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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
WILLIAM N. DOAK* Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

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f r .....................

COO

llOe DLO

LABOR LAWS OF THE UNITE D STATES SERIES

LABOR LEGISLATION
1929

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D
DECEMBER, 1930

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON * 1931

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents* Washington* D. C.




Price 20 cents




Acknowledgment
This bulletin was prepared by Charles F. Sharkey, of the United
States Bureau of Labor Statistics.




m




Contents
Page

Introduction____________________________________________________
1, 2
Part 1.—Digests and summaries of certain classes of laws affecting labor.. 3-19
3
Apprenticeship______________________________________________
Vocational education________________ ________________________
3
Schools for employed children.._______________________________
3,4
4
Mothers’ pensions___________________________________________
Examination, licensing, etc., of workmen________________________
4-8
Aviators______________________________ _________________
4, 5
Barbers________________________________________________
5, 6
Beauty parlors__________________________________________
6, 7
Chauffeurs______________________________________________
7
Employees on vessels_____________________________________
7
Hoisting-machine operators_______________________________
7
Plumbers_____________ *________________________________
8
Emigrant agents_____________________________________________
8
Mechanics’ liens_____________________________________________
8, 9
Protection of wages of employees, etc., of contractors_____________ 9, 10
Assignment of wages—wage brokers____________________________
10
Sunday labor______________________________________________
_
11
11
Legal holidays in the States and Territories_____________________
Bakeries and the preparation distribution, etc., of food products___
11
Vocational rehabilitation—State and Federal cooperation_________
11
Old-age pensions_____________________________________________ 11-13
Retirement of public employees________________________________ 13, 14
Cooperative associations______________________________________
14
Credit unions________________________________________ ______
15
Preference for local labor and domestic materials on public works___
15
Rate of wages of employees on public works_____________________ 15, 16
Industrial police_____________________________________________
16
Trade-marks of trade-unions__________________________________
16
Absent voters_______________________________________________
16
Convict labor_______________________________________________ 17, 18
Investigative commissions____________________________________ 18, 19
Part 2.—Text and abridgment of labor laws________________________ 21-96
Alaska_____________________________________________________
21
Arizona____________________________________________________ 21, 22
Arkansas___________________________________________________
22
California___________________________________________________22-32
Colorado- _________________________________________________32-38
Connecticut_________________________________________________
38
Delaware___________________________________________________
38
District of Columbia_________________________________________
39
Florida_______________________________ _____________________
39
Georgia____________________________________________________
39
Hawaii_____________________________________________________ 39, 40




v

VI

CONTENTS

Part 2*
—Text and abridgment of labor laws—Continued.
Page
Idaho______________________________________________________
40
Illinois_____________________________________________________ 40, 41
Indiana____________________________________________________ 41, 42
Iowa_______________________________________________________42, 43
Kansas_____________________________________________________ 43, 44
Maine______________________________________________________ 44, 45
Maryland___________________________________________________
46
Massachusetts_______________________________________________46, 47
Michigan___________________________________________________ 47-50
Minnesota__________________________________________________ 50-52
Missouri____________________________________________________52-55
Montana___________________________________________________ 55, 56
Nebraska_______________ ___________________________________ 56, 57
Nevada__________ __________________________________________ 57-59
New Hampshire_____________________________________________
59
New Jersey_________________________________________________ 59-62
New Mexico_____________________________________ __________
62
New York__________________________________________________ 62-65
North Carolina______________________________________________ 65, 66
North Dakota_______________________________________________
67
Ohio................................... ......................................- ......... —................... 67,68
Oklahoma__________________________________________________ 68-72
Oregon_____________________________________________________ 72-76
Pennsylvania________________________________________________76-81
Philippine Islands___ - _______________________________________
81
Porto Rico_______________________________________________- _81, 82
Rhode Island________________________________________________82, 83
South Carolina______________________________________________
83
South Dakota_______________________________________________
84
Tennessee__________________________________________________
84
Texas______________________________________________________ 84-87
U tah............................................................................................................87,88
Vermont____________________________________________________
88
Washington_________________________________________________
88
West Virginia_______________________________________________ 89-92
Wisconsin_______________________________ ___________________ 92-94
Wyoming___________________________________________________ 95, 96
United States_______________________________________________
96




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
n o . 528

WASHINGTON

S e p t e m b e r , 1930

REVIEW OF LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1929
Introduction
During the legislative year of 1929, 43 States met in regular
session, Alabama, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Virginia
being the only States that did not meet in regular session. Louisiana
and Mississippi, however, held special sessions. Of the States hold­
ing regular sessions, eight held extra sessions.1 Alaska, Hawaii,
Porto Rico, and the Philippine Islands held regular sessions, and an
extra session was called in Porto Rico. The Congress of the United
States also convened in regular and special session.
Legislation affecting labor in some respect was passed by all of the
legislatures meeting during the year, whether in regular or special
session, with the exception of Louisiana and Mississippi.
During the year 1929, four States (California, Minnesota, Utah,
and Wyoming] provided for the establishment of old-age pension
systems. Florida, Maryland, and New Hampshire repealed the
mother’s pension laws, and in their stead enacted new legislation.
The subject of the examination and licensing of barbers received
attention, and new legislation was enacted in Arizona, Montana, Ne­
vada, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas, while the examination
and licensing of beauty parlor employees engaged the attention of
legislatures in Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Missouri, Montana, and Ne­
braska. In general it can be said, after a careful examination of the
action of the 43 States which met in legislative session during the
year, that for the most part the laws and amendments pertaining in
general or particular to labor were beneficial and that the various
labor laws have been enlarged and strengthened.
The current bulletin is primarily and essentially a supplement
of a basic bulletin (No. 3y0) published in 1925, entitled “ Labor
Laws of the United States, with Decisions of Courts Relating
Thereto,” containing reprints, abridgments, digests, and references
to all labor legislation, with the exception of workmen’s compensa­
tion laws, up to the beginning of the year 1925. Since the publica­
tion of the basic volume (No. 370) yearly supplements have been
1 Connecticut, Florida, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, and
Wyoming.




1

2

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 19 29

issued as follows: Bulletin No. 403, Labor Legislation of 1925; Bulle­
tin No. 434, Labor Legislation of 1926; Bulletin No. 470, Labor Leg­
islation of 1927; and Bulletin No. 486, Labor Legislation of 1928.
It is the intention of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, after the publi­
cation of the supplemental bulletin of labor legislation for 1930,
to compile a basic volume of all labor legislation up to and includ­
ing the legislative year of 1931, similar to Bulletin No. 370. The
volume will be issued probably in the early part of 1932.
In the basic bulletin of 1925 certain classes of laws were presented
in brief or by a representative or typical law, and in the current
bulletin the classification and form there adopted is retained. The
subject matter is divided into two parts. The first part, entitled
“ Digests and Summaries of Certain Classes of Laws Affecting
Labor,” is of general interest to labor, and the second part, “ Text
and Abridgment of Labor Laws,” contains the laws of more specific
interest and which are less generally standardized. At the end of
the bulletin a cumulative index provides a ready reference to the
laws found in this bulletin as well as to those published in the pre­
ceding bulletins.
As has been done for some years past, workmen’s compensation
legislation is treated separately and is omitted from the general
legislative bulletin. Bulletin No. 423, entitled “ Workmen’s Com­
pensation Legislation of the United States and Canada as of July
1, 1926,” contains an analysis, a comparison, and the text of the
workmen’s compensation laws of the United States and Canada. In
1929, Bulletin No. 496 was published, bringing the basic volume
(No. 423) up to January 1, 1929. During the legislative year of
1929, amendments to the various State workmen’s compensation
laws appeared in the several issues of the Labor Review,2 and they
have been compiled in a separate reprint, available for distribution.
2 May (1929), pp. 135, 136; August (1929), pp. 85-88; September (1929), pp. 89, 90;
October (1929), pp. 73-77; November (1929), pp. 52-55; December (1929), pp. 71-73;
and March (1930); pp. 68-70.




Part 1.—Digests and Summaries of Certain Classes
of Laws Affecting Labor
This part is a supplement to part 1 of Bulletin No. 370, and the
same general arrangement of subject matter is followed. The intro­
ductory statements found in Bulletin No. 370 continue to be appli­
cable and therefore are not here repeated.

Apprenticeship
Michigan.—Act No. 309 (p. 839). Kepeals Act No. 126, Acts of
1883 (secs. 11491 to 11518, incl., C. L., 1915).

Vocational Education
New Mexico.—Ch. 107. Accepts Federal statute, in accordance
with act of Congress of February 5, 1929, “An act to provide for
the further development of vocational education in the several States
and Territories.”
New York.—Ch. 264. Amends secs. 590, 591, and 592, ch. 21,
Acts of 1909 (ch. 16, Con. L., 1909), as amended by ch. 140, Acts of
1910, and added by ch. 505, Acts of 1926. A new section (593) is also
added, exempting certain districts from the provisions of the act.
Ch. 407. Amends art. 22, ch. 21, Acts of 1909 (ch. 16, Con. L.,
1909), as amended by ch. 531, Acts of 1919, by adding two new sec­
tions, 609, 610.
Pennsylvania.—No. 102. Amends sec. 5151, Pa. Stats., 1920 (sec.
10, No. 92, Acts of 1913), as amended by No. 250, Acts of 1925.
Philippine Islands.—No. 3377. Provides for the promotion of
vocational education in agriculture, commerce, trades, and industries.
Wisconsin.—Ch. 13. Amends subsec. 6 of sec. 41.15, Wis. Stats.,
1923.
Ch. 103. Amends pars, (a), (b), subsec. (2) of sec. 20.33 and sub­
sec. (3) of sec. 41.16.
Ch. 142. Amends secs. 41.18 and 41.19, Wis. Stats., 1923. Voca­
tional schools.
Ch. 261, Amends sec. 25.01 (subsec. 3) and sec. 41.16 (subsec. 3),
Wis. Stats., 1923.
Ch. 444. Amends introductory paragraph of subsec. (1), pars,
(a) and (b) of subsec. (2) and subsec. (4) of sec. 20.33 and sec.
20.337, Wis. Stats., 1923, relating to vocational education.
United States.—Ch. 153 (45 Stat. 1151) provides for further
development of vocational education in the States and Territories.

Schools for Employed Children
California.—Ch. 185. Supersedes secs. 3.490 to 3.495, art. 8, ch.
1, part 4, div. 3, of the School Code (ch. 23, Acts of 1929), relative
to the establishment and maintenance of special continuation school
classes.




3

4

PAET 1.----DIGESTS AND SUMMARIES OF LAWS

Ch. 187. Supersedes secs. 1.350 to 1.430, ch. 2, part 2, div. 1, of the
School Code (ch. 23, Acts of 1929), relative to compulsory attendance
of minors at special continuation school classes.
Iowa.—Ch. 108. Amends ch. 218, sec. 4291, Code of 1927.
Utah.—Ch. 47. Amends sec. 1, ch. 92, Acts of 1919.
Mothers’ Pensions
Delaware.—Ch. 251. Amends 3071A, sec. 11A, ch. 88, R. C., 1915
(as amended by ch. 183, Acts of 1921). Increases age of child from
14 to 16 years.
Florida,.—Ch. 13759. Repeals ch. 7920, Acts of 1919 (as amended
in part by ch. 12000, Acts or 1927).
Illinois.—P. 198. Amends R. S., 1917, ch. 23, secs. 298-315 (as
amended by p. 162, Acts of 1921, and p. 185, Acts of 1925), by adding
two new sections, 16a and 16b. Appropriation of $500,000 to be paid
to counties.
Iowa.—Ch. 92. Amends sec. 3641-bl, Code of 1927.
Maijie.—Ch. 204 (p. 162). Amends secs. 7 and 11 (as amended by
ch. 17, Acts of 1919), ch. 222, P. L., 1917.
Maryland.—Ch. 401. Repeals secs. 21 to 31 of art. 88A, Code of
1924, and enacts seven new sections, 21 to 27, incl.
Michigan.—No. 33. Amends sec. 2017, C. L., 1915 (amended by
act No. 294, Acts of 1923). Requires residence of one year in county
prior to making application.
Minnesota.—Ch. 101. Amends sec. 8679, G. S., 1923, relating to
allowance.
Nevada.—Ch. 42. Amends secs. 2 and 3, ch. 107, Acts of 1921.
New Hampshire.—Ch. 145. This act repeals secs. 40 to 47, ch. 116,
P. L., 1926 (as amended by ch. 87, Acts of 1927), and amends ch. 108,
P. L., 1926, by adding seven new sections (9 to 15) following sec. 8.
Ch. 177. Amends sec. 1, ch. 108, P. L., 1926. The State board of
charities and correction is changed to the State board of public
welfare.
New York.—Ch. 347. Amends subdiv. 1, ch. 29, sec. 153, Acts of
1909 (ch. 24, Con. Laws, 1909), as added by ch. 228, Acts of 1915, as
last amended by ch. 684, Acts of 1927, granting relief to a mother
whose husband is suffering from tuberculosis.
Oregon.—Ch. 45. Amends sec. 3322 (amended by ch. 202, Acts
of 1921) and sec. 3333, G. L., 1920.
Pennsylvania.—No. 367. This act provides for an appropriation
and the basis of distribution of funds, to carry into effect P. L. 893,
Act of July 10, 1919.
Examination, Licensing, etc., of Workmen
Aviators

Alaska.—Ch. 75. New act. Provides for licensing of “ airman.”
California.—Ch. 850. Provides for the licensing of airmen, etc.
Connecticut.—Ch. 253. Concerns aviators, etc. Ch. 249, Acts of
1925, and ch. 324, Acts of 1927, are repealed.
Delaware.—Ch. 249. Concerns licensing of airmen.




EXAMINATION, LICENSING, ETC., OF WORKMEN

5

Idaho.—Ch. 137. Provides for examination and licensing of air­
men. Fee for license, $1. Renewal fee, $1.
Illinois.—P. 172. Amends secs. 2 and 5, p. 85, Acts of 1928.
Indiana.—Ch. 171. New act. Licensing of airmen, etc.
Iowa.—Ch. 135. New act. Licensing of airmen, etc.
Maine.—Ch. 265, p. 228. Regulates aviation and licensing of
aviators. Airman’s license fee, $15.
Maryland.—Ch. 318. Adds secs. 13 to 25, inclusive, to art. 1A,
Code of 1924 (as amended by ch. 637, Acts of 1927). State aviation
commission of five members created. Examination fee for airman’s
license, $25.
Michigan.—No. 148. Amends secs. 2 and 3a, act 138, Acts of 1927.
Qualifications.
Minnesota.—Ch. 290. New act. Examination fee for license, $10.
Missouri.—P. 124. Provides for the licensing of aircraft pilot.
Nebraska.—Ch. 34. Provides for the licensing of airmen.
New Hampshire.—Ch. 182. Licensing and regulation of aviation.
Airman’s license, $15. Issuance of certificate of license, $3.
New Mexico.—Ch. 71. Provides for licensing of operators of air­
craft.
North Carolina.—Ch. 190. Regulation of air pilots, etc.
North Dakota.—Ch. 85. Licensing of airmen by board of railroad
commissioner's.
Oregon.—Ch. 352. Amends secs. 1,3, and 4, of ch. 45, Acts of 1921;
and secs. 5 and 6 (as amended by ch. 202, Acts of 1923) of the same
act. Relative to pilot’s license for aviators.
Pennsylvania.—No. 316. Repeals No. 250, Acts of 1927, and
enacts a new law, providing for the licensing, etc., of airmen.
South Dakota.—Ch. 70. Relates to the licensing of airmen.
Texas.—Ch. 285. Provides for regulation of aircraft and airmen.
Vermont.—No. 79. Licensing of aviators. Annual license fee, $5.
Washington.—Ch. 157. Provides for licensing of aircraft and
airmen.
'Wyoming.—Ch. 66. Amends secs. 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7, ch. 72, Acts of
1927. Regulating and registering air pilots, etc.
Barbers

Arizona.—Ch. 76. New act. Establishes a State board of barbers.
Applicant must be over 18 years of age. Fees: For examination,
$10; registration, $5; apprentice, $5; issuance of certificate, $3; an­
nual renewal, $2.
California.—Ch. 302. Amends secs. 1, 2, 7, 13, 15, 17, 18, 21, and
23 of ch. 853, Acts of 1927.
Colorado.—Ch. 64. Amends secs. 4739-4743, incl., 4745-4747, incl.,
4751, 4752, 4753, and 4755, C. L., 1921. New provisions as to fees,
examinations, qualifications, etc.
Connecticut.—Ch. 173. Amends secs. 2972, 2973, and 2977, G. S.,
1918.
Idaho.—Ch. 261. Amends secs. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 17, 18, and 23 of
ch. 245, Acts of 1927, relative to qualifications for registration, fees,
etc.
Illinois.—P. 189. Act amends secs. 1-19, inclusive, Acts of 1909
(R. S., 1917, ch. 16b, as amended by p. 165, Acts of 1923).



6

PART 1.— DIGESTS AND SUMMARIES OF LAWS

Iowa.—Ch. 71. Amends sec. 2585-bl5, of ch. 124-b2, of the Code
of 1927, by adding a new section (2585-bl5a) relative to sanitary
rules.
Ch. 72. Amends sec. 2585-bl3, of ch. 124r-b2 of the Code of 1927.
Additional requirements for license.
Minnesota.—Ch. 270. Amends ch. 316, Acts of 1927. Practically
new act.
Ch. 386. Amends sec. 19, ch. 316, Acts of 1927.
Montana.—Ch. 127. New act. Regulates the practice of barbering and provides for registration, examination, and licensing of
barbers. Examination, fee, $15; issuance of certificate, $3; renewal
fee, $3.
Nebraska.—Ch. 154. Amends secs. 1,3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 10B, 16 and 17,
ch. 163, Acts of 1927.
Nevada.—Ch. 131. New act. Regulates the practice of barbering, etc. Examination fee fixed by board to be not more than $10.
Annual renewal fee, not more than $5.
North Carolina.—Ch. 119. New act. Regulates and licenses the
practice of barbering. Examination fee, $5; license fee for registered
barber, $3; renewal, $3; apprentice license, $1.50; renewal, $1.50.
Tennessee.—Ch. 118. New act. Regulates the practice of barber­
ing. Examination fee, $10; issuance of certificate, $3; renewal fee,
$3; apprentice, $5; issuance of certificate, $2; renewal fee, $2.
Texas.—Ch. 65 (first called session). New act. Relating to the
practice of barbering. Applicant must be at least 18 years of age.
Examination fee, $10.
Ch. 62 (second called session). Amends secs. 27 and 28 of ch.
65 (first called session), 1929.
Utah—Ch. 35. Amends secs. 6 and 7, ch. 72, Acts of 1927, relating
to registration of apprentice and student barbers.
Washington.—Ch. 209. Amends secs. 2, 4, 6, 7, 10, 14, 17 of ch.
75, Acts of 1923, and also adds a new section, 14r-a, and repeals
sec. 11, of the same act.
Beauty Parlors

Arizona.—Ch. 76. New act. Licensing of shops and persons re­
quired. Applicant must be over 18 years of age and must serve 6
months as apprentice. Fees: For examination, $15; second examina­
tion, $5; annual renewal of registration, $2. For examination of
manicurists, $5; registration, $3; annual renewal, $1.
Connecticut.—Ch. 233. Amends secs. 1 and 2 of ch. 303, Acts of
1927. The board of three commissioners is now appointed quadren­
nially instead of biennially. Salary of president of the board is
increased from $1,000 to $2,000 per annum.
Hawaii.—No. 145. New act. Establishes a territorial board of
three members. Examination fee, $10.
Idaho.—Ch. 265. New act. Licensing of shops and persons re­
quired. Applicants for registered cosmetician must be 18 years of
age. Fee for examination for registration, $10. License to practice
cosmetology, $5. Renewal license fee, $2.
Iowa.—Ch. 70. Amends secs. 2511, 2516, 2585-b2, 2585-b4, 2585b6, and repeals and reenacts secs. 2585-b5 and 2585-b9 of ch. 124-bl
of Code of 1927.
Kansas.—Ch. 217. Amends sec. 13, ch. 245, Acts of 1927.



EXAMINATION, LICENSING, ETC., OF WORKMEN

7

Missouri.—P. 218. New act. Regulates the occupations of hair­
dressers and cosmeticians. Examination fee, $10. Annual renewal
fee, $2.
Montana.—Ch. 104. New act. Licensing of shops and persons
required. Fee for examination, $10. Issuance of certificate and
renewal, $5.
Nebraska.—Ch. 156. New act. Regulates and licenses the practice
and teaching of cosmetology. Examination fee, $10; issuance of
certificate, $3; renewal fee, $3.
Oregon.—Ch. 399. Amends ch. 192, Acts of 1927.
South Dakota.—Ch. 94. Amends secs. 8, 11, 17, ch. 77, Acts of
1927.
Chauffeurs

California.—Ch. 253, sec. 22. Amends ch. 239, sec. 61, Aets of
1925. Form of application.
Ch. 258, secs. 2, 3, and 4. Amends ch. 266, secs. 66, 72, and 73,
Acts of 1923. Revocation, etc., of licenses.
Delaware.—Ch. 10. General motor vehicle act. Licensing of
chauffeurs, etc., secs. 51-65 incl.
Indicma.—Ch. 162. Provides for a uniform operator’s and chauf­
feur’s act, and thereby repeals secs. 23 and 24 of ch. 213, Acts of 1925;
and ch. 177, Acts of 1927.
Maine.—Ch. 327 (p. 334). Amends sec. 31, ch. 211, P. L., 1921.
Minnesota.—Ch. 433. Examination and license fee, $1.50. Re­
newal, $1.
Missouri.—P. 260. Amends sec. 3 of Acts of Extra Session, 1921,
pages 77 to 79.
New York.—Ch. 54, sec. 20 (pp. 70-72). Licensing of chauffeurs.
Ch. 30, sec. 289, Acts of 1909 (ch. 25, Con. L., 1909), as added by ch.
374, Acts of 1910 (as last amended by ch. 867, Acts of 1928), is
repealed.
Oregon.—Ch. 393. Amends sec. 17, ch. 371, Acts of 1921. Regis­
tration, etc., of chauffeurs.
Employees on Vessels

Florida.—Ch. 13758. Amends sec. 2463, R. G. S., 1920 (as last
amended by ch. 12194, Acts of 1927). Provides for five pilots at
port of Miami.
Oregon.—Ch. 140. Amends secs. 7731 and 7737, G. L., 1920 (as
amended by ch. 295, Acts of 1927). Relative to fees of pilots and
pilot commissioners.
Philippine Islands.—No. 3426. Amends secs. 1184 and 1185 (as
last amended 1924 by act No. 3177), 1189-1196, 1198, 1200, and 1201
(as amended 1919, act No. 2852), Administrative Code, 1917 (Act
No. 2711), relating to boards of examiners, tests, etc. New section
1192^ is added relating to admission fees for examination.
Hoisting-Machine Operators

Nevada.—Ch. 92. Amends sec. 8, ch. 213, Acts of 1921. Provides
for a fee of $2.50, where a change oi classification is required.




8

PAET 1.----DIGESTS AND SUMMARIES OE LAWS

Plumbers

Colorado.—Ch. 142. Amends secs. 4838, 4846, and 4850, C. L.,
1921. Master plumber’s license, $15; renewal, $10; examination fee,
$15; renewal fee, $20. Journeymen, $5; renewal, $1; examination,
$5; renewal fee, $5. A special examination fee for master plumber
is provided, $25.
Michigan.—Act 202. Amends secs. 2 and 12, act 222, Laws of
1901 (C. L., secs. 6858 and 6868), relative to compensation payable to
board members.
Act 266. Provides for licensing of plumbers and enforcement of
standards by the State commissioner of health. Fees: Master
plumber, $25; journeyman plumber, $5.
Porto Rico.—No. 16a. Regulates examinations for plumbers and
creates board of examiners.
Emigrant Agents
Georgia.—Act No. 306 (p. 176). Amends sec. 632, Penal Code
(as amended by act No. 756 (p. 87), Acts of 1920). Defines the word
“ emigrant ” as any person who has been solicited, persuaded, enticed,
or employed to leave the State to be employed or worked beyond the
limits of the same.
Texas.—Ch. 104 (first called session). Provides for licensing of
emigrant agents.
Ch. 11 (second called session). Provides for a State tax of $1,000
for each emigrant agent and in addition a tax of $100 to $300
according to population in every county the agent operates, and
thereby repeals license provision in ch. 104 (first called session, 1929).
Ch. 96 (second called session). Repeals ch. 104 (first called ses­
sion, 1929) and enacts a new law regulating and providing for the
licensing and supervision of emigrant agents.
Mechanics’ Liens
California.—Ch. 157. Adds a new section, 3065b, to the Civil
Code, relating to loggers’ liens.
Ch. 868. Amends sec. 3051, Civil Code (as amended by ch. 435,
Acts of 1911).
Ch. 869. Amends sec. 1183, Code of Civil Procedure (as amended
by ch. 681, Acts of 1911).
Ch. 870. Amends sec. 1187, Code of Civil Procedure (as amended
by ch. 146, Acts of 1919) and sec. 1188.
Ch. 871. Amends sec. 1197, Code of Civil Procedure (as amended
by ch. 681, Acts of 1911).
Colorado.—Ch. 123. Lien on gas and oil wells, derricks, pipe
lines, etc.
Hawaii.—No. 207. Amends secs. 2891 and 2892, R. L., 1925.
Liens on buildings, etc.
Illinois.—P. 547. Amends sec. 50a, act of 1874 (as amended by p.
598, Acts of 1$27). Liens on crops for services.
Indiana.—Ch. 113. Amends secs. 9 and 10, A. S. 8303 and 8304.
Liens on realty.




PROTECTION OF WAGES OF EMPLOYEES, ETC., OF CONTRACTORS

9

Maine.—Ch. 279 (p. 245). Amends sec. 56, ch. 96, R. S., 1916 (as
amended by ch. 171, Acts of 1925). Vehicles.
Michigan.—Act 264. Amends sec. 1, act 179, Acts of 1891 (C. L.,
1915, sec. 14796, as amended by ch. 140, Acts of 1919). Liens on
buildings, etc.
Minnesota.—Ch. 302. Amends sec. 8527, G. S., 1923 (sec. 4, ch.
320, Acts of 1911). Relating to liens on motor vehicles.
Ch. 314. Amends secs. 8555 and 8556, G. S., 1923, relating to
thresher’s liens.
Montana.—Ch. 20. Amends secs. 8366 and 8367, R. C., 1921, re­
lating to liens of thresher men.
New York.—Ch. 28. Amends ch. 38, sec. 184, Acts of 1909 (as
amended by ch. 373, Acts of 1926). Liens on repair of motor cycles.
Ch. 515. Amends arts. 1, 2, and 3, ch. 38, Acts of 1909 (ch. 33,
Con. L., 1909, amended by ch. 507, Acts of 1916). Amending the lien
law generally, in relation to mechanics’ liens.
North Carolina,.—Ch. 69. Amends sec. 2436, Con. S., 1919. Labor­
ers’ liens upon timber products.
North Dakota.—Ch. 156. Amends sec. 6855, Supp. C. L., 1913
(Acts of 1925, ch. 160). Threshers’ liens.
Oregon.—Ch. 117. Amends secs. 10219 and 10222 and repeals
secs. 10224 and 10225, Oregon Laws, 1920.
Ch. 372. Lien on farm land, etc. Repeals secs. 10230-10235 incl.,
10265-10271, incl., G. L., 1920.
Pennsylvania.—No. 433. Amends P. L. 431, Act of June 4, 1901
(sec. 14632, Pa. Stats., 1920) so as to include water wells.
Rhode Island.—Ch. 1354. Amends ch. 606, Acts of 1925. Liens
of spinners, throwsters, processors, etc.
Texas.—Ch. 78 (second called session). Relates to the giving of a
bond by contractors when claim is filed under chapter 17, Acts
of 1925.
Ch. 211. Merely provides for release of liens by filing bond.
Ch. 223. Amends arts. 5473, 5474, R. C. S., 1925. Liens on oil
wells, mines, etc.
Ch. 224. Amends art. 5453, R. C. S., 1925, relative to securing
liens.
XJtah.—Ch. 18. Repeals sec. 3738, C. L., 1917, relating to the filing
of mechanics’ liens before doing work.
Washington.—Ch. 230. Amends sec. 3, ch. 24. Acts of 1893 (sec.
1131, Rem. C. S., 1910). Relative to liens for labor and material on
real property.
Wisconsin.—Ch. 275. Amends secs. 289.41 and 289.42, Wis. Stats.,
1923, relating to mechanics’ liens and garage keepers’ liens.
Protection of W ages of Employees, etc., of Contractors
Arkcmsas.—Act 368. Public construction bonds.
California.—Ch. 817, sec. 6. Amends sec. 8, ch. 496, Acts of 1911
(as amended by ch. 482, Acts of 1927). Bonds for labor, etc.
Colorado.—Ch. 148. Amends sec. 3, ch. 155, Acts of 1923. Public
works.
Idaho.—Ch. 254. Amends sec. 7341, C. S., 1919. Public works.




10

PART 1.----DIGESTS AND SUMMARIES OF LAWS

Indiana.—Ch. 41. New act. Secures the payment of wages due
employees from lessees.
Massachusetts.—Ch. 110. Amends sec. 29, ch. 149, G. L., 1921.
Relating to security for payment of labor, etc.
Ch. 111. Amends sec 39, ch. 30, G. L., 1921 (as amended by ch.
416, Acts of 1922). Relative to filing of claim.
Minnesota.—Ch. 369. Amends secs. 9700 and 9705, G. S., 1923.
Oregon.—Ch. 136. Amends sec. 2991, G. L., 1920.
Pennsylvania.—No. 114. Amends sec. 1, P. L. 158, act of May 10,
1917 (amended by No. 292, Acts of 1925), sec. 15854, Pa. Stats.,
1920. The requirement that contractors’ bonds be provided for pay­
ment of labor is extended to repair of municipal roads and bridges.
No. 490. Amends sec. 13, P. L. 468, act of May 31,1911 (amended
by No. 277, Acts of 1921), sec. 19207, Pa. Stats., 1920. Public works.
Texas.—Ch. 226. Amends art. 5160, R. C. S., 1925 (amended by
ch. 39 (first called session), Acts of 1927). Contracts for public
buildings and works.
West Virginia.—Ch. 76. Amends sec. 12, ch. 75, Code of 1923,
relating to bonds of contractors on public works.

Assignment of Wages—Wage Brokers
Connecticut.—Ch. 207. Provisions of sec. 4 of ch. 219, Acts of
1919 (as amended by ch. 223, Acts of 1923) are repealed, and a new
section enacted providing for a minimum capital of small loan
companies.
Delaware.—Ch. 260. Amends 3554 sec. 119 to 3560 sec. 125 of art.
29, R. C., 1915. Regulation of small loans.
Maine.—Ch. 195 (p. 156). Amends sec. 7, ch. 298, P. L., 1917.
Licensee must now state the rate of interest charged in soliciting
loans.
Ch. 208 (p. 168). Amends sec. 2, ch. 298, P. L., 1917.
Ch. 319 (p. 323). Amends sec. 8, ch. 298, P. L., 1917. Rate of
interest reduced from 3y2 per cent to 3 per cent.
Ch. 324 (p. 330). Amends sec. 1, ch. 298, P. L., 1917. License
fees.
Massachusetts.—Ch. 159. Amends sec. 3, ch. 154, G. L., 1921. Ad­
ditional requisites for validity of assignment of wages.
Missouri.—P. 201. Repeals secs. 10, 12, 13, 16, 17, and 19 of Acts
of 1927, pages 252 to 258, and reenacts six new sections in lieu there­
of. Relative to investigation of business of small loans and interest
rates to be charged.
Montana.—Ch. 112. Amends sec. 4181, R. C., 1921. Penalties for
violation of act.
New Jersey.—Ch. 293. Amends secs. 2, 3, and 5, ch. 49, Acts of
1914. Rate of interest reduced from 3 to V/2 per cent.
Ohio.—P. 43. Amends sec. 6346, G. C., 1910.
West Virginia.—Ch. 24. Amends sec. 12, ch. 91, Acts of 1925.
Allows interest of 2 per cent per month instead of 3y2 per cent.
Wisconsin.—Ch. 408. This act merely renumbers sec. 115.05, Wis.
Stats., 1923, and adds secs. 2 to 14, inclusive, also subsec. (lb) of sec.
20.53, Wis. Stats., 1923, relating to the loaning of money.




OLD-AGE PEN SIO N S

11

Sunday Labor
Hawaii.—No. 94. Amends sec. 4484, R. L., 1925. Livery stables
are excluded from the list of industries not within the purview of
the act. Poi, rice, and flowers may now be sold during the entire
day.
M ain e .— Ch. 303 (p. 304). Amends sec. 35, ch. 126, R. S., 1916.
Certain occupations exempted from provisions of the law.
Massachusetts.—Ch. 118. Amends sec. 6, ch. 136, G. L., 1921 (as
later amended by ch. 234, Acts of 1928). Retail sale of bread per­
mitted between certain specified hours.
Minnesota.—Ch. 308. Amends sec. 10235, Gen. Stats. 1923.
West Virginia.—Ch. 44. Amends sec. 16, ch. 149, Code of 1923.
Relative to violations of Sunday work law.
Legal Holidays in the States and Territories
The following States designated November 11 a legal holiday, to
be known as Armistice D ay:
Alaska.—Ch. 27.
Georgia.—Act 285, page 211.
New Hampshire.—Ch. 11.
Bakeries and the Preparation, Distribution, etc., of Food
Products
Cormecticut.—Ch. 298. Repeals sec. 2518, G. S., 1918, and enacts
new provisions.
Pennsylvania.—No. 240. Amends sec. 19, P. L. 788, act of July
9, 1919 (sec. 13659, Pa. Stats., 1920) relative to penalties for viola­
tions of act.
Vocational Rehabilitation—State and Federal Cooperation
Connecticut.—Ch. 201. Original acceptance and appropriation to
carry out the act of Congress.
District of Columbia.—Ch. 303 (45 Stat. 1260) provides for the
acceptance of the vocational rehabilitation act tor the District of
Columbia.
Mafrylwnd.—Ch. 201. Adds secs. 265-271, incl., to art. 77 of Code of
1924. Original acceptance of Federal act. Appropriation provided.
Texas.—Ch. 23 (first called session). Accepts benefits of Federal
act of June 2, 1920 (amended June 5, 1924) relating to vocational
rehabilitation.
Old-Age Pensions
Alaska.—Ch. 65. Amends ch. 80, Acts of 1913 (amended by ch.
46, Acts of 1923). The maximum amount is increased from $25
to $35 a month for males. The general subject of old-age depend­
ency has been revised and codified by the 1929 act.
California.—Ch. 530. New act. A State-wide law authorizing
the payment of not exceeding $1 a day to persons 70 years of age.
Applicant must be a citizen of the United States and resident of the
State for 15 years, and one year in the county; property value must
11178°—31----- 2




12

PART 1 .----DIGESTS AND SUMMARIES OE LAWS

not exceed $3,000; act to be administered by county or city and county
boards of supervisors.
Minnesota.—Ch. 47. New act. Any county in the State is au­
thorized to establish a system of old-age pensions, contingent upon
the act being accepted by a majority of the legal voters in the county.
Pension shall not exceed $1 per day. Payments granted to persons
70 years of age or over, who have been citizens of the United States,
and a resident of the State and county for 15 years; who are not at
the time of making application inmates of any prison, jail, workhouse,
infirmary, insane asylum, or any other public corrrectional institution,
or have not been imprisoned for a felony 10 years immediately preced­
ing such date, or if a husband has not deserted wife and children for
6 months or more during the preceding 15 years, or been an habitual
tramp or beggar or who has no child or other responsible person
liable for his support and able to support him. No pension shall be
granted to a person while confined in a public correctional or a
private charitable institution or if the value of the husband’s prop­
erty, or the joint property of husband and wife, exceeds $3,000 or
who has deprived himself of property for the purpose of qualifying
for a pension. Act is administered by the district judge. On the
death of any person pensioned, the amount paid as pension may be
deducted from the estate he may leave, with interest at 3 per cent
annually.
Utah.—Ch. 76. New act. The board of county commissioners of
each county is authorized to grant monthly pensions not exceeding
$25 per month to a person who has attained 65 years of age, is in­
capacitated to gain a livelihood, and has been for 5 years prior to
application a resident of the county. Applicant must also have been
a citizen of the United States and a resident of the State for the
past 15 years, or have been a resident of the State for 25 years
and have resided therein continuously for the past 5 years; that
he has not a yearly income of $300 and no relative able to support
him, has not been a vagrant or beggar, nor during the past ten years
been imprisoned for a felony or misdemeanor, and certain other
qualifications.
Wisconsin.—Ch. 181. This act repeals and reenacts sec. 49.20
and amends secs. 49.21, 49.22 (subsecs. 2, 6, 7) 49.23, 49.25, 49.26
(subsecs. 1, 2), 49.27-49.32, 49.34 (pars, (a) and (b )), 49.35 (subsec.
2) and secs. 49.36-49.39, Wis. Stats., 1923. Term “ old age pension ”
is now designated as “ old-age assistance ” in the act. The former
provision that a two-thirds vote of the county board was necessary
prior to the adoption of an old-age pension system is no longer
required. The county board may at any time reduce or discontinue
any assistance to a beneficiary.
Wyoming.—Ch. 87. New act. The administration of the old-age
pension act is by a county old-age pension board, established in each
county of the State. To qualify for a pension a person must have
attained the age of 65, been a citizen of the United States for at
least 15 years; resided in the State 15 years, 5 years of which im­
mediately preceding the application must have been in the county;
has not been imprisoned during the 10 years preceding the date
of application, or been a beggar or tramp within one year of the
application for pension, or lias not deserted either husband or wife.




RETIREMENT OF PUBLIC EMPLOYEES

The income of the claimant must not exceed $360 a year.
maximum pension is $30 a month.

13
Payment of

Retirement of Public Employees
California,-—Ch. 87 (p. 2266) proposes a constitutional amendment
giving the legislature power to provide for State employees’ retire­
ment act.
Georgia.—Act 95, p. 308. Retirement of employees of certain
counties (population 52,995 to 80,000) after 25 years5 service, on half
pay. Contributory.
Act 219, p. 312. Amends act 318, p. 265, Acts of 1927. Provides
for payment to a widow in certain cases.
Act 406, p. 314. Retirement of certain employees and officers of
counties of over 200,000, after 25 years’ service. Noncontributory.
Hawaii,—No. 68. Amends subsec. 10, sec. 6, of act 55, Laws of
1925.
No. 182. Amends sec. 4, act 251, Laws of 1927.
No. 190. Amends sec. 2, act 251, Laws of 1927. City and county
employees.
Massachusetts.—Ch. 366. Amends sec. 4, ch. 32, G. L., 1921 (as
amended by ch. 300, Acts of 1926), relating to the raising of funds
for the State retirement system.
Ch. 367. Amends sec. 5, ch. 32, G. L., 1921 (as later amended by ch.
101, Acts of 1927), relating to minimum and maximum payments
upon retirement.
Minnesota.—Ch. 106. Authorizes the payment of disability allow­
ances pursuant to ch. 522, Acts of 1919.
Ch. 191. Establishes a compulsory State employees’ retirement
fund. Contributory system. Employee pays 3y2 per cent of salary.
Optional retirement after 20 years’ service and 65 years of age or
35 years’ service with no age limit.
New Jersey.—Ch. 122. A contributory retirement system for em­
ployees of first-class counties.
New York.—Ch. 234. Amends ch. 466, sec. 1717, Acts of 1901
(amended by ch. 427, Acts of 1920, and ch. 142, Acts of 1923). New
York City employees’ retirement system.
Ch. 415. Amends ch. 466, sec. i f 03, Acts of 1901 (as amended by
ch. 142, Acts of 1923). Allowance for service. New York City em­
ployees’ retirement system.
Ch. 421. Amends the following: Ch. 15, Acts of 1909 (ch. 7,
Con. L., 1909),sec. 50, subd. 8 (as added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920, and
later amended by ch. 578, Acts of 1927); sec. 52, subd. 9; sec. 52~a
(as added by ch. 592, Acts of 1923); sec. 53, subd. 5 (as amended by
ch. 301, Acts of 1928); sec. 55; sec. 62, subd. 1 (as amended by ch.
578, Acts of 1927); sec. 63, subd. 2 (as amended by ch. 669, Acts of
1925); sec. 67 (as amended by ch. 578, Acts of 1927) and sec. 72.
State employees.
Ch. 422 Amends ch. 15, sec. 53, subd. 5, Acts of 1909 (ch. 7, con.
L., 1909), as added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920, and as amended by ch.
301, Acts of 1928. Prior service.
N ote.—Subd. 5 was amended by ch. 421, Acts of 1929 above. The amend­
ments effected by ch. 421 are incorporated in subd. 5 as here amended.




14

PART 1.----DIGESTS AND SUMMARIES OF LAWS

Ch. 439. Amends ch. 466, sec. 1703a, Acts of 1901 (amended by
ch. 427, Acts of 1920, as added by ch. 786, Acts of 1928). Credit
for prior State or city service. New York City employees’ retire­
ment system.
Ch. 443. Amends ch. 466, sec. 1710, subd. 3, Acts of 1901 (amended
by ch. 427, Acts of 1920 and ch. 69, Acts of 1923 (as added by ch.
788, Acts of 1928). Minimum retirement age. New York City em­
ployees’ retirement system.
Oh. 574. Amends ch. 466, sec. 1711, Acts of 1901 (amended by ch.
427, Acts of 1920). Allowance on service retirement. New York
City employees5 retirement system.
Permsylvania.—No. 101. Amends P. L. 138, act of May 8, 1919
(sec. 6504, Pa. Stats., 1920). County employees.
No. 369. Amends sec. 1, No. 331, Acts oi 1923 (amended by No.
249, Acts of 1927), sec. 3 (amended by No. 214, Acts of 1927) and sec.
11. Retirement of State employees. A part of act No. 234, Acts of
1919, is repealed, relative to the retirement of judges.
No. 447, secs. 311-326. Contributory system for employees of
counties of second class.
No. 565. Amends secs. 1 and 6 of No. 331, Acts of 1923 (amended
by No. 55 and No. 249, Acts of 1927), and secs. 4, 8, 9, 11,16, 17, and
par. 6, sec. 7, of the same act, No. 331, Acts of 1923.
Philippine Islands.—No. 3360. Amends sec. 1 of act No. 2891, Acts
of 1920 (as last amended by act No. 3189, Acts of 1924), and sec.
2589, Acts of 1916 (as last amended by act No. 3304, Acts of 1926),
relating to retirement of employees of the Philippine Government.
Vermont.—No. 61. Authorizes a municipal corporation having a
population of 5,000 and over to adopt a pension system for employees
with 25 years5 service.
United States.—Ch. 271 (45 Stat. 1248) amends ch. 801 (44 Stat.
904) relative to retention of employee beyond retirement age.
Cooperative Associations
Iowa.—Ch. 5. Repeals and reenacts ch. 389, sec. 8461, Code of
1927. Relative to filing of certificates of incorporation.
Ch. 18. Amends ch. 389, secs. 8481, 8509, Code of 1927.
Ch. 398. Merely legalizes certain acts of associations organized
under ch. 389, Code of 1927.
Minnesota.—Ch. 171. Relative to renewal of corporate existence.
North Dakota.—Ch. 101. Amends sec. 4609a7, of Supp. C. L., 1913,
relative to by-laws.
Oregon.—Ch. 412. Amends secs. 6954, 6966 (amended by ch. 324,
Acts of 1925), 6956, 6958, 6960, 6967, 6971, 6976 (amended by ch. 260,
Acts of 1921), 6957 (amended by ch. 237, Acts of 1925) 6970
(amended by ch. 25, Acts of 1923), 6961, 6963, 6964, 6972, 6973, 6975,
6978, 6979, and 6980, G. L., 1920. Secs. 6955 and 6969 (amended by
ch. 260, Acts of 1921), G. L., 1920, repealed.
Pennsylvania.—No. 211. Repeals sec. 3 of No. 404, Acts of 1923
(P. L. 984).
No. 215. Amends sec. 8 of act of June 7, 1887, P. L. 365 (sec.
5527, Pa. Stats., 1920).
South Dakota.—Ch. 89.—Authorizes cooperative associations to
adopt code of by-laws, etc.




WAGES OP EMPLOYEES ON PUBLIC WORKS

15

Ch. 90. Repeals ch. 126, of the Acts of 1923.
Vermont.—No. 81. Amends par. I ll, of sec. 4897, G. L., 1917.
Credit Unions
Arizona.—Ch. 58. Provides for the organization, etc., of credit
unions.
Florida.—Ch. 14499 (special session). Provides for the organiza­
tion, etc., of credit unions.
Kansas.—Ch. 141. New act. Provides for organization, etc., of
credit unions.
Maryland.—Ch. 337. New act. Authorizes the establishment and
operation of credit unions.
Michigan.—Act No. 303. Amends secs. 1 and 9, act No. 285, Acts
of 1925.
Montana.—Ch. 105. Incorporation and supervision of credit
unions.
New Hampshire.—Ch. 46. Repeals sec. 51, ch. 267, P. L., 1926,
relative to taxation of credit unions.
New Jersey.—Ch. 266. Amends secs. 1 and 2, ch. 48, Acts of 1924.
Extends provisions of act to associations having 10 or more persons
engaged in agricultural pursuits.
New York.—Ch. 323. Amends subdiv. 1, sec. 454, sec. 470, and sub­
div. 4, sec. 471, ch. 369, Acts of 1914 (ch. 2, Consol. L., 1909).
Ch. 324. Amends subdiv. 4, sec. 454, and secs. 465 and 466, ch. 369,
Acts of 1914 (ch. 2, Consol. L., 1909).
Ch. 325. Amends subdiv. 2, sec. 451, ch. 369, Acts of 1914 (ch. 2,
Consol. L., 1909), relative to qualifications for membership.
North Carolina.—Ch. 47. Amends ch. 115, Acts of 1915 (amended
by ch. 73, Acts of 1925.)
Oregon.—Ch. 396. Provides for the formation, incorporation, and
operation of credit unions. Sections 6264r-6298, G. L., 1920, are here­
by repealed.
Texas.—Ch. 17. Amends articles 2461, 2462, 2463, 2464, 2465, 2466,
and 2477, subd. 1, Title 46, R. C. S., 1925.
Ch. 85 (second called session). Amends articles 2463 and 2465,
subd. 1, Title 46, R. C. S. 1925 (amended by ch. 17, Acts of 1929) and
article 2484.
Wisconsin.—Ch. 323. Amends secs. 186.04, 186.09, 186.11, 186.17,
and adds a new section, 186.19; Wis. Stats., 1923.
Preference for Local Labor and Domestic Materials on Public
Works
Arkansas.—Act 141. Provides for preference of domestic prod­
ucts in the purchase of supplies for State institutions.
Missow'i.—P. 257. Authorizes and requires officials to give pref­
erence to Missouri products.
Nevada.—Ch. 60. Amends sec. 1, R. L., 1919, p. 2965, relative to
employment preferences.
North Dakota.—Ch. 195, sec. 8. Provides that materials produced
in the State shall be used in public buildings.
Oregon.—Ch. 144. Amends sec. 2995, G. L., 1920. Certain prefer­
ences on public contracts.



16

PART 1 .— DIGESTS AND SUMMARIES OE LAWS

Rate of W ages of Employees on Public Works
Hawaii.—No. 86. Amends sec. 178, R. L., 1925 (as amended by
Act 165, Acts of 1925). Fixes a minimum rate of $3 per day.
Nevada.—Ch. 44. Amends sec. 3481, R. L., 1912, by increasing the
minimum rate to $4 per day for unskilled labor on public works.
Industrial Police
Pennsylvania.—No. 243. Authorizes the appointment of industrial
olice by the governor. (P. L. 99, act of April 11, 1866 (sec. 18548,
‘ Stats., 1920) as amended by No. 140, Acts of 1925, is repealed.)
a.

g

Trade Marks of Trade-Unions

Nebraska.—Ch. 136. Repeals secs. 7662-7665, C. S., 1922, and
enacts new sections. Principal change is the filing of the label or
trade-mark for record in the office of the secretary of state instead
of in the department of labor.
Absent Voters
California.—Ch. 150. Amends sec. 1359 (Pol. Code) as amended
by sec. 2, ch. 362, Acts of 1927, and sec. 1361 (Pol. Code) as amended
by ch. 283, Acts of 1923. Liberalizes the absent voting law.
Ch. 770. Amends sec. 1361 (Pol. Code) as amended by ch. 150,
A.cts of 1929
Colorado.—Ch. 94. Repeals secs. 7727-7733, incl., C. L., 1921, and
ch. 96, Acts of 1927, and enacts a new absent voting law.
Connecticut.—H. R. No. 26 (p. 4815). Passed, proposing an
amendment to State constitution providing for absentee voting.
Hawaii.—No. 177, sec. 15 (p. 190). Amends sec. 119, R. L., 1925.
Kansas.—Ch. 179. Amends secs. 25-1101 to 25-1106, 25-1108, and
25-1109, R S., 1923. Liberalizes absent voting law.
Massachusetts.—Ch. 93. Amends sec. 87, ch. 54, G. L., 1921 (as
amended by ch. 38, Acts of 1926) as to the form of application for
ballots.
Minnesota.—Ch. 29. Amends ch. 68, Acts of 1917 (as amended
by ch. 289, Acts of 1925).
Ch. 168. Amends ch. 68, Acts of 1917 (as amended by ch. 388,
Acts of 1925).
Nebraska.—Ch. 96. Repeals secs. 2002, 2003, 2005-2012, 2013 (as
amended by ch. 78, Acts of 1923), 2015 and 2017, C. S., 1922; and
enacts new law.
Nevada.—Ch. 209. Amends secs. 2 and 4, ch. 90, Acts of 1921 (as
amended by ch. 117, Acts of 1923).
New Hampshire.—Ch. 102. Amends secs. 63 and 67, ch. 26, P. L.,
1926 (ch. 20, Acts of 1925).
New York.—Ch. 96. Amends sec. 117, ch. 568, Acts of 1922 (ch.
1, Consol. L. 1909) as last amended by ch. 509, Acts of 1925.
North Carolina.—Ch. 329. Amends ch. 260, Acts of 1927.
Ohio.—Pages 333 (secs. 4785-55) and 370-373 (secs. 4785-134 to
4785-139). Incorporates secs. 4785-55 and 4785-134 to 4785-139,
Code 1910, absent voter’s law, into the general election laws of the
State.



CONVICT LABOR

17

Oregon.—Ch. 177. Amends sec. 4080, Gen. Laws, 1920 (as later
amended by ch. 125, Acts of 1925).
South Dakota.—Ch. 114. Amends secs. 7227, 7228, 7229, R. C.,
1919 (amended by ch. 159, Acts of 1925).
TJtah.—Ch. 73. Amends secs. 1, 2, and 4 (amended by ch. 99, Acts
of 1923), sec. 3 (amended by ch. 25, Acts of 1927), and secs. 5, 6, 8, 9,
11, 12, and 13, ch. 42, Acts of 1919, relating to voting of absent
electors.
Vermont.—No. 2. Amends secs. 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 of act No. 2,
Acts of 1927, relating to absent voters.
Convict Labor
California.—Ch. 125. Amends sec. 1613, Penal Code. Labor on
public works.
Ch. 881. Provides for labeling, disinfecting, and advertising of
convict-made goods.
Indiana.—Ch. 91. Manufacture of motor-vehicle license plates
and highway signs and markers for State and for sale to others.
Iowa.—Ch. 87. Amends sec. 3757 of ch. 187, Code of 1927.
Michigan.—Act No. 309 (p. 826). Repeals secs. 1781 to 1789, incl.,
and 1919, C. L., 1915.
Minnesota.—Ch. 138. Requires the marking of all convict-made
goods, with words “ prison made.”
Ch. 348. Amends sec. 10815, G. S., 1923 (as amended by ch. 172,
Acts of 1927) relative to manufacture of agricultural machinery,
rope and ply goods in State prison.
Montana.—Ch. 173. Authorizes the establishment of a tannery
at State prison.
Nebraska.—Ch. 137. Public works employment. Repeals sec.
3016, C. S., 1922.
New Mexico.—Ch. 50. Provides for the marking of “ prisonmade ” goods.
New York.—Ch. 243 (pp. 564 to 577). Amends the prison law
(sections 170 to 196—“ Labor in correctional institutions ”) to con­
form to the State departments law.
North Carolina.—Ch. 221. Authorizes the manufacture of auto­
mobile license tags in State prison.
Ch. 292. Provides for monthly inspections of mines in which
State convicts are employed.
Oregon.—Ch. 133. Convict-made goods must be disinfected and
marked “ These Goods are Convict-Made,” before offered for sale.
South Dakota.—Ch. 107. Authorizes the employment of State
convicts to assist in the maintenance and upkeep of certain drainage
ditches.
Ch. 236. Authorizes the manufacture of motor-vehicle license
plates, highway signs, and markers.
Texas.—Ch. 229. Amends sec. 25, ch. 212, Acts of 1927, relative
~
to overtime allowances to prisoners.
West Virginia.—Ch. 51. Relates to employment of convict labor
on roads.
Wisco'ndn.—Ch. 121. Amends subsec. (1) of sec. 56.01, Wis. Stats.,
1923, relating to prison industries.




18

PART 1.----DIGESTS AND SUMMARIES OE LAWS

Ch. 342. Amends subsec. (5) of sec. 56.08, Wis. Stats., 1923. Mak­
ing of contracts by sheriffs for employment of prisoners.
United States.—An act (ch. 79) of January 19, 1929 (45 Stat.
1084}, divests convict-made goods of their interstate character. The
provision of the law is as follows:
“ That all goods, wares, and merchandise manufactured, produced,
or mined, wholly or in part, by convicts or prisoners, except convicts
or prisoners on parole or probation, or in any penal and/or reform­
atory institutions, except commodities manufactured in Federal penal
and correctional institutions for use by the Federal Government,
transported into any State or Territory of the United States and
remaining therein for use, consumption, sale, or storage, shall upon
arrival and delivery in such State or Territory be subject to the
operation and effect of the laws of such State or Territory to the
same extent and in the same manner as though such goods, wares,
and merchandise had been manufactured, produced, or mined in such
State or Territory, and shall not be exempt therefrom by reason of
being introduced in the original package or otherwise.” [This act
becomes effective on January 19, 1934.]
Investigative Commissions
California.—Assembly C. R. No. 42 (ch. 56, p. 2230). A commit­
tee of five members is appointed to investigate the advisability of a
more extended employment of convicts. Findings to be reported to
1931 legislative meeting. Appropriation of $3,000.
Assembly C. R. No. 47 (ch. 92, p. 2276). A committee of four
members is appointed to consider the mechanics’ lien law and report
to the next session of the legislature.
Delaware.—Ch. 108. Governor is authorized to appoint three per­
sons, constituting an employment bureau, to cooperate with the United
States Employment Service, and the city of Wilmington, for the
purpose of relieving unemployment in the State, and to investigate
and secure facts relating to employment and unemployment in gen­
eral. An annual report of activities and expenditures is required to
be made to the governor. Appropriation of $2,500.
Illinois.—P. 137. Governor to appoint a commission of nine mem­
bers to investigate the methods and conditions of mining in the
State. To report to the governor and to the legislature at its next
regular session. Appropriation of $7,000.
P. 758. A commission of five members to be appointed by the
governor is created to investigate the advisability and practicability
of establishing a retirement fund for State employees. Report of
such investigation to be made to next session of the legislature. No
appropriation made.
P. 780 (Senate Joint Resolution No. 23). Committee to be ap­
pointed by governor to study “ child welfare.” Report to be made to
1931 legislature. No appropriation.
P. 780 (House Joint Resolution No. 20). A commission of three
to be appointed to study and investigate conditions pertaining to
physically handicapped children. Report to 1931 legislature. No
appropriation.
Massachusetts.—Ch. 43 (Resolve, p. 533). The department of
public health is directed to investigate the need for establishing a




INVESTIGATIVE COMMISSIONS

19

board of registration of barbers. Report and recommendation to
be made to legislature in December, 1929. Appropriation of $3,000.
Ch. 54 (Resolve, p. 539). The Massachusetts Industrial Com­
mission is authorized to investigate conditions affecting the textile
industry. Report to be made to legislature in December, 1929.
Appropriation of $3,000.
New York.—Ch. 664. A temporary State commission is appointed
to “ study and investigate the industrial condition of aged men
and women 5 and the most practical method of providing security
5
against old-age want. Appropriation of $25,000.
Oregon.—S. J. R. No. 16 (p. 782). Provides for a reorganization
of State departments effective July, 1931. The department of labor
and industry to be one of the nine departments created. Proposed
constitutional amendment to be submitted at next general election
for approval or rejection.
Philippine Islands.—P. 469 (vol. 24), C. R. No. 11. A committee
of eight members is appointed to investigate and propose a general
retirement system for officers and employees of the insular govern­
ment, and make a report to the regular 1929 legislative session.
Porto Rico.—J. R. No. 16 (Special session, p. 84). Creates a
joint committee of seven members of the Legislature of Porto Rico
to make a survey of the causes producing industrial unrest and
giving rise to unemployment. The committee is to suggest remedies
and offer solutions m a yearly report to be submitted to the legisla­
ture and governor. Appropriation of $25,000.
Tennessee.—S. J. R. No. 17 (p. 547). A committee of ten members
is appointed to make an investigation of conditions in the coal mines
of the State, and make recommendations to the next meeting of the
assembly. Expenses to be paid and included in miscellaneous appro­
priation bill.
West Virginia.—S. Con. Res. No. 3 (p. 496). A committee of
seven members is appointed to make an investigation of present
conditions at the State penitentiary relative to employment of labor,
etc.
Wisconsin.—Ch. 326. A committee of five is appointed to study
a retirement plan for State employees to be submitted at the next
session of the legislature. An appropriation of $1,000 is made.
Ch. 393. This act merely provides for the compilation and codify­
ing by the legislative reference library of all statutes and general
orders of the industrial commission and laws of the State relative
to labor. An appropriation not exceeding $2,500 is made.
Ch. 447. Authorizes the board of control to make a study of the
hours of labor in State charitable and penal institutions with the
purpose of placing such employees on an 8-hour basis. Report to be
made to 1931 legislative session.
Ch. 511. Continues the existence of the investigating committee
appointed under ch. 354, Acts of 1927, relative to prison labor
conditions.
United States.—Ch. 28, Public bill No. 13 (approved June 18,
1929). Provides for the fifteenth decennial census, and incorporated
in the act is the provision for inquiries on the subject ox unem­
ployment.







Part 2.—Text and Abridgment of Labor Laws
(The text of the laws has been punctuated in accordance with the rules for
punctuation laid down by the Government Printing Office for Government
publications, and does not follow, in all cases, the official State editions.)
ALASKA
LAWS OF 1929
C hapter

97.—Employment of children—School attendance
(Page 222)

71. Requirement.—[Attendance at school until 16 is required unless
excused on account of physical or mental condition or for other cause.]
Approved May 2, 1929.
Digests, etc.
S ection

[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of aviators, ch. 75; Legal holidays in the States and Territories, ch. 27; Old
age pensions, ch. 65.]
ARIZONA
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

50.—Garnishment of wages

[This act provides for the garnishment of the salaries of all officers and
employees of the State or of any of its political subdivisions.]
Approved March 9, 1929.
C hapter

73.—Miners’ hospitals

S ection 1. Establishment.— There is hereby established the State Hospital
for Disabled Miners to be built adjacent to the Pioneers’ Home, now located
in Prescott in Yavapai County, on the grounds of the Pioneers’ Home, to be
managed by the board of directors of State institutions. The superintendent
of the Pioneers’ Home shall serve as superintendent in such miners’ hospital
and as such officer may appoint assistants and employees and prescribe their
duties, subject to the approval of the board of directors, and claims for wages
and expenses hereunder shall be presented and paid in the manner of other
State claims.
S ec. 2. Admission, etc.—A resident of Arizona who has followed the occupation
of mining for 20 years within this State, who is a citizen of the United States
and of this State, who has been a resident of the State for not less than 35
years, and who has reached the age of 60 years or over, and is financially unable
to support himself or who has suffered incapacitating injuries arising out of
and in the course of mining, may be admitted to the hospital under the order of
the board.
S ec. 3. Appropriation, etc.—The State treasurer is hereby authorized and
directed to transfer to the account of the board of directors of State in­
stitutions for the use and purpose of said miners’ hospital all money received
from the land set aside for the purpose of building the miners’ hospital, and
the same shall be used as provided in said enabling act. There is hereby
further appropriated out of the general fund from any money not otherwise
appropriated, the sum of $40,000 to be placed in the above-mentioned fund and
used for the purpose herein set forth.
Approved March 16, 1929.




21

22

FART 2.----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS
Chapter

85.—Employment on public works—Alims

[This act amends secs. 1352 and 1353 of ch. 24, R. C., 1928, so as to read as
follows:]
S ection 1352. Aliens not to be employed.— No person who is not a citizen or
ward of the United States shall be employed upon or in connection with any
State, county, or municipal works or employment: Provided, That nothing
herein shall prevent the working of State, county, and municipal prisoners in
such employment: And provided, further, That the foregoing shall not apply
to projects involving the expenditure of Federal funds.
Seo. 1353. Violations .— [Violation of three preceding sections is punishable by
a fine of not less than $50 nor more than $300, or by imprisonment for not
more than six months, or both.]
Approved March 19, 1929.
C hapter

105.—Employment of labor—Employment of aliens on public works

[This act provides for an amendment to section 10, Article XVIII of the
Arizona constitution, to be voted on at the next general election.]
Sec. 10. Employment of aliens on public works.—No person not a citizen or
ward of the United States shall be employed upon or in connection with any
State, county, or municipal works*or employment: Provided, That nothing herein
shall be construed to prevent the working of prisoners by the State or by any
county or municipality thereof on street or road work or other public work.
The legislature shall enact laws for the enforcement, and shall provide for the
punishment of any violation of this section.
Act received in the office of the secretary of state, March 25, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of barbers, ch. 76; Examination, etc., of beauty parlors, ch. 76; Credit unions,
ch. 58.]

ARKANSAS
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

303.—Inspection of steam boilers

[This act amends sec. 1 of act No. 482, Acts of 1917 (as last amended, Acts of
1927, act No. 228).]
S ection 1. Inspectors.—The salary of the chief inspector of the boiler inspec­
tion department is increased from $2,100 to $3,000; four deputy inspectors of
boilers from $1,800 to $2,400; the clerk’s salary, acting as bookkeeper, is increased
from $1,500 to $1,800; and one stenographer is now provided at a salary of
$1,500 per annum.
Approved March 30, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Protection of wages
of employees, etc., of contractors, No. 368; Preference for local labor and
domestic materials on public works, No. 141.]

CALIFORNIA
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

40.—Employment of women—Hours of labor

[This act amends sec. 4, ch. 258, Acts of 1911 (as amended by ch. 352, Acts
of 1913) by increasing the maximum penalty for first offense from $50 to $100.]
Approved April 5, 1929.




CALIFORNIA— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9
C hapter

23

82.—Employment of children—School attendance

[This act amends sec. 1.180 of the School Code (ch. 23, Acts of 1929) so as
to read as follows:]
S ection 1.180. Vacation permits.—Vacation permits shall be signed by the
principal of the school which such minor is attending, or has attended duiring
the term next preceding any such vacation, or, if such school is not in session,
by the custodian of the school records of such school, from which records the
age of the minor shall be transcribed.
Approved April 10, 1929.
89.—Private employment agencies

C hapter

[This act amends sec. 1, ch. 282, Acts of 1913 (as amended by ch. 551, Acts of
1915, and as later amended by ch. 333, Acts of 1927), by adding farm labo*
employment agency, and further defining the term “ fee.”]
Approved April 12, 1929.
C hapter

155.—Department of industrial relations

[This act amends secs. 1, 2, 3, and 4, ch. 880, Acts of 1927, and adds two new
sections—section 5 relating to the regulation of hazardous buildings and section
6 creating a division of industrial fire safety in the department of industrial
relations.]
Approved April 23, 1929.
C hapter

180.—Inspection of air pressure tanks

1-6. Inspection, fees, etc.—[A permit must be secured to operate an
air pressure tank, except tanks under the jurisdiction of United States Govern­
ment and those used in household domestic service. An inspection at least once
in two years is required by qualified inspectors under the industrial accident
commission, who may order necessary repairs. For inspection of tanks a fee
not exceeding $3 is charged. Reports of inspection must be made within 21
days.]
Approved April 30, 1929.
S ections

C hapter 181.—Inspection of steam boilers
1-6. Inspection, fees, etc.—[Permits to operate a steam boiler are
required, except (1) those under jurisdiction of United States Government and
boilers operated by employers not subject to the workmen’s compensation in­
surance act; (2) boilers on which the pressure does not exceed 15 pounds per
square inch; (3) automobile boilers and boilers on road vehicles. The industrial
accident commission shall require inspections to be made of boilers (internally
and externally) at least once each year. Fee for external inspection not to ex­
ceed $5; and $15 for each internal inspection. For other types of boilers differ­
ent fees are required. Inspectors must report each inspection within 21 days,
to the industrial accident commission.]
Approved April 30, 1929.
S ections

C hapter

215.—Private employment agencies

[This act amends sec. 12, ch. 282, Acts of 1913 (as amended by ch. 551, Acts
of 1915, and as later amended by ch. 334, Acts of 1927). A notice to the effect
that a fee must be returned within 48 hours after demand if no employment is
secured, must be inserted in the employment receipt, and included in the posted
schedule of fees.]
Approved May 4, 1929.
C hapter

230.—Wages as preferred claims

[This act amends sec. 1206, Code of Civil Procedure, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 1206. Executions.—Upon the levy of an attachment, garnishment,
or execution, not founded upon a claim for labor, any miner, mechanic, sales­
man, servant, clerk, laborer, or other person who has performed work or ren­
dered services for the defendant within 60 days prior to the levy, may file a




24

PART 2 .— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

verified statement of Ms claim therefor with the officer executing the writ, and
give copies thereof, containing his address, to the debtor and creditor, or any
attorney, clerk, or agent representing them, or mail same to them by registered
mail at their last known address, return of which by the post office undelivered
shall be deemed a sufficient service if no better address is available, and such
claim, not exceeding $100, unless disputed, must be paid by such officer, imme­
diately upon the expiration of the time for dispute of the claim as prescribed
in section 1207, from the proceeds of such levy remaining in his hands at the
filing of such statement or collectible by him on the basis of the said writ.
If any claim is disputed within the time, and in the manner prescribed in
section 1207, and a copy of the dispute is mailed by registered mail to the
claimant at the address given in his statement of claim and the registry receipt
is attached to the original of the dispute when it is filed with the levying officer,
or is handed to the claimant or served on his attorney, the claimant, or his
assignee, must within 10 days thereafter commence an action against the debtor
for the recovery of his demand, which action must be prosecuted with due
diligence, or his claim to priority of payment is forever barred.
The officer must retain in his possession until the determination of such action
so much of the proceeds of the writ as may be necessary to satisfy the claim,
and if the claimant recovers judgment, the officer must pay the same, including
the cost of suit, from such proceeds, immediately after the said judgment
becomes final.
Approved May 6, 1929.
C hapter

231.—Bureau of labor statistics

[This act amends sec. 7, act No. 1828, Code of 1906 (as amended by ch. 257,
Acts of 1923) so as to read as follows:]
S ection 7. Collection of wages; entry.—The commissioner and his repre­
sentatives duly authorized by him in writing shall have the power and au­
thority to take assignments of wage claims and claims for penalties for non­
payment of wages and to prosecute actions for the collection of wages, penal­
ties, and other demands of persons who are financially unable to employ counsel
in cases in which, in the judgment of the commissioner, the claims for wages
are valid and enforceable in the courts; to issue subpoenas, to compel the
attendance of witnesses and parties and the production of books, papers, and
records, and to administer oaths and to examine witnesses under oath, and
to take the verification or proof of instruments of writing and to take deposi­
tions and affidavits for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this act
and all other acts now or hereafter placed in the bureau for enforcement.
When civil action is brought by the commissioner, or his duly authorized
representative, no court costs of any nature shall be payable by the said
commissioner in connection with same, and any sheriff or constable requested
by said commissioner to serve the summons in the said action upon any person,
firm, association, or corporation within his jurisdiction or levy an attachment,
garnishment, or execution in the said action upon any money or property
of any defendant within his jurisdiction, shall do so without costs to the said
commissioner, except for keeper’s fees, mileage fees, and storage charges:
Provided, however, That he must specify when such summons or other process
is returned, what costs he would ordinarily have been entitled to for such
service, and such costs and the other regular court costs that would have
accrued were the action not an official action shall be made a part of any
judgment recovered by the said commissioner and shall be paid by him if
sufficient money is collected by him to cover same over and above the wages
actually due the claimants on whose behalf he sued, and not otherwise.
The commissioner shall have a seal inscribed “ Department of Industrial
Relations—State of California,” and all courts shall take judicial notice of such
seal. Obedience to subpoenas issued by the commissioner or his duly authorized
representatives shall be enforced by the courts in any county, or city and
county, and it shall be a misdemeanor offense to willfully ignore said sub­
poenas : Provided, That said subpoenas do not call for an appearance at a distance
greater than 25 miles.
The commissioner and his representatives shall have free access to all places
and works of labor, and any principal, owner, operator, manager, superintendent,
or lessee of any mine, mill, ranch, factory, hospital, office, laundry, place of
amusement, restaurant, hotel, workshop, manufacturing, mechanical, or mer­
cantile establishment, construction camp or other place of labor, or any agent




CALIFORNIA— ACTS OF 19 29

25

or employee of such principal, owner, operator, manager, superintendent, or
lessee, who shall refuse to said commissioner, or his duly authorized repre­
sentative, admission therein, or who shall, when requested by him, willfully
neglect or refuse to furnish him any statistics or information, pertaining to his
lawful duties, which may be in his possession or under the control of said
principal, owner, operator, lessee, superintendent, or manager, or agent thereof,
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and be punished by a fine of not more
than $200.
Approved May 6, 1929.
C hapter

245.—Insurance of employees—Group insurance

[This act amends sec. 629a, Pol. Code (as amended by ch. 659, Acts of 1927),
and sec. 629b, Pol. Code (as amended by ch. 657, Acts of 1927), so as to read
as follows:]
S ection 629a. Rates.—Any life insurance company may issue life or endow­
ment insurance, with or without annuities, with special rates of premiums less
than the usual rates of premiums for such insurance, upon the group plan, and
may value policies of such insurance on any accepted table of mortality and
interest assumption adopted by the company for that purpose: Provided, In no
case shall such standard be lower than the American Men Ultimate Table of
Mortality with interest assumption at 3 ^ per centum. All policies of group
insurance shall be segregated by the company into a separate class and the
mortality experience kept separate. In addition to the groups now acceptable
to the insurance commissioner and the life insurance companies as being
eligible to group insurance, State, county, and municipal government employees
or employees of school districts, irrigation districts, or other political subdi­
visions, and members of labor unions and members of the National Guard
are hereby declared as being eligible for group insurance. The number of
policies, amount of insurance, reserves, premiums, and payments to policy­
holders thereunder, together with the mortality table and interest assumption
adopted by the company, shall be reported separately in the company’s annual
financial statement.
Seo. 629b (1). Definition.—Group life insurance is hereby declared to be
that form of life insurance covering not less than 50 employees with or with­
out medical examination, written under a policy issued to the employer, the
premium on which is to be paid by the employer or by the employer and em­
ployees jointly, and insuring only all of employees, or all of any class or
classes thereof determined by conditions pertaining to the employment, for
amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will preclude individual
selection, for the benefit of persons other than the employer: Provided, how­
ever, That when the premium is to be paid by the employer and employee
jointly and the benefits of the policy are offered to all eligible employees, not
less than 75 per centum of such employees may be so insured.
The following forms of life insurance are also declared to be group insur­
ance within the meaning of this chapter: Life insurance covering the members
of any labor union or of any association of employees of the United States, of
the State, county, or municipal governments, employees of school districts (in­
cluding teachers), irrigation districts, or other political subdivisions of gov­
ernment. Such insurance shall be written under a policy issued to such union
or association, which union or association shall be deemed to be the employer
for the purposes of this chapter, the premium on which is to be paid by the
union or the association and the members thereof jointly, and insuring only
members of such union who are actively engaged in the same occupation, or of
such association, for amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will
preclude individual selection, for the benefit of persons other than the union
or association or the officials thereof: Provided, however, That when a pre­
mium is to be paid by the union or the association and its members jointly,
and the benefits are offered to all eligible members jointly, not less than 75
per centum of such members may be so insured; And provided, further, That
when members apply and pay for additional amounts of insurance a smaller
percentage of members may be insured for such additional amounts of in­
surance.
Sec. 629b (2). Approval by insurance commissioner.—No policy of group life
insurance shall be issued or delivered in this State unless and until a copy
of the form thereof has been filed with the commissioner of insurance and




26

PART 2 .— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

approved by him ; nor shall such policy be so issued or delivered unless it con­
tains in substance the following provisions:
(a) A provision that the policy shall be incontestable after two years from
its date of issue, except for nonpayment of premiums and except for violation
of the conditions of the policy relating to military or naval service in time of
war.
(b) A provision that the policy, the application of the employer, and the
individual applications, if any, of the employees insured, shall constitute the
entire contract between the parties, and that all statements made by the em­
ployer or by the individual employees shall, in the absence of fraud, be deemed
representations and not warranties, and that no such statement shall be used
in defense to a claim under the policy, unless it is contained in a written ap­
plication.
(c) A provision for the equitable adjustment of the premium or the amount
of insurance payable in the event of a misstatement of the age of an employee.
(d) A provision that the company will issue to the employer for delivery to
the employee, whose life is insured under such policy, an individual certificate
setting forth a statement as to the insurance protection to which he is entitled,
to whom payable, together with provision to the effect that in case of the
termination of the employment for any reason whatsoever the employee shall
be entitled to have issued to him by the company, without evidence of insur­
ability and upon application made to the company within 31 days after such
termination, and upon the payment of the premium applicable to the class of risk
to which he belongs and to the form and amount of the policy at his then
attained age, a policy of life insurance in any one of the forms customarily
issued by the company, except term insurance, in an amount equal to the
amount of his protection under such group insurance policy at the time of such
termination.
(e) A provision that to the group or class thereof originally insured shall
be added from time to time all new employees of the employer eligible to
insurance in such group or class.
Policies of group life insurance, when issued in this State by any company
not organized under the laws of this State, may contain, when issued, any
provision required by the law of the State, or Territory, or district of the
United States under which the company is organized; and policies issued in
other States or countries by companies organized in this State, may contain
any provision required by the laws of the State, Territory, district, or country
in which the same are issued, anything in this section to the contrary not­
withstanding. Any such policy may be issued or delivered in this State which
in the opinion of the commissioner of insurance contains provisions on any one
or more of the several foregoing requirements more favorable to the employer
or to the employee than hereinbefore required.
S eo. 629b ( 3 ) . Policyholder.— In e v ery group p olicy issu ed b y a d om estic lif e
in su ran ce com pany, th e em ployer sh a ll be deem ed to be th e policyh old er fo r all
purposes w ith in th e m ean in g o f th is chapter, and if e n title d to v o te a t m eetin gs
o f th e com pany sh a ll be en title d to on e v o te th ereat.
S ec. 629b ( 4 ) . Policy not attachable.— N o p olicy o f group lif e insu ran ce, nor
th e proceeds thereof, w h en paid to an y em ployee or em p loyees thereunder, sh all
be lia b le to attach m en t, garnishm ent, or other process, or to be seized, tak en ,
app rop riated or app lied by a n y legal or equ itab le process or operation o f la w
to p ay a n y debt or lia b ility o f such em ployee, or h is beneficiary, or a n y other
person w ho m ay h a v e a r ig h t thereunder, eith er before or a fte r p a y m e n t; nor
sh a ll th e proceeds th ereof, w hen not m ade payab le to a nam ed beneficiary, con­
stitu te a p art o f th e e s ta te o f th e em ployee fo r th e p aym ent o f h is debts.

Approved May 7,1929.
C h a p te r 256.— Industrial

welfare commission

[This act amends sec. 3, ch. 324, Acts of 1913 (as amended by ch. 248, Acts
of 1927), and sec. 15, ch. 324, Acts of 1913, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 3. Duties of commission.— (a) It shall be the continuing duty of the
commission to ascertain the wages paid, the hours and conditions of labor and
employment in the various occupations, trades, and industries in which women
and minors are employed in the State of California, and to make investiga­
tions into the comfort, health, safety, and welfare of such women and minors.
(b)
It shall be the duty of every person, firm, or corporation employing labor
in this State:



CALIFORNIA— ACTS OF 19 29

27

1. To furnish to the commission, at its request, any and all reports or infor­
mation which the commission may require to carry out any of the purposes of
this act, such reports and information to be verified by the oath of the person
or a member of the firm, or the president, secretary, or manager of the corpo­
ration furnishing the same, if and when so requested by the commission or
any member thereof.
2. To allow any member of the commission, its secretary or any of its duly
authorized experts or employees, free access to the place of business or em­
ployment of such person, firm, or corporation for the purpose of securing any
information which the commission is authorized by this act to ascertain, or to
make any investigation authorized by this act, or to make inspection of, or
excerpts from the books, reports, contracts, pay rolls, documents, or papers of
such person, firm, or corporation relating to the employment of women and
minors, the conditions under which their labor is performed, or the payment
of such labor by such person, firm, or corporation.
3. To keep a record which shall show the names and addresses of all women
and minors employed and the ages of all minors. To keep and maintain at
the plants, or establishments, at which women, or minors, are employed, pay­
roll records, which said records shall show the hours worked daily by and the
wages paid to such women and minors so employed at such respective plants
or establishments, and which said records shall be kept in accordance with
rules established for said purpose by the industrial welfare commission. All
such records shall be kept on file for at least one year.
Any person, firm, or corporation, who either individually or as an officer,
agent, or employee of any person, firm, or corporation who neglects or refuses
to furnish to the commission any information requested by it under the pro­
visions of subdivision (b) of this section, or who refuses access to his place
of business or employment to any member, officer, or authorized employee of
the commission, or hinders such member, officer, or employee in the securing
of any information authorized by this subsection, or who omits, neglects, or
refuses to keep any of the records required by this subsection shall be guilty
of a misdemeanor.
(c)
For the purposes of this act, a minor is defined to be a person of either
sex under the age of 21 years: Provided, however, That this provision shall not
be construed to authorize the commission to fix minimum wages or maximum
hours of work for male minors between the ages of 18 and 21 years.
S ec. 15. Reports.—The commission shall have power and authority to publish
and distribute in its discretion from time to time reports and bulletins cover­
ing its operations and proceedings and such other matters relative to its work
as it may deem advisable.
Approved May 11, 1929.
C hapter

266.—Employment of women

[This act amends ch. 258, Acts of 1911 (as amended by ch. 352, Acts of 1913),
by adding a new section, 3a, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 3a. Employer’s records.—Every employer subject to the provisions
of this act shall keep an accurate record showing the names and actual hours
worked of all female employees, which record shall be accessible at all reason­
able hours to the chief of the division of labor statistics and law enforcement
of the department of industrial relations, his deputies and agents.
Approved May 13, 1929.
C hapter

280.—Bureau of mmes

[This act amends sec. 5, ch. 679, Acts of 1913, by changing the due date of
the annual reports of mine owners from June 30th of each year to March 31st,
and a new section is added, sec. 16, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 16. Definitions.—For the purpose of this act and as used herein the
term “ mine” is hereby defined to embrace and include all mineral-bearing
properties of whatever kind or character whether underground, quarry, pit,
well, spring or other source from which any mineral substance is or may be
obtained, and the term “ mineral” for the purposes of this act and whenever
so used shall embrace and include any and all mineral products both metallic
11178°—31----- 3




28

PART 2 .— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

and nonmetallic, solid, liquid, or gaseous, and mineral waters of whatever kind
or character.
Approved May 14, 1929.
Chapter

286.—Employment of women

[This act amends sec. 1, ch. 258, Acts of 1911 (as amended by ch. 352, Acts
of 1913, and as later amended by ch. 248, Acts of 1919), so as to read as
follows:]
S e c tio n 1. Eight-hour tcorkday.—No female shall be employed in any manu­
facturing, mechanical, or mercantile establishment or industry, laundry, hotel,
public lodging house, hospital, barber shop, place of amusement, or restaurant,
or telegraph or telephone establishment or office, or in the operation of elevators
in office buildings, or by any express or transportation company in this State,
more than 8 hours during one day of 24 hours or more than 48 hours in one
week. It shall be unlawful for any employer of labor to employ, cause
to be employed or permit any female employee to labor any number of hours
whatever, with knowledge that such female has heretofore been employed
within the same date and day of 24 hours in any establishment or industry and
by any previous employer, for a period of time that will, combined with the
period of time of employment by a previous employer, exceed 8 hours: Provided,
That this shall not prevent the employment of any female in more than
one establishment where the total number of hours worked by said employee
does not exceed 8 hours in any one day of 24 hours. If any female shall
be employed in more than one such place, the total number of hours of
such employment shall not exceed 8 hours during any one day of 24 hours or
48 hours in one week. The hours of work may be so arranged as to permit
the employment of females at any time so that they shall not work more
than 8 hours during the 24 hours of one day, or 48 hours during any one
week: Provided further, That the provisions of this section in relation to
hours of employment shall not apply to or affect graduate nurses in hospitals,
nor the harvesting, curing, canning, or drying of any variety of perishable
fruit, fish, or vegetable during such periods as may be necessary to h arvest,
cure, can, or dry said fruit, fish, or vegetable in order to save the same from
spoiling.
Approved May 14, 1929.
Chapter

348.—Sanitation of foundries, etc.

[This act amends ch. 244, Acts of 1921, by adding a new section (4), so as
to read as follows:]
Section 4. Duty of health officer.—It shall be the duty of every city or
county or city and county health officer to report violations of this act to the
district attorney of the county in which said violation is committed, and it
shall be the duty of said district attorney to prosecute all persons who violate
the provisions of this act.
Approved May 20, 1929.
C hapter

546.—Employment of children—General provisions

[This act amends sec. 5, ch. 259, Acts of 1919 (as amended by ch. 141, Acts
of 1925), by providing that the exemption of minors from certain hours of labor
in agricultural and domestic labor shall not be construed so as to permit
children under school age to work during school session.]
Approved May 28, 1929.
C hapter

559.—Employees9 "bonds and photographs—Costs

[This act amends sec. 1, ch. 108, Acts of 1917 (as amended by ch. 34T, Acts of
1927), by adding a new section (1 ^ ) and also section 2 (as amended by ch. 347,
Acts of 1927) so as to read as follows:]
S ection 1%. Security.—Any money or property put up by any employee or
applicant for employment as a cash bond in any case must not be used for any
purpose other than liquidating accounts between the employer and his said
employee or return to the said employee or applicant for employment, and shall
be held in trust for this purpose and not mingled with the money or property




CALIFORNIA— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

29

of the employer who receives same, any provision of any contract between the
employer and employee or applicant for employment to the contrary notwith­
standing. Any employer or prospective employer, or agent or officer thereof,
who misappropriates any such money or property, mingles it with his own or
uses it for any other purpose than that set forth above, shall be guilty of
theft and shall be punished, upon conviction thereof, in accordance with the
provisions of sections 486, 487, 488, 489, and 490 of the Penal Code.
S ec. 2. Violations.—Any person, firm, association, or corporation, or agent or
officer thereof, violating any provision of this act, except as otherwise provided
in section IV2 hereof, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of
not less than $25 nor exceeding $500, or by imprisonment for not exceeding
six months, or by both such fine and imprisonment. All fines imposed and
collected under the provisions of this section shall be paid into the State treas­
ury and credited to the general fund.
Approved May 29, 1929.
C hapter

573.—Payment of wages in scrip

[This act amends ch. 92, Acts of 1911 (as amended by ch. 628, Acts of 1915),
so as to read as follows:]
S ection 1. Orders, etc., to be negotiable.—No person, firm, association, or
corporation, or agent or officer thereof, shall issue, in payment of or as an
evidence of indebtedness for wages due an employee, any order, check, mem­
orandum, or other acknowledgment of indebtedness, unless the same is nego­
tiable, and is paid upon demand without discount in cash at some bank or other
established place of business in the State; and no person, firm, association, or
corporation shall issue in payment of wages due, or wages to become due an
employee, or as an advance on wages to be earned by an employee, any scrip,
coupons, cards, or other thing redeemable in merchandise or purporting to be
payable or redeemable otherwise than in money. But nothing herein contained
shall be construed to prohibit an employer from guaranteeing the payment of
bills incurred by an employee for the necessaries of life or for the tools and im­
plements used by such employee in the performance of his duties: Provided,
however, That the provisions of this act shall not apply to counties, cities and
counties, municipal corporations, quasi municipal corporations, or school dis­
tricts organized and existing under the laws of this State.
S eo. 2. Violations.— A n y person, firm, association , or corporation, or agen t
or officer thereof, w ho sh a ll v io la te any o f th e p rovisions o f th is a ct sh a ll be
g u ilty o f a m isdem eanor, an d upon conviction th ereof, sh a ll be punished by a
fine n o t to exceed $500, or by im prisonm ent in th e county ja il for n ot m ore
than s ix m onths, or by both such fine and im prisonm ent.

Approved May 29, 1929.
C hapter

586.—Blacklisting

[This act amends sec. 653e (added by ch. 350, Acts of 1913) of the Penal
Code, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 653e. Blacklisting prohibited.—Any person, firm or corporation, or
officer or director of a corporation, or superintendent, manager or other agent
of such person, firm or corporation who, after having discharged an employee
from the service of such person, firm or corporation or after having paid
off an employee voluntarily leaving such service, shall, by word, writing or
any other means whatsoever, misrepresent and thereby prevent or attempt to
prevent such former employee from obtaining employment with any other per­
son, firm or corporation, and any person, firm or corporation or agent or officer
thereof, who shall require, as a condition precedent to securing or retaining
employment, that an employee or applicant for employment be photographed
or fingerprinted by any person, firm or association which desires his photo­
graph or fingerprints for the purpose of furnishing same or information con­
cerning same or concerning the said employee, or applicant for employment, to
any other employer 01* third person which could be used to the detriment of
such employee, or applicant for employment, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor
and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine of not exceeding
$500, or by imprisonment for not exceeding six months, or by both such fine
and imprisonment. Any person, firm or corporation who shall knowingly cause,
suffer or permit an agent, superintendent, manager or other employee in his



30

FART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

or its employ to commit a violation of this section, or who shall fail to take
all reasonable steps within his or its power to prevent such violation of this
act, shall be guilty of a violation of the provisions of this section and be
subject to the penalties herein provided.
Nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent an employer as herein­
after defined or an agent, employee, superintendent, or manager of such em­
ployer from furnishing upon special request therefor, a truthful statement con­
cerning the reason for the discharge of an employee, or why an employee
voluntarily left the service of the employer: Provided, however, That if such
statement shall in connection therewith furnish any mark, sign or other means
whatever conveying information different from that expressed by words therein,
such fact, or the fact that such statement or other means of furnishing infor­
mation was given without a special request therefor, shall be prima facie
evidence of a violation of the provisions of this section.
In addition to and apart from the criminal penalty hereinabove provided,
any person, firm, association or corporation, or agent or officer thereof, who
shall violate any of the provisions of this act shall be liable to the party or
parties aggrieved, in a civil action, to treble damages. Such civil action may
be brought by such aggrieved person or persons, or his or their assigns, or suc­
cessors in interest, without first establishing any criminal liability under
this act.
Approved May 31, 1929.
C hapter 768. —Employment

of women—Moving boxes, etc.

[This act amends secs. 1 and 2, ch. 903, Acts* of 1921, so as to read as
follows:]
S ection 1. Pulleys, etc., when.—Boxes, baskets, and other receptacles which
with their contents weigh 50 pounds or over and which are to be moved by
female employees in any mill, restaurant, workshop, packing, canning, or mer­
cantile establishment, or any other establishment employing women, shall be
equipped with pulleys, casters, or other contrivance connected with or upon
which such boxes or other receptacles are placed so that they can be moved
easily from place to place in such establishments. No female employee shall be
requested or permitted to lift any box, basket, bundle, or other receptacle or
container which with its contents weighs 50 pounds or over. Nor shall any
female employee be requested or permitted to carry any box, tray, or other
receptacle which with its contents weighs ten pounds or over up or down any
stairway, or series of stairways that rise for more than five feet, from the
base thereof.
S ec. 2. Violations.—Every employer, or manager, superintendent, agent, or
officer thereof, employing any female, who violates or omits to comply with
any of the provisions of this act, or who employs or suffers or permits any
female to work in violation thereof, or to violate any provision thereof, is guilty
of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof* shall be punished by a fine of
not exceeding $500, or imprisonment for not exceeding 60 days, or both such
fine and imprisonment. This act shall be enforced by the department of indus­
trial relations and all fines imposed and collected by virtue of its provisions
shall be paid into the State treasury and credited to the general fund.
Approved June 11, 1929.
Chapter

793.—Hours of labor on public works

[This act amends sec. 653c, Penal Code (as amended by ch. 257, Acts of 1927),
so as to read as follows:]
S ection 653c. Limit of eight hours a day.—The time of service of any
laborer, workman, or mechanic employed upon any of the public works of the
State of California, or of any political subdivision or district thereof, or upon
work done for or by the authority of said State, or any county, city and county,
city, town, township, district, or any other political subdivision thereof, whether
said work is done by contract or otherwise, is hereby limited and restricted to
eight hours during any one calendar day. and it shall be unlawful for any
ofiicer or agent of said State, or of any political subdivision or district thereof
or for any contractor or subcontractor doing work under the contract upon any
public works aforesaid, who employs, or who directs or controls the work of
any laborer, workman, or mechanic, employed as herein aforesaid, to require
or permit such laborer, workman, or mechanic, to labor more than eight hours



CALIFORNIA----ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

31

during any one calendar day, except in cases of extraordinary emergency,
caused by fire, flood, or danger to life or property or except to work upon public*
military or naval defenses or works in time of war: Provided, however, That
within 30 days after any employee is permitted to work over eight hours in one
calendar day due to such an extraordinary emergency, the contractor doing the
work, or his duly authorized agent, shall file with the officer, board or commis­
sion awarding the contract a report, verified by his oath, setting forth the nature
of the said emergency, which report shall contain the name of the said worker
and the hours worked by him on the said day, and failure to file the said report
within the said time shall be prima facie evidence that no extraordinary emer­
gency existed. Such contractor shall also keep an accurate record showing the
names and actual hours worked of all workers employed by him, or by any
subcontractor under him, in connection with the said public work, which record
shall be open at all reasonable hours to the inspection of the officer, board, or
commission awarding the contract, or their deputies or agents, and to the chief
of the division of labor statistics and law enforcement of the department of
industrial relations, his deputies or agents.
Any officer or agent of the State of California, or of any political subdivision
or district thereof, making or awarding, as such officer or agent, any contract,
the execution of which involves or may involve the employment of any laborer,
workman, or mechanic upon any of the public works, or upon any work herein
mentioned, shall cause to be inserted therein a stipulation which shall provide
that the contractor to whom said contract is awarded shall forfeit as a penalty,
to the State or political subdivision or district in whose behalf the contract is
made and awarded, $10 for each laborer, workman, or mechanic employed, in
the execution of said contract, by him, or by any subcontractor under him, upon
any of the public works, or upon any work herein mentioned, for each calendar
day during which such laborer, workman, or mechanic is required or permitted
to labor more than eight hours in violation of the provisions of this section,
and it shall be the duty of such officer or agent to take cognizance of all
violations of the provisions of this section committed in the course of the
execution of said contract, authorized to pay to the contractor moneys becoming
due to him under said contract, and to report the same to the representative of
the State or political subdivision or district, party to the contract, and said repre­
sentative, when making payments of moneys thus due, shall withhold and retain
therefrom all sums and amounts which shall have been forfeited pursuant to
the herein said stipulation.
Any officer, agent, or representative of the State of California or of any
political subdivision or district thereof who shall violate, or omit to comply
with, any of the provisions of this section, and any contractor, or agent or
representative of any contractor doing public work as aforesaid, who shall
neglect to keep an accurate record of the names and actual hours worked by
the workers employed by him, or by any subcontractor under him, in connection
with the said public work, or who shall refuse to allow access to same at any
reasonable hour by any person authorized to inspect same under this section,
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall upon conviction be punished by a
fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment for not exceeding six months, or
by both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.
Work done for irrigation, utility, reclamation, and improvement districts, and
other districts of this type, as well as street, sewer, or other improvement work
done under the direction and supervision of the State, or of any political
subdivision or district thereof, whether such political subdivision or district
operates under a freeholder’s charter or not, shall be held to come under the
provisions of this section: Provided, however, That nothing in this section shall
apply to the operation of the irrigation or drainage system of any irrigation or
reclamation district.
Approved, June 13, 1929.
C hapter

891.—Tips to employees—Notice to public

S ection 1.—Definition.—[This section defines the following terms: “ Em­
ployer,” “ employee,” “ employing,” “ agent of employer,” “ tip,” or “ gratuity,”
“ establishment,” etc., and “ department of industrial relations.”]
S ec. 2. Notice to public.—Every employer, or agent of any employer, who
collects, takes, or receives any tips or gratuities, or a part thereof, paid or
given to or left for his employees by patrons, or who deducts any amount from
wages due his employees on account of such tips or gratuities, or who requires




32

PART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

Ms employees to credit the amount, or any part thereof, of such tips or
gratuities received by them against and as a part of the wages due such em­
ployees from said employer, shall post and keep posted in a conspicuous place
at the location or locations where the said business or enterprise is carried
on, where it can easily be seen by the patrons thereof, a notice or notices, in
lettering or printing of not less than 48-point black-face type, to the following
effect, as the case may be:
(1) If not shared by the employees, that any tips or gratuities paid, given
to or left for employees by patrons go to and belong to the establishment or
employer and are not shared by the employees thereof, or
(2) If shared by the employees, the extent to which such tips or gratuities
are shared between employer and employees.
Such notice shall also state the extent to which the employees are required
by such employer to accept such tips or gratuities in lieu of wages or the
extent to which the employee is required to accept and credit such tips and
gratuities against wages due such employees. Every employer shall also keep
accurate records of all such tips or such gratuities received by such employer,
whether received directly from the worker or indirectly by means of deductions
from the wages of the worker, or otherwise, which records shall be open to
inspection at all reasonable hours by the department of industrial relations.
Sec. 3. Violations.—Any employer, or agent of an employer, who violates
or omits to comply with any of the provisions hereof shall be guilty of a mis­
demeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine of not
exceeding $500 or by imprisonment for not exceeding 60 days, or by both such
fine and imprisonment.
S ec. 4. Enforcement.— T he departm ent o f in d u strial rela tio n s sh a ll en force
th e provisions h ereo f and a ll fines im posed and collected thereunder sh a ll be
paid in to the S ta te treasu ry and credited to th e gen eral fund.

Approved June 19, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Schools for employed
children, chs. 185, 187; Examination, etc., of aviators, ch. 850; Examination,
etc., of barbers, ch. 302; Examination, etc., of chauffeurs, chs. 253 (sec. 22),
258 (secs. 2, 3, 4) ; Mechanics’ liens, chs. 157, 868, 869, 870, 871; Protection of
wages of employees, etc., of contractors, ch. 817 (sec. 6) ; Old-age pensions,
ch. 530; Retirement of public employees, ch. 87 (p. 2266) ; Absent voters, chs.
150, 770; Convict labor, chs. 125, 881; Investigate Commissions, chs. 56 (p.
2230), 92 (p. 2276).]

COLORADO
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter 68.—Mine

regulations—Coal mines

[This act amends secs. 3440, 3446, 3462, 3463, 3482 (as amended by ch. 129,
Acts of 1927), 3503, 3505, 3527 (as amended by sec. 22, ch. 134, Acts of 1925),
3532, 3550, 3551, 3556, 3557, 3571, 3584, 3587, 3597, 3601, Compiled Laws, 1921,
relating to mine safety, checkweighmen, ventilation, etc.]
Approved May 9, 1929.
C hapter

95.—Inspection and regulation of factories, etc.

[This act amends secs. 4313-4322, inclusive, and 4324, Comp. Laws, 1921, so as
to read as follows:]
S ection 4313. Department of factory inspection.—That there is hereby
established a separate and distinct department to be known as the Department
of Factory Inspection of the State of Colorado, which department shall be
charged with the inspection of all factories, mills, workshops, bakeries, laundries,
stores, hotels, boarding or bunk houses, schoolhouses, theaters, moving-picture
houses and places of public assemblage, or any kind of an establishment wherein
laborers are employed or machinery used, for the purpose of protecting said
employees or guests against damages arising from imperfect or dangerous
machinery, or hazardous and unhealthy occupation, and regulating sanitary
conditions under which guests are protected or laborers are employed by
providing individual towels in place of roller towels in hotel wash rooms, and



COLORADO— ACTS OP 1 9 2 9

33

nine foot top sheets for beds, which sheets shall be provided not later than Sep­
tember 1 ,1 9 1 1 . The Deputy State Labor Commissioner of the State of Colorado
shall be the chief factory inspector under this act; the said chief inspector
within five days after the passage of this act, shall recommend, and the secre­
tary of state shall appoint four deputy factory inspectors, one of whom shall
be a woman, and each of said deputy factory inspectors shall receive a salary
of $1,200 per annum with necessary traveling expenses, but said expenses shall
in no case exceed the sum of $1,200 per annum for each deputy factory inspector:
Provided, That the deputy labor commissioner, being chief factory inspector,
shall recommend and the secretary of state appoint a clerk with an annual
salary of $1,200 per annum: And be it provided, That a stenographer shall be
recommended by the deputy labor commissioner and the chief factory Inspector
and appointed by the secretary of state with an annual salary of $1,200 per
annum; the said appointees shall receive their said salaries upon vouchers
issued by the chief factory inspector and paid in the same manner as other
State officers of the State of Colorado are paid: And be it further provided,
That a fund not to exceed $500 per annum shall be appropriated for the purpose
of paying for printing, stationery, postage, and buying such necessary equip­
ment as are necessary to the office of the chief factory inspector; and to provide
for any expenses through arbitration as provided in section seven of this act.
Sec. 4314. Guards for dangerous machinery.— T h a t an y person, firm, cor­
poration, or association operatin g a factory, m ill, workshop, bakery, laundry,
store, hotel, schoolhouse, th eater, m oving-picture hou se or p lace o f public
assem blage, or an y kind o f an estab lish m en t w h erein laborers are em ployed
or m achinery used sh a ll provide and m ain tain in u se belt sh ifte r s or other
m ech anical contrivance for th e purpose o f th row in g on or off b elts or pu lleys
w h ile running, w h ere th e sam e are practicab le w ith due regard to th e n atu re
and purpose o f said belts and the dan gers to em ployees th e r efr o m ; also reason­
able sa feg u a rd s fo r a ll v a ts, pans, trim m ers, cut-offs, ga n g edger and other
saw s, planers, cogs, gearings, beltin gs, sh a ftin g s, couplings, set screw s, lin e
rollers, conveyors, m anglers in lau n d ries, and m achinery o f other or sim ila r
descriptions, w h ich it is practicable to guard, and w h ich can be effectively
guarded w ith due regard to th e ordinary u se o f such m ach in ery and appliances,
and the dangers to em ployees therefrom , and w ith w h ich th e em ployees o f any
such factory, m ill, or w orkshop are lia b le to com e in con tact w h ile in th e
perform ance o f th e ir d u tie s; and i f any m achinery, or any part thereof, is in
a d efective condition, and it s operation w ou ld be extrah azard ou s because o f
such defect, or i f a n y m achinery is n ot safegu ard ed as provided in th is act,
th e u se th ereof is prohibited, and a n otice to th a t effect sh a ll be attach ed
th ereto by th e em ployer im m ed iately upon receivin g n otice o f su ch d efect or
la ck o f safeguard, and such n otice sh a ll n o t be rem oved u n til sa id d e fe ct has
been rem edied or th e m ach in e safegu ard ed a s herein provided.
Sec. 4315. Ventilation.— T h a t any person, firm, corporation, or association
operatin g a factory, m ill, w orkshop, bakery, laundry, store, h otel, schoolhouse,
th eater, m oving-picture house, or place or pu blic assem blage, or an y kin d o f
an estab lish m en t w h erein laborers are em ployed, or m ach in ery used and
m anu al labor is exercised by th e w a y o f trad e fo r th e purpose o f gain w ith in
an in closed room (p r iv a te h ou ses in w h ich th e em ployees liv e ex cep ted ) sh all
be provided in each w orkroom th e r eo f w ith good, sufficient v e n tila tio n and
kept in a clean, sa n ita r y sta te, and sh a ll be so ve n tila te d as to render harm less,
so fa r as practicable, a ll gases, vapors, d u st or oth er im purities, generated in
th e course o f the m an u factu rin g or laborin g process carried on th e r e in ; and if
a n y factory, m ill, w orkshop, bakery, laundry, store, h otel, schoolhouse, th eater,
m oving-picture house, place o f public assem b lage, or any kind o f an estab lish ­
m ent w h erein laborers are em ployed or m achinery u sed in an y inclosed room s
th ereo f by w h ich d u st i s generated and inh aled to an in ju riou s e x ten t by the
persons em ployed therein, conveyors, receptacles, or e x h a u st fan s, or other
m ech anical m eans sh a ll be provided and m ain tain ed for th e purpose o f carryin g
off or receiving and co llectin g such dust.
Sec. 4316. Hoistioays, etc.— T he openin gs o f a ll h o istw a y s, h atch w ays, e le v a ­
tors, and w ellh oles and sta ir w a y s in fa cto ries, m ills, w orkshops, bakeries,
laun dries, stores, hotels, schoolhouses, th eaters, m oving-picture houses, places
o f public assem blage, or any kin d o f an estab lish m en t w h erein laborers are
em ployed, or m achinery used, sh a ll be protected by good and sufficient trapdoors,
h atches, fences, g a tes or other safegu ard s, and a ll due diligen ce sh a ll be used
to keep all such m eans o f protection closed, excep t w hen it is n ecessary to have
th e sam e opened th a t th e sam e m ay be used.




34

PART 2.----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

Sec. 4317. Inspection.—It shall be the duty of the chief factory inspector, by
himself or his duly appointed deputy, to examine as soon as may be after the
passage of this act, and thereafter annually, and from time to time, all fac­
tories, mills, workshops, bakeries, stores, hotels, schoolhouses, theaters, movingpicture houses, places of public assemblage, or any kind of an establishment
wherein laborers are employed or machinery used or appliances therein con­
tained to which the provisions of this act are applicable, for the purpose of
determining whether they do conform to such provisions, and to granting or
refusing certificates of approval, as hereinafter provided.
Sec. 4318. Notice by employees.—Any employee of any person, firm, corpora­
tion, or association operating a factory, mill, workshop, bakery, laundry, store,
hotel, schoolhouse, theater, moving-picture house, place of public assemblage,
or any kind of an establishment wherein laborers are employed or machinery
used, shall notify his employer of any defect in or failure to guard the machin­
ery, appliances, ways, works or plants, on which or in or about which he is
working, when any such defect or failure to guard shall come to the knowledge
of any such employee, and if such employer shall fail to remedy such defect
then said employee may complain in writing to the chief factory inspector of
any such alleged defect in or failure to guard the machinery, appliances, ways,
works, and plants, or any alleged violation by such person, firm, corporation,
or association, of any of the provisions of this act, in the machinery and appli­
ances and premises used by such person, firm, corporation, or association and
with or about which said employee is working, and upon receiving such com­
plaint it shall be the duty of the chief factory inspector, by himself or his
deputy, to forthwith make an inspection of the machinery and appliances
complained of.
Sec. 4319. Certificates of inspection.—Whenever upon any examination or
reexamination of any factory, mill, workshop, bakery, laundry, store, hotel,
schoolhouse, theater, moving-picture house, place of public assemblage, or any
kind of an establishment wherein laborers are employed, or machinery used to
which the provisions of this act are applicable, the property so examined and
the machinery and appliances therein conform in the judgment of said chief
factory inspector to the requirements of this act, he shall thereupon issue to
the owner, lessee, or operator of any storehouse, factory, mill, workshop, bakery,
laundry, hotel or any kind of an establishment wherein laborers are employed
or machinery used, a certificate to that effect, and such certificate shall be
prima facie evidence as long as it continues in force of compliance on part of
the person, firm, corporation, or association to whom it is issued, with the pro­
visions of this act. Such certificate may be revoked by said chief factory
inspector at any time upon written notice to the person, firm, corporation, or
association holding the same whenever in his opinion, after reexamination, con­
dition and circumstances have so changed as to justify the revocation thereof.
A copy of said certificate shall be kept posted in a conspicuous place on every
floor of all factories, mills, workshops, bakeries, laundries, stores, hotels, school­
houses, theaters, moving-picture houses, places of public assemblage, or any
kind of an establishment wherein laborers are employed or machinery used to
which the provisions of this act are applicable. If in the judgment of the said
chief factory inspector such factory, mill, workshop, bakery, laundry, store,
hotel, schoolhouse, theater, moving-picture house, place of public assemblage,
or any kind of an establishment wherein laborers are employed or machinery
is used does not conform to the requirements of this act, he shall forthwith
personally or by mail serve on the person, firm, corporation, or association
operating or using such machinery or appliances or occupying such premises
a written statement of the requirements of said chief factory inspector before
he will issue a certificate as hereinbefore provided for; and upon said require­
ments being complied with within a period of 30 days after said written state­
ment has been served as aforesaid the said chief factory inspector shall forth­
with issue such certificate; but if the person, firm, or corporation operating or
using said machinery and appliances or occupying such premises shall consider
the requirements of said chief factory inspector unreasonable and impracticable
or unnecessarily expensive, he may within ten days after the requirements of
said chief factory inspector have been served upon him, appeal therefrom or
from any part thereof to three arbitrators to whom shall be submitted the
matters and things in dispute, and their findings shall be binding upon said
applicant and upon the chief factory inspector. Such appeal shall be in writing,
addressed to the chief factory inspector and shall set forth the objection to hia




COLORADO— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

35

requirements or any part thereof, and shall mention the name of one person
who will serve as a representative of said applicant calling for arbitration.
Immediately upon the receipt of such notice of appeal, it shall be the duty of
the chief factory inspector to appoint a competent person as arbitrator resident
in the county from which such appeal comes, and to notify such person so
selected, and also the party appealing, stating the cause of the arbitration, and
the place, date, and time of meeting. These two arbitrators shall select the
third within five days and, within ten days thereafter, give a hearing on the
matters of said appeal, and the findings of those arbitrators by a majority
vote shall be reported to the chief factory inspector and to the applicant and
shall be binding upon each. The expense of such arbitration shall be borne
by the party calling for the arbitration; and if said arbitrators sustain the
requirements of said chief factory inspector or any part thereon, said applicant
shall within 30 days comply with the findings of said arbitrators, and thereupon
said chief factory inspector shall issue a certificate as hereinbefore provided
(in section 5 of this a c t); but if said arbitrators shall sustain such appeal
or any part thereof the same shall be binding upon said chief factory inspector,
and any such person, firm, corporation, or association shall within 30 days after
the finding of the board of arbitrators comply with the requirements of the
chief factory inspector, as amended by said arbitrators, if so amended as herein
provided for, and thereupon said chief factory inspector shall forthwith issue
to any person, firm, corporation, or association, his certificate as provided for
in section 5 of this act: Provided, That in case such arbitrators shall decide
against such chief factory inspector, the cost of the arbitration shall be paid
out of the funds for such purposes. In case the chief factory inspector is
sustained in part by the arbitrators, the cost of the arbitration shall be divided
equitably, in proportion to that decision, the appellant paying such share as the
arbitrators may deem fair, the rest to be paid out of said fund.
S ec. 4320. Provisions in case of fire.—In all factories, mills, workshops,
offices, bakeries, laundries, stores, hotels, schoolhouses, theaters, moving-picture
houses, places of public assemblage, or any other buildings in which people
are employed at manual or other labor, proper and sufficient means of escape
in case of fire shall be provided by more than one way of egress, and such
means of escape shall at all times be kept free from any obstruction; in good
repair and ready for use; and at night, or where lights are necessary in the
daytime, a red light shall be provided with the words inscribed thereon “ Fire
Escape.” All doors leading into or to such factories, workshops, offices, bakeries,
mills, laundries, stores, hotels, schoolhouses, theaters, moving-picture houses,
places of public assemblage, or other buildings in which people are employed
at manual or other labor, shall be so constructed as to open outward when
practicable, and shall not be locked, bolted, or fastened during working hours
so as to prevent free egress. Proper and substantial handrails shall be pro­
vided on all stairways and in factories, hotels, mills, and workshops, and other
buildings where people are employed at manual or other labor. And in all
factories, laundries, mills, and workshops, in which females are employed,
the stairs regularly used by them shall be properly screened at the sides and
bottom.
S ec. 4321. Fire escapes.—In any factory, mill, workshop, office, bakery,
laundry, store, hotel, schoolhouse, theater, moving-picture house, place of public
assemblage, or other building of three or more stories in height where proper
and sufficient means of escape in case of fire are not provided as required by
preceding section of this act, the owner or occupant of said building upon
notice by the chief factory inspector or any deputy factory inspector employed
in the bureau of labor statistics shall construct one or more fire escapes as the
same may be found necessary and sufficient. Said fire escape or fire escapes,
shall be provided on the outside of such factories, mills, workshops, offices,
bakeries, laundries, stores, hotels, schoolhouses, theaters, moving-picture houses,
and places of public assemblage, or other buildings, connecting with each floor
above the first; well fastened and secured and of sufficient strength. Each of
such fire escapes shall have landings or balconies not less than six feet in
length and three in width, guarded by iron railings not less than three feet in
height and embracing at least two windows at each story, and connecting with
the interior by easily accessible and unobstructed openings; and the balconies
or landings shall be connected by iron stairs not less than 24 inches wide, and
the steps to be not less than eight inches tread, placed at not more than an
angle of 45 degrees slant, and protected by well-secured handrails on both




36

PART 2 .— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

sides, with a 12-inch wide drop ladder from the lower platform reaching to the
ground. Any fire escape so constructed shall be sufficient. Any other plan
or style of fire escape shall be sufficient if approved by the chief factory
inspector, but if not so approved the said chief factory inspector or one of the
deputy factory inspectors may notify the owner, proprietor, or lessee of such
factory, mill, workshop, office, bakery, laundry, store, hotel, schoolhouse,
theater, moving-picture house, place of public assemblage, or other building in
which factory or workshop is conducted, or the agent or the superintendent,
or either of them, in writing, that any such style of fire escape is not sufficient
and he may issue an order in writing requiring one or more fire escapes as he
shall deem necessary and sufficient to be provided for such factory, mill, work­
shop, office, bakery, laundry, store, hotel, schoolhouse, theater, moving-picture
house, place of public assemblage, or other buildings in which people are
employed at manual or other labor at such location and of such plan and style
as shall be specified in such written order. Within 30 days after the service of
such order the number of fire escapes required in such order for such factory,
mill, workshop, office, bakery, laundry, store, hotel, or other building shall be
provided therefor, each of which will be either of the plan and style and in
accordance with the specifications in said order required or of the plan ana
style in this section above described and declared sufficient. The windows and
doors of each fire escape shall be located as far as possible consistent with
accessibility from the stairways and elevators, hatchways or openings, and the
ladder thereof shall extend to the roof. Stationary stairs or ladders shall be
provided on the inside of each such factory, mill, workshop, office, bakery,
laundry, store, hotel, schoolhouse, theater, moving-picture house, place of public
assemblage, or other buildings where people are employed at manual or other
labor from the upper story to the roof as a means of escape in case of fire.
Sec. 4322. Water-closets etc.—Every factory, workshop, office, bakery, laundry,
store, hotel, schoolhouse, theater, moving-picture house, place of public assem­
blage, or other building in which four or more persons are employed shall be
provided within reasonable access with a sufficient number of water-closets,
earth closets or privies, for the reasonable use of the persons therein; and
whenever male or female persons are employed as aforesaid together, waterclosets, earth closets or privies separate and apart shall be provided for the
use of each sex and plainly so designated, and no person shall be allowed to use
such closet or privy assigned to the other sex. Such closets shall be properly
screened and ventilated and at all times kept in a clean and good sanitary
condition. In factories, laundries, mills, and workshops and in all other places
where the labor performed by the operator is of such character that it becomes
desirable or necessary to change the clothing wholly or in part before leaving
the building at the close of the day’s toil, separate dressing rooms shall be
provided for women and girls whenever so required by the factory inspector.
It shall be the duty of every occupant, whether owner or lessee of any premises
so used as to come within the provisions of this act to carry out the same and to
make all the changes and additions necessary therefor. In case such changes
are made upon the order of the chief factory inspector or of a factory inspector
by the lessee of the premises he may at any time within 30 days after the com­
pletion thereof bring an action before any justice of the peace, county or district
court, having competent jurisdiction, against any person having an interest in
such premises and may recover such portion of the expense of making such
changes and in addition as the court adjudges should justly and equitably be
borne by such defendant.
Sec. 4324. Towers of factory inspector.—The chief factory inspector or any
employee of the department of factory inspection shall have power to enter any
factory, mill, workshop, office, bakery, laundry, store, hotel, schoolhouse, theater,
moving-picture house, place of public assemblage, or any other public or private
works where labor is employed or machinery used. Any person, persons, firm,
copartnership, corporation, trust, trustee, their agent, or agents, who shall
refuse to allow any inspector or employee of the said department to enter or
who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, shall be deemed guilty of a
misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof before any court of competent
jurisdiction shall be punished by a fine of not less than $50 nor more than $100
or be imprisoned in the county jail not to exceed 90 days for each and every
offense.
Approved May 10, 1929.




COLORADO— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9
C hapter

37

110.—Insurance of employees—Group insurance

[This act amends sec. 2594, Comp. Laws, 1921, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 2594. Definition.—Group life insurance is hereby declared to be that
form of life insurance covering not less than 50 employees with or without
medical examination; or less than 50 employees with medical examination,
written under a policy issued to the employer, the premium on which is
to be paid by the employer or by the employer and the employees jointly,
and insuring only all of his employees, or all of any class or classes thereof
determined by conditions pertaining to the employment, for amounts of
insurance based upon some plan which will preclude individual selection, for
the benefit of persons other than the employer: Provided, however, That when
the premium is to be paid by the employer and employee jointly and the benefits
of the policy are offered to all eligible employees, not less than 75 per centum
of such employees may be so insured. The term employer as used in this
section shall be construed to include counties, cities, cities and counties,
incorporated towns, school districts, and other political subdivisions of this
State, and such subdivisions may, in order to promote the better efficiency of
its employees, insure its employees, or any class or classes thereof, under a
policy or policies, of group insurance covering life, health, or accident insurance
for such employees, and may pay, or authorize to be paid, out of the corporate
revenue of such political subdivisions, the premiums required from time to time
to maintain such group insurance in force.
Approved April 10, 1929.
C hapter

121.—Protection of employees in their political rights

1. Employers not to interfere.—It shall be unlawful for any employer
of labor to make, adopt, or enforce any rule, regulation, or policy forbidding
or preventing his employees, or any of them, from engaging or participating
in politics or from becoming candidates or a candidate for public office.
S ec. 2. Violations.—Any employer violating the provisions of this act shall
upon conviction thereof, be punishable by imprisonment.
S ec. 3. Damages.—Nothing herein contained shall be construed to prevent the
injured employee from recovering damages from his employer for injury suffered
through a violation of this act.
Approved May 9, 1929.
S ection

C hapter

145.—Private employment offices

[This act amends secs. 4295, 4296, and 4335, Comp. Laws, 1921, so as to read
as follows:]
S ection 4295. Licenses, register.—[The deputy State labor commissioner is
empowered to revoke or refuse a license if the character or business methods
of the applicant unfit him for the business, or if the premises are unfit. An
agency must report monthly the number of applicants registered, and the number
of positions filled during the preceding month.]
S ec . 4296. Acts forbidden; fees.—No agency shall send or cause to be sent
any female help or servant to any place of bad repute, house of ill fame, or
assignation house, any place of questionable character, or to any house or place
of amusement kept for immoral purposes. No such licensed agency shall publish
or cause to be published any notice or advertisement soliciting persons to
register with such agency and demanding a fee or remuneration therefor, for
positions or jobs unless such agency actually has on its books a definite and
reliable order from a responsible source to fill such places. No such licensed
agency shall publish or cause to be published any false or fraudulent notices or
advertisements or give any false information, or make any false promises concerning or relating to work or employment to any one who shall register for
employment, and no licensed agency shall make any false entries in the register
to be kept as herein provided. No person, firm or corporation shall conduct
the business of any employment office in, or in connection with, any place where
gambling of any character is carried on or indulged in. In all cases a receipt
shall be given in which shall be stated the name of the applicant, the amount
of the fee, the date, the name or character of the work or situation procured,
and the name of the party from whom the position is to be secured. In case
the said applicant shall not obtain a situation or employment through such li­
censed agency within five days after registration, then said licensed agency shall




38

FART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

forthwith repay and return to such applicant, upon demand being made there­
for, the full amount of the fee paid or delivered by such applicant to said
licensed agency, provided said fee is demanded within 30 days after the date
of registration.
Note.— Sec. 4335 above referred to as amended pertains to the administration of the
private employment agency law by the deputy labor commissioner, instead of commissioner
of labor statistics.

Approved May 8, 1929.
Digests , etc .

[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of barbers, ch. 64; Examination, etc., of plumbers, ch. 142; Mechanics’ liens,
ch. 123; Protection of wages of employees, etc., of contractors, ch. 148; Absent
voters, ch. 94.]

CONNECTICUT
ACTS OF 1929
C h a p te r

54.—Assignment of wages

[This act repeals sec. 4752, G. S., 1918, and enacts a new law so as to read
as follows:]
S e c tio n 4752. Future earnings.—No assignment of future earnings made as
security for a loan or other indebtedness shall be valid unless the amount of
such indebtedness shall be stated therein, nor unless the employer from whom
such wages are to become due shall be named therein, nor unless the term for
which such earnings are assigned shall be definitely stated in the assignment
so as to expire not later than one year from the actual date of such assignment,
nor unless such assignment shall bear a dated certificate of acknowledgment of
the assignor made before a competent authority. Such authority shall not
be valid to transfer earnings to become due from any employer except the one
named therein, nor unless a copy thereof shall be left with such employer
within one month from the date of such assignment, nor unless such assign­
ment shall bear the date of the day on which such assignment was actually
executed by the assignor; and no such assignment shall be valid against an
attaching creditor of the assignor unless such assignment shall also be recorded
before such attachment in the town clerk’s office in the town where the
assignor resides, or, if he shall reside without the State, in the town where the
employer resides. Each certificate of acknowledgment required by this act
shall be dated as of the day on which such acknowledgment shall be actually
made. Any person who shall intentionally date such assignment or such cer­
tificate of acknowledgment as of a date other than the actual date on which each
assignment or such acknowledgment shall be made shall be fined not more
than $25 or imprisoned not more than 30 days or both.
Approved April 18, 1929.
Digests , etc .

[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of aviators, ch. 253; Examination, etc., of barbers, ch. 173; Examination, etc.,
of beauty parlors, ch. 233; Assignment of wages—Wage brokers, ch. 207;
Bakeries and the preparation, distribution, etc., of food products, ch. 298;
Vocational rehabilitation—State and Federal cooperation, ch. 201; Absent
voters, H. R. No. 26 (p. 4815).]
DELAWARE
ACTS OF 1929
C h a p te r

108.—Free public employment offices

[See under “ Investigative commissions,” Delaware, on page 18.]
Digests , etc .

[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Mothers’ pensions,
ch. 251; Examination, etc., of aviators, ch. 249; Exnminations, etc., of chauffeurs,
ch. 10; Assignment of wages—Wage brokers, ch. 260.]




HAWAII— ACTS OF 19 2 9

39

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
SEVENTIETH CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION, 1929
[The only labor legislation of the District of Columbia is noted in Part 1,
under the headings: Vocational rehabilitation—State and Federal cooperation,
ch. 303 (45 U. S. Stat. L. 1260).]

FLORIDA
ACTS OF 1929
[The only labor legislation of this State enacted at the 1929 session is noted
in Part 1, under the headings: Mothers’ pensions, ch. 13759; Examination, etc.,
of employees on vessels, ch. 13758; Credit unions, ch. 14499 (spec, sess.).]

GEORGIA
ACTS OF 1929
[The only labor legislation of this State enacted at the 1929 session is noted
in Part 1, under the headings: Emigrant agents, No. 306 (p. 176) ; Legal holi­
days in the States and Territories, No. 285 (p. 211) ; Retirement of public em­
ployees, Nos. 95 (p. 308), 219 (p. 312), 406 (p. 314).]

HAWAII
ACTS OF 1929
No. 86.—Wages of laborers on public works
[This act amends sec. 178, R. L., 1925 (amended by act No. 165, Acts of 1925),
so as to read as follows:]
S e c tio n 178. Minimum.— The daily pay for each working-day of each laborer
engaged in construction or repairing roads, bridges or streets, waterworks or
other works, either by contract or otherwise, for the Territory of Hawaii, or
for any political subdivision thereof shall not be less than $3.
Approved April 26, 1929.
No. 103.—Employment of aliens on public works
[This act amends secs. 171 (as amended by acts Nos. 181 and 271, Acts of
1925), and 173, R. L., 1925, so as to read as follows:]
S e c tio n 171. Aliens—All officers and employees in the service of the govern­
ment of the Territory of Hawaii or in the service of any county or city and
county or municipal subdivision of said Territory shall be citizens of the
United States of America and residents of said Territory for at least one year
immediately preceding their appointment: Provided, however, That in cases
where it is not reasonably practicable to obtain persons with the foregoing
qualifications competent for such service, persons without such qualifications
may be employed until persons with such qualifications competent for such
service can be obtained.
The foregoing requirements shall not apply to teachers in public schools
higher in grade than public elementary and grammar schools: Provided, however, That in the appointment of such teachers preference shall be given to
local teachers of the same standing, grade, or rating as those from abroad.
The foregoing requirement as to citizenship shall not apply to any female
person who, having been a citizen, has lost her citizenship through marriage to
an alien*
All elective officers of any county or city and county or municipal subdivi­
sion of the Territory of Hawaii shall be citizens of the United States of
America and shall have resided in said Territory for at least three years and
within the respective county or city and county or municipal subdivision of said
Territory wherein the office is to be held for at least three months next preced­
ing their election.




40

PART 2.— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT O ' LABOR LAWS
B

S ec. 173. Violations.—Any division or department head or any public officer
or anyone in authority who shall employ or cause to be employed a person in
violation of section 171 shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction
thereof shall be punished by a fine of not more than $100 or by imprisonment
not to exceed 30 days or by both fine and imprisonment for each offense.
Approved April 29, 1929.
Digests, etc.

[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination,
etc., of beauty parlors, No. 145; Mechanics’ liens, No. 207; Sunday labor, No.
94; Retirement of public employees, Nos. 68,182,190; Rate of wages of employees
on public works, No. 86; Absent voters, No. 177 (sec. 15, p. 190).]

IDAHO
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

5.—Arbitration of labor disputes—Labor commission

[This act repeals ch. 105, C. S. 1919 (secs. 2280-2296, inclusive).]
Approved February 7, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination of
aviators, ch. 137; Examination of barbers, ch. 261; Examination, etc., of beauty
parlors, ch. 265; Protection of wages of employees, etc., of contractors, ch. 254.]

ILLINOIS
ACTS OF 1929
Employment of children—General provisions
(Page 429)

[This act amends secs. 1-15, inclusive, of ch. 48, R. S., 1917 (as amended
1921, p. 435), so as to read as follows:]
S ection 1. Age.—No minor under the age of 14 years shall be employed,
permitted or suffered to work at any gainful occupation in, for or in connection
with, any theater, concert hall or place of amusement, or any mercantile in­
stitution, store, office, hotel, laundry, manufacturing establishment, mill, can­
nery, factory or workshop therefor, within the State.
S ec . 2. Registers.—[Registers must be kept of children over the age of 14
and under 16.]
S ec. 3. Posting.—[Lists must be posted in workroom, containing name, age,
and place of residence of minor.]
S ec . 4. Certificates.—[Employment certificates are required for children under
16 years of age.]
S ec . 5. Evidence.—[Issue of certificates calls for equivalent of 8 years of
school work, proof of age and statement must be signed by employer, certificate
of physical fitness signed by a designated physician.]
S ecs . 5a, 5b. Vacation certificates.—[Provides for the issuance of vacation
certificates, and for employment outside of school hours.]
S ecs . 6, 6a. Form of certificate.—[Employment certificate must be in speci­
fied form and issued in triplicate.]
Sec. 7. Receipt.—[Employers must acknowledge receipt of certificates and
return same to the issuing officer on termination of employment.]
Sec. 8. Enforcement.—[Department of labor makes inspections; school boards
may make complaints.]
Sec. 9. Work time.—[Children under the age of 16 may not be employed
more than 6 days per week, nor more than 8 hours per day, nor between
7 p. m. and 7 a. m. Schedule of hours must be posted.]
Sec. 10. Dangerous employments.—No minors under the age of 16 years
shall be employed at sewing belts, in any capacity whatever; nor shall any
minors adjust any belt to any machinery; they shall not oil or assist in oiling,
wiping, or cleaning any machinery; they shall not operate or assist in oper­



INDIANA— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

41

ating circular or band saws, wood shapers, wood joiners, planers, sand-paper
or wood polishing machinery, emery or polishing wheels used for polishing
metal, wood turning or boring machinery, stamping machines in sheet-metal
and tinware manufacturing, stamping machines in washer and nut factories,
corrugating rolls, such as are used in roofing factories, nor shall they be
employed in operating or assisting to operate any passenger or freight elevator,
steam boiler, steam machinery or other steam generating apparatus; they shall
not operate or assist in operating dough braker or cracker machinery of any
description; wire or iron straightening machinery; nor shall they operate or
assist in operating rolling-mill machinery, punches or shears, washing, grinding
or mixing mill or calender rolls in rubber manufacturing; nor shall they oper­
ate or assist in operating laundry machinery; nor shall minors under the age
of 16 years be employed in any mine or quarry; nor shall they be employed
in any capacity in preparing any composition in which dangerous or poisonous
acids are used, and they shall not be employed in any capacity in the manu­
facture of paints, colors, or white lead; nor shall they be employed in any
capacity whatever in any employment that the department of labor finds to be
dangerous to their lives or limbs, or where their health may be injured or
morals depraved; nor in any bowling alley, nor in any theater, concert hall,
or place of amusement wherein intoxicating liquors are sold; nor shall any
females under the age of 16 years be employed in any capacity where such
employment requires them to remain standing for and during the performance
of their work.
S ec. 11, Presence.—[Presence in establishment is evidence of employment.]
S ecs . 12, 13.—Enforcement and penalties.—[The department of labor and
school officials enforce the law ; penalties are fines, $5 to $200 for various viola­
tions; employer not deemed to have violated act if he has obtained a duly
attested over-age certificate.]
S ec. 14. Exceptions, etc.—[Act not to affect minor lawfully employed on cer­
tain date relative to educational requirements; voluntary work of a temporary
and harmless character permitted; no minor under 14 years allowed to work
more than 8 hours per day nor more than 6 days in any one week.]
Approved June 17, 1929.
Employment of children—School attendance
(Page 726)

[This act amends sec. 274, ch. 122, R. S., 1917 (as amended by page 917, Acts of
1919), by requiring the attendance of children at either public or private school
to the age of 16, for the entire time during which the public schools are in
session. (The former provision that attendance must be at least seven months
per year is omitted.) ]
Approved April 19, 1929.
Department of Labor
(Pages 749-751)

[This act amends sec. 5 (as amended by page 335, Acts of 1921) and sec. 9
(as amended by page 338, Acts of 1921), ch. 24%, R. S., 1917, by providing that
one of the five industrial officers shall be designated as chairman, and receive
a salary of $6,000.]
Approved June 17, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Mothers’ pensions,
p. 198; Examination, etc., of aviators, p. 172; Examination, etc., of barbers,
p. 189; Mechanics’ liens, p. 547; Investigative commissions, pp. 137, 758, 780
(S. J. Res. No. 23), 780 (H. J. Res. No. 20).]

INDIANA
ACTS OF 1929
C h apter

76.—Employment of children

[This act amends secs. 18, 19, and 21, of ch. 132, Acts of 1921.
employed as caddies are exempt now from the provisions of the act.]
Approved March 9, 1929.




Children

42

PART 2.— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS
DigesU, etc,

[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of aviators, ch. 171; Examination, etc., of chauffeurs, ch. 162; Mechanics’ liens,
ch. 113; Protection of wages of employees, etc., of contractors, ch. 41; Convict
labor, ch. 91.]

IOWA

ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

49.—Private employment offices

[This act repeals par. 4, sec. 5743, Code of 1927, and amends sec. 1546-al, of
the same code, and reads as follows:]
S ection 1. Securing license.—Every person, firm, or corporation who shall
keep or carry on an employment agency for the purpose of procuring or offering
to procure help or employment, or the giving of information as to where help
or employment may be procured either directly or through some other person or
agency, and where a fee, privilege, or other thing of value is exacted, charged,
or received either directly or indirectly for procuring, or assisting or promising
to procure employment, work, engagement, or situation of any kind, or for
procuring or providing help or promising to provide help for any person,
whether such fee, privilege, or other thing of value is collected from the
applicant for employment or the applicant for help, shall before transacting
any such business whatsoever procure a license from a commission, consisting
of the secretary of state, the industrial commissioner, and the labor commis­
sioner, all of whom shall serve without compensation.
Seo. 2. Application.—Application for such license shall be made in writing to
the commission provided in section 1 of this act. It shall contain the name
of the applicant, and if applicant be a firm, the names of the members, and if
it be a corporation, the names of the officers thereof; and the name, number,
and address of the building and place where the employment agency is to be
conducted. It shall be accompanied by the affidavits of at least two reputable
citizens of the State in no way connected with applicant certifying to the good
moral character and reliability of the applicant, or, if a firm or corporation,
of each of the members or officers thereof, and that the applicant is a citizen
of the United States, if a natural person; also a surety company bond in the
sum of $2,000 to be approved by the labor commissioner and conditioned to pay
any damages that may accrue to any person or persons because of any wrongful
act, or violation of law, on the part of applicant in the conduct of said business.
There shall also be filed with the application a schedule of fees to be charged
for services rendered to patrons, which schedule shall not be changed during
the term of license without consent being first given by the commission.
S ec . 3. Investigation of applicants.—The commission shall fully investigate
all applicants for the license required by section 1 hereof, and shall not issue
any license earlier than one week after the application therefor is filed: Pro­
vided, however, That the commission shall either grant or refuse such license
within 30 days from the date of the filing of the application. All licenses issued
under the provisions of this act shall expire on June 30th next succeeding their
issuance.
Sec. 4. Fees.—[License fees $5 to $50, dependent on population.]
S ec. 5. Revocation of license.—[Commission may revoke license for cause
shown.]
S ec. 6. Violation.-r-[Failure to secure license deemed to be a misdemeanor.]
S ec. 7. Repeal.—[Par. 4, sec. 5743, Code of 1927, granting power to cities and
towns to-regulate and license employment bureaus, is repealed.]
S ec. 8. Exceptions.—[This section amends sec. 1546-al, Code of 1927, by
exempting certain organizations from provisions regulating fee charges.]
Approved April 16, 1929.
C hapter

221.—Insurance of employees—Group insurance

[This act amends sec. 8676, Code of 1927, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 8676. Terms defined.—The word * employer ” as used in the preced­
*
ing section shall include the advisory, supervising, or governing body or
bodies of all regularly organized religious denominations. The word “ em­
ployee” shall include clergymen, priests, and ministers of the gospel in good
standing in any of such denominations.




KANSAS— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

43

The following form of life insurance is hereby decreed to be group life in­
surance within the meaning of this section:
Life insurance covering the members of any labor union or teachers’ associa­
tion written under a policy issued to such union or teachers’ association, which
shall be deemed to be the employer for the purposes of this chapter, the pre­
mium on which is to be paid by the union or by the union and its members
jointly, or by the teacher or by the teachers’ association jointly, and insuring
only all of its members who are actively engaged in the same occupation or
profession, for amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will preclude
individual selection, for the benefit of persons other than the union, teachers’
association, or their officials: Provided, however, That when the premium
is to be paid by the union or teachers’ association and their members jointly
and the benefits are offered to all eligible members, not less than 65 per centum
of such members may so be insured.
Provided, also, That in case an insurance policy is renewable annually only at
the option of both parties to the contract, and provided that the basis of pre­
mium rates may be changed by the insurance company at the beginning of
any policy year, all members of a trade-union or teachers’ association may be
insured.
Approved April 5, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in Part 1, under the headings: Schools for em­
ployed children, ch. 108; Mothers’ pensions, ch. 92; Examination, etc., of
aviators, ch. 135; Examination, etc., of barbers, chs. 71, 72; Examination, etc.,
of beauty parlors, ch. 70; Cooperative associations, chs. 5, 18, 398; Convict
labor, ch. 87.]
KANSAS
ACTS OF 1929
Chapter

183.—Department of labor and industry

[This act authorizes the department of labor and industry instead of the
public service commission to appoint certain employees at stated salaries.]
Approved March 16, 1929.
C ha pter

258.—Department of labor and industry

1. Department created.—A commission of labor and industry is
hereby created to be composed of three commissioners, who, upon the taking
effect of this act, shall be appointed by the governor, by and with the consent
of the senate. Of such members first appointed one shall be appointed! for a
term of two years and two for a term of four years. Upon the expiration of
the term of the three members first appointed, as aforesaid, each succeeding
member shall be appointed and shall hold his office for a term of four years
and until his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. In the case
of a vacancy in the office of a member of said commission the governor shall
appoint a successor to fill the vacancy for the unexpired term. The governor
shall appoint one member of such commission as chairman thereof and upon
the expiration of his term as chairman the governor shall, by appointment or
designation, designate the chairman of said commission.
S ec . 2. Duties of commissioner, etc.—One of said members shall be designated
by the governor as chairman of said commission, who shall have active charge
of the administration of the workmen’s compensation act, with authority to call
upon any one of the other members of said commission in such administration,
or to act in the capacity of examiner, as provided for in said act. One of said
members shall be designated as commissioner of labor and shall have been for
at least five years immediately preceding such appointment actively identified
with labor in this State and not be less than 30 years of age, who shall have
active charge of factory inspection, State mine inspection, State bureau of free
employment, supervision of laws pertaining to women and children in industry,
and such commission is hereby given full jurisdiction over and control of fac­
tory, workshop, and mill inspection, mine inspection, and State free employ­
ment bureau.
11178*—81----- 4
S ection




44

PART 2 .----TEXT A
3STD ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

S ec. 3. Powers of commission, appointees.— T he com m ission o f labor and in­
d u stry m ay em ploy such inspectors, exam in ers, su perintend en ts o f S ta te fr ee
em ploym ent offices, and clerica l force as is n ecessa ry to carry on it s d u ties and
sh a ll fix th eir salaries. A ll em ployees sh a ll be under th e direction and control
o f th e com m ission and sh a ll hold th eir office du rin g its pleasure.
S ec. 4. Salaries.—The chairman shall receive as salary the sum of $4,000

per annum and each of the other members of said commission shall receive a
salary of $3,750 per annum, which salaries shall be payable monthly.
S ec. 5. Commission as successor of former powers.— A ll o f th e la w s rela tin g
to th e pow ers, au th ority, ju risd iction , and d u ties o f th e present public service
com m ission a s th e court of in d u strial relation s, com m issioner o f labor and
industry, S ta te factory inspector, S ta te m ine inspector, and director o f th e
free em ploym ent bureau and pertain in g to th e ad m in istration o f th e w orkm en's
com pensation act are hereby adopted as fu lly a s though herein reenacted, and
a ll th e pow ers, au th ority, ju risd iction , and d u ties p ertain in g th ereto now
im posed by law upon the public service com m ission are hereby conferred and
im posed upon th e com m ission o f labor and ind ustry, and sh a ll from and a fter
th e tak in g effect of th is act d evolve upon th e com m ission o f labor and ind ustry,
and such com m ission is hereby em pow ered to do a ll th in gs n ecessary and
convenient for th e ex ercise o f all such pow ers, ju risd iction , au th ority, and
du ties. T he public service com m ission is hereby divested of th e ad m in istration
o f chapter 232, L aw s o f 1927, and w here the term “ com m ission ” is used in said
chapter it sh a ll be in terp reted to m ean th e com m ission o f labor and in d u stry
as provided in th is act.
S ec. 6 Travel allowance.—The commissioners of the department of labor and

.

industry, while acting in the performance of their official duties, together with
the officers and employees thereof, shall be entitled to receive from the State
their actual necessary expenses while absent from the city of Topeka on official
business, whicli amount shall be paid by the treasurer of State on the order
T
of the State auditor, an itemized sworn statement thereof having first been filed
with the commission and approved by it.
Approved March 12, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of beauty parlors; ch. 217; Credit unions, ch. 141; Absent voters, ch. 179.]
MAINE
ACTS OF 1929
C h a p te r 146. —Department

of labor and industry

(Page 119)

[This act amends sec. 15, ch. 49, R. S., 1916, so as to read as follows:]
Report required.—The person in charge o f any factory, work­
shop, or other industrial establishment shall within ten days after the
occurrence, report in writing to the commissioner of labor and industry all
deaths, accidents, or serious physical injuries sustained by any person therein
or on the premises, stating as fully as possible the cause of the death or the
extent and cause of the injury, and the place where the injured person has
been sent, with such other or further information relative thereto as may
be required by said commissioner, who may investigate the causes thereof and
require such precautions to be taken as will prevent the recurrence of similar
happenings. No statement contained in any such report shall be admissible
in evidence in any action arising out of the death or accident therein reported.
The term “ serious physical injuries,” as used in this section, shall be construed
to mean every accident which results in the death of the employee or causes
his absence from work for at least six days thereafter. The provisions of this
section shall not apply to persons, firms, or corporations obliged by law to
report such deaths, accidents, and injuries to the Maine Industrial Accident
Commission.
S ectio n 15.

Approved March 26, 1929.




MAINE— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9
C hapter

45

179.—Employment of women and children
(Page 143)

[This act amends secs. 4 and 5, ch. 350, P. L. 1915 (see R. S., 1916, pages 1650,
1651), so as to read as follows:]
S ection 4.* Time for meals.— N o fem ale sh all, except in cases o f em ergency or
extraord in ary public requirem ent a s provided in section 3 o f th is act, be em ­
ployed or perm itted to w ork for m ore th an six hours con tin u ou sly a t one tim e
in any estab lish m en t or occupation nam ed in section s 1 and 3 o f th is a c t in
w hich th ree or m ore such fe m a le s are em ployed w ith ou t an in terv a l o f a t le a s t
one h o u r ; excep t th a t such fem a le m ay be so em ployed for n ot m ore th an six
and one-half hou rs continuou sly a t one tim e if such em ploym ent en d s n ot la ter
than h alf-p ast 1 o’clock in th e afternoon and i f sh e is th en d ism issed fo r th e
rem ainder o f the day, bu t th is sh a ll not apply to any teleph one exch an ge w h ere
th e operator du rin g th e n ig h t is n ot required to operate a t th e sw itchb oard
continuou sly but is able to sleep th e m ajor p art o f th e nigh t.
S ection 5. Law to " e posted.—Every employer except those hereinafter
b

designated, shall post and keep posted in a conspicuous place in every room in
any establishment or place of occupation named in sections 1 and 3 of this
act in which females or male minors under 16 years of age are employed, except
in any telephone exchange employing less than five female operators, a
printed notice stating the number of hours such female or male minors are
required or permitted to work on each day of the week, the hours of beginning
and ending, and the recess allowed for meals: Provided, however, That every
employer engaged in furnishing public service or in any other kind of business
in respect to which the State department of labor and industry shall find that
public necessity or convenience requires the employment of women or male
minors as aforesaid by shifts during different periods or parts of the day shall
post in a conspicuous place, in every room in which such persons are em­
ployed, a printed notice stating separately the hours of employment for each
shift or tour of duty and the amount of time allowed for meals. The printed
form of such notice shall be furnished by the commissioner of labor and in­
dustry and State factory inspector.
The employment of any such female or male minor for a longer time in any
day than that stated in the printed notice, or, in case the hours named in such
notice are less than as provided in sections 1 and 3 of this act, the employment
of any such female or male minor for a longer time in any day than as pro­
vided in sections 1 and 3 of this act, shall be deemed a violation of the pro­
visions of this section except in cases of emergency or extraordinary public
requirement as provided in section 3 of this act, and in such cases no employ­
ment in excess of the hours authorized under the provisions of this act shall be
considered as legalized until a written report of the day and hour of its
occurrence and its duration is sent to the commissioner of labor and industry
and State factory inspector. Whenever the nature of the business makes it
impracticable to fix the recess allowed for meals at the same time for all
females or male minors employed, the commissioner of labor and industry and
State factory inspector may issue a permit dispensing with the posting of the
hours when the recess allowed for meals begins and ends, and requiring only
the posting of the total number of hours which females or male minors are
required or permitted to work on each day of the week, and the hours of be­
ginning and stopping such work. Such permit shall be kept by such employer
upon such premises, and exhibited to the commissioner of labor and industry
and State factory inspector, his deputy, or any authorized agent of the labor
department, who is hereby authorized to enforce this act.
Approved April 2, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Mothers’ pensions,
ch. 204 (p. 162) ; Examination, etc., of aviators, ch. 265 (p. 228); Examination,
etc., of chauffeurs, ch. 327 (p. 334) ; Mechanics’ liens, ch. 279 (p. 245) : Assign­
ment of wages—Wage brokers, chs. 195 (p. 156), 208 (p. 168), 319 (p. 323), 324
(p. 330); Sunday labor, ch. 303 (p. 304).]




46

PAi.iT 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LAB Oil LAWS

MARYLAND
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter 265. —Exemption

of wages from attachment

[This act adds sections 33A to 33F, inclusive, to section 33, art. 9, Code of
1924, relating to the payment of judgments for certain necessaries of life.]
Approved April 11, 1929.
C hapter

423.—Employment of children—General provisions

[This act merely repeals section 53, art. 100, Code of 1924 (sec. 50, ch. 840,
Code of 1914). The specific appropriation of $17,000 for enforcement of the act
is superfluous since the adoption of the budget amendment.]
Approved April 11, 1929.
C hapter 491. —Employment

of children—General provisions

[This act amends sec. 18, art. 100, Code of 1924 (sec. 18, art. 100, Code of
1914), so as to read as follows:]
S ection 18. Evidence of school attendance.—The school record required by
this subtitle shall be filled out and signed by the principal or chief executive
officer of the school which such child has last attended and shall be furnished to
a child who after due examination and investigation may be entitled thereto;
it shall contain a statement certifying that the child has regularly attended
the public schools or private or parochial schools for not less than such a mini­
mum period of attendance as is now or may hereafter be prescribed by law
during any period of 12 months after such child shall have arrived at the age
of 13 years and that such child has completed the course prescribed for ele­
mentary schools in the city or county in which said child resides. Such school
record shall give the name, date of birth, and residence of the child as shown on
the records of the school and the name of the parent or guardian or custodian.
The provisions of this section relating to school attendance shall not be
enforced against any child who has been granted a permit under the provisions
of chapter 192 of the Acts of 1906: Provided, however, That such child is able
otherwise to meet the educational requirements of this section.
Approved April 11, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Mothers* pensions,
ch. 401; Examinations, etc., of aviators, ch. 318; Vocational rehabilitation—
State and Federal cooperation, ch. 201; Credit unions, ch. 337.]

MASSACHUSETTS
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

117.—Payment of wages—Weekly pay day

[This act amends sec. 148, ch. 149, G. L. (as amended by ch. 165, Acts of
1925), by providing an imprisonment in the house of correction for not more
than two months or both fine and imprisonment, for violation of the act.]
Approved March 14, 1929.
C hapter 321.—Insurance

of employees—Group insurance

[This act amends sec. 133, ch. 175, G. L. (as amended by ch. 141, Acts of
1921) and as last amended by ch. 244, Acts of 1928, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 133. Definition.—Group life insurance is hereby defined to be that
form of life insurance covering (a) not less than 50 employees, with or with­
out medical examination, written under a policy issued to the employer, the
premium on which is to be paid by the employer or by the employer and em­
ployees jointly, and insuring only all of his employees, or all of any class or




MICHIGAN— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

47

classes thereof determined by conditions pertaining to the employment, or by
duration of service in which case no employee shall be excluded if he has been
for one year or more in the employ of the person taking out the policy, for
amounts of insurance based upon some plan precluding individual selection,
and for the benefit of persons other than the employer: Provided, That when
the premium is to be paid by the employer and employees jointly and the bene­
fits of the policy are offered to all eligible employees, not less than 75 per cent
of such employees may be so insured, or not less than 40 per cent if each em­
ployee belonging to the insured group has been medically examined and found
acceptable for ordinary insurance by an individual policy; or (b) the mem­
bers of any trade-union or other association of wage workers described in
section 29, with or without medical examination, written under a policy issued
to such union or association, the premium on which is to be paid by the union
or association and the members thereof jointly, and insuring all of the members
thereof for amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will preclude
individual selection, and for the benefit of persons other than the union or
association or any officers thereof: Provided, That when the premium is to be
paid by the union or association and its members jointly and the benefits of the
oolicy are offered to all members, not less than 75 per cent of such members
may be so insured: And provided further, That any member or members in­
sured under the policy may apply for amounts of insurance additional to those
granted by said policy, in which case any percentage of the members may be
insured for additional amounts if they pass satisfactory medical examinations.
Approved March 14, 1929.
C h a p te r 857. —Department

of labor and industries

[This act adds 3 new sections (9A. 9B, 9C) after section 9, ch. 23, G. L.
1921, establishing in the department of labor and industries a commission for
the promotion and development of the industrial, etc., resources of the State.]
Approved May 29, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Protection of wages
of employees, etc., of contractors, chs. 110, 111; Assignment of wages—Wage
brokers, ch. 159; Sunday labor, ch. 118; Retirement of public employees, chs.
366, 367; Absent voters, ch. 93; Investigative commissions, chs. 43 (Res. p. 533),
54 (Res. p. 539).]

MICHIGAN
ACTS OF
A c t N o. 102. — Employment

1929

of children — General provisions

[This act amends secs. 10, 11, and 23, act No. 285, Acts of 1909, being secs.
5331, 5332, and 5344, C. L., 1915, as follows:]
S ection 5331 (10). Age limit—permits.—[Minors over 14 years of age may be
employed during the vacation periods in any occupation which is not prohibited
by the department of labor to minors between 16 and 18 years of age.]
S ec. 5332 (11). Dangerous occupations.—No person under the age of 18 years
shall be allowed to clean machinery while in motion nor employed in any
hazardous employment, or where their health may be injured or morals de­
praved, nor shall females be unnecessarily required in any employment to
remain standing constantly. No child under the age of 16 years shall be
employed in or about any theater, variety show, moving picture show, burlesque
show, or other kind of playhouse, music or dance hall, pool room or billiard
room: Provided, however, That any person over 16 and under 18 years of age
may be employed in any occupation, other than the cleaning of machinery while
in motion, subject to the following conditions: Such employment shall be for
a total of not more than 54 hours in any week nor more than 10 hours in any
one day. The occupation in which such person is employed shall be approved
by the department of labor and industry as not being injurious to health or
morals or unduly hazardous. The employer must file the permit or certificate
as required by section 10 of this act This act shall not be construed so as




48

PART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

to prevent children under 16 years of age from being employed by traveling
theatrical companies whose employment consists of acting a part in the produc­
tion of such company, when in the opinion of the commission or any authorized
representative, such employment is not detrimental to the health or morals
of such children.
Factory, etc., regulations
S ection 5344 (23). Change in buildings.—Factory inspectors shall have power
to order all improvements herein specified, such as the repairing of elevators,
the installment of wash and dressing rooms, and water closets. In addition,
factory inspectors shall have power to order the installation of proper and
adequate ventilating devices in manufacturing, mercantile, and other establish­
ments where, by reason of the nature of the work carried on therein, such
inspectors may in the exercise of their discretion consider such devices neces­
sary for the preservation of the health or safety of the persons therein employed;
such devices to supply fresh air in equal quantities to the exhausted air at
room temperature not to exceed six changes per hour or less as conditions may
require in such establishment. When such improvements are found necessary
orders for same shall be served on the owner of the building or premises:
Provided, That whenever the owner of such buildings or premises as mentioned
in this act be a nonresident of this State said order may be made on his
resident agent or the tenant of such buildings or premises. If the tenant
be required to make such improvements he may deduct the cost thereof from the
amount of rent for use of such buildings or premises.
Approved April 29, 1929.
C hapter 154.—Insurance

of employees—Group imurance

[This act amends subdiv. 2, ch. II, part 3, act No. 256, Acts of 1917 (as
added by sec. 9-a, act No. 372, Acts of 1925), so as to read as follows:]
S ection 9-a. Definition.— (1 ) Group life insurance is hereby declared to be
that form of life insurance covering not less than 25 employees with or without
medical examination, written under a policy issued to the employer, the
premium on which is to be paid by the employer or by the employer and the
employees jointly, and insuring only all of his employees, or all of any class
or classes thereof determined by conditions pertaining to the employment, for
amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will preclude individual
selection, for the benefit of persons other than the employer: Provided, however,
That when the premium is to be paid by the employer and employee jointly
and the benefits of the policy are offered to all eligible employees, not less
than 75 per centum of such employees may be so insured.
(2)
The following form of life insurance is hereby declared to be group life
insurance within the meaning of this chapter:
(a) Life insurance covering the members of one or more companies, bat­
teries, troops, or other units of the National Guard of any State, written under
a policy issued to the commanding general of the National Guard who shall
be deemed to be the employer for the purposes of this chapter, the premium
on which is to be paid by the members of such units for the benefit of persons
other than the employer: Provided, however, That when the benefits of the
policy are offered to all eligible members of a unit of the National Guard, not
less than 75 per centum of the members of such a unit must be so insured.
(b) Life insurance covering the members of any labor union, or State asso­
ciations of teachers or postal clerks written under a policy issued to such union
or association which shall be deemed to be the employer for the purposes of
this chapter, the premium on which is to be paid by the union or association
or by the union or association and its members jointly, and insuring only all
of its members for amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will
preclude individual selection, for the benefit of persons other than the union
or association or its officials: Provided, however, That when the premium is
to be paid by the union or association and its members jointly and the benefits
are offered to all exigible members, not less than 75 per centum of such members
may be so insured: Provided further, That when members apply and pay for
additional amounts of insurance, a smaller percentage of members may be in­
sured for such additional amounts if they pass satisfactory medical examination.
Approved May 16, 1929.




MICHIGAN— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9
A ct N o.

49

299.—Employment of women and children

[This act amends sec. 5380, C. L., 1915 (was sec. 9„No. 285, Acts of 1909) as
amended by act 21, Acts of 1927, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 5330. Nine-hour day.—No male under the age of 18 years, and no
female shall be employed, permitted, or suffered to work in any factory, mill,
warehouse, workshop, quarry, clothing, dressmaking, or millinery establishment,
or any place where the manufacture of any kinds of goods is carried on, or
where any goods are prepared for manufacturing, or in any laundry, store,
shop, or any other mercantile establishment, or in any office or restaurant,
theater, concert hall, music hall, hotel, hospital, or operating an elevator, or
on street or electric railways, for a period longer than an average of 9 hours
a day or 54 hours in any week nor more than 10 hours in any one day; and
all such establishments shall keep posted a copy of this section printed in
large type, in a conspicuous place. In establishments having a time clock such
copy shall be posted near the time clock. Copies of this section suitable for
posting shall be furnished upon the application of any employer by the com­
mission: Provided, however, That the provision of this section in relation to
the hours of employment shall not apply to nor affect any person, corporation,
or association engaged in preserving and shipping perishable goods, in fruit
and vegetable canning, or fruit packing establishments, or students and grad­
uate nurses in hospitals or nurses in fraternal or charitable homes. Such em­
ployment shall be approved by the commission, or any duly authorized repre­
sentative, as not being injurious to the health of the person or persons so en­
gaged. No female under the age of 18 years shall be employed in any manu­
facturing establishment between the hours of 6 o’clock p. m. and 6 o’clock a. m.
No child under the age of 16 years shall be employed in any manufacturing
establishment or workshop, quarry, mine, or messenger service in this State
between the hours of 6 o’clock p. m. and 6 o’clock a. m. No child under the
age of 18 years shall be employed between the hours of 10 o’clock p. m. and 5
o’clock a. m. in the transmission, distribution, or delivery of messages or
merchandise.
Approved May 23, 1929.
A ct N o.

301.—Factory, etc., regulations

[This act amends sec. 5351, C. L., 1915 (was sec. 30, No. 285, Acts of 1909),
so as to read as follows:]
S ection 5351. Speed of fans.—It shall be the duty of any person, company,
or corporation operating any such factory or workshop, to provide the necessary
fans or blowers to be connected with such pipe or pipes, as above set forth,
which shall be run at such rate of speed as will produce a velocity of air in such
suction or discharge pipes of at least 9,000 feet per minute or ah equivalent
suction or pressure of air equal to raising a column of water not less than five
inches high in a U-shaped tube. All branch pipes must enter the main trunk
pipe at an angle of 45 degrees or less. All bends, turns, or elbows in such
pipes must be made with easy, smooth surfaces having a radius in the throat of
not less than two inches diameter, of the pipe on which they are connected.
Approved May 23, 1929.
A ct

No. 309.—Department of Labor
(Page 831)

[Act No. 285, Acts of 1909, secs. 38-53 inclusive (secs. 5359 to 5374, C. L.,
1915) is repealed.]
Approved May 24, 1929.
A ct

No. 309.—Employment of women and children
(Page 831)

[Act No. 265, Acts of 1889 (secs. 5592 to 5599, C. L., 1915), is repealed.]
[Act No. 152, Acts of 1887 (secs. 5600 to 5603, C. L. 1915), is repealed.]
Approved May 24, 1929.




50

PART 2.— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS
A c t No. 321 .—Private

employment offices

[This act repeals act Nq. 255, Acts of 1925, and enacts a new act as follows:]
S ection 1. Administration.—[A State superintendent of private employment
bureaus under the department of labor is appointed to administer the act.]
S eo. 2. Definition.—[The terms “ employment agent ” or “ agency,” “ theatrical
engagement,” “ emergency engagement,” 4 employer,” “ employee,” and “ person ”
4
are defined.]
Sec. 3. License.—[License is required; charitable organizations not charging
a fee are not included under the act]
Secs. 4-6. Application, investigation, etc.—[Application for license must state
name and address of applicant, etc.; an investigation as to the character and
financial standing of the applicant is made.]
Seo. 7. Bond.—[Bond of $1,000 is required conditioned on the observance of
the act.]
Seo. 8. License fees.—[Fees from $50 to $200 are required, based on popula­
tion of city or town of applicant.]
S ec. 9. Form of license.—[License shall state name of employment agent
or agency, location of office, person to be charged with general management,
etc. Application must be granted or refused within 30 days from date of
filing.]
Sec. 10. Posting.—[Parts of act must be posted in the place of business.]
S ec . 11. Duration of license.—[License shall remain in effect until December
31, next after issue.]
S ecs . 12, 13. Suspension, revocation, transfer of license.—[Authorizes super­
intendent of private employment bureaus to suspend and revoke license for
violations of act. No transfer of licenses is permitted.]
Sec. 14. Place of business.—[Business must be maintained at place specified
in the license, unless consent is obtained from superintendent.]
Secs. 15, 16, 17. Classification of licenses.—[Three classes of licenses are pro­
vided for. Each must be hung in a conspicuous place in the employment office;
receipts must be issued showing particulars of all transactions; records of
orders received and acceptances must be kept open for inspection during busi­
ness hours; agents are prohibited from sending employees to place of employ­
ment unless they have bona fide order; provisions for refunding fees are pro­
vided.]
S ec. 18. False advertising.—[False notice or advertisement for employees or
for obtaining employment is forbidden.]
S ec. 19. Immoral resorts.—[Sending any female to an immoral resort is
forbidden.]
S ec. 20. Fraud, etc.—[Fraud and fe e splitting is prohibited.]
S ec . 21. Violations.—[Violations are punishable by a fine of $300 to $1,000 or
imprisonment for not more than 4 years or both.]
Approved May 28, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Apprenticeship, No.
309 (p. 839) ; Mothers’ pensions, No. 33; Examination, etc., of aviators, No. 148;
Examination, etc., of plumbers, Nos. 202, 266; Mechanics’ liens, No. 264; Credit
unions, No. 303; Convict labor, No. 309, p. 826.]

MINNESOTA
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

234.—Employment of children—General provisions

[This act amends secs. 4094 and 4103 (as amended by ch. 388, Acts of 1927)
G. S., 1923, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 4094. Employment under 14 years.—No child under 14 years of age
shall be employed, permitted or suffered to work at any time, in or in connection
with any factory, mill, or workshop, or in any mine, or in the construction of
any building, or about any engineering work; it shall be unlawful for any
person, firm, or corporation to employ or exhibit any child under 14 years of
age in any business or service whatever, during any part of the term during
which the public schools of the district in which the child resides are in
session .




MINNESOTA— ACTS OP 1929

51

Sbo. 4103 (as amended by ch. 388, Acts of 1927). Employment under 10, 16,
and 18 years.—No person shall employ or permit any child under the age of
36 years to serve or work as an employee of such person in any of the following
occupations:
Sewing or adjusting belts used on machinery; oiling or assisting in oiling,
wiping, or cleaning machinery; operating or assisting in operating circular or
band saws, wood shapers, wood jointers, planers, sandpaper or wood-polishing
machinery, emery or polishing wheels used for polishing metal, wood turning
or boring machinery, stamping machines in sheet-metal and tinware manu­
facture, stamping machines in washer and nut factories, operating corrugating
rolls used in roofing factories; operating a steam boiler, steam machinery, or
other steam generating apparatus; setting pins in bowling alleys; operating
or assisting in operating dough grates or cracker machinery; operating wire
or iron straightening machinery; operating or assisting in operating rollingmill machinery; punches or shears, washing, grinding or mixing m ill; operating
calender rolls in rubber manufacturing; operating or assisting in operating
laundry machinery; preparing or assisting in preparing any composition in
which dangerous or poisonous acids are used; operating or assisting in operat­
ing any passenger or freight elevator; manufacturing of goods for immoral
purposes; nor in any other employment or occupation dangerous to the life,
limb, health, or morals of such child.
No female under 16 years of age shall be employed where such employment
requires such female to stand constantly during such employment.
No child under the age of 18 years shall be employed as a rope or wire walker,
contortionist, or at flying rings, horizontal bars, trapeze or other aerial acts,
pyramiding, weight lifting, balancing or casting acts, or in any practices or
exhibitions dangerous or injurious to the life, limb, health, or morals of such
child.
No child under the age of 10 years, whether or not a resident of this State,
may be employed or exhibited in any theatrical exhibition except in the cases
hereinafter referred to.
No child over the age of 10 years and under the age of 16 years, whether or
not a resident of this State, shall be employed or exhibited in any theatrical
entertainment except with the permission of the industrial commission: Pro­
vided, That under a permit hereinafter provided for one or more children under
the age of 16 years may participate in a family group with either or both of
their parents in instrumental musical performance not prohibited as being
dangerous or injurious to the health, life, limb, or morals of such child or
children and not detrimental to their education: And provided, That under
such a permit a child or children under the age of 16 years may participate in
legitimate dramatic performances by adults where some part or parts can only
be portrayed by a child or children and where no singing, dancing, or acrobatic
performance nor any practice or exhibition dangerous or injurious to the life,
limbs, health, or morals is performed by such child or children.
In the event it is desired to employ or exhibit in any theatrical entertainment
a child within the age limits permitted by law, during that portion of the year
when such employment or exhibition is permitted, written application shall be
made to the industrial commission, specifying the name of the child, its age,
and the name and residence of its parent or guardian, the nature, and kind
of such performances; the dates, duration, and number of performances desired,
together with the place and character of the exhibition.
Application for any permit under this act shall be made at least 72 hours
before the first performance at which it is desired to exhibit such child.
The industrial commission shall, through its division of women and children,
investigate each application and shall have power to grant a permit for such
employment or exhibition not prohibited by law and for any period during
which such employment or exhibition is not prohibited by law after it shall
first find that the health, education or school work, morals and welfare will not
be detrimentally affected by such employment or exhibition or by the environ­
ment in which the same is rehearsed or given. Such permit shall specify the
name and residence of the child and the nature and date of performances and
the number and duration thereof permitted.
The industrial commission shall revoke any permit whenever in its opinion
the exhibition of any child in any performance is detrimental to its health,
welfare, or morals, or is interfering with its education.
Nothing contained in this section or in section 4094, General Statutes 1923,
shall prohibit the appearance of any child in an entertainment given by one or



52

PART 2.— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

more religious or educational organizations or by a neighborhood association of
parents of the children who may perform before it, or in any recital connected
with the teaching of the art or practice of music; but this proviso shall not be
construed as authorizing the appearance of any child in any such entertainment
at which an admission fee is charged unless the entire program is furnished
by and for the benefit of such religious or educational organization or neighbor­
hood association at such recital unless the entire program is furnished by the
pupils of the teachers sponsoring the recital.
Any person violating any of the provisions of this act shall be guilty of a
misdemeanor.
Approved April 18, 1929.
C hapter

260.—Labor organizations—Injunctions

[This act amends sec. 4256, G. S., 1923, so as to read as follows:]
4256. Injunctions limited.—No restraining order or injunction shall
be granted by any court of this State, or any judge or judges thereof in any
case between an employer and employee or between employers and employees,
or between employees or between persons employed and persons seeking em­
ployment, involving or growing out of a dispute concerning terms or conditions
of employment, except after notice and a hearing in court and shown to be
necessary to prevent irreparable injury to property, or to a property right of
the party making the application, for which injury there is no adequate remedy
at law, and such property or property right must be described with particu­
larity in the application, which must be in writing and sworn to by the appli­
cant or by his agent or attorney: Provided, That a temporary restraining order
may be issued without notice and hearing upon a proper showing that violence
is actually being caused or is imminently probable on the part of the person
or persons sought to be restrained: And provided, That in such restraining order
all parties to the action shall be similarly restrained.
Approved April 19, 1929.
S ection

C hapter

293.—Private employment offices

[This act amends sec. 3, ch. 347, Acts of 1925 (and repeals secs. 4246, 4247,
4248, G. S., 1923). The industrial commission is empowered to refuse to
issue a license when upon examination it is found that the character of the
applicant makes him unfit to be an employment agent, or the premises are
unfit for such use, or that the number of licensed employment agents or public
employment agencies in the community are sufficient to supply the needs of
employers and employees.]
Approved April 23, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Mothers’ pensions,
ch. 101; Examination, etc., of aviators, ch. 290; Examination, etc., of barbers,
ch. 270, 386; Examination, etc., of chauffeurs, ch. 433; Mechanics’ liens, ch.
302, 314; Sunday labor, ch. 308; Protection of wages of employees, etc., of con­
tractors, ch. 369; Old age pensions, ch. 47; Retirement of public employees, chs.
106, 191; Cooperative associations, ch. 171; Absent voters, chs. 29, 168; Convict
labor, chs. 138, 348.]

MISSOURI
ACTS OF 1929
Employment of children—General provisions
(Page 130)

[This act repeals secs. 1 to 14, pages 184 to 188, Acts of 1921, and in lieu
new7 sections are enacted, to read as follows:]
S ection 1. Age limit.—It shall be unlawful for any child in this State under
the age of 14 years to be employed, permitted or suffered to work at any
gainful occupation except in (a) the sale and distribution of newspapers, maga­
zines and periodicals; (b) agricultural labor and domestic service, or any
service performed for parent or guardian.



MISSOURI— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

53

S ec. 2. Authorized employment.—It shall be unlawful for any child in
this State under the age of 16 years to be employed, permitted or suffered
to work at any gainful occupation unless such employment is authorized as
in this act, or otherwise by law provided: Provided, That during the hours the
public schools are not in session, children between the ages of 12 and 16 years
may be gainfully employed except in industries which employ more than
six persons.
S ec. 3. Hours.—No child under the age of 16 years shall be employed, per­
mitted or suffered to work at any gainful occupation for more than eight
hours in any day, nor more than 48 hours or six days in any one week, nor
before the hour of 7 o’clock in the forenoon nor after the hour of 7 o’clock in
the afternoon of any one day: Provided, however, That the provisions of this
act shall not apply to any child engaged in the sale of newspapers, magazines,
and periodicals, nor to agriculture labor and domestic service nor to any
work, labor or service performed for or under the personal supervision or
control of the parent or guardian of such child, nor when school is not in
session to industries which employ less than six persons.
Sec. 4. Prohibited occupations.—No child under the age of 16 years shall be
employed, permitted or suffered to work at any of the following occupations
or in any of the following positions: Upon any scaffolding, nor erecting or
repairing of electric wires or lines, nor in operating any railway or railroad
engine or car, or street or interurban car; nor in connection with any con­
struction or repair work on or for any railway or railroad, street or interurban
line or tracks; nor upon or in the operation of any passenger or freight ele­
vator ; nor in the operation of any automobile, truck or motor vehicle; nor in
any concert hall, theater or cabaret; nor in any restaurant; except students
in high schools, colleges or universities who may be so employed with the ap­
proval of the school authorities, nor in any other occupations dangerous to
the life, health or limb, or injurious to the health or morale of children under
the age of 16.
Sec. 5. Issuance of permits.—Work permits shall be issued only by the
superintendent or principal of the public school of the district wherein such
child resides, or by some person appointed by an order of the board of direc­
tors, board of education, or body having local supervision of public schools.
The work permit shall show the name, age, sex, place of birth, date of birth,
and place of residence of the child together with the name and place of resi­
dence of his parent, guardian, or custodian and also the name and address
of the employer and the nature of the employment for which the work permit
was issued. No work permit shall be issued until the child accompanied by his
parent, guardian, or custodian, has appeared in person before the issuing officer
and he has received, examined, and approved the following papers, viz: (a)
A promise to employ at lawful work signed by the prospective employer of the
child for whom application for a work permit is made, (b) Evidence estab­
lishing the age of such child, wr
hieh shall consist of one of the following proofs
of age to be required in the order herein designated, as follows: (1) A copy
of the birth certificate duly attested by the officer in charge of the birth
records; which shall be prima facie evidence of the age of such child; (2) of
a certificate of baptism showing the date of birth and date of baptism of such
child; (3) a passport or duly attested transcript thereof; (4) an insurance
policy dated two years prior to the date of the work permit; (5) other docu­
mentary evidence such as a record of birth made in the family Bible, or other
book in which the records of the births of the members of the child’s family
are preserved; (6) if none of the above enumerated documentary proofs of age
is obtainable a record of age from the register of the school first attended
by such child and a statement signed by the family physician or the physician
designated herein to grant certificates of health and capacity to work showing
the physical age of the child, if accompanied by the affidavit of the parent,
guardian, or custodian, (c) Certificate of the physician of the public school
of the district in which such child resides, or of the physician designated by
the board of said school district, showing that he has examined the child and
upon examination finds that such child is in good mental and physical health
and is capable of performing labor without injury to his health and mental
development of such child, (d) Certificate of superintendent or principal of
the public school of the district in which such child resides, stating that such
child has completed the sixth grade of the course of study prescribed for the
public schools or the equivalent: Provided, That if all other requirements are
met the educational requirement may be waived for a special w ork permit
7




54

PART 2 .— TEXT AXD ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

different in form and color, to be valid only during the hours when the public
school of the district in which the child resides is not in session: Provided
further, That if all other requirements are met, no certificate of educational
attainment shall be required for a child permanently excused from attendance
at the public school because of mental incapacity to derive further benefit
from the educational facilities offered in the public school of the district in
which such child resides. Such excuse shall be given in writing by the super­
intendent of schools or a court of competent jurisdiction and a copy of such
excuse shall be sent to the State superintendent of schools and kept on file in
his office.
Sec. 6. Posting of permit.—Whenever any child under 16 years of age is
granted a work permit such shall be mailed by the issuing officer directly to
the employer of such child and the employer shall take and preserve on file the
work permit of such child, and shall keep posted in a conspicuous place in the
factory or where said child is employed, a list of all children employed under
the age of 16. Upon termination of the employment of any such child the work
permit of such child shall be forthwith transmitted by the employer to the
officer who issued the same and the parent, guardian, or custodian shall cause
the child to return to school. A new work permit may be issued for any child
whose work permit has been returned by the employer to the issuing officer
as herein provided, upon the presentation of a new promise to employ showing
the nature of the work and a new certificate of good health and capability to
work as provided in subsection c of section 5 of this act: Provided, That if
the former certificate of health was made upon an examination not more than
three months previous, a reexamination shall not be required.
S ec . 7. Form of permit, no fee charged.—No fee shall be charged for a work
permit issued under the provisions of this act. The forms for all work permits
shall be prepared by the State superintendent of public schools in accordance
with the provisions of section 5 of this act. Such blank work permits as may
be necessary to carry out the provisions of this act shall be furnished to the
board of directors, board of education or body having local supervision of
public schools of each school district by the State superintendent of public
schools.
Sec. 8. Enforcement of latv.—The commissioner of labor and industrial inspec­
tion is hereby charged with the enforcement of the provisions of this act and
all other laws regulating the employment of children and the commissioner of
labor and industrial inspection is hereby vested with the power and jurisdiction
to exercise such supervision over every employment as may be necessary
adequately to enforce and administer this law, including the right to enter any
place where children are employed and to inspect the premises and to call for
and inspect work permits. The issuing officer is hereby authorized to cancel
any work permit when it appears that it has been improperly granted or that
the child is being injured, or is likely to be injured by the employment. Notice
of such cancellation, with reasons therefor, shall be given immediately to the
person, firm, or corporation employing the child and thereafter it shall be
unlawful for any such person, firm, or corporation to continue to employ such
child.
S ec. 9. Evidence of age shown.— U pon th e req uest o f an y em ployer w ho
w ish e s to em ploy an y m inor, w ho rep resen ts h is age to be 16 y ea rs or m ore,
th e issu in g officer upon the p resentation o f evid en ce o f age a s herein provided
in th is act for child ren under 16 years of age, sh a ll issu e a certificate sh ow in g
th e age o f such m inor and said certificate sh all be accepted a s con clu sive
evid en ce o f th e age o f su ch m inor.
S ec. 10. Presence as presumptive evidence.—The presence of any child under

16 years of age in any place where labor is employed shall be presumptive
evidence that said child is employed therein.
S kc. 11. Violations.—Any person violating the provisions of this act shall
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor.
Approved June 11, 1929.
Mine regulations—State mining board—Powers and duties
(Page 25G)

[Article 111, ch. 69, R. S., 1919 (secs. 7528 to 7546), is repealed.]
Approved May 24, 1929.




MONTANA— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

55

Mine regulations
(Page 256)

[This act repeals and reenacts sec. 7494, art. 2, ch. 69, R. S., 1919, so as to
read as follows:]
S ection 7494. State bureau of mines, chief mime inspector, etc.—There is
hereby created a department to be known as the bureau of mines with its office
to be located at the State capitol. The governor shall appoint one mine
inspector, to be designated and known as State chief mine inspector, with
offices at the State capitol, who shall serve for a term of four years and receive
an annual salary of $3,000. The State chief mine inspector so appointed may
appoint, with the approval of the governor, two coal mine inspectors, each of
whom shall have had five years’ practical experience in coal mining, and four
lead, zinc, and other mine inspectors, each of whom shall have had five years’
practical experience in lead and zinc mining and each of the inspectors so
appointed shall receive an annual salary of $2,400 but in no case shall any
such inspector be a person interested in any mine. The State chief mine
inspector so appointed shall have authority to appoint a secretary of the bureau
of mines, who, in addition to other qualifications, shall be a competent
draughtsman and receive an annual salary of $2,400. The State chief mine
inspector and the assistant inspectors so appointed shall be allowed actual and
necessary expenses, and the same, together with all salaries, shall be paid out
of the mine inspection fund. It shall be the duty of the State chief mine
inspector so appointed, to classify, supervise, and direct the work of inspection
by the assistant inspectors who shall, at all times, be amenable to the chief
inspector, whose further duty it shall be to compile and make report to the
governor, annually, on the 1st day of January, in accordance with the existing
laws of the State in reference to mining.
Approved June 17, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of aviators, p. 124; Examination, etc., of beauty parlors, p. 218; Examination,
cl:c., of chauffeurs, p. 260; Assignment of wages—Wage brokers, p. 201;
Preference for local labor and domestic materials on public works, p. 257.]
MONTANA
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

116.—Hours of labor—Mines, smelters, etc.

[This act amends secs. 3073, 3079, and 3080, R. C., 1921, so as to read as
follows:]
S ection 3073. Violations.—Any person or persons, body corporate, agent,
manager, or employer, who shall violate any of the provisions of sections 3071
and 3072 of the Revised Codes of Montana, 1921, shall be guilty of a mis­
demeanor, and upon conviction thereof, for each offense, be subject to a fine
of not less than $100 or more than $600, or by imprisonment in the county jail
for a period of not less than one month or more than seven months, or by both
such fine and imprisonment.
Sec. 3079. Limit on public tcorks, etc.—A period of eight hours shall con­
stitute a day’s work in all works and undertakings carried on or aided by any
municipal, county, or State government, first-class school districts, and on all
contracts let by them, and for all janitors, except in courthouses of sixth and
seventh class counties, engineers, firemen, caretakers, custodians, and laborers
employed in or about any buildings, works, or grounds used or occupied for any
purpose by any municipal, county, or State governments, school districts of
first class, and in mills and smelters for the treatment of ores, and in under­
ground mines, and in the washing, reducing, and treatment of coal.
Sec. 3080. Violations.—Every person, corporation, stock company, or associa­
tion of persons who violates any of the provisions of the preceding section shall
be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by
a fine of not less than $100 nor more than $600, or by imprisonment in the




56

PART 2.— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

county jail for not less than 30 days nor more than 7 months, or by both such
fine and imprisonment.
Approved March 12, 1929.
Digests, etc,
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of barbers, ch. 127; Examination, etc., of beauty parlors, ch. 104; Mechanics’
liens, chi 20; Assignment of wages—wage brokers, ch. 112; Credit unions, ch.
105; Convict labor, ch. 173.]
NEBRASKA
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

87.—Employment of children—School attendance

[This act amends sec. 6508a, C. S., 1922, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 6508a. Requirement.—Every person residing in school districts other
than city and metropolitan city school districts within the State of Nebraska
who has legal or actual charge or control of any child not less than 7 nor more
than 16 years of age shall cause such child to attend regularly the public,
private, denominational or parochial day schools for a period of not less than
six months each year in which the public day schools of such school districts
are in session, unless the school term be 7 months, in which case the child
shall be caused to regularly attend such school or schools for a period of not
less than 130 days each year, unless the school term shall be for 8 months,
in which case the child shall be caused to regularly attend such school or schools
for a period of not less than 145 days each year, unless the school term be 9
months in which case the child shall be caused to regularly attend such school
or school for a period of not less than 160 days each year, unless such child
has graduated from the high school maintained by the district in which he
resides or from a high school of equal grade; or if no high school is main­
tained by the district in which he resides, unless such child has graduated
T
from the school maintained in the district or from a school of equal grade.
Every person residing in city and metropolitan city school districts within the
State of Nebraska who has legal or actual charge or control of any child not less
than 7 nor more than 16 years of age, shall cause such child to attend regularly
the public, private, denominational or parochial day schools for the entire time
each year in which the public day schools of such school district are in session,
unless such child has graduated from the high school maintained by the district
in which he resides or from a high school of equal grade: Provided, That in
any city school district the attendance of such child at any time during the cal­
endar year for a period equaling the period of regular term of school in such
district within the calendar year shall be accepted as compliance with this act.
Approved March 15, 1929.
C hapter

138.—Factory, etc., regulations

[This act amends sec. 7693, C. S., 1922, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 7693* Safety appliances, approval.—All safety appliances prescribed
by this article shall be subject to the approval of the department of labor.
(a) The department of labor is directed and empowered to formulate, adopt,
publish, and enforce such safety codes, orders, rules, and standards as it deems
necessary, in order that all employments and places of employment shall be,
in all respects, so constructed, equipped, arranged, operated, and maintained as
to provide reasonable and adequate protection to the lives, health, and safety
of all persons employed therein and frequenting the same, as the nature of
the employment will reasonably permit. Such codes as may be adopted shall
be subject to modification, amendment or repeal at any time, in the discretion
of the department,
(b) The department of labor shall, from time to time, create commissions
composed of employers, employees, and such other persons as the department
may designate, to assist it in formulating, adopting, amending or repealing
such codes, orders, rules, and standards. Before any code is adopted, amended
or repealed there shall be a public hearing thereon, notice of which hearing
shall be given such publicity as the department deems necessary. The depart­



NEVADA— ACTS OP 1929

57

ment may make or cause to be made such investigations and surveys as will
assist in the formulation and modification of such codes, orders, rules, and
standards.
(c) It shall be the duty of the department of labor to make periodical inspec­
tions of all places of employment for the purpose of enforcing the provisions
of such safety codes as have been adopted, and any inspector or employee of
the department of labor may order the discontinuance of the use or operation
of any machine or device which does not conform to the provisions of the
code or codes pertaining thereto. The department of labor shall adopt a
suitable label to be attached to any such machine or device stating that the
use or operation of such machine or device is dangerous and has been ordered
discontinued; such label shall not be removed except upon authority from the
department of labor; and any employer or employee who uses or operates, or
causes to be used or operated, any machine or device so labeled, shall be deemed
guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be fined for each
offense in any sum not less than $25, Taor more than $100. Railroad companies
engaged in interstate or foreign commerce are declared subject to the powers
of Congress and not within the provisions of this act
(d) Any person in interest, or his duly authorized agent, may file a petition
with the department of labor for a review of the validity or reasonableness
of any code, order, rule or standard made under the provisions of this section.
The department of labor shall, as soon as practicable thereafter, hold a hearing
to determine the issues raised, and shall give ample notice of the time and
place of such hearing to the petitioner, and to such other interested persons
as the department may determine.
(e) Any person in interest who is dissatisfied with the decision of the depart­
ment of labor may appeal therefrom to any court of competent jurisdiction
to determine the validity or reasonableness of said decision: Provided, That
the decision of the department shall be final unless within 30 days thereafter
one of the parties commences an action in the district court as provided
herein.
Approved April 23, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination,
etc., of aviators, ch. 34; Examination, etc., of barbers, ch. 154; Examination,
etc., of beauty parlors, ch. 156 ; Trade-marks of trade-unions, ch. 136; Absent
voters, ch. 96; Convict labor, ch. 137.]
NEVADA
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter 44.—Employment

of labor on public works

[This act amends sec. 3481, R. L., 1912, so as to read as follows:]
3481. Minimum wages of four dollars.—On all public works carried
on in the erection of public buildings by or for the State of Nevada, or by any
individual, firm, company, or corporation under contract with the State of
Nevada, unskilled labor shall be paid for at a rate of not less than $4 per
eight-hour day for each male person over the age of 18 years who shall be
employed at such labor.
Approved March 13, 1929.
S ection

C hapter

171.—Free public employment agencies

[This act amends sec. 1, ch. 121, Acts of 1923, so as to read as follows:]
1. State employment service.—The State free employment service
of the State of Nevada is hereby established. The commissioner of labor shall
also be the executive officer of the State free employment service, and the man­
agement of such service shall be under his supervision. He shall have authority
to appoint agents, who shall be under the direction of said commissioner of*
labor, as may be required in carrying out the provisions of this act, such
agents being located at convenient points in the State for the handling of
the movement of labor of all classes, with the view that labor will not be
S ection




58

PART 2.--- TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OP LABOR LAWS

congested at any one point, and to use their best endeavors to keep the supply
of labor filled at the places where it is desired and in seasonable time.
Such agents may be located at points in the State which will best serve
to carry out the provisions and intent of this act, and the commissioner in
charge has power to enter into agreements with the governing bodies of cities,
towns, or counties which desire such service, to use a portion of the fund
provided by the State to assist in the maintenance of any such service put
into effect by such governing bodies, or he may establish offices at points where
he deems it to be for the best interest of employment, and maintain the same.
The commissioner of labor, in the capacity of head of the State free employ­
ment service, is hereby empowered to employ such clerical assistants as are
necessary to carry out the provisions of this law and fix their compensation; to
secure and distribute the necessary books and forms for keeping a record
of the movement of labor, registration and placements and all reports required
to be made to that end. The said commissioner is authorized to attend con­
ferences outside the State in cooperation with government officers and other
State employment officials, relative to labor and employment conditions, and
he shall be entitled to his necessary expenses upon any such attendance, said
amounts to be paid out of the State free employment service fund upon
approval of the State board of examiners.
Approved March 28, 1929.

.

C hapter

194.—Mine regulations—Bureau of mines

S ection 1 Office created.—There is hereby established a bureau of mines of
the State of Nevada, which shall be under the direction of the board of regents
of the University of Nevada, who shall serve without compensation, but w ho
r
shall be reimbursed for the actual expenses incurred in the performance of their
official duties. The said board shall appoint as director a competent mining
engineer to be known as the director of the bureau of mines, and upon his
nomination such assistants and employees as the said board shall deem neces­
sary. Said board may also determine the compensation of all persons employed
by the bureau of mines, and may remove them at will.
S eo. 2. Purposes.— S aid bureau o f m ines sh a ll h a v e fo*r its o b je c ts:
(1) To, by questionnaire or otherwise, conduct a thorough mineral survey of
the State and to catalogue each and every mineral deposit and occurrence, both
metallic and nonmetallic of whatsoever nature, together with its location and
name and address of discoverer, owner, ol* agent; to make analysis of same; to
determine its constituent parts, only, for the prospector or owner when so re­
quested, and to serve as a bureau of information and exchange on Nevada
mining.
(2) The collection, compilation, and publishing of statistics of all kinds
relative to Nevada mining, such as production, values, efficiency, reports,
methods, mill statistics, and other things of interest and importance of every
mine operator of this as well as other States.
(3) The collection of a library of bibliography of all literature pertaining to
Nevada mining and geology.
(4 ) Experimentation, and publishing of results, of Nevada problems of wet,
dry, and electrostatic concentration, dry placer, flotation methods, etc.
(5) The collection of typical geological and mineralogical specimens: Pro­
vided, however, That collections of geological and mineralogical specimens may
be maintained and displayed elsewhere within or without the State.
(6) The education of the miner and prospector through lectures and pub­
lications.
(7) The collection of models, drawings, and descriptions of appliances used
in mining and metallurgical work.
(8) The consideration of such other kindred scientific and economic ques­
tions as in the judgment of the board shall be deemed of value to the people
of the State.
S ec. 3. Cooperation.—It shall be the duty of all departments of the State
government and its various schools of mines to render full cooperation to the
bureau of mines in the acquisition and compilation of all such data.
S ec. 4. Illegal acts.— I t sh a ll be ille g a l fo r the director or a n y attach^ o f th e
bureau o f m ines to receive a com m ission or to act a s agen t or broker of, or
fo r a n y purchaser, owner, or h is or th eir a g en ts o f a m in in g property, or to
a ct in an y other th an a w h o lly im p artial w a y w h ile so em ployed.




NEW JERSEY— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

59

S ec . 5. Annual report.— The board shall cause to be prepared an annual
report showing the progress and condition of the bureau, together with such
other information as they may deem necessary or useful, or as the board may
require.
S ec. 6. Disposition of reports.—The regular and special reports of the bureau
of mines shall be printed as the board may direct, and the reports may be
distributed or sold by the board as the interests of the State or science may
demand, and all moneys obtained by the sale of said reports shall be paid into
the State treasury.
Seo. 7. [An appropriation of $5,000 annually for 2 years is made to carry
out the provisions of the act.]
Approved March 29, 1929.
Digests, etc.

[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Mothers’ pensions,
ch. 42; Examinations, etc., of barbers, ch. 131; Examination, etc., of hoistingmachine operators, ch. 92; Preference for local labor and domestic materials
on public works, ch. 60; Rates of wages of employees on public works, ch. 44;
Absent voters, ch. 209.]

NEW HAMPSHIRE
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

93.—Hours of labor

[This act amends ch. 176, P. L., 1926, by adding a new section, 42, so as to
read as follows:]
S ection 42. Ten hours a day’s tvork.—In all contracts relating to labor ten
hours’ actual labor shall be taken to be a day’s work unless otherwise agreed
by the parties. This provision shall not apply to classes of labor for which
the law now provides day limits.
Approved April 2, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Mothers’ pensions,
chs. 145, 177; Examination, etc., of aviators, ch. 182; Legal holidays in the
States and Territories, ch. 11; Credit unions, ch. 46; Absent voters, ch. 102.]

NEW JERSEY
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter 5.—Retirement,

etc.f of employees

[This act provides for the creation and maintenance of trust funds by
corporations, for the purpose of paying pensions during old age, disability, or
unemployment or other similar aids for the relief or general welfare of its
employees.]
Approved February 26, 1929.
C hapter

90.—Work in compressed air

[This act amends secs. 10 and 11, ch. 121, Acts of 1914, so as to read as
follows:]
S ection 10. Hours of service.—The working time in any 24 hours shall be
divided into two shifts under compressed air with an interval in open air.
Persons who have not previously worked in compressed air shall work therein
but one shift during the first 24 hours. No person shall be subjected to pressure
exceeding 50 pounds except in emergency. The maximum number of hours
to each shift and minimum open air interval between the shifts during any 24
hours for any pressure, as given in columns 1 and 2 of the following table,
shall be as set opposite such pressure in columns 3, 4, 5, and 6:
11178°—31----- 5




60

PART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

Shifts and intervals of work for each 24-hour period
Pressure

Hours

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

Minimum
number of
pounds

Maximum
number of
pounds

Maximum
total

Normal
18
26
33
38
43
48

18
26
33
38
43
48
50

Column 4

8
6
4
3
2

Column 5

Column 6

Maximum
Maximum
Minimum
first shift in rest interval second shift
compressed in open air
in com­
air
pressed air
4
3
2

H
1

2
3
4
5
6

m
i
H
H

m
i

4
3
2

1H
1
%
A
l

The employer may determine the time of each shift when the pressure is
less than 18 pounds, provided that the total for the two shifts does not exceed
eight hours.
Sec. 11. Decompression locks.—The employer or person in charge shall not
permit any person to pass from compressed air to normal pressure without
passing through an intermediate lock or stage of decompression. For tun­
nels, the rate of such decompression shall be three pounds every two minutes
when the pressure is thirty-six pounds or less and one pound every minute
when the pressure exceeds thirty-six pounds. For caissons, the rate for any
pressure, as given in columns 1 and 2 of the following table shall be as set
opposite such pressure in column 3;
Decompression
Pressure

Rate

Minimum
number of
pounds

Maximum
number of
pounds

Minimum
number of
minutes

10
15
20
25
30
36
40

10
15
20
25
30
36
40
50

1
2
5
10
12
15
20
25

Approved April 15, 1929.
C hapter

158.—Department of labor

[This act amends sec. 1, ch. 40, Acts of 1916, by creating a bureau to be
known as the “ Bureau for Women and Children” so as to read as follows:]
S ection 1. Creation.— In connection with the bureaus created by section one
of the act to which this act is a supplement, there shall be established in the
department of labor a bureau to be known as the “ Bureau for Women and
Children.”
S ec. 2. Director.—The head of the bureau for women and children, who
shall be a woman, shall be the director of such bureau, appointed thereto by
the commissioner of labor, and shall hold her said position pursuant to the
provisions of an act entitled, “An act regulating the employment, tenure, and
discharge of certain officers and employees of this State, and the various coun­
ties and municipalities thereof, and provide for a civil service commission and
defining its powers and duties,” approved April tenth, one thousand nine hun­




NEW JERSEY— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

61

dred and eight, in the exempt class thereof. She shall receive an annual
salary of $4,000, to be paid in semimonthly installments.
S eo. 3. Duties.— S aid bureau is auth orized and em pow ered to m ake stu d ies
and in v e stig a tio n s o f sp ecial problem s connected w ith the labor o f w om en and
children, and to create th e n ecessary organization, and appoint an adequ ate
num ber o f in v estig a to rs, w ith th e consent o f th e com m issioner o f labor, and
th e director sh a ll perform , under th e supervision and control o f th e com m is­
sioner o f labor, th e d u ties devolvin g upon the departm ent o f labor or th e com ­
m issioner o f labor, w ith relation to th e enforcem ent o f th e la w s, rules, and
regu lation s govern in g th e em ploym ent o f w om en and children.
S ec. 4. Annual report.— T he director o f th e bureau for w om en and children
sh a ll a n n u ally report to th e com m issioner o f labor m aking su ch recom m enda­
tion s a s m ay be app rop riate fo r th e betterm ent o f w orking conditions, w hich
report sh all, by th e com m issioner o f labor, be tran sm itted to th e legislatu re.
S ec . 5. Appropriation.—[An appropriation of $20,000 is made to carry out the

provisions of the act.]
Approved April 22, 1929.
C hapter

207.—Department of labor

[This act amends ch. 92, Acts of 1927, by providing that the commissioner of
labor may discontinue unsafe amusement places in cities which have no local
building supervision; a registry of all such amusement places must be kept
by the commissioner of labor; for violations of the act a penalty of $200 is
provided.]
Approved April 27, 1929.
C hapter

235.—Payment of wages, modes and times of

[This act amends sec. 1 of an act approved March 16, 1899 (Comp. Stat. of
1910, p. 3050), as amended 1928, ch. 150, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 1. Biweekly pay day.—Every person, firm, association, or partnership
doing business in this State, and every corporation organized under or acting
by virtue of or governed by the provisions of an act entitled “An act concerning
corporations” (revision of one thousand eight .hundred and ninety-six), in
this State, shall pay at least every two weeks, in lawful money of the United
States, to each and every employee engaged in his, their, or its business, or to
the duly authorized representative of such employee, the full amount of wages
earned and unpaid in lawful money to such employee, up to within 12 days of
such payment: Providedt however, That if at any time of payment, any
employee shall be absent from his or her regular place of labor and shall not
receive his or her wages through a duly authorized representative, he or she
shall be entitled to said payment at any time thereafter upon demand: Provided,
further, That any person, firm, partnership, association or corporation that
can reasonably satisfy the commissioner of labor that he, they, or it have a
paid-up cash capital invested in this State of not less than $200,000, and that
arrangements have been made with a banking institution for the payment in
full of any negotiable check issued for the payment of wages may, with the
written consent of the commissioner of labor, pay any such wages by negotiable
check instead of in lawful money; any employer or employers as aforesaid who
shall violate any of the provisions of this section shall, for the first offense,
be liable to a penalty of $50, and for the second and each subsequent offense to
a penalty of $100, to be recovered by and in the name of the department of
labor of this State. Every district court, justice of the peace, and police
magistrate is hereby empowered, upon filing of a complaint in writing by any
person alleging that a violation of this act has occurred, which complaint may
be made upon information and belief, to issue process at the suit of the
Department of Labor of New Jersey as plaintiff: such process shall be either
in the nature of a summons or warrant, which warrant may issue without any
order of the court first being obtained against the person or persons so charged,
which process, when in the nature of a warrant, shall be returnable forthwith,
and when in the nature of a summons shall be returnable in not less than five
or more than fifteen entire days; such process shall state what provision of the
law is alleged to have been violated by the defendant or defendants, and on
the return of such process or at any time to which the trial shall be adjourned,
the said court shall proceed in a summary manner, without a jury, to hear
testimony and to determine and give judgment in the matter without the filing



62

PA RT

2.— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

o f a n y plead in gs for the p la in tiff for the recovery o f such pen alty, w ith co sts or
fo r th e d efendan t, and th e said court sh all, if judgment be rendered fo r th e
p lain tiff, cau se any such defendan t, who m ay refu.se or neglect to fo r th w ith pay
th e am ount o f th e jud gm en t rendered against him and all the co sts and ch arges
in cid en t thereto, to be com m itted to th e county j;iil for any period not exceed in g
100 days, th a t th e officers to serve and execu te a ll process under th is a ct sh all
be th e officers auth orized to serve and ex ecu te process in sa id c ou rt; th a t
sa id d istr ict court, ju stic e o f th e peace or police m a g istra te sh a ll h a v e pow er
to adjou rn the h earin g or tr ia l in an y c a se from tim e to tim e, b u t in such
case, ex cep t in cases in w h ich the first process w a s a sum m ons, it sh a ll be*
th e du ty o f th e ju d ge o f th e d istrict court ju stic e o f th e peace, or police
m agistrate, to d etain th e d efendan t in sa fe custody, u n less h e sh a ll en ter into
bond to th e sa id departm en t o f labor, w ith a t lea st one sufficient su rety in
double th e am ount o f th e pen alty claim ed, conditioned fo r h is appearance
on th e day to w h ich th e h earin g sh all be adjourned, and th en ce from d ay to
d ay u n til th e ca se is disp osed of, and then to abide by th e jud gm en t o f th e
sa id court, and su ch bond, i f fo rfeited , m ay be prosecuted by th e sa id board.

[The subsequent paragraphs contain the form of conviction and commitment;
penalties for violations; the signing of process by the clerk of the district
courts; corrections in form made by the court; exemption of employees engaged
in agricultural work or as watermen.]
Approved April 29, 1929.
Digests, etc .
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Assignment of
wages—wage brokers, ch. 293; Retirement of public employees, ch. 122; Credit
unions, ch. 260.]
NEW MEXICO
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

128.— Assignment of wages

S ection 1. Acknowledgments, etc.— A ny and a ll assign m en ts o f w a g e s or
sa la r ie s due or to becom e due to any person in order to be v a lid sh a ll be ac­
kn ow ledged by th e p arty m aking th e a ssign m en t b efore a n otary public, or other
officer auth orized to ta k e acknow ledgm ents, and i f th e person m ak in g such
a ssign m en t is m arried and liv in g w ith h is w ife , su ch a ssig n m en t sh a ll be re­
corded in th e office o f th e county clerk o f th e cou n ty in w h ich th e m on ey is
to be paid, and a copy th ereo f served upon th e em ployer or person w h o is to
m ake paym ent.

Approved March 12, 1929.
Digests, etc .

[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Vocational educa­
tion, ch. 107; Examination, etc., of aviators, ch. 71; Convict labor, ch. 50.]
NEW YORK
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

164,— Private employment agencies

[This act amends sec. 170, ch. 25, Acts of 1909 (ch. 20, Con. L.) as later
amended by ch. 320, Acts of 1927, so as to read as follows:]
S e c t i o n 170. Scope .—This article shall apply to all cities of the State, except
that the provisions hereof relating to domestic and commercial employment
agencies shall not apply to cities of the third class. This article does not apply
to employment agencies which procure employment for persons as teachers
exclusively, or employment for persons in technical or executive positions in
recognized educational institutions; and employment bureaus conducted by
registered medical institutions, duly incorporated hospitals or registries con­
ducted by duly incorporated individual alumnae associations of registered nurses.
Nor does such article apply to departments or bureaus maintained by persons
for the purpose of securing help or employees, where no fee is charged.
Approved March 20, 1929.



NEW YORK— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9
C hapter 292.—Insurance

63

of employees—Group life insurance

[This act amends sec. 101-a, subdivs. 1 and 2, ch. 33, Acts of 1909 (added by
ch. 192, Acts of 1918, amended by ch. 129, Acts of 1926) and also sec. 101-b
(as amended by ch. 275, Acts of 1922) so as to read as follows:]
S ection 101-a. Definition .—(1) Group life insurance is hereby declared to
be that form of life insurance covering not less than 50 employees with or
without medical examination, written under a policy issued to the employer, the
premium on which is to be paid by the employer or by the employer and em­
ployees jointly, and insuring only all of his employees, or all of any class or
classes thereof determined by conditions pertaining to the employment, for
amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will preclude individual
selection, for the benefit of persons other than the employer: Provided, however ,
That when the premium is to be paid by the employer and employee jointly and
the benefits of the policy are offered to all eligible employees, not less than 75
per centum of such employees may be so insured. Such group policy may pro­
vide that the term “ employees ” shall include the officers, managers, and em­
ployees of subsidiary or affiliated corporations arid the individual proprietors,
partners, and employees of affiliated individuals and firms, when the business
of such subsidiary or affiliated corporations, firms, or individuals is controlled
by the common employer through stock ownership, contract or otherwise.
(2)
The following forms of life insurance are hereby declared to be group
life insurance within the meaning of this chapter: (a) Life insurance covering
the members of one or more companies, batteries, troops, battalions, divisions,
or other units of the National Guard or Naval Militia of any State, written
under a policy issued to the commanding general of the National Guard or
commanding officer of the Naval Militia, as the case may be, who shall be
deemed to be the employer for the purpose of this chapter, the premium on
which is to be paid by the members of such units for the benefit of persons
other than the employer: Provided , however, That when the benefits of the
policy are offered to all eligible members of a unit of the National Guard or
Naval Militia, not less than 75 per centum of the members of such a unit may
be so insured; (b) life insurance covering the members of one or more troops
or other units of the State troopers or State police of any State, written under
a policy issued to the commanding officer of the State troopers or State police
who shall be deemed to be the employer for the purposes of this chapter, the
premium on which is to be paid by the members of such units for the benefit
of persons other than the employer: Provided , however , That when the benefits
of the policy are offered to all eligible members of a unit of the State troopers
or State police* not less than 75 per centum of the members of such a unit may
be so insured; (c) life insurance covering the members of any labor union,
written under a policy issued to such union which shall be deemed to be the
employer for the purposes of this chapter, the premium on which is to be paid
by the union or by the union and its members jointly, and insuring only all of
its members who are actively engaged in the same occupation, for amounts of
insurance based upon some plan which will preclude individual selection, for
the benefit of persons other than the union or its officials: Provided , That in
case the insurance policy is cancelable at the end of any policy year at the
option of the insurance company: And provided also , That the basis of premium
rates may be changed by the insurance company at the beginning of any policy
years, all members of a labor union may be insured: Provided , further , That
when the premium is to be paid by the union and its members jointly and the
benefits are offered to all eligible members, not less than 75 per centum of
such members may be so insured: Provided , further , That when members apply
and pay for additional amounts of insurance, a smaller percentage of members
may be insured for such additional amounts if they pass satisfactory medical
examinations; and (d) life insurance covering only the lives of all members
of a group of persons for not more than $10,000 on any one life, numbering
not less than 100 new entrants to the group yearly, who become borrowers from
one financial institution, including subsidiary or affiliated companies, or who
become purchasers of securities, merchandise, or other property from one vendor
under agreement to repay the sum borrowed or to pay the balance of the price
of the securities, merchandise, or other property purchased in installments over
a period of not more than 10 years, to the extent of their indebtedness to said
financial institution or vendor but not to exceed $10,000 on any one life, written
under a policy which may be issued upon the application of and made payable
to the financial institution or vendor or other creditor to whom such vendor
may have transferred title to the indebtedness, as beneficiary, the premium on



64

PART 2.--- TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

such policy to be payable by the financial institution, vendor or other creditor;
and (e) life insurance covering the members of any duly organized corporation
or association of veterans or veteran society or association of the World War
veterans, written under a policy issued to such corporation, association or
society shall be deemed to be the employer for the purpose of this chapter, the
premium on which is to be paid by the corporation, association, society and its
members jointly, and insuring all of its members who are actively engaged in
any occupation for amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will pre­
clude individual selection for the benefit of persons other than the corporation,
association or society or its officials: Provided, however, That when the pre­
mium is to be paid by the corporation, association or society and its members
jointly and the benefits are offered to all eligible members, not less than 75
per centum of such members may be so insured: Provided further, That when
members apply and pay for additional amounts of insurance, a smaller percent­
age of members may be insured for such additional amounts if they pass satis­
factory medical examination.
S ec. 101-b. Standard policy.—N o policy o f group life in su ran ce sh a ll be
issu ed o<r d elivered in th is S ta te u n less and u n til a copy o f th e form th ereo f
h a s been filed w ith th e superintend en t o f insu ran ce and form ally approved by
h im ; nor sh a ll such policy be so issu ed or delivered u n less i t con tain s in sub­
stan ce th e follo w in g p r o v isio n s:

(1) A provision that the policy shall be incontestable after two years from
its date of issue, except for nonpayment of premiums and except for violations of
the conditions of the policy relating to military or naval service in time of war.
(2) A provision that the policy and the application or applications submitted
in connection therewith shall constitute the entire contract between the parties,
and that all statements contained in such application shall, in the absence of
fraud, be deemed representations and not warranties, and that no such state­
ment shall be used in defense to a claim under the policy, unless it is contained
in a written application.
(3) A provision for the equitable adjustment of the premium or the amount
of insurance payable in the event of a misstatement of the age of an employee
or other person whose life is insured under a group life policy.
(4) Except in the case of a policy described in clause (d) of subdivision two
of section 101-a of this chapter, a provision that the company will issue to the
employer for delivery to the employee, whose life is insured under such policy,
an individual certificate setting forth a statement as to the insurance protec­
tion to which he is entitled, to whom payable, together with provision to the
effect that in case of the termination of the employment for any reason what­
soever the employee shall be entitled to have issued to him by the company,
without evidence of insurability, and upon application made to the company
within 31 days after such termination, and upon the payment of the premium
applicable to the class of risk to which he belongs and to the form and amount
of the policy at his then attained age, a policy of life insurance in any one of
the forms customarily issued by the company, except term insurance, in an
amount equal to the amount of his protection under such group insurance
policy at the time cf such termination.
(5) A provision that to the group or class thereof originally insured shall be
added from time to time all new employees of the employer or other persons
eligible to insurance in such group or class.
(6) In the case of a policy covering all members of a labor union, a notice
to the effect that the annual renewable term premium depends upon the attained
ages of the members in the group and increases with advancing ages.
Except as provided in this chapter it shall be unlawful to make a contract
of life insurance covering a group in this State.
Policies of group life insurance, when issued in this State by any company
not organized under the laws of this State, may contain, when issued, any
provision required by the law of the State, or Territory, or district of the
United States under which the company is organized; and policies issued in
other States or countries by companies organized in this State may contain any
provision required by the laws of the State, Territory, district, or country in
which the same are issued, anything in this section to the contrary notwith­
standing. Any such policy may be issued or delivered in this State which in
the opinion of the superintendent of insurance contains provisions on any one
or more of the several foregoing requirements more favorable to the employer
or to the employee than hereinbefore required.
Approved April 4, 1929,




NORTH CAROLINA— ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

65

296.—Inspection and regulation of factories a/nd workshops

[This act amends ch. 31, Consol. Laws, 1909 (as amended in 1921 by Ch. 50,
sec. 270, subdiv. 6) so as to read as follows:]
6. Partitions.—All partitions in the interior of fireproof buildings shall be of
incombustible material. Nothing in this section shall prevent the use, in a build­
ing equipped with automatic sprinklers, of subdividing partitions of wood, or of
wood and glass, in spaces used solely for office or showroom purposes: Provided,
however, That where such spaces are contiguous to any room or rooms in which
manufacturing is carried on, such spaces shall be separated from such room
or rooms by a dividing partition which, including doors, is constructed of
incombustible material.
Approved April 5, 1929.
C hapter

399.—Labor law

[This act amends sec. 18a, ch. 50, Acts of 1921 (Consol. Laws, 1909, ch. 31),
as added by ch. 884,.Acts of 1923, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 18-a. Department of labor, inspectors.—The factory, mercantile,
boiler, mine, and tunnel inspectors shall be divided into eight grades. In‘spectors of the first grade shall each receive an annual salary of $1,680; in­
spectors of the second grade shall each receive an annual salary of $1,800;
inspectors of the third grade shall each receive an annual salary of $1,920;
inspectors of the fourth grade shall each receive an annual salary of $2,100;
inspectors of the fifth grade shall each receive an annual salary of $2,220; in­
spectors of the sixth grade shall each receive an annual salary of $2,400; in­
spectors of the seventh grade shall each receive an annual salary of $2,700;
inspectors of the eighth grade shall each receive an annual salary of $3,000.
Inspectors of the first grade who have served one year in said grade, shall
be placed in the second grade; inspectors of the second grade who have served
one year in said grade, shall be placed in the third grade; inspectors of the
third grade who have served one year in said grade, shall be placed in the
fourth grade; inspectors of the fourth grade who have served one year in said
grade, shall be placed in the fifth grade; inspectors of the fifth grade who have
served one year in said grade, shall be placed in the sixth grade; inspectors
of the sixth grade who have served one year in the said grade at the time this
section as amended takes effect, or who hereafter will have served one year
in said grade, shall be placed in the seventh grade; inspectors of the seventh
grade who hereafter will have served one year in said grade, shall be placed
in the eighth grade.
Safety inspectors of the bureau of industrial hygiene shall receive an annual
salary of $2,500. Safety inspectors of the bureau of industrial hygiene who
have served for one year as such at the time this section as amended takes
effect, or who hereafter will have served one year as such, shall receive an
annual salary of $2,750; safety inspectors of the bureau of industrial hygiene
who have served two years as such at the time this section as amended takes
effect, or who hereafter will have served two years as such, shall receive an
annual salary of $3,000.
Supervising inspectors shall each receive an annual salary of $4,000.
Approved April 9, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Vocational educa­
tion, chs. 264, 407; Mothers’ pensions, ch. 347; Examination, etc., of chauffeurs,
ch. 54, sec. 20, pp. 70-72; Mechanics’ liens, chs. 28, 515; Retirement of public
employees, chs. 234, 415, 421, 422, 439, 443, 574; Credit unions, chs. 323, 324,
325; Absent voters, ch. 96; Convict labor, ch. 243 (pp. 564-577) ; Investigative
commissions, ch. 664.]

NORTH CAROLINA
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

178.—Private employment offices

S e c t i o n 1. Definition.—Employment agency within the meaning of this act
shall include any business operated by any person, firm, or corporation for




66

PART 2.— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOB LAWS

profit and engaged in procuring employment for any individual, for any person,
firm, or corporation in the State of North Carolina and making a charge on
the employee or employer for the service.
S ec. 2, License.—That no person, firm, or corporation shall engage in the
business of operating any employment agency, as designated in section 1, in
North Carolina without first making a written application to the commissioner
of labor and printing and being licensed by him as herein provided, to engage
in such business. Upon receiving an application from such person, firm, or
corporation it shall be the duty of the commissioner of labor and printing to
make an investigation into the character and moral standing of the person,
firm, or corporation. * If after such investigation, the commissioner of labor
and printing shall be satisfied that such person, firm, or corporation is of such
character and moral standing as to warrant the issuance of a license to engage
in the business covered by this act then he shall issue a license to such person,
firm, or corporation as provided herein.
S ec. 3. Regulation.—T he com m issioner o f labor and p rin tin g is authorized
and em pow ered to m ake general rules and regu lation s in relation to th e lic e n s­
ing o f such em ploym ent agencies and for the general su pervision th ereof in
accordance w ith th is act.

Sec. 4. Inspection.—The commissioner of labor and printing is authorized
and empowered by himself, his assistant, or agents, duly authorized by him
to that effect, to investigate the books and records of any employment agency
licensed under this act, when he deems it best for the public interest to do
so to effectuate the purposes of this act and for cause to rescind the license
theretofore granted by him if upon such investigation *he finds that such em­
ployment agency is not complying with the terms and conditions of this act,
under which it was licensed by him, to engage in such business. Before re­
scinding the licenses issued hereunder, after such investigation the commis­
sioner of labor and printing, after first giving 10 days’ notice to the holder
of such license, to appear and show cause why such license should not be
revoked, shall hold a hearing at the county courthouse of the county in which
such licensee is doing business, when and where the results of the investigation
of the commissioner of labor and printing or his duly authorized agents shall
be presented under oath, before the commissioner of labor and printing, and
the said licensee may also and in accordance w ith said notice, present evidence
T
to show why such license should not be revoked; and the licensee shall have
the right of appeal within 10 days to the superior court.
S ecs . 5-7. Hearings, etc.—[The commissioner of labor and printing may
compel attendance of witnesses and the production of books, papers, records.
Subpoenas to be served by the county sheriffs.]
S ec. 8. Special fund.—T he licen se fee, charged under th e provisions o f th is
act, sh a ll be paid into a sp ecial fund o f the departm ent o f labor and printing
and the proceeds o f such licen se fees sh a ll be used for th e purpose o f the
su pervision and the regu lation o f the em ploym ent agencies, inclu ding costs of
in v e stig a tio n s or h earin gs to revoke licen ses and th e n ecessary tra v elin g
exp en ses and other exp en d itu res incurred in adm inisterin g th is act.

Sec. 9. Violations.—Any person, firm, or corporation conducting an employ­
ment agency in the State of North Carolina in violation of this act shall be
guilty of a misdemeanor, and if a person punishable by a fine of not less than
$500, or imprisonment of not less than six months, or both; and if a corporation,
by a fine of not less than $500 and not more than $1,000.
S ec. 10. Public agcnci.es excepted.—This act shall not in any manner affect
or apply to any employment agency operated by the State of North Carolina,
the Government of the United States, or any city, county or town, or any agency
thereof.
S«c. 11. Application of act.—This act shall in no wise conflict with or affect
any license tax placed upon such employment agencies by the general revenue
act of North Carolina but instead shall be construed as supplementary thereto
in exercising the police powers of the State.
Approved March 16, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of aviators, ch. 190; Examination, etc., of barbers, ch. 119; Mechanics’ liens,
ch. 69; Credit unions, ch. 47; Absent voters, ch. 329; Convict labor, chs*
221, 292.]




OHIO— ACTS OF 1929

67

NORTH DAKOTA
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

188.—Garnishment of wages

[This act amends sec. 7567, Supp., C. L., 1913 (Laws of 1921, ch. 72) so as
to read as follows:]
S ection 7567. Amount.—Any creditor shall be entitled to proceed by garnish­
ment in any court having jurisdiction of the subject of the action, against any
person, any public corporation, the State of North Dakota, or any institution,
department or agency of the State, indebted to or having any property what­
ever, real or personal, in his or its possession or under his or its control, be­
longing to such creditor’s debtor, in the cases, upon the conditions and) in the
manner prescribed in this chapter. The term plaintiff is used in this chapter to
embrace every judgment creditor and the term defendant a judgment debtor:
Provided, That the wages or salary of any person who is the head of a family
and a resident of this State, to the amount of $20 per week, shall be exempt
from garnishment. Every employer shall pay to such person such exempt wages
or salary not to exceed the sum of $20 per week of each week’s wages earned
by him, when due, upon such wage earner making and delivering to such em­
ployer his affidavit that he is such head of a family and residing with the same
in this State, notwithstanding the service of such writ, and the surplus only
of such exempt salary or wages shall be held by the employer to abide the
event of the garnishment suit.
At least two days prior to the issuance of any garnishment summons the
creditor shall cause demand to be served upon the debtor and the employer for
the excess above the amount herein exempted. Such demand with proof of
service, shall be filed with the court at the time of the issuance of garnishment
summons. Failure to serve or file said notice as herein provided shall render
said garnishment void. The excess of wages over and $bove the amount herein
exempted shall be held by the employer subject to such garnishment from the
time of service of such demand and for five days thereafter:
Provided, however, That when a public corporation, the State of North Dakota,
or any institution, department or agency of the State, is named as garnishee,
such garnishee shall not be permitted to defend the principal action for the
defendant upon the ground that the defendant is an officer, agent or employee
of such garnishee.
Service upon the State of North Dakota, or any institution, department or
agency thereof, as garnishee, may be made upon the State auditor, in manner
now by law provided for such service in garnishment proceedings, except that
the fee to be tendered and paid the State auditor for making affidavit of dis­
closure and filing same, shall be $3.
Any and all fees so received by the State auditor shall constitute a “ special
garnishment fund,” from which shall be paid' by him all extra expense incurred
by his office in making disclosures in the garnishment:
Provided, further, That the right to garnishee the State of North Dakota or
any institution, department or agency of the State, shall not apply to any debt
or obligation created or becoming due prior to the taking effect of this act.
Approved March 9, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1 under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of aviators, ch. 85; Mechanics’ liens, ch. 156; Cooperative associations, ch. 101;
Preference for local labor and domestic materials on public works, ch. 195.]
OHIO
ACTS OF 1929
Public utilities—Railroad employees—Safety, eta.
(Page 256)

[This act amends sec. 614-3, G. C., by authorizing the public utilities com­
mission to promulgate and enforce all orders relating to the protection, welfare
and safety of railroad employees, etc.]
Approved April 19, 1929.



68

PART 2.--- TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS
Assignment of wage*
(Page 479)

[This act amends sec. 6846-12, G. C., so as to read as follows:]
6346-12. What assignments valid, etc.—* * * No assignment of,
or order for, wages or salary shall be valid unless made in writing by the
person by whom the said wages or salary are earned and no assignment of,
or order for, wages or salary made by a married person shall be valid unless
the written consent of the husband or wife of the person making such assign­
ment or order is attached to such assignment or order; and no assignment or
order for wages or salary of a minor shall be valid unless the written consent
of a parent or the guardian of such minor is attached to such order or assign­
ment. No assignment of, or order for, wages or salary shall be valid for
more than 25 per cent of the earnings, wages, or salary of any married person;
nor shall such assignment be valid for more than 50 per cent of the earnings,
wages, or salary of any unmarried person.
Assignments of wages shall have priority as to each other from the time
same are filed with the employer of the assignor, and the balance due any
married person after 25 per cent shall have been so assigned or due any
unmarried person after 50 per cent shall have been so assigned shall not be
subject to any further assignment.
Approved April 19, 1929.
Digests , eto.
S ection

[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Assignment of
wages—wage brokers, p. 43; Absent voters, pp. 333 (sec. 4785-55), 370-873
(secs. 4785-134 to 4785-139).]
OKLAHOMA
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter 35.—Employment of children

[This act amends secs. 7208, 7213, 7214, Art. Ill, ch. 55, C. S. 1921, so as to
read as follows:]
S ection 7208. Age limit.— No child under the age of 14 years shall be em­
ployed or permitted to work in any factory, factory workshop, theater, bowling
alley, pool hall, or steam laundry, and no child under the age of 15 years shall
be employed or permitted to work in any occupation injurious to health or
morals or especially hazardous to life and limb: Provided , That nothing in this
act shall prevent any child not a resident of the State of Oklahoma under 15
years of age from being employed to perform or from performing in any duly
licensed theater, motion-picture theater, or other place of public amusement if
such child is accompanied by or is in the custody, care, or control of a parent,
guardian, governess, or teacher, who shall remain on the stage in such theater,
motion-picture theater, or other place of public amusement during the per­
formance of such child. It shall be the duty of the commissioner of labor
upon investigation by himself or the agents of his department, or upon the
complaint of the commissioner of charities and corrections, or the board of
health, to determine what occupations are injurious to health or morals or espe­
cially hazardous to life or limb, and to notify employers in such occupations
of his decision, which decision shall be final until such occupation or occu­
pations shall be defined by law or by final judgment in a court of competent
jurisdiction as safe for health, morals, life, or limb.
Sec. 7213. Night work.—No boy under the age of 16 years and no girl under
the age of 18 shall be employed or permitted to work in any of the occupations
mentioned in section 7208 between the hours of 6 o’clock p. m. and 7 o’clock
a. m .: Provided , That this section shall not apply to the employment of children
not residents of the State of Oklahoma to perform in any duly licensed theater,
motion-picture theater, or other place of public amusement.
S ec. 7214. Certificates.—Before any child under the age of 16 years shall be
employed in any occupation specified in section 7208, it shall be the duty of the
parent or guardian of such child to procure and furnish the employer of such
child an age and schooling certificate as hereinafter provided in this article. It
shall be the duty of every person, firm, or corporation owning or operating any



OKLAHOMA— ACTS OF 1929

69

of the establishments specified in section 7208, or employers in such occupations,
to keep on file for the inspection of factory inspectors, truant officers, or other
persons charged with the administration of this article, such age and schooling
certificate for every child under 16 years of age employed in such occupation,
and to keep on file and to post conspicuously in every room where such children
are employed a register, with a complete list of children under 16 years of age
so employed, together with the age of each child as set forth in the age and
schooling certificate opposite the name of such child, and also to keep on file
and to post conspicuously in such place or establishment, in such form as the
factory inspector may prescribe, the time of opening and closing of such factory
or other establishment, the number of hours of labor required or permitted in
such establishment, the hours of commencing and stopping work, and the time
allowed for meals, and, if there be two or more shifts in such establishment, the
number of hours in each shift during which the employees are required or
permitted to work. On termination of the employment of a child so registered,
and whose certificate is so filed, such certificate shall be forthwith surrendered
by the employer to the child or its parent, guardian, or custodian: Provided ,
That this section shall not apply to the employment of children who are not
residents of the State of Oklahoma, to perform in any duly licensed theater,
motion-picture theater, or other place of public amusement.
Approved March 25,1929.
C h a p te r 42.— Mine regulations — Lead and zinc mines

[This act provides for a separate law, applicable to lead and zinc mines only.
Secs. 7540-7633, incl., of ch. 63, C. S., 1921, are repealed in so far as applicable
to metal mines, and a new law is reenacted governing exclusively the operation
of lead, zinc, and other metal mines.]
S ection 1. Definitions .—That the words defined in this section shall have the
following meaning when found in this act, to wit, “ Mines ” mean mines in the
State of Oklahoma wherein lead, zinc, or other metals are sought or produced.
4 Operator ” means the person, individual, or corporation charged with the
4
responsibility of management and control of mining. “ Mine inspector ” means
the chief mining inspector of this State and the deputy or assistant ‘mining
inspector provided by law for the district in which the mining operation is
located, except where the context specifies the deputy or assistant mining
inspector.
S ecs . 2-7. Mine inspector, duties , etc .—[The mine inspector is authorized to
examine all mines, and see that the provisions of the act are complied with.
The inspector may enter the mines at any reasonable time, but must not ob­
struct the operation of any mine. He may require the installation of additional
shafts and provide for the proper ventilation of such mine. Dust inspection
must also be made and proper water lines and sprinkling attachments installed
when necessary.]
S ec. 8. Report of accidents.— [T h e operator o f an y m ine m u st report a ll
d eath s and in ju ries to th e depu ty m in e inspector.]
S ec. 9. Hoisting engineer.—[Hoisting engineers must be over 21 years of age

and experienced with hoisting engines of the type operated in the mine in which
they are employed.]
S ecs . 10-14. Safety provisions .—[S p eak in g tu b es or telep h on es m u st be in ­

sta lled ; sign al codes p r e sc rib e d ; h oistin g equipm ent r e g u la te d ; e x p lo siv es stored
in m agazin es rem oved from h o istin g derricks.]
S ec. 15. Drinking devices.— [Every operator of said mines in this State em­

ploying 10 or more men shall provide sanitary drinking devices for the use of
their employees.]
S ecs . 16-18. Toilets , etc.—[D r y closets or to ilets m ust be provided a t a ll m ines

w h ere 10 or m ore m en are em ployed, and a room properly equipped a s a dressing
room for the changing, keeping, and storing o f th eir cloth es m u st be m a in ta in e d ;
underground sta b le s w h ere livestock is kept m ust be fr ee o f a ll com bustible
m aterial.]
S ec. 19. 'Noonday meal.— [A ll em ployees are allow ed to com e to th e su rface of
th e ground for th e purpose o f e a tin g th eir noonday m eal.]
S ecs . 20, 21. Maps, etc .— [M aps m ust be provided sh ow in g w ork in gs o f th e
m ine w h ere 10 or m ore m en are em ployed. A tra v elin g w a y m u st be in sta lled
a t th e bottom o f every sh a ft to enable m en to p ass from one sid e o f the sh a ft
to tiie other, w ith o u t p a ssin g under th e sh a ft opening.]




70

PART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

Sec. 22. Women and minora.—[Boys under the age of 16 years and women
and girls shall not be employed underground or in the operation of said mines
in this State in any capacity other than clerical, and then only on top oi the
ground.]
Seo. 23. Hours of labor.—[Except in cases of emergency, 8 hours constitutes
a day’s work underground.]
S eo. 24. Review of orders.— [Provision is made for the review of any order
made by a mining inspector to the district court in the judicial district in which
the mine is located.]
Sec. 25. Violations.— [Penalties for violations are fines not to exceed $500.]
Approved February 15, 1929.
C hapter

251.—Mine regulations—Goal mines

[This act repeals secs. 7540 to 7633, of ch. 63, C. S., 1921, and reenacts a new
coal-mining code, to read as follows:]
A rticle

I

1. Mining board.— [A State mining board, appointed by the governor,
consisting of two practical miners, one mining engineer, one hoisting engineer,
one coal operator, has charge of granting certificates of competency under the
law. They are allowed per diem for not more than 20 days per quarter, except
the secretary, who may be compensated for 25 days per quarter.' Board must
be composed of citizens of the United States and of the State of Oklahoma.]
S ecs . 2-9 . Certificates.—[Certificates of competency are required for mine in­
spectors, superintendents, foremen, fire bosses, hoisting engineers, under penalty
of fine of from $50 to $250, or imprisonment of from 10 to 30 day, or both. Chief
mine inspector must have 8 years’ actual experience and be 35 years of age.
Members of board are allowed $6 per day and actual expenses. Fees for ex­
amination are: Mine superintendent and foreman, $2.50; gas men and hoisting
engineers, $2; a like sum must be paid for the issue of a certificate. Records
are kept of certificates issued, which may be revoked for incompetency, intoxica­
tion, or other sufficient cause; a hearing after 10 days’ written notice must be
allowed.]
A rticle II
S ection

S ection

1. Mine districts.—[Three mining districts are created.]
A rticle

III

S ections 1-12. Inspectors.—[Chief mine inspector must file a bond in the
amount of $10,000. Must devote his entire time to the duties of the office,
and see that the State mining laws are executed. The office of chief mine
inspector is at the seat of the government, where maps and plans of all mines
are kept. Salary is fixed at $3,000 per annum for chief mine inspector; $1,800
for chief clerk; and a stenographer at $1,200. District mine inspectors are
elective officers for a term of 4 years at a salary of $1,800 per annum. It is
the duty of district mine inspectors to devote their entire time to the duties
of the office; they may inspect mines as often as necessary, but at least every
3 months. They may enter mines at any time, but must not necessarily ob­
struct the operation of the mine. Reports of all fatal and serious nonfatal
accidents must be made to the chief mine inspector monthly. Orders of in­
spectors are final and binding until reversed or modified by some court of
the State.]
A rticle IV
S ections 1-7. Mine foremen.—[The operators of coal mines must employ a
mine foreman who is charged with the underground operations. Assistant
mine foremen may be employed in extensive operations. Each working place
and traveling way must be visited once a day.]
A rticles

V

to

XIV

Safety, etc., provisions.—[Proper ventilation must be provided, inspections
made by fire bosses for gas detection, two available exits for workmen and
proper timbering are required, hoisting is regulated, gasoline or oil engines



OKLAHOMA----ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

71

prohibited, safety lamps to be used in gaseous mines, a check in and out system
adopted, and a systematized method of mining conducted.]
XV

A rticle

S ections 1-3. Weighing coal.—[Recognized standard scales must be used
where payment for mining is by the quality of coal mined, and coal may not
be screened before weighing. Weighman must act under oath, and the miners
may employ a check weighman at their own expense, who' has equal rights,
powers, and privileges in weighing coal as the regular weighman. Penalties
are fixed for incorrect weighing.]
A rticle

XVI

S ection 1. Convicts.—[In no event shall convicts ever be employed in any
mines in this State.]
A rticles XVII
S ection 1. Bathhouses, etc.-—
[A suitable building must be provided at all
mines, equipped with lockers and baths, etc., with separate baths and lockers
for negro employees. Employees furnish their own soap, towels, and locks,
and are responsible for property left in the lockers. Failure to comply with
this law subjects the employer to a fine of from $25 to $50.]

XYIII

A rticle

S ection 1. Monthly reports.—[A monthly report must be sent to’ district
mine inspector, showing the name of the operator and officer of the mine,
quantity of coal mined, number of different employees classified, the total num­
ber of days worked during the month.]
A rticle

XIX

S ection . 1. Provisions for accidents.—[Stretchers, blankets, and other firstaid supplies must be furnished at all mines. If the mine extends a mile or
more from means of egress, one or more inside relief stores must be maintained.]
A rticle

XX

S ections 1-4. Telephones and alarms.— [A telephone system must be installed
in every coal mine. Danger signals and alarms must be communicated by all
drivers, motormen, and trip riders and every person receiving such notice must
communicate it to other persons. Penalties for failure to obey the requirements
or willfully giving a false danger signal or tampering with appliances entails a
fine of from $10 to $200, or imprisonment not to exceed 3 months, or both.]
A rticle

XXI

S ections 1, 2. Check numbers.— [Changing, exchanging, substituting, altering
or removing any check number on any car or pit car in or about any mine with
the intent to cheat or defraud any person out of the value of his services, is a
misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of from $25 to $100, or imprisonment from
30 days to 6 months, or both.]
A rticle

XXII

S ection 1. Sprinkling <md rock dusting .—[Operators of mines must thor­
oughly sprinkle or rock dust mine when haulage way, air courses, entry, or
room becomes so dry that the air becomes dangerously charged with coal dust.]
A rticle

XXIII

S ections 1, 2. Use of explosives—shot firers.—[Storage of explosives musx
be in a fire and bullet proof magazine. All explosives taken into the mine
must be delivered at the working place of each miner by the company. Shot
firers must be furnished at the operator’s expense.]




72

PART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

XXIV

A rticle

S e c tio n 1. Hours of labor, age, etc.—[Boys under the age of 16 years and
women and girls shall not be employed in any capacity, other than office work,
in the operation of mines in this State, and, except in emergency, 8 hours shall
constitute a day’s work in or about all coal mines in this State.]
A rticle

XXV

S ection 1. Electrical regulations.—[All wires must be insulated or protected
in a safe manner.]
A rticle XXVI
S ections 1, 2. Abandoned mines.—[The mining of coal within 200 feet of any
abandoned mine is prohibited. Provision is also made for the boring of holes.]

XXVII

A rticle

S ection 1. Barrier pillars.—[The workings of a mine must not be driven
nearer than 50 feet of the boundary line of the coal rights pertaining to such
mine. Penalties by a fine of from $300 to $500 are provided.]
A rticle

XXVIII

S ections 1-6. Maps.—[Maps must be provided by every mine owner showing
the operations and details of construction and progress.]
A rticle

XXIX

S ections 1-3. Analysis of minerals.—[The chief mine inspector in order
to promote and develop the mining industry is authorized to have an analysis
and assay made of coal, gypsum, and asphalt. A chemical analysis may also
be made of gases, etc., in the air circulating in any of the mines.]
A rticle

XXX

Definitions.—[The following terms are defined in the act—coal, face, mine,
slope, shaft, drift, tunnel, room, working place, panel, entry, cross cuts, rock
dusting, rock dust barriers, gas, methane, permissible, etc.]
A rticle

XXXI

S ection 1. Violations.—[Penalties for violations are by a fine of from $100
to $500.]
Approved July 16, 1929.

OREGON
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

137.—Employment of labor on public works—Hours of labor

[This act amends sec. 6718, Gen. Laws of 1920 (as amended by ch. 24, Acts
of 1923), so as to read as follows:]
S ection 6718. Ten'ms of contract.—Every contract made with the State,
county, school district, municipality, municipal corporation or subdivision
thereof shall contain a condition that the contractor shall promptly, as due,
make payment to all persons supplying to such contractor labor or material
for the prosecution of the work provided for in such contract, and shall also
pay all contributions or amounts due the State industrial accident fund from
such contractor or subcontractor incurred in the performance of said contract,
and that said contractor shall not permit any lien or claim to be filed or prose­
cuted against the State, county, school district, municipality, municipal corpo­
ration or subdivision thereof, on account of any labor or material furnished,
and a penal bond, with good and sufficient sureties, shall be required of each
and every such contractor to secure the faithful performance of all the usual
or particular obligations of such contract, especially the conditions herein men­



73

OREGON— ACTS OF 19 2 9

tioned, and every such contract shall contain a condition that no person shall
be employed for more than 8 hours in any one day or 48 hours in any one week,
unless in case of emergency, when no other competent labor is available, and
in such cases such laborer shall be paid double wages for all overtime, and
such contract shall contain the further clause or condition that should any
such contractor fail, neglect, or refuse to make prompt payment of any claim
for labor or services, furnished by any person in connection with such contract
as said claim becomes due, whether said services and labor be performed for
said contractor, or a subcontractor, then and in such event the proper officer
or officers representing the State, county, school district, municipality, municipal
corporation or subdivision thereof, as the case may be, may pay such claim to
the person furnishing such labor or services and charge the amount thereof
against funds due or to become due said contractor by reason of his said
contract, but the payment of any such claims in the manner herein authorized
shall not relieve the contractor or his surety from his or its obligation with
respect to any unpaid claims. For the purpose of this act the State industrial
accident commission is considered to be a person.
Approved February 19, 1929.
Chapter 224.—Employment of labor on public works—Hours of labor

[This act amends sec. 6721, Gen. Laws of 1920.]
Note.—The section was again amended by ch. 358, Acts of 1929.
latest amendment.
C hapter

See ch. 358 for

297.—Private employment offices

[This act amends secs. 6725, 6726, 6728 (amended by ch. 244, Acts of 1925),
6730, and 6737, Gen. Laws, 1920, so as to read as follows:]
S ec. 6725. Agencies.—Every person, other than a clerk or employee work­
ing for salary or wages only and not otherwise financially interested in the
business, who, for compensation, procures, or in any manner assists in pro­
curing, employment or help for another, or furnishes intelligence or informa­
tion to persons securing or seeking employment or help, shall be deemed and
considered an employment agent If furnishing intelligence or information
concerning both male and female persons seeking employment, such employ­
ment agent shall be designated as a “ general employment agent.” If furnish­
ing intelligence or information concerning female help only, such employment
agent shall be designated as a “ female employment agent.”
Sec. 6725. Licenses; bonds.—Application for an employment agent’s license
shall be filed in writing with the commissioner of labor statistics and inspector
of factories and workshops of the State of Oregon at least 30 days in advance
of the date on which the said license is to be issued. Said application shall
set forth that the applicant is a citizen of the United States, and the name
and address of the applicant, the street and number of the building or place
where the business is to be conducted, and the names and addresses of all per­
sons financially interested in the operation of said business either as partners,
associates, or profit sharers therein. Said application shall be accompanied
by the affidavits of at least 10 freeholders of the State of Oregon, to the effect
that the said persons believe the said applicant to be a person of good moral
character and capable of exercising an employment agent’s license according
to the terms of this act. Upon receipt of such application the commissioner
of labor may cause an investigation to be made as to the character and respon­
sibility of the applicant and of the premises designated in such application
as the place in which it is proposed to conduct such agency. The commissioner
of labor or his deputies may administer oaths, subpcena witnesses, and take
testimony in respect to matters contained in such application and in respect
to complaints of any character against the applicant for such license, and upon
proper hearing may refuse to grant a license. Each application shall be
granted or refused within 30 days from date of filing. In all towns and cities
containing more than 15,000 inhabitants no license shall be granted to a person
to conduct the business of an employment agency in rooms used for living
purposes, or where boarders or lodgers are kept, or where meals are served,
or where persons sleep, or by any person who is interested in or benefits
from the sale of railroad and stage transportation. No license shall be granted
to a person whose license has been revoked within one year from the date of
said revocation. Before any such license is issued to the employment agent,




74

PART 2.----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

i he applicant shall first file a bond with the State of Oregon and in the office
of the said commissioner of labor statistics and inspector of factories and
workshops, in the sum provided for in section 6728, Oregon Laws, as amended,
with at least one good and sufficient surety to be approved by the commissioner
of labor statistics and inspector of factories and workshops, conditioned that
the applicant shall fully comply with the provisions and requirements imposed
by the laws of this State regulating employment agencies, and shall pay all
judgments recovered against him for any violation of the said provisions or
requirements, together with such judgments and costs as may be recovered
against him by any laborer, w orker, or applicant for position on account of
T
any willful misrepresentations, or for willfully deceiving any laborer, worker,
or applicant for position transacting business with him as such employment
agent, and pay all damages by reason of any violation of this act. Such
license shall not be valid to protect any other than the person to whom it is
issued. In towns and cities containing more than 15,000 inhabitants no licensee
shall employ or permit any persons to operate an employment agency under
such license except a bona fide clerk or employee receiving a stated salary
or wage, who shall, before entering upon such employment, obtain from the
commisisoner of labor statistics and inspector of factories and workshops
a permit authorizing him so to do. A fee of $5 shall be exacted and paid
for such permit, and the applicant therefor, if found to be of good moral
character and a fit and proper person to transact business as such clerk or
employee, may be granted such permit, good for one year from date of issu­
ance, upon executing to the State of Oregon a good and sufficient bond in the
sum of $100, and to be approved by the commissioner, and conditioned that
such clerk or employee shall honestly and faithfully comply with, observe,
and obey all the laws of this State regulating employment agents. Such
permits may be renewed annually upon the payment of a like fee and the
execution of a like bond.
S ec. 6728. License fees, bonds.—The commissioner of labor statistics and
inspector of factories and workshops may if the applicant for such license be
a fit and proper person to conduct an employment agency, and upon the pay­
ment of an annual license fee and filing of a bond in the amounts hereinafter
provided, when such bond has been approved by him, issue to. the employment
agent a license for the period of one year. The amount of the license fee to
be paid and the bond to be furnished by the said employment agent shall
be in proportion to the population of the city or town in which the employment
agent has its principal place of business according to the last census of the
United States, and as indicated by the following schedule:
Population

License

Bond

$250
$3,000
Cities of 100,000 and over.
100
2,000
Cities of 50,000 to 100,000.
Cities of less than 50,000.
50
1,000
If the employment agency for which the application is made is not to be
operated in any incorporated city or town, then the applicant shall file the
minimum bond and pay the minimum license above specified. No other license
fee shall be required of any such licensee by any city, town, county, or other
political subdivision thereof: Provided, however, Female employment agents,
as defined in section 6725, Oregon Laws, shall only pay the sum of $50 as
annual license fee and furnish bond in the sum of $1,000. That of the fund
made up of the license fees as provided herein, $600 thereof, or so much of
said sum as may be necessary, hereby is set aside and appropriated annually
to and for the use of the commissioner of the bureau of labor statistics and
inspector of factories and workshops to defray the expenses of investigating
and adjusting grievances made as to the violation of this act by employers,
employees, or employment agencies.
S ec. 6730. Civil liability.—Any employment agent who sends an applicant for
employment to any place where the supposed employment is to be had on
information that is incorrect or not as stated in the receipt for fee paid by
the applicant for employment, or if the position which the said applicant
is to take has already been taken and is not procurable for such applicant,
shall be liable for the fee paid by the said applicant and the return of same,
and for the return of the fare or transportation to and from the place where
the said applicant is sent: Provided, however, That if transportation is fur­
nished or offered the applicant by either employer or the employment agent,
the said applicant shall recover only his fee: And provided further, That any




OREGON— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

75

applicant who obtains employment and is discharged within two days shall
be entitled to the return of his entire fee from the employment agent, and i1!
the applicant is discharged after two days and within six days he shall be
entitled to one-half of the fee, except in case where it is specifically stated
on the face of the employment ticket that the employment is for six days 01*
less: And provided further , That the applicant shall have no right to recover,
against either the employer or the employment agent, either the transportation,
fees or other costs, in the event that the said applicant voluntarily refuses
to go to work* in the position stated in the receipt, or is discharged by reason
of intoxication or other good and sufficient cause.
S eo. 6737. Appeals .—Any person, aggrieved by the decision of the commis­
sioner of labor statistics and inspector of factories and workshops, cither
refusing or revoking a license under this act, may appeal from such decision to
the Circuit Court for Marion County. Said appeal shall be taken by serving
a notice of appeal and giving a bond in the sum of $500, within the time and in
the manner provided for appeals from justice of the peace or district courts,
and upon the trial in the circuit court the case shall be tried de novo. Said
bond shall be conditioned for the payment of the costs and disbursements of
the appeal and the costs and disbursements shall be allowed and taxed as in
other cases as now provided by law. Upon the trial in the circuit court the
appellant shall be the plaintiff.
Approved March 5, 1929.
C hapter

344.—Bureau of labor statistics

[This act amends secs. 6660, 6661, and 6667 (as amended by ch. 449, Acts of
1927), Gen. Laws, 1920, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 6660. Bureau established .—There hereby is established a separate
and distinct department in this State, to be known as the “ bureau of labor,”
to be in charge and under control of a commissioner of the bureau of labor,
which office hereby is created. The present commissioner of the bureau of
labor shall hold office until the expiration of the term for which he was elected.
Sec. 6661. Commissioner.—At. the general election in the year 1930 there
shall be elected, as other State officers are elected, a citizen of the State of
Oregon, who has been a resident of the State over five years, to fill the office of
commissioner of labor, whose term of office shall be four years, and until
his successor shall be elected and qualified. At the general election every
fourth year thereafter there shall be elected a commissioner of labor whose
term of office shall be four years, and until his successor is elected and has
qualified.
S ec. 6667. Salary, etc.—The commissioner of the bureau of labor shall, from
and after the 1st day of January, 1929, receive an annual salary of $3,000,
payable monthly, and is authorized to incur such expense and employ such
clerical aid as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of this act. The
secretary of state hereby is authorized to draw warrants on the State treasurer
for the payment of such expense upon properly verified vouchers approved by
the commissioner: Provided, however, That said expense shall not exceed at
any time the amount appropriated therefor. Said commissioner shall, before
entering upon the duties of his office, execute a bond to the State of Oregon
in the sum of $5,000, conditioned upon the faithful, honest, and impartial
performance of his duties under this act, and upon the prompt and faithful
accounting for all fees of whatsoever nature collected by him or by his
assistants or deputies. Said bond shall be approved as to legal form by the
attorney general and shall be filed in the office of the secretary of state. The
premium on said bond shall be payable from any fund under the control and
administration of said commissioner or of the bureau of labor or from any
appropriation made for the purpose of defraying the expenses of said com­
missioner or of said bureau. Such commissioner shall include in his biennial
report to the governor and legislature an itemized statement of the expense
of the bureau incurred by him.
Approved March 6, 1929.
C hapteb 358.—Employment of labor on public wot'ks—Hours of labor

[This act amends secs. 6721 and 6722, Gen. Laws of 1920, so as to read as
follows:]
11178°—31----- 6



76

PART 2.--- TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

S ection 6721. Hours.—In all cases where labor is employed by the State,
county, school district, municipality, municipal corporation or subdivision either
directly or through another, as a contractor, no person shall be required or
permitted to labor, except as hereinafter provided, more than 8 hours in any one
day, or 48 hours in any one week, except in cases of necessity, emergency, or
where the public policy absolutely requires it, in which event the person or
persons so employed for excessive hours shall receive double pay for the over­
time so employed; and no emergency, necessity, or public policy shall be
presumed to exist when other labor of like skill and efficiency, which has not
been employed full time, is available: Provided , however , That the provisions
of this section shall not apply to State institutions and departments: And
provided further , That in the operation or repair of any plant owned or
operated by any municipality of this State in any city or town having a popula­
tion of not more than 1,000 inhabitants, any person hereinbefore mentioned
may be permitted to labor more than 8 hours in any one day, but not more
than 56 hours in any one week: And provided further , That nothing in this
section contained shall apply to the employment on work funded partly or
wholly by public funds, of foremen, watchmen, and timekeepers paid on monthly
rate: And provided further , That the provisions of this section relating to
double pay for overtime shall not in any wise apply to labor employed by any
dock commission or port commission while engaged in handling cargo fpr
maritime commerce: And provided further , That this amendment shall not be
construed as any legislative declaration or interpretation as to whether this
section heretofore applied to such cases.
Sec. 6722. Eight hours a day’s labor.—Eight hours shall constitute a day’s
labor in all cases where the State, county, school district, or any municipality,
municipal corporation or subdivision is the employer of labor, either directly or
indirectly, by contract with another: Provided , however , That nothing in this
section contained shall apply to the employment by any contractor of work for
any such State, county, school district, or any municipality, municipal corpora­
tion, or subdivision thereof, of foremen, watchmen, and timekeepers paid on
monthly rate.
Approved March 7, 1929.
C hapter

424.—Factory , etc.f regulations

[This act amends sec. 10, ch. 298, Acts of 1925, relating to prevention of
fire hazards in dry cleaning establishments.]
Approved March 8, 1929.
Digests , eto.

[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Mothers* pensions,
ch. 45; Examination, etc., of aviators, ch. 852; Examination, etc., of beauty
parlors, ch. 399; Examination, etc., of chauffeurs, ch. 393; Examination, etc.,
of employees on vessels, ch. 140; Mechanics’ liens, chs. 117, 372; Protection of
wages of employees, etc., of contractors, ch. 136; Cooperative associations, ch.
412; Credit unions, ch. 396; Preference for local labor and domestic materials
on public works, ch. 144; Absent voters, ch. 177; Convict labor, ch. 133; Investi­
gative commissions, S. J. Res. No. 16 (p. 782).]

PENNSYLVANIA
ACTS OF 1929
No. 41.—Employment of children —School attendance
[This act amends sec. 14, P. L. 286, act of May 13, 1915, relative to physical
examination.]
Approved March 21, 1929.
No. 88.—Hours of labor—Women , etc.
[This act repeals P. L. 68, act of April 4, 1901 (sec. 13630a, Pa. Stats., 1920)
relative to hours of labor in bakeries.]
Approved March 29, 1929.




PENNSYLVANIA— ACTS OP 1 9 2 9

77

No. 89.—Employment of children—General provisions
[This act merely repeals P. L. 69, act of April 15, 1913, P. L. 283, act of April
29, 1909; P. L. 832, act of June 9, 1911; P. L. 287, act of June 1, 1887; and
P. L. 862, act of July 19, 1913, relating to the employment of minors.]
Approved March 27, 1929.
No. 90.—Factory , etc., regulations
[This act merely repeals P. L. 30, act of April 29, 1897; P. L. 322, act of
April 29,1901; and P. L. 47, act of March 20,1903, relating to health and safety
of employees in manufacturing plants.]
Approved March 27, 1929.
No. 175.—Department of labor
[This act provides for a reorganization of the various departments of the
State. The department of labor and industry is contained in Article XXII,
secs. 2201 to 2214, inclusive.]
Approved April 9, 1929.
No. 190.—Mine regulations—Bituminous mines
[This act amends sec. 5, art. 3, and sec. 17, art. 4 of act of June 9,1911, P. L.
756 (secs. 15344 and 15364 respectively, Pa. Stats., 1920), relative to extension
of safety provisions in bituminous coal mines.]
Approved April 10, 1929.
No. 233.—Manufacture in tenements
[This act merely repeals P. L. 34, act of April 11, 1895, relating to manufac­
turing in tenement houses and shops.]
Approved April 17, 1929.
No. 248.—Protection of employees on buildings
[This act merely repeals P. L. 41, act of May 11, 1893 (secs. 13607, 13608, Pa.
Stats., 1920), relative to protection of employees on building construction.]
Approved April 18, 1929.
No. 249.—Factory , etc., regulations—Exhaust fans
[This act merely repeals P. L. 970, act of July 24, 1913 (secs. 13609, 13610,
13611, Pa. Stats., 1920), relative to the use of blowers.]
Approved April 18, 1929.
No. 250.—Hours of labor
[This act merely repeals P. L. 99, act of April 14, 1868 (secs. 13620, 13621,
Pa. Stats., 1920), relative to length of working-day.]
Approved April 18, 1929.
No. 254.—Mine regulations—Bituminous mines
[This act amends sec. 9, par. 2, art. 4, and sec. 14, par. 3, art. 4, of P. L. 756,
act of June 9, 1911 (secs. 15356 and 15361, Pa. Stats., 1920), relating to rock
dusting in mines.]
Approved April 18, 1929.
No. 256.—Employment of females—Factory regulations
[This act amends secs. 17 and 18, P. L. 1024, of the act of July 25, 1913 (secs.
13556, 13557, 13558, Pa. Stats. 1920). The act now provides for costs and
imprisonment in addition to fines for violations of the act.]
Approved April 18, 1929.



78

PART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

No. 264.—Mine regulations—Anthracite mines
[This act amends secs. 9,10, of art. 4, rules 9, 10, and 12, of art. 12, P. L. 176,
act of June 2, 1891 (secs. 15136, 15137, 15239, 15240, and 15242, Pa. Stats.,
1920), by providing for additional safety measures in coal mines—such as
installation of telephones, gates, headgears, lamps, etc. The carrying of matches
and smokers’ articles into mines is forbidden, and a mine foreman may, when
he sees fit, cause a search of the men to be made. When a mine is idle for
48 hours, an examination of every working place is to be made before
operations are resumed.]
Approved April 22, 1929.
No. 336.—Insurance of employees—Group insurance
[This act adds secs. 415 to 418 to art. 4 of No. 284, Acts of 1921 (P. L.
682), relating to group life insurance.]
Section 415. Definition.— (a) Group life insurance is hereby declared to be
that form of life insurance covering not less than 50 employees, with or with­
out medical examination, written under a policy issued to the employer, the
premium on which is to be paid by the employer, or by the employer and em­
ployees jointly, and insuring only all of his employees, or all of any class or
classes thereof, determined by conditions pertaining to the employment, for
amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will preclude individual
selection, for the benefit of persons other than the employer: Provided, however,
That, when the premium is to be paid by the employer and employee jointly,
and the benefits of the policy are offered to all eligible employees, not less than
75 per centum of such employees may be so insured.
(b) The following forms of life insurance are hereby declared to be group
life insurance within the meaning of this act: (1) Life insurance covering
the members of one or more companies, batteries, troops, battalions, divisions,
or other units of the National Guard or Naval Militia of any State, written
under a policy issued to the commanding general of the National Guard, or
commanding officer of the Naval Militia, as the case may be, who shall be
deemed to be the employer for the purposes of this act, the premium on which
is to be paid by the members of such units, for the benefit of persons other
than the employer: Provided, hotoever, That when the benefits of the policy
are offered to all eligible members of a unit of the National Guard or Naval
Militia, not less than 75 per centum of the members of such a unit may be so
insured; (2) life insurance covering the members of one or more troops, or
other units, of the State troopers, or State police, of any State, written under
a policy issued to the commanding officer of the State troopers or State police,
who shall be deemed to be the employer for the purposes of this act, the
premium on which is to be paid by the members of such units, for the benefit
of persons other than the employer: Provided, however, That when the benefits
of the policy are offered to all eligible members of a unit of the State troopers
or State police, not less than 75 per centum of the members of such a unit may
be so insured; and (3) life insurance covering the members of any labor union,
written under a policy issued to such union, which shall be deemed to be the
employer for the purposes of this act, the premium on which is to be paid by
the union, or by the union and its members jointly, and insuring only all of
its members who are actively engaged in the same occupation, for amounts of
insurance based upon some plan which will preclude individual selection, for
the benefit of persons other than the union or its officials: Provided, however,
That when the premium is to be paid by the union and its members jointly,
and the benefits are offered to all eligible members, not less than 75 per centum
of such members may be so insured: Provided further, That when members
apply and pay for additional amounts of insurance, a smaller percentage of
members may be insured for such additional amounts if they pass satisfactory
medical examinations.
(c) No domestic life insurance company shall issue any policy of group
life insurance, the premium for which shall be less than the net premium
based on the American men ultimate table of mortality, with interest at 3
per centum per annum, plus a loading the formula for the computation of
which shall be determined by the insurance commissioner. A foreign life
insurance company which shall not conduct its business in accordance with this
requirement shall not be permitted to do business in this Commonwealth. Any
such policy may, however, anything in this act to the contrary notwithstanding,



PENNSYLVANIA— ACTS OF 19 2 9

79

provide for a readjustment of the rate, based on experience at the end of the
first or any subsequent year of insurance, which readjustment may be made
retroactive for such policy year only.
S ecs . 416-418. [Relates to standard provisions for insurance policies, voting
powers, policies exempt from execution.]
Approved April 26, 1929.
No. 350.—Hours of labor—Manufacturing establishments
[This act merely repeals P. L. 472, act of May 7, 1855, relative to the hours
of labor in manufacturing establishments.]
Approved April 26, 1929.
No. 390.—Mine regulations —Bituminous mines
[This act amends rule 25, art. 25, P. L. 756, act of June 9, 1911 (sec. 15579,
Pa. Stats., 1920). Incombustible material for tamping must be used in all
gaseous, dry, and dusty mines. The mine inspector may authorize “ cushion ”
or “ a ir” blasting.]
Approved April 30, 1929.
No. 438.—P rivate employment offices
S ection 1. Definition.—[Defines the terms “ employment agent,” “ secretary,”
“ department,” “ fee,” “ persons.”]
S ec. 2. Scope.—[This act does not apply to associations, departments, or
bureaus maintained for purpose of obtaining employees for themselves or
their members, and which charge no fee to applicants; or to theatrical mana­
gers or agents engaging talent for their own performances; or teachers’ or
nurses* agencies; or to public employment bureaus; or employment bureaus
of any association of manufacturers of the State securing employees for their
members, without fee.]
S ec. 3. License.—[Unlawful for employment agent to operate without a
license.]
S ec . 4. Application.— [Applications for license must be made on forms fur­
nished by the secretary of labor and must be attested by at least three
reputable residents of the city or county in which the applicant intends to
operate.]
S ec. 5. Posting of notice , investigation.— [Notice of the filing of an applica­
tion must be posted on premises, and an investigation made as to applicant’s
character and responsibility. Provisions are made for protest against granting
license, and hearings must be held.]
S ec. 6. Refusal.—[Licenses may be refused for the reason that the applicant
is not a person of good character or reputation; or because of the unsuitability
of proposed location, or other good reason; that the proposed plan of business is
unjust or unfair; or that the applicant failed to comply with the law when
engaged in a prior employment agency.]
S ec. 7. G rafting of license.—[The secretary of labor and industry shall grant
a license for a period of one year, and must make a final decision as to grant­
ing or refusing a license within 30 days after filing of application.]
S ec. 8. Bond.—[A bond is required in the sum of $1,000 conditioned on com­
pliance with the law and the payment of damages occasioned to any person
by reason of any misstatement, misrepresentation, fraud or deceit or other un­
lawful act of the agent or his employees.]
S ec. 9. License fee .—[License fees are divided into three classifications, and
fees for licenses of each classification are Class A, $100; Class B, $100; Class C,

$200.]

S ec. 10. Revocation , eto.—[The secretary of labor is empowered to revoke a
license for grounds enumerated in the act. Licenses revoked will not be re­
issued for one year. The splitting of fees is forbidden. Licenses may be
renewed upon same conditions as specified in the original application.]
S ec. 11. Foreign agencies.—[Foreign employment agents must file a state­
ment as to where the labor is to be taken, for what purpose, for what length
of time, and other specific questions.]
Sec. 12. Register .—[Registers must be kept of applicants for work and for
help.]




80

PART 2.— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

S ec. 13. Return of fee.—[A bona fide order for employment must be obtained,
and if no employment of the kind applied for existed at the place to which
applicant was directed, the fee must be returned within three days of demand.]
S ec. 14. Employment card.—[The employment agent must give applicant an
employment card containing specific questions.]
S ec. 15. Receipts.— [A p p lican ts p ayin g a fe e m ust be given a receipt sh ow in g
th e am oun t o f fe e paid, etc.]
S ec . 16. Contract labor.—[An

employment agent sending applicants as con­
tract laborers outside city must file a statement within five days after the
contract is made.]
S ec. 17. Posting act.—[The act must be posted in the agency in large type
and in language in which persons commonly doing business with such employ­
ment agent can understand.]
S ec. 18. Enforcement.— [T h e secretary o f labor and in d u stry is d irected to
en force th e act, and au th orized to appoint insp ectors. In sp ectors m u st m ake
a s n early a s possible five v isits to each agency a m onth.]
S ec. 19. Inspection.—[The secretary or his inspectors are authorized to inspect

registers, books, records, and other papers at all reasonable hours. An employ­
ment agent must file a schedule of fees.]
S ec. 20. Registration of exempted class.—[Persons operating under an ex­
empted class must apply for annual registration.]
S ec. 21. Collection of fees.—[All fees collected by the secretary of labor must
be paid into the State treasury.]
S ec. 22. Acts prohibited.—[Inducing employee to leave employment; false or
fraudulent information; employment of children in violation of child-labor
law s; inducing person to enter any agency by force; persons not to be sent to
houses of ill repute; sending out any female applicant without an investigation
as to the character of the employer; females not to be sent out to sell liquor;
and the frequenting of persons of bad character at employment agencies is
prohibited.]
S ec . 23. Operating without license.—[No person shall operate without hold­
ing a license. Violations are punishable by fines of from $25 to $100 or by im­
prisonment. For second offense fines of from $25 to $250 or imprisonment for
not more than one year or both.]
S ec . 24. Penalties.— [F o r v io la tio n s o f paragraphs ( e ) , ( f ) , ( g ) , or ( h ) o f
sec. 22 o f th e act, p e n a lties by a fine o f from $100 to $1,000, or by im prisonm ent
or both are provided.]

Approved May 2, 1929.
No. 450.—Department of labor and industry
[This act amends sec. 16, P. L. 396, act of June 2, 1913 (sec. 13497, Pa. Stats.,
1920). For violations of the rules and regulations of the department of labor
and industry, in addition to a fine, costs are imposed, and for the nonpayment
of which imprisonment for not exceeding one month is provided. The depart­
ment of labor is charged with the enforcement of the law and may institute
proceedings for violations.]
Approved May 2, 1929.
No. 451.—Factory, etc., regulations—Steam boilers
[This act repeals sec. 19, P. L. 352, act of May 2, 1905 (secs. 13598, P. Stats.,
1920), and reenacts a new law providing that all boilers used for generating
power or heat in establishments, except farms or private dwellings, must
be constructed, installed, and operated in accordance with the rules and
regulations of the department of labor and industry. Boilers subject to
Federal control, boilers carrying a pressure of not more than 15 pounds per
square inch, boilers subject to municipal inspection, and boilers used in the
operation of oil wells are not governed by this act. Inspectors must pass a
written examination, fee $10; for certificate of competency, $5; renewable
annually on payment of fee of $2. Inspection of insured boilers may be made
by an employee of the insurance company; inspection of uninsured boiler to
be made by an inspector of labor department. Boilers must be inspected once
a year while operating and once while not under pressure. An annual certficate for operation is issued for a fee of $1. Internal and external inspection,
not under pressure, fee of $5, and an additional 10 cents for every square foot
of grate area in excess of 10 square feet; external inspection of boiler while



PORTO RICO— ACTS OF 1929

81

under operating conditions, $2.50; inspection of miniature boiler, $2; hydro­
static test, $5. Adequate and sufficient exits must be provided from all boiler
rooms. Penalties for violations are provided by fine or imprisonment.]
Approved May 2, 1929.
No. 452.—Factory regulations, etc., elevators
[This act repeals sec. 12, P. L. 352, act of May 2, 1905 (sec. 13592, Pa. Stats.,
1920), amended by No. 37, Acts of 1925, and reenacts a new law regulating
construction, equipment, maintenance, operation, and inspection of elevators out­
side of cities of the first, second, and second A classes. All elevators, dumb­
waiters, escalators, gravity elevators, hoists, and other lifting or lowering
apparatus must be safely constructed in accordance with the rules, regulations,
and specifications of the department of labor and industry. Inspectors must
pass a written examination, fee $10, and secure a certificate, fee $5; renewable
annually on payment of fee of $2. Inspection of insured elevators may be made
by an employee of an insurance company; inspection of uninsured elevators
shall be made by an inspector of the labor department. Inspection fees range
from $1 to $12. Periodic inspections are required and no elevator may be
operated without a certificate posted in the elevator car or cage. Enforcement
and prosecutions for violation are by the labor department. Penalties for
violations are provided by a fine or imprisonment.]
Approved May 2, 1929.
No. 453.—Factory , etc., regulations
[This act amends secs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 13, and 15 of No. 299, Acts of 1927
(P. L. 465), by strengthening the safety code for the prevention of fire hazards
in cities not of first class, second class, and second class A; and provides for
the enforcement of the act by giving inspectors of the department of labor the
right of entry.]
Approved May 2, 1929.
Digests , etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Vocational educa­
tion, No. 102; Mothers’ pensions, No. 367; Examination, etc., of aviators, No.
316; Mechanics’ liens, No. 433; Protection of wages of employees, etc., of con­
tractors, Nos. 114, 490; Bakeries and the preparation, distribution, etc., of food
products, No. 240; Retirement of public employees, Nos. 101, 369, 447 (secs.
311-326), 565; Cooperative associations, Nos. 211, 215; Industrial police, No.
243.]
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
ACTS OF 1929
[The only labor legislation enacted at the 1927-28 session is noted in part 1,
under the headings: Vocational education, No. 3377; Examination, etc., of em­
ployees on vessels, No. 3426; Retirement of public employees, No. 3360; In­
vestigative commissions, p. 469 (vol. 24), O. R. No. 11.]
PORTO RICO
ACTS OF 1929
No. 37.—Factory, etc., regulations—First-aid provisions
[This act amends secs. 1 and 3, act No. 41, Acts of 1917 (as amended by act
No. 16, Acts of 1928), so as to read as follows:]
S e c t i o n 1. Scope of lam .—That every owner of a sugar factory, dock, factory,
workshop, electric or hydraulic plant, or building where power-driven machin­
ery is used, boxing stadium, or race track, whether inside or outside of the
urban zone, whose employees exceed 50 in number, is hereby obliged to pro­
vide a dispensary sufficiently stocked with medicines and an emergency room
for cases of accident: Provided, That the provisions of this section, in so far
as the maintenance of an emergency room is concerned, shall not be appli­




82

PART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

cable to dressmaking establishments where only small motors are usefd far
the operation of sewing machines: Provided, That such motors are so covered
as to prevent danger to the operators in such establishments.
S ec. 3. Physician.—It shall be the duty of every owner of a sugar factory,
dock, factory, workshop, boxing stadium, electric or hydraulic plant where
power-driven machinery is used, or race track, whether inside or outside of
the urban zone, whose employees exceed 50 in number, to contract for the serv­
ices of a physician and a minor surgeon (practicante) or nurse, duly authorized,
for such accidents as may occur: Provided, That said minor surgeon (practi­
cante) or nurse shall be at the factory, workshop, dock, etc., during work
hours: Provided, That the provisions of this section shall not be applicable
to dressmaking establishments where only small motors are used for the opera­
r
tion of sewing machines, provided that such motors are so covered as to pre­
vent danger to the operators in such establishments.
Approved April 25, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of plumbers, No. 16a; Investigative commissions, J. R. No. 16 (spec. sess. p.
84).]

RHODE ISLAND
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

1310.—Factory, etc.t regulations—Duties of factory inspectors

[This act amends sec. 3, ch. 85, G. L. 1923, so as to read as follows:]
3. Inspectors.—Clause A. The governor shall during the January
session, A. D. 1923, and in the month of January every third year thereafter,
appoint, with the advice and consent of the senate, one chief factory inspector,
one deputy chief factory inspector, and three assistant factory inspectors, one
of whom shall be a woman, whose term of office shall be three years and until
their successors shall be so appointed and qualified: Provided, That the term
of office of the present factory inspectors shall not be changed. Any vacancy
which may occur in said offices when the senate is not in session shall be filled
by the governor until the next session thereof, when he shall, with the advice
and consent of the senate, appoint some person to fill such vacancy for the
remainder of the term.
Clause B. Said inspectors shall be empowered to visit and inspect at all
reasonable hours and as often as practicable, the factories, workshops, and
other establishments in this State subject to the provisions of this chapter,
and shall report to the general assembly of this State at its January session,
in each year, including in said reports the name of the factories and the number
of such hands employed.
Clause C. Every person, firm, or corporation now or hereafter doing business
in this State employing five or more persons shall forthwith furnish the chief
factory inspector his or its name, the character of his or its business, and the
address at which it is conducted, and shall forthwith report to him any change
in the same.
Clause D. Every person, firm or corporation doing business in this State,
employing five or more persons, shall during the months of April and October
in each year report in writing to said inspector the number of his or its em­
ployees, classified by sex, as adults, and as minors under 16 years of age, on
blanks to be furnished by said inspectors.
Clause E. It shall also be the duty of said inspectors to enforce the provisions
of this chapter and prosecute all violations of the same before any court of
competent jurisdiction in the State. The name and residence of any child
found working without the certificate provided for in section 1 of this chapter
shall be reported by the chief factory inspector to the school committee in the
city or town where such child resides.
Clause F. Said inspectors shall devote their whole time and attention to the
duties of their respective offices, under the direction of the chief factory inspec­
tor, and in his absence or inability to serve, under the direction of the deputy
chief factory inspector.
S ection




SOUTH CAROLINA— ACTS OF 1029

83

Clause G. The annual salary of the chief factory inspector shall be $8,000;
of the deputy chief factory inspector, $2,500; and of each of the three assistant
factory inspectors, $2,000.
Approved March 21, 1929.
C hapter

1311.—Factory, etc ., reputation —Inspection

[This act amends sec. 4, ch. 85, G. L., 1923 (as amended by ch. 638, Acts of
1925), by authorizing the general assembly to appropriate annually necessary
funds for expenses of department and factory inspectors, instead of the specified
appropriation as heretofore.]
Approved March 21, 1929.
C hapter

1316.—Employment of women and children—Hours of labor

[This act amends ch. 85, G. L., 1923 (as amended by ch. 1231, Acts of 1928),
by adding a new section (39) providing that the provisions of section 35 shall
not apply to women working by shifts during different periods or parts of the
day in the employ of a public utility.]
Approved March 29, 1929.
Chapter

1831,

S ec.

8.—Factory, etc., regulations—Inspection

[This section of the act amends sec. 10, ch. 85, G. L., 1923, so as to tead as
follows:]
S ection 10. Appeal from inspector's orders .—Any person who is aggrieved by
any order of said inspectors may appeal therefrom to the district court of the
judicial district in which the building which is the subject of the order is
situated, by filing his reasons of appeal within seven days after the date of the
ordef appealed from, and by giving notice thereof to the inspector who made
the order within 48 hours after filing said reasons of appeal; and said court
shall proceed to hear the said appeal at its first session after such notice shall
have been given, and shall approve, modify, or revoke said order as it may
deem right, subject, however, to the right of an appeal after decision as pre­
scribed for the claiming of an appeal in civil actions. And any such decisions
of said court from which an appeal is not claimed shall be final and conclusive.
Approved April 4, 1929.
C hapter

1362.—Bureau of labor, etc.

[This act amends sec. 3, ch. 87, G. L., 1923, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 3. Assistants , etc.— Said commissioner may employ such assistants
and incur such expenses incident to the proper discharge of the duties of his
office, but no assistant shall be paid more than $5 per day in addition to neces­
sary traveling expenses, and the general assembly shall annually appropriate
such amount as it may deem necessary for the purpose of paying said salaries
and expenses. The salary provided for said commissioner shall be in addition
to the compensation fixed by the general assembly for said commissioner for
taking the census.
An appropriation for carrying out the provisions of the act during the fiscal
yea* ending November 30, 1929, is provided.
Approved April 16. 1929.
Digests , etc .
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the heading: Mechanics’ liens,
ch. 1354.]
SOUTH CAROLINA
ACTS OF 1929
No. 249.—Factory, etc., regulations—Company houses—Sanitation
’ [This act provides that textile manufacturers must install sewerage systems
in company houses, for the protection of public health.]
Approved April 9, 1929.




84

PART 2.--- TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS
SOUTH DAKOTA
ACTS OF 1929

[The only labor legislation of this State enacted at the 1929 session is noted
in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc., of aviators, ch. 70 ; Examina­
tion, etc., of beauty parlors, ch. 94; Cooperative associations, chs. 89, 90;
Absent voters, ch. 114; Convict labor, chs. 107, 236.]
TENNESSEE
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

28.—Mine regulations—Inspection fees

[This act repeals so much of sec. 35 of ch. 237, Acts of 1903 (as amended by
ch. 13, sec. 6, Acts of 1915) and so much of sec. 34, ch 169, Acts of 1915 as
fixes fees for the inspection of coal mines. See also sec. 338a-44, Thompson’s
Shannon’s Code of 1918. The intent of the act is to repeal all acts in which
fees were required for the inspection of coal mines.]
Approved February 21, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examinations, etc.,
of barbers, ch. 118; Investigative commissions, S. J. Res. No. 17 (p. 547).]
TEXAS
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

156.—Railroads—Removal of shops and terminals

[This act amends art. 6286, ch. 2, title 112, R. C. S., 1925, so as to read as
follows:]
A rticle 6286 ( 6435) (4376). .Removal.—After the passage of this act, no
railroad company shall change the location of its general offices, machine shops,
roundhouses, or home terminals, save with the consent and approval of the
Railroad Commission of Texas, and this shall apply also to receivers, and to
purchasers of the franchises and properties of railroad companies, and to new
corporations, formed by such purchasers or their assigns. The commission shall
not consent to, or approve of, any removal or change of location in conflict with
the restrictions of the first article of this chapter. No consent or approval
of the commission shall be required before the return of general offices, machine
shops, roundhouses, or home terminals to previous locations, when ordered or
required under judgments in suits now pending in trial or appellate courts.
Approved March 2, 1929.
C hapter

180.—Employment of children—General provisions

[This act amends ch. 42, Acts of 1925, so as to read as follows:]
1. Age limit.—Any person, or any agent or employee of any person,
firm, or corporation who shall hereafter employ any child under the age of 15
years to labor in or about any factory, mill, workshop, laundry, or in mes­
senger service in towns and cities of more than 15,000 population, according
to the preceding Federal census, shall be fined not less than $25 nor more
than $200, or be imprisoned in jail for not more than 60 days.
Sec. 2. Prohibited employment.—Any person, or agent or employee of any
person, firm, or corporation who shall hereafter employ any child under the age
of 17 years to labor in any mine, quarry, or place where explosives are used,
or who, having control or employment of such child, shall send or cause to be
sent, or who shall permit any person, firm, or corporation, their agents or
employees to send any such child under the age of 17 years to any disorderly
house, bawdy house, assignation house, or place of amusement conducted for
immoral purposes, the character or reputation of which could have been ascer­
tained upon reasonable inquiry on the part of such person, firm, or corporation
S ection




TEXAS— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

85

having the control of such child, shall be fined not less than $50 nor more than
$500, or be imprisoned in jail not to exceed 60 days.
Sec. 3. Same.—It shall be the duty of every person, firm, or corporation,
their agents or employees, doing a messenger or delivery business, or whose
employees may be required to deliver any message, package, merchandise, or
other thing, having in their employ or under their control, any child under the
age of 17 years, before sending any such child on such errand, to first ascer­
tain if such child is being sent or is to be sent to any place prohibited in sec­
tion 2 of this act. Failure or refusal to comply with this section shall subject
any person or the agents or employees of any person, firm, or corporation hav­
ing the control of such child or children, to the penalties provided in section 2 of
this act.
S ec. 4. Work time.—Any person, firm, or corporation, their agents or em­
ployees, having in their employ or under their control any child under the age
of 15 years, who shall require or permit any such child to work or be on duty
for more than 8 hours in any one calendar day, or for more than 48 hours in
any one week, or who shall cause or permit such child to work between the
hours of 10 p. m. and 5 a. m. shall be fined not less than $25 nor more than
$200, or be imprisoned in jail not to exceed 60 days.
Sec. 5. Children of dependent widows, etc.—Upon application being made to
the county judge of any county in which any child over the age of 12 years
shall reside, the earnings of which child are necessary for the support of itself,
its mother when widowed or in needy circumstances, invalid father, or of other
children younger than the child for whom the permit is sought, the said county
judge may upon the affidavit of such child or its parents or guardian, that the
child for whom the permit is sought is over 12 years of age, that the said child
has completed the fifth grade in a public school, or its equivalent, and that it
shall not be employed in or around any mill, factory, workshop, or other place
where dangerous machinery is used, nor in any mine, quarry, or other place
where explosives are used, or where the moral or physical condition of such
child is liable to be injured, and that the earnings of such child are necessary
for the support of such invalid parent, widowed mother or mother in needy
circumstances, or of younger children, and that such support can not be ob­
tained in any other manner, and that suitable employment has been obtained
for such child, which affidavit shall be accompanied by the certificate of a
licensed physician showing that such child is physically able to perform the
work or labor for which the permit is sought, issue a permit for such child
to enter such employment. Every person, firm, or corporation employing any
such child between the ages of 12 years and 15 years shall post in a conspicuous
place where such child is employed, the permit issued by the county judge:
Provided, That no permit shall be issued for a longer period than 12 months,
but may be renewed from time to time upon satisfactory evidence being pro­
duced that the conditions under which the former permit was issued still ex­
ist, and that no physical or moral injury has resulted to such child by reason
of its employment. In every case where a permit is sought for any child be­
tween the ages of 12 years and 15 years, the parent, guardian, or other person
in charge or control of such child shall appear before the county judge in person
with such child for whom a permit is sought before such permit shall be issued.
Nothing in this act shall prevent the working of school children of any age
from June 1 to September 1 of each year except that they shall not be per­
mitted to work in factory, mill, workshop, and the places mentioned in sections
2 and 5 of this act; nor shall their hours of labor conflict with section 4 of
this act.
S ec . 6. Enforcement.—The commissioner of labor statistics, or any of his
deputies or inspectors shall have free access during working hours to all
places where children or minors are employed, and any owner, manager,
superintendent, foreman, or other person in authority, who shall refuse to
admit, or in any way hinder or deter the said commissioners or any of his
deputies or inspectors from entering or remaining in such place, or from collect­
ing information with respect to the employment of children as provided in this
act, shall be fined not less than $25 nor more than $100.
Seo. 7. Exemptions.—Provided that nothing in this act shall be construed as
prohibiting the employment by any person of nurses, maids, yard servants, or
others for private homes and families, regardless of their ages, nor apply to those
engaged in agricultural pursuits. Nothing in this act shall apply to the employ­
ment of children for farm labor, or to hours which children may work on
farms, nor shall anything in this act be construed as affecting the employment




86

PART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

of children on farms, ranches, dairies, or other agricultural or stock-raising
pursuits, nor shall any person be guilty under this act where the child employed
is permitted to work under the provisions of this act.
Approved March 2, 1929.
C h a p te r 189 .—Enticing

employees, etc.

S e c tio n 1. Removing laborer forbidden.— T h a t it sh a ll be u n la w fu l fo r an y
person or persons to go on th e prem ises or p lan tation o f a n y c itize n o f th is
S ta te in th e n igh ttim e or betw een su n set and su n rise and m ove or a ss is t in
m oving a n y laborer or ten a n t or th e effects or property o f an y laborer or ten an t
therefrom w ith o u t th e consent o f the ow ner or proprietor o f said prem ises or
plan tation .
Sec. 2. Exception.— T h a t th e provisions o f th is a ct sh a ll n ot be construed to
app ly to the discharge o f a c iv il or m ilitary order.
S ec. 3. Violations.— T h a t an y person foun d g u ilty o f v io la tin g th e p rovision s
o f th is act sh a ll upon conviction be pu nish ed by a fine o f n o t le s s th an $50
nor m ore th an $1,000, or im prisonm ent in th e county j a il fo r a term o f n o t le s s
th an 10 d ays nor m ore th an 6 m onths, or both by such fine an d im prisonm ent.

Approved March 18, 1929.
C hapter

245.—Blacklisting

[This act amends art. 5196, B. C. S., 1925, so as to read as follows:]
5196. Discrimination.—Either or any of the following acts shall
constitute discrimination against persons seeking employment:
1. Where any corporation, or receiver of the same, doing business in this
State, or any agent or officer of any such corporation or receiver, shall black­
list, prevent, or attempt to prevent, by word, printing, sign, list or other means,
directly or indirectly, any discharged employee, or any employee who may have
voluntarily left said corporation’s services, from obtaining employment with
any other person, company, or corporation, except by truthfully stating in
writing, on request of such former employee or other persons to whom such
former employee has applied for employment, the reason why such employee
was discharged, and why his relationship to such company ceased.
2. Where any corporation, or receiver of the same, doing business in this
State, or any officer or agent of such corporation or receiver shall, by any
means, directly or indirectly, communicate to any other person or corporation
any information in regard to a person who may seek employment of such per­
son or corporation, and fails to give such person in regard to whom the com­
munication may be made, within 10 days after demand therefor, a complete
copy of such communication, if in writing, and a true statement thereof if by
sign or other means not in writing, and the names and addresses of all per­
sons or corporations to whom said communication shall have been made:
Provided, That if such information is furnished at the request of a person
other than the employee, a copy of the information so furnished shall be mailed
to such employee at his last known address.
3. Where any corporation, or receiver of the same, doing business in this
State, or any agent or employee of such corporation or receiver, shall have
discharged an employee, and such employee demands a statement in writing
of the cause of his discharge, and such corporation, receiver, agent, or em­
ployee thereof fails to furnish a true statement of the same to such discharged
employee, within 10 days after such demand, or where any corporation or
receiver of the same, or any officer or agent of such corporation or receiver
shall fail, within 10 days after written demand for the same, to furnish to
any employee voluntarily leaving the service of such corporation or receiver,
a statement in writing that such employee did leave such service voluntarily,
or where any corporation or receiver of the same, doing business within this
State, shall fail to show in any statement under the provision of this title the
number of years and months during which such employee was in the service
of the said corporation or receiver in each and every separate capacity or
position in which he was employed, and whether his services were satisfactory
in each such capacity or not, or where any such corporation or receiver shall
fail within 10 days after written demand for the same to furnish to any such
employee a true copy of the statement originally given to such employee for
his use in case he shall have lost or is otherwise deprived of the use of the
said original statement.
A rticle




UTAH— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

87

4. Where any corporation, or receiver of same, doing business in this State,
or any agent or officer of the same, shall have received any request, notice, or
communication, either in writing or otherwise, from any person, company, or
corporation, preventing, or calculated to prevent, the employment of a person
seeking employment, and shall fail to furnish to such person seeking employ­
ment, within 10 days after a demand in writing therefor, a true statement of
such request, notice, or communication, and, if in writing, a true copy of same,
and, if otherwise than in writing, a true statement thereof, and a true inter­
pretation of its meaning, and the names and addresses of the persons, com­
pany, or corporation furnishing the same.
5. Where any corporation or receiver of the same, doing business in this
State, or any officer or agent of such corporation or receiver, discharging
an employee, shall have failed to give such employee a true statement of the
causes of his discharge, within 10 days after a demand in writing therefor, and
shall thereafter furnish any other person or corporation any statement or
communication in regard to such discharge, unless at the request of the
discharged employee.
6. Where any corporation or receiver of same, doing business in this State,
or any officer or agent of such corporation or receiver, shall discriminate
against any person seeking employment on account of his having participated
in a strike.
7. Where any corporation or receiver of the same, doing business in this
State, or any officer or agent of such corporation or receiver, shall give any
information or communication in regard to a person seeking employment hav­
ing participated in any strike, unless such person violated the law during his
participation on such strike, or in connection therewith, and unless such
information is given in compliance with subdivision 1 of this article.
Approved March 21, 1929.
C hapter

86 (first called session).—Employment of women—Hours of labor

[This act amends art. 5172, R. C. S., 1925, so as to read as follows:]
A rticle 5172. Exceptions.—The four preceding articles shall not apply to
stenographers and pharmacists, nor to mercantile establishments, nor telegraph
and telephone companies in rural districts, and in cities or towns or villages
of less than 3,000 inhabitants as shown by the last preceding Federal census,
nor to superintendents, matrons and nurses, and attendants employed by, in,
and about such orphans’ homes as are charitable institutions not run for
profit, and not operated by the State. In ease of extraordinary emergencies,
such as great public calamities, or where it becomes necessary for the pro­
tection of human life or property, longer hours may be worked, but for such
time not less than double time shall be paid such female with her consent.
Effective 90 days after adjournment.
[Chapter 87 of the first called session amends article 1571 of the Penal Code
of 1925, relating to the same subject as contained in chapter 86. Both chapters
were emergency measures and were received in the department of state without
the signature of the governor.]
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1 under the headings: Examination of
aviators, ch. 285; Examination, etc., of barbers, chs. 65 (first called session),
62 (second called session) ; Emigrant agents, ch. 104 (first called session), 11
(second called session), 96 (second called session) ; Mechanics’ liens, chs. 78
(second called session), 211, 223, 224; Protection of wages of employees, etc.,
of contractors, ch. 226; Vocational rehabilitation—State and Federal coopera­
tion, ch. 23 (first called session) ; Credit unions, chs. 17, 85 (second called
session) ; Convict labor, ch. 229.]

UTAH
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

9.—Employment of women and children

[This act repeals secs. 3671, 3672, 3673, and 3674, C. L., 1917, relating to
minimum wages paid to female employees.]
Approved February 23,1929.



88

PART 2.----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS
C hapter

23.—Employment of children—General provisions

[This act repeals sec. 1863, C. L., 1917, relating to the school record of
children in employment.]
Approved March 4, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is not&d in part 1, under the headings: Schools for em­
ployed children, ch. 47; Examination, etc., of barbers, ch. 35; Mechanics’ liens,
ch. 18; Old-age pensions, ch. 76; Absent voters, ch. 73.]

VERMONT
ACTS OF 1929
No. 82.—Public service commission—Ra/ilroad employees
[This act amends sec. 5035, and subd. I ll, sec. 5050, G. L., 1917, by extend­
ing the jurisdiction of the public service commission to the maintenance of
proper wash rooms and lockers for the use of railroad employees at railroad
terminals; and notices of hearings must be given at least 10 days before hear­
ing date to the secretary of the brotherhood of railroad trainmen on matters
concerning the safety of trainmen.]
Approved March 13, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination of
aviators, No. 79; Retirement of public employees, No. 61; Cooperative associa­
tions, No. 81; Absent voters, No. 2.]

WASHINGTON
ACTS OF 1929
Chapter

129.—Insurance of employees—Group life insurance

[This act amends art. Ill, title XLV, Rem. C. S. (as amended by ch. 300, Acts
of 1927), so as to read as follows:]
S ection 7242-1. Definition.—Group life insurance is hereby declared to be
that form of life insurance covering not less than 25 employees with or without
medical examination, written under a policy issued to the employer, the premium
on which is to be paid by the employer or by the employer and the employees
jointly, and insuring only all of his employees, or all of any class or classes
thereof determined by the conditions pertaining to the employment, for amounts
of insurance based upon some plan which will preclude individual selection,
for the benefit of persons other than employer: Provided, however, That when
the premium is to be paid by the employer and employees jointly and the
benefits of the policy are offered to all eligible employees, not less than 75 per
centum of such employees may be so insured. Life insurance covering the
members of a labor union written under a policy issued to such labor union is
hereby declared to be group life insurance and such labor union shall be deemed
to be an employer and the members thereof shall be deemed to be employees
within the meaning of this act.
Approved March 20, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of aviators, ch. 157; Examination, etc., of barbers, ch. 209; Mechanics* liens,
ch. 230.]




WEST VIRGINIA— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

89

WEST VIRGINIA
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

12.— Employment offices-—Public and private

[This act amends ch. 49, Acts of 1923, so as to read as follows:]
1. Bureau created.—The commissioner of labor shall maintain in
connection with the bureau of labor, a public bureau to be known as the “ State
public employment bureau,” for the purpose of receiving and filing applications
of persons seeking employment and of persons or firms seeking to employ labor.
There shall be no fee or compensation charged or received, directly or indirectly,
from persons applying for employment or from those desiring to employ labor
through said service.
Sec. 2. Cooperation.—The commissioner of labor may accept cooperation from
the Federal Government in the establishment and maintenance within the State
of such employment bureau.
S eo. 3. Duty of commissioner of labor.— I t sh a ll be th e d u ty o f th e com m is­
S ection

sion er o f labor to com m unicate w ith em ployers o f labor, and th e sa id com m is­
sion er is auth orized to a d v e r tise or u se such other m eth ods and m eans a s he
deem s practicable to su pp ly th e dem and o f em ployers and to provide em ploy­
m en t for those w h o h a v e filed th eir ap p lication s w ith th e em ploym en t bureau.

Sec. 4. Definition.—The term “ employment agent” shall mean and include
all persons, firms, corporations, or associations excepting municipal corporations,
church and charitable associations which furnish to persons seeking employ­
ment, information enabling or tending to enable such persons to secure the
same, or which furnish employers seeking laborers or help of any kind, infor­
mation enabling or tending to enable such employers to secure such help, or
shall keep a register of persons seeking employment or help as aforesaid,
whether such agents conduct their operations in a fixed place of business, on
the streets, or as transients, and also whether such operations constitute the
principal business of such agents or only as a side line or incidental to other
business.
Sec. 5. Fraudulent statements.—No person, firm, association, or corporation
or any employee or agent thereof, shall make any false statement to any
person seeking employment, knowing the same to be false, in regard to any
employment, work or situation, its nature, location, duration, wages or salary
attached thereto, or the circumstances surrounding said employment, work,
or situation. No employment agent shall falsely or fraudulently offer or
represent himself as in a position to secure or furnish employment without
having an order therefor, from an employer; and no employment agent shall
misrepresent any other material matter in connection with any employment,
work, or situation he may offer or represent himself in a position to secure,
nor shall he withhold any information furnished by the employer concerning
any work. The term “ commissioner” shall mean the commissioner of labor.
Sec. 6. License.—No person, firm, corporation, or association shall engage
in the business of an employment agent for profit or receive any fee, charge
commission or other compensation, directly or indirectly, for services as
employment agent, without first having obtained a license therefor from the
State tax commissioner. Said license shall constitute a license from the State
to operate as an employment agent for compensation and shall not be trans­
ferable. Such employment bureau or labor agencies as receive application and
hire laborers for employment within the State shall pay to the State tax
commissioner an annual license tax of $200. Such employment bureaus or
labor agencies that hire or contract with laborers for employment without
the State or arrange for the transportation of such laborers to points without the
State for employment in another State, shall pay to the State tax commissioner
an annual license tax of $5,000.
Seo. 7. Expiration of.—Each employment agent’s license issued by the State
tax commissioner shall expire on the thirtieth day of June, next, following
the date on which it was issued and shall not be transferable.
Sec. 8. Issuance of.—License to operate as an employment agent shall be
issued only to citizens of the United States.




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PART 2 .----TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

Sec. 9. Refusal of.—The State tax commissioner shall refuse to issue a
license if, upon investigation, he finds that the applicant is unfit to engage in
the business or has had a license previously revoked, or that the business
Is to be conducted on or immediately adjoining what is considered by him
to be unsuitable premises, or that any other good reason exists within the
meaning of the law.
Sec. 10. Revocation of.—The State tax commissioner shall revoke any license
issued under the provisions of this act, with or without hearing, and may
order such license to be returned for cancellation if the employment agent
has violated any of the provisions of this act or the rules and regulations
issued thereunder or if any cause appears for which a license might have been
refused. The commissioner of labor shall cooperate with the State tax
commissioner in the issuance and revocation of such licenses.
Sec, 11. Records kept.—A record of all men directed to employment shall be
kept by every employment agent; such records shall set forth the name, age,
nationality, and material state of each applicant, and also the name of the
employer, kind of work, and pay. A copy of this record shall be forwarded
to the commissioner of labor for each month and shall be furnished on or
before the tenth day of the month immediately succeeding.
Seo. 12. Posting of license.—Every employment agent shall keep# conspicu­
ously posted in his office or place of business the license issued under this act.
A copy of the schedule of all fees is required to be filed with the commissioner
of labor and other notices or information that the commissioner may direct
and in such form and manner as he may prescribe.
Seo. 13. Inspection.—For the purpose of enforcing this act and the rules
and regulations issued thereunder, the commissioner of labor or his duly
authorized agent may enter any employment office or place of business of an
employment agent and inspect the registers, cards, or other records of such
employment agent. In the performance of the duties herein required by law,
the commissioner of labor or his agent may at any time enter any premises
occupied or used as an employment office.
Sec. 14. Child labor.—No employment agent shall furnish employment to
any child in violation of the law regulating the labor of children or their
compulsory attendance at school.
Sec. 15. Violations.—Any person, copartnership, association, or corporation
carrying on the business of an employment agency as defined in this act with­
out first fully complying with the provisions thereof, shall be deemed guilty
of a misdemeanor, and shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined not less than
$100 nor more than $500 for each offense, or any such person may be imprisoned
not less than 30 days nor more than 6 months, or both, at the discretion of the
court. Any justice of the peace shall have concurrent jurisdiction with circuit
court and other courts having criminal jurisdiction in his county for the trial
of offenses under this act.
S ec. 16. Enforcement.—The commissioner of labor shall prescribe such
rules and regulations as may be necessary for the supervision of employment
agents.
Sec. 17. Exceptions to .act.—Nothing contained in this act shall apply to,
nor prevent or interfere with, any person, firm, corporation or association em­
ploying labor for his, their, or its business carried on in this State.
Passed February 26, 1929.
Chapter

16.—Mine regulations

[This act amends secs. 14, 20. 36, 37. ch. 88, Acts of 1925 (as amended by ch.
24, Acts of 1927) and adds a new .section, 7a, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 7a. Inspectors at large.—In addition to the 25 inspectors provided for
in section 7 of chapter 88 of the acts of the legislature of 1925, the chief of the
department of mines is hereby authorized to appoint three inspectors at large.
Said inspectors at large shall have the same qualifications as are required of
district mine inspectors and shall receive the same salary as paid to district
mine inspectors, together with their actual traveling expenses while engaged in
the performance of their duties.
Sec. 14. Rock dusting.—In all mines accumulations of fine dry coal dust shall,
as far as practicable, be removed from the mine and all dry and dusty operating
sections kept thoroughly watered down or rock dusted or dust allayed by such
other methods as may be approved by the State department of mines.




WEST VIRGINIA— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

91

Seo. 20. Safety regulations.—Mines which liberate explosive gas from the coal
or adjacent strata in dangerous quantities, and where three-fourths of 1 per
cent is determined by air analysis, or other approved methods, on return air
currents shall, upon order of the chief of the State department of mines, be
worked exclusively by the use of approved safety lamps, or approved electric
lamps, and in such mine or mines no open lamps or torch shall be used except
as may be permitted in writing by the chief of the said department of mines:
Provided, however, the foregoing provision requiring the use of approved safety
lamps or approved electric lamps shall not be effective in mines or sections of
mines where the ventilation may be increased in sufficient volume to dispel,
eliminate, or reduce the methane content below the percentage heretofore men­
tioned. In mines where flame safety lamps and approved electric lamps are
required to be used for working therein the lamps shall be in charge of some
person to be designated by the mine superintendent; and at least two additional
flame-safety lamps shall be kept at every coal mine, whether such mine liberates
explosive gas or not. All mine foremen and fire bosses employed in gaseous
mines shall, at all times, carry an approved flame-safety lamp for the purpose of
detecting the presence of explosive gas, said lamp to be kept lighted at all times
when in use inside the mines.
Sec. 36. Same.—Any mine worked by safety or approved electric lamps shall
work electric haulage locomotives operated from trolley wire upon the intake
airway fresh from the outside; except where permission is granted by the
chief of the State department of mines, such mine may operate such locomotive
on the return airways.
Sec. 37. Conditions, etc., gaseous mines.—In gaseous mines the chief of the
department of mines may designate where flame proof electric coal-cutting
machines shall be used.
No man shall be placed in charge of a coal-cutting machine in any gaseous
portion of a mine who is not a competent person, capable of determining the
safety of the roof and the sides of the working places and detecting the presence
of explosive gas. Machine runners shall be compelled to undergo an examina­
tion to determine their fitness to detect explosive gas before they are permitted
to have charge of machines in mines liberating gas unless they be accompanied
by a certified fire boss, or a machine runner or helper having passed such an
examination. Said examination to be given by the mine foreman, blank forms
for same to be furnished by the depratment of mines, a copy to be retained
on file at the mine office and the original sent to the State deparment of
mines, fully made out and signed by the machine runner and mine foreman.
Passed March 5, 1929.
Chapter

17.—Mine regulations

[This act amends sec. 4, ch. 88, Acts of 1925, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 4. Qualifications.—The chief of the department of mines shall be a
male citizen of West Virginia and shall be a competent person, having had
at least eight years’ experience in the working, ventilation, and drainage of coal
mines, two years of which have been in this State, and having a practicable
and scientific knowledge of all noxious and dangerous gases found in such
mines. A diploma from any accredited engineering school shall qualify as
two years’ working experience. He shall devote all of his time to the duties
of his office and shall not be directly or indirectly interested in a financial
way in any coal mines in this State.
The salary of the chief of the department of mines shall be $7,000 per
annum and traveling expenses, which shall be paid monthly out of the State
treasury upon a requisition upon the State auditor, properly certified by the
chief of the department of mines.
Passed March 8, 1929
C hapter

83.—Factory, etc., regulations

[This act amends sec. 59, ch. 15, Code of 1923, so as to read as follows:]
S ection 59. Guards for dangerous machines and places; repairing moving
machinery; adoption of safety codes.—All power driven machinery, including
all saws, planers, wood shapers, jointers, sandpaper machines, iron mangles,
emery wheels, ovens, furnaces, forges, and rollers of metal; all projecting set
screws or moving parts; all drums, cogs, gearing, belting, shafting, fly wheels,
11178°—31------ 7




92

PART 2.— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

and flying shuttles; all laundry machinery, mill gearing, and machinery of
every description; all vats or pans and all receptacles containing molten metal
or hot or corrosive fluids in any factory, mercantile establishment, mill, or work­
shop shall be located, whenever possible, as not to be dangerous to employees
or, where possible, be properly inclosed, fenced, or otherwise protected. All
dangerous places in or about mercantile establishments, factories, mills, or
workshops, near to which any employee is obliged to pass or to be employed,
shall, where possible, be properly inclosed, fenced, or otherwise guarded. No
machine in any factory, mercantile establishment, mill, or workshop, shall be
used when the same is known to be dangerously defective, and no repairs
shall be made to the active mechanism or operative part of any machine when
the machine is in motion. The State commissioner of labor is authorized to
adopt the codes promulgated by the American Society of Mechanical Engi­
neers and approved by the United States Department of Labor, relating to the
construction of scaffolding, hoists, and temporary flooring of buildings two
or more stories in height, in the course of erection. All factories, mills, or
workshops employing five or more people in the mechanical department shall
keep on hand, easily accessible, necessary first aid equipment recommended by
the bureau of labor and approved by the State health department.
Passed February 25, 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Protection of wages
of employees, etc., of contractors, ch. 76; Assignment of wages—wage brokers,
ch. 24; Sunday labor, ch. 44; Convict labor, ch. 51; Investigative commissions,
S. Con. Res. No. 3 (p. 496).]

WISCONSIN
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

67.—Factory, etc., regulation»—Dyeing and deeming establishments

[This act repeals introductory paragraph of subsec. 6, and amends par. h
of subsec. 2 and par. c of subsec. 7, sec. 167.21, Wis. Stats., so as to read
as follows:]
S ection 167.21 (2) h. Regulations, etc.—No gas or gasoline engine, steam
generator, or heating device and no electric dynamo or motor or other electrical
machine, apparatus, or device shall be located, maintained, or operated inside
of any room used for the business of cleaning and dyeing, except electric
motors, machines, apparatus, or devices which are free from all explosion,
fire, and spark hazards, and which are approved for such use by the industrial
commission.
S ection 167.21 (7) c. Duties.—To investigate, ascertain, declare, and prescribe
what alterations, improvements, or other means or methods are reasonably
necessary * * * to prevent fires and explosions and for protection and
safety of employees and the public in cleaning and dyeing establishments,
and such requirements and regulations shall also apply to existing cleaning
and dyeing establishments.
Approved May 2, 1929.
C hapter

123.—Employment of labor—General provisions

[This act creates a new section (103.46, Wis Stats.), so as to read as
follows:]
S ection 103.46. Restrictive right of employees, etc.—Every undertaking
or prom se hereafter made, w
’hether written or oral, express or implied, con­
stituting or contained in either: (1) A contract or agreement of hiring or
employment between any employer and any employee or prospective employee,
whereby (a) either party to such contract or agreement undertakes or promises
not to join, become or remain, a member by any labor organization or of any
organization of employers, or (b) either party to such contract or agreement
undertakes or pronrses that he will withdraw from the employment relation
in the event that he joins, becomes or remains, a member of any labor
organization or of any organization of employers; or (2) in a contract or




WISCONSIN— ACTS OP 1 9 2 9

93

agreement for the sale of agricultural, horticultural, or dairy products between
a producer of such products and a distributor or purchaser thereof, whereby
either party to such contract or agreement undertakes or promises not to
join, become or remain a member of any cooperative association organized
under chapter 185 or of any trade association of the producers, distributors,
or purchasers of such products, is hereby declared to be contrary to public
policy and wholly void and shall not afford any basis for the granting of
legal or equitable relief by any court.
Approved May 24, 1929.
C hapter 268. —Railroads—Safety

provisions

[This act amends subsec. (2) of sec. 192.90, Wis. Stats., and renumbers
subsecs. 1 (par. e), 2, and 3, so as to read subsecs. 2, 3, and 4, respectively,
relating to railroad track clearances.]
Approved July 2, 1929.
Chapter

317.—Insurance of employees—Group Ufe insurance

[This act adds a new subsec. to sec. 201.04, Wis. Stats., so as to read as
follows:]
S ection 201.04 (3a). Definition.— (a) Life insurance covering not less than
50 employees with or without medical examination, written under a policy
issued to the employer, the premium on which is to be paid by the employer
or by the employer and employees jointly, and insuring only all of his employees,
or all of any class or classes thereof determined by conditions pertaining to
the employment, for amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will
preclude individual selection, for the benefit of persons other than the employer:
Provided, however, That when the premium is to be paid by the employer and
employee jointly and the benefits of the policy are offered to all eligible
employees, not less than 75 per centum of such employees may be so insured.
(b) Life insurance covering the members of any labor union, written under
a policy issued to such union which shall be deemed to be the employer for
the purposes of this chapter, the premium on which is to be paid by the union
or by the union and its members jointly, and insuring only all of its members
who are actively engaged in the same occupation, for amounts of insurance
based upon some plan which will preclude individual selection, for the benefit
of persons other than the union or its officials: Provided, That in <mse the
insurance policy is cancelable at the end of any policy year at the option of
the insurance company and that the basis of premium rates may be changed
by the company at the beginning of any policy year, all members of a labor
union may be insured: Provided, also, That when the premium is to be paid by
the union and its members jointly and the benefits are offered to all eligible
members, not less than 75 per centum of such members may be so insured.
Approved July 19, 1929.
Chapter 367. —Hours

of labor on public works

[This act adds a new subsection to sec. 103.42, Wis. Stats., so as to read as
follows:]
S ection 103.42 (5 ) a. Same, violations.— (a) The industrial commission may
make general investigations with respect to all matters bearing upon com­
pliance with or violations of the provisions of sections 103.41 and 103.42; and
for the purpose of making such investigation the commission, its deputies, and
its duly appointed officers and agents shall have inquisitorial power and may
take testimony under oath if it deems necessary.
(b) Every person, firm, and corporation mentioned in sections 103.41 and
103.42 shall furnish to the commission all information required by it to carry
into effect the provisions of said sections and shall make specific answers to
all questions submitted by the commission relative thereto.
(c) Any person, firm, or corporation mentioned in subsection (3) of section
103.42 violating any of the provisions of said subsection, shall forfeit and pay
into the State treasury a sum not less than $10 nor more than $100 for each
violation; and each day during which any such violation occurs shall constitute
a separate and distinct violation.




94

PART 2.— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS

(d)
Upon the request of the industrial commission, the attorney general shall
prosecute on behalf of the State all actions for the recovery of the forfeitures
imposed in this subsection. The attorney general may institute and prosecute
criminal proceedings hereunder and shall institute such proceedings, and prose­
cute the same, when so requested by the industrial commission.
Approved August 8, 1929.
372.—Insurance of employees—Group life insurance

C hapter

[This act added a new subsection (11) to sec. 59.08, Wis. Stats., providing
for group life insurance for officers and employees of counties having a popu­
lation of 250,000 or more.]
Approved August 9, 1929.
Chapter

447.—Hours of labor—Cert aim public employees
,

[This act merely adds a new section (103.47) Wis. Stats., relating to the hours
of labor for guards in penal institutions so as to read as follows:]
S ection 103.47. Eight-hour day.—The board of control shall make a study of
the hours of labor in the State charitable and penal institutions and of the
feasibility of placing the employees of these institutions on the 8-hour day basis,
and the said board is authorized to put the 8-hour day into effect for guards at
the State prison and the State reformatory as soon as it shall be practicable
and the necessary funds shall be available.
Approved August 29, 1929.
C hapter

460.—Railroads—Safety provisions—Operating locomotive

[This act renumbers sec. 192.41, Wis. Stats., to be subsec. 1, and adds a new
section to sec. 192.41, Wis. Stats., so as to read as follows:]
S ection 192.41 (2). Service list of three years.—No person shall run or operate
any steam locomotive upon any railroad in this State without having been on a
service list for three years as a locomotive fireman: Provided, That the provi­
sions of this subsection shall not apply to the following: 1. Persons employed,
on or prior to May i, 1929, to run or operate steam locomotives. 2. Persons
employed as steam locomotive watchmen or steam locomotive handlers on other
than main lines.
Approved September 3, 1929.
C hapter

470.—Safety appliance—Electrical

[This act adds a new section (1) to sec. 167.16, Wis. Stats., so as to read as
follows:]
S ection 167.16 (1). Compliance.—It is hereby made the duty of every con­
tractor and other person who does any electric wiring in this State to comply
with the Wisconsin State electrical code, and the company furnishing the
electric current shall obtain proof of such compliance before furnishing such
service: Provided, That nothing therein contained shall be construed as pro­
hibiting any municipality from making more stringent regulations than those
contained in the above-mentioned code. Proof of such compliance shall consist
of a certificate furnished by a municipal or other recognized inspection depart­
ment or officer, or if there is no such inspection department or officer it shall
consist of an affidavit furnished by the contractor or other person doing the
wiring, indicating that there has been such compliance.
(2) Any person who shall violate the provisions of this section shall be
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine of not less than
$25 nor more than $100, or by imprisonment in the county jail not less than
30 days nor more than 6 months.
Approved September 6. 1929.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Vocational educa­
tion, chs. 13, 103, 142, 261, 444; Mechanics’ liens, ch. 275; Assignment of
wages—wage brokers, ch. 408; Old age pensions, ch. 181; Credit unions,
ch. 323; Convict labor, chs. 121, 342; Investigative commissions, chs. 326, 393,
447, 511.]



WYOMING— ACTS OF 1 9 2 9

95

WYOMING
ACTS OF 1929
C hapter

13.—Employment Of women

[This act amends secs. 2, 4, and 6, ch. 62, Acts of 1923, so as to read as
follows:]
S ection 2. Seats to be provided.—Every employer in any manufacturing,
mechanical, or mercantile establishment, laundry, hotel, or restaurant, or
other establishment, employing any female, shall provide suitable seats for
all female employees, and shall permit them to use such seats when they are
not engaged in the active duties of their employment. Every such employer
shall keep posted in an open and conspicuous place in each establishment
where such females are at work a copy of this act printed in such form
and style as may be easily read.
Sec. 4. Violations.—Any employer who shall permit or require any female
to work in any of the places mentioned in section 1 more than the number of
hours provided for in this act during any day of 24 hours, or who shall
fail, neglect, or refuse to so arrange the work of females in his employ that
they shall not work more than the number of hours provided for in this
act during any day of 24 hours, or who shall fail, neglect, or refuse to provide
suitable seats as provided in this act, or who shall fail, neglect, or refuse to
keep posted in an open and conspicuous place in each establishment where
such females are at work, a copy of this act printed in such form and style
as may be easily read, or who shall permit or suffer any overseer, superin­
tendent, foreman, or other agent of any such employer to violate any of
the provisions of this act, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon con­
viction. thereof shall be punished for the first offense by a fine of not less
than $25 nor more than $50; for a second offense, by a fine of not less than
$100 nor more than $250; or by imprisonment for not more than 60 days, or
by both such fine and imprisonment.
S eo. 6. Emergency.—Provided that nothing in this act shall forbid the em­
ployment of any female at any time where an emergency exists and if under
such conditions a female does work overtime she shall not be paid less than
time and a half for each and every hour of overtime in any one day.
Approved February 7, 1929.
C hapter

28.—Mine regulations—Coal mines

[This act amends sec. 4453, C. S., 1920, so as to read as follows:]
4453. Unused crosscuts.—It shall be the duty of every person, com­
pany, or corporation, owning or operating coal mines, to shut off all unused
crosscuts between main entries or cross entries and air courses, with a tightly
built wall or stopping of incombustible material and air-tight construction;
said wall to be kept at all times in perfect condition and repair: Provided,
That panel slopes or panel entries shall not be driven more than 1,000 feet be­
yond or in advance of incombustible stoppings.
Approved February 11, 1929.
S ection

Chapter

29.—Mine regulations—Coal mmes

[This act amends sec. 4450, C. S., 1920, so as to read as follows:]
4450. Stretchers.—It shall be the duty of owners, operators, lessees,
superintendents, and agents of coal mines to keep at the mouth of the drift,
shaft, or slope, or at any such place or places as shall be designated by the
inspector, stretchers in such manner as the inspector shall designate, properly
constructed for the purpose of carrying away any miner or employee working
in and about such mines, who may in any way be injured in and about his
employment: And provided further, That in mines employing ten or more men
properly equipped and adequate ambulance service and conveyance shall be
provided by or for account of such owner, operator, lessee, superintendent, and
agents for the prompt transportation of such miner or employee from mine
where injury is sustained to a hospital.
Approved February 11, 1929.
S ection




96

PART 2 .— TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS
C hapter

30.—Mine regulations—Fire bosses, etc.

[This act amends sec. 4447, C. S. 1920 (as amended by ch. 53, Acts of 1927),
so as to read as follows:]
S ection 4447. Qualifications.—No person shall act as fire boss, mine foreman,
or assistant mine foreman, safety engineer, unit foreman, or face boss unless
he shall be at least 23 years of age, and a citizen of the United States with at
least five years’ experience underground in coal mines, one year of which shall
have been in Wyoming, and shall have been granted a certificate of competency
by the Coal Mining Examining Board of Wyoming, or has been granted a
temporary permit by the State inspector of coal mines: Provided, however,
That each one year’s training as a mining engineer shall be considered the
equivalent of one year’s practical experience underground, but such credit for
training as a mining engineer shall not exceed three years: And provided,
further, That any person holding a certificate from a proper examining board
of the State of Colorado, or the State of Utah, or the State of Montana, certify­
ing that He is competent to perform the duties of foreman or assistant foreman
or of fire boss in coal mines, may perform the duties of foreman or assistant
foreman or of fire boss in coal mines, may perform the duties in Wyoming for
which his certificate certifies that he is competent, without examination by the
Coal Mining Examining Board of Wyoming. Any such person before assuming
any duties in a coal mine or mines in Wyoming shall present his certificate to
the Coal Mining [Examining] Board of Wyoming or to the State inspector of
coal mines and secure their or his approval of the certificate. Such person shall
be subject to examination by said board, at the request of said State inspector
of coal mines, and his authority to act in Wyoming as mine foreman, assistant
mine foreman, fire boss, safety engineer, unit foreman, or face boss shall be sub­
ject to cancellation as if his certificate was issued by the Coal Mining Examining
Board of Wyoming. No owner, operator, contractor, lessee, or agent shall
employ any mine foreman, assistant mine foreman, fire boss, safety engineer,
unit foreman, or face boss who does not have the certificate of competency
herein required.
Approved February 11, 1929.
C hapter

34.—Mine regulations—Firing shots

[This act repeals ch. 61, Acts of 1923, and ch. 67, Acts of 1925, and provides
new rules and regulations governing shot firing. Operators of coal mines must
furnish certified shot firers where shooting and blasting is carried on, and
provide for their examination and certification.]
Approved February 11, 1929.
Digest, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in part 1, under the headings: Examination, etc*
of aviators, ch. 66; Old-age pensions, ch. 87.]

UNITED STATES
SEVENTIETH CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION, 1929
[The only labor legislation enacted is noted in part 1, under the headings:
Vocational education, ch. 153 (45 U. S. Stat. L., 1151) ; Retirement of public
employees, ch. 271 (45 U. S. Stat. L., 1248) ; Convict Labor, ch. 79 (45 U. S.
Stat. L., 1084) ; Investigative commissions, ch. 28, Pub. No. 13 (approved June
18, 1929).]




CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

Abandonment of employ­
ment. (See Contracts of
employment.)
Abandonment of locomo­
tives, etc. (See Strikes
of railroad employees.)
Absent voters, summary
of laws as to____ ____ _

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

Accidents, reports and in­
vestigation of—Con.
Arkansas................... .
California.................. .

116-118

13.14
6

13.14
8

Accident insurance. (See
. Insurance of employees.)
Accident, old age, etc., re­
lief, summary of laws as
to. (See Old-age pen­
sions.)
Accident prevention, in­
struction as to:
California...................
New Jersey.................
Ohio.................. ........
(See also Safety mu­
seum.)
Accidents, provisions for:
Alabama.. 1................
Alaska........................
Arizona.......................
A rkansas............ .............

California...................
Colorado....................
Connecticut................
Illinois........................
Indiana^...................
Kentucky........
Maryland____
Massachusetts.
Michigan.........
Missouri.............
Montana.............
Nevada...............
New Hampshire.
New Jersey.........
New Mexico_
_
New York.........
North Carolina.
Ohio..................
Oklahoma.........
Pennsylvania...
Porto Rico.........

16




Iowa.......................... .
Kansas........................
Kentucky...................
Louisiana.................. .
Maine.........................
Maryland...................
Massachusetts............
Michigan....................
Minnesota..................

217
717
845
135
148
159
178
203, 223
225
268
24
361 403
372
439
452,455
499
519, 520
541, 545 470 35,36
557, 558
626
641
666
1
686
712, 717 _ i
718, 72 i
737
768
789
828
71
8 6 ' i 528
931
21
960,961 486
528 81,82
1009,1018
1061
1080

Tennessee..................
Utah..........................
Virginia.....................
Washington...............
1100
West Virginia...........
1112
Wisconsin...................
1152
Wyoming............. .
11G . 528
0
Accidents, reports and in­
vestigation of:
133,134,143
Alabama.................... 1
Alaska.......................
148
Arizona...................... I
154

Colorado.....................
Connecticut................
District of Columbia..
Florida...................... .
Hawaii........................
Idaho....... ................. .
Illinois..... ................. .
Indiana.......................

95

Mississippi................ .
Missouri.....................
Montana....................
Nebraska....................
Nevada..... .................
New Hampshire___...
New Jersey___ ____
New Mexico.......... .
New York................. .
North Carolina_____
North Dakota... ....... .
Ohio..................... .....
Oklahoma................. .
Oregon........... .......... .
Pennsylvania....... .....
Porto Rico.............. .
Rhode Island______
South Carolina...........
South Dakota.............
Tennessee...................
Utah...........................

178
210,216,
218,219
225,226
259,262,263
287
292
312
326,327
347,353,360
372,379,
380,384
413,415,
416,419
430,432
450,451
470
485 528
491
531,533
550
567,568,
571,572
597
615,621, 625
633,640,
642,643
653,657
666,667
687
702, 711,
714,729,734
738
775,780
790
800
815,827,830
863
878,879
918,924,
931,933
961
974,982
988
1005
1016,1017
1055,1061,
1062
1066
1080,1081
1097,1098

Vermont.....................
Virginia............. .........
Washington..... ......... .
West Virginia.......... . 1110,1112
Wisconsin...................
1152
Wyoming.................. . 1159,1160,
1163
United States..........
74
Advances made by em­
ployers. (See Employ­
ers’ advances, etc.)
Aeronauts. (S ee A v ia ­
tors.)
Age not ground for dis­
charge:
Colorado.....................
230
Age of employment. (See
Children, etc.; Tele­
graph operators, etc.)

97

98

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Aid societies. (See Bene­
fit societies.)
Air space required in
workrooms:
Arizona___________
Delaware__________
Jllinftff?
__ _
Indiana,......
Maryland_________
Michigan__________
Minnesota___ _____
New Jersey___—
___
New York_________
Pennsylvania
Porto Rico_________
Tennessee.. ___
Wisconsin...................
(See also Inspection and
regulation.)
Air tanks, inspection, etc.,
of:

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

Apprenticeship, summary
of laws as to_________
162
218
352
381
493
540,541
585,586
701
767,769
905,923
966
1020
1146

528
23
Massachusetts______
507
Alien contract labor:
Wyoming. _
1158
United States..........
1174
(See also Coolie labor.)
Alien laborers, employ­
ment of:
Alaska______ _____
144
Montana....................
633,634
Alien laborers,protection of:
Connecticut . .
257
314
Hawaii____________
Pennsylvania______
925
Utah..... ................. .... 1062,1063
Wyoming.................... 1161,1162
Aliens, duty of employers
as to taxes of. (See Lia­
bility of employers for
taxes.)
Aliens, etc., employment
of, on public works:
Arizona__________ _
•
153,155, 528
22
165
California__________
210,211
Hawaii____________
310 528 39,40
316,325
Idaho_____________
Massachusetts______
511
Nevada___________
677,678
New Jersey________
699
New York_________
761
Oregon____________
875
Pennsylvania______
933
Utah............................
1062
Wyoming.................... 1156,1157
(See also Chinese, em­
ployment of; Public
works, preference of
domestic materials,
etc., on.)
Anarchists, employment
of, forbidden:
New Mexico_______
739
Antitrust act:
Texas_____________ 1034,1035
Wisconsin. T
1147
United States.............. 1181,1182 403
58
Antitrust act, exclusions
from:
California__-______
196
Colorado__________
226
Iowa_____________
423
Louisiana__________
461
553
Michigan__________
649
Montana__________
New Hampshire____
692
New Mexico_______
741
Virginia.......................
1084
Wisconsin_________
1147
United States.............. 1181.1182




3-7 403
470
528

3
2
3

403

60

Arbitration and mediation:
141,142
Alabama__________
146-148
Alaska____________
Arizona___________
169
Arkansas__________
248-253
Colorado__________
267,268
Connecticut________
Georgia___________
307
316-322
Idaho_____________
Illinois......................... 330-332,336
386-388
Indiana___________
417-419
Iowa_______ -_____
Kansas____________ 424,425,441
Louisiana__________
458-460
Maine____________
478-480
489,490,
Maryland_________
497,498
Massachusetts______
524-526
Michigan__________
545-548
589
Minnesota_________
Missouri__________
610-612
Montana____ -_____
634-636
651
Nebraska__________
Nevada___________
662-664
New Hampshire____
687-689
New Jersey________
697
New York_________
749
Ohio_____________ 819,837,838
Oklahoma_________
856,857,
859,860
Oregon___ ________
900-902
Pennsylvania______ 915,941,942
Philippine Islands___
950
Porto Rico_________
962-965

South Carolina_____
996-999
South Dakota______
1008
Texas_____________ 1023-1025,
1044,1045
Utah............................ 1047,1051,
1056,1057
Vermont__________ 1071,1072
Washington________ 1095,1096,
1108
West Virginia______
1120
Wisconsin_ ______ 1127,1144,
1145
Wyoming_________
1157
United States............. 1187-1191
(See also Court of Indus­
trial Relations.)
Armed guards, hiring,
summary of laws as to.
(See Industrial police.)
Assignment of wages:
Arkansas__________
175
California.......... .........
183
Connecticut________
263
Delaware__________
279
Georgia____ _______
301
Illinois.........................
359
Indiana___________
374,410
Iowa_____________
419
Louisiana__________
Maine____________
486
Maryland...................
496
Massachusetts____
521
Missouri_
_ __
604
New Hampshire
684
New Jersey_______
706,707
New Mexico______
New York______ _
759
North Carolina.........
Ohio____ _________
Pennsylvania______
937
Tennessee_________
1012
Vermont..................... 1066.1070

’528’ *34,35
528

40

403
470

45
53

434 20-28

528

38

486

13

528

62

470
528

49
68

99

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

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Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Page

No. Page

Assignment of wages—Con.
Blacklisting:
Washington________
1091
Alabama__________
Wisconsin .
1152
Arizona- __________
Wyoming_________ 1158,1159,
Arkansas__________
California_________
1161
{See also Payment of
Colorado__________
wages; Wage brokers.)
Connecticut________
Assignments of claims to
Florida........................
avoid exemption laws.
Illinois__________ T qn?y___________
nrH
(See E xem ption of
Iowa_____________
wages.)
Associations, cooperative,
Kansas____________
list of laws relating to ...
96-98 403
Minnesota___ -____
12
Missouri__________
434
6
470 11,12
Montana_____ ____
g
486
Nevada. _____ . ___
New Mexico____ -__
528
14
North Carolina_____
Attachment of wages:
268
North Dakota______
Connecticut
- _
604
Oklahoma_________
Missouri . ,
Oregon____________
913
Pennsylvania______
Porto Rico _______
486
21
Texas_________ -___
Attorneys’ fees in suits for
Utah..........................
wages. (See Suits for
Virginia___________
Washington________
wages).
Automobile mechanics, ex­
Wisconsin _______
amination, etc., of, sum­
(See also Discharge,
mary nf law s as to
34
statement of cause of;
Interference with em­
Aviation, commercial:
ployment, and cross
United States. _____
434
20
Aviators, examination,
references.)
etc., of, summary of
Boarding or commissary
4
laws as to___________
33 403
cars, taxation of:
3
434
Mississippi..................
3 Boilers, creating an unsafe
470
amount of steam in,
3
486
(See Negligence of em­
4,5
528
B
ployees.)
Boilers, entering under
pressure:
Badges, employees:
New York.......... ........
778,779
Oklahoma.......... .......
Boilers, steam, inspection
Badges, etc., of labor or­
of. (See
Inspection,
ganizations. (See Labor
organizations, etc.)
etc.)
Bakeries, summary of laws
Bonds, contractors’, list of
87-89 403
laws relating to_______
10
as to_______________
9 Bonds of employees:
470
Arizona_________ _
6
486
Arkansas__________
11
528
California_________
Barber shops, summary of
32
laws as to.......................
Barbers,
examination,
Florida____________
etc., of, summary of
Georgia.___________
29-32 403
laws as to___________
4
Idaho_____________
4
Louisiana__________
470
3
Mississippi_________
486
Missouri__________
5,6
528
Basements. (See Cellars,
New Mexico_______
etc.)
Oklahoma___ ______
Beauty parlor operators,
Virginia____ _______
examination, etc., of,
West
summary of laws as to_
34,35 403
5 Bonuses. Virginia.............
(See Efficiency
3
434
tests and bonuses.)
4,5 Boycotting:
470
4
486
Alabama____ ______
6,7
528
.......... ...........
Benefit societies:
Colorado
28
California....................
470
Connecticut________
Massachusetts______
532,534
Illinois______ _ __
Indiana______________
Michigan__________
555,556
Kansas__ ______
New York___ _____
745
North Carolina...........
39
Texas_____________
403
Ohio............................
847,848
United S ta te s ..........
Philippine Islands___
946
(See also Interference
South Carolina...........
987,994
with employment, and
Benefit societies, forced
cross references.)
contributions for. (See
Brakemen, sufficient num­
Forced contributions.)
ber of, list of laws as to..




135,136
153,163
175
190 528 29,30
227
269,270
292
' 338
375
422
430
569,575
604,605
639,649
669
736 403 36,37
787,788
794
866
875
1033,1034 528 86,87
1047,1060
1077
1091
1154

603

867,868

59-61
153,154
174
213 470
24
528 28,29
291
307,308
327
472
600
624
737
857
1081
1119
135,136
227
269
338
369,370
443
1034,1035
1172,1173

83,84

_!

CUMULATIVE INDEX

100

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

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No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Page

No. Page

Brakes on railroad trains,
(See Railroads, safety
provisions, etc.)
Bribery, etc., of em­
ployees:
California
210
Connecticut________ 256,270, 271
289
Florida
Iowa______________
422,423
Tifwisiana ..........
475,476
Maine _ .
486, 487
Maryland...
502
535
Massachusetts______
Michigan__________
660,661
Nebraska._________
670,671
Nevada___________
New Jersey.................
698, 726
New York............ ......
775, 776
787
North Carolina...........
982,983
Rhode Island..............
S outh C a r o lin a ___
989.990
Virginia___________ 1081,1082
W ashington ,
1089
W isconsin _ ____
1155
Bribery of representatives
of labor organizations:
Nevada___________
671
New Jersey________
710
New York_________
775
1089
V irginia______________
Bridges over railroad
tracks. (See Railroad
tracks, etc.)
Builders’ tools, acceptance
of, as pledges:
California_________
Buildings, protection of
employees on. ( ^ P r o ­
tection of employees,
etc.)
Bureau of labor:
149
Alaska____________
Arkansas__________ 167-169,179
181,182,
California
192-194,
202,211
Colorado _____ __
Connecticut ______
Delaware__________
Georgia___________
Hawaii____________
Idaho_____________
Illinois____________
Indiana___________
Iowa_____________
Kansas____________
Kentucky_________
Louisiana__________
Maine____________
Maryland_________
Massachusetts______
Michigan__________
Minnesota_________
Missouri__________
Montana............... ....
Nebraska. _
Nevada_
_
New Hampshire
New Jersey________

231.232
256,257
273,274
305-307
310,311
316,317
333-338
383,384
413-415
434-437
448,449,
455-457
465
480-482,486
496-499,
502,503
504,505,
507-510,
524
536,537,
558,559
560-563, 589
608,609
627,628,
641,642
653,654
680,681
685, 687,688
699,724-726

Bureau of labor—Con.
Ohio............................

470

403




18

18
403
470 25-27,
28
528 24,25
403

21

528 "” "40
41
528
528 43,44
528

44

470
528

34
47

30
403
49
528
31
403
470 40-42
57
528
403 32,33

470
528
746-753 434
470
528
791,793
North Carolina____
North Dakota............. 794,795,803

New York______ _

30

' “ '43
60,61
14,15
44-47
65

813-815,
824,839
Oklahoma_________ 856,859,869
Oregon____________
880,881, 470
890-897 528
914,915, 528
Pennsylvania..____
937-943
949-951
Philippine Islands---953,964, 403
Porto Rico
_
_
966-968
975,976 403
Rhode Island_______
486
528
South Carolina
984-986,992
1004
South Dakota______
Tennessee_________ 1021,1022
Texas. __ ______ 1026-1028, 434
1036
Vermont__________ 1067-1068
1074-1076, 486
Virginia ....
1081
Washington ______ 1089,1090,
110&
-1108
W est V irginia .
1109,1110
W yom ing____________
1164-1166
United States______ 1169-1172 ’470'
(See also Commission,
industrial, etc.)
Bureau of mines:
470
Alaska____________
Arizona___________
163
’528’
California__________
225
Colorado__________
Illinois____________ 333,336,337
391-394
Indiana___________
Kentucky_________
455
471
Louisiana__________
622 528
Missouri__________
528
Nevada___________
470
New Mexico_______
Oklahoma_________
868 528
Pennsylvania______
939,940
Tennessee_________ 1021,1022
Virginia ___________
1080
W est V irginia
1110 528
Wyoming:________ _
1166
1169
United States______
C also Mine regula­
See
tions.)

51
75
77,80
44-46
48
21
83
2
23

59
18
27,28

55
58,59
44
70
90,91

C

Caissons, etc., work in.
(See Compressed air,
work in.)
Camps, labor. (See Labor
camps.)
Candidates for office, pro­
tection of employees as.
(See Protection, etc.)
Cannery inspector:
Delaware__________
Minnesota_________
Cause of discharge. (See
Discharge, statement of
cause of.)
Cellars and basements,
use of:
California_________
Michigan__________
Minnesota_________
New York_________
Oklahoma___ ____
Wisconsin. ____ ____
Chauffeurs, examination,
etc., of, summary of
laws as to___________

279-281

‘470’ " 37

191,192
542,543
567,582
769
869
1146
23-26 403
434
470
486
528

6
3,4

5
4
7

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

101

(See also Children, em­

ployment of, in dan­
gerous occupations.)
Children and women, em­
p loym en t of. (S e e
Women, married, earn­
ings of; Minors, earn­
ings of; Minimum wa­
ges; Women, wages of.)
Children, corporal punish­
ment of, by employers,
etc.:
Georgia.......................
Children, earnings of, list
of laws as to...................
Children, employed, cer­
tificates, registers, etc.
(See Children, employ­
ment of, general provi­
sions for.)
Children, em ployed,
schools for, summary of
laws as to.......................

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

No. Page
Chauffeurs, protection of:
Illinois....................... .
Child labor amendment—
Child labor commission:
Delaware....................
Child welfare department:
Alabama.....................
Montana....................
North Carolina..........
South Dakota.............
Childbearing women, em­
ployment of. (See Wo­
men, childbearing.)
Children and women, em­
ployment of, in mines:
Alabama.....................
Alaska........................
Arizona.......................
Arkansas.....................
Colorado.....................
Delaware....................
District of Columbia..
Idaho____________
Illinois........................
Indiana.......................
Maryland...................
Michigan....................
Montana.................
New Mexico...............
New York..................
North Carolina..........
North Dakota............
Ohio...........................
Oklahoma...................
Pennsylvania..... .......
Philippine Islands_
_
Utah...........................
Virginia......................
Washington................
West Virginia.............
Wisconsin_________

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Children, employment of,
fraud in:
787
North Carolina..........
Children, employment of,
general provisions for: *
Alabama.................. . 133,136,137
528
Alaska........................
Arizona..................... . 154-156,164
171,179
Arkansas................... .
195,221 403
17
California.................. .
528 23,27,
I 28
233,254,255
Colorado.......
256,261, 403 20,21
Connecticut..
264,265, 470
30
267,269,
271,272
Delaware......... ......... 276,277,283
284,286
21
District of Columbia.

358
273,274
133
627,628
1007

135
149
155
178
224,225
276
316

10,11

Florida......................
486

407
499

10,11

528
49
627
735
753
788,790
804
827
857 528 70,72
922
951
1047,1059
1080
1101

Georgia.
Hawaii..
Idaho...
Illinois. _
Indiana.
Iowa___
Kentucky..
Louisiana..
Maine.......
Maryland____
Massachusetts .
Michigan.........
Minnesota.

1120

1133
1156,1157

Mississippi..........
Missouri.............
Montana........... .
Nebraska______
Nevada_______
New Hampshire .
New Jersey.........
New Mexico .
New York...
North Carolina.
North Dakota...

300
486

Ohio.
Oklahoma......
Oregon...........
Pennsylvania .

3.4
10-15
Philippine Islands.
2
Porto Rico.............
3.4
Children, employed, seats
for. (See Seats for em­
Rhode Island.
ployed children.)
Children, employment of,
age limit for. (See Chil­
dren, employment of,
South Carolina..
general provisions for.)
Children, employment of,
South Dakota_
as messengers. (See
Children, employment
of, in street trades.)
* Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in fall, see Wisconsin.




290,291,
295,296
300,305,308 403 21,22
310,313,315
317,329
341,361 528 40,41
378,379,391 528
41
416,419
434,437-439
448-450
10,11
469-471,476
33,34
477,482,
487,488
45
491,496,500
46
505,510,
26
534-516
537,538,
29
548,549
35,36
47,49
560,564,590
37,38
50-52
594,602
52-54
605,625,626
627,628,639
56
651,653,655
43
665,672,677
34
— , 695,696
699,710,
17,18
722,723,
733
735,740,742
37
38
743,744,
19,20
753,756-758
49
786,788 470
794,800,
806,808,
811,812
41
842,843, 403
846,
853-855
857,861 528
884,887,902
52
906,913,
76,77
914,917
951,952
47
953,965,
972,973,
975,
977-979
991,994,
1006,1007
1010,1014,
1015

48
16,17
22,23
83
528
48,49

CUMULATIVE INDEX

102
Bulletin
No. 370

Utah..
Vermont..........
Virginia_____
Washington....
West Virginia..
Wisconsin........
Wyoming....... . ..........

(See also Children and

women, etc.)
Children, employment of,
in dangerous, mendi­
cant, etc., occupations:3
Alabama.....................
Arizona.......................
California..................
Colorado....................
Connecticut..............
Delaware..................
District of Columbia.
Florida......................
Georgia.....................
Idaho.........................
Illinois.......................
Indiana.....................
Iowa.
Kentucky..................
Louisiana..................
Maine.......................
Maryland..................
Massachusetts_____
Michigan..................
Minnesota................
Missouri..................
Montana...................
Nebraska..................
Nevada.....................
New Hampshire.......
New Jersey...............
New York.................
North Dakota...........
Ohio..........................
Oklahoma...... ..........
Oregon......................
Pennsylvania............
Philippine Islands...
Porto Rico................
Rhode Island............
South Dakota...........
Utah.................
Vermont...........
Virginia............
Washington___
West Virginia...
Wisconsin____
Wyoming..................
Children, employment of,
in street trades:1
Alabama....................
Arizona___________
California-.................
Connecticut...............
Delaware...................
District of Columbia.
Florida.......................
Georgia......................
Iowa...........................
Kentucky-.................
Maryland_________
Massachusetts...........

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Children, employment of,
general provisions for—
Continued.
Texas..........................

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

59, 51
84-85
87,83

1039-1041
1047,1048,
1059,1061
1068,1069
1084,1085
1089,1091
1119,1120

23,24

1122,

1131-1141
1163 403

136
155
171
188,221
233
261,267,269
274,276,277
284
290,294
305
317
338,341
365,391
416
431,438
494,450
469,471
486
495,500
515,516
538,550
564,565,575
605,626
639,649
655
665,672
685
, 699,710
753,754,776
812
853-855
857,861
887
913
952
968
973,974,979
1006
1014
1041
1047
1068
1085
1087,1088
1119,1120
1132,1133,
1155
1157,1163

North Carolina..
Oklahoma..........
Pennsylvania. . .
Porto Kico.........
Rhode Island...
South Carolina—
Utah..................
Virginia.............
Wisconsin..........

57
53,54
56

Children, hiring out, to
support parents in idle-

486 10,11
528 40,41

47,49
51
53

528

528 84-86

156
221

Children, employment of,
in street trades—Con.
Minnesota..................
Missouri.....................
New Hampshire____
New Jersey.................
New York................. .

261
277
284 486 10,11
290
305
416
450
491,500
505,515

Alabama.......-............
Georgia.......................
Louisiana....................
Mississippi-................
North Carolina..........
Texas..........................
Virginia.......................
Children, hours of labor of.
(See Children, employ­
ment of, general pro­
visions for; Hours of
labor in general employ­
ments.)
Children, medical, etc.,
certificates for. ( See
Children, employment
of, general provisions
for.)
Children, night work by.
(See Children, employ­
ment of, general pro­
visions for.)
Children of widows, de­
pendent parents, etc.:
Arizona—
.................. .
Arkansas_:...............
California—............... .
Colorado—
..................
Delaware....................
District of Columbia..
Florida...................... .
Georgia.......................
Idaho____________
Louisiana.................. .
Michigan....................
Minnesota..................
Montana................... .
Nebraska.................. .
Nevada_____ _____
New Jersey________
New Mexico.—
.........
Ohio............ -...........
South Carolina..........
South Dakota...........
Texas........................
Washington................
(See also Mothers' pen­
sions.)
Children, seats for. (See
Seats for employed chil­
dren.)
Children, vocational train­
ing for. (See Children,
employed, schools for.)
Children, wages of. (See
Minors, earnings of.)
Children. (See Children
and women.)

564,690




19

139
304
464
598
787
1033
1080

154
179
195
254
277
284
296
308
329
476
549
590
628
653
665
723
740
846
998
1006
1039,1041 403,
528
1091

* Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in full, see Wisconsin.
Delaware i
and Wisconsin.

*Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in full,

528 52,53

713
743,744, 486
753,776
788
861
913
968
975,979
994
1048
1085
1132,1133,
1138-1140

50

103

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page
Children’s Bureau:
United States.............
Chinese, employment of:
California..................
Montana__________
Nevada— .................
Oregon........................
United States............
Chinese exclusion, regis­
tration, etc.:
_
Philippine Islands_
United States.............
Chinese labor, products of,
not to be bought by
State officials:
California...................
Cigar factories, regulation
of:
Maryland...................
Wisconsin_____ ___
Citizens to be employed.
(See Aliens, employment
of.)
Clearance cards. (See Serv­
ice letters.)
Coal mined within State,
use of, in public build­
ings. (See Public works,
preference of domestic
materials, etc.)
Coal mines. (See Mines.)
Coercion of employees in
trading, etc.:
California...............
Colorado................
Florida........ ...........
Idaho....................
Indiana..................
Iowa.......................
Kentucky...............
Louisiana...............
Massachusetts.......
Michigan...............
Montana................
Nevada..................
New Jersey............
New Mexico..........
Ohio.......................
Oregon............. —
Philippine Islands..
Porto Kico.............
Texas.........................
Utah...........................
Washington................
West Virginia.............
(See also Com pany
stores.)
Coercion. (See Interfer­
ence, etc.; Protection of
employees, etc.)
Collection of statistics:
(See Bureau of labor.)
Collective bargaining:

No. Page

1171
181,196
628

944
1174
182
492
1146




Commission, industrial,
etc.:
Arizona.....................
California..................
Colorado...
Idaho.........
Illinois___
Indiana___
Kansas.__
Maryland..
Minnesota .
Montana_
Nebraska. .
New York.
Ohio...............
Oregon...........
Pennsylvania.
South Dakota...........
Texas.........................
Utah..........................
Washington...............
Wisconsin..................
Commissioner of labor.
(See Bureau of labor.)
Commissions,
tive.............

145
214
234,235
294
324
375
419
453
474
511
552
649
671,678,679
706
737
851,852
875
Q4.Q

956,961
1017
1033,1034
1063
1096
1116,1117

443
1147

Bulletin
No. Page

666

875
1174,1175

Wisconsin...................
Color blindness of railroad
employees. (See Rail­
road employees, qualifi­
cations of.)
Combination, right of.
(See Conspiracy, labor
ements not; Protecof employees as
members of labor organ­
izations.)

r

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Company doctors. (See
Physicians, employ­
ment of.)
Company stores:
California.............—
Colorado.....................
Connecticut................
Indiana............. -.......
Louisiana--------------Maryland...................
New Jersey................
New Mexico...............
New York..................
Ohio...........................
Pennsylvania.............
Philippine Islands---Virginia......................
West Virginia.......—
(See also Coercion of em­
ployees in trading;
Payment of wages in
scrip.)
Compressed-air tanks:
California...................
Massachusetts_____
Compressed air, work in:
California...................
New Jersey................
New York..................
Pennsylvania.............
Conciliation. (See Arbi­
tration.)
Conspiracy against work­
men:
Alabama.....................
Florida.......................
Georgia.......................
Hawaii........................
Minnesota..
Mississippi..
Nevada.......

403 59-63
181,182, 470 20-22,
25-27
205-208,
214-219
241-253
328
333-338
384,385,390
440-447
502,503
587-589 528 51,52
630-633
651
747-753 470 44-47
18
486
813-824
881-885
921,922,
942,943
1004
1044,1045
1949-1056
1098
1124-1130

14,15
16,17
9
18,19

214
234,235
266,267
374,375
474
490
706
737,739
761
851,852
909,910
949
1078
1116

507
717-719
772-774
906-909

135
295
303
313
425,426
574

668

528

23
23
59,60

104

CUMULATIVE INDEX
=.

,=B»

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin
No. 570

Bulletin

Page
Conspiracy against work­
men—Continued.
New York_________
North Dakota______
Texas_____________
Washington________
(See also Interference
with employment, and

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

776
799
1043
1087

cross references.)

Conspiracy, labor agree­
ments not:
California
190,191
Colorado__________
226
Iowa_____________
423
Maryland ..
491
574
Minnesota .
Nevada___________
671
New Hampshire____
692
New Jersey________
708
New York_________
776,777
North Dakota______
799
Oklahoma_________
865
Pennsylvania______
935
Porto R ico________
955
Texas. ___________
1028
Utah................. ........
1057
West Virginia.-.......... 1111,1112
Conspiracy. (See also In­
terference with employ­
ment, etc.)
Contempt, regulation of:
New Jersey________
Continuation schools.
(S ee Children em­
ployed, schools for.)
Contract labor, alien. (See
Alien contract labor.)
Contract work on public
buildings and works:
California_________
182
Contractors’ bonds for the
protection of wages,
summary of laws re­
quiring..................-.......
59-61
Contractors’ debts, liabili­
ty of stockholders for,
list of laws determining.
62
Contractors’ general li­
censing, etc., summary
of laws as to...................
Contractors, right of, to
give bonds:
Louisiana___________
Contracts of employees
waiving right to dam­
ages:
Alabama__________
141
Arizona___________
153
Arkansas__________
176
California_________
184
Colorado__________
224
Florida..... ....... -.........
294
Georgia___________
298, 299
Indiana___________ 372,377,378
Iowa_____________
411,412
Kansas___________
433
Maine
________
485
Massachusetts______
524
Michigan____ _____
544
Minnesota_________
578
Mississippi________
597
Missouri__________
606,607
Montana__________
627,644,
645, C
50
Nebraska__________
652
Nevada___________
667
New Mexico_______
735
New York...................
.781
North Carolina_____
786
North Dakota.............
796




403

36

403

8,9

403

6

434 11,12

Contracts of employees
waiving right to dam­
ages—Continued.
847,848
Ohio...........................
857
Oklahoma............ ......
Oregon........................
876,877
947
Philippine Islands___
984
South Carolina_____
Texas_____________ 1028,1030,
1031
1082
Virginia__________
Wisconsin_________
1151
Wyoming_________ 1156,1158,
1163
1178
United States.......... .
(See also Liability of em­
ployers for injuries to
employees.)
Contracts of employment,
regulation, etc., of. (See
Employment of labor.)
Contracts of employment,
violations of, endanger­
ing life:
Nevada___________
668
Washington................
1088
Contracts of employment
with intent to defraud.
(See Employers’ ad­
vances, repayment of.)
Convict labor, summary
of laws as to................ . .
118-129 403
14
6,7
434
470 14-16
8,9
486
528 17,18
Convict labor, employ­
ment of, in mines:
Oklahoma________ _
268
Coolie labor:
California_________
181
United States.............
1174
Cooperative associations,
summary of laws as to..
12
96-98 403
6
434
470 11,12
8
486
14
528
Core rooms, employment
of women in:
Massachusetts______
514
Minnesota_________
581
New York_________
754
Corn huskers, etc., guards
on:
Michigan__________
554
Minnesota_________
567
Wisconsin.......... ....... 1148,1149,
1153
Corporal punishment of
minor employees:
Georgia..................... .
300
Corporations, liability of
stockholders in, for wage
debts, list of laws de­
termining___________
62 470
8
Corporations, pensions for
employees of:
Pennsylvania______
909
Corporations, profit shar­
ing by. (See Profit shar­
ing.)
Corporations, restriction
of powers of:
Pennsylvania.......... .
909,910
Costs in suits for wages.
(See Suits for wages.)
Cotton bales, bands, ties,
etc., of:
Texas.......................... 1025,1026

CUMULATIVE
m n■
ri'i rrsx " r rssi
•n.rr

105

in d e x

-s
Bulletin
No. 370

Credit unions, summary
of laws as to_________
C r im in a l syndicalism,
summary of laws as to.
(See also Anarchists.)
D
Damages, waiver of right
to. (See Contracts of
employees waiving right
to damages.)
Dangerous, injurious, etc.,
employments:
Arizona
Colorado__________
Illinois. . r .
Missouri . ^ ■
New York . _ ______
Ohio_____________
P^nn,<uylvania. . ____
Wisconsin...................
Days of rest for railroad
employees:
Maryland
Massachusetts.. __ _
_
(/See also Weekly day of
rest.)
Deaf, division for, in bu­
reau of labor:
Minnesota_________
North Carolina____ .
Death. (See Injuries caus­
ing death; Negligence
etc.)
Deception in employment
of labor. (See Employ­
ment of labor, deception
in.)
Department of labor.
(See Bureau of labor.)
Department of mines.
(See Bureau of mines.)
Detectives, private:
Wisconsin_________
Discharge, etc., of em­
ployees of public-service
corporations:
Massachusetts______
Discharge, notice of inten­
tion to. (See Employ­
ment, termination of,
notice of.)
Discharge of employees on
account of age:
Colorado__________
Discharge, statement of
cause of; hearings:
California__________
Florida_________ . . .
TnrHana._. ________
Michigan_______ . . .
Missouri__________
Montana________-_
Nebraska.... n ,.r ^ .
w
Nevada. . . . . . . . . . __
Ohio..........................
Oklahoma_______ _
Oregon.............: .........
Texas_____ _____
Wisconsin___ __. . .
(Sec also Blacklisting;
Employment of labor;
Service letters.)




Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Couplers, safety. (See
Railroads, safety provi­
sions for.)
Court of Industrial Rela­
tions:

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

440-447
98,99 m
470
528

12
12
15

107-109 434

6

154-158
228,229
355
618
750,760
843-845
926-928
1132

Discharged employees,
payment of wages due.
(See Payment of wages
due, etc.)
Discounting of w ages.
(See Wages, discounts,
deductions, etc., from.)
Diseases, occupational.
(See Occupational dis­
eases.)
Docks, safety appliances
at:
New Jersey____ ____
Domestic products, prefer*
ence of, for public use.
(See Public works, pref­
erence of, etc.)
Drinking water. (See
Water for drinking, etc.)
Drug clerks, hours of labor
of. (See Hours of labor
of drug clerks.)
Dust, fumes, etc., provisionsfor. (StoFactories
and workrooms.)

716

E

491
533

£63
793

403 54,55
535

Earnings of married wom­
en, summary of laws as
' to. (See Women, mar­
ried, earnings of.)
Earnings of minors, sum­
mary of laws as to. (See
Minors, earnings of.)
Eating in workrooms.
See Food, taking, into
certain workrooms.)
Educational needs, indus­
trial, summary of laws
as t o . . ___________ _
Efficiency tests and bo­
nuses:
United States_______
Eight -hour - day. (See
Hours of labor, miscel­
laneous headings.)
Electric installations, sub­
ways, etc., construction
and maintenance of,
summary of laws as to..
Electricians, examinations,
etc., of, summary of laws
as to________________
Elevator operators, exami­
nation, etc., of, sum­
mary of laws as t o _ —
_
Elevators, inspection and
regulation of:
California__________
Connecticut.. . . . . . __
T H f o n is ________________

230
209 528
292,293
375,376
555
623
639
654,655
673
852,853
865,866
876

30

528 86,87

1154
'

Indiana____________
Iowa_____ _______
Kftnsfts__________
Massachusetts__ __
Minnesota_________
Nebraska_________
New Jersey________
New York_ ______
_
Oklahoma_________
Pennsylvania_______
Rhode Island_______
Texas..... ....................
Washington.............

West Virginia_____
Wyoming.._______
(See also Inspection, eta.
of factories, etc.)

7-15
1192 403

58

85-87
34 470

5

35
213
258,259
351
379
423 403
428
519
565,566,
584,585
657
710,711,
716,726
763
862
923 403
973,980
1093
1114
1165

25

43

528

81

403*

49

106

CUMULATIVE INDEX
i
Bulletin
No. 370

(See also Employment
offices.)
Emigration of laborers:
Porto Rico_________
Employees' bonds. (See
Bonds of employees.)
Employees, bribery, etc.,
of. (See Bribery of em­
ployees.)
Employees’ deposits, in­
terest to be paid on:
Louisiana

Maine____________
Employees' funds:

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Emigrant agents, sum­
mary of laws as to____ -

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

36,37 403
434
470
486
528
962

464
485
470

W ashington

Employees’ representa­
tion:
Massachusetts______
New Jersey________
Employers’ advances, in­
terest on:
Louisiana

Employers’ advances, re­
payment of:
Alabama..... ..............
Florida
Georgia . ________
Michigan
Minnesota_________
Mississippi
New Hampshire
New Mexico
North Carolina
North Dakota
Oregon........................
Philippine Islands___
Porto Rico
South Carolina
Virginia
W ashington

Employers’ certificates,
forgery of:
Georgia___________
Minnesota_________
Nevada___________
Washington.................
Wisconsin.................._
Employers’ liability. (See
Lability of employers.)
Employers’ liability insur­
ance:
W isconsin

Employers to furnish
names of employees to
officials of county, etc.,
summary of laws as to_.
Employment, abandon­
ment of. (See Contracts
of employment.)
Employment agents. (See
Employment offices.)
Employment, discrimina­
tion in, forbidden:
In d ian a ______________

Massachusetts______
Employment, foremen,
etc., accepting fees for
furnishing:
Alabama__________
Arizona___________
California__________
Connecticut________
Florida........................




7
4
6
4
8

56

531
731
472
138
170
296
304,305
548
576,577
595
692
736
786
800,801
873,874
947
961,962
992
1083 486
1105
304
575
670
1088
1153

1152
104,105

381
513
139
156
209
266
289

23

Employment, foremen,
etc., accepting fees for
furnishing—Continued.
Michigan__________
Minnesota_________

M on tan a_____________

Nevada_____ 1_____
New Hampshire____
New Jersey________
Ohio....... 4...................
Pennsylvania.. ___
Utah............................
Employment, notice of
termination of. (See
Employment, termina­
tion of, etc.)
Employment, obtaining,
under false pretenses.
(See Employers’ ad­
vances, repayment of;
Employers’ certificates,
forgery of.)
Employment of children.
(See Children, employ­
ment of.)
Employment of labor by
public-service corpora­
tions. (See Public serv­
ice employments.)
Employment of labor, de­
ception, etc., in:
Alaska____________
Arizona___________
California.—
...............
Colorado__________

557
575
650
669,670
687
710
826
925,932
1062,1063

145
160
188,191
226,227,
232,233
296
Florida___________
510
Massachusetts. ...........
575-577
Minnesota...................
649
Montana__________
Nevada....................... 664,670,681
777,778
New York_________
787
North Carolina_____
865
Oklahoma...................
Oregon........................ 874,898,899
957
Porto Rico_________
1011,1012
Tennessee_________
1065
Utah
..........
1142
Wisconsin_________
(See also Employers’ ad­
vances; Strike, notice
of, in advertisements
for laborers.)
Employment of labor, gen­
eral provisions:
Arkansas^
_
_
169,170
183-187
California
_
_
Colorado
_ 225,226,230
_
265-267
Connecticut................
294
Florida......................
Georgia..
_ 299,301,302
_
H aw a ii......... _
312
323,324
Idaho_____________
365,381
In d ian a ___
___
Kentucky..
_
_
452
L ouisiana __________ 462-464,473
Massachusetts______
513
Michigan.... ................ 536,548,557
Missouri__________
623,624
Montana__________ 645-648,650
Nevada.......... ............
674-676
New York...................
746-774
North Carolina_____
789
North Dakota.............
796-799
Ohio............................
813
Oklahoma...................
864-868
Oregon.___________
878,879
Pennsylvania_______
904
Philippine Islands___ 948,949,951
Porto Rico.................. 953»956,067

470

23

403

55

I

403

26

'434“ 15,16

408

46

107

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Page

No. Page

Employment of labor, gen­
Employment offices, pri­
eral provisions—Con.
vate—Con.
South Carolina_____
988,989
306,307,309
Georgia
South Dakota............. 1000-1002
312
Hawaii - ___
Utah............................ 1047,1062,
322,323
Idaho
___
1063
344-347
Illinois
_
_
Washington................ 1105,1106
32
372,373 470
Indiana
55
Wisconsin................... 1130,1131 403
25
417 403
Iowa .
____
528 92,93
52S
42
1156
Wyoming....................
Kansas
426,427
United States............
1181
453
Kentucky
{See also Discharge,
474 486 13,14
Louisiana__________
statement of cause of;
MftinA___________ _
478
Employers’ advances;
502
Maryland_________
Employment, termi­
506
Massachusetts. - -___
nation of; Examina­
Michigan_______ __
543,544 403 28,29
tion, etc.; Inspec­
470
35
tion, etc., of factories;
528
50
Wages, etc.)
572 403 30,31
Minnesota________ Employment of labor on
528
52
public works.
(See
598
Mississippi— _
. _
Public works, labor on.)
610
Missouri— — —
—
Employment of women.
628,643
Montana.............. - (See Women, employ­
Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . .
659,660
ment of.)
670,676,677
Nevada__-____
Employment offices, free
686
New Hampshire____
public:
New Jersey_____ —_
728,729 486 17,18
Xa tVAft
Tw
Arizona.......................
163,164 403
60
48
744,745 470
Arkansas
179,180
A
O
020
O
Z
California....................
210
Worth flamlina
403
39
Colorado__________
235-237
528 65,66
Connecticut................
257,258
825,826
QV
A
Ohio
Delaware....................
528
38
871,872
Georgia.......................
306
"’42
888 ‘403’ “7Q>r
_7
Idaho_____________
322,323
528 I&-40
.
.
Illinois.......... .............
343,344
R fi
O
o
911 O& 79,80
Indiana.......................
388-390
Philippine Islands---948,949
Iowa...........................
416,417
D)ia/1a TolonH
972
Kansas........................
43
426,446 528
flnnth
1007,1008
Louisiana....................
476
1009,1010 403
Maryland....................
497
Texas.......................... 1045,1046
Massachusetts............
523,524
1048,1049
M ich igan ...... .................
543
1076
Virginia.---------------562,578,
Minnesota...................
K
A
1088 ‘476"
579,589
1118 528 89,90
West Virginia______Missouri.....................
610
Wisconsin................ — 1145,1146 403 55,56
Montana_________
642
1166
Wyoming....................
654
Nebraska....................
(S ee a ls o E m igran t
Nevada___________
682,683 528 57,58
agents.)
New Hampshire____
694,695
Employment, prevention
New Jersey________
723-725
of. (See Interference
New York.___ ____
749,778
with employment, and
North Carolina_____
791-793
cross references.)
North Dakota______
810,811
Employment, termination
819,824
Ohio............................
of, notice of:
Oklahoma...................
871
483
Maine...................... —
Pennsylvania
915-918,942
523
Massachusetts______
Philippine Islands---947,948,
702,704
New Jersey.................
950,951
937
Pennsylvania_______
Pnrt.n Rin/i
969-971
956
Porto Rico..................
Rhode Island
976,977
978 486 22,23
Rhode Island..............
South Dakota
1004,1008
994
South Carolina_____
Utah
1051
1137
Wisconsin...................
V irginia
1085,1086
(See also Discharge; Em­
West Virginia______
1110 528" 89~90
ployment of labor, gen­
Wisconsin_________
1127 470
58
eral provisions.)
United States.............
1171 403
58 Engineers, examination,
Employment offices, pri­
etc., of, summary of
vate: 3
laws as to.......................
7
21-23 403
Alaska
151 470
18
6
470
Arizona___________
403
60
Arkansas__________
179
Engineers, illiterate, em­
California_________ 204,205,221 470 23,24
ployment of, on rail­
528
23
roads. (See Railroad
Colorado____ ______
237 528 37,38
employees, illiterate.)
Connecticut................
258
Engineers, unlicensed, em­
District of Columbia—
286,287
ployment of:
Florida........................
289
Alabama__________
138,139
•Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in tall, tee Illinois.

11178°—31----- 8



108

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No. 370

Bulletin

Bulletin
No. 570

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Page

No. Page

Enlisted men, employ­
ment of, in civil pursuits:
1173
United States.............
Enticing employees, etc.:
Alabama.....................
137,138
Arkansas....................
166,169
294
Florida.......................
303
Georgia.......................
312,313
Hawaii...................... 451
Kentucky...................
594,595
Mississippi.................
787
North Carolina......... .
South Carolina...........
993
1011
Tennessee...................
Texas____________
United States.............
1191
(See also Interference,
etc.)
Examination, etc., of min­
ers, mine foremen, etc.: *
134
Alabama....................
150
Alaska....................... .
Arkansas....................
178
225
Colorado....................
Illinois....................... 336,337,360
404-407
Indiana.....................
419
Iowa..........................
439
Kentucky........
452
Missouri..........
622
640,641
Montana..........
804
North Dakota..
850
Ohio.................
863
Oklahoma........
Pennsylvania..
931,932,
938-941
Tennessee...................
1009
1061
Utah...........................
1080
Virginia......................
Washington................
1100
1112
West Virginia.............
Wyoming...................
1160
Examination, etc., of
workmen, summary of
19-35
laws as to.......................

486
528

:
528

70

4-7

3.4

3-6
3.4
4-8

Exemption of wages from
execution, etc.—Con.
Idaho..........................
23
Illinois....................... .
24
Indiana..................... .
420
Iowa.......................... .
426,432
Kansas...................... .
451
Kentucky...................
464
13
Louisiana.... ..............
485,486
Maine____________
”46
490
Maryland..................
534
Massachusetts ............
553
Michigan....................
574 403
31
Minnesota.
596
Mississippi.........
604
Missouri...1.......
648
Montana.............
32
660 403
Nebraska............
667
Nevada...............
684
New Hampshire .
697,724
New Jersey.........
736,737
New Mexico___
784
New York...........
39
790
North Carolina. _
799
North Dakota__
849,851 403 41,"42
Ohio....................
858,859,869
Oklahoma...........
873
Oregon...............
904,911,912
Pennsylvania___
957
Porto Rico..........
Rhode Island___
South Carolina53
1002 470
South Dakota__
1011
Tennessee............
1023,1025,
Texas..................
1026
1062
Utah...........................
1066
Vermont.....................
23
1083 | 486
Virginia..................... .
54
1087 1470
Washington...............
1118 ----West Virginia______
58
Wisconsin........... ....... 1152,1153 ! 470
Wyoming.................. 1158,1161 !___
United States______ 1176,1177 -....
Explosives, storage, manu­
facture, etc., of:
519
Massachusetts.... .......
Missouri.....................
616 '
630
Montana................... .
35
701,728
New Jersey................
New York................. .
774
Ohio..........................
Explosives, use of, in
mines. (See Mine regu­
lations.)
Extortion:
364
Illinois........................
575
Minnesota..................
650
Montana........ ............
(See also Interference, etc.,
intimidation.)

Examination, etc., of rail­
road employees. (See
Railroad
employees,
qualifications of.)
Examination, etc., of street
railway employees. (See
Street railways, em­
ployees on.)
Execution, exemption
from. (See Exemption,
etc.)
Executions in suits for
wages. (See Suits for
wages.)
Exemption of mechanics,
etc., from license tax,
Factories, accidents in.
35,36
summary of laws as to. (See Accidents, etc.)
Exemption of wages from
Factories and workrooms,
execution, etc.:
ventilation, sanitation,
142,143
Alabama.....................
etc., of. (See Air space;
144
Alaska........................
Inspection and regula­
Arizona.......................
153,159
tion.)
167
Arkansas.....................
Factories, eating, etc., in.
19
California...................
187 470
(See Food, taking into
253
Colorado.....................
certain workrooms.)
Connecticut_______
268
Factories, fire escapes on.
284
District of Columbia—
(See Fire escapes, etc.)
Florida........................
290
Factories, plants, etc., es­
Georgia.......................
302,304
tablishment by State,
Hawaii........................
312
summary of laws as to..
‘Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in full, see Indiana.




99,100

109

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No. 370

Bulletin

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Page

No. Page

Factories, etc., registration
of:
California..................
202,203
Kentucky_________
457
Maryland
492
601,602
Mississippi____ ____
New York.... ....... ......
763
New Jersey________
Wisconsin_________ 1142,1148
Factories, smoking in.
(See Smoking, etc.)
Factory inspectors. (See
Inspectors, factory.)
Factory regulation. (See
Inspection and regula*
tion of factories, etc.)
Fellow servant, negligent,
to be named in verdict:
Minnesota _
674
Fellow servants. (See Lia­
bility of employers for
injuries to employees.)
Female employees. (See
Women, employment
of.)
Female employees, seats
for. (See Seats for fe­
male employees.)
Fire escapes on factories,
etc.:
Alabama
138
Colorado___ _____ _
240
Connecticut ______
261,262
Delaware__________
278
District of Columbia..
285,286
Georgia___________ 300,301,304
Idaho_____________
327
352,359
Illinois____________
Indiana___________
366,367
Iowa_____________
421,422
Kansas____________
428
Kentucky_________
451,452
Louisiana__________
474,475
Maine____________
478
Massachusetts______
506,507
Michigan__________
538
Minnesota_________
566, 567
Missouri__________
616, 625
Montana__________
629
Nebraska__________
657
New Hampshire____
691
New Jersey________
712,713
New York_________
764
North Carolina
788,789
North Dakota_____
795
Ohio.......................... .*
834,840
Oklahoma. _____
863,869
Oregon____________
Pennsylvania__
905,912,
913,924
Rhode Island............ .
980
South Dakota______
1003
Tennessee_________ 1014,1020
Texas___________
1038,1039
Vermont__________
1073
Virginia___________
1080
West Virginia_____
1114,1115,
1117
Wisconsin.................. 1126,1127
Wyoming_________ 1163,1164
(See also Inspection and
regulation of factories
and workshops.)
Fire marshal:
Hawaii___ ________
314
Oregon............. ...........
903
Pennsylvania..............
922




Fire, safeguards against,
in factories. (See In­
spection and regulation
of factories, etc.)
Firemen, stationary, ex­
amination, etc., of, sum­
403
35
mary of laws as to
486
16 First-aid provisions. (See
Accidents, provisions
for.)
Food products, manufac­
ture of, summary of
laws as to.....................
Food, taking into certain
workrooms:
Delaware__________
Illinois____________
Minnesota_________
Missouri__________
New Jersey__ ._ .
New York_________
Ohio............................
Pennsylvania______
West Virginia............
Forced contributions from
employees:
Indiana___________
Louisiana_________
Maryland_________
Michigan__________
Nevada___ _______
New Jersey________
"528* "35,'36
New York_________
Ohio.................... ......
Oregon__ :_________
Utah...........................
(See also Employees’
funds.)
Foremen, etc., accepting
fees for furnishing em­
ployment.
(See Em­
ployment, foreman, etc.,
accepting fees for fur­
12
434
nishing.)
Funds, employees’. (See
Employees’ funds.)
G
Garnishment, exemption
of wages from. (See Ex­
emption of wages from
34
403
execution, etc.)
Garnishment of wages:
Alabama__________
49
470
Arizona.......................
Arkansas.....................
Colorado.....................
Delaware....................
403
43
Hawaii_______ ___ _
52
470
Indiana___________
Louisiana_________
Michigan....... ......... .
Missouri__________
Nebraska....................
New Jersey..............—
New Mexico...............
North Dakota______
Oregon........................
Tennessee_________
Utah...........................
Virginia___________
Wisconsin_________
Wyoming....................
Government printing of­
fices. (See Public print­
ing, etc.

21,22 403

7

87-89
281
351,356
586
619
721
760
844
927
1114
366
2,"
474 ’486" 1 13
490
563,554
665
707
772
847,848
878
1048

143
167

528

21

"470"

29

279
22
313,314 ’403"
403
24
470
31
486
13
403
31
604
"403" " " ’ 32
734
739
528
67
873
1021
1062
1083 *486’
23
1153 470
67
1161

CUMULATIVE INDEX

110

Bulletin
No. 370

(See also Industrial police.)
Guards for dangerous ma­
chinery, etc. (See In­
spection and regulation
of factories and work­
shops.)

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Groceries, employees in:
New York_________
Group insurance. (See In­
surance of employees.)
Guards, armed, summary
of laws as to_________

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

Hours of labor in general
employments—Con.

780
111,112 403
470
486

H
Hatch tenders:
California r
Headlights on locomotives,
summary of laws as to.
Highways, hours of labor
on, summary of laws fix­
ing_________________
Hiring.
(See Employ­
ment of labor.)
Hoisting-machine opera­
tors, examination, etc.,
of, summary of laws as
to_________________
Holiday labor:
Massachusetts______
New Hampshire____
Holidays in the different
States and Territories,
list of. (See Legal holi­
days.)
Horseshoers, examination,
etc., of, summary of
laws as to___________
Hospital fees. (See Forced
contributions, etc.)
Hospitals and hospital
funds, administration,
etc., of:
Arizona___________
Arkansas__________
California__________
New Mexico_______
Oklahoma_________
Oregon........................
Pennsylvania______
West Virginia.............
Wyoming__________
United States.............
(See also Forced contri­
butions.)
Hours of labor in general
employments:
Arizona___________
Arkansas.....................
California....................
Connecticut________
Florida........................
Georgia.......................
Idaho.........................
Illinois..-....................
Indiana.......................
Maine. .......................
Maryland_________
Michigan....................
Minnesota____ ____
Mississippi.................
Missouri............... .
Montana.....................
New Hampshire____
New York................... j
North Carolina...........




188,189
74-81
104

35 470
528
513
690

19-21 403

173
212,213
737,738
870
878,898
932,937
1117
1157
1187

528

154,155
170
183
265
290
300 I
326
339
373
486
499
549
563
599,600
612
628,647
684 528
754-759,
778,780
789 I .....

813,819,840
Oregop„..,T ^
n
886,887
Pennsylvania_______
Porto Rico_________
13
957,958
Rhode Island_______
12,13
977,978
South Carolina_____
990,991
8
Wisconsin ...
_
1141
Hours of labor of children
and women. (See Chil­
dren, etc.)
Hours of labor of deck of­
ficers:
United States______
1176
Hours of labor of drug
clerks:
California ___
194,195
New York_________
780
Hours of labor of employ­
ees in brickyards:
New York_________
755
Hours of labor of employ­
ees in compressed air:
New Jersey________
719
New York_________
773,774
Pennsylvania______
908
Hours of labor of employ­
ees in electric plants:
5
Arizona__________ _
154
7 Hours of labor of employ­
ees in groceries:
New York_________
780
Hours of labor of employ­
ees in mines, smelters,
etc.:
Alaska_______ ____
148
Arizona___ _______ 155,161,162
California_____ ____
201
Colorado__________
224,228
6
Idaho_____________
325
____________
439
Maryland_________
501
Missouri_______ ___
612,621
Montana
627,637
Nevada___________
665,668
North Dakota______
21
804
Oklahoma
. . . ___
857,868
Oregon. _ . ..
887
Utah............................ 1047,1059
Washington________
1092
Wyoming__________ 1156,1159
Hours of labor of employ­
ees in plaster and ce­
ment mills:
Colorado_________
Nevada___________
668
Hours of labor of employ­
ees on railroads:
United States............. 1179-1181
Summary of State
laws as to________
82,83
Hours of labor of employ­
ees on street railways:
California,. . T ........
183
Louisiana__________
462
Maryland_________
Massachusetts______
533
New Jersey_______
709
New York.._______
754,755
Pennsylvania______
910
Rhode Island____
981,982
Smith narnlina
991,992,996
Washington________
1092
Hours of labor of seamen:
United States..............
1176
59 Hours of labor of telegraph
operators. (See Hours
of labor of employees on
railroads.)

528" "77,'79
403 45.46
486 22,23

403 18,19

528~ ’55,’56
470 42,43
'528' ""” 72

470

29

470

34

CUMULATIVE INDEX

111

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Page

No. Page

Hours of labor of telephone
operators:
Montana
637
Hours of labor of women.
(See Women, etc.)
Hours of labor on public
roads, summary of laws
as to_______________
104
Hours of labor on public
works:
Alaska ^
144
__
Arizona
152,154
California _____ _ ^ 181,189,190 470, 22,'23,"
528 30,31
Colorado.................. —
228
Delaware,_________
274
District of Columbia. _
284,287
Hawaii
310
Idaho..........................
316,325
Indiana___________
373
Kansas
........ .
427 403
26
Kentucky....................
452
Maryland....................
501.502
Massachusetts............
511,512 434
15
M inn esota . _ _ ___ 563,564,580
Montana__________
627, 638 528 55,56
Nevada____ _______
669,678
New Jersey
.................
717
New Mexico...............
735
New York_________
760,761
Ohio............................
813
Oklahoma...... ............
857.864
Oregon____________
887,888 '528' 72’ 7 "
3,
75,76
Pennsylvania..............
933
Porto Rico_________ 953,959,969 '403' '''"46
Texas............... ........... 1037,1038
Utah............................ 1047,1059
Washington________ 1091,1092
West Virginia.......... ._
1117
Wisconsin_________
1141,1142 528 93,94
1156,1162
United States______
1183,1184
I
Illiterate employees on
railroads. (See Rail­
road employees, illiter­
ate.)
Immigration:
United States..............
1174
Immigration, etc., bureau
of:
California__________
181,182
Hawaii____________ 310,311,314
Idaho..........................
316-318
Illinois.........................
333,388
South Dakota.............
1007
Importing workmen from
outside the State:
Oregon........................
898
Inclosed platforms. (See
Protection of employees
on street railways.)
Incorporation of labor or­
ganizations, etc. (See
Labor
organizations,
etc.)
Industrial commission.
(See Commission, in­
dustrial, etc.)
Industrial diseases. (See
Occupational diseases.)
Industrial education, sum­
mary of laws as to..........
7-10 403
Industrial home work.
Sweating system.)




3,4

Industrial police, sum­
mary of laws as to_____

Industrial rehabilitation.
(See Rehabilitation of
injured persons.)
Industrial R ela tio n s,
Court of:
T fln flff_________
T fS
Industrial relations, de­
partment of:
California_______
Ohio............................
Industrial welfare com­
missioners, etc.:
A rlrangpg
_
_
California
Kansas____ ____ _
Oregon____ _____
Injunctions:
Illinois____
Kansas _ .
Minnesota_________
Montana__________
New Jersey
__
North Dakota_____
Oregon____________
U t a h .................
Washington________
Wisconsin _- ___
United States.......... . .
Injuries causing death,
right of action for, sum­
mary of laws as to____ _
Injuries to employees.
(See Liability of em­
ployers.)
Inspection and regulation
of bakeries, etc., sum­
mary of laws as to_____

109-112 403
13
434
6
470 12,13
486
8
528
16

440-447 403

813-815

26

528 23,24,
32

172,173
205-208 470" 20^22
528 26,27
447
881-885
403
23
431,432
579 528
52
648
_434" "’’"ii
805
899,900
1057-1059
1104
1147
1172,1173
89-91 403
434
470

10
5
9

87-89 403
470
486

10
9
6

Inspection and regulation
of barber shops, sum­
29-32
mary of laws as to..........
Inspection and regulation
of factories and work­
shops:
136-138
Alabama_________
Alaska____ _______
149,150
60
Arizona,_________ 162,164,165 403
Arkansas__________ 167-169,173
191,192, 470
20
California__________
202,203, 528
28
213-219,
222,223
232, 528 32-36
Colorado___ _______
238-241,
244-246
20
258-262, 403
Connecticut________
268,271 470 29,30
Delaware__________ 273,278-282
285,286
District of Columbia..
290,291
Florida____________
Georgia___________
300,304,
308,309
Hawaii___________
314
Idaho_____________ 317,327,328
nifopip_________
341-343,
347,348.
350-359

CUMULATIVE INDEX

112

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No. Page

Inspection and regulation
of factories and workshops—Continued.
Wisconsin_________

Inspection and regulation
of factories and work
shops—Continued.
Indiana

366,367,
379,383,
388,392,
393
413-416,
Iowa_____________
420-423
428,429, 403
Kansas........,, ...... .
436-437 470
528
Kentucky_________
460-452 486
T^lipi'ana.
462,472-475 434
Maine........................ 478,481,482
Maryland, ...............
492-495
MaStSanhnsAtta .. - 606,607, 434
513,514,
517-520
Michigan .. , __ __
538-543 403
528
Minnesota
564-567, 470
576,
680-582,
584-587,
590
Mississippi
_..
601-603
MiR8«nri _ n______ 613-621,625
629-633
Montana__________
Nebraska__________
655-657 528
668,671, 403
Nevada___________
674-676,
681
____ 686,691-694 403
New Hampshire
New Jersey________
699-703, 403
712,713, 486
716,
719-722,
724,725,
728,730,
733
New Mexico_______
739
New_________
York
750,751, 403
759,760, 470
763-772 486
528
North Carolina_____
788-790 470
North Dakota______ 795,796,803
Ohio______________ 817-820,824,
825,828-835,
840,843-845
Oklahoma
...... ........... 861-864,869
Oregon____________ 888-897,903 403
528
Pennsylvania______ 905,912,913, 403
918-928 470
528
Philippine Islands___
950
Porto Rico_________ 960,961,966,
967
Rhode Island.............. 973-975,977,
980,981
South Carolina_____
South Dakota______
Tennessee_______ __
Texas_____________
TTt*h
Vermont__________
Virginia___________
Washington_
_

25
33
43,44
11,12
12
13
29
48,49
37

56,57
32,33
34
35,36
16

39
49
20,21
65
49

43
76
43,44
52
77,
80,81

486* """’21
528 81,82
48
403
16
434
528 82,83
83
986,995 528
1003,1004,
1006,1007
1013-1016,
1019-1021
49
1027,1041, 403
1042
1050-1052
1069,1070,
1072,1073
1078-1080,
1083,1084
1087,1088,
1093-1095,

1101-1104
West V irgin ia......... 1110,1113- 528 91,92
1115,1119




1123-1130, 528 92,94
1132,1133,
1146,1148,
1149
Wyoming__________ 1163-1166
(See also Cellars and
basements, use of;
Compressed air; Ex­
plosives; Fire escapes;
Inspection, etc., of
bakeries; Inspectors,
factory; Laundries;
Seats for female em­
ployees; Sweating sys­
tem; Toilet rooms.)
Inspection of locomotives,
etc., summary of laws as
69-81 403 9,10
to_________________
Inspection, etc., of mercan­
tile establishments:
692-694
New Hampshire...._
710,711
New Jersey________
New York_________ 750,771,772
Inspection, etc., of mines.
(See Mine regulations.)
Inspection of railroads,
railroad equipment, etc.,
69-81 403 9,10
summary of laws as to...
470
9
Inspection of steam boilers:
Arkansas__________
470
19
528
22
528
23
California... . . . . . . . . . .
253 470
28
Colorado__________
262
Connecticut_______
283
Delaware_________ _
Indiana__________ _
385,386
4
.99.
Iowa..______
477,478
Maine_________ ___
507 434
Massachusetts__. . . _
13
543
Michigan__________
589
Minnesota________
Missouri__________
621
Montana,_______ _
629,633
44
New York . . . ___ 760,774,775, 470
781,782
Ohio__________ ___
836
Oklahoma_________ 867,868,872
924 528 80,81
Pennsylvania _____
978,979 403
Rhode Island_______
48
434
16
486 21,22
West Virginia_ . . . . .
_
1115
Wisconsin_________ 1127,1128,
1130
(See also Inspection of
locomotives.)
Inspection of steam boilers
in mines. (See Mine
regulations.)
Inspection of steam ves­
sels:
Idaho____________
470
31
384
Indiana.__________
488
Maine____________
643
Montana__________
690
New Hampshire____
New York..................
774,775
Washington
1096
1175
United States.
Inspectors, factory, etc.:
136
Alabama ............
Alaska____________
149,150
Arkansas _______
171,172
Colorado__________
238-241 528
36
Connecticut______

Delaware.....................

258,259, 403
264,271 470
279-282

20
29

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Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Page

No. Page

Inspectors, factory, etc.—
Continued.
District of Columbia—
Florida______ ____ _
Georgia___________
Illinois... .........

288
291
308,309
335, 347,
348,357
381,382,
Indiana..................
385,392
414,415
Iowa_ ___________
_
Kansas
. „
434-436
450,455,456
465,470,471
478,481
Maine ____ ____
494,500
Maryland ...............
504, 505,
M
ftftf'ftfthusAt.ta
510,518
539,540,542
Michigan . „
560,561
Minnesota......... .......
Mississippi _____
601
613-615
Missouri*-................
M o n ta n a ,
632,633
Nebraska....................
653,654
681
Nevada.............
New TTfljnpshirfl
692,694
726,727
New Jersey________
739
New Mexino
New York_________
748,749
North Dakota ...
803
Ohio............................
828,829,
842,843
Oklahoma.... _ .....
861,862
Oregon____________
881,882,
884,893
921,941
Pennsylvania______
Philippine Islands___
950
Porto Rico...............
967,968
Rhode Island_______ 973,974,980
South Carolina_____
986,992
South Dakota______
1007
1019-1021
Tennessee_________
Texas_____________
1042
Utah..........................
1050
Vermont__________ 1068,1069
Virginia^,„ ________ 1075,1076,
1080
Washington________ 1093,1103,
1104,1107
West Virginia______ 1110,1119
Wisconsin_________ 1125,1126,
1129,1130
(See also Fire marshal.)
Insurance of employees:
California.............
Colorado__________
Florida........................
291
Iowa............................
Louisiana___ ___
474
Massachusetts______
532
Michigan____ __
_ 552,555,556
Minnesota_________
New Jersey________
New York_________
North Carolina_____
Ohio............................
Pennsylvania______
South Carolina_____
South Dakota______
Virginia......................
Washington________
Wisconsin...................
Insurance, unemployment:
Michigan__________
Intelligence offices. (See
Employment offices.)




528

44

528

45

434

13

528

65

528
403

69
42

528 82,83

528

528 25,26
37
528
‘528’ "42,'43
’486’ ’l4,’l5
528 46,47
403 29,30
528
48

584
733,734 486
745,772 403
528
403
849
528
987,995
1004
434
470
528
1152 528
555,556

90

17
38
63,64
39
78,79
17,18
54-56

88

93,94

Intemperate employees,
summary of laws as to_ _
105-107
Interference with employ­
ment, intimidation, etc.:
Alabama__________ 135,137,138
Arkansas_____ ____
166
Colorado__________
227
Connecticut________
269
278
Delaware-_____
Florida........................
295
Georgia___________
303
Hawaii.
312,313,315
Idaho_____________
Illinois____________ 338,339,361
Kansas____________ 425,426,438
451
Kentucky_________
Maine____________
486,487
Massachusetts______
510
Michigan___ ______
553
Minnesota_________ 569,574,575
Mississippi________
594,595
604
Missouri__________
Montana_________ _
639,649
Nebraska__________
661
Nevada__________ _
668,669
New Hampshire____
685
New Jersey________
709
New York_________
776,777
North Dakota______ 794,799,800
Oklahoma________ _
858
Oregon____________
874,875
Pennsylvania_______
934
Porto Rico_________
955
Rhode Island_______
983
South Dakota______
1003
Texas_____________ 1032,1034,
1042-1044
Utah............................ 1047,1061,
1063,1065
Vermont__________
1073
Washington________ 1087,1088
Wflst V irg in ia
1111,1112
Wisconsin_________
1154
United States..........
1191
(See also Blacklisting;
Boycotting; Conspir­
acy against work­
men; Enticing em­
ployees; Picketing;
Protection of employ­
ees; Sabotage; Strikes
ofrailroad employees.)
Intoxication, negligence,
etc., of employees, sum­
mary of laws, as to____
105-107
K
Kidnaping:
Philippine Islands___
948
United States..........
1191
L
Labels. (SeeTrade-marks.)
Labor agents. (See Emi­
grant agents.)
Labor agreements not con­
spiracy. (See Conspir­
acy, labor agreements
not.)
Labor, bureau of. (See
Bureau of labor.)
Labor camps, etc.:
California__________
200,201
Delware___________
280
Hawaii.... ................. .
311
539
Michigan______ ____
Minnesota________ _
573
682
Nevada__________ ,
New Mexico...............
739

403

13

486

15

‘403' ’51,’52

470

28

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CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Labor camps, etc.—Con.

New York.............

Pennsylvania..........
Porto Rico...............
Virginia...................
(See also Lodging houses.)
Labor, commissioner of.
(See Bureau of labor.)
Labor contracts.
(See
Contracts of employ­
ment.)
Labor organizations, brib­
ery of representatives of.
(See Bribery of repre­
sentatives, etc.)
Labor organizations ex­
cluding members of
National Guard, sum­
mary of laws as to..........
Labor organizations, in­
corporation, regulation,
etc., of:
Alabama....................
California..................

Legal holidays in the
States and Territories—

767
925
1075

Letters of recommenda­
tion. (See Employers’
certificates.)
Liability of corporations
for debts of contractors
for labor, list of laws de­
termining___________
Liability of employers for
injuries to employees:
Alabama__________
AlftsVa____________
Arizona___________

118

Utah................
Washington....
West Virginia..
Wisconsin.......
Wyoming.......
United States.
Labor organizations. (See
Antitrust act; Conspir­
acy, labor agreements
not; Protection of em­
ployees as members;
Trade-marks of tradeunions.)
Labor organs, public ad­
vertising in:
New Jersey.................
Labor spies:
Wisconsin...................
Laborers, alien. (See Alien
laborers.)
Laundries, license fee for:
Montana.....................
Laundries, regulation of,
summary of laws as to..




36

955
994
1025,1028,
1032
1057,1063
1104,1105
1111, 1112,

1121

1147,1153
1161
1173,1182,
1183

708
403 54,55

Bulletin

Page

No.

139
188,190,
191,196
226
Colorado....................
Connecticut..............
272
District of Columbia.
286
304
Georgia.....................
364
Illinois........................ |
Iowa............................!
411,423
439,440,443
Kansas...............
Louisiana..........
460
Massachusetts-.
534, 535
Michigan...........
551, 552
Minnesota.........
575, 579, 580
649
Montana—
.........
660
Nebraska...........
671
Nevada_______
New Hampshire.
685
New Jersey.......
708 403
New York.........
743.777,778
Ohio..................
815
865
Oklahoma.........
Oregon...............
875,899,900
Pennsylvania—
904,935,936
Porto Rico........
South Carolina..
Texas.................

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

No, Page

67-69 403
434
470
486
528

9
5
8.9
5,6
11

59-62 403
434
470

8.9

4

7,8

139-141
145,146
152,153,
157-159
175-177
Arkansas__________
184,198
California__________
Colorado__________ 227,228,241
267
Connecticut................
284
District of Columbia..
293,294
Florida___________
Georgia___________ 297-299,302
357,358
Illinois........................
Indiana___________ 370,376-378
Iowa
_ _________ 411,412,419
T flngftS _________ 428,432,433
T
455
Kentucky._________
463
Louisiana__________
Maine __ _______
483-485
529-531
Massachusetts.....
544.
Michigan___ ______
572-574,
Minnesota_________
577,578
Mississippi_________ 593-598,601
605-608,622
Missouri-______
627,644
Montana_______ ___
Nebraska______ _ 652,659,660
667
N evada___________
704-706
New Jersey._____ _
735
New Mexico..
743,
New York_________
781-784
785,786
North Carolina___
796,801,802
North Dakota
827,841,
Ohio
842,
847-849
856,867
Oklahoma
876,877,
Oregon
897,898
904,932,933
Pennsylvania
945-948
Philippine Islands___
953-955
Porto Rico
978
Rhode Island
984,988,
South Carolina
989,997,
998
1005,1006
South Dakota
1026,
Texas. ____ _ _____
1028-1031
1060
Utah .........................
Virginia....................... 1074,1075, 434 18,19
1082,1083
1149-1151
Wisconsin
1156,1162,
Wyoming
1163
24
1172, 486
United States______
1177-1179
(See also Contracts of
employees w aiving
right to damages.)

115

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Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Liability of employers for
taxes of employees, sum­
mary of laws as to..........
Liability of railroad com­
panies for debts of con­
tractors. (See Liability
of stockholders* Protec­
tion of wages.)
Liability of railroad com­
panies for injuries to em­
ployees. (See Liability
of employers.)
Liability of railroad com­
panies for wages due
from predecessors:
Wisconsin_________Liability of stockholders
of corporations for wage
debts, list of laws deter­
mining
License tax, exemption of
mechanics, etc., from,
lists of laws granting.......
License tax, laborers not
topay:
T,rm nft
isifV
Philippine Islands___
Licensing, etc. (See Exam­
ination, etc.)
Liens. (See Mechanics'
liens.)
Loans to employees:
Louisiana__________
Local or special laws regu­
lating labor, etc.:
Kentucky_________
Louisiana__________
North Carolina.......
Pennsylvania______
Texas_____________
Virginia..................... .
Locomotives, etc., aban­
donment of. (See Strikes
of railroad employees.)
Locomotives, headlights,
etc., summary of laws as
to_________________
Lodging houses, laborers’:
Connecticut________
Hawaii.... - . . . ___
(See also Labor camps.)
Lunch, time for. (See
Time for meals.)

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

104,105 470

12

1150
62 470
35,36

8

Mechanics* liens, sum­
mary of laws as to..___

Mediation. (See Arbitra­
tion.)
Medical attendance for
employees:
Montana . . . . . . . . . .
New Mexico_____ _
Oregon^___ ^ ^ ^
Medical examination. (See
Physical examination.)
Mercantile establishments
etc., inspection of. (See
Inspection, etc., of mergpntile establishments.)
dren?8 (See Children,
employment of, in street
trades.)
Mine regulations:*
Alabama.....................

37-59 403
434
470
486
528

7.8
4
6,7
4,5
8.9

644
737,738
878

133-135,
138,139
Alaska_________
148-151 470
18
Arizona___________ 153,159,165 528
21
Arkansas__________ 166,177,178 470
19
California__________ 187,194,208 528 27,28
Colorado__________
224-226 403
19
29
470
472
32
528
Idaho_____________
327,328 470
31
Illinois_______ ____
330,336, 403
23
448
337,360,364 470 31.32
458
Indiana.______. . . ___
391-410 403 24,25
793
470 32.33
904
Iowa............. ..............
419 403
25
1023
33
470
1074
Kansas____________
431,439 528
43
Kentucky_________
12
452,453 486
Louisiana___ ______
471
Maryland_________
499
Michigan__________
545,551 470
35
Minnestoa_________
571
75-81
Missouri__________
621,622 528’ 54^55
Montana_________ _
630,633, 470
42
266
640,641, 528 55,56
311,312
649,650
Nevada___________
666,671, 403 32,33
679,680 528 58,59
New Jersey________
729
......
New Mexico_______ 735,737,738 -476"
M
New York___ _____
772,778
North Carolina_____
Mail, obstructing:
790
North Dakota.............
803,804 403
United States______ 1191,1192
40
Ohio............................ 826,827,850 470
Manufactures, State, sum­
50
Oklahoma_________ 856,868-870 470
mary of laws as to...........
50
99,100
Married women, earnings
528 6&
-72
Oregon____________
of, summary of laws as
902
to. (See Women, mar­
Pennsylvania____ . . .
930,932, "403* "43,-5
ried, earnings of.)
938-941 470 51,52
Mason contractors, exami­
528 77-79
South Dakota______ 1004,1008
nation, etc., of, summary
Tennessee_________ 1009,1021 528
of laws as to__________
84
35
Master and servant. (See
Texas.......................... 1028,1029,
Employment of labor;
1036,1037
Utah............................
Liability of employers;
1061
Virginia___________
and cross references un­
1080
der each.)
Washington________ 1087,1097, 470
56
1100-1104
Matches, use of white phos­
phorus in making:
West Virginia______ 1110-1113 403 51,52
United States..............
56
1175
470
Meals, time for. (See
528 90,91
Time for meals.)
Wyoming__________ 1156,1157, 403 56-58
Mechanics, exemption of,
1159,1160, 470 58,59
from
manufacturers’
1162,1166, 528 95,96
taxes:
1167
Philippine Islands___
945
United States..............
1173
*Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in full ,see Indiana.




458
945

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No. 370

Bulletin

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Page

No. Page

Miners' homes:
Occupational diseases, re­
932
Pennsylvania.............
ports, prevention, etc.,
Miners' hospital. (See
of:
Hospitals and hospital
261
Connecticut__ . . . . . . .
Illinois___ __. . . . . . . .
funds.)
355-358
Miners, qualifications of.
462
Louisiana__— _—__
(See Examination, etc.,
Maine_____ _______
477
of miners.)
495
Maryland_________
Mines, bureau of. (See
509
Massachusetts______
Bureau of mines.)
536
Michigan__________
Mines, fire-fighting and
567,568
Minnesota_________
rescue stations for. (See
618
Missouri__________
Accidents, provisions
689,690
New Hampshire____
for.)
715* 716,
New Jersey________
Mines, etc., hours of labor
719-722
in. (See Hours of labor,
738
New Mexico..— — _
etc.)
New York___ _____
760
Minimum wages:
Ohio............................ 839,843,844
164
Arizona___________
Pennsylvania______
926,928
Arkansas . _ ____
172,173
Rhode Island
979,980
California_________ 181,205-208
Wisconsin _ ____ _
1123
235
Colorado__________
Old-age pensions, sum­
528
39
Hawaii..............
93,94 403
mary of laws as to
11
TTanjwslir
5
437,438,447
434
458
Louisiana .. _____
470
10
6
526-528
Massachusetts_____
486
Minnesota................ . 569-571,589
528 11-13
651
Nebraska
Overtime work, payment
528
57
Nevada..
........
for:
49
North Dakota.............
806-809 470
\ rlrflT ftR ______
iR
172
813
Ohio............................
California
183
Oregon........................
881-885
290
Florida
965
Porto Rico..................
741
New Mexico
1G
08
South Dakota.............
Oklahoma
871
87
1059 528
Utah...........................
Orecron
______
886,887
Washington................ 1098-1100
Pnrtn T if»
? n
965
Wisconsin................... 1142-1144 403 52,53
1040
Texas
Minors, earnings of, sum­
1092
Washington________
5
65 486
mary of laws as to_____
1168
______
Wyoming
Mothers’ pensions, sum­
United States______ 1180,1181
4
15-19 403
mary of laws as to_____
434
3
P
2,3
470
486
3 Payment of wages due at
4
528
end of employment:
Motion-picture machine
161
Arizona _________
operators, examination,
174.175 !
Arkansas__________
etc., of, summary of
186, 219
California__________
5,6
32,33 470
laws as to_____ ______
|
233,234
Motion-picture theaters,
328
Idaho __________ I
provisions for employees
427,428 !
Kansas —
_________ |
476 !
Louisiana _________
20
223 470
California....................
!
483
iV
Eaine
521 !
Massachusetts
N
Minnesota________ 577,582,583 i---624
Missouri ________
National Guard, protec­
638 !
Montana
tion of employees as
673,674 403
33
Nevada _________
members of, summary
704
New Jersey. ____ 118
of laws as to...................
899
Oregon
Negligence of employees,
9S8 I___
South Carolina_
!---105-107
summary of laws as to ~ .
1063
Utah
Newsboys.
(See Chil­
1115
West Virginia___ ___
dren, employment of, in
1141 :
Wisconsin
street trades.)
1167
Wyoming__________
Night work. (See Chil­
Payment of wages due de­
dren, employment of,
ceased employees:
g e n e r a l provisions;
142
Alabama
Women, hours of labor
164
Arizona
____
of.)
263
Connecticut _
_
Notice of intention to ter­
277,278
Delaware . . . . _
minate employment.
294
Florida _. . . . . ____
(See Employment, ter­
299,3C
0
Georgia ______-___
mination of, notice of.)
596
Mississippi-_______
Notice of reduction of
708
New Jersey
__
wages. (See Wages, re­
910
Pennsylvania
duction of, notice of.)
1084
Virginia
Payment of wages in scrip:
O
161
Arizona
Afk a n s a s ____________
174
Obstructing mail:
29
197 528
California....................
United States.............. 1191,1192




117

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Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Payment of wages in scrip—
Con.
Colorado__________
Florida____________
Georgia..._________
Illinois____________
Indiana _
Iowa___ __________
K'ansfts r
Kentucky_________
Louisiana,.
Michigan__________
Mifinftsnta
Mississippi________
Missouri__________
Nevada___________
New Hampshire____
New Jersey________
New Mexico_______
New York_________
North Carolina
Ohio............................
Oklahoma_________

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

Payment of wages, modes
and times of—Con.
Pennsylvania..............
Philippine Islands___
Porto Rico_________
Rhode Island_______
South Carolina_____

936,937 470
951
961,962
981
987-989,
993,994,
997-999
South Dakota______ 1002,1008
Tennessee_________ 1012,1013
12
Texas_____________
1039
Utah........................... 1063,1064
Vermont__________ 1070,1071
Virginia
.........
1077,1078
Washington_____ _
1088
West Virginia
1112,1113,
1116,1118,
1119
Wisconsin_________ 1141,1142
Wyoming_________
1160,1167
United States..........
1176,1177
(See also Payment of
wages in scrip.)
42
Pennsylvania_______
Peddler’s license, exemp­
Philippine Islands___
tion of mechanics from,
Porto Rico_________
summary of laws as to ...
35,36
8011th Carnlinn.Pensions for employees,
summary of laws as to.
Tftnnessee ____
1012
(See Retirement.)
1064
Utah_____________
Pensions, old age, sum*
Vermont.._________ 1070,1071
maryoflawsasto. (See
1078
Virginia___________
Old age pensions.)
Washington ,
1090
Peonage:
1116 403" ’"’"si
West Virginia______
944,948
Philippine Islands___
470
United States______ 1174,1192
57
1142
Wisconsin_________
Phosphorus, white, use of,
(S ee a ls o C om pany
in m anufacture of
matches:
stores.)
Payment of wages, modes
1175
United States______
and times of:
Physical competence, cer­
AlasIra____________
150,151 403
tificates of. (See Chil­
16
160,161
Arizona__________
dren, employed, etc.)
Arlcansas__________
174,175
Physical examination of
202, 212, 403 "‘” 17
California__________
employees:
219,220 470
Illinois____________
355
20
233-235,
_________
New Jersey________ 718,721,722
Colorado—
255
New York_________
754,773
Georgia___________
309
Ohio_____________
845
310
Hawaii____________
Pennsylvania............. 907,927,928
Illinois____________
340
Physicians, employment
Indiana___________
373-375
of:
413
Iowa_____________
Louisiana__________
486
Transas____________
425
New Mexico .
738
Kentucky..._______
448,451, 434 9,10
Porto Rico____ ___
486
453,454
Tennessee_________
1017
Louisiana_________
472,473 434
10 Picketing:
Maine____________
483
135
Alabama__________
Maryland...................
490,495
Colorado__________
227
Massachusetts______
521-523 403 26,27
Hawaii____________
315
528
46
Kansas____________
444
Michigan__________
403 27,28
Nebraska__________
661
Minnesota_________
573,577
Utah...........................
1064
Mississippi________ 600,602,603
United States______ 1172,1173
Missouri___________ 613,621,624
(See also Interference
Montana_________ !
638,650
with employment.)
Nebraska__________
651,652
Plumbers, examination,
Nevada...................... | 670,673,674 403 33,34
etc., of, summary of
New Hampshire____ 684,687,689
26-28 403
laws as t o . . _______ _
704,706, 486" 16,17
New Jersey________
434
708,710, 528 61,62
470
713,714
486
New Mexico_______
739
528
New York..................
759
Poisons, handling, manu­
North Carolina_____
785,790
facture, etc., of. (See
North Dakota______
802,803
Occupational diseases.)
851,852 i
Ohio............................
Police, industrial, sum­
869 :
Oklahoma_________
mary of laws as to. (See
Oregon........................
899 i"403" 42,43
Industrial police.)




234
289
297
340
374
419
439
457
466 434
549,550
579
600
613
664,670
684,687
706
737
759,778
788
851
864,865
899 403
934,935
949
956
988,989,
993,996

52

13
21

6

4

6

4

8

118

CUMULATIVE INDEX
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No. 370

Protection of employees as
members of National
Guard, summary of

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Police, private:
Wisconsin_________
Poll tax of employees, lia­
bility of employers for,
summary of laws as to—
Postal employees, rights
of:
United States.............
Profit sharing by corpora­
tions:
Connecticut________
Indiana
.
New Jersey________
Protection of chauffeurs:
THinnis . ...
____
Protection of employees as
candidates for office:
California ..........
Colorado _________
"Wyomfog . __ - _
Protection of employees as
members of labor organi­
zations, summary of

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

403 54,55
104,105 470
1173
262
390,391
731
358
209
1158

528

37

114,115

118
Protection of employees as
traders. (See Coercion
of employees.)
Protection of employees as
voters:
137
Alabama.....................
Arizona....................... 159-161,165
167
188,209
California....................
253,254
Colorado.....................
256
Connecticut________
274
Delaware....................
295,296
Florida........................
329
Idaho..........................
365
Indiana.......................
411
Iowa............................
426
Kansas........................
448,454
Kentucky...................
461
Louisiana....................
495
Maryland...................
505
Massachusetts............
554
Michigan....................
576
Minnesota..................
593,594
Mississippi..................
608
Missouri.....................
648,649
Montana.....................
651
Nebraska....................
Nevada....................... 672,681,682
732
New Jersey.................
736,740
New Mexico...............
777
New York...................
786
North Carolina...........
840,852
Ohio
....................
858
Oklahoma
874
Oregon
910
Pennsylvania.............
951
Philippine Islands___
957
Porto Rico _ ___
_
990
South Carolina 1003
South Dakota______
Tennessee_________ 1009,1010
1032
Texas ___ ______
1048
Utah...........................
1109,1120
West Virginia
Wisconsin . ______ 1122,1137,
1138,1154
1157,1158
(See ateo Time to vote.)
Protection of employees on
buildings:
189,194,
California___ _____
198,199,
203




12

403

14

528

37

403

29

__ ___
470 43,44
__ ____

"470* "53,‘54

Protection of employees on
buildings—Continued.
229,230
Colorado__________
265,266
Connecticut________
282,283
Delaware__________
348-350
Illinois____________
Indiana____ _
367-369
Kansas___
429,430
Kentucky_________
Louisiana__________
466-468
Maryland. 496
506
Massachusetts
566
Minnesota..
617
Missouri__________
628,629
Montana___
657-659
Nebraska__________
675,676
Nevada___ _______
727,728
New Jersey. _
762,778
New York__
809,810
North Dakota__
Ohio............................
850,851
866,867
Oklahoma_________
897,898
Oregon____ _______
904,905,924
Pennsylvania___
958
Porto Rico_________
978
Rhode Island_______
1042
Texas___ _________
Washington................ 1101-1104
Wisconsin_________ 1125,1126
Protection of employees
on street railways:
Colorado__________
224,225
263
Connecticut________
279
Delaware............ ........
285
District of Columbia—
361
Illinois........................
372
Indiana.......................
411
Iowa...........................
433,434
Kansas.......................
472
Louisiana....................
485
Maine
533
Massachusetts..........
551
Michigan...................
inriftC to
A
576
JT
U iccicQ vrk
iT f
599
Ti* iii*i
ViccA
605,624,625
A A ltciT
T T lQ
636,637
X A lrft
T hfdQ
653
X A if T qT T iii*
T T T in \cV a
686
Maw Torfiov
709
782
New York
Mftrth norAlino
786
Ohio
851
877,878
Rniith flflrnHnft.
989,994,998
Ta itasq a
ti a
1010
Utah
1063
1081
Virginia
1097
Washington
1116
West Virginia
yy isconsin
1151,1152
(See also Street railways,
safety provisions on.)
Protection of employees.
(See also Fire escapes on
factories; Inspection,etc.,
of factories, etc.; Mine
regulations; Railroads,
safety provisions on.)
Protection of wages of
employees, summary of
lonro 00 fft
59-61
(See also Exemption of

wages; Forced con­
tributions; Liability of
stockholders of corpo­
rations for wage debts;
Wages as preferred
claims.)

434

8,9

470 38,40

528

77

403 47,48

403
434
470
528

8,9

4

7,8
9,10

119

CUMULATIVE INDEX

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Page

No. Page

Public buildings, contract
work on:
California__________
Public employment offices.
(See Employment offices.)
Public ownership and
operation, summary of
laws as to
______
Public printing to be done
within the State, sum­
mary of laws as to..........
Public printing, union
label to be used on, sum­
mary of laws as to_____
Public printing, wages and
hours of labor in:
Iowa_____________
Kansas___________
Public service commis­
sions, duties of:
Connecticut................
District of Columbia..
Idaho

.........

Indiana___________
Kansas
Missouri__________

99,100

Nevada.......................
New Hampshire____
New Jersey _
New York___ ______
Oklahoma...................
Oregon

101,102
114
423
438
152,514
210,214
262,263
287
312
'326
369
372
485
625
642,643
653
677
711
735
780
800

Nebraska--- ______
Nevada
_______
New Jersey________
New Mexico_______
New York_________
North Dakota__
Ohio .........................
Oregon - ______ 875,876,903
933
Pennsylvania 961
Porto Rico ______
987,988
South Carolina
Texas
_____ 1031,1032
Utah
.................. 1061,1062
1066
Vermont____ ______
Washington.......-........ 1097,1098
1117
West Virginia.............
1152
Wisconsin
______
United States.............. 1171-1174
Public service employ­
ments:
152,154
Arizona
_____
Arlrflnsfls_ _______
_
166
287
District of Columbia. _
312
Hawaii--....................
535
Massachusetts............
697,698
New Jersey
Public supplies, preference
of domestic products for,
summary of laws as to.
(See Public works, pref­
erence of domestic mate­
rials and local labor on.)
Public works, employ­
ment of aliens on. (See
Aliens, etc., employment
of, etc.)
Public works, hours of la­
bor on. (See Hours of la­
bor.)
Public works, labor on:
165
Arizona. -__________
182,186,
California__________
189,196
274
Delaware....................
296
Florida--....................
X aT O
T IT li
310,315
325
427
Kansas........................




Public works, labor on—
Continued.
Kentucky
Louisiana__________
Maine____________
Maryland....................
Massachusetts______

182

403
528

26
44

Pennsylvania______
Porto Rico
Utah
United States.............
(See also Aliens, etc.,
employment of, on
public works; Rates of
wages of employees
on public works.)
Public works, preference
of domestic materials
and local labor on, list
of laws as to
Purchases by employees.
(See Coercion.)
n
vj

452,453
468 486 12,13
483
502
505,511513,524
665,666 528
57
691
697,698
743,76)
857,864
875 “528" 72773"
,
75,76
933
969 403
46
1062
1174,1175

100,101 403
470
486
528

Quarries. (See Mines.)
528

528

67

88

!
22 i
528
!
470 22, 23,
28 i
528 39,40

K
Railroad bridges, height
of. (See Railroad tracks,
etc.)
Railroad cars, etc., to be
repaired within the
State:
Arkansas
TiAiiiciano
T flQ
fiY
Railroad companies, lia­
bility of, for debts of con­
tractors for labor. (See
Liability of stockhold­
ers; Protection of wages.)
Railroad companies, lia­
bility of, for wages due
from predecessors:
Wisconsin________ Railroad employees, com­
plaint by:
Massachusetts
Railroad employees, ex­
amination, etc., of. (See
Examination, etc.)
Railroad employees, false
charge against:
Arkansas
Indiana
Iowa
Missouri
South Dakota
Railroad employees, hours
of labor of. (See Hours
of labor, etc.)
Railroad employees, illit­
erate:
Missouri__________
New York...................
Ohio............................

178,179
468,469
1035,1036

1150
531

175
366
423
605
1006

329
624
779
850

12
IO
IZ
8
15

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No. 370

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Page

No. Page

Railroad employees, illit­
erate—Continued.
Oregon........................
877
Washington.............. .
1088
Railroad employees, etc.,
negligence, etc., of, sum­
mary of laws as to........ .
105-107
Railroad employees, qual­
ifications of:
Alabama....................
143
Arizona..................... 156, 157,160
California.................. .
196
Georgia..................... .
297,304
Indiana..... ...............
370,371
532,533
Massachusetts.......... .
Michigan..................
550,551
Missouri___ ___ __
624
Nebraska..................
653
New York.................
779
Ohio..........................
850
Oregon........................
877
Wisconsin_________
1150 528
(See also Examination,
etc., of railroad em­
ployees; Railroad em­
ployees, illiterate; Tel­
egraph operators, rail­
road, etc.)
Railroad employees, reim­
bursement of, for losses
due to removal of divi­
sion points:
Montana................... .
644,645
Railroad employees, rules
for:
Arizona..................... .
154
211,214
California-------------Connecticut...............
263
Indiana__________
371,372
Michigan.
550
596,598
Ohio. ____________
944,945
Philippine Islands___
Railroad employees, strikes
of. (See Strikes, etc.)
Railroad employees, uni­
forms of:
New York.................
779
Washington................
1096
Railroad employees, etc.,
voting by. (See Absent
voters.)
Railroad relief societies.
(See Benefit societies.)




877
981
994,995
1021
1067

94

67

1081
1149,1150

Railroad trains, operation
of:
Kansas........................
433
Texas.......................... 1031,1032,
1037,1038
Railroad trains, etc., suf­
ficient crews required on,
83,84
summary of laws as to__
Railroads, accidents on.
(See Accidents.)
Railroads, construction of
caboose cars on, sum­
81,82
mary of laws as to.........
Railroads, hours of labor of
employees on, list of laws
as to...............................
Railroads, obstructing,
hindering operation of,
etc. (See Strikes of rail­
road employees.)
Railroads, safety provi­
sions, etc., on, summary
70-82
of laws as to...................
Railroads, shelters for car
repairers, etc., on:
Arkansas.....................
California....................
Illinois____________
Kansas........................
Mississippi..................
North Carolina...........
North Dakota.............
Oklahoma...................
Oregon........................
South Carolina...........
Texas..........................
Virginia.......................
Railroads, standard workUnited States..............
Rates of wages of employ­
ees on street railways:
California....................
Rates of wages of em­
ployees on public works,
summary of laws as to. ..

19
57

9,10
9

170
214
361
790
805
867
876
995
1029
1084
1180,1181
183
102-104

12
12

15,16

wires, etc., over or near:
Arkansas__________
166
Connecticut................
256
Idaho_________
327
Indiana....................... 370,372,393
Iowa_____________
411,413
Kansas........................
432,434
Kentucky....................
450
Louisiana....................
462
Michigan__________
550
Minnesota..................
572
Mississippi..................
596,597
Missouri......................
Nebraska....................
653
684, 685
New Hampshire.........
North Dakota______
801
Ohio..........................
847,850
Oregon____________
Rhode Island............
South Carolina...........
Tennessee_________
Texas_____________
Vermont.....................

Railroad tracks, bridges,
wires, etc., over or
near—Continued.
Virginia.......................
Wisconsin........ ..........

Rates of wages of laborers
at salvage:
Virginia..................... .
Rates of wages of weavers,
etc., to be posted:

40,41
50

403

49

1081

522
Recommendation, letters
of. (See Employers’ cer­
tificates; Service letters.)
Reduction of wages, notice
of. (See Wages, reduc­
tion of, notice of.)
Registration of factories,
etc. (See Factories, etc.,
registration of.)
Rehabilitation of injured
persons:
Illinois____________
362,363
Minnesota....... .......... 583,584,590
Oregon........................
879,880
Pennsylvania............. 928-930,942
972,973
Rhode Island.............
United States............. 1185-1187

121

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page
Rehabilitation of injured
persons, State and Fed­
eral cooperation in, sum­
mary of laws as to...........
(See Contracts
of employees waiving
rights to damages.)
Relief department. (See
Benefit societies.)
Removing property of
tenant at night..............

Repayment of employers’
advances.
(See Em­
ployers’ advances.)
Restriction of output:
Kansas...................... .
Retirement of public em­
ployees, summary of
laws as to___ _______

Retirement of workmen:
Massachusetts......... .
New Jersey...............
Pennsylvania_____
S
Sabotage, summary of
laws as to........................
(See also Interference
with employment.)
Safety museum:
California.................. .
New Jersey................
Safety appliances. (See
Fire escapes on factories;
Inspection, etc., of fac­
tories; Railroads, safety
provisions on; Street
railways, safety provi­
sions on.)
Safety lamps. (See Mine
regulations.)
Sailors. (See Seamen.)
Salvage laborers, wages of:
Virginia......................
Sanitation. (See Inspec­
tion of and regulation of
factories, etc.).
Scaffolding, etc.
(See
Protection of employees
on buildings.)
Scrip, payment of wages
in. (See Payment of
wages in scrip.)
United States .
Seamen, list of State laws
relating to......................
Seamen’s hospitals:
United States...........
Seasonal labor:
Washington..............
Seats for employed chil­
dren:
Delaware.................
Florida......................
Kentucky.................




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Seats for employed chil­
dren-—
Continued .
516
Massachusetts_____
861
91-93
10,11
Oklahoma.___ _____
1007
9
South Dakota.............
Vermont..................... 1068,1069
1137
Wisconsin...................
Seats for employees in
stores, etc.:
221
California...................
294
Florida.......................
Seats for employees on
street railways. (See
10
Street railways.)
15,16 Seats for female em­
86
ployees:
138
Alabama.....................
155
Arizona.......................
171
Arkansas....................
192,197
California...................
230,231
443,444
Colorado.....................
267
Connecticut................
281
Delaware....................
94-96
285
11,12
District of Columbia..
291,294
5.6
Florida.......................
300,303
10,11
Georgia.......................
326
6.7
Idaho..........................
351
13,14
Illinois........................
365
Indiana.......................
420
605
Iowa.......... ................
430
Kansas........................
453
Kentucky...................
Louisiana.................. 464,469,474
482
Maine........................
491
Maryland...................
516
Massachusetts............
541
107-109 403
Michigan....................
586 528
Minnesota....... ..........
616
Missouri.....................
638
Montana..... ...............
654
217
Nebraska....................
673
731,732
Nevada......................
686
New Hampshire____
703,704
New Jersey.................
754
New York_________
789
North Carolina...........
831
Ohio............................
861,871
Oklahoma...................
885
Oregon........................
919
Pennsylvania..............
951
Philippine Islands___
966
Porto Rico______
974
Rhode Island.........
991
1081
South Carolina.......
1007
South Dakota........
1013,1014
1040
Texas...............
1059
Utah................
1073
Vermont..........
1077
Virginia...........
1097
Washington__
1114
West Virginia..
1137
Wisconsin........
1161,1167, 528
Wyoming........
1168
1173,11751177,1191
Service letters:
219
California.................. .
304
84
Georgia.....................
366,384
Indiana.......................
623
Missouri.................... .
654,655
528
Nebraska....................
669,670
Nevada.......................
865,866
1187
Oklahoma...................
(See also Employers’ cer­
tificates, forgery of:
1105,1106
Discharge, statement
of cause of.)
Set-offs not to defeat ex­
281
291
emption of wages:
Alabama....................
143
460

41

51

95

CUMULATIVE INDEX

122

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Page
Bex no disqualification for
employment:
California................ .
Tllinnis.
Washington................
Shelters over railroad re­
pair tracks. (See Rail­
roads, shelters for car
repairers, etc., on.)
Shuttles:
Connecticut________
Massachusetts______
Rhode Island....... ......
Smelting works, hours of
labor in. (See Hours of
labor of employees in
mines, smelters, etc.)
Smoking in factories, etc.:
Mirmfisntfi
_
Nevada___________
New Jersey________
New York..................
Vermont.....................
Washington................
West Virginia______
Soliciting money from em­
ployees. (See Employ­
ment, foremen, etc., ac­
cepting fees for furnish­
ing.)
State conduct of businoss,
summary as to...............
Stay of execution in suits
for wages. (See Suits
for wages.)
Steam boilers, inspection
of. (See Inspection,
etc.)
Steam engineers, examina­
tion, etc., of, digest of
laws relating to..........—

Bulletin
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No. Page

Street railways, safety pro­
visions on:
California ________
Connecticut________
Montana _________ New Hampshire____
Ohio............. .............
Vermont _________
Washington________
Wisconsin_________
Street railways, seats for
employees on:
Connecticut
. «
Louisiana__________
Missouri__________
Ohio_____________
Oregon____________
Vermont__________
Strike, notice of, in adver­
tisements, etc., for labor­
ers:

181
339
1091

271
519
974

576
668
733
766
1073
1038
1115

99,100 403

12

21-23 403
470
Steamboats, employment
of unlicensed engineers
on:
Alabama
138
Stevedores:
........ . _
188,189
2S9, 295
Florida
Texas
1038
Stock for employees of cor­
porations:
221
California__
___
Illinois
363 ; 403
Indiana
390, 391
Massachusetts
_.
533
Michigan
1 470
New Jersey731
New York
i 403
O hio.______
403
Pennsylvania
! 403
1108
Washington................
Stockholders, liability of,
62 470
list of laws determining..
Stop watches. (See Effi­
ciency tests, etc.)
Street railways, employees
on:
Louisiana__________
473
New York_________ 771,780,781
Washington............... 1096,1097
Street railways, hours of
labor of employees on.
(See Hours of labor, etc.)
Street railways, protection
of employees on. (See
Protection of employ­
ees.)
Street railways, rights and
remedies of employees
on:
South Carolina
...........
989

7
6




|

24

i
1

38
41
44

36
i

8

!

189
263
637
686
849
1067
1098

1151,1152

263
471
624,625
847
877
1067

208 470 23,24
226
Illinois
344
Massachusetts
510, 523, 525
649
Montana
______
New Hampshire____
691
North Dakota______
811
Oklahoma ______
865
Oregon____________
898
Pennsylvania______
916,917
Porto Rico _______
960
South Dakota______
1008
1011
Tennessee_________
Texas____ ________
1046
Wisconsin_________
1142 403
55
(See also Employment
of labor, deception in.)
Strike, notice of, to be
signed by citizens:
N evada
683
Strikes of coal mine and
public utility employees:
North Dakota...........
809
Strikes of railroad employ­
ees:
269
Connecticut................
278, 279
Delaware__________
297
Georgia___________
Illinois___ ________
361
‘
Kansas____ _______ 425,426,441
Kentucky...... ............
451
486, 487
Maine....... .................
70S, 709
New Jersey.................
850
Ohio........ ..................
933,934
j
Pennsylvania.............
'j
Texas......................... 1034,10421044
!
United States........ .
1191,1192
! Strikes, participation in,
not to be bar to employ­
ment:
Minnesota.................
569
Strikes. (See also Arbitra| tion and m ediation;
j Conspiracy, labor agree1 ments not; Interference
with employment.)
Suits for wages:
187
California
___
Colorado _________ 233, 234,255
302
Georgia. _______ _
312
Hawaii
_
_
327, 328
Idaho_____________
Illinois____________ 332, 333, 359
365
Indiana___________
Iowa_ _ __________
419, 420
426
Kansas___________
Louisiana_________ 458,461,471
Massachusetts............
532

123

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Terminals, railroad, re­
Suits for wages—Con.
Michigan
,
__
moval of:
552,553
Minnesota
528
84.
Texas_____________
560,574
604,623
Missouri
(See also Railroad em­
638,639,648
Montana.
ployees, reimburse­
651,660
Nebraska.......
ment of, for losses due
403
33
Nevada___________
to removal of division
714,715 486 16,17
points.)
New Jersey___ —
___
790
North Carolina....... ..
Termination of employ­
North D ak ota......
799,808
ment. (^Employment
839,849
Ohio............................
of labor; Employment,
Oklahoma_________
858
termination of, notice
Oregon..______ ___ 873,885,899
of.)
Pennsylvania___ ;___ 911,912,936
Time for meals or rest:
Porto Rico___ _____
960
Arizona___ _____ __
162
South Dakota______
1002
171,173
Arkansas__________
Texas__________. __
187
1026
California_________
Utah........................... 1060,1061
275
Delaware__________
Vermont-_________
287
1066
District of Columbia..
Virginia____ ____ __
1083
Indiana___ _______
380
Washington_______
1087
464,469
Louisiana_______ __
Wisconsin_________
1153
487,488 528
Maine_________
45
Wyoming._________
11-61
£01
Maryland_________
(See 'also Payment of
516
Massachusetts______
wages; Protection of
Minnesota_________
592
wages; Wages as pre­
Missouri__________
621
ferred claims.)
690
New Hampshire____
Sunday labor, summary of
713
New Jersey._______
laws as to___________
9
66,67 403
New York . . . .
755 434
14
434
5
Ohio............................
831
470
8
69
Oklahoma_________
~528~
Oregon____________
528
11
886
(See also Weekly day of
919
Pennsylvania______
rest.)
951
Philippine Islands___
Suspension of work, notice
Wisconsin...................
1131
of:
Time to vote to be allowed
South Carolina_____
994
employees, summary of
Sweating system:
laws as to___________
116 470
13
259,260
Connecticut__ _____
(See also Protection of
Illinois_______ . ____
341,342
employees as voters.)
Indiana___________
380,381
Tips, receiving or giving:
Arlransaa
_
_
Maryland_________
492-494
166,167 403
16
520
Massachusetts______
California . . . . . . . .
528 31,32
Michigan__________
540,541
Illinois____________
339
Missouri__________
620
598,599 434
i4
Mississippi
New Jersey________
702,703
1018 403
Tennessee ____ _
46
768-771, 403
New York_________
39 Toilet rooms, etc., for em­
779,780
ployees:
Ohio............................
832
Alabama ________
136
Pennsylvania______
905,923 528
77
Alaska____________
149
Tennessee_________ 1015,1016,
Arizona _ ______
159,164
1020
Arkansas__ ________
173
Wisconsin_________ 1142,1148
California
_ .
200,201,223
Syndicalism, summary of
Colorado__________
240 528
36
laws as to___________
107-109
Connecticut
259,271 403
20
Delaware................. .
280,281
T
District of Columbia..
285
Florida____________
291
Taxes of employees, liabil­
Idaho_____ ___ ____
317
ity of employers for,
Illinois____________
353,359
summary of laws as to..
104,10c 470
12
380,404
Indiana___________
Telegraph operators^hours
Iowa_____________
411,420 403
25
of labor of. (See Hours
431,434
Kansas____________
of labor of employees on
Kentucky_________
453
railroads).
Louisiana_________
470
Telegraph operators, rail­
Massachusetts______
519
road, age of employment,
Michigan__________
539,541, 528
48
etc., of:
545,548
Arizona___________
160
Minnesota_______
581,586
Georgia___________
297
Missouri_ ____
_
616,618,
Michigan__________
551
620,622
Nebraska__________
653
640,641
Montana _____ . . . .
New York..................
779
Nebraska__________
655
Wisconsin___ ___ _
1150
Nevada___________
403
32
Telegraph, eto,wires cross­
New Hampshire____
682
ing railroads, height of.
New Jersey________
701,702, 403
35
(See Railroad tracks,
711,720,
etc.)
721
New York__. . . . . . . _
Tenement manufactures.
759,760,
(See Sweating system.)
766,771

11178 ° — 31


124

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

Oklahoma___
Pennsylvania.
Philippine Islands__
Rhode Island............ .
South Carolina_____
South Dakota.............
Tennessee...................
Texas............. ............
Vermont............... ......
Virginia......................
Washington________
West Virginia.............
Wisconsin_________
Wyoming....................
Trade-marks of tradeunions, summary of
laws as to.......................
(See also Public printing,
union label to be used
on.)
Trade schools, regulation
of:
Michigan__________
Trade secrets:
New York..................
Trade-unions. (See Labor
organizations.)
Trading, coercion of em­
ployees in. (See Coer­
cion.)
Train crews, summary of
laws as to......_...............
Truck system. (See Com­
pany stores.)
T u n n e ls. (S ee Com­
pressed air, work in;
Mines, etc.)

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Toilet rooms, etc., for em­
ployees—Continued.
North Carolina.........
North Dakota_____
Ohio..........................

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

790
804
827,831,
832,844
862,869,871 528 69,71
919,922,
926,927,
932
952
974,977
986 528
83
1006
1014,1021
1039,1040,
1042
528
1079,1080
1097
1115
1146
1168
112-114

Vaccination of employees:
Connecticut.............. .
Maine.........................
Massachusetts............
Virginia..................... .
Ventilation of factories.
(See Air space; Inspec­
tion and regulation, etc.)




7-15

Vocational rehabilitation..

91-93

10,11

9
6

11

(See also Rehabilitation.)

Vocational training for
children. (See Children,
employed, schools for.)
Volunteer servants. (See
Employment of labor.)
Voters, protection of em­
ployees as. (See Absent
voters; Protection of em­
ployees; Time to vote.)
W

28
15,16

83,84

U
Unemployment insurance.
(See Insurance, unem­
ployment.)
Unemployment, provi­
sions for:
California....................
New Jersey.................
Wisconsin...................
Uniforms, influencing rail­
road employees not to
wear. (See Railroad em­
ployees, uniforms of.)
Union label. (See Public
printing, union label to
be used on; Trade­
marks of trade-unions.)
Union newspapers, public
advertising in:
New Jersey................

Ventilation of mines. (See
Mine regulations.)
Vessels, employees on.
(See Seamen, list of State
laws relating to.)
Vessels, loading, etc. (See
Stevedores.)
Vocational education,
summary of laws as to._.

222

723
1122,1123

708

265
277
505,506
1075

Wage brokers, summary
of laws as to...................
(See also Assignment of

62-65

9
8

528

5

10

wages.)
ges as preferred claims:
Alabama__________
139,143
144
Alaska____________
Arizona_____ _____ _
159
Arkansas__________
166,167
California___ ____ _
187,188 528 23,24
Colorado,__________
235,253
Connecticut________
264,269
274,277
Delaware__________
289
Florida___________
299
Georgia___________
328
Idaho ____________
Illinois____________ 1
330,332,339
Indiana___________
366,373
Iow a_____________
420
Kansas __________
426,428
464
Louisiana__________
485
Maine____________
Maryland_________
496
534
Massachusetts______
Michigan__________
552,553
Minnesota_________
573, 574
604,623
Missouri__________
Montana j__ ___
648
651
Nebraska__________
Nevada___________ 662,667,668
684
New Hampshire____
697,698,
New Jersey________
706,709
735,736
New Mexico_______
New York_________ 743,745,775
785
North Carolina_____
799
North Dakota______
849
Ohio_____________
Oklahoma_________
470
51
Oregon____________
873,903
Pennsylvania_______ 904,910,936
Philippine Islands___
947
982
Rhode Island_______
1002
South Dakota______
Texas_____________
1026
Utah........................... 1047,1060,
1062
Vermont___________ 1066,1073

125

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Page

No. Page

Wages as preferredclaims—
Continued.
Washington___ ____
1087
Wisconsin_. . . . __ __ 1146,1147,
1149,1152,
1153
Wyoming_____ ____
1157,1161
United States..............
1187 434
28
Wages, assignment of.
(See Assignment of
wages.)
Wages, attachment of.
(See Attachment of
wages.)
Wages, collection of, by
State officials:
California_____ ____
193,222
Nevada___________
680
Washington................ 1105,1106
Wages, deducting from,
for benefit societies. (See
Forced contributions.)
Wages, discounts, deduc­
tions, etc., from:
Arkansas__________
178
California_________
186 528
24
Connecticut________
267
Hawaii____________
313
Indiana___________
374
Louisiana. 1
________
486
Massachusetts______
522,523
Michigan
__________
553,554
Minnesota_________
584
Mississippi________
600
Nevada____ _______
670,674
New Jersey................
707,708
Ohio_____________
851
Oregon_________ . . .
898
Porto Rico_________
961,962
South Carolina_____
996
Wyoming..................
1160
Wages due deceased em­
ployees. (See Payment
of wages due, etc.)
Wages due from contrac­
tors. (See Liability of
stockholders; Protection
of wages.)
Wages due from munici­
palities:
Massachusetts______
511
Missouri....................
623
Wages due from predeces­
sors, liability of railroad
companies for:
Wisconsin...................
1150
Wages, exemption of. (See
Exemption of wages.)
Wages, garnishment of.
(See Garnishment of
wages.)
Wages, liability of stock­
holders of corporations
for, list of laws determin­
ing.................................
62 470
8
Wages of employees on
public works, retention
of:
California....................
190 470
28
Louisiana__________
486 12, 13
Wages, payment of. (See
Payment of wages.)
Wages, preference of. (See
Wages as preferred
claims.)
Wages, protection of. (See
Protection of wages.)
Wages, rates of.
(See
Rates of wages.)
Wages, recovery of. (See
Suits for wages.)




Wages, reduction of, notice
of:
Missouri__________
Texas_____________
United States______
Wages, security for. (See
Mechanics’ liens; Pro­
tection of wages; Wages
as preferred claims.)
Wages, suits for. (See
Suits for wages.)
Wages, withholding. (See
Extortion; Forced con­
tributions.)
Waiver of right to dam­
ages. (See Contracts of
employees waiving right
to damages.)
Washrooms, water-closets,
etc. (See Toilet rooms.)
Water for drinking, etc:
Alaska_________ ___
California_________
Delaware..._______
Iowa_____________
Massachusetts._____
Minnesota_________
Missouri__________
Nevada___________
New Jersey..______
New York_________
Ohio............................
Oklahoma_________
Pennsylvania_______
Rhode Island_______
Weekly day of rest:
California_________
Massachusetts______
Minnesota.._______
New York...______
Porto R ico....______
Wisconsin____ _____
(See also Days of rest;
Sunday labor.)
Weight that workmen
may carry:
Porto Rico_________
Widows, employment of
children of. (See Chil­
dren of widows.)
Wife’s earnings.
(See
Women, married, earn­
ings of.)
Windows, colored:
Connecticut________
Wiping cloths or rags:
California._____ ____
Massachusetts______
Ohio_ ___ _______
_
Women and children. (See
Children and women.)
Women, childbearing, em­
ployment, etc., of:
Connecticut________
Massachusetts______
Missouri__________
New York_________
Philippine Islands___
Vermont_________ _
Women, employment of,
general provisions:
Ark a n sa s____________
California______
Connecticut________
Delaware__________
District of Columbia..
K a n s a s , ___

___ _
_

Kentucky______ ___
Louisiana____ _____
Maine____________
Maryland....................|

623
1029
1179

149
211
281
420
517
586
622
679,680
721
766,771
844
920
974,975

528

69

191
513
591
754,755
957,958 ’463’ ‘45,"46
57
470

959

259
199,200
520
831,832

265
514
613
754
952
1069
171-173
197,198
264,265
275,276
287,288
437,447
453,454
464
487,488
495

528 27,28
30
470

434
528

11
45

126

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Women, employment of,
general provisions—Con.
Massachusetts--------Michigan___— ____

Bulletin
No. Page

Page

No. Page

513-516
537,557 470 *35,”36
528
49
591,592
637,639
654
486
17
New J e r s e y ...........
758
824,831,
842.843
Oklahoma______ _
870,871
884*885,902
906. 528
77
Pennsylvan ia..
__
918-922
951
Philippine Islands___
965,966
83
528
Rhode Island_______
South Carolina........ ^
991,992
Utah...........................
528
87
Vermont__. . . . . . . . . . . 1068,1069
434
l9
Washington..
1108
1131-1133,
1146
Wyoming_________
95
528
Women, employment of,
in dangerous, etc., occu­
pations:
Louisiana.. . . . . . . . . . . .
470
___ -____
Minnesota
565,581
Missouri..
015
_. . . _
New Y ork-.... 753,754,771
Ohio_____ ________
831
1132
Wisconsin-------------Women, employment of,
in mines. (See Children
and women.)
Women, employment of,
in moving heavy weights:
California__. . . . . . . . . .
223 528
30
Massachusetts.
513,514
Minnesota_____ -___
581
Ohio___________ -_
831
Women, employment of.
(See also Children and
women; Seats for female
employees; Sex no dis­
qualification for employ­
ment.)
Women, hiring out to sup­
port husbands in idle­
ness:
Louisiana__________
464
North Carolina_____
787
Women,. hours of labor,
etc., of:
Arizona_ . . . ______
_
162 470 18,19
Arkansas__________
171
California_______ __
197 528 : 22.28
Colorado_ ________
_
229
Connecticut-. ___ ___
2°
264,265 403
Delaware
__________
275
District of Columbia.
287,288
j
300
Georgia..._________
Idaho____ ________
325,326 ___ !____
1




Women, hours of labor,
etc., of—Continued.
Illinois____________
Indiana-— . . . . . ____
Kansas. . T
_„ _ _ _ _
Kentucky. . . . . . ____
Louisiana.— . ______
Maine____________
Maryland— — . . _ . _
Massachusetts. . . . __Michigan. _________
Minnesota_________
Missouri.— —_____
—
Montana_. . . . . . __—
Nebraska.... . . . . . . . . .
Nevada______. . . . . . .
New Hampshire...._
New Jersey__—
____
New Mexico... . . . . . . .
New Y o r k .......— ..

354,355
379
437,438
453
469
487,488
501
514,515
537,538
591
602
612,613
637
651,654
672,673
690
715,733
740,741
758

North Carolina_____
North Dakota______

789
800,804,
805,808
831
Ohio............................
Oklahoma__ _______ 861,870,871
Oregon........................
885
Pennsylvania_______
918,919
Porto Rico__. . . . . . . . .
965
Rhode Island...__-_
977,978

South Carolina... . . _
South Dakota..__ -_
Tennessee.........—..
Texas.__. . . . . . . . ___
T tfth
T
_
Vermont__________
Virginia___________
Washington________
Wisconsin. _. . . . . . . . . .
Wyoming__— ____
Women, married, earnings
of, summary of laws as
to....................................
Women, night work by.
(See Women, hours of
labor of.)
Women, seats for. (See
Seats for female em­
ployees.)
Women, wages of:
Arizona________ ___
Arkansas__ . . . . . . . . . .
Massachusetts.. . . . . . .
M ichigan...... . . . . . . .
Montana. . . ______
Utah...........................
(See also Children and
women; Minimum
wages.)
Women's Bureau:
New York_________
United States______
Wood-sawing machines:
W isco n sin ............

i
\

i

434

11

528
470

49
37

470
486

48
19

403~
40
470 49,50
528

78

486 22,23
83
528

991,992
1006
1015
1040 528
87
1059,1060
1069
1077 434 18,19
1097
52
1131 "403" ■"■
1167,1168
65,66 486

164
172,173
522,523
557
639

528

748,749
1172
1149

"
1

5

87

LIST OF BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
T h e fo llo w in g is a lis t o f a ll b u lle tin s o f th e B u rea u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s p u b lis h e d s in c e
J u ly , 1912, e x c e p t t h a t in th e ca se o f b u lle tin s g iv in g th e r e s u lts o f p e r io d ic s u rv e y s o f th e
b u re a u o n ly th e la te s t b u lle tin o n a n y o n e s u b je c t is h e re lis te d .
A c o m p le te lis t o f th e r e p o r ts a n d b u lle tin s is su e d p r io r to J u ly , 1912, a s w e ll a s th e b u l­
le tin s p u b lis h e d s in c e t h a t d a te , w ill b e fu rn ish e d o n a p p lic a tio n . B u lle tin s m a r k e d th u s (*)
a re o u t o f p r i n t •

Conciliation and Arbitration (including strikes and lockouts).

•No. 124. Conciliation and arbitration in the building trades of Greater New York. [1913.]
•No. 133. Report of the industrial council of the British Board of Trade on its inquiry into industrial
agreements. [1913.]
No. 139. Michigan copper district strike. [1914.]
♦No. 144. Industrial court of the cloak, suit, and skirt industry of New York City. [1914.]
•No. 145. Conciliation, arbitration, and sanitation in the dress and waist industry of New York City<
[1914.]
•No. 191. Collective bargaining in the anthracite-coal industry. [1916.]
•No. 198. Collective agreements in the men’s clothing industry. [1916.]
No. 233. Operation of the industrial disputes investigation act of Canada. [1918.]
No. 255. Joint industrial councils in Great Britain. [1919.]
No. 283. Btistory'of the Shipbuilding Labor Adjustment Board, 1917 to 1919.
No. 287. National War Labor Board: History of its formation, activities, etc. [1921.]
•No. 303. Use of Federal power in settlement of railway labor disputes. [1922.]
No. 341. Trade agreement in the silk-ribbon industry of New York City. [1923.]
No. 402. Collective bargaining by actors. [1926.]
No. 468. Trade agreements, 1927.
No. 481. Joint industrial control in the book and job printing industry. [1928.]
Cooperation.

No. 313. Consumers’ cooperative societies in the United States in 1920.
No. 314. Cooperative credit societies (credit unions) in America and in foreign countries. [1922.]
No. 437. Cooperative movement in the United States in 1925 (other than agricultural).
Employment and Unemployment.

*No. 109.
No. 172.
•No. 183.
•No. 195.
No. 196.
*No. 202.
No. 206.
•No. 227.
No. 235.
•No. 241.
No. 247.
•No. 310.
No. 409.
No. 520.

Statistics of unemployment and the work of employment offices in the United States. [1913.]
Unemployment in New York City, N. Y. [1915.]
Regularity of employment in the women’s ready-to-wear garment industries. [1915.]
Unemployment in the United States. [1916.]
Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference held at Minneapolis, Minn., Janu­
ary 19 and 20,1916.
Proceedings of the conference of Employment Managers’ Association of Boston, Mass.,
held May 10,1916.
The British system of labor exchanges. [1916.]
Proceedings of the Employment Managers’ Conference, Philadelphia, Pa., April 2 and 3,
1917.
Employment system of the Lake Carriers’ Association. [1918.]
Public employment offices in the United States. [1918.]
Proceedings of Employment Managers’ Conference, Rochester, N. Y., May 9-11,1918.
Industrial unemployment: A statistical study of its extent and causes. [1922.]
Unemployment in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925.
Social and economic character of unemployment in Philadelphia, April, 1929.

Foreign Labor Laws.

•No. 142. Administration of labor laws and factory inspection in certain European countries. [1914.]
No. 494. Labor legislation of Uruguay. [1929.]
No. 510. Labor legislation of Argentina. [1930.]
Housing.

•No. 158.
No. 263.
No. 295.
No. 524.

Government aid to home owning and housing of working people in foreign countries. [1914.]
Housing by employers in the United States. [1920.]
Building operations in representative cities in 1920.
Building permits in the principal cities of the United States in 11921 to] 1929.




[I]

Industrial Accidents and Hygiene.

*No. 104. Lead poisoning in potteries, tile works, and porcelain enameled sanitary ware factories.
[1912.]
No. 120. Hygiene of painters’ trade. [1913.]
•No. 127. Dangers to workers from dusts and fumes, and methods of protection. [1913.1
♦No. 141. Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead. [1914.]
•No. 157. Industrial accident statistics. [1915.]
•No. 165. Lead poisoning in the manufacture of storage batteries. [1914J
•No. 179. Industrial poisons used in the rubber industry. [1915.]
No. 188. Report of British departmental committee on the danger in the use of lead in the painting
of buildings. [1916.]
•No. 201. Report of the committee on statistics and compensation insurance cost of the International
Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions. [1916.J
•No. 209. Hygiene of the printing trades. [1917.J
•No. 219. Industrial poisons used or produced in the manufacture of explosives. [1917.1
No. 221. Hours, fatigue, and health in British munition factories. [1917.]
No. 230. Industrial efficiency and fatigue in British munition factories. [1917.]
•No. 231. Mortality from respiratory diseases in dusty trades (inorganic dusts). [1918.]
•No. 234. Safety movement in the iron and steel industry, 1907 to 1917.
No. 236. Effects of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. [1918.]
No. 249. Industrial health and efficiency. Final report of British Health of Munition Workers'
Committee. [1919.]
No. 251. Preventable death in the cotton-manufacturing industry. [1919.]
No. 256. Accidents and accident prevention in machine building. [1919.]
No. 267. Anthrax as an occupational disease. [1920.]
No. 276. Standardization of industrial accident statistics. [1920.]
No. 280. Industrial poisoning in making coal-tar dyes and dye-intermediates. [1921.J
•No. 291. Carbon-monoxide poisoning. [1921.]
No. 293. The problem of dust phthisis in the granite-stone industry. [1922.]
No. 298. Causes and prevention of accidents in the iron and steel industry, 1910-1919.
No. 306. Occupational hazards and diagnostic signs: A guide to impairments to be looked for in
hazardous occupations. [1922.]
No. 392. Survey of hygienic conditions in the printing trades. [1925.]
No. 405. Phosphorous necrosis in the manufacture of fireworks and in the preparation of phosphorous.
[1926.]
No. 427. Health survey of the printing trades, 1922 to 1925.
No. 428. Proceedings of the Industrial Accident Prevention Conference, held at Washington, D. C*
July 14r-lG, 1926.
No. 460. A new test for industrial lead poisoning. [1928.]
No. 466. Settlement for accidents to American seamen. [1928.]
No. 488. Deaths from lead poisoning, 1925-1927.
No. 490. Statistics of industrial accidents in the United States to the end of 1927.
No. 507. Causes of death by occupation. [1929.]
Industrial Relations and Labor Conditions.

No. 237.
No. 340.
No. 349.
No. 361.
No. 380.
No. 383.
No. 384.
No. 399.

Industrial unrest in Great Britain. [1917.]
Chinese migrations, with special reference to labor conditions. [1923.]
Industrial relations in the West Coast lumber industry. [1923.]
Labor relations in the Fairmont (W. Va.) bituminous-coal field. [1924.]
Postwar labor conditions in Germany. [1925.]
Works council movement in Germany. [1925.]
Labor conditions in the shoe industry in Massachusetts, 1920-1924.
Labor relations in the lace and lace-curtain industries in the United States. [1925.J

Labor Laws of the United States (including decisions of courts relating to labor).

No. 211.
No. 229.
No. 285.
No. 321.
No. 322.
No. 343.
No. 370.
No. 408.
No. 486.
No. 517.

Labor laws and their administration in the Pacific States. [1917.]
Wage-payment legislation in the United States. [1917.J
Minimum wage laws of the United States: Construction and operation. [1921.]
Labor laws that have been declared unconstitutional. [1922.]
Kansas Court of Industrial Relations. [1923.]
Laws providing for bureaus of labor statistics, etc. [1923.]
Labor laws of the United States with decisions of courts relating thereto. [1925.]
Laws relating to payment of wages. [1926.]
Labor legislation of 1928.
Decision of courts and opinions affecting labor, 1927-1928.




tn]

Proceedings of Annual Conventions of the Association of Governmental Officials in Industry of the
United States and Canada. (Name changed in 1928 from Association o f Governmental Labor
Officials o f the United States and Canada.)

No. 266.
No. 307.
No. 323.
*No. 352.
♦No. 389.
♦No. 411.
No. 429.
♦No. 455.
No. 480.
No. 508.

Seventh, Seattle, Wash., July 12-15,1920.
Eighth, New Orleans, La., May 2-6,1921.
Ninth, Harrisburg, Pa., May 22-26, 1922.
Tenth, Richmond, Va., May 1-4,1923.
Eleventh, Chicago, HI., May 19-23, 1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 13-15, 1925.
Thirteenth, Columbus, Ohio, June 7-10, 1926.
Fourteenth, Paterson, N. J., May 31 to June 3, 1927.
Fifteenth, New Orleans, La., May 21-24, 1928.
Sixteenth, Toronto, Canada, June 4-7, 1929.

Proceedings of Annual Meetings of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and
Commissions.

No. 210.
No. 248.
No. 264.
♦No. 273.
No. 281.
No. 304.
No. 333.
♦No. 359.
No. 385.
No. 395.
No. 406.
No. 432.
♦No. 456.
No. 485.
No. 511.

Third, Columbus, Ohio, April 25-28, 1916.
Fourth, Boston, Mass., August 21-25,1917.
Fifth, Madison, Wis., September 24-27, 1918.
Sixth, Toronto, Canada, September 23-26,1919.
Seventh, San Francisco, Calif., September 20-24, 1920.
Eighth, Chicago, HI., September 19-23, 1921.
Ninth, Baltimore, Md., October 9-13, 1922.
Tenth, St. Paul, Minn., September 24-26,1923.
Eleventh, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 26-28, 1924.
Index to proceedings, 1914-1924.
Twelfth, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 17-20, 1925.
Thirteenth, Hartford, Conn., September 14-17, 1926.
Fourteenth, Atlanta, Ga., September 27-29, 1927.
Fifteenth, Paterson, N. J., September 11-14,1928.
Sixteenth, Buffalo, N. Y., October 8-11,1929.

Proceedings of Annual Meetings of the International Association of Public Employment Services.

No. 192. First, Chicago, December 19 and 20,1913; second, Indianapolis, September 24 and 25,1914;
third, Detroit, July 1 and 2,1915.
No. 220. Fourth, Buffalo, N. Y., July 20 and 21,1916.
No. 311. Ninth, Buffalo, N. Y., September 7-9,1921.
No. 337. Tenth, Washington, D. C., September 11-13,1922.
No. 355. Eleventh, Toronto, Canada, September 4-7, 1923.
No. 400. Twelfth, Chicago, 111., May 19-23, 1924.
No. 414. Thirteenth, Rochester, N. Y., September 15-17,1925.
No. 478. Fifteenth, Detroit, Mich., October 25-28,1927.
No. 501. Sixteenth, Cleveland, Ohio, September 18-21,1928.
Productivity of Labor.

No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes, 1923.
No. 407. Labor cost of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper box-board industry.
[1926.J
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 441. Productivity of labor in the glass industry. [1927.]
No. 474. Productivity of labor in merchant blast furnaces. [1928.]
No. 475. Productivity of labor in newspaper printing. [1929.]
Retail Prices and Cost of Living.

♦No. 121.
♦No. 130.
♦No. 164.
No. 170.
No. 357.
No. 369.
No. 495.

Sugar prices, from refiner to consumer. [1913.]
Wheat and flour prices, from farmer to consumer. [1913.]
Butter prices, from producer to consumer. [1914.]
Foreign food prices as affected by the war. [1915.]
Cost of living in the United States. [1924.]
The use of cost-of-living figures in wage adjustments. [1925.]
Retail prices, 1899 to 1928.

Safety Codes.

♦No. 331.
No. 336.
No. 350.
♦No. 351.
No. 375.
No. 378.
No. 382.
No. 410.

Code of lighting: Factories, mills, and other work places.
Safety code for the protection of industrial workers in foundries.
Rules governing the approval of headlighting devices for motor vehicles.
Satety code for the construction, care, and use of ladders.
Safety code for laundry machinery and operations.
Safety code for woodworking plants.
Code of lighting school buildings.
Satety code for paper and pulp mills.




[H I]

Safety Codes—Continued.
No. 430. Safety code for power presses and foot and hand presses.
No. 433. Safety codes for the prevention 01 dust explosions.
No. 447. Safety code for rubber mills and calenders.
No. 451. Safety code for forging and hot-metal stamping.
No. 463. Safety code for mechanical power-transmission apparatus—first revision.
No. 609. Textile safety code.
No. 512. Code for identification of gas-mask canisters.
No. 519. Safety code for woodworking plants, as revised 1930.
No. 527. Safety code for the use, care, and protection of abrasive wheels. (In press.)
Vocational and Workers" Education.
♦No. 159. Short-unit courses for wage earners, and a factory-school experiment. [1915.J
*No. 162. Vocational education survey of Richmond, Va. [1915.]
♦No. 199. Vocational education survey of Minneapolis, Minn. [1917.]
No. 271. Adult working-class education in Great Britain and the United States. [1920.]
. No. 459. Apprenticeship in building construction. [1928.]
Wages and Hours of Labor.
*No. 146. Wages and regularity of employment and standardization of piece rates in the dress and
waist industry of New York City. [1914.]
•No. 147. Wages and regularity of employment in the cloak, suit, and skirt industry. [1914.]
No. 161. Wages and hours of labor in the clothing and cigar industries, 1911 to 1913.
No. 163. Wages and hours of labor in the building and repairing of steam railroad cars, 1907 to 1913.
♦No. 190. Wages and hours of labor in the cotton, woolen, and silk industries, 1907 to 1914.
No. 204. Street-railway employment in the United States. [1917.]
No.* 225. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber, millwork, and furniture industries, 1915.
No. 265. Industrial survey in selected industries in the United States, 1919.
No. 297. Wages and hours of labor in the petroleum industry, 1920.
No. 356. Productivity costs in the common-brick industry. [1924.]
No. 358. Wages and hours of labor in the automobile-tire industry, 1923.
No. 360. Time and labor costs in manufacturing 100 pairs of shoes, 1923.
No. 365. Wages and hours of labor in the paper and pulp industry, 1923.
No. 394. Wages and hours of labor in metalliferous mines, 1924.
No. 407. Labor costs of production and wages and hours of labor in the paper box-board industry.
[1926.]
No. 412. Wages, hours, and productivity in the pottery industry, 1925.
No. 416. Hours and earnings in anthracite and bituminous coal mining, 1922 and 1924.
No. 472. Wages and hours of labor in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry, 1927.
No. 476. Union scale of wages and hours of labor, 1927. [Supplement to Bulletin No. 457.]
No. 484. Wages and hours of labor of common street laborers, 1928.
No. 487. Wages and hours of labor in woolen and worsted goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1928.
No. 492. Wages and hours of labor in cotton-goods manufacturing, 1910 to 1928.
No. 497. Wages and hours of labor in the lumber industry in the United States, 1928.
No. 498. Wages and hours of labor in the boot and shoe industry, 1910 to 1928.
No. 499. History of wages in the United States from colonial times to 1928.
No. 502. Wages and hours of labor in the motor-vehicle industry, 1928.
No. 503. Wages and hours of labor in the men’s clothing industry, 1911 to 1928.
No. 504. Wages and hours of labor in the hosiery and underwear industries, 1907 to 1928.
No. 513. Wages and hours of labor in the iron and steel industry, 1929.
No. 514. Pennsylvania Railroad wage data. From Report of Joint Fact Finding Committee in wage
negotiations in 1927.
No. 515. Union scale of wages, May 15, 1929.
No. 516. Hours and earnings in bituminous coal mining, 1929.
No. 522. Wages and hours of labor in foundries and machine shops, 1929.
No. 523. Hours and earnings in the manufacture of airplanes and aircraft engines, 1929.
No. 525. Wages and hours of labor in the Portland cement industry, 1929. (In press.)
No. 526. Wages and hours of labor in the furniture industry, 1910 to 1929. (In press.)
Welfare Work.
♦No. 123. Employers’ welfare work. [1913.]
No. 222. Welfare work in British munitions factories. [1917.]
♦No. 250. Welfare work for employees in industrial establishments in the United States. [1919.]
No. 458. Health and recreation activities in industrial establishments, 1926.
Wholesale Prices.
No. 284. Index numbers of wholesale prices in the United States and foreign countries. [1921.]
No. 453. Revised index numbers of wholesale prices, 1923 to July, 1927.
No. 493. Wholesale prices, 1913 to 1928.
No. 521. Wholesale prices, 1929.




[IV]

Women and Children in Industry.

No. 116. Hours, earnings, and duration of employment of wage-earning women in selected industries in
the District of Columbia. [1913.]
♦No. 117. Prohibition of night work of young persons. [1913.]
♦No. 118. Ten-hour maximum working-day for women and young persons. [1913.]
No. 119. Working hours of women in the pea canneries of Wisconsin. [1913.]
♦No. 122. Employment of women in power laundries in Milwaukee. [1913.]
♦No. 160. Hours, earnings, and conditions of labor of women in Indiana mercantile establishments and
garment factories. [1914.]
♦No. 167. Minimum-wage legislation in the United States and foreign countries. [1915.]
♦No. 175. Summary of the report on conditions of women and child wage earners in the United States.
[1915.]
♦No. 176. Effect of minimum-wage determinations in Oregon. [1915.]
♦No. 180. The boot and shoe industry in Massachusetts as a vocation for women. [1915.]
♦No. 182. Unemployment among women in department and other retail stores of Boston, Mass.
[1916.]
No. 193. Dressmaking as a trade for women in Massachusetts. [1916.]
No. 215. Industrial experience of trade-school girls in Massachusetts. [1917.]
♦No. 217. Effect of workmen’s compensation laws in diminishing the necessity of industrial employ­
ment of women and children. [1918.]
♦No. 223. Employment of women and juveniles in Great Britain during the war. [1917.]
No. 253. Women in the lead industries. [1919.]
Workmen's Insnranc8 and Compensation (including laws relating thereto).

♦No. 101.
♦No. 102.
No. 103.
No. 107.
♦No. 155.
♦No. 212.
♦No. 243.
<No. 301.
No. 312.
No. 379.
No. 477.
No. 496.

Care of tuberculous wage earners in Germany. [1912.]
British national insurance act, 1911.
Sickness and accident insurance law in Switzerland. [1912.]
Law relating to insurance of salaried employees in Germany. [1913.]
Compensation for accidents to employees of the United States. [1914.]
Proceedings of the conference on social insurance called by the International Association of
Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions, Washington, D. C., December 5-9, 1916.
Workmen’s compensation legislation in the United States and foreign countries, 1917 and
1918.
Comparison of workmen’s compensation insurance and administration. [1922.]
National health insurance in Great Britain, 1911 to 1921.
Comparison of workmen’s compensation laws of the United States as of January 1, 1925.
Public-service retirement systems, United States and Europe. [1929.]
Workmen’s compensation legislation of the United States and Canada as of January, 1929.
(With text of legislation enacted in 1927 and 1928.)

Miscellaneous series.

♦No. 174. Subject index of the publications of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics up to May
1,1915.
No. 208. Profit sharing in the United States. [1916.]
No. 242. Food situation in central Europe, 1917.
No. 254. International labor legislation and the society of nations. [1919.]
No. 268. Historical survey of international action affecting labor. [1920.]
No. 282. Mutual relief associations among Government employees in Washington, D. C. [1921.]
No. 319. The Bureau of Labor Statistics: Its history, activities, and organization. [1922.]
No. 326. Methods of procuring and computing statistical information of the Bureau of Labor Sta­
tistics. [1923.]
No. 342. International Seamen’s Union of America: A study of its history and problems. [1923.]
No. 346. Humanity in government. [1923.]
No. 372. Convict labor in 1923.
No. 386. Cost of American almshouses. [1925.]
No. 398. Growth of legal-aid work in the United States. [1926.]
No. 401. Family allowances in foreign countries. [1926.]
No. 461. Labor organization in Chile. [1928.]
No. 462. Park recreation areas in the United States. [1928.]
No. 465. Beneficial activities of American trade-unions. [1928.]
No. 479. Activities and functions of a State department of labor. [1928.]
No. 483. Conditions in the shoe industry in Haverhill, Mass., 1928.
No. 489. Care of aged persons in United States. [1929.]
No. 491. Handbook of labor statistics, 1929 edition.
No. 505. Directory of homes for the aged in the United States. [1929.]
No. 506. Handbook of American trade-unions: 1929 edition.
No. 518. Personnel research agencies: 1930 edition.




[V]