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INDUSTRY WADE SURVEY




WOOL TEXTILES
Part I:

W ool Yarn and Broadwoven
Fabric Mills

Part II:

Dyeing and Finishing Plants
i

Part III: Scouring and Combing Plants
NOVEMBER 1966

B u lle tin N o. 1 5 5 1

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

/''fsrv

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY
WOOL TEXTILES

Part I:

W o o l Yarn and Broad woven
Fabric Mills

Part II:

Dyeing and Finishing Plants

Part III: Scouring and Combing Plants
NOVEMBER 1966

B u lle t in N o. 1 5 5 1
June 1 9 6 7

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 2 040 2 - Price 45 cents







Preface
This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of
Labor Statistics survey of wages and supplementary bene­
fits in the wool textiles industry in November 1966.
Part I provides information on national, regional,
State, and area data for wool yarn and broadwoven fabric
m ills. An advance release, providing national and regional
information, was issued in February 1967.
Separate r e ­
leases were also issued for the Southeast region and for
the following States and areas: Maine, Massachusetts, New
Hampshire, North Carolina—
Virginia, Rhode Island, and
Philadelphia—
Camden, P a .— .J . Copies of these releases
N
are available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Wash­
ington, D .C ., 20212, or any of its regional offices.
Part II provides information for wool dyeing and
finishing and shrinking and sponging plants.
Part III provides information for scouring and comb­
ing plants.
The study was conducted in the Bureau1s Division
of Occupational Pay, Toivo P. Kanninen, Chief, under
the general direction of L. R. Linsenmayer, Assistant
Com missioner, Office of Wages and Industrial Relations.
The analysis was prepared by Edward J. Caramela, under
the immediate supervision of L. Earl Lewis. Field work
for the survey was directed by Assistant Regional D irec­
tors for Wages and Industrial Relations.
Other reports available from the Bureau*s program
of industry wage studies, as well as the addresses of the
Bureaus six regional offices, are listed at the end of this
bulletin.




iii




Contents
Page

Part I. Wool yarn and broadwoven fabric m ills --------------------------------------------------------------------Sum m ary-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Industry characteristics,-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Employment trends -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Location---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Type of m i l l --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Unionization -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Method of wage payment ----------------------------------------------------------------------------S e x ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Average hourly earnings ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Occupational earnings---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Establishment practices and supplementary wage
provisions -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Scheduled weekly hours ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Shift provisions and practices --------------------------------------------------------------------Paid holidays ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- —
Paid vacations----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Health, insurance, and retirement p la n s--------------------------------------------------Other selected benefits --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
5
5
5
6
6
6
6

Tables:
Average hourly earnings:
1.

By selected characteristics

-----------------------------------------------------------------

7

A ll m ills by type of y a r n ----------------------------------------------------------------------A ll m ills by type of m i l l -----------------------------------------------------------------------Weaving and integrated broadwoven fabric m ills by
type of fabric ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Yarn m ills by type of yarn -------------------------------------------------------------------

8
9

Earnings distribution:
2.
3.
4.
5.

10
11

Occupational averages:
6.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

A ll m ills --------------------------------------

12

Weaving m ills ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Integrated m i l l s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Weaving and integrated m ills by type of fabric -----------------------------------A ll m ills by size of community -----------------------------------------------------------A ll m ills by size of m ill ----------------------------------------------------------------------A ll m ills by method of wagepayment ---------------------------------------------------

16
17
18
20
22
23

iv

C ontents— Continued
Page

Tables— Continued
Occupational earnings:
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.

Maine ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Massachusetts -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------New H am pshire------------------------------------------------------------------------------------North Carolina— irg in ia ---------------------------------------------------------------------V
Philadelphia—Camden, P a .— J . -------------------------------------------------------N.
Rhode Island -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

24
25
27
28
29
30

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.

Method of wage paym en t---------------------------------------------------------------------Scheduled weekly hours ----------------------------------------------------------------------Shift differential provisions --------------------------------------------------------------Shift differential practices -----------------------------------------------------------------Paid holidays----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Paid vacations -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Health, insurance, and retirement plans -----------------------------------------Other selected benefits -----------------------------------------------------------------------

32
32
33
34
35
36
38
40

Part II. Dyeing and finishing plants--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

41

Sum m ary-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Industry ch aracteristics-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Average hourly earnings ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Occupational earnings---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Establishment practices and supplementary wage
provisions -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Scheduled weekly hours and shift p ra c tic es----------------------------------------------Paid holidays ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Paid vacations ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Health, insurance, and retirement plans ------------------------------------------------Other selected benefits --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

41
41
42
42
42
42
42
43
43
43

Tables:
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.

Earnings distribution -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Earnings distribution: By type of plant -------------------------------------------------Occupational earnings ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Method of wage payment --------------------------------------------------------------------------Scheduled weekly hours ---------------------------------------------------------------------------Shift differential provisions --------------------------------------------------------------------Shift differential practices-----------------------------------------------------------------------Paid holidays----------Paid vacations -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Health, insurance, and retirement plans ----------------------------------------------Other selected benefits----------------------------------------------------------------------------




44
45
46
46
46
47
47
48
49
50
51




C ontents— Continued
Page

Part III. Scouring and combing plants-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

52

Summary —----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Industry ch aracteristics------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Average hourly earnings -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Occupational earnings----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Establishment practices and supplementary wage p rovision s--------------------Scheduled weekly h o u rs---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Shift provisions and practices ---------------------------------------------------------------------Paid holidays -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Paid vacations -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Health, insurance, and retirement p la n s---------------------------------------------------Other selected benefits ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

52
52
53
53
53
53
53
54
54
54
54

Tables:
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48..

Earnings distribution ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Occupational earnings -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Method of wage payment ---------------------------------------------------------------------------Scheduled weekly hours -----------------------------------------------------------------------------Shift differential provisions ----------------------------------------------------------------------Shift differential practices-------------------------------------------------------------------------Paid holidays-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Paid vacations ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Health, insurance, andretirement plans -------------------------------------------------Other selected benefits -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

55
56
57
57
58
58
59
59
60
61

Appendixes:
A.
B.

Scope and method of su rv ey-----------------------------------------------------------------------Occupational descriptions ------------------------------------------------------------------------- -

vi

63
67

Industry W age Survey----

W ool Textiles, November 1966
Part I.

W ool Yarn and Broadwoven Fabric Mills

Summary
Straight-time earnings of production and related workers in wool yarn and
broadwoven fabric m ills averaged $ 1. 90 an hour in November 1966.
Approxi­
mately 2 percent of the 41, 765 workers covered by the survey 1 earned less than
$ 1 .4 0 an hour, 1 and nearly 16 percent earned less than $ 1 .6 0 ; the middle half
2
of the workers earned between $ 1 .6 7 and $ 2 .0 8 an hour, and 6 percent earned
$ 2. 50 or m ore.
Workers in the Southeast region, 3 accounting for slightly more than twofifths of the industry^ work force, averaged $ 1 .8 2 an hour; compared with
$ 1 .9 2 in New England, where nearly two-fifths of the workers were employed.
Workers in the Middle Atlantic and Great Lakes regions averaged $ 2 .2 0 and
$ 1.77 an hour, respectively.
Earnings also varied by sex, size and type of
m ill, type of product, size of community, labor-management contract status, and
occupation.
Among the occupations selected for separate study, 4 nationwide averages
ranged from $ 1 .6 3 an hour for janitors to $ 2 .5 0 for loom fixers in worsted
operations and nonautomatic box loom weavers in woolen operations.
Paid holidays and paid vacations, as well as various types of health and
insurance benefits, were provided by establishments employing about nine-tenths
of the workers or m ore.
Industry Characteristics
Employment Trends. Employment in wool yarn and broadwoven fabric m ills
has declined steadily during the past 20 years. Mills within scope of the current
survey employed 41, 765 production and related workers in November 1966. This
is approximately 75 percent below the employment level of April 1946 and 15 per­
cent below that of June 1962, when sim ilar surveys were conducted.5

1 See appendix A for scope and method o f survey. Wage data in this report exclude premium pay for overtime
and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 The Federal minimum wage for workers in manufacturing establishments engaged in interstate com m erce was
$1 .25 an hour at the tim e o f the surveyj it was raised to $1.40, effective Feb. 1, 1967.
3 For definition of regions, see table in appendix A.
4 See appendix B for jo b descriptions.
5 See Wage Structure; W oolen and Worsted Textiles. 1946 (Series 2, No. 40, 1947) and Industry Wage Survey.
W ool Textiles, June 1962 (BLS Bulletin 1372, 1963).
Minor differences in the coverages of the three surveys have been taken into account for comparison purposes.




1

2
All of this decline has occurred in regions other than the Southeast, where
employment has increased slightly. As a result, the regional distribution of the
industry*s work force has changed substantially, as indicated in the following
tabulation:
Percent of production workers in selected regions
Survey date
April 1946------------April—
May 1952 ---September 1957 ---June 1962 ------------November 1966------

New England

Middle Atlantic

Southeast

63
63
50
48
39

22
18
16
11
9

7
14
26
33
44

Location.
The Southeast region accounted for 44 percent of the workers
covered by the current survey, and New England accounted for 39 percent. Nearly
one-tenth of the workers were in the Middle Atlantic region. About two-fifths of
the Southeast workers were employed in North Carolina and Virginia. The New
England employment was distributed fairly evenly among Maine, Massachusetts,
New Hampshire, and Rhode Island.
Two-fifths of the Middle Atlantic workers
were employed in the Philadelphia—
Camden, P a .— .J ., area.
N
M ills located in nonmetropolitan areas employed two-thirds of the industry*s
w o rk fo rce. Regionally, the proportions of workers in metropolitan areas 6 were:
Slightly less than one-sixth in the Southeast, one-third in New England, and about
nine-tenths in the Middle Atlantic.
Type of M ill.
Integrated m ills, which have both spinning and weaving
operations, employed slightly more than three-fifths of the workers nationally,
and more than one-half of those in the three major regions. Yarn m ills— those
limited to spinning yarn and thread— accounted for three-tenths of the workers;
nearly one-fourth in New England and nearly two-fifths in the Middle Atlantic
region and the Southeast.
Weaving m ills, which produce cloth from purchased
yarn, ^employed the remainder of the workers.
Most of these m ills were in
New England.
M ills primarily engaged in the manufacture of apparel fabrics and blanketing
accounted for nearly nine-tenths of the workers in weaving and integrated estab­
lishments.
Among integrated m ills, employment on woolen fabric production
accounted for seven-tenths of the workers nationally, and more than nine-tenths
in the New England and Middle Atlantic regions.
In yarn m ills, slightly fewer
than three-fifths of the workers were in m ills producing wool y a rn s;7 establish­
ments primarily engaged in the manufacture of carpet or rug yarn accounted for
two-fifths of the yarn m ill workers; most of these m ills were in the Southeast.
Unionization.
M ills having collective bargaining agreements covering a
majority of their production workers employed nearly one-third of the industry*s
work force. The proportions were fewer than one-tenth in the Southeast, about
half in New England, and the Great Lakes, and nearly seven-tenths in the Middle
Atlantic region.
The major unions in the industry were the Textile Workers
Union of Am erica and the United Textile Workers of Am erica.

6 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget through March 1965.
7 In the Bureau's June 1962 survey, two-thirds of the employment in yarn mills was engaged in the manufacture
o f worsted yarn.




3

Method of Wage Payment. Nearly three-fourths of the industry's production
workers were paid time rates, usually under formal systems providing a single
rate for a given occupation (table 20).
Incentive systems— normally individual
piece rates----applied to slightly over one-fourth of the workers in the Southeast,
about one-fourth in New England, and two-fifths in the Middle Atlantic region.
Incentive workers included more than nine-tenths of the weavers, a majority of
the cloth menders, slightly fewer than one-half of the frame spinners, and twofifths of the winders.
Sex.
Men accounted for nearly three-fifths of the industry's production
workers and were predominant in such jobs as card finishers, card strippers,
hand truckers, and weavers, as well as in plant maintenance work. Women com ­
prised the large majority of cloth menders, frame spinners, and winders. Men
accounted for slightly more than three-fifths of the workers in integrated m ills,
compared with about one-half in weaving and yarn m ills.
Average Hourly Earnings
Straight-time earnings of the 41,765 production and related workers in wool
yarn and broadwoven fabric m ills averaged $ 1 .9 0 an hour in November 1966
(table 1). This was 14 percent above the average ($ 1. 66) recorded in June 1962. 8
Workers averaged $ 1 .8 2 an hour in the Southeast and $ 1 .9 2 in New England.
Earnings in these two regions were, respectively, 21 and 12 percent higher in
November 1966 than in June 1962. In the Middle Atlantic and Great Lakes regions,
workers averaged $ 2 .2 0 and $ 1 .7 7 an hour, respectively.
As indicated in the
following tabulation, wage levels also varied by State and a r e a .9

Selected States and areas

Number of
production
workers

Average
hourlyearnings

M a in e ------------------------------------------------------------Massachusetts ------------------------------------------------ ----New Ham pshire---------------------------------------------North Carolinar—
Virginia -------------------------------Rhode Isla n d -------------------------------------------------Philadelphia—
Camden, Pa.— J . ------------------------N.

4,037
4,068
3,456
7,297
3,561
1,502

$1. 74
2.02
1. 93
1.83
1.98
2.06

Average hourly earnings of workers in woolen m ills exceeded those in
worsted m ills by 9 cents (table 2).
In both the Southeast and New England,
however, averages for these two m ill groups were nearly identical.
Workers in integrated m ills (those having both spinning and weaving oper­
ations) averaged $ 1 .9 6 an hour, compared with $ 1 .9 1 for workers in weaving
m ills, and $ 1 .7 6 for those in yarn (spinning) m ills. In New England, the only
region permitting such comparison, the corresponding averages were $ 1 .9 5 ,
$ 1 .9 2 , and $ 1 .8 3 . Although the lack of skilled weaving operations in yarn m ills
contributes to the relatively low earnings level for this type of m ill, yarn m ill
workers usually had lower pay when comparisons were made at the occupa­
tional level.

® Op. c i t ., BLS Bulletin 1372.
9 For greater detail, see individual State and area tables 14—19.




4

Average earnings among fabric m ills (weaving and integrated m ills) varied
by predominant class of fabric.
In the three regions permitting comparisons,
earnings of workers in m ills primarily engaged in manufacturing apparel fabrics
and blanketing averaged less than those of workers in m ills manufacturing other
types of fabrics— the differences amounting to 11 cents an hour in New England,
35 cents in the Great Lakes, and 38 cents in the Middle Atlantic region.
Data were also tabulated by size of community and size of m ill,
In the
New England and Middle Atlantic regions, workers in metropolitan areas averaged
7 and 35 cents an hour m ore, respectively, than workers in sm aller communities;
in the Great Lakes region, the relationship was reversed.
In the Southeast,
however, averages were nearly identical. Nationwide, workers in establishments
employing 250 workers or more averaged $ 1 .9 3 an hour----7 cents more than those
in sm aller m ills. This relationship of m ill-employm ent size to earnings held in
the three regions permitting comparisons— the differences amounting to 7 cents
an hour in New England, 14 cents in the Southeast, and 41 cents in the Middle
Atlantic region.
The wage advantage of workers in m ills with labor-management contracts
over workers in m ills not having such contracts amounted to 15 cents an hour
in New England, 29 cents in the Middle Atlantic region and 24 cents in the Great
Lakes region.
Because of the interrelationship with other factors previously
mentioned, it is not possible to determine the exact influence unionization had on
earnings. In each of the three regions, integrated m ills accounted for a larger
proportion of the employment in union m ills than in those not having labormanagement contracts.
In New England, for example, the proportions were
three-fourths and one-half, respectively.
As indicated previously, fewer than
one-tenth of the workers in the Southeast were in union m ills.
Men, who accounted for 57 percent of the workers in wool yarn and broadwoven fabric m ills, averaged $1.97 an hour; women averaged $1.81. Men averaged
13 cents an hour more than women in the New England and Southeast regions,
and 26 cents more in the Middle Atlantic region.
Differences in average pay
levels for men and women may be the result of several factors, including variation
in the distribution of the sexes among establishments and among jobs with d is­
parate pay levels. Differences in averages in the same job and area may reflect
minor differences in workers’ duties. Job descriptions used in classifying work­
ers in wage surveys are usually more generalized than those used in individual
establishments, because allowance must be made for minor differences among
establishments in specific duties performed. A lso, earnings in some jobs in the
industry are largely determined by production at piece rates.
Variations in in­
centive earnings for individuals or sex groupings may be traceable to differences
in work experience, effort, workflow, or other factors which the worker may or
may not control.
Ninety-seven percent of the workers earned between $ 1 .4 0 and $ 3 an hour;
the middle half of.the workers earned between $ 1 .6 7 and $ 2 .0 8 . Nearly 6 p e r­
cent of the workers earned less than $ 1 .5 0 an hour and a comparable proportion
earned $ 2 .50 or more (table 2).
Occupational Earnings
Occupational classifications for which data are presented separately, ac­
counted for slightly more than two-fifths of the production workers covered by
the study (table 6).
Hourly averages for these jobs ranged from $ 1 .6 3 for
janitors to $ 2 .5 0 for loom fixers in worsted operations and nonautomatic box
loom weavers in woolen operations. Some numerically important jobs in woolen
operations and their averages were winders, $ 1 .7 6 an hour; card finishers and




5

cloth menders, $ 1 .8 5 ; frame spinners, $ 1 .9 2 ; and w eavers, $ 2 .3 2 . In worsted
operations, cloth menders averaged $ 1 .7 8 an hour; frame spinners, $ 1 .7 7 ;
weavers, $ 2 .2 5 ; and winders, $ 1 .6 8 .
Hand truckers and battery hands, two
jobs common in both woolen and worsted m ills, averaged $ 1 .7 0 and $ 1 .7 1 an
hour, respectively.
Earnings of individual workers were widely distributed within the same job
and geographic area.
In some jobs, particularly those with incentive workers,
the highest hourly earnings exceeded the lowest in the same occupation and area
by $1 or m ore.
Thus, a number of workers in comparatively low paying jobs
(as measured by the average for all workers) earned more than some workers
in jobs for which significantly higher averages were recorded.
The following
tabulation illustrates the overlap in earnings occurring between men weavers (box
loom s, automatic) and women cloth menders, both engaged in woolen operations
in Maine, despite a 57-cent difference in the hourly averages for the two jobs:
Hourly earnings
Under
$1. 40
$1. 60
$1. 80
$2. 00
$2. 20
$2. 40
$2. 60

$ 1 .4 0 ------------------and under $1. 60 and under $1. 80 and under $2. 00 -•
and under $2. 20 —
and under $2. 40 and under $2. 60 -■
and o v e r -------------Total workers

Average hourly earnings

Men weavers
(box loom , automatic)
-

3
15
83
45
43
1

Women cloth
menders
10
73
87
31
4
6
3
-

190

214

$ 2. 22

$1.65

Occupational earnings data were also tabulated by type of m ill, type of
fabric, size of community, size of m ill, and method of wage payment (tables 7
through 13).
Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Data were also obtained on certain establishment practices, including shift
differentials for production w orkers, work schedules, and selected supplementary
benefits, such as paid holidays, vacations, and various health, insurance, and
retirement plans for production and office workers.
Scheduled Weekly Hours. Work schedules of 40 hours a week were in effect
in m ills employing three-fifths of the production workers and four-fifths of the
office workers(table 21). Seven-tenths of the production workers in New England
and the Great Lakes regions, and nearly two-thirds in the Middle Atlantic region
were scheduled to work 40 hours a week; in the Southeast, over nine-tenths of
the workers were scheduled for 40 hours (48 percent) or 48 hours (45 percent).
Shift Provisions and P ractices.
Nearly all m ills had provisions for lateshift work (table 22); about one-half of the production workers were employed
on late shifts in November 1966 (table 23).
Most workers on the second shift
in New England m ills received premium pay— usually 4 cents an hour above the
day-shift rate; in the Southeast region, nearly one-fourth of the second-shift
workers received premium pay, most commonly 5 cents an hour.
In both of
these regions most of the workers on third or other late shifts received premium
pay, most commonly 7 cents an hour in New England and 5 cents in the Southeast.




6

Paid Holidays.
Paid holidays were provided by establishments employing
about nine-tenths of the production workers (table 24).
Provisions varied by
region and within regions. For example, workers in New England most commonly
received 6 paid holidays annually, however, provisions for 7 days or more applied
to one-fourth of the workers. In the Middle Atlantic region, 7 and 8 paid holidays
were about equally prevalent, and in the Southeast, about one-half of the workers
were employed in m ills providing 2 days a year, although provisions for 5 days
or more applied to one-fourth of the workers. Paid holiday provisions for office
workers were somewhat more liberal than those for plant workers.
Paid Vacations. Paid vacations (after qualifying periods of service) were
provided for production and office workers by nearly all of the m ills studied
(table 25). Vacation payments for slightly more than one-half of the production
workers were based on a stipulated percentage of the employee’ s annual earnings;
payments for more than nine-tenths of the office workers were determined on a
length-of-tim e basis.
For purposes of this study, percentage payments were
converted to an equivalent time basis. Most common vacation payments for pro­
duction workers were 1 week’ s pay after 1 year of service and 2 week’ s pay
after 5 years or m ore. Nearly one-fifth of the production workers were in e s ­
tablishments providing at least 3 weeks' paly after 15 years of service or m ore.
Nearly two-thirds of the office workers received 2 weeks’ pay after 1 year of
service; slightly more than two-fifths received 3 weeks' after 15 years; and onefifth received 4 weeks' after 20 years.
Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans.
More than nine-tenths of the
production and office workers were employed in m ills that paid at least part of
the cost of life, hospitalization, and surgical insurance (table 26).
Accidental
death and dismemberment insurance and medical insurance were provided to at
least three-fifths of the workers in both groups; sickness and accident insurance
applied to three-fourths of the production workers and one-half of the office
workers.
Sick leave (full pay, no waiting period) was available to two-fifths of
the office workers, but to none of the production workers; catastrophe insurance
was available to one-fifth of the office workers, and two-fifths of the production
workers.
All types of plans were usually financed wholly by the employer,
except for catastrophe insurance that applied to production workers.
Usually,
plans wholly financed by the employer did not provide benefits to the employee's
dependents.
Pension plans (other than social security), providing regular payments to
workers on retirement, were provided by m ills employing two-fifths of the pro­
duction workers and one-half of the office workers. Plans providing lump-sum
payments upon retirement applied to fewer than one-tenth of the workers in
both groups.

Other Selected Benefits.
Mills with provisions for severance pay1 em ­
0
ployed fewer than one-tenth of the production workers and one-eighth of the
office workers (table 27). Formal plans providing pay for funeral leave applied
to one-fifth of the production workers; and provisions for jury duty pay applied to
nearly three-tenths; both of these provisions applied to nearly two-fifths of the
office workers.




10 Pay to employees permanently separated from work through no fault o f their own.

Table 1.

Average Hourly Earnings:

By Selected Characteristics

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m i l l s b y s e l e c t e d c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ,
U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U nited S ta te s 2

N ew E ngland

M id d le A tla n tic

N um ber
of
w ork ers

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N u m ber
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
ea rn in g s

A l l w o r k e r s --------------------------------------------------------------M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------

4 1 ,7 6 5
2 3 ,8 0 0
17, 965

$ 1 . 90
1. 97
1. 81

1 6 ,4 0 7
9 ,9 1 8
6 ,4 8 9

$ 1 . 92
1. 97
1. 84

S iz e o f co m m u n it y :
M e t r o p o lit a n a r e a 4 ------------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a ---------------------------------------

1 3 ,1 6 1
2 8 ,6 0 4

2. 00
1. 85

5, 316
1 1 ,0 9 1

S iz e o f m i l l :
20—249 w o r k e r s -------------------------------------------------250 w o r k e r s o r m o r e ---------------------------------------

1 7 ,8 5 7
2 3 ,9 0 8

1. 86
1. 93

L a b o r-m a n a g e m e n t co n tr a c ts:
M i ll s w ith —
M a j o r it y o f w o r k e r s c o v e r e d -------------------N on e o r m in o r it y o f w o r k e r s c o v e r e d -----

1 3 ,2 2 3
2 8 ,5 4 2

2. 04
1. 83

T y p e o f m i l l and p r o d u c t :
Y a r n m i l l ------------------------------------------------------------W o o le n y a r n -------------------------------------------------W o r s t e d y a r n ------------------------------------------------W e a v in g m i l l -----------------------------------------------------W o r s t e d f a b r i c ---------------------------------------------I n te g r a te d m i l l --------------------------------------------------W o o le n f a b r i c -----------------------------------------------

1 2 ,9 8 4
7, 536
5 ,4 4 8
2, 661
2, 012
2 6 ,1 2 0
1 8 ,7 0 4

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

76
81
70
91
97
96
98

P r e d o m in a n t c l a s s o f f a b r i c : 5
A p p a r e l f a b r i c s 6 ----------------------------------------------N o n a p p a r e l f a b r i c s -------------------------------------------

2 5 ,3 6 5
3 ,4 1 6

1. 92
2. 24

Item

N u m ber
of
w ork ers

G re a t L ak es

S ou th ea st 3

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N um ber
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

3, 664
2, 332
1 ,3 3 2

$ 2 . 20
2. 30
2. 04

1 8 ,4 0 9
9 ,8 1 1
8, 598

$ 1. 82
1 88
*.
1. 75

1, 735
761
974

$ 1. 77
1. 90
1. 67

1. 97
1. 90

3, 268
396

2. 24
1. 89

2, 747
1 5 ,6 6 2

I. 81
1. 82

889
846

1. 72
1. 82

1 0 ,2 8 9
6, 118

1. 89
1. 96

1 ,9 3 9
1 ,7 2 5

2. 01
2 .4 2

3 ,3 5 8
1 5 ,0 5 1

1. 70
1. 84

1 ,4 7 5

1. 75

7 ,4 4 6
8, 961

2. 00
1. 85

2 ,4 7 5
1, 189

2. 30
2. 01

_
1 6 ,8 3 3

1. 81

3, 749
1, 751
1 ,9 9 8
2, 322
1 ,6 7 3
1 0 ,3 3 6
9, 700

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

83
82
83
92
99
95
95

1 ,4 1 4
1 ,2 2 7
_
2, 172
2, 172

1 .9 6
2. 00
_

7 ,0 2 0
4 , 350
2, 670

2. 36
2. 36

1 2 ,1 8 6
472

1. 94
2. 05

550
1, 700

2. 07
2 .4 5

-

-

-

-

1. 70
1. 75
1. 61
-

-

N u m ber
of
w ork ers

-

A v era ge
h o u r ly
ea rn in g s

-

873
862

1. 89
1. 65

801

1. 71

-

-

593
934
934

1. 65
-

432
502

1. 63
1. 98

-

1. 82
1. 82

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n clu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 D ata a r e n ot p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e ly f o r in te g r a te d m ills s in c e in fo r m a t io n w as ob ta in ed fr o m to o fe w o f the la r g e m i l l s . E m p lo y m e n t and e a rn in g s e s t im a t e s f o r w o r k e r s in in teg ra ted
m il ls a r e , h o w e v e r , in c lu d e d in the data fo r a ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s .
4 T h e t e r m " m e t r o p o li t a n a r e a " as u s e d in this study r e f e r s to the Sta n da rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a s as d e fin e d b y the U. S. B u r e a u o f the B u d get th rou g h M a r c h 1965.
5 I n clu d e s da ta f o r w e a v in g and in te g r a te d m il ls on ly .
6 A p p a r e l f a b r ic s c a t e g o r y a ls o in clu d e s b la n k etin g .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a t e no data r e p o r t e d o r data that do not m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .




J

Table 2.

Earnings Distribution:

00

All Mills by Type of Yarn

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m il ls b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1
and p r e d o m in a n t ty p e o f y a r n p r o d u c e d o r w o v e n , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited States 2
A l l ty p es

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
T ota l

M en

W om en

N ew E ngland

W oolen
yarn or
fa b r ic

W o r s te d
yarn or
fa b r ic

A ll
ty p es

W o o le n
yarn o r
f a b r ic

$ 1 .2 5
$ 1. 30
$ 1 .3 5
$ 1 .4 0
$ 1 .4 5

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1 .3 0 ---------------------------1 .3 5 ---------------------------1 .4 0 ---------------------------1. 4 5 ---------------------------1. 5 0 ----------------------------

0.
.
1.
1.
2.

3
3
5
5
3

0 .4
.3
.7
1. 2
2. 3

0.
.
2.
2.
2.

2
3
6
1
2

0. 3
.4
1 .4
1 .3
2. 8

0.
.
1.
1.
1.

3
1
7
9
4

0. 3
.3
. 7
1. 2
3. 8

0. 2
*4
, 7
Hi
5i 0

$
$
$
$
$

50
60
70
80
90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 .6 0 ---------------------------$ 1 .7 0 ---------------------------$ 1. 8 0 ---------------------------$ 1. 9 0 ---------------------------$ 2 . 0 0 ----------------------------

9.
13.
15.
14.
9.

9
7
2
6
9

7. 3
12. 3
1 2 .4
13. 7
9. 7

13.
15.
18.
15.
10.

3
7
9
9
1

7. 6
12. 3
14. 3
15. 8
9 .4

14.
16.
16.
12.
10.

1
3
8
4
7

7. 0
1 1. 2
14. 2
1 6 .4
12. 3

7^9
9* 2
14a 2
16a 1
11<5

$ 2 . 00
$ 2 .1 0
$ 2 . 20
$ 2. 30
$ 2. 40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 . 10---------------------------$ 2 . 2 0 ---------------------------$ 2 . 3 0 -------------------------$ 2. 4 0 ---------------------------$ 2 . 5 0 ----------------------------

6.
6.
4.
3.
2.

8
5
6
7
6

7. 3
7. 8
6. 4
5. 3
3 .5

6.
4.
2.
1.
1.

0
9
3
7
3

7. 2
7. 5
4. 7
3 .9
3. 0

5 .9
4. 8
4. 5
3. 5
1. 8

8. 2
5 .9
4. 5
4. 6
2. 8

7j
6j
4.
5.
2.

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$ 2.

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 . 6 0 ---------------------------$ 2 . 7 0 ---------------------------$ 2 . 8 0 ----------------------------$ 2 . 9 0 ---------------------------$ 3 . 0 0 ----------------------------

2.
1.
.
.
.

5
3
8
5
3

3. 7
2. 0
1 .3
.8
.5

1.
.
.
.
.

0
5
3
2
1

2.
1.
1.
.
.

2. 1
.9
. 3
. 1
(4)

2 .9
1. 6
. 9
.4
.2

3.
1.
1.
.
.

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

50
60
70
80
90

8
6
1
8
5

W orsted
yarn o r
fa b r ic

0. 3
. 1
. 7
1 .4
.4

A ll
ty p e s 3

_
0. 1
.3

W o o le n
yarn o r
fa b r ic

_
_
(4)
0. 2

A ll
ty p e s

0.
.
1.
2.
1.

W o o le n
yarn o r
fa b r ic

W orsted
yarn or
fa b r ic

A ll
ty p es 3

W o o le n
yarn or
f a b r ic

0.
2.
7.
2.
5.

3
3
6
7
4

13.
9.
11.
6.
12.

9
1
1
5
6

4
2
2
0
3

0. 7
.4
2. 1
1. 8
. 6

0.
.
.
2.
1.

2
1
4
3
9

0. 2
1. 5
15. 6
2. 1
3 .9

17.
17.
18.
10.
9.

3
1
1
6
6

13.
7.
14.
8.
10.

4.
16.
14.
17.
14.

6
8
1
3
7

4.
2.
8.
11.
6.

6
6
9
6
3

1.
2.
9.
12.
6.

1
6
1
2
8

13. 4
1 9 .5
18. 0
14. 8
8. 6

9. 2
2 2. 1
1 7 .9
1 9 .4
7. 5

7
2
8
1
9

9.
5.
3.
3.
2.

7
2
8
2
5

12.
11.
7.
4.
5.

4
9
6
6
9

13.
11.
8.
4.
5.

2
7
0
8
8

4.
4.
4.
3.
1.

4.
5.
3.
1.
2.

2
7
0
4
2

2.
1.
.
.
.

3
3
6
3
1

4.
3.
3.
3.
2.

3
7
9
1
7

4. 5
3 .9
4. 1
3. 3
2. 8

G re a t L a k es

S ou th ea st

M id d le A tla n tic

4
7
2
0
7

1. 5
. 7
. 2
(4 )

8
8
6
5
0

2
1
2
9
0

4. 6
4. 4
5. 1
3. 9
1 .4

6. 5
4 .4
2. 7
1. 8
1. 7

9 .4
4. 3
4. 0
2. 2
2. 6

.9
.6
. 3
(4)
-

2. 1
.7
. 1
(4 )

1. 6
.8
.5
. 7
.2

1.
1.
.
1.
.

8
0
4
1
3

$ 3 . 00 and o v e r ------------------------------------------

. 8

1. 1

.4

1. 1

. 3

. 6

•is

.8

5. 6

6. 0

(4 )

. 1

.9

1. 3

T o t a l--------------------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s ----------------------------------M e n --------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ----------------------------------------------------

4 1 ,7 6 5
2 3 ,8 0 0
1 7 ,9 6 5

2 3 ,8 0 0

1 7 ,9 6 5

2 6 ,8 8 9
1 6 ,7 3 3
10, 156

1 4 ,8 7 6
7, 067
7, 809

1 6 ,4 0 7
9 ,9 1 8
6 ,4 8 9

1 2 ,1 0 0
7 ,9 3 7
4 , 163

4 , 307
1 ,9 8 1
2, 326

3 ,6 6 4
2, 332
1 ,3 3 2

3 ,3 9 9
2, 240
1, 159

1 8 ,4 0 9
9 ,8 1 1
8 ,5 9 8

8, 727
5, 033
3, 694

9 , 682
4 , 778
4 , 904

1 ,7 3 5
761
974

1, 142
548
594

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1-----------------------M e n --------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ----------------------------------------------------

$ 1 .9 0
1. 97
1 .8 1

$ 1 .9 7

$ 1. 81

-

-

$ 1 .9 3
1 .9 7
1 .8 5

$ 1. 84
1 .9 5
1. 74

$ 1 .9 2
1 .9 7
1 .8 4

$ 1 .9 2
1 .9 6
1. 86

$ 1 .9 1
2. 03
1. 80

$ 2 . 20
2. 30
2. 04

$ 2 . 23
2. 30
2. 08

$ 1. 82
1. 88
1. 75

$ 1 . 81
1. 84
1. 78

$ 1. 82
1 .9 2
1. 73

$ 1 . 77
1. 90
1. 67

$ 1. 83
1. 94
1. 74

_

_

-

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s ,
2 I n clu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 I n clu d e s data f o r w o r s t e d y a r n o r f a b r i c m ills not sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
4 L e s s than 0. 05 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq u al to ta ls,

and la te s h ift s .

(4)

Table 3.

Earnings Distribution:

All Mills by Type of Mill

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m il ls b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s
and ty p e o f m i l l , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited S ta tes
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1

N ew E n g la n d

Y a rn

W ea vin g
m il ls

I n te g r a te d
m il ls

0. 7
.4
3 .4
3. 2
3. 2

0. 2
. 5
.4
. 9
3. 6

0.
.
.
.
1.

1
2
7
8
7

$ 1. 25
$ 1. 30
$ 1 .3 5
$ 1. 4 0
$ 1. 45

an d
an d
an d
and
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

30_____________________________
35_____________________________
4 0 --------------------------------------------4 5 --------------------------------------------50_____________________________

$
$
$
$
$

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

50
60
70
80
90

an d
an d
an d
and
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1.
1.
1.
1.
2.

60_____________________________
70_____________________________
80_____________________________
90_____________________________ ,
00---------------------------------------------

16.
17.
14.
15.
8.

8
5
2
8
9

8. 6
18. 3
9 .0
10. 2
13. 8

6. 6
1 1 .4
16. 3
14. 5
10. 0

$
$
$
$
$

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

00
10
20
30
40

an d
and
and
an d
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.

10_____________________________
20--------------------------------------------30________i______________ ______
4 0 _____________________________
50--------------------------------------------

5.
4.
1.
1.
.

5
8
8
2
7

9 .0
7 .4
2. 5
4. 2
4. 1

7.
7.
6.
4.
3.

2
3
3
9
4

$
$
$
$
$

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

50
60
70
80
90

and
and
an d
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$3.

60_____________________________
70--------------------------------------------80-------------------------------------------90---------- ------------------------------00---------------------------------------------

.
.
.
.
.

6
2
3
2
1

3. 2
2. 3
.9
. 5
.2

3.
1.
1.
.
.

$ 3. 00 an d o v e r ______________________________________

. 5

T o t a l ...............— --------- -------------- ------------------------

Y a rn
m il ls

0 .4
. 5
.9
2. 8
6. 3

W ea vin g
m il ls

(4)
0. 5
.4
. 9
4. 0

M id d le A tla n tic
In te g r a te d
m il ls

0.
.
.
.
2.

Y a rn
m il ls

0. 2
. 7

3
3
6
7
7

I n te g r a te d
m il ls

-

S ou th ea st3
Y a rn
m il ls

G r e a t L ak es
Y a rn
m il ls

1.
.
3.
4.
2.

0
5
2
4
3

23. 0
. 7
. 7

In teg ra ted
m ills

0.
2.
9.
3.
6.

3
8
3
3
6

7.
15.
16.
16.
12.

6
1
2
1
1

9.
14.
9.
11.
14.

5
9
3
0
8

6. 2
9 .0
14. 6
17. 8
11. 8

11.
4.
15.
17.
6.

0
7
8
3
1

0.
1.
4.
8.
6.

7
3
5
3
7

23.
22.
12.
16.
7.

2
8
1
0
6

14.
4.
21.
10.
10.

0
0
0
1
7

7.
5.
3.
2.
.

1
5
6
7
6

9.
6.
2.
4.
4.

1
0
7
7
0

8 .4
6. 0
5. 3
5. 2
3. 3

16.
12.
3.
1.
3.

8
3
9
1
3

9.
10.
10.
6.
7.

8
3
2
8
0

2.
2.
.
.
.

1
9
7
5
2

7.
4.
.
.
.

6
7
6
7
2

4
8
1
7
5

.5
. 1
. 5
. 2
-

3.
2.
1.
.
.

7
6
0
6
1

3. 6
1. 9
1. 0
.4
.3

1.
1.
.
1.
.

8
3
9
0
5

6.
5.
6.
4.
4.

0
3
0
6
1

.4
(4 )

.3

1. o

1. 0

. 2

. 5

1. 3

8. 5

(4 )

. 1

1. 6

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s __________________________________
M e n ________________________________________________
W o m e n _____________________________________________

1 2 ,9 8 4
6, 115
6, 869

2, 661
1 ,4 3 8
1, 223

2 6 ,1 2 0
16, 247
9, 873

3, 749
1, 764
1, 985

2, 322
1 ,2 8 9
1 ,0 3 3

1 0 ,3 3 6
6, 865
3 ,4 7 1

1 ,4 1 4
854
560

2, 172
1 ,4 3 6
736

7, 020
3, 194
3, 826

801
303
498

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1--------------------------------------M e n ________________________________________________
W o m e n _____________________________________________

$ 1. 76
1. 82
1. 71

$ 1 . 91
2. 03
1. 78

$ 1. 96
2. 01
1. 88

$ 1. 83
1. 87
1. 79

$ 1. 92
2. 03
1 .7 8

$ 1 . 95
1. 99
1. 88

$ 1. 96
2. 07
1. 78

$ 2 . 36
2 .4 3
2. 22

$ 1. 70
1. 73
1. 67

$ 1. 71
1. 85
1. 63

1
2
3
4

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
In c lu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
D ata a r e n ot p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e ly fo r in te g r a te d m il ls s in c e in fo r m a t io n w as o b ta in e d f r o m
L e s s than 0. 05 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




_
-

. 7
.4
. 5
_
-

13. 6
11. 1
9. 2
7. 2
9 .4
5.
4.
4.
2.
3.

6
2
5
7
0

2. 2
1. 2
.4
1 .4
. 3

934
4 58 ‘
476
$ 1. 82
1. 92
1 .7 2

too fe w o f the la r g e m i l l s .

su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot eq u a l t o t a ls .

C
D

Table 4.

Earnings Distribution:

Weaving and Integrated Broadwoven Fabric Mills by Type of Fabric

O

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o o l w ea v in g and in te g r a t e d b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m il ls by a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1
and type o f fa b r ic p r o d u c e d , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited S tates 2
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1

A p pa rel fa b r ic s 3
W o o le n

$ 1. 25
$ 1. 30
$ 1. 35
$ 1. 40
$ 1 .4 5

an d
and
and
an d
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1. 30________________________ ____ _
$ 1. 35_____________________________
$ 1. 40
$ 1 .4 5
___
. . . . . . ...........
$ 1. 50. ___
. ............... ........

$
$
$
$
$

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

50
60
70
80
90

and
an d
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1.
i.
1.
1.
2.

6 0 ..................................
_
70_____________________________
80______________________________
90_____________________________
00_____________________________

$
$
$
$
$

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
an d
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2.
$2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.

$
$
$
$
$

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

50
60
70
80
90

an d
an d
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

2.
2.
2.
2.
3.

W orsted

M id d le
A tla n tic

N ew E n gland
N o n a p p a re l
f a b r ic s

W o o le n

W o rsted

N o n a p p a re l
fa b r ic s

1
5
6
1
2

10.
10.
10.
9.
11.

6
0
6
0
4

5
5
1
9
8

5. 8
2. 1
2. 3
1. 4
"

5.
6.
6.
3.
5.

4
0
4
8
6

3
0
4
4
2

. 7
. 2
. 2

3.
2.
.
2.
.

6
2
8
4
4

5.
14.
20.
13.
12.

6
0
1
7
2

4.
4.
5.
4.
9.

0
8
9
6
3

7. 9
9 .4
14. 3
17. 5
11. 6

2.
13.
12.
14.
16.

9
3
3
6
5

4.
8.
6.
5.
8.

0
5
8
9
5

0.
1.
3.
2.
3.

9
5
3
9
6

10_____________________________
20.....................................................
30------------------------------------ ------4 0 ___________________ __________
50_____________________________

7. 0
7. 9
5. 2
4 .4
2. 7

7.
6.
6.
5.
2.

1
2
3
1
7

9.
7.
8.
6.
8.

5
9
1
3
9

7.
5.
4.
5.
3.

7
8
8
3
2

11.
6.
4.
4.
4.

3
3
9
3
4

12.
8.
4.
6.
3.

1
9
9
6
6

9.
9.
10.
7.
8.

60_____________________________
70_____________________________
80_____________________________
90--------------------------------------------00_____________________________

3.
1.
.
.
.

3.
1.
.
.
.

1
3
4
1
1

5.
5.
4.
3.
2.

6
0
9
2
9

3. 4
1. 8
.9
.4
. 2

4.
2.
1.
.
.

0
3
0
5
1

6.
6.
2.
1.
1.

8
1
3
5
5

7.
6.
7.
5.
5.

(4 )
(4 )
0. 1
. 8
. 2

_
2. 3
5. 7
3. 6

N on ap parel
fa b r ic s

17.
12.
7.
5.
7.

1
5
0
3
5

3
4
6
5
6

W o o le n

7
0
1
1
7

8.
12.
15.
16.
9.

0.
.
.
.
3.

A p p a rel
fa b r ic s 3

0.
6.
20.
7.
3.

2
4
1
8
5

_
0. 3
. 8
2. 0

G r e a t L a k es

N o n a p p a re l
fa b r ic s

0.
.
1.
.
2.

1
5
7
5
2

0. 1
(4)
. 1
. 8
. 8

A p p a rel fa b r ic s 3

_
-

_

9. 2

3. 0

$ 3. 00 and o v e r _______________________________________

.4

. 1

5. 9

. 5

. 2

.4

10. 8

T o t a l ___________________________________________

100, 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s __________________________________

1 5 ,9 3 7

9 ,4 2 8

3 ,4 1 6

9, 877

2, 309

472

1, 700

432

502

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1---------------------------------------

$ 1. 92

$ 1. 92

$ 2 . 24

$ 1 . 93

$ 1. 98

$ 2 . 05

$ 2. 45

$ 1. 63

$ 1. 98

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y f o r o v e r t i m e an d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n c lu d e s data f o r r e g i o n s in a d d it io n t o th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
Data a re n ot p r e s e n t e d
in te g r a t e d m i l l s .
3 A p p a r e l f a b r ic s c a t e g o r y a l s o in c lu d e s b la n k e tin g .
4 L e s s than 0. 05 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot eq u al

to t a ls .

s e p a r a t e ly f o r the

S ou th ea st s in c e

in fo r m a t io n

w as

100. 0

ob ta in e d f r o m

100. 0

t o o fe w o f the la r g e

Table 5.

Earnings Distribution:

Y arn Mills by Type of Yarn

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n m il ls b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s
and p r e d o m in a n t type o f y a r n p r o d u c e d , U n ited S tates and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited S ta tes 2
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1

^

M id d le
A tla n tic

N ew E n g lan d

W o o le n
yarn

W orsted
y a rn

W o o le n
yarn

W orsted
y arn

W o o le n
y a rn

S ou th ea st
W o o le n

W orsted

1.
.
4.
3.
1.

3
8
3
3
1

0.
.
1.
6.
4.

6
1
5
1
3

45.
24.
5.
2.
6.

3
0
3
8
2

$
$
$
$
$

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

25
30
35
40
45

and
and
and
an d
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

30_________________ ____ _________________
35---------------------- ------ ------------------------------4 0 .........................................................................
4 5 ________________________________________
50_________________ ______________________

0.
.
2.
2.
3.

8
6
6
7
7

0.
.
4.
4.
2.

5
2
6
0
5

0.
.
3.
13.

8
5
4
0

0.
.
1.
2.
.

7
3
3
2
6

$
$
$
$
$

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

50
60
70
80
90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1.
1.
1.
1.
2.

6 0 . . . ...........- --------------------------------------------70------- -------------- -------------- ---------------------80_______________________________________
90________________ ______________________
00________________________________________

8.
15.
16.
19.
9.

3
5
5
8
5

28. 5
20. 2
11. 1
1 0 .4
8. 1

8.
8.
16.
11.
11.

8
5
2
3
7

6.
21.
16.
20.
12.

6
0
3
3
5

1.
4.
17.
19.
7.

8
9
2
1
0

9.
22.
16.
24.
8.

6
1
2
2
5

$
$
$
$
$

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
and
an d
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

10________________________________________
20-------------- ---------- ----------------------------------30......... ................... - ------ ---------------------------4 0 --------------------- -------------------------------------50--------------------------------- ---------------------------

6.
6.
2.
1.
1.

7
4
1
5
0

3.
2.
1.
.
.

8
5
5
8
2

6.
7.
4.
3.
1.

2
4
7
7
0

7.
3.
2.
1.
.

9
9
6
9
3

19.
14.
4.
1.
3.

2
0
0
3
7

2.
4.
.
.
.

4
0
5
8
2

$
$
$
$
$

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

50
60
70
80
90

and
an d
and
and
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

2.
2.
2.
2.
3.

60----------------- ------------------------------------------70_______________________________________
80-----------------------------------------------------------90_______________________________________
0 0 ------------------------------------------------------------

.
.
.
.
.

9
3
4
3
1

. 3
. 1
. 1
-

.
.
1.
.
-

7
1
0
5

. 3
. 1
. 1
-

1.
1.
.
1.
.

8
3
7
1
6

. 7
( 3)
-

$ 3. 00 and o v e r _________________________________________________

.4

. 6

. 5

1. 5

1. 5

_

. 1

T o t a l _____________________________________________________

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

-

'

0. 1
. 7

1. 5
1. 1
. 9
( 3)
. 2
_
-

-

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------------------------------

7, 536

5 ,4 4 8

1 ,7 5 1

1, 998

1 ,2 2 7

4 , 350

2, 670

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1-------------------------------------------------------

$ 1 .8 1

$ 1. 70

$ 1. 82

$ 1. 83

$ 2. 00

$ 1. 75

$ 1. 61

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s ,
2 I n c lu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th ose sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 L e s s than 0. 05 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:




B ecause

o f rou n d in g ,

h o lid a y s ,

su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u a l t o t a ls .

and la te s h ift s .

Table 6.

Occupational Averages:

All Mills

10

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m il ls ,
U n ited States and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited States 2
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

M ean3

Me d ia n 3

M id d le A tla n tic

New E n g lan d
N um ber
of
w ork ers

H ou r ly e a rn in g s
M id d le
ra n g e3

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

H o u r ly e a rn in g s
M e a n3

M e d ia n 3

M id d le
ra n g e3

H o u r ly e a rn in g s
M ean3

M e d ia n 3

M id d le
ra n g e3

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
C a r d fi n is h e r s —
___
_ ^
M e n _________
W o m e n _______
_
___
C a r d s t r ip p e r s (a ll m e n )_________________________________
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g fr a m e (332 m e n and 29 w o m e n )___
D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c lo t h
(215 m e n and 1 w o m a n )_________________________________
D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , y a r n (a ll m e n )_____________
F u ll e r t e n d e r s (a ll m e n ) _________________________________
L o o m f i x e r s (a ll m e n )
M e n d e r s , c lo t h (11 m e n and 1 ,2 2 3 w o m e n )___________
S p in n e r s , f r a m e ___________________________________________
M en
W om en— _
___
__
S p in n e r s , m u le (124 m e n and 23 w o m e n )
W e a v e r s 4________ _________________________ _________________
M e n „ _______________________________________________
W om en
B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c ________________________________
M en
W o m e n _______________________________________________
B o x lo o m s , n o n a u to m a tic
(140 m e n and 57 w o m e n ) ____________________________
W e a v in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ______________________________
M e n ____________________________________________________ —
W o m e n ___________________________________________________
W in de r s 4 ____________ _______ ____________ _____ ______ ____
M e n _____ ___________________________________________
W om en
_________________
C on e and tube a u to m a tic
(12 m e n and 144 w o m e n ) ____________________________
C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d , n o n a u to m a tic
(18 m e n and 853 w o m e n ) __________________________ _
F il li n g , a u to m a tic (6 4 m e n and 445 w o m e n )_______

1, 176
1 ,0 5 8
118
499
361

$1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

85
87
72
93
74

$1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

85
85
77
89
77

$ 1 .7 2 —$1.
1. 7 6 - 1.
1 . 5 1 - 1.
1. 7 7 - 2.
1. 6 4 - 1.

216
109
346
557
1 ,2 34
2, 779
591
2, 188
147
1 ,9 0 9
1, 370
539
1 ,5 7 9
1, 108
471

1.
1.
2.
2.
1.
1.
1.
1.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

78
78
01
45
85
92
99
90
09
32
39
16
27
32
15

1.
1.
1.
2.
1.
1.
1.
1.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

79
84
91
47
85
89
96
87
07
32
38
18
28
31
17

1 .6 5 1 .6 7 1. 7 1 2. 2 3 1 .6 5 1. 7 8 1. 8 5 1. 7 7 1 .8 5 2. 1 1 2. 1 5 1. 9 9 2. 0 9 2. 1 3 2. 0 0 -

197
49
34
15
1 ,6 7 0
116
1 ,5 5 4

2.
2.
2.
2.
1.
1.
1.

50
44
60
06
76
77
76

2. 55
2. 43
2. 50
1. 96
1 .7 6
1 .7 6
1. 76

2. 3 0 2. 1 0 2. 3 9 1. 9 4 1 .6 1 —
1. 7 5 1 .6 1 —

95
97
85
05
84

547
441
106
259
86

1.
1.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

93
92
28
60
03
08
12
05
32
55
58
40
48
53
38

129
73
139
302
594
1 ,2 4 0
207
1 ,0 3 3
93
950
683
267
892
631
261

1.
1.
1.
2.
1.
1.
2.
1.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

2.
2.
2.
2.
1.
1.
1.

80
71
99
29
86
80
86

31
41
29
12
594
20
574

2.
2.
2.
2.
1.
1.
1.

107

182
180
_
68
38

$2. 09
2. 08
_
2. 13
1. 99

$2. 01
2. 01
_
2. 10
1. 80

88
92
94
54
90
15
20
13
30
51
56
38
50
54
38

76
59
57
244
165
79
40
209
183
26
_
_

_
2. 36
2. 89
1. 88
2. 13
2. 12
2. 14
2. 32
2 .6 9
2. 73
2. 42
_
_
_

_
_
2. 28
2. 78
1. 81
2. 1 1
2. 12
2. 11
2. 25
2. 75
2. 77
2. 40
_
_
_

_
_
1. 9 9 2. 6 2 1. 8 1 2. 0 0 2. 0 3 2. 0 0 1. 9 6 2. 3 7 2. 4 5 2. 1 5 _
_
_

_
2. 77
3. 25
2. 03
2. 14
2. 12
2. 23
2. 62
2. 96
2. 98
2. 70
_
_
_

2. 73
2. 72
3. 01
1. 86
1. 91
1. 86

61
_
248
39
209

2. 80
_

2. 86
_
_
_
1. 80
1 .7 1
1. 83

2. 5 6 _
_
_
1. 7 7 1. 7 1 1. 7 7 -

3. 06
_
_
_
1. 94
1. 80
2. 00

$1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

84
86
77
92
80

76
83
87
43
81
99
04
99
09
32
35
22
31
34
22

1.
1.
1.
2.
1.
1.
2.
1.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

75
89
87
47
85
97
00
97
10
33
37
22
33
36
22

1 .6 5 1. 8 3 1. 7 0 2. 2 5 1. 6 5 1. 8 4 1. 8 2 1. 8 4 1. 8 7 2. 1 2 2. 1 7 2. 0 5 2. 1 1 2. 1 6 2. 0 5 -

1.
1.
1.
2.
1.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

45
45
64
00
76
80
76

2. 47
2. 45
2. 52
1. 72
1. 76
1. 70

2. 1 3 2. 1 0 2. 4 0 1. 5 7 1. 7 5 1. 5 7 -

1. 81

1. 75

1. 5 5 - 1. 86

164
34

$1. 83
1. 86
1 .6 9
1. 99
1. 67

-

$ 1 .6 7 —$ 1 .9 0
1. 7 2 - 1. 95
1 .4 8 - 1. 85
1 .8 1 — 2. 06
1. 4 5 - 1. 81

156

1. 86

1. 79

1. 6 7 - 2. 04

871
509

1. 73
1. 78

1 .7 7
1. 76

1. 6 2 - 1. 84
1 .6 1 — 1. 89

209
232

1. 73
1. 78

1. 70
1. 76

1. 5 7 - 1. 83
1. 6 5 - 1. 92

327
203
124
311
195
116
21
35
348
1 ,0 8 4
397
124
273

1. 77
1. 87
1. 61
1. 78
1. 88
1 .6 2
1. 87
1. 91
2. 50
1. 78
1. 74
1. 82
1. 71

1 .6 9
1. 91
1. 53
1 .7 0
1 .9 5
1. 53
1. 90
1 .8 3
2. 55
1. 75
1 .7 5
1. 78
1 .6 7

1. 5 7 1. 5 7 1. 5 1 1. 5 7 1. 5 7 1. 5 1 1. 8 3 1. 8 3 2 .4 7 1. 7 2 1. 5 9 1 .7 1 —
1. 5 5 -

90
25
65
88
_
63
21
29
114
334
113
19
94

1. 75
1. 96
1. 67
1. 76
_
1. 68
1. 87
1. 92
2. 46
1. 84
1. 82
1. 83
1. 81

1. 71
1. 96
1. 71
1 .7 1
_
1 .7 1
1. 90
1. 83
2. 49
1. 82
1. 75
1. 75
1 .7 8

1. 6 7 1. 95—
1. 5 0 1 .6 9 _
1. 4 9 1. 8 3 1. 8 3 2. 3 8 1. 7 5 1. 7 0 1. 6 5 1 .7 1 -

_

_
1. 86
1. 77
1. 88
1. 81
1. 89

-

1. 77
1. 86

$1. 94—$2. 12
1. 9 4 - 2. 12
_
_
1. 9 4 - 2. 20
1. 7 4 - 2. 24

-

-

1. 7 7 - 1. 84
1. 8 2 - 1. 89

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g fr a m e 4 _____________________ __________
M en
______ ____ __
W o m e n _______________________________________________
A m e r ic a n s y s t e m ______________________________________
M e n ____ ____________________________________________
W o m e n _______________________________________________
D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c lo t h (a ll m e n ) _____________
F u ll e r t e n d e r s (a ll m e n ) ___ _____________________________
L o o m f i x e r s (a ll m e n ) ___________________________________
M e n d e r s , c lo t h (a ll w o m e n ) _____________________________
P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------------------------M e n ______________________________________________ ________
W o m e n _—_______________________________________ __ _____

See fo o t n o t e s

at en d o f t a b le .




1. 96
2. 06
1 .7 1
1. 96
2. 08
1. 71
1. 91
1. 93
2. 55
1. 85
1. 85
1. 87
1. 80

1. 96
1. 96
1. 74
1. 96
_
1. 85
1. 91
2. 08
2. 50
1. 90
1. 95
1. 96
1 .9 5

_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

-

-

“

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

Table 6.

Occupational Averages:

All Mills---- Continued

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m i l l s ,
U n ited Sta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited S ta tes 2
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

N ew E n g la n d

H o u r ly e a r n in g s
M ean3

M e d ia n 3

M id d le
ra n g e3

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

M id d le A tla n tic

H o u r ly e a rn in g s
M ean3

M e d ia n 3

M id d le
range3

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

H o u r ly e a rn in g s
M ean3

M e d ia n 3

M idd le
ra n g e 3

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s — C on tin u ed
S p in n e r s , fr a m e (94 m e n and 1, 110 w o m e n )4------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m (94 m e n and 7 83 w o m e n )-----------B r a d f o r d s y s t e m (a ll w o m e n )----- ---------------------------W e a v e r s 4 _ ______ . _________________________ _________
M e n __ _ -------- ----------------------------------------------------W o m e n _______________________________________________
B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c . _____________________________
M e n __________________________________________________
W o m e n _______________________________________________
W in d e r s (16 m e n and 1 ,4 9 6 w o m e n )4__________________
C o n e and t u b e , a u to m a tic
(3 m e n and 341 w o m e n )----------------- -----------------------C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d , n o n a u to m a tic
(3 m e n and 882 w o m e n )_____________________________
F il li n g , a u t o m a t ic (1 0 m e n and 148 w o m e n )----------

86
90
81
39
43
18
41
44
16
74

$ 1 .8 9
1. 94
1 .6 9
2. 44
2. 48
2. 20
2. 50
2. 50
2. 02
1 .7 1

$1. 70—$2. 06
1. 8 1 - 2. 06
1 . 6 6 - 1 .9 9
2. 2 0 - 2 .5 7
2. 3 5 - 2 .5 8
2. 0 2 - 2. 29
2. 1 7 - 2 .5 8
2. 3 6 - 2. 59
2. 0 2 - 2 .4 9
1 . 6 5 - 1 .8 2

_
-

-

-

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
-

103

1. 75

1. 75

1. 6 6 - 1. 86

-

-

-

-

1. 5 0 - 1. 73
1 . 6 5 - 1 .7 2

215
88

1. 76
1. 68

1. 73
1. 65

1 . 6 3 - 1 .8 5
1. 65— 1 .6 7

-

-

-

-

1 .6 1 1. 6 2 1 .6 1 1 .5 1 1. 5 2 1. 44—
*
2. 2 8 1 .6 1 1 .6 1 1. 5 7 -

216
69
147
56
48
8
33
365
324
41

1. 70
1. 73
1 .6 9
1. 73
1. 74
1. 64
2. 32
1. 75
1. 76
1. 68

1. 74
1. 74
1. 74
1 .7 2
1. 74
2. 28
1. 74
1. 75
1 .6 6

1 .6 4 1. 6 7 1 .6 1 1 .6 6 1. 6 8 _
2. 1 5 1 .6 5 1 .6 5 1. 5 7 -

1, 204
877
289
798
633
165
627
519
108
1 ,5 1 2

$1. 77
1. 78
1 .7 3
2. 25
2. 29
2. 12
2. 26
2. 29
2. 14
1. 68

$1. 77
1. 78
1 .6 9
2. 27
2. 29
2. 17
2. 27
2. 29
2. 13
1 .6 6

$1. 59—$1. 96
1 . 5 3 - 1 .9 6
1 .6 6 — 1 .9 7
2. 1 1 - 2. 40
2. 1 3 - 2. 42
2. 0 1 - 2 .2 9
2. 1 0 - 2 .4 2
2. 1 3 - 2. 43
2. 0 0 - 2 .2 9
1. 5 3 - 1. 81

480
254
188
253
209
44
200
180
20
460

344

1. 80

1. 81

1 .7 1 - 1. 89

885
158

1. 64
1. 71

1. 59
1 .6 7

278
105
173
283
256
27
128
1 ,0 9 7
1 ,0 2 5
72

1 .7 1
1. 76
1. 68
1. 63
1. 63
1. 56
2 .4 3
1. 70
1. 70
1. 65

1. 73
1. 75
1. 72
1. 58
1. 58
1. 52
2. 36
1. 65
1. 65
1 .6 2

$1.
1.
1.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
1.

-

_
-

-

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

-

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
B a t t e r y h a n d s ---------------- ---------------------------- ---------------M en __ _____ _____________________ ____________________
W om en.
---------- ----------------------------------------------------J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s ) --------------------M en
----------------- —
— --------- ~ --------W o m e n _____ _____ _ ____ ___ — ----- ----------------M a c h i n i s t s , m a in te n a n c e (a ll m e n ) . _________________
T r u c k e r s , h and (in clu d in g b o b b in b o y s ) ___ __ ______
M e n ___________________________
___ __________________
W o m e n ______________________________________________ —

S ee fo o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b le .




1 .7 9
1. 88
1 .7 5
1 .7 2
1. 72
1 .6 2
2 .6 3
1 .7 6
1. 77
1 .7 1

1 .7 8
1. 81
1 .7 6
1 .8 2
1. 82
2. 50
1 .8 6
1 .8 6
1. 83

_
_
_
26
21
13
74
74

_
-

_
$1. 88
1. 93
_
2. 96
2. 00
2. 00
-

_
_
_
$1. 94
1. 94
_
1. 83
1. 83
-

_
_
_
$1. 72—$2.
1. 8 5 - 2.
_
1. 8 0 - 2.
1. 8 0 - 2.
-

08
09

18
18

Table 6.

Occupational Averages:

All Mills— Continued

*

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m i l l s ,
U n ited S tates and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
S ou th ea st 5
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

G r e a t L a k es

H o u r ly e a r n in g s
M ean 3

M id d le
ra n g e 3

M ed ia n 3

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

H o u r ly e a rn in g s
M ea n 3

M id d le
ra n g e 3

M ed ia n 3

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
C a r d f i n i s h e r s _____________________________________________
M e n ______________________________________________________
___________ ____________________
W o m e n _______
C a r d s t r ip p e r s (a ll m e n )_________________________________
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g fr a m e (332 m e n and 29 w o m e n )----D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c lo t h
(215 m e n and 1 w o m a n )_________________________________
D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , y a r n (a ll m e n )______________
F u ll e r t e n d e r s (a ll m e n ) _________________________________
L o o m f i x e r s (a ll m e n ) ______ ______________________________
M e n d e r s , c lo t h (11 m e n and 1 ,2 2 3 w o m e n ) ____________
S p in n e r s , f r a m e ___________________________________________
M e n ______________________________________________________
W o m e n ___________________________________________________
S p in n e r s , m u le (1 2 4 m e n and 23 w o m e n )______________
W e ave r s 4___________________________________________________
M e n __ _______________ ______________ _______ ___ ___ _
W o m e n __ __________________________ ___________________
B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c ________________________________________
M e n --------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n _____ __________________________________________
B o x lo o m s , n o n a u to m a tic
(140 m e n and 57 w o m e n ) ___________________________________
W e a v in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s --------------------------------------------------------M e n ____________________________________________________________________
W nm*=>n
W in d e r s 4 _________________________________________________________________
M en
.............. ...................... . . ............... — — — —
W o m e n _______________________________________________
C on e and tu b e, a u t o m a t ic
(12 m e n and 144 w o m e n ) -----------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d , n o n a u to m a tic
(18 m e n and 853 w o m e n ) -----------------------------------------F il li n g , a u to m a tic (64 m e n and 4 45 w o m e n )_______

339
339
126
199

$ 1 .7 9
1. 79
1. 76
1. 74

29
1 ,0 5 2
200
852

1 .6 0
1 .7 9
1. 86
1 .7 8

$1.
1.
1.
1.

81
81
81
77

1 .6 2
_
-

1. 80
1. 85
1. 79

$1. 71—$1. 85
1 .7 1 — 1. 85
1. 7 2 - 1. 83
1. 6 4 - 1. 84
1 .6 2 -

1. 75
_
_
1. 7 6 - 1. 85
1. 8 5 - 1. 85
1. 7 0 - 1. 85
-

54
44
_
29
30

$1. 66
1. 62
_
1. 75
1. 75

$1. 65
1. 55
1. 82
1. 79

25
25
97
129
9
120
106
27
79
54

2. 01
2. 40
1. 72
1. 77
1. 88
1. 76
1. 90
2. 62
1. 65
1. 62

2. 20
2. 50
1. 50
1. 76
-

1 .7 1
1. 72
2. 66
1 .6 7
1. 68

$1. 40—$1. 85
1. 39— 1. 87
_
_
1. 5 5 - 1. 95
1. 5 6 - 1. 90
1 .6 2 2. 2 5 1. 4 6 1 .6 0 _
1. 6 0 1. 59—
2. 3 4 1 .4 2 1. 3 8 -

2. 21
2. 56
1. 81
2. 05
_
2. 05
2. 15
2. 86
1. 79
1. 81

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

52

1 .6 1

1. 63

1. 3 8 - 1. 80

-

-

-

-

-

52

2. 18

2. 21

1. 6 7 - 2. 66

-

-

-

-

-

-

600
54
546
-

1. 73
1 .7 7
1. 72
-

1. 72
1 .7 6
1 .7 0
-

-

1 .6 1 — 1. 85
1. 7 6 - 1. 76
1 .6 1 — 1. 85
-

-

147
-

145
-

407
143

1 .7 1
1 .6 9

1. 72
1. 76

1. 5 6 - 1. 85
1 .6 1 — 1. 76

224
178
46
213
170
43

1. 80
1. 86
1 .5 5
1 . 80
1. 87
1. 55

1.
1.
1.
1.

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

81
37

_

-

1. 64
-

1 .6 5
-

1 .6 1
1. 72

_

-

1. 75
-

1. 75
-

1. 80
1. 67

_

-

_

-

1. 3 8 - 1. 80
_

_

1. 3 8 - 1. 80
-

-

1. 3 5 - 1. 80
1. 6 0 - 1. 85

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e 4________________________________
M e n _________ _ ____________________________________
W o m e n — ---------- --------------- --------------------------------------------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m ______ _____ _______ ___ ____________ ____
M e n ______________ - ________________________________________________
W o m e n _____ ___________________________________________________
D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c lo t h (a ll m e n ) _________________
F u ll e r t e n d e r s (a ll m e n ) ---------------------------------------------------------------L o o m f i x e r s (a ll m e n ) ---------------------------------------------------------------------M e n d e r s , c lo t h (a ll w o m e n ) ---------------------------------------------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------M e n ____________________________________________________________________
W o m e n ------------------------------------ -----------------------------------------------------.------

See fo o t n o t e s at en d o f ta b le




65
72
53
65
1 . 81
1. 53

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

256
105
151

-

1. 74
1 . 82
1 . 68

-

1. 72
1. 78
1 . 60

575753575753-

2.
2.
1.
2.
2.
1.

04
09
53
06
11
53

-

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_
_
_

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1. 5 5 - 1. 85
7 2 - 1. 87
1. 5 5 - 1 . 80

1.

-

-

Table 6.

Occupational Averages:

All Mills---- Continued

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m i l l s ,
U n ited Sta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
S ou th ea st5
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

M ea n 1
3
2

6 34
578
-

$1. 73
1. 73
-

G rea t L akes

H o u r ly e a rn in g s
M id d le
ra n g e 3

M e d ia n 3

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

H o u r ly e a r n in g s
M ea n 3

M idd le
ra n g e 3

M ed ia n 3

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s — C on tin u ed
S p in n e r s , fr a m e (94 m e n and 1, 110 w o m e n )4 ------------.
5
A m e r ic a n s y s t e m (94 m e n and 783 w o m e n )-----------B r a d fo r d s y s t e m (a ll w o m e n )-----------------------------------W e a v e r s 4„
________ _____________________________________
M e n ____ __ _______________________________________
W o m e n _______________________________________________
B o x lo o m s , a u t o m a t i c ____ __________________________
M e n __________________________________________________
W o m e n _______________________________________________
W in d e r s (16 m e n and 1 ,4 9 6 w o m e n )4 ---------------------------C on e and tube , a u to m a tic
(3 m e n and 341 w o m e n )_____________________________
C on e and t u b e , h ig h s p e e d , n o n a u to m a tic
(3 m e n and 882 w o m e n )_____________________________
F il li n g , a u to m a tic (10 m e n and 148 w o m e n )_______

-

955
-

-

1 .6 7
-

$1. 68
1. 68
-

1. 65
-

$1. 5 3—$1. 93
1. 5 3 - 1. 94
1. 5 0 - 1. 81
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

-

-

-

.

_
_

_
_

_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

623
64

1 .6 0
1. 74

1. 55
1. 72

1. 5 0 - 1. 67
1. 7 0 - 1. 81

178
167
11
69
598
568
30

1. 55
1. 55
1 .4 9
2. 35
1. 62
1 .6 2
1 .6 1

_
1. 55
1. 56
2. 32
1. 62
1. 62
1. 62

_
1. 5 0 1. 5 0 2. 2 9 1. 5 7 1. 5 8 1. 5 7 -

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
B a t t e r y h a n d s ___ __________________ ________________________
M e n ______________________________________________________
W o m e n __________________________________________________
J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s ) --------------------M e n _____________________________________ ;________________
W o m e n __________________________________________________
M a c h in is t s , m a in t e n a n c e (a ll m e n ) ____________________
T r u c k e r s , ha n d (in clu d in g b o b b in b o y s ) _______________
M e n ______________________________________________________
W o m e n __________________________________________________

_
1. 58
1. 58
2. 55
1 .6 4
1. 65
1. 64

_
11
9
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
$1. 70
1. 76
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_

-

-

_

-

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 In c lu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 T h e m e a n is c o m p u t e d f o r e a c h jo b b y to ta lin g the e a rn in g s o f a ll w o r k e r s and d iv id in g b y the
n u m b er o fw o r k e r s .
T he m e d ia n d e s ig n a t e s p o s it io n — o n e -h a l f o f the e m p lo y e e s
s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e d the ra te sh ow n o r m o r e ; o n e -h a lf r e c e iv e d the ra te sh ow n o r le s s .
The m id d le ra n g e is d e fin e d b y 2 r a te s o f p a y ; o n e -f o u r t h o f the w o r k e r s e a r n e d the lo w e r o f th ese
r a t e s o r le s s and o n e -f o u r t h e a r n e d the h ig h e r ra te o r m o r e .
M id d le ra n g e s a re o m it t e d f o r o c c u p a t io n s that had fe w e r than 15 e m p lo y e e s in a r e g io n .
4 I n c lu d e s data f o r w o r k e r s in this c l a s s i f ic a t i o n in a d d ition to th o se
sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
5 D ata a r e n ot p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e ly fo r o c c u p a t io n s a s s o c ia t e d w ith w ea v in g o p e r a t io n s s in c e in fo r m a t io n w a s
o b ta in e d fr o m to o few o f the la r g e
in te g r a t e d m il ls .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a t e no da ta r e p o r t e d o r data that do. n ot m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .




Table 7.

Occupational Averages:

Table 8.

Yarn Mills

U n ited S t a t e s 2
N u m ber
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

N ew E ngland
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A verage
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

M id d le A tla n tic
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A vera g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

Weaving Mills

0)

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s
in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l w e a v in g m i l l s ,
U n ited S ta tes and N ew E n g lan d , N o v e m b e r 1966)

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in
s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n m i l l s , U nited S tates and
s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

Occupational Averages:

U n ited S ta tes 3

S ou th ea st
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

O c c u p a t io n 2 and s e x

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A vera g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N ew E ng lan d
N u m ber
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
M en

M en
C a rd f i n i s h e r s ------------------------------C a rd s t r i p p e r s —---------------------------D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e ------------D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s ,y a r n —
S p in n e r s , f r a m e --------------------------S p in n e r s , m u l e ------------------------------

513
196
222
33
210
57

$ 1. 87
1 .8 7
1 .7 5
1 .6 2
2. 09
2. 22

139
63
67
22

$ 1 .8 7
1 .8 3
2. 07
2. 05

127
51
33
137
-

$ 2 . 05
2. 11
1 .9 5
2. 11
-

225
70
133
29
-

$ 1 .7 9
1 .7 5
1 .7 4
1. 60
-

1, 115
894

1 .8 4
1 .7 4

342
189

1 .9 6
1 .7 1

43
161

2. 02
1 .8 4

663
441

1 .7 7
1 .7 3

777

1 .7 2

149

1 .7 3

144

1 .8 1

407

1 .7 1

104
40

1 .7 0
1 .7 3

17

1 .7 8

-

-

79
23

1 .6 2
1 .7 0

119
111
214
733
546
149
963
96

1 .6 1
1 .6 1
1. 66
1 .6 5
1. 66
1 .5 6
1 .6 2
1 .7 6

65
63
85
307
167
102
347
91

1 .6 7
1 .6 8
1 .7 9
1 .7 7
1 .8 3
1 .6 4
1 .7 4
1 .7 7

' -

-

41
38
101
340
338
529
-

1. 53
1. 53
1 .6 0
1. 58
1. 58
1 .5 5
-

762

1 .6 1

202

1 .7 4

-

513

1 .5 6

77
42

1 .5 6
2 .4 8

6
6

1 .7 5
2. 32

7
-

1 .8 1
-

62
21

1 .5 0
2. 38

389

1 .6 7

112

1 .7 1

34

1 .8 9

194

1 .5 8

27

1 .6 0

15

1 .6 2

-

$2.
2.
2.
2.

03
43
36
36

13
88
191
170

$ 2 . 03
2 .4 8
2 .4 5
2 .4 4

1 .8 4
2. 01
2. 14
1 .7 1
1 .6 8

298
19
19
106
88

1 .8 6
2. 14
2. 14
1 .7 1
1. 68

W om en

W om en
S p in n e r s , f r a m e --------------------------W in d e r s 3 --------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t ic --------------------------

13
113
241
217

F u ll e r t e n d e r s -----------------------L o o m f i x e r s ---------------------------W e a v e r s 4 -------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t ic -----

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s

M e n d e r s , c l o t h ----------------------W e a v e r s 4 -------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c ----W in d e rs 4 -------------------------------F illin g , a u t o m a t ic ------------

371
43
28
116
94

M en
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e ,
A m e r ic a n s y s t e m ----------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s ----------------W om en
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g fr a m e 3 ---------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m -------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s ----------------S p in n e r s , fr a m e 3-------------------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m -------------------B r a d fo r d s y s t e m -------------------W in d e r s 3 ---------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , a u t o m a t i c ----C on e and tu b e , h igh s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t ic --------------------------

-

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d
o c c u p a t io n s
M en
J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y
c l e a n e r s ) -------------------------------------M a c h i n i s t s , m a in t e n a n c e -----------T r u c k e r s , hand (in clu d in g
b o b b in b o y s ) --------------------------------W om en
T r u c k e r s , hand (in clu d in g
b o b b in g i r l s ) --------------------------------

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n clu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d it io n to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 I n clu d e s da ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n in a d d ition to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a t e n o da ta r e p o r t e d o r data that d o n ot m e e t p u b lica tio n c r i t e r i a .




“

"

1
E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s ,
h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
A ll o c c u p a t io n s sh ow n w e r e in w o r s t e d o p e r a t io n s .
3 In clu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to N ew E n glan d .
4 In clu d e s data f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i f ic a t i o n in a d d itio n to
th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
N O T E : D a s h e s in d ic a t e
m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .

no

data r e p o r t e d

o r data

that

d o not

Table 9.

Occupational Averages:

Integrated Mills

(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l in te g r a t e d m i l l s ,
U n ited S tates and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited S ta tes 1
2
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

N ew E n g lan d

M id d le A tla n tic

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N u m ber of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

545
303
110
189
76
346
525
381
67
1, 310
1, 072
140
34
78

$ 1. 87
1. 97
1. 73
1. 80
1. 85
2. 01
2 .4 6
1. 94
2. 09
2. 40
2. 33
2. 65
2. 60
1. 78

302
196
44
109
69
139
270
140
65
623
595
28
29
20

$ 1 .8 5
2. 04
1. 73
1. 81
1. 84
1 .8 7
2. 46
2. 02
2. 08
2. 38
2. 37
2. 49
2. 64
1. 80

80
1, 185
1, 073
491
425
15
617
106
76
407

1. 77
1. 86
1. 96
2. 16
2. 16
2. 06
1. 79
1 .8 8
1 .7 6
1. 78

76
555
691
219
215
12
342
74
60
204

1 .7 6
1. 81
2. 00
2. 25
2. 25
2. 00
1 .8 0
1. 87
1 .7 4
1. 79

80
163
85
597

1. 74
1 .6 6
2 .4 0
1 .7 2

50
38
26
173

1.
1.
2.
1.

68
74
31
78

_
14
40

159
16
37

1. 68
1 .6 2
1. 71

141
6
18

1. 69
1. 64
1 .7 9

-

N u m ber of
w ork ers

N u m ber of
w ork ers

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

G rea t L akes
N u m ber of
w ork ers

A v era ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
M en
C a r d f i n i s h e r s -------------------------------------------------------------------C a rd s t r ip p e r s -----------------------------------------------------------------D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e -------------------------------------------------D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c l o t h ------------------------------------D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , y a r n ------------------------------------F u ll e r t e n d e r s -------------------------------------------------------------------L o o m f i x e r s ---------------------------------------------------------- ------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e ----------------------------------------------- ---------------S p in n e r s , m u l e ------ ------------------ --------------- ---------------------W e a v e r s 3 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t ic ---------------------------------------------B o x l o o m s , n o n a u t o m a t ic ------------------------------------------W e a v in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------- ------------W in d e r s — ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

53
17
-

$ 2 . 15
2. 21

22
17

-

-

-

-

-

-

76
59
183
53
-

2. 36
2. 89
-

2 .7 3
2. 83
-

25
25
9
27
-

$ 1 .6 1
1. 77
-

2. 01
2. 40
1. 88
2. 62
-

W om en
C a r d f i n i s h e r s -------------------------------------------------------------------M e n d e r s , c l o t h -----------------------------------------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e ----------------------------------------------- --------------W e a v e r s 3 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------B o x lo o m s , a u t o m a t i c --------------------------------- -------------W e a v in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------------W in d e r s 3 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , a u t o m a t i c ----------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d , n o n a u t o m a t ic ------------F il li n g , a u t o m a t i c -------------------------------------------------------

_
57
36
26
-

48
-

_
1. 88
2. 29
2. 42
2. 01
-

"

_
97
53
79
52
42
19

_
1. 72
1. 67
1. 65
1 .6 1
1 .5 5
1. 62

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
M en
B a t t e r y h a n d s ------------------------------ ------- ---------------------J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s ) -------------------M a c h i n i s t s , m a in t e n a n c e -----------------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , hand (in c lu d in g b o b b in b o y s ) ------------------------

_

_

_

1 .9 9
2. 09

7
6

1 .7 0
1. 77

_

_

W om en
B a t t e r y h a n d s -----------------------------------------------------------------J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s ) ------- ----------T r u c k e r s , ha n d (in c lu d in g b o b b in g i r l s ) ---------------------

-

-

“

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n clu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly . D ata a r e n ot p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e ly f o r the S o u th e a st s in c e in fo r m a t io n w a s o b ta in e d f r o m t o o fe w of
th e la r g e in t e g r a t e d m i l l s .
3 I n c lu d e s da ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i fic a t i o n in a d d itio n to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:




D a s h e s in d ic a t e n o data r e p o r t e d o r data that d o n ot m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .

Table 10.

Occupational Averages:

W eaving and Integrated Mills by Type of Fabric

00

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l w e a v in g and in te g r a t e d m il ls
b y type o f fa b r ic , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U nited S ta tes 2
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A p p a r e l f a b r ic s 3
N u m ber
of
w ork ers

A vera g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N ew E n g lan d

N o n a p p a re l
fa b r ic s
N u m be r
A v era g e
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

A p p a rel fa b r ic s 3
N u m ber
of
w ork ers

A v era ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

M id d le A tla n tic

N o n a p p a re l
f a b r ic s
A v era ge
N um ber
h o u r ly
of
e a rn in g s
w ork ers

N o n a p p a re l
f a b r ic s
N u m ber
A v era ge
h o u r ly
of
w ork ers
e a r n in g s

G r e a t L a k es
A p p a rel fa b r ic s 3
N um ber
of
w ork ers

A vera g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N o n a p p a re l
f a b r ic s
N u m ber
A vera ge
h o u r ly
of
w ork ers
e a r n in g s

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
M en
C a r d f i n i s h e r s --------------------------------------------------------------C a rd s t r i p p e r s -------------------------------------------------------------D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e ______________________________
D y e i n g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c l o t h --------------------------------D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , y a r n --------------------------------F u ll e r t e n d e r s --------------------------------------------------------------L o o m f i x e r s ------------------------------------------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e ---------- -----------------------------------------------S p in n e r s ,m u le -------------------------------------------------------------W e a v e r s 4 ----------------------------------------------------------------------B o x lo o m s , a u t o m a t i c -------------------------------------------B o x lo o m s , n o n a u t o m a t i c ------------------------------------W e a v in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s -------------------------------------W in d e r s 4 ------------------------------------------------------------------------

466
276
108
200
76
212
467
367
58
1, 107
1 ,0 6 7
16
34
73

$ 1 .8 4
1 .9 7
1 .7 3
1. 76
1 .8 5
1. 84
2. 39
1. 93
2. 13
2. 33
2. 32
2. 48
2. 60
1 .7 8

75
1, 060
1, 007
483
461
15
582
90
71
395

1. 76
1. 85
1 .9 6
2. 16
2. 15
2. 06
1 .7 7
1 .8 4
1. 75
1. 78

_
163
66
56

21
35
342
633
519

1. 87
1 .9 0
2. 50
2. 29
2. 29

_

_

-

-

"

"

79
27

$ 2 . 04
2. 04

-

-

-

-

-

-

134
90
14
263
-

124
-

2. 29
2. 74
2. 13
2. 63
2. 67
-

284
190
44
120
69
120
291
138
58
657
629
29
18

$ 1 .8 6
2. 04
1. 73
1 .7 3
1 .8 4
1. 88
2. 44
2. 02
2. 13
2. 35
2. 34
2. 64
1 .8 0

73
582
678
258
256
12
377
86
57
224

1. 77
1 .8 1
2. 00
2. 22
2. 22
2. 00
1. 78
1 .8 6
1 .7 3
1. 78

21
29
114
209
180

1 .8 7
1 .9 2
2. 46
2. 43
2 .4 4

18
6
_
-

11
-

_
_
-

$ 1. 75
1. 99
-

_
2. 31
-

29
13
_
_
70
42
144
_
53
-

$ 2 . 31
2. 22
_
-

2. 39
2. 97
_
_
2. 83
_
2. 83
-

_

_

13

_
_
-

$ 1. 72
_
_
1. 58
2. 29
1. 84
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
17
15
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
$ 2 . 21
2. 47
_
_
_
_
_
-

“

-

-

-

-

_
_
8
10
6
-

W om en
C a rd f i n i s h e r s --------------------------------------------------------------M e n d e r s , c l o t h --------------------------,.---------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e ----------------------------------------------------------W e a v e r s 4 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------B o x lo o m s , a u t o m a t i c -------------------------------------------------------W e a v in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------------------W in d e r s 4 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , a u t o m a t i c ----------------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , h igh s p e e d , n o n a u t o m a t i c ---------F i l l i n g , a u t o m a t i c -----------------------------------------------------------------

_
1 .9 1
2. 04
2. 07

-

-

-

-

78
29
-

32

1 .8 7
1 .9 6
-

1 .7 2

_
13

_
2. 06

33
21
21

_
1. 94
2. 43
2. 46

_

_

32
43
53
52

-

-

_
1 .4 2
1 .6 7
1 . 61
1 . 61

_
65
10

-

-

_

-

21
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

-

2. 20

-

21

-

1 .4 7

_
-

21
_

_
1. 87
1. 64
_
_
-

1. 64
_
-

1. 64

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
M en
D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c l o t h -----------------------------------------F u ll e r t e n d e r s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------L o o m f i x e r s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------W e a v e r s 4 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c --------------------------------------------------------

S e e fo o t n o t e s at end o f ta b le,




-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

•

“

■

-

_

"

-

-

-

Table 10.

Occupational Averages:

Weaving and Integrated Mills by Type of Fabric-----Continued

(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l w e a v in g and in te g r a t e d m il ls
by ty p e o f f a b r i c , U nited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U nited Sta tes 1
2
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A p p a r e l f a b r ic s 3
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A verage
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

M id d le A tla n tic

N ew E ngland

N o n a p p a re l
fa b r i c s
N u m b er
A vera ge
h o u r ly
of
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

A p p a r e l f a b r ic s 3
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A vera g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N on ap parel
fab r i c s
N um b e r
A v era ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a r n in g s

G re a t L a k es

N o n a p p a re l
f a b r ic s
N um ber
A v era ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

A p p a r e l f a b r ic s 3
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N o n a p p a re l
f a b r ic s
N u m b er
A v e ra g e
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s — C ontin u ed
W om en
M e n d e r s , c l o t h ------------------------------------------------------------W e a v e r s 4 ------------- ...................................................................
B o x lo o m s , a u t o m a t i c ------------------------------------------W in d e r s 4 ----------------------------------------------------------------------F il li n g , a u t o m a t i c --------------------------------------------------

.

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

334
44
20
112
88

$ 1 .7 9
1 .8 0
2. 82
2. 09

64
38
23
208

.

_
-

147
7
26

1 .6 9
1 .6 3
1 .7 2

$ 1 .7 8
2. 12
2. 14
1 .7 8
1 .7 1

85
139
62
580

1. 76
1. 63
2. 25
1 .6 9

14
40
24
56

173
13
45

1 .6 8
1. 58
1 . 68

"

“

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

1 .7 3
1 .7 1
2. 28
1 .7 9

-

_

$ 1 .8 4
2. 18
2. 16
1 .7 2
1 .6 8

1 ,0 8 2
165
108
533
148

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
M en
B a t t e r y h a n d s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s ) -----------------M a c h in is t s , m a in t e n a n c e ------------------------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , hand (in c lu d in g b o b b in b o y s ) ---------------------

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2 . 20

-

“

'

-

_
_

_

_

_

-

-

-

”

"

29

-

W om en
B a t t e r y h a n d s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s ) -----------------T r u c k e r s , hand (in clu d in g b o b b in g i r l s ) -----------------------

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 In c lu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly . D ata a r e not p r e s e n t e d
in te g r a t e d m i l l s .
3 A p p a r e l f a b r i c s c a t e g o r y a ls o in clu d e s b la n k etin g .
4 In c lu d e s da ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i fic a t i o n in a d d itio n to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a t e no data r e p o r t e d o r data that do not m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .




s e p a r a t e ly

_

_

_

-

-

-

"

fo r

_

-

"

the

S ou th ea st

s in c e

in fo r m a t io n

-

w as

o b ta in e d f r o m

to o few

o f the

la r g e

Table 11.

Occupational Averages:

N
>

o

All Mills by Size of Community

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m il ls
b y s iz e o f co m m u n ity , U n ited Sta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited S ta tes 2
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

M e tr o p o lita n
a rea s
A v e ra g e
N u m b er
of
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s
w ork ers

N ew E n g lan d

N o n m e t r o p o lit a n
a rea s
N u m ber
A v era g e
of
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s
w ork ers

M e t r o p o lit a n
a rea s
N um ber
A v era g e
h o u r ly
of
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

M id d le A tla n tic

N o n m e t r o p o lit a n
a rea s
N u m ber
A v era ge
h o u r ly
of
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

M e t r o p o lit a n
a rea s
N um ber
A vera ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
M en
C a rd f i n i s h e r s --------------------------------------------------------C a rd s t r i p p e r s -------------------------------------------------------D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e --------------------------------------D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c l o t h --------------------------F u ll e r t e n d e r s --------------------------------------------------------L o o m f i x e r s ------------------------------------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e ----------------------------------------------------W e a v e r s 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------B o x lo o m s , a u t o m a t i c --------------------------------------

00
03
87
94
30
71
11
59
46

721
364
235
146
221
392
389
956
898

$ 1 .8 1
1 .9 0
1. 69
1 .7 0
1. 85
2. 34
1 .9 3
2. 30
2. 29

73
40
22
13
40
39
75
32

$ 2 . 13
2. 16
1 .9 8
2. 10
2. 64
2. 09
2. 53
2 .5 3

368
219
70
107
126
262
168
608
599

$ 1 .8 1
1 .9 6
1. 64
1 .7 1
1 .8 4
2 .4 0
2. 02
2. 33
2. 33

154
55
34
76
59
150
183
-

$ 2 . 09
2. 13
1 .9 4
2. 36
2. 89
2. 13
2. 73
-

312
505
106
47
548
374
131

1. 86
1 .9 7
2. 26
2. 33
1. 79
1. 73
1. 86

911
1, 683
433
424
1, 006
479
314

1 .8 6
1 .8 8
2. 13
2. 13
1 .7 4
1. 72
1 .7 4

61
170
8
6
131
95
32

1 .9 6
2. 12
2. 18
2. 06
1 .7 4
1 .7 5
1 .7 2

532
863
259
255
443
114
192

1 .8 0
1. 96
2. 22
2. 22
1 .’76
1 .7 2
1 .7 9

57
61
26
190
127
33

1 .8 8
2. 19
2. 42
1 .8 7
1 .7 9
1 .8 8

133
44
216
189

2. 51
1 .7 8
2. 40
2 .4 2

215
80
417
330

2 .4 9
1 .8 4
2. 23
2. 21

92
13
154
130

2 .4 9
1 .8 6
2. 51
2. 55

22

2. 37

55
50

2. 22
2. 17

62
57
395
106
538
213
544
106
255
89

1. 64
1. 65
1. 83
1. 74
1 .7 5
1. 76
1 .7 2
1 .7 5
1 .7 4
1 .6 9

62
59
689
167
572
570
952
235
627
59

1 .5 8
1 .5 8
1 .7 5
1 .6 9
1 .7 4
1 .7 4
1 .6 6
1. 82
1 .6 0
1 .7 4

51
49
236
77
362
136
416
85
208
77

1 .6 7
1. 67
1 .8 8
1 .8 2
1 .8 2
1 .8 2
1 .7 5
1 .7 6
1 .7 6
1 .6 9

98
39
39
43
18
-

44
66
32
203

1. 91
1 .7 7
2. 66
1. 82

61
190
96
822

1 .6 4
1 .5 9
2. 36
1. 67

29
17
9
106

1 .8 5
1 .7 8
2 .4 1
1 .7 8

40
31
24
218

337
135
97
69
125
165
202
414
210

$2.
2.
1.
1.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

W om en
M e n d e r s , c l o t h -------------------------------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e ----------------------------------------------------W e a v e r s 3----------------------------------------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t ic -------------------------------------W i n d e r s 3 ___________________________________________
C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d , n o n a u to m a tic—
F il li n g , a u t o m a t i c --------------------------------------------S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
M en
L o o m f i x e r s ---------------------------------------------- -----------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------------W e a v e r s 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c --------------------------------------

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1. 74
1. 89
1 .8 9
1 .6 3
1 .7 1
-

_
-

_
-

1 .6 4
1 .7 2
2. 29
1 .7 5

_
19
13
55

-

-

W om en
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e --------------------------------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m ---------------------------------------------M e n d e r s , c l o t h -------------------------------------------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------------S p in n e rs , f r a m e ----------------------------------------------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m --------------------------------------------W i n d e r s 3 ----------------------------------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , a u t o m a t i c ------------------------------C one and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d , n o n a u to m a tic—
F il li n g , a u t o m a t i c --------------------------------------------S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
M en
B a t t e r y ha nds --------------------------------------------------------J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s ) --------M a c h in is t s , m a in t e n a n c e -------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , h and (in clu d in g b o b b in b o y s ) -----------

S ee fo o t n o t e s at end o f ta b le,




_
1 .9 2
2. 96
2. 04

Table 11.

O ccupational Averages:

All Mills by Size o f Community— Continued

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m il ls
by s i z e o f c o m m u n ity , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
S ou th ea st4
O c c u p a tio n and s e x

M e t r o p o lit a n
a rea s
N u m b er
A vera ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

G r e a t L a k es

N o n m e tr o p o lita n
a rea s
N u m b er
A v era g e
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

M e t r o p o lit a n
a rea s
N u m b er
A v era ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

N o n m e t r o p o lit a n
a rea s
A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
M en
C a rd f i n i s h e r s ------------------------------------------------------------------C a rd s t r ip p e r s -----------------------------------------------------------------D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e ------------------------------------------------D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c l o t h ------------------------------------F u ll e r t e n d e r s ------------------------------------------------------------------L o o m f i x e r s ----------------------------------------------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e --------------------------------------------------------------W e a v e r s 1 --------------------------------------------------------------------------3
2
B o x lo o m s , a u t o m a t i c ------------------------------------------------

52
14
-

$ 1 .7 5
1 .4 8
-

287
112
151
-

$ 1 .8 0
1 .7 9
1 .7 3
-

35
16
-

$ 1 .6 6
1 .7 8
-

9
13
14
13
6
-

$ 1 .4 8
1. 72
1 .8 4
2. 35
1. 84
-

156
98
-

1 .6 9
1 .7 1
-

696
448
331
-

1. 80
1 .7 2
1. 70
-

90
-

_
1 .6 0
-

44
53
53
52
55
-

1. 85
1. 70
1 .6 1
1 .6 1
1 .7 2
-

31
-

1 .7 4
-

74
-

1 .8 5
-

-

38
35

1. 56
1 .5 6
1 .6 8
1 .7 3
1 .7 4
1. 67
1 .8 2
1. 60
1 .7 7

-

-

-

-

-

W om en
M e n d e r s , c l o t h -----------------------------------------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e --------------------------------------------------------------W e a v e r s 3 -------------------------------------------------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c -----------------------------------------------W in d e r s 3 --------------------------------------------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d , n o n a u t o m a t ic ------------F il li n g , a u t o m a t i c -----------------------------------------------------S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
M en
L o o m f i x e r s ----------------------------------------------------------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------------------------W e a v e r s 3 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----B o x lo o m s , a u t o m a t i c ------------------------------------------------

-

_
-

W om en
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e ------------------------------------------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m -------------------------------------------------------M e n d e r s , c l o t h --------------------------- -----------------------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s — ------------------------------------------ -----S p in n e r s , f r a m e --------------------------------------------------------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m -------------------------------------------------------W in d e r s 3 --------------------------------------------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , a u t o m a t i c ----------------------------------------C on e and tu b e, h ig h s p e e d , n o n a u t o m a t ic ------------F il li n g , a u t o m a t i c — ----------------- ------------------------------

-

116
77
-

-

1 .7 2
1 .6 7
-

-

144
507
505
863
•217
575
48

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
M en
B a t t e r y h a n d s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s ) -------------------------M a c h in is t s , m a in t e n a n c e ------------------------------------------------------ .—
T r u c k e r s , ha n d (in c lu d in g b o b b in b o y s ) ----------------------------

-

16
-

32

-

1. 55
-

1 .5 8

-

151
62
536

-

1. 55
2. 34
1 . 62

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

1. 83

-

_

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n c lu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th ose sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 In c lu d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i fic a t i o n in a d d itio n to t h o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
4 D ata a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e ly f o r o c c u p a t io n s a s s o c ia t e d w ith w ea v in g o p e r a t io n s s in c e in fo r m a t io n w a s o b ta in e d f r o m to o few o f the la r g e in te g r a t e d m ills
h a v in g su c h o p e r a t io n s .




NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a te no data r e p o r t e d o r data that do n ot m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r it e r ia .

Table 12.

Occupational Averages:

All Mills by Size of Mill

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m il ls
b y s iz e o f m il l, U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
N ew E ng lan d

U n ited S tates 2

M id d le A tla n tic

S o u th ea st

G r e a t L a k es

M ills w ith—
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

20—249 w o r k e r s

250 w o r k e r s
or m ore
A ver­
age
h o u r ly
ea rn ­
in g s

20—
249 w o r k e r s

250 w o r k e r s
o r m ore
A v er­
age
h o u r ly
earn ­
in gs

$ 1 .6 2
1 .7 5
2. 01
2. 40
1. 88
2. 62
-

.
293
123
-

1 .6 6
1. 50
-

559
423
-

1 .8 4
1. 78
-

97
113
79
52
112
-

1 .7 2
1. 76
1 .6 5
1. 61
1. 58
-

-

96
27

1 .4 6
1 .6 6

311
-

1 .7 8
-

74
19

1. 59
1. 62

-

-

34
194
192
286

1 .6 1
1 .6 0
1 .6 0
1 .6 0

117
429
375
654

1. 70
1 .7 9
1. 79
1 .7 0

-

-

-

270

1 .6 1

351

1 .6 0

-

1 .7 4
1 .9 0
1 .9 7
2. 17
2. 17
1 .7 4
1 .7 1

63
-

40
16
17

174
-

2. 02
1 .8 4
-

1. 95
2. 64
2. 60
2. 05
-

1 .7 4
1 .7 9

98

1 .7 6

146
-

1 .8 1
-

-

78
158
366

1 .7 9
1 .8 1
1 .7 0

-

-

-

-

-

1 .6 4

163

1 .7 0

-

-

-

-

-

62
295
773
155
149
380
36

1 .6 6
1 .7 2
1 .9 9
2. 26
2. 26
1 .7 7
2. 00

1 .6 8
1 .7 5

359
229

1 .7 8
1 .8 0

174
126

140
578
391
749

1 .6 8
1 .6 6
1 .6 8
1 .6 5

133
532
392
747

1 .7 3
1 .8 4
1 .8 1
1 .7 2

4 80

1 .6 3

402

494
216

43
29
25
25
9
27
-

44
298
260
112
112
194
59

1 .7 9
1. 95
1 .9 1
2. 24
2. 19
1 .8 1
1 .7 9

1 .6 5
1 .7 3
1 .8 9
2. 09
2. 12
1 .7 2
1 .9 9

$ 1 .8 3
1. 79
1. 77
2. 23
-

$ 2 . 23
2. 26
2. 55
2. 94
2. 73
-

54
703
881
229
202
718
84

64
520
1, 307
310
269
836
60

248
102
167
98
-

36
11
57
48
161
-

83
70
16
80
39
45
125
61
315
300

A ver­
age
h o u r ly
ea rn ­
in gs

$ 1 .7 1
1 .6 3
1. 58
2. 55
-

$ 2 . 04
2. 11
1 .9 4
2. 64
2. 11
2. 68
-

$ 1 .8 4
2. 03
1 .6 8
1 .7 8
1 .7 9
1 .8 3
2 .4 7
2. 10
2. 33
2. 33

20—249 w o r k e r s

91
24
22
26
-

144
57
34
11
144
22
-

358
189
66
49
34
94
177
146
368
331

385
191
189
125
63
169
301
278
855
675

250 w o r k e r s
or m ore
A v er­
age
h o u r ly
ea rn ­
in g s

Num ­
b e r of
w ork ­
ers

$ 1 .9 4
1 .8 8
1. 56
1 .7 5
1 .8 7
1 .9 4
2. 37
1 .8 8
2. 38
2. 36

$ 1 .9 0
1 .8 6
1 .7 5
1 .7 8
1 .8 1
2. 18
2 .4 4
1 .8 9
2 .4 3
2. 34

$ 1 .8 5
1 .9 8
1 .7 4
1 .7 7
1 .7 4
1 .8 6
2 .4 6
2. 08
2. 31
2. 28

20—249 w o r k e r s
A v er­
a ge
h o u r ly
ea rn ­
in g s

Num ­
b er of
w ork ­
ers

Num ­
b er of
w ork ­
ers

Num ­
b e r of
w ork ­
ers

673
308
143
90
46
177
256
313
515
4 33

250 w o r k e r s
or m ore
A v er­
age
h o u r ly
ea rn ­
in g s

A v er­
age
h o u r ly
ea rn ­
in g s

A v er­
age
h o u r ly
ea rn ­
in g s

A ver­
age
h o u r ly
earn ­
in g s

20—249 w o r k e r s
Num ­
b er of
w ork ­
ers

N um ­
ber of
w ork ­
e rs

Num ­
ber of
w ork ­
ers

Num ­
b er of
w ork ers

Num ­
b er of
w ork ­
ers

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
M en
C a rd f i n i s h e r s ---------------------------- —
C a rd s t r i p p e r s ----------------------------------D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e ----------------D y e i n g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c l o t h ----D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , y a r n ----F u ll e r t e n d e r s ----------------------------------L o o m f i x e r s -------------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e ------------------------------W e a v e r s 4 --------------------------- --------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c ---------------W om en
C a rd f i n i s h e r s ----------------------------------M e n d e r s , c l o t h ---------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e ------------------------------W e a v e r s 4 -------------------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c ---------------W in d e r s 4 .....................................................
C on e and tu b e , a u t o m a t i c --------C on e and tu b e, h igh s p e e d ,
n o n a u to m a tic — --------- ---------------F il li n g , a u t o m a t i c —.........................

-

-

35
-

-

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
W om d h
P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s --------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e 4 ---------------------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m -----------------------W i n d e r s 4 — ---------- ---------------------------C on e and tu b e, h i g h s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t ic ------------- ------------- —

-

-

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d
o c c u p a t io n s
M en
B a t t e r y h a n d s ------------------------------------J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y
c l e a n e r s ) -----------------------------------------M a c h in is t s , m a in t e n a n c e ---------------T r u c k e r s , hand (in c lu d in g
b o b b in b o y s ) -----------------------------------

50

1 .7 6

55

1 .7 5

41

1 .7 9

28

1 .6 3

-

-

-

-

82
28

1 .6 5
2 .4 4

174
100

1 .6 3
2 .4 3

20
17

1 .7 4
2. 37

28
16

1 .7 4
2. 28

9
6

1 .8 0
2. 93

-

-

39
-

1. 55
-

128
64

1. 55
2. 37

9
-

1 .7 6
-

324

1. 72

683

1 .7 0

212

1 .7 2

112

1 .8 4

51

i . 88

23

70

1 .5 6

498

1. 63

8

1 .81

72

1 .7 0

101

1 .6 6

49

1 .7 5

98

1 .6 6

2. 25

-

-

-

-

-

W om en
B a t t e r y h a n d s ------------------------------------1
2
3
4

"

"

-

-

-

-

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
In clu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
D ata a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e l y f o r o c c u p a t io n s a s s o c ia t e d w ith w e a v in g o p e r a t io n s
s in c e in fo r m a t io n w a s o b ta in e d f r o m t o o fe w o f the la r g e in te g r a t e d m il ls h a vin g su ch o p e r a t io n s .
In clu d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i f ic a t i o n in a d d itio n to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .

NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a t e no da ta r e p o r t e d o r data that do n ot m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r it e r ia .




Tabic 13.

Occupational Averages:

All Mills by Method of Wage Payment

(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m il ls
b y m eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t, U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited S ta tes 2

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

N ew E ng lan d

M id d le A tla n tic

A ver­
a ge
h o u r ly
ea rn i nfis

In cen tive
w ork ers
Num ­
A ver­
ber
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork ­
ea rn ers
in gs

$1.
1.
1.
1.
2.
1.
1.
2.
1.

83
85
72
90
35
90
85
03
77

104
52
85
52
123
228
103
1,287
1,057

$2. 24
2. 67
1. 82
2. 66
2. 78
2. 13
2. 21
2 .4 1
2. 34

403
219
82
128
243
101
18
-

$1. 81
1 .8 6
1 .6 6
1 .8 2
2. 36
1 .8 8
1. 83
-

.
40
11
59
106
69
656
604

_
$2. 69
2 .4 0
2 .7 1
2. 18
2. 14
2. 38
2. 37

142
56
22
47
11
-

585
903
29
22
938
70

1. 74
1 .8 3
1 .8 8
1. 94
1. 68
1. 73

638
1,285
510
449
616*
74

1. 96
1 .9 5
2. 17
2. 16
1. 88
2. 01

353
347
14
13
343
47

1 .7 4
1. 86
1. 98
1 .9 6
1. 69
1 .6 9

240
686
253
248
231
48

1 .9 2
2 .0 5
2. 24
2. 23
1 .8 7
1 .9 5

55
45
128
95

554
288

1. 66
1 .7 2

299
157

1. 85
1. 88

159
125

1 .6 6
1. 73

50
99

1 .9 7
1. 84

-

105
97
322
53
50
47

1. 68
1. 68
2. 51
1 .7 4
2. 15
2. 15

98
98
71
583
472

2.
2.
1.
2.
2.

2. 48
1. 78
-

_
-

-

87
30
30

94
17
-

107
99
418
207
731
490
840
133

1. 60
1. 60
1. 82
1. 65
1 .6 5
1. 65
1 .6 3
1. 74

_
666
66
379
293
656
208

1. 76
1. 88
1.9.3
1. 90
1 .7 5
1. 83

53
51
308
88
284
144
341
82

1. 67
1 .6 7
1 .8 4
1 .7 9
1. 76
1 .8 2
1 .7 0
1. 74

482
121

1 .5 9
1. 69

400
27

1. 70
1. 82

121
88

1 .7 0
1 .6 8

T im e w o r k e r s
Num ­
ber
of
w ork ­
er s

T im e w o r k e r s
Num ­
ber
of
w ork ­
ers

A ver­
a ge
h o u r ly
ea rn in fis

In cen tive
w ork ers
A ver­
Num ­
ber
age
h o u r ly
of
ea rn ­
w ork ­
in gs
ers

T im e w o r k e r s
Num ­ A v er­
ber
a ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ­ ea rn ­
ers
in gs

S ou th ea st 3

In ce n tiv e
w ork ers
Num ­
A v er­
ber
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork ­
ea rn ­
in g s
ers

T im e w o r k e r s
Num ­
ber
of
w ork ­
ers

A v er­
age
h o u r ly
ea rn ­
in gs

G re a t L ak es

In cen tiv e
w ork ers
A v er­
Num ­
ber
a ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ­
earn ­
ers
in g s

T im e w o r k e r s
Num ­ A v er­
ber
a ge
h o u r ly
of
w ork ­ ea rn ­
in gs
ers

In cen tive
w ork ers
N lim ­
A ver­
ber
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork ­
ea rn ­
ers
in gs

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
M en
C a rd f i n i s h e r s ------------------------------------C a rd s t r i p p e r s ----------------------------------D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e ------------------F u ll e r t e n d e r s ------------------------------------L o o m f i x e r s ----------------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e -------------------------------S p in n e r s , m u le ---------------------------------W e a v e r s 4 -------------------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c -----------------

954
447
247
294
434
363
21
83
51

_
67
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
$1. 74
_

-

38
12
29
48
97
183
-

$2. 45
2. 58
2. 85
2. 94
2. 13
2. 73
-

1 .8 7
2. 02
_
_

_
34
21
81
-

_
2. 31
2. 56
_
2. 02
-

352
_
_
307
_

_
1 .6 4
_

239
_

-

51
-

1. 92
-

216
75

1 .6 2
1 .6 4

-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

80
72
_
36
_
-

1. 59
1. 58
_
1 .7 2
_
-

98
98
_
69
-

_
-

_
-

"

-

$ 1 .9 8
2. 04
1 .7 6
2. 05
2. 64
-

-

41
38
91
361
305
402
51

1. 53
1. 53
_
1 .5 7
1 .6 1
1 .5 8
1. 58
1 .7 3

_
_
60
262
262
538
187

1. 84
1. 90
1. 90
1 .7 4
1. 83

-

-

314
27

1 .5 4
1. 70

307
27

1. 66
1 .8 2

311
126
122
_
_
_
_
-

-

$ 1 .7 9
1. 76
1 .7 5
_
_
_
_
-

_
" -

25
25
_
_
_
-

$1. 62
1. 75
_
2. 01
2 .4 0
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
.
_
-

74
90
27
_
112
_

1. 56
1 .7 9
2. 62
_
1. 58
_

30
69
48
_

74
19

1 .5 9
1. 62

_
-

44
29

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

W om en
M e n d e r s , c l o t h ----------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e --------------------------------W e a v e r s 4 --------------------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c ----------------W in d e r s 4 --------r-----------------------------------C on e and tu b e , a u t o m a t i c ---------C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t ic ------------------------------F il li n g , a u t o m a t ic -----------------------

1 .7 9
1 .7 5

_

_
1 .7 4

_
500
_
_

_
1. 80
_
1. 82
_
-

-

_

_
$ 1 .6 9
1 .6 3
1. 58
_
_
_
-

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s
M en
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e 4 -------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m -----------------------L o o m f i x e r s ----------------------------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s ----------------------W e a v e r s 4 --------------------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c -----------------

08
08

-

177
148

2 .4 8
2. 50

-

-

W om en
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g fr a m e 4 ---------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m -----------------------M e n d e r s , c l o t h ----------------------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s ----------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e 4 -----------------------------A m e r ic a n s y s t e m -----------------------W in d e r s 4 --------------------------------------------C on e and tu b e , a u t o m a t ic -----------C on e and tu b e, h ig h s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t ic ------------------------------F il li n g , a u t o m a t i c ------------------------

_
_
_
118
21
93 *

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

-

-

1 .8 2
1 .7 9
1 .8 3
“

"

-

"

_

_

2. 08
2. 08
_
1. 86
_
-

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

_

_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
'

_

_
_

_

_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

"

-

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n c lu d e s da ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d ition to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 D ata a r e n ot p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e ly f o r o c c u p a t io n s a s s o c ia t e d w ith w e a v in g o p e r a t io n s s in c e in fo r m a t io n w as o b ta in e d f r o m t o o fe w o f the la r g e in te g r a t e d m il ls ha vin g su ch o p e r a t io n s .
4 In c lu d e s da ta f o r w o r k e r s in this c l a s s i f ic a t i o n in a d d ition to t h o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a t e n o da ta r e p o r t e d o r data that d o not m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .




to
03

Table 14.

Occupational Earnings:

Maine

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m i l l s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

of
w ork ers

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s ----W o m e n _____

_

------

_____________________

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ofA vera ge
$1. 25 $1. 30 $1. 35 $ 1 .4 0 $1. 45 $1. 50 $1. 60 $1. 70 $1. 80 $1. 90 $2. 00 $2. 10 $2. 20 $2. 30 $2. 40 $2. 50 $2. 60 $2. 70 $2. 80 $2. 90 $3. 00
h o u r ly
and
and
e a rn in g s 1
und er
$1. 30 $1. 35. $1. 40 $ 1 .4 5 $1. 50 $1. 60 $1. 70 $1. 80 $1. 90 $2. 00 $2. 10 $2. 20 $2. 30 $2. 40 $2. 50 $2. 60 $2. 70 $2. 80 $2. 90 $3. 00 o v e r

4 , 037
2 ,5 8 7
1 ,4 5 0

$1. 74
1. 76
1. 71

23
14
9

43
27
16

91
20
71

151
48
103

549
350
199

812
533
279

530
341
189

487
371
116

333
228
105

216
143
73

209
126
83

223
128
95

105
57
48

98
67
31

67
51
16

38
32
6

8
5
3

8
8
-

12
7
5

16
14
2

18
17
1

124
87
71
57
38
79
65
80
199
190

1. 62
1. 85
1. 62
1 .6 1
1 .6 8
2. 25
2. 15
1. 95
2. 21
2. 22

_
-

_
-

_
-

34
8
8
20
-

33
32
32
8
4
3
-

13
11
11
17
14
2
-

38
7
16
29
3
3

20
20
5
4
2
2
7
8
7

6
19
19
2
9
8

.
8
8
10
45
42

15
15
17
42
41

8
8
10
18
17

12
4
29
28

1
1
34
33

8
8
10
10

_
-

-

"

-

6
“

6
1
1

_
2
"

_
2
6
-

42
214
158
56
273
39
234
92
89
127
44
83
46
38

1 .4 8
1 .6 5
1 .6 2
1. 74
1. 93
1. 58
1. 99
2. 10
2. 10
1. 65
1. 47
1. 75
1. 78
1. 85

_
4
4
_
2
2
-

-

_
2
2
2
2
-

_
6
2
4
19
18
1
9
1

29
24
21
3
3
3
43
13
30
10
10

12
43
22
21
41
31
10
18
4
14
5
5

_
83
76
7
38
2
36
11
11
4
4

1
4
4
35
35
8
5
3
3
3

_
31
27
4
11
6
5
1
1
2
2
2
2

_
9
9
11
11
6
6
6
6

_
4
4
21
21
45
43
4
4
1
1

.
63
63
22
21
2
2
-

_
1
1
36
36
4
4
2
2
-

_
5
5
4
4
6
6
1
1
-

.
2
2
10
10
3
3
-

_
1
1
2
2
-

1
1
-

_
-

_
4
4
4
4

_
2
2
2
2

.
-

13
66
23
43

1.
1.
1.
1.

53
59
51
64

2
2

-

2
2

8
-

2
2

2
2

1
1

"

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

1
-

-

-

-

-

7
7

-

-

13
4
9

5
5

-

4
29
10
19

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

9

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

7

34

1

1

-

-

"

-

“

-

16

6

3

-

-

-

"

-

-

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
M en
C a r d fi n is h e r s 1
2_____________ _______
C a r d s t r i p p e r s _______________________
T im e _______________________________
D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c l o t h 2__
F u ll e r t e n d e r s 2______________________
L o o m f i x e r s __
— ----------------------T im e _______ ______________________
S p in n e r s , fr a m e f b / -------------------------W e a v e r s (a ll in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s )4„
B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c ----------------

-

W om en
C a r d fi n is h e r s 2______________________
M e n d e r s , c l o t h ______________ ______
T im e
____________________________
I n c e n t iv e ___________________ ______
S p in n e r s , f r a m e ------------------------T im e _______________________________
I n c e n t iv e — -------- --------------- ----W e a v e r s (a ll in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s ) 4 . .
B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c ______ __
in d e r s ^ ,___
_______—
T im e ____________________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________________
C on e and t u b e , a u t o m a t ic ---------I n c e n t iv e _______________________
C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d ,
n o n a u to m a tic 3 a / — ----------------F i l l i n g , au tom a t i c ----------------------T im e __________________________
In c e n tiv e ---------------------- --------

-

.
4
4
-

-

-

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d
o c c u p a t io n s 2
M en
B a t t e r y h a n d s ________________________
T r u c k e r s , hand (in clu d in g
b o b b in b o y s ) ------------- --------------------

19

1. 57

62

1. 48

25

1. 50

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

W om en
B a t t e r y h a n d s ________________________

1
2
3
4

-

-

-

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h olid a y s, and la te s h ift s .
A l l w o r k e r s w e r e p a id on a t im e b a s i s .
I n s u ffic ie n t da ta to w a r r a n t p u b lic a t io n o f s e p a r a t e a v e r a g e s b y m eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t; (a) p r e d o m in a n t ly t im e w o r k e r s ,
In clu d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n in a d d ition to th ose sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .




-

or

-

(b) p r e d o m in a n t ly in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s .

-

Table 15.

Occupational Earnings:

Massachusetts

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h ou rly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m il ls ,

N o v e m b e r 1966)

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f—
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s -------------------M e n ----------------------------------■
--------------W o m e n --------------------------------------------

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

4, 068
2, 544
1, 524

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s 1

$ 2 . 02
2. 09
1. 90

Under
$ 1 ,5 0

$ 1 . 50
and
u n d er
$ 1 .6 0

$ 1 . 60

$ 1 . 70

$ 1 . 80

$ 1 . 90

$ 2 . 00

$ 2 . 10

$ 2 . 20

$ 2 . 30

$ 2. 40

$ 2 . 50

$ 2 .60

$ 2 . 70

$ 2. 80

$2. 90

$ 1 . 70

$ 1 . 80

$ 1. 90

$ 2 . 00

$ 2 . 10

$ 2 . 20

$ 2 . 30

$ 2 . 40

$ 2 . 50

$ 2 . 60

$ 2 . 70

$ 2 . 80

$ 2 . 90

over

178
126
52

112
98
14

60
57
3

32
31
1

_
2
13
13
11
11

_
_
_
_
-

and

40
8
32

79
20
59

414
87
327

539
341
198

716
407
309

505
327
178

371
259
112

307
218
89

251
192
59

272
221
51

.
-

_
-

_
4
_
-

26
26
20
2
2
-

30
30
11
11
3
4
7
7
18
18
-

-

-

-

-

-

40
40
17
17
16
11
12
12
_
14
13
1
4
4
4
4

3
3
12
12
3
3
23
17
6
5
5
5
5

15
15
8
8
9
1
T
18
18
18
18

8
7
7
9
9
34
34
34
34

14
4
4
17
16
14
14
33
32
29
28

2
2
2
30
29
8
8
24
24
24
24

_
2
1
1
22
9
30
30
29
29

_
12
3
45
45
39
39

1
1
1
1
2

14
13
1
18
18
2
2
42
28
14
-

57
52
5
44
32
12
38
33
5
11

38
5
33
60
47
13
6
6
12
8
4
-

31
1
30
33
11
22
3
2
9
9
-

4
4
60
60
2
2
5
5
-

16
.
16
12
12
14
14
5
5
-

1
_
1
22
22
11
10
7
7
-

_
8
8
16
16
5
5
-

_
_
_
2
2
-

_

16
6
10
2

1
1
72
56
16
6

.
-

-

4
4

32
32
18
18

28
28
12
“

12
11
15
11

3
3
9
5

1
4
"

5
-

4
-

2
4
“

1
4
"

-

-

_

“

"

155*
120
35

37
32
5

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s
M en
C a rd f i n i s h e r s ---------------------------------T im e ---------- —— ------------- ---------------C a rd s t r i p p e r s ----------------------------------T i m e -----------------------------------------------D y e i n g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c lo t h 2 —
D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , y a r n 2 —
F u lle r t e n d e r s ----------------------------------T i m e ---------- ------------------------------------L o o m f i x e r s ---------------------------------------T im e -----------------------------------------------S p in n e rs , f r a m e --------------------------------T im e -----------------------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------------------------W e a v e r s 3 -------------------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------------------B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c ---------------I n c e n t iv e -----------------------------------

138
114
56
48
53
16
30
22
92
66
88
48
40
217
216
198
197

1.
1.
2.
1.
1.
1.
2.
1.
2.
2.
2.
1.
2,
2.
2.
2.
2.

99
92
03
96
90
90
06
92
50
46
07
92
24
45
45
43
43

163
71
92
258
90
168
59
55
211
131
80
19

1.
1.
2.
2.
1.
2.
2.
2.
1.
1.
1.
1.

94
83
02
03
92
09
26
29
79
73
90
76

88
74
70
38

1.
1.
1.
1.

80
72
85
74

7
7
2
2

_
1
2
2
_
4
4
3
3

W om en
M e n d e r s , c l o t h ---------------------------------T im e -----------------------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e --------------------------------T im e -----------------------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------------------------W e a v e r s , b o x lo o m s , a u t o m a t ic —
I n c e n t iv e ----------------------------------------W in d e r s 3 --------------------------------------------T i m e -----------------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------------------C on e and tu b e, a u t o m a t ic 2 -------C on e an d tu b e, h ig h s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t i c -----------------------------T i m e -----------------------------------------F il li n g , a u t o m a t i c ----------------------T i m e ------------------------------------------

"

_

_
_
_
_
_
.
-

_
_
„
_
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

S ee fo o t n o t e s a t end o f ta b le .




10

01

Table 15.

Occupational Earnings:

Massachusetts---- Continued

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m il ls ,

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te sh ifts .
2 A l l w o r k e r s w e r e p a id on a t im e b a s i s .
3 I n c lu d e s data f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n in a d d itio n to t h o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
4 I n s u ffic ie n t da ta to w a r r a n t p u b lic a t io n o f s e p a r a t e a v e r a g e s b y m ethod o f w a g e p a y m e n t,




p r e d o m in a n t ly t im e w o r k e r s .

10

0)
N o v e m b e r , 1966)

Table 16.

Occupational Earnings:

New Hampshire

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m i l l s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f—
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s -----------------------M e n ___________________________________
W o m e n _______________________________

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

3 ,4 5 6
2 ,2 1 0
1 ,2 4 6

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s 1

$1. 93
1. 96
1. 87

$1. 50
and
u n d er
$ 1 .6 0

$1. 60

$1\ 70

$1. 80

$1. 90

$2. 00

<^•19

$2. 20

$2. 30

$2. 40

$2. 50

$2. 60

$2. 70

$1. 70

$1. 80

$1. 90

$2. 00

$2. 10

$2. 20

$2. 30

$2. 40

$2. 50

$2. 60

$2. 70

over

61
19
42

70
21
49

408
243
165

712
372
340

660
449
211

466
337
129

345
204
141

152
110
42

181
139
42

153
113
40

86
62
24

94
84
10

42
34
8

26
23
3

_
-

_
-

19
2
21
-

8
5
6
9
2
-

39
12
2
12
13
-

_
29
20
19
-

_
7
1
-

_
1
1

_
2
9
9

_
22
22

_
_
_
18
18

_
_
_
9
5

_
_
_
8
8

_
_
_
_
-

"

_

_

1

“

3

7

16

38

17

42

17

4

_
1
1
8
7
18
18
2
2

_
13
6
7
22
22
11
11
5
5
6
6

17
13
13
39
31
8
24
24
13
13
11
11

25
80
68
12
9
9
2
2
2
2
5
5
-

_
7
7
50
18
32
_
-

_
12
12
60
60
1
1
1
1
4
_
4
2

-

-

-

5
5

-

2

_
1
1
17
17
1
1
1
1
7
_
7
1
6

_
_
_
12
12
9
3
8
3
2
_
2
_
2

_
_
_
9
9
21
21
21
21
3
_
3
3
_
_

_
_
_
_
4
_
4
15
15
15
15
3
_
3
2
_
1

_
_
_
2
_
2
4
4
4
4
2
_
2
1
_
1

_
_
_
_
_
_
1
1
1
1
1
_
1
_
_
1

“

-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
8
8
8
8
2
_
2
1
_
1
-

U n der
$1. 50

and

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s

M en
C a r d fi n is h e r s 1
2_________________________
C a r d s t r ip p e r s 2________________________
D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c lo t h 2 ____
D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , y a r n 2-------F u ll e r t e n d e r s 2_________________________
L o o m f i x e r s _____________________________
T im e __________________________________
W e a v e r s , b o x l o o m s , a u to m a tic
(a ll in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s ) ______________

66
55
11
41
55
67
63

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
2.
2.

78
92
77
86
81
42
42

145

2 .4 3

42
129
87
42
232
56
176
62
56
61
56
82
58
24
30
20
36
22

1. 82
1. 84
1. 83
1. 87
1. 96
1. 79
2. 01
2. 38
2. 40
2. 39
2. 40
1. 87
1 .6 9
2. 30
1. 92
1. 72
1. 96
1. 76

_
2
2
1
1
-

14
12

1. 73
1. 73

_
-

_
-

5
5

9
7

_
-

_
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

12
18

1. 70
2. 24

2
-

-

4
-

2

3
-

-

1
7

-

-

6

3

-

_
1

_
1

48

1. 73

~

"

18

26

“

~

2

2

W om en
C a r d fi n is h e r s 2_________________________
M e n d e r s , c l o t h _________________________
T im e ____________________________ ____
I n c e n t iv e ______________________________
S p in n e r s , f r a m e ________________________
T im e __ ______________ _______ _____
I n c e n t iv e ______________________________
W e a v e r s 3________________________________
I n c e n t iv e __________________________
B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c _____________
I n c e n t iv e __________________________
W in d e r s 3________________________________
T im e _____________________ _________
I n c e n t iv e __________________________
C on e and tu b e , a u t o m a t ic _________
T im e _______________________________
F i l l i n g , a u tom a t i c __________________
T im e ----------------------------------------------

-

-

-

-

-

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d
o c c u p a t io n s

M en
B a t t e r y h a n d s ___________________________
T im e __________________________________
J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y
c l e a n e r s ) 2______________________________
M a c h in is t s , m a in t e n a n c e 2 ___________
T r u c k e r s , hand (in c lu d in g
b o b b in b o y s ) ______________________ __

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 A l l w o r k e r s w e r e p a id on a tim e b a s is .
3 In c lu d e s da ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i f ic a t i o n in a d d ition to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .




-

"

“

_

Table 17.

Occupational Earnings:

North Carolina—Virginia

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m i l l s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f—
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s __
____
M e n ------------------------------- ---------------W om en
__ __
_____

N u m ber
of
w ork ers

A v era ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s 1

$1. 25
and
und er
$1. 30

$1. 30

$1. 35

$1. 40

$1. 45

$1. 50

$1. 60

$1. 70

$1. 80

$1. 90

$2. 00

$2. 10

$2. 20

$2. 30

$2. 40

$2. 50

$1. 35

$1. 40

$ 1 .4 5

$1. 50

$1. 60

$1. 70

$1. 80

$1. 90

$2. 00

$2. 10

$2. 20

$2. 30

$2. 40

$2. 50

over

1119
501
618

1006
536
470

1444
552
892

1016
372
644

655
317
338

290
116
174

348
254
94

393
356
37

299
285
14

99
90
9

226
220
6

4
2
2

18
6
4

39
31
8

_
6

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

"

"

73
61
-

-

_
“

and

7, 297
3, 749
3, 548

$1. 83
1. 91
1. 74

15
11
4

7
1
6

120
42
78

130
40
90

130
56
74

73
51
28

1. 73
1 .7 1
1 .6 9

_
-

_
-

_
-

"

12
12
8

_
-

"

~

“

“

196
114
53

1. 67
1 .6 1
1. 57

_
-

40
40
20

_
-

2
-

17
13
5

8
"

56
28

115

1. 88

1

“

1

“

32

17

3

6

8

16
110
56
321
136
319
134
622
217
405

1. 59
1 .7 1
1. 57
1. 76
1. 57
1. 76
1. 57
1 .6 7
1. 57
1. 72

_
2
2
2
2

_
_
2
2

_
16
10
6

1
46
8
38

1
8
7
5
1
5
1
36
6
30

11
28
28
97
87
97
87
176
129
47

1
26
17
55
46
55
46
68
6
62

_
12
4
20
2
18
99
48
51

1
15
11
11
95
4
91

_
12

1
8

_
-

-

-

-

102
102
61
6
55

21
21
14
14

3
3
3
3

3
3
3
3

408
164
244

1 .6 0
1. 53
1. 64

2
_
2

2
2

16
10
6

43
7
36

34
5
29

168
123
45

47
5
42

33
11
22

29
_
29

19
3
16

11
_
11

2
_
2

2
2

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s 2

M en
C a r d f i n i s h e r s ________________________
T im e ___________________ ____________
C a r d s t r ip p e r s (a ll t i m e w o r k e r s )__

_
-

•
*'

W om en
S p in n e r s , f r a m e ______________________
T im e ----------------- ---------------------------W in d e r s , y a r n (a ll t i m e w o r k e r s ) —

"

_
"

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

"

“

“

_
"

8

12

2

5

2

_
1

_
-

-

-

1
1
-

_
1
1

1
1
-

_

_

_

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s

M en
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g fr a m e
(A m e r ic a n s y s t e m ) 3b / _____________

18

W om en
D o f f e r s , sp in n in g f r a m e 3 a / _________
P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s ________________
T im e ________________________________
S p in n e r s , f r a m e 4-------------------------------T im e _____________________________
A m e r ic a n s y s t e m -------------------------T im e ____________________ _______
W in d e r s , y a r n 4_______________________
T im e _____________________________
I n c e n t iv e ________________________
C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t ic ____________________
T im e _____ _______________________
I n c e n t iv e ________________________

"

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 D ata a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e l y f o r o c c u p a t io n s a s s o c ia t e d w ith w ea v in g o p e r a t io n s s in c e in fo r m a t io n w as o b ta in e d fr o m t o o few o f the la r g e m il ls ha vin g su c h o p e r a t i o n s .
and e a r n in g s e s t im a t e s f o r th e s e o c c u p a t io n s a r e , h o w e v e r , in clu d e d in the da ta f o r a ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s .
3 I n s u ffic ie n t data to w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t io n o f s e p a r a t e a v e r a g e s b y m eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t; (a) p r e d o m in a n t ly t im e w o r k e r s , and (b) p r e d o m in a n t ly in c e n tiv e w o r k e r s .
4 I n clu d e s da ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n in a d d ition to th o se sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .




“

E m p lo y m e n t

Table 18.

Occupational Earnings:

Philadelphia—Camden, Pa.—N.J.1

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m i l l s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f—
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s ------------- —
M e n _______________________ _________
W o m e n ___ ________________ —-----------

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A vera ge
$ 1 .4 0
h o u r ly
and
e a r n in g s 2
u n d er
$ 1 .4 5

1 ,5 0 2
1 ,0 0 8
494

$ 2 . 06
2. 13
1. 90

121
99
36
28
7
19
135
85

2. 06
1 .9 9
2. 18
2. 07
2. 06
2 .6 8
2. 14
2. 16

33
145
91
54

2.
1.
1.
1.

1
-

1

$ 1 .4 5

$1. 50

$1. 60

$1. 70

$1. 80

$1. 90

$2. 00

$2. 10

$2. 20

$2. 30

$2. 40

$2. 50

$2. 60

$2. 70

$2. 80

$2. 90

$3. 00

$3. 10

$3. 20

$1. 50

$1. 60

$1. 70

$1. 80

$1. 90

$2. 00

$2. 10

$2. 20

$2. 30

$2. 40

$2. 50

$2. 60

$2. 70

$2. 80

$2. 90

$3. 00

$3. 10

$3. 20

over

261
124
137

170
147
23

215
162
53

261
190
71

_

42
42
6
6
4
6
6

34
34
2
2
2
38
37

23
18
16
16
_
_
66
17

19
12

4
1

-

-

1

6
23
8
15

12

1

1

15

3

and

8
2
6

23
9
14

14
8
6

218
69
149

5
5
-

101
89
12

29
22
7

68
63
5

30
28
2

17
-

_
-

-

-

_
_
10
10

_
_
_
10
10

32
30
2

17
17
-

21
21

11
8
3

13
10
3

1
1
-

8
8

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
-

_
-

_
_

_
-

-

'

-

-

-

.
_

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s

M en
C a r d f i n i s h e r s ---------------------------------—
T i m e ___________ _______ ___________
C a r d s t r i p p e r s —--------------------------------T im e ___ __________ ___ ________
F u ll e r t e n d e r s 3 a / __________________
L o o m f i x e r s 3b / ----- ---------------------------S p in n e r s , f r a m e --------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ___________________________

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

"

“

“

-

-

"

-

-

-

2
2
4
4

_

_

-

-

2
2
1
1
1

2
_
-

_

_

_
4
_
11
-

_

_
2
_
8
-

-

-

-

_

-

_
_
_
-

_

_

_

_

W om en
S p in n e r s , f r a m e 3 a / _________ ______
W i n d e r s 4___ ____________ __________
T im e ___— ________________ - _ _
_
In ce n tiv e _______________ _____
_
C o n e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t ic 3 a / ------------------------

13
88
82
98

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

53
50
3

27

_

2
54
33
21

53

-

1
-

_
-

_

_

-

_
_

_
_

1

-

_

2
1

_
_

_

_

_
_

_

_

_
_

_

.

_
_
_

_
_
_

.

99

1. 84

“

-

“

6
6

1. 84
2. 93

_

_

-

_

3

2

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

-

1

2

22

1. 88

“

1

8

7

“

“

6

“

■

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d
o c c u p a t io n s 5

M en
J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y
c l e a n e r s ) ____ _ _____________________
M a c h in is t s , m a in t e n a n c e __________
T r u c k e r s , ha n d (in clu d in g
b o b b in b o y s ) _ __ _______ __ _____

1

1 T h e P h ila d e lp h ia —C a m d e n A r e a c o n s is t s o f D e la w a r e and P h ila d e lp h ia C o u n t ie s , P a . , and C a m d e n C ou n ty , N. J.
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
3 I n s u ff ic ie n t d a ta to w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t io n o f s e p a r a t e a v e r a g e s b y m e th o d o t w a g e p a y m e n t; (a) p r e d o m in a n t ly t im e w o r k e r s ,
4 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i f ic a t i o n in a d d ition to th o se sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
8 A l l w o r k e r s w e r e p a id on a t im e b a s is .




or

_

_

_
_

_

2

_

_

_

1

(b) p r e d o m in a n t ly in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s .

10

<
0

Table 19.

Occupational Earnings:

Rhode Island

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m i l l s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—
O c c u p a tio n and s e x

N u m ber A v era ge
h o u r ly
of
U n der
w o rk e r s e a rn in g s 1
$1. 50

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
M e n __ _____ ...
W om en

$1. 50
and
under
$1. 60

$1. 60

$1. 70

$1. 80

$1. 90

$2. 00

$2. 10

$2. 20

$2. 30

$2. 40

$2. 50

$2. 60

$2. 70

$2. 80

$2. 90

$3. 00

$3. 10

$3. 20

$1. 70

$1. 80

$1. 90

$2. 00

$2. 10

$2. 20

$2. 30

$2. 40

$2. 50

$2. 60

$2. 70

$2. 80

$2. 90

$3. 00

$3. 10

$3. 20

over

25
24
1

133
23
110

454
81
373

410
123
287

645
306
339

614
234
380

308
228
80

198
141
57

165
127
38

196
174
22

131
109
22

109
99
10

68
64
4

44
38
6

15
10
5

3
3
-

13
08
20
14
19

_

_
_
_
_

_

_
-

10
10
_

-

“

1
_
_
_
1

_
_
_

-

1
_
1
_
4

_
_
_
-

“

18
18
11
10
3

_
_
_
_

"

14
2
10
_
2

_
_
-

"

_
4
4
12

-

-

10
10
_
_

4
4

-

_
5
5

“

-

-

127
99
58
41

2. 13
1. 72
1 .6 6
1. 81

_
_
_
-

_

_
15
4
11

_

30
30
_

9
8
1

1
36
16
20

75
6
_
6

1
3
_
3

_
-

15
_
_
_

13
_
_
_

11
_

3
_
_
_

1
_
_

4
_
_
_

2
_
_

89
58

1. 73
1. 66

30
30

5
4

9
8

36
16

6

3

-

-

-

“

-

3, 561
1 ,7 9 8
1 ,7 6 3

$1. 98
2. 10
1. 86

and

3
2
1

32
5
27

8
7
1

_
-

_
_
-

_
_
_
_

-

-

S e le c t e d w o o le n o c c u p a t io n s

M en
C a r d fi n is h e r s
...
.......
T im e ________________________________
C a r d s t r ip p e r s _ ....
T im e _____________________________ _
S p in n e r s , fr a m e 2____________________

58
44
31
19
22

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

_
_
_

-

_

W om en
S p in n e r s , fr a m e 2_________ ___ ___
W in d e r s 3__________________________ __
T im e ______________________ __
I n c e n t iv e _______________________
C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t ic ____________________
T im e _________________________ _

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

“

12
28
28
16
16

24
29
29
25
25

18
46
39
46
39

18
19
18
19
18

17
17
17
17

_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_
-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

“

1
_
_
_
-

-

-

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s

M en
L o o m f i x e r s 4_________________________
W e a v e r s 3______________________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________________
B o x l o o m s , a u t o m a t i c __________
I n c e n t iv e -----------------------------------

72
146
138
130
122

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

52
53
53
55
54

35
230
51
200
104
64

1. 81
1. 88
1. 85
1 . 79
1 . 88
1 .6 1

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_
-

_
-

_

_

-

-

“

"

~

-

-

2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2

_

_

_

16
85
10
31
31

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

32

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

11
17
17

-

-

-

-

~

“

"

"

"

"

"

_

2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1

-

W om en
C o f f e r s , sp in n in g fr a m e 4__________
M e n d e r s , c l o t h 4--------------------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s 4_____________
S p in n e r s , f r a m e 3 ’ 4__________________
A m e r ic a n s y s t e m ____________________
B r a d fo r d s y s t e m _____________________

See fo o t n o t e s

at en d o f ta b le .




2

_

-

-

-

-

-

19

“

19

-

9
51
6
45

17
63
13
23
23

50
8
59
27
~

"

_

Table 19.

Occupational Earnings:

Rhode Island-— Continued

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m i l l s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f—
N u m b er A v e r a g e
of
h o u r ly
U nder
w o r k e r s e a r n in g s 1
$1. 50

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

$1. 50
and
under
$ 1 .6 0

$1. 60

I s T T W “$ l7 8"0

$1. 90

$2. 00

$2. 10

$2. 20

$2. 30

$2. 40

$2. 50

$2. 60

$2. 70

$2. 80

$2. 90

$3. 00

$3. 10

$3. 20

$2. 00

$2. 10

$2. 20

$2. 30

$ 2 .4 0

$2. 50

$2. 60

$2. 70

$2. 80

$2. 90

$3. 00

$3. 10

$3. 20

over

and
$1. 70

$1. 80

$1. 90

S e le c t e d w o r s t e d o c c u p a t io n s —
C on tin u ed
W o m e n — C o n tin u e d
W in d e r s 1
3______________________________
2
T im e ____________________________
I n c e n t iv e __ 1____________________
C on e and tu b e, a u t o m a t ic _______
T im e ___________________________________
C on e and tu b e , h ig h s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t ic _________________________
T im e _______________________________ _—
I n c e n t iv e _____________________________
F il li n g , a u to m a tic 4 _________________

314
2 36
78
71
62

$1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

59
48
11
4
4

80
50
30
28
22

18
10
8
-

18
6
12
3

1
1
-

12

2
2
-

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
-

-

1
-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

48
26
22

12
4
8
4

9

1

12

2

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
4

1
-

12

2

-

1

1

-

-

69

21
12
9
-

-

-

“

25

13

37

6

7

1

6

3

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

113
113

79
72
98
76
74

-

9
9
-

-

-

36
36

120
55
65
77

1 . 88
1. 74
2. 00
1 .6 9

-

9
9

4
4

-

-

-

________

93

1. 78

4

T r u c k e r s , hand (in clu d in g
b o b b in g i r l s ) ________________________

9

1 .6 8

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

"

“

“

S e le c t e d w o o le n and w o r s t e d
o c c u p a t io n s 4

M en
T r u c k e r s , hand (in clu d in g
b o b b in b o y s ) ______________________

W om en

_

_

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n s u ffic ie n t da ta to w a r r a n t p u b lic a t io n o f se p a r a te a v e r a g e s b y m e th o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t, p r e d o m in a n t ly t im e w o r k e r s .
3 I n c lu d e s da ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i f ic a t i o n in a d d ition to th o se sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
4 A l l w o r k e r s w e r e p a id on a tim e b a s is .




_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

Table 20.

Method of W age Payment

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m i l l s b y m e th o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t,
U nited S t a te s , s e l e c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
A reas

Reg;ions
U nited
S ta tes 1
2

M eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t 1

A ll w o r k e r s ---------------------------- ----------------------T i m e - r a t e d w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------------F o r m a l p la n s ------------------------------------------------------S in g le ra te ----------------------------------------------------R a n g e o f r a t e s -----------------------------------------------I n d iv id u a l r a t e s --------------------------------------------------I n c e n t iv e w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------------In d iv id u a l p i e c e w o r k -----------------------------------------G ro u p p i e c e w o r k ------------------------------------------------I n d iv id u a l b o n u s --------------------------------------------------G ro u p b o n u s ----------------------------------------------------------

100
73
67
64
3
6
27
18
(3 )
7
3

N orth
C a r o lin a —
V ir g in ia

N ew
E ngland

M id d le
A tla n tic

S ou th ea st

G re a t
L a k es

M a in e

M assach u ­
se tts

N ew
H a m p s h ir e

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

80
51
51

75
73
73

76
72
72

68
66
66
3
32
12

58
56
50
7
2
42
17
( 3)
8
16

76
70
69
1
6
24
18
(3 )
4
2

72
69
65
4
3
28
17
(3 )
10
1

-

-

29
20
18
2

2
25
24

70
66
61
5
4
30
16

(? )
(3)
I

13
1

-

“

-

-

4
24
22
( 3)
1
(3)

-

17
3

P h ila d e lp h ia —
C a m d en ,
P a .— J.
N.
100
75
74
74
1
25
10
(3 )
4
12

R hode
Islan d
100
82
81
81
2
18
12
-

1
5

1 F o r d e fin it io n o f m e th o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t , s e e a p p en d ix A .
2 In clu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u al to ta ls .

Table 21.

Scheduled W eekly H ours

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m il ls by s c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s , 1
U nited S t a t e s , s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
R e g io n s
W e e k ly h o u r s 1

U nited
Sta tes 2

A reas

N ew
England

M id d le
A tla n tic

S ou th ea st

G re a t
L a k es

100

M a in e

M assach u ­
se tts

N ew
H a m p s h ir e

N orth
C a r o lin a —
V ir g in ia

P h ila d e lp h ia —
C am den,
P a .— J.
N.

R h od e
Isla n d

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------------32
40
44
45
46
48

100

100

100

100

h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------h o u r s ----------------------------------------------------------------------

2
60
2
5
1
29

_

_
65

6
48
2

71
4
8
1
16

-

3

_
70
-

-

30

-

32

45

"

-

100

100

100

100

100

100

_
44
5
2
_
50

_

_
100

_
40

_
55

77

-

-

-

-

7

23
_

-

60

38

100

100

100

100

11
17
38

2

-

79
6
9
3
3

-

_

O ffi c e w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------------S S .h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------3 6 V4 h o u r s -----------------------------------------------------------------3 7 V2 h o u r s ------ —-------------------------------------------------------38 h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------40 h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------44 h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------45 h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------46 h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------48 h o u r s

100
1
( 3)
9
( 3)
80
5
4
1
(3 )

100

100

1

3
3
42

-

2
(3)
89
(3)
6
3

"

100

r o u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u al to ta ls.

100

_

1

_

-

-

88
7
5

66
32
2

99

-

-

-

'

"

-

50

2

1 D ata r e la t e to p r e d o m in a n t w o r k s c h e d u le s o f f u l l- t im e d a y -s h ift w o r k e r s in e a ch e s t a b lis h m e n t .
2 I n clu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .

 T E : B e c a u s e o f
NO


100

_

100

_

_

_

-

-

-

100

100

34

-

-

-

5

-

72
1
14
8

2
91

-

-

-

-

"

'

'

'

-

5
-

-

-

Table 22.

Shift Differential Provisions

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s b y sh ift d iff e r e n t ia l p r o v is i o n s 1 in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m i l l s ,
U n ited S ta te s , s e l e c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
R e g io n s
S h ift d iff e r e n t ia l

U nited
Sta tes 2

N ew
England

M id d le
A tla n tic

A reas

S ou th ea st

G re a t
L a k es

M a in e

M assach u ­
s e tts

N ew
H a m p s h ir e

N o rth
C a ro lin a —
V ir g in ia

P h ila d e lp h ia —
Cam den,
P a .-N . J.

R hod e
Islan d

S e c o n d s h ift

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s h a v in g
s e c o n d -s h if t p r o v i s i o n s -------------------- ----------------W ith s h ift d i ff e r e n t ia l -----------------------------------U n ifo r m c e n ts p e r h o u r -----------------------------2 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------3 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------4 c e n t s ------------------------------------------------------5 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------7 c e n t s ------------------------------------------------------7V2 c e n t s ----------------------------------- ,-------------9 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------10 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------13 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e -----------------------------------4 p e r c e n t -------------------------------------------------5 p e r c e n t -------------------------------------------------W ith no s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l --------------------------------

98.
50.
4 7.
.
5.
23.
13.
.
.
1.
1.
.
2.
.
2.
47.

1
3
7
7
3
2
7
8
9
8
1
2
6
3
3
8

98. 3
69. 1
68. 0
1. 7
48. 8
17. 6
_
-

93. 8
76. 1
7 2 .4
.4
1. 0
27. 7
5. 6
21. 2
1 . 6
4. 2
4. 7
3. 5
. 3
1 .4
. 3
. 5
3. 7
. 3
3 .4
17. 7

9 1 .0
70. 3
67. 3

-

1. 1
.8
.3
29. 2

95.
85.
64.
1.
16.
9.
5.
17.
12.
2.
21.
21.
10.

8
8
6
0
0
6
7
5
0
7
2
2
0

99. 5
23. 1
23. 1
10. 1
10. 9
2. 1
76. 4

86.
4 8.
4 1.
27.
6.
7.
6.
6.
38.

2
0
1

9
2

60. 0

9 9. 5
80. 9
80. 9

74. 7
57. 4
4 1. 1

94. 2
39. 1
39. 1

8
3

94. 2
34. 3
34. 3
28. 9
5 .4
-

0

9

100.
87.
86.
1.
37.
47.
1.
1.
12.

0
3
0
6
4
0

100.
79.
79.
6.
54.

0
3
3
3

20. 7

9 8 .7
14. 6
14. 6
1 1 .3
3. 3
84. 0

96. 8
9 1. 6
61. 7
3 1 .4
23. 5
6. 8
29. 9
29. 9
5. 2

92. 2
79. 1
79. 1
-

98. 7
97. 9
97. 9
-

84. 8
84. 8
54. 9
-

-

-

11. 8

83. 2
11. 3
1 . 2

-

0

19.0

-

3
3
7

100.
73.
69.
67.
2.

0
3
8

2
6

-

3. 5
3. 5
26. 7

T h ir d o r o t h e r la te s h ift

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s h a v in g t h ir d o r o t h e r la t e -s h ift p r o v is i o n s --------------------------W ith s h ift d i f f e r e n t ia l -----------------------------------U n ifo r m ce n t s p e r h o u r -----------------------------3 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------4 c e n t s ---------------------------- -------------------------5 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------6 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------7 c e n t s --------------------------------------------------------------------7 V2 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------------------8 c e n t s --------------------------------------------------------------------10 ce n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------1 2
c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------13 ce n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------15 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------2 2 V2 c e n ts -----------------------------------------------------------25 ce n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e ---------------------------------------------5 p e r c e n t -------------------------------------------------------------10 p e r c e n t ------------------------------------------------------------W ith n o s h ift d i ff e r e n t ia l ------------------------------------

-

2 .4
3. 8
1 . 8
47. 1
. 5
. 7
4. 8
5 .0
-

2
3. 0
1

.

85. 3
77. 4
56. 2
-

-

-

1. 0
3. 1
8. 6

57. 8
10. 1
1 .4

7. 7

-

-

6. 3

-

8. 1
1 .4

-

8. 3

-

-

24. 1
1. 9

87.
85.
85.
1.
4.

5
3
3
6
6

91. 2
75. 8
63. 5
-

1. 0
8. 2
4 6. 7

-

-

58. 9

4 9. 4

-

3. 2
14. 8

-

-

-

2. 1

34. 0

7. 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 1 .0

-

-

7. 0

5. 1

2. 1

-

-

-

-

-

4. 8

-

-

-

-

21. 2

-

16. 3
6. 9
9 .4
17. 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

29. 9

55. 1

2. 2

13. 0

.

12. 4
15. 4

20. 8
17. 5

-

-

3. 0
20. 6

21. 2
7. 9

18. 6

1 0
1 0

.
.
-

1
1

-

20. 3

29. 9

8

12. 4

1 R e f e r s to p o l i c i e s o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s e it h e r c u r r e n t ly o p e r a tin g la te sh ifts o r h a vin g p r o v is i o n s c o v e r i n g la te s h ift s .
2 In c lu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not e q u a l to t a ls .




C
O
C
O

Table 23.

C
O

Shift Differential Practices

A

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d on la te sh ifts in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m il ls b y a m ount o f sh ift d iff e r e n t ia l,
U nited S ta tes , s e le c t e d re g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
A reas

R e g io n s
S h ift d i ff e r e n t ia l

U n ited
S ta tes 1

N ew
England

M id d le
A tla n tic

G re a t
L a k es

M a in e

30. 9
7. 3
7. 3

18. 5
10. 7
8. 0

27. 3
9. 9
9. 9

-

-

-

2. 9
_
3. 8

_

S ou th ea st

M assach u ­
s e tts

N ew
H a m p s h ir e

N o rth
C a r o lin a —
V ir g in ia

P h ila d e lp h ia —
C a m d en ,
P a .— . J .
N

R hod e
Islan d

S e c o n d sh ift

W o r k e r s e m p lo y e d on s e c o n d s h i f t ---------------------R e c e iv in g s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l -----------------------------U n ifo r m ce n ts p e r h o u r ------------------------------2 c e n t s -------------------------------------------------------3 ce n t s ------------------------------------------------------4 c e n t s -------------------------------------------------------5 c e n t s -------------------------------------------------------7 c e n t s ------------- -------------------------------------------7 V2 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------9 c e n ts -------------------------------------------------------10 c e n t s ------------------------------------------------------13 c e n t s ------------------------------------------------------U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e -------------------------------------4 p e r c e n t ---------------------------------------------------5 p e r c e n t ---------------------------------------------------R e c e iv in g no s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l -------------------------------

28. 6
14. 1
13. 4
. 2
1. 5
6. 6
4. 0
. 2
. 3
.4
. 2
(2 )
. 8
. 1
. 6
14. 5

28. 5
19. 6
19. 1
.5
_
14. 0
4. 6

16. 6
12. 6
12. 4

-

. 5
.4
. 1
8. 9

23. 6
20. 9
15. 4
-

4. 3
2. 8
1. 8

-

-

6. 0
1. 2

26. 5
20. 4
2 0 .4
1. 9
_
15. 8
2. 7

29. 6
4. 3
4. 3

_
7. 9
2. 0

28. 0
24. 9
24. 4
.4
_
10. 5
13. 5
_

-

-

. 5

. 6

-

4. 7
1. 8
. 1
5. 4

-

_

. 8
-

_
_

-

2. 7

-

-

-

3. 3
-

1. 0

26. 6
25. 2
16. 0
-

-

7. 7
6. 9
1 .4

18. 7
. 8

-

-

-

3 1 .0
21. 2
19. 6

-

-

1. 7
1. 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

5. 4
2. 7

-

2. 7
7. 8

-

-

17. 5

. 5
3. 1

-

23. 5

6. 0

25. 3

9. 1
9. 1
1 .4

13. 9
9. 1
8. 7

10. 2
8. 0
6. 8

2 1 .4
17. 3
17. 3

5. 7
3. 7
3. 7

20. 9
6. 0
6. 0

1 1 .4
11. 3
11. 3

10. 0
7. 5
7. 5

24. 5
24. 4
2 4 .4

9. 1
9. 1
7. 7

14. 0
11. 1
9. 6

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

<■

-

.
-

22. 4
1 . 6

-

6 .4

-

4. 3

.4
8. 2

-

-

-

-

3 .4
-

.
-

-

-

1 .3
1 .3

1 .5
1. 5
2. 8

-

-

9 .8

T h ir d o r o t h e r la te s h ift s

W o r k e r s e m p lo y e d on th ir d o r o t h e r
la te s h i f t s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------R e c e iv in g s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l -------------------------------------U n ifo r m c e n ts p e r h o u r ---------------------------------------3 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------------4 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------------5 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------------6 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------------7 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------------7 V2 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------8 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------------------------10 c e n t s ------------- ;-------------------------------------------------------12 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------------------------13 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------------------------15 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------------------------U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e ------------------------------------------------10 p e r c e n t --------------------------------------------------------------R e c e iv in g n o s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l -----------------------

. 1
. 1

6. 3
. 5
3. 2
. 3
1 . 1

.
.

3
5

(*■)
. 1
. 3
. 3
4. 0

. 2
. 3
. 1

7. 2
(2 )
. 1
. 2
. 6
-

4
4
4. 8
.
.

.
1 .
-

7
8

1. 7
2. 3

-

3
2
2
2. 2

.
-

.

1 .
1 .

.
.
-

-

2. 1
. 2
-

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u a l totals,




_

-

I n clu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d it io n to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
L e s s than 0. 05 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

1 3 .9
.9

2

4. 1

9
2

5. 0

8. 2

. 1
-

-

2. 1
.
-

9

.
-

5

-

.
-

5

2. 6

.
-

-

7

4

-

-

-

-

2. 0

14. 8

.

.
-

-

1

4

-

2 .4

.

1

. 1

8

Table 24.

Paid Holidays

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o ff ic e w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n fa b r ic m il ls w ith f o r m a l p r o v is i o n s f o r p a id h o lid a y s ,
U n ited S ta te s , s e l e c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
R e g io n s
N u m b e r o f p a id h o lid a y s

U nited
S ta tes 1

New
England

M id d le
A tla n tic

A reas

S ou th ea st

G reat
L a k es

M a in e

M assach u ­
se tts

N ew
H a m p s h ir e

N orth
C a r o lin a —
V ir g in ia

P h ila d e lp h ia —
Cam den,
P a .-N . J.

R hod e
Islan d

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g pa id
h o lid a y s ---------------------------------------------------------1 d a y ----------------- -----------------------------------------2 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------3 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------4 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------5 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------6 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------6 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y -----------------------------7 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------7 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y -----------------------------8 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------9 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g no

100

89
3
22
2
3
8
34
(2 )
8
2
7
1

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

96

84

67

100

40

16
68

88

92
7
61
7
2
4
8

88

4
11

87
6
49
4
4
12
10

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

30

-

10

12

4

22

-

_

-

_

10

-

-

35
5

2
1
-

-

56

-

2

6

-

-

-

4

"

"

40
-

6

4

8

12

-

-

-

(1 )
2
1
1
5
63
1
13
2
9
1

-

96

94

96

_

-

_

_

_
_

-

1

-

7
-

_
_

3
69
5
7
9

-

27

_
_

4
4
3
28

11

4

16

13

33

4

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

97

98

100
1

99

98

100

_

96
6

91

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

4

2

-

_

-

_

-

28
62

2
60
10
5

_
_

80

84

2
58
28

23

4

-

-

-

_

7

-

53

30

_

O ffic e w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id h o l i d a y s -----------------------------------------2 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------3 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------4 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------5 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------6 days 6 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y 7 d a y s ----------------------------7 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y 7 d a y s p lu s 2 h a lf d a y s
8 d a y s ----------------------------9 d a y s ----------------------------10 d a y s ■
10 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y -----------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g no
p a id h o l i d a y s ------------------------------------------------

98
(2 )
1

96
5
(2 )
1
21
36
1
7

-

-

7
56
3
12

1
6

93
14
1
3
52
17

-

-

-

-

12

6

4

9

1
17
3
(2 )
1

2
6
5
1
4

_

_

_

_

_

4

-

1

15

-

7

2
12

_

_

_
_

-

-

4

2

1

2

4

9

_
_

_

_

_
_

71
7

(2 )

13

_

_

_

-

-

3

"
2

_

_

_

10
31
21
_

1 In c lu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
2 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq u a l t o t a ls .




GO

01

Table 25.

Paid Vacations

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m il ls w ith fo r m a l p r o v is i o n s f o r p a id v a c a t io n s
a fte r s e le c t e d p e r io d s o f s e r v i c e , U nited S t a t e s , s e l e c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
A reas

R eg ion s
V a c a t io n p o l i c y

U nited
Sta tes 1

N ew
H a m p s h ir e

N orth
C a r o lin a —
V ir g in ia

P h ila d e lp h ia —
C a m d en ,
P a . - N . J.

R hode
Islan d

100

100

100

100

100

100
90
10

99
42
57

100
20
80

100
77
23

97
17
81

N ew
E ngland

M id d le
A tla n tic

S ou th ea st

G re a t
L a k es

100

100

100

100

100

100

97
43
54

97
53
44

96
75
21

98
25
74

79
28
51

93
63
30

3

3

4

2

21

7

4
83
4
6

5
84
6
2

_
73
12
11

4
83
1
10

_
79

16
77

_
100

89

_
95

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

3

58
31
8

43
50
4

32
54
11

79
6
12

34
37
8

71
22

46
54

33
56
10

97

14
5
76
2

27
4
61
4

4
92

7
6
85

-

-

12
4
66
7
8

22
3
49
15
7

4
50
8
34

12
4
58
4
18

22
3
39
10
23

4
30
62

12
4
57
4
17
2

22
3
39
10
23

M a in e

M assach u ­
se tts

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------------M eth od o f p a y m e n t
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id v a c a t io n s -------------------------------------------------------L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t ---------------------------------P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t -----------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
no p a id v a c a t io n s ---------------------------------------------------

3

1

A m ou n t o f v a c a t io n p a y 2
A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
U n d er 1 w e e k -----------------------------------------------------------1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s -------------------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_
74
13
13

3
67
27
"

3

25
61
13

28
63
6

16
6
72
4

9
7
84

100

A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s -------------------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

-

A fte r 5 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s -------------------------------------2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s --------------------------------------

_

_
79
-

55
38

32
3
64

-

-

_
-

"

8
8
66
15

A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s -------------------------------------2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s -------------------------------------3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_

34
-

-

57

-

-

2

16
6
31
20
25

9
7
84

4

54
12
2

32
40
12
16

16
6
31
20
25

9
7
84
-

32
40
12
16

16
6
31
20
25

9
7
84
-

56
44

"

"

“

"

-

32

_

-

64
15

7
6
81

-

-

84
16

-

-

8
8
56
22
4

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s -------------------------------------2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s -------------------------------------3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

_

7
6
81
4

_

34

-

-

31
48

49
10

_
24
55

34
49
10
"

-

_
56
44

8
8
39
3
39

A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e 3
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s -------------------------------------2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s -------------------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

 e fo o t n o t e s at end
Se


o f ta b le ,

"

_
4
23
52
17

7
6
81
2
2

_

8
8
39
3
39
"

Table 25.

Paid Vacations— Continued

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f ic e w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m i l l s w ith f o r m a l p r o v is i o n s f o r p a id v a c a t io n s
a ft e r s e le c t e d p e r io d s o f s e r v i c e , U n ited S ta te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
A reas

R e g io n s
V a c a t io n p o l i c y

S ta tes 1

New
England

M id d le
A tla n tic

S ou th ea st

G re a t
Lakes

M a in e

M assach u ­
se tts

N ew
H a m p s h ir e

N orth
P h ila d e lp h ia —
C a r o lin a —
C a m d en ,
V ir g in ia
P a .-N . J.

R hode
Islan d

O ffic e w o r k e r s
100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
92
7

99
84
15

98
94
4

99
96
4

100
100
-

99
72
27

100
100
-

100
83
17

100
100
-

100
74
26

100
70
30

1

A l l w o r k e r s ----------------------------------------------------

1

2

1

“

-

2
33
(4 )
64
(4 )

(4 )
52
1
45
1

10
1
87
-

5
26
69
-

19
81
-

72
26
"

46
52
2

26
74
-

13
87
"

49
51
-

3
60
4
33
"

16
13
70
(4 )

20
24
54
1

6
5
87
-

20
5
75

14
86

38
27
34

11
15
74

-

13
87
-

23
2651

“

11
28
59
2

-

29
22
49
-

4
94
(4 )

8
91
1

_
98

8
92

10
89
-

10
88
2

3
97
-

7
93

-

3
96
-

-

.
100
-

3
97
-

4
69
2
23

8
77
5
9

20
4
74

3
87
9

8
60
32

10
89
-

10
80
5
4

3
53
10
33

7
93
-

_
74
26

3
86
11

4
49
2
44

8
70
5
16

13
85

3
51
46

8
21
72

10
89
-

10
69
5
15

3
53
10
33

7
37
56

_
51
49

3
66
3
28

4
49
2
25
19

8
70
5
16

11
12
75

3
51
40
6

8
21
40
32

10
89
-

10
69
5
15

3
53
10
33
"

7
37
56

51
49
"

3
66
3
28

M e th o d o f p a y m e n t
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id v a c a t io n s ------------------------------------- ------------------L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t ----------------------------------P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t -----------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
no p a id v a c a t i o n s ----------------------------------------------------

1

'

A m o u n t o f v a c a t io n p a y 2
A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
U n d er 1 w e e k -----------------------------------------------------------1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s ----------------------- -------------2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------- -

.

A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s -------------------------------------2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s --------------------------------------------- -— --------------------A fte r 5 y e a rs o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ------------------------------------- ----------------------------------2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s -------------------- ---------------------------------------------------

-

A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------——
2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------- -------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s --------- ---------------------------3 w e e k s --------------------------- -------------------------------------------

-

-

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ------------------------------ ------------------------------------------2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------- -------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s —----------------------------------3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

-

A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e 3
1 w e e k ---------------------------------------------------------------------—
2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s -------------------------------------3 w e e k s — ------------------------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

”

-

_

1 In c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
2 V a c a t io n p a y m e n t s s u c h as p e r c e n t o f annual e a rn in g s w e r e c o n v e r t e d to an e q u iv a le n t tim e b a s is .
P e r i o d s o f s e r v i c e w e r e a r b it r a r i ly c h o s e n and do n ot n e c e s s a r i l y r e f le c t the
in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t p r o v is i o n s f o r p r o g r e s s i o n . F o r e x a m p le , the ch a n g e s in p r o p o r t io n s in d ic a t e d at 10 y e a r s m a y in clu d e ch a n g e s o c c u r r in g b e tw e e n 5 and 10 y e a r s .
3 V a c a t io n p r o v is i o n s w e r e v ir t u a lly the sa m e a ft e r lo n g e r p e r io d s o f s e r v i c e .
A m o n g p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s , h o w e v e r , 37 p e r c e n t in the M id d le A t la n t ic , 4 p e r c e n t in the S ou th ea st,
and 7 p e r c e n t in th e G r e a t L a k e s r e g io n s r e c e iv e d 4 w e e k s ' a ft e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e .
* L e s s than 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u a l t o t a ls .




Table 26.

Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans

G)

00

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n t e x t ile m il ls w ith s p e c i fie d h ea lth , in s u r a n c e , and
r e t ir e m e n t p la n s, U nited S ta te s , s e l e c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
R e g io n s
T y p e o f p la n 1

A reas

R e g io n s

A reas

U n ited
N ew
N ew
M a ssa ­
S t a te s 2
M id d le South­ G re a t
Eng­
H am p­
M ain e
ch u setts
e a s t L ak es
A t la n t ic
la n d
s h ir e

N o rth
U nited
P h il a ­
N ew
N ew
C a ro­
d e lp h ia — R h od e S ta te s 2 E n g ­ M id d le Sou th ­ G r e a t M a in e M a s s a ­ H a m p ­
lin a —
c h u s e tts
A tla n t ic
east L ak es
C a m d en , Isla n d
s h ir e
V ir­
land
P a . —N. J .
g in ia
O ffic e w o r k e r s

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
A l l v / o r k e r s ---------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s
p r o v id in g :
L ife i n s u r a n c e -----------------------E m p lo y e r fi n a n c e d -----------J o in t ly finan ced. ---------------A c c id e n t a l d ea th and d i s m e m b e r m e n t i n s u r a n c e ----E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d -----------J o in tly fin a n c e d ---------------S ic k n e s s and a c c i d e n t in ­
s u r a n c e o r s i c k le a v e
o r b o th 3 — ----------------------------S ic k n e s s and a c c i d e n t
i n s u r a n c e ------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ---------S ic k le a v e (fu ll p a y , no
w a itin g p e r io d ) -------------S ic k le a v e (p a r t ia l p a y
o r w a itin g p e r i o d ) --------—
H o s p it a liz a t io n in s u r a n c e —
C o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s
o n l y ----------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ---------C o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s and
t h e ir d e p e n d e n ts -----------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ---------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d f o r
e m p l o y e e s , jo in t ly
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s --------------------S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e ------------- -C o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s
o n l y ----------------------------------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d ----J o in t ly fin a n c e d ---------C o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s and
t h e ir d e p e n d e n t s ------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----J o in t ly f i n a n c e d --------—
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d f o r
e m p l o y e e s , jo in t l y
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s ---------------------

S ee fo o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b le .




N orth
P h il a ­
C aro­
d elp h ia — R h od e
lin a —
C a m d en , Isla n d
V ir ­
P a . —N. J .
g in ia

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

91
69
23

84
72
12

91
75
16

99
70
2.9

77
43
33

93
65
28

89
79
9

100
89
11

100
76
24

95
85
10

49
49
-

94
67
27

88
73
15

96
85
11

99
57
42

94
58
36

94
54
40

94
85
9

100
88
12

100
39
61

94
83
11

52
52
-

60
44
16

76
65
11

70
61
9

44
27
17

52
25
26

89
62
28

63
56
7

1 00
89
11

34
16
18

88
78
10

47
47
-

63
45
18

77
63
14

65
57
9

43
25
17

70
36
34

88
48
40

68
60
8

100
88
12

40
17
23

91
79
11

48
48
-

74

73

44

82

58

92

77

100

86

71

14

79

77

91

84

55

95

77

100

94

60

14

74
49
25

73
61
12

44
34
10

82
47
36

58
25
33

92
64
28

77
67
9

100
89
11

86
61
25

71
68
3

14
14
-

51
27
24

69
54
15

43
16
27

37
5
32

55
36
19

87
47
40

70
60
9

100
88
12

21
21

60
55
6

14
14
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

40

18

81

51

5

-

7

43

86

-

3

1
95

94

9
94

99

72

83

97

96

100

95

99

(4)
96

95

97

99

87

86

12
98

98

100

94

100

52
46

43
36
7

74
63
11

58
55
3

25
25
-

46
41
5

38
23
15

43
43
-

70 «
69
1

72
72
-

40
31

54
48

40
33
7

83
80
3

56
51
5

36
36
-

51
43

30
15
15

50
50
-

69
68
1

68
68
-

23
23
-

43
9
25

51
19
15

20
11
9

41
37

47
12
35

36
20

59
30
28

54
4
5

30
25

23
20
3

59
40

43
11
25

55
26
14

14
5
10

43
39

52
10
42

35
12

68
45
23

48
7
9

31
27

27
21

77
56
10

9
94

17
90

94

4
98

72

16
83

92

45
96

5
100

95

11
91

96

14
93

97

5
99

87

23
86

95

32
98

4
100

94

11
95

50
44
6

39
33
7

74
63
11

57
55
2

25
25
-

46
41
5

33
18
15

43
43
-

70
69
1

72
72
-

31
23
8

53
47
6

38
31
7

83
80
3

56
51
4

36
36
-

51
43
8

27
13
15

50
50
-

69
68
1

68
68
-

18
18

43
9
25

51
19
15

20
11
9

41

36

54
4
5

59
40
8

43
11
25

55
26
14

14
5
10

52
10
42

35

68
45
23

48
7
9

31

25

23
20
3

43

20

59
30
28

30

37

47
12
35

26
21
6

77
56
10

9

17

“

4

"

16

"

45

5

11

6

14

~

5

32

4

6

-

-

-

8
8

6

6

_

39

8

-

12

23

_

27

6

-

11

Table 26.

Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans-----Continued

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o ffic e w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n t e x t ile m il ls w ith s p e c i fie d h ea lth , in s u r a n c e , and
r e t ir e m e n t p la n s , U n ited S ta tes , s e l e c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
R e g io n s
T y p e o f p la n 1

A reas

A reas

R e g io n s

N orth
N orth
U n ited
U nited
P h ila ­
P h ila ­
New
N ew
C a ro­
N ew
C a ro­
M a s s a ­ New
S t a te s 2
M idd le South­ G rea t
d e lp h ia — R h od e S ta te s 2
d elp h ia — R hod e
M id d le S outh­ G re a t
M assa­
Eng­
M a in e ch u s e tts H a m p ­ lin a —
E ng­
H a m p ­ lin a —
M a in e
A tla n tic
e a s t L ak es
C am den , Isla n d
A tla n tic
e a s t L a k es
C am den , Island
c h u s e tts
land
V ir­
V ir ­
land
s h ir e
s h ir e
P a .— J.
N.
P a .— J.
N.
g in ia
g in ia

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s
p r o v id in g — C on tin u ed
M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e ---------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s
o n l y ---------- -— -------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----J o in t ly f i n a n e e d ---------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s and
t h e ir d e p e n d e n t s ------ ----E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----J o in tly f i n a n c e d ---------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d f o r
e m p l o y e e s , jo in t ly
fin a n c e d f o r d e ­
p e n d e n ts —
C a ta s tro p h e i n s u r a n c e --------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s
o n l y ----------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ---------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s and
t h e ir d e p e n d e n t s ------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ---------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d f o r
e m p l o y e e s , j o in t ly
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s --------------------R e t ir e m e n t p la n s :
P e n s io n p la n s 5 ----------------E m p lo y e r
fi n a n c e d ----------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----A c t u a r ia l p l a n ------------E m p lo y e r
fin a n c e d ---------------J o in tly f i n a n c e d ----A n n u ity ty p e p r o f i t sh a r in g p la n ------------E m p lo y e r
f i n a n c e d ---------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----B oth t y p e s o f p la n s 6 -L u m p -s u m p a y m e n ts -----N o p l a n s -----------------------------------

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

62

79

66

46

43

83

45

96

32

41

91

83

80

84

90

69

86

58

98

95

58

93

28
23

36
29
7

55

43
43
-

9
9
-

28
28
-

50
44

54
50
4

32
32
-

8

15

50
50
-

68
68

6

78
75
3

17

8

34
28
7

51
43

2

46
41
5

31
23

11

15
15
-

17

44

16
14

-

42
42
-

15
15
-

43
14

11
8

28
28-

28

13
13
-

12

22

48
7
9

26
23

17
17
-

77
56

2

36
36

41
19

22

36
34

35
-

8

45
17
14

6

18

23
18

34
7

20

54
4
5

59
40

3

31
28

36
-

12

8
20

17
26

26

45
44

5
13

-

11

13

7

5
43

14
32

39

2

15

57

54

23
35

28

32
51

4
75

26

11
6

8
6
1

12
11
1

19

(4)

I
-

7
7
-

-

28
26

17
15

32
29

2

2

32
32
-

26
26
-

2
1

41
41
-

57
56

1

37
37
( 4)

3

7

1

23
23
-

-

13

14
5

8

7
7
-

7
7
-

16
3

15
7
7

8
1

20

22

10

-

11

22

7
-

18
18

4
4
-

6
6

20

9
9

25

-

7

-

6

34
6
20

2
9

6

10

24

16

-

28

21

15
15
-

14
14
-

5

( 4)
"

3

35
35
-

15
14

9
9

14
14

16

8

12

6
10

4
-

12

2

12

3
5

2

15

2

1

-

12

4

2

13

10

-

1

2

-

1

-

-

4

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

2

-

40

20

48

59

22

10

14

5

79

51

52

22

79

66

57

24

16

9

76

-

44

37
3
19

20

53
7
18

22

10

-

11

-

51
35

33
18
30

13

72
7
78

19
48
23

57
25

24
24

16
3

9
9

6

10

5
5

22

7

14
-

74

16

43
5
44

-

44
27

17
3

16
-

39
5

13
5

7
-

10

11

35
-

27
4

13
-

71
7

25
-

24
-

3
-

9
-

-

2

-

17

-

5
-

13

-

1

-

27
-

20

4

4

40

15

-

3

-

61

-

15

7

9

( 4)

3

32

-

13

-

2

-

18

20

15
-

8

3
-

-

7
(4)
14
8

( 4)

2
1

32
-

13
9

7

-

41
-

-

12

15
-

”

“

"

26
6

18
-

1

16
5

9
-

12

61
4
-

2

4
3
6

40
-

6

4
9

1

1

-

10
21

6

15

-

1 '

(4)

1

10
1

11

3

( 4)

6

13
3

20
2

"

70
1

2

67
~

I n c lu d e s o n ly th o s e p la n s f o r w h ich at le a s t p a r t o f the c o s t is b o r n e b y the e m p lo y e r ; le g a lly r e q u ir e d p la n s su ch a s w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n s a t io n and s o c ia l s e c u r i t y w e r e e x clu d ed ;
h o w e v e r , th o s e p la n s r e q u i r e d b y S tate t e m p o r a r y d is a b ilit y in s u r a n c e la w s w e r e in clu d e d , i f the e m p lo y e r c o n t r ib u t e s m o r e than is le g a lly r e q u i r e d o r the e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e b e n e fits in
e x c e s s o f the le g a l r e q u i r e m e n t s .
2 I n c lu d e s data f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to th ose show n se p a r a te ly .
3 U n d u p lic a te d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s ic k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
4 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .
5 L im it e d to p la n s p r o v id in g r e g u la r p a y m e n ts f o r the re m a in d e r o f the r e t i r e e 's li fe , in clu d in g :
A c t u a r ia l p la n s— the e m p lo y e r c o n t r ib u t e s s p e c i f i c a m ou n ts to a p e n s io n plan p r o ­
v id in g f o r p r e d e t e r m i n e d p a y m e n ts to the r e t i r e e f o r life (the plan m a y b e fu n d ed o r unfu nded, and is not b a s e d on p r o f i t s ) ; and annuity type p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s
c e r t a in n o n c u rre n t
p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s w h ic h p r o v id e f o r the p u r c h a s e o f an annuity p a y a b le o v e r the r e t i r e e 's life w ith fund s a c c u m u la te d to h is c r e d i t a t r e t ir e m e n t .
6 B oth " a c t u a r ia l " and "a n n u ity ty p e p r o fi t -s h a r i n g p la n s " a re p r o v id e d s e p a r a t e ly b y the e s ta b lis h m e n t.
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r.ounding,




su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not e q u a l t o t a ls .

G)
CD

Table 27.

*

Other Selected Benefits

O

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f ic e w o r k e r s in w o o l y a r n and b r o a d w o v e n f a b r ic m il ls p r o v id in g fu n e r a l le a v e pay,
ju r y duty pay, and s e v e r a n c e pay, U n ited S ta tes , s e l e c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
A reas

R e g io n s
Item

U n ited
S ta tes 1

N ew England

M id d le
A tla n tic

Southea st

G rea t L akes

M a in e

M assach u ­
se tts

N ew
H a m p s h ir e

N orth
C a r o lin a —
V ir g in ia

P h ila d e lp h ia —
C a m d en ,
R h od e Isla n d
P a. - N . J.

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s -----------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s
w ith p r o v is i o n s f o r :
F u n e r a l le a v e p a y ----------------J u r y du ty p a y -------------------------S e v e r a n c e p a y 2 -----------------------

100

1 00

1 00

100

20

28

28
9
10

53
37
5

44

6

100

1 00

1 00

100

1 00

38
38

25

12

7

85
76
3

25
46
25

37
52
3

2
2

100

35
45
( 3)

100

1 00

100

17

15

-

20
12

7

100

100

1 00

14
-

10

29
3

8

100

100

1 00

29

-

29

56

6

61

-

12

13

3

100

100

1 00

39
56
39

43
17

70
16

O ffic e w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s ----------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s
w ith p r o v i s i o n s f o r :
F u n e r a l le a v e p a y ----------------J u r y du ty p a y -------------- ------- —
S e v e r a n c e p a y 2 -----------------------

8

I n c lu d e s data f o r r e g i o n s in a d d it io n to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
P a y to e m p l o y e e s p e r m a n e n tly s e p a r a t e d f r o m the c o m p a n y th rou g h no fa u lt o f t h e ir ow n.
L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .




"

16
12

6

Part II.

Dyeing and Finishing Plants

Summary
Straight-time earnings of production and related workers in wool dyeing and
finishing plants averaged $ 2 .1 2 an hour in November 1966. 1
1
Approximately
2 percent of the 3, 559 workers covered by the survey earned less than $ 1 .4 0 an
hour, 1 and about 8 percent earned less than $ 1. 60; the middle half of the workers
12
earned between $ 1 .8 1 and $ 2. 31 an hour, and nearly 6 percent earned $ 3 or m ore.
Workers in the Middle Atlantic and New England regions, 1 together ac­
3
counting for almost two-thirds of the w ork force, averaged $ 2 .4 3 and $ 1 .8 5 an
hour, respectively. Earnings also varied by sex, type of plant, and occupation.

from

Among the occupations studied separately, 1 1 nationwide averages ranged
4
5
$ 1 .5 9 an hour for janitors to $ 2 .2 7 for yarn dyeing-machine tenders.

Paid holidays and paid vacations, as well as various types of health and
insurance benefits were provided by establishments employing a large majority
of the workers.
Industry Characteristics
Plants primarily engaged in eyeing and finishing woven wool fabrics, or
dyeing wool, tops, or yarn, accounted for 87 percent of the 3, 559 production
workers covered by the study; one-third of these workers were in plants owned
by textile producing companies.
Plants shrinking and sponging wool goods for
the trade accounted for the other 13 percent of the workers.
Plants in the Middle Atlantic region employed 45 percent of the production
workers; those in New England, 20 percent. 1
3 Most of the remaining workers
were in the Southeast. Nearly all the workers in the Middle Atlantic region and
about one-half in New England were in metropolitan areas. 1
6
T hirty-six of the 58 establishments covered by the survey employed fewer
than 50 workers; 8 employed 100 workers or m ore.
Establishments with labor-management contracts covering a majority of
their production workers employed about seven-tenths of such workers.
In the
Middle Atlantic, the proportion of workers in such plants was four-fifths; in New
England, two-fifths.
Slightly more than nine-tenths of the production workers were paid time
rates (table 31). The large majority of these workers were in plants with fo r­
malized wage structures; most commonly, these plants provided a single rate
for a given occupation.

11 Op. c i t . , footnote 1, p. 1.
12 Op. c it ., footnote 2, p. 1.
13 Op. c it ., footnote 3, p. 1.
14 Op. c i t . , footnote 4, p. 1.
15 In the 1962 study (op. c i t . , footnote 5, p.
production workers; the Middle Atlantic, 38 percent.
Op. c i t . , footnote 6, p. 2.




1) the New England region

41

accounted for 41 percent of the

42

Average Hourly Earnings
Straight-time earnings of the 3, 559 production workers in wool dyeing and
finishing plants averaged $ 2 .1 2 an hour in November 1966 (table 28).
Workers
in the Middle Atlantic and New England regions averaged $ 2 .4 3 and $ 1 .8 5 an
hour, respectively. In New England, all of the workers were in plants primarily
engaged in dyeing and finishing woven wool fabrics, or dyeing wool, tops, or yarn.
In the Middle Atlantic region, slightly more than one-fourth of the workers were
in shrinking and sponging plants and averaged $ 2 .9 9 an hour, compared with
$ 2. 22 for workers in other dyeing and finishing plants (table 29).
Men accounted for three-fourths of the workers and averaged $ 2 .2 2 an
hour; women averaged $ 1 .8 0 . In New England, earnings of men exceeded those
of women by 30 cents an hour; in the Middle Atlantic region the differential was
48 cents.
Men and women, however, were generally employed in different
occupations.
Earnings of more than nine-tenths of the production workers were between
$ 1 .4 0 and $ 3 .5 0 an hour; the middle half of the workers earned between $ 1 .8 1
and $ 2 .3 1 . In the Middle Atlantic region, fewer than 1 percent of the workers
earned less than $ 1 .4 0 an hour and 12.3 percent earned $ 3 or m ore; the middle
half earned between $ 2 .0 7 and $ 2 .6 0 . In New England, 3 .6 percent earned less
than $ 1 .4 0 an hour and none of the workers earned as much as $ 2 .8 0 an hour;
the middle half earned between $ 1 .7 0 and $ 2 .0 3 .
Occupational Earnings
Occupational classifications for which data are presented separately in
table 30 accounted for about one-sixth of the work force.
Averages for these
jobs ranged from $ 1 .5 9 for janitors to $ 2 .2 7 for yarn dyeing-machine tenders
(all men). Winders, accounting for three-tenths of the women production workers
in the industry, averaged $ 1 .9 2 .
Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Data were also obtained on certain establishment practices, including work
schedules, paid holidays, vacations, and various health, insurance, and retire­
ment plans, as well as other selected benefits for production and office workers.
Scheduled Weekly Hours and Shift P ractices. Work schedules of 40 hours
a week were in effect in plants employing nearly two-thirds of the production
and office workers (table 32).
All of the production workers in New England
and four-fifths in the Middle Atlantic region were scheduled to work 40 hours a
week; the remainder in the Middle Atlantic were employed in plants with 35-hour
work schedules.
About 17 percent of the production workers were employed on second shifts
in November 1966 (table 34). About one-half of these workers received premium
pay, usually 5 cents an hour above the day-shift rate in the Middle Atlantic region
and 4 cents in New England. Third shifts accounted for about 7 percent of the
workers; all of whom received premium pay.
Paid Holidays.
Paid holidays were provided by establishments employing
nearly all of the production and office workers (table 35).
The most common
provisions for both groups were 7 lU days a year in New England and 7 or 8 days
in the Middle Atlantic.




43

Paid Vacations. Paid vacations (after qualifying periods of service) were
provided by plants employing nearly all of the production and office workers
(table 36).
Vacation payments for three-tenths of the production workers were
based on a stipulated percentage of the employee’ s annual earnings; in the New
England and Middle Atlantic regions, vacation payments for nine-tenths or more
of the production and office workers were determined on a length-of-tim e basis.
For purposes of this study, percentage payments were converted to an equivalent
time basis. The most common provisions for production workers were 1 week’ s
pay after 1 year of service and 2 weeks’ pay after 5 years. Nearly two-fifths
of the production workers (primarily in the Middle Atlantic region) were in estab­
lishments providing 3 weeks’ pay after 15 years. About four-fifths of the office
workers received 2 weeks’ pay after 1 year of service, and three-fifths received
3 weeks’ after 15 years.
Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans.
About nine-tenths or more of
the production and office^ workers were employed in establishments that paid at
least part of the cost of life, hospitalization, and surgical insurance (table 37).
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance was provided for one-half of the
production workers, medical insurance for nearly two-thirds, and sickness and
accident insurance for three-fourths; these plans applied to about two-fifths or
fewer of the office workers. Sick leave (full pay, no waiting period) was available
to nearly seven-tenths of the office workers, but to fewer than one-tenth of the
production workers.
Catastrophe insurance was available to 6 percent of the
workers in both groups.
Except for catastrophe insurance, the other types of
plans were usually financed wholly by the employer.
Dependents of production
workers were frequently covered by hospitalization, surgical, and medical insur­
ance plans wholly financed by the employer.
Pension plans (other than social security) providing regular payments to
workers on retirement, were provided by establishments employing six-tenths
and seven-tenths, respectively, of the production and office workers.
Plans
providing lump-sum payments upon retirement applied to 11 percent of the pro­
duction workers and 4 percent of the office workers.
Other Selected Benefits. Formal plans providing pay for funeral leave and
jury duty applied to three-eighths of the production workers, and the corresponding
figures were three-tenths and nearly two-thirds of the office workers (table 38).
Provisions for severance p a y 1 were practically nonexistent.
7

17 Op. c i t . , footnote 10, p. 6.




Table 28.

*

Earnings Distribution

*

( P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f m e n and w om en p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o o l d y e in g and fin is h in g p la n ts b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s , 1
U nited States and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
M id d le A tla n tic

N ew E n g lan d

U n ited Sta tes 2
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
A ll w ork ers

M en

W om en

A ll w o rk e rs

W om en

0.
.
.
3.
.

8
8
6
2
4

2 .0
3 .0
2. 5
18. 3
7. 1

0. 2
. 1
.2

.
.
1.
6.
5.

$ 1 .2 5
$ 1 . 30
$ 1 .3 5
$ 1 .4 0
$ 1 .4 5

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1. 3
$ 1 .3
$ 1 .4
$ 1 .4
$ 1 .5

0
5
0
5
0

---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0.
.
1.
2.
1.

4
4
5
2
2

0. 3
.3
1. 2
1. 1
.9

0.
.
2.
5.
2.

7
7
3
8
0

1. 1
1 .4
1. 1
7. 4
2. 3

$ 1 .5 0
$ 1 .6 0
$ 1 .7 0
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 .6 0
$ 1 .7 0
$ 1. 8 0
$ 1 .9 0
$ 2. 0 0

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------

2. 0
4. 7
10. 3
1 7 .7
8. 2

1. 3
2. 6
7. 6
12. 5
9 .8

4.
11.
18.
34.
3.

2
1
6
1
2

5. 2
6. 4
9. 3
1 6 .9
20. 5

1 .8
3. 6
9. 6
15. 1
26. 9

1 3 .7
1 3 .7
8 .6
21. 3
4. 1

$ 2 .0 0
$ 2 .1 0
$ 2 . 20
$ 2 . 30
$ 2 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 . 10
$2. 2 0
$2. 3 0
$2. 4 0
$ 2 .5 0

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------*
--------------------------------------------------------

10. 6
10. 8
4 .9
3. 1
4 .0

1 1 .8
13. 2
4. 3
4. 0
5. 2

6. 7
3. 0
6 .9
. 2
-

11. 2
10. 4
2 .0
1 .4
1. 1

1 3 .9
14. 1
2. 6
2 .0
1 .6

4. 1
1 .0
.5

$ 2. 50
$ 2. 60
$ 2 . 70
$ 2 .8 0
$ 2 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
under
under
under

$ 2. 6 0
$ 2. 7 0
$2. 8 0
$ 2 .9 0
$ 3 .0 0

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5. 8
2. 2
.8
1 .8
1 .8

7.
2.
1.
2.
2.

. 4
-

1 .4
.6
. 1

-

-

2. 0
.8
. 2
-

$ 3 .0 0
$ 3 .1 0
$ 3. 20
$ 3. 30
$ 3 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$3.
$ 3.
$ 3.
$ 3.
$3.

1 0 -----------------------------------------2 0 -----------------------------------------3 0 -----------------------------------------4 0 -----------------------------------------------------5 0 ------------------------------------------------------

. 6
.4
. 1
(3 )
. 7

.8
.4
.2
(*)

5
8
1
3
4

_

_

_

. 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

0. 9

-

1. 4

-

-

4
4
7
4
1

.4
. 1
1 .5
2 .9
5. 6

. 5
2. 3
2. 8
28. 8
1 .9

14. 3
1 6 .0
7. 5
5. 2
6. 7

13. 0
17. 1
4. 5
5 .9
7. 8

22. 8
9. 3
27. 0
•9
-

1 1 .0
3. 5
1 .7
3. 3
3. 8

12. 4
4. 1
2 .0
3 .9
4. 4

1. 4

-

1. 1
. 6
. 2

1 .3
.7
. 2

-

-

. 1

. 1

-

-

-

_
-

-

_

-

_

-

~

-

1. 5

1 .8

-

_

8. 8

10. 1

-

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

197
$ 1 . 64

1 ,6 1 6
$ 2 . 43

1 ,4 0 1
$ 2 . 50

215
$ 2 . 02

T o t a l ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s --------------------------------------------------------------A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 -----------------------------------------------

3, 559
$ 2 . 12

2 ,7 0 2
$ 2 . 22

857
$ 1 .8 0

699
$ 1 .8 5

502
$ 1 .9 4

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n c lu d e s da ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 L e s s than 0. 05 p e r c e n t .




0. 1
. 1

.

4 .0

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot e q u a l to ta ls .

W om en

_

$ 3. 50 and o v e r -------------------------------------------------------------------------

NOTE:

-

M en

-

1.0

5. 3

-

-

A ll w o rk e rs

M en

Table 29.

Earnings Distribution:

By Type of Plant

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o o l d y ein g and fin is h in g p la n ts b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1
and ty p e o f pla n t, U n ited Sta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
N ew E ng lan d

U n ited S ta tes 2
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
T o ta l

0 .4
.4
1. 5
2. 2
1 .2

M id d le A tla n tic

S h rin k in g and
sp o n g in g

O th e r d y ein g
and fin is h in g

0. 2
.7
-

0. 5
.4
1. 6
2. 6
1. 3

1. 1
1 .4
1. 1
7. 4
2. 3

1. 1
1. 4
1. 1
7 .4
2. 3

0. 2
. 1
.2
-

2. 2
5 .4
1 1 .6
20. 0
9 .4

5. 2
6 .4
9. 3
16. 9
20. 5

5. 2
6 .4
9. 3
16. 9
20. 5

.4
.4
1. 7
6 .4
5. 1

T ota l

O th er d y e in g
and fin is h in g

T o ta l

$ 1 .2 5
$ 1. 30
$ 1. 35
$ 1 .4 0
$ 1 .4 5

and
and
and
and
and

u nd e r
under
under
unde r
under

$ 1.
$ 1.
$ 1.
$ 1
$1.

30
35
40
45
50

- ......... ............................................
-------------------------------- .......................
--------------------------------------------------....................... — - - .............—
- ...........................................................

$ 1 .5 0
$ 1 .6 0
$ 1 .7 0
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
u nd e r
unde r
under

$
$
$
$
$

60
70
80
90
00

............................ .................... - —
--------------------------------- ----------------__________________________________
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2.
4.
10.
17.
8.

0
7
3
7
2

.9
1. 1
2. 4

$ 2 .0 0
$ 2 . 10
$ 2 . 20
$ 2 . 30
$ 2 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2.
$2.
$ 2.
$2.
$2.

10 - - ------------- ------------------------2 0 --------------------------------------------------3 0 ------ - ---------------- -----------------------4 0 --------------------------------------------------5 0 ---------------------------------------------------

10.
10.
4.
3.
4.

6
8
9
1
0

7.
3.
5.
2.
3.

6
1
2
2
9

11. 0
1 1 .9
4. 8
3. 3
4. 0

11. 2
1 0 .4
2. 0
1 .4
1. 1

11. 2
1 0 .4
2. 0
1 .4
1. 1

14.
16.
7.
5.
6.

3
0
5
2
7

$2.
$2.
$2.
$ 2.
$ 2.

50
60
70
80
90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2.
$2.
$2.
$ 2.
$ 3.

60
7 0 ----------------- - .......................... —
8 0 --------------------------------------------------9 0 ___________________ -_____________
0 0 ----- ----------------------- --------------------

5. 8
2. 2
.8
1 .8
1. 8

8.
1.
1.
9.
13.

5
3
1
2
1

5 .4
2. 3
.8
.7
. 1

1. 4
.6
. 1
-

1 .4
.6
, 1
-

11.
3.
1.
3.
3.

$ 3 .0 0
$ 3 . 10
$ 3 . 20
$ 3 .3 0
$ 3. 4 0

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
under
under
under
under

$ 3.
$3.
$3.
$ 3.
$ 3.

1 0 ----------------------- ------------------------2 0 ...............................................................
3 0 --------- -------------- --------------------------4 0 ...............................................................
5 0 ---------------------------------------------------

.6
.4
. 1
(3 )
.7

3. 7
1 .5
.7
3. 9

. 1
. 2
. 1

1.
.
.
.
1.

4. 0

4 29. 8

.2

_

T o t a l --------------------------------------------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------------------A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1-----------------------------------------------

3 ,5 5 9
$ 2 . 12

459
$ 2 .9 5

3, 100
$ 2 . 00

699
$ 1. 85

699
$ 1. 85

1.
1.
1
1.
2.

$ 3 . 5 0 and o v e r --------

1
2
3
4
5

-

(3)
.3

-

O th er d y ein g
and fin is h in g

.
0 .7
-

0. 3
.2
-

-

"
.7
.9
2. 5
-

17.
20.
9.
6.
7.

3
8
1
3
7

0
5
7
3
8

8. 9
1 .4
1. 1
9. 6
13. 7

11.
4.
2.
1.
.

7
3
0
0
2

1
6
2
1
5

3 .9
1. 6
.7
4. 1

.
.
.
.

1
3

_

8. 8

5 31. 3

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1 ,6 1 6
$ 2 .4 3

438
$ 2 .9 9

1, 178
$ 2 . 22

_
-

-

6.
3.
3.
2.
4.

. 3
.6
2. 0
7. 8
7. 0

2
2
2
3
1

_

S h rin k in g and
s p on g in g

1
6

.4

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
In c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
L e s s than 0. 05 p e r c e n t .
W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o l lo w s : 3. 7 p e r c e n t at $ 3. 50 to $ 3. 60; 16. 1 p e r c e n t at $ 3 . 7 0 to $ 3. 80; 4 . 8 p e r c e n t at $ 3. 80 to $ 3. 90; and 5. 2 p e r c e n t at $ 3. ^0 and o v e r .
W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s fo l lo w s : 3. 9 p e r c e n t at $ 3. 50 to $ 3. 6 0 ; 16. 9 p e r c e n t at $ 3. 70 to $ 3. 8 0; 5 .0 p e r c e n t at $ 3. 80 to $ 3. 9 0; and 5. 5 p e r c e n t at $ 3. 90 and o v e r .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot eq u a l t o t a ls .




*

01

Table 30.

Occupational Earnings

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o o l d y e in g and fin is h in g p la n t s , U n ited S ta te s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o
N u m ber A vera ge
$ 1 . 25 $ 1 . 30 $ 1 . 35 $ 1 .4 0 $ 1 .4 5 $ 1. 50 $ 1 .6 0 $ 1 . 7 0 $ 1. 80 $ 1 .9 0 $ 2 . 00 $ 2 . 10 $ 2 . 20 $ 2 . 30 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 . 50 $ 2 . 60 $ 2 . 70 $ 2 . 80
h o u r ly
of
and
U n der
w o r k e r s e a r n in g s 1
$ 1 . 25 u n d er
$ 1 . 30 $ 1 . 35 $ 1 .4 0 $ 1 . 45 $ 1 . 50 $ 1 . 60 $ 1 . 70 $ 1 . 8 0 $ 1. 90 $ 2 . 00 $ 2 . 10 $ 2 . 20 $ 2 . 30 $ 2 . 4 0 $ 2 . 50 $ 2 . 60 $ 2 . 70 $ 2 . 80 $ 2 . 90

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , c lo th
(a ll m e n ) -----------------------------------------D y e in g -m a c h in e t e n d e r s , y a r n
(a ll m e n ) -------------- --------------------------F u ll e r t e n d e r s (a ll m e n ) ----------------J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y
c l e a n e r s ) (21 m e n and
6 w o m e n )-----------------------------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s (12 m e n
and 14 w o m e n ) --------------------------------T r u c k e r s , hand (in clu d in g
b o b b in b o y s ) (a ll m e n ) ------------------W in d e r s ( a ll w o m e n )1
2----------------------C one and tu b e, h igh s p e e d ,
n o n a u t o m a t ic ------------------------------

31

$ 2 . 07

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

16

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

233
7

2. 27
1 .9 8

-

-

-

16

2

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

5
-

6
6

9
1

42
-

7
-

9
-

30
-

84
-

6
-

4
-

2
-

27

1 .5 9

-

-

1

4

6

-

5

4

2

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

1 .7 0

-

-

-

2

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

34
256

1 .8 1
1 .9 2

-

-

-

1

6
6

4

6

5
26

1
12

3
90

7
13

12
34

12

52

-

-

-

-

-

-

188

1 .8 9

~

“

"

”

2

“

5

13

11

89

10

34

12

12

“

"

“

"

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in th is c l a s s i f ic a t i o n in a d d ition to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .

Tab le 31.

Method o f Wage Payment

Table 32.

^ P e r ce n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o o l d y ein g and fin is h in g
p la n ts b y m e t h o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t ,1 U nited States
and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited
S ta tes 2

M e th o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t 1

N ew
E n gland

Scheduled W eekly Hours

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in w o o l d y e in g and fin is h in g
p la n ts b y s c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s , 1 U n ited S ta tes
and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
M id d le
A tla n tic

U n ited
S ta tes 2

W e e k ly h o u r s 1

N ew
E n g lan d

M id d le
A tla n tic

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s ----------------------------------------

100

100

100

A ll w o r k e rs ---------------------------------------

100

100

T i m e - r a t e d w o r k e r s -------------------------------- F o r m a l p la n s -------------------------------------------S in g le r a t e -----------------------------------------R a n g e o f r a t e s ----------------------------------I n d iv id u a l r a t e s --------------------------------------

91
80
73
7
11

83
58
58
25

100
94
87
7
6

35 h o u r s --------------------------------------------------------4 0 h o u r s --------------------------------------------------------48 h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------

8
65
26

100
-

I n ce n tiv e w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------In d iv id u a l p i e c e w o r k -----------------------------G rou p p i e c e w o r k ------------------------------------In d iv id u a l b o n u s -------------------------------------G ro u p b o n u s ---------------------------------------------

9
7
-

17
5
-

_
A ll w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------

100

100

100

35 h o u r s --------------------------------------------------------37V2 h o u r s ----------------------------------------------------40 h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------

10
23
67

4
88
8

39
11
51

2

-

13

1 F o r d e fin it io n o f m e t h o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t , s e e a p p en d ix A.
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

B ecau se




of

ro u n d in g ,

su m s

of

in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u al t o t a ls .

100
18
82

O ffi c e w o r k e r s

1 D ata r e la t e to p r e d o m in a n t w o r k s c h e d u le o f f u l l- t im e
d a y -s h i ft w o r k e r s
in e a c h e s t a b lis h m e n t .
2 I n clu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

B ecau se

of

rou n d in g ,

su m s o f

in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not e q u a l t o t a ls .

Table 33.

Shift Differential Provisions

Table 34.

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o o l d y e in g and fin is h in g pla n ts e m p lo y e d
on la te s h ifts b y a m ou n t o f s h ift d i ff e r e n t ia l , U n ited Sta tes
and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s b y s h ift d i ffe r e n t ia l p r o v is i o n s i
in w o o l d y e in g and fin is h in g p la n ts , U nited S ta tes
and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

S h ift d i ff e r e n t ia l

U n ited
Sta tes 2

N ew
E n g lan d

Shift Differential Practices

M id d le
A tla n tic

Shift d i ff e r e n t ia l

U n ited
S ta tes 1

New
E n g lan d

M id d le
A tla n tic

12. 0
9 .9
9. 6

S e c o n d s h ift
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s h a v in g
s e c o n d - s h ift p r o v i s i o n s -------------------------------------W ith s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l -------------------------------------U n ifo r m c e n t s p e r h o u r ----------------------------4 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------5 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------7 c e n t s ----------------------------------------------------- 8 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e (10 p e r c e n t ) ----------P a id lu n ch p e r i o d ---------------------------------------W ith n o s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l --------------------------------

S e co n d s h ift
78. 8
4 4. 8
34. 8
8. 0
19. 0
2. 3
5 .4
1. 8
8. 3
34. 0

9 3.
83.
40.
40.
42.
10.

0
0
9
9

1
0

6 1 .9
55. 6
51. 7
34.
5.
12.
4.
6.

6
1
0
0
3

W o r k e r s e m p lo y e d on s e c o n d s h i f t -------------------R e c e iv in g s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ---------------------------U n ifo r m c e n ts p e r h o u r ----------------------------4 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------5 c e n t s ------------- •
---------------------------------------7 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------8 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e (10 p e r c e n t ) ---------- —
P a id lu n ch p e r i o d ---------------------------------------R e c e iv in g n o s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l -----------------------

17.
7.
6.
1.
3.
.
1.
.
1.
9.

3
8
5
6
6
3
1
1
2
5

17. 5
1 3 .9
8. 0
8. 0

-

6 .6
.6
2. 3
. 3

5 .9
3. 6

2. 2

7.
7.
7.
5.
.

5
5
4
6
3

1. 3
1. 3
.6

3. 0
3. 0
3. 0

-

-

-

-

T h ir d o r o t h e r la te sh ift
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s h a v in g t h ir d - o r
o t h e r la t e - s h i f t p r o v i s i o n s -------------------------------W ith s h ift d i ff e r e n t ia l — -------------------------------U n ifo r m ce n t s p e r h o u r ----------------------------5 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------7 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------8 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------10 c e n t s ------ .--------------------------------------------15 ce n t s --------------------------------------------------U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e (10 p e r c e n t ) ------------P a id lu n ch p e r i o d ---------------------------------------W ith n o s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l --------------------------------

T h ir d o r o t h e r la te sh ift
69.
67.
57.
28.
5.
2.
19.
2.

7
0
7
3
0
3
2
9

1. 0

8. 3
2. 8

8 8.
8 8.
41.
10.
19.
11.

3
3
1
0
5
6

-

5. 2
42. 1

44. 0
44. 0
4 4. 0
-

37. 7
6. 3
■

1 R e f e r s to p o l i c i e s o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s e it h e r c u r r e n t ly o p e r a tin g la te sh ifts o r h a vin g
p r o v is i o n s c o v e r i n g la te s h ift s .
2 In c lu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot eq u a l t o t a ls .




W o r k e r s e m p lo y e d on t h ir d o r o th e r
la t e s h i f t -------- — ------------------------------------------R e c e iv in g s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ---------------------------U n ifo r m c e n ts p e r h o u r ----------------------------5 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------7 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------8 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------10 ce n ts --------------------------------------------------15 ce n t s --------------------------------------------------P a id lu n ch p e r i o d ----------------------------------------

1

-

1. 3
.2
. 1

.6
-

-

2. 6
.4

.7

I n clu d e s da ta t o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f rou n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot e q u a l t o t a ls .

A
■J
n

Table 35. Paid Holidays
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in w o o l d y e in g and fin is h in g pla n ts w ith f o r m a l p r o v is i o n s f o r p a id h o lid a y s ,
U nited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

N u m b e r o f p a id h o lid a y s

U nited
Sta tes 1

N ew
England

M id d le
A tla n tic

N u m b e r o f p a id h o lid a y s

U n ited
S ta tes 1

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s -------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g p a id
h o l i d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------2 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------------3 d a y s ------------------------------------------------------------

7 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------------7 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y ------------------------------8 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------------8 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y ------------------------------9 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------------11 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g n o
p a id h o l i d a y s _________________________________

100

100

97
26
2
1
5
14
8
22
1
11
8

100

100

3

7
15
25
42
17

40

19
-

15
18

-

-

l

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot eq u a l to t a ls .




M id d le
A tla n tic

O ffic e w o r k e r s

100

In c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to t h o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

N ew
E ngland

A ll w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------------------- '

100

100

100

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g p a id
h o l i d a y s ------------------------------------------------------------------------5 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------------------6 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------------------7 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------------------7 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y --------------------------------- -----------8 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------------------9 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------------------10 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------------------------11 d a y s ------------------------------------------------------------------------

100
47
5
9
16
10
5
1
6

100

100

-

-

6
-

31

70
2
17
6

38
5

-

-

26

Table 36.

Paid Vacations

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in w o o l d y e in g and fin is h in g p la n ts w ith fo r m a l p r o v is i o n s f o r p a id v a c a t io n s
a ft e r s e le c t e d p e r io d s o f s e r v i c e , U n ited Sta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

V a c a t io n p o l i c y

U nited
S ta tes 1

N ew
E n g lan d

M id d le
A tla n tic

V a ca tio n p o l ic y

U n ited
S ta tes 1

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
100

100

M id d le
A tla n tic

O ffi c e w o r k e r s
100

A ll w o r k e r s ----------------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100
98
2

100
94
6

100
100
-

M eth od o f p a y m e n t

M e th o d o f p a y m e n t
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id v a c a t i o n s ----------------------------------------------------------------L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t --------------------------------------------P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t --------------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
n o p a id v a c a t i o n s -------------------------------------------------------------

N ew
E n g lan d

97
68
29

100
95
5

100
100
-

3

-

"

A m o u n t o f v a c a t io n p a y 1
2

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id v a c a t io n s -------------------------------------------------------------L e n g t h - o f-t i m e p a y m e n t -----------------------------------------P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t-------------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
n o p a id v a c a t io n s ---------------------------------------------------------

“

A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s --------- --------------------------------------2 w e e k s ------------------------ --------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

77
8
10
2

58
42

76

-

19
5

56
23
14
4

58
42
-

-

A fte r 2 y e a rs of s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

32
34
26
9

A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

42
17
23
11
4

22
59
19
-

21
12
34
24
9

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

3
69
19
6

17
41
42
-

63
24
13

3
58
17
18

17
36
47
"

-

50
18
32

3
39
17
38

17
19
47
17

14
18
68

3
39
9
46

17
19
47
17

14
86

A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k -------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A m ou n t o f v a c a t io n p a y 2
A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

16
82
2

12
88

40
54
6

10

9
13
72
6

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s --------------------------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7
3
88
2

_

90
-

A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s --------------------------------------——------------------------ —-----O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s --------------------------------------------3 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------------- ,.------

3
95
1
2

6
94

97
1
2

100

92
1
7

94
6
-

77

37
1
61

94
6

43

-

-

6
83
4
6

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s --------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

:

87
4
9

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s ----------------- ----------------------------------------------------------- O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s --------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- -

-

23

A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e 3
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e 3
2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s --------------------------------------------3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 In c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
2 V a c a t io n p a y m e n t s s u c h a s p e r c e n t o f annual e a r n in g s w e r e c o n v e r t e d to an e q u iv a le n t t im e b a s is . P e r i o d s o f s e r v i c e w e r e a r b it r a r i ly c h o s e n d o n ot n e c e s s a r i l y
e s t a b lis h m e n t p r o v is i o n s f o r p r o g r e s s i o n .
F o r e x a m p le , the ch a n g es in p r o p o r t io n s in d ic a t e d at 10 y e a r s m a y in c lu d e ch a n g e s o c c u r r in g b e tw e e n 5 and 10 y e a r s .
3 V a c a t io n p r o v is i o n s w e r e the sa m e a ft e r lo n g e r p e r io d s o f s e r v i c e .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u a l t o t a ls .




-

57

r e f le c t the in d iv id u a l




Table 37.

Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans

( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c t io n and o ff ic e w o r k e r s in w o o l d y ein g and fin is h in g p la n ts w ith s p e c i f ie d h e a lth , in s u r a n c e ,
and r e t ir e m e n t p la n s, U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

T y p e o f pla n 1

U n ited
S ta tes 2

New
E ng lan d

M id d le
A tla n tic

U n ited
S ta tes 2

N ew
E n g la n d

M id d le
A tla n tic

O ffic e w o r k e r s

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L ife i n s u r a n c e ------------------------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------------

87
83
3

90
90
-

78
78

90
89
2

100
100
-

67
67
-

A c c id e n t a l d ea th and d is m e m b e r m e n t in s u r a n c e -----------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------------

52
48
3

90
90

60
60

41
39
2

100
100
-

53
53
-

S ic k n e s s and a c c i d e n t in s u r a n c e o r s ic k le a v e
o r b o t h - ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------S ic k n e s s and a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e ---------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------S ic k le a v e (fu ll p a y , n o w a itin g p e r i o d ) ---------------------S ic k le a v e (p a r t ia l p a y o r w aitin g p e r i o d ) ------------------

74
74
65
9
8
"

47
47
47
-

81
31
28
3
67

80
76
76

-

83
83
65
18
18

62
54
44
10
9
-

H o s p it a liz a t io n i n s u r a n c e ---------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s o n l y -----------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s and t h e ir d e p e n d e n t s -----------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in tly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d f o r e m p lo y e e s , jo in t ly
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s ------------------------------------------

95
49
49
2
45
28
17

100
47
47

90
26
26

89
69
67
2
20
15
5

100
76
76

-

-

-

-

-

-

S u r g ic a l i n s u r a n c e ---------------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s o n l y -----------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in tly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s and th e ir d e p e n d e n t s -----------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d f o r e m p lo y e e s , jo in t ly
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s ------------------------------------------

95
50
49
2
45
28
17

100
47
47
53
46
7

90
26
26
63
36
27

89
69
67
2
20
15
5

100
76
76
24
19
6

54
8
8
46
37
10

-

-

-

"

M e d ic a l i n s u r a n c e -----------------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s o n l y -----------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s and th e ir d e p e n d e n t s -----------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d f o r e m p lo y e e s , jo in t ly
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s ------------------------------------------

65
25
23
2
41
24
17

95
42
42
53
46
7

84
30
30

39
21
19
2
18
13
5

94
70
70
24
19
6

44
8
8
37
27
10

"

■

S ee fo o t n o t e s at en d o f ta b le.

-

-

53
46
7

63
36
27

-

54
27
27

-

74

-

24
19
6

-

54
8
8
-

46
37
10

”




Table 37.

Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans-----Continued

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in w o o l d y ein g and fin is h in g p la n ts w ith s p e c i f ie d h e a lth , in s u r a n c e ,
and r e t ir e m e n t p la n s , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited
Sta tes 1
2

T yp e o f p la n 1

N ew
E ngland

M id d le
A tla n tic

U n ited
S ta tes 2

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g — C ontin u ed
C a ta s tro p h e in s u r a n c e ---------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s o n l y -----------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d -----------------------------------------------------J o in tly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s and t h e ir d e p e n d e n t s -----------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d -----------------------------------------------------J o in tly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d f o r e m p lo y e e s , j o in t ly
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s -------------------------------------------

-

2
5
2
3

-

-

-

-

R e t ir e m e n t p la n s:
P e n s io n pla n s 5 ___________________________________________
E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ________________________________
J o in tly f i n a n c e d ___________________________________
A c t u a r ia l p l a n _________________________________________
E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ________________________________
J o in tly f i n a n c e d ___________________________________
A nn u ity ty p e p r o fit -s h a r in g plan ....................................
E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ________________________________
B oth t y p e s o f pla ns 6__________________________________
L u m p -s u m p a y m e n t s ------------------------------------------------------N o p l a n s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6
2
(4 )
2
4
2
2

-

-

54
54
_
54
54
_

52
47
5
52
47
5

-

-

-

11

5

21

61
59
2
34
32
2
26
26

'

M id d le
A tla n tic

O ffi c e w o r k e r s

10
10
10
-

6
2

N ew
E n g lan d

“

"

72
71
1
24
23
1
1
1
46
4
6

13
1
12
6
5
"

84
84
_
84
84
_
_
_

20
16
4
15
11
4
5
5

-

-

6

10
24

1 I n clu d e s o n ly t h o se p la n s fo r w h ic h at le a s t p a r t o f the c o s t is b o r n e b y the e m p lo y e r ; le g a lly r e q u ir e d p la n s su ch as w o r k m e n 's
c o m p e n s a t io n and s o c ia l s e c u r it y w e r e e x c lu d e d ; h o w e v e r , t h o se p la n s r e q u ir e d b y Sta te t e m p o r a r y d is a b ilit y in s u r a n c e la w s w e r e in c lu d e d i f the
e m p l o y e r co n t r ib u t e s m o r e than is le g a lly r e q u ir e d o r the e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e s b e n e fit s in e x c e s s o f the le g a l r e q u ir e m e n t s .
2 I n clu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 U n d u p lica ted to ta l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s ic k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
4 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .
5 L im it e d to pla n s p r o v id in g r e g u la r p a y m e n ts f o r the r e m a in d e r o f the r e t i r e e 's l i f e , in clu d in g : A c t u a r ia l p la n s — the e m p lo y e r co n t r ib u t e s
a s p e c i f i c a m ou n t to a p e n s io n plan p r o v id in g f o r p r e d e t e r m in e d p a y m e n ts to the r e t i r e e f o r li fe (the p la n m a y b e fu n d ed o r u n fu n d ed , and
is not b a s e d on p r o fi t s ); and annuity type p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s---- c e r t a in n o n c u r r e n t p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s w h ic h p r o v id e f o r the p u r c h a s e o f an
a nnuity p a y a b le o v e r the r e t i r e e 's li fe w ith funds a c c u m u la te d to h is c r e d i t at r e t ir e m e n t .
B oth " a c t u a r ia l " and "a n n u ity type p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s " a r e p r o v id e d s e p a r a t e ly b y the e s t a b lis h m e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , sum s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not e q u a l t o t a ls .

Table 38.

Other Selected Benefits

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in w o o l d y ein g and fin is h in g p la n ts p r o v id in g fu n e r a l p a y , j u r y duty p a y ,
and s e v e r a n c e p a y , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

Item

U n ited
S ta tes 1

N ew
E n g lan d

M id d le
A tla n tic

U n ited
S ta tes 1

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
AU w o r k e r s ___________________ - __________________________
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith p r o v is io n s f o r :
F u n e r a l le a v e p a y -----------------------------------------------------------------J u r y du ty p a y -------------------------------------------------------------------------S e v e r a n c e p a y 2-----------------------------------------------------------------------

1
2

N ew
E n g lan d

M id d le
A tla n tic

O ffic e w o r k e r s

100

100

100

100

100

100

37
38
1

78
42
5

47
6

30
65
1

89
74
6

35
5
"

In clu d e s da ta f o r re g io n s in a d d ition to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
P a y to e m p lo y e e s p e r m a n e n tly s e p a r a t e d f r o m the c o m p a n y th rou g h no fa u lt o f t h e ir ow n.

Part III.

Scouring and Combing Plants

Summary
Straight-time earnings of production and related workers in scouring and
combing plants averaged $ 1 .9 2 an hour in November 1966. 1
8 Three percent of
the 4,041 workers covered by the survey earned less than $ 1 .4 0 an hour, 1 and
9
12.4 percent earned less than $ 1 .6 0 ; the middle half of the workers earned from
$ 1 .7 3 to $ 2 .0 9 an hour, and 4. 5 percent earned $ 2 .5 0 or m ore.
Workers in the New England and Southeast regions, 20 together accounting
for nearly nine-tenths of the industry^ work force, averaged $ 2 .0 4 and $ 1.81 an
hour, respectively. Earnings also varied by s*ex and occupation.
Among the occupations studied separately, 2 nationwide earnings ranged
1
from $ 1 . 6 7 an hour for hand truckers (including bobbin boys) to $ 2 . 5 1 for m ain­
tenance machinists.
Paid holidays and paid vacations, as well as various types of health and
insurance benefits, were provided by establishments employing a large majority
of the workers.
Industry Characteristics
Scouring and combing plants prepare wool fibers for further processing by
textile m ills. Raw "g re a sy " wool is washed to remove grease and other impurities
before the fibers are spun into yarn. In addition, scoured wool is combed before
it is spun on the worsted system . Frequently these operations also are performed
in yarn and integrated wool textile m ills.
The 32 scouring and combing plants within scope of the survey employed
4, 041 production workers in November 1966. These plants ranged in size from
20 to 500 workers or m ore; about one-half of the establishments each employed
fewer tharf 100 workers, and one-fourth employed 250 workers or m ore.
New England plants employed one-half of the production workers; the South­
east plants, nearly two-fifths.
Nationwide, establishments employing slightly
more than two-fifths of the workers were in metropolitan areas; 22 in New England
the proportion was two-thirds; in the Southeast, one-fifth.
Establishments which had labor-management contracts covering a majority
of their production workers employed three-tenths of the work force. Such plants
accounted for one-half of the workers in New England and none in the Southeast.
More than nine-tenths of the production workers were paid time rates
(table 41).
A large majority of these workers were in plants with formalized
wage structures; most of these plants provided a single rate for a given occupation.
Op. cit. ,
*9
Op. c i t . ,
20 Op. c i t . ,
21 Op. c it .,
22 Op. c i t . ,




footnote
footnote
footnote
footnote
footnote

1,
2,
3,
4,
6,

p.
p.
p.
p.
p.

1.
1.
1.
1.
2.

52

53

Average Hourly Earnings
Straight-time earnings of the 4, 041 production workers in wool scouring and
combing plants averaged $ 1 . 9 2 an hour in November 1966 (table 39).
Workers
in the New England region averaged $ 2 . 0 4 an hour, compared with $ 1 . 8 1 in
the Southeast.
Men accounted for four-fifths of the workers and averaged $ 1 . 9 6 an hour;
women averaged $ 1 . 7 6 . The wage advantage held by men amounted to 14 cents
an hour in New England and 15 cents in the Southeast.
Differences in average
pay levels for men and women may be the result of several factors, including
the variation in the distribution of the sexes among establishments and among
jobs with disparate pay levels.
Ninety-six percent of the workers had individual earnings within a range of
$ 1 . 4 0 to $3 an hour; earnings of the middle half were between $ 1 . 7 3 and $ 2 . 0 9
(table 39). Practically all of the workers in New England earned $ 1 . 7 0 or more
an hour, contrasted with those in the Southeast, more than one-fifth of whom
earned less than $ 1 . 6 0 an hour.

Occupational Earnings
The seven occupational classifications for which data are presented sepa­
rately in table 40 accounted for nearly one-fourth of the production workers cov­
ered by the study. Averages for these jobs ranged from $ 1 . 6 7 for hand truckers
(almost all men) to $ 2 . 5 1 for maintenance machinists (all men). Averages for
the two numerically most important occupations studied separately were $ 1 . 7 9
for pin drafter operators and $ 1 . 8 8 for comber tenders. F orty-five percent of
the women production workers were employed in these two jobs.
In New England, averages for 6 of the 7 jobs exceeded the nationwide av­
erages by amounts ranging from 2 to 22 cents an hour; in the Southeast region—
in the five jobs for which comparisons can be made— averages ranged from 5 to
18 cents below the nationwide averages.
Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Data were also obtained on certain establishment practices, including shift
provisions and practices for production workers, work schedules, paid holidays,
v a c a tio n s,

and v a r io u s h ealth ,

in su r a n c e ,

and r e tir e m e n t p la n s,

fo r produ ction

and office workers.
Scheduled Weekly Hours. Work schedules of 40 hours a week were in effect
in establishments employing three-fourths of the production workers and more
than nine-tenths of the office workers (table 42).
Work schedules of 48 hours
applied to about one-fifth of the production workers.
Shift Provisions and P ractices. Nearly all of the plants studied had formal
provisions for late-shift work (table 43) and almost one-half of the production
workers were employed on late shifts in November 1966 (table 44). Slightly more
than one-fourth of the workers were employed on second shifts. In New England
the majority of these workers received premium pay— usually 4 cents an hour
above day-shift rates; in the Southeast region, premium pay for these workers
was practically nonexistent. In both of these regions, a majority of the workers
on third or other late shifts received premium pay, typically 7 cents an hour
in New England and 5 cents in the Southeast region.







54

Paid Holidays.
Paid holidays were provided by establishments employing
nearly all of the production and office workers (table 45).
Provisions varied,
ranging from 5 to 10 paid holidays annually for both groups of workers in New
England, to 1 or Z days for production workers and 5 days for office workers
in the Southeast.
Paid Vacations. Paid vacations (after qualifying periods of service) were
provided to production and office workers by nearly all of the plants studied
(table 46). More than nine-tenths of the production workers received 1 week's pay
after 1 year of service and Z weeks1 after 5 years. Two-fifths of the production
workers were in establishments providing at least 3 weeks' after 15 years of
service or m ore. Alm ost three-fourths of the office workers received Z weeks'
pay after 1 year of service and three-fifths received at least 3 weeks' after
15 years of service or m ore.
Vacation payments for three-fourths of the production workers were based
on a stipulated percentage of the employee's annual earnings; payments for a
similar proportion of the office workers were determined on a length-of-tim e
basis.
For purposes of this study, percentage payments were converted to an
equivalent time basis.
Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans. A ll of the production and office
workers studied were in establishments that paid at least part of the cost of hos­
pitalization and surgical insurance (table 47).
Life insurance was available to
about seven-eighths of the workers in both groups; medical insurance to threefourths, and accidental death and dismemberment insurance to nearly two-thirds.
Sickness and accident insurance was available to slightly over three-fifths of
the production workers and to one-third of the office workers. Sick leave (full
pay, no waiting period) was provided to three-tenths of the office workers, but
to none of the production workers. Catastrophe insurance was available to fewer
than one-tenth of the workers in both groups. Except for catastrophe insurance,
the other types of plans were usually financed wholly by the employer. Depen­
dents of production and office workers were frequently covered by hospitalization,
surgical, and medical insurance plans wholly financed by the employer.
Other Selected Benefits. Provisions for severance pay 2 applied to one3
sixth and one-tenth of the production and office workers, respectively (table 48).
Formal plans providing pay for funeral leave applied to three-tenths of the work­
ers in both groups; jury duty pay applied to one-half of the production workers
and about one-third of the office workers.

23 Op. c i t . , footnote 10, p. 6.

Table 39,

Earnings Distribution

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f m en and w om en p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s c o u r in g and c o m b in g p la n ts b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited S ta tes 0
2
1
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1

A ll
w ork ers

M en

$ 1 .2 5
$ 1 .3 0
$ 1 .3 5
$ 1 .4 0
$ 1 .4 5

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 .3 0
$ 1 .3 5
$ 1 .4 0
$ 1. 45
$ 1 .5 0

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0. 6
(3 )
2 .4
2. 0
1. 6

0.
1.
2.
1.

$ 1 .5 0
$ 1. 60
$ 1. 70
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1. 60
$ 1. 70
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .9 0
$ 2. 00

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

$ 2. 00
$ 2 .1 0
$ 2. 20
$ 2 .3 0
$ 2. 40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 .1 0
$ 2. 20
$ 2. 3 0
$ 2. 40
$ 2. 50

$ 2.
$2.
$2.
$ 2.
$ 2.

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2.
$2.
$2.
$ 2.
$ 3.

50
60
70
80
90

6
7
8
9
0

0
0
0
0
0

5

W om en

M en

W om en

(3 )
(3 )

.
0. 1
. 1

0. 3
. 3

6
1
5

1.
.
5.
1.
2.

0
1
9
5
0

0. 1

5. 8
9. 1
1 2 .9
16. 0
15. 1

5. 8
6 .9
11. 3
14. 6
14. 9

5.
18.
19.
21.
15.

5
3
3
8
9

(3 )
. 6
7. 5
21. 7
25. 0

. 6
5 .9
19. 6
23. 1

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

10. 9
6 .4
5. 3
5. 7
1. 6

12. 7
7. 5
6. 3
6. 9
1 .9

3.
1.
1.
.
.

3
8
5
6
5

14.
9.
9.
3.
1.

7
6
2
1
8

16.
10.
10.
3.
1.

3
9
5
6
9

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1. 3
1. 1
.8
.5
(3)

2. 5
1. 3
. 5
. 9
(3 )

2.
1.
.
1.
.

9
4
7
0
1

1.
1.
1.
.
.

6
2
0
6
1

S ou th ea st

N ew E ngland
A ll
w ork ers

. 3
.4
. 3
-

_

.

A ll
w ork ers

M en

W om en

.
0. 9
5. 2
1. 7

.
0. 6
5. 5
1. 5

_
2. 1
4. 1
2 .4

.
.
15.
31.
33.

3
6
2
7
6

13.
18.
21.
10.
5.

5
5
1
9
0

14. 4
16. 3
18. 2
8 .9
5. 9

7.
3.
3.
.
1.

2
9
3
8
1

6.
3.
1.
8.
1.

8
2
2
8
2

8. 3
3. 9
1. 5
10. 8
1 .4

. 6
. 8
. 6
-

_

_

. 7
1 .4
. 1

. 8
1. 7
. 1

-

-

9.
28.
33.
19.
1.

2
1
2
2
0

_
. 7
_
-

_

$ 3. 00 and o v e r ---------------------------------------------------------

.8

1. 0

1. 3

1. 5

T o t a l ----------------------------------------------------------------

100. 0

100, 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------------A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 --------------------------------------

4 , 041
$ 1 .9 2

3 ,2 5 5
$ 1 .9 6

786
$ 1. 76

2 ,0 5 4
$ 2 .0 4

1 ,6 9 1
$ 2 . 06

363
$ 1 .9 2

1 ,5 3 8
$ 1. 81

1 ,2 4 6
$ 1. 84

292
$ 1 .6 9

1
2
3

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
I n clu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to t h o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
L e s s than 0. 05 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not e q u a l t o t a ls .




01
01

Table 40.

Occupational Earnings

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in s c o u r in g and c o m b in g p la n t s ,
U nited Sta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

N um ber
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
U n der
e a r n in g s 1
$ 1 .4 0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g ; s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—
$ 1 .4 0
and
under
$ 1 .4 5

$ 1. 45

$1. B0

$1. 60

$1. 70

$ 1 .8 0

$ 1 .9 0

$2. 00

$ 2 . 10

$2. 20

$2730

$2. 40

$2. 50

$2. 60

$2. 70

$ 1 .5 0

$1. 60

$1. 70

$1. 80

$ 1 .9 0

$2. 00

$2. 10

$2. 20

$2. 30

$2. 40

$2. 50

$2. 60

$2. 70

$2. 80

$2. 80
and
over

U n ited S ta tes 2
C a rd fi n is h e r s (99 m e n and 7 w o m e n )---------------C a r d s t r ip p e r s ( a ll m e n ) -------------------------------------C o m b e r t e n d e r s ------------------------------------------------------M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------J a n i t o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s )
(33 m e n and 1 w o m a n ) ----------------------------------------M a c h in is t s , m a in t e n a n c e (a ll m e n ) -------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s -------------------------------------------M e n --------- -------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , hand (in c lu d in g b o b b in b o y s )
(145 m e n and 1 w o m a n ) ----------------------------------------

106
50
251
128
123

$1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

82
94
88
89
87

2
1
1

3
2
1

3
2
1

.
20
6
14

32
55
19
36

41
22
32
25
7

33
18
77
30
47

5
49
43
6

3
3

5
3
3

.
-

-

.
-

_
2
2

.
-

_

-

34
25
353
119
234

1.
2.
1.
1.
1.

68
51
79
83
77

2
-

3
1
1

2
3
3

9
19
1
18

2
78
2
76

108
56
52

11
35
15
20

3
85
38
47

1
10
5
5

1
3
5
2
3

9
3
3

2
2
2

4
3
3

1
1
1

-

3
-

3
-

146

1. 67

3 24

"

2

50

2

16

14

29

3

6

"

"

■

“

■

~

2
2

N ew E ngland
C a r d fi n is h e r s (81 m e n and 7 w o m e n ) ---------------C a rd s t r ip p e r s ( a ll m e n )---------------------------------------C o m b e r t e n d e r s ------------------------------------------------------M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------J a n it o r s (e x c lu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s )
(14 m e n and 1 w o m a n )'-----------------------------------------M a c h in is t s , m a in t e n a n c e ( a ll m e n ) -------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s --------------------------------------------M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , hand (in c lu d in g b o b b in b o y s )
( a ll m e n )------------------------------------------------------------------

88
27
159
89
70

$ 1 . 84
1. 98
1. 98
1 .9 5
2. 01

.
-

.
-

33
18
76
29
47

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

41
4
27
20
7

.

-

14
-

.

-

46
40
6

3
3

5
3
3

-

-

-

2
2

-

2
2

15
21
138
35
103

1. 88
2 .4 9
1 .9 2
1. 86
1. 94

-

-

-

-

-

32
12
20

10
19
19

3
70
23
47

1
5
5

1
3
3
3

9
3
3

1
2
2

4
3
3

1
1
1

-

-

3
-

45

1. 89

■

“

“

"

1

14

29

1

“

"

~

“

"

-

~

~

_

_

_

_

-

2
1

3
1

3
1

_
10
4

55
36

16
5
-

_
1
-

5
3
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

3
1
-

3
-

9
19
1

64
2

76
44

16
15

15
15

5
5

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

50

2

.

S ou th ea st
C a r d s t r ip p e r s ( a ll m e n )---------------------------------------C o m b e r t e n d e r s ------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------J a n it o r s (e x clu d in g m a c h in e r y c l e a n e r s )
( a ll m e n )-----------------------------------------------------------------P in d r a f t e r o p e r a t o r s -------------------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , hand (in c lu d in g b o b b in b o y s )
(5 3 m e n and 1 w o m a n ) -----------------------------------------

21
82
43

$ 1 . 89
1. 72
1. 70

12
201
84

1. 50
1. 71
1. 81

54

1. 56

-

-

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
I n clu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d it io n to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o l lo w s : 4 at $ 1 . 2 5 to $ 1 . 3 0 and 20 at $ 1 . 35 to $ 1 . 4 0 .




_




Table 41.

Method of W age Payment

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s c o u r in g and c o m b in g p la n ts b y m e th o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t,
U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

M eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t 1

U n ited S ta tes 1
2

N ew E ng lan d

S ou th ea st

---------------------------

100

1 00

1 00

T im e -r a t e d w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------------------------------------F o r m a l p l a n s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------S in gle r a t e -------------------------------------------------------------------------------R a nge o f r a t e s ------------------------------------------------------------------------In d ivid u a l r a t e s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

94
89
71
18
5

92
92
85

95
95
56
39
-

In ce n tiv e w o r k e r s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------In d ivid u a l p i e c e w o r k ------------------------------------------------------------------G rou p p i e c e w o r k -------------------------------------------------------------------------In d ivid u a l b o n u s --------------------------------------------------------------------------G rou p b o n u s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6

8
1

A ll w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------------

1
2
3

(3 )

6

"

5
5

-

6

8

(3 )

-

F o r d e fin itio n o f m eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t, s e e a p p en d ix A .
In clu d e s data f o r re g io n s in a d d ition to t h o se sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f rou n d in g, su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot e q u a l t o t a ls .

Table 42.

Scheduled W eekly Hours

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in s c o u r in g and c o m b in g p la n ts b y s c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s , 1
U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

W e e k ly h o u r s 1

U nited
S tates 2

New
E n g lan d

S ou th ea st

W e e k ly h o u r s 1

U n ited
S ta tes 2

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s

N ew
E n g lan d

S ou th ea st

O ffic e w o r k e r s

A ll w o r k e r s -----------------

100

1 00

100

4 0 h o u r s -----------------------------------

77

77

4 ^ V im ir e

75
4

48 h o u r s -----------------------------------

21

23

23

1
2

A ll w o r k e r s --------------

10 0

5

10

40 h o u r s --------------------------------

95

90

10 0

1 00

1 00

D ata r e la t e to p r e d o m in a n t w o r k sc h e d u le o f f u l l- t im e d a y - s h i f t w o r k e r s in e a c h e s t a b lis h m e n t .
I n clu d e s data f o r rfegions in addition to t h o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .

01

Table 44.

Table 43. Shift Differential Provisions

U nited
Sta tes 2

N ew
E ngland

100. 0
4 2. 2
42. 2
32. 9
9 .4
5 7 .8

100.
7 7.
7 7.
63.
13.
23.

00

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s c o u r in g and c o m b in g p la n ts
e m p lo y e d on la te s h ifts by am ou n t o f sh ift d iff e r e n t ia l,
U n ited Sta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s b y sh ift d iff e r e n t ia l p r o v i s i o n s 1
in s c o u r in g and c o m b in g p la n t s , U n ited States
and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

S h ift d i ff e r e n t ia l

01

Shift Differential Practices

S o u th e a st

S h ift d iff e r e n t ia l

U nited
S ta tes 1

N ew
E ngland

27.
10.
10.
8.
2.
17.

7
4
4
1
4
2

24.
19.
19.
15.
3.
5.

18.
10.
9.
4.
4.
.
.
.
8.

8
0
7
7
3
2
5
4
7

14. 8
10. 3
9. 5
_
8. 5
1. 0
.8
4. 5

S ou th ea st

S e c o n d s h ift
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s h a v in g s e c o n d s h ift p r o v i s i o n s ---------------------------------------------------W ith s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l -------------------------------------U n ifo r m c e n ts p e r h o u r -----------------------------4 c e n t s ____________________________________
5 c e n t s -------------------------------- : --------------------W ith no s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ---------------------------------

S e co n d s h ift
0
0
0
2
8
0

100. 0
2. 0
2. 0
-

2. 0
9 8. 0

W o r k e r s e m p lo y e d on s e c o n d s h i f t -------------------R e c e iv in g s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ---------------------------U n ifo r m c e n ts p e r h o u r ----------------------------4 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------5 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------R e c e iv in g n o s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ----------------------

5
0
0

26. 9
.6
.6

9
1
5

.6
26. 3

-

T h ir d o r o t h e r la te s h ift
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s h a v in g t h ir d o r o t h e r la t e -s h ift p r o v i s i o n s --------------------------W ith s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l -------------------------------------U n ifo r m ce n t s p e r h o u r -----------------------------5 c e n t s ------------------------------------------------------7 c e n t s ------------------------------------------------------7 V2 c e n t s --------------------------------------------------8 c e n t s ------------------------------------------------------10 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------11 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e (10 p e r c e n t ) ------------W ith no s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ---------------------------------

T h ir d o r o t h e r la te sh ift
99. 5
6 4. 1
62. 2
23. 5
2 8 .4
.8
5. 0
2 .4
2. 0
2. 0
3 5 .4

100. 0
77. 0
7 3. 1
-

100.
6 0.
6 0.
58.

0
7
7
8

55. 8

-

-

2. 0

9 .9
3 .4
4. 0
3 .9
23. 0

-

39. 3

1 R e f e r s to p o l i c i e s o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s e it h e r c u r r e n t ly o p e r a tin g la te sh ifts o r ha vin g
p r o v is i o n s c o v e r i n g la te s h ift s .
2 In c lu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n t o t h o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq u a l to ta ls.




W o r k e r s e m p lo y e d on th ir d o r o th e r
la te s h i f t ---------------------------------------------------------------R e c e iv in g s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ---------------------------U n ifo r m ce n t s p e r h o u r ----------------------------5 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------7 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------------10 ce n t s --------------------------------------------------11 c e n t s --------------------------------------------------U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e (10 p e r c e n t ) ------------R e c e iv in g no s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ----------------------

1

In clu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to t h o se sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u a l t o t a ls .

2 2 .4
12. 7
12. 7
12. 2
-

.5
-

9 .8

Table 45.

Table 46.

Paid Holidays

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in s c o u r in g and c o m b in g p la n ts w ith
fo r m a l p r o v is i o n s f o r p a id v a c a t io n s a ft e r s e l e c t e d p e r io d s o f s e r v i c e ,
U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in s c o u r in g and com b in g
p la n ts w ith f o r m a l p r o v is i o n s f o r p a id h o lid a y s , U n ited S tates
and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

N u m b e r o f p a id h o lid a y s

U n ited
S ta tes 1

New
E ngland

V a ca tio n p o l ic y

Sou th ea st

U nited
S ta tes 1

A ll w o r k e r s --------------------------------------100

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s
p r o v id in g p a id h o l i d a y s --------------------1 d a y ---------------------------------------------------2 d a y s --------------------------------------------------5 d a y s -------------------------------------------------6 d a y s -------------------------------------------------6 d a y s p lu s 2 h a lf d a y s -------------------7 d a y s --------------------------------------------------8 d a y s --------------------------------------------------10 d a y s -----------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s
p r o v id in g no p a id h o l i d a y s ----------------

95
16
22
11
17
5
13
9
2

100

100

100

100
41
59

-

-

19
24
10
24
19
4

N ew
E n g lan d

-

-

U n ited
S ta tes 1

S ou th ea st
'

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r ^

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s

A ll w o r k e r s — ------------------------------

Paid Vacations

N ew
E n g lan d

Sou th ea st

O ffic e w o r k e r s

100

100

100

100

100

100

95
20
75

100
36
64

100
100

100
78
22

100
95
5

100
63
37

5

-

-

-

-

-

92
3

96
4

100
-

27
73

10
90

37
63

63
29
4

49
47
4

100
-

15
11
74

3
7
90

63

2
93
-

4
96
-

_
100
-

_
91
9

_
84
16

_
100
-

2
61
10
22

4
71
12
14

_
61

_
58
9
33

_
57
5
38

_
63

2
49
4
40

4
46

_
61

-

-

50

39

_
33
6
60

_
50
50

_
4
96

2
49
4
24
17

4
46
17
33

61
39
-

_
■
33
6
49
11

_
50
28
21

_
4
_
96
-

2
49
4
24
10
6

4
46
17
20
12

61
39
-

_
33
6
49
9
3

_
50
28
16
5

_
4
96
-

M eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id v a c a t i o n s ------------------------------------------L e n g t h - o f-t i m e p a y m e n t ----------------------P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t ----------------------------W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
no p a id v a c a t i o n s --------------------------------------

-

A m ou n t o f v a c a t io n p a v 2
A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------A fte r 3 y e a r s of s e r v ic e

5

"

"

O ffic e w o r k e r s

1 w e e k -----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s — ---------------------2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------

-

37
-

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e

100

100

100

98
48
15
6
10
9
3
5

A l l w o r k e r s ----------------------------------

100
24
15
12
16
17
7
10

100
100

1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------- -------3 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------A fter. 10 v e a r s o f s e r v i c e

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s
p r o v id in g p a id h o l i d a y s --------------------5 d a y s -------------------------------------------------6 d a y s -------------------------------------------------6 d a y s p lu s 2 h a lf d a y s -------------------7 d a y s --------------------------------------------------8 d a y s ------------------- ------------------------ 9 d a y s — '--------------------------------------------10 d a y s _______________________________
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s
p r o v id in g no p a id h o l i d a y s ----------------

-

-

2

1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ---------- --------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------- -----------------------

-

39

-

37

A ft e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k -----------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ------------------------3 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------A fte r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e

1

I n clu d e s da ta f o r

NOTE:
e q u a l t o t a ls .

B ecau se

of




r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
r o u n d in g ,

sum s

of

in d iv id u a l

it e m s m a y n ot

1 w e e k -------------------- --------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ------------------------3 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ------------------------A f t e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k -----------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ------------------------3 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ------------------------4 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------

-

-

1 I n clu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to t h o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
2 V a c a t io n p a y m e n ts su ch a s p e r c e n t o f annual e a r n in g s w e r e c o n v e r t e d to an e q u iv a le n t tim e b a s is .
P e r i o d s o f s e r v i c e w e r e a r b it r a r i ly c h o s e n and do n ot n e c e s s a r i l y r e f l e c t the in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t p r o ­
v is io n s f o r p r o g r e s s i o n . F o r e x a m p le , the ch a n g e s in p r o p o r t io n s in d ic a t e d at 10 y e a r s m a y in clu d e ch a n g es
o c c u r r in g b e tw e e n 5 and 10 y e a r s .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not e q u a l t o t a ls .




Table 47.

Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o ff ic e w o r k e r s in s c o u r in g and c o m b in g p la n ts w ith s p e c i f ie d h e a lth , in s u r a n c e ,
and r e t ir e m e n t p la n s, U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

T y p e o f pla n 1

U n ited
S ta tes 2

N ew
E n g lan d

S ou th ea st

U n ited
S ta tes 2

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s

N ew
E ng lan d

S ou th ea st

O ffic e w o r k e r s

A ll w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L ife in s u r a n c e ------------------------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------------

86
74
12

83
79
4

100
79
21

88
76
12

80
77
3

100
80
20

A c c id e n t a l dea th and d i s m e m b e r m e n t i n s u r a n c e ----------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------------

64
60
4

83
79
4

41
41

80
77
3

41
41

-

65
62
3

S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r s ic k le a v e
o r b oth 3 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------S ic k n e s s and a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e ------------------------------ E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------S ic k le a v e (fu ll p a y , n o w a itin g p e r i o d ) ---------------------S ic k le a v e (p a r t ia l p a y o r w aitin g p e r i o d ) ------------------

64
64
51
14
-

98
98
77
21
-

59
35
31
4
31
“

43
37
30
7
19
-

96
37
37

-

49
49
41
7
-

H o s p it a liz a t io n i n s u r a n c e ---------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s o n l y -----------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s and t h e ir d e p e n d e n t s -----------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d f o r e m p lo y e e s , jo in t ly
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s ------------------------------------------

100
58
52
6
42
26
7

100
57
47
10
43
20
4

100
61
61

100
55
54
1
45
29
3

100
46
46
54
28
3

100
63
63
37
37
-

10

19

-

13-

24

S u r g ic a l i n s u r a n c e ---------------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s o n ly ----------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s and t h e ir d e p e n d e n t s -----------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ---------------------------------------- ----------- J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ------------------------------------------------ ---------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d f o r e m p l o y e e s , jo in tly
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s ------------------------------------------

100
58
52
6
42
26
7

100
57
47
10
43
20
4

100
61
61
39
39

100
55
54
1
45
29
3

100
46
46
54
28
3

10

19

-

13

24

"

M e d ic a l i n s u r a n c e -----------------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s o n l y ---------------------------------------------- E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d — ------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p l o y e e s and t h e ir d e p e n d e n t s -----------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d f o r e m p l o y e e s , j o in t ly
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s ------------------------------------------

76
35
29
6
41
25
7

100
57
47
10
43
20
4

39
-

76
32
32
1
44
28
3

100
46
46
54
28
3

37
37
37
-

10

19

13

24

S ee fo o t n o t e s at en d o f ta b le .

-

39
39
-

-

-

39
39
-

-

-

59
-

100
63
63
37
37
-




Table 47.

Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans-----Continued

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f ic e w o r k e r s in s c o u r in g and c o m b in g p la n ts w ith s p e c i f ie d h e a lth , in s u r a n c e ,
and r e t ir e m e n t p la n s , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
U nited
Sta tes 1

T yp e o f p l a n 1

N ew
E ng lan d

S ou th ea st

U n ited
S ta tes 1

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g — Continued
C a ta s tro p h e i n s u r a n c e ---------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s o n l y -----------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------C o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s and t h e ir d e p e n d e n ts -----------------E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------J o in t ly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d f o r e m p lo y e e s , jo in t ly
fin a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s -------------------------------------------

-

7
7

-

7
-

10

-

-

7
3
3

-

10
7
3

-

-

R e t ir e m e n t p la n s:
P e n s io n p l a n s 4 ___________________________________________
E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ________________________________
J o in tly f i n a n c e d ________________________________ _
A c t u a r ia l plan _______________________________________
E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ________________________________
J o in tly f i n a n c e d ___________________________________
A n n u ity ty p e p r o fi t -s h a r i n g p l a n ___________________
E m p lo y e r f i n a n c e d ________________________________
J o in tly f i n a n c e d ___________________________________
B oth ty p e s o f pla ns 5 _________________________________
L u m p -s u m p a y m e n t s ____________________________________

S ou th ea st

O ffic e w o r k e r s

7
3
3
4
4

8
2
2

N ew
E n gland

“

-

29
29
5
5
24
24

11
11
8
8
3
3

59
59
59
59

39
32
7
16
10
'7
2
2

32
32
16
16
3
3

-

-

-

-

-

1
13

24

-

20
10

12
18

40
■

“

59
40
20
20
20

1 In c lu d e s on ly t h o se pla n s f o r w h ich at le a s t p a r t o f the c o s t is b o r n e b y the e m p l o y e r ; le g a ll y r e q u ir e d p la n s
su c h a s w o r k m e n 's
c o m p e n s a t io n and s o c ia l s e c u r it y w e r e e x clu d e d ; h o w e v e r , th o s e p la n s r e q u ir e d b y S tate t e m p o r a r y d is a b ilit y in s u r a n c e la w s w e r e in c lu d e d i f the
e m p l o y e r c o n t r ib u t e s m o r e than is le g a lly r e q u ir e d o r the e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e b e n e fit s in e x c e s s o f the le g a l r e q u ir e m e n t s .
2 I n clu d e s data f o r re g io n s in a d d ition to th o se sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 U n d u p lic a te d tota l of w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s i c k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
4 L im it e d to pla n s p r o v id in g re g u la r p a y m e n ts f o r the r e m a in d e r of the r e t i r e e 's l i f e , in c lu d in g :
A c t u a r ia l p la n s— the e m p lo y e r co n t r ib u t e s
a s p e c i f i c a m ou n t to a p e n s io n pla n p r o v id in g f o r p r e d e t e r m in e d p a y m e n ts to the r e t i r e e f o r li fe (the p la n
m a y b e fu n d ed o r unfu n ded, and
is n ot b a s e d on p r o f i t ) ; and annuity type p r o fi t -s h a r i n g p la n s— c e r t a in n o n c u r r e n t p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s w h ic h p r o v id e f o r the p u r c h a s e o f an annuity
p a y a b le o v e r the r e t i r e e 's life w ith funds a c c u m u la te d to h is c r e d i t at r e t ir e m e n t .
5 B o th " a c t u a r ia l " and "a n n u ity type p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s " a r e p r o v id e d s e p a r a t e ly b y the e s t a b lis h m e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f rou n d in g, su m s of in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot eq u a l t o t a ls .

Table 48.

Other Selected Benefits

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n and o f f ic e w o r k e r s in s c o u r in g and c o m b in g p la n ts p r o v id in g fu n e r a l le a v e p a y , ju r y duty p a y ,
and s e v e r a n c e p a y , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1966)

Item

U nited
S ta tes 1

N ew
E n g lan d

S ou th ea st

U n ited
S ta tes 1

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s

N ew
E ngland

S ou th ea st

O ffic e w o r k e r s

A ll w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith p r o v is io n s f o r :
F u n e r a l le a v e p a y ------------------------------------------------------------------J u r y du ty p a y -------------------------------------------------------------------------S e v e r a n c e p a y 1 ---------------------------------------------------------------------2

30
51
17

57
56
33

-

61
■

28
35
10

35
25
5

23
63
20

1
2

I n clu d e s data f o r re g io n s in a ddition to th o se sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
P a y to e m p lo y e e s p e r m a n e n tly s e p a r a t e d f r o m th e c o m p a n y th rou g h n o fa u lt o f t h e ir ow n.




Appendix A.

Scope and Method of Survey

For purposes of this study, woolen and worsted yarns and fabrics are defined as those
which contain 50 percent wool or more by weight.
The term "wool" includes not only the
wool of sheep, but also the hair of certain other animals, including the angora and cashmere
goats, camel, alpaca, llama, and vicuna.
Part I of the survey includes data for establishments primarily engaged in the following
activities, as defined in the 1957 edition and 196 3 Supplement of the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual, prepared by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget: (1) Weaving fabrics
over 12 inches in width, wholly or chiefly by weight of wool, mohair, or similar animal
fibers (part of SIC 2231); (2) spinning, twisting, throwing, winding, or spooling yarn (in­
cluding carpet and rug yarn) wholly or chiefly by weight of wool, mohair, or similar animal
fibers (SIC 2283).
Part II includes data for establishments primarily engaged in: (1) Dyeing and finishing
woven wool fabrics or dyeing wool, tops, or yarn; or (2) shrinking and sponging wool goods
for the trade (parts of SIC 2231).
Part III includes data for establishments primarily engaged in processing textile fibers
to prepare them for spinning, such as wool scouring and carbonizing and combing and con­
verting top (SIC 2297).
The establishments studied were selected from those employing 20 workers or more
at the time of reference of the data used in compiling the universe lists (unemployment
insurance listings compiled by the various States). Separate auxiliary units such as central
offices were excluded.
The number of establishments and workers actually studied by the Bureau, as well as
the number estimated to be within scope of the survey during the payroll period studied,
are shown in the table on the following page.
Method of Study
Data were obtained by personal visits of Bureau field economists under the direction
of the Bureau's Assistant Regional Directors for Wages and Industrial Relations. The survey
was conducted on a sample basis.
To obtain appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a
greater proportion of large than of small establishments was studied. In combining the data,
however, all establishments were given their appropriate weight. All estimates are presented,
therefore, as relating to all establishments in the industries, excluding only those below the
minimum size at the time of reference of the universe data.
Establishment Definition
An establishment, for purposes of this study, is defined as a single physical location
where industrial operations are performed.
An establishment is not necessarily identical
with the company which may consist of one establishment or more.
Employment
The estimates of the number of workers within the scope of the study are intended as
a general guide to the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey. The
advance planning necessary to make a wage survey requires the use of lists of establishments
assembled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied.
Production Workers
The term "production workers, " as used in this bulletin, includes working foremen
and all nonsupervisory workers engaged in nonoffice functions.
Administrative, executive,
professional, and technical personnel, and force-account construction employees who were
utilized as a separate work force on the firm's own properties were excluded.




63

64

Estimated Number of Establishments and Workers Within Scope of Survey and
Number Studied, Wool Textile Manufacturing, November 1966
Number of
establishments2
Region, * State, and area

Within
scope of
study

Workers in establishments
Studied

Within scope of study
Studied
T otal3

Production
workers

Office
workers

Total

1,854
635
148
220
124
97
346
53
653
224
159

35, 992
14,414
3, 639
3,350
3, 297
3, 311
4,048
1,312
14,015
5,782
1, 918

388
90
93

2,763
713
1, 116

231
123
81

4, 375
2, 158
1,793

Yarn and broadwoven fabric mills
United States 4 -g -----------------------------------New England-----------------------------------M aine------------------------------------------Massachusetts---- .--------------------------New Hampshire----------------------------Rhode Island----------- ------------------Middle Atlantic ^ --------- -------------------Philadelphia— am den ------------------C
Southeast 5 ----------------------------------------North Carolina—
Virginia----------------Great Lakes---------------------------------------

239
121
23
32
21
31
31
16
62
25
14

166
87
17
21
19
22
21
10
37
16
12

47, 340
18,328
4,479
4,664
3,856
3,895
4, 646
1,669
20,436
8,095
2, 170

41,765
16,407
4,037
4,068
3,456
3,561
3,664
1,502
18, 409
7,297
1,735

Dyeing and finishing plants7
4

United States --------------------------------------New England---------------------- ----- ------Middle A tla n tic------- ------------------------

58
15
33

32
7
18

4,477
939
1,864

3,559
699
1,616

Scouring and combing plants
United States4 --------------------------------------New England-------------------------------------Southeast------------------------------------------

32
21
5

22
12
5

4,795
2, 476
1,793

4,041
2, 054
1,538

1 The regions used in this study include: New England—Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island,
and Vermont; Middle Atlantic— New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; Southeast-—Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North
Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia; and Great Lakes— Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin.
2 Includes only mills with 20 workers or more at the time of reference of the universe data.
3 Includes executive, professional, and other workers excluded from the production and office workercategories shown separately.
*
Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. Alaska and Hawaii were notincluded in the study.
3
Includes data for States and areas in addition to those shown separately.
^ Includes Delaware and Philadelphia Counties, Pa., and Camden County, N.J.
7 Includes data for shrinking and sponging plants.

Office Workers
The term "office workers," as used in this bulletin, includes all nonsupervisory office
workers and excludes administrative, executive, professional, and technical employees.
Occupations Selected for Study
Occupational classification was based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed
to take account of interestablishment and interarea variations in duties within the same job.
(See appendix B for these descriptions.) The occupations were chosen for their numerical
importance, their usefulness in collective bargaining, or their representativeness of the
entire job scale in the industry.
Working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners,
trainees, handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers were not reported
in the data for selected occupations, but were included in the data for all production workers.
Wage Data
The wage information relates to average straight-time hourly earnings, excluding pre­
mium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Incentive pay­
ments, such as those resulting from piecework or production bonus systems and cost-of-living
bonuses, were included as a part of the workers’ regular pay; nonproduction bonus payments,
such as Christmas or yearend bonuses, were excluded.




65

Average (mean) hourly rates or earnings for each occupation or other group of work­
ers, such as men, women, or production workers, were calculated by weighting each rate
(or hourly earnings) by the number of workers receiving the rate, totaling, and dividing by
the number of individuals. The hourly earnings of salaried workers were obtained by dividing
their straight-time salary by normal rather than actual hours. The median designates posi­
tion; that is, one-half of the employees surveyed received more than this rate and one-half
received less. The middle range is defined by two rates of pay; one-fourth of the employees
earned less than the lower of these rates and one-fourth earned more than the higher rate.
Size of Community
Tabulations by size of community pertain to metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas.
The term "metropolitan a rea ," as used in this bulletin, refers to the Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Areas, as defined by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget through March 1965.
Except in New England, a Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area is defined as a county
or group of contiguous counties which contains at least one city of 50, 000 inhabitants or
more.
Contiguous counties to the one containing such a city are included in a Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Area, if, according to certain criteria, they are essentially metro­
politan in character and are socially and economically integrated with the central city. In
New England the city and town are administratively more important than the county, and
they are the units used in defining Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas.
Labor-Management Agreements
Separate wage data are presented, where possible, for establishments with (1) a ma­
jority of the production workers covered by labor-management contracts, and (2) none or a
minority of the production workers covered by labor-management contracts.
Method of Wage Payment
Tabulations by method of wage payment relate to the number of workers paid under the
various time and incentive wage systems. Formal rate structures for time-rated workers
provide single rates or a range of rates for individual job categories.
In the absence of
a formal rate structure, pay rates are determined primarily with reference to the qualifi­
cations of the individual worker. A single rate structure is one in which the same rate is
paid to all experienced workers in the same job classification. Learners, apprentices, or
probationary workers may be paid according to rate schedules which start below the single
rate and permit the workers to achieve the full job rate over a period of time. Individual
experienced workers, may occasionally be paid above or below the single rate for special
reasons, but such payments are regarded as exceptions. Range of rate plans are those in
which the minimum and/or maximum rates paid experienced workers for the same job are
specified. Specific rates of individual workers within the range may be determined by merit,
length of service, or a combination of various concepts of merit and length of service.
Incentive workers are classified under piecework or bonus plans.
Piecework is work for
which a predetermined rate is paid for each unit of output. Production bonuses are based
on production in excess of a quota or for completion of a job in less than standard time.
Scheduled Weekly Hours
Data on weekly hours refer to the predominant work schedule for full-time production
workers (or office workers) employed on the day shift.
Shift Provisions and Practices
Shift provisions relate to the policies of establishments either currently operating late
shifts or having formal provisions covering late-shift work.
Practices relate to workers
employed on late shifts at the time of the survey.
Supplementary Wage Provisions
Supplementary benefits were treated statistically on the basis that if formal provisions
were applicable to one-half or more of the production (or office workers) in an establishment,




66
the benefits were considered applicable to all such workers. Similarly, if fewer than onehalf of the workers were covered, the benefit was considered nonexistent in the establishment.
Because of length-of-service and other eligibility requirements, the proportion of workers
receiving the benefits may be smaller than estimated.
Paid Holidays.
vided annually.

Paid holiday provisions relate to full-day and half-day holidays pro­

Paid Vacations. The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal arrangements,
excluding informal plans, whereby time off with pay is granted at the discretion of the em­
ployer or the supervisor.
Payments not on a time basis were converted; for example, a
payment of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered the equivalent of 1 week’ s pay.
The periods of service for which data are presented were selected as representative of the
most common practices, but they do not necessarily reflect individual establishment pro­
visions for progression. For example, the changes in proportions indicated at 10 years of
service may include changes which occurred between 5 and 10 years.
Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans. Data are presented for health, insurance,
pension, and lump-sum retirement payment plans for which all or a part of the cost is borne
by the employer, excluding programs required by law, such as workmen’s compensation and
social security. Among the plans included are those underwritten by a commercial insurance
company and those paid directly by the employer from his current operating funds or from
a fund set aside for this purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form of life insurance.
Sickness and accident in­
surance is limited to that type of insurance under which predetermined cash payments are
made directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly basis during illness or accident dis­
ability. Information is presented for all such plans to which the employer contributes at
least part of the cost. However, in New York and New Jersey, where temporary disability
insurance laws require employer contributions,2 plans are included only if the employer
4
(l) contributes more than is legally required or (2) provides the employees with benefits
which exceed the requirements of the laws.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to formal plans which provide full pay
or a proportion of the worker's pay during absence from work because of illness; informal
arrangements have been omitted.
Separate tabulations are provided according to (1) plans
which provide full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans providing either partial pay or
a waiting period.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete or partial payments of doc­
tors' fees. Such plans maybe underwritten by a commercial insurance company or a non­
profit organization, or the benefits may be paid by the employer from a fund set aside for
this purpose.
Catastrophe insurance, sometimes referred to as extended medical insurance, includes
the plans designed to cover employees in case of sickness or injury involving as expense
which goes beyond the normal coverage of hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to plans which provide regular payments
for the remainder of the retiree's life.
Information is also presented on various types of
retirement pension plans— actuarial and annuity type profit-sharing plans. Data are presented
separately for lump-sum retirement pay (one payment or several over a specified period of
time) made to employees on retirement. Establishments providing bom lump-sum payments
and pensions to employees on retirement were considered as having both retirement pension
and lump-sum retirement pay. Establishments having optional plans providing employees a
choice of either lump-sum retirement payments or pensions were considered as having only
retirement pension benefits.
Paid Funeral and Jury Duty Leave. Data for paid funeral and jury duty leave are
limited to formal plans which provide at least partial payment for time lost as a result of
attending funerals of specified family members or serving as a juror.
Severance Pay. Data relate to formal plans providing for payments to employees per­
manently separated from the company through no fault of their own.




The temporary disability insurance laws in California and Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.

A ppendix B.

O ccupational D escriptions

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions
for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field staff
in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are
employed under a variety of payroll titles and different
work arrangements from establishment to establishment
and from area to area. This permits the grouping of oc­
cupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
Because of this emphasis on inter establishment and inter­
area comparability of occupational content, the Bureau's
job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use
in individual establishments or those prepared for other
purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's
field economists are instructed to exclude working super­
visors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handi­
capped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

BATTERY HAND
Transfers or loads quills or bobbins of filling to the battery or loading hopper of
automatic looms. May convey filling to looms by means of a handtruck.
CARD FINISHER (woolen and worsted)
Tends the front or discharge ends of a number of carding machines which prepare
wool for further processing by cleaning and opening the fibers, arranging them parallel and
transforming them into loose untwisted strands.
Work involves: Doffing balls of sliver
(worsted system) or spools of roving (woolen system); starting new balls by winding ends
of strands around revolving axle or setting in empty spools; and guiding broken ends to their
places on balls or spools.
CARD STRIPPER (woolen and worsted)
Removes accumulated wool fibers adhering to the clothing of carding machines,
using any of the following methods: (1) Mounting a wire-tooth-covered stripping roll on
brackets over the drums; attaching a machine-driven belt to the roll, which, while rotating,
combs out the fibers packed between the teeth of the card clothing; lifting the stripping roll
from the drum and removing the waste fibers by turning the roll against a stationary comb
mounted on a truck used to transport the stripping roll; (2) using a wire card to comb out
the fibers by hand; or (3) placing stripper nozzles of vacuum stripper attachment at side of
carding cylinder and doffer drum; and starts machine to move stripper across cylinder;
drawing dust into nozzle.
COMBER TENDER (worsted)
Tends the operation of a machine that combs out short fibers, removes dirt, and
delivers long fibers in a sliver which is coiled in a can preparatory to the drawing process.
Work involves: Laying card slivers on pair of fluted rollers; starting new slivers, feeding
through machine by pinching end of new slivers onto end of slivers from exhausted roll, or
balls; threading card slivers between combing and drawing rollers, through gathering eyes,
and through coiler head into can; and replacing full cans with empty cans.
DOFFER, SPINNING FRAME
Removes full bobbins of yarn from spindles of ring- or cap-spinning frames, replaces
with empty ones and starts yarn on empty bobbins. May help piece-up broken ends of yarn.




67

68
DOFFER, SPINNING FRAME— Continued
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of yarn and by type of
system as follows:
Doffer,
Doffer,
Doffer,
Doffer,
Doffer,

spinning
spinning
spinning
spinning
spinning

frame
frame,
frame,
frame,
frame,

(woolen)
American system (worsted)
Bradford system (worsted)
French system (worsted)
other systems (worsted)

DYEING-MACHINE TENDER, CLOTH (woolen and worsted)
Operates or runs one of many types of dyeing machines such as "spiral dye beck,"
"jigger," "padder," etc., to dye cloth. Work involves most of the following: Threading cloth
through machine; operating valves admitting dye or liquor into the trough or vat of machine;
observing passage of cloth to eliminate tangling or overlapping; regulating speed of machine
and adjusting it for proper number of dips cloth is to receive; washing out vat after each
batch; and cleaning and oiling machine.
DYEING-MACHINE TENDER, YARN OR TOPS (woolen and worsted)
Prepares and operates one or more of the various types of dyeing machines or kettles
used to dye yarn or tops. Work involves: Mixing dye colors, acids, soap and water accord­
ing to formula, and pouring solution into kettle or tank of machine, or opening and controlling
valves which supply dyeing equipment with dyeing solution and water; loading material into
machine or kettle; controlling steam valves to heat solution; starting and stopping the rotating
or revolving mechanism of the machine; and removing dyed batch, draining solution from
kettle or machine and rinsing equipment for next batch. May use mechanical hoist to lower
or raise kettle baskets or other parts of equipment.

FULLER TENDER (woolen and worsted)
(Wet finisher, wool)
Operates a machine that causes fibers of wool to felt or interlock, thus strengthening
cloth preparatory to other finishing processes. Work involves: Threading cloth through rollers
of machine and sewing the two ends together with a portable sewing machine to make an
endless strand with bulk of cloth resting in bottom of machine; pouring proper amount of
soap into tank, and admitting water; and cleaning and oiling machine.
JANITOR
(Cleaner; porter; sweeper; charwoman; and janitress)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas and washrooms, or
premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial or other establishment. Duties involve
a combination of the following: Sweeping, mopping and/or scrubbing, and polishing floors;
removing chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing
metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor maintenance services; and cleaning
lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Workers who specialize in window washing are excluded.
LOOM FIXER (woolen and worsted)
Prepares looms for operation and keeps looms in an assigned section of the weave
room in good working condition. Work involves most of the following: Inspecting and exam­
ining looms to see that they are operating properly; adjusting or fixing various parts of looms,
dismantling or partially dismantling loom to make necessary repairs, adjustments, or re­
placement of parts; reassembling loom; changing cams and gears; installing or setting harness
and reeds in position; changing beams; cutting and removing cloth from loom; and using a
variety of handtools. May have supervisory or inspectoral duties over weavers and their work.




69

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of metal parts of
mechanical equipment operated in an establishment. Work involves most of the following:
Interpreting written instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using
a variety of machinist's handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and op­
erating standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerance; making standard
shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining;
knowledge of the working properties of the common metals; selecting standard materials,
parts and equipment required for his work; and fitting and assembling parts into mechanical
equipment. In general, the machinist's work normally requires a rounded training in machineshop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.
MENDER, CLOTH (woolen and worsted)
(Sewer)
Repairs defects in cloth by hand. Work involves examining closely the defects which
are indicated by chalk marks, to determine method of repair; weaving in missing strands of
yarn with hand needle; repairing rips and tears; pulling threads with heavy sections (slubs)
to the surface, thinning them, and working them carefully back into cloth; and performing
other fine mending as required. Does not include burlers.

PIN DRAFTER OPERATOR (worsted)
Tends the operation of a pin drafter (also called gill reducer). This machine, which
is based on the screw gill principle, transforms top from the card or comb to the reducer
stage of the Bradford system, the forefinisher of the French system, and the long-draft roving
frame of the American system, in three consecutive operations. This replaces six equivalent
operations of gilling and drawing of the traditional English and French systems. Work involves
most of the following: Creel balls of top into first pass (set of machines), creel cans into
second and third passes, doff cans from all three passes, weigh and balance cans before
creeling third pass, repair all sliver breaks and remove bad work from can, clean machines
according to schedule, start up machines once per shift after faller inspection, sweep floor
in pin drafter area, prepare and punch identification tickets, sort weight tickets and replace
in weight box, fill out daily production records, break out pin drafters and run out lots as
instructed, replace or trim parchment rolls and replace shear pins as necessary.
SPINNER, FRAME
Tends the operation of one or more sides of ring- or cap-frame-spinning machines
which spin yarn or thread from roving by drawing out strand of roving to proper size, twisting
it and winding it on a bobbin or cop. Work involves: Placing full bobbins of roving on spin­
dles or pins of creel; threading yarn through the various guides and starting it on a winding
bobbin, piecing-up broken ends by pinching or twisting the two ends together; and cleaning
rollers and wiping off other parts of spinning frame.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
Spinner,
Spinner,
Spinner,
Spinner,
Spinner,

frame (woolen)
frame, American system (worsted)
frame, Bradford system (worsted)
frame, French system (worsted)
frame, other systems (worsted)

SPINNER, MULE
Tends the operation of one or more mule-spinning machines which draw out, twist,
and wind strands of yarn on cops and bobbins. Work involves most of the following: Setting




70

full spools or bobbins of roving on creel; threading ends of yarn through various guides,
piecing-up broken ends of yarn by twisting or tying the two ends together, doffing the machine
by removing full cops of spun yarn from the spindles, placing empty tubes on spindles and
starting yarn on the empty tubes; cleaning and oiling machine; and making minor repairs
and adjustments to the mule-spinning machine.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of yarn, as follows:
Spinner, mule (woolen)
Spinner, mule, French system (worsted)
TRUCKER, HAND (INCLUDING BOBBIN BOY)
Pushes or pulls handtrucks, cars, or wheelbarrows used for transporting goods and
materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment, and
usually loads or unloads handtrucks or wheelbarrows. May stack materials in storage bins,
etc. , and may keep records of materials moved.
WEAVER
(Plain loom weaver; box loom weaver; automatic loom weaver)
Tends the operation of one or more looms to produce woven cloth. Work involves:
Piecing-up broken warp threads by twisting or tying together the two ends, drawing the yarn
through the harness, reed, and/or drop wires when necessary; replacing empty bobbins in
shuttle with full ones, if loom is not automatic in this respect; and inspecting product as it
is woven for imperfections and stopping loom and removing imperfections when they occur.
For wage study purposes, weavers are classified by type of loom operated and type
of cloth, as follows:
Weaver, box loom
nonautomatic 26)

(woolen and worsted,

automatic; 2 and woolen and worsted,
5

(Box weaver; C. and K. cam box loom weaver)
Tends the operation of one or more cam driven looms fitted with a
box motion so that several shuttles of different colors or twists of filling
may be used.
The loom may have two, four, or six boxes on one side of
the lay, known as 2 x 1, 4 x 1, and 6 x 1 looms, or there may be an equal
number of boxes on each side of the lay known as 2 x 2 , 4 x 4 , and 6 x 6
looms.
The box motion on these looms can be adjusted to weave plain
fabrics.
This classification includes all weavers on cam box looms, irre­
spective of the type of fabric woven.
Weaver, plain loom (woolen and worsted)
(Plain weaver; Draper loom weaver; plain automatic weaver)
Tends the operation of one or more plain looms which are equipped with
cams to alternately raise or lower from 2 to 4 harnesses, and occasionally
up to 7 harnesses.
These looms are equipped with a single shuttle and
weave plain fabrics.
Weaver, loom, other than box or plain loom (woolen and worsted)

2^ Includes weavers tending box looms in which the filling bobbins are changed automatically.
Includes weavers tending box looms in which the filling bobbins are changed by hand.




71

WEAVING-MACHINE OPERATOR (woolen and worsted)
(Draper shuttle-less loom operator; Warner and Swasey
Sulzer-loom weaver)

weaving-machine operator;

Tends the operation of one or more machines which weave cloth without the use of
conventional bobbins and shuttles.
Filling yarn is carried through warp yarns at high
speed by a steel gripper shuttle which grasps yarn from a cone and passes through a shed
formed by intermittent steel guides. Harnesses are operated by direct cam motion.
WINDER. YARN, AUTOMATIC MACHINE
Tends the operation of a section or an entire automatic machine used to wind yarn
from one form to another for shipment or to facilitate handling in later processing. One
or more of the following steps, which are manually performed on nonautomatic winders,
are accomplished automatically on these machines: Tying in ends of yarn; removing full
bobbins; placing empty bobbins or cones on spindle heads; and piecing-up broken ends.
For wage study purposes, winders on automatic machines are classified as follows:
Winder, cone and tube, automatic (woolen and worsted)
(Abbot Automatic Tube and Cone Winder, etc. )
Winder, filling, automatic (woolen and worsted)
(Abbot Automatic Quiller, Barber-Colmen Automatic Quiller, Whitin-Schweiter
Automatic Filling Bobbin Winder, Hacoba (Swiss) Automatic Filling Winder, etc. )
WINDER. YARN. NONAUTOMATIC MACHINES
(Winder; rewinder; reeler; quiller; tuber)
Tends the operation of one or more of the various type machines used to wind yarn
from one form to another for shipment or to facilitate handling in later processing.
Work
involves: Placing skeins, bobbins or cones of yarn on reels or spindles of machine; threading
yarn through the various guides; piecing-up broken ends by twisting or tying the two ends
together; removing full winding bobbins, cones, tubes, or quills, and replacing them with
empty ones. Does not include spoolers.
For wage study purposes,

winders on nonautomatic machines are classified

as

follows:
Winder, cone and tube, high speed, nonautomatic (woolen and worsted)
(Universal Roto-Coner No. 44, Universal No. 50, Foster No. 102, Walter Kidde
and Co. Cone Winder, and similar types)
Winder, cone and tube, slow speed, nonautomatic (woolen and worsted)
(All other nonautomatic cone and tube winders not specified under above)
Winder, filling, nonautomatic (woolen and worsted)
(All nonautomatic winding of filling on bobbins or quills for use in shuttles on
looms)
Winder, other (woolen and worsted)
(All other winding not reported separately; may include automatic as well as
nonautomatic winding)







Industry Wage Studies
The most recent reports for industries included in the Bureau's program
of industry wage surveys since January 1950 are listed below.
Those for which
a price is shown are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U .S.
Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. , 20402, or any of its regional
sales offices.
Those for which a price is not shown may be obtained free as
long as a supply is available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington,
D. C. , 20212, or from any of the regional offices shown on the inside back cover.

I. Occupational W age Studies
Manufacturing
Basic Iron and Steel, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1358 (30 cents).
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1520 (30 cents).
^Canning and Freezing, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Cigar Manufacturing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1436 (30 cents).
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1472 (20 cents).
Cotton Textiles, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1506 (40 cents).
Distilled Liquors, 1952. Series 2, No. 88.
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1463 (30 cents).
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1362 (40 cents).
Flour and Other Grain M ill Products, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1337 (30 cents).
Fluid Milk Industry, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1464 (30 cents).
Footwear, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1503 (50 cents).
Hoisery, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1456 (45 cents).
Industrial Chemicals, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1529 (40 cents).
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1386 (40 cents).
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1378 (40 cents).
Machinery Manufacturing, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1476 (25 cents).
Meat Products, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1415 (75 cents).
Men's and Boys' Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1964.
BLS Bulletin 1457 (40 cents).
Men's and Boys' Suits and Coats, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1424 (65 cents).
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1439 (35 cents).
Miscellaneous Textiles, 1953. BLS Report 56.
Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle P arts, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1393 (45 cents).
Nonferrous Foundries, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1498 (40 cents).
Paints and Varnishes, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1524 (40 cents).
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1478 (70 cents).
Petroleum Refining, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1526 (30 cents).
P ressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1423 (30 cents).
^Processed Waste, 19-57. BLS Report 124.
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard M ills, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1341 (40 cents).
Radio, Television, and Related Products, 1951. Series 2, No. 84.
Railroad Cars, 1952. Series 2, No. 86.
*Raw Sugar, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Southern Sawmills and Planing M ills, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1519 (30 cents).
Structural Clay Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1459 (45 cents).
Synthetic F ibers, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1540 (30 cents).
Synthetic Textiles, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1509 (40 cents).
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1965—
66. BLS Bulletin 1527 (45 cents).

* Studies of the effects of the $1 minimum wage.




I. Occupational W age Studies— Continued
Manufacturing— Continued
"•'Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1957. BLS Report 136.
West Coast Sawmilling, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1455 (30 cents).
Women's and M isses' Coats and Suits, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1508 (25 cents).
Women's and M isses' D resse s, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1538 (30 cents).
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1496
(40 cents).
^Wooden Containers, 1957. BLS Report 126.
Work Clothing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1440 (35 cents).
Nonmanufacturing
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1452 (30 cents).
Banking, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1466 (30 cents).
Bituminous. Coal Mining, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1383 (45 cents).
Communications, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1521 (20 cents).
Contract Cleaning Services, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1507 (30 cents).
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, I960. BLS Report 181.
Department and Women's R eady-to-W ear Stores, 1950. Series 2, No. 78.
Eating and Drinking P laces, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1400 (40 cents).
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1374 (50 cents).
Hospitals, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1409 (50 cents).
Hotels and M otels, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1406 (40 cents).
Laundries and Cleaning Services, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1401 (50 cents).
Life Insurance, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1324 (30 cents).
Nursing Homes and Related F acilities, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1492 (45 cents).

II. Other Industry W age Studies
Factory Workers' Earnings— Distribution by Straight-Time Hourly
Earnings, 1958. BLS Bulletin 1252 (40 cents).
Factory Workers' Earnings— Selected Manufacturing Industries, 1959.
BLS Bulletin 1275 (35 cents).
Employee Earnings and Hours, June 1965—
Retail Trade. BLS Bulletin 1501 (50 cents).
Building M aterials, Hardware, and Farm Equipment D ealers.
BLS Bulletin 1501-1 (25 cents).
General Merchandise Stores. BLS Bulletin 1501-2 (40 cents).
Food Stores. BLS Bulletin 1501-3 (30 cents).
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Stations.
BLS Bulletin 1501-4 (40 cents).
Apparel and A ccessory Stores. BLS Bulletin 1501-5 (45 cents).
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household Appliance Stores.
BLS Bulletin 1501-6 (40 cents).
Miscellaneous Stores. BLS Bulletin 1501-7 (30 cents).
Employee Earnings in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the South and North
Central Regions, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1416 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Eight Metropolitan Areas of the South, 1965.
BLS Bulletin 1533 (40 cents).
* Studies of the effects of the $1 minimum wage.




* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1967 0 - 2 6 6 - 2 7 1




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102