View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

1.2.$: J

Jobs for Which
Apprenticeships
Are Available
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics




7^6

5 7 / 6 / f 76

LRR KP iAT^
,8AY E S
E

edition

o n ly

Jobs for Which
Apprenticeships
Are Available
W o u ld y o u lik e to b e c o m e a n e x p e r t in a
tra d e — to d e v e lo p a skill th a t w ill c o m m a n d
a g o o d s a la ry a n d a s e c u re s p o t in th e jo b
w o rld ? O n e s u re ro u te is a p p r e n tic e s h ip . O v e r
100,000 p e r s o n s e n te r e d fo rm a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip
p ro g ra m s in 1974. I t ’s n o t th e o n ly w a y , o f
c o u r s e , b u t it h a s o n e big a d v a n ta g e : it is
w id e ly re c o g n iz e d b y e m p lo y e rs a s a n e s p e c ia lly
th o ro u g h tra in in g m e th o d . B e s id e s th is , c o m p le ­
tio n o f a n a p p r e n tic e s h ip p ro g ra m m a k e s e n tr y
le v e l jo b s e a s ie r to o b ta in . It im p ro v e s y o u r
c h a n c e s fo r a d v a n c e m e n t, to o .
H e r e is a list o f o c c u p a tio n s — s e le c te d fro m
th e O c c u p a tio n a l O u tlo o k H a n d b o o k — fo r w h ic h
y o u c a n tra in th ro u g h a p p r e n tic e s h ip .
Y o u w ill se e th a t a h igh sc h o o l d ip lo m a is
n e c e s s a r y fo r so m e o f th e s e p ro g ra m s . F o r o th e r s ,
a p p r e n tic e s h ip s a re o p e n to a p p lic a n ts h a v in g
le s s th a n a h ig h s c h o o l e d u c a tio n . B u t re m e m b e r
th a t, g iv e n a c h o ic e , e m p lo y e rs u s u a lly w ill
s e le c t th e a p p lic a n t h a v in g th e m o s t e d u c a tio n
a n d tra in in g .
T h e s u m m a rie s w h ic h fo llo w g iv e o n ly h ig h ­
lig h ts o f j o b q u a lific a tio n s a n d e m p lo y m e n t
tre n d s d e s c rib e d in th e H a n d b o o k . S p e c ia l ta le n ts ,
a p titu d e s , a n d p e r s o n a l c h a ra c te ris tic s n o t s p e c i­
fica lly m e n tio n e d h e re m a y b e n e c e s s a r y fo r
m a n y o c c u p a tio n s . A ls o , re m e m b e r th a t th e
c o m m e n ts in th e “ E m p lo y m e n t O p p o rtu n itie s ,
c o lu m n re fle c t c o n d itio n s fo r e s e e n o v e r th e 1974
to 1985 p e r io d fo r th e e n tire N a tio n . A s a re s u lt,
th e c o m m e n ts d o n o t n e c e s s a rily re fle c t e m p lo y ­
m e n t o p p o rtu n itie s in a n y single y e a r o r in
a n y s p e c ific lo c a lity .
T h e 1976-77 e d itio n o f th e O c c u p a tio n a l
O u tlo o k H a n d b o o k c o n ta in s th e fo llo w in g in fo r­
m a tio n fo r m o re th a n 850 o c c u p a tio n s :
N a tu r e o f th e w o rk
P la c e s o f e m p lo y m e n t
T ra in in g , o th e r q u a lific a tio n s a n d a d v a n c e ­
m ent
E m p lo y m e n t o u tlo o k
E a rn in g s a n d w o rk in g c o n d itio n s
S o u rc e s o f a d d itio n a l in fo rm a tio n




T h e H a n d b o o k is p u b lis h e d e v e ry 2 y e a rs b y th e
U .S . D e p a rtm e n t o f L a b o r ’s B u re a u o f L a b o r
S ta tis tic s . C o p ie s m a y b e p u rc h a s e d fo r $7 fro m
a n y re g io n a l o ffic e o f th e B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta tis ­
tic s . S e e b a c k c o v e r fo r a d d r e s s e s .
A list o f re p rin ts a b o u t jo b s fo r w h ic h a p p r e n ­
tic e s h ip s a re a v a ila b le a p p e a rs a t th e e n d o f th is
p a m p h le t. Y o u m a y u se th e listin g to o r d e r
re p rin ts . T he c o s t o f e a c h r e p rin t is 3 5 0.
R e p rin ts o f o th e r o c c u p a tio n s d e s c rib e d in th e
O c c u p a tio n a l O u tlo o k H a n d b o o k also a re a v a il­
a b le s e p a ra te ly a t 35# e x c e p t re p rin t n u m b e r 154
w h ic h is 450. A c o m p le te s e t o f th e 155 r e ­
p rin ts m ay b e p u rc h a s e d fo r $55. F o r a fre e list
o f all re p r in ts , w rite to :
U .S . D e p a rtm e n t o f L a b o r
B u re a u o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s
O c c u p a tio n a l O u tlo o k S e rv ic e
G A O B u ild in g
W a s h in g to n , D .C . 20212

Qualifications
and Training

Employment Opportunities
and Trends to 1985

Patternmakers
(20,500)

Most learn through 5-year apprentice­
ship. The high degree of skill and
wide range of knowledge needed
make learning the trade on the job
difficult.

Little or no change in employment
is expected, due to the increased use
of metal patterns and other technical
improvements in patternmaking. Most
of the relatively small number of
openings created by replacement
needs will be for metal patternmakers
instead of wood patternmakers.

Molders
(60,000)

A 4-year apprentice program is needed
to become a journeyman molder.
Molders’ helpers and less skilled
handmolders learn on the job. An 8thgrade education is minimum require­
ment for apprenticeship, but many
employers require additional educa­
tion.

Little or no change in employment
is expected, due to the trend to more
machine molding, such as the sand
slinging process, and other laborsaving innovations. However, hun­
dreds of openings annually will be
created by replacement needs.

Coremakers
(24,500)

A 4-year apprentice program is re­
commended training for coremakers.
Less skilled handcoremaking and
most machine-coremaking jobs are
learned on the job.

Little or no change in employment is
expected, as more cores are made
by machine instead of by hand.
Nevertheless, several hundred open­
ings annually will be created by re­
placement needs.

All-round Machinists
(335,000)

A 4-year apprenticeship is best way
to learn trade, but many learn on
the job.

Employment is expected to increase
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, due to the expansion
of metal-working activities and the
rising demand for machined goods
such as automobiles, appliances, and
industrial products.

Instrument Makers
(Mechanical)
(5,500)

Most learn through 4-year appren­
ticeship; some advance from other
machining jobs.

Employment is expected to increase
at a slower rate than the average
for all occupations, due to laborsaving technological innovations.
Very few job opportunities.

Setup Workers
(Machine Tools)
(50,000)

Must be all-round machinist or skilled
machine tool specialist (who has
usually learned the trade through ap­
prenticeship).

Despite growth in consumer and in­
dustrial demand for machined goods,
the increasing use of numerically
controlled machine tools will result
in slower than average employment
growth. Most opportunities will arise
from replacement needs.

Tool and Die Makers
(170,000)

Either a 4-year apprenticeship or
long-term training on the job.

Employment is expected to grow
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, as a result of expansion
in metal-working industries.

Occupations
(Employment 1974)
Industrial Production
and Related Occupations
Foundry Occupations

Machining Occupations




Occupations
(Employment 1974)

Qualifications
and Training

Employment Opportunities
and Trends to 1985

Cooks and Chefs
(955,000)

Skills usually learned on the job;
cooking courses an advantage for
hotel and restaurant work. Some train
as apprentices.

Employment is expected to increase
faster than the average for all occu­
pations. Most starting jobs in small
restaurants and other eating places
having simple food preparation.

Meatcutters

Most acquire their skills through ap­
prenticeship or on the job.

Although little or no change in em­
ployment is expected, thousands of
openings annually will be created
by replacement needs.

Barbers
(130,000)

Practically all States require a li­
cense for which applicants usually
must be 16 (in some cases, 18),
have completed 8th grade, have
graduated from a State-approved bar­
ber school, and have served a 1-2
year apprenticeship.

Little or no employment change with
most openings resulting from replace­
ment needs. Better opportunities for
hairstylists than for those offering
conventional services.

Cosmetologists
(500,000)

License required. Usually applicant
must be at least 16 and have com­
pleted at least 10th grade and a
State-approved cosmetology course.
Some States substitute apprentice­
ship for the cosmetology course.

Employment is expected to grow
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, in response to the rise
in demand for beauty shop services.
Good opportunities for both new­
comers and experienced cosmetolo­
gists, including those seeking parttime work.

Funeral Directors and
Embalmers
(45,000)

Twenty-one is generally the minimum
age required by law. All States re­
quire embalmers to be licensed.
Graduation from a mortuary science
school and 1-2 year apprenticeship
required.

Little change in employment is ex­
pected. Nevertheless, prospects are
good for mortuary school graduates
due to openings created by replace­
ment needs.

Usually applicant must be at least
18 years old. Most learn through 4year apprenticeship. Examination re­
quired on completion of apprentice­
ship program.

Employment is expected to grow
much faster than the average for all
occupations, in response to in­
creased construction activity and the
need for energy-saving insulation.
Best opportunities in metropolitan
areas where most insulation contrac­
tors are located.

Service Occupations
Food Service Occupations

(202 , 000 )

Personal Service Occupations

Construction Occupations
Asbestos and
Insulation Workers
(30,000)




Occupations
(Employment 1974)

Qualifications
and Training

Employment Opportunities
and Trends to 1985

Bricklayers and
Stonemasons
(165,000)

Usually applicant must be at least
17 years old. Work can be learned
on the job, but 3-year apprenticeship
recommended.

Em ploym entis expected to grow
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, in response to in­
creased construction activity and the
expanding use of brick for decora­
tive work. Little or no change is ex­
pected in the employment of stone­
masons, due to the cost of stone
relative to other materials.

Carpenters
(1,060,000)

Usually applicant must be at least
17. Some learn skills informally on
the job, but 4-year apprenticeship
recommended.

Plentiful job opportunities over the
long run resulting from high replace­
ment needs and average employment
growth due to increased construction
activity.

Cement Masons
(Cement and Concrete
Finishers)
(90.000)

Usually applicant must be at least
18 years old. Work can be learned
on the job, but 3-year apprentice­
ship recommended.

Favorable opportunities due to faster
than average employment growth in
response to increased construction
activity and greater use of concrete.

Electricians
(Construction)
(245.000)

A 4-year apprenticeship recom­
mended, but possible to learn trade
through job experience. Usually must
be 18 years old.

Employment is expected to increase
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, as more electrical fixtures
and wiring will be needed in homes,
offices, and other buildings.

Floor Covering
Installers
(85,000)

Usually applicant must be at least
16. Many learn skills on the job,
but apprenticeship recommended.

Employment is expected to increase
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, due to the more w ide­
spread use of resilient floor coverings
and carpeting. Best opportunities for
those who can install both carpeting
and resilient flooring.

Glaziers
(9,000)

Many learn trade informally, but 4year apprenticeship recommended.
Usually must be 18 years old.

Employment is expected to increase
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, as more glass is used in
building design. Best opportunities in
metropolitan areas where most glaz­
ing contractors are located.

Lathers
(25,000)

Usually applicant must be at least
16 years old. A minimum 2-year ap­
prenticeship recommended, though
many learn trade informally.

Little or no change in employment is
expected, as drywall materials are in­
creasingly used in place of lath and
plaster. Some openings annually due
to replacement needs.

Marble Setters,
Tile Setters, and
Terrazzo Workers
(40,000)

Many learn trade informally, but 3year apprenticeship recommended.

Employment is expected to grow more
slowly than the average for all occu­
pations, due to the increasing use of
competing materials such as carpet­
ing, paving brick, and plastic coated
wall board, which usually are in­
stalled by other skilled workers.




Qualifications
and Training

Employment Opportunities
and Trends to 1985

Bookbinders and
Related Workers
(35,000)

Usually a 4- or 5-year apprentice­
ship after high school.

Employment is expected to grow more
slowly than the average for all occu­
pations, because of the increasing
mechanization of bindery operations.

Composing Room
Occupations
(165,000)

Most compositors learn trade through
6-year apprenticeship. Some learn on
the job. Tape-perforating machine operators usually learn typing in high
school or business school.

Employment is expected to decline
due to the use of high-speed phototypesetting and typesetting computers requiring fewer operators than
traditional methods. For the few thou­
sand openings annually resulting
from replacement needs, best pro­
spects for those who have completed
post-high school programs in printing
technology.

Electrotypers and
Stereotypers
(4,000)

Entry usually through a 5- or 6-year
apprenticeship.

Employment is expected to decline
as a result of offset printing and
other laborsaving developments. Op­
portunities will be very scarce in this
small occupation.

Lithographic
Occupations
(85,000)

Usually a 4- or 5-year apprentice­
ship after high school.

Employment is expected to grow
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, as offset presses are increasingly'used in place of letter presses.
Best prospects for those who have
completed post-high school pro­
grams in printing technology.

Photoengravers
(17,000)

Usually a 5-year apprenticeship.

Employment is expected to decline
as a result of the advent of offset
printing, which requires no photo­
engraving, and other technological
advances. Limited opportunities in
this occupation.

Printing Press
Operators and
Assistants
(140,000)

Usually a 2- to 5-year apprentice­
ship. Some learn the work from onthe-job and technical school training.

Despite the increased use of faster,
more efficient presses, employment
is expected to increase about as
fast as the average for all occupa­
tions, because of growth in the volume
of printed materials. Particularly good
outlook for web-press operators.

Most learn on the job. A few have
3-year apprenticeships.

Employment is expected to increase
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, due to the growing num­
ber of motor vehicles damaged in
traffic accidents. Best opportunities in
metropolitan areas.

Occupations
(Employment 1974)
Printing Occupations

Other industrial Production
and Related Occupations
Automobile Painters
(25,000)




Occupations
(Employment 1974)

Qualifications
and Training

Employment Opportunities
and Trends to 1985

Blacksmiths
(9,000)

Most learn in shop; others through 3or 4-year apprenticeships. Courses in
metal-working, blueprint reading,
helpful.

Employment is expected to decline,
as blacksmiths are being replaced by
machines in forge shops and by weld­
ers. Some openings due to replace­
ment needs.

Boilermaking
Occupations
(45,000)

Boilermakers often learn trade
through 4-year apprenticeship; layout
workers and fitters usually acquire
skills on the job.

Employment is expected to increase
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, due to the construction of
many new electric powerplants and
the expansion of industries that use
boilers such as chemicals, petrol­
eum, steel, and shipbuilding.

Electroplaters
(34,000)

Most learn skills on the job; some
through 3- or 4-year apprenticeship.

Employment is expected to grow
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, due to the expansion
of metalworking industries and the in­
creased use of electroplating on
metals and plastics.

Forge Shop Occupations
(65,000)

Most learn skills on the job; 4-year
apprenticeships for skilled jobs such
asdiesinker, heattreater, hammeroperator, hammersmith, and press op­
erator. Courses in geometry, drafting,
and shopwork helpful.

Despite the expansion on industries
that use forgings, particularly auto­
mobile and energy-related industries,
employment is expected to grow more
slowly than the average for all occu­
pations because of improved forging
techniques and equipment.

Millwrights
(95,000)

Skills acquired through either appren­
ticeship (usually 4 years) or training
on the job. Courses in science, mathe­
matics, mechanical drawing, and ma­
chine shop practice useful.

Employment is expected to increase
about as fast as the average for all
occupations as a result of the con­
struction of new plants, improvements
in existing plant layouts, and the
building and maintenance of increas­
ingly complex machinery.

Motion Picture
Projectionists
(18,000)

Applicant must be at least 18. One
to 2 years of apprenticeship re­
quired.

Employment is expected to grow more
slowly than the average for all occu­
pations, because of laborsaving inno­
vations in equipment and theater de­
sign. Applicants are likely to face
keen competition.

Ophthalmic Laboratory
Technicians

Training may be obtained on the job,
through apprenticeship programs, or
vocational schools. Some States re­
quire licenses.

Employment is expected to increase
much faster than the average for all
occupations, due to the rising de­
mand for eyeglasses.

Many learn on the job, but 4-year
apprenticeship recommended. A
number of States and cities require
licenses.

Little or no change in employment is
expected because of the increased
use of more powerful and more cen­
tralized equipment in factories,
powerplants, and other buildings.
However, several thousand openings
will arise annually due to replace­
ment needs.

( 22 , 000 )

Stationary Engineers
(193,000)




Occupations
(Employment 1974)

Qualifications
and Training

Employment Opportunities
and Trends to 1985

Automobile
Mechanics
(735,000)

Most learn skills on the job, though
a 3-4 year apprenticeship recom­
mended.

Employment is expected to grow
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, as more automobiles
w ill be equipped with pollution con­
trol devices, air-conditioning, and
other features that increase mainte­
nance requirements. Good opportuni­
ties because of this factor and high
replacement needs.

Diesel Mechanics
(95,000)

Most train on the job. Some learn
the trade through apprenticeship
(usually 4 years).

Employment is expected to grow
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, due to the expansion of in­
dustries which are major users of
diesel engines and continued re­
placements of gasoline engines by
diesel engines.

Electric Sign
Repairers
(9,000)

Employers prefer high school gradu­
ates with electrical and mechanical
aptitudes. Most learn skills on the job,
but some through electricians’ ap­
prenticeship programs.

Employment is expected to grow
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, in response to a rapid in­
crease in the number of signs.

Farm Equipment
Mechanics
(60,000)

Many learn skills on the job; a few
learn through apprenticeship, usually
3-4 years.

Employment is expected to grow
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, as the increase in the
size and complexity of farm equip­
ment will lead to more maintenance
requirements.

Industrial Machinery
Repairers
(500,000)

Most acquire skills informally on the
job; some, through apprenticeship.

Employment is expected to increase
much faster than the average for all
occupations, because of the growing
amount of complex factory machinery
requiring maintenance and repair.

Instrument Repairers
(110,000)

Training may be obtained on the job;
in apprenticeships (usually 4 years);
in technical institutes and junior col­
leges; or at Armed Forces technical
school. High school courses in math
and science, including electronics,
useful.

Employment is expected to increase
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, because of the anticipated
increased use of instruments for ener­
gy conservation and exploration, air
and water pollution monitoring, medi­
cal diagnosis, and other areas.

Jewelers
(18,000)

Usually learned through either 3-4
year apprenticeship or training on
the job.

Little or no employment change.
While the demand for jewelry is grow­
ing, improved production methods
will limit the need for new workers.
For openings created by replacement
needs, priority will be given to a pp li­
cants who have completed technical
school courses in jewelry design,
construction, and repair.

Maintenance
Electricians
(280,000)

Skills learned either on the job or
through apprenticeship (usually 4
years). Courses in mathematics and
basic science helpful.

Employment is expected to grow
faster than the average for all occupa­
tions, due to the increased use of
electrical and electronic equipment
by industry.




Occupations
(Employment 1974)

Qualifications
and Training

Shoe Repairers
(30,000)

Most workers learn on the job. A
few complete apprenticeships. Some
vocational schools offer training.

Employment is expected to decline,
largely because the number of
people entering the trade has been
insufficient to meet replacement
needs. Good opportunities for experi­
enced repairers who wish to open
their own shops.

Truck Mechanics and
Bus Mechanics
(135,000)

Most learn on the job, but 4-year
apprenticeship recommended.

Employment of truck mechanics is
expected to grow faster than the aver­
age for all occupations, due to signi­
ficant increases in the transportation
of freight by trucks. Employment of
bus mechanics, however, is expected
to grow more slowly than the aver­
age.

Watch Repairers
(17,000)

Usually no specific educational re­
quirements. Training available in
watch repair and vocational schools.
Some learn skills on the job or
through apprenticeship.

Employment is expected to grow at
a slower rate than the average for
all occupations, because many
watches now made cost little more to
replace than to repair. Nevertheless,
good opportunities for graduates of
watch repair schools.

Training may be obtained on the job,
in vocational high school, or in junior
college. Manual dexterity needed.

Employment is expected to grow
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, in response to the increasing
demand for artificial dentures. Very
good opportunities for graduates of
approved programs.

Training may be obtained on the job;
in apprenticeships; in vocational
schools; or in junior college.

Employment is expected to increase
much faster than the average for all
occupations, in response to the grow­
ing demand for prescription lenses.
Best opportunities for those with asso­
ciate degrees in opticianry.

Employment Opportunities
and Trends to 1985

Health Occupations
Dental Occupations
Dental Laboratory
Technicians
(32,000)

Other Health Occupations
Dispensing Opticians
(17,000)




Occupations
(Employment 1974)

Qualifications
and Training

Employment Opportunities
and Trends to 1985

Operating Engineers
(Construction
Machinery Operators)
(400,000)

Many learn through informal training
and experience, but 3-year appren­
ticeship recommended. Usually must
be 18 years old.

Employment is expected to grow
much faster than the average for all
occupations, due to increased activity
in construction, highway mainte­
nance, and materials movement in
factories and mines.

Painters and
Paperhangers
(470,000)

Usually applicant must be at least
16. Many acquire skills informally on
the job, but 3-year apprenticeship
recommended.

Although employment of painters is
expected to grow more slowly than
the average for all occupations, many
openings annually resulting from high
replacement needs. Despite average
employment growth for paperhangers, stimulated by the rising
popularity of w allpaperand vinyl w all­
covering, fewer job opportunitiesthan
for painters because of the small
size of the occupation.

Plasterers
(26,000)

Usually applicant must be at least
17. A 3- or 4-year apprenticeship
recommended.

Little change is expected in em­
ployment, as drywall materials are in­
creasingly used in place of plaster.
Several hundred openings annually
due to replacement needs.

Plumbers and
Pipefitters
(375,000)

Usually applicant must be at least
16. A 5-year apprenticeship recom­
mended, but many learn on the job.
Trade or correspondence courses can
be useful training aids.

Employment is expected to grow
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, due to increased construc­
tion activity and growth in areas which
use extensive pipework such as
chemical and petroleum refineries,
coal gasification, and nuclear power
plants. Also, the trend toward more
air-conditioning, appliances, and
disposal equipment will create addi­
tional demand for these workers.

Roofers
(90,000)

Applicant must be at least 18. Many
learn informally on the job, but 3year apprenticeship recommended.

Employment is expected to increase
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, due to increases in construc­
tion activity, roof repairs, and water­
proofing.

Sheet-Metal
Workers
(65,000)

A 4-year apprenticeship recommended, though many learn on the
job. Trade or correspondence courses
helpful.

Employment is expected to increase
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, due to the need for airconditioning and heating ducts, and
other sheet-metal products in homes,
stores, offices, and other buildings.




Occupations
(Employment 1974)

Qualifications
and Training

Employment Opportunities
and Trends to 1985

Structural, Ornamental,
and Reinforcing Iron
Workers, Riggers, and
machine movers
(85,000)

Usually applicant must be at least
18. A 3-year apprenticeship recommended,

Employment in all ironworking occu­
pations is expected to increase faster
than the average for all occupa­
tions. The growing use of structural
steel, ornamental panels, metal
framing, and prestressed concrete
should create additional jobs for
structural, ornamental, and reinforc­
ing iron workers, while the need to
handle the increasing amount of
heavy construction machinery will re­
sult in additional jobs for riggers
and machine movers.

Occupations in Transportation Activities
Air Transportation Occupations
Airplane Mechanics
(130,000)

Most train in FAA-approved mechan­
ics’ schools. Large airlines train a
few in 3-4 year apprenticeship pro­
grams. A license from the FAA is fre­
quently required.

Although employment is expected to
increase about as fast as the aver­
age for all occupations, opportunities
in various areas of aviation will differ.
Good opportunities in general avia­
tion; keen competition for airline jobs;
opportunities in the Federal Govern­
ment dependent upon defense
spending.

Apprenticeship lasting 3-4 years is
recommended for shop trades. Many
helpers and laborers are upgraded.

Employment is expected to decline
as shop efficiency increases and as
newer, more durable railroad cars
replace older models.

Railroad Occupations
Shop Trades
(75,000)

Scientific and Technical Occupations
Drafters
(313,000)

Technical training usually required in
a junior college, technical institute,
or vocational school; also 3 or 4year apprenticeships.

Employment is expected to increase
faster than the average for all occu­
pations, as more drafters will be
needed as supporting personnel for
a growing number of scientists and
engineers. Increasingly complex de­
sign problems also will require addi­
tional drafters. Best opportunities for
holders of associate degrees in draft­
ing.

Most learn skills on the job. A 3-4
year apprenticeship recommended.

Employment is expected to increase
about as fast as the average for all
occupations, as a result of the rising
number of motor vehicles damaged
in traffic accidents.

Mechanics and Repairers
Automobile Body
Repairers
(145,000)




Employment
Outlook for

Bulletin
No.

Foundries
Coremakers
Molders
Patternmakers

1875-2

Machining Occupations
All-Round Machinists
Instrument Makers (Mechanical)
Machine Tool Operators
Setup Workers (Machine Tools)
Tool-and-Die Makers

1875-3

Printing and Publishing
Bookbinders
Composing Room Occupations
Electrotypers and Stereotypers
Lithographic Occupations
Photoengravers
Printing Press Operators and
Assistants

1875-4

Factory Production Occupations
Assemblers
Electroplaters
Inspectors
Power Truck Operators
Production Painters

1875-5

Blacksmiths

1875-6

Boilermaking Occupations

1875-8

Forge Shop Occupations

1875-9

Motion Picture Projectionists

1885-11

Stationary Engineers
Boiler Tenders

1875-12

Bartenders, Cooks and Chefs,
Waiters and Waitresses

1875-37

Meatcutters

1875-39

Barbers, Cosmetologists

1875-40

Funeral Directors and Embalmers

1875-41

Asbestos and Insulation Workers

1875-57

Bricklayers, Stonemasons, Marble
Setters, Tile Setters, and
Terrazzo Workers

1875-58

Carpenters, Painters and
Paperhangers, Glaziers

1875-59

Cememt Masons, Lathers, Plasterers

1875-60

Electricians (Construction)

1875-63




How
Many

Total
Cost

Employment
Outlook for

Bulletin
No.

Elevator Constructors, Structural,
Ornamental, and Reinforcing Iron
Workers, Riggers, and Machine Movers

1876-64

Floor Covering Installers

1875-65

Operating Engineers

1875-66

Plumbers and Pipefitters

1875-67

Roofers, Sheet-Metal Workers

1875-68

Civil Aviation
Air Traffic Controllers
Airplane Mechanics
Airplane Pilots
Flight Attendants
Reservation, Ticket and
Passenger Agents

1875-69

Railroads
Brake Operators
Conductors
Locomotive Engineers
Shop Trades
Signal Department Workers
Station Agents
Telegraphers, Telephoners, and
Tower Operators
Track Workers

1875-71

Other Scientific and Technical
Occupations
Drafters
Engineering and Science
Technicians
Surveyors

1875-80

Automobile Service Occupations
Automobile Body Repairers
Automobile Mechanics
Truck and Bus Mechanics
Automobile Service Advisers
Automobile Parts Counter Workers
Gasoline Service Station Attendants
Automobile Painters

1875-82

Diesel Mechanics

1875-88

Electric Sign Repairers

1875-89

Farm Equipment Mechanics

1875-90

Maintenance Electricians,
Industrial Machinery Repairers
Millwrights

1875-91

Instrument Repairers

1875-92




How
Many

Total
Cost

Employment
Outlook for

Bulletin
No.

Jewelers, Watch Repairers

1875-93

Shoe Repairers

1875-96

Dental Occupations
Dentists
Dental Assistants
Dental Hygienists
Dental Laboratory Technicians

1875-101

Dispensing Opticians, Ophthalmic
Laboratory Technicians

1875-109

How
Many

Total
Cost

Orders for copies of this leaflet or for priced publications
should be sent to any regional office of the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor.

1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203

Suite 540
1371 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309

9th Floor, 230 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, III. 60604

2nd Floor, 555 Griffin Square
Dallas, Texas 75202

P. O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa.

Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106

19101

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036




450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102

☆ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1976

0 - 2 1 0 - 8 8 2 (153)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

THIRD CLASS MAIL

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20212
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE, $300




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
LAB-441

BKCULTY