage law exempting various individuals
from the overtime payment requirement
was amended to add, by reference, the
Federal Fair Labor Standards Act exemption
for employees employed as seamen.
The law requiring the payment of over­
time was amended to allow compensatory
time in lieu of overtime to employees of
any county, charter county, consolidated
local government, or urban-county govern­
ment, including an employee of a countyelected official. Compensatory time may
be offered upon the written request by an
employee, made freely and without coer­
cion, pressure, or suggestion by the em­
ployer, and upon a w ritten agreement
reached between the employer and em­
ployee before the performance of the work.
Compensatory leave will be given on an
hour-for-hour basis, except that an em­
ployee who is not exempt from the pro­
visions of the Federal Fair Labor Standards
Act may be granted compensatory time in
lieu of overtime pay at a rate of not less
than 1 and 1-1/2 hours for each overtime
hour worked. Up to 240 hours o f com­
pensatory time may be accrued except for
certain emergency or seasonal workers who
may accrue up to 480 hours. Civil penalties
are authorized for violation of the law.
Child labor. The Labor Cabinet pro­
mulgated amendments to the child labor
regulation. Among these, coverage was
extended to minors who are not enrolled in
school and who have not graduated.
Previously, some of the work restrictions
did not apply to youth who had dropped
out of school. Minors age 14 and 15 now
may not be employed more than 3 hours in
any one school day, nor more than 8 hours
in any nonschool day when school is in

January 2003

session. Previously, 14- and 15-year-olds
could work no more than 3 hours per day
when school was in session, regardless of
w hether it was a school day. A nother
amendment provides that minors age 16 and
17 may not work more than 30 hours a week
when school is in session, except that a
minor may work up to 40 hours if a parent
or legal guardian gives permission in writing
and his or her school certifies that the
student has maintained at least a 2.0 gradepoint average in the most recent grading
period. Previously, these minors could
work up to 40 hours per week without
p aren tal approval or a g rad e -p o in t
requirement. Minors 16 and 17 years of age
must now end their workday by 10:30 p.m.
on days preceding a school day, instead of
the previous 11:30 p.m.

Other laws. The law protecting em ­
ployees who are volunteer firefighters from
discharge for being absent or late to work,
as the result of responding to an emergency
prior to their starting time, was amended to
also apply to employees who are rescue
squad members, emergency medical tech­
nicians, peace officers, and members of
emergency management agencies. Em­
ployers are not required to pay employees
for the work time missed.
Louisiana
Worker privacy. The law pertaining to
employment records of State employees
was am ended by adding a sectio n
authorizing the G o v ern o r’s O ffice o f
Workforce Commission, the division of
administration, or any contractor working
on behalf of either of them, to be provided
with employment data for use in compiling
sta tistics w hich w ould su p p o rt p e r­
formance management and evaluation by
program managers o f State and Federal
programs, compiling statistics which would
assist in the p rep aratio n o f com m on
performance reports across agencies, or
com piling statistics for education and
training research purposes, including
longitudinal studies to assist in program
improvement and design. Employment data
obtained is to be kept confidential and used
only for these statistical purposes. A
person who unlawfully uses or releases the
data will be fined from $1,000 to $20,000
or imprisoned for not less than 30 days nor
more than 6 months, or both.
Other laws.

The reem ploym ent law
affecting persons called to duty in State
military forces was amended. The law now

will be applicable to persons called to active
duty in the National Guard of any other
State. After release from military service,
under honorable conditions, employees are
to be reinstated or restored to the same or
com parable position o f em ploym ent,
unless the person is no longer capable of
performing essential functions of the same
position by reason of a service-connected
disability. If otherw ise qualified, by
education, training, or experience to
perform another position, the employee
shall be employed in that other position
which the employee is physically capable
and qualified to perform provided the
employment does not pose a direct threat
or significant risk to the safety o f any
employee if the risk cannot be eliminated
by reasonable accommodation. The pro­
visions, protections, and rights o f the
Federal Soldiers and Sailors Civil ReliefAct
and the Federal Uniformed Services Em­
ployment and Reemployment Rights Act
are adopted and incorporated. Every
employer shall post in a prominent place in
each establishment a State produced notice
regarding these rights. The law is applicable
to all persons called to service as of
September 11, 2001.

Maine
Wages'. As the result o f prior legislation,
the State minimum wage rate rose from
$5.15 to $5.75 per hour on Jan. 1, 2002,
and to $6.25 per hour on Jan. 1, 2003.
As a result of cases pending before the
Maine courts in early 2002, the legislature
enacted into law a long standing practice of
exem pting interstate truck drivers and
driver’s helpers from overtime require­
ments. These employees, when engaged in
the transportation of goods or services in
interstate commerce, are exempt from the
overtime provisions of the Federal Fair
Labor Standards Act and the provisions of
the State overtime law. Application of the
law is retroactive to Jan. 1, 1995.

Family issues.

The law requiring em­
ployers to grant leave from work, with or
without pay, for an employee to prepare
for and attend court proceedings, to receive
medical treatment, or to obtain necessary
services to remedy a crisis caused by
dom estic violence, sexual assault, or
stalking was amended to also apply to leave
to attend to medical treatment for a victim
who is the em ployee’s child, parent, or
spouse.
The donation of an organ by an em­
ployee for a human organ transplant was


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

added to the list of reasons allowed for the
use of family and medical leave.
A com mittee is to be appointed to
study the benefits and costs of increasing
access to family and medical leave for
Maine families. Among other duties, the
com m ittee is to id en tify or develop
sources of Maine-specific data on use of
fam ily and m ed ical leav e and th e
a v a ila b ility o f p aid leav e, o b ta in
in fo rm atio n from o th e r S tates and
in te re st g ro u p s th a t are co n d u c tin g
studies or developing methodologies for
estim ating costs and benefits on paid
fam ily and m edical leave, and invite
te stim o n y from ex p e rts on ea rly
childhood development, including experts
on bonding between children and parents,
to assist in considering potential long­
term benefits o f providing paid leave so
that parents will be able to take leave
following the birth or adoption of a child.
A report, together with any necessary
im plem en tin g le g isla tio n w as to be
submitted to the legislature by Nov. 6,

2002.
Drug and alcohol testing.

The State law
concerning substance abuse testing of job
app lican ts was am ended to allow a
screening test of urine or saliva at the col­
lection point through the use of a noninstrumented collection point test device
approved by the Federal Food and Drug
Administration. Employers using such
tests must include procedures to ensure test
result confidentiality and establish pro­
cedures for training testing personnel in the
proper manner of collecting samples and
reading results, while maintaining a proper
chain o f custody. Negative test samples
must be destroyed, while positive samples
must be forwarded to a qualified testing lab
for confirmation testing.

Private employment agencies.

Health care
institutions, facilities, or organizations,
in cludin g tem porary nurse agencies,
employing certified nursing assistants,
must, before hiring a certified nursing
assistant, verify that he or she is listed on
the Maine Registry of Certified Nursing
Assistants and that there are no annotations
to prohibit the hiring of that individual
according to State and Federal regulations.

Plant closing.

The Department o f Labor
is to adopt rules to implement the law
governing severance pay that is to be paid
to employees by covered employers who
close or relocate an establishment. Initial

rules were to be submitted to the legislature
by Jan. 15, 2003.

Other laws.

The Maine Fire Protection
Services Commission is to examine the issue
o f providing protection to a volunteer
fire fig h ter from being d isch arg ed or
disciplined by an employer on the grounds
that he or she arrives late or does not arrive
at w ork because o f responding to an
emergency. Findings and any recommended
legislation were to be reported to the
legislature by Dec. 31, 2002.

Maryland
Wages. A law was enacted relating to
employee contributions to political action
committees. Among other provisions, it
authorizes an employee to contribute by
payroll deduction to one or more affiliated
political action committees selected by the
employee. Procedures are established for the
transfer of withheld contributions from the
employer to the employee’s mem-bership
entity and from the membership entity to the
named political action committee.
An employer may not require a licensed
practical nurse or a registered nurse to work
more than the regularly scheduled hours
according to the predeterm ined work
schedule. E xceptions perm it required
overtim e in u n fo reseen em ergency
situations; the em ergency situation is
nonrecurring and is not caused by or
aggravated by the employer’s inattention
or lack o f reasonable contingency planning;
the employer has exhausted all good faith,
reasonable attempts to obtain voluntary
workers during the succeeding shifts; the
nurse has the critical skills and expertise
required for the work; the standard of care
for a patient requires continuity of care
through completion o f a case, treatment, or
procedure; and the employer has informed
the nurse of the basis for the employer’s
direction. Overtime work also may be
required if a condition o f employment
includes on-call rotation or the nurse works
in community-based care. Employers must
exhaust all good faith, reasonable attempts
to ensure that appropriate staff is available
to accept responsibility for a patient’s care
beyond a n u rse’s predeterm ined work
schedule.
The prevailing wage law was amended
to provide that the contractor and the
subcontractor be jointly and severally liable
for restitu tio n to the su b c o n tra cto r’s
employees if they are paid less than the

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

13

State Labor Laws, 2002

p rev a ilin g w age rate for the w ork
performed.

Family issues. A June 30, 2002, termination
date provision was removed from the law
which requires an employer who provides
leave with pay to an employee following the
birth of the employee’s child to provide the
same leave with pay to an employee when a
child is placed with him or her for adoption.
Whistleblower. A Health Care Worker
Whistleblower Protection Act was enacted.
This measure makes it unlawful for an
employer to take or refuse to take any
personnel action as reprisal against an
employee because he or she discloses or
threatens to disclose to a supervisor or
board an activity, policy, or practice of the
employer that is in violation of a law, rule,
or regulation; provides information to or
testifies before any public body conducting
an investigation, hearing, or inquiry into any
violation o f a law, rule, or regulation by the
em ployer; or objects to or refuses to
participate in any unlawful activity, policy,
or practice. Protection will apply only if
the employee has a reasonable, good faith
b e lie f th a t the em ployer is acting
unlawfully; the activity, policy, or practice
that is the subject of the disclosure poses a
substantial and specific danger to the public
health or safety; and the employee has
affo rded the em ployer a reasonable
o p p o rtu n ity to co rrect the problem .
Provision is made for civil action in the
event of violation.

Massachusetts

Child labor. The section of the child labor law
prohibiting the employment of any person
under age 18 in operating motor vehicles of
any description, except in the course of
employment in an automobile repair shop,
was amended to permit the operation of golf
carts on a golf course if the minor is licensed
to operate a motor vehicle.
Following a hearing where it has been
shown that an emergency exists or that a
hardship exists in an industry or individual
establishment, the attorney general was
authorized to suspend the application or
operation of the child labor law or any rule
or regulation made under that law which
reg u lates, lim its, or p ro h ib its the

Digitized for 14
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

employment of minors older than age 16.
This authority is limited to the time periods:
(1) Sept. 5, 2002, to Oct. 31, 2002; May
25, 2003, to June 21, 2003; and Sept. 4,
2003, to Oct. 31, 2003, on Friday and
Saturday evenings only and (2) Aug. 1,
2002, to Sept. 4, 2002, inclusive, and June
21, 2003, to Sept. 3, 2003, inclusive.
Sections of the child labor law, regulating
hours of work by children under age 16,
work permit requirements, work in public
exhibitions, and license requirements for
theatrical exhibitions or shows, were
suspended, thereby allowing the theatrical
group Cirque du Soleil to employ children
under age 16 years, including employment
as acrobats, contortionists, or in any feat of
gymnastics, provided each child performs
in no more than 10 shows per week and no
more than 2 shows per day.

Equal employment opportunity. Complaints
of sexual harassment and other forms of
discrimination now may be filed within 300
days after the alleged act of discrimination,
rather than within 6 months as before. The
superior court has jurisdiction to enforce
the law and award damages.

Private employment agencies.

A law was
enacted to limit the amount o f fees that
staffing agencies may charge employees for
transportation. If a staffing agency or
worksite employer offers transportation
services to an employee for a fee, the fee
may be no more than the actual cost to
transport the employee to or from the
designated worksite. In addition, the fee
may not exceed 3 percent of the employee’s
total daily wages, and may not reduce the
employee’s pay below the minimum wage
earned for the day. If a staffing agency or
worksite employer requires the use of such
transportation services, no fee may be
charged. Transportation costs may not be
deducted from an em p lo y ee’s w ages
without express written authorization. The
staffing agency or worksite employer is to
give the employee a copy of the signed
authorization in a language that he or she
can understand.

Michigan
Agriculture.

A resolution was adopted
urging the U .S. C ongress and the

January 2003

Immigration and Naturalization Service to
determine the appropriateness of increasing
the num ber o f visas for tem p o rary
agricultural workers. It is the belief of the
Michigan House of Representatives that an
increase in the permissible number of legal
status temporary agricultural workers may
both benefit the economy and increase the
security of the United States by causing a
decrease in the number o f aliens here
without documentation.

Other laws.

The State amended the law
co n cern in g reem ploym ent rig h ts o f
employees who were on leave following
military service, release, or rejection from
service. Their re-employment rights follow
an established priority order. Having
served 1-90 days, they shall be re-employed
in the position they would have had, if
qualified, and if their employment had not
been interrupted for m ilitary service.
Following service o f 1-90 days, if the
person were not qualified for the position
they would have had if their employment
had not been interrupted and the employer
makes a reasonable effort to qualify the
person, the employee shall be re-employed
in the position they held when service
began. Following service of 91 or more
days, if the employee was not qualified for
the position held just prior to service and
cannot become qualified through reasonable
efforts of the employer, re-employment
would occur in a position of lessor status
or pay. The employee would be entitled to
seniority and its rights and benefits along
with rights and benefits not determined by
seniority. W ith certain exem ptions,
em ployees are not en title d to re ­
employment after 5 years military service
or a dishonorable discharge.
A reso lu tio n was ad o p ted to
commemorate Apr. 28, 2002, as Workers’
Memorial Day in Michigan, to remember
the working men and women who have been
killed or injured as a result of their work.

Minnesota
Overtime. A hospital or other licensed
health care facility is prohibited from
discharging, disciplining, threatening,
penalizing, or otherwise discriminating
against a registered nurse, advanced practice
registered nurse, or licensed practical nurse

solely on the grounds that the nurse fails to
accept an assignm ent o f additio n al
consecutive hours at the facility in excess
o f a normal work period, if the nurse
declines to work the additional hours
because o f a belief that to do so may
jeopardize patient safety. A nurse may be
scheduled for duty or may be required to
continue on duty for more than one normal
work period in an emergency, defined as a
period when replacement staff are not able
to report for duty because o f unusual,
unpredictable, or unforeseen circumstances,
such as, but not lim ited to, an act o f
terrorism , a disease outbreak, adverse
weather conditions, or natural disasters
which impact continuity of patient care.
The law does not apply to nursing facilities,
intermediate care facilities for persons with
mental retardation, licensed boarding care
facilities, or housing with services es­
tablishments.

Worker privacy. The portion o f the
Government data practices code concerning
the release of State employee personnel data
was amended to specifically provide that
d ata p e rta in in g to an em p lo y ee’s
dependents will be treated as private data.
Upon written request, various licensed
program s and fa c ilitie s providing
residential, treatment and other care for
children and for persons w ith mental
retardation, developmental disabilities or
related conditions may disclose, in writing,
inform ation about a current or former
em ployee to a prospective em ployer.
Information disclosed may include dates of
employment, wage history, job description,
training and education provided by the
employer, and all acts of violence, theft,
harassm ent, or illegal conduct by the
employee documented in the personnel
record which resulted in disciplinary action
or resignation, and the employee’s written
response, if necessary. No action may be
brought for disclosure of the information
unless it is proven that the disclosure was
made fraudulently or w ith deliberate
disregard as to its accuracy. Another new
p ro v isio n req u ires, w ith the w ritten
informed consent of the subject of the data,
school districts or charter schools to release
to another school district or charter school
private personnel data on a current or
former employee related to documented


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

violence toward or sexual contact with a
student.

Private employment agencies.

Several
changes were made in the law regulating
supplemental nursing services agencies. The
conditions for registration were amended
to add requirements that the agency carry
an employee dishonesty bond of $10,000;
that the agency maintain workers’ com­
pensation insurance for all nurses, nursing
assistants, nurse aides, and orderlies
provided or procured by the agency; that
the agency file with the Commissioner of
Revenue the name and address of the bank,
savings bank, or savings association in
which all em ployee income tax w ith­
holdings are deposited, and the name and
address of any nurse, nursing assistant,
nurse aide, or orderly whose income is
derived from placement by the agency, if
the agency purports the income is not
subject to withholding; and that the agency
document that each temporary employee
provided to health care facilities is an
employee o f the agency and is not an
independent contractor. Changes were also
made pertaining to registration revocation,
hearings, and period o f ineligibility for
having registration restored.

less than 2 years, on the premises where
any child is employed, the work certificate,
a record of the name, address, and age of the
child, and times and hours worked by the
child each day. Waivers of time and hour
restrictions issued by the director now will
apply only to the entertainment industry.
The exemption from the law for farm work
performed with the knowledge and consent
o f the child’s parent was expanded. In
determining the amount of civil damages due
in the event of violation, the director is to
consider the size of the business, based on
the number of employees.

Montana
Wages. New more comprehensive and
detailed prevailing wage regulations were
adopted September 13. The rules better
identify the nature o f projects, heavy,
highway or building construction, and
conform them largely to Federal DavisBacon terminology. The regulations also
establish a procedure for debarment for a
period of up to 3 years for law violations,
and make the appeal procedure for pre­
vailing wage cases consistent with the
overall wage claim process. The respons­
ibilities o f contractors and contracting
agencies are more clearly defined. Facsimile
filings are permitted.

Mississippi

Nebraska

Worker privacy. Licensed health care
facilities will not be held liable in any
employment discrimination suit in which
an allegation of discrimination is made
regardin g an em ploym ent d ecision
authorized by provisions of the licensing
law requiring background checks and signed
affidavits by employees and applicants
attesting that they have not been convicted
of various specified felonies.

Agriculture.

Missouri
Child labor.

Among several changes in the
child labor law, street occupations and
door-to-door sales are now prohibited for
youth under age 16. Previously, such work
was permitted with written permission
from the director of the division of labor
standards. The director now may require
the production of work certificates or work
permits and other documents. All such
records obtained by the division are
confidential. Employers are to keep for no

Among revisions to the Farm
Labor Contractors Act, operations which
have a workforce comprised of 80 percent
or more individuals who are age 17 years or
y ounger and w hich have o b tain ed a
certificate o f exem ption from the de­
partm ent o f labor were excluded from
coverage, while the previous exemption was
elim inated for those operations which
employ individuals who all live within 50
miles o f the worksite. The provisions for
application and annual renewal fees of $750
were replaced with a requirement that the
C om m issioner o f Labor establish the
amount of the fees, which are not to exceed
$750, by rule and regulation with due regard
for the costs of administering the act. On
its own initiative or upon receipt o f a
complaint or notice that a farm labor con­
tractor is in violation of the act, the depart­
ment now is to conduct an investigation of
the contractor. Contractors are to provide a
bilingual employee who will be available at
the worksite for each shift a non-Englishspeaking worker is employed, if the farm

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

15

State Labor Laws, 2002

labor contractor has a workforce of 10 or
more non-English-speaking workers who
speak the same language.

Other laws. State law was made con­
sistent with Federal law, regarding private
and public sector employees who serve in
the military, by adopting, as State law, parts
of the Federal Uniformed Services Employ­
ment and Reemployment Rights Act of
1994. In other changes, State and local
personnel will be granted a “State em­
ergency leave of absence” for emergency
duty when called upon by the governor,
and public sector employees are now en­
titled to take a military leave of absence
equal to the normal number of hours the
employee works in a 3-week period up to a
maximum of 120 hours in a calendar year.
Previously, State and local government
employees were granted up to 15 workdays
of leave each year for service in the National
Guard or reserves, regardless of their hours
worked.
If an employee, who is not a member of
a labor organization, chooses to have legal
representation from the labor organization
in any grievance or legal action, the em­
ployee must reimburse the labor organ­
ization for his or her share of the actual
legal fees and court costs incurred in the
representation.
New Hampshire
Other laws.

A law was enacted providing
employment protection for members o f the
National Guard, State Guard, or Militia.
The measure eliminates the differences in
benefits, rights, and protections in em­
ployment between individuals called to
active duty by the Federal Government and
those called to active duty by the State. It
provides that an individual may not be
denied hiring, retention in employment,
promotion, or other incidents or advantages
of employment because of any obligation
as a member of the National Guard or the
State Militia. The department of labor is to
provide assistance to affected m ilitary
members with respect to the enforcement
o f rights and benefits under the law.

New Jersey
Wages. When a regular payday falls on a
non-workday, resulting from the workplace
being closed for business, payment now is
to be made on the immediately preceding
workday, unless otherwise provided in a
collective bargaining agreement. Previously,

16 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

paym ent was to be made on the next
following workday.
An executive order was issued requiring
that on a project-by-project basis, a State
department, instrumentality, or authority
is to include a project labor agreement in a
public works project where it has been
determined that it advances the State’s
interests of cost, efficiency, quality, safety,
tim eliness, skilled labor force, labor
stability, or the State’s policy to advance
minority and women-owned businesses.
Among other things, the project labor
agreement is to set forth binding procedures
for resolving jurisdictional labor disputes
and grievances arising before the completion
of work; contain guarantees against strikes,
lockouts, or sim ilar actio n s; perm it
flexibility in work scheduling and shift
hours and times; ensure a reliable source of
skilled and experienced labor; permit the
selection of the lowest qualified bidder,
without regard to union or nonunion status
at other construction sites; and be made
b inding on all co n tracto rs and su b ­
contractors on the public works project
through the inclusion of appropriate bid
specifications in all relevant bid documents.
The sections of the prevailing wage law
requiring payment of the prevailing wage
rate on construction contracts let by the
New Jersey E conom ic D evelopm ent
Authority were amended to also apply to
construction contracts let by other au­
thorities receiving financial assistance from
the Economic Development Authority.
Financial assistance was defined as any
loan, loan guarantee, grant, incentive, tax
exemption, or other financial assistance that
enables an entity to engage in a construction
contract. Payment of the prevailing wage
will not be required for construction com­
m encing m ore than 2 years after the
assistance is received.
The maximum administrative penalties
that the labor commissioner is authorized
to assess and collect for violations of the
prevailing wage law were increased from
$250 to $2,500 for a first violation, and
from $500 to $5,000 for each subsequent
violation.

Overtime. Em ployees o f health care
facilities will not be required to accept work
in excess of an agreed to, predetermined,
and regularly scheduled daily work shift,
not to exceed 40 hours per week, except in
the case of an unforeseeable emergent cir­
cumstance when the overtime is required
only as a last resort and is not used to fill

January 2003

vacancies resulting from chronic short
staffing, and the employer has exhausted
reasonable efforts to obtain staffing.
Acceptance by any employee of work in
excess o f 40 hours per week m ust be
voluntary and the refusal o f any employee
to accept such overtime work will not be
grounds for discrimination, dismissal, or
any other penalty or adverse employment
decision. The requirement that the employ­
er exhaust reasonable efforts to obtain
staffing will not apply in the event of any
declared national, State, or m unicipal
emergency or a disaster or other catas­
trophic event which substantially affects
or increases the need for health care service.
The law will take effect in January 2003 for
acute care hospitals and in July 2003 for
long-term care facilities and all other health
care facilities.

Apparel.

An executive order was issued
specifying that public bodies obtaining
apparel from a vendor are to require that all
production be performed in the United
States. They also are to require that it be
performed in facilities w here:(l) vendors
and their contractors and subcontractors do
not interfere with union organization and
agree to voluntarily recognize a duly
authorized union; (2) apparel production
workers will not be terminated except for
just cause and vendors and their contractors
and su b co n tracto rs w ill p ro v id e a
mechanism to resolve all disputes; (3)
workers are to have a safe and healthy work
environment that is free of discrimination
on the basis of race, national origin, religion,
sex, and sexual preference; (4) contracts will
be issued only to co n tra cto rs, and
production will be perform ed only by
contractors or subcontractors having a
record o f co m pliance w ith laws and
regulations governing wages and hours,
discrimination, and occupational safety and
health; and (5) apparel production will be
perform ed only by co n tra cto rs or
subcontractors who provide compensation
at an hourly rate that yields an annual
income at least equal to the poverty-level
threshold amount for a family o f three.
Bidders for apparel contracts are to provide
inform ation on every location w here
production is to take place, and the name,
business address, and names of principal
officers of each subcontractor to be used.
In the event of a violation, the Commissioner

of Labor may terminate an existing contract
and may bar the vendor or bidder from
receiving pending or subsequent apparel
contracts.

Equal employment opportunity.

It now is
unlawful for any employer to discharge or
otherwise discriminate against an employee
in compensation or in terms, conditions, or
privileges of employment for displaying the
American flag on the employee’s person or
work station, provided the display does not
interfere with the employee’s job duties.
An employer in violation will be liable to
the em ployee for dam ages, including
punitive dam ages, and for reasonable
attorney’s fees.

Worker privacy. An Open Public Records
Act was enacted expanding the public’s
right to access all public records to include
all government records and facilitating the
way in which that access is provided by
the custodian o f a government record.
Public agencies were authorized to take
an ticip ato ry adm inistrative action in
advance as necessary for the efficient
implementation of the act, establishing the
process by which members of the public
may seek access to records and, at the same
time, providing for the confidentiality of
ce rtain reco rd s. A P rivacy Study
Commission was established to examine
privacy issues raised by the collection,
processing, use, and dissem ination o f
information by public agencies, and to
recom m end to the governor and the
legislature specific measures to address
these issues and safeguard individuals’
privacy rights.
Workplace violence. A task force was
established to study workplace violence and
to recommend legislation and other action
to improve workplace security. A report is
to be issued by Aug. 3, 2003, that will
contain: (1) a review of the incidence of
workplace violence, based on data obtained
from Federal, State, and local health, labor,
and law enforcem ent agencies; (2) an
an aly sis o f the types o f busin esses,
employees, and situations with the greatest
occurrences o f workplace violence; and (3)
reco m m endations for app ro p riate
legislation, regulations, or incentives
n ecessary for in creased secu rity in

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

w orkplaces
employees.

and the p ro tec tio n

of

Other laws.

The req u irem en t th at
individuals hired as perm anent public
school teachers be U.S. citizens was
amended to exempt teachers from foreign
cou n tries who are en ro lled w ith an
approved international agency which
operates a teacher placement program or
teacher exchange program. These teachers
may be employed for up to 3 years. To be
ce rtified , the teach er m ust m eet the
eligibility requirements for a provisional
in stru c tio n a l ce rtifica te cfr p ossess
equivalent qualifications as determined by
the State Board o f E ducation, and
demonstrate the ability to fluently speak,
read, and write the English language.

New Mexico
Family issues.

A resolution was adopted
requesting the Commission on the Status
of Women to lead a task force to study the
costs and benefits o f providing wage
replacement to employees who take family
and medical leave.

New York
Wages. The minimum wage and payment
o f wages laws were amended to cover
limited liability companies.
The debarm ent p ro v isio n s o f the
prevailing wage law, previously applicable
to the five largest shareh o ld ers o f a
contractor or subcontractor, now will apply
to shareholders who own or control at least
10 percent of the outstanding stock. The
law was also amended to provide for the
ineligibility to submit a bid or to be awarded
any public works contract for a period of 5
years from the date o f conviction when any
person or corporation, or any officer or
shareholder who owns or controls at least
10 percent of the outstanding stock of the
corporation, has been convicted o f a felony
offense for conduct directly relating to
obtaining or attem pting to obtain, or
performing or attempting to perform a
public work contract with a public body,
and the felony offense is a violation of the
prevailing wage or wage payment laws or is
one or more o f several listed felonies.
Amendments were made in relation to
actions for recovery from performance

bonds on public work projects. Actions by
an affected employee to recover unpaid
wages, supplements, and interest may be
b ro u g h t ag ain st the co n tra cto r, the
subcontractor, or the issuer o f the bond.
The action now may be brought either
within 1 year of the date of the filing of an
order by the Commissioner o f Labor or
other fiscal officer determining a wage or
supplement underpayment or within 1 year
o f the date of the last alleged underpayment.
The em ployee may p erm it the
commissioner or other fiscal officer to
commence the action on his or her behalf in
addition to an employee organization as
before.
The labor law was amended to increase
the civil penalty for an employer’s failure
to pay wages or for differentiating in the
rate of pay because of sex from $50 to $500
for each violation. Penalties are to be
recovered by the labor commissioner.
The crim inal penalty section o f the
payment o f wages law was amended to
provide that a conviction for a first offense
o f failure by an employer to pay wages of
employees or failure to maintain payroll
records is a misdemeanor punishable by a
fine of not less than $500 nor more than
$20,000 or by imprisonment for not more
than 1 year. Conviction o f a second or
subsequent offense within 6 years of the
first conviction is a felony punishable by a
fine o f not less than $500 nor more than
$20,000 or imprisonment for not more than
1 year plus 1 day, or both a fine and
im prisonm ent, for each offense. In
determining the penalty for recordkeeping
violations, the court is to consider the
severity of the violation, the size o f the
employer, and the employer’s good faith
effort to comply with the law.

Child labor.

A cashier under age 18 and
employed by a retailer with a drug store
beer license, may now sell alcoholic
beverages if under the direct supervision of
a person age 18 or older. This amendment
expands a provision previously applicable
to cashiers in licensed grocery stores.

Apparel.

A New York State A pparel
W orkers F air L abor C o n d itio n s and
Procurement Act was enacted. This law
amends the labor law, the State finance law,
and the education law to require that State

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

17

State Labor Laws, 2002

agencies, public authorities, the State
U niv ersity o f N ew York, the C ity
University of New York, and community
colleges consider labor standards and
w orking conditions when purchasing
apparel. Contracts for the purchase of
apparel are only to be entered into with
bidders who attest that the apparel was
m anufactured in com pliance w ith all
applicable labor and occupational safety
laws, including but not limited to child labor
laws, wage and hour laws, workplace safety
laws, and laws protecting the rights of
employees to form unions. Bidders must
also provide, if known, the name and
address of each subcontractor to be used
and a list of all manufacturing plants used
by the bidder or subcontractor.
The labor commissioner is to prepare
and issue a notice to be posted at the
w ork site o f every know n apparel or
garment manufacturer or contractor in the
State. The notice is to clearly specify: (1)
the duties of employers with regard to the
rights o f employees to the receipt and
payment of wages; (2) a toll free number at
the department of labor to which employees
may direct questions or register complaints
concerning the conditions of employment
or an employer’s failure to pay wages; and
(3) the address of the regional department
to file a complaint. The notice is to be in
English, Spanish, Chinese, and Korean, is
to be printed in at least 10-point type, and
is to be posted in a visible and prominent
location within the worksite.

Equal employment opportunity.

It now is
unlawful for any employer to discharge or
otherwise discriminate against an employee
in compensation, or in terms, conditions,
or privileges o f employment for displaying
the American flag on the employee’s person
or work station, provided the display does
not interfere w ith the em ployee’s job
duties. The labor commissioner may assess
an employer in violation a civil penalty of
not less than $200 or more than $2,000. An
em ployee may bring a civil action for
appropriate re lie f including rehiring,
payment of lost compensation, damages,
and reasonable attorneys’ fees.
Amendments were made to the unlawful
discrim inatory practices section o f the
Human Rights Law pertaining to pro­
tecting the right of employees to practice
th eir religion. It now is an unlaw ful

18 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

discriminatory practice for an employer to
refuse to allow an employee to use leave
solely because the leave is being used to
accommodate religious observance. It also
is an unlawful discriminatory practice for
an employer to impose upon an individual
circum stan ces th at w ould force th at
individual to forgo religious observance as a
condition of employment, advancement, or
promotion unless, after engaging in a bona
fide effort, the employer demonstrates that
he or she is unable to reasonably
accommodate the employee’s or applicant’s
religious observance or practice without
undue hardship on the conduct o f the
business. Employers will not be required
to pay premium wages to employees who
are working during hours when premium
wages would normally be paid, if the work
during those hours is to accommodate
religious observation on the employee’s
behalf.

Worker privacy. The section of the civil
rights law relating to the confidentiality of
the personnel records of police officers,
co rrectio n o fficers, fire fig h ters, and
paramedics was amended to also cover
individuals defined as peace officers within
the Division o f Parole. Their personal
records are to be considered confidential and
not subject to inspection or review without
their express written consent except as may
be mandated by lawful court order.
Employee leasing.

A New York Pro­
fessional Employers Act was enacted.
Under the law, anyone engaged in the
b usiness o f p ro v id in g pro fessio n al
employer services for a client company
must register with the department o f labor.
The initial registration fee is $1,000 with an
annual renewal fee of $500. Information that
must be provided includes the name or
names under which it conducts business;
the address o f the principal place o f
business and the address of each office it
maintains in the State; the taxpayer or
employer identification number; a list by
jurisdiction o f each name under which the
professional employer organization has
operated in the preceding 5 years; a
financial statement; and, in the event the
organization is a privately or closely held
company, a list of all persons or entities
that own a 5-percent or greater interest at
the time of application, or owned a 5-

January 2003

percent or greater interest in the preceding
5 years. A publicly traded company is to
file a list of all persons or entities that own
a 50-percent or greater interest at the time
of application. A professional employer
agreement will have no effect on existing
collective bargaining agreements.

Whistleblower. A section relating to the
prohibition of retaliatory personnel actions
by certain health care employers against
health care employees was added to the
labor law. Retaliatory action is prohibited
against an employee who discloses or
threatens to disclose, or refuses to partic­
ipate in, an employer activity, policy, or
practice that the employee, in good faith,
reasonably believes constitutes improper
quality of patient care. This protection shall
only apply if the employee brought the
im proper ac tiv ity to a su p e rv is o r’s
attention and gave the employer reasonable
opportunity to correct such activity. The
protection application sequence of events
will not apply where the improper quality
of patient care presents an imminent threat
to public health or safety, or where the
em ployee believes that reporting to a
supervisor would not result in corrective
action. Employees who have been subject
to retaliation may seek relief through a civil
action. Besides relief for the employee, if
the employer has acted in bad faith, the
co u rt may assess a p en alty o f up to
$ 10,000. These penalties will go into a fund
committed to improving the quality o f
patient care.
Ohio
Child labor.
Sections o f the education
code and child labor law reg ard in g
ad m in istratio n o f age and sch o o lin g
certificates for minors were amended. Parttime age and schooling certificates for 14and 15-year-olds were eliminated, and a
ch ild may now apply fo r a reg u lar
certificate at age 14 instead of age 16. The
p ro v isio n for issu an ce o f over age
certificates to persons over age 18 was
eliminated. It is no longer required to
complete a vocational or special education
program in order to receive a certificate.
Certificates may no longer contain social
security information. The chief adm in­
istrative officer of the nonpublic or com-

munity school district attended by the
child, is responsible for issuing age and
schooling certificates for city, local, joint
vocational, or exempted districts when
there is proof that the child is at least age
14. Issuing officers must electronically file
the certificates with the State director of
commerce, while employers are no longer
required to keep the certificates on file.
While any licensed physician or physician’s
assistant may certify a students’ physical
condition, a student athlete’s certificate of
exam ination may be used to certify a
student’s condition.

Oklahoma
Wages. The commissioner of labor now
may assess an administrative fine of $500
against an employer operating in Oklahoma
who is found to have knowingly violated
the payment o f wages law, if the violations
occur on two or more occasions within any
6-month period. All such administrative
fines collected will be deposited to the
Department of Labor Revolving Fund.
A classified State employee who is oncall will receive a minimum of 2 hours of
work if he or she reports to a work location
while on-call. Previously, this guarantee
applied only to classified State employees
working in institutional settings.

The law requiring semimonthly pay­
ment of wages on regular paydays, except
for exempt employees and State, county,
and municipal employees who may be paid
a minimum of once each calendar month,
was amended to also allow employees of
qualified nonprivate foundations to be paid
monthly.

Employee leasing.

An Oklahoma Pro­
fessional Em ployer O rganization R e­
cognition and Registration Act was enacted.
Under the law, anyone engaged in the
b u sin ess o f p ro v id in g professional
employer services for a client company
must register with the Insurance Com­
mission. The initial registration fee is $500
w ith an annual renew al fee o f $250.
Information that must be provided includes
the name or names under which the business
operates; the address of the principal place
of business and the address of each office it
maintains in the State; the taxpayer or
em ployer id e n tifica tio n num ber; a
statement of management experience; and a


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

financial statement. Each professional
employer organization must maintain either
a net worth of $50,000 or a bond in that
amount. Both the client company and the
professional employer organization will be
considered the employer for the purpose
o f coverage under the W o rk er’s
Compensation Act and for purposes of
sponsoring em ployee retirem en t and
welfare benefit plans.

Inmate labor.

Persons convicted of drug
distribution now will be included among
those inmates authorized to be issued a
pass to be away from the correctional
facility for purposes including contacting
prospective employers or participating in
work, educational, and training programs in
the community.

in compliance with hours restrictions and
such other requirements as the Department
of Labor and Industry may establish to pro­
tect the minor’s safety, health, and well-be­
ing. Youth peddling is defined as the selling
of goods or services by minors to customers
at their residence, places of business, or pub­
lic places including, but not limited to, street
comers, roadway medians, sports and per­
forming arts facilities, public transportation
stations and sales from vehicles. The law
does not apply to minors who sell prod­
ucts, goods, or services as volunteers with­
out compensation on behalf of nonprofit or­
ganizations, minors who deliver newspapers
to customers, or minors employed at fixed
retail locations in compliance with the Fed­
eral Fair Labor Standards Act.

Other laws.

The State law regarding time
off for employees who are required to serve
on a jury was amended. Employees may no
longer be required to use vacation or sick
leave to serve on a jury. The employer is
not required to pay an employee wages for
the time he or she was absent for jury duty.
However, the employee has the choice of
whether to take paid or unpaid leave for the
time off. Employers in violation will be
guilty o f a m isdem eanor and, upon
conviction, subject to a fine of up to $5,000.

Oregon
Wages. A minimum wage ballot initiative
was approved by the voters in the
November general election. Ballot measure
25 provided for an increase in the State
minimum wage from $6.50 per hour to
$6.90 on Jan. 1, 2003. Beginning Jan. 1,
2004, and annually thereafter, the rate will
be adjusted for inflation based on data from
the U .S. B ureau o f L abor S tatistics
Consumer Price Index. The rate will be
rounded to the nearest 5 cents.
Pennsylvania
Child labor.

The child labor law was
amended to provide that minors under age
16 may not be employed in youth peddling
unless a signed consent has been obtained
from the minor’s parents or guardian, appro­
priate adult supervision is provided, the mi­
nor is not employed past 6 pm., and work is

Puerto Rico
Family issues.

The law that provides for
the adoption of flexible work schedules
upon agreement between the employee and
the em ployer was am ended to require
employers to give priority in processing to
those requests submitted by women with
minor children and single parents with
custody of their children.

Other laws. A sports leave without pay
policy was established for all public and
private sector employees who are selected
and ce rtified by the B oard for the
D evelopm ent o f Full-Tim e High P er­
formance Puerto Rican Athletes, as athletes
in training and as trainers for Olympic,
Paralym pic, Pan Am erican or Central
American Games, or for Regional or World
Championships. The unpaid sports leave
will be for up to 1 year with a right of
renewal, provided it has been approved
by the Board and the employer is notified
30 days b efo re its e x p ira tio n d ate.
E m ployees on leave w ill retain th eir
vested rights and benefits. D uring the
term o f the sports leave, the Board will
be responsible for the salaries o f the
p a rtic ip a n ts and m u st re m it to the
employer the amounts corresponding to
th e re q u ire d leg al d e d u c tio n s . An
em p lo y er fo u n d in v io la tio n m ust
compensate the athletes or trainers for
any damages sustained, plus a sum equal
to double the compensation awarded, and

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

19

State Labor Laws, 2002

m ust also rein state them in th eir
employment if they have been dismissed.

Rhode Island
Wages. The section o f the payment of
wages law establishing the enforcement
pow ers and duties o f the D irector o f
Labor and Training was amended to add a
provision that the director may institute
any action to recover unpaid wages or
o th e r c o m p e n sa tio n u n d er th e law,
including adm inistrative fees, with or
without the consent o f the employee or
em ployees affected. A nother change
p erm its filin g o f w age claim s by a
representative authorized in writing by
the employee.
R esolutions were adopted declaring
Apr. 3, 2002, to be “Rhode Island Pay
E q u ity D ay” and ask in g all R hode
Islanders to join in urging all other States
to establish equitable compensation that
elim in a te s sex and race based w age
discrimination.
Genetic testing. The Genetic Testing as
a C ondition o f E m ploym ent law was
am ended. The law, w hich p ro h ib its
em ployers, em ploym ent agencies, or
licensing agencies from discrim inating
a g a in s t em p lo y ee s, lic e n s e e s , or
applicants for employment or licensure
on the basis o f genetic inform ation or
te s tin g , w as ex p a n d ed by ad d in g a
definition section and by specifying that
the ban on discrimination applies to the
refusal o f the em ployee, licensee, or
applicant for employment or licensure to
submit to a genetic test, submit a family
h e a lth h isto ry , re v e a l w h e th e r the
individual has submitted to a genetic test,
or reveal the results of any genetic test.
A ny c o n tra c t or a g re em e n t, w hich
purports to waive the provisions o f this
law are invalid.
Private employment agencies.

A special
H o use C o m m issio n w as cre ate d to
examine procedures and best practices to
foster the employment of all individuals
in th e S tate in c lu d in g te m p o rary


20 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

employees working for any employment
agency, placement service, training school
or center, labor organization, or any other
em p lo y ee re fe rrin g so u rce , and to
safeguard their right to obtain and hold
employment without discrim ination. A
report of findings and recommendations
is to be made by Mar. 12, 2003.

O ther laws. The law re q u irin g
em ployers to pay for the cost o f any
physical examination they require o f a
p ro sp e c tiv e
em p lo y ee
p rio r to
employment was amended to specify that
any employer who fails to comply with
the law will be subject to a fine of $200.

South Carolina
Wages. A m easu re w as en a cted to
prohibit a political subdivision o f the
State from establishing, mandating, or
otherw ise requiring either a minimum
wage that exceeds the Federal minimum
wage rate or a minimum wage rate related
to employee wages that are exempt under
the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act.
Political subdivisions may establish wage
rates in contracts to which they are a
party.
Other laws. The Director o f the Depart­
ment o f Labor, Licensing and Regulation
is to ensure compliance with the State
right-to-w ork law, and is to cooperate
with employees in the investigation and
enforcement of claims against employers.
Upon the filing of a complaint with the
department, the director may enter a place
of employment to determine compliance.
It now is unlawful to obstruct the director
in the performance of duties under the
law. It also is unlawful for a person or a
labor organization to participate in an
agreement, arrangement, or practice that
has the effect o f requiring, as a condition
o f em ployment, that an em ployee be,
become, or remain a member of a labor
organization or pay union dues or fees,
and for a person or labor organization to
induce, cause, or encourage an employer
to violate the law.

January 2003

South Dakota
Other laws. Any member of the South
Dakota National Guard ordered to active
duty service by the governor or by the
President o f the United States will have
all the employment and reemployment
rights and other protections afforded to
persons serving on Federal active duty as
provided for under Federal law. The
section o f State law regarding job rights
fo r re s e rv is ts and g u ard sm e n w as
repealed.

Tennessee
Wages. R e so lu tio n s w ere ad o p ted
asking the governor to recognize Apr. 16,
2002, as “Equal Pay Day” in Tennessee
recognizing the full value o f w om en’s
skills and their significant contributions
to the labor force. April 16 symbolizes
the day on w hich the w ages paid to
American women to that date in 2002,
when added to women’s earnings for all
o f 2001, equal the 2001 earnings o f
American men.
The prevailing wage commission is to
report to the general assembly on or before
Jan. 1, 2003, with recommendations for
improvements to the current prevailing
wage survey process which optimizes the
response rates for the surveys conducted
by the department.

Drug and alcohol testing.

New sections
were added to the State law dealing with
dru g -free w orkplaces. S tate or local
government entities must include in any
issued bid or procurement specification
for construction services a statement as
to w h eth e r th e g o v e rn m e n t en tity
operates a certified drug-free workplace
program or any other programs which
provide for testin g o f em ployees for
workplace use of drugs or alcohol. Where
such p ro g ra m s e x ist, th e b id or
p ro cu rem en t sp e cific atio n is also to
include statements describing the program
and sp e c ify in g th a t all b id d e rs fo r
c o n stru c tio n serv ice c o n tra cts sh all
submit an affidavit that attests that the

bidder operates a drug-free workplace or
other testing program with requirements
at least as stringent as those of the program
operated by the government entity.

Employee leasing.

Among amendments
to the employee leasing law, it now is
specified that a client will be jointly and
sev erally liab le w ith a s ta ff leasing
com pany for S tate unem ploym ent
premiums for each of the client’s leased
employees, provided however, that a client
will be relieved of joint and several liability
if the staff leasing company has posted a
co rp o rate surety bond w ith the
ad m in istra to r o f the D ivision o f
Employment Security o f the Tennessee
D epartm ent o f L abor and W orkforce
Development.

Utah
Genetic testing. A G enetic T esting
R e stric tio n s on E m ployers A ct was
enacted. This measure makes it unlawful
for an employer, in connection with hiring,
promotion, retention or related decisions,
to take into consideration private genetic
information about an individual, to request
or require an individual or his or her blood
relative to submit to a genetic test, or to
take into consideration the fact that an
individual or his or her blood relative has
taken or refused to take a genetic test.
Limited exceptions permit an employer to
seek an order compelling the disclosure of
genetic information in connection with an
em plo y m en t-related
ju d ic ia l
or
administrative proceeding in which the
individual has placed his or her health at
issue, or an employment-related decision
in which the employer has a reasonable
basis to believe that the individual’s health
condition poses a real and unjustifiable
safety risk requiring the change or denial of
an assignment. The order will only be
entered if other ways o f obtaining the
private information are not available or
would not be effective.
Worker privacy. Among amendments to
the Government Records and Management
Act is a new section permitting an at-risk
government employee to file a written
application that gives notice of his or her

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

status to each government entity holding a
record that would disclose the employee’s
or a family m ember’s home address or
telephone number, Social Security number,
insurance coverage, m arital status, or
payroll deductions, and requests that the
records be classified private. Neither the
governmental entity or political subdivision
is liable for damages arising from the
negligent disclosure of records classified as
private unless the d isclo su re was o f
employment records maintained by the
governm ental entity, or the current or
former employee had previously filed the
required notice and the government entity
did not take reasonable steps to preclude
access or distribution of the record, or the
release of the record was otherwise willfully
or grossly negligent. “At-risk government
employees” include peace officers, judges,
U.S. attorneys and assistant attorneys, and
certain prosecutors. Changes made to the
law in 2001 concerning limits on disclosure
of information were repealed.

Employee leasing.

A m ong several
amendments to the Professional Employer
Organization Licensing Act, references to
the term “employee leasing company” were
removed. References to the term “leased
em ployee” were also elim inated and
replaced with the term “co-employee,”
defined as a person who is an employee of
a professional employer organization and
of a client company. A client company is
defined as an entity that leases any or all of
its regular employees from a professional
em ployer organization. The law now
provides that employees of professional
employer organizations are not exempt
from applicable licensure laws. Several
changes were made in the qualifications for
licensure, in the procedure for refusing to
renew the license o f a pro fessio n al
employer organization, and in the definition
of unprofessional conduct.

Vermont
Wages.
It now is an unlaw ful em ­
ploym ent p ractice for any em ployer,
employment agency, labor organization, or
person seeking employees to discriminate
between employees on the basis of sex by
paying wages to employees of one sex at a
rate less than the rate paid to employees of
the other sex for equal work that requires
equal skill, effort, and responsibility, and is
perfo rm ed u n d er sim ilar w orking
conditions. Different wage rates may be
paid pursuant to a seniority system, a merit
system, a system in which earnings are
based on quantity or quality of production,
or any factor other than sex. An employer
who is paying wages in violation of the act
may not reduce the wage rate o f any other
employee in order to come into compliance.
An employer in violation will be liable to
any affected employee in the amount of the
underpaid wages and an equal amount as
liquidated damages in addition to any other
remedies available.

Drug and alcohol testing.

Among several
amendments to the law regulating drug
testing of employees and job applicants,
the requirement that the test be given to
applicants as part of or in conjunction with
a comprehensive physical examination was
dropped, the time limit for administering
the test was eliminated, and employers are
to designate a certified collector to collect
specim ens from jo b ap p lica n ts and
em ployees. The co llecto r may be an
employee for the purposes o f collecting
specim ens from jo b ap p lican ts. The
collector may not be an employee for the
purpose o f collecting specim ens from
em ployees for drug testin g based on
probable cause.

Other laws.

A State employee who serves
as a bone marrow donor will be granted a paid
leave of absence of up to 7 days for the
donation and recovery time. A State employee
who donates a human organ will be granted a
paid leave of absence of up to 30 days for the
donation and recovery time.
A resolution was adopted expressing
support for emergency measures needed to
save the American steel industry.

Other laws.

A disaster relief workers
fund was established to provide wage
reimbursement to any Vermont employer
for disaster relief services rendered by
em ployees. The em ployee m ust be a
certified disaster relief service volunteer of
the American Red Cross. Reimbursement
will be for not more than 14 days for

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

21

State Labor Laws, 2002

performing disaster relief work pursuant to
a request from the American Red Cross
w hen: (1) the w ork is perform ed in
Vermont; or (2) the disaster is a Federal or
presidentially-declared disaster designated
as Level III or above, according to the
A m erican Red Cross regulations and
procedures; or (3) the disaster is declared
by the governor of a State or territory. An
employer will not be liable for damage,
injury, or harm caused or sustained by an
em ployee who perform s disaster relief
serv ices and who is elig ib le for
reimbursement under the law.

Virginia
Wages. The law generally requiring that
employees who are paid on an hourly basis
be paid at least once every 2 weeks or twice in
each month, was amended to allow employees
whose weekly wages total more than 150
percent of the average weekly wage of the
Commonwealth to be paid monthly, upon
agreement of each affected employee.
Genetic testing. It now is unlawful for an
employer to request, require, solicit, or
administer a genetic test to any person as a
condition of employment, or to refuse to
h ire, fail to prom ote, discharge, or
otherwise adversely affect any terms or
co n d itio n s o f em ploym ent o f any
employee or job applicant solely on the
basis o f a genetic characteristic or the
results o f a genetic test. An employee may
bring court action against an employer in
violation.
Workplace violence/security. Any em­
ployee who, in good faith with reasonable
cause and without malice, truthfully reports
threatening conduct by a person employed
at the same workplace will be immune from
all civil liability that might otherwise be
incurred or imposed as the result of making
such a report.
Other laws. The law protecting those
employees who are summoned to serve on
jury duty or summoned or subpoenaed to
appear in cour, from discharge or other
adverse personnel action, or from a re­
quirement to use sick leave or vacation time,

Monthly Labor Review
Digitized for22
FRASER
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

was amended to also apply to individuals
who, having appeared, are required in
writing by the court to appear at any future
hearing.
The law regarding time off for military
service by Commonwealth officers and
employees who are former members of the
Armed Forces or members of organized
reserve components, National Guard, or
Naval Militia was amended. The Common­
wealth may supplement the military pay
o f its personnel in an effort to bring their
total salary up to the level of their non­
military pay. Nongovernment employees
of the Commonwealth can choose to take
leave without pay from their employment
and not be forced to use or exhaust any
type o f accrued leave. D iscrim ination
against the above persons is prohibited in
actions concerning initial employment,
reem ploym ent, em ploym ent retention,
promotion, or earned benefits. If the office
or position of the returning service person
has been abolished or otherwise ceased to
exist, the person shall be re-instated in a
position of like seniority, status, and pay if
the position exists or in a comparable
vacant position for which they are qualified
unless to do so would be unreasonable. If
the employer fails or refuses to comply
w ith the law, the courts may require
compliance and compensate the employee
for any lost wages or benefits.

Virgin Islands
Wages. A law passed in 2001 increased
the maximum fines from $500 to $2,500 for
violation of wage payment, minimum wage,
recordkeep in g , po stin g , and other
provisions o f the Fair Labor Standards
chapter.
Equal employment opportunity.

A re­
solution was adopted asking the President
and U.S. Congress to enact legislation that
would require that future foreign aid to
Afghanistan and other foreign countries be
conditioned, in significant part, upon the
recipient’s active commitment to eliminate
discrimination against women.

Washington
Wages. The State minimum wage rate is
adjusted for inflation annually in September

January 2003

by a calculation using the U.S. Bureau o f
Labor Statistics Consumer Price Index for
Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPi-u) for the previous year. As a result,
the rate for employees older than age 18
increased from $6.72 per hour to $6.90 on
Jan. 1, 2002, and to $7.01 on Jan. 1, 2003.
Also receiving these rates are 16 and 17
year-olds, the result of an administrative
rule requiring that they earn the same
minimum wage as adults; 14 and 15 yearolds may be paid 85 percent of the adult
minimum wage.
Provision was made for the State to
make payroll deductions for union dues
from the wages of individual care providers
who, solely for the purposes of collective
bargaining, are employed by the home care
quality authority. The payroll deduction is
voluntary upon the written authorization
o f the individual provider unless the
collective bargaining agreement includes a
union security provision. In the event of a
union security provision, the State will
enforce the agreement by deducting the
union dues for m em bers, or for
nonmembers, a fee equivalent to the dues.
The initial additional costs to the State shall
be negotiated, agreed in advance, and
reimbursed to the State by the bargaining
representative. Ongoing additional costs
to the State shall be negotiated with the
bargaining representative.
The State transportation law was re­
vised to implement recommendations o f the
S ta te ’s B lue R ibbon C om m ission on
Transportation. Among the changes, all
intent and affidavit fees paid by contractors
are to be used solely for administering the
State prevailing wage program. Prevailing
wage survey data collected by the Depart­
ment of Labor and Industry may now be
used only in the county for which the work
was perform ed. The D epartm ent is to
establish a goal o f conducting surveys for
each trade every 3 years; actively promote
increased response rates from all survey
recipients; work to ensure the integrity of
information used in the development of
prevailing wage rates; maintain a timely
processing of intents and affidavits, with a
target processing time of no more than 7
working days from receipt of completed
forms; and develop and implement elec-

tronic processing of intents and affidavits.
The Department, in cooperation with the
Department of Transportation, is also to
conduct an assessment of current practices,
including survey techniques, used in setting
prevailing wages for those trades related to
transportation facilities and transportation
project delivery.

Overtime. Overtime work may not be
required o f licensed practical nurses or
licen sed reg istered nurses who are
employed by a health care facility and who
are involved in direct patient care activities
or clinical services and who receive an
hourly wage. The acceptance by any
employee of overtime is strictly voluntary,
and the refusal to accept overtime work may
not be grounds for discrimination, dismissal,
discharge, or any other penalty. Exceptions
are permitted for overtime work that occurs
because o f any unforeseeable emergent
circumstance; because of prescheduled oncall time; when the employer documents
that he or she has used reasonable efforts to
obtain staffing (an employer has not used
reasonable efforts if overtime work is used
to fill vacancies resulting from chronic staff
shortages); or when an employee is required
to work overtime to complete a patient care
procedure already in progress where the
absence of the employee could have an
adverse effect on the patient. The
Department of Labor and Industries is to
enforce the law.

attempted to exercise, any right provided
by the law, or has filed a com plaint,
testified, or assisted in any proceeding.

A griculture.

T he law e s ta b lish in g
standards for tem porary labor camps,
used by agricultural workers employed
in the harvest of cherries, was amended
to provide that the housing and facilities
may be o cc u p ie d by a g ric u ltu ra l
employees for a period not to exceed 1
week before the start through 1 week
follow ing the end o f the cherry crop
harvest in the State. Previously, camp
occupancy was limited to 21 days in a
c a le n d a r year w ith p ro v isio n for
extensions under certain circumstances.

Worker privacy. It now is unlawful for a
person or organization, with the intent to
harm or intimidate, to sell, trade, give,
publish, distribute, or otherwise release
the re s id e n tia l ad d re ss, re s id e n tia l
telephone number, date of birth, or Social
Security number o f any law enforcementrelated, corrections officer-related, or
court-related employee or volunteer and
categorize them as such, w ithout the
ex p re ss w ritte n p e rm issio n o f th e
employee or volunteer unless specifically
exem pted by law or co u rt order. An
individual who suffers damages as the
result o f unauthorized release o f this
personal information may bring a court
action for actual damages sustained, plus
attorney’s fees and costs.

Family issues.

Significant amendments
were made to the law requiring employers
to allow employees to use accrued sick
leave to care for minor children with serious
medical conditions. Now, where a collective
bargaining agreement or employer policy
entitles an employee to sick leave or other
paid time off, either the sick leave or other
time off may be used to provide care. The
definition of child was expanded to include
those age 18 or older who are incapable of
self-care because o f a mental or physical
disability. Coverage of the law was also
expanded to apply to leave by an employee
to care for a spouse, parent, parent-in-law,
or grandparent with a serious medical
condition. An employer may not discharge,
threaten to discharge, demote, suspend,
discipline, or otherwise discriminate against
an employee because he or she exercised, or


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

West Virginia
Wages. An am endm ent to the West
V irginia Tax Increm ent Financing Act
stipulates that projects financed by tax
increment financing are considered to be
public improvements subject to prevailing
w age, local labor p referen ce, and
competitive bid requirements. Prevailing
wage coverage will apply to any project
acquired, constructed, or financed, in whole
or in part, by a county commission or
municipality under the law with a contract
cost exceeding $50,000. This requirement
is awaiting a vote by the people of the State
to ratify an am endm ent to the State
constitution authorizing tax increment
financing secured by ad valorem property
taxes.

Child labor. Several maj or revisions were
made to the child labor law. These include
enacting exem ptions from the law for
minors under age 14 similar to exemptions
for minors under the Federal Fair Labor
S tandards A ct, in c lu d in g n ew spaper
delivery and em ployment as actors or
performers in motion pictures, theatrical,
radio, or television productions. Federal
stan d ard s w ere added p ro h ib itin g
hazardous occupations for children under
age 18. Federal standards were also adopted
limiting work to no more than 3 hours per
day on school days, no more than 18 hours
per week during a school week, and not
before 7 a.m. or after 7 p.m., except from
June 1 through Labor Day when the evening
hour is extended to 9 p.m. A limit of 6 days
a w eek was elim inated. P en alties for
violation were increased from a range of $20
to $50 for a first offense to a range of $50 to
$200, and for a second or subsequent
offense from a range of $50 to $200 to a
range o f $200 to $1,000. The tim e o f
maximum possible imprisonm ent for a
second or subsequent offense was increased
from 30 days to 6 months. Other changes
were made in the requirements for issuing
individual and blanket work permits.
Inmate labor.

The law regarding the
paym ent o f w ages to p riso n inm ates
participating in work release programs
w as am en d ed to p e rm it in m a te s to
designate a person to receive the balance
o f p ay m en ts fo r th e su p p o rt o f th e
in m a te ’s d e p e n d e n ts a fte r re q u ire d
deductions are made. The requirem ent
th at the clerk o f the co u rt, w ith the
consent of the inmate, pay the inm ate’s
expenses or unpaid debts was eliminated.

Other laws.

It now is unlawful for any
employer to employ, hire, recruit, or refer,
for private or public employment in the
State, an alien who is not authorized to work
by the im m igration laws or the U. S.
A ttorney G eneral. E m p lo y ers are
responsible for checking the legal status or
authorization to work of their prospective
employees. Such proof includes, but is not
limited to a valid Social Security card, a
valid immigration visa, a birth certificate, or
a passport. Identification must include
some form o f photo id e n tifica tio n .
Em ployers m ust keep a record o f the

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

23

State Labor Laws, 2002

persons employed and proof o f their legal
status or au th o rizatio n to w ork. An
employer found in first violation o f the
provisions o f this article is guilty o f a
misdemeanor and may be fined between
$100 and $1,000 for each violation. An
em ployer found guilty o f subsequent
violations is guilty of a misdemeanor and
may be fined between $500 and $5,000 for
each violation.

Wisconsin
Wages. On Jan. 1, 2002, the threshold
am ount for coverage under the State
p re v a ilin g w age law s for S tate and
m u n ic ip a l c o n tra c ts was chan g ed
a d m in is tra tiv e ly from $ 1 7 2 ,0 0 0 to
$175,000 for contracts in which more
than one trade is involved, and from
$35,000 to $36,000 for contracts in which
a single trade is involved. On Jan. 1,2003,
these amounts were changed administratively
to $180,000 for contracts in which more
than one trade is involved, and $37,000 for
co n tracts in w hich a sin g le trad e is
involved.
Other laws. A law was enacted providing
reem ploym ent rights and benefits for
persons called to duty in the N ational

Digitized for24
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Guard or State defense force, under State
law instead of Federal law. Re-employment
rights and benefits are parallel to those
provided under Federal law for persons
called for Federal service. Employers are
now required to re-employ entitled persons
promptly upon completion of their active
duty unless the employer’s circumstances
have so changed as to make re-employment
of an employee impossible or unreasonable.
Persons are entitled to re-employment if 1)
the employer received advance notice of the
active service, 2) service did not exceed 5
years, 3) the person reports back to work
within required time frames, and 4) service
was terminated under honorable conditions.
U pon re-em ploym ent, the p erson is
entitled to the seniority and other rights
and benefits that the person would have
had if his or her employment had not been
interrupted by the State active service.

Wyoming
Wages. A committee is to be established
to determine the parameters o f a study to
be condu cted by the U n iv ersity o f
Wyoming on the disparity o f wages and
benefits between men and women in the
State. The study is to focus on where
disparities exist, the major causes of the
wage and benefit disparities, the impact of

January 2003

the disparities on Wyoming’s economy, and
possible solutions to reduce or eliminate
the disparities. A report is to be submitted
to the legislature by May 1, 2003.

Other laws. The legislature approved a
plan for reorganization o f the State
government, including the creation o f a
Department of Workforce Serviceson. Among
the several functions or programs transferred
to the department are displaced worker
education and training, public employment
offices, veteran’s employment services, the
school-to-careers program, and the unem­
ployment insurance program.
□

Notes
1 The Arkansas, Montana, Nevada, North
Dakota, Oregon, and Texas legislatures did not
meet in regular session in 2002. The District of
Columbia, Indiana, Iowa, and North Carolina
did not enact significant legislation in the fields
covered by this article. This article is based on
information received by Nov. 8, 2002.
2 Several tables displaying State labor law
information, including a table on State
minimum wage rates, are available on the U.S.
Department
of
Labor,
Employment
Standards Administration Website at: http://

w ww .dol.gov/esa/program s/w hd/state/
state.htm

Workers’ Compensation, 2002

Changes in workers’
compensation laws, 2002
Changes in State compensation laws ranged from increasing
death benefit and burial expense amounts, to revising
the criteria for eligibility for disability benefits,
to expanding coverage for rescue workers whose health
was affected or whose life was terminated by the events
o f September 11, 2001
Glenn Whittington
a lifo rn ia e n a c te d m a jo r ch a n g es to its w o rk e rs ’
c o m p e n sa tio n sta tu te s in 2002. O ne o f the m ore
significant provisions included increasing the m ax­
im um w eekly benefit for tem porary disability and perm anent
total disability to $602 for injuries occurring on or after January
1, 2003; to $728 for injuries occurring on or after January 1,
2004; and to $840 for injuries occurring on or after January 1,
2005. Beginning January 1,2006, and each January 1 thereafter,
the m axim um w eekly benefit w ill be increased by an am ount
equal to the percentage in the State average w eekly wage.
A lso, effective January 1, 2006, death benefits w ill be in­
creased from $125,000, $145,000, and $160,000 to $250,000,
$290,000, and $320,000, respectively, according to the num ber
o f surviving dependents.
In Florida, the D ivision o f W orkers’ C om pensation was

C

Alaska
A resident of the State temporarily engaged as
a civilian volunteer in an emergency or a disaster
relief function in another State or country who
suffers injury or death during the course, and
within the scope, of providing such aid is

Glenn W hittington is C hief, Branch o f
Planning P olicy and Standards, O ffice o f
Workers’ Compensation Programs, Employee
Standards Administration, U.S. Department of
Labor. E-mail: gaw@fenix2.dol-esa.gov


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

transferred from the D epartm ent o f L abor and E m ploym ent
Security to the D epartm ent o f Insurance. W orkers’ com pensa­
tio n m ed ical services w ere tran sfe rred to th e A g en cy for
H ealth C are A d m in istra tio n an d w o rk e rs’ co m p en sa tio n
rehabilitation and reem ploym ent services to the D epartm ent
o f E ducation.
In K entucky, ce rtain p resu m p tio n s o f d isa b ility w ere
created for claim ants diagnosed w ith pneum oconiosis on the
basis o f X -ray and spirom etric test values.
M axim um burial expenses w ere increased from $5,000 to
$ 1 5 ,0 0 0 in R h o d e Islan d and fro m $ 2 ,5 0 0 to $ 5 ,0 0 0 in
Wyoming.
In N ew Jersey and N ew York, coverage issues resulting
fro m th e te rro ris t attac k s o f S ep te m b er 11, 2 0 0 1 , w ere
addressed.

considered an employee of that State or
country for workers’ compensation purposes.
The requirements for determining whether
someone qualifies as a volunteer are outlined
in detail.

California
The maximum weekly benefit for temporary
disability and for permanent total disability
was increased to $602 for injuries occurring
on or after January 1, 2003; to $728 for
injuries occurring on or after January 1,
2004, and to $840 for injuries occurring on

or after January 1, 2005.
Beginning January 1, 2006, and each
January 1 thereafter, the maximum and
minimum temporary disability and per­
manent total disability benefit will be in­
creased by an amount equal to the percentage
in the State average weekly wage.
The maximum weekly permanent partialdisability benefit, currently between $140
and $230 per week, will be increased to $230
in 2006 for all partial-disability ratings
below 70 percent and to $270 for those
above 70 percent.
Effective January 1,2006, death benefits

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

25

Workers' Compensation, 2002

will be increased from $125,000, $145,000,
and $160,000 to $250,000, $290,000, and
$320,000, respectively, according to the
number of surviving dependents.
Death benefit payments for a totally
dependent child who is physically or men­
tally incapacitated and therefore unable to
earn a salary shall continue until the death
of that child.
An employer and an attorney-repre­
sented employee may agree to settle the
employee’s right to prospective vocational
rehabilitation services with a one-time
payment to the employee not to exceed
$10,000 for the employee’s use in selfdirected vocational rehabilitation. The
settlement agreement must be approved by
the administrative director’s vocational
rehabilitation unit.
It is unlawful to knowingly make, or
cause to be made, a fraudulent material
statement or representation for the purpose
o f o b ta in in g or denying benefits or
reimbursement provided in the Return-toWork Program, or for discouraging an
employer from claiming any benefits or
reimbursement provided in the Return- toWork Program.
All workers’ compensation administrative
law judges appointed on or after January 1,
2003, shall be attorneys licensed to practice
law in California for 5 or more years prior
to their appointment and shall have ex­
perience in workers’ compensation law.
The director o f industrial relations is
required to establish and maintain a program
to encourage, facilitate, and educate
employers in providing appropriate con­
ditions for the early and sustained return to
work of employees after an occupational
injury or illness.
For workers’ compensation purposes, a
collective bargaining agreement between a
private employer or groups of employers
engaged in the aerospace or tim ber
industries and a union shall be recognized
as valid and binding, as long as the
agreement establishes (1) an alternative
dispute resolution system, (2) the use of an
agreed-upon list of medical providers and
qualified medical evaluators, (3) joint labormanagement safety committees, (4) a lightduty, m odified jo b or return-to-w ork
program, and (5) a vocational rehabilitation
or retraining program. An employer or
group o f em ployers and the collective
bargaining representative must meet certain
criteria in order to establish or continue to
participate in such an agreement.
In the event that no person qualifies as a
total or partial dependent of a deceased
employee, then the surviving parent or
parents of the deceased employee shall be
Digitized for26
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

conclusively presum ed to be w holly
dependent for support upon the deceased
employee.
If the director of industrial relations
determ ines that an em ployer has been
uninsured for a period in excess of 1 week
during the calendar year, the employer may
be assessed a penalty of twice the amount
the employer would have paid in workers’
compensation premiums during the period
the employer was uninsured or $1,000 per
employee employed during the period the
employer was uninsured.
The administrative director is required
to publish an official pharmaceutical fee
schedule that shall establish reasonable
maximum fees paid for medicines and
medical supplies.
The Workers’ Occupational Safety and
Health Education fund was created as a
special account. Proceeds of the fund may
be expended by the Commission on Health
and Safety and Workers’ Compensation for
the purposes o f establishing and main­
taining a workers’ occupational safety and
health training and education program and
an insurance loss services coordinator.
Funding will come from a fee assessed
against insurers.

Colorado
The assessment capacity of the Colorado
Guaranty Fund was increased from 1 to 2
percent.
The exposure to or contraction of hep­
atitis C by a firefighter, emergency services
provider, or peace officer shall be presumed
to be within the course and scope of em­
ployment if certain preestablished condi­
tions are met.
The Colorado Compensation Insurance
Authority has been replaced by Pinnacol
Assurance, which will operate as a do­
mestic mutual insurance company. All
moneys in the Pinnacol Assurance fund
have been transferred out o f the State
treasury and into the custody of the board
of Pinnacol Assurance.

Florida
Effective July 1, 2002, the Division of
Workers’ Compensation was transferred
from the D epartm ent o f L abor and
Employment Security to the Department
o f Insurance. W orkers’ com pensation
medical services were transferred to the
Agency for Health Care Administration and
workers’ compensation rehabilitation and
reemployment services to the Department
of Education.
The Department of Insurance is allowed

January 2003

to share confidential information with the
Agency for Health Care Administration in
furtherance of the Department’s official
duties. The D epartm ent req u ires the
Agency to maintain the confidential nature
of the information.
The penalty associated with carriers
failing to pay 90 or more percent of their
compensation benefits or medical bills on
time was eliminated. Penalties for late
payments will be imposed pursuant to the
provisions of the insurance code.
The authority to order an examination
by an expert medical advisor was trans­
ferred from the D ivision o f W orkers’
Compensation to the Agency for Health
Care Administration.
The responsibility for the Preferred
Worker program was transferred from the
Department of Labor to the Departments
of Education and Insurance.
The authority to regulate individual selfinsurers o f workers’ compensation was
transferred from the Division of Workers’
C om pensation to the D ep artm en t o f
Insurance and the Florida Self-Insurers
Guaranty Association. The Association will
review employer applications and make a
recommendation to the D epartm ent o f
Insurance. The recommendation is binding
upon the Department, unless it is shown
by clear and convincing evidence that the
Association erred.
The authority to require employers to
post a qualifying security deposit has been
transferred to the Department of Insurance,
acting on the recommendation of the Florida
Self-Insurers Guaranty Association. The
security deposit is now deposited with the
Association rather than the Division o f
Workers’ Compensation.
The blanket prohibition against the use
of State funds o f any kind by or for the
Florida Self-Insurers Guaranty Association
would be removed. State funds cannot be
used for claims payments, but funds could
be paid to the Association under a contract
for performing “services required by law.”
A firefighter who is engaged in fire
fighting within Florida, but outside o f the
employer’s jurisdiction, and a firefighter
who is off duty, neither of whom is engaged
in services by a private employer, are now
considered to be acting within the course of
employment and are thereby covered by
workers’ compensation. Similar coverage
was provided for em ergency m edical
technicians and paramedics.

Georgia
The requirement that income benefit checks

be drawn on a Georgia depository was
eliminated.

Idaho
Equal workers’ compensation benefits are
now paid to widows and widowers in death
claims.

Kansas
For purposes of workers’ compensation
coverage, a volunteer member of a regional
emergency medical response team shall be
considered a person in the service of the
State in connection with authorized training
and upon activation for emergency re­
sponse, except when such duties arise in
the course of employment or as a volunteer
for an employer other than the State.
If a party or a party’s attorney believes
that the administrative law judge to whom
a case is assigned cannot afford that party a
fair hearing in the case, the party or
attorney may file a motion for change of
administrative law judge.

Kentucky
The commissioner shall maintain a list of
duly qualified “B” reader physicians who
are licensed in the Commonwealth and who
have agreed to interpret chest X rays for a
fee. Physicians from the “B” reader list shall
be utilized as necessary to obtain consensus
classificatio n s o f chest film s in coal
workers’ pneumoconiosis claims. A con­
sensus classification shall be presumed to
be the correct classification o f the em­
ployee’s condition, unless overcome by
clear and convincing evidence. A “B” reader
is a physician who has dem onstrated
proficiency in evaluating chest X rays to
determine their quality and in the use of the
International Labor Organization classi­
fication for interpreting chest X rays for
pneum oconiosis and other diseases by
taking and passing a specially designed
proficiency examination.
In submitting medical evidence in a coalrelated occupational pneumoconiosis claim,
the chest X ray must have been interpreted
by a “B” reader certified by the National
In stitu te o f O ccupational Safety and
Health.
In coal w o rk e rs’ pneum oconiosis
claims, the employer’s notice of denial or
acceptance of a claim shall be filed within
30 days of the issuance of the notice of the
consensus reading by the commissioner,

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

unless the consensus reading is that no
evidence of coal workers’ pneumoconiosis
exists. The commissioner is required to
determine whether X rays submitted by the
em ployee and an em p lo y er-selected
physician are in consensus. If they are not,
then the commissioner specifies the method
for resolving the issue by having the X rays
read by additional “B” readers.
If an em ployee has a radiographic
classification of category 1/0 pneumoconiosis
and a respiratory impairment, as evidenced
by spirometric test values of 55 or more
percent, but less than 80 percent, o f pre­
dicted normal levels, or if the employee has
a radiographic classification of category 1/1
or 1/2 pneumoconiosis and spirometric test
values of 80 or more percent of predicted
norm al levels, the em ployee shall be
awarded a one-time-only retraining in­
centive benefit equal to 66-2/3 percent of
the employee’s average weekly wage, but
not more than 75 percent o f the State
average weekly wage, payable semimonthly
for a period not to exceed 104 weeks. The
criteria for receiving these benefits were
revised.
If an em ployee has a radiographic
classification of category 1/0 pneumoconiosis
and spirometric test values of less than 55
percent o f predicted normal levels; or
category 1/1 or 1/2 pneumoconiosis and
spirometric test values of 55 or more percent,
but less than 80 percent, o f predicted
normal levels; or category 2/1, 2/2, or 2/3
pneumoconiosis and spirometic test values
of 80 or more percent of predicted normal
levels, there shall be an irreb u ttab le
presum ption that the em ployee has a
disability rating of 25 percent, resulting
from exposure to coal dust, and the
employee shall be awarded an income
benefit in the amount equal to 66 2/3
percent of the employee’s average weekly
wage, but not to exceed 75 percent of the
State average weekly wage. The award
shall not exceed 425 weeks.
If an em ployee has a radiographic
classificatio n o f category 1/1 or 1/2
pneum oconiosis, and spirom etric test
values o f less than 55 percent o f the
predicted normal levels; or category 2/1,
2/2, or 2/3 pneumoconiosis and spirometric
test values o f 55 or more percent, but less
than 80 percent, of predicted normal levels;
or category 3/2 or 3/3 pneumoconiosis and
spirom etric test values o f 80 or more
percent of predicted normal levels, there
shall be an irrebuttable presumption that
the employee has a disability rating of 50
percent, resulting from exposure to coal
dust, and the employee shall be awarded
an income benefit in the amount equal to

66-2/3 percent o f the employee’s average
weekly wage, but not to exceed 75 percent
of the State average weekly wage. The
award shall not exceed 425 weeks.
If an em ployee has a radiographic
classification of category 2/1, 2/2, or 2/3
pneumoconiosis and spirometric test values
of less than 55 percent of predicted normal
levels; or categoiy 3/2 or 3/3 pneumoconiosis
and spirometric test values of 55 or more
percent, but less than 80 percent, of predicted
normal levels, there shall be an irrebuttable
presumption that the employee has a 75percent disability rating, resulting from
exposure to coal dust, and the employee
shall be awarded an income benefit in the
amount equal to 66-2/3 percent o f the
employee’s average weekly wage, but not
to exceed 75 percent of the State average
weekly wage. The award shall not exceed
520 weeks.
If a miner has 15 or more years of
employment in coal mines or processing
facilities and has developed pneumoconiosis
and respiratory impairment, it shall be
rebuttably presumed that coal dust exposure
was a significant contributing factor in the
development of the impairment.
A miner 55 years or older on the date of
his or her last occupational exposure to coal
dust, or a miner who has been granted an
exemption from retraining, but who is
otherwise entitled to an award of retraining
incentive benefits, may elect to receive an
award equal to 66-2/3 percent o f the
employees’ average weekly wage, but not
to exceed 75 percent of the State average
weekly wage, multiplied by a disability
rating of 25 percent. The award is not to
exceed 425 weeks.
The co m m issioner is req u ired to
prom ulgate regulations for the recon­
sideration of claims filed between December
12, 1996, and April 13, 2002.
The co m m issioner is req u ired to
maintain a list and assess the performance
o f “ B” readers.

Maine
Any person engaged in harvesting forest
products is not an “employee” for workers’
com pensation purposes if the person
contracts directly with the landowner and
meets the criteria for obtaining a certificate
of independent status or a predetermination
of independent contractor status.
A contractor engaged in harvesting forest
products must notify, within 3 business days,
any of its employees and the landowner to
whom the person is under contract of the
cancellation of the contractor’s workers’
compensation insurance.

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

27

Workers' Compensation, 2002

The definition o f “em ployee” now
includes a member of a limited liability
company.

August 1 of the same calendar year, and the
balance is due on February 1 of the following
calendar year.

Maryland

New Jersey

The termination provision set for September
30, 2002, that governs certain types of
collective bargaining agreements between an
employer and a certified exclusive bargaining
representative regarding workers’ compen­
sation and generally relating to collective
bargaining agreements with respect to
workers’ compensation was repealed.
The total amount of benefits to be paid
for a period of partial dependency in case
o f death was increased from $45,000 to
$60,000.
The W orkers’ Com pensation Com­
mission may not modify an award, unless
the modification is applied for within 5
years after the latest of (1) the date of the
accident, (2) the date of disablement, or (3)
the last compensation payment.

A law enforcement officer, firefighter,
emergency medical technician, or paramedic
employed by a municipality, county, or fire
district of the State of New Jersey or of a
State that participated in a search-andrescue task force or team in response to the
terrorist attacks o f September 11, 2001,
without the authorization of the municipality,
county, or fire district or the said State and
who suffered injury or death as a result of his
or her participation shall be deemed an
employee of New Jersey for the purpose of
payment of workers’ compensation benefits
as would have accrued if the injury or death
had occurred in the performance of duties in
the territorial jurisdiction in which the
individual is or was employed. A similar
provision also was passed for volunteer
police, fire, and emergency personnel.
Whenever a law enforcement officer,
firefighter, emergency medical technician, or
paramedic employed by a municipality,
county, or fire district of the State of New
Jersey or of another State participates in a
national, multistate, State, county, municipal,
or regional search-and-rescue task force or
team w ithout the authorization o f the
municipality, county, or fire district or the
said State, but, pursuant to a Declaration of
Emergency by the Governor of the State of
New Jersey specifically authorizing vol­
unteers to respond immediately to the
emergency without requiring the authori­
zation of the municipality, county, or fire
district or the State, and the law enforcement
officer, firefighter, emergency medical
technician, or paramedic suffers injury or
death as a result of his or her participation,
the individual shall be deemed an employee of
New Jersey for the purpose of payment of
workers’ compensation benefits as would
have accrued if the injury or death had
occurred in the performance of duties in the
territorial jurisdiction in which the person
is or was employed. A similar provision
also was passed for volunteer police, fire,
and emergency personnel.
Certain emergency volunteers are now
exempt from the State’s 7-day waiting period
for collecting workers’ compensation benefits.

Minnesota
An injured employee or a dependent of an
employee who is either a minor or in­
capacitated shall have a guardian or
conservator to represent the interests of the
employee or dependent if the employee
receives or is eligible for permanent total
disability benefits, supplementary benefits,
or permanent partial disability benefits
totaling more than $3,000. A parent is
presumed to be the guardian if he or she has
legal custody of the employee or dependent.
The commissioner of labor and industry
no longer has to keep a list of neutral
physicians for the purpose of having an
injured worker examined in a disputed case.
The act of altering information on a
document to be filed with the State De­
partment of Labor and Industry without
the notice and consent of any person who
previously signed the document and who
would be adversely affected by the alter­
ation is prohibited.
On or before April 1 of each year, all
self-insured employers shall report paid
indemnity losses, and insurers shall report
paid indemnity losses and standard work­
ers’ compensation premiums, in the form
and manner prescribed by the commis­
sioner. On June 1 of each year, the com­
missioner shall determine the total amount
needed to pay all estimated liabilities,
including administrative expenses, of the
special fund for the following fiscal year.
At least one-half of the payment shall be
made to the commissioner for deposit into
the special compensation fund on or before
Digitized for28
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

New York
The w o rk ers’ com pensation law was
amended in order to address issues affecting
the victim s o f the terro rist attacks o f
September 11, 2001, and their families.

January 2003

Specifically, the amendments state that (1)
the law does not permit insurance carriers
to assert a lien against awards from the
Federal victim compensation fund and (2)
the filing o f a claim for an award from the
fund does not provide such carriers with
the right to term inate w o rk ers’ com ­
pensation benefits being paid as a result of
the terrorist attacks.
Death benefits and funeral expenses
were made available to domestic partners
o f persons who perished as a result of the
terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.
Any exposure of a State or local correction
officer to the blood or bodily fluid of an
individual, incarcerated or otherwise, during
the course of the officer’s employment that is
reported in writing to his or her employer
within 24 hours of the exposure shall be
presumed, in the absence of substantial
evidence to the contrary, to be an injurious
exposure if the officer subsequently is
diagnosed with a bloodborne disease,
including, but not limited to, hepatitis.
A licensed insurance agent or broker is
not covered under workers’ compensation
if substantially all of the remuneration for
the services performed by such agent or
broker is directly related to sales.

Oklahoma
Employers and personnel service companies
that are authorized in writing by a worker to
be the worker’s representative in order to
conduct a search of the worker’s prior claims
records is exempt from the $1 search fee.
An independent medical examiner is
prohibited from deriving any direct or indirect
economic benefit from the performance of
surgery on, or the provision of treatment for,
a patient, unless both the examiner and the
patient agree to such benefit, in writing, before
the patient makes any appointment with, is
referred to, or gives notice to the examiner.

Pennsylvania
A municipality or an area of a municipality
that receives emergency services pursuant to
a contract, a standing agreement, or an
arrangement from a volunteer emergency
service provider located in a host munic­
ipality shall reimburse the host municipality
for a portion of the cost of the workers’
com pensation prem ium s covering the
members of the volunteer emergency service
provider.

Rhode Island
Effective January 1, 2003, whenever a

general employer contracts with a special
employer to supply an employee or em­
ployees for work, the special employer
shall require written evidence that the general
employer carries workers’ compensation
insurance. In the event that the special
employer fails to obtain the written docu­
mentation from the general employer, the
special employer is deemed to be the em­
ployer for workers’ compensation purposes.
An alternative workers’ compensation
scheme can now be approved by the director
and the chief judge of the workers’ com­
pensation court.
Burial expenses were increased from
$5,000 to $15,000.
The demand by an injured worker to be
reinstated to his or her former position must
now be made in writing.
In any case in which an employee or, in
case o f death, the adm inistrator of the
em ployee’s estate, fails to exercise the
employee’s right to sue a third party within
2 years and 8 months after an injury, the
self-insured employer or the employer’s
insurance carrier may proceed with such
action. If the self-insured employer or the
employer’s insurance carrier recovers, from
the third party, damages or benefits in
excess o f the amount of the lien, after
expenses and costs of action have been paid,
then any such excess shall be paid to the
injured employee or the employee’s estate.

South Dakota
The requirement that volunteer firefighters
had to complete the wildland firefighter
training course before becoming eligible for
workers’ compensation was eliminated.

Tennessee
An employer, an insurer, or the Department
of Labor and Workforce Development may
have an employee who has been declared
permanently totally disabled examined from
time to time, at the expense of the requesting
party, in the event that the second-injury fund
is involved. However, the request for an
examination may not be made until 24 months
have elapsed following the entry of a final
order and may not be requested more than
every 24 months. The employee is required


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

to certify, on an annual basis, that he or she
continues to be permanently totally disabled.
A “mental injury” means a loss of mental
faculties or a mental or behavioral disorder,
the proximate cause of which is a compensable
physical injury resulting in a permanent
disability or an identifiable work-related event
resulting in a sudden or unusual mental
stimulus. A mental injury does not include a
psychological or psychiatric response due to
the loss o f employment or employment
opportunities.
Each group of employers qualifying as
self-insurers must submit a statement of
the group’s financial condition to the
commissioner of commerce and insurance.
The statem ent m ust be audited by an
independent certified public accountant on
or before the last day of the 6th month
following the end of the group’s fiscal year.
In workers’ compensation cases, a re­
quest for medical records shall, if available,
include a medical or anatomical impairment
rating.

Vermont
No later than July 1, 2004, all first reports
of injury are to be filed electronically by
the insurance carrier in question. The
com m issioner may grant an insurance
carrier a variance if the carrier documents,
to the satisfaction of the commissioner, the
fact that com pliance would cause the
insurance carrier “undue hardship,” meaning
significant difficulty or expense.

Virginia
Secretaries and administrative assistants for
officers and members of the State General
Assembly shall be deemed employees of
the Commonwealth.
The presumption that hypertension or
heart disease causing the death or any
health condition or impairment resulting in
the total or partial disability of an individual
is an occupational disease was extended to
officers of the police force established and
maintained by the M etropolitan Wash­
ington Airports Authority.
In addition to the Virginia Employment
Commission and the Department of Social

Services, the Workers’ Compensation Com­
mission shall make its records containing
information about an injured worker available
to the Virginia Retirement System.
If an employer contests a claim on the
basis that an employee’s intoxication or use
of a nonprescribed controlled substance was
the cause of an accident, the presumption that
such employee was intoxicated when he or
she tested positive for the substance is not
available if the employee dies as a result of his
or her injuries.
Hepatitis, meningococcal meningitis,
tuberculosis, and h i v were added to the
infectious disease presumption for certain
groups of Virginia employees or volunteers.
The presumption as to death or dis­
ability from a respiratory disease, hyper­
tension, heart disease, or cancer was extended
to a commercial vehicle enforcement officer
or motor carrier safety trooper employed by
the Department of State Police, or a full-time
sworn member of the enforcement division of
the Department of Motor Vehicles.
The W orkers’ Com pensation Com ­
mission is permitted to require annual written
certifications from a surviving spouse or
parent confirming that the portion of such
payments for the benefit of a minor child has
been used for that purpose.

Wyoming
The definition of “employee” was amended
to include county coroners.
A limited liability company may now
elect to provide workers’ compensation
coverage for its members.
Any university of the State of Wyoming
or any community college, school district, or
private parochial school or college in the State
may elect to obtain workers’ compensation
coverage for any person who may, at any
time, be receiving training under any work or
job training program for the purpose of
learning a trade or an occupation.
The burial expenses for a deceased
employer were increased from $2,500 to
$5,000.
The Standard Industrial Classification
system was replaced with the North American
Industry Classification System for purposes
of determining employers’ rates for premiums
for workers’ compensation.
□

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

29

Changes in unem ploym ent insurance
legislation in 2002
State enactments include increase o f maximum weekly benefit amounts,
establishment o f special programs, and implementation
o f alternative base periods; three Federal bills were enacted that affected
the Federal-State unemployment insurance program
Loryn Lancaster
and Anne Vogel

he “E conom ic G row th and Tax R e lie f R econciliation
A ct o f 2001 ” (RL. 107-16), am ong other things, affects
the unem ploym ent insurance program by reducing the
v o lu n ta ry w ith h o ld in g rate o f F ed era l incom e ta x es on
u n em p lo y m e n t in su ran ce b en e fits from 15 p erc en t to 10
percent. The tw o States needing to am end their law s did so
in 2002.
The “ C onsolidated A ppropriations A ct, 2001” (P.L. 106—
554) requires that States having federally recognized Indian
tribes w ithin their borders am end their law s to treat Indian
tribes sim ilar to State and local governm ents. A total o f 35
States have federally recognized Indian tribes that require
them to enact legislation extending coverage to those tribes.
T h ir ty - th re e e n a c te d le g is la tio n , o ne h as p u b lis h e d a
perm anent rule for com m ent as w ell as introduced legislation,
and the other has a Federal exem ption from tribe coverage
requirem ents.
In 2 002, only a few S tates intro d u ced bills gen erally
follow ing the guidelines set forth in the B irth and A doptionU nem ploym ent C om pensation final rule, effective A ugust 14,
2000, w ith no enactm ents.

T

T h re e F ed era l en a ctm en ts a ffe c te d th e F ed era l-S ta te
unem ploym ent insurance program :

Loryn Lancaster and Anne Vogel are unemployment insurance
program specialists in the Division of Legislation, Office of
Workforce Security, Employment and Training Administration, U.S.
Department of Labor. E-mail: llancaster@doleta.gov

30 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

• The “Job C reation and W orker A ssistance A ct o f 2002”
(P.L. 1 0 7 -1 4 7 as am en d e d ) e s ta b lish e d th e T em p o rary
E xtended U nem ploym ent C om pensation (T E U C ) program .
E ffective M arch 10 through M ay 3 1 ,2 0 0 3 , up to 13 w eeks o f
benefits are available u nder this program to eligible jo b le ss
w orkers in all States and up to an additional 13 w eeks o f
benefits are available to eligible jo b le ss w orkers in States
w ith high and rising unem ploym ent; individuals w ith benefits
rem aining in th eir accounts as o f M ay 31, 2003, can receive
b en e fits th ro u g h A u g u st 30, 2 0 0 3 . T h ese b e n e fits and
adm inistrative costs are entirely federally financed. T he act
also p ro v id ed for a d istrib u tio n o f $8 b illio n in F ed eral
unem ploym ent trust funds (a special R eed A ct distribution)
th a t can be u sed fo r b en e fits and ad m in istra tio n o f th e
unem ploym ent insurance and em ploym ent service program s.
• The “Trade A ct o f 2002” (P.L. 107-210) m ade a num ber
o f changes to the T rade A dju stm en t A ssistance program .
Follow ing are key features: includes as eligible w orkers those
directly affected by increased im ports or certain shifts o f
production to other countries, and also includes secondarily
affected w orkers o f an upstream su p p lier or dow nstream
p roducer to a certified prim ary firm; provides 26 additional
w eek s o f in c o m e s u p p o rt fo r w o rk e rs p a r tic ip a tin g in
training— the m axim um Trade A djustm ent A ssistance income
support period increases from 52 to 78 w eeks, which, together
w ith 26 w eeks o f unem ploym ent insurance could resu lt in a
m axim um o f 104 w eeks o f incom e support; provides w orkers
w hose training includes rem edial education an additional 26
w eeks o f incom e support— for a m axim um o f 130 w eeks;
p ro v id es for an A lte rn a tiv e T rade A d ju stm en t A ssistan c e

Program for affected workers aged 50 years and older.

benefits can receive disaster unemployment assistance.

• “To Extend the Period o f Availability o f Unemployment
Assistance under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster R elief and
Em ergency A ssistance A ct in the Case o f Victims o f the
Terrorist Attacks o f September 11, 2001” (P.L. 1 0 7 -154)
extends unemployment assistance from 26 to 39 w eeks for
workers who lost their jobs as a direct result o f the September
11 terrorist attacks. Under the 1998 Robert T. Stafford Disaster
R elief and Em ergency A ssistance Act, workers in specified
disaster areas who are not eligible for regular unemployment

Enactments o f State unemployment insurance laws include
most States (43) increasing their maximum weekly benefit
amounts; nearly half o f the States using the Reed Act (March
13, 2 0 0 2 ) distribution to help pay for administration o f
unemployment insurance and/or employment services; and
many States expanding coverage to service performed for an
Indian tribe.
Follow ing is a summary o f som e significant changes in
State unemployment insurance laws during year 2002.

Alabam a
Coverage.

The definition of employment
includes individuals performing work under
the Javits Wagner O ’Day Act or a similar
set-asid e program . The defin itio n o f
“employer” and “employment” includes
service perform ed for an Indian tribe,
resulting in unem ploym ent insurance
coverage of such services and exclusion of
coverage of certain services. An Indian tribe
can either pay contributions or elect to make
reimbursements. An Indian tribe or unit
that elects to make reimbursements may be
required to execute and file a surety bond or
d ep o sit m oney or se cu ritie s at the
discretion of the director. Under certain
circumstances, the reimbursement election
and coverage will be terminated when a tribe
fails to make the required paym ents;
provides for reinstatement when the failure
is corrected. E xtended ben efits not
reimbursed by the Federal Government
must be financed in their entirety by the
Indian tribe.

Financing.

Up to 15 percent of Reed Act
monies is appropriated to administer the
unem ploym ent com pensation law and
public employment office.

to $330 for existing claims with unexhausted
benefits as of September 11, 2001, and new
claims effective beginning on or after
September 11, 2001 and prior to January 1,
2002. The maximum weekly benefit amount
increases from $330 to $370 for new claims
effective beginning on or after January 1,2003,
and before January 1, 2004. The maximum
weekly benefit amount increases from $370
to $410 for new claims effective beginning on
or after January 1, 2004, and before January
1, 2005. The maximum weekly benefit
amount increases from $410 to $450 for new
claims effective beginning on or after January
1, 2005.

Colorado
Administration.

Electronic technology
will be used for notices, appeals, and other
communications involving administration of
the Colorado Employment Security Act.
The Division of Employment and Training
has been granted authority to prescribe
regulations governing the form and manner
of such electronic communications.

The maximum
weekly benefit amount increased from $190
to $210 for benefit years beginning on or
after July 1, 2002.

Coverage. A for-profit entity that has
contracted with a governmental entity is
not liable for any benefits to persons
sentenced to participate in community or
useful public service, but a for-profit is not
prohibited from covering such persons
under Workers’ Compensation.

California

Financing.

Monetary entitlement.

Financing.

A total of $600 million of
Reed Act money must be utilized for the
payment of unemployment compensation
and for ensuring the solvency of the State’s
Unemployment Trust Fund.

Monetary entitlement. The maximum
weekly benefit amount increased from $230

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

A 20-percent employer tax
credit, available if the unem ploym ent
compensation fund balance is at least 1-1/10
percent of the total amount of insured wages
for the preceding year, is now permanent.
Employers who have not filed required
reports or paid taxes due, who are negative
balance employers, or who reimburse the
fund rather than pay contributions are not
eligible for the tax credit. The tax credit was

originally applicable only for calendar years
2000 and 2001.

Connecticut
Financing.

Nine million dollars of the
M arch 14 Reed A ct d istrib u tio n is
ap p ro p riated for the use o f paying
administrative expenses for the adm in­
istration o f the unemployment compen­
sation law and o f public em ploym ent
offices.

Monetary entitlement.

An alternative base
period is established from January 1,2003,
to December 31, 2005 (for individuals
ineligible under the standard base period),
co n sistin g o f the four m ost recen tly
completed calendar quarters prior to the
individual’s benefit year; for w orkers’
compensation recipients or individuals
properly absent from work due to sickness
or disability, the alternate base period
consists of the four most recently worked
calendar quarters prior to such benefit year;
requires the adm inistrator to promptly
contact the individual’s employer to obtain
wage information for the most recently
worked calendar quarter if unavailable from
the quarterly reports.

Delaware
Coverage. The terms “employee leasing
com pany,” “professional em ploym ent
o rg a n iz a tio n ,” and “ em ployer clien t
company” are defined. The employer client
com pany, n ot the em ployee leasin g
com pany, is the em ployer o f leased
employees for unemployment insurance tax
purposes.
Financing.

The North American Industry
Classification System, not the Standard
Industrial Classification system is used in
the determination of average employer

Monthly Labor Review

January

2003

31

Unemployment Insurance Laws, 2002

assessments, average industry assessment
rates, average construction industry rates,
and new employer rates.

Florida
Administration.

The Florida Department
of Education must develop and maintain a
m anagem ent inform ation system with
access to the unemployment insurance wage
reports, to collect and report placement
in fo rm ation about form er students.
Disclosure of the individual identities of
form er stu d en ts is disallow ed. An
administrative child support order must
provide, if applicable, for withholding of
40 percent of the benefits for payment of
support if the noncustodial parent receives
unemployment compensation. The Unem­
ployment Appeals Commission has been
transferred to the newly created Agency for
Workforce Innovation. The Agency for
Workforce Innovation will not control,
supervise, or direct the Commission in the
performance of its powers and duties but
will support and assist the Commission in
its requirements for the performance of its
duties.
The ad m in istratio n o f the unem ­
ployment compensation program, and any
other program s delivered directly by
agency staff, rather than through the onestop delivery system, has been assigned to
the Office of Workforce Services.

Coverage.

The definition of employment
includes service performed for an Indian
tribe or tribal unit, resulting in unemploy­
ment insurance coverage of such serviceseffective retroactive to December 21,2000.
An Indian tribe may either pay contri­
butions or elect to make reimbursements.
A reimbursing tribe or tribal unit may be
required to execute and file a surety bond or
deposit money or securities at the dis­
cretion o f the director. U nder certain
circumstances, the reimbursement election
and coverage are terminated when a tribe fails
to make the required payments; provides for
reinstatement when failure is corrected.
Extended benefits not reimbursed by the
Federal Government must be financed in their
entirety by the Indian tribe.

Financing.

The Revenue Department
may release unemployment tax rate in­
formation to an employer payroll services
agent which provides services for more
than 500 employers, pursuant to a Mem­
orandum of Understanding that also states
the agent will retain the confidentiality of
such information, has power o f attorney to
obtain such information, and will provide,
Digitized for 32
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

upon request, a copy o f the employer’s
power of attorney. The Revenue Depart­
ment is considered to be administering a
revenue law o f the State o f Florida when
such Department provides unemployment
com pensation tax collection services
pursuant to a contract o f the department
with the agency, and that certain sections
of Florida Statutes apply to the collection
of unemployment contributions by the
Revenue Department unless prohibited by
Federal law.
Provisions concerning reporting and
payment of taxes on domestic service em­
ployees are changed to reflect the following:
• The restriction that employers of
domestic service employees pay contri­
butions or report wages other than quarterly
on only a limited basis is removed
• All (not certain ones as before) such
employers may elect to pay contributions
or report wages other than quarterly
• The due date changed from April 1 to
January 1 for employers of domestic serv­
ice employees to report wages and pay
taxes annually and the delinquent date
changed from April 30 to February 1
• To qualify for the electio n , the
employer must be eligible for a variation
from the standard rate
• The furnishing of any wage infor­
mation must be timely
• Failure to timely furnish wage in­
formation when required will (previously
may) result in the employer’s loss of pro­
gram election
• The loss of election is effective the
calendar quarter immediately following the
calendar quarter in which such failure
occurred
• The employer is eligible to reapply
for annual reporting after 1 com plete
calendar year has elapsed since the
employer’s disqualification if the employer
tim ely furnished any requested wage
information during the period in which
annual reporting was denied.

basis. The limitation that contribution rates
for rated employers are not to be imposed
above the level of 1 percent of statutory
contribution rates ends after calendar year
2003. The authority for the governor to
suspend the limitation for years 2002 and
2003 remains effective. The rate increase
required when the calculated statewide
reserve ratio is less than 1.7 percent is
suspended for calendar year 2003.

Monetary entitlement.

A temporary 18month alternative base period is implemented
(for individuals ineligible under the standard
base period) from January 1, 2003, to June
30, 2004, calculated using the last four
completed quarters immediately preceding the
first day of an individual’s benefit year. Reed
Act moneys must be used for unemploy­
ment benefit payments made using the
temporary alternative base period. The
weekly “earnings disregard” increased from
$30 to $50 for claims filed on or after July
1,2002. Earnings in excess of $50 must be
deducted from the weekly benefit amount;
earnings of $50 or less will not affect benefit
entitlem ent. Jury duty pay is not con­
sidered as earnings. The minimum weekly
benefit amount increased from $39 to $40
for benefit years beginning on or after July
1, 2002. The maximum weekly benefit
amount increases from $284 to $295 for
claims filed on or after July 1, 2002, but
before July 1, 2003, and from $295 to $300
for claims filed on or after July 1, 2003.
The factor to compute the weekly benefit
amount has changed: from 1/48 to 1/46 of
wages paid to the individual in the highest
two quarters of the base period; and from
1/24 to 1/23 of the highest single quarter of
the base period wages, if an individual fails
to meet the regular qualifying requirements.
The provision providing for no increase in
the w eekly b enefit am ount when the
statewide reserve ratio is less than 1.25
percent is deleted.

Hawaii
Georgia
Administration.

The State auditor is
authorized to conduct audits and disclose
confidential information, including unem­
ployment information, for other public
purposes including the disclosure to other
officers independently entitled to its receipt.

Financing.

Employers paying $1,000 or
more for domestic services during a calendar
quarter are now required to file tax and wage
reports on an annual rather than quarterly

January 2003

Appeals.

An appeal may now be filed at
the employment security appeals referee’s
office.

Iowa
Appeals.

The recording o f oral p ro ­
ceedings of a hearing (before an adminis­
trative law judge) in which the decision is
not appealed to the board must be filed and
maintained for at least 2 years from the
decision date.

Illinois

Louisiana

tirety by the Indian tribe.

Coverage.

Administration.

Extensions and special programs. The

An Indian tribe includes any
subdivision, subsidiary, or business enter­
prise wholly owned by an Indian tribe—
effective retroactive to December 21,2000.
The definition o f employment includes
service perform ed for an Indian tribe,
resu lting in unem ploym ent insurance
coverage o f such services and excludes
coverage of certain services. An Indian tribe
may either pay contributions or elect to
make reimbursements. Under certain cir­
cumstances, the reimbursement election is
terminated when a tribe fails to make the
required payments; provides for reinstate­
ment when failure is corrected.

Kansas
Financing.

Contributing employers or
rated governmental em ployer’s account
with respect to their pro rata share of
benefit charges is not charged if such
charges are $100 or less.

Monetary entitlement.

An alternative base
period is established for certain individuals
meeting the eligibility conditions when a
qualifying injury occurred; alternative base
period means the last four com pleted
quarters immediately preceding the date the
qualifying injury occurred; wages used in a
prior claim are excluded from usage in the
alternative base period; qualifying injury
means a personal injury by accident arising
out of and in the course of employment
within the coverage of the Kansas workers’
com pensation act. An unem ployed in­
dividual must be eligible for benefits if the
claim ant is returning to w ork after a
qualifying injury and has been paid total
wages for insured work in the claimant’s
alternative base period of not less than 30
times the claimant’s weekly benefit amount
and has been paid wages in more than 1
quarter of the claimant’s alternative base
period and the claimant meets the following
requirements:
1. Filed for benefits within 4 weeks of
being released to return to work by a
licensed and practicing health care provider
2. Files for benefits within 24 months
of the date the qualifying injury occurred
3. Attempted to return to work with
the employer where the qualifying injury
occurred, but the individual’s regular work
or comparable and suitable work was not
available.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Employment data, ob­
tained under the adm inistration o f the
Employment Security Law, is specifically
authorized to be released to the Governor’s
Office of Workforce Commission, the Div­
ision of Administration, or any contractor
working on behalf of either of them, for
purposes of compiling statistics which
would support performance management
and evaluation by program managers of
State and Federal programs; which would
assist in the preparation of common perfor­
mance reports across agencies; and provide
for education and training research.
Such data is prohibited from use for any
purposes other than the statistical pur­
poses for which it is furnished, and such
information is confidential and may not be
released to the public in a manner that
would allow the identity of any individual
or employing unit to be inferred by direct
or indirect means. The data is to be released
on a reimbursable basis. Penalties have been
established for violations o f those pro­
visions.

Maryland
Monetary entitlement. The maximum
weekly benefit amount increased from $280
to $310; the “earnings disregard” increased
to $90. The increase in the maximum
weekly benefit am ount and “ earnings
disregard” is nullified if, on September 30,
2002, the ratio between the Unemploy­
ment Insurance Trust Fund balance and the
total taxable wages for the four preceding
completed calendar quarters is less than 4.7
percent.
Massachusetts
Coverage. The definition o f “employ­
ment” includes service performed for an
Indian tribe, resulting in unemployment in­
surance coverage o f such services and
excludes coverage of certain services— ef­
fective as of December 31,2000. An Indian
tribe may either pay contributions or elect
to make reimbursements. An Indian tribe
that elects to make reimbursement may be
required to execute and file a surety bond or
deposit money or securities. Under certain
dircumstances, the reimbursement election
is terminated when a tribe fails to make the
required payments; provides for reinstate­
ment when failure is corrected. Extended
benefits not reimbursed by the Federal
Government must be financed in their en­

extended benefits program ’s eligibility
conditions are modified to allow the use of
m ore than one m ethod o f m easuring
employment and earnings by requiring
individuals to have had 20 weeks of work,
or the equivalent in wages (1-1/2 times high
quarter wages, or 40 tim es the weekly
benefit amount), effective March 9, 2002.

Financing.

Employers meeting certain
criteria may pay voluntary contributions
that must be paid not later than 30 days
after the date a contribution rate notice has
been issued or prior to the expiration of
120 days after the start of the calendar year
for w hich the co n trib u tio n rates are
effective, whichever is earlier— effective
relative to computation dates occurring not
less than 90 days after October 9, 2002.
Benefits will be charged to the solvency
account after a separation if a base period
employer recalls an employee to work
during the benefit year and the employee is
separated from such employment within
the benefit year for reasons relating tb
voluntary quit, discharge, or convictions of
felony or misdemeanor if such employer
had been the em ployee’s m ost recent
employer— effective for claims filed on or
after October 6, 2002.
A judgm ent entered in favor o f the
applicant and against the commissioner is
entered without interest when the court
finds that an adjustment or refund of a con­
tribution or payment in lieu of contribution
is excessive or has been collected or im­
posed incorrectly or unlawfully.
The provision requiring that interest
imposed on an adjustment or refund o f a
contribution or payment in lieu o f con­
tribution be payable only if such interest is
$10 or more is deleted. The amount of un­
employment benefits deducted and with­
held for Federal income tax purposes for
individuals electing voluntary withholding
decreased from 15 percent to 10 percent—
effective relative to benefits paid on or after
July 1, 2002.
The amount of unemployment benefits
deducted and withheld for State income tax
purposes for individuals electing voluntary
withholding changed from 5.95 percent to
the rate of tax imposed under the revenue
code— effective relative to benefits paid on
or after July 1, 2002.
The commissioner may participate with
the commissioner of revenue in a program
which permits employing units to file with
the department of revenue a consolidated

Monthly Labor Review

January

2003

33

Unemployment Insurance Laws, 2002

return w hich includes unem ploym ent
insurance, unemployment health insurance,
workforce training, income tax withholding,
and wage reporting information, together
with the required payment.
The date changed from not later than
December 31 to not later than November
30 for determining the total taxable wages
required to determine experience rates—
effective relative to computation dates oc­
curring not less than 90 days after October
9, 2002. For the calendar year 2003, Table
B will be used in determining tax rates. The
minimum experience rate is 1.325 percent
and the maximum is 7.225 percent effective
January 1, 2003.

Michigan

the contingency fund for deposit into the
general fund on June 30,2002. Contingency
funds in excess of $15,000,000 must lapse
to the unemployment trust fund at the close
of the State fiscal year in 2002 and each
year after 2002. A base period employer
that paid a claimant $200 or less in wages
will be noncharged; the nonchargeable
benefits account will be charged.
If benefits for a week of unemployment
are charged to two or more base period
employers, the share o f benefits charged to
a contributing employer must be charged to
the nonchargeable benefits account if the
claimant, during the week, earns remuner­
ation with that employer that equals or
exceeds the amount of benefits charged to
that employer.

Administration.

Monetary entitlement.

The Bureau of Worker’s
and Unemployment Compensation is created
within the Department of Consumer and
Industry Services; the authority, powers,
functions, duties, and responsibilities of the
unemployment agency are transferred to such
bureau.

The maximum
weekly benefit rate increases from $300 to
$362 effective on and after April 26, 2002,
for all claims in existence. The percentage
of base period wages considered in cal­
culating benefit duration increases to 43
percent for benefit years beginning the week
after April 26, 2002.

Coverage.

The definition of employer
includes service performed for an Indian
tribe or tribal unit, resulting in unemploy­
ment insurance coverage of such services—
effective retroactive to December 20,2000.
An Indian tribe may either pay contribu­
tions or elect to make reimbursements. A
reimbursing tribe or unit, meeting certain
conditions, must post a security in the form
of a surety bond, irrevocable letter of credit,
or other banking device or deposit money
or securities at the discretion o f the
director. Under certain circumstances, the
reimbursement election is terminated when
a tribe fails to make the required payments;
provides for reinstatement when the failure
is corrected.

Financing.

The taxable wage base is
reduced to $9,000 from $9,500 for calendar
years after 2002. Beginning in 2003, the
maximum nonchargeable benefits com­
ponent is reduced to 0.1 percent, 0.09
percent, 0.08 percent, 0.07 percent, and
0.06 percent for employers who have no
benefit charges against their account for 5,
6, 7, 8, and 9 years respectively; non­
consideration must apply to denied or
fraudulent claims for benefits in charges
against employers accounts when determin­
ing the nonchargeable benefits component.
Beginning 2003, the chargeable benefits
component increases from 6.0 percent to
6.3 percent. The unemployment agency is
authorized to withdraw $79,500,000 from

34 Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Nonmonetary eligibility.

Vacation or
holiday pay, retroactive pay, pay in lieu of
notice, severance payments, salary con­
tinuation, or other remuneration intended
by the employing unit as continuing wages
or other monetary consideration as the
result of the separation, excluding supple­
mentary unemployment benefit payments,
are to be considered remuneration in de­
termining whether an individual is unem­
ployed and also in determining benefit pay­
ments for the period to which designated
by the contract/agreement or current or
former employing unit. An individual who
left work is presumed to have left work
voluntarily without good cause attributable
to the em-ployer or employing unit, and has
the burden of proof to establish that he or she
left work involuntarily or for good cause
attributable to the employer or employing
unit. An individual will not be disqualified
from benefit status if during an established
and effective benefit year the individual
leaves unsuitable work within 60 days after
the beginning of the work. An individual is
disqualified from receiving benefits—
•
If suspended or discharged for
misconduct connected with the individual’s
work or for intoxication while at work
• For failure, without good cause, to
apply for available suitable work after
receiving notice of the availability of that
work

January 2003

• For failure, w ithout good cause,
while unemployed, to report to the former
em ployer or em ploying unit w ithin a
reasonable time after a notice was provided
of the availability of an interview concerning
available suitable work with the former
employer or employing unit.
The weeks needed to requalify after a
disqualification increases from 6 to 13 for—
• Failure without good cause to apply
for available suitable work after receiving
notice of the availability of that work
• Failure, without good cause while
unemployed, to report to the former em­
ployer or employing unit within a reason­
able time after a notice was provided o f the
availability o f an interview concerning
available suitable work with the former
employer or employing unit
• Failure without good cause to ac­
cept suitable work offered or to return to
customary self-employment
• Losing a job due to absence from
work because of a conviction and sentencing
to jail or prison
• Being discharged due to strike in
violation of the collective bargaining agree­
ment resulting in stoppage o f work or
restriction of or interference with produc­
tion or a wildcat strike
• Failure to provide the temporary
help firm the required information after
completing services for the client.
The weeks needed to requalify after a
disqualification increases from 13 to 26
for—
• Being discharged for an act of assault
and battery, theft, or willful destruction of
property connected with the work
• Committing theft after receiving a
layoff or discharge notice resulting in loss
or damage to the otherwise chargeable em­
ployer
• Being discharged for illegally in­
gesting, injecting, inhaling or possessing a
controlled substance on the premises of the
employer, refusing to submit to a drug test
• Testing positive on a drug test.
For a requalifying week, individuals
must earn or receive remuneration equal to
at least 1/13 of the minimum amount needed
in a calendar quarter of the base period for
an individual to qualify for benefits. (Ap­
plies to the disqualifications previously
mentioned.)
The earnings req u irem en t am ount
needed to requalify after a disqualification
for voluntarily leaving work without good
cause attributable to the employer or em­
ploying unit changed to 12 times the weekly

benefit rate. (Formerly, the requirement
amount was the lesser of 7 times the weekly
benefit rate or 40 times the State minimum
hourly wage times 7.)
The earnings requirem ent am ount
needed to requalify after a disqualification
for a suspension or discharge for mis­
conduct connected with the work or for
intoxication while at work changed to 17
times the weekly benefit rate. (Formerly,
the earnings requirement was the lesser of
7 times the weekly benefit rate or 40 times
the State minimum hourly wage times 7.)
Benefits are denied to individuals refusing
an offer of suitable work at a rate paying at
least 70 percent o f the gross pay rate
received immediately before becoming
unemployed. Any base period employer
m ust notify the agency o f a possible
disqualifying separation due to a voluntary
quit within 30 days of the separation in
order for a further reconsideration to be
made. By October 26, 2002, the unem­
p loym ent agency m ust establish and
provide access to a secure Internet site,
enabling employers to determine whether
the agency has received correspondence
sent by employers; requires the unem­
ployment agency to post within 10 days
on the Internet site a statement confirming
receipt of a request for redetermination or a
protest from an employer or employing
unit. The commissioner is to attempt to
reco ver the am ount o btained due to
fraudulent improper payments of $500 or
more, and the com m issioner may recover

damages equal to 4 times the amount.

Minnesota
Administration.

The unemployment in­
surance advisory council must present to
the legislature, by January 15, 2003, a
report, including proposals for any legisla­
tion, on the long-term solvency o f the
Minnesota unemployment insurance pro­
gram trust fund.

Coverage.

The enactm ent that wage
credits may not be used to determ ine
unem ploym ent insurance eligibility if
earned while an individual worked for a
private employer performing work under a
contract between the employer and an
elementary or secondary school and the
employment was related to food services
provided to the school by the employer
will expire December 31,2004.

Extensions and special programs.

A
temporary additional benefit program in
effect from June 1,2001, through December


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

31, 2003, is established for individuals
permanently laid off: from the Farmland
Food Company in Freeborn county on or
after July 8, 2001; by Fingerhut Com­
panies, Inc. on or after January 1, 2002,
and worked at one o f that em ployer’s
facilities in the St. Cloud Eveleth, or Mora
areas; or by Northwest, Sun Country, or
certain other Airlines or US Airways on or
after September 11, 2001, and before June

1, 2002.
An individual is eligible for the tem­
porary additional benefit if: a majority of
the applicant’s wage credits were with the
employer responsible for the layoff; the
individual meets the State eligibility re­
quirements; the individual is not subject to
disqualification under the State unemploy­
ment insurance law; the individual is not
entitled to any regular, additional, or
extended unemployment benefits for that
week and the individual is not entitled to
receive unemployment benefits under any
other State or Federal law or the law of
Canada for that week; and the individual is
enrolled in, or has, within the last 2 weeks,
successfully completed, a program that
qualifies as reem ploym ent assistance
training under the State dislocated worker
program, except that an individual whose
training is scheduled to begin in more than
30 days may be considered to be in training
if certain conditions are met.
The temporary additional benefit pro­
gram provides that exhaustees of regular
benefits that qualify for a new regular be­
nefit account must apply for and exhaust
the new regular benefits or any other type
of unemployment insurance benefits under
any State or Federal law; the weekly amount of additional benefits payable is the
same as the regular weekly benefit amount,
and the maximum weekly additional ben­
efits amount is 13 times the weekly addi­
tional amount; and benefits are payable
from the unemployment insurance fund.
A special State temporary extended
unemployment program in effect from
March 10 through December 28, 2002 is
established for individuals who:
• Do not qualify for unemployment
benefits under the Federal Temporary Ex­
tended Unemployment Compensation Act
o f2002 because the individuals do not meet
the 20 weeks of full-time insured employ­
ment or the equivalent in insured wages
requirement of that act
• Have established a benefit account
effective on or after March 19,2000, under
the same terms and conditions as those that
apply to Federal temporary extended un­

employment compensation. Individuals
may not receive more than a combined total
of 13 times their weekly benefit amount
available under the Federal Temporary
Extended Unemployment Compensation
Act and this provision.
Special State temporary extended un­
employment benefits must be paid from the
Minnesota unemployment insurance pro­
gram trust fund and not be used in com­
puting the future unemployment tax rate o f
a taxpaying employer nor charged to the
reimbursing account of a government or
nonprofit employer.

Financing.

The solvency assessment based
on the fund balance as o f June 30 is
discontinued, and a special assessment for
interest on Federal loans is imposed if on
October 31 interest on any loan from the
Federal unemployment trust fund is due the
following calendar year. The Commissioner is
authorized to determine the appropriate level
of the assessment, due the following year,
ranging from 2 percent to 8 percent of the
quarterly unemployment insurance taxes due
necessary to pay the loan interest. At the end
of each calendar quarter, any excess as­
sessment, after paying interest on Federal
loans or on any loan as of that date that has
accrued or will accrue the next calendar
quarter, immediately must be paid to the
Federal fund. For calendar year 2003, the un­
employment insurance base tax rate for
em ployers is 0.38 percent. O f the ap­
proximately $163,000,000 Federal “Reed
Act” money transferred under the Temporary
Extended Unemployment Compensation Act
of 2002, $12,000,000 is appropriated for
unemployment insurance program admin­
istration, effective July 1,2002. The termina­
tion of an employee in good faith reliance on
information or records obtained in a back­
ground study regarding a confirmed conviction
does not subject a hospice provider to
liability for unemployment benefits.

Mississippi
Coverage.

The definition of “employing
unit” and “employment” means any Indian
tribe, which includes any subdivision,
subsidiary or business enterprise, wholly
owned by an Indian tribe and includes service
performed for an Indian tribe, resulting in
unemployment insurance coverage o f such
services. The definition of “employment”
excludes service performed as a member of an
Indian tribal council. An Indian tribe may
either pay contributions or elect to make
reimbursements. A tribal unit must post any
bond; and, under certain conditions, the

Monthly Labor Review

January

2003

35

Unemployment Insurance Laws, 2002

reimbursement election is terminated for the
failure to post bond. Under certain cir­
cumstances, the reimbursement election is
terminated and coverage may be terminated
when a tribe fails to make the required pay­
ments; provides for reinstatement when the
failure is corrected. Extended benefits not
reimbursed by the Federal Government
must be financed in their entirety by the
Indian tribe.

Nebraska
Coverage. A professional employer or­
ganization must report and pay combined
tax, penalties, and interest owed on wages
earned by worksite employees under the
client’s employer account number using the
client’s combined tax rate. The client is
liable for such payments if unpaid, and the
w orksite e m p lo y ees are considered em­
ployees of the client for purposes of the
Nebraska Employment Security Law.
New Hampshire
Monetary entitlement.

The maximum
weekly benefit amount increased from $311
to $372 and the maximum total amount of
benefits payable from $8,606 to $9,672.

New Jersey

the period from November 25,2001, through
the end of the emergency unemployment
benefit period. Individuals must continue to
meet the eligibility requirements for regular
unemployment compensation and must not
be eligible for any other unemployment
benefits (including extended benefits pro­
vided for by any federal law) to be eligible
for State emergency unemployment be­
nefits. Weekly emergency unemployment
benefits will equal the weekly benefit amount of an individual’s most recent regular
unemployment compensation claim. The
maximum emergency unemployment ben­
efits of an individual are limited to 10 times
the weekly benefit amount that was pay­
able in the individual’s applicable benefit
year. Emergency unemployment benefits
will not be charged except for out-of-State
employers who are liable for charges under
the Combined Wage Program, reimbursing
employers, and emergency unemployment
benefits paid to Federal civilian employees
and ex-service persons. The use of approp­
riate administrative means is required to
ensure that em ergency unem ploym ent
benefits are paid only to individuals who
meet the eligibility requirements, including,
but not limited to, matching the claimant’s
Social Security number against available
wage records to insure that no earnings were
reported for that claimant by employers
for periods in which emergency unem­
ployment benefits were paid.

Extensions and special programs.

A State
emergency unemployment benefits pro­
gram has been established. “Emergency un­
employment benefits” is defined as benefits
financed entirely by the State and paid to
exhaustees. The period for which emer­
gency unemployment benefits will be paid
is lim ited to Decem ber 30, 2001, and
through the earlier of March 9, 2002, or the
conclusion of the calendar week in which
total expenditures of emergency unem­
ployment benefits chargeable to the unem­
ployment compensation fund statewide
first exceed $100 million, except that
emergency unemployment benefits will not
be paid during an Extended Benefit period.
The “eligibility period” is limited to the
weeks in an exhaustee’s benefit year that
begin in the emergency unemployment
benefit period and, if that benefit year ends
in the emergency unemployment benefit
period, any weeks thereafter that begin in
that period. “Exhaustee” is defined as an
individual who exhausts all available regular
unemployment compensation (including
benefits payable to Federal civilian em­
ployees and ex-service persons or payable
under the combined wage program) during

36 Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Financing.

A new tax table has been
established for years beginning on or after
July 1, 2002, tied to lower fund reserve
ratios. The com putation rate for each
employer liable to pay contributions has
been reduced from January 1, 2002, until
June 30, 2002, by a factor of 36 percent;
from July 1, 2002, until June 30, 2003, by
a factor of 15 percent. The requirement that
workers pay contributions to the unem­
ployment compensation fund at 0.1825
percent of wages has been extended until
June 30, 2003. Effective on and after July
1,2003, the rate of worker contributions to
the unem ployment com pensation fund
increased to 0.3825 percent o f wages.
Excess State disability benefit funds will be
transferred to the unemployment compen­
sation fund. A refund will be given to any
employee who received wages from more
than one employer and the sum of whose
contributions deposited in the unem ­
ploym ent com pensation fund and the
health care subsidy fund exceeded 0.3825
percent o f the employee’s wages if a claim
for the refund is made within 2 years after
the end of the calendar year the wages were

January 2003

received. The refunds from either or both
funds must be noninterest. The refund of
contributions must be in the form of an
income tax credit to the employee. The
amount transferred from the Health Care
Subsidy Fund to the unemployment in­
surance fund for the first quarter o f 2002 is
reduced by $125 million.
Unemployment insurance experience
rates for the second quarter of 2002 are
reduced by 85 percent (except for em­
ployers with reserve ratios of negative 35
percent or lower).

Monetary entitlement.

The waiting week
is waived for benefit years beginning on or
after January 1, 2002.

New York
Coverage.

U nem ploym ent insurance
coverage includes services performed for an
Indian tribe. An Indian tribe may either
pay contributions or elect to make reim­
bursements. Joint and several liability
among members of a tribe which elect to
make reimbursements as a group is allowed.
An Indian tribe that elects to make reim­
bursements must file a surety bond. Under
certain conditions, the reim bursem ent
election is terminated and the industrial
commissioner is permitted to terminate
coverage when a tribe fails to make the
required payments. Two or more Indian
tribes are permitted to form a joint account.
Extended benefits attributable to service in
the employ of an Indian tribe that are not
reimbursed by the Federal Government will
be financed in their entirety by the Indian
tribe. The definition o f “em ploym ent”
includes services rendered for a health care
facility, including academic medical centers,
by fellow, resident and intern physicians.
Professional employer organizations oper­
ating in New York must register with the
Department of Labor, and standards for
registration requirements for such organi­
zations were established. Terms relating to
professional employer organizations were
defined. Professional employer organiza­
tions must pay unemployment taxes. Li­
censed insurance agents and brokers are
excluded from coverage, under certain cir­
cumstances, classifying them as independ­
ent contractors.

Monetary entitlement.

The general account
will be charged for benefits for the first 28
effective days o f benefits paid to accounts
of certain employers who were a claimant’s
last employer prior to claim filing. Such
employers and conditions include:

• Educational institutions and edu­
cational service agencies and employees
performed professional school services and
provided other specific conditions are met
• Educational institutions and edu­
cational service agencies and employees
performed nonprofessional school services
and provided other specific conditions are
met, except that if services were not per­
formed for the next academic year or term
after reasonable assurance was proved,
benefits will be charged to the employer’s
account for any retroactive payments made
to the claimant
• Federal Government and out-ofState non-base period employers, provided
other specific conditions are met, except
such base period employers will be charged
for benefits.
Wages paid to professional and non­
professional school employees during the
base period by such educational institutions
or educational service agencies will not be
considered base period wages during per­
iods that such wages may not be used to
gain entitlement to benefits. The provision
providing that the duration of the proffered
employment shall not be taken into account
in determining whether the wages, com­
pensation, hours, or conditions offered are
substantially less favorable than those
prevailing for similar work in the locality is
repealed. The provision denying eligibility
for the shared work program to those who
derive more than 5 percent of their wages
from piecework is eliminated. Retroactive
claims for such benefits are allowed to those
who were denied for the period from
October 1, 2001, to December 1, 2001.

North Carolina
Extensions and special programs. The
optional total unemployment rate trigger
provision to pay extended benefits to
exhaustees of regular benefits with respect
to benefits for weeks of unemployment
beginning after May 1, 2002 has been im­
plemented and:
• The total extended benefit amount
payable is the lesser of 50 percent of regular
benefits payable or 13 times the weekly
benefit amount
• The extended benefit period will
begin with the week for which there is an
“on” indicator triggered when the average
total unemployment rate, seasonally ad­
justed, for the most recent 3 months for
which data for all States are published
before the close of such week equals or
exceeds 6.5 percent and the average total

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

unemployment rate for the 3-month period
equals or exceeds 110 percent o f such
average for either or both of the cor­
responding 3-month periods ending in the
2 preceding calendar years
• There is an “off” indicator for a week
only if, for the period consisting of such
week and the immediately preceding 12
weeks, the previously mentioned criteria
are not met
• For weeks beginning in a high un­
employment period, the total extended
benefit amount payable is the lesser of 80
percent of regular benefits payable or 20
times the weekly benefit amount
• A high unemployment period is any
period during which an extended benefit
period would be in effect if the total unem­
ployment rate as mentioned earlier, equals
or exceeds 8 percent
• An employer’s account of the State’s
portion of such extended benefits will not be
charged under certain conditions.

Oklahoma
Administration. The Commissioner may
release unem ploym ent com pensation
information to—
• Officials, employees, and agents of
public housing agencies for purposes of
determining eligibility
• An agency of the State or its political
subdivisions, or any nonprofit corporation
that operates a program or activity de­
signated as a partner in the Workforce In­
vestment Act One-Stop delivery system
based on a showing of need made to the
Commission and after an agreement con­
cerning the release of information (wage and
benefit claim information) is entered into
with the entity receiving the information
• The wage record interchange system
• The U.S. Social Security Adminis­
tration.
Any information obtained in connection
with the administration of the employment
service may be made available to any agency
of the State or its political subdivisions or
nonprofit corporation that operates a
program or activity designated as a required
partner in the Workforce Investment Act
One-Stop delivery system in accordance
with a w ritten agreement entered into
between the partner and the Commission.

Appeals.

Appeals may be filed by tele­
phone through the interactive voice re­
sponse system or by speaking with a claims
representative. To be considered timely, an
appeal filed by telephone through the

interactive voice response system must be
completed by 12 midnight on the date it is
due, and an appeal filed by phone through a
claims representative must be completed
before the end of normal business hours.

Coverage.

A trib al u n it in clu d es
subdivisions, subsidiaries, and business
enterprises wholly owned by an Indian
tribe— effective July 1, 2002. The defini­
tion of employment includes service per­
formed for an Indian tribe, resulting in
unemployment insurance coverage of such
services and to exclude coverage of certain
services. An Indian tribe may either pay
contributions or elect to make reimburse­
ments. Under certain circumstances, the
reimbursement election and coverage are
terminated when a tribe fails to make the
required payments; provides for reinstate­
ment and coverage when failure is corrected.
Extended benefits not reimbursed by the
Federal Government must be financed in
their entirety by the Indian tribe.
The exclusion from the definition of
employment for service performed for a
for-profit corporation by an individual
owning 100 percent of the stock of the
corporation is eliminated.
Covered employees of a professional
em ployer organization are considered
solely the employees of the professional
o rg an izatio n , and the p ro fessio n al
organization is liable for the payment of
contributions, penalties, and interest on
wages paid by the professional organization
to its covered employees during the term of
the applicable professional em ployer
agreement.

Extensions and special programs. A
supplemental unemployment benefit plan,
under which an employer may make pay­
ments to its employees during a temporary
layoff that supplem ent unem ploym ent
benefits is established. Under such a plan,
an employer must be able to give reasonable
assurance that the employee will be able to
return to work at the end of the temporary
layoff. The purpose of the plan is to allow
an employer to keep its workforce intact
during a temporary layoff. Any supple­
mental unemployment benefit plan must be
approved by the Director o f the Unem­
ploym ent In su ran ce D iv isio n o f the
Oklahoma Employment Security Commiss­
ion. The obsolete extended benefit state
“on” and “off” indicators provisions are
eliminated. An individual is ineligible for
extended benefits unless, in the base period
w ith respect to w hich the in dividual
exhausted all rights to regular benefits, the

Monthly Labor Review

January

2003

37

Unemployment Insurance Laws, 2002

individual was paid wages for insured work
o f at least 1- V2 times the amount of wages
during that quarter of the base period in
which the wages were the highest.

Financing. An em ployer’s account is
noncharged for unemployment benefits if a
claim was established utilizing an alter­
native base period. Reed Act funds may be
used for the payment of unemployment
benefits or may be appropriated by the
Legislature for the administration of the
unem ploym ent com pensation law and
public employment offices in the State.
Monetary entitlement.

The exclusion from
the definition of wages for payment by an
employer on behalf of an employee to a
retirement fund shall not include employee
contributions or deferrals after December
31, 2002, under a qualified 401(k) plan.
Payments made under an approved supple­
mental unemployment benefit plan are
excluded from the definition of wages. An
alternative base period is established. If an
individual lacks sufficient base period
wages of $1,500 to establish a claim for
benefits, any wages paid in the most recent
four com pleted calendar quarters im­
mediately preceding the first day o f an
individual’s benefit year (the alternative
base period) will be considered in deter­
mining monetary eligibility. With respect
to alternative base periods:
• The Com mission will accept an
affidavit from the individual supported by
wage information such as check stubs,
deposit slips, or other supporting docu­
mentation to determine wages paid if the
Commission has not received wage infor­
mation for the most recent calendar quarter
from the employer
• A determination of benefits will be
adjusted based on an alternative base period
when the quarterly wage report is received,
if the wage information in the report differs
from that reported by the individual
• If alternative base period wages are
established by affidavit, the employer to
which the wages are attributed will have
the right to protest the wages reported, and
the employer must provide documentary
evidence of wages paid if such a protest is
made
• Wages paid will be determined based
on the preponderance o f the evidence
presented by each party
• Wages used to establish a claim
under an alternative base period will not be
subsequently used to establish a second
benefit year

38 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

• Alternative base period provisions
are not applicable and no alternative base
period will be available in any calendar year
in which the balance in the Unemployment
Compensation Fund is below a certain level.
The income tax withholding provision
changed to provide that the Federal with­
holding will be deducted at the percentage
specified in federal law. If it has been
determined that any individual committed
fraud in a particular benefit year and in any
subsequent benefit year, the individual will
be ineligible to receive unemployment
compensation for the week in which the
subsequent determination is made and for
the next following 103 weeks, and no
benefit year will be established during such
period o f ineligibility. The individual will
be disqualified for each week benefits were
paid as a result o f a false statement or
representation or a failure to disclose a
material fact, and deemed overpaid for the
entire amount of benefits paid as a result of
claim ant fraud. The in elig ib ility and
disqualification are in addition to the
penalty imposed by other provisions of
Oklahoma law. A determination of fraud
must be made within 2 years of the date on
which the violation occurred.

Nonmonetary eligibility.

No claim for
unemployment benefits will be allowed or
paid unless the claimant resides within a State
or foreign country with which the State of
Oklahoma has entered into a reciprocal or
cooperative arrangement. If a person is
convicted of claim fraud in a particular benefit
year, and in any subsequent benefit year again
commits such fraud, that person is guilty of a
misdemeanor and will be punished by a fine
of not less than $100 nor more than $1,000,
or by imprisonment for not more than 180
days, or by both fine and imprisonment, and
that each false statement or representation or
failure to disclose a material fact constitutes a
separate offense for each week of benefits.
Provisions relating to overpayment of
unemployment benefits changed such that
overpayments are classified in one o f three
ways with recoveiy and recoupment to be
conducted as follows:
1.
Fraud overpaym ent. When
individual intentionally makes a false
statement or representation or fails to disclose
a material fact, and has received any sum as
benefits to which the individual was not
entitled, the individual will be liable to repay
this sum, plus interest at the rate of 1 percent
m onthly on the unpaid balance o f the
overpayment. The interest will cease to accrue

January 2003

when the total accrued interest equals the
amount o f the overpayment. If an over­
payment is modified, the interest will cease
to accrue when the total accrued interest
equals the amount of the modified over­
payment. The principal sum may be deducted
from any future benefits payable to the
individual.
2. Claimant error overpayment. When
an individual, by mistake of law or fact,
makes a false statement or representation
or fails to disclose a material fact and has
received any sum as benefits to which the
individual was not entitled, the recovery
and recoupment will be identical to that
outlined previously in item 1.
3. Administrative overpayment. When
an individual has received—
a. Any sum as benefits due to an error
by the Commission or an employer, or
b. Benefits and, under a redeter­
mination or a reversal o f a decision on
appeal, the individual has been found to
be not entitled to benefits, the individual
will be liable to have this sum deducted
from any future benefits payable to the
individual with respect to the benefit
year current at the time of the receipt
and the next subsequent benefit year
that begins w ithin 1 year after the
expiration of the benefit year current at
the time of the receipt. No interest will
accrue on administrative overpayments.

Oregon
Extensions and special programs.

A State
emergency unemployment benefits program
financed by the State and payable to
exhaustees during the emergency period from
April 7, 2002, to December 28, 2002, has
been established. Emergency unemployment
benefits are available to individuals beginning
with the 14th week following the week for
which the individual exhausted regular
benefits. To be eligible for em ergency
unemployment benefits, an individual must:
(a) have exhausted regular unemployment
benefits, (b) continue to meet the eligibility
requirements for regular unemployment
benefits under this chapter, (c) have a benefit
year which expired after Januaiy 5,2002, and
(d) have been paid wages by an employer or
an employers during the base period o f the
individual’s applicable benefit year in an
amount equal to or in excess of 40 times the
individual’s applicable weekly benefit
amount. Weekly emergency unemployment
benefit amounts will equal the weekly benefit
amount of the individual’s most recent regular
unemployment benefit claim. The maximum
amount of emergency unemployment benefits

receivable is limited to 50 percent of an
individual’s most recent regular unemploy­
ment benefit claim. The emergency weekly
benefit amount increased by $20 each week
ap p licab le from M arch 17, 2002, to
October 5, 2002; and the period o f the
increase was extended to December 28,2002,
if the State was notified on or before October
1, 2002, that Reed Act funds w ill be
distributed to the State, the funds equal or
exceed $23 million, and the State is permitted
to use $23 million or more of the funds for
benefit payments. Emergency unemployment
benefits will not be paid if the Federal
maximum extended benefit amount payable
increased to 100 percent of the total amount
of regular benefits payable in the applicable
benefit year. An employer’s account will not
be charged for payments o f emergency
benefits and the benefit increase.

Financing.

A new tax rate schedule
(Schedule III-K) assigning tax rates from a
low of 0.66 percent to a high of 5.40 percent
for wages paid during the third and fourth
quarters of 2002 is established if the fund
adequacy percentage ratio is 170.00
percent, but less than 190 percent. The
effectiveness of the new rate schedule for
the fourth quarter of 2002 is conditioned
on if the State has been notified on or before
October 1, 2002, that Reed Act funds will
be distributed to the State, those funds equal
or exceed $23 million, and Federal law
permits the State to use $23 million or more
of the funds for benefit payments.

Pennsylvania
Appeals. The party’s attorneys or other
representatives o f record must be duly
notified of the time and place of a referee’s
hearing and of the decision and reasons for
the decisio n w hen an appeal from a
determination or revised determination is
filed. Referees must conduct their hearing
de novo (from the beginning). Under certain
circumstances, no finding of fact or law,
judgment, conclusion, or final order made
with respect to a claim for unemployment
compensation may be deemed to be con­
clusive or binding in any separate or sub­
sequent action or proceeding in another
forum (collateral estoppel).

Financing.

Reim bursable em ployers
must not be charged for benefits paid during
a calendar year if the employer satisfies the
following requirements:
• Pays a nonrefundable solvency fee
within 30 days after notice of the fee is sent

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

to the employer’s last known address and
• Files all required reports for calendar
quarters through the second calendar quarter
of the preceding calendar year. (Applicable
to calendar years beginning after December
31, 2002, and to compensation paid on
applications for benefits effective after
December 31,2002.)
“ Solvency fee for a calendar year” is
defined as the monetary amount determined
by multiplying the solvency fee rate for the
year by the amount of wages paid, without
regard to the exclusion specified in law, by the
employer in the four consecutive calendar
quarters ending on June 30 of the preceding
calendar year; an employer’s solvency fee for
a year must not be less than $25.
For calendar years 2003, 2004, and
2005, the solvency fee rate is .0003.
The Secretary must redetermine the
solvency fee rate in 2005 so that the
unrounded rate yields solvency fees ap­
proximately equal to the amount of com­
pensation for which charges are relieved. The
Secretary is required to use the amount of
compensation (for which charges are relieved)
paid during 2003 and 2004 and the amount of
wages paid, without regard to the exclusion
specified in the law, during the same time
period by employers who paid a solvency
fee. The redetermined rate must take effect
for the next calendar year and remain in effect
for 3 years. The Secretary must redetermine
the solvency fee rate beginning in 2008 and
each fifth year thereafter so that the un­
rounded rate yields solvency fees approx­
imately equal to the amount of compen­
sation for which charges are relieved. The
Secretary must use the amount of com­
pensation (for which charges are relieved)
paid during the 5 calendar years im­
mediately preceding the year in which the
redetermination occurs and the amount of
wages paid, without regard to the exclusion
specified in the law, during the same time
period by employers who paid a solvency
fee. The redetermined rate must take effect
for the next calendar year and remain in
effect for 5 years.
If the solvency fee rate redetermined as
such is not a multiple of 100th of 1 percent,
it must be rounded to the next higher
multiple of 100th of 1 percent.
Solvency fees paid by employers must
be deposited in the unemployment com­
pensation fund. Noncharged benefits must
not be used in the calculation of the State
adjustment factor.
An employer’s account is noncharged
for benefits attributable to individuals
separated from their most recent work by a

base period employer and disqualified due
to discharge or temporary suspension from
work for failing to submit and/or pass a
drug test.

Nonmonetary eligibility.

The provisions
with respect to making false statements or
rep resen tatio n s to obtain or increase
compensation have been changed by:

• Increasing the sentence to pay a fine
to of not less than $100 nor more than
$1,000 (formerly $30 nor more than $200)
• Providing that in addition to any
other sanction, convicted individuals must
make restitution o f the compensation to
which they were not entitled and interest
on the compensation in accordance with the
State unemployment insurance law
• Changing the penalty weeks to begin
within the 4-year period following the end
of the benefit year with respect to which
the improper payment or payments oc­
curred (formerly within the 2-year period
following the departmental determination
imposing such penalty weeks).
The provisions with respect to making
false statements or representations to pre­
vent or reduce compensation have been
changed by:
• Increasing the sentence to pay a fine
to of not less than $100 nor more than
$1,500 (formerly $50 nor more than $500).
• Deleting the language requiring
sentencing to imprisonment in default of
the payment of such fine and costs.
• Providing that in addition to any
other sanction, any employer, officer agent
or other convicted person for willful failure
or refusal to make a payment must make
restitution of the unpaid amounts, including
interest and penalty from the date the pay­
ment was due through the date of payment.
The provision with respect to Violation
of Act and Rules and Regulations have been
changed by:
• Increasing the sentence to pay a fine
to of not less than $100 nor more than
$1,000 (formerly $20 nor more than $200)
• D eleting the language requiring
sentencing to imprisonment in default of
the payment of such fine and costs.
Unemployed individuals (to requalify
for compensation) must earn remuneration
for services at least 6 times their weekly
benefit rate after being disqualified due to
discharge or temporary suspension for
failing to submit and/or pass a drug test.

Monthly Labor Review

January

2003

39

Unemployment Insurance Laws, 2002

An employee must be ineligible for
compensation for any week in which his or
her unemployment is due to discharge or
temporary suspension due to failure to
submit and/or pass a drug test conducted
pursuant to an em ployer’s established
substance abuse policy, provided that the
drug test is not requested or implemented
in violation of the law or of a collective bar­
gaining agreement.
An employee will not be eligible for
unem ploym ent com pensation for any
weeks of unemployment while incarcerated
after a conviction (applies to compensation
for weeks ending on or after December 9,

2002).
The Department must refer all claimants
eligible for compensation to employment
offices for reemployment services.

Rhode Island
Appeals.

The number of days any in­
terested party has to file a petition for judicial
review from a board o f review decision
changed from 15 to 30.

Extensions and special programs.

Max­
imum allowable duration of unemployment
compensation paid under a worksharing
plan extended from 26 to 52 weeks.

lowered from 5.4 percent to 2.64 percent
(delinquent employer pays higher of 2.64
percent or experience rate). The successor
employer rating period expanded from 1
quarter to 1 year.

Monetary entitlement.

A person who
received benefits in another State to which
not entitled must pay the overpayments if
both States entered into an interstate
reciprocal overpayment recovery agree­
ment. Circumstances under which the com­
mission may waive repayment o f over­
payments if written request is submitted
within the statutory appeal period were
established.

Nonmonetary eligibility.

The commission
is allowed to establish a penalty in cases of
fraudulent misrepresentation for an amount
not less than 2 times the weekly benefit
amount and not more than the maxirpum
benefit payable in a benefit year. The de­
duction o f such penalty from unemploy­
ment benefits to which a claimant is entitled
to in the present, next, or both benefit years
is permitted. The recoupment or recovery
enforcement is limited to 5 years from final
determination.

South Dakota
South Carolina
Appeals.

The claimant’s last or separating
employer and any employer whose account
may be affected by the adjudication o f the
claim may file an appeal from an initial
determ ination, redeterm ination or sub­
sequent determination.

Coverage. U nem ploym ent insurance
coverage includes services performed for an
Indian tribe. An Indian tribe may either pay
contributions or elect to make reimburse­
ments. Under certain conditions, the reim­
bursement election is terminated when a tribe
fails to make the required payments. The
definition of “employment” now exempts
any appointed successor to an elected official.
The requirement that requests for certain
information on covered employers and benefit
recipients from certain entities must be in
writing has been clarified.
Financing.

Employers with 250 or more
employees must report wages electronically
beginning in 2003 and employers with 100 or
more employees must do so beginning in
2005. New employers are experience rated
after 12 (rather than 24) consecutive months
of coverage. The delinquent employer rate is
Digitized for 40
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Coverage. The definition o f “employ­
ment” includes service performed for an
Indian tribe, resulting in unemployment
insurance coverage of such services and
excludes coverage of certain services. An
Indian tribe may either pay contributions
or elect to make reimbursements. An Indian
tribe that elects to make reimbursements
may be required to execute and file a surety
bond or deposit money or securities. Under
certain circumstances, the reimbursement
election and coverage is terminated when a
tribe fails to make the required payments;
provides for reinstatement when failure is
corrected. Extended benefits not reimbursed
by the Federal Government must be fin­
anced in their entirety by the Indian tribe.
Vermont

inherent in the system to determine whether
it leads to an appropriate trust fund balance
• Examining employers who elect to
make payments in lieu o f contributions.
Requires such department in developing its
recom m endation to co n su lt w ith any
interested party, including the Vermont
State Labor Council, Associated industries
o f Vermont, Vermont State Chamber of
Commerce, Vermont Retail Association and
Associated General contractors.

Extensions and special programs.

An
additional w eekly benefit o f $18 per
individual from July 1, 2002, through June
30,2003, will be paid to eligible claimants.
The total amount of such benefits is limited
to $6 m illion. Each additional benefit
payment must be identified as a temporary
unemployment benefit supplement. A total
of 13 weeks o f additional unemployment
compensation will be paid to eligible in­
dividuals who exhausted rights to regular
unemployment compensation after March
15, 2001, and who do not quality for tem­
porary extended unemployment compensa­
tion solely because of the requirement in
Federal law that an individual have 20
weeks of full-time insured employment or
the equivalent in insured wages in the base
period.

Financing.

Employers received an un­
employment insurance tax credit when their
contributions were reduced for the first
three calendar quarters beginning on July 1,
2001, by the difference between the pay­
ments made under the tax schedule in effect
and the payments that would have been
made under a lower tax rate schedule; such
additional credits must be paid until the end
o f the quarter in which the credits paid
exceed $7.5 million.

Monetary entitlement.

The maximum
weekly benefit amount increases from $298
to $312 from July 1, 2001, through June
30,2002, and from $312 to $351 from July
1, 2002, through June 30, 2003.

Virginia
Monetary entitlement.

Administration.

The Department of Em­
ployment and Training must study the
unemployment contribution system by—

• Reviewing the effectiveness o f the
experience rating system in associating cost
with contribution rates and the distribution
of cost by industry and employer size
• Reviewing the adequacy standard

January 2003

R equires that
eligible individuals be paid benefits at the
new weekly benefit amounts retroactively
to September 9, 2001, for claimants es­
tablishing a benefit year as of that date and
expiring January 1, 2003— the minimum
weekly benefit am ount is $69 and the
maximum benefit amount is $368; for
claimants establishing a benefit year on or
after January 1, 2003, but before January

1, 2004—the minimum benefit rate is $59
and the maximum benefit rate is $318; and
for claimants establishing a benefit year on
or after January 1, 2004—the minimum
benefit rate is $50 and the maximum benefit
rate is $263 (amounts in effect prior to
September 9, 2001).

Washington
Financing.

Benefits are noncharged for
individuals who qualify for unemployment
b en efits under the voluntary leaving
provision for domestic violence or stalking.

from the requirement to actively engage or
provide evidence in seeking work.

West Virginia
Coverage. Employment excludes service
performed in the employ of a governmental
entity as an election official appointed to
serve during any municipal, county, or
State election.
Wisconsin

Financing.

Extensions and special programs.
Nonmonetary eligibility.

An individual
has not left work voluntarily without good
cause when the separation was necessary
to protect the claimant or the claimant’s
immediate family members from domestic
violence or stalking. An evaluation of suit­
able work must consider the individual’s
need to address the physical, psychological,
legal, and other effect of domestic violence
or stalking for those individuals who
qualified for unemployment benefits under
the voluntary leaving pro v isio n for
domestic violence or stalking. Individuals
who qualify for unemployment benefits
under the voluntary leaving provision for
domestic violence or stalking are excluded


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

• The weekly temporary supplemental
rate payable is the same as for regular benefits
• The maximum entitlement is limited
to the lesser of 50 percent of regular bene­
fits or 8 times the temporary supplemental
benefits rate
• Provisions for regular benefits apply
to temporary supplemental benefits
• Temporary supplemental benefits
will be charged to the fund’s balancing
account.

The
Wisconsin supplemental benefits program is
suspended until on or after January 26,2003.
A temporary supplemental unemployment
insurance benefits program is created pro­
viding that—
• From March 3,2002, to December 28,
2002, individuals may be eligible to receive
temporary supplemental benefits if that week
is in the individual’s eligibility period, the
individual’s benefit year was established on
or after March 11,2001, the individual is an
exhaustee, and the individual is not
disqualified and has satisfied the other
requirements regarding the payment of regular
benefits

The same rate schedule in
effect for calendar year 2002 will be in effect
for calendar year 2003. The first $2,389,107
of fiscal year 2002 Reed Act moneys are
authorized to be used for administration of
unemployment insurance.

Wyoming
Financing.

The taxable wage base increases
from $14,100 to $14,700 for calendar year
2003 only. The assigned base rate reduces by
25 percent for calendar year 2003.

Monetary entitlement.

The waiting week
is elim inated for 2 years for initial or
additional claims filed between July 1,2002,
and June 30, 2004.
□

Monthly Labor Review

January

2003

41

Precis
Disability and em ploym ent
The 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) brought the em p loym en t o f
persons with disabilities to the forefront
both o f policy— there is now an Office o f
Disability Employment Policy headed by
an assistant secretary within the Depart­
ment o f Labor— and o f academic research.
Douglas Kruse and Thomas Hale lead o ff
a research symposium on disability and
employment in this month’s In du strial
R elations. The symposium focuses on the
effect o f the a d a and the significant con­
ceptual and measurement issues such
evaluations raise.
Kruse and Hale, in addition to sum­
marizing the other papers in the sym­
p o siu m , sum m arize the con cep tu al
d efin itio n issu e s and m easurem ent
approaches. The traditional definition o f
disability, they point out, is basically a
medical diagnosis o f a physical or mental
abnormality. The remedies such a de­
finition suggests are also medical— correct
the condition, or therapeutic— help the
person adapt.
A second conceptual basis Kruse and
Hale identify for defining a disability is
economic. The economic concept o f dis­
ability stresses an incapacity for work.
Such definitions are often found in the
implementation o f income support pro­
grams on the policy side and in survey
questionnaires on the research side. Kruse
and Hale point out, however, that the
economic definition falls short o f a general
definition o f disability because it excluded
limitations on aspects o f living outside o f
the labor market.
A broader sociop olitical or social
definition o f disability has become more
important recently as new perceptions o f
disability rights have sought to change
the treatment o f persons with disabilities.
Sociopolitical definitions emphasize the
interaction b etw een an in d ivid u al’s
characteristics and the environment as a
whole.
After Kruse and Hale’s survey o f the
conceptual and measurement issues, three
articles examine specific aspects o f the

42 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

disability-employment nexus. Barbara A.
Lee briefs research on the case law that
has resulted from the Americans with
Disabilities Act. She finds that the Act has
not resulted in significant employment
gains for persons with disabilities nor has
it led to many legal findings o f discri­
mination. The latter finding is, according
to Lee, often the result o f narrow judicial
interpretations o f the a d a definition o f
d isa b ility as “a p h y sica l or m ental
impairment that ‘substantially limits’ one
ore more ‘major life functions.’”
Douglas Kruse and Lisa Schur review
and refine the academic literature on the
effect o f the ADA on the employment o f
persons with disabilities. The majority
o f studies seem to indicate that there
was little or no change in the em ploy­
ment o f workers with disabilities after
the A ct and, in fact, the m ost recent
research based on the Current Popu­
lation Survey found a decline in such
em ploym ent over the course o f the
1990s. Kruse and Schur use results
based on the alternative measures o f
disability available in the Survey o f
Income and Program Participation to
su g g e st that em p lo y m en t a ctu a lly
increased when a definition o f disability
more appropriate to the actual inter­
pretation o f the a d a is substituted for
self-reported limitations on work.
Susan Schwochau and Peter Blanck
conclude the symposium by returning the
issue o f defining disability to the drafting
ofthe American with Disabilities Act. They
underline the need to more completely
understand the labor market decisions o f
workers with disabilities before deve­
lop in g new statutory language. The
q u estion s S ch w och au and B lan ck
suggest considering include not only
what impels persons with disabilities to
enter the work force, but what factors
might keep them from finding employment,
what barriers and attitudes continue to
impede progress, how does lack o f work
experience play out in the context o f ADA,
and to what extent do the definitional
issu e s a ffe ct the answ ers to th ese
questions.

January 2003

Low-wage labor markets
The Novem ber 2002 issue o f E co n o m ic
D e v e lo p m e n t Q u a r te r ly in clu d es a

focus section on low -wage labor mar­
k ets. A s the in trodu ctory e ssa y by
R a ch el W eber and N ik T h eo d o re
suggests, leaving welfare to enter the
workplace is a com plex process and
understanding the labor markets these
processes operate in is crucial for deve­
loping w ays to help w elfare leavers
progress into sustainable careers.
Karen Chappie identifies the inter­
actions between styles o f labor market
attachment, job search m ethods, and
individual characteristics as important
determ inants o f career p rogression.
Among the three labor market attachment
typologies she finds among women on
welfare in San Francisco— chronically
unem ployed, jo b m obile, or careeroriented— the chronically unemployed
rely overly on informal job search methods
w hile the career oriented use a com ­
bination o f social networks and education
to advance.
Evelyn Blumenberg enumerates the
many and interrelated barriers that face
welfare participants in the search for work
and career. Chief among these are failure
to complete high school, limited language
ability, transportation problems (espe­
cially using mass transit), presence o f
children, and poor health. The m ost
important, especially among women, were
education and competence in the English
language.
Sammis B. White and Lori A. Geddes
analyze the importance ofthe employer’s
characteristics in determining success at
leaving poverty. They report that women
who are employed in larger establish­
ments that are not in the agriculture,
mining, retail, or service industries have
the best chance o f escaping poverty. It
w as also important to be em p loyed
consistently, preferably throughout the
year for the same employer (or at least in
the same industry), and to avoid estab­
lishments with high turnover and higher
proportions o f welfare recipients on the
payroll.
□

Book Reviews

Internet’s economic promise
By Robert E.
Litan and A lice M. Rivlin. Washing­
ton, DC, Brookings Institution Press,
2001,130 pp.,$19.95/cloth.

B e y o n d th e D ot. corns.

In the 1990s, there was much investment
into the dot.coms. Many thought there
was com ing a golden age o f entrepre­
neurship— that the world o f business
w ould be transformed. But then the
bubble o f dot.com burst. It had been an
exciting new frontier. There was an ex­
plosion o f new companies. But profit on
paper did not match actual revenue—
and the result was myriad bankruptcies.
In B e yo n d th e D ot. corns, two o f the
N a tio n ’s m ost respected econom ists
look past the dot.coms to search out the
Internet’s real impact on the econom y in
the near future. They examine the po­
tential effect o f the Internet on produc­
tivity growth across a wide range o f ex­
isting “old econom y” sectors.
Robert Litan and Alice Rivlin summa­
rize the conclusions o f a Brookings re­
search team set up for the purpose o f
this study. Their judgment is that the
impact o f the Internet w ill be positive,
significant, and sustained, and that it
would be a mistake to equate the ben­
efits o f the Internet with the profitability
o f the dot.coms or, for that matter, the
broader “new econom y” techn ology
sector.
In short, the authors surmise that the
Internet w ill produce significant cost
savings in many sectors o f the economy.
Some o f the cost savings will mean faster
productivity growth; others w ill be re­
flected in narrower profit margins and
lower prices for consumers. Overall, the
Internet w ill improve the standard o f liv­
ing for the average American. Other ben­
efits are not easily quantified, but they
are nonetheless real; for example, in­
creased and efficient accessibility to
products never before available to the
man on the street.
The Brookings Task Force, which
was com posed o f experts in the major

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

economic sectors, was asked to estimate
how the Internet might alter productiv­
ity over the next 5 years. It examined
such businesses as automobile manu­
facturing and sales, general manufactur­
ing, education, financial services, gov­
ernment, healthcare, retailing, and truck­
ing. The Brookings’ project indicates that
the effect o f the Internet w ill not be so
much in e-commerce as in enhancements
that lower transaction costs and improve
business efficiency.
The Internet has the potential to in­
crease productivity growth in a variety
o f distinct, but mutually reinforcing,
w ays— by significantly reducing the
costs o f many transactions necessary
to the production and distribution o f
goods and services, and by promoting
c o s t-e ffe c tiv e m anagem ent o f such
things as supply chains and communi­
cations within firms and with custom­
ers. Other benefits include an increase
in competition, more price transparency,
and broader markets for both buyers and
sellers.
Andrew McAfee o f the Harvard Busi­
ness School projected overall cost re­
ductions in the manufacturing sector.
Routine transactions w ill be handled
more consistently and expeditiously.
Firms can reduce their cost o f produc­
tion, not by doing anything new or dif­
ferent, but by simply using the Internet
to do the same things cheaper. Within
the manufacturing firms them selves,
intranets are allowing management to
share information more accurately and
less expensively.
In their discussion o f the healthcare
sector, Patricia Danzon and M ichael
Furukawa from the Wharton School at
the University o f Pennsylvania said that
“perhaps as much as $27 billion a year
could be saved ....”
Lower processing costs to financial
services were forecast by Eric Clemons
and Loren Hitt, also from the Wharton
School.
Jane Fountain o f Harvard’s Kennedy
School o f Government projects that the
Government could also realize significant

savings in transaction costs in terms o f
response to questions and information
gathering. However, it was noted that egovemment is in its early stages and that
realization o f savings w ill be impeded by
the need to maintain alternate systems
for those unable or unwilling to use the
Internet.
Even though distance-learning at the
postsecondary level is on the rise, A us­
tin G oolsbee o f the University o f Chi­
cago predicts that the im pact o f the
Internet on education productivity in the
next few years w ill be slight, owing to
the fact that the cost o f developing learn­
ing tools is steep and the advantages
are protracted.
Charles Fine o f MIT and Daniel R aff
o f the University o f Pennsylvania, on
the other hand, predict that the automo­
bile sector o f the future w ill involve far
fewer dealers and sales personnel be­
cause o f productivity improvements in
product development, procurement and
supply, and in various aspects o f the au­
tomobile manufacturing process itself.
Even though only 1 percent o f retail
sales are transacted over the Internet
currently, and in 5 years are likely to ac­
count for no more than 10 percent, Jo­
seph B ailey o f the University o f Mary­
land believes there is considerable po­
tential for retailers to be able to use the
Internet to increase their overall effi­
cien cy and, thus, indirectly advance
productivity.
Litan and R ivlin observe that the
Internet also provides opportunities for
convenience, pleasure, and comfort that
cannot be m easured in dollars (that
don’t show up in the Gross Domestic
Product). They also mention that there
are serious hurdles to overcom e if the
Internet is to maximize its potential, is­
sues like relationship-dependent ser­
vices, confidentiality o f records, and
unwillingness o f the public to make the
changeover from paper to electronic
transactions. The authors also mention
the Internet’s potential to affect politics,
m aking it feasible to know virtually
everyone’s opinion on a given subject

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

43

Book Reviews

on a daily basis, with the warning that
such a society could easily degenerate
from a system that relies on elected lead­
ers making responsible judgments into a
“knee-jerk” democracy.
In sum, the studies indicate that the
potential o f Internet-related cost savings
is as much as 2.5 percent o f the gross
domestic product and that the savings
are likely to accrue over time. But im­
provement in the process does not guar­
antee improvement in the outcome. There
is an unpredictable human element that
can sa b o ta g e the b est te c h n o lo g y .

People who thought the Internet would
shorten, or even eliminate, econom ic
cycles were probably wrong in that eco­
nomic growth can turn downward for a
host o f reasons other than the technol­
ogy. The Internet can help companies
save money, but it does not protect them
from managerial mistakes.
The biggest bottleneck in reaping the
rewards o f the Internet is retraining per­
sonnel to do things differently. Ironi­
cally, the people who thought they’d get
rich quickly on dot.coms are now help­
ing firms adapt to the Internet era.

T he au th ors su m m a rize the
Brookings study team’s conclusions to
say that use o f the Internet w ill produce
major savings in many sectors o f the
econom y and that some o f these cost
savings w ill mean faster productivity
growth for years to come. “In product
markets the new and old w ill blend
seamlessly. And the econom y w ill have
m oved beyond the dot.com s.”
— Ellen M essing
Consumer Price Computer Systems,
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Where are you publishing your research?
The M on th ly L a b o r R e view w ill consider for publication studies o f the labor force,
labor-management relations, business conditions, industry productivity, compen­
sation, occupational safety and health, demographic trends, and other econom ic
developments. Papers should be factual and analytical, not polemical in tone.
We prefer (but do not require) submission in the form o f an electronic file in
M icrosoft Word, either on a diskette or as an attachment to e-mail. Please use
separate files for the text o f the article; the tables; and charts. We also accept hard
copies o f manuscripts.
Potential articles should be mailed to: Editor-in-Chief, M o n th ly L a b o r R e v ie w ,
Bureau o f Labor Statistics, Washington, DC 20212, or by e-mail to mlr@bls.gov


44 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

Current Labor Statistics

■

Notes on labor statistics

46

Labor compensation and collective
bargaining data—continued

58

28. Employment Cost Index, private nonfarm workers,
by bargaining status, region, and area s iz e .................... 84
29. Participants in benefit plans, medium and large firm s..... 85
30. Participants in benefits plans, small firms
and government.................................................................... 86
31. Work stoppages involving 1,000 workers or m o re........... 87

Comparative indicators
1. Labor market indicators.............................
2. Annual and quarterly percent changes in
compensation, prices, and productivity
3. Alternative measures of wages and
compensation changes............................

59
59

Labor force data
4. Employment status of the population,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
5. Selected employment indicators,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
6. Selected unemployment indicators,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
7. Duration of unemployment,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
8. Unemployed persons by reason for unemployment,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
9. Unemployment rates by sex and age,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
10. Unemployment rates by States,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
11. Employment of workers by States,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
12. Employment of workers by industry,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
13. Average weekly hours by industry,
seasonally adjusted ....................................................
14. Average hourly earnings by industry,
seasonally adjusted.....................................................
15. Average hourly earnings by industry............................
16. Average weekly earnings by industry...........................
17. Diffusion indexes of employment change,
seasonally adjusted....................................................
18. Establishment size and employment covered under ui,
private ownership, by naics supersector................
19. Annual data establishment, employment, and wages,
covered under Ui and UCFE, by ow nership...............
20. Annual data: Establishments, employment,
and wages covered under u i and UCFE, by S ta te .....
21. Annual data: Employment and average annual pay of
ui- and ucFE-covered workers, by largest counties ..
22. Annual data: Employment status of the population ...
23. Annual data: Employment levels by industry.............
24. Annual data: Average hours and earnings level,
by industry................................................................

Price data
60
61
62
62
63
63
64
64
65
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
78
79
79

Labor compensation and collective
bargaining data
25. Employment Cost Index, compensation,
by occupation and industry group.................................
26. Employment Cost Index, wages and salaries,
by occupation and industry group.................................
27. Employment Cost Index, benefits, private industry
workers, by occupation and industry group.................

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

32. Consumer Price Index: U.S. city average, by expenditure
category and commodity and service groups................
33. Consumer Price Index: U.S. city average and
local data, all item s...........................................................
34. Annual data: Consumer Price Index, all items
and major groups..............................................................
35. Producer Price Indexes by stage of processing.................
36. Producer Price Indexes for the net output of major
industry groups................................................................
37. Annual data: Producer Price Indexes
by stage of processing.....................................................
38. U.S. export price indexes by Standard International
Trade Classification.........................................................
39. U.S. import price indexes by Standard International
Trade Classification.........................................................
40. U.S. export price indexes by end-use category.................
41. U.S. import price indexes by end-use category...............
42. U.S.international price indexes for selected
categories of services........................................................

88
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
98
98

Productivity data
43. Indexes of productivity, hourly compensation,
and unit costs, data seasonally adjusted.......................
44. Annual indexes of multifactor productivity......................
45. Annual indexes o f productivity, hourly compensation,
unit costs, and prices......................................................
46. Annual indexes of output per hour for selected
industries...........................................................................

99
100
101
102

International comparisons data
47. Unemployment rates in nine countries,
data seasonally adjusted.................................................. 105
48. Annual data: Employment status of the civilian
working-age population, 10 countries............................ 106
49. Annual indexes of productivity and related measures,
12 countries...................................................................... 107

Injury and illness data
80
82
83

50. Annual data: Occupational injury and illness
incidence rates.................................................................. 108
51. Fatal occupational injuries by event
or exposure............................................................................110
Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

46

Notes on Current Labor Statistics

This section of the .Review presents the prin­
cipal statistical series collected and calcu­
lated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics:
series on labor force; employment; unem­
ployment; labor compensation; consumer,
producer, and international prices; produc­
tivity; international comparisons; and injury
and illness statistics. In the notes that fol­
low, the data in each group of tables are
briefly described; key definitions are given;
notes on the data are set forth; and sources
of additional information are cited.

General notes
The following notes apply to several tables
in this section:
Seasonal adjustment. Certain monthly
and quarterly data are adjusted to eliminate
the effect on the data of such factors as cli­
m atic conditions, industry production
schedules, opening and closing of schools,
holiday buying periods, and vacation prac­
tices, which might prevent short-term evalu­
ation of the statistical series. Tables con­
taining data that have been adjusted are iden­
tified as “ seasonally adjusted.” (All other
data are not seasonally adjusted.) Seasonal
effects are estimated on the basis of past
experience. When new seasonal factors are
computed each year, revisions may affect
seasonally adjusted data for several preced­
ing years.
Seasonally adjusted data appear in tables
1-14, 16-17, 43, and 47. Seasonally ad­
justed labor force data in tables 1 and 4-9
were revised in the February 2002 issue of
the Review. Seasonally adjusted establish­
ment survey data shown in tables 1, 12-14
and 16-17 were revised in the July 2002
Review and reflect the experience through
March 2002. A brief explanation o f the sea­
sonal adjustment methodology appears in
“Notes on the data.”
Revisions in the productivity data in
table 49 are usually introduced in the Sep­
tember issue. Seasonally adjusted indexes
and percent changes from month-to-month
and quarter-to-quarter are published for nu­
merous Consumer and Producer Price Index
series. However, seasonally adjusted in­
dexes are not published for the U.S. average
All-Items CPI. Only seasonally adjusted per­
cent changes are available for this series.
A djustm ents for price changes. Some
data— such as the “real” earnings shown in
table 14—are adjusted to eliminate the ef­
fect of changes in price. These adjustments
are made by dividing current-dollar values
by the Consumer Price Index or the appro­
priate component of the index, then multi­
plying by 100. For example, given a current
Monthly Labor Review
Digitized for46
FRASER
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

hourly wage rate of $3 and a current price
index number of 150, where 1982 = 100, the
hourly rate expressed in 1982 dollars is $2
($3/150 x 100 = $2). The $2 (or any other
resulting values) are described as “real,”
“constant,” or “ 1982” dollars.

For additional information on interna­
tional comparisons data, see International
Comparisons o f Unemployment, BLS Bulle­
tin 1979.
Detailed data on the occupational injury
and illness series are published in Occupa­

Sources of information

tional Injuries and Illnesses in the United
States, by Industry, a BLS annual bulletin.
Finally, the Monthly Labor Review car­

Data that supplement the tables in this sec­
tion are published by the Bureau in a variety
of sources. Definitions of each series and
notes on the data are contained in later sec­
tions of these Notes describing each set of
data. For detailed descriptions of each data
series, see BLS Handbook o f Methods, Bul­
letin 2490. Users also may wish to consult

Major Programs o f the Bureau o f Labor Sta­
tistics, Report 919. News releases provide
the latest statistical information published
by the Bureau; the major recurring releases
are published according to the schedule ap­
pearing on the back cover of this issue.
More information about labor force, em­
ployment, and unemployment data and the
household and establishment surveys under­
lying the data are available in the Bureau’s
m onthly publication, Employment and
Earnings. Historical unadjusted and season­
ally adjusted data from the household sur­
vey are available on the Internet:
http://www. bis. gov/cps/

Historically comparable unadjusted and sea­
sonally adjusted data from the establishment
survey also are available on the Internet:
http://www. bis. gov/ces/

Additional information on labor force data
for areas below the national level are pro­
vided in the BLS annual report, Geographic

Profile o f Employment and Unemployment.
For a comprehensive discussion of the
Employment Cost Index, see Employment
Cost Indexes and Levels, 1975-95, BLS Bul­
letin 2466. The most recent data from the
Employee Benefits Survey appear in the fol­
lowing Bureau of Labor Statistics bulletins:

Employee Benefits in Medium and Large
Firms; Employee Benefits in Small Private
Establishments; and Employee Benefits in
State and Local Governments.
More detailed data on consumer and pro­
ducer prices are published in the monthly
periodicals, The CPI Detailed Report and
Producer Price Indexes. For an overview of
the 1998 revision of the c p i , see the Decem­
ber 1996 issue of the Monthly Labor Re­
view. Additional data on international prices
appear in monthly news releases.
Listings of industries for which produc­
tivity indexes are available may be found on
the Internet:

January 2003

http://www. bis. gov/lpc/

ries analytical articles on annual and longer
term developments in labor force, employ­
ment, and unemployment; employee com­
pensation and collective bargaining; prices;
productivity; international comparisons;
and injury and illness data.

Symbols
n.e.c. = not elsewhere classified,
n.e.s. = not elsewhere specified.
p = preliminary. To increase the time­
liness of some series, preliminary
figures are issued based on repre­
sentative but incomplete returns,
r = revised. Generally, this revision
reflects the availability o f later
data, but also may reflect other ad­
justments.

Comparative Indicators
(Tables 1-3)
Comparative indicators tables provide an
overview and comparison of major b l s sta­
tistical series. Consequently, although many
of the included series are available monthly,
all measures in these comparative tables are
presented quarterly and annually.
Labor m arket indicators include em­
ployment measures from two major surveys
and information on rates of change in com­
pensation provided by the Employm ent
Cost Index (ECl) program. The labor force
participation rate, the em ploym ent-topopulation ratio, and unemployment rates
for major demographic groups based on the
Current Population (“household”) Survey
are presented, while measures of employ­
ment and average weekly hours by major
industry sector are given using nonfarm pay­
roll data. The Em ploym ent Cost Index
(compensation), by major sector and by bar­
gaining status, is chosen from a variety of
BLS compensation and wage measures be­
cause it provides a comprehensive measure
of employer costs for hiring labor, not just
outlays for wages, and it is not affected by
employment shifts among occupations and
industries.

D ata on ch a n g e s in c o m p en sa tio n ,
prices, and productivity are presented in
table 2. Measures of rates of change of com­
pensation and wages from the Employment
Cost Index program are provided for all ci­
vilian nonfarm workers (excluding Federal
and household workers) and for all private
nonfarm workers. Measures of changes in
consumer prices for all urban consumers;
producer prices by stage of processing; over­
all prices by stage of processing; and overall
export and import price indexes are given.
Measures of productivity (output per hour
of all persons) are provided for major sec­
tors.
A ltern a tiv e m easu res o f w age and
com pensation rates o f change, which re­

flect the overall trend in labor costs, are sum­
marized in table 3. Differences in concepts
and scope, related to the specific purposes
of the series,
contribute to the variation in changes among
the individual measures.

Notes on the data
Definitions of each series and notes on the
data are contained in later sections of these
notes describing each set of data.

Employment and
Unemployment Data

not work during the survey week, but were
available for work except for temporary ill­
ness and had looked for jobs within the pre­
ceding 4 weeks. Persons who did not look
for work because they were on layoff are
also counted among the unemployed. The
unem ploym ent rate represents the num­
ber unemployed as a percent of the civilian
labor force.
The civilian labor force consists of all
employed or unemployed persons in the
civilian noninstitutional population. Persons
n o t in th e la b o r fo rce are those not
classified as employed or unemployed. This
group includes discouraged workers, defined
as persons who want and are available for a
job and who have looked for work sometime
in the past 12 months (or since the end of
their last job if they held one within the past
12 months), but are not currently looking,
because they believe there are no jobs
available or there are none for which they
would qualify. The civilian n on in stitu ­
tional population comprises all persons 16
years of age and older who are not inmates
of penal or mental institutions, sanitariums,
or homes for the aged, infirm, or needy. The
civilian labor force participation rate is
the
pro portion
o f the
civilian
noninstitutional population that is in the
labor force. The em ploym ent-population
ratio is employ-ment as a percent of the
civilian nonin-stitutional population.

(Tables l;4 - 2 4 )

Notes on the data

Household survey data

From time to time, and especially after a
decennial census, adjustments are made in
the Current Population Survey figures to
correct for estimating errors during the
intercensal years. These adjustments affect
the comparability of historical data. A de­
scription of these adjustments and their ef­
fect on the various data series appears in the
Explanatory N otes o f Employment and

Description of the series
E mployment data in this section are ob­
tained from the Current Population Survey,
a program of personal interviews conducted
monthly by the Bureau of the Census for
the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The sample
consists of about 60,000 households selected
to represent the U.S. population 16 years of
age and older. Households are interviewed
on a rotating basis, so that three-fourths of
the sample is the same for any 2 consecutive
months.

Definitions
Em ployed persons include (1) all those
who worked for pay any time during the
week which includes the 12th day of the
month or who worked unpaid for 15 hours
or more in a family-operated enterprise and
(2) those who were temporarily absent from
their regular jobs because of illness, vaca­
tion, industrial dispute, or similar reasons. A
person working at more than one job is
counted only in the job at which he or she
worked the greatest number of hours.
U nem ployed persons are those who did


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

rate the experience through June, are pro­
duced for the July-December period, but no
revisions are made in the historical data.
F or additional information on na­
tional household survey data, contact the
Division of Labor Force Statistics: (202)
691-6378.

Establishment survey data
Description of the series
Employment, hours, and earnings data
in this section are compiled from payroll
records reported monthly on a voluntary ba­
sis to the Bureau of Labor Statistics and its
cooperating State agencies by about 300,000
establishments representing all industries
except agriculture. Industries are classified
in accordance with the 1987 Standard In­
dustrial Classification (SIC) Manual. In most
industries, the sampling probabilities are
based on the size of the establishment; most
large establishments are therefore in the
sample. (An establishment is not necessar­
ily a firm; it may be a branch plant, for ex­
ample, or warehouse.) Self-employed per­
sons and others not on a regular civilian pay­
roll are outside the scope o f the survey
because they are excluded from establish­
ment records. This largely accounts for the
difference in employment figures between
the household and establishment surveys.

Definitions

Earnings.
Labor force data in tables 1 and 4 -9 are
seasonally adjusted. Since January 1980,
national labor force data have been season­
ally adjusted with a procedure called X -l 1
arima which was developed at Statistics
Canada as an extension of the standard X -l 1
method previously used by bls . A detailed
description of the procedure appears in the
X -ll ARIMA Seasonal Adjustment Method,
by Estela Bee Dagum (Statistics Canada,
Catalogue No. 12-564E, January 1983).
At the beginning of each calendar year,
historical seasonally adjusted data usually
are revised, and projected seasonal adjust­
ment factors are calculated for use during
the January-June period. The historical sea­
sonally adjusted data usually are revised for
only the most recent 5 years. In July, new
seasonal adjustment factors, which incorpo­

An e sta b lish m en t is an economic unit
which produces goods or services (such as a
factory or store) at a single location and is
engaged in one type of economic activity.
Employed persons are all persons who
received pay (including holiday and sick
pay) for any part of the payroll period in­
cluding the 12th day of the month. Persons
holding more than one job (about 5 percent
of all persons in the labor force) are counted
in each establishment which reports them.
Production workers in manufacturing
include working supervisors and nonsupervisory workers closely associated with pro­
duction operations. Those workers men­
tioned in tables 11-16 include production
workers in manufacturing and mining; con­
struction workers in construction; and
nonsupervisory workers in the following in­
dustries: transportation and public utilities;
wholesale and retail trade; finance, insur­
ance, and real estate; and services. These
groups account for about four-fifths of the
total employment on private nonagricultural payrolls.
Earnings are the payments production
or nonsupervisory workers receive during
the survey period, including premium pay

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

47

Current Labor Statistics
for overtime or late-shift work but exclud­
ing irregular bonuses and other special
paym ents. R eal ea rn in g s are earnings
adjusted to reflect the effects of changes in
consumer prices. The deflator for this series
is derived from the Consumer Price Index
for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W).
H ours represent the average weekly
hours o f production or nonsupervisory
workers for which pay was received, and
are different from standard or scheduled
hours. Overtime hours represent the por­
tion of average weekly hours which was in
excess o f regular hours and for which over­
time premiums were paid.
The D iffu sio n In d ex represents the
percent of industries in which employment
was rising over the indicated period, plus
one-half of the industries with unchanged
employment; 50 percent indicates an equal
balance between industries with increasing
and decreasing employment. In line with Bu­
reau practice, data for the 1-, 3-, and 6-month
spans are seasonally adjusted, while those
for the 12-month span are unadjusted. Data
are centered within the span. Table 17 pro­
vides an index on private nonfarm employ­
ment based on 356 industries, and a manu­
facturing index based on 139 industries.
These indexes are useful for measuring the
dispersion of economic gains or losses and
are also economic indicators.

Notes on the data
Establishment survey data are annually ad­
justed to comprehensive counts of employ­
ment (called “benchmarks”). The latest ad­
justment, which incorporated March 2001
benchmarks, was made with the release of
May 2002 data, published in the July issue
of the Review. Coincident with the bench­
mark adjustment, historical seasonally ad­
justed data were revised to reflect updated
seasonal factors. Unadjusted data from April
2000 forward and seasonally adjusted data
from January 1997 forward were revised
with the release of the May 2002 data.
In addition to the routine benchmark re­
visions and updated seasonal factors intro­
duced with the release o f the May 2002
data, the first estimates for the transporta­
tion and public utilities; retail trade; and fi­
nance, insurance, and real estate industries
were published from a new probabilitybased sample design. These industries are
the third group to convert to a probabilitybased sample under a 4-year phase-in plan
of a sample redesign project. The comple­
tion o f the phase-in for the redesign, in June
2003 for the services industry, will coincide
with the conversion of national establish­
ment survey series from industry coding
based on the 1987 Standard Industrial Clas­
sification (SIC) system to the North Ameri­

48
Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

can Industry Classification System (NAICS).
For additional information, see the the June
2002 issue of Employment and Earnings.
Revisions in State data (table 11) oc­
curred with the publication of January 2002
data.
Beginning in June 1996, theBLS uses the
X-12-arima methodology to seasonally ad­
just establishment survey data. This proce­
dure, developed by the Bureau of the Cen­
sus, controls for the effect of varying sur­
vey intervals (also known as the 4- versus
5-week effect), thereby providing improved
measurement of over-the-month changes and
underlying economic trends. Revisions of
data, usually for the most recent 5-year pe­
riod, are made once a year coincident with
the benchmark revisions.
In the establishment survey, estimates
for the most recent 2 months are based on
incomplete returns and are published as pre­
liminary in the tables (12-17 in the Review).
When all returns have been received, the es­
timates are revised and published as “final”
(prior to any benchmark revisions) in the
third month of their appearance. Thus, De­
cember data are published as preliminary in
January and February and as final in March.
For the same reasons, quarterly establish­
ment data (table l ) are preliminary for the
first 2 months of publication and final in the
third month. Thus, fourth-quarter data are
published as preliminary in January and
February and as final in March.
F or additional information on estab­
lishment survey data, contact the Division
of Current Employment Statistics: (202)
691-6555.

Unemployment data by
State
Description of the series
Data presented in this section are obtained
from the Local Area Unemployment Statis­
tics (LAUS) program, which is conducted in
cooperation with State employment secu­
rity agencies.
Monthly estimates o f the labor force,
employment, and unemployment for States
and sub-State areas are a key indicator of
local economic conditions, and form the ba­
sis for determining the eligibility of an area
for benefits under Federal economic assis­
tance programs such as the Job Training
Partnership Act. Seasonally adjusted unem­
ployment rates are presented in table 10.
Insofar as possible, the concepts and defini­
tions underlying these data are those used in
the national estimates obtained from the cps .

Notes on the data
Data refer to State of residence. Monthly

January 2003

data for all States and the D istrict o f
Columbia are derived using standardized
procedures established by BLS. Once a year,
estimates are revised to new population
controls, usually with publication of January
estim ates, and benchm arked to annual
average CPS levels.
F or additional information on data
in this series, call (202) 691-6392 (table 10)
or (202) 691-6559 (table 11).

Covered em ploym ent and
wage data (ES-202)
Description of the series
E mployment, wage, and establishment data

in this section are derived from the quarterly
tax reports submitted to State employment
security agencies by private and State and
local government employers subject to State
unemployment insurance (ui) laws and from
Federal, agencies subject to the Unemploy­
ment Compensation for Federal Employees
(ucfe) program. Each quarter, State agencies
edit and process the data and send the infor­
mation to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The Covered Employment and Wages
data, also referred as ES-202 data, are the
most complete enumeration of employment
and wage information by industry at the na­
tional, State, metropolitan area, and county
levels. They have broad economic signifi­
cance in evaluating labor market trends and
major industry developments.

Definitions
In general, es-202 monthly employment data
represent the number of covered workers
who worked during, or received pay for, the
pay period that included the 12th day o f the
month. Covered private industry em ploy­
m ent includes most corporate officials, ex­
ecutives, supervisory personnel, profession­
als, clerical workers, wage earners, piece
workers, and part-time workers. It excludes
proprietors, the unincorporated self-em­
ployed, unpaid family members, and certain
farm and domestic workers. Certain types
of nonprofit employers, such as religious
organizations, are given a choice of coverage
or exclusion in a number of States. Workers
in these organizations are, therefore, reported
to a limited degree.
Persons on paid sick leave, paid holiday,
paid vacation, and the like, are included. Per­
sons on the payroll o f more than one firm
during the period are counted by each uisubject employer if they meet the employ­
ment definition noted earlier. The employ-

ment count excludes workers who earned no
wages during the entire applicable pay period
because of work stoppages, temporary lay­
offs, illness, or unpaid vacations.
Federal employment data are based on
reports of monthly employment and quarterly
wages submitted each quarter to State agencies
for all Federal installations with employees
covered by the Unemployment Com pensa­
tion for Federal Employees (ucee) program,
except for certain national security agen­
cies, which are omitted for security rea­
sons. Employment for all Federal agencies for
any given month is based on the number of
persons who worked during or received pay
for the pay period that included the 12th of
the month.
An establishm ent is an economic unit,
such as a farm, mine, factory, or store, that
produces goods or provides services. It is typi­
cally at a single physical location and engaged
in one, or predominantly one, type of eco­
nomic activity for which a single industrial clas­
sification may be applied. Occasionally, a single
physical location encompasses two or more
distinct and significant activities. Each activity
should be reported as a separate establishment
if separate records are kept and the various
activities are classified under different four­
digit sic codes.
Most employers have only one establish­
ment; thus, the establishment is the predomi­
nant reporting unit or statistical entity for re­
porting employment and wages data. Most
employers, including State and local govern­
ments who operate more than one establish­
ment in a State, file a Multiple Worksite Re­
port each quarter, in addition to their quarterly
ui report. The Multiple Worksite Report is
used to collect separate employment and wage
data for each of the employer’s establishments,
which are not detailed on the ui report. Some
very small multi-establishment employers do
not file a Multiple Worksite Report. When the
total employment in an employer’s secondary
establishments (all establishments other than
the largest) is 10 or fewer, the employer gener­
ally will file a consolidated report for all estab­
lishments. Also, some employers either can­
not or will not report at the establishment level
and thus aggregate establishments into one con­
solidated unit, or possibly several units, though
not at the establishment level.
For the Federal Government, the reporting
unit is the installation: a single location at
which a department, agency, or other govern­
ment body has civilian employees. Federal agen­
cies follow slightly different criteria than do
private employers when breaking down their
reports by installation. They are permitted to
combine as a single statewide unit: 1) all instal­
lations with 10 or fewer workers, and 2) all


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

installations that have a combined total in the
State of fewer than 50 workers. Also, when
there are fewer than 25 workers in all second­
ary installations in a State, the secondary in­
stallations may be combined and reported with
the major installation. Last, if a Federal agency
has fewer than five employees in a State, the
agency headquarters office (regional office,
district office) serving each State may consoli­
date the employment and wages data for that
State with the data reported to the State in
which the headquarters is located. As a result
of these reporting rules, the number of report­
ing units is always larger than the number of
employers (or government agencies) but
smaller than the number of actual establish­
ments (or installations).
Data reported for the first quarter are tabu­
lated into size categories ranging from worksites
of very small size to those with 1,000 em­
ployees or more. The size category is deter­
mined by the establishment’s March employ­
ment level. It is important to note that each
establishment of a multi-establishment firm is
tabulated separately into the appropriate size
category. The total employment level of the
reporting multi-establishment firm is not used
in the size tabulation.
Covered employers in most States report
total wages paid during the calendar quarter,
regardless of when the services were per­
formed. A few State laws, however, specify
that wages be reported for, or based on the
period during which services are performed
rather than the period during which compen­
sation is paid. Under most State laws or regu­
lations, wages include bonuses, stock options,
the cash value of meals and lodging, tips and
other gratuities, and, in some States, employer
contributions to certain deferred compensa­
tion plans such as 401(k) plans.
Covered employer contributions for oldage, survivors, and disability insurance (oasdi),
health insurance, unemployment insurance,
workers’ compensation, and private pension
and welfare funds are not reported as wages.
Employee contributions for the same pur­
poses, however, as well as money withheld
for income taxes, union dues, and so forth, are
reported even though they are deducted from
the worker’s gross pay.
Wages o f covered Federal workers rep­
resent the gross amount of all payrolls for all
pay periods ending within the quarter. This
includes cash allowances, the cash equivalent
of any type of remuneration, severance pay,
withholding taxes, and retirement deductions.
Federal employee remuneration generally cov­
ers the same types of services as for workers
in private industry.
Average annual wages per employee for
any given industry are computed by dividing

total annual wages by annual average employ­
ment. A further division by 52 yields average
weekly wages per employee. Annual pay data
only approximate annual earnings because an
individual may not be employed by the same
employer all year or may work for more than
one employer at a time.
Average weekly or annual pay is affected
by the ratio of full-time to part-time workers
as well as the number of individuals in highpaying and low-paying occupations. When
average pay levels between States and indus­
tries are compared, these factors should be
taken into consideration. For example, indus­
tries characterized by high proportions of parttime workers will show average wage levels
appreciably less than the weekly pay levels of
regular full-time employees in these industries.
The opposite effect characterizes industries
with low proportions of part-time workers, or
industries that typically schedule heavy week­
end and overtime work. Average wage data also
may be influenced by work stoppages, labor
turnover rates, retroactive payments, seasonal
factors, bonus payments, and so on.

Notes on the data
Beginning with the release of data for 2001,
publications presenting data from the Covered
Employment and Wages (CEW) program have
switched to the 2002 version of the North
American Industry Classificatiion System
(NAICS) as the basis for the assignment and
tabulation of economic data by industry, naics
is the product of a cooperative effort on the
part of the statistical agencies of the United
States, Canada, and Mexico. Due to difference
in naics and Standard Industrial Classifica­
tion (SIC) structures, industry data for 2001 is
not comparable to the sic-based data for ear­
lier years.
Effective January 2001, the cew program
began assigning Indian Tribal Councils and re­
lated establishments to local government own­
ership. This bls action was in response to a
change in Federal law dealing with the way
Indian Tribes are treated under the Federal
Unemployment Tax Act. This law requires
federally recognized Indian Tribes to be treated
similarly to State and local governments. In
the past the cew program coded Indian Tribal
Councils and related establishments in the
private sector. As a result of the new law,
cew data reflects significant shifts in em­
ployment and wages between the private sec­
tor and local government from 2000 to 2001.
Data also reflect industry changes. Those
accounts previously assigned to civic and
social organizations were assigned to tribal
governments. There were no required indus­
try changes for related establishments owned

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

49

Current Labor Statistics

by these Tribal Councils. These tribal busi­
ness establishments continued to be coded ac­
cording to the economic activity of that entity.
To insure the highest possible quality of
data, State employment security agencies
verify with employers and update, if neces­
sary, the industry, location, and ownership clas­
sification of all establishments on a 3-year cycle.
Changes in establishment classification codes
resulting from the verification process are in­
troduced with the data reported for the first
quarter of the year. Changes resulting from
improved employer reporting also are intro­
duced in the first quarter. For these reasons,
some data, especially at more detailed geo­
graphic levels, may not be strictly comparable
with earlier years.
The2000 county data used to calculate the
2000-2001 changes were adjusted for changes
in industry and county classification to make
them comparable to data for 2001. As a result,
the adjusted 2000 data differ to some extent
from the data available on the Internet at:
http: //www. bis. gov/cew/home. htm.

County definitions are assigned according
to Federal Information Processing Standards
Publications as issued by the National Insti­
tute of Standards and Technology. Areas
shown as counties include those designated
as independent cities in some jurisdictions
and, in Alaska, those areas designated by the
Census Bureau where counties have not been
created. County data also are presented for
the New England States for comparative pur­
poses, even though townships are the more
common designation used in New England
(and New Jersey).
For additional information on the covered
employment and wage data, contact the Divi­
sion of Administrative Statistics and Labor
Turnover at (202) 691-6567.

Compensation and
Wage Data
(Tables 1-3; 25-31)
C ompensation and wage data are gathered
by the Bureau from business establishments,
State and local governments, labor unions, col­
lective bargaining agreements on file with the
Bureau, and secondary sources.

pensation per hour worked and includes
wages, salaries, and employer costs of em­
ployee benefits. It uses a fixed market
basket of labor—similar in concept to the Con­
sumer Price Index’s fixed market basket of
goods and services—to measure change over
time in employer costs of employing labor.
Statistical series on total compensation
costs, on wages and salaries, and on benefit
costs are available for private nonfarm work­
ers excluding proprietors, the self-employed,
and household workers. The total compensa­
tion costs and wages and salaries series are
also available for State and local government
workers and for the civilian nonfarm economy,
which consists of private industry and State
and local government workers combined. Fed­
eral workers are excluded.
The Employment Cost Index probability
sample consists of about 4,400 private non­
farm establishments providing about 23,000
occupational observations and 1,000 State and
local government establishments providing
6,000 occupational observations selected to
represent total employment in each sector. On
average, each reporting unit provides wage and
compensation information on five well-speci­
fied occupations. Data are collected each quar­
ter for the pay period including the 12th day
of March, June, September, and December.
Beginning with June 1986 data, fixed em­
ployment weights from the 1980 Census of
P opulatio n are used each q u arter to
calculate the civilian and private indexes and
the index for State and local governments.
(P rior to June 1986, the em ploym ent
weights are from the 1970 Census of Popu­
lation.) These fixed weights, also used to
derive all of the industry and occupation
series indexes, ensure that changes in these
indexes reflect only changes in compensa­
tion, not employment shifts among indus­
tries or occupations with different levels of
wages and compensation. For the bargaining
status, region, and metropolitan/non-metropolitan area series, however, employment
data by industry and occupation are not
available from the census. Instead, the 1980
employment weights are reallocated within
these series each quarter based on the cur­
rent sample. Therefore, these indexes are not
strictly comparable to those for the aggre­
gate, industry, and occupation series.

Definitions

Employment Cost Index

Total com pensation costs include wages,

Description of the series
The Employment Cost Index (ECI) is a quar­
terly measure of the rate of change in com­

50
Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

salaries, and the employer’s costs for em­
ployee benefits.
Wages and salaries consist of earnings
before payroll deductions, including produc­

January 2003

tion bonuses, incentive earnings, commis­
sions, and cost-of-living adjustments.
Benefits include the cost to employers
for paid leave, supplemental pay (includ­
ing nonproduction bonuses), insurance, retire­
ment and savings plans, and legally required
benefits (such as Social Security, workers’ com­
pensation, and unemployment insurance).
Excluded from wages and salaries and em­
ployee benefits are such items as payment-inkind, free room and board, and tips.

Notes on the data
The Employment Cost Index for changes in
wages and salaries in the private nonfarm
economy was published beginning in 1975.
Changes in total compensation cost—wages
and salaries and benefits combined—were
published beginning in 1980. The series of
changes in wages and salaries and for total
compensation in the State and local govern­
ment sector and in the civilian nonfarm
economy (excluding Federal employees) were
published beginning in 1981. Historical in­
dexes (June 1981=100) are available on the
Internet:
http://www. bis. gov/ect/

F or additional information on the
Employment Cost Index, contact the Office
of Compensation Levels and Trends: (202)
691-6199.

Employee Benefits Survey
Description of the series
Employee benefits data are obtained from

the Employee Benefits Survey, an annual
survey of the incidence and provisions of
selected benefits provided by employers.
The survey collects data from a sample of
approximately 9,000 private sector and
State and local government establishments.
The data are presented as a percentage of em­
ployees who participate in a certain benefit, or
as an average benefit provision (for example,
the average number of paid holidays provided
to employees per year). Selected data from the
survey are presented in table 25 for medium
and large private establishments and in table
26 for small private establishments and State
and local government.
The survey covers paid leave benefits
such as holidays and vacations, and personal,
funeral, jury duty, military, family, and sick
leave; short-term disability, long-term dis­
ability, and life insurance; medical, dental,
and vision care plans; defined benefit and
defined contribution plans; flexible benefits
plans; reimbursement accounts; and unpaid
family leave.
Also, data are tabulated on the inci-

dence o f several other benefits, such as
severance pay, child-care assistance, well-ness
program s, and em ployee assistance
programs.

Definitions
Em ployer-provided benefits are benefits
that are financed either wholly or partly by
the employer. They may be sponsored by a
union or other third party, as long as there is
some employer financing. However, some
benefits that are fully paid for by the em­
ployee also are included. For example, long­
term care insurance and postretirement life
insurance paid entirely by the employee are
included because the guarantee of insurabil­
ity and availability at group premium rates
are considered a benefit.
Participants are workers who are covered
by a benefit, whether or not they use that benefit.
If the benefit plan is financed wholly by
employers and requires employees to complete
a minimum length of service for eligibility, the
workers are considered participants whether or
not they have met the requirement. If workers
are required to contribute towards the cost of a
plan, they are considered participants only if
they elect the plan and agree to make the required
contributions.
Defined benefit pension plans use pre­
determined formulas to calculate a retirement
benefit (if any), and obligate the employer to
provide those benefits. Benefits are generally
based on salary, years of service, or both.
D efined contribution plans generally
specify the level of employer and employee
contributions to a plan, but not the formula for
determining eventual benefits. Instead, indi­
vidual accounts are set up for participants, and
benefits are based on amounts credited to these
accounts.
Tax-deferred savings plans are a type of
defined contribution plan that allow par­
ticipants to contribute a portion of their sal­
ary to an employer-sponsored plan and defer
income taxes until withdrawal.
Flexible benefit plans allow employees
to choose among several benefits, such as life
insurance, medical care, and vacation days, and
among several levels of coverage within a given
benefit.

Notes on the data
Surveys of employees in medium and large
establishments conducted over the 1979-86
period included establishments that employed
at least 50,100, or 250 workers, depending on
the industry (most service industries were
excluded). The survey conducted in 1987

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

covered only State and local governments with
50 or more employees. The surveys conducted
in 1988 and 1989 included medium and large
establishments with 100 workers or more in
private industries. All surveys conducted over
the 1979-89 period excluded establishments
in Alaska and Hawaii, as well as part-time
employees.
Beginning in 1990, surveys of State and
local governm ents and sm all private
establishments were conducted in evennumbered years, and surveys of medium and
large establishments were conducted in oddnumbered years. The small establishment
survey includes all private nonfarm
establishm en ts w ith few er than 100
w orkers, w hile the State and local
government survey includes all governments,
regardless of the number of workers. All
three surveys include full- and part-time
workers, and workers in all 50 States and
the District of Columbia.
F or additional information on the Em­
ployee Benefits Survey, contact the Office of
Compensation Levels and Trends on the
Internet:
http ://www. bis. gov/ebs/

Work stoppages
Description of the series
Data on work stoppages measure the number
and duration of major strikes or lockouts (in­
volving 1,000 workers or more) occurring dur­
ing the month (or year), the number of work­
ers involved, and the amount of work time lost
because of stoppage. These data are presented
in table 27.
Data are largely from a variety of pub­
lished sources and cover only establishments
directly involved in a stoppage. They do
not measure the indirect or secondary effect
of stoppages on other establishments whose
employees are idle owing to material short­
ages or lack of service.

Definitions
The number of
strikes and lockouts involving 1,000 workers
or more and lasting a full shift or longer.
Workers involved: The number of work­
ers directly involved in the stoppage.
Number o f days idle: The aggregate
number of workdays lost by workers involved
in the stoppages.

N um ber o f stoppages:

D ays o f id len ess as a p ercen t o f
e stim a ted w o r k in g time: A ggregate

workdays lost as a percent of the aggregate
number of standard workdays in the period
multiplied by total employment in the period.

Notes on the data
This series is not comparable with the one
terminated in 1981 that covered strikes in­
volving six workers or more.
F or additional information on work
stoppages data, contact the Office of Com­
pensation and Working Conditions: (202)
691-6282, or the Internet:
http:/www. bis. gov/cba/

Price Data
(Tables 2; 32-42)
P rice data are gathered by the Bureau
o f Labor Statistics from retail and pri­
mary markets in the United States. Price in­
dexes are given in relation to a base period—
1982 = 100 for many Producer Price Indexes,
1982-84 = 100 for many Consumer Price In­
dexes (unless otherwise noted), and 1990 =
100 for International Price Indexes.

Consumer Price Indexes
Description of the series
The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a mea­
sure of the average change in the prices paid
by urban consumers for a fixed market bas­
ket of goods and services. The CPI is calcu­
lated monthly for two population groups,
one consisting only o f urban households
whose primary source of income is derived
from the employment of wage earners and
clerical workers, and the other consisting of
all urban households. The wage earner index
(CPi-W) is a continuation of the historic in­
dex that was introduced well over a halfcentury ago for use in wage negotiations. As
new uses were developed for the CPI in re­
cent years, the need for a broader and more
representative index became apparent. The
all-urban consumer index (CPi-U), introduced
in 1978, is representative of the 1993-95
buying habits o f about 87 percent o f the
noninstitutional population of the United
States at that time, compared with 32 per­
cent represented in the CPi-W. In addition to
wage earners and clerical workers, the CPl-U
covers professional, managerial, and techni­
cal workers, the self-employed, short-term
workers, the unemployed, retirees, and oth­
ers not in the labor force.
The CPI is based on prices o f food, cloth­
ing, shelter, fuel, drugs, transportation fares,
doctors’ and dentists’ fees, and other goods
and services that people buy for day-to-day
living. The quantity and quality of these
items are kept essentially unchanged between
major revisions so that only price changes
will be measured. All taxes directly associ-

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

51

Current Labor Statistics

ated with the purchase and use of items are
included in the index.
Data collected from more than 23,000 re­
tail establishments and 5,800 housing units
in 87 urban areas across the country are used
to develop the “U.S. city average.” Separate
estimates for 14 major urban centers are pre­
sented in table 33. The areas listed are as
indicated in footnote 1 to the table. The area
indexes measure only the average change in
prices for each area since the base period, and
do not indicate differences in the level of
prices among cities.

Notes on the data
In January 1983, the Bureau changed the
way in which homeownership costs are
meaured for the CPI-U. A rental equivalence
method replaced the asset-price approach
to homeownership costs for that series. In
January 1985, the same change was made in
the cpi-w . The central purpose of the change
was to separate shelter costs from the in­
vestment component of home-ownership so
that the index would reflect only the cost of
shelter services provided by owner-occu­
pied homes. An updated CPI-U and CPI-W
were introduced with release of the January
1987 and January 1998 data.
F or additional information , contact
the Division of Prices and Price Indexes:
(202) 691-7000.

Producer Price Indexes
Description of the series
Producer Price Indexes (ppi) measure av­

erage changes in prices received by domestic
producers of commodities in all stages of
processing. The sample used for calculating
these indexes currently contains about 3,200
commodities and about 80,000 quotations
per month, selected to represent the move­
ment of prices of all commodities produced
in the manufacturing; agriculture, forestry,
and fishing; mining; and gas and electricity
and public utilities sectors. The stage-ofp ro cessing stru ctu re o f ppi organizes
products by class o f buyer and degree of
fabrication (that is, finished goods, inter­
mediate goods, and crude materials). The
traditional commodity structure o f ppi or­
ganizes products by similarity of end use
or material composition. The industry and
product structure o f ppi organizes data in
accordance with the Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC) and the product code
extension of the sic developed by the U.S.
Bureau of the Census.
To the extent possible, prices used in

52
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

calculating Producer Price Indexes apply to
the first significant commercial transaction
in the United States from the production or
central marketing point. Price data are gen­
erally collected monthly, primarily by mail
questionnaire. Most prices are obtained di­
rectly from producing companies on a vol­
untary and confidential basis. Prices gener­
ally are reported for the T uesday of the week
containing the 13th day of the month.
Since January 1992, price changes for the
various commodities have been averaged
together with implicit quantity weights
representing their importance in the total net
selling value of all commodities as of 1987.
The detailed data are aggregated to obtain
indexes for stage-of-processing groupings,
commodity groupings, durability-of-product
groupings, and a number of special composite
groups. All Producer Price Index data are
subject to revision 4 months after original
publication.
F or additional information , contact
the Division o f Industrial Prices and Price
Indexes: (202) 691-7705.

International Price Indexes
Description of the series
The International Price Program produces
monthly and quarterly export and import
price indexes for nonmilitary goods and ser­
vices traded between the United States and
the rest of the world. The export price index
provides a measure of price change for all
products sold by U.S. residents to foreign
buyers. (“Residents” is defined as in the na­
tional income accounts; it includes corpora­
tions, businesses, and individuals, but does
not require the organizations to be U.S.
owned nor the individuals to have U.S. citi­
zenship.) The import price index provides a
measure of price change for goods purchased
from other countries by U.S. residents.
The product universe for both the import
and export indexes includes raw materials,
agricultural products, semifinished manufac­
tures, and finished manufactures, including
both capital and consumer goods. Price data
for these items are collected primarily by mail
questionnaire. In nearly all cases, the data are
collected directly from the exporter or im­
porter, although in a few cases, prices are
obtained from other sources.
To the extent possible, the data gathered
refer to prices at the U.S. border for exports
and at either the foreign border or the U.S.
border for imports. For nearly all products,
the prices refer to transactions completed dur­
ing the first week of the month. Survey re­

January 2003

spondents are asked to indicate all discounts,
allowances, and rebates applicable to the re­
ported prices, so that the price used in the
calculation of the indexes is the actual price for
which the product was bought or sold.
In addition to general indexes of prices for
U.S. exports and imports, indexes are also
published for detailed product categories of
exports and imports. These categories are
defined according to the five-digit level of
detail for the Bureau of Economic Analysis
End-use Classification, the three-digit level
for the Standard Industrial Classification
(SITC), and the four-digit level of detail for the
Harm onized System. A ggregate im port
indexes by coun-try or region o f origin are
also available.
bls publishes indexes for selected catego­
ries of internationally traded services, calcu­
lated on an international basis and on a balance-of-payments basis.

Notes on the data
The export and import price indexes are
weighted indexes of the Laspeyres type. The
trade weights currently used to compute both
indexes relate to 2000.
Because a price index depends on the same
items being priced from period to period, it is
necessary to recognize when a product’s
specifications or terms of transaction have
been modified. For this reason, the Bureau’s
questionnaire requests detailed descriptions of
the physical and functional characteristics of
the products being priced, as well as informa­
tion on the number of units bought or sold,
discounts, credit terms, packaging, class of
buyer or seller, and so forth. When there are
changes in either the specifications or terms of
transaction of a product, the dollar value of
each change is deleted from the total price
change to obtain the “pure” change. Once this
value is determined, a linking procedure is em­
ployed which allows for the continued repric­
ing of the item.
F or additional information, contact
the Division of International Prices: (202)
691-7155.

Productivity Data
(Tables 2; 43-46)

Business and major sectors
Description of the series
The productivity measures relate real output
to real input. As such, they encompass a fam-

ily of measures which include single-factor
input measures, such as output per hour, out­
put per unit of labor input, or output per
unit of capital input, as well as measures of
multifactor productivity (output per unit of
combined labor and capital inputs). The Bu­
reau indexes show the change in output rela­
tive to changes in the various inputs. The
measures cover the business, nonfarm busi­
ness, manufacturing, and nonfinancial corpo­
rate sectors.
Corresponding indexes of hourly compen­
sation, unit labor costs, unit nonlabor pay­
ments, and prices are also provided.

Definitions
O utput per hour of all persons (labor pro­

ductivity) is the quantity of goods and ser­
vices produced per hour of labor input. Out­
put per unit o f capital services (capital
productivity) is the quantity of goods and
services produced per unit of capital ser­
vices input M ultifactor productivity is the
quantity of goods and services produced per
combined inputs. For private business and pri­
vate nonfarm business, inputs include labor
and capital units. For manufacturing, inputs
include labor, capital, energy, non-energy ma­
terials, and purchased business ser-vices.
C om pensation per hour is total com­
pensation divided by hours at work. Total
compensation equals the wages and salaries
of employees plus employers’ contributions
for social insurance and private benefit plans,
plus an estimate of these payments for the
self-employed (except for nonfinancial cor­
porations in which there are no self-em­
ployed). Real com pensation per hour is
com pensation per hour deflated by the
change in the Consumer Price Index for All
Urban Consumers.
U nit labor costs are the labor compen­
sation costs expended in the production of a
unit of output and are derived by dividing
compensation by output. U nit nonlabor
paym en ts include profits, depreciation,
interest, and indirect taxes per unit of out­
put. They are computed by subtracting com­
pensation of all persons from current-dollar
value of output and dividing by output.
U n it non lab or costs contain all the
com ponents o f unit nonlabor payments
except unit profits.
U nit profits include corporate profits
with inventory valuation and capital con­
sumption adjustments per unit of output.
H o u rs o f a ll p e r so n s are the total
hours at work o f payroll w orkers, selfem ployed persons, and unpaid fam ily
workers.
L abor inputs are hours o f all persons
adjusted for the effects of changes in the

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

education and experience of the labor force.
C ap ital services are the flow of ser­
vices from the capital stock used in pro­
duction. It is developed from measures of
the net stock of physical assets— equip­
ment, structures, land, and inventories—
weighted by rental prices for each type of
asset.
Com bined units o f labor and cap ital
inputs are derived by combining changes

in labor and capital input with weights
which represent each component’s share
of total cost. Combined units o f labor,
capital, energy, materials, and purchased
business services are similarly derived by
com bining changes in each input with
weights that represent each input’s share
o f total costs. The indexes for each input
and for com bined units are based on
changing weights which are averages o f the
shares in the current and preceding year
(the Tornquist index-number formula).

Notes on the d a ta
B usiness sector output is an annuallyweighted index constructed by excluding
from real gross domestic product ( g d p ) the
following outputs: general government,
nonprofit institutions, paid employees of
private households, and the rental value
of owner-occupied dwellings. Nonfarm
business also excludes farming. Private
business and private nonfarm business
further exclude government enterprises.
The measures are supplied by the U.S. De­
partment of Commerce’s Bureau of Eco­
nomic Analysis. Annual estimates of manu­
facturing sectoral output are produced by
the Bureau o f Labor Statistics. Quarterly
m anufacturing output indexes from the
Federal Reserve Board are adjusted to these
annual output measures by the BLS. Com­
pensation data are developed from data of
the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the
Bureau o f Labor Statistics. Hours data
are developed from data of the Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
The productivity and associated cost
measures in tables 4 3 -4 6 describe the re­
lationship between output in real terms
and the labor and capital inputs involved
in its production. They show the changes
from period to period in the amount of
goods and services produced per unit of
input.
Although these measures relate output
to hours and capital services, they do not
measure the contributions of labor, capi­
tal, or any other specific factor of produc­
tion. Rather, they reflect the joint effect
of many influences, including changes in

technology; shifts in the composition of
the labor force; capital investment; level
o f output; changes in the utilization of
capacity, energy, material, and research
and development; the organization of pro­
duction; managerial skill; and characteris­
tics and efforts of the work force.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on this
productivity series, contact the Division
o f P roductivity R esearch: (202) 691 —
5606.

Industry productivity
measures
Description of the series
The b l s in d u s try p ro d u c tiv ity d ata
supplement the measures for the business
economy and major sectors with annual
measures of labor productivity for selected
industries at the three- and four-digit levels
o f the Standard Industrial Classification
system. In addition to labor productivity,
the industry data also include annual
measures of compensation and unit labor
co sts fo r th re e -d ig it in d u s trie s and
measures of multifactor productivity for
three-digit manufacturing industries and
railro ad tra n sp o rta tio n . The in d u stry
measures differ in methodology and data
sources from the productivity measures
for the major sectors because the industry
measures are developed independently of
the National Income and Product Accounts
fram ew ork used for the m ajor sector
measures.

Definitions
O utput per hour is derived by dividing
an index o f industry output by an index of
labor input. For most industries, output
indexes are derived from data on the value
o f in d u stry o u tp u t ad ju sted for price
change. For the remaining industries, out­
put indexes are derived from data on the
physical quantity o f production.
The labor input series consist o f the
hours of all employees (production workers
and nonproduction workers), the hours of all
persons (paid employees, partners, propri­
etors, and unpaid family workers), or the
number of employees, depending upon the
industry.
U n it la b o r costs represent the labor
com pensation costs per unit o f output
produced, and are derived by dividing an
index of labor compensation by an index
o f output. L abor com pensation includes
payroll as w ell as su p p lem en tal pay-

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

53

Current Labor Statistics

ments, including both legally required ex­
penditures and paym ents for voluntary
programs.
M u ltifactor prod u ctiv ity is derived
by dividing an index o f industry output
by an index of the combined inputs con­
sumed in producing that output. C om ­
bined inputs include capital, labor, and
intermediate purchases. The measure of
cap ital in p u t used represents the flow of
services from the capital stock used in
production. It is developed from measures
o f the net stock o f physical a sse ts—
equipment, structures, land, and invento­
ries. The measure o f in term ed iate p u r­
chases is a combination of purchased ma­
terials, services, fuels, and electricity.

Definitions
For the principal U.S. definitions of the labor
force, employment, and unemployment, see
the Notes section on Employment and Unem­
ployment Data: Household survey data.

Notes on the data

Notes on the d a ta
The industry measures are compiled from
data produced by the Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics and the Bureau of the Census,with
additional data supplied by other govern­
m ent agencies, trade associations, and
other sources.
For most industries, the productivity
indexes refer to the output per hour of all
employees. For some trade and services
industries, indexes of output per hour of
all persons (including self-employed) are
constructed. For some transportation in­
dustries, only indexes o f output per em­
ployee are prepared.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on this
series, contact the Division o f Industry
Productivity Studies: (202) 691-5618.

International
Comparisons
(Tables 4 7-49)

Labor force and
unem ploym ent
Description of the series
Tables 47 and 48 present comparative meas­
ures of the labor force, employment, and un­
em ploym ent— approxim ating U.S. con­
cepts—for the United States, Canada, Aus­
tralia, Japan, and several European countries.
The unem ploym ent statistics (and, to a
lesser extent, employment statistics) pub­
lished by other industrial countries are not,
in most cases, comparable to U.S. unemploy­
ment statistics. Therefore, the Bureau ad­
justs the figures for selected countries, where
necessary, for all known major definitional

54
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

differences. Although precise comparability
may not be achieved, these adjusted figures
provide a better basis for international com­
parisons than the figures regularly published
by each country. For further information on
adjustments and comparability issues, see
Constance Sorrentino, “International unem­
ployment rates: how comparable are they?”
Monthly Labor Review, June 2000, pp. 3-20.

The adjusted statistics have been adapted to
the age at which compulsory schooling ends
in each country, rather than to the U.S. stan­
dard of 16 years of age and older. Therefore,
the adjusted statistics relate to the popula­
tion aged 16 and older in France, Sweden, and
the United Kingdom; 15 and older in Austra­
lia, Japan, Germany, Italy from 1993 onward,
and the Netherlands; and 14 and older in Italy
prior to 1993. An exception to this rule is
that the Canadian statistics for 1976 onward
are adjusted to cover ages 16 and older,
whereas the age at which compulsory school­
ing ends remains at 15. The institutional
population is included in the denominator of
the labor force participation rates and em­
ployment-population ratios for Japan and
Germany; it is excluded for the United States
and the other countries.
In the U.S. labor force survey, persons on
layoff who are awaiting recall to their jobs
are classified as unemployed. European and
Japanese layoff practices are quite different
in nature from those in the United States;
therefore, strict application of the U.S. defi­
nition has not been made on this point. For
further information, see Monthly Labor Re­
view, December 1981, pp. 8-11.
The figures for one or more recent years
for France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands,
and the United Kingdom are calculated using
adjustment factors based on labor force sur­
veys for earlier years and are considered pre­
liminary. The recent-year measures for these
countries, therefore, are subject to revision
whenever data from more current labor force
surveys become available.
There are breaks in the data series for the
United States (1990,1994,1997,1998,1999,
2000), Canada (1976) France (1992), Ger­
many (1991), Italy (1991, 1993), the Neth­
erlands (1988), and Sweden (1987).
For the United States, the break in series

January 2003

reflects a major redesign of the labor force
survey questionnaire and collection method­
ology introduced in January 1994. Revised
population estimates based on the 1990 cen­
sus, adjusted for the estimated undercount,
also were incorporated. In 1996, previously
published data for the 1990-93 period were
revised to reflect the 1990 census-based
population controls, adjusted for the un­
dercount. In 1997, revised population con­
trols were introduced into the household sur­
vey. Therefore, the data are not strictly
conparable with prior years. In 1998, new
composite estimation procedures and minor
revisions in population controls were intro­
duced into the household survey. Therefore,
the data are not strictly comparable with data
for 1997 and earlier years. See the Notes sec­
tion on Employment and Unemployment
Data o f this Review.
BLS recently introduced a new adjusted
series for Canada. Beginning with the data
for 1976, Canadian data are adjusted to more
closely approximate U.S. concepts. Adjust­
ments are made to the unemployed and labor
force to exclude: (1) 15-year-olds; (2) pas­
sive jobseekers (persons only reading news­
paper ads as their method of job search); (3)
persons waiting to start a new job who did
not seek work in the past 4 weeks; and (4)
persons unavailable for work due to personal
or family responsibilities. An adjustment is
made to include full-tine students looking for
full-time work. The impact of the adjust­
ments was to lower the annual average unem­
ployment rate by 0.1-0.4 percentage point
in the 1980s and 0.4-1.0 percentage point in
the 1990s.
For France, the 1992 break reflects the
substitution of standardized European Union
Statistical Office (eurostat) unemployment
statistics for the unemployment data esti­
mated according to the International Labor
Office (ilo) definition and published in the
Organization for Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD) annual yearbook and
quarterly update. This change was made be­
cause the eurostat data are more up-to-date
than the OECD figures. Also, since 1992, the
eurostat definitions are closer to the U.S.
definitions than they were in prior years. The
impact of this revision was to lower the un­
employment rate by 0.1 percentage point in
1992 and 1993, by 0.4 percentage point in
1994, and 0.5 percentage point in 1995.
For Germany, the data for 1991 onward
refer to unified Germany. Data prior to 1991
relate to the former West Germany. The im­
pact of including the former East Germany
was to increase the unemployment rate from
4.3 to 5.6 percent in 1991.
For Italy, the 1991 break reflects a revi­
sion in the method of weighting sample data.

The impact was to increase the unemploy­
ment rate by approximately 0.3 percentage
point, from 6.6 to 6.9 percent in 1991.
In October 1992, the survey methodol­
ogy was revised and the definition of unem­
ployment was changed to include only those
who were actively looking for a job within
the 30 days preceding the survey and who
were available for work. In addition, the
lower age limit for the labor force was raised
from 14 to 15 years. (Prior to these changes,
BLS adjusted Italy’s published unemploy­
ment rate downward by excluding from the
unemployed those persons who had not
actively sought work in the past 30 days.)
The break in the series also reflects the incor­
poration of the 1991 population census re­
sults. The impact of these changes was to
raise Italy’s adjusted unemployment rate by
approximately 1.2 percentage points, from
8.3 to 9.5 percent in fourth-quarter 1992.
These changes did not affect employment
significantly, except in 1993. Estimates by
the Italian Statistical Office indicate that em­
ployment declined by about 3 percent in
1993, rather than the nearly 4 percent indi­
cated by the data shown in table 44. This
difference is attributable mainly to the incor­
poration of the 1991 population benchmarks
in the 1993 data. Data for earlier years have
not been adjusted to incorporate the 1991
census results.
For the Netherlands, a new survey ques­
tionnaire was introduced in 1992 that allowed
for a closer application of il o guidelines.
EUROSTAT has revised the Dutch series back
to 1988 based on the 1992 changes. The 1988
revised unemployment rate is 7.6 percent;
the previous estimate for the same year was
9.3 percent.
There have been two breaks in series in
the Swedish labor force survey, in 1987 and
1993. Adjustments have been made for the
1993 break back to 1987. In 1987, a new
questionnaire was introduced. Questions
regarding current availability were added
and the period o f active workseeking was
reduced from 60 days to 4 weeks. These
changes lowered Sw eden’s 1987 unem­
ployment rate by 0.4 percentage point,
from 2.3 to 1.9 percent. In 1993, the mea­
surement period for the labor force sur­
vey was changed to represent all 52 weeks
o f the year rather than one week each
month and a new adjustment for popula­
tion totals was introduced. The impact
was to raise the unem ployment rate by
approximately 0.5 percentage point, from
7.6 to 8.1 percent. Statistics Sweden re­
vised its labor force survey data for 1987—
92 to take into account the break in 1993.
The adjustment raised the Swedish unem­


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

ployment rate by 0.2 percentage point in
1987 and gradually rose to 0.5 percentage
point in 1992.
Beginning with 1987, b l s has adjusted the
Swedish data to classify students who also
sought work as unemployed. The impact of
this change was to increase the adjusted un­
employment rate by 0.1 percentage point in
1987 and by 1.8 percentage points in 1994,
when unemployment was higher. In 1998,
the adjusted unemployment rate had risen
from 6.5 to 8.4 percent due to the adjustment
to include students.
The net effect of the 1987 and 1993
changes and the b l s adjustment for stu­
dents seeking w ork lowered Sw eden’s
1987 unemployment rate from 2.3 to 2.2
percent.
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on this se­
ries, contact the Division of Foreign Labor
Statistics: (202) 691-5654.

Manufacturing productivity
and labor costs
Description of the series
Table 49 presents comparative indexes of
manufacturing labor productivity (output per
hour), output, total hours, compensation per
hour, and unit labor costs for the United
States, Canada, Japan, and nine European
countries. These measures are trend compari­
sons—that is, series that measure changes
over time—rather than level comparisons.
There are greater technical problems in com­
paring the levels of manufacturing output
among countries.
BLS constructs the comparative indexes
from three basic aggregate measures—output,
total labor hours, and total compensation.
The hours and compensation measures refer
to all employed persons (wage and salary
earners plus self-employed persons and un­
paid family workers) in the United States,
Canada, Japan, France, Germany, Norway,
and Sweden, and to all employees (wage and
salary earners) in the other countries.

Definitions
O utput, in general, refers to value added

in manufacturing from the national ac­
counts o f each country. However, the
output series for Japan prior to 1970 is
an index of industrial production, and the
national accounts measures for the United
Kingdom are essentially identical to their
indexes of industrial production.
The 1 9 7 7 -9 7 o u tp u t data for the
United States are the gross product origi­

nating (value added) measures prepared
by the Bureau of Economic Analysis of
the U.S. Department of Commerce. Com­
parable m anufacturing output data cur­
rently are not available prior to 1977.
U.S. gross product originating is a chaintype annual-weighted series. (For more in­
formation on the U.S. measure, see Robert
E. Yuskavage, “Improved Estim ates o f
Gross P roduct by Industry, 1 9 5 9 -9 4 ,”
Survey o f Current Business, August 1996,
pp. 133-55.) The Japanese value added
series is based upon one set o f fixed price
weights for the years 1970 through 1997.
Output series for the other foreign econo­
mies also employ fixed price weights, but
the weights are updated periodically (for
example, every 5 or 10 years).
To preserve the comparability of the U.S.
measures with those for other economies, BLS
uses gross product originating in manufac­
turing for the United States for these com­
parative measures. The gross product origi­
nating series differs from the manufacturing
output series that b l s publishes in its news
releases on quarterly measures of U.S. pro­
ductivity and costs (and that underlies the
measures that appear in tables 43 and 45 in
this section). The quarterly measures are on
a “sectoral output” basis, rather than a valueadded basis. Sectoral output is gross output
less intrasector transactions.
Total labor hours refers to hours worked
in all countries. The measures are developed
from statistics of manufacturing employment
and average hours. The series used for France
(from 1970 forward), Norway, and Sweden
are official series published with the national
accounts. Where official total hours series are
not available, the measures are developed by
b l s using employment figures published with
the national accounts, or other comprehen­
sive employment series, and estimates of an­
nual hours worked. For Germany, b l s uses
estimates of average hours worked developed
by a research institute connected to the Min­
istry of Labor for use with the national ac­
counts employment figures. For the other
countries, b l s constructs its own estimates
of average hours.
Denmark has not published estimates of
average hours for 1994-97; therefore, the b l s
measure of labor input for Denmark ends in
1993.
Total compensation (labor cost) includes
all payments in cash or in-kind made directly
to employees plus employer expenditures for
legally required insurance programs and con­
tractual and private benefit plans. The mea­
sures are from the national accounts of each
country, except those for Belgium, which are
developed by b l s using statistics on employ-

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

55

Current Labor Statistics
ment, average hours, and hourly compensa­
tion. For Canada, France, and Sweden, com­
pensation is increased to account for other sig­
nificant taxes on payroll or employment. For
the United Kingdom, compensation is reduced
between 1967 and 1991 to account for em­
ployment-related subsidies. Self-employed
workers are included in the all-employed-persons measures by assuming that their hourly
compensation is equal to the average for wage
and salary employees.

Notes on the data
In general, the measures relate to total manu­
facturing as defined by the International Stan­
dard Industrial Classification. However, the
measures for France (for all years) and Italy
(beginning 1970) refer to mining and manu­
facturing less energy-related products, and
the measures for Denmark include mining and
exclude manufacturing handicrafts from 1960
to 1966.
The measures for recent years may be
based on current indicators of manufacturing
output (such as industrial production in­
dexes), employment, average hours, and
hourly compensation until national accounts
and other statistics used for the long-term
measures become available.
F OR a d d i t i o n a l in f o r m a t io n on this se­
ries, contact the Division of Foreign Labor
Statistics: (202) 691-5654.

Occupational Injury
and Illness Data
(Tables 50-51)

Survey of Occupational
Injuries and Illnesses
Description of the series
The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Ill­
nesses collects data from employers about their
workers’ job-related nonfatal injuries and ill­
nesses. The information that employers pro­
vide is based on records that they maintain un­
der the Occupational Safety and Health Act of
1970. Self-employed individuals, farms with
fewer than 11 employees, employers regulated
by other Federal safety and health laws, and
Federal, State, and local government agencies
are excluded from the survey.
The survey is a Federal-State coopera­
tive program with an independent sample

56
Monthly Labor Review

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

selected for each participating State. A strati­
fied random sample with a Neyman alloca­
tion is selected to represent all private in­
dustries in the State. The survey is strati­
fied by Standard Industrial Classification
and size of employment.

Definitions
Under the Occupational Safety and Health
Act, employers maintain records of nonfatal
work-related injuries and illnesses that in­
volve one or more of the following: loss of
consciousness, restriction of work or motion,
transfer to another job, or medical treatment
other than first aid.
Occupational injury is any injury such as
a cut, fracture, sprain, or amputation that re­
sults from a work-related event or a single, in­
stantaneous exposure in the work environment.
Occupational illness is an abnormal con­
dition or disorder, other than one resulting
from an occupational injury, caused by expo­
sure to factors associated with employment.
It includes acute and chronic illnesses or dis­
ease which may be caused by inhalation, ab­
sorption, ingestion, or direct contact.
Lost w orkday injuries and illnesses

are cases that involve days away from work,
or days of restricted work activity, or both.
Lost w orkdays include the number of
workdays (consecutive or not) on which
the employee was either away from work
or at work in some restricted capacity, or
both, because of an occupational injury or
illness, b l s measures of the number and
incidence rate o f lost workdays were dis­
continued beginning with the 1993 sur­
vey. The num ber o f days aw ay from
work or days o f restricted work activity
does not include the day o f injury or
onset o f illness or any days on which
the employee would not have worked,
such as a Federal holiday, even though
able to work.
Incidence rates are computed as the num­
ber of injuries and/or illnesses or lost work
days per 100 full-time workers.

Notes on the data
The definitions of occupational injuries and
illnesses are from Recordkeeping Guidelines
for Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (U. S.
Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics, September 1986).
Estimates are made for industries and em­
ployment size classes for total recordable cases,
lost workday cases, days away from work
cases, and nonfatal cases without lost work­
days. These data also are shown separately for

January 2003

injuries. Illness data are available for seven cat­
egories: occupational skin diseases or disorders,
dust diseases of the lungs, respiratory condi­
tions due to toxic agents, poisoning (systemic
effects of toxic agents), disorders due to physi­
cal agents (other than toxic materials), disorders
associated with repeated trauma, and all other
occupational illnesses.
The survey continues to measure the num­
ber of new work-related illness cases which
are recognized, diagnosed, and reported during
the year. Some conditions, for example, long­
term latent illnesses caused by exposure to car­
cinogens, often are difficult to relate to the
workplace and are not adequately recognized
and reported. These long-term latent illnesses
are believed to be understated in the survey’s
illness measure. In contrast, the overwhelming
majority of the reported new illnesses are those
which are easier to directly relate to workplace
activity (for example, contact dermatitis and
carpal tunnel syndrome).
Most of the estimates are in the form of
incidence rates, defined as the number of inju­
ries and illnesses per 100 equivalent full-time
workers. For this purpose, 200,000 employee
hours represent 100 employee years (2,000
hours per employee). Full detail on the avail­
able measures is presented in the annual bulle­
tin, Occupational Injuries and Illnesses:

Counts, Rates, and Characteristics.
Comparable data for more than 40 States
and territories are available from the b l s Of­
fice of Safety, Health and Working Condi­
tions. Many o f these States publish data on
State and local government employees in ad­
dition to private industry data.
Mining and railroad data are furnished to
b l s by the Mine Safety and Health Adminis­
tration and the Federal Railroad Administra­
tion. Data from these organizations are in­
cluded in both the national and State data
published annually.
With the 1992 survey, b l s began publish­
ing details on serious, nonfatal incidents re­
sulting in days away from work. Included are
some major characteristics of the injured and
ill workers, such as occupation, age, gender,
race, and length of service, as well as the cir­
cumstances of their injuries and illnesses (na­
ture of the disabling condition, part of body
affected, event and exposure, and the source
directly producing the condition). In general,
these data are available nationwide for de­
tailed industries and for individual States at
more aggregated industry levels.
F o r a d d i t i o n a l in f o r m a t io n on occu­
pational injuries and illnesses, contact the Of­
fice of Occupational Safety, Health and Work­
ing Conditions at (202) 691-6180, or access
the Internet at: http://www.bls.gov/iif/

Census of Fatal
Occupational Injuries
The Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries
compiles a complete roster of fatal job-re­
lated injuries, including detailed data about
the fatally injured workers and the fatal
events. The program collects and cross
checks fatality information from multiple
sources, including death certificates, State
and Federal workers’ compensation reports,
Occupational Safety and Health Administra­
tion and Mine Safety and Health Adminis­
tration records, medical examiner and au­
topsy reports, media accounts, State motor
vehicle fatality records, and follow-up ques­
tionnaires to employers.
In addition to private wage and salary
workers, the self-employed, family members,
and Federal, State, and local government
workers are covered by the program. To be
included in the fatality census, the decedent


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

must have been employed (that is working
for pay, compensation, or profit) at the time
of the event, engaged in a legal work activity,
or present at the site of the incident as a re­
quirement of his or her job.

Definition
A fa tal w ork in ju ry is any intentional or

unintentional w ound or dam age to the
body resulting in death from acute expo­
sure to energy, such as heat or electricity,
or kinetic energy from a crash, or from the
absence of such essentials as heat or oxy­
gen caused by a specific event or incident
or series o f events within a single work­
day or shift. Fatalities that occur during a
person’s commute to or from work are ex­
cluded from the census, as well as workrelated illnesses, which can be difficult
to identify due to long latency periods.

Notes on the data
Twenty-eight data elements are collected,
coded, and tabulated in the fatality pro­
gram, including information about the fa­
tally injured worker, the fatal incident, and
the m achinery or equipm ent involved.
Summary worker demographic data and
event characteristics are included in a na­
tional news release that is available about
8 months after the end of the reference
year. The Census o f Fatal Occupational
Injuries was initiated in 1992 as a joint
Federal-State effort. M ost States issue
summary information at the time of the
national news release.
F o r a d d i t i o n a l i n f o r m a t i o n on the
Census o f Fatal Occupational Injuries con­
tact the b l s Office of Safety, Health, and
Working Conditions at (202) 691-6175, or
the Internet at:
http://www.bls. gov/iif/

W here to find additional data
Current and historical statistics from Bureau o f Labor Statistics surveys are
available at the addresses listed on the inside back cover o f this R e v ie w , or on
the Internet at

http://www.bls.gov

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

57

Current Labor Statistics:

Comparative Indicators

1. Labor market indicators
Selected indicators

2000

2000

2001
III

2001
IV

1

II

2002
III

IV

1

II

III

E m p lo y m e n t d a ta
E m p lo y m e n t s ta tu s o f th e c iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a liz e d
p o p u la tio n (h o u s e h o ld s u rv e y ) : 1
L a b o r fo rc e p a rtic ip a tio n r a te ..................................

6 7 .2

6 6 .9

6 7.0

67.1

6 7.2

6 6 .9

6 6 .8

66.9

6 6 .5

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p u la tio n ra tio ...............................

6 6.7

6 6 .6

6 4 .5

6 3 .8

64.3

6 4 .4

6 4.4

6 3 .9

6 3 .6

63.1

6 2 .8

6 2.8

62 8

4 .0

4 .8

4.1

4 .0

4.2

4 .5

4 .8

5.6

5 .6

5.9

5 .7

3.9

4 .0

4.2

4 .6

4 .9

5.7

5 .7

6 .0

5 .9

U n e m p lo y m e n t r a te .......................................
M e n ...................................................

3 .9

4 .8

16 to 2 4 y e a rs .................................................

9 .7

11.4

9.8

9 .6

1 0 .6

1 1 .2

11.5

12.7

12.9

2 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r.......................................

1 2 .8

13.3

2 .8

3 .6

2 .8

2 .9

3.1

3 .4

3 .7

4.4

4 .5

4.9

4 6

4.1

4 .7

4.2

4 .0

4.1

4 .3

4 .8

5.5

5 .5

5.8

5 .5

W o m e n ................................................
16 to 2 4 y e a rs ...........................................

8 .9

9 .7

8.5

8 .4

8.7

9.2

1 0 .0

1 0 .6

1 1 .0

2 5 y e a rs a n d o v e r.............................................

1 1 .2

1 0 .8

3.2

3 .7

3.3

3 .0

3.3

3 .4

3 .7

4 .4

4 .4

4 .8

4 .3

E m p lo y m e n t, n o n fa rm (p a y ro ll d a ta ), in th o u s a n d s : 1
T o ta l................................................................

1 3 1 ,7 2 0

1 31 ,92 2

1 31 ,87 6

1 32 ,18 5

132 ,55 9

1 32 ,19 3

1 31 ,9 4 3

1 31 ,13 0

1 30 ,75 9

1 30 ,70 6

1 3 0 ,8 4 4

1 11 ,01 8

1 10 ,98 9

111 ,21 9

111,551

1 11 ,68 7

1 11 ,3 3 2

1 1 0 ,9 3 9

110 ,03 5

1 0 9 ,5 9 4

G o o d s -p ro d u c in g .............................................

1 09 ,50 5

1 0 9 ,5 7 4

2 5 ,6 4 9

2 4 ,9 4 9

25,681

2 5 ,6 2 6

2 5,4 93

2 5 ,1 3 6

2 4 ,7 8 6

2 4 ,3 7 5

M a n u fa c tu rin g ............................................

2 4 ,0 4 9

2 3 ,8 7 9

2 3 ,7 8 7

1 8,4 73

1 7,6 95

1 8,4 94

1 8,4 00

1 8,196

1 7,8 72

1 7,5 38

1 7,1 74

1 6 ,8 8 3

16,7 76

16,691

106,051

1 06 ,97 8

106 ,19 5

1 0 6 ,5 5 9

106,941

1 0 7 ,0 5 7

1 07 ,1 5 7

106 ,75 5

106,711

106 ,82 7

1 0 7 ,0 5 7

P riv a te s e c to r..............................................

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ..................................................
A v e ra g e h ou rs:
P riv a te s e c to r...............................................
M a n u fa c tu rin g ...............................................
O v e r tim e ................................................

3 4 .5

3 4.2

3 4.4

3 4 .3

34.3

3 4.2

34.1

34.1

3 4 .2

3 4.2

34.1

4 1 .6

4 0 .7

41.5

41.1

41.0

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0.5

4 0 .8

4 1 .0

40 8

4 .6

3 .9

4 .5

4 .4

4.1

3 .9

3 .9

3.8

4 .0

4.2

4.1

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t I n d e x 2
P e rc e n t c h a n g e in th e E C I, c o m p e n s a tio n :
A ll w o rk e rs (e x c lu d in g fa rm , h o u s e h o ld a n d F e d e ra l w o rk e rs )....
P riv a te in d u s try w o rk e rs ......................
G o o d s -p ro d u c in g 3 ......................................................
S e rv ic e -p ro d u c in g 3 ..................................................
S ta te a n d lo c a l g o v e rn m e n t w o rk e rs ..................

4.1

4.1

1 .0

.7

1.3

.9

1 .2

.8

1 .0

9

4 .4

4 .2

.9

.7

1.4

1 .0

.9

.8

1.1

1.1

.6

4 .4

3 .8

.9

.6

1.3

.9

.7

.8

1 .2

.9

.6

4 .4

4 .3

1 .0

.7

1.4

1 .0

1 .0

.8

1.1

12

3 .0

4.2

1.3

.7

.9

.6

2 .1

.6

.6

.4

2 .2

1.1

1 .0

1.4

1.1

1 .0

1 .2

■7

1.1

1.1

.5

W o rk e rs b y b a rg a in in g s ta tu s (p riv a te in d u s try ):
U n io n ....................................................

4 .0

4.2

1 .2

.5

N o n u n io n .................................................

4 .4

4 .1 1

1 .0

■A

.7
1.5

1 .0 |

•9|

1 Q u a rte rly d a ta s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .
2

A n n u a l c h a n g e s a re D e c e m b e r-to -D e c e m b e r ch a n g e s . Q u a rte rly c h a n g e s a re c a lc u la te d u sin g th e la st m o n th o f e ach q u a rte r.
G o o d s -p ro d u c in g in d u s trie s in c lu d e m inin g , c o n s tru c tio n , a n d m a n u fa c tu rin g . S e rv ic e -p ro d u c in g in d u s trie s in c lu d e a ll o th e r p riv a te s e c to r in du strie s.

Digitized for58
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

2. Annual and quarterly percent changes in com pensation, prices, and productivity
2000

Selected measures

2001

2002

2001

2000

IV

IV

C o m p e n s a tio n d a ta ’
E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — c o m p e n s a tio n (w a g e s ,
s a la r ie s , b e n e fits ) :
C iv ilia n n o n f a r m ................................................................

4.1

P riv a te n o n f a r m ...........................................................

4 .4

0 .9

.6

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — w a g e s a n d s a la rie s :
C iv ilia n n o n f a r m ...............................................................
P r iv a te n o n f a r m ...........................................................
P r ic e d a t a

C o n s u m e r P ric e In d e x (A ll U r b a n C o n s u m e rs ) : A ll Ite m s ..

1.6

3 .4

1.3

1.0

.9

.8
1.0

-.9

P r o d u c e r P ric e In d e x :

.6
.8

1.8

F in is h e d g o o d s .....................................................................................

3 .5

-

F in is h e d c o n s u m e r g o o d s ..........................................................

4 .3

-2 .4

C a p ita l e q u ip m e n t ..........................................................................

1.2

1.0

-7 .2

I n te r m e d ia te m a te r ia ls , s u p p lie s , a n d c o m p o n e n ts ...........

4 .0

-.2

1.0
2.1

C r u d e m a t e r ia ls ....................................................................................

31.1

-

8.8

1.2
-.1

-3 .2

.2

-.3

-4 .3

.4

-.1

.1

-.3

-.7

1.0
12.0

-3 .6

1.1

1.1

3 7 .1

1 .9

- 7 .1

.6

.2
-

-3 .5

-

6.6

-

.2
.0

-.3

-

12.2

P r o d u c t iv it y d a ta

O u t p u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s :
B u s in e s s s e c t o r ............................
N o n fa r m b u s in e s s s e c t o r .........
4
N o n fin a n c ia l c o r p o r a t io n s .....
1

Annual

changes

a re

D e c e m b e r- to -D e c e m b e r

c a lc u la t e d u s in g t h e la s t m o n th o f e a c h q u a rte r.

changes.

Q u a rte rly

changes

3 Annual

a re

ra te s

-.2

7 .6

5 .4

-.1
2.2

7 .3

5.1

10.8

5 .7

of change

a re

c o m p u te d

by

c o m p a rin g

a n n u a l a v e ra g e s .

Q u a rte rly p e r c e n t c h a n g e s re fle c t a n n u a l ra te s o f c h a n g e In q u a rte rly in d e x e s .

C o m p e n s a tio n a n d p ric e d a ta a re n o t

T h e d a ta a re s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .

s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d , a n d th e p ric e d a ta a re n o t c o m p o u n d e d .

4 O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f a ll e m p lo y e e s .

2 E x c lu d e s F e d e r a l a n d p riv a te h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs .

3. A lternative measures of w ag e and com pensation changes
Four quarters ending

Quarterly average
2001

Components

III

II

1

IV

III

III

II

1

IV

III

2002

2001

2002

A v e r a g e h o u rly c o m p e n s a tio n : 1
0 .9

1 .4

3 .0

4 .2

5 .3

2 .0

1 .5

1 .4

2 .4

3 .5

1 .0

1 .5

2 .9

3 .9

4 .9

1 .8

1 .4

1 .4

2 .3

3 .3

1 .2

.8

1 .0

.9

.9

4.1

4.1

3 .9

4 .0

3 .7

.9

.8

1.1

1.1

.6

4 .0

4 .2

3 .9

4 .0

3 .7

1 .0

1 .4

1 .1

1 .0

1 .2

3 .4

4 .2

4 .7

4 .5

4 .7

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — c o m p e n s a tio n :
, 2

.9

.7

1.1

1.1

.5

4.1

4.1

3 .8

3 .9

3 .5

2 .1

.6

.6

.4

2 .2

4 .4

4 .2

3 .9

3 .6

3 .8

1 .0

.7

.9

.8

.7

3 .6

3 .7

3 .5

3 .5

3 .2

.8

.8

.9

1 .0

.4

3 .6

3 .8

3 .5

3 .6

3 .2

1 .0

1 .6

.7

.9

1 .0

3 .6

4 .4

4 .4

4 .2

4 .3

.8

.7

1 .0

1 .0

.4

3 .6

3 .6

3 .4

3 .5

3.1

1 .9

.5

.5

.3

1 .8

3 .9

3 .6

3 .4

3 .2

3.1

E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x — w a g e s a n d s a la r ie s :

S ta te a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n ts .....................................................................
1 S e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .

" Q u a rte r ly a v e r a g e " Is p e r c e n t c h a n g e fro m a q u a rte r a g o , a t a n a n n u a l ra te .

2 E x c lu d e s F e d e ra l a n d h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

59

Current Labor Statistics:

4.

Labor Force Data

Employment status of the population, by sex, age, race, and Hispanicorigin, monthly data seasonally adjusted

[ N u m b e r s in t h o u s a n d s ]

Employment status

Annua average
2000

2001

2 0 9 ,6 9 9

2 1 1 ,8 6 4

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e .............. . 1 4 0 ,8 6 3
P a rtic ip a tio n ra te .........
67.2

1 41 ,81 5

2001
Nov.

2002
Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

2 1 2 ,7 6 7

2 1 2 ,9 2 7

2 1 3 ,0 8 9

2 1 3 ,2 0 6

2 1 3 ,3 3 4

2 1 3 ,4 9 2

2 1 3 ,6 5 8

2 1 3 ,8 4 2

2 1 4 ,0 2 3

2 1 4 ,2 2 5

2 1 4 ,4 2 9

2 1 4 ,6 4 3

2 1 4 ,8 1 9

1 42 ,27 9

1 42 ,3 1 4

1 41 ,39 0

142,211

1 42 ,00 5

142 ,57 0

142 ,76 9

142 ,47 6

1 42 ,39 0

1 4 2 ,6 1 6

6 6.9

1 4 3 ,2 7 7

66.9

1 43 ,1 2 3

6 6 .8

6 6 .4

6 6 .7

6 6 .6

6 6 .8

6 6 .8

6 6 .6

6 6 .5

6 6 .6

1 35 ,2 0 8

6 6 .8

66 7

1 4 2 ,7 3 3
f if i 4

1 35 ,07 3

134 ,25 3

1 34 ,05 5

1 33 ,46 8

1 34 ,31 9

1 33 ,8 9 4

1 33 ,97 6

134 ,41 7

134 ,05 3

1 34 ,0 4 5

1 34 ,4 7 4

1 3 5 ,1 8 5

1 3 4 ,9 1 4

1 3 4 ,2 2 5

u la tio n ra tio 2..............

6 4.5

6 3.8

63.1

6 3.0

6 2 .6

6 3.0

6 2 .8

6 2.8

6 2.9

6 2.7

6 2 .6

6 2 .8

U n e m p lo y e d .....................

63.0

6 2 .9

5 ,6 6 5

6 2 .5

6 ,7 4 2

8 ,0 2 6

8 ,2 5 9

7 ,9 2 2

7,891

8 ,1 1 1

8 ,594

8,351

8 ,4 2 4

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te..

8 ,3 4 5

8 ,1 4 2

4.0

8 ,0 9 2

8 209

R 5 fiR

4.8

5.6

5 .8

5 .6

5 .5

5.7

6 .0

5.8

5.9

5.9

5 .7

6 8 ,8 3 6

7 0,0 50

5 6

7 0 ,4 8 8

7 0 ,6 1 3

7 1 ,6 9 9

7 0 ,9 9 5

7 1 ,3 2 9

7 0,9 22

7 0,8 89

7 1 ,3 6 6

7 1 ,6 3 3

7 1 ,6 0 9

7 1 ,1 5 2

7 1 ,5 1 9

7 2 ,0 8 7

p o p u la tio n 1.............................

9 2,5 80

9 3,6 59

9 4,0 77

94,161

9 4 ,2 2 8

9 4 ,2 6 2

9 4 ,3 1 5

9 4 ,4 1 4

9 4 ,4 7 9

9 4,6 22

9 4 ,6 9 4

9 4 ,7 5 6

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ...............

9 4 ,9 0 6

9 5 ,0 2 0

7 0,9 30

9 5 ,1 5 8

71,5 90

7 1,9 35

7 1 ,9 8 8

7 1 ,5 3 4

7 1 ,7 1 8

7 1 ,7 2 3

7 2,0 98

7 2,4 28

7 2,2 88

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te .........

7 2 ,1 7 2

7 2 ,2 0 3

76.6

7 2 ,4 7 3

76.4

7 2 ,3 4 2

76.5

7 2 ,1 8 5

7 6 .5

7 5 .9

76.1

7 6.0

7 6.4

7 6.7

7 6.4

E m p lo y e d ..........................

7 6 .2

6 8,5 80

7 6.2

6 8 ,5 8 7

7 6 .4

76.1

75 9

6 8 ,2 0 4

6 8 ,2 7 6

6 7 ,8 1 8

6 8 ,1 5 7

6 8 ,0 1 3

6 8,1 93

6 8,6 47

6 8,3 90

6 8 ,4 0 5

6 8 ,4 4 7

68,711

6 8 ,5 4 5

6 8 ,0 9 9

TO TAL
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
p o p u la tio n 1............................

E m p lo y e d ..........................
E m p lo y m e n t-p o p -

N o t in th e la b o r fo r c e ........
M en, 20 ye a rs a n d o ver
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p u la tio n ra tio 2..............

74.1

73.2

72.5

7 2 .5

7 2 .0

72.3

72.1

72.2

72.7

72.3

7 2 .2

7 2 .2

7 2 .4

A g ric u ltu re .....................

72.1

2 ,2 5 2

7 1 .6

2 ,1 0 2

2 ,0 8 2

2,141

2 ,2 0 7

2 ,1 8 5

2 ,0 8 4

2 ,2 1 3

2 ,1 2 5

2 ,1 3 8

2 ,2 5 6

2 ,2 2 1

2 ,2 2 6

2 ,4 3 2

2 ,3 3 7
6 5 761

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l
in d u s trie s ....................

6 6 ,3 2 8

6 6 ,4 8 5

6 6 ,1 2 2

6 6 ,1 3 5

65,611

6 5 ,9 7 3

6 5 ,9 2 9

65,9 80

66,5 22

U n e m p lo y e d .....................

66,251

6 6 ,1 4 9

2 ,3 5 0

6 6 ,2 2 6

3 ,0 0 3

6 6 ,4 8 5

6 6 ,1 1 4

3,731

3 ,7 1 2

3 ,7 1 6

3 ,5 6 0

3 ,7 1 0

3 ,905

3,781

3 ,8 9 9

3 ,7 6 7

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ...

3 ,7 5 7

3.3

3 ,7 6 2

4.2

3 ,7 9 6

5.2

5.2

5.2

5.0

5.2

5.4

5.2

5.4

5 .2

5.2

5 .2

5.2

5 .7

W om en, 20 ye a rs a nd o v e r
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
p o p u la tio n 1..............................

1 01 ,0 7 8

102 ,06 0

1 02 ,43 8

1 0 2 ,4 9 2

1 02 ,55 0

102,651

1 0 2 ,7 2 8

1 0 2 ,8 4 7

1 02 ,93 6

103 ,03 8

1 03 ,1 2 7

1 03 ,2 5 6

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ...............

1 0 3 ,3 3 5

1 0 3 ,4 1 6

6 1 ,5 6 5

1 0 3 ,4 9 9

6 2,1 48

62,321

62,481

6 2 ,0 5 6

6 2 ,7 0 3

6 2 ,3 2 0

6 2,7 24

6 2,5 97

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te ..........

62,481

6 2 ,5 9 0

60.9

6 2 ,7 8 3

6 2 ,9 2 9

60.9

6 3 ,0 4 5

6 2 9 0 fi

60.8

6 1 .0

6 0 .5

61.1

6 0 .7

6 1.0

E m p lo y e d ............................

6 0.8

6 0.6

6 0 .7

5 9,3 52

6 0 .8

6 0 .9

fin R

5 9,5 96

61 0

5 9 ,2 8 8

5 9 ,2 0 5

5 9 ,1 0 2

5 9 ,5 8 8

5 9 ,2 2 7

5 9 ,3 3 3

5 9 ,3 3 7

5 9 ,3 1 6

5 9 ,3 6 4

5 9 ,7 1 0

5 9 ,8 3 5

5 9 ,7 6 4

5 9 ,7 6 5

u la tio n ra tio 2...............

5 8.7

5 8.4

5 7.9

5 7 .8

5 7 .6

5 8 .0

5 7 .7

57.7

57.6

57.6

5 7 .6

5 7 .8

A g ric u ltu re .......................

5 7 .9

8 18

5 7 .8

5 7 .7

8 17

852

8 59

8 24

8 29

8 04

7 32

7 60

7 49

8 14

772

845

8 65

832

5 8 ,5 3 5

5 8 ,7 7 9

5 8,4 36

5 8 ,3 4 6

5 8 ,2 7 7

5 8 ,7 5 9

5 8 ,4 2 3

58,6 02

5 8,5 77

5 8 ,5 6 7

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

5 8 ,5 5 0

5 8 ,9 3 8

58,991

2 ,2 1 2

2,551

5 8 ,8 9 9

3 ,0 3 3

5 8 ,9 3 3

3 ,2 7 6

2 ,9 5 4

3 ,1 1 6

3 ,0 9 3

3,391

3 ,2 6 0

3 ,1 6 5

3 ,2 2 6

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ....

3 ,0 7 3

3 ,0 9 4

3.6

4.1

3,281

3 ,1 4 0

4.9

5.2

4 .8

5.0

5.0

5.4

5.2

5.1

5.2

4 .9

4 .9

5.2

5.0

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p -

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l
in d u s trie s .....................

B o th s e x e s , 16 t o 1 9 y e a r s
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
p o p u la tio n 1..............................

1 6,042

1 6,146

16,252

1 6,2 75

1 6,3 1 0

1 6,2 93

1 6,292

16,231

1 6,243

16,182

1 6,202

16,2 12

1 6,1 89

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ................

1 6,2 06

1 6 ,1 6 3

8 ,3 6 9

8 ,0 7 7

8 ,0 2 3

7 ,8 4 5

7 ,8 0 0

7 ,7 9 0

7 ,9 6 2

7 ,748

7 ,744

7 ,7 0 7

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te ..........

7 ,6 2 9

7 ,6 3 0

5 2.2

7 ,8 7 4

7 ,7 3 7

7 fi4 2

50.0

4 9 .4

4 8 .2

4 7 .8

4 7 .8

4 8 .9

4 7.7

4 7.7

4 7.6

E m p lo y e d ...........................

47.1

47.1

7 ,2 7 6

4 8 .6

47 3

6 ,8 8 9

4 7 .7

6,761

6 ,5 7 4

6 ,5 4 8

6 ,5 7 5

6 ,6 5 5

6 ,450

6 ,434

6 ,3 4 7

6 ,2 7 6

6 ,3 1 8

6 ,6 3 9

6 ,6 0 9

6,361

u la tio n ra tio 2...............

4 5.4

4 2 .7

4 1 .6

4 0 .4

40.1

4 0 .4

4 0 .8

39.7

39.6

39.2

3 8 .7

3 9 .0

A g ric u ltu re .......................

4 1 .0

4 0 .8

3 9 .4

2 35

225

220

2 46

241

2 33

239

209

213

223

213

196

227

229

188

in d u s trie s .....................

7,041

6,6 6 4

6,541

6 ,3 2 8

6 ,3 0 7

6 ,3 4 2

6 ,4 1 6

6 ,240

6 ,2 2 1

6 ,1 2 4

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

6 ,0 6 4

6 ,1 2 2

6,411

1,093

1,187

6 ,3 7 6

6 173

1,262

1,271

1,2 5 2

1,2 1 5

1,308

1,298

1,310

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ....

1,360

1 ,352

13.1

1,312

14.7

1 ,236

15.7

1 131

16.2

16.1

15.6

16.4

16.8

16.9

17.6

17.7

17.2

15.7

1 4.6

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p -

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l

W h ite

16.8

C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
p o p u la tio n 1..............................

1 74 ,42 8

1 75 ,88 8

176 ,50 0

1 76 ,60 7

1 76 ,71 3

1 76 ,78 3

1 7 6 ,8 6 6

1 76 ,97 2

1 77 ,08 7

177 ,21 7

1 77 ,3 4 5

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ................

1 77 ,48 6

1 7 7 ,6 2 8

1 7 7 ,7 7 7

1 17 ,5 7 4

118 ,14 4

1 7 7 ,8 9 6

118 ,56 6

1 1 8 ,4 0 3

1 1 7 ,7 5 9

1 18 ,47 2

1 1 8 ,1 5 9

118,661

118 ,74 2

118 ,53 0

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te ..........

1 18 ,6 7 8

1 18 ,9 1 9

67.4

119,021

118 7 in

67.2

1 18 ,9 6 9

67.2

6 7 .0

6 6 .6

6 7 .0

6 6 .8

67.1

67.1

6 6.9

6 6 .9

1 1 3 ,4 7 5

6 7 .0

113 ,22 0

112 ,65 2

6 7.0

66 9

1 12 ,3 8 8

1 11 ,87 6

1 12 ,63 2

1 12 ,2 8 6

1 12 ,4 2 6

1 12 ,56 3

112 ,38 2

1 1 2 ,4 4 6

1 1 2 ,8 4 4

1 13 ,01 0

1 12 ,8 8 2

1 1 2 ,5 6 2

u la tio n ra tio 2...............

65.1

6 4.4

6 3.8

6 3 .6

6 3 .3

6 3 .7

6 3 .5

63.5

63.6

63.4

6 3 .4

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

6 3 .6

6 3 .6

4 ,0 9 9

6 3 .5

63 3

4 ,9 2 3

5 ,9 1 4

6 ,0 1 5

5 ,8 8 3

5 ,8 4 0

5 ,8 7 3

6,2 3 6

6,1 7 9

6,1 4 8

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te....

6 ,2 3 3

6 ,0 7 5

3.5

6 ,0 1 1

4.2

6 ,0 8 7

5.0

5.1

5.0

4 .9

5.0

5.3

5.2

5.2

5 .3

5.1

5.1

5.1

5.2

E m p lo y e d ............................
E m p lo y m e n t-p o p -

B la c k
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l
p o p u la tio n 1...............................

2 5 ,2 1 8

2 5 ,5 5 9

2 5,7 20

2 5 ,7 5 2

2 5 ,7 8 5

2 5 ,8 1 3

2 5 ,8 3 9

2 5 ,8 6 8

2 5 ,8 9 8

2 5 ,9 3 0

25,961

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ................

2 6 ,0 0 0

2 6 ,0 3 9

2 6,081

1 6,603

2 6 ,1 1 6

1 6,7 19

1 6,687

16,8 33

16,7 69

1 6,7 47

1 6,7 58

16,941

1 6,887

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te ..........

1 6,822

1 6,6 18

6 5.8

6 5.4

1 6,7 53

1 7,0 53

64.9

1 6,9 40

6 5.4

16 8 2 0

6 5.0

6 4 .9

6 4 .9

6 5.5

6 5.2

64.9

E m p lo y e d ............................

6 4 .0

6 4 .4

1 5,334

6 5 .5

1 5,270

6 5 .0

64 4

15,040

1 5,1 22

1 5,1 19

15,131

1 4,9 69

1 5,045

1 5,1 68

1 5,027

14,9 76

15,1 42

15,4 20

1 5,2 75

1 4 ,9 7 4
57 3

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p u la tio n ra tio 2 ...............

60.8

59.7

58.5

5 8 .7

5 8 .6

5 8 .6

5 7 .9

58.2

5 8.6

58.0

5 7 .7

U n e m p lo y e d .......................

5 8.2

5 9 .2

1,269

5 8 .6

1,450

1,647

1,711

1 ,650

1 ,616

1 ,789

1,896

1,718

1,794

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te ....

1,642

1,611

7.6

8.7

1 ,633

1 ,665

9.9

1 0 .2

9 .8

9 .6

10.7

1 1 .2

1 0 .2

10.7

9 .9

9 .6

9 .6

9 .8

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

Digitized for
60FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

11 0

4. Continued— Employment status of the population, by sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin, monthly data seasonally adjusted
[ N u m b e r s in t h o u s a n d s ]

Employment status

2002

2001

Annual average
2000

2001

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov

2 3 ,4 1 7

2 3 ,4 7 8

2 3,5 42

2 3 ,6 0 4

2 3 ,6 6 4

2 3,7 97

2 3 ,8 6 7

2 3 ,9 3 5

2 3 ,9 9 9

2 4 ,0 6 5

2 4 ,1 9 4

2 3 ,1 2 2

2 4 ,1 2 9

2 2 ,3 9 3

2 3,7 32

p o p u la tio n 1 ............................

1 5,9 32

16,0 13

1 5,9 88

16,011

1 5,908

1 6,156

1 6,085

1 6,1 46

1 6,3 04

1 6,2 16

1 6 ,3 4 7

15,751

1 6 ,2 9 4

1 5,3 68

1 6,2 40

C iv ilia n la b o r fo r c e ..............

6 7.9

6 7.8

67.2

6 8 .1

6 7 .6

6 7 .6

6 8 .1

6 7 .6

6 8 .0

6 8 .2

6 7 .2

6 8 .1

6 7 .7

6 8 .6

6 7 .7

P a rtic ip a tio n ra te ........

14,751

1 4,7 53

1 4,700

1 4,867

1 4,743

1 4,877

1 4,963

1 4,9 59

1 5 ,0 6 6

1 5,0 95

1 5 ,0 7 6

1 4,7 14

1 4,9 52

14,4 92

1 5 ,0 1 4

E m p lo y e d .........................

H is p a n ic o r ig in
C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l

E m p lo y m e n t-p o p ­
6 3 .0

62.8

62.4

6 3.0

6 2.3

62.7

6 2.9

6 2 .9

6 2 .6

6 2 .7

6 2 .3

6 3 .6

6 2 .0

6 4 .7

6 2 .7

u la tio n ra tio 2 ............

1,181

1,260

1,288

1,143

1,165

1,279

1 ,1 2 2

1 ,1 8 7

1 ,2 3 8

1,1 9 8

1,271

1 ,037

1 ,2 6 4

8 76

1,2 2 5

U n e m p lo y e d ....................

7.9

8.1

7.1

7.3

7.9

7.0

7 .4

7 .6

7 .5

7 .8

6 .6

7.4

7 .8

5.7

7 .4

________U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te.

NOTE:

1 T h e p o p u la tio n fig u re s a re n o t s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .

D etail fo r th e a b o ve ra ce a n d H is p a n ic -o rig in g ro u p s w ill n o t su m to to ta ls

b e c a u s e d a ta fo r th e "o th e r ra c e s " g ro u p s a re n o t p re s e n te d a n d H is p a n ic s a re in c lu d e d
2 C iv ilia n e m p lo y m e n t a s a p e rc e n t o f th e c iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l p o p u la tio n .

5.

Selected employm ent indicators, monthly data seasonally adjusted

[In t h o u s a n d s ]

Annual average
Selected categories

2002

2001
Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

2000

2001

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

1 35 ,07 3

134 ,25 3

134 ,05 5

1 33 ,46 8

134 ,31 9

1 33 ,89 4

133 ,97 6

1 34 ,41 7

1 34 ,05 3

1 34 ,04 5

1 3 4 ,4 7 4

135 ,18 5

1 34 ,9 1 4

1 3 4 ,2 2 5

1 35 ,2 0 8

7 2,0 80

7 1,5 70

7 1 ,5 7 7

7 1 ,1 1 4

7 1,4 57

7 1,2 99

7 1,3 97

7 1 ,8 9 4

7 1 ,5 2 4

7 1,5 09

7 1,5 52

7 2 ,0 0 4

7 1 ,8 5 4

4 1 ,3 4 8

7 2 ,2 9 3

6 2,9 92

6 2,6 83

6 2,4 78

6 2,3 54

6 2,8 62

6 2,5 95

6 2,5 79

6 2,5 24

6 2 ,5 2 8

6 2 ,5 3 6

62,9 22

63,181

63,061

6 2 ,8 7 7

6 2 ,9 1 5

4 3 ,2 4 3

42,861

4 2 ,7 7 2

4 2 ,8 2 3

4 3 ,2 7 5

4 3,3 17

4 3,1 67

4 3 ,5 4 8

4 3 ,1 4 0

4 3 ,2 7 3

43,371

4 3 ,2 2 5

4 3 ,3 7 6

4 3 ,1 7 2

4 3 ,3 6 8
3 3 ,7 0 8

3 3 ,6 1 3

3 3,3 30

3 3,2 09

3 3,1 74

3 3 ,7 0 3

3 3,5 52

3 3,4 46

33,371

33,3 62

33,361

3 3,7 23

3 3,9 97

3 3 ,7 7 3

3 3 ,6 6 9

8 ,3 7 7

8,361

C h a r a c t e r is t ic
E m p lo y e d , 16 y e a r s a n d o ver...

M a rrie d m e n , s p o u s e
M a rrie d w o m e n , s p o u s e
W o m e n w h o m a in ta in
8 ,3 8 7

8 ,3 6 4

8,331

8 ,4 5 8

8 ,3 9 6

8 ,4 1 7

8 ,3 2 0

8,2 6 6

8 ,3 9 7

8 ,4 6 5

8,521

8 ,4 1 9

8 ,3 5 7

2 ,0 3 4

1,8 8 4

1,865

1,879

1,917

1,930

1,825

1,896

1,911

1,909

2,031

1,927

2 ,0 5 4

2 ,1 8 6

2 ,0 3 8

W a g e a n d s a la ry w o rk e rs ......

1,2 3 3

1,2 7 6

1,3 1 3

1,311

1,293

1 ,264

1,216

1,156

1,158

1,227

1,231

1,322

1 ,2 9 3

1 ,2 3 3

1 ,2 2 1

S e lf-e m p lo y e d w o rk e rs ..........

27

12

27

49

21

29

34

40

29

27

24

25

42

38

34

U n p a id fa m ily w o rk e rs ...........

1 22 ,62 7

1 22 ,19 6

1 2 2 ,8 8 5

1 23 ,32 7

1 22 ,6 5 3

1 2 1 ,8 5 6

C la s s o f w o r k e r
A g ric u ltu re :

N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s trie s :
W a g e a n d s a la ry w o rk e rs ......

1 22 ,54 5

122 ,36 6

123,071

1 23 ,23 5

1 22 ,50 7

122 ,19 6

1 22 ,14 5

1 9,1 27

1 9,172

1 9,1 83

1 9,047

1 9,286

1 9,218

1 9,3 47

19,811

1 9,630

1 9,709

1 9,5 96

1 9,442

19,4 23

1 8 ,3 8 4

1 9 ,0 5 3

1 03 ,09 8

103 ,48 5

103 ,32 7

103 ,01 9

103 ,26 0

1 02 ,99 7

1 02 ,48 6

1 03 ,2 8 9

1 03 ,88 5

1 03 ,23 0

1 0 2 ,4 7 2

1 04 ,0 7 6
P riv a te h o u s e h o ld s .........

122 ,77 0

1 2 3 ,1 2 8

1 04 ,10 8

1 03 ,33 5

1 03 ,01 3

8 03

790

7 36

7 25

709

6 77

791

7 75

810

8 55

8 87

934

9 02

931

8 90

103 ,30 5

1 02 ,54 5

1 02 ,27 7

1 02 ,37 3

102 ,77 5

1 02 ,65 0

102 ,22 8

1 02 ,48 5

1 02 ,18 7

101,631

1 02 ,40 2

102,951

1 02 ,32 8

101,541

1 03 ,1 8 6

8 ,3 6 8

8,4 3 9

8 ,5 8 2

8 ,9 1 0

S e lf-e m p lo y e d w o rk e rs ........

8 ,6 7 4

8 ,5 9 4

8 ,507

8 ,5 2 4

8 ,2 1 3

8,2 5 7

8 ,2 0 0

8 ,2 3 4

8 ,3 0 5

8 ,2 0 8

8 ,2 6 8

92

97

86

89

103

105

95

99

87

98

10 1

77

94

101

91

U n p a id fa m ily w o rk e rs .........

3 ,672

4 ,2 0 6

4 ,2 6 7

3 ,9 7 3

4 ,2 2 8

3 ,9 9 7

4,151

3 ,996

3 ,8 9 9

4 ,1 7 7

4 ,3 2 5

4 ,2 1 7

4 ,2 6 2

4 ,1 5 5

3 ,1 9 0

2 ,9 0 8

2 ,7 1 5

P e r s o n s a t w o r k p a r t t im e 1
A ll in d u s trie s :
P a rt tim e fo r e c o n o m ic
S la c k w o rk o r b u s in e s s
1 ,927

2 ,3 5 5

2 ,7 9 6

2 ,8 0 9

2 ,5 4 9

2 ,7 5 5

2,721

2 ,6 9 0

2 ,6 2 6

2 ,5 8 8

2 ,7 2 3

2 ,8 8 0

2 ,6 8 7

1,007

1 ,1 2 1

1,161

1,089

1 ,1 2 0

1 ,0 2 1

1,131

1,064

1,031

1,096

1,159

1 ,2 0 2

1,130

1 ,1 9 0

9 44

1 8,707

1 8,587

1 8,540

18,291

1 8,395

1 8,5 30

1 8,793

18,887

19,1 70

19,1 38

19,1 20

1 8,833

1 8 ,4 8 4

1 8 ,5 4 8

1 8,7 22

3 ,5 2 9

4 ,0 1 7

4 ,1 1 9

3,781

3 ,9 9 8

3 ,8 4 8

4 ,0 0 9

3 ,8 1 8

3 ,7 5 8

3 ,9 4 9

4 ,0 6 0

4 ,0 6 8

4 ,1 4 8

4 ,0 3 2

3 ,0 4 5

2 ,2 6 6

2 ,6 7 9

2 ,7 1 7

2 ,4 4 8

2 ,6 1 5

2 ,6 0 5

2 ,5 8 7

2 ,5 1 5

2 ,4 7 2

2 ,6 0 9

2 ,7 1 5

2 ,5 9 6

2 ,8 3 4

2,631

1 ,8 3 5

1 ,1 5 8
1 7 ,9 9 0

C o u ld o n ly fin d p a rt-tim e
P a rt tim e fo r n o n e c o n o m ic
N o n a g ric u ltu ra l in d u s trie s :
P a rt tim e fo r e c o n o m ic
S la c k w o rk o r b u s in e s s
C o u ld o n ly fin d p a rt-tim e
9 24

9 89

1,096

1,138

1,068

1,089

1 8,1 65

1 8,1 77

1 8,0 07

1 7,9 60

1 7,717

1 7,886

1 ,0 0 1

1 ,1 2 2

1,033

1 ,0 2 2

1,0 7 4

1,131

1,174

1 ,097

1 8,274

18,3 50

1 8,739

1 8,572

18,6 09

18,3 00

1 7,8 84

P a rt tim e fo r n o n e c o n o m ic
1 8,0 04 I

E x c lu d e s p e rs o n s "w ith a jo b b u t n o t a t w o rk " d u rin g th e s u rv e y p e rio d fo r s u ch re a s o n s a s v a c a tio n , illne ss, o r in d u s tria l d is p u te s .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

61

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

6. Selected unem ploym ent indicators, monthly d a ta seasonally adjusted
[Unemployment rates]
Annual average

Selected categories

2000

2001

2001

Nov.

2002

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

C h a r a c te r is tic
T o ta l, 1 6 y e a r s a n d o v e r ....................................

4 .0

4 .8

5 .6

5 .8

5 .6

5 .5

5 .7

6 .0

5 .8

5 .9

5 .9

5 .7

5 .6

5 .7

6 .0

13.1

1 4 .7

1 5 .7

1 6 .2

16.1

1 5 .6

1 6 .4

1 6 .8

1 6 .9

1 7 .6

1 7 .7

M e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ................................

1 7 .2

1 5 .7

1 4 .6

1 6 .8

3 .3

4 .2

5 .2

5 .2

5 .2

5 .0

5 .2

5 .4

5 .2

5 .4

5 .2

W o m e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ..........................

5 .2

5 .2

5 .2

5 .7

3 .6

4.1

4 .9

5 .2

4 .8

5 .0

5 .0

5 .4

5 .2

5.1

5 .2

4 .9

4 .9

5 .2

5 .3

B o th s e x e s , 1 6 t o 1 9 y e a r s ...........................

W h ite , t o t a l..........................................................

3 .5

4 .2

5 .0

5.1

5 .0

4 .9

5 .0

5 .3

5 .2

5 .2

5 .3

5.1

B o th s e x e s , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s ....................

5.1

5.1

5 .2

1 1 .4

1 2 .7

1 3 .5

1 3 .7

1 4 .2

1 4 .0

1 4 .5

1 4 .0

1 4 .8

1 5 .6

1 6 .4

M e n , 1 6 t o 1 9 y e a r s ..............................

1 4 .8

1 3 .8

1 3 .7

1 2 .3

1 4 .6

1 3 .8

1 5 .8

1 4 .6

1 3 .7

1 5 .4

1 6 .3

1 5 .4

1 5 .4

1 7 .7

19.1

1 7 .5

W o m e n , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s .......................

1 5 .3

1 4 .4

1 5 .8

1 0 .4

1 1 .4

1 1 .1

1 2 .8

1 4 .6

1 2 .6

1 2 .7

1 2 .5

1 4 .2

1 3 .4

1 3 .6

1 2 .1

M e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ..........................

1 2 .3

1 3 .0

1 3 .3

2 .8

3 .7

4 .7

4 .6

4 .7

4 .4

4 .5

4 .8

4 .8

4 .7

4 .8

4 .7

4 .7

W o m e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ...................

4 .7

5 .0

3.1

3 .6

4 .2

4 .5

4 .2

4 .4

4 .3

4 .6

4 .5

4 .4

4 .4

4 .3

4 .3

4 .5

4 .2

B la c k , t o t a l...........................................................

7 .6

8 .7

9 .9

1 0 .2

9 .8

9 .6

1 0 .7

1 1 .2

1 0 .2

1 0 .7

9 .9

9 .6

B o th s e x e s , 1 6 t o 1 9 y e a r s ....................

9 .6

9 .8

1 1 .0

2 4 .7

2 9 .0

3 2.1

3 3 .4

3 0 .7

2 7 .9

3 1 .0

3 5 .4

3 0 .2

3 0 .2

2 8 .0

M e n , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s ..............................

3 0 .5

2 7 .7

2 3.1

3 0 .6

2 6 .4

3 0 .5

3 1 .6

3 2 .0

32.1

3 0 .0

3 6 .9

3 7 .3

3 6 .8

3 0 .0

2 0 .5

W o m e n , 1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s .......................

3 0 .5

3 4 .7

2 4 .8

2 9 .7

2 3 .0

2 7 .5

3 2 .6

3 4 .8

2 9 .0

2 5 .6

2 4 .7

3 3 .5

2 2 .3

3 0 .4

3 4 .8

3 0 .4

2 0 .8

M e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ..........................

2 1 .3

3 1 .5

7 .0

8 .0

8 .7

9.1

8 .9

8 .7

1 0 .1

9 .3

8 .6

1 0 .4

9 .0

8 .8

W o m e n , 2 0 y e a r s a n d o v e r ...................

9 .3

9 .7

1 0 .9

6 .3

7 .0

8 .4

8 .7

8 .4

8 .5

9 .0

1 0 .2

9 .5

8 .8

8 .9

8 .3

7 .9

8 .5

9 .0

5 .7

6 .6

7 .4

7 .9

8 .1

7.1

7 .3

7 .9

7 .0

7 .4

7 .6

7 .5

7 .4

7 .8

7 .8

H is p a n ic o rig in , t o t a l...................................
M a r r ie d m e n , s p o u s e p r e s e n t ................

2 .0

2 .7

3 .3

3 .4

3 .5

3 .4

3 .4

3 .9

3 .6

4.1

3 .5

3 .4

M a r r ie d w o m e n , s p o u s e p r e s e n t ...........

3 .6

3 .4

3 .6

2 .7

3.1

3 .6

3 .7

3 .4

3 .8

3 .7

3 .9

3 .9

3 .8

3 .7

3 .5

W o m e n w h o m a in ta in f a m ilie s ...............

3 .6

3 .8

3 .8

5 .9

6 .6

8 .0

8 .0

7 .9

8 .0

7 .3

8 .6

8 .1

8 .2

8 .4

7 .3

F u ll- tim e w o r k e r s ...........................................

7 .2

8 .0

8 .3

3 .9

4 .7

5 .6

5 .8

5 .7

5 .7

5 .8

6 .2

5 .9

6 .1

5 .9

P a r t- tim e w o r k e r s ..........................................

5 .7

5 .7

5 .8

6 .1

4 .8

5.1

5 .6

5 .6

5 .2

4 .8

5 .2

5 .2

5 .6

5 .0

5 .4

5 .6

5 .3

5 .3

5.1

In d u s tr y
N o n a g r ic u ltu r a l w a g e a n d s a la ry
w o r k e r s .....................................................................

4.1

5 .0

6 .0

6 .2

5 .9

6 .0

6 .1

6 .5

6 .3

6 .3

6 .2

M in in g .....................................................................

6 .0

6 .0

6 .2

6 .3

3 .9

4 .7

5 .3

6 .1

5 .9

4 .5

6 .3

6 .0

4 .4

7 .9

3 .8

6 .0

8 .0

C o n s t r u c t io n .......................................................

5 .2

7 .6

6 .4

7 .3

8 .9

8 .9

9 .4

7 .9

8 .8

9 .3

8 .9

9.1

M a n u f a c tu r in g ...................................................

1 0 .3

9 .5

9 .3

9 .9

9 .3

3 .6

5 .2

6 .4

6 .8

6 .6

6 .7

7 .0

7 .2

6 .7

6 .8

6 .3

6 .3

D u r a b le g o o d s ...............................................

6 .5

6 .4

6 .6

3 .4

5 .3

6 .9

7 .2

7 .0

7 .5

7 .5

7 .6

6 .3

7 .3

6 .8

6 .5

N o n d u r a b le g o o d s .......................................

6 .9

6 .5

7 .0

4 .0

5.1

5 .5

6 .1

5 .9

5 .5

6 .3

6 .6

7 .5

6 .1

5 .6

5 .9

T r a n s p o r t a tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ............

5 .9

6 .2

6 .1

3.1

4.1

6 .1

6 .1

6 .2

5 .4

6 .1

5 .7

5 .9

5 .3

4 .8

5 .0

W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ..........................

5 .2

5 .6

5 .0

5 .6

6 .4

7.1

6 .3

6 .5

6 .5

7 .2

7 .0

6 .6

6 .8

6 .8

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te .......

6 .9

7 .3

7 .5

2 .3

2 .8

3 .5

3 .0

2 .2

2 .8

5 .8

3.1

3 .2

3 .2

4 .0

4.1

3 .7

S e r v ic e s ...............................................................

3.1

3.1

3 .0

3 .8

4 .6

5 .4

5 .5

5 .4

5 .5

5 .4

5 .8

5 .6

5 .9

5 .8

G o v e r n m e n t w o r k e r s ...........................................

5 .4

5.1

5 .4

5 .4

2 .1

2 .2

2 .4

2 .4

2 .3

2 .7

2 .8

2 .5

2 .6

2 .3

2 .5

2 .4

2 .7

2 .8

A g r ic u ltu r a l w a g e a n d s a la r y w o r k e r s .........

2 .5

7 .5

9 .7

9 .3

9 .6

1 0 .3

9 .5

1 2 .4

9 .0

9.1

8 .3

9 .7

9 .8

8 .8

6 .7

8 .7

E d u c a tio n a l a tt a in m e n t 1
L e s s t h a n a h ig h s c h o o l d ip lo m a ....................

6 .4

7 .3

8 .1

8 .8

8 .1

8 .3

8 .0

9 .0

8 .5

7 .9

8 .7

8 .4

H ig h s c h o o l g r a d u a te s , n o c o lle g e ................

7 .8

8 .8

9 .2

3 .5

4 .2

5 .0

4 .9

5 .2

5 .3

5 .4

5 .7

5 .6

5 .6

5.1

5.1

5 .0

4 .8

5 .2

S o m e c o lle g e , le s s t h a n a b a c h e lo r ’s
d e g r e e .......................................................................

2 .7

3 .3

4 .2

4 .3

4 .2

4.1

4 .3

4 .7

4 .9

4 .7

4 .4

C o lle g e g r a d u a t e s ..................................................

4 .3

4 .7

4 .4

4 .7

1 .7

2 .3

2 .9 I

3.1

2 .9

2 .9

2 .7

3 .0

2 .9

2 .9

2 .9

2 .7

2 .9

3.1

2 .9

1 D a ta r e fe r t o p e r s o n s 2 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r.

7. Duration of unem ploym ent, monthly d ata seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Weeks of
unemployment

Annual average
2000

2001

2001

2002

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

2 542

2 R 33

2 ,9 7 8

2 ,8 2 8

3 ,0 7 8

2 ,7 9 3

2 ,8 7 6

2 ,7 2 9

2 ,8 9 6

2 ,8 8 0

5 to 1 4 w e e k s .........................................

2 ,7 0 8

2 ,7 1 5

2 ,9 0 4

1 ,8 0 3

2 ,1 6 3

2 ,5 7 3

2 ,7 2 4

2 ,5 8 6

2 ,5 1 5

2 ,4 1 1

2 ,8 1 8

2 ,5 3 1

2 ,7 8 4

2 ,4 6 4

2 ,4 3 1

1 5 w e e k s a n d o v e r ...............................

2 ,5 1 1

2 ,4 7 1

2 ,4 9 0

1 ,3 0 9

1 ,7 4 6

2 ,3 1 7

2 ,4 1 0

2 ,5 4 6

2 ,5 6 1

2,688

2 ,8 5 4

2 ,9 5 2

3 ,1 0 3

2 ,8 8 3

2 ,7 8 3

1 5 t o 2 6 w e e k s ......................................

2 ,9 0 0

2 ,9 8 0

3 ,0 2 2

665

949

1 ,2 0 7

1 ,2 9 5

1 ,4 1 8

1 ,3 8 3

1 ,3 5 5

1 ,3 6 0

1 ,3 1 6

1 ,4 3 4

1 ,3 4 9

1 ,3 0 9

2 7 w e e k s a n d o v e r ..............................

1 ,3 1 5

1 ,3 2 4

644

1 ,2 8 8

797

1 ,1 1 0

1 ,1 1 5

1 ,1 2 7

1 ,1 7 8

1 ,3 3 3

1 ,4 9 4

1 ,6 3 6

1 ,6 6 9

1 ,5 3 3

1 ,4 7 4

1 ,5 8 5

1 ,6 5 6

1 ,7 3 4

M e a n d u r a tio n , in w e e k s ......................

1 2 .6

1 3 .2

1 4 .4

1 4 .5

1 4 .6

1 5 .0

1 5 .4

1 6 .6

17.1

1 7 .3

1 6 .4

1 6 .2

M e d ia n d u r a tio n , in w e e k s ..................

1 7 .8

1 7 .5

1 7 .7

5 .9

6 .8

7 .6

8 .2

8.8

8.1

8.1

8 .9

9 .8

1 1 .7

8.6

8 .4

9 .5

9 .6

9 .3

Digitized62for FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

8. Unem ployed persons by reason for unem ploym ent, monthly d ata seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Reason for
unemployment

Dec.

Nov.

2001

2000

2002

2001

Annual average

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

July

June

Aug.

Sept.

Nov.

Oct.

4 ,6 5 1

3 ,4 2 8

4 ,5 0 1

4 ,4 9 2

4 ,3 5 4

4 ,3 2 6

4 ,2 7 0

4 ,5 2 5

4 ,5 9 8

4 ,5 7 9

4 ,5 8 0

4 ,5 6 0

4 ,5 3 5

4 ,7 3 7

2 ,4 9 2

1 ,1 0 7

1 ,1 2 4

1 ,1 0 6

1 ,0 6 6

1 ,0 9 5

1 ,0 9 1

1 ,0 6 1

1 ,2 2 4

1 ,1 5 1

999

1 ,0 3 1

1 ,0 4 9

1 ,1 5 7

1 ,0 5 4

842

3 ,3 4 4

3 ,3 8 5

3 ,2 3 1

3 ,2 2 0

3 ,2 0 4

3 ,4 3 0

3 ,5 0 6

3 ,5 1 8

3 ,3 5 6

3 ,4 1 0

3 ,6 8 2

3 ,6 1 9

2 ,3 7 9

3 ,5 3 6

1 ,6 5 0

908

879

877

862

1 ,0 1 7

902

836

818

824

822

848

838

832

7 81

775

2 ,3 6 1

2 ,1 9 1

2 ,2 6 8

2 ,4 7 1

2 ,4 5 0

2 ,4 3 3

2 ,3 6 0

2 ,3 7 5

2 ,2 7 0

2 ,2 6 3

2 ,3 7 6

2 ,0 2 9

2 ,1 9 7

2 ,3 4 4

1 ,9 5 7

497

495

479

485

557

519

499

584

571

619

469

588

453

526

4 31

5 4 .4

5 5.1

5 4 .4

5 2 .3

5 3 .2

5 4 .5

5 4 .8

5 4 .9

5 5.1

5 6 .0

5 5 .1

5 0 .8

5 6 .0

5 6 .4

4 4.1

1 3 .4

1 4 .2

1 3 .9

13.1

1 2 .9

1 2 .9

1 2 .7

1 4 .7

1 3 .9

1 2 .3

1 2 .2

1 5 .6

1 4 .4

1 2 .6

1 4 .9

4 1 .6

4 1 .0

4 0 .9

4 0 .5

3 9 .3

4 0 .3

4 1 .6

4 2 .1

4 0 .2

4 1 .2

4 3 .6

4 2 .9

3 5 .3

4 3 .9

2 9 .2

P e r c e n t o f u n e m p lo y e d

1 1 .0

1 1 .1

1 1 .0

1 0 .6

1 2 .0

1 0 .7

1 0 .0

9 .8

1 0 .0

9 .6

9 .7

1 2 .3

1 0 .5

1 0 .0

1 3 .7

2 8 .6

2 7 .7

2 8 .5

3 0 .3

2 8 .8

2 8 .9

2 8 .2

2 8 .5

2 7 .4

2 8 .2

2 7 .3

2 7 .9

3 0.1

2 7 .9

3 4 .6

6 .2

6 .0

6 .1

6 .1

6 .8

6 .1

5 .9

7 .0

6 .8

7 .5

6 .5

7 .0

6 .7

5 .6

7 .6

3 .3
P e r c e n t o f c iv ilia n
la b o r fo r c e
3 .2

3 .2

3.1

3 .0

3 .0

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .2

3 .3

.6

.6

.6

.6

.7

.6

.6

.6

.6

.5

.6

.6

.6

.6

1 .4

1 .5

1 .6

1.7

1 .7

1 .7

1 .7

1 .7

1 .6

1 .6

1 .6

1 .4

1.7

1 .7

1 .5
.3

.3

.3

.3

.4

.4

.3

.4

.4

.4

.3

.4

.3

.4

.3

Apr,

May

June

July

.6

N e w e n t r a n ts ............................................

3 .3

2 .4

1 .8

1 In c lu d e s p e r s o n s w h o c o m p le te d te m p o r a r y jo b s .

9. Unem ploym ent rates by sex a n d a g e , monthly d a ta seasonally adjusted
[C iv ilia n w o r k e r s ]

Sex and age

Annual average
2000

2001

2002

2000
Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Oct.

Nov.

Aug.

Sept.

5 .5

5 .7

6.0

5 .8

5 .9

5 .9

5 .7

5 .6

5 .6

6.0

11.6

1 2 .5

1 2 .3

11.6

12.2

1 2 .3

12.2

11.8

11.8

12.2
1 6 .8

Feb.

Mar.

T o ta l, 1 6 y e a r s a n d o v e r ......................

4 .0

4 .8

5 .6

5 .8

5 .6

1 6 to 2 4 y e a r s ......................................

9 .3

1 0 .6

1 1 .7

1 1 .9

1 1 .9

13.1

1 5 .7

1 6.2

16.1

1 5 .6

1 6 .4

1 6 .8

1 6 .9

1 7 .6

1 7 .7

1 7 .2

1 5 .7

1 6 to 1 9 y e a r s ..................................

1 4 .7

1 5 .7

17.1

1 7 .5

1 8 .8

1 7 .0

1 6 .5

1 8.0

1 9 .4

2 0 .7

20.8

2 0 .9

1 9 .3

1 9 .3

1 9 .4

1 5 .4

1 9 .7

1 6 to 1 7 y e a r s ..............................

1 4 .8

1 4 .8

1 5.2

1 4 .7

15.1

15.1

1 4 .8

1 5 .6

16.1

1 3 .6

1 5 .3

1 8 to 1 9 y e a r s ..............................

1 3 .2

1 3 .6

1 1 .5

1 6 .0

8 .3

9 .5

9 .6

9 .7

9 .5

1 0 .3

10.0

8 .9

9 .3

9 .6

9 .7

9 .7

9 .8

7.1

9 .5

2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ..................................

3 ,7

4 .4

4 .5

4 .4

4 .5

4 .5

4 .9

4 .8

4 .8

4 .5

4 .5

4 .5

4 .8

3 .0

4 .6

2 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r ..............................

3 .8

4 .6

4 .7

4 .7

4 .6

4 .7

5 .0

5 .0

4 .9

4 .6

4 .6

4 .6

5 .0

3.1

4 .8

2 5 to 5 4 y e a r s ..............................

3 .0

3 .5

4 .0

3 .5

3 .8

3 .5

4 .0

4 .2

4 .2

3 .7

3 .7

3 .8

3 .5

2 .6

4 .0

5 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r ......................

5 .9

6.1

5 .9

6.1

6.0

6.0

5 .9

5 .8

6 .3

1 3 .7

1 3 .0

1 2 .5

1 2 .9

1 3 .0

1 3 .7

1 3 .2

12.2

1 2 .7

M e n , 1 6 y e a r s a n d o v e r .....................

3 .9

4 .8

5 .9

5 .8

5 .8

5 .6

1 6 to 2 4 y e a r s ...................................

9 .7

1 1 .4

1 3.0

1 2 .8

1 2 .5

1 2 .4

1 5 .9

1 7 .7

1 7 .2

1 6 .3

1 6 .8

1 8 .5

18.1

1 8 .6

1 9 .6

1 9 .8

20.1

1 7 .8

1 5 .6

1 7 .7

1 4.0
1 6.8

1 8 .8

2 0 .4

2 0 .0

1 7 .6

1 9 .6

20.8

1 9 .6

2 3 .7

2 3 .2

2 3 .9

2 4 .5

2 1 .5

1 7 .5

21.1

14.1

1 6 .2

1 5 .6

15.1

1 5 .4

1 6 .7

1 7 .2

1 5 .6

1 7 .4

1 7 .4

1 7 .8

1 4 .5

1 5 .7

1 2 .2

1 5 .9

8 .9

1 0 .5

1 0 .5

10.6

10.2

11.1

1 0 .3

9 .4

9 .5

9 .6

1 0 .5

10.8

1 0 .4

7 .3

10.2

3 .6

4 .5

4 .5

4 .5

4 .4

4 .5

4 .8

4 .8

4 .9

4 .6

4 .5

4 .6

5.1

2 .8

4 .7

2 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r ...........................

3 .7

4 .6

4 .5

4 .7

4 .5

4 .7

4 .9

4 .9

5 .0

4 .8

4 .7

4 .8

5 .3

2 .9

4 .7

2 5 to 5 4 y e a r s ...........................

3 .3

4.1

4 .2

3 .8

4.1

3 .6

4 .3

4 .5

4 .6

4 .0

3 .9

3 .8

3 .9

2 .7

4.1

5 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r ....................

5 .8

5 .7

5 .7

5 .4

5 .4

5 .7

5 .6

1 0 .7

1 1 .4

11.6

10.6

1 0 .3

1 1 .3

11.6

4.1

4 .7

5 .4

5 .8

5 .4

5 .5

5 .5

8 .9

9 .7

1 0 .3

1 1 .0

1 1 .3

1 0 .7

11.2

6.0
11.6

1 3 .4

13.7

15.1

1 5 .8

1 4 .3

1 4 .3

1 5 .4

1 5.2

1 5 .6

1 5 .6

1 4 .2

1 3 .5

1 3 .6

1 5 .8

1 2 .1

1 5 .3

1 4 .5

1 7 .6

1 6 .4

1 3 .6

1 5 .3

1 9 .2

1 7 .4

1 8 .3

1 7 .9

15.1

1 7 .2

1 4 .7

1 7 .6

1 4.0

1 3 .3

14.0

1 5 .2

14.1

11.1

1 4 .8

1 0 .8

1 2 .2

1 3 .3

8 .3

8 .7

8 .7

8 .7

9 .4

9 .6

8 .3

9.1

8 .7

8 .5

9 .3

7 .5

9 .4

2 0 to 2 4 y e a r s ...............................

7 .0

10.1

3 .7

4 .4

4 .6

4 .3

4 .6

4 .4

5.0

4 .8

4 .6

4 .6

4 .5

4 .5

4 .6

4 .4

2 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r ..........................

3 .2

3 .8

4 .7

4 .8

4 .6

4 .7

4 .6

5.1

5.1

4 .8

4 .8

4 .6

4 .6

4 .8

4 .7

3 .3

2 .7

2 .8

3 .7

3 .0

3 .5

3 .4

3 .7

3 .7

3 .8

3 .4

3 .8

3 .5

3 .8

3.1

2 .6

W o m e n , 1 6 y e a r s a n d o v e r.............

5 5 y e a r s a n d o v e r ...................


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

1 3 .9

1 3 .4

1 2 .9

14.1

1 3 .7

1 4 .8

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

63

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

10. Unem ploym ent rates by State, seasonally adjusted
Oct.
2001

State

Sept.

Oct.

2002p

2002p

Oct.
2001

State

A la b a m a -

5 .7

5 .7

5 .6

M is s o u ri

4 .9

A la s k a .......

6 .1

7 .5

6 .8

M o n ta n a ..........................................................

4 .6

Sept.

Oct.

2002p

2002p

4 .8
3 Q

4 .9

3 .2

A r iz o n a .....

5 .3

5 .7

5 .7

N e b r a s k a ..................................................................

3 .2

3 .5

A rk a n s a s ..

5 .3

5 .0

5.1

N e v a d a ........................................................

6 .6

4^9

C a lifo r n ia ..

5 .9

6 .4

6 .4

N e w H a m p s h ire ....................................................

3 .9

4 .5

4 .8

C o lo r a d o .......................

4 .5

5 .2

5 .2

N e w J e r s e y ..............................................................

4 .7

5 .4

5 .5

C o n n e c tic u t ..................

3 .8

4.1

4 .2

N e w M e x ic o ............................................................

4 .9

6 .0

6 .0

D e la w a r e .......................

fi

3 .3

4.1

3 .9

N e w Y o r k ...............................................................

5 4

fi

D is tr ic t o f C o lu m b ia -

6 .6

6 .1

6 .0

N o rth C a r o lin a .......................................................

6 .1

6 .2

6 .0

F lo r id a ............................

5 .4

5 .3

5.1

N o rth D a k o ta ........................................................

2 7

3 fi

3j

G e o r g ia -

4 .3

4 .7

4 .6

O h io ............................................................................

4 .6

5 .6

5 .6

H a w a ii....

5 .4

4 .2

4 .0

O k la h o m a ............................................................

4 3

4

Id a h o .......

5.1

5 .4

5 .5

O r e g o n .......................................................................

9

7 .2

6 .8

Illin o is .....

5 .7

6 .3

6 .7

P e n n s y lv a n ia .......................................................

5 0

fi ?

In d ia n a ...

5 .0

5 .0

5 .0

R h o d e Is la n d ..........................................................

4 .8

5.1

5 .2

lo w a ........... .

3 .7

3 .9

4 .0

S o u th C a r o lin a .......................................................

5 .9

5 .4

5 .5
2 .7

7 .0

K a n s a s ......

4 .4

4 .6

4 .6

S o u th D a k o ta ..........................................................

3 .7

2 .6

K e n t u c k y . .,

6 .0

5 .2

4 .9

T e n n e s s e e ..........................................................

4 .7

4 .8

4 .5

L o u is ia n a ..

6 .2

5 .9

5 .8

T e x a s ..........................................................................

5 .4

6 .2

6 .2

M a in e ........ .

4 .3

4.1

4.1

U ta h .............................................................................

4 .8

5 .3

5.1

M a r y la n d ..............

4 .3

4 .0

3 .9

V e r m o n t ..................................................................

3 .9

4 .0

3 .9

M a s s a c h u s e tts ..

4 .2

5 .2

5 .2

V irg in ia ...................................................................

4 .2

3 .9

3 .8

M ic h ig a n ..............

5 .8

5 .8

5 .6

W a s h in g to n ..............................................................

6 .9

7 .4

6 .7

M in n e s o t a ...........

3 .9

3 .0

3 .9

W e s t V irg in ia ...........................................................

M is s is s ip p i..........

6 .0

5 .9

6 .7

4 .6

6 .1

6 .2

W is c o n s in .................................................................

4 .7

5.1

4 .9

W y o m in g ...................................................................

4 .0

3 .9

3 .9

p = p r e lim in a r y
D a s h in d ic a te s d a t a n o t a v a ila b le .

11. Em ploym ent of workers on nonfarm payrolls by State, seasonally adjusted
[In thousands]
State

Oct.
2001

Sept.

Oct.

2002p

2002p

State

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

2001

2002p

2002p

A la b a m a -

1 ,9 1 0 .8

1 ,8 9 7 .7

1 ,8 9 1 .7

2 ,7 1 1 .6

2 ,6 7 8 .4

2 ,6 7 2 .1

A la s k a .......

2 9 1 .4

2 9 4 .7

2 9 5 .4

M o n ta n a ................................................

3 8 9 .5

3 9 6 .4

3 9 7 .0

A r iz o n a .....

2 ,2 5 9 .3

2 ,2 3 5 .9

2 ,2 5 2 .3

N e b r a s k a .................................................

9 0 9 .9

9 0 6 .8

9 1 1 .9

A rk a n s a s ..

1 ,1 5 1 .4

1 ,1 4 8 .7

1 ,1 5 0 .7

N e v a d a ....................................................

1 ,0 4 6 .5

1 ,0 6 8 .8

1 ,0 7 6 .8

C a lifo rn ia ..

1 4 ,6 8 8 .5

1 4 ,6 4 5 .6

1 4 ,6 6 5 .6

N e w H a m p s h ir e ...................................

6 2 3 .3

6 2 4 .8

6 2 2 .9

C o lo r a d o .......................

2 ,2 2 1 .9

2 ,1 8 4 .8

2 ,1 8 5 .6

N e w J e r s e y ............................................

4 ,0 2 2 .3

4 ,0 0 1 .8

4 ,0 1 2 .2

C o n n e c tic u t..................

1 ,6 7 3 .4

1 ,6 7 3 .0

1 ,6 6 9 .1

D e la w a r e .......................

4 1 8 .1

4 1 4 .8

4 1 0 .5

M is s o u r i..................................................

N e w M e x ic o .........................................

7 5 7 .7

7 5 9 .5

7 6 3 .7

N e w Y o r k ................................................

8 ,5 7 9 .2

8 ,5 3 9 .2

8 ,5 4 0 .7

6 4 9 .1

N o rth C a r o lin a ......................................

3 ,8 8 6 .1

3 ,8 9 5 .5

3 ,8 8 4 .3

7 ,2 3 7 .2

N o rth D a k o ta ........................................

3 3 0 .9

3 3 1 .0

3 3 0 .2

3 ,8 5 6 .3

O h io ...........................................................

5 ,5 4 5 .1

5 ,5 0 4 .1

5 ,4 9 7 .6

5 5 1 .9

O k la h o m a ...............................................

1 ,5 " 0 .8

1 ,5 2 1 .5

1 ,5 2 0 .2

5 6 3 .1

O r e g o n ......................................................

1 ,5 8 7 .1

1 ,5 8 1 .1

1 ,5 8 4 .0

5 ,9 1 5 .0

P e n n s y lv a n ia ........................................

5 ,6 7 6 .5

5 ,6 4 2 .0

5 ,6 3 6 .7

2 ,8 9 9 .7

2 ,9 0 1 .1

R h o d e Is la n d .........................................

4 7 7 .6

4 8 1 .3

4 8 0 .6

1 ,4 6 3 .8

1 ,4 6 7 .5

1 ,4 6 2 .0

S o u th C a r o lin a ......................................

1 ,8 3 8 .5

1 ,8 3 4 .3

1 ,8 3 7 .7

K a n s a s ......

1 ,3 5 9 .9

1 ,3 6 6 .0

1 ,3 6 4 .0

S o u th D a k o ta ........................................

3 7 9 .7

3 7 8 .4

3 7 7 .2

K e n tu c k y ..

1 ,8 1 5 .0

1 ,8 3 7 .7

1 ,8 3 7 .8

T e n n e s s e e ..............................................

2 ,7 0 4 .3

2 ,6 9 7 .5

2 ,6 9 6 .2

L o u is ia n a ..

1 ,9 3 8 .0

1 ,9 3 2 .8

1 ,9 3 1 .8

T e x a s ........................................................

9 ,9 4 6 .7

9 ,4 2 2 .3

9 ,4 1 5 .0

6 0 8 .0

6 1 0 .8

6 1 0 .4

U ta h ............................................................

1 ,0 7 9 .1

1 ,0 6 2 .4

1 ,0 6 3 .4

2 ,4
,4 7 1 .6

2 ,4 6 2 .7

2 ,4 6 8 .9

V e r m o n t....................................................

D is tr ic t o f C o lu m b ia -

6 4 9 .5

6 4 9 .8

F lo r id a ............................

7 ,2 1 0 .0

7 ,2 2 9 .4

G e o r g ia -

3 ,9 4 2 .8

3 ,8 6 6 .9

H a w a ii—

5 5 0 .1

5 4 9 .9

Id a h o .......

5 6 9 .8

5 6 3 .2

Illin o is ......

5 ,9 7 8 .9

5 ,9 1 9 .0

In d ia n a . . .

2 ,9 2 3 .5

Io w a ...........

M a in e ........
M a r y la n d .................................................
M a s s a c h u s e t t s ..............................

3 ,3 1 5 .3

3 ,2 7 6 .0

3 ,2 7 4 .1

V ir g in ia ....................................................

M ic h ig a n ...........................................

4 ,5 6 7 .2

4 ,5 4 0 .7

4 ,5 3 2 .1

W a s h in g to n ............................................

M in n e s o t a ........................................

2 ,6 5 6 .4

2 ,6 4 4 .2

2 ,6 4 6 .1

W e s t V ir g in ia ..........................................

M is s is s ip p i.......................................

1 ,1 3 0 .7

1 ,1 3 0 .3

1 ,1 3 0 .7

W is c o n s in ...............................................
W y o m in g ..................................................

p = p r e lim in a r y .

2 9 7 .7

2 9 6 .4

2 9 8 .4

3 ,5 1 0 .6

3 ,4 9 5 .5

3 ,4 9 7 .5

2 ,6 7 7 .2

2 ,6 3 3 .0

2 ,6 4 0 .6

7 3 1 .5

7 2 7 .2

7 2 6 .2

2 ,8 1 8 .2

2 ,8 3 5 .6

2 ,8 4 9 .2

2 4 6 .2

2 4 6 .5

2 4 6 .3

D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

NO TE : S o m e d a t a in th is ta b le m a y d iffe r fro m d a ta p u b lis h e d e ls e w h e r e b e c a u s e o f th e c o n tin u a l u p d a tin g o f th e d a ta b a s e .

Digitized64
for FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

12. Employment of workers on nonfarm payrolls by industry, monthly data seasonally adjusted
[In thousands]________
Industry

2002

2001

Annual average
2000

2001

Nov.

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.p

Nov.p

1 3 0 ,8 9 0

1

130 ,70 6

130,701

1 30 ,68 0

1 30 ,70 2

1 30 ,7 3 6

1 30 ,79 0

1 3 0 ,8 7 5

1 31 ,08 7

1 3 0 ,9 1 5

1 3 1 ,9 2 2

1 30 ,8 2 9

1 3 1 ,7 3 9

1 30 ,82 9

TOTAL.............................
PRIVATE SECTOR...............

1 0 9 ,7 6 8

1

109 ,54 4

109 ,50 5

109 ,49 5

1 09 ,49 6

1 0 9 ,5 2 5

1 09 ,5 6 2

1 0 9 ,5 3 6

1 09 ,521

1 0 9 ,9 8 7

1 0 9 ,5 6 9

1 10 ,9 8 9

1 0 9 ,6 2 4

1 11 ,0 7 9

24,041

2 3,9 75

2 3 ,9 0 5

2 3 ,8 7 0

2 3,861

2 3 ,8 1 2

23,801

2 3 ,6 4 4

2 4 ,3 5 3

24,261

2 3 ,6 9 4

2 5 ,7 0 9

2 4 ,9 4 4

2 3 ,7 4 8

GOODS-PRODUCING...............
Mining'...................................

565

5 68

5 64

560

5 64

558

5 55

551

5 55

551

5 66

553

5 65

5 52

5 43

33

33

32

32

32

32

33

32

32

34

32

36

32

41

32

M e ta l m in in g .................................

3 39

342

3 39

336

3 39

334

3 33

3 33

332

3 40

3 32

338

3 30

311

3 29

O il a n d g a s e x tr a c tio n ..............

111

111

111

112

112

110

110

111

109

111

111

11 1

110

111

1 14

6 ,615

6 ,5 9 7

6 ,593

6,541

6,541

6 ,5 4 9

6 ,5 1 9

6 ,5 5 6

6 ,5 5 6

6 ,5 4 5

6,541

1,459

1,458

1,462

1,452

1,4 5 4

1 ,454

1 ,445

1 ,4 5 0

1 ,4 6 9

1 ,4 7 5

1 ,4 8 2

Dec.

Jan.

N o n m e ta llic m in e ra ls ,
e x c e p t fu e ls ..............................

Construction.......................... .

6 ,6 9 8

6 ,6 8 5

6 ,6 2 9

6 ,6 3 4

G e n e ra l b u ild in g c o n tra c to rs ..

1 ,5 2 8

1,4 6 2

1 ,4 5 4

1,459

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

H e a v y c o n s tru c tio n , e x c e p t
9 24

919

9 14

9 08

901

908

9 10

8 98

885

9 25

8 93

922

8 98

901

8 99

b u ild in g ......................................

4 ,2 3 7

4 ,2 2 5

4 ,2 2 3

4 ,1 8 8

4 ,1 7 9

4 ,1 8 5

4 ,1 9 8

4 ,1 7 4

4 ,2 5 0

4,251

4 ,1 7 7

4 ,3 0 0

4 ,1 8 9

4 ,2 6 9

4 ,1 7 5

S p e c ia l tra d e s c o n tra c to r s .....

17,0 62

16,947

1 6,880

16,822

1 6,800

1 6,7 58

16,7 57

16,7 42

16,551

1 7,1 58

1 6,5 96

1 7,6 95

1 6 ,6 4 0

1 8,4 69

1 6,6 90

Manufacturing........................

1 1,4 37

11,362

1 1,305

1 1,264

1 1,250

1 1,2 45

1 1,2 36

1 1,2 47

1 1 ,1 6 4

1 1 ,0 9 4

P ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs ...........

1 1,5 13

1 1,1 32

1 1 ,9 3 3

1 1 ,2 1 2

1 2 ,6 2 8

1 0,1 66

1 0,070

1 0,023

9 ,9 7 6

9 ,9 7 6

9 ,9 6 3

9 ,9 4 4

9 ,9 2 2

9 ,8 8 9

9 ,8 3 2

9 ,7 6 5

1 1,1 38

10,2 37

9,801

1 0,6 36

6 ,6 9 0

6 ,6 5 3

6 ,6 2 5

6 ,6 2 0

6 ,6 1 9

6 ,6 0 3

6 ,6 0 9

6,591

P ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs ...........

6 ,7 5 3

6 ,4 9 2

6 ,8 0 9

6 ,5 2 0

7 ,1 2 6

6 ,5 3 9

7,591

772

770

771

771

769

7 67

770

7 67

7 68

7 64

7 62

7 86

764

832

7 66

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p ro d u c ts

4 94

492

491

491

4 97

494

4 95

495

495

4 88

488

486

4 95

5 57

Durable goods.....................

,

5 58

5 19
571

561

5 58

5 55

551

550

551

549

5 52

5 57

558

5 57

5 79

554

p ro d u c ts .................................

6 25

617

6 07

601

5 96

5 98

597

5 93

5 89

5 82

581

6 56

5 86

6 98

5 89

P rim a ry m e ta l in d u s trie s .....

1,4 3 8

1,437

1,427

1,425

1,422

1,425

1 ,428

1 ,4 2 5

1 ,4 1 8

1 ,4 0 9

1 ,3 9 9

1 ,4 8 3

1 ,412

1 ,5 3 7

1 ,428

F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts ..

1 ,909

1,887

1,868

1,855

1,846

1,842

1,8 2 6

1 ,8 2 9

1 ,8 2 6

1,801

1 ,7 9 8

1 ,7 9 6

2 ,0 1 0

1 ,8 1 0

2 ,1 2 0

325

322

3 17

3 15

315

3 13

308

3 04

301

2 96

296

296

3 43

2 95

361

1,5 2 0

1,499

1,478

1,443

1,4 3 7

1,4 2 8

1 ,4 2 6

1 ,4 0 8

1,3 8 0

1 ,3 6 9

1,631

1 ,392

1 ,719

5 44

5 37

F u rn itu re a n d fix tu r e s ...........
S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s

In d u s tria l m a c h in e ry a n d
e q u ip m e n t.............................

.

C o m p u te r a n d o ffic e
e q u ip m e n t..........................
E le c tro n ic a n d o th e r e le c trica l
e q u ip m e n t...............................
E le c tro n ic c o m p o n e n ts a n d
661

6 05

5 95

582

571

5 66

567

5 66

5 63

5 55

a c c e s s o rie s ............................

682

5 50

1,709

1,680

1,682

1,671

1 ,675

1 ,679

1,661

1,661

1 ,6 4 9

1,7 6 0

1 ,7 2 0

1 ,6 6 0

1,8 4 9

1 ,6 7 5

T ra n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t.....

921

9 20

902

9 13

9 12

914

920

9 18

9 13

910

9 47

9 12

1 ,013

9 05

e q u ip m e n t..............................

449

4 37

4 27

416

416

411

407

4 00

390

461

4 52

3 96

465

409

A irc ra ft a n d p a r ts ...................

8 03

7 99

7 98

7 93

7 92

M o to r v e h ic le s a n d

In s tru m e n ts a n d re la te d
852

p ro d u c ts ...................................

8 30

825

822

818

811

8 16

8 07

8 05

3 73

3 74

372

371

3 72

371

3 74

3 70

3 72

374

3 80

3 72

370

3 94

6,8 9 6

6 ,877

6 ,8 5 7

6 ,8 2 4

6 ,8 0 8

6 ,8 1 3

6 ,8 2 0

6,801

6 ,7 8 6

Nondurable goods...............

6,921

6 ,7 9 5

7,331

7 ,0 5 9

6 ,8 0 8

..

4 ,7 0 4

4 ,6 8 4

4 ,6 7 2

4 ,6 5 2

4 ,6 3 0

4 ,6 2 6

4 ,6 3 3

4,621

4 ,6 1 2

4 ,6 0 2

5 ,0 3 8

4 ,8 0 8

4 ,6 2 5

..

4 ,6 3 8

P ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs ...........

1,6 9 0

1,685

1,686

1,686

1,689

1 ,687

1,691

1 ,687

1 ,6 8 3

1 ,6 9 3

1 ,6 8 9

F o o d a n d k in d re d p ro d u c ts..

1,691

1 ,6 9 4

1 ,6 8 4
34

34

34

34

34

33

34

34

35

38

37

451

4 48

4 44

441

434

4 32

427

426

37
424

4 78

4 27

5 28

4 29

T e x tile m ill p ro d u c ts ...............

33
4 36

37

Tobacco products................

537

5 37

536

531

5 23

520

522

524

5 16

510

566

511

6 33

5 25

p ro d u c ts .................................

6 26

6 24

622

621

6 15

612

612

612

6 13

6 12

611

P a p e r a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts ....

8 34

613

6 57

1,4 5 3

1,444

1,437

1,428

1,413

1,407

1,4 0 5

1,4 0 6

1,401

1 ,4 0 3

1,401

1 ,5 4 7

1 ,4 9 0

1,401

P rin tin g a n d p u b lis h in g ......... ...

1,008

1,011

3

1,008

1 ,006

1 ,008

1 ,0 0 8

1 ,0 0 6

1 ,0 0 7

1 ,0 2 2

1 ,0 1 2

1 ,00 6

1 ,038

1 ,0 1 5

1 ,0 1 0

s.

127

126

126

126

8

125

125

125

126

125

126

126

126

125

127

9 36

9 29

9 27

926

926

in d u s trie s .................................

A p p a re l a n d o th e r te x tile

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s
1 ,0 1 1

9 58

9 32

9 30

928

9 24

9

9 27

928

9 29

56

56

56

6

55

55

55

56

5 55

57

55

60

56

57

71

1 06 ,6 2 9

106,741

106 ,66 5

6

1 06 ,77 5

1 06 ,8 3 2

1 06 ,8 7 5

1 06 ,9 7 8

1 0 7 ,1 1 2

107,081

107,221

SERVICE-PRODUCING........... ... 1 06 ,0 5 0

1 06 ,7 3 4

1 0 7 ,2 3 2

1 06 ,9 7 8

6 ,9 0 7

6 ,856

6 ,8 5 0

6 ,8 3 7

4

6 ,7 9 9

6 ,7 9 3

6 ,7 9 0

6 ,7 8 0

6 ,7 6 5

6 ,7 2 5

6 ,7 1 6

7 ,0 6 5

6 ,7 2 6

7 ,0 1 9

4 ,3 6 7

4 ,332

4 ,3 4 3

4,341

0

4 ,3 3 0

4 ,3 2 8

4 ,3 3 4

4 ,3 2 8

4 ,3 2 3

4 ,2 9 3

4 ,3 0 0

T ra n s p o rta tio n ...........................

4 ,4 9 7

4 ,3 0 0

4 ,5 2 9

2 32

2 33

235

234

3

2 30

228

2 29

228

226

224

2 34

225

2 36

2 27

R a ilro a d tra n s p o rta tio n ........

481

481

4 79

8

4 76

475

4 72

471

4 66

467

4 80

471

4 80

4 69

476

1,827

1,824

1,826

9

1,830

1,8 2 7

1,8 2 9

1 ,8 3 4

1 ,827

1 ,8 1 6

1 ,8 2 7

1 ,8 3 0

1 ,848

1,831

p la s tic s p ro d u c ts ..................

Transportation and public
utilities.............................. ...

L o ca l a n d in te ru rb a n
p a s s e n g e r tra n s it.................
T ru c k in g a n d w a re h o u s in g . ....
W a te r tra n s p o rta tio n .............
T ra n s p o rta tio n b y a ir...........
3...
T ra n s p o rta tio n s e rv ic e s .....

1 ,8 5 6

189

188

188

187

6

190

193

193

192

190

189

191

192

188

196

1 ,187

1,159

1,171

1,171

2

1,162

1 ,1 6 5

1,172

1 ,1 6 7

1 ,1 7 6

1 ,1 6 0

1 ,1 5 2

1 ,266

1 ,1 5 6

1,281

15

15

15

5

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

14

4 33

4 29

4 29

4 29

7

4 27

425

424

422

421

4 18

421

462

418

471

2 ,5 4 0

2 ,5 2 4

2 ,5 0 7

2 ,4 9 6

4

2 ,4 6 9

2 ,4 6 5

2 ,4 5 6

2 ,4 5 2

2 ,4 4 2

2 ,4 2 6

2 ,4 1 6

2 ,5 7 0

2 ,4 3 2

2 ,4 9 0

1 ,689

1,679

1,660

1,652

3

1,628

1,626

1 ,615

1 ,608

1,597

1 ,5 8 4

1 ,5 8 0

1,7 1 6

1 ,588

1,6 3 9

C o m m u n ic a tio n s a n d p u b lic
u tilitie s ...................................... ....
C o m m u n ic a tio n s ...................
E le c tric , g a s , a n d s a n ita ry
851

8 45

847

844

H

841

839

844

845

8 42

836

8 52

844

851

841

s e rv ic e s .................................

6,7 0 2

6,7 0 2

6 ,6 8 9

11

6,6 7 8

6,681

6,681

6 ,679

6 ,663

6 ,6 5 2

6 ,7 7 6

6 ,6 9 3

6 ,6 5 7

7 ,0 2 4

6,671

Wholesale trade...................

2 3,5 22

2 3 ,3 1 8

2 3,3 96

23,331

)2

2 3 ,3 4 5

2 3,327

2 3 ,3 0 8

23,3 39

13,295

2 3,291

2 3 ,2 5 3

2 3 ,3 0 7

2 3 ,4 4 9

2 3 ,2 9 2

Retail trade........................... ....

1,050

1,049

1 ,048

53

1,061

1,06£

1,066

1,067

1,066

1,081

1,049

1,071

1,016

1,044

2,067

s u p p lie s .................................... .....
G e n e ra l m e rc h a n d is e stores. .....

2 ,8 7 7

2 ,8 5 3

2 ,8 5 6

2 ,892

31

2 ,915

2,897

2 ,8 8 4

2 ,8 8 6

2.85C

2,856

2,8 3 1

2 ,897

2,85 1

2 ,8 3 7

2 ,5 2 0

2 ,5 2 0

2 ,5 5 0

50

2,575

2.56C

2 ,542

2 ,5 4 ^

2,516

2 ,4 8 8

2 ,540

2,50 6

2,491

2,558

2,51 C

D e p a rtm e n t s to re s ................. ....

1,081

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

65

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

12. Continued— Employment of workers on nonfarm payrolls by industry, monthly data seasonally adjusted
[In thousands]
Industry

Annual average
2000

i-o o a s to re s .....................................

2001

2001
Nov.

2002
Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

Oct.p

Nov.p

3,541

3 ,4 4 8

3,4 3 0

3,421

3 ,4 0 2

3 ,3 9 2

3 ,3 9 2

3 ,3 9 7

3 ,3 9 4

3 ,3 8 8

3,392

3 ,3 9 2

3 ,3 8 7

3 ,3 8 6

2 ,4 1 2

2 ,4 2 5

2 ,4 3 4

2 ,4 3 8

2 ,4 3 6

2 ,4 3 0

2 ,4 2 6

2 ,4 2 9

2 ,4 3 4

2 ,4 3 2

2 ,4 3 7

1,1 1 4

2 ,4 4 3

2 ,4 3 8

1 ,1 2 1

1,126

2 ,4 3 8

2 ,4 3 3

1,131

1 ,1 3 3

1 ,134

1,131

1,129

1,1 3 3

1,128

1,127

1 ,193

1,130

1,131

1,189

1,173

1,131

1 ,1 2 8

1,163

1 ,187

1 ,172

1 ,175

1,170

1,1 6 9

1,173

1,178

1,177

1,171

1 ,17 3

1 ,1 7 7

A u to m o tiv e d e a le rs a n d
s e rv ic e s ta tio n s ......................... .
N e w a n d u s e d c a r d e a le rs .....
A p p a re l a n d a c c e s s o ry s to res..

July

3,521

Aug.

F u rn itu re a n d h o m e fu rn is h in g s

Sept

s to r e s ............................................

1 ,134

1,141

1,156

1,156

1 ,138

1 ,143

1,1 4 3

1,141

1 ,146

1,148

E a tin g a n d d rin k in g p la c e s ........

1,153

1,154

8 ,1 1 4

1,153

8 ,2 5 6

1 ,15 8

8 ,2 2 4

1 ,160

8,1 9 0

8 ,2 3 8

8,161

8 ,1 5 4

8 ,1 5 2

8 ,1 3 0

8 ,1 2 1

8,1 4 4

8 ,1 2 5

8 ,1 2 9

8,141

8 ,1 2 7

3 ,0 8 0

3 17

3 ,0 8 6

3 ,0 3 8

3 ,0 6 9

3 ,0 8 3

3 ,0 8 8

3 ,0 8 5

3 ,0 8 6

3 ,090

3 ,0 8 7

3 ,0 8 8

3 ,0 8 5

3 ,0 7 3

3 ,0 5 8

7 ,7 4 5

M is c e lla n e o u s re ta il
e s ta b lis h m e n ts ...........................

Finance, insurance, and
real estate...............................

7 71?

7 ,5 6 0

7 ,7 4 5

7 ,7 4 0

7 ,7 4 3

7 ,7 3 2

F in a n c e ............................................

7 ,7 3 3

7 ,7 3 7

3 ,7 1 0

7 ,7 7 3

7 ,8 1 4

3 ,8 0 0

3,821

3 ,8 1 8

3 ,8 1 9

3 ,8 1 2

3 ,8 0 9

3 ,8 1 3

3 ,8 1 3

D e p o s ito ry in s titu tio n s ..............

3 ,8 1 9

3 ,8 1 9

3 ,822

3 ,8 3 7

2 ,0 2 9

2 ,0 5 3

3 ,8 6 0

2 ,0 6 8

3,861

2 ,0 7 0

2 ,0 7 0

2 ,0 7 2

2 ,0 7 4

2 ,0 7 5

2 ,0 7 3

2,071

C o m m e rc ia l b a n k s ...................

2 ,0 7 3

2 ,0 7 5

1 ,430

2 ,0 7 8

1 ,434

2 ,0 8 2

1,442

2 ,0 8 3

1,444

1,4 5 0

1,4 4 6

1 ,447

1 ,446

1 ,446

1,444

S a v in g s in s titu tio n s ..................

1,445

1,448

253

1,450

256

1,4 5 3

2 60

261

1 ,4 5 3

262

2 63

2 64

264

2 64

2 64

N o n d e p o s ito ry in s titu tio n s ........

2 63

2 63

681

2 64

720

264

7 47

261

752

7 55

754

7 53

756

756

7 62

7 67

7 73

7 83

802

807

7 48

769

7 45

734

7 29

7 26

722

7 23

7 23

7 23

7 18

7 14

7 14

7 13

709

251

257

261

2 62

2 59

2 60

2 60

2 59

261

In s u ra n c e .........................................

2 63

261

2 60

2 ,3 4 6

2 62

2 ,3 6 9

2 63

2 ,3 7 7

262

2,3 7 2

2 ,3 7 2

2 ,3 7 6

2 ,3 7 5

2 ,3 7 4

2 ,3 6 9

In s u ra n c e c a rrie rs .......................

2 ,3 6 6

2 ,3 6 5

2 ,3 6 6

1 ,589

2 ,3 6 6

1 ,595

2 ,3 7 2

1,597

1,594

2 ,3 7 6

1,594

1,5 9 3

1,591

1 ,989

1 ,583

1,579

1,576

1,574

1,577

1 ,5 7 8

1 ,5 7 8

7 57

7 73

7 80

7 78

7 78

783

7 84

7 85

7 86

7 87

1,5 0 4

7 89

792

1,5 4 4

7 89

7 94

1,553

1,558

798

1 ,557

1 ,557

1,5 5 6

1,5 5 6

1,550

1,548

1,5 5 3

1,5 5 7

1,570

1 ,582

1 ,5 8 4

4 0 ,4 6 0

4 1 ,3 4 7

4 1 ,3 3 6

4 1 ,3 8 6

4 1 ,4 3 6

S e c u rity a n d c o m m o d ity
b ro k e rs .........................................
H o ld in g a n d o th e r in v e s tm e n t
o ffic e s ...........................................

In s u ra n c e a g e n ts , b ro k e rs ,
a n d s e rv ic e ..................................
R e al e s ta te ......................................

Services1...................................

7,821

4 0 ,9 7 0

4 0,8 34

4 0 ,8 8 3

1 0,9 08

40,901

4 0 ,9 6 3

4 1 ,0 2 5

4 1 ,0 9 3

4 1,1 52

A g ric u ltu ra l s e rv ic e s .....................

4 1 ,2 1 5

8 32

8 49

8 60

8 65

8 65

868

872

8 57

8 56

862

862

H o te ls a n d o th e r lo d g in g p la ce s

863

1,9 1 4

8 74

8 73

1,8 7 0

8 80

1,810

1,805

1,811

1,811

1,811

1 ,796

1 ,789

P e rs o n a l s e rv ic e s ..........................

1,801

1,795

1,251

1,788

1,782

1,2 6 9

1,791

1,266

1,284

1 ,7 9 0

1,290

1 ,282

1 ,289

1 ,286

1 ,279

B u s in e s s s e rv ic e s ..........................

1,285

1,282

9 ,8 5 8

1,285

1,287

9 ,5 7 2

9 ,2 7 7

1,2 8 9

1 ,2 8 7

9 ,265

9,231

9 ,2 0 7

9 ,2 3 7

9 ,3 1 2

9 ,3 3 0

9,3 3 2

S e rv ic e s to b u ild in g s ...................

9,3 2 5

9 94

9 ,3 9 5

9,3 3 0

1 ,016

9 ,3 2 0

1,025

9 ,3 1 0

1,025

1 ,0 2 2

1,018

121

1 ,0 2 7

1 ,0 2 3

1 ,023

P e rs o n n e l s u p p ly s e rv ic e s ........

1,034

1,041

3 ,8 8 7

3 ,4 4 6

3 ,1 2 6

3 ,107

3 ,0 8 0

3 ,0 7 0

3 ,1 0 7

3 ,1 7 5

3 ,1 9 8

3 ,2 0 5

H e lp s u p p ly s e rv ic e s ................

3 ,1 9 6

3 ,2 5 7

3 ,4 8 7

3 ,1 8 8

3 ,0 8 4

3 ,1 7 4

3 ,1 5 6

2 ,7 9 9

2 ,7 8 2

2,761

2 ,7 5 8

2 ,7 9 5

2 ,8 5 7

2 ,8 8 8

2 ,9 0 2

2 ,8 7 5

2 ,9 2 5

2 ,8 6 9

2 ,8 6 0

2 ,8 3 7

2 ,0 9 5

2 ,2 2 5

2 ,2 2 1

2 ,2 1 9

2 ,2 1 3

2 ,2 0 8

2 ,1 9 8

2 ,1 9 0

2 ,1 9 0

2,191

2 ,1 9 3

2,191

2 ,1 9 0

2 ,1 9 3

2 ,1 9 4

a n d p a rk in g ...................................

1,2 4 8

1,2 5 7

1,259

1,259

1,262

1,262

1 ,260

1,261

1,2 6 2

M is c e lla n e o u s re p a ir s e rv ic e s ....

1,265

1,266

1,266

3 66

3 74

1,266

1,261

3 75

3 76

1 ,2 6 8

3 76

379

3 77

3 77

3 75

M o tio n p ic tu re s ...............................

3 78

3 79

3 77

594

3 78

583

577

3 78

574

378

581

5 74

5 72

5 74

578

581

584

588

5 95

591

588

C o m p u te r a n d d a ta
p ro c e s s in g s e rv ic e s ..................
A u to re p a ir s e rv ic e s

A m u s e m e n t a n d re c re a tio n

1,042

1,041

1 ,0 4 7

s e rv ic e s ..........................................

1 ,728

1,721

1,685

1,680

1 ,6 9 9

1,6 4 9

1,6 3 5

1,611

1,621

1,631

1,649

1,662

1,638

1 ,640

1 ,6 3 5

H e a lth s e rv ic e s ...............................

1 0,1 97

10,381

1 0,502

1 0,530

10,551

1 0 ,5 7 5

1 0,6 02

10,611

1 0,626

1 0,660

1 0,687

10,711

1 0,7 29

1 0,7 53

1 0 ,7 8 0

1,9 2 4

2 ,0 0 2

2 ,0 2 5

2 ,0 2 9

2 ,0 3 3

3,041

2 ,0 4 6

2 ,0 4 4

2 ,0 5 0

2,061

2 ,0 6 7

2 ,0 7 5

2 ,0 7 9

2 ,0 8 5

2 ,0 8 6

fa c ilitie s .........................................

1 ,795

1 ,847

1 ,8 6 6

1,871

1 ,876

1 ,875

1 ,879

1,8 8 3

1 ,8 8 6

H o s p ita ls .........................................

1,887

1 ,8 8 8

3 ,9 9 0

1,893

1,896

4 ,0 9 6

1 ,900

4 ,1 5 3

4 ,1 6 4

1 ,9 0 6

4 ,1 7 4

4 ,1 8 4

4 ,1 9 3

4 ,1 9 9

4 ,2 0 7

H o m e h e a lth c a re s e rv ic e s ......

4,221

4 ,2 3 3

4 ,2 4 4

643

4 ,2 4 7

636

6 40

641

4 ,2 5 5

4 ,2 6 9

6 43

6 42

6 43

643

644

643

6 46

646

646

651

655

O ffic e s a n d c lin ic s o f m e d ic a l
d o c to rs ...........................................
N u rs in g a n d p e rs o n a l c a re

L eg a l s e rv ic e s ..................................

1 ,0 1 0

1 ,037

1,049

1,051

1 ,0 5 3

1,0 5 4

1,0 5 6

1 ,059

1 ,066

E d u c a tio n a l s e rv ic e s .....................

1,065

1,065

1,065

2 ,3 2 5

1,072

2 ,4 3 3

1 ,0 7 7

2 ,4 5 8

2 ,4 6 3

1 ,0 8 0

2 ,4 7 3

2 ,4 8 5

2 ,4 8 9

2,501

2 ,5 1 8

2,511

S o c ia l s e rv ic e s .................................

2 ,5 2 9

2 ,5 3 8

2 ,9 0 3

2 ,5 5 0

3 07

2 ,5 6 6

3,121

2,5 8 1

3 ,1 3 5

3 ,1 4 9

3 ,1 5 5

3 ,1 6 2

3 ,1 6 7

3 ,1 6 4

C h ild d a y c a re s e rv ic e s ..............

3 ,1 6 5

3,181

712

3 ,2 0 3

7 16

3 ,1 9 9

721

3 ,2 0 4

3,211

7 23

7 23

722

7 23

9 25

7 22

R e s id e n tia l c a re ............................

7 26

7 26

806

7 36

864

731

731

888

891

7 30

896

8 99

9 02

9 03

901

904

904

9 06

9 06

9 09

912

M u s e u m s a n d b o ta n ic a l a n d
z o o lo g ic a l g a r d e n s .....................

106

110

109

110

110

109

109

109

108

109

109

M e m b e rs h ip o rg a n iz a tio n s ..........

108

108

2 ,4 7 5

107

2 ,4 6 8

107

2 ,4 7 3

2 ,4 7 3

2,471

2,471

2 ,4 7 0

2 ,4 7 7

2 ,4 8 0

2 ,4 8 4

2 ,4 7 6

2 ,4 7 2

2 ,4 7 8

2,481

2 ,4 7 9

3 ,4 1 9

3 ,5 9 3

3 ,620

3,621

3 ,6 2 4

3 ,6 2 9

3,631

3 ,6 3 6

3 ,6 4 9

3 ,6 3 6

3 ,6 3 4

3 ,6 3 4

3 ,6 5 9

3 ,6 6 5

3 ,6 7 3

1 ,017

1 ,053

1,051

1,048

1 ,047

1 ,044

1 ,044

1,041

1,0 4 2

1,034

1,032

1,030

1 ,029

1 ,0 2 8

1 ,0 2 9

re la tio n s .......................................

1 ,090

1 ,166

1,182

1,184

1,192

1 ,193

1,191

1 ,2 0 2

1,2 0 9

1,204

1,214

1 ,2 1 1

1,2 2 4

1 ,2 2 4

1 ,2 2 9

Government................................

20,681

2 0 ,9 3 3

2 1 ,1 0 0

2 1 ,1 2 2

2 1 ,1 3 7

2 1 ,1 6 2

2 1 ,1 9 6

2 1 ,1 8 5

2 1 ,2 0 6

2 1 ,2 1 1

F e d e ra l..............................................

2 1 ,2 2 8

2 1,2 89

2 ,7 7 7

2 1 ,2 9 3

2 ,6 1 6

2 ,6 2 2

2 1 ,3 4 6

2 1 ,3 5 4

2 ,6 1 6

2 ,6 1 5

2 ,6 0 9

2 ,6 0 8

2,611

2 ,6 0 0

2,601

2 ,6 0 7

2,611

2,621

2 ,6 4 5

2 ,6 4 8

S e rv ic e .........................................

1 ,9 1 7

1 ,7 6 7

1,776

1,776

1 ,7 7 6

1 ,777

1,782

1,7 8 4

1,7 7 7

S ta te ...................................................

1,783

1,790

1,792

4 ,7 8 5

1,810

4 ,8 8 5

4 ,9 2 5

4,9 3 2

4 ,9 3 5

4 ,9 3 7

4 ,9 4 0

4 ,9 4 2

E d u c a tio n ........................................

4 ,9 4 5

4 ,9 3 5

4 ,9 5 0

2 ,0 3 2

4 ,9 4 8

4 ,9 5 8

2 ,0 9 6

4 ,9 5 8

2 ,1 2 1

2 ,1 2 4

4 ,9 5 9

2 ,1 2 7

2 ,1 3 0

2 ,1 3 3

2 ,1 3 5

2,141

2 ,1 3 5

2 ,1 5 5

2 ,1 4 5

2 ,1 6 3

2 ,1 6 3

2 ,1 6 3

E n g in e e rin g a n d m a n a g e m e n t
s e rv ic e s ..........................................
E n g in e e rin g a n d a rc h ite c tu ra l
s e rv ic e s .........................................
M a n a g e m e n t a n d p u b lic

F e d e ra l, e x c e p t P osta l

1 ,8 3 6

1 ,8 4 6

O th e r S ta te g o v e rn m e n t...........

2 ,7 5 3

2 ,7 8 9

2 ,8 0 4

2 ,8 0 8

2 ,8 0 8

2 ,8 0 7

2 ,8 0 7

2 ,8 0 7

2 ,8 0 4

L o c a l...................................................

2 ,8 0 0

2 ,7 9 5

2 ,8 0 3

1 3,1 19

2 ,7 9 5

2 ,7 9 5

1 3,4 32

2 ,7 9 6

1 3,518

1 3,559

1 3,5 75

1 3 ,5 9 3

1 3,6 17

1 3,6 45

13,661

E d u c a tio n ........................................

1 3,675

13,671

13,730

7 ,4 4 0

1 3,714

7 ,6 4 6

1 3,7 43

7 ,7 1 0

1 3 ,7 4 7

7 ,7 2 3

7 ,7 3 2

7 ,7 4 6

7 ,7 6 7

7 ,7 5 4

7 ,7 7 0

O th e r lo c a l g o v e rn m e n t............

7 ,755

7 ,788

7 ,8 3 7

5 ,6 7 9

7 ,8 0 8

5 ,7 8 6 I

5 ,8 4 9

7 ,8 2 9

7 ,8 2 6

5 ,852

5,861

5,871

5 ,8 7 8

5 ,8 7 9

5,891 I

5,9 2 0

5 ,8 8 3

5 ,8 9 3

5 ,9 0 6

5 ,9 1 4

5,921

1 In c lu d e s o th e r in d u s trie s n o t sh o w n se p a ra te ly.

p = p re lim in a ry .
N o t e : S e e "N o te s on th e d a ta " fo r a d e s c rip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a rk re visio n .

Digitized for
66 FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

13. A verag e w eekly hours of production or nonsupervisory workers on private nonfarm payrolls, by industry, m onthly
d ata seasonally adjusted_______________ __________________________________ ______________________________
Industry

Annual average
2000

PRIVATF s e c t o r .................................
GOOnS-PRODUCING...................................
m in in g

.........................................................

m a n u f a c t u r in g ......................................

3 4 .5

2001
3 4 .2

2002

2001
Nov.
3 4.1

Dec.
3 4.1

Jan.
3 4.1

Feb.
3 4 .2

Mar.
3 4 .2

Apr.
3 4 .2

May
3 4 .2

June
3 4 .3

July
3 4 .0

Aug.

Sept

34.1

3 4 .2

Oct.p Nov.p
3 4 .2

3 4 .2

4 1 .0

4 0 .4

4 0 .2

4 0 .2

4 0 .3

4 0 .4

4 0 .5

4 0 .4

4 0 .3

4 0 .5

4 0 .0

4 0 .3

4 0 .3

4 0 .1

4 0 .0

4 3.1

4 3 .5

4 3 .5

4 3 .8

4 3 .0

4 3 .4

4 3 .3

4 2 .4

4 3 .0

4 3 .3

4 2 .7

4 3 .3

4 2 .8

4 2 .8

4 3 .1

4 1 .6

4 0 .7

4 0 .4

4 0 .8

4 0 .6

4 0 .7

4 1 .0

4 0 .9

4 0 .9

4 1.1

4 0 .7

4 0 .9

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0 .7

4 .6

3 .9

3 .8

3 .8

3 .9

3 .9

4.1

4 .2

4 .2

4 .3

4 .0

4 .2

4.1

4.1

4.1

4 1 .0

41.1

4 1 .3

4 1 .4

4 1 .3

4 1 .5

4 1 .0

4 1 .2

4 1 .3

4 1 .2

4 1 .0

4 2.1

4 1 .0

4 0 .6

4 0 .9

4 .7

3 .9

3 .7

3 .8

3 .9

3 .9

4.1

4.1

4.1

4 .2

3 .9

4.1

4.1

4 .2

4.1

4 1 .0

4 0 .6

4 0 .7

4 1 .0

4 0 .5

4 0 .9

4 1 .1

4 0 .8

4 0 .8

4 1 .0

4 1 .2

4 1 .0

4 1.1

4 1 .0

4 0 .6

4 0 .0

3 9 .0

3 8 .8

3 9 .2

4 0.1

4 0 .3

4 0 .6

4 0 .8

4 0 .4

4 0 .2

40.1

4 0 .3

4 0 .2

3 9 .7

3 9 .6

43.1

4 3 .6

4 3 .6

4 3 .4

4 3 .8

4 4.1

4 3 .6

4 3 .8

4 3 .4

4 3 .7

4 3 .2

4 3 .3

4 3 .4

4 3 .4

4 3 .0

4 4 .9

4 3 .6

4 3 .0

4 3 .7

4 3 .6

4 3 .8

4 4 .4

4 4 .3

4 4 .1

4 4 .6

4 4.1

4 4 .3

4 4 .2

4 4 .6

4 4 ,5

4 6 .0

4 4 .6

4 3 .9

4 4 .4

4 4 .5

4 4 .8

4 5 .5

4 5 .1

4 5 .6

4 6 .1

4 5 .5

4 5 .8

4 6 .0

4 6 .3

4 2 .6

4 1 .4

4 1 .0

4 1 .3

4 1 .3

4 1 .6

4 1 .7

4 1 .6

4 1 .9

4 2 .0

4 1 .7

4 1 .7

4 1 .6

4 1 .6

4 1 .1

3 9 .9

40.1

40.1

40.1

4 0 .5

4 0 .6

4 0 .7

4 0 .9

4 0 .3

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0 .5

4 0 .4

4 6 .3
B la s t f u r n a c e s a n d b a s ic s te e l

In d u s tr ia l m a c h in e r y a n d e q u ip m e n t...

4 2 .2

4 0 .6

E le c tr o n ic a n d o th e r e le c tr ic a l

In s t r u m e n ts a n d r e la t e d p r o d u c ts ........

A p p a r e l a n d o th e r te x t ile p r o d u c ts ......

4 1 .1

3 9 .4

3 9 .0

3 9 .4

3 8 .7

3 8 .9

3 9 .4

3 9 .5

3 9 .4

3 9 .4

3 8 .7

3 8 .7

3 8 .8

3 8 .3

3 8 .7

4 3 .4

4 1 .9

4 1 .6

4 1 .9

4 2 .7

4 2 .3

4 2 .4

4 2 .6

4 2 .3

4 3 .5

4 1 .7

4 2 .2

4 2 .6

4 2 .5

4 2 .1

4 4 .4

4 2 .7

4 2 .5

4 3 .2

4 4 .3

4 3 .7

4 3 .9

4 4 .4

4 4 .2

4 4.1

4 2 .9

4 3 .8

4 4 .3

4 4 .4

4 3 .9

4 1 .3

4 0 .9

4 0 .6

4 0 .6

4 0 .5

4 0 .4

4 0 .6

4 0 .4

4 0 .4

4 0 .9

4 0 .4

4 0 .7

4 0 .8

4 0 .7

4 0 .7

3 9 .0

3 7 .9

3 7 .4

3 8 .0

3 8 .2

3 8 .4

3 8 .8

3 8 .8

3 8 .8

3 9 .6

3 8 .4

3 8 .5

3 8 .6

3 8 .9

3 8 .5

4 0.1

4 0 .0

4 0 .2

4 0 .4

4 0 .3

4 0 .4

4 0 .6

4 0 .2

4 0 .5

4 0 .2

4 0 .1

4 0 .3

4 0.1

4 0 .8

4 0 .3

4 .4

4 .0

3 .9

3 .9

4 .0

3 .9

4 .2

4 .3

4 .3

4 .3

4 .2

4 .2

4 .0

4 .0

4.1

4 1 .7

4 1 .1

4 1 .0

4 0 .9

4 1 .0

4 1 .0

4 1 .4

4 1 .2

4 1 .2

4 1 .6

4 1 .0

4 1 .3

4 0 .8

4 0 .8

4 1 .3

4 1 .2

3 9 .9

3 9 .3

4 0 .0

4 0 .2

4 0 .9

4 1 .4

4 1 .5

4 1 .4

4 1 .5

4 1 .6

4 1 .8

4 1 .2

4 1 .0

4 1 .0

3 7 .8

3 7 .3

3 6 .9

3 6 .9

3 6 .7

3 6 .7

3 7 .4

3 7.1

3 7 .0

3 7 .0

3 6 .8

3 6 .8

3 6 .9

3 6 .6

3 7 .0

4 2 .5

4 1 .6

4 1 .3

4 1 .3

4 1.1

4 1 .5

4 1 .5

4 1 .6

4 1 .9

4 1 .6

4 1 .2

4 1 .7

4 1 .4

4 1 .3

4 1 .4

3 7 .8

3 7 .3

3 7 .4

3 7 .5

3 7 .2

3 7 .5

3 7 .7

3 7 .3

3 7 .7

3 7 .5

3 7 .5

3 7 .3

3 8 .3

3 8.1

3 7 .8

4 2 .5

4 2 .3

4 1 .9

4 1 .9

4 1 .9

4 1 .9

4 2 .0

4 1 .8

4 2 .3

4 2 .5

4 2 .1

4 2 .6

4 2 .4

4 1 .9

4 2 .1

4 1 .4

4 0 .7

4 0 .7

4 0 .8

4 0 .5

4 0 .9

4 1.1

4 1 .6

4 1 .2

4 1 .3

4 1 .0

4 1 .2

4 0 .8

4 0 .9

4 0 .7

3 7 .5

3 6 .3

3 6 .6

3 6 .9

3 7 .0

3 7 .2

3 7 .3

3 7 .5

3 6 .7

3 6 .8

3 6 .7

3 5 .7

3 5 .6

3 6 .3

3 7 .0

3 2 .7

3 2 .7

3 2 .8

3 2 .7

3 2 .8

3 2 .8

3 2 .6

3 2 .7

3 2 .8

3 2 .8

3 2 .9

3 8.1

3 8 .2

3 8 .2

3 8 .3

3 8 .4

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .4

3 8 .5

3 8 .4

3 8 .5

3 8 .2

3 8 .3

3 8 .4

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .6

3 8 .4

3 8 .5

3 8 .5

3 8 .6

3 8 .5

2 9 .0

2 9.1

2 9 .0

2 9 .1

2 9 .1

2 8 .8

2 8 .9

2 9 .0

2 9 .3

2 9 .3

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s

Q P R v m F -P R nnu eiN G ..............................

3 2 .8

3 2 .7

3 2 .6

3 2 .7

TRANSPORTATION AND
PURI 1C UTILITIES................................

3 8 .6

3 8 .2

3 8 .9

3 8 .2

3 8 .5

RETAIL TRADE..........................................

4 6 .3

2 8 .9

3 8 .2
2 8 .9

3 8 .2
2 8 .8 I

3 8 .3
2 8 .9

2 8 .9

p = p r e lim in a r y .
NO TE : S e e " N o t e s o n t h e d a ta " to r a d e s c r ip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a r k re v is io n .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

67

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

14. A verage hourly earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers on private nonfarm payrolls, by industry,
seasonally adjusted
Industry

Annual average

2001

2002

2000

2001

$ 1 3 .7 5

$ 1 4 .3 2

Goods-produdng...................................

1 5 .4 0

1 5 .9 2

16.11

1 6 .1 8

1 6 .2 4

M in in g ..............................................................

1 7 .2 4

1 7 .5 6

1 7 .6 8

17.51

1 7 .6 9

C o n s tr u c tio n ..................................................

1 7 .8 8

1 8 .3 4

1 8 .4 7

1 8 .6 0

1 8 .6 5

1 8 .6 8

PRIVATE SECTOR (in current dollars).

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug

Sept.

Oct.p

Nov.p

$ 1 4 .5 2

$ 1 4 .5 6

$ 1 4 .5 8

$ 14 .61

$ 1 4 .6 4

$ 1 4 .6 6

$ 1 4 .6 9

$ 1 4 .7 4

$ 1 4 .7 6

$ 1 4 .8 3

$ 1 4 .8 5

$ 1 4 .8 9

$ 1 4 .9 3

1 6 .2 8

1 6 .2 9

1 6 .3 2

1 6 .3 5

1 6 .3 9

1 6 .3 8

1 6 .4 4

1 6 .4 8

1 6 .5 3

1 6 .5 5

1 7 .6 6

1 7 .7 2

1 7 .6 3

1 7 .8 7

1 7 .7 0

1 7 .7 8

1 7 .8 7

1 7 .8 2

17.81

1 7 .9 7

1 8 .7 4

1 8 .8 3

1 8 .7 7

18.81

1 8 .8 7

1 8 .9 0

1 8 .9 8

1 8 .9 8

1 9 .0 3
1 5 .4 4

M a n u fa c tu rin g ..............................................

1 4 .3 8

1 4 .8 3

1 5 .0 3

1 5 .0 8

15.13

1 5 .1 7

1 5 .1 9

1 5 .1 9

1 5 .2 7

15.31

1 5 .2 8

1 5 .3 4

1 5 .3 5

1 5 .4 4

E x c lu d in g o v e r tim e ................................

1 3 .6 2

1 4 .1 5

1 4.3 6

1 4 .3 9

1 4 .4 2

1 4 .4 6

1 4 .4 5

1 4 .4 3

1 4 .5 3

1 4 .5 6

1 4 .5 7

1 4 .5 9

1 4 .6 2

1 4 .7 0

1 4 .7 2

Service-producing.................................

1 3 .2 4

1 3 .8 5

1 4 .0 6

1 4 .1 0

14.11

1 4 .1 3

1 4 .1 8

1 4 .1 9

1 4 .2 3

1 4 .2 7

14.31

1 4 .3 7

1 4 .4 0

1 4 .4 3

1 4 .4 8

T r a n s p o r ta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........

1 6 .2 2

1 6 .7 9

1 7 .0 3

1 7 .0 9

1 7 .0 9

17.11

17.21

17.21

1 7 .2 6

17.31

1 7 .2 7

1 7 .2 8

1 7 .3 8

1 7 .4 5

1 5 .2 0

1 5 .8 6

1 5 .9 8

1 6 .0 7

16.10

1 7 .3 6

W h o le s a le t r a d e ..........................................

1 6 .1 9

1 6 .2 3

16.11

1 6 .1 2

1 6 .1 5

1 6 .1 4

1 6 .2 8

1 6 .2 9

1 6 .2 9

1 6 .3 4

R e ta il t r a d e ....................................................

9 .4 6

9 .7 7

9 .9 0

9 .8 9

9 .9 0

9 .9 2

9 .9 5

9 .9 7

9 .9 9

1 0 .0 6

1 0 .0 5

1 0 .0 9

10.10

10.11

10.12

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ...

1 5 .0 7

1 5 .8 0

1 6 .0 0

1 6 .0 0

1 6 .0 6

1 6 .0 8

1 6 .1 4

1 6 .1 8

1 6 .1 7

1 6 .2 7

1 6 .3 8

1 6 .4 3

1 6 .5 3

1 6 .5 6

1 6 .7 3

S e r v ic e s ...........................................................

13.91

1 4 .6 7

1 4 .9 4

1 4 .9 8

15.01

1 5 .0 4

1 5 .0 8

15.13

1 5 .1 6

1 5 .1 9

1 5 .2 6

1 5 .3 0

1 5 .3 4

1 5 .3 9

1 5 .4 3

7 .8 6

8 .0 0

8 .1 0

8 .1 4

8 .1 4

8 .1 3

8.12

8.11

8 .1 3

8 .1 3

8 .1 4

8 .1 4

8 .1 5

PRIVATE SECTOR (In constant (1982)
dollars).....................................................

p = p re lim in a ry . D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .
NO TE: S e e " N o te s o n th e d a ta " fo r a d e s c rip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a r k re v is io n .

Digitized68
for FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

15. A verag e hourly earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers on private nonfarm payrolls, by industry
Annual average
Industry

PRIVATE SECTOR.....................................

2002

2001

2000

2001

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

$ 1 3 .7 6

$ 1 4 .3 2

$ 1 4 .5 4

$ 1 4 .6 2

$ 1 4 .6 5

$ 1 4 .6 7

$ 1 4 .6 7

$ 1 4 .6 9

$ 1 4 .6 7

$ 1 4 .6 8

$ 1 4 .6 5

$ 1 4 .7 0

$ 1 4 .9 2

$ 1 4 .9 1

$ 1 4 .9 6

Oct.p Nov.p

MINING..........................................................

1 7 .2 2

1 7 .5 6

1 7.61

1 7 .5 8

1 7 .8 9

1 7 .7 6

1 7 .7 3

1 7 .7 0

1 7 .7 4

1 7 .6 5

1 7 .7 6

1 7.71

1 7 .8 0

1 7 .7 9

1 7 .8 9

CONSTRUCTION.........................................

1 7 .8 8

1 8 .3 4

1 8 .5 4

1 8 .6 9

1 8 .5 6

1 8 .6 2

1 8 .6 6

1 8 .7 0

1 8 .6 7

1 8 .7 4

1 8 .9 0

1 8 .9 7

1 9 .1 0

1 9 .1 2

1 9 .0 9

MANUFACTURING.....................................

1 4 .3 7

1 4 .8 3

1 5 .0 7

1 5 .1 7

1 5 .1 5

1 5 .1 6

1 5 .1 6

1 5 .2 0

1 5 .2 3

1 5 .2 8

1 5 .2 6

1 5 .3 2

1 4 .4 0

1 5 .4 2

1 5 .4 8

1 4 .8 2

1 5 .2 8

1 5 .5 5

1 5 .6 6

1 5.61

1 5 .6 3

1 5 .6 3

1 5 .6 6

1 5 .6 8

1 5 .7 4

1 5 .6 6

1 5.8 1

1 5 .8 0

1 5 .9 5

1 6 .0 3

1 1 .9 4

1 2 .2 6

1 2 .4 0

1 2 .4 2

1 2 .3 8

1 2 .3 9

1 2 .3 5

1 2 .3 3

1 2 .4 3

1 2 .5 3

1 2 .5 8

1 2 .5 7

1 2 .6 3

1 2 .6 0

1 2 .5 9

1 1 .7 4

1 2 .2 4

1 2 .4 5

1 2 .5 6

12.6 1

1 2 .5 9

1 2 .5 7

1 2 .5 4

1 2 .5 9

1 2 .6 2

1 2 .5 5

1 2.7 1

1 2 .7 4

1 2 .6 7

1 2 .7 4

F u r n itu r e a n d f ix t u r e s ..................................

1 5 .0 0

1 5 .1 3

1 5 .1 0

1 5 .1 2

1 5 .1 7

1 5 .1 2

1 5 .3 5

1 5 .4 3

1 5 .4 8

1 5 .6 2

1 5 .5 2

1 5 .6 9

1 5 .7 9

1 5 .6 5

S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s p ro d u c ts ............

1 4 .5 3
16.4 1

1 6 .9 2

1 7 .2 4

1 7 .1 9

1 7 .1 5

1 7 .1 5

1 7 .2 0

1 7 .2 5

1 7 .3 6

1 7 .4 6

1 7 .6 0

1 7 .4 9

1 7 .5 4

17.6 1

1 7 .6 9

P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s t r ie s ...........................

Durable goods...........................................

B la s t f u r n a c e s a n d b a s ic s te e l
1 9 .8 2

2 0 .4 1

2 0 .6 6

2 0 .5 3

2 0 .5 3

2 0 .6 3

2 0 .6 6

2 0 .6 9

2 0 .8 1

2 0 .9 2

2 1 .0 7

2 0 .9 0

2 0 .9 6

2 1 .0 2

2 1 .2 3

p r o d u c t s ........................................................
F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c ts .......................

1 3 .8 7

1 4 .2 5

1 4 .4 2

1 4 .5 6

1 4 .5 7

1 4.51

1 4 .6 0

1 4 .6 6

1 4 .6 4

1 4.71

1 4.61

1 4 .6 9

1 4 .8 0

1 4 .8 4

1 4 .9 6

In d u s tr ia l m a c h in e r y a n d e q u ip m e n t...

1 5 .5 5

1 5 .8 9

1 6 .1 6

1 6 .2 3

16.3 1

1 6 .3 3

1 6.31

1 6 .3 0

1 6 .3 5

1 6 .3 6

1 6 .4 7

1 6 .5 5

1 6 .5 8

1 6 .5 3

1 6 .5 8

E le c tr o n ic a n d o th e r e le c tr ic a l
e q u ip m e n t .....................................................

1 3 .7 9

1 4.51

1 4 .8 8

1 4 .9 7

1 4 .8 6

1 4 .9 0

1 4 .9 3

1 4 .8 7

14.9 1

1 5 .0 4

1 5 .0 5

1 5 .0 6

1 5 .0 5

1 5 .0 7

1 5 .1 1

T r a n s p o r t a tio n e q u ip m e n t ........................

1 8 .4 6

1 9 .0 6

1 9 .5 4

19.7 1

1 9 .5 7

1 9 .6 9

1 9 .6 5

1 9 .6 8

1 9 .6 5

1 9 .7 5

1 9 .3 7

1 9 .8 6

2 0 .0 4

2 0 .3 1

2 0 .5 4

M o to r v e h ic le s a n d e q u ip m e n t ............

1 8 .8 0

1 9 .4 0

1 9 .9 6

2 0 .1 9

1 9 .9 9

2 0 .0 5

2 0 .0 9

2 0 .2 2

2 0 .1 7

2 0 .3 6

1 9 .7 6

2 0 .5 6

2 0 .7 1

2 1 .1 1

2 1 .4 5

1 4.41

14.8 1

1 4 .9 8

1 5 .0 9

1 5 .0 9

1 5 .1 0

1 5 .1 2

1 5.11

1 5.11

1 5 .1 4

1 5 .2 4

1 5 .2 8

1 5 .4 0

1 5 .4 5

1 5 .3 6

In s tr u m e n ts a n d r e la te d p ro d u c ts ........
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r in g .................

1 1 .6 3

1 2 .1 6

1 2 .3 5

1 2 .3 9

1 2 .4 6

1 2 .4 2

1 2 .3 9

1 2 .3 6

1 2 .3 7

1 2 .2 8

1 2 .3 0

1 2 .3 9

1 2 .4 4

1 2 .4 3

1 2 .5 1

Nondurable goods...................................

1 3 .6 8

1 4 .1 6

1 4 .3 6

1 4 .4 5

1 4 .4 7

1 4 .4 7

1 4 .4 6

1 4 .5 3

1 4 .5 5

1 4 .6 0

1 4 .6 9

1 4 .6 0

1 4 .6 9

1 4 .6 6

1 4 .7 1

1 2.51

1 2 .8 9

1 3 .1 0

1 3 .1 7

1 3 .1 4

1 3 .0 8

1 3 .1 0

1 3 .1 8

1 3 .2 5

1 3 .2 9

1 3 .3 4

1 3 .2 4

1 3 .2 6

1 3 .2 3

1 3 .2 4

F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c ts ......................

2 1 .3 4

2 1 .5 0

2 1 .4 6

3 1 .3 7

2 1 .2 1

2 1 .7 1

2 2 .4 7

2 2 .8 0

2 3 .0 9

2 3 .2 6

2 3 .3 4

2 0 .8 3

2 0 .6 1

2 0 .2 9

2 0 .4 0

1 1 .7 4

1 1 .8 2

T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s .....................................

1 1 .1 6

1 1 .3 5

1 1 .4 0

1 1 .5 3

1 1 .6 6

1 1 .6 4

1 1 .6 5

1 1 .6 5

1 1 .7 3

1 1 .6 9

1 1 .7 4

1 1 .7 5

1 1 .8 0

A p p a r e l a n d o th e r t e x tile p r o d u c ts .......

9 .2 9

9 .4 3

9 .4 9

9 .6 0

9 .7 2

9 .7 7

9 .8 2

9 .9 3

9 .9 3

9 .9 5

9.91

9 .9 5

9 .9 4

9 .9 8

9 .9 6

1 6 .2 5

1 6 .8 7

1 7 .1 9

1 7 .2 6

1 7 .1 9

1 7 .1 7

1 7 .2 5

1 7 .3 3

17.5 1

1 7 .5 3

1 7 .7 3

1 7 .5 5

1 7 .6 6

1 7 .6 0

1 7 .6 5

P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c ts ........................

1 5 .3 4

1 4 .4 0

1 4 .8 2

14.91

1 5 .0 4

1 5.0 1

1 5 .0 6

1 5 .1 2

1 5.11

1 5 .0 5

15.1 1

1 5 .1 5

1 5 .1 8

1 5 .3 2

1 5 .3 2

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c ts ..............

1 8 .1 5

1 8.61

1 8 .8 3

1 8 .8 8

1 8 .8 7

1 8 .9 5

1 8 .9 3

1 9.01

1 8 .9 6

1 9 .1 4

1 9 .3 2

1 9 .2 8

1 9 .4 5

1 9 .3 0

1 9.5 1

P e tr o le u m a n d c o a l p r o d u c ts ..................

2 1 .9 9

2 2 .0 8

2 2 .3 8

2 2 .1 9

2 2 .1 0

2 2 .4 5

2 2 .3 9

2 2 .3 9

2 2 .0 2

2 2 .1 5

2 2 .2 2

2 2 .1 1

2 2 .4 6

2 2 .4 8

2 2 .5 4

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s
1 2 .8 5

1 3 .3 9

1 3 .5 7

1 3 .6 9

1 3.71

1 3 .6 5

13.6 1

1 3 .6 8

1 3 .6 9

1 3 .6 6

1 3 .7 6

1 3.71

1 3 .7 4

1 3 .7 7

1 3 .7 6

1 0 .1 7

1 0.31

1 0 .2 0

1 0 .2 9

10.31

1 0 .3 5

1 0 .4 0

1 0 .3 9

1 0 .4 3

1 0 .2 7

1 0 .3 7

1 0 .2 7

1 0 .0 4

1 0 .0 8

1 0 .2 4

L e a t h e r a n d le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ................

TRANSPORTATION AND
PIIRI ID IITII ITIES.................................

1 6.21

1 6 .7 9

1 7 .0 5

17.1 1

1 7 .1 3

1 7 .1 2

1 7 .1 9

1 7 .2 6

1 7 .1 8

1 7 .2 4

1 7 .2 8

1 7 .2 6

1 7 .4 0

1 7 .3 8

1 7 .4 6

1 1 .5 8

1 1 .7 5

1 1 .7 0

1 1 .7 2

1 5 .2 2

1 5 .8 6

1 1 .4 5

1 1 .4 7

1 1 .5 7

1 1 .5 8

1 1 .5 7

1 1 .5 8

1 1 .5 4

1 1 .5 7

1 1 .5 2

9 .4 6

9 .7 7

9 .9 1

9 .8 9

9 .9 6

9 .9 5

9 .9 8

1 0 .0 0

9 .9 8

1 0 .0 0

9 .9 8

1 0.0 1

1 0 .1 5

1 0 .1 3

1 0 .1 3

AND REAL ESTATE...............................

1 5 .1 4

1 5 ,8 0

1 5 .9 7

1 6 .1 4

1 6 .0 7

1 6 .1 3

1 6 .1 7

1 6 .2 3

1 6 .1 8

1 6 .2 7

1 6 .2 5

1 6.31

1 6 .5 7

1 6 .5 2

1 6 .7 0

SERVICES....................................................

1 3 .9 3

1 4 .6 7

1 4 .9 9

1 5 .1 5

1 5 .1 4

1 5 .1 7

1 5 .1 6

1 5 .1 6

1 5 .1 2

1 5 .0 8

1 5 .0 2 I

1 5 .0 5

1 5 .3 6

1 5 .3 9

1 5 .4 9

WHOL FfiALE TRADE................................
RFTAIL TRADE..........................................
FINANCE, INSURANCE,

p = p r e lim in a r y .
NO TE : S e e " N o t e s o n t h e d a ta " f o r a d e s c r ip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a r k re v is io n .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

69

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

16. A verage w eekly earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers on private nonfarm payrolls, by industry
Industry

Annual average
2000

2001

$ 4 7 4 .3 8

$ 4 8 9 .7 4

2001
Nov.

2002
Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

$ 4 9 7 .9 9

$ 5 0 0 .2 5

$ 5 0 9 .4 0

$ 5 0 1 .0 3

5 0 1 .3 7

5 0 2 .4 0

5 0 5 .5 8

5 0 1 .8 4

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.p

Nov.p

$ 5 0 5 .6 8

$ 5 1 4 .7 4

$ 5 0 8 .7 3

$ 5 0 8 .6 4

5 0 5 .7 0

5 0 7 .8 7

5 0 9 .2 4

5 1 0 .6 1

PRIVATE SECTOR
C u r r e n t d o lla r s ....................................
S e a s o n a lly a d ju s t e d ...................

$ 4 9 4 .3 6

$ 5 0 2 .9 3

$ 4 9 2 .2 4

4 9 5 .1 3

4 9 6 .5 0

4 9 7 .1 8

4 9 9 .6 8

5 0 0 .6 9

$ 4 9 7 .3 1

$ 4 9 7 .3 1

I

C o n s ta n t (1 9 8 2 ) d o lla r s ...............

2 7 2 .1 6

2 7 3 .4 5

2 7 5 .7 2

2 8 1 .9 1

2 7 5 .4 6

2 7 7 .3 6

2 7 5 .8 2

2 7 4 .5 3

2 7 5 .7 7

2 8 0 .6 6

2 7 5 .7 5

2 7 7 .5 4

2 8 1 .7 4

2 7 7 .8 3

2 7 7 .7 9

MINING...............................................

7 4 3 .0 4

7 6 3 .8 6

.7 6 4 .2 7

7 7 1 .7 6

7 5 4 .9 6

7 6 1 .9 0

7 5 7 .0 7

7 5 0 .4 8 .

7 6 6 .3 7

7 6 7 .7 8

7 6 3 .6 8

7 6 8 .6 1

7 6 8 .9 6

7 6 6 .7 5

7 6 7 .4 8

CONSTRUCTION.............................

7 0 2 .6 8

7 2 0 .7 6

7 2 4 .9 1

7 1 9 .5 7

7 1 4 .5 6

7 1 6 .8 7

7 1 6 .5 4

7 2 3 .6 9

7 2 8 .1 3

7 4 0 .2 3

7 4 0 .8 8

7 4 9 .3 2

7 5 4 .4 5

7 4 5 .6 8

7 4 5 .4 2

MANUFACTURING
C u r r e n t d o lla r s ...................................

5 9 8 .2 1

6 0 3 .5 8

6 1 3 .3 5

6 2 5 .0 0

6 1 2 .0 6

6 1 0 .9 5

6 2 0 .0 4

6 2 0 .1 6

6 2 2 .9 1

6 3 1 .0 6

6 1 4 .9 8

6 2 9 .6 5

6 3 6 .0 2

6 3 0 .6 8

C o n s t a n t (1 9 8 2 ) d o lla r s .................

6 3 4 .6 8

3 4 3 .2 1

3 3 7 .0 1

3 4 2 .0 8

3 5 0 .3 4

3 4 2 .5 1

3 4 0 .7 4

3 4 3 .8 9

3 4 1 .8 7

3 4 3 .3 9

3 4 7 .6 9

3 3 8 .4 6

3 4 5 .5 8

3 4 8 .1 2

3 4 4 .6 3

3 4 6 .6 3

Durable goods............................

6 2 3 .9 2

6 2 6 .4 8

6 3 6 .0 0

6 5 1 .4 6

6 3 6 .8 9

6 3 7 .7 0

6 4 5 .5 2

6 4 6 .7 6

6 4 9 .1 5

6 5 6 .3 6

6 3 4 .2 3

6 5 4 .5 3

6 6 2 .6 1

6 5 8 .7 4

6 6 0 .4 4

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p r o d u c t s .......

4 8 9 .1 3

4 9 7 .7 6

5 0 7 .1 6

5 0 7 .9 8

4 9 3 .9 6

4 9 5 .6 0

5 0 3 .8 8

5 0 4 .3 0

5 1 0 .8 7

5 2 0 .0 0

5 1 7 .0 4

5 1 9 .1 4

5 2 6 .6 7

F u r n itu r e a n d f ix t u r e s ....................

5 2 0 .3 8

5 1 2 .4 1

4 6 9 .2 0

4 7 7 .3 6

4 8 5 .5 5

5 0 1 .1 4

5 0 4 .4 0

5 0 1 .0 8

5 0 9 .0 9

5 0 4 .8 6

5 0 8 .5 9

4 4 9 .4 9

5 1 6 .0 3

5 1 9 .7 9

5 0 3 .0 0

5 0 4 .5 0

p r o d u c t s ...........................................

6 2 6 .2 4

6 5 4 .0 0

6 6 2 .6 9

6 4 9 .3 0

6 4 5 .6 2

6 4 6 .2 4

6 4 5 .6 2

6 6 7 .7 3

6 7 5 .8 3

6 8 7 .3 1

6 8 2 .5 9

6 8 4 .4 3

6 9 9 .7 7

6 9 3 .1 8

P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s t r ie s ..............

6 7 6 .0 8

7 3 7 .2 6

7 3 7 .7 1

7 4 8 .2 2

7 6 3 .2 4

7 4 6 .0 3

7 4 6 .0 3

7 5 8 .5 2

7 6 2 .4 5

7 6 7 .3 1

7 8 2 .2 1

7 6 9 .1 2

7 7 4 .8 1

7 8 0 .5 3

7 8 3 .6 5

7 9 4 .2 8

s te e l p r o d u c t s ..............................

9 1 1 .7 2

9 1 0 .2 9

9 1 5 .2 4

9 0 9 .4 8

9 0 7 .4 3

9 1 5 .9 7

9 3 3 .8 3

9 3 7 .2 6

9 5 1 .0 2

9 7 2 .7 8

9 6 5 .0 1

9 5 7 .2 2

9 7 2 .5 4

9 6 6 .9 2

9 9 1 .4 4

F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c t s .........

5 9 0 .8 6

5 8 9 .9 5

5 9 6 .9 9

6 1 4 .4 3

6 0 0 .2 8

5 9 7 .8 1

6 0 7 .3 6

6 0 6 .9 2

6 1 1 .9 5

6 1 9 .2 9

5 9 9 .0 1

6 1 4 .0 4

6 2 0 .1 2

6 2 0 .3 1

6 2 0 .8 4

6 5 6 .2 1

6 4 5 .1 3

6 4 8 .0 2

6 6 7 .4 9

6 5 7 .2 9

6 5 8 .1 0

6 6 3 .8 2

6 6 0 .1 5

6 6 5 .4 5

6 6 9 .1 2

6 5 8 .8 0

6 7 1 .9 3

6 7 6 .4 6

6 6 7 .8 1

6 7 3 .1 5

e q u ip m e n t .......................................

5 6 7 .1 8

5 7 1 .6 9

5 8 7 .7 6

6 0 3 .2 9

5 7 3 .6 0

5 7 6 .6 3

5 8 8 .2 4

5 8 1 .4 2

5 8 2 .9 8

5 9 2 .5 8

5 7 1 .9 0

5 8 4 .3 3

5 8 9 .9 6

T r a n s p o r t a tio n e q u ip m e n t ...........

5 8 0 .2 0

5 9 2 .3 1

8 0 0 .7 3

7 9 8 .6 1

8 1 8 .7 3

8 4 1 .6 2

8 2 7 .8 1

8 2 5 .0 1

8 3 5 .1 3

8 4 4 .2 7

8 4 2 .9 9

8 4 7 .2 8

7 8 0 .6 1

8 4 8 .0 2

8 6 3 .7 2

8 6 7 .2 4

8 7 0 .9 0

8 3 4 .2 8

8 2 8 .3 8

8 5 6 .2 8

8 9 2 .4 0

8 7 1 .5 6

8 6 8 .1 7

8 8 3 .9 6

9 0 7 .8 8

9 0 5 .6 3

9 1 0 .0 9

8 1 0 .1 6

9 1 4 .9 2

9 3 1 .9 5

9 3 9 .4 0

9 4 5 .9 5

5 0 6 3 1 /5 0

S to n e , c la y , a n d g la s s

B la s t f u r n a c e s a n d b a s ic

In d u s tr ia l m a c h in e r y a n d
e q u ip m e n t ......................................
E le c tr o n ic a n d o th e r e le c tr ic a l

M o to r v e h ic le s a n d
e q u ip m e n t .....................................
In s tr u m e n ts a n d r e la te d
p r o d u c t s ...........................................
M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu r in g ....

5 9 5 .9 6

6 0 5 .7 3

6 1 1 .1 8

6 2 3 .2 2

6 1 2 .6 5

6 1 1 .5 5

6 1 6 .9 0

6 0 7 .4 2

6 0 7 .4 2

6 2 0 .7 4

6 0 9 .6 0

6 2 0 .3 7

6 2 8 .3 2

6 2 8 .8 2

6 2 9 .7 6

4 5 3 .5 7

4 6 0 .8 6

4 6 1 .8 9

4 7 7 .0 2

4 6 9 .7 4

4 7 3 .2 0

4 8 3 .2 1

4 7 9 .5 7

4 7 9 .9 6

4 8 5 .0 6

4 6 8 .6 3

4 7 9 .4 9

4 8 0 .1 8

4 8 3 .5 3

4 8 2 .8 9

Nondurable goods....................

5 5 8 .5 5

5 7 0 .6 5

5 8 0 .1 4

5 8 8 .1 2

5 7 5 .9 1

5 7 4 .4 6

5 8 1 .2 9

5 8 2 .6 5

5 8 6 .3 7

5 9 2 .7 6

5 8 7 .6 0

5 9 2 .7 6

5 9 7 .8 8

5 9 0 .8 0

5 9 7 .2 3

F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s .........

5 2 1 .2 5

5 2 9 .7 8

5 4 4 .9 6

5 4 6 .5 6

5 3 3 .4 8

5 2 3 .2 0

5 3 3 .1 7

5 3 3 .7 9

5 4 3 .2 5

5 5 0 .2 1

5 4 6 .9 4

5 5 3 .4 3

5 5 4 .2 7

5 4 7 .7 2

T o b a c c o p r o d u c t s ............................

5 5 4 .7 6

8 7 7 .9 0

8 5 1 .4 0

8 6 2 .6 9

8 8 0 .4 4

8 5 4 .7 6

8 8 1 .4 3

9 1 2 .2 8

9 3 2 .5 2

9 6 2 .8 5

9 8 3 .9 0

9 8 2 .6 1

8 3 9 .4 5

8 2 8 .5 2

8 2 9 .8 6

T e x tile m ill p r o d u c t s .......................

8 2 4 .1 6

4 5 9 .7 9

4 5 2 .8 7

4 5 0 .3 0

4 6 5 .8 7

4 6 5 .2 3

4 7 1 .4 1

4 8 3 .4 8

4 8 5 .8 1

4 8 6 .8 0

4 8 9 .8 1

4 8 0 .1 7

4 9 4 .6 8

4 8 9 .7 0

4 7 8 .9 9

4 8 5 .8 0

A p p a r e l a n d o th e r te x tile
p r o d u c t s ...........................................

3 5 1 .5 4

3 5 1 .7 4

3 5 1 .1 3

3 5 8 .0 8

3 5 0 .8 9

3 5 7 .5 8

3 6 8 .2 5

3 6 9 .4 0

3 6 9 .4 0

3 7 3 .1 3

3 6 2 .7 1

3 6 6 .1 6

3 6 4 .8 0

3 6 3 .2 7

P a p e r a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s ...........

3 6 9 .5 2

6 9 0 .6 3

7 0 1 .7 9

7 1 8 .5 4

7 2 4 .9 2

7 0 9 .9 5

7 0 5 .6 9

7 1 3 .4 3

7 1 7 .4 6

7 2 8 .4 2

7 2 7 .5 0

7 2 8 .7 0

7 3 0 .0 8

7 4 3 .4 9

7 3 0 .4 0

7 3 9 .5 4

P r in tin g a n d p u b lis h in g ..................

5 5 1 .5 2

5 6 4 .6 4

5 7 2 .5 4

5 7 6 .0 2

5 5 5 .3 7

5 5 8 .7 3

5 6 8 .5 1

5 6 0 .5 8

5 5 9 .8 6

5 6 3 .6 0

5 6 2 .0 7

5 7 3 .8 0

5 8 2 .1 6

5 7 7 .5 6

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p r o d u c ts ..

5 8 1 .3 9

7 7 1 .3 8

7 8 7 .2 0

7 9 3 .7 4

8 0 0 .5 1

7 9 0 .6 5

7 9 0 .2 2

7 9 3 .1 7

7 9 4 .6 2

8 0 0 .1 1

8 1 5 .3 6

8 0 9 .5 1

8 1 9 .4 0

8 3 0 .5 2

8 0 8 .6 7

P e tro le u m a n d c o a l p r o d u c ts ....

8 2 3 .3 2

9 3 2 .8 0

9 4 5 .0 2

9 3 9 .9 6

9 3 4 .2 0

9 3 2 .7 8

9 3 8 .4 1

9 2 0 .2 3

9 0 0 .2 3

8 8 7 .4 1

9 1 7 .0 1

9 2 8 .8 0

9 0 4 .3 0

9 6 8 .0 3

9 4 8 .6 6

9 48 93

p la s tic s p r o d u c t s ...........................

5 3 1 .9 9

5 4 4 .9 7

5 5 3 .6 6

5 6 8 .1 4

5 5 5 .2 6

5 5 6 .9 2

5 5 9 .3 7

5 6 4 .9 8

5 6 4 .0 3

5 6 9 .6 2

5 5 4 .5 3

5 6 3 .4 8

5 6 4 .7 1

L e a th e r a n d le a t h e r p r o d u c ts ....

5 6 3 .1 9

5 61 41

3 8 1 .7 5

3 7 4 .2 5

3 7 6 .3 8

3 8 0 .7 3

3 7 8 .3 8

3 8 0 .8 8

3 8 6 .8 8

3 8 8 .5 9

3 8 2 .7 8

3 8 4 .1 0

3 7 3 .3 2

3 6 9 .7 2

3 5 8 .4 3

3 6 7 .9 2

3 8 1 .9 5

TRANSPORTATION AND
PUBLIC UTILITIES........................

6 2 6 .0 9

6 4 1 .3 8

6 4 6 .2 0

6 6 0 .4 5

6 4 4 .0 9

6 4 8 .8 5

6 5 1 .5 0

6 5 4 .1 5

6 5 7 .9 9

6 6 8 .9 1

6 6 3 .5 5

6 6 7 .9 6

6 7 6 .8 6

6 6 5 .6 5

6 7 0 .4 6

WHOLESALE TRADE.....................

5 8 5 .2 0

6 0 5 .8 5

6 1 1 .2 7

6 2 7 .3 3

6 0 8 .9 6

6 1 5 .9 8

6 1 4 .5 5

6 1 5 .4 0

6 1 5 .8 6

6 3 0 .6 3

6 1 6 .6 3

6 2 3 .3 2

6 3 6 .4 0

6 2 4 .0 0

6 2 9 .4 8

RETAIL TRADE.................................

2 7 3 .3 9

2 8 2 .3 5

2 8 2 .4 4

2 8 9 .7 8

2 7 9 .8 8

2 8 4 .5 7

2 8 6 .4 3

2 8 7 .0 0

2 8 9 .4 2

2 9 7 .0 0

2 9 5 .4 1

2 9 5 .3 0

2 9 5 .3 7

2 9 2 .7 6

2 9 2 .7 6

FINANCE, INSURANCE,
AND REAL ESTATE.....................

5 4 7 .0 4

5 7 0 .3 8

5 7 3 .3 2

5 9 2 .3 4

5 7 5 .3 1

5 8 2 .2 9

5 8 0 .5 0

5 8 1 .0 3

5 7 7 .6 3

5 9 7 .1 1

5 8 1 .7 5

5 8 8 .7 9

6 0 8 .1 2

5 9 1 .4 2

5 9 9 .5 3

SERVICES..........................................

4 5 4 .8 6

4 7 9 .7 1

4 8 7 .1 8

4 9 8 .4 4

4 8 7 .5 1

4 9 3 .0 3

4 9 2 .7 0

4 9 1 .1 8

4 8 9 .8 9

4 9 7 .6 4 1

4 8 9 .6 5

4 9 3 .6 4

5 0 5 .3 4

5 0 1 .7 1

5 0 4 .9 7

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s

p = p r e lim in a r y .
NO TE : S e e " N o t e s o n th e d a t a " f o r a d e s c r ip tio n o f th e m o s t r e c e n t b e n c h m a r k r e v is io n . D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

Digitized
FRASER Labor Review
70 for Monthly
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

17.

Diffusion indexes of employment change, seasonally adjusted

[In percent]
Jan.

Timespan and year

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

Dec.

Nov

Oct.

Sept.

Aug.

July

June

May

Private nonfarm payrolls, 356 Industries
O v e r 1-m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 8 ...........................................................

6 2 .4

5 7 .5

5 9.1

6 0 .2

5 7 .5

5 6 .8

5 4 .6

5 9.1

57.2

5 3 .0

5 7 .9

5 6 .8

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

5 5 .3

5 8 .6

5 3 .6

5 8 .4

5 5 .5

5 7 .8

57.1

5 4 .8

57.1

5 7 .2

6 0 .4

5 8.1

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

5 5 .9

5 7 .5

5 7 .9

5 1 .2

50.1

5 5 .8

5 7 .8

5 1 .4

5 2 .4

5 2 .4

5 3 .2

5 2 .7

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

4 9 .4

4 5 .7

5 0 .3

4 2 .4

4 7 .3

4 3 .2

4 4 .5

4 2 .5

4 2 .4

4 0 .5

3 9 .3

4 4 .1

2 0 0 2 ...........................................................

4 7 .3

4 1 .4

4 9 .7

4 7 .8

5 0 .9

4 9 .4

4 8 .6

4 8 .8

4 9 .3

4 9 .9

4 7 .7

-

O v e r 3 - m o n th s p a n :
........................................................

6 5 .3

6 6 .3

6 5 .3

6 5 .9

6 2 .7

5 8 .2

5 8 .9

5 9.1

5 9 .8

5 7 .9

57.1

5 8 .8

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

5 9 .2

5 7 .6

5 9 .5

5 5 .2

6 0 .2

5 7 .2

5 9 .4

5 9 .2

5 9 .7

5 8 .9

6 1 .2

6 0 .7

2 0 0 0 ............................................................

6 0 .4

6 1 .4

5 9 .4

5 3 .2

5 2 .4

5 5 .5

5 6 .6

5 6 .2

5 1 .2

5 1 .0

5 3 .2

5 1 .6

2001

....................................................

4 5 .5

46.1

4 0 .8

4 3 .4

3 7 .8

4 3 .2

3 9 .3

3 8 .0

3 5 .3

3 3 .7

3 6 .3

3 8 .9

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

4 0.1

4 3 .2

4 2 .5

4 6 .5

4 8 .0

5 0.1

47.1

4 5.1

4 8.1

4 5 .5

-

-

5 8 .4

1998

O v e r 6 -m o n th s p a n :
1 9 9 8 .........................................................

7 0 .2

6 7 .4

6 4 .7

6 1 .5

64.1

6 2.1

59.1

5 8 .8

5 7 .5

6 0 .2

5 9 .2

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

6 0 .2

5 8 .9

5 8 .5

5 9 .7

5 7 .2

6 0 .8

6 1 .2

6 2 .5

6 2 .7

6 1 .8

6 1 .2

6 2 .8

2000

.......................................................

6 1.1

5 9 .4

58.1

5 7 .9

5 4 .2

5 2 .4

5 2 .9

5 4 .2

5 2 .4

4 8 .7

4 5 .7

4 6 .5

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

4 4 .7

4 2 .7

3 9 .5

40.1

4 0 .8

3 5 .8

3 7 .0

3 2 .4

3 4 .3

33.1

3 4.1

3 5 .6

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

3 7 .0

4 1 .6

4 3 .4

4 4 .4

4 6 .5

4 6 .0

4 6 .8

4 4 .7

-

-

-

-

5 8 .9

O v e r 1 2 - m o n th s p a n :
.......................................................

6 9 .9

6 7 .9

6 7 .6

6 5 .6

6 4.1

6 2 .7

6 1 .7

6 2 .2

6 0 .8

5 9 .4

6 0 .8

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

6 1 .2

60.1

5 8 .2

6 1 .0

6 0 .7

6 1 .6

6 2 .2

61.1

6 3 .8

6 2 .2

5 9 .7

6 0 .5

2000

...................................................

6 1 .4

5 9 .9

5 8 .8

5 6 .2

5 5 .3

5 3 .6

5 3 .0

5 1 .0

4 7 .7

4 5 .2

4 4 .5

4 2 .9

2 0 0 1 ............................................................

4 1 .5

4 1 .5

3 8 .9

3 7 .5

3 7 .3

3 6 .2

34.1

3 3 .6

3 4 .4

3 3 .9

3 3 .3

3 4 .4

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

3 5 .2

3 6 .0

3 7 .3

3 8 .5

4 0 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1998

Manufacturing payrolls, 139 industries
O v e r 1- m o n th s p a n :
......................................................

5 7 .0

5 2 .6

5 2 .2

5 2 .9

4 4 .9

4 7 .4

3 8 .2

5 2 .9

4 4 .9

3 8 .6

4 2 .3

4 1 .5

1 9 9 9 ............................................................

4 7 .4

4 1 .2

4 2 .6

4 6 .0

4 6 .3

4 3 .4

5 0 .0

4 2 .6

4 6 .0

4 5 .6

5 1 .5

4 9 .3

2 0 0 0 ...........................................................

4 4 .9

5 2 .2

4 9 .3

4 6 .0

4 9 .3

5 0 .7

5 7 .4

3 6 .8

3 9 .0

4 2 .3

4 7.1

4 0 .8

2 0 0 1 ...........................................................

3 4 .9

2 6 .8

3 8 .2

2 9 .0

2 8 .3

3 0 .5

3 4 .9

2 5 .7

3 1 .6

3 1 .3

2 5 .0

3 0 .9

2 0 0 2 ............................................................

3 5 .3

3 7 .9

4 0 .4

4 7 .4

4 7.1

4 0 .4

4 8 .9

4 1 .9

4 0.1

4 2 .3

4 1 .5

-

19 9 8

O v e r 3 -m o n th s p a n :
5 9 .2

5 7 .0

5 4 .8

5 1 .8

4 8 .2

3 8 .2

4 1 .9

4 3 .0

4 3 .0

3 8 .2

3 2 .7

4 0 .4

1 9 9 9 ...........................................................

3 9 .3

3 9 .3

3 9 .7

40.1

4 1 .2

4 3 .8

44.1

4 6 .3

4 2 .3

4 4.1

4 7 .8

4 5 .2

2000

................................................

48.2

4 8 .9

4 8 .9

4 4 .5

4 6 .7

5 2 .2

4 6 .0

3 8 .6

2 9 .0

3 4 .2

3 9 .0

3 6 .0

2 0 0 1 ...........................................................

2 1 .3

2 1 .3

1 8 .4

2 3 .5

1 9 .9

2 3 .2

1 7 .3

19.1

1 6 .2

1 8 .0

1 8 .4

1 8 .0

2002

2 4 .6

30.1

37.1

3 8 .6

4 0.1

4 1 .2

3 8 .6

3 4 .6

3 4 .6

3 2 .0

-

-

1 9 9 8 ...........................................................

6 0 .7

5 4 .4

4 9 .3

4 0.1

4 5 .2

4 2 .6

3 9 .0

3 8 .2

3 4 .6

4 1 .2

3 5 .7

3 3.1

1 9 9 9 ...........................................................

3 6 .4

3 6 .0

3 7 .5

4 0 .4

3 7 .5

4 2 .3

4 3 .0

4 4 .5

4 8 .2

4 3 .0

4 4 .5

4 7 .4

2 0 0 0 ...........................................................

4 7 .8

4 5 .2

4 4 .5

5 0 .0

4 1 .9

3 7 .9

3 6 .0

3 5 .3

3 2 .4

26.1

2 1 .3

2 1 .7

2 0 0 1 ...........................................................

2 0 .2

1 6 .9

1 4 .0

1 6 .2

1 6 .5

1 3 .2

1 4 .7

1 1 .8

1 4 .0

1 3 .2

1 7 .6

1 6 .5

2 0 0 2 ...........................................................

1 9 .9

2 6 .8

2 9 .8

3 8 .2

3 6 .4

3 4 .2

3 2 .4

2 8 .3

1 9 9 8 ...........................................................

5 4 .8

5 2 .2

5 1 .8

4 6 .7

4 0 .4

4 0 .1

3 8 .2

3 7 .5

3 6 .4

3 4 .6

3 5 .7

3 4 .2

1 9 9 9 ........................................................

3 8 .6

3 4 .6

3 2 .4

3 6 .0

3 7 .9

3 9 .0

40.1

4 0 .4

4 4 .5

4 4 .5

4 3 .4

4 4 .5

2 0 0 0 ...........................................................

4 9 .3

4 4.1

3 9 .3

3 6 .8

3 5 .3

3 4 .2

3 3 .6

2 8 .7

2 2.1

19.1

1 7 .6

1 4 .0

2 0 0 1 ...........................................................

1 3.6

13.6

1 3.6

1 5 .4

12.1

1 1 .0

11.C

1 1.0

12.9

1 2.9

1 4 .0

1 4 .0

2 0 0 2 ...........................................................

1 8.0

18.C

2 0 .2

1 9 .9

2 4 .3

-

1998

.......................................................

.................................................

O v e r 6 - m o n th s p a n :

-

O v e r 1 2 - m o n th s p a n :

D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .
NO TE:

D a ta fo r th e 2 m o s t r e c e n t m o n th s s h o w n in e a c h s p a n a re

F ig u re s a re th e p e r c e n t o f in d u s trie s w ith e m p lo y m e n t

in c re a s in g

p lu s

o n e - h a lf

e m p lo y m e n t, w h e r e

50

of

th e

-

in d u s trie s

p e r c e n t in d ic a te s

w ith
an

unchanged

e q u a l b a la n c e

p re lim in a ry . S e e th e " D e fin itio n s " in th is s e c tio n . S e e " N o t e s o n
th e

d a ta "

fo r

a

d e s c r ip tio n

o f th e

m ost

re c e n t

b e n c h m a rk

re v is io n .

b e tw e e n in d u s trie s w ith in c e a s in g a n d d e c r e a s in g e m p lo y m e n t.

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

71

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data

18. Establishment size and employment covered under Ul, private ownership, by Supersector, first quarter 2001
Size of establishments
Industry, establishments, and
employment

Total

Fewer than
5 workers1

5 to 9
workers

10 to 19
workers

20 to 49
workers

50 to 99
workers

100 to 249
workers

250 to 499
workers

500 to 999
workers

1,000 or
more
workers

Total all industries2
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

...............

7 ,6 6 5 ,9 6 8

4 ,5 2 6 ,0 6 2

1 ,3 0 4 ,7 4 1

8 5 8 ,6 0 6

5 9 8 ,4 3 8

2 0 8 ,0 8 4

1 2 1 ,1 8 9

3 1 ,1 4 9

1 1 ,6 7 8

6 ,0 2 1

1 0 8 ,9 3 2 ,8 0 4

6 ,8 8 6 ,7 5 2

8 ,6 3 3 ,3 3 7

1 1 ,5 8 8 ,2 2 0

1 8 ,1 0 4 ,0 6 1

1 4 ,3 2 3 ,0 6 0

1 8 ,1 5 8 ,2 7 6

1 0 ,6 1 1 ,5 5 6

7 ,9 1 7 ,0 6 5

1 2 ,7 1 0 ,4 7 7

1 2 7 ,9 6 9
1 ,5 6 6 ,1 0 4

7 4 ,6 4 4

2 3 ,3 0 4

1 5 ,1 6 9

9 ,5 0 1

2 ,9 3 5

1 ,7 0 0

499

167

50

1 1 0 ,9 4 2

1 5 4 ,1 9 9

2 0 3 ,8 4 5

2 8 5 ,4 8 6

2 0 0 ,3 6 0

2 5 4 ,3 5 8

1 7 2 ,0 1 1

1 0 9 ,9 7 3

7 4 ,9 3 0

7 6 5 ,6 4 9

4 9 4 ,2 5 4

1 2 7 ,0 1 7

7 5 ,9 8 3

4 7 ,2 3 0

1 3 ,5 9 1

6 ,0 4 0

1 ,1 7 6

293

65

6 ,4 8 1 ,3 3 4

7 1 4 ,9 9 2

8 3 2 ,9 7 8

1 ,0 2 0 ,9 8 2

1 ,4 1 0 ,1 3 1

9 2 5 ,1 7 8

8 9 0 ,2 8 2

3 9 0 ,6 3 0

1 9 7 ,1 4 6

9 9 ,0 1 5

Natural resources and mining
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h ................

Construction
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

...............

Manufacturing
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

...............

3 9 8 ,8 3 7

1 4 8 ,6 8 2

6 7 ,5 1 0

6 0 ,2 6 7

5 8 ,9 4 2

2 8 ,6 3 3

2 2 ,4 9 0

7 ,6 3 6

3 ,1 9 8

1 ,4 7 9

1 6 ,8 0 6 ,4 5 2

2 5 5 ,3 7 6

4 5 3 ,7 5 0

8 3 0 ,6 8 5

1 ,8 3 6 ,8 5 8

2 ,0 0 9 ,2 2 4

3 ,4 5 6 ,6 2 0

2 ,6 2 2 ,5 1 2

2 ,1 6 6 ,3 5 2

3 ,1 7 5 ,0 7 5

Trade, transportation, and utilities
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

.........

1 ,8 4 0 ,1 0 4

9 6 9 ,7 6 0

3 7 6 ,5 7 8

2 4 4 ,8 9 0

1 5 3 ,4 5 0

5 3 ,1 1 0

3 2 ,8 9 8

..........................

6 ,9 7 0

1 ,8 1 3

635

2 5 ,5 1 8 ,4 3 0

1 ,6 2 9 ,6 2 6

2 ,5 0 7 ,9 0 6

3 ,2 7 8 ,0 7 4

4 ,6 3 0 ,6 1 1

3 ,6 7 0 ,3 6 3

4 ,8 8 8 ,0 3 3

2 ,3 4 3 ,7 9 4

1 ,1 9 1 ,8 9 4

1 ,3 7 8 ,1 2 9

1 5 0 ,8 5 5
3 ,6 9 2 ,9 4 8

8 4 ,6 7 2
1 1 3 ,8 1 2

2 0 ,6 3 6
1 3 7 ,4 2 6

1 7 ,1 1 9
2 3 4 ,4 9 2

1 4 ,7 7 2
4 5 7 ,2 3 6

6 ,6 9 8
4 6 5 ,5 6 7

4 ,4 7 5
6 8 5 ,7 4 6

1 ,4 7 6
5 0 7 ,0 6 3

674
4 6 2 ,5 3 3

333
6 2 9 ,0 7 3

7 1 6 ,8 0 8

4 5 8 ,3 9 0

1 2 8 ,2 6 6

7 1 ,6 1 5

3 7 ,5 2 9

1 1,7 31

6 ,0 8 4

1 ,8 0 8

897

488

7 ,6 2 3 ,1 2 6

7 5 0 ,4 2 1

8 4 3 ,3 1 1

9 5 2 ,1 9 8

1 ,1 2 1 ,8 2 5

8 0 1 ,9 9 4

9 1 7 ,2 5 0

6 2 1 ,2 4 0

6 0 9 ,1 9 9

1 ,0 0 5 ,6 8 8

Information
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h ...............

Financial activities
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h

...............

Professional and business services
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a r te r .............
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h ...............................

1 ,2 3 8 ,2 6 7

8 2 5 ,6 1 7

1 7 3 ,7 7 3

1 0 7 ,6 9 4

7 3 ,8 0 7

2 9 ,1 3 9

1 9 ,4 0 5

5 ,6 5 4

2 ,1 7 7

1 ,0 0 1

1 6 ,4 4 1 ,2 8 9

1 ,1 7 0 ,0 9 8

1 ,1 4 0 ,7 7 2

1 ,4 5 1 ,9 3 2

2 ,2 4 5 ,7 2 9

2 ,0 2 2 ,7 4 5

2 ,9 5 1 ,8 7 3

1 ,9 3 3 ,6 6 8

1 ,4 8 0 ,8 7 8

2 ,0 4 3 , 5 9 4

1 ,6 9 0
1 ,1 7 8 ,7 2 7

3 ,5 2 6 ,9 4 3

Education and health services
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r .
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h ..................

6 7 9 ,7 6 2

3 2 1 ,4 2 8

1 5 5 ,3 3 3

9 6 ,1 2 1

6 1 ,0 9 7

2 2 ,7 8 9

1 5 ,9 8 9

3 ,7 2 1

1 4 ,7 1 2 ,8 2 9

6 0 3 ,4 7 0

1 ,0 2 7 ,9 1 3

1 ,2 9 1 ,6 0 5

1 ,8 3 6 ,7 9 9

1 ,5 8 9 ,8 0 9

2 ,3 8 3 ,4 4 3

1 ,2 7 4 ,1 2 0

1 ,5 9 4

Leisure and hospitality
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , f ir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h ...............

6 2 7 ,8 7 5

2 4 9 ,5 4 2

1 0 4 ,5 4 8

1 1 0 ,3 7 4

1 1 7 ,2 6 4

3 3 ,9 3 9

9 ,4 6 3

1 ,7 2 5

667

353

1 1 ,5 9 0 ,0 4 8

3 9 0 ,2 5 8

7 0 5 ,2 2 2

1 ,5 4 2 ,7 6 0

3 ,5 6 0 ,7 1 5

2 ,2 6 3 ,9 3 5

1 ,3 4 4 ,2 1 7

5 8 6 ,2 6 9

4 5 3 ,7 0 3

7 4 2 ,9 6 9

9 5 4 ,6 2 7

7 5 0 ,2 6 1
9 7 7 ,8 7 1

1 1 5 ,6 1 9

5 5 ,7 5 6

2 4 ,2 5 4

5 ,4 9 8

2 ,6 3 0

484

102

23

7 5 2 ,6 8 9

7 3 4 ,9 8 0

7 0 3 ,6 8 7

3 7 2 ,4 9 9

3 8 4 ,0 4 4

1 6 0 ,2 4 9

6 6 ,6 6 0

3 5 ,0 6 1

Other services
E s ta b lis h m e n ts , fir s t q u a rte r
E m p lo y m e n t, M a rc h ...............

4 ,1 8 7 ,7 4 0

1 In c lu d e s e s ta b lis h m e n ts th a t re p o rte d n o w o rk e rs in M a rc h 2 0 0 1 .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r u n c la s s ifie d e s ta b lis h m e n ts , n o t s h o w n s e p a ra te ly .


72 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

NOTE:

D e ta il m a y n o t a d d to to ta ls d u e to ro u n d in g .

D a ta r e fle c t th e m o v e m e n t o f

In d ia n T rib a l C o u n c il e s ta b lis h m e n ts fro m p riv a te in d u s try to th e p u b lic s e c to r.
N o te s o n C u r r e n t L a b o r S ta tis tic s .

See


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

19.

Annual data: establishments, employment, and wages covered under Ul and UCFE by ownership

Year

Average
establishments

Average
annual
employment

Total annual wages
(in thousands)

Average annual
wages
per employee

Average
weekly
wage

Total covered (Ul and UCFE)

1 9 9 2 .................................................................

6 ,5 3 2 ,6 0 8

1 0 7 ,4 1 3 ,7 2 8

$ 2 ,7 8 1 ,6 7 6 ,4 7 7

$ 2 5 ,8 9 7

$498

1 9 9 3 .................................................................
1 9 9 4 .................................................................

6 ,6 7 9 ,9 3 4

1 0 9 ,4 2 2 ,5 7 1

2 ,8 8 4 ,4 7 2 ,2 8 2

2 6 ,3 6 1

507

6 ,8 2 6 ,6 7 7

1 1 2 ,6 1 1 ,2 8 7

3 ,0 3 3 ,6 7 6 ,6 7 8

2 6 ,9 3 9

518

1 9 9 5 .................................................................

7 ,0 4 0 ,6 7 7

1 1 5 ,4 8 7 ,8 4 1

3 ,2 1 5 ,9 2 1 ,2 3 6

2 7 ,8 4 6

536

1 9 9 6 .................................................................

7 ,1 8 9 ,1 6 8

1 1 7 ,9 6 3 ,1 3 2

3 ,4 1 4 ,5 1 4 ,8 0 8

2 8 ,9 4 6

557

1 9 9 7 .................................................................

7 ,3 6 9 ,4 7 3

1 2 1 ,0 4 4 ,4 3 2

3 ,6 7 4 ,0 3 1 ,7 1 8

3 0 ,3 5 3

584

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

7 ,6 3 4 ,0 1 8

1 2 4 ,1 8 3 ,5 4 9

3 ,9 6 7 ,0 7 2 ,4 2 3

3 1 ,9 4 5

614

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

7 ,8 2 0 ,8 6 0

1 2 7 ,0 4 2 ,2 8 2

4 ,2 3 5 ,5 7 9 ,2 0 4

3 3 ,3 4 0

641

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

7 ,8 7 9 ,1 1 6

1 2 9 ,8 7 7 ,0 6 3

4 ,5 8 7 ,7 0 8 ,5 8 4

3 5 ,3 2 3

679

4 ,6 9 5 ,2 2 5 ,1 2 3

3 6 ,2 1 9

697

$493

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

7 ,9 8 4 ,5 2 9

1 2 9 ,6 3 5 ,8 0 0

Ul covered

1 9 9 2 .................................................................

6 ,4 8 5 ,4 7 3

1 0 4 ,2 8 8 ,3 2 4

$ 2 ,6 7 2 ,0 8 1 ,8 2 7

$ 2 5 ,6 2 2

1 9 9 3 .................................................................
1 9 9 4 .................................................................

6 ,6 3 2 ,2 2 1

1 0 6 ,3 5 1 ,4 3 1

2 ,7 7 1 ,0 2 3 ,4 1 1

2 6 ,0 5 5

501

6 ,7 7 8 ,3 0 0

1 0 9 ,5 8 8 ,1 8 9

2 ,9 1 8 ,6 8 4 ,1 2 8

2 6 ,6 3 3

512

1 1 2 ,5 3 9 ,7 9 5

1 9 9 5 .................................................................
1 9 9 6 .................................................................
1 9 9 7 .................................................................

6 ,9 9 0 ,5 9 4
7 ,1 3 7 ,6 4 4

3 ,1 0 2 ,3 5 3 ,3 5 5
3 ,2 9 8 ,0 4 5 ,2 8 6

2 7 ,5 6 7

530

1 1 5 ,0 8 1 ,2 4 6

2 8 ,6 5 8

551

7 ,3 1 7 ,3 6 3

1 1 8 ,2 3 3 ,9 4 2

3 ,5 5 3 ,9 3 3 ,8 8 5

3 0 ,0 5 8

578

3 ,8 4 5 ,4 9 4 ,0 8 9

3 1 ,6 7 6

609

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

7 ,7 7 1 ,1 9 8

1 2 4 ,2 5 5 ,7 1 4

4 ,1 1 2 ,1 6 9 ,5 3 3

3 3 ,0 9 4

636

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

7 ,8 2 8 ,8 6 1

1 2 7 ,0 0 5 ,5 7 4

4 ,4 5 4 ,9 6 6 ,8 2 4

3 5 ,0 7 7

675

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

7 ,9 3 3 ,5 3 6

1 2 6 ,8 8 3 ,1 8 2

4 ,5 6 0 ,5 1 1 ,2 8 0

3 5 ,9 4 3

691

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

7 ,5 8 6 ,7 6 7

1 2 1 ,4 0 0 ,6 6 0

Private industry covered
$ 2 5 ,5 4 7

$491

1 9 9 3 .................................................................

6 ,4 5 4 ,3 8 1

9 1 ,2 0 2 ,9 7 1

2 ,3 6 5 ,3 0 1 ,4 9 3

2 5 ,9 3 4

499

1 9 9 4 .................................................................

6 ,5 9 6 ,1 5 8

9 4 ,1 4 6 ,3 4 4

2 ,4 9 4 ,4 5 8 ,5 5 5

2 6 ,4 9 6

510

1 9 9 5 .................................................................

6 ,8 0 3 ,4 5 4

9 6 ,8 9 4 ,8 4 4

2 ,6 5 8 ,9 2 7 ,2 1 6

2 7 ,4 4 1

528

1 9 9 6 .................................................................
1 9 9 7 .................................................................

6 ,9 4 6 ,8 5 8

9 9 ,2 6 8 ,4 4 6

2 ,8 3 7 ,3 3 4 ,2 1 7

2 8 ,5 8 2

550

1 9 9 2 .................................................................

6 ,3 0 8 ,7 1 9

8 9 ,3 4 9 ,8 0 3

$ 2 ,2 8 2 ,5 9 8 ,4 3 1

7 ,1 2 1 ,1 8 2

1 0 2 ,1 7 5 ,1 6 1

3 ,0 7 1 ,8 0 7 ,2 8 7

3 0 ,0 6 4

578

7 ,3 8 1 ,5 1 8
7 ,5 6 0 ,5 6 7

1 0 5 ,0 8 2 ,3 6 8
1 0 7 ,6 1 9 ,4 5 7

3 ,3 3 7 ,6 2 1 ,6 9 9
3 ,5 7 7 ,7 3 8 ,5 5 7

3 1 ,7 6 2

611

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

3 3 ,2 4 4

639

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

7 ,6 2 2 ,2 7 4

1 1 0 ,0 1 5 ,3 3 3

3 ,8 8 7 ,6 2 6 ,7 6 9

3 5 ,3 3 7

680

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

7 ,7 2 4 ,9 6 5

1 0 9 ,3 0 4 ,8 0 2

3 ,9 5 2 ,1 5 2 ,1 5 5

3 6 ,1 5 7

695

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

State government covered

1 9 9 2 .................................................................

5 8 ,8 0 1

4 ,0 4 4 ,9 1 4

$ 1 1 2 ,4 0 5 ,3 4 0

$ 2 7 ,7 8 9

$534

1 9 9 3 .................................................................

5 9 ,1 8 5

4 ,0 8 8 ,0 7 5

1 1 7 ,0 9 5 ,0 6 2

2 8 ,6 4 3

551

1 9 9 4 .................................................................

6 0 ,6 8 6

4 ,1 6 2 ,9 4 4

1 2 2 ,8 7 9 ,9 7 7

2 9 ,5 1 8

568

1 9 9 5 .................................................................

6 0 ,7 6 3

4 ,2 0 1 ,8 3 6

1 2 8 ,1 4 3 ,4 9 1

3 0 ,4 9 7

586

1996

............................................................

62,146

4 , 191,726

1 31 ,605,800

31,3 97

604

1 9 9 7 .................................................................

6 5 ,3 5 2

4 ,2 1 4 ,4 5 1

1 3 7 ,0 5 7 ,4 3 2

3 2 ,5 2 1

625
646

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

6 7 ,3 4 7

4 ,2 4 0 ,7 7 9

1 4 2 ,5 1 2 ,4 4 5

3 3 ,6 0 5

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

7 0 ,5 3 8

4 ,2 9 6 ,6 7 3

1 4 9 ,0 1 1 ,1 9 4

3 4 ,6 8 1

667

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

6 5 ,0 9 6

4 ,3 7 0 ,1 6 0

1 5 8 ,6 1 8 ,3 6 5

3 6 ,2 9 6

698

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

6 4 ,5 8 3

4 ,4 5 2 ,2 3 7

1 6 8 ,3 5 8 ,3 3 1

3 7 ,8 1 4

727

Local government covered
1 9 9 2 .................................................................

1 1 7 ,9 2 3

1 0 ,8 9 2 ,6 9 7

$ 2 7 7 ,0 4 5 ,5 5 7

$ 2 5 ,4 3 4

$489

1 9 9 3 .................................................................
1 9 9 4 .................................................................

1 1 8 ,6 2 6

1 1 ,0 5 9 ,5 0 0

2 8 8 ,5 9 4 ,6 9 7

1 2 1 ,4 2 5

1 1 ,2 7 8 ,0 8 0

3 0 1 ,3 1 5 ,8 5 7

2 6 ,0 9 5
2 6 ,7 1 7

502
514

1 1 ,4 4 2 ,2 3 8

2 7 ,5 5 2

530

2 8 ,3 2 0
2 9 ,1 3 4

560

1 9 9 6 .................................................................

1 2 8 ,6 4 0

1 1 ,6 2 1 ,0 7 4

3 1 5 ,2 5 2 ,3 4 6
3 2 9 ,1 0 5 ,2 6 9

1 9 9 7 .................................................................

1 3 0 ,8 2 9

1 1 ,8 4 4 ,3 3 0

3 4 5 ,0 6 9 ,1 6 6

1 9 9 8 .................................................................

1 3 7 ,9 0 2

1 2 ,0 7 7 ,5 1 3

3 6 5 ,3 5 9 ,9 4 5

3 0 ,2 5 1

582

1 9 9 9 .................................................................

1 4 0 ,0 9 3

1 2 ,3 3 9 ,5 8 4

3 8 5 ,4 1 9 ,7 8 1

3 1 ,2 3 4

601

3 2 ,3 8 7

623

3 3 ,5 2 1

645

$ 3 5 ,0 6 6

$674

1 9 9 5 .................................................................

1 2 6 ,3 4 2

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

1 4 1 ,4 9 1

1 2 ,6 2 0 ,0 8 1

4 0 8 ,7 2 1 ,6 9 0

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

1 4 3 ,9 8 9

1 3 ,1 2 6 ,1 4 3

4 4 0 ,0 0 0 ,7 9 5

545

Federal Government covered (UCFE)
4 7 ,1 3 6

3 ,1 2 5 ,4 0 4

$ 1 0 9 ,5 9 4 ,6 5 0

1 9 9 3 .................................................................

4 7 ,7 1 4

3 6 ,9 4 0

710

1 9 9 4 .................................................................

3 ,0 7 1 ,1 4 0
3 ,0 2 3 ,0 9 8

1 1 3 ,4 4 8 ,8 7 1

4 8 ,3 7 7

1 1 4 ,9 9 2 ,5 5 0

3 8 ,0 3 8

1 9 9 5 .................................................................
1 9 9 6 .................................................................

5 0 ,0 8 3
5 1 ,5 2 4

2 ,9 4 8 ,0 4 6
2 ,8 8 1 ,8 8 7

1 1 3 ,5 6 7 ,8 8 1

3 8 ,5 2 3
4 0 ,4 1 4

731
741
777

1 9 9 7 .................................................................

5 2 ,1 1 0
4 7 ,2 5 2

2 ,8 1 0 ,4 8 9

1 9 9 2 .................................................................

1 9 9 8 .................................................................
1 9 9 9 .................................................................

4 9 ,6 6 1

2 ,7 8 2 ,8 8 8
2 ,7 8 6 ,5 6 7

2 0 0 0 .................................................................

5 0 ,2 5 6

2 ,8 7 1 ,4 8 9

2 0 0 1 .................................................................

5 0 ,9 9 3

2 ,7 5 2 ,6 1 9

NO TE:

D e ta il m a y n o t a d d to to ta ls d u e to ro u n d in g .

1 1 6 ,4 6 9 ,5 2 3

4 2 ,7 3 2

822

1 2 3 ,4 0 9 ,6 7 2

4 3 ,6 8 8
4 4 ,2 8 7

840
852

1 3 2 ,7 4 1 ,7 6 0
1 3 4 ,7 1 3 ,8 4 3

4 6 ,2 2 8
4 8 ,9 4 0

889
941

1 2 0 ,0 9 7 ,8 3 3
1 2 1 ,5 7 8 ,3 3 4

D a ta re fle c t th e m o v e m e n t o f In d ia n T rib a l C o u n c il e s ta b lis h m e n ts fro m p riv a te In d u s tr y to

th e p u b lic s e c to r. S e e N o te s o n C u r r e n t L a b o r S ta tis tic s .

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

73

Current Labor Statistics:

20.

Labor Force Data

Annual data: establishments, employment, and wages covered under Ul and UCFE, by State
A v e ra g e

A v e ra g e a n n u a l

T o ta l a n n u a l w a g e s

A v e r a g e w e e k ly

e s t a b lis h m e n t s

e m p lo y m e n t

(in t h o u s a n d s )

w age

S ta t e

20002 00 1

2000-

2001

2 00 1

change

T o ta l U n ite d S ta te s

2000-

200 1

2 00 1

change

2 00 1

2000200 1

2001

change

change

...........

7 ,9 8 4 ,5 2 9

1 5 4 ,5 4 0

1 2 9 ,6 3 5 ,8 0 0

- 1 8 5 ,7 7 9

$ 4 ,6 9 5 ,2 2 5 ,1 2 3

$ 1 0 9 ,8 8 4 ,9 2 0

$697

A l a b a m a ...................................

1 1 2 ,3 5 6

30

1 ,8 5 4 ,4 6 2

-2 3 ,5 0 0

5 5 ,8 2 2 ,0 9 7

1 ,2 8 4 ,0 8 8

579

21

A l a s k a .......................................

1 9 ,2 8 7

467

2 8 3 ,0 3 3

7 ,4 7 9

1 0 ,2 3 7 ,2 9 2

5 5 3 ,2 3 7

696

20

2 ,5 4 6 ,2 4 8

A r i z o n a .....................................

1 1 8 ,7 0 6

$18

2 ,2 4 3 ,6 5 2

2 2 ,9 4 2

7 4 ,9 6 3 ,0 7 2

643

16

A rk a n s a s ..................................

7 2 ,8 1 4

587

1 ,1 2 7 ,1 5 1

9 6 3 ,8 6 2

524

18

1 ,0 6 5 ,6 9 9

7 4 ,6 4 5

1 4 ,9 8 1 ,7 5 7

-3 ,7 3 1
1 3 8 ,2 8 4

3 0 ,7 2 5 ,5 9 2

C a l if o r n ia .................................

6 1 9 ,1 4 6 ,6 5 1

7 ,4 9 7 ,4 7 6

795

3

C o l o r a d o ..................................
C o n n e c t i c u t ............................

1 5 3 ,8 2 4

5 ,3 4 7
414

2 ,2 0 1 ,3 7 9
1 ,6 6 5 ,6 0 7

1 4 ,7 2 8
-9 ,1 2 1

8 3 ,5 4 7 ,6 0 2

2 ,2 7 4 ,6 6 9

1 0 8 ,2 0 1

7 8 ,2 7 2 ,0 9 9

2 ,0 9 5 ,2 4 3

730
904

29

D e la w a r e ..................................

2 5 ,2 5 3

505

4 0 6 ,7 3 6

482

1 5 ,6 2 9 ,6 3 6

7 8 7 ,0 6 7

739

36

3 ,5 4 6

15

D is tr ic t o f C o lu m b ia ............

2 8 ,4 1 4

9

6 3 5 ,7 4 9

-1 ,5 3 5

3 5 ,5 4 3 ,5 5 9

1 ,7 9 0 ,0 8 6

1 ,0 7 5

56

F l o r i d a .......................................

4 5 4 ,0 7 7

9 ,3 6 7

7 ,1 5 3 ,5 8 9

9 2 ,6 0 6

2 2 5 ,7 1 3 ,7 0 1

9 ,9 3 3 ,3 5 6

607

19

G e o r g i a ....................................

2 3 0 ,2 3 2

5 ,2 1 9

3 ,8 7 1 ,7 6 3

-1 0 ,9 4 1

1 3 6 ,0 3 9 ,4 3 8

3 ,1 9 5 ,9 2 6

676

18

H a w a i i .......................................

3 5 ,4 3 9

1 ,4 1 2

5 5 7 ,1 4 6

3 ,9 6 1

1 7 ,4 1 2 ,2 1 0

4 6 9 ,2 6 6

601

12

I d a h o ..........................................

4 6 ,4 8 0

1 ,0 8 4

5 7 1 ,3 1 4

8 ,1 3 7

1 5 ,8 6 4 ,5 1 0

2 6 3 ,8 3 2

534

1

I l l i n o i s ........................................

3 1 9 ,5 8 8

-2 ,7 2 3

5 ,8 8 6 ,2 4 8

-5 4 ,2 5 9

2 3 0 ,0 5 4 ,8 3 5

4 ,0 5 0 ,8 1 1

752

20

I n d i a n a ......................................

1 5 1 ,3 7 6

-1 ,3 2 8

2 ,8 7 1 ,2 3 6

-6 3 ,3 9 2

9 1 ,2 4 6 ,1 8 9

1 8 3 ,5 2 0

611

14

I o w a ...........................................
K a n s a s ......................................

9 1 ,0 0 6
8 0 ,5 2 1

-5 ,8 2 5
52

1 ,4 2 9 ,5 4 3
1 ,3 1 9 ,6 6 7

-1 3 ,4 3 2
5 ,9 8 4

4 1 ,2 2 3 ,5 3 4
3 9 ,7 9 2 ,1 1 4

9 1 9 ,4 9 2
1 ,2 2 1 ,3 8 7

555
580

18
15

K e n t u c k y ..................................

1 0 8 ,0 2 5

302

1 ,7 3 6 ,5 7 5

-2 6 ,1 6 0

5 2 ,1 3 3 ,4 1 7

1 ,3 6 7 ,0 2 8

577

L o u is ia n a ................................

1 1 5 ,8 0 7

1 ,8 6 9 ,9 6 6

827

5 4 ,4 7 3 ,1 4 6

2 ,3 4 5 ,8 7 1

M a i n e ........................................

4 6 ,2 0 6

-2 ,3 8 6
1 ,3 4 4

5 9 3 ,1 6 6

2 ,4 7 2

1 7 ,0 9 2 ,0 4 3

7 5 0 ,8 8 6

560
554

23
24
22

622

2 ,4 2 1 ,8 9 9

36

M a r y l a n d .................................

1 4 7 ,1 5 8

1 6 ,3 9 2

1 9 1 ,8 2 4

6 ,8 4 8

3 ,2 7 6 ,2 2 4

2 1 ,1 0 4

9 2 ,6 4 4 ,8 7 3
1 4 7 ,3 4 8 ,2 3 4

5 ,0 9 6 ,0 1 6
3 ,5 7 4 ,4 9 4

736

M a s s a c h u s e t t s .....................
M ic h ig a n ..................................

2 5 9 ,5 5 6

4 ,4 7 6 ,6 5 9

-1 0 7 ,8 8 0

1 6 7 ,3 8 5 ,1 2 9

- 2 ,2 9 5 ,1 5 8

719

16
7

M i n n e s o t a ...............................

1 5 6 ,0 3 1

5 ,8 0 9
487

2 ,6 0 9 ,6 6 9

1 ,3 2 5

9 5 ,4 7 9 ,1 8 8

3 ,1 0 7 ,3 9 6

704

23

M is s is s ip p i .............................

6 3 ,2 0 7

-7 4 8

1 ,1 1 1 ,2 5 5

-2 5 ,5 2 0

2 8 ,8 0 6 ,8 6 9

1 5 1 ,3 8 5

499

14

M is s o u r i ...................................

1 6 3 ,1 2 1

138

2 ,6 5 2 ,8 7 6

8 6 ,0 0 9 ,6 9 4

2 ,0 0 0 ,4 3 8

623

M o n t a n a ...................................

4 0 ,4 7 7

2 ,1 3 6

3 8 3 ,9 0 5

-2 3 ,9 6 0
4 ,8 6 2

9 ,6 7 2 ,3 7 1

4 7 2 ,1 1 2

485

19
18

N e b r a s k a ................................

1 ,5 1 6

865

5 2 ,6 5 3

836

6 4 6 ,7 4 5

1 ,7 7 0

2 5 ,9 1 9

3 4 ,5 6 9 ,5 0 6

1 ,7 1 7 ,0 6 3

546
637

13

4 9 ,6 3 5

8 8 3 ,9 2 0
1 ,0 4 3 ,7 4 8

2 5 ,0 8 3 ,2 9 3

N e v a d a ....................................
N e w H a m p s h ir e ...................

4 6 ,0 7 0

171

6 1 0 ,1 9 2

3 ,6 8 5

2 1 ,6 5 0 ,2 6 7

5 8 2 ,7 5 4

682

14

N e w J e r s e y ............................

2 5 6 ,5 3 6

- 1 3 ,7 9 3

3 ,8 7 6 ,1 9 4

-1 ,2 2 1

1 7 1 ,7 9 3 ,6 4 2

2 ,4 4 3 ,6 1 8

852

N e w M e x ic o ...........................
N e w Y o r k ................................

4 8 ,4 3 9

522

7 2 9 ,4 2 2

1 2 ,2 9 3

2 0 ,9 3 5 ,8 2 5

1 ,2 1 6 ,1 9 1

552

23

5 3 8 ,8 9 8

9 ,8 2 2

8 ,4 2 3 ,3 1 2

-4 7 ,4 4 6

3 9 3 ,5 9 8 ,6 6 6

9 ,3 8 3 ,3 4 6

899

27

616
494

19

N o rth C a r o lin a .......................

2 2 4 ,4 2 6

2 ,2 0 8

3 ,8 0 5 ,4 9 8

-5 7 ,2 7 2

1 2 1 ,8 6 6 ,0 0 7

1 ,8 5 8 ,8 7 2

N o rth D a k o t a .........................

2 3 ,3 2 6

38

3 1 1 ,6 3 2

2 ,4 1 2

8 ,0 1 1 ,0 8 5

3 7 8 ,5 1 0

O h io ...........................................

2 8 5 ,5 6 7

16

12

19

-7 7 ,8 6 5

1 8 0 ,8 8 5 ,1 5 4

1 ,6 8 1 ,2 9 9

640

15

9 0 ,6 0 3

4 ,7 0 5
1 ,5 7 4

5 ,4 3 4 ,7 6 9

O k la h o m a ...............................

1 ,4 6 3 ,6 2 2

1 1 ,7 7 1

4 1 ,0 0 4 ,2 5 0

1 ,8 2 1 ,7 4 3

539

20

O r e g o n .....................................

1 1 1 ,0 7 3

2 ,1 5 0

1 ,5 9 6 ,7 5 3

-1 1 ,1 7 5

5 3 ,0 1 8 ,3 6 5

3 1 7 ,0 9 8

639

9

P e n n s y lv a n ia ........................

3 3 1 ,4 0 5

1 6 ,1 8 7

5 ,5 5 2 ,3 6 6

-5 ,5 3 5

1 9 4 ,2 1 1 ,6 9 6

5 ,1 5 8 ,6 3 2

673

19

R h o d e I s l a n d .........................

3 3 ,6 3 6

311

4 6 8 ,9 5 2

1,3 5 1

1 5 ,7 5 8 ,3 6 9

5 0 7 ,6 1 0

646

19

S o u th C a r o l i n a .....................
S o u th D a k o t a ........................

1 1 4 ,9 7 9

5 ,6 1 3
221

1 ,7 8 6 ,8 9 9
3 6 4 ,7 1 5

-3 3 ,2 1 0
598

5 2 ,2 7 5 ,6 7 9

9 8 6 ,9 6 7

21

3 0 6 ,3 0 2

563
492

T e n n e s s e e .............................

1 2 5 ,1 6 5

140

2 ,6 2 5 ,7 4 6

-4 1 ,0 0 5

8 2 ,7 6 2 ,4 0 2

1 ,2 7 5 ,6 4 1

606

18

T e x a s ........................................

4 9 4 ,0 8 8

4 ,5 0 9

9 ,3 5 0 ,7 7 0

6 2 ,4 3 7

3 3 7 ,0 4 7 ,9 6 2

1 2 ,4 8 4 ,2 2 3

693

21

U ta h ...........................................

6 8 ,6 0 7

2 ,4 7 0

1 ,0 5 0 ,6 7 4

6 ,5 5 1

3 1 ,6 0 0 ,7 1 5

1 ,0 8 2 ,2 0 4

578

16

V e r m o n t ...................................

2 7 ,3 6 5

9 ,3 3 7 ,0 1 4

15

2 4 ,1 5 6

287

2 9 8 ,0 2 0

4 3 9 ,4 9 2

581

25

1 9 5 ,6 3 9

3 ,0 4 8

3 ,4 3 6 ,1 7 2

1 ,5 5 8
8 ,4 1 1

9 ,0 1 1 ,4 6 8

V i r g i n i a .....................................

1 2 6 ,2 2 2 ,3 5 0

5 ,6 6 2 ,7 7 9

706

30

W a s h in g t o n ............................

2 2 1 ,4 5 0

1 ,7 7 5

2 ,6 8 9 ,5 0 7

-1 4 ,9 2 1

1 0 0 ,7 4 6 ,6 6 3

4 1 3 ,7 4 0

720

7

W e s t V i r g i n i a .........................
W is c o n s in ...............................

4 6 ,6 2 0
1 4 8 ,2 2 7

-1 8 6
2 ,3 7 4

6 8 5 ,7 5 4

1 9 ,1 8 7 ,8 3 2
8 5 ,7 1 3 ,7 2 5

7 2 6 ,8 3 6
1 ,7 3 3 ,6 2 9

538
607

21

2 ,7 1 7 ,6 6 0

-8 4 5
-1 8 ,3 8 8

W y o m i n g .................................

2 1 ,2 8 8

429

2 3 7 ,2 7 8

6 ,4 4 6

6 ,6 5 4 ,0 9 2

4 5 9 ,5 9 6

539

23

P u e rto R i c o ............................

5 1 ,7 3 3

-6 3 3

1 ,0 0 7 ,9 1 9

- 1 8 ,2 3 4

1 9 ,8 8 4 ,3 8 1

5 7 8 ,1 7 3

V ir g in I s l a n d s ........................

3 ,2 3 6

-1 7

4 4 ,3 3 0

1,9 8 1

1 ,2 9 4 ,8 8 5

1 2 0 ,9 3 6

379
562

29

NO TE:

D e ta il m a y n o t a d d to to ta ls d u e to ro u n d in g .


74 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

17

17


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

21. Annual data: Employment and average annual pay for all workers
covered under Ul and UCFE in the 249 largest U.S. counties
Average annual pay

Employment
County1
2001

U n ite d S ta te s 4 ........................

1 2 9 ,6 3 5 ,8 0 0

Percent
change,
2000-2001 2

Ranked by
percent
change,
2000-20013

2001

Percent
change,
2000-20012

-.1

-

3 6 ,2 1 9

2 .5

3 5 ,4 5 3
3 7 ,0 8 9
2 9 ,5 0 2
2 9 ,9 7 9
3 7 ,9 9 8
3 5 ,6 8 9
3 0 ,6 9 0
3 2 ,2 6 1
4 6 ,4 8 9
4 4 ,7 4 4

4 .2
3 .5
3.1
3 .8
3 .7
1.6
5.1
4 .7
3.1
5 .7

J e ffe rs o n , A L .........................
M a d is o n , A L ............................
M o b ile , A L ................................
M o n tg o m e r y , A L ...................
A n c h o ra g e , A K .....................
M a ric o p a , A Z .........................
P im a , A Z ...................................
P u la s k i, A R .............................
A la m e d a , C A .........................
C o n tr a C o s ta , C A ................

3 8 0 ,6 8 0
1 5 6 ,1 6 9
1 6 7 ,0 0 0
1 2 9 ,8 7 8
1 3 3 ,8 4 2
1 ,5 6 1 ,7 7 3
3 2 6 ,9 1 7
2 4 0 ,7 5 4
6 9 7 ,1 8 1
3 3 7 ,4 4 4

-1 .0
1 .3
-1 .5
-.9
3.1
1 .2
-.6
-.7
-.1
.7

1 97
54
212
1 92
16
61
170
1 75
135
80

F re s n o , C A .............................
K e rn , C A ...................................
L o s A n g e le s , C A ...................
M a rin , C A .................................
M o n te re y , C A .........................
O ra n g e , C A .............................
P la c e r, C A ...............................
R iv e rs id e , C A .........................
S a c r a m e n to , C A ...................
S a n B e r n a rd in o , C A ............

3 2 2 ,0 8 4
2 4 2 ,2 3 2
4 ,1 0 3 ,3 7 0
1 1 1 ,9 3 9
1 6 6 ,1 8 6
1 ,4 1 1 ,9 4 4
1 1 6 ,1 8 5
4 9 1 ,5 3 5
5 8 8 ,4 2 6
5 4 5 ,1 1 3

-.1
1 .5
.6
1 .3
.8
1.6
6.1
4 .2
3 .0
2 .8

136
49
87
55
75
46
1
8
18
21

2 7 ,8 7 8
3 0 ,1 0 6
4 0 ,8 9 1
4 3 ,5 4 7
3 1 ,7 3 5
4 0 ,2 5 2
3 4 ,7 7 3
2 9 ,9 7 1
3 9 ,1 7 3
3 0 ,9 9 5

6 .5
5 .3
3.1
2 .2
5 .9
2 .6
4.1
2 .8
3 .8
3 .6

S a n D ie g o , C A .......................
S a n F ra n c is c o , C A ...............
S a n J o a q u in , C A ...................
S a n M a te o , C A .....................
S a n ta B a rb a ra , C A .............
S a n ta C la ra , C A ....................
S a n ta C ru z , C A .....................
S o la n o , C A .............................
S o n o m a , C A ...........................
S ta n is la u s , C A .......................

1 ,2 1 8 ,9 8 2
5 8 6 ,0 8 5
2 0 4 ,5 0 4
3 6 9 ,8 6 8
1 7 7 ,2 3 4
1 ,0 0 2 ,6 3 7
1 0 2 ,6 6 9
1 2 1 ,4 0 2
1 9 4 ,9 2 2
1 6 4 ,4 7 3

2 .0
-3 .3
1 .9
.1
.8
-2 .3
.9
3 .0
2.1
2 .2

37
246
39
1 20
76
233
64
19
32
30

3 8 ,4 1 8
6 1 ,0 6 8
3 0 ,8 1 8
6 2 ,2 8 8
3 3 ,6 2 6
6 5 ,9 3 1
3 5 ,0 2 2
3 3 ,4 9 6
3 6 ,1 4 5
2 9 ,5 9 1

2 .3
6.1
5 .3
-7 .2
3 .2
-1 3 .5
-2 .2
5 .7
1.1
4 .9

T u la re , C A ...............................
V e n tu r a , C A ............................
A d a m s , C O .............................
A ra p a h o e , C O ........................
B o u ld e r, C O ............................
D e n v e r, C O .............................
El P a s o , C O ............................
J e ffe rs o n , C O ........................
L a rim e r, C O ............................
F a irfie ld , C T ............................

1 3 2 ,8 7 8
2 9 3 ,2 0 8
1 4 6 ,0 4 3
2 8 5 ,9 6 3
1 8 4 ,7 5 5
4 6 1 ,9 9 6
2 4 0 ,1 0 0
2 1 0 ,3 7 5
1 2 1 ,8 8 0
4 2 1 ,2 1 1

.0
1 .5
.6
-.2
3 .2
-.6
.9
.1
2 .3
-1 .0

1 30
50
88
1 44
13
171
65
121
29
198

2 4 ,7 3 2
3 7 ,7 8 3
3 4 ,7 5 3
4 4 ,9 9 9
4 4 ,3 1 0
4 6 ,1 3 4
3 4 ,3 9 1
3 7 ,8 1 9
3 3 ,2 4 8
6 3 ,1 6 3

4 .2
1 .9
4 .0
-2 .7
-2 .8
4 .0
4.1
4 .5
2 .6
3 .3

H a rtfo rd , C T ............................
N e w H a v e n , C T ....................
N e w L o n d o n , C T ...................
N e w C a s tle , D E ....................
W a s h in g to n , D C ...................
A la c h u a , F L ............................
B re v a rd , F L .............................
B ro w a rd , F L ............................
C o llie r, F L ................................
D u v a l, F L .................................

4 9 7 ,2 8 0
3 6 3 ,2 6 5
1 2 4 ,6 8 4
2 8 2 ,3 1 8
6 3 5 ,7 3 4
1 1 9 ,1 4 8
1 8 4 ,7 2 5
6 6 3 ,9 5 4
1 1 0 ,2 3 0
4 3 6 ,6 6 3

-.5
-1.1
1.6
.2
-.2
.7
1 .7
2.1
5 .9
1 .8

1 63
201
47
1 12
145
81
43
33
2
41

4 5 ,0 5 0
3 9 ,4 8 3
3 8 ,5 0 5
4 2 ,8 4 9
5 5 ,9 0 9
2 6 ,9 1 7
3 2 ,7 9 8
3 3 ,9 6 6
3 0 ,8 3 9
3 3 ,7 2 1

3 .2
2 .9
4 .8
5 .8
5 .6
2 .9
2 .2
2 .2
2 .9
2 .9

E s c a m b ia , F L .........................
H ills b o ro u g h , F L ...................
L e e , F L .....................................
L e o n , F L ...................................
M a n a te e , F L ...........................
M ia m i-D a d e , F L ....................
O ra n g e , F L .............................
P a lm B e a c h , F L ....................
P in e lla s , F L .............................
P o lk , F L ....................................

1 2 1 ,2 8 5
5 9 5 ,7 6 8
1 7 1 ,9 0 2
1 42 ,9 8 1
1 1 8 ,7 8 8
9 9 3 ,8 3 4
6 0 2 ,6 6 8
4 9 9 ,6 8 8
4 4 8 ,7 8 8
1 84 ,4 7 1

.8
1 .8
4 .5
.9
5 .2
1.6
.2
3 .9
3 .3
.1

77
42
5
66
4
48
113
9
12
1 22

2 8 ,6 1 0
3 2 ,8 7 4
2 9 ,4 3 2
3 0 ,2 8 7
2 6 ,6 2 9
3 4 ,5 2 4
3 2 ,2 1 8
3 5 ,9 5 7
3 1 ,7 4 2
2 8 ,8 9 0

7.1
3 .7
4 .6
3 .5
4 .4
3 .6
3 .5
2.1
1 .5
3 .6

S a r a s o ta , F L ...........................
S e m in o le , F L .........................
V o lu s ia , F L ...............................
C h a th a m , G A .........................
C la y to n , G A ............................
C o b b , G A .................................
D e k a lb , G A .............................
F u lto n , G A ...............................
G w in n e tt, G A .........................
R ic h m o n d , G A .......................

1 4 7 ,2 0 6
1 4 5 ,1 4 7
1 4 2 ,4 7 8
1 2 2 ,6 0 8
1 1 4 ,9 8 2
3 0 1 ,5 2 0
3 0 5 ,9 0 3
7 5 4 ,8 7 0
2 8 9 ,5 3 8
1 0 4 ,6 9 4

4 .5
2 .2
-.2
-.2
-.3
-.1
-.7
.1
2 .9
-.9

6
31
1 46
147
151
137
1 76
123
20
193

2 9 ,0 3 0
3 1 ,9 5 1
2 6 ,0 6 4
3 0 ,5 4 9
3 8 ,3 0 1
4 0 ,1 7 4
3 9 ,6 4 8
4 7 ,7 6 1
3 9 ,4 0 5
2 9 ,4 3 1

1.9
3 .6
3 .9
3 .0
4 .2
3 .6
2 .7
1 .5
.9
2 .9

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

75

Current Labor Statistics:

Labor Force Data


76
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

21. Continued—Annual data: Employment and average annual pay for
all workers covered under Ul and UCFE in the 249 largest U.S.
counties
Employment
County1
2001

Average annual pay

Percent
change,
2000-2001 2

Ranked by
percent
change,
2000-20013

2001

Percent
change,
2000-20012

H o n o lu lu , H I ............................
A d a , I D .......................................
C o o k , I L ....................................
D u P a g e , I L .............................
K a n e , I L ....................................
L a k e , I L .....................................
P e o ria , I L .................................
S a n g a m o n , I L ........................
W ill, I L ........................................
W in n e b a g o , IL .......................

4 0 9 ,6 6 9
1 8 2 ,3 0 9
2 ,6 3 0 ,7 6 8
5 8 0 ,9 3 8
1 9 4 ,3 7 4
3 1 6 ,1 5 0
1 0 2 ,7 6 4
1 4 5 ,1 9 5
1 4 5 ,5 7 0
1 3 9 ,8 1 5

.4
2 .7
-1 .5
-.2
-.1
-.3
-1 .8
.2
.1
-2 .9

99
23
213
1 48
138
1 52
223
114
124
241

3 2 ,5 3 1
3 3 ,0 8 1
4 4 ,1 0 8
4 3 ,4 7 0
3 3 ,3 6 2
4 3 ,9 7 0
3 3 ,2 8 8
3 6 ,2 5 9
3 4 ,2 8 0
3 1 ,9 5 1

2.1
-4 .0
2 .8
2.1
3 .7
3 .2
6.1
4 .3
6.1
1 .4

A lle n , I N ....................................
E lk h a rt, I N ................................
L a k e , IN ....................................
M a rio n , I N ................................
S t. J o s e p h , I N ........................
V a n d e rb u rg h , IN ...................
L in n , IA .....................................
P o lk , IA .....................................
J o h n s o n , K S ...........................
S e d g w ic k , K S ........................

1 8 3 ,3 2 9
1 1 3 ,5 2 4
1 9 4 ,6 2 4
5 9 1 ,4 0 6
1 2 4 ,9 6 7
1 0 9 ,4 1 8
1 1 9 ,9 1 4
2 6 3 ,4 6 9
2 9 2 ,9 8 4
2 4 9 ,8 6 3

-2 .3
-6 .8
-1 .9
-1 .3
-3.1
.1
-1 .7
-.2
2 .4
.1

234
249
226
210
244
125
219
1 49
27
1 26

3 2 ,8 3 0
3 0 ,7 9 7
3 2 ,0 1 7
3 7 ,8 8 5
3 0 ,7 6 9
3 0 ,4 9 4
3 4 ,6 4 9
3 4 ,9 4 4
3 7 ,2 0 4
3 3 ,9 3 7

1 .7
1 .5
1 .4
3 .8
3 .7
3.1
1.6
3 .8
-.1
3 .8

S h a w n e e , K S .........................
F a y e tte , K Y .............................
J e ffe rs o n , K Y .........................
C a d d o , L A ................................
E a s t B a to n R o u g e , L A .......
J e ffe rs o n , L A .........................
L a fa y e tte , L A .........................
O rle a n s , L A .............................
C u m b e r la n d , M E ...................
A n n e A ru n d e l, M D ...............

1 0 0 ,4 6 2
1 6 7 ,7 1 4
4 3 1 ,3 4 7
1 2 0 ,8 7 7
2 4 3 ,3 9 2
2 1 3 ,9 1 1
1 1 9 ,2 9 4
2 6 3 ,4 2 7
1 6 8 ,1 4 7
2 0 0 ,1 7 4

.3
-2 .4
- 1 .7
1 .3
-1 .1
-.4
4 .5
.1
1 .3
2 .8

105
237
220
56
202
1 60
7
1 27
57
22

3 0 ,5 1 3
3 2 ,2 3 7
3 4 ,6 8 8
2 9 ,3 5 4
3 0 ,3 9 7
2 9 ,3 2 6
3 2 ,3 6 4
3 2 ,8 8 0
3 2 ,3 2 7
3 7 ,1 9 0

3 .9
5 .0
4.1
2 .0
3 .9
4 .6
8 .2
3 .7
5.1
4 .9

B a ltim o re , M D ........................
H o w a rd , M D ............................
M o n tg o m e r y , M D ..................
P rin c e G e o rg e s , M D ...........
B a ltim o r e C ity , M D ...............
B ris to l, M A ...............................
E s s e x , M A ...............................
H a m p d e n , M A ........................
M id d le s e x , M A .......................
N o rfo lk , M A .............................

3 6 0 ,1 2 8
1 3 2 ,9 3 5
4 4 9 ,8 8 1
3 0 4 ,0 2 2
3 8 1 ,1 5 5
2 1 8 ,8 1 8
3 0 6 ,1 1 1
2 0 4 ,8 2 4
8 5 0 ,2 9 5
3 2 7 ,0 6 7

.2
1 .3
.9
.5
.4
-1 .1
.2
.9
1 .4
.7

115
58
67
94
1 00
203
116
68
52
82

3 6 ,2 4 0
4 0 ,1 9 1
4 5 ,8 9 3
3 8 ,9 8 6
4 0 ,5 0 8
3 2 ,0 1 2
3 9 ,2 4 2
3 3 ,3 5 7
5 1 ,7 3 4
4 4 ,1 7 3

6 .2
6.1
5 .0
5 .2
5 .0
4.1
.5
3 .6
.0
2 .2

P ly m o u th , M A ........................
S u ffo lk , M A .............................
W o rc e s te r , M A .......................
G e n e s e e , M l ...........................
In g h a m , M l ...............................
K a la m a z o o , M l .......................
K e n t, M l ....................................
M a c o m b , M l ............................
O a k la n d , M l ............................
O tta w a , M l ..............................

1 6 6 ,4 7 1
6 0 2 ,9 8 3
3 2 1 ,0 4 4
1 6 0 ,4 4 2
1 7 4 ,2 9 0
1 1 6 ,7 2 8
3 3 9 ,5 1 0
3 2 6 ,6 0 0
7 5 5 ,4 5 1
1 1 5 ,8 8 0

.8
.1
.3
-3 .0
-.3
-1 .7
-1 .8
-3 .2
-1 .4
-2 .5

78
128
1 06
242
153
221
224
245
211
239

3 4 ,9 2 9
5 8 ,9 0 6
3 7 ,2 9 9
3 5 ,9 9 5
3 5 ,7 5 3
3 3 ,9 0 8
3 4 ,5 7 0
4 0 ,4 8 1
4 5 ,0 3 8
3 2 ,2 4 6

3 .4
4 .0
-.9
-.9
2 .3
3 .8
1 .7
-1 .0
1 .2
.9

W a s h te n a w , M l .....................
W a y n e , M l ..............................
A n o k a , M N ...............................
D a k o ta , M N .............................
H e n n e p in , M N ........................
R a m s e y , M N ...........................
H in d s , M S ................................
G re e n e , M O ............................
J a c k s o n , M O ...........................
S t. L o u is , M O .........................

1 9 5 ,5 6 2
8 4 8 ,4 6 3
1 0 9 ,5 2 1
1 5 5 ,6 6 2
8 6 3 ,6 7 4
3 3 3 ,3 8 0
1 3 4 ,2 8 5
1 4 0 ,7 3 9
3 8 4 ,9 4 2
6 4 1 ,1 5 1

.2
-2 .4
-.3
1 .3
-.8
.0
-.9
-.9
-2 .3
-.8

117
238
154
59
1 86
131
194
195
235
187

4 0 ,2 4 9
4 2 ,9 6 8
3 4 ,5 8 5
3 5 ,6 8 3
4 5 ,4 9 5
4 0 ,4 0 0
3 1 ,1 3 8
2 8 ,0 6 5
3 7 ,4 0 5
3 8 ,9 2 9

.2
1 .2
1.9
3 .8
3 .8
3 .4
1.8
4.1
3 .7
2.1

S t. L o u is C ity , M O ................
D o u g la s , N E ...........................
L a n c a s te r, N E ........................
C la rk , N V .................................
W a s h o e , N V ...........................
H ills b o ro u g h , N H .................
R o c k in g h a m , N H .................
A tla n tic , N J .............................
B e rg e n , N J ...............................
B u r lin g to n , N J ........................

2 4 5 ,1 9 2
3 2 5 ,6 2 9
1 4 8 ,2 0 0
7 2 0 ,1 8 4
1 9 3 ,5 7 1
1 9 2 ,7 1 2
1 3 0 ,9 1 7
1 4 1 ,2 4 0
4 5 3 ,6 2 6
1 8 7 ,3 9 8

-2 .2
-.7
.9
3 .2
2 .4
.0
.7
.9
1 .5
3 .6

231
1 77
69
14
28
1 32
83
70
51
11

4 0 ,8 3 4
3 2 ,8 6 6
2 9 ,3 5 2
3 2 ,6 4 8
3 4 ,2 3 1
3 9 ,3 2 0
3 6 ,6 4 2
3 2 ,5 5 5
4 6 ,8 2 8
3 8 ,7 7 6

5 .8
1 .6
2 .9
1 .6
4 .5
.3
2 .3
4 .8
1.1
3.1

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

January 2003


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

21. Continued—Annual data: Employment and average annual pay for
all workers covered under Ul and UCFE in the 249 largest U.S.
counties
Average annual pay

Employment
County'
2001

Percent
change,
2000-2001 2

Ranked by
percent
change,
2000-20013

2001

Percent
change,
2000-20012

C a m d e n , N J ............................
E s s e x , N J ................................
H u d s o n , N J .............................
M e rc e r, N J ...............................
M id d le s e x , N J ........................
M o n m o u th , N J .......................
M o rris , N J ................................
O c e a n , N J ................................
P a s s a ic , N J .............................
S o m e r s e t, N J .........................

1 9 9 ,8 6 9
3 6 1 ,5 6 9
2 3 7 ,2 5 3
2 1 5 ,5 2 4
3 9 9 ,3 3 2
2 4 0 ,7 5 7
2 7 7 ,6 5 3
1 3 3 ,6 5 7
1 7 5 ,1 0 8
1 7 6 ,7 1 3

.5
-.5
.0
2 .6
1 .3
3 .2
.4
3 .7
-1.1
1 .7

95
164
133
25
60
15
101
10
204
44

3 6 ,5 3 0
4 6 ,5 2 6
4 7 ,6 3 8
4 6 ,8 3 1
4 7 ,7 2 6
4 0 ,3 9 9
5 3 ,8 2 9
3 1 ,0 3 4
3 9 ,1 9 2
5 5 ,7 6 9

4 .0
4 .2
.4
4 .9
2 .7
1 .8
- 1 1 .0
1.9
3 .8
1 .8

U n io n , N J ..................................
B e rn a lillo , N M ........................
A lb a n y , N Y ...............................
B ro n x , N Y ................................
D u tc h e s s , N Y .........................
E rie , N Y ....................................
K in g s , N Y .................................
M o n ro e , N Y ............................
N a s s a u , N Y ............................
N e w Y o rk , N Y ........................

2 3 6 ,6 0 9
3 0 9 ,1 6 6
2 2 9 ,9 5 7
2 1 4 ,2 2 7
1 1 2 ,9 1 2
4 5 4 ,8 3 9
4 3 9 ,3 4 3
3 9 3 ,7 8 3
5 9 3 ,3 6 8
2 ,3 4 2 ,3 3 8

-.1
.7
-.5
.4
2 .5
-1.1
-.1
-.7
-.8
-1 .5

139
84
165
1 02
26
205
1 40
178
188
214

4 6 ,2 0 4
3 1 ,6 6 3
3 7 ,8 4 8
3 4 ,2 4 8
3 8 ,7 4 8
3 2 ,1 0 3
3 1 ,9 5 2
3 6 ,5 9 7
4 0 ,5 9 9
7 4 ,8 8 3

2 .0
4 .9
5 .7
4 .3
7 .4
1 .9
3 .9
3 .3
1 .4
3 .2

O n e id a , N Y .............................
O n o n d a g a , N Y .......................
O ra n g e , N Y .............................
Q u e e n s , N Y ............................
R o c k la n d , N Y .........................
S u ffo lk , N Y ...............................
W e s tc h e s te r , N Y ...................
B u n c o m b e , N C .....................
C u m b e r la n d , N C ...................
D u rh a m , N C ............................

1 0 8 ,6 8 6
2 4 9 ,7 5 4
1 2 0 ,9 0 3
4 7 8 ,6 6 1
1 0 7 ,3 4 8
5 8 1 ,9 3 8
4 0 4 ,9 7 4
1 0 5 ,3 7 8
1 0 6 ,3 8 1
1 6 9 ,6 0 9

-1 .8
-1 .1
.7
-.7
.4
.1
-.4
-.3
-2 .8
.3

225
206
85
179
103
129
161
155
240
107

2 8 ,3 8 1
3 3 ,4 6 9
3 0 ,2 1 8
3 6 ,9 6 3
3 8 ,7 2 0
3 8 ,7 0 6
4 8 ,7 1 6
2 8 ,7 0 1
2 6 ,9 8 1
4 8 ,0 7 6

4 .0
3 .0
2 .9
5 .7
3 .9
2 .2
3 .5
3 .8
3 .3
-2 .6

F o rs y th , N C ............................
G u ilfo r d , N C ............................
M e c k le n b u rg , N C .................
W a k e , N C ................................
B u tle r, O H ................................
C u y a h o g a , O H .......................
F ra n k lin , O H ...........................
H a m ilto n , O H .........................
L o ra in , O H ...............................
L u c a s , O H ................................

1 8 0 ,1 5 5
2 7 4 ,0 7 7
5 1 4 ,0 3 6
3 8 5 ,7 7 7
1 2 6 ,8 6 3
7 9 6 ,3 5 3
7 0 2 ,6 2 8
5 5 9 ,8 5 2
1 0 3 ,1 1 5
2 3 4 ,6 7 8

-.7
-2 .0
.3
.9
-.5
-1 .6
.2
-1 .1
-3 .5
-1 .7

1 80
229
108
71
166
217
118
207
247
222

3 4 ,6 9 3
3 3 ,2 1 7
4 1 ,7 7 5
3 6 ,9 9 6
3 2 ,3 2 5
3 7 ,5 3 3
3 6 ,0 9 0
3 8 ,3 3 9
3 2 ,1 9 4
3 3 ,0 8 8

2 .0
3.1
3.1
4 .6
2 .6
2 .8
3 .2
2 .0
.6
2 .6

M a h o n in g , O H .......................
M o n tg o m e r y , O H .................
S ta rk , O H .................................
S u m m it, O H ............................
O k la h o m a , O K .......................
T u ls a , O K .................................
C la c k a m a s , O R ....................
L a n e , O R ..................................
M a rio n , O R .............................
M u ltn o m a h , O R ....................

1 0 8 ,7 6 9
2 9 8 ,9 8 2
1 7 3 ,8 8 8
2 6 1 ,0 9 8
4 1 5 ,5 0 7
3 4 2 ,5 0 2
1 3 3 ,9 9 7
1 3 7 ,5 7 4
1 2 6 ,9 9 9
4 4 4 ,3 9 3

-3 .7
-1 .5
-1 .6
-2.1
.4
.6
-.2
-1 .9
-.6
-1 .1

248
215
218
230
104
89
150
227
172
208

2 6 ,8 6 0
3 4 ,7 8 3
2 9 ,1 9 7
3 3 ,4 1 6
3 0 ,1 6 1
3 2 ,7 7 1
3 3 ,6 9 9
2 8 ,9 8 3
2 8 ,7 8 5
3 7 ,6 6 8

3 .5
.7
2 .4
2.1
3 .2
5 .2
3 .7
4 .0
2 .4
2 .4

W a s h in g to n , O R ...................
A lle g h e n y , P A ........................
B e rk s , P A .................................
B u c k s , P A ................................
C h e s te r, P A ............................
C u m b e r la n d , P A ...................
D a u p h in , P A ...........................
D e la w a re , P A .........................
E rie , P A ....................................
L a n c a s te r, P A ........................

2 2 8 ,4 5 3
7 1 1 ,5 3 2
1 6 5 ,2 6 3
2 4 6 ,4 9 1
2 1 7 ,1 4 8
1 2 2 ,6 4 9
1 7 3 ,2 9 2
2 1 4 ,1 0 6
1 2 8 ,8 9 3
2 1 8 ,4 1 5

1 .4
.3
-.7
.6
.6
-.6
.3
1.0
-2 .3
-.3

53
109
181
90
91
173
1 10
63
236
156

4 2 ,2 2 2
3 8 ,0 8 6
3 2 ,8 0 7
3 5 ,2 3 9
4 4 ,2 1 6
3 3 ,9 9 6
3 4 ,8 5 5
3 8 ,4 9 4
2 9 ,2 9 3
3 1 ,4 9 3

-5 .0
3 .7
2 .5
3 .5
1.0
3 .6
3 .5
4 .5
3 .3
2 .2

L e h ig h , P A ...............................
L u z e rn e , P A ............................
M o n tg o m e r y , P A ...................
P h ila d e lp h ia , P A ...................
W e s tm o re la n d , P A ...............
Y o rk , P A ...................................
P ro v id e n c e , R l .......................
C h a r le s to n , S C .....................
G re e n v ille , S C .......................
R ic h la n d , S C ...........................

1 7 2 ,8 6 0
1 4 1 ,9 4 4
4 8 5 ,8 2 2
6 5 8 ,8 2 7
1 3 4 ,1 2 8
1 6 5 ,8 7 9
2 8 8 ,6 5 0
1 8 0 ,7 1 1
2 2 6 ,3 6 2
2 0 5 ,8 4 1

.2
-.8
.5
-.7
-.4
-1 .0
-.7
-1 .0
-3 .0
-.5

119
189
96
182
162
199
183
200
243
167

3 5 ,5 6 4
2 8 ,9 2 4
4 4 ,3 6 6
4 0 ,8 1 3
2 8 ,8 2 7
3 1 ,9 3 6
3 4 ,5 6 6
2 9 ,0 1 3
3 2 ,6 2 2
3 0 ,5 9 1

.8
3 .8
1 .3
2 .8
3 .0
3 .3
3 .5
4 .8
4 .3
3 .3

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

77

Current Labor Statistics:

Compensation & Industrial Relations

21. Continued—Annual data: Employment and average annual pay for
all workers covered under Ul and UCFE in the 249 largest U.S.
counties
Employment
County1
2001

Average annual pay

Percent
change,
2000-2001 2

Ranked by
percent
change,
2000-20013

2001

Percent
change,
2000-20012

S p a rta n b u r g , S C ...................
M in n e h a h a , S D .....................
D a v id s o n , T N .........................
H a m ilto n , T N ...........................
K n o x , T N ...................................
S h e lb y , T N ...............................
B e x a r, T X ..................................
C a m e ro n , T X ..........................
C o llin , T X ..................................
D a lla s , T X ................................

1 1 7 ,2 6 2
1 0 6 ,7 1 7
4 3 4 ,0 0 6
1 8 7 ,7 2 4
2 0 3 ,4 7 0
4 9 6 ,6 4 7
6 5 5 ,1 9 5
1 1 1 ,3 7 4
1 8 1 ,0 0 7
1 ,5 5 0 ,8 3 5

-2 .2
1.1
-.1
-.3
.6
-.5
.9
2.1
5 .7
-.6

232
62
141
157
92
168
72
34
3
174

3 1 ,8 5 6
2 9 ,2 0 5
3 5 ,5 0 9
3 1 ,2 4 0
3 0 ,7 6 5
3 5 ,7 9 1
3 1 ,0 3 2
2 2 ,1 4 2
4 1 ,3 3 8
4 4 ,9 0 9

4.1
3 .5
1.9
2 .2
2 .2
4 .2
3 .7
2 .7
2 .0
1.2

D e n to n , T X .............................
E l P a s o , T X .............................
H a rris , T X ................................
H id a lg o , T X .............................
J e ffe rs o n , T X .........................
L u b b o c k , T X ...........................
N u e c e s , T X .............................
T a rra n t, T X .............................
T ra v is , T X ................................
S a lt L a k e , U T .........................

1 2 2 ,5 5 2
2 4 8 ,4 0 7
1 ,8 6 4 ,1 0 0
1 6 8 ,6 1 0
1 1 8 ,7 6 4
1 1 8 ,0 4 2
1 4 3 ,4 7 0
7 0 9 ,1 6 2
5 3 4 ,8 6 1
5 3 0 ,4 9 7

.9
-1 .2
1 .7
3.1
-1 .9
2.1
.7
.5
-.7
-.1

73
209
45
17
228
35
86
97
184
142

3 0 ,7 8 8
2 5 ,8 4 7
4 3 ,7 5 1
2 2 ,3 1 3
3 2 ,5 7 0
2 6 ,5 7 7
2 9 ,4 0 6
3 7 ,2 8 7
4 1 ,6 9 8
3 3 ,2 1 0

5.1
3.1
4 .5
2 .8
4.1
1.1
4 .3
5 .2
.9
3 .2

U ta h , U T ...................................
A rlin g to n , V A ...........................
C h e s te rfie ld , V A ....................
F a irfa x , V A ...............................
H e n ric o , V A ............................
N o rfo lk , V A .............................
R ic h m o n d , V A ........................
V ir g in ia B e a c h , V A ...............
C la rk , W A ................................
K in g , W A ...................................

1 4 3 ,4 2 3
1 5 9 ,1 7 0
1 0 7 ,7 2 1
5 4 2 ,9 8 4
1 6 9 ,8 2 7
1 4 6 ,4 1 4
1 6 4 ,9 0 6
1 6 6 ,0 0 7
1 1 4 ,7 1 6
1 ,1 4 6 ,1 9 1

.5
.3
-.1
2 .7
2 .0
.8
-.7
.9
2.1
-.9

98
111
143
24
38
79
185
74
36
196

2 8 ,2 6 6
5 5 ,3 9 0
3 2 ,9 5 7
5 2 ,6 4 1
3 7 ,8 6 9
3 3 ,5 0 4
4 0 ,1 7 3
2 6 ,7 5 0
3 3 ,1 2 5
4 7 ,1 8 6

1 .3
4 .8
3 .4
2.1
4 .8
4.1
4 .0
5 .3
3 .0
-.6

P ie rc e , W A ...............................
S n o h o m is h , W A ....................
S p o k a n e , W A .........................
K a n a w h a , W V ........................
B ro w n , W l ................................
D a n e , W l ...................................
M ilw a u k e e , W l .......................
W a u k e s h a , W l .......................

2 3 8 ,6 0 0
2 0 9 ,6 5 7
1 9 0 ,0 5 7
1 1 1 ,5 5 2
1 4 1 ,9 5 0
2 7 9 ,2 0 8
5 2 2 ,0 2 2
2 2 4 ,7 2 1

-1 .5
-.3
.0
-.8
-.3
1 .9
-.8
.6

216
158
134
1 90
159
40
191
93

3 1 ,2 6 1
3 6 ,3 8 8
2 9 ,3 1 0
3 1 ,6 0 1
3 2 ,6 3 1
3 4 ,0 9 7
3 5 ,7 3 6
3 7 ,0 9 2

4 .7
3 .6
-1 .5
4 .8
3 .5
3 .9
2 .9
3 .7

S a n J u a n , P R ........................

3 2 4 ,7 9 1

-.5

169

2 2 ,1 7 9

4.1

1 In c lu d e s a re a s n o t o ffic ia lly d e s ig n a te d a s
c o u n tie s .
See
N o te s o n
C u rre n t L a b o r
S ta tis tic s .

4
T o ta ls fo r th e U n ite d S ta te s d o n o t in c lu d e
d a ta f o r P u e rto R ic o .
N o te : D a ta p e r ta in to w o rk e rs c o v e r e d by
U n e m p lo y m e n t
In s u ra n c e
(U l)
and
U n e m p lo y m e n t
C o m p e n s a tio n
fo r
F e d e ra l
E m p lo y e e s (U C F E ) p ro g ra m s .
T h e 2 4 8 U .S .
c o u n tie s c o m p ris e 6 6 .2 p e r c e n t o f th e to ta l
c o v e r e d w o rk e rs in th e U n ite d S ta te s .

2 P e r c e n t c h a n g e s w e re c o m p u te d fro m
a n n u a l e m p lo y m e n t a n d p a y d a ta a d ju s te d fo r
n o n e c o n o m ic c o u n ty re c la s s ific a tio n s .
S ee
N o te s o n C u r r e n t L a b o r S ta tis tic s .
3 R a n k in g s
fo r
p e rc e n t
change
in
e m p lo y m e n t a re b a s e d o n th e 2 4 9 c o u n tie s th a t
a re c o m p a ra b le o v e r th e y e a r.

22.

Annual data: Employment status of the population

[Numbers in thousands]_______________________________________
Employment status

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

C iv ilia n n o n in s titu tio n a l p o p u la tio n .............

1 9 2 ,8 0 5

1 9 4 ,8 3 8

1 9 6 ,8 1 4

1 9 8 ,5 8 4

2 0 0 ,5 9 1

2 0 3 ,1 3 3

2 0 5 ,2 2 0

2 0 7 ,7 5 3

2 0 9 ,6 9 9

2 1 1 ,8 6 4

C iv ilia n la b o r f o r c e ..........................................

1 2 8 ,1 0 5

1 2 9 ,2 0 0

1 3 1 ,0 5 6

1 3 2 ,3 0 4

1 3 3 ,9 4 3

1 3 6 ,2 9 7

1 3 7 ,6 7 3

1 3 9 ,3 6 8

1 4 0 ,8 6 3

1 4 1 ,8 1 5

L a b o r fo r c e p a r tic ip a tio n ra te ..................

6 6 .4

6 6 .3

6 6 .6

6 6 .6

6 6 .8

6 7.1

67.1

6 7.1

6 7 .2

6 6 .9

E m p lo y e d ......................................................

1 1 8 ,4 9 2

1 2 0 ,2 5 9

1 2 3 ,0 6 0

1 2 4 ,9 0 0

1 2 6 ,7 0 8

1 2 9 ,5 5 8

1 3 1 ,4 6 3

1 3 3 ,4 8 8

1 3 5 ,2 0 8

1 3 5 ,0 7 3

E m p lo y m e n t- p o p u la tio n r a tio ............

6 1 .5

6 1 .7

6 2 .5

6 2 .9

6 3 .2

6 3 .8

64.1

6 4 .3

6 4 .5

6 3 .8

A g r ic u ltu r e ..............................................

3 ,2 4 7

3 ,1 1 5

3 ,4 0 9

3 ,4 4 0

3 ,4 4 3

3 ,3 9 9

3 ,3 7 8

3 ,2 8 1

3 ,3 0 5

3 ,1 4 4

N o n a g r ic u ltu r a l in d u s tr ie s ...............

1 1 5 ,2 4 5

1 1 7 ,1 4 4

1 1 9 ,6 5 1

1 2 1 ,4 6 0

1 2 3 ,2 6 4

1 2 6 ,1 5 9

1 2 8 ,0 8 5

1 3 0 ,2 0 7

1 3 1 ,9 0 3

1 3 1 ,9 2 9

U n e m p lo y e d ................................................

9 ,6 1 3

8 ,9 4 0

7 ,9 9 6

7 ,4 0 4

7 ,2 3 6

6 ,7 3 9

6 ,2 1 0

5 ,8 8 0

5 ,6 5 5

6 ,7 4 2

U n e m p lo y m e n t r a t e ...............................

7 .5

6 .9

6.1

5 .6

5 .4

4 .9

4 .5

4 .2

4 .0

4 .8

N o t in th e la b o r f o r c e ......................................

6 4 ,7 0 0

6 5 ,6 3 8

6 5 ,7 5 8

6 6 ,2 8 0

6 6 ,6 4 7

6 6 ,8 3 7

6 7 ,5 4 7

6 8 ,3 8 5

6 8 ,8 3 6

7 0 ,0 5 0


78
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

23. Annual data: Employment levels by industry
[In thousands]
Industry
T o ta l e m p lo y m e n t .....................................................

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

1 0 8 ,6 0 1

1 1 0 ,7 1 3

1 1 4 ,1 6 3

1 1 7 ,1 9 1

1 1 9 ,6 0 8

1 2 2 ,6 9 0

1 2 5 ,8 6 5

1 2 8 ,9 1 6

1 3 1 ,7 2 0

1 3 1 ,9 2 2

P r iv a te s e c to r ..........................................................

8 9 ,9 5 6

9 1 ,8 7 2

9 5 ,0 3 6

9 7 ,8 8 5

1 0 0 ,1 8 9

1 0 3 ,1 3 3

1 0 6 ,0 4 2

1 0 8 ,7 0 9

1 1 1 ,0 1 8

1 1 0 ,9 8 9

G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ...............................................

2 3 ,2 3 1

2 3 ,3 5 2

2 3 ,9 0 8

2 4 ,2 6 5

2 4 ,4 9 3

2 4 ,9 6 2

2 5 ,4 1 4

2 5 ,5 0 7

2 5 ,6 6 9

2 4 ,9 4 4

M in in g .................................................................

635

610

601

581

580

596

590

539

543

565

C o n s t r u c t io n ....................................................

4 ,4 9 2

4 ,6 6 8

4 ,9 8 6

5 ,1 6 0

5 ,4 1 8

5 ,6 9 1

6 ,0 2 0

6 ,4 1 5

6 ,6 5 3

6 ,6 8 5

M a n u f a c tu r in g .................................................

1 8 ,1 0 4

1 8 ,0 7 5

1 8 ,3 2 1

1 8 ,5 2 4

1 8 ,4 9 5

1 8 ,6 7 5

1 8 ,8 0 5

1 8 ,5 5 2

1 8 ,4 7 3

1 7 ,6 9 5

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ............................................

8 5 ,3 7 0

8 7 ,3 6 1

9 0 ,2 5 6

9 2 ,9 2 5

9 5 ,1 1 5

9 7 ,7 2 7

1 0 0 ,4 5 1

1 0 3 ,4 0 9

1 0 6 ,0 5 1

1 0 6 ,9 7 8

T r a n s p o r t a tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s ........

5 ,7 1 8

5 ,8 1 1

5 ,9 8 4

6 ,1 3 2

6 ,2 5 3

6 ,4 0 8

6 ,6 1 1

6 ,8 3 4

7 ,0 3 1

7 ,0 6 5

W h o le s a le t r a d e ............................................

5 ,9 9 7

5 ,9 8 1

6 ,1 6 2

6 ,3 7 8

6 ,4 8 2

6 ,6 4 8

6 ,8 0 0

6 ,9 1 1

6 ,9 4 7

6 ,7 7 6

1 9 ,3 5 6

1 9 ,7 7 3

2 0 ,5 0 7

2 1 ,1 8 7

2 1 ,5 9 7

2 1 ,9 6 6

2 2 ,2 9 5

2 2 ,8 4 8

2 3 ,3 3 7

2 3 ,5 2 2

6 ,6 0 2

6 ,7 5 7

6 ,8 9 6

6 ,8 0 6

6 ,9 1 1

7 ,1 0 9

7 ,3 8 9

7 ,5 5 5

7 ,5 7 8

7 ,7 1 2

2 9 ,0 5 2

3 0 ,1 9 7

3 1 ,5 7 9

3 3 ,1 1 7

3 4 ,4 5 4

3 6 ,0 4 0

3 7 ,5 3 3

3 9 ,0 5 5

4 0 ,4 5 7

4 0 ,9 7 0

1 8 ,6 4 5

1 8 ,8 4 1

1 9 ,1 2 8

1 9 ,3 0 5

1 9 ,4 1 9

1 9 ,5 5 7

1 9 ,8 2 3

2 0 ,2 0 6

2 0 ,7 0 2

2 0 ,9 3 3

2 ,9 6 9

2 ,9 1 5

2 ,8 7 0

2 ,8 2 2

2 ,7 5 7

2 ,6 9 9

2 ,6 8 6

2 ,6 6 9

2 ,7 7 7

2 ,6 1 6

4 ,4 0 8

4 ,4 8 8

4 ,5 7 6

4 ,6 3 5

4 ,6 0 6

4 ,5 8 2

4 ,6 1 2

4 ,7 0 9

4 ,7 8 6

4 ,8 8 5

1 1 ,2 6 7

1 1 ,4 3 8

1 1 ,6 8 2

1 1 ,8 4 9

1 2 ,0 5 6

1 2 ,2 7 6

1 2 ,5 2 5

1 2 ,8 2 9

1 3 ,1 3 9

1 3 ,4 3 2

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te ....

F e d e r a l...........................................................

L o c a l...............................................................
NO TE :

S e e " N o te s o n th e d a ta " f o r a d e s c r ip tio n o f th e m o s t re c e n t b e n c h m a r k re v is io n .

24. Annual data: A verag e hours and earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers on nonfarm
payrolls, by industry______________________________________________________________________
Industry

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

Private sector:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ............................................................

3 4 .4

3 4 .5

3 4 .7

3 4 .5

3 4 .4

3 4 .6

3 4 .6

3 4 .5

3 4 .5

3 4 .2

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ................................

1 0 .5 7

1 0 .8 3

1 1 .1 2

1 1 .4 3

1 1 .8 2

1 2 .2 8

1 2 .7 8

1 3 .2 4

1 3 .7 6

1 4 .3 2

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ..............................

3 6 3 .6 1

3 7 3 .6 4

3 8 5 .8 6

3 9 4 .3 4

4 0 6 .6 1

4 2 4 .8 9

4 4 2 .1 9

4 5 6 .7 8

4 7 4 .7 2

4 8 9 .7 4

Mining:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ..........................................................

4 3 .9

4 4 .3

4 4 .8

4 4 .7

4 5 .3

4 5 .4

4 3 .9

4 3 .2

43.1

4 3 .5

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) .............................

1 4 .5 4

1 4 .6 0

1 4 .8 8

1 5 .3 0

1 5 .6 2

1 6 .1 5

1 6.9 1

1 7 .0 5

1 7 .2 2

1 7 .5 6

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

6 3 8 .3 1

6 4 6 .7 8

6 6 6 .6 2

6 8 3 .9 1

7 0 7 .5 9

7 3 3 .2 1

7 4 2 .3 5

7 3 6 .5 6

7 4 2 .1 8

7 6 3 .8 6

Construction:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs ..........................................................

3 8 .0

3 8 .5

3 8 .9

3 8 .9

3 9 .0

3 9 .0

3 8 .9

3 9.1

3 9 .3

3 9 .3

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

1 4 .1 5

1 4 .3 8

1 4 .7 3

1 5 .0 9

1 5 .4 7

1 6 .0 4

1 6.61

1 7 .1 9

1 7 .8 8

1 8 .3 4

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

5 3 7 .7 0

5 5 3 .6 3

5 7 3 .0 0

5 8 7 .0 0

6 0 3 .3 3

6 2 5 .5 6

6 4 6 .1 3

6 7 2 .1 3

7 0 2 .6 8

7 2 0 .7 6

Manufacturing:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ..........................................................

4 1 .0

4 1 .4

4 2 .0

4 1 .6

4 1 .6

4 2 .0

4 1 .7

4 1 .7

4 1 .6

4 0 .7

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

1 1 .4 6

1 1 .7 4

1 2 .0 7

1 2 .3 7

1 2 .7 7

1 3 .1 7

1 3 .4 9

1 3 .9 0

1 4 .3 7

1 4 .8 3

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

4 6 9 .8 6

4 8 6 .0 4

5 0 6 .9 4

5 1 4 .5 9

5 3 1 .2 3

5 5 3 .1 4

5 6 2 .5 3

5 7 9 .6 3

5 9 7 .7 9

6 0 3 .5 8

Transportation and public utilities:
3 8 .3

3 9 .3

3 9 .7

3 9 .4

3 9 .6

3 9 .7

3 9 .5

3 8 .7

3 8 .4

3 8 .2

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

1 3 .4 3

1 3 .5 5

1 3 .7 8

1 4 .1 3

1 4 .4 5

1 4 .9 2

1 5.3 1

1 5 .6 9

16.2 1

1 6 .7 9

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

5 1 4 .3 7

5 3 2 .5 2

5 4 7 .0 7

5 5 6 .7 2

5 7 2 .2 2

5 9 2 .3 2

6 0 4 .7 5

6 0 7 .2 0

6 2 2 .4 6

6 4 1 .3 8

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ..........................................................

Wholesale trade:
3 8 .2

3 8 .2

3 8 .4

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .4

3 8 .3

3 8 .3

3 8 .5

3 8 .2

1 1 .3 9

1 1 .7 4

1 2 .0 6

1 2 .4 3

1 2 .8 7

1 3 .4 5

1 4 .0 7

1 4 .5 9

1 5 .2 2

1 5 .8 6

4 3 5 .1 0

4 4 8 .4 7

4 6 3 .1 0

4 7 6 .0 7

4 9 2 .9 2

5 1 6 .4 8

5 3 8 .8 8

5 5 8 .8 0

5 8 5 .9 7

6 0 5 .8 5

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ..........................................................

2 8 .8

2 8 .8

2 8 .9

2 8 .8

2 8 .8

2 8 .9

2 9 .0

2 9 .0

2 8 .9

2 8 .9

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

7 .1 2

7 .2 9

7 .4 9

7 .6 9

7 .9 9

8 .3 3

8 .7 4

9 .0 9

9 .4 6

9 .7 7

2 0 5 .0 6

2 0 9 .9 5

2 1 6 .4 6

2 2 1 .4 7

2 3 0 .1 1

2 4 0 .7 4

2 5 3 .4 6

2 6 3 .6 1

2 7 3 .3 9

2 8 2 .8 2

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs .........................................................

Retail trade:

Finance, insurance, and real estate:
3 5 .8

3 5 .8

3 5 .8

3 5 .9

3 5 .9

36.1

3 6 .4

3 6 .2

3 6 .4

3 6 .1

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ............................

1 0 .8 2

1 1 .3 5

1 1 .8 3

1 2 .3 2

1 2 .8 0

1 3 .3 4

1 4 .0 7

1 4 .6 2

1 5 .1 4

1 5 .8 0

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................

3 8 7 .3 6

4 0 6 .3 3

4 2 3 .5 1

4 4 2 .2 9

4 5 9 .5 2

4 8 1 .5 7

5 1 2 .1 5

5 2 9 .2 4

5 5 1 .1 0

5 7 0 .3 8

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ..........................................................

Services:
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ..........................................................

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s (in d o lla r s ) ...........................


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

3 2 .5

3 2 .5

3 2 .5

3 2 .4

3 2 .4

3 2 .6

3 2 .6

3 2 .6

3 2 .7

3 2 .7

1 0 .5 4

1 0 .7 8

1 1 .0 4

1 1 .3 9

1 1 .7 9

1 2 .2 8

1 2 .8 4

1 3 .3 7

1 3 .9 3

1 4 .6 7

3 4 2 .5 5

3 5 0 .3 5

3 5 8 .8 0

3 6 9 .0 4

3 8 2 .0 0

4 0 0 .3 3

4 1 8 .5 8

4 3 5 .8 6

4 5 5 .5 1

4 7 9 .7 1

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

79

Current Labor Statistics:

25.

Compensation & industrial Relations

Em ploym ent Cost Index, com pensation,1 by occupation and Industry group

[June 1989 = 100]
2000
Sept.

Series

Dec.

Mar.

June

Percent change

2002

2001
Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

3 months

12 months

ended

ended

Sept. 2002
Civilian workers2..........................................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .8

1 5 8 .4

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .5

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .9

P r o fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l..........................................

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .3

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .5

0 .9

3 .7

1 6 3 .5

.9

3 .7

1 6 1 .4

1 .3

3 .0

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .3

1 6 0 .5

1 62.1

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .3

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itr a tiv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l................................

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .6

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .6

1 6 1 .2

1 6 3 .7

1 6 5 .6

1 6 6 .3

.4

4 .2

A d m in is tr a t iv e s u p p o r t, in c lu d in g c le r ic a l.................................

1 5 1 .8

1 5 2 .8

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .8

1 5 8 .8

1 6 0 .0

1 6 2 .0

1 6 3 .3

1 6 4 .9

1 .0

3 .8

B lu e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ................................................................................

1 4 5 .6

1 4 6 .5

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .3

1 51.1

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .7

1 55.1

1 5 6 .4

.8

3 .5

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ...............................................................................

1 4 8 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .3

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .4

1 6 1 .3

1.2

4.1

1 5 8 .7

..6

3 .6

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :
G o o d s - p r o d u c in g .....................................................................................

1 4 8 .0

1 4 8 .8

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .7

M a n u f a c tu r in g ........................................................................................

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .3

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .6

1 58 .1

1 59.1

.6

3 .8

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g .................................................................................. .

1 50.1

151 .1

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .6

1 59 .1

1 6 0 .7

1 6 2 .2

.9

3 .7

S e r v ic e s ....................................................................................................

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .4

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .4

158 .1

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .2

1 61.1

1 6 3 .2

1 .3

3 .2

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ...................................................................................

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .5

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .8

1 63.1

.8

4.1
4 .7

H o s p ita ls .............................................................................................

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .3

1 5 3 .2

1 5 5 .6

1 5 8 .2

1 6 0 .0

1 6 2 .3

1 6 3 .8

1 6 5 .7

1 .2

E d u c a tio n a l s e r v ic e s ........................................................................

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .2

156 .1

1 5 6 .6

1 57 .1

1 5 7 .4

1 6 1 .6

2 .7

3 .5

P u b lic a d m in is tr a t io n 3 ..........................................................................

1 4 6 .9

1 4 8 .3

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .5

1 6 0 .2

1 .7

4 .2

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ..................................................................................

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .6

1 5 4 .0

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .7

1 6 0 .2

1 6 1 .7

.9

3 .7

Private industry w orkers..........................................................

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .9

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .9

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .6

.6

3 .7

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ........................................................

1 4 9 .8

1 5 0 .9

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .2

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .6

.7

3 .6

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :
W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ...........................................................................

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .7

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .7

1 60 .1

1 6 1 .9

1 6 3 .8

1 6 4 .6

.5

3 .7

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .....................................................

1 5 2 .9

1 54.1

1 5 6 .5

1 58.1

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .3

1 6 5 .3

.6

3 .6

P r o fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s .............

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .7

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .3

1 6 1 .5

1 6 2 .5

1 5 3 .6

.7

2 .8

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itr a tiv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l o c c u p a tio n s ..

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .3

1 5 7 .3

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .2

1 6 1 .8

1 6 4 .4

1 6 6 .6

1 6 7 .0

.2

4 .2

S a le s o c c u p a t io n s .............................................................................

1 5 1 .2

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .3

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .7

1 6 1 .6

1 6 1 .6

.0

4 .3

A d m in is tr a t iv e s u p p o r t o c c u p a tio n s , in c lu d in g c le r ic a l...

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .4

156 .1

1 5 7 .7

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .8

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .2

1 6 5 .6

.9

3 .8

B lu e - c o lla r w o r k e r s .............................................................................

1 4 5 .5

1 4 6 .4

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .3

1 5 1 .0

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .6

155 .1

1 5 6 .3

.8

3 .5

P r e c is io n p r o d u c tio n , c ra ft, a n d r e p a ir o c c u p a tio n s .........

1 4 5 .8

1 4 6 .7

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .8

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .7

1 5 6 .9

.8

3 .4

M a c h in e o p e r a to r s , a s s e m b le rs , a n d in s p e c to r s ...............

1 4 6 .0

1 4 6 .8

1 4 8 .3

1 49.1

1 5 0 .4

1 5 1 .5

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .7

1 5 5 .4

.5

3 .3

T r a n s p o r t a tio n a n d m a te r ia l m o v in g o c c u p a tio n s .............

1 3 9 .9

1 41 .1

1 4 2 .6

1 4 3 .9

1 4 5 .6

1 4 6 .3

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .6

1 5 1 .0

.9

3 .7

H a n d le r s , e q u ip m e n t c le a n e rs , h e lp e rs , a n d la b o re rs ....

1 4 9 .4

1 5 0 .4

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .7

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .4

.9

4 .2

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ............................................................................

1 4 6 .6

148 .1

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 4 .8

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .4

1 5 9 .0

1 .0

4 .2

P r o d u c tio n a n d n o n s u p e rv is o ry o c c u p a tio n s 4 .....................

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .5

1 57.1

1 5 8 .7

1 5 9 .7

.6

3 .5

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :
G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ..................................................................................

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .8

1 5 0 .7

1 52 .1

1 53.1

1 5 4 .4

1 5 6 .2

1 5 7 .6

1 5 8 .6

.6

3 .6

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 4 7 .2

1 4 8 .2

1 50.1

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .9

1 5 7 .9

.6

3 .5

W h it e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s .............................................................

1 5 1 .3

1 5 1 .9

1 5 4 .5

1 5 6 .5

1 5 6 .8

158 .1

1 60.1

1 6 1 .9

1 6 2 .9

.6

3 .9

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .5

1 5 3 .0

1 5 5 .0

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .4

1 6 0 .2

1 61 .1

.6

3 .7

B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s ...............................................................

1 4 5 .8

1 4 6 .8

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .3

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .9

.7

3 .4

C o n s t r u c t io n .........................................................................................

1 45.1

1 4 6 .7

1 4 8 .2

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .0

154 .1

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .3

.7

3 .0

M a n u f a c tu r in g .....................................................................................

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .3

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .6

1 58.1

159 .1

.6

3 .8

W h it e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s ............................................................

1 5 1 .4

1 5 1 .5

1 5 4 .2

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .9

159 .1

1 61.1

1 6 2 .2

.7

4 .0

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 4 9 .3

1 4 9 .7

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .0

1 5 3 .8

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .6

.6

3 .8

B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s ...............................................................

1 4 6 .7

1 4 7 .8

149 .1

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .7

.6

3 .6

D u r a b le s ................................................................................................

1 4 9 .4

1 50.1

1 5 1 .8

153 .1

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .3

1 5 8 .9

.4

3 .2

N o n d u r a b le s ........................................................................................

1 4 7 .5

1 4 7 .7

1 5 0 .4

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .2

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .2

1.1

4 .7

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ................................................................................

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .8

1 6 2 .7

.6

3 .7

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 51.1

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .8

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .4

1 6 3 .5

.7

3 .6

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .4

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .3

162 .1

1 6 4 .0

1 6 4 .7

.4

3 .6

1 5 3 .9

1 55.1

1 5 7 .5

1 59.1

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .2

164 .1

1 6 5 .6

1 6 6 .5

.5

3 .5

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................
B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s ...............................................................

1 4 4 .5

1 4 5 .3

1 4 7 .7

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 1 .4

1 5 3 .2

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .6

.9

3 .8

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ......................................................................

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .9

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .0

1 5 8 .5

1 .0

4.1

T r a n s p o r t a tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s .............................................

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .3

1 5 0 .5

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .9

1 6 0 .8

1 .2

4 .8

T r a n s p o r t a tio n ...................................................................................

1 4 2 .8

1 4 3 .9

1 4 5 .4

1 4 6 .9

1 4 8 .2

1 51 .1

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .4

1 .0

4 .9

P u b lic u tilit ie s .....................................................................................

1 5 3 .5

1 54 .1

1 5 7 .3

1 5 9 .8

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .5

1 6 3 .9

1 6 5 .5

1 6 8 .2

1 .6

4 .7

C o m m u n ic a t io n s ..........................................................................

1 5 3 .9

1 5 4 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 61.1

1 6 2 .8

1 6 3 .4

1 6 6 .0

1 66 .1

1 6 9 .0

1 .7

3 .8

E le c tr ic , g a s , a n d s a n ita ry s e r v ic e s ...................................

1 5 2 .9

1 5 3 .4

1 5 6 .0

1 58.1

158 .1

1 59.1

1 6 1 .3

1 6 4 .8

1 6 7 .2

1 .5

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .4

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .5

1 5 9 .5

1 5 9 .6

.1

3 .8

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .4

1 57.1

1 5 7 .5

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .3

.2

3 .2
4 .6

W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ............................................................

5 .8

152 .1

1 5 4 .4

1 55.1

1 5 7 .8

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .5

1 6 1 .9

1 6 6 .3

1 6 5 .9

-.2

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .6

1 6 2 .3

1 6 4 .4

1 66.1

1.0

3 .8

R e ta il t r a d e ........................................................................................

1 4 6 .2

1 4 6 .6

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 3 .2

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .0

.3

3 .4

G e n e r a l m e r c h a n d is e s to r e s .................................................

1 4 2 .2

1 4 4 .4

1 4 7 .3

1 4 9 .4

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .4

1 5 4 .2

1 56.1

1 .2

4 .3

F o o d s t o r e s .....................................................................................

1 4 3 .4

1 4 4 .5

1 46.1

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .9

1 5 4 .5

1 5 6 .3

1 .2

4 .4

W h o le s a le t r a d e ...............................................................................

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b le .


80 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

25. Continuod-HEm ploym ent Cost Index, com pensation,1 by occupation and industry group
[June 1989 = 100]

Series

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Percent change

2002

2001

2000

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

3 months

12 months
ended

ended

Sept. 2002
4 .4

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te .........................................

1 5 5 .2

1 5 5 .7

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .9

1 6 1 ,3

1 6 5 .2

1 6 7 .3

1 6 8 .0

0 .4

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .4

1 6 1 .2

163 .1

1 6 4 .7

1 6 5 .0

1 6 9 .8

1 7 1 .3

1 72 .1

.5

4 .5

B a n k in q , s a v in g s a n d lo a n , a n d o th e r c r e d it a g e n c ie s .

1 6 5 .8

1 6 6 .5

1 7 0 .8

1 7 2 .7

1 7 5 .4

1 7 4 .5

1 82.1

1 8 4 .2

1 8 4 .6

.2

5 .2

In s u r a n c e ............................................................................................

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .2

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .3

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .3

1 6 4 .0

166 .1

1 67.1

.6

4 .5

S e r v ic e s ..................................................................................................

1 5 2 .9

154.1

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .8

1 6 0 .0

1 6 1 .0

1 6 2 .6

1 6 3 .7

1 6 4 .9

.7

3.1

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .4

1 6 0 .5

1 6 3 .0

1 6 5 .2

1 6 6 .2

1 6 6 .3

1 6 6 .6

1 6 7 .2

.4

1 .2

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ................................................................................

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .8

1 5 8 .4

1 6 0 .6

1 6 2 .0

1 6 3 .2

.7

4.1

H o s p ita ls ...........................................................................................

1 4 9 .2

151.1

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 8 .4

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .8

1 6 4 .5

1 6 6 .2

1 .0

4 .9

1 5 8 .8

1 5 9 .9

1 6 2 .3

1 6 2 .6

1 6 6 .4

1 6 7 .6

1 6 8 .5

1 6 9 .0

1 7 3 .5

2 .7

4 .3

C o lle q e s a n d u n iv e r s itie s .........................................................

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .2

1 6 2 .2

1 6 2 .6

1 6 6 .2

1 6 7 .5

168 .1

1 6 8 .4

1 7 2 .0

2.1

3 .5

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ............................................................................

1 5 0 .0

151.1

1 53.1

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .3

1 61 .1

1 6 2 .0

.6

3 .6

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ......................................................................

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .5

1 5 9 .0

1 6 0 .5

1 6 2 .2

164 .1

1 6 4 .8

.4

3 .6

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 5 3 .8

155.1

1 5 7 .5

159.1

1 6 0 .9

1 6 2 .3

1 6 4 .2

1 6 5 .7

1 6 6 .6

.5

3 .5

B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a tio n s ................................................................

1 4 3 .9

1 4 4 .8

1 4 6 .9

148 .1

1 5 0 .2

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .4

.9

3 .5

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ......................................................................

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .8

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .7

1 52.1

154 .1

1 5 5 .9

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .4

1 .0

4.1

State and local government workers......................................

1 4 7 .8

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .2

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .2

1 56.1

1 5 6 .7

1 60.1

2 .2

3 .8

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

1 4 7 .3

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .2

1 5 5 .7

1 5 9 .3

2 .3

3 .6

P r o fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d t e c h n ic a l..........................................

1 4 6 .6

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .2

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .2

1 5 3 .6

1 54.1

1 58.1

2 .6

3 .5

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in is tr a tiv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l..............................

1 4 9 .2

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .5

1 5 9 .6

1 6 2 .3

1 .6

3 .8

A d m in is tr a tiv e s u p p o r t, in c lu d in g c le r ic a l.................................

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .4

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .6

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .0

1 6 1 .0

1 .9

4 .4

1 4 5 .9

1 4 7 .2

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .0

1 5 1 .5

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .0

1 5 4 .7

1 5 8 .4

2 .4

4 .6

S e r v ic e s ...................................................................................................

1 4 8 .0

1 4 8 .9

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .6

1 5 4 .4

1 5 4 .9

1 5 5 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 9 .7

2 .4

3 .4

S e r v ic e s e x c lu d in g s c h o o ls 5 .........................................................

1 4 7 .6

1 4 8 .8

1 50.1

1 5 1 .9

1 5 4 .5

1 56 .1

1 5 7 .9

1 5 8 .7

1 6 1 .0

1 .4

4 .2

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ................................................................................

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .6

1 52.1

1 5 4 .4

1 57 .1

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .4

1 6 1 .4

1 6 3 .5

1 .3

4.1

H o s p ita ls .........................................................................................

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .0

1 5 2 .2

1 5 4 .7

1 5 7 .4

159 .1

1 6 0 .7

1 6 1 .8

164 .1

1 .4

4 .3

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .6

1 50.1

1 54.1

1 5 4 .5

1 5 4 .8

1 55.1

1 5 9 .2

2 .6

3 .3

S c h o o ls ...........................................................................................

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 4 .4

1 5 4 .8

155 .1

1 5 5 .4

1 5 9 .6

2 .7

3 .4
3 .2

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :

E le m e n ta r y a n d s e c o n d a r y .................................................

1 4 7 .3

1 48.1

1 4 8 .5

1 4 9 .0

1 5 2 .8

153 .1

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .6

1 5 7 .7

2 .7

C o lle q e s a n d u n iv e r s itie s .....................................................

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .0

1 6 0 .4

1 6 4 .7

2 .7

3 .6

P u b lic a d m in is tr a tio n .........................................................................

1 4 6 .9

1 4 8 .3

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .9

1 6 0 .2

1 .7

4 .2

1 C o s t (c e n ts p e r h o u r w o rk e d ) m e a s u re d in th e E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x c o n s is ts o f
w a g e s , s a la r ie s , a n d e m p lo y e r c o s t o f e m p lo y e e b e n e fits .
2 C o n s is ts o f p r iv a te in d u s try w o r k e r s ( e x c lu d in g fa r m a n d h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs ) a n d
S ta t e a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t ( e x c lu d in g F e d e ra l G o v e rn m e n t) w o rk e rs .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

3 C o n s is ts o f le g is la tiv e , ju d ic ia l, a d m in is tr a tiv e , a n d r e g u la to r y a c tiv itie s .
4 T h is s e r ie s h a s th e s a m e in d u s try a n d o c c u p a tio n a l c o v e r a g e a s th e H o u r ly
E a r n in g s in d e x , w h ic h w a s d is c o n tin u e d in J a n u a r y 1 9 8 9 .
5 In c lu d e s , f o r e x a m p le , lib ra ry , s o c ia l, a n d h e a lth s e rv ic e s .

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

81

Current Labor Statistics:

26.

Price Data

Em ploym ent Cost Index, w ages and salaries, by occupation and industry group

[June 1989 = 100]_____________________________________________________________________
2000

2001

2002

Percent change

Series
Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

3 months
ended

12 months
ended

Sept. 2002
Civilian workers1..........................................................................

1 4 7 .0

1 4 7 .9

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .8

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

1 4 9 .2

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .7

1 53.1

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .6

P r o fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l..........................................

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .6

1 51.1

1 5 2 .-

1 5 4 .2

1 55 .1

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .8

156 .1

1 5 7 .2

0 .7

1 5 7 .0

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .6

.8

3 .3

1 5 5 .6

1 5 6 .2

1 5 8 .0

1 .2

2 .5
4 .3

3 .2

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itr a tiv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l...............................

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .4

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .7

1 58 .1

1 6 0 .7

1 6 2 .6

1 6 3 .5

.6

A d m in is tr a t iv e s u p p o r t, in c lu d in g c le r ic a l.................................

1 4 8 .5

1 4 9 .6

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 ,7

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .7

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .6

.8

3 .2

B lu e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ................................................................................

1 4 2 .0

1 4 2 .9

1 4 4 .7

1 4 6 .0

1 4 7 .6

1 4 8 .5

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .0

1 5 1 .9

.6

2 .9

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ..............................................................................

1 4 5 .7

147 .1

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .7

1 5 1 .2

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .2

155 .1

‘ 5 6 .2

.7

3 .3

G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 4 4 .3

1 4 5 .3

1 4 7 .0

1 4 7 ,6

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .8

1 53 .1

1 5 3 .9

.5

2 .9

M a n u f a c tu r in g ........................................................................................

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .5

1 4 8 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .7

153 .1

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .4

.6

3.1

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ..................................................................................

1 4 8 .0

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .2

1 5 6 .4

,8

3 .3

S e r v ic e s ....................................................................................................

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .6

1 5 6 .2

157 .1

1 58 .1

1 5 8 .8

1 6 0 .7

1 .2

2 .9

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ...................................................................................

1 4 6 .7

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .6

.7

3 .8

H o s p ita ls .............................................................................................

1 4 5 .6

1 4 7 .3

1 4 8 .8

1 5 1 .2

1 5 .5

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .3

1.1

4 .4

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :

E d u c a tio n a l s e r v ic e s .......................................................................

1 4 8 .9

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .0

1 5 4 .6

155 .1

1 5 5 .3

1 5 5 .6

2 .4

3 .0

P u b lic a d m in is tr a tio n ..........................................................................

1 4 4 .6

146 .1

1 4 7 .6

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .8

.9

3 .0

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ..................................................................................

1 4 7 .2

1 48 .1

1 4 9 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .4

1 5 7 .5

.7

3 .2

1 4 6 .8

1 4 7 .7

1 4 9 .4

1 5 0 .9

1 52.1

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .3

1 5 7 .0

.4

3 .2

1 4 6 .5

1 4 7 .6

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .9

1 56 .1

1 5 7 .0

.6

3 .2

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ...........................................................................

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 5 4 .8

156 .1

1 5 7 .7

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .0

.4

3 .4

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .....................................................

1 4 9 .9

1 51 .1

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .7

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .0

1 6 9 .8

.5

3 .3

P ro fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s .............

1 4 8 .6

1 5 0 .2

1 52.1

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .9

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .2

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in itr a t iv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l o c c u p a tio n s ..

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .0

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 6 1 .3

1 6 3 .6

1 6 4 .3

S a le s o c c u p a t io n s .............................................................................

1 4 9 .0

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .5

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .6

1 5 7 .0

1 5 6 .9

Private industry workers.........................................................
E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ........................................................
W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :

A d m in is tr a t iv e s u p p o r t o c c u p a tio n s , in c lu d in g c le r ic a l...

.5
.4
- .1

2 .2
4 .5
3 .8

149 .1

1 50 .1

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .5

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .2

1 6 0 .3

.7

3 .2

1 4 1 .9

1 4 2 .8

1 4 4 .6

1 4 5 .9

1 4 7 .5

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .6

150 9

1 5 1 .7

.5

2 8

P r e c is io n p r o d u c tio n , c r a ft, a n d r e p a ir o c c u p a tio n s ........

1 4 2 .0

1 4 2 .8

1 4 4 .6

1 4 5 .7

1 4 7 .7

1 4 8 ,4

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .0

1 5 1 .8

.5

2 .8

M a c h in e o p e r a to r s , a s s e m b le rs , a n d in s p e c to r s ...............

1 4 2 .9

1 4 3 .7

1 4 5 .6

1 4 6 .9

1 48.1

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .0

.3

2 .6

T r a n s p o r t a tio n a n d m a te r ia l m o v in g o c c u p a tio n s .............

1 3 6 .5

1 3 7 .6

1 3 9 .5

1 4 0 .7

1 42 .1

1 4 2 .8

1 4 4 .8

1 4 5 .2

1 4 6 .3

.8

3 .0

H a n d le r s , e q u ip m e n t c le a n e rs , h e lp e rs , a n d la b o re rs ....

1 4 5 .0

1 4 6 .2

1 4 8 .0

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .4

1 5 4 .2

1 55.1

1 5 6 .0

.6

3 .3

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ............................................................................

1 4 3 .5

1 4 4 .9

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .5

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .0

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .9

.7

3 .5

P ro d u c tio n a n d n o n s u p e rv is o ry o c c u p a tio n s 3 .....................

1 4 5 .0

1 4 6 .0

1 4 7 .7

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .5

1 5 2 .7

1 5 4 .0

1 5 4 .7

.5

2 .9

2 .9

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :
G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ..................................................................................

1 4 4 .3

1 4 5 .2

1 4 7 .0

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 53 .1

1 5 3 .9

.5

1 4 3 .4

1 4 4 .6

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .8

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .0

5

2 9

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .5

1 5 2 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .6

1 5 7 .9

6

8 2

.6
5

2 8
2 .7

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 4 6 .0

1 4 7 .2

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .9

1 5 4 .5

1 5 5 .4

B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s ...............................................................

1 4 2 .0

143 .1

1 4 4 .7

1 46.1

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .5

3.1

C o n s t r u c t io n .........................................................................................

1 3 9 .4

1 4 0 .7

1 42.1

1 4 3 .9

1 45.1

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .0

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .0

.5

M a n u f a c tu r in g .....................................................................................

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .5

1 4 8 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .7

153 .1

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .4

.6

3.1

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .2

1 51.1

1 5 2 .7

1 5 2 .8

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .6

157 7

7

8 2

1 4 6 .6

1 4 7 .5

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 0 .5

151 0

152 3

153 9

155 0

7

3 0

1 4 3 .4

1 4 4 .6

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .8

149 1

150 3

151 7

152 8

153 5

5

8 0

D u r a b le s ................................................................................................

146 .1

1 4 7 .3

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .5

1 5 1 .7

153 9

155 3

156 0

5

3*0

N o n d u r a b le s ........................................................................................

1 4 5 .0

1 4 5 .4

1 4 7 .5

1 4 9 .0

149 3

153 9

151 9

153 1

154 4

8

3 4

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .9

153 2

1 5 1 .9

156 1

1 5 7 .7

158 4

4

3 4

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .4

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .6

1 5 4 .2

156 1

157 2

158 5

159 3

5

8 8

1 5 0 .0

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .5

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .2

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .2

159 9

160 5

4

3 4

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .3

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .6

1 5 7 .2

158 2

160 4

161 6

162 5

6

3 4

1 4 1 .6

1 4 2 .2

1 4 4 .3

145 3

1 4 7 .5

148 1

149 4

151 1

151 8

5

2 Q

1 4 3 .5

1 4 4 .8

1 46 .1

1 4 7 .2

148 4

149 4

151 6

152 4

153 5

7

3 4

T r a n s p o r ta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilitie s .............................................

1 4 1 .3

1 4 2 .3

1 4 3 .7

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .7

1 4 9 .2

1 5 0 .5

1 52.1

1 5 3 .4

.9

4 .6

T r a n s p o r t a tio n ..................................................................................

1 3 7 .4

1 3 8 .6

1 3 9 .8

1 4 1 .6

1 4 2 .6

1 4 5 .7

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .6

.7

4 .9

P u b lic u tilit ie s ....................................................................................

1 4 6 .4

1 47.1

1 4 8 .7

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .2

1.2

4.1

C o m m u n ic a t io n s .........................................................................

1 4 6 .7

1 4 7 .4

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .3

1 5 5 .2

1 5 5 .3

1 57.1

1 5 9 .6

1 .6

4.1

E le c tr ic , g a s , a n d s a n ita ry s e r v ic e s ...................................

1 4 5 .9

1 4 6 .6

1 48 .1

1 4 9 .9

1 5 0 .4

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .0

1 5 5 .5

1 5 6 .5

.6

4.1

1 52.1

1 5 3 .0

1 5 5 .7

1 5 5 .5

- .1

W h o le s a le a n d re ta il t r a d e ............................................................

W h o le s a le t r a d e ..............................................................................

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .4

1 50.1

1 5 0 .6

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .9

153 .1

1 4 9 .6

1 5 1 .6

1 5 4 .5

154 .1

1 6 0 .4

-.6

4.1

1 5 1 .3

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .4

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .4

1 6 1 .2

1 6 2 .6

1 4 4 .8

1 4 5 .2

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .8

1 4 8 .8

1 5 0 .7

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .7

1 5 2 .9

.9
.1

2 8

G e n e r a l m e r c h a n d is e s to r e s ..................................................

1 3 9 .7

1 4 2 .2

1 4 3 .8

1 4 5 .5

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .5

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .9

150 .1

.8

3 .0

F o o d s t o r e s .....................................................................................

1 4 0 .2

1 4 1 .6

1 4 3 .3

1 4 4 .5

1 4 5 .7

1 4 6 .7

1 4 8 .0

1 4 8 .9

150 .1

.8

3 .0

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b le .


82 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

1 5 1 .6

1 5 4 .8

1 5 7 .2

3 .3

1 6 1 .3

3 3

26.

Continued—Em ploym ent Cost Index, w ages and salaries, by occupation and industry group

[June 1989 = 100]
Percent change

2002

2001

2000
Series
Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

Mar.

Dec.

June

Sept.

12 months
ended

3 months
ended

Sept. 2002
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta t e .........................................

1 5 1 .7

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .9

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .8

1 5 6 .0

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .0

1 6 2 .4

0 .2

4 .2

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s .................................................

1 5 3 .3

1 54.1

1 5 6 .6

1 5 7 .6

1 59 .1

159 .1

1 6 4 .5

1 6 5 .7

1 66 .1

.2

4 .4

B a n k in g , s a v in g s a n d lo a n , a n d o th e r c r e d it a g e n c ie s ..

1 6 5 .0

1 6 5 .7

1 6 9 .4

1 7 0 .8

1 7 3 .2

1 7 1 .7

1 8 1 .2

1 8 2 .8

1 8 2 .7

In s u r a n c e ............................................................................................

1 5 0 .7

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .3

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .0

157 .1

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .6

.6

3 .9

S e r v ic e s ..................................................................................................

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .0

1 57.1

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .3

1 6 1 .5

.7

2 .8

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .0

1 5 8 .2

1 6 0 .8

1 6 2 .8

1 6 3 .7

1 6 4 .0

1 6 4 .0

1 6 4 .6

.4

1.1

1 4 6 .6

148 .1

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .6

1 5 5 .4

1 5 7 .3

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .9

.7

3 .8

H e a lth s e r v ic e s .................................................................................
H o s p ita ls ...........................................................................................

5 .5

- .1

1 4 4 .9

1 4 6 .8

1 4 8 .5

1 5 1 .0

1 5 3 .3

1 5 5 .4

1 57 .1

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .2

1 .0

4 .5

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .4

1 56.1

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .5

1 6 1 .2

1 6 1 .2

1 6 5 .2

2 .5

3 .5

C o lle g e s a n d u n iv e r s itie s .........................................................

1 5 2 .5

1 5 2 .9

1 54 .1

1 5 5 .0

1 5 8 .4

1 5 9 .6

1 5 9 .9

1 5 9 .9

1 63 .1

2 .0

3 .0

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ............................................................................

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .9

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .5

1 5 7 .2

.4

3 .3

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ......................................................................

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .6

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .0

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .2

.4

3 .4

E x c lu d in g s a le s o c c u p a tio n s ................................................

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .9

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .9

1 5 8 .3

1 60.1

1 6 1 .3

162 .1

.5

3 .3

B lu e - c o lla r o c c u p a t io n s ................................................................

1 4 0 .3

1 4 0 .9

1 4 2 .8

1 4 3 .9

1 4 5 .8

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .5

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .8

.5

2 .7

S e r v ic e o c c u p a t io n s ......................................................................

1 4 3 .4

1 4 4 .7

1 4 6 .0

147 .1

1 4 8 .2

1 50 .1

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .4

.7

3 .5

State and local government workers.....................................

1 4 7 .2

1 4 8 .3

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .2

1 5 4 .3

1 5 5 .2

156 .1

1 5 6 .7

1 60 .1

1 .8

3.1

W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

147 .1

1 4 8 .0

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .8

1 5 2 .7

1 5 3 .3

1 5 3 .9

1 5 4 .4

1 5 7 .4

1 .9

3.1

P r o fe s s io n a l s p e c ia lty a n d te c h n ic a l..........................................

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .2

1 49.1

1 4 9 .8

1 5 3 .0

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .6

154 .1

1 5 7 .5

2 .2

2 .9

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :

1 4 7 .3

1 4 8 .8

1 50.1

1 5 1 .5

1 5 3 .9

155 .1

1 5 6 .6

1 5 6 .8

1 5 9 .0

1 .4

3 .3

1 4 5 .0

1 4 6 .2

1 4 7 .0

1 4 7 .6

1 4 9 .8

1 5 0 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 5 2 .8

1 55 .1

1 .5

3 .5

1 4 3 .9

145 .1

1 4 6 .0

1 4 6 .5

1 49.1

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .6

152 .1

1 5 4 .5

1 .6

3 .6

S e r v ic e s ...................................................................................................
4
S e r v ic e s e x c lu d in g s c h o o ls .........................................................

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .2

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .2

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .0

1 5 8 .4

2 .2

3.1

1 4 6 .7

1 4 7 .9

149 .1

1 5 0 .7

1 5 3 .2

1 5 4 .9

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .3

1 59 .1

1 .1

H e a lth s e r v ic e s ................................................................................

1 4 7 .7

1 4 9 .3

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .8

1 5 7 .8

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .5

1.1

4.1

E x e c u tiv e , a d m in is tr a tiv e , a n d m a n a g e r ia l..............................

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :

H o s p ita ls .........................................................................................

3 .9

1 4 7 .7

1 4 9 .2

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .8

1 5 4 .2

1 5 5 .7

1 5 7 .7

1 5 8 .8

1.1

4 .2

1 4 8 .0

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .0

1 5 4 .2

1 5 4 .5

1 58.1

2 .3

2 .9

2 .4

2 .9

1 6 0 .6

S c h o o ls ...........................................................................................

1 48.1

1 4 8 .9

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .2

1 5 3 .8

1 54 .1

1 5 4 .3

1 5 4 .6

1 5 8 .3

E le m e n ta r y a n d s e c o n d a r y .................................................

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .5

1 4 9 .0

1 4 9 .5

1 5 2 .8

1 53.1

1 5 3 .4

1 5 3 .6

1 5 7 .4

2 .5

3 .0

C o lle g e s a n d u n iv e r s itie s .....................................................

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .4

1 5 1 .8

1 5 6 .5

1 5 6 .7

1 5 6 .8

1 5 7 .3

1 6 0 .7

2 .2

2 .7

P u b lic a d m in is tr a tio n .........................................................................

1 4 4 .6

1 46.1

1 4 7 .6

1 4 8 .7

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .8

.9

3 .0

1 C o n s is ts o f p riv a te in d u s try w o rk e rs (e x c lu d in g fa r m a n d h o u s e h o ld w o rk e rs ) a n d

S ta te a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t ( e x c lu d in g F e d e ra l G o v e rn m e n t) w o r k e r s .

E a r n in g s In d e x , w h ic h w a s d is c o n tin u e d in J a n u a r y 1 9 8 9 .

2 C o n s is ts o f le g is la tiv e , ju d ic ia l, a d m in is tr a tiv e , a n d r e g u la to r y a c tiv itie s .

27.

T h is s e rie s h a s th e s a m e in d u s try a n d o c c u p a tio n a l c o v e r a g e a s th e H o u r ly

4 In c lu d e s , fo r e x a m p le , lib ra ry , s o c ia l, a n d h e a lth s e rv ic e s .

Em ploym ent Cost Index, benefits, private industry workers by occupation and industry group

[June 1989 = 100]
Percent change

2002

2001

2000
Series
Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

Mar.

Dec.

June

Sept.

12 months
ended

3 months
ended

Sept. 2002
Private industry workers...........................................................

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .6

1 6 1 .5

1 6 3 .2

1 6 5 .2

1 6 6 .7

1 6 9 .3

1 7 1 .6

1 73 .1

0 .9

4 .8

W o r k e r s , b y o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p :
W h it e - c o lla r w o r k e r s ..............................................................................

1 6 0 .4

1 6 1 .5

1 6 5 .2

1 6 7 .4

1 6 9 .5

1 7 1 .2

1 7 3 .5

1 76.1

1 7 7 .2

.6

4 .5

1 53 .1

1 54 .1

1 5 5 .7

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 5 9 .2

1 6 2 .2

1 6 4 .0

1 6 6 .2

1 .3

5 .0

W o r k e r s , b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n :
G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 5 5 .7

1 5 6 .2

1 5 8 .5

1 5 9 .6

1 6 0 .8

1 6 2 .6

1 6 5 .8

1 6 7 .4

1 6 8 .8

.8

5 .0

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ...................................................................................

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .4

1 6 2 .6

1 6 4 .6

1 67.1

1 6 8 .4

1 7 0 .7

1 7 3 .3

1 7 4 .9

.9

4 .7

M a n u f a c tu r in g ..........................................................................................

1 5 4 .9

1 5 4 .8

1 57.1

1 5 7 .9

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .4

1 6 3 .7

1 6 5 .5

1 6 6 .8

.8

5 .2

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g .................................................................................

1 58 .1

1 5 9 .7

1 6 2 .9

1 6 4 .9

1 6 7 .4

1 6 8 .6

1 71.1

1 7 3 .5

1 7 5 .2

1 .0

4 .7


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

83

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

28. Employment Cost Index, private nonfarm workers by bargaining status, region, and area size
[June 1989 = 100]_______________________________________________________________
2000

2001

2002

Percent change

Series
Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

3 months
ended

12 months
ended

Sept. 2002
COMPENSATION
Workers, by bargaining status1
U n io n ....................................................................................................................

1 46 .1

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .9

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .0

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .8

1 5 6 .3

1 58.1

1 .2

4 .7

G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ......................................................................................

1 4 6 .8

1 4 7 .3

1 4 7 .9

1 4 9 .3

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .6

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .7

1 5 6 .2

1 .0

3 .7

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 4 5 .2

1 4 6 .4

1 4 7 .6

1 4 9 .5

1 5 1 .2

1 5 4 .2

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .9

1 .5

5 .8

M a n u f a c tu r in g ............................................................................................

1 47.1

1 4 7 .4

1 4 7 .9

1 4 8 .8

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .4

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .6

1 5 5 .9

.8

4 .0

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ...................................................................................

1 4 5 .0

1 4 6 .2

1 4 7 .3

1 4 9 .4

1 51 .1

1 5 3 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 6 .6

1 5 8 .6

1 .4

5.1

N o n u n io n ............................................................................................................

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .6

1 5 3 .8

1 5 5 .3

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .8

1 5 9 .6

1 6 1 .4

1 6 2 .5

.5

3 .5

G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ......................................................................................

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .3

1 5 1 .6

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .0

1 5 5 .3

1 5 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 5 9 .5

.6

3 .6

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .3

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .3

1 6 2 .2

1 6 2 .9

.4

3 .4

M a n u f a c tu r in g ............................................................................................

1 4 9 .2

1 4 9 .9

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .5

1 5 7 .6

1 59.1

1 60 .1

.6

3 .7

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ...................................................................................

1 5 0 .7

1 5 1 .8

1 5 3 .9

1 5 5 .4

1 5 7 .0

1 5 8 .2

1 5 9 .9

1 6 1 .7

1 6 2 .4

.4

3 .4

Workers, by region1
N o r t h e a s t ..........................................................................................................

1 4 9 .3

1 5 0 .3

1 5 1 .6

1 5 3 .7

1 5 5 .2

1 5 6 .3

1 5 8 .3

1 5 9 .9

1 6 0 .5

.4

3 .4

S o u t h ..................................................................................................................

1 4 7 .6

1 4 8 .6

151 .1

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .2

1 5 7 .6

1 5 8 .9

.8

3 .5

M id w e s t ( fo r m e r ly N o r th C e n t r a l) .........................................................

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .8

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .4

1 5 8 .6

1 61 .1

1 6 2 .2

1 6 3 .5

.6

3 .9

W e s t ...................................................................................................................

1 5 0 .8

1 5 1 .8

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .6

1 5 9 .4

1 6 0 .4

1 6 2 .9

1 6 3 .8

.6

3 .9

Workers, by area size1
M e tr o p o lita n a r e a s .......................................................................................

1 50 .1

1 5 1 .0

1 53 .1

1 5 4 .6

1 5 6 .0

1 5 7 .4

1 59 .1

1 6 0 .9

1 6 1 .8

.6

3 .7

O th e r a r e a s .....................................................................................................

1 4 8 .8

1 5 0 .3

1 52 .1

1 5 3 .7

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .6

1 5 7 .5

1 5 8 .5

1 6 0 .0

.9

3 .4

WAGES AND SALARIES
Workers, by bargaining status1
U n io n ....................................................................................................................

1 4 0 .0

1 4 1 .2

142 .1

1 4 3 .7

1 45 .1

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .4

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .3

1 .0

4 .3

G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ......................................................................................

1 4 0 .2

1 4 1 .3

1 4 2 .4

1 4 4 .2

1 4 5 .3

1 4 6 .3

1 4 7 .2

1 5 8 .6

1 5 0 .0

.9

3 .2

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 40 .1

1 4 1 .5

1 4 2 .2

1 4 3 .7

1 4 5 .4

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .0

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .9

1 .0

5 .2

M a n u f a c tu r in g ............................................................................................

1 4 1 .4

1 4 2 .6

1 4 3 .9

1 4 5 .5

1 4 6 .7

1 4 8 .0

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .0

.9

3 .3
4 .7

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ...................................................................................

1 3 9 .2

1 4 0 .4

141 .1

1 4 2 .7

1 4 4 .3

1 47.1

1 48.1

1 4 9 .6

1 51 .1

1 .0

N o n u n io n ............................................................................................................

1 48 .1

1 4 9 .0

1 5 0 .8

1 5 2 .2

1 5 3 .4

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

1 58 .1

.4

3.1

G o o d s - p r o d u c in g ......................................................................................

1 4 5 .8

1 4 6 .8

1 4 8 .8

1 5 0 .3

1 51 .1

152 1

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .8

1 5 5 .5

.5

2 .9

S e r v ic e - p r o d u c in g ....................................................................................

1 4 8 .7

1 4 9 .6

1 5 1 .4

1 5 2 .7

1 54 .1

1 55 .1

1 5 6 .7

1 5 8 .3

1 5 8 .9

.4

3.1

M a n u f a c tu r in g ...........................................................................................

1 4 7 .2

1 4 8 .0

150 .1

1 5 1 .6

1 5 2 .2

153 .1

1 5 4 .7

1 56.1

1 5 6 .8

.4

3 .0

N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g ...................................................................................

1 4 8 .0

1 4 8 .9

1 5 0 .7

1 5 2 .0

1 5 3 .3

1 5 4 .4

1 5 5 .9

1 5 7 .5

1 58 .1

.4

3.1

N o r t h e a s t ..........................................................................................................

1 4 5 .3

1 4 6 .0

1 4 7 .3

1 4 9 .2

1 5 0 .6

1 5 1 .7

1 5 3 .5

1 5 4 .9

1 5 4 .9

.1

3 .0

S o u t h ..................................................................................................................

1 4 5 .3

1 4 6 .3

1 4 8 .3

1 4 9 .3

1 5 0 .2

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .5

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .7

.7

3 .0

1 4 8 .6

1 4 9 .6

1 5 0 .9

1 5 2 .3

1 5 3 .6

1 5 4 .7

1 57.1

1 5 8 .5

159 2

4

3 .6

1 4 8 .2

1 4 9 .2

1 5 1 .3

1 5 2 .9

1 5 4 .3

1 5 6 .0

1 5 6 .4

1 5 8 .7

1 5 9 .3

4

3 .2

Workers, by region1

Workers, by area size1
M e tr o p o lita n a r e a s ......................................................................................

1 47.1

1 4 8 .0

1 4 9 .8

1 5 1 .2

1 5 2 .4

1 5 3 .7

1 55.1

1 5 6 .7

1 5 7 .4

.4

3 .3

O th e r a r e a s .....................................................................................................

1 4 4 .7

1 4 6 .0

1 4 7 .4

1 4 8 .8

1 4 9 .7

1 5 0 .5

1 5 1 .7

1 5 2 .6

1 5 3 .8

.8

2 .7

1 T h e in d e x e s a re c a lc u la te d d iffe re n tly fr o m t h o s e f o r th e o c c u p a tio n a n d in d u s try g ro u p s .

T e c h n ic a l N o te , " E s tim a tio n p ro c e d u r e s fo r th e E m p lo y m e n t C o s t In d e x ," M a y 1 9 8 2 .


84
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

F o r a d e ta ile d d e s c r ip tio n o f th e in d e x c a lc u la tio n , s e e th e

Monthly Labor Review

29. Percent of full-time employees participating in employer-provided benefit plans, and in selected features within plans,
Ite m
S c o p e o f s u rv e y (in 0 0 0 's ) ..................................................

1984

1982

1980
2 1 ,3 5 2

2 1 ,0 4 3

3 1 ,1 6 3

3 2,4 28

3 1,0 59

2 1 ,3 0 3

2 1 ,0 1 3

1997

1995

1993

1991

1989

1988

1986

2 8 ,7 2 8

3 3 ,3 7 4

3 8 ,4 0 9
2 9 ,3 4 0

N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s (in 0 0 0 's ):
W ith m e d ic a l c a re ...............................................................

2 0,711

2 0 ,4 1 2

2 0 ,3 8 3

2 0 ,2 3 8

2 7,9 53

2 9 ,8 3 4

2 5 ,8 6 5

2 3 ,5 1 9

2 5 ,5 4 6

W ith life in s u r a n c e ..............................................................

2 0 ,4 9 8

2 0 ,2 0 1

2 0 ,1 7 2

20,451

2 8 ,5 7 4

3 0,4 82

2 9 ,2 9 3

2 6 ,1 7 5

2 9 ,0 7 8

3 3 ,4 9 5

1 7,6 76

17,231

16,1 90

1 9,567

2 0 ,4 3 0

1 8,3 86

1 6 ,0 1 5

1 7,4 17

1 9,2 02

W ith d e fin e d b e n e fit p la n .................................................

17,9 36

T im e - o f f p la n s
P a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
P a id lu n c h t im e ......................................................................

10

9

9

10

11

10

8

9

-

-

A v e ra g e m in u te s p e r d a y ................................................

-

25

26

27

29

26

30

29

67

68

_

-

76

73

72

72

A v e ra g e m in u te s p e r d a y ................................................

75
-

71

25

26

26

26

26

28

26

P a id fu n e ra l le a v e ................................................................

-

-

-

88

85

84

80

83

_
80

81
3 .7

P a id re s t tim e .........................................................................

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r o c c u r re n c e .......................................

-

-

-

3.2

3.2

3.3

3 .3

3 .0

3 .3

P a id h o lid a y s ..........................................................................
A v e ra g e d a y s p e r y e a r ....................................................

99

99

99

99

96

97

92

91

89

89

1 0 .1

1 0 .0

9 .8

1 0 .0

9.4

9.2

1 0 .2

9 .4

9.1

9 .3
20

P a id p e rs o n a l le a v e .............................................................

20

24

23

25

24

22

21

21

22

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r y e a r....................................................

-

3 .8

3 .6

3.7

3.3

3.1

3 .3

3.1

3 .3

3 .5

P a id v a c a tio n s ........................................................................
P a id s ic k le a v e 1...................................................................
U n p a id m a te rn ity le a v e ......................................................

100

99

99

100

98

97

96

97

96

95

62

67

67

70

69

68

67

65

58

56

-

33

37

37

60

-

-

26

53

84

-

76

-

U n p a id p a te rn ity le a v e .......................................................

-

-

-

-

16

18

U n p a id fa m ily le a v e ............................................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

97

97

97

95

90

92

83

82

77

86

Insurance plans
P a rtic ip a n ts in m e d ic a l c a re p la n s ....................................
P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith c o v e ra g e for:
H o m e h e a lth c a r e ...............................................................

-

-

46

66

78

85

E x te n d e d c a re fa c ilitie s ...................................................

58

62

62

70

79

80

80

82

73

78

18

28

28

30

42

56

63

P h y s ic a l e x a m ....................................................................

8

76

75

81

-

-

26

27

36

43

44

47

51

61

67

69

-

$ 1 1 .9 3

$ 1 2 .8 0

$ 1 9 .2 9

$25.31

$ 2 6 .6 0

$ 3 1 .5 5

$ 3 3 .9 2

$ 3 9 .1 4

66

69

76

78

80

P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith e m p lo y e e
c o n trib u tio n re q u ire d fo r:
A v e ra g e m o n th ly c o n trib u tio n .....................................

51

58

63

64

-

$ 3 5 .9 3

$ 4 1 .4 0

$ 6 0 .0 7

$ 7 2 .1 0

$ 9 6 .9 7

$ 1 0 7 .4 2

$ 1 1 8 .3 3

$ 1 3 0 .0 7

96

96

96

96

92

94

94

91

87

87

69

_

72
_

74
_

72

78

71

71

76

77

74

10

8

7

6

5

7

6

-

64

64

59

49

42

44

41

37

33

40

43

47

48

42

45

4C

41

42

43

51

49

46

43

45

44

-

-

-

-

-

-

53

55

82

76

63

63

59

56

52

50

46
A v e ra g e m o n tn iy c o n triD u tio n .....................................
P a rtic ip a n ts in life in s u ra n c e p la n s ..................................
P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
A c c id e n ta l d e a th a n d d is m e m b e rm e n t
in s u ra n c e .............................................................................
R e tire e p ro te c tio n a v a ila b le .............................................
P a rtic ip a n ts in lo n g -te rm d is a b ility
P a rtic ip a n ts in s ic k n e s s a n d a ccid e n t
54

51

P a rtic ip a n ts in s h o rt-te rm d is a b ility p la n s 1...................

Retirement plans
P a rtic ip a n ts in d e fin e d b e n e fit p en sio n p la n s .............

84

84

P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
N o rm a l re tire m e n t p rio r to a g e 6 5 ...............................

55

58

63

64

59

62

55

52

52

52

98

97

97

98

98

97

98

95

96

95

47

35

26

22

7

4

6

10

53

52

54

57

55

64

56

61

58

56

45

45

56

62

62

63

54

48

51

49

60

45

48

48

49

55

57

33

36

41

44

43

54

55

P a rtic ip a n ts in d e fin e d c o n trib u tio n p la n s .....................
P a rtic ip a n ts in p la n s w ith ta x -d e fe rre d s a v in g s
a rra n g e m e n ts ......................................................................

Other benefits
E m p lo y e e s e lig ib le fo r:

P re m iu m c o n v e rs io n p la n s ..............................................
1

T h e d e fin itio n s fo r p a id s ic k le a ve a nd s h o rt-te rm d is a b ility (p re vio u sly s ic k n e s s a nd

2

5

{

10

12

12

13

5

12

23

36

52

38
5

32
7

I
I
fits at le s s th a n fu ll pay.
P rio r to

199 5, re im b u rs e m e n t a c c o u n ts in c lu d e d p re m iu m c o n v e rs io n

p lan s, w h ic h

a c c id e n t in s u ra n c e ) w e re c h a n g e d fo r th e 199 5 su rve y. P aid s ic k le a ve n o w in c lu d e s o n ly

2

p la n s th a t s p e c ify e ith e r a m a x im u m n u m b e r o f d a y s p e r y e a r o r u n lim ite d days.

s p e c ific a lly a llo w m e d ic a l plan p a rtic ip a n ts to p ay re q u ire d plan p re m iu m s w ith p re ta x

S h o rt-

te rm s d is a b ility n o w in c lu d e s all in s u re d , s e lf-in s u re d , a n d S ta te -m a n d a te d p la n s a va ila b le

dollars.

on a p e r-d is a b ility b a s is , a s w e ll a s th e u n fu n d e d p e r-d is a b ility p la n s p re v io u s ly re p o rte d as

ta b u la te d se p a ra te ly.

A lso ,

re im b u rs e m e n t a c c o u n ts th a t w e re

p art o f fle x ib le b e n e fit p la n s w e re

s ic k le a v e . S ic k n e s s a n d a c c id e n t in s u ra n c e , re p o rte d in y e a rs p rio r to th is su rve y, in c lu d e d
o n ly in s u re d , s e lf-in s u re d , a n d S ta te -m a n d a te d p la n s p ro v id in g p e r-d is a b ility b e n e ­


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

NOTE: D a sh in d ic a te s d a ta not a vailab le .

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

85

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

30. Percent of full-time employees participating in employer-provided benefit plans, and in selected features
within plans, small private establishments and State and local governments, 1987, 1990, 1992, 1994, and 1996
Small private establishments

Item
1990

1992

1994

State and local governments
1987

1996

S c o p e o f s u rv e y (in 0 0 0 's )..................................................

3 2 ,4 6 6

3 4,3 60

3 5 ,9 1 0

3 9 ,8 1 6

N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s (in 0 0 0 ’s):
W ith m e d ic a l c a re ...............................................................

2 2 ,4 0 2

2 4,3 96

2 3 ,5 3 6

W ith life in s u ra n c e ..............................................................

2 0 ,7 7 8

2 1,9 90

2 1 ,9 5 5

W ith d e fin e d b e n e fit p la n .................................................

6 ,4 9 3

7 ,5 5 9

5 ,4 8 0

1990

1992

1994

10,321

12,972

1 2,4 66

1 2,9 07

2 5 ,5 9 9

9 ,5 9 9

1 2,064

1 1,2 19

1 1,1 92

2 4 ,6 3 5

8 ,7 7 3

1 1,415

1 1,0 95

1 1,1 94

5 ,8 8 3

9 ,5 9 9

1 1,675

1 0,8 45

1 1,7 08

Time-off plans
P a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
P a id lu n c h t im e .....................................................................

8

9

-

-

17

11

10

_

A v e ra g e m in u te s p e r d a y ................................................

37

37

-

-

34

36

34

_

P a id re s t tim e ........................................................................

48

49

58

56

53

-

27

26

-

-

A v e ra g e m in u te s p e r d a y ................................................

-

29

29

29

_

47

50

50

51

56

63

P a id fu n e ra l le a v e ...............................................................

65

62

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r o c c u r re n c e .......................................

2 .9

3.0

3.1

3 .0

3.7

3.7

3 .7

3 .7

P a id h o lid a y s .........................................................................

84

82

82

80

81

74

75

73

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r y e a r 1...................................................
P a id p e rs o n a l le a v e .............................................................

9 .5

9.2

7.5

7 .6

10.9

13.6

14.2

11.5

11

12

13

14

38

39

38

38

A v e ra g e d a y s p e r y e a r....................................................

2 .8

2 .6

2 .6

3 .0

2 .7

2 .9

2 .9

3 .0

P a id v a c a tio n s .......................................................................

88

88

88

86

72

67

67

66

P a id s ic k le a v e 2...................................................................

47

53

50

50

97

95

95

94

U n p a id le a v e ..............................................................
Unpaid paternity leave..............................................

17

18
7

-

-

57

51

59

_

30

33

47

48

“

“

44
“

93

71

66

64

93

93

90

87

80

-

-

8

U n p a id fa m ily le a v e .............................................................

-

"

Insurance plans
P a rtic ip a n ts in m e d ic a l c a re p la n s ....................................

69

P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith c o v e ra g e for:
H o m e h e a lth c a re ....................................................

79

E x te n d e d c a re fa c ilitie s ..........................................

83

84

P h y s ic a l e x a m ....................................................................

26

28

76

82

87

84

78

79

84

81

36

36

47

55

P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith e m p lo y e e
c o n trib u tio n re q u ire d for:
S e lf c o v e r a g e ......................................................................

42

47

52

52

35

38

43

47

A v e ra g e m o n th ly c o n trib u tio n .....................................

$ 2 5 .1 3

$36.51

$ 4 0 .9 7

$ 4 2 .6 3

$ 1 5 .7 4

$ 2 5 .5 3

$ 2 8 .9 7

$ 3 0 .2 0

F a m ily c o v e r a g e ................................................................

67

73

76

75

71

65

72

71

A v e ra g e m o n th ly c o n trib u tio n .....................................

$ 1 0 9 .3 4

$ 1 5 0 .5 4

$ 1 5 9 .6 3

$ 1 8 1 .5 3

$ 7 1 .8 9

$ 1 1 7 .5 9

$ 1 3 9 .2 3

$ 1 4 9 .7 0

P a rtic ip a n ts in life in s u ra n c e p la n s ..................................

64

64

61

62

85

88

89

87

64

P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
A c c id e n ta l d e a th a n d d is m e m b e rm e n t
in s u ra n c e ............................................................................

78

76

79

77

67

67

74

S u rv iv o r in c o m e b e n e fits .................................................

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

2

R e tire e p ro te c tio n a v a ila b le ............................................

19

25

20

13

55

45

46

46

19

23

20

22

31

27

28

30

6

26

26

14

21

22

21

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20

22

15

93

90

87

91

P a rtic ip a n ts in lo n g -te rm d is a b ility
in s u ra n c e p la n s ...................................................................
P a rtic ip a n ts in s ic k n e s s a n d a c c id e n t
in s u ra n c e p la n s ....................................................................
P a rtic ip a n ts in s h o rt-te rm d is a b ility p la n s 2 ...................

29

Retirement plans
P a rtic ip a n ts in d e fin e d b e n e fit pen sio n p la n s .............

15

P e rc e n t o f p a rtic ip a n ts w ith :
N o rm a l re tire m e n t p rio r to a g e 6 5 ...............................

54

50

-

47

92

89

92

92

E a rly re tire m e n t a v a ila b le ...............................................

95

95

-

88

89

87

7

4

-

92
-

90

A d h o c p e n s io n in c re a s e in la st 5 y e a rs ....................

33

16

10

13

58

54

-

53

100

100

100

99

B e n e fit c o o rd in a te d w ith S o c ia l S e c u rity ...................

49

46

-

44

18

8

10

49

P a rtic ip a n ts in d e fin e d c o n trib u tio n p la n s ......................

31

33

34

38

9

9

9

9

17

24

23

28

28

45

45

24

T e rm in a l e a rn in g s fo r m u la .............................................

P a rtic ip a n ts in p la n s w ith ta x -d e fe rre d s a v in g s
a rra n g e m e n ts .......................................................................

Other benefits
E m p lo y e e s e lig ib le for:
F le x ib le b e n e fits p la n s .......................................................

1

2

3

4

5

5

5

5

R e im b u rs e m e n t a c c o u n ts 3 ..............................................

8

14

19

12

5

31

50

64

P re m iu m c o n v e rs io n p la n s ............................................

7

1 M e th o d s u s e d to c a lc u la te th e a v e ra g e n u m b e r o f p a id h o lid a y s w e re re vise d

in 1 9 9 4 to c o u n t p a rtia l d a y s m o re p re cise ly.

A v e ra g e h o lid a y s fo r 199 4 a re

n o t c o m p a ra b le w ith th o s e re p o rte d in 1 99 0 a nd 1992.
2

T h e d e fin itio n s fo r p a id s ic k le a v e a nd sh o rt-te rm

S ic k n e s s a n d a c c id e n t in su ra n ce , re p o rte d in y e a rs p rio r to th is su rve y,
in c lu d e d o n ly in sured , s e lf-in s u re d , a n d S ta te -m a n d a te d p la n s p ro viding p e rd is a b ility b e n e fits a t less th a n full pay.

d isa b ility (p re vio u sly

3

P rio r to 1996, re im b u rs e m e n t a c c o u n ts in c lu d e d p re m iu m c o n v e rs io n p lan s,

s ic k n e s s a n d a c c id e n t in s u ra n c e ) w e re c h a n g e d fo r th e 1 9 9 6 su rve y. P aid sic k

w h ic h

le a v e n o w in c lu d e s o n ly p la n s th a t s p e c ify e ith e r a m a xim u m n u m b e r o f d ays

p re m iu m s w ith p re ta x d ollars. A lso , re im b u rs e m e n t a c c o u n ts tha t w e re part of

p e r y e a r o r u n lim ite d d a y s . S h o rt-te rm d is a b ility n o w in c lu d e s all in su re d , se lf-

fle x ib le b e n e fit p la n s w e re ta b u la te d se p a ra te ly.

s p e c ific a lly

a llo w

m e d ic a l

p lan

in s u re d , a n d S ta te -m a n d a te d p la n s a v a ila b le on a p e r-d is a b ility b a s is , a s w e ll
a s th e u n fu n d e d p e r-d is a b ility p la n s p re v io u s ly re p o rte d a s s ic k le ave .


86
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

NOTE: D ash in d ic a te s d a ta not a vailab le .

p a rtic ip a n ts

to

p ay

re q u ire d

plan

31. Work stoppages involving 1,000 workers or more
Annual totals
Measure
2000

2001

2002P

2001
Nov.

Jan

Dec.

Apr

Mar

Feb

June

May

Nov.

Oct.

Sept.

Aug.

July

N u m b e r o f s to p p a g e s :
B e g in n in g in p e r io d .....................................

39

29

0

2

0

1

1

2

3

1

3

1

3

1

2

In e ffe c t d u r in g p e r io d ...............................

40

30

1

2

1

2

1

3

5

3

4

3

3

3

2

W o r k e r s in v o lv e d :
B e g in n in g in p e r io d (in t h o u s a n d s ) ....

394

99

.0

6 .0

.0

1.5

2 .9

4.1

5.1

1.5

6 .7

3 .5

1 3 .7

1 .2

4 .3

In e ffe c t d u r in g p e r io d (in th o u s a n d s ).

397

102

1 .6

6 .0

1 .0

2 .5

2 .9

7 .0

9 .2

5 .3

8 .2

6 .2

1 3 .7

1 3 .5

4 .3

2 0 ,4 1 9

1,151

1 1 .2

5 5 .0

2 1 .0

9 .0

4 3 .5

8 0 .7

1 3 8 .2

3 6 .0

5 4 .0

5 0 .6

3 9 .3

1 3 3 .4

2 3 .9

.0 6

.0 0

,0 0

,0 0

,0 0

.0 0

.0 0

.0 0

.0 0

.0 0

.0 0

.0 0

D a y s id le :

P e r c e n t o f e s tim a te d w o rk in a tim e 1....
1 A g r ic u ltu ra l a n d

(*

_____ a

,00

g o v e r n m e n t e m p lo y e e s a re in c lu d e d in th e to ta l e m p lo y e d a n d to ta l w o rk in g tim e ; p riv a te h o u s e h o ld , fo re s try , a n d fis h e ry e m p lo y e e s a re e x c lu d e d . A n e x p la n a tio n of

th e m e a s u r e m e n t o f id le n e s s a s a p e rc e n ta g e o f th e to ta l tim e w o rk e d is fo u n d i n " T o ta l e c o n o m y ’ m e a s u re s o f s trik e id le n e s s ,"

Monthly Labor Review , O c to b e r

196 8, pp. 54— 56.

2 L e s s th a n 0 .0 0 5 .

p = p r e lim in a ry .
N O T E : D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

87

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

32. Consumer Price Indexes for All Urban Consumers and for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers: U.S. city average,
by expenditure category and commodity or service group
[1982-84 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]_______________________

Annual average

Series

2000

2001

2002

2001
Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX
FOR ALL URBAN CONSUMERS
A ll ite m s ...................................................................................

172.2

177.1

177.4

176.7

177.1

177.8

178.8

179.8

179.8

179.9

180.1

180.7

181.0

181.0

181 .3

A ll ite m s (1 9 6 7 = 1 0 0 ).........................................................

5 15.8

5 30.4

531 .3

5 29 2.0

5 30 .6

5 32.7

5 35.5

5 38 .6

5 38 .5

5 38 .9

5 39 .5

5 41.2

542.1

5 43 .2

543.1

F o o d a n d b e v e ra g e s ..........................................................

168.4

173.6

175.2

175.2

176.2

176.4

176.6

176.7

176.4

176.4

176.6

176 .6

176.9

177.1

177 .4

F o o d .......................................................................................

167.8

173.1

174.6

174.7

175.8

175.9

176.1

176.2

175.8

175.8

176.0

176.0

176.4

176.5

176 .8

F o o d a t h o m e ...................................................................

167.9

173.4

174.7

174.7

176.2

176.0

176.3

176.4

175.5

175.0

175.2

174.9

175.2

175.1

1 75 .5

C e re a ls a n d b a k e ry p ro d u c ts ...................................

188.3

193.8

194.9

195.3

196.7

197.6

197.0

198.1

198.2

198.7

198.7

198.6

198.4

1 98.9

198 .3

M e a ts , p o u ltry , fis h , a nd e g g s ..................................

154.5

161.3

162.7

162.0

162.1

161.8

162.8

162.5

162.4

161.9

162.3

162.2

161.8

161.3

162.1

D a iry a n d re la te d p ro d u c ts 1......................................

160.7

167.1

171.2

170.8

169.9

170.1

169.4

168.7

169.0

168.0

167.6

167.2

166 .3

166.5

167.1

2 04 .6

2 1 2 .2

2 1 2 .9

2 14.4

2 24 .8

2 23 .3

2 2 5 .8

223 .4

N o n a lc o h o lic b e v e ra g e s a nd b e v e ra g e
m a te r ia ls .......................................................................

137.8

139.2

139.5

18.5

139.5

140.0

140.1

140.1

138.0

137.5

138.3

137.6

140.2

140.5

139.1

O th e r fo o d s a t h o m e ....................................................

155.6

159.6

160.3

160.9

161.3

160.4

159.9

161.5

160.0

160.8

161.0

160.6

160.8

160.9

161.1

S u g a r a n d s w e e ts .......................................................

154.0

155.7

154.9

156.1

158.4

158.5

157.2

1 58 .5

159.6

157.9

158.0

160.2

159.9

159.6

159.9

F a ts a n d o ils .................................................................

147.4

155.7

155.6

156.9

158.3

157.2

156.4

156.5

155.9

154.6

154.9

154.1

154.1

155.9

153.4

O th e r fo o d s ...................................................................

172.2

176.0

177.6

177.9

177.4

176.3

175.9

177.8

176.1

177.4

177.3

176.9

177.0

177.0

1 78 .3
1 10 .3

O th e r m is c e lla n e o u s fo o d s 1'2 .............................

107.5

108.9

1 1 0 .6

108.5

108.9

108.0

107.8

108.0

108.9

109.0

1 1 0 .1

109.3

109.7

109.8

F o o d a w a y fro m h o m e 1..................................................

169.0

173.9

175.8

176.0

176.4

177.0

177.1

177.2

177.6

178.2

1 78 7.5

178.8

179.2

179.6

1 79 .8

O th e r fo o d a w a y fro m h o m e 1,2................................

109.0

113.4

115.5

115.5

115.5

115.8

116.3

116.9

117.1

117.6

117.7

118.1

118.8

119.1

119 .7

A lc o h o lic b e v e ra g e s ........................................................

174.7

179.3

181.2

180.9

181.8

182.6

182.5

182.9

183.3

183 .5

183.8

184.2

1 83.9

1 84.7

185.1

H o u s in g ...................................................................................

169.6

176.4

176.9

176.9

177.6

178.5

179.1

179.5

179.7

180.7

181.2

2 0 9 .6

181.5

181.4

181 .2

S h e lte r.................................................................................

193.4

2 0 0 .6

2 0 2 .9

2 03 .2

2 0 4 .5

206.1

2 07 .0

207 5

207 5

2 0 ft 1

R e n t o f p rim a ry re s id e n c e .........................................

183.9

192.1

195.5

196.4

197.0

197.7

198.2

198.5

198.8

199.3

199.8

2 0 0 .2

2 0 0 .7

2 0 1 .3

2 0 2 .0

L o d g in g a w a y fro m h o m e ..........................................

117.5

118.6

1 1 1 .6

108.0

113.1

119.3

121.9

122.1

1 2 0 .1

120.9

121.7

123.6

117 .6

117.0

113.2

O w n e rs ’ e q u iv a le n t re n t o f p rim a ry re s id e n c e 3...

198.7

2 0 6 .3

2 1 0 .1

2 1 0 .9

2 1 1 .6

2 1 2 .2

2 1 2 .8

2 13 .3

2 13 .7

2 14 .3

2 1 4 .9

2 15 .4

2 16 .2

2 1 6 .8

2 1 7 .3

T e n a n ts ' a n d h o u s e h o ld in s u ra n c e 1,2....................

103.7

106.2

106.9

106.3

106.4

106.8

106.8

107.2

107.6

107.8

108.6

109.6

1 1 0 .0

1 1 0 .0

111 .4

F u e ls a n d u tilitie s ..........................................................

137.9

150.2

143.5

142.2

141.5

140.0

140.2

140.3

141.5

146.2

146.8

146.8

147.2

144.4

143 .6

F u e ls ................................................................................

1 2 2 .8

135.4

127.8

126.2

125.3

123.7

123.8

123.8

125.1

130.3

130.8

130.7

131.0

127.9

127 .0

F u el o il a n d o th e r fu e ls ...........................................

129.7

129.3

118.3

112.7

112.9

112.3

1 1 2 .8

115.1

114.4

1 12.7

1 1 1 .6

1 1 2 .1

115.2

119.3

1 2 1 .8

G a s (p ip ed ) a n d e le c tric ity .....................................

128.0

142.4

134.7

133.5

132.4

130.6

130.7

130.6

132.1

138.0

138.6

138.5

138.7

134.9

1 33 .7

H o u s e h o ld fu rn is h in g s a nd o p e ra tio n s ..................

128.2

129.1

129.1

128.9

128.7

128.6

128.7

128.9

128.9

128.7

128.6

128.1

128.1

128.0

1 27 .8

A p p a r e l...................................................................................

129.6

127.3

128.0

123.7

120.4

123.5

128.2

128.8

127.1

122.7

118.7

120.5

124.6

126.8

125 .5

M e n 's a n d b o y s ' a p p a re l.............................................

129.7

125.7

127.4

1 2 2 .8

1 2 0 .8

1 2 2 .0

125.2

125.6

124.3

1 2 0 .8

118.4

118.3

1 2 0 .1

1 2 2 .8

123 .2

W o m e n 's a n d g irts' a p p a r e l.......................................

121.5

119.3

119.4

114.8

109.7

115.3

121.3

1 2 2 .2

2 29.4

113.7

107.6

1 1 1 .0

118.0

120.5

118 .0

In fa n ts ’ a n d to d d le rs ' a p p a r e l...................................

130.6

129.2

132.4

128.5

125.0

127.2

129.9

198.9

127.4

124.9

122.9

124.3

126.2

127 .7

127 .5

F o o tw e a r...........................................................................

123.8

123.0

123.7

1 2 0 .6

117.1

119.5

123.5

124.5

124.5

1 2 1 .2

118.5

119.7

1 2 1 .6

123.0

122 .7

T ra n s p o rta tio n ......................................................................

153.3

154.3

150.2

148.5

148.6

148.4

150.5

153.7

153.8

153.4

153.7

153.9

154.0

154.9

155 .2

P riv a te tra n s p o rta tio n .....................................................

149.1

150.0

146.1

144.3

144.4

144.1

146.3

149.6

149.5

149.1

149.5

149.7

150.0

151.1

1 51 .5

N e w a n d u s e d m o to r v e h ic le s 2 .................................

1 0 0 .8

101.3

101.3

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .0

1 0 0 .1

99.6

99.3

99.1

9 8.8

98.8

98.7

98.7

9 8.9

9 8 .8

N e w v e h ic le s .................................................................

142.8

142.1

142.6

143.5

142.7

141.2

140.7

140.4

139.8

139.2

138.7

138.1

138.7

139.5

140 .4

U s e d c a rs a n d tru c k s 1...............................................
M o to r fu e l..........................................................................

155.8

158.7

157.4

157.2

155.6

153.9

152.1

152.7

153.4

152.2

1 50.7

148 .8

129.3

124.7

104.5

96.1

9 7.9

98.2

107.7

121.4

121.4

1 2 0 .1

1 2 0 .8

121.5

121.7

1 24.5

124.4

G a s o lin e (a ll ty p e s ).....................................................

128.6

124.0

103.8

95.4

97.2

9 7.6

107.1

1 2 0 .8

1 2 0 .8

119.5

120.3

120.9

1 2 1 .1

123.9

1 23 .8

M o to r v e h ic le p a rts a n d e q u ip m e n t.........................

101.5

104.8

105.8

105.8

106.2

106.1

106.5

106.8

106.8

106.7

107.4

107.7

107.4

106.9

1 07.2

M o to r v e h ic le m a in te n a n c e a nd re p a ir...................

177.3

183.5

186.4

186.4

187.1

188.0

188.5

189.0

189.9

190.0

189.8

191.0

191.4

191.8

1 92 .8

P u b lic tra n s p o rta tio n .......................................................

2 09 .6

2 1 0 .6

205.1

2 0 4 .8

2 05 .8

2 07 .3

2 0 7 .9

2 0 9 .7

2 11 .3

2 1 1 .3

2 0 9 .7

2 09 .4

2 0 6 .5

2 03 .4

2 0 2 .3

M e d ic a l c a re ..........................................................................

2 60 .8

2 7 2 .8

2 76 .7

2 7 7 .3

2 79 .6

2 9 0 .5

152.8

151.8

152.2

2 81 .0

2 82 .0

2 83 .2

284.1

2 8 4 .7

2 86 .6

2 87 .3

2 8 7 .7

2 89 .2

M e d ic a l c a re c o m m o d itie s ............................................

238.1

2 4 7 .6

2 50 .6

2 5 1 .6

2 5 2 .6

2 53 .7

254.1

2 5 4 .8

2 55.4

2 56 .4

2 57 .5

2 5 7 .7

2 57 .9

2 5 8 .3

259.1

M e d ic a l c a re s e rv ic e s .....................................................

2 66.0

2 78 .8

2 83 .0

2 83 .5

2 86 .2

2 8 7 .7

2 88 .9

2 90 .2

2 91 .2

2 91 .7

2 9 3 .8

2 9 4 .7

2 95 .2

297.1

2 9 8 .5

P ro fe s s io n a l s e rv ic e s ...................................................

2 3 7 .7

2 46 .5

2 4 8 .8

2 48 .9

2 50 .6

2 51 .4

2 5 1 .9

2 52 .5

2 5 2 .9

2 53 .2

2 55 .0

2 54 .9

2 5 4 .8

2 5 6 .0

2 5 6 .5

H o s p ita l a n d re la te d s e rv ic e s .....................................

3 17 .3

3 38 .3

347.1

3 48 .3

353.1

356 .4

3 59.4

3 62.4

3 64.5

3 65 .3

3 67.6

3 7 1 .3

3 7 3 .3

3 76 .7

3 8 0 .7

R e c re a tio n 2 ...........................................................................

103.3

104.9

105.5

105.3

105.7

105.9

106.1

106.5

106.4

106.2

106.2

106.3

106.2

106.4

106.4

V id e o a n d a u d io 1'2 ..........................................................

1 0 1 .0

101.5

101.4

1 0 1 .2

1 0 2 .1

102.9

102.9

102.9

103.1

103.0

1 0 2 .6

102.4

102.3

1 0 2 .6

103.0

E d u c a tio n a n d c o m m u n ic a tio n 2 .....................................

102.5

105.2

107.0

106.9

107.2

107.3

106.6

106.2

106.6

106.9

107.6

108.9

109.5

109.4

109 .3

E d u c a tio n 2 ........................................................................

112.5

118.5

122.3

1 2 2 .0

1 2 2 .6

123.2

123.3

123.3

123.5

124.3

124.8

127.1

129.6

1 29.9

130.0

E d u c a tio n a l b o o k s a n d s u p p lie s ............................

2 7 9 .9

2 9 5 .9

3 04 .7

2 94 .7

3 03.0

3 14.4

3 14.2

314.4

3 15 .6

3 17 .4

3 18 .3

3 19 .6

3 23.2

3 23 .2

3 2 4 .0

T u itio n , o th e r s c h o o l fe e s , a n d c h ild c a re ...........

3 24.0

341.1

3 52.0

3 52.2

3 53.2

3 53 .9

354.1

354.1

3 54 .6

3 56 .8

3 58 .3

3 65 .6

3 72 .8

3 73 .8

274.1

C o m m u n ic a tio n 1,2...........................................................

9 3.6

93.3

9 3.3

93.4

93.4

93.1

92.0

91.2

9 1.9

9 1.8

9 2.6

93.2

9 2.5

92.2

9 1 .8

In fo rm a tio n a n d in fo rm a tio n p ro c e s s in q 1'2 .........

92.8

9 2.3

92.2

9 2.3

9 2.2

92.0

90.8

90.0

90.7

9 0.6

9 0.8

9 1.5

9 0.7

90.4

9 0 .0

T e le p h o n e s e rv ic e s 1,2 ............................................

98.5

9 9.3

99.6

9 9.6

100.3

100.3

99.1

98.2

99.3

99.2

99.5

1 0 0 .6

1 0 0 .1

99.9

9 9 .8

25.9

2 1 .3

2 0 .0

19.8

19.4

19.0

18.8

18.6

18.5

18.4

18.4

18.3

17.8

17.7

17.3

In fo rm a tio n a n d in fo rm a tio n p ro ce ssin g
o th e r th a n te le o h o n e s e rv ic e s 1'4 ......................
P e rs o n a l c o m p u te rs a n d p erip h e ra l
e q u ip m e n t 1,2.....................................................

41.1

2 9.5

2 5.8

2 5.3

24.6

2 3.8

23.1

2 2.9

23.0

2 2 .6

22.3

2 2 .0

2 1 .1

2 0.7

2 0 .0

O th e r g o o d s a n d s e rv ic e s .................................................

271.1

2 82 .6

2 89 .2

286 .4

2 87 .2

2 90 .2

2 8 8 .5

2 92 .9

2 9 1 .5

2 94.4

2 9 4 .5

2 9 5 .9

2 97 .0

2 95 .4

2 9 5 .6

T o b a c c o a n d s m o k in g p ro d u c ts ..................................

3 94 .9

4 2 5 .2

4 4 6 .7

4 3 1 .7

4 32 .8

4 49 .3

4 33 .4

4 61.4

4 49 .0

4 67 .4

4 67 .2

4 78 .2

4 8 5 .8

4 7 0 .6

4 7 0 .4

P e rs o n a l c a r e ...................................................................

165.6

170.5

172.6

172.6

173.2

173.7

174.1

174.4

174.7

174.9

175.0

174.9

174.9

175.3

175 .5

P e rs o n a l c a re p ro d u c ts 1............................................

153.7

155.1

155.4

155.4

155.2

155.5

155.1

155.4

154.8

155.4

154.6

154.3

154.4

154.6

154.2

P e rs o n a l c a re s e rv ic e s 1 .............................................

178.1

184.3

186.8

186.4

186.3

186.4

187.3

187.9

188.3

188.3

188.7

189.1

189.2

189.3

1 89 .9

S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .


88
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

32. Continued—Consumer Price Indexes for All Urban Consumers and for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers: U.S. city
average, by expenditure category and commodity or service group
[1982-84 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]

Annual average
Series

2000

2001

2002

2001
Nov.

Dec.

2 68 .0

M is c e lla n e o u s p e rs o n a l s e rv ic e s ..........

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

2 70 .4

2 71 .8

2 72 .9

2 73 .2

2 74.2

2 7 4 .6

275.1

2 7 5 .4

2 75 .2

2 7 6 .0

2 7 6 .6

C o m m o d ity a n d s e rv ic e g ro u p :
149.2

150.7

149.5

147.9

147.8

148.1

149 .4

151.0

150.5

149.8

149.3

149.6

150.2

150.7

1 50 .6

C o m m o d itie s .......................................................

168.4

173.6

175.2

175.2

176.2

176.4

176.6

176.7

176.4

176.4

176.6

176.6

176.9

177.1

1 77 .4

F o o d a n d b e v e ra g e s .....................................
C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d a n d b e v e ra g e s ..

137.7

137.2

134.6

132.3

131.6

132.1

133.7

136.0

135.4

134.4

133.6

1 34.0

134.8

135.5

135 .2

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d a n d b e v e ra g e s .

1 47.4

147.1

142.8

138.4

137.9

139.6

143.6

148.4

1 47.4

145.7

144.4

145 .4

147.2

1 48.4

148 .0

129.6

127.3

128.0

123.7

120.4

123.5

128.2

128.8

127.1

122.7

118.7

120.5

1 24.6

126.8

1 25 .5

A p p a r e l........................................................

1 66 .0

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d , b e v e ra g e s ,
a n d a p p a r e l...............................................

162.5

163.4

156.2

151.6

152.6

153.6

157.3

164.7

164.1

164.0

1 64 .3

164.8

165.2

166.0

D u ra b le s .........................................................

125.4

124.6

124.2

124.3

123.6

122.7

122.1

121.9

121.7

121.3

121.1

120.7

120.6

120.6

120 .5

S e r v ic e s ...............................................................

195.3

2 0 3 .4

205.1

2 05 .3

2 0 6 .3

2 07 .3

2 08 .0

2 08 .4

2 0 8 .8

2 09 .8

2 1 0 .7

2 11 .5

2 1 1 .5

2 1 1 .7

211.8

2 0 1 .3

2 08 .9

2 11 .3

2 11.7

2 13 .0

2 14 .7

2 15 .6

216.1

216.1

2 1 6 .8

2 1 7 .4

2 1 8 .3

2 1 7 .9

2 1 8 .4

2 1 8 .2

R e n t o f s h e lte r 3 .............................................
T ra n s p o ra ta tio n s e rv ic e s ...........................

196.1

2 0 1 .9

204 .2

2 04 .5

2 05 .2

2 06 .5

2 07 .3

2 07 .9

2 0 8 .9

2 09 .0

2 0 9 .6

210.1

210.1

2 1 0 .9

212.0

2 29 .9

2 38 .0

2 41 .9

2 41 .9

2 4 2 .9

2 43 .5

2 43 .6

2 43 .8

2 44 .5

245.1

2 4 6 .4

2 48 .2

249.1

2 4 9 .7

O th e r s e rv ic e s ...............................................

2 4 9 .9

182.1

S p e c ia l in d e x e s :
A ll ite m s le ss fo o d ........................................................

173 .0

177.8

177.8

177.0

177.4

178.2

179.2

1 80.4

180.4

180.6

180.8

1 81.5

1 81.8

182.2

A ll ite m s le ss s h e lte r...................................................

165.7

169.7

169.3

168.2

168.4

168.7

169.7

170.9

170.9

170.9

170.9

171.3

171,9

172.2

172 .3

A ll ite m s le s s m e d ic a l c a re ......................................

167.3

171.9

172.0

171.3

171.7

172.4

173.3

174.3

174.2

174 .4

174.5

175.0

1 75.3

175.6

1 75 .6

139.2

138.9

136.4

134.1

133.5

133.9

135.6

137.8

137.3

136.3

135.5

135.9

136.7

1 37 .3

1 37.0

C o m m o d itie s le s s f o o d ..............................................

149.1

149.1

145.1

140.9

140.5

142.2

145.9

1 50.4

149.5

148.0

146.7

147.7

149 .3

1 50 .6

1 50.2

N o n d u ra b le s le s s f o o d ...............................................
N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d a n d a p p a re l......................

162.9

164.1

157.7

153.4

154.5

155.4

158.7

165.5

165.0

164.9

165.2

165.8

166.1

166 .9

166 .9

N o n d u ra b le s .................................................................

158.2

160.6

159.1

156.8

157.0

158.0

160.2

162.7

162.1

161.2

160.6

161.2

162.2

163.0

1 62 .9

2 1 2 .3

2 13 .3

2 13 .2

2 1 3 .9

2 1 4 .3

2 14 .8

215.1

2 1 6 .0

2 1 7 .5

2 1 8 .6

2 1 9 .5

2 2 0 .0

2 1 9 .9

2 2 0 .2

S e rv ic e s le s s re n t o f s h e lte r 3 ..................................

2 02 .9

S e rv ic e s le s s m e d ic a l c a re s e rv ic e s .....................

188.9

196.6

198.2

198.3

199.2

2 0 0 .2

2 0 0 .8

2 0 1 .2

2 0 1 .6

2 0 2 .6

203 .2

2 04.2

204.1

2 04 .2

2 0 4 .3

E n e rg y .............................................................................

124.6

129.3

116.0

111.4

111.7

1 1 1 .0

115.6

1 2 2 .2

122.9

124.9

1 25.5

1 25.8

126.1

125 .8

1 25 .3

A ll ite m s le s s e n e rg y .................................................

178.6

183.5

185.4

185.2

185.7

186.5

187.1

187.5

187 .4

187.3

187.5

188.1

1 88.4

188 .8

188 .9

A ll ite m s le s s fo o d a n d e n e rg y ............................

181.3

186.1

188.1

187.8

188.2

189.2

189.8

190.3

190.2

190.1

190 .3

1 91.0

1 91.3

191 .8

191 .8

C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d a n d e n e rg y .................

144.9

145.3

146.0

144.7

143.7

144.2

144.6

145.1

1 44.4

143.4

142.5

142.8

143.6

1 43 .9

143 .6

E n e rg y c o m m o d itie s ...........................................

129.5

125.2

105.8

9 7.6

9 9.3

99.5

108.6

1 2 1 .6

1 2 1 .6

120 .3

1 20.9

121.5

1 2 2 .0

124.8

1 24 .9

S e rv ic e s le s s e n e rg y .............................................

2 0 2 .1

2 0 9 .6

2 12 .3

2 1 2 .6

2 1 3 .8

215.1

2 15 .9

2 16 .3

2 16 .6

2 17 .2

2 1 8 .0

2 1 9 .0

2 1 8 .9

2 1 9 .5

2 1 9 .8

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FOR URBAN
WAGE EARNERS AND CLERICAL WORKERS
163.2

173.5

173.7

172.9

173.2

173.7

174.7

175.8

175.8

175.9

176.0

176.6

1 77.0

177 .3

1 77 .4

A ll ite m s ................................................................................
All ite m s (1 9 6 7 = 1 0 0 ).....................................................

4 86.2

5 16.8

517 .3

5 15.0

5 15 .0

5 17 .5

520 .2

5 23.7

5 23 .6

5 24 .0

5 24 .5

5 26 .0

5 27 .3

5 28 .2

5 2 8 .4

F o o d a n d b e v e ra g e s ......................................................

1 63.8

173.0

174.5

174.6

175.7

175.8

176.1

176.1

1 75.7

175.7

176.0

175.9

176.2

1 76 .3

176 .6

1 72.5

174.1

174.1

175.2

175.3

175.6

175.5

175.1

175.2

1 75.4

1 75.3

175.7

175 .7

1 76 .0

F o o d ....................................................................................

163.4
163.0

172.4

173.7

173.7

175.3

175.1

175.5

175.3

174 .4

174.1

174.3

174.0

174.3

174 .2

1 74 .5

F o o d a t h o m e ................................................................

193.6

194.7

195.1

196.7

197.5

197.0

197.9

198.2

1 98.6

198.7

198.5

1 98 .4

198 .9

198 .2

C e re a ls a n d b a k e ry p ro d u c ts ................................

184.7
147.6

161.2

162.6

161.8

162.0

161.6

162.7

162.1

162.1

161.8

162.2

162.0

161.5

161 .2

162.1

M e a ts , p o u ltry , fis h , a n d e g g s ...............................

167.1

171.2

170.6

169.7

170.0

169.2

168.7

168.7

167.8

1 67.4

167.0

166.1

1 66 .4

1 66.9

D a iry a n d re la te d p ro d u c ts 1 ..................................

159.4
2 0 1 .8

2 1 0 .8

2 11 .5

2 1 2 .8

2 23 .2

2 2 2 .2

2 24 .9

2 2 2 .0

219.1

2 16 .4

2 1 6 .4

2 16 .2

2 1 7 .5

2 16 .2

2 1 8 .0

F ru its a n d v e g e ta b le s ..............................................
N o n a lc o h o lic b e v e ra g e s a n d b e v e ra g e

133.2

138.4

138.7

137.7

138.8

139.5

139.7

139.4

137.3

136.9

137.6

136.9

139.6

139 .9

138 .6

m a te r ia ls ...................................................................

152.8

159.1

159.7

160.5

161.0

160.1

159.6

161.0

159.7

160.4

160.5

160.1

1 60.3

160 .3

1 60 .7

O th e r fo o d s a t h o m e ................................................

155.6

154.7

155.9

158.5

158.5

157.1

153.4

157.6

158.8

159.9

159.6

159.5

1 59 .5

158.2

S u g a r a n d s w e e ts ..................................................

152.2
147.9

155.4

155.1

156.5

158.0

157.0

156.3

■<56.2

1 55.7

154.3

154.7

1 54.0

155.2

155 .8

1 53 .4

F a ts a n d o ils .............................................................

176.3

177.8

178.3

177.9

176.8

176.5

178.2

176.7

177.9

177.6

177.3

177.2

177 .2

178 .8

O th e r fo o d s ..............................................................

168.8
104.6

109.1

1 1 0 .8

109.0

109.3

108.5

108.3

108.5

109.5

109.6

1 1 0 .8

109.9

1 1 0 .1

1 1 0 .1

1 1 1 .0

1 79 .7

12

O th e r m is c e lla n e o u s fo o d s ' ........................

165.0

173.8

175.8

176.0

1 76.4

176.9

177.0

177.1

177.5

178.0

178.4

1 78.7

179.0

1 79 .4

105.1

113.6

115.8

115.8

115.8

116.0

116.8

117.4

117.7

118.1

118.2

118.9

119.3

1 19 .6

1 2 0 .0

O th e r fo o d a w a y fro m h o m e ' ..........................

168.8

178.8

180.8

180.5

181 .4

182.1

182.2

182.8

183.1

183.2

183.6

183.8

183.4

1 84 .3

1 84 .6

A lc o h o lic b e v e ra g e s ....................................................
H o u s in g ..............................................................................

160.0

172.1

172.8

172.9

173.4

173.9

174.4

174.8

175.1

176.1

176.5

176.9

177 .0

176 .9

1 76.9

194.5

197.2

197.7

198.7

199.8

2 0 0 .6

2 0 1 .0

2 0 1 .2

2 0.7

2 0 2 .3

2 0 2 .9

2 0 3 .0

2 0 3 .5

2 0 3 .7

S h e lte r.............................................................................

181.6

2 0 1 .3

F o o d a w a y fro m h o m e 1 .............................................
12

177.1

191.5

194.9

195.7

196.3

197.0

197.5

197.8

98.1

198.7

199.2

199.6

2 0 0 .0

2 0 0 .6

1 2 2 .2

118.4

1 1 1 .8

108.8

113.2

119.4

1 2 2 .2

1 2 2 .0

120.7

120.4

1 21.3

122 .9

117.7

117 .7

114 .0

175.7

187.6

190.9

191.7

192.3

192.9

193.3

193.9

194.2

194.7

195.2

195.7

196 .4

196 .9

1 97 .4

1 0 1 .6

106.4

107.1

106.3

106.4

106.8

106.9

107.5

107.6

107.9

1 08.7

1 09.7

1 1 0 .1

1 1 0 .1

1 1 1 .2

T e n a n ts ’ a n d h o u s e h o ld in s u ra n c e ' ...............

128.7

149.5

142.8

141.5

140.8

139.4

139.6

139.6

140.7

145.6

146.1

146.2

1 46.5

143 .6 3 .0 1 4 3 .0

F u e ls a n d u tilitie s ....................................................

113.C

134.2

126.7

125.2

124.2

122.7

1 2 2 .6

122.7

123.9

129.1

129.6

129.6

129.9

126 .7

1 26 .0

F u e ls ..........................................................................

91.7

129.2

118.5

112.7

113.0

112.4

112.7

114.7

1 14.0

1 1 2 .2

110.9

111.3

114.5

1 18 .6

1 2 1 .0

F u el o il a n d o th e r fu e ls .....................................

120.4

141.5

133.7

132.5

131.4

129.7

129.6

129.6

131.0

136.9

137.5

137.4

137.6

133.8

1 32 .9

G a s (p ip e d ) a n d e le c tr ic ity ..............................

124.7

125.5

125.6

125.4

125.0

124.9

124.9

125.1

1 25.0

124.8

124.7

124.2

123.9

1 23 .9

1 23.7

H o u s e h o ld fu rn is h in g s a n d o p e ra tio n s ............

130.1

126.1

127.2

123.C

119.6

122.4

126.5

127.9

126.2

1 2 2 .0

118 .0

1 19.6

123.5

125 .5

1 24 .6

A p p a r e l.............................................................................

R e n t o f p rim a ry re s id e n c e .....................................
2

L o d g in g a w a y fro m h o m e ....................................
O w n e rs ’ e g u iv a le n t re n t o f p rim a ry re s id e n c e
12

131.2

125.5

127.2

122.7

1 2 1 .C

1 2 2 .2

125.5

125.8

124.6

1 2 1 .1

118.6

118.2

119.8

122 .3

122 .7

M e n 's a n d b o y s ' a p p a r e l.......................................

1 2 1.2

117.2

118.C

1 3.5

108.5

113.6

1 1 9 .'

120.9

118.2

112.7

106.5

109.6

116.8

119 .3

117.2

W o m e n 's a n d g irls' a p p a r e l.................................

130.2

130.5

134.2

130.2

126.7

128.4

131."

131.7

129.9

127.5

125.3

126.8

128 .4

1 29 .5

129 .7

In fa n ts ’ a n d to d d le r s ’ a p p a re l 1 ...........................

126.2

123.

124.2

121.

117.7

119.5

12 2.6

1 24.4

124.4

1 2 1 .0

118.2

119.6

121.4

122 .3

1 22 .5

F o o tw e a r....................................................................

1 4 3 .'

153.(

149.2

1 4 7 .'

147.5

147.1

149.5

152.7

152.7

152.4

152.7

153.0

153.1

154 .0

154 .2

T ra n s p o rta tio n ................................................................

1 40 .'

150.

146'

144 .Î

144.5

144.5

1 46 .'

149.8

149.8

149.5

149.9

150.2

1 50.4

151 .4

1 51 .6

P riv a te tra n s p o rta tio n ...............................................

1 0 0 .'

101.

1 0 1 .'

1 0 2 .0 1

1 0 1.2

100.5

99.

9 9.5

9 9.3

99.1

99.1

99.1

99.0

9 9 .0

9 8 .7

N e w a n d u s e d m o to r v e h ic le s ..........................
S e e fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

89

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

32. Continued—Consumer Price Indexes for All Urban Consumers and for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers: U.S. city
average, by expenditure category and commodity or service group
[1982-84 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]_________________

Series

Annual average
2000

2001

2001
Nov.

2002

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

N e w v e h ic le s ...........................................................

143.9

143.2

143.8

144.7

143.8

1 42.3

141 .8

1 41 .5

1 40.9

1 40.3

1 39.8

139.1

139.8

140.7

1 41 .5

U s e d c a rs a n d tru c k s 1..........................................

157.1

159.8

158.3

158.1

156.5

1 54.8

153 .0

1 52 .6

1 52.7

1 53.0

153 .6

154.2

153.1

151.5

149 .7

M o to r f u e l....................................................................

129.5

124.9

104.4

9 6.3

98.2

9 8 .5

108 .0

1 21 .7

1 2 1 .8

1 20.4

1 2 1 .2

1 2 1 .8

1 2 2 .1

1 24 .9

1 24.8

G a s o lin e (all t y p e s )................................................

128.8

124.2

1 03.8

95.7

9 7.6

9 7 .9

1 07 .5

1 2 1 .2

1 2 1 .2

1 19 .9

1 2 0 .6

121 .3

1 2 1 .6

1 24 .4

1 24.3

M o to r v e h ic le p a rts a n d e q u ip m e n t....................

100.9

104.0

105.0

104.9

105.3

1 05.3

1 05.7

106 .0

1 06 .0

1 05.9

1 06 .7

107 .0

106.7

106.2

1 06.5

M o to r v e h ic le m a in te n a n c e a n d re p a ir..............

178.8

185.1

187.8

187.9

188.6

1 89.5

1 89.9

1 90 .5

1 91.4

191 .5

1 91 .4

192.5

1 92.9

1 93.3

1 94 .3

P u b lic tr a n s p o rta tio n ..................................................

2 03 .4

2 04 .9

2 0 0 .4

2 0 0 .1

2 0 1 .0

2 0 2 .5

2 0 3 .0

2 0 4 .5

2 0 6 .3

2 0 5 .9

2 0 4 .7

2 0 4 .5

2 01 .9

199.2

1 98 .5

2 59 .9

2 71 .8

2 75 .6

2 76.2

2 7 8 .5

2 7 9 .8

2 8 0 .9

2 8 1 .9

2 8 2 .9

2 8 3 .6

2 8 5 .5

2 86 .3

2 8 6 .7

2 8 8 .3

2 8 9 .6

M e d ic a l c a re .................................................................
M e d ic a l c a re c o m m o d itie s .......................................

2 33 .6

2 42 .7

2 45 .6

2 4 6 .7

2 4 7 .6

2 4 8 .5

2 4 9 .0

2 4 9 .6

2 5 0 .3

2 5 1 .3

2 5 2 .3

2 5 2 .3

2 5 2 .5

2 5 2 .8

2 5 3 .5

M e d ic a l c a re s e rv ic e s ................................................

2 65 .9

2 78 .5

2 8 2 .6

2 8 3 .0

2 85 .7

2 8 7 .2

2 8 8 .4

2 8 9 .6

2 9 0 .6

2 9 1 .3

2 9 3 .5

2 9 4 .5

2 94 .9

2 9 6 .9

2 9 8 .4

P ro fe s s io n a l s e rv ic e s ...............................................

2 39 .6

2 4 8 .7

2 5 0 .9

2 51 .0

2 5 2 .8

2 5 3 .6

2 5 4 .0

2 5 4 .6

2 5 5 .3

2 5 5 .3

2 5 7 .2

2 5 6 .9

2 5 6 .8

2 58 .2

2 5 8 .7

H o s p ita l a n d re la te d s e rv ic e s ................................

3 13.2

3 33.8

3 42 .7

3 43 .6

348 .2

3 5 1 .4

3 5 4 .3

357.1

3 5 9 .4

3 6 0 .6

3 6 3 .2

367.1

3 68 .9

3 72 .6

3 7 6 .7

102.4

103.6

104.0

103.8

104.2

1 04 .5

1 04.6

1 05.0

1 04 .9

104 .6

1 04.6

104.7

1 04 4

100.7

100.9

100.7

100.5

101.4

1 0 2 .2

1 0 2 .1

1 0 2 .2

1 02.3

1 0 2 .2

1 0 1 .8

1 0 1 .6

101 4

E d u c a tio n a n d c o m m u n ic a tio n 2 ................................

102.7

105.3

106.9

106.9

107.1

107.2

1 06 .5

106 .0

1 06.5

1 06 .7

1 07 .4

108 .6

109.1

1 09.0

108 .8

E d u c a tio n 2 .....................................................................

1 1 2 .8

118.7

122.3

1 2 2 .1

122.7

123 .3

1 23.3

123 .3

1 23.5

1 24 .4

1 24 .8

126 .9

129.3

129.6

1 29 .7

E d u c a tio n a l b o o k s a n d s u p p lie s ........................

2 83 .3

2 99 .9

3 08 .9

2 9 7 .3

3 05.2

3 15 .2

315.1

3 1 5 .3

3 1 6 .3

3 1 8 .2

319.1

3 2 0 .4

3 23 .9

3 24.2

3 2 5 .0

T u itio n , o th e r s c h o o l fe e s , a n d c h ild c a re ......

3 18.2

3 34 .7

3 44 .9

345 .2

346 .2

3 47 .0

3 47 .2

3 4 7 .2

3 4 7 .7

3 5 0 .3

3 5 1 .4

3 57 .7

3 64 .9

3 65 .7

3 6 6 .0

9 4.7

9 4.5

9 3 .3

9 2 .6

9 3 .3

93.1

9 3.9

94 6

93 9

9 4.6

9 4.5

94.5

94.6

In fo rm a tio n a n d in fo rm a tio n p ro c e s s in q 1'2 .....

94.1

93.8

93.8

9 3.9

94.0

9 3 .7

9 2.6

9 1 .7

9 2 .5

9 2 .4

9 2 .7

9 3.4

9 2 .4

9 2.4

9 2 .0

T e le p h o n e s e rv ic e s 1,2........................................

98.7

9 9 .4

99.7

9 9.9

100.4

1 00.5

9 9 .3

9 8 .4

9 9 .4

9 9 .3

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .8

100 .3

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .1

2 6.8

2 2 .1

2 0 .8

2 0 .6

2 0 .1

19.7

19.5

19.3

19.2

19.1

19.1

18.9

18.5

18.3

17.9

In fo rm a tio n a n d in fo rm a tio n p ro c e s s in g
o th e r th a n te le D h o n e s e rv ic e s 1,4 .................
P e rs o n a l c o m p u te rs a n d p e rip h e ra l
e q u ip m e n t 1,2 ................................................

40.5

29.1

2 5 .5

2 5.0

2 4.3

2 3 .5

2 2 .8

2 2 .5

2 2 .7

2 2 .3

2 2 .1

2 1.7

2 0 .8

2 0 .4

19.7

O th e r g o o d s a n d s e rv ic e s .............................................

2 7 6 .5

2 8 9 .5

2 97 .3

2 93 .3

2 9 4 .0

2 9 8 .3

2 9 5 .2

3 0 1 .7

299.1

3 0 3 .5

3 0 3 .5

3 06 .0

3 07 .8

3 04 .9

3 0 5 .0

T o b a c c o a n d s m o k in g p ro d u c ts .............................

395 .2

426.1

4 48 .3

4 3 2 .9

4 3 3 .5

4 5 0 .7

434.1

4 6 2 .7

450.1

4 6 8 .7

4 6 8 .8

4 80 .7

4 8 8 .4

473.1

4 7 2 .8

P e rs o n a l c a r e 1..............................................................

165.5

170.3

172.3

172 .3

172.7

1 73.2

173 .7

1 73.9

1 74 .0

1 74 .4

1 74 .4

174.3

1 74.4

174.8

174 .9

P e rs o n a l c a re p ro d u c ts 1.........................................

154.2

155.7

156.1

156.0

155.9

1 56.3

156 .0

1 56.2

1 55.4

1 56.2

155 .3

155.1

155.2

155 .5

155 .0

P e rs o n a l c a re s e rv ic e s 1 .........................................

178.6

184.9

1 87.4

187.1

187.0

187.1

1 88 .0

188.7

189.1

1 89 .0

1 89 .4

189.8

190 .0

190.1

190 .6

M is c e lla n e o u s p e rs o n a l s e rv ic e s ........................

2 51 .9

2 6 2 .8

2 6 7 .5

2 68 .0

2 69 .8

2 7 1 .4

2 7 2 .5

2 7 2 .6

2 7 3 .6

274.1

2 7 4 .7

2 75 .2

2 7 4 .9

2 7 5 .9

2 7 6 .6

149.8

151.4

150.1

148.4

148.3

148 .6

1 49.8

1 51 .7

1 51.2

150 .5

150.1

150.4

151.0

151.4

1 76 .6

C o m m o d ity a n d s e rv ic e g ro u p :
C o m m o d itie s ....................................................................

1 51 .3

F o o d a n d b e v e ra g e s ...................................................

167.7

173.0

174.5

174.6

175.7

175 .8

176.1

176.1

1 75.7

1 75 .7

2 7 5 .7

175 .9

176.2

176.3

136 .5

C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d a n d b e v e ra g e s .................

139.0

138.7

135.9

1 33.4

132.7

133.1

1 34.7

137 .5

1 36 .8

1 35.9

1 35.2

135.6

136.4

136.9

150 .2

N o n d u ra b le s le ss fo o d a n d b e v e ra g e s ..............

149.1

149.0

144.2

1 39.4

138.9

140 .7

1 44.8

1 50 .5

1 49.3

1 47.8

1 46.5

147.7

149.4

159.6

1 24 .6

A p p a r e l.......................................................................

128.3

126.1

127.2

123.0

119.6

1 22 .4

1 26.9

1 27.9

126 .2

1 2 2 .0

1 18.0

119.6

1 23.5

125.5

1 25 .5

N o n d u ra b le s le s s foo d , b e v e ra g e s ,
a n d a p p a r e l..............................................................

165.3

166.3

158.2

153.1

154.2

1 55.4

1 59 .4

168.1

167.2

1 67.3

167 .6

168.5

169.1

169.7

169 .6

D u ra b le s ........................................................................

125.8

125.3

124.8

124.9

124.1

123.1

122 .3

1 2 2 .1

1 2 2 .0

1 2 1 .6

121 .5

121.3

1 2 1 .1

1 2 1 .0

1 2 0 .6

208.1

S e rv ic e s ..............................................................................

191.6

199.6

2 0 1 .4

2 01 .7

2 0 2 .5

2 0 3 .3

2 0 3 .9

2 0 4 .2

2 0 4 .8

2 0 5 .8

2 0 6 .6

2 0 7 .3

2 0 7 .6

2 0 7 .8

R e n t o f s h e lte r 3 ............................................................
T ra n s p o ra ta tio n s e rv ic e s ..........................................

180.5

187.3

189.9

190.4

191.4

1 92.5

1 93.2

193 .7

1 93.9

1 94.3

1 94.8

195.5

195.5

196.1

1 96.2

192.9

199.1

2 0 2 .3

2 0 2 .6

2 0 3 .4

2 0 4 .7

2 0 5 .6

2 0 6 .2

207.1

2 0 7 .3

2 0 8 .0

2 08 .6

2 08 .8

2 1 0 .0

2 1 1 .4

O th e r s e rv ic e s ..............................................................

2 2 5 .9

2 3 3 .7

2 37 .2

2 3 7 .3

2 3 8 .3

2 3 9 .0

2 3 8 .8

2 3 8 .9

2 3 9 .7

2 4 0 .4

2 4 1 .6

2 4 3 .4

244.1

2 4 4 .6

2 4 4 .8

S p e c ia l in d e x e s :
A ll ite m s le s s f o o d .......................................................

169.1

173.6

173 .4

172.5

172.7

173 .3

174 .3

1 75.7

1 75.8

1 75.9

176.1

176.7

177.1

1 77.5

1 77 .5

A ll ite m s le s s s h e lte r...................................................

163.8

167.6

166.9

165.7

165.8

166.1

167.1

1 68.5

1 68.4

1 68 .4

1 68 .4

168.9

169.5

169.7

169 .7

A ll ite m s le s s m e d ic a l c a r e ......................................

164.7

169.1

169.1

168.3

168.5

169.0

170 .0

171.1

171 .0

171.2

171 .3

171.8

172.2

172.5

172 .5

C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d ............................................

140 .4

140.2

137.6

135.1

134.5

1 34.8

136 .5

139.1

138 .5

1 37.6

136 .9

137.4

138.1

138.6

1 38 .3

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d ...............................................

150.7

150.8

146.4

141.8

141.8

143.1

1 47.0

1 52.5

151 .4

1 50.0

1 48.7

149.8

151.5

152 .6

1 52 .3

N o n d u ra b le s le s s fo o d a n d a p p a re l......................

165 .4

166.7

159.5

154.7

154.7

1 57 .0

1 60.7

1 68.7

167.9

168 .0

168.3

169.2

169.6

179.3

170 .2

N o n d u ra b le s .................................................................

158.9

161.4

159.7

157.3

157.5

158 .5

1 60.8

163 .7

1 62.9

162 .2

1 61.6

162.2

163.2

163.9

163 .9

S e rv ic e s le s s re n t o f s h e lte r 3 ...................................

180.1

188.5

189.3

189.2

189.8

190.1

1 90.5

190.7

1 81.6

193.2

194.1

194.9

195.3

195.2

1 95 .6

199.6

2 0 0 .4

2 0 0 .6

2 0 0 .7

2 0 0 .9

S e rv ic e s le s s m e d ic a l c a re s e rv ic e s .....................

1 85.4

193.1

194.8

195.0

195.7

196 .5

1 97.0

197 .4

1 97.9

198 .9

E n e rg y .............................................................................

124.8

128.7

114.8

1 1 0 .0

110.5

1 09.8

1 14.7

1 2 1 .6

1 2 2 .2

124.1

124.7

125.0

125.3

125.2

124 .8

A ll ite m s le s s e n e rg y .........................................

175.1

179.8

181.8

181.5

181.6

1 82.5

1 82.9

183 .4

183 .3

1 83.2

1 83.3

183.8

184.3

184.7

184 .8

A ll ite m s le s s fo o d a n d e n e rg y .............................

177.1

181 .7

183.8

183.5

183.6

1 84 .4

1 84.9

185.5

1 85 .4

1 85.3

1 85.4

186.0

186.5

186.9

187 .0

C o m m o d itie s le s s fo o d a n d e n e rg y .................

145 .4

146.1

146.9

145.6

144.4

1 44.8

145 .0

1 45.8

145 .0

144.2

143 .2

143.7

144.4

144.5

144.1

E n e rg y c o m m o d itie s ...........................................

129.7

125.3

1 05.5

97.5

99.2

9 9 .5

108 .7

1 21.9

1 21 .9

1 20.5

1 2 1 .2

1 2 1 .8

1 2 2 .2

125.1

125 .2

S e rv ic e s le s s e n e rg y .............................................

198.7

2 0 6 .0

2 09 .0

2 0 9 .4

2 1 0 .4

2 1 1 .5

2 1 2 .1 1

2 1 2 .6

2 1 3 .0

2 1 3 .3

2 1 4 .3

2 1 5 .1 1

2 1 5 .4

216.1

2 1 6 .5

1 N o t s e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d .

4 In d e x e s on a D e c e m b e r 198 8 = 1 00 b ase .

2 I n d e x e s o n a D e c e m b e r 1 9 9 7 = 100 b a se .

D ash in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

3 In d e x e s o n a D e c e m b e r 1 98 2 = 100 b a se .

NoTE: ln d e x a p p lie d t0 a m o n th a s a w h o le ' n o t t 0 a n V s p e c i,ic d a te -


90
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

33. Consum er Price Index: U.S. city averag e and availab le local area data: all items
[1 9 8 2 -8 4 = 100, unless otherw ise indicated]

Pricing

All Urban Consumers

sched-

2002

ule1

June

May

2002
Nov.

Oct.

Sept.

Aug.

July

Urban Wage Earners

Nov.

Oct.

Sept.

Aug.

July

June

May

1 8 1 .0

1 8 1 .3

1 8 1 .3

1 7 5 .8

1 7 5 .9

1 76 .1

1 7 6 .6

1 7 7 .0

1 7 7 .3

1 7 7 .4

1 8 6 .9

M

1 7 9 .8

1 7 9 .9

180 .1

1 8 0 .7

N o r t h e a s t u r b a n ..........................................................................................

M

1 8 7 .7

1 8 7 .8

1 8 8 .3

1 8 9 .3

1 8 9 .5

1 8 9 .9

1 90.1

1 84.1

1 8 4 .2

1 8 4 .7

1 8 5 .7

1 8 6 .2

1 8 6 .5

S iz e A — M o r e th a n 1 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .......................................................

M

1 8 9 .2

1 8 9 .5

1 90.1

1 8 1 .3

1 9 1 .2

1 9 1 .5

1 9 1 .7

1 8 4 .3

1 8 4 .6

1 8 5 .2

1 8 6 .4

1 8 6 .7

1 8 6 .9

1 8 7 .3

M

1 1 2 .0

1 1 1 .6

1 1 1 .8

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .6

1 1 3 .0

113 .1

1 1 1 .7

1 1 1 .4

1 1 1 .7

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .9

1 1 3 .1

M

1 7 4 .8

1 7 5 .3

1 7 5 .3

1 7 5 .8

1 7 6 .2

1 7 6 .3

176 .1

1 7 0 .3

1 7 0 .7

1 7 0 .8

1 7 1 .3

1 7 1 .7

1 7 1 .8

1 7 1 .6

M

1 7 7 .2

1 7 7 .7

1 7 7 .5

1 7 8 .2

1 7 8 .2

1 7 8 .7

1 7 8 .3

1 7 2 .0

1 7 2 .3

1 72 .1

1 7 2 .8

1 7 3 .4

1 7 3 .3

1 7 3 .0

M

1 1 0 .8

1 1 1 .2

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .4

1 1 1 .5

1 1 1 .9

1 1 1 .7

1 1 0 .7

1 1 0 .7

1 1 0 .9

1 1 1 .0

1 1 1 .1

1 1 1 .4

1 1 1 .3

S iz e D— N o n m e tr o p o lita n ( le s s t h a n 5 0 ,0 0 0 ) ........................

M

1 6 8 .2

1 6 8 .9

1 6 9 .4

1 6 9 .7

1 7 0 .0

1 7 0 .2

1 7 0 .4

166 .1

1 6 6 .7

1 6 7 .3

1 6 7 .6

1 6 7 .8

1 6 8 .1

1 6 8 .2

S o u th u r b a n ................................................................................................

M

1 7 3 .2

1 7 3 .5

1 7 3 .6

1 7 3 .8

1 7 4 .2

1 7 4 .9

1 7 4 .9

1 7 0 .8

1 71 .1

1 71.1

1 7 1 .3

1 7 1 .7

1 7 2 .3

1 7 2 .4

U .S . c ity a v e r a g e ...............................................................................
R e g i o n a n d a r e a s iz e 2

S iz e B /C

5 0 ,0 0 0 t o 1 .5 0 0 .0 0 0 3 ..................................................

4

M id w e s t u r b a n ...........................................................................................
S iz e A — M o r e t h a n 1 ,5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .......................................................
S iz e B /C — 5 0 ,0 0 0 to 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 s .................................................

S iz e A — M o re th a n 1 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .......................................................
S iz e B /C — 5 0 , 0 0 0 to 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 s ..................................................

M

1 7 4 .6

1 7 4 .9

1 7 4 .8

1 7 5 .4

1 7 5 .7

1 7 6 .9

1 76.1

1 7 1 .9

1 7 2 .3

1 7 2 .2

1 7 2 .7

1 7 2 .9

1 7 3 .7

1 7 3 .3

M

1 1 0 .7

1 1 0 .9

1 1 1 .0

1 1 0 .9

1 1 1 .2

1 1 1 .6

1 1 1 .9

1 1 0 .1

1 1 0 .2

1 1 0 .2

1 1 0 .2

1 1 1 .5

1 1 0 .9

1 1 1 .1

S iz e D— N o n m e tr o p o lita n (le s s t h a n 5 0 , 0 0 0 ) ........................

M

1 7 0 .6

1 7 1 .6

1 7 2 .2

1 7 2 .7

1 7 2 .6

1 7 3 .9

1 7 3 .0

1 71.1

1 7 1 .8

1 72.1

1 7 2 .8

1 7 3 .0

1 7 3 .2

1 7 3 .4

W e s t u r b a n ..................................................................................................

M

1 8 4 .8

1 8 4 .5

1 8 4 .7

1 8 5 .3

1 8 5 .7

1 8 5 .8

1 8 5 .8

1 8 0 .0

1 7 9 .7

1 7 9 .8

1 8 0 .3

1 8 0 .7

1 8 0 .6

1 8 1 .0

S iz e A — M o re t h a n 1 ,5 0 0 , 0 0 0 .......................................................

M

1 8 7 .5

1 8 7 .2

1 8 7 .4

1 8 7 .9

1 8 8 .2

1 8 8 .4

1 8 8 .4

1 8 1 .0

1 8 0 .7

1 8 0 .8

1 8 1 .3

1 8 1 .7

1 8 1 .7

1 8 1 .9

soo ooo3 .................................

M

1 1 2 .5

1 1 2 .2

1 1 2 .5

1 1 3 .0

1 1 3 .1

1 1 3 .3

113 .1

1 1 2 .3

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .2

1 1 2 .5

1 1 2 ,7

1 1 2 .9

1 1 2 .9

R Í7 P

r

ir.

5 0 n o n to 1

S iz e c la s s e s :
.5
A ..................................................................................................................
D ...................................................................................................................

M

1 6 4 .3

1 6 4 .5

1 6 4 .6

1 6 5 .3

1 6 5 .5

1 6 5 .8

1 6 5 .7

1 6 2 .5

1 6 2 .6

1 6 2 .7

1 6 3 .4

1 6 3 .8

1 6 4 .0

1 6 4 .0

M

1 1 1 .2

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .4

1 1 1 .5

1 1 1 .8

1 1 2 .1

1 1 2 .2

1 1 0 .7

1 1 0 .7

1 1 0 .9

1 1 1 .0

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .6

1 1 1 .7

M

1 7 2 .4

1 7 3 .0

1 7 3 .3

1 7 3 .9

1 7 4 .3

1 7 4 .3

1 7 4 .5

171 .1

1 7 1 .7

1 7 2 .0

1 7 2 .5

1 7 2 .9

1 7 3 .0

1 7 3 .1

S e l e c t e d lo c a l a r e a s 6
M

1 8 1 .4

1 82.1

1 8 1 .2

1 8 1 .6

1 82 .1

1 8 2 .8

1 8 3 .2

1 7 5 .3

1 7 5 .9

1 75.1

1 7 5 .5

1 7 5 .8

1 7 6 .5

1 7 6 .9

L o s A n g e le s - R iv e r s id e - O r a n g e C o u n ty , C A .............................

M

1 8 2 .6

1 8 1 .9

1 8 2 .2

1 8 3 .0

1 8 3 .4

1 8 3 .7

1 8 4 .0

1 7 5 .4

1 7 4 .7

1 7 5 .0

1 7 5 .6

1 7 6 .3

1 7 6 .5

1 7 7 .0

N e w Y o r k , N Y - N o r t h e r n N J - L o n g Is la n d , N Y - N J - C T - P A .

M

1 9 1 .4

1 9 1 .5

1 9 2 .0

193 .1

1 9 3 .3

1 9 3 .7

1 9 3 .4

1 8 6 .4

1 8 6 .5

1 87.1

1 88.1

1 8 8 .5

1 8 8 .8

1 8 8 .8

1

1 9 4 .8

_

1 9 5 .7

_

1 99 .1

-

2 0 0 .4

1 9 3 .3

-

1 94.1

-

1 9 7 .7

-

1 9 9 .2

C le v e la n d - A k r o n , O H .............................................................................

1

1 7 3 .0

-

1 7 3 .4

-

1 7 4 .6

-

1 7 3 .4

1 6 4 .0

-

1 6 4 .5

-

1 6 5 .7

-

1 6 4 .9

D a lla s - F t W o r th , T X ................................................................................

1

1 7 2 .9

-

1 7 2 .9

-

1 7 3 .2

-

1 7 3 .6

1 7 2 .5

-

1 7 2 .6

-

1 7 2 .9

-

1 7 3 .0

1

1 1 2 .8

-

1 1 3 .4

-

1 1 4 .0

-

1 1 4 .0

1 1 2 .4

-

113 .1

-

1 1 3 .7

~

1 1 3 .5

2

-

1 79.1

-

1 7 9 .7

-

1 7 9 .4

-

-

1 7 6 .5

-

1 7 6 .8

1 7 6 .3

1 7 9 .0

_

1 8 0 .9

-

1 8 0 .4

-

1 7 3 .2

-

1 7 5 .0

-

1 7 5 .0

-

1 6 2 .6

_

1 5 6 .7

-

1 5 8 .0

-

1 6 0 .3

-

1 7 5 .2

1 7 7 .0

_

1 7 2 .0

_

1 7 2 .8

-

1 7 4 .5

“

W a s h in a t o n - B a lt im o r e , D C - M D - V A - W V 7 .................................
A tla n ta , G A ...................................................................................................

2

_

2

1 5 8 .3

2

1 7 4 .4

-

1 8 8 .3

185.8

184.7

-

186.7

-

185.6

-

1 9 3 .2

-

1 9 3 .5

1 9 4 .3

1 89 .1

-

1 8 9 .3

“

1 9 0 .0

-

1 8 9 .4

1 9 0 .3

1 9 0 .9

1 84.1

-

1 8 4 .8

2

-

S a n F r a n c is c o - O a k la n d - S a n J o s e , C A ........................................

2

S e a t t l e - T a c o m a - B r e m e r t o n , W A ....................................................

2

F o o d s , fu e ls , a n d s e v e r a l o th e r ite m s p ric e d e v e r y m o n th in a ll a re a s ; m o s t o th e r

AK;

C i n c in n a t i

M in n e a p o lis - S t.

g o o d s a n d s e r v ic e s p r ic e d a s in d ic a te d :

P a u l,

M N -W I;

J a n u a r y , M a rc h , M a y , J u ly , S e p te m b e r, a n d N o v e m b e r.

7

2—

F e b r u a r y , A p r il, J u n e , A u g u s t, O c to b e r , a n d D e c e m b e r.

NO TE:

C ity ,

P itts b u rg h ,

PA;

M O -K S ;

1 8 5 .5
M ilw a u k e e - R a c in e ,

P o r t- la n d - S a le m ,

O R -W A ;

St

W l;
L o u is ,

L o c a l a r e a C P I in d e x e s a re b y p r o d u c ts o f th e n a tio n a l C P I p ro g r a m .

E a c h lo c a l

in d e x h a s a s m a lle r s a m p le s iz e a n d is , th e r e fo r e , s u b je c t to s u b s ta n tia lly m o r e s a m p lin g

2 R e g io n s d e fin e d a s t h e f o u r C e n s u s re g io n s .

a n d o th e r m e a s u re m e n t e rro r.

3 In d e x e s o n a D e c e m b e r 1 9 9 6 = 1 0 0 b a s e .

T h e " N o r th C e n t r a l" r e g io n h a s b e e n r e n a m e d th e " M id w e s t" re g io n b y th e C e n s u s

A s a re s u lt, lo c a l a r e a in d e x e s s h o w g r e a t e r v o la tility th a n

th e n a tio n a l in d e x , a lth o u g h t h e ir lo n g -te rm tre n d s a re s im ila r.

T h e r e fo r e , th e B u r e a u o f

L a b o r S ta tis tic s s tro n g ly u rg e s u s e r s to c o n s id e r a d o p tin g th e n a tio n a l a v e r a g e C P I fo r

It is c o m p o s e d o f t h e s a m e g e o g r a p h ic e n titie s .

u s e in th e ir e s c a la to r c la u s e s .
5 In d e x e s o n a D e c e m b e r 1 9 8 6 = 1 0 0 b a s e .
6

K ansas

In d e x e s o n a N o v e m b e r 1 9 9 6 = 1 0 0 b a s e .

1—

B u re a u .

O H -K Y -IN ;

M O - I L ; S a n D ie g o , C A ; T a m p a - S t . P e te r s b u r g - C le a r w a te r , F L.

M — E v e r y m o n th .

4

_

_

160 .1

1 8 6 .3

P h i la d e lp h ia - W ilm in g t o n - A t la n t ic C ity , P A - N J - D E - M D . . . .

1

_

d a te .

In d e x a p p lie s to a m o n th a s a w h o le , n o t to a n y s p e c ific

D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

In a d d itio n , th e f o llo w in g m e tr o p o lita n a re a s a re p u b lis h e d s e m ia n n u a lly a n d a p p e a r in

t a b le s 3 4 a n d 3 9 o f t h e J a n u a r y a n d J u ly is s u e s o f th e


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

CPI Detailed Report:

A n c h o ra g e ,

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

91

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

34. Annual data: Consumer Price Index, U.S. city average, all items and major groups
[1982-84 = 100]
Series

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

C o n s u m e r P ric e In d e x fo r A ll U rba n C o n s u m e rs :
A ll Item s:
In d e x .................................................................

1 40 .3

1 44.5

148.2

152 .4

3.0

3 .0

2 .6

2 .8

3.0

In d e x .............................................................................

1 38.7

141 .6

144.9

1 48.9

153.7

P e rc e n t c h a n g e ........................................................

1.4

2 .1

2 .3

2 .8

3.2

137 .5

1 41.2

144.8

1 48 .5

2 .9

2 .7

2 .5

1 31.9

1 33.7

2 .5

1.4

1 26.5

1 C0 r

172.2

177.1

2 .3

3.4

2 .8

168 .4

173 .6

2.3

3.1

152.8

169.6

1 76 .4

2 .6

2.9

3.5

4 .0

133.4

132 .0

131.7

129.6

1 27 .3

- .2

- 1 .0

-.2

-1 .3

- 1 .8

1 30 .4

134.3

139.1

153.3

1 54.3

2 .2

3.1

3 .0

3 .6

2 .8

6 .2

0 .7

In d e x ...............................................................................

190.1

2 0 1 .4

2 1 1 .0

2 2 0 .5

2 28 .2

2 60 .8

2 7 2 .8

P e rc e n t c h a n g e ...........................................................

7 .4

5.9

4 .8

4 .5

3.5

4.1

4 .6

183 .3

1 92.9

198.5

2 0 6 .9

2 1 5 .4

271.1

2 8 2 .6

6 .8

5.2

2 .9

4 .2

4.1

4 .4

5.0

4 .2

138.2

142.1

145.6

149 .8

154.1

1 57.6

168.9

1 73 .5

2 .9

2 .8

2 .5

2 .9

2.9

2 .3

3.5

2 .7

P e rc e n t c h a n g e ...........................................................
F o o d a n d b e v e ra g e s :

2 .6

H o u s in g :
In d e x ...................................................................
A p p a re l:
In d e x ...............................................................
T ra n s p o rta tio n :
In d e x ...........................................................................
P e rc e n t c h a n g e .................................................................

AAA O

M1 6

1
2 .0

M e d ic a l ca re :

0 .0

2 .8

O th e r g o o d s a n d s e rv ic e s :
In d e x ......................................................................

°3 7 7

C o n s u m e r P ric e In d e x fo r U rb a n W a g e E a rn e rs
a n d C le ric a l W o rk e rs :
A ll ite m s :
In d e x ..................................................................
P e rc e n t c h a n g e ....................................................................

Digitized for 92
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

1.3

2 .2

35. Producer Price Indexes, by stage of processing
[1 9 8 2 = 1 0 0 ]

Annual average
Grouping
2000

2001

2002

2001
Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Sept.

Aug.

Oct.

Nov.
139.6

Finished goods..................................................

138.0

140.7

139.7

137.2

137.4

137.7

138.7

138.8

138.6

139.0

138.8

138.9

140.6

138.2

141.5

138.4

136.8

137.2

137.5

138.9

139.2

139.1

139.6

139.6

139.5

139.8

141.5

140.3

F in ish ed c o n s u m e r g o o d s ............................
F in ish ed c o n s u m e r fo o d s ...........................

137.2

141.3

140.5

140.4

141.1

142.3

143.4

139.2

139.4

139.8

139.8

139.2

138.4

139.1

139.2

Fin sh ed c o n s u m e r g oods
e xc lu d in g fo o d s ..........................................

138.4

141.4

137.3

135.1

135.4

135.4

138.9

138.6

139.1

139.3

142.0

142.1

141.8

139.8

139.5

139.3
140.6

141.0

141.3

142.5

143.9

133.5

133.5

133.0

132.8

131.5

131.3

131.1

134.5

139.3

138.4

138.2

138.1

139.7

139.7

128.1

128.5

129.4

129.7

129.8

127.0

127.3

127.8

138.7

140.3

N o n d u ra b le g oo ds less fo o d ..................

138.7

142.8

136.8

134.0

134.4

134.3

136.9
136.7

D u ra b le g o o d s ............................................

133.9

133.9

134.5

133.9

133.9

134.1

133.6

C a p ita l e q u ip m e n t........................................

138.8

139.7

139.9

139.7

139.7

139.8

139.5

139.3

139.1

139.0

Intermediate materials,
supplies, and components....................

129.2

128.7

126.7

125.4

125.5

125.2

126.1

127.2

127.1

127.7

M a te ria ls and c o m p on en ts
fo r m a n u fa c tu rin g ............................................

128.1

127.4

125.2

124.7

124.5

124.6

125.1

125.5

125.5

125.9

126.3

126.7

M a te ria ls fo r fo o d m a n ufa ctu rin g ................

119.2

124.3

123.9

122.5

1 2 2.1

1 2 2 .6

122.9

1 2 1 .8

1 2 1 .2

1 2 2 .1

122.7

123.1

123.9

124.3

125.3

M a te ria ls fo r n o n du ra b le m anufacturing...

132.6

131.8

127.4

126.2

125.4

125.4

126.5

128.0

128.1

128.8

129.7

130.7

131.7

132.8

133.3

M a te ria ls fo r d u ra b le m a n u fa ctu rin g .........

129.0

125.2

1 2 2 .8

122.5

122.5

1 2 2 .6

123.5

123.7

124.1

124.7

125.3

125.6

125.8

125.7

126.4

C o m p o n e n ts fo r m a n u fa ctu rin g ..................

126.2

126.3

125.9

126.0

126.3

126.3

126.4

126.3

126.2

126.1

126.0

126.2

125.9

125.8

126.1

151.1

M a te ria ls a nd c o m p on en ts
fo r c o n s tru c tio n ...............................................

150.7

150.6

150.3

149.0

150.2

150.2

150.7

151.1

151.4

151.5

151.7

152.1

152.3

151.8

1 0 2 .0

104.5

94.7

89.3

90.0

8 8 .8

91.3

95.3

94.8

96.4

97.3

97.3

100.4

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .1

P ro cesse d fue ls and lu b ric a n ts .....................
C o n ta in e rs...........................................................

151.6

153.1

152.2

152.2

152.6

151.9

151.7

151.2

151.3

151.4

151.7

152.8

152.3

153.8

136.9

138.6

138.3

138.1

138.7

139.1

139.7

139.6

139.7

S u p p lie s ...............................................................

139.4

Crude materials for further
processing..............................................

1 2 0 .6

121.3

104.8

94.8

98.9

117.1

F o o d s tu ffs and fe e d s tu ffs ..............................

1 0 0 .2

106.2

98.3

96.4

99.6

C ru d e n on foo d m a te ria ls ................................

130.4

127.3

105.5

90.2

95.0

F in ish ed g oods, exclud in g fo o d s .................

138.1

140.4

137.7

136.1

F in ish e d e n e rg y g o o d s ...................................

94.1

96.8

85.5

80.7

F in ish ed g o o d s le ss e n e rg y ...........................

144.9

F in ish e d co n s u m e r g o o d s less e n e rg y ......
F in ish e d g o o d s le ss food a nd e n e rg y .........

138.3

138.5

151.0
138.4

9 8.0

103.7

108.3

109.9

105.7

106.8

108.3

108.5

1 1 1 .6

1 0 2 .0

1 0 2 .8

96.5

98.2

96.8

98.0

99.6

100.7

99.7

9 9.4

91.4

100.9

114.0

115.6

109.2

1 1 0 .2

111.5

1 1 1 .1

117.4

127.3

136.3

136.3

137.2

138.5

138.2

138.6

138.4

138.4

138.8

140.7

139.5

81.3

81.3

85.0

8 8 .8

88.4

89.8

90.5

91.0

92.8

94.4

91.1

147.3

146.7

146.5

146.2

147.8

147.5

138.2

138.1

Special groupings:

147.6

147.7

148.1

148.2

147.3

147.1

151.0

150.9

151.1

151.6

151.9

150.6

150.5

150.7

150.3

150.0

149.6

151.2

151.0

150.6

150.4

150.4

150.4

150.2

150.4

150.2

150.2

149.5

149.4

149.3

151.2

150.8

156.9

159.0

158.6

147.5

147.7

147.4

150.8

148.0

150.0

F in ish e d c o n s u m e r g o o d s less food
and e n e rg y ......................................................

154.0

156.9

157.8

158.0

157.6

157.6

157.4

157.9

157.7

157.8

157.1

157.0

C o n s u m e r n o n du ra b le g o o d s less food
and e n e rg y ....................................................

169.8

175.1

176.4

176.4

176.4

176.2

176.3

177.6

177.6

178.0

177.9

177.9

177.9

178.7

178.8

130.5

Inte rm e d ia te m a terials less fo o d s
and fe e d s .........................................................

130.1

130.5

127.3

126.0

126.1

125.9

126.8

127.9

127.9

128.4

128.8

128.8

130.0

130.4

Inte rm e d ia te fo o d s and fe e d s ......................

111.7

115.9

115.5

114.3

113.6

113.6

114.3

113.6

112.9

114.2

115.8

116.5

117.9

117.4

117.7

101.7

104.1

94.3

89.0

89.6

88.4

90.9

94.9

94.6

96.2

96.7

96.7

1 0 0.1

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .0

Inte rm e d ia te e n e rg y g o o d s ...........................
Inte rm e d ia te g o o ds less e n e rg y ..................

135.0

135.1

133.7

133.4

133.3

133.3

133.8

134.0

134.0

134.4

134.8

135.2

135.4

135.4

135.7

Inte rm e d ia te m a terials less foo d s
a n d e n e rg y ......................................................

136.6

136.4

134.9

134.6

134.6

134.6

135.0

135.4

135.4

135.7

136.0

136.5

136.6

136.6

136.9

107.3

108.3

97.8

98.1

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .0

108.9

123.2

C ru d e e n e rg y m a te ria ls .................................

1 2 2 .1

1 2 2 .8

96.5

76.7

82.8

76.9

89.9

C ru d e m a te ria ls less e n e rg y ........................

111.7

1 1 2 .2

104.8

103.4

106.2

108.5

109.3

105.5

107.5

107.4

108.9

110.9

110.5

109.8

109.5

C ru d e n on fo o d m a terials le ss e n e rg y .......

145.2

130.6

124.5

124.2

126.1

128.1

129.0

131.8

134.9

138.6

141.0

140.5

139.6

139.4

139.1


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

93

Current Labor Statistics:

Price Data

36. Producer Price Indexes for the net output of major industry groups
[December 1984 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]
SIC

Annual average

Industry

2000
Total mining industries....................................

2001

113.5

114 .3

2001

2002

Nov.

Dec.

8 8 .3

7 7 .6

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

8 1 .9

7 8 .0

8 7 .5

9 9 .8

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

1 00.3

9 3 .5

9 3.5

9 3 .6

95.1

102 .7

1 12 .3

7 2 .5

10

M e ta l m in in g ............................................................

73.8

7 0 .8

6 8.9

6 8 .9

7 1 .0

7 2 .3

7 2 .9

7 3 .4

7 3 .9

7 6 .9

7 4 .7

7 4 .4

12

74.1

C o a l m in in g (1 2 /8 5 = 1 0 0 )....................................

8 4.8

9 1 .3

9 5 .4

9 2 .5

9 5 .3

9 4.5

9 4 .6

9 4 .4

9 4 .4

9 3 .7

9 3 .9

9 3 .8

13

9 3 .6

O il a n d g a s e x tra c tio n (1 2 /8 5 = 1 0 0 )................

9 4 .0

9 3 .7

126.8

1 27 .5

9 2.0

7 8.3

8 4 .0

7 7 .9

9 2 .7

111 .9

1 12.7

14

1 01.7

1 0 2 .0

1 0 2 .1

M in in g a n d q u a rry in g o f n o n m e ta llic

1 04 .5

1 16 .5

1 31 .7

m in e ra ls , e x c e p t fu e ls .........................................

137 .0

1 41.0

1 41.6

141 .5

142 .5

1 43.4

1 43.5

1 43 .4

1 43.6

1 43.7

143 .7

1 43.7

1 43 .4

1 43.5

1 4 3 .8

Total manufacturing industries......................

133.5

1 34.6

1 32.7

1 31.6

131 .7

1 32.0

1 32.8

133 .8

1 33.5

1 33 .6

1 33 .6

1 33.7

134 .2

1 35 .6

1 3 4 .7

7 2 .6

20

F o o d a n d k in d re d p ro d u c ts ..............................

128.5

132 .8

1 32.4

1 31.7

131 .5

132.0

1 32.0

131 .5

130 .9

1 31 .3

1 31 .5

21

131.3

131 .4

T o b a c c o m a n u fa c tu re s ........................................

1 31.6

1 3 1 .7

3 45 .8

386.1

3 9 8 .3

3 9 8 .2

3 9 1 .7

3 9 1 .7

3 92 .2

4 0 7 .8

4 0 8 .0

4 0 8 .2

4 0 8 .6

4 0 8 .6

22

T e x tile m ill p ro d u c ts ...................................

4 0 8 .5

4 0 8 .5

4 0 9 .2

116.7

1 16 .9

1 16.3

116.1

1 16 .3

115 .8

1 15 .8

1 15.8

115 .5

1 15.8

1 15.7

23

115 .6

1 15.7

A p p a re l a n d o th e r fin is h e d p ro d u c ts

1 15 .6

1 16 .0

125 .7

125.8

125 .6

1 25.3

125.2

125.1

125.2

1 25.0

125.1

125 .2

1 25.3

1 25 .4

1 25 .4

126 .0

1 2 5 .8

154.8

1 56.7

154.1

m a d e fro m fa b ric s a n d s im ila r m a te ria ls .......
24

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p ro d u cts,
158.1

156.2

156 .8

1 56.0

155 .3

25

1 55.5

1 55.7

F u rn itu re a n d fix tu re s .............................................

155.1

1 54 .8

143.3

145.1

1 45 .5

145 .5

1 45.6

1 45.8

1 45.7

145 .7

1 45 .9

146.1

1 46 .6

146.2

26

146 .3

1 46 .7

P a p e r a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts ......................................

1 4 6 .9

145.8

146 .2

1 44.6

144 .8

144.1

143.2

1 42.9

1 43 .3

1 42 .5

1 42.8

142 .9

1 43 .9

144 .6

1 44 .6

1 45 .3

e x c e p t fu r n itu re .......................................................

154 .0

1 53.4

1 54.0

27

P rin tin g , p u b lis h in g , a n d a llie d in d u s trie s ........

182.9

188 .7

190.2

1 92.0

192 .0

192.1

192.1

1 92.6

192 .6

1 92.9

193.1

1 93.0

1 93.6

1 93.8

1 9 4 .0

28

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p ro d u c ts .............................

156.7

1 58 .4

1 55 .4

1 54.3

154 .0

154 .3

155.1

1 55 .9

1 56 .3

1 57 .0

29

158 .5

1 58.7

1 59.5

P e tro le u m re fin in g a n d re la ted p ro d u c ts ..........

1 59.5

1 6 0 .6

1 1 2 .8

105.3

8 6 .3

7 5 .9

7 7 .7

7 9 .5

8 9.2

100.5

9 9 .7

9 8 .9

1 0 1 .1

103.1

1 08.7

30

1 17 .6

107.1

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro d u c ts ..

124.6

1 25.9

125 .6

125 .2

125.1

124 .4

124 .6

1 24.8

1 25.3

125 .8

31

1 25.5

1 26 .4

L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u c ts ..............................

1 26 .3

1 2 6 .3

1 2 5 .7

137.9

1 41 .3

1 40.9

1 40 .3

140.2

139.8

140 .0

140.1

32
33

S to n e , c la y , g la s s , a n d c o n c re te p ro d u c ts ......

1 36.4

136 .3
114 .4

1 36.6

137.1

1 37.2

1 37 .0

1 37 .3

1 37.4

137 .5

1 3 6 .9

1 14 .7

1 15 .4

1 16 .3

116 .9

34

1 17 .5

117 .8

1 17.6

118 .2

F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts ,

Primary metal industries.........................

134.6

1 36.0

1 36.9

136 .7

119.8

116.1

1 14.2

114 .0

1 36.9
1 13 .7

1 13.7

1 40.6

140 .9

1 41 .4

141 .7

1 41.6

141 .7

1 4 2 .3

e x c e p t m a c h in e ry a n d tra n s p o rta tio n
e q u ip m e n t...................................
35

M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e le c tric a l.................................

36

E le c tric a l a n d e le c tro n ic m a ch in e ry,
e q u ip m e n t, a n d s u p p lie s ......................................

37

T ra n s p o rta tio n .........................................................

38

M e a s u rin g a n d c o n tro llin g in s tru m e n ts ;

39

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s trie s

1,3 1 0.3

1 31 .0

131.1

1 31.2

1 31.2

131 .2

1 31.2

131 .3

1 31 .4

1 31.6

1 31 .9

132 .0

1 32.2

132.1

1 3 2 .3

117.5

1 18 .0

1 17 .9

1 17.8

1 17.7

117 .6

117 .7

1 17.6

117 .6

1 17.4

1 17.2

116 .8

1 16 .8

1 16 .7

1 16 .6

108.3

1 07.0

106 .5

1 06.6

1 06 .7

1 06.6

1 06 .6

106.1

1 05.9

105 .8

1 05 .5

1 05 .7

1 05 .5

105.1

1 04 .9

136.8

1 37 .9

1 38 .3

138 .6

1 38.0

1 38.5

137.9

137.7

137.1

137 .0

1 35.5

1 35 .4

1 34 .9

139 .2

1 3 8 .3

126.2

127 .3

1 27 .8

1 27 .7

128 .3

1 28.6

1 28 .9

1 28.2

128 .2

1 28.3

128 .3

1 28 .4

1 28 .5

1 28 .7

1 2 8 .8

130.9

132 .4

132 .6

1 32 .4

132 .7

1 33.4

1 32.9

1 33.3

133.1

1 33 .3

1 33 .4

133 .2

1 3 3 .4

1 33 .4

p h o to g ra p h ic , m e d ic a l, a n d o p tic a l
g o o d s ; w a tc h e s a n d c lo c k s .................................
in d u s trie s (1 2 /8 5 = 1 0 0 ).......................................

1 3 2 .7
1 3 3 .4

Service industries:
42

M o to r fre ig h t tra n s p o rta tio n
a n d w a re h o u s in g (0 6 /9 3 = 1 0 0 ) .........................

119 .4

123.1

1 23 .4

123.1

123.2

1 23 .4

123 .5

1 23.7

124.1

1 24 .3

1 24 .3

1 24 .6

43

1 25 .0

1 2 5 .4

U .S . P o s ta l S e rv ic e (0 6 /8 9 = 1 0 0 )........................

1 2 5 .9

135.2

1 43 .4

1 45.4

145 .4

1 45 .4

145 .4

145 .4

1 45 .4

1 45 .4

145 .4

155 .0

1 55 .0

44

1 55 .0

1 55 .0

1 5 5 .0

W a te r tra n s p o rta tio n (1 2 /9 2 = 1 0 0 ).....................

1 2 2 .6

1 29.8

130.2

1 29 .7

129 .3

1 35 .4

45

135 .2

1 38 .4

T ra n s p o rta tio n b y a ir (1 2 /9 2 = 1 0 0 )....................

1 4 1 .0

147.7

157 .2

1 56 .8

157.1

157.1

157.1

1 56.8

156 .3

156.2

1 56.8

46

157 .9

1 58.9

1 59 .0

1 59.6

P ip e lin e s , e x c e p t n a tu ra l q a s (1 2 /9 2 = 1001.....

1 6 0 .3

102.3

1 10 .3

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .0

1 1 1 .1

1 11 .3

1 1 1 .6

111 .5

1 11 .3

1 11.5

112 .3

1 12 .5

1 12 .5

1 12 .7

1 1 2 .3

Digitized for94
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

1 28.9

128 .7

1 27.9

1 31.7

1 34.0

1 35 .4

37.

Annual data: Producer Price Indexes, by stage of processing
In d e x

199 2

199 3

199 4

199 5

19 9 6

19 9 7

19 9 8

2000

19 9 9

2001

Finished goods
1 2 3 .2

1 2 4 .7

1 2 5 .5

1 2 7 .9

1 3 1 .3

1 3 1 .8

1 3 0 .7

1 3 3 .0

1 3 8 .0

1 4 0 .7

1 2 3 .3

1 2 5 .7

1 2 6 .8

1 2 9 .0

1 3 3 .6

1 3 4 .5

1 3 4 .3

1 35.1

1 3 7 .2

1 4 1 .3

7 7 .8

7 8 .0

7 7 .0

7 8.1

8 3 .2

8 3 .4

7 5 .1

7 8 .8

9 4.1

9 6 .8

1 3 4 .2

1 3 5 .8

1 37.1

1 4 0 .0

1 4 2 .0

1 4 2 .4

1 4 3 .7

1 46 .1

1 4 8 .0

1 5 0 .0

1 1 4 .7

1 1 6 .2

1 1 8 .5

1 2 4 .9

1 2 5 .7

1 2 5 .6

1 2 3 .0

1 2 3 .2

1 2 9 .2

1 2 9 .7

1 1 3 .9

1 1 5 .6

1 1 8 .5

1 1 9 .5

1 2 5 .3

1 2 3 .2

1 2 3 .2

1 2 0 .8

1 1 9 .2

1 2 4 .3

8 4 .3

8 4 .6

8 3 .0

84.1

8 9 .8

8 9 .0

8 0 .8

8 4 .3

1 0 1 .7

1 0 4 .1

1 2 2 .0

1 2 3 .8

1 27.1

1 3 5 .2

1 3 4 .0

1 3 4 .2

1 3 3 .5

1 33 .1

1 3 6 .6

1 3 6 .4

1 0 0 .4

1 0 2 .4

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .7

1 1 3 .8

1 1 1 .1

9 6 .8

9 8 .2

1 2 0 .6

1 2 1 .3

1 05.1

1 0 8 .4

1 0 6 .5

1 0 5 .8

1 2 1 .5

1 1 2 .2

1 0 3 .9

9 8 .7

1 0 0 .2

1 0 6 .2

7 8 .8

7 6 .7

72.1

6 9 .4

8 5 .0

8 7 .3

6 8 .6

7 8 .5

1 2 2 .1

1 2 2 .8

9 4 .2

9 4.1

9 7 .0

1 0 5 .8

1 0 5 .7

1 0 3 .5

8 4 .5

9 1.1

1 1 8 .0

1 0 1 .8

Intermediate materials, supplies, and
components

Crude materials for further processing

O t h e r ...................................................................................................


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

95

Current Labor Statistics:

38.

Price Data

U.S. export price indexes by Standard International Trade Classification

[2000

=

s rrc
Rev. 3

0
01

100]
2001

Industry

Nov.

2002

Dec.

101.2

Jan.

Feb.

100.0

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

100.6

9 9.7

9 9.8

101.1

103.4

107.7

106 .4

M e a t a n d m e a t p re p a ra tio n s ....................................................

9 9 .2

9 7 .8

93.1

91.3

93.2

92.0

9 1.6

90.0

87.8

88.7

04

89.8

89.1

C e re a ls a n d c e re a l p re p a ra tio n s .............................................

105.2

107 .2

1 08 .4

106 .0

105.4

103.8

106.5

112 .7

1 19.9

1 33.4

130.5

05

V e g e ta b le s , fru it, a n d nuts, p re p a re d fre sh o r d ry ...........

9 9 .7

100.6

105.2

1 10.5

1 02 .4

102.5

103.7

103.8

99.0

9 8.0

98.2

98.9

9 7.8

9 9 .0

Crude materials, Inedible, except fuels..........................

8 6 .3

87.1

87.1

86.9

8 7.7

89.7

9 0.9

9 5.3

9 9.8

97.9

9 7.3

96.8

9 8 .8

9 2.0

93.8

95.1

102.9

117.0

113.5

114.1

107.2

116 .9

2
22

Food and live animals......................................................

100.9

102 .7

100.3

1 06 .8

88.2
1 31 .7

O ils e e d s a n d o le a g in o u s fru its .................................................

89.1

9 0 .9

9 1.6

89.4

24

C o rk a n d w o o d .........................................................

8 8 .7

88.0

88.1

8 7.6

87.2

8 7.3

8 7.4

87.1

25

88.1

88.8

9 0 .0

9 0.7

9 0 .6

P u lp a n d w a s te p a p e r.............................................................

7 7 .4

7 7 .2

7 5.8

7 3.9

74.1

77.1

89.6

8 6 .5

8 7 .9

8 4 .0

85.3

84.9

88.6

8 8.5

8 2 .0

86.8

96.5

T e x tile fib e rs a n d th e ir w a s te ..........................................

86.2

89.3

26

86.6

81.0

94.6

93.1

9 4.2

94.2

9 6 .4

28

M e ta llife ro u s o re s a n d m e ta l s c ra p ........................................

8 1 .4

8 1 .3

8 4.9

8 7.0

87.3

9 1.7

98.9

9 9.8

99.6

9 7.9

9 3.9

94.1

9 5 .0

3

Mineral fuels, lubricants, and related products.............

102.8

8 8 .3

8 2 .4

87.1

8 4.3

89.8

99.7

9 5.4

9 3.9

9 7.3

109.3

104 .6

1 08 .8

109 .5

109.7

110.8

97.1

108.9

111 .4

111.4

110.9

114.3

114.3

1 14.0

114 .0

114 .0

P e tro le u m , p e tro le u m p ro d u c ts , a n d re la te d m a terials...

8 0 .9

7 4 .6

80.1

7 6.5

8 3.6

9 5.8

90.2

87.9

91.6

9 2 .0

98.0

105 .8

9 9 .6

Chemicals and related products, n.e.s............................

9 3 .6

9 2 .8

9 2.2

92.3

93.2

94.8

95.1

9 6.4

97.1

100 .9

100.5

100.3

100.4

101.3

101.3

101.3

55

100.8

9 6 .8

1 00.9

100.2

9 6.8

M e d ic in a l a n d p h a rm a c e u tic a l p ro d u c ts ...............................

100.8

96.1

54

101.1

95.4

101 .3

E s s e n tia l oils; p o lis h in g a n d cle a n in g p re p a ra tio n s ..........

9 8 .9

9 8 .8

9 7.5

97.1

97.6

9 7.5

97.1

97.3

97.1

9 7.5

9 7.4

9 7.3

9 7.2

32

C o al, c o k e , a n d b riq u e tte s ....................................................

33
5

57

P la s tic s in p rim a ry f o r m s ........................................................

8 8 .5

8 6 .5

8 5 .4

85.8

8 7.6

9 0.5

92.2

9 2.5

93.1

93.1

92.9

9 7.3

9 3 .4

58

P la s tic s in n o n p rim a ry fo rm s .....................................................

9 5 .8

9 5 .8

9 5.9

95.7

9 5.8

95.3

95.6

9 6.0

9 6.4

9 6.5

96.9

59

97.6

9 7 .3

C h e m ic a l m a te ria ls a n d p ro d u c ts , n .e .s ...............................

9 8 .7

9 7 .6

98.1

9 7.6

9 8.0

9 7 .4

9 7 .4

9 7.5

9 7.3

98.2

9 8.3

98.6

9 8 .7

Manufactured goods classified chiefly by materials....

9 6 .6

9 6 .7

97.3

97.2

96.7

9 7.4

97.4

98.0

98.7

99.0

99.1

99.1

99.1

62

R u b b e r m a n u fa c tu re s , n .e .s ......................................................

100 .5

1 00.9

1 00 .4

1 00.4

100.8

101.1

101.5

102.7

103.8

105.1

2 0 5 .9

64

1 05.7

105 .6

P a p e r, p a p e rb o a rd , a n d a rtic le s o f p ap er, pulp ,

6

66
68
7

a n d p a p e r b o a rd ........................................................................

9 5 .2

9 5 .2

95.3

94.1

92.5

92.9

94.8

9 5.7

102.2

9 6 .5

101.9

102.2

9 6.8

101 .4

102.0

96.3

1 01.7

102.1

96.2

1 01.4

102.1

93.1

N o n m e ta lllc m in e ra l m a n u fa c tu re s , n .e .s .............................

102.2

102.2

1 01.4

1 01 .4

N o n fe rro u s m e ta ls ........................................................................

8 1 .8

83.1

8 5.3

85.9

85.1

86.5

86.5

8 5.3

8 5.2

84.9

8 4 .4

8 3.4

8 3 .2

Machinery and transport equipment...............................

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

9 9.3

9 9.3

99.5

9 9.5

9 9.3

98.9

98.7

98.8

9 8.7

9 8.7

9 8 .7

104.6

104.6

104.7

105 .3

71

P o w e r g e n e ra tin g m a c h in e ry a n d e q u ip m e n t.....................

104.1

1 04.0

1 04.6

1 04 .4

104.6

104.6

104.6

100 .5

1 00 .5

100 .7

101.1

104.5

M a c h in e ry s p e c ia liz e d fo r p a rtic u la r in d u s trie s ...................

100.8

104.5

72

101.4

74

102.0

101.8

102.1

G e n e ra l in d u s tria l m a c h in e s a n d p arts, n.e .s.,

102.0

101.8

101.8

101.8

1 01.9

1 01.7

102.1

102.0

102.2

102.1

102.3

102.3

102.1

102.3

1 02.3

102.2

1 02 .3

9 0.4

9 0.3

8 9.3

89.1

a n d m a c h in e p a rts ......................................................................
75

C o m p u te r e q u ip m e n t a n d o ffic e m a c h in e s ..........................

76

T e le c o m m u n ic a tio n s a n d s o u n d re c o rd in g a nd
re p ro d u c in g a p p a ra tu s a n d e q u ip m e n t...............................

94.2

9 2 .9

9 2.5

9 2.9

93.1

9 2.5

91.7

90.4

9 8 .0

9 7 .7

9 7.9

97.5

9 7.5

97.8

9 7.8

97.7

96.2

96.3

9 6 .4

9 6.3

88.8
9 6 .3

77

E le c tric a l m a c h in e ry a n d e q u ip m e n t.....................................

9 5 .9

9 5 .9

94.6

94.7

100.2

9 4.6

93.9

9 3.3

9 3.5

9 3.6

9 3.3

100 .3

100.3

100.4

100.3

100.4

100.6

9 3 .3

100 .3

100.1

94.8

R o a d v e h ic le s ..........................................................................

100.2

94.8

78

100.6

100.9

100 .9

87

Professional, scientific, and controlling
instruments and apparatus............................................

1 00.9

100.9

100.8

101.1

101.2

101.3

101.3

101.3

101.4

101.5

101 .4

101.6

1 01 .5

Digitized for96
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

39.

U.S. import price indexes by Standard International Trade Classification

r? n n n - 1 0 01

_______________________________________ - — ----------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------- ---------------------

SITC

2002

2001

Industry

Nov.

Rev. 3

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

May

Apr.

05
07

29

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

9 4 .8

9 5 .8

9 4 .3

9 6 .4

9 7 .0

9 6 .4

9 4 .5

9 6 .3

9 6 .6

9 8 .7

9 7 .5

9 7 .7

1 18.0

1 05 .5

107 .4

1 09.8

1 1 0 .1

1 05 .4

1 04 .0

1 05 .9

1 05 .4

1 0 3 .4

1 0 2 .0

1 0 1 .2

8 2 .8

8 2.9

8 2 .3

8 2 .0

8 0 .4

80.1

8 0 .0

7 9 .8

8 1 .9

8 3 .0

8 4 .9

8 1 .4

82.1

101 .5

9 9 .3

1 06 .8

98.1

1 04 .0

1 04.9

108.1

1 0 2 .2

1 05 .0

1 05 .0

1 06 .7

1 07 .6

1 0 6 .3

7 7 .2

7 8 .5

7 7 .5

7 8 .8

8 3 .3

8 8 .5

8 3.8

8 4 .6

8 4.2

8 4 ,5

9 3 .5

9 4 .3

9 8 .9

1 0 2 .0

1 02.7

103 .0

1 02.7

1 02 .5

1 0 2 .6

1 02 .4

1 0 2 .5

1 02 .3

1 02 .4

1 0 2 .8

1 02 .4

1 0 2 .2

1 0 2 .2

1 0 2 .1

1 0 2 .2

9 6 .8

9 6 .8

9 6 .4

9 5 .8

9 5 .0

1 0 2 .6

103 .0

102 .9

102.9

1 0 2 .1

1 0 2 .6

103.1

103.2

103.2

102 .5

9 1 .3

89.9

90.1

9 2 .7

9 5 .8

9 6.3

9 7 .0

9 6 .4

9 7 .5

9 1 .7

9 2.6

9 8 .6

1 06.6

108.1

105.2

103.1

1 03.4

1 0 1 .8

9 8 .3

9 6 .3

9 5 .8

7 8 .0

7 7.7

78.1

7 7.2

7 4 .9

7 3 .4

7 4 .7

77.1

8 0 .2

8 2 .3

8 2 .3

8 2 .3

8 0 .5

8 9.8

9 1.2

9 1 .4

9 2.7

9 3.7

9 5 .0

9 5 .6

9 5 .9

9 6 .4

9 5.2

9 3 .3

9 3 .8

9 3 .9

93.1

9 6 .0

92.2

9 1 .7

9 2 .3

9 0 .5

103 .8

9 2 .8

9 1 .0

9 7 .5

1 04 .9

1 0 1 .8

1 00 .3

C ru d e a n im a l a n d ve g e ta b le m a te ria ls , n .e .s .....................

6 5 .0

6 1.2

6 4 .0

6 5.2

7 6 .4

87.1

8 9 .0

8 6 .0

6 6 .1

91.1

9 6 .3

9 7 .3

8 9 .6

6 3 .0

5 9.8

6 2 .6

6 5 .6

7 7 .4

8 6 .8

89.1

8 5 .9

8 8 .9

9 2 .9

9 7 .8

98.1

8 8 .6

P e tro le u m , p e tro le u m p ro d u c ts , a nd re la te d m a te ria ls....

7 5 .9

6 8.7

7 0 .8

5 8 .2

6 4 .8

8 6 .0

8 4 .3

8 3 .6

7 7 .7

7 2 .7

81.1

8 7 .3

9 3 .9

9 7.8

9 7 .5

9 7 .7

9 6 .7

9 6 .3

9 7 .3

9 7 .5

9 7 .0

9 8 .6

9 8 .9

9 8 .7

9 8 .3

9 8 .9

9 8 .9

9 7 .6

9 7 .0

97.1

9 7 .8

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

9 8 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .1

1 01 .5

1 0 2 .9

34
5

Aug.

1 09.8

C o ffe e , te a , c o c o a , sp ic e s , a n d m a n u fa c tu re s

3
33

July

95.1

F ish a n d c ru s ta c e a n s , m o llu sks, a n d o th e r

03

June

Chemicals and related products, n.e.s...........................

53

9 6 .8

97.1

9 7 .8

9 7 .4

9 7 .2

9 5 .6

9 5 .6

9 6.2

9 6 .4

9 6 .8

9 6 .6

9 5 .8

9 5 .9

9 7 .3

9 7 .0

97.1

9 6 .3

9 6 .0

9 6 .6

9 6.7

9 8 .0

9 8 .7

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .5

9 9 .5

9 9 .3

1 0 1 .2

9 8 .4

9 8 .4

9 8 .8

9 9.7

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .1

9 9 .9

9 9 .8

9 8 .9

99.1

9 9 .9

55

E s s e n tia l o ils ; p o lis h in g a n d cle a n in g p re p a ra tio n s ..........

1 00 .4

9 9 .8

9 9 .8

9 8 .6

97.1

9 1 .5

9 1 .4

91.1

9 1 .8

9 6 .4

9 7 .9

96.1

9 5 .7

P la s tic s in p rim a ry fo rm s ............................................................

9 6 .6

57

100.9

1 0 0 .8

1 0 0 .6

1 0 0 .6

1 0 1 .8

1 0 1 .8

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

9 9 .5

9 9 .6

1 0 1 .1

9 9 .5

P la s tic s in n o n p rim a ry fo rm s .....................................................

1 00 .3

58

9 8 .6

9 7 .8

96.1

95.2

9 3 .6

9 4 .5

94.3

9 3 .6

9 3 .5

9 3 .5

9 2 .4

9 1 .0

9 1 .0

93.1

9 3 .5

9 3 .6

9 3 .6

9 9 .3

9 9 .4

9 9 .4

6

Manufactured goods classified chiefly by materials....

62
64

P a p e r, p a p e rb o a rd , a n d a rtic le s o f p ap er, p u lp ,

66

N o n m e ta llic m in e ra l m a n u fa c tu re s , n .e .s .............................

74

76

8E

9 2 .4

9 2 .0

9 2 .4

9 2 .3

9 2.2

9 2 .6

9 2 .3

9 2 .8

9 3 .0

9 7 .8

97.9

9 7 .3

9 7 .6

9 7 .6

9 7 .9

98.1

98.1

9 8 .2

9 8 .2

9 7.6

96.1

9 5 .0

9 3 .7

9 3 .4

9 2 .5

9 1 .9

9 1 .7

9 1 .7

9 3 .7

9 3.2

9 3 .2

9 3 .3

9 7 .2

9 7 .5

9 7 .2

9 7 .0

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 7 .0

9 7 .0

9 7 .2

9 7 .5

9 7 .5

9 7 .6

9 7 .6

7 3 .7

7 3 .8

7 6 .4

7 7 .2

7 6 .9

79.2

7 9 .7

7 9 .7

7 9.2

7 7 .7

7 6 .4

7 6 .0

7 6 .4

9 9 .5

9 9 .0

9 8 .6

9 8 .6

9 8 .5

9 8 .2
9 6 .3

9 9 .0

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

9 8.2


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

j

9 8 .3

9 7 .9

9 7 .7

9 7 .4

97.2

97.1

9 7 .2

9 7 .0

97.1

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 6 .7

9 9 .0

9 8.7

9 8 .5

9 8.5

9 8 .5

9 8 .6

9 8 .8

9 9 .0

9 8 .7

9 9.2

9 8 .4

9 8 .4

9 8 .7

98.1

9 7 .8

98.1

9 7.5

9 7 .5

9 7 .6

9 7 .4

9 7 .8

98.1

9 8 .4

9 8 .4

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

8 9.0

8 8 .8

8 8 .6

8 8 .2

8 8 .1

8 8 .2

8 8 .0

8 7 .8

87.2

8 6 .9

8 6 .4

8 4 .9

85.1

9 6.4

9 6.3

95.7

95.1

9 4 .8

9 4 .8

9 4 .5

9 4 .4

9 4 .0

93.1

9 8 .6

9 7 .0

9 6 .9

9 7 .0

9 6 .8

9 7 .0

97.1

97.1

9 6 .6

9 6 .7

9 6 .6

9 6 .0

9 5 .9

1 0 0 .8

1 00 .7

T e le c o m m u n ic a tio n s a n d s o u n d re co rd in g a nd

a n d o D tical a o o d s . n .e .s .........................................................

9 8 .3

9 6 .4

G e n e ra l in d u s tria l m a c h in e s a n d p arts, n.e.s.,

P h o to g ra p h ic a p p a ra tu s , e q u ip m e n t, a n d su p p lie s,

9 8 .3

9 2 .8

92.1

91.1

1 0 0 .2

1 00 .3

1 ,0 0 1 . 0

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .2

1 00 .3

1 00 .3

1 00 .3

9 9 .9

100 .3

9 9.3

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

9 9 .0

99.1

9 9.2

9 9 .3

9 9 .5

9 9 .4

9 9 .4

9 9 .4

9 8 .5

9 8 .4

9 7.7

9 7 .3

9 7 .2

9 7.2

9 7 .4

9 7 .8

9 8 .4

9 8 .8 I

9 8 .4

9 8 .5

9 8 .4

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

97

Current Labor Statistics:

40.

Price Data

U.S. export price indexes by end-use category

[2000

=

100]
2C 01

Category

2002

Nov.

Dec.

ALL COMMODITIES...................................................

9 7 .8

9 7 .6

9 7 .5

9 7 .3

9 7 .6

9 8 .0

9 8 .0

9 8 .0

F o o d s , fe e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s .......................................

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .6

1 0 2 .0

9 8 .9

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .3

1 0 0 .4

1 0 1 .5

A g r ic u ltu r a l f o o d s , fe e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s ....................

1 0 0 .7

1 0 1 .6

1 0 2 .6

9 9 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .8

1 0 0 .9

N o n a g r ic u ltu r a l (fis h , b e v e ra g e s ) fo o d p r o d u c ts .......

9 0 .9

9 0 .4

9 6 .3

9 4 .5

9 8 .3

9 6 .2

96.1

In d u s tr ia l s u p p lie s a n d m a te r ia ls .........................................

9 2 .3

9 1 .4

9 1 .5

9 1 .4

9 1 .9

9 3 .4

A g r ic u ltu r a l in d u s tr ia l s u p p lie s a n d m a te r ia ls .............

92.1

9 3 .3

9 2 .3

9 2 .9

9 3 .6

F u e ls a n d lu b r ic a n t s ...............................................

8 8 .5

8 3 .5

8 5 .6

8 3 .8

9 2 .8

9 2 .3

9 2 .3

9 4 .4

94.1

9 4 .4

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

9 8 .3

9 8 .5

9 8 .8

9 8 .7

9 8 .8

1 0 4 .0

106 .1

1 1 0 .0

1 0 7 .8

1 0 9 .9

1 0 1 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .7

1 1 1 .0

1 0 8 .4

1 1 0 .7

1 0 0 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .7

1 0 1 .3

1 0 2 .1

1 0 2 .2

9 3 .8

9 4 .6

9 5 .6

9 5 .5

9 5 .9

9 6 .4

9 6.1

9 3 .6

9 3 .0

9 5 .8

9 7 .9

9 7 .7

9 8 .4

9 8 .4

1 0 0 .2

8 5 .6

9 0 .3

8 7 .9

8 6 .7

8 8 .3

8 8 .0

9 2 .9

9 4.1

9 1 .6

9 2 .2

9 2 .6

9 4 .0

9 4 .8

9 5 .7

9 6 .7

9 6 .5

9 6 .4

9 6 .8

96 6

9 4 .4

9 4 .2

9 4 .3

94.1

9 4 .2

9 5 .0

9 5 .4

9 6 .2

9 6 .6

9 6 .5

Oct.

Nov.

N o n a g r ic u ltu r a l s u p p lie s a n d m a te ria ls ,
e x c lu d in g fu e l a n d b u ild in g m a te r ia ls ..........................
S e le c te d b u ild in g m a t e r ia ls ..............................................
C a p ita l g o o d s .......................................................
E le c tr ic a n d e le c tr ic a l g e n e r a tin g e q u ip m e n t .............

9 9 .7

9 9 .4

99.1

9 9 .2

9 9 .4

9 9 .5

9 9 .2

9 8 .7

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

9 8 .4

9 8 .3

9 8 .4

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 2 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 2 .1

1 0 1 .8

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .0

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .1

1 0 2 .1

1 0 2 .1

102 0

9 6 .2

9 6 .0

9 5 .9

9 5 .8

1 0 1 .1

1 0 1 .2

1 0 1 .3

1 0 1 .4

9 9 .3

9 9 .3

9 9 .4

99 3

9 8 .7

9 8 .8

9 8 .7

N o n e le c tr ic a l m a c h in e r y ..................................................

98.1

9 7 .7

9 7 .2

9 7 .3

9 7 .5

9 7 .6

9 7 .3

9 6 .5

9 6 .2

A u to m o tiv e v e h ic le s , p a r ts , a n d e n g in e s .........................

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .7

1 0 0 .8

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .7

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .9

C o n s u m e r g o o d s , e x c lu d in g a u to m o tiv e ...........................

9 9 .8

9 9 .9

9 9 .5

99.1

99.1

9 8 .9

9 9 .0

99.1

99.1

N o n d u r a b le s , m a n u f a c tu r e d .......................................

99.1

99.1

9 8 .2

9 8 .2

98.1

9 8 .2

9 8 .3

9 8 .5

9 8 .5

9 8 .7

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .6

9 9 .9

9 9 .7

9 9 .3

9 9 .2

9 9 .4

9 9 .5

9 9 .7

9 9 .6

9 9 .6

9 9 .6

A g r ic u ltu r a l c o m m o d itie s ..............................................

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .9

9 8 .3

9 8 .9

9 9 .6

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .7

1 0 3 .4

1 0 5 .2

1 0 8 .8

1 0 6 .7

N o n a g r ic u ltu r a l c o m m o d itie s ..........................................

1 0 9 .0

9 7 .7

9 7 .3

9 7 .2

9 7 .2

9 7 .5

9 7 .8

9 7 .8

9 7 .8

9 7 .9

9 7 .9

9 8 .0

98.1

9 8 .0

D u ra b le s , m a n u f a c tu r e d ............................................

41. U.S. im port price indexes by end-use category
[2000 = 100]
2C»01

Category

Nov.
ALL COMMODITIES....................................................
F o o d s , fe e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s ..............................................

2002

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

9 2 .3

9 1 .4

9 1 .6

9 1 .6

9 2 .8

9 4 .3

9 4 .4

9 4.1

9 4 .5

9 4 .8

9 5 .5

9 5 .5

9 4 .5

9 5 .2

9 4 .6

9 5 .7

9 3 .8

9 5 .0

9 6 .0

9 7 .2

9 6 .2

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .8

1 0 7 .0

Oct.

Nov.

A g r ic u ltu r a l f o o d s , fe e d s , a n d b e v e r a g e s ..................

9 9 .5

9 8 .3

9 9 .9

9 7 .2

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .7

1 0 1 .3

1 0 2 .4

1 0 2 .0

1 0 5 .3

1 0 6 .0

N o n a g r ic u ltu r a l (fis h , b e v e ra g e s ) fo o d p r o d u c ts .......

8 6 .4

8 6 .8

8 7 .0

8 6 .8

8 5 .5

8 5 .5

8 5 .2

85.1

8 5 .0

8 6 .0

8 7 .3

8 6 .6

8 7 .2

7 9 .9

7 7 .6

79.1

7 9 .8

8 4 .9

9 0 .3

9 0 .8

8 9 .8

9 1 .3

9 2 .6

9 5 .2

9 5 .6

9 1 .9

6 5 .7

6 1 .6

6 4 .5

6 5 .9

7 6 .4

8 7.1

8 8 .5

8 5 .8

8 8 .1

9 0 .7

9 6 .2

9 7 .0

88 9

6 3 .6

5 9 .9

6 3 .0

6 5 .7

7 6 .9

8 6 .7

8 8 .4

8 5 .3

8 8 .5

9 1 .8

9 7.1

9 7 .4

8 7 .7

9 2 .3

9 0 .7

9 0 .0

8 8 .8

8 8 .0

8 7 .0

8 6 .7

8 7.1

8 8 .0

8 9 .3

9 0 .5

90 1

8Q 8

9 6 .7

9 6 .2

9 6 .3

9 6 .0

9 5 .9

9 7 .4

9 7 .4

9 7.1

98.1

99.1

S e le c te d b u ild in g m a t e r ia ls ....................................

9 9 .3

9 9 .7

99 8

96.1

9 2 .9

9 3.1

9 6.1

1 0 0 .7

1 0 1 .0

9 9 .6

99.1

9 9 .9

9 9 .2

9 7 ,8

9 7 .0

U n fin is h e d m e ta ls a s s o c ia te d w ith d u r a b le g o o d s ..

96 5

82.1

8 2.1

8 3 .2

8 3 .8

8 3 .8

8 6 .2

8 6 .6

8 8 .5

8 9 .4

8 8 .6

8 9 .7

90 1

90 8

N o n m e ta ls a s s o c ia te d w ith d u r a b le g o o d s .................

9 8 .9

9 9 .0

9 8 .4

9 7 .6

9 7 .2

9 7 .6

9 6 .8

9 6 .7

97.1

9 7 .0

9 6 .9

9 6 .9

9 7 .0

9 6 .5

9 6 .2

9 5 .7

9 5 .4

9 5 .2

9 5 .2

9 5.1

95.1

9 4 .8

9 4 .9

9 4 .7

9 4 .0

94 0

1 0 1 .2

1 0 0 .6

9 7 .3

9 6 .7

9 5 .5

9 5 .3

9 5 .0

95.1

9 5 .3

9 5 .9

9 5 .8

95 3

94 9

9 5 .3

9 4 .9

9 4 .8

9 4 .5

9 4 .4

9 4 .5

9 4 .4

9 4 .4

9 3 .8

9 3 .9

9 3 .7

9 2 .9

9 2 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .1

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .1

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .1

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .3

1 0 0 .6

1 0 0 .5

In d u s tr ia l s u p p lie s a n d m a t e r ia ls .........................................
F u e ls a n d lu b r ic a n t s .............................................
P e tr o le u m a n d p e tr o le u m p r o d u c ts ............................
P a p e r a n d p a p e r b a s e s t o c k s ..........................................
M a te r ia ls a s s o c ia te d w ith n o n d u ra b le
s u p p lie s a n d m a t e r ia ls ..................................................

C a p ita l g o o d s ...........................................................
E le c tr ic a n d e le c tr ic a l g e n e r a tin g e q u ip m e n t .............
N o n e le c tr ic a l m a c h in e r y .........................................
A u to m o tiv e v e h ic le s , p a r ts , a n d e n g in e s ..................
C o n s u m e r g o o d s , e x c lu d in g a u to m o tiv e ...........................

9 8 .8

9 8 .7

9 8 .7

9 8 .4

9 8 .2

9 8.1

9 8 .2

98.1

9 8 .2

9 8 .2

9 8.1

N o n d u r a b le s , m a n u f a c tu r e d ............................................

9 8.1

98 0

9 9 .6

9 9 .7

9 9 .8

9 9 .7

9 9 .2

99.1

99.1

9 9.1

9 9 .3

9 9 .6

D u ra b le s , m a n u f a c tu r e d ....................................

9 9 .4

9 9 .6

99 4

9 8 .3

9 8 .0

9 7 .8

9 7 .4

9 7 .3

9 7 .2

9 7 .2

9 7 .2

9 7 .3

9 7 .0

9 6 .8

N o n m a n u fa c tu r e d c o n s u m e r g o o d s ................

9 6 .8

9 6 .7

9 5 .7

9 6 .4

9 5 .8

9 5 .7

9 6.1

9 5 .8

9 7 .6

9 5 .6

9 5 .3

9 5 .6

9 5 .4

9 5 .4

9 5 .2

42. U.S. international price Indexes for selected categories of services
[2000 = 100]_______________
2000

Category
Sept.

2001
Dec.

Mar.

June

2002
Sept.

Dec.

Mar.

June

Sept.

A ir f r e ig h t ( in b o u n d ) ............................................

1 0 0 .2

9 9 .0

9 7 .9

95.1

9 4 .9

9 5 .2

9 3 .9

A ir f r e ig h t ( o u tb o u n d ) ...............................................

9 8 .3

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .1

9 8 .0

9 7 .6

9 7 .9

9 5 .9

9 8 .4

9 7 .5

A ir p a s s e n g e r f a r e s (U .S . c a r r ie r s ) ...................................

1 03.1

9 9 .9

1 0 1 .9

1 0 6 .4

1 0 7 .6

1 0 3 .5

1 0 3 .3

1 1 0 .7

A ir p a s s e n g e r f a r e s ( fo r e ig n c a r r ie r s ) ....................................

1 1 4 .3

1 0 3 .2

9 7 .6

1 0 0 .7

1 0 3 .8

1 1 0 .2

1 0 0 .8

9 9 .4

1 1 0 .9

1 1 8 .5

O c e a n lin e r f r e ig h t ( in b o u n d ) ................................................

1 0 1 .1

1 0 1 .0

1 0 2 .8

1 0 0 .8

98.1

9 3 .6

9 1 .7

9 0 .3

9 3 .5


98
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

1 0 0 .3

43.

Indexes of productivity, hourly com pensation, and unit costs, quarterly d ata seasonally adjusted

[1992 = 100]

III

IV

I

II

2002

2001

2000

1999

Item

III

IV

I

II

III

IV

I

II

III

B u s in e s s
1 1 3 .6

1 1 5 .2

1 1 5 .3

1 1 7 .2

1 1 7 .3

1 1 7 .9

1 1 7 .5

1 1 7 .4

1 1 7 .9

1 2 0 .1

1 2 2 .5

1 23.1

1 2 4 .7

1 2 3 .4

1 2 7 .0

1 3 1 .4

1 3 2 .4

1 3 5 .0

1 3 6 .3

1 3 7 .3

1 3 7 .5

1 3 7 .8

1 3 8 .3

1 3 9 .3

1 4 0 .8

1 4 2 .6

1 0 7 .3

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 1 .7

1 1 1 .9

1 1 1 .8

1 1 1 .0

1 1 1 .1

1 1 1 .6

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .2

1 1 3 .2

1 1 0 .4

1 1 0 .2

1 1 4 .0

1 1 3 .0

115 .1

1 1 5 .6

1 1 6 .9

1 17 .1

1 1 6 .8

1 15 .1

1 1 3 .7

1 1 4 .4

1 1 4 .3

1 14 .1

1 1 5 .3

1 1 0 .7

1 14 .1

1 1 1 .2

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .3

1 1 3 .6

1 1 5 .5

1 1 7 .2

1 1 9 .9

1 1 9 .3

1 1 9 .7

1 1 1 .8

1 1 2 .1

1 1 2 .8

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .7

1 1 4 .3

1 1 5 .2

1 1 5 .8

1 1 6 .4

1 1 5 .9

1 1 6 .0

1 1 6 .2

1 1 6 .3

1 1 2 .9

1 1 4 .7

1 1 4 .7

1 1 6 .4

1 1 6 .6

1 17 .1

1 1 6 .7

1 1 6 .6

1 1 7 .2

1 1 9 .3

1 2 1 .8

1 2 2 .3

1 2 3 .8

1 2 4 .5

1 2 6 .3

1 3 0 .8

1 3 1 .5

1 3 4 .3

1 3 5 .3

1 3 6 .3

1 3 6 .3

1 3 6 .7

1 3 7 .2

1 3 8 .2

1 3 9 .5

1 4 1 .2

1 0 6 .6

1 0 7 .2

1 1 0 .0

1 0 9 .8

1 1 1 .1

1 1 1 .2

1 1 0 .9

1 1 0 .1

1 1 0 .2

1 1 0 .7

1 1 1 .1

1 1 1 .2

1 1 2 .0

1 1 0 .3

1 1 0 .1

1 1 4 .0

1 1 3 .0

1 1 5 .2

1 1 5 .6

1 1 6 .8

1 1 6 .9

1 1 6 .6

1 1 5 .0

1 1 3 .4

1 1 4 .0

1 1 5 .8

1 1 7 .0

1 1 2 .3

1 1 5 .6

1 1 2 .8

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .8

1 1 5 .3

1 1 7 .2

1 1 9 .2

1 2 1 .7

1 2 1 .7

1 2 1 .9
1 1 6 .9

N o n f a r m b u s in e s s

1 1 4 .0

1 1 2 .3

1 1 2 .6

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .9

1 1 4 .3

1 1 4 .8

1 1 5 .7

1 1 6 .3

1 1 6 .8

1 1 6 .5

1 1 6 .4

1 1 6 .8

1 1 4 .7

1 1 5 .8

1 1 7 .8

1 1 8 .3

1 1 9 .5

1 1 9 .5

1 1 8 .8

1 1 9 .4

1 2 0 .4

1 2 3 .5

1 2 4 .9

2 3 6 .7

1 2 8 .4

1 2 1 .2

1 2 2 .7

1 2 6 .9

1 2 7 .8

1 3 0 .4

1 3 1 .7

1 3 1 .3

1 3 1 .9

1 3 2 .7

1 3 3 .6

1 3 4 .7

1 3 6 .2

1 38 .1
1 0 9 .6

N o n f i n a n c i a l c o r p o r a t io n s

1 0 3 .7

1 0 4 .2

1 0 6 .7

1 0 6 .6

1 0 7 .9

1 0 8 .2

1 0 6 .9

1 0 6 .5

1 0 7 .0

1 0 7 .8

1 0 8 .3

1 0 8 .6

1 0 5 .3

1 0 5 .7

1 0 6 .9

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 1 0 .8

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .7

1 0 9 .8

1 0 9 .5

1 0 9 .4

1 0 9 .5

1 0 5 .6

1 0 6 .0

1 0 7 .8

1 0 8 .0

1 09.1

1 1 0 .2

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .4

1 1 0 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 0 7 .9

1 0 7 .5

1 0 7 .5

1 0 4 .5

1 0 4 .6

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .3

1 07.1

1 0 8 .9

1 1 1 .6

1 1 3 .5

1 1 5 .5

1 14.1

1 1 4 .0

1 1 4 .5

1 1 4 .8

1 2 7 .7

1 2 6 .0

1 1 9 .5

1 1 8 .8

1 0 9 .5

9 8 .6

93.1

9 5 .4

9 7 .9

1 0 7 .6

1 0 7 .6

1 0 7 .8

1 0 4 .9

1 1 0 .4

1 1 0 .1

1 0 8 .4

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .7

1 0 6 .3

1 0 6 .9

1 0 8 .9

1 1 1 .0

1 1 2 .4

1 1 2 .4

1 1 2 .8

1 1 2 .3

1 0 7 .2

1 0 7 .4

1 0 8 .0

1 0 8 .5

1 0 8 .6

1 0 8 .9

1 0 9 .3

1 0 9 .9

1 1 0 .5

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .4

1 0 9 .3

1 0 9 .1

1 4 4 .2

M a n u f a c t u r in g

U n it la b o r c o s t s ................................................................................


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

1 2 9 .8

1 32.1

1 3 3 .6

1 3 4 .9

1 3 5 .4

1 3 5 .9

1 3 5 .4

1 3 5 .4

1 3 6 .4

1 3 7 .6

1 4 0 .9

1 4 2 .3

1 2 2 .6

1 2 4 .2

1 3 1 .4

1 2 9 .3

1 3 2 .2

1 3 1 .5

1 3 2 .0

1 3 3 .0

1 3 3 .3

1 3 4 .3

1 3 5 .6

1 3 6 .6

1 3 8 .1

1 0 4 .9

1 0 5 .4

1 1 0 .5

1 0 7 .9

1 0 9 .4

1 0 8 .0

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .3

1 0 9 .0

1 0 8 .9

1 0 9 .6

9 4 .4

9 4 .0

9 8 .4

9 5 .9

9 7 .7

9 6 .7

9 7 .5

9 8 .2

9 7 .8

9 7 .6

9 6 .2

9 6 .0

9 5 .8

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

99

Current Labor Statistics:

44.

Productivity Data

Annua! indexes of m ultifactor productivity and related measures, selected years

[1996 = 100, unless otherwise indicated]
Item

1960

1970

1980

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

Private business
P r o d u c tiv ity :
O u tp u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s ..............................................
O u tp u t p e r u n it o f c a p ita l s e r v ic e s ........................................
M u ltifa c to r p r o d u c t iv it y ......................................................
O u t p u t ................................................................................

4 5 .6

6 3 .0

7 5 .8

9 0 .2

9 1 .3

9 4 .8

9 5 .4

9 6 .6

9 7 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .0

1 0 4 .8

1 0 4 .8

1 1 0 .4

1 1 1 .1

1 0 1 .5

9 9 .3

96.1

9 7 .7

9 8 .5

1 0 0 .3

9 9 .7

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .5

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .1

6 5 .2

8 0 .0

8 8 .3

9 5 .3

9 4 .4

9 6 .6

97.1

98.1

9 8 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .1

1 0 2 .6

1 0 2 .6

2 7 .5

4 2 .0

5 9 .4

8 3 .6

8 2 .6

8 5 .7

8 8 .5

9 2 .8

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 5 .2

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .6

1 0 6 .4

In p u ts :
L a b o r in p u t ............................................................

5 4 .0

6 1 .0

7 1 .9

8 9 .4

8 8 .3

8 9 .3

9 1 .8

9 5 .6

9 8 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 6 .4

C a p ita l s e r v ic e s .........................................................

2 4 .9

3 7 .8

5 8 .6

8 4 .2

8 6 .0

8 7 .7

8 9 .8

9 2 .6

9 6 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .7

1 1 0 .4

C o m b in e d u n its o f la b o r a n d c a p ita l in p u t ........................

1 1 0 .4

4 2 .3

5 2 .4

6 7 .3

8 7 .7

8 7 .5

8 8 .8

91.1

9 4 .6

9 7 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .0

1 0 7 .7

1 0 7 .7

4 1 .3

5 6 .7

7 4 .7

9 0 .8

9 5 .0

9 7 .0

9 6 .8

9 6 .3

9 7 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .7

1 0 4 .7

1 0 4 .5

C a p ita l p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s .........................................

Private nonfarm business
P ro d u c tiv ity :
O u t p u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s ...........................................

4 8 .7

6 4 .9

7 7 .3

9 0 .3

9 1 .4

9 4 .8

9 5 .3

9 6 .5

9 7 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .7

O u tp u t p e r u n it o f c a p ita l s e r v ic e s ........................................

1 0 4 .5

1 2 0 .1

1 1 8 .3

1 0 5 .7

1 0 0 .0

9 6 .6

9 7 .9

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .3

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .2

9 9 .8

M u ltifa c to r p r o d u c t iv it y ................................................................

9 9 .8

69.1

8 2 .6

9 0 .5

9 5 .6

9 4 .7

9 6 .6

97.1

98.1

9 8 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .4

1 0 2 .4

2 7 .2

4 1 .9

5 9 .6

8 3 .5

8 2 .5

8 5 .5

8 8 .4

9 2 .6

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 05.1

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .6

L a b o r in p u t ..............................................................................

50.1

5 9 .3

7 0 .7

8 9 .2

8 8 .0

8 9 .0

9 1 .8

9 5 .4

9 7 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .8

1 0 6 .6

C a p ita l s e r v ic e s ..............................................................

1 0 6 .6

2 2 .6

3 5 .5

5 6 .4

8 3 .5

8 5 .4

8 7 .3

8 9 .5

9 2 .3

9 5 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .9

1 1 0 .8

1 1 0 .8

C o m b in e d u n its o f la b o r a n d c a p ita l in p u t ........................

3 9 .3

5 0 .7

6 5 .9

8 7 .3

87.1

8 8 .4

9 1 .0

9 4 .4

9 7 .2

1 0 0 .0

1 0 4 .2

1 0 8 .0

1 0 8 .0

4 0 .5

5 4 .8

7 3 .1

9 0 .3

9 4 .7

9 6 .8

9 6 .5

9 6 .3

9 7 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .7

1 0 4 .7

O u t p u t .............................................................................
In p u ts :

C a p ita l p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s ................................................

Manufacturing (1992 = 100)
P r o d u c tiv ity :
O u t p u t p e r h o u r o f a ll p e r s o n s .................................................
O u tp u t p e r u n it o f c a p ita l s e r v ic e s ........................................
M u ltifa c to r p r o d u c t iv it y ........................................................
O u t p u t ..........................................................................................

4 1 .8

5 4 .2

7 0.1

9 2 .8

9 5 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .9

1 0 5 .0

1 0 9 .0

1 1 2 .8

1 17 .1

1 2 4 .3

1 2 4 .3

1 2 4 .3

1 1 6 .5

1 0 0 .9

1 0 1 .6

9 7 .5

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .1

1 0 4 .0

1 0 5 .0

1 0 4 .5

1 0 5 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 0 6 .5

7 2 .7

8 4 .4

8 6 .6

9 9 .3

9 8 .3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .4

1 0 2 .6

1 0 5 .0

106.1

1 0 9 .8

1 1 3 .2

1 1 3 .2

3 8 .5

5 6 .5

7 5 .3

9 7 .3

9 5 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .3

1 0 8 .7

1 1 3 .4

1 1 6 .9

1 2 3 .5

1 3 0 .7

1 3 0 .7

In p u ts :
H o u r s o f a ll p e r s o n s ..................................................................

9 2 .0

1 0 4 .2

1 0 7 .5

1 0 4 .8

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 1 .4

1 0 3 .6

1 0 4 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 5 .5

1 0 5 .2

C a p ita l s e r v ic e s .....................................................................

1 0 5 .2

3 0 .9

4 8 .5

7 4 .7

9 5 .8

9 7 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .2

1 0 4 .5

1 0 8 .0

1 1 1 .9

1 1 6 .9

E n e r g y ...............................................................

1 2 2 .8

1 2 2 .8

5 1 .3

8 5 .4

9 2 .5

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 7 .3

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .0

1 0 3 .9

N o n e n e r g y m a t e r ia ls ..................................................................

1 0 9 .2

1 0 9 .2

3 8 .2

4 4 .8

7 5 .0

9 2 .5

9 3 .6

1 0 0 .0

1 0 5 .7

1 1 1 .3

1 1 2 .8

1 2 0 .4

1 2 0 .4

1 2 7 .2

1 2 7 .2

P u r c h a s e d b u s in e s s s e r v ic e s ..................................................

2 8 .2

4 8 .8

7 3 .7

9 2 .5

92.1

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .0

1 05.1

1 1 0 .0

1 0 8 .9

1 1 4 .2

1 1 6 .8

C o m b in e d u n its o f a ll f a c t o r in p u ts ........................................

1 1 6 .8

5 2 .9

6 7 .0

8 7 .0

9 8 .0

9 7 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 2 .9

1 0 6 .0

1 0 7 .9

1 1 0 .2

1 1 2 .5

1 1 5 .5

1 1 5 .5


100
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

45.

Annual indexes of productivity, hourly com pensation, unit costs, and prices, selected years

n 9 92 -1 0 0 1

Item

1960

1 97 0

19 8 0

19 9 0

1 99 3

19 9 4

19 9 5

199 6

1 99 7

1998

19 9 9

2000

2001

Business
1 1 8 .2

4 8 .8

6 7 .0

8 0 .4

9 5 .2

1 0 0 .5

1 0 1 .9

1 0 2 .6

1 0 5 .4

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .6

1 1 3 .5

1 1 6 .9

1 3 .7

2 3 .5

5 4 .2

9 0 .7

1 0 2 .5

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .7

1 1 0 .1

1 1 3 .5

1 1 9 .7

1 2 5 .2

1 3 3 .8

1 3 7 .7

5 9 .8

7 8 .6

8 9 .2

9 6 .3

1 0 0 .0

9 9 .9

9 9 .6

1 0 0 .1

1 0 1 .0

1 0 5 .0

1 0 7 .6

1 1 1 .2

1 1 1 .4

2 8 .0

35.1

6 7 .4

9 5 .3

1 0 1 .9

1 0 2 .6

1 04 .1

1 0 4 .5

1 0 5 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 1 0 .3

1 1 4 .4

1 1 6 .5

2 5 .2

3 1 .6

6 1 .5

9 3 .9

1 0 2 .5

1 0 6 .4

1 0 9 .4

1 1 3 .3

1 17.1

1 1 4 .5

1 1 3 .9

1 1 2 .0

1 1 4 .7

2 7 .0

3 3 .9

6 5 .2

9 4 .8

1 0 2 .2

1 0 4 .0

1 0 6 .0

1 0 7 .7

1 0 9 .7

1 1 0 .6

1 1 1 .8

1 1 1 3 .5

1 1 5 .8

5 1 .9

6 8 .9

8 2 .0

9 5 .3

1 0 0 .5

1 0 1 .8

1 0 2 .8

1 0 5 .4

1 0 7 .5

1 1 0 .3

1 1 2 .9

1 1 6 .2

1 1 7 .5

1 4 .3

2 3 .7

5 4 .6

9 0 .5

1 0 2 .2

1 0 4 .3

1 0 6 .6

1 0 9 .8

113 .1

1 19 .1

1 2 4 .3

1 3 3 .0

1 3 6 .6

6 2 .6

7 9 .2

8 9 .8

9 6 .2

9 9 .7

9 9 .7

9 9 .4

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .6

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .8

1 1 0 .6

1 1 0 .5

Nonfarm business

2 7 .5

3 4 .4

6 6 .5

9 5 .0

1 0 1 .7

1 0 2 .5

1 0 3 .7

1 0 4 .2

1 0 5 .2

1 0 8 .0

1 1 0 .1

1 1 4 .4

1 1 6 .3

2 4 .6

3 1 .3

6 0 .5

9 3 .6

1 0 3 .0

1 0 6 .9

1 1 0 .4

1 1 3 .5

1 1 8 .0

1 1 5 .7

1 1 5 .5

1 1 3 .5

1 1 6 .4

2 6 .5

3 3 .3

6 4 .3

9 4 .5

1 0 2 .2

1 04.1

1 06 .1

1 0 7 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 1 0 .8

1 1 2 .1

114 .1

1 1 6 .3

Nonfinancial corporations
5 5 .4

7 0 .4

81.1

9 5 .4

1 0 0 .7

103 .1

1 0 4 .2

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .4

1 1 1 .7

1 1 4 .7

1 17 .1

1 1 8 .3

1 5 .6

2 5 .3

5 6 .4

9 0 .8

1 0 2 .0

1 0 4 .2

1 0 6 .2

1 0 9 .0

1 1 0 .3

1 1 6 .0

1 2 1 .1

1 2 9 .2

1 3 2 .4

6 8 .1

8 4 .4

9 2 .9

9 6 .5

9 9 .6

9 9 .6

9 9 .0

9 9 .0

9 8.1

1 0 1 .7

104 .1

1 0 7 .4

1 0 7 .0

2 6 .8

3 4 .8

6 8 .4

9 5 .9

1 0 1 .0

1 0 1 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 1 .2

1 0 1 .5

1 0 3 .3

1 05 .1

1 0 9 .8

1 1 2 .9

2 8.1

3 5 .9

6 9 .6

9 5 .2

1 0 1 .3

1 0 1 .0

1 0 1 .9

1 0 1 .4

1 0 1 .8

1 0 3 .8

1 0 5 .6

1 1 0 .3

1 1 1 .9

2 3 .3

3 1 .9

65.1

9 8 .0

1 0 0 .2

1 0 1 .3

1 0 2 .2

1 0 0 .6

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .2

1 0 3 .5

1 0 8 .3

1 1 5 .8

5 0 .2

4 4 .4

6 8 .8

9 4 .3

1 1 3 .2

1 3 1 .7

1 3 9 .0

1 5 2 .2

1 5 6 .9

1 4 1 .7

1 3 1 .7

1 1 3 .2

1 0 0 .5

3 0 .2

3 5.1

6 6 .0

9 7 .1

1 0 3 .5

1 0 9 .0

1 1 1 .6

1 1 3 .8

1 1 5 .2

1 1 2 .3

1 1 0 .7

1 0 9 .5

1 1 1 .8

2 8 .8

3 5 .6

6 8 .4

9 5 .8

1 0 2 .1

1 0 3 .7

1 05 .1

1 0 5 .5

1 0 6 .2

1 0 6 .6

1 0 7 .3

1 1 0 .0

1 1 1 .9

Manufacturing

I m p lic it p r ic e d e f la t o r .....................................................................

4 1 .8

5 4 .2

7 0.1

9 2 .9

1 0 1 .9

1 0 5 .0

1 0 9 .0

1 1 2 .8

1 1 7 .6

1 2 3 .3

1 2 9 .7

1 3 4 .9

1 3 6 .2

1 4 .9

2 3 .7

5 5 .6

9 0 .8

1 0 2 .7

1 0 5 .6

1 0 7 .9

1 0 9 .4

1 1 1 .5

1 1 7 .4

1 2 2 .1

1 31 .1

1 3 3 .1

6 5 .0

7 9 .2

9 1 .4

9 6 .4

1 0 0 .2

1 0 1 .0

1 0 0 .6

9 9 .4

99.1

1 0 3 .0

1 0 4 .9

1 0 9 .0

1 0 7 .7

3 5 .6

4 3 .8

7 9 .3

9 7 .8

1 0 0 .8

1 0 0 .7

9 9 .0

9 6 .9

9 4 .8

9 5 .2

94.1

9 7 .2

9 7 .8

2 6 .8

2 9 .3

8 0 .2

9 9 .8

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .8

1 0 6 .9

1 0 9 .9

1 1 0 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 0 7 .0

“

3 0 .2

3 5 .0

7 9 .9

9 9 .0

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .0

1 0 3 .9

1 0 4 .8

104 .1

1 0 0 .4

1 0 0 .7

1 0 3 .2

D a s h in d ic a te s d a t a n o t a v a ila b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

101

Current Labor Statistics:

Productivity Data

46. Annual indexes of output per hour for selected 3-digit SIC industries
[1987=100]
Industry

SIC

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1 2 6 .0

1 1 7 .2

1 1 6 .5

1 1 8 .9

1 1 8 .3

1 1 0 .0

1 2 2 .6

1 4 1 .6

1 5 9 .8

1 6 0 .8

1 4 4 .2

1 3 8 .3

1 5 8 .5

1 8 7 .6

1 9 7 .5

2 3 9 .9
2 0 7 .0

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

Mining
C o p p e r o r e s ................................................

m?

1 0 2 .7

G o ld a n d s ilv e r o r e s ...............................

104

1 2 2 .3

1 2 7 .4

B itu m in o u s c o a l a n d lig n it e m in in g .

122

1 1 8 .7

1 2 2 .4

1 3 3 .0

1 4 1 .2

1 48.1

1 5 5 .9

1 6 8 .0

1 7 6 .6

1 8 8 .0

C r u d e p e t r o le u m a n d n a tu r a l g a s ...

1 9 4 .9

131

9 7 .0

9 7 .9

1 0 2 .1

1 0 5 .9

1 1 2 .4

1 1 9 .4

1 2 3 .9

1 2 5 .2

C r u s h e d a n d b r o k e n s t o n e .................

1 2 7 .5

1 3 4 .5

1 4 2 .5

142

1 0 2 .2

9 9 .8

1 0 5 .0

1 0 3 .6

1 0 8 .7

1 0 5 .4

1 0 7 .2

1 1 2 .6

1 1 0 .2

1 0 5 .0

1 0 1 .9

9 9 .6

1 0 4 .6

1 0 4 .3

1 0 2 .9

Manufacturing
M e a t p r o d u c t s ...........................................

201

97.1

D a ir y p r o d u c t s ...........................................

?n?

1 0 7 .3

P r e s e r v e d f r u it s a n d v e g e t a b le s ......

203

9 5 .6

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .5

1 0 6 .8

1 0 7 .6

109.1

1 0 9 .2

G r a in m ill p r o d u c t s ..................................

204

1 0 5 .4

1 0 4 .9

1 0 7 .8

1 0 9 .2

1 0 8 .4

1 1 5 .4

1 0 8 .0

205

9 2 .7

9 0 .6

9 3 .8

9 4 .4

9 6 .4

9 7 .3

9 5 .6

B a k e ry p r o d u c t s .......................................

S u g a r a n d c o n f e c tio n e r y p r o d u c ts ................

1 0 1 .2

1 0 2 .3

9 7 .4

1 0 2 .5

1 0 2 .3

1 0 1 .8

1 1 1 .8

1 1 6 .4

1 1 6 .0

1 1 9 .3

1 1 9 .3

1 1 2 .7

1 1 0 .7

1 1 7 .8

1 2 0 .4

1 2 3 .5

1 1 8 .2

1 2 6 .2

1 2 9 .3

1 2 7 .5

99.1

1 0 0 .9

1 0 6 .4

1 0 7 .6

1 1 3 .5

206

1 0 3 .2

1 0 2 .0

9 9 .8

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .2

1 0 8 .3

1 1 3 .7

1 1 6 .7

F a ts a n d o ils .............................................................

1 2 3 .0

1 2 7 .0

1 3 0 .5

207

118 .1

1 2 0 .1

1 14.1

1 1 2 .6

1 1 1 .8

1 2 0 .3

1 1 0 .1

1 2 0 .2

B e v e r a g e s ..................................................................

1 3 7 .3

1 5 4 .4

1 5 1 .4

208

1 1 7 .0

1 2 0 .0

127.1

1 2 6 .4

130 .1

1 3 3 .5

1 3 5 .0

1 3 5 .5

1 3 6 .4

1 2 9 .7

M is c e lla n e o u s f o o d a n d k in d r e d p ro d u c ts .

1 2 8 .6

209

9 9 .2

1 0 1 .7

1 0 1 .5

1 0 5 .2

1 0 0 .9

1 0 2 .9

1 09.1

C ig a r e tt e s ...................................................................

1 0 4 .0

1 1 2 .4

1 1 3 .9

1 1 6 .3

211

1 1 3 .2

1 0 7 .6

1 1 1 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 2 6 .6

1 4 2 .9

1 4 7 .2

1 4 7 .2

1 5 2 .2

1 3 7 .7

139 .1

B r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m ills , c o tt o n .........

221

1 03.1

1 1 1 .2

1 1 7 .8

1 2 2 .1

1 3 4 .0

1 3 7 .3

1 3 1 .2

1 3 6 .2

B r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m ills , m a n m a d e .

1 3 9 .3

1 4 0 .2

222

1 1 1 .3

1 1 6 .2

1 2 6 .2

1 3 1 .7

1 4 2 .5

1 4 5 .3

1 4 7 .6

1 6 2 .2

N a r r o w f a b r ic m ills ...................................

1 6 8 .6

1 7 5 .3

1 6 7 .4

224

9 6 .5

9 9 .6

1 1 2 .9

1 1 1 .4

1 1 0 .3

1 2 0 .1

1 1 8 .9

1 2 6 .3

1 1 0 .8

K n ittin g m ills ................................................

1 1 7 .7

1 2 4 .9

1 17.1

225

1 0 7 .5

1 1 4 .0

1 1 9 .3

1 2 7 .9

134 .1

1 3 8 .3

1 5 0 .3

T e x tile fin is h in g , e x c e p t w o o l..............

1 3 8 .0

1 3 5 .9

1 4 6 .6

1 5 5 .6

226

8 3 .4

7 9 .9

7 8 .6

7 9 .3

8 1 .2

7 8 .5

7 9 .2

9 4 .3

9 3 .7

9 4 .4

9 7 .2

C a r p e ts a n d r u g s .................................

227

9 3 .2

8 9 .2

96.1

97.1

9 3 .3

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .2

1 0 0 .3

Y a r n a n d t h r e a d m ills ........................

1 0 2 .3

9 6 .0

1 0 3 .0

228

1 1 0 .2

1 1 1 .4

1 1 9 .6

1 2 6 .6

1 3 0 .7

1 3 7 .4

1 4 7 .4

1 5 0 .4

M is c e lla n e o u s t e x tile g o o d s ...........

1 5 3 .0

1 5 7 .6

1 5 5 .4

229

1 0 9 .2

1 0 4 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 1 0 .4

1 1 8 .5

1 2 3 .7

1 23 .1

1 1 8 .7

1 2 0 .1

M e n 's a n d b o y s ' f u r n is h in g s ...........

1 2 8 .0

1 3 4 .4

232

1 0 2 .1

1 0 8 .4

1 09.1

1 0 8 .4

1 1 1 .7

1 2 3 .4

1 3 4 .7

162 .1

W o m e n 's a n d m is s e s ' o u t e r w e a r .

1 7 4 .8

1 9 0 .9

2 0 0 .3

233

104.1

1 0 4 .3

1 0 9 .4

1 2 1 .8

1 2 7 .4

1 3 5 .5

1 4 1 .6

1 4 9 .9

1 5 1 .9

1 7 3 .9

1 8 9 .9

W o m e n 's a n d c h ild r e n 's u n d e r g a r m e n ts ...

234

1 0 2 .1

1 1 3 .7

1 1 7 .4

1 2 4 .5

1 3 8 .0

1 6 1 .3

1 7 4 .5

2 0 8 .9

2 1 6 .4

2 9 4 .7

3 5 2 .3

H a ts , c a p s , a n d m illin e r y ....................................

235

8 9 .2

91.1

9 3 .6

8 7 .2

7 7 .7

8 4 .3

8 2 .2

8 7.1

9 8 .7

M is c e lla n e o u s a p p a r e l a n d a c c e s s o r ie s ...

9 9 .3

1 06.1

238

9 0 .6

9 1 .8

9 1 .3

9 4 .0

1 0 5 .5

1 1 6 .8

1 2 0 .1

1 0 1 .5

1 0 8 .0

M is c e lla n e o u s f a b r ic a t e d te x t ile p ro d u c ts

1 0 5 .8

1 1 1 .3

239

9 9 .9

1 0 0 .7

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .5

1 0 7 .8

1 0 9 .2

1 0 5 .6

1 1 9 .2

S a w m ills a n d p la n in g m ills ................................

1 1 7 .3

1 2 8 .8

1 3 2 .5

242

9 9 .8

1 0 2 .6

108.1

1 0 1 .9

1 0 3 .3

1 1 0 .2

1 1 5 .6

1 1 6 .9

1 1 8 .7

1 2 5 .4

1 2 4 .4

M illw o r k , p ly w o o d , a n d s tr u c tu ra l m e m b e rs ..

243

9 8 .0

9 9 .9

9 7 .0

9 4 .5

9 2 .7

9 2 .4

89.1

W o o d c o n t a in e r s ........................................................

9 1 .3

8 9 .2

9 1 .4

244

1 1 1 .2

113 .1

1 0 9 .4

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .9

1 06.1

1 0 6 .7

1 0 6 .2

1 0 6 .5

W o o d b u ild in g s a n d m o b ile h o m e s ..................

1 0 3 .9

1 0 4 .6

245

103 .1

1 0 3 .0

9 8 .0

103.1

1 0 3 .8

9 8 .3

9 7 .0

9 6 .7

1 0 0 .3

M is c e lla n e o u s w o o d p r o d u c t s .............................

9 9 .2

1 0 0 .3

9 4 .6

249

1 0 7 .7

1 1 0 .5

1 1 4 .2

1 1 5 .3

1 1 1 .8

1 1 5 .4

1 1 4 .4

1 2 3 .4

1 3 1 .2

H o u s e h o ld f u r n itu r e ..................................................

1 4 0 .7

1 4 6 .5

251

1 0 4 .5

1 07.1

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .6

1 1 2 .5

1 1 6 .9

1 2 1 .6

1 2 1 .3

1 2 5 .7

1 2 8 .9

1 2 8 .4

O ffic e f u r n itu r e .............................................

252

9 5 .0

94.1

1 0 2 .5

1 0 3 .2

1 0 0 .5

1 0 1 .1

1 0 6 .4

1 1 8 .3

P u b lic b u ild in g a n d r e la te d f u r n itu re .

113 .1

1 0 8 .9

1 1 1 .2

253

1 1 9 .8

1 2 0 .2

1 4 0 .6

1 6 1 .0

1 5 7 .4

1 7 3 .3

1 8 1 .5

2 1 4 .9

P a r titio n s a n d f ix t u r e s ...............................

2 0 7 .6

2 2 2 .4

2 0 2 .0

254

9 5 .6

9 3 .0

1 0 2 .7

1 0 7 .4

9 8 .9

1 0 1 .2

9 7 .5

1 2 1 .1

M is c e lla n e o u s f u r n itu r e a n d f ix tu r e s ..

1 2 5 .6

1 2 5 .9

1 3 1 .9

259

1 0 3 .5

1 0 2 .1

9 9 .5

1 0 3 .6

1 0 4 .7

1 1 0 .0

1 1 3 .2

1 1 0 .7

P u lp m i lls ........................................................

1 2 1 .9

119 .1

1 1 0 .5

261

1 1 6 .7

1 2 8 .3

1 3 7 .3

1 2 2 .5

1 2 8 .9

1 3 1 .9

1 3 2 .6

8 2 .3

8 6 .6

8 4 .8

7 8 .8

P a p e r m ills ................................................................

262

1 0 2 .3

9 9 .2

1 0 3 .3

1 0 2 .4

1 1 0 .2

1 1 8 .6

1 1 1 .6

1 1 2 .0

1 1 4 .8

P a p e r b o a r d m i lls ...................................................

1 2 6 .2

1 3 3 .5

263

1 0 0 .6

1 0 1 .4

1 0 4 .4

1 0 8 .4

1 1 4 .9

1 1 9 .5

1 1 8 .0

1 2 6 .7

1 2 7 .8

P a p e r b o a r d c o n t a in e r s a n d b o x e s ..............

1 3 4 .9

1 3 5 .3

265

1 0 1 .3

1 0 3 .4

1 0 5 .2

1 0 7 .9

1 0 8 .4

105.1

1 0 6 .3

1 0 9 .7

1 1 3 .5

1 1 1 .9

1 1 2 .9

1 2 6 .0

1 2 8 .3

M is c e lla n e o u s c o n v e r te d p a p e r p ro d u c ts .

267

1 0 1 .4

1 0 5 .3

1 0 5 .5

1 0 7 .9

1 1 0 .6

1 1 3 .3

1 1 3 .6

1 1 9 .5

N e w s p a p e r s .............................................................

1 2 3 .0

271

9 0 .6

8 5 .8

8 1 .5

7 9 .4

7 9 .9

7 9 .0

7 7 .4

7 9 .0

8 3 .6

8 6 .0

8 8 .3

P e r io d ic a ls ...............................

272

9 3 .9

8 9 .5

9 2 .9

8 9 .5

8 1 .9

8 7 .8

89.1

1 0 0 .1

1 1 2 .2

1 1 1 .2

1 0 9 .9

B o o k s ..........................................

273

M is c e lla n e o u s p u b lis h in g .

9 6 .6

1 0 0 .8

9 7 .7

1 0 3 .5

1 0 3 .0

1 0 1 .6

9 9 .3

1 0 2 .6

1 0 0 .9

106 .1

1 06.1

274

9 2 .2

9 5 .9

1 0 5 .8

1 0 4 .5

9 7 .5

9 4 .8

9 3 .6

C o m m e r c ia l p r in t in g ...........

1 1 4 .5

1 1 9 .4

1 2 7 .2

1 2 7 .8

275

1 0 2 .5

1 0 2 .0

1 0 8 .0

1 0 6 .9

1 0 6 .5

1 0 7 .2

1 0 8 .3

1 0 8 .8

M a n ifo ld b u s in e s s f o r m s ...

1 0 9 .9

1 1 5 .0

1 1 8 .7

276

9 3 .0

89.1

9 4 .5

9 1 .1

8 2 .0

7 6 .9

7 5 .2

7 7 .9

7 6 .7

7 0 .6

6 9 .4

G r e e t in g c a r d s .......................................

277

1 0 0 .6

9 2 .7

9 6 .7

9 1 .4

8 9 .0

9 2 .5

9 0 .8

9 2 .2

B la n k b o o k s a n d b o o k b in d in g ........

104 .1

1 0 9 .3

1 05.1

278

9 9 .4

96.1

1 0 3 .6

9 8 .7

1 0 5 .4

1 0 8 .7

1 1 4 .5

1 1 4 .2

P r in tin g tr a d e s e r v ic e s .......................

1 1 6 .5

1 2 3 .8

1 2 6 .2

279

9 9 .3

1 0 0 .6

1 1 2 .0

1 1 5 .3

1 1 1 .0

1 1 6 .7

1 2 6 .2

In d u s tr ia l in o r g a n ic c h e m ic a ls .......

1 2 3 .3

1 2 6 .7

1 2 1 .5

1 1 9 .6

2 81

1 0 6 .8

1 0 9 .7

1 0 9 .7

1 0 5 .6

1 0 2 .3

1 0 9 .3

1 1 0 .1

1 1 6 .8

1 4 5 .8

P la s tic s m a te r ia ls a n d s y n th e tic s ..

1 4 8 .5

1 4 1 .3

282

1 0 0 .9

1 0 0 .0

1 0 7 .5

1 1 2 .0

1 2 5 .3

1 2 8 .3

1 2 5 .3

1 3 5 .4

1 4 2 .2

1 4 8 .6

1 5 1 .0

D r u g s ...........................................................

283

1 0 3 .8

1 0 4 .5

1 0 4 .6

1 0 8 .7

1 1 2 .5

1 1 2 .4

S o a p s , c le a n e r s , a n d t o i le t g o o d s .

1 0 4 .3

1 0 5 .6

1 0 6 .2

284

1 0 3 .8

1 0 5 .3

1 0 4 .4

1 0 8 .7

1 1 1 .2

1 1 8 .6

1 2 0 .9

1 2 6 .4

1 2 2 .7

P a in ts a n d a llie d p r o d u c t s .................

1 1 4 .8

1 2 4 .8

285

1 0 6 .3

1 0 4 .3

1 0 2 .9

1 0 8 .8

1 1 6 .7

9 9 .5

9 9 .7

1 1 8 .0

1 2 5 .6

1 2 6 .4

In d u s tr ia l o r g a n ic c h e m ic a ls .............

1 2 6 .8

1 2 2 .7

1 2 4 .6

286

1 0 1 .4

9 5 .8

9 4 .6

9 2 .2

9 9 .9

9 8 .6

9 9 .0

1 1 1 .3

1 0 5 .7

A g r ic u ltu r a l c h e m ic a ls ..........................

1 2 0 .6

1 2 7 .8

287

1 0 4 .7

9 9 .5

9 9 .5

1 0 3 .8

1 0 5 .0

1 0 8 .5

1 1 0 .0

1 1 9 .8

1 1 8 .0

1 0 4 .6

1 1 2 .0

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b le .

Digitized for 102
FRASER
Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

46. Continued - Annual indexes of output per hour for selected 3-digit SIC industries
[1987=100]_________________ ______ _____________________________ _
Industry

M is c e lla n e o u s e le c tr ic a l e q u ip m e n t & s u p p lie s ...

SIC

1990

1991

_
1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

1 2 5 .6

289

9 7 .3

96.1

1 0 1 .8

1 07.1

1 0 5 .7

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .1

1 2 0 .3

1 2 0 .8

1 2 3 .3

291

1 0 9 .2

1 0 6 .6

1 1 1 .3

1 2 0 .1

1 2 3 .8

1 3 2 .3

1 4 2 .0

1 4 9 .2

1 5 5 .8

1 7 0 .2

1 8 0 .2

295

9 8 .0

94.1

1 0 0 .4

1 0 8 .0

1 0 4 .9

1 1 1 .2

1 13.1

1 23.1

1 2 4 .7

1 2 3 .4

1 2 6 .1

299

9 4 .8

9 0 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .2

9 6 .3

8 7 .4

8 7.1

9 6 .5

9 8 .5

8 6 .5

8 2 .9

301

1 0 3 .0

1 0 2 .4

1 0 7 .8

1 1 6 .5

124 .1

1 31 .1

1 3 8 .8

149 .1

1 44 .1

142 .1

1 4 5 .9

305

96.1

9 2 .4

9 7 .8

9 9 .7

1 0 2 .7

1 0 4 .6

1 0 7 .4

1 1 3 .5

1 1 2 .7

1 1 0 .6

1 1 5 .4

306

1 0 9 .0

1 0 9 .9

1 1 5 .2

123 .1

1 19.1

1 2 1 .5

1 2 1 .0

1 2 5 .3

1 3 2 .3

1 3 6 .9

1 4 4 .7

308

1 0 5 .7

1 0 8 .3

1 1 4 .4

1 1 6 .7

1 2 0 .8

1 2 1 .0

1 2 4 .7

1 2 9 .9

1 3 3 .8

1 4 0 .9

1 4 5 .4

314

1 0 1 .1

9 4 .4

1 0 4 .2

1 0 5 .2

1 1 3 .0

1 17 .1

1 26.1

1 2 1 .4

1 1 0 .9

1 3 2 .6

1 4 6 .2

3 21

8 4 .5

8 3 .6

9 2 .7

9 7 .7

9 7 .6

9 9 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 7 .6

1 1 4 .0

1 2 9 .4

1 4 0 .4

322

1 0 4 .8

1 0 2 .3

1 0 8 .9

1 0 8 .7

1 1 2 .9

1 1 5 .7

1 2 1 .4

1 2 8 .3

1 3 5 .2

1 3 9 .3

1 3 5 .8

323

9 2 .6

9 7 .7

1 0 1 .5

1 0 6 .2

1 0 5 .9

1 0 6 .1

1 2 2 .0

125 .1

1 2 2 .0

1 3 0 .2

1 3 7 .2

324

1 1 2 .4

1 0 8 .3

1 15 .1

1 1 9 .9

1 2 5 .6

1 2 4 .3

1 2 8 .7

133.1

1 34.1

1 3 8 .6

1 3 6 .9

325

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 1 1 .4

1 0 6 .8

1 1 4 .0

1 1 2 .6

1 1 9 .6

1 1 1 .9

1 1 4 .8

1 2 3 .5

1 2 4 .8

326

9 8 .7

9 5 .9

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .3

1 0 8 .5

1 0 9 .4

1 1 9 .4

1 2 4 .2

1 2 7 .4

1 2 2 .0

1 2 1 .2

327

1 0 2 .3

1 0 1 .2

1 0 2 .5

1 0 4 .6

1 0 1 .5

1 0 4 .5

1 0 7 .3

1 0 7 .6

1 1 2 .8

1 1 1 .1

105 .1

329

9 5 .4

9 4 .0

1 0 4 .3

1 0 4 .5

1 0 6 .3

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .4

1 1 4 .7

1 1 4 .9

1 1 3 .3

1 16 .1

331

1 0 9 .7

1 0 7 .8

1 1 7 .0

1 3 3 .6

1 4 2 .4

1 4 2 .6

1 4 7 .5

1 5 5 .0

1 5 1 .0

1 5 5 .6

1 6 0 .1

332

106 .1

1 0 4 .5

1 0 7 .2

1 1 2 .1

1 1 3 .0

1 1 2 .7

1 1 6 .2

1 2 0 .8

1 2 1 .1

1 2 8 .9

1 32 .1

333

1 0 2 .3

1 1 0 .7

1 0 1 .9

1 0 7 .9

1 0 5 .3

1 1 1 .0

1 1 0 .8

1 1 2 .0

1 1 8 .9

1 1 7 .7

1 1 1 .9

335

9 2 .7

9 1 .0

9 6 .0

9 8 .3

1 0 1 .2

9 9 .2

1 0 4 .0

1 1 1 .3

1 1 5 .7

1 2 1 .4

1 1 8 .0

336

1 0 4 .0

1 0 3 .6

1 0 3 .6

1 0 8 .5

1 1 2 .1

1 1 7 .8

1 2 2 .3

1 2 7 .0

1 3 1 .5

1 2 9 .8

1 2 9 .7

339

1 1 3 .7

1 09.1

1 1 4 .5

1 1 1 .3

1 3 4 .5

1 5 2 .2

1 4 9 .6

1 3 6 .2

1 4 0 .0

1 4 9 .0

1 5 4 .3

341

1 1 7 .6

1 2 2 .9

1 2 7 .8

1 3 2 .3

1 4 0 .9

1 4 4 .2

1 5 5 .2

1 6 0 .3

1 6 3 .8

1 5 7 .9

1 5 9 .5

342

9 7 .3

9 6 .8

1 0 0 .1

1 0 4 .0

1 0 9 .2

1 1 1 .3

1 1 8 .2

1 1 4 .6

1 1 5 .7

1 2 1 .9

1 2 5 .4

343

1 0 2 .6

1 0 2 .0

9 8 .4

1 0 2 .0

109.1

1 0 9 .2

1 1 8 .6

1 2 7 .3

1 3 0 .5

1 2 5 .7

1 3 2 .2

344

9 8 .8

1 0 0 .0

1 0 3 .9

1 0 4 .8

1 0 7 .7

1 0 5 .8

1 0 6 .5

1 1 1 .9

1 1 2 .7

1 1 2 .8

1 1 2 .8

346

9 5 .6

9 2 .9

1 0 3 .7

1 0 8 .7

1 0 8 .5

1 0 9 .3

1 1 3 .6

1 2 0 .2

1 2 5 .9

1 2 8 .3

1 2 9 .8

347

1 0 4 .7

9 9 .4

1 1 1 .6

1 2 0 .6

1 2 3 .0

1 2 7 .7

1 2 8 .4

1 2 4 .4

1 2 7 .3

1 26.1

1 3 5 .7

348

82.1

8 1 .5

8 8 .6

8 4 .6

8 3 .6

8 7 .6

8 7 .5

9 3 .7

9 6 .6

9 1 .0

9 2 .8

1 0 9 .2

349

9 7 .5

9 7 .4

1 0 1 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 3 .2

1 0 6 .6

1 0 8 .3

1 0 7 .7

1 1 1 .6

1 0 9 .3

3 51

1 0 6 .5

1 0 5 .8

1 0 3 .3

1 0 9 .2

1 2 2 .3

1 2 2 .7

1 3 6 .6

1 3 6 .9

1 46.1

1 5 1 .5

1 6 4 .5

352

1 1 6 .5

1 1 2 .9

1 1 3 .9

1 1 8 .6

1 2 5 .0

1 3 4 .7

1 3 7 .2

1 4 1 .2

1 4 8 .5

1 2 8 .6

1 3 9 .6

353

1 0 7 .0

99.1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 8 .2

1 1 7 .7

1 2 2 .1

1 2 3 .3

1 3 2 .5

1 3 7 .6

1 3 3 .6

1 3 9 .8

354

1 0 1 .1

9 6 .4

1 0 4 .3

1 0 7 .4

1 0 9 .9

1 1 4 .8

1 1 4 .9

1 1 9 .2

1 1 9 .8

1 2 3 .0

1 2 9 .8

355

1 0 7 .5

1 0 8 .3

1 0 6 .0

1 1 3 .6

1 2 1 .2

1 3 2 .3

1 3 4 .0

1 3 1 .7

1 2 4 .5

1 3 8 .6

1 7 2 .2

356

1 0 1 .5

1 0 1 .6

1 0 1 .6

1 0 4 .8

1 0 6 .7

1 0 9 .0

1 0 9 .4

1 1 0 .0

1 1 1 .2

113 .1

1 1 8 .7

357

138.1

1 4 9 .6

1 9 5 .7

2 5 8 .6

3 2 8 .6

4 6 9 .4

6 8 1 .3

9 6 0 .2

1 3 5 6 .6

1 8 6 2 .5

2 1 7 2 .0

358

1 0 3 .6

1 0 0 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 0 8 .6

1 1 0 .7

1 1 2 .7

1 1 4 .7

1 1 5 .0

1 2 1 .4

1 2 4 .0

1 2 2 .3

359

1 0 7 .3

1 0 9 .0

1 1 7 .0

1 1 8 .5

1 2 7 .4

1 3 8 .8

1 4 1 .4

1 2 9 .3

1 2 7 .5

1 3 5 .8

1 4 1 .8

1 5 5 .4

361

1 0 6 .3

1 0 6 .5

1 1 9 .6

1 2 2 .2

1 3 1 .8

1 4 3 .0

1 4 3 .9

1 4 2 .8

1 4 7 .5

1 4 8 .9

362

1 0 7 .7

107.1

1 17 .1

1 3 2 .9

1 3 4 .9

1 5 0 .8

1 5 4 .3

1 6 4 .2

1 6 2 .3

1 5 8 .3

1 5 7 .0

363

1 0 5 .8

1 0 6 .5

1 1 5 .0

1 2 3 .4

1 3 1 .4

1 2 7 .3

1 2 7 .4

1 4 2 .9

1 5 0 .2

1 4 9 .5

1 6 2 .4

364

9 9 .9

9 7 .5

1 0 5 .7

1 0 7 .8

1 1 3 .4

1 1 3 .7

1 1 6 .9

1 2 1 .8

1 2 9 .2

1 3 2 .4

1 3 4 .8

366

1 2 3 .8

1 29.1

1 5 4 .9

1 63.1

1 8 6 .4

2 0 0 .7

2 2 9 .5

2 7 5 .4

2 8 4 .5

3 7 1 .9

4 4 8 .8

367

1 3 3 .4

1 5 4 .7

1 8 9 .3

2 1 7 .9

2 7 4 .0

4 0 1 .5

5 1 5 .0

6 1 3 .4

7 6 8 .6

1 0 6 2 .6

1 4 4 0 .1

369

9 0 .6

9 8 .6

1 0 1 .3

1 0 8 .2

1 1 0 .5

1 1 4 .1

123 .1

1 2 8 .3

1 3 5 .3

1 4 7 .2

1 5 6 .0

3 71

1 0 2 .4

9 6 .6

1 0 4 .2

1 0 6 .2

1 0 8 .8

1 0 6 .7

1 0 7 .2

1 1 6 .3

1 2 5 .2

1 3 6 .7

1 2 7 .1

372

9 8 .9

1 0 8 .2

1 1 2 .3

1 1 5 .2

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .8

1 13.1

1 1 4 .7

1 40.1

1 38.1

1 3 2 .2

373

1 0 3 .7

9 6 .3

1 0 2 .7

1 0 5 .9

1 0 3 .8

9 8.1

9 9 .3

1 0 5 .5

1 0 2 .5

1 13.1

1 2 1 .6

374

141 .1

1 4 6 .9

1 4 7 .9

1 5 1 .0

1 5 2 .5

1 5 0 .0

1 4 8 .3

1 8 4 .2

189 .1

2 1 2 .8

2 1 8 .4

375

9 3 .8

9 9 .8

1 0 8 .4

1 3 0 .9

125 .1

1 2 0 .3

1 2 5 .5

1 2 0 .4

1 2 7 .7

1 2 2 .4

1 1 9 .4

376

1 1 6 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 9 .4

1 1 4 .9

1 1 6 .9

125 .1

1 3 3 .6

1 3 8 .9

1 56.1

1 1 3 .3

3 81

1 1 2 .7

1 1 8 .9

1 2 2 .1

1 29.1

1 32.1

1 4 9 .5

1 4 2 .2

1 4 9 .5

1 49 .1

1 4 9 .6

1 6 3 .7

382

1 0 6 .4

1 13.1

1 1 9 .9

1 2 4 .0

1 3 3 .8

1 4 6 .4

1 5 0 .5

1 4 2 .4

1 4 3 .5

1 5 2 .4

1 5 8 .5

384

1 1 6 .9

1 1 8 .7

1 2 3 .5

1 2 7 .3

1 2 6 .7

1 3 1 .5

1 3 9 .8

1 4 7 .4

1 5 8 .6

1 6 0 .4

1 6 7 .0

385

1 2 1 .2

1 25.1

1 4 4 .5

1 5 7 .8

1 6 0 .6

1 6 7 .2

1 8 8 .2

1 9 6 .3

1 9 9 .0

2 3 5 .2

2 5 0 .2

386

1 0 7 .8

1 1 0 .2

1 1 6 .4

1 2 6 .9

1 3 2 .7

1 2 9 .5

1 2 8 .7

1 2 1 .5

1 2 8 .0

1 6 0 .6

1 6 9 .4

391

9 9 .3

9 5 .8

9 6 .7

9 6 .7

9 9 .5

1 0 0 .2

1 0 2 .6

1 1 4 .2

1 13.1

1 3 4 .3

1 4 4 .9

393

9 7.1

9 6 .9

9 6 .0

9 5 .6

8 8 .7

8 6 .9

7 8 .8

8 2 .9

8 1 .4

9 7.1

1 0 5 .3

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t e n d o f ta b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

103

Current Labor Statistics:

Productivity Data

46. Continued - Annual indexes of output per hour for selected 3-digit SIC industries
[1987=100]
Industry

SIC

1990

T o y s a n d s p o r tin g g o o d s ...................................................

394

1 08 .1

1 0 9 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 1 4 .2

1 0 9 .7

P e n s , p e n c ils , o ffic e , a n d a r t s u p p lie s ........................

395

1 1 8 .2

1 1 6 .8

1 1 1 .3

1 1 1 .6

1 2 9 .9

C o s tu m e je w e lr y a n d n o t io n s ...........................................

396

1 0 5 .3

1 0 6 .7

1 1 0 .8

1 1 5 .8

1 2 9 .0

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u f a c tu r e s ...........................................

399

1 0 6 .5

1 0 9 .2

1 0 9 .5

1 0 7 .7

1 0 6 .1

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

1 1 3 .6

1 1 9 .9

1 2 5 .7

1 3 1 .6

1 2 6 .6

1 4 0 .4

1 3 5 .2

144 .1

1 2 7 .5

1 3 2 .5

1 2 3 .4

1 2 4 .9

1 4 3 .7

1 4 2 .2

1 1 8 .0

1 3 1 .2

1 3 0 .8

1 4 5 .3

108 .1

1 1 2 .8

1 0 9 .4

1 0 8 .5

1 1 4 .9

1 1 5 .9

Transportation
R a ilr o a d tr a n s p o r t a t io n ........................................................

4 01 1

1 1 8 .5

1 2 7 .8

1 3 9 .6

1 4 5 .4

1 5 0 .3

1 5 6 .2

1 6 7 .0

1 6 9 .8

1 7 3 .3

1 8 2 .5

1 9 5 .8

T r u c k in g , e x c e p t l o c a l 1.......................................................

4213

1 1 1 .1

1 1 6 .9

1 2 3 .4

1 2 6 .6

1 2 9 .5

1 2 5 .4

1 3 0 .9

1 3 2 .4

1 2 9 .9

u m t e o s t a te s p o s ta l s e r v ic e - ...........................................

1 3 1 .6

1 3 1 .2

431

1 0 4 .0

1 0 3 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 07.1

1 0 6 .6

1 0 6 .5

1 0 4 .7

1 0 8 .3

1 0 9 .8

1 1 0 .9

1 1 3 .6

9 2 .9

9 2 .5

9 6 .9

1 0 0 .2

1 0 5 .7

1 0 8 .6

1 1 1 .1

1 1 1 .6

1 0 8 .4

1 09.1

1 1 0 .7

A ir t r a n s p o r t a t io n ..................................................................... 4 5 1 2 ,1 3 ,2 2 ( p ts .)

Utilities
T e le p h o n e c o m m u n ic a t io n s ...............................................

481

1 1 3 .3

1 1 9 .8

1 2 7 .7

1 3 5 .5

1 4 2 .2

148.1

1 5 9 .5

1 6 0 .9

170.1

1 8 6 .3

2 0 1 .3

R a d io a n d t e le v is io n b r o a d c a s tin g ................................

483

1 0 4 .9

1 06.1

1 0 8 .3

1 0 6 .7

1 1 0 .1

1 0 9 .6

1 0 5 .8

1 0 1 .7

1 0 4 .5

1 0 8 .4

1 0 9 .9

C a b le a n d o th e r p a y T V s e r v ic e s ...................................

484

9 2 .6

8 7 .6

8 8 .5

8 5 .3

8 3 .4

8 4 .5

8 1 .9

8 4 .7

8 6 .1

8 5 .0

8 7 .6

E le c tr ic u t i lit ie s ..........................................................................

4 9 1 ,3 (p ts .)

1 1 0 .1

1 1 3 .4

1 1 5 .2

24.1

5 0 .5

8 0 .8

1 1 6 .8

1 5 0 .0

1 5 9 .6

1 6 2 .0

1 6 9 .6

G a s u tilit ie s ................................................................................

4 9 2 ,3 ( p ts .)

1 0 5 .8

1 0 9 .6

1 1 1 .1

1 2 1 .8

1 2 5 .6

1 37.1

1 4 5 .9

1 5 8 .6

1 4 4 .4

1 4 7 .2

1 6 0 .6

521

1 0 4 .3

1 0 2 .3

1 0 6 .4

1 1 1 .4

1 4 4 .2

Trade
L u m b e r a n d o th e r b u ild in g m a te r ia ls d e a le r s ............

1 1 8 .9

1 1 7 .8

1 2 1 .6

1 2 1 .8

1 3 4 .2

1 4 3 .0

P a in t, g la s s , a n d w a llp a p e r s t o r e s ..................................

523

1 0 6 .8

1 0 0 .4

1 0 7 .6

1 1 4 .2

1 2 7 .8

1 3 0 .9

1 3 3 .5

1 3 4 .8

1 6 3 .5

165 .1

170 .1

H a r d w a r e s t o r e s .......................................................................

525

1 1 5 .3

1 0 8 .7

1 1 5 .2

1 1 3 .9

1 2 1 .2

1 1 5 .6

1 1 9 .5

1 1 9 .0

1 3 7 .9

1 4 7 .6

1 4 5 .7

R e ta il n u r s e r ie s , la w n a n d g a r d e n s u p p ly s t o r e s ...

526

8 4 .7

8 9 .3

1 0 1 .2

107.1

1 1 7 .0

1 1 7 .4

1 3 6 .4

1 2 7 .5

1 3 3 .7

1 5 0 .4

1 5 4 .5

D e p a r tm e n t s t o r e s ..................................................................

531

9 6 .8

1 0 2 .0

1 0 5 .4

1 1 0 .4

1 1 3 .5

116 .1

1 2 3 .8

1 29.1

1 3 5 .8

1 4 6 .0

1 6 0 .4

V a r ie t y s t o r e s ...........................................................................

533

1 5 4 .6

1 5 9 .0

1 7 3 .9

1 9 1 .9

1 9 7 .9

2 1 2 .4

2 4 0 .4

2 6 0 .1

2 7 1 .2

3 1 5 .0

3 3 0 .9

M is c e lla n e o u s g e n e r a l m e r c h a n d is e s t o r e s ..............

539

1 1 8 .6

1 2 4 .8

1 4 0 .4

1 6 4 .3

1 6 4 .8

1 6 7 .4

1 6 7 .7

1 7 0 .4

1 8 5 .9

1 9 9 .6

2 2 4 .3

G r o c e r y s t o r e s ..........................................................................

541

9 6 .6

9 6 .3

9 6 .5

9 6 .0

9 5 .4

9 3 .9

92.1

9 1 .7

9 2 .2

9 5 .3

9 6.1

M e a t a n d f is h ( s e a fo o d ) m a r k e ts .....................................

542

9 8 .9

9 0 .8

9 9 .2

9 7 .7

9 5 .7

9 4 .4

8 6 .4

9 0 .8

9 5 .7

9 7 .4

1 1 0 .0

R e ta il b a k e r ie s ..........................................................................

546

9 1 .2

9 6 .7

9 6 .5

8 6 .5

8 5 .3

8 3 .0

7 5 .9

6 7 .6

6 8 .1

83.1

8 8 .4

1 1 2 .5

N e w a n d u s e d c a r d e a le r s ..................................................
A u to a n d h o m e s u p p ly s t o r e s ...........................................

5 51

1 0 6 .7

1 0 4 .9

1 0 7 .4

1 0 8 .6

1 0 9 .7

108.1

109 .1

1 0 8 .8

1 0 8 .7

1 1 1 .6

553

1 0 3 .7

1 0 0 .2

1 0 1 .6

1 0 0 .8

1 0 5 .3

109.1

1 0 8 .2

1 08.1

113 .1

1 1 5 .5

1 1 9 .3

G a s o lin e s e r v ic e s t a t io n s ....................................................

554

1 0 3 .0

1 0 4 .8

1 1 0 .2

1 1 5 .9

1 2 1 .1

1 2 7 .2

126.1

1 26.1

1 3 3 .9

1 4 1 .7

1 3 9 .0

M e n 's a n d b o y 's w e a r s t o r e s .............................................

561

1 1 5 .6

1 2 1 .9

1 2 2 .3

1 1 9 .5

1 2 1 .7

1 2 1 .4

1 2 9 .8

1 3 6 .3

1 4 5 .2

1 5 4 .5

1 6 5 .0

W o m e n 's c lo t h in g s t o r e s .....................................................

562

1 0 6 .6

1 1 1 .2

1 2 3 .6

1 3 0 .0

1 3 0 .4

1 3 9 .9

1 5 4 .2

1 5 7 .3

1 7 6 .0

1 9 0 .2

2 0 5 .7

F a m ily c lo th in g s t o r e s ...........................................................

565

1 0 7 .8

1 1 1 .5

1 1 8 .6

1 2 1 .5

1 2 7 .7

1 4 1 .8

1 4 6 .9

1 5 0 .2

153.1

1 5 5 .9

1 6 0 .4

S h o e s t o r e s ................................................................................

566

1 0 7 .9

1 0 7 .8

1 1 5 .5

1 1 7 .3

1 3 0 .7

1 3 9 .2

1 5 1 .9

1 4 8 .4

1 4 5 .0

1 5 2 .9

1 6 0 .2

F u r n itu r e a n d h o m e f u r n is h in g s s t o r e s ..........................

571

1 0 4 .6

1 0 5 .4

1 1 3 .9

1 1 3 .3

1 1 4 .7

1 1 7 .4

1 2 3 .6

1 2 4 .2

1 2 7 .3

1 3 4 .5

141 .1

H o u s e h o ld a p p lia n c e s t o r e s ..............................................

572

1 0 4 .6

1 0 7 .2

116.1

1 1 8 .7

1 2 2 .4

1 3 9 .6

1 4 2 .2

1 5 5 .2

1 8 4 .2

1 8 6 .4

2 0 9 .3

R a d io , t e le v is io n , c o m p u te r , a n d m u s ic s to r e s ........

573

1 2 0 .8

1 2 9 .3

1 3 9 .3

1 5 3 .8

1 7 8 .2

1 98.1

2 0 6 .6

2 1 6 .8

2 5 8 .3

3 0 9 .1

3 5 9 .4

E a tin g a n d d r in k in g p la c e s .................................................

581

1 0 4 .5

1 0 3 .8

1 0 3 .4

1 0 3 .8

1 0 2 .1

1 0 2 .0

1 0 0 .6

1 0 1 .6

1 0 2 .0

1 0 4 .0

D r u g a n d p r o p r ie t a r y s t o r e s ...............................................

591

1 0 6 .3

1 0 8 .0

1 0 7 .6

1 0 9 .6

1 0 9 .9

1 1 1 .1

1 1 3 .9

1 1 9 .8

1 2 5 .7

1 2 9 .8

1 3 6 .9

L iq u o r s t o r e s ..............................................................................

592

1 0 5 .9

1 0 6 .9

1 0 9 .6

1 0 1 .8

1 0 0 .1

1 0 4 .7

1 1 3 .8

1 0 9 .9

1 1 6 .5

1 1 4 .5

1 2 7 .7

1 0 7 .3

U s e d m e r c h a n d is e s t o r e s ...................................................

593

1 0 3 .0

1 0 2 .3

1 1 5 .7

1 1 6 .7

1 1 9 .5

1 2 0 .6

1 3 2 .6

1 4 0 .3

1 6 3 .6

1 8 3 .2

2 1 6 .7

M is c e lla n e o u s s h o p p in g g o o d s s t o r e s ..........................

594

1 0 7 .4

1 0 9 .3

1 0 7 .9

1 1 1 .7

1 1 7 .3

1 2 3 .2

1 2 5 .3

1 2 9 .4

1 3 8 .7

1 4 3 .7

1 5 0 .6

2 6 3 .2

N o n s to r e r e t a ile r s ...................................................................

596

1 1 1 .1

1 1 2 .5

1 2 6 .5

1 3 2 .2

1 4 9 .0

1 5 2 .5

1 7 3 .5

1 8 6 .8

2 0 8 .3

2 2 0 .6

F u e l d e a le r s ..............................................................................

598

8 4 .6

8 5 .3

8 4 .3

9 1 .9

9 9 .0

1 1 1 .4

1 1 2 .5

109.1

1 0 5 .8

1 1 5 .2

1 1 7 .3

R e ta il s to r e s , n .e . c ..................................................................

599

1 1 4 .5

1 0 4 .0

1 1 2 .5

118.1

1 2 5 .8

1 2 7 .0

1 4 0 .2

1 4 7 .8

1 5 7 .4

1 6 2 .5

1 68.1

C o m m e r c ia l b a n k s ..................................................................
H o te ls a n d m o t e ls ...................................................................

Finance and services
602

1 0 7 .7

1 1 0 .1

1 1 1 .0

1 1 8 .5

1 2 1 .7

1 2 6 .4

1 2 9 .7

1 3 3 .0

132 6

1 3 5 .9

1 4 3 .2

701

9 6 .2

9 9 .3

1 0 8 .0

1 0 6 .5

1 0 9 .9

1 1 0 .5

1 1 0 .0

1 0 8 .2

1 0 8 .2

1 0 9 .9

114.1

L a u n d r y , c le a n in g , a n d g a r m e n t s e r v ic e s ...................

721

1 0 2 .3

9 9 .9

9 9 .3

9 9 .9

1 0 5 .0

1 0 6 .6

1 0 9 .8

1 0 9 .0

1 1 6 .0

1 2 0 .8

1 2 3 .6

P h o t o g r a p h ic s tu d io s , p o r tr a it ...........................................

722

9 8 .2

92.1

9 5 .8

1 0 1 .8

1 0 8 .3

1 1 6 .2

1 1 0 .7

114.1

1 2 1 .6

1 0 7 .7

1 1 2 .0

B e a u ty s h o p s .............................................................................

723

9 7 .5

9 5 .8

1 0 0 .9

9 7 .0

1 0 1 .1

1 0 4 .8

1 0 7 .6

1 0 8 .5

1 1 0 .5

1 1 3 .4

1 1 4 .5

1 2 9 .9

B a r b e r s h o p s .............................................................................

724

1 0 0 .7

9 4 .9

1 1 3 .2

1 2 1 .9

1 1 8 .8

1 1 5 .7

1 2 8 .8

1 5 0 .4

1 5 7 .4

1 3 2 .8

F u n e r a l s e r v ic e s a n d c r e m a t o r ie s ..................................

726

9 1 .2

8 9 .9

1 0 3 .8

9 8 .7

1 0 4 .3

1 0 0 .2

9 7 .6

1 0 1 .9

1 0 4 .2

1 0 0 .2

9 3 .9

A u to m o tiv e r e p a ir s h o p s ......................................................

753

1 0 7 .9

1 0 0 .1

105.1

1 0 5 .7

1 1 4 .3

1 2 1 .6

1 16.1

1 1 7 .2

1 2 4 .9

1 2 6 .4

1 2 8 .5

M o tio n p ic t u r e t h e a t e r s ........................................................

783

1 18.1

1 1 8 .2

1 1 4 .8

1 1 3 .8

1 1 0 .4

1 0 5 .0

1 04.1

1 0 3 .4

106 .1

1 0 8 .7

1 1 2 .3

M e te rs t o o u t p u t p e r e m p lo y e e .

n .e .c . = n o t e ls e w h e re c la s s ifie d

M e te rs t o o u t p u t p e r tu ii- t im e e q u iv a le n t e m p lo y e e y e a r o n tis c a i o a s is .


104 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

47. Unem ploym ent rates, approxim ating U.S. concepts, in nine countries, quarterly d ata
seasonally adjusted_______________________________________ _
Annual average
Country

2000

2001

2000
I

2001

II

IV

III

I

III

II

IV

U n ite d S ta te s ..........

4 .0

4 .8

4 .0

4 .0

4.1

4 .0

4 .2

4 .5

4 .8

5 .6

C a n a d a ......................

6 .1

6 .4

6 .1

6 .1

6 .1

6 .1

6 .2

6 .3

6 .4

6 .8

F r a n c e 1 .....................

Ita ly 1,2 ........................

6 .3

6 .7

6 .5

6 .4

6 .1

6 .2

6 .5

6 .9

6 .8

6 .8

4 .8
9 .4

5.1
8 .7

4 .8
9 .9

4 .7
9 .5

4 .7
9 .3

4 .8
9 .0

4 .8
8 .6

4 .9
8 .5

5 .2
8 .7

5 .5
8 .9
8 .1

8 .1

8 .0

8 .3

8 .1

8 .0

7 .8

7 .9

8 .0

8 .0

1 0 .7

9 .6

1 1 .2

1 0 .9

1 0 .5

1 0 .1

1 0 .0

9 .7

9 .5

9 .3

5 .8

5 .0

6 .6

6 .0

5 .6

5 .2

5.1

5 .0

5 .0

5.1

5 .8

5 .5

5 .4

5 .3

5.1

5 .0

5.1

-

5 .5

U n ite d K in n d n m 1 ..

-

1 P re lim in a ry f o r 2 0 0 1 f o r J a p a n , F ra n c e , G e r m a n y , Ita ly , S w e d e n ,

2 Q u a rte rly ra te s a re fo r th e fir s t m o n th o f th e q u a rte r.

NO TE:

Q u a rte rly fig u r e s fo r F ra n c e a n d G e r m a n y a re c a lc u la te d

b y a p p ly in g
and

a n n u a l a d ju s tm e n t fa c to rs to

th e re fo r e

s h o u ld

be

S e e " N o te s o n th e d a ta " fo r In fo rm a tio n o n b r e a k s In s e r ie s .

For

Comparative Civilian
Labor Force Statistics, Ten Countries, 1959-2001 (Bureau o f L a b o r

fu r th e r q u a lific a tio n s a n d h is to ric a l d a ta , s e e

a n d th e U n ite d K in g d o m .

v ie w e d

a s le s s

c u r r e n t p u b lis h e d d a ta ,
p re c is e

In d ic a to rs o f

u n e m p lo y m e n t u n d e r U .S . c o n c e p ts th a n th e a n n u a l fig u r e s .

S ta tis tic s , M a r. 2 5 , 2 0 0 2 ) , o n th e In te rn e t a t

http://www.bls.gov/fls/home.htm
M o n th ly a n d q u a r te r ly u n e m p lo y m e n t ra te s , u p d a te d
a ls o o n th is s ite .

m o n th ly , a re

D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a v a ila b le .

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

105

Current Labor Statistics:

Injury and Illness

48. Annual data: Employment status of the w orking-age population, approxim ating U.S. concepts, 10 countries
[Numbers in thousands]
Employment status and country

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

C iv i lia n la b o r fo r c e
U n ite d S ta te s ..................................................................................

1 2 8 ,1 0 5

1 2 9 ,2 0 0

1 3 1 ,0 5 6

1 3 2 ,3 0 4

1 33 ,9 4 3

1 3 6 ,2 9 7

1 3 7 ,6 7 3

1 3 9 ,3 6 8

1 4 0 ,8 6 3

1 4 1 ,8 1 5

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

1 4 ,1 7 7

1 4 ,3 0 8

1 4,4 00

1 4 ,5 1 7

1 4,6 69

1 4 ,9 5 8

1 5 ,2 3 7

1 5 ,5 3 6

1 5,7 89

1 6 ,0 2 7

A u s tra lia ............................................................................................

8 ,5 5 7

8 ,6 1 3

8,771

8 ,9 9 5

9 ,1 1 5

9 ,2 0 4

9 ,3 3 9

9 ,4 6 6

9 ,6 7 8

9 ,8 1 7

J a p a n .................................................................................................

6 5 ,0 4 0

6 5 ,4 7 0

6 5 ,7 8 0

6 5 ,9 9 0

6 6 ,4 5 0

6 7 ,2 0 0

6 7 ,2 4 0

6 7 ,0 9 0

6 6 ,9 9 0

6 6 ,8 7 0

F ra n c e ...............................................................................................

2 4 ,5 7 0

2 4 ,6 4 0

2 4 ,7 8 0

2 4 ,8 3 0

2 5 ,0 9 0

2 5 ,2 1 0

2 5 ,5 2 0

2 5 ,8 3 0

2 5 ,9 8 0

-

G e r m a n y ..........................................................................................

3 9 ,0 1 0

3 9 ,1 0 0

3 9 ,0 7 0

3 8 ,9 8 0

3 9 ,1 4 0

3 9 ,4 2 0

3 9 ,7 5 0

3 9 ,8 0 0

3 9 ,7 5 0

-

Ita ly .....................................................................................................

2 2 ,9 1 0

2 2 ,5 7 0

2 2 ,4 5 0

2 2 ,4 6 0

2 2 ,5 7 0

2 2 ,6 8 0

2 2 ,9 6 0

2 3 ,1 3 0

2 3 ,3 4 0

2 3 ,5 4 0

N e th e rla n d s ....................................................................................

6 ,9 5 0

7 ,1 0 0

7 ,1 9 0

7 ,2 6 0

7 ,3 7 0

7 ,5 3 0

7 ,6 9 0

7 ,9 0 0

8 ,0 5 0

-

S w e d e n .............................................................................................

4 ,5 2 0

4 ,4 4 3

4 ,4 1 8

4 ,4 6 0

4 ,4 5 9

4 ,4 1 8

4 ,4 0 2

4 ,4 3 0

4 ,4 8 9

4 ,5 3 7

U n ite d K in g d o m .............................................................................

2 8 ,4 1 0

2 8 ,4 3 0

2 8 ,4 4 0

2 8 ,5 6 0

2 8 ,7 2 0

2 8 ,9 1 0

2 9 ,0 4 0

2 9 ,3 0 0

2 9 ,4 5 0

-

P a r tic ip a t io n ra te 1
U n ite d S ta te s .................................................................................

6 6 .4

6 6 .3

6 6 .6

6 6 .6

6 6 .8

67.1

67.1

67.1

6 7 .2

6 6 .9

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

6 5 .9

6 5 .5

6 5 .2

6 4 .9

6 4 .7

6 5 .0

6 5 .4

6 5 .8

6 5 .9

6 6 .0

A u s tr a lia ............................................................................................

6 3 .9

6 3 .5

6 3 .9

6 4 .6

6 4 .6

6 4 .3

6 4 .3

6 4 .2

6 4 .7

6 4 .7

J a p a n .................................................................................................

6 3 .4

6 3 .3

63.1

6 2 .9

6 3 .0

6 3 .2

6 2 .8

6 2 .4

6 2 .0

6 1 .6

5 5 .9

5 5 .8

5 5 .8

5 5 .6

5 5 .8

5 5 .7

56.1

5 6 .4

5 6 .4

_

G e r m a n y ..........................................................................................

5 8 .2

5 7 .7

5 7 .4

57.1

57.1

5 7 .3

5 7 .7

5 7 .6

5 7 .5

-

Ita ly .....................................................................................................

4 7 .5

4 7 .9

4 7 .3

47.1

47.1

4 7 .2

4 7 .6

4 7 .8

48.1

-

N e th e rla n d s ....................................................................................

5 7 .8

5 8 .6

5 9 .0

59.2

5 9 .8

6 0 .8

6 1 .7

6 2 .8

6 3 .5

-

S w e d e n .............................................................................................

6 5 .7

6 4 .5

6 3 .7

64.1

6 4 .0

6 3 .3

6 2 .8

6 2 .8

6 3 .8

6 4 .2

U n ite d K in q d o m .............................................................................

63.1

6 2 .8

6 2 .7

6 2 .7

6 2 .8

6 2 .9

6 2 .9

6 3 .2

6 3 .3

-

E m p lo y e d
U n ite d S ta te s ..................................................................................

1 1 8 ,4 9 2

1 2 0 ,2 5 9

1 2 3 ,0 6 0

1 2 4 ,9 0 0

1 2 6 ,7 0 8

1 2 9 ,5 5 8

1 3 1 ,4 6 3

1 3 3 ,4 8 8

1 3 5 ,2 0 8

1 3 5 ,0 7 3

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

1 2 ,6 7 2

1 2 ,7 7 0

1 3 ,0 2 7

13,271

1 3 ,3 8 0

1 3 ,7 0 5

1 4 ,0 6 8

1 4 ,4 5 6

1 4 ,8 2 7

1 4 ,9 9 7

A u s tra lia ...........................................................................................

7 ,6 6 0

7 ,6 9 9

7 ,9 4 2

8 ,2 5 6

8 ,3 6 4

8 ,4 4 4

8 ,6 1 8

8 ,8 0 8

9 ,0 6 8

9 ,1 5 7

J a p a n .................................................................................................

6 3 ,6 2 0

6 3 ,8 1 0

6 3 ,8 6 0

6 3 ,8 9 0

6 4 ,2 0 0

6 4 ,9 0 0

6 4 ,4 5 0

6 3 ,9 2 0

6 3 ,7 9 0

6 3 ,4 7 0

2 2 ,0 2 0

2 1 ,7 4 0

2 1 ,7 2 0

2 1 ,9 1 0

2 1 ,9 6 0

2 2 ,0 9 0

2 2 ,5 1 0

2 2 ,9 4 0

2 3 ,5 3 0

_

3 6 ,3 9 0

3 5 ,9 9 0

3 5 ,7 6 0

3 5 ,7 8 0

3 5 ,6 4 0

3 5 ,5 1 0

3 6 ,0 6 0

3 6 ,3 6 0

3 6 ,5 4 0

2 1 ,2 3 0

2 0 ,2 7 0

1 9 ,9 4 0

1 9 ,8 2 0

1 9 ,9 2 0

1 9 ,9 9 0

2 0 ,2 1 0

2 0 ,4 6 0

2 0 ,8 4 0

Ita ly .....................................................................................................

_

2 1 ,2 8 0

N e th e rla n d s ....................................................................................

6 ,5 6 0

6 ,6 3 0

6 ,6 7 0

6 ,7 6 0

6 ,9 0 0

7 ,1 3 0

7 ,3 8 0

7 ,6 4 0

7 ,8 1 0

-

S w e d e n .............................................................................................

4 ,2 6 5

4 ,0 2 8

3 ,9 9 2

4 ,0 5 6

4 ,0 1 9

3 ,9 7 3

4 ,0 3 4

4 ,1 1 7

4 ,2 2 9

4 ,3 0 9

U n ite d K in g d o m .............................................................................

2 5 ,5 3 0

2 5 ,4 5 0

2 5 ,7 2 0

2 6 ,0 7 0

2 6 ,3 8 0

2 6 ,8 8 0

2 7 ,2 1 0

2 7 ,5 3 0

2 7 ,8 3 0

-

E m p lo y m e n t - p o p u la t io n r a t io 2
U n ite d S ta te s ..................................................................................

6 1 .5

6 1 .7

6 2 .5

6 2 .9

6 3.2

6 3 .8

64.1

6 4 .3

6 4 .5

6 3 .8

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

5 8 .9

5 8 .5

5 9 .0

5 9 .4

59.1

5 9 .7

6 0 .4

6 1 .3

62.1

6 1 .9

A u s tr a lia ...........................................................................................

5 7 .2

5 6 .8

5 7 .8

5 9 .2

5 9 .3

5 9 .0

5 9 .3

5 9 .8

6 0 .6

6 0 .3

J a p a n .................................................................................................

6 2 .0

6 1 .7

6 1 .3

6 0 .9

6 0 .9

6 1 .0

6 0 .2

5 9 .4

5 9 .0

5 8 .4
_

50.1

4 9 .2

4 8 .9

4 9 .0

4 8 .8

4 8 .8

4 9 .5

50.1

51.1

5 4 .2

5 3 .2

5 2 .6

5 2 .4

5 2 .0

5 1.6

5 2 .3

5 2 .6

5 2 .8

Ita ly .....................................................................................................

4 4 .0

4 3 .0

4 2 .0

4 1 .5

4 1 .6

4 1 .6

4 1 .9

4 2 .3

4 2 .9

-

N e th e rla n d s ....................................................................................

5 4 .5

5 4 .7

5 4 .7

55.1

5 6.0

5 7 .5

5 9.2

6 0 .8

6 1 .6

-

S w e d e n ............................................................................................

6 2 .0

5 8 .5

5 7 .6

5 8 .3

5 7 .7

5 6 .9

5 7.6

5 8 .4

60.1

6 1 .0

U n ite d K in q d o m ............................................................................

5 6 .7

5 6 .2

5 6 .7

5 7 .2

5 7 .6

5 8 .5

5 8 .9

5 9 .4

5 9 .4

-

_

U n e m p lo y e d
6 ,7 4 2

U n ite d S ta te s .................................................................................

9 ,6 1 3

8 ,9 4 0

7 ,9 9 6

7 ,4 0 4

7 ,2 3 6

6 ,7 3 9

6 ,2 1 0

5 ,8 8 0

5 ,6 5 5

C a n a d a .............................................................................................

1 ,5 0 5

1 ,5 3 9

1 ,3 7 3

1 ,2 4 6

1 ,2 8 9

1 ,2 5 2

1 ,1 6 9

1 ,0 8 0

9 62

A u s tra lia ...........................................................................................

897

914

829

739

751

760

721

658

611

661

2 ,3 0 0

2 ,7 9 0

3 ,1 7 0

3 ,2 0 0

3 ,4 0 0

1,031

1 ,4 2 0

1 ,6 6 0

1 ,9 2 0

2 ,1 0 0

2 ,2 5 0

2 ,5 5 0

2 ,9 0 0

3 ,0 6 0

2 ,9 2 0

3 ,1 3 0

3 ,1 2 0

3 ,0 2 0

2 ,8 9 0

2 ,4 5 0

2 ,6 2 0

3 ,1 1 0

3 ,3 2 0

3 ,2 0 0

3 ,5 1 0

3 ,9 1 0

3 ,6 9 0

3 ,4 4 0

3 ,2 1 0

Ita ly .....................................................................................................

1 ,6 8 0

2 ,3 0 0

2 ,5 1 0

2 ,6 4 0

2 ,6 5 0

2 ,6 9 0

2 ,7 5 0

2 ,6 7 0

2 ,5 0 0

N e th e rla n d s ....................................................................................

3 90

470

520

500

470

400

310

270

240

-

255

415

426

404

440

445

368

313

260

228

2 ,8 8 0

2 ,9 8 0

2 ,7 2 0

2 ,4 9 0

2 ,3 4 0

2 ,0 3 0

1 ,8 3 0

1 ,7 7 0

1 ,6 2 0

-

J a p a n ................................................................................................

U n ite d K in g d o m ............................................................................

_

2 ,2 7 0

U n e m p lo y m e n t ra te
U n ite d S ta te s .................................................................................

7 .5

6 .9

6.1

5 .6

5 .4

4 .9

4 .5

4 .2

4 .0

4 .8

C a n a d a ............................................................................................

1 0 .6

1 0 .8

9 .5

8 .6

8 .8

8 .4

7 .7

7 .0

6 .1

6 .4

A u s tra lia ..........................................................................................

1 0 .5

1 0 .6

9 .4

8 .2

8 .2

8 .3

7 .7

7.0

6 .3

6 .7

2 .2

2 .5

2 .9

3.2

3 .4

3 .4

4.1

4 .7

4 .8

5.1

1 0.4

1 1 .8

1 2 .3

1 1 .8

12.5

12.4

1 1 .8

1 1 .2

9.4

8 .7

6 .7

8 .0

8 .5

8 .2

9 .0

9 .9

9 .3

8 .6

8.1

8 .0

Ita ly ....................................................................................................

7 .3

1 0 .2

1 1 .2

1 1 .8

11.7

11.9

1 2 .0

11.5

1 0.7

9 .6

N e th e rla n d s ....................................................................................

5 .6

6 .6

7 .2

6 .9

6 .4

5 .3

4 .0

3 .4

3 .0

-

S w e d e n ............................................................................................

5.6

9 .3

9.6

9.1

9.9

1 0 .1

8 .4

7.1

5 .8

5 .0

U n ite d K in g d o m ............................................................................

1 0 .1

1 0 .5

9.6

8 .7

8 .1

7 .0

6 .3

6 .0

5 .5

-

1 L a b o r fo rc e a s a p e rc e n t o f th e w o rk in g -a g e p o p u la tio n .
2 E m p lo y m e n t a s a p e r c e n t o f th e w o rk in g -a g e p o p u la tio n .

N O T E : S e e n o te s o n th e d a ta fo r In fo rm a tio n o n b re a k s in s e rie s .


106 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

January 2003

F o r fu rth e r q u a lific a tio n s a nd h is to ric a l d a ta , s e e

Statistics, Ten Countries,
o n th e In te rn e t a t

Comparative Civilian Labor Force

1 9 5 9 -2 0 0 1 (B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s , M a r. 2 5 ,2 0 0 2 ),

http://www.bls.gov/fls/home.htm

D a s h in d ic a te s d a ta a re n o t a v a ila b le .

49.

Annual indexes of manufacturing productivity and related measures, 12 countries

[1992 = 100]

Item and country

1970

1960

1980

1990

1991

1993

1994

1995

1997

1996

1998

2000

1999

2001

Output per hour
U n ite d S ta te s ......................................................................

-

-

7 0 .5

9 6 .9

9 7 .9

1 0 2 .1

1 07 .3

113.8

117.0

121 .3

126.5

135.3

1 42.9

145 .6

C a n a d a .................................................................................

3 7 .8

5 4 .9

7 2 .9

9 3 .4

9 5 .3

1 05.8

1 1 0 .8

112.4

109.7

113 .5

113.1

116.0

1 18.4

116.1

3 7 .5

6 3.2

1 01.7

103 .3

1 1 1 .0

116.1

1 2 1 .0

1 2 1 .2

126.9

134.1

128.1

B e lg iu m .................................................................................

18.0

3 2 .9

6 5 .4

9 6 .8

99.1

1 02.5

108 .4

113.2

117.0

127.0

129.2

1 29.5

133.4

134.1

D e n m a rk ...............................................................................

2 9 .9

5 2 .7

9 0 .4

99.1

9 9 .4

1 0 0 .8

-

-

-

-

-

F ra n c e ...................................................................................

2 2 .0

43.1

6 6 .8

9 3 .8

9 7 .0

1 0 0 .6

121.9

127.7

1 32.7

142.5

1 46.3
128 .2

J a p a n .....................................................................................

13.8

9 4 .4

9 9 .0

-

-

108.2

113.9

-

114.6

G e r m a n y ...............................................................................

2 9 .2

5 2 .0

7 7.2

9 9 .0

98.3

1 0 1 .8

109 .5

1 1 2 .2

113.9

1 19.4

120.3

120.4

127.9

Ita ly .........................................................................................

2 3 .6

4 4 .3

7 4.2

9 5 .8

95.9

1 01 .4

104 .9

108.0

108.1

109.9

1 1 0 .0

109.9

113.0

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

18.5

3 7 .9

6 8 .8

9 8 .5

99.6

1 0 1 .6

113.2

118.2

1 2 0 .2

122.3

125.0

128.5

133.8

-

99.6

9 9.6

100.7

102 .5

1 0 2 .0

99.9

1 03.6

104.5

1 05 .3

N o rw a y ..................................................................................

3 7 .4

5 8 .8

7 7 .5

9 7 .6

98.2

115.0

S w e d e n .................................................................................

2 7 .3

52.2

73.1

9 4 .6

9 5 .5

107 .3

1 19 .4

121.9

124.5

132.3

139.5

149.7

158.0

1 60 .4

U n ite d K in g d o m .................................................................

3 0 .0

4 3 .2

5 4.3

8 9.2

9 3 .8

103 .9

107.1

104.9

103.8

105.2

107.0

1 1 1 .6

118.0

1 19 .8

Output
U n ite d S ta te s ......................................................................

-

-

7 5 .8

1 0 1 .6

9 8 .3

103 .5

1 1 1 .1

118.4

121.3

1 27.9

133.1

141.2

1 47.0

1 41.3

C a n a d a .................................................................................

3 3 .4

5 8.9

8 3.6

1 06.0

9 9 .0

105 .9

114.1

119.6

119.6

127.7

132.8

141.0

1 48.8

1 43.9

1 0 2 .0

9 6.3

J a p a n .....................................................................................

6 0 .4

97.1

94.9

98.9

103.0

106.5

1 0 0 .2

101.9

107.6

99.1

10.7

3 9 .2

B e lg iu m .................................................................................

3 0 .7

5 7 .6

7 8.2

1 0 1 .0

1 00.7

97.0

1 01.4

104.2

106.6

113.8

1 16.4

118.0

1 2 2 .2

1 21 .7

D e n m a rk ...............................................................................

4 0 .8

6 8 .0

9 1 .4

1 0 2 .8

1 01.5

95.6

1 05.6

1 1 1 .6

106.7

115.2

115.7

115.1

122.9

1 26 .7

F ra n c e ..................................................................................

3 1 .0

64.1

8 8.7

99.1

9 9.8

95.7

1 00.3

104.9

104.6

109.7

115.0

118.7

124.1

126 .3

G e rm a n y ...............................................................................

4 1 .5

7 0 .9

8 5 .3

99.1

1 02.3

9 2.4

95.1

95.2

92.5

95.7

97.2

9 5.8

101.7

1 0 1 .8

Ita ly ........................................................................................

2 3 .0

48.1

8 4 .4

9 9 .4

9 9 .3

96.5

1 02 .4

107.2

1 05.4

108.8

110.7

110 .5

113.9

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

3 1 .5

59.1

7 6 .8

9 9 .9

100 .4

9 8.4

1 04.6

108.1

108.7

111 .5

1 14.8

118.1

123.7

114 .6
108 .9

N o rw a y .................................................................................

5 7 .4

9 0 .6

1 04 .4

1 00 .9

9 9 .0

1 01.7

1 04.6

107.3

110.3

114.2

113.7

113.6

1 1 0 .2

S w e d e n .................................................................................

4 5 .9

8 0 .7

90.7

1 1 0 .1

104.1

1 01.9

117.1

128.4

131.1

138 .0

147.6

157.8

168.7

1 67 .4

U n ite d K in g d o m .................................................................

6 7 .3

9 0.2

87.2

1 05 .4

1 0 0 .0

1 01 .4

106.1

107.8

108.5

109.9

1 1 0 .8

1 1 1 .1

113 .3

110 .7

Total hours
U n ite d S ta te s ......................................................................

92.1

1 04 .4

1 07.5

104 .8

100.4

1 01 .4

103 .6

104.0

103.6

105.4

105.2

1 04.4

1 0 2 .8

97.1

C a n a d a .................................................................................

8 8 .3

107.1

1 14.6

113 .5

103.9

1 0 0 .1

103 .0

106 .4

109.0

1 12.4

117.5

121.5

125 .6

1 23 .9
7 7 .4

J a p a n .....................................................................................

7 7 .8

1 04 .4

95.6

94.7

9 1.9

89.1

88.7

8 8 .0

82.7

8 0.3

80.2

B e lg iu m .................................................................................

170 .7

174 .7

1 19 .7

104 .3

101 .5

94.7

9 3.6

89.6

90.1

91.1

9 1.7

94.8

-

92.0
-

91.1

1 0 2 .1

-

-

-

-

-

-

102 .9

95.1

9 2.7

92.1

91.3

90.0

90.0

8 9.4

87.1

8 6 .3

102 .9

103.1

9 0.7

D e n m a rk ...............................................................................

1 36 .5

129 .0

1 0 1 .1

103 .7

F ra n c e ..................................................................................

140 .8

148 .5

1 32.9

105 .6

G e r m a n y ...............................................................................

142 .3

1 36 .3

1 10.5

1 0 0 .1

104.1

90.8

8 6 .8

8 4.9

81.2

80.1

80.7

7 9.6

7 9.5

7 8 .8

Ita ly .........................................................................................

9 7 .6

1 08 .5

1 13.8

103 .7

1 03 .6

95.2

9 7.6

9 9.3

97.5

99.0

1 0 0 .6

100.5

100.7

9 9 .7

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

170 .5

156.1

1 11.7

1 01 .4

1 00 .9

96.8

9 2.4

9 1.5

9 0.4

91.1

9 1.8

9 2.0

9 2.5

-

N o rw a y .................................................................................

153 .6

1 53.9

1 34.7

1 03 .4

1 0 0 .8

1 0 2 .1

1 05 .0

106.6

107.6

1 1 2 .0

113.7

109.6

1 05.4

1 03 .4

1 06.8

104 .3

9 6.0

9 2 .4

S w e d e n .................................................................................

168 .3

1 54.7

1 24.0

1 16 .4

1 09.0

94.9

98.1

105.3

105.3

104.3

105.8

105 .4

U n ite d K in g d o m .................................................................

2 2 4 .6

2 0 8 .8

1 60.5

118.1

1 06.6

97.6

99.1

102.7

104.5

104.5

103.6

99.6

U n ite d S ta te s .....................................................................

14.9

2 3 .7

5 5 .6

9 0 .8

9 5.6

102 .7

1 05.6

107.9

109 .4

111.5

1 17.4

1 2 2 .1

131.1

133.1

C a n a d a .................................................................................

1 0 .0

17.1

4 7 .6

8 8 .3

9 5 .0

1 0 2 .0

1 03.7

106.0

107.0

109.3

1 10.5

112 .3

113.9

1 17 .8

Compensation per hour

J a p a n .....................................................................................

4 .3

16.4

5 8 .5

9 0 .5

9 6 .4

1 0 2 .8

1 04 .9

108.3

109.2

1 12.9

1 15.8

115.2

114.5

115 .0

B e lg iu m .................................................................................

5 .4

13.7

5 2 .5

90.1

9 7 .3

104 .8

106.1
-

109.2
-

110.9
-

114.9

116.6

125 .9

-

118.3
-

1 2 1 .1

-

D e n m a rk ..............................................................................
G e rm a n y ..............................................................................

4 .6

9 2 .7

9 5 .9

104 .6

-

13.3

4 9 .6

4 .3

10.4

4 0 .9

90.9

9 6 .4

1 0 2 .6

1 06.0

1 1 0 .0

1 1 2 .1

1 1 2 .0

1 1 2 .6

116.3

1 2 0 .8

126 .6

8.1

2 0 .7

5 3.6

8 9 .4

9 1 .5

1 06 .4

1 11.7

117.5

122.3

124.7

126.5

1 29.3

133.5

137 .7
132 .6

Ita ly ........................................................................................

1 .8

5 .3

3 0 .4

8 7 .6

9 4 .2

105 .7

1 06.8

111 .3

119.0

123.0

1 2 2 .2

1 24.6

1 27.8

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

6 .4

2 0 .2

6 4 .4

9 0 .9

9 5.3

103 .8

108.2

110.7

113.0

115.8

1 2 0 .6

124.0

1 31.0

-

4 .7

1 1 .8

3 9.0

9 2 .3

9 7.5

1 01 .5

1 04 .4

109.2

113.6

118.7

1 25.7

133.0

140.0

147 .6

S w e d e n ................................................................................

4.1

10.7

3 7 .3

8 7 .8

9 5.5

9 7.4

1 0 0 .0

106.5

1 14.4

119 .4

1 24.4

129.3

131.8

137.2

U n ite d K in g d o m .................................................................

3 .0

6.1

32.1

8 2 .9

9 3.8

1 04.6

1 06.7

107.9

1 09.5

113 .9

120.5

1 29.6

135.2

140 .4

7 8 .8

9 3.7

9 7 .6

1 0 0 .6

98.5

94.8

9 3.5

9 1.9

9 2.8

90.2

91.7

9 1 .4

C a n a d a .................................................................................

2 6 .4

31.1

6 5 .2

9 4 .6

9 9 .6

9 6.4

9 3.6

94.3

9 7.5

9 6.2

9 7.7

9 6.8

96.1

101 .5

J a p a n .....................................................................................

3 1 .3

4 3 .8

101 .5

Unit labor costs: N a tio n a l c u rre n c y b asis

9 4.0

9 3.3

9 5.5

85.4

9 7 .4

1 0 1 .1

30.1

4 1 .7

8 0 .3

9 3 .0

98.1

1 02 .3

9 7.9

96.4

9 4.7

9 0.5

90.2

9 1 .4

90.8

9 3 .9

1 5.4

2 5 .2

5 4.9

9 3 .5

96.5

103 .7

96.2

96.4

103.7

9 9.7

102 .9

105 .4

1 0 1 .8

101 .7

19.4

2 4 .0

6 1 .3

9 6 .9

99.3

101 .9

9 7.9

96.6

97.8

91.9

8 8 .2

87.7

84.8

8 6 .5

G e r m a n y ...............................................................................

2 7 .8

39.8

6 9 .4

9 0 .3

93.1

104 .5

1 0 2 .0

104.7

107 .4

1 04.4

105.2

107 .4

104.4

1 06 .6

11.9

101 .9

103.0

1 1 0 .0

111.9

1 1 1 .1

113 .4

113.1

1 15 .4

9 2.5

97.6

9 0.8

9 5 .9

B e lg iu m ................................................................................
D e n m a rk ...............................................................................

8 9 .8

Ita ly .........................................................................................

7 .5

4 1 .0

9 1 .5

98.2

104 .3

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

3 4 .6

5 3 .3

9 3 .7

9 2 .3

95.6

1 0 2 .1

95.6

93.7

9 4.0

9 4.7

9 6.5

9 6.6

97.9

-

N o rw a y .................................................................................

12.7

2 0 .1

5 0 .3

9 4.6

99.2

101 .9

1 04 .8

108.4

1 1 0 .8

116.4

125.7

128.4

134.0

140.1

S w e d e n ................................................................................

15.0

2 0 .6

5 1 .0

9 2.9

1 0 0 .0

9 0.8

83.8

8 7.4

9 1.9

90.2

89.2

8 6.3

8 3.4

8 5 .5

U n ite d K in g d o m .................................................................

9.8

14.1

5 9 .0

9 2 .9

1 0 0 .1

1 0 0 .8

99.7

102.9

105.5

108.2

112.7

116.2

1 14.5

1 17.2

1 0 0 .6

Unit labor costs: U .S . d o lla r b asis
U n ite d S ta te s ......................................................................

-

-

7 8.8

9 3 .7

9 7.6

93.5

91.9

92.8

9 1.7

9 1 .4

C a n a d a .................................................................................

3 2 .9

3 6 .0

6 7 .4

9 8 .0

105.1

9 0.3

82.8

8 3.0

86.4

84.0

7 9.6

7 8.8

78.2

7 9.2

8 3.8

9 1 .7

1 15 .4

1 25 .9

131.7

109.6

9 7.7

9 2.4

1 0 1 .2

100 .4

9 3 .6

9 2 .3

95.1

94.2

105.2

98.4

81.2

7 9.9

7 7.6

6 6 .8

6 7 .0

9 8.5

94.8

9 0.2

J a p a n ...................................................................................

1 1 .0

15.5

5 1 .8

B e lg iu m ................................................................................

19.4

2 7 .0

8 8 .3

8 9 .5

13.4

2 0 .2

5 8 .8

9 1 .2

9 1 .0

96.5

9 1.4

104.0

108.0

9 1.0

92.7

9 1.0

7 5.9

7 3 .7

2 1 .0

2 3 .0

76.8

94.1

93.1

95.2

9 3.4

103.5

1 0 1 .2

8 3.3

79.1

75.4

63.2

6 2 .5

59.6

98.7

98.2

D e n m a rk ..............................................................................

1 0.4

17.1

8 7 .3

8 7 .5

114.2

111.5

9 4.0

9 3.3

9 1.4

7 6.9

7 6.2

Ita ly .........................................................................................

15.0

2 3 .3

5 9 .0

94.1

9 7 .5

81.6

77.9

77.9

87.9

8 0.9

78.8

76.9

6 6.4

6 5.7

N e th e rla n d s ........................................................................

16.1

2 5 .9

8 2 .9

89.1

8 9.9

96.6

9 2 .4

102.7

98.1

85.3

8 5.5

82.1

72.1

-

1 1 .1

17.5

6 3 .3

9 4 .0

9 5 .0

89.2

92.3

1 06.4

106.6

1 0 2 .1

103 .5

1 0 2 .2

9 4.5

9 6 .8

16.9

23.1

70.2

9 1.3

9 6 .3

67.8

63.2

7 1.3

79.8

6 8 .8

65.3

60.8

5 3.0

4 8 .2

15.6

19.1

7 7 .7

9 3 .9

1 0 0 .1

85.6

8 6.4

9 1.9

93.2

100.4

105.7

106.4

9 8.3

9 5 .5

G e r m a n y .............................................................................

U n ite d K in g d o m .................................................................

N O T E : D a ta fo r G e rm a n y fo r y e a rs b e fo re 1991 a re fo r th e fo rm e r W e s t G e rm a n y . D a ta fo r 1991 o n w a rd a re fo r u n ifie d G e rm a n y . D ash in d ic a te s d a ta n o t a va ila b le .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

107

Current Labor Statistics:

50.

Injury and Illness

O ccupational injury and illness rates by industry,1 United States
Incidence rates per 100 full-time workers3
In d u s tr y a n d ty p e o f c a s e

1989 1

1990

1991

1992

1993 4 1994 4 1995 4 1996 4 1997 4 19984 1999 4 2000 4

PRIVATE SECTOR*
8 .6

8 .8

8.4

8.9

8.5

8.4

8.1

7.4

7.1

6.7

6.3

6.1

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

4 .0

4.1

3.9

3.9

3.8

3.8

3.6

3.4

3.3

3.1

3.0

3.0

L o s t w o rk d a y s ..................................................................................................

78.7

84.0

8 6.5

93.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

10.9

1 1 .6

1 0 .8

1 1 .6

1 1 .2

1 0 .0

9.7

8.7

8.4

7.9

7.3

7.1

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

5.7

5.9

5.4

5.4

5.0

4.7

4.3

3.9

4.1

3.9

3 .4

100.9

1 1 2 .2

108.3

126.9

3.6
_

T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

Agriculture, forestry, and fishing5

Mining
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

8.5

8.3

7.4

7.3

6 .8

6.3

6 .2

5.4

5.9

4.9

4 .4

4.7

4.8

5.0

4.5

4.1

3.9

3.9

3.9

3.2

3.7

2.9

2.7

3.0

137.2

119.5

129.6

2 04 .7

14.3

14.2

13.0

13.1

1 2 .2

1 1 .8

1 0 .6

9.9

9.5

8 .8

8 .6

8.3

6 .8

6.7

6.1

5.8

5.5

5.5

4.9

4.5

4.4

4.0

4.2

4.1

1 43.3

147.9

148.1

161.9

13.9

13.4

1 2 .0

1 2 .2

11.5

10.9

9.8

9.0

8.5

8.4

8 .0

7.8

6.5

6.4

5.5

5.4

5.1

5.1

4 .4

4.0

3.7

3.9

3.7

3.9

137.3

137.6

132.0

142.7

Construction
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

G e n e ra l b u ild in g c o n tra c to rs :
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

H e a v y c o n s tru c tio n , e x c e p t b uildln a :
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

S p e c ia l tra d e s c o n tra c to rs :
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

1 2 .1

11 .1

1 0 .2

9.9

9.0

8.7

8 .2

7.8

7.6

6.5

6.3

6 .0

5.4

5.1

5.0

4.8

4.3

4.3

4.1

3.8

3.7

147.1

144.6

160.1

165.8

13.8

13.8

1 2 .8

13.8

1 2 .8

12.5

11 .1

10.4

1 0 .0

9.1

8.9

8 .6

6.9

6.9

6.3

6.1

5.8

5.8

5.0

4.8

4.7

4.1

4 .4

4.3

144.9

153.1

1 51.3

168.3

14.6

14.7

13.5

Manufacturing
12.5

12.1

1 2 .2

1 1 .6

1 0 .6

10.3

9.7

9.2

9.0

5.8

5.8

5.6

5.4

5.3

5.5

5.3

4.9

4.8

4.7

4.6

4.5

113.0

120.7

121.5

124.6

14.1

14.2

13.6

13.4

13.1

13.5

1 2 .8

1 1 .6

11.3

10.7

1 0 .1

6 .0

6 .0

5.7

5.5

5.4

5.7

5.6

5.1

5.1

5.0

4.8

_

116.5

123.3

122.9

126.7

13.1

13.2

12.7

D u ra b le g o o d s :
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

L u m b e r a n d w o o d p ro d u c ts :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

F u rn itu re a n d fix tu re s :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

16.3

15.9

15.7

14.9

14.2

13.5

13.2

13.0

1 2 .1

9.4

8 .8

8.3

7.6

7.6

7.7

7.0

6 .8

6.5

6 .8

6.7

6.1

177.5

172.5

172.0

165.8

16.1

16.9

15.9

14.8

14.6

15.0

13.9

1 2 .2

1 2 .0

11.4

11.5

1 1 .2

7.2

7.8

7.2

6 .6

6.5

7.0

6.4

5.4

5.8

5.7

5.9

5.9

18.4

18.1

16.8

1 28.4
S to n e , c la y , a n d q la s s p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ...................................................................................................

P rim a ry m e ta l In d u s trie s :
T o ta l c a s e s .................................................................................................

F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts :
T o ta l c a s e s .................................................................................................

15.5

15.4

14.8

13.6

13.8

13.2

12.3

12.4

1 1 .8

1 1 .8

10.7

10.4

7 .4

7.3

6 .8

6.1

6.3

6.5

5.7

6 .0

5.7

6 .0

5 .4

5.5

149.8

160.5

156.0

152.2

18.7

19.0

17.7

17.5

17.0

16.8

16.5

15.0

15.0

14.0

12.9

1 2 .6

8.1

8.1

7.4

7.1

7.3

7.2

7.2

6 .8

7.2

7.0

6.3

6.3

168.3

180.2

169.1

175.5
16.8

16.2

16.4

15.8

14.4

14.2

13.9

1 2 .6

11.9

7.9

7.9

7.1

6 .6

6.7

6.7

6.9

6 .2

6.4

6.5

6 .0

5.5

147.6

155.7

146.6

144.0

18.5

18.7

17.4

In d u s tria l m a c h in e ry a n d e q u ip m e n t:
T o ta l c a s e s .................................................................................................

E le c tro n ic a n d o th e r e le c tric a l e q u ip m e n t:
T o ta l c a s e s .................................................................................................

T ra n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t:
T o ta l c a s e s .................................................................................................

In s tru m e n ts a n d re la te d p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s .................................................................................................

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu ré e in d u strie s:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................\..............................................................................

1 1 .1

1 1 .1

1 1 .6

1 1 .2

9.9

1 0 .0

9.5

8.5

8 .2

4.8

4.7

4.4

4.2

4.2

4.4

4 .4

4.0

4.1

4.0

3.7

3.6

8 6 .8

88.9

8 6 .6

87.7

12 .1

9.1

9.1

8 .6

8.4

8.3

8.3

7.6

6 .8

6 .6

5.9

5.7

5.7

3.8

3.7

3.6

3.5

3.6

3.3

3.1

3.1

2 .8

2 .8

2.9

7 7.5

7 9.4

83.0

81.2

17.7

17.8

18.3

18.7

18.5

19.6

18.6

16.3

15.4

14.6

13.7

13.7

6 .8

6.9

7.0

7.1

7.1

7.8

7.9

7.0

6 .6

6 .6

6.4

6.3

138.6

153.7

166.1

186.6
5.9

5.6

5.9

5.3

5.1

4.8

4.0

4.0

4.5

2.5

2.7

2 .7

2.7

2.5

2.7

2 .4

2.3

2.3

1.9

1 .8

2 .2

5 5.4

5.6

5 7.8

6 4.4

65.3

in

11.3

97.6

S e e fo o tn o te s at e n d o f ta b le .


108 Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

1 1 .2

3.9

5.1
L ost w o rk d a y s .............................................................................................

1 2 .0

January 2003

5.9

6 .0

10.7

1 0 .0

9.9

9.1

9.5

8.9

8.1

8.4

7.2

5.1

5.1

5.0

4.6

4.5

4.3

4.4

4.2

3.9

4.0

3.6

113.1

104.0

108.2

11.3

50. Continued— Occupational injury and illness rates by industry,1 United States
Incidence rates per 100 workers3
Industry and type o f case

19891

1990

1992

1991

1993 4 1994 4 1995 4

1996 4

1997 4

1998 4

1999 4

2000 4

N o n d u ra b le g o o d s :
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

1 1 .6

11.7

11.5

11.3

10.7

10.5

9.9

9.2

8 .8

8 .2

7.8

-

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

5.5

5.6

5.5

5.3

5.0

5.1

4.9

4.6

4.4

4 .3

4.2

-

L o s t w o rk d a y s ..................................................................................................

107.8

116.9

119.7

1 2 1 .8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

18.5

2 0 .0

19.5

18.8

17.6

17.1

16.3

15.0

14.5

13.6

12.7

12.4

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

9.3

9.9

9.9

9.5

8.9

9.2

8.7

8 .0

8 .0

7.5

7.3

7 .3

L o st w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

174.7

2 0 2 .6

2 07 .2

2 11 .9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

T o b a c c o p ro d u c ts :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

8.7

7.7

6.4

6 .0

5.8

5.3

5.6

6.7

5.9

6.4

5.5

6 .2

F o o d a n d k in d re d p ro d u cts:

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

3.4

3.2

2 .8

2.4

2.3

2.4

2 .6

2 .8

2.7

3.4

2 .2

3.1

L ost w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

64.2

62.3

52.0

4 2 .9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

T e x tile m ill p ro d u c ts :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

9.9

9.7

8.7

8 .2

7.8

6.7

7.4

6.4

6 .0

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

4.2

4.0

4.4

4.2

4.1

4.0

4.1

3.6

3.1

3.4

3.2

3.2

L ost w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

81.4

85.1

8 8.3

87.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

A p p a re l a n d o th e r te x tile p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

8 .6

8 .8

9.2

9.5

9.0

8.9

8 .2

7.4

7.0

6 .2

5.8

6.1

3 .0

10.3

9.6

10.1

L o st w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

3.8

3.9

4.2

4.0

3.8

3.9

3.6

3.3

3.1

2 .6

2 .8

L o st w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

80.5

92.1

99.9

104.6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

P a p e r a n d a llie d p ro du cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

12.7

1 2 .1

1 1 .2

1 1 .0

9.9

9.6

8.5

7.9

7.3

7.1

7.0

6 .5

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

5.8

5.5

5.0

5.0

4.6

4 .5

4.2

3.8

3.7

3.7

3.7

3.4

L ost w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

132.9

124.8

122.7

125.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

P rin tin q a n d p u b lis h in g :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

7.3

6.9

6.7

6.4

6 .0

5.7

5.4

5.0

5.1

L o st w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

3.3

3.3

3.2

3.2

3.1

3.0

3.0

2 .8

2.7

2 .8

2 .6

2 .6

L o st w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

6 3.8

69.8

74.5

7 4.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

C h e m ic a ls a n d a llie d p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

7.0

6.5

6.4

6 .0

5.9

5.7

5.5

4 .8

4.8

4.2

4.4

4.2

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

3.2

3.1

3.1

2 .8

2.7

2 .8

2.7

2.4

2.3

2.1

2.3

2 .2

L ost w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

63.4

6 1.6

62.4

64.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

P e tro le u m a n d c o a l p ro d u c ts :
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

6 .6

6 .6

6 .2

5.9

5.2

4.7

4.8

4.6

4.3

3.9

4.1

3 .7

6.9

6.9

6.7

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

3.3

3.1

2.9

2 .8

2.5

2.3

2.4

2.5

2 .2

1 .8

1 .8

1.9

L ost w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

6 8 .1

7 7.3

6 8 .2

71.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

R u b b e r a n d m is c e lla n e o u s p la s tic s p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

14.5

13.9

14.0

12.9

12.3

11.9

1 1 .2

1 0 .1

10.7

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

8 .0

7.8

7.2

6 .8

6.5

6.7

6.5

6.3

5.8

5.8

5.5

5 .8

L ost w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

147.2

151.3

150.9

153.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

L e a th e r a n d le a th e r p ro d u cts:
T o ta l c a s e s ..................................................................................................

13.6

12.1

12.5

1 2 .1

12.1

1 2 .0

11.4

10.7

1 0 .6

9.8

10.3

9.0

L ost w o rk d a y c a s e s ...................................................................................

6.5

5.9

5.9

5.4

5.5

5.3

4.8

4 .5

4.3

4 .5

5.0

4 .3

L o s t w o rk d a y s ..............................................................................................

130.4

152.3

140.8

128.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16.2

16.2

15.1

T r a n s p o r ta tio n a n d p u b lic u tilit ie s
9.1

9.5

9.3

9.1

8.7

8 .2

7.3

7.3

-

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

5.3

5.5

5.4

5.1

5.4

5.5

5.2

5.1

4.8

4.3

4.4

4 .3

L o s t w o rk d a y s .................................................................................................

121.5

134.1

140.0

144.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9.2

T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

9.6

9.3

W h o le s a le a n d r e ta il tra d e
8.4

8.1

7.9

7.5

6 .8

6.7

6.5

6.1

-

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

3.6

3.5

3.4

3.5

3.4

3.4

3.2

2.9

3.0

2 .8

2.7

-

L o s t w o rk d a y s .................................................................................................

63.5

6 5.6

72.0

80.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 .8
-

T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

8 .0

7.9

7.6

W h o le s a le tra d e :
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

7.7

7.4

7.2

7.6

7.8

7.7

7.5

6 .6

6.5

6.5

6.3

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

4.0

3.7

3.7

3.6

3.7

3.8

3.6

3.4

3.2

3.3

3.3

L o s t w o rk d a y s .................................................................................................

71.9

71.5

79.2

82.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

R e tail tra d e :
T o ta l c a s e s .....................................................................................................

8.1

8.1

7.7

8.7

8 .2

7.9

7.5

6.9

6 .8

6.5

6.1

-

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

3.4

3.4

3.3

3.4

3.3

3.3

3.0

2 .8

2 .9

2.7

2 .5

-

L o s t w o rk d a y s .................................................................................................

60.0

63.2

69.1

79.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d re a l e s ta te
2 .0

2.4

2.4

2.9

2.9

2.7

2 .6

2.4

2 .2

.7

1 .8

1.9

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s .......................................................................................

.9

1.1

1.1

1 .2

1.2

1.1

1 .0

.9

.9

.5

.8

.8

L o s t w o rk d a y s .................................................................................................

17.6

2 7.3

24.1

3 2.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

S e r v ic e s

'

5.5

6.0

6.2

7.1

6.7

6.5

6.4

6 .0

5.6

5.2

4.9

4.9

L o s t w o rk d a y c a s e s ......................................................................................

2.7

2 .8

2 .8

3.0

2 .8

2 .8

2 .8

2 .6

2.5

2.4

2 .2

2 .2

L o s t w o rk d a y s .................................................................................................

51.2

56.4

60.0

6 8 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

D a ta fo r 1 9 8 9 a n d s u b s e q u e n t y e a rs a re b a s e d on th e

ification Manual,

198 7 E dition . F o r th is re a son , th e y a re n o t stric tly c o m p a ra b le w ith d a ta

fo r th e y e a rs 1 9 8 5 -8 8 , w h ic h w e re b a s e d on th e

Manual,

Standard Industrial Class­

Standard Industrial Classification

N = n u m b e r o f in ju rie s a n d illn e s s e s o r lo st w o rk d a y s ;
EH - to ta l h o u rs w o rk e d b y all e m p lo y e e s d u rin g th e c a le n d a r ye ar; a nd
2 0 0 ,0 0 0 - b a s e fo r 100 fu ll-tim e e q u iv a le n t w o rk e rs (w o rkin g 4 0 h o u rs p e r w e e k , 50
w e e k s p er ye ar).

197 2 E dition , 197 7 S up p le m e n t.

2 B e g in n in g w ith th e 1992 s u rve y, th e a n n u a l su rve y m e a s u re s o n ly n on fata l in ju rie s a nd

4 B eg in ning w ith th e 199 3 su rv e y , lo st w o rk d a y e s tim a te s w ill not be g e n e ra te d . A s o f

illn e s s e s , w h ile p a st s u rv e y s c o v e re d b o th fa ta l a nd n o n fa ta l in cid e n ts. T o b e tte r a d d re s s

1992, B LS b eg an g e n e ra tin g p e rc e n t d is trib u tio n s a nd th e m e d ia n n u m b e r o f d a y s a w a y

fa ta litie s , a b a s ic e le m e n t o f w o rk p la c e s a fe ty, B LS im p le m e n te d th e C e n s u s o f F atal

fro m w o rk b y in d u s try a n d fo r g ro u p s o f w o rk e rs su s ta in in g s im ila r w o rk d isa b ilitie s .

O c c u p a tio n a l In juries.

5 E x c lu d e s fa rm s w ith fe w e r th a n 11 e m p lo y e e s sin ce 1976.

3 T h e in c id e n c e ra te s re p re s e n t th e n u m b e r o f in ju rie s a n d illn e s s e s o r lo st w o rk d a y s p er

100

fu ll-tim e


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

w o rk e rs

and

w e re

c a lc u la te d

as

(N /E H )

X

2 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,

w h ere:

Dash in d ic a te s d a ta not a vailab le .

Monthly Labor Review

January 2003

109

Current Labor Statistics:

Injury and Illness

51. Fatal occupational injuries by event or exposure, 1996-2001
Fatalities
Event or exposure1

1996-2000

20002

Average

Number

20013
Number

Percent

T o t a l..................................................................................................................

6 ,0 9 4

5 ,9 2 0

5 ,9 0 0

Transportation incidents......................................................................

2 ,6 0 8

2 ,5 7 3

2 ,5 1 7

43

H ig h w a y in c id e n t ....................................................................................................

1 ,4 0 8

1 ,3 6 5

1 ,4 0 4

24

C o llis io n b e tw e e n v e h ic le s , m o b ile e q u ip m e n t ...................................

685

696

723

12

M o v in g in s a m e d ir e c tio n ..........................................................................

117

136

142

2

M o v in g in o p p o s ite d ire c tio n s , o n c o m in g ..........................................

247

243

256

4

M o v in g in in t e r s e c t io n .................................................................................

151

154

137

2

V e h ic le s t r u c k s ta tio n a r y o b je c t o r e q u ip m e n t....................................

289

279

295

5

100

N o n c o llis io n in c id e n t ........................................................................................

372

356

339

6

J a c k k n ife d o r o v e r tu r n e d — n o c o llis io n ..............................................

298

304

273

5

N o n h ig h w a y ( fa rm , in d u s tria l p re m is e s ) in c id e n t...................................

378

399

324

5

O v e r tu r n e d ............................................................................................................

212

213

157

3

A ir c r a f t ........................................................................................................................

263

280

247

4

W o r k e r s t r u c k b y a v e h ic le ................................................................................

376

370

383

6

W a te r v e h ic le in c id e n t .........................................................................................

105

84

90

2

R a ilw a y .......................................................................................................................

71

71

62

1

Assaults and violent acts....................................................................

1 ,0 1 5

930

902

15

H o m ic id e s .................................................................................................................

766

677

639

11

S h o o tin g ................................................................................................................

617

533

505

9

58

S t a b b in g ................................................................................................................

68

66

O th e r , in c lu d in g b o m b in g .............................................................................

80

78

76

1

S e lf- in flic te d in ju r ie s .............................................................................................

216

221

228

4

Contact with objects and equipm ent...............................................

1 ,0 0 5

1 ,0 0 6

962

16

S tr u c k b y o b je c t ......................................................................................................

567

5 71

553

9

S tr u c k b y f a llin g o b je c t ....................................................................................

364

357

343

6

1

S tr u c k b y f ly in g o b je c t .....................................................................................

57

61

60

1

C a u g h t in o r c o m p r e s s e d b y e q u ip m e n t o r o b je c ts .............................

293

294

266

5
2

C a u g h t in r u n n in g e q u ip m e n t o r m a c h in e r y ........................................

157

157

144

C a u g h t in o r c r u s h e d in c o lla p s in g m a te r ia ls ..........................................

128

123

122

2

Falls .................................................................................................................................

714

734

808

14

F a ll to lo w e r le v e l..................................................................................................

636

659

698

12

F a ll f r o m la d d e r ..................................................................................................

106

110

122

2

F a ll f r o m r o o f .......................................................................................................

153

150

159

3

F a ll f r o m s c a ffo ld , s t a g in g .............................................................................

90

85

91

2

F a ll o n s a m e le v e l.................................................................................................

55

56

84

1

Exposure to harmful substances or environments.....................

535

4 81

499

8

C o n ta c t w ith e le c t r ic c u r r e n t.............................................................................

290

256

285

5

C o n t a c t w it h o v e r h e a d p o w e r lin e s ..........................................................

132

128

124

2

40

29

35

1

112

100

96

2

C o n t a c t w ith te m p e r a t u r e e x tr e m e s .............................................................

57

48

49

1

92

94

83

1

73

75

59

1

Fires and exp losions...........................................................................

196

177

188

3

Other events or exposures4................................................................

20

19

24

O x y g e n d e f ic ie n c y .................................................................................................

1 B ased

on

th e

1992

BLS O c c u p a tio n a l

In ju ry

and

T o ta l e x c lu d e s

3

Illn e s s

2 T h e b l s n e w s r e le a s e is s u e d A u g . 1 4 , 2 0 0 1 , re p o rte d a to ta l

o f 5 ,9 1 5 f a ta l w o r k in ju r ie s fo r c a le n d a r y e a r 2 0 0 0 .

S in c e th e n ,

4

w o rk -r e la te d

fa ta litie s

re s u ltin g fro m

In c lu d e s th e c a te g o r y " B o d ily re a c tio n a n d e x e r tio n ."

N O TE :

a n a d d itio n a l fiv e jo b - r e la t e d fa ta litie s w e r e Id e n tifie d , b rin g in g

not

t h e t o ta l jo b - r e la t e d fa t a lit y c o u n t fo r 2 0 0 0 to 5 ,9 2 0 .

because


no Monthly Labor Review
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

2 ,8 8 6

e v e n ts o f S e p te m b e r 1 1 .

C la s s ific a tio n S tr u c tu r e s .

January 2003

T o ta ls f o r

show n
of

m a jo r c a te g o r ie s

s e p a ra te ly .
ro u n d in g .

m a y in c lu d e s u b - c a te g o rie s

P e r c e n ta g e s
D ash

in d ic a te s

m ay
le s s

not
th a n

add
0 .5

to

to ta ls

p e r c e n t.

Where are you publishing
your research?
The M onthly Labor R eview welcomes articles on the
labor force, labor-management relations, business
conditions, industry productivity, compensation,
occupational safety and health, demographic trends
and other economic developments. Papers should be
factual, and analytical, not polemical in tone.
Potential articles, as well as comments on
material published in the R eview , should be

1

submitted to:
Editor-in-Chief
M onthly Labor Review
Bureau of Labor Statistics
W ashington, DC 20212
Telephone: (202)691-5900
E-mail: m lr@ bls.aov

Need more research, facts, and analysis?
Subscribe to M onthly Labor R eview today!
United States Government

INFORMATION
Credit card orders are welcome!
Fax your orders (202) 512-2250

O r d e r P r o c e s s in g C o d e :

*5338

Phone your orders (202) 512-1800

] YES, please s e n d _______ subscriptions to:
Monthly Labor Review (MLR) at $45 each ($63.00 foreign) per year.
The total cost of my order is $ ___________.

For privacy protection, check the box below:

Price includes regular shipping & handling and is subject to change.

□ Do not make my name available to other mailers
Check method of payment:

N a m e o r title

( P le a s e ty p e o r p rin t )

C o m pany nam e

R o o m , flo o r , s u ite

□

Check payable to: Superintendent of Documents

HD

□ GPO Deposit Account

S tr e e t a d d r e s s

□ VISA
S ta te

C ity

□ MasterCard

□ Discover

Z ip c o d e + 4

D a y tim e p h o n e in c lu d in g a r e a c o d e

(expiration date)

Thank you for your order!
P u r c h a s e o r d e r n u m b e r (o p tio n a l)

Mail to: Superintendent of Documents, P.O. Box 371954,
Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954
Important:
Please include this completed order form with your
remittance.
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

A u th o r iz in g s ig n a tu r e

12/99

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Free from BLS, to keep you informed
The Bureau’s series of issues papers provides you with succinct, up-to-the-minute background data in a readily digestible form.
They’re convenient, current, easy to read, and available free from BLS. To be added to the Issues in Labor Statistics mailing list
(No. J336), write to: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Office of Publications and Special Studies, Room 2850, 2 Massachusetts Ave.,
NE., Washington, DC 20212-0001, or fax the coupon below to (202) 691-7890.
Issues in Labor Statistics also are available in PDF format on the BLS Web site: http://www.bls.gov/opub/ils/opbilshm.htm
Here are some recent Issues.
2002

•
•
•
•
•

Twenty-first century moonlighters
Declining teen labor force participation
Consumer Spending Patterns Differ by
Region
Housing expenditures
Certification Can Count: The Case of Aircraft Mechanics

2001

•
•
•

New and emerging occupations
Who was affected as the economy started to slow?
Characteristics and spending patterns of consumer units in the lowest 10 percent of the expenditure distribution

2000

•
•
•
•
•
•
1999
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1998
•
•
•

Unemployed Job Leavers: A Meaningful Gauge of Confidence in the Job Market?
Spending Patterns By Age
When one job is not enough
A comparison of the characteristics and spending patterns of Food Stamp recipients and nonrecipients
Labor Supply in a Tight Labor Market
Are Managers and Professionals Really Working More?
Occupational Stress
Expenditures on Public Transportation
Consumer Spending on Traveling for Pleasure
What the Nation Spends on Health Care: A Regional Comparison
What Women Earned in 1998
Computer Ownership Up Sharply in the 1990s
The Southeast is Maintaining Its Share of Textile Plant Employment
Auto Dealers are Fewer, Bigger, and Employ More Workers
Labor-Market Outcomes for City Dwellers and Suburbanites
Spending Patterns of High-income Households
New Occupations Emerging Across Industry Lines

Yes, please add my name to mailing list J336, Issues in Labor Statistics.
N am e__________________________________________________________________
Organization____________________________________________________________
Street _________________________________________________________________
C ity ________________________________________

https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

State_________________ Zip

O btaining inform ation from the Bureau of Labor Statistics
O ffice or Topic
Bureau o f Labor Statistics
Information services

In ternet address

E-mail

http://www.bls.gov
http://www.bls.gov/opub/

blsdata_staff@ bls.gov

http://www.bls.gov/ces/
http://www.bls.gov/sae/

cesinfo@ bls.gov
data_sa@ bls.gov

http://www.bls.gov/cps/
http://www.bls.gov/lau/
http://www.bls.gov/cew/
http://www.bls.gov/oes/
http://www.bls.gov/lau/
http://www.bls.gov/nls/

cpsinfo@ bls.gov
lausinfo@ bls.gov
cew info@ bls.gov
oesinfo@ bls.gov
m lsinfo@ bls.gov
nls info@ bls.gov

http://www.bls.gov/cpi/
http://www.bls.gov/ppi/
http://www.bls.gov/mxp/
http://www.bls.gov/cex/

cpi_info@ bls.gov
ppi-info@ bls.gov
mxpinfo@bls.gov
cexinfo@ bls.gov

http://www.bls.gov/ncs/
http://www.bls.gov/ebs/
http://www.bls .go v/ect/
http://www.bls.gov/ncs/
http://www.bls.gov/iif/
http://stats.bls.gov/iif/
http://www.bls.gov/cba/

ocltinfo@ bls.gov
ocltinfo@ bls.gov
ocltinfo@ bls.gov
pcltinfo@ bls.gov
oshstaff@ bls.gov
cfoistaff@ bls.gov
cbainfo@ bls.gov

http://www.bls.gov/lpc/
http://www.bls.gov/lpc/
http://www.bls.gov/mfp/

dprweb@ bls.gov
dipsw eb@ bls.gov
dprweb@ bls.gov

http://www.bls.gov/emp/
http://www.bls.gov/oco/

oohinfo@ bls.gov
oohinfo@ bls.gov

http://www.bls.gov/fls/

flshelp@ bls.gov

http://www.bls.gov/ro4/
http://www.bls.gov/rol/
http://www.bls.gov/ro5/
http://www.bls.gov/ro6/
http://www.bls.gov/ro7/
http://www.bls.gov/ro2/
http://www.bls.gov/ro3/
http://www.bls.gov/ro9/

BLSinfoAtlanta@ bls.gov
BLSinfoBoston@ bls.gov
BLSinfoChicago@bls.gov
BLSinfoDallas@bls.gov
BLSinfoKansasCity@ bls.gov
BLSinfoNY @bls.gov
BLSinfoPhiladelphia@bls.gov
BLSinfoSF@bls.gov

E m p lo y m e n t a n d u n e m p lo y m e n t

Employment, hours, and earnings:
National
State and local
Labor force statistics:
National
Local
U l-covered employment, wages
Occupational employment
Mass layoffs
Longitudinal data
P r i c e s a n d li v i n g c o n d i t i o n s

Consumer price indexes
Producer price indexes)
Import and export price indexes
Consumer expenditures
C o m p e n s a t i o n a n d w o r k in g c o n d it io n s

National Compensation Survey:
Employee benefits
Employment cost trends
Occupational compensation
Occupational illnesses, injuries
Fatal occupational injuries
Collective bargaining
P r o d u c tiv ity

Labor
Industry
Multifactor
P r o je c tio n s

Employment
Occupation
I n t e r n a t io n a l
R e g io n a l c e n te r s

Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Kansas City
N ew York
Philadelphia
San Francisco
O t h e r F e d e r a l s t a tis tic a l a g e n c ie s


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

http://www.fedstats.gov/

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Postal Square Building, Rm. 2850
2 Massachusetts Ave., NE
Washington, DC 20212-0001

Periodicals
Postage and Fees Paid
U.S. Department of Labor
USPS 987-800

Official Business
Penalty for Private Use, $300
Address Service Requested

MLR
STIER442K ISSDUE008R
’
K A T R I N A S T I E R H O L Z LIB UNIT
f e d r e s e r v e b a n k o f ST LOUIS
po BOX 442
QAIN T LO UI S
MO
63166

Schedule of release dates for BLS statistical series
Series

Release
date

Period
covered

Release
date

Period
covered

Release
date

Period
covered

MLR table
number

Employment situation

January 10

December

February 7

January

March 7

February

1; 4—24

U.S. Import and Export
Price Indexes

January 14

December

February 13

January

March 13

February

38-42

Producer Price Indexes

January 15

December

February 20

January

March 14

February

2; 35-37

Consumer Price indexes

January 16

December

February 21

January

March 21

February

2; 32-34

Real earnings

January 16

December

February 21

January

March 21

February

14, 16

Employment Cost Indexes

January 30

4th quarter

Productivity and costs


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

1-3; 25 -2 8
February 6

4th quarter

March 6

4th quarter

2; 43-46