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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
JAMES J. DAVIS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, C om m issioner

BULLETIN OF TH E UNITED STATES \
B U R E A U O F LA BO R S T A T I S T I C S /

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L A B O R LAWS OF T H E U N I T E D S T A T E S S E R I E S

LABOR LEGISLATION
OF 1928




MAY, 1929

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON ; 1929

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

This bulletin was prepared by Daniel F. Callahan and Charles F,
Sharkey, of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.
u




CONTENTS
P age

Introduction__________________________________________________________
1, 2
Part I.— Digests and summaries of certain classes of laws affecting labor. _
3-9
Vocational education______________________________________________
3
M others’ pensions________________________________________________
3
Examination, licensing, etc., of workmen___________________________
3, 4
A viators_____________________________________________________
3
Barbers______________________________________________________
3
Beauty parlors_______________________________________________
4
Chauffeurs___________________________________________________
4
Plum bers____________________________________________________
4
Em ployees on vessels_________________________________________
4
Emigrant agents__________________________________________________
4
M echanics’ lien s__________________________________________________
4, 5
Assignment of wages— Wage brokers______________________________
5
Earnings of minors________________________________________________
5
Earnings of married w om en_______________________________________
5
Legal holidays in the States and Territories________________________
5, 6
Bakeries and preparation, distribution, etc., of food p ro d u cts_______
6
Regulations governing laundries___________________________________
6
Vocational rehabilitation__________________________________________
6
Old-age pensions__________________________________________________
6
Retirement of public em ployees____________________________________
6, 7
Cooperative associations__________________________________________
8
8
Preference for local labor and domestic materials on public w orks___
Industrial police__________________________________________________
8
Absent voters_____________________________________________________
8
Convict labor_____________________________________________________
8, 9
Investigative commissions_________________________________________
9
Part II.— Text and abridgment of labor law s___________________________ 10-24
D istrict of Columbia______________________________________________ 10, 11
Illinois____________________________________________________________
11
K entucky-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11, 12
Louisiana_________________________________________________________ 12-14
M assachusetts____________________________________________________ 14, 15
M ississippi________________________________________________________ 15, 16
New Jersey_______________________________________________________ 16-18
New York________________________________________________________ 18-21
Porto R ico________________________________________________________
21
Rhode Island_____________________________________________________ 21-23
South Carolina____________________________________________________
23
Virginia-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------23, 24
Wisconsin_________________________________________________________
24
United S ta tes____________________________________________ ________
24




in




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
NO. 486

WASHINGTON

MAY, 1929

REVIEW OF LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1928
INTRODUCTION
Regular legislative sessions were held in 1928 in nine States1 and
in Porto Rico. The Seventieth Congress was in session also during
the year. Extra sessions were held in 12 States.2 Legislation of in­
terest to labor was enacted in every State in which the legislature
met except in Arizona,3 Arkansas,3 California, Iowa, Kansas, Nevada,
and North Dakota.
As was the case with Bulletin No. 403, Labor Legislation of 1925,
Bulletin No. 434, Labor Legislation of 1926, and Bulletin No. 470,
Labor Legislation of 1927, this bulletin is essentially a supplement to
Bulletin No. 370, entitled “ Labor Laws of the United States With
Decisions of Courts Relating Thereto,” containing reprints, abridg­
ments, digests, and references to ail labor legislation, with the excep­
tion of workmen’s compensation laws, up to the beginning of the
year 1925.
The classification of subjects and the method of treatment found in
Bulletin No. 370 are followed closely in this bulletin. The subject
matter is divided into two parts, the first part entitled “ Digests and
Summaries of Certain Classes of Laws Affecting Labor,” which is
of general interest to labor, and the second part entitled u Text and
Abridgment of Labor Laws,” containing laws which more directly
affect labor. The laws in P art I are classified under appropriate
subject headings, while those of P art I I are found under the State
headings.
The cumulative index provides a ready reference to the laws found
in this bulletin as well as to those published in the preceding bulletins.
Workmen’s compensation legislation has been considered of suffi­
cient importance to receive separate treatment. Bulletin No. 423,
entitled “ Workmen’s Compensation Legislation of the United States
and Canada, as of July 1, 1926,” contains an analysis, a comparison,
and the text of the workmen’s compensation laws in the United
1 Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island,
South Carolina, and Virginia.
2 Arizona, Arkansas, California, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada,
New Jersey, North Dakota, and Wisconsin.
3 The bureau has been unable to obtain copies of legislation passed, but information
available indicates no labor legislation was enacted.




1

2

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 192 8

States and Canada. An article appearing in the Monthly Labor
Review for January, 1928 (pp. 17-33), presents nn analysis of this
type of legislation for the year 1927 and in the issue of December,
1928 (pp. 107-112), the legislation of 1928 is given.
A bulletin bringing Bulletin No. 423, on workmen’s compensation,
up to date is now being compiled and will be published in the near
future.




PART I.—DIGESTS AND SUMMARIES OF CERTAIN CLASSES OF
LAWS AFFECTING LABOR

This part is a supplement to P art I of Bulletin No. 370, and the
same general arrangement of subject matter is followed. The intro­
ductory statements found in Bulletin No. 370 continue to be appli­
cable and therefore are not here repeated.
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

Virginia.—Ch. 471, sec. 625. The school laws of Virginia were
codified and provisions concerning vocational education are now sec.
625 of the code.
MOTHERS’ PENSIONS

Illinois.—P. 3. Amends sec. 16, p. 127, Acts of 1913 (sec. 313. ch. 23,
E. S. 1917). Lifted the limitation on the property tax from threetenths of 1 mill on the dollar to two-fifths of 1 mill on the dollar for
the mothers’ pension fund. Makes additional provisions as to tax.
Kentucky.—Ch. 17. New act. Also repeals ch. 107, Acts of 1922.
Abolishes the Kentucky Child Welfare Commission and creates in its
place a bureau to be known as the Kentucky Children’s Bureau.
Also provides for the administration of mothers’ aid throughout the
State.
Louisiana.—Act No. 228. Amends secs. 4 and 5, Act No. 209, Laws
of 1920, changing “ shall ” to “ may ” in provisions for payment of
relief.
EXAMINATION, LICENSING, ETC., OF WORKMEN
AVIATORS

Illinois.—P. 85. New act. Regulates aviation and licensing of
aviators.
Massachusetts.—Ch. 388. Amends ch. 90, secs. 35 to 59, G. L. (as
amended by ch. 534, Acts of 1922), relative to aircraft and pilots’
licenses.
Mississippi.—Ch. 208. New act. Provides for licensing of pilots.
New Jersey.—Ch. 63. New act. Operator must be licensed.
Virginia.—Ch. 463. New act. Provides for the licensing of
aviators.
BARBERS

Louisiana.—Act No. 247. New act. Regulates the practice of
barbering, and provides for the examination and licensing of barbers
and fixes certain license fees.




3

4

LABOR LEGISLATION- OF 192 8
BEAUTY PARLORS

Louisiana.—Act No. 245. Amends Act No. 135, secs, 2, 3 (as
amended by Act No. 95, Laws of 1926), 4, 5, 6, 7, 14, and 18, Acts of
1924. Many changes made in existing laws.
Rhode Island.—Ch. 1211. Amends ch. 765, sec. 8, P. L. 1926. Pro­
vides for making rules and regulations relative to use of appliances.
CHAUFFEURS

Louisiana.—Act No. 296. New act. Licenses; to be issued by
Louisiana Highway Commission, and no one to be issued a license
who is not at least 18 years of age and who fails to pass such exami­
nation as the department sees fit to give.
New York.—Ch. 867. Amends ch. 30, sec. 289, Acts of 1909 (ch.
25, Con. L.), as added by ch. 374, Acts of 1910 (amended by ch. 319,
Acts of 1925). Makes number of changes.
Porto Rico.—Act. No. 66. Amends sec. 10 of an act as amended by
act No. 9, Acts of 1926. Schedule of fees for licenses.
Virginia.—Ch. 38. Amends ch. 149, sec. 29, subsec. (e), Acts of
1926. Provides that such license fees and taxes upon vehicles shall
be charged as the proper authorities determine.
Ch. 531. Also amends ch. 149, sec. 29, Acts of 1926.
PLUMBERS

Massachusetts.—Ch. 76. Amends ch. 142, G. L., regarding licenses,
examinations, etc., of plumbers.
EMPLOYEES ON VESSELS

Louisiana.—Act No. 198. New act. Regulates river port pilotage
and provides for the licensing of river pilots and also provides for
certain license fees. Pilots are forbidden to solicit employment.
New Jersey.—Ch. 247, p. 461. Repeals ch. 39, p. 69, Acts of 1884,
relating to apprentice pilots.
Porto Rico.—Act No. 59. New act. Relates to licensing of pilots.
Provides schedule of fees to be charged for pilotage.
Virginia.—Ch. 239. Amends secs. 3613, 3615, 3625, and 3638, Code.
Relates to pilots.
EMIGRANT AGENTS

Virginia.—Ch. 45. Consolidates the revenue statutes.
grant agents’ licenses, see sec. 183.

For emi­

MECHANICS’ LIENS

Louisiana.—Act No. 171. New act, Relates to liens cT laborers on
oil and gas wells for wages.
Act No. 172. Amends Act No. 134, Acts of 1880. Laborers given
first privilege on buildings for labor performed.
Mississippi.—Ch. 136. New act. Provides for the filing of claims
by laborers and material men in the office of ths chancery clerk.




LABOR LEGISLATION OF 192 8

5

Ch. 137. Amends ch. 150, Acts of 1926 (sec. 2418, Hemingway’s
Code). Lien may also be for architectural service rendered, and
delivery of material on the job is made first evidence of its use on
such job.
New Jersey.—J. R. No. 10. Creates a commission to revise the
present mechanics’ lien laws.
Ch. 58. Amends ch. 241, Acts of 1927, relating to bonding of lien.
Ch. 67. Amends ch. 250, Acts of 1926, liens on motor vehicles.
Ch. 247, p. 459. Repeals ch. 225, p. 418, Acts of 1891, and ch. 86,
p. 138, Acts of 1915.
Ch. 253. New act. Gives a lien to processors of linen, cotton, etc.
New Y ork.—Ch. 13. Amends ch. 38, sec. 44, subd. 3, Acts of 1909
(ch. 33, Con. L.).
Ch. 236. Amends ch. 38, sec. 18, Acts of 1909 (ch. 33, Con. L,
amended 1916, ch. 507). Duration of lien.
South Carolina.—No. 600. New act. Gives lien to processors of
cotton, wool, silk, etc., for work, labor, and material.
Virginia.—Ch. 253. Amends sec. 6439, Code.
ASSIGNMENT OF WAGES—WAGE BROKERS

Louisiana.—Act No. 92. New act. Small loans act. For sums of
$300 and less.
Act. No. 7 (extra sess.). Small loans act. For sums of $300 and
less.
New Jersey.—Ch. 250. Amends Acts of 1904, p. 218 (Comp. Stat.
of 1910, p. 4135), regulating provident loan associations an!l fixes a
limit on loans to $300.
Ch. 251. Amends ch. 49, Acts of 1914. Limits loans to $300.
New York.—Ch. 365. Amends ch. 369, sec. 368, Acts of 1914 (ch.
2. Con. L.), as amended by ch. 703, Acts of 1920. Small loans of
$300 and less.
Virginia.—Ch. 152. Amends ch. 300, subsec. 14, Acts of 1922.
Small loans less than $300.
Ch. 448. Amends ch. 74, Acts of 1920. Small loans.
EARNINGS OF MINORS

Kentucky.—Ch. 152. New act. Gives to the father and mother
equal rights to the earnings of their minor children and to maintain
actions for loss of earnings.
EARNINGS OF MARRIED WOMEN

New Jersey.—Ch. 241. Amends sec. 4 of an act approved March
27, 1874 (Comp. Stat. of 1910, p. 3225). Work performed by a
married woman for third persons shall be deemed for her sole and
separate account.
LEGAL HOLIDAYS IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES

Louisiana.—Act No. 49. Lists legal holidays. Mardi Gras is a
legal holiday now in the Parishes of St. Bernard, Jefferson, St.
Charles, and St. John the Baptist, as well as in Orleans, and Satur­




6

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1 92 8

day a half holiday in cities having a population of 6,000 instead of
10,000.
Massachusetts.—Ch. 235. Amends ch. 4, sec. 7, G. L., to make
Armistice Day, November 11, a holiday.
New Jersey.—Ch. 247. Repeals ch. 58, Acts of 1876 (rev. 1877) ;
ch. 260, Acts of 1886; ch. 114, Acts of 1887; ch. 244, Laws of 1907;
and ch. 261, Acts of 1909.
BAKERIES AND PREPARATION, DISTRIBUTION, ETC., OF FOOD
PRODUCTS

Massachusetts.—Ch. 229. Adds a new section—sec. 305 B—to ch.
94, G. L. (as amended by ch. 50, Acts of 1924) authorizing the com­
missioner of public health to make examination of persons suspected
of contagious disease.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING LAUNDRIES

Rhode Island.—Ch. 1200. New act. Defines “ public laundry ”
and provides for the issuing of permits and the inspection of
laundries.
VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

New Jersey.—Ch. 34. Amends ch. 74, Acts of 1919. Appoints two
more members, one of whom shall be a woman, to the State com­
mission for the rehabilitation of physically handicapped persons.
OLD-AGE PENSIONS

Massachusetts.—Ch. 383. Amends ch. 6, sec. 17, and adds sec. 28 A 28 D to ch. 6, G. L. Establishes public bequest commission au­
thorized to receive gifts for a public bequest fund,” which is to be
T
used in aiding aged men and women.
RETIREMENT OF PUBLIC EMPLOYEES

Massachusetts.—Ch. 248. Amends sec. 2, ch. 32, G. L. (as amended
1921, ch. 439, sec. 1, and ch. 487, secs. 4 and 5 and later amended
1924, ch. 264, and 1925, ch. 12), by striking out par. 8 and substitut­
ing a new paragraph; also a new paragraph (11) is added relating to
retirement of members of the State retirement association.
Ch. 251. Amends ch. 29, G. L., by adding a new section—sec. 9 A—
relative to State retirement fund.
New York.—Ch. 222. Amends ch. 15, Acts cf 1909 (ch. 7, Con. L.)
art. 4 (as added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920) by inserting a new sec­
tion—sec. 52-b. Employees transferred to Port of New York Au­
thority shall be considered as being under the retirement system.
Ch. 294. Amends ch. 15, Acts of 1909 (ch. 7, Con. L .), sec. 50,
subds. 9, 10 (as added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920), by adding to “ prior
service,” service during the World War of soldiers, sailors, etc., who
were residents of the State at the time of their enlistment. “ Total
service” now includes military service.




LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1 92 8

Ch. 301. Amends ch. 15, Acts of 1909 (ch. 7, Con. L.), sec. 52, subd.
1, par. c (as added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920, and last amended by
chs. 440 and 578, Acts of 1927), and par. d (as added by ch. 280, Acts
of 1926, and amended by ch. 171, Acts of 1927), and also sec. 53, subd.
5 (as amended by ch. 174, Acts of 1927), by extending from June 30,
1927, to January 1, 1929, period in which certain employees may be­
come members of the retirement system.
Ch. 326. Amends ch. 15, Acts of 1909 (ch. 7, Con. L.), sec. 62, subd.
2 (as added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920, and amended by ch. 684, Acts of
1926), by allowing members of the industrial board to continue in
the State service beyond retirement age.
Ch. 481. Amends ch. 47, Acts of 1909 (ch. 43. Con. L.), by adding
a new section at the end of article 16, to be section 412. Provides for
benefits to be paid dependents of prison employees who were not
T
members of the State retirement system.
Ch. 534. Amends ch. 15, Acts of 1909 (ch. 7, Con. L.), sec. 61 (as
added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920), by adding a new subdivision—subd.,
6. Provides for borrowing, by members of the State service who
have had at least 3 years’ service, from the retirement fund.
Ch. 555. Amends ch. 15, Acts of 1909 (ch. 7, Con. L.), sec. 57, subd.
3 (as added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920, and last amended by ch. 440,
Acts of 1927), and also sec. 78, art. 5 (as added by ch. 591, Acts of
1922, as amended by ch. 440, Acts of 1927). Sec. 78, art. 5, makes all
taxes payable to the “ comptroller ” ; sec. 57, subd. 3, provides that
the comptroller shall have a fund in his immediate possession for the
payment of pensions.
Ch. 556. Amends ch. 15, Acts of 1909 (ch. 7, Con. L.), sec. 52, subd.
1 (as added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920), by adding a new paragraph—
par. (e). Provides that members of the State police be covered by
the State retirement law.
Ch. 557. Amends ch. 15, Acts of 1909 (ch. 7, Con. L.), sec. 52, subd.
1, par. (a) (as added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920, and amended by ch.
618, Acts of 1924), by making several exceptions to the provisions of
the law; also, sec. 61, subd. 1 (as added by ch. 741, Acts of 1920).
so that a member with less than 3 years’ allowable service may elect
to withdraw his contributions in lieu of a retirement allowance.
Ch. 571. Amends sec. 174 of the mental hygiene law. Provides
that annuity for employers shall become effective within a period of
60 days subsequent to the elate of the meeting of the retirement board
taking action and shall be payable in monthly, instead of quarterly,
installments. See other changes in secs. 171-176.
Ch, 713. Amends ch. 15, Acts of 1909 (ch. 7, Con. L.), by adding a
new section—sec. 52-c. Members elected to the Congress of the
United States held to be in State service for purposes of the retire­
ment act.
Porto Rico.—Act No. 33. Repeals Act No. 22, Acts of 1923, and
also amends act No. 104, secs. 12, 15, 16, and 19, Acts of 1925. Pro­
vides that pension board notify attorney general on death of em­
ployees; that the pension board invest in bonds of the Insular and
Federal Governments; and for the employment of a chief clerk, one
clerk, and such other personnel as the board may deem necessary; and
provides for disposition of surplus.




8

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 19 2 8

COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATIONS

Virginia.—Ch. 166. Amends sec. 3855, Code.
changes in the law.

Makes several

PREFERENCE FOR LOCAL LABOR AND DOMESTIC MATERIALS ON
PUBLIC WORKS

Louisiana.—Act No. 30. New act. All boards, officers, etc., subject
to the control of the State shall, in making purchases, give preference
to Louisiana products.
Act No. 116. Amends and changes entirely title and Act No. 271.
secs. 1, 2, and 3, Acts of 1908, requiring that mechanics employed on
public buildings shall be citizens of the State.
Wisconsin.—J. R. No. 7. Relates to discrimination against iaterials and residents of other States by Minnesota.
INDUSTRIAL POLICE

Louisiana.—Act No. 254. New act. Provides for appointment of
railroad policemen; appointed by the governor. (See also Act No.
251.)
ABSENT VOTERS

Virginia.—Ch. 397. Amends secs. 202, 203, 205. and 208, Code, con­
cerning absent voting.
CONVICT LABOR

Louisiana.—Act No. 189. Amends Act No. 203. Acts of 1926. P ro­
vides for the creation of prison districts.
Act No. 293. Amends Act No. 95, sec. 24, Acts of 1921 (extra
sess.). Provides for the use of convicts on State roads.
Massachusetts.—Ch. 387. Amends ch. 127, G. L., by adding a new
section— sec. 48A. Provides for establishment of system of com­
pensation for convicts to be paid from profits from industries.
Mississippi.—Ch. 45. Amends sec. 4020, Hemingway’s Code, 1917,
sec. 4396, Hemingway’s Code, 1927. Concerning the wages of con­
victs working on public roads.
New TorJc.—Ch. 146. Amends sec. 1828, Penal Law, to conform to
the State department’s law in relation to prison officer’s interest in
prison contracts.
Ch. 167. Amends highway law to conform to the State depart­
ment’s law, in relation to the employment of convict labor on roads.
Ch. 805. Amends ch. 25, Acts of 1909, by adding a new article after
article 6, to be known as article 6A. Provides for the labeling and
marking of convict-made goods. Also provides for due registration
of vendors of convict-made goods.
South Carolina.—No. 892. New act. Creates board for the man­
agement of the chain gang in Fairfield County.
Virginia.—Ch. 150. Amends sec. 5017, Code. Concerning good
conduct of prisoners at work on roads and repeals ch. 301, sec. 6, Acts
of 1918.




LABOR LEGISLATION OF 19 2 8

9

Ch. 153. Amends ch. 301, sec. 1, Acts of 1918. Drops provision
permitting a commutation of prisoner’s sentence.
Ch. 154. Repeals sec. 5036 and amends secs. 5019, 5048, and 2091,
Code. Authorizes the superintendent of a penitentiary to employ
physicians in the several locations where the State convict road force
camps are located to attend prisoners needing medical attention.
Ch. 487. Amends sec. 2075, Code, as last amended by ch. 65, Acts of
1926. Provides for physical examinations for prisoners transferred
to convict road force.
Ch. 511. New act. Motor-vehicle license plates, road signs, etc.,
for use of State or to be sold, shall be made by prison labor.
Ch. 525. Amends sec. 2094, Code, as amended by ch. 10, Acts of
1920. Forbids work of females on convict road force.
Ch. 526. Amends sec. 2095, Code. Provides that convict held to
labor in the State convict road force for the nonpaj^ment of any fine
imposed upon him shall be required to work out the full amount of
said fine.
INVESTIGATIVE COMMISSIONS

New Jersey.—J. R. No. 10, p. 804. A commission of nine members
to be appointed for the purpose of revising the present mechanics’
lien laws. Appropriation of $500.




PART II.—TEXT AND ABRIDGMENT OF LABOR LAWS
[The text of tlie laws has been punctuated in accordance with 1he rules for punctuation
laid down by the Government Printing Office for Government publications, and does not
follow, in all cases, the official State editions.]

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
SEVENTIETH CONGRESS, FIR ST SESSION, 1927-28
C h a p te r 008 (45 Stat. 998).—Employment of children— G eneral provisions
S ection 1. Age limit.— [No child under 14 years of age may work at any
gainful occupation. Several exemptions are made for outside of school hours.]
S ec. 2. Work time.— [Employment of children under 18 years of age for more
than 8 hours per day or 48 hours per week is forbidden. Girls under 18 years
of age and boys under 16 years of age are forbidden to work between 7 p. m.
and 7 a. m. Boys between 16 and 18 years of age are forbidden to work be­
tween 10 p. m. and 6 a. m. Employers must post notices and keep accessible a
list of minors under 18 employed, and an accurate tim e record showing the
hours of beginning and ending work each day, and the hours for meals.]
S ecs . 3-7. Prohibited employments.— [Minors are forbidden to work at any
dangerous employment or an employment which is prejudicial to the life, health,
safety, or welfare of such minor. Minors under 16 years of age are forbidden
to work at the operation of any machinery by power and in the oiling, wiping,
or cleaning of same. Minors under 18 years of age are forbidden to operate
any elevator; wT
ork in any quarry, tunnel, or excavation, or in any tobacco
warehouse or cigar factory. Girls under 18 years of age are forbidden to work
in any retail cigar or tobacco store, hotel, or apartment house, or as usher,
attendant, or ticket seller in any theater, or as a messenger in the distribution
or delivery of goods or messages. Males between the ages of 18 and 21 are for­
bidden to deliver messages between 12 a. m. and 5 a. m. Females between the
ages of 18 and 21 are forbidden to deliver messages between the hours of 7
p. m. and 6 a. m. A minor under 16 years of age is forbicden to be employed as
an acrobat or a gymnast, etc.]
S ecs . 8-10. Permits.— [Employer must secure a work or vacation permit for
all minors between the ages of 14 and 18. Permits are issued by the director of
the department of school attendance and work permits, under the Board of
Education of the D istrict of Columbia. Application for permits must be made
by the minor, and accompanied by evidence that the employer intends to give
employment, evidence of age and school record if minor is under 16, etc.]
S ec. 11. Evidences of age.— [A birth certificate, baptismal record, Bible rec­
ord, or other documentary evidence satisfactory to the officer, a certificate of
physical fitness signed by medical inspector of schools.]
S ec. 12. Vacation permits.— [Issued by director of the department of school
attendance.]
S ecs . 13, 14. D u ty of employer.— [Employer must give notice of employment
and termination. An employer must furnish evidence of the minor’s age when­
ever there is a doubt.]
S ec. 15. Violation.— [For the first offense a fine of from $25 to $100 or im ­
prisonment from 10 to 30 days; for subsequent offense a fine of from $50 to
$200 or imprisonment from 30 to 90 days, or, in the discretion of the court, by
both such fine and imprisonment.]
S ec. 16. Enforcement. — [Enforcement by inspectors and agents of the depart­
ment of school attendance.]
S ecs . 17-21. Street trades, etc.— [Boys under 12; or gi ’ls under 18 forbidden
to sell newspapers, e tc .; stuffing of newspapers by boyu under 16 forbidden;
and boys from 16 to 18 may not be employed more th a i 40 hours in any one

10




LABOR LEGISLATION OF 192 8

11

week nor more than one night in any one week. Boys under 16 years of age
forbidden to work at any of the street trades between the hours of 7 p. m.
and 6 a. m. Boys under the age of 16 must wear badge. Issue of badge is
made only after application, and application must contain certain requirements.]
S ecs. 22, 2:3, Violations ~by minor, etc. (street trad es).— [For first offense the
minor is w arned ; for subsequent offenses the minor may be committed to the
care of the Board of Public W elfare of the D istrict of Columbia. Provision
is also made for supervision by a probation officer of the juvenile court. Revo­
cation of badge may be made by an officer. A person offering a minor under
16 an article to be sold in a public place must ascertain if the minor wears his
own badge. A punishment is provided for failure to comply.]
S eo. 24. Loitering.— [Loitering around newspaper offices, etc., during school
hours is forbidden to boys under 16 years of age.]
S ec . 25. Appointment of officers.— [Board of Education is authorized.]
S ec. 26. Jurisdiction.— [The Juvenile Court of the D istrict of Columbia.]
Approved May 2.9, 1928.

ILLINOIS
ACTS OF 1928
[The only labor legislation of this State enacted at the first, second, and
third special sessions of 1928 is noted in Part I, under the headings : Mothers’
pensions, p. 3; Examination, etc., of aviators, p. 85.]

KENTUCKY
ACTS OF 1928
C hapteb 124.—Factory, etc., regulations—Exhaust fans
S e c t i o n 1. Suction or exhaust system s.—That all persons, firms, or corpora­
tions operating any factory or workshop where emery wheels or emery belts of
any description are used, either solid emery, leather, leather covered, felt,
canvas, linen, paper, cotton, or wheels or belts rolled or coated with emery or
corundum, or any other abrasive material, or cotton wheels used as buffs shall,
for the protection of the health of the employees, provide the same with suction
or exhaust systems or similar apparatus, which shall be placed over, beside, or
under such wheels or belts in such a manner as to protect the person or persons
using the same from the particles of dust produced and caused thereby and to
carry away the dust arising from or thrown off by such wheels or belts in
operation directly to the outside of the building or to some receptacle placed
so as to receive and confine such d u s t: Provided, That grinding machines upon
which water is used at the point of grinding contact and solid emery wheels
that are used occasionally for tool grinding, or emery wheels used only in con­
nection with fitting operations necessitating only momentary contact with
wheels, also flexible shaft grinding and swing fram e grinding, shall be exempt
from the provisions of this act.
S ec. 2. Installation. — It shall be the duty of every person, firm, or corpora­
tion operating any such factory or workshop to provide or construct such ap­
pliances, apparatus, machinery, or other things necessary to carry out the
purpose of this act, as set forth in the preceding section, as fo llo w s: Each and
every such wheel shall be fitted with a sheet or cast-iron hood or hopper of
such form and so applied to such wheel or wheels that the dust or refuse there­
from w ill fall from such wheels or w7 be thrown into such hood or hopper by
ill
centrifugal force and be carried off by the current of air into a suction pipe
attached to said hood or hopper.
S ec . 3. Measurements.—Each and every such wheel 6 inches or less in
diameter shall be provided w ith a 3-inch suction p ip e ; wheels 6 to 24 inches
in diameter with 4-inch suction p ip e ; wheels froi$ 24 inches to 36 inches in
diameter with 5-inch suction p ip e ; and all wheels larger in diameter than those
etated above shall be provided each with a suction pipe not less than 6 inches
in diameter. The suction pipe from each wheel so specified must be full size
to the main trunk suction pipe and the main suction pipe to which smaller




12

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 192 8

pipes are attached shall, in its diameter and capacity, be equal to the combined
area of such smaller pipes attached by the same, and the discharge pipe from
the exhaust fan, connected with such suction pipe or pipes, shall be as large
or larger than the suction pipe.
Sec. 4. Velocity, etc., of fans.— It shall be the duty of every person, firm,
or corporation operating any such factory or workshop to provide the necessary
fans or blowers to be connected with such pipe or pipes, as above set forth,
which shall be run at a rate of speed as w ill produce a velocity of air in such
suction or an equivalent suction or pressure of air equal to raising a column of
w ater not less than five inches in a U-shape tube. All branch pipes must enter
the main trunk pipe at an angle of 45 degrees or less, the main suction or trunk
pipe shall be either upon the floor or beneath the floor on which the machines
are placed to which such wheels are attached. All bends, turns, or elbows in
such pipes must be made with easy, smooth surfaces having a radius in the
throat of not less than two diameters of the pipe on which they are connected.
Sec. 5. Enforcement.—It shall be the duty of the department of labor to
supervise and enforce the provisions of this act, and to prosecute all violations
of the same before any court of competent jurisdiction in this State, and for
that purpose said department of labor is empowered to visit and inspect, at all
reasonable hours, all places that may come under the provisions of this act.
In the enforcement thereof said department of labor shall give proper notice
in regard to any violation of this act to any employer of labor violating it,
and direct the proper changes to be made to protect the health of the employees
therein, and such notice shall be written or printed and shall be signed by the
chief officer of the department of labor, and said notice may be served by
delivering the same to the person upon whom service is to be had or by leaving
at usual place of abode or business an exact copy thereof, or by sending
a copy thereof to such person by mail, and upon receipt of such notice calling
the attention of the employer to such violation he shall im mediately comply
w ith the provisions of this act.
S ec. 6. Violations. — E very person, firm, or corporation w ho sh all fa il to com ­
p ly w ith the provisions of th is act sh all be deem ed guilcy of a m isdem eanor,
and on conviction th ereof sh all be punished for the first offense by a fine o f
not less than $25 nor m ore than $200; and upon conviction of the second or
subsequent offense sh a ll be fined not less than $100 nor m ore than $500.

Approved March 20, 1928.
C hapter 166.— Mine regulations — Requirements

[This act repeals and reenacts sec. 2728, subd. 2, Carroll’s Kentucky Statutes,
1922 (being sec. 2, art. 7, ch. 79, Acts of 1914). Permitting as many passengers
on mine car as said car w ill accommodate, allowing each person 3 square feet
of floor space.]
Approved March 21, 1928.
D igest, etc.
[The only other legislation is noted in Part I, under the h ea d in g s: Mothers’
pensions, ch. 17; Earnings of minors, ch. 152.]

LOUISIANA
ACTS OF 1928
A ct No. 7.—Retention of tcages of employees—Public w orks
S e c tio n 1. Retention of wages. — I t sh all be u n la w fu l for any person, firm, or
corporation to retain m ore than 10 per cent of sluj and all m oneys collected
from th e em ployees as p h ysician ’s fees a s a rem uneration for th eir services or
otherw ise, or to pay to th e ph ysician em ployed less than 90 per cent o f the
am ount a ctu a lly collected from said em ployees for said purpose. T he provi­
sion s o f th is act, how ever, are not intended to apply and sh all n ot apply to any
person, firm, or corporation w ho contribute tow ard th e m aintenance o f a con­
ven ien tly located hospital or w h ose em ployees are cared foe in such h osp itals and
are given fr ee service therein.




LABOR LEGISLATION OF 19 2 8

13

Sec. 2. E lection of physician .— T h e ph ysician em ployed to do the p ractice for
the em ployees on pu blic w orks sh all be elected or appointed by th e em ployees
them selves, a t election s to be held once each year, or w henever a vacan cy m ay
occur, and any persons em ployed on said public w orks for a period of tw o w eeks
prior to th e election and w ho sh all have paid fees fo r said ph ysician sh a ll be
qualified to vote.
S ec. 3. Definition.—A public work is hereby defined to be any work, public or

private, where more than 10 persons are employed.
Sec. 4. Violation .— A ny person, firm, or corporation violatin g any provisions
o f th is act sh all be deem ed g u ilty of a m isdem eanor and sh all upon conviction
th ereof be fined not le ss than $100 nor more than $200.

Approved July 7, 1928.
A c t No. 47.— Assignment of wages
S ection 1. Assignment of claims.—When several parties have claim s against
a common defendant, or defendants, arising out of a common transaction, such
as claims of laborers for their wages, said claimants, or any of them, may
transfer and assign their claims to any person or persons for the purpose of
collection by suit or otherwise, and in such case it shall not be necessary that
such transfer or assignment be supported by a.valu ab le consideration but it
shall be sufficient that said transfer or assignment be in writing, and said
assignee shall thereupon be authorized to collect said claims and to prosecute
same to judgment should it be necessary.
Approved July 7, 1928.
A ct No. 115.—Exemption of wages from garnishment

[This act provides that one-half of the wages of certain employees receiving
$250 or less per month shall be exempt from garnishment. The other half is not
exempt but subject to seizure, and in every case not less than $75 per month
shall be entirely exempt from seizure. The balance of the act relates to
procedure. 1
Approved July 12, 1928.
A ct No. 135.—Private employment offices
S ection 1. Definitions.—Any person, firm, company, corporation, or associa­
tion, or his or its agent, who shall solicit, hire, employ, or who contracts with
laborers of any kind, whether domestic help, common, semiskilled, or skilled
workmen, or who contracts for the employment or placement of salesmen, clerks,
or other kind of clerical workers or help, shall be deemed a labor agent or
employment bureau, except as hereinafter provided.
Sec. 2. Same.—Any person, firm, company, corporation, or association, or his
or its agent, who charges a fee to register applicants seeking employment of any
kind or who directly or indirectly charges, solicits, collects, or accepts, if ten­
dered, by either the applicant seeking employment or from the employer giving
employment, any sum, fee, or percentage of wages earned or to be earned, as a
remuneration for placement or assignment of the worker, is hereby deemed a
labor agent or employment bureau, except as hereinafter provided.
S ec. 3. Exemptions.—The provisions of this act shall not apply to any person,
firm, company, corporation, or association, or his or its agent, who may operate
a labor bureau or employment office in conjunction with his or its own business
and for the sole and exclusive purpose of employing help for his or its own u s e :
Provided, That no fee or other charge or deduction is exacted from the wages
of the worker for employment given. I f a fee or charge of any kind is exacted
of the worker, then said employer is deemed a labor agent or employment bureau
and is subject to the provisions of this act.
S ec . 4. Same. — T he provisions o f th is act sh all not apply to men or women
w ho m ay be engaged by any em ployer as a labor hustler, agent, or r e c r u ite r :
Provided, Such hustler, agent, or recru iter fu rn ish es help only to h is respective
em ployer and is solely com pensated by his em ployer and does not directly or
in d irectly charge, collect, or accept any fee or other rem uneration from help
secured or placed.

32857°—29------2




14

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1 9 2 8

S ec. 5. License fee.—Every person, firm, company, corporation, or. association,
or his or its agent, who engages in the business of a labor agent or employment
bureau, except as herein provided, shall pay unto the State of Louisiana an
annual license tax of $500: Provided, That labor agents >r employment bureaus
in cities and towns of this State who have and keep a regular office in such*
city 01* town and who transact all of their business in s uch office, and who do
not in person or by agent solicit, or hire, or attempt to do so, except by written,
telegraphic, or telephonic communication, shall be required to pay annually the
sum of $25 license tax unto the State of Louisiana for such privileges, and the
license so paid for and obtained shall permit all of the employees of such labor
agents or employment bureaus who assist in the prosecution of such work in
such office only, as aforesaid, to aid therein.
S ec. 6. Bond.— In addition to paying the license tax provided for in this act,
every person, firm, company, corporation, or association who may engage in the
business of a labor agent or employment bureau shall furnish to the commis­
sioner of labor and industrial statistics a bond w ith good and solvent security
in the sum of $5,000, conditioned that such person shall pay all such damages
which may result from his action as such labor agent or employment b u rea u ;
and that anyone who may have been injured or damaged by said labor agent,
by fraud or misrepresentation of said agent, shall have a right to sue on said
bond to recover such damages before any court of competent jurisdiction.. The
bond furnished to said commissioner of labor and industrial statistics shall be
filed in his office and become a part of departmental records.
S ec. 7. Supervision by commissioner of labor.—The operation of the business
of labor agents or employment bureaus, shall be under the supervision of the
Commissioner of Labor and Industrial Statistics of the State of Louisiana.
S ec. 8. Penalty.—Any person, firm, company, corporation, or association, who
shall violate the provisions of the act shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and
upon conviction thereof shall be fined in a sum not less than $100, nor more
than $500, or imprisoned in the parish jail for a period of not less than 10
nor more than 90 days, or both fined and imprisoned it the discretion of the
court.
(
S ec. 9. Repeal.—This act shall not interfere with or repeal Act No. 54, 1906,
or acts amendatory thereof.
S ec. 10. Constitutionality.—If for any reason any section or part of this act
shall be held to be unconstitutional or invalid, then that part so held shall not
invalidate any other part of this act, but the same shall be enforced without
reference to the parts held to be invalid.
S ec. 11. [A ll law s or parts of law s in conflict herew ith are repealed.]

Approved July 12, 1928.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in Part I, under the headings: Mothers’ pensions,
Act No. 2 2 8 ; Examination, etc., of barbers, Act No. 247; Examination, etc., of
beauty parlors, Act No. 245; Examination, etc., of chauffeurs, Act No. 296;
Examination, etc., of employees on vessels, Act No. 198; Mechanics’ liens, Acts
Nos. 171, 172; Assignment of wages—Wage brokers, Act No. 92, Act No. 7 (Extra
Sess.) ; Legal holidays in the States and Territories, Act No. 49; Preference for
local labor and domestic materials on public works, Acts Nos. 30, 116; Industrial
police, Act No. 254; Convict labor, Acts Nos. 189, 293.]

MASSACHUSETTS
ACTS OF 1928
C hapter 244.—Insurance of employees— Group insurance

[This act amends sec. 133, ch. 175, G. L. (amended by sec. 133, ch. 141, Acts
of 1921), so as to read as follow s:]
S ection 133. Definition.— Group life insurance is hereby defined to be that
form of life insurance covering {a) not less than 50 employees, w ith or without
medical examination, written under a policy issued to the employer, the pre­
mium on which is to be paid by the employer or by the employer and employees
jointly, and insuring only all of his employees, or all of any class or classes
thereof determined by conditions pertaining to the employment, or by dura­
tion of service in which case no employee shall be excluded if he has been for




LABOR LEGISLATION OF 192 8

15

one year or more in the employ of the person taking out the policy, for amounts
of insurance based upon some plan precluding individual selection, and for the
benefit of persons other than the em ployer: Provided, That when the premium
is to be paid by the employer and employee jointly and the benefits of the policy
are offered to all eligible employees, not less than 75 per cent of such employees
may be so insured, or not less than 40 per cent if each employee belonging to
the insured group has been medically examined and found acceptable for
ordinary insurance by an individual policy; or (b) the members of any tradeunion or other association of wage workers described in section 29, w ith or
w ithout medical examination, written under a policy issued to such union or
association, the premium on which is to be paid by the union or association or
by the union or association and the members thereof jointly, and insuring only
all of the members thereof who are actively engaged in the same occupation,
for amounts of insurance based upon some plan which w ill preclude individual
selection, and for the benefit of persons other than the union or association or
any officers th ereof: Provided, That when the premium is to be paid by the
union or association and its members jointly and the benefits of the policy are
offered to all eligible members, not less than 75 per cent of such members
may be so in su red : And provided further, That any member or members in­
sured und^r the policy may apply for amounts of insurance additional to those
granted by said policy, in which case any percentage of the members may be
insured for additional amounts if they pass satisfactory medical examinations.
2. [Section 134 of ch. 175, G. L., is amended so as to read as follow s:]
The word “ employer,” as used in this section and in section 137, shall include
a trade-union or association of wage workers described in section 29, and the
word “ employee,” as used in this section and in section 135, shall include a
member of such a union or association.
Approved April 17, 1928.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in Part I, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of aviators, ch. 388; Examination, etc., of plumbers, ch. 76; Legal holidays in
the States and Territories, ch. 235; Old-age pensions, ch. 383; Retirement of
public employees, chs. 248, 251; Convict labor, ch. 387; Bakeries and prepara­
tion, distribution, etc., of food products, ch. 229.]

MISSISSIPPI
LAWS OF 1928
C hapter 292.—Interference w ith employment, intimidation, etc.

[T his act amends ch. 160, Acts of 1924, amendatory of sec. 1146, Code of 1906,
and sec. 874, Hem ingway’s Code, so as to read as follow s:]
S ection 1. Enticing laborers under contract. — If any person wT knows or
ho
has such information as would make a reasonable person believe that a laborer
or renter has contracted with another person for a specified time, and where
such laborer has actually made such contract, shall interfere with, entice away,
or employ before a breach of his contract such laborer or renter, or persuade
such laborer or renter to breach his contract, or leave his employer or leased
premises without the consent of the employer or landlord under or w ith whom
said laborer had first contracted, he shall upon conviction be fined not less
than $25 nor more than $100, and in addition shall be liable to the employer
or landlord for all advances made by him to said renter or laborer by virtue of
his contract with said renter or laborer and all damages which he may have
sustained by reason thereof. The provisions of this section shall apply to
minors under contract made by a parent or guardian.
Approved April 26, 1928.
ACTS OF 1928 (Extraordinary Session)
C hapter 52.— Removing property of laborer or tenant at night
S e c t i o n 1. Removal unlawful.—It shall be unlawful for any person, or per­
sons, firm, or corporation to go or send to or upon the premises or plantation of
^ny person, firm, or corporation, in this State in the night tim e or between




16

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 19 2 8

sunset and sunrise and move, or in any way assist in moving any laborer, tenant,
or other employee, or any of the effects or property of any such laborer, tenant,
or employee therefrom w ithout the written consent of the owner, manager, or
proprietor of said premises or plantation.
Sec. 2. E xception .— P rovided th at th e provisions o f th is act sh all not be con­
strued to apply to the discharge of a civil or m ilitary order by any duly
authorized officer o f the law.
S ec. 3. Penalty.—That any person found guilty of t i e violation of this act
shall be, upon conviction, punished by line of not less tiian $50 nor more than

$1,000 or imprisoned in the county jail for a term of not less than 10 days nor
more than six moths, or both, in the discretion of the court.
Approved October 2, 1928.
Digests, eto.
[Other legislation is noted in Part I, under the h ead in gs: Examination, etc.,
of aviators, ch. 208; Mechanics’ liens, chs. 136, 137; Convict labor, ch. 45.]

NEW JERSEY
ACTS OF 1928
C hapter 108.—Factory, etc., regulations—Registration

[This act amends the title of an act approved March 24, 1904 (Comp. Stat. of
1910, p. 3029, sec. 44). See Acts of 1925, ch. 117.]
Approved March 27, 1928.
C hapter 150.—Payment of wages, modes ancl times of

[This act amends sec. 1 of an act approved March 18, 1899 (Comp. Stat. of
1910, p. 3050), so as to read as follow s:]
S e c t i o n 1. Biw eekly pay da y.—Every person, firm, association, or partnership
doing business in this State, and every corporation organized under or acting
by virtue of or governed by the provisions of an act entitled “An act concerning
corporations” (revision of 1896), in this State, shall pay at least every two
weeks, in law ful money of the United States, to each and every employee engaged
in his, their, or its business, or to the duly authorize! representative of such
employee, the full amount of wages earned and unpaid in law ful money to such
employee, up to within 12 days of such paym ent: Provided, however, That if at
any time of payment any employee shall be absent from his or her regular place
of labor and shall not receive his or her wages through a duly authorized rep­
resentative, he or she shall be entitled to said payment at any time thereafter
upon dem and; any employer or employers as aforesaid who shall violate any
of the provisions of this section, shall, for the first offense, be liable to a penalty
of $50, and for the second and each subsequent offense, to a penalty of $100, to
be recovered by and in the name of the department of labor of this State.
Every district court, justice of the peace, and police m agistrate is hereby
empowered, upon filing of a complaint in writing by any person alleging that a
vio ation of this act has occurred, which complaint may be made upon informa­
tion and belief, to issue process at the suit of the Department of Labor of New
Jersey as p la in tiff; such process shall be either in the nature of a summons or
warrant, which warrant may issue without any order of the court first being
obtained against the person or persons so charged, which process, wT
hen in the
nature of a warrant, shall be returnable forthwith, and when in the nature of a
summons shall be returnable in not less than 5 nor more than 15 entire d a y s;
such process shall state what provision of the law is alleged to have been vio­
lated by the defendant or defendants, and on the return of such process or at
any time to which the trial shall be adjourned, the said court shall proceed in a
summary manner, without a jury, to hear testimony and to determine and give
judgment in the manner w ithout the filing of any pleadings for the plaintiff
for the recovery of such penalty w ith costs, or for the defendant, and the said
court shall, if judgment be rendered for the plaintiff, cause any such defendant,
who may refuse or neglect to forthwith pay the amount of the judgment ren­
dered against him and all the costs and charges incident thereto, to be com­
m itted to the county jail for any period not exceeding IQO days, th at the officers




LABOR LEGISLATION OE 1 92 8

17

to serve and execute all process under this act shall be the officers authorized
to serve and execute process in said co u rt; that said district court, justice of
the peace, or police m agistrate shall have power to adjourn the hearing or trial
in any case from time to time, but in such case, except in cases in which the
first process w as a summons, it shall be the duty of the judge of the district
court, justice of the peace, or police magistrate, to detain the defendant in safe
custody, unless he shall enter into bond to the said department of labor, with ‘at
least one sufficient surety in double the amount of the penalty claimed, condi­
tioned for his appearance on the day to which the hearing shall be adjourned,
and thence from day to day until the case is disposed of, and then to abide by the
judgment of the said court, and such bond, if forfeited, may be prosecuted by the
said board.
[The subsequent paragraphs contain the form of conviction and commitment ;
penalties for violations; the signing of process by the clerk of the district
co u rts; corrections in form made by the co u rt; exemption of e m p lo y e e s engaged
in agricultural work; enforcement of act by the department of labor; and
exemption of companies having a certain paid-up cash capital.]
Approved April 3, 1928.
C hapter

222.—Insurance of employees— Group insurance

[This act supplements an act approved April 3, 1902 (Comp. Stat. of 1910, p.
2836), by adding the following :]
S e c t i o n 1. Group insurance.—Any insurance company authorized to make in­
surance against bodily injury or death by accident and upon the health of per­
sons in this State may make such insurance on the group plan at special rates
for groups covering not less than 25 employees, written under a policy issued to
the employer, the premium for which is to be paid by the employer, by the
employees, or by the employees and employer jointly, such insurance to cover
all of his employees or all of any class or classes thereof, determined by condi­
tions pertaining to the employment, for amounts of insurance based on some
plan which w ill preclude individual selection, for the benefit of persons other
than the employer : Provided, however, That when the premium is to be paid
by the employer and employees jointly or by the employees and the benefits
are offered to eligible employees, not less than 75 per centum of such employees
may be so insured. For the purposes of this act the members of any labor
union, or of any association formed for some law ful purpose other than procur­
ing insurance under this act, who are actively engaged in the same occupation
shall be considered employees of such union or association.
Approved April 3, 1928.
C h a p te r

247.—Employment offices, private
(Page 451)

[This act merely repeals ch. 42, Acts of 1911, relating to the regulation of
employment agencies.]
Approved April 3, 1928.
C h a p te r

247.— Children, employment of— General provisions
(Pages 456-457)

[This act merely repeals law on p. 321, Laws of 1851 (Rev. 1877, p. 485) ;
ch. 30, p. 63, Acts of 1852 (Rev. 1877, p. 485) : ch. 189, p. 306, Acts of 1876
(Rev. 1877, p. 485) ; ch. 108, p. 157, Acts of 1889; and ch. 66, p. 102, Acts of
1903, relating to hours of labor and prevention of employment of minors in
factories.]
Approved April 3, 1928.
C h a p te r

247.— Women, employment of— General provisions
(Page 457)

[This act repeals ch. 159, p. 227? Acts of 1882, relating to the preservation of
health of fem ale employees.]
Approved April 3, 1928.




18

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 192 8
C hapter

276.—Employment of children— General provisions

[This act amends sec. 8, ch. 223, Acts of 1914. Completion of six yearly
grades is now necessary in order to receive age and school certificate, instead
of five as heretofore.]
rApproved April 3, 1928.
C hapter

283.—Employment offices, private

[This act amends ch. 227, Acts of 1918, under the headings, as follow s:]
1. Definitions.— [Definition of “ p rivileges” now provides that the
furnishing of food, supplies, tools, etc., to laborers, if performed or paid for
within the State in connection with the promise or offer to provide help or
employment regardless of where such offer is made or where such help is ob­
tained shall be considered proof of violation of the act.]
S e c . 3. License—P en alty.— [The penalty now includes imprisonment of not
more than one year, at the discretion of the court.]
S e c . 5. Fees.— [Schedule of fees must be posted in a conspicuous manner in
the office of the agency.] 1
S e c . 8. Acts forbidden—Penalty.— [The penalty now includes imprisonment for
not more than one year, at the discretion of the court.]
S e c . 10. Enforcement.— [The commissioner of labor shall cause bimonthly
visits to be made by inspectors designated by him. The commissioner of labor
may also withhold licenses if the needs of em ployeis and employees in a
municipality appear to the commissioner of labor to be served adequately by
the public free agencies or licensed private employment agencies.]
S e c . 11. Procedure.— [ S p e c i f i e s t h e p r o c e d u r e a n d f o r m s o f c o n v i c t i o n a n d
S e c t io n

c o m m itm e n t .]

Approved July 14, 1928.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in Part I, under the headings: Examination, etc.,
of aviators, ch. 63 ; Examination, etc., of employees on vessels, ch. 247 ; Mechan­
ics’ liens, chs. 58, 67, 247, 253, J. R. 10; Assignment of wages—wrage brokers, chs.
250, 251; Earnings of married women, ch. 241; Legal holidays in the States and
Territories, ch. 247; Vocational rehabilitation— State and Federal, cooperation,
ch. 34; Investigative commissions, J. R. No. 10.]

NEW YORK
ACTS OF 1928
C hapter

145.—Industrial commission—L r'bor law
i

[This act amends sec. 1275, Penal Law7, so as to read as follow s:]
1275. Violations.—Any person who violates or does not comply with
any provision of the labor law, any provision of the industrial code, any rule,
regulation, or law ful order of the department of labor, industrial commissioner,
or industrial board, and any person who knowingly makes a false statement
in or in relation to any application made for an employment certificate as to
any matter required by the labor lawT to appear in any affidavit, record, trans­
cript, or certificate therein provided for, is guilty of a misdemeanor and upon
conviction shall be punished, except as in this chapter otherwise provided, for
a first offense by a fine of not less than $20 nor more than $50; for a second
offense by a fine of not less than $50 nor more than $250, or by imprisonment
for not more than 30 days or by both such fine and im prisonm ent; for a third
offi nse by a fine of not less than $250', or by imprisonment for not more than
60 days, or by both such fine and imprisonment.
Approved February 25, 1928,
S e c t io n

1 The req u irem ent th a t th e com m issioner of labor approve schedules of fees has been
dropped. See the decision holding such requirem ent u n co n stitu tio n al. Ribnik v. M cBride,
48 Sup. Ct. 545, May 28, 1928.




LABOR LEGISLATION OF 192 8
Chapter

19

567.—Hours of labor— Women

[This act amends sec. 181, ch. 50, Acts of 1921 (ch. 31, Con. L.) as amended
by eh. 453, Acts of 1927, by exempting duly licensed pharmacists from the
operation of the act.]
Approved March 24, 1928.
646.— Employment of children — School attendance

C h apter

[This act amends several sections of the compulsory education law, art. 23,
ch. 21, Acts of 1909, as later amended, is hereby further amended by repealing
secs. 620 to 638 and substituting the following sections:
—620 to 643 inclusive:]
S e c s . 620, 621. Instruction required; definition. — [Provides a place of instruc­
tio n ; quality and language of instruction; course of study; defines employed
m in or; full-time day instruction required for each minor from 7 to 14 years of
age, and each minor from 14 to 16 years of age who is not em ployed; in each
city the board of education is empowered to require minors from 16 to 17 years
of age who are not employed to attend full-time day instruction.]
S e c s . 622-626. Attendance. — [Provides for minors on part-time instruction
and evening instruction ; proper m ental and physical condition required; amount
and character thereof; keeping of the records.]
S ec. 627. Definition, duties.— [Provides for the duties of persons in parental
relation ; of minors from 16 to 21 years of a g e ; of other p ersons; birth certifi­
c a te ; duties of poor law officials.]
S e c . 628. Delinquents. — [Authorizes the establishment of special day schools
and parental schools, and the commitment to private institutions of delinquents;
parole and suspension of delinquents.]
Sec. 629. Unlawful employment.— [A minor under 14 years of age; or a minor
from 14 to 17 years who does not present either an employment certificate or a
vacation work permit. Section is not applicable to employment of minors from
12 to 16 years of age in farm service or other outdoor wT
ork for their p aren ts;
an employment certificate shall not be required for a minor 16 years of age
and over engaged in farm work.]
S e c . 630. Duties of employers.— [D uties of employers outlined.]
S e c . 631. Certificates.— [General regulations relative to employment certifi­
cates, vacation work permits, street trades badges.]
S e c s . 632-636. Procedure, etc. — [Relates generally to the procedure of issuing
school records; pledge of employment shall be signed by the prospective em­
ployer ; evidence of age, including physical fitness and ability to read and write
English with comprehension.]
S e c s . 637-639. Issuance ami reissuance of permits.— [Regulations relative to
the issuance of vacation work and street trades p erm it; and also as to the
reissuance and revocation of the same.]
S e c s . 640-643. Appointments, powers, penalties.— [Includes provisions regu­
lating attendance officers, jurisdiction of the courts, enforcement and penalties
for violations of the school law.]
Approved March 27, 1928.
C hapter

697.—Employment of children—Dangei'ous occupations

[This act amends subd. 5, sec. 485, penal law (as amended 1916, ch. 278), by
providing that applicant must apply in writing to the Society for the Prevention
of Cruelty to Children for consent to engage in certain occupations. Said society
may request a hearing within 48 hours.]
Approved March 27, 1928.
C h apter

725.—Employment of children— General provisions

[This act amends the labor law, secs. 130, 131, 142, 144, and 145, ch. 50, Acts
of 1921 (ch. 31, Con. L .), (as amended by ch. 386, Acts of 1921) and adds twT
o
new sections—secs. 132 and 133.]
S ection 130. Age limit for children.— [A new paragraph 2 is added providing
that “ No child under 14 years of age shall be employed in connection with or
for any trade, business, or occupation carried on for pecuniary gain.”]
S e c . 131. Certificates.—1. No child between 14 and 17 years of age except as
provided in subdivision 2 of this section shall be employed in or in connection




20

LABOB LEGISLATION OP 19 2 8

with or for any factory, establishment, [or] trade, business, or occupation speci­
fied in section 130, unless either an employment certificate or a vacation work
permit issued in accordance with the provisions of the education law is kept on
file in the office of the employer at the child’s place of employment, authorizing
the employer named therein to employ said child. Bui; no child for whom a
vacation work permit has been issued shall be employed in or in connnection with
a factory or during such hours as school is in session. The employment of a
child for whom a vacation work permit has been issued shall be unlaw ful after
the opening of school in September following the date of its issuance until a
new vacation work permit shall have been issued for hin..
2. When attendance upon instruction is not required by the education law
the provisions of this section and of section 130 shall not apply to the employ­
ment of children between 12 and 10 years of age in work for their parents,
guardians, or custodians either at farm service or at ether outdoor work not
connected with or for any trade, business, or occupation specified in section
130 or to children under 16 years of age employed or engaged in occupations
regulated by section 485 of the penal law and not prohibited thereby.
3. An employment certificate shall not be required for a child 16 years of age
and over engaged in work on a farm.
S ec, 132. Duties of employers. — T he em ployer of any child required to h ave
an em ploym ent certificate or vacation .work p e r m it:

1. Shall before employment begins file in his office at the place of the child’s
employment such certificate or permit, so that it may be readily accessible to
any person authorized by law to examine such document.
2. Shall require the child presenting such certificate cr permit to again sign
his name on such document in space to be provided for such signature.
3. Shall upon the commencement of the child’s employment mail at once
to the certificating officer notice of such employment and upon the termination
of the child’s employment shall mail at once to said officer the employment
certificate or vacation work permit, together w ith the child’s physical exam ina­
tion record.
4. Shall discontinue the services of a child required by the education law
to attend upon part-time day instruction, upon receipt of written notice from the
school authorities of the failure of such child to attend as thus required.
5. May require from a child claiming to be over 17 years of age and who
does not present an employment certificate or vacation work permit duly
issued for him, a certificate of age issued by an employment certificating officer.
Such a certificate of age or an employment certificate or vacation work permit
previously issued for such child and on file in the place of his employment
shall be conclusive evidence that the child has reached the age certified to
therein.
S ec. 133. Employment of children 16 to 17 years of age under physical
disability.—No employer shall employ a child whose employment certificate
states that the occupation in which the child may engage is limited because of
his physical disability, for more than six months from the date of the issuance
of said employment certificate, nor in any other occupation than that to which
the employment of the child is limited by the terms of the employment
certificate.
S ec. 142. D u ty of commissioner. — [T h is section is am ended so a s to direct
th e com m issioner to tran sm it to the district su perintend en t of schools the
nam es o f children under 17 years o f age found ille g a lly em ployed.]
S ec . 144. Children apparently under 17 years of ag<?.— [P roof o f age m ay
be dem anded in case any em ployed child is apparently under 17.]
S ec . 145. Physical examinations.— [A medical inspector may require any child

between 14 and 17 years of age to have a physical exam ination if he believes
such child is physically unfit. If found unfit, the employment certificate must
be taken from the office of the employer and returned to the superintendent of
schools, who w ill recommend its cancellation.]
Approved March 28, 1928.
C h apter

726.—Inspection and regulation of factories

[This act amends secs. 263, 264, 265, 270 of ch. 50, Acts of 1921 (ch. 31,
Con. L .), subjecting certain enumerated fireproofing factory partition and
w all material to the approval of the department of labor, adding cinder or




LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1 92 8

21

concrete block or tile to the enumerated list of material, and giving detailed
requirements as to construction.]
Approved March 28, 1928.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in Part I, under the headings: Examination,
etc., of chauffeurs, ch. 867 ; Mechanics’ liens, chs. 13, 236; Assignment of wages—
wage brokers, ch. 365; Retirement of public employees, chs. 222, 294, 301, 326,
481, 534, 555, 556, 557, 571, and 713; Convict labor, chs. 146, 167, 805.]

PORTO RICO
ACTS OF 1928
A ct No. 16.—Factory, etc., regulations—First-aid provisions
[This act amends secs. 1 and 3, act No. 41, Acts of 1917, so as to read as
fo llo w s:]
S e c t i o n 1. Scope of law. — T hat every owner of a sugar factory, dock, factory,
workshop, electric or hyd rau lic plant, or building w here pow er-driven m achinery
is used, boxin g stadium , or race track, w hether insid e or outside of the urban
zone, w hose em ployees exceed 50 in number, is hereby obliged to provide a
dispensary sufficiently stocked w ith m edicines and an em ergency room for
cases of accident.
S ec. 3. Physician.— It sh a ll be th e duty of every owner of a sugar factory,
dock, factory, workshop, boxing stadium , electric or hydraulic plant w here
pow er-driven m achinery is used, or race track, w hether inside or outsid e of the
urban zone, w hose em ployees exceed 50 in number, to contract for the services
o f a ph ysician and a m inor surgeon ( practicante ) or nurse, duly authorized,
for such accidents as m ay occur: Provided, T h at said minor surgeon ( prac­
ticante ) or nu rse sh all be a t the factory, workshop, dock, etc., du rin g wT
ork
hours.

Approved April 19, 1928.
A ct No. 53.— Attachment of wages of public employees

[Section 84, p. 400, of this act, establishing a system of local self-government
for its municipalities, provided that no part of the salary of any municipal
officer or employee shall be subject to attachment.]
Approved April 28, 1928.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in Part I, under the h ead in gs: Examination, etc.,
of chauffeurs, act No. 66: Examination, etc., of employees on vessels, act No.
59; Retirement of public employees, act No. 33.]

RHODE ISLAND
ACTS OF 1928
Ch apter

1159.— Commissioner of labor

[This act amends sec. 5, ch. 87, G. L. (as amended by ch. 626, Acts of 1925),
by advancing the salary of the deputy commissioner from $2,800 per annum to
$3,000 per annum.]
Approved April 7, 1928.
C hapter

1197.—inspection of steam boilers

[This act amends secs. 1, 2, 8, and 12, ch. 94, G. L.]
1. Definitions.— [Inspector and deputy inspector o f boilers t o be
appointed by the governor; “ authorized inspector” means a boiler inspector
employed by an insurance company to whom a permit is issued under the pro­
visions o f this chapter.]
S e c t io n




LABOR LEGISLATION OE 192 8

22

S e c . 2. Inspector.— [Inspector may issue a permit tc act as an “ authorized
inspector ” to inspect steam boilers in tlie State. Such authorized inspector
must pass a written examination or be licensed. 1
S ec. 8. Fees.— [Fee for inspections are as follow s: $5 for each boiler of three
horsepower and o v er ; $2.50 for each boiler of less than three horsepower, in­
spected. No fee shall be paid by the State, fire district, city, or town. When
authorized inspector inspects boilers, if the boiler is in a safe condition, the
owner shall pay him $1 for such inspection. A u th o r e d inspector shall issue
certificate authorizing the operation of such boiler and prescribing lim it of pres­
sure at which such boiler may be used. An “ authorized in sp ector” after an
inspection of a boiler must make a report to the inspector.]
S e c . 12. Exceptions.— [Provides for cases in which boilers are insured and
inspected by insurance companies.]
Approved April 25, 1928.
C hapter

1222.— Employment of children

[This act amends sec. 1, clause 1, ch. 85, G. L. (as amended by ch. 482, Acts
of 1923, and by ch. 812, Acts of 1926), by forbidding the employment of chil­
dren under 16 between the hours of 7 o’clock in the afternoon, instead of 8 p. in.
as heretofore, and 6 o’clock in the forenoon of the following day in certain
employments. ]
Approved April 27, 1928.
C hapter

1223.—Employment of children in street trades

[This act amends sec. 1, ch. 143, G. L., by forbidding boys under the age of
12 and girls under the age of 16 from selling papers, etc., or acting as scavengers
or bootblacks in any city of over 40,000 inhabitants.]
Approved April 27, 1928.
C hapter

1231.—Employment of ivomen and children—Hours of labor

[This act amends ch. 85, G. L., and repeals secs. 22-25, ch. 91, G. L., by adding
the following sections :]
S e c t i o n 35. Hours per week and day. — No child under 16 years of age shall
be employed or permitted or suffered to work in any factory, manufacturing,
mechanical, business, or mercantile establishment within this State more than
48 hours in any one week, and in no case shall the hours of labor exceed 9
hours in any period of 24 consecutive hours.
No woman shall be employed or permitted or suffered to work in any factory,
manufacturing, mechanical, business, or mercantile establishment w ithin this
State more than 54 hours in any one week, and in no case shall the hours of
labor exceed 10 hours in any period of 24 consecutive hours. Every employer
shall post in one or more places in his establishment where it may be easily
seen and read by all women and children em ploye! by him, a printed or
typewritten notice stating the number of hours’ work required of such persons
on each day of the week, and the hours of commencing and stopping work and
the employment of any such person for a longer time in a period of 24 consecu­
tive hours than so stated, shall be deemed a violation of this sectio n : Provided,
That the provisions of this section shall not be construed to enlarge or impair
any restriction placed upon the employment of any child by the provisions of
chapter 76 of the General Laws.
S ec. 36. Violation.—Every person who w illfully employs or has in his employ
or under his charge any person in violation of the provisions of the section 35
of this chapter and every parent or guardian wT permits any child to be so
ho
employed shall be fined not exceeding $20 for each offense. The age and em­
ployment certificates required by section 1 of this chapter shall be prima facie
evidence of the age of a child upon the trial of any person other than the
parent or guardian for the violation of said section 31.
S ec. 37. Ten hours a day's labor. — E xcep t as otherw se provided by law , labor
perform ed in any m anu factu ring establishm ent, and all m ech anical labor, dur­
ing th e period of 10 hours in any one day, sh all be considered a legal d ay’s
work, un less otherw ise agreed by the parties to the contract for the same.
S e c . 38. Notice of discharge.— E v e r y p e r s o n w h o r e q u i r e s f r o m a n y p e r s o n i n
h i s e m p lo y , u n d e r p e n a lt y o f a f o r f e i t u r e o f a p a r t o f th e w a g e s e a r n e d b y h im ,




LABOR LEGISLATION OF 19 2 8

23

a notice of intention to leave such employ, shall be liable to the payment of a
like forfeiture if he discharges without similar notice such person in his
employ, except for incapacity or misconduct, unless in case of a general or
partial suspension of labor in his business.
Approved April 28, 1928.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in Part I, under the h ead in gs: Examination, etc.,
of beauty parlors, ch. 1211; Regulations governing laundries, ch. 1200.]
SO U TH CAROLINA
ACTS OF 1928
[The only labor legislation of the State enacted at the 1928 session is noted
in Part I, under the h ead in gs: Mechanics’ liens, No. GOO; Convict labor, No. 892.]

VIRGINIA
ACTS OF 1928
C h apter

19.—Bureau of Labor

[This act amends sec. 1798, Code of 1919, by changing the term of office of the
commissioner of labor from two to four years.]
Approved February 18, 1928.
Chapter

81.—Exemption of wages from garnishment

[This act amends and reenacts sec. 6555, Code of 1919, so as to read as
fo llo w s:]
S e c t i o n 6555. Wage exemptions.—In addition to the estate, not exceeding
in value $2,000, and the other property which every householder or head of a
fam ily residing in this Commonwealth shall be entitled to hold exempt, as pro­
vided in the preceding sections of this chapter, wages owing or to be owing to
a laboring man, who is a householder or head of a fam ily, to the extent of $50
per month shall also be exempt from distress, levy, garnishment, or other
process; and any assignment, sale, transfer, pledge, or mortgage thereof shall
be void and unenforceable by any process of law.
Approved March 2, 1928.
C h apter

91.—Breach of contract

[This act amends Code by adding thereto a new section numbered 4454-a and
repeals ch. 408, Acts of Assembly, 1924. Sec. 4454-a is as follow s:]
S e c t i o n 4454-a. Fraudulent contract.— If any person enters into a contract
of employment, oral or written, for the performance of personal service to be
rendered wT
ithin one year, in and about the cultivation of the soil, and, at any
time during the pendency of such contract, thereby obtains from the land
owner, or the person so engaged in the cultivation of the soil, advances of
money or other thing of value under such contract, with intent to injure or
defraud his employer, and fraudulently refuses or fa ils to perform such service
or to refund the said money or other thing of value so obtained, he shall be
guilty of a m isdem eanor: Provided, however, That prosecutions hereunder shall
be commenced within 60 days after the breach of such contract.
Approved March 5, 1928.
C hapter

471.—Employment of children—School attendance

S e c t i o n 683. Requirements.— [Attendance during school term i s required up
to the fifteenth birthday unless the child is physically or mentally unfitted for
school work; unless the prescribed elementary course has been completed and
the child is regularly and law fully employed, and unless children live more
than two miles by the nearest traveled road from a public school unless public




24

LABOR LEGISLATION OP 19 2 8

transportation is provided within one mile. However, the local board, under
certain conditions, may fix the maximum compulsory school age a t 16 years.]
Approved March 26, 1928.
Digests, etc.
[Other legislation is noted in Part I, under the headings: Vocational educa­
tion, ch. 471; Examination, etc., of aviators, ch. 463; Examination, etc., of
chauffeurs, chs. 38, 531; Examination, etc., of employees on vessels, ch. 239; Em­
igrant agents, ch. 45; Mechanics' liens, ch. 253; Assignment of wages—wage
brokers, chs. 152, 448; Cooperative associations, ch. 166; Absent voters, ch 397 ,*
Convict labor, chs. 150, 153, 154, 487, 511, 525, 526.]

WISCONSIN
ACTS OF 1928
[The only labor legislation enacted in the first and second special sessions of
1928 is noted in Part I, under the heading: Preference for local labor and
domestic m aterial on public works, J. R. No. 7.]

UNITED STATES
SEVENTIETH CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION, 1927-28
C hapter

15 (45 Stat. 54). — Employers' liability — National parks

That in the case of the death of any person by the neglect or wrongful act of
another within a national park or other place subject to the exclusive juris­
diction of the United States, within the exterior boundaries of any State, such
right of action shall exist as though the place were under the jurisdiction of
the State within whose exterior boundaries such place may be ; and in any action
brought to recover on account of injuries sustained in any such place the rights
of the parties shall be governed by the laws of the State within the exterior
boundaries of which it may be.
Approved February 1, 1928.




CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

No.

Accident insurance. (See
Insurance, accident.)
Accident, old age, etc., re­
lief, summary of laws as
to. (See Old age pen­
sions) _.
__
___
Accident prevention, in­
struction as to:
California
___
New Jersey
___
Ohio
(See also Safety mu­
seums.)
Accidents, provisions for:
.......
Alabama.
Alaska __
___
Arizona. _ __ ___
Arkansas...
___
California_________
Colorado___________
Connecticut________
Illinois..........................
___
Indiana _
Kansas____________
Kentucky_____ _____
Maryland
_____
Massachusetts ______
Michigan_____ ____
Missouri....... ...............
Montana___________
Nevada. _
__
New Hampshire___
New Jersey..................

116-118

13.14
6
13.14
8

93,94
217
1
717
845 ___ 1
135
148
159
178
203, 223
225
268
361 403
24
372
439
452, 455
499
519, 520
541, 545, 470 35, 36
557, 558
626
641
666
686
712,717,
718, 729
737
768
789
826
j
869
i
931
960, 961 486
21
1009, 1018
1061
1080
1100
1112
1152
1160

New Mexico......... ......
New York
___
North C aro lin a____
Ohio............
. ..
Oklahoma....................
Pennsylvania
__
Porto Rico...................
Tennessee...................
U ta h ...................... .
Virginia.......................
Washington. ...............
West Virginia..............
Wisconsin ._
W yom ing___ _____
Occidents, reports and in­
vestigation of:
Alabam a..................... 133,134,143
A laska..____ ______
148
Arizona...................... .
154
Arkansas___________
178
210, 216,
California....................
218, 219
Colorado....... ...............
225, 226
Connecticut________ 259, 262, 263
District of Columbia.
287




403
434
470
486

Bulletin
No.

Page

A
Abandonment of employ­
ment. (See Contracts of
employment.)
Abandonment of locomo­
tives, etc. (See Strikes
of railroad employees.)
Absent voters, summary
of laws as to__________

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Accidents, reports and in­
vestigation of—Con.
292
Florida............. .........
SI 9
Hawaii.......................
326, 327
Idaho.........................
347, 353, 360
Illinois................... .
372, 379,
Indiana___ _______
380, 384
413, 415,
Iowa______________
416, 419
430, 432
Kansas.......................
450, 451
Kentucky_________
470
Louisiana ...................
485
Maine........................
491
M aryland_________
531,533
Massachusetts______
550
Michigan__________
567, 568,
M innesota...............
571, 572
597
Mississippi________
M issouri.................... 615, 621, 625
633, 640,
Montana__________
642, 643
653, 657
Nebraska__________
666, 667
Nevada___________
687
New Hampshire____
702, 711,
New Jersey________
71 ,729, 734
738
New Mexico_______
New York____ ____
775, 780
North Carolina_____
790
North Dakota______
800
Ohio_________ ____ 815, 827, 830
863
Oklahoma___ ____...
878, 879
Oregon____________
918,924,
Pennsylvania______
931, 933
961
Porto Rico_________
974, 982
Rhode Island______
South Carolina_____
988
1005
South D akota.......... .
1016, 1017
Tennessee_________
U tah_____ ________ 1055,1061,
1062
Vermont....... ........... .
1066
Virginia..................... . 1080,1081
Washington.............. . 1097,1098
1110,1112
West Virginia______
1152
Wisconsin_________
Wyoming. ................. . 1159,1160,
1163
74
United States______
Advances made by em­
ployers. (See Employ­
ers’ advances, etc.)
Aeronauts. (See Avia­
tors.)
Age not ground for dis­
charge:
230
Colorado...................
Age of employment. (See
Children, etc.; Tele­
graph operators, etc.)
Aid societies. (See Bene­
fit ocieties.)
Air space required in
work rooms:
Arizona...................... .
Delaware................... .
Illinois....................... .
Indiana.......................
M aryland................. .

162
281
352
381
493

25

26

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Air space required in
work rooms—Con.
Michigan _ _______
Minnfisnta
......
New Jersey_________
New Y ork_________
Pennsylvania.... .........
Tennessee__________
Wisconsin__________

(See also Inspection and

regulation.)
Air tanks, inspection, etc.,
of:
Massachusetts
__

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin
No.

Page

540, 541
585, 586
701
767, 769
905,923
966
1020
1146

507

______
W y oming
United States __ __
(See also Coolie labor.)
Alien laborers, employ-

1158
1174

A lask a....... ................
Montana
Alien laborers, protection

144
633, 634

Connecticut............... .
Hawaii
_.

257
314
925
1062,1063
1161,1162

U tah____ _________
Wyoming
Aliens, duty of employers
as to taxes of. (See Lia­
bility of employers for
taxes.)
Aliens, etc., employment
of, on public works:
Arizona.................... .
California _ _______
Hawaii........ ............. .
Idaho
M assachusetts
N evada-.. ............ .
New Jersey
New York
______
Oregon___ _______
Pennsylvania_______
U tah______________
Wyoming, _ ....... ......
(See also Chinese, em­
ployment of; Public
works, preference of
resident laborers on.)
Anarchists, employment
of, forbidden:
New Mexico
Antitrust act:
Texas
Wisconsin
TTnifpH o lei loo _____
UIII It?L
A
Antitrust act, exclusions
from:
California
Colorado
Iowa
Louisiana
Michigan
Montana
New Hampshire
New Mexico
Virginia
Wisconsin
United States_______
Apprenticeship, summary
of laws as to
Arbitration and mediation:
Alabama___________
Alaska____ ________
Arizona______ _____
Arkansas___________
Colorado.....................




153,155,
165
210, 211
310
316,325
511
677, 678
699
761
875
933
1062
1156,1157

739
1034,1035
1147
1181,1182

403

58

403
470

3
2

403

60

196
226
423
461
553
649
692
741
1084
1147
1181,1182
3-7
141,142
146-148
169
248-253

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Arbitration a n d medi­
ation—Continued.
Connecticut...... ..........
267, 268
307
Georgia.... ...................
316-322
Idaho-.............. ...........
Illinois.___ ________ 330-332, 336
386-388
In d ian a........... ...........
417-419
Iowa_________ _____
K ansas......... _______ 424,425, 441
458-460
Louisiana__________
478-480
Maine
___ ______
489,490,
M aryland__________
497,498
M assachusetts..____
524-526
Michigan_____ _____
545-548
589
Minnesota_________
610-612
Missouri______ _____
634-636
Montana___________
651
Nebraska____ _____
662-664
N e v a d a ____ ______
687-689
New Hampshire. _ __
697
New Jersey________
New York____ _____
749
O hio-.......................... 819, 837, 838
856, 857,
Oklahoma__________
859, 860
900-902
Oregon.......... ...............
915, 941, 942
950
Philippine Islands___
962-965 403
45
Porto Rico___ ______
470
53
996-999
South Carolina______
1008
South Dakota_______
Texas....... ............ ...... 1023-1025,
1044,1045
U tah........................... 1047,1051,
1056,1057
Vermont_________ . 1071,1072
W ashington_______
1095,1096,
1108
1120
West Virginia..... ........
1127,1144,
Wisconsin___ ______
1145
1157
Wvoming ________
United States_____ _ 1187-1191 434 20-28
(See also Court of 1ndustrial Relations.)
Armed guards, hiring,
summary of laws as to.
(See Industrial Pjlice.)
Assignment of wage3
:
175
Arkansas_
___
183
California...................
263
Connecticut...______
279
Delaware____ ______
301
Georgia____________
359
Illinois................. ........
374,410
In d ia n a ............... ......
419
Io w a ___^__________
486
13
L ouisiana...................
486
Maine
______
Maryland.... ................
496
521
Massachusetts............
604
Missouri___________
684
New Hampshire____
706, 707
New Jersey...............
New York...................
759
North Carolina_____
470
49
937
Pennsylvania_______
1012
Tennessee.-............. .
Vermont...................... 1066,1070
1091
Washington____ ____
1152
Wisconsin.. ________
Wyoming.................... 1158,1159
1161
(See also Payment of
wages; Wage brokers.)
Assignments of cla ms to
avoid exemption laws.
(S e e E x e m p tio n of
wages j.
I

27

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

No.

Page
Associations, cooperative,
list of laws relating to___

Attachment of wages:
Connecticut.................
Missouri................... .
Pennsylvania_______
Porto Rico. ________
Attorneys’ fees in suits for
wages. (See Suits for
wages).
Automobile mechanics, ex­
amination, etc., of, sum­
mary of laws as to_........
Aviation, commercial:
United States. _____
Aviators, examination, etc.,
of, summary of laws as to.

B

Bulletin
No. 370

96-98

268
604
913

Page

403
434
470
486

12
6
11,12
8

486

21

34
434

20

33 403
434
470
486

4
3
3
3

778, 779

ganizations. (See Labor
organizations, etc.)
Bakeries, summary of laws
as to________________

87-89

Basements. (See Cellars,
etc.)
Beauty parlor operators,
examination, etc., of,
summary of laws as to ...
Benefit societies:
California __________
Massachusetts______
Michigan__________
New York...... .............
North Carolina_____
O hio..................... ......
Philippine Islands___
South Carolina______
Benefit societies, forced
contributions for. (See
forced contributions.)
Blacklisting.
Alabama______ _____
Arizona.. .
Arkansas..
California.... ..............
C olorado.____ _
Connecticut___ ___ _
Florida__ __
Illinois______ _
Indiana.
Iowa_________ __ .
Kansas ______
Minnesota. _
Missouri. _
Montana
Nevada____________
New Mexico _
North Carolina
North Dakota.............




No. Page

866
875
1033,1034
1047,1060
1077
1091
1154

references.)

Badges, employees:
New Y o rk _________

Barber shops, summary of
laws a? to__
Barbers, examination,etc.,
of, summary of laws as
t o __________________

Blacklisting—Continued.
Oklahoma...... ...........
Oregon_____________
Texas_____ ________
Utah........................... .
Virginia. ................... .
Washington... .........
Wisconsin. . _______
(See also Discharge,
statement of cause of
Interference with em­
ployment, and cross

Bulletin

Page

Bulletin

403
470
486

10
9
6

29-32 403
470
486

4
4
3

34, 35 403
434
470
486

5
3
4,5
4

470

28

403

39

32

532, 534
555, 556
745
847, 848
946
S87, 994

135,136
153,163
175
190
227
269, 270
292
338
375
422
430
569, 575
604, 605
639, 649
669
736 I 403
787, 788 1
794

36, 37

Boarding or commissary
cars, taxation of:
Mississippi_________
Boilers, creating an unsafe
amount of steam in.
(See Negligence of em­
ployees.)
Boilers, entering under
pressure:
Oklahoma. ..... .........
Boilers, steam, inspection
of. (See Inspection, etc.)
Bonds, contractors’, list of
laws relating to_______
Bonds of employees:
Arizona____________
Arkansas___ _______
California____ _____
Florida. __________
Georgia.......... ............
Idaho_____________
Louisiana....................
Mississippi_____ ____
M isso u ri...... ........ .....
New Mexico________
Oklahoma__________
Virginia__________ West Virginia............
Bonuses. (See Efficiency
tests and bonuses.)
Boycotting:
Alabama. ________
Colorado. _________
Connecticut__ ____
Illinois .............. ........
Indiana.___________
Kansas. ..................
Texas_____________
United States___ _ _
(See also Interference
with employment, and

603

867, 868
59-61
153,154
174
213 470
291
307, 308
327
472
600
624
737
857
1081
1119

24

135,136
227
269
338
369, 370
443
1034,1035
1172,1173

cross references.)

Brakemen, sufficient num­
ber of, list of laws as to ...
83, 84
Brakes on railroad trains.
(See Railroads, safety
provisions, etc.)
Bribery, etc., of em­
ployees:
California....................
210
Connecticut-............... 256, 270, 271 470
289
Florida.........................
422, 423
Iowa______________
475, 476
Louisiana................. .
486, 487
Maine. ................... .
Maryland______ ____
502
Massachusetts__ ____
535
Michigan.....................
554, 555
660, 661
Nebraska______ ____
Nevada.......................
670, 671
698, 726
New Jersey_________
New York_________
775, 776
;
North Carolina...........
787
l
982, 983
Rhode Isla n d .............
989, 990
South Carolina______
Virginia____________ 1081,1082
1089
Washington________
1155
Wisconsin....................

30

28

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Bulletin
No. 370

No.

Page

Bribery of representatives
of labor organizations:
Nevada____________
671
710
New Jersey_________
New York__________
775
Virginia____________
1089
Bridges over r a i l r o a d
tracks. (See Railroad
tracks, etc.)
Builders’ tools, acceptance
of, as pledges:
California ..................
403
18
Buildings, protection of
employees on. (See Pro­
tection of employees,
etc.)
Bureau of labor:
Alaska. ________
149
Arkansas_________ . 167-169,179
California____ _____
181,182, 403
18
192-194, 470 25-27,
202, ‘III
28
231, 232
256, 257
273, 274
305-307
310,311
316, 317
333-338
383, 384
413-415
434-437
448, 449,
455-457
Louisiana.....................
465
M a in e ____.
480-482. 4S6
Maryland
496-499,
502, 503
504, 505,
Massachusetts........
507-510,
524
Michigan__________
536, 537,
558, 559
560-563, 589
Minnesota
608, 609
Missouri
627, 628,
Montana______
641, 642
Nebraska_______ __
653, 654
Nevada.____ ______
680, 681
New Hampshire____ 685, 687, 688
New Jersey. .
699,
724-726
New York...... .............
746-753

C olorado.________ .
Connecticut ______
Delaware__________
Georgia____________
Hawaii____________
Idaho_____________
Illinois_____________
Indiana.............. ..........
Iowa_____________ _
K ansas____________
Kentucky__________

North Carolina_____
791, 793
North D akota...
794, 795, 803
Ohio_________ _
813-815,
824, 839
Oklahoma__________ 856, 859, 869
880, 881,
Oregon
890-897
Pennsylvania _
914, 915,
937-943
Philippine Islands___
949-951
Porto Rico
953,964,
966-968
Rhode Island_______
975, 976

403

470

34

403

30

403
470

31
40-42

403

32, 33

470

43

434
470

14,15
44-47

470

51

403

44-46

403
486

48
21

South Carolina______ 984-986, 992
South Dakota_______
1004
Tennessee______ ____ 1021,1022
Texas ______
1026-1028, 434
1036
Vermont________ _
1067-1068
Virginia ___ _
1074-1076, 486
1081
W ashington.......... ..... 1089,1090,
1106-1108




21

2
23

Bulletin

Page

Bulletin

No. Page

Bureau of labor—Con.
West Virginia_______ 1109,1110
Wyoming _ ______ 1164-1166
_
United States
1169-1172 470
(See also Commission,
industrial, etc.)
Bureau of mines:
Alaska______ ______
470
163
Arizona ______
225
Colorado. _ ____
Illinois______ ____ _ 333, 336, 337
391-394
In d ian a..___ _______
Kentucky.
455
471
Louisiana___ ___ _
622
Missouri. . . . .
New Mexico.... ...........
470
Oklahoma _ __
868
939, 940
Pennsylvania.. ...........
Tennessee.. . . . . . . _ _ 1021,1022
1080
Virginia_____ ______
1110
West Virginia ___
W yom ing___ ____ _
1166
1169
United States _______
(See also Mine egulations.)

59

18

44

C
Caissons, etc., wcrk in.
(See Compressed air,
work in.)
Camps, labor. (See Labor
camps.)
Candidates for office, pro­
tection of employees as.
(See Protection, etc.)
Cannery inspector:
Delaware__________
Minnesota_________
Cause of discharge (See
Discharge, statement of
cause of.)
Cellars and basements,
use of:
California___ ______
Michigan....................
Minnesota......... .........
New York_____ ____
Oklahoma
_ ______
Wisconsin.. _______
Chauffeurs, examination,
etc., of, summary of
laws as to .____ ______

Chauffeurs, proteclion of:
Illinois_____________
Child labor amendment
Child labor commission:
______
Delaware _
Child welfare depai tment:
Alabama....................
Montana
___
North Caroline______
South Dakota___ ___
Childbearing womon, em­
ployment of. (See W o­
men, childbearing )
Children and womon, em­
ployment ol, in nines:
Alabama___________
Alaska ____________
Ari::ona ___________
Arkansas............. ........
Colorado___________
Delaware__________
District of Columbia

279-281
470

37

403
434
470
486

6
3,4
5
4

434
470

7
17

486

10,11

191,192
542, 543
567, 582
769
869
1146
23-26

358

273, 274
133
627, 628
788
1007

135
149
155
178
124, 225
276

29

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

NOi Page

Children, employment of,
general provisions for—
Continued.
Indiana_____ _____ 378,379,391
Iowa............ ...............
416, 419
Kansas........................ 434,437-439
Kentucky.......... .........
448-450
Louisiana......... .......... 469-471,476
477,482,
Maine_____ _____
487, 488
491, 496,500
Maryland____
Massachusetts.
505,510,
514-516
M ichigan.........
537,538.
548,549
560,564,590
Minnesota...........
594, 602
Mississippi..........
605, 625,626
Missouri_______
627, 628,639
Montana.............
651, 653,655
Nebraska. ...........
665, 672, 677
Nevada________
690, 695,696
New Hampshire.
699, 710,
New Jersey____
722, 723,
733
New Mexico.
735, 740,742
743, 744,
New York__
753,
756-758
North Carolina.
786, 788
794,800,
North Dakota...
806, 808,
811, 812
842,843,
Ohio.
846,
853-855
857, 861
Oklahoma.......
Oregon______
884,887,902
Pennsylvania.
906,913,
914,917
951,952
Philippine Islands _
953,965,
Porto Rico....... ......

316
360
407
499
627
735
753
788,790
804
827
857
922
951
1047,1059
1080
1101
1120

1133
1156,1157

300
65

Children, employed, seats
for. (See Seats for em­
ployed children.)
Children, employment of,
age limit for. (See Chil­
dren, employment of,
general provisions for.)
Children, employment of,
as messengers.
(See
Children, employment
of, in street trades.)
Children, employment of,
fraud in:
North Carolina_____
787
Children, employment of,
general provisions for: i
Alabama...................... 133,136,137
Arizona........................ 154-156,164
Arkansas......................
171,179
California................
195, 221
Colorado...................... 233,254,255
Connecticut.................
256, 261,
264, 265,
267,269,
271,272
Delaware__________ 276,277,283
District of Columbia.
284, 286

Bulletin

Page

Page

Page
Children and women, em­
ployment of, in mines—
Continued.
Idaho.................. ........
Illinois.................... .
Indiana.......................
M aryland....................
M ontana.....................
New Mexico........ ......
New York_________
North Carolina...........
North Dakota______
Ohio............ ................
Oklahoma................ .
Pennsylvania..............
Philippine Islands___
Utah______________
Virginia.......................
Washington________
West Virginia..-.........
Wisconsin__________
Wyoming__________
See also Children, em­
ployment of, in danger­
ous occupations.)
Children and women, em­
ployment of. (See Earn­
ings of married women;
Earnings of minors;
Minimum wages; Wo
men, wages of.)
Children, corporal punish­
ment of, by employers,
etc.:
Georgia____________
Children, earnings of, list
of laws as to....................
Children, employed, cer­
tificates, registers, etc.
(See Children, employ­
ment of, general provi­
sions for.)
C h i l d r e n , e m p lo y e d ,
schools for, summary of
laws as to____________

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

3,4

Rhode Island.

2

South Carolina..
South Dakota..
Tennessee____
Texas.
Utah..
Vermont..........
Virginia_____
Washington__
West Virginia..
Wisconsin____
Wyoming. ................. .

(See also Children and

972,973,
975,
977-979
991, 994,
998, 999
1006,1007
1010,1014,
1015
1039-1041
1047,1048,
1059,1061
1068,1069
1084,1085
1089,1091
1119,1120
1122,

1131-1141
1163

women, etc.)
Children, employment of,
in dangerous,mendicant,
17
etc., occupations:2
20,"21
Alabama. .....................
136
Arizona...................... .
155
Arkansas..... ................
171
California. ............ ......
188, 221
Colorado______ _____
233
21
Connecticut________ 261, 267, 269
Delaware__________ 274, 276, 277
10,11
Florida..
290,291,
District of Columbia. _
284
295, 296
Florida.................... .
290, 294
Georgia.
300, 305, 308 403
Georgia......... ............. .
305
Hawaii..
310, 313,315
Idaho...........................
317
Idaho.
317, 329
Illinois.........................
338, 341
Illinois..
341, 361
Indiana........ ..............,
365, 391
1Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in full, see Wisconsin.
1 Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in full, see Delaware-and Wisconsin.

32857°— 29— 3



434
470

10,11

33,34

403
403
470
470

29
35, 36
37,38

470
403

43
34
17,18

403
403
486

37
38
19,20

403

52
403
403
434
486

48
16,17
22,23

403

48, 49

403

50, 51

486 ’23,24
470
403

57
53, 54

10,11

30

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Chidren, employment of,
in dangerous,mendicant,
etc., occupations—Con.
Iowa______________
Kansas.......... ..............
Kentucky..... ........... .
Louisiana____ _____
Maine. ___ ______
Maryland__________
Massachusetts______
Michigan.....................
Minnesota...................
Missouri___________
Montana.....................
Nebraska......... ...........
Nevada____________
New Hampshire____
New Jersey________
New York...... ..........
North Dakota______
Ohio__________ ___
Oklahoma__________
Oregon..... ................ .
Pennsylvania_______
Philippine Islands___
Porto Rico____ ____
Rhode Island_______
South Dakota.......... .
Tennessee— ......... ......
Texas........................
Utah____________
Vermont......................
Virginia..... ................ .
Washington________
West Virginia.............
Wisconsin__________

Bulletin

Page

416
431, 438
494, 450
469, 471
486
495, 500
515, 516
538, 550
564, 565, 575
605, 626
639, 649
655
665, 672
685 403
198, 699, 710
'53, 754, 776
812
853-855
857, 861
887
913
952
968
973, 974, 979
1006
1014
1041
1047
1068
1085
1087,1088
1119,1120
1132,1133,
1155
Wyoming__________ 1157,1163
Children, employment of,
in street trades:1
Alabama___________
136
156
Arizona______ ______
221
California__________
Connecticut________
261
277
Delaware__________
284 486 10,11
District of Columbia. _
Florida____________
290
Georgia____________
305
Iowa______________
416
Kentucky__________
450
491, 500
Maryland__________
Massachusetts______
505, 515
Minnesota_________
564, 590
New Hampshire____
696
New Jersey________
713
New York_________
743, 744, 486
19
753, 776
788
North Carolina.
861
Oklahoma_____
913
Pennsylvania. __
968
Porto Rico____
Rhode Island__
975, 979 486
22
South Carolina..
994
Utah_________
1048
Virginia_______
1085
Wisconsin_____
1132,1133,
1138-1140
Children, hiring out, to
support parents in idle­
ness:
Alabama___________
139
Georgia................... .
304
Louisiana. _ ________
464
Mississippi. _______
598
North Carolina .........
787
Texas............................
1033
Virginia.. ...................
1080
1Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in




Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

No. Page
Children, hours of labor of.
(See Children, employ­
ment of, general pro­
visions for; Hours of
labor in general em ployments.)
Children, medical, etc.,
c e rtific a te s for. (See
Children, employment
of, general prov sions
for.)
Children, night wore by.
(See Children, employ­
ment of, general pro­
visions for.)
Children of widow,5, de­
pendent parents, ei c.:
Arizona______ _____
Arkansas___________
California....................
Colorado___________
Delaware_____ _____
District of Colur ibia_ _
Florida____________
Georgia____________
Idaho________ _____
Louisiana__________
Michigan_____ _____
Minnesota_________
M ontana_____ _____
Nebraska____ _____
Nevada______ ______
New Jersey.................
New Mexico_______
Ohio______________
South Carolina______
South Dakota_______
Texas______________
Washington________
(See also Mothers pen­
sions.)
Children, seats for. (See
Seats for employed chil­
dren.)
Children, vocational train­
ing for. (See Children,
employed, schools for.)
Children, wages of. (See
Earnings of mino's.)
Children. (See Children
and women.)
Children’s Bureau:
United States_______
Chinese, employment of:
California___ ____
Montana___________
Nevada....... ................
Oregon____________
United States_______
Chinese exclusion, registra­
tion, etc.:
Philippine Islands___
United States_______
Chinese labor, prod acts of,
not to be bought by State
officials:
California___ ______
Cigar factories, regulation
of:
Maryland__________
Wisconsin_________
Citizens to be employed.
(See Aliens, employment
of.)
C l e a r a n c e cards. (See
Service letters.)
full, see Wisconsin.

154
179
195
254
277
284
296
308
329
476
549
590
628
653
665
723
740
846
998
1006
1039,1041
1091

1171
181,196
628
875
1174,1175
944
1174

182
492
1146

I
I
i
!

; 403
!'

50

31

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

No.

em ployees.)

Colorado...............
Idaho................. ..........
Illinois____________
Indiana.................
Kansas.......... ...........
Maryland____ ______
Minnesota_________
Montana___________
Nebraska_________
New York...................
Ohio. ....... ..................
Oregon. ___ _____
Pennsylvania_______
South D ak o ta............
Texas............ ...............
Utah.......... ..................
Washington____ ____
Wisconsin__________
Commissioner of Labor.
(See Bureau of labor.)




Bulletin

Page

Page

Coal mined within State,
use of, in public build­
ings. (See Public sup­
plies.)
Coal mines. (See Mines.)
Coercion of employees in
trading, etc.:
Alaska. ......................
145
California___ ____
214
Colorado......... .............
234, 235
Florida........ ............. __
294
Idaho______________
324
Indiana........................
375
Io w a _______ _____
419
Kentucky..................
453
Louisiana. .................
474
Massachusetts______
511
Michigan.. ..............
552
M ontana... ............
649
Nevada_____ ____
671, 678, 679
New Jersey.. ............
706
New M e x ic o .._____
737
Ohio. _____________
851, 852
Oregon_____ ______
875
Q
4Q
Philippine Islands___
Porto Rico_________
956, 961
Tennessee__________
1017
Texas.. ............ .
1033,1034
U tah.. _________
1063
Washington_______
1096
West Virginia............
1116,1117
(See a l s o Company
stores.)
Coercion. (See Intimida­
tion; Protection of em­
ployees, etc.)
Collection of statistics.
(See Bureau of labor.)
Collective bargaining:
Kansas__ _________
443
Wisconsin________
1147
Color blindness of railroad
employees. (See Exami­
nation, etc., of railroad
Combination, right of.
(See Conspiracy, labor
agreements not; Protec­
tion of employees as
members of labor organ­
izations.)
Commission, industrial,
etc.:
Arizona.................... .
California................

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

No. Page

Commissions, investigative__ ________ ____
Company doctors. (See
Physicians,
employ­
ment of.)
Company stores:
California. .............. .
Colorado....... ...............
Connecticut___ _____
Indiana. __________
Louisiana__________
M a ry la n d ......... ........
New Jersey_________
New Mexico________
New York__ _______
Ohio________ _____
P en n sy lv a n ia ..____
Philippine Islands___
Virginia____________
West Virginia_______
(See also Coercion of em­
ployees in trading;
Payment of wages in
scrip.)
Compressed-air tanks:
Massachusetts______
Compressed air, work in:
New Jersey. ..............
New York
Pennsylvania_______
Conciliation. (See Arbi­
tration.)
Conspiracy against work­
men:
Alabama_____ _____
Florida________ ____
Georgia____________
Hawaii___ _________
Kansas____________
Minnesota_________
Mississippi... ............
Nevada. __________
N ew York .............. .
North Dakota______
Texas
. __ ______
Washington________
(See also Interference
with employment, and

403 14,15,
470 16,17
9
486

214
234, 235
266, 267
374, 375
474
490
706
737, 739
761
851, 852
909, 910
949
1078
1116

507
717-719
772-774
906-909

403

38

403

36

135
295
303
313
425,426
* 574
594, 595
668
776
799
1043
1087

cross references.)

403 59-63
181,182, 470 20-22,
205-208,
25-27
214-219
241-253
328
333-338
384, 385, 390
440-447
502, 503
587-589
630-633
651
747-753 470 44-47
486
18
813-824
881-885
921,922,
942, 943
1004
1044,1045
1049-1056
1098
1124-1130

Conspiracy, labor agree­
ments not:
California ................. .
Colorado___________
Iowa______ _____ _
Maryland....................
Minnesota_________
Nevada. _ . . _____
New H am pshire____
New Jersey__
New York...................
North Dakota.............
Oklahoma ...
___
Pennsylvania.............
Porto Rico_________
Texas_____________
U tah______________
West V irginia._
_
Conspiracy. (See also In­
terference; Intim ida­
tion.)
Contempt, regulation of:
New Jersey________
C ontinuation schools.
(See C h ild re n em­
ployed, schools for.)
Contract labor, alien. (See
Alien contract labor.)

190,191
226
423
491
574
671
692
708
776, 777
799
865
935
955
1028
1057
1111,1112

32

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Contract work on public
buildings and works:

No.

182

Coolie labor:
California__________
United States-______
Cooperative associaticns,
summary of laws as to_ _

Bulletin

Page

Page

Contractors’ bonds for the
protection of wages,
summary of laws re­
8,9
quiring
........ .....
59-61 403
Contractors’ debts, liabili­
ty of stockholders for,
62
list of laws determining.
Contractors, general li­
censing, etc., summary
6
of laws as to__________
403
Contractors, right of, to
give bonds:
Louisiana...
434 11,12
Contracts of employees
waiving right to dam­
ages:
141
Alabama____ ______
153
Arizona......... ............
176
Arkansas___________
184
California...................
224
Colorado_____ ______
294
Florida................ ........
298, 299
Georgia____________
Indiana____________ 372, 377, 378
411,412
Io w a.......................... .
433
Kansas___ _________
485
Maine____ ________
524
Massachusetts.............
544
Michigan_____ _____
578
M innesota-................
597
Mississippi.......... ........
606, 607
Missouri......................
627, 644,
Montana__________
645, 650
652
Nebraska.............. ......
667
Nevada - ________
735
New Mexico________
New York____: _____
781
786
North Carolina_____
796
North Dakota____
847,848
O h io ...................... .
857
Oklahoma.____ _____
876, 877
Oregon_ ________
_
947
Philippine Islands___
984
South Carolina... _ _
Texas_____________ 1028, 1030,
1031
1082
Virginia— _________
1151
Wisconsin__________
W yom ing................... 1156, 1158,
1163
1178
United States_______
(See also Liability of em­
ployers for injuries to
employees.)
Contracts of employment,
regulation, etc., of. (See
Employment of labor.)
Contracts of employment,
violation of, endanger­
ing life:
668
Nevada______
1088
Washington
Contracts of employment
with intent to defraud.
(See Employers’ ad­
vances, repayment of.)
Convict labor, summary
118-129 403
14
of laws as to..
434
6,7
470 14-16
486
8,9
Convict labor, employ­
ment of, in mines:
268
Oklahoma..................




Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

No. Page

181
1174
96-98

403
434
470
486

Core rooms, employment
of women in:
514
Massachusetts______
581
Minnesota_________
New York______
754
Corn huskers, etc., guards
on:
Michigan__________
554
567
Minnesota
Wisconsin______ _ __ 1148,1149,
1153
Corporal punishment of
minor employees:
Georgia .
. ______
300
Corporations, liability of
stockholders in, for wage
debts, list of laws de­
termining
62 470
Corporations, pension >for
employees of:
Pennsylvania
909
Corporations, profit shar­
ing by. (See Profit shar­
ing.)
Corporations, restriction
of powers of:
P ennsylvania_____
909, 910
Costs in suits for w&ges.
(See Suits for wages )
Cotton bales, bands, ties,
etc., of:
T e x a s___ _____ ___ 1025,1026
Couplers, safety.
(See
Railroads, safety provi­
sions for.)
Court of industrial rela­
tions:
Kansas
440-447
Credit unions, sum nary
of laws as t o _________
98,99 403
470
Criminal s y n d ic a lis m ,
summary of laws as to__
107-109 434
(See also Anarchists.)
D

Damages, waiver of -ight
to. (See Contracls of
employees waiving right
to damages.)
Dangerous, injurious, etc.,
employments:
Arizona_______ _____
Colorado__•___.........
Illinois___ ________
Missouri......... ........... .
New York...................
Ohio _____________
Pennsylvania. ............
Wisconsin...................
Days of rest for railroad
employees:
Maryland
____ _
Massachusetts______
(See also Weekly day of
rest.)
Deaf, division for, in bu­
reau of labor:
Minnesota
______
North Carolina_____

154-158
228,229
355
618
750, 760
843-845
926-928
1132
491
533

563
793

12
6
11,12
8

8

12
12
6

33

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin
No. 370

Page
Death. (See Injuries caus­
ing death; Negligence,
etc.)
Deception in employment
of labor. (See Employ­
ment of labor, deception
in.)
D e p a r tm e n t of labor.
(See Bureau of labor.)
D e p a rtm e n t of mines.
(See Bureau of Mines.)
Detectives, private:
Wisconsin__________
Discharge, etc , of em­
ployees of public-service
corporations:
Massachusetts______
Discharge, notice of inten­
tion to. (See Employ­
ment, termination of,
notice of.)
Discharge of employees on
account of age:
Colorado___________
Discharge, statement of
cause of; hearings:
California______ ____
Florida____________
Indiana____________
Michigan__________
Missouri....... ............._
M ontana..................
Nebraska.... ................
Nevada____ _______
Ohio_______ _____
Oklahoma_____ ____
Oregon____________
Wisconsin__________
(See also Blacklisting;
Employment of labor;
Service letters.)
Discharged em p lo y ees,
payment of wages due.
(See Payment of wages
due, etc.)
Discounting of wages. (See
Wages, deductions, dis­
counts, etc., from.)
Diseases, o c c u p a tio n a l.
(See Occupational dis­
eases.)
Docks, safety appliances
at:
New Jersey________
Domestic products, prefer­
ence of, for public use.
(See Public supplies.)
Drinking water. (See Wa­
ter for drinking, etc.)
Drug clerks, hours of labor
of. (See Hours of labor
of drug clerks.)
Dust, fumes, etc., provi­
sions for. (See Factories
and workrooms.)

Earnings of married wom­
en, summary of laws as
to. (See Women, mar­
ried, earnings of.)
Earnings of minors, sum­
mary of laws as to. (See
Minors, earnings of.)
Eating in w o rk ro o m s.
(See Food, taking, into
certain workrooms.)
Educational, in d u stria l,
summary of laws as to...




403

535

230
209
292,293
375,376
555
623
639
654, 655
673
852,853
S65, 866
876
1154

7-15

Page

Page

54,55

Efficiency tests and bo­
nuses:
United States______
E ig h t-h o u r d ay . (See
Hours of labor, misceL
laneous headings.)
(See also Hours of labor
on public works.)
Electric installations, sub­
ways, etc., construction
and m ain ten an ce of,
summary of laws as to_.
Electricians, examinations,
etc., of, summary of laws
as to________________
Elevator operators, exami­
nation, etc., of, summary
of laws as to__________
Elevators, inspection and
regulation of:
California___ _____
Connecticut...............
Illinois_______ _____
Indiana......... ..............
Iowa_________ ____
Kansas________ ____
Massachusetts______
Minnesota_________
Nebraska.
New Jersey.
New York...... ........... .
Oklahoma..................
Pennsylvania_______
Rhode Island_______
Texas_____________
Washington________
West Virginia______
Wyoming__________
(See also Inspection of
factories, etc.)
Emigrant agents, sum­
mary of laws as to_____
(See also Employment
offices.)
Emigration of laborers:
Porto Rico_________
Employees’ bonds. (See
Bonds of employees.)
Employees, bribery, etc.,
of. (See Bribery of em­
ployees.)
Employees’ deposits, in­
terest to be paid on:
Louisiana....................
Maine..........................
Employees’ funds:
Washington.................
Employees’ representa­
tion:
Massachusetts______
New Jersey.......... ......
Employers’ advances, in­
terest on:
Louisiana. .................
Employers’ advances, re­
payment of:
Alabama......................
Arkansas..... ................
Florida........................
Georgia.......................
Michigan__________
M innesota..............
Mississippi..................
New Hampshire.........
New Mexico................

Bulletin
No. Page

1192 403

58

470

OQ
l
258, 259
351
379
423 403
428
519
565, 566,
584, 585
657
710, 711,
716, 726
763
862
Q<W

973, 980
1093
1114
1165

43
403

1 , 37 403
6
434
470
486
962

464
485
470
531
731
472
138
170
296
304, 305
548
576,577
595
692
736

'49

34

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Employers’ advances, re­
payment of—C-ontd.
North Carolina_____
North Dakota______
Oregon_____________
Philippine Islands.......
Porto Rico_________
South Carolina_____
Virginia___ ________
Washington.
__
E m ployers’ certificates,
forgery of:
Georgia.... ....................
Minnesota...................
Nevada____________
Washington________
Wisconsin______ ___
Employers’liability. (See
Liability of employers.)
Employers’ liability insur­
ance:
__________
Wisconsin
E m p lo y ers to fu rn ish
names of employees to
officials of county, etc.,
summary of laws as to ..
Employm ent, abandon­
ment of. (See Contracts
of employment.)
Employ ment agents. (See
Employment offices.)
Employment, discrimina­
tion in, forbidden:
Indiana__ _______
Massachusetts ______
E m ploym ent, foremen,
etc., accepting fees for
furnishing:
Alabama
Arizona
______
California ______ _
Connecticut
Florida.. _ ________
Michigan _ _ . ___
Minnesota _ _______
_______
Montana
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey __
___
Ohio
Pennsylvania
Utah______ _ _____
Employment, notice of
te rm in a tio n of. (S ee
Employment, termina­
tion of, etc.)
Employment, obtaining,
under false pretenses.
(S ee E m p lo y ers’ a d ­
vances, repayment of;
Employers’ certificates,
forgery of.)
Employment of children.
(See Children, employ­
ment of.)
Employment of labor by
public-service corpora­
tions. (See Public serv­
ice employments.)
Employment of labor, de­
ception, etc., in:
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Massachusetts
Minnesota...................




Bulletin
No.

786
800, 801
873, 874
947
961, 962
992
1083 486
1105
304
575
670
1088
1153

1152

104,105

381
513
139
156
209
266
289
557
575
650
669, 670
687
710
826
925, 932
1062,1063

145
160
188,191 470
226, 227,
232, 233
296
510
575-577

Page

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Employment of labor, de­
ception, etc., in—Con.
649
Montana
6
Nevada
164, 670, 681
777, 778
New York
787
North Carolina
865
Oklahoma
874, 898, 899
Oregon __ _____
23
957
Porto Rico. ____ _
Tennessee __ __
1011,1012
1065
Utah
1142
W isconsin__________
(See also Employers’ ad­
vances; Strikes, notice
of, in advertisenK nts
for laborers.)
Employment of labor, gen­
eral provisions:
169,170
Arkansas
183-187
California
225, 226, 230
Colorado
Connecticut
.
1 265-267
294
Florida __
_
|
299,
Georgia___ _ _
1 301,302
312
Hawaii________
323, 324
Idaho. ..............
365, 381
Indiana
452
Kentucky. _____
462-464,473
Louisiana . . . .
513
Massachusetts_____ 1
Michigan . __ _ . 536, 548, 557
623, 624
M issouri.. ________
M o n ta n a __________ 645-648,650
674-676
Nevada.
________
746-774
New York. ..... .........
789
North Carolina
796-799
North Dakota __ __
813
Ohio
864-868
Oklahoma
878, 879
Oregon
904
Penns vlvania__
Philippine Island -;___ 948, 949, 951
Porto Rico . ___ 953, 956, 957
988, 989
South C a ro lin a.._
_
South D a k o ta______ 1000-1002
Utah________ ______ 1047,1062,
1063
1105,1106
W ashington. ............
1130,1131
Wisconsin ________
1156
Wyoming.. ______
1181
United States.. .
(See also Discharge,
statement of cause of;
Employers’ advances;
Employment, termi­
nation of; Examina­
tion, etc.; Inspection
of factories; W iges,
etc.)
Employment of labcr on
public works.
(See
Public works, labor on.)
Employment of wo nen.
(See Women, employ­
ment of.)
Employment offices, free
public:
163,164
Arizona_____ _____...
179,180
Arkansas
210
California_________
235-237
Colorado
_______
257, 258
Connecticut
___
306
Georgia___ _______
322, 323
Idaho.. ____________
343, 344
Illinois_____________
23
388-390
I n d ia n a ....................
416, 417
Iowa _____________
K an sas.......................
426, 446
476
Louisiana..... ...............
497
Maryland....................

403

55

403

26

434

15,16

403

46

403

55

403

60

35

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page
Employment offices, free
public—Continued.
Michigan.............. ......
Minnesota......... .........
Missouri......................
M ontana................. .
Nebraska__________
Nevada___
...
New Hampshire____
New J e rs e y ................
New York __ ____
North Carolina...........
North Dakota______
Ohio _
________
Oklahoma .... ...........
Pennsylvania_______
Philippine Islands___

Bulletin
No. 370

No.

523, 524
543
562, 578,
579, 589
610
642
654
682, 683
694, 695
723-725
749, 778
791-793
810, 811
819, 824
871
915-918,942
947, 948,
950, 951
969-971
976, 977
1004,1008
1051
1085,1086
1110
1127 470
1171 403

Page

Bulletin

Page

Bulletin

No. Page

Employment, prevention
of. (See Interference
with employment, and
cross references.)

Employment, termination
of, notice of:
M aine._ . .............
Massachusetts______
New J e rs e y ...............
Pennsylvania ______
Porto R ic o ________
Rhode Island
__
South Carolina __ __
Wisconsin _ _____
(See also Discharge; Em­
ployment of labor, gen­
eral provisions.)
Engineers, examination,
etc., of, s u m m a r y of
laws as to ........................

483
523
702, 704
937
956
978 486
994
1137 •

21-23 403
470
Engineers, illiterate, em­
ployment of, on railroads.
(See Railroad employ­
ees, illiterate.)
Engineers, unlicensed, em­
58
ployment of:
58
138,139
Alabama___________
Enlisted men, employ­
ment of, in civil pursuits:
470
18
United States_______
1173
403
60 Enticing employees, etc.:
137,138
Alabama.. ________
Arkansas___________
470 23,24
166,169
294
Florida____________
303
Georgia____________
312, 313
Hawaii.......... .............K entucky............... .
451
594, 595 486
Mississippi______-__
787
North Carolina_____
993
South Carolina............
1011
Tennessee____ _____
32
1191
470
United States_______
25
(See also Interference,
403
etc.)
Examination, etc., of min­
ers, mine foremen, etc.:4
486 13,14
134
Alabama___________
150
A la s k a ._____ ______
178
Arkansas___________
225
403" ’28,"29
Colorado _________
35
470
Illinois __________ 336, 337, 360
572 403 30,31
404-407
Indiana ___________
Minnesota
419
598
Iowa___ _________
M ississippi..............
439
610
Kansas.... _________
Missouri
452
K entucky..................
628, 643
M o n ta n a ................ .
662
659, 660
Missouri___________
Nebraska
Montana
________
640, 641
670, 676, 677
Nevada
804
North D ak o ta______
686
New Hampshire __
850
728, 729 486 17,18
Ohio_______ ______
New Jersey _
__
868
48
744, 745 470
O klahom a.________
New York
__
931,932,
39
Pennsylvania ______
403
North Carolina
938-941
825, 826
Ohio_____________ _
1009
Tennessee__________
871, 872
Oklahoma
1061
888 403
42
Utah_________ _____
Oregon
1080
911
Virginia ___________
Pennsylvania
Washington___ _____
1100
948, 949
Philippine Islands___
1112
972
W Virginia..............
rest
Rhode Island
1007,1008
Wyoming............. . _
1160
South Dakota
49 Examination, etc., of
Tennessee................... 1009,1010 403
workmen, summary of
Texas.___ _________ 1045,1046
19-35 403
1048,1049
laws as t o . .........-...........
U ta h ____ ________
434
1076
Virginia... ................
470
1088 470
54
Washington........ ........
486
1118
West Virginia.
403 55, 56 Examination, etc., of rail­
Wisconsin__________ 1145,1146
road employees. (See
1166
Wyoming__________
Railroad
employees,
( S e e a l s o Emigrant
qualifications of.)
agents.)
3 Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in full, see Illinois.
4 Texts mostly abridged; for representative law in full, see Indiana.

Porto Rico ................
Rhode Island_______
South Dakota_______
Utah _______ ______
_
Virginia_ ____ _____
West Virginia_______
W isconsin
T
United States___ . . .
Employment offices, pri­
vate: 3
151
Alaska....... ...... ...........
Arizona.....................
179
_______
Arkansas
California _ _ ___ 204, 205, 221
237
Colorado
_______
258
Connecticut____ ____
286, 287
District of Columbia._
289
Florida_____ ______
306, 307,309
Georgia
312
Hawaii ___________
322, 323
Idaho_____________
344-347
Illinois ......................
372, 373
Indiana____________
417
Iowa _____________
426, 427
Kansas
__ ___
Kentucky ...........
453
474
Louisiana ______ ____
478
Maine
502
Maryland
___
506
Massachusetts
543, 544
Michigan




22,23

7
6

15

4-7
3,4
3-6
3,4

36

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

No.
Examination, etc., of street
railway employees. (See
Street railways, em­
ployees on.)
Execution, e x e m p t i o n
from. (See Exemption,
etc.)
Executions in suits for
wages. (See Suits for
wages.)
Exemption of mechanics,
etc., from license tax,
summary of laws as to—
.
35, 36
Exemption of wages from
execution, etc.:
142,143
Alabama___________
144
Alaska..........................
Arizona................. ......
153,159
Arkansas---------------167
187
California-..................
253
Colorado.-..................
268
Connecticut------------284
District of Columbia..
290
Florida.........................
302, 304
Georgia........................
312
Hawaii.........................
328
Idaho.____ ________
359
Illinois..........................
365, 366
Indiana........................
420
Iowa............................
Kansas,...................
426,432
Kentucky...................
451
464
Louisiana................. ..
485,486
Maine...... ....................
490
Maryland....................
534
Massachusetts.............
553
Michigan.....................
574
Minnesota_________
596
Mississippi...................
604
Missouri.......... ...........
648
Montana---------------660
Nebraska.....................
667
N evada................ ......
684
New Hampshire.........
697, 724
New Jersey.................
736, 737
New M exico............
784
New York_____ ____
790
North Carolina_____
799
North Dakota.............
849, 851
Ohio________ ______
Oklahoma__________ 858, 859, 869
Oregon__________
873
Pennsylvania_______ 904, 911, 912
957
Porto Rico_________
982
Rhode Island_______
989
South Carolina.........
1002
South Dakota_______
1011
Tennessee-................. Texas....... ................... 1023,1025,
1026
1062
U tah ............................
Vermont......................
1066
1083
Virginia___________
Washington............... .
1087
1118
West Virginia............
Wisconsin__________ 1152,1153
W
ryomfrig__________
1158,1161
United States_______ 1176,1177
Explosives, storage, manu­
facture, etc., of:
519
Massachusetts............
Missouri..... ................
616
630
M ontana.....................
New Jersey.................
701, 728
774
New Y o rk ..................
Ohio______________
Explosives, use of, in mines.
(See Mine regulations.)




Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin
Page

Bulletin
No. Page

Extortion:
Illinois........................
Minnesota...................
M ontana__________
(See also Intimidation.)

364
575
650

F

470

403

403 41,42

470

403

Factories, accidents in.
(See Accidents, etc.)
Factories and workrooms,
ventilation, sanitation,
etc., of. (See Air spice;
Inspection and regilation.)
Factories, eating, etc, in.
(See Food, taking :nto
certain workrooms.)
Factories, fire escapes on.
(See Fire escapes, e t ).)
Factories, plants, etc.. es­
tablishment by State,
summary of laws as to. .
Factories, etc., registration
of:
California_____ _____
202, 203
Kentucky.................. .
457
M aryland....................
492
Mississippi............. .
601,602
New Y ork...................
New Jersey.................
Wisconsin__________ 1142,1148
Factories, smoking in.
(See Smoking, etc.)
Factory inspectors. (See
Inspectors, factory.)
Factory regulation. (See
Inspection and regula­
tion of factories, e tc )
Fellow servant, negligent,
to be named in verdict:
Minnesota___________
574
Fellow servants. (See Lia­
bility of employers for
injuries to employees.)
Female employees. (See
W omen, employs lent
of.)
Female employees, seats
for. (See Seats for fe­
male employees.)
Fire escapes on factories,
etc.:
Alabama___ _______
138
Colorado___________
240
Connecticut________
261, 262
Delaware__________
278
285, 286
District of Columbia.,
Georgia____________ 300, 301,304
Idaho................. ........
327
352, 359
Illinois.............. ...........
Indiana........................
366,367
Iowa_____ _________
421,422
Kansas........................
428
Kentucky__________
451,452
474,475 434
Louisiana__________
Maine_____________
478
Massachusetts______
506, 507
Michigan__________
538
M innesota........ .........
566, 567
M issouri........... ..........
616,625
629
Montana___________
657
Nebraska__________
New H am pshire........
691
New Jersey_________
712, 713
New York_________
764
North Carolina. ___
788, 789
North D akota.............
795

35
16

34
49

37

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page
Fire escapes on factories,
etc.—Continued.
Ohio______________
Oklahoma__________
Oregon........ ...........
Pennsylvania_______

834, 840
863, 869

No.

403
470

905,912,
913, 924
Rhode island_______
980
South D akota.______
1003
Tennessee__________ 1014,1020
T e x a s ........................ 1038,1039
Vermont......................
1073
Virginia.. . ______
1080
West Virginia........... 1114,1115,
1117
Wisconsin..................
1126,1127
Wyoming_________
1163,1164
(See also Inspection and
regulation of factories
and workshops.)
Fire marshal:
Hawaii.........................
314
Oregon..... ................
903
Pennsylvania_______
922
Fire, safeguards against,
in factories.
(See In­
spection of factories, etc.)
Firemen, stationary, ex­
amination, etc., of, sum­
mary of laws as t o . . _
_
21, 22 403
First-aid provisions. (See
Accidents, provisions
for.)
Food products, manufac­
ture of, summary of
laws as to_______ . _
87-89
Food, taking into certain
workrooms:
Delaware_________
281
Illinois......................
351, 356
M innesota............
586
M issouri.....................
619
New Jersey.................
721
New York____
760
Ohio
_
______
844
Pennsylvania_______
927
W
’est Virginia_______
1114
Forced contributions from
employees:
Indiana___________
366
Louisiana.......... ........
474 486
Maryland____ _____
490
Michigan.....................
553,554
Nevada________ . . .
665
New Jersey________
707
New York_________
772
Ohio.................. .........
847,848
Oregon___ _______
878
U ta h ......................
1048
(See also Employees’
funds.)
Foremen, etc., accepting
fees for furnishing em­
ployment. (See Em­
ployment, foreman, etc.,
accepting fees for fur­
nishing.)
Funds, employees’. (See
Employees’ funds.)

43
52

7




143
167
279 !

470

Garnishment of wages—
Continued.
Hawaii _
_
__
In d ia n a ............... ......
Louisiana....................
Michigan__________
Missouri. _________
Nebraska ________
New Jersey ________
New Mexico_______
Oregon. . . . ............
Tennessee__________
Utah_____ _____ ___
Virginia.. _________
Wisconsin__________
Wyoming .. . _ ____
Government Printing Of­
fice. (See Public print­
ing office.)
Groceries, employees in:
New York_________
1 Group insurance. (See In­
surance of employees.)
Guards, armed, summary
of laws as to. (See In! dustrial police)__ ___

Bulletin

Page

Page

No. Page

313, 314

403
403
470
486
403

22
24
31
13
31

403
734
739
873
1021
1062
1083 486
1153 470
1161

32

604

23
57

780

111,112

403
470
486

13
12,13
8

35 470

p
;

Guards for dangerous ma­
chinery, etc. (See In­
spection and regulation
of factories and work­
shops.)
H

12, 13

G

Garnishment, exemption
of wages from. (See Ex­
emption of wages; from
execution, etc.)
Garnishment of wages:
Alabama. _. ________
Arkansas___________
Colorado. ________
Delaware....................

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

29
.........

Hatch tenders:
California_____ ____
Headlights on locomotives,
summary of laws as to_ _
Highways, hours of labor
on, summary of laws fix­
___ ___
ing. .
Hiring. (See Employ­
ment of labor.)
Hoisting-machine opera­
tors, examination, etc.,
of, summary of laws as
to ___ _ _ ________
Holiday labor:
Massachusetts______
New Hampshire___
Holidays in the different
States and Territories,
list of. (See Legal holi­
days.)
Horseshoers, examination,
etc., of, summary of
laws as to___
...
Hospital fees. (See Forced
contributions, etc.)
Hospitals and hospital
funds, administration,
etc., of:
Arkansas
California_________
New Mexico________
Oklahoma__________
Oregon
____ _____
Pennsvlvania. .
West Virginia.
Wyoming ________
United States..
(See also Forced contri­
butions.)
Hours of labor in general
employments:
Arizona
................
Arkansas_____ _____
California-...................

188,189
74-81
104

513
690

19-21

173
212, 213
737, 738
870
878,898
932, 937
1117
1157
1187

154,155
170
183

403

6

38

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

No.
Hours of labor in general
employments—Con.
Connecticut..... ..........
Florida____________
Georgia___ ____ ___
Id ah o .-.___ _______
Illinois_____ ____—
Indiana_____ _____
Maine................... —
Maryland__________
Michigan.....................
Minnesota-...........—
Mississippi-------------Missouri___________
Montana__________
New Hampshire-----New York--------------

North Carolina-------Ohio______ _____
Oregon.........................
45, 46
Porto Rico..................
22, 23
Rhode Island_______
South Carolina______
Wisconsin__________
Hours of labor of children
and women. (See Chil­
dren, etc.)
Hours of labor of deck of­
ficers:
United States_______
Hours of labor of drug
clerks:
194,195 403 18,19
California____ _____
780
New York_________
Hours of labor of employ­
ees in brickyards:
New York-------------Hours of labor of employ­
ees in compressed air:
719
New Jersey________
773, 774
New York_________
Pennsylvania_______
Hours of labor of employ­
ees in electric plants:
154
Arizona___________
Hours of labor of employ­
ees in groceries:
780
New York_________
Hours of labor of employ­
ees in mines, smelters,
etc.:
148
Alaska____________
Arizona..................... 155,161, 162
201
California.___ _____
224, 228
Colorado___________
325
Id ah o ......... .........—
439
Kansas..... ...............
501
M aryland............... .
612, 621
Missouri................. .
627, 637
Montana___________
665, 668 470
Nevada___________
804
North Dakota______
857, 868
Oklahoma........... .......
887
Oregon.................. ......
Utah........................... . 1047,1059
1092
Washington________
1156,1159
Wyoming__________
Hours of labor of employ­
ees in plaster and ce­
ment mills:
29
Colorado......................
Nevada___________
Hours of labor of employ­
ees on railroads:
1179-1181
United States______
Summary of State
laws as to .................




Bulletin
No. Page

Page

265
290
300
326
339
373
486
499
549
599, 6W
612
628, 647
684
754-759,
778, 780
789
813, 819, 840
886, 887
957, 958
977, 978
990,991
1141

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Hours of labor of employ­
ees on street railways:
California______ ____
Louisiana.....................
M aryland..___ _____
Massachusetts______
New Jersey......... ........
New York_________
Pennsylvania_______
Rhode Island___ ___
South Carolina--------Washington________
Hours of labor of seamen:
United States___ ___
Hours of labor of telegr iph
operators. (See Hours
of labor of employee;; on
railroads.)
Hours of labor of telephone
operators:
M ontana.....................
Hours of labor of women.
(See Women, etc.)
Hours of labor on public
roads, summary of laws
as to ________________
Hours of labor on public
works:
A laska.......................
A rizona....................
California-.................
Colorado---------------Delaware__________
District of Columbia..
Hawaii------------------Idaho........ ............
Indiana.....................
Kansas-----------------Kentucky__________
Maryland__________
Massachusetts______
Minnesota_________
Montana__________
Nevada_____ _____ _
New Jersey________
New Mexico_______
New York.... ..............
Ohio------------- -------Oklahoma___ _____
Oregon------------------Pennsylvania---------Porto Rico_________
Texas______ ____—
Utah_____________ _
Washington----- ------ West Virginia......... .
Wisconsin_____ _____
Wyoming__________
United States______
(See also Eight-! lour
day.)

183
462
533
709
754, 755
910
981,982
991,992, 996
1092
1176

637

144
152,154
181,189,190
228
274
284, 287
310
316, 325
373
427
452
501, 502
511,512
563, 564, 580
627, 638
669, 678
717
735
760, 761
813
857, 864
887, 888
933
953, 959, 969
1037, 1038
1047,1059
1091,1092
1117
1141,1142
1156,1162
1183,1184

Illiterate employees on
railroads. (See -Rail­
road employees, il iter­
ate.)
Immigration:
1174
United States______
Immigration, etc., bureau
of:
181,182
California....................
Hawaii___ ________ 310,311,314
316-318
Idaho................. .........
333, 388
Illinois____________
1007
South Dakota----------

22, 23

39

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page
Importing wort men from
outside the State):
Oregon.................. ......
Inclosed platforms. (See
Protection of employees
on street railways.)
Incorporation of labor or­
ganizations, etc. (See
Labor
organizations,
etc.)
Industrial
commission.
(See Commission, in­
dustrial, etc.)
Industrial diseases. (See
Occupational diseases.)
Industrial
education,
summary of laws as to—
Industrial police, sum­
mary of laws as to_____

Industrial rehabilitation.
(See Rehabilitation of
injured workmen )
Industrial relations, court
Kansas__ _________
Industrial relations, de­
partment of:
Ohio...............
....
Industrial welfare com­
missioners etc.:
Arkansas................. .
California............ ........
Kansas___ _________
Oregon_____________
Injunctions:
Illinois _______ _
Kansas____________
Minnesota_________
M o n ta n a .___ _____
New Jersey_________
North Dakota___ ___
Oregon_____________
Utah___ ___________
Washington________
Wisconsin....................
United States_______
Injuries causing death,
right of action for, sum­
mary of laws as to ........ .
Injuries

to employees.
(See Liability of em­
ployers.)
Inspection and regulation
of bakeries, etc., sum­
mary of laws as to_____

No.

Inspection and regulation
of factories and work­
shops—Continued.
C onnecticut..._____

403

3,4

109—
112 403
434
470
486

7-10

13
6
12,13
8

440-447

403

26

813-815
172,173
205-208 470
447
881-885

20-22

403

23

434

14

8&-91 403
434
470

10
5
9

87-89

10
9
6

431,432
579
648
805
899,900
1057-1059
1104
1147
1172,1173

403
470
486

60
20

1

Bulletin

Page

Page

898

Inspection and regulation
of barber shops, sum­
mary of laws as to_____
29-32
Inspection and regulation
of factories and work­
shops:
A labam a__________
136-138
149,150
Alaska____________
Arizona ___________ 162,164,165 403
Arkansas........ ............. 167-169,173
191,192, 470
California__________
202, 203,
213-219,
222, 223
Colorado___________
232,
238-241,
244-246




Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

No. Page

258-262,
268, 271
Delaware . . . _____ 273, 278-282
285,286
District of Columbia. - |
Florid a__....... ........_. 1 290,291
Georgia ___________ I 300,304,
308, 309
314
H aw aii____________ !
Idaho ____________ 317, 327, 328
341-343,
Illinois____ ________
347, 348,
350-359
366, 367,
Indiana............ ..........
379, 383,
388, 392,
393
413-416,
I o w a .......... ......... .
420-423
428,429,
K ansas..;__________
435-437
Kentucky ________
450-452
Louisiana .. ______ 462,472^75
Maine
_______ 478, 481, 482
492-495
Maryland
_______
506, 507,
Massachusetts...........
513,514,
517-520
538-543
Michigan. ............ .
564-567,
Minnesota________
576,
580-582,
584-587,
590
601-603
Mississippi_________
Missouri ___ ____ 613-621, 625
629-633
Montana
..............655-657
Nebraska__________
668, 671,
Nevada____ ______
674-676,
681
New Hampshire___.. 686, 691-694
699-703,
New Jersey_________
712, 713,
716,
719-722,
724, 725,
728, 730,
733
739
New Mexico _______
750, 751,
New York_________
759, 760,
763-772
788-790
North Carolina ___
North Dakota
__ 795, 796, 803
Ohio - .. ................... 817-820,824,
825,828-835,
840, 843-845
861-864, 869
Oklahoma
__ .
Oregon __ ____ _____ 888-897, 903
905,912,913,
Pennsylvania . _
918-928
950
Philippine Islands___
Porto Rico_________ 960,961,966,
£67
Rhode Island.... ........ 973-975,977,
980, 981
South Carolina
__
086, 995
1003,1004.
South Dakota
1006,1007
Tennessee ________ 1013-1016,
1019-1021
Texas_____________ 1027,1041,
1042
Utah .......................... 1050-1052
V erm ont__________ 1069,1070,
1072,1073

403
470

20
29,30

403
470
486
434

25
33
11,12
12

434

13

403
470

29
37

403 32,33
34
403
403 35, 36
16
486

39
403
49
470
486 20, 21
49
470

43
403
403 43,44
52
470
486

21

403

48

434

16

403

49

40

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Inspection and regulation
of factories and work­
shops—Continued.
Virginia___________
Washington..
West Virginia..
Wisconsin____

No.

Page

Delaware__________
District of Columbia.
Florida______ _____
Georgia. .....................
Illinois_____ _____
Indiana.

Wyoming__________
(See also Cellars and
basements, use of;
Compressed air; Ex­
plosives; Fire escapes;
Inspection, etc., of
bakeries; Inspectors,
factory; L au ndries;
Seats for female em­
ployees; Sweating sys­
tem; Toilet rooms.)
Inspection of locomotives,
etc., summary of laws as
69-81
to ______ ____________
Inspection, etc., of mercan­
tile establishments:
New Hampshire____
710, 711
New Jersey________
New York_________ 750, 771, 772
Inspection, etc., of mines.
(See Mine regulations.)
Inspection of railroads,
railroad equipment, etc.,
summary of laws as to...

IowT ________
a
Kansas______
Kentucky____
Louisiana____
Maine_______
Maryland____
Massachusetts .

9,10

9,10

(See also Inspection of

locomotives.)
Inspection of steam boilers
in mine:. (See Mine
regulations.)
Inspection of steam ves­
sels:
Idaho....... ................ .
Indiana........................
Maine_____________
Montana______ _____
New Hampshire____
New York_________
Washington____ ___
United S tates.............




1115
1127,1128,
1130

384
488
643
690
774, 775
1086
1175

Oklahoma.
Oregon___

Washington..
West Virginia..
Wisconsin____
48
16

21,22

West Vriginia..
Wisconsin____

Michigan______
Minnesota_____
Mississippi........ .
Missouri______
Montana______
Nebraska______
Nevada_______
New Hampshire.
New Jersey____
New Mexico___
New York_____
North D a k o ta ...
Ohio____ _____

Pennsylvania___
Philippine Islands
Porto Rico_____
Rhode Island_
_
South CarolinaSouth Dakota__
Tennessee_____
Texas_________
U tah..................
Vermont______
Virginia...............
470

Bulletin
No. Page

Inspectors, factory, etc.:
Alabama__________
Alaska___________
Arkansas__________
Colorado__________
Connecticut_______

1078-1080,
1083,1084
1087,1088,
1093-1095,
1101-1104
1110,11131115,1119
1123-1130,
1132,1133,
1146,1148,
1149
1163-1166

Inspection of steam boilers:
Arkansas__________
253
Colorado___________
262
Connecticut________
283
Delaware__________
385, 386
Indiana.......................
422
Iowa______________
477,478
Maine. _r....... ...........
507
Massachusetts............
543
M ichigan.................
589
Minnesota_________
621
Missouri......................
629, 633
M ontana........... .........
New York_________ ’60,774,775,
781, 782
836
Ohio________
867, 868, 872
Oklahoma___
924
Pennsylvania.
978, 979
Rhode Island..

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

136
149,150
171,172
238-241
258,259,
264,271
279-282
288
291
308, 309
335, 347,
348,357
381, 382,
385, 392
414, 415
434-436
450, 455, 456
465, 470, 471
478,481
494,500
504,505,
510,518
539, 540, 542
560, 561
601 434
613-615
632, 633
653, 654
681
692, 694
726, 727
739
748, 749
803
828, 829,
842, 843
861, 862
881, 882, 403
884, 893
921,941
950
967,968
973,974, 980
986,992
1007
1019-1021
1042
1050
1068,1069
1075,1076,
1080
1093,1103,
1104,1107
1110,1119
1125,1126,
1129,1130

(See also Fire marshal.)
Insurance of employers:
Florida________
291
Louisiana______
474
Massachusetts. __
532
Michigan______
552, 555, 556
Minnesota_____
584
New Jersey_____
733, 734
New York_____
745, 772
North Carolina. _
Ohio__________
South Carolina...
987, 995
South Dakota_
_
1004
Virginia___ ____
Washington____
Wisconsin______
Insurance, unemployment
Michigan______ ___
555,556
Intelligence offices, i See
Employment offices)

20

29

13

42

14,15
29, 30

17,18
54-56

41

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

No.

K

948
1191

L

Labels. (See Trade-marks.)
Labor agents. (See Emi­
grant agents.)
Labor agreements not con­
spiracy. (See Conspir­
acy, labor agreements
not.)
Labor, bureau of. (See
Bureau of Labor.)
Labor camps>etc.:
California............. ......
________
Delaware
Hawaii____________
Michigan__________
Minnesota_________




200, 201
280
311
539
573

470

Page

Page

Intemperate employees,
summary of laws as to__
105-107
Interference with employ­
m en t,
intimidation,
etc.:
Alabama ................. 135,137,138
Arkansas
___ ___
166
Colorado___________
227
Connecticut___ _____
269
D elaw are...................
278
Florida____________
295
Georgia____________
303
Hawaii......................... 312, 313, 315
Idaho....... ........... ........
403
13
Illinois............ ............. 338, 339, 361
Kansas____________ 425, 426, 438
Kentucky__________
451
Maine ___________
486,487
Massachusetts.... ........
510
Michigan ________
553
Minnesota_________ 569,574, 575
Mississippi.......... ........
594, 595 486
15
Missouri___________
604
Montana......................
639, 649
Nebraska__________
661
N e v a d a ......................
668, 669
New Hampshire____
685
New Jersey. _______
709
New York.. ..............
776,777
North Dakota______ 794, 799, 800
Oklahoma........ ...........
858
Oregon____________
874, 875
Pennsylvania_______
934
Porto Rico..................
955
Rhode Island...... ........
083
South Dakota_______
1003
Texas........................... 1032,1034,
1042-1044
Utah............................. 1047,1061,
1063,1065
Vermont.....................
1073
Washington________
1087,1088
West Virginia_______ 1111,1112 403 51,52
Wisconsin__________
1154
United States. ____
1191
(See also Blacklisting;
Boycotting; Conspir­
acy against work­
men; Enticing em­
ployees;
Picketing;
Protection of employ­
ees; Sabotage; Strikes
of railroad employees.)
Intoxication, negligence,
etc., of employees, sum­
mary of laws, as to____
105-107
Kidnaping:
Philippine Islands___
United States..............

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

28

Labor camps, etc.—Con.
Nevada____________
New Mexico________
New York_________
Pennsylvania_______
Porto Rico...................
Virginia— ...................
.
(See also Lodging houses.
Labor, commissioner of.
(See Bureau of labor.)
Labor contracts.
(See
Contracts of employ­
ment.)
Labor organizations, brib­
ery of representatives of.
(See Bribery of repre­
sentatives, etc.)
Labor organizations ex­
cluding members of
National Guard, sum­
mary of laws as to_____
Labor organizations, in­
corporation, regulation,
etc., of:
Alabama___________
California__________

Bulletin
No.

Page

682
739
767
925
969
1075

118

139
188,190,
191,196
226
Colorado___________
272
Connecticut________
286
District of Columbia..
304
Georgia .
364
Illinois
411, 423
Iowa __ ____
439, 440, 443
Kansas______ _ _
460
Louisiana
534, 535
Massachusetts__
551, 552
Michigan
Minnesota_______ _ 575, 579, 580
649
Montana
660
Nebraska__________
671
Nevada
685
New Hampshire
708 403
36
New Jersey
743, 777, 778
New York
815
Ohio
865
Oklahoma__________
Oregon_____________ 875, 899, 900
904, 935, 936 403
44
Pennsylvania.... ..........
52
470
955 403
46
Porto Rico_ ________
994
South Carolina_____
T exas..___ ________ 1025,1028,
1032
Utah...................... ...... 1057,1063
1104,1105
Washington________
1111,1112,
West Virginia
1121
52
Wisconsin.................... 1147,1153 403
Wyoming.....................
1161
United States....... ...... 1173, 1182, _403’ “ "‘58
1183
Labor organizations. (See
Antitrust act; Conspir­
acy, labor agreements
not; Protection of em­
ployees as members;
Trade-marks of tradeunions.)
Labor organs, public ad­
vertising in:
New Jersey_____
708
Labor spies:
403 54,55
Wisconsin_____
Laborers, alien. (See Alien
laborers.)
Laundries, license fee for:
628
Montana
. .
Laundries, regulation of,
9
89 470
summary of laws as to.
6
J 486

42

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Legal holidays in the
States and Territories. __

59-62

Liability of emplcyers for
injuries to employees:
Alabama___________
Alaska______ _____..
Arizona___________
Arkansas..... ............
California-............ ......
Colorado___________
Connecticut________
District of Columbia-.
Florida____________
Georgia____________
Illinois_____________
Indiana____________
Iowa_____ _____ —
Kansas..... ............. ......
Kentucky__________
Louisiana____ ______
Maine_____________
Massachusetts______
Michigan__________
Minnesota_________
Mississippi_________
Missouri___________
M ontana__________
Nebraska__________
Nevada____________
New Jersey________
New Mexico_______
New York_________
North Carolina_____
North Dakota______
Ohio____________
Oklahoma...... .........
Oregon_______ ____
Pennsylvania_______
Philippine Islands___
Porto Rico_________
Rhode Island_______
South Carolina_____
South D akota........... .
Texas......................... .
U tah_____________
Virginia..... ............. .
Wisconsin................. .
Wyoming................. .
United States............
(See also Contracts of

employees
waiving
right to damages.)
Liability of employers for
taxes of employees, sum­
mary of laws as to_____




Liability of railroad com­
panies for debts of con­
tractors. (See Liability
of stockholders; Protec­
tion of wages.)
Liability of railroad com­
panies for injuries to em­
ployees. (See Liability
of employers.)
Liability of railroad com­
panies for wages due
from predecessors:
Wisconsin__________
4
7,8 Liability of stockholders
of corporations for wage
debts, list of laws deter­
mining
____
License tax, exemption of
! mechanics, etc., f -om,
' lists of laws grantir g___
j License tax, laborers not
to pay:
Louisiana
Philippine Islands___
Licensing, etc. (See Exam­
ination, etc.)
i Liens. (See Mechanics’
liens.)
Loans to employees:
Louisiana
Local or special laws regu­
lating labor, etc.:
K e n tu c k y ..________
Louisiana
North Carolina
Pennsylvania

No. Page

9
5
8,9
5,6

139-141
145,146
152,153,
157-159
175-177
184, 198
227, 228, 241
267
284
293,294
297-299, 302
357, 358
370, 376-378
411,412, 419
428, 432, 433
455
463
483-485
529-531
544
572-574,
577, 578
593-598, 601
605-608, 622
627, 644
652, 659, 660
667
704-706
735
743,
781-784
785, 786
'96, 801, 802
827, 841,
842,
847-849
856, 867
876,877,
897, 898
904, 932, 933
945-943
953-955
978
984, 988,
989, 997,
998
1005,1006
1026,
1028-1031
1060
1074,1075,
1082,1083
1149-1151
1156,1162,
1163
1172,
1177-1179

104,105

Bulletin

Page

No.

67-69

Letters of recommenda­
tion. (See Employers’
certificates.)
Liability of corporations
for debts of contractors
for labor, list of laws de­
termining_______ ____

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Texas

______

__

Virginia.
Locomotives, etc., fbandonment of. (See Strikes
of railroad employees.)
I Locomotives, headlights,
etc., summary of laws as
to
Lodging houses, labo ers’:
Connecticut
Hawaii-. ___
(See also Labor canps.)
Lunch, time for. (See Time
for meals.)

1150
62 470
35,36
458
945

472
448
458
793
904
1023
1074

75-81
266
311,312

M

18,19

Mail, obstructing:
United States
Manufactures, State, sum­
mary of laws as to_____
Married women, earnings
of, summary of laws as
to. (See Women, mar­
ried, earnings of.)
Mason contractors, e lami­
nation, etc., of, summary
of laws as to
Master and servant. (See
Employment of ]abor;
Liability of employers;

1191,1192
99,100

35

and cross references under
each.)

24

470

12

Matches, use of whito phos­
phorus in making:
United States
Meals, time for. (See
Time for meals.)
Mechanics, exemption of,
from
manufacturers’
taxes:
Philippine Islan is___

1175

945

8

43

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page
Mechanics’ liens, sum­
mary of laws as to_____
Mediation. (See Arbitra­
tion.)
Medical attendance for em­
ployees:
M ontana.....................
New Mexico_______
Oregon__________ _
Medical examination. (See
Physical examination.)
Mercantile establishments,
etc., inspection of. (See
Inspection, etc., of mer­
cantile establishments.)
Messenger service by chil­
dren. (See Children,
employment of, in street
trades.)
Mine regulations: *
Alabama_____

37-59

No.

403
434
470
486

7,8
4
6,7
4,5

644
737, 738
878




18
19
19
29
31
23
31,32
24, 25
32, 33
25
33
12
35
42
32, 33
44
40
50
50
'43,'44
51, 52

56
51, 52
56
56-58
58, 59

law in

Bulletin

Page

Page

133-135,
138,139
148-151 470
153,159,165
166,177, 178 470
187,194, 208
224-226 403
470
Idaho_____
327, 328 470
330. 336, 403
Illinois____
337,360, 364 470
Indiana......................
391-410 403
470
Io w a ....................
419 403
470
Kansas_________
431, 439
Kentucky............ .
452,453 486
Louisiana_____
471
Maryland__________
499
Michigan_____
545,551 470
Minnesota_____ _
571
Missouri______ _____
621, 622
Montana. _________
630, 633, 470
640, 641,
. 649,650
Nevada.................
666. 671, 403
679, 680
New Jersey..........
729
New Mexico___
735, 737, 738 470
New York________
772, 778
North Carolina____
790
North D ak o ta...........
803, 804 403
O h io ..____
826, 827, 850 470
Oklahoma_____ _ 856,868-870 470
Oregon_______ __
902
Pennsylvania............
930, 932, 403
938-941 470
South Dakota_______ 1004,1008
Tennessee____ ____
1009,1021
Texas........................
1028,1029,
1036,1037
U tah ,.-........................
1061
Virginia..... ................
1080
W ashington..... ........
1087,1097, 470
1100-1104
West Virginia............. 1110-1113 403
470
Wyoming. .................
1156, 1157, 403
1159,1160, 470
1162,1166,
1167
.
United States........
1173
Texts mostly abridged; for representative
Alaska________
Arizona_______
Arkansas ______
C alifo rn ia..____
Colorado______

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

No. Page

Miners’ homes:
932
Pennsylvania .. _
M in e rs’ hospital. (See
Hospitals and hospital
funds.)
Miners, qualifications of.
(See Examination, etc.,
of miners.)
Mines, bureau of. (See
Bureau of mines.)
Mines, fire-fighting and
rescue stations for. (See
Accidents, provisions
for.)
Mines, etc., hours of labor
in. (See Hours of labor,
etc.)
Minimum wages:
A rizona-.....................
164
Arkansas.....................
172,173
California.................. . 181, 205-208
C olorado.._____ _ . 1
235
Kansas........ .............. 437,438,447
L ouisiana.................. !
458
Massachusetts______
526-528
Minnesota____ _____ '569-571, 589
Nebraska ..
651
North Dakota
806-809
Ohio_________ _____
813
Oregon. . _________
881-885
Porto Rico.. _______
965
South Dakota_______
1008
Utah___ _________
1059
Washington____ ____ 1098-1100
Wisconsin
1142-1144
•Minors, earnings of, sum­
mary of laws as to
65
Mothers’ pensions, sum­
mary of laws as to
15-19

Moving-picture machine
operators, examination,
etc., of, summary of
laws as to
Moving-picture theaters,
provisions for employees
in:
California__________

49

403

52, 53

486
403
434
470
486

4
C
f
2,3

32,33

470

5,0

223

470

20

N
National Guard, protec­
tion of employees as
members of, summary
of laws as to _
Negligence of employees,
summary of laws as to. __
Newsboys.
(See Chil­
dren, employment of, in
street trades.)
Night work. (See Chil­
dren, en ployment of,
g e n e r a l provisions;
Women, hours of labor
of.)
Notice of intention to ter­
m inate em ploym ent.
(See Employment, ter­
mination of, notice of.)
Notice of reduction of
wages. (See Wages, re­
duction of, notice of.)
full, see Indiana.

470

118
105-107

44

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

No.

Obstructing mail:
United States______
Occupational diseases, re­
ports, prevention, etc.,
of:
Connecticut. ..............
Illinois____________
Louisiana....... ........... .
Maine________ ____
Maryland____ _____
Massachusetts..........
Michigan....... ........... .
Minnesota.................
Missouri---------------New Hampshire____
New Jersey................
New Mexico......... . . .
New York.................
Ohio______________
Pennsylvania.............
Rhode Island______
Wisconsin_________
Old-age pensions, sum­
mary of laws as to-------

Overtime work, payment
for:
Arkansas....................
California...................
Florida.......................
New Mexico............
Oklahoma................ .
Oregon____________
Porto Rico_________
Texas......................... .
Washington________
Wyoming__________
United States______

Payment of wages in sc rip:
Arizona________
Arkansas______
California............
Colorado_______
Florida........... . . .
Georgia................
Illinois. ................
Indiana...............
Iowa....................
Kansas________
Kentucky______
Louisiana______
Michigan.........
Minnesota_____
Mississippi_____
Missouri_______
Nevada________
New Hampshire.
New Jersey____
New Mexico___
New York_____
North Carolina..
Ohio__________
Oklahoma______
Oregon________
Pennsylvania___
Philippine Island:
Porto Rico_____
South Carolina._

261
355-358
462
477
495
509
536
567, 568
618
689,690
715, 716,
719-722
738
760
839, 843,844
926, 928
979, 980
1123
93,94

Tennessee____
U ta h ............. .
Vermont_____
Virginia_____
Washington__
West Virginia..

172
183
290
741
871
886, 887
965
1040
1092
1168
1180,1181

Wisconsin....................
(See also C o m p a n y
stores.)
Payment of wages, nudes
and times of:
Alaska_ _________
_
Arizona...................
Arkansas..... ................
California................... .
Colorado..
Georgia___
Hawaii___
Illinois___
Indiana_
_
Iowa_____
Kansas___
Kentucky..
33

Bulletin
No.

Page

1191,1192

Payment of wages due at
end of employment:
Arizona___________
161
Arkansas__________
174,175
California__________
186, 219
Colorado.....................
233, 234
328
Idaho........................ .
Kansas........................
427, 428
Louisiana_____ _____
476
483
Maine______ _____ _
M assachusetts.......... .
521
Minnesota................. . 577, 582, 583
624
Missouri___________
Montana..................
638
N evada.......................
673, 674 403
704
New Jersey................ .
Oregon____________
South Carolina.......... .
U tah____________
1063
1115
West Virginia—
..........
1141
Wisconsin_________
Wyoming__________
1167
Payment of wages due
deceased employees:
Alabama......................
142
Arizona............ ..........
164
263
Connecticut............... .
Delaware.....................
277, 278
294
Florida........ ...............
299, 300
Georgia........................
Mississippi___ ____
596
New Jersey.................
708
910
Pennsylvania..............
1084
Virginia.......................




Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Louisiana....... .
Maine________
Maryland_____
Massachusetts..
Michigan_____
Minnesota____
Mississippi____
Missouri............
M ontana...........
Nebraska...........
Nevada_______
New Hampshire
New Jersey____
New Mexico.......
New York_____
North C arolina..
North Dakota__
Ohio..... ...............
Oklahoma............

161
174
197
234
289
297
340
374
419
439
457
466 434
549, 550
579
600
613
664, 670
684, 687
706
737
759, 778
788
851
864, 865
899
934,935
949
956
988, 989,
993, 996
1012

1064
1070,1071
1078
1090
1116
1142

51
57

150,151
160,161
174,175
202 , 212

219,220
233-235,
255
309
310
340
373-375
413
425
448, 451
453, 454
472, 473
483
490. 495
521-523
573, 577
600,602,603
613, 621, 624
638,650
651,652
670, 673,674
684,687, 689
704, 706,
708, 710,
713, 714
739
759
785, 790
802, 803
851, 852

17
20

9,10
10

26, 27
27, 28

33, 34
16,17

45

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

South Dakota.......
Tennessee.......... ..........
T e x a s .___ _______
Utah ........................
Vermont___________
Virginia............ ...........
W ashington________
West Virginia..............
Wisconsin__________
W yom ing...............
United States_______
(See also Payment of
wages in scrip.)
Peddler’s license, exemp­
tion of mechanics from,
summary of laws as to ...
Pensions for employees,
summary of laws as to.
(See Retirement.)
Pensions, old age, sum­
mary of laws as to. (See
Old age pensions.)
Peonage:
Philippine Islands___
United States_______
Phosphorus, white, use of,
in m a n u f a c t u r e of
matches:
United States_______
Physical competence, cer­
tificates of. (See Chil­
dren, employed, etc.)
Physical examination of
employees:
Illinois............ ..........
New Jersey..................
New York...................
Ohio______ ______
Pennsylvania_______
Physicians, employment
of:
Louisiana.....................
New Mexico________
Porto Rico. ________
Tennessee....................
Picketing:
Alabama______ _____
Colorado___________
Hawaii.........................
Kansas.........................
Nebraska......... ..........
U tah______________
United States_______
(See also Interference
with employment.)
Plumbers, examination,
etc., of, summary of
laws as to........................

Poisons, handling, manu­
facture, etc., of. (See
Occupational diseases.)
Police, industrial, sum­
mary of laws as to. (See
Industrial police.)
Police, private:
Wisconsin_____ _____

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page
Paym ent of wages, modes
and times of—Con.
Oregon____________
Pennsylvania__ __
Philippine Islands___
Porto Rico ......... .....
Rhode Island.... ..........
South Carolina______

Bulletin
No.' Page

Page

No. Page

Poll tax of employees, lia­
bility of employers for,
899 403 42,43
summary of laws as to __
104,105
936, 937 470
52 | Postal employees, rights
951
of:
United S t a t e s ...___
1173
961, 962
981
Profit sharing by corpora­
987-989,
tions:
.993, 994,
Connecticut.................
262
997-999
390, 391
Indiana____________
1002,1008
New Jersey_________
731
Protection of chauffeurs:
1012,1013
Illinois________ ____
1039
358
Protection of employees as
1063,1064
candidates for office:
1070,1071
209
1077,1078
California__________
1088
Wyoming__________
1158
1112,1113,
Protection of employees as
members of labor organi­
1116,1118,
1119
zations, summary of
114,115
laws as to ____________
1141,1142
Protection of employees as
1160,1167
1176,1177
members of National
Guard, summary of
laws as to ____________
118
Protection of employees as
traders. (See Coercion
of.employees.)
35,36
Protection of employees as
voters:
137
Alabama............... ......
Arizona. ____ _____ 159-161,165
Arkansas ................. .
167
California____ ____
188, 209
Colorado . _____ ___
253, 254
Connecticut ___ ___
256
944, 948
274
Delaware
1174,1192
Florida
295, 296
Idaho _____________
329
365
Indiana____________
411
Iow a................. .........
1175
Kansas
426
Kentucky_______ _.
448, 454
Louisiana ________
461
495
Maryland.
______
Massachusetts______
505
554
M ichigan__________
355
M innesota
576
718, 721, 722
Mississippi
593, 594
754, 773
608
Missouri
845
Montana
648, 649
907, 927, 928
651
Nebraska
Nevada _ _______ _ 672,681,682
732
New J e rs e y .... ...........
^ 486
13
New Mexico
736, 740
738
New York
777
486 1 21
786
North Carolina
1017 i
Ohio
840, 852
858
Oklahoma__________
135
i
Oregon
874
227
910
Penns vl vania
315
!
Philippine Islands___
951
444
957
'
Porto Rico
661
990
*
South Carolina
1064
1003
South Dakota
1172,1173
Tennessee
1009,1010
1032
■
Texas _____________
i
U tah______________
1048
!
West Virginia_______ 1109,1120
Wisconsin..... ............. . 1122,1137,
26-28 403
6
1138,1154
434
4
Wyoming__________
1157,1158
470
6
(See also Time to vote.)
486
4 Protection of employees on
buildings:
California.....................
189,194,
198, 199,
203
Colorado....................
229, 230
Connecticut________
265, 266
282,283
Delaware
________
403 54,55
Illinois..........................
348-350

32857°— 29-------4




470

12

403

14

403

29

470

43, 44

470

53, 54

46

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Bulletin
No.

Protection of employees
on buildings—Con.
367-369
Indiana____________
Kansas____________
429, 430
Kentucky__________
Louisiana....... .............
466-46S
M aryland_____ _____
496
Massachusetts ___.......
506
Minnesota________ _
566
Missouri___________
617
Montana___________
628, 629
657-659
N ebraska..___ _____
Nevada____________
675,676
New Jersey_________
727, 728
New York_________
762, 778
North Dakota______
809, 810
850, 851
Ohio______________
Oklahoma__________
866, 867
Oregon____________
897, 898
Pennsylvania_______ 904, 905, 924
Porto Rico_________
958
Rhode Island........... .
978 403
1042
Texas____________
Washington________
1101-1104
Wisconsin__________ 1125,1126
Protection of employees
on street railways:
Colorado___________
224, 225
Connecticut________
263
Delaware__________
279
District of Columbia..
285
Illinois,......................
361
372
Indiana........................
411
Iowa....... .....................
Kansas___________ .
433, 434
472
Louisiana--------------Maine_____________
485
Massachusetts--------533
Michigan__________
551
Minnesota_____ ____
576
Mississippi..................
599
Missouri___________ 605, 624, 625
M ontana___________
636, 637
Nebraska__________
653
New Hampshire____
686
New Jersey________
709
782
New York_________
North C arolina.........
786
Ohio______________
851
Oregon____________
877, 878
South Carolina_____ 989, 994, 998
Tennessee__________
1010
Utah_____ ____ ____
1063
Virginia___________
1081
Washington....... .........
1097
West Virginia______
1116
Wisconsin__________ 1151,1152
(See also Street railways,
safety appliances on.)
Protection of employees.
(See also Fire escapes on
factories; Inspection of
factories, etc.; Mine
regulations; Railroads,
safety appliances on.)
Protection of w ages of
T
employees, summary of
laws as to______ _____
59-61
(See also Exemption of

wages; Forced con­
tributions; Liability of
stockholders of corpo­
rations for wage debts;
Wages as preferred
claims.)
Public buildings, contract
work on:
California__________
Public employment offices.
(See Employment offices.)




Page

8,9

47, 48

Bulletin
No. 370
Page
Public ownership and
operation, summary of
99,100
laws as to____________
Public printing to be done
within the State, sum­
mary of laws as to_____
101,102
Public printing, union
label to be used on, sum­
114
mary of laws as to____ r
Public printing, wag( s and
hours of labor in:
423
Iowa______________
Kansas____________
438
Public-service
commis­
sions, duties of:
152,154
Arizona____ ____ ___
210, 214
California__________
262, 263
Connecticut________
287
District of Columbia. _
312
Hawaii____________
Idaho_____________
326
Illinois_____________
360
372
Indiana........................
Kansas____________
485
Maine_____________
625
Missouri___________
642, 643
Montana..................
653
Nebraska____ _____
667
Nevada____________
711
New Jersey_________
735
New Mexico________
New York_________
780
800
North Dakota______
Oregon____________ 875, 876, 903
933
Pennsylvania_______
Porto Rico_________
961
987, 988
South Carolina______
T ex a s________________
1031, 1032
U tah______________
1001, 1002
Vermont___________
1066
1097,1098
Washington.......... .
1117
West Virginia_______
1152
Wisconsin__________
United States_______ 1171-1174
Public service employ­
ments:
152,154
Arizona____________
166
Arkansas___________
287
District of Columbia-.
312
Hawaii____________
535
Massachusetts______
697, 698
New Jersey_________
Public supplies, preference
of domestic products for,
summary of laws as to.
(See Public works, pref­
erence of domestic naterials and local labor on.)
Publ i c works, employ­
ment of aliens on. (See
Aliens, employment of,
etc.)
Public works,hours oflabor
on. (See Hours of labor.)
Public works, iabor m:
165
Arizona______ _____
182,186,
California__________
189,196
274
Delaware..........
296
Florida______
310,315
Hawaii______
325
Idaho________
427
Kansas______
452, 453
Kentucky____
46 i
Louisiana____
483
M aine_______
502
Maryland____
505, 511Massachusetts.
513, 524
665, 666
Nevada_______
691
New Hampshire.
697, 698
New Jersey.........

Bulletin
No.

22, 23,
28

12.13

47

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Bulletin
No.

Public works, labor on—
Continued.
New York_________
743, 761
857, 864
Oklahoma__________
Oregon.- __ ________
875
Pennsylvania_______
933
969 403
Porto Rico._...............
Utah __ __ .................
1062
1174,1175
United S ta te s .___
(See also Aliens, etc.,
employment of, on
public works; Rates of
wages of employees
on public w orks.)
T
Public works, preference
of domestic materials
and local labor on, list
of laws as to..................
100,101 403
470
486
Purchases by employees.
(See Coercion.)
Q
Quarries.

(See Mines.)
R

Railroad bridges, height
of. (See Railroad tracks
etc.)
Railroad cars, etc., to be
repaired within the
State:
Arkansas___________
178,179
Louisiana...................
468,469
Texas___________
1035,1036
Railroad companies, lia­
bility of, for debts of con­
tractors for labor. (See
Liability of stockhold­
ers; Protection of wages.)
Railroad companies, lia­
bility of, for wages due
from predecessors:
Wisconsin__________
1150
Railroad employees, com­
plaint by:
Massachusetts.
_. _
531
Railroad employees, ex­
amination, etc., of. (See
Examination, etc.)
Railroad employees, false
charge against:
Arkansas__________
175
Indiana____________
366
Iowa______________
423
Missouri_ ________
_
605
South Dakota______
1006
Railroad employees, hours
of labor of. (See Hours
of labor, etc.)
Railroad employees, il­
literate:
Idaho....... ...................
329
Missouri___________
624
New York...... ...........
779
Ohio. ____________
850
Oregon_____________
877
Washington. _ _ _
_
1088
Railroad employees, etc.,
negligence, etc., of, sum­
mary of laws as to_____
105-107
Railroad employees, qual­
ifications of:
Alabama______ _____
143
Arizona__________ 156,157,160
California-..................
196
Georgia.......................
297, 304
Indiana........................
370,371




Page

46

1
12
8

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

Page

No. Page

Railroad employees, qual­
ifications of—Con.
532, 533
Massachusetts
___
550, 551
Michigan __ __
___issouri
M _ __
624
653
Nebraska ___ 1___
New York____t ____
779
850
Ohio______ ______
O regon..___ _ __
877
Wisconsin... ______
1150
(See also Examination,
etc., of railroad em­
ployees; Railroad em­
ployees, illiterate; Tel­
egraph operators, rail­
road, etc.)
Railroad employees, reim­
bursement of, for losses
due to removal of divi­
sion points:
M ontana.. . . . _
_
644,645
Railroad employees, rules
for:
Arizona____________
154
California__________
211, 214
Connecticut...............
263
In d ia n a .__________
371, 372
_______
Michigan.
550
Mississippi_________
596,598
944, 945
Philippine Islands___
Railroad employees, strikes
of. (See Strikes, etc.)
Railroad employees, uni­
forms of:
779
New York. ________
Washington .
_
_
1096
Railroad employees, etc.,
voting by. (See Absent
voters.)
Railroad relief societies.
(See Benefit societies.)
Railroad tracks, bridges,
wires, etc., over or near:
Arkansas..................
166
Connecticut________
256
Idaho ___________
327
Indiana___________ 370, 372, 393
411,413
Iowa. ____ _______
K an sas...... ..............
432, 434
Kentucky__________
450
462
Louisiana.___ _____
Michigan.... ........... .
550
572 403
Minnesota_________
Mississippi_________
596, 597
M isso u ri........ ...........
403
Nebraska... .. ____
653
New Hampshire _
684,685
North Dakota _
801
Ohio_______ _
847,850 403
470
O regon.._ _____ _
_
877
Rhode Island. ____
981
South Carolina______
994,995
1021
T ennessee..________
Texas. ....... ........... .
403
Vermont. ............ ........
1067
Virginia .........
1081 434
Wisconsin ...
1149,1150 470
Railroad trains, operation
of:
Kansas................ ........
433
Texas_________ __
1031,1032,
1037,1038
Railroad trains, etc., suf­
ficient crews required on,
summary of laws as to__
83,84
Railroads, accidents on.
(See Accidents.)
Railroads, construction of
caboose cars on, sum­
mary of laws as to ........
81,82

30
31
40,41
50

49
19
57

48

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

Railroads, hours of labor of
employees on, list of laws
as t o .___ ______ _____
Railroads, o b structing,
hindering operation of,
etc. (See Strikes of rail­
road employees.)
Railroads, safety provi­
sions, etc., on, summary
of laws as to___................
Railroads, shelters for car
repairers, etc., on:
Arkansas___________
California ...................
Illinois..........................
Kansas____________
Mississippi— ______
North Carolina..........
North Dakota______
Oklahoma....................
Oregon..........................
South Carolina______
T ex as..........................
Virginia____________
Railroads, standard work­
day of employees on:
United States_______
Rates of wages of employ­
ees on street railways:
California....... .............
Rates of wages of em­
ployees on public works,
summary of laws as to__

Page

Page
Retirement of workmen:
Massachusetts______
___
Pennsylvania

Bulletin
No. Page

505
909

S

70-82

403
470

9,10
9

403
470

12
12

170
214
361
433
599
790
805
867
876
995
1029
1084
1180,1181
183
102-104

403
470
486

10,11
9
6

434
486

Releases. (See Contracts
of employees waiving
rights to damages.)
Relief department. (See
Benefit societies.)
Removing property of
tenant at night




No.

82,83

Rates of wages of laborers
at salvage:
Virginia_____ _____
1081
Rates of wages of weavers,
etc., to be posted:
M assachusetts......... .
522
Recommendation, letters
of. (See Employers’ cer­
tificates; Service letters.)
Reduction of wages, notice
of. (See Wages, reduc­
tion of, notice of.)
Registration of factories,
etc. (See Factories, etc.,
registration of.)
Rehabilitation of injured
persons:
Illinois
362, 363
Minnesota____
583, 584,590
Oregon
__
879,880
Pennsyl van ia........... . 928-930,942
Rhode Island...............
972, 973
United States
1185-1187
Rehabilitation of injured
persons, State and Fed­
eral cooperation in, sum­
mary of laws as to_____
91-93

Repayment of employers’
advances.
(See Em­
ployers’ advances.)
Restriction of output:
Kansas
Retirement of public em­
ployees, summary of
laws as to

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

10
15,16

403
434
470
486

11,12
5.6
10,11

443, 444
94-96

6.7

Sabotage, summary of
laws as to____________
107-109 403
(See also Interference
with employment.)
Safety museum:
California ________
217
New Jersey....... ..........
731, 732
Safety appliances. (See
Fire escapes on factories:
Inspection of factories;
Railroads, safety provi­
sions on; Street rail­
ways, safety provisions
on.)
Safety lamps. (See Mine
regulations.)
Sailors. (See Seamen.)
Salvage laborers, wa^es of:
Virginia.__________
1081
Sanitation. (See Inspec­
tion of and regulation of
factories, etc.)
Scaffolding, etc.
(See
Protection of employees
on buildings.)
Scrip, payment of images
in. (See Payment of
wages in scrip.)
Seamen:
United States.- _____ 1173,11751177,1191
Seamen, list of State laws
84 403
relating to___________
470
486
Seamen’s hospitals:
1187
United States_______
Seasonal labor:
Washington.. ............
1105,1106
Seats for employed chil­
dren:
281
Delaware___________
291
Florida____________
Kentucky.____ _____
450
Massachusetts______
516
Oklahoma__ _______
861
South Dakota..............
1007
V erm ont.......... ......... 1068,1069
Wisconsin__________
1137
Seats for employees in
stores, etc.:
California...................
221
294
F lo rid a__________
Seats for employeas on
street railways.
(See
Street railways.)
Seats for female em­
ployees:
138
Alabama___________
Arizona____________
155
Arkansas___________
171
C alifornia_________
192,197
Colorado. ............ ......
230, 231
Connecticut.......... ......
267
Delaware___________
281
District of Columbia. _
285
Florida.................... .....
291, 294
G eorgia___________
300, 303
Idaho______________
326
Illin o is____________
351
Indiana .....................
365
Iowa______________
420
430
Kansas.........................
Kentucky__________
453
Louisiana_ ;_______ 464,469, 474
_
482
Maine_____ _______
M aryland................... .
491

13

7

6

4

49

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

No.

Seats for female em­
ployees—Continued.
M assachusetts_____
516
Michigan................. .
541
Minnesota...................
586
Missouri......... .............
616
Montana___________
638
Nebraska........... ..........
654
Nevada____________
673
New Hampshire____
686
New Jersey................ .
703, 704
New York_________
754
North Carolina_____
789
O hio..___ _________
831
Oklahoma__________
861, 871
Oregon____________
885
Pennsylvania.... ..........
919
Philippine Islands___
951
Porto Rico_________
966
Rhode Island_______
974
South Carolina______
991
South Dakota..... ........
1007
Tennessee..................
1013,1014
1040
Texas_____________
Utah..................
1059
Vermont.___ ______
1073
V irg in ia..____
1077
Washington. _ _
1097
West Virginia_______
1114
Wisconsin ...................
1137
Wyoming__________ 1161,1167,
1168
Service letters:
California.. .................
219
Georgia____________
304
Indiana____________
366, 384
Missouri
623
Nebraska
654, 655
669,670
Nevada
Oklahoma__________
865, 866
(See also Employers’ cer­
tificates, forgery of;
Discharge, statement
of cause of.)
Set-offs not to defeat ex­
emption of wages:
Alabama___________
143
Sex no disqualification for
employment:
California
181
Illinois........................
339
Washington___ _____
1091
Shelters over railroad re­
pair tracks. (See Rail­
roads, shelters for car
repairers, etc., on.)
Shuttles:
Connecticut.................
271
Massachusetts.............
519
Rhode Island_______
974
Smelting works, hours of
labor in. (See Hours of
labor in mines, smelters,
etc.)
Smoking in factories, etc.:
Minnesota...................
576
Nevada........................
668
New Jersey.............. .
733
New York...... .............
766
Vermont....... ...............
1073
Washington_______ •
1088
West Virginia_______
1115
Soliciting money from em­
ployees. (See Employ­
ment, foremen, etc., ac­
cepting fees for furnish­
ing.)
State conduct of business,
summary as to ..............
99,100 403




Bulletin
No. 370

Page
Stay of execution in suits
for wages. (See Suits
for wages.)
Steam boilers, inspection
of. (See
Inspection,
etc.)
Steam engineers, examina­
tion, etc., of, digest of
laws relating to

12

Bulletin

Page

Bulletin

No. Page

21-23

Steamboats, employment
of unlicensed engineers
on:
138
Alabama___________
Stevedores:
188,189
California__________
289, 295
Florida____________
1038
Texas_______ ______
Stock for employees of cor­
porations:
221
California__________
363
Illinois_____________
390, 391
Indiana
______
533
Massachusetts______
Michigan . . ______
731
New Jersey.............. .
New York_________ !...................
Ohio
_____
Pennsylvania_______
1108
W ashington.._____
Stockholders, liability of,
62
list of laws determining—
Stop watches. (See Effi­
ciency tests, etc.)
Street railways, employees
on:
473
Louisiana_____ _____
New York...... ........... . 771, 780, 781
Washington------ ------ 1096,1097
Street railways, hours of
labor of employees on.
(See Hours of labor, etc.)
Street railways, protection
of employees on. (See
Protection of employ­
ees.)
Street railways, rights and
remedies of employees
on:
989
South Carolina______
Street railways, safety pro­
visions on:
189
California_________
263
Connecticut________
637
Montana.— _____
686
New Hampshire____
849
Ohio. _____________
1067
Vermont......................
1098
W ashington
1151,1152
Wisconsin
Street railways, seats "for
employees on:
263
Connecticut________
471
Louisiana__________
624, 625
Missouri___________
847
Ohio..................... ......
877
Oregon.......... ..............
1067
Vermont___________
Strike, notice of, in adver­
tisements, etc., for labor­
ers:
208
California__________
226
Colorado______ _____
344
Illinois
_
__
510, 523, 525
Massachusetts
649
M ontana... . _____
691
New Hampshire____
811
North Dakota —
865
Oklahoma_ _______
_
898
Oregon..........................

7
6

403
470

i
i

403

24

1 470
___
403"
[ 403
403

36
38
41
44

470

8

I___

I

470 23,24

50

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

No.

Sunday labor, summary of
laws as to__________
(See also W'eekly d iy of
rest.)
Suspension of work, r otice
of:
South Carolina............
Sweating system:
Connecticut............ .....
Illinois_____________
Indiana. ...................
Maryland__________
M assach usetts______
Michigan__________
M issouri._ ________
New Jersey_________
New York......... ______

Bulletin

Page

Page

Strike, notice of, in adver­
tisements, etc., for labor­
ers—Continued.
Pennsylvania _
916,917
960
Porto Rico
1008 !___
South D a k o ta ..__ .
1011
Tennessee..... ...............
Texas______________
1046
1142 403
55
Wisconsin__________
(See also Employment
of labor, deception in.)
Strike, notice of, to be
signed by citizens:
Nevada.
683
Strikes of coal mine and
public utility employ­
ees:
North Dakota _
809
Strikes of railroad employ­
ees:
Connecticut________
269
Delaware...... ...............
278, 279
Georgia____________
297
Illinois.................. .
361
K ansas________
425, 426, 441
Kentucky_______
451
Maine______ ______
486, 487
New Jersey_____ ___
708, 709
Ohio....... ................... .
850
Pennsylvania_______
933, 934
T exas................ . _. 1034, 10421044
United States______
1191,1192
Strikes, participation in,
not to be bar to employ­
ment:
Minnesota. _ _ . . .
569
Strikes. (See also Arbitra­
tion of labor disputes;
Conspiracy, labor agree­
ments not; Interference
with employment.)
Suits for wages:
California_____ _____
187
Colorado....... ............... 233, 234, 255
Georgia........................
302
Hawaii__________ __
312
Idaho....... ..................
327, 328
Illinois...............
332, 333, 359
Indiana....... ...............
365
Iowa______________
419, 420
Kansas.......... ...............
426
Louisiana................... 458, 461, 471
Massachusetts______
532
M ichigan.............. .
552, 553
Minnesota......... ..........
560, 574
M issouri................ .
604, 623
Montana..... ............. 638, 639, 648
Nebraska______ _
651, 660
Nevada____________
403
33 ;
New Jersey_________
714,715 486 16,17 |
North Carolina_____
790
North Dakota______
799, 808
Ohio. ................... ......
839, 849
Oklahoma________
858
Oregon...................... 873, 885, 899
Pennsylvania_______ 911, 912, 936
Porto Rico.. ..........
960
South D akota............
1002
Texas____________
1026
Utah_____________
1060,1061
I
Vermont_____ ______
1066
Virginia____________
1083
Washington.......... ......
1087
Wisconsin________
1153
Wyoming__________
1161
(See also Payment of
wages; Protection of
wages; Wages as pre­
ferred claims.)




Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

No. Page

66,67

403
434
470

9
5
8

403

39

470

12

994

259, 260
341, 342
380, 381
492-494
520
540, 541
620
702, 703
768-771,
779, 780
Ohio. ..........................
832
Pennsylvania_______
905. 923
Tennessee_________ _ 1015,1016,
1020
Wisconsin__
1142,1148
Syndicalism, summary of
laws as to___________
107-109

T
Taxes of employees, liabil­
ity of employers for,
summary of laws sis to._.
Telegraph operators hours
of labor of. (See Hours
of labor of employees on
railroads.)
Telegraph operators, rail­
road, age of employment,
etc., of:
Arizona____________
G eorgia......... .............
Michigan.......... .........
Nebraska__________
New York_________
W isconsin.___
Telegraph, etc.,wires cross­
ing railroads, height of.
(See Railroad rracks,
etc.)
Tenement manufactures.
(See Sweating system.)
Termination of employ­
ment. (See Employment
of labor; Employment,
termination of, notice
of.)
Time for meals or rest:
Arizona_____ ______
Arkansas.._ ________
California_________
Delaware___ ______
District of Columbia._
Indiana__. . .
Louisiana__________
Maine.... ......................
M arvland... _______
Massachusetts
Minnesota . ___
Missouri_______ ^ __
NewHampshi*e____
New Jersey_________
New York________
O h io ........ ................
O regon..__________
Pennsylvania..............
Philippine Islands___
Wisconsin....................

104,105

160
297
551
653
779
1150

162
171,173
187
275
287
380
464, 469
487, 488
501
516
592
621
690
713
755 434
831
886
919
951
1131

14




51

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin
No.

116 470

13

Page

Page

Page

letin
Page

Truck system. (See Com­
pany stores.)
T u n n e l s . (See C o m­
pressed air, work in;
Mines, etc.)

166,167

U

598, 599
1018

Unemployment insurance.
(See Insurance, unem­
ployment.)
Unemployment, provi­
sions for:
California______ ____
New Jersey.................
Wisconsin__________
Uniforms, influencing rail­
road employees not to
wear. (See Railroad em­
ployees, uniforms of.)
Union label. (See Public
printing, union label to
be used on; Trade­
marks of trade-unions.)
Union newspapers, public
advertising in:
New Jersey.................

136
149
159,164
173
200, 201, 223
240
259, 271
280, 281
285
291
317
353, 359
380,404
411,420
431,434
453
470
519
539, 541,
545, 548
581,586
616, 618,
620, 622
640, 641
655

20

Vaccination of employees:
Connecticut...............
Maine...... ................ .
Massachusetts______
Virginia____________
Ventilation of factories.
(See Factories and work­
rooms and inspection
and regulation.)
Ventilation of mines. (See
Mine regulations.)
Vessels, loading, etc. (See
Stevedores.)

403
682
701, 702,
711, 720,
721 403
759, 7C0,
766, 771
790
804
827, 831,
832, 844
862, 869, 871
919, 922,
926, 927,
932
952
974, 977
986
1006
1014, 1021
1039, 1040,
1042
1079,1080
1097
1115
1146
1168
112-114

V o c a tio n a l

222

723
1122,1123

708

265
277
505, 506
1075

e d u c a t io n ,

summary of laws as to ...

3
2

3

Vocational rehabilitation.

10,11

9

6

(See also Rehabilitation.)

Vocational training for
children. (See Children,
employed, schools for.)
Volunteer servants. (See
Employment of labor.)
Voters, protection of em­
ployees as. (See Absent
voters; Protection of em­
ployees; Time to vote.)
W

Wage brokers, summary
of laws as to_____ _____

9
8

470

5

(See also Assignment of

28
15,16

13,84

wages.)
Wages as preferred claims:
Alabama.....................
Alaska____________
Arizona____________
Arkansas_____ _____
California............... .
Colorado___________
Connecticut............
Delaware.....................
Florida_______ ____
Georgia....... ................
Id ah o .........................

139,143
144
159
166,167
187, 188
235, 253
264, 269
274, 277
289
299
328

52

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page

W a g e s as p r e f e r r e d
claims—Continued.
In d ian a...................
Iowa______________
Kansas................ ........
Louisiana____ _____
M aine... .............. ......
Maryland_ ______
_
Massachusetts............
Michigan . . _______
Minnesota_________
Missouri___________
M ontana___________
Nebraska______ ____
Nevada..... ..................
New Hampshire.........
New Jersey..................

330, 332, 339
366, 373
420
426, 428
464
485
496
534
552, 553
573,574
604, 623
648
651
662, 667, 668
684
697, 668,
706, 709
735, 736
743, 745, 775
785
799
849

No.

New Mexico_______
New York_________
North Carolina_____
North D akota............
Ohio...........................
470
Oklahoma_________
Oregon____________
873, 903
Pennsylvania.. ____ 904, 910, 936
Philippine Islands___
947
982
Rhode Island __
South Dakota ___
1002
1026
U tah........ .................. . 1047,1060,
1062
Vermont....... ............... 1066,1073
Washington................
1087
Wisconsin.................... 1146,1147,
1149,1152,
1153
1157,1161
Wyoming.___ _____
1187 434
United States. ___
Wages, assignment of. (See
Assignment of wages.)
Wages, attachment of. (See
Attachment of wages.)
W'ages, collection of, by
State officials:
193, 222
California.
680
Nevada_ _____ _
_
1105,1106
Washington
Wages, deducting from, for
benefit societies. (See
Forced contributions.)
Wages, discounts, deduc­
tions, etc., from:
178
Arkansas
186
California.
267
Connecticut
313
Hawaii
374
Indiana_____ _
Louisiana486
522,523
Massachusetts
Michigan__
553, 554
584
Minnesota
600
Mississippi _ __
670,674
Nevada .
707, 708
New Jersey
851
Ohio__________
Oregon . . .
898
961. 962
Porto Rico.
996
South Carolina
1160
W yoming
Wages due deceased em­
ployees. (See Payment
of wages due, etc.)
Wages due from contrac­
tors. (See Liability of
stockholders; Protection
of wages.)
Wages due from munici­
palities:
M. assachusett s......... .
511
Missouri.......................
623




Bulletin
No. 370

Page

51

Wages due from predeces­
sors, liability of railroad
companies for:
Wisconsin
Wages, exemption of (See
Exemption of wag( s.)
Wages, garnishment of.
(See Garnishment of
wages.)
Wages, liability of stock­
holders of corporations
for, list of laws determin­
ing_
_
Wages of employees on
public works, retention
of:
California____ _____
Louisiana....................
Wages, payment of. (See
Payment of wages )
Wages, preference of. (See
W ages as preferred
claims.)
Wages, protection of (See
Protection of wages.)
Wages, rates of.
(See
Rates of wages.)
Wages, recovery of. (See
Suits for wages.)
Wages, reduction of, notice
of:
Missouri___ __
Texas.
. .
United States.. _.
Wages, security for. (See
Mechanics’ liens; Pro­
tection of wages; Wages

Bulletin

Page

Bulletin

Noi Page

1150

62 470

8

190 470
486

28
12,13

623
1029
1179

as preferred claims.)

28

Wages, suits for.
(See
Suits for wages.)
Wages, withholding (See
Extortion; Forcec con­
tributions.)
Waiver of right to dam­
ages. (See Contracts of
employees waiving right
to damages.)
W ashrooins, water-c losets,
etc. (See Toilet rooms.)
Water for drinking, etc.:
Alaska______ ______
California___ ____
Delaware . ._ ____
Iowa
____
Massachusetts ._ _
Minnesota_________
Missouri.............. ........
Nevada
New Jersey____ ____
New York...................
Ohio____ _______ __
Pennsvlvania.
_ __
Rhode Island. . __
Weekly day of rest:
California. .
___
Massachusetts ______
Minnesota_________
New York___ ______
Porto R ic o ________
Wisconsin
(See also Days of rest;
Sunday labor.)
Weight that workmen
may carry:
Porto Rico_______ __
Widows, employixent of
children of. (Se<’ Chil­
,
dren of widows.)
Wife’s earnings. (Ste Earn­
ings of married w jmen.)
Windows, colored:
Connecticut.................

149
211
281
420
517
586
622 i
679,680
721
766, 771
844
920
974, 975
191
513
591
754, 755
957, 958 403
470

959

259

45,46
57

53

CUMULATIVE INDEX
Bulletin
No. 370
Page
Wiping cloths or rags:
Ohio.
...........
Women and children. (See
Children and women.)
Women, childbearing, em­
ployment, etc., of:
Crmripnticnt
M assachusetts_____
Missouri ___ _____
New York
______
Philippine Islands___
Vermont___________
Women, employment of,
general provisions:
Arkansas
California ________
Connecticut
_____
______
Delaware
District of Columbia..
Kansas __________
Kentuckv__________
Maine. _ _________
M assachusetts_____
Michigan ________
Minnesota ________
Montana
Nebraska__________
New Jersey ______
New York
______
Ohio______________
__
Oklahoma
Oregon
__
Pennsylvania_______
Philippine Islands___
Porto Rico
____
South Carolina ___
Vermont
____
Virginia
___
Washington ______
Wisconsin
_____

265
514
613
754
952
1069
171-173
197,198
264,265 470
30
275,276
287,288
437,447
453,454
464 434
11
487, 488
495
l
513-516
537,557 470 35,36
591, 592
637, 639
!
654
486
17
758
824,831,
842,843
870, 871
884, 885, 902
906,
918-922
951
965,966
991,992
l
1068,1069
434
19
1108
1131-1133,
1146




1
!
1

Women, hours of labor,
etc., of:
Arizona ___________
Arkansas___________
California__________
Colorado___________
Connecticut________
Delaware__________
District of Columbia..
Georgia ____ _____
Idaho _____________
Illinois_____________
Indiana_______ _____
K ansas____________
Kentucky....................
Louisiana..................
Maine
............ ......
M aryland_________
Massachusetts _ ........ .
Michigan _________
Minnesota. _______
Mississippi..................
Missouri.___ ______
Montana _________
Nebraska.... ......... ......
Nevada ___________
New Hampshire_____
New Jersey................
New Mexico _______
New York.... ..............
North Carolina_____
North D akota............
O hio..____ ________
Oklahoma________ .
Oregon _ _________
Pennsylvania..............
Porto Rico_____ ____
Rhode Island ............
South Carolina...........
South Dakota..............
Tennessee....... ......... .
Texas ____________
Utah..... .......................
Vermont___________
Virginia _________
Washington________
Wisconsin __________
W yom ing_________
Women, married, earnings
c/, summary of laws as
t o ___________ _____
Women, night work by.
(See Women, hours of
labor of.)
W^omen, seats for. (See
Seats for female em­
ployees.)
Women, w'ages of:
Arizona_______ -____
Arkansas.___ ______
Massachusetts .............
M ichigan____ ____
Montana_____ ______
(See also Children and
women;
Minimum
wages.)
Women’s Bureau:
New York ...............
United S tates.............
Wood-sawing machines:
Wisconsin__________

Bulletin

Page

Page

No.

199, 200
520
831,832

Women, employment of,
in dangerous, etc., occu­
pations:
470
Louisiana....................
565,581
Minnesota_________
615
Missouri ________
New York ________ 753, 754, 771
831
O h io ...........................
1132
Wisconsin _ ............
Women, employment of,
in mines. (See Children
and women.)
Women, employment of,
in moving heavy weights:
223
California
______
513,514
Massachusetts______
581
Minnesota
____
831
Ohio ................... ........
Women, employment of.
(See also Children and
women; Seats for female
employees; Sex no dis­
qualification for employ­
ment.)
Women, hiring out to sup­
port husbands in idle­
ness:
464
Louisiana ............ ......
North Carolina_____
787

Bulletin
No. 370

Bulletin

No. Page

162
171
197
229
264,265
275
287,288
300
325,326
354, 355
379
437, 438
453
469
487,488
501
514,515
537, 538
591
602
612, 613
637
651, 654
672, 673
690
715,733
740, 741
758

470

18,19

403

20

789
800, 804,
805, 808
831
861, 870, 871
885
918,919
965
977, 978
991,992
1006
1015
1040
1059, 1060
1069
1077
1097
1131
1167,1168

__ 1
__ 1.......
1
1

434

11

470

37

470
486

48
19

403
40
470 49,50

486

22, 23

434

18,19

403

52

65, 66 486

5

164
172,173
522,523
557
639

748, 749
1172
1149




LIST OF BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
The following is a list of all bulletins of the Bureau of Labor Statistics published since
July, 1912, except that in the case of bulletins giving the results of periodic surveys of the
bureau only the latest bulletin on any one subject is here listed.
A complete list of the reports and bulletins issued prior to July, 1912, as well as the bulletins
published since that date, will be furnished on application. Bulletins marked thus (*) are
out of print.
Conciliation and A rbitration (including strikes and lockouts).
*No. 124. C onciliation and a rb itration in th e bu ildin g trades of Greater N ew York.
[1 9 1 3 .]
♦No. 133. R eport o f th e in d u stria l council o f th e B ritish Board of Trade on its
inquiry into in d u stria l agreem ents.
[ 1 9 i3 .]
No. 139. M ichigan copper d istr ic t strike.
[1 9 1 4 .]
No. 144. In d u strial court o f th e cloak, suit, and skirt ind ustry of N ew York City.
[1 9 1 4 .]
No. 145. C onciliation, a rbitration, and sa n ita tio n in the dress and w a ist ind ustry of
N ew York City.
[1 9 1 4 .]
♦No. 191. C ollective bargaining in th e an th ra cite coal ind ustry.
[1 9 1 6 .]
♦No. 198. CollectW e agreem ents in th e m en’s cloth in g industry.
[19 1 6 .]
No. 233. O peration o f the in d u stria l d ispu tes in v e stig a tio n a ct o f Canada.
[1 9 1 8 .]
No. 255. J o in t in d u stria l councils in G reat B rita in .
[1919.]
No. 283. H istory of th e Sh ipbuilding Labor A dju stm ent Board, 1917 to 1919.
No. 287. N a tio n a l W ar Labor B o a r d : H isto ry of its form ation, a c tiv ities, etc.
[19 2 1 .]
No. 303. U se o f F ederal pow er in settlem en t of railw ay labor disputes.
[1 9 2 2 .]
No. 341. Trade agreem ent in th e silk-ribbon ind ustry o f N ew York C ity.
[1 9 2 3 .]
No. 402. C ollective bargaining by actors.
[1 9 2 6 .]
No. 468. Trade agreem ents, 1927.
No. 481. J o in t in d u stria l control in th e book and job prin tin g ind ustry.
[1 9 2 8 .]
C o o p eratio n .

No. 313. C onsum ers’ cooperative so cieties in the U nited S tates in 1920.
No. 314. C ooperative credit so cieties in A m erica and in foreign countries.
[1 9 2 2 .]
No. 437. C ooperative m ovem ent in the U nited S ta te s in 1925 (other th an agricul­
tu ra l).
Employm ent and Unem ploym ent.
♦No. 109. S ta tistic s o f unem ploym ent and th e w ork o f em ploym ent offices in the
U nited S ta tes.
[1 9 1 3 .]
No. 172. U nem ploym ent in N ew York C ity, N. Y. [1 9 1 5 .]
♦No. 183. R egularity of em ploym ent in th e w om en’s ready-to-w ear garm ent in d ustries.
[1 9 1 5 .]
♦No. 195. U nem ploym ent in th e U nited S ta tes.
[i9 1 6 .]
No. 196. P roceed ings o f th e E m ploym ent M anagers’ Conference held a t M inneapolis,
M inn., Janu ary 19 and 20, 1916.
♦No. 202. P roceedings o f th e conference o f E m ploym ent M anagers’ A ssociation of
B oston, M ass., held May 10, 1916.
No. 206. The B ritish sy stem o f labor exchanges.
[1 9 1 6 .]
No. 227. Proceedings of th e E m ploym en t M anagers’ C onference, P h iladelph ia, Pa.,
A pril 2 and 3, 1917.
No. 235. Em ploym ent sy stem o f th e Lake C arriers’ A ssociation .
[1 9 1 8 .]
♦No. 241. Public em ploym ent offices in th e U nited S ta tes.
[19 1 8 .]
No. 247. P roceedings of E m ploym en t M anagers’ Conference, R ochester, N. Y., May
9 -1 1 , 1918.
No. 310. In d u stria l u n em p lo y m e n t: A s ta tistic a l stu d y of it s ex te n t and causes.
[1 9 2 2 .]
No. 409. U nem ploym ent in Columbus, Ohio, 1921 to 1925.




(I)

Foreign Labor Law s.
♦No. 142. A d m in istra tio n o f labor la w s and fa cto ry in sp ection in certa in E uropean
countries.
[1 9 1 4 .]
H ousing.
♦No. 158. G overnm ent aid to hom e ow nin g and hou sin g of w orking people in foreign
countries.
[1 9 1 4 .]
N o. 263. H ou sin g by em ployers in th e U nited S tates.
[1 9 2 0 .]
N o. 295. B u ild in g op eration s in rep resen tative citie s in 1920.
No. 469. B u ild in g p erm its in th e principal cities of the U n ited S ta te s in [1921 to ]
1927.
Industrial A ccidents and Hygiene.
♦No. 104. L ead poisonin g in potteries, tile w orks, and porcelain enam eled san itary
w are fa cto ries. [19 1 2 .]
No. 120. H ygiene o f th e p a in te rs’ trade. [1 9 1 3 .]
♦No. 127. D angers to w orkers from d u sts and fum es, and m ethods of protection.
(1 9 1 3 .]
♦No. 141. Lead poison in g in the sm eltin g and refining of ead.
[1 9 1 4 .]
♦No. 157. In d u str ia l accid en t sta tis tic s .
[1 9 15.]
♦No. 165. Lead poisonin g in th e m an ufacture of storage b atteries. [1 9 1 4 .]
♦No. 179. In d u stria l poisons used in th e rubber ind ustry. [1 9 1 5 .]
No. 188. R eport o f B ritish departm en tal com m ittee on th e danger in th e use o f lead
in th e p a in tin g of buildings. [1 9 16.]
♦No. 201. R eport o f com m ittee on s ta tis tic s and com pensation insurance cost o f th e
In tern a tio n a l A sso cia tio n o f In d u strial A ccid en t B oards and C om m is­
sions.
[1 9 1 6 .]
♦No. 207. C auses of death, by occupation.
[1 9 1 7 .]
♦No. 209. H ygiene o f th e p rin tin g trades.
[1 917.]
♦No. 219. In d u stria l poisons used or produced in th e m an ufacture o f exp losives.
[1 9 1 7 .]
No. 221. H ours, fa tig u e, and h ea lth in B ritish m u nition fa cto ries.
[1 9 1 7 .]
No. 230. In d u stria l efficiency and fa tig u e in B ritish m u n ition factories. [1917.]
♦No. 231. M o rta lity from respiratory d iseases in d u sty trades (in organ ic d u sts ).
[1 9 1 8 .]
♦No. 234. S a fety m ovem ent in th e iron and ste el ind ustry, 1907 to 1917.
No. 236. E ffects o f th e air ham m er on th e hands of ston ecu tters.
[1 9 1 8 .]
No. 249. In d u str ia l h ea lth and efficiency. F in a l report of B ritish H ea lth of M uni­
tion W orkers’ Com m ittee. [19 1 9 .]
♦No. 251. P rev en ta b le death in th e cotton -m anu facturing ind ustry.
[1 9 1 9 .]
No. 256. A ccidents and accident preven tion in m achine building.
[1 9 1 9 .]
No. 267. A n th ra x as an occu pation al d isease. [1 9 2 0 .]
No. 276. S ta n d a rd iza tio n of in d u stria l accid en t s ta tis tic s .
[19 2 0 .]
No. 280. In d u stria l poisonin g in m aking coal-tar dyes and dye in term ed iates. [1 9 2 1 .]
No. 291. Carbon-m onoxide poisoning.
[1 9 2 1 .]
No. 293. The problem of du st p h th isis in th e granite-ston e ind ustry. [1 9 2 2 .]
No. 298. C auses and preven tion o f accidents in th e iron anc steel in d u stry, 1 9 1 0 -1 9 1 9 .
No. 306. O ccupation hazards and d ia g n o stic sign s : A guide to im p airm en ts to be
looked for in hazardous occu pation s. [1 9 2 2 .]
No. 339. S ta tis tic s o f in d u strial accid en ts in th e U n ited S ta tes. [1 9 2 3 .]
No. 392. Survey o f h y g ien ic conditions in the p rin tin g trades. [1925.]
No. 405. Ph osp horus necrosis in th e m an ufacture of fireworks and in th e preparation
o f phosphorus. [1 9 2 6 .]
N o. 425. Record o f in d u stria l accidents in th e U n ited S ta te s to 1925.
No. 426. D ea th s from lead poisoning.
[1 9 2 7 .]
No. 427. H ea lth survey o f the prin tin g trades, 1922 to 1925.
No. 428. P roceed ings o f th e In d u stria l A ccid en t P reven tion C onference, held a t W ash­
in g to n , D. C., J u ly 1 4 -1 6 , 1926.
No. 460. A new te s t for in d u stria l lead poisoning. [1 9 2 8 .]
No. 466. S ettlem en t for accidents to A m erican seam en. [1 9 2 8 .]
Industrial
No.
N o.
No.
N o.
No.
No.

Relations and Labor Conditions.
237. In d u stria l un rest in G reat B rita in .
[1917.]
340. C hinese m igration s, w ith special reference to labor conditions.
[1 9 2 3 .]
349. In d u stria l rela tio n s in th e W est C oast lumber ind ustry.
[19 2 3 .]
361. Labor relations in th e F airm ont (W . V a.) bitu nin ou s-coal field. [1 9 2 4 .]
380. P o stw a r labor co n d itio n s in Germany. [1 9 2 5 .]
383. W orks council m ovem ent in Germany. [1925.]




(II)

Industrial Relations and Labor Conditions— Continued.
No. 384. Labor co n d itio n s in th e shoe in d u stry in M a ssach u setts, 1 9 2 0 -1 9 2 4 .
No. 399. Labor rela tio n s in th e la ce and lace-curtain in d u stries in th e U nited S tates.
[1 9 2 5 .]
No. 483. C onditions in th e shoe in d u stry in H averhill, M ass., 1928.
Labor Laws o f
No. 211.
No. 229.
No. 285.

the U nited States (including: decisions o f courts relating to labor).
Labor la w s and th eir a d m in istra tio n in the Pacific S tates. [1 9 1 7 .]
W age-paym ent le g isla tio n in the U nited S ta tes. [19 1 7 .]
M inim um w age la w s o f th e U nited S t a t e s : C onstruction and operation.
[19 2 1 .]
No. 321. Labor la w s th a t have been declared u n co n stitu tion al.
[19 2 2 .]
No. 322. K ansas Court o f In d u stria l R elations. [1 9 2 3 .]
No. 343. L aw s providing for bureaus o f labor s ta tistic s, etc. [1923.]
No. 370. Labor la w s o f th e U n ited S ta tes, w ith decision s o f courts rela tin g th ereto.
[1 9 2 5 .]
N o. 408. L aw s rela tin g to paym ent o f w ages. [19 2 6 .]
No. 444. D ecisio n s o f courts and opin ions affecting labor, 1926.
No. 467. M inim um -w age le g isla tio n in various countries.
[1 9 2 8 .]
No. 470. Labor leg isla tio n o f 1927.
Proceedings of A nnual Conventions o f the Association of Governmental Labor Officials of the
U nited States and Canada.
(Name changed in 1928 to A ssociation of Governmental Officials
in Industry o f the U nited States and Canada.)
*No. 266. Seventh, S ea ttle, W ash., J u ly 1 2 -1 5 , 1920.
No. 307. E ig h th , N ew O rleans, La., M ay 2 -6 , 1921.
No. 323. N in th , H arrisburg, Pa., May 2 2 -2 6 , 1922.
No. 352. T enth, R ichm ond, Va., May 1 -4 , 1923.
♦No. 389. E lev en th , Chicago, 111., M ay 1 9 -2 3 , 1924.
*No. 411. T w elfth , S a lt Lake C ity, U tah, A ugust 13—
15, 1925.
No. 429. T h irteen th , Columbus, Ohio, J a n e 7 -1 0 , 1926.
No. 455. F o u rteen th , P aterson, N. J., May 31 to Jun e 3, 1927.
No. 480. F ifte e n th , N ew O rleans, La., M ay 1 5 -2 4 , 1928*
Proceedings o f A nnual M eetings of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards
and Commissions.
No. 210. T hird, Columbus, Ohio, A pril 2 5 -2 8 , 1916.
N o. 248. Fou rth, B oston, M ass., A u gu st 2 1 -2 5 , 1917.
No. 264. F ifth , M adison, W is., Septem ber 24—
27, 1918.
♦No. 273. Sixth, T oronto, Canada, Septem ber 2 3 -2 6 , 1919.
No. 281. Seventh , San F rancisco, C alif., Septem ber 20—
24, 1920.
No. 304. E ighth , Chicago, 111., Septem ber 1 9 -2 3 , 1921.
No. 333. N inth, B altim ore, Md., October 9 -1 3 , 1922.
No. 359. T enth, St. Paul, M inn., Septem ber 2 4 -2 6 , 1923.
No. 385. E leven th, H a lifa x , N ova Scotia, A ugust 2 6 -2 8 , 1924.
No. 395. Index to proceedings, 1 9 1 4 -1 9 2 4 .
No. 406. T w elfth , S a lt Lake City, U tah, A ugust 1 7 -2 0 , 1925.
No. 432. T h irteen th , H artford, Conn., Septem ber 1 4 -1 7 , 1926.
No. 456. Fou rteenth, A tla n ta , Ga., Septem ber 2 7 -2 9 , 1927.
No. 485. F ifte e n th , Paterson, N. J., Septem ber 1 1 -1 4 , 1928. (In press.)
Proceedings of A nnual M eetings of the International Association of Public Employm ent Services.
No. 192. F irst, Chicago, D ecember .19 and 20, 1913 ; second, Ind ian ap olis, Septem ber
24 and 25, 1914 ; th ird , D etroit, J u ly 1 and 2, 1915.
No. 220. Fou rth, Buffalo, N. Y., J u ly 20 and 21, 1916.
No. 311. N inth, Buffalo, N. Y., Septem ber 7 -9 , 1921.
No. 337. T en th, W ashington, D. C., Septem ber 1 1 -1 3 , 1922.
No. 355. E leven th, Toronto, Canada, Septem ber 4 -7 , 1923.
No. 400. T w elfth , Chicago, 111., May 1 9 -2 3 , 1924.
No. 414. T hirteenth, R ochester, N. Y., Septem ber 1 5 -1 7 , 1925.
No. 478. F ifte e n th , D etro it, M ich., October 2 5 -2 8 , 1927.
Productivity of Labor.
No. 356. P ro d u ctiv ity co sts in th e common-brick ind ustry.
[1 9 2 4 .]
N o. 360. Tim e and labor co sts in m a n u fa ctu rin g 100 pairs of shoes, 1923.
No. 407. Labor cost o f production and w ages and hours of labor in th e paper box-.
board in d u stry .
[1 9 2 6 .]
No. 412. W ages, hours, and p ro d u ctiv ity in th e p o ttery ind ustry, 1925.
No. 441. P ro d u ctiv ity o f labor in the g la ss in d u stry . [1 9 2 7 .]
No. 474. P ro d u ctiv ity o f labor in m erchant b la st fu rn aces. [1 9 2 8 .]
No. 475. P ro d u ctiv ity of labor in new spaper p rin tin g. [1928.]




(H I)

R etail Prices and Cost o f Living.
♦No. 121. Sugar prices, from refiner to consum er. [1 9 1 3 .]
♦No. 130. W heat and flour prices, from farm er to consum er. [1 9 1 3 .]
No. 164. B u tter prices, from producer to consum er.
[1 9 1 4 .]
No. 170. F oreign food prices as affected by th e w ar. [19J5.J
No. 357. Cost of liv in g in th e U nited S ta tes. [1 9 2 4 .]
N o. 369. T he use of co st-o f-liv in g figures in w age ad ju stm en ts. [1 9 2 5 .]
No. 464. R eta il prices, 1890 to 1927.
Safety Codes.
♦No. 331. Code o f lig h tin g : Factories, m ills, and other w ork places.
No. 336. S a fety code for the p rotection of in d u strial w orkers in fou ndries.
No. 350. Sp ecifications o f laboratory te sts for approval o f electric h ea d lig h tin g
d evices for m otor vehicles.
No. 351. S a fety code for th e construction, care, and use of ladders.
No. 375. S a fety code for laundry m achinery and o p e r a tio is.
No. 378. S a fety code for w oodw orking plan ts.
No. 382. Code for lig h tin g school buildings.
No. 410. Sa fety code for paper and pulp m ills.
No. 430. S a fety code for power presses and foot and hand presses.
No. 433. S a fety codes for the preven tion of dust explosior s.
No. 436. S a fety code for th e use, care, and protection of abrasive w heels.
No. 447. S a fety code for rubber m ills and calenders.
N o. 451. S a fety code for forging and hot-m etal stam ping.
No. 463. S a fety code for m echanical pow er-transm ission ap p aratu s.— F ir s t revision .
V ocational Workers* Education.
*No. 159. Sh ort-u n it courses for w age earners, and a factory school experim ent.
[1 9 1 5 .]
*No. 162. V ocational education survey o f Richm ond, Va. [1915.]
No. 199. V ocation al education survey of M inneapolis, M inn.
[1 9 1 7 .]
No. 271. A dult w orking-class education in Great B r ita ij and th e U n ited S ta tes.
[1 9 2 0 .]
No. 459. A pprenticeship in building construction.
[1928 ]
W ages and Hours o f Labor.
♦No. 146. W ages and regu larity o f em ploym ent and stan d ard ization of piece rates in
th e dress and w a ist ind ustry of N ew York. |1 9 1 4 .]
♦No. 147. W ages and reg u la rity o f em ploym ent in th e cloak, suit, and sk irt ind ustry.
[1 9 1 4 .]
No. 161. W ages and hours of labor in th e clo th in g and cigar in d u stries, 1911 to 1913.
No. 163. W ages and hours o f labor in the bu ildin g and lep a irin g o f steam railroad
cars, 1907 to .1913.
♦No. 190. W
rages and hours o f labor in the cotton, w oolen, and silk in d u stries, 1907
to 1914.
No. 204. Street-ra ilw a y em ploym ent in th e U nited S ta te s
[1917.]
No. 225. W ages and hours of labor in th e lum ber, m illw ork, and fu rn itu re in d u stries,
1915.
No. 265. In d u stria l survey in selected in d u stries in th e U n ited S ta te s, 1919.
No. 297. W ages and hours of labor in th e petroleum in d u stry, 1920.
No. 356. P ro d u ctiv ity costs in th e common-brick in d u stry. [1 9 2 4 .]
No. 358. W ages and hours o f labor in th e autom obile-tire in d u stry, 1923.
No. 360. T im e and labor costs in m an ufacturin g 100 pairs o f shoes, 1923.
No. 365. W ages and hours of labor in th e paper and pulp in d u stry, 1923.
No. 394. W ages and hours of labor in m eta lliferou s m in e -i, 1924.
No. 407. Labor costs o f production and w ages and hours of labor in th e paper boxboard ind ustry. [19 2 6 .]
No. 412. W ages, hours, and p ro d u ctiv ity in th e p ottery n d ustry, 1925.
No. 413. W ages and hours o f labor in the lum ber ind ustry in the U n ited S ta tes, 1925.
No. 416. H ours and earn ings in a n th ra cite and bitum in ous coal m in ing, 1922 and
1924.
No. 435. W ages and hours o f labor in th e men's cloth in g in d u stry, 1911 to 1926.
No. 438. W ages and hours of labor in th e m otor-vehicl i in d u stry, 1925.
No. 442. W ages and hours o f labor in th e iron and ste el industry, 1907 to 1925.
No. 443. W ages and hours of labor in w oolen and w orsted goods m an u factu rin g, 1910
to 1926.




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W ages and Hours of Labor— C ontinued.
No. 446. W ages and hours of labor in cotton-goods m an ufacturin g, 1910 to 1926.
T
No. 450. W ages and hours o f labor in th e boot and shoe industry, 1907 to 1926.
No. 452. W ages and hours o f labor in th e h osiery and underw ear in d u stries, 1907
to 1926.
No. 454. H ours and earnings in bitum inous-coal m in ing, 1922, 1924, and 1926.
No. 471. W ages and hours of labor in foundries and m achine shops, 1927.
No. 472. W ages and hours of labor in slau gh terin g and m eat packing, 1927.
No. 476. U nion scales o f w a g es and hours of labor, 1 9 2 7 -1 9 2 8 . Supplem ent to B ui.
No. 457.
No. 482. U nion scales o f w ages and hours o f labor, M ay 15, 1928. (In p ress.)
No. 484. W ages and hours o f labor of common str ee t labor, 1928. (In p ress.)
W elfare Work.
♦No. 123. E m ployer’s w elfa re w ork.
[1913.]
No. 222. W elfare w ork in B ritish m u nition s fa cto ries. [19 1 7 .]
T
♦No. 250. W elfare work for em ployees in in d u stria l estab lish m en ts in th e U nit9d
S ta tes.
[1 9 1 9 .]
No. 458. H ea lth and recreation a c tiv itie s in in d u stria l estab lish m en ts, 1926.
Wholesale Prices.
No. 284. Index num bers o f w h o lesa le prices in th e U n ited S ta tes and foreign coun­
tries.
[1 9 2 1 .]
No. 453. R evised index num bers o f w h olesale prices, 1923 to July, 1927.
No. 473. W holesale prices, 1913 to 1927.
W men and Children in Industry.
No. 116. Hours, earnings, and du ration o f em ploym ent o f w age-earn ing w om en in
selected in d u stries in th e D istr ict of Colum bia. [19 1 3 .]
♦No. 117. P ro h ib itio n of n ig h t work of youn g persons. [1913.]
No. 118. Ten-hour m axim um w orking-day for w om en and young persons.
[1 9 1 3 .]
No. 119. W orking hours of w om en in th e pea canneries of W iscon sin . [1 9 1 3 .]
T
*No. 122. E m ploym en t o f w om en in pow er laun dries in M ilw aukee.
[1913.]
No. 160. H ours, earn ings, and conditions o f labor o f w om en in In d ian a m ercan tile
e sta b lish m en ts and garm ent fa cto ries.
[1 914.]
♦No. 167. M inimum-wT
age le g isla tio n in the U nited S tates and foreign countries.
[19 1 5 .]
♦No. 175. Sum m ary o f th e report on conditions of w om an and child w age earners in
th e U nited S ta tes.
[1 9 1 5 .]
♦No. 176. E ffect o f m inim um -w age d eterm inations in Oregon. [1 9 1 5 .]
♦No. 180. The boot and shoe in d u stry in M a ssa ch u setts as a voca tio n for wom en.
[1 9 1 5 .]
♦No. 182. U nem ploym ent am ong w om en in departm ent and other r etail stores of
B oston, M ass.
[1 9 1 6 .]
No. 193. D ressm aking as a trade for women in M assachusetts.
[1 9 1 6 .]
No. 215. In d u stria l experience ot trade-school g irls in M assachusetts.
[1 9 1 7 .]
♦No. 217. E ffect of w orkm en’s com pensation law s in dim inishin g th e n ecessity of
in d u stria l em ploym ent of women and children.
[1918.]
No. 223, E m ploym ent o f w om en and ju v en iles in Great B rita in during th e war.
[1 9 1 7 .]
No. 253. W omen in th e lead in d u stries.
[1 9 1 9 .]
Workmen’s Insurance and Compensation (including law s relating thereto).
*No. 101. Care of tuberculous w age earners in G erm any. [1912.]
♦No. 102. B ritish n a tio n a l insurance act, 1911.
No. 103. Sickness and accid en t insurance law in Sw itzerland.
[1 9 1 2 .]
No. 107. L aw rela tin g to insurance o f salaried em ployees in Germany. [1 9 1 3 .]
*No. 155. C om pensation for accid en ts to em ployees o f th e U nited S tates.
[1 9 1 4 .]
No. 212. P roceedings o f th e conference on so cia l in su ran ce called by th e In te r ­
n a tio n a l A sso cia tio n of In d u str ia l A ccid en t B oards and C om m issions,
W ashington, D. C., Decem ber 5 -9 , 1916.
♦No. 243. W orkm en’s com pensation leg isla tio n in th e U n ited S ta tes and foreign
countries, 1917 and 1918.
No. 301. Com parison o f w orkm en’s com pensation insurance and ad m in istration .
[1 9 2 2 .]
No. 312. N a tio n a l h ea lth insurance in Great B ritain , 1911 to 1921.
No. 379. C om parison of w orkm en’s com pensation law s of the U n ited S ta tes as o f
Janu ary 1, 1925.




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W orkmen’s Insurance and Compensation (including laws relating thereto)— C ontinued.
No. 423. W orkm en’s com pensation le g isla tio n of th e U nited S ta tes and Canada as
o f J u ly 1, 1926.
N o. 477. P u blic-service retirem en t system s, U n ited S ta te s and Europe. [1 9 2 8 .]
M iscellaneous Series.
*No. 174. Subject ind ex o f the pu blication s of th e U nited S ta te s B ureau o f Labor
S ta tistic s up to M ay 1, 1915.
No. 208. Profit sharing in the U n ited S ta tes.
[1 9 1 6 .]
No. 242. Food situ a tio n in cen tral Europe, 1917.
No. 254. In tern a tio n a l labor leg isla tio n and the so ciety of n ation s.
[1 9 1 9 .]
No. 268. H isto rica l su rvey o f in ter n a tio n a l action affectin g labor. [1920.]
No. 282. M utual r elief association s am ong G overnm ent em ployees in W ash in gton ,
D. C. [1 9 2 1 .]
No. 299. P erson n el research a g e n c ie s : A guide to organized research in em ploy­
m ent m anagem ent, in d u stria l r elation s, tr a i ring, and w orking condi­
tion s.
[1 9 2 1 .]
No. 319. T he B ureau o f Labor S ta tistic s : I ts h istory, a c tiv ities, and organization .
[1 9 2 2 .]
No. 326. M ethods o f procuring and com puting s ta tis tic a l inform ation of th e Bureau
of Labor S ta tistic s.
[1 9 2 3 .]
No. 342. In te r n a tio n a l Seam en’s U nion o f A m e r ic a : A study of its h isto ry and
problem s. [1 9 2 3 .]
No. 346. H u m a n ity in governm ent.
[1 9 2 3 .]
No. 372. C onvict labor in 1923.
No. 386. C ost o f A m erican a lm shou ses. [1 9 2 5 .]
No. 398. G row th o f legal-aid work in th e U nited S tates.
[1 9 2 6 .]
No. 401. F a m ily allow ances in foreign countries.
[19 2 6 .]
No. 420. H andbook of Am erican trade-unions.
[1 9 2 6 .]
No. 439. Handbook of labor s ta tistic s, 1924 to 1926.
No. 461. Labor organization in Chile. [1928.]
No. 462. Park recreation areas in th e U nited S tates.
[3 9 2 8 .]
No. 465. B eneficial a c tiv ities o f A m erican trade-unions.
[19 2 8 .]
No. 479. A c tiv ities and fu n ctio n s of a S tate departm en t of labor.
[1 9 2 8 .]




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