View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

ALLEGHi;:'.NY COLLEGE LIBRAR'Y

Apr2"70
WAGES: At least the minimum wage
lega I ly established for most other workers. Specific days on which wages will
be paid. (Gifts of food, clothing, etc.,
are not a part of wages nor a substitute
for adequate wages.)
HOURS: Schedule of work days and hours
you prefer. Changes to be arranged by
mutua I consent. Arrangements about pa id
and unpaid days off.
DUTIES: Notation of specific tasks, frequency, and desired standards.
CHILDREN: Clear understanding of her
responsibility in relation to the children.
OTHER: Agreement on SOCIAL SECURITY
contributions (a legal obligation for most),
LUNCH arrangements, TELEPHONE privileges, etc. ACCIDENT COVERAGE in
your homeowner•s or tenant·s pol icy.
You probably realize by now that YOUR
COMMITTEE'S job will also include the
task of changing employer ATTITUDES.
POWER TO YOU!


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

MRS. HALL found herself deeply involved in
social welfare activities at increasingly
responsible levels. She ca I led the training
program office and secured a household
technician to work 8 hours a day 5 days a
week. The employee was ski I led in cleaning, competent to handle three school-age
children, and qualified to prepare simple
meals. She received $100 a week with time
and a half for overtime, 1 week's paid vacation after 1 year, 6 paid holidays a year,
and specified sick pay .... THE WORKER,
mother of six children, had worked only
intermittently prior to training and earned
$10 to $12 a day. She is especially pleased
with the confidence and ,. know-how" gained
in the training course as wel I as in having
a steady job. The employer is delighted:
"She more than meets my bill!"

MRS. SMITH worked odd hours, had a small
chi Id, and needed a trained worker ha If a
day, 5 days a week. The household technician she secured, trained to work efficiently
without supervision, was just what she
needed. The training program, having estab1ished a business that matched part-time
and day workers with employers needing
such help, was able to guarantee the worker $95 a week, plus fringe benefits, from
two half-time jobs. Previously THE WORKER
had struggled to support herself and her inva I id husband on casual, low-paid work.

IF ONLY
I could get
sonie
household
help!

MRS. DAVIS wanted her home thoroughly
cleaned once a week. The training program for household workers had developed a cooperative specializing in teamcleaning and other household services.
THE TEAM employed by the cooperative
and regularly servicing her area consists
of a former welfare mother of six children and a woman whose sporadic employment had paid only $1 an hour when
she worked. Now, after careful training,
they are specialists and guaranteed a 40hour week at $1.75 an hour plus a week's
paid vacation each year. "Maximum results with minimum disruption" is the way
Mrs. Davis describes the team program.

0
::::,

WHERE TO GET FURTHER INFORMATION

Women's Bureau

Wage and Labor Standards Administration
U.S. Department of Labor
Washington, D.C. 20210

National Committee on Household Employment
1346 Connecticut Avenue NW.
Washington, D.C. 20036
(The NCHE wi II provide materials on developing standards, existing training prograrrs.
sample contracts, etc.)

r-7
I~ I
I~ I
I ti I

Io I
I~ I
I ~ I
Is::: I

Cover photo: Courtesy of National Council of
Jewish Women.
1'1-

U, S, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1970 0 - 372-427

I~ I
I r-4J
L-

WOMEN'S BUREAU
WAGE AND LABOR
STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION
U.S . DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
,,.- ,

Li 3 . i I :

Leaflet 51

1969

Wailing .. IF ONLV" won't solve the problem. Problem-solving ACTION is needed.

The modern home - replete with
complex. expensive devices; new
fabrics; and specia I ized cleaning
agents-requires a worker who is
both wel I trained and rel iable.

"HOW CAN I GET THIS PARAGON?"

• Get together a sma 11 group of friends
or representatives of loca I organ izations committed to establishing a
training program.
• Write the National Committee on
Household Employment for names of
organizat ions in your area affiliated
with the National Committee.

• Spend more time with their children
and husbands, or
• Serve as volunteers, or

• Seek the assistance of the State
Employment Service office in your
locality; ask for its participation.

• Continue their education, or
• Make clothes for themselves and their
chi ldren, or


https://fraser.stlouisfed.org
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

TWO THINGS ARE NECESSARY-

• Involve your school system - the
vocationa I education program.

• TRAINED workers must be available.
• GOOD STANDARDS must be widely
accepted.
and YOU can do a lot to get both.

DEVELOPING GOOD ST AN DAROS

Action is needed in every community.
It wi 11 have to be INITIATED BY YOU,
the employer. Fol low the example of
other housewives who have banded together to get training programs established.

FORM A COMMITTEE:

• Enjoy dua I roles as homemakers and
earners, or

Why can't you find trained, reliable
household workers to release you for
doing YOUR "thing .. ? EVERYONE
WOULD BENEFIT.

Finding trained household workers is
difficu It. Developing efficient household employees is like any other occupational training. It requires financing
and specializ.ed trainers, facilities, and
recruitment programs.

How To Do It?

You hear it all over town-in offices,
schools, clubs, coffee klatches, church
groups, dinner" parties- ,.IF ONLY I
COULD GET SOME HELP AT HOME." The
reasons for this complaint are numerous
and valid. More trained, reliable household employees would al low many women
to:

• Have time for other activities of their
own choice.

MAKING TRAINED WORKERS AVAILABLE

• If you live in a small town, don't
forget your county office of the Cooperative Extension Service of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Through the years good standards have
been established for many workers in
business and industry, but not for household employees. Good training alone
wi 11 not solve the problem. Standards
must be provided for this occupation,
too. And that's up to YOU, the employer.
SET UP A PUBLIC MEETING to spotlight
BOTH the need for such trained workers
and the need for good standards for employment. Ask the Nationa I Committee
on Household Employment or the Women ' s
Bureau to help you get a speaker. To
get a big "turnout," appoint a publi ci ty
committee to invo Ive the mass med ia and
the community.

MOBILIZE ALL POSSIBLE RESOURCES in
your particular community WITH THIS
COMMUNITY SUPPORT as a base. Contributions wil I vary from helping with
fundraising to actual training. Agencies
assisting with similar projects include :
public vocational schools, commun,ty
colleges, technical institutes, State Employment Services, Extension Services.,
chambers of commerce, labor unions,
local health and welfare associations ,
and churches.

Sound like a tall order? It' s been done
successfully in a number of communities.
And the success has a "two-way stretch"
-benefiting both employers and employees.

Relations between employer and employee in the home should be business1ike, based on MUTUAL NEED and MUTUAL RESPECT . Gone-and happily gone
-are the days when your Victorian predecessors said: "My Mildred-why she's
a member of the family!" Mrs. Mildred
Doe, household employee of the 1970's,
home technician, doesn't want to be a
member of your family! She wants to do
a day's or week's work for an employer
in return for a fair wage. proper and defined hours, decent working conditions,
and mutua I respect.

Here are the concrete elements of the
standards essentia I for successful employer-employee relations in the home .

! ! ! JOT THESE DOWN prior to the interview
with the prospective employee!! !
When the employee arrives, do have a
friendly but business I ike discussion, being very specific on these points and
in answering the questions she will raise.