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Industry Wage Survey:
Wood Household Furniture,
November 1974
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1976
Bulletin 1930




Industry Wage Survey:
Wood Household Furniture,
November 1974
U.S. Department of Labor
W. J. Usery, Jr., Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1976
Bulletin 1930

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Stock number 029-00 1-0 196 0-2




Preface
T his b u lle tin su m m arizes th e resu lts o f a Bureau o f L abor S ta tistic s survey o f w ages and
related b e n e fits in th e w o o d h o u se h o ld fu rn itu re (e x c e p t u p h o lste r e d ) m an u fa ctu rin g in d u s­
try in N o v em b er 1 9 7 4 . A sim ilar survey w as c o n d u c te d in O cto b er 1 9 7 1 (B L S B u lletin 1 7 9 3 ).
A su m m ary ta b u la tio n o f 1 9 7 4 n a tio n a l data w as issu ed in D e c e m b e r 1 9 7 5 . A research
su m m ary ap peared in th e M onthly Labor R eview , A p ril 1 9 7 6 , p p . 4 6 -4 7 .
Separate releases also w ere issu ed earlier for C h icago, 111.; G ardner, M ass.; G rand R ap id s,
M ich.; H ic k o r y -S ta te sv ille , N .C .; J a m e sto w n , N .Y .; L os A n g eles-L o n g B each , C alif.; L o u is­
v ille , K y .-In d .; M iam i and F t. L a u d e r d a le -H o lly w o o d , F la.; W in ston -S alem -H igh P o in t, N .C .;
and th e S ta tes o f A rk an sas, In d ian a, T e n n e sse e , and V irgin ia. C o p ies o f th e se releases are
available from th e B ureau o f L abor S ta tistic s, W ash in gton , D .C . 2 0 2 1 2 , or a n y o f its region al
o ffic e s .
T his s tu d y w as c o n d u c te d in th e B u reau ’s O ffice o f W ages and Indu strial R e la tio n s. Carl
B arsky o f th e D iv isio n o f O c c u p a tio n a l W age S tru ctu res prepared th e an alysis in th is b u lle tin .
F ield w o rk for th e survey w as d irected b y th e A ssista n t R eg io n a l D irecto rs for O p eration s.
O th er rep orts available fro m th e B u reau ’s program o f in d u str y w age stu d ie s, as w e ll as
th e addresses o f th e B u rea u ’s region al o ffic e s , are liste d at th e en d o f th is b u lle tin .
M aterial in th is p u b lic a tio n is in th e p u b lic d o m a in and m a y b e rep ro d u ced w ith o u t th e
p erm issio n o f th e F ed eral G o v ern m en t. P lease cred it th e B ureau o f L abor S ta tistic s and cite
th e n am e and n u m b er o f th e p u b lic a tio n .




in




Contents
Page
S u m m a r y ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1

In d u stry ch a ra cteristics.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................1
P r o d u c t s .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................1
E m p lo y m e n t t r e n d s ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1
L o c a t i o n ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2
U n i o n i z a t i o n .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................2
M e th o d o f w age p a y m e n t
2
A verage h o u r ly e a r n in g s ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................2
O c c u p a tio n a l e a r n i n g s ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3
E sta b lish m en t p ractices and su p p lem en ta ry w age p r o v i s i o n s .....................................................................................................................................4
M in im u m en tran ce r a t e s ......................................................................................................................................................................................................4
W ork sch ed u les and sh ift p r o v i s i o n s ............................................................................................................................................................................4
Paid h o l i d a y s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4
Paid v a c a tio n s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4
H ea lth , in su ra n ce, and r etirem en t p l a n s ..................................................................................................................................................................... 4
O th er se le c te d b e n e f i t s .........................................................................................................................................................................................................4
T e x t tab les:
1.

P ercen t o f w ork ers in esta b lish m e n ts o p eratin g u n d er lab or m a n a g em en t a g reem en ts, b y se le c te d esta b lish m e n t
c h a r a c te r istic s............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

R e feren ce tab les:
A verage h o u r ly earnings:
1.

B y se le c te d c h a r a c te r istic s.........................................................................................................................................................................6

Earnings d istrib u tio n :
2.

A ll p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s..............................................................................................................................................................................7

O c c u p a tio n a l averages:
3.

A ll e s t a b lis h m e n ts ..................................................................................................................................................................................

4.

B y size o f c o m m u n i t y ............................................................................................................................................................................10

8

5.

B y size o f e s t a b lis h m e n t.........................................................................................................................................................................11

6.

B y lab or-m an agem en t co n tr a c t c o v e r a g e .....................................................................................................................................12

7.

B y m e th o d o f w age p a y m e n t ...............................................................................................................................................................13

O c c u p a tio n a l earnings:
8.

A r k a n s a s ..........................................................................

15

9.

C h ica g o , 111...........................................................................................................................................................................

17

10.

G ardner, M ass................................................................................................................................................................................................18

11.

G rand R a p id s, M ic h ....................................................................................................................................................................................2 0

12.

H ic k o r y -S ta te sv ille , N C ..........................................................................................................................................................................2 2

13.

I n d i a n a ............................................................................................................................................................................................................2 4

14.

J a m e s to w n , N .Y .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 6

15.

L o s A n g eles-L o n g B ea ch , C a lif............................................................................................................................................................2 8

16.

L o u isv ille , K y .-I n d ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 29

17.

M iam i and F o rt L a u d e r d a le -H o lly w o o d , F la ............................................................................................................................... 3 0

18.

T e n n e s s e e ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 31

19.

V ir g in ia ............................................................................................................................................................................................................33




v

Contents— Continued
20.

W in ston -S alem -H igh P o in t,

N.C...............................................................................................................................................................35

E arnings rela tio n sh ip s:
21.

S e le c te d region s and l o c a l i t i e s ............................................................................................................................................................... 3 6

E sta b lish m en t p ra ctices and su p p lem en ta ry w age p rovision s:
22.

M e th o d o f w age p a y m e n t .........................................................................................................................................................................3 7

23.

M in im u m en tra n ce rates: H and san d ers, fu rn itu re, and o ff-b ea rers, m a c h i n e ..............................................................3 8

24.

S c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s ............................................................................................................................................................................4 0

25.

S h ift d iffe r e n tia l p r o v is io n s ..................................................................................................................................................................... 41

26.

Paid h o l i d a y s ...................................................................................................................................................................................................4 2

27.

Paid v a c a tio n s ...................................................................................................................................................................................................4 3

28.

H e a lth , in su ra n ce, and r etirem en t p l a n s ........................................................................................................................................ 4 6

29.

O th er se le c te d b e n e f i t s ............................................................................................................................................................................... 4 7

A p p e n d ix e s:
A.

R egression a n a l y s i s ...................................................................................................................................................................................................4 8

B.

S c o p e and m e th o d o f s u r v e y ............................................................................................................................................................................... 51

C.

O c c u p a tio n a l d e s c r ip tio n s ...................................................................................................................................................................................5 5




Wood Household Furniture, November 1974
Sum m ary

p rocessed b e fo r e b ein g m a rk eted , su ch as radio and t e le ­
vision cases or fram es for b e d springs.4 F irm s in th e in d u s­

S traigh t-tim e earnings o f p r o d u c tio n and related w ork ers

try w ith few er th an 2 0 w ork ers w ere e x c lu d e d fro m th e

in th e n o n u p h o lste r e d w o o d h o u se h o ld fu rn itu re in d u stry

sco p e o f th e su rvey. T h ese e x c lu d e d firm s are e stim a ted

averaged $ 3 .0 5 an h o u r in N o v em b er 1 9 7 4 . A ll b u t 6 p er­
cent

o f th e

1 2 2 ,3 5 0

w ork ers covered b y

th e

to e m p lo y a b o u t 6 p ercen t o f th e in d u str y ’s w o r k fo r c e .

su r v e y 1

In N o v em b er 1 9 7 4 , ju st over tw o -fifth s o f th e p r o d u c ­

earned b e tw e e n $ 2 and $ 4 .5 0 an h ou r; th e m id d le 5 0 p er­

tio n w ork ers covered b y th e survey w ere in p lan ts c h ie fly

c e n t fe ll b e tw e e n $ 2 .5 0 and $ 3 .4 0 .

p rod u cin g b e d r o o m fu rn itu re. P lan ts w h o se m ajor p ro d u ct

R e g io n a lly , average h o u r ly earnings ranged from $ 3 .8 7

w as eith er livin g ro o m fu rn itu re, d in in g r o o m /k itc h e n fu rn i­

in th e P a cific S ta tes to $ 2 .6 6 in th e B order S ta tes and

tu r e , or k itc h e n ca b in ets e m p lo y e d 1 6 , 1 5 , and 13 p ercen t

$ 2 .6 7 in th e S o u th w e s t.2 W orkers in th e S o u th e a s t, th e

o f th e w o rk ers, r e sp e c tiv e ly . L ess th a n o n e -te n th o f th e

region w ith th e largest n u m b er o f e m p lo y e e s in th e in d u s­

w ork ers w ere in esta b lish m e n ts p rim arily m ak in g rad io,

tr y , averaged $ 2 .7 8 . Earnings also varied b y c o m m u n ity

te le v isio n , and p h o n o g ra p h c a b in ets. T he rem ain in g p lan ts

and e sta b lish m en t siz e , la b or-m an agem en t co n tra ct co v e r ­

in th e in d u stry m o s t c o m m o n ly m a n u fa ctu red o u td o o r ,

age, and ty p e o f fu rn itu re m a n u fa c tu r e d , as w e ll as b y o c ­

in fa n t, and o th e r varieties o f fu rn itu re at th e tim e o f th e

c u p a tio n , s e x , and m e th o d o f w age p a y m e n t.

su rvey.

A m o n g th e o c c u p a tio n s stu d ied sep a ra tely , average h o u r ly
earnings ranged from

$ 3 .6 3

B ed ro o m and d in in g r o o m /k itc h e n fu rniture fre q u e n tly

fo r p la stic -to p in stallers to

w ere p ro d u ced in th e sam e e sta b lish m e n t. E sta b lish m en ts

$ 2 .7 1 for m a ch in e o ff-b ea rers, h an d ru b bers, and m o ld in g -

p ro d u cin g o th e r k in d s o f fu rn itu re, h o w e v e r , ty p ic a lly had

m a ch in e o p era to rs w h o d o n o t set up th eir o w n m a c h in e s.3

n o seco n d a ry p r o d u c t lin es.

F u rn itu re assem b lers (e x c e p t ch airs), th e largest o c c u p a ­

E m ploym en t trends. E sta b lish m en ts w ith in th e sco p e o f

tio n a l grou p stu d ie d , averaged $ 3 .0 8 .

th e

Paid h o lid a y s, paid v a c a tio n s, and part o f th e c o st o f

su rvey

e m p lo y e d

1 2 2 ,3 5 0

p r o d u c tio n

w ork ers in

N o v em b er 1 9 7 4 , d o w n 4 p ercen t fro m a sim ilar survey c o n ­

life , h o sp ita liz a tio n , and surgical in su ran ce w ere p rovid ed
b y p lan ts e m p lo y in g m ore th a n n in e -te n th s o f th e w ork ers

d u c te d in O cto b er 1 9 7 1 .5 T he 1 9 7 4 survey to o k p lace

covered b y th e su rvey. F u rn itu re w ork ers ty p ic a lly received

during

b e tw e e n 5 and 9 h o lid a y s and b e tw e e n 1 and 5 w e e k s o f

w ork ers in th e in d u stry reach ed its h ig h est lev el in m ore

v a ca tio n a n n u a lly , th e la tter d ep en d in g o n len g th o f service.

th an 16 y ears. T he in d u stry b egan to recover in m id -1 9 7 5 ,

a r e c e ssio n , h o w e v e r , w h en th e la y o f f rate for

P en sio n plan s and o th e r form s o f h e a lth insu ran ce w ere also

and b y A p ril 1 9 7 6 p r o d u c tio n w ork er e m p lo y m e n t w as

w id esp read in th e in d u str y .

ab ove th e O cto b er 1971 le v e l.6
4 The definition o f wood household furniture (except uphol­
stered) used for this survey is found under industry 2511 in the
1967 S ta n d a r d I n d u s tr ia l C la ssific a tio n M a n u a l o f the U.S. Office
o f Management and Budget. The 1972 edition o f the M a n u a l classi­
fies wood kitchen, radio, television, and sewing-machine cabinets
in industries other than 2511.
5See I n d u s tr y Wage S u rv e y : W o o d H o u s e h o ld F u rn itu re , E x c e p t
U p h o lste r e d , O c to b e r 1 9 7 1 , Bulletin 1793 (Bureau o f Labor Statis­
tics, 1973).
6 Layoff and employment data are based on the Bureau’s
monthly employment and earnings series. The estimate o f the num­
ber o f production workers within the scope o f the study is intended
only as a general guide to the size and composition o f the labor
force included in the survey. It differs from that published in the
monthly series (158,900 in November 1974) primarily by the ex­
clusion o f establishments employing fewer than 20 workers. The ad­
vance planning necessary to make the survey required the use o f
lists o f establishments assembled considerably in advance o f data
collection. Thus, establishments new to the industry are omitted,
as are establishments originally classified as wood household furni­
ture establishments, but found to be in other industries at the time
o f the survey.

I n d u s tr y c h a r a c te r is tic s

Products.

T he

w ood

h o u se h o ld

fu rn itu re

in d u str y ,

as

d efin ed for th is su rv ey , in c lu d e s esta b lish m e n ts m a n u fa c ­
turing a w id e v ariety o f n o n u p h o lste r e d p r o d u c ts in clu d in g
th o se th a t can be u sed d ir e c tly b y th e c o n su m e r , su ch as
b e d s, c a b in e ts, and ta b le s, and ite m s th a t m u st b e fu rth er
JSee appendix B for scope and method o f survey. The straighttime average hourly earnings in this bulletin differ in concept from
the gross average hourly earnings published in the Bureau’s monthly
employment and earnings series ($3.15 in November 1974). Unlike
the latter, the estimates presented here exclude premium pay for
overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Aver­
age earnings were calculated by summing individual hourly earnings
and dividing by the number o f individuals; in the monthly series,
the sum o f the employee-hour totals reported by establishments in
the industry was divided into the reported payroll totals.
2For definitions o f the regions, see appendix B, table B -l, foot­
note 1.
3See appendix C for occupational descriptions.




1

V irtu a lly all o f th e d eclin e in in d u stry e m p lo y m e n t b e ­

in u n io n esta b lish m e n ts in 1 9 7 4 ranged from 12 p ercen t in

tw e e n 197 1 and 1 9 7 4 w as c o n c e n tr a te d in firm s prim arily

th e B order S ta tes to 7 0 p ercen t in th e M iddle A tla n tic .

m an u fa ctu rin g radio and te le v isio n c a b in e ts—d o w n 3 6 p er­

T e x t tab le 1 sh o w s th e in c id e n c e o f u n io n iz a tio n b y c o m ­

c e n t—and d in in g ro o m fu rn itu re—d o w n 17 p e r c e n t. P ro d u c­

m u n ity and e sta b lish m e n t size.

p ro d u ct

T he U n ite d B r o th e r h o o d o f C arpenters and Join ers and

b ran ch es stu d ied sep arately d e c lin e d o n ly slig h tly or a c ­

the U n ite d F u rn itu re W orkers o f A m erica (b o th A F L -C IO ),

tu a lly in crea sed .

w ere th e m ajor u n io n s in th e in d u stry .

L ocation. T he S o u th e a s t, th e region w ith th e greatest c o n ­

M ethod o f wage p a ym en t . A b o u t fiv e-six th s o f th e p r o d u c ­

tio n

w ork er

e m p lo y m e n t

in

o th e r

p rin cip al

ce n tr a tio n o f in d u stry e m p lo y m e n t, e m p lo y e d tw o -fifth s

tio n w ork ers w ere paid tim e rates in 1 9 7 4 —a p r o p o r tio n

of

u n ch an ged

th e

p r o d u c tio n

w ork ers.

A n o th e r

o n e -s ix th

of

th e

from

th ree years earlier. T im e w ork ers w ere

w ork ers w ere in th e G reat L akes reg io n , and o n e -e ig h th

ty p ic a lly paid u n der form al plan s p rovid in g a range o f rates

w ere in th e

o th e r region s

for o c c u p a tio n s (ta b le 2 2 ) . T h e p r o p o r tio n o f w ork ers paid

a c c o u n te d for as m u c h as o n e -te n th o f th e in d u s tr y ’s w o rk

tim e rates a ccord in g to th eir in d ivid u al q u a lific a tio n s d e ­

fo r c e .

clin ed to a b o u t o n e -fo u r th in 1 9 7 4 from slig h tly u nder tw o -

B order S ta te s. N o n e

o f th e

T he ty p e o f fu rn itu re m a n u fa ctu red varied a m o n g th e

fifth s in 1 9 7 1 .

region s. B ed ro o m fu rn itu re w as th e p rin cip al p ro d u ct o f

In cen tiv e w age sy ste m s in 1 9 7 4 a p p lied to a b o u t o n e-

e sta b lish m e n ts e m p lo y in g a b o u t th ree-fifth s o f th e w ork ers

third o f th e w ork ers in th e M iddle A tla n tic , S o u th w e s t, and

in th e S o u th e a st and tw o -th ird s in th e B order S ta te s. In

G reat L akes reg io n s, o n e -fo u r th in N e w E n glan d , o n e -fifth

th e M iddle A tla n tic reg io n , a lm o st o n e -h a lf o f th e w ork ers

in th e B order S ta te s, and to o n ly a sm all p r o p o r tio n o f th e

w ere e m p lo y e d in p lan ts c h ie fly p rod u cin g k itc h e n ca b in ets.

S o u th e a st w o rk ers. In cen tiv e p ay m o s t c o m m o n ly a p p lied

In th e G reat L akes r eg io n , a b o u t h a lf o f th e w ork ers w ere

to a ssem b lers, glu ers, p a ck ers, and sanders a m o n g th e jo b s

e m p lo y e d

stu d ie d sep a ra tely .

b y p la n ts en gaged

p rim arily in m ak in g living

ro o m fu rn itu re (in clu d in g ra d io , te le v isio n , and p h o n o g ra p h
c a b in e ts).

A v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n in g s

E sta b lish m en ts

lo c a te d

o u tsid e

m e tr o p o lita n

areas7

e m p lo y e d a lm o st th r e e -fifth s o f th e in d u s tr y ’s w o rk fo r c e .

S traigh t-tim e h o u r ly earnings o f th e 1 2 2 ,3 5 0 p r o d u c tio n

B y r e g io n , th e p r o p o r tio n o f w ork ers in sm aller c o m m u n i­

w ork ers covered b y th e survey averaged $ 3 .0 5 in N o v em b er

ties a m o u n te d to fo u r -fifth s in N e w E n glan d , a b o u t seven-

1 9 7 4 —a b o u t 2 7 p ercen t ab ove th e lev el in th e O cto b er

e ig h th s in th e B order S ta te s, sev en -ten th s in th e S o u th e a st,

197 1 su r v e y 8 (ta b le 1). T his eq u aled th e gain for p r o d u c ­

th r e e -fifth s in th e G reat L akes reg io n , and tw o -fifth s or less

tio n w ork ers in all durable g o o d s m an u factu rin g in th e sam e

in th e rem ain in g region s.

p erio d . T h e in crease in w age rates w as fairly u n ifo r m —b e ­

A m o n g th e n in e areas o f in d u stry c o n c e n tr a tio n sur­

tw e e n 2 0 and 2 8 p e r c e n t—am on g th e seven region s th a t

v e y e d , th e largest n u m b ers o f w ork ers w ere in H ic k o r y -

co u ld b e co m p a red .

S ta te sv ille , N .C . ( 1 1 ,4 7 5 ) , and W in ston -S alem -H igh P o in t,

A verage h o u r ly earnings in N o v em b er 1 9 7 4 w ere h ig h est

N .C . ( 8 ,5 5 0 ) . T h ese tw o areas to g e th e r a c c o u n te d for tw o -

in th e P a cific S ta tes ( $ 3 .8 6 ) and lo w e st in th e B order S ta tes

fifth s o f all w ork ers in th e S o u th e a st reg io n . L os A n geles-

( $ 2 .6 6 ) and S o u th e a st ( $ 2 .6 7 ) . W orkers in th e S o u th e a s t,

L on g B e a c h , w ith a b o u t 6 ,0 0 0

th e region o f g reatest in d u stry e m p lo y m e n t, averaged $ 2 .7 8 .

w o rk ers, a c c o u n te d for

a b o u t h a lf o f th e P a cific S ta tes e m p lo y m e n t. T he sm allest

N a tio n w id e ,

w ork ers

in

m e tr o p o lita n

areas averaged

e m p lo y m e n t c o u n ts a m on g th e n in e areas w ere record ed

$ 3 .3 0 an h o u r —15 p ercen t m ore th an w ork ers in sm aller

in

c o m m u n itie s. W hen co m p a riso n s w ere lim ite d to th e sam e

J a m e s to w n ,

N .Y .,

and M iam i and

F ort L auderdale-

H o lly w o o d , F la ., ea ch w ith a b o u t 1 ,1 0 0 w ork ers.

r eg io n , m e tr o p o lita n area w ork ers averaged m o re th a n th eir

T h e fou r S ta tes stu d ied sep a ra tely c o n ta in e d m ajor p o r ­

co u n terp a rts in n o n m e tr o p o lita n areas in 5 o f 6 in sta n ces;

tio n s o f th e in d u s tr y ’s lab or fo rce in th eir resp ective region s.

in ea ch case th e d iffe r e n tia l w as b e tw e e n 7 and 10 p e r c e n t.

T en n essee ( 6 ,7 3 7 w o rk ers) a c c o u n te d for o n e -se v e n th o f

In th e M iddle A tla n tic r eg io n , h o w e v e r , w ork ers in sm aller

th e e m p lo y m e n t in th e S o u th e a st; Indiana ( 9 ,2 4 2 ) , for ju st

c o m m u n itie s averaged 15 p ercen t m ore th an m e tr o p o lita n

und er o n e -h a lf in th e G reat L ak es region ; A rkansas ( 5 ,1 0 3 ) ,

area w ork ers.

for tw o -th ird s in th e S o u th w e st; and V irgin ia, ( 1 4 ,2 8 4 )

W orkers in p la n ts w ith b e tw e e n 2 0 and 2 4 9 w ork ers

for m ore th a n n in e -te n th s in th e B ord er S ta tes.

averaged $ 3 .1 9 an h o u r , com p ared w ith $ 2 .9 4 per h ou r for
w orkers in larger e sta b lish m e n ts. T he lo w e r n a tio n a l average

Unionization. E sta b lish m en ts th a t had lab or-m an agem en t

for larger p la n ts m a y b e ex p la in e d in part b y th e h igher

c o n tr a c ts coverin g a m a jo rity o f th eir w ork ers e m p lo y e d
a b o u t o n e-th ird o f th e p r o d u c tio n w ork ers in 1 9 7 4 —u n ­
ch an ged fro m th e 19 7 1 s tu d y . R e g io n a lly , th e p r o p o r tio n

8BLS Bulletin 1793. Data for the October 1971 survey do not
include retroactive adjustments for wage increases scheduled to be­
come effective during the 90-day wage-price-rent freeze which
ended Nov. 14, 1971.

7Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the U.S.
Office o f Management and Budget through February 1974.




2

T e x t ta b le 1 .
o p e r a tin g

e s t a b lis h m e n t s

th o s e u sed in in d ivid u al e sta b lish m e n ts, b eca u se allo w a n ce

u n d e r l a b o r - m a n a g e m e n t a g r e e m e n t s , b y s e le c t e d

P e rc e n t

o f

w o rk e rs

in

m u st b e m ad e for m in or d iffe r e n c e s a m on g e sta b lish m en ts

e s ta b lis h m e n t c h a r a c t e r is t ic s

in sp e c ific d u tie s p erfo rm ed .
Location

Region

United States. .
Middle A t la n t ic ................
Border States......................
Southeast............................
Great L a k e s ......................
Pacific...................................

Metro­
politan
areas
45-49
65-69
20-24
20-24
55-59
65-69

Nonmetro­
politan
areas
25-29
80-84
10-14
10-14
70-74

T h e b asic su rvey ta b u la tio n s did n o t a tte m p t to iso la te

Size

w a ge-d eterm in in g ch aracteristics to e x a m in e th eir in d e p e n ­

20-249
workers

250
workers
or
more

40-44
60-64
25-29
5-9
50-54
55-59

30-34
85-89
10-14
15-19
80-84
90-94

are h ig h ly in terrela ted .

d en t in flu e n c e o n w age le v e ls. S o m e o f th e ch a racteristics
asso cia ted w ith h igh er w age le v e ls, su ch as u n io n iz a tio n ,
and lo c a tio n in m e tr o p o lita n areas or in th e P a cific region ,
A p p e n d ix A , h o w e v e r , p resen ts a b r ie f te c h n ic a l n o te o n
th e results o f a m u ltip le regression in w h ic h th e singular
e ffe c ts o f in d ivid u al survey ch aracteristics w ere iso la te d to
a m easu rab le d egree. In several ca ses, th ere w ere m arked
d iffe r e n c e s b e tw e e n th e average earnings d ifferen tia ls p r o ­

NOTE: Dash indicates no data.

d u ced b y cro ss-ta b u la tio n (sim p le reg ressio n ), as d iscu ssed
in th is se c tio n o f th e rep o rt, and th o se d erived b y m u ltip le
regression .

c o n c e n tr a tio n o f larger p lan ts in th e rela tiv ely lo w -p a y in g

F or

e x a m p le , p r o d u c tio n

w ork ers in u n io n

p lan ts averaged 6 4 c e n ts an h ou r m ore th an th o se in n o n ­

B order S ta tes and S o u th e a st region s. T he n a tio n w id e rela­

u n io n p la n ts, b u t a p p aren tly o n ly tw o -fifth s o f th is d iffe r ­

tio n sh ip did n o t a p p ly in th e M iddle A tla n tic , S o u th e a s t,

en tia l (2 7 c e n ts ) can be a ttrib u ted so le ly to u n io n iz a tio n

S o u th w e st, G reat L ak es, and P a cific reg io n s, w h ere w ork ers

(see a p p e n d ix ta b les A -l and A -2 ).

in larger p lan ts averaged b e tw e e n 1 p ercen t and 2 0 p ercen t

Earnings o f all b u t 6 p ercen t o f th e w ork ers w ere w ith in

m ore th an w ork ers did in sm aller p lan ts.

a range o f $2 an h ou r and $ 4 .5 0 an hou r; th e m id d le 5 0

H ou rly earnings in p lan ts w ith a m ajority o f p r o d u c tio n

p ercen t earned b e tw e e n $ 2 .5 0 and $ 3 .4 0 (ta b le 2 ). T he p r o ­

w orkers covered b y u n io n co n tr a c t averaged $ 3 .4 6 —2 3 p er­

p o r tio n o f w ork ers at th e u pper en d o f the earnings array

cen t higher th an in n o n u n io n p la n ts. In th e S o u th e a st and

varied w id e ly b y reg io n . F or e x a m p le , less th an 5 p ercen t

S o u th w e st, n o n u n io n p ay levels w ere slig h tly higher th an

o f th e w ork ers in th e B order S ta te s, S o u th e a s t, and S o u th ­

th o se for u n io n p la n ts, b u t p ay levels in u n io n p lan ts w ere

w est earned at least $ 4 an h ou r; th e p ro p o rtio n earning at

h igher b y b e tw e e n 3 and 59 p ercen t in th e o th er regions

least $ 4 a m o u n te d to 2 4 p ercen t in th e M iddle A tla n tic and

stu d ied sep a ra tely .

4 9 p ercen t in th e P a cific.

A m o n g th e prin cip al p ro d u ct ca teg o ries stu d ie d , m a n u ­
factu rers o f k itc h e n w o o d ca b in ets had th e h igh est n a tio n ­
w id e average ( $ 3 .9 5 ) and th e h ig h est lev el in each region

O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s

w h ere co m p a riso n s w ere p o ssib le . O ther in d u stry b ran ch es
and th eir n a tio n w id e averages w ere: R a d io , T V , and p h o n o ­

T h irty o c c u p a tio n s w ere se le c te d to rep resent various

graph c a b in e ts, $ 3 .0 7 ; d in in g ro o m and k itc h e n furn itu re

skills and w age lev els o f p r o d u c tio n w ork ers in th e in d u stry

(e x c e p t

(ta b le 3 ). T h ese o c c u p a tio n s m ad e up ju st over h a lf o f th e

c a b in e ts), $ 3 .0 0 ; livin g ro o m

fu rniture (e x c e p t

w o rk fo r c e .

radio and T V c a b in e ts), $ 2 .9 0 ; and b e d r o o m fu rn itu re, th e

N a tio n w id e averages for th ese jo b s ranged fro m $ 3 .6 3

largest in d u stry b ran ch stu d ie d , $ 2 .8 4 .
for

Wage lev els for th e variou s p ro d u ct b ran ch es w ere h ea v ­

p la stic -to p

in stallers

rubbers. O n ly tw o o th e r jo b s , te n o n e r o p erators (se t up and

furn itu re w ork ers w ere lo c a te d in th e lo w -p a y in g B order

o p e r a te ) and m ain tain ers, averaged ab ove $ 3 .5 0 ( $ 3 .5 8 and

S o u th e a st region s. A b o u t fo u r -fifth s o f th e

m a ch in e

for m old in g-m ach in e

cla ssific a tio n s. F or e x a m p le , th ree-fo u rth s o f th e b e d r o o m
and

o n ly ) ,

$ 2 .7 1

o p erators

S tates

(fe e d

to

ily in flu e n c e d b y region al d istr ib u tio n o f w ork ers in th ese

o ff-b ea rers, and

hand

$ 3 .5 1 , r e sp e c tiv e ly ). F urn itu re assem b lers (e x c e p t ch airs),

w ork ers in k itc h e n ca b in et p la n ts, h o w e v e r , w ere in th e

th e largest o c c u p a tio n stu d ied sep a ra tely , averaged $ 3 .0 8 .

M iddle A tla n tic , G reat L ak es, and P acific S ta te s, th e th ree

T able 21 p resen ts earnings rela tio n sh ip s for several rep re­

h ig h est p ay in g region s stu d ie d .

sen ta tiv e jo b s in each o f th e reg io n s, S ta te s, and areas

M en averaged $ 3 .1 9 , com p ared w ith $ 2 .7 4 for w o m e n .

stu d ied as a p ercen t o f th e n a tio n w id e average for all p r o ­

T he region al ad vantage h eld b y m en ranged from 2 p ercen t

d u c tio n w ork ers ( $ 3 .0 5 ) . O ccu p a tio n a l averages w ere ty p i­

in th e P a cific region to 21 p ercen t in N e w E n glan d . D iffe r ­

ca lly h ig h est in th e P a cific S ta tes (c o m m o n ly averaging

en c e s in average p a y lev els for m en and w o m e n m a y b e th e

$ 4 or m ore an h o u r ) and lo w e st in th e S o u th w e st. P ay rela­

result o f several fa c to r s, in clu d in g variation in th e d istrib u ­

tio n sh ip s, n e v e r th e le ss, varied w id e ly b y region and a m on g

tio n o f th e se x e s a m o n g esta b lish m e n ts and also am on g

areas se le c te d

jo b s w ith disparate p ay le v e ls. D iffe r e n c e s in averages for

region .

for separate stu d y , even w ith in th e sam e

m en and w o m e n in th e sam e jo b and area m a y re fle c t m in or

In m o s t in sta n ces w h ere region al co m p a riso n s w ere p o s ­

variation s in d u tie s. Job d e scrip tio n s u sed in cla ssify in g

sib le , o c c u p a tio n a l averages w ere h igher in m e tr o p o lita n

w ork ers in w age su rveys u su a lly are m ore g en eralized th an

areas th an in n o n m e tr o p o lita n areas (ta b le 4 ), h igh er in




3

p la n ts o f 2 5 0 or m ore th a n in sm aller p la n ts (ta b le 5 ),

d a y , 3 5 -h o u r or 37% -hour w e e k s. F ou r-d ay sch ed u les o f

and h igh er in u n io n p lan ts th an in n o n u n io n p la n ts (ta b le 6 ).

at least 3 5 h o u rs w ere rare in th e in d u stry .
W ork sch ed u les varied w id e ly b y r eg io n . F or ex a m p le,,

E arnings also w ere u su a lly high er for in c e n tiv e w ork ers th a n
and region (ta b le 7 ).

slig h tly m ore th an on e-th ird o f th e p r o d u c tio n w ork ers ip

T h e e ffe c t o f th e se ch aracteristics o n w age lev els is d is­

N e w E ngland w o rk ed at least 4 5 h ou rs; in th e P a c ific , o n ly

cu ssed fu rth er in a p p e n d ix A .

4 p ercen t w o rk ed for m o re th a n 4 0 h o u rs per w e e k .

for tim ew o rk ers in th e

sam e jo b

P ay p ro v isio n s for se c o n d -sh ift w o rk w ere rep o rted b y

E arnings o f in d ivid u als p erfo rm in g th e sam e task varied
c o n sid era b ly w ith in th e sam e area (ta b le s 8 -2 0 ). T h u s, som e

p lan ts

w ork ers in co m p a ra tiv ely lo w -p a id jo b s (as m easu red b y th e

w ork ers; for third or o th e r late sh ifts , th e p r o p o r tio n w as

e m p lo y in g ju st over o n e -h a lf o f th e p r o d u c tio n

average for all w o rk ers) earned m o re th an so m e in jo b s for

o n e -fifth (ta b le 2 5 ). L ess th a n 5 p ercen t o f th e p r o d u c tio n

w h ic h sig n ific a n tly h igh er averages w ere reco rd ed . F or e x ­

w o rk ers, h o w e v e r , w ere a c tu a lly e m p lo y e d o n late sh ifts

a m p le, in C h ica g o , earnings o f p ack ers and sprayers o v e r ­

at th e tim e o f th e su rvey.

la p p ed

co n sid e r a b ly ,

d e sp ite

an

8 4 -c e n t

d iffe r e n c e

in

h o u r ly averages for th e tw o jo b s , as sh o w n in th e fo llo w in g

Paid holidays. N ea rly all p r o d u c tio n and o ffic e w ork ers

ta b u la tio n :

w ere in esta b lish m e n ts p rovid in g paid h o lid a y s (ta b le 2 6 ).

Hourly earnings

Packers Sprayers

Under $ 2 . 4 0 ............................................................
$2.40 to $ 2 .8 0 ......................
$2.80 to $ 3 .2 0 ......................
$3.20 to $ 3 .6 0 .........................................................
$3.60 to $ 4 .0 0 .........................................................
$4.00 to $ 4 .4 0 .........................................................
$4.40 and over.........................................................

8
41
7
5
9
70
$2.83

tw e e n 5 d a y s and 9 d ays a n n u a lly , b u t p r o p o r tio n s varied

1
9
14
11
27
9
13

Number of w o rk e rs ...............................................
Average hourly e a rn in g s ......................................

A b o u t tw o -th ird s o f th e p r o d u c tio n w ork ers receiv ed b e ­

84
$3.67

w id e ly . F or e x a m p le , at lea st th r e e -fifth s o f th e w ork ers in
th e M iddle A tla n tic , G reat L ak es, and P a cific S ta te s re­
ceiv e d 8 d a y s or m o r e . In th e B order S ta tes and S o u th e a s t,
h o w e v e r , at lea st h a lf o f th e w ork ers received 5 d a y s or le ss.
O ffic e w ork ers w ere co v ered b y sim ilar p ro v isio n s in m o st
region s.

Paid vacations. P aid v a c a tio n s, after q u a lify in g p erio d s o f
serv ice, w ere p ro v id ed b y e sta b lish m e n ts e m p lo y in g vir­

E s t a b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s a n d s u p p le m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v is io n s

tu a lly all o f th e in d u s tr y ’s p r o d u c tio n and o ffic e w ork ers
(ta b le 2 7 ) . T y p ic a l p ro v isio n s for p r o d u c tio n w ork ers w ere

D ata also w ere o b ta in e d o n certain e sta b lish m en t p rac­

1 w e e k o f v a ca tio n p a y after 1 year o f service and 2 w e e k s

tic e s , in clu d in g sh ift d iffe r e n tia ls and m in im u m en tran ce

after 5 y ea rs. A b o u t th r e e -fifth s o f th e w ork ers w ere e lig i­

rates, for p r o d u c tio n w ork ers, and w o rk sch ed u les for p r o ­

b le for at lea st 3 w e e k s o f service after 15 y ea rs. O ffic e

d u c tio n and o ffic e w o rk ers. S u p p lem en ta ry b e n e fit in fo r ­

w ork ers m o s t c o m m o n ly received 1 w e e k after 1 y e a r , 2

m a tio n , in c lu d in g paid h o lid a y s, paid v a ca tio n s, and h e a lth ,

w e e k s after 3 y ea rs, and 3 or 4 w e e k s after 15 years.

in su ra n ce, and r etirem en t p la n s, w as c o lle c te d fo r b o th p r o ­
d u c tio n and o ffic e w ork ers.

Health , insurance , and retirem ent plans . A t least n in e -te n th s
o f th e p r o d u c tio n and o ffic e w ork ers w ere in e sta b lish ­

Minimum entrance rates. T w o -th ird s o f th e 3 3 6 e sta b lish ­

m e n ts p rovid in g all or part o f th e c o st o f life , h o sp ita liz a ­

m e n ts in th e B u reau ’s sam ple had form al m in im u m e n ­

tio n , and surgical in su ran ce (ta b le 2 8 ). A b o u t sev en -ten th s

tran ce ( “h ire-in ”) rates for m a ch in e off-b earers (ta b le 2 3 ).

o f ea ch e m p lo y e e grou p w as p ro v id ed a c c id e n ta l d e a th and

S ev en -ten th s o f th e se 2 2 3 p la n ts had m in im u m s b e tw e e n $2

d ism em b erm en t in su ran ce and p r o te c tio n fro m lo ss o f in ­

(th e F ed eral m in im u m w age at th e tim e o f th e su rv ey ) and

co m e due to illn ess or a c c id e n t.

$ 2 .5 0 ; o n e -fifth fe ll b e tw e e n $ 2 .5 0 and $ 3 ; and a b o u t o n e-

B asic and m ajor m e d ic a l in su ran ce ap p lied to at least

te n th w ere over $ 3 .

fo u r -fifth s o f ea ch e m p lo y e e g ro u p , and lon g-term d isa b ility

O f th e 2 3 6 e sta b lish m e n ts (s e v e n -te n th s o f th e to ta l)

in su ran ce to a b o u t o n e -fifth o f th e o ffic e w ork ers and 5

w ith form al m in im u m s for h an d san d ers, n early tw o -th ird s

p ercen t o f th e p r o d u c tio n w o rk ers.

had m in im u m s o f less th a n $ 2 .5 0 ; and th r e e -te n th s, b e ­

R e tir e m e n t p e n sio n s (in a d d itio n to F ed eral so c ia l secu r­

tw e e n $ 2 .5 0 and $ 3 . M in im u m en tra n ce rates fo r b o th jo b s

it y )

w ere g en erally h ig h est in th e P a c ific region and lo w e s t in

w ork ers and a b o u t th r e e -fifth s o f th e o ff ic e w o rk ers. L u m p ­

th e S o u th e a st and S o u th w e s t.

su m severance p a y m e n ts, h o w e v e r , w ere rare in th e in d u str y .

Work schedules and shift provisions . F o u r -fifth s o f th e p r o ­

and r etirem en t p lan s stu d ie d w ere n o t req u ired to c o n tr i­

d u c tio n w ork ers and m ore th an n in e -te n th s o f th e o ffic e

b u te to w a rd th e c o s t o f th e se p lan s. T h is w as mfcre o fte n

w ork ers w ere in e sta b lish m e n ts sch ed u lin g a 5 -d ay, 4 0 -h o u r

th e case fo r o ffic e th an for p r o d u c tio n w ork ers.

w ere

p ro v id ed

to

se v e n -te n th s

o f th e

p r o d u c tio n

A m a jo rity o f th e w o rk ers covered b y h e a lth , in su ra n ce,

w o r k w e e k in N o v e m b e r

1974

(ta b le 2 4 ). L on ger w o rk

sc h e d u le s, m o s t c o m m o n ly 5 d a y s, 4 5 h o u r s, ap p lied to ju st

O ther selected benefits. P ro v isio n s fo r p aid fu n eral leave

u n d er o n e -te n th o f th e p r o d u c tio n w ork ers. M ost o f th e

ap p lied to a b o u t th ree-eig h ts o f th e p r o d u c tio n w ork ers

o ffic e w ork ers o n o th e r th a n 4 0 -h o u r sch ed u les w o r k e d 5-

(ta b le 2 9 ). J u ry -d u ty p a y w as p rovid ed in esta b lish m e n ts




4

and least c o m m o n in th e S o u th e a st and S o u th w e st.

e m p lo y in g ju st over h a lf th e w o rk ers. T e c h n o lo g ic a l sever­
an ce p a y , p rovid in g p ay to w ork ers p e r m a n e n tly sep arated

P r o d u c tio n and o ff ic e w ork ers w ere covered in sim ilar

from th eir jo b s due to te c h n o lo g ic a l ch an ge or p la n t c lo sin g ,

p r o p o r tio n s b y ju r y -d u ty p a y p r o v isio n s. A larger p ro p o r­

w as rarely fo u n d . A ll o f th e a b ove b e n e fits g en erally w ere

tio n o f th e o ffic e w o rk ers, h o w e v e r , a b o u t o n e -h a lf, w ere

m o st c o m m o n in th e N e w E ngland and G reat L akes S ta tes

cov ered b y fu n eral leave p lan s.




5

Table 1. Average hourly earnings: By selected characteristics
(Num ber and a vera ge straigh t-tim e h ou rly e a r n in g s 1 o f p roduction w o rk e rs in w ood household fu rniture (excep t u p h o lste re d ) m anufacturing establish m en ts by s e le cte d c h a r a c t e r is t ic s ,
United States and s e le cte d re g io n s , N ovem ber 1974)

It em

U n it e d S t a t e s 2
Number Avera ge
hourly
of
w or k er s e a r n i n g s

Border S ta te s
New Eng la nd
Middle A t l a n t i c
Southeast
S o ut hw e s t
G rea t l a k e s
Pac:i f i c
Number ' A ve rag e
Av e ra ge
Number
Number
Ave ra ge
Number Av er a ge
Number
Number
Av era ge
Av era ge
Number Average
of
of
hourly
of
hourly
hourly
of
hourly
hourly
of
of
of
hourly
hourly
w orkers e a r n i n g s w or k e rs e a r n i n g s w or k ers e a r n i n g s w o r k e r s e a r n i n g s w o r k e r s e a r n i n g s w or k er s e a r n i n g s w o rk e rs e a r n i n g s

A l l p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s 3 ........................................
Men..........................................................................................
Women.....................................................................................

12 2 ,3 50
83,835
36,210

$3.05
3.19
2.74

6, 962
4, 94 3
2,019

$3.04
3.20
2.65

10 ,9 12
8,641
2, 27 1

$3. 41
3.52
2.99

15 ,7 10
9,200
4,205

$2.66
2.80
2.43

48,372
33,081
15 , 2 9 1

$2.78
2.89
2.56

7,748
4,550
3,198

$2.67
2.74
2.57

19 ,2 55
12 ,0 02
7,253

$3.47
3.68
3.12

11,562
10,196
1,366

$3.86
3.87
3.79

Si ze of c o m m u n i t y :
M etrop olitan a r e a s 4
...........................................
N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s .............................................

52,092
70 , 2 5 8

3.30
2.86

1,298
5,664

3.22
3.00

7,894
3,018

3.27
3.77

1, 8 1 0
13,900

2.84
2.64

14 , 6 8 1
33,691

2.97
2.70

4,717
3,031

2.74
2.55

8,489
1 0, 76 6

3.63
3.35

11,562
-

3.86
-

Si ze o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t :
2 0 - 2 4 9 w o r k e r s ...............................................................
2 50 w o r k e r s o r m o r e ..................................................

51,408
70,942

3.19
2.94

4,8 35
2, 127

3.06
3.00

8, 4 0 1
2 , 51 1

3.26
3.90

2,042
1 3, 66 8

3.20
2.58

12,412
35,960

2.76
2.79

2,875
4,873

2.58
2.72

11 ,5 40
7,715

3.43
3.53

7,804
3,758

3.73
4. 12

l a b o r - m a n a g e m e n t c o n t r a c t co ve ra ge :
E s t a b lis h m e n t s with—
M a j o r i t y o f w o r k e r s c o v e r e d .........................
None o r m i n o r i t y o f w o r k e r s
c o v e r e d .........................................................................

43,024

3.46

2, 882

3.09

7,585

3.53

1, 921

3.20

7,276

2.77

2,411

2.65

12 ,3 26

3.52

8,003

4.35

79,326

2.82

4, 080

3.01

3,327

3 . 14

13, 78 9

2.58

41,096

2.78

5,337

2.68

6,929

3.39

3,559

2.74

8,393

3.07

1,883

2. 58

5,137

3.24
2,050

$3 .5 1

P r i n c i p a l pr od uc t: 6
R a d i o , t e l e v i s i o n , and pho n o gr a ph
wood c a b i n e t s ...............................................................
L i v i n a r o o m , l i b r a r y , and h a l l wood
f u r n it u r e (except r a d io , t e l e v i s i o n ,
and ph on og ra p h c a b i n e t s ) ...................................
D in i n g ro om and k i t c h e n wood f u r n i t u r e
( e x c e p t c a b i n e t s ) ....................................................
K i t c h e n wood c a b i n e t s .............................................
Bedroom wood f u r n i t u r e ...........................................

1 9, 56 4

2.90

2, 153

$2.88

18 ,4 8 5
16 ,4 0 8
51,589

3.00
3.95
2.84

2 , 38 5

2.97

-

969

-

$3.14

2,593
1, 837
4,886
2,514

1 E x clu d es p rem iu m pay fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holid ays, and late sh ifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 Includes w o rk e rs in e stablish m en ts fo r w hich separate data fo r m en and w om en was un­
ava ila b le.
4 Standard M etrop olitan S ta tistica l a re a s as defined by the U. S. O ffice o f M anagem ent and
Budget through F eb ru a ry 1974.




$3.59
3.60
3.36

2.56

6,312

2.54

1,678

2.80

4,037

3.35

1, 1 6 2

2.62

9,676
1,789
28,642

2.86
3.71
2.76

825
510
2,967

2.51
2.93
2.54

2,170
4,824
2,090

3.39
3.95
3.26

-

10 , 6 2 0

-

$2.66

.
-

-

3,787

$3.45

5 E stab lish m en ts w e re c la s s ifie d a ccord in g to p rin cip a l type of furniture m anufactured. The
p rod u ction w o rk e rs total above includ es data fo r establish m en ts with p rin cip a l p rod u cts in addition
to those shown se p a ra te ly .
NOTE:

D ashes indicate no data rep orted or data that do not m eet p ub lication c r it e r ia .

Table 2. Earnings distribution: All production workers
(P e r c e n t distrib u tion o f p roduction w o rk e rs in wood household furnitrue (e x ce p t uph olstered) m anufacturing establish m en ts by straigh t-tim e hourly e a r n in g s ,1 United States and selected
r eg io n s, N o ve m b e r 1974)
H o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1
Total 3
T o t a l .........................................................................................

U n it ed S t a t e s 2
Hen

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

10 0. 0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

Women

New England

M id dl e
A tlantic

Border
States

Southeast

S out hw es t

P a cific

G re a t l a k e s

$2.00
$2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

and
and
and
and
and

u nd e r
u n d er
under
u n d er
u n d er

$ 2 . 1 0 .................................................
$ 2 . 2 0 .................................................
$ 2 . 3 0 .................................................
$ 2 . 4 0 .................................................
$ 2 . 5 0 .................................................

3.6
4.3
5.3
5.5
5.9

2.9
3.0
4.0
4. 1
4.8

5.1
7.1
7.7
8.2
8.2

2.6
4 .2
7 .0
3.4
4.6

1.7
3.3
3.7
1.7
2.8

1. 1
6.7
10.4
12.0
11.8

4.0
4.2
5.3
6.8
7.9

8.3
1 1. 6
9. 1
7.3
4.7

1.5
1.0
1.2
.9
1.5

8.3
2.9
3. 1
1.7
1. 6

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
u n d er
under
under

$ 2 . 6 0 .................................................
$ 2 . 7 0 .................................................
$ 2 . 8 0 .................................................
$ 2 . 9 0 .................................................
$ 3 . 0 0 .................................................

7.5
7.0
7.0
6.1
5.3

6.6
6.1
6.2
5.7
5.5

9.0
8.9
8.8
7 .0
5.0

8.4
7.7
8.8
5.3
3.7

3.3
3.1
4.4
2.3
3.7

12.2
9. 1
8.3
6.5
5.5

9.9
9.8
9.2
8.2
6.3

7.4
7.2
7.8
6,4
5?0

2.5
2.9
4.4
5.9
6.7

2.7
2.9
1.8
.7
.9

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

and
and
and
and
and

un d e r
under
under
under
under

$ 3 . 1 0 .................................................
$ 3 . 2 0 .................................................
$ 3 . 3 0 .................................................
$ 3 . 4 0 .................................................
$ 3 . 5 0 .................................................

5.4
4.0
4.4
3.4
3.1

5. 9
4.4
5.0
3.8
3.7

4.6
3.1
3.4
2 .6
2.1

4.9
3.3
5. 1
2.5
3.0

5.0
6.0
7.3
5. 1
5.5

3.9
2.6
2.3
1.5
1.5

6.3
4.2
4.3
2.6
2.0

5.2
3.8
3.4
2.7
2.5

7.5
4.9
7.6
7.8
7.5

1.4
1. 4
1.1
1 .3
1.6

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
u h d er
under
under

$ 3 . 6 0 .................................................
$ 3 . 7 0 .................................................
$ 3 . 8 0 .................................................
$ 3 . 9 0 .................................................
$ 4 . 0 0 .................................................

3.1
2.3
2. 1
1. 6
1. 2

3.9
2.8
2.5
2. 1
1 .6

1.5
1 .4
1.3
.7
.5

4.5
1.8
4.2
2.5
1. 9

3.7
4.9
4.0
2.0
2.4

1.0
.8
.4
.3
.2

2.6
1.4
.9
.8
.4

2.8
1.2
.8
.7
.3

5.0
5.3
3.8
3. 1
2.3

3.7
1 .6
4.2
4.4
3.5

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
u n d er
under
under

$ 4 . 1 0 .................................................
$ 4 . 2 0 ................................................
$ 4 . 3 0 .................................................
$ 4 . 4 0 .................................................
$ 4 . 5 0 .................................................

1.4
1.2
1.2
1.2
.8

2.0
1 .6
1. 5
1.5
1 .2

.3
.4
.5
.7
. 1

2.7
.9
1.3
.9
.6

4.7
2.3
4.2
1.3
2.4

.3
. 1
. 1
.1
.1

.5
.5
.4
.2
.5

.8
. 1
. 1
. 1
.1

2.0
1.4
1.3
.9
1.0

$ 4 . 5 0 and o v e r ..................................................................

5 .8

7.8

Number o f w o r k e r s ...........................................................

12 2 ,3 5 0

A v er a ge h o u r l y e a r n i n g s ............................................

$3.05

1.8

4.2

9.2

83,835

36,210

6,962

10 , 9 1 2

15,710

48,372

7,748

19,255

11,562

$3.19

$2.74

$3.04

$3 . 4 1

$2.66

$2.78

$2.67

$3.47

$3.86

1 E x clu d es p r e m iu m pay fo r o v ertim e and for w ork on w eekends, h olid ays, and late
sh ifts.
2 Inclu des data fo r region s in addition to those shown separately.
3 Inclu des w o rk e rs in establishm ents fo r which separate data fo r m en and w om en
w as una vailable.
W o r k e r s w e re distributed as fo llo w s : 4 .8 p e rce n t at $ 4 .5 0 and under $ 4 .6 0 ; 5.1




4

2.7
5.8
3.8
8.7
2.4

I

1.2

.9

.4

10.0

4 25.9

p e r c e n t at $ 4 .6 0 and under $ 4 .8 0 ; 2 .7 p e r c e n t at $ 4 .8 0 and under $ 5 ; 1 .6 p ercen t at $5
and under $ 5 .2 0 ; 1 .4 p e r c e n t at $ 5 .2 0 and under $ 5 .4 0 ; 0 .5 p e r c e n t at $ 5 .4 0 and under
$ 5 .6 0 ; 2 .3 p e r c e n t at $ 5 .6 0 and under $ 5 .8 0 ; 1.3 p e r c e n t at $ 5 .8 0 and under $ 6; and
7. 3 p e r c e n t at $ 6 and o v e r .
N OTE:

B ecau se of rounding,

sum s of individual item s m ay not equal 100.

Table 3. Occupational averages: All establishments
(N um ber and a v era g e s traigh t-tim e h ou rly earnings 1 of produ ction w ork ers in se le cte d occupations in w ood household furniture (e x ce p t uph olstered) m anufacturing establishm ent, United States and selected
reg ion s, N ovem ber 1974)

O c c u p a t i o n and s e x 2

New Engla nd
H id d le A t l a n t i c
Ave ra ge
Number
Number
A ve rag e
hourly
of
of
hourly
w orkers e a r n i n g s w o r k e r s e a r n i n g s

O n it e d S t a t e s 3
Humber Avera ge
of
hourly
w o rk e rs e a r n i n g s

B o r de r S t a t e s
Southeast
S o u t h w es t
Number
Av er a ge
Number
Number Av e ra ge
A ve rag e
of
hourly
of
hourly
hourly
of
w or k e rs e a r n i n g s w o rk e rs e a r n i n g s w o r k e r s e a r n i n g s

G rea t Lakes
P a cific
Number A ve rag e
Number A ve rag e
of
of
hourly
hourly
w or k e rs e a r n i n g s w o rk e rs e a r n i n g s

Selected occupations
A s s e m b l e r s , f u r n i t u r e ( e x c e p t c h a i r s ) ..........
Hen............................................................. .................... .
Women................................................................................
Complete f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s (ca s e g o o d s ) . .
Hen.....................................................................................
Women................................................................................
C o m p l e t e f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( o t h e r than
c a s e g o o d s ) ...................................................................
Hen.....................................................................................
Women................................................................................
S u b a s s e m b l i e s .................................................................
Hen.....................................................................................
Women..............................................................................
A s s e m b l e r s , c h a i r s ..........................................................
Hen................................................ ....................................
Women................................................................................
C u t - o f f - s a w o p e r a t o r s ( 1 , 9 0 8 men, 90
women).....................................................................................
D ouble-en d -trim m in g-an d-borin g-m ach in e
o p e r a t o r s ..............................................................................
Hen.....................................................................................
Women................................................................................
G l u e r s , r o u g h s t o c k .......................................................
Hen.....................................................................................
Women..................................................................- ............
l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t i c ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) (331 men, 4 w o m e n ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
L a th e o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t i c ( f e e d o n l y )
(174 men, 86 women).....................................................
H a i n t a i n e r s , g e n e r a l u t i l i t y ( 1 , 5 1 6 men, 6
women) ...........................................................
H o l d i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) (6 53 men, 17 women) .....................
H o l d i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ( f e e d o n l y ) .......
Hen ...........................................................
Women................................................................................
O f f - b e a r e r s , m a c h i n e .....................................
Hen ...........................................................
Women........................................................
P a c k e r s , f u r n i t u r e ........................................
Hen ...........................................................
Women........................................................
P l a n e r o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) (409
men, 7 w om en ) ...............................................
P l a n e r o p e r a t o r s ( f e e d o n l y ) (124 men, 15
women ) ...........................................................
P l a s t i c - t o p i n s t a l l e r s (468 men, 17 women)
R i p - s a w o p e r a t o r s ( 2 ,2 0 1 men, 323 w o m e n ). .
See footn otes at end o f table,




16,742
9,946
6,491
6,833
4,382
2,297

$3.08
3.33
2.72
3.32
3.65
2.76

823
483
340
476
239

3, 188
2,023
1,106
6,721
3,541
3,088
1, 2 0 3
621
582

2.92
3.11
2.57
2.91
3.07
2.75
2.77
2.91
2.63

164
134
183
110
73
228
169
59

2,016

3.35

1,201
940
242
1 , 49 7
1, 21 8
266

3. 13
3. 19
2.95
2. 93
2.96
2. 83

-

$3.01
3.35
2.52
2.87
3.31
-

2,052
1,725
327
790
699
-

$3.50
3.60
2.99
3.69
3.79
-

$3.44
3.63
$3.37
3. 41
$2.59
$2 . 5 1

1,811
747

$2 .6 5
$2.72

-

-

-

-

348
716

$2.66
$2.56

5 , 88 9
3,357
2 , 53 2
2, 0 2 7
1,235
79 2

$2 .7 5
2.91
2.54
2.87
3.09
2. 52

1,380
611
769
539
252
287

$2.57
2.62
2.54
2.68
2 . 78
2.59

3,114
1,571
1,543
1,536
918
618

$3.51
3.92
3.09
3.83
4.26
3.19

1,357
1,173
184
644
584
-

$4.01
4.06
3.66
4.72
4.73
-

1,49 3
853
640
2,369
1,269
1,100
450
234
216

2.68
2.82
2.48
2.70
2.80
2. 57
2.60
2.64
2.56

275
187
88
566
172
394
79
20
59

2.41
2.37
2.50
2.55
2.65
2.51
2.25
2.17
2.28

323
204
119
1,255
449
806
61
24
-

3.51
3.90
2.86
3.11
3.22
3.05
3.78
3.83
-

226
218
487
371
116
90
-

$3.60
3.59
$3.25
3.29
3.12
3.50
-

2.68
3.01
3.22
2.41

333
251
929
775
175
117

105

3.17

298

3.42

174

2.81

662

2.92

114

2.47

239

$3 .5 1

328

$4 . 6 8

74
65

53
53

3.39
3.39
3.42
3. 4 2
-

151
119
13
213
177
23

2.73
2.80
2.42
2.66
2.71
2.40

439
369
70
616
541
75

2.95
3.00
2.67
2.68
2.70
2.55

96
61
35

112
110
-

3.12
3.24
2 .2 2
3.19
3.20
-

2.92
3.06
2.67
2.57
2.50
2.69

190
125
65
257
147
110

3.32
3.53
2.92
3.21
3.40
2.96

152
120
32
91
72
-

3.94
3. 9 2
4. 01
4.25
4.31
-

27

$4 . 0 9

9

$3.33
3.44
$3.07

3. 33

-

87
86
-

-

-

120
52
68

$2.52
2.59
2.46

99
63
36

337

3.35

!

26

$3.68

30

$3.43

37

3.26

182

3.09

-

-

-

-

265

2.94

i

21

3.02

37

3. 4 2

23

2.56

157

2.79

-

-

-

-

1,522

3.51

|
I

90

3.14

128

3.74

279

3.07

506

3.27

151

$3.34

681
372
225
141
5,919
3,824
2,005
3,675
2,5 21
1, 0 6 7

3.38
2.71
2.84
2. 52
2. 7 1
2.78
2.60
2.87
2.93
2.75

;

-

39

3. 6 0

105
78
45
27
838

3.27
2.49
2.56
2.35
2.45

316
184
117
67
3,060
1,937
1,123
1,450
1,033
417

2.98
2.59
2.62
2.53
2.50
2.51
2. 47
2.61
2 . 64
2.52

14
2C

3.05
2.79

419

3. 17

40

146
487
2,580

2.82
3.63
3. 15

-

I

j
-

198
140
58
193
166
-

142

-

$2.84
2.91
2.66
3.10
3.10
-

$3.26
-

$3.11

-

-

420
324
96
290
221
69

$3.35
3.47
2.96
3.34
3.52
2.76

32

3.40

46

$2.82

208

2.80
3.59
3.50

22

2.62
2.57
2.77

53
168
1,107

2.61
3. 54
2.81

-

-

-

-

460

$2.46
-

-

-

9
310

-

253
157
96
264
198
66

$2.58
2.57
2.59
2.61
2.56
2.76

12
-

21
127

-

$2.66
2.74

-

248

$4.06

99

$4 . 7 2

104
12

3.73
3.27

74
28
27

4. 6 6
4.C9
4. 13

438
390
48
208
175
33

$3.60
3.60
3. 61
3.64
3.57
4.C1

31

5. 3 7

319

$4.36

-

2.68

2.84

34
180
177

-

-

-

643
340
303
570
392
178

$3.10
3.19
3.00
3.42
3.51
3.24

50

-

3.38

-

288

-

$3.45

-

-

-

Table 3. Occupational averages:

All establishments— Continued

(N um ber and avera g e straigh t-tim e hourly earnings 1 of p rodu cts
reg ion s, N ovem ber 1974)

O c c u p a t i o n and s e x 2

w o rk e rs in se le cte d occu pation s in wood household furniture (e xce p t uph olstered) m anufacturing establish m en ts, United States and selected

U n it e d S t a t e s 3
New En qland
Number Avera qe
Av e ra ge
Number
of
hourly
of
hourly
w or k er s e a r n i n q s w ork ers e a r n i n q s

R o u te r o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) (929
men, 75 w om en ).................................................................
1, 01 7
$ 3 .3 9
R o u te r o p e r a t o r s ( f e e d o n l y ) (292 men, 60
women).....................................................................................
352
2.95
R u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , ha n d ..........................................
3 , 45 1
2. 7 1
H e n . ..................................................................................
1, 1 4 6
3.09
Women................................................................................
2,297
2.52
R u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h i n e ...................................
6C9
3.06
Hen.....................................................................................
469
3.15
Women. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110. . . . . . . . . 2. 8 6
.....
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , ha n d ..........................................
5, 8 0 1
2.80
Hen............................................. . . . ............................... . . .
2,017
2. 99
Women............................................................................... | 3 , 7 3 4
2.69
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h i n e ...................................
6,066
3.06
Hen....................................................................................
4,345
3. 16
Women...............................................................................
1,6 59
2. 81
B e l t .......................................................................................
4,158
3.05
Hen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. ,. 1 .8. 6. . . . . . . . . 3. 13
.. .. . .
..
Women. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .914. . . . . . . . 2 . 8 2
.....
.
O th er t ha n b e l t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,.908 . .!
... ......
3 .0 7
Hen....................................................................................
1,159 *
3.24
Women...............................................................................
745
2.80
Sh a pe r o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t i c ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) (4 76 men, 24 wome n) ..............................
509
3.37
Sha per o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t i c ( f e e d o n l y )
(155 men, 31 women) ....................................................
189
2.85
Shaper o p e r a t o r s , hand ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) (4 52 men, 67 women )..............................
525
3. 42
Sha per o p e r a t o r s , hand ( f e e d o n l y ) (157
men, 30 w om en ) ................................................................
187
3.13
S p r a y e r s ..................................................................................
3.23
6,298
Hen.....................................................................................
4,256
3.38
Women................................................................................
2.94
1,950
T e n o n e r o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e )
(912 men, 19 women)....................................................
947
3.58
Te n on er o p e r a t o r s ( f e e d o n l y ) (209 men, 55
women).....................................................................................
284
2.95
V a r i e t y - s a w o p e r a t o r s ( 1 , 1 0 2 men, 144
women)....................................................................................
3.47
1 , 26 0

50

Mid dle A t l a n t i c
Number Av e ra qe
of
hourly
w or k e rs e a r n i n q s
82

$3.33
_

168
|
I
!
!
i
!

;
j
i
I
i
|
i
:

i

|

60

I
!

3 57
94
263
370
284
86
238
172
66
132
112
20

i

3.29

i

97

2.54
2.38
2.69
2.29
2.68
-

411

$3.02
2.94
2.51
2.67
2. 45
2.89
2.94
2. 6 1 2. 55
2. 68
2.51
2.82
2.87
2.66
2.83
2.87
2.67
2.78
2.87
2.64

64

$2.83

247

$3.99

62

$4.45

18
158
43
115
-

2.53
2.56
2.52
2.57
-

47
478
216
262
81
49

3.04
3.23
3.36
3.11
3.36
3.43

19
47
47

3.68
4. 01
4.0 1

23

3.92

$2.73
2.99
-

I

78

$3.08

224

3. 16

32

2.96

79

3. 71

42

4.52

22

2.49

65

2.69

27

2.43

32

3. 1 1

29

3. 60

|

56

2.95

177

3. 15

17

2.85

68

3.38

34

4.58

1

28
84 6
-

2.65
2.87
-

91
2,493
1,659
834

2.87
2.82
2. 91
2.64

16
357
204
153

2.68
2.89
2.92
2.85

1 , 16 6
617
549

$3.65
3.92
3.35

605
547
58

$4.25
4.26
4.18

115

$3.22

341

3.21

96

2.98

161

3.75

141

4.85

2.63

99

2.68

11

2.74

34

3.15

37

4. 0 1

109

2.78

359

3.17

62

2.87

344

3.36

157

5.00

!

|

-

$3.27
!
3.48
3.07
j 3.65
3.75
■ 3.20
3.68
i
3.71
:
3.49
3.57
3.92
j
2.81
!

1

2.66

-

52

3.56

119

192
140
52

$3.35
3.53
2.88

580
505
75

$3.77
3.86
3.19

29

3.67

59

3.71

_

_

48

$3.17

|

3.72

_
165

235
101

193
1,908
534
1,374
258
223
35
2,131
573
1,558
2,760
2,041
719
1,809
1,456
353
951
585
366

i
;

12

v

$2.90
_

64

$ 3 .6 3
3.99
2.96
i
3.94
1 3.99

3

26
477
108
361
130

G reat Lakes
P a cific
Number Av era qe
Number Av erage
of
hourly
of
hourly
w or k ers e a r n i n g s work ers e a r n i n q s

|

157
102
55
67
61
6 59
319
340
418
342
76
315
271
44
103
71
32

$2.61
3.20
2.40
;
i
3.39
3.58
2.76
3.36
3.62
i
2.68
I!
3.44
3.52
|
2.99

j
|

$3.60

_

$2.76
3.48
j
2.35
3.17
3.30

108
39
28

Border S t a t e s
Southeast
So ut hw es t
Number
Averaqe
Number
Avera qe
Number
A ve rag e
of
of
hourly
hourly
of
hourly
w ork ers e a r n i n q s w o rk e rs e a r n i n g s w o rk e rs e a r n i n g s

$ 3 .7 2

|

j
!
,
|
|
j
I
!
I

j

767
164
553
835
521
_

600
420

$2.39
2.64
2.31
2.75
2.86
$2.77
2.83
-

-

-

-

-

258
60
198
253
153
100
163
91
72
90
62
28

1

5

15

-

-

$2.75
3.19
2.62
2.79
2.94
2.5?
2.74
2.99
2.43
2.86
2 .87
2.84

1,011
317
694
909
540
369
642
414
228
267
126
141

2 E x clu d es p r e m iu m pay fo r ove rtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holidays,
and late sh ifts.
3 Includes data fo r region s in addition to those shown sep arately.
T otals m ay include w o rk e rs in establishm ents fo r which separate data fo r m en and wom en
Lnavailable.
NOTE: D ashes indicate no data re p o rte d o r data that do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .




i

$3.33
3.63
3. 19
3.43
3.63
3.14
3.38
3.54
3.09
3.55
3. 9 1
3.23

558
444
114
487
441
46
357
339
18
130
102
28

3. 9 1
3. 91
2.83
2.62
3.65
3.64
3.60
4. 0 2
3.45
3. 4 1
4.13
4. 15
4.20
3.95

-

Table 4. Occupational averages: By size of community
(Number and average straight-time hourly earings 1 of production workers in selected occupations in wood household furniture (except upholstered) manufacturing establishments,
United States and selected regions, November 1974)
New England
P a cific
Southeast
S o ut hw e s t
G reat l a k e s
M id dl e A t l a n t i c
NonNon­
NonNonNonM et ro­
m etro­
m etro­
m etro­
metro­
M et ro ­
Metro­
M et ro ­
iretroM et ro­
Metro­
politan
p olitan
politan
p olitan
polita n
p olitan
politan
politan
politan
p olitan
p olita n
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
Av erage
Avera ge
Av erage
Ave ra ge
Ave ra ge
Avera ge
Avera ge
A ve rag e
Av e ra ge
Ave ra ge
Number
Ave ra ge
Av era ge
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hcurly
hourly
hcurly
of
hourly
workers e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s

U ni t e d S t a t e s 2
N o n m e tr o p o l i t a n
areas

M etrop olitan
areas
O ccup ation

Number Av era ge
hourly
of
w or k er s e a r n i n g s
A s s e m b l e r s , f u r n i t u r e ( e x c e p t c h a i r s ) ..........
Co m pl et e f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( c a s e g o o d s ) . .
Co m p l e t e f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( o t h e r than
c a s e g o o d s ) ...................................................................
S u b a s s e m b l i e s .................................................................
A s s e m b l e r s , c h a i r s ..........................................................
C u t - o f f - s a w o p e r a t o r s ..................................................
D ouble-end -trim m ing-and-borin g-m achine
o p e r a t o r s .............................................................................
G l u e r s , r ou gh s t o c k .......................................................
l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t i c ( s e t uf and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
M a i n t a i n e r s , g e n e r a l u t i l i t y .................................
M o l d i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
O f f - b e a r e r s , m a c h i n e ....................................................
P a c k e r s , f u r n i t u r e .........................................................
Rip- saw o p e r a t o r s ............................................................
Ro ute r o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) ..........
R u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , h a n d ...........................................
R u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h i n e ....................... ..
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , ha n d ...........................................
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h i n e ...................................
B e l t .......................................................................................
O th e r t han b e l t ...........................................................
Shaper o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t i c ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
Shaper o p e r a t o r s , hand ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
S p r a y e r s ..................................................................................
Te n on er o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) . . . .
V a r i e t y - s a w o p e r a t o r s ..................................................

8,603
3,716

$3.30
3. 65

8, 13 9
3 , 11 7

$2.85
2.93

$2.86
2.60

$3.18
3.51

$3.44
3.72

$3.75
3.52

1,5 42
3, 3U5
481
1, 0 4 6

3. 10
3.00
2. 80
3.69

1,646
3 , 37 6
722
970

2.74
2.82
2.76
2.98

3 .8 1
3.53
2.98
3.96

3.13
2.85
3.02
3.09

3.29
3.25
2.35
3.31

4. 33
3.76
$ 3 .7 9

482
472

3.36
3.18

719
1,0 25

2.98
2.82

3.75
3. 6 4

3.08
3. 19

2.99
2.83

90
544

3. 65
4.03

247
978

3.24
3.22

3.68

3.68
3.12

216
2, 041
1, 517
971
413
1, 02 5

3. 88
2.87
3. 08
3. 49
3.86

465
3,878
2 , 15 8
1,6 09
604
2 , 42 6
489
3, 1 6 0
3,9 43
2 , 69 5
1,248

3.15
2.63
2.72
2.95
3.07
2.63
3.01
2.67
2.94
2.93
2.95

3.50
3.32
3.67
3.98
3. 7 9
4.00
3. 26
3.40
3.47
3.35

3.55
2.82
3.04
3.07
3.23
2.65
2.80

120

2 , 64 1
2, 123
1,4 63
660

2.88
3.29
2. 95
3. 28
3. 28
3. 28

$3. 38
3.34
3.48

$2.63

2.66

$2.62
2.74

$2 .4 8
2. 5 8

$3.69
4.05

$3.32
3.55

$4.01
4. 7 2

2.75

2.47
2.58
2.55
2.52

2 .3 1
2. 4 6
$2.26

3.77
3.07

2.80
3.35

2.63
2.61
2.50
2.77

3.15
3.14
3.81
3.47

3. 6 0
3. 2 5
3. 5 0
4.68

4. 01
4 .0 3

3.18
3.01

2.83
2. 59

2.94
2.70

2.86
2. 23

3.34
3.13

3.32
3.26

3. 9 4
4 .2 5

2.82
3.77

4 . 12
3. 71

3.74
3.54

2.94
3.14

$3.37

$3.30

3.78
4.72

4. 15
3.60

4. 09
4. 7 2

3.05
2.94
3.38
3.20
3.55
3.54
3.63
3.06
3.37
3.45
3.16

4. 31
3.67
3.26
3.92
3.94

2.82
2.47
2. 55
2.74

2.88

3.43
2.67
2.80
2.95
2.97

2.52
2.89
2. 54
2.74
2.74
2.73

2. 8 3
2. 4 9
2.45
2. 4 2
2.75
2. 3 4

$4. 11
4. 23
4.19
4.12
“

3.49
2.57
2.74
3.02
3.31
2.48
2.89
2.58
3.02
3.08
2.90

$2.85
2.96
2.94 .
2.98

3.92
2.87
3.57
3.22
4.67
3. 13
3.51
3.55
3.61
3.59
3.69

3.66
3.28
3.31
3.55
3.47
3.27
3.34
3.11
3.36
3.29
3. 5 1

4. 66
3 .6 0
3. 64
4. 36
4 .4 5
4.01
3. 91
2 .8 3
3.64
3.45
4.15

2. 5 6

3.95

3.62

4. 5 2

$3 . 2 6
2.93
3.63
3.45

3.09
2.77
3.02
3.01

2.54
2 .6 9
3.04
2.50

3.57
3.90
4.03
3.36

3.27
3.48
3.64
3.36

4.58
4 .2 5
4 .8 5
5. 00

-

185

3.73

324

3.17

4.08

3.24

3.43

3. 80
3.53
3.94
3.78

331
3,565
525
543

3.20
3.01
3.28
3.07

4. 10
3.85
4. 0 5
4. 18

3. 55
3.29
3.63
3.02

4.19
3.62
3 .3 1
3.70

3 .2 8
4. 3 1
4.05
3.82

2.86

$ 4 .4 5

194
2,733
422
717

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shift!
Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.




-

$2.98
3.35

NOTE:

Dashes

2.66

-

$2.47
2 .4 7
2.45
2.54

2.99

indicate no data

$3.13
3.00
2.96
2.99

reported or data that

-

$3.57
'

do not meet publication criteria.

Table 5. Occupational averages: By size of establishment
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of production workers in selected occupations in wood household furniture (except upholstered) manufacturing establishments,
United States and selected regions, November 1974)
U n ite d S t a t e s 2

New England

M id d le A t l a n t i c

S o u th ea st

S ou th w est

250 w o rk e rs
o r m ore

O c c u p a t io n

A s s e m b le r s , f u r n i t u r e ( e x c e p t c h a i r s ) ..........
C o m p lete f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( c a s e g o o d s ) . .
C o m p lete f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( o t h e r than
c a s e g o o d s ) ...................................................................
S u b a s s e m b li e s ................................................................
A s s e m b le r s , c h a i r s .........................................................
C u t - o f f - s a w o p e r a t o r s ..................................................
E o u b le - e n d - t r im m i n g - a n d - b o r in g -m a c h i n e
o p e r a t o r s .............................................................................
G lu e r s , r o u g h s t o c k .......................................................
l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t ic ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
M a i n t a in e r s , g e n e r a l u t i l i t y ................................
H o ld in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
O f f - b e a r e r s , m a c h in e ....................................................
P a c k e r s , f u r n i t u r e .........................................................
R ip -saw o p e r a t o r s ...........................................................
R ou ter o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) ..........
R u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , h a n d ..........................................
R u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h in e ...................................
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , han d..........................................
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h i n e . . . ...........................
B e l t .......................................................................................
O th e r th a n b e l t ...........................................................
S ha per o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t ic ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
S h a per o p e r a t o r s , hand ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
S p r a y e r s ..................................................................................
T en on er o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) . . . .
V a r ie t y - s a w o p e r a t o r s ..................................................

2 50
250
250
w o rk e rs
2 0 -2 4 9 w o rk e rs
2 0 -2 4 9
2 0 -2 4 9
w o rk e rs
2 0 -2 4 9
w o rk ers
2 0 -2 4 9
w o rk e rs
o r more
w o rk e rs
o r more
w o rk e rs
w ork ers
o r more
A v era ge
A verage
Number A verage
Number
A v era ge
A v e ra ge
A v e ra ge
A vera ge
A vera ge
A vera ge
h o u r ly
of
of
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
w o rk e rs e a r n in g s w o rk e rs e a r n in g s e a r n in g s e a r n i n g s e a r n in g s e a r n in g s e a r n in g s e a r n in g s e a r n in g s

P a c ific

250
250
w o rk e rs
w o rk e rs
2C -249
2 0 -2 4 9
w ork ers
o r more w ork ers
o r m ore
A v era ge
A v era ge
A v era ge
A verage
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
e a r n i n g s e a r n i n g s e a r n in g s e a r n in g s

250
w ork ers
o r more
A verage
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

7 ,8 6 9
3 ,1 1 5

$3. 25
3. 64

8 ,8 7 3
3 ,7 1 8

$ 2 .9 3
3 .0 6

$ 3 .2 7
3 .4 7

$ 2 .6 4
2 .5 5

$ 3 . 49
3 .6 5

$ 3 .5 5
4 .0 8

$ 2 .8 4
3 .2 2

$ 2 .7 1
2 .7 2

$ 2 .4 5
2. 65

$ 2 .7 0
2.68

$ 3 .3 1
3 .4 8

$ 3 .7 8
4 .3 2

$ 3 .9 2
4 .7 4

$ 4 .3 7

1 ,5 5 5
3 , 199
731
1 ,2 6 2

3 .0 2
2 .9 9
2 . 80
3 .4 1

1 ,6 3 3
3 ,5 2 2
472
754

2 .8 2
2 .8 3
2 .7 3
3 .2 3

3 .3 0
3 .0 2
2 .9 5
3. 15

3 .7 2

3 .2 7
3 .3 8
2 .3 5
3 .2 9

4 .5 3
3 .3 5

2 .6 9
2 .7 2
2 .5 6
2 .9 7

3 .4 4
3 .0 5
3 .5 8
3 .4 4

$ 3 .6 7

3 .5 6
3 .2 0
3 .5 0
4 .7 1

$ 3 .6 9

$ 2 .4 2

3 .1 2
2 .6 2
2 .5 5
2.68

$ 3 .1 9

$ 4 .0 4

2 .6 3
2 .6 4
2.68
2.8 6

2 .2 4
2 .5 1

$ 3 .3 5

553
619

3 .2 4
2. 96

648
878

3 .0 4
2 .9 1

3 .0 1
3 . 12

3 .3 4
3 .4 7

3 .0 5
2 .7 7

$ 4 .2 0

2 .7 7
2 .5 9

3 ,0 2
2 .7 3

3 .0 8
2 .2 7

2 .8 1
2 . 7J

3 .3 7
3 .1 4

3 .2 7
3 .3 0

3 .8 6
4 .3 5

4 .3 4
4 . 10

144
596

3 .4 6
3 .6 5

193
926

3 .2 6
3 .4 2

3 .6 8
3 .2 2

2 .9 4

3 .0 5
3 .5 8

4 .9 6
4 .1 4

3 .0 9
3 .1 8

3 .1 0
3 .3 0

3 .6 9

2 .8 1
3 . 17

3 .8 6
3 .8 9

$ 4 .3 5

3 .8 9
4 .6 4

$ 4 .8 2

305
2 ,2 2 4
1 ,5 4 5
1 ,2 8 7
432
1 ,1 7 6
165
2 ,8 9 3
2 ,3 8 9
1 ,8 1 1
578

3 .2 9
2 .8 1
2 . 99
3 .2 4
3 .4 3
2 . 89
3 .3 7
2 .8 2
3 .1 6
3 . 12
3 .3 0

376
3 ,6 9 5
2 ,1 3 0
1 ,2 9 3
585
2 ,2 7 5
444
2 ,9 0 8
3 ,6 7 7
2 ,3 4 7
1 ,3 3 0

3 .4 5
2 .6 5
2 .7 8
3 .0 6
3 .3 6
2 .6 1
2 .9 5
2 .7 7
2 .9 9
3.CC
2 .9 7

3 .4 6
2 .7 5
3 .0 5
2 .9 9
3 . 18
2 .6 4
3 .4 2
2 .5 7
3 .3 4
3 .2 8
3 .4 5

$ 3 .3 5
$3. 58
$ 3 .4 0

3 .4 5
2 .9 6
3 .3 0
3 .3 1
3 .5 3
3 .4 7
3 .5 8
3 .0 2
3 .3 2
3.4 C
3 .0 3

$ 3 .9 4
3 .4 2
$ 3 .8 2
3 .9 7
$ 4 .0 9
4 .7 9
4 .8 0

2 .6 3
2 .3 9
2 .5 0
2 .6 2
2 .8 5
2 .3 3
2 .7 9
2 .5 2
2.68
2 .6 9
2 .6 5

3 .2 6
2 .5 3
2 .6 5
2 .9 1
3 .1 0
2 .5 6
2 .9 2
2 .5 7
2 .8 5
2 .8 9
2 .8 0

2. 83
2 .5 2
2 .5 1
2 .7 9
3 .0 3
$ 2 .5 7
2 .6 1
2 .5 2
2 .7 7

3 .4 3
2 .6 0
2 .6 9
2 .6 3
2 .7 8
2 .6 0
2 .7 9
2 .8 5
2 .9 0
2 .88
2 .9 1

3 .7 8
3 .0 1
3 .3 0
3 .3 2
3 .5 2
3 .1 8
3 .5 0
3 .1 8
3 .3 2
3 .2 9
3 .4 2

3 .7 0
3 .2 9
3 .5 9
3 .6 5
4 .3 9
3 .3 2
3 .3 2
3 .5 8
3 .5 8
3 .5 4
3 .6 4

4 .4 1
3 .6 0
3 .6 4
4 .4 3
4 .4 7
4 .0 6
$ 2 .7 4
3 .5 1
3 .3 5
4 . 03

5 .2 3
3 .6 2
3 .6 7
4 .2 0
$ 3 .4 8
4 .3 3
4 . 19
4 .5 2

195

3. 50

314

3 .3 0

3 .2 1

313
2 ,8 5 3
403
777

3. 59
3 .4 2
3 . 69
3 .7 1

21 2
3 ,4 4 5
544
483

3 .1 7
3 .0 8
3 .4 9
3.1C

3 .5 4
3 .2 1
3 .6 9
3 .2 6

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts,
Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.




G rea t l a k e s

-

-

-

“

3 .7 1
3 .6 1
3 .3 8
3 .6 6
NOTE:

-

-

1
!

2 .7 1

3 .5 7
-

|

-

-

$ 4 .4 4
4 .4 6
3 .8 9

3 .3 1

3 .1 5

2 .9 1

3 .7 2

3 .7 0

4 .5 0

3 .1 8
2 .7 8
3 .2 8
3 .4 1

3 .1 4
2 .8 4
3 .1 7
3 .0 2

2 .7 6
2 .7 8
2 .8 7
2 .7 2

2 .9 4
2 .9 7
3 .0 6
3 .0 4

3 .2 5
3 .5 7
3 .7 1
3 .3 3

3 .6 4
3 .7 4
3 .7 9
3 .5 0

4 .5 9
4 . 19
4 .7 0
5 .0 0

-

4 .5 5

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.

-

$ 4 .4 2
5 .0 6

Table 6. Occupational averages: By labor-management contract coverage
(N um ber and average s tra ig h t-tim e h ourly earnings 1 of production w ork ers in selected occupations in wood household furniture (except upholstered) m anufacturing esta b lish m en ts,
U nited S tates and s e le c te d re g io n s, N ovem b er 1974)
New E n gla n d

U n ite d S t a t e s 2

O c c u p a t io n

A s s e m b le r s , f u r n i t u r e ( e x c e p t c h a i r s ) ..........
C o m p le te f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( c a s e g o o d s ) . .
C om p lete f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( o t h e r th a n
c a s e g o o d s ) ............... ...................................................
S u b a s s e m b li e s ............. .........................................
A s s e m b le r s , c h a i r s .........................................................
C u t - o f f - s a w o p e r a t o r s ..................................................
D o u b l e -e n d -t r im m i n g - a n d - b o r in g -m a c h i n e
o p e r a t o r s ........................................... ..................................
G lu e r s , r o u g h s t o c k ............... .......................................
l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t ic ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
M a i n t a in e r s , g e n e r a l u t i l i t y .................................
H o ld in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
O f f - b e a r e r s , m a ch in e .....................................................
P a c k e r s , f u r n i t u r e .........................................................
B ip -s a w o p e r a t o r s ............................................................
B o u te r o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) ..........
B u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , h a n d ...........................................
B u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h in e ...................................
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , h a n d ...........................................
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h in e ...................................
B e l t ........................................................................................
O th e r th a n b e l t ............................................................
S haper o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t ic ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
S ha per o p e r a t o r s , hand ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ................................................................................
S p r a y e r s ....................................................... ..
T en on er o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) . . . .
V a r i e t y - s a w o p e r a t o r s ..................................................

None o r
H a jo r i t y c o v e r e d m in o r i t y c o v e r e d H a jo r i t y
covered
Number A v era ge
Number A v e ra g e
A v era ge
h o u r ly
of
of
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
w o r k e r s e a r n in g s w ork ers e a r n in g s e a r n in g s

H id d le A t l a n t i c

S ou th ea st

S ou th w es t

G rea t L a kes

None o r
H a jo r i t y m in o r i t y
covered
covered
A v e ra g e
A v era ge
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s e a r n i n g s

None o r
H a jo r i t y m in o r i t y
co vered
covered
A v era ge
A vera ge
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s e a r n i n g s

None o r
Ha j o r i t y m in o r i t y
covered
covered
A v era ge
A v era ge
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s e a r n i n g s

Hone o r
H a j o r i t y m in o r i t y
covered
covered
A v era ge
A v era ge
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s e a r n in g s

P a c ific
H a jo r i t y
covered
A v era ge
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

None o r
m in o r i t y
covered
A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

6 ,7 8 8
3 ,2 6 2

$ 3 .3 9
3 .5 7

9 ,9 5 4
3 ,5 7 1

$ 2 .8 7
3 .1 1

$ 2 .8 3
2 .7 1

$ 3 .2 3
3 .2 9

$ 3 .5 4
3 .7 4

$ 3 .4 2
3 .5 6

$ 2 .7 1
2 .7 2

$ 2 .7 6
2 .9 2

$2 . 6 6
2 .7 0

$ 2 .5 3
2 .6 7

$ 3 .4 2
3 .5 8

$ 3 .6 8
4 .3 6

$ 4 .5 1
5 .1 8

$ 2 .9 6
3 .2 2

818
2 ,7 0 8
227
782

3 .2 8
3 .2 2
3 . 49
3 .9 4

2 ,3 7 0
4 ,0 1 3
976
1 ,2 3 4

2 .7 9
2 .7 0
2 .6 1
2 .9 7

2 .9 9
3 .5 2
3 .2 9
3 .2 8

3 .6 6
2 .9 3
2 .7 7
3 .0 8

3 .8 0
3 .3 7
3 .4 0
3 .5 2

3 .3 1
3 .3 8
$ 3 .2 7

2 .7 1
2.68
$ 2 .9 9

2 .6 7
2 .7 0
2 .6 1
2 .9 1

$ 2 .6 5

3 .7 2
3 .1 7

$ 2 .5 7

2 .3 9
2 .4 7
2 .1 8
2 .4 6

$ 3 .6 0

3 .2 9
2 .9 8
3 .6 8
3 .3 8

3 .9 1
3 .6 6
3 .9 4
4 .8 8

3 .3 3
2 .4 8
3 .1 4
3 .4 7

397
457

3 .4 9
3 .3 4

804
1 ,0 4 0

2 .9 5
2 .7 5

3 .2 2
3 .3 8

3 .0 6
3 .0 9

3 .5 9
3 .6 0

$ 3 .1 6

2 .7 1
2 .6 7

3 .0 0
2 .68

2 .6 9
2 .7 0

2 .9 8
2 .4 7

3 .4 9
3 .3 3

3 .1 2
3 .0 1

4 .1 9
4 .5 0

3 .1 6
3 .6 7

89
508

3 .9 6
3 .9 1

248
1 ,0 1 4

3 .1 3
3 .3 1

3 .6 3
3 .2 7

3 .7 4
3 .0 6

4 . 10
3 .8 6

2 .8 4
3 .4 9

$ 3 .2 3

3 .1 1
3 .2 7

$ 3 .0 0

$ 3 .5 3

4 .2 2
3 .9 2

3 .7 1
4 .3 0

4 .0 9
4 .8 9

3 .4 1

216
1 ,7 1 5
1 ,3 4 6
815
368
724
173
1 ,4 4 8
1 ,7 9 2
1 ,1 3 7
655

3 .8 9
3 .1 3
3 .2 0
3. 67
3 .6 7
3 .0 8
3 .5 2
3 .4 3
3 .4 5
3 . 48
3 . 42

465
4 ,2 0 4
2 ,3 2 9
1 ,7 6 5
649
2 ,7 2 7
436
4 ,3 5 3
4 ,2 7 4
3 ,0 2 1
1 ,2 5 3

3 .1 4
2 .5 4
2.68
2 .9 1
3 .2 3
2 .6 1
2.88
2 .5 9
2 .8 9
2 .8 9
2.8 8

3 .5 1
2 .7 8
3 .2 3
3 .3 9
3 .6 2
2.86
2 .6 7
3 .3 3
3 .5 3
3 .6 3
3 .4 1

$ 2 .8 7
2 .9 9
2 .9 2
3 .1 9
2 .6 7
3 .1 9
2 .4 9
3 .2 9
3 .2 2
3 .4 7

3 .6 1
3 .4 5
3 .3 6
3 .5 6
3 .6 5
3 .7 3
3 .8 3
3 .5 6
3 .6 8
3 .6 4
3 .8 2

3 .5 9
3 .1 9
3 .3 0
3 .3 8
3 .4 0
3 .3 8
4 .4 6
2 .8 2
3 .5 6
3 .8 6
3 .0 1

2 .7 6
2 .3 4
2 .5 8
2 .6 9
3 .0 2
2 .4 5
2 .3 6
2 .8 2
2 .6 7
2 .7 9
2 .4 9

2 .9 9
2 .5 1
2 .6 1
2 .8 2
3 .0 2
2 .5 2
2 .9 2
2 .5 4
2 .8 3
2 .8 4
2 .8 3

$ 2 .6 0
2.6 8
2 .8 4
3 .1 0
2 .5 7
2 .6 4
2 .9 3
3 .0 1
2 .8 3

2 .8 1
2 .5 6
2 .5 8
2 .7 1
2 .7 8
2 .5 4
2 .7 9
2 .8 0
2 .7 0
2 .6 3
2 .9 0

3 .7 2
3 .1 9
3 .4 7
3 .5 7
3 .6 2
3 .3 4
3 .3 9
3 .4 8
3 .4 4
3 .4 3
3 .4 6

3 .7 8
2 .8 9
3 .3 2
3 .1 3
4 .4 3
3 .1 4
3 .0 6
3 .1 7
3 .4 2
3 .3 3
3 .7 1

5 .0 5
3 .7 9
3 .8 2
4 .5 9
5 .0 6
4 .0 1
3 .9 1
3 .6 4
4 .2 9
4 .4 1
4 .1 5

4 . 11
2 .21
2 .9 0
3 .9 5
2 .9 6
-

-

-

158

3 .8 6

351

3 .1 5

3 .9 9

3 .0 1

4 .0 0

3 .6 2

2 .7 3

3 .1 9

2 .9 3

2 .9 7

3 .7 7

3 .5 8

3 .5 6
3 .7 0
3 . 98
3 .8 5

323
4 ,0 6 4
560
595

3 .3 3
2 .9 8
3 .3 0
3 .0 6

3 .6 3
3 .5 8
3 .7 9
3 .8 2

3 .4 8
3 .2 3

3 .5 6
3 .8 2
3 .7 6
3 .7 5

4 .4 0
3 .6 6
3 .5 8
“

3 .0 1
2 .7 6
2 .8 1
3 .2 2

3 .1 7
2 .8 3
3 .2 7
3 .1 6

2 .9 5
2 .9 4
2.86
2 .6 9

2 .7 4
2 .8 7
3 .0 2
2 .9 3

3 .5 5
3 .6 5
3 .8 0
3 .3 9

3 .2 4
3 .6 5
3 .6 3
3 .2 9

4 .2 4
4 .6 3
4 .8 8
5 .2 2

-

$ 2 .2 4
2 .7 8
2 .7 8

4 .6 1

202
2 ,2 3 4
387
665

1 E xclud es p rem ium pay fo r overtim e and for w ork on w eekends, h olidays, and la te shifts,
2 Includes data for region s in addition to th ose shown sep arately.




None o r
m in o r i t y
covered
A v era ge
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

-

$ 2 .7 7

NOTE:

D ashes indicate no data rep orted o r data that do not m eet publication c r it e r ia .

$ 3 .4 4
4 .5 7




Table 7. Occupational averages: By method of wage payment
(N um ber and av e ra g e straigh t-tim e hourly eanings1 of prod u ction w o rk e rs in s e le cte d occu pation s
United States and se le cte d region s, N ovem ber 1974)

O c c u p a t io n

A s s e m b le r s , f u r n i t u r e ( e x c e p t c h a i r s ) ..........
C o m p le te f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( c a s e g o o d s ) . .
C o m p le te f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( o t h e r than
c a s e q o o d s ) ................................................................
S u b a s s e m b li e s ...............................................................
A s s e m b le r s , c h a i r s .......................................................
C u t - o f f - s a w o p e r a t o r s .................................................
Boub l e - e n d - t r i ir m in g - a n d - b o r in g - i r a c h in e
o p e r a t o r s ........................................ . . ..............................
.
G lu e r s , r o u g h s t o c k ......................................................
H a in t a in e r s , g e n e r a l u t i l i t y ................................
O f f - b e a r e r s , m a c h in e ...................................................
P a c k e r s , f u r n i t u r e ........................................................
F ip -s a w o p e r a t o r s ..........................................................
P o u te r o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) ..........
R u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , hand.........................................
R u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h in e ..................................
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , han d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h in e ..................................
B e lt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O th e r th a n b e l t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S haper o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t ic ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ............................................................................
T en on er o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) . . . .
V a r ie t y - s a w o p e r a t o r s ................................................

New E n gland
U n ite d S t a t e s 2
M id d le A t l a n t i c
T im e w o rk e rs
T im ew orkers
I n c e n t iv e w ork ers
I n c e n t i v e w o rk e rs
T im ew ork ers
I n c e n t i v e w o rk e rs
A v e ra ge
A v era ge
Number
Number A v era ge
Number
A v era ge
Number
Number
A v era ge
Number A v era g e
of
of
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
of
of
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s w o rk e rs e a r n i n g s w o rk e rs e a r n i n q s w o rk e rs
e a r n in g s
w o rk e rs
e a r n i n g s w o rk e rs
e a r n in g s w o rk e rs
1 2 ,8 4 3
5 ,0 6 8

$ 2 .9 8
3 .2 1

3 ,8 9 9
1 ,7 6 5

$ 3 .4 1
3 .6 6

649
397

$ 2 .9 2
2 .7 7

174
79

$ 3 .3 4
3 .3 8

1 ,3 5 3
595

$ 3 .4 9
3 .7 7

699
195

$ 3 .5 3
3 .4 3

2 ,4 6 1
5 ,3 1 4
S76
1 ,6 7 3

2 .8 2
2 .8 4
2 .6 4
3 .3 2

727
1 ,4 0 7
227
j
343
|

3 .2 5
3 .1 8
3 .3 6
3 .4 8

133
119
192
70

3 .2 6
3 .0 3
2 .8 2
3 .0 4

31
64
36
35

3 .6 3
3 .1 4
4 .0 2
3 .4 3

166
592
135
228

3 .3 6
3 .2 5
2 .3 3
3 .3 0

167
337
70

3 .5 2
3 .5 9
$ 3 .8 2

966
1 ,1 5 2
1 ,4 1 8
4 ,9 7 6
2 ,8 6 0
2 , 135
735
2 ,9 7 9
482
. 4 ,9 0 .6.
. . . .
4 ,9 2 9
. 3 ,3 5 2.
. . . . .
. 1. ,5. 7 7 .
. . .

3 .0 6
2 .8 2
3 .4 5
2 .6 2
2 .7 8
3 .0 9
3 .2 2
2 .6 1
2 .9 6
. 2 ..6 .7.
. .
2 .9 5
. 2 .9 .6.
. . .
. 2 .9 3 .
. . . .

3 .4 4
3 .3 1
4 .4 0
3 .2 1
3 .1 7
3 .4 7
3 .8 2
3 .3 2
3 .4 7
3 .4 7
3 .5 3
. 3 .4 6.
. . . .
. 3 .7 3.
. . . .

51
57
90
111
136
77
32
123
21
245
215
.141 .
. . .
74

2 .9 3
2 .9 8
3 .1 4
2 .5 6
2 .9 4
2 .8 1
3 .1 7
2 .5 3
3 .4 1
2 .3 7
3 .0 4
. 2 .9 9 .
. . . .
3 .1 3

55
87
57
65
18
45

$ 3 .4 1
3 .1 9
3 .4 9
3 .4 6
3 .6 2
3 .3 9

32
26
95
161
152
107
49
71

3 .0 3
2 .3 6
3 .6 4
2 .7 7
3 .3 8
3 .1 9
3 .6 7
3 .5 2

112
155
97
58

$ 3 .1 3
3 .8 7
3 .8 8
3 .8 4

457
247
198
49

$ 3 .0 2
3 .3 4
3 .4 4
2 .9 3

21
61
33
259
138
70
33
86
61
202
171
117
54

3 .9 5
3 .8 8
4 .0 3
3 .7 1
3 .2 8
3 .9 8
3 .4 9
3 .7 1
3 .9 8
3 .8 4
4 .1 1
4.C 8
4 .1 6

14
17

4 .0 5
$ 3 .7 2

13
18
116

3 .4 8
3 .1 5
3 .6 8

. . .
. . .
. . .

403
736
1,0 21

. . . .
. . . .
. . . .

3 .3 0
3 .5 6
3 .4 7

i

!i
|
|

. . . . .
. . . . .
. . . . .

235
345
104
943
815
445
282
472
127
. . . 895 .
. . .
1 ,1 3 7
. . . 806 .
. . .
. . . 331 .
. . .

. .
. . . . .
. . . . .

106
21 1
239

S outll e a s t
T im ew ork ers
I n c e n t iv e

. . . . . .
. . . .

3 .6 4
3 .6 4
3 .5 0

. . . . . .

17
11
31

w o rk e rs

438
$ 3 .3 2
A s s e m b le r s , f u r n i t u r e ( e x c e p t c h a i r s ) . . . . .
5 ,4 5 1
$ 2 .7 0
225
C o m p le te f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( c a s e g o o d s ) . .
1 ,8 0 2
2 .7 6
3 .7 2
C o m p le te f u r n i t u r e p i e c e s ( o t h e r than
c a s e g o o d s ) ...............................................................
1 ,3 9 2
2.6 6
101
2 .9 1
S u b a s s e m b li e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ,2 5 .7. . . . . . . .2. .6. 9 . . . . . . . 1 1 2 . . . . . . . . 2. .9. 0 .
. . . .
. .
. . .
. . .
A s s e m b le r s , c h a i r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .390 . . . . . . .2. .5. 6 . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . - . . .
. . .
. .
C u t - o f f - s a w o p e r a t o r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651 . . . . . . . 2 .9 2 . . . . . . . . . 11 . . . . . . .$. 3 .0 2
. . .
. . . .
. .
.
D o u b le -e n d -t r im m in g - a n d - b o r in g -m a c h in e
o p e r a t o r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .428 . . . . . . .2. .9. 3 . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . .
. .
G lu e r s , ro u g h s t o c k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607 . . . . . . .2. . . 6. 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . .
.
See fo o tn o te s end of table.

in w ood household furniture (ex cep t uph olstered) m anufacturing establish em n ts,

-

-

. . . . .

2.6 6
3 .3 6
2.86

-

S ou tltiwest
T im ew ork ers
I n c e n t i v e w o rk e rs

41
49

$ 2 .5 9
2 .8 1

533
277

$ 2 .5 4
2 .5 5

1 ,6 6 7
757

$ 3 .2 5
3 .4 1

120

2 .5 9
2 .4 7
2 .1 4
2 .4 8

155
101

2 .2 7
2 .9 4

122
788

2 .9 5
3 .1 3

. . . . . . 465
. . .

57
109

. . . . . . . 54 . . . . .
. .

76

2 .9 3
2 .5 6

-

-

42
23

132
$ 2 .9 0
2 .6 0

$ 3 .9 6
3 .8 3

1 ,4 4 7
779

-

-

-

G rea t Lakes
T im ew orkers
I n c e n t i v e w o rk e rs

847
262

. .

-

-

$ 3 .4 7

102
104

3 .0 5
3 .1 1

-

$ 3 .8 0
4 .2 3

20 1
467
60
107

3 .8 6
3 .0 6
3 .7 9
3 .5 7

88
153

3 .6 4
3 .2 8

-




Table 7. Occupational averages: By method of wage payment— Continued
(N um ber and average straight-tim e hourly earn in gs1 of production w ork ers in s ele cted occupations in wood household furniture (ex cep t upholstered) m anufacturing esta b lish m en ts,
United States and s ele cted region s, N ovem ber 1974)

Occupation
M a i n t a in e r s , g e n e r a l u t i l i t y ...........................
O f f - b e a r e r s , m a c h in e ..............................................
P a c k e r s , f u r n i t u r e ...................................................
R ip -s a w o p e r a t o r s . . . . ............................................
R o u te r o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) . . .
R u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , hand.....................................
R u b b e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h in e ...................... ..
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , hand.....................................
S a n d e r s , f u r n i t u r e , m a c h in e ....................
B e l t .................................................................................
O th e r th a n b e l t ......................................................
S h a p er o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t ic ( s e t up and
o p e r a t e ) ........................................................................
T en on er o p e r a t o r s ( s e t up and o p e r a t e ) . .
V a r i e t y - s a w o p e r a t o r s ............................................

Number
of
w ork ers

I n c e n t i v e w o rk e rs
Ave rage
hourly
earnings

Ave rage [ Numbe
hourly
of
earnings w o rk e rs

506
2 ,9 7 6
1 ,3 6 5
1,100
394
1 ,9C 4
25*1
2 ,0 7 5
2 ,6 7 1
1 ,7 4 3
S26

$ 3 .2 7
2 .5 0
2 .5 9
2 .8 0
2 .9 9
2 .5 0
2.88
2 .5 4
2 .8 1
2 .8 3
2 .7 9

221
326
330

3 .1 6
3 .2 2
3 .1 3

8a
85

$2.a2
2 .9 1

S o u th w est
T im e w o rk e rs
I n c e n t i v e w o rk e rs
T im ew ork ers
Number A v era ge Number Average
of
h ou rly
of
h ourly
w ork ers
earnings workers earnings
137
$ 3 .3 2
. 193
$ 3 . sa
152
2 .5 2
101
$2.68
397
2.88
ia8
2 .5 7
116
2.66
326
3 .2 5
97
2 .7 a
30
2 .7 3
171
3 .3 1
21
3 .0 7
2 .7 1
107
3 .5 3
133
2 .5 3
25
2.68
2ai
3 .1 1
71
3.ao
200
$2.7a
58
$ 2 .7 9
611
3 .1 5
197
2 .7 5
56
2 .9 1
a75
3 .2 1
127
2 .6 9
36
2 .9 5
398
3 .1 8
70
2 .8 7
20
2 .8 5
127
3 .2 8

Number A verage
of
hourly
workers earnings

a3

15
29

$ 3 .0 5
3 .5 5

1 E xcludes p rem ium pay for overtim e and for work on w eekends, h olidays, and
la te sh ifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown sep arately.

22

6a
52

3 .1 3
2 .9 8
2 .8 9

NOTE: D ash es

criteria.

10
32

indicate no

2 .5 9
3 .0 0

data reported

31
90
233

or data

3 .7 6
3 .7 3
3 .3 1

that do

I n c e n t i v e w o rk e rs

Number
of
55

2a6

249

117
140
237
10
400
434
294
140
48
71

111

A verage
hourly
earnings
$ 4 .8 1
3 .4 6
3 .6 6
3 .6 5
4 .3 4
3 .3 4
3 .0 9
3 .5 9
3 .6 8
3 .6 2
3 .7 9
3 .6 8
3 .7 8
3 .4 7

not m eet publication

Table 8. Occupational earnings: Arkansas
(N um ber and a vera ge straigh t-tim e earning hourly earnings 1 of w o rk e rs in se le cte d occu pation s in w ood household furniture, e xce p t u ph olstered, m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)

O ccup ation

Number
of
workers

Average
earnings 1

Num ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings ofi
$
S
1 ---- $
1 ---- ---- 1 ---- T ~
$
$
"5---- S
$
Tf~
$
$
$
S
>
T~
? ---- $
$
5
IE--- $
4.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.3o 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3,00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.60 3. 80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.,6a
and
and
under
2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 2.60 2.7p 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.60 3.80 4. 0Q 4.20 4.40 4.60 o v e r

ALL P R O D U C T I O N WO R K E R S
T I M E -----------------

5, 10 3
3,361

$
2.75
2.73

815
488
327
410
175

2.74
2.75
2.73
2.70
2.87

133
111
272
202
70
31

9
7

478
359

45
33

123
50

200
170

145
109

179
129

141
84

83
49

320
154

431
186

472
328

405
288

334
236

343
197

246
123

209
135

178
136

308
227

123
86

75
52

-

“

7?
18
54
48
~

16
16
“

26
18
8
8
2

50
44
6
18
14

13
12
1
1
~

49
44
5
37
32

19
10
9
9
~

10
10
8
“

68
22
46
51
7

78
31
47
43
-

61
4b
15
15
-

58
48
10
26
18

68
47
21
60
41

44
26
18
17
13

61
18
43
24
K

31
23
d
9
8

20
18
2
9
7

42
34
8
19
17

14
8
6
7
5

9
5
4
1
1

2.59
2.60
2.87
2.72
3.29
2.59

-

_

H

2

_

12
12

2

_

12
12

8
8
2
2

2

46
46

“

“

1

-

1

4

1

2

-

4
4
18
11
7
“

6
6
5
5

-

8
8
19
5
14
)

9
9
14
8
6
2

4

33
31
2
1

4
2
4
4

8

8

32
30
-

.

-

16
14
2
2

_

-

18
12
6
6

2
3
1
2
1

2
2
6
2
4
-

53
73
69
107

3.03
2.61
2.58
3.15

-

-

-

-

2

-

_

“

”

~

-

-

2
2
“

2
8
8
1

1
3
1
3

_

15
15
“

5
1

1
3
3
8

1
7
7
6

2

1

7

19

3

-

13
179
106
167
82
o5

3.07
2.71
2.68
2.82
2.79
2.55

2
1

3

_

_

_
-

«
-

-

9
60
47
13

2.79
2.51
2.39
2.97

47
17
108
65
176
123
S3
179
141
38
120
92
28
59
49
10

2.84
3.16
2.72
2.75
2.9*
2.93
2.65
2.80
2.81
3.1?
2.77
2.70
3.o3
3.-9
3.03
3.37

20
14

3.06
3.16

205
203

2b
17

10

8
3

8
”

-

-

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
AS S E M B L E R S * EX C E P T C H A I R S ---------t i m e --------------------------------IN C E N T I V E -------------------------C O M P L E T E P I E C E S (CASE GOODS) ----T I M E --------------------------------C O M P L E T E PI E C E S (OTHER T h *N
CA S E GOODS) ------------------ ------T I M E --------------------------------S U B A S S E M B L I E S -----------------------T I M E --------------------------------IN CE NT IV E --------------------------C U T - O F F - S A W O P E R A T O R S 2 --------------D O U B L F - E N D - T R I M M E S a ND RO P I N G
M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R S 2------------------GL UF RS , R O U G H S T OC K -----------------T I M E --------------------------------M A I N T A I N E R S , G E N E R A L U T I L I T Y 2------M O L D I N G M A CH IN E O P E R A T O R S
(SET UP AND O P E R A T E ) 2 --------------OF F- B E A R E R S , M A CH IN E ---------------T I M E --------------------------------PA CK ER S, F U R N I T U R E ------------------T I M £ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------IN CE NT IV E -------------------------PL A N E R O P E R A T O R S
(SET UP AMO O P E R A T E ) 2 --------------RIP SAW O P E R A T O R S -------------------t i m e --------------------------------I N CE NT IV E -------------------------R O U T E k OP E R A T O R S
(SET UP A NO O P E R A T E ) --- --- — ----T I M E --------------------------------RUBB ER S, FU RN I T U R E * hANf> - — — — —
TlMfc --------------------------------S A N D E R S , FU RN I T U R E , H A ND -----------TlMf --------------------------------IN CE NT IV E -------------------------SAND ER S, FU RN IT UP F, MA CH IN E -------TIME --------------------------------INCE NT IV E --------------------------B E L T ----------------------------------T I M E --------------------------------I N C E NT IV E -------------------------O T HE R THAN BELT --------------------TIME --------------------------------i n c e n t i v e -------------------------SH A P E R OP ER A T O R S , A U T O M A T I C
(SET UP AND OPERATE) --------------TI M f --------------------------------See footn otes at end o f table,




_

t.

5

1
-

16
8
7
5
2

8
a

-

2
2
~

1
“

-

5
4
9
6
1

11
6
12
12
~

13
12
3
3

2
5

-

_

-

_

_

1C
10
-

~

1
)

~

5
5
~

~

2
7
7
~

-

-

-

-

7

-

1

30
30

-

10
10
22
15
7
1
1
1
1
-

-

1

c
,
5
“

1
~

2
2

-

30
30
~

-

5
b

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

”

“

“

g

-

1
“

14
12
2
“
1
~

-

-

-

-

15
15

2

4

4

8
6

5

4
“

-

1
5
8

5
9
4
5

.
-

-

_

_

4
4
~

2
2
-

6
4
2

1

7

.

>

2
3
2
1
1
1
2
2
~

7
4
1
1
1
1

6
6
-

7
-

1
1
1
1
“

11
7
4

-

-

-

“

-

-

9

-

1
' 8
7
26

-

-

9

19

«.

8
5
16

-

_
_

_

_

31
24
10
4
6

4
3
8
4
4

14
5
7
5
2

18
12
24
8
16

1
?
2

1
3
1
2

4
3
1

3
3

1

1

6

5

-

_

2h
24
lb
13

7
3

32
30
2
2

_

2
23
IS
19

1
1
1

-

_

J

4
2
18
1«
10
7
3
21
17

6
6
7
4
3

4

_

3
2

9
9

4

13

4

6

i
3
2
1

_

5
ID
5
S
3
3
~

17
14
3
4
3
1

5
5
-

1
-

3
-

3
3

_

-

-

4
4
-

-

_

_

“

-

-

-

3
4
4
6

_

■
>

_

6
29
2
27
2

4
4
-

5
3
11
7
32
15
17
15
14
1
7
6
l
8
8
_
-

1^
16
*
4
_

4
2

2
2

7
d

1
2u
17
3
8
0
3

12
12
i
1

_

1

4
4
2
4

4
3

13
1
1
5

l
2
1
5
1
4

_
_

-

2
2
7
5
2

3
1
14
13
1

2
4
1

_
_

_

-

a
2
6
1

2

4

-

-

2

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
•
2
-

4
4
“

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

1

1
-

_

_

-

•
_
-

.
-

-

-

-

’

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

l
1

-

2

_

3

-

3
2
1
1
9
d
i
14
8
6
7
3
4
7
5
2

4
4
3
3
17
17
10
7
3
4
•3
1
6
4
2

1
1

1
1

5
2
3
12
11
1
19
13
6
17
11

1
1
1
1
7
7

7
3

2
?

4

-

-

3
2

2
2

-

2
2
-

4
1
3

-

-

5
4

2
2

-

-

“

_

-

_

1

1

-

-

-

1
1

1

1

-

1
-

_
-

1

_
_
-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

i
1

“

“

_

_

.

_

_

-

-

-

“

-

Table 8. Occupational earnings: Arkansas — Continued
(N u m ber and av era g e straigh t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs 1 of w o rk e rs in se le cte d occupations in w ood household furniture.

O ccup ation

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
e rnings1
a

------- S
$
2 .0 5 2 . 1 0

^ .0 0

$
$
2 .1 5 2 . 2 0

$

$

2 .2 5 2 .3 o

S

excep t upholstered, m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)

Number o f w o rk e rs r e ce iv in g stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings of
$
S
S
S
8
S
S
$
S
f ------- $
8
8
%
$
$
S
s
2 .4 5 2 .5 0 2 . 6 0 2 .7 0 2 . 8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0

2 .3 5 2 .4 0

under

and

2 .0 5 2 . 1 0

2 .1 5 l * 2 0
1

2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .3 5 2 . * 0

2 .4 5 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0

1
*
3 .0 0 3 . In -R.*.cy * ~ Ill 1 AA A f . dan
°v

A /VA

uu 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0

ov er

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS^-CONTINUED
SHAPER OPERATORS, HAND
(SET UP AND OPERATE)2 -------------------------SPRAYERS — — — — —
____ ____ -rm-m-r-m
TIME ———————_______ ____ _____ ___
I M r F N T T X / F ____________________________________

TENONER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE)

— ——— — — —
TJ M£ __________________________________________

VARIETY-SAW OPERATORS2 --------------------- ----------

$
11

247
169
78

55
33

45

3 .1 8
2 .9 9
2 .9 4
3 .1 0
3 .2 0
3 .1 0
2 .8 7

'
“

-

-

-

-

1
1

17
17

”
"

*

-

-

-

“

“

"

3
2
1

4
4

•

, .
r V r *
Pay 1£>r o v e r tim e
fo r w ork on w eekends, holidays, and late sh ifts.
In su fficien t data to w arra n t p u b lica tio n s o f separate earnings data by m ethod o f w age p a y-

1 fa
2




5

1

5
4

10
10

-

3

1
2
2
6

3

”
6

2
2

4

8
7
1

4

-

-

2

7

-

7

-

15
1

14

47
33
14

22
21
1

10

8
5
1

1
1
2

4

9
1

l

1
12
10
2
2
1

44

16

16
14

5

1
1

21

3

1

6

2

23

2

2
1
5

9
5
1

7
•5
5

6

2

22

1

1
1

A

5

2

-

1

2

2

2

-

_
-

-

-

Table 9. Occupational earnings: Chicago, III.1
(N um ber and a v era g e straigh t-tim e h ou rly earnings2 o f w o rk e rs in se le cte d occupations in w ood h ousehold furn itu re, excep t u p h olstered , m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Number
Occupation

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS -----------------------T I M E ------------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------

workers

4
~s—
S
5
"5--- $
~i --- "1--- "i
"5--- S
$
5
--- S
1 --- “I--- $
S
$
5
$
:
$
S
$
$
Average 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2 .40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.4o 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5 .0a
earnings2 and
and
under
2.20 2.30 2.40 2 .50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.0Q 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.0Q 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 over
2.10

$
\
1*717 3.21 |
1*437 3.17
280 3.40

36
36

59
57
2

25
23
2

73
70
3

127
108
19

191
158
33

97
68
29

56
29
27

48
26
22

_
-

8
8
*
*

14
13
1
-

32
28
4
3
-

43
36
7
31
26

21
18
3
16
13

10
6
4
5
4

2
1
1
-

54
48
6

52
44
8

40
32
8

69
60
9

49
41
8

64
55
9

65
62
3

92
78
14

100
92
8

62
37
25

31
29
2

33
28
5

46
40
6

43
26
17

22
20
2
1
1
.

9
9
1
1

8
6
2
-

18
17
1
2
2

13
12
1
12
12

3
3
-

36
28
8
32
24

28
26
2
2
2

3
3
3
3

33
33
33
33

1
1
1
1

22
1
21
1
1

16
16
8
8

-

•
-

.
-

.

_

21

6

1
1
-

1
2
_

9
-

_
•
5
5

2
3
.
-

1
.
_
.

-

1
.
1
1

-

1
.
•
-

-

19

1

-

-

-

-

_
_
8
_
8
8
8
11
11
-

_
16
16
13
12
1
13
12
1
6
3
3

•

_
_
_

342
282
60
151
131

3.27
3.22
3.50
3.36
3.41

_
-

54
137
124
13
31
8
18
15
70
64
20
16

3.76
2.98
2.96
3.10
3.64
4.23
2.66
2.68
2.83
2.84
3.09
3.08

*

_
1
1
8
8
-

8
8
“

8
8
“

_
14
13
1
3
2
2
2
8
8

_
29
28
1
1
1

12
10
2
3
1
1

1
4
4
2
-

1
4
2
2
1
-

1
1
1
•
2
-

17
4
3
1
3
-

1
7
7
-

1
7
6
1
1
-

1
15
15
1
-

1
-

_
3
3
-

_
4
4
1

-

-

20
20
-

14
11
“

5
5
1
-

4
2
1
~

1
1

1
1
-

2
1
-

1
1

_
•
1
-

•
1
-

•
.
-

-

1
25
23
2
1
3
3
5
5
-

29

3.76

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

-

2

-

1

2

-

-

1

-

-

25
76
54
58
41
17
48
33
15
84
67
17

3.05
2.90
2.96
3.50
3.41
3.70
3.66
3.62
3.74
3.67
3.72
3.48

_
16
16

_

3
3
-

_
2
2
-

1
5
5
-

5
7
17
16
1
9
8
1
1
1
*

4
2
1

2
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
-

_
1
1
2

3

1

3
2
1

2
10
2
1
1
1
1
5
4
1

4
1
1
7
6
1
7
6
1
2
2
“

7
6

5.05
3.90

“

~

.
1

■“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“
*
*

-

-

-

1
1
*
*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
“

_
"

-

-

1 The Chicago Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area, consists of Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake,
McHenry, and W ill Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3 Workers paid on a time and incentive basis were equally divided.
4 Insufficient data to warrant publication of separate earnings data by method of wage payment:




31
25
6

54
45
9

!

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
ASSEMBLERS* EXCEPT CHAIRS -----------------T IM E ------------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------COMPLETE PIECES (CASE GOODS) --------T I M E ------------------------------------------------------COMPLETE PIECES (OTHER THAN
CASE GOODS)3 -----------------------------------------SUBASSEMBLIES ---------------------------------------T IM E ------------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------CUT-OFF-SAW OPERATORS4-------------------------MAINTAINERS* GENERAL UTILITY5-----------OFF-BEARERS* MACHINE ---------------------------T I M E ------------------------------------------------------PACKERS* FURNITURE -------------------------------t i m e ------------------------------------------------------RIP SAW OPERATORS ---------------------------------T IM E ------------------------------------------------------ROUTER OPERATORS
(SFT UP AND OPERATE)5 -------------------------ROUTER OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY)5 --------------------------------------------SANDERS* FURNITURE, HAND-------------------T IM E ------------------------------------------------------SANDERS, FURNITURE, MACHINE6------------T I M E ------------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------B E L T ----------------------------------------------------------t i m e ------------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE -------------------------------------------SPRAYERS ----------------------------------------------------T IM E ------------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------TENONER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE)5 -------------------------VARIETY-SAW OPERATORS5 -------------------------- 1

,120
>120

_

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3
2
-

1

_
4
4
1

-

-

-

-

2
1

1
-

1
1

4
1
3

7
6
1

1
1

2
1
1

1

5
3
2

1
4
3
1

-

_

_
1

"

.

_

_
-

_

-

_
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
- , 13
1
”

.
“

1
1
9
9
- "
-

«
.

.
_
_

_

_
_
_
1
1
1
1
•
3
2
1
_
-

workers are paid predominantly on a time basis.
5 All timeworkers.
6 Includes workers in classification in addition to those shown separately.
7 Workers were at $5 to $ 5 .2 0 .

_
-

-

4
3
1
4
3
1
•
-

1
1
1
1
1
1

•
12
12
-

-

1
1

2

76
“

-

•

-

Table 10. Occupational earnings: Gardner, Mass.1
(N um ber and a vera ge s tra igh t-tim e h ou rly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o rk e rs in s e le cte d occupations in w ood household fu rn itu re, excep t uph olstered, m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
Number
Occupation

workers

S
i
$
$
i
S
i
S
$
S
$
S
S
$
$
$
S
$
$
S
$
J
$
S
Average
£.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2 . 3 o 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.5v 2.60 2.70 2 . 8 0 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.40 3.60 3 • 80 4.00 4.20 4 .40 4.60 4.80
earnings2 and
and
under
%

2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.*0 2.45 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.40 3*_6Q 3.80 4 i M
ALL P R O D U C T I O N W O R K E R S --------- ---t i m e

------------------------------

I N CE NT IV E ---------------------------

1*527
9B1
54 6

$
3.25
2.88
3.92

15
15

82
38
41
18

3.51
4.28
3.60
4.31

_
-

-

12
29
10
35
31
18
8

3.95
3.19
4.37
4.02
4.18
3.17
3.80

12
12
6
6

3.93
3.61
2.94
4.28

18
16

3.78
3.77

11
19
36
21
15
34
6
28

3.53
3.42
2.75
2.40
3.24
3.44
3.24
3.49

6
21
17

3.49
3.76
4.02

15
7
55

3.82
3.21
3.05
3.80
4.37
2.84
4.62
4.55
2.90

4.20 4*,4ll 4 *60 4.80

240
230
10

89
76
13

57
43
14

38
2«
10

76
57
19

45
1*
27

114
63
51

111
67
44

69
32
37

83
27
56

53
10
43

7
-

-

14
14
-

-

1
1
~

6
2
2
2

1
“

4
3
~

16
8
13
5

3
2
“

1

-

-

7

-

-

-

1
-

2
2

1

-

1
-

1
-

2
1
-

1

1
-

1
1
1
1

“

2
2
1
2
2

3
1
1
_

1
2
1
3
1

5
5
1
1

7
7
1
1

1
1

1
1

2
2

-

-

-

-

2
1
1

7
1
1

“

2
1
1
~

_
-

_

2
2

_
-

_

-

-

*
*

”

1
1

2
2

3
3

4
2

-

2
2

1
-

4
-

3
1

2
2
1

3
3
1

4
-

2
1
1

-

1
3
3

1
12
1
11

1
8
3
5

1
-

_
-

-

1
1
1

_
1
1

2
1
6
3
3
3
3
3

3
2
-

1
1
1
1
-

-

8
1
1
4
4
1
1
3
3

35
30
5

15
14
1

31
29
2

25
22
3

42
37
5

_
-

7
-

-

1
1
-

2
2
1
1

-

-

-

_
_

7

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

1
1
-

2
2

-

-

.

_

-

-

~

91
82
9

53
50
3

10
8
2

_

over

49
13
36

35
3
32

108
17
91

1
1
-

1
i
”

3
3
2
2

3 14
14
8
6

1
1

1
1
2
2
2
2

1
1
3
3
*

3
3
3
55
5
-

“

1
2
2

-

72
. 2
8
2

2
2

3
3

-

-

1
1

2
2

2
2
1

1

-

-

1

*

2
3
3

1
-

1
1
1

“

1
1

1
l
1

1
1

3
3

.
3
3

_
1
1

1
2
2

_
1
1

10 i
2
a 2

1
1
1

1
1

1
2
2

4
1
1
3
3

-

1
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
1

41
H

33

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
AS S E M B L E R S * EX CE PT C H A I R S ---------I N CE NT IV E --------------------------C O M P L E T E P I E C E S (CASE GOO^S) ----IN CE NT IV E --------------------------C O M P L E T E PI E C E S (OTHER TH A N
CASE G O O D S ) 4 *-----------------------S U B A S S E M B L I E S -----------------------INCE NT IV E --------------------------A S SE MB LE RS * C H A I R S ------------------I N C E NT IV E --------------------------C U T - O F F - S A W O P E R A T O R S --------------I N C E NT IV E --------------------------d o u b l e -e n d -t r i m m e r an d b o r i n g
M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R S 6 ------------------GL UE KS * R O U G H STOC K -----------------T I M E --------------------------------I N C E NT IV E --------------------------LA TH E OP ER A T O R S , A U T O M A T I C
(SET UP AND OPERATE) --- -----------I N CE NT IV E --------------------------L A T H E OP ER A T O R S * A U T O M A T I C
(FEED O N L Y ) 4 ------------------- ------*
M A I N T A I N E R S * G E N E R A L U T I L I T Y 9-----O F F - B E A R E R S , M A C H I N E ---- -----------T I M E --------------------------------IN C E N T I V E -------------- -----------PA CK ER S* F U R N I T U R E ------------------T I M E --------------------------------I N CE NT IV E --------------------------PLANER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND O P E R A T E ) 4 --- -----------RIP SAW O P E R A T O R S -------------------I N CE NT IV E --------------------------ROUTER OPERATORS
(SET UP 4N0 O P E R A T E ) 6 --------------R U B B ER S* FU RN IT UR E, H A N D 6-----------SAND ER S, FU RN IT UR E, H A N D -----------I N C E NT IV E --------------------------SAND ER S* F U R N IT UR E, M A C H I N E -------T I M E --------------------------------I N C E NT IV E --------------------------B E L T -----------------------------------

T I M E ------------------------------

I N C E N T I V E ----------------------- *
--OT H E R TH AN BE LT ---------------------I N C E NT IV E -------------- ------------

28
78

11
67
45

6
39
33

4 .1 2

28

_

_

_




-

_

_

_

_ ,
1

_
_

_
_
.

1
1

_

2
2
_

-

11
11
-

1
1

- 1
_

_

_

7

_

14

•

1
-

3

-

-

_
_
_
_
_

_
»

.
_

2
1
1
1
1

.

1
1

_

1
1

-

_
_

.
_
_
_
.

•
.

1
1

-

_

-

1
1

-

.

-

_
_
_

4. 37

4 .8 0

_

2
1
1
1

-

1

1
1

8
7
1

-

2
2
1
1

1
3
1

‘
See footn otes at end o f table,

_

_
-

1
2
-

_
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
-

2
3
1
1
1

3
3
-

•

•

-

-

1
1

-

1

.

1

-

-

-

-

4
4

2
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
2
2

1
1
1

1
-

8
8

3
3
5

5

5
-

_____ 1

5

5

3
3
2
2

122
101
3
3
3
13
3
13 14 26
13
26
19
8
19
8
5
7

5

7

Table 10. Occupational earnings: Gardner, Mass.1 — Continued
(Num ber and a v e ra g e straigh t-tim e h o u rly earnings* o f w o rk e rs in se le cte d occu pation s in w ood household fu rniture, e x ce p t u ph olstered, m anufacturing establish m en ts. N ovem ber 1974)
N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly
%
$
$
“5--<
t
%
$
1
r$
$
1 ---- i —
$
2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30
and
under
2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.3S 2.40 2.45 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10

—^—
Occupation

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings 2

s

earnings of
$
$
$
i
$
$
$
S
$
f
3.10 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.^0 4.60 4.80
-

and

3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80

over

SELECTED OC CU PATIONS— CONTINUED
S H A P E * OP E R A T O R S * A U T O M A T I C
(SET UP AMD O P E R A T E ) 6 --------------S P R A Y E R S -------------------------------t i m e --------------------------------IN CE NT IV E --------------------------VARIETY-SAW OPERATORS 1
17— -----------6
5
4
3
2
0

9
31
13
18
10

$
4,48
3.91
3.57
4.15
3*36

~

~

—

1 The Gardner area consists of Ashburnham, Athal, Baldwinville, Gardner, and Winchendon.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3 Workers were distributed as follows: 4 at $5 to $5.20; 2 at $ 5 .2 0 to $ 5 .4 0 ; 2 at $ 5 .4 0 to
$ 5 .6 0 ; 2 at $ 5 .6 0 to $ 5 .8 0 ; 1 at $ 5 .8 0 to $6; 1 at $6 to $6.2 0 ; and 2 at $ 6 .6 0 to $ 6 .8 0 .
4 Insufficient data to warrant publication of separate earnings data by mehtod of wage payment;
w o rk er s are paid predominantly on an incentive basis.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 4 at $5 to $5.20; and 1 at $ 5 .2 0 to $ 5 .4 0 .
6 Insufficient data to warrant publication of separate earnings data by me ht od of w a g e payment;
w o rk er s are paid predominantly on a time basis.
at $ 5 .2 0 to $5.40: and 1 at $ 5 .4 0 to
7 Workers were distributed as follows:
8 Workers were at $5 to $ 5 .2 0 .
9 A ll tim e w o r k e r s .




2
2

*
*

3

1
1

-

-

1

-

-

1

1

2

5
2

1
3
1

l

f

1
6
4
2
1

2
3

2
3

•
»
1

3

j

„

_

4
2
2

1
1

1 3
5
2
1 2
6
1

1
--1
0
1
1
1
2
1
3

Worker at $4. 80 to $5.
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $5 to $ 5 .2 0 ; and 1 at $ 5 .2 0 to $5.4 0 .
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $ 5 .4 0 to $5. 60; and 1 at $6 to $6.2 0 .
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $4. 80 to $5; 1 at $ 5 .2 0 to $ 5 .4 0 ; and 1 at $5. 80

1 Workers were distributed as follows: 5 at $4. 80 to $5; 5 at $5 to $5. 20; 4 at $5. 20 to $5. 40;
4
3 at $ 5 .4 0 to $ 5 .6 0 ; 6 at $ 5 .6 0 to $ 5 .8 0 ; 2 at $ 6 .2 0 to $ 6 .4 0 ; and 1 at $ 6 .4 0 to $ 6 .6 0 .
1 W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 1 at $ 4 .8 0 to $5; 1 at $ 5 .2 0 to $ 5 .4 0 ; and 1 at $5 .8 0
5
to $ 6 .
1 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $4. 80 to $5; and 1 at $5 .4 0 to $5. 60.
6
1 Workers paid on a time and incentive basis were equally divided.
7

Table 11. Occupational earnings: Grand Rapids, Mich.1
(N um ber and av era g e stra igh t-tim e h ou rly e a rn in g s 2 o f w o rk e rs in s e le cte d occupations in w ood household fu rn itu re, e xce p t u p h olstered , m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)

N ber
um
of
w rk
o ers

Occupation

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

3

5
Ti
3
f
$
"T
s
Tl
Average 2 .0 0 2*10 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0
h rly
ou
ea in s 2 and
rn g
unde i

2.8 2 .9 0
0
*Q
7
fa
60
Od
43
lb
14
1 1X 1X

2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2.4Q 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0
$ _
3 •33
3 •32
J * Jo

39

27
27
"

23

3 .0 0

$
3 .0 0

S
$
$
$
s
$
$
s
s
3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 •40 3 .5 0 3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 •80 3 *90 4 .0 0

s
$
S
$
4 .2 0 4 .4 o 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0
and

3 .1 0 3 .2 0

cc.

132
105
57
Xf

17
13
4
O
C

16
V
9
-a

114
92
oo

3 .1 0

140
nn
99
AI
41

3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 •5p 3*60 3 .7 0
144
92
52

136
9b
Aa
4Q

ftQ
9o
XX
O
O
70
Jc

117

10X
1
1
lb

115
no
9c
oo
CJ

3 •8Q 3 .9 0
70
cx
D
O
4
^

1

77
*7
f1

1
6

4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0 over
80

6

112
1/17
IU
c
3

f

0
0 2
7 18
2

100
90
A

1
10

42
Jr
5

5

14
14

7
7

“

“

“

5

6
1,
1

c
3

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
3*43
J
3 * -ib

«>
*6

76
14

“
“

1
1

“
”
~

“

3

2
1

~

-a
o
«
a
o

COMPLETE PIECES (OTHER THAN
41
24
17
XUJ
m . i.j
u ul

*

1IN l I 1 XVu
L N
—
•
DOUBLE-END-TPIMMER AND BORi N
G
M
ATUTM rtOFOATnOQ
C
“ Ainii>ic vrc.r\ a i u* d
*

im
- .""

24
HS
lb
7

9
7

“

1

■
*

iicuc KUUt?n o U -t
uLUtKbf Dm ir.u CTiirk'
Ln
~
~
M T T A1M
A M
CDC - /'ICM KA1 IT ILi ' T _ _ •_ _ _
l
MAilVl AlNtrfbi O I-JCLAL Ul T TTV “*“ _***” “
C C)

1

MOLDING MACHINE OPERATORS
/ CCT t|r AM ADCL ATT
Q
n
lo t 1 \J Ai'iJ Uri.Hw 1,J\
nrF-PPADC'P^.
APHTM ■•••••••••••••»
F —
U r “ D A'TtKai M
r
C
-

3 • ft

50
PACKERS* rUHMJlU^t
~~— — — — —
—— — —
— ------— —
TIME — ~— -----------— —
TM T? T ivr — — — — — — — — — —
TPMI TV
/F — —
—— —————
X» U N
N
PLANER OPERATORS
/CCT IIO Af*r ADCOa :
lot- U Am 'S Ur\“ ATCI _ _ —
H vu
TIME — — — ------- — — _
——
—
n t n c a i.i adcda Tmdc _ ____ ^
— ------_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
T IM E ------------------------— —
ROUTER OPERATORS
(DC Ur A'Nv '
I / mmmm mmmmmmm*
IMt
^
MM—M ------- M -L M
RUBBERS* FURNITURE* H .N — — — —
A O ——

1

1t

1
1

TMrCMTTWC — — — — — — — — — — —
1'NUt mI XVC — — — — — — — — — — —
uu-ju-rtra
cAMhCoc f rUK'VX lUKCt nANU — ^ u — —
I M
—
D rM JC D riiPMTTiiLf- h ai n — —a .— — —
A L K
w —
cAMncac ci il mt lUKt*
>
———
SANDERS. rUKNl Ti iuC. matm f £ — — — —
————
—
—
T I^E — — — — — — — — — — — — — —
———————— —————

1

1

ATUCD I n.An d C
—— ———————
—
U nc.K tpam “ p il t • — • — — — — — — —
•

11
1

n
u
45
34
15
60
26
34

112

6
3 •6
b

3 •95
2*67
2*61
3•
3.U3
3.2 1

0
6

3*^1
J
0*41
3*24
3• d

t1
x
1

a 7^
J* f O
L7
O•Df
3*20

1

See footn otes at end o f ta b le .

c

i

~

“
“

“

b
X
4
9
D
3
3

19

11
ft
11
5

2
2
17
1C

*
b
5
3

6

~

"
”

2

*yQ
2 .6 3

77
35
1Q

' oc
J
> 3 * 9b
5 c •36
■ a
b oJ•Jc
d *a *>o
6 0 0
8 *0o
>7
bt) o*c f
2 3 .5 0
0

1

3.7C

5

I

4
“

1
1

“
3
3

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1
i
X

14
13

3
i

5
5

3
3

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f

3
-s
J

*

2
2

1
1

"

“

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*

2
2

2
2

“
14
i /.
IH

”
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~
"

7
4
3

3
3
~
7
5

2
1
19
2
9

2

1

£

2
6 12
6 12
i
i

6

2

2 1
2 1
3
11
2 10
1 1
3
3
1 3
a

*

C

1

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t
4

3

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2
1

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“
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7
4 Kir 4 b Aw
<
+
3

4

2
2
4
1

2
2

2
2

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1
1
1
1
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3

1
1
6
1

10

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j
7
f
2
3
3
3
3

5
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1
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c
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i

1
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3

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1 b
1 £
6 19
3 1U
1
7
A

o
X
o

c
5
D

1
1
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6
6
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J
l
3

1
i7
9

10
9
9

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5

c
10
7
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6

H
1
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11

1

7

I

c
j
9
5
8
4

1
1
1
1

4

1
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12
6
5
3
7
3

1

2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

i

2
7
•1
1
1
2
1

4

1
2
1
2
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2
3

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1
1
3

1

1
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4
4

4
3

4
4

b

2

1

6

b

2

l
”

6 18
18
1
1 10

c
b

1
1

£

1

”
1
~
OrtKAiUrb 3
5
5
3

7

3 .5 3

19
1

1

i
X
i

16
4
lo

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g

3
3

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1
1
1

2
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2
2 3
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2
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.
1 2
1 2

7

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2

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5

16

SHAPER OPERATORS* HAND
lo t 1 UP ANU yrtrf# Cl




40

3
7
O

2

-a « u
o# 7rt
3 •b3
* ot
a

15

2

-a
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lB

ln
1u
6A

-a
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1
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15
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7

3# 4b

39

n
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1
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i m w xv u
ir!L v
U 1“ Ur r "ottw urc.«f* 1v Kj ~

g
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n
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2
6

2
1
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3

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1
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o
C

1
1
1

6
”*

3

2
2
1
1

1
1

2
2
1
1

6

2
2
6
6

n

4
1

l

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~

2
2

i

“
l

7

2
2

7
7

f
2
1

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1

1
1

7

fa

3
3
—

4
4

4
4

~

2

1
1

0
D
2

2

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9

7

1

6

fe

2
2
1
1
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1

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2
2
1
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3

3
l

1
1
1
1

2

3
3

1 ii
2 11

1
1
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8 11
8 d
3
7
6

9
7
7

2
1
l

6

4
5
3
i
l

4

1

4

3

1
1

3

1
1
1

2
1
1

1

X

1
1
7
1
1

■„

~
1
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“

z

z

_

_

_

Table 11. Occupational earnings: Grand Rapids, Mich.1 — Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in wood household furniture, except upholstered, manufacturing establishments, November 1974)

Occupation

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings ^

s—

s

S

$--- T

2. 0 0 2 . 1 0 2.20 2.30

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
1--- *--1--- $—
$
$
S
* S
$ $
$ £ S
S
$
$
S
$—
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.0C 3.10 3.23 3.30 3.4o 3.So 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4,00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00

and
under

2 10
•

and
2 .2 0 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3«M 3.10 3.20

3.301

3.4Q 3.50 3.60 3.70

3.90 i iim

A .
..2Q

4.40 4.60

5.00 .over

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS— CCNTINUEO
SPRAYERS
TIME

OPERATORS
» AND OPERATE) ---TIME
RIETY- ■SAW OPERATORS---TIME

$
3.18
93' 3.15

111

16
10

33
27

3.72
3.75
3.67
3.72

The G rand R apids Standard M etropolitan Statistical A rea,




c o n s ists o f Kent and Ottawa Coun-

2.40

2 E xclu des

p re m iu m

pay fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w eeken ds, h olid ays, and late sh ifts.

Table 12. Occupational eamings: Hickory-Statesville, N.C.1
(N um ber and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t- tim e h o u rly e a rn in g e 2 of w o rk e rs In s e le c te d o cc u p atio n s in wood h o u seh o ld f u r n itu r e , ex c e p t u p h o ls te re d , m a n u fa c tu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts , N o v em b e r 1974)
N um ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings of—

Occupation

Number
of
workers

A ve rag e
hourly
earnings 2

11* 4 7 5
11*248
227

$
2
2
3

'
.9 5
.9 4
.5 4

1 ---- 1---- 3 ---- 3

S

$---- S

$

$

$

S

s

S

S

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .10

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3.8 0

3 .9 0

4 .0 0

4 .10

4 .20

4 .3 0

4 .4 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .80

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .10

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7,9

3_._80_ 3 . 9 0

4 * M

4 .10

4 .2 0

4 .3 0

4 .4 0

*t§.(L over

270
265

375
367

516
504

932

1019

1128

912

882

4 17

11 15

343
334

-

12

13

5

390
27

522
515

8

880
2

631

S

880
2

911

8

10 11
8

877
858

640

932

1003
998

882

145

9
9

15
15

3
3

7
7

27

93

132

81

132
41

115
115

157

93

157

81
42
AQ
HC

S
2 .1 0

$
2 .2 0

2 .2 0

73

153

73

2 .0 0

3 ---- S

S

3 ---

t

3

3 ----

and
under
2 .1 0

ALL P R O D U C T I O N W O R K E R S -------------T I M E -------------- ----------------I N C E N T I V E -------- ------------------

1 ---2 .3 0

1 ----

$ .
4 , - 5 0'

and ’

*
1

19

9

77

63
55
29

7

9

120
115

146
131

106
95

32
29

37
18

14
8

26

15

11

3

19

6

22
17
5

28

5

20
8

20

3
3

6
2

4
-

4
-

-

-

-

4

-

*

“

1
1
1

-

4

“

**

~
4

*
**
**

6

SELECTED OCCUPA TI ON S3
AS S E M B L E R S * E X C E P T C H A I R S ---------T I M E -------------- -----------------C O M P L E T E P I E C E S (CASE GOODS) — ------TI ME " ” * *" *" w " " " * ^ " * * ^ ™ * *
C O M P L E T E P I E C E S (OTHER T H AN
C A SE GOODS) ----------------------------------------------------S U B A S S E M B L I E S ------------ -------------------------------------T I M E --------------------------------------------------------------------AS S E M B L E R S * C H A I R S
CUT-OFF-SAW OPERATORS — — — — — —
D O U B L E - E N D - T R I M M E R AND B O R I N G
M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R S ---------------------------------------GL UE RS * R O U G H STOC K — — — ——— — — —
L A T H E OP E R A T O R S * A U T O M A T I C
(SET UP AND OPERATE) --------------------------------L A T H E OP E R A T O R S , A U T O M A T I C
(FEED ONLY) — —
— — —
—
—
M A I N T A I N E R S , GE N E R A L U T I L I T Y --------------MOLDING MACHINE OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OP ERATE) --------------------------------MOLDING MACHINE OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) -------------------------------------------------------OFF-BEARERS* MACHINE — — — —
— —
PACK ER S* F U R N I T U R E — ----------------------------------PLANER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) — — —— — —
PLANER OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) — — — —
—
— — — —
RIP SAW O P E R A T O R S -------------------POUTER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OP ERATE) --------------R O UT ER O P E R A T O R S
(FEED ONLY) --------------------------t i m e --------------------------------RU BB ER S* FU R N I T U R E * HA ND ------- ---RUBB ER S* FU R N I T U R E * M A C H I N E ------—
SA NO ER S* F U R N I T U R E * HA N D ------- ---TIME — — — — —
— —
—
—
I N C E NT IV E -------------------------------------------------------SA NDERS* FU RN I T U R E . M A C H I N t ----------------B E L T -------------------------------------------------------------------------O T HE R TH A N BELT ---------------------SH A P E R OP ER A T O R S * A U T O M A T I C
(SET UP AND OPERATE) --------------S H A P E R OP ER A T O R S * A U T O M A T I C
(FEED ONLY) —
—
—
— — —
—

See footn otes at end o f ta b le .




1*148
1*10 4
474

2 .9 6
2 .9 3

27
7

142
532
111
116
65
131

3 .0 1
2 .8 7
2 .8 3
2 .6 4

“

2

-

-

•

9
9

15

3
3

5

20

15

5

10

10

5

4

20
7

5
-

-

27

46
30
*»C*I
fD f
388
53
10
206

-

70

3 .3 2

-

3 .18

-

3
59
59
19

10
33

11
23
19

2
Q
O

2

9

6

- 4

22

19

17

4

1

2

3

9

18

46

35
35

13
49
49
14

40
40

22
69

8
54

23
94

69

54

94

21
18
18

4

3

6
10

12
10

4

2

4

8
12
1

1
6

9
5

3

6

7

3

7

b

1

-

1

-

3
1

1

7

13

2
17

2

-

4

3

2
13

33

16
12

28

12

28

12

11
23
15

6
19

10
8

7

8

4
oc
CD

4
13

3

3

7

2

2

l

4

3

4

5

1

1

3

3

11

18

3

11

-

c

4

-

2

18

29

-

10
-

-

_

-

-

3 .3 4

-

-

-

.

.

-

-

2

4

3

-

2 .8 5
2 .6 1

22

12

“
28

2
31

2
79

6

1
154

5

3

3

121

15

5

12

16

16

21

47

79

37
24

2
9

2 .7 0

1
112
63

23

16

9

2

-

1

2

7

7

1

11

3

3

5

3

7

11

10

34

1
39

1
35

1
26

14

2

10

5

14

7

4

3

11

4

2

11

4

2

*

2
-

1
5

-

-

4

“

-

-

1

”

14

“

-

2

“

•

“

2

-

-

-

1

~

4

5

-

2

4

1

1

1

1

2

1

-

-

-

“

•

~

~

”

3

-

-

*

“

“

1
22
22

“

*

“
“
~

*

“

9

3 .0 7

50b

2 .7 0

143
646

3 .0 0
2 .5 8

O C2.

5

-

2

1

1
1

2 .9 2

36

3 .3 1

-

1

2 .9 o

3 .3 2
3 .0 4
3 .13

137
49
2

-

17
729
430
299

A
IH

43
A1

46

53

10

3 .1 1
3 .13

-

3 .0 7

OC7

91
ft 1
t !

41
25

DJ

3 .3 0
2 .7 8
3 .2 9

80
71

73

41

31

5

2 .9 2

42
104

30
30

-

3 .16
3 .2 4

134
134

2

3 .0 3

2

500

92
92

-

5

-

-

2

5

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

58
-

27

66
66

27

1

2

1

2
33

40
1
78

-

4
4
53

10

8

10
30

8

115

62

16
104

16

15

”

8

2

2

2

1

4

*
*

2

1

1
1

*
*

*
“
“

4

2

5

2

10

6

2

18

12

1

2
4

2

12

-

-

-

“

“

12
•

b

10
2
62
36

14
4
134

11
1
63

101

42

1
37
29

46

-

-

1

-

1

2

2

2

1

2

-

9
9

“

1

8

1

“

•

”

15

22
24

21

“

-

b

85

23

“

-

24

51
34

16

-

2

24

24

-

2

5

20
12

45

3

2

3

-

58

26

7

14
14

2
1

-

22
36

23

8

73

13

3
17

-

19

_

8

3

42
18
24

-

5

•

3

3
45

100
4

-

-

3

8

12

73

11

2

117
117

78
-

5

1

6
97
97
-

5
5
-

3

**
•

1
3
52
46

1

*
*
2

-

-

w

-

-

-

15
6

9
7

1
1

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

1

26

33

21

8

6.

9

2

-

4

8

7

-

3

7

1

-

1

1
1

2

2

”

~
“

“

”

“

1
4

2
~

“
“

“

“

~

“

“

"

“
“

“
“

"
“

Table 12. Occupational earnings: Hickory-Statesvllle, N.C.1— Continued
(N um ber and a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 2 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o cc u p atio n s in wood h o u seh o ld f u r n itu r e , e x c e p t u p h o ls te re d , m a n u fa c tu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts , N o v em b e r 1974)
N um ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings o f—

J--- "5--- t --5
--- - --- -

---

--- "5- T T

S

$

S

S

S

S

i

$

s

S

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .7 0

2.80

$

2.20

2.60

S

2 .10

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 .9 0

4 .0 0

4 .1 0

4 .2 0

4 .3 0

4 .4 0

4 .5 0 ,

2.10

2 .20

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 * 7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3«8Q

3 .9 0

4 .0 0

4 .1 0

4 .2 0

4 .3 0

4 .4 0

4 * 5 0

over

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

5

8
8

"1

Occupation

N u m b er

o
f

w orkers

A v era g e

2 .00

h o u rly
ea rn in g s

2

^ --- S

1

1

1

--- S

1

and
.under

and .

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS--CONTINUED
SHAPER OPERATORS* HAND
(SET UP AND O P ER AT E)--------- ---SPRAYERS — — — —
—
— — —

$
38

3 .5 6

54 0

3 .0 7

t i m e -------------------- ------------— ------------------

5 3 2

TENONER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -------------------- -----TENONER OPERATORS

58

2 .8 3

-

1

-

-

1

12
12

30

4 7

5 9

6 2

3 .4 0

pA
C0

17

VARIETY-SAW OPERATORS --------------— -------T I M E ------------------------ ------------------------------

3 .0 5

97

3 .3 8

81

3 .2 3

5

17

30

4 7

4

5

-

2

.

-

_

_

2

2

5 9

2

2

6

6

7
7

9
9

5 6

6 2

2
101
101

1

4

12

8

1

2
11
11

1

O
c
5

5

5
5

4

5 6

2
60
60

7
7

5
21
21
5

6
6

2

6

1

2
1
1

12

.

_

_

•

•
•

-

-

-

2 9

12

1

7

8

6

_

_

•

-

-

-

-

14

3

1

_

-

.

.

1

1
1

12

3

3
3

5

14

16

2
1

‘
1 The H ick ory — S ta te sv ille a re a co n s ists o f Burke, Caldw ell, Catawba, and I r e d e ll Counties,
2 E x clu d es p rem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eekends, h olid a ys, and late shifts.




-

_

2 9

E xcep t w here in dica ted , all o r n ea rly all w o rk e rs w e re tim e rated.

4

Table 13. Occupational earnings: Indiana
(N um ber and a v era g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u r ly earnings 1 o f w o rk e rs in s e le cte d occupations in w ood h ousehold furniture, excep t u ph olstered, m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)

Number
o
f
wres
okr

Occupation

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS -----------T I M E ---------------------------INCENTIVE ----------------------

Number
~S--- 1 --- S
r
s—
S
$
$
S
Average
2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2 . 8 0 2.90 3.00
h u l TTrwIor 2.30
ory
erig 1
anns
%
2.30 under
2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2 ,8 Q 2,90 3.00 3.10

9.242
4.326
4.916

$
3.52
i.29
3.73

1.521
458
1.063
920
198
722

71
28
43

90
30
60

3.76
3.22
3.99
4.09
3.31
4.31

25
25

15

16

-

-

15
5
.
5

16
•

51
44
550
253
297
98
to
52

4.26
4.50
3.16
3.17
3.15
3.50
3.45
3.56

-

_
-

113
63
158

122

77
45

108
67
41

183
125
58

9
9

27
15

365

760
572
188

468
320
148

573
224
349

70
47
23
40
27
13

94
52
42
41

55
29
26
21
11
10

59
14
45
24
24

7
23
13

1
1

1
1

-

53
44
9
5

.

-

5

-

23
9
-

31
3
29
5

218

147

of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
-5--- s
S
S
1 --- $
r$—
S
1 --- s
$
S
"5--- 1 ---$
S
$
3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.40 5.8o
and
3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3,60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00. 4,20 4,40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.40 5.80 over
463 952
158 406
305 546

907
350
557

897
449
448

269
136
133
119

116

134
62
72
94
62
32

514
297
217

645
333
312

399
234
165

327
134
193

165
39
126

241
94
147

138
37

56

43
13
30
37

70

14

26

35

1

12

101

126
37
89

103
28
75

134
23

23
_
23
23
23

6

42

6

3

42
42

3

42

18
18
15
15

_
_
.

•
3

1

.

3
-

-

•

•

.

7
7
3
3

3
3
-

-

.
.

•
_

_

-

•
-

60
11

49

111

98

311
13
298

9

138

120
22

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
assemblers.

EXCEPT CHAIRS --------TIME
-------------------------INCENTIVE ---------------------COMPLETE PIECES (CASE GOODS) ----T I M E ---------------------------INCENTIVE------------------ ---COMPLETE PIECES (OTHER THAN
CASE GOODS) --------------------INCENTIVE ---------------------SUBASSEMBLIES ------------- ------T I M E ---------------------------INCENTIVE ---------------------CUT-OFF-SAW OPERATORS ------------T lnt
1 T MC
-**"’
i
’ ******-**
INCENTIVE ---------------------DOUBLE-END-TRIMMER AND BORING
MACHINE OPERATORS ---------------INCENTIVE ---------------------GLUERS. ROUGH STOCK --------------INCENTIVE
MAINTAINERS. GENERAL UTILITY------T I M E ------------ --------------INCENTIVE ------------- --------MOLDING MACHINE OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) — — ------- —
INCENTIVE ---------------------FF-BEARERS. M A CH IN E--------- ----INCENTIVE ------- ---------- ----PACKERS. FURNITURE ------ ----— ---TIME
INCENTIVE ------------------------------------------------ —
PLANER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE ) 4 ------------------------ — RIP SAW OPERATORS4 -------------- — ------- — --------ROUTER OPERATORS
(SET UR AND OPERATE) ------------t i m e ---------------------------INCENTIVE ----------------------ROUTER OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY ) 5 --------- ------------RUBBERS. FURNITURE. HAND -----------------------T TMF
INCENTIVE -----------------------------------------------------RUBBERS. FURNITURE. MACHINE —
—
time

—

—

—

—

— —

—

—

INCENTIVE ----------------------------------------------------SANDERS. FURNITURE. HAND -----------------------TI ME

S ee fo o tn o tes a t end of table,




1

1

-

24
24
-

12

2

4
4
-

-

_

-

-

-

2

-

23

.

16
16
-

.

_

.

3.48
3.75
3.27
•3.43
4.11
3.52
4.85

.
.
-

5
5
.
_
-

1
1
1
1

3.60
3.84
3.32
2.92
3.53
3.46

“

3.67

1

2

6

4

3

7

.

.

-

•

•

140

3.51
3.57

-

1

2

4

3

-

176
52
124

4.09
3.30
4.4 2

.
-

-

-

•

-

-

—

-

-

8

1

6

10

2.81
3.45
3.24
3.59
3.33
3.37
3.04
3.45

-

3

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

—

14
-

12

-

-

-

-

•
-

4
15

-

-

-

-

-

101

119
66

53
61
19
245
84
161
303
117
186
21

242
99
143
78
69
9
509
219
290

_
1

10

-

10

11
11
2

“
_
6

O 1o
Jo 1 J

11
12
2
c

1
1

_
-

1
1
10

1
1

2

19
1C
T
ID
4
11

.

10

3
3
28
1A
lo
10

23
1A
1©

O

,

3

10
8
2
2

5
4
7

-

3

13

3
3

6

1

1

1
6
2

11
3

8

32

4
62

150
115
35
27

9
9
41
16
25
5

21

4
4
19
1

18
1
1

9

-

18

1

3
3

6
6

16
16

4
4
4
3

8
8
11
8

3

1

18
c
3
13
23

4
38
1Q
19
16

7
7
33
33
1
1

3
3
24
8

32
34
52
32
20

3
3
11

-

11

7
3
5
4
5
5

4
4
-

10

1
1
21
11
1J

1
1
2

1
1

65

22

19
3

8

7
3

12

44
33
10

26

23

.
-

2
21
22
1“

2
2

_

2

11

3

4
3

8

8

5

2

3

•

•

1

-

.

7

4

2

8

1

1

14

6

15

25

14

8

13

-

6

•
-

-

-

-

1

19
19

18

51

1

5

1

32

19

15
12

14
-

9

71
41
30

6

•

4

2

-

-

8
-

8

-

3
71

2

1

14

47

14

10
4

57

30
28

1
1

2

-

>

2

27

•

7

33

20

7

33

-

.
3
.
3

-

_
_
.
.

6

6

_
7

3
3
3

7

3

3

60

14

1
1

11
2

5

3

_
_

•
»

9
5

8

14

5
5

1
1

8

1
1

5

1
10

_

_

4

4

-

11
11

11

1

8

7
5
5

7

11

-

25

8

_
_
.

9

13

9
3

2
2

.
3

32

-

12

1

1
1
1
1

•

.

6
1

7

3
3

1

2

5

.

5

-

11
1
10

16

26

1

2
2

5
4

n

10

11
2
1

1

5
9

13

1
2
1

5
5
3
3

23
17

7

3

5
4
5
5

7

28

_
.
7
_
7
_

4

6
6

•

35
28
_

_
_
13

1
1

1

4
16

e
©

1
12

-

1
1
8
8

26

2

10

7

23

cc
33

10

10

14
13

18
3

4

•a
©

15
5

13

4

1

5

4

12

58
55
7
48

10

-

10

6
2

3
_
5

1A

3
3

11

23

-

-

9
9

2

13

A
V

2

66

98

66

2

-

-

o
c
•

20
2

96

6

5

1

2

34
14

20

32

-

-

1
1

33
18
15

85
63
63

3

-

3.00

3.79

7
7
-

8

33

86
1

-

6

8

7

18

4

3

-

—

-

18
41
41

4

3

1

8

8

3

1

11

8

3

11
-

11

4
4

'

7

3

2
_

2

1

13

2

3

3

1

1
12

2

3

3

•

_

10

1
12

•

1

-

-

•

1

•

1

•
•

•
-

5

10

9
3

-

—

-

1

-

-

-

43

20

17

7

9

3 f 6

42

33

20

14

7

3
6

3

f

*

1

. .

1
1
3

15
15
•
.
_
16
16

1

_

_

327

•
•

27

•

-

-

-

-

.

6

•

.

6

9
9
.
.
.

•

3

4

_

-

76

3

1

-

_

2

5

9
9
-

_

2

-

9 2138
- 129
•
- 129

-

-

58
16

-

-

-

15
•

15

•
•
-

▼

•

-

3

9

28

-

3

9

28

Table 13. Occupational earnings: Indiana — Continued
(N um ber and a vera ge s tr a ig h t-tim e hourly earnings 1 o f w o rk e rs in s e le cte d occu pation s in w ood household fu rn itu re, excep t uph olstered, m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)

oj

Number of w orkers receiv in g stra ig h t-tim e hourly earnings of—
S
%
S
S
$
$
$
—
S
S
S
S
$
$
$
"
S
$
$
3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.4o 3.50 3.60 3.7o 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.40 5.80
o
t
*
f

©
o
ro

S
i
S
$
$
S
Average
2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.60
hourly
earnings 1 Under and
$
2.30 under
2.40 2.50 2.6 0 2.70 2.80 2.90

w

Occupation

Number
of
workers

and
3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.40 5.80

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS— CONTINUED

10

01

SANDERS* FURNITURE, MACHINE ------T I M E -----------------------------INCENTIVE -----------------------B E L T -------------------------------T I M E -----------------------------INCENTIVE -----------------------OTHER THAN BELT -------------------INCENTIVE -----------------------SHAPER OPERATORS. AUTOMATIC
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -------------INCENTIVE -----------------------SHAPER OPERATORS. HAND
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -------------TTMF
INCENTIVE ------------------- ----SPRAYERS ----------------------------t i m e -----------------------------INCENTIVE --------------- -------TEN0NER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) --- ----------T I M E -----------------------------INCENTIVE ------------- ----------VARIETY-SAW OPERATORS — — ---------T I M E ---- ------- -«*--------- - - - - INCENTIVE -------------------------

530
232
298
353
134
219
177
79

$
3.40
3.20
3.56
3.41
3.12
3.59
3.39
3.50

46
32

3.58
3.63

-

37
18
19
651
285
366

3.51
3.42
3.60
3.69
3.40
3.92

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

.

8
8

,1

.
5

-

1

_
13
13
-

_
50
27
23

79
30
49
126
33
93

3.65
3.53
3.73
3.38
3.05
3.50

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

3

-

1
1

-

1

11

20

17

il
9

10

1
2
2

-

-

1

-

11
8

9

22

8
1
8
8

16

-

6
11
8

11

27
14
13
19
14
5
S

3

8
8

46
30
16
43
30
13
3
3

-

-

-

1
1

3

-

-

1

2

-

11

2

-

9
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

3

1
'

11

3
3

1

4
7

32
4
28
20

-

59
24
35
37
6

31

53
16
37
52
16
36

45
23
38
18
20

8

29
3

68

20
20

20
12
8

22

4

1
1

30
3

3

3
3

2
2

4
4

3
3

8
8

2

-

-

8

37
27
10

37
26
11
8
_

_
_

22

16
6
16
10
6
6

14
3

10

1

1

14

2

1

8

1

1

8
6

2

30

73

6

20

8

24

53

116
45
71

44
31
13

1

1

-

—

5
4

_

2

40
16
24

7

-

23

12
2
10
10
2
8
2
2

_
_
2
1
1

15

71
57
14
5
5

8

9

2

1
8
11

23
13

7
5

1
12

2

10

2

18

12

5

18

13
3
10

9

3
3

5

3

6

6

3
3

6

5

5
3

5

3

3

2
2

1
1

2
2

_

2
2

13

12
12

2
11
11
2

12

9

2

7
4
3

6

12

_

_

2

2

2

2

14

15
IS

25
24

2

_

2
2

12
1
11

3

_

6
8

2

1
1
10

9

1

5

-

_

4

4

4

4

3
5

5

4

4

4

4

5

1

6

_

-

3
.
3
3
_
3

12

.

_

12
6

.

6
6
6

_

_

3
3

1
1

_

_

_

«
,

_

_

.

_
27

30

•

27

30

_
_

9
9

.

•

4
4

4

1

.

4

_

_

_

2

1
1

.

_

_

2

1

*
*

'

E xclud es prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on w eekends, h olid ays, and late sh ifts.
2 W orkers w ere d istrib u ted as follow s: 9 at $ 6 .2 0 to $ 6 .6 0 ; and 129 at $ 7 .4 0 to $ 7 . 8 0 .
3 W orkers w ere at $ 7 .4 0 to $ 7 .8 0 .
4 In su fficien t data to w arrant publication of sep arate earnings data by m ethod of w age paym ent




47
18
29
27
18
9

w ork ers are paid predom inantly on a tim e b a sis.
5 Insu fficien t data to w arrant publication of sep a ra te earnings data by method of Wage payment;
w ork ers are predom inantly on an in centive b a sis.

Table 14. Occupational earnings: Jamestown, N.Y.1
(N um ber and a v era g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o rk e rs in se le cte d occupations in w ood h ousehold fu rniture, excep t u p h o lste re d , m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem b er 1974)

Number

Average

workers

earnings7

3 ------- S

S

2.00 2 . 1 0

and
under

and

2 .10

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS ------------T I M E -----------------------------INCENTIVE -------------------------------------------------

2.20

11

$
1 ,0 6 0

401
659

Number of w orkers receiv in g stra ig h t-tim e hourly earnings of—
s —
S
S
T — S
S
S
S
S
$
S
S
S
S
S
s
$
*
S
S
"5--2,30 2.40 2.50 2.6 0 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.50

S

2.20

2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00

2 .88

5

42
40

52
41

3.49

6

2

11

32
27
5

3.35
2.81
3.58
3.34
3.79
3.39
3.50
3.07
3.28
3.22
3.45

-

9
9

-

-

3.26

41
19

53

22

31

3

5
4

22

73
37
36

58
20

38

57
19
38

48
18
30

7
4

3.10 3,20 3.30 3,4 q 3,50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.5Q

47
13
34

39
16
23

38
14
24

57
39
18

49
9
40

45
7
30

33
5
28

40
14
26

44
9
35

6
2

8
8
.

5
_
5

11
•
11

3
3

9
9

8
2
6
2

2
2
•
_

2
2
•
-

6
6
.
.

-

-

1

1

29

17
3
14

62
5
57

3

4

4

3

4

25
3
22

14

2

3

2

2

3

2
_

«.

2
2

3

5
17

10
10

6

15

31
4
27

22

23

over

1

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
ASSEMBLERS* EXCEPT CHAIRS 3------------------t i m e ------------------------------------------------------------

INCENTIVE ------------------------------------------------COMPLETE PIECES (CASE GOODS) ---------INCENTIVE ------------------------------------------------SUBASSEMBLIES -------------------------------------------INCENTIVE ------------------------------------------------CUT-OFF-SAW OPERATORS ----------------------------INCENTIVE ------------------------------------------------GLUERS* ROUGH STOCK --------------------------------INCENTIVE ------------------------------------------------LATHE OPERATORS, AUTOMATIC
(SET UP AND OPERATE) ----------------------------INCENTIVE — — — —
— —
—
MAINTAINERS, GENERAL UTILITY 5-----------MOLDING MACHINE OPERATORS!
(SET UP AND OPERATE) — — —
— —

TNiTENTTVE — — — — — — — — — — —
— — — — — — — — — — —

OFF-BEARERS, MACHINE ------------------------------INCENTIVE ------------------------------------------------PACKERS, FURNITURE ----------------------------------INCENTIVE ------------------------------------------------PLANER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE ) 7-------------RIP SAW OPERATORS ------------------INCENTIVE ------------------------RUBBERS, FURNITURE, HAND:
T I M E -----------------------------RUBBERS, FURNITURE, MACHlNt ----- —
INCENTIVE ------------------------SANDERS, FURNITURE, HAND ----------in c e n t iv e ------------------------SANDERS, FURNITURE, MACHINE ------T T M F ___________ -----_____ ------INCENTIVE ------------------------B E L T --------------------------------TIME — -------— --- - - - - - - - - - - - INCENTIVE ------------------------OTHER THAN BELT 10— — — — — — — —
SHAPER OPERATORS, HAND
(SET UP AND OPERATE ) 11 -------------SPRAYERS ----------------------------TTMF —

—

— —
—

—

— — — —

—

INCENTIVE -----------------------TENONER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -------------INCENTIVE ------------------------

See footn otes at end o f table,




137
41
96
57
29
72
62
19
14
14
11

-

9

-

-

-

-

3

-

3

-

-

3
-

3
3

-

1
5
1
1
1

9
5
4
-

6

5

5

-

1
3

5
2
2

3
2
-

7
2

5
3
1

3

3
-

6

3

3

5

3

3

4
1
1

1
2
2
2
2

3
2
2
-

3
2
.
_

3
1
1
1

3
1
1
1
1

1
1

1

5

9

3.55
3.78

26

3 .2 6

_

-

_

_

1

_

_

1

1

1

10
8

-

9

3
-

4
3
-

11
7

37
18

4.36
4.51
3.04
3.30
2.87
3.30

2
2

1
1

3
3
3

5
5
3

2

8
2
1
1

1

1

6
6
1
1

2

9
34
24

3.69
3.59
3.90

-

-

-

1
1

1
3
1

8

-

-

_

•

2
2

1
1
1

1
1

2
2

1
1
l

39

2.59
3.54
3.48
3.03
3.42
3.17
2.65
3.40
3.25
2.75
3.38

10

2.80

6

3.70
3.53
3.30
3.60

85
62

30
28
27
13
59
18
41
49
10

56
13

43
11

9

4.U7
4.26

4

-

6
-

3

-

-

-

-

1
1

4
1

-

3
-

1
1
1

1

-

-

-

2
2

1
1
3
1

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

3
3

2
2

3

3
3

4

-

-

3

-

2

2

-

2

»

-

4

8
2
, 3

2

4
4

3
3

2
2

3

2

1

-

1

_

9
6
3

3

7

1
4

1
2
2
3
3

4

_
.
_

4
3

_

1
2
2
2
2
1
1

6
6

_

_
_

-

_

«
1
1

1
5

3

-

-

5

1
1
3

-

_

9

1

1

1
1

4

2
2

.
2

3

-

8
2

6

~

l
1

4
4

4
4

3
3
3

2
2
1
1

2
2
2
2

1
1

2
2

_

_
-

1
2
2

_

2

1
1

-

_
_
1
1

_
_
1
3
1

1
2

_
_

-

-

_
-

5
2

4

4

1

1

3

2

4
2

4

4
4

_
3
C

1
1

1
1

1
1

2

4

1

2

I

-

1

5

2

2

2

2
2

2
2

1

-

“

-

63

_

1
1
1

I

I

3
3

1

1

1
1

1
1

1

_

_

_

1
1
1
1
3

1
1

2
2

-

4

]

2
2

•
-

1

1
1

4
3

2

-

4

3
3

2
2

_
-

4
4

3
3

4

3

3

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

2

6

6
3

2

1

-

3

1

2

3

2

1

.

3

_

.

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

_

3

1
1

_

_

81
9b

_

_

1

1

1

_

4

_

1
1

_

1
1
1

2

_
•

2

1
1

2

1

3
5
5

_

1
1
1

1

2

1

_
2
2

_
_
3

3

I

1

_

_
-

3

1

1
1

1
1

.

3

-

-

1
1
1

3

~

1
1

1
1
1

4

1
1

-

-

1

1

1
1

“

-

.

1

-

1
1

-

3

I

“

1
1

4
3
4

1

I
I

_
_

4

3

1
1
3
3

I
1

1

1

4

1

A
A

I
1
2
2
I

_
_

_

_

_

1

2
1
1
2
1
1

2

3

2

_

2
2

3

7
7
2

1

6
6

_
3

. 3
2

2
1

_
4

-

1

1
5

2

1

1

5

4

2

1

4

2
2

1
1

1
1

-

13 2

-

2

-

_

-

-

_

12 1
5
1

Table 14. Occupational earnings: Jamestown, N.Y.1— Continued
(N um ber and av era g e s tr a ig h t-tim e hourly e a rn in g s 2 o f w o rk e rs in s e le cte d occu pation s in w ood household fu rn itu re, e xce p t u p h o lste re d , m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)

io
's i

1 The Jam estow n a re c o n s is t s o f Chautauqua County.
E x clu d es p rem iu m pay fo r o v ertim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holid ays and late shifts.
3 Inclu des w o r k e r s in c la s s ific a tio n in addition to those shown sep arately.
4 W o r k e r s w e re d istrib u te d as fo llo w s : 2 at $ 4 .5 0 to $ 4 .6 0 ; and 1 at $ 5 .4 0 to $ 5 .5 0 .
5 A ll tim e w o r k e r s .
6 W o r k e r s w e re d istrib u te d as fo llo w s: 1 at $ 4 .5 0 to $ 4 .6 0 ; 1 at $ 5 .6 0 to $ 5 .7 0 ; and 1 at $ 6 .7 0
to $ 6. 80.
7 A ll in cen tive w o r k e r s .
2




8 W o rk e r at $ 5 . 50 to $ 5 . 60.
9 W ork ers w e re distribu ted as fo llo w s : 3 at $ 4 .5 0 to $ 4 .6 0 ; 1 at $ 5 .1 0 to $ 5 .2 0 ; 1 at $ 5 .2 0
to $ 5 .3 0 ; and 1 at $ 5 .9 0 to $6 .
10
In su fficien t data to w arrant p ub lication of separate earnings data by m ethod of wage paym ent;
w o rk e rs a re paid predom in an tly on a tim e b a s is .
1 1 W o rk e rs paid on a tim e and in cen tive b a s is w ere equally divided.
12 W o rk e r at $ 4 . 60 to $4 . 70.
3
13 W ork e rs w e re distribu ted as fo llo w s : 1 at $5 to $ 5 . 10; and 1 at $ 5 .6 0 to $ 5 .7 0 .

Table 15. Occupational earnings: Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.1
(N um ber and a vera ge s tra igh t-tim e h o u rly e a r n in g s 2 of w o rk e rs in s e le cte d occupations in w ood household fu rn itu re, excep t uph olstered, m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)
Num ber o f w ork ers re c e iv in g stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings of—
O ccupation

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS -------------

Average

r_ ---------

1 ---------

workers

earnings 2

i

%

$

$

$

$

$

5

S

$

S

%

$

S

S

$

$

S

$

2.00

2.10

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2 .6 0

2.7 o

2.80

2.90

3 .0 0

3.20

3 .40

3.6 0

3 .80

4 .00

4 .2 0

4.4U

4 .60

4 .80

5 .0 0

5.2 0

5.4 0

5 .60

5 .80

6.00

2.10

Number

2 .20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2 .60

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .90

3.00

3 .2 0

3.40

3 .60

3 .80

4 .00

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4.80

5.00

5 .20

5.4 0

5.60

5 .8 0

6.00

over

128

150

29

78

24

85

105

330

18
-

_

66

-

*66

--- S

---

$

and
under

and

5 .9 4 4

$
3,4 2

87 2

201

300

194

187

278

178

194

77

103

301

232

482

250

301

352

348

165

736
248

3.4 6
4 .1 3

48
-

16
-

69
24

29
-

16

45
24

18
12

27

15
-

3
-

54

41
-

45
19

56

37

47

61

25

•

.

.

_

-

l

13

26

25

6

25

-

-

-

-

-

173
315

3 .52

7
41
7
f

-

21
24

11
18

9

-

-

21

6

7
8

1
2

8
18

1
42

20

6

1
25

5

16

6

49
6

126

-

2
6
17

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
ASSEMBLERS* EXCEPT CHAIRS ---------COMPLETE PIECES (CASE GOODS) ------------COMPLETE PIECES (OTHER THAN
CASE GOODS) ----------------------------------------------------------SUBASSEMBLIES -------------------------------------------------------AbStMHLtKb * C H A I N S — — — — — —
CUT-OFF-SAW OPERATORS -----------------------------------d o u b l f - e n d - t r i m m e r a n d BORING
MACHINE OPERATORS --------------------------------------------GLUEKS 9 KDUbn b TULIN • • • • • * • • • • • • •
LATHE OPERATORS* AUTOMATIC
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -----------------------------------MAINTAJNERS* GENERAL UTILITY ---------------molding

machine

1

14
27
-

7

-

-

1
l oA

29

4 .7 9

-

-

-

-

. -

-

-

12

-

-

3.b8
4*30

-

-

-

-

1?

-

7

-

i
i

-

-

23
44

4 .0 0
4 .4 4

-

-

28
1 1“
11Q
94163

33

U

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

-

on
cU
-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
6

-

-

-

-

27

2

-

-

-

-

-

24

430

7

6

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

-

-

4
18

-

-

-

-

5

-

6

-

6

-

•

5

3

3

2

1

5

1 -J
i

d

Qtr

J . uc
3 .19
4 .1 9

?T
CA
1V
1A

CO
-

-

-

'
-

£
-

11
1 -3
-

' cu
?n
-

1

O
c
•

1 Zl
16

£
D

3 .2 8

276

4 .0 5
2 .58
3 .1 6

260
J. o

3.0 8
4 .5 4

12

-

-

-

-

-

61

58

23

7

63
-

-

-

25

4 .7 2

370

4 .0 0

43
43

7
7

12
12

7
7

12
12

31
31

25

8

7

7
7

2
14
-

-

-

17

36
-

25-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

8

C AO
3.UC
J •OH

The L os A n g ele s— Long Beach Standard M etrop olitan S tatistical A re a ,

-

25

12

-

-

25

-

-

-

13

7

1

40

2
c o n s ists o f L os A n geles
and late sh ifts.

2
*

2
13

W ork ers
W ork ers
W ork ers
W ork e rs

w e re
w e re
w e re
w e re

40

13

-

2

2

14

-

Z

1
12
-

-

c
2

..

24

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

2

•

24
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

23
19

5

37

1

36
i
i

14

-

-

-

-

2

1

2

-

-

-

-

4

52

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

12

11

69

32

45

38

18

10

6

-

-

-

24

la
1U

ic
l?

11

7
1
1

10

5

29

5

11
46

14

8

1

3
4
5
6

11
11

c

1

1

-

20

°

6
101

5 .2 7

39

-

3
1*
S
1J

o

7
7

3.41
39
434

1O
id
2

c
o

-

E x clu d es p re m iu m pay fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olid ays,
A ll p rod u ction w o rk e rs w e re paid on a tim e b a s is .




7

73
CA
“ U

County.
2

6

41
1c
5

operators

(SET UP AND OPERATE) — —
— —
OFF-OC ARfc-KS* M A C H I N E —— — — — —
PACKERS* FURNITURE — — — — — —
RIP SAW OPERATORS — ------------- -- -------------- -- -------ROUTER OPERATORS
# c r T i i“
a MH
(5CT U n A ND A D C O AlTIIrT l/
Urr Kf
ROUTER OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) —
—
—
—
—
—
—
RUBBERS* FURNITURE. HAND --------------------------SANDERS. FURiNlTURE* H A N D ---------------------------SANDERS. FURNITURE. MACHINE ------------------B E L T ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------OTHLR THAN b t L 1
SHAPER OPERATORS,(AUTOMATIC
(SET UP AND OPERATE) --------------------- -------- —
SHAPER OPERATORS. HAND
(SET UP AND OPERATE) - — ---------------—
SPRAYERS ----------------------------------------------------TEN0NER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE 1 — — —
— — —
VARIETY-SAW OPERATORS —
—
— —

2.90
3 .14

1

4

1

4

1

i

1
1

-

1A
ID

10

d istribu ted as fo llo w s : 58 at $ 6 to $ 6 .2 0 : and 8 at $ 6 .2 0 to $ 6 .4 0 .
at $ 6 to $ 6 .2 0 .
at $ 6 .2 0 to $ 6 .4 0 .
d istribu ted as follow s* 4 at $ 6 to $ 6 .2 0 ; and 4 at $ 6 .2 0 to $ 6 .4 0 .

6

2

4^

-

68

Table 16. Occupational earnings: Louisville, Ky.-lnd.1
(N um ber and a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 2 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o cc u p atio n s in wood h o u seh o ld f u r n itu r e , ex c e p t u p h o ls te re d , m a n u fa c tu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts , N o v em b e r 1974)

O ccup ation

Number
of
workers

$
Average
hourly
earnings 1
2

2 .20

S
S
S
s
S
S
2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 . 8 0

and
under

and

2 .3 0 2 .4 0

a ll

p r o d u c t io n workers ------------------------ : 1*288
T I M E ------------------------------------------------------476
INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------812

$
4 .2 2
3 .4 1
4 .7 o

N um ber o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings o f—
s
S
1 ------- 1 ------ %
S
$
S
s
* .
'S
S
"5------ "5------ s —
S
*
2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 o 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .5 0 3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .8 0 3 .9 0 4 .0 0 4 .1 0 4 .2 0 4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0

2 .5 0 2 . 6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

40
7
33

98
13
85

52
23
29

75
36
39

81
44
37

94
29
65

49
17
32

79
58

33

66

20

60

13
3

21

13

6

10

8
8

18
16
5
5
.

9
7
7
5
_

14

7
7

13
13

13
13
9

18
1C
4

2

12

8
'2

.

55
27
28

32
9
23

32
13
19

30
13
17

60
22

31

7
3

38

19

3
3

8
8

4
4

2
2

3
3
_

7
7
7
7
.

7
7
7
7

4
4
4
4
.

1
1
1
1
2

1
1
1

i
l

10

12

3 .4 o 3.5ft 3.6Q 3 .7 0

3 .8 0 3 .9 0 4 . o0 4 .1 0

4 .2 0 4 .3 0 H .40 4 .6 0 4 .6 0 5 .0 0

4
4

27
27
-

1

3

-

2

2

8

6

7

4

6
1

2

5
4

11
11

1

-

_
.
_
_
_

.
_
.
_

ovs»r

3

291

1
2

285

6

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
ASSEMBLERS EXCEPT CHAIPS 3 4----------------INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------SUBASSEMBLIES---------------------------------------INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------CUT-OFF-SAW OPERATORS5 — ----- ---------------D0U3LE-END-TRIMMEP AND B0R1NU
MACrllNE OPERA TORS6 — — — — — —
GLUERS* ROUGH STOCK5— — — — — — —
MAINTAINERS* GENERAL UTILITY -----------T I M F _______ ___________. __ ___ ____
OFF-RE ARERS* MACHINE 7— —
—
—
PACKERS* FURNITURE — —
——
—
INCENTIVE -------------------------------------------SANDERS* FURNITURE* HAND — — — — —
INCENTIVE — —
——
—
—
SANDERS* FURNITURE, MACHINt — ------INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------b e l t ----------------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------other than b e l t 6 — — — — —
——
SPRAYERS ----------------------------------------------------I n c e n t iv e — — ---------------------------------tenoner

287
253
81
b3
6

14
16
30
IS

5 .2 0
5 .4 0
3 .1 6
3 .0 5
3 .2 3

_

c
o

uc
1 1
J • 1 11
5 .9 7

2
2

1

4
4
.

3

*
3

P Hft
C•OO

64

4 «b 3
4*89
5 #^*4
4 .1 4
h , 38
4 .1 6
4 .4 7
4 .1 2
4 .5 4
4 .7 2

11

11
1
1
2
2

5
5

C

•
>
o
3

i
i
l
i

13
XC
1
1

p
c.

4

\

61

59
43
33
22

26
101

_
-

1
1
1
1

.

-

-

O
c
p

3
3
2
2
1

3
1
2

i
X
1

1
1

.
_

10
10
2
2
9

7
5

i
X

I
1
1
1
1
1
I
1
•
•
•

1
1
1
1

P
c

9
9

3

3

23
23

6

M
.

1
1

«*

5
3
1

5

i7
lo

2

2
2

2
2
3

d

1

l

“

1

9
9
3
3

2
1
2
2
2

i
X
1

_

_
_
_

2

l




1

3

-

-

_

1

“

_

1

1
1
1
1

3
1
1
1

_

2

1
1

4

_
1

I

_ 4 129
129
_
■„
_

”
2
2

9
V

_

3

5
2

1

5

2

*

5
.

1

5

3
3

3

1
1

_

?
4
4

6

2

2

'
1 T h e Louisville Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area, consists of Bullitt, Jefferson, and Old­
h a m Counties, K y . ; and Clark and Floyd Counties, Ind.
2 Excludes p r e m i u m pa y for overtime and for w o r k on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3 Includes w o r k e r s in classification in addition to those shown separately.
4 W o r k e r s w e r e at $7.60 to $7.80.

2

_

1

11

2

•

1
1

H

2

2

i
i
12

2
C

6

5
3

operato rs

(SET UP AND OPERATE) 7 --------------------------

1
1

“

7
5

3 .6 6

39

4

4

A

48
76

1
1

10

*

4
<
♦
4
4
_

3

1
1

i
1

1

_
_

_
_

1
1
1
1

_

•

_
.
_

_
_

4

15

41 J
1)
1*
5
4C o
>a
28
4 12
12
6

b
_

6
4

30
30

1

'

5 W o r k e r s paid on a time and incentive basis w e r e equally divided.
6 Insufficient data to warrant publication of separate earnings data by me t h o d of w a g e payment:
wo rk er s are paid predominantly on an incentive basis.
7 Insufficient data to warrant publication of separate earnings data by me t h o d of w a g e payment;
wo rk er s are paid predominantly on a time basis.

Table 17. Occupational earnings: Miami and Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood, Fla.1
(N um ber and a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 2 of w o rk e rs in se le c te d o ccu p atio n s in wood h o u seh o ld f u r n itu r e , ex c ep t u p h o ls te re d , m a n u fa c tu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts , N o v em b e r 1974)
N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of3

----------

O ccup ation

w ork ers

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS ------------------------

1 * 0 7 1

A vera ge

S

h o u rly
e a rn in g s

$
4 .0 6

S

S

s

2*10

2.20

2 .3

2 .10

N um ber
of

2 .20

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

24

14

2.00

0

s

S

S

S

$

$

S

$

S

%

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2.60

2 .7 o

2 . 8o

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 o

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2.80

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

22

4

2 3

"5------ 3

----------

$

S

S

S

s

S

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

------

3

------

S

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

5 .8 Q

over

and
under

and

10

2

4

8

6

18

14

40

3 6

2 8

4 .0 0

2 7

4 .2 0

181

1 4 7

2 9 3

20

14
-

68

6 3

6 5

21

3

7

5

_

4

1

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
ASSEMBLERS# EXCEPT CHAIRS -----------------COMPLETE PIECES (CASE GOODS) --------------SUBASSEMBLIES ---------------------------------------------------------------CUT-OFF-SAW OPERATORS ----------------------------------------GLUERS# ROUGH STOCK
ftP F
U ” r —R P A i J F P < ; «

M AF H T N JF

™

■■■■■■■■

PLASTIC-TOP INSTALLERS -------------------------------------RIP SAW OPERATORS -------------------------------------- --------------SANDERS# FURNITURE# HAND - - - - - - - - - SANDERS* FURNITURE* MACHINE 3 - - - - - 3ELT ———————————————— —————————————
SPRAYERS -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------VARIETY-SAW OPERATORS -----------------------------------------

4 .2 8

_

70

4 .3 6

.

4 7

4 .1 6

3 3

4 .2 2
A A -l
*▼• V O

1 1 7

15
i ft
5 9
17
41

9

_

2

.

4

8

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

_

.

_

4
-

4

_
.

_
_

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

4

4

o
c

_

_

_

_

_

.

-

-

-

-

7

hll
4 .2 4
3 .2 1
•» a o
J •o o
o
7 7
f r

44

4 .2 4

38

4 .2 7

„

•

i c
1?

o

_

c
.

_

2
2

_
_

*

2
-

.
-

-

-

-

2

-

.
-

4

4

2

_

_

2

.

.

2
2

4

16

14

19
X7

4

_

_

_

.

11

_

.

_

4

13

8

13

22

_

_

4
_

_
_

«.

10

_
_

_

1

7

1 T h e M i a m i and Fort Lauderdale— Hollywood Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, consist
w o rk er s w e r e paid on a time basis.
of B r o w a r d and D a d e Counties.
3 Includes wo rk er s in classification in addition to those s h o w n separately.
2 Excludes p r e m i u m pa y for overtime and for w o r k on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. All




•
_

4 7
•

•
a

2

_

_
_

1 X
£

12
.

_

5 2

23

4

_

4
4

_

_

_
»




Table 18. Occupational earnings: Tennessee
( N u m b e r and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of wo rk er s in selected occupations in w o o d household furniture, except upholstered, manufacturing
establishments, N o v e m b e r 1974)
N u m b e r of w o rk er s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
f ------ “ 5------ "5------ s
$
------ %
“ 1 -----2 . 6 o 2 . 7 q 2 . 8 o 2 . 9 0 3 .0 o 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0

Average

workers

earnings 1

i

$

2«00

2 .10

S
$
$
2 . 2 o 2 .3 o 2 . 4 0 2 .5 o

2 .10

Number

2.20

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2.60

2 .7 0

866

709
617

768
662

745
649

688

761

S

. 8 o 2 .9 0

'$
2 .5 6
2 .5 4

309
233

656
614

526
461

CHAIRS -----------------

784

2 .5 0

32
26
24

43
pc
28

29

2 ^ 1
2 .* 7

148
128
75

210
1o r
1 87

452
353

56
aA
HI1
25
16

91

COMPLETE PIECES (CASE GOODS) ---------

83
83
39
39

45

68

22

22

159
153

9*+

2 .6 5

2

3

5

10

1

20

16
16
35
13
9

12

9

9

EXCEPT

COMPLETE PIECES (OTHER THAN
CASE GOODS) -----------------------------------------T I M E ______________ _______________ ____
SUBASSEMBLIES ---------------------------------------CUT-OFF-SAW OPERATORS ------------------------t i m e _____________ - ____- ______ ________
DOUBLE-END-TRIMMER AND BORING
MACHINE OPERATORS2 ------------------------------GLUERS, ROUGH STOCK2----------------------------LATHE OPERATORS, AUTOMATIC
(SET UP ANO OPEPATE) 2 ------------------------MAINTAINERS, GENERAL UTILITY 3 ----------MOLDING MACHINE OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) 2 ------------- — _ -----------------------OFF-BEARERS, MACHINE --------------------------TI M E ___________________________________
PACKERS, FURNITURE ------------------------------T I M E -----------------------------------------------------PLANER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE)2 — — — — — —
RIP SAW OPERATORS --------------------------------t i m e -----------------------------------------------------ROUTER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) 3 ------------------------ROUTER OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) 2 ______ __________ - __________
RUBBERS, FURNITURE, HAND 3- - - - - - - - - SANDEPS, FUPNITURE, HA\'D------------------T IMF — — — — — — __ _ —
——— — ——
_____ _____
SANDERS, FURNITURE, MACHINE ------------T I M E -----------------------------------------------------B E L T ---------------------------------------------------------t i m e -----------------------------------------------------OTHER THAN BELT ------------------SHAPER OPERATORS, AUTOMATIC
(SET UP AND OPERATE) 2 -------------SHAPER OPERATORS, AUTOMATIC
(FEED ONLY)2 _r
SHAPER OPERATORS, HAND
(SFT

1ID A MI HPP DATr 1 2

SPRAYERS ---------------------------------------------------t im e

1

2 .^ 3

4

2 .5 5
2 .5 2

6
6

49
8o

2.60

2 .5 t

46
83

2

238
X*0
117
109

19
397
•3 a
3
JCf'
215
173

————————

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table,

■
a
63

14

11
11

13
13

19
26
19
19
19

3 .0 0 .3 .1 0 3 .2 0

467
387

418
339

176
123

48
18
30

15

12

8

9

12

605

3 . 3<j 3 .4 o

155
114

53
31

9

4

41
23

3 .5 o

34
14

3 .6 0 ■3 .7 0

3 .8 0

over

29
27

43
25

41
37

13

_

_
_

*

_

_

_

1

2

-

2
8

2
11

4

9
24

5
9

11
20

13
7

-

. 6 ,}
3 .1 2

4
-

-

-

10

4

7
-

1

12

3

3

4

1

2 31
? l3 8
p 8 ft
C* JO
2 .5 8
2 .5 1

4
17
g

2

-

p

45

46
Ap

40
38

16
16

20
20

21

2

q

12
12

81
6
D11
23
23

7
69
58
5
5

4

I

a

1

1

52

19

67
b2
23
14

2 .4 9
2 .5 9
2 .5 7

-

8
8

9
9

12
12

20
20

27
27

SB

2.62

-

4

5

2

8

9

7

28
26

24
32

g
4

58
54
43
41
15
13

60

48
46
33

418
363
332
318
ob

C•* X
*
< 43
L
2 .4 6 2
l
C•u. 1
2 .*6

2 .4 5
2 .4 5
2.**5
2 .4 6
2 .4 7

24

2 ,6 5

i c
C3

28
28
26
28
-

-

20

23
P1
C i
23
17
16
14
7
3

49
**
ar
7
31
25
23

-

5

.

19
62
80

77
65
65
15

20

8
5

? • 68

2 .6 3

6

5

12

8

C•

319

g
1 ft
XO

C I O

1
4

9
9

15
15

25
25

3

2

9

1*

P

_

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

_

•
a
9

6
i
1
8

g
1

1

3

3

_

?

1

_

15

7
7

_

_

?

_

_

3
-

-

1

_

_

1

3

_
_

_
_

7

4
_

_

_

_

_

4
4

9

24

1

-

_

10

8

1
6

3
o
4
-

_

_

1

_

3

_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

1

_

3

16
1O
An
63
56
3

26
26

4

2

i
X
9
4

2

9
.

_

_

7
7

_
_

_
_

2

_

-

_

1

1

_

_

_

_

4
7
5

4
9

j
c

6

-

17

2
2

_

_
_

_
_

4
•
_

_

_
-

_

_

-

-

_

1

54
47
43
13

39

72
7o
ȣ
25
24
21

33

21

15
13

4

11
3

-

8

c

1

3

3

i

3

3

-

6

-

36
33
32
31
4

16
16
16
16

S

3
3
3
3

1

_

1

3
3
3

3

£
<

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

3

_
_

_
_

-

_

_

_

2

_

_

_

_

i
i

i
X

14
1.4

1

1

36
141
134

l3
l7
162

9

4

3
14
i4

2 95

3

28
24
14
14

57

_

9

8

41
41
4

4

65

t im e

S - ” 5------ ------3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .8 0

-

SELECTEO OCCUPATIONS
a sse m b l e r s

3 .5 0

and
2

6 ,7 3 7
5 ,7 2 3

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS ----------------------T I M E ------------------------------------------------------

3
>

and
under

Q

34
26

21

3

_

]

_

1

5

.

-

1

1

_

49
45

42

7
3

2

_

2

1

29
29

-

-

2

30

59
58

-a i
JX

_

_

Table 18. Occupational earnings: Tennessee — Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in wood household furniture, except upholstered, manufacturing
establishments, November 1974)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
O ccu p ation

Number
of
workers

%
$
$
5
$
$
--- 1 ---- 1 --- S
S
S
S
%
$
S
S
$
Average 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00
3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80
hourly
earning.1 and

and

under

2.10 ?*20 2t3Q 2.40 2.50 2.60 2.70 2 .8 0 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3. B0 over
CO
10




SELECTED OCCUPATIONS— CONTINUED
TENONER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) 1 ----------------------2
TENONER OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) 2 -----------------------------------------VARIETY-SAW OPERATORS2 -----------------------

$

40

2.82

“

-

•

4

1

5

7

5

1

2

b

1

3

36
42

2.83
2.67

_

.

.

4

2

_

4

6

"

5

1

2

4
9

7

“

5

4

11

3

“

9
*

3
“

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays,
and late shifts.
2 Insufficient data to warrant publication of separate earnings data by

1

-

_
1

“

*

2

-

_

_

“

method of wage payment: workers are paid predominantly on a time basis,
3 All timeworkers.

Table 19. Occupational earnings: Virginia
(N um ber and a v e ra g e straigh t-tim e h ou rly e a r n in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le cte d occupations in w ood household furniture, except u ph olstered, m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)
N um ber o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings of—
S
O ccup ation

of
w
orkers

hourly
earnings 1

5 '

S

2.00

2.10

2.20

$
$
2 .3 0 2 .4 0

$
5
2 .5 0 2 . 6 0

$
S
2 .7 o 2 . 8 0

$
2 .9 0

$
3 .0 0

2.20

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .6 0

2.80

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0 3 .2 0

1 4 ,2 8 4
1 1 ,8 3 5

$
2 .5 8
2 .5 7

1050 1622 1870 1815 1803 1298 1251
8 8 8 1298 1599 1472 1538 1024
997

966
835

S
S
3 .3 0 3 .4 0

$
3 .5 0

$
S
3.6t) 3 .7 0

4
3 .8 0

$
$
3 .9 0 4 .0 0 4 .1 0

■%

$
S
s
$
4 .2 0 4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 .5 0

and
under
2.10

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS -----------------------T I M E -------------------------------------------------------

S
S
3 .1 0 3 .2 0

160

124

and
2 .5 0

2 .7 0

80S

705

3 .3 0

567
489

330
274

19
14
J*
.4
5
13
1c

10

7

6
7

3 .4 0 3 .5 0 3 ,6 0

5

272
228

142
117

108

82

86

66

2

5

3
o
c

3 .7 0

3 .8 0 3 .9 0

54
47

10

17

_

_

15
7

4 .0 0 4 .1 0 4 .2 0 4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 .5 0
7
2

10

11

7

9

9

6

2
2

2

over
13
5

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
a ssem blers,

e x c e p t CHAIRS -----------------T IM E -------------------------------- ---------------------INCENTIVE----------;---------------------------------COMPLETE PIECES (CASE GOODS) — —
j i me
__ _____________________________
TNCFNTTVF --------------------------------------------COMPLETE PIECES (OTHER THAN
CASE G O O D S )--------------— - - - — ------------t i m e ---------------------------------- -------------------SUBASSEMBLIES ----------------------------------------TIME
ASSEMBLERS. CHATRS ----------------- -------------t i m e ---------------------------- - - - - - - -------------CUT-OFF-SAW OPERATORS -------------------------t im e — — — — —
—— ——
—
INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------do u ble - enq - t rim m er AND BORING
m achin e OPERATORS — — — — — — —
TIME —
—
—
—
—
—
GLUERS, ROUGH STOCK -----------------------------t im e — — — — — — — — — — —
INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------LATHE OPERATORS, AUTOMATIC
(SET UP ANO OPERATE) -------------------------T IM E ------------------------------------------------------LATHE OPERATORS, AUTOMATIC
(FEEO ONLY) — — — — —
————
TIME — — — — — —
—
— —
MAINTAINERS, GENERAL U TILITY 2 ----------MOLDING MACHINE OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) ------------------------ T IM E ------------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE — — — — — — — — — —
MOLDING MACHINE OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) --------------------------------------------TIME — — — — — — —
———— —
OFF-BEARERS, MACHINE ---------------------------t im e — — — — — — — — —
——
INCENTIVE --------------------------------------------PACKERS, FURNITURF — —
————
t im e — — — — — — —
—
—
—
PLANER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) — — — — — —
t im e — — — — — — —
—
——
INCENTIVE —
—
—— ————
PLANER OPERATORS
(FEED O N L Y )-------------------------------------------, TIME ---------------------------------------------------------------------------PLASTIC-TOP INSTALLERS3- ------------------------------RIP SAW OPERATORS -------------------------------— ----------T IM E ----------------------------------------------------------------------------ROUTER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -----------------------------------T IM E ---------------------------------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE ------------------- --------------------- --------------------

See footn o te s at end o f table.




1 ,5 8 0
1 ,3 1 7
263
687
575
112

331
274
562
468
120

J ll
146
119
27

2 .4 9
2 .4 6
2 .6 7
2 .5 6
2 ,5 1
2 .7 4

18
15
3
7

2 .5 ?
? . 47
2 .3 9
2 .3 7
2 ,5 ?
2 ,5 ?
2 .7 4
2 .7 0
2 .9 0

4
4
7

157
gi
53

190
158
32
39
39

74

??
2?
129

11

252

211

244

156
134

26
63

*37
69

31
153

22

166
136
30

79

110

66

94

23

-

g

10

4
3

1
1

6
6

148

97
2?

35

100

71
29
55
45

15
24

2o

1

13

13

16

10

10

39
26
17
16
17
16

42
23
3

g

5]
30

36
29
41
39

ft

19

10
10

s

c

1
1
1

4

2

2
2

21

17

1

3

_

1

1

3

»

1
X
1
1

4

1

_

_

_

1

_

4

1

o
c
o
c

13
13

_

->
o

?

15
13

3

11

16
15

11

21
16

2

1

7

3
•
a
■
J

3

5

2

1

3

5

18
3

21
20
1

16
14
24
24

21

10
6

17
13
29
27

14

13

10

8

12

9

9
9

22
21

7
7

1
1

3
i
X

2

1

1
1

2
2

8
8

14

5

j:
1
1

3

O
c

130
106
185
153
32

2 .60

1

2 .6 0
2 .5 5
2 .5 0
2 .8 0

5
4

10
8

1
1

8
8

15
1j
4

32
28

3 .0 1
2 .9 6

-

-

-

23
15
259

2 .5 6
2 .5 1
2 .9 8

1
1

2
2

1

1
1

1

4

6

2

5

17

6

20

26

9

22

31

87
63
24

3 .0 2
3 .0 4
2 .9 9

3
3

-

1

-

-

6

4
2
2

4
4

8

5

6
2

5

6

2
2

o
c

1

_

1

2

1

«.!

1

2

1

4

_

2
1

1

2

757
648
109
437
346

2 .4 9
2 .4 3
2 .3 8
2 .3 5
2 .5 8
2 .4 1
2 .4 1

44
37
7

-

1
1

22
14.

9
280
"

210

91
70
21

2 .6 2
2 .5 5 ,
2 .5 7
2.66
2.68

2 .7 9
2 .7 7
2 .8 7

33
19
14

33
33

3
3

-

1

3

5
5
129

2

122

1

7
64
48

ll

24
23

11
121
11 0
11

40
24

6

1

2 .8 2
2 .8 0
2 .9 1

77
66

20

14
14
175
153
22

73
62

9

15
14
130

9
u i

112

101

18
64
54

10

22
11

64
56

38
34

1
1

6
6

7
6

10

10
6

33

1

•

-

-

-

•

18

1
1

3
3

3

5

1

3
1

■-

4

12

20

3

19
9

-

2
2

4
4

-

2
2

-

“

“

2

-

-

5
2

16

39
31
11

9
2

7
4

.
-

4
4
4
31

f

1

3

1

2

1

1

3

1

2

1

3

3

1

_

1
1

3

_

_

5
4

2
1

2
2

3

2

_

24

17

30

1?

5

3

15

1

13

16
14
£

7

5
5

10

1
1

1

2
1

7
f

6
1
1

_

1

1

2

9
1
I

1

3

l

3

4
3

4

4
£

1

20
11
66

6
2

3

2

1

1

_

42

2

3

5
5

_

_
_

_
_

3

2

1

i
X

2
2

3
1
2

_
_

2

3

5

1

_

_
_

.

2

_

1

c

4
4
-

_

1
1

6
2

L

_

_

2
1

2

-

38

A1

33

37

16
7
9

6
3

9

3

_

1

1

_

_

1

_

_
_

_

_

_
_

1

4

_

1

_

_

i

1

_

i

l

i
X
9
7

£

2
2

-

1A
XV

2

•
•

o

8

•”

1
i
1

Z

52
49

25
24

3

14
14

13
13

6
6

-

“

“

.

_

1

-

_

-

-

-

1

_

i

_

-

1

_

_

_

1

1

-

1

-

-

1

Table 19. Occupational earnings: Virginia — Continued
(N um ber and av era g e straigh t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs 1 of w o rk e rs in se le cte d occupations in w ood household furniture, except u ph olstered, m anufacturing establish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)
Num ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings of-

workers

earnings 1

S
T
s
S
2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 . 6 0

S

$

S

2.0 0

2 .10

2.20

2.20

2 .3 0 2 .4 0

2 .5 0

4
4

7
7
53
41

$
2*7o 2 . 8 0

$
2 .9 0

$
3 .0 0

S
S
$
S
3 . 1 0 3 . 2 0 3 . 30 3 .4 0

$
T1 ------ T T
$
f ------ S
i
s
$
1 -----3 . 50 3* 60 3 . 70 3 .8 0 3 . 90 4 .0 0 4 .1 0 4 .2 0 4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 .5 o

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 . 2 Q 3 . 3(? 3* 4Q 3 .5 0

3 . 8 0 3 . 70 3 . 80 3 .9 0 4 . 00 4 .1 0 4 .2 0 4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 .5 0 over

and
under
IV

O ccupation

Average

o

Number

and
2

.6 0 2 .7 0

2.80

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS— CONTINUED
ROUTER OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) -----------------------------------------t i me

G)
*

-----------------------------

RUBBERS* FURNITURE* HAND -----------------T I M E ----------------------------------------------------RUBBERS* FURNITURE* MACHINE ----------T IM E ----------------------------------------------------SANDERS* FURNITUPE, HAND ----------------T I M E ----------------------------------------------------SANDERS* FURNITURE* MACHINE ----------T IM E ----------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE -----------------------------------------B E L T --------------------------------------------------------T I M E ----------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE -----------------------------------------OTHER THAN BELT ----------------------------------

T I M E ----------------------------SHAPER OPERATORS* AUTOMATIC
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -------------------- —
T I M E ----------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE -----------------------------------------SHAPER OPERATORS* AUTOMATIC
(FEED ONLY) -----------------------------------------SHAPER OPERATORS* HAND
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -----------------------t i m e ----------------------------------------------------SHAPER OPERATORS* HAND
(FEED ONLY) 1 ------------------* ---------------------2
SPRAYERS --------------------------------------------------T IM E ----------------------------------------------------TENONER OPERATORS
(SET UP ANO OPERATE) -----------------------T I M E ---------------------------------------------------INCENTIVE -----------------------------------------TENONER OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) -----------------------------------------T I M E ----------------------------------------------------VARIETY-SAW OPERATORS ----------------------T I M E -----------------------------------------------------

189

$
2*54
2 .5 4
2 .2 9
2 .2 7
2 .5 1
2 .5 3
2 .3 3
2 .3 3
2 .6 4
2 .6 2
2 .7 3
2 .6 9
2 .6 7
2 .7 3
2 .5 2
2 .5 0

75
57
18

26
26
438
394
115
94
709
677
751
584
167
551
395
156

6
6

75
75

R

8
8
111

8

107
27
23
4

3
3
-

145
1 A1
9

109
14

6

8

3

216
194
73
62

166
163
70
65
5
40
35
5
30
30

102
100

11

110

11

78
51
27
56
29
27

3
3
40
16
30
26
57
56
80
50
30
48

9
9
4
1
20
20
12
12

21

62
49
13
41
29

27
32
29

12
21
20

5
5
17
17
10
10

98
73
25
79
54
25
19
19

-

17
4

2
2

6
6

39
30
9
34
32

2 .9 8
2 .9 4
3 .0 9

_

_

_

-

-

-

2
2

1
1

-

-

-

7
7
-

-

“

1

-

4
4

21

2 .4 9

-

2

3

4

2

6

-

40
36

2.60

-

-

“

3
3

4
4

5

“

1
1

_

2 .6 2

27
722
620

2 .6 5
2 .6 4
2 .6 3

_

_

9
9

4
4

89
69

3 .0 0
2 .9 9
3 .0 5

-

-

-

-

20

“

“

64
46
96
82

2 .6 3
2 .6 1
2 .6 5
2 .6 7

_

_

-

-

3
3
4

7
7
5
4

200

1 E x clu des p rem iu m pay f o r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on
2 A ll tim e w o r k e r s .




-

1
1

21

1

_

1

6

52
40

105
98

92
92

-

2
2

6
6

-

-

3
19
12
-

1

w eekends,

22
22

holidays,

2
2

“
6

5
21

18

11
8
11
10

3
3
6
6

5
5
69
82
7
70
63
7
19
19

9
9
106
90
16
99
83
16
7
7

-

8

5
5
4

2

1

3

?

1

2

•

1

-

l

-

-

8
6

4
4

2
1

1
1

3
3

2
2

1
1

2
2

-

-

-

-

_

1
1

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

2

6

4

3

2

1

2

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

7
>

-

1
1

1

5

7
7
“

1
1

4
3

_

1

_

.

.

-

1

-

1

-

-

“

-

-

5
5

-

1
1

2
2

4
3

6

_

_

_

5
1

-

1

1

-

-

8
6

40
36
4
35
33

-

-

■i

9
7

6
6

11
6

15
13

2

-

5

2

-

1

-

-

3

2
1

7
7

14
14

2

_

2

c

-

3
123
103

2

12

127
103

89
71

58
48

24
24

14

-

10

-

9

4
3

15
14

11
10

1

1

18
13
5

6

1

5
5
3
3

1
1

1
1

3
3
“

8

1
8

13

9

6
8

6

1

5
5

13

5

12

17
15

12
12

and late shifts,

5

1

1

1

1

2
2

_

_

1

-

1

-

_

_

-

_

5
-

3
Insufficien t data to w arrant publication of separate earnings data by m ethod of w age payment;
w o rk e rs are paid p redom in an tly on a tim e b a s is .

Table 20. Occupational earnings: Winston-Salem -- High Point, N.C.1
(Num ber and average straigh t-tim e hourly earnings of w ork ers in selected occupations in wood household furniture, excep t upholstered, m anufacturing esta b lish m en ts, N ovem ber 1974)
N um ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings of—

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS ------------------------

Average
hourly
earnings

$

S '

s

2.0 0

2.10

2.20

$
S
2 .3 0 2 .^ 0

2,20

O ccup ation

Number
of
workers2

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

s
S
*
2 . 5 0 2 . 6 o 2 .7 o

r$-

$

T ------ $
------ "5------ "5------ $
1 ------5
"5-----3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .8 0 3 .9 0 4 .0 0 4 .1 0 4 .2 0 4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 .5 o

2 .9 0

5
3 .0 u

3 .1 0

s
3 .2 0

5
3 .3 0

3 .4 0

$
3 .5 0

%

2 .8 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 o

3 .8 0

3 .9 0

4 ,0 0

892 1009

879

659

779

444

495

301

277

327

227

143

127

57

71
23

95
9

69
5

44

48
9

31

26
9

6

5

10

30
3

15

8

3
x

7
41
_
19

29
57

5
31
17
13

3
36
18
4

1
20

1
21

7

7

7
57
13
24

_

2

2

1

1

7

4

6

1
1
6

9

2

_

3

7

4

7
13
15

3

and
tinder

and
2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0

8 ,5 5 0

$
2 .9 1

231

217

232

301

330

478

861
194

2 .8 4
2 .7 5

8
6

27

24
9

42
16

56
18

73
31

80
6

106

12

84
583
79
94

2 .8 9

2

3

1

1

2

12

3 .2 1
2 .9 1

14
3

37
.
.

40
_
7

5
69
.
3

13
85
3

27

3 .6 5

64
124

2 .9 5
3 .6 1

.

_

2

6

_

.

57

3 .5 7

-

-

-

_

_

3

47
565
216

2 .7 6
2 .6 2
2 .7 5

_

6

17
15

15
9

4 .1 0 4 .2 0 4 .3 0 4 ,4 0 4 .5 0

50

38

21

14

9

_

_

_

over

_

13

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS
ASSEMBLERS EXCEPT CHAIRS -----------------COMPLETE PIECES (CASE GOODS) ---------COMPLETE PIECES (OTHER THAN
CASE GOODS) ------------------------------------------SUBASSEMBLIES ---------------------------------------CUT-OFF-SAW OPERATORS -------------------------GLUERS, ROUGH STOCK -----------------------------LATHE OPERATORS* AUTOMATIC
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -------------------------LATHE OPERATORS. AUTOMATIC
(FEED ONLY) — —
MAINTAINERS* GENERAL UTILITY -----------MOLDING MACHINE OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -------------------------MOLDING MACHINE OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) --------------------------------------------OFF-BEARERS. MACHINE ---------------------------PACKERS. FURNITURE -------------------------------PLANER OPERATORS
(SET UP ANO OPERATE) -------------------------PLANER OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) --------------------------------------------PLASTIC-TOP INSTALLERS -------------RIP SAW OPERATORS --- ----------------ROUTER OPERATORS
(SET UP AND OPERATE) --------------ROUTER OPERATORS
(FEED ONLY) --------------------------RUBBERS. FURNITURE, HAND -----------SANDERS, FURNITURE, HAND -----------SANDERS, FURNITURE, MACHINE -------------b e l t ----------------------------------------------------------other than b e l t ---------------------------- -------SHAPER OPERATORS, AUTOMATIC
(FEED ONLY) — ----- ---------------------------------SHAPER OPERATORS, HAND
(SET UP AND OPERATE) -------------------------SHAPER OPERATORS, HAND
(FEED O N L Y )--------------------------------------------SPRAYERS ----------------------------------------------------TENONER OPERATORS
(FEED O N L Y )-------------------------------- -----------VARIETY-SAW O P E R A T E S --------------------------

2.86

-

-

26

8

11

1
1 1

2

_

164
14

A
109
37

p

21

14
5

40

82

8

6

X7
2

-

6

2
11

Q

56

26
32

24

3 .3 6

a
13
158

3 O
ft
2 .5 8
2 .9 8

_
-

3
3

3

4
3

73

3 .2 8

-

.

3

-

31
427
469
549
331
218

2 .8 5
2 .4 8
2 .5 4
3 .0 4
3 .1 1
2 .9 3

21

•

2
10

2

1
19

6

. 14

35
70

39
38

35
40

8

-

-

8

•

3

3

46
io

33

c:
46
25

6
2

8

40

5

6

17

17

15

5
2
40

.

-

1

1

3

7

5
84

5

10

3

.

46
19
13
7

S9
45
<♦4
28
16

28
62
57
16
41

6

37
30
26
7
19

100

41
30
11

14
21

36
22
14

9

2 .9 2

36

3 .2 1

_

2 .7 3
2 .8 7

_
_

9
2.60
50 _ 3 .1 6

3

6

•

_

_

-

7

14

3
15

-

_

.

73

2

_

5

17
5

7
x

2

5

2

11

6

**'

11

—

43
3

56
5

3

5

4

3

_

2

2

1

_

3

16

12

9

5

7

7

2

1

6

5

12

1

7

1

4

4

1

_

1

_

_
_

2

_

_

_

3

1

4

_

9

1
J
L
6

4

4

12

7

6

11

46
40

1
l
46
36

36

21

6

10

4

34
29
5

23
14
9

2

3

3

2

8

1

4 k

1

3

1

1

_

5

o

_

1

4

2

2

x

_

1

,
32

6
6

2

1

_

3

_

1

_

_

_

4

4

_
_
_

4

5

.

1

4

11

1

29

6

_

1

u

j

64

52

81

31

26

21

15

x

x
9

6

3

2

_

_

_

,

4

3

2

1

_
2

_

4

1

7
4

c

_

2

3

_

15

13
484

3
20

3

15

6

4

2_

■

The W in sto n -S a lem -H ig h P oint area c o n sists of Davidson,




Forsyth,

Guilford, and Randolph

2 E xclud es p rem ium pay for o v ertim e and for work on w eekends, holidays,
w ork ers w ere paid on a tim e b a s is .

and la te sh ifts. A ll




Table 21. Earnings relationships: Selected regions and localities
(A verage h ou rly earn in gs in s e le cte d occupations as a p e rce n t o f the national average fo r all p rodu ction w o r k e r s 1 in w ood household fu rniture (excep t
u p h o lste re d ) m anufacturin g establish m en ts, United States, s e le cte d re g io n s States, and a r e a s , N ovem ber 1974)

A ll
produc­
t io n
w o rk e rs

A s s e m b le r s ,
c o m p le t e
fu r n it u r e
p ie c e s
(ca s e goods)

C u t-o ffsaw
o p era tors

H a in t a in e rs
gen eral
u t ilit y

O ffbearers,
m achine

U n ite d S t a t e s ...............................................

100

109

11 0

115

89

94

10 0

112

106

New E n g la n d ....................................................
G a r d n e r , H a ss..........................................
H id d le A t l a n t i c ..........................................
J am estow n , H .T ........................................
B o r d e r S t a t e s .................................. ...........
L o u i s v i l l e , K y .- I n d ...........................
V i r g i n i a .......................................................
S o u t h e a s t . .......................................................
H i c k o r y - S t a t e s v i l l e , M.C...............
Miami and F o r t - L a u d e r d a le —
H o lly w o o d , F l a ...................................
T e n n e s s e e ....................................................
W in s to n -S a le m —
H igh P o i n t , N .C .................................
S o u t h w e s t .........................................................
A r k a n s a s .......................................................
G rea t L a k e s ....................................................
C h ic a g o , 1 1 1 . ..........................................
Grand B a p id s , H ic h ..............................
I n d i a n a .........................................................
P a c i f i c ..............................................................
L os A n g e le s -L o n g
B e a ch , C a l i f ........................................

100
107
11 2
107
87
139
85
91
97

94
118
121
11 0
89

103
112
123
107
10 1
196
98
107
108

93
90
110
100
80
95
78
82
86

102
113
109
94
81
141
79
86
89

110
149
12 1
107
91
137
88
93
103

117

84
94
100

104
104
112
10 1
92
106
90
96
104

92
103
117

110
128
124
116
94
149
87
93
10 1

133
84

143
82

138
84

10 2

10 2
78

85

124
80

88

95
88
90
114
105
109
116
127

90
88
89
126
11 0
119
134
155

105
81
85
115
119
110
115
153

118
11 0
103
133
139
’ 128
135
155

86
85
89
102
87
88
109
118

90
86
92
112
93
10 0
114
120

102
90
91
111
1 20
109
112
113

119
115
150

94
95
98
12 0
12 1
104
12 1
140

112

136

157

146

99

105

10 1

155

131

R e g io n and l o c a l i t y

-

1 The national a verage fo r all p rodu ction w o rk e rs is $ 3 .0 5 ,

-

NOTE: D ashes
pub lication c r it e r ia .

P a ck ers,
fu r n itu r e

-

indicate

S h a per
S an ders,
op era tors,
fu r n itu r e ,
hand
b e lt
( s e t up
and
op era te)

-

122
121
97
-

-

105
94
105
111
-

S p ra y ers

139
86

no data re p o rte d o r data that do no m eet




Table 22. Method of wage payment
(P e r c e n t of p roduction w o rk e rs in wood household fu rn itu re (except u p h o lste re d ) m anufacturing establish m en ts by m ethod of w age paym ent, United States,
s e le cte d r e g io n s , States, and areas, N ovem ber 1974)

M ethod o f
wage paym ent 1

Unit ed
S ta tes 2

New
E n gland

M id dle
A tla n tic

B order
S ta tes

R e g io n s
S o u th ­
east

G rea t
la k e s

S o u th ­
w est

P a c ific

Arkan­
sas

S ta tes
In d i­
T en­
ana
nessee

V ir ­
g in ia

A l l w o r k e r s ......................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

1C0

100

100

100

Time r a t e d w o r k e r s ............
F orm al p l a n s ......................
S i n g l e r a t e ....................
Range o f r a t e s ............
I n d i v i d u a l r a t e s ............

83
56
11
45
27

74
41
3
37
34

66
32
8
24
34

81
54
5
49
27

96
65
4
61
31

68
45
3
42
23

65
49
20
29
16

100
78
48
30
22

66
41
5
36
25

47
38
18
20
8

85
50

82
56
6
50
26

I n c e n t i v e w o r k e r s ...............
I n d iv id u a l p ie c e w o r k ..
Group p i e c e w o r k ...............
I n d i v i d u a l b o n u s ............
G roup b o n u s ........................

17
6
1
4
5

26
8
2
14
1

34
9
2
11
12

19
3
<*)
11
4

4
4
(3 )
(3)
(s )

32
24
5

35
7
4
7
17

34
26
4
5

53
11
8
3
32

15
14

-

3

(s )
(3)
-

*

-

50
35

18
1
(»)
12
4

-

2
-

A rea s
C h i­
cago

Gard
ner

Grand
R a p id s

H ic k oryS ta tesv ille

Ja m estow n

LOS
A n g e le s Long
Beach

L o u is ­
v ille

Miami and
F ort
L a u d e r­
d a le —
H o lly w o o d

H in s t o n S alem —
High
P o in t

A l l w o r k e r s ......................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Time r a t e d w o r k e r s .............
Form al p l a n s ......................
S i n g l e r a t e ....................
Range o f r a t e s ............
I n d i v i d u a l r a t e s ............

84
65
21
44
19

64
54
6
48
10

82
25

40
19

100
66
66

100
62

19
21

100
64
38
26
36

37
13
13

25
57

98
67
4
63
31

-

-

24

34

62
38

I n c e n t i v e w o r k e r s ...............
I n d i v i d u a l p ie c e w o r k ..
G roup p i e c e w o r k ...............
I n d i v i d u a l b o n u s .............
Group b o n u s ........................

16
8
3
5

36
23
9
4

18
2
7
9

2
1
<*)
1

60
21
31
8

_

63
16
15
2
29

“

-

1 F o r defin ition o f m ethod o f w age paym ent, see appendix A .
2 Includes data fo r re g io n s in addition to those shown se p a ra te ly .
3 L ess than 0. 5 p e rce n t.

-

NOTE:
to ta ls .

-

“

-

-

-

B ecau se of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal




Table 23. Minimum entrance rates: Machine off bearers and hand furniture sanders
(N um ber o f w ood household furniture (except u ph olstered) m anufacturing establish m en ts studied b y m in im um hourly rates f o r m achine off
b e a r e r s and hand furniture sanders, United States and s e le cte d r e g io n s , N o ve m b e r 1974)

Minimum e n t r a n c e r a t e s 1

U n it e d
S ta tes 2

New
E n gland

M id d le
A tla n tic

B order
S ta tes

S o u th ­
east

S ou th ­
w est

G rea t
L a kes

P a c ific

O f f - b e a r e r s , m a ch in e
E s t a b li s h m e n t s s t u d i e d ...............................................

336

30

41

27

10 1

22

72

35

E s t a b lis h m e n t s h a v in g an
e s t a b l i s h e d minimum.................................................

223

22

23

23

66

16

47

22

$ 2 . 0 0 and
$ 2 . 1 0 an d
$2 . 2 0 and
$ 2 .3 0 and
$ 2 .4 0 and

un d er
under
u n d er
u n d er
und er

$2 . 1 0 ................................................
$2 . 2 0 .................................................
$ 2 .3 0 .................................................
$ 2 .4 0 .................................................
$ 2 . 5 0 ................................................

33
32
45
19
30

2
3
6
4
3

1
6
5
2
3

2
8
3
4
3

12
7
19
4
19

7
5
1
1
-

4
2
6
3
2

4
4
1
-

$ 2 .5 0
$ 2 .6 0
$ 2 .7 0
$ 2 .8 0
$ 2 .9 0

un d er
und er
un d er
u nd er
under

$ 2 . 6 0 .................................................
$ 2 . 7 0 .................................................
$ 2 .8 0 .................................................
$ 2 .9 0 .................................................
$ 3 .0 0 .................................................

19
5
8
9
3

1
1
-

3
1
1

2
-

3
2
-

2
-

8
1
4
7
3

- 1
2
1
“

$ 3 .0 0 and un d er $ 3 . 1 0 . . ............................................
$ 3 .1 0 an d un d er $ 3 .2 0 .................................................
$ 3 .2 0 and u n d er $ 3 . 3 0 .................................................
$ 3 .3 0 and un d er $ 3 .4 0 .................................................
$ 3 .4 0 an d u n d er $ 3 . 5 0 .................................................

3
3
2
2
3

1

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

"

1

-

2
2
1
1

1
1
1

$ 3 .5 0
$ 3 .6 0
$ 3 .7 0
$ 3 .8 0
$ 3 .9 0

and
an d
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
un d er
u n d er
un d er

$ 3 . 6 0 .................................................
$ 3 .7 0 .................................................
$ 3 . 8 0 .................................................
$ 3 . 9 0 .................................................
$ 4 .0 0 .................................................

1
2
-

-

-

-

_

1
“

2
“

$ 4 .0 0
$ 4 .1 0
$ 4 .2 0
$ 4 .3 0
$ 4 .4 0

and
and
and
an d
and

un d er
under
u n d er
u n d er
un d er

$ 4 . 1 0 .................................................
$ 4 .2 0 .................................................
$ 4 . 3 0 .......................................
$ 4 . 4 0 .................................................
$ 4 . 5 0 .................................................

_

_

-

$ 4 .5 0

and
and
and
and
and

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•“

1
“
3

and o v e r ..................................................................

3

-

-

-

-

-

No f o r m a l m inim um ,........................................................

36

2

1

1

21

1

6

2

W ork ers n o t h i r e d in t h i s c a t e g o r y ..................

77

6

17

3

14

5

19

11

See foo tn o te s at end of table.




Table 23. Minimum entrance rates: Machine off bearers and hand furniture sanders — Continued
(Number of wood household furniture (ex cep t upholstered) m anufacturing esta b lish m en ts studied by m inim um hourly ra tes for m achine off
b ea re rs and hand furniture sand ers. United S tates, and sele c te d reg io n s, N ovem ber 1974)

Hi ni mu m en tr an ce r a t e 1

Onited
St at es 2

Hew
En gl an d

R i dd le
Atlantic

Bor der
St at es

South­
ea st

South­
west

G r ea t
La k e s

Pa c i f i c

Sanders, f u r n it ur e, h a n d
Es t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d .......................

336

30

41

27

101

22

72

35

E s t a bl is hm en ts ha vi nq an
e s t a b l i s h e d m i n i m u m .........................

236

23

29

23

72

13

48

24

$2 .0 0
$ 2 .1 0
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

an d
an d
an d
and
and

unde r
under
under
under
under

$2 . 1 0 ........................
$2 . 2 0 .........................
$ 2 . 3 0 ........................
$ 2 . 4 0 ........................
$ 2 . 5 0 ........................

28
28
52
23
19

1
2
9
4
1

1
6
5
2
3

3
7
3
3
3

10
6
24
9
10

6
3
2
-

2
1
5
4
2

4
2
3
1
-

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

and
an d
an d
an d
an d

un de r
unde r
under
under
under

$ 2 . 6 0 ........................
$ 2 . 7 0 .........................
$ 2 . 8 0 ........................
$ 2 . 9 0 .........................
$ 3 . 0 0 .........................

34
6
15
9
4

1
3
-

6
1
2
1

3
-

12
1
-

2
-

10
3
7
8
-

_
1
2
1
3

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

an d
and
an d
an d
and

u n de r
under
under
unde r
under

$ 3 . 1 0 ........................
$ 3 . 2 0 .........................
$ 3 . 3 0 ........................
$ 3 . 4 0 ........................
$ 3 . 5 0 ........................

2
3
2
3
1

_

1
1
*

_
1
-

“

-

1
1
1
1

_

1
1
-

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

and
and
and
an d
and

un de r
under
under
under
under

$ 3 . 6 0 .........................
$ 3 . 7 0 . . . ....... .
$ 3 . 8 0 ........................
$ 3 . 9 0 ..... ...................
$4 . 0 0 .........................

1
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

1
1
-

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

and
an d
an d
and
and

under
under
under
un de r
under

$ 4 . 1 0 ........................
$ 4 . 2 0 .........................
$ 4 . 3 0 ........................
$ 4 . 4 0 . . . .....................
$ 4 . 5 0 ........... .............

-

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

1

$4.50 an d o v e r .................................

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

Ho f o r m a l m i n i m u m .............................

42

1

3

2

24

1

8

2

Wo r k e r s not hired in this c a t e g o r y .........

58

6

9

2

5

8

16

9

1 Minimum entrance rates are the lo w est fo rm a lly esta b lish ed
rates for in exp erien ced w orkers in the esta b lish m en ts studied.

_

2
-

-

2 Includes data for region s in addition to those shown sep a ra tely ,




Table 24. Work schedules
( P e r c e n t of p ro d u c tio n and office w o r k e r s in w ood h o u seh o ld fu r n itu r e (ex ce p t u p h o lste re d ) m a n u fa c tu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts by w o rk sc h e d u le s ,
U nited S ta te s and s e le c te d re g io n s, N o v em b er 1974)
fork s c h e d u l e 1

U n it ed
States2

lew
En gl an d

Bi dd le
At l a n t i c

B o rd er
s t at es

S o ut hea s t

South­
west

Gr ea t
La ke s

P a ci fi c

Production workers
A l l w o r k e r s ................................
20 h o u r s - 5 d a y s .............................
32 h o u r s - 4 d a y s ...... ......................
35 h o u r s - 5 d a y s .............................
O v e r 3 5 a n d u n de r 40 h o u r s ..................
4 d a y s ........................................
5 d a y s .................................. ......
40 h o u r s ........................................
4 d a y s . . ......................................
5 d a y s ........................................
O v e r 40 a n d un d e r 45 h o u r s ..... ............
5 d a y s ........................................
5 1/2 d a y s ...................................
45 h o u r s . . . . . ..................................
5 d a y s ........................................
5 1/2 d a y s ...................................
O v e r 45 h o u r s ..................................
5 d a y s ........................................
5 1/2 d a y s ...................................
6 d a y s ........................................

100
<3)
3
<3)
1
1
<3>
80
2
78
4
3
(3)
10
8
2
2
<3>
1
(3)

100

_
3
1
2
49
49
12
10
1
27
13
15
9
5
4
~

100

_
93
3
90
1
1
5
5
-

1
1
-

100

_
76
76
13
13

100
(3 )
4
2
2
80
2
78
3
3

100

_
96
8
88
-

100

100

_
96
96
-

8
1
72
4
68
-

-

-

-

-

8
4
4
3

10
10

4
4

-

-

-

-

3
*

1
(3)

16
13
2
3
3

1

~

-

-

4
4

~

Office workers
All w o r k e r s .................................
L e s s t h a n 35 h o u r s ............................
3 d a y s . . . . ...................................
4 d a y s ........................................
5 d a y s ........................................
35 h o u r s - 5 d a y s .............................
37 1/2 hour s - 5 d a y s ........................
38 3/ 4 h o ur s - 5 d a y s ........................
40 h o u r s ........................................
4 d a y s ........................................
5 d a y s ........................................
O v e r 40 h o u r s - 5 1/2 d a y s ..................

100
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
2
2
(3)
94
1
93
2

100

_
2
1
-

100
(3)
(3)
12
3
-

100

_
1
1
-

95

84

98

-

-

-

95
2

84
1

98

1 Data rela te to the predom inant schedule for fu ll-tim e day.
sh ift w ork ers in each estab lish m en t.
2 Includes data for region s in addition to th ose shown sep a ra tely .

100
(3)
<3)
2
3
1
92
1
91
2

100

_
3
97
11
86
~

..too....
.

100

(3)
(3)
-

!

...

3
3
2
-

<3>
96

95

-

-

96
4

95
”

-

3 L e s s than 0 .5 p ercen t.
NOTE: B ecau se of rounding, sum s of individual ite m s m ay not
equal to ta ls.




Table 25. Shift differential provisions
(P e r c e n t o f production w ork ers by shift diffe re n tia l p r o v is io n s in w ood h ousehold furniture (e x cep t u ph olstered) m anufacturing establish m en ts,
United States and se le cte d region s, N ovem ber 1974)

Shift d i f f e r e n t i a l 1

United
States2

New
England

Bi dd le
Atla nt ic

Bo rd er
St at es

South­
e a st

South­
west

53.7
48.2
40 .2
2 .6
.8
.5
1 .1
2 2 .0
3.4
.4
7.2
.3
1.4
.5
6 .0
1 .8
4.0
.2
1 .0
1 .0

49.4
49.4
43.2
32.1
5.6
-

32.3
29.3
26.5
16.3
1 0 .2
-

79 .3
6 6 .2
60 .9
46.3
4.4
1.7

48.2
40.4
35 .3
5.6
.8
16.8
1 2 .2

61.1
57.0
57.0
5.7
1 2 .8
30.2
8.4

-

-

-

-

5.6
6 .2
2 .1
4.2
-

-

2 1 .1
2 1 .0
15.4
3.7
.5
2.5
5.1
2.3
1 .1
.2
3.4
1 .1
2.3
.7
1.4

Great
La ke s

P a ci fi c

Se c o n d shift
W o rk er s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s with
se c o n d shift p r o v i s i o n s ....................
With shift d i f f e r e n t i a l .................
Un i f o r m cents per h o u r ................
5 c e n t s ................................
7 c e n t s ................................
8 c e n t s ................................
9 c e n t s ................................
10 c e n t s ...............................
12 c e n t s ...............................
12 1 /2 c e n t s ..........................
15 c e n t s ...............................
19 c e n t s ...............................
20 c e n t s ...............................
25 c e n t s ...............................
U n i f o r m p e r c e n t a g e .....................
5 p e r c e n t ..............................
10 p e r c e n t ............................
15 p e r c e n t ............................
Fall d a y ’s pa y for r e d u c e d ho ur s. .. .
O t h e r ............................ ........

-

2 .8

8. 5
5.4
5.4
-

5.1
2.5
2. 6
-

19.4
19.4
17.3
7.1

19.8
18.5
15.7
3.0

11.5
11.5
11.5
10.5

14.2
14.2
10.3

-

-

-

~

49.5
49.5
41.4
3.4
4.9
20.7
4.5
2.4
1.9
2 .2
1 .2
8.1
8. 1
-

68.7
6 8 .0
31.7
4.9
18.9
4.1
3.8

32.4
32.4
25.8
1 .6
3.4
9.1
8.3
2 .2
1 .2
6 .6
6 .6
"

46.0
46.0
2 0 .8

-

17.5
17.5
10.5
8 .2

Th ir d or o t h e r la te shift
W o r k e r s in e s ta bl is hm en ts with th i r d
or o t h e r late shift p r o v i s i o n s ...........
Wi th shift d i f f e r e n t i a l .................
U n if or m cents per h o u r ................
10 c e n t s ...............................
11 c e n t s ...............................
12 c e n t s ...............................
15 c e n t s ............ ..................
18 c e n t s ............ ..................
20 c e n t s ...............................
35 c e n t s ..............................
U n if or m p e r c e n t a g e .....................
5 p e r c e n t ..............................
10 p e r c e n t ............................
Full d a y ’s pay for r e du ce d h o u r s. .. .
O t h e r .....................................

1 0 .2
2 .1
2 .1
-

-

1 R efer to p o lic ies of esta b lish m en ts cu rren tly operating la te
sh ifts or having p ro v isio n s covering la te sh ifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown sep a ra tely .

2.5
1 0 .2
2 .8

1 .0
-

-

2.3
7.1
.9
3.9
2.5
1.5
-

18.2
18.2
18.2
18.2
-

-

-

2.1
14.9
3.8
7.5
7.5
7.8
9.8

NOTE: B eca u se of rounding, sum s of individual ite m s m ay not
equal to ta ls.




Table 26. Paid holidays
(P e r c e n t o f p roduction and o ffic e w o rk e rs in w ood household fu rniture (e xce p t uph olstered) m anufacturing establish m en ts with fo rm a l
p r o v is io n s f o r paid holid ays, Unites States and s e le cte d re gio n s,

Number of pa i d holidays

U n it ed
St a t e s 1

New
E n gl an d

Middle
Atlantic

Border
St a t e s

South­
east

So u t h ­
west

Great
L a ke s

P a ci fi c

Production workers
All w o r k e r s .................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

W o r k e r s in es ta b l i s h m e n t s
p r o v i d i n g paid h o l i d a y s ....................
le ss th a n 3 d a y s ...........................
3 d a y s .......................................
4 d a y s or 4 pl u s 1 half d a y .............
5 d a y s .......................................
6 d a y s .......................................
6 da ys plus 1 or 2 half d a y s ............
7 d a y s .............................. ........
7 d a ys plus 1 half d a y ...................
7 d a y s pl u s 2 ha l f d a y s ..................
8 d a y s .......................................
8 d a y s plus 1 or 2 half d a y s ............
9 d a y s .......................................
9 da ys pl us 1 or 2 half d a y s ............
10 days or 10 p l us 1 half d a y ...........
11 days or m o r e ............................

95
2
10
7
13
13
1
10
2
1
10
1
17
1
6
2

100
3
11
4
18
8
3
14
4
23
1
7
2

100
15
1
6
5
16
1
13
14
11
18

95
7
13
31
20
3
9
1
3
5
1

92
2
19
6
23
12
8
1
6
10
5

88
4
1
15
16
25
2
21
5
-

100
1
1
18
2
14
1
3
15
2
29
1
12
1

100
1
19
6
3
12
3
48
7
1

All w o r k e r s .................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

97
1
5
2
8
23
2
11
3
1
13
1
19

100
1
3
2
17
7
4
28
1

100
12
1
3
7
20
1
33

100
4
1
4
8
60
1
10
3
5

88
19
4
15
18
10
2
8
6

100
(2)
23
3
11
3
3
11
4
29

7

12

4

4

7

98
4
38
15
25
1
9
6
-

3

7

18

"

~

100
2
19
2
3
2
26
38
6
2

O f f i c e w o rk er s

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
p r o v i d i n g paid h o l i d a y s ....................
Le ss th a n 3 d a y s ...........................
3 d a y s .......................................
4 da y s or 4 pl us 1 half d a y .............
5 days or 5 p l u s 2 half d a y s ............
6 d a y s .......................................
6 da y s plus 1 or 2 half d a y s ............
7 d a y s .......................................
7 da ys plus 1 ha lf d a y ...................
7 da y s pl us 2 ha lf d a y s ..................
8 d a y s .......................................
8 da ys plus 1 or 2 half d a y s ............
9 da y s plus 1 or 2 half d a y s ............
10 d a ys or 10 pl us 1 half d a y ...........
11 da y s or m o r e ............................

1 Includes data for region s in addition to those shown sep a ra g ely .
L e s s than 0 .5 p ercen t.
1

17

11

( 2)

.NOTE: B eca u se of rounding, sum s of individual ite m s m ay
not equal to ta ls.




Table 27. Paid vacations
(P ercen t of produ ction and o ffic e w o rk e rs in w ood household fu rniture (except u p h o lstered ) m anufacturing establish m en ts with
fo rm a l p ro v is io n s fo r paid vacation s after s e le cte d p e r io d s o f s e r v ic e , United States and s e le cte d re g io n s , N ovem ber 1974)

V a c a t io n p o l i c y

U n ite d
S ta tes i

New
E n gland

M id d le
A tla n tic

B order
S ta te s

S o u th ­
east

S ou th ­
w est

G rea t
Lakes

P a c ific

P r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s ..................................................................

100

10 0

100

10 0

10 0

100

100

100

M ethod o f paym ent
W orkers in e s t a b l is h m e n t s
p r o v i d i n g p a id v a c a t i o n s ........................................
Len gth o f tim e paym ent........................................
P e r c e n t a g e paym en t.................................................

98
65
33

100
60
40

100
86
14

97
45
52

96
54
42

94
83
11

10 0
65
35

10 0
10 0
*

1
77
6
9
3
1

2
93
6
-

99
1
-

91
2
-

3
61
6
17
7
2

92
_

76
19
5
_

86
3
11
_
_

1
62
11
15
6
1

2
48
34
16
-

70
20
10
-

84
4
3
2
-

3
52
6
19
14
3

93
1
-

50
27
23
_
-

76
3
21
_
_

2
33
39
25
1

30
30
40
-

65
10
15
2
_

3
44
6
26
14
3

74
3
18
_

17
40
37
5
_

_
7
3
90
_
_

2
93
4
1
-

8
3
71
16
1
-

45
10
41
2
-

1
16
2
59
3
13
4

15
79
-

2
1
74
19
4
_

4
3
71
22
-

3

45
5
39
5
4

16
1
42
1
24
13

15

2
1
27
21
46
3
-

4
3
16

Amount o f v a c a t i o n pay 2
A fte r 1 year o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 w eek................................................................
1 w eek..................................................................... ..
Over 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s ...................................
2 w ee k s...........................................................................
Over 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s...................................
3 w eeks............................................................................
A fte r 2 years o f s e r v ic e :
under 1 w eek................................................................
1 w eek..............................................................................
Over 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s...................................
2 w eek s............................................................................
Over 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s...................................
3 w e e k s............................................................................
A fte r 3 y ea rs o f s e r v ic e :
under 1 w eek................................................................
1 w eek..............................................................................
O ver 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ...................................
2 w ee k s............................................................................
Over 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s . . . . . .......................
3 w eeks............................................................................
A fte r 5 years o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 w eek................................................................
1 w eek..............................................................................
Over 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s...................................
2 w eeks............................................................................
Over 2 and un d er 3 w e e k s ..................................
3 w e e k s...........................................................................
Over 3 and un d er 4 w e e k s ...................................
A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek..............................................................................
Over 1 and un d er 2 w e e k s ...................................
2 w e e k s............................................................................
Over 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s...................................
3 w eeks............................................................................
Over 3 and u nd er 4 w e e k s ...................................
4 w e e k s ..........................................................................
A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek..............................................................................
Over 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s ...................................
2 w ee k s..................................... ......................................
O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ...................................
3 w eeks............................................................................
Over 3 and un d er 4 w e e k s ...................................
4 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s . . ..............................

See footn otes at end o f table,

1
39
16
34
7
1
(3)
15
3
64
6
8
2
14
1
38
8
29
' 6
1
14
1
22
3
44
7
7
( 3>

1
1
i
'
;
i

2

-

-

-

49
32
14
4

32
18
47

-

2
35
6
53
-

4

-

-

-

3
8

45
27
8
17
-

16
1
27
1
35
9
6

-

63
19
7

-

69
-

10
-

15
20
59
-

1
1
10
5
66
9
8

-

62
-

15
4
3
16
43
8
25




Table 27. Paid vacations — Continued
(P e r c e n t o f p rod u ction and o ffic e w ork ers in w ood household fu rn itu re (except u p h o lste red ) m anufacturing establish m en ts with fo r
fo r m a l p r o v is io n s fo r paid vacations after s e le cte d p e r io d s o f s e r v ic e , United States and se le cte d re g io n s , N ovem ber 1974)

V a c a t io n p o l i c y

U n ite d
S ta tes 1

New
E n gla n d

M id d le
A tla n tic

B order
S ta tes

S o u th ­
east

S o u th ­
w est

G rea t
L akes

P a c ific

O f f i c e w o rk e rs
A l l w o r k e r s ..................................................................

100

10 0

100

100

10 0

100

100

100

M ethod o f payment
W ork ers i n e s t a b l is h m e n t s
p r o v i d i n g p a id v a c a t i o n s .......................................
L e n g th o f t im e paym ent.......................................
P e r c e n t a g e paym en t.................................................

99
93
6

100
98
2

10 0
93
7

100
96
4

96
8$
10

97
84
13

10 0
95
5

10 0
10 0
-

1
58
3
34
1
(3)
1

3
52
46
-

76
1
23
-

53
42
-

3
39
44
5
1
3

86
10
-

1
57
13
29
-

62
38
-

1
39
9
48
1
(3)
1

3
13
84
-

48
19
32
-

43
5
46
2
-

2
30
2
52
5
2
3

85
12
-

1
35
20
43
<3 >
-

35
65
-

1
22
10
63
1
1
1

3
10
87
-

26
19
54
-

30
6
58
2
-

2
26
4
53
5
3
3

66
31
-

1
8
24
66
( 3)
<3>
-

5
95
-

( 3)
7
2
81
4
3
1

3
97
1
-

7
3
84
6
-

7
5
83
3
2
-

1
9
1
74
1
8
3

26
70
-

4
2
80
10
3
-

3
92
5
-

7
1
46
6
39
1
1

3
60
4
34

1
32
7
59

9

-

-

45
6
42

52
29
3
3

26
66
5
-

3
3
39
16
38
<3)
-

2
29
69
-

6
1

26
36
35
-

3
30
( 3)
55
3
8
“ .

Amount o f v a c a t i o n pay 2
A fte r 1 year o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 w eek................................................................
1 w e e k . . . . ....................................................................
Over 1 and u n d er 2 w ee k s...................................
2 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s..................................
3 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ..................................
A fte r 2 years o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 w eek................................................................
1 w e e k ..............................................................................
O ver 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s................. ................
2 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s..................................
3 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 3 and u nd er 4 w e e k s..................................
A fte r 3 y ea rs o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 w e e k ........................................................ ..
1 w eek .............................................................................
O ver 1 and u n d e r 2 w ee k s..................................
2 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 2 and u nd er 3 w eek s..................................
3 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w eek s..................................
A fte r 5 years o f s e r v ic e :
under 1 w eek................................................................
1 w e e k ..............................................................................
O ver 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s......................... ..
2 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 2 and u nd er 3 w eek s..................................
3 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s..................................
A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w e e k ..............................................................................
O ver 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s..................................
2 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 2 and u nd er 3 w ee k s..................................
3 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s..................................
O ver 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s ..................................
A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek ..............................................................................
O ver 1 and un d er 2 w ee k s..................................
2 w e e k s . . .......................................................................
O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w ee k s..................................
3 w e e k s ............................................................................
O ver 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s..................................
4 w e e k s ............................................................................
Over 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s..................................
See footn otes at end o f table,

-

2

3
32
63
-

9

2

1

-

33
<3)
47

7

-

-

-

-

1

7
40
53
-

16
53
6

24
-

9
41
1

28
3
11

3

2

29
5"2
17
-




Table 27. Paid vacations — Continued
(P ercen t of p rod u ction and o ffic e w o rk e rs in w ood h ousehold fu rn itu re (except u p h o lste re d ) m anufacturing establish m en ts with
fo rm a l p r o v is io n s fo r paid vacation s after s e le cte d p e r io d s o f s e r v ic e , United States and s e le cte d re g io n s , N ovem ber 1974)

V acation p o lic y

United
States 4

Hew
England

over

1

ailQ ullvlci £•

weONO
•••••••••••••**

OV6t z

an a u n a e i

j

wccao•••••••••■•••*•

Over

^

ana u na er

u

w e e n s.................... ..

0V€E *
1

Sind under

D W KS • ••••••••••••••
cc

^ ^
3

a

a

|
(

Border
States

I
I

Sootheast

Gr e a t
La ke s

| South­

west

Pacific

P rod u ction w o rk e rs

Am ount o f vacation pay2
I f te r 20 years of service: 4

B i dd le
Atlantic

14
1
22
3
35
7
13
1
2

2
-

35
6
29
9
15
4
-

3
8
55
1
20
13
-

45
27
8
14
3
-

16
1
27
1
32
9
9

56
3

“

"

-

-

9
41
1
21
3
18
3

26

4
3
16

1
1
10
5
38
15
28

15
20

37
8
16

1

15

O ffice w o rk e rs

if t e r 20 ye ar s o f service: 4
1 w eek. . . . .. ..__^ _____ w^
Over 1 ana un a er z w e e n s•• •••••••••••••
o v e r z ana unuci j w t j c a o •••••• •• *• **
Over 3 and under h weeivs•• •• •••••••••••
over

ana unacx. 3 ■w i w o •••••••••••••■*

6
(*)
33
(3)
34
4
20
1
(’)

1 Includes data fo r re gio n s in addition to those shown s e p ­
ara te ly .
* V acation p aym en ts, such as p e r c e n t o f annual e arn in gs,
w e re converted to an equivalent tim e b a s is . P e r io d s o f s e r v ic e
w e re chosen a r b itra rily and do not n e c e s s a r ily r e fle c t individual
establishm ent p ro v is io n s fo r p r o g r e s s io n . F o r exam ple changes
indicated at 10 years m ay include change that o c c u r r e d betw een

3
-

32
-

46
4
16
-

1
16
44
1
38
-

7
40
43
10
-

”

33
37
”

_
2
31
<s>
22
12
31

2
29
“
47
22

1

5 and 10 y e a r s .
3 L e s s than 0 .5 p e r c e n t.
4 V acation p r o v is io n s w ere v irtu a lly the sam e after lon ger
p e r io d s o f s e r v ic e .
N OTE: B ecau se o f rounding,
not equal totals.

sum s o f individual item s m ay

Table 28. Health, insurance, and retirement plans
(P e r c e n t o f p ro d u c tio n and o ffic e w o rk e rs in w ood household furniture (except u p h o lste re d ) m anufacturing e stablish m en ts with s p e c ifie d health, in su ran ce, and r e tire m e n t plans, United States and s elected
r e g io n s , N ovem ber 1974)

T yp e o f p la n 1

U n ite d
S ta te s 2

New
England

M id d le
A tla n tic

B order
S ta tes

S o u th ­
east

S o u th ­
w est

G re a t
L akes

P a c ific

U n ite d
S ta tes 2

New
E n gland

M id d le
A tla n tic

Pr o d u c t i o i i w o rk e rs
A l l w o r k e r s .....................................................

B order
S ta tes

S ou th ­
east

S o u th ­
w e st

G rea t
L akes

P a c ific

O f f i c e w o rk e rs

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

94
52

98
69

99
82

93
34

96
34

95
48

96
75

77
69

92
58

100
73

85
69

90
31

95
46

94
53

94
69

82
73

69
41

91
63

80
67

40
18

71
24

52
31

79
61

77
69

74
50

95
69

71
58

55
22

70
35

62
37

84
65

81
72

69

74

73

82

63

61

88

47

70

91

73

75

53

46

92

49

64
36

69
48

67
59

82
34

59
21

59
28

84
61

32
32

50
36

65
42

61
54

30
23

36
19

29
14

86
64

25
25

4

-

7

-

5

2

1

10

35

48

17

51

34

17

35

36

3
5
2
97
52
97
52
90
50
83
45
72
70
68
3
1

4

-

-

-

-

100
43
100
43
99
42
74
36
72
72
72
4
-

100
70
100
70
93
67
57
36
80
78
73
2

96
53
96
53
90
50
86
48
82
82
79

4
4
97
32
97
32
84
30
86
29
75
71
71
5 '
1

_

-

10
3

9
11
3
96
76
96
76
95
75
78
66
65
64
56
2
1

5
3
3
93
82
93
82
93
82
93
82
66
66
63

6
19
12
98
63
98
63
93
62
88
58
66
64
62
2
1

15
2
2
100
55
100
55
99
54
86
54
71
71
71

17
9
5
93
69
93
69
90
67
69
52
69
64
60
4
4

2
29
25
99
61
99
61
95
58
91
57
90
90
89

9
28
10
100
77
100
77
99
76
89
68
59
58
56
1
<•»

4
16
16
94
82
94
82
94
82
94
82
50
50
49

W ork ers i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g ;

*

0)

L i f e i n s u r a n c e ................................................
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ..........................
A c c i d e n t a l d e a t h and
dism em berm ent i n s u r a n c e .......................
W o n c o n t r ib u t o r y p l a n s .........................
S i c k n e s s and a c c i d e n t in s u r a n c e o r
s i c k l e a v e o r b o t h 3 ............................
S i c k n e s s and a c c i d e n t
i n s u r a n c e .....................................................
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ....................
S ic k l e a v e ( f u l l p a y .
no w a it i n g p e r i o d ) ...............................
S ic k l e a v e ( p a r t i a l pay
o r w a it i n g p e r i o d ) ...............................
L o n g -te r m d i s a b i l i t y i n s u r a n c e . . . .
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ..........................
H o s p i t a l i z a t i o n i n s u r a n c e .....................
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ..........................
S u r g i c a l i n s u r a n c e ......................................
N c n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ..........................
H e d ic a l i n s u r a n c e .........................................
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ..........................
( la j o r m e d ic a l i n s u r a n c e ..........................
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ..........................
R e t ir e m e n t p l a n s 4 ...................................
Pens i o n s ..........................................................
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s .....................
S e v e r a n c e p a y ..............................................
No p l a n s ....................... .......................................

-

-

-

1 "N on con tribu tory p la n s " includ e only th ose plans financed e n tire ly by the e m p lo y e r . L ega lly
r e q u ir e d plans such as w o r k e r s ' co m p e n sa tio n and s o c ia l se cu rity a re excluded; how ever, plans r e ­
qu ired by state te m p o r a r y d is a b ility law s a r e included if the e m p lo y e r contribu tes m o r e than is
le g a lly r e q u ir e d o r the e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e b en efits in e x c e s s o f le g a l req u ire m e n ts.
2 Inclu des data fo r re g io n s in addition to th ose shown se p a ra te ly.
3 U nduplicated to ta l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g sick n e ss and accid en t insurance and s ick leave
shown s e p a ra te ly .




21
-

98
57
98
57
98
57
97
56
62
62
62
-

-

-

7

_
-

~

_
17
12
99
48
99
48
84
46
92
45
68
62
62
6
(5)

_
19
9
96
59
96
59
96
59
94
57
48
48
39
-

4 Unduplicated total o f w o rk e rs c o v e r e d by p en sion s and se v e r a n c e pay shown sep a ra tely.
5 L e s s than 0 .5 p e r c e n t.
N OTE:

B ecau se o f rounding,

sum s o f individual item s m ay not equal to ta ls .

6




Table 29. Other selected benefits
(P e rce n t of p roduction and o ffic e w o rk e rs in w ood household furn itu re (e x ce p t uph olstered) m anufacturing establish m en ts with fo rm a l
p r o v is io n s fo r funeral leave pay, ju ry duty pay, and tech n o lo g ica l se v e ra n ce pay United States and se le cte d reg ion s, N ovem ber 1974)

Type o f b e n e f i t 1

U nited
S ta te s 2

New
England

R id d le
A t la n t ic

B order
S ta te s

South­
ea st

South­
west

Great
la k e s

30
38
-

67
55
13

33
29
3

37
47

71
64
11

25
32
4

P a c ific
•

P rod u ction workers
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts
w ith p ro v is io n s f o r :

T e c h n o lo g ic a l severa n ce pay................................

38
53
3

71
77

66
39

-

-

23
68
-

23
56
1

O f f i c e w orkers
Workers in e sta b lish m e n ts
with p r o v is io n s f o r :

T e c h n o lo g ic a l severa n ce p a y . . . .........................
1 F o r definition fo item s, see appendix A.

50
59
5

85
90
-

69
48
-

35
82
12

33
52
~

'

2 Includes data fo r region s in addition to those shown sep ­
arately.

Appendix A. Regression Analysis
C o n v e n tio n a l m e th o d s o f an a ly zin g w age variation s using

or $ 2 .9 0 i f o th e r th in g s are h eld c o n sta n t. I f th ese w ork ers

c r o ss-ta b u la tio n s (sim p le reg ressio n ) o f d ata ty p ic a lly sto p

are lo c a te d in a m e tr o p o lita n area, a n o th er 7 c e n ts is a d d ed

sh ort o f m easu rin g th e in d e p e n d e n t in flu e n c e o n w age

to th e c o n sta n t term . T h u s in c lu d e d , th e average h o u r ly

lev els o f su ch fa cto rs as size o f e sta b lish m e n t, lo c a tio n , and

earnings w o u ld b e raised to $ 2 .9 7 .

u n io n co n tr a c t sta tu s. T he in d e p e n d e n t e ffe c t o f u n io n iz a ­

Wage d iffe r e n c e s fo u n d b y a sim p le c ro ss-ta b u la tio n can

tio n o n earn in gs, for e x a m p le , m a y be o b scu red so m e w h a t

be la b eled gross d iffe r e n tia ls, and th o s e iso la te d b y regres­

b y earnings d iffe r e n tia ls a sso cia ted w ith larger e sta b lish ­

sion te c h n iq u e s, n e t d iffe r e n tia ls. A s illu stra ted in ta b le A -2 ,

m e n ts and lo c a tio n in m e tr o p o lita n areas—tw o ch aracteris­

n e t d iffe r e n tia ls are g en era lly sm aller th a n gross d iffe r e n ­

tics g en erally fo u n d m o re o fte n w ith u n io n th a n n o n u n io n

tia ls. T he sm aller size o f n e t w age d iffe r e n tia ls is to b e e x ­

esta b lish m e n ts.

p e c te d , b eca u se o f th e a fo r e m e n tio n e d te n d e n c y fo r ch arac­
o f iso la tin g th e in d e p e n d e n t e ff e c t o n

teristics a sso c ia te d w ith h igh er w a g es, su ch as u n io n iz a tio n

w ages o f various e sta b lish m e n t and w ork er ch a racteristics

and m e tr o p o lita n lo c a tio n , to b e fo u n d in c o m b in a tio n .

O ne

m e th o d

is m u ltip le regression . B y th is m e th o d , th e e stim a te d w age

R egression te c h n iq u e s, th u s , p erm it a m o re p recise m ea su re­

d iffe r e n tia l for a given variable is d eterm in ed in d e p e n d e n tly

m e n t o f th e im p a ct o f in d ivid u al fa c to r s o n th e w age stru c­

o f th e in flu e n c e o f o th e r su rvey variables. T he variables

ture o f an in d u str y .

in c lu d e d in tab le A -l

R egression resu lts h e lp to clarify or su b sta n tia te o b serv a ­

are d e fin e d , w h ere n ecessa ry , in

a p p e n d ix B , S c o p e and M eth o d o f S u rvey.

tio n s m ad e from sim p le cro ss-ta b u la tio n s. A s m e n tio n e d in

In th e regression a n a ly sis, o n e c a te g o r y o f ea ch o f th e

th e m ain part o f th is rep o rt, variation in w ages b y p rin cip al

variables in th e e q u a tio n is n o t sh o w n e x p lic itly , b u t its

fu rn itu re m a n u fa ctu red are in flu e n c e d b y th e d istr ib u tio n

in flu e n c e is e m b o d ie d in th e co n sta n t term . In tab le A - l ,

o f w ork ers a m o n g h igh and lo w p a y in g reg io n s. T he regres­

th e r e fo r e , th e ca teg o ries rep resen ted b y th e c o n sta n t term

sion

are n o n m e tr o p o lita n area, sm all e m p lo y m e n t siz e , th e tw o

k itc h e n ca b in e t m an u fa ctu rin g w ere h ig h ly sig n ifica n t even

p rin cip al p r o d u c ts o f b e d r o o m and d in in g r o o m /k itc h e n

w h e n region al and o th e r fa c to r s are h eld c o n sta n t. N e t d if­

fu rn itu re, n o n u n io n p la n t, and S o u th e a s t. F or th e se le c te d

feren tials o f th e se p la n ts over th o s e m ak in g b e d r o o m or

in d ic a te s

th a t

w age

d iffe r e n tia ls

a sso c ia te d

w ith

o c c u p a tio n s, fem a le w ork er and p a y m e n t o n a tim e basis

dining r o o m /k itc h e n fu rn itu re ranged from 18 to 9 7 c e n ts

w ere a d d e d .1 T he average w age lev el relatin g to th is set o f

a m on g th e jo b s stu d ied sep a ra tely .

su p p ressed ch aracteristics is rep resen ted b y th e value o f th e

It sh o u ld b e em p h a siz e d th a t th e regression an alysis is

c o n sta n t te r m , and th e c o e ffic ie n ts o f th e e x p lic it variables

n o t su ffic ie n tly c o m p le te to say w ith c e r ta in ty th a t w e have

rep resen t th e d iffe r e n tia ls a sso cia ted w ith ca teg o ries o f th e

m easu red th e tru ly in d e p e n d e n t im p a ct o n w age lev els o f

ch aracteristics w h ic h d iffer from th e b asic set e m b o d ie d in

particular ch a ra cteristics. A s tab le A -l sh o w s, th e regression

th e c o n sta n t.

an alysis le f t u n e x p la in e d a b o u t 5 6 p ercen t o f th e variation

T o d e te r m in e th e e ffe c ts o f th e c o e ffic ie n ts o n average

in average earnings lev els for all p r o d u c tio n w ork ers and b e ­

w age le v e ls, su b stitu te th e valu es o f th e n e w variables in

tw e e n 3 9 and 5 9 p ercen t o f th e variation in earnings fo r

tab le A -l fo r th o s e su p p ressed in th e c o n sta n t term . F or e x ­

th e five se le c te d o c c u p a tio n s . (S e e c o e ffic ie n t o f d e te r m in a ­

a m p le , i f th e p r o d u c tio n w ork ers are in a u n io n sh o p , th e

tio n , R 2 .) T his m ea n s th a t o th e r fa c to r s, b e y o n d th e sc o p e

e stim a te d average h o u r ly earnings are h igher b y 2 7 c e n ts ,

o f th e su r v e y , u n d o u b te d ly in flu e n c e d th e e stim a te s. H o w ­
ever, b y h o ld in g c o n sta n t th o s e ch aracteristics w ith in th e

1For assemblers, the subcategory subassemblies is also embodied
in the constant.




survey sc o p e , a d e fin ite im p r o v e m e n t in th e e stim a te s for
sp e c ifie d ch aracteristics w as o b ta in e d .

48

Table A-1.

Regression analysis of average hourly earnings, all production workers and selected occupations, wood house­

hold furniture (except upholstered) manufacturing. United States, November 1974
Selected occupations
Variable

All
production
workers

Assem­
blers,
fu rn itu re
(except
chairs)

O ffbearers,
machine

Rip-saw
operators

Sanders,
fu rn itu re,
machine

Tenoner
operators
(set-up
and
operate)

$ 2 .6 3
(.07)
.16
(.07)
.07
(.07)
.27
(.07)

$ 2 .2 2
(.07)
.20
(.05)
.02
(.05)
.19
(.05)

$ 2 .3 2
(.05)
.02
(.04)
.11
(.04)
.09
(.05)

$2.51
(.11)
.06
(.08)
.11
(.07)
.21
(.08)

$ 2 .4 0
(.08)
.21
(.05)
.18
(.06)
.14
(.06)

$ 2 .7 5
(.23)
.36
(.09)
.04
(.08)
.05
(.10)

.69
(.10)
-.18
(.12)
-.08
(.08)

.97
(.07)
-.16
(.08)
.01
(.06)

.57
(.08)
.04
(.09)
-.04
(.06)

.52
(.12)
-.26
(.16)
-.17
(.08)

.49
(.09)
-.10
(.10)
-.19
(.06)

.18
(.13)
.05
(.17)
-.06
(.11)

.28
(.13)
.17
(.13)

.04
(.11)
-.21
(.0 9)
.08
(.07)
-.47
(.09)
.16
(.08)
.65
(.09)
.39
(.05)
.50
(.05)
.26
(.0 5)
.13
(.06)

.21
(.11)
.48
(.09)
-.09
(.05)
-.07
(.10)
.41
(.08)
.81
(.10)
.11
(.04)
.41
(.06)
-

.14
(.14)
.17
(.15)
-.12
(.10)
-.27
(.14)
.38
(.12)
1.37
(.12)
.22
(.09)
.49
(.10)
-

.48
(.11)
.30
(.11)
-.06
(.07)
-.17
(.11)
.39
(.09)
.58
(.10)
.33
(.05)
.50
(.06)
-

.33
(.22)
.16
(.19)
-.05
(.13)
-.47
(.14)
.37
(.14)
1.35
(.16)
.32
(.20)
.28
(.10)
-

C o n s ta n t..............................................................................................................
M etropolitan a r e a .............................................................................................
2 5 0 workers or m o r e .......................................................................................
Union s h o p ..........................................................................................................
Principal product:
Kitchen cabinets...................................................................................
R ad io-T V cabinets................................................................................
Other living room f u r n i t u r e ............................................................
Regions:
New E n g lan d ..........................................................................................
Middle A t l a n t i c ...................................................................................
Border States..........................................................................................

(.09)
-.20
(.13)
.42
(.10)
.68
(.12)

S o u th w e s t.............................................................................................
Great L a k e s ..........................................................................................
<
P acific.......................................................................................................
Male w o r k e r ....................................................................................................

-

Incentive pay s y s te m ......................................................................................

-

Assembling complete pieces (case g o od s)..................................................

-

Assembling complete pieces (except case g o o d s ) .................................

-

Statistical inform ation:
C oefficient of determ ination (R 1 ) ..................................................
2
Standard error of the e s tim a te ........................................................
Mean ( Y ) ................................................................................................
N um ber of observations ( N ) ............................................................
Num ber of establishments (S) .........................................................

.44
$ 0 .5 2
$ 3 .0 5
33 6
336

1 Less than $ 0 .0 5 .

.61
$ 0 .3 5
$2.71
39 0
24 6

.58
$ 0 .5 0
$ 3 .1 5
313
242

.41
$ 0 .5 3
$ 3 .0 6
62 8
266

.60
$ 0 .5 0
$ 3 .5 8
199
63

about 19 out of 2 0 th at the difference would be less than twice the
standard error. Y is the mean of the earnings (dependent) variable
weighted by production workers, N is the number of observations
used in each regression equation, treating tim e and incentive workers,
men and wom en, and subclassifications of assemblers and sanders
in a firm as separate observations. S is the number of establishments
in the sample or w ith employees in the occupations shown above.

N O TE : Dashes indicate not applicable. Numbers in parenthesis
are standard errors. Since the regression coefficients are based on a
sample, they may differ from the figures that would have been
obtained from a complete census of the industry. Chances are about
2 out of 3 that an estimate from the sample would d iffer from those
in a total census-derived value by less than the standard error, and




.50
$ 0 .6 2
$ 3 .0 8
915
308

49

Table A-2.
Earnings differentials associated with selected characteristics, wood household furniture (except upholstered)
industry, November 1974
Selected occupations
Characteristic

All
production
workers

Assem­
blers,
fu rn itu re
(except
chairs)

O ffbearers,
machine

Rip-saw
operators

Sanders,
fu rn itu re,
machine

Tenoner
operators
set-up
and
operate)

$ 0 .4 4
.16
(.07)

$ 0 .4 5
.20
(.05)

$ 0 .2 4
.02
(.04)

$ 0 .5 4
.06
(.08)

$ 0 .3 4
.21
(.05)

$ 0 .6 6
.36
(.09)

.64
.27
(.07)

.52
.19
(.05)

.59
.09
(.05)

.76
.21
(.08)

.56
.14
(.06)

.68
.05
(.10)

1.08
.68
(.12)

1.26
.65
(.09)

1.10
.81
(.10)

1.55
1.37
(.12)

.82
.58
(.1 0 )

1.64
1.35
(.16)

1.07
.69
(.10)

1.23
.97
(.07)

1.03
.57
(.08)

1.05
.52
(.12)

.81
.49
(.09)

.84
.18
(.13)

M e tro p o lita n vs. rionm etropolitan area:
Gross d i f f e r e n t ia l................................................................................
N et d i f f e r e n t ia l...................................................................................
*
Union vs. nonunion:
Gross d i f f e r e n t ia l................................................................................
N et d i f f e r e n t ia l...................................................................................

Pacific vs. Southeast:
Gross d i f f e r e n t ia l................................................................................
Net d i f f e r e n t ia l...................................................................................

Kitchen cabinets vs. bedroom and
dining room fu rn itu re:
Gross d i f f e r e n t ia l................................................................................
Net d i f f e r e n t ia l...................................................................................




50

Appendix B. Scope and Method of Survey
factory basis and camp furniture weije included. Separate
auxiliary units such as central offices were excluded.,
Establishments studied were selected from those employ­
ing 20 workers or more at the time of reference of the data
used in compiling the universe lists. Table B-l shows the
number of establishments and workers estimated to be
within the scope of the survey, as well as the, number ac­
tually studied by the Bureau.

Scope of survey

The survey included establishments engaged primarily
in manufacturing wood household furniture (except uphol­
stered) commonly used in dwellings (SIC 2511 as defined in
the 1967 edition of the S ta n d a rd In du strial Classification
M anual , prepared by the U.S. Office of Management and
Budget). Manufacturers of wood kitchen cabinets on a

Table B-1.
Estimated number of establishments and workers within scope of study and number actually studied, wood
household furniture (except upholstered) manufacturing industry, November 1974
Num ber of
Region,

1

state, and area

2

Workers in establishments
A ctu ally
studied

W ithin scope of study

W ithin
scope of
study

A ctually
studied

T o ta l4

Production
workers

O ffice
workers

Total

United States5 ................................................................................

1,121

336

1 4 4,22 7

12 2 ,3 5 0

6 ,6 1 3

8 2 ,6 6 6

New E ng land.......................................................................................................

82

30

8 ,7 7 6

6 ,9 6 2

65 0

5,421
1,683
5,5 7 4
1,1 36
1 3 ,606
1,454
1 2 ,7 7 9
3 1 ,6 9 8
9 ,3 7 6

19
178
12
55
7
36
302
45

1,527
10 ,912
1,0 60
1 5 ,710
1,288
1 4 ,284
4 8 ,3 7 2
1 1 ,475

10
15

1,3 23
7,6 0 5

1,071
6 ,7 3 7

47
254

857
5,471

16
22
13
72
13
13
29
35

9 ,4 4 4
9 ,3 8 9
5,9 8 7
2 3 ,4 3 0
2 ,0 5 4
2 ,3 8 3
10 ,9 0 5
13 ,9 2 2

8 ,5 4 6
7,7 4 8
5 ,1 0 3
19 ,255
1,717
1,912
9 ,2 4 2
11 ,562

28 6
525
29 6
1,401
90
169
56 ^
626

6,221
6 ,9 0 3
4 ,9 7 7
; 13 ,984
1,5 84
2 ,1 0 2
7,4 7 0
4 ,6 3 6

109

A rk a n s a s ................................................................................................
Great L a k e s .......................................................................................................
Chicago, II I ...............................................................................................
Grand Rapids, M ic h ..............................................................................
In d ia n a ....................................................................................................
P acific................................................................................ ....................................
Los Angeles-Long
Beach, C a lif.......................................................................................

1,892
13 ,4 4 8
1,297
1 8 ,4 2 0
1,5 39
16 ,6 8 6
5 4 ,5 7 5
12 ,7 2 6

34
73
28
204
29
18
65
190

S o u t h w e s t ................................................................................................................................................................

11
41
9
27
6
21
101
25

24
36

Gardner, M a s s ......................................................................................
Middle A t l a n t i c ................................................................................................
Jamestown, N. Y ...................................................................................
Border States.......................................................................................................
Louisville, K y .-ln d ................................................................................
V ir g in ia ....................................................................................................
S ou theast..............................................................................................................
Hickory-Statesville, N .C ......................................................................
M iam i and Fort-Lauderdale—
H ollyw oo d, F la .................................................................. ...
Tennessee.................................................................................................
W inston -S alem High Point, N . C ..............................................................................

21

7 ,2 0 4

5 ,9 4 4

33 3

2,5 8 5

data include areas in addition to those shown separately.
2 For d e fin itio n of the selected areas, see fo otn ote 1, tables
9 -12, 14-17, and 20.
3 Includes only establishments w ith 20 workers or more at the
tim e of reference of the universe data.
4 Includes executive, professional and other workers excluded
from the production and office worker categories shown separately.
5 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
Alaska and Hawaii were not included in the study.

JThe regions used in this study include: N e w E n g la n d — Con­
necticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island,
and V erm o nt; M i d d l e A t l a n t i c — New Jersey, New Y o rk , and Pen­
nsylvania; B o r d e r S t a t e s — Delaware, District of Columbia, K entucky,
M aryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; S o u t h e a s t — Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee;
S o u t h w e s t — Arkansas,
Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas; G r e a t
L a k e s — Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin;
and P a c if ic — California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington. Regional




16 4
811^
93
987
91
863
. 1,4 88
257

51

Products

of job descriptions designed to take account of interestab­
lishment and interarea variations in duties within the same
job. (See appendix C for these descriptions.) The criteria
for selection of the occupations were: The number of
workers in the occupation; the usefulness of the data in col­
lective bargaining; and appropriate representation of the
entire job scale in the industry. Working supervisors, appren­
tices, learners, beginners, trainees, and handicapped, parttime, temporary, and probationary workers were not re­
ported in the data for selected occupations but were in­
cluded in the data for all production workers.

Classification of establishments by product was based
on the principal type of furniture manufactured. For ex­
ample, if 40 percent of the total value of an establishment’s
production was bedroom furniture, 30 percent was dining
room and kitchen furniture, and 30 percent was living room,
library, and hall furniture, all workers in that establishment
were considered as producing bedroom furniture.
Method of study

Data were obtained by personal visits of the Bureau’s
field staff to a representative sample of establishments with­
in the scope of the survey. To obtain appropriate accuracy
at a minimum cost, a greater proportion of large than of
small establishments was studied. In combining the data,
however, all establishments were given an appropriate
weight. All estimates are presented, therefore, as relating
to ah establishments in the industry, excluding only those
below the minimum size at the time of reference of the
universe data.

Wage data

Information on wages relates to straight-time hourly
earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for work
on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Incentive payments,
such as those resulting from piecework or production bonus
systems, and cost-of-living bonuses were included as part of
the workers’ regular pay. Nonproduction bonus payments,
such as Christmas or yearend bonuses, were excluded.
A verage (m ea n ) h o u rly rates o r earnings for each occu­
pation or category of workers, such as production workers,
were calculated by weighting each rate (or hourly earnings)
by the number of workers receiving the rate, totaling, and
dividing by the number of individuals. The hourly earnings
of salaried workers were obtained by dividing straight-time
salary by normal (or standard) hours to which the salary
corresponds.

Establishment definition

An establishment is defined for this study as a single
physical location where manufacturing operations are per­
formed. An establishment is not necessarily identical with
a company, which may consist of one establishment or
more.

The m edian designates position; that is, one-half of the
employees surveyed received more than this rate and onehalf received less. The m id d le range is defined by two rates
of pay such that one-fourth of the employees earned less
than the lower of these rates and one-fourth earned more
than the higher rate.

Employment

Estimates of the number of workers within the scope
of the study are intended as a general guide to the size and
composition of the industry’s labor force, rather than as
precise measures of employment.

Size of community
Production workers and office workers

Tabulations by size of community pertain to metropol­
itan and nonmetropolitan areas. The term “metropolitan
areas,” as used in this bulletin, refers to the Standard Metro­
politan Statistical Areas as defined by the U.S. Office of
Management and Budget through February 1974.
Except in New England, a Standard Metropolitan Statis­
tical Area is defined as a county or group of contiguous
counties which contains at least one city of 50,000 inhabi­
tants or more. Counties contiguous to the one containing
such a city are included in a Standard Metropolitan Statis­
tical Area if, according to certain criteria, they are essen­
tially metropolitan in character and are socially and eco­
nomically integrated with the central city. In New England,
where the city and town are administratively more impor­
tant than the county, they are the units used in defining
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas.

The terms “production workers” and “production and
related workers,” used interchangeably in this bulletin, in­
clude working supervisors and all nonsupervisory workers
engaged in nonoffice activities. Administrative, executive,
professional, and technical personnel, and force-account
construction employees, who are used as a separate work
force on the firm’s own properties, are excluded.
“Office workers” includes all nonsupervisory office
workers and excludes administrative, executive, profes­
sional, and technical employees.
Occupations selected for study

Occupational classification was based on a uniform set



52

Labor-management agreements

Supplementary benefits

Separate wage data are presented, where possible, for
establishments that had (1) a majority of the production
workers covered by labor-management contracts, and (2)
none or a minority of the production workers covered by
labor-management contracts.

Supplementary benefits in an establishment were con­
sidered applicable to all production (office) workers if they
applied to half or more of such workers in the establish­
ment. Similarly, if fewer than half of the workers were cov­
ered, the benefit was considered nonexistent in the estab­
lishment. Because of length-of-service and other eligibility
requirements, the proportion of workers receiving the bene­
fits may be smaller than estimated.

Method of wage payment

Tabulations by method of wage payment relate to the
number of workers paid under the various time and incen­
tive wage systems. Formal rate structures for time-rated
workers provide single rates or a range of rates for indi­
vidual job categories. In the absence of a formal rate struc­
ture, pay rates are determined primarily by the qualifica­
tions of the individual worker. A single rate structure is one
in which the same rate is paid to all experienced workers in
the same job classification. (Learners, apprentices, or proba­
tionary workers may be paid according to rate schedules
which start below the single rate and permit the workers
to achieve the full job rate over a period of time.) An exper­
ienced worker occasionally may be paid above or below the
single rate for special reasons, but such payments are excep­
tions. Range-of-rate plans are those in which the minimum,
maximum, or both of these rates paid experienced workers
for the same job are specified. Specific rates of individual
workers within the range may be determined by merit,
length of service, or a combination of these. Incentive
workers are classified under piecework or bonus plans.
Piecework is work for which a predetermined rate is paid
for each unit of output. Production bonuses are for produc­
tion in excess of a quota or for completion of a task in less
than standard time.

P aid h o lid a ys. Paid holiday provisions relate to full-day and

half-day holidays provided annually.
P aid vacations. The summaries of vacation plans are limited

to formal arrangements and exclude informal plans where­
by time off with pay is granted at the discretion of the em­
ployer or supervisor. Payments not on a time basis were
converted; for example, a payment of 2 percent of annual
earnings was considered the equivalent of 1 week’s pay. The
periods of service for which data are presented represent
the most common practices, but they do not necessarily
reflect individual establishment provisions for progression.
For example, changes in proportions indicated at 10 years
of service may include changes which occurred between 5
and 10 years.
H ealth , insurance , an d re tire m e n t plans. Data are presented

for health, insurance, pension, and retirement severance
plans for which the employer pays all or a part of the cost,
excluding programs required by law such as workers’ com­
pensation and social security. Among plans included are
those underwritten by a commercial insurance company
and those paid directly by the employer from current oper­
ating funds or from a fund set aside for this purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form of life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of
insurance under which predetermined cash payments are
made directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly basis
during illness or accident disability. Information is pre­
sented for all such plans to which the employer contributes
at least a part of the cost. However, in New York and New
Jersey, where temporary disability insurance laws require
employer contributions,1 plans are included only if the em­
ployer (1) contributes more than is legally required, or (2)
provides the employees with benefits which exceed the re­
quirements of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to formal
plans which provide full pay or a proportion of the worker’s
pay during absence from work because of illness; informal
arrangements have been omitted. Separate tabulations are
provided for (1) plans which provide full pay and no wait­
ing period, and (2) plans providing either partial pay or a
waiting period.

Minimum rates

Minimum entrance rates are the lowest formal rates es­
tablished for inexperienced time-rated workers employed
as hand furniture sanders and machine off-bearers. Ex­
cluded are incentive paid workers and hourly-rated learners
who eventually will be on an incentive basis.
Scheduled weekly hours

Data on weekly hours refer to the predominant work
schedule for full-time production workers (or office
workers) employed on the day shift.

Shift provisions and practices

Shift provisions relate to the policies of establishments
either currently operating late shifts or having formal pro­
visions covering late-shift work. Practices relate to workers
employed on late shifts at the time of the survey.



! The temporary disability insurance laws in California and
Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.

53

retiree’s life. Data are presented separately for retirement
severance pay (one payment or several over a specified
period of time) made to employees on retirement. Estab­
lishments providing both retirement severance payments
and retirement pensions to employees were considered as
having both retirement pensions and retirement severance
plans; however, establishments having optional plans pro­
viding employees a choice of either retirement severance
payments or pensions were considered as having only retire­
ment pension benefits.

Long-term disability insurance plans provide payments
to totally disabled employees upon the expiration of sick
leave, sickness and accident insurance, or both, or after a
predetermined period of disability (typically 6 months).
Payments are made until the end of disability, a maximum
age, or eligibility for retirement benefits. Payments may be
full or partial, but are almost always reduced by social
security, workers’ compensation, and private pension bene­
fits payable to the disabled employee.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete
or partial payment of doctors’ fees. Such plans may be
underwritten by a commercial insurance company or a non­
profit organization, or they may be a form of self-insurance.
Major medical insurance, sometimes referred to as ex­
tended medical or catastrophe insurance, includes plans
designed to cover employees for sickness or injury involving
an expense which exceeds the normal coverage of hospitali­
zation, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to plans
which provide regular payments for the remainder of the




P aid fu n era l a n d ju r y -d u ty leave. Data for paid funeral and

jury-duty leave relate to formal plans which provide at least
partial payment for time lost as a result of attending fun­
erals of specified family members or serving as a juror.
T echnological severance p a y . Data relate to formal plans
providing for payments to employees permanently sepa­
rated from the company because of a technological change
or plant closing.

54

Appendix C. Occupational Descriptions
The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to assist
its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a
variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment
and from area to area. This permits the grouping of occupational wage rates representing com­
parable job content. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability
of occupational content, the Bureau’s job descriptions may differ significantly from those in
use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job
descriptions,' the Bureau’s field staff are instructed to exclude working supervisors, apprentices,
learners, beginners, trainees, and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

blies, which will later be used in complete articles of
furniture, from wood parts and/or other subassemblies.

Assembler, furniture (except chairs)

(Bed assembler; table assembler; cabinet assembler;
back maker; frame maker)

Assemblers, chairs

Assembles and fastens together wooden parts or assem­
blies to form sections, frames, or complete articles of furni­
ture (except chairs). Work involves m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g :
Trimming joints to fit, using hand-tools; applying glue to
joints or edges of stock and putting parts or sections to ­
gether; placing assembled parts in clamp until glue has dried
or reinforcing joints with dowels, screws, staples, or nails;
and attaching glue blocks, corner blocks, drawer guides,
tops, molding, shelves, dust bottoms, or skids with nails,
screws, glue or staples. May also drill holes and attach parts
of drawer locks. This classification e x c lu d e s : (1) Cabinet
makers who, in addition to assembling furniture are respon­
sible for shaping wood parts from rough stock; (2) workers
assembling relatively inexpensive furniture that is nailed or
glued together and sold unfinished; and (3) workers who
specialize in attaching parts such as doors, hinges, knobs,
skids, and baffle screens, in fitting drawers, doors, and trays
into furniture, or in assembling small parts such as desk
trays, card file boxes, and display pedestals.
For wage study purposes, furniture assemblers are to be
classified according to type of assembly work, as follows:

(Chair maker)
Assembles shaped and fitted wooden parts to form plain
or semiupholstered chairs. Work involves gluing, nailing,
screwing, or clamping the parts together.
Cut-off-saw operator

(Cut-off-saw operator, treadle operated; swinging-cut­
off-saw operator)
Operates a swinging or treadle-operated cut-off saw to
cut wooden stock to desired lengths; grades and cuts stock
to best advantage, eliminating knots and other defects.
Double-end-trimmer-and-boring-machine operator

Sets up and operates machine to trim or miter ends of
wooden furniture parts and bore holes for dowels. Work in­
volves m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g : Inserting bits in chucks and
tightening chuck jaws; setting angle and spacing of circular
saws, according to specifications; attaching holders, jigs, or
stops to table and adjusting clamps; starting automatic trim­
ming and boring cycle and positioning stock under clamps
where it is held during trimming and boring operations.

C om p lete fu rn itu re pieces (case g o o d s )—
Workers en­
gaged in final assembly of bodies (cases) for such articles
of furniture as book cases; chests; radio, television, and
phonograph cabinets; and vanities, from wood parts and/
or subassemblies.
C o m p lete fu rn itu re p ieces (o th e r than case g o o d s) —

Workers engaged in assembling complete articles of fur­
niture (other than case goods), such as tables, beds, and
occasional pieces, from wood parts and/or subassemblies.

Gluer, rough stock

(Clamp-carrier operator; glue-clamp-machine operator;
glue-press operator; glue-rack operator; glue-wheel

S u bassem blies —
Workers engaged in assembling subassem­



55

operator; glueman; revolving-press operator; rotaryclamp operator; squeezer operator)

Packer, furniture

(Crater)

Applies glue to edges or surfaces of wooden pieces to
be joined, assembles and clamps the glued boards into a
press until the glue has set or hardened. May also prepare
glue.

Prepares furniture or furniture parts for shipment. Per­
forms m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g : Placing units in wooden crates
or corrugated cardboard cartons; arranging packing material
around articles; sealing shipping containers with nails or
tape; placing identifying marks or labels on containers; nail­
ing blocks or wooden strips in crates to prevent shifting of
articles; and building crates around very large pieces.
This classification does not include workers who make
crates or crate parts but do not prepare furniture for ship­
ment, or who specialize in wrapping furniture parts for
shipment.

Lathe operator, automatic

(Swing-type-lathe operator; wood turning-lathe oper­
ator, etc.)
Operates swing-type (rotary cutting) lathe to cut round
wooden articles such as table legs or dowels. For wage
study purposes, workers are to be classified as follows:
S e t u p an d o p e r a te —Selects and installs proper

Planer operator

cutting heads; inserts and clamps stock between
turning centers; and moves lever to swing ro­
tating stock against cutters until shaping is
completed.

(Facer operator; planer; surface operator; woodplaner operator)
Operates a single- or double-surface planer to level off ir­
regularities and cut a smooth surface on rough stock, reduc­
ing it to specified thickness. For wage survey purposes,
workers are to be classified as follows:
0

F e e d —Feeds stock into machine.
Maintained general utility

Keeps in repair the machines, mechanical equipment,
and/or structure of an establishment (usually a small plant
where specialization in maintenance work is impractical).
Duties involve the performance of operations and the use
of tools and equipment of several trades, rather than speciali­
zation in one trade or one type of maintenance work only.
Work involves a co m b in a tio n o f th e fo llo w in g : Planning and
laying out of work relating to repair of buildings, machines,
mechanical and/or electrical equipment; repairing electrical
and/or mechanical equipment; installing, aligning, and bal­
ancing new equipment; repairing buildings, floors, or stairs
as well as making and repairing bins, cribs, and partitions.

S et-u p a n d o p era te
F e e d o n ly

Plastic-top installer

Installs la m in a ted plastic tops on furniture, such as cabi­
nets, counters, tables, and desks. Work involves m o s t o f th e
fo llo w in g : Applying adhesive to surface of furniture; posi­
tioning plastic top on adhesive-coated section of furniture;
smoothing and pressing top onto surface; and trimming and
smoothing edges of top. May also clean laminated plastic,
attach edge molding and trim to edge, cut plastic parts to
size and shape, or attach clamp to hold laminated plastic
until adhesive sets.

Molding-machine operator

(Molder operator; molding maker, machine; wood­
molding-machine operator)

Rip-saw operator

Operates a machine that planes wooden boards or strips
on all sides and shapes item to required cross section. For
wage survey purposes, workers are to be classified as
follows:

(Band-rip-saw operator; circular-rip-saw operator)
Operates a rip-sawing machine to cut lumber with the
grain to specified widths, feeding each piece into roller,
adjusting roller speed according to hardness of wood.

S et-u p an d o p e ra te
F eed o n ly

Router operator
Off-bearer, machine

(Router; router-machine operator)
(Catcher; machine tailer; tailer)

Cuts and shapes various designs in wooden stock by
machine. Work involves m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g : Clamps and
tightens bit in chuck of machine; inserts guide pin hole of
machine table; places groove of jig over pin and adjusts

Catches or receives wooden parts as they come off the
discharge end of a machine; piles products or loads mate­
rials on conveyor or truck for transfer elsewhere.



56

table for depth of cut and sets table stops; starts machine
and feeds stock. For wage survey purposes workers are to
be classified as follows:

and clamps to hold blank properly in bed of
machine; lays blank over pattern and starts
machine.

Set-up and operate

Feed o n ly —
Feeds stock into machine.

F eed only
Shaper operator, hand
Rubber, furniture

(Detail-shaper operator; frazer-machine operator;
shaping-machine operator; variety-molder operator;
wood-shaping operator)

(Burnisher; polisher)
Rubs surface of furniture after each coat of dry finish
such as stain, priming coat, varnish, or lacquer has been
applied, to smooth surfaces for successive coats. For wage
survey purposes, workers are to be classified as follows:

Operates a hand shaping machine to cut designs of ir­
regular shape in the surface of straight, curved, or irregular
shaped pieces of wood by feeding stock against rotating
blocks, using template or free hand manipulation to pro­
duce shape desired. For wage survey purposes, workers are
to be classified as follows:

R u bber , furniture , hand
R u bber , furniture , machine

Set-up and operate
Sander, furniture, hand

F eed only

Smooths, by hand, the surfaces of wooden furniture parts
before application of finishing materials. Work involves
using sand or emory paper, steel wool, etc. May also use
portable sanding machine to complete certain phases of
work. Workers who primarily use a portable sanding ma­
chine to accomplish their duties, however, are excluded.

Sprayer

(Spray painter)
Applies paint, varnish, lacquer, enamel, or other finishes
to surfaces of manufactured products for protective or dec­
orative purposes, with a spray gun.

Sander, furniture, machine
Tenoner operator

Smooths and finishes the edges and surfaces of wood
furniture parts and sections on stationary sanding machines.
For wage survey purposes, workers are to be classified
by type of machine, as follows:

(Saw-and-chuck-machine operator; double-tenonermachine operator; single-end-tenoner operator; tenonmachine operator)

B elt

Operates a machine that cuts tenons on wooden parts
for assembling into complete upits. For wage survey pur­
poses, workers are to be classified as follows:

O ther than belt

Set-up and operate

Shaper operator, automatic

F eed only

(Sizer operator, automatic)
Operates a machine to form quantities of like, irregularly
shaped wooden furniture parts from roughly shaped blanks.
For wage survey purposes, workers are to be classified as
follows:

Variety saw operator

(Combination saw operator; universal saw operator)
Operates adjustable circular saw to perform such opera­
tions as ripsawing, cross cutting, beveling, grooving, and
mitering. Selects sawing blade, adjusts table for angle or
depth of cut, and feeds stock into saw.

Set-up and operate

Selects and installs proper cutters on spin­
dles; sets and locks pattern in place; sets stops




57
☆ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1976

0 - 2 4 1 - 0 1 6 (23)

BUREAU OF LABOR STATiSTICS
REGIONAL OFFICES

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: (617)223-6761
Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: (212) 399-5405

Region V
9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: (312)353-1880
Region VI
Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: (214)749-3516

Region III
3535 Market Street
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: (215) 596-1154

Regions VII and V lir
911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: (816)374-2481

Region IV
1371 Peachtree Street, NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: (404) 881-4418

Regions IX and X **
450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415)556-4678




Regions VII and VIII are serviced by Kansas City
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D C. 20212

Postage and Fees Paid
U.S. Department of Labor
Third Class Mail

Official Business
Penalty for private use, $300




Lab-441