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INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits




I

AUGUST 1965

Bulletin No. 1508
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

y
tfel

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY

W om en’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits
AUGUST 1965

Bulletin N o. 1508
June 1966

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S

Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by th e S u p e rin te n d e n t o f D ocum ents, U .S . G o v e rn m e n t Printin g O ffic e , W a s h in g to n , D .C ., 2 0 4 0 2 - Price 2 5 cents










Preface
This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau
of Labor Statistics survey of wages and supplementary
benefits in the women’ s and m is s e s ’ coat and suit industry
in August 1965.
Separate releases for each of the nine important
manufacturing centers surveyed were issued earlier, usu­
ally within a few months after the payroll period studied.
Copies of these releases are available from the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, Washington, D. C. , 20212, or any of
its regional offices.
This study was conducted in the Bureau's Division
of Occupational Pay, Toivo P. Kanninen, Chief, under the
general direction of L. R. Linsenmayer, Assistant Com ­
m issioner, Office of Wages and Industrial Relations. The
analysis was prepared by George L. Stelluto, under the
immediate supervision of L. Earl Lewis. Field work for
the survey was directed by the Assistant Regional D irec­
tors for Wages and Industrial Relations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’ s pro­
gram of industry wage studies, as well as the addresses
of the Bureau’ s six regional offices, are listed at the end
of this bulletin.

ill




Contents
Page
Summary------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Industry characteristics-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Area employment-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Products--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Type of shop--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Occupation and sex ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Method of wage payment------------------------------------------------------------------------------Unionization--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Average hourly earnings-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Occupational earnings---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions------------------------Scheduled weekly hours--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Paid holidays-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Health, welfare, and vacation benefits-------------------------------------------------------Severance benefits___________________________________________________________
Retirement plans--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
5
5
5
5
5

Tables:
Earnings distribution:
1. All production workers_______________________________________________
2. Women production workers__________________________________________
3. Men production workers_____________________________________________

6
7
8

Average hourly earnings:
4. Selected occupations--------------------------------------------------------------------------

9

Occupational earnings:
5. Baltimore, Md-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------6. Chicago, 111----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------7. Kansas City, M o .—
Kans---------------------------------------------------------------------8. Los Angeles—
Long Beach, C alif-------------------------------------------------------9. New York, N. Y .— all shops-------------------------------------------------------------10. New York, N. Y .— regular and jobbing shops----------------------------------11. New York, N. Y .— contract shops----------------------------------------------------12. Newark and Jersey City, N. J -----------------------------------------------------------13. Pater son—
Clifton—
Pas saic, N. J--------------------------------------------------------14. Philadelphia, P a.— J _______________________________________________
N.
15. San Francisco—
Oakland, Calif------------------------------------------------------------

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
16. Method of wage payment_____ . _______________ -______________________
_
17. Scheduled weekly hours---------------------------------------------------------------------18. Paid holidays--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------19. Health, welfare, and vacation benefits______________________________
20. Retirement plans_____________________________________________________

21
21
22
23
24

Appendixes:
A. Scope and method of survey____________________________________________
B. Occupational descriptions-----------------------------------------------------------------------

25
27







Industry Wage Survey
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, August 1965
Summary
Average straight-time hourly earnings of production workers in the
women’ s and misses* coat and suit industry ranged from $2 in Kansas City to
$2.92 in New York, the largest area (in terms of employment) among the nine
surveyed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in August 1965. 1 Individual earnings
in each area were widely dispersed, resulting from such characteristics of the
industry as the extensive use of incentive wage systems and differences in the
types of work performed.
Sewing-machine operators accounted for a large segment of the industry’ s
labor force. Singlehand-system operators typically had higher earnings than
section-system operators. Machine pressers were usually highest paid of the
jobs studied separately and thread trimmers were lowest paid.
More than nine-tenths of the workers covered by the survey were in
shops having agreements with the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.
These agreements included provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, various
types of health and welfare benefits, and retirement pension plans.
Industry Characteristics
The nine areas included in the survey, with a combined total of about
47,000 production workers in August 1965, accounted for slightly more than half
of the industry's nationwide employment. Employment in the women's suits,
skirts, and coats industry in August 1965, when shops were producing fall and
winter lines, was at the highest level for the year, according to the Bureau's
monthly employment and earnings series. It was 12 percent above the annual
average and 51 percent above April, the month of the lowest employment. Gross
average hourly and weekly earnings, as well as gross average weekly hours,
were also at or near an annual peak in August 1965.

Area Employment. New York, the leading production center in the
industry, accounted for 28, 334 production workers and the nearby areas of Newark
and Jersey City and Pater son—
Clifton—
Passaic, an additional 10, 380. Kansas City
and Los Angeles-Long Beach were the only other areas studied in which as many
as 2, 000 production workers were employed in the industry. Establishments with
fewer than 50 workers accounted for nearly half of the employment in the nine
areas combined. A fifth of the employment was in establishments with 100 workers
or more.

1 See appendix A for scope and method of survey. Earnings data in this report exclude prem ium pay
overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.




for

2

Products. Four-fifths of the workers in the nine areas combined were
in shops primarily making coats. 2 The proportions differed, however, among
the areas, as indicated below:

Percent of workers in shops
primarily m aking—
Coats

Suits

Baltimore-------------------------------------------------------- -----------------C h icago---------------------------------------------------------- ------------------

48
70

Kansas C ity---------------------------------------------------- ------------------

100
65

52
30
35

80

16
20

Los Angeles- Long B e a c h -------------------------- -----------------New York 1---------------------------------------------------Newark and Jersey C ity---------------------------- -----------------Paterson—C lif ton-Pas s a ic 1-------------------------- -----------------P hiladelphia1 ------------------------------------------------ -----------------San F rancisco-Oakland------------------------------ ------------------

78
68
67

16
20
33

1 Contract shops primarily making skirts for suit manufacturers or jobbers
accounted for 3 percent o f the workers in New York, 6 percent in Paterson—Cl if ton—
•
Passaic, and 12 percent in Philadelphia. Because of rounding, sums of individual
item s m ay not equal 100 percent.

Type of Shop. Three types of shops were included in the survey: (1)
Regular or "inside” shops, which own the materials and perform all or most
of the manufacturing operations; (2) contract shops, which process materials
owned (and frequently cut) by others; and (3) jobbing shops, which contract out
most manufacturing operations, but may perform such functions as cutting,
finishing, or packing and shipping. Contract shops accounted for more than
nine-tenths of the workers in Newark and Jersey City and Pater son—
Clifton—
Passaic, and two-thirds in New York. Regular shops employed a large majority
of the workers in the other areas. Jobbing shops were found in four areas,
Los Angeles—
Long Beach, New York, Pater son—
Clifton—
Passaic, and San Fran­
cisco—
Oakland, but their employment was relatively small.
Occupation and Sex. Sewing-machine operators accounted for at least
three-tenths of the total production workers in each area and for approximately
half in Newark and Jersey City. Sewing systems are of two types— the singlehand
or tailor system, in which an individual performs all or most of the sewingmachine operations involved in making a complete garment; and the section
system, where an operator’ s sewing is limited to a specific part or parts of a
garment. About half of the operators in the two West Coast cities and nearly
two-fifths in Chicago and New York were on the singlehand system; the proportions
of operators on the section system were three-fourths in Baltimore and nearly
all in the four remaining areas. Women accounted for a large majority of the
section-system operators in all areas; most singlehand-system operators in
New York and Chicago were men. Men were also predominant in the cutting arid
pressing jobs in most areas.
Women accounted for a large majority of the workers in all areas, with
proportions ranging from seven-eighths in Kansas City to nearly three-fifths in
New York. In the latter areas, men comprised nearly two-thirds of the employ­
ment in regular and cutting shops, compared with about a third in contract shops.

The number o f coats produced during August 1965 was nearly three times as great
Current Industrial Reports, Series: M 2 3 H (6 5 )-8 , U . S. Bureau of the Census.




as the number of suits

3

Method of Wage Payment.
Incentive pay, almost always individual
piecework, applied to slightly more than two-fifths of the workers within scope
of the survey. The proportions of incentive-paid workers differed among the
areas, ranging from a fourth in Paterson—
Clifton—
Passaic to seven-tenths in
Philadelphia (table 16).
Workers employed as pressers and sewing-machine
operators were commonly paid under incentive systems in most areas. A majority
of^the time-rated workers in most areas were paid under formal systems pro­
viding a single rate for a given occupation.
Unionization. Collective bargaining agreements with the International
Ladies’ Garment Workers' Union were in effect in shops employing approximately
9 3 percent of the production workers in nine areas combined. The proportions
were approximately 85 percent in Newark and Jersey City and San Francisco—
Oakland and 90 percent or more in the other areas.
Average Hourly Earnings
Average hourly earnings for production workers in August 1965 had
increased in each of the survey areas since a similar study conducted by the
Bureau in August 1962. 3 The increases amounted to nearly 3 percent in Kansas
City, 4 percent in Chicago and New York, almost 6 percent in Paterson—
CliftonPassaic, 7 percent in Baltimore and Philadelphia, and approximately 10 percent
in the 3 remaining areas. These rises in average earnings partly reflect wage
adjustments (including across-the-board increases and increases in minimum
wage scales for different crafts) during the 3-year period. 4
Variations in average earnings for production workers were partly due
to differences in manufacturing methods and processes. New York regular (and
jobbing) shops, with an average of $3. 19 an hour in August 1965, made the most
extensive use of the singlehand system of sewing; singlehand operators outnumber
those on the section system by 3 to 1 in these shops. The singlehand system
requires more highly trained operators than are generally needed under the
section system. Averages in Newark and Jersey City ($2.49) and Paterson—
Clifton—
Passaic ($2.25), where all sewing-machine operators were on the section
system, were also influenced to some extent by the domination of contract shops
manufacturing garments from materials owned and frequently cut by others. As
a result, the proportion of cutters and markers, who usually receive relatively
high wages, was smaller in these areas than in the others. In Kansas City and
Baltimore, where three-fourths or more of the sewing-machine operators were
on the section sy ste m , production workers averaged $2 and $2 . 0 2 , respectively
(table 1 ), the lowest earnings levels among the areas studied.
Men, as a group, averaged more than women in each area; the average
wage advantages for men ranged from 22 percent in Kansas City to 61 percent
in Los Angeles—
Long Beach. (See tables 2 and 3.) Differences in average pay
levels for men and women may be the result of several factors, including
variations in the distributions of the sexes among establishments and, as pointed
out in the discussion of industry characteristics, among jobs with disparate pay
levels. Differences noted in averages for men and women in the same job and

3 For an account of the earlier survey,
August 1962 (BLS Bulletin 1371).
~

4 See

between

the

New York,

see Industry W age

Survey:

W om en 's and Misses' Coats and Suits,
— ------------ “ -------- ---- ----------------------

Current W age Developm ents, Nos. 183, 187, 19 6 , 198, 199, and 203. A c o lle c tiv e bargaining agreement
ILGWU

and three

Pennsylvania,

coat

and suit manufacturing

and Connecticut, becam e

effectiv e

associations, covering 4 0 ,0 0 0
in June 1964.

The 3 -y e a r

workers in New Jersey,
agreement

provided the

follow ing w age increases effective June 1, 1964: $3 to $5 a w eek for timeworkers and 5 1/2 percent for pieceworkers,
as w ell as increases of craft m inim um wage scales. The agreement also provided that the union could demand wage
increases for covered workers, if there is a rise in the cost of living above the M ay 15, 1964, base period.




4

area may also reflect minor differences in duties. Job descriptions used in
classifying workers in wage surveys are usually more generalized than those
used in individual establishments because allowance must be made for possible
minor differences among establishments in specific duties performed. Also,
earnings for some jobs in the industry are largely determined by production at
piece rates. Variations in incentive earnings for individuals or sex groupings
may be traceable to differences in work experience, work flow, or other factors
which the worker may or may not control.
Earnings as low as $1. 25 and as high as $5 an hour were recorded for
some workers in all areas. With the exception of nearly a fourth of the workers
earning between $1.60 and $1.70 an hour in Kansas City, there were no significant
concentrations in the earnings arrays in any of the areas.
This dispersion of
individual earnings reflects the widespread use of piece-rate pay systems, and
the sharply different earnings among jobs with varying degrees of skill.
Occupational Earnings
Ten occupational classifications, accounting for a large majority of the
production workers covered by the survey, were selected to represent the types
of skills and manufacturing operations in the industry.
In New York, singlehand-system sewing-machine operators averaged
$3.45 an hour, compared with $2.70 an hour for section-system operators. In
the other three areas for which data are shown for both types of operators,
singlehand-system operators held an average wage advantage of more than
50 cents an hour.
Machine pressers, mostly men, had the highest averages among the
selected jobs in eight areas, with averages of $5. 17 an hour in Chicago and more
than $4 in four other areas including New York. Cutters and markers and workers
performing both hand and machine pressing were also among the highest paid jobs
studied.
Thread trim m ers, nearly all women, had the lowest average earnings of
the jobs studied separately in 8 of the 9 areas. Their averages ranged from $1. 35
an hour in Baltimore to $1.81 in San Francisco—
Oakland.
Earnings of individuals performing similar tasks also varied within the
same establishment, particularly for jobs typically paid under incentive wage
systems. For example, the difference between the highest and lowest paid machine
pressers in the same establishment frequently amounted to more than $ 1 an hour.
Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Data were also obtained on work schedules and selected supplementary
wage benefits for production workers. Provisions for paid holidays, health and
welfare benefits, vacation pay, severance benefits, and retirement pension plans
were stipulated in collective bargaining agreements with the International Ladies'
Garment Workers' Union, which were in effect in shops employing approximately
93 percent of the production workers. 5

5 Provisions differed slightly in a few shops. Am ong the shops contacted which did not have a contract with
ILGWU, form al provisions for paid holidays and vacations were c om m on , but insurance and pension plans were
reported in only a few instances.




*

5

Scheduled Weekly Hours. Work schedules of 35 hours a week were in
effect in shops employing nine-tenths or more of the workers in six areas,
three-fourths in Kansas City and in Newark and Jersey City, and nearly seveneighths in San Francisco—
Oakland (table 17). A fifth of the workers in Newark
and Jersey City had weekly work schedules of 40 hours, and nearly a fourth in
Kansas City were scheduled to work 44 hours a week.
Paid Holidays. Paid holiday provisions varied from 4 days a year in
Chicago6 to T T z days in Pater son—
Clifton—
Passaic (table 18). In most areas,
timeworkers were paid their regular rates and incentive workers were given
flat amounts varying by craft.
Health, Welfare, and Vacation Benefits. Health and welfare benefits in
all areas and vacation payments in all areas except Chicago and Kansas City
were provided from a health and welfare fund to which employers contributed
specified percentages of their payrolls for workers covered by the union agree­
ment (table 19).
The provisions included hospitalization, disability, maternity, eyeglass,
and death benefits in nearly all areas and surgical and medical benefits in several
areas. In Chicago and Kansas City, union health centers, which provide free
medical care to union members, were maintained through employer contributions
to a health center fund.
Vacation payments in New York, Newark and Jersey City, and Paterson—
Clifton—
Passaic varied by occupation, ranging from $50 to $70. In Chicago and
Kansas City, vacation benefits (paid directly by employers to workers) amounted
to 1 week of pay after 1 year of service and 2 weeks after 5 years; both areas
had provisions for prorating vacation pay for workers with less than 1 year of
service. In the other four areas, vacation payments were determined as a
percentage of the workers' annual earnings, usually with minimum and maximum
payments specified.
Severance Benefits. Severance benefits were provided from
fund to which employers contributed one-half percent (1 percent in
of their weekly payrolls for workers covered by the union contract.
provides both lump-sum severance allowance and weekly supplemental
ment benefits to qualified workers.

a national
Baltimore)
This fund
unemploy­

Retirement Plans. Retirement pension benefits (other than Federal social
security) were provided through employer contributions to a retirement fund
(table 20). The amounts contributed varied among the areas from 2V2 to 6 V per­
2
cent of the payrolls for workers covered by the union agreements. Benefits of
$65 a month were paid from the fund to qualified workers over age 65 in New
York, Newark and Jersey City, and Pater son—
Clifton—
Passaic and $50 a month
in the other areas. Totally disabled workers, in nearly all areas, might retire
with full benefits at age 60. Reduced benefits for early retirement were available
to workers in all areas. The fund also provided a $500 death benefit.

6 Workers in Chicago were guaranteed o n e -h a lf day's pay for each holiday;
holiday week received three-fourths pay, and those working 4 days received full pay.




those working 3 days in

the

Table 1. Earnings Distribution: All Production Workers

0)

( P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f a ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s ' c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s
b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , 1 9 s e l e c t e d a r e a s , A u g u st 1965)
N ew Y o r k
B a lt im o r e

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s '

C h ica g o

$1. 25
$1. 30
$1. 35
$ 1 .4 0
$ 1 .4 5

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$1. 30_____________________________
______ __
$1. 35
.
___
__
$ 1 .4 0
.
_
$ 1 .4 5 _________
....
_ ..
$1. 50_____________________________

11.
1.
3.
4.
3.

2
4
5
1
3

3.
1.
2.
2.
1.

$1. 50
$1. 60
$1. 70
$1. 80
$ 1 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
u n d er
u n d er
under

$1. 60
_ _
$1. 70
_ _
$ 1. 80_____________________________
$ 1 .9 0
........ . ....
... _
$2. 00 ...
. ..
.... _

6.
7.
11.
7.
4.

1
8
2
2
5

5. 5
5. 1
5. 2
3 .9
3. 6

$2.
$2.
$2,
$2.
$2.

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2. 10_____________________________
$2. 20_____________________________
$2. 30_____________________________
$2. 4 0 _____________________________
$ 2 .5 0 _____________________________

5.
3.
3.
3.
2.

1
3
3
3
0

4.
4.
3.
3.
2.

5
7
2
1
7

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.

50
60
70
80
90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$3.

6 0 _____________________________
7 0 _____________________________
8 0 _____________________________
9 0 _____________________________
00_____________________________

3.
3.
2.
1.
1.

3
7
7
4
8

3.
2.
3.
2.
2.

$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.

00
20
40
60
80

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
under
under
under
under

$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.
$4.

20_____________________________
4 0 _____________________________
6 0 _____________________________
8 0 _____________________________
0 0 _____________________________

1.
1.
2.
.
.

6
6
5
8
6

$4. 00
$4. 20
$4. 40
$4. 60
$ 4 .8 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
u n d er

$4. 20_____________________________
$4. 4 0 _____________________________
$4. 6 0 _____________________________
$4. 8 0 _____________________________
$ 5 .0 0 _____________________________

1. 0
.4
_
.4
.2

K ansas
C ity

A ll
sh op s

R e g u la r
sh o p s 1
2

C o n tr a c t
sh op s

N e w a rk and
J e r s e y C ity

6
8
5
6
5

.
1.
1.
1.
.

6
0
8
8
8

1.
.
.
.
.

3
5
8
9
6

0.
.
1.
.
.

5
3
5
3
3

1.
.
.
1.
.

7
6
5
3
7

3.
1.
1.
1.
1.

7. 6
2 2 .6
9 .0
6. 3
5. 3

4.
4.
4.
4.
3.

8
0
2
5
7

3.
2.
3.
3.
2.

7
5
3
9
2

2.
2.
2.
3.
1.

8
0
4
9
7

4.
2.
3.
3.
2.

2
9
8
9
5

7. 8
4. 4
5. 0
4 .9
4. 0

4. 8
3 .9
3. 5
3. 2
2. 7

2. 9
4. 3
4. 7
3 .9
3. 0

4.
3.
4.
2.
3.

2
8
0
5
6

3.
2.
3.
1.
1.

7
6
0
4
9

4.
4.
4.
3.
4.

4
4
5
0
5

6.
5.
5.
3.
3.

5
5
1
8
3

2.
1.
1.
1.
1.

4
6
7
5
4

4.
2.
3.
3.
2.

7
5
6
4
1

4.
2.
3.
5.
2.

2
6
3
8
7

3.
1.
2.
5.
1.

0
3
3
7
7

4. 9
3. 3
3. 9
5 .9
3. 2

4. 5
2 .9
3. 8
3. 0
2. 1

6.
4.
5.
2.
2.

3
9
4
8
5

3.
2.
1.
.
.

9
0
6
6
2

6.
4.
3.
1.
1.

2
0
5
7
9

7.
4.
7.
5.
4.

5
9
2
6
7

9.
4.
8.
8.
6.

1
8
9
8
7

6.
5.
6.
4.
3.

7
0
3
0
7

1.
1.
.
.
1.

8
3
6
6
1

. 2
. 3
. 3
. 1
(3)

2.
4.
3.
2.
2.

4
0
6
6
0

4.
2.
1.
.
.

0
5
8
9
8

6.
3.
2.
1.
.

0
3
7
1
8

2.
2.
1.
.
.

9
1
2
8
8

6
7
6
7
2

4.
.
2.
1.
3.

L os A n g e le s L ong B e a ch

8
0
6
3
8

P aterson —
C lifto n —
P a s s a ic

2. 7
1. 2
.6
1. 6
.9

P h ila d e lp h ia

3. 8
1 .9
1. 7
2 .9
1. 8

San
F ra n cis co —
O ak land

1.
1.
1.
3.
1.

4
7
4
3
0

1
4
0
8
7

5.
6.
5.
6.
6.

6
8
2
6
8

4. 6
3. 5
3. 3
2 .9
3. 3

6.
4.
3.
3.
3.

2
3
3
7
7

4. 1
1 .9
1. 5
2. 6
1. 5

3.
2.
3.
2.
2.

5
7
0
4
1

3.
4.
3.
4.
2.

9
6
2
3
3

4 .9
3 .4
2. 5
2. 8
1. 7

3. 7
2. 5
1. 6
.9
1. 5

5.
3.
3.
2.
1.

2
1
2
8
7

4.
3.
2.
2.
1.

0
0
9
7
4

.
1.
1.
.
.

1.
.
.
.
.

1. 8
1 .9
.6
1. 1
.6

1.
1.
.
1.
.

3
1
7
1
1

6
8
2
7
7

8
2
3
7
8

11.
7.
6.
6.
5.

2
0
6
1
9

8.
6.
6.
3.
4.

7
8
4
1
8

3
5
2
5
3

11.
4.
5.
5.
2.

$5. 00 and o v e r ______________________________________

.4

5. 1

. 1

5. 8

3. 8

5. 7

2. 8

3. 0

1. 8

5. 6

2. 2

T o t a l ._______________ __________________________

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s ________________________________
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s '--------------------------------------

489
$2. 02

1, 184
$2. 64

2, 062
$2. 00

2, 142
$2. 87

2 8 ,3 3 4
$ 2 .9 2

9 , 893
$3. 19

1 8 ,4 4 1
$2. 78

6 ,7 5 6
$ 2 .4 9

3, 624
$2. 25

1 ,8 4 3
$ 2 .5 2

696
$2. 44

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 In c lu d e s jo b b in g s h o p s p e r fo r m i n g s o m e m a n u fa ctu rin g o p e r a t io n s , in a d d ition to r e g u la r (in s id e )
3 L e s s than 0. 05 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq u al 100.

shops.

Table 2. Earnings Distribution: W om en Production Workers
(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f w om en p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s ' c o a t and suit m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s
b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , 1 9 s e l e c t e d a r e a s , A u g u st 1965)
New Y o r k
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1

B a lt im o r e

C h ica g o

$ 1. 25
$ 1 .3 0
$ 1 .3 5
$ 1 .4 0
$ 1 .4 5

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1. 3 0 ------------------------------------------1. 3 5 ------------------------------------------1 .4 0 ------------------------------------------1 .4 5 ------------------------------------------1 .5 0 ____________________________

9 .2
.6
3. 6
4. 7
3 .9

4.
2.
3.
3.
1.

5
0
0
0
5

$ 1. 50
$ 1 .6 0
$ 1 .7 0
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1.9 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
u n d er
under

$
$
$
$
$

1 .6 0 ------------------------------------------1. 7 0 ------------------------------------------1 .8 0 ------------------------------------------1 .9 0 ____________________________
2. 0 0 -------------------------------------------

5 .9
10. 1
14. 8
9 .8
6. 1

7.
6.
6.
4.
4.

2
1
6
8
8

$
$
$
$
$

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
under
under
u n d er
under

$
$
$
$
$

2. 10------------------------------------------2. 2 0 ------------------------------------------2 . 3 0 ------------------------------------------2 .4 0 ------------------------------------------2 .5 0 -------------------------------------------

6.
3.
3.
3.
2.

1
4
4
4
2

5.
5.
3.
3.
3.

$ 2. 50
$ 2. 60
$ 2 .7 0
$ 2. 80
$ 2. 90

and
and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
under
u n d er
under

$
$
$
$
$

2.
2.
2.
2.
3.

2. 5
1 .7
1. 1
1. 1
1 .4

4.
3.
4.
2.
2.

$
$
$
$
$

3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

00
20
40
60
80

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

3. 20------------------------------------------3. 4 0 ____________________________
3, 6 0 ____________________________
3 .8 0 ------------------------------------------4 . 0 0 ____________________________

.
.
.
.
.

$
$
$
$
$

4.
4.
4.
4.
4.

00
20
40
60
80

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

4.
4.
4.
4.
5.

K a n sa s
C ity

4. 0
.7
2. 2
1 .4
3. 3

L o s A n g e le s —
L on g B e a c h

A ll
sh op s

R e g u la r
sh o p s 1
2

N ew a rk and
J e r s e y C ity

P a terson —
C lifto n —
P a s s a ic

P h ila d e lp h ia

San
F ra n cis co —
O akland

.9
1 .2
2. 7
1. 2
1. 2

1. 6
. 5
.5
1 .4
.8

0.
.
.
.
.

6
6
9
7
6

6.
5.
4.
5.
5.

3
1
8
9
3

4. 8
2 .9
4. 1
4. 7
2. 9

2
8
5
3
3

4. 7
4. 1
3 .9
3. 5
3. 1

3.
5.
6.
5.
4.

9
6
4
4
0

5. 1
5. 5
5 .9
3. 6
5. 5

0
3
1
9
6

2.
1.
2.
1.
1.

6
8
0
5
6

6. 2
2. 6
3 .9
3. 5
2. 3

5.
3.
4.
7.
3.

7
7
7
7
6

5.
1.
5.
12.
3.

6
8
8
6
3

5. 4
2. 9
4. 1
1. 9
1 .9

2.
1.
.
.
.

2
3
7
4
1

7 .4
3. 5
4. 0
1. 2
1. 1

7.
3.
4.
2.
2.

2 0 ------------------------------------------4 0 ------------------------------------------6 0 ------------------------------------------8 0 ------------------------------------------0 0 --------------------------- -------------

.6
.3
_
.3
.3

.
.
.
.
.

5
8
3
1
1

. 1
_
.2

.
1.
.
.
.

1.
1.
.
.
.

$ 5 . 0 0 and o v e r ---------------------------------------------------------

.3

. 6

. 1

.5

1. 0

1. 6

.8

1 .0

T o t a l-----------------------------------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s -------------------------------------------------A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1--------------------------------------

358
$ 1. 91

858
$ 2 .2 8

1, 783
$ 1 .9 4

1 ,4 6 5
$ 2. 41

15, 668
$ 2. 57

3, 193
$ 2. 82

12, 475
$ 2 . 50

5, 202
$ 2. 31

2, 932
$ 2. 07

1 ,3 4 3
$ 2. 21

561
$ 2. 23

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

6 0 ------------------------------------------7 0 ------------------------------------------8 0 ------------------------------------------9 0 ------------------------------------------0 0 ------------------------------- -----------

7.
24.
9.
6.
5.

. 1

8
0
9
9
2

1 .8
.7
.6
1 .7
.8

4. 0
1. 2
1 .7
1. 3
2. 0

3. 7
1. 2
1 .4
3. 4
1 .4

5.
3.
4.
5.
3.

0
3
8
0
2

8.
5.
5.
5.
4.

7
2
7
6
5

12.
7.
7.
6.
6.

5
6
8
2
6

1 1 .9
5. 0
5. 7
7. 4
3. 6

3. 9
3 .9
5 .9
2. 5
4. 7

5.
5.
5.
3.
5.

4
9
9
9
7

6.
6.
5.
3.
4.

7
6
2
8
2

9.
7.
6.
3.
5.

6
8
9
5
4

5.
4.
4.
3.
4.

6
2
0
6
2

7. 1
4. 8
3 .7
4. 1
3 .9

3
6
2
8
6

5.
4.
4.
6.
3.

8
2
5
4
6

4.
3.
3.
2.
2.

5
0
8
7
3

4. 5
2. 3
1 .8
2. 0
1 .6

3.
2.
3.
2.
2.

5
8
6
8
8

3.
5.
3.
3.
2.

4
9
2
9
0

14. 3
5. 5
5. 7
3. 8
1 .7

5.
3.
3.
2.
2.

7
5
9
7
1

4. 4
2. 8
1 .9
2. 4
1. 3

2. 3
2. 2
.6
.4
. 1

5. 7
2. 3
2. 5
1 .6
1. 3

3. 2
1. 2
2. 1
1. 2
1 .2

1
2
7
3
2

1. 3
2. 1
1 .0
. 5
.4

.
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

1.
.
.
.

1.
.
.
.

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 In c lu d e s jo b b in g sh o p s p e r fo r m i n g s o m e m a n u fa ctu rin g o p e r a t io n s , in a d d itio n to r e g u la r (in s id e )
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot eq u al 100.

8
1
1
3
6

C on tra ct
sh op s

sh op s.

1. 0
1 .0
.6
.3
. 1

6
8
8
5
5

3. 1
1 .3
.5
1 .4
.9

4
3
2
1

3.
2.
2.
3.
2.

2
5
1
7
0

3
3
5
3

1 .8
2. 1
1 .8
4. 1
1 .2
6.
7.
4.
7.
8.

6
8
8
8
2

9
0
6
0
1

1
9
2
5

.5

Table 3. Earnings Distribution: Men Production Workers

0
0

( P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f m e n p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s ' c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s
b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s , 1 9 s e l e c t e d a r e a s , A u g u st 1965)
N ew Y o r k
B a lt im o r e

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1

$1. 25
$1. 30
$1. 35
$ 1 .4 0
$1. 45

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
u n d er
u n d er
under

$1. 30_ _
___ __
_ ______
$1. 35____
______
_____________
$ 1 .4 0
_
_
_
_
_ _
$ 1 .4 5 _____________________________
$1. 50______________________________

$ 1. 50
$ 1 .6 0
$ 1 .7 0
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 1 . 6 0 _____________________________
$ 1 . 7 0 _____________________________
$ 1 . 8 0 ______________________________
$ 1 . 9 0 _____________________________
$ 2. 0 0 _____________________________

$2.
$2.
$ 2.
$2.
$2.

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
under
under
under

$ 2 .5 0
$2. 60
$2. 70
$2. 80
$2. 90

and
and
and
and
and

$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.

00
20
40
60
80

$4.
$4.
$4.
$4.
$4.

00
20
40
60
80

C h ica g o

K ansas
C ity

L os A n g e le s L ong B e a ch

A ll
sh o p s

R e g u la r
sh o p s 1
2

C o n tr a c t
sh op s

N e w a rk and
J e r s e y C ity

P aterson —
C lifto n —
P a s s a ic

P h ila d e lp h ia

San
F r a n cis co —
O ak la nd

2
9
5
8
3

7. 9
1. 8
3 .9
2 .9
4. 7

0. 4
_
3. 2
-

0. 9
.4
1. 2
. 3
. 3

0.
.
2.
.
.

3
5
1
3
2

1 .5
. 3
. 2
. 3
.4

3. 0
.4
.9
1. 0
1. 3

1. 0
.4
.7
2. 7
.7

5.
.
.
.
1.

4
2
8
8
4

_
-

6 .9
1. 5
1. 5
-

.9
2. 5
1. 5
1. 5
.6

7 .2
10. 0
3 .2
3. 2
3 .9

1. 5
1 .6
3. 0
1. 5
. 1

2 .4
2. 1
2. 2
2. 9
1 .4

2 .4
2. 3
2 .8
4. 1
1 .8

2 .4
1 .9
1 .6
1. 5
1 .0

4. 7
1 .7
2. 6
2 .4
2. 1

6. 2
4. 8
1 .6
5. 6
3. 3

8. 8
2. 8
3. 2
1 .6
.4

1.
2.
6.
1.
.

5
2
7
5
7

$2. 10
________
_____
$2. 20 _
_ _ _ _
______
$2. 30_______ _________
_______
$ 2 .4 0 _ _ _ _ _ _
______ __
$ 2. 50______________________________

2.
3.
3.
3.
1.

3
1
1
1
5

2.
1.
2.
2.
1.

5
8
5
8
2

5.
2.
1.
1.
.

.9
1. 5
1 .0
.6
.9

3.
1.
1.
1.
1.

0
7
6
1
2

3. 6
2. 0
1. 7
.9
.6

2.
1.
1.
1.
1.

4
3
5
3
9

6. 2
3. 2
5. 4
3. 3
1 .9

5.
2.
4.
1.
2.

2. 0
1. 6
1 .4
.8
.8

2.
2.
1.
2.
3.

2
2
5
2
0

under
under
under
under
u n d er

$2. 60______________________________
$ 2 .7 0 _____________________________
$2. 80_____________________________
$2. 9 0 _____________________________
$ 3. 0 0 ________________ _____________

5. 3
9. 2
6 .9
2. 3
3. 1

2.
.
.
2.
1.

5
6
6
5
5

.7
.4
.4
1. 4
.4

1.
2.
3.
3.
1.

2.
1.
1.
3.
1.

4
2
7
5
6

1. 9
1. 1
.9
2. 2
.8

3.
1.
2.
5.
2.

0
3
5
0
4

4.
2.
4.
3.
1.

4
3
1
7
7

2. 7
.4
.4
4. 9
.9

3.
2.
1.
1.
.

6
6
6
4
2

3.
3.
1.
9.
3.

7
0
5
6
0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.
$4.

20_____________________________
4 0 _____________________________
6 0 ______________________________
8 0 _____________________________
0 0 _____________________________

4. 6
3. 8
6 .9
1. 5
1. 5

8. 9
10. 1
8 .9
5. 2
4. 3

14. 7
6. 5
7. 2
1 .4
1. 1

3. 5
4 .9
2. 4
2. 7
3. 5

7 .6
6. 2
10. 8
9. 0
8. 0

6
5
5
1
0

8.
8.
11.
6.
6.

7
1
3
6
9

6.
5.
4.
4.
2.

6
6
4
2
8

9. 8
3 .9
5. 9
2 .9
7. 4

3.
5.
5.
5.
2.

6
2
0
8
8

7. 4
10. 4
5 .9
8 .9
2. 2

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
u n d er
u n d er
under

$4.
$4.
$4.
$4.
$5.

20_____________________________
4 0 _____________________________
60_____________________________
8 0 _____________________________
0 0 _____________________________

2. 3
.8

5.
2.
1.
1.
3.

1 .4
2. 5
1. 1
.7
-

5 .9
10. 5
9 .6
6 .4
5. 8

7.
4.
3.
1.
1.

8. 3
3. 9
3. 5
1 .4
1. 0

6.
4.
2.
2.
2.

8
3
6
0
1

1. 7
2. 6
3. 0
1. 5
1 .9

5.
1.
.
2.
1.

3.
6.
.
3.
2.

2
2
8
2
2

2.
2.
3.
3.
.

16.
3.
3.
2.
1.

8
8
1
3
5

_

.8

1.
,
1.
1.
.

2
5
2
8
7

7
5
1
1
4

3
4
0
1
6

6.
4.
10.
11.
9.

6
1
1
7
5

2
6
3
3
3

3
6
4
2
7

_
-

2
2
7
0
7

$5. 00 and o v e r _______________________________________

.8

16. 9

.7

17. 3

7. 3

7. 6

6. 9

9. 6

6. 5

20. 6

8. 9

T o t a l___________________________________________

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s _________________________________
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1
__________________________

131
$2. 34

326
$3. 59

279
$2. 36

677
$3. 88

12, 666
$3. 37

6, 700
$3. 36

5 ,9 6 6
$3. 37

1 ,5 5 4
$ 3 .0 8

692
$2. 98

500
$3. 35

135
$3. 30

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n clu d e s jo b b in g sh o p s p e r fo r m i n g s o m e m a n u fa ctu rin g o p e r a t io n s , in a d d itio n to r e g u la r (in s id e ) s h o p s .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq ual 100,

Table 4. Average Hourly Earnings: Selected Occupations
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
co a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , 9 s e l e c t e d a r e a s , A u g u st 1965)

B a lt im o r e
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

C u tte r s and m a r k e r s 3 --------------------I n s p e c t o r s , fin a l ( e x a m i n e r s ) -------W o m e n ------------------------------------------M e n ------------------------------------------------P a c k e r s , sh ip p in g 3 ------------------------P r e s s e r s , hand______________________
W o m e n ____________________________
M e n ------------------------------------------------P r e s s e r s , m a c h in e 3 ________________
P r e s s e r s , hand and m a c h in e 3 ____
S e w e r s , hand ( f i n i s h e r s ) ----------------W o m e n -------------------------------------------M e n ________________________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m _____________________
W o m e n _____________________________
M e n ________________________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s in g le h a n d (t a ilo r ) s y s t e m -----------W o m e n _____________________________
M e n ------------------------------------------------T h r e a d t r i m m e r s ( c l e a n e r s ) 4 --------

C h ica g o

N u m ­ A v e r ­ N u m ­ A v e r ­ N um ­ A v e r ­
ber
ber
age
b er
age
age
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
of
of
of
w ork ­ ea rn ­ w ork ­ ea rn ­ w ork ­ ea rn ­
ers
in gs
ers
in gs
e rs
in gs

$2. 58

New Y o r k

L os
A n g e le s L on g B e a ch

K an sas
C ity

$ 3 .4 0
1 .8 2
1 .8 2
1 .8 3
3 .4 8
2. 23
4. 50
5. 17
2. 23
2. 22
-

83
30
28
2
36
85
82
3
88
221
221
-

$2. 73
1 .8 0

A ll £
:hops

Num ­ A v e r­
ber
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork ­ ea rn ­
ers
in g s

Num ­ A v e r­
ber
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork ­ earn ­
ers
in g s

1. 59
2. 12
2. 13
3. 11
1 .8 6
1 .8 6
-

147 $ 4 . 20
36
2. 03
32
1 .8 7
4
53
1. 77
65
3. 32
32
2. 34
33
4. 28
105
4. 81
31
4. 29
416
2. 38
404
2. 38
12
2. 50

1,506
490
107
383
921
1,382
85
1,297
1,126
540
5 ,812
5,107
705

$ 3. 90 1,307
3. 02
281
2. 38
52
3. 20
229
921
1 .8 7
3. 88
296
296
4. 23
227
4. 20
151
2. 73 2 ,1 4 6
2. 68 1,716
3. 11
430

18
11
7
20
8
68
68
-

2 .3 9
_
2. 63
2 .7 0
1 .9 2
1 .9 2
-

73
11
11
11
51
23
28
55
211
207
4

104
102
2

1 .91
-

240
218
22

2 .7 4
2. 70
3. 12

755
752
3

2. 14
2. 14
-

354
321
33

2. 69
2. 67
-

6 ,3 6 2
5 ,352
1,010

2. 70
2. 62
3. 15

36
22
14
6

3. 00
2 .7 9
1 .3 5

143
66
77
27

3. 28
2. 83
3 .6 6
1 .4 4

25

1 .7 5

410
226
184
30

3. 46
2 .7 9
4 . 29
1 .4 3

3,797
1,291
2,5 0 6
465

3. 45 1,429
2. 98
140
3 .6 9 1,289
1 .6 0
43

26
-

-

-

-

C on tra ct
sh op s
Num ­ A v e r­
ber
a ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ­ ea rn ­
ers
in g s

N e w a rk and
J e r s e y C ity

P a terson —
C lifto n —
P a s s a ic

P h ila d e lp h ia

San
F ra n cis co —
O akland

Num ­ A v e r­
ber
a ge
h o u r ly
of
w ork ­ ea rn ­
ers
in gs

Num ­ A v e r­
ber
age
h o u r ly
of
w ork ­ ea rn ­
ers
in g s

Num ­ A v e r ­
ber
age
h o u r ly
of
w ork ­ ea rn ­
er s
in g s

Num­ A v e r­
ber
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork ­ ea rn ­
ers
in gs

199 $ 3 . 82
2. 87
209
2. 35
55
154
3. 05
1,086
3. 79
85
1,001
3. 99
899
3. 84
389
3 ,6 6 6
2. 58
2. 54
3,391
275
3. 06

43 $ 3. 94
2. 72
23
2. 30
6
2. 86
17
321
3. 06
_
30
_
291
365
4. 08
116
2. 71
2. 36
1 ,004
_
1,000
_
4

3. 07
2. 50
4. 06

5 ,9 1 4
5,067
847

2. 67
2. 62
2. 98

3 ,1 4 5
2 ,7 9 4
351

2. 59
2. 52
3. 09

1 ,594
1,522
72

2. 29
2. 28
2. 58

716
670
46

2 .4 3
2. 34
3. 77

_
_
_

3.
3.
3.
1.

2 ,3 6 8
1,151
1,217
422

3.
2.
3.
1.

_
169

_
1. 53

_
116

_
1. 54

_
_
33

_
_
1 .4 0

129
125
4
21

R eg u la r
sh o p s 2
Num ­ A v e r­
ber
age
h o u r ly
of
w ork ­ ea rn ­
ers
in gs

448
285
163

$ 3. 91
3. 13
2. 40
3. 30
1 .8 7
4. 19
4. 19
5. 19
5. 12
3. 00
2 .9 6
3. 14

78
27
83
66

25
94
55
59

67 $ 4. 04
20
2. 71
_
12
_
8
_
2. 62
175
64
1 .8 9
111
3. 05
205
3 .4 7
26
4. 00
443
1. 98
_
441
_
2

72 $ 3 .4 1
27
1. 99
1. 75
19
2. 56
8
10
1 .7 5
88
4 . 23
17
1 .9 9
4. 77
71
4. 38
98
_
_
2. 35
245
_
238
_
7

49
_
_
_
17
40
33
7
39
_
97
97
_

$ 3 . 56
_
_
_
1 .9 4
2 .9 1
2. 80
_
3. 52
_
1. 96
1. 96
_
_
_
_
2. 22
_
_
1 .8 1

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n clu d e s jo b b in g sh o p s p e r fo r m i n g s o m e m a n u fa ctu rin g o p e r a t io n s , in a d d itio n to r e g u la r (in s id e ) s h o p s .
3 A l l ( o r v ir t u a lly a ll) w o r k e r s in n e a r ly a ll a r e a s w e r e m en .
4 A l l ( o r v ir t u a lly a ll) w o r k e r s in n e a r ly a ll a r e a s w e r e w o m e n .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a t e n o data r e p o r t e d o r data that do not m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .




(0

Table 5. Occupational Earnings: Baltimore, M d.1

O

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
c o a t and suit m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 1965)
NumO c c u p a t io n and s e x

h o u r ly
earn -

cls

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s _____
W o m e n ____________________
M e n ________________________

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s of-

A ver-

of
w ork -

489
358
131

$2. 02
1 .9 1
2. 34

$ 1 .2 5 $ 1 .3 0 $ 1.40 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1.90 $2.0 0 $2.1 0 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2 .6 0 $2.7 0 $2.8 0 $2.9 0 $ 3.00 $ 3.20 $ 3.4 0 $ 3.60 $ 3.8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $4.4 0
and
u n d er
$ 1 .3 0 $ 1 .4 0 $1.5 0 $ 1 .6 0 $1.7 0 $1.8 0 $1.90 $ 2.00 $2.1 0 $2.2 0 $ 2.3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $2.5 0 $2.6 0 $ 2.7 0 $2.8 0 $ 2.9 0 $3.0 0 $3.2 0 $3.4 0 $ 3.60 $ 3.80 $ 4.0 0 $ 4.2 0 $ 4 .4 0 o v e r

56
34
22

24
15
9

36
31
5

30
21
9

38
36
2

55
53
2

35
35

22
22

_
-

_

2

1

-

_

1

_
_

25
22
3

16
12
4

2
2
2

1
2
2
1
1

16
12
4

16
12
4

2
2
1
4
1

4
2
1
1
1
1

10
8
2

16
9
7

.

8
3
5

12
3
9

4
2
2

3
1
2

5
2
3

2
1
1

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_

1
1

1
1

2
2

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

1
1
1
1
1

_

_
_

"

-

-

18
6
12

13
4
9

7
4
3

9
5
4

8
2
6

10

_

3
1
1

_

_
_

1
1

4
2
1
2
1
1

5
3
2

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u t t e r s and m a r k e r s
(2 3 m e n and 3 w o m e n )
(a ll t i m e w o r k e r s ) _________
P r e s s e r s , hand______________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
M en 3 ______________________
P r e s s e r s , m a c h in e 3 _______
M en 3 ______________________
P r e s s e r s , hand and
m a c h in e ( a ll m en )
( a ll t i m e w o r k e r s ) _________
S e w e r s , hand ( f in i s h e r s )
(a ll w o m e n ) _________________
T i m e ...........................................
I n c e n t iv e __________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m (1 0 2
w o m e n and 2 m e n ) ________
T im e _______________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
sin g le h a n d (t a ilo r )
s y s t e m 3 ____________________
W o m e n ! ___________________
T h rea d trim m e rs
(c le a n e r s ) ( a ll w o m e n )
(a ll t i m e w o r k e r s ) _________ 1
3
2

26
18
14
7
20
11

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

58
39
46
72
63
98

8

1. 92
1. 74
2. 19

104
52

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

_

_

2

2. 70

68
40
28

_
_

1
1
_

1
1

1
2
2
1
2
-

_
_
_

1
1

_
_
-

1
1

-

-

-

3

-

2

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

16
12
4

7
2
5

4
2
2

1
1

1
1

1

1

.

1

.

1

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

“

1

-

1

"

3
1
2

1

_

3
3

-

11
7
4

1

1

-

1

1

1

"

-

3
1

3

1

2

-

“

1
1

1

-

1
1

"

3
2

4
4

3
3

1

"

1
1

2
1

-

-

1
1

1

-

6
4
2

1. 91
1. 87

-

1
1

9
2

6
4

9
3

18
10

17
10

13
8

8
6

5
3

5
2

36
22

3. 00
2. 79

"

1
1

"

2
2

2
2

2

“

1
1

1

“

6

1. 35

3

1

-

1

1

6
6

-

-

1 T h e B a lt i m o r e S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f the c it y o f B a lt i m o r e , and the co u n tie s o f A n n e A r u n d e l, B a lt i m o r e ,
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
3 I n s u ffic ie n t data to w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t io n o f s e p a r a te a v e r a g e s b y m eth od o f w a g e p a y m en t; p r e d o m in a n t ly in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s .




1

C a r r o ll,

1
1

1
"

1

3
1

1
1

and H ow a rd .

-

1

2
1

-

2
1

3
1

Table 6. Occupational Earnings: Chicago, 111.1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 1965)
NumO c c u p a t io n and s e x

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s _____
W o m e n ____________________
M e n ________________________

of
w ork -

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—
A verage
$1.25 $1.30 $1.40 $1.50 $1.6 0 $ 1.7 0 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1.90 $ 2 .0 0 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3.0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $3.4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $4.4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4.8 0 $5.00 $ 5 .2 0 $ 5 .4 0
h o u r ly
and
ea rn u n d er
in g s 2 $ 1.30 $ 1.40 $1.50 $1.60 $1.7 0 $ 1.8 0
$1.9 0 $ 2.00 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2.6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3.0 0 $ 3.2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $3.6 0 $ 3.8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4.2 0 $ 4.4 0 $ 4.6 0 $ 4.8 0 $ 5 .0 0 $ 5.20 $5.4 0 o v e r

1, 184
858
326

$2. 64
2. 28
3. 59

43
39
4

51
43
8

46
39
7

65
62
3

60
52
8

62
57
5

46
41
5

43
41
2

109
95
14

75
58
17

74
62
12

67
63
4

60
47
13

75
46
29

58
25
33

64
35
29

33
16
17

30
16
14

21
4
17

15
7
8

7
3
4

7
1
6

13
1
12

4
1
3

5
5

73

3. 40

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

18

19

19

5

5

4

1

-

-

-

-

-

11

1. 82

-

-

-

1

2

4

2

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
51
47

1 .8 3
3. 48
3. 62

.
_

2
_

1
_

_
2

3
3

1
4
3

1
2
2

1
1

4
4

3
3

3
3

1
1

1
1

4
4

-

“

2
2

1
1

1
1

-

-

2
4
3

-

-

_
1
1

-

-

2
2
2

_

-

2
1
1

-

11
11

28
23

4. 50
2. 23

4

_

_

_

2

1

1

_

11

3

1

2

1

4

4

1
2

1

2

1
2

1

"

1
1

_

"

10
2
8
10
2
8

6

1
6

27

10
4
6
10
4
6

1
6

4

24
20
4
24
20
4

5
5

1

12
5
7
12
5
7

3
6

2

18
13
5
18
13
5

1
10

3

8
5
3
8
5
3

2
21
3
18
18

1

5
3
2
5
3
2

1
25
7
18
25
7
18

2

5
3
2
5
3
2

10
10

6
6

5
5

6
6

6
6

6
6

.

2

1

5

7

_

_

_

_

1
1

5
5

7
7

_
-

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

-

2

1

5

7

25
2
23
23
2
21

_

_

2
2

12
1
11
12
1
11

3

_

_
_
_

9
1
8
8
1
7

_

_

8
2
6
8
2
6

-

-

51
4
47

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u tte r s and m a r k e r s (a ll
m en ) (a ll t im e w o r k e r s ) ___
I n s p e c t o r s , fin a l
(e x a m in e r s ) ( a ll w o m e n )
(a ll t i m e w o r k e r s ) __________
P a c k e r s , sh ip p in g ( a ll
m en ) (a ll t i m e w o r k e r s ) ___
P r e s s e r s , ha n d______________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
M en ( a ll in c e n t iv e
w o r k e r s ) _________________
W o m e n 3 _____ _____________
P r e s s e r s , m a c h in e
(5 3 m e n and 2 w o m e n )
(a ll in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s ) ___
S e w e r s , hand ( f i n i s h e r s ) ___
T i m e ___________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
W o m e n ____________________
T im e ____________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m _____________
T i m e ____________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
W o m e n ____________________
T i m e ___________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
M en (a ll in c e n t iv e
w o r k e r s ) _________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
sin g le h a n d (t a il o r )
s y s t e m ______________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
M en (a ll in c e n t iv e
w o r k e r s ) _________________
W o m e n ____________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
T h rea d trim m e rs
(c le a n e r s ) (a ll w o m e n )____
T im e _______________________
Inc e n t iv e ___________________

55
211
68
143
207
65
142

5.
2.
1.
2.
2.
1.
2.

17
23
73
46
22
70
46

240
10
230
218
10
208

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

74
27
76
70
27
72

_

1

18

1
17
2
15
16
2
14

17
1
16
17
1
16

17

21

24

_

10

6

5

6

6

6

23
1
22
23
1
22

16

19

6

6

3

6

3

16
11

19
19

6
5

6
6

3
2

6
6

3
2

-

3
1

11

19

5

6

2

6

2

-

1

_

_

_

17
16

21
20

24
21

_

_

_

16

20

21

24
3
21
20
3
17

_

22

3. 12

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

1

1

3

4

-

5

-

1

-

1

-

1

-

2

-

-

143
141

3. 28
3. 28

3
3

3
3

2
2

3
3

4
4

9

13
13

17
17

8
8

4
4

9
9

2
2

10

-

1
1

10

-

12
12

7
7

7
7

5
5

3
3

1
1

6
6

1
1

1
1

11
11

77
66
64

3. 66
2. 83
2. 83

_

_

1
1
1

2
1
1

1
3
3

2
8
7

7
6
6

4
13
13

1
7
7

2
2
2

3
6
6

7
3
2

8
4
4

5
2
2

6
1
1

4
1
1

2
1
1

1

6

1

1

1
1

_

_

-

_

-

2
1
1

2

_

-

1
2
2

-

-

-

8
3
3

27
20
7

1. 44
1. 39
1. 60

2
2

12
12

5
3
2

2
1
1

5
2
3

_
_

_

-

-

9

1
1

T h e C h ic a g o S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S ta tis tica l A r e a c o n s is ts o f C o o k , D u P a g e , K a n e, L a k e , M c H e n r y , and W ill C o u n tie s .
E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
I n s u ffic ie n t da ta to w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t io n o f s e p a r a t e a v e r a g e s b y m e th o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t; p r e d o m in a n t ly in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s .




4

Table 7. Occupational Earnings: Kansas City, M o.—Kans.
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
c o a t and suit m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 1965)

Number of w ork ers receivin g straigh t-tim e hourly earnings of—
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s _____
W om en
_ __ _
M e n ________________________

ber
of
w ork ­
ers

age
$ 1 .3 0 $1.40 $1.50 $ 1.60 $1.7 0 $1.80 $ 1 .9 0 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 1 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .7 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4.0 0 $ 4.2 0 $ 4 .4 0 '$ 4 .6 0
h o u r ly $ 1 .2 5
and
and
ea rn ­
u n d er
in gs 1
2
$ 1 .3 0 $1.4 0 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $ 1.8 0 $ 1 . 9 0 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 1 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .7 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4.6 0 o v e r

2
2

10
8

5
4

1
1

7

7

13

1
1
1

2

- .
1

12
12
12

_
_

_
_

7
7

-

1

-

1
1
1

30

11

10

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

5
5
5

4
4
4

7
7
7

1
1
1

1
1
1

1
1
1
1

1
1

2
2
2
1
1

-

-

8
8
2
2

9
7
5
3

-

1

1

6

4

4

1

3

3
3
3
3
3
-

7
7
7

3
3

-

3
3
3

2

-

10
10

-

5
5
4
4
4

1
1

11
11

-

4

-

3

31
31

1

12
12
12

-

8

2
2

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

5
5

1
1

-

3
3

3
3

3

2
1

3
3

2
2

4

-

-

1
1

20

-

1
1
1

3

1

-

2
2
2

8

1

-

2
2

5
5

5

2

2
1

-

11

20

5

1

-

9

21

12
8

2

2
2

84

33
13

1

4
4

100

99

41
23
18

36
35

16

110

120

80
39
41

33
32

66

129

60
55
5

49
47

72
69
3

186
177
9

156
136

56
55

80
73
7

467
4 39
28

105
84

6

4

7
7

3
3

4

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4
3
3

2
2
2
2

4
4
4
4

-

7
7
5
5

7
7
7
7

6
6
6
6

4
4
3
3

5
5
4
4

4

2

-

1

-

-

-

1

1

6

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

5

2

1

-

2

-

12
12

5
5

2
2

1
1

-

2
2

-

17

12

5

2

1

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 ,7 8 3
279

$ 2 . 00
1. 94
2. 36

94
72

83
77

2. 73
2 . 80

_
-

-

3
3

57
26
20

3. 15
1 . 81
1. 83

-

-

30
25

1 . 80
1. 76

-

36
85
81
82

1 . 59
2 . 12

_

45
43

2.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.

43

2. 51

-

-

-

-

7

-

4

1

3

2

1

5

3

221

1 . 86
1 . 61

2
1
1

11
2

3

105
14
91

20

7

3

6

12

10

5
15

12
2
10

8
1

1. 90

2
1
1

7

7

3

6

12

10

4

4

1

3

6

2

755
41
714
752
41
711

2. 14
1 .9 4
2. 15
2. 14
1. 94
2. 15

3
_
3
3
_
3

2

7

149
3
146
149
3
146

103
16
87
103
16
87

64
4
60
64
4
60

52
52
52
52

55
5
50
54
5
49

49
3
46
48
3
45

42
42
42
42

32

30

32

21

17

1

1

29
30

21
21

17
17

1

1

31

29

26

19
19
19
19

23

31
32

30
3
27
29
3

2

3
_
3
3
_
3

1
22

30

21

25

1. 75
1. 47
1 .9 3

1

1
1

5
5

4
4

5

-

3

1

1

1

-

-

-

2

-

1

-

-

3

1

1

1

2 , 062

22

68

52
16

63
3

6
2

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u tte r s and m a r k e r s
... _
T im e ___________________
M en (a ll
t im e w o r k e r s ) _
W o m e n ____________________
T im e ___________________
I n s p e c t o r s , fin a l
(e x a m in e r s ) (2 8 w o m e n
and 2 m e n ) __________________
T im e _______________________
P a c k e r s , sh ip p in g (31
m e n and 5 w o m e n ) ( a ll
t im e w o r k e r s ) _______________
P r e s s e r s , ha n d______________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
W o m e n 3 __________________
P r e s s e r s , m a c h in e _________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
M e n ________________________
W o m e n ( a ll in c e n tiv e
w o r k e r s ) _________________
S e w e r s , hand (f in is h e r s )
( a ll w o m e n ) _________________
T i m e _______________________
I n c e n t iv e __________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m _____________
T im e ___________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
W o m e n ____________________
T im e ___________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
T h rea d trim m e rs
(c le a n e r s ) (a ll w o m e n )-----T i m e _______________________
I n c e n t iv e __________________

88
86

28
193

10

15

15
13
11
14

1
1

1

_
_

_

1
1

1

1

5
5
4
3
3

7
7
7
3
3
1
1

68

72

1

_
2
2

_

9

2
1

2

5
7
2
5

5

-

6
6
6
2
2
1
1

6
6
1
1

2

1
22

23

2

30
32
2

1

1 T h e K a n s a s C it y S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S ta tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s of C a s s , C la y , J a c k s o n , and P la t t e C o u n t ie s , M o . ; and J o h n so n and W y an dotte C o u n t ie s , K an s.
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
3 I n s u ffic ie n t data to w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t io n o f se p a r a te a v e r a g e s b y m eth od o f w a g e p a y m en t; p r e d o m in a n t ly in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s .




Table 8. Occupational Earnings: Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif.
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 2 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 1965)

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s -------W o m e n ------------------------------M e n -------------------------------------

Number
of
w ork -

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—
A ve:
age
h o u r ly $ L 25 $ 1 .3 0 $ 1 .4 0 $ 1.5 0 $ 1 . 6 0 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1 .9 0 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4 .8 0 $ 5 .0 0 $ 5 .2 0 $ 5 .4 0
ea rn and
“
~
u n d er
in gs
$ 1 .3 0 $ 1 .4 0 $ 1 .5 0 $ 1 . 6 0 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1 .9 0 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 . 6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4 .8 0 $ 5 .0 0 $ 5 .2 0 $ 5 .4 0 o v e r

2 ,1 4 2
1 ,4 6 5
677

$ 2 .8 7
2 .4 1
3. 8 8

147
146

4. 20
4. 21

36
32

2. 03
1 .8 7

53
65
23
42
33
28
32
18
14

1 .7 7
3. 32
2. 13
3 .9 8
4. 28
4 . 59
2. 34
2. 03
2. 74

105
103

4. 81
4. 84

7
7

31
29
24
416
186
230
4 04
178
226

4. 29
4. 31
4. 69
2. 38
2 . 21
2. 53
2 . 38
2 . 18
2. 54
2. 50
2 .8 2

5
5

60

57
3

56
34

102

92

85
74

91
71

97
87

79
78

155
139

184
173

22

10

11

20

10

1

16

11

164
149
15

131
95
36

117
85
32

132
108
24

85
52
33

75
59

36
18
18

40

51

16

11

16

24

10

17
17
"

3
3

6
6

-

-

3
3

6
6

40

85
14
71

78
13
65

56
13
43

42
3
39

32
4
28

21
1
20

20
20

43
43

30
30

8
8

8
8

9
9

1
1

-

1

_

1

12

.

1
1
1

12
12
12

_

_

71
2

69

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u tte r s and m a r k e r s
(1 4 6 m e n and 1 w o m a n )----T im e ----------------------------------I n s p e c t o r s , fin a l
(e x a m in e r s ) (a ll
t i m e w o r k e r s ) ----------------------W o m e n ____________________
P a c k e r s , sh ip p in g (a ll
m en ) (a ll t i m e w o r k e r s ) ----P r e s s e r s , ha n d--------------------T im e ___________________
I n c e n t iv e ----------------------M e n ------------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------W o m e n ------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------P r e s s e r s , m a c h in e
(102 m e n and 3 w o m e n )___
I n c e n t iv e ___________________
P r e s s e r s , hand and
m a c h in e -------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------M e n 3 ---------------------------------S e w e r s , hand ( f i n i s h e r s ) ----T im e -----------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------W o m e n ____________________
I n c e n t iv e ----------------------M e n -----------------------------------T im e -----------------------------S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m _____________
T im e -----------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------W o m e n ------------- ----------------I n c e n t iv e _______________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
sin g le h a n d ( t a il o r )
s y s t e m ---------------------------------T im e ___________________
I n c e n t iv e ----------------------W o m e n ____________________
I n c e n t iv e ----------------------M en — -------------- ----------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------T h rea d tr im m e r s
(c le a n e r s ) (27 w o m e n
and 3 m en ) (a ll
t i m e w o r k e r s ) ----------------------- 1
3
2

12
8

354
60

294
321
57
264

2. 69
2 . 00
2. 83
2. 67
1 .9 5
2. 83

390
226
213
184
177

3 .4 6
3. 03
3. 49
2 .7 9
2 .7 9
4. 29
4. 33

30

1 .4 3

410
20

9

-

-

-

5
5

5
5

-

4
4

16
16

-

2
1

-

1
1

2

_

8

_

_
_

_
_

9
9

3
3
3

3
4
3

2
8
1

3

-

-

-

-

1

3

_

7
7

_

_

_
-

2
2

22
2
2

2
1
1

_

9
3

-

_

_

-

-

-

_

2

-

2
2

2
2

1
1

_
-

3

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

*

-

-

3

-

-

1

6
2

11
8

4

3

_

6
2

11
8

1

4

3

_

-

_

-

1
1

-

-

-

_

6

6
6

_
_
_
_

1
6

5

6
6

“

1

-

5

_

9

22

1
8
8

9
13
20

29
19

29
19

20

10

10

29
19

29
19

2
20

10

10

2

-

_

_

18

9
9
-

56
33
23
54
33

1

5
-

6
1

5

5

2
2

-

3

_

_

_

3

2

_

_

-

_
-

_
_
_

3
• 3
3

_
_
_
_

_

_

2
1
1
1

_
_

_

_
_

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

2
2

14
14

9
9

20
20

4
4

5
5

3
3

4
4

32
32

4
4
4
4

2
2
2

2
2
2

_

1

_

_

1

8
8
8

_

_
_

-

4

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

1

3
4

_
_
_

_

_

3

_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

3

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

1

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
-

4
3

3

5

-

-

-

1
2
2
2
1
1

-

1

1

3

5

-

_

3

-

2

2
1

_

_

3

-

-

2
1
10

56
27
29
56
27
29

49
18
31
49
18
31

6
1

1

29
9

27
7

23

20

20

27
7

25
5

17
23
6

_

20
2
2

20
2
2

17

7
3
3

32

41

69

6

2

3
7
7

_

_

-

-

22
1
21
22
1
21

9
4
5
9
4
5

1

3
4

9
11
2

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

10

9
7

11

8
2
6
8
2
6

11
8

13

22

25

8

1

3

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2
11
12
2
10

5
17

47
7
40
44
7
37

6

1

2

1

-

_

-

_

67
64

31
28

25
24

8

3
3

_
_

.
_

4

1
1

_
_
_

_

40
31

_
_

_

26
32

_

_

-

_
_

_
_
_

6
26

-

-

1

31

64

27

24

4

1

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

21

20

43

5
5
10

5
5

2

9
7
2

3
8
6

3
3

18

3
11
8

3

21
2

22

5
17

-

-

-

32

37

14

18

25

19

19

9

17

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

2

2

17
17
17

11
11
11

13
13

35
35
33

17
9

17

8
11

_

9

1
16

-

_

_

_

-

-

2
16
16

1

17
17
17

_

-

“

"

2
12
12
10
2
2

1

14
14
14

24

_

_
.
_
_

4

-

14

“

23

2

-

17

17

11

~

14

_

4
4
4

-

12
1
1

2
2

14

12
11

2
2

13
13

18

8

10
8

9
9

9
9

7
6
12

5

2
2

7
7

7
6
10
10

1

17

19

15

_
_

13

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

9
5
5
4
4

21

20

17

13

7
7
13
13

19
4
4
15
15

15

7
7
14
14

43
13
13
30
30

1
1

1
1
12
12

2
2

15
15

14
14

1

1 T he L o s A n g e le s —L o n g B e a c h S tandard M e tr o p o lita n S ta tis tic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f L o s A n g e le s C ou n ty .
T he a r e a c o v e r e d L o s A n g e le s and O ra n g e C o u n tie s in the B u r e a u 's A ugust
s u r v e y ; the la t t e r c o u n ty a c c o u n te d f o r le s s than a tenth o f c o m b in e d e m p lo y m e n t in the tw o c o u n tie s .
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y f o r o v e r t i m e and fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
3 I n s u ffic ie n t da ta to w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t io n o f se p a r a te a v e r a g e s b y m e th o d o f w a g e p a y m en t; p r e d o m in a n tly in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s .




_

8
1
1

-

■

_
_
_

6
6
6

-

_

4

1
1
1

1962

Table 9. Occupational Earnings: New York, N .Y .1-----All Shop;
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
co a t and suit m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 1965)1
3
2
NumO c c u p a t io n and s e x

h o u r ly
ea rn -

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—

A v er-

of
w ork ei &

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s ____________ 2 8 ,3 3 4
W o m e n ____________________________ 1 5 ,6 6 8
M e n _______________________________ 1 2 , 6 6 6

$2 . 92
2. 57
3. 37

$1.25 $1.30 $1.40 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1 . 9 0 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2 .4 0 $2.60 $2.8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3.4 0 $ 3.6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4 .8 0 $ 5 .0 0 r $ n t >
and
under
$1.30 $1.40 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2.40 $ 2.6 0 $2.8 0 $3.0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3.6 0 $3.8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4.2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4 .8 0 $ 5 .0 0 $ 5 .2 0 o v e r
357
248
109

364
159
205

422
343
79

1047
746
301

722
456
266

926
643
283

110 1

733
368

630
449
181

2257
1660
597

1830
1493
337

2212

1755
457

1667
1305
362

2414
1770
644

2129
1163
966

139 2
606
786

2037
663
1374

1600
462
1138

1332
313
1019

1128
167
961

713
194
519

496
106
390

212

218
27
191

260
24
236

265
53

815
130
685

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u tte r s and m a r k e r s
(1 , 500 m e n and 6 w o m e n )
fa ll t im e w o r k e r s )
__
I n s p e c t o r s , fin a l
(e x a m in e r s i
............. . _
W om en ( a ll

1, 506

3. 90

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

16

2

14

9

54

47

207

259

257

305

167

72

30

10

57

490

3. 02

-

-

-

-

-

17

8

6

32

23

54

41

45

107

23

53

8

12

33

6

20

2

_

_

_

6

32

q

_

-

23
23

14
27
27

12

-

14
40
40

33
33

98
98

8
8

12
12

33
33

6
6

20
20

2
2

_
_

_
_

_
_

1 07

M e n _______________________________
T im e ___________________________
P a c k e r s , sh ip p in g (9 1 2
m e n and 9 w o m e n ) (a ll
t i m e w o r k e r s ) ______________________
P r e s s e r s , hand (1 ,2 9 7
m e n and 85 w o m e n ) 3______________
P r e s s e r s , m a c h in e (1 , 108
m e n and 18 w o m e n ) 3______________
P r e s s e r s , hand and
m a c h in e ( a ll m e n )_________________
T im e ---------------------------------------------In cen t iv e _______________________ _
_
S e w e r s , hand ( f i n i s h e r s ) __________
W o m e n ____________________________
T i m e ___________________________
I n c e n t iv e ______________________
M e n _______________________________
T i m e ___________________________
I n c e n t iv e ______________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m ____________________
W o m e n ____________________________
T i m e . . . ________________________
I n c e n t iv e ______________________
M e n -----------------------------------------------T im e ----------------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ______________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
sin g le h a n d (t a ilo r )
s y s t e m _____________________________
W o m e n ____________________________
T im e ___________________________
I n c e n t iv e ______________________
M e n _______________________________
T i m e ---------- -----------------------------I n c e n t iv e ______________________
T h rea d trim m e rs
( c l e a n e r s ) __________________________
W o m e n ____________________________
T i m e ___________________________
M en ( a ll
t im e w o r k e r s ) ___________________

383
377

3. 20
3. 19

_
_

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_

55

921

1. 87

2

112

23

43

1, 382

3. 88

-

-

2

-

1 , 126

4. 23

-

-

-

-

4.
3.
4.
2.
2.
2.
2.
3.
3.
3.

_
_
_

_
-

_
_
142
140

51
83
11
09
16

_
_
17
17
4
13
_
-

70
62
32
81
15
99
26

41
29
15
14

382
628

2.
2.
2.
2.
3.
2.
3.

3, 797
1 , 291
224
1 ,0 6 7
2, 506
1 ,2 3 3
1 ,2 7 3

3.
2.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.

45

540
88

452
5 ,8 1 2
5, 107
2, 354
2, 753
705
492
213
6 , 362

5, 352
2 , 102
3, 250
1,0 10

10

20
21
39
73
68

98

11

9
2

7
2

88

82
28
54

68

72

7
7

99

191

59

18

15

-

14

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

9

12

2

27

10

29

45

46

108

88

141

187

115

139

67

48

16

65

31

178

-

-

-

-

-

4

21

27

61

52

92

130

45

123

109

85

55

60

34

23

205

_
_
97
95
31
64

6
6

8
8

6
6

90

16

59

45

6
10

2

6

46
_
46
80
52

32
_
32
74

13
_
13
38
26
_
26

21

-

28
16

21
12
12

12
11
11

3
_
3

100

2

8

683
658
333
325
25

2
22

15

_
_
_
516
472
237
235
44
17
27

38

149
149
94
55
-

4
4
560
536
269
267
24

21

158
150
65
85

_
_
_
138
138
50
88

_
-

-

-

-

-

2

8

83
76
18
58
7
_
7

91
84
53
31
7
7
-

132
126
65
61

261
251
182
69

242
236

6

10

6

183
164
70
94
19

_

6

6

3
7

5

12

33
26
23
3
7
7
-

1

13

_

-

_

6
6

29
23

6
6

22

43
29

12

_

121

115

7

472
470
283
187
2

2

796
713
406
307
83
36
47

640
588

135
124
53
71

14

11

465
440
425

1 . 60
1 . 60
1. 57

51
49
49

31
31
31

41
41
41

195
183
183

36
29
26

40
40
40

21

-

39
39
36

3
3

25

1 . 68

2

"

"

12

7

~

~

19
19
2

29
14

-

“ ■

11

651
560
207
353
91
27
64

426
334
92
242
92
50
42

327
246
28
218
81

332

363
163
50
113

212

200

-

15

7
15

519
464
135
329
55
14
41

218
140
18

-

_

20

207
144
18
126
63
28
35

6

6

6

20

70
371
248
85
163
123

118
90
25
65
28
7

-

23

_

12

60

-

6

10

21

_

26
614
415
255
160
199
169
30

31

-

_
_

2
2

21

322
52

-

_
_

4

803
695
334
361
108
48

266

73
03
69
51
87

_
_

51
45

179

2
2

-

23
23

17

111

6
6

2

2

21

933
795
507
288
138
118

22

27
173
132
33

56

99

164
36

3
3

-

5
3

122

78

200

102
21

30 3
240
35
205
63
51

57
205
193
_
193

39
91

12
8

3
3

12

241
155

615
83

438

42
8

11

68
12

34
170
95
75

72
532
394
138

_

-

21

60

6

149
86

53
33

68

_

8

_

88

44
28
7

68
6

4

321
228
57
171
93
59
34

88

175
133
17
IK

42
9
33

21

98
67
7
60
31
8

12

_

12

11

2

_
-

-

-

6

69
42
_
42
27

_

_
12

83
58
_
58
25
3

78
44
_
44
34
3
31

45
25
_
25

8

16

_
_
_

8

20

8

8
8

_

_

_

2

20

8

8

25

98

54
7
7
47
_
47

37

78

6

12

-

-

6

31
31

12
66
66

141
27
27
114
_
114

-

-

-

22

218
28

56
370
238
132

310
36
36
274
136
138

117
30
_
30
87

99

65

78
3
75

-

-

-

_

_

26
190
91

_

47
41
_
41

6

23

2

_

2
2

10 0

22

20

20

_

_

6

-

-

2

_

“

"

“

“

“

"

~

1 T he N ew Y o r k S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a t is t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f N ew Y o r k C ity (B r o n x , K in g s , N ew Y o r k , Q u een s, and R ich m o n d C o u n t ie s ), N a ss a u , R o c k la n d , S u ffo lk , and W e s t c h e s t e r
C o u n tie s .
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te sh ifts .
3 I n s u ffic ie n t data to w a r ra n t p r e s e n ta tio n o f s e p a r a te a v e r a g e s b y m eth od of w a g e p a y m e n t, p r e d o m in a n t ly in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s .




Table 10. Occupational Earnings: New York, N .Y .1— Regular and Jobbing Shop'
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
2
c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 1965)
Num -

h o u r ly
ea rn -

9 , 893
3, 193
6 , 700

$3.19
2.82
3.36

48
26
22

177
4
173

61
27
34

277
118
159

194
39
155

234
45
189

384
107
277

1, 307

3.91

_

_

.

_

_

_

_

2.49

1, 301

3.91

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

_

281

3.13

-

-

-

_

-

_

2

_

26

7

43

52

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s ____________
W o m e n ____________________________
M e n -----------------------------------------------

A ver -

of
w ork ei s

6

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

N u m be r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—

2 .40

9

229

3.30

_

-

_

_

_

921
296

1.87
4 .19
3.63
4 .7 6
5.19
4 .08
5.*62

2

112

23

43

55

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

5 .1 2
3.83
5.61
3.00
2.96
2.69
3.39
3 .1 4
3.12
3.22

_

-

.

_

$1.25 $1.30 $1.40 $ 1 .5 0 $ 1 . 6 0 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1 .9 0 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4 .8 0 $ 5 .0 0 $ 5 .2 0
and
u n d er
$1.30 $1.40 $1.50 $ 1.60 $ 1.70 $ 1.80 $ 1 . 9 0 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4 .8 0 $ 5 .0 0 $ 5 .2 0 o v e r
621
248
373

441
269
172

_

482
318
164

351
218
133

731
525

901
456
445

478
175
303

884
182
702

867

206

746

658
53
605

598
43
555

66
261

267
31
236

109
15
94

64

161

16

2

8

_

42

37

169

243

240

270

133

62

27

10

48

2

166
45
121

2

2
6

-

42

37

169

243

240

270

133

62

27

10

48

.

20

33

49

15

14

8

12

30

_

20

2

_

_

.

2

12

1

21

48

15

14

8

12

30

_

20

2

_

_

_
_
73
3

121

327

76
12

165 396
4 46
350

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u t t e r s and m a r k e r s _______________
W o m e n ( a ll
M en ( a ll
t im e w o r k e r s ) -------------- ------------I n s p e c t o r s , fin a l
( e x a m i n e r s ) ________________________
W o m e n (a ll
M en (a ll
t i m e w o r k e r s ) ___________________
P a c k e r s , sh ip p in g (912
m e n and 9 w o m e n ) (a ll
t i m e w o r k e r s ) ______________________
P r e s s e r s , hand ( a ll m e n )-------------T im e ______________________________
I n ce n tiv e
P r e s s e r s , m a c h in e ( a ll m e n )_____
Tim p
I n c e n t iv e __________________________
P r e s s e r s , hand and
m a c h in e (a ll m e n )_________________
T im e _ ____ ____ _
____
I n c e n t i v e ____ __ __
__
S e w e r s , hand ( f i n i s h e r s ) ---------------W o m e n ____________________________
T im e ___________________________
I n c e n t iv e ______________________
M e n -----------------------------------------------T im e
.
_ ..
I n c e n t iv e ______________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m ____________________
W o m e n ____________________________
T im e.
__ ..
I n c e n t iv e ______________________
M e n _______________________________
T im e ----------------------------------------I n ce n tiv e
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
sin g le h a n d (t a il o r )
s y s t e m ______________________________
W o m e n ____________________________
T im e ----------------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ---------------------------------M e n _______________________________
T im e ___________________________
I n c e n t iv e ---------------------------------T h rea d tr im m e r s
( c le a n e r s ) (41 w o m e n
and 2 m en ) ( a ll
t im e w o r k e r s )

150
146
227
64
163
151
42
109
2, 146
1 ,7 1 6
1 ,0 4 8

4
2
2

2
2
-

_

7

34

18

179

99

191

59

18

15

_

14

_

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

16
16

19
19

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

_

_

_

_

_

13

24
20
4

426
283
184
99
143
119
24

199
115

23
14

23

6

-

21

4
4

2
2
2

2

-

2

_

1
1

-

4
3

1

.

-

-

2
1
1

63

3.07
2 .50
2 .3 4
3.39
4 .0 6
3.51
4 .9 4

1 ,4 2 9
140
64
76
1, 289
753
536

3.78
3.27
2.91
3.57
3.83
3.58
4 .1 9

_

43

1.66

1

19

_

100

_

_

-

448
285
241
44
163

_

6
7

2

430
323
107

26

2

-

668

_

-

111

4
4
4

39
39
26
13

10
10
8
2

95
93
75
18

131
125

_

_

2

6
2

110

-

2

_

_

_

2

4

6
6
6

14
14
14

3
3
3

4
4
4

54
53
50
3

43
40
40

1
1

3
3

-

-

-

-

192
180
124
56

150
131
83
48
19
4
15

458
375
325
50
83
77

71
65
61
4

26
26
24

14
14
14

6
6

_

12

3
9

6

2
-

-

_

150
105

_

79
45
34
9
q
7

-

_

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_
_

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_

5

24

3

6

25
23

17
14

12
6

20

_

_

3

14
3

-

-

6
6
2

2

3

4

2

22
_
_
_

22
10
12

_

103
91

20
8

14

13

14
42
42
_
42

13

_

_

29
26

13

16

16

_

_

8

91

26
3

5
3

13
4

36

6

12

g
4
24
24

12

g
4

45
3
3
42
42

3

3

8

8

4

4

1
6

_

_
10
2

_

_

_

22

3

7

91

20

3

5

91

28

3

56

16
12

"

CL
DO

2
2

47
41

_

_

2

41

_

8
2

6
6

2
6

6

_

_
_

4
4
_
4
_

6

_

2

6

_

_
_

6

8

20

_

28

_

6

_

.

_
.

4
4

2
8

6
22

2

_

_

_

_

4

4
4
4

8

22

2

53
3

42
_
16
26

25
_
_

9
_

_

_
_

3

_

_

_

_

25

9

48
_
48

3
58
_
58

90

86

321

263

202

125

6
6

24

10

_

_

§

6
6

7

8

2

_

14

84
75
9

16
62
44
18

311
271
40

257
185
72

7
195
107

8
2
6

2

4

13

28
14
14

2
12

_

2

17

89
45
39

4
9
9

_

_

44

55
84
69
15

9
9

_

4

60

8
6

_

16
16

_

_
7

17
3

_
5
5

22

_

58
42
16
9
q
7

1

1 T h e N ew Y o r k S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f New Y o r k C ity (B ro n x ,
W e s t c h e s t e r C o u n t ie s .
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .




15

_

2

7
7
7

-

_

_

88

117
54
63

3
50
3
47

16

_

_

8

_

_

_

26

25

9

20
2

18

48

61

8

_

2

K in g s ,

N ew

Y ork,

Q u e e n s,

and R ich m o n d C ou n ties)

N a ss a u ,

R o c k la n d ,

S u ffo lk ,

and

Table 11. Occupational Earnings: New York, N.Y.1-----Contract Shops

0)

2
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
co a t and suit m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 1965)

Numbe:r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—

Num-

A ver -

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

of
w ork ci a

$1.30 $1.40 $1.50 $ 1 . 6 0 $1.70 $1.8 0 $1.90 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $2.4 0 $2.6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4 .8 0 $ 5 .0 0 $ 5 .2 0
h o u r ly $ 1.25
and
earn and
u n d er
$ 1.30 $1.40 $1.50 $ 1 . 6 0 $1.70 $1.80 $1.9 0 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2.4 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4.0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4.6 0 $ 4 .8 0 $ 5 .0 0 $ 5 .2 0 o v e r

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s
__ __
W o m e n __________ __________________
M en
____
_.
.. ..

18,441
1 2 ,4 7 5
5 ,9 6 6

$ 2 .7 8
2 .5 0
3 .3 7

199

3 .8 2

87

187
155
32

361
316
45

770
628
142

528
417

-

-

111

692
598
94

717
626
91

464
404
60

1636
1412
224

1389
1224
165

1730
1437
293

1316
1087
229

1683
1245
438

1228
707
521

914
431
483

1153
481
672

733
341
392

674
260
414

530
124
406

386
128
258

229
75
154

156
38
118

6

309
222

9

12

10

38

16

17

35

34

10

3

39

-

-

3

6

-

-

-

_

_
_

3
3

6
6

_

_
_

_
_

_

_

108
50
58

no

123
52
71

48

31
_
31

16
_
16

63
_
63

27
_
27

105
_
105

36
15

119
7

38

112

31
_
31

16

21

16

114
_
114

59

45

2

6

57

39
62
62
_
62
_
_
_

_
_
_
7
7
_
7
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

44
_
44
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

8

8
8

49
42
_
42
7
_
7

142
15
127

95
20

75

419
84
335

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u tte r s and m a r k e r s (a ll
I n s p e c t o r s , fin a l
(e x a m in e r s )________________________
W o m e n (a ll
M e n _______________________________
T im e ____ ____________________
P r e s s e r s , hand (1 ,0 0 1 m en
and 85 w o m e n )____________________
T im e ______________________________
I n c e n t iv e __________________________
P r e s s e r s , m a ch in e
(881 m e n and 18 w o m e n ) ______ _
T im e ______________________________

Timp

M en (a ll
t im e w o r k e r s)__________ ___ ____

-

2 .87

55
154
148

2 35
3 .0 5
3 .0 4

_
-

_
-

1,086
289
797

3.79
3 .2 4
3 .99

-

899

3.99
3 .4 0
4 .1 7

-

212

687
P r e s s e r s , hand and
m a c h in e (a ll m e n )_________________
T im e .....................................................
In c e ntiv e ______ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
S e w e r s , hand (fin is h e r s ).._________
W o m e n ___ _________________ _
T im e ______________________
I n c e n t iv e ___________________ _
M e n ___
___ _______ _____ __
T im e ___________________________
In c e n tiv e ______________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m ____________________
W om en
_
T im e ___________________________
I n c e n t iv e ____ __________________
M en
T im e ___________________________
I n ce n tiv e ______________________
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s in g le h a n d (t a ilo r )
s y s t e m _______ ___________________
W o m e n _____________ ___ _______
T i rr» #
=
»
I n c e n t iv e ______________________
_________
M e n ______________
T im o
I n c e n t iv e ______________________
T h rea d t rim m e rs
( c l e a n e r s ) __________________________
W nm e*r\

-

209

-

4

9
9

12
12

50
50

8
8

37
31

46
9
37

92
43
49

69
14
55

66

61
43
18

52
31

92
16
76

21

25

66

_

6

-

19
188
132
71
61
56
50

66

172
133
25
108
39
33

6

6

637
546
193
353
91
27
64

403
320
84
236
83
41
42

314
242
28
214
72

304
186
13
173
118
31
87

273
157
44
113

126
18

_

3
3

2
2

27
19

_

8

10
2
8

29
15
14

45

8

-

_

-

_

-

-

_

_

4
4

21
12
9

26
5

4

_
_
_
366
341
154
187
25
13

_

-

15
15
4
11

88

82
28
54

_
_

79
73
16
57

6

84
77
46
31
7
7
_

-

6
6

_
-

6

_

8
8

_
_

no
no

61

68

85
8

42
-

-

-

-

-

8

-

126
120

247
237

59

168

61
6

69

239
233
118
115

10

6

94
19

-

5

6

6

3
7

1

29
23

6
6

22

91
91
27
64
-

6
6

6
6

154
146

119
119
49
70
_
-

-

-

_
-

7

128
128
42

6
6

6

23

6

-

6

-

7
15

2
2

24

21

429
411
159
252
18
_
18

491
478
209
269
13
7
6

12

597
548
226
322
49
18
31

732
630
273
357

493
438

13

742
660
356
304
82
35
47

42
60

327
55
14
41

43
29

no

101

101

76
25
51
25
7
18

195
138
18

196
140
18

120

122

86

_
179
160
66

33
_
-

4
4

21

377
377
208
169
_
_
-

29
14

_

_

_

_

6

_

15

14

31
31
31

36
36
36

171
159
159

33

-

26

23

34
34
34

21

1.57

50
48
48

1.56

2

"

"

12

7

“

68

9

102

111

57

56

26

12

31

44

_

3
3

8

21

475
420
182
238
55
41
14

21

116

89
27

2

12

60

18
108
51
57

83
17

121

47
74
16
6
10

_
_

153
135
19

102
102

116

102

18
12
6

285
216

49
167
69
35
34

294
73
3
70

_
_
_
_
196
152
6

146
44
11

33

175
62
6

14
96

167
129
17
112

38
5
33

108
29

60
12

65
25
40

68

35

5
63

6

6

?Q
t.7

32

46
_
46
64
39
_
39
25
7
18

18
_
18
32
26

21

26

_
_
_
30
24
_
24

6

6

_

_

6

6

90
63
7
56
27

73
56
_
56
17
3
14

50
38
_
38
3
9

43
25
_
25
18
_
18

64
27

56
4
4
52
49

8

19

93
20

_

1 23
98

56
113
53
60

29
79
29
50

73
37
36

27
37
17
i. Q
18

_

_

_

_

_

221

_

20

12

_
21
6
6

_

6

_
_
-

_
_
_

_

_

_

8

8

_
_
_

29
7

28

30

6

12

7
22

6
22

18

24
56

22

22

18

56

8

_

12

80
24

2

422
399
384

1.6 0

23

1.59

19
19

9
37
37
34

1 T he N ew Y o r k S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f New Y o r k C ity (B r o n x ,
W e s t c h e s t e r C o u n tie s .
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te sh ifts .




6
6

12

_

8

16
16

17
4
13

3 .2 5
2 .9 4

_
-

_

58

12

9
9
_

2 ,3 6 8
1,151
160
991
1 ,217
480
737

Z.99

_

12

21

5

-

12

3 .5 5
3 .4 0
3 !6 4

-

11

2
2

33
26
23
3
7
7
-

2.6 6

7
7

16

6

_

40
28
15
13
-

6

6

-

2 .67
2 .6 2
2 .3 2
2 .8 0
2 .9 8
2 .8 0
3 .0 7

12

6

6

_
-

5 ,9 1 4
5,0 6 7
1,861
3 ,2 0 6
847
282
565

-

6

10

_
-

106

7
7
7
-

17

_
-

3 .8 4
2 .6 4
4 .0 0
2 .58
2 .5 4
2 .37
2 .6 5
3 .0 6
3 .0 3
3.11

389
46
343
3 ,6 6 6
3 ,391
1 ,306
2 ,0 8 5
275
169

-

9

3
3

K in g s,

N ew

Y o r k , Q u een s,

_

and

R ich m o n d

C o u n t ie s ),

N a ss a u ,

_

_

R o c k la n d ,

_

_

S u ffo lk ,

_

and

Table 12. Occupational Earnings: Newark and Jersey City, N.J.1
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 2 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 1965)
N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o fA v er­
age
h o u r ly $ 1.2 5 $ 1 .3 0 $ 1 .4 0 $1.5 0 $ 1 . 6 0 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1 . 9 0 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 1 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 . 6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4.8 0 $ 5 .0 0
and
and
ea rn ­
u n d er
in gs 2
$ 1 .3 0 $ 1 .4 0 $ 1 .5 0 $ 1 . 6 0 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1 .9 0 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 1 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4.8 0 $ 5 .0 0 o v e r

O c c u p a t io n and se x

Num ­
ber
of
w ork ­
ers

A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s _____
W o m e n -----------------------------M e n -------------------------------------

6 ,7 5 6
5 ,2 0 2
1 ,554

$ 2 .4 9
2. 31
3. 08

43

3. 94

23
6

446
350
96

394
345
49

354
270
84

251

38

268
236
32

51

554
457
97

-

1

-

1

2

1

5

-

-

1

-

1

2

1

-

-

5

-

9
7

5

9

7

25

17

6

22

3

1
6

22

4

1

32
28
4

27

1

16
15

2

9
9
-

5

3

-

-

-

1
1

-

3
3

-

8
8

-

300
273
27

340
299
41

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

11

171
151

2. 72
2. 30

292

452
354
98

345

1

525
452
73

330

20

207
171
36

254
207
47

-

-

329
227

84

102

233
146
87

169

261

1

-

4

3

3

1

6

1

-

-

1

3

1

6

-

-

2

20

7

13

18
2

6
1

9
9

21

16
1

16
13
3

35
30
5

23
19
4

32

26

11

21
11

16
10

35
33

6
6

10
8

20

15
15

6

16

53

83
19
64

89
4
85

68
22

46

200

114
70
44

56
29
27

84
44
40

90
44
46

47
24
23

54
25
29

200

66

4

6

3

8

3

5

-

-

5

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

2
2

11

-

2

-

15
4

35
35

17
4
13

21

-

25
5

21

20

5
81

101
68

189
123

51
149

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u tte r s and m a r k e r s (a ll
m en ) (a ll t im e w o r k e r s ) ----I n s p e c t o r s , fin a l
( e x a m in e r s ) ------------------------W om en ( a ll
t i m e w o r k e r s ) ___________
M en (a ll
t i m e w o r k e r s ) ___________
P r e s s e r s , hand ( 2 9 1 m e n
and 30 w o m e n ) -------------------T im e ----------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ---------------------------P r e s s e r s , m a c h in e
( 3 6 1 m e n and 4 w o m e n )----T im e ----------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ---------------------------P r e s s e r s , hand and
m a c h in e (71 m e n and
45 w o m e n )---------------------------T im e ----------------------------------S e w e r s , hand (f in i s h e r s )
( 1 , 0 0 0 w o m e n and
4 m e n )----------------------------------T im e _______________________
I n c e n t iv e ---------------------------S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m -------------------W o m e n ------------------------------T im e -----------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------M e n ------------------------------------T im e .
, , ........ , ,
I n c e n t iv e ----------------------T h rea d t r im m e r s
( c le a n e r s ) (1 6 5 w o m e n
and 4 m e n ) --------------------------I n c e n t iv e ----------------------------

17

2 . 86

321
188
133

3. 06
2. 40
3. 99

-

_

7
4

365

_
_

_
_

1
1

199

4 . 08
3. 08
4. 91

116
106

2 .7 1
2 . 69

_

1 ,0 0 4
368
636

2. 36
1 .9 9
2. 58

1

9

4

2

3 ,1 4 5
2 ,7 9 4
1,607
1,187
351
225
126

2 . 59

11
11
10
1

50
46
26

_
_

4
4

-

10
6
6

-

-

1

-

5

14
14

81
71

4
4

166

169
1**7
1 4Q
20

2.
2.
3.
3.
2.
3.

52
16

01
09
70
80

1. 53
1 .4 7
1 .9 3

5

43
43

_

11

20

7
7

-

10

5
5
46
45
42
3
1

_

-

_

16
16

-

9
9

64
28
36

51
36
15

54
33

56
34

77
67

21

22

10

92

107

86

100

152
145

76

83
17
7

150
142
126

10

2

120

122
111

69
42

25
7
3
4

16
8

-

-

2

-

-

2

5
3

11
6

5

6

4
4

68

86

72

33
35

26
60

21

21

51

32

244
216
174
42
28
24
4

231
227
184
43
4
4

215
141
49
25
19

140
123
71
52
17
15

354
330
258
72
24

268
238
99
139
30

189
175
30
145
14

20

-

6

2

4

20
10

8
6

6
6

4

-

4
4

3

-

3

T he N e w a r k and J e r s e y C ity Standard M e tr o p o lita n S ta tis tic a l A r e a s c o n s is t o f E s s e x , H u d son ,
E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .




M o r ris ,

2

7

19
9

14

4

10

2
12

2
2

4
4

2

86

7
4

5

3
3

4
4

6
6

-

8
6

2
2

-

-

-

-

56
7
49

31
31

18
18

14
_
14

15

4
_
4

5
5

4
_
4

6

2

2

_

_

_

6

2

2

193
149
51
98
44
39
5

122

92
72
14
58

47
5
4

54
35
4
31
19

17

25
23
_
23

55
34
_
34

2

2

21

4

6

1

31
24
_
24
7
7

20

20
16

109
94
4
90
15
9

54
49

1

190

6

7

2

1

4

7

4
17

4
4

and U n ion C o u n tie s .

96
22

74
26
13
13

2

13

2

19
15
_
15
4
_
■
4

8
11

18
1

_

_

-

2

2

21

Table 13. Occupational Earnings: Paterson—Clifton—Passaic, N.J.1

0
0

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
2
c o a t and suit m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 1965)

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s ______
M e n _________________________

of
w ork ­
ers

o

o
n

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ofU
$1.70" $1.80 $1.9 0 $ 2.00 $2.1 0 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2.3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $2.6 0 $ 2.8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3.2 0 $ 3.4 0 $ 3.60 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4.0 0 $4.2 0 $ 4.40 $4.6 0 $4. & "
and

1

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A verage
$ 1 .2 5 ' $1.3 0 $1.40 $ 1.50
h o u r ly
and
ea rn ­
under
in gs 2
$ 1 .3 0 $1.40 S i . 50 $1.60

Lj
o

Num-

$2.3 0 ,$2^m $ 2.60 s a .a n $ 3.0 0 $ 3 .2ft S L l f t $2.6,Q $3. an, $4. OP $4.20, $4.4 0 $4.6 0 $4.8 0 $5.00 o v e r

$1.80. $1.90 $ 2 .M $2UQ. $2.

409
366
43

257
224
33

241
230
11

221
182
39

216
193
23

318
282
36

246
228
18

232
202
30

91
64
27

60
19
41

32
12
20

53
2
51

48
11
37

19
8
11

8
5
3

19
4
15

12
12

45
45

3

63
55
8

5

-

27

21

2

3

-

2

4

3
29

3

3
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

10
6
4

29
14
15

3
3

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
13

-

11
11
-

25
25
-

18
16
2

18
18
-

20
13
7

21
5
16

10
7
3

7
2
5

-

15
15

9
9

9
9

1
1

-

3
3

4
1

-

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

9
-

3
3

14
3
11

15
15

9
9

10
2
8

15
15

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

88
86
57
29
2
2
-

242
233
190
43
9
6
3

95
94
59
35
1
1
-

76
70
21
49
6
4
2

52
44
17
27
8
5
3

40
40
6
34
-

25
19
2
17
6
3
3

7
7

1
1

9
9

2
2
2
-

4
4
4
"

-

-

9
7
7
2
2

3
3
3

113
104
9

325
290
35

125
119
6

147
107
40

3, 624
2, 932
692

$2.2 5
2 .07
2 .98

67

20
175
64
53
111
67
44

2.71
2 .6 2
1.89
1.83
3.05
2 .4 8
3 .9 2

2
2
2
_
_
-

2
2
2
-

_
.
-

3
15
13
13
2
2
-

8
3
3
5
5
-

13
13
11
.
-

11
5
5
6
6
-

5
5
3
-

20
8
8
12
9
3

2
2
2
-

11
4
2
7
4
3

3
3
-

3
17
6
4
11
8
3

2
5
2
2
3
3

6
10

205
137
68

3 .47
3.00
4 .4 1

.
-

_
-

_
-

3
3
-

3
3
-

-

4
4
-

5
5
-

7
5
2

-

14
14
-

-

6
6
-

26
11

4 .0 0
3.01

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
1

2
2

-

443
304
139

1.98
1.83
2 .2 9

15
10
5

4
4
-

18
14
4

25
18
7

57
47
10

39
27
12

40
34
6

70
58
12

72
62
10

18
18
-

18
7
11

1, 594
1, 522
1 ,0 4 7
475
72
40
32

2 .29
2 .2 8
2 .1 8
2 .4 9
2 .5 8
2 .4 8
2.7 1

6
6
2
4

14
14
2
12
_

7
7
4
3

41
36
16
20
5

62
62
43
19
-

88
88
68
20
_

92
92
69
23

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

5

-

-

107
97
61
36
10
4
6

182
177
154
23
5
5

178
169
139
30
9
9
-

164
158
137
21
6
6
-

116
102

1.54
1.55

10
8

2
2

6
6

81
69

12
12

3
3

2
2

134
66
68

4 .0 4

99
92
7

91
67
24

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u t t e r s and m a r k e r s (a ll
m en) ( a ll t i m e w o r k e r s ) -----I n s p e c t o r s , fin a l
(e x a m in e r s ) (1 2 w o m e n
and 8 m en) (a ll
t im e w o r k e r s ) ________________
P r e s s e r s , h a n d ----------------------W o m e n --------------------------------T im e ------------------------------M e n _________________________
T im e ____________________
I n c e n t iv e -----------------------P r e s s e r s , m a ch in e
(2 0 3 m e n and 2 w o m e n ) -----T im e __________ '-------------------I n c e n t iv e -----------------------------P r e s s e r s , hand and
m a c h in e (a ll m e n )---------------T im e ________________________
S e w e r s , hand (f in is h e r s )
(441 w o m e n and 2 m e n )-----T i m e ..................- .........................
I n c e n t iv e -----------------------------S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m --------------------W o m e n _____________________
T im e ___ , ________________
I n c e n t iv e ________________
M e n _________________________
T i m e ------------------------------I n c e n t iv e ________________
T h rea d trim m e rs
( c le a n e r s ) (1 1 4 w o m e n
and 2 m en )-----------------------------T im e ------------------------------------

1
2

_

_

-

-

T h e P a t e r s o n — lif t o n — a s s a ic S ta n d a rd M e tr o p o lita n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f B e r g e n and P a s s a ic C o u n t ie s .
C
P
E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .




-

-

7

1

-

-

-

-

9
-

-

-

Table 14. Occupational Earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.—N.J.1
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 1965)
Num O c c u p a t io n and se x

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s _____
W o m e n ____________________
M e n ________________________

of
w ork er s

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—
A v erage
$1.25 $1.3 0 $1.40 $1.50 $1.60 $1.7 0 $1.8 0 $1.9 0 $2.0 0 $2.1 0 $2.2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $2.5 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3.0 0 $ 3.2 0 $ 3.4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3.8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $4.2 0 $ 4.40 $4.60 $ 4.80
h o u r ly
and
and
u n d er
in g s 2
$1.30 $ 1.40 $ 1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $ 1 .8 0 $1.9 0 $2.0 0 $ 2.1 0 $ 2.2 0 $2.3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2.5 0 $2.6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3.2 0 $ 3.4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4.0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4.4 0 $ 4.60 $4.80 o v e r

1 ,8 4 3 $ 2. 52
1, 34 3
2 . 21
500
3. 35

70
43
27

67
62
5

88
77
11

204
160
44

81
67
14

92
76
16

107
99
8

50
48
2

85
75
10

65
57
8

61
54
7

60
56
4

65
47
18

106
85
21

83
75
8

95
77
18

57
31
26

59
34
25

51
22
29

31
17
14

33
17
16

1

53
49
4

2

1
1

7
7

21
21

18
18

17
17

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

20
4
16

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

11
7
4

35
4
31

114
114

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u tte r s and m a r k e r s
(a ll m en )
_
_ __
T im e _______________________
I n s p e c t o r s , fin a l
( e x a m in e r s ) _________________
W om en ( a ll
t im e w o r k e r s ) ___________
M en ( a ll
t im e w o r k e r s ) ___________
P a c k e r s , sh ip p in g ( a ll
m en ) ( a ll t i m e w o r k e r s ) ___
P r e s s e r s , h and______________
W o m e n ____________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
M en (a ll in c e n t iv e
w o r k e r s ) _________________
P r e s s e r s , m a c h in e
(9 3 m e n and 5 w o m e n )
( a ll in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s ) ___
S e w e r s , hand (f in i s h e r s )
(2 3 8 w o m e n and 7 m e n )___
T i m e _______________________
I n ce n tiv e
__
_ _
S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
s e c t io n s y s t e m _____________
W o m e n ____________________
I n c e n t iv e _______________
M en ( a ll in c e n t iv e
w o r k e r s ) _________________
T h rea d trim m e rs
( c le a n e r s ) (31 w o m e n
and 2 m en ) ( a ll
t im e w o r k e r s ) _______________

72
68

1

3. 41
3. 47

27

1. 99

-

-

3

4

2

1

5

1

1

-

2

1

1

2

1

3

19

1. 75

-

-

3

4

2

1

5

1

-

-

2

-

1

-

-

-

8

2. 56

1

-

-

1

-

2

1

3

3
3
3
3

_
5
4
4

_
_
-

_
_
_

1
_
_

3

_

4

_

_

8

4

6

43

-

-

1
1
1

2

-

2
2
2

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

3

-

4

-

-

8

4

6

43

-

4

48

_

_

-

-

-

1
1
1

14

75
23
99

_

_

1
2
2

4
1
1

-

-

1
1
1
1

_

_

_

1
1
1

1
1
1

_
_

17
14

1.
4.
1.
2.

71

4. 77

98

4. 38

-

-

-

-

-

1

3

-

-

1

1

1

2

7

5

1

3

-

1

2

1

6

11

245
34

3
3

3
3

7
7

10
2
8

14
6
8

15
1
14

11
4
7

13
7

13
3
10

16
_
16

19
5
14

24
4
20

9
9

9
2
7

21

20

19

4

9

_

4

1

1

211

2. 35
1. 97
2. 41

21

20

19

4

9

-

4

1

716
670
658

2. 43
2. 34
2 . 35

10
10
10

30
30
30

33
33
33

47
47
47

28
26
26

38
38
36

41
41
33

23

44
44
44

34
34
32

34
34
34

21
20
20

39
39
39

38
35
35

59
52
52

33
32
32

49
47
47

26
24
24

26
24
24

9
7
7

16
10
10

15
13
13

4
3
3

4
4
. 4

46

3. 77

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

3

7

1

2

2

2

2

6

2

1

-

33

1. 40

7

13

8

1

1

10
88

_
_

10

1
1
1

-

1

3

6

22
22

1

l 1

_

-

14

1 T h e P h ila d e lp h ia S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f B u c k s , C h e s t e r , D e la w a r e , M o n t g o m e r y , and P h ila d e lp h ia C o u n tie s , P a .; and B u r lin g to n , C a m d e n , and G lo u c e s t e r
C o u n t ie s , N .J .
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .




Table 15. Occupational Earnings: San Francisco—Oakland, Calif.1
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
2
c o a t and suit m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A u g u st 196b)
N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g str a ig h t- t im e htou rly ea rn iings o f-

A ver age

696
561
135

O c c u p a t io n and se x

Num ­
ber
of
w ork ers

$2. 44
2. 23
3. 30

10
10

49
32

3. 56
3. 00

_
_

17
9
8
40
14
26
33
10
23
39
17
22
24
15

1.
1.
2.
2.
2.
3.
2.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
2.

97
8
89

1. 96
1. 72
1. 98

_

129
125
21
9

earn in gs

$ 1 .2 5 $1.3 0 $1.35 $ 1.40 $ 1.45 $1.5 0 $1.60 $1.7 0 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1 .9 0 $ 2 .0 0 $ 2.2 0 $2.4 0 $2.6 0 $ 2.8 0 $ 3.0 0 $3.2 0 $3.4 0 $ 3.6 0 $3.8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $4.4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4.8 0 $ 5.00
and
and
u n d er
$ 1 .3 0 $ 1 .3 5 $1.40 $ 1.45 $ 1.50 $ 1.60 $1.70 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1.9 0 $ 2.0 0 $ 2.2 0 $ 2.4 0 $2.6 0 $2.8 0 $ 3.0 0 $3.2 0 $3.4 0 $3.6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $4.6 0 $ 4 .8 0 $ 5 .0 0 o v e r

12
12
_

10
10

_

_
_

_

47
46
1

9
6
3

8
5
3

6
1
5

7
3
4

1
1

1

-

3
1

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

2

-

-

2

-

2
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

4

73
67
6

49
44
5

53
44
9

54
48
6

46
29
17

28
18
10

21
7
14

20
12
8

19
7
12

10
7
3

_

1
1

4
3

1
1

9
8

6
5

8
6

3
2

3
2

2
1

-

1

23
23
_

7
7
_

39
37
2

47
44
3

36
27
9

46
44
2

_

_
_

_
_

2
2

_
_

_

-

2
1
1

1
1

6
2
4

1
1

3
3

_

_

1

2
1
1
2
1
1
1

2
1
1
5
4
1
5
4
1
1

_

_

_

15
3
12

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
C u tte r s and m a r k e r s
(a ll m en)
.
.... .
T im e . _ .
P a c k e r s , sh ip p in g
(a ll t im e w o r k e r s )

P r p s s p r s , band
T im e
Tnrpntivp
W om en
T im e

.... .
...
_ .
__ ___ ___ _
_
__ _____
_ .

'P r o s p e r s , m a c h in e
___ _ _
T im e
....
. _
I n ce n tiv e
_ ___
____
.
W orsen 3
S e w e r s , hand ( f in i s h e r s )
(a ll w o m e n !
_____________
T im e _______________________
Incen tive

___________________

94
83
06
91
46
15
80
32
01
52
37
64
89
93

_
_

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

.

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

7
2
5

2
2

2

_

3
1
2

_

2. 22
2. 24

6
6

4
4

4
4

13
12

1. 81
1. 55

_

1
1

2

2
2

_

_
_

.
.

1

_

_

1

. ___
..._

T h rea d trim m e rs
( c le a n e r s ) ( a ll w o m e n ) -------T im e

___________________

2

1

1

1

_

2
_

2
2
_

2
1

1
7
4
3
7
4
3

_

_
_

1

_

_

1

8
1
7
8
1
7
2

2
1
1
1

-

-

_

-

1
1

2
2

1
1

1
1

_

_

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

1
1

-

2
2

1
1

2
2

1
1

-

-

1
2
1
1
2

-

5
1

1
8
5
3
7
1

2

2

_

-

-

-

6
6

1
1

7
7

2

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

_

6
3
3
2
_

2
6
5
1

_

_

1

1

1

1

_

6

-

_

3

13

5

11

12

-

_

_

_

_

3

13

5

11

12

6
1
5

7
1
6

4

10
10

12
11

4
2

3
3

4
4

4
4

15
15

9
9

9
9

9
9

-

1
1

3

2

4

1

1

1

3
1

-

-

1
1

-

1
1

1

-

-

-

1
-

1
1

1

-

4
3
1

1
1

-

-

5

2
2

-

-

1

5

.

17
1
16

4

_

1
1

-

-

1 T h e San F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f A la m e d a , C o n tra C o s ta , M a r in , San F r a n c i s c o ,
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
3 I n s u ffic ie n t data to w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t io n o f s e p a r a t e a v e r a g e s by m eth od o f w a g e p a y m en t; p r e d o m in a n t ly in c e n t iv e w o r k e r s .




-

1

1

1

S e w in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
sin g le h a n d (t a ilo r )
s y s t e m (1 2 5 w o m e n
nnd 4 m en )
Inceptive

_

_

-

2

and San M a te o C o u n tie s .

Table 16. Method o f W age Payment
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s ' c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s b y m e th o d o f w ag e p a y m e n t ,1
9 s e l e c t e d a r e a s , A u g u st 1965)
N ew Y o r k
B a lt im o r e

M eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t 1

C h ica g o

C ity

L os A n g e le s L on g B e a c h

A ll
sh op s

R e g u la r
sh op s 2

C o n tr a c t
sh op s

N e w a rk and
J e r s e y C ity

P aterson —
C lifto n —
P a s s a ic

P h ila d e lp h ia

San
F ra n cis co —
O akland

A ll w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

I n ce n tiv e w o r k e r s --------------------------------------------------In d iv id u a l p i e c e w o r k ---------------------------------------G ro u p p i e c e w o r k _______________________________

38
38

65
64
2

67
67
-

56
56

44
39
6

23
21
3

56
48
7

37
36
1

25
23
2

71
67
4

68
68
1

T im e - r a t e d w o r k e r s _____________ _________________
F o r m a l p la n s -----------------------------------------------------S in gle ra te ___________________________________
R a n g e o f r a t e s ---------------------------------------------In d iv id u a l r a t e s _________________________________

62
62
62

35
34

33
32

-

-

34
1

32
1

56
52
52
3

77
67
67
9

44
44
44
(3 )

63
54
51
3
9

75
73
73
2

29
28
28

-

44
11
10
(3 )
33

32
5
5
27

1
2
3

-

F o r d e fin it io n o f m e th o d o f w age p a y m en t, se e a ppen dix A .
I n clu d e s jo b b in g sh o p s p e r fo r m in g s o m e m a n u fa ctu rin g o p e r a t i o n s , in a d d itio n to r e g u la r (in s id e )
L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,

-

(3)

shops.

su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u al t o t a ls .

Table 17.

Scheduled W eekly Hours

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s ' c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s b y s c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s , 1
9 s e l e c t e d a r e a s , A u g u st 1965)
N ew Y o r k
B a lt im o r e

W e e k ly h o u r s 1

A ll w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------------------U n der 3 5 h o u r s -------------------------------------------------------35 h o u r s ___________________________ __________________
3 7 l/z h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------------40 h o u r s -------------------------------------------------------------------44 h o u r s _____________________________________________

C h ica g o

K a n sa s
C ity

L os A n g e le s L on g B e a ch

A ll
sh op s

R e g u la r
sh op s 2

C o n tr a c t
sh op s

N e w a rk and
J e r s e y C ity

P aterson —
C lifto n —
P a s s a ic

P h ila d e lp h ia

San
F r a n c is c o —
O akland

100

100

100

100

93

77

89

-

-

-

-

5
3

(3)
23

11

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

_

100

_

91
1
8

98
1
1

6
75

98

98

7
84

-

-

-

-

19

2

2

9

96
1
3

1 D ata r e la t e to p r e d o m in a t e w o r k sc h e d u le o f fu l l- t im e d a y -s h ift w o r k e r s in e a c h e s t a b lis h m e n t .
2 I n clu d e s jo b b in g sh o p s p e r fo r m in g s o m e m a n u fa ctu rin g o p e r a t io n s , in a d d itio n to r e g u la r (in s id e ) sh o p s .
3 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u al t o t a ls .

10

Table 18. Paid Holidays
(P a id h o lid a y p r o v i s i o n s 1 f o r p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y In te rn a tio n a l L a d ie s ' G a r m e n t W o r k e r s ' U n ion c o n t r a c t s in w o m e n 's and m i s s e s '
c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , 9 s e l e c t e d a r e a s , A u g u st 1965)

N u m b er o f h o lid a y s

M e th o d o f co m p u tin g p a y

B a lt i m o r e _

6

C h i c a g o ___

4 d a y s a n n u ally ; o n e -h a lf d a y 's pa y g u a r a n te e d , t h r e e - fo u r t h s T im e w o r k e r s p a id t h e ir r e g u la r r a t e s ; t h o s e on an in c e n t iv e b a s is w e r e p a id 7 t im e s
d a y 's p a y fo r t h o s e w o rk in g 3 days in the h o lid a y w e e k , and t h e ir a v e r a g e h o u r ly e a rn in g s d u rin g the 2 0 w e e k s ending in the f i r s t w e e k o f the p r e ­
v io u s June.
fu ll p a y f o r t h o s e w o rk in g 4 d a y s.

K a n s a s C i t y _________________

6 d a y s a n n u ally .

T im e w o r k e r s p a id t h e ir r e g u la r r a t e s ; t h o s e on an in ce n tiv e b a s is w e r e p a id 7 t im e s
t h e ir a v e r a g e h o u r ly e a rn in g s d u rin g the y e a r en d in g the p r e v io u s M a r c h 31.

L o s A n g e l e s —L on g B e a c h ..

6 d a y s a n n u ally .

T im e w o r k e r s p a id t h e ir r e g u la r r a t e s ; t h o s e on an in c e n t iv e b a s is w e r e p a id a m ou n ts
ra n g in g f r o m $13 to $ 16, a c c o r d in g to c r a f t .

N ew Y o r k .,

7 d a y s a n n u ally .

T im e w o r k e r s p a id th e ir r e g u la r r a t e s ; t h o s e on an in c e n t iv e b a s is w e r e p a id a m ou n ts
ra n g in g fr o m $12. 50 to $ 20 , a c c o r d in g to c r a f t .

N e w a rk and J e r s e y C it y .,

7 d a y s a n n u ally .

T im e w o r k e r s p a id t h e ir r e g u la r r a t e s ; t h o s e on an in c e n tiv e b a s is w e r e p a id a m ou n ts
ra n g in g fr o m $ 1 2 .5 0 to $ 2 0 , a c c o r d in g to c r a f t .

P a t e r son — lifto n — a s s a i c
C
P

7 V2 d a y s

a n n u ally .

T im e w o r k e r s p a id th e ir r e g u la r r a t e s ; t h o s e on an in c e n t iv e b a s is w e r e p a id a m ou n ts
ra n g in g f r o m $12. 50 to $ 20, a c c o r d in g to c r a f t .

P h il a d e lp h ia ______________

6 V2 d a y s

an n u ally.

San F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d _
O

7 d a y s an n u ally.

1

In a fe w

sh o p s in




C h ic a g o

and

days

1 in

an n u ally

to

P h ila d e lp h ia ,

t h o se w ho w o r k any p a r t o f h o lid a y w e e k .

7 t im e s a w o r k e r 's

a v e r a g e h o u r ly e a rn in g s in the p r e v io u s 4 w e e k s .

7 t im e s a w o r k e r 's a v e r a g e h o u r ly e a rn in g s but n ot m o r e than $20.
T im e w o r k e r s p a id t h e ir r e g u la r r a t e s ; th o s e on an in c e n tiv e b a s is w e r e p a id a m ou n ts
ra n g in g f r o m $ 1 0 .8 5 to $ 1 7 .5 7 , a c c o r d in g to c r a f t .

p r o v is io n s d iff e r e d s lig h tly fr o m

t h o s e show n.

Table 19. Health, Welfare, and Vacation Benefits
(H e a lth , w e l f a r e ; and v a c a tio n b e n e fits p r o v is io n s 1 f o r p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by In te rn a tio n a l L a d ie s ' G a r m e n t W o r k e r s ' U n ion C o n t r a c t s in w om en*!
c o a t and su it m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , 9 s e l e c t e d a r e a s , A u g u st 1965)

A rea

E m p lo y e r c o n tr ib u tio n 1
2

V a c a tio n b e n e fit s 3

and m i s s e s '

O th er b e n e fit s

B a l t i m o r e ---------------------------------------------------------

5 p ercen t.

2 V2 p e r c e n t o f w o r k e r 's e a rn in g s in p r e v io u s c a le n d a r y e a r if H o s p ita l,
s u r g i c a l,
b e lo w $ 1 ,0 0 0 ; $40 to $70 f o r w o r k e r s w ith h ig h e r e a r n in g s . and d ea th b e n e fit s .

clin ic a l,

d i s a b ilit y ,

m a te r n ity ,

e y e g la s s ,

C h i c a g o ________________________________________

1 V2 p e r c e n t . 4

1 w e e k 's pay— 35 t im e s a w o r k e r 's a v e r a g e h o u r ly e a rn in g s H o s p ita l, s u r g i c a l, d i s a b ilit y , e y e g l a s s , and death b e n e fit s ; a ls o ,
d u rin g the 2 0 w e e k s ending the f i r s t w e e k o f the p r e v io u s f r e e m e d i c a l c a r e f o r u n ion m e m b e r s at un ion hea lth c e n t e r .
June— if e m p lo y e d at le a s t 1 y e a r ; V4 w e e k f o r e a ch q u a r te r
y e a r w o r k e d , i f e m p lo y e d 6 m on th s but le s s than 1 y e a r .

K a n sa s C it y ------------------------------------------------------ 3 p e r c e n t . 5

1 w e e k a fte r 1 y e a r and 2 w e e k s a fte r 5 y e a r s ; b e n e fit s p r o r a t e d H o s p ita l, s u r g i c a l, m a te r n it y , d i s a b ilit y , and death b e n e fit s ,
f o r w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d o v e r 8 m on th s as o f A p r il 1, a c c o r d in g and r e im b u r s e m e n t o f d o c t o r 's f e e s ; a ls o , f r e e m e d ic a l c a r e
to the n u m b e r o f m on th s o f e m p lo y m e n t.
B e n e fit s w e r e b a s e d f o r u n ion m e m b e r s at un ion h ea lth c e n t e r .
on w o r k e r 's a v e r a g e h o u r ly e a rn in g s in the y e a r ending the
p r e v io u s M a rc h 31.

L o s A n g e le s —L on g B e a c h ___________________

6 V2 p e r c e n t .

2 p e r c e n t o f w o r k e r 's e a rn in g s in the p r e v io u s c a le n d a r y e a r , H o s p ita l,
s u r g i c a l,
and d ea th b e n e fit s .
w ith a m in im u m p a y m en t o f $ 2 .

N ew Y o r k ______________________________________

6 V2 p e r c e n t .

$70 f o r o p e r a t o r s , fi n is h e r s , p r e s s e r s , c u t t e r s , e x a m in e r s , and H o s p ita l,
b u tton h ole m a k e r s ; $60 f o r f e l l e r s and s p e c i a l m a c h in e o p e r ­ b e n e fit s .
a t o r s ; and $50 f o r fl o o r w o r k e r s .

m e d i c a l,

d i s a b ilit y ,

N e w a rk and J e r s e y C it y --------------------------------

7 p ercen t.

$70 f o r o p e r a t o r s , p r e s s e r s ,
and $50 f o r f l o o r w o r k e r s .

and

c u t t e r s ; $60 f o r fi n is h e r s ; H o s p ita l,
b e n e fit s .

m e d i c a l,

P a t e r s o n — lift o n — a s s a i c ---------------------------- 6 V2 p e r c e n t .
C
P

$70 f o r o p e r a t o r s , p r e s s e r s ,
and $50 fo r f l o o r w o r k e r s .

and

cu tters;

$60 f o r f i n is h e r s ; H o s p ita l,
b e n e fit s .

m e d i c a l,

P h il a d e lp h ia ___________________________________ 6 V2 p e r c e n t .

2 p e r c e n t o f w o r k e r 's e a rn in g s in the p r e v io u s c a le n d a r y e a r H o s p ita l, s u r g i c a l, d i s a b ilit y , m a te r n it y , c l in i c a l, and e y e g la s s
w ith p a y m e n ts in C a m d e n ra n g in g f r o m $10 m in im u m to $65 b e n e fit s in C a m d e n and h o s p it a l, s u r g i c a l, c l in i c a l, and d i s ­
m a x im u m , and in P h ila d e lp h ia , f r o m a $15 m in im u m to a $65 a b ilit y b e n e fit s in P h ila d e lp h ia .
m a x im u m .

San F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d ______________________
O

33/ 4 p e r c e n t o f w o r k e r 's e a rn in g s in the p r e v io u s c a le n d a r y e a r . M e d ic a l,
P a y m e n ts ra n g e d f r o m $10 to $263 f o r annual e a rn in g s f r o m
$250 to $ 7 ,0 0 0 .

7 p ercen t.

m a te r n it y ,

c l in i c a l,

d i s a b i li t y ,

m a te r n ity ,

e y e g la s s ,

m a te r n it y ,

e y e g la s s ,

and death

d i s a b ilit y ,

m a te r n it y ,

e y e g la s s ,

and death

d is a b ilit y ,

m a te r n it y ,

e y e g la s s ,

and death

d i s a b ilit y ,

e y e g la s s ,

and

death b e n e fit s .

In a fe w sh o p s in C h ic a g o and 1 in B a lt im o r e , p r o v is io n s d i ff e r e d s lig h t ly f r o m th o s e show n.
E m p lo y e r c o n t r ib u t io n s to th e h e a lth , w e lf a r e , and v a c a tio n fund w e r e b a s e d on p a y r o lls f o r w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y u n ion a g r e e m e n t s .
V a c a t io n b e n e fit s p a id f r o m un ion fund in a ll a r e a s ex ce p t C h ic a g o and K a n sa s C ity w h e re v a c a t io n p a y m e n ts w e r e m a d e b y e m p lo y e r s d i r e c t l y to the w o r k e r s .
E m p lo y e r s c o n t r ib u t e d V2 p e r c e n t o f w e e k ly p a y r o lls f o r w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y the a g r e e m e n t s to a h e a lth fund . A n a d d itio n a l 1 p e r c e n t o f p a y r o lls f o r c o v e r e d w o r k e r s w as con tr ib u te d
to a h ea lth c e n t e r fund .
5 E m p lo y e r s c o n t r ib u t e d l 3/ 4 p e r c e n t o f w e e k ly p a y r o lls f o r w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y the a g r e e m e n t s to a h ea lth and w e lf a r e fund . A n a d d itio n a l 1V4 p e r c e n t o f p a y r o l ls f o r c o v e r e d w o r k e r s
w as c o n t r ib u t e d f o r the s u p p o r t o f a un ion h ea lth c e n t e r .
1
2
3
4




1
0

CO

Table 20. Retirement Plans

10
*

(R etirem en t p r o v isio n s 1 fo r w ork ers co v e re d by International L ad ies' G arm ent W o rk e rs ’ Union co n tr a c ts in w om en 's and m is s e s '
coa t and suit m anufacturing e sta b lish m en ts, 9 se le c te d a re a s , August 1965)

A rea

B en efits to q u alified w o r k e r s 3

E m p loy er contrib ution 2

B a lt im o r e ---------------------------------------------------

3 p ercen t.

$ 50 a m onth, after age 65; tota lly disa b led
w ork ers; lu m p -su m $ 500 death ben efit.

w o r k e r s , at age 60; red u ced b en efits

fo r

e a r lie r

retirem en t

to qu alified

C h ic a g o ____________________________________

5 percen t.

$ 50 a m onth, after age 65; tota lly d isa bled
w ork e r s; lu m p -su m $ 500 death ben efit.

w o rk e r s,

at age 60; red u ced b en efits

fo r

e a r lie r

re tire m e n t

to

qu alified

K ansas C ity.... . .... . .

2 lk

p ercen t.

$ 50 a m onth, after age 65; tota lly d isa bled
w ork e r s; lu m p -su m $ 500 death ben efit.

w o rk e r s ,

at age 60; red u ced b en efits

fo r

e a r lie r

re tire m e n t

to

qu alified

L os A n g eles—L ong B e a c h -------------------------

5 V2 p ercen t.

$ 50 a m onth, after age 65; totally disa b led
w o rk e r s; lu m p -su m $ 500 death ben efit.

w o rk e r s,

at age 60; red u ced b en efits

for

e a r lie r

retirem en t

to

q ualified

New Y ork ___________________________________

6 V2 p ercen t.

$ 65 a m onth, after age 65; totally d isa bled
w o rk e r s; lu m p -su m $ 500 death b en efit.

w o r k e r s , at age 60; red u ced ben efits

fo r

e a r lie r

retirem en t

to

q ualified

N ew ark and J e r s e y C ity ----------------------------

672 percen t.

$ 6 5 a m onth, a fter age 65; totally disa b led
w o rk e r s; lu m p -su m $ 500 death ben efit.

w ork e r s,

at age 60; red u ced ben efits

fo r

e a r lie r

retirem en t

to qu alified

P a te rso n — lifton — a s s a i c -----------------------C
P

672 percen t.

$ 6 5 a m onth, a fter age 65; totally disa b led w o r k e r s , at age 60; red u ced ben efits
w o rk e r s; lu m p -su m $ 500 death ben efit.

fo r

e a r lie r

retirem en t

to

q ualified

P h ila d e lp h ia -----------------------------------------------

37 2 p ercen t in Cam den.
5 percen t in P hiladelphia.

$ 50 a m onth, after age 65; totally disa b led
w o rk e r s; lu m p -s u m $ 500 death b en efit.

fo r

e a r lie r

retirem en t

to

q ualified

San F r a n c is c o — akland----------------------------O




percen t.

w o rk e r s,

at age 60; red u ced ben efits

$ 50 a m onth, after age 65; tota lly d isa b led w ork e r s m eeting ce r ta in s e r v ic e req u irem en ts m ay re t ir e at any age with
full b en efits; red u ced b en efits fo r e a rly retirem en t are paid 1to other q u alified w o rk e r s; lu m p -s u m $ 500 death benefit.

In a few shops in C h ica g o, p r o v isio n s d iffe re d slightly from those shown.
E m p lo y e r con trib u tion s to re tire m e n t fund w ere b ased on p a y rolls fo r w ork e r s c o v e r e d by union a greem en ts.
O ther than b en efits a va ila ble under F ed e r a l o ld -a g e , su r v iv o rs, and d isa b ility in su ra n ce.

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Scope of Survey
The survey included establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing women's,
m isses', and juniors' suits and coats, except fur coats and raincoats (part of industry 2337
as defined in the 1957 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual and 1963
Supplement, prepared by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget). Shops making coats of "manmade"
fur (a textile product) and contract shops making single skirts for suit manufacturers or for
suit jobbers were included in the study, but regular (inside) shops and jobbing shops primarily
engaged in producing single skirts and contract shops working on skirts for such establish­
ments were excluded. The jobbing shops included in the study were limited to those which
perform some manufacturing operation such as cutting, finishing, or packing and shipping.
The establishments studied were selected from those employing four workers or
more at the time of reference of the data used in compiling the universe lists (unemployment
insurance listings compiled by the various State agencies).
The number of establishments and workers actually studied by the Bureau, as well
as the number estimated to be in the industry during the payroll period studied, are shown
in the following table:
Estimated Number of Establishments and Employees Within Scope of Women's and Misses' Coat and Suit IndustrySurvey and Number Studied, 9 Selected Areas, August 1965
Number of
establ ishme nts2
Within
scope of
study

Studied

Baltimore-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Chicago-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Kansas City-----------------------------------------------------------------------------Los Angeles—Long Beach-------------------------------------------------------New Y ork-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Regular shops ------------------------------------------------------------------Contract shops--------------------------------------------------------------------Newark and Jersey City-----------------------------------------------------------Paterson—Clifton—Passaic-----------------------------------------------------Philadelphia---------------------------------------------------------------------------San Francisco—Oakland----------------------------------------------------------

8
22
11
69
1,063
555
508
132
72
26
14

6
19
11
29
175
78
97
46
30
15
9

Total--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1,417

340

Workers in establishments

Area1

Within scope of study

Studied

Production
workers

Total3

572
1,344
2,403
2, 759
34, 728
15, 127
19,601
7,331
3,854
1,963
838

489
1, 184
2,062
2,142
28,334
9,893
18,441
6,756
3,624
1,843
696

522
1,306
2,403
1,437
8,544
3,721
4,823
3,286
1,871
1,099
740

55, 792

47,130

21,208

Total3

* Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget through March 1965 (see individual area
tables for counties included in the 9 areas).
^ Includes only shops with 4 workers or more at the time of reference of the universe data,
3 Includes executive, professional, office, and other workers in addition to production workers.
4 Includes jobbing shops performing some manufacturing operations, in addition to regular (inside) shops.

Method of Study
Data were obtained by personal visits of Bureau field economists under the direction
of the Bureau's Assistant Regional Directors for Wages and Industrial Relations. The survey
was conducted on a sample basis. To obtain appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a greater
proportion of large than of small establishments was studied. In combining the data, however,
all establishments were given their appropriate weight. All estimates are presented,
therefore, as relating to all establishments in the industry in the areas, excluding only those
below the minimum size at the time of reference of the universe data.
Establishment Definition
An establishment, for purposes of this study, is defined as a single physical location
where industrial operations are performed.
An establishment is not necessarily identical
with the company, which may consist of one or more establishments.
The terms "estab­
lishment" and "shop" are used interchangeably in this bulletin.




25

26

Employment
The estimates of the number of workers within the scope of the study are intended
as a general guide to the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey.
The advance planning necessary to make a wage survey requires the use of lists of estab­
lishments assembled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied.
Production Workers
The term "production workers, " as used in this bulletin, includes working foremen
and all nonsupervisory workers engaged in nonoffice functions. Administrative, executive,
professional, and force-account construction employees, who were utilized as a separate
work force on the firm's own properties, were excluded.
Occupations Selected for Study
Occupational classification was based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed
to take account of inter establishment and inter area variations in duties within the same job.
(See appendix B for these descriptions.) The occupations were chosen for their numerical
importance, their usefulness in collective bargaining, or their representativeness of the
entire job scale in the industry.
Working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners,
trainees, handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers were not reported
in the selected occupations but were included in the data for all production workers.
Wage Data
The wage information relates to average straight-time hourly earnings, excluding
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Incen­
tive payments, such as those resulting from piecework or production bonus systems and
cost-of-living bonuses, were included as part of the workers' regular pay; but nonproduction
bonus payments, such as Christmas or yearend bonuses, were excluded.
Average hourly rates or earnings for each occupation or other groups of workers,
such as men, women, or production workers, were calculated by weighting each rate (or
hourly earnings) by the number of workers receiving the rate, totaling, and dividing by the
number of individuals. The hourly earnings of salaried workers were obtained by dividing
straight-time salary by normal rather than actual hours.
Method of Wage Payment
Tabulations by method of wage payment relate to the number of workers paid under
the various time and incentive wage systems. Formal rate structures for time-rated workers
provide single rates or a range of rates for individual job categories. In the absence of a
formal rate structure, pay rates are determined primarily with reference to the qualifications
of the individual worker. A single rate structure is one in which the same rate is paid to
all experienced workers in the same job classification. Learners, apprentices, or proba­
tionary workers may be paid according to rate schedules which start below the single rate
and permit the workers to achieve the full job rate over a period of time.
Individual
experienced workers may occasionally be paid above or below the single rate for special
reasons, but such payments are regarded as exceptions. Range of rate plans are those in
which the minimum and/or maximum rates paid experienced workers for the same job are
specified. Specific rates of individual workers within the range may be determined by merit,
length of service, or a combination of various concepts of merit and length of service.
Incentive workers are classified under piecework or bonus plans.
Piecework is work for
which a predetermined rate is paid for each unit of output. Production bonuses are based on
production in excess of a quota or for completion of a job in less than standard time.
Scheduled Weekly Hours. Data refer to the predominant work schedule for full-time
production workers employed on the day shift.
Supplementary Benefits. Supplementary benefits are presented in terms of the pro­
visions of the collective bargaining agreements with the International Ladies' Garment
Workers' Union, which were in effect in establishments employing about 93 percent of the
workers in the nine areas.




Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions

The primary purpose of preparing job descrip­
tions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field
staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers
who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and
different work arrangements from establishment to estab­
lishment and from area to area. This permits the group­
ing of occupational wage rates representing comparable
job content. Because of this emphasis on interestablish­
ment and interarea comparability of occupational content,
the Bureau's job descriptions may differ significantly from
those in use in individual establishments or those prepared
for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions,
the Bureau's field economists are instructed to exclude
working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners,
trainees, handicapped, part-time, temporary, and pro­
bationary workers.

CUTTER AND MARKER
Marks the outlines of various garment parts on a ply of fabrics and cuts out parts
with shears, hand knife, or powered cutting machine. May spread or lay up cloth on cutting
table. Workers who specialize in cutting or in marking and workers engaged in marking
and cutting linings and trimmings are included.
Specialized markers using perforated patterns, and marking by use of talcum, are
excluded as are all workers who specialize in spreading cloth.
INSPECTOR, FINAL (EXAMINER)
Examines and inspects completed garments prior to pressing or shipping. Work
involves determining whether the garments conform to shop standards of quality, and marking
defects such as dropped stitches, bad seams, etc. May make minor repairs. In many
shops manufacturing inexpensive garments there will be no inspectors falling within this
classification; and in those shops, whatever inspection is carried on is usually performed
by thread trimmers, who may only casually inspect garments and are, therefore, excluded.
PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them in shipping
containers, the specific operations performed being dependent upon the type, size, and
number of units to be packed, the type of container employed, and method of shipment.
Work requires the placing of items in shipping containers and may involve one or more of
the following: Knowledge of various items of stock in order -to verify content; selection of
appropriate type and size of container; inserting enclosures in container; using excelsior or
other material to prevent breakage or damage; closing and sealing container; and applying
labels or entering identifying data on container. Packers who also make wooden boxes or
crates are excluded.
PRESSER
Performs pressing operations (finish or under) on garments or garment parts by
means of a handpressing iron and/or powered press or mangle.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of pressing equipment,
as follows:
Presser, hand
Presser, machine
Presser, hand and machine




27

28

PRESSER— Continued
Workers are classified as "pressers, hand and machine” when sizable proportions
of their work are performed by each of the two methods. Otherwise, the predominant type
of pressing is the determining factor in classification.
SEWER, HAND (FINISHER)
(Bench worker)
Performs sewing operations by hand including sewing on buttons, making button­
holes, stitching edges, closing openings that have been left by various hand and machine
operations. Workers who specialize in sewing tickets or labels are excluded.
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATOR, SECTION SYSTEM
Uses a standard or special purpose sewing machine to perform the sewing operations
required in making parts of garments, joining parts made by others, joining various sections
together, or in attaching previously completed parts to partially completed garments, but
does not construct the entire garment. In shops that operate entirely on a section (or bundle)
system this classification would include all sewing-machine operators (except buttonhole
makers, button sewers, and lining sewers), without any differentiation of operators by type
of machine or operation performed. In shops that operate partly on a section system, this
classification would include all operators who do not construct an entire garment.
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATOR, SINGLEHAND (TAILOR) SYSTEM
Performs all the standard sewing-machine operations involved in the manufacture
of a complete garment. Work involves assembling and joining all parts of the garment
except those added by finishers. Is usually an experienced operator working on better
grade apparel in which the variety of design is so great and style changes so frequent as
to prevent the economical use of a section system.
Workers, employed in a singlehand system shop, who pair-up and work as a team
and divide work tickets equally are included. This arrangement is informal, in contrast to
the section system in which rates are established for individual operations.
THREAD TRIMMER (CLEANER)
(Clipper)
Trims loose thread ends, basting threads and seam edges of garments with scissors
prior to pressing or packing. Workers who also carefully examine and inspect garments
are classified as inspectors, final.




Industry Wage Studies
The most recent reports for industries included in the Bureau’ s program
of industry wage surveys since January 1950 are listed below. Those for which
a price is shown are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U. S.
Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. , 20402, or any of its regional
sales offices. Those for which a price is not shown may be obtained free as
long as a supply is available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington,
D. C. , 20212, or from any of the regional offices shown on the inside back cover.

I. Occupational Wage Studies
Manufactur ing
Basic Iron and Steel, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1358 (30 cents).
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, I960. BLS Report 195.
^Canning and Freezing, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Cigar Manufacturing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1436 (30 cents).
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1965. BLS Bulletin 147 2 (20 cents).
Cotton Textiles, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1410 (40 cents).
Distilled Liquors, 1952. Series 2, No. 88.
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1463 (30 cents).
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1362 (40 cents).
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1337 (30 cents).
Fluid Milk Industry, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1464 (30 cents).
Footwear, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1360 (45 cents).
Hosiery, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1456 (45 cents).
Industrial Chemicals, 1955. BLS Report 103.
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1386 (40 cents).
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1378 (40 cents).
Machinery Manufacturing, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1476 (25 cents).
Meat Products, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1415 (75 cents).
Men’ s and Boys1 Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1964.
BLS Bulletin 1457 (40 cents).
Men's and Boys' Suits and Coats, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1424 (65 cents).
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 196*4. BLS Bulletin 1439 (35 cents).
Miscellaneous Textiles, 1953. BLS Report 56.
Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Parts, 1963. BLS Bulletin 139 3 (45 cents).
Nonferrous Foundries, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1498 (40 cents).
Paints and Varnishes, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1318 (30 cents).
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1478 (70 cents).
Petroleum Refining, 1959. BLS Report 158.
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1423 (30 cents).
"'Processed Waste, 1957. BLS Report 124.
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1341 (40 cents).
Radio, Television, and Related Products, 1951. Series 2, No. 84.
Railroad Cars, 1952. Series 2, No. 86.
*Raw Sugar, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Southern Sawmills and Planing M ills, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1361 (30 cents).
Structural Clay Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1459 (45 cents).
Synthetic Fibers, 1958. BLS Report 143.
Synthetic Textiles, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1414 (35 cents).
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1311 (35 cents).
^Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1957, BLS Report 136.

*

Studies o f the effects o f the $1 m inim um w age.




I. Occupational Wage Studies— Continued
Manufacturing— Continued
West Coast Sawmilling, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1455 (30 cents).
Women's and M isses' Coats and Suits, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1371 (25 cents).
Women's and M isses' D resses, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1391 (30 cents).
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1496
(40 cents).
*Wooden Containers, 1957. BLS Report 126.
Wool Textiles, 1962. BLS Bulletin 137 2 (45 cents).
Work Clothing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1440 (35 cents).
Nonmanufactur ing
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1452 (30 cents).
Banking, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1466 (30 cents).
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1383 (45 cents).
Communications, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1467 (20 cents).
Contract Cleaning Services, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1327 (25 cents).
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, I960. BLS Report 181.
Department and Women’ s Ready-to-W ear Stores, 1950. Series 2, No. 78.
Eating and Drinking Places, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1400 (40 cents).
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1374 (50 cents).
Hospitals, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1409 (50 cents).
Hotels and M otels, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1406 (40 cents).
Laundries and Cleaning Services, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1401 (50 cents).
Life Insurance, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1324 (30 cents).
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1492 (45 cents).

II. Other Industry Wage Studies
Factory W orkers1 Earnings— Distribution by Straight-Time Hourly Earnings,
1958. BLS Bulletin 1252 (40 cents).
Factory W orkers’ Earnings— Selected Manufacturing Industries, 1959.
BLS Bulletin 1275 (35 cents).
Retail Trade:
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade, June 1962 (Overall Summary of the
Industry). BLS Bulletin 1380 (45 cents).
Employee Earnings at Retail Building M aterials, Hardware, and Farm
Equipment Dealers, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-1 (25 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail General Merchandise Stores, June 1962.
BLS Bulletin 1380-2 (45 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Food Stores, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-3
(40 cents).
Employee Earnings at Retail Automotive Dealers and in Gasoline Service
Stations, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-4 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Apparel and A ccessory Stores, June 1962.
BLS Bulletin 1380-5 (45 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household
Appliance Stores, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-6 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Miscellaneous Retail Stores, June 1962.
BLS Bulletin 1380-7 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the South and North Central
Regions, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1416 (40 cents).*

*

Studies o f the effects o f the $1 m in im u m w a g e .

☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING O FF IC E : 1966 O - 220-974







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