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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
J A M E S J . D A V IS , S ecreta ry

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ETHELBERT STEWART, Commissioner

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES )
BUREAU OF L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S )
LA B O R

LAWS

OF

THE

U N ITED

.

• • No. 330
STATES

SERIES

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1922




M AY, 1923

W A S H IN G T O N
G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F IC E

1923




ADDITIONAL COPIES
OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM
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GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON, D. C.
AT

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PURCHASER AGREES NOT TO RESELL OR DISTRIBUTE THIS
COPY FOR PRO FIT— PUB. RES. 57, APPROVED MAY 11, 1922

CONTENTS,

Review o! labor legislation of 1922:
Page.
Introduction...............................................................................................................
1
Regulation of contract of em ploym ent.................................................................
1
Examination and licensing of workmen...............................................................
2
Wages...........................................................................................................................
2,3
Hours of labor.............................................................................................................
3
Holidays and rest days.............................................................................................
3
Hygiene and safety...................................................................................................
3,4
3
Factories___ "......................................................................................................
M ines...................................................................................................................
3
Railroads..............................................................................................................
3,4
Buildings.............................................................................................................
4
Children ana wom en................................................................................................
4,5
Employment offices..................................................................................................
5
Bureaus of labor.........................................................................................................
5
Mothers’ pensions......................................................................................................
5, 6
Re firemen t provisions..............................................................................................
6
Employers’ liability..................................................................................................
6
Accident, etc., insii ranee........................................................................................
7
Vocational rehabilitation.........................................................................................
7
Labor organizations and labor disputes.................................................................
7
State and industrial police......... ............................................................................
7, 8
Cooperative assoeiarions...............................................
8
Civil rights of employees..........................................................................................
8
Convict labor.
..................................................................................................
8, 9
Investigative commissions.......................................................................................
9
Laws of various States relating to labor enacted since January 1, 1923:
K entucky....................................................................................................................
11
Louisiana.....................................................................................................................
13
Maryland........................................................................................................................ 15-17
Massachusetts............................................................................................................. 19-21
Mississippi....................................................................................................................23, 24
New Jersey.....................................................................................................................25,26
New Y ork....... .............................................................................................................. 27-32
Rhode Island.............................................................................................................. 33, 34
South Carolina...............................................................................................................35-37
Virginia........................................................................................................................ 39-45
United States................................................................................................................ 47-50




ill




BULLETIN OF THE

U. S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON

NO. 330

M AY, 1923

REVIEW OF LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1922.
By

L in d l e y D . C l a r k .

INTRODUCTION.
The legislatures of 11 States and the Philippine Islands, and Congress
met in 1922 in regular session, besides three extra sessions; New York
also met in extra session for the specific purpose of dealing with the
marketing of coal. The amount of labor legislation was compara­
tively small, even taking into consideration the small number of
bodies that met. Compensation amendments are not included in the
resent compilation, but are presented in a separate series. The
asic bulletin for general labor legislation is number 148, with annual
supplements beginning with 1914. These bear the numbers 166, 186,
213, 244, 257, 277, 292, and 308. Each bulletin carries a cumulative
index, so that the entire material on any given subject m ay be
referred to by the use of the index in the latest number issued.
Of the labor legislation presented in this bulletin, perhaps the most
numerous changes are made in reference to the employment of chil­
dren, though some important legislation relates to the organization of
State departments of labor. Though few in actual numbers, there is
a significance in the enactments modifying earlier legislation on the
subject of train crews, the apparent current tendency being to do
away with statutory numbers and leave the subject in the hands of a
commission whose action can meet particular conditions.

E

REGULATION OF CONTRACT OF EM PLOYM ENT.
The prohibition of the use of stop watches, the devices for measur­
ing production, as well as the offering of a bonus or cash reward to
stimulate output, continues to be forbidden by the appropriation bills
for the Arm y (No. 259) and the N avy (No. 264). Payment of wages
to civilian employees out of Arm y funds is limited to the rates cur­
rently in use in the locality, and a preference is directed for the use
of domestic productions. In this connection may be mentioned an
act of the Massachusetts Legislature (ch. 517), which directs that
where work is done by the State or a county, city or town, or by con­
tractors therewith, preference is to be given to citizens or partnerships
all of whose members are citizens, though this is not to extend to
the acceptance of a higher bid than one made by nonresidents.




1

LABOR LEG ISLATIO N OF 1922.

2

EXAMINATION AND LICENSING OF WORKMEN.
Little was added in this field in 1922, the Massachusetts Legisla­
ture being chiefly active. This State increased the allowance of travel­
ing expenses, etc., of plumbers’ examiners from $500 to $750 per
annum (ch. 481), an indirect encouragement of their activity; and
directed by resolution (ch. 20) the registrar of motor vehicles to con­
sider the advisability of establishing a system for licensing motor
repairmen. Mention may also be made o f a provision for a board of
experts to test the competency of aviators (ch. 534); a license fee
of $5 is charged, annual renewals being of the same amount. A
Kentucky statute (ch. 77) fixes places of holding examinations of
mine foremen, etc., at least one examination each year to be held at
each o f the places mentioned. Chauffeurs are considered in a Philip­
pine statute (No. 3045) which requires competency, an age of 16
years, and a fee of 5 pesos ($2.50); renewals are to be made annually.

WAGES.
A n act of the South Carolina Legislature (No. 537) directs that the
wages of textile employees working on the premises shall be paid
during working hours. A different aspect of the wage question was
considered by the same legislature in its repeal of No. 162, Acts of
1915, which forbade the giving of tips to waiters, barbers, train
porters, etc. (No. 541). On the other hand, New Jersey (ch. 145)
amended and strengthened its law on the subject of gifts or bribes
to employees charged with representation of their employers, adding
the proviso that if a corporation, partnership or other organization
violates the statute the person or persons acting shall also be deemed
guilty; one who first turns State’s evidence giving testimony tending
to convict another of guilt is to be allowed immunity.
A Kentucky statute (ch. 131), forbidding the use of trading stamps,
included also the issue of coupons, tokens, etc., “ in connection with
work, services, or labor performed for reward or com pensation/’ It
was attacked as a trading-stamp law, and declared unconstitutional
in its entirety. (Lawton v. Stewart Dry Goods Co., 247 S. W . 14).
A Virginia statute (ch. 268) authorizes the payment of wages due
a deceased workman in amount not exceeding $300, to be paid to
the next of kin without administration.
The Federal bankruptcy law, as amended (No. 121), provides that
wages earned within three months prior to the bankruptcy and
employees’ deposits to secure faithful performance are not discharged
by a release in bankruptcy.
Several laws were passed relative to mechanics’ liens, one in
Mississippi (ch. 282) extending the time within which sawmill em­
ployees may begin action for enforcement from three months to six
months. A provision of the South Carolina law relative to the sale
of property left at a shop for repairs was amended by A ct N o. 523,
while another act (No. 526) adds the boring and equipping of wells
to the kinds of work for which a lien may be given. Two amend­
ments were made to the Virginia law, one (ch. 9) relating to the
rights of employees of transportation companies and the other
(ch. 498) to payments for work or material for the construction,
removal, repair, or improvement of buildings. Instead of a mech­




H Y G IE N E AND SAFETY.

3

anic’s lien, an act of the Louisiana Legislature (No. 139) directs
that contracts for buildings, etc., be recorded and that a bond be
given and recorded, conditioned on the payment of all subcontractors,
workmen and material men.

HOURS OF LABOR.
The only substantial change in this field was made by the South
Carolina Legislature (No. 567), fixing the maximum hours of labor
per week in textile mills at 55 instead of 60. The hours per day (10)
are unchanged, and the statute also provides that employers may
make up as much as 60 hours per year of lost time. A Kentucky
statute (ch. 31) penalizes any employer who adonts for his workmen
daylight saving or any other time than standard" central time unless
adopted by State authorities. Mention may be made, though not
related to employees, of a Mississippi statute (ch. 242) which fixes
eight hours as a day’s work for working out poll tax on public roads.

HOLIDAYS AND REST DAYS.
Virginia (ch. 21) was the only State to follow the example of a
considerable number of States which have adopted November 11,
Armistice Day, as a legal holiday.
A law of Massachusetts (ch. 234) directs that scrubwomen employed
by the State be allowed two weeks per annum as vacation after six
months of employment.

HYGIENE AND SAFETY.
FACTORIES.

Few laws appear under this heading this year. One of Kentucky
(ch. 125) relates to dry-cleaning and dyeing establishments, and
is unusually detailed in a field not much developed. It is chiefly a
fire-prevention statute, practically no reference being made to
the subject of employment conditions. Another law is likewise a
border-line statute, being an act of the Maryland Legislature (ch. 120)
providing for the regulation of soft-drink factories. Here the chief
concern is the health of the public; but some provisions, as sanitation,
the prohibition of the employment of diseased persons, etc., affect
employees. See also under Bureaus of Labor (Va., ch. 373).
MINES.

Apart from the provision for the examination of mine foremen,
under another head, the only law affecting mines was passed in Mary­
land (ch. 307). This is a lull code with standard provisions as to
ventilation, safety, first aid, qualifications of bosses and inspectors,
etc., superseding and repealing existing laws covering mining oper­
ations in the State.
RAILROADS.

The New York law on the subject of the inspection of locomotives
was materially amended (eh. 601), details as to inspection, the
construction of boilers, and the appointment of inspectors being




4

LABOR LEG ISLATIO N OF 1922.

touched upon. Another act (ch. 336) repeats the customary post­
ponement of the date when the law regulating the construction of
coal jimmies and caboose cars shall become operative, the date being
set by this statute as July , 1923.
The Maryland statute prescribing specific train crews was re­
pealed by chapter 143, and the public service commission of the
State is given power to prescribe suitable crews for trains either on
complaint or on its own motion. The New Jersey Legislature
had previously taken similar action, but left standing a section
of the law which forbade reduction in the numbers as fe e d by the
old act unless the board of public utility commissioners should
authorize the change. The present statute (ch. 270) repeals this
section.

1

EMPLOYEES ON BUILDINGS.

A single enactment under this heading weakens rather than
strengthens .the protection afforded by the law amended. An act
of the New York Legislature prohibited the hoisting of material on
the outside of certain buildings. This prohibition is now restricted
to “ lumber or timber,” so that other material may now be hoisted
external to the structure (ch. 1).

CHILDREN AND WOMEN.
The most important piece of legislation under this heading is the
enactment of a complete new code in Virginia (ch. 489). Previous
laws on the subject are repealed, the present statute undertaking to
present a complete body of law on the subject. The age for begin­
ning work is fe e d at 14 years for any gainful occupation except in
farm, orchard, or garden work. Children under 16 may not work
more than 8 hours per day or 48 hours per week nor between 6 p. m .
and 7 a. m. Children under 16 must have a certificate, issue of
which is regulated according to the standard methods. An excep­
tion is made as to work in canneries, in which children from 12 to 16
m ay be employed eight hours daily outside of the school term.
Special legislation as to dangerous occupations, messenger service,
and street trades is embodied. Another statute (ch. 381) makes
school attendance compulsory to 14 years instead of 12 as formerly,
but contains a provision exempting any child who has completed an
elementary course of study and is regularly and lawfully employed.
A n unusual law making it a misdemeanor to endanger life or health
or morals or overwork or treat cruelly any child was also passed by
this legislature (ch. 284).
A Louisiana law (No. 117) on the subject of school attendance
requires children from 7 to 14 to attend a full term or 140 days, but
exempts needy widows] children. In Rhode Island (ch. 2232) em­
ployment certificates will be issued only on a showing that the child
has completed six grades of school; while in New York (ch. 464) the
law as to the employer filing employment certificates, prescribing
penalties for violations, and the issuing of various classes of cer­
tificates is amended in several details. An act of Maryland (ch. 350)
advances from 50 cents to $1 the fee for the physical examina­
tion of the child applying for a work certificate, and authorizes the
bureau of labor statistics to exercise a vocational supervision of
children up to the age of 18 years.




m others

’

p e n s io n s .

5

A Massachusetts statute providing for the establishment of con­
tinuation schools for employed children was amended so as to permit
the discontinuance of such schools if the number of eligible children
in the locality falls below 200 for two consecutive years (ch. 401).

EMPLOYMENT OFFICES.
A single statute appears under this heading, being an appropria­
tion by Congress of $225,000 to enable the United States Secretary of
Labor to establish a national system for clearing labor between the
States and coordinating public employment offices throughout the
country (No. 183).

BUREAUS OF LABOR.
In Maryland (ch. 29) and New Jersey (ch. 252) there was a general
reorganization of the offices administering the labor legislation of the
States, the change in Maryland taking place in connection with a
eneral reorganization of the State executive and administrative
epartments; while in New Jersey the act relates exclusively to the
department of labor. In both States considerable changes are
effected in the grouping and assignment of the various activities of
the offices. The United States Department of Labor received a
second assistant secretary of labor by the provisions of A ct No. 260;
while in Massachusetts (ch. 537) the industrial accident board was
enlarged to consist of seven members, one of whom is required by
the law to be a woman.
The commissioner of labor of Rhode Island (ch. 2160) is authorized
to expend $5,000 per annum instead of $3,000, as formerly, in the
performance of the duties devolving upon him.
Extensive amendments were made in the law of Virginia relating
to the powers of the commissioner of labor as to inspection, law
enforcement, etc. (ch. 373). The provisions of the Code of 1919
relative to seats for female employees, blacklisting, toilets, safety
appliances, and lighting were also amended.

S

MOTHERS* PENSIONS.
Statutes under this head are only indirectly connected with the
question of labor, but are enumerated because of the relationship
that does exist. In Massachusetts (ch. 376) aid may be extended to
mothers of children under 16 years of age if the child is required by
law to attend school and his assistance is needed. A New York law
(ch 546) adds a new article to chapter 24 of the Consolidated Laws,
establishing boards of child welfare in counties whose supervisors
take the necessary steps in favor of such action; this law applies
outside the city oi New York and of Dutchess and Suffolk Counties.
Virginia (ch. 488) authorizes an allowance by county or city boards
of public welfare, or by juvenile courts, domestic relations courts, or
other courts for the aid of mothers of children under 16 years of age,
if the father is dead, imprisoned, or disabled.
Other legislation that may be mentioned under this head is a law of
Rhode Island (ch. 2180) providing for a State director of mothers’
aid to look after the needs of mothers with children under 14 years of




«

LABOR LEG ISLATIO N OF

1922.

age; and a joint resolution (No. :9) of the Maryland Legislature
accepting the provisions of the Federal statute of 1921 relative to
cooperation between State and Federal agencies in the matter of
maternity aid.

RETIREMENT PROVISIONS.
The laws under this head relate entirely to public employment, but
are indicative of a steady if slow growth of the idea. An amendment
(ch. 341) of a Massachusetts law provides for the computation of
board and housing furnished to State employees as a part of the basic
wage for reckoning retirement allowances." Another act '(eh. 521)
relates to public employees of the city of Boston or of Suffolk County;
a cooperative fund to which employees contribute 4 per cent of their
wages is established ; retirement is made optional at 60 and compulsory
at .70, the annuity not to exceed one-half the pay for the average for
the last five years of service. Provisions are also made for disability.
A New Jersey statute (ch. 127) relates to the retirement of county
employees only if incapacitated, allowing an annuity of one-half the
•last year's pay if 60 years of age after 30 years of service.
Two acts of the New York Legislature bear on this subject, one
=(eh. -591) permitting certain county and city employees to join the
State retirement association; while the other (ch. 592) amends the
State law as to scope, contributions from wages, restoration after
retirement, etc.
The Federal statute providing for the retirement of civil service
employees received attention in four separate acts, one (No. 142)
relating merely to procedure in the departments, the keeping of
records, etc.; the second (No. 182) lavs down the construction to be
placed upon the original act, declaring that it covers all employees in
the classes affected, whether the position was obtained by competitive
examination, Executive order, or otherwise. The third enactment
(No. 243) relates to charwomen, laborers, and others, classified or
unclassified, who are paid less than $600 per annum. Their retire­
ment allowance is to be computed on a percentage basis, and shall not
exceed the percentage nor the maximum provided for the term of
service. The fourth act (No. 363) provides for workmen who are
discharged without fault. If these are 55 years of age they m ay
receive an annuity certificate which will mature at the retiring age
for their class; or they may receive an annuity at once scaled down
according to the number of years intervening until the retirement age.

EMPLOYERS5 LL4BIMTY.
A Massachusetts statute (ch. 215) forbids waivers by any contract
or agreement where an employer m ay be liable for injuries to his
workmen. A Mississippi statute (ch. 229) amends section 721 of
the Code of 1906, which provides for actions for injuries causing
death. This act provided for a survival of action in fatal cases
where the deceased, if the injury had not been fatal, would have
been entitled to sue. This act makes that provision of law applica­
ble to employees and prescribes the distribution of the amount
required.




STATE AN D IN D U ST R IA L PO LICE.

7

ACCIDENT, ETC., INSURANCE.
An act of the New York Legislature (ck. 108) amends the law on
the subject of insurance of employees, authorizing a collective policy
by which an employee may insure a group of workmen. A second
statute (ch. 286) amends the same law, exempting employers’
liability and workmen’s compensation policies and blanket company
or association policies from the conditions fixed for accident and
health policies generally.

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION.
A number of States accepted the Federal statute of 1920, providing
State and Federal cooperation in the matter of the rehabilitation
of persons injured in industry or otherwise. Such action was taken
in Kentucky (ch. 66), Louisiana (No. 125), Mississippi (ch. 189),
and Virginia (ch. 516). Kentucky makes a specific appropriation,
Louisiana engages to comply with the requirements of the law,
Mississippi engages to make an appropriation at least equal to the
Federal allotment, and Virginia simpty accepts the statute, directing
the State board on vocational education to act.

LABOR ORGANIZATIONS AND LABOR DISPUTES.
A Massachusetts law (ch. 151) provides that the filing of certifi­
cates, insignia, badges, etc., of labor and other similar organizations
shall be effective as a recording of such instruments or insignia.
An act of the Virginia Legislature (ch. 17) strikes out the specific
penalty for the unauthorized use of insignia, badges, etc., as defined
m section 4719 of the Code, leaving such violations simply as misde­
meanors subject to the general penalty.
A South Carolina statute (No. 589) makes arbitration obligatory
on both parties of a labor dispute on the request of either one, the
statute being restricted to street-railway service. Appeals are
allowed to the court on questions of law and fact, but if none are taken
the award is binding on all parties. The United States Board of
Mediation and Conciliation, created by an act of 1913, while not
abolished was practically superseded b y the transportation act of
1920, creating a railroad labor board. B y an act of the present
Congress (No. 109) the earlier board was abolished as of December
1, 1921.
Criminal syndicalism laws of recent years have been rather fre­
quent, but 1922 saw but one such act. This was in Kentucky (ch.
20), where, however, the law is only political in its aspect ana con­
tains no industrial or labor, reference.

STATE AND INDUSTRIAL POLICE.
The laws of Massachusetts and New Jersey on the subject of State
police were amended in the direction of an increase of force. In
Massachusetts (ch. 331) the number of men that may be employed
was increased; while in New Jersey (ch. 271) the force is organized
in three groups instead of two, with corresponding changes in staff.
The New Jersey law authorizing the designation cf certain persons
as railroad, etc., police, to be paid by the designating corporation,




LABOR LEG ISLATIO N OR 1922.

8

was amended (ch. 153) by striking out the limitation that required
such appointees to be ratified by the officers of cities of the first
and second class before such officers could act within the city limits,
thus considerably enlarging the authority of such persons.

COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATIONS.
As indicative of the interest taken in the solution of the problem
of the cost of living as affected by distribution, mention m ay be made
of the statutes providing for cooperative associations. The Kentucky
Legislature provided (ch. 1) for the organization of such bodies for
the marketing of farm products; while another act (ch. 109) permits
foreign associations of substantially the same purposes and methods
to use the title “ cooperative” with the meaning determined by the
State law. The Maryland statute (ch. 197) authorizes associations
for the purpose of producing and marketing farm products, with
power to buy and sell for their members. In New Jersey also (ch. 11)
an amendment to the Act of 1920 relates to the power oi agricultural,
horticultural, dairying, etc., associations to buy and sell, providing
that they may also act in this respect for nonmembers. Amendments
to the New York law relate to methods of voting by members (chs.
447, 448); while the Virginia statute (ch. 48) authorizes five or more
persons engaged in the production of farm products to form coopera­
tive associations for marketing.

CIVIL RIGHTS OF EMPLOYEES.
The law of South Carolina relating to the State militia (No. 501)
contains provisions forbidding employers to discriminate against
members of the State militia; a like inhibition is directed to clubs,
associations, etc., in regard to receiving such persons into member­
ship.
The Philippine Legislature (No. 3030) amended the earlier law
on the subject of the protection of employees as voters, relative to
threats of loss of employment or pay or promise of employment or
pay, making such acts misdemeanors if committed in connection
with “ any forthcoming election.” The New York election law
(ch. 588) provides in section 200 that two hours shall be allowed
as voting time for employees, and if advance notice has been given, no
reduction of wages m ay "be made for two consecutive hours’ absence.
The same act provides for voting by persons absent from their
homes, permitting voting anywhere withm the United States upon
complying with the prescribed formalities. The Virginia law (ch.
505) provides for voting anywhere either within or without the
United States through an American consulate or through official
channels from members of the Army and Navy. A Minnesota law
(ch. 256), while making the absent voters’ provision applicable to all
elections, is restricted to voting within the State.

CONVICT LABOR.
In Kentucky (ch. 34) convicts m ay not be employed outside the
enitentiary, except in quarrying or mining road material and on
tate farms in the production of food for the inmates of the particular

E




IN VESTIG ATIVE CO M M ISSIO N S.

9

institution in which convicts are confined. The Virginia Legislature
finds that road work is not suitable for certain classes of convicts
and provides (ch. 6) that such convicts may be employed on farms,
quarries, and in prison shops, etc.

INVESTIGATIVE COMMISSIONS.
Massachusetts leads in the number of investigative commissions
on various subjects of industrial and economic interest. Its existing
commission on “ the necessaries of life” had its term extended to
May 1, 1923 (ch. 343). B y a resolution of May 12, 1922 (ch. 34),
this commission was authorized to investigate the subject of the pro­
duction of meat. A commission on unemployment and the minimumwage law was created (resolves, ch. 43). Two members of the
Senate, four of the House, and three other persons appointed from
the outside were to consider the problem of unemployment and
make recommendations; also to study the workings of the minimumwage law of the State and report on the desirability of a mandatory
act. There was also a commission created on the subject of aiding
the physically handicapped other than blind persons (resolves,
ch. 52). The subject oi relief and not of rehabilitation was to be
considered.
The United States Congress, impelled by the economic results
of the coal strike, appointed a commission of seven members to
investigate costs, working conditions, causes of strikes, etc., in the
coal industry (No. 347). Each member is given a salary of $7,500,
the life of the commission being limited to one year. The sum of
$200,000 was provided for the hiring of experts and other expenses,
and recommendations are to be made as to standardizing mines, cost
of living, cost of production and distribution, the regulation of the
industry, etc.







LAWS OF VARIOUS STATES RELATING TO LABOR
ENACTED SINCE JANUARY 1, 1922.
KENTUCKY.
ACTS OF 1922.
Chapter 31.— H

o u r s o f la b o r — D a y lig h t s a v in g

.

S ection 1. On and after the passage and approval of this act, it shall .
sav*
be unlawful in this Commonwealth for any person, firm or corporation mg forbldden*
employing others, to adopt or establish or use in connection with such
employment of others, any daylight saving or other standard of time,
other than the standard central time of the United States, in any city
of the first class.
S ec . 2. Any person, firm or corporation violating section 1 of this Penalty,
act shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall upon conviction thereof,
be fined in any sum of not less than fifty or more than five hundred
dollars for each offense.
Sec . 3. Section 1 of this act shall not apply or be effective during Exception,
any period of time wherein the governor of this Commonwealth shall b y
proclamation designate for such period any other standard of time to
be observed, other than the standard central time of the United States.
Approved March 21, 1922.
Chapter 66.—

V o c a tio n a l r e h a b ilita tio n — S ta te a n d F e d e r a l c o o p e r a tio n .

[This act accepts the provisions of the act of Congress of June 2,1920,
on the subject of the rehabilitation of persons injured in industry or
otherwise, directs the State board on vocational education to act also
in this capacity, and makes the necessary appropriation.]
Chapter 77.—

E x a m in a tio n s fo r

m in e fo r e m e n

,

e tc .

[Section 1]. The board of examiners for the examination of applicants for certificates of qualification to serve as mine foremen, and as
fire boss in coal mines, and for the examination of candidates for the
position of assistant inspector of mines shall hold at least one regular
meeting or session each year for examination of said applicants and
candidates at the following places: Paintsville, Johnson County,
Kentucky; Pineville, Bell County, K entucky; Lexington, Fayette
County, K entucky; Madisonville, Hopkins County, Kentucky.
The chairman of the board of examiners shall have authority to call
special meetings to be held at any of the above-named places when­
ever there shall be necessity therefor. Notice of time and place shall
be given thirty days in advance of all meetings for examinations.
Approved March 23, 1922.




Time and place,

11




LOUISIANA.
ACTS OF 1922.
A

ct

N

o.

117.—Employment of children—School attendance.

S e c t io n 1. Every parent, guardian or other person residing within
the State of Louisiana having control or charge of any child or children
between the ages of seven and fourteen years both inclusive, shall
send such child or children to a public or private day school under
such penalty for noncompliance herewith as is hereinafter provided.
S e c . 2. The minimum session of attendance required under this
act shall be one hundred forty days or for the full session of the public
schools where the public school session is one hundred forty days or less.
S e c . 3. The following classes of children between the ages
and fourteen years shall be exempted from the provisions of
the parish school board to be sole judge in all such cases;
(e) Children whose services are needed to support widowed
Approved July 13, 1922.
A

ct

N

o.

of seven
this act,
* * *
mothers.

Scope.

Minimum

term.

Exemptions.

125.— Vocational rehabilitation—State and Federal cooperation.

[This act accepts the provisions of the Federal act of June 2, 1920,
without appropriation, but engages to “ observe and comply with all
requirements of said act.” ]
30253°—23— Bull. 330----- 2




13




MARYLAND.
ACTS OF. 1922.
Ch apter

29 . —
T

S t a t e la b o r o ffic ia ls .
a r t

I.

The executive and administrative departments, boards
and commissions of the State Government are hereby created or
recognized and continued as follows:
*
*
*
*
*
X IV . The State industrial accident commission.
X Y . The commissioner of labor and statistics.
X V I. The department of State employment and registration.
*
*
*
*
*
S e c t io n 1.

P

art

Boards, etc.

II.

X IV .

S e c t i o n 1. The State industrial accident commission, constituted
and organized as at present, and having and exercising the rights,
powers, duties, obligations and functions now or hereafter conferred
by law, shall constitute a separate department of the State Government.

Industrial acci­
dent commission.

x v.
B o a r d a b o l­
S e c t i o n 1. The terms of office of the members of the State board of
labor and statistics shall continue or be extended, as the case may be, ished.
until the taking effect of this act, whereupon the same shall cease and
be at an end and the said board shall be and stand abolished.
Law amended.
S e c . 2. On the taking effect of this act, section 1 of article 89 of
the Annotated Code, Volume IY , title “ Statistics and Information as
to Branches of Industry,” is hereby repealed and reenacted with
amendments, so as to read as follows:
1. The office of commissioner of labor and statistics is hereby created. C om m issioner
of labor and in ­
The term of office of said commissioner shall be two years, and until his dustrial statistics.
successor shall be appointed and shall have qualified, said term begin­
ning on the first Monday of May succeeding his appointment, except
that the commissioner first appointed under this act shall be appointed
on the taking effect of this act and hold office until the first Monday of
May, 1924, and until his successor shall qualify. A n y vacancy shall be
filled b y the governor for the unexpired term. The governor may at
any time remove the commissioner from office for inefficiency, neglect
of duly or malfeasance in office. The salary of the commissioner shall
be $3,000 per annum. The said commissioner shall be allowed for
actual and necessary expenses incurred in the discharge of his duties.
The commissioner of labor and statistics is authorized and empowered Staff.
to appoint or em ploy such deputies, inspectors, assistants and em­
ployees of every kind as may be necessary for the performance of the
duties now or hereafter imposed upon him by this or any other law:
P r o v i d e d , h o w e v e r , That such appointments and employments, and the
compensation to be allowed therefor, shall in each and every case be
subject to the approval of the governor.
T r a n s f e r of
S e c . 3. On the taking effect of this act, all the rights, powers, duties,
obligations and functions of the State board of labor and statistics, powers.
under any provisions of law, including all the powers and duties trans­
ferred to and imposed and devolved upon said board b y the Acts of 1916,
Chapter 406, shall be transferred to and thereafter be exercised and per­
formed b y the said commissioner of labor and statistics, who shall be
the lawful successor of the said State board of labor and statistics to the
same extent as if the said commissioner had been named in said provis­
ions of law as the official upon whom the said rights, powers, duties,
obligations and functions were conferred.




15

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1922,

16

XVI.
Department of
em ploym ent, etc.

S ection 1. The Department of State Employment and Registration
is hereby established. * * *

H ow
tuted.

S e c . 2. The following boards and agencies shall be assigned to the
department of employment and registration.

consti­

State board of barber examiners.
Board of examining engineers.
Board of electrical examiners and supervisors.
Board of examiners of horseshoers.
*
*
*
*
*
State board of commissioners of practical plumbing.
*
*
*
*
*
Approved March 1, 1922.
Chapter 120.— I n

s p e c t i o n a n d r e g u la tio n o f fa c to r i e s , e tc .— S o f t d r i n k s

.

[This chapter adds several sections to Article 43 of the Annotated
Code. The provisions relating to workmen are as follows:]
S ection 1500.

*

Sanitation.

Clothing.
Diseased
sons.

per­

*

*

*

*

(a) Every building, room, basement or cellar, occupied or used for
the preparation for sale, manufacture, packing, storage, sale or distribu­
tion of any drink products shall be properly lighted, drained, plum bed
and ventilated and conducted with due regard for the purity and whole­
someness of the products therein produced, and with strict regard to the
influence of such conditions upon the health of the operatives, em­
ployees, clerks, or other persons therein employed. * * *
(f) The clottdng of operatives, employees, clerks or other persons
must be clean.
(i) No employer shall knowingly permit, require or suffer any person
to work in a bottling establishment who is afflicted with any contagious
or infectious disease, or with any skin disease.
Approved March 13, 1922.
C hapter 143.— R

a ilr o a d s — S u ffic ie n t c re w s f o r tr a in s

.

[This act repeals the “ full crew law” (art. 23, secs. 331-335), and
enacts the following as a section of the same article:]
Powers of p u b ­
lic service com ­
mission.

Section 435C. Whenever the [public service] commission shall be of
the opinion, after a hearing upon its own motion, or upon a complaint
made as provided in this subtitle, that any railroad company operates
or intends to operate in Maryland, any freight train or trains, without
em ploying thereon a sufficient number of men for the safe and efficient
operation of said train or trains, the commission may order or require
such railroad company to em ploy such a number of men upon any of its
freight trains, operated or to be operated in the State of Maryland, as in
the judgm ent of the commission is requisite for the safe and efficient
operation thereof; any such order to be enforceable or reviewable as
provided in this subtitle for the enforcement and review of other orders
of the commission.
A pproved April 13, 1922.
Chapter 307.— M

N ew co d e .

in e r e g u la tio n s .

[This act repeals prior legislation and enacts a full code for the regu­
lation of work in coal mines. A bureau of mines is created in the State
board of labor and statistics, charged with the duty of enforcing all laws
property. The act is extensive and .embodies standard provisions on
ventilation, lighting, exits, first-aid, weighing coal, the qualifications
of bosses and inspectors, etc.]




T E X T OF L A W S— M A R Y LA N D .
Chapter

350. —

E m p lo y m e n t o f c h ild r e n

—C

17

e r tific a te s .

[This act amends secs. 36A and 47 of art. 100, Annotated Code, so as to
read as follows:]
S ection 36A (as amended b y ch. 350, acts of 1922). The State board S u b n o r m a l
of labor and statistics shall have the discretion of issuing temporary children.
permits to children over 14 years of age, who are mentally retarded ana
are unable to make further advancement at school, upon the written
recommendation of the superintendent of education, of the city of
Baltimore or any county in the State, as the case may be; and said
State board of labor and statistics may exercise vocational supervision
over such children until they reach the age of 18 years.
Sec . 47 (as amended b y ch. 350, acts of 1922). No fee shall be charged Fees.
or collected from any minor, or from his parents, guardian, legal cus­
todian or next friend for any services rendered b y the bureau of labor
and statistics, or b y any school, or other officer issuing a permit, or for
any school certificate or physician’s certificate issued under the pro­
visions of this act; but m the counties the physician or physicians
designated b y the superintendent of schools for each county shall be
entitled to receive a fee of one dollar for each physician’s certificate
issued b y him under the provisions of this article, said sum to be paid
b y the bureau of labor and statisics on the warrant of the superintend­
ent of schools of said county.
Approved April 13,1922.







MASSACHUSETTS.
ACTS OF 1922.
Chapter

151.— L

a b o r o r g a n iz a tio n s

—B

a d g es

,

b u tto n s

,

e tc .

S e c t i o n I . Chapter four of the General Laws is hereby amended b y
inserting after section seven the following new section:
S ec. 7A. The certificates, articles of organization and amendment
and affidavits relating to corporations, labels [sic] and limited partner­
ships, and to the insignia, ribbons, badges, rosettes, buttons and
emblems of any society, association or labor union, required b y law to
be filed and recorded in the office of the state secretary shall b y the act
of filing be deemed and taken to be recorded within the meaning of the
statute requiring such record to be made, and when so filed shall be pre­
served in form convenient for reference.
Approved March 16, 1922.
Ch apte r

196.— D

e p a r tm e n t o f la b o r a n d in d u s tr ie s .

S e c t i o n 1. Section four of chapter twenty-three of the General Laws,
as amended b y section three of chapter three hundred and six of the acts
of nineteen hundred and twenty-one is hereby further amended * * *
so as to read as follows:
S ec . 4. The commissioner, assistant commissioner and associate com­
missioners may, with the approval of the governor and council, appoint,
and fix the salaries of, not more than five directors, and may, with like
approval, remove them. One of them, to be known as the director of
standards, shall have charge of the division of standards, and each of the
others shall be assigned to take charge of a division. The commissioner
may employ, for periods not exceeding ninety days, such experts as may
be necessary to assist the department in the performance of any duty
imposed upon it b y law, and such employm ent shall be exempt from
chapter thirty-one. E xcep t as otherwise provided in section eleven,
the commissioner may em ploy and remove such inspectors, investi­
gators, clerks and other assistants as the work of the department may
require, and fix their compensation. Four inspectors shall be men
who, before their employm ent as such, have had at least three years’
experience as building construction workmen. The commissioner may
require that certain inspectors in the department, not more than seven
in number, shall be persons qualified b y training and experience in
matters relating to health and sanitation. The commissioner may
employ temporarily, from time to time, such persons to act as surveyors
of lumber as he may find necessary for making the surveys applied for,
and such employm ent shall be exem pt from chapter thirty-one. He
may fix their compensation and, subject to his approval, they may be
allowed reasonable expenses incurred in the performance of their official
duties.
Approved March 24, 1922.
Chapter

215.— L

i a b il ity o f e m p lo y e r s f o r in j u r ie s to e m p lo y e e s

—W

Appointees,

a iv e r s .

S e c t i o n 1. Chapter one hundred and forty-nine of the General Laws
is hereby amended b y inserting after section one hundred and seventyseven the following new section:
S ec. 177A. No person shall, b y a special contract with his employees,
exem pt himself from liability which he may be under to them for in ­
juries suffered b y them in their employm ent and resulting from the
negligence of the employer or of a person in his employ.
Approved March 31, 1922.




Effect of filing.

Waivers
bidden.

19

for­

LABOB LEG ISLATIO N

20

Chapter 401.— E

Schools to be
established.

m p lo y e d c h ild r e n —

re­

.

r e fe r e n c e o f c itiz e n s o n p u b lic w o r k s .

S ection 1. Chapter one hundred and forty-nine of the General
Laws is hereby amended b y inserting after section one hundred and
seventy-nine the following new section:
S ec . 179A. In the awarding of contracts for public work b y the
commonwealth or b y a county, city or town or b y persons contracting
therewith to do such work, preference shall be given to persons who
are citizens of the United States and to partnerships, all of whose
members are such citizens. A ny person who knowingly and w illfully
violates this section shall be punished b y a fine of not more than two
hundred dollars. Nothing in this section shall require the acceptance
of a higher bid in preference to a lower bid.
Approved June 8, 1922.
Chapter 537.— I n

Membership.

C o n tin u a tio n sc h o o ls

S ection 1. Section twenty-one of chapter seventy-one of the General
Laws is hereby amended * * * so as to read as follows:
S ec . 21. Every town which has accepted chapter three hundred and
eleven of the General Acts of nineteen hundred and nineteen, and in
which, in any year, tw;o hundred or more minors under sixteen are
em ployed not less than six hours per day b y authority of employment
certificates or home permits.described in section one of chapter seventysix, exclusive of minors employed only during vacations, shall, except
as otherwise provided in this section^ and any other town which has
accepted said chapter, may, through its school committee, local board
of trustees for vocational education, or both, establish at the beginning
of the next school year and maintain continuation schools or courses of
instruction for the education of such minors, and for such others as may
be required to attend under section twenty-five. The said schools or
courses shall be in session the same number of weeks in each year as the
local high schools, and the sessions shall be between the hours of eight
in the morning and five in the afternoon of any working days except
Saturday. If in a town required to establish continuation schools or
courses under this section, after examination of the records required to
be kept under sections eighty-six and eighty-nine of chapter one hun­
dred and forty-nine, it appears that in each of two consecutive years the
number of employed minors described above falls below two hundred,
the school committee of said town may apply to the department for
exemption from the provisions of this section, and, if specifically ex­
empted b y the department under conditions defined b y it, said town,
shall be deemed to have come under the permissive provisions of this
section and shall so remain until two hundred or more such minors in
any year are employed therein.
Approved May 11, 1922.
Chapter 517.— P

Preference
quired.

OF 1922.

d u s tr ia l a c c id e n t b o a r d .

S ection 1. Section two of chapter twenty-four of the General Laws
is hereby amended * * * so as to read as follows:
S e c . 2. The industrial accident board shall consist of seven mem­
bers, one of whom shall be a woman, at salaries of five thousand dollars
each, except that the chairman, who shall be designated b y the gov­
ernor, shall receive a salary of fifty-five hundred dollars. Upon the
expiration of the term of office of a member, his successor shall be
appointed for five years b y the governor, with the advice and consent
oi the council. The members shall devote their whole time in business
hours to the work of the board.
Approved June 13, 1922.
resolves .

Chapter 43.—
Commission
established.

C o m m is s io n

o n

u n e m p lo y m e n t a n d

m in im u m -w a g e

la w

.

An unpaid special commission is hereby established, to consist of
two members of the senate to be designated b y the president, four
members of the house of representatives to be designated b y the
speaker, and three other persons not members of the general court to




21

T E X T OF LA W S---- M A SSACH U SETTS.

be appointed b^ the governor with the advice and consent of the
council, which shall investigate unemployment in Massachusetts and
the extent, nature and causes thereof, and what measures may be
taken, either through legislation, community effort, private initiative,
or otherwise; (a) toward decreasing unemployment b y removing so
far as possible seasonal fluctuations, b y checking overexpansion and
consequent contraction and depression, b v establishing reserves from
the profits of normal times for the stabilization of industry, or other­
wise; (b ) toward helping those seeking employment to find employ­
ment b y extending the free employment service, b y coordinating
local agencies, or otherwise; and (c) toward providing relief b y insur­
ance, b y advance planning and reserving of public works for periods
of unemployment, or otherwise, for those who are involuntarily unem­
ployed.
The commission shall also investigate the question of the operation
and administration of the minimum-wage law, and its effect on the
industries and on the employees in the industries for which minimum
wages have been established or may be established under the law, and
whether mandatory effect should be given to the decisions of the wage
board or the law should b e otherwise extended, amended or repealed,
and it shall investigate particularly the subject matter of house docu­
ments one hundred and eleven, one hundred and tw elve and seven
hundred and seventy-eight, and senate documents two hundred and
sixty, two hundred and sixty-one and two hundred and seventyeight of the current year.
The departments of industrial accidents, of labor and industries
and of banking and insurance are authorized and directed to cooperate
with the commission in every way feasible, in carrying out the purposes
of this resolve.
The commission shall report its findings, with such recommendations
and drafts for such legislation as it may deem expedient, to the next
annual session of the general court, b y filing the same with the clerk
of the house of representatives on or before the second Wednesday of
January, nineteen hundred and twenty-three. Upon the filing of
such report the existence of the commission shall terminate. The
commission shall be furnished with rooms in the state house, and
shall hold public hearings.
The commission may incur such reasonable expenses, including
such sums for traveling, clerical and other assistance, as may be
approved b y the governor and council, not exceeding such sum as
the general court may appropriate; provided, that the members of
the commission shall not receive reimbursement except for expenses
actually incurred in the discharge of their duties.
Approved June 2, 1922.




Duties.

Cooperation.

Report.

Expenses.




MISSISSIPPI,
ACTS OF 1922.
Chapter

189.—

V o c a tio n a l r e h a b ilita tio n — S ta te a n d F e d e ra l c o o p e r a ­
tio n .

[This act accepts the provisions of the Federal law of 1920, makes
the vocational education board under the Federal statute of 1917 the
administrative board, and provides that the State shall appropriate
sums at least equal to the Federal allotment.]
Ch apte r

229.— A

c tio n s f o r in j u r ie s c a u s in g d e a th

—E

A ct accepted.

m p lo y e r s ' lia b ility .

S e c t i o n 1. Section 721 of the code of Mississippi, 1906 * * * is
hereby amended so as to read as follows:
Whenever the^ death of any person shall be caused b y any real
wrongful or negligent act, or omission, or b y such unsafe machinery,
way or appliances as would, if death had not ensued, have entitled the
party injured, or damaged thereby to maintain an action and recover
damages in respect thereof, and such deceased persons shall have left
a widow or children, or both, or husband, or father, or mother or sister,
or brother, the person or corporation, or both that would have been
liable if death had not ensued, and the representatives of such person
shall be liable for damages, notwithstanding the death, and the fact
that death was instantaneous shall, in no case affect the light of
recovery. The action for such damages may be brought in the name
of the personal representative of the deceased person, for the benefit
of all persons entitled under the law to recover or b y the widow, for
the death of her husband, or b y the husband^ for the death of the wife,
or b y the parent for the death of a child, or in the name of a child for
the (leath of a parent[,] or b y a brother for the death of a sister, or b y a
sister for the death of a brother, or b y a sister for the death of a sister,
or a brother for the death of a brother, or all parties interested may
join in the suit, and there shall be but one suit for the same death
which shall ensue for the benefit of all parties concerned, but the
determination of such suit shall not bar another action unless it be
decided on its merits. *In such action the party or parties suing shall
recover such damages as the jury may determine to be just, taking into
consideration all the damages of every kind to the decedent and all
damages of every kind to any and all parties interested in the suit.
This section shall apply to all personal injuries of servants and em­
ployees received in the service of [or] business of the master or employer,
where such injuries result in death. Damages recovered under the
rovisions of this section shall not be subject to the payment of the
ebts or liabilities of the deceased, except as hereinafter provided,
and such damages shall be distributed as follows:

PDamages for the injury and death of a married man shall be equally

W hen
action,
m ay be brought.

F or who s e
benefit.

Employees.

Distribution o f

distributed to hi3 wife and children, and if he has no children all shall damages.
go to his wife; damages for the injury and death of a married woman
shall be equally distributed to the husband and children, and if she
has no children all shall go to the husband; and if the deceased has no
husband or wife the damages shall be equally distributed to the chil­
dren; if the deceased has no husband, nor wife, nor children, the
damages shall be distributed equally to the father, mother, brothers
and sisters, or such of them as the deceased may have living at his or
her death. If the deceased have neither husband, or wife, or children,
or father, or mother, or sister, or brother, then the damages shall go to
the legal representative, subject to debts and general distribution, and
the fact that the deceased was instantly killed shall not affect the




23

LABOR LEG ISLATIO N OF 1922.

24

right of the legal representative to recover. The provisions of this
section shall apply to illegitimate children on account of the death
of the mother and to the mother on account of the death of an illegiti­
mate child or children, and they shall have all the benefits, rights and
remedies conferred by this section on legitimates.
If the deceased be illegitimate and shall leave neither mother, child
nor lawful heirs, then all the provisions of this section shall extend
and apply to the legal representatives, and the other natural blood
relatives of deceased the same as if they were his legitimate relatives
and heirs, excepting his father and his father’s relatives, unless they
be full brothers or sisters of deceased, or their heirs.
Approved April 8, 1922.




NEW JERSEY.
ACTS OF 1922.
145.— B

Chapter

.

r ib e r y o f e m p lo y e e s

.

S e c t i o n 1 Section one of the act to which this act is an amendment
[sec. 212e, p. 1810, Comp. Stat.] is hereby amended to read as follows:
1. Corrupt influencing of agents, employees or servants:
Whoever gives, offers or promises to an agent, employee or servant,
any gift or gratuity whatever, without the knowledge and consent of
the principal, employer or master of such agent, employee or servant,
with intent to influence his action in relation to his principal’s, em­
ployer’s or master’s business; or an agent, employee or servant who,
without the knowledge and consent of his principal, employer or master,
requests or accepts a gift or gratuity or a promise to make a gift, or to
do an act beneficial to himself, under an agreement, or with an under­
standing that he shall act in any particular manner to his principal’s,
employer’s or master’s business; or an agent, employee or servant who,
being authorized to procure materials, supplies or other articles, either
b y purchase or contract for his principal, employer or master, or to
em ploy service or labor for his principal, employer or master, receives
directly or indirectly, for himself or for another, a commission, discount
or bonus, from the person who makes such sale or contract, or furnishes
such material, supplies or other articles, or from a person who renders
such service or labor, and any person who gives or offers such an agent,
employee or servant such commission, discount or bonus, shall be
guilty of a misdemeanor: P r o v i d e d , h o w e v e r , That if a corporation, part­
nership or other organization is guilty of a violation hereof, the person
or persons through whom the corporation, partnership or other organiza­
tion acts shall also be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor: P r o v i d e d , h o w e v e r , That any person guilty of any offense within the purview of this
act who shall first report the facts under oath to the attorney general of
New Jersey, and who shall give evidence tending to the conviction of
any other person charged with an offense under this act, shall be granted
full immunity from prosecution or conviction under this act with
respect to the offense reported.
Approved March 11, 1922.
Ch apter

153.— I n

Acts forbidden,

im m un ity.

d u s tr ia l p o lic e .

[This act amends chapter 324, Acts of 1911, which authorizes the Lim itation re­
appointment of railroad, steamboat, etc., police, on the designation of pealed*
the companies interested, and at their cost, b y striking out the lim i­
tation which forbade such appointees to act in cities of the first and
second class unless registered and ratified b y the local police boards.]
Chapter

252.— D

e p a r tm e n t o f la b o r .

[This act amends chapter 40, Acts of 1916. Sections 4 and 5 are
repealed, and subsequent sections are renumbered accordingly.
Sections 1, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 are amended (all but the first being
renumbered) so as to read as follows:]
S e c t i o n 1 (as amended b y ch. 252, Acts of 1922). The department
of labor shall be reorganized and hereafter composed of :
First. One commissioner of labor.
Second. A bureau of general and structural inspection.
Third. A bureau of electrical and mechanical equipment.
Fourth. A bureau of hygiene, sanitation and mine inspection.
Fifth. A bureau of engineer’s and firemen’s licenses.
Sixth. A bureau of industrial statistics.
Seventh. A bureau of employment.




Organization.

25

26

LABOR LEG ISLATIO N OF 1922.

S ec . 4 (as amended b y ch. 252, Acts of 1922). The bureau of general
an(j structural inspection shall consist of a chief inspector, who shall
be a structural expert, appointed b y the commissioner of labor, and
who shall be hereafter known as deputy commissioner of labor, and
nineteen inspectors appointed b y the commissioner of labor, of which
at least three shall be women.
D u ty o f deputy
S e c . 5 (as amended b y ch. 252, Acts of 1922). The deputy commiscommissioner.
si0ner of labor in charge of the bureau of general and structural inspec­
tion shall direct and assign, under the supervision and control of the
commissioner of labor, the work of general and structural inspection
except as hereinafter provided; supervise the work relating to plans for
the alterations of old and the erection of new buildings, elevators, fire
escapes, fire protection!;] supervise the inspection of the manufacture,
storage and transportation of explosives ana such additional correlated
duties as the commissioner shall direct. The deputy commissioner of
labor in charge of the bureau of general and structural inspection shall
be the representative of the commissioner of labor, in his absence, in
the administrative duties of the general office and as the commissioner
of labor shall authorize.
Electrical and
S e c . 6 (as amended b y ch. 252, Acts of 1922). The bureau of elecm echanical bu- tncal and mechanical equipm ent shall consist of a chief inspector, who
shall be appointed b y the commissioner of labor. In addition to the
chief inspector, there shall be one inspector, who shall be appointed
b y the commissioner of labor.
Fire alarms, etc
S e c . 7 (as amended b y ch. 252, Acts of 1922). T h e bureau of electrical
and mechanical equipment shall, under the supervision and control of
the commissioner of labor, perform such duties in matters relating to
fire alarm installations or other electrical equipment, the installation
of mechanical safeguards on machinery and other correlated duties as
the commissioner shall direct.
Hygiene, etc.
S e c . 8 (as amended b y ch. 252, Acts of 1922). The bureau of hygiene,
sanitation and mine inspection shall consist of a chief inspector ap­
pointed b y the commissioner of labor, who shall be hereafter known as
deputy commissioner of labor, an expert investigator of occupational
diseases, a mine inspector having practical knowledge and skill in the
work in and operation of mines and quarries, a bakery inspector who
shall be a practical baker, one inspector, who shall be a person having
practical knowledge and skill as a metal polisher and buffer, and such
other inspectors or employees as may be assigned to the bureau.
V e n t ila t io n ,
S e c . 9 (as amended b y ch. 252, Acts of 1922). T h e deputy eommissamtation, etc.
sioner 0f labor in charge of the bureau of hygiene, sanitation and mine
inspection shall perform, under the supervision and control of the com­
missioner of labor, the duties devolving upon the department of labor
or the commissioner of labor, with relation to the elimination of dust,
fumes and excessive heat in industrial operation; the investigation of
occupational diseases and the ventilation and sanitation of factories,
mills, bakeries, workshops and places where the manufacture of goods
is carried on; the inspection of mines, quarries, tunnels and caissons;
the direction of industrial safety education and such additional cor­
related duties as the commissioner of labor shall direct. The deputy
commissioner of labor in charge of the bureau of hygiene, sanitation
and mine inspection shall be the personal representative of the com­
missioner of labor in the field and as authorized.
Passed March 16, 1922.

General # and
struetural inspec-

Chapter

270.— R

a ilr o a d s — S u ffic ie n t c re w s fo r tr a in s .

Restriction^re- (This act amends chapter 94, Acts of 1917, b y striking out section 3
pealed.
thereof, which prohibited any reduction in any train crew as previously
'constituted, without the authorization of the board of pu blic utility
commissioners.]




NEW YORK.
ACTS OF 1922.
Chapter

1.—

P r o te c tio n o f e m p lo y e e s o n

b u ild in g s .

[This act amends subdivision 6 of section 241, chapter 50, Acts o f
1921, b y substituting the words “ lumber or tim ber” for the word
“ material,” thus restricting the prohibition contained in this sub­
division.]
Ch apter

108.— I n

s u r a n c e o f e m p lo y e e s .

[This act amends section 55 of chapter 28, Consolidated Laws. The
portion of the section affecting labor reads as follows:]
S e c t i o n 55. * * * No policy or agreement for insurance shall be Who may inissued upon the life or health of another or against loss b y disablem entsure*
by accident except upon the application of the person insured; but
* * * an employer may take out a p olicy of insurance covering his
employees collectively for the benefit of such as may suffer loss from
injury, death or disablement resulting from sickness, * * *.
Became a law March 10, 1922.
Ch apter

286. — I n

s u r a n c e o f e m p lo y e e s .

[This act amends subdivision (k) (1) of section 107, chapter 28, Con­
solidated Laws, added b y chapter 155, Acts of 1913. The section pre­
scribes provisions for accident and health policies generally. The sub­
division named, as amended, reads as follows:]

Subd. (k) (1). Nothing in this section, however, shall apply to or Policies exempt,
affect any policy of liability or workmen’s compensation insurance or
any general or blanket policy of insurance issued to any municipal cor­
poration or department thereof, or to any employer whether a corpora­
tion, copartnership, association or individual, or to any police or fire
department, underwriters’ corps, salvage bureau, or to any association
of fifty or more members having a constitution or by-laws and formed
in good faith for purposes other man that of obtaining insurance, where
not less than seventy-five per centum of the members, or employees are
insured for their individual benefit against specified accidental bodily
injuries or sickness while exposed to the hazards of the occupation or
otherwise in consideration of a premium intended to cover the risks of
all the persons insured under such policy.
Became a law March 27, 1922.

Chapter

336.— R

a ilr o a d s —

C o n s tr u c tio n o f c o a l jim m ie s a n d ca b o o se c a rs.

[This act postpones the date when the law regulating the construc­
tion of caboose cars shall be effective, from July 1,1922, to July 1,1923.]
Ch apter

464.— E

m p l o y m e n t 'o f c h ild r e n — G e n e r a l p r o v is io n s .

[This act amends sections 627, 628, and 631 of chapter 16, Consoli­
dated Laws, so as to read as follows:]
S e c t i o n 627 (as amended b y ch. 464, Acts of 1922). The employer
of any minor between fourteen and eighteen years of age in a city or
district shall keep and shall file in the place where such minor is "em­
ployed, the employm ent certificate or vacation employm ent certificate
of the minor, if such minor is required to obtain such an employm ent
certificate under the provisions of section six hundred and twenty-six
of this chapter.




File,

27

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1922.

28
Return of cer­
tificate.

V i o l a t io n s .

C e r t ific a t e s ,
va lid when.

W ithin three days, he shall report to the em ploym ent certificating
officer the beginning of the minor’s em ploym ent and upon the sur­
render of the minor’s identification certificate shall return his employ­
ment certificate to him and mail his identification certificate to tne
em ploym ent certificating officer, but if the minor terminates his em­
ploym ent w ithout notice or without the surrender of his identification
certificate, then the employer shall return at once to the employment
certificating officer the minor’s employment certificate. In the case
of a minor to whom a vacation employm ent certificate or a general
employm ent certificate for agricultural work only is issued, the em­
ployer shall endorse thereon the dates of the beginning and termina­
tion of the minor’ s employment and a description of the work per­
formed.
S ec . 628 (as amended b y ch. 464, Acts of 1922). 1. A ny person, firm
or corporation or any officer, manager, superintendent or employee
acting therefor who violates the provisions of sections six hundred and
twenty-six and six hundred and twenty-seven of this chapter and any
person in parental relation to a child or minor included b y the pro­
visions of this chapter who does not cause such child or minor to be
subordinate and orderly when in attendance upon instruction as re­
quired b y this chapter and to com ply with the provisions of sections
six hundred and twenty-six and six hundred and thirty-one of this
chapter shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and the punishment therefor
shall be for a first offense a fine of not more than fifty dollars; or im ­
prisonment for not more than ten days; for a second and each subse­
quent offense, a fine of not more than two hundred dollars or both such
tine and imprisonment. A prosecution instituted under this section
shall be deemed a bar to prosecution under the provisions of any other
statute based on the same state of facts.
2. In case, however, the person in parental relation to such a child
or minor establishes to the satisfaction of the court that the child or
minor is beyond his control such child or minor shall then be subject
to the provisions of section six hundred and thirty-five of this chapter,
except in respect to unlawful employment, and in the discretion of the
school authorities may be proceeded against for violation of this act.
3. Attendance officers who are hereby vested with the powers of
peace officers for the purpose shall enforce the provisions of tnis act.

. Sec. 631 (as amended by ch. 464, Acts of 1922). 1. A general employ­
ment certificate shall be valid only for the regular and permanent
employment of a minor by the employer named therein except when
issued for agricultural work only.

2. A vacation employment certificate and a general employment
certificate for agricultural work only shall be valid for the temporary
employm ent of a minor b y successive employers.
3. A vacation employment certificate shall be valid for the em ploy­
ment of a minor in a mercantile establishment or business office
or in outdoor work when attendance upon instruction is not required
but not in a factory nor before morning school hours. It shall be issued
at the discretion of the employment certificating officer for a definite
period not exceeding five months, but if any such certificate expires
between the first day of July and the thirty-first day of August, it shall,
notwithstanding, continue in force until the thirty-first day of August
of such year.
4. An employment certificate shall not be valid for the employment

of a girl under eighteen years of age to deliver messages or articles of any
kind outside of tne place of her employment.
5. A minor while employed shall keep in his possession the identifi­
cation certificate issued to him and shall produce it on demand of a
representative of the department of labor or of the school authorities.
Issue.

6. Employment certificates, vacation employment certificates and
newsboy permit badges shall be issued only b y the following officials:
In cities and school districts having a population of four thousand five
hundred or more, by the superintendent of schools, elsewhere b y the
district superintendent; provided that any such superintendent of
schools may authorize and deputize in writing one or more public
school officials other than attendance officers to act in his stead, as
employment certificating officers in accordance with the regulations of




29

TE X T OF L A W S— N E W Y O R K .

the commissioner of education. The number of persons so deputized
as employm ent certificating officers, except for the purpose of issuing
newsboy permit badges, snail not exceed the proportion of one for
each quarter million of the population or fraction thereof of any such
city or school district. A district superintendent under the rules laid
down b y the commissioner of education may deputize in writing such
principals of union free schools, school officers, or employees, other
than attendance officers as may be necessary to act as employment
certificating officers
7. A general employment certificate shall be issued for a minor
between fourteen and eighteen years of age in accordance with the
following procedure:
A. The parent, guardian, or custodian of the minor shall make appli­
cation in person for the issuance of a school record certificate to the
principal, chief executive officer of the school which the minor attends,
or as otherwise provided in section six hundred and thirty of this
chapter.
B. The minor shall then present the application of parent, the school
record certificate and evidence of age as hereinafter prescribed to the
employment certificating officer for examination and approval. If
any of these papers are unsatisfactory the employment certificating
officer shall reject the applicant. If they are approved and if the
minor is under sixteen years of age and is not a graduate of an ele­
mentary school course of study, he shall also test the minor as to his
ability to read and write simple sentences in the English language, and
shall sign and file a statement as to the minor’s ability in these respects
together with the sentences written b y the minor. If the minor fails
in the test he shall be rejected, but if he succeeds or if he is not re­
quired to take the test, the employment certificating officer shall
transmit the evidence of age to the board of health.
C. Such board shall designate a medical officer who shall make a
thorough physical examination of the minor. lie shall record the
results of the examination and such other facts concerning the minor’s
physical condition and history as may be required on the record of
physical examination provided for that purpose. If the medical
officer shall find that the minor has reached the normal development of
a child of his age and is in sound health, he shall then issue to the minor
a certificate of physical fitness stating these facts. If he finds the minor
to be physically unfit in either of these respects he shall certify these
facts and return the evidence of age to the employment certificating
officer who shall reject the applicant.

Procedure.

D. If the minor receives a certificate of physical fitness and is under
sixteen years of age the employment certificating officer shall issue to
the minor a statement that an employment certificate will be granted to
him upon the presentation of a statement signed by the prospective
employer or by his duly authorized representative that he expects to
give the minor present employment and setting forth the character
of such employment and the number of hours per day and per week
which the minor will be employed and the location of the place of
employment.

E. Upon the presentation b y the minor of the statement signed b y
the prospective employer or if the minor be more than sixteen years of
age upon the receipt of the certificate of physical fitness, the employ­
ment certificating officer shall issue to the minor a general employment
certificate together with an identification certificate containing the
number of the employment certificate and the principal facts entered
thereon.
F. The employment certificating officer shall sign an employment
certificate and the minor to whom it is issued shall sign it in his presence.
8. For the issuance of a general employment certificate for agri­
cultural work only no statement of the prospective employer shall be
required; for the issuance of a vacation employment certificate, the
school record certificate and the test in reading and writing shall be
required, otherwise the foregoing procedure shall be followed.
9. An employment certificate shall contain the name, place of resi­
dence, date of birth, height, color of hair and color of eyes of the minor.

30253°—23—Bull. 330-----3




Contents o f cer­
tificate.

30

Reissuance.

E v id e n c e
age.

Physician's fee.

N ew sboy badge.

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1922.

E xcep t in the case of a general employm ent certificate for agricultural
work only and a vacation em ploym ent certificate it shall also contain
the name and place of business of the prospective employer and a de­
scription of the work which the minor expects to perform.
10. A n y em ployed minor between fourteen and eighteen years of age
for whom an employment certificate is required b y the provisions of tms
chapter, shall obtain a new employment certificate before taking up
new employment, except a minor to whom a general employm ent cer­
tificate for agricultural work only or a vacation em ploym ent certificate
has been issued, and unless he shall be in possession of an employment
certificate lawfully issued to him prior to September first, nineteen hun­
dred and twenty-one. He shall be entitled thereto upon the return to
the employm ent certificating officer of the old employm ent certificate
or of his identification certificate and if the minor is between fourteen
and sixteen years of age upon the presentation to such officer of a state­
ment from the prospective employer as hereinbefore provided. But if
the employm ent certificate formerly issued can not be produced and. if
the employment certificating officer is satisfied that the minor’s appli­
cation is made in good faith, provided it can be shown that such a cer­
tificate had been issued to the minor, then the employment certificating,
officer may issue to the minor a new employm ent certificate.
11. The evidence of age shall show that the child is at least the age
required for the issuance of the school record certificate and shall be as
follows:
a. Birth certificate: passport or baptismal certificate. A certified
transcript of the birth certificate filed according to law; a duly certified
transcript of a record of baptism or a passport, showing the date of birth
of the child.
b. Other documentary evidence. If the child appears to the em­
ployment certificating officer to be of the required age and can furnish
none of the evidence mentioned in subdivision a. but can furnish other
satisfactory documentary evidence of age, such officer m ay accept such
documentary evidence as sufficient as to the age of such child, and shall
file a statement showing such facts and the nature of the evidence.
c. Physicians’ certificates of age. If the child appears in the school
records and to the employment certificating officer to be the required
age and can furnish no documentary evidence of age, the employm ent
certificating officer may receive an application signed, b y the child’s
parent, guardian, or custodian for physicians’ certificates as herein
provided. The application, shall be on file for not less than forty days
and shall contain (1) The name, the place and date of birth, and the
present residence of the child; (2) such further facts as may aid in
determining the child's age. If within such period no facts appear
to contradict any material statement of such application the officer shall
direct the child to appear for physical examination before two phy­
sicians who shall be designated b y the board of health. If the phy­
sicians certify in writing that they have separately examined the child
and that the child is at least of the required age, such certificate shall be
sufficient evidence of age. If their opinions do not concur the child
shall be examined b y a third physician similarly designated and the
concurring opinions shall be accepted as evidence of the age of the
child.
d. The employment certificating officer shall require evidence of age
in the order designated in this subdivision and shall not accept the
evidence permitted in paragraph b or c of this subdivision unless he
receives and files in addition a statement signed b y the child’s parent,
guardian or custodian that he has made every effort to obtain the
evidence specified in the preceding paragraph or paragraphs and that
none can be procured.
12. E xcep t in a city of the first class and of the second class, a fee
not exceeding fifty cents shall be paid to the physician designated b y
the board of health for the physical examination required b y the pro­
visions of this section and this fee shall be a charge against the city,
town or village where the child resides.
13. a. When the schools are in session a newsboy permit badge shall
be issued only on the personal application of the parent, guardian or
custodian to the principal of the school the boy attends and the cer-




T E X T OF L A W S — N E W Y O R K .

31

tificate of such principal that the boy is of normal development and
physically fit for such employment and is twelve years of age or up­
ward as shown b y the school records, and when the schools are not in
session upon the similar certification as complete as may be of the
employment certificating officer, who in either case shall file the
certificate.
b. The newsboy permit badge shall be worn in plain sight whenever
the boy to whom it was issued is engaged in the work it authorizes him
to do.
14. An employm ent certificate or a newsboy permit badge may be R evocation,
revoked for cause b y the superintendent of schools or the district super­
intendent of schools within their respective jurisdictions.
15. A n y person who makes a false statement in or in relation to any F a lse s ta te employment certificate as to any matters required b y this act or in any ments*
affidavit, record, transcript or certificate therein provided for, is guilty
of an offense, punishable in each case b y a fine of not more than a
hundred dollars or b y imprisonment for not more than sixty days, or
b y both such fine and imprisonment.
16. The commissioner of education is hereby authorized to prescribe Form , etc.
the form and content of all certificates and newsboy permit badges
required b y this chapter except that in the case of the record of physical
examination, the approval of the commissioner of health shall also be
required, and in the case of the employment certificate the approval of
the industrial commissioner.
4.
Article twenty-two a of this chapter [added b y chapter 21, Acts of Repealer.
1921] is hereby repealed.
Became a law April 5, 1922.
Chapter

588. —

E le c tio n

la w —

T im e to v o te to b e a llo w e d e m p lo y e e s

.

S e c t i o n 200. A ny person entitled to vote at an election shall on the
T w o hours aiday of election be entitled to absent himself from any service or e m -lowed*
ployment in which he is then engaged or employed, for a period of two
hours, while the polls of the election are open: P r o v i d e d , h o w e v e r > That
this section shall not apply to a voter on the day of a primary election
if there be two successive hours, while the polls of such election are
open, in which he is not in the service of an employer. If the voter
shall notify his employer before the day of election of such intended
absence, and if thereupon two successive hours for such absence shall
be designated b y the employer, and such absence shall be during such
designated hours, or if the employer upon the day of such notice makes
no designation, and such absence shall be during any two successive
hours while the polls are open, no deduction shall be made from the
usual salary or wages of such- voter, and no other penalty shall be im­
posed upon him b y his employer b y reason of such absence. This
section shall be deemed to include all employees of municipalities.
Became a law April 12, 1922.
Ch a p t e r

601.— R

a ilr o a d s — I n s p e c tio n o f lo c o m o tiv e s .

[This act amends sections 72 and 73 of chapter 49, Consolidated Laws,
so as to read as follows:]
S e c t i o n 72 (as amended b y ch. 601, Acts of 1922). It shall be the
Scope of law.
duty of every railroad corporation which operates a railroad not ex­
ceeding fifty miles in length b y steam power, within this State, and
of any other corporation (except a railroad corporation), partnership
or person owning or operating a locomotive or locomotives propelled
b y steam, which may at any time pass over or on the tracks of any
railroad corporation within the State or over or on any track parallel
to and immediately adjacent to any track of any railroad corporation
within the State, and of the directors, managers or superintendents
of such corporations, to cause thorough inspections to be made of the inspection re­
boilers, safety appliances, machinery, and all appurtenances thereto qulred*
of all the steam locomotives which may be owned or operated b y such
corporations, partnerships or persons within this State. Such inspec­
tions shall be made at least every three months under the direction
and superintendence of said corporations, partnerships or persons, b y
persons of suitable qualifications and attainments to perform the serv­
ices required of inspectors of boilers and other locom otive equip-




LABOR LEGISLATION OP 1922.

32

Certificates.

Buies.

Violations.

Inspectors.

ment, and who from their knowledge of the construction and use of
boilers and other locomotive equipment and the appurtenances there­
with connected, are able to form a reliable opinion of the strength, form,
workmanship and suitableness of boilers and other locom otive equip­
ment, to be employed without hazard of life, from imperfections m
material, workmanship, or arrangement of any part of such locom o­
tive and appurtenances. All boilers used on such locom otives shall
com ply with the following requirements: The boilers must b e made
of good and suitable materials; the openings for the passage of water
and steam respectively, and all pipes and tubes exposed to heat shall
be of proper dimensions; the safety valves, fusible plugs, water glasses,
gauge cocks and steam gauges, shall be of such construction, condition
and arrangement that the same may be safely employed in the active
service of said corporations, partnerships or persons without peril of
life; and each inspector shall satisfy himself b y thorough examina­
tion that said requirements have been fully complied with. No
boiler, nor any connection therewith, shall be approved which is un­
safe in its form, or dangerous from defects, workmanship or other cause.
The person or persons who shall make the said inspections if he or they
approve of the boiler and other locomotive equipment and the appur­
tenances thereto throughout, shall make and subscribe his or their
name to a certificate which shall contain the number of each locom o­
tive and boiler inspected, the date of inspection, the condition of the
boiler and other locomotive equipment inspected, and such other
details as may be prescribed b y the public service commission. E very
certificate shall be verified b y the oath of the inspector, and he shall
cause such certificate to be filed in the office of the pu blic service
commission, within ten days after each inspection shall have been
made, and also a copy thereof with the chief operating officer or em­
ployee of such corporation, partnership or person having charge of the
operation of such locom otive; a copy shall also be placed b y such
officer or employee in a conspicuous place in the cab connected with
such locomotive, and there kept framed under glass. The pu blic
service commission shall have the power, from time to time, to formu­
late rules and regulations for the inspection and testing of locomotives
as aforesaid, and may require the removal of incom petent inspectors of
locomotives under the provisions of this section. If it shall be ascer­
tained b y such inspection and test or otherwise, that any locom otive
is unsafe for use, the same shall not again be used until it shall be re­
paired, and made safe, so as to com ply with the requirements of this
section. Every such corporation, director, manager or superin­
tendent, partnership or person violating any of the provisions of this
section shall be liable to a penalty, to be paid to the people of the State
of New York, of one hundred dollars for each offense, and the further
penalty of one hundred dollars for each day it or he shall om it or
neglect to com ply with said provisions, and the making or filing of a
false certificate shall be a misdemeanor, and every inspector who
willfully certifies falsely touching any steam locomotive, or any ap­
purtenance thereto belonging, or any matter or thing contained or
required to be contained in any certificate, signed and sworn to b y him,
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. The public service commission
shall enforce the provisions of this section as to penalties.
S e c . 73 (as amended b y ch. 601, Acts of 1922). Inspectors shall
be appointed b y the pu blic service commission, who shall be familiar
with the construction and operation of steam locomotives and their
appurtenances, whose salaries shall be fixed b y the commission.
They shall, under the direction of the commission, inspect locom o­
tives used b y corporations operating steam railroads within the State,
or locomotives owned or operated b y corporations, partnerships or
persons on or over any track adjacent to or parallel with any track of
any railroad corporation within the State, and may cause the same to
be tested b y hydrostatic tests and shall perform such other duties in
connection with the inspection and test of locomotives as the com­
mission shall direct. B ut this section shall not relieve any corpora­
tion, partnership or person from the duties imposed b y the preceding
section.
Became a law April 12, 1922.




RHODE ISLAND.
ACTS OF 1922.
Ch a p t e r

2160. —

C o m m is s io n e r o f la b o r

.

S e c t i o n 1. Section 5 of chapter 1741 of the Public Laws passed at the
January session, A. D. 1919, is hereby amended to read as follows:
S e c . 5. Said commissioner shall employ such assistants and incur
such expenses incident to the proper discharge of the duties of his office
as may be necessary not exceeding five thousand dollars in amount in
any one year; but no such assistants shall be paid more than four
dollars per day in addition to his necessary traveling expenses, and
the salary provided for said commissioner shall be in addition to the
compensation fixed b y the General Assembly for said commissioner
for taking the census.
S e c . 2. Section 3 of chapter 80 of the G eneral Laws is hereby repealed.
Approved February 17, 1922.
Ch apter

2232.—

Expenditures.

E m p lo y m e n t o f c h ild r e n — G e n e r a l p r o v is io n s .

S e c t i o n 1. Clause 2 of section 1 of chapter 78 of the General Laws,
* * * as amended * * * b y chapter 1378 of the Public Laws,
passed at the January session, A. D. 1916, is hereby amended so as to
read as follows:
Clause 2. No child under sixteen years of age shall be employed or Certificate re­
permitted or suffered to work in any factory or manufacturing or busi­ quired.
ness establishment unless said person, firm or corporation employing
him or her shall have in his, their or its possession an age and employ­
ment certificate, given b y or under the direction of the school com­
mittee of the city or town in which said child resides; such certificate
shall state (a) the name of said child; (b) the date and place of birth of
said child; (c) the height, color of eyes and hair, and complexion of
said child; (d) the name and place of residence of the person having
control of said child, and such certificate shall certify (1) that said child
has completed fourteen years of age, (2) that said child is able to read
at sight and write legibly simple sentences in the English language and
has completed a course of study equivalent to six yearly grades, and
(3) that said child has been examined physically by a licensed physi­
cian, and that said physician has certified that said child is in suffi­
ciently sound health and physically able to be employed in any of the
occupations or processes in which a child between fourteen and sixteen
years of age may be legally employed. The statements contained in
such certificate in regard to the name, date and place of birth of said
child, shall be substantiated b y a duly attested copy of the birth certi­
ficate, baptismal certificate, or passport of such child. The statement
contained in such certificate in regard to the school record of said child
shall be substantiated b y a signed statement from the principal or chief
executive officer of the school which the child has last attended, certi­
fying that the child has complied with the educational requirements
as above stated. Such statement shall also give the name, date of birth
and residence of the child as shown on the records of the school and
the name of the parent or guardian or custodian. After the official
authorized to issue the age and employment certificate above named
has determined that the child applying for such certificate is fourteen
years of age and has completed the necessary course of schooling as above
required, said official shall send such child to a physician for a physical Physical exam­
examination: P r o v i d e d , That the physical examination of any such ination.
child who resides in the City of Providence shall be made b y either of
the physicians appointed as hereinafter provided b y the commissioner
of education, and no age and employment certificate shall be issued to




33

LABOR LEG ISLATIO N OF 1922.

34

Physicians.

any child until the physician as above provided shall certify in writing
that said child is in sufficiently sound health and physically able to be
employed in any of the occupations or processes in which a child
between fourteen and sixteen years of age may be legally employed.
For making the physical examination and certifying as to the health,
the physician, except those physicians appointed by the commis­
sioner of education under this act, shall receive from the state the sum
of one dollar. H e shall render to the secretary of the State board of
education his account, properly certified b y the official authorized to
issue the age and employment certificate required b y this section. The
commissioner of education is hereby authorized to appoint two
physicians for the City of Providence, who shall make the physical
examinations in accordance with the provisions of this section. On
the first day of May, 1915, said commissioner shall appoint said ph y­
sicians for-the term of three years and every third year thereafter said
commissioner shall appoint two physicians for the term of three years to
perform the duties required b y this section. Any vacancy occurring
during any such term shall b e filled by appointment by said commis­
sioner for the unexpired portion of such term. Said physicians shall
examine all the children in said city between fourteen and sixteen years
of age who shall apply for a physical examination in accordance with
the provisions of this section. Said physicians shall each receive in
full compensation for his services the sum of twelve hundred dollars,
annually, on vouchers approved by the commissioner of education.
Operative May 1, 1922.




SOUTH CAROLINA.
ACTS OF 1922.

Act N o. 501.— P r o t e c t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s a s m e m b e r s o f S t a t e m i l i t i a .
In
e ing
Section 47. A person, who either b y himself, or with another, will­ with t e r femrploy­

fully deprives a member of the Organized Militia of South Carolina of
his employment or prevents, b y himself or another such member being
employed, or obstructs or annoys said member or his employer in his
trade, business or employment, because he is such a member or dis­
suades any person from enlisting in said organized militia b y threat or
injury to him in his employment, trade or business, in case he shall so
enlist, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction thereof,
shall b e fined in a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars, or imprison­
ment in the county jail not more than thirty days, or shall suffer both
such fine and imprisonment.
ec 48. No club, society, association, corporation, or organization
shall b y any constitution, rule, by-laws, resolution, vote or regulation,
or otherwise, discriminate against any member of the Organized Militia
of South Carolina because of his membership in said organized militia,
in respect to his eligibility to membership m such club, society, asso­
ciation, corporation or organization, or in respect to his rights to retain
and exercise the rights of membership therein. Any person or persons,
club, society, association, corporation or organizations, violating, or
aiding, abetting or assisting in the violation of any provisions of this
section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof,
shall be fined in any sum not exceeding one hundred dollars, or im ­
prisonment in the county jail for a period not exceeding thirty days, or
shall suffer both such fine and imprisonment.
Approved March 22, 1922.

S .

Act N o. 537.—P a y m e n t

m ent.

Membership in
clubs, etc.

o f w a g e s o f te x tile e m p lo y e e s .

S

ection 1. From and after the approval of this act, every textile Paym ent dur­
industry in this State, whether incorporated or otherwise, shall, on its ing work hours.
regular pay day, pay its employees who work within the bounds of the
premises owned, leased, controlled or occupied b y such textile in ­
dustry during work hours.
ec A ny employee not present to receive his or her wages in ac­ Absent em­
cordance with section 1 of this act, shall at any time thereafter upon ployees.
demand receive such wages as are due to him or her.

S . 2.

Sec. 3. Any person, firm or corporation violating the provisions of
this act shall be liable for the payment of fifty ($50) dollars penalty for
each violation to be recovered at the instance of the aggrieved party.

Violations.

Approved March 1, 1922.

Act N o. 541.— T i p s f o r

e m p lo y e e s .

[This act repeals A ct No. 162, Acts of 1915, which forbade the giving
of tips to certain employees, and enacts no other provision.]

Repealer.

Act N o. 567. — H o u r s o f l a b o r i n t e x t i l e m i l l s .
Section 1. Fifty-five hours a week in cotton and woolen mills—ten Hours per day
hours a day or fifty-five hours a week: P r o v i d e d , That the hours of a and week.
single day shall not exceed ten hours, except for the purpose of making
up lost time as hereinafter provided, shall constitute the hours for
working all operatives and employees in cotton and woolen manu­
facturing establishments engaged in the manufacture of yarns, cloth,
hosiery and other products of merchandise, except mechanics, engi-




35

LABOR LEG ISLATIO N OF 1922.

36

Schedule to
posted.

Lost tim e.

neers, firemen, watchmen, teamsters, yard employees and clerical
force, and for night running fifty-five hours per week. All contracts for
longer hours of work other than herein provided in said manufacturing
establishments shall be, and the same are hereby declared null and
void, and any person that requires, permits or suffers any person to
work a longer time than so stated, shall be deemed guilty of a misde­
meanor in each and every instanc e and on conviction m a court of
competent jurisdiction shall be fined a sum of money not less than
twenty-five ($25) dollars nor more than one hundred ($100) dollars,
or imprisonment not exceeding thirty (30) days: P r o v i d e d , That nothing
herein contained shall be construed as forbidding or preventing any
such manufacturing company from making up lost time to the extent
of sixty hours per annum, beginning January 1 of each year current
with the loss of time incurred, where such lost time has been caused
b y accident or other unavoidable cause: P r o v i d e d , f u r t h e r , That such
lost time shall be made up within three months after the lost time
b e was incurred: P r o v i d e d , f u r t h e r , That all manufacturing establishments
subject to the provisions of this section shall cause to be posted in a
conspicuous place in every room where such persons are employed, a
notice printed in plain type, stating the number of hours required of
them each day of the week, the exact time for commencing work in the
morning, stopping at noon for dinner, commencing after dinner, and'
stopping at night; the form of such notice shall be approved b y the
commissioner of agriculture, commerce and industries: P r o v i d e d ,
f u r t h e r , That should any manufacturer desire to make up any lost time
caused b y accident or unavoidable cause to the extent allowed in this
section, he shall post in each room a typewritten notice, stating the
exact time that w ill be made up, the exact time lost, when lost, and
for what cause. A complete record of all lost time, time made up b y
dates, in hours and minutes shall be kept b y the proper officer of the
manufacturing establishment, and presented on demand of the factory
inspector. Failure to com ply with any requirements in this section
shall be deemed a violation of this act.
Approved March 15, 1922.
A

Request

cither party.

Selection of
bitrators.

Hearings.

of

ct

No.

589.— A

r b itr a tio n

o f la b o r d is p u te s — S tr e e t r a ilw a y s .

S e c t i o n 1. In case of differences and disputes arising between any
street railway and its employees, in reference to wages, hours, rules
and regulations, or any other matter affecting or pertaining to such
employment, tlie said parties, to wit: The employer and employees
shall submit such matters of difference to a board of arbitration, if
either party, that is, the employer or the employees, make request
therefor.
arS e c . 2. Such request b y either party shall be made b y serving
notice on the other party of the matters of difference which it, or they
desire arbitrated, and naming with such notice an arbitrator in behalf
of the party giving the notice. Thereupon the other party shall, within
five days thereafter, name an arbitrator on their or its behalf, serving
notice of and the name of such proposed arbitrator of the other party
or parties. The two arbitrators so chosen shall meet within five days
thereafter and select a third disinterested party to act with them.
And if the arbitrators so chosen b y the respective sides fail to agree
upon a third person, then the mayor of the city in which such street
railway is located, shall act as the third arbitrator. If either party,
after five (5) days’ notice and request for the appointment and naming
of an arbitrator as hereinabove provided, shall fail to name such arbi­
trator, then on application and affidavit setting forth such fact the
judge holding the court of common pleas of the circuit in which such
county is located, or the judge of the court of common pleas, resident
in such circuit shall name such arbitrator for the party m default.
S e c . 3 . It shall be the duty of the said board of arbitrators so se­
lected, after notice to both parties of not less than ten days, to hold
such hearing or hearings as the said board may deem proper, to inves­
tigate all matters of difference and dispute, to ascertain the cause or
causes thereof, and to make a finding or award in respect thereto, fur­
nishing a copy of such finding or award to the parties to the said dis-




TEX T OE L A W S ---- SO U TH CAROLINA.

37

pute, to wit: One copy to the employees and one to the common car­
rier, and also to file a copy with the governor of the State.

Sec. 4. Such finding and award by a majority of said board shall be
binding upon all the parties, unless an appeal is taken therefrom within
ten days after the service of a copy of such finding and award. Either
party shall have the right to appeal upon questions of law and fact from
such finding.

S e c . 5. If either party to said finding shall desire to appeal therefrom,
such party shall give notice in writing within ten days after notice of
said award to the other party, and to the chairman of the board of ar­
bitrators, setting forth in such notice the grounds of his appeal; there­
upon it shall be the duty of said board of arbitrators to transmit all the
papers including any evidence taken b y it, to the court of common
pleas for the county in which such common carrier is situated. Upon
receipt of such papers b y the clerk of the court of common pleas for
such county, it shall be the duty of said clerk to forthwith file and
docket the same on Calendar 2. And it shall be the duty of the judge
holding the courts of said circuit, or the judge resident in said circuit,
to take up the said case as speedily as possible, giving the same pref­
erence in hearing, and to hear the same upon the record transmitted
and to review and correct any errors of law he may find.
S e c . 6. For the purposes of this act, any judge of the Circuit Court
of the State of South Carolina shall have jurisdiction to hear and pass
upon any appeal herein, at chambers, as fully as might be done in
open court.
S e c . 7. This act shall only apply to counties in which there are in­
corporated cities of not less than thirty thousand, and not more than
fifty thousand people, according to the last census.
Approved February 24, 1922.




Findings.

Appeals.

Jurisdiction.

Application of




VIRGINIA.
ACTS O F 1922.
Ch apte r

268.— P

a y m e n t o f w a g e s d u e d e c e a s e d e m p lo y e e s .

S e c t i o n 1. * * * When there is due from any employer to a
Paym ent
deceased employee, upon whose estate there has been no qualification, next ofJdna sum not exceeding three hundred dollars, it shall be lawful for such
* * * employer, after one hundred and twenty days from the
death of said person, to pay said balance to his next of kin, whose
receipt therefor shall be a full discharge and acquittance * * *.
Approved March 15, 1922.
Ch apte r

284.— E

m p lo y m e n t o f c h ild r e n

—A

b u se .

S e c t i o n 1. It shall be unlawful for any person employing or having
the custody of any child w illfully or negligently to cause or permit the
life of such child to be endangered or the health of such child to be
injured, or w illfully or negligently to cause or permit such child to be
placed in a situation that its life or health or morals may be endangered,
or to cause or permit such child to be overworked, tortured, tormented,
mutilated, or cruelly beaten or cruelly treated. Any person violating
this act shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.
Approved March 17, 1922.
Chapter

373.— C

o m m is s io n e r o f la b o r — I n s p e c t io n
f a c t o r i e s , e tc .

a n d

r e g u la tio n

A cts forbidden,

o f

[This chapter amends various sections of the Code of 1919, as follows:]
S e c t i o n 1799 (as amended b y ch. 373, Acts of 1922). The commissioner of labor shall have the power to take and preserve testimony,
examine witnesses, administer oaths, and under proper restriction
enter any public institution of the State, and any factory, store, work­
shop, laundry, or mine, and interrogate any person em ployed therein
or connected therewith, or the proper officer of a corporation, or file a
written or printed list of interrogatories and require full and complete
answers to the same, to be returned under oath within thirty days of
the receipt of said list of questions.
He shall have general supervision and control of the bureau of labor
and industrial statistics and shall have authority to appoint such
assistants as may be necessary to carry out the objects and purposes of
the bureau.
He shall secure the enforcement of all laws relating to the inspection
of factories, mercantile establishments, mills, workshops, and com­
mercial institutions in the State and to aid him in this work shall have
power to appoint such factory inspectors and other assistants as may be
necessary. The duties of such inspectors and other assistants shall be
precribed b y the commissioner of labor.
The commissioner of labor, his assistants and factory inspectors shall
visit and inspect at reasonable hours, as often as practicable, the fac­
tories, mercantile establishments, mills, workshops and commercial
institutions in the State, where goods, wares, or merchandise are manu­
factured, purchased, or sold, at wholesale or retail. The commissioner
of labor shall report in writing to the governor annually concerning the
work of his department, with such other information and with such
recommendations as he may deem proper.
It shall be the duty of the commissioner of labor to enforce the provisions of this chapter, and to prosecute all violations of law relating to
the inspection of factories, mercantile establishments, mills, work­
shops and commercial institutions in this State before any justice of
the peace or court of competent jurisdiction.




to

Powers,

Inspections,

Enforcem ent,

39

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1922,

40
Prosecutions.

It shall be the duty of the Commonwealth’s attorney of the proper
county or city, upon the request of the commissioner of labor, or any of
his assistants or deputies, to prosecute any violation of law, which is
made the duty of said commissioner of labor to enforce.
Violations.
ec
(as amended b y ch.
Acts of
If any person, who
may be sworn to give testimony, shall w ilfully fail or refuse to answer
any legal and proper question propounded to him concerning the sub­
ject of such examination as indicated in section seventeen hundred and
ninety-nine, or if any person, to whom a written or printed list of such
interrogatories has been furnished b y the commissioner of labor, shall
neglect or refuse to fu lly answer and return the same under oath, or if
any person in charge of any factory, mill, workshop, laundry, mercan­
tile or manufacturing establishment shall refuse admission to, or
obstruct in any manner the inspection of such establishment or the
proper performance of the authorized duties of the commissioner of
labor or any of his assistants or any factory inspector, or other duly
authorized representative of the bureau of labor and industrial statis­
tics, he shall be guilty of misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof,
shall be fined not exceeding one hundred nor less than twenty-five
dollars, or imprisoned in jail not exceeding ninety days, or both.
Nothing in this chapter shall be construed as permitting the com­
missioner or any employee of said bureau to make use of any informa­
tion or statistics gathered from any person, company, or corporation
for any purposes other than those oi this chapter.
Seats for female
ec
(as amended b y ch.
Acts of
Chairs, stools, or
employees.
other suitable seats shall be maintained in all factories, shops, mills,
laundries, mercantile and manufacturing establishments, except fruit
and vegetable canning factories, for the use of female employees therein
to the number of at least one seat for every three females employed, and
the use thereof b y such employees shall be allowed at such times and
to such extent as may be necessary for the preservation of their health.
Such seats shall be placed where the work of such females is to be prin­
cipally performed, whether in front of or behind a counter, table, desk,
or other fixture. Any employer of female help in this State who shall
neglect or refuse to provide seats as required in this section, or shall
make any rules, orders, or regulations in his factory, shop, mill, laun­
dry, store, or other place of business requiring females to remain stand­
ing when not necessarily employed in sendee or labor therein shall be
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon a conviction thereof shall
be fined not exceeding twenty-five dollars and costs, at the discretion
of the court. In any manufacturing establishment where it is neces­
sary on account of the nature of the work in such establishment for the
female employees to stand while working, it shall be deemed a sufficient
com pliance with this section if suitable rest rooms are provided to
which such employees may go at all reasonable times.
Blacklisting.
ec
(as amended by ch.
Acts of
No person or per­
sons, partnership, corporation or association doing business in this
State, or any agent or attorney of such person or persons, partnership,
corporation or association, after having discharged any em ployee from
the service of such person or persons, partnership, corporation or asso­
ciation, or after any employee naving voluntarily left the service of such
person or persons, partnership, corporation or association, shall will­
fu lly and maliciously prevent or attempt to prevent b y word or writing,
directly or indirectly, such discharged employee or such employee
voluntarily leaving from obtaining employment with any other person
or persons, partnership, corporation or association. For violation of
this section the offender shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall,
on conviction thereof, be fined not less than one hundred nor more
than five hundred dollars. But this section shall not be construed as
prohibiting any person or persons, partnership, corporation or associa­
tion from giving on application for any other person or corporation, a
truthful statement of the reason for such discharge, or a truthful state­
ment concerning the character, industry, and ability of such person
voluntarily leaving.
Toilets, etc.
S e c . 1822 (as amended b y ch. 373, Acts of 1922). E very factoiy in
which five or more persons are employed, and every factory, workshop,
mercantile or other establishment, or office, in which ttoro or more

S . 1802

373,

1922).

S . 1807

373,

1922).

S . 1817

373,

1922).




TE X T OF LA W S---- V IR G IN IA .

children, under eighteen years of age, or women, are employed, shall
be kept clean and free from effluvia arising from any drain, privy or
nuisance, and shall be provided with a sufficient number of waterclosets, earth closets or privies, and reasonable access shall be afforded
thereto; and whenever one or more males and one or more females are
em ployed together, a sufficient number of separate water-closets, earth
closets or privies, with partitions between to extend from floor to ceil­
ing, shall be provided for the use of each sex, and plainly designated;
and all rooms in which toilets for males and females are installed after
July first, nineteen hundred and twenty-two, shall have separate
entrances for each sex; no person shall be allowed to use a closet or
privy which is provided for persons of the other sex. In buildings
used exclusively for offices the provisions of this section shall not apply,
if separate toilets are within convenient access in the buildings wherem
the offices are located.
S e c . 1830 (as amended b y ch. 373, Acts of 1922). The owner or person
in charge of a factory, shop, manufacturing establishment, where ma­
chinery is used, shall provide, in the discretion of the commissioner of
labor, belt shifters or other mechanical contrivances for the purpose of
throwing on or off belts on pulleys. Whenever practicable, all machin­
ery shall be provided with loose pulleys. All vats, elevators, saws,
planers, cogs, gearing, belting, shafting, set screws, shapers, comer
machines shall be properly guarded. No person shall remove or make
ineffective any safeguard around or attached to machinery, vats, or
elevators while the same are in use, unless for the purpose of imme­
diately making repairs thereto, and all such safeguards so removed
shall be promptly replaced. If a machine or any part thereof is in a
dangerous condition, or is not properly guarded, notice thereof shall
be given to the manager or owner in charge of such operation, and unless
such machinery is repaired or made safe within thirty days after such
notice, the use thereof may be prohibited by the commissioner of labor
and a notice to that effect shall be attached thereto. Such notice shall
not be removed until the machine is made safe and the required safe­
guards are provided, and in the meantime such unsafe or dangerous ma­
chinery shall not be used. When in the opinion of the commissioner
of labor it is necessary, the workrooms, halls and stairs leading to the
workrooms shall be properly lighted; and in cities of the first class, if
deemed necessary b y the commissioner of labor, a proper light shall be
kept burning by the owner or lessee in the pu blic hallways, near the
stairs upon the entrance floor and upon the other floors on every work­
day in the year, from the time when the building is opened for use
in the morning until the time it is closed in the evening, except at
times when the influx of natural light shall make artificial light unnec­
essary. Such lights shall be independent of the motive power of such
factory.
2. Section eighteen hundred and thirty-one of the Code of Virginia
is hereby repealed.
Approved March 24, 1922.
Ch apter

381. —

S a fe ty
ances.

a p p li­

Lighting.

R e p e a le r .

E m p lo y m e n t o f c h ild r e n — S c h o o l a tte n d a n c e .

S e c t i o n 1. E very parent, guardian, or other person in the State of
Virginia, having control or charge of any child, or children, who have
reached the eighth birthday and have not passed the fourteenth birth­
day, shall send such child, or children, to a public school, or to a private,
denominational or parochial school or have such child or children
taught b y a tutor or teacher in a home, and such child, or children, shall
attend regularly such school during the period of each year the public
schools are in session and for the same number of days as in the pu blic
schools. The period of compulsory attendance shall commence at the
beginning of the school which the pu pil attends. But the provisions
of this section shall not apply to a child between the ages aforesaid who
has completed the elementary course of study prescribed b y the State
board of education, or the course of study provided b y the school he
should attend, and who is actually, regularly and lawfully em ployed;




41

S c o p e o f la w .

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1922.

42
Violations.

S e c . 4. A n y parent, guardian, or other person having control of a
child, who fails to send such child to school as required b y this act; or
*
*
*
*
*
A n y person who induces or attempts to induce any child to be absent
unlawfully from school, or who knowingly employs or harbors while
school is in session, any child absent unlawfully from school; or
A n y person who commits any offense under this act io r w hich no
specific penalty is provided herein, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor
and on conviction shall be fined not exceeding twenty-five dollars.
*

*

*

*

*

Approved March 24, 1922.

S

Chapter 489.—

E m p lo y m e n t o f c h ild r e n — G e n e r a l p r o v is io n s .

ection 1. No child under fourteen years of age shkll be em ployed,
permitted or suffered to work in, about, or in connection with any
gainful occupation, other than work on farms, orchards and in gardens,
except as specified in this act.
W o r k t im e .
ec 2. No child under sixteen years of age shall be employed, per­
m itted or suff ered to work in, about, or in connection with any gainful
occupation, (1) more than six days in any one week; (2) nor more than
forty-four hours in any one week; (3) nor more than eight hours in any
N ig h t w o r k .
one day; (4) nor before the hour o f seven o ’clock in the morning nor
alter the hour of six o ’ clock in the evening, except on farms, in orchards
or in gardens. E very employer shall post and keep posted conspicuously
in the place wnere any cnild is employed, permitted, or suffered to
work a printed notice setting forth the maximum number of hours such
child m ay b e required or permitted to work each day of the week, the
hours of beginning and ending of work each day, and the hours when
the time allowed for meals begins and ends.
C e r t ific a t e s re ­
ec 3. No child under sixteen years of age shall be employed, per­
q u ire d .
mitted or suffered to work in, about, or in connection with any gainful
occupation w ith the exception of work on farms, orchards and in gar­
dens, unless the person, firm or corporation employing such child pro­
cures and keeps on file and accessible to any school attendance officer,
inspector of labor or other authorized person charged with the enforce­
ment of this aet,^ the employm ent certificate as hereinafter provided,
issued to such ch ild ; and keep two complete lists of the names, together
with the ages, of all children under sixteen years of age em ployed in
or for such establishment or in such occupation, one on file and one
conspicuously posted near the principal entrance of the place where
such children are employed.
W h o m a y is su e .
ec 4. Em ployment certificates shall be issued only b y the chief
school attendance officer, or if there is no attendance officer, b y the
division superintendent of schools or b y any person designated b y him
in the city, town, or county in w hich the child is to be employed and
only upon application in person of the child desiring employment,
accompanied b y the parent, guardian, or custodian of such child.
Where there is no attendance officer, the division superintendent of
schools shall designate one or more persons to grant such permit in every
city, town, or county. The person issuing such certificate shall have
authority to administer the oath provided for therein, or to make any
investigation or examination necessary for the issuance thereof. No
fee shall be charged forissuing any such certificate nor for administering
any oath or rendering any services in respect thereto. The officer
issuing the certificate snail establish and maintain proper records where
copies of all such certificates and all documents connected therewith
shall be filed and preserved.
E v id e n c e .
ec
The person authorized to issue an employm ent certificate
shall not issue such certificate until he has received, examined, ap­
proved and filed the following papers:
(a) A statement signed b y the prospective employer, or some one
duly authorized on his behalf, stating that he expects to give such
child present employment, setting forth the specific nature o f the
occupation in w hich he intends to em ploy such child and the number
of hours per day and of days per week w hich said child shall be em­
ployed and the daily tim e of the beginning and ending of such em­
ploym ent and of the period for lunch, and agreeing to send the notice of
A g e l im it .

S .

S .

S .

S . 5.




TE X T OF L A W S— V IR G IN IA .

43

the commeneement of employment and to return the certificate ac­
cording to the provisions of this act.
(b) Proof of age as provided in section six of this act.
(c) A certificate of physical fitness as provided in section seven of
this act.
S e c . 6. The evidence of age required b y this act shall consist of one
Proof of age.
of the following proofs of age, which shall be required in the order herein
designated.:
(a) A birth certificate or attested transcript issued b y a registrar of
vital statistics or other officer charged with the duty of recording births.
(b) A baptismal record or duly certified transcript thereof showing
the date of birth and place of baptism of the child.
(c) A passport or a certificate of arrival issued b y immigration officers
of the United States showing the age of the child.
(d) A bona fide contemporary record of the date and place of the
child’s birth kept in the Bible in which the record of the births in the
family of-the child are preserved.
(e) Other documentary record of the child’s age satisfactory to the
issuing officer: P r o v i d e d , That a school record, a school census
record, or a. parent’s, guardian’s or custodian’s affidavit1<or statement
of age shall not be accepted except as specified in subdivision (f).
(f) A certificate of physical age, signed b y a public health or public
school physician and based upon a physical examination. Such cer­
tificate shall state the height and weight of such child and other evi­
dence upon which the opinion as to the age of such child is founded.
No fee shall be charged for this certificate. A parent’s,^guardian’s or
custodian’s affidavit of age, and a record of the age as given in the
register of the school first attended b y the child, if obtainable, or in
the earliest available school census, shall accompany the physician^
certificate of age. And no employment certificate shall be issued if
any of the above possible sources shows the child to be under the age
of fourteen; except as provided in section ten of this act.
S e c . 7. The certificate of physical fitness required b y this act shall Physical
fitbe signed b y a pu blic health or school physician. It shall show h eigh tness*
and weight of the child and shall state that the said child has been
thoroughly examined b y the said physician within a period of ten
days and has been found to be of normal development for a child of
his age, is in sound health, and is physically qualified for the employ­
ment specified in the statement submitted b y the employer.
S e c . 8 . But nothing contained in this act shall be construed as School law.
qualifying in any way the provisions of the compulsory education laws
of this State, nor as authorizing the employment of any child who is
absent unlawfully from school.
S e c . 9. The employment certificate required to be issued shall state Contents
of
the name, sex, color, date of birth and place of residence of the child, certificate.
It shall certify that all the conditions and requirements for issuing an
employment certificate under the provisions of this act have been
fulfilled, and shall be signed b y the person issuing it. It shall state the
grade last completed b y said child, the number of years said child has
attended school, and the kind of evidence of age accepted for the em­
ployment certificate. It shall state the name and address of the em­
ployer for whom and the nature of the specific occupation in wr
hich the
employment certificate authorizes the child to be employed, and no
certificate shall be valid except for the employer so named and the
occupation so designated. It shall bear a number, shall show the date
of its issue, and shall be signed b y the child for whom it is issued in the
presence of the person issuing it. It shall be issued in triplicate, one
copy to be mailed to the employer, one copy to be sent to the State
commissioner of labor and one copy to be retained and kept on file b y
the issuing officer.
S e c . 10. The provisions of this act shall not apply to children be- Canneries,
tween the ages of twelve and sixteen working in fruit or vegetable can­
neries for not more than eight hours in any one day, where public
schools are not actually in session.
S e c . 1 1 . Every employer receiving an employment certificate shall .E m ployers
to
notify the issuing officer within seven days of the time of the c o m -glve notlce*
mencement of the employment of such child, and within seven days




LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1922.

4 4

T erm .

E m p lo y m e n ts
forbidden.

Messenger serv­
ice.

Street trades.

Badges.

after the termination of the employment shall return- said certificate
to the issuing officer. Failure so to notify shall be cause for the can­
cellation of the certificate; and failure so to return it shall be cause for
the refusal of further certificates upon the application of such em­
ployer. Returned certificates shall be filed, and the commissioner of
labor shall be notified b y the issuing officer of their return.
S ec . 12. An employment certificate shall be invalid after twelve
months from date of issue unless there shall have been filed with the
issuing officer a new certificate of physical fitness as provided for in
section seven.
S ec . 13. No child under sixteen years of age shall be employed,
permitted or suffered to work in any mine, quarry, tunnel, excavation
work, brick or lumber yard, nor shall they operate or assist in operating
any dangerous machinery; oil, assist in oiling, wiping or cleaning any
such machinery; nor shall they be employed in any capacity in pre­
paring any composition in which dangerous or poisoning chemicals
are used; and they shall not be employed in any capacity in the manu­
facturing of paints, colors or white lead; and no boy under sixteen
and no girl under eighteen years of age shall be employed, permitted
or suffered to work in any retail cigar or tobacco store, or in any theatre,
concert hall, pool hall, bowling alley or place of amusement or in any
hotel, restaurant, steam laundry, or in any passenger or freight ele­
vator.
S ec . 14. No male under fourteen years of age and no female under
eighteen years of age shall be employed, permitted or suffered to work
as a messenger for any telegraph or messenger company or messenger
service in the distribution, transmission or delivery of goods or mes­
sages at any time. No male under eighteen years of age and no girl
under twenty-one years of age shall be employed, permitted or suffered
to work as a messenger for any telegraph or messenger company or
service in the distribution, transmission or delivery of goods or mes­
sages before five o ’clock in the morning or after ten o ’ clock in the even­
ing of any day.
S ec . 15. No boy under fourteen years of age, and no girl under
eighteen years of age, shall be employed, permitted or suffered to
work in a street or public place in the occupation of peddling, boot­
blacking or distributing or selling newspapers, magazines, periodicals
or circulars, or engaged in any gainful occupation, in a street or public
place, except that any boy between twelve and sixteen years of age
may engage in the occupations of bootblacking or distributing and
selling newspapers, magazines, periodicals or circulars which are b y law
permitted to be distributed ana sold, or running errands or delivering
parcels at such time or times between six o ’clock a. m. and seven
o’ clock p. m. in each day that the public schools are not in session,
provided such boy procures and carries on his person a badge as herein­
after provided. Such badge shall be issued b y the same person author­
ized to issue an employm ent certificate, and upon compliance w ith all
the requirements for thfe issuance of an employment certificate. It
shall bear a number and on its reverse side shall be signed in the pres­
ence of the person issuing it b y the child in whose name it is issued,
together with address and date of birth. A deposit of fifty cents shall
be made for the use of each badge, to be held b y the officer issuing the
badge and refunded upon the return thereof.
S ec . 16. No boy to whom such a badge is issued shall transfer it to
any other person, nor be engaged in any of the trades and occupations
mentioned in section fifteen without having conspicuously on his per­
son such badge, and he shall exhibit the same upon demand to any
police officer, school attendance officer, or to any labor inspector or
other person charged with the duty of enforcing the provisions of this
act. A complete record of badges issued and refused, and of the facts
relating thereto, shall be kept b y the issuing officer. No boy engaged
in any of the street trades mentioned in section fifteen shall work more
than eight hours in any one day. Nothing herein contained shall be
construed to permit the violation of a curfew ordinance of any city or to
prevent any boy twelve years of age or over from distributing news­
papers, magazines or periodicals to regular subscribers at their resi­
dences or places of business, without securing such badge. A ll such




TE X T OF L A W S ---- V IR G IN IA .

45

badges shall expire annually on the first day of January. The color
of the badge shall be changed each year.
S e c . 17. Whoever employs, procures, or, having under his control,
permits a child to be employed, or issues an employment certificate in
violation of any of the provisions of this act, shall be guilty of a mis­
demeanor and upon conviction shall be fined not less than ten dollars
nor more than twenty-five dollars for the first offense, not less than
twenty-five dollars nor more than fifty dollars for the second offense,
and not less than fifty dollars nor more than two hundred and fifty
dollars for any subsequent offense, or in addition to such fine in the
case of such subsequent offense, may be confined in jail not less than
thirty days nor more than ninety days. A ny employm ent contrary to
the provisions of this act shall be prima facie evidence of guilt botn as
to employer and the person having control of the child.
S e c . 18. The commissioner of labor shall enforce the provisions of
this act and shall have authority to appoint such inspectors and assist­
ants as may be necessary to secure the enforcement of this act. He
shall supervise the work of the attendance officers or other persons in
each city and county authorized to enforce this act and shall make all
necessary rules and regulations for carrying out thepurposes of this
act, and shall prescribe and supply to the proper officials blanks for
employm ent certificates, badges for street trade, and such other forms
as may be required for carrying out the provisions of this act.
[Section 19 repeals chapters 301, 1908; 339, 1914; 204, 1918; 390 and
507, 1920; and sections 1809 to 1816, inclusive, of the Code of 1919.]
Approved March 27, 1922.
Ch apte r

516.—

V o c a tio n a l r e h a b ilita tio n — S ta te a n d F e d e r a l c o o p e r a tio n

.

[This act accepts the provisions of the Federal act of 1920, and des­
ignates the State board on vocational education, appointed to cooper­
ate with the Federal agencies under the act of 1917, as the administra­
tive agency in the work of industrial rehabilitation.]
30253°—23— Bull. 330------ 1




Violations.

E n fo r c e m e n t .




UNITED STATES.
ACTS OF 1921-2— 67TH CONGRESS— SECOND SESSION.
N o. 109.—
S e c t io n 1.

*

*

*

C o n c ilia tio n

—

*

U n ite d S ta te s B o a r d o f M e d ia tio n a n d
A b o litio n .

*

The offices of Commissioner of Mediation and Conciliation and As­
sistant Commissioner of Mediation and Conciliation are abolished after
December 31, 1921.
Approved December 15, 1921.
N o. 121.— B

a n k r u p tc y

—W

a ges

,

e tc ., o f e m p lo x je e s .

R ank
S e c t i o n 1. Section 17 of an act entitled “ An act to establish a uni­
form system of bankruptcy throughout the United States,” approved claims.
July 1, 1898, as amended, * * * is further amended so as to read
as follows:
S e c . 17. A discharge in bankruptcy shall release a bankrupt from
all of his provable debts, except such as (first) are due as a tax levied by
the United States, the State, county, district, or municipality in w hich
he resides; (second) are liabilities for obtaining property b y false pre­
tenses or false representations, oi for willful and malicious injuries to the
person or property of another, or for alimony due or to become due, or
for maintenance or support of wife or child," or for seduction of an un­
married female, or for breach of promise of marriage accompanied b y
seduction, or for criminal conversation; (third) have not been duly
scheduled in time for proof and allowance, with the name of the
creditor, if known to the bankrupt, unless such creditor had notice of
actual knowledge of the proceedings in bankruptcy; or (fourth) were
created b y his fraud, embezzlement, misappropriation, or defalcation
while acting as an officer or in any fiduciary capacity; or (fifth) are for
wages due to workmen, clerks, traveling or city salesmen, or servants,
which have been earned within three months before the date of com­
mencement of the proceedings in bankruptcy; or (sixth) are due for
moneys of an employee received or retained b y his employer to secure
the faithful performance by such employee of the terms of a contract
of employment.
Approved, January 7, 1922.

No. 183.— F

r e e p u b l i c e m p l o y m e n t o ffic e s .

S e c t i o n 1. T o enable the Secretary of Labor to foster, promote, and
develop the welfare of the wage earners of the United States, to im ­
prove their working conditions, to advance their opportunities for
profitable employm ent b y maintaining a national system of employ­
ment offices, and to coordinate the public employment offices through­
out the country b y furnishing and publishing information as to oppor­
tunities for employm ent ana b y maintaining a system for clearing
labor between the several States, including personal services in the
District of Columbia and elsewhere, and for their actual necessary
traveling expenses while absent from their official station, together
with their per diem in lieu of subsistence, when allowed pursuant to
section 13 of the Sundry Civil Appropriation A ct approved August 1,
3914; supplies and equipment, telegraph and telephone service, and
printing and binding, $225,000 [is appropriated].
Approved, March 28, 1922.




o f wage

Purpose.

Appropriation.

47

LABOR LEG ISLATIO N OF 1922.

48

N o. 259.— A
*

r m y a p p r o p r ia tio n a c t—
d o m e s tic p r o d u c ts — S to p
*

*

W a g e s o f c iv ilia n e m p lo y e e s —
w a tc h — B o n u s s y s te m .
*

U se o f

*

No part of the moneys appropriated in this act shall be used for pay­
ing to any civilian employee of the United States Government an
average daily wage or salary larger than that customarily paid b y pri­
vate individuals for corresponding work in the same locality.
Dom estic mate­
A ll material purchased under the provisions of this act shall be of
rial.
American manufacture, except in cases when, in the judgment of the
Secretary of War, it is to the manifest interest of the United States to
make purchases abroad, which material shall be admitted free of duty.
W age rate.

*

Tim e studies.

B onus

*

*

*

No part of the appropriation made in this act shall b e available for
the salary or pay of any officer, manager, superintendent, foreman, or
other person having charge of the work of any em ployee of the United
States Government while making or causing to be made with a stop
watch, or other time-measuring device, a time study of any job of any
such em ployee between the starting and completion thereof, or of the
movements of any such employee while engaged upon such work; nor
shall any part of the appropriation made in this act be available to pay
any premium or bonus or cash reward to any employee in addition to
his regular wages, except for suggestions resulting in improvements or
economy in the operation of any Government plant.
Approved, June 30, 1922.
N o. 260.— D

Appointm ent.

*

e p a r tm e n t o f L a b o r — S e c o n d A s s is ta n t S e c r e ta r y .

S ection 1. There shall be in the Department of Labor an additional
Secretary, who shall be known and designated as Second Assistant
Secretary of Labor. He shall be appointed b y the President and shall
receive a salary of $5,000 a year. He shall perform such duties as
shall be prescribed b y the Secretary of Labor, or required b y law, and
in case of the death, resignation, absence, or sickness of the Assistant
Secretary, shall, until a successor ' s appointed or such absence or sick­
ness shall cease, perform the duties devolving upon the Assistant Sec­
retary b y reason of section 177, Revised Statutes, unless otherwise
directed b y the President, as provided b y section 179, Revised Statutes.
Approved, June 30, 1922.

N o. 264.— N

a v y a p p r o p r ia tio n a c t— S t o p

w a tc h

—B

o b u s .

[The provisions of this act are similar to those in No. 259, above, on
the same subjects.]
N o. 347.— C

o a l c o m m is s io n —

C o n d itio n s o f e m p lo y m e n t, p r o d u c tio n

,

e tc .

S ection 1. For the purpose of securing information in connection
with questions relative to interstate commerce in coal and all questions
Commission es­
tablished.

T erm .

is hereby established a governmental agency to be known and designated as the United States Coal Commission, to be composed of not
more than seven members appointed b y the President of the United
States, b y and with the advice and consent of the Senate. No member
of the United States Senate or of the House of Representatives shall be
eligible to serve on said commission. Said commission shall elect a
chairman b y majority vote of its members, shall maintain central offices
in the District of Columbia, but may, whenever it deems it necessary,
meet at such other places as it m ay determine. A member of the com­
mission m ay be removed b y the President for neglect of du ty or mal­
feasance in office but for no other cause. Each member of said com­
mission shall receive a salary of $7,500 a year. A n y vacancy on the
commission shall be filled in the same manner as the original appoint­
ment. Said commission shall cease to exist one year after the taking
effect of this act.




TEXT OF LAW S— UNITED STATES.

49

The term “ person7’ as used in this act means any individual, part­ Definitions.
nership, corporation, or association; the term “ coal” means anthra­
cite, bituminous, and other coal, lignite, coke, and culm, whether in
place extracted, or banked.
It shall be the duty of said commission to investigate and ascertain Duties.
fu lly the facts and conditions and study the problems and questions
relative to the coal industry with a view to and for the purpose of
aiding, assisting, and advising Congress in matters of legislation which
w ill insure a supply of this commodity to the industries and the people
generally throughout the country and maintain the uninterrupted
flow of commerce among the States, or any legislation which Congress
may, after said investigation, deem wise and which, under the Consti­
tution, Congress has the power to enact.
To this end said commission shall ascertain and report to the Presi­ R eport.
dent and Congress. As to the ownership and titles of the mines; prices
of coal; the organizations and persons connected with the coal industry;
cost of production; profits realized b y the operators or owners of said
mines during the last ten years; profits of other persons or corporations
having to do with production, distribution, or sale of coal; labor costs;
wages paid; wage contracts; irregular production; waste of coal; and
suggestions as to the remedy for the same; the conditions generally un­
der which coal is produced; distribution; the causes which from time
to time induce strikes, thereby depriving interstate carriers of their
fuel supply and otherwise interrupting the flow of interstate commerce;
and all facts, circumstances, or conditions which would be deemed help­
ful in determining and establishing a wise and efficient policy b y the
Government relative to said industry.
Said commission shall, under the provisions of this act, make a sepa­ Anthracite in­
rate investigation and report for the anthracite industry, which investi­ dustry.
gation and report shall cover all of the matters specified in the last pre­
ceding paragraph, and shall cover also every other phase of the anthra­
cite industry, including the production, transportation, and distribu­
tion of anthracite, and the organized or other relationships, if any,
among the mine operators or the mine workers, or among any persons
engaged in the production, transportation, or distribution of coal.
Recommends*
Said commission shall also submit recommendations relative to:
(a) Standardizing the mines upon the basis of their economic pro­ tions.
ductive capacity and regarding the closing down of mines which, b y
reason of their natural limitations, or other conditions, fall below the
standard.
(b) Ascertaining and standardizing the cost of living for mine
workers and the living conditions which must be supplied or afforded
in order to surround the workmen with reasonable comforts, and
standardizing also as far as practicable the amount of work a man
shall perform for a reasonable wage, recognizing the value and effect
of such surroundings in ’respect of their efficiency.
(c) Standardizing a basis of arriving at the overhead cost of pro­
ducing and distributing the coal, including delivery at the door of
the consumer, recognizing in this compilation that the standardized
cost of living to the miners should be the first and irreducible item of
expense.
(d) The advisability of any legislation having to do with govern­
ment or private ownership, regulation or control in the coal industry.
Said commission shall render its first report and recommendations Tim e for report.
to the Congress and to the President not later than January 15, 1923.
Said commission shall render its separate report on the anthracite
industry on or before July 1,1923, and shall endeavor, in said separate
report and in the recommendations contained therein, regarding
wages in the anthracite industry, to take into consideration the con­
ditions obtaining up to the time when said report is made.
That any officer or employee of the commission who shall make Disclosures.
public any information obtained b y the commission without its
authority, unless directed b y a court, shall be deemed guilty of a
misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished b y a
fine not exceeding $5,000, or b y imprisonment not exceeding one
year, or b y both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the
court.




60

Powers, etc.

LABOR LEGISLATION OF 1922.

That any member of said commission shall have power to adminis­
ter oaths, to subpoena and examine witnesses, and to com pel the
production of any book, paper, document, or other evidence, from
any place in the United States, at any designated place of hearing,
and to take or authorize the taking of the deposition of any person
before any person haying power to administer oaths. In the case
of a deposition the testimony shall be reduced to writing b y the person
taking the deposition or under his direction and be subscribed to b y
the deponent. The same fees and mileage as are paid in the courts
of the United States shall be paid in the case of witnesses subpoenaed
or depositions taken under this act.
Testim ony to
No person shall be excused from so attending and testifying and
b e given.
deposing, or from so producing any book, paper, document, or other
evidence on the ground that the testimony or evidence, documentary
or otherwise, may tend to incriminate him or subject him to a penalty
or forfeiture ; but no natural person shall be prosecuted or subjected
to any penalty or forfeiture for or on account of any transaction, mat­
ter, or thing as to which, in obedience to a subpoena and under oath,
he may be compelled to testify or produce in evidence; except that
no person shall be exem pt from prosecution and punishment for per­
jury committed in so testifying.
Any member of the commission, officer, or employee thereof, duly
authorized in writing by the commission, shall, at all reasonable
times for the purpose of examination, have access to and the right to
copy any book, account, record, paper, or correspondence relating to
any matter which the commission is authorized b y this act to investi­
gate.
D u ty of officers,
Every officer or employee of the United States whenever requested
etc*
b y the commission shall supply it with any data or information per­
taining to any investigation b y the commission which may be con­
tained in the records of the office of such officer or employee.
Refusal to tesAny person who shall willfully neglect or refuse to attend and testify
tify*
or depose, or to produce or permit aceess to any book, account, record,
document, correspondence, or paper, as herein provided for, shall
be guilty of an offense and upon conviction thereof be punished b y a
fine of not more than $5,000, or b y imprisonment for not more than one
year, or b y both such fine and imprisonment.
E xpenses.
The commission may appoint and remove such officers, employees,
and agents; and make such expenditures for rent, printing, telegrams,
telephone, law books, books of reference, periodicals, furniture, sta­
tionery, office equipment, and other supplies and expenses, including
salaries, traveling expenses of its members, secretary, officers, em ­
ployees, and agents, and witness fees, as are necessary for the efficient
execution of the functions vested in the commission b y this act and
as may be provided for b y Congress from time to time, and make such
rules and regulations as may be necessary for the efficient administra­
tion of this act. All of the expenditures of the commission shall be
allowed and paid upon the presentation of itemized vouchers therefor
approved b y the chairman of the commission. No salary or compensa­
tion of any em ployee shall exceed $7,500 per year.
Appropriation.
There is hereby authorized to be appropriated, out of any money
in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, the sum of $200,000, or so
much thereof as may be necessary, to be available until expended,
for carrying out the provisions of this act.
Approved, September 22, 1922.




CUMULATIVE INDEX.
Bulletin
N o. 148.

Page.

No.

Page.

A.

47
50,51
23
36
28

(See also Railroad em­

ployees, etc., voting

(S ee also Inspection

factories, etc.)




of

Page.
Accidents in mines, re­
ports and investigation
of:
Alabama...........
A laska...............
A rizona.............
Arkansas..........
Colorado...........

A bandonm ent of em­
ploym ent. ( See Con­
tracts o f em ploym ent.)
A bandonm ent oflocom otives; etc. (S ee Strikes
o f railroad employees.)
Absence, leave of. (See
Leave of absence.)
A bsent voters, summary
o f laws as t o ....................

A ccident i n s u r a n c e .
(S ee Insurance, acci­
d ent.)
A ccident, old age, etc.,
relief:
Alaska..........................
186
A rizona........................
Minnesota....................
A ccident prevention:
California.....................
Illinois..........................
687,588
N ebraska.....................
1285
N ew Jersey..................
1430
O h io..............................
1674
V ir g in ia ...
W isconsin.
2256
A ccidents,
industrial,
commissions on, digest
146
o f law as t o .
Accidents,
industrial,
reports and investiga­
tion of:
California.....................
416,417
Connecticut.................
Illinois..........................
561,571
Indiana........................
646
757
Iow a ..............................
Kansas.........................
776,777
861,862
Louisiana....................
Maine............................
878,889
Massachusetts............ 1033-1035
Minnesota...................
1097
1132,1133
Missouri.......................
1179
M ontana......................
Nebraska.....................
1300
1391
N ew Jersey.................
1415,1421
N ew Y o r k ................... 1481,1482
1489,1510
O h io............................. 1647,1648
’ O klahom a................... 1717,1718
Oregon.........................
3769
1787
Pennsylvania.............
1849,1927
1971
R hode Isla n d .............
2030
Tennessee....................
2064,2065
Utah
V erm on t..
2258,2292
W isconsin,
2293

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.

74,75
153
244

84

166

209

244

141
152,153
163
212-215
191
218

186

311,312

345
347
421
364
370

Id a h o.................
Illinois...............
Indiana.............
Iow a ..................
Kansas..............
K en tu ck y.........
M aryland..........
M ichigan..........
Minnesota........
Missouri............
M ontana...........
N evada.............
New Jersey___
N ew M e x ico .. .
N ew Y o r k ........
North Carolina.
O h io...................
Oklahom a........
P enn sylvania..
South Dakota.
Tennessee.......
U ta h ................
V irginia..........
W ashington...

166,168
193
219,220
236
336,340
341,387
510
614
658
730,753
758,759
780,781

Bulletin.
No.

244

143

166

58

277

222

244

325

244
277
186

35i
321-330
409,415

186

84

244

217

1111

1190,1191
3268
1330,1331
1448
1525,1526
1569-3571
1618,1619
1621,1627
1735
1812
1813,1876
1904,1915
. 2010
2030,2050
2117,2118
2174
2203,2204

W est Virginia.............
2253
W yom ing.................... 2339,2344
United States.............
2410
(See also Mine regula­
tions.)
Accidents on railroads,
etc., reports and inves­
tigation of:
157
Alabam a......................
A rizona........................
230
California.....................
Colorado......................
351
Connecticut.................
403,422
District of C olum bia..
464
Florida.........................
467,478
H aw aii.........................
506
Illinois..........................
627
Indiana........................
664
675,705
Ic w a ..............................
724
776,777
Kansas.........................
K en tu ck y....................
813
890,891
Maine............................
M aryland.....................
897
Massachusetts.............
949,950
Michigan......................
1073
Minnesota....................
1109
Mississippi...................
1149
Missouri.......................
1216
M ontana...................... 1231,1271
Nebraska.....................
1315
N evada........................ 1335,1336
N ew Ham pshire........
1366
N ew Jersey.................
1409
New Y o r k ...................
1554
North Dakota............. 1503,1594

51

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX.

52

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Page.
A ccid en ts on railroads,
etc., reports and inves­
tigation of—Con.
O h io ............................
Oregon........................ .
Pennsylvania.............
Porto R ic o ..................
R hode I s l a n d .. ..—
South Carolina...........
South D akota........... .
U tah.............................
V erm ont......................
Virginia...................... .
W ashington................

1604
1764,1773
1937,1938

Michigan.............
M ontana.............
N evada1.............
N ew Hampshire
N ew Jersey........
N ew M exico___
N ew Y o r k ..........
N orth Carolina.
O h io...................
O klahom a........
P ennsylvania..
Porto R ic o ........
Tennessee.........
Virginia...........
W ashington...
W est Virginia.
W isconsin....................
W yom in g.....................
A ctions for injuries. (S ee
Injuries.)
A ction s for wages. (S ee
Suits for wages.)
Advances m ade b y em ­
ployers. (S ee E m ploy­
ers’ advances, etc.)
Aeronauts, examination,
etc., of, digest of law
relating t o .......................
JLge not ground for dis­
charge:
Colorado......................
A g e of em ploym ent of
children.
(S ee Chil­
dren, etc.)




186

311,312
312,313

244

336

2020
2138,2139
2154
2210,2213
2214,2217
2284,2285
244

370

186

449

186

71

244
308

84,94
48,49

186
186

119
149

244
166

169-171
67

166
186
277
308

132
186
141,142
127

378
580-582
614
659,677
753
831
932
982
1070-1091
1243,1244
1266
1335
1362
1409
1447
1515
1575,1576
1620,1625
1738
1803,1836
1837,1897
1955
2063
2065-2067
2113,2120
2172,2173
2205,2206
2251

244

242

186
308

283,284
175

166

193

244

244
186
244

351
404
357

334

A ge o f em ploym ent of
telegraph operators on
railroads.
(S e e Tele­
graph operators, etc.)
Agents, emigrant. (S ee
Emigrant agents.)
A id societies. (S ee B ene­
fit societies.)
A ir, compressed, work in.
(S ee Compressed air.)
A ir space required in
workrooms:
A rizona........................
Delaware.....................
Illinois..........................
Indiana........................
M aryland.....................
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
N ew J ersey.. .
N ew Y o r k ___
Pennsylvania.
P orto R ico ___
Teunessee........
W isconsin___

308

3

No.

Page.

244
568,569
648
918
1069

116

166

103,104

244
308
186

237
175

1120
1141,1142
1390
1509,1518
1839,1847
1963
2264
2266,2321

Factories
and workroom s.)
Alien contract labor:
Delaware................... .
434
H awaii.........................
495
Indiana...................... .
642
Virginia...................... .
2152
W yom ing....................
2331
United States........... . 2414-2416
(S ee also Coolie labor.)
Alien laborers, em ploy­
m ent of, in fisheries:
Alaska.........................
185,186
W ashington................
Alien laborers, protec­
tion of:
Connecticut................
405
H aw aii.........................
505
N ew Y o r k ................... 1531,1532
Pennsylvania.............
W yom ing....................
2347
Aliens, employers of, to
deduct
taxes
from
wages:
Pennsylvania............. 1844,1845
Aliens, em ploym ent of:
A rizona........................
(S ee

Bulletin.

211

186*
186

433

also

311,312

2284
2341

143

Page.

Page.

1989
1995-1997

....... 220

In d ia n a —
Iow a ...........
Kansas----K entucky..
M aryland..

No.

244

W isconsin.................. .
W yom in g.....................
U nited States............. 2425,2426
2429,2430
A ccid ents on vessels, etc.:
1059
Michigan......................
1542
N ew Y o r k ...................
U nited States.............
A ccidents, provisions for:
180
Alabam a......................
Alaska 1:......................
A rizona........................
244
Arkansas....................
307,308
California.....................
Colorado___
Connecticut.
Illinois.........

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.

M ontana......................
Aliens, em ploym ent of,
on public works:
A rizona........................
California....................
H aw aii..............
Id a h o.................
Massachusetts..
N evada.............

196,197
261,277

244

375^377

186

397

186

337

186
308
277

75
35,36
174

186
308

89,90
48

277
308

208,209
135

186
292

**25i

277

**32i

166

186

496,502
507,519
967

N ew Jersey............
1386
N ew Y o r k ..............
1479,1480
Oregon....................
1838,1839
Pennsylvania........
W ashington...........
W yom ing...............
........2328
(S ee also Chinese, em­
ploym ent of; P ub­
lic works, prefer­
ence o f resident la­
borers on.)
American Museum of
Safety:
N ew Y o r k ...................
1561

68

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
No. 148.
Page.
Anarchists, em ploym ent
of, forbidden:
New M exico................
Antitrust act:
N ew Ham pshire........
Texas........................... 2094,2095
W isconsin....................
United States............. 2402^-2404
Antitrust act, exclusions
from:
290
California.....................
Iow a .............................
*840
Louisiana....................
Massachusetts.............
1051
Michigan......................
1237
M ontana......................
1238,1244
New Hampshire.
Virginia.................
2284
W isconsin.............
United States—
Appliance, safety, in fac­
tories. (See Guards for
dangerous m achinery.)
Appliances, safety, on
railroads. (S ee R ail­
roads, safety provisions,
etc., on.)
Apprentice laws, digest of
Arbitration and m edia­
tion:
A labam a......................
A laska..........................
Arkansas......................
California.....................
Colorado......................
Connecticut.
Georgia........
Id a h o...........
I llin o is ....
In d ia n a ...
Iow a ..........
Kansas—
Louisiana.
Maine........
M aryland.
Massachusetts..
Michigan...............
Minnesota.............
Missouri................
M ontana...............
N ebraska..............
N evada.................
N ew Hampshire.
N ew Jersey..........
N ew Y o r k ............
O h io......................
Oklahoma.
Oregon......................
Pennsylvania..........
Philippine Islands.

408,409
493
507
513-517
535-538
634-638
761-763
765,766
837-839
879-881
893,894
903-905
963-966




277

225

244

226

308

271

277

119

166
244

i42
196

244
277
277
166
186

226
320
347,348
235,236
439

A rbitration and m edia­
tion—ConcludedUnited States...........

1925,1926
1946

2071-2073
2105-2108
2147-2150
2196,2197
2297
2328

Bulletin.

No.

330

Connecticut.
Delaware___
Georgia........
Illinois..........
Indiana........

308
186
308

50
113-118
59-62

244

131,133

244
186

142,143
154r-157

91-95
47

277

51,52

2440-2445

Court of In­
dustrial Relations.)
Arm ed guards, hiring:
188,189
A laska..........................
231,232
Arkansas......................
Colorado......................
364,365
Illinois..........................
551
Massachusetts.............
969,970
Missouri.......................
1164
Oklahom a...................
1720
Tennessee.................... 2056,2057
2184
W ashington.................
2308
W isconsin....................
(S ee also Industrial
police.)
Assignment
165
A rizona. . .
Arkansas..
250
California.
265
C olorado..
350,351
(See also

Iow a...................
K entucky.........
Louisiana.........
Maine.................
M aryland..........
Massachusetts..
M ichigan...
Minnesota..

99,100
83

88

411
434
485
621,622
639
640,663
676,677
738
834,835
851,862
874,875
894,895
984,986
987,1010

23,24
155

97

41
51,52
182
51
71,74
191-193
205

1112,1121

1133,1134
Mississippi.
Missouri___
Montana. . .
N ebraska..

213

63,64

166
292
186
308

136
48
193-196
115

277

181

O h io..................
Pennsylvania.

244

225

292

64

277

1099,1100
1173-1175
1223-1225
1308-1310
1322-1324
1367,1368
1373
1529,1530
1605-1609
1658-1661
1703,1704
1709,1710

Porto R ic o .........
South Carolina.
South D a k ota .,
Texas............... .
U tah.................
V erm ont...........
W ashington....
W isconsin....... .
W yom ing.........

Page.

Page.

9-27
163-165
190-192
259
277,278
333

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

53

267-269

166
244
277
213
277
330
292
292
244
186
308
277

198
302
281-284
137,138
295
36,37
80
83,84
340,341
395
253
349-351

R hode I s la n d ..
Tennessee.........
Texas............... .
U tah..................
V erm ont.........
Virginia...........
W ashington....
W est Virginia.
W isconsin.......

N evada.................
New Hampshire.
N ew Jersey..........
N ew Y o rk .

Paym ent of
wages; W age brok­
ers.)
Assignments of claims to
avoid exem ption laws.
(S ee
E xem ption
of
wages.)
Associations, cooperative,
list of laws relating t o ...
Associations of employees.
(S ee Benefit societies.)

145

1202
1246,1247
1287-1290

217
219-222
224

1356
1374-1376
1398,1399
1479,1552

153-155
174
187-190
161
301-304

1672,1673
1825
1864,1926
1985,1986
2034

322
386-388
335

2135-2137

........ 2i90’
2292
2332

(S ee also

87-92

257

110
344
424

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Attachm ent of wages:
Connecticut................. :
________
Attorneys1 fees in suits i
,
for wages, (S ee Suits
for wages.)

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

Page.

897
1824

B.
Badges, employees:
N ew Y o r k ...................
257
Badges, etc., of labor o r - ;
ganizations. (S ee La­
b o r organizations, e t c .) ;
Bakeries, hours of labor
in. (S ee Hours of la ­
b or.)
Bakeries, inspection, e t c .,.
of.
(S ee Inspection,
etc.)
B ankruptcy:
U nited States............. 2406,2407 330
Barber shops, inspection
o f.
(S ee Inspection,
etc., of barber shops.)
Barbers, exam ination,
etc.; of. (S ee Exam i­
nation, etc.)
Barroom s, paym ent of
wages m . (See Pay­
m ent of wages in bar­
room s.)
Basements, (S ee Cellars,
etc.)
Benefit societies:
Massachusetts.............
949
1060
Michigan......................
1603
O h io..............................
Philippine Islands___ 1941,1942
South Carolina........... 1994,1995
(S ee also Contracts of
employees w aiving
rights to damages.)
Benefit societies, forced
contributions for. (See
Forced contributions.)
Blacklisting:
154,155 368
Alabam a.......................
196 186
A rizona........................
228,229
Arkansas____ ________
243
California.....................
275
324
Colorado.......................
417
Connecticut.................
422,423
466
Florida.........................
539
Illinois..........................
Indiana................. . . .
641,642
743
Io w a ..............................
Kansas............. ..........
773
Minnesota....................
1097
1107,1108
Mississippi................... 1149,1150
Missouri.......................
JL165
M ontana...................... 1230,1239
N evada........................
1341 186
N ew M exico................ 1441,1442
N orth Carolina...........
1575
N orth Dakota............. 1583,1591
Oklahom a....................
1721
1750
Oregon..........................
Texas............................ 2073-2075
2092,2093
U tah.............................. 2105,2109
Virginia........................
2158 .330
W ashington................. 2190,2191
W isconsin....................
2308




78

47

32
73,74

230,231

40

Page.
B lack listin g-C onclud ed .
(S ee also Discharge,
statement o f cause
of; I n t e r f e r e n c e
w ith em ploym ent,
and cross refer­
ences.)
Blasting in mines. (See
Mine regulations.)
Boarding houses. (S ee
Lodging houses.)
Boarding or commissary
cars, taxation of:
Mississippi..................
Boards of arbitration,
etc. (S ee A r b i t r a ­
tion and mediation.)
Boatm en. (See Seamen.)
Boilers, creating an un­
safe amount of steam in.
(S ee Negligence of op­
erators, etc.)
Boilers, entering under
pressure:
Oklahom a....................
Boilers, steam, inspection
of.
(S ee Inspection,
etc.)
Bonds, contractors', list
of laws relating t o ..........
B onds of employees:
A rizona........................
Arkansas......................
California.....................
Florida..........................
Georgia.........................
Id a h o............................
Louisiana.....................
Massachusetts_______
Mississippi.................
Missouri.......................
N ew M exico................
North Carolina...........
Oklahoma....................
Virginia......................
W est Virginia.............
Bonuses. (S ee Efficiency
tests and bonuses.)
B oycotting:
Alabam a.......................
Colorado.......................
Illinois..........................
Indiana.................... _
Kansas..........................
Texas............................
United States...........
(See also Interference
with em ploym ent,
and cross refer­
ences.)
B r a k e m e n , sufficient
number of. (S ee Rail­
road trains, sufficient
crews required on.)
Brakes on railroad trains.
See Railroads, safety
provisions, etc.)
Bribery, etc., of em­
ployees:
California.....................
Connecticut.................
Indiana........................
Io w a ..............................
Louisiana....................
Maine............................
M aryland.....................
I
Massachusetts.............

Bulletin.

N o.

Page.

«

213

81

244

74

1723

76-79
213,214
251,252
476,477
494
533
865,866
968

257

45

166

146,147

166
186

V'fcO
00©

54

308

32

1205,1206
1435
1577,1578
1704,1705

154,155
324
539
632,633

292

34

166

235,236

.186
244

87,88
110

292

41,42

257

51

2095,2099

411,4i2
668,669
743,744
876
968,969

55

C U M U L A T I V E IN D E X ,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
B ribery, etc., of employees—Concluded.
Montana... .

Bribery of representatives of labor organizations:

244
1318,1319
1342,1343
1377
1543
1581,1582
1987!1988
2000! 200l
2162
2184
2308,2309

331,334
405

492-494

Illinois..........................

495
499-501
504-506
507
512,513
565,566

Indiana................ .......

650,651

Towa...................... .......

724-726

"Kansas..........................

796-798
803,804

K entucky....................
Louisiana....................

809-812
849
852,853

Maine............................
M aryland.....................
Massachusetts.............




Page.

1061-1063
1073

186
244
277
308
244
277
308

190
196
137
109, HO
201
149,154
113

1126
1134,1138

1170,1171
1217
1271,1272
N ebraska..................... 1290,1291
N evada........................
Missouri.......................
M ontana......................

!
j

878,879
884-887
903-905
961,962
1015-1017

308

127,128

277
186
244
277
308
244

181-196
231-233
224
202

New Ham pshire........

Colorado......................

Id a h o............................

Minnesota....................

..........1343
1406
1542,1543

Connecticut.................

H awaii...................... / .

25

N o.

211

330

Bulletin.

Page.

Page.
Bureau o f labor—Con.
Michigan......................

Bricklayers’ certificates:
W isconsin.................... ...................
Brickyards, hours of labor of employees in:
1476
1477,1548
Bridges over railroad
tracks. ( See Railroad
tracks, etc.)
Building industry, investigation of:
Illinois......................
Buildings, protection of
employees on.
( See
Protection of em ploy­
ees, etc.)
Bureau, children’s:
TTnito.d States
2431
Bureau of labor:
/U« sira
257-259
Arkansas......................
284-286
California....................
306

Delaware......................1
Georgia.........................i

N o.

1054,1055

______

N ew Jersey.................

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

New Jersey.................
244

368

New Y o r k ...................

308

1358,1359
1366-1368
1385,1386
1392,1993
1417,1418

1482-1490
1532

81

Oklahoma.................... 1703,1708
1709,1742
Oregon.......................... 1750-1752
Pennsylvania.............

1921-1926

Philippine Is la n d s .. .

1945-1947

Porto R ic o ................... 1959-1961
R hode Island .............

277

103

244

139-143
146
151,152
159
160
97
163
166,167
121
99
49
90,91
48
42
180,181
125
62-65
15,16
132
76
131-136
104
19

1S6
244
186
308
244
277
308
213
166
257
292
186
227
213
330
166
213
277
308
330

213
244
257
277
292
330
166
186
257
277
292
308

N orth Carolina........... 1567,1568
N orth D akota............. 1583,1584
O h io............................. 1605,1663
277
48,49
244
69
90,92
186
244
78,79
64
277
49,50
308
186 105-118
244
99
122
186
244
109
308 63.64,68
186 123,124
131
244
277
97

166
186

1975

South Carolina ........
South D akota.............
Tennessee.....................
Texas............................

1991-1994
2023-2025
2029-2031
2077-2079
2096,2097
2121,2122
2129,2130

U tah.............................
V erm ont.......................
Virginia........................

2151
2155,2156

W ashington................. 2187-2189
W est Virginia.............
W isconsin....................
W yom in g....................

2233,2234

U nited States.............

2353,2354
2411-2413
2434
2438-2440

( See also Commission,

industrial, etc.)

186
277
277
398

13d

225-229
158
241,242
246,247
83-85
233,234
74,75
219-221
55,56
25,26
174-176
260-266
78,79,81
227,228
233
59
14o—
153
163
296
239-241
249
203-205

244
277
166
186
244
244
277
308
277
330

317
220
319,320
329,331
332,337
338
277,278
275,280
198
363
301-303
305,313
281,282
225,226
289-291
33

277
277

301-305
307,308

186

393

186
308
186

244 347,348
308
249
166 211,212
330 39,40,45
277
308
186
308
244
277
257
330

321-330
251-254
416,417
261
371-373
353
119,120
48

C U M U L A T I V E IN D E X ,

56

Bulletin
N o 148.
Page.

N o.

Page.

335-341

186
277
244
166
257

Bureau o f mines:
A rizon a.........
C olorado........
Illinois...........

73
82,83
139,140
143-145
53-56
39-41

186

335

186

399-401

K entucky.
Louisiana___
Missouri.........
Pennsylvania

863
1191
1831-1834
1933
Tennessee..................... 2029-2031
Virginia........................
2160
W est Virginia............. 2243-2245
U nited States............. 2426,2427
(S ee also Mine regula­
tions.)
Bureau o f public print­
ing . (S ee Public print­
ing office.)

C.

^

Caissons, etc., work in.
(S ee Compressed air,
work in .)
Cam ps, l a b o r . ( S e e
Labor cam ps.)
Candidates for office, pro­
tection ofem ployees as:
W yom in g....................
Canneries, em ploym ent
o f wom en in:
California...............

2322

N ew Y o r k ...................
1561
Cannery inspector. (See
Inspector, cannery.
Cause o f discharge. (See
Discharge, statement of
cause of.)
Cellars and basements,
use of:
California.....................
278
Illinois..........................
561
Michigan......................
1071
Minnesota....................
1119
1418
N ew Jersey..................
N ew Y o r k .................... 1523,1524
O h io..............................
1649
1741
Oklahom a....................
Pennsylvania..............
W isconsin.................... 2262,2266
Certificates, em ployers’ .
(S ee Em ployers’ certifi­
cates.)
Charges, false, against
railroad e m p l o y e e s .
(S e e Railroad em ploy­
ees, e tc.)
Chauneurs, examination,
etc., of. (S ee Exam ina­
tion , etc.)
Checks, p a y m e n t o f
wages in . (S ee P ay­
m ent o f wages in scrip.)
Child la bor com m ission:
438,439
Delaware.....................
Child labor, national com ­
m ittee on, incorpora­
tion of:
U nited States............. 2416,2417
Child welfare depart­
m ent:
Alabam a.......................
H aw aii..............
N orth Carolina.
South D akota..




Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

213
244
308

29-32
92-95
158

186

145

308

177-179
181

186

359,360

No.
Childbearing w o m e n ,
em ploym ent of. (S ee
W om en, childbearing.)
Children and wom en,
commission on em ploy­
m ent of:
Louisiana.....................
Children and w om en,
commission on em ploy­
m ent of, digest o f la w s
149
as t o ..................................
Children and wom en,
em ploym ent of, in base­
ments:
New Y o r k .................... 1535,1536
Children and wom en, em­
ploym ent of, in mines:
183
Alabam a.......................
236
Arkansas......................
381
Colorado.......................
615
Illinois..........................
663
Indiana........................
932,933
M aryland.....................
1189
Missouri.................... •..
1526
N ew Y o r k ....................
1704
Oklahoma....................
Pennsylvania.............. 1791,1805
1899,1900
U tah.............................. 2105,2108
V erm ont.......................
2173
Virginia........................
W ashington.................
2203
2252
W est Virginia.............
W yom in g..................... 2327,2330
(S ee also Children,
etc.; W om en, e tc.)
Children and wom en, em­
ploym ent of. (S ee also
Earnings o f married
wom en; Earnings o f
minors; M i n i m u m
wages; W om en, wages
of.)
Children, corporal pun­
ishment of, b y em ploy­
ers, etc.:
484
Porto R ic o ................. .
1955
Children, earnings of.
(S ee E a r n i n g s o f
m inors.)
Children, em ployed, cer­
tificates, registers, etc.,
of:
161
Alabama.
A rizon a..
Arkansas.
California.

353-358
419
420,425

Delaware.

442-449

District of Columbia.
Florida.........................
Georgia.........................

453-455
472,473
484,485

Id a h o..
Illinois.
277
292
277
277
277

199-202
248
279-283

Colorado___
Connecticut.

186

531
542-549

Indiana

645
707,708
727
791

123

39,40
19
99,100
235,236
297

Bulletin.

Iow a ___
Kansas.

Page.

257

45

277

41

308

155

244

349

244
186

352
406,407

186
60-62
277
42-44
308
39
186
82,83
186
94-99
277 64-68,71
308
52-56
244
308
277
186
244
277
308

107
66,67
86-89
125
119-124
91,92
69

166
213

31,32
41

244
308
308

148-152
83
89-92

186
244

161,162
164-166

C U M U L A T I V E IN D E X ,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Children, em ployed, certificates,registers, etc.,
of—Continued.
K en tu cky....................
Louisiana.....................
Maine............................
M aryland.....................

Massachusetts.............

Michigan......................

827
828,832
857-860
870-872
901,902
907-910
953
973-979

1063-1066

Minnesota...............
1115
1116,1118
Mississippi................... 1150,1151
Missouri........................ 1156-1158
M ontana......................
Nebraska.....................
N evada........................
New Ham pshire.
New Jersey...........

New Y ork ...........

1218
1219,1229
1275,1276
1293-1297
1355
1363-1365
1387
1388,1407
1428,1429
1457,1458
1490-1494
1533-1535

166
292
213
186
244
277
166
213
292
166
186
213
277
308
186
277
166
277
308
277

277
186
277
166
213
257
213
244
257
308
330
186
277

North Dakota............. 1596-1598
O hio.............................. 1667,1668
1674^1677
1695-1698

166

Oklahoma.................... 1713-1715

R hode Island .............. 1968-1970
South Carolina............ 1994,2002
South Dakota.............
Tennessee__

2026
2060

Texas............................
U tah............................ 2131,2132
V erm ont...................... 2141,2142
Virginia........................
2163

W ashington................. 2185,2191
W est Virginia______
2231,2232




Page.

33-35
40
51
178-180
177,178
123,124
123,124
56-61
64.69
'45
128,133
184
71-73
75,76
129-131
105-107
196-198
142,143
148,149
161
168-170
121-123
172,173

277
308
244
277
277
186

181
184-188
204,205
235
213,214
162-166
168-170
85,86
74
93-96
248,249
87
153,154
188-191
27-31
295
235-237
191-193
195
256
207-217
269,270
259
272
320
322-326

277
308
186
213
330
244
277
308

286
228-232
368-370
133-136
33,34
317
296
235

244
308
244
277
244
166
257
292
330
277
277
308

323
240
328
316,317
349,350
213
105,106
89
42,43
330-332
340
259

Bulletin.

Page.
Children, em ployed, cer­
tificates, registers, etc.,
of—Concluded.
W isconsin....................
United States.............
Children, e m p l o y e d ,
schools for:
Alabama.....................
A rizona........................
California.....................

No.

Page.

2269
2272-2276
2278-2280

244
277
308
277

364-366
349
265-268
357

277
277
277
308
308
308
308
308
277
277
277
308
330
277
308
277
277
308
277
308
277
308
277
308
•277
277
308
308
277
277
186
277
277
277
308
186
244
308

52,53
64-72
74-78
86-89
65
69,70
71
85,86
94
119
125
129-131
105-107
20
142,143
112
168-170
173
128-130
198,199
131,132
204,205
136
213,214
137,138
215,221
229-232
186,187
206,207
262,263
271-273
321
316,317
330-332
337
257,258
423
366,367
268-270

186
277
277

59
40
52

163

Connecticut.................
Delaware......................
Florida.........................
Illinois..........................
Indiana........................
Iow a ..............................
Maine............................
Massachusetts............. 1018,1019
Michigan......................
Missouri........................
M ontana......................
Nebraska.....................

277

North Carolina............ 1578,1579

Oregon.......................... 1753,1754
Pennsylvania.............
1791
1805,1846
1859-1862
Porto R ic o ...................
1962

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

57

N evada........................
New Ham pshire........
New Jersey.................
New Y o r k ...................
O h io.............................
Oklahoma....................
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania.............
U tah.............................
W ashington.................
W est Virginia.............
W isconsin....................
Children em ployed, seats
for. (S ee Seats for em ­
ployed children.)
Children, em ploym ent of,
age lim it for:
Alabama......................
A rizona........................
Arkansas......................
California.....................
Colorado......................
Connecticut.................
Delaware......................
District of C olum bia..
Florida.........................
Georgia.........................
Id a h o............................
Illinois..........................
Indiana........................
Iow a ..............................
Kansas.........................
K en tu cky....................
Louisiana.....................
Maine............................

2275

160
195
197-202
247,248
279,281
325,352
401
419-421
440
441,445
452
472
484
530
542,546
645
692,693
727
790,791
827
857
870,877

81
186
94,96
186
277 68-72,74
308

64

244

118,124

166

31,32

244
148
308 89,90,91
186
244
166
166
186
277

160
164
33
88
178
123

C U M U L A T IV E

58

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Children, em ploym ent
o f, age lim it for—Con.
M aryland...................
Massachusetts..

906
973

M ichigan...

1063

Minnesota..
Mississippi.
M issouri.. .

1115-1118
1150
1155

M ontana..
Nebraska.
N e v a d a ...
N ew H ampshire.
N ew Jersey..........
N ew M exico.
N ew Y o r k .. .
N orth Carolina..
N orth Dakota...
O h io...................
Oklahoma..
Oregon.......
Pennsylvania.
Porto R ic o —
R hod e I sla n d ..
South Carolina.
South D a k ota ..

Texas___
U tah.......
Verm ont.
V irginia.-

W ashington....
W est V irginia..
W isconsin.........

1228
1293
1344
1345,1348
1363
1386
1406,1407
1457
1490,1533
1572,1578
1583,1596
1674
1696-1700
1704,1712
1752
1761,1769
1791,1845
1858,1860
1962-1964

N o.

Page.

213
257
166
292
308
186
277
308
166
277
308
308
277

55,56
51
133
47
107
196,198
137
118
148
161,162
121
125
184

166

186
277

155
166-168
170 i
142
153-155
187
295
235

277

256,257

277

266

186

321

308
308

2019,2026
2000
2097,2098
2131,2132
2135
2158,2163




Children, em ploym ent of,
general provisions for—
Continued.
Arkansas..
California.

Colorado............•
.____
Connecticut............... .
Delaware___ '. .......... .

District o f Columbia.
Florida........................
Georgia.......................
Hawaii..
I d a h o ...
Illinois..

Iow a___
Kansas..

N o.

247,248
252,253
279,283
289,290
292

186
81-83
244
70,71
186
94-100
244 75,76,80
277
63-72
308
52-56
74-78

324,325
352-358
399,400
421
440-449

452-455
458,459
470
472-476
484,4S5
496,497
530-532
542-547
580
644-646
692,693
707,708
727,728
737,738
790,791
795,796

244
277
308
213

313
284-287
227
133

K entucky..

809
827,832

213
277

137
295,296

Louisiana..

857,860

186
244
277
244
186
244
166
257
292
330
244
277
308

383
323
306
327
393
348
212
105
87,89
42
354
337,338
265-267

Maine.........

867
869-872

M aryland..

900-903
906-915

151
357

Massachusetts..

941,942
971,979
1018,1019
1030,1031
1035-1039

Michigan.............

1054
1063-1066

Minnesota...........

2191
2231
2270-2272
2278

1105
1115-1118
1121,1122
1144
1150,1151
1155,1158
1200,1201
1218,1219
1222,1223
1228,1229
1275,1276
1293-1298
1316,1317
1326,1327
1348-1350
1363-1365

Mississippi..........
Missouri..............
M ontana.............

Nebraska............

1565

N evada...............
160-163
197-202
229

186
277
277
308

59-64
39-46
52,53
38-40

Bulletin.

Page.

Indiana.

(S ee also Children and

Arizona........................

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

213
277

1967
1968,1980
2001,2007

U nited States.
w om en, em ploy­
m ent of, in mines;
C h ild ren e m ­
ployed ,certificates,
registers, etc., of;
Children of widows,
dependent parents,
etc.)
Children, em ploym ent of,
as
messengers. (S ee
Children, em ploym ent
o f,in street trades.)
Children, em ploym ent of,
fraud i n :
N orth Carolina...........
Children, em ploym ent of,
general provisions for:
A labam a......................

IN D E X ,

N ew Hampshire.

244
308
186
244
292
308

Page.

107-110
66,67
125
118-124
21
69,70

186

129

166
213

31,32
41

308
244
308
308

79
148,154
82,83
89-94

186

160-162

186
244

257
292
330
166
186
213
244
257
277
308
186
244
277
308

171-175
164-166
174
33-38
47
42,43
40
87,88
51,53
13
178-180
177,178
123,124
123,124
55-61
65,69
51
45
17
133
184
71-73
187
55
133
105-107
196-198
196,199
137,138
119

166
257
277
308

148,149
61
161,162
121-123

277

184-188

166
213
257
292
166
213
330
186
244
277
166
213

308

135

186

235
237,238
229,230
137,138

244
308

C U M U L A T I V E IN D E X ,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Children, em ploym ent
of, general provisions
for—Concluded.
N ew Jersey.................. 1386-1388
1406-1409
1427-1429
N ew M exico................
N ew Y o r k ...................

N orth Carolina...........

1455-1458

1565,1566
1572,1581

N orth D akota............. 1596-1599
O h io.............................. 1667,1668
1674,1677
1695-1701
Oklahom a.................... 1712-1716
Oregon.......................... 1752-1755
Pennsylvania.............. 1845,1846
1857-1862
1864,1865
Porto R ico ................... 1982^-1964
R hode Isla n d.............. 1967-1971

South Carolina............ 2001,2002

South D akota............. 2025,2026
Tennessee.................... 2060-2063
T exa s..........................

2097,2098
2100,2101
U ta h ............................. 2131,2132

V erm ont......................

2135
2141,2142

V irginia.......................

W ashington................
2185
W est V i r g i n i a ................. 2231,2232
W isconsin.................... 2255,2256
W yom in g.....................
U nited States...........

195,193
200,201

Arkansas.....................
California.....................
Colorado......................
Connecticut.................
Delaware.....................
Florida.........................
Illinois..........................




166
186
257
277
308
186
213
244
257
277
292
330
186
244
277
244
166
277
308
244
213
186
303

Bulletin.
l

Page.

Page.

162-171
242
69
215
142
258
93-96
248-251
81
232,233
59
27-31
295
255
235-237
258,259
191-193
195
256,257 j
206-217
269,270
117
118,121
126,127
320,326
224

Children, em ploym ent of,
in dangerous occupa­
tions—Concluded.
Indiana........................
Iow a ..............................
K ansas.........................
K en tu ck y....................
Louisiana....................
M aryland.....................
Massachusetts.............
M ichigan......................
Minnesota....................
Missouri.......................
M ontana......................
Nebraska.....................
N evada........................
N ew Jersey.................

N o.

647
692,693
727,740

308

93

186
308
244
166

161
97
164
35,36

292

47

277
308
277

162
121,122
188

166
186
213
308

16S
169,171
242
93
154,155

308

215,216

186
244
244
277

321,322
298
313
288

244
ISO
244

328
393
338

330
244
277
308
186

44
354
338
264,265
437

791
809
829,830
859,861
906
907,911
978
1035,1036
1065
1117
1129,1130
1158,1179
1228
1298
1348,1349
1390

New Y o r k ...................

1512,1513

N orth D akota............
O h io.............................
Oklahom a...................
Pennsylvania.............

1598
1698-1700
1713
1787,1802
1845,1858

313
244
277 284-287
Porto R ic o ..................
308 227-232
186 367-370
R hode Island............. '
213 133-136 j
1971
233 i
303
South Carolina........... 1 1994,2002
33,34 i
South Dakota.............
2026
330
Tennessee....................
2060
186 372,373
Texas............................ , 2097,2098
317 i
244
U ta h .............................
277 295,296 i
2131
235
308
V erm ont......................
297 j
2141
277
V irginia.......................
386 332,383 i
W ashington................
244
323
2191
240 i
W est V irginia.............
2238
308
W isconsin................... i 2269-2271
186 388,389 i
W yom in g....................
244 327,328 j
338 Children, em ploym ent of,
244
313 1 in m endicant, acro277
395 i batic, etc., occupations:
186
A labam a......................
244 348,350 1
A rizona........................
198,200
166 212,214 ’
271,272
California.....................
257 105-107 '
Colorado......................
352,353
292
89
398
Connecticut........... .
330 39,41-45 |
Delaware......................
431
186 397,398 ■
District oi Columbia.
451
277 337-341
Florida.........................
469
186 422,424
491,492
Georgia........................
244 364,367 ;
Id a h o............................
o31, D 2
o
308 264-270
Illinois..........................
540
186 437,438 ;
Indiana........................
213 151-153
630
692,693
277 357,358
Iow a..............................
727
791,792
K en tu ck y....................
812,813
Louisiana....................
863-865
M aine...........................
877
M a ry la n d .......................
919,920
60
186
277
41
Massachusetts............
978,979
Miciiigan...................... 1046,1065
Minnesota.................... 1105,1117
81,82
Missouri....................... 1165,1166
186
1238
M ontana......................
186
95,96
Nebraska.....................
1298
69,70
277
1344
N evada........................
120
N ew H ampshire........ 1356,1357
186
N ew Jersey................. 1383,1384
244 118,119
N ew Y o r k ................... 1543,1544
N orth Dakota.............
1598
244 i52,i53
O h io..............................
1695

Page.

277

41,42

277

69,70

iS6
244 j

119
119

214

153

J

(S ee also Children and
wom en, e tc.)
Children, em ploym ent of,
in dangerous occupa­
tions:
A labam a......................

A rizona........................

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

59

352,353
420,421
441
442,445
474,475
546

277

162

277

188

186
213

242
93,94

60

C U M U L A T IV E

Bulletin
N o. 148,

R hode Isla n d ..
Texas................
U tah..................
Virginia............
W ashington....
W est Virginia..
W isconsin.........
W yom in g....................
(S ee also Children,
em ploym ent of, in
dangerous occupa­
tions.)
Children, em ploym ent
of, in mines:
Alabam a.................... .
A laska........................ .
A rizona...................... .
California................... .
Colorado.............
Delaware............
Id a h o..................
Illinois.................
Ind ia n a ............. .
Iow a ....................
Kansas................
K en tu cky...........
Louisiana...........
M aryland...........
Michigan.............
Minnesota..........
Missouri..............
M ontana.............
N evada...............
N ew Jersey____
N ew M exico.......
N orth C arolina..
N orth D akota...
O h io....................
Oklahom a.......
Pennsylvania.
South Dakota.,
Texas............................
U tah..............................
V erm ont......................
Virginia........................
W est Virginia.............
W isconsin....................
U nited States.............
(S ee also Children
and wom en, etc.).
Children, em ploym ent of
in street trades:
A labam a......................
A rizo n a ...
California.
Connecticut...........
Delaware................
District of C olu m bia..
Florida....................
Georgia...................




1982,1983
2097,2098
2131
2159:2160
2181
2237,2238
2271
2272,2309
2330

Page.

244
277
308

213
286
227,228

244
244

327,328
338

244
277
308

354
338
268,269

186

437

41
70

186
277

95
69,70

244

153

186
244
166

i60-162
164
35,36

198,226
323,353
441
507

162

166

166

277

235

446,447
455
472,474
492

Minnesota.............
Missouri................
N ew Hampshire.
N ew Jersey..........
N ew Y o r k ............

North Carolina.
O h io....................
Oklahoma.........
Oregon................
P enn sylvania..
Porto R ic o .........

327,328
338
348,349
212
338
357

. 186 59,60,62
63
277 41,44,45

04.9

943,1009
1036-1039
1118
1158
1363
1416
1538-1540
1544

277
244
244

96,99
100
69
109
119

N o.

Page.

93
59,60
75,76
57
107
118
162
173,174
80,81
145,187
30,31
235

1697
1713
1755

R hode I s la n d ..
South Carolina.

1975
2007,2008

Texas.
U tah.......
Virginia..

322
286
227
363-370

2131,2132

Washi
Wiscoi
W yom in g....................
Children, hiring out to
support parents in
idleness:
A labam a......................
Louisiana....................
Mississippi..................
N orth Carolina......... .
Tennessee....................
Texas.......................... .
Virginia.......................
Children, hours o f labor
of:
Alabam a.................... .

323
327
213
106,107
44
354
2270
2278-2280

111,112

348,349
437

160
491
850
1149
1566
2057
2092
2152,2153
160
195,201
248
279

Colorado____
Connecticut.

356
417,418

Delaware....................
District of Columbia.
Florida........................
Georgia.......................
H aw aii........................
Id a h o..........................
Illinois........................
Ind iana......................

445
454
473,474
483,484

40,41
52
82
96
30
68-72
109
64

Iow a.
. 186

Bulletin.

160,161
36,37
859
897
911-914

A rizo n a ...
Arkansas..
California.

244
. 244
244
2163 166
. 277
2270
2410 277

201

Massachusetts..

Georgia......................

277
1217,1229
1344
1384
1433
1568
1583,1596
1629
1698,1700
1704,1715
1860-1862
2010,2026
2060
2098

Page.
Children, em ploym ent of
in street trades—Con.
Iow a .............................
K en tu cky....................
Louisiana....................
M aryland.....................

277
186

630
727
781,790
827
857
907
1063
1115

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.
Children, em ploym ent of,
in m endicant, acro­
batic, etc., o c c u p a tions—C oncluded.
Oklahoma.................... 1712,1713
Pennsylvania............. 1790,1791
1857,1858
1955
Porto R ico.,
1957,1963

IN D E X ,

75
531
542,545
644,645
664,692
727
791

K en tu cky..
Louisiana..
Maine.........
M aryland.

122

905
906,916

148,152
92
161
119
171-175
35
53
181,182
123,124
61,65

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin

No. 148.

Children, hours of labor
of—Concluded.
Massachusetts............

971,972
1000,1036

Page.

186
213
257
277

138
75
55
127
128,130
103,104
107
196
141,143

308
Michigan.
Minnesota.
Mississippi.
M issouri...,
Montana.
Nebraska............
N evada...............
New Hampshire.
New Jersey........
Now Mexico.
New Y o r k ..
North Carolina.

1011,1063
1116
1150
1155

1296
1349
1355,1363
1370,1371
1388,1407
1494
1495,1533
1572

North Dakota.
O hio.................
Oklahoma.......
Oregon.............

1593,1598
1697
1713
1752

Pennsylvania.

1827
1858-1861
1955,1962

Porto R ic o ...
R hode Isla n d ..
South Carolina,
South D a k ota ..
Tennessee.........
Texas,
Utah..
Vermont.
Virginia.,

1984,1985

2132
2135,2145
2157,2158

Washington.
W est Virginia.
W isconsin.......

186
277
166
277
308
277
277
277
186
244
166
277
308
166
277
308
186
277
277
277
186
213
277
186

148
161
162,169
121
173
188
204
237,238
229,230
169,170
215,216
142
181,182
232,233
158,159
295
235
244
256
311
118
126,127
272
321

277
308
186

285
227
367

186

379
380,383
323
327
338
316,317
348,349
210,213
105
89
42
397,398
351,353
331,332
340
365
268
437
151
357,358

2001
2025,2026
2057,2058
2062,2063

2266,2275

W yom in g....................
United States.............

244
244
244
277
244
166
257
292
330
186
244
277
277
244
308
186
213
277

H ours o f la­
bor in general em ­
ploym ents.)

(S ee also

Children, illiterate, em ­
ploym ent of:
Alabam a.................
Arkansas................
California...............
Colorado.................
Connecticut...........
Delaware................
District o f C olum bia..
Georgia...................
Id a h o ......................
Illinois....................
Indiana...................
Kansas....................

Page.
Children, illiterate, em­
ploym ent of—Con.
M aryland...................
Massachusetts...........
Michigan....................
Minnesota..................
Missouri......................
M ontana....................
Nebraska...................
N ew Hampshire.......
N ew Y o r k .................
N orth Dakota...........
O h io............................
Oklahom a..................
Oregon........................
Pennsylvania............
R hode Isla n d ............
V erm ont....................
W isconsin...................
Children, m edical, etc.,
certificates for. (S ee
Children,
em ployed,
certificates, etc., for.)
Children, night work b y :
Alabam a......................

277

42,43

277

74-78

248
325
399,400
444
453
484
531
545
645
781

902,909
932,933
974,975
1018,1019
1065
1116
1156
1218
1219,1276
1294
1363
1492
1597
1695
1713
1753
1860,1862
1968
2135
2273

160,161
248
279,299

Colorado.......................
Connecticut.................

352,356
418

Delaware......................
District o f Columbia.
Florida.........................
Georgia.........................
Hawaii..........................
Id a h o............................
Illinois..........................
Indiana........................
Iow a .............................
Kansas.........................
K en tu cky....................
Louisiana.....................
Maine............................

445
452,454
474
484,492
506
530
542,545
645,692
727
791
829
859

M aryland............
Massachusetts...
Michigan.............
Minnesota...........
Mississippi..........
Missouri..............
Nebraska............
N evada...............
N ew Hampshire.
N ew Jersey.

Bulletin.

N o.

277
308
257

213,214
137,138
79,80

308

233

257

111

186
277

59
40,41

186
186
277

82
96
68-72

244
308
244

109
64
122

166

31,32

244

148,152

186
244
166
213
186
277
213
244

161
164
35-37
53
181
124
61
188

277

141

166
277
277

148
161
188

186
244
166
277
166
277
308
186

237
230
169,170
215,216
182
232
158,159
295

201

A rizona..
Arkansas.
California.

N ew Y ork .

30253°—23—Bull, 330----- 5



Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

61

897
972,1009
1036,1037
1063
1116
1150
1155
1296
1349
1363,1370
1388,1407
1416,1419
1494,1533

North Carolina.
North Dakota..
O h io..................
Oklahoma.........
Oregon...............
Pennsylvania..
Porto R ic o .......
R hode I s la n d ..

1572,1578
1598
1697
1713
1752,1755
1859,1861

South Carolina.
Tennessee.........
U tah.......
Verm ont,

2001,2007
2060
2131,2132
2135

1968,1975

277

256

213
186
277
186
213

118,127
321
285,286
369
133

244

323

244

62

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Children, night w ork
b y —Concluded.
Virginia...................... .

W ashington.................
W est Virginia.............
W iscon sin...................

2158

2186
2270
2275,2279

U nited States.............
Children of widows, de­
pendent parents, etc.:
A rizona........................
Arkansas......................
California.....................
Colorado.......................
Delaware.....................
District of C olum bia..
Florida.........................
Georgia.........................
Id a h o............................
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
M ontana.......................

Bulletin.

N o.

166 212,213
105
257
89
292
42
330
244
353
340
277244
365
308
268
213
151
277 357,358

244

112

119
172
125
131
135
165
236,237

1276

South Dakota.............
2026
Texas............................
Virginia........................
2163
W ashington.................
2191
(S ee also Mothers'
pensions.
Children, school attend­
ance b y . ( S ee Children,
em ploym ent of, general
provisions for.)
Children, seats for. (See
Seats for em ployed
children.)
C h ild r e n , v o c a t i o n a l
training for. ( See V o ­
cational training.)
Children, wages of. ( See
Earnings o f m inors.)
C h i l d r e n . ( S ee also
Children and wom en.)
Children's bureau:
2431
United States.............
Children's code, commis­
sion on:
North Dakota.............
Chinese, employm ent of:
261
California.....................
1230
M ontana......................
1327
N evada........................
1764
Oregon..........................
U nited States............. 2356.2412
Chinese, exclusion, regis­
tration, etc., of:
H aw aii.........................
495,496
1939
Philippine Isla n d s.. .
1942-1944
U nited States............. 2355-2360
2411.2412
Chinese labor, products
of, not to be bought b y
State officials:
California....... ..............
263

122
31,32
79
196

484
1064
1078,1079

Nebraska..................... 1316,1317
N evada........................
N ew Jersey..................
N orth Carolina............
1581
N orth Dakota.............
1596
O h io..............................
1677
Porto R ic o ...................
South Carolina............




Page.

39
248
279
324
448
453

Bulletin
N o. 148.

214
285
295,296
235
244

327,328

308

197

Bulletin.

N o.
Cigar factories, regulation
of:.
Maryland.....................
W isconsin....................
2266
Citizens to b e em ployed.
(S ee Aliens, em ploy­
m ent of; P ublic works,
preference o f resident
laborers on.)
C ivil service:
California.....................
Colorado.......................
326
Louisiana.....................
849
941
Massachusetts.............
Missouri.......................
1215
New Jersey.................. 1376,1402
1417,1418
N ew Y o r k .................... 1453,1454
O h io..............................
1604
Pennsylvania.............. 1850,1851
1856,1857
W isconsin....................
2257
Clearance cards. (See
Service letters.)
Coal m ined within State,
use of, in p u b lic build­
ings. (S ee P ublic sup­
plies.)
Coal mines. (See Mines.)
Coercion of employees in
trading, etc.:
187
Alaska..........................
California.....................
346,347
Colorado.......................
468,469
Florida.........................
529
Id a h o............................
640,641
Indiana........................
735
Iow a ..............................
821
Kentucky.....................
Louisiana.....................
920
Maryland.....................
967
Massachusetts.............
1050
Michigan......................
1239
M ontana.......................
N evada......................... 1342,1343
1398
New Jersey..................
1438
N ew M exico................
1693
O h io..............................
Oregon.......................... 1749,1750
1950
Philippine Isla n d s .. .
1954
Porto R ic o ...................
2093
Texas............................
U tah.............................. 2125,2129
2190
W ashington.................
2214,2215
2235
W est Virginia.............
( See also Company
stores.)
Coercion. (See Intim ida­
tion; Protection of em­
ployees, etc.)
Collection o f statistics.
(S ee Bureau o f labor.)
Color blindness o f rail­
road employees. (S ee
Exam ination, etc., o f
railroad employees.)
Combination, right of.
( See Conspiracy, labor
agreements n ot; P ro­
tection of employees as
members o f labor or­
ganizations.)
Combinations
to
fix
wages, etc.:
Louisiana.....................
850,851
Commerce and Labor,
Department of:
United States.............. 2412,2413

Page.

166

93,94

277

78

166

131

244

75

213

53

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Commission, employers’
liability:
New Jersey..................
Commission, industrial,
etc.:
California.

Colorado.
Id a h o...............
Illinois.............
Indiana...........
Kansas.............
M aryland........
Massachusetts.
M ichigan...
Minnesota..
M on ta n a ...
N ew Y o r k .

1484-1486
1496,1500
1506,1516
1524

N orth D akota..
O h io...................

1604-i6i5

Oregon.........................
Pennsylvania.............

1775-1780
1923,1924

Texas.................................................
U tah..................................................
W ashington.....................................
W isconsin.................... 2255,2268
2293-2302
Commission, industrial,
etc., orders of:
California..........................................
Colorado..........
Kansas.............
Massachusetts.
M ontana.........
New J e rs e y .. .
N ew York,

1561,1582

O h io............... .
Oregon...........
Pennsylvania
Washington.
W isconsin...

Page.

1414,1415
304
316-321

2311-2325

244
277
308
186
244
308
244
244
186
186
330
166
277
330
277
308
iS6
2-14
186
277

76,77
81-85
64
49
105-118
100-105
59-62
137
139-143
151,152
171-175
15
135
131-136
20
139,140
113-116
210-215
213
260-266
233

277
186
244
277

239-241
301,305
261
249

186
244
277
244
277
308
277
186
308

319,320
277,278
308-312
338-346
313
247,248
333
425
261

213
244
186
244
213
244
186
213
244
186

29-40
92-95
109,110
173,174
78,79
191-193
213,215
86-90
240-243
263-266
268-293
98-106
254
107-115
117-127
343-361
286-299
352-354
425-433
367,368

213
244
213
213
186
244
244
186
244

Commission, labor. (See
Labor com m ission.)
Commission on children’s
N orth D akota.................................
Commission on coalindustry:
U nited States................................ .
Commission on convict
labor, digest o f laws as
t o .......................................
145
Commission on cost o f
living, digest o f laws as
t o .......................................
145




Bulletiiv
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

308

197

330

48-50

63

Page.
Commission on em ploy­
ers’ liability and work­
m en’s compensation,
digest o f laws as t o ........
Commission on em ploy­
m ent offices, digest o f
laws as t o ........................
Commission on em ploy­
m ent of wom en:
Illinois..........................
Commission on em ploy­
m ent o f wom en and
children:
Louisiana....................
North Dakota.............
Commission on em ploy­
m ent o f w om en and
children, digest o f laws
as t o ..................................
Commission on factory
inspection, digest of
laws as t o ........................
Commission on health
insurance:
Connecticut.................
Illinois..........................
Massachusetts.............
O h io.............................
Pennsylvania.............
Commission on homes for
w o r k i n g m e n . (See
Hom es, etc.)
Commission on immigra­
tion, etc. (S ee Im mi' gration, etc.)
Commission on immigra­
tion, digest o f laws as to
Commission on industrial
accidents, digest of law
as t o ..................................
Commission on industrial
relations, digest of law
as t o ..................................
Commission on labor on
public works, digest of
law os t o ..........................
Commission on mine reg­
ulations:
Illinois..........................
M aryland.....................
Commission on m ine reg­
ulations, etc., digest of
law s as t o ........................
Commission on mini­
m um wages, digest of
laws as t o ........................
Commission on mini­
m um wages:
Connecticut.................
M assachusetts.............
Commission on mothers’
pensions, digest of laws
as to ..................................
Commission on occupa­
tional diseases, digest
of laws as t o ....................
Commission on old-age
insurance and pensions:
M ontana......................
N ew Jersey.................
O h io.............................
Pennsylvania.............
Commission on old-age
pensions, digest of laws
as t o ..................................
Commission, public wel­
fare:
Connecticut.................
North D akota.............

Bulletin.

N o.

Page.

244

154,155

257
244

45
258

244
244
244
244
244

108
147,148
191
262,263
285,286

244
166

156,157
94

244
330

108
20,21

308
244
244
244

130
240
262,263
285

244
244

108
258

149,150
145

149
145,146

146
146
146,147
147

147
147,148

148
148

148,149

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

64

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Commission on rates of
insurance for work­
m en’s com pensation:
Massachusetts.............
Commission on social
insurance:
Connecticut.................
Massachusetts.............
W isconsin....................
Commission on unem ­
p loym ent, resolution
as to:
California.....................
Illinois..........................
Massachusetts.............
Commission on wom an
labor:
Illinois..........................
Commissioner of labor.
(S ee Bureau of labor.)
C om pany doctors. (See
Physicians,
em ploy­
m ent of.)
C om pany stores:
California.....................
Colorado.......................
Connecticut.................
Ind ia n a ........................
Louisiana.
M aryland.
N ew J e rs e y ...
N ew M exico...
N ew Y o r k ----O h io.................
Pennsylvania.




N o.

166
244
213
244

277
149

Page.

143
108
77
363,364
367

79

20,21
154,155

244

75

346,347
408
640,641
687
853
895,896
920,940
1397,1398

Page.
Conspiracy, labor agree­
ments not—Con.
Iow a .............................
M aryland.....................
916
Massachusetts.............
Minnesota....................
1104
N evada........................
1344
N ew H am pshire........
N ew Jersey.................
1400
N ew Y o r k ...................
1545
North Dakota.............
1591
Oklahom a...................
1720
Pennsylvania............. 1787,1818
Porto K ico ...................
1953
Texas............................
2079
U tah..............................
W est Virginia.............
2252
Conspiracy. (See also In ­
terference; Intim ida­
tion.)
Continuation
schools.
(S ee
Children, em­
ployed, schools for.)
Contract labor, alien.
(See
Alien contract
labor.)
Contract work on public
buildings and works:
California.....................
263
Contractors' bonds for
the protection of wages,
sum mary o f laws re­
quiring.............................
77-79

Bulletin.

N o.

277

135
155-158
183-185
281-283

Contractors' debts, liabil­
ity of stockholders for,
lists of laws determin­
ing.....................................
Contracts o f employees
waiving right to dam ­
ages:
A labam a......................
A rizon a...................... .
Arkansas.................... .
California................... .
Colorado......................
Florida.........................
Georgia........................
Ind iana......................
Iow a .............................
Maine.......................... .
Massachusetts........... .
Michigan......................
Mississippi................. .
Missouri..................... .
M ontana.................... .

292

81

Nebraska................... .
N evada........................
New M exico...............
N ew Y o r k ...................
N orth Carolina...........
N orth Dakota........... .
O h io.............................
Oklahoma.................. .
Philippine Isla n d s...
South Carolina......... .
Texas.......................... .
Virginia...................... .
W isconsin.................. .
W yom in g....................
United States........... .
(S ee also Liability of
employers for inju­
ries to employees.)

Page.

119
142
205,206

244

226

244

337

186

102

10
18,19
12.13
12.13

141
164

1479
1693
1791,1792
1817
2159
2235

Virginia........................
W est Virginia.............
(See also Coercion of
em ployees in trad­
ing; Paym ent of
wages in scrip.)
Complaints b y railroad
employees:
Massachusetts.............
949
Compressed-air tanks:
California.....................
Massachusetts.............
*i022
Compressed air, work in:
New Jersey.................
N ew Y o r k ................... 1526-1529
Pennsylvania.
Com pulsory work laws.
(See Labor, require­
m ent of.)
Conciliation. (S ee A rbi­
tration.)
Conspiracy against work­
men:
A labam a......................
154
Florida.........................
469,470
Georgia........................
488,489
H awaii.........................
498,499
Kansas.........................
767
Minnesota....................
1104
Mississippi..................
1144
1338
N evada........................
N ew Y o r k ...................
1545
N orth Dakota.............
1591
T exas............................
W ashington.................
2180
(S ee also Interference
w ith em ploym ent,
and cross refer­
ences.)
Conspiracy, labor agree­
ments not:
276
California.....................
Colorado......................
334

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

12
8

79

153
213
241
266
323
477
481,483
643
644,665
666,689
720
878
990
1057
1143
1168
1217,1232
1242,1246
1312
1337
1433
1555
1577
1593
1667,1685
1704
1949
1991
2087,2088
2152,2154
2289,2290
2327,2328
2332,2352
2420

330

19

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Contracts of em ploym ent,
regulation, etc., of.
(S ee E m ploym ent of
labor.)
Contracts
of em ploy­
ment, violation of, en­
dangering life:
N eva d a ........................
N ew Y o r k ...................
W ashington.................
Contracts of~employment
with intent to defraud.
(See Em ployers7 ad­
v a n ces,
rep a ym en t
of.)
C o n tr ib u tio n s , f o r c e d .
(See Forced contribu­
tions.)
Convict labor, com m is­
sions, etc., on...............
Convict labor, digest of
laws relating to...............

Page.
Cost of living, investiga­
tion of—Concluded.
New H am pshire........
New Jersey.................
Costs in suits for wages.
(See Suits for wages.)
Cotton bales, bands, ties,
etc., of:
Texas............................ 2075,2076
Councils of defense, etc.,
industrial adjustments
by:
Delaware......................
Louisiana....................
M aryland.....................
New Mexico................
W est Virginia.............
Councils of defense, etc.,
summary of provisions
fo r ................................T_

145
90-127 166
186
213
244
257
292
308
330

Copyrights:
Umted States............. 2405,2406
Core rooms, em ploym ent
of women in:
Massachusetts............. 1011,1012
N ew Y o r k ...................
1513
O hio..............................
Com huskers, guards on.
(See Guards for danger­
ous machinery.)
Corporal punishment of
minor employees. (See
Children, corporal pun­
ishment of, b y em ploy­
ers.)
Corporations, liability of
stockholders in, for
wage debts, list of laws
determ ining....................
79
Corporations, pensions for
em ployees of:
Pennsylvania.............
1783
Corporations, profit shar­
ing b y. (See Profit
sharing.)
Corporations, restriction
of powers of:
Pennsylvania............. 1791,1792
C orporation s, special
stock for employees of:
946
Massachusetts.............
Cost of living, commis­
145
sion, etc., o n ...................
Cost of living, investiga­
tion of:
District of Columbia.
Massachusetts.............




Page.

1340
1550
2182

Convict labor, em ploy­
ment of, in mines:
Oklahoma....................
1737
Coolie labor:
California.....................
261
N evada........................
1345
United States............. 2355,2356
Cooperative associations,
87-92
list of laws relating t o . .

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

65

28
55-58
26,27
53-57
24-26
17
28,29
8,9

Couplers,
safety. (See
Bailroads, safety provi­
sions for.)
Court of industrial rela­
tions:
Kansas.........................

Bulletin.

N o.

Page.

244
244

226
240

257
244
244
244
244

29
175
183
246
358,359

244
257

37,38
20,21

292
308

29-37
99,100

186
186

110
145,146

186

263

166
166

93
140,141

Crime, advocacy of. (See
Sabotage.)
D.

166
186
244
257
292
308
330

26
45
49,50
23
16,17
27,28
8

213

214

166

244
308

141

127
104,105

Damages for injuries.
(See Injuries; Liability
of em ployers.)
Damages, waiver of right
to. (See Contracts of
em p loyees w aiving
right to damages.)
Dangerous, injurious, etc.,
employm ents:
A rizona........................

198
203,204
Colorado......................
389
Illinois..........................
Massachusetts.............
978
Missouri....................... 1211-1214
New Y o r k ...................
1516
O h io.............................. 1668,1669
1698-1700
Oklahoma.................... 1712,1713
1934
Pennsylvania.............
W ashington.................
2179
W isconsin.................... 2269-2271
Days of rest for railroad
employees:
M aryland.....................
Massachusetts.............
(See also W eekly day
of rest.)
Deaf, division for, in bu­
reau of labor:
1126
Minnesota....................
Death.
(See
Injuries
causing death; Negli­
gence, etc.)
Deceased employees, pay­
ment of wages due.
(See Paym ent of wages
due deceased em ploy­
ees.)
Deception in em ploy­
m ent of labor.
(See
E m ploym ent of labor,
deception in.)
Department of Commerce
and Labor:
TTnitod States............. 2412,2413
Department of labor.
(See Bureau of labor.)

#

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

@6
Bulletin
No. 148.

No.
Departm ent of mines.
( See Bureau o f mines.)
Deserters, etc., em ploy­
m ent orr
Arizona.................
Discharge, etc., of em ­
ployees of public se
ic e corporations:
Massachusetts_______
968
Discharge, notice of in ­
tention to. (S ee E m ­
ploym ent, termination,
of, notice of.)
Discharge of employees
on account of age:
Colorado............... .
334
Discharge^ statement o f
cause of; hearings:
California.....................
Florida.........................
466,467
642,690
Indiana........................
Michigan......................
Missouri....................... lieo'iitfL
1230
Montana......................
Nebraska..................... 1292,1293
1341
N evada........................
O h io ............................
Oklahoma...................
Oregon.........................
W isconsin....................
(S ee also Blacklist­
ing; Em ploym ent
of labor; Service
letters.)
Discharged employees,
paym ent o f wages due.
( See Paym ent of wages
due, etc.)
Discounting of wages.
(S ee
Wages, deduc­
tions, discounts, etc.,
fro m .)
Diseased persons, em ­
ploym ent of:
Michigan......................
Pennsylvania.............
T exa s............................
Inspection
and regulation of
bakeries, etc.)
Diseases, occupational,
(S ee Occupational dis­
eases.)
D ocks, safety appliances
at:
N ew Jersey.................
Dom estic products, pref­
erence o f,f or public use.
(S ee PubUc supplies.)
Drinking
water. (S ee
W ater for drinking,
etc.)
Drug clerks, hours of la­
bor of. (S ee Hours of
labor of drug clerks.)
D ust, fum es, e tc., pro­
vision for. (S ee Fac­
tories and workrooms,
ventilation of.)

1685
1721
1771,1772
2308

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.

257

186

Page.

27

86
151
195

227
230,231
264

Page.

No.

Earnings of minors—Con.
Kansas.........................
790
Massachusetts.............
986
Minnesota.................... 1096,1104
M ontana......................
1230
N ew Y o rk ....................
1454
1586
N orth Dakota.............
Oklahoma....................
1738
Porto R ic o ...................
1955
1997
South Carolina...........
2012
South D a kota .............
U tah..............................
2120
Virginia........................
2157
2185
Washington.................
Eating in workrooms.
(S ee F ood, taking into
certain workroom s.)
Educational, industrial.
(See Vocational train­
ing.)
Efficiency
tests
and
bonuses:
United States.............
186
244
277
292
330
Eight-hour day:
187,188 186
Alaska..........
244
195-197
Arizona____
205,206
209,215
Arkansas.
California.

Illinois.............
Indiana...........
Kansas.............
K entucky........
M aryland........
Massachusetts.

261,263
264,274
275,305
323
334,389
407
415,423
451,463
498
507
519,520
529,530
541
639
770
832,883
934
970,1001

Minnesota.......

1095,1096

Missouri.

1175
1185,1216
1217,1226 244
1227,1230
1325,1326 277
1338-1340
1415
1429,1430
1433
1476 308
1603,1665
1704
1718,1737
1760} 1761 186
1773,1774 244
1791,1845
1953,1954 244
1964,1965
2101 308
2105,2108
2191-2193 244
2236,2237
2280
2327,2334
2335,2350

C olorad o......................
Connecticut.................
District of C olu m b ia .
Hawaii..........................
Idaho.'..........................
137
328,329
223,224
243,244

(S ee also

1423
M ontana........
N evada..........
N ew Jersey...

*

New M exico..
N ew Y ork ___
O h io............... .
O klahom a.....
Oregon........... .

E.

Pennsylvania.
P orto R ic o ...,

Earnings of married wo­
m en, nst of laws secur­
in g J h e .............................
Earnings of m inors:
California.....................
Id a h o.
I o w a ..

Texas...............
U tah................
W ashington...
W est Virginia.
W isconsin.......
W yom in g........




Bulletin.

f9,8G
265
521
738

439,440
382
358
96
48
65,66
59,60

244
277

73
64

244

172

218
244
277
308

75
191
145
119
211,216
209,210

164

317
271
313
244,245
351

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

Page.
E ight-hoar
day—Con­
clu d ed .
U nited States............

H ours of la­
bor
on
pu blic
w orks.)
E lectric
insta llation s,
subways, etc.:
California.....................

N o.

244

380,382
383

297,298

213
244

38,39
80

244

214-216

244
308
308
244

242
163
219,220
292,298

213
244
244

37
73,74
108

277
213
166
186
213
244

154
86
182.183
272-277
100-106
247,248
254
287
133
215,216
368

( S ee also

697
946

Indiana.........................
Massachusetts.............
Montana.......................
N evada......................... 1350-1353
N ew Jersey..................
New Y o r k ....................
Oregon.......................... 1759,1760
Pennsylvania..............
W ashington................ 2221-2224
Electricians,
examina­
tion, etc., of. (S ee E x ­
amination, etc.)
E lectricity, use of? in
mines.
(S ee
Mines,
electriowming, etc., in .)
Elevator operators, ex ­
amination, etc., of, di­
143
gest of laws relating t o ..
Elevators, inspection and
regulation of:
California.....................
C onnecticu t...
Massachusetts.
Minnesota___
Now J ersey .. .
New Y o r k ___

Pennsylvania,
R hode Island
W isco n sin ...

1031-1033
1423-1426
1496

2313-2320

(S ee also Inspection
of factories, e tc.)
Em ergency suspension,
etc., of la bor law s:
Alaska..........................
California.....................
Connecticut.................
Georgia........................
Massachusetts.............

H aw aii....................
Mississippi..............
North Carolina___
Philippine Islands.
South Carolina___
Tennessee...............
T exa s......................
Virginia___ 1.
W est Virginia.




244
213
166
244

244
244
244
244
244

60
75,76

110

277
244
244
277
244
244
277
244
244
244
292

129
132
23

186

155
465,469
479,491

133
187,189
190
128
229,230
25ft, 251
261,262
277,278
348
320
380-383

363,364

244
244
292
213

N ew Hampshire
N ew Y o r k ..........
Oklahom a..........
P en n sy lv a n ia...
V erm ont.............
United S ta tes.. .
Emigrant agents:
Alabam a.............
Florida................
Georgia................

Bulletin
N o. 148.

322
332,333
84-86
149

502-504
1152
1571
2007

2229

Bulletin.

N o.

Page.

2361-2363
2412,2414
2430,2432
2433,2436

67

Em igrant agents—Con.
(S ee also E m p loy­
m ent offices.)
Emigration of laborers:
Porto R ic o ...................
Em ployees’ bonds. (See
B onds of em ployees.)
Em ployees, bribery, etc.,
of. (S ee B ribery of em­
ployees.)
Em ployees, d e c e a s e d ,
paym ent of wages due.
(See Paym ent of wages,
etc.)
Em ployees’ deposits, in­
terest to be paid on:
852
Louisiana.....................
M aine............................
Em ployees, discharge of.
(S ee Discharge, state­
m ent o f cause of; E m ­
ploym ent of labor.)
Em ployees, discharged,
paym ent of wages due.
(S ee Paym ent of wages,
etc.)
Em ployees, enticement
of. (S ee Enticing em­
ployees.)
Employees, examination
of. (S ee Exam ination,
etc.)
Em ployees, false charges
against. (S ee Railroad
e m p lo y e e s , fa ls e
charges against.)
E m ployees, forced con­
tributions from . (S ee
Forced contributions.)
Em ployees, intimidation
of. (.SeeIntimidation.)
Em ployees, intoxication
of. (S ee Intoxication.)
E m ployees’ inventions:
un ited Slates............. 2433,2435
Em ployees, loans to:
Louisiana.....................
E m ployees not to be dis­
charged on account of
age:
334
Colorado.......................
Employees, protection of.
(S ee Protection of em ­
ployees, etc.)
E m p loyees, r a i l r o a d .
(S ee Railroad em ploy­
ees.)
Em ployees’ representa­
tion:
Massachusetts.............
New Jersey..................
Em ployees, safety and
health laws authorized
for:
1453
N ew Y o r k ...................
1603
O h io..............................
Porto R ic o ...................
Employees, sale of liquor
to. (S ee Intoxicants,
sale of, to employees.)
Em ployees, s o lic it in g
m oney from . (See E m ­
ploym ent, fo r e m e n ,
etc., accepting fees for
furnishing.)
Em ployees, taxes of.
(S ee Liability of em ­
ployers for taxes, etc.)
Employees, tim e for, to
vote. (S ee T im e to
vote, etc.)

277

Page.

281

177

277
292

127
53,54

244

313

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

68

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
E m ployees, transporta­
tion of. (S e e Trans­
portation of em ployees.)
Em ployees, vaccination,
of. (S ee Vaccination,
etc.)
E m ployer and employee,
obligations
of. (S ee
E m ploym ent of labor.)
E m p loyers' advances, in­
terest on:
Louisiana....................
E m ployers' advances, re­
paym ent of:
Alabam a......................

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

Page.
E m ploym ent, foremen,
etc., acceptm g fees for
furnishing—Con.
California.....................

866

Arkansas_________ ..
Wlnrlda..... .................. .
Georgia_____________

155,156
162,163
246,247
469,478
491
851,852

Minnesota....................

1108,1109
1144,1145

244

V irginia........................
Em ployers' certificates,
forgery of:
489
Georgia.........................
1107
Minnesota....................
1342
N evada........................
Pennsylvania............. 1828,1829
2183
W ashington.................
2307
W isconsin....................
E m ployers'
liability.
( S e e L ia bility of em ­
ployers for injuries,
etc.)
Em ployers' liability com ­
mission. (S ee Commis­
sion.)
Em ployers to furnish
names of em ployees to
officials of cou nty, etc.:
238
Arkansas......................
274
California.....................
343
Colorado.......................
497
Hawaii..........................
Id a h o ............................
523,524
M ontana.......................
N ew M exico................ 1440,1441
N orth Carolina............ 1571,1572
South Carolina...........
2006
W ashington................. 2186,2187
W yom in g.....................
2329
E m ploym ent, abandon­
m ent of. (S ee Con­
tracts of em ploym ent.)
E m ploym ent a g e n t s .
( S ee E m ploym ent of­
fices.)
E m ploym ent, contracts
of. (S ee Contracts of
em ploym ent; E m ploy­
m ent of labor.)
E m ploym ent, discrimi­
nation in, forbidden:
I n d i a n a ........................
648
M a ssa c h u se tts .
E m ploym ent, foremen,
etc, accepting fees for
furnishing:
Alabama.......................
182,183
202,203
A rizon a........................

180

244
N ew M exico................ i439,1440
N orth Dakota............. 1594,1595
Oregon..........................
1949
South Carolina............ 2004,2005




Page.

225

277

271

244
257
257

317
97,98
105

214
277

292

216
174

48

Connecticut.................
407
Florida.........................
471
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
1242
M ontana......................
1341
N evada........................
1362
N ew Hampshire.........
N ew Jersey.................
1406
O h io......... . ..................
Pennsylvania............. 1837,1867
U ta h ............................
2129
E m ploym ent, interfer­
ence with. (S ee Inter­
ference with em ploy­
m ent.)
E m ploym ent, notice of
termination of. (See
Em ploym ent, termi­
nation of, etc.)
E m ploym ent, obtaining,
under false pretenses.
(S ee Em ployers' ad­
vances, repayment of;
Em ployers' certificates,
forgery of.)
E m ploym ent of aliens.
(S ee Aliens.)
Em ploym ent of children.
(S ee Children, em ploy­
ment of.)
E m ploym ent of children
and wom en. (S ee chil­
dren and wom en, etc.)
E m ploym ent of Chinese.
(S ee Chinese, em ploy­
m ent of.)
E m ploym ent o f deserters,
etc.:
A rizona........................
E m ploym ent
of
dis­
charged soldiers, sailors,
and marines, com m it­
tees, preferences, etc.:
California.....................
Illinois..........................
E m ploym ent o f enlisted
m en in civil pursuits:
United States.............
E m ploym ent of intem­
perate drivers, etc.
(S ee Intemperate em. ployees, etc.)
E m ploym ent o f labor b y
public-service corpora­
tions:
968
Massachusetts.............
E m ploym ent of labor,
deception, etc., in:
A l a s k a ..................................
188,189
A rizona........................
276
California.....................
364,365
Colorado.......................
Florida.........................
550,551
Illinois..........................
968
Massachusetts.............
1138
Minnesota....................
M ontana......................
1239
N evada........................ 1325,1353
1546
New Y o r k ...................
1720
Oklahoma....................
Oregon.............„*
........... 1761,1762
P o r t o R i c o ______________

Tennessee..................... 2056,2057
U tah.............................
Virginia........................

Bulletin.

N o.

Page.

186
244

86
75

277
308

140
119

186

227,228

244

265

277

318,319

•

257

27

277
277

59
105,106

213

151

308
186
244
277
277

35
85
99
81
93

186

185

213
244
308
213

131
321,322
247
145

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
E m ploym ent of labor,
description, etc., in—
Concluded.
W ashington................
W isconsin...................
Strikes, no­
tice of, in adver­
tisements for la­
borers.)
E m ploym en t o f labor,
general provisions:
Arkansas.....................
California.....................

Page.

334
424
351

. 277
2282 186
277

(See also

233,234
265-269

H aw aii..............
Idaho.................
Indiana.............
K en tu ck y.........
Louisiana..........
Massachusetts.
Michigan...........
Missouri....................
M ontana...................
N ebraska.................
N evada.....................
N ew M exico............
New Y o rk ................
N orth Carolina........
North D akota........
O h io..........................
Oklahom a................
Oregon......................
Pennsylvania..........
Philippine Islands.
Porto R ico ...............
South Carolina........
South Dakota..
Texas............... .
U tah..................
V irginia.......... .
W ashington.. .
W isconsin........
W yom in g........
United States.
Contracts of
em ploym ent; Dis­
charge, statement
of cause of; E m ­
ployers' advances;
Em ploym ent, ter­
m ination of; E xam ­
ination, etc.; In ­
spection o f facto­
ries; Wages, etc.)
E m ploym ent o f labor on
p u b l i c w ork s. ( S e e
P u b lic w ork s, la b o r
on.)
E m ploym ent o f police­
m en as laborers:
M aryland.....................
E m ploym ent of unem­
ployed and needy person s. (S e e U nem ployed, etc.)
E m ploym ent o f women.
Smploj
(S ee W om en, em ploy­
m ent of.)

1160,1161
1232-1235

93

1C6
292
244
277
308

•

87
48
196
138
112

277
. 277
. 277
. 277

174,175
182-184
210-212
221

. 186

296

. 244
. 186

1475-1482

275
330,331

244
257

307,313
97,98

1586,1589
1603
1718-1721
1949
1955,1956
1997-1999
2004,2005
2012-2015
2075
2105
2152
2258
*2280-2282
2327
2354
2362,2363

277

318,319

. 277

(See also




85,90
78
43
109,110
81

407,408
483
486,488
497
518
629,648
816
846-848
966-970
1053,1054

Page.
E m p l o y m e n t o ffic e s ,
commission o n ...............
E m p l o y m e n t o ffice s ,
free p u b lic:
Arizona........................
Arkansas.....................
California................... .
Colorado......................

334,335

N o.

329-331

Connecticut.
Georgia........
Id aho............
Illinois..........

Indiana.

698,699

Iow a ..........
Kansas___
Louisiana.

109
99
82

551-553

771,772
904

Massachusetts.
Michigan...........
Minnesota.........
M issouri..
M ontana..
Nebraska.

406,410
131
138,139
142-144
139-143
154
83
115-118
27
162,163
38
92

101
94
63
183

962,963
1072,1073
1135,1137

190

201
115

1171,1173
1218
1291

308
186
27T

New Hampshire.
New Jersey..........

244
186
213
166
213
244
257
308
308

New Y o rk .

North Carolina........
North D akota.........
O h io..........................
Oklahom a................
Pennsylvania..........
Philippine Islands.
R hode Island..........
South Dakota..........
U tah.........................
W est Virginia.........
W isconsin................

Tage.

61
65

1609,1615
1710,1711

2238
2297

United States.

128
217
183
230,231
241,242
85
174-176
97,98
253,254
79
193,194
199-201
310
331-335
363
302,303

1946
1949,1950
1976
2023,2024

” *79,’ 80
244
277
244
292

361
347,351
378

101

47

E m ploym ent offices, p ri­
vate:
A laska........................
Arkansas..
California.
Colorado___
Connecticut.
District of Columbia.
Georgia.......................
938

Bulletin.

145

M aryland.

186
277
308
186
277
. 277

Colorado____
Connecticut.
Florida..........
Georgia........

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

69

H aw aii___
Id a h o.........
Illinois.......
Indiana___
Iow a ...........
Kansas___
K entucky..
Louisiana..

264
308-312
348,350
406,407
412,433
459-463

186
277
308
244
186
277
186
186

72
48
33
65,66
93
73
109

121

132
35
23
497
517,518
574-579
677-680
728,729
799,800
821
843,844

142
87

257

46,47

C U M U L A T IV E IND EX,

70

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
E m ploym en t offices, pri­
vate—Concluded .
M aine...........................
M aryland................... .
Massachusetts.............
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
Missouri................ ......
M ontana......................
Nebraska.....................

N evada...............
N ew Hampshire.
N ew Jersey........
N ew Y o r k ..........
O h io.....................
Oklahom a..........
Oregon................
Pennsylvania. . .
R hode I s la n d ...
South D a k ota ...

N o.

V irginia...........
W ashington...
W est Virginia.
W isconsin-----W yom in g.....................
also Emigrant
agents;
Lodging
houses, sailors7.)
E m ploym ent, prevention
of.
(S ee Interference
w ith em ploym ent, and
cross references.)
E m ploym ent, sex n o disualification for. (S e e
ex n o disqualification,
etc.)
E m ploym en t, termina­
tion o f, notice of:
Maine............................
Massachusetts.............
N ew Jersey..................

Page.

177
47
197

945
1093,1094
1097,1098
1172,1178
1230

177-179
222-225
218-220
193-196
132
205-208

1328,1342
1359,1360
1377-1382
1461-1469
1532,1533
1615-1617
1711,1712

69-74
98
252-255
267-269
313-317
335-338
368
297-299
379
324,325
391,392
340
247
146,147
149,150
397

1852-1856
1967
2058

Texas...............
U ta h ................

2125-2129
2161
2162,2165
2183
2229
2302-2304

228-232
421,422
347
353,354

( See

870
986
1391
1393,1394
1821
1985
2008
2277




Enticing e m p l o y e e s ,
etc.—Concluded.
K en tu ck y....................
814
Louisiana.....................
851
Mississippi................... 1144* 1145
N orth Carolina............
1565
Porto R ic o ...................
South Carolina...........
2006
Tennessee.....................
2033
U nited States.............
2422
(S ee also Interference,
etc.)
E xam ination, etc., erf
aeronauts, digest of
la w s relating t o .............
143
Exam ination, etc., of
barbers, digest of laws
relating t o .......................

Exam ination, etc.,
bricklayers:
W isconsin............
Exam ination, etc.,
chauffeurs, digest
law s relating t o . . . .

244
244

140-143

307
361

Exam ination, etc., of
miners, m ine forem en,
etc.:
A labam a......................
Arkansas......................
Colorado.......................
Illin ois..........................

10,11

Indiana..........
Io w a ...............
Kansas............
K e n tu ck y ....,
Missouri..........
M o n ta n a ,....

157

O h io............... .
292

20

Oklahoma___
Pennsylvania.

Bulletin.
N o.

277
277

237
281

244

321,322

308
330

3
2

166
186
244
277
292
308 ,

8
9,10
9
7
6,7
3,4

244

368

132-135

166
186
244
257
277
292
308

7,8
10
9,10
9
7,8
7
4

143

186
244
257
277
308

10
10
10
8
4

144

186
277
308

10,11
8
4

135,136

186
277

11
8

277
244
186
244

56-58
87,98
146
139-145
148,149

244
166
330

168,169
69-71
11

186

330,331

of
of

Exam ination, etc., of
electricians, digest of
law s relating t o ..............

10

156
234
468
488
503,509

127-132

of

Exam ination, etc., of
horseshoers, digest of
law s relating t o ..............

11

Engineers, illiterate, em­
ploym ent of, on rail­
roads. (S ee Railroad
em ployees, illiterate.)
Engineers,
unlicensed,
em ploym ent of:
A la b a m a ...................
Enticing employees, etc.:
A labam a................
Arkansas................
Florida....................
Georgia...................
H aw aii....................

Page.

Exam ination, etc., of ele­
vator operators, digest
of la w relating t o ............
Exam ination, etc., of *
hoisting-machine oper­
ators, digest of laws re­
lating t o ...........................

§

Pennsylvania.............
P orto R ic o ...................
R hode Isla n d ..............
South Carolina...........
W isconsin....................
(S e e also Discharge;
E m ploym ent of la­
b or, general provi­
sions.)
Engineers, examination,
etc., of, digest of laws
relating t o .......................

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

143

169-171
370,371
549,595
625-627
662
699-702
733,734
825
831,832
1196-1198
1253
1254* 1269
1638
1639,1691
1724
1803-1805
1833-1836
1871,1876
1905-1908

_

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX.

Bulletin.
No. 148.
Page.
E xam in ation, etc., o f
miners, m ine forem en,
etc.—Concluded.
Tennessee..................... 2044-2046
2048
U tah..............................
2118
Virginia........................
2167
2171,2172
W ashington.................
W est Virginia.............
W yom in g...................* 2340,2341
Exam ination, etc., o f
m oving picture ma­
chine operators, digest
of laws relating t o ..........
136,137

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.
No.

Page.

166

7

186

137-140

11

244
257
Exam ination o f plum b­
ers. digest o f laws re­
lating to ...........................

Montana......................
Nebraska.....................
N evada........................
N ew H am pshire........
N ew Jersey.................

738-740
769
792,793
815
848
850,862
874
895,903
948
1041,1012
1103,1104
1147
1159,1160
1183,1202
1235
1317,1318
1336
1356
1374

N ew Mexico.

1434,1435

K entucky....................
Louisiana.....................
351
411,412
436,437

11

166
186
244
277
308

8
11,12
11
8
4

10

Maine............................
M aryland.....................
Massachusetts.............
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
Mississippi...................
Missouri................ .

11

Georgia.........................
Massachusetts.............
O h io..............................
(S ee also Railroad
em ployees, qualifi­
cations of; Tele­
graph
operators,
railroad, etc.)
Exam ination, etc., of
steam engineers, fire­
m en, etc.:
N ew Jersey..................
Exam ination, etc., o f
steam engineers, fire­
m en, etc., digest o f laws
relating t o ........................

N ew Y o r k ................... 1559-1561
N orth Carolina...........
1573
N orth Dakota.............
1589
O h io.............................. 1687,1688
1692,1693
Oklahoma.................... 1708,1739
Oregon..........................
1747
Pennsylvania.............. 1786,1787
Porto R ic o ................... 1956,1957
1986
R hode Island..............
South Carolina...........
2000
South Dakota.............
2015
Tennessee.................... 2023,2055
2071
Texas............................
2073,2077
U tah................
2123
2135,2136
V erm ont.........
Virginia...........
2156,2157
W ashington...
2179
W est Virginia.
2230
W isconsin.......
2304-2307
W yom in g.......
2331,2346

10

Examination, etc., of rail­
road em ployees:
A labam a......................

U n ite d States.

153
154,159
479
952
1689

213

84

10,11

140-143

8

Exam ination, etc., o f
street railw ay em ploy­
ees:
Louisiana.....................
N ew Y o r k ....................
W ashington.................
E xecution,
exem ption
from .
(S ee E xem p­
tion, etc.)
Executions in suits for
wages. (S ee Suits for
wages.)
E xem ption of mechanics,
etc., from license tax,
list of laws granting----E xem ption of wages from
execution, etc.:
Alabama......................
Alaska..........................
Arizona........................
Arkansas......................
California.....................
Colorado.......................
Connecticut.................
Delaware-....................
District o f Columbia.
Florida.........................
Georgia........................
Hawaii.........................
Id a h o............................
Illinois..........................
Indiana........................




7

166
1555
2215

88

153,154
186
206,211
233,249
270
331
417
428,429
451
465
487-489
498
521
554-556
629,665

Explosives, storage, man­
ufacture, etc., of:
Iow a .............................
M aryland.....................
Massachusetts.............
Missouri.......................
Montana.....................
N ew Jersey.................
N ew Y ork...................
O hio..............................

Page.

186
186

198,199
203

186
292
186
244

242,243
55
•249
245

308

198

186

309

186

335

308

210

186

422,123

186

445

244
244
308
213

213
239,240
185
113

244

2S7-299

308

82

186
277
277
277

63
45
53
56

743
934
982
1179
1390

1664
1665,3689
Oklahoma.................... 1739,1740
Pennsylvania.............
Explosives, use of, in
mines. (See Mine regu­
lations.)
E xtortion:
Illinois..........................
1107
Minnesota....................
Montana......................
1242
(S ee also Intim ida­
tion.)

80,81

Bulletin.
No.

E xem ption o f wages from
execution, etc.—Con.
Iow a ..............................
Kansas..........................

244
186
186

71

F.
186

120,121

166

3i

186

135

Factories, accidents in .
(See A ccidents, e tc.)
Factories and workrooms,
ventilation, sanitation,
etc., of:
Alabam a......................
A rizon a ...
Arkansas..

161

211

12

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
No. 148.
Page.
Factories and workrooms,
ventilation, sanitation,
etc., of—Continued.
California.....................
Colorado___
Connecticut.

278,279
300,301
360
405
424,425

Florida.
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois.

Indiana

Massachusetts

M ichigan..
Minnesota.
M issouri..
Nebraska.
N e v a d a .. .
N ew Hampshire.
New Jersey.
N ew Y o r k .,

213 30,31,36
244
93-95
308
43,44
186
277
186
244

i22
85,89
126,127
115-117

166
308
186

32
79,80
145

549,550
561, 562
568, 569
589, 590
616, 617
647,648
682,683

277

112
171-175
166,167
173,174
36

166
861,866
917,918
939,940
943,949
979,980
1029
1067
1070-1072
1096,1097
1120,1142
1179
1180,1182
1213,1214
1280,1281
1298,1299

1382,1383
1389,1390
1409,1418
1506-1510
1521,1523

166
330
166
186
257
277
186
244
277
277
277
244
277
166
244
277
166
186
257
308

Ohio,
Oklahoma.
Oregon___
Pennsylvania

Porto R ic o .. .
R hod e Island.

1649-1652
1668-1670

213
277

1741
1756

213

1827
1839,1847
1928,1930
1934-1937
1963
1973

South D akota............. 2011,2026
Tennessee..................... 2036,2058
Texas___
Vermont.
Virginia..




Page.

475

I o w a ...
Kansas
K entucky.
Louisiana.
M aryland.

No.

186
244

Delaware

2150
2164

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.

277
186
•244
277
277
244
257
292
186
277
257
244
166
213
257

99-101
103,104
16
126
127,141
184
53
145-148
154-158
206
209
163-165
188-193
210-212
227
213
159,160
239-243
223,224
178,179
184,185
263
270-272
278-293
86
161-163
173-176
180,181
111-115
250-252
255,256
120
121,127
269-271
349,350
352-360
287-299
276,277
286,287
315
93
77
377
381,382
301-305
101-103
350
210-212
145
107,108

Page.
Factories and workrooms,
ventilation, sanitation,
etc., of—Concluded.
Washington.................
W est V irgin ia .
W isconsin.........

(S ee also A ir space.)
Factories, eating, etc., in.
(S ee F ood , taken into
certain workroom s.)
Factories, fireescapes on.
(S e e Fire escapes, etc.)
Factories, etc., inspection
of.
(S ee Inspection,
etc.)
Factories, plants,etc., es­
tablishment b y State:
A rizona........................
Factories, etc., registra­
tion of:
California.....................
M aryland.....................

W isconsin....................
Factories, sm oking in.
(See Smoking, e tc.)
Factory inspectors. (S ee
Inspectors, fa ctory.)
Factory regulations. (See
Inspection and regula­
tion olfactories, etc.)
False charges against rail­
road em ployees. (S ee
Railroad
employees,
etc.)
False credentials, etc., of
labor
*organizations.
(S ee Labor organiza­
tions, using false cards
of.)
False pretenses.
(See
E m ployers' advances,
repaym ent of; Em ) l o y e r s ' certificates,
orgery of; E m ploy­
m ent of labor, decep­
tion in .)
Fees for furnishing em­
p loym ent. (S ee E m ­
ploym ent, f o r e m e n ,
etc., accepting fees for
furnishing.)
Fellow servant, negligent,
to be named in verdict:
Minnesota....................
Fellow servants.
(S ee
Liability o f employers
for injuries to em ploy­
ees.)
Female employees. (See
W om en, em ploym ent
of.)
Female employees, seats
for. (S ee Seats for fe­
m ale employees.)
Fines. (S ee W ages, de­
ductions,
discounts,
etc., from .)
Fire escapes on factories,
etc.:
A labam a......................
Arkansas.....................
Colorado......................
Connecticut.................

Bulletin.
No.

1490,1518
1519
2265

352
341-345
432,433

75,76

166
166
308

102,104
148
178-180

308

262

244

306,307

244
277
186

186

2185
2186,2194
2239
2261
2264,2266
2310,2320
2321,2325

69,70

J

Delaware.

1103

157
362,363
401
415,423
430

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Fire escapes on factories,
etc.—Concluded.
District o f C olum bia..
Georgia........................
I d a h o ............................
Illin ois..........................
In d ia n a ........................
Io w a ..............................

K an& s.........................

K en tu ck y ....................
Louisiana....................
Maine...............
M aryland........
Massachusetts.
M ichigan.........
M inn esota.. . .
Missouri..........

456-458
485,491
520
553
554,569
680,681
741,742
774
815,816
844,845
935
960
1024,1025
1066,1067
1131
-1179
1198-1200

Page.

186
244
213
166
257
186

164-168
166,167
43,44
89,90
48,49
177

244

187

277
244

148
210

1305,1306

New Hampshire
N ew Jersey........
N ew Y o r k ..........

1361
1410-1414
1474
1498-1500

North Carolina.
N orth D akota.
O h io..................
Oklahom a........
P en n sylva n ia..

R hode Isla n d .
South Dakota.
Tennessee.......
Texas.
V erm ont.........
V irginia..........
W est Virginia.
W isconsin___

1574
1585
1663,1664
1717,1739
1788-1790
1838,1849
1863,1866
1867,1920
1921
1977-1981
2012
2067-2069
2140
2153
2241,2242
2294-2296

W yom in g.........................................
Inspection
and regulation of
factories and work­
shops.)
Fire marsnal:
Arkansas..........................................
H aw aii......................... ....................
N ew Y o r k ................... 1472-1475
Oregon..............................................
Pennsylvania............. 1866,1867
Fire, safeguards against,
in factories. (S e e I n ­
spection o f factories,

175-177
126
217,218
190,191
236

166
186

183,184
251
255-258
266,267
272
99,100
253
169-172

244
308

279,280
223,224

186
244

Nebraska.

277
308
244
277
186

213
244
308

Montana.

385,386
330-332

213
277
166
186
244

148,149
343
222-225
430-432
369-371

244
244
186
308

69,70
135
251
219

(S ee also

Firemen, stationary, ex­
am ination, etc., of.
(S ee E xam ination, etc.)
First - aid
provisions.
(S ee A ccidents, provi­
sions for.)
F ood products, manufac­
ture of. (S ee Inspec­
tion and regulation of
bakeries, etc.)




Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

78

Page.
Food, taking into certain
workrooms:
Delaware.....................
Illin ois..........................
568,589
Missouri.......................
1213
N ew Jersey..................
N ew Y o r k ...................
1512
O h io..............................
1670
Pennsylvania.............
1935
W est Virginia.............
F orced c o n tr ib u t io n s
from em ployees:
Ind ia n a ........................
631
Louisiana....................
M aryland.....................
896
M ichigan..................... 1051,1052
N evada........................
1326
New Jersey.................
1398
N ew Y o r k ...................
O h io..............................
1685
Oregon
U ta h ..
Forem en, etc., accepting
fees for furnishing em­
ploym ent. (S ee E m ­
p loym ent,
foremen,
etc., accepting fees for
furnishing.)
Forgery of cards, etc., of
labor
organizations.
(S ee Labor organiza­
tions, using false cards,
etc., of.)
Forgery o f employers’
certificates. (See E m ­
ployers’ certificates.)
Foundation for Promo­
tion o f Industrial Peace:
United States................. 2417,2418
Fraudulent contracts o f
employers. (See E m ­
ployers’ advances, re­
paym ent of; E m ploy­
m ent o f labor, decep­
tion in .)
Free public em ploym ent
offices. (See E m ploy­
m ent offices, free pub­
lic.)
Freedom to trade. (See
Coercion, etc.)

Bulletin.

N o.

244

116

166
308

160
162

244
277

298
343

213

54

277

203

166
308

181
182

244
244

275
338

257

121,122

186

133

G.
Garnishment, exem ption
of wages from . (See
E xem ption o f wages
from execution, etc.)
Garnishment o f wages:
Arkansas.....................
Colorado.......................
Delaware.....................
H aw aii.........................
Missouri.......................

232,233
323
434
498
1159
1160,1201
1444
N ew M exico................
1688
O h io..............................
Oregon.........................
1747
U ta h ............................. 2122,2123
2157
V irginia.......................
W yom ing.................... 2345,2346
Goods, etc., o f lo ca l pro­
duction preferred for
pu blic use. (See P ub­
lic supplies, etc.)
Government P A n t i n g
Office. (See
P ublic
printing office.)

n

CUM ULATIVE INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Groceries, employees in :
N ew Y ork ...................
Group insurance. (S ee
Insurance o f em ploy­
ees.)
Guaranty companies:

Colorado........ ..............
F lorida.........................
Idaho ........................
Indiana .................... .
Kansas..........................

Minnesota.................. .
Missouri.......................

N o.

Page.

186

254,255

1435

Guards,
arm ed. (S ee
A rm ed guards.)
Guards for dangerous
m achinery, e tc.:

359,360
404
475

98i,982
1055,1067
1121
1128,1129
1179

Nebraska..................... 1299,1300
N evada........................ 1343,1344
N ew Hampshire.........
New Jersey.................. 1388,1389
1409,1423
1482
N ew Y o r k __________
1505,1506
O h io.............................. 1607,1608
1651,1652
Oklahom a.................... 1716,1717
Oregon.......................... 1755,1756
Pennsylvania............. 1787,1847

137

244
166
213
166

166,167
36
53
126

277

U tah.............................
V i r g i n i a ................................

W ashington................. 2193,2194
W est Virginia............. 2238,2239
2267
W isconsin....................
2295,2306
2311-2313
W yom in g.....................
H.
H atch tenders:
California....................
Headlights on locom o­
tiv es. (S ee Railroads,
safety provisions on.)
H ealth, effect of em ploymen ts on, to be inves­
tiga ted :
California.....................
M a s s a c h iis e t t s ________
H ighw ays, hours of labor
on, sum m ary o f law s
fix in g
________ _____
H iring. (S e e E m ploy­
m ent of la bor.)
Hoisting-machine opera­
tors, examinations, etc.,
o f. (S ee Exam ination,
etc.)




272,273

263
1008
85,86

H oliday labor:
Massachusetts.............
N ew Ham pshire........
H olidays for dot diem
employees o f Govern­
m ent:
U nited States.............
H olidays in the different
States and Territories,
list o f ...............................

277
186
244
277
277
244
213

163,164
212
215
190
211
226,227
86-90

97-99

343-351
355
291

186
277
244
166
330
277
277
186

382
304
339,340
207
41
321
341,342
427-429

244

371

186

(See also Farced con­
tributions.)
Hospitals for seamen:
United States.............
Hours o f la bor, emergen­
cy suspension o f laws
r e l a t i n g t o . (S e e
Emergency s u s p e n sion .)
Hours of labor in general
em ploym ents:
Alaska..........................

Arkansas....
California.. .
Connecticut,
Florida........
Georgia........
Illinois.........
Ind iana.......
K en tu ck y...
Maine...........
M arylan d...
M ich igan....
Minnesota.
Mississippi,

Page.

16&
186
213
244
257
292

12
20,21
14,15
18,19
13
8,9

244

86

244
277
308
257
166
186
244
166
244
292
308
257

87-91
73
43
49
143
185
188
199,200
308-311
75
225
114-116

308

30

186
186
186
244
292

1009,1019

Porto R ico,

United States.............
Summary o f laws
as to ...........................
Horseshoers, exam ina­
tion, etc., of. (S ee E x­
amination, etc.)
H ospital, erection of, for
em ployees:
Arkansas......................
N ew M exico.................
H o s p i t a l f e e s . ( S ee
Forced contributions,
etc.)
H ospital for miners. (See
Miners’ hospital.)
H ospital funds, adminis­
tration of:
California......................
Oklahom a....................
Oregon..........................

N o.

2355

H om e defense guards, not
to be used in strikes:
California.....................
Hom es for workingmen:
California......................
Louisiana........
Massachusetts.

Bulletin.

999,1000
1371

148

244
R hode Island.............. 1970,1971
Tennessee.....................
2036

Page.

186 67,71,72
32-40
213
81,82
244
105
186
244

556
566-568
646
647,697
740,743
774,797
830

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

102,103
307
317
275
67

292

101

186
244
277
277
277

66
60
56
64
86

250
1439

2405

242,243
263,264
407,423
466
483,484
541
639

330
874
905,906
1042,1043
1095
1154

Missouri........................
1175
M ontana....................... 1230,1234

244.
277
308
244
166
213

ii

185
143
112
204
150
81,82

75

CUMULATIVE INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.

N o.

Page.

Hours of labor in general
em ploym ents—Con .
N ew Y o r k ...................
O h io..............................
P p .rm

syl van i a .............

R hode Isla n d ..............
Smith
, ___
U tah..............................
W isconsin....................
Hours o f labor in indus­
tries o f continuous op­
eration, investigation
of:
Massachusetts.............
Hours of labor of children
and wom en. ( See Chil­
dren, etc.)
Hours o f labor o f deck
officers:

1291
1355
1476,1477

1985
2001

California.....................
Colorado.......................
Id a h o............................
Kansas..........................
M aryland ........... ............
M issou ri_

..................

M ontana......................
N evad a........................
N orth Dakota.............
Oklahom a...................
Oregon..........................
P enn sylvania..
U tah .......................................
W ashington ......................
W yom in g ...........................




254,255
92
156,160

166
244

199
307,308

213
330
186

139,140
35,36
393

78

2280

2438
Hours of labor o f drug
clerks:
289
California.....................
1553
N ew Y o r k ..........................
Hours of labor o f em ploy­
ees in bakeries:
N ew Jersey ........................ 1419,1420
Pennsylvania ..................
1827
Hours of labor o f em ploy­
ees in brickyards:
1476
N ew Y o r k ....................
1477,1548
Hours of labor o f em ploy­
ees in compressed air:
N ew Jersey .......................
N ew Y o r k .......................... 1526,1527
Pennsylvania ..................
Hours of labor o f em ploy­
ees in electric plants:
A riz o n a ...........................
196
Hours of labor o f em ploy­
ees in
Government
Printing Office:
U n ited S ta tes ..................
2363
Hours oflabor o f em ploy­
ees in groceries:
N ew Y ork....................
Hours oflabor of em ploy­
ees in mines, smelters,
etc.:
A l a s k a ...................................
188
A rizona ................................

186
213
308

213

1665
1780
1791
1958,1959

308
166

51
186,187

308

Hours oflabor o f em ploy­
ees in plaster and ce­
m ent mills:
N eva d a .........................
Hours oflab or o f em ploy­
ees on railroads:
A rizon a........................
Arkansas......................
California.....................
Colorado.......................
Connecticut.................
District o f C o lo m b ia .
Florida..........................
Georgia.........................
Ind iana........................
Iow a ..............................
Kansas..........................
M aryland.....................
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
Missouri........................
M ontana......................
Nebraska.....................
N evad a........................
N ew M exico................
N ew Y o r k ....................
N orth Carolina...........
N orth D akota.............
O h io..............................
Oregon..........................
Porto R ic o ...................
South Dakota.............
Texas............................
W ashington.................
W est Virginia.............
W isconsin....................
U nited States.............

166

157

244

282,283

186

254,255

186
244

65
59

244

172

244

211

277
1737
1760,1761
1864
2108
2193
2327
2334,2335

Page.

157

241

197
209,210
215,216
305
323,389
519,520
921
1175,1185
1217
1226,1227
1325,1326
1338,1339

B ulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

244

351

Hours oflabor of em ploy­
ees on street railways:
California.....................
Louisiana....................
M aryland___ 4 ...........
Massachusetts............
N ew Jersey..................
N ew Y o r k ....................
Pennsylvania.............
R hode Island..............
South Carolina...........
W ashington.................
Hours o f labor o f letter
carriers:
U nited States.............
Hours ofla b o r o f seamen:
U nited States.............
Hours o f labor o f tele­
graph operators. ( See
Hours o f l a b o r o f em­
ployees on railroads.)
Hours o f la bor o f tele­
phone operators:
M ontana......................
H ours oflab or o f wom en.
( See W om en, etc.)
Hours o f l a b o r on public
roads, sum mary o f laws
fixin g...............................
Hours o fla b o r on public
works:
A laska..........................
A rizona.............
California.....................
Colorado......................
District o f C olum bia..
H aw aii.......................
I d a h o ............................

Bulletin.

No.

Page.

1339
210
240
241,247
295,296
343
415
452
466
479,480
669,670
722,723
794
896
1043
1114
1176,1210
1227
1312,1313
1353,1354
1442
1477
1478,1.548
1576,1577
1594
1684
1770
1954
2019
2085,2095
2192,2193
2242
2287
2290,2291
2418,2419

264
845,846
938
1011
1403,1404
1477,1547
1817,1818
1984
2003
2192

277

165

308

156, i58

213

151
153,154

186

186

308

156,157

213

137

186

440

257

12

2362,2430

1243

85,86

187
195,197
261,274,275 244
334
451,463
496
507,529,530
I n d i a n a .................................
639
770 1
Kansas.........................

73

C U M U L A T IV E IN D EX ..

76

Bulletin
No. 148.
Page.
H ours of labor on pu blic
works—Concluded.
K en tu ck y....................
M aryland....................
Massachusetts............
Minnesota...................
M issouri..........
M ontana.........
N eva d a ...........
N ew J ersey...
N ew M ex ico ..
N ew Y o r k —
O h io ................
O klahom a—
Oregon.......... .
Pennsylvania.
P orto R ico ___
T exa s..................
U tah....................
W ashington.......
W est Virginia. ..
W isconsin........ .
W yom in g...........
U nited S tates...
(S ee also Eight-hour
d a y.)
H ou sin g............................ .
( See Hom es for work­
ingm en.)
Hygiene, industrial:
N ew Y o r k ................. .
Pennsylvania.............

934
970
971,1001
1095,1096
1216
1217,1227
1340
1415
1429,1430
1433
1476,1547
1603
1704,1718
1761
1773,1774
1845
1953,1954
1964,1965

2101
2105,2108
2191,2192
2236,2237
2281
2327,2350
2361-2363
2432,2433

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.
No.

166
213
257
277
308

134
75
53
145
119

244
277

211,216
209,210

213
308
292

91-93
164

186
244

317
271

244
308
308

313
232
244,245

277

348,351

17,18

1488,1489
1923

Im m igration and hous­
ing. com m ission of:
California...............

Industrial relations, de­
partm ent of:
O h io.............................
Industrial reports b y em-

No.

277

333

166

15

257

121,122

29-37
99,100
308

203-205

277

174
4
63,64
45,46,49
99,100
139,140
308-312
244
254
346

K a n s a s ...
Michigan..
T exa s........
434
277

105

166

153<M532*

201

"i.992*
2414-2416 244
2439
313-316

Im m igration, bureau of:
Illinois..........................
Massachusetts.............
U nited States.............
Im m igration, bureau of
industries and:
N ew Y o r k ................... 1530-1532
(S ee also A lien con­
tract labor.)
Im m igration,
com m is­
sion. on, digest of laws
146
relating t o .......................
Im porting w orkm en from
outside th e State:
Oregon.......................... 1761,1762
Inclosed platform s. (See
Protection o f em ploy­
ees on street railways.)
Incorporation o f labor
organization, etc. (S ee
L abor organizations,
etc.)




Industrial board. (See
Commission, industrial,
etc.)
Industrial code, com m is­
sion for:
W ashington.................
Industrial com m ission.
(S ee Commission, in­
dustrial, etc.)
Industrial directory:
N ew Jersey..................
N ew Y o r k ...................
1489
Industrial diseases. (See
Occupational diseases.)
Industrial
education.
(S ee V ocational train­
ing.)
Industrial Peace, Foun­
dation for the P rom o­
tion of:
U nited States............. 2417,2418
Industrial police. (See
Police, industrial and
State.)
Industrial rehabilitation.
(S ee R ehabilitation of
injured workm en.)
Industrial relations, com ­
m ission on, digest of
law relating t o ...............
146,147
Industrialrelations, court
of:
Kansas....................

M ontana....................
Industrial welfare com ­
missions, etc.:
A rkansas....................
California...................

I
.
Illiterate em ployees on
railroads. (S ee R ail­
road em ployees, illit­
erate.)
Im m igration:
Delaware................... .
Illin ois........................
N ew Y o r k ................. .
R h od e Isla n d ............
South Carolina.........
U nited States...........

Page.

Page.

Bulletin.

375-380

186
308

92
49

277
244
244

150
188,189
376,378

W ashington................
W est Virginia.............
Industries and imm igra­
tion , bureau of:
N ew Y o r k ................... 1530-1532
Injunctions:
805,806
K ansas.........................
Massachusetts............
M innesota___ •
...........
1235
M ontana......................
N orth Dakota.............
Oregon.........................
U tah.............................

142
205,206
242,243
273,274
336,337
346

W ash in g ton ...............
W isconsin....................
U nited States.............
Injured persons, special
training for, investiga­
tion of:
Massachusetts.............
Injuries causing death,
right of action for, list,
etc v of laws granting. . .
Injuries, personal, ac­
tions for:
A rizon a...................... .
Connecticut............... .
Delaware.....................
Georgia.......................
Hawaii........................
Id a h o ..........................

333,334
347,348
235,236

213
83-85
195
397,398
433
486,487
501
521

308

77

C U M U L A T IV E INTDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Injuries, personal, ac­
tions for—Concluded.
Illinois..........................
Ind iana........................
Iow a .............................
K entucky....................
Louisiana....................
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
Missouri........................
Nebraska.....................
N evada........................
N ew H am pshire........
N ew Jersey.................
N orth Da&ota............
Pennsylvania.............
Tennessee....................
Texas............................
W isconsin....................
W yom in g.....................
United States.............
Injuries t o employees.
(See L ia bility of em­
ployers.)
Inspection and regulation
of bakeries, etc.:
California.....................
Colorado......................
Connecticut.................
Delaware......................
Georgia.........................
Illinois..........................

No.

556
629
738
816
846,847
1053

m

Page.

Page.

244

161

Inspection and regulation
of factories and work­
shops— Continued.
Arizona........................
Arkansas......................

257

47

California.....................

186

202,203

278,279
284,285

186

237
Colorado......................

359-364

201
258,259

1337
1400
1783,1829
2032-2034
2079,2080
2304
2327

Bulletin.

No.

Page.

244
277
186
213
244

69,70
56
99
30-39
73-75
80,81
93-95
73,74
46
108
110, 111
119,122
107-109
123-128
115-118
30

225

186

145,146

1166-1168

257
342

244
186

450

Connecticut.................

403-405

Delaware......................
186

431-433

District of Columbia.
Florida.........................
Georgia........................

456-458
475
485,493

277
308
186
186
244
186
244
166

308

50,51

244

108

Indiana........................

547-550
566-574
586-591
644-650

166

32

Iow a ..............................

740-743

166
213
244
244
186
244
277
186
277
186

Kansas.........................

774
775,797

186
244

K en tu cky....................

830,831

Louisiana....................

852,853
860-862
868,869
885,886
898
934,935

166
213
213

Hawaii.........................
Id a h o............................
Illinois..........................
290-292
393-395
400,401-416
435-438
562
616-618
682-684
760,761

Indiana........................
Iow a ..............................
Kentucky....................
M aryland.....................
Massachusetts.............
943
Michigan......................
Minnesota.................... 1096,1097
1122,1123
Missouri........................ 1203,1204
Nebraska..................... 1280-1282
New Jersey.................. 1382,1383
1418-1421
New Y o r k ................... 1520-1524

North Carolina...........
North Dakota.............
O hio.............................. 1649,1650
Oklahoma.................... 1740-1742
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania............. 1827,1828
1848
R hode Island............. 1972-1975
South Dakota.............
Tennessee..................... 2057-2059
Texas............................
V erm ont......................
W ashington.................
2185
2186,2221
W isconsin.................... 2261-2263
2310
2350,2351
Inspection ami regulation
of barber shops:
Id a h o ............................
N evada........................
New Ham pshire........ i36i, 1362
North Dakota.............
1595
( See also Exam ina'
tion, etc., of bar­
bers.)
Inspection and regulation
of factories and work­
shops:
A labam a......................
157,158
161,162
A laska..........................

277

112-114

213
166
292
277
277

47.49
99-101
48.49
137
155-158

Maine............................
M aryland.....................

277

182

186

270-272
281
176-178
194,195
257
218

Massachusetts.............
308
308
244
308
186
186

Michigan......................

960
979-983
1000,1008
1009
1022-1027
1029

Minnesota....................

277

317,318
339
352-356
276,277

1053
1066-1072
1119,1120
1128-1132

308

237,238

Mississippi...................

1147

308
244

243
350

186
244

432,433
364

277
244

103
224

Missouri........................ 1179-1183
M ontana......................
N ebraska.....................

1298-130i

N evada........................

1343

N ew Ham pshire........

1362

N ew Jersey.................. 1388-1393
1409

N ew M exico................
N ew Y o r k ...................
186
277
277

30253°—23—Bull. 330-----6



B ulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

Page.

77

63,64
45
48,49

1453
1485-1490
1496-1524
1562

32
41
135
137
145,146
143
108
151,152
112
160
164-168
171-175
166,167
173,174
33,35,36
48-49
53

186

177

166

93,94
98-104
64
125-127
130-133
141-143
184^186
73
187
129,134
135
187
137
145-148
154-158
117
147,148
81
206
209,210
163-168
212,215
217,218
188-193
133
232
210-212
236
226-229
158-162
83
237-243
67
223,224
142
177
182-186
255-260
263,266
267,272

213
166
186
213
244
277
186
277
277
308
166
213
186
244
277
186
244
277
308
186
277
186
244
166
213
244
257
277
308
166
186

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

78

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.

B ulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

Page.

Page.
Inspection o f locom o­
tives—Concluded.
N ew Y o r k ................... 1556-1558

186
213
244
257
277
308
N orth Dakota..
O h io..................

1585
1608,1615
1644-1654

Oklahom a.
Oregon........

1716-1718
1755-1759

Pennsylvania.

1787-1790
1838
1847-1849
1865-1867
1924,1925
1927-1937

Philippine Islands.
Porto R ic o ...............
R hode Island..........

1963
1970-1975
1977-1982

South Carolina____
South D akota.........

2011

Tennessee............... .

2012,2026
2036,2037

Texas.
U tah........

2105

V erm ont.
V irginia..

2150
2162-2165

213
277
292

110-115
250-252
65

277
292
308
186

277

269-271
68-73
219
339
343-361
279,280
287-299
276,277

244
244
2.44

302
311,312
315

186
213

371
137

186

377,378
381,382
322
301-305
385,386
330-332
101-103
339-346
247,248

244

244
277
186
244
257
244
308
166
213

W ash in gton ....
W est V irginia..

2193-2196
2238,2239

W isconsin.____

2259
2261-2266
2296,2297
2310-2325

W yom in g.....................
• {S ee also Cellars and
basements, use of;
Compressed a i r ;
E xplosives; Facto­
ries a n d work­
rooms, ventilation,
etc., of; Fire es­
capes; Guards for
dangerous machine r y ; Inspection,
etc., o f bakeries;
Inspectors, factory;
Laundries; S e a t s
for female em ploy­
ees: Sweating sys­
tem ; Toilet room s.)
Inspection o f factories
and workshops, com ­
m ission on, digest o f
law s relating t o ..............
Inspection o f locomotives:
District of C olum bia..

Indiana............. .......
Massachusetts..




278-293
91
96-106
247-254
83-86
228-232
233
146
166-176

330
277
186
277
166
186
308
344

207
210-212
145,148
149
39-41
321-330
416,417
341-345
221-228
427-432
263
369-373

O h io..............................
V erm ont.......................
U nited States.............
Inspection, etc., o f mer­
cantile establishments:
N ew Hampshire
N ew Jersey..................
N ew Y o r k ....................
Inspection, etc., o f mines.
{S ee Mine regulations.)
Inspection o f railroads,
railroad
equipm ent,
etc.:
Connecticut.................
M aine...........................
Michigan......................
Mississippi...................
Missouri........................
M ontana.......................
N evada__ . . . . . . . . . . .
O h io..............................
O r e g o n ................
Texas.........
U tah..............................
V e r m o n t ..................
W ashington................
U nited States.............
Inspection o f steam boil­
ers:
A l a s k a . . . . . . . . ............
Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . .
California - . . . . . . . • ...
Colorado. . . . . . . . . . . . .
C onnecticut.. . . . . . . . .

1682,1683
2144,2145
2427-2430

343-345
409,410
694
710-717
743
867,868
935-937
953-959

Michigan....... ..............
M in n e so ta . ___________

1072
1100-1103

M ontana.... ................. 1219-1222

1474,1475

1605
1654-1658
Oklahom a....................
P e n n sy lv a n ia .............. 1848,1849
R hode Island..............
W i s c o n s i n . ... ... ... ..

710
952

63,64
31,32

186

450
138

166
308

178,179
146
180-182

186
244

177
177

335,336

186
244
213
244
308

71
71,72
39
77,78
57

186
308
277
186

119,120
67,68
91
152-154

257
277

58
135

277
308
244
277
244
277
186
244
277
308
213

150-152
116
213
172
238,239
219-221
257
254
227,228
162
115

277
244
277
277
166
244

260,261
286
278
291-294
218-221
367

2138
2212,2213
2219,2220
2421,2422

O hio..............................

684 -6 8 6

292
330

244

1073,1074
1149
1180,1181
1245
1335
1681-1683
1764
2098

N ew Jersey............ .

1 4 5 ,1 4 6

Page.

421,422

Iow a ..............................
Maine............................
M aryland.............
Massachusetts—

N ew Y o r k . . . . . . . . . . .

N o.

308
1408,1409
1487,1488

D e l a w a r e . . . . . . . . . __
I n d ia n a ______________

Bulletin.

{S ee also Inspection
of locom otives.)
Inspection o f steam boil­
ers in mines. {S ee
Mine regulations.)
Inspection o f steam ves­
sels:
I n d ia n a .....................
652,653
M aine...........................
* 873
Michigan...................... 1057-1060
1100-1103
Minnesota........... ..

i

C U M U L A TIV E IX D E X ,

Bulletin
No. 14S.
Page.

Bulletin.
No.

Page.

244
186

213
235

Inspection of steam ves­
sels—Concluded.
1273,1274
1371
N ew H ampshire........
N ew Jersey.................. 1400,1401
N ew Y o r k ................... 1540-1542
P Armsy 1van i a _______ 1840-1S44
W ashington................ 2208-2210
U nited States. — . . . 2367-2374
Inspector, cannery:
D elaw are.. . . . . . . . . . .
O hio........... .................
Inspectors, factory, etc.:
A la b a m a ... . . . . . . . . . .
J\la<?lra___________ . . .
flransas_________ . . .
C olorado.. . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecti cu t.................
Delaware......................
District o f Columbia.
Florida.......................
Georgia.......................
Illinois........................
In d ia n a ...
Iow a..........
K ansas....
Kentucky.
Louisiana.
Maine........
Maryland.
Massachusetts.

253
332,333
359,364
410,411
414,415
432,433
435-438
440,449
474,476
493
548,549
648,650
693-695
725,726
797
803,804
810,811
837,852
853,862
884-887
914-916
959,960
976,1016
1017,1019

1021

Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
Mississippi..........
Missouri..............
Montana.............
Nebraska............
New Hampshire.

1061-1063
1067,1068
1134r-1136
1177-1179
1272
1290
1365

N ew Jersey___ T

1392
1393,1409
1410,1417

New York.

1486-1489

Ohio,
Oklahoma....................
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania..............
Philippine Islands—
Porto R ic o ...................
R hode Island..............

South Carolina.
South Dakota..
Tennessee.........




1605,1608
1644-1647
1668
1716
1751,1752
1921-1923
1946
1959,1960
1970-1972
1977
1993
1994,2003
2026
2036,2058
2061,2062

430,441
450,451

186
277
157,158
161,162

186

125-128
251

186
277
277

63,64
45,46
48,49

277

122

186
244
277
186

124-128

166
186
213
186
244
186

30
129
41
145
142,143
152

244

166,167

166
166

33
90

109

125
277
166 94,98,99
123,124
213
61
166
130
186
184
257
58
277
129
134-136
308
166
277

115
147,148
166-168

244
308
213
244
277
330
277
292

227,229
138
83
233,234
221
26
228,229
60

244

277,278

213
257
277
292

136
95
291-294
77

186
277

381
301

79

Bulletin
No. 148.
Page.

Bulletin.
No.

Inspectors, factory, etc.—
Concluded.
Texas............................ 2077,2078
U tah.............................
2130.
V erm ont............. 1____ 2146,2147 186
244
Virginia............................................ 166
W ashington................ 2187,2188
W est Virginia.............
2234 186
277
W isconsin................
2295-2297
Inspectors, mercantile:
N ew Y o r k ...............
1486,1488 166
Inspectors, m ine:
Alabam a..................
165,166
192 186
Alaska......................
308
196,217,218
A rizon a..
236,237 244
Arkansas.
277
Colorado.
335-337 244
365-370
I d a h o ....
507-511
Illin ois...
594-599 186
244
In d ia n a ...
660 1$6
662,673
Iow a..........
729-731 186
Kansas—
780,799
K entucky.
816-824 166
832
257
Louisiana.
863
Maryland.
926 213
Michigan—
1074 277
1075,1084
Minnesota.
1109-1111
M issouri..
1191-1193
M on ta n a 1248-1253 186
1278 244
308
N evada.............
1328-1330 186
New M exico___
1433,1445 277
1446,1451
N ew Jersey___
166
New Y o r k ........
1524
1569,1570
North Carolina.
1589,1590
North Dakota..
O h io..................
1605,1608 277
1617-1621 308
1703
Oklahoma.........
1724-1726
1744
1794-1797 186
Pennsylvania,
1831,1832 308
1900-1905
South Dakota.
2009 277
Tennessee.......
2030 186
2037-2042 244
Texas...........
2080,2081
U tah.............
2111,2112 244
Virginia.......
2166
Washington.
2198 244
277
W est Virginia.
2243-2245 186
244
277
W yom ing.
2327
2342-2344
2349
United S ta te s....
2408,2409
Inspectors, railroad:
Illinois..................
558,559 244
Maine....................
186
Massachusetts....
950
Michigan.............
1073
1315 1
Nebraska.............
1681,1683
O h io.................... .
2098
Texas....................
W ashington.........
2219,2220

Page.

395
347

212
416,417
311
182
66,67
33
67-69
56-58
99
146,147
139-145
152
163
53-56
69,71
39-41
65,66
137

215
213
126,127
277
225
166

258
203

329,331
224
299
380
325
341
351
321-330
400-402
355
345

142
177

C U M U L A T IV E I2TDEX,

80

Bulletin
No. 148.
Page.
Insurance, accident:
California............
Connecticut........
Id a h o...................
Indiana...............
Massachusetts...
Michigan...................
N ebraska.................
N ew Jersey..............
N orth Carolina........
N orth Dakota.........
Oregon......................
Pennsylvania..........
South Carolina........
V erm ont...................
Washington.............
W isconsin.................
Insurance, collective:
Maine........................
N ew Jersey........ .
Insurance, cooperative:
M aryland.................
Michigan...................

No.

244

Page.

85,86

419
532,533
690,691
1050,1074
1283
1384
1580
1595
1772
1926,1927
1995
2146
2216
2291,2292

186
244

308

185
197-199

254,255

879
1384
921-926
186
244

Insurance of employees:
California.....................
301-304
618
Illinois..................
Indiana...............1
.............................
Louisiana....................... ..................
M aryland.........................................
Massachusetts..................................

187-189
197-199

213
257
308
M ic h ig a n ........
Minnesota...........
N ebraska............
N ew Hampshire
N ew Jersey........
N ew Y o r k ..........
O h io....................
South Carolina..
Insurance, health:
California........
Illinois.............
Massachusetts.

1079-1082
1094
1123-1125
1142
1283-1287
1368-1370
1384
1469-1472
1686,1687
1995

N orth Dakota...........
O klahom a..................
V erm ont.....................
W isconsin..................
W yom ing....................
(S ee also Intoxica­
tion, etc.)




257
330

77,78
27
371,372
92
147,148
191
60
262.263
285,286
79
60
262.263
363,364
367

186
244

560
1042,1047
1275
1282
1404
1469,1550
1554,1555
1585
1740
2138
2259,2260

186

244
257
244
244

Insurance,
unem ploy­
m ent:
Michigan......................
Intelligence offices. (S ee
E m ploym ent offices.)
Intemperate e
'
California
Illinois........
M ichigan...
M on ta n a ...
N ebraska. .
N ew Jersey
New Y o r k .

87-89
. 54
95-98
130
131,143
71
53-55
103

308
213
166
166

244
244
244
257
244
244

O h io .................
Pennsylvania.
Insurance, social:
California........
Massachusetts.
O h io .................
W isconsin.......

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.

187-189
197-199

Page.
Interference with em­
ploym ent:
Alabam a......................
Arkansas*....................
Delaware.....................
Florida.........................
Georgia........................
Hawaii.........................
Id a h o...........................
Illinois..........................
Iow a .............................
K entucky....................
Louisiana....................
Massachusetts........... .
Minnesota.................. .
Mississippi..................
N evada........................
N ew H am pshire-----N ew Jersey.................
N ew Y o r k ...................
N orth Dakota...........
Pennsylvania............
R hode Island ............
Tennessee...................
T exas..........................
U tah............................
W ashington............... .
W est Virginia............
W isconsin.................. .
U nited States........... .
(S ee also Blacklist­
ing;
Boycotting;
Conspiracy against
workingmen; E n­
ticing employees;
Intim idation; Pro­
tection o f em ployees; S a b o t a g e ;
Strikes o f railroad
employees.)
Intim idation:
Alabam a....................
C olorado.....................
Connecticut...............
Illinois........................
Louisiana...................
Maine..........................
Massachusetts...........
Michigan....................
Mississippi
Missouri.............
New Y o r k ........
N orth D akota..
Oklahoma.........
Oregon...............
P orto R ic o ........
R hode I s la n d ..
South D a k o ta ..
Texas.................
U tah.............................
V erm ont......................
W ashington................
(S ee also Interference
w ith em ploym ent,
and cross refer­
ences.)
Intoxicants, sale of, to
employees:
A rizona........................
California.....................
C olorado......................
H aw aii.........................
Massachusetts.............
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
M ontana......................
N ebraska.....................
N evada........................
New H am pshire------New Jersey.................

154
234

Bulletin.
No.

308

31,32

AO
Q

186

130

308
244

75,76
138

244

164

244

201,202

244

225,226

244
292

321,322
81-83

186

408

186

469,470
488,489

189,190

186

209

560
813,814
851
1027,1028
1104,1108
1144
1340
1356,1357
1403
1544,1545
1583,1591
1785,1819
1986,1987

2110
2180,2183
2252
2307,2308
2422

157
324
398
539,558
842,843
876
967
1051
1146
1164
1544
1592,1593
1706
1749
1953
1986
2017,2018
2091
2092,2094
2125
2140
2205

212
292
326,327
501,502
945
1095,1119
1241,1242
1310
1345
1360
1385

81

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.

N o.

Page.

1592
1665
O h i o ............................
1768
1977
2011
2129
U tah.............................
2139,2140
2187
W ashington.................
..........2241
Intoxication,~ drinking,
etc., of employees:
160,182
186
226
Connecticut.................
Tdaho............. ...........
Illinois..........................

M arvland.....................

Nebraska .......................
Nevada, _ __________
New Jersey.................
New M exico__ . . . . . . .
N ew Y o r k ...................
North Carolina...........
N orth D akota.............
O h io..............................
Oklahom a...................
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania.............

239
273
398
470
528
613
675,702
754
873
932
1092
1106
1145
1164
1240
1265,1275
1282
1283,1312
1327,1339
1402
1439
1469
1566
1592
1637,1684
1706
1770
1912

Porto R ic o .....................
1958
South D akota ...............
2017
U tah ................................ 2115,2124
V erm ont ........................
2138
Virginia ..........................
W ashington ..................
2182
W est Virginia ..............
2230
W isconsin ......................
2260
W yom in g ......................
2347
(S ee also Intemperate
employees.)
Inventions, etc., o f em­
ployees:
U nited States .............. 2433,2435
Isthmian Canal, hours of
labor on:
2414
United States ...............

244

107

244

242

244
186
244

271
338,339
291
298,299

213
186

147
398

U nnisiana...................

Maine...............................
Massachusetts..............
Michigan......................

K.

L.
Trade­




Pennsvlvania.............
Porto R ico ...................
also
Lodging
houses.)
Labor commission:
Delaware.....................
H aw aii.........................
Indiana....................
Labor, commissioner of.
(S e e Bureau o f labor.)
Labor,com pulsory. (S ee
Labor,requirement of.)
Labor contracts. (S ee
Contracts o f em ploy­
m ent.)
Labor, em ploym ent of.
(S e e E m ploym ent o f
labor.)
Labor, etc., local or spe­
cial laws regulating.
(S e e Local or special
laws, etc.)
Labor
organizations,
bribery o f representa­
tives of. (S e e Bribery
of representatives, etc.)
Labor organizations ex­
c l u d i n g members o f
N ational Guard. (S ee
Protection
of
em­
ployees as members of
National Guard.)
Labor organizations, in ­
corporation, r e g u l a ­
tion, etc., of:
Alabama......................
Colorado____ ________
Con n e cticu t...................
Illinois .............................
Iow a .................................
Kansas ............................

1547
166
2423

N o.

Page.

257

60

186
277
308
186

88,89
59
51,52
126,127

186
186

187
268-270
337
232

186
308
186

123,124
77
152

308

31

308
277
292

82
119
29,33

244
166
186
330
277

181
142
183,184
19
140

244
244

205,206
211

166

204

244

336,337

505
1515
1516,1531

(S ee

Judgments for wages.
(See Suits for wages.)

Labels. (See
marks.)

Delaware
.....................
H awaii.........................
Michigan...................
New Y o r k ...................

Bulletin.

186
308

70

J.

Kidnapping:
New Y o r k ...................
Philippine islands
U nited States.............

Page.
Labor agents. (See Emi­
grant agents.)
Labor agreements not
conspiracy. (S ee Con­
spiracy, labor agree­
ments n ot.)
Labor
and industries,
State board of:
M assach nsetts............. 1015-1017
Labor, bureau of. (See
Bureau o f labor.)
Labor camps, etc.:
California.....................
304,305

Intoxicants, sale o f, to

Arkansas......................

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

197

499,50i
634-638

334
413
720
769,770
839,840
879
946,947
969,1001

1048-1050
1060
Minnesota....................
M ontana......................
Nebraska..................... 1279,1318
N ew Ham pshire........ 1357,1358
1384
New Jersey ...................
1453
New Y o r k ...................
O h io..............................
1603
P e n n s y lv a n ia ............... 1784,1785
1818-1821
South Carolina...........
Texas............................ 2075,2079
U tah.............................

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

82

Bulletin
No. 148.
Page.
L abor organizations, in­
corporation, r e g u l a ­
tion, etc., of—Concld.
Virginia........................
W a s h in g to n .............
W isconsin----- \ ..........
W yom in g....................
United States.............
Labor
organizations,
using false cards, etc.,
of:
California................... .

No.

2345
2404,2423
2436,2445

Page.

Page.

277
277
277

320
333,334
347,348

166

Leave of absence for em­
ployees in public serv­
ice—Concluded.
Hawaii.........................
Iow a .................
Massachusetts.
N evada.............
North Carolina.
U nited States..

91
45

201

77

Letter carriers, hours of
labor of:
United States.............
Letters of recommenda­
tion. (S ee Em ployers’
certificates.)
Liability of corporations
for debts of contractors
.fo r labor, list o f laws
determining....................
Liability of employees for
negligence. (S ee Negli­
gence.)
Liability of employers,
and workmen’s cornpensation for injuries,
commission on. (See
Commission, etc.)
Liability of em ployers for
injuries to employees:
Alabam a......................
A laska..........................
A rizon a .. . . .................
Arkansas......................

29
35-37
164
43,44
45,46
183-185
58-60
64
67-69
81-83
93-95

100
359,360

California.....................
Colorado.......................
Connecticut.................
District o f C olum bia..
Florida.........................
Georgia.........................
Id a h o............................
Illinois..........................
Indiana........ ................

Iow a ..............................
Kansas..........................
K en tu cky....................
Louisiana.....................

36
64
123
173,174
117,124

M a in e ....'.....................
M arvland.....................
Massachusetts.............
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
Mississippi...................
Missouri........................
M ontana......................

85

Nebraska.....................

Bulletin.
No.

186
308

134
75

166
186

235,236

292 186
308
413
Connecticut.................
489,490
Georgia.........................
969
Massachusetts.............
1107
Minnesota....................
1203
M ontana......................
1549
N ew Y o r k ...................
N orth Dakota.............
308
1701
O h io..............................
1769
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania.............
1828
292
R hode Island..............
2091
Texas............................
2162
V irginia........................
W isconsin....................
2307
L a b o r organizations.
(S ee also Antitrust act;
C o n s p i r a c y , labor
agreements not; Pro­
tection o f employees as
m em bers; Trade-marks
of trade-unions.)
Labor organs, public ad­
vertising in :
1402
N ew Jersey..................
Labor, requirement of:
Delaware.....................
257
257
Georgia.........................
244
Kansas.........................
K en tu cky...............—
257
Louisiana....................
257
M aryland.....................
244
Massachusetts.............
257
M ontana......................
257
N ew Jersey.................
257
N ew Y o r k ...................
257
R hode Island..............
257
South Dakota.............
257
W est Virginia.............
244
Labor, Sunday. ( S e e
Sunday labor.)
Laborers, alien. ( S e e
Alien laborers.)
Laborers, exem ption of,
from license tax, list of
80,81
law s granting.................
Laborers’ lodging houses.
(S ee Lodging houses.)
Laborers. (S ee E m ploy­
ees.)
Ladders, standards for:
Pennsylvania.............
244
Laundries, regulation of:
211
A rizona........................
California.....................
213
Connecticut.................
308
Delaware.....................
186
Kansas.........................
244
1230
M ontana......................
1512
N ew Y o r k ...................
Oregon..........................
213
Virginia....................... 2163,2164
W isconsin................... 2313,2325
Leave of absence for em­
ployees in public serv­
ice:
California.....................
292 186
District of Colum bia..
463




Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.

125
183

745,746
1328
1565
2354,2355
2360-2364
2435
2363

76-79

151-153
189
190,194
195,196
204,205
241,245
250,251
254,255
265,266
342,343
358,359
363,365
408
451,452
468
477,478
480-483
524-526
560
629
633,643
644,663
688-690
695-697
720-722
740,741
774
775,793
801,802

51

244

70

186

105

186

145,146

186
244

163,164
161

257
846
847,865
881-883
897
960
987-991
1009,1010
1056,1057
1100
1103,1128
1143,1146
1148,1151
1166-1169
1194
1231
1245,1246
1300,1301
1312,1317

277

41

166
186

132
186

186

202,203

166
330

147
23,24

186

225

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
L iability of em ployers
for injury to em p loy­
ees—Concluded.
N evada........................
N ow Hampshire.
N ow Jersey........
N ew M exico.......
N ew Y o r k ........
North Carolina.
N orth D akota..
O h io ..................
Oklahoma....................
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania.............
Philippine I s la n d s .. .
Porto R ic o ...................
South Carolina.
South D akota..

Page.

1337
186
1394-1396
1433
1434,1436
1438,1439
1536-1538
1555
1564
1570,1577
1586
1593,1600
1665-1667
1680
1684-16S7
1703
1704,1723
1760
1764,1765
1857
1947-1949
1951-1953
1991
1994-1997
1999

237

308

186

186

296

186
244

298,299
257

186
186

342
363

213

140,141

308

244

213

147,148

166

233

186

450

2012
2021,2022

Texas............... .
U tah..................
V erm ont...........
V irgin ia ...

2086-2088
2109
2142-2144
2151
*2152,2154
W isconsin.
2260,2287
2289,2290
W yom in g.
2327
2328,2341
2351,2352
U nited States............. 2419-2421
(S ee also Contracts o f
em ployees waiving
right to damages;
E m ploym ent o f la­
bor; Injuries, etc.;
Insurance, a c c i ­
dent.)
L iability of employers for
taxes o f employees:
A la ska ........................ .
.
California................... .
262
Georgia........................
479
Id a h o ...........................
511,520
Louisiana....................
849,850
M ontana...................... 1274,1275
N eva d a ........................ 1327,1328
Pennsylvania.............
1844
1845,1864
W ashington.................
,
(S ee also Em ployers
to furnish names,
etc.)
Liability o f railroad com ­
panies for debts o f con­
tractors. (See Liability
of stockholders; Protec­
tion o f wages.)
L iability o f railroad com ­
panies for injuries to
em ployees. (See Lia­
b ility of em ployers.)
L iability of railroad com ­
panies for wages due
from predecessors:
W isconsin....................
2289
L iability of stockholders
of corporations for wage
debts, list o f laws de­
term ining........................
79




Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

277

47,48

83

Page.
License ta x , exem ption
oim echam cs, etc.,from ,
list of laws granting.. . .
License tax , laborers not
to pay:
Louisiana.....................
Philippine I sla n d s .. .
Licensing, etc. (S ee E x ­
amination, etc.)
Liens. (S ee Mechanics’
liens.)
Lighting code:
New Jersey.................
Pennsylvania.............
Liauor. ( S e e I n t o x i cants.)
Loans to employees:
Louisiana.....................
L ocal or special laws reg­
ulating labor, etc.:
K en tu cky....................
Louisiana........: ...........
North Carolina...........
Pennsylvania.............
Texas............................
Virginia........................
Locom otive boilers, in­
spection of. (S ee In­
spection of locom o­
tives.)
Locom otives, etc., aband o n i n e n t of. ( S e e
Strikes of railroad em­
ployees.)
Locom otives, headlights
on.
(S ee Railroads,
safety provisions on.)
Lodging houses, laborers’ :
Connecticut.................
Hawaii.........................
(See also L a b o r
camps. X
Lodging houses, sailors’ :
Louisiana....................
United States.............
(S ee also Seamen.)
Logging and sawmill
safety orders:
California.....................
Lunch, tim e for. (See
Tim e for meals.)

Bulletin.

N o.

Page.

80,81
837
1944

244
244

243
287

186
244

296
255

244

95

186

75,76

866
809
837
1783
2071
2151

408
497

846
2396

M.

308

255

Mail cars:
United States............. 2430,2435
Mail, obstructing:
United States.............
2364
Mail
service,
ocean,
American vessels and
crews for:
United States.............
2364
Manufactures, State:
A rizona........................
Married women, earnings
of. (S ee Earnings of
married wom en.)
Master and servant. (See
Em ploym ent of labor;
Liability of employers;
and cross references un­
der each.)
Matches, use of white
phosphorus in making:
United States............. 2431,2432
Meals, tim e for. (S ee
Tim e for meals.)
Mechanics, exem ption of,
from license tax, list of
laws granting.................
80,81

84

CU M O TiATIVE IND EX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Mechanics, exem ption of.
from
manufacturers’
taxes;
Philippine Islands. . .
Mechanics* liens, digest
of laws relating t o .........

27-76

216-228

Arkansas......................

231
234-239
243-245

California.....................
Colorado.......................

269
321
323
335-341
365-389

Id a h o............................

526-529

Illinois..........................

535,556
557,565
580-588
591-616
624r-627
653-663
669-673

Kansas..........................




Page.

1944

A rizona........................

Iow a..............................

No.

729-737
747-755
757-760
777-790
801,804
805

M aryland.................
166
186
213
247
257
292
308

10
17,18
12
16
12
8
6,7

Michigan..
Minnesota.
Missouri...
M ontana..
N e v a d a ...

244

275

N ew Jersey..
New Mexico.
N ew Y o rk .........
N orth Carolina.
North Dakota..
O h io..................

Oklahoma___
Oregon...........
Pennsylvania

South Dakota.

Texas.

No.

816-827
831
926-934

166
257
213
330

53-73
41,43
65,66
16

186
244

206-208
209,210

186
244
186
244

215
213
227-229
224

277
186

222,223
250

308

182,183

277
166
186
244
277
292
308

241
193,194
304,305
261
249
66
203

186

329-331
335
284

1074-1077
1083-1092
1109-1112
1183-1198
1204,1205
1214,1215
1240,1241
1247-1271
1328-1335
1344
1346-1348
1354
1433,1434
1436,1437
1445-1451
1524-1526
1529,1547
1566-1571
1617-1644

1723-1738
1742-1745
1762-1764
1792-1817
1831-1837
1857
1867-1916
1933
2009-2011
2018,2019
2031
2042-2055
2065-2067
2080-2083
2097-2100

66-72
60
33
73
36,37
77,78
67,68
55-58
41
79

186
244
277
308
186
244
186
244

308
186

105
97-99
81-83
59
137,138
137
146-149
139-145
156-158
108,109
84,85
111,112
115
94,95
163

186
244
277

169-170
168-172
121

277
308
277

2111-2120

Virginia...........
W ashington...

2166-2177
2198-2208
2217

W est Virginia.

2232,2233
2239-2241
2243-2254

W is c o n s in ....
W yom in g____

U nited States
(See also Accidents
in mines; Inspec­
tors. mine; Mines,
etc.)
Mine regulations, com ­
mission on;
Illinois..........................

2327
2329,2330
2332-2345
2347-2350
2408-2410

M aryland....................
Mine regulations, com ­
mission on, digest of
laws as t o ........................
M i n e r s , examination,
etc., of. (See Exam ina­
tion, etc.)

244

Page.

147

277

299

186
244
308
186

380,381
325
239,240
389

244
277
308
213
244
277
186
244
277
308
186
186
244
277

341
313
248
148
351,352
321-330
335,336
399-416
355,357
345,346
258
425,426
436,437
373
353,355

244
308
166
292

Utah..
186
244
308
186
308
186
244
277
308
244

Bulletin.

Page.
Mine regulations—Con.
K entucky.................

Mediation.
{S ee A rbitration.)
Medical attendance for
em ployees;
New M exico................
1435
Oregon..........................
M edicarinspection:
N ew Y ork .................... 1488,1489
■
Pennsylvania............. 1922,1923
{S ee also Physical
examination of em ­
ployees;)
Mercantile
establish­
ments. etc., inspection,
of.
(S ee Inspection,
etc., of mercantile es­
tablishments.)
Messenger service b y chil­
dren. {S ee Children,
em ploym ent
of, in
street trades.)
Militia, organized. {See
Protection o f em ploy­
ees as members of Na­
tional Guard.)
Mine gases, etc., investi­
gation of:
• entucky.....................
K
826,827
2426
United States___
Mine in sp ectors.' {S ee In­
spectors, m ine.)
Mine operations, com ­
mission on. (S ee B u­
reau of Mines.)
Mine regulations:
158
Alabam a.......................
165-184
185
A laska..........................
192,193

Indiana........................

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

156,157
81, 82
94
45

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

85

Page.

Page.

Bulletin.

No.

Page.
!

Miners’ home:
Pennsylvania............
Miners’ hospital:
California................... .
N ew M exico...............
O h io............................
Pennsylvania.............
U tah.............................
W est Virginia.............
W yom in g....................
Miners, qualifications of.
(See Exam ination, etc.,
of miners.}
Mines, a c c i d e n t s in.
(See Accidents in mines.)
Mmes, bureau of. (See
Bureau of m ines.)
Mines, department of.
(See Bureau of mines.)
Mines, electric wiring,
etc., in:
Alabam a......................
Colorado.................
Id a h o............................
Illinois..........................
Kansas.........................
K entucky....................
Michigan......................
M ontana......................
O h io.............................
Oklahoma....................
Pennsylvania.............
Texas............................
W est Virginia.............
W yom ing....................
Mines, fire-fighting and
rescue stations for. (See
Accidents, provisions
for.)
Mines, etc., hours of labor
in. (See Hours of la­
bor, etc.)
Mines, inspection of. (See
Mine regulations.)
Mines, inspectors of. (See
Inspectors, m ine.)
Minimum wages:
Arizona........................
Arkansas......................
California.

Colorado.....................
District of Columbia.
Kansas........................
Massachusetts..

1829-1831
308

50

213

287
1439

107-110

1825,1826
2120
2235,2236
2328,2329

Arkansas......................
California.....................
Colorado.......................
Delaware......................

181,182
382
527
608
789

Florida.........................
Hawaii......... ...............
Id a h o............................
Illinois..........................
Iow a .............................
Kansas............. ...........
166

1087
1264
1630-1632
1732
1887-1895
2098,2099

719

M aryland.....................
Massachusetts............. 1028,1029
Michigan...................... 1055,1056
1126
Minnesota....................
Missouri.......................
M ontana......................

1201

Nebraska.....................

1279,1280
1321,1322

New Ham pshire........
New Jersey.................

1369,1370
1430,1431

New Y o r k ...................

316-320

390-392

1012-1014

Porto R ic o ..................
Texas............................
2133
U tah.............................
Washington................. 22%2227




583,534
618-620

Louisiana....................
Maine............................

410,411
353

2282-2284 .

61,62
79,80
56
41
29
93,94
29,30
92,93
45,46
100-105
31-34
171-175
99,100
128-130
184
76,78,79
191-193
127
47,48
117
243-247
311
118-120
122-127
284
308-312
81
244
397-398
351-354

North Dakota.............
O h io.............................. 1661,1662
Oklahoma.................... 1740,1745
Oregon.......................... 1774,1775
Pennsylvania.............

1917,1918

South Dakota.............

2026-2028

Tennessee...................
Texas........................ .
U tah.............................

2133,2134

Virginia........................
W ashington................. 2227,2228
W est Virginia.............
W isconsin.................... 2256,2257
W yom ing.....................
Mothers’ pensions, com ­
mission on, digest of
148
laws as t o ........................
Moving-picture machines,
examination, etc., of
operators of. (See E x­
amination, etc.)
Moving-picture theatres,
provisions for em ploy­
ees in :
California.....................

186

38

186
244
244

74,75
62,63
70

244
277
292
277
277
186
186
244
244
186
244
292
244
277
213

113-115
92
21
93-95
99,100
138
141
146,147
161
170,171
163,164
42,43
178-180
123
66-69

244
277
244
186
244
277
186
277
186
244
186
186
186
213
277
186
186
186
186
244
186
277
244
277
186
277
244
186
277
257
186
277
186
244
244
186

202-204
152
207,208
209,210
212,213
175
217,218
198,197
229,230
223
236,237
239
240,242
252-254
97
228
297,298
305
308,309
312,313
272-274
340-342
277,278
319
299,300
378,379
305,306
328,329
393
315,316
105
398
321
418,419
355,356
361-363
435,436

308
330

21,22
5,6

308

56

262
326

N evada........................

M innesota.................. 1138-1141
Nebraska..................... 1306-1308 .
North Dakota.............
277
O h io.............................
1603
Oregon.......................... 1775-1780

W isconsin....................

Minimum wages, com ­
mission on, digest of
law s as t o ........................
147,148
Minors, earnings of. (See
Earnings o f minors.)
Misdemeanors, penalty
for:
Georgia........................
492
N ew Y o r k ................... 1547-1549
U tah..............................
2123
Mothers’ pensions:
A rizona........................

CUMULATIVE IUDEX,

86

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.

N o.

Page.

N.
Names of employees to
be f u r n i s h e d . (S ee
E m ployers to furnish
names, etc.)
National Guard, m em ­
bers of, not to be ex­
cluded from labor or­
ganizations. (S ee La­
bor organizations, etc.)
National Guard, protec­
tion of employees as
m embers of. (See Pro­
tection of employees as
m embers of National
Guard.)
National trade-unions:
U nited States.............
N a vy yards, employees
in:
U nited States.............
Negligence of employees
of com m on earners:
Alabam a.......................
A rizona........................
Arkansas......................
California.....................
Florida.........................
Georgia.........................
Id a h o............................
Illinois..........................
Kansas..........................
Louisiana.....................
Maine............................
Massachusetts.............
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
Mississippi...................
Missouri........................
M ontana.......................
N evada.........................
N ew Jersey..................
N ew Y o r k ...................
North Dakota.............
Oklahoma....................
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania..............
Porto R ic o ...................
South Carolina............
South Dakota.............
Tennessee.....................
U tah..............................
V erm ont.......................
Virginia........................
W ashington.................
W est Virginia.............
W isconsin....................
U nited States.............

Bulletin.

N o.

Page.

N ewsboys.
(See Chil­
dren, em ploym ent of,
in street trades.)
Night work. (S ee Chil­
dren, night work b y ;
W om en, night work
b y .)
Nonresidents,
em ploy­
m ent of, as armed
guards.
(See A rm ed
guards.)
Notice of intention to ter­
minate em ploym ent.
(See E m ploym ent, ter­
m ination of, notice of.)
Notice of reduction of
wages.
(S ee Wages,
reduction of, notice of.)

2404

O.
2354
159
209
231
272,273
470
488
523
539
766,767
840
875
948,949
952,953
1059
1104-1107
1145,1146
1163
1239,1240
1338.1340
1401,1402
1542,1546
1547,1550
1591.1592
1706
1748
1786
1957,1958
2000,2006
2016,2017
2034
2124
2138
2159
2180-2182
2184,2209
2210
2230
2306
2407

steam boilers^ etc.:
208
A rizona........................
272
California.....................
523
Id a h o ............................
Minnesota.................... 1106,1107
M ontana....................... 1238-1240
N evada......................... 1338.1340
1547
N ew Y o r k ....................
1549,1555
N orth Dakota............. 1591.1592
Pennsylvania.............. 1842,1843
1957
Porto R ic o ...................
South Dakota.............
2017
Negligent fellow servant
to be named in verdict:
1103
Minnesota....................




Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

Obligations o f employers,
etc.
(See
E m p loy­
m ent o f labor.)
Obstructing mail:
U nited States.............
Occupational diseases,
com m ission, etc., on,
resolutions as t o .............
Occupational diseases, re­
ports, prevention, etc.,
of:
California.....................
Connecticut.................
Illinois..........................

2364
148

263
296,297
424
568
588-591

244

145,146
83,84

Maine............................
M aryland.....................
Massachusetts............. 1008,1009
1033-1035
1074
Michigan......................
1122
Minnesota....................
Missouri....................... 1211-1214
1369
N ew Ham pshire........
N ew Jersey.................
1423
N ew Mexico.
N ew Y o r k ..
213

131

244

322

O h io.............................

1435
1490
1512,1516
1526-1529
1661
1668-1672
1934-1937

Pennsylvania.............
R hode Isla n d.............
W isconsin.................... 2258,2259
Ocean
m ail
service,
American vessels and
crews for:
United States.............
2364
O ffenses. ( S e e N e g li­
gence.)
Oil and gas wells near
mmes:
Illinois..........................
616
O h io.............................. 1640,1641
Old-age, accident, etc.,
relief:
Alaska..........................
186
A rizona........................
M ontana......................
Old-age insurance and
pensions, commissions
on, digest o f laws as t o .
148,149
(S ee also Commissions.)
Overtime work:
Arkansas......................
California.....................
Kansas.

79

158-162
242
181
162,163
292

65
298,299
367

186

74,75
130

308

24
79
30
92,93
174

CUMULATIVE INDEX,
Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.

►
>
Overtim e work—Con.
N ew M exico................
Oklahom a....................
Oregon..........................
Philippine Isla n d s .. .
Porto R ic o ...................
T exa s............................
W ashington................
U nited States.............

1780
1961
2192
2436

Page.

308
186
244
244
244
186

143
308
271
301
305
390

213
244

154
380

Paym ent o f wages due at
end o f em ploym ent:
209
239,240
298,299

Louisiana.....................

346
532
690
773,800
806

Maine............................
Massachusetts.............

884
984

Missouri........................
1206
M ontana ..........................
N evada ............................
N ew Jersey .................... 1393,1394
nrp ffn n
1762
fin u th C o r n lin a

IGOfi

277
277

87,90
A
1
01
83,84

186
277
166
292

151
121
87-89
42

1R6

201
149,150

308
277

125
203

277
186

266
373 374

277
277
186
277

313
344
421
355

244
308

61
63

244
186
292

129
131
51

077

Utah
V ir o in i'a

W isconsin .......................
W ynm ing
Paym ent o f wages due
deceased em ployees:
Alabam a......................
153
Arizona........................
211
Connecticut.................
Delaware......................
435
Florida.........................
Georgia.........................
483
Mississippi..................... 1146,1147
New Jersey .................... 1399,1400
Pennsylvania ...............
1858
Virginia ...........................
Paym ent of wages in bar­
rooms:
California ........................
275
N evada ............................
1334
Paym ent of wages in
scrip:
Arizona ............................
209-212
Arkansas .........................
242
California ........................
294,295
Colorado ..........................
346-348
Florida.........................
Georgia.........................
479
Illinois..........................
557
640
Indiana........................
653,687
Iow a ..............................
735
Kansas .............................
771
K entucky .......................
809,814
Louisiana .......................
841
842,853
M aryland ........................
920
921,939
Michigan .........................
1044
1082,1083
Minnesota .......................
Mississippi.....................
Missomi ..........................
Montana......................
1288
N evada........................ 1325,1342
New Ham pshire........ 1362,1363




Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

No.

277
330

oox
O

275
39

87

Page.
Paym ent of wages in
scrip—Concluded.
N ew Jersey.................
N ew M exico................

1397,1398
1437
1438,1440
N ew Y o r k ................... 1478,1479
1566
North Carolina...........
Oklahom a....................
1719
Oregon.........................
1762
Pennsylvania.............
1844
Philippine Isla n d s .. .
Porto R ic o ..................
1954
South Carolina...........
1998
1999,2005
Tennessee....................
2033
2035,2036
U tah.............................
V erm ont...................... 2136,2137
Virginia ...........................
2159
W ashington................ 2189,2190
W est Virginia.............
2234
W isconsin.................... 2235,2261
( See also Company
stores.)
Paym ent of wages, modes
and times of:
A rizona........................
209
Arkansas......................
239
240,249
California ........................
299
► 305,306
Colorado......................
Connecticut ...................
Georgia ............................
H awaii.........................
Illinois ..............................
Indiana ...........................
Iow a.............
Kansas......... „ ..............
K entueky. . . . . . . . . . . .
Louisiana....................
Maine .............................
Mary! A nd
Massachusetts.

345-348
407,408
498
542
561,623
639-641
687,703
704
735
773
821
864
872,873
883,884
895
938,939
984-986
1000

1103

Mississippi.....................

1153

100, i o i

186

129

244

147

244

167,168

244
166
277

205
145,146
166

277

Missouri........................ 1160,1176
1177,1184
1185,1202
M ontana......................
Nebraska.....................
N evada........................
New Hampshire.........
1355
1356,1368
New Jersey .................... 1396-1400
1406,1417
New Mexico ...................
New Y o r k ......................
North Carolina .............
North Dakota ...............
O h io ..................................
Oklahom a ......................
Oregon .............................
Pennsylvania.............

203
Philippine Islands. . . .

N o.

277

Page. "

221

213

129

166
186
186
244
277

203,204
371,374
379
321
314

277

344,345

186
101
244
79,80
277 61-63,78
277
83,84
277
87,88
97
277
............... 1

186
186
213
166
213
257
186

159,160
169
46,47
86,87
52
48
178

166
186
213
257
292
186
30.8
166

125,126
184,186
71
GO, OD

213
277

47
201
118
145
146,150
82
166

277
244
277
277
308

171,172
220,221
202-204
213
137

244
308

245
161

186
244

* Minnesota .......................

186

Bulletin.

295,296
257,258

244
277

272
275

244

303

1479,1548
1693,1694
1719,1742
1825,1857
1917,1933

CUM ULATIVE INDEX.

88
Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.

Bulletin.

t. .

No.
P aym ent of wages, m odes
and tim es of—Con.
R hode Island.............
South Carolina...........

South D a kota ..
Tennessee.........
Texas............... .
U tah..................
V erm ont......... .
Virginia........... .
W est V irginia.,
W isconsin.......
W yom in g....................
U nited States.............
( See also Paym ent of
wages in scrip.)
Paym ent of wages, re­
fusal of. (See Wages,
refusing to pa y.)
P eddler's license, exem p­
tion o f mechanics from,
list of laws granting—
P enalty for misdemean­
ors. (See Misdemean­
ors.)
Pensions for employees.
(See Retirement funds.)
Pensions, m others'. (See
Mothers' pensions.)
Peonage:
N evada.......................
Philippine Isla n d s..
U nited States...........
Phosphorus, white, use
of, in manufacture of
matches:
U nited States.............
Physical competence, cer­
tificates of. (See Chil­
dren, em ployed, etc.)
Physical examination of
employees:
Illinois..........................
N ew Jersey.................
N ew Y o r k ...................
O h io.................
Pennsylvania.
Physicians, em ploym ent
of:
Arkansas.................... .
N ew Mexico................
Tennessee...................
Picketing:
Alabama.....................,
Colorado.....................
Nebraska.....................
W est Virginia........... .
U tah.............................
United States........... .
(See also Interference
with em ploym ent.)
Plate printers, wages,
etc., of:
United States.............
Plum bers, examination,
etc., of. (See Exam i­
nation, etc.)
Poisons, handling, man­
ufacture, etc., of. (See
Occupational diseases.)




Police, industrial and
State, digest o f laws
as t o .................................

1983
1995

204
139
295
35
300
321
386
313,314

2033,2064
2136,2137
2158,2159
2235

108,109
357,358
344,345
421
361
271
355
441

2281
2345

80,81

1345
166

197

2355
2408,2423

2431,2432

588

161
271,272
59,60

" 1.482
1671
1936

328,329
299

255,256
1435
2035
154
324

308

31,32
34
132,133

2252
319
235

2434

Page.

Page.

P o l i c e o ff ic e r s . ( S e e
A rm ed guards.)
Police, State, use of, in
labor disputes:
Massachusetts.............
Policem en, em ploym ent
of, as laborers:
M aryland.....................
P oll tax of employees,
liability o f employers
for. (See Liability of
employers for taxes of
em ployees.)
Postal employees, rights
of:
United States.............
Powder, use of, in mines.
(S ee Mine regulations.)
P r e fe r e n c e of w a g es.
(See Wages as preferred
claims.)
Printing, public. (See
Public printing.)
Profit sharing b y corpo­
rations:
Connecticut.................
Massachusetts.............
N ew Jersey..................
Protection o f alien labor­
ers. (See Alien labor­
ers.)
Protection o f em ployees
as candidates for office:
California.....................
W yom in g.....................
Protection o f employees
as members o f labor
organizations:
California.....................
Colorado.......................
Connecticut.................
Id a h o............................
Indiana........................
Kansas..........................
Louisiana.....................
Massachusetts.............
Minnesota....................
Mississippi...................
N evada........................
N ew Ham pshire........
N ew Jersey..................
N ew Y o r k ...................
O h io..............................
Oklahom a....................
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania.............
P orto R ic o ...................
South Carolina...........
U tah.............................
W isconsin....................
Protection o f em ployees
as m embers o f National
Guard:
Arizona........................
California.....................
Illinois..........................
Kansas.........................
Maine............................
Massachusetts............
Michigan......................
Mississippi..................
N ew M exico................
N ew Y o r k ...................
O hio..............................
O klahom a...................

No.

92-97

Page.

35
27
7,8

308

2436,2437 244

107

380

402
946
292

186

85

166

2332

53,54

91,92

244

312

244

181

275
351,352
398,399
518,519
631
774
1107,1108
1149,1150
1343
1371,1372
1400
1544,1545
1693
1719,1720
1750
1840
1958
2003,2004
2129
2308

229,230
274
580
777
879
1010,1011

1061
82
141
1549
244
*3.745

262

CUMULATIVE INDEX,

Bulletin
No. 148.
Page.
Protection of em ployees,
as m embers of National
Guard—Concluded.
South Carolina...........
W ashington................ 2197,2198
2306
W isconsin....................
Protection o f em ployees
as traders. ( See Coer­
cion of em ployees.)
Protection o f em ployees
as voters:
155
Alabam a......................
208
A rizona........................
232
Arkansas......................
271
California.....................
327-329
Colorado.......................
399
Connecticut.................
427
Delaware.....................
471,472
Florida.........................
523
Id a h o ............. .............
631
Indiana........................
719,720
Iow a ..............................
768
Kansas..........................
815
K en tu cky....................
840,841
Louisiana....................
898
M aryland.....................
1039
Massachusetts.............
1052
Michigan......................
1095
Minnesota....................
1108,1122
Mississippi.................. 1143,1144
1169
Missouri.......................
1237
M ontana......................
1280
N ebraska.....................
1345
N evada........................
N ew Jersey................. 1376,1377
1434
N ew M exico...............
1441,1443
1546
N ew Y o r k ...................
N orth Carolina........... 1565,1581
1694
Oklahom a.................... 1707,1708
Oregon.......................... 1748,1749
1783,1784
Pennsylvania. . . . —
1945
Philippine Is la n d s .. .
1957
P orto R ico ...................
'South Carolina...........
2010
South Dakota.............
2011,2016
2032
2055,2056
2090
Texas...............
2106
U tah.................
2229
W est Virginia.

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

W yom in g...............A
(See also Tim e to
vote.)
P rotection o f em ployees
on buildings:
California...............

Colorado...........
C on n ecticu t....
Delaware..........
Illinois...............
Indiana.............
Kansas..............
Louisiana.........
M aryland.........
Massachusetts..
Minnesota.........
Missouri............
Montana...........
Nebraska..........
N evada.............
N ew J e r s e y ....




.
562-565
695-697
775,776
853-856
899,900
1042
1130,1131
1180
1244,1245
1301-1305
.
.

Page.

277
308
330
308
277

233
165,166
27
197,198
255,256

277
277

261
271

Protection of employees
on buildings—Con.
N p,w

330
244

Y ork.................. 1480,1481

35
352

1548,1549
N orth Dakota.............
O hio..............................

1608
1691,1692

Oklahoma.................. 1721,1722
Oregon..........................
Pennsyl vania.............
Porto R ico ............. .

186

85

213

43

244

197

186
292
308

228
56,57
141

244

264

244

303

Rhode Island............
Texas.........................

244
186
308

338
418
258

308

46-48

277
244

85,86
124,125

277

114,115

277
277
244

191-i93
210-212
235-237

1759,1760
1783
1851,1852
1961
1988,1989

W ashington................
W isconsin.................... 2295,2296
Protection o f employees
on road engines:
688
Indiana........................
Protection of employees
on street railways:
Arkansas......................
341,342
Colorado.......................
Connecticut.................
Delaware.....................
4.56
District o f Colum bia..
560,561
Illinois..........................
. Indiana........................
633,634
719,744
Iow a ..............................
Kansas.........................
794,795
Louisiana....................
850
876,877
. Maine............................
Massachusetts.............
953
1045
Michigan......................
Minnesota....................
1108
Mississippi...................
1153
1166
Missouri.......................
1225
M ontana......................
1226,1271
Nebraska..................... 1315,1316
N ew Ham pshire........
1359
N ew Jersey..................
1404
N ew Y o r k ...................
1559
1564
N orth Carolina...........
O h io..............................
1692
Oregon..........................
South Carolina............

2255
2277,2311
2329

273
274,286
298-300
307
392,393
413,414

* Bulletin.

No.

Page.

2001

W isconsin.......

89

1766
1999

2035
Tennessee.....................
U tah.............................. 2124,2125
2153
Virginia........................
W ashington.................
2215
W est V irginia.............
2237
W isconsin....................
2291
(S ee also Street rail­
ways, safety appli­
ances on.)
Protection o f employees.
(S ee Fire escapes on
factories; Guards for
dangerous machinery;
Inspection o f factories,
etc.; Mine regulations;
Railroads, safety appli­
ances on.)
Protection o f wages, sum­
76-79
m ary of laws requiring..
(S ee also E xem ption
of wages; Forced
contributions; Lia­
b ility of stockhold­
ers o f corporations
for wage debts;
W ages as preferred
claims.)
Public buildings, con­
tract work on:
California.....................

244

312

277
277
166

307,308
321-330
217,218

244

69

186
244
166

159
173
75

277

140

186
277

30i
249

166
257

203
97,98

CUM ULATIVE INDEX,

90

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
P ublic carriers, intem ­
perate employees on.
(See Intem perate em­
ployees; Intoxication.)
Public em ploym ent of­
fices. (S ee E m ploy­
m ent offices.)
P ublic ownership. (See
State, manufactures,
etc. b y .)
P ublic printing office,
employees in :
261,262
C alifornia....................
Iow a ....................
798
K a n sa s..____________
Massachusetts.............
1773
Oregon.........................
Philippine Island s.. . 1939,1940
Porto R ic o ...................
U nited States............. 2362,2363
2422,2434
P ublic printing to be
done within the State,
list of laws requiring—
86,87
P ublic printing, union
label to be used on:
903
1217
M ontana.......................
N eva d a .........................
1335
Public-service com m is­
sions, duties of:
195
A rizon a...................... ..
California.....................
Connecticut............... ..
425
District of Colum bia..
464
506
H aw aii..........................
Illinois..........................
627,628
674,675
I n d i a n a .....................
Kansas..........................
Maine....................... .
1216
Missouri.......................
M ontana....................... 1245,1277
1315
N ebraska.....................
N eva d a ........................
1335
1409
N ew Jersey..................
N ew M exico................
1433
1764
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania............. 1937,1938
1995
South Carolina............
V erm ont....................... 2138,2139
W ashington................. 2213,2218
2219,2223
W isconsin.................... 2284,2286
U nited States.............. 2421-2426
P u b lic supplies, prefer­
ence of dom estic prod­
ucts for:
264
California.....................
Michigan......................
1077
N ew Y o r k ....................
1559
N orth Dakota.............
1585
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania.............
U nited States............. 2353,2355
P u b lic works, commis­
sion on labor on, reso­
lution as to ......................
147
P u b lic works, em ploy­
m ent of aliens on. (See
Aliens, em ploym ent of,
etc.)
P ublic works, hours of
labor on. ( S ee Hours
of labor.)
P ublic works, labor on:
A rizon a .......................
197
263
California.....................
H aw aii.........................
Id a h o...........................
K en tu cky.....................




496

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

Public works, labor on—
Concluded.
M aryland.....................
N evada........................
N ew Jersey..................
N ew Y o r k ....................

186
244

103
161

244

190,191

244
244
257
277

30i, 302
305
121
359

934
1327
1376
1453
1479,1480
Oklahom a.................... 1718,1719
Oregon.......................... 1773,1774
Pennsylvania.............
Porto R ico ...................
Virginia........................
2155
W ashington.................
(S ee also Rates of
wages of employees
on public works.)
Public works, paym ent
of wages o f employees
on:
California.....................
274,275
Public works, etc., pref­
erence of citizens or
resident laborers, etc.,
on:
Arizona........................
fifU

Indiana........................
Louisiana....................
M aine...........................
Massachusetts............
186

186
186

186

87

175
177

399

848,856
879
967

New H am pshire........
N ew M exico................
N ew Y o r k ...................

1440
1479

Pennsylvania.............. 1838,1845
U ta h .............................
2129
(See also Agents, em ­
ploym ent of.)
Public works, preference
of dom estic materials
for:
Massachusetts............
Minnesota....................
Missouri....................... 1155,1201
New M exico................
1440
Porto R ico...................
W ashington................
2221
United States.............
2361
Public works, rates of
wages of employees on.
(See Rates of wages,
etc.)

N o.

Page.

277

208,209

186

251

244
244
244

271
284,285
313

277

321

186
244
277

73
64
53,54

166
244
330
186

134
188
20
235

186
308

251
164,165

166
186

132
203,204

186

365

330

48

186

Page.

Page.

Bulletin.

80,81

R.

186
186
186
186

297
317
342
439

102
186
244 73,79,80
186
133
244 135-137
135
186
39
257

Railroad bridges^ height
of. ( S e e R a i l r o a d
tracks, etc.)
Railroad cars, etc., to be
repaired within the
State:
Arkansas.....................
Louisiana....................
Texas............................
Railroad cars, refusal to
m ove. (See Strikes of
railroad employees.)
Railroad
commissions.
( See
Public service
commissions.)
Railroad companies, li­
ability of, for debts of
contractors for labor.
(See Liability of stock­
holders; Protection of
wages.)
Railroad companies, li­
ability of, for injuries
to em ployees. (S.ee Li­
ability of em ployers.)

856,857
2096

C U M U L A T IV E INDEX,

Bulletin
No. 148.
Page.
Railroad companies, li­
ability of, for wages
due from predecessors:
W isconsin...................
2289
Railroad em ployees, com ­
plaint by:
Massachusetts............
949
Railroad employees, dis­
obedience
of.
(See
Negligence, etc.)
Railroad e m p l o y e e s ,
examination, etc., of.
( See Exam ination, etc.)
Railroad employees, false
charges against:
Arkansas.....................
241
Indiana........................
Iow a .............................
Missouri.......................
1164
South Dakota.............
2028
Railroad e m p l o y e e s ,
forced
contributions
from . (See F o r c e d
contributions.)
Railroad e m p l o y e e s ,
hours of labor of. (See
Hours of labor, etc.)
Railroad employees, illit­
erate:
532
Id a h o............................
1106
Minnesota...................
Missouri.......................
1339
N evada........................
1550
N ew Y o r k ...................
1689
O hio..............................
1772
O regon.........................
W ashington................ 2182,2214
Railroad em ployees, etc.,
intoxication of.
(See
Intoxication.)
Railroad em ployees, neg­
ligence of. (S ee Negli­
gence, etc.)
Railroad employees, pro­
tection of. (See Rail­
roads, safety provi­
sions, etc., on.)
Railroad e m p l o y e e s ,
qualifications of:
203,204
A rizona........................
212,213
294
California.
479
G eorg ia ...
480,491
695,704
In d ia n a ...
705,709
952
Massachusetts..
1007,1008
Michigan...................... 1077,1078
New Y o r k ...................
O h io..............................
1689
Oregon.........................
1772
(See also Examina­
tion, etc., of railr o a d employees;
Railroad em ploy­
ees, illiterate; Teleg r a p h operators,
railroad, etc.)
Railroad employees, re­
imbursement of, for
losses due to rem oval
of division points:
Montana......................
Railroad employees, rules
for:
195,230
Arizona........................
Connecticut.................
425
674
Indiana........................
Michigan..................... 1047,1048
Philippine Isla n d s.. .
1944




Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.
No.

186

Page.

168

208
’ *94

277

308

*234

126

91

Pago.
Railroad e m p l o y e e s ,
strikes of. (See Strikes,
etc.)
Railroad employees to be
paid when discharged.
(See Paym ent of wages
due discharged em­
ployees.)
Railroad e m p l o y e e s ,
uniforms of:
New Y o r k ...................
1551
W ashington................ 2214,2215
Railroad e m p l o y e e s ,
etc., voting b y:
Kansas.........................
768,789
Michigan......................
Missouri....................... i210,1211
1322
N evada........................
N ew M exico................ 1443,1444
R a i l r o a d inspectors.
(See Inspectors, rail­
road.)
Railroad relief societies.
(See Benefit societies.)
Railroad tracks, bridges,
wires, etc., over:
243
Arkansas......................
399
Connecticut.................
520,521
Id a h o............................
667,668
Indiana........................
691,692
723
Iow a ..............................
Kansas.........................
795
K entucky....................
813
Michigan...................... 1044,1048
Minnesota....................
Mississippi...................
1148
Nebraska.....................
1358
New Ham pshire........
1599
North Dakota.............
1683
O hio..............................
1684,1689
Oregon.......................... 1765,1766
1983
Rhode Island.............
Tennessee....................
V erm ont......................
2137
Railroad tracks, struc­
tures near:
668
Indiana........................
Kansas.........................
Minnesota.................... ' 1127,1128
North Dakota............. 1599,1600
O h io.............................
1690
Railroad train orders:
California.....................
Railroad trains, number
of ears in:
228
Arizona........................
Railroad trams, etc., suf­
ficient crews required
on:
210
A rizona........................
214,215
246,249
Arkansas......................
250,254
293,294
California.. . . . . . . . . . .
402
Connecticut.................
403,417
675,676
Indiana........................
688,706
708-710
Maine........... ...............
873
M aryland.....................
896,897
1029
Massachusetts.. . . . . . .
Mississippi...................
Missouri.. . . . .... .......... 1208,1209
Nebraska..................... 1310,1311
N evada........ ................ 1346,1347
New J ersey............... 1426,1427
N ew Y o r k ....................

1554

Bulletin.
No.

Page

244
244
186

195-197
208
233

308
186

111
201,202

186

218,219

308

241

186
186

175
201,202

186

91

186

91,92

308

87

330

16

166
277

150,15i
161

186
244
330
308

229
235
26
186

CUM ULATIVE INDEX.

92

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
R ailroad trains, etc., suf­
ficient crews required
on—Concluded.
N orth Dakota.............
O h io..............................
Oregon..........................
Pennsylvania.............
South Carolina...........
Texas...........................
W ashington.................
W isconsin....................
Railroad trains, switch­
ing:
Mississippi..................
Railroads, accidents on.
(S ee A ccidents.)
Railroads, construction
of caboose cars on:
Arkansas.....................
Illinois..........................
Indiana................. ; . . .
Iow a ............................ .
Kansas....................
Maine......................
Michigan............. ;
Minnesota........... . .
Missouri..... ...........
M ontana.................
Nebraska................
N ew H am p shire..
N ew Y o r k ..............

1586
1690,1691
1781
191G, 1917
1996
2084

Connecticut.................
Delaware.....................
District of Columbia.
Florida.........................
Georgia.........................
Id a h o............................
Illinois..........................
Indiana........................




N o.

277
277

241,242
258

308

Page.
Railroads, safety provi­
sions, etc., on—
-Con.
Iow a..............................

224

Kfl.nsa.s..........................
K entucky....................
Louisiana.....................
Maine............................
Massachusetts.............
Michigan......................

2288
1147,1148

Minnesota....................
253
579,580
686,687
746

Mississippi...................
Missouri........................
244

891
1056
1119
1202,1203
1231
1313,1314
1369
1558

342
343,395
402,425
433,434
452
478
480,491
533
559
560,628
666,668

673,674
677
680-682
684
705-707
709,710

173

Montana.......................
Nebraska.....................
N evada........................
N ew Ham pshire........
N ew Mexico................
N ew Y o r k ....................

292
308
330
308
186

59
186
27
198
305

166

208

North Carolina...........
North Dakota.............
O h io..............................
Oklahoma....................
Oregon..........................

721
722,745
756,757
793
802,803
806,807
813
845,864
873
950-952
1044,1045
1047,1048
1055,1083
1100
1113-1115
1123
1148,1150
1153,1154
1161-1163
1206-1209
1243
1245,1277
1311-1315
1346
1355
1433
1551,1554
1556-1559
1572,1573
1600,1601
1678-1684
1691
1705,1706
1772
1773,1780
1944

Wisconsin....................
U nited States.............
J(See also Inspection

186
78
244
67
186 86.87.91
244 76.77.91
56
308
107

of
railroads, etc.; Railroads, construction
of caboose cars on.)
Railroads, shelters for
workmen on:
Arkansas......................
Kansas..........................
Minnesota....................
Mississippi...................

Missouri.....................

244

158

244

177

277
308

141,142
110

213

81

186
244

205,206
209

2260,2261
2284-2289
2401,2402
2413,2414
2421-2425

186

229

186
244
257

249,250
247
88

308
244

198,199
263

244

312,313

166
213

204,205
137

244

335

166

208,209

186
308
244

399
259
361

277
308

Philippine Islands....
Porto R ic o ...................
R hode Island .............. 1983,1984
South Carolina........... 1995-1997
2008
South Dakota............. 2020,2021
Texas............................ 2083-2085
2089,2090
U tah.............................
V erm ont...................... 2137,2138
2145,2146
Virginia_____ ________ 2153,2154
Washington................. 2210-2214
2218-2220
W est Virginia.............

244

Bulletin.

Page.

2220,2221

North Dakota............. 1595,1596
O h io..............................
1680
South D akota............. 2022,2023
Virginia........................ 2165,2166
W ashington.................
2214
W iscon sin....................
Railroads, construction
of post-office cars on.
(See R ailw ay m ail cars.)
Railroads, hours of labor
of em ployees on. (S ee
Hours of labor.)
Railroads, inspection of.
(See Inspection of rail­
roads, etc.)
Railroads, obstructing,
hindering operation of,
etc. (S ee Strikes of
railroad em ployees.)
Railroads, rules for em­
ployees on. (See Rules,
etc.)
Railroads, safety provi­
sions, etc., on:
215,216
A rizona........................
247
Arkansas......................
250,253
312,313
California.....................
Colorado.......................

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

158-160
119,120

245
794
1153

North Carolina...........
1579
N orth Dakota.............
Oklahoma.................... 1722,1723
Oregon..........................
1768
South Carolina...........
Texas............................
2085
Virginia........................
Railroads.standard work­
day ana rates of wages
of employees on:
United States.............

244

209

277

243

166

205

292

87

213

153,154

CUMULATIVE INDEX,
Bulletin
No. 148.

Page.
Railroads, workingmen’ s
trains on:
Massachusetts.............
R ailw ay m ail cars:
U nited States.............
Rates of wages of em ploy­
ees of public printing
offices. ( See P u b l i c
printing office.)
Rates of wages of em ploy­
ees on public works:
Arizona........................
California.....................
Hawaii..........................
I n d i a n a ................................

634
934
1008

Oklahoma....................
United States.............

1718,1719
2437

Rates of wages of weav­
ers, etc., to be posted:
Massachusetts.............
Recommendation, letters
of. ( S e e Em ployers’
certificates; Service letters.)
Reduction of wages, no­
tice of. (See Wages,
reduction of, notice of.)
Registration of factories,
etc. ( S e e Factories,
etc., registration of.)
Rehabilitation of injured
persons:
Alabam a......................
Arizona........................
California................... .
Georgia....................... .
Id a h o.......................... .
Illinois........................ .
Indiana........................
Iow a ............................ .
K en tu cky....................
Louisiana....................
Maine..........................
Massachusetts........... .
Michigan.........
Minnesota.......
Mississippi----Missouri...........
M ontana..........
N evada............
N ew J ersey.. .
New M exico...
N ew Y o r k ----North Dakota.
O h io.................
Oregon.............
Pennsylvania.
R hode Island.
South Dakota.

244
186
244
277

73
133
135
101

166
244

130,131
216

213
308

92
164

308
330

275
48

New Y o rk ___
Pennsylvania

292

993-999
1002-1007
1009,1011
1018,1027

1783

S.
308

277
308
292
308
277
308
308
308
330
330
308
257
292
308
308
277
303
330
308
308
277
277
292
308
292
308
308
277
292
277
308
277
308
308

19,20
37,38
59-61,73
51
24,25
79
106-108
81
95
97

11

13
103
55-57
49,50
108

110,111
153
119
23
123
126
209
216-219
57
142
61-63
199
206
274
67
278-280
221-223
289
233,234
237

34
271

277
277
277
166

72.73
87
123
128,130
133,134
183,186
73.74
57
47
243-246
234,235
240
79
320,326
328,339
277
129,130
117
13,14
22,23

Sabotage:
A labam a..
Alaska —
A rizon a ...
California.
H a w a ii...

257
186

308
277
257
277
277
308
244
277
277
277
292
277
244

Idaho........
In d ia n a ...
Iow a ..........
K a n s a s ...
M ichigan.,
Minnesota.
M ontana.........
Nebraska........

257
257
277
277
257
277
277
277
308
257
277
277

N evada............
North Dakota
O h io.................
Oklahom a___
Oregon.............

32
47
27
61

100,101

75,76
138
103
114

120

37,38
139

201,202
206
63,64
65
197,198

201

277
257

South Dakota.
U ta h ................
W ashington..
W yom in g....................
U nited States.............
(S ee also Interference
with em ploym ent.)
Safety museum:
New Jersey.................
N ew Y o r k ...................

186
213
257
292
186
244

244
213
257
292
308

Philippine Islands.
United States.-—
Sum mary of law s.

30253°—23—Bull. 330-----7




R epaym ent of employers’
advances. (See E m ­
ployers’ advances.)
Restriction of output:
K ansas.........................
W isconsin....................
Retirem ent funds:
California.....................
Connecticut.................
Maine............................
Massachusetts............

N ew Jersey,

292

241
248
87-89
45
258
271-274
275
117-119
358,359
97-99

Releases. (See Contracts
of employees waiving
rights to damages.)
Rehef department. (See

2156
985

Page.

308
308
292
330
308
308
308
257
277
292

W est Virginia.
W isconsin.......
W yom ing____
United States.
197
289
501

Bulletin.
No.

Rehabilitation of injured
persons—Concluded.
Tennessee....................
U tah.............................
Virginia.......................

2430

1282
1327
1476

V i r g i n i a ................................

Page.

952

M aryland.....................
Massachusetts.............
Montana......................
Nebraska.....................
N evada........................
New Y o r k ...................

Rates of wages of labor­
ers at salvage:

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.
No.

93

1561

89
249,250
259,260
265,266
219
99,100
317,318
321,332
333
355
113,114

292
166

55,56
186

CUMULATIVE INDEX,

94

B u lle tin
N o . 148.

P age.

Bulletin
N o. 148.

B u lle tin .

N o.

2156
S an ita tion .
(See F a c­
tories a n d w ork room s,
ven tila tion , e tc .)
S a w m ill sa fety orders:
244

95

S ca ffold in g, etc.
(See
P rotection o f em p loy ees
on b u ild in gs .)
S crip , p a y m e n t o f w ages
in .
(See P a y m e n t o f
w ages in s crip .)
S eam en :

485,489
534
546,568
630
631,647
Iow a ..............................
727,740
772
Kansas.........................
K en tu cky....................
830,833
Louisiana.....................
848,860
Maine............................
883
M aryland.....................
917,935
Massachusetts.............
978
Michigan...................... 1065,1070
Minnesota....................
1096
Missouri.......................
1163
1164,1180
M ontana......................
1277
Nebraska........ *...........
1292
N evada........................
New Ham pshire.........
1359
New Jersey.................. 1393,1394
New Y o r k ................... 1480,1535
North Carolina...........
1575
O hio.............................. 1648,1649
Oklahom a.................... 1715,1716

2354,2355
2364r-2367
2374-2401
2405,2407
2408,2414
2437,2438
S eam en , A m erican , for
ocea n m a il service:
2364
U n ite d S ta tes...............
S eam en , em p lo y m e n t of,
as la borers, e tc .:
L o u is ia n a .......................
843
2094
T e x a s ...............................
U n ited S ta tes ............... 2433,2434
S eam en, list of State law s
97
relatin g t o ..........................
(See also L o d g i n g
h ou ses, s a ilo r s ’ ;
S h ip pin g m asters.)
S eam en ’ s hospitals:
U n ited S ta tes...............
2405
S eats for e m p lo y e d ch il­
dren :
C aliforn ia.......................
D e la w a re ........................
445
K e n t u c k y ......................
M a ssachu setts..............
978
O k la h o m a .....................
1713
2026
S ou th D a k o ta ..............
2141
V e r m o n t ........................
W is c o n s in ......................
271
S eats fo r em p loy ees in
stores, e tc.:
C aliforn ia.......................
F lo r id a ............
469
Seats for em p loy ees on
street ra ilw a y s .
(See
Street ra ilw a y s .)
Seats fo r fem ale e m p lo y ­
ees:
157
A la b a m a ........................
198
A r iz o n a ...........................
199,202
A rk a n sas........................
256,257
C aliforn ia.......................
279,295




N o.

Page.

Seats for female em ploy­
ees—Concluded.
Georgia.........................
Id aho............................
Illinois..........................
Indiana........................

S afety ap p lian ces. (See
F ire escapes on fa c to ­
ries; G u ards for danger­
ous m a c h in e ry ; In sp ec­
tion o f fa ctories; R a il­
roads, sa fety p rov ision s
on ; Street ra ilw a ys,
sa fety p rov ision s o n .)
S afety la m p s . (See M ine
reg u la tion s.)
S ailors. (See S eam en .)
S ailors’ b oa rd in g houses.
(See L o d g in g houses,
sailors’ .)
S alvage laborers, w ages
of:

C olor a d o.........................
C on n ec ticu t..................
D ela w a re.......................
D istrict o f C o lu m b ia ..
F lo r id a ............................

Page.

P age.

Bulletin.

335
408
430-432
456
475

186
244
257
292

440-450
378-380
382
114
96,100
101

244

94,95

166

36

308

265

308

43

213
244

31
94,95

244
166

116
30

Oregon.........................
1755
Pennsylvania.............
1930
Porto R ic o ...................
1962
R hode Island........ .
1971
South Carolina...........
2002
South Dakota.............
2026
Tennessee.....................
2057
Texas............................
2103
U ta h .............................
2108
V erm ont......................
Virginia........................
2157
W ashington................
2216
W est Virginia.............
2239
W isconsin....................
2277
W yom in g.....................
2346
Service letters:
California.....................
Indiana........................
690
Missouri....................... 1160,1161
Nebraska..................... 1292,1293
1341
N evada........................
1721
Oklahom a...................
(See also E m ploy­
ers’ certificates, for­
gery of; Discharge,
statement of cause
of.)
Set-offs not to defeat ex­
em ption of wages:
Alabam a......................
154
Sex no disqualification
for em ploym ent:
California.....................
261
Illinois..........................
541
W ashington................
2191
Shelters over railroad repair tracks. (See Rail­
roads, shelters for work­
men on.)
Shipping masters:
Florida.........................
465,471
Louisiana....................
842,843
United States............. 2374-2379
(See
also
Lodging
houses,
sailors’ ;
Seamen.)
Shuttles:
982,1000
Massachusetts.............
R hode Island..............
Slave labor:
1345
N evada........................
1939
Philippine Isla n d s .. .

244
166
257

173
36
47

213

59

277

158

244
277
244

211
183
223

277
308

232
155,156

277
186
277
213
186
277
244

257
308
262
121
354
285
315

186

390

186
330

396
40

277

343

186

437,438

244
186

86
151

277
186

183,184
230,231

257

93

CUMULATIVE INDEX,
Bulletin
No. 148.
Page.
Sleeping rooms for work­
men:
California....................
Colorado......................
Connecticut.................
Delaware.....................
Illinois..........................
Indiana........................
I ow a .............................
M aryland....................
Massachusetts............
Michigan.....................
Missouri.......................
N ebraska.....................
New Jersey.................
N ew Y o r k ...................
O h io.........
Oklahoma
Oregon...........
Pennsylvania,
R hode Island.
Tennessee____
Washington
W iscon sin ..
Smelting works, hours of
labor m . (See Hours
of labor m mines,
smelters, etc.)
Smoking in factories,
etc.:
Minnesota.
N e v a d a ...
New Y ork

291
394
401
436
617
683
761

1204
1281
1383,1419
1521
1650
1741
1827
1973
2059
2186
2261
2351

1108
1339
1508

Pennsylvania..................................
V erm ont......................
2140
2182
W ashington................
W est Virginia..................................
Social insurance. (See
Insurance, social.)
Soliciting m oney from
employees. (See E m ­
ploym ent,
foremen,
etc., accepting fees for
furnishing.)
State, manufactures, etc.,

by: .

A rizona...........................................
Kansas............................................
North D akota................................

100

186

187

244
186

239
255
268,271

186
186

318
. 352

186
308
186

256,257
173
353

277

344

186
292
277

75,76
35
239-241
247

South Dakota.................................. 257
United States.................................. 257
Summary of laws
as t o ............................................
State police. (See Police,
industrial and State.).
Statistics,
industrial.
(See Bureau of labor.)
Stay of execution in suits
for wages. (See Suits
for wages.)
Steam boilers, inspection
of. (See
Inspection,
etc.)
Steam boilers, negligence
of operators of. (See
Negligence, etc.)
Steam boilers, repairing,
cleaning, etc.:
Oklahom a...................
1723
Steam engineers, exami­
nation, etc., of, digest
of laws relating t o ..........
140-143 186
244
Steamboats, employees
on. (S ee Seamen.)




Page.

166
943

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.
i.

QQ

120,121

29,30

Page.
Steamboats, em ploym ent
of unlicensed engineers
on:
Alabam a......................
157
Steamboats, inspection
of. (See
Inspection,
etc.)
Steamboats, negligence
of employees on. (See
Negligence, etc.)
Stevedores:
470,471
Florida.........................
937,938
M aryland.....................
Texas............................ 2101-9103
Stock for employees of
corporations:
California.....................
Indiana........................
Massachusetts.............
946
New Y o r k ...................

Bulletin.
To.

Page.

308
308
166
277
308

43
87
141
228
145,186

308

205,206

308

261

186
244

121
107

244

263,264

277

Stockholders, liability of,
list of laws determining.
79
Stop watches. (See Effi­
ciency tests, etc.)
Street railways, examina­
tion, etc., of employees
on (See Examination,
etc.)
Street railways, hours of
labor of employees on.
(See Hours of labor,etc.)
Street railways, news­
boys on:
Massachusetts.............
953
Street railways, protec­
tion of employees on.
(See Protection of em­
ployees.)
Street railways, rights
and remedies of em­
ployees on:
South Carolina...........
1999
Street railways, safety
provisions on:
California.....................
273
416
Connecticut.................
744-746
Iow a ..............................
Massachusetts.............
953
M ontana......................
1277
New H am pshire........ 1360,1361
1686
O h io..............................
V erm ont......................
2145
W ashington................
2218
W isconsin....................
2260
Street railways, seats for
employees on:
Connecticut.................
418,419
Louisiana.....................
Missouri.......................
New Jersey.................
O h io..............................
Oregon.........................
V erm ont......................
Street railways, em ploy­
m ent of wom en on:
New Y o r k . . . : ...........
Strike, notice of, in adver­
tisements, etc., for la­
borers:
California.....................
Colorado......................
Illinois..........................
Maine............................
Massachusetts........... :

10,11
11

95

234

186

85

166
186
213
257
292

127
185
72,73
57
48

863
1163
1403
1766
2145

320,321
364
550,551
890
991

CUMULATIVE INDEX,

96

Bulletin
N o. 148.

N o.

Page.
Strike, notice of, in adver­
tisements, etc., for la­
borers—Concluded.
M ontana......................
New Ham pshire........
N ew Y o r k ...................
North D akota............
Oklahom a...................
Oregon.........................
Pennsylvania.............
P orto R ico................. .
South Dakota........... .

Strikes, participation in,
not to be bar to em ploy­
m ent:
Minnesota.................. .
Texas.......................... .
Strikes. (S ee also A rbi­
tration of labor dis­
putes; Conspiracy, la­
bor agreements not;
H om e defense guards;
Interference with em­
ploym ent.)
Suits for injuries. (See
Injuries, etc.)
Suits for wages:
California...................
Colorado.....................
Georgia.......................
Id a h o ..........................
Illinois........................
Iow a ............................
Kansas........................
Louisiana...................
Massachusetts...........
M ichigan....................
Minnesota
Mississippi.........
Missouri............ .
M ontana........... .
Nebraska.......... .
N ew Jersey____
N ew Y o r k ..........
North Carolina..
North Dakota..,
O h io...................
Oklahom a..........
Oregon............... .

Page.

1239
1372

244
166
308

225
175
200

186
244
292

333,334
305
79,80

186

424

1720
1761

2066

398
429,430
480
557,558
767
813
875,876
1145
1402,1403
. 308

206

1785
2094




2179
2305
2345,2346

H aw aii..............
Id a h o.................
Illinois...............
Indiana.............
Iow a ...................
Kansas..............
K entucky.........
Louisiana.........
Maine................
M aryland.........
Massachusetts.

159,160
187
186
232
327
402
403,414
422,424
431,433
470
490,491
499
523
539,540
664
744
767
814
841
876
920
943,944
960,962

M ichigan...,
Minnesota..
Mississippi.
Missouri___
M ontana_
_
N ebraska..
N evada____

270
346
487,488
522
538,553
738
773
844
967,968
1051
1095
1153
1159

186

138

1046
1105,1106
1146
1166
1238
1319

N ew H ampshire.
N ew Jersey..........

1097
2074,2075

1357
1404-1406

N ew M exico___
N ew Y o r k ..........
N orth Carolina..
N orth Dakota...
O h io....................
Oklahom a..........
Oregon................
P ennsylvania..,
P orto R ic o .........

1434
1551,1552
1563-1565
1590,1591
1701
1706
1749
1818
1958

R hode I s la n d ..,
South Carolina.
South D akota..
Tennessee.........
Texas.................
U tah..................
V erm ont...........
Virginia.............

1987
1996,2006
2016
2032
2090-2091
2123,2124
2140
2160,2161

244
186

208
209

186

254

1563
' 186
• 186

W ashington....
W est V irginia.,
W isconsin........

2181,2184
2230
2309,2310

297
305

W yom in g........
U nited States.

2347
2430,2435

186
277

311
266

. 244

306,307

244
l .......
186
2156

330

Pennsylvania.
Porto R ic o ___
South Dakota.
Texas...............
U tah................
Verm ont.........
Virginia..........

Paym ent of
wages; Protection
of wages; Wages as
preferred claims.)
Sunday labor:
Alabam a......................
Alaska........................ .
A rizona......................
Arkansas.....................
Colorado.....................
Connecticut...............

395

Page.

(S ee also

Delaware.
F lo r id a ...
G eorgia ...

811

Bulletin.
N o.

Suits for wages—Con.
Washington...........
W isconsin..............

W isconsin....................
(S ee also E m ploy­
m ent of labor, de­
ception, in.)
Strikes, factory inspec­
tors not to be concerned
K entucky....................
Strikes of railroad em­
ployees:
Connecticut............... .
Delaware.....................
Georgia........................
Illinois........................ .
Kansas....................... .
K en tu cky....................
Maine.......................... .
Mississippi................. .
N ew Jersey.................
O h io............................
Pennsylvania............

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

W eekly day
of rest.)
Surgical, etc., appliances
to b e furnish©!.
(See
Accidents, provisions
for.)
Suspension o f labor laws.
(See Emergency sus­
pension, etc.)
(S ee also

73

244

110,111

244
308
186
308

132,133
73
133
80

257

47

213
244
257

73
187
53

244
224
277

221
224
201

166
277

169,170
215,216

277
308
244
244

232
156
259
271

244

271

166
244

199
307

308
213
292

249
147
87

186
277

422
352

244
257

380
121

CUMULATIVE INDEX,
Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
Suspension of work, no­
tice of:
South Carolina..........
Sweating system:
Connecticut...............
Illinois........................
Ind ia n a ......................
M aryland...................
Massachusetts...........
Michigan....................
Missouri.....................
New Jersey................
N ew Y o r k ..................
O h io.................
Pennsylvania.
Tennessee....................
W isconsin....................
Syndicalism.
(S ee Sa­
botage.)

Page.

166

244
186
308

237-239
259,260
178-180

186

339
377,378
261-263

T.

Delaware..........
Indiana.............
Iow a ...................
Louisiana.........
Maine.................
M aryland..........
Massachusetts..
Minnesota.........




186

445
647
186
848,851,859 213
186
915 213
244
977
1120,1141

339

161

A rizona........................
Arkansas......................
California.....................

291

Colorado......................
Connecticut.................

161
53
181
55
187

363,394
404,412

Delaware.....................

431
432,436

District of C olu m bia.
Florida.........................
Illinois..........................

456
475
570,571
589,617
623,624
647,683
740,760

Indiana........................
Iow a..............................

237
182
255
232
157
257
118,119
122-127

244
244
186

352
365
436

65,66

257
330

77
31

244

338

257
186
186
257

35
141,142
168
55
374
35
143,144

186
277
186
277
277
277
186
213
244

63
45
67
49
53
55,56
88
30,31
93,94

277
308
186
244
308

89
65,66
126
115-117
70

277
308

108
84

186

i59

li52,1153

Alaska..........................

78
31
94
115

186

165
206,207
246
262
328
541,582
634
719,720
768
809,815
897,898
971,1039
1095
1169
1280
1345
1441
1458

I l l i n o i s ..................................

Tennessee...................
Toilet rooms, etc.,for em ­
ployees:
Alabama___ : ..............

Page,

166
186
277
308
277
213

1929
2269

O h io.............................
1694
Oklahoma....................
1707
South Dakota............. 2010,2011
Utah.............................
2106
West Virginia.............
2229
W yom ing....................
2347
(See also Protection
of employees as
voters.)
Tips, receiving or giving:
Arkansas......................
254
Georgia........................
Iow a.............................
Massachusetts.............
Mississippi..................
South Carolina...........

N o.

186
330
213

O h io............................. 1649,1697
Oregon..........................
1752
Pennsylvania.............
W ashington................
W isconsin....................
W yom in g....................
Tim e to vote to be al­
low ed employees:
Alabam a......... .•
...........
Alaska..................
A rizona........................
Arkansas......................
California.....................
Colorado......................
Illinois..........................
Indiana........................
Iow a .............................
Kansas.........................
Kentucky....................
M aryland....................
Massachusetts.............
Minnesota....................
Missouri.......................
Nebraska.....................
N evada........................
N ew M exico................
New Y o r k ...................

Bulletin.

186

101-104

2263-2266

Taxes of employees, lia­
bility of employers for.
( See Liability o f em ­
ployers, etc.)
Telegraph, o p e r a t o r s ,
hours of labor of. (See
Hours of labor of em ployees on railroads.)
Telegraph operators, rail­
road, age of em ploy­
m ent, etc., of:
212,213
A rizona........................
Colorado.......................
343
Georgia.........................
479
Nebraska.....................
1314
New Y o r k ...................
1550
W isconsin....................
2287
Telegraph, etc., wires
crossing r a i l r o a d s ,
height of. (S ee Rail­
road tracks, etc.)
Tem porary laws, etc.,
s u m m a r y o f....................
144-150
Tenant factories:
New Y o r k ................... 1513-1515
Tenement manufactures.
(See Sweating system .)
Tenem ents, workrooms
in, fireproofing of:
California.....................
321
Pennsylvania.............
Term ination of em ploy­
m ent. (S ee E m ploy­
m ent o f labor; E m ploy­
m ent, term ination of,
notice of.)
Thrashing m a c h i n e s ,
g u a r d s for.
(See
Guards, etc.)
Threats. (See Intim ida­
tion.)
Tim e for meals or rest:
A rizona........................
206
Arkansas..
California.

Page.
Tim e for meals or rest—
Concluded.
N ew Hampshire.........
1370
New Jersey................. 1415,1416
New Y o r k ................... 1512,1533

2008
405
547,548
647,648
917-919
982,983
1068,1069
1181,1182
1391,1392
1487
1516-1520
1553
1650,1651
1839,1840
1847,1848
1927,1928

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

N o.

97

CUMULATIVE INDEX,

98

Bulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
T oilet rooms, etc., for em ­
ployees—Concluded.
Kansas......................
K entucky.........
Louisiana.........
Massachusetts..
Michigan......... .

N o.

170,175
173,174
39,40

Minnesota........
Missouri...........

1179,1182

166

N ew Y ork .

1247
1281,1298

188,189
997

1382
1390,1391
1408,1419
1510-1512
1515,1526
1535

N orth Carolina.
O h io...................

159,160
239-242
178,179
184,185
269-271
278,283
286
251
233
161,162
173-176
181

1579,1580
1649,1650
1669,1670

Oklahoma..........

141
146,147
157-159
207,208
209
166

1211,1212

M ontana.............
Nebraska............
N ew Hampshire.
N ew Jersey........

Page.

804,805

860,861
979,982
1053
1067,1088
1096

1717
1741-1743

112,113
249,251
203

Oregon................
Penn sylvania..

R h od e Is la n d ..
South Carolina.
South D akota.,
Tennessee........
Texas.................
Virginia.............

318
1802
1803,1827
1865,2866
1898,1930
1934,1935
1971
1973,1977
1994,2002
2026
2036
2037,2059
2164

W ashington...
W est Virginia.
W isconsin.......

2186i2217
2239
2261
2265,2266
2322,2325
W yom in g..................... 2350,2351
Trade-marks of mechan­
ics:
N ew Jersey.................
1377
W isconsin......... ..........
2307
Trade-marks o f tradeunions, etc., protection
8K83
o f.......................................
Trade-marks o f tradeunions. (See also Pub­
licprinting, union label
t o be used on.)
Trade-unions. ( See La­
bor organizations.)
Trading, coercion o f em ­
ployees in. (S ee Coer­
cion.)
Transportation o f em ­
ployees:
California.....................
Massachusetts.............




263
952

Bulletin
N o. 148.

Bulletin.

121

354-358
291,298
276,277
244
308
244
308
186
166
213
330
244
277
186

315
237
322
239,240
389
210,211

145,149
40,41
352
343,344
432,433

Page.
T r e n c h construction,
.safety orders:
California.....................
T r u c k s y s t e m . (See
Company stores.)
Tunnels. ( S e e C o m ­
pressed air, work in;
M ines, etc.)

Bulletin.
N o.

213

Page.

39,40

U.
U nem ploym ent,
com ­
mission on, resolution
as t o .................................
Unemploment,
com ­
m ittee to investigate:
C alifom ia.....................
Oregon..........................
Unem ploym ent i n s u r ­
ance. (See Insurance,
unem ploym ent.)
Unem ploym ent, provi­
sions for:
Califom ia.....................
Id a h o............................
Louisiana....................
N ew Jersey.................
North Carolina...........
Pennsylvania.............
Uniforms, influencing rail­
road employees not to
wear. (S ee Railroad
employees, uniforms of.'
U nion label. (S ee Public
printing, union label
t o b e used on ; Trade­
marks of trade-unions.)
U nion newspapers, pu b ­
lic advertising in:
N ew Jersey.................

149

79
276

44
135,137

101

240,241
255
284,285

1402

V.
Vacations:
Massachusetts.............
Vaccination of employees:
Connecticut.................
Maine............................
Virginia........................
Vagrancy. (S ee Labor,
refusal to perform .)
Ventilation o f factories.
(S ee
Factories and
workroom s.)
Ventilation o f mines.
(See Mine regulations.)
Vessels, inspection of.
(S ee Inspection, etc.)
Vessels, loading, etc.:
California.....................
Vessels of American con­
struction for ocean
m ail service:
U nited States.............
Violation o f contract.
(See E m ploym ent of
labor.)
Violence, advocacy of.
(S ee Sabotage.)
Vocational
education,
Federal and State ac­
tion as to.........................
Vocational rehabilitation.
(See Rehabilitation.)
Vocational training:
Arkansas.................
California............... .

277

129

407
867

2155

272,273

2364

51-53
23,24
14 15

74-78

CUMULATIVE INDEX,
B ulletin
N o. 148.
Page.
V ocational training—Con.
D elaw are......................
In d ian a........................
702,703
Iow a ..............................
K en tu cky....................
M assachusetts.............
1432
N ew Jersey.................
N ew Y ork ".................. 1454-1458
P enn sylvania............. 1918-1920
W isconsin....................

Page.

244

124

277
166
257
213

119
36
55-57
85,86

186
244

423
366,367

V olunteer servants. (See
E m ploym ent of la bor.)
V oters, p rotection o f em ­
ployees as. (S ee A b ­
sent voters; P rotection
of em ployees, e tc.)
V otin g b y railroad em ­
ployees, etc. (See R ail­
road em ployees, etc.,
votin g b y .)
V otin g, tim e for. (See
T im e to v ote.)

W age brokers:
350,351 244
277
277
C onnecticut.................
434
D elaware......................
257
G eorgia.........................
621,622 244
Illin ois..........................
Indiana........................
676,677
308
Iow a.............................
862 213
Louisiana....................
292
244
M aine...........................
257
M aryland.....................
M ichigan......................
186
M innesota.................... 1133,1134
M ississippi...................
166
M ontana...................... 1246,1247
N ebraska..................... 1287-1290 186
N ew Jersey.................. 1374-1376 166
New Y o rk ................... 1458-1461 166
292
O h io............................. 1672,1673 186
244
Tennessee....................
Texas............................
186
U tah.............................
244
V irginia........................
257
(See also A ssignm ent
o f w ages.)
W ages as preferred claim s:
Alahftma
151
A laska..........................
186,187
A rizona........................
207,208
Arkansas......................
231,233
C alifornia.....................
270,271 277
C olorado......................
323
324,348
397
C onnecticut.................
427
Delaware......................
428,433
G eorgia.........................
482
522
Id a h o............................
Illin ois..........................
535,538
540,541
631,632 244
In dian a........................
638,639
Tnwa
738,739
"EancQ q
”
769
772,773
Louisiana....................
848
M aine..........................•
.
874
Marvlonrl
898« Ot/o
O 899
vO
947,948
M assachusetts.............
M ichigan...................... 1050,1052 186
1104
M innesota....................




Page.
W ages
as
preferred
claim s—C oncluded.
M issouri.......................
M ontana......................
N ebraska.....................
N evada........................
N ew H am pshire........
N ew Jersey.................
N ew M exico................
N ew Y o rk ...................

W.
C olorado......................

B ulletin
N o. 148.

B ulletin.

N o.

99,100
83
88
35
155
97
51,52
43
181,182
51
191-193
145
219-222
153-155
187-190
60,61
301-304
322
386-388
335
110

78

159

108

99

1155
1159,1160
1235-1237
1279
1321,1322
1336-1338
1356
1373,1374
1376,1396
1397,1403
1440
1454,1478

N orth Carolina...........
1563
N orth D akota.............
1590
O h io.............................. 1687,1688
Oregon.......................... 1747,1748
1766-1768
P ennsylvania.............
1786
1822-1824
1829
1949
P hilippin e Isla n d s.. .
R hode Isla n d ..............
1986
South D akota.............
2015
T exas............................ 2076,2077
U tah............................. 2105,2109
2110,2123
V erm ont...................... 2136,2144
W ashington................
2180
W est V irginia.............
W isconsin.................... 2267,2268
2304,2305
W yom in g....................
2330
2331,2346
U nited S tates............. 2406,2407
W ages, assignm ent of.
(S ee
A ssignm ent of
w ages.)
W ages, attachm ent of.
(S ee
A ttachm ent of
w ages.)
W ages, com binations to
fix :
Tjonisiarift
850,851
W ages, deducting from ,
for benefit societies.
(S ee Forced con tribu­
tion s.)
W ages, discounts, deduc­
tion s, etc., from :
239
A rkansas.. . . . . . . . . . . .
C alifornia.....................
498
H aw aii..........................
984-986
M assachusetts.............
1008
M ississippi...................
N ew Jersey................. 1398,1399
1693
O h io..............................
South C arolina...........
2345
W yom ing.....................
W ages due deceased em ­
ployees. (S ee Paym ent
of wages due, e tc.)
W ages due • from con­
tractors. (-Sec L ia bility
o f stockholders; Pro­
tection o f w ages.)
W ages due from m unici­
palities:
957,968
M assachusetts.............
1163
M issouri.......................
W ages due from prede­
cessors, lia b ility o f rail­
road com panies for:
W iscon sin....................
2280
W ages, exem ption of.
(-See E xem ption
of
wages.)

B u lletin .

N o.

Page.

166
308

i82
145

186

311

186

395

277

344

308
308
257

56
75
55

166

145,146

213

i39,140

CUMULATIVE INDEX,

100

Bulletin
No. 148.
Page.
W ages, garnishm ent of.
(S ee G arnishm ent o f
w ages.)
W ages, lia b ility o f stock. holders of corporations
for, list o f laws deter­
m ining..............................
W ages o f em ployees on
p u b lic w orks, reten­
tion of:
C alifornia.....................
W ages, paym ent of. (See
Paym ent of w ages.)
W ages, preference of.
(S ee W ages as preferred
claim s.)
W ages, protection of. (See
P rotection of w ages.)
W ages, rates o f. (See
R ates o f w ages.)
W ages, recovery of. (See
Suits for w ages.)
W ages, reduction o f, no­
tice of:
M issouri.......................
Texas
W ages, refusing to p a y:
C alifornia..................
C onnecticut........
Illin ois.................
In d ian a...............
M innesota...........
M ontana.............
N evada...............
N orth D a k ota ...
O regon.................
W ashington.......
W est V irg in ia ...
(S ee also Suits for
w ages.)
W ages, security for. (S ee
M echanics’ lien s: Pro­
tection of wages: W ages
as preferred claim s.)
W ages, suits for. (See
Suits for w ages.)
W ages, w itholding. (See
E xtortion ; Forced con ­
tribu tion s; W ages, re­
fusing to p a y .)
W aiver o f right to dam ­
ages. ( S ee Contracts of
e m p lo y e e s w aiving
right to dam ages.)
W ar em ergency. (See
E m ergency.)
W a s h r o o m s , waterc l o s e t s , etc. (S ee
T oilet room s.)
W ater for drinking, etc.:
A laska..........................
C alifornia...................

Page.

Page.

Bulletin.
No.

Page.

276,277
422
61
76,77

972,973
1021,1022

N ew Y o rk .

79

274,275

1478

185
254
156
118,119
122-127
329,330
308
91
292
352
380

Oregon.............
P enn svlvania.
P orto R ic o ....
T exas......................
W isconsin...............
U nited States........
(S ee also D ays of rest.)
W eight that w orkm en
m ay carry:
P orto R ico ................. .

1161
2086
63,78

275
407
542
639
1107
1242

101

186

201
257
272

2182
2235

W idow s, em ploym ent of
ch ildren of. (S ee Children o f w idow s.)
W ife’ s earnings. (S ee
Earnings o f m arried
w om en.)
W indow cleaning, safety
orders:
C alifornia.....................
W ipin g cloths or rags:
C alifornia.....................
M assachusetts.............
W om en and children.
(S ee Children and w o­
m en.)
W om en,
childbearing,
em ploym ent, e tc., o f:
C onnecticut............... .
M assachusetts........... .
M issouri..................... .
. N ew Y o rk ...................
V erm on t.................... .
W om en, em ploym ent o f,
com m ission on :
Illin ois........................
W om en, em ploym ent o f,
general provisions:
C alifornia...................
D elaw are...................
D istrict o f C olum bia.
K ansas.......................

2436

305
91

37
300,301
1019

91

424

1000
1513
2145

50
163
155
244
154,155

261
431-433
29,30
171-175
.

K en tu ck y..
L ou isian a..
M assachusetts..
49
31
90
94
117
960,979

N ew Y o rk ........

1510




No.

W eekly d ay o f rest:
C alifornia............
C onnecticut........
M aryland.

D elaw are..........
Iow a ..................
K ansas..............
M assachusetts..
M issouri............
N ew Jersey—

O h io.................
Pennsylvania.
R hode Isla n d .

Bulletin
No. 148.

Bulletin.

740

1670
1930,1935

173
185
207
160
241
178
173
180,181
269,282
355
93

M ich ig a n ...
M on ta n a ...
N eb ra sk a ..
N ew Y o rk .
N orth D a k ota ..
O h io...................
O klahom a.........
O regon...............
P en n sylvan ia.
P orto R ico ..
V e rm o n t...,

833,834
848,849

100

94
175
125
183
133
141,143
174

1018

1291,1292

1648,1649

1928-1933

277
308
244
277
277
213
277
186
244
277
244
277

232-234
155,156
258
257
261,262
117-127
266
329
330,359
277,278
284-287
347,348
320

CUMULATIVE INDEX,
B ulletin
N o. 148.

O h io..............................
P enn sylvania.............

O h io.............................
W om en, em ploym ent of.
(See also Children and
w om en; Seats for fe­
m ale em ployees; Sex
n o disqualification for
em ploym ent.)
W om en, hiring out to
support husbands in
idleness:
L ouisiana....................
N orth Carolina...........
W om en, hours of la bor of:
A rizon a........................
A rkansas.....................

861
1130
1179
1513
1653

N evada........................
N ew H am pshire........

Page.

1175,1176
1277
1292

277
244
186
277
244
186
244
292
308
308
166
186
244
257
277
292
308
186
277
244
277
186
277
186
213
244

165
211
217
183
223
237,238
229,238
54,55
139
142-144
182
258
248
80,81
232,233
59
158-160
295
242,244
261
256,257
307,308
261,262
311
118-120
122-127
272

277
186
166

284
367
203

186
186
277
244
277
166
257
186
244
244
186
244

379
380,383
389,390
313
349
320
210
107,110
397,398
351
368
436
370

186
244
308
244
166

78
109
64
115
29

244
277
213

174
124
55

277
186
277
186
244
166
186
277
308

14i
217
183
237
230
182
258
232,233
158-160

166
244

203
368

213
244
244

29,30
92,93
175

1355
1370,1371
1422

N ew M exico................
N ew Y o rk ............
1494,1495
1533,1561
186
292
308
186
244

287,288
59
155
359
298,299

N orth Carolina...........
N orth D akota.............
O h io.............................

1593
1649

O klahom a...................
277
308

257
265

213
308
186

32
57
183
114

Oregon...............

1755

1827,1929
1961
1984,1985
2001,2003
2025
2057,2058
2062,2063
T exas............................ 2103,2104
U tah............................. 2130,2131
V erm ont......................
2145
P enn sylvania.............
P orto R ico...................
R hode Isla n d .............
South Carolina...........
South D akota........
Tennessee.................

W ashington.................

2216

W isconsin.................... 2268,2269
W yom ing....................
850
1566
205,206

395
417,418

D elaw are.....................
D istrict o f C olum bia.
G eorgia........................
Id a h o............................
Illin ois..........................
K ansas.........................

439,440

K en tu cky....................
Louisiana....................
M aine..........................

833
859
869

M aryland.....................

905
906,915
971
972,1000

186
78-80
56
277
213
30
244 80,92,93
64
277
244
277
244
166

109
86
115
29,30

483
534
574
186
244

M ichigan...................... 1041,1063




29-32
92-95

N o.

V irginia........................ 2157,2158

C olorado......................
C onnecticut.................

M ississippi...................

W om en, hours o f labor
of—C oncluded.
M issouri.......................
M ontana......................
N ebraska.....................

213

1011,1012
1018

295

M innesota...................

397,398
265

B u lletin .

Page.

N ew Jersey.................

C alifornia.....................

M assachusetts.............

Page.

1561

W est V irginia.............
2238
W iscon sin.................... 2268-2271
W om en, em ploym ent of,
in m ines:
A rizon a........................
201
O h io.............................
W iscon sin....................
227i
(S ee also Children
and w om en.)
W om en, em ploym ent of,
in
m oving
heavy
w eights:
C alifornia.....................
M assachusetts.............

N o.

213
244

W om en, em ploym ent of,
general provisions—Con.
W ashington................
W iscon a n ....................
W om en, em ploym ent of,
in canneries:
C alifornia.....................
N ew Y o rk ...................
W om en, em ploym ent o f,
in dangerous, etc., oecupations:
Louisiana....................
M innesota....................
M issouri.......................
N ew Y o rk ...................

B ulletin
N o. 148.

B ulletin.

186
308

Page.

101

171-175
174

213
186
277
213

53
181,182
124
55

186
213
257
277
308
186
277
166

W om en, m arried, earn­
ings of. (See Earnings
o f m arried w om en.)
W om en, night w ork b y :
Arkansas......................
C onnecticut.................
Delaware......................
D istrict of C olum bia.
Indiana........................
Kansas.........................
M aine............................
M arvland.....................
M assachusetts.............
M ichigan......................
N ebraska.....................

418

645

972
1292

N ew H am pshire........

1370

N ew Y ork ...................

1513,1533

183
75
55
127,128
103,104
196
141,143

Pennsylvania. .
P orto R ico ...................
South C arolina...........
W isconsin....................
W om en, seats for. (See
Seats for fem ale em­
ployees.)
W om en, wages of:
C alifornia.....................

1929
1961
2003
2269

149

L ouisiana....................

1119
1120,1141

CUMULATIVE INDEX.

102

B u lle tin
N o . 148.

P a ge.

W o m e n , w ages of— Con.
M assachu setts..............
M ich ig a n ........................
M o n ta n a ........................
N o rth D a k o ta ..............
P o r t o R i c o ....................
{See also C hildren
a n d w o m e n ; M in i­
m u m w a g e s .)
W o m e n 's b u rea u :
N ew Y o r k .....................
U n ite d S ta tes..............
W o m e n 's exch an ges, i n ­
corp ora tion o f:
I n d ia n a ..........................




B u lle tin
N o . 148.

B u lle tin .

N o.

P age.

986,1012
1041

244
277
277
277
277

191
138
174
243,244
284

277
292
633

227
99,100

P a ge.

W o o d w o r k in g , s a f e t y
orders:
C aliforn ia .......................
W o r k , c o m p u ls o r y . {See
L a b o r, requirem ent o f .)
W o r k in g m e n 's h o m e s ,
co m m is s io n o n :
M assachusetts..............
W o r k in g m e n 's t r a i n s .
{See T ra n sp o rtatio n o f
e m p lo y e e s .)
W o r k m e n 's
co m p e n sa ­
tio n , co m m issio n s o n . . .
W o rk ro o m s . '{See F a c ­
tories an d w o r k ro o m s.)

o

B u lle tin .

N o.

213

1009,1019

149,150

Page.

37 38