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MARILYN WANTS TO KNOW


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

WITHDRAWN EROM

~ GRINNELL COLLEGE LIBRA lES

After
High
'
, ·' School
What.;;
.

Women's Bureau Leaflet 8
1954

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
James P. Mitchell, Secretary
WOMEN'S BUREAU

Mrs. Alice K . Leopold , Director


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

PAY ENVELOPE
OR WEDDI NG BELLS?

I am a girl in high school. Of course
I hope to be married some day and
have a home of my own. So- why
should I bother about earning a
living? Why not prepare now for
marriage and homemaking?

Prepare for both a job and marriage !
You are right in thinking you will probably marry.
Most girls now in high school or vocation al school can
expect to marry. I!1 the United States, four of every
five women and girls who are 14 or older are married,
or have been married.
The chances are that you will also be employe d-before
marriage and perhaps for a few years afterwar d. Nowadays, more and more married women continue with
their jobs or return to work when their children are old
enough.
Women make up nearly a third of the Nation's workers.
The jobs they do are vital to the national economy .
Study after study has shown that in most cases women
work for much the same reasons that men work: To
support themselv es and to help support the family.
So it is importan t for you to prepare for a job, even if
you expect to marry soon.
318011 0 - 55


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

1

CHOOSING
A CAREER

How can I decide what
kind of job would be best
for me?

What kind of work to choose is a big question, and you
should not expect to reach a final decision at once.
But here are some practical ways to start thinking
seriously about it now:

First, let's size up

YOUR QUALIFICATI ONS,

by taking

a look a'!: your interests and talents:

2

1. What activity do you like bestin school?
ame your favorite
a. subject
_ __ __
b. student activity
(such as music club, dramatics, school paper, student government, ballet dancing)
at home? \Vrite down your chosen
a. responsibility
(such as care of younger children cooking, making your own
clothes)
b. hobby _
(such as photography, stamps, handcrafts, reading)
tfention whatever you enjoy most m the
in the community?
way of
a. club
(such a Girl Scouts, H church groups
b. recreation
(such as tennis, dances, concerts, ballgames)


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

2. What can you do best? Make a new list, and include anything
in which you are really tops (whether you have already listed
it or not):
in school _ _ _
at home __
in the community
3. What job experience have you had? List work of any kind,
whether paid or unpaid. Don't forget to include babysitting,
farmwork, assisting in the school office or cafeteria.

Second, you will need to get some idea of what
various JOBS are like. So how about
reading books that describe how an occupation reached its present stage, its probable future, its importance to humanity and
to the national welfare, and what part women play in it.
scanning a few trade journals, to get the feel of the occupation,
and absorb some shoptalk.
talking with women you know who are successfully employed in
the type of work that interests you. Perhaps you can start a
down-to-earth discussion of its advantages and disadvantages
as a career.

Third, you can ask for some expert advice from
your parents. They have known you a long time; they have a
vital interest in your future; and probably they have personal
experience with employment conditions in the place where you
live.
your teachers and counselors. They know something of your
capabilities, and a great deal about the job situation in general
and various occupations in particular.

Specifically, you may want to ask about
job prospects for girls in the field that interests you:
Are there many job openings?
What pay can you expect?
Are the working conditions good?
Is there a fair chance for steady employment and for promotion?
training needed for the kind of work you want:

How long does the training take?
How much does it cost?
Where is the nearest approved school?


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

3

Suppose you enjoy chemistry or physics and plan to work in a
medical laboratory after graduation. You would probably start
as a laboratory assistant, spending most of your time on chores
such as washing test tubes. But if you decide to spend 3 or 4
years after high school in getting technical training, you would
be prepared for a research job as medical technologist.
The counselor will know what kinds of work call for additional
training beyond high school, and where to get that training.
She can help select a school or college where the course you
want is approved by the State accrediting body or by the national
professional association in that field.
financial aid. If the training you need seems out of reach
financially, ask your school counselor or principal aboutScholarships.
Cooperative programs that alternate school with paid employment.
Training or apprentice programs where a student can work
her way.
Free public vocational courses (day or evening).
Other sources of aid from civic, community, or church groups.
aptitude tests. Perhaps the counselor will suggest that you take
the general aptitude tests which your own school may have, or
which may be obtained through the State Employment Service.
These tests bring to light hidden talents and aptitudes and may
help you decide among several fields. If you have no school
counselor, you can go to the nearest office of the State Employment Service and request a counselor's help.

4


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

WHY FINISH
HIGH SCHOOL?

I have the offer of a job right now;
and I am old enough to leave school.
What use would a high-school diploma
be to me?

No matter what kind of work you plan to do, a highschool education will pay off in the long run. Studies
have shown that earning capacity later in life is greater
among high-school graduates than among those who
have less schooling. A good educational background
enriches your life in many other ways-as a voter and
citizen, as a member of the community, as a parent,
and as an individual.
The United States is one of the few countries in the

world where all girls are entitled to education through
high school free of cost.
To get the greatest advantage from your years in high
school, look for courses and activities that offer
LIFETIME VALUES

a broad background for the work you want to do.
an introduction to new interests you can develop later in life.
a practice field for committee work and group projects.
preparation for the responsibilities of citizenship and homemaking.

procedures for reaching decisions and solving problems.
insight into national and world events, past and present.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

5

MARKETABLE SKILLS

"getting it across." Skill in using English as a tool is a must
if you want to advance very far in any field of work. Communication depends on your ability to understand others and make
them understand you-in speech and in writing.
typing. Even if you do not plan to do office work you will find
typing useful, in college, at home, and in almost any type of
employment.
operating some special business machine or equipment, such as
an adding machine, a mimeograph machine, a telephone switchboard.
keeping accounts. Ability to figure, keep track of money spent,
write checks, and estimate costs is needed in many jobs in
offices, stores, and restaurants, in small businesses of any kind,
and in managing your own household.
driving a car. This is important in selling real estate or insurance
and in many other kinds of work.

Any basic, marketable skill that you can learn, either
through your school courses or (if you are not underage) through suitable vacation work, will improve
your prospects for a good job after graduation.
Basic skills can be used in many jobs and also at home
or in community service. They are sometimes called
"cushion" skills because you can fall back on them
when jobs in your preferred field are scarce! They also
enable you to qualify for a wider variety of jobs, and
give you a definite advantage in case you apply for a
job where they may be useful.

6


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

HOW ABOUT
WORK EXPERIENCE?

Do you think girls should work while
they are in high school? Two of my
friends plan to take part-time jobs
during their senior year. Joan says
she wants some work experience;
Bettie needs the extra money.

For older girls, who are at least 16, a summer vacation
job may be a good way to get work experience. Unless
a girl is strong and well and handles her courses with
ease, a Saturday job or an after-school job may take
too much energy or time. A full-time vacation job is
less likely to interfere with school progress, and usually
offers a better chance to acquire sound work habits.
The school counselor could help girls like Joan and Bettie find
suitable jobs, if employment is really the answer to their problems.
And she can help a girl who has her doubts-as Marilyn apparently
has-weigh the pros and cons.

Another thing: When a student takes a job, it must
conform with the child-labor laws set up for the protection of young people. The counselor will know what
the requirements are in your State and where to go for
a work permit if one is needed.
\Vhen jobs are scarce-or money is not too important-worthwhile experience can be gained from unpaid vacation work for
relatives, on the home farm, or as a volunteer worker in a community agency.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

7

More than one woman who has made a lifelong career of social
service first became interested through doing volunteer work
for a
community center
child-welfare agency
church, or
hospital.

Girls who are under 16 (and many who are older) will
do well to postpone the matter of job experience. It
can be acquired when needed, after graduation.
Until then,
your
education
comes
first.

8


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

LOOKING
FOR A JOB

Can you tell me how to find a job
when I am ready for one? I don't
know where to start.

There are many ways of finding a suitable job.
are some that have helped other girls:

Here

Your own school may have a placement service. If so, this is
the first thing to try. The school placement service specializes in
jobs for beginners, and the counselor will know what training
you have.
There is also likely to be a local office of the State Employment
Service in your town, or in a nearby city. The State Employment Office will refer you to any job opening they know of, for
which you are qualified. All their services are free, including
counseling and aptitude tests if needed.
You can apply direct to an employer. This works especially well
in a small community where the employer may know you or
your family personally; also in the case of a large company which
has its own employment office.

If you have relatives or friends employed in the company where
you want to work, ask them to let you know when there is a
vacancy, so you can ap"ply.
A quick way of checking on he kind of job openings and the
rates of pay in your locality is to run through the "help wanted"
advertisements in the daily newspaper.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

9

If your first job has no relation to your long-term plans,
do not be discourage<l. You may like it better than
you think. At the very least it will supply job experience which will help you when you find the opening
you want.
Be sure that you meet the requirements of your State
as to a WoRK PER nT or AGE CERTIFIC TE for employment, if you go to work before you are 18.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

HOW MORE
EDUCATION CAN HELP

I am 16 and have one more year of
high school. Will you please tell me
what kind of job I could expect to
get-if I left school now?-ajter
graduation?-with a year or more
of special training after high school?

You can get a general idea of the amount of education
and training required for a few types of work from the
following list of so-called "entry jobs." Ask your
school counselor or the local office of the State Employment Service about specific requirements.
The Women's Bureau has published reports describing
job opportunities for women and training requirements
in the broad fields of health service and social work,
food service management, engineering, and some other
occupations.
However, there is no hard and fast rule about the training required for most jobs. When vacancies are plentiful and applicants scarce, a girl may get a chance to try
a job that ordinarily calls for more training than she has
had. But when employers can pick and choose among
well-qualified applicants, the amount of training may
be the deciding factor.

With less than 4 years of high school, a girl must expect to
begin work in an entry job where no special skill is re-


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

11

quired, or where training is given on the job. She may
take an entry job in a factory, store, restaurant, or
hospital, or do private household work.
As she gains experience and skill she may be able to
qualify for more responsible and better-paid jobs.
Skilled factory operatives often earn more than women
in some clerical and professional occupations.
The graduate of a general or commercial high-school
course may be able to find a position as
bank teller (trainee)
cashier in a store, restaurant,
office
clerk (billing, cost, payroll,
posting, time clerk)
"copy boy" on local newspaper
laboratory assistant in a hospital or a drug or cosmetics
firm
library attendant or helper

photographer's helper in advertising or in newspaper or
magazme wor
receptionist
salesgirl in a department or
other retail store
telephone operator (must be at
least 18 years)
typist

NoTE: If she is 18 years or over and in good health, a highschool graduate is eligible for enlistment in the Armed Forces.

A girl who has completed a vocational course at the
high-school level may find a beginning position where
she can use her training as
baker (assistant) in a bread and
cake factory
beauty-service operator
commercial artist (beginner
doing copy work, lettering,
stencils, model making) in a
department store or advertising agency
cook (assistant) m restaurant

12


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

electronics assembler (semiskilled) in radio or television
manufacture
gardener or landscaper's assistant
practical nurse
sewing-machine operator m a
factory
welder in an aircraft factory

With 1 to 3 years of specialized training beyond high
school, a girl can qualify for many skilled or semiskilled jobs, such as
assistant, dentist's or doctor's
office (1 to 2 years)
bookkeeper assistant
dental hygienist (1 to 2 years)
draftsman
fashion designer (beginner, 3
years)
illustrator of catalogs or magazines

medical laboratory technician
(3 years)
medical records technician in a
hospital
medical X-ray technician (1 to 2
years)
registered nurse, hospital school
(3 years)
stenographer (business, legal,
medical)

Four years or more in a college, university, or professional school, with specialization in the field selected,
is the standard preparation for a professional or technical career, especially for a girl who hopes to advance
to a position of greater responsibility. This applies in
the practice of medicine, dentistry, law, or theology,
and also for a woman planning to be an
accountant (professional)
biologist
chemist
college instructor
dietitian or nutritionist
engineer
dairy bacteriologist
floriculturist
food-service manager
high-school teacher
home economist
journalist or editorial worker
kindergarten teacher

librarian
medical technologist
nurse, college trained
occupational therapist
optometrist
pharmacist
physicist
physical therapist
plant nursery specialist
recreation or group worker
religious worker
social worker
veterinarian

For ale by th e SuperintendH1t ot Document , l '. ·. <,overmnf'nt Printlni: Offi ce
Wnshini;ton :!5, l>. C.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

•

l'rin• 10 c1•11ts


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

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LLEG E

V COLLEG

LfBRAR

MARILYN WANTS TO KNOW


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

After
High
School
What.~
W,omen 's Bureau Leaflet 8

1954

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Janies P. Mitchell, Secretary
WOMEN ' S BUREAU
Mrs. Alice K . Leopold, Director


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

PAY ENVELOPE
OR WEDDI NG BELLS?

I am a girl in high school. Of course
I hope to be married some day and
have a home of my own. So - why
should I bother about earning a
living? Why not prepare now for
man·iage and homemaking?

Prepare for both a job and marriage !
You are right in thinking you will probably marry.
:Most girls now in high school or vocation al school can
expect to marry. In the United States, four of every
five women and girls who are 14 or older are married,
or have been married.
The chances are that you will also be employe d- before
marriage and perhaps for a few years afterwar d. 1 Towadays, more and more married \.Vomen continue with
their jobs or return to work when their children are old
enough.
Women make up nearly a third of the Tation's workers.
rJ he jobs they do are vital to the national economy .
Study after study has shown that in most cases women
work for much the same reasons that men work: To
support themselv es and to help support the family.
So it is importan t for you to prepare for a job, even if
you expect to marry soon.
H80ll O - ,;,


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

CHOOS ING
A CAREE R

How can I decide what
kind of job would be best
for me?

What kind of work to choose is a big question , and you
should not expect to reach a final decision at once.
But here are some practical ways to start thinking
seriously about it now:

First, let's size up Yo R QuALIFIC ATIO s, by taking
a look a~ your interests and talents:
1. \ hat activity do you like bestin school?
ame your favorite

2

a. subject
b. student activity _
(such as music club, dramatics, school paper, student government, ballet dancing)
at home? vY rite down your chosen
a. responsibi lity ___ _
(such as care of younger children, cooking, making your own
clothes)
b. hobby _ _ _ _ __
(such as photograp hy, stamps, handcrafts , reading)
in the community ? Mention whatever you enjoy most in the
way of
a. club _
(such as Girl Scouts, 4-H, church groups)
b. recreation
_______ ______ _
(such as tennis, dances, concerts, ballgames)


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

2. What can you do best? Make a new list, and include anything
in which you are really tops (whether you have already listed
it or not):
in school ________ _
at home . _ __ __ _
in the community
3. What job experience have you had? List work of any kind,
whether paid or unpaid. Don't forget to include babysitting.
farmwork, assisting in the school office or cafeteria.

Second, you will need to get some idea of what
various Joas are like. So how about
reading books that describe how an occupation reached its present stage, its probable future, its importance to humanity and
to the national welfare, and what part women play in it.
scanning a few trade journals, to get the feel of the occupation,
and absorb some shoptalk.
talking with women you know who are successfully employed in
the type of work that interests you. Perhaps you can start a
down-to-earth discussion of its advantages and disadvantages
as a career.

Third, you can ask for some expert advice from
your parents. They have known you a long time; they have a
vital interest in your future; and probably they have personal
experience with employment conditions in the place where you
live.
your teachers and counselors. They know something of your
capabilities, and a great deal about the job situation in general
and various occupations in particular.

Specifically, you may want to ask about
job prospects for girls in the field that interests you:
Are there many job openings?
What pay can you expect?
Are the working conditions good?
Is there a fair chance for steady employment and for promotion?
training needed for the kind of work you want:

How long does the training take?
How much does it cost?
Where is the nearest approved school?


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

3

Suppose you enjoy chemistry or physics and plan to work in a
medical laboratory after graduation. You would probably start
as a laboratory assistant, spending mo t of your time on chores
such as washing test tubes. But if you decide to spend 3 or 4
years after high school in getting technical training, you would
be prepared for a research job as medical technologist.
The counselor will know what kinds of work call for additional
training beyond high school, and where to get that training.
She can help select a school or college where the course you
want is approved by the State accrediting body or by the national
professional association in that field.
financial aid. If the training you need seems out of reach
financially, ask your school counselor or principal aboutScholarships.
Cooperative programs that alternate school with paid employment.
Training or apprentice programs where a student can work
her way.
Free public vocational courses (day or evening).
Other sources of aid from civic community, or church groups.
aptitude tests. Perhaps the counselor will suggest that you take
the general aptitude tests which your own school may have, or
which may be obtained through the State Employment Service.
These tests bring to light hidden talents and aptitudes and may
help you decide among several fields. If you have no school
counselor, you can go to the nearest office of the State Employment Service and request a counselor's help.

4


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

WHY FINISH
HIGH SCHOOL?

I have the offer of a job right now;
and I am old enough to leave school.
What use would a high-school diploma
be to me?

o matter what kind of work you plan to do, a highschool education will pay off in the long run.
tudies
have shown that earning capacity later in life is greater
among high-school graduates than among tho e who
have less schooling. A good educational background
enriches your life in many other ways-as a voter and
citizen, as a member of the community, as a parent,
and as an individual.
The United States is one of the few countries m the

world where all girls are entitled to education through
high school free of cost.
To get the greatest advantage from your years in high
school, look for courses and activities that offer
LIFETIME VALUES

a broad background for the work you want to do.
an introduction to new interests you can develop later in life.
a practice field for committee work and group projects.
preparation for the responsibilities of citizenship and homemaking.

procedures for reaching decisions and solving problems.
insight into national and world events, past and present.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

5

MARKET BLE SKILLS

"getting it across." Skill in using English as a tool is a must
if you want to advance very far in any field of work. Communication depends on your ability to understand others and make
them understand you-in speech and in writing.
typing. Even if you do not plan to do office work you will find
typing useful, in college, at home, and in almost any type of
employment.
operating some special bus-£ness machine or equipment, such as
an adding machine, a mimeograph machine, a telephone switchboard.
keeping accounts. Ability to figure, keep track of money spent,
write checks and estimate costs is needed in many jobs in
offices, stores, and restaurants, in small businesses of any kind,
and in managing your own household.
driving a car. This is important in selling real estate or insurance
and in many other kinds of work.

Any basic, marketable skill that you can learn, either
through your school courses or (if you are not underage) through suitable vacation work, will improve
your prospects for a good job after graduation.
Basic skills can be used in many jobs and also at home
or in community service. They are sometimes called
"cushion" skills because you can fall back on them
when jobs in your preferred field are scarce. They also
enable you to qualify for a wider variety of jobs, and
give you a definite advantage in case you apply for a
job where they may be useful.

6


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

HOW ABOUT
WORK EXPERIENCE?

Do you think girls should work while
they are in high school? Two of my
friends plan to take part-time jobs
during their senior year. Joan says
'--she wants some work experience;
Bettie needs the extra money.

For older girls, who are at least 16, a summer vacation
job may be a good way to get work experience. Unless
a girl is strong and well and handles her courses with
ease, a Saturday job or an after-school job may take
too much energy or time. A full-time vacation job is
less likely to interfere with school progress, and usually
offers a better chance to acquire sound work habits.
The school counselor could help girls like Joan and Bettie find
suitable jobs, if employment is really the answer to their problems.
And she can help a girl who has her doubts-as Marilyn apparently
has-weigh the pros and cons.

Another thing: When a student takes a job, it must
conform with the child-labor laws set up for the protection of young people. The counselor will know what
the requirements are in your State and where to go for
a work permit if one is needed.
\Vhen jobs are scarce-or money is not too important-worthwhile experience can be gained from unpaid vacation work for
relatives, on the home farm, or as a volunteer worker in a community agency.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

7

~1ore than one woman who has made a lifelong career of social
service first became interested through doing volunteer ,vork
for a
community center
child-welfare agency
church, or
hospital.

Girls who are under 16 (and many who are older) will
do well to postpone the matter of job experience. It
can be acquired when needed, after graduation.
Cntil then,
your
education
comes
first.

8


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

LOOKING
FOR A JOB

,_..

Can you tell me how to find a job
when I am ready for one.? I don't
;::::-

,,

know where to start.

--- 1\)1'-==- ..._

There are many ways of finding a suitable job.
are some that have helped other girls:

Here

Your own school may have a placement service. If so, this is
the first thing to try. The school placement service specializes in
jobs for beginners, and the counselor will know what training
you have.
There is also likely to be a local office of the State Employment
Service in your town, or in a nearby city. The State Employment Office will refer you to any job opening they know of, for
which you are qualified. All their services are free, including
counseling and aptitude tests if needed.
You can apply d irect to an employer. This works especially well
in a small community where the employer may know you or
vour family personally; also in the case of a large company which
has its own employment office.

If you have relatives or friends employed in the company where
you want to work. ask them to let you know when there is a

vacancy, so you can apply.
A quick way of checking on the kind of job openings and the
rates of pay in your locality is to run through the "help wanted"
advertisements in the daily newspaper.


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

9

If your first job ha no relation to your long-term plans,
do not be discourage<l. You may like it better than
you think. At the very least it will supply job experience which will help you when you find the opening
you want.
Be sure that you meet the requirements of your State
as to a WoRK PER HT or AGE CERTIFICATE for employment, if you go to work before you are 1 .


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

HOW MORE
EDUCATION CAN HELP

I am 16 and have one more year of
high school. Will you please tell me
what kind of job I could expect to
get- if I left school now?- ajter
graduation?-with a year or more
of special training after high school?

You can get a general idea of the amount of education
and training required for a few types of work from the
following list of so-called "entry jobs." Ask your
school counselor or the local office of the State Employment Service about specific requirements.
The Women's Bureau has published reports describing
job opportunities for women and training requirements
in the broad fields of health service and social work,
food service management, engineering, and some other
occupations.
However, there is no hard and fast rule about the training required for most jobs. When vacancies are plentiful and applicants scarce, a girl may get a chance to try
a job that ordinarily calls for more training than she has
had. But when employers can pick and choose among
well-qualified applicants, the amount of training may
be the deciding factor.

With less than 4 years of high school, a girl must expect to
begin work in an entry job where no special skill is re-


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

11

quired, or where training is given on the job. She may
take an entry job in a factory, store, restaurant, or
hospital, or do private household work.
As he gains experience and skill she may be able to
qualify for more responsible and better-paid jobs.
Skilled factory operatives often earn more than women
in some clerical and professional occupations.
The graduate of a general or commercial high-school
course may be able to find a position as
bank teller (trainee)
cashier in a store, restaurant
office
clerk (billing, cost, payroll,
posting, time clerk)
"copy boy" on local newspaper
laboratory assistant in a hospital or a drug or cosmetics
firm

telephone operator (must be at
least 18 years)

library attendant or helper

typist

photographer's helper in advertising or in newspaper or
magazine work
receptionist
salesgirl in a department or
other retail store

OTE: If she is 18 years or over and in good health, a highschool graduate is eligible for enlistment in the Armed Forces.

A girl who has completed a vocational course at the
high-school level may find a beginning position where
she can use her training as
baker (assistant) in a bread and
cake factory
beauty-service operator
commercial artist (beginner
doing copy work, lettering,
stencils, model making) in a
department store or advertising agency
cook (assistant) m restaurant

12


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

electronics assembler (semiskilled) in radio or television
manufacture
gardener or landscaper's assistant
practical nurse
sewing-machine operator m a
factory
welder in an aircraft factory

With 1 to 3 years of specialized training beyond high
school, a girl can qualify for many skilled or semiskilled jobs, such as
assistant, dentist's or doctor's
office (1 to 2 years)
bookkeeper assistant
dental hygienist (1 to 2 years)
draftsman
fashion designer (beginner, 3
years)
illustrator of catalogs or magazines

medical laboratory technician
(3 years)
medical records technician in a
hospital
medical X-ray technician (1 to 2
years)
registered nurse, hospital school
(3 years)
stenographer (business. legal,
medical)

Four years or more in a college, university, or professional school, with specialization in the field selected,
is the standard preparation for a professional or technical career, especially for a girl who hopes to advanre
to a position of greater responsibility. This applies in
the practice of medicine, dentistry, law, or theology,
and also for a woman planning to be an
accountant (professional)
biologist
chemist
college instructor
dietitian or nutritionist
engineer
dairy bacteriologist
floriculturist
food- ervice manager
high-school teacher
home economist
journalist or editorial worker
kindergarten teacher

librarian
medical technologist
nurse, college trained
occupational therapist
optometrist
pharmacist
physicist
physical therapist
plant nursery specialist
recreation or group worker
religious worker
social worker
veterinarian

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis


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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

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