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Industry Wage Survey:
Pressed or Blown Glass
and Glassware, May 1975
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1976
Bulletin 1923




-s i

G°*

Industry Wage Survey:
Pressed or Blown Glass
and Glassware, May 1975
U.S. Department of Labor
W. J. Usery, Jr., Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1976
Bulletin 1923

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, GPO Bookstores, or
°BLS Regional Offices listed on inside back cover. Price $1.05
Make checks payable to Superintendent of Documents
Stock Number 029-001-01934-3







Preface
This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of wages and
related benefits in the pressed or blown glass and glassware industries in May 1975. A similar
survey was conducted in May 1970.
This study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of Wages and Industrial Relations. The
analysis was prepared by Carl Barsky in the Division of Occupational Wage Structures. Field­
work for the survey was directed by the Assistant Regional Commissioners for Operations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program of industry wage studies, as well as the
addresses of the Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end of this bulletin.
Material in this publication is in the public domain and may be reproduced without per­
mission o f the Federal Government. Please credit the Bureau of Labor Statistics and cite the
name and number o f the publication.




iii




Contents
Page
Summary
.............................
Industry characteristics
.......................................... ° ...................................................................................................................
Employment and product ................................................................................................. • ...................................................
Location ............................................................................................................. . ...................................................................
Size of e sta b lish m e n t..................... „........................................................................................................................................
Type o f company
........................................................................................................................................................... .... .
Unionization
...............................................................................................................................................................
Sex of worker . . . ....................................................... . ° ....................................................................................................
Method o f wage payment ..........................................................................................................................................................
Average hourly earnings ................................................................................................................................................................
Occupational e a r n in g s ....................................................................................................................................................................
Establishment practices and supplementary wage p r o v is io n s ...................................................................................
Scheduled weekly h o u r s ...........................................................................................................................................................
Shift provisions and practices
...............................................................................................................................................
Paid holidays
............................................................................................................................................................................
Paid v a c a t io n s ............................................................................................................................................................................
Health, insurance, and retirement plans
..............................................................................................................................
Other selected benefits
...........................................................................................................................................................

1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Text tables:
1. Pay relationships between establishments manufacturing glass containers and other pressed or blown
glass and glassware, United States and selected regions, May 1975 .......................................... .........................

3

Reference tables:
Average hourly earnings:
1. By selected ch aracteristics.....................................................................................................

6

Earnings distribution:
2. Pressed or blown glass and glassware— e sta b lish m en ts....................................................................................
All
3. Glass c o n t a in e r s ......................... ..................................................................................................................................
4. Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers
....................................................................................

7
8
9

Occupational averages:
Glass containers:
5. All establishments
................................................................................................................................................
6. By size of c o m m u n ity ...........................................................................................................................................
7. By size of estab lish m en t..............................
8. By method of wage p a y m e n t ............................................................................„................................................

10
12
13
14

Pressed
9.
10.
11.
12.

or blown glass and glassware, except containers:
All establishments
................................................................................................................................................
By size of c o m m u n ity .......................................................
By size of estab lish m en t.......................................................................................................................................
By method of wage p a y m e n t ......................... : ................................................................................................




v

15
16
17

18

Contents—Continued
Page
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
Glass containers:
13. Method o f wage payment ..................................................................................................................................
14. Scheduled weekly h o u r s ......................................................................................................................................
15. Shift differential provisions
........................................................................................ .....................................
16. Shift differential p r a c t ic e s .........................................................................................................................., .
17. Paidholidays
........................................................................................................................................................
18. Paidv a c a t io n s .....................................................................................
19. Health, insurance, and retirement plans
........................................................................................ .... . . .
20. Other selected benefits
. . ..............................................................................................................................
Pressed
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.

19
19
20
21
21
22
24
24

or blown glass and glassware, except containers:
Method o f wage payment ............................................................... ...............................................................•.
Scheduled weekly h o u r s ......................................................................................................................................
Shift differential provisions
..............................................................................................................................
Shift differential p r a c t ic e s ................................. : ............................................................................................
Paidholidays
.........................................................................................................................................................
Paidv a c a t io n s ........................................................................................................................................................
Health, insurance, and retirement plans
........................................................................................ .... . . .
Other selected benefits
......................................................................................................................................

25
25
26
27
28
29
31
31

Scope and method o f s u r v e y ...........................................................................................................................................
Occupational d e s c r ip tio n s .................................

33
37

Appendixes:
A.
B.




Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, May 1975
Sum m ary

Most glass is made by melting silica (in the form of sand)
with an alkali (such as soda or potash) and another base
ingredient (usually lime). Cullet, or crushed glass, common­
ly is added to hasten melting and to make the batch more
workable. Other ingredients, such as oxides of various
metals (e.g., chromium, cobalt, iron, or nickel) may be
added for color. Fused together in furnace heats of about
2,700 degrees F., the materials become a liquid that can
then be poured or cast; in the viscous state, it can be blown
and forced to take the shape of a mold.
The manufacture of glass containers is highly mech­
anized. Raw materials, after being mixed in large hoppers,
are carried to melting furnaces by overhead rails or moving
belts. The molten glass is automatically fed into the molds
of a forming machine and blown to shape by compressed
air. (None of the establishments in the Bureau’s sample
predominantly used hand methods to produce glass con­
tainers.) The containers pass on moving belts through
annealing ovens, or lehrs, to be cooled slowly, and are then
inspected and packed, or sent to the finishing department
for decoration.
The pressed or blown glass and glassware (except con­
tainers) industry also is predominantly mechanized. About
one-sixth of the production workers covered by the survey,
however, were in plants primarily making hand pressed
articles and just under one-tenth were in establishments
mostly producing hand blown items.

Straight-time earnings of production and related workers
in the pressed or blown glass and glassware industries
averaged $4.54 an hour in May 1975. Workers in glass con­
tainer establishments, who accounted for seven-tenths of
the survey employment,1 averaged $4.63— cents an hour
31
more than workers in firms making other types of pressed
or blown glass and glassware.
Among the occupations studied separately in glass con­
tainer plants, hourly averages ranged from $6.58 for form­
ing-machine upkeepers to $3.97 for janitors.2 In other
glassware plants, they ranged from $6.26 for metal mold
makers to $3.49 for glassware-grinders. Selectors, numeri­
cally the most important job studied, averaged $4.11 in
glass containers and $3.83 in the other segment. Within
each industry, occupational averages also varied by loca­
tion, size of establishment, and method of wage payment.
All of the establishments studied in both industries pro­
vided paid holidays, paid vacations, and at least part of the
cost of life, hospitalization, and surgical insurance. Other
forms of health insurance and retirement plans also were
widespread in the industries. Workers typically received 10
paid holidays and between 1 and 6 weeks of paid vacation
annually, depending on length of service.
Industry characteristics

Employment and product. Establishments within the scope
of the survey employed 90,919 production and related
workers in May 1975.4 About seven-tenths of these
workers were in glass container plants. Of the 28,328 work-

Glass manufacturing may be classified into three sep­
arate industries: The flat glass industry, including establish­
ments primarily producing sheet, plate and float, laminated,
and safety glass; the glass container industry, producing
containers for products such as food, beverages, drugs, cos­
metics, and household and industrial chemicals; and the
pressed or blown glass and glassware (except containers)
industry, manufacturing items such as tableware, artware,
industrial and illuminating glassware, and technical and
scientific glassware from glass produced in the same estab­
lishment. This study includes data for the glass container
industry and the other pressed or blown glass and glassware
(except containers) industries, but excludes the flat glass
industry.3

3
Also excluded from the study are establishments primarily
producing textile glass fibers which are included in the pressed or
blown glass and glassware, except containers, industry as defined in
the 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual,
prepared by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, as well as
products made from purchased glass (industry group 323). The term
“other pressed or blown glass and glassware” is used here to indicate
SIC 3229, except textile-glass fibers.
4
The current survey differs from a May 1970 study of pressed or
blown glass and glassware by the exclusion of establishments em­
ploying between 20 and 99 workers. However, workers in this estab­
lishment size class accounted for only 1 percent of total employment
in glass containers and 6 percent in the other glassware industry,
according to County Business Patterns, 1973 (U.S. Dept, of Com­
merce, December 1974). For a report on the earlier survey see
Industry Wage Survey: Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, May
1970, Bulletin 1713 (Bureau o f Labor Statistics, 1971).

1 See appendix A for scope and method of survey. Wage data
contained in this bulletin exclude premium pay for overtime and for
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 See appendix B for occupational descriptions.




1

ers in the other pressed or blown glass and glassware indus­
try, four-fifths were in establishments primarily producing
tableware, artware, industrial, and illuminating glassware.
Another one-tenth were in plants chiefly making scientific
and technical glassware.

majority of their production workers. The American Flint
Glass Workers Union of North America (AFL-CIO) usually
had contracts covering workers in the mold-making depart­
ments in both industries and other production workers in
the pressed or blown glassware (except containers) indus­
try. The Glass Bottle Blowers Association of the United
States and Canada (AFL-CIO) typically had contracts
covering production workers in the glass container industry
outside, those in the moldmaking departments.
Collective bargaining in the industries generally takes
place on a company-by-company basis. In the glass contain­
er industry, most companies have 3-year contracts with the
two major unions. The last major settlement, affecting
50,000 workers, took place in the spring of 1974.6

Location. Of the glass containers work force, the Middle
Atlantic and Great Lakes regions each accounted for about
three-tenths,-the Pacific region, one-sixth. The remaining
regions studied separately each employed less than onetenth of this class.
Of the workers in the other pressed or blown glass and
glassware industry nearly two-fifths were in the Middle At­
lantic region, and another one-third in the Great Lakes
States. The Border States, the only other region studied
separately in this industry, accounted for nearly one-fourth
of the glass and glassware workers.
About two-thirds of the glass container workers and
one-half of those in the other glassware segment were lo­
cated in metropolitan areas.5 The percentage of workers in
such areas varied substantially by region for each industry,
as indicated in the following tabulation:
Glass
containers

United States .....................
Middle A t l a n t i c .......................
Border S t a t e s ...........................
S o u th e a st................................
S o u t h w e s t ..............................
Great L a k e s .....................
P a c if ic ....................................

68
72
74
85
51
53
86

Sex o f worker. Men accounted for slightly less than twothirds of the work force in both industries. Jobs in which
men constituted all, or nearly all, of the work force includ­
ed maintenance occupations, forming machine operators
and upkeepers, and material handling laborers. Women were
largely employed as carton assemblers, inspectors, and
selectors.

O th e r
pressed o r
b lo w n glass
a n d glassware

Method o f wage payment. Most of the workers—
seveneighths of the glass container workers and about two-thirds
of those in the other glassware industry—
were paid on a
time basis (tables 13 and 21). Almost all time-workers were”
paid under formal plans typically providing single rates for
specified occupations. Incentive workers were usually paid
under bonus plans.
Jobs for which a substantial proportion of workers (at
least one-fourth) were paid under incentive plans in the
other pressed or blown glassware industry included assem­
blers, blowers, carry-in laborers, decorating-machine opera­
tors, forming-machine operators and upkeepers, gatherers,
grinders, lehr tenders, pressers, reheaters, and selectors.
However, only two jobs (forming-machine operators and
upkeepers) in the glass containers industry had significant
proportions of incentive workers— least 25 percent. Since
at
the last survey, a number of glass container plants have aban­
doned incentive plans for all workers outside the forming
department.

49
62
32

44

N O T E : Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not
meet publication criteria.

Size o f establishment. Employment in individual establish­
ments ranged from about 100 to over 2,000 workers. Estab­
lishments employing 500 workers or more accounted for
over seven-tenths of the work force and slightly more than °
half of the firms sampled. Glass container establishments
were somewhat larger, on the average, than other pressed or
blown glass and glassware plants—
605 compared with 528
employees.

Type o f company. Multiplant companies, i.e., those operat­
ing two establishments or more either in the glass container
industry or the other pressed or blown glass and glassware
industry, or in both industries, employed 94 percent of the
glass container workers and 74 percent of the other pressed
or blown glass and glassware workers. Of the regions
studied separately for the latter industry, only in the
Border States were as many as two-fifths of the workers in
single-plant companies.

Average h ou rly earnings

Straight-time hourly earnings in the pressed or blown
glass and glassware industries averaged $4.54 an hour in
May 19757 (table 1). Among the regions studied separately,
averages ranged from $4.89 in the Pacific to $4.31 in the
Border States. Averages in the two largest regions studied
separately were $4.59 in the Middle Atlantic and $4.47 in
the Great Lakes.

Unionization. Nearly all of the establishments in the survey
reported labor-management contracts covering all or a

6 For more details on the 1974 settlement see Current Wage
5
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSA’s) as defined Developments, June 1974, p. 1.
by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget through February
7 The straight-time hourly earnings in this bulletin differ in
1974.
concept from the gross average hourly earnings published in the




2

Nationwide, average hourly earnings in glass container
plants averaged $4.63— percent more than those in other
7
pressed or blown glassware manufacturing. This same gen­
eral relationship held for the three regions permitting com­
parison.
Average earnings for men were 18 percent higher than
those for women in glass container plants, and 19 percent
higher in other pressed or blown glassware establishments.
A similar gap between wage levels for men and for women
prevailed among the regions studied separately in both in­
dustries. Differences in average pay for men and women
-largely reflect their distribution among jobs with disparate
pay levels. Within the same occupation, men’s and women’s
earnings overlapped considerably.
Average hourly earnings in both industries were higher in
metropolitan than in nonmetropolitan areas and in estab­
lishments with 500 workers or more than in smaller plants.
These relationships generally held in the few instances
where regional comparisons could be made.
It was not possible for this survey to isolate wage­
determining factors to measure their independent influence
on earnings. Characteristics associated with higher pay
levels such as metropolitan area location and large establish­
ment size tend to be highly correlated. However, the rela­
tively small number of establishments in the sample
prevents the meaningful use of econometric techniques,
such as regression analysis.
Individual earnings of most workers were concentrated
in a fairly narrow range (tables 2-4). The index of disper­
sion (calculated by dividing the middle range by the
median) was 17 percent in glass container plants and 22
percent in other establishments. Contributing to this nar­
row earnings span were the high incidence of single rate pay
plans, the high degree of unionization, and the widespread
use of company wide rates.7

O ccupational earnings

Thirty-two occupations were selected to represent
worker skills and the wage structure of glassware manufac­
turing. These occupations accounted for just over seventenths of the work force in glass containers and slightly less
than one-half of the other glassware workers.
In the glass container industry, average hourly earnings
ranged from $6.58 for forming-machine upkeepers to $3.97
for janitors (table 5). In the other glassware industry,
hourly levels ranged from $6.26 for metal mold makers to
$3.49 for glassware grinders (table 9). Selectors, numeri­
cally the most important job in both industries, averaged
$4.11 in glass containers and $3.83 in other pressed or
blown glass and glassware plants.
Pay levels in the glass container industry usually were
higher than those for workers in the same job and region in
plants manufacturing pressed or blown glass and glassware,
except containers. As indicated in text table 1, pay relation­
ships between the industries varied by occupation, although
the spread was commonly 10 percent or less.
Among the six regions that could be compared in the
glass co n tain e r in d u s try , o ccu p atio n al earnings were
generally highest in the Pacific and lowest in the Southwest.
Except for the Pacific, interregional variations by occupa­
tion usually amounted to 5 percent or less, when the re­
maining regions could be compared. Among the three
regions for which comparisons could be made in the other
pressed or blown glassware segment, occupational averages

T e x t table 1. Pay relationships between establishments
m anufacturing glass containers and other pressed or blow n
glass and glassware. United States and selected regions, M ay

1975
(Other pressed or blown glass and glassware = 100)
Occupation
Assemblers ...................
Cullet handlers ..............
Decorating-machine
o p e r a t o r s ..................
Electricians,
m aintenance..............
Forming-machine
o p e r a t o r s ..................
Forming-m achine
upkee pers..................
Furnace o p e ra to rs..........
Inspectors, final
...........
J a n ito r s .........................
Laborers, material
h a n d lin g ....................
Mechanics,
m aintenance..............
M old makers, m e ta l.........
S e le c to r s .......................
Truckers, power
(forklift) ..................

7— Continued
Bureau’s monthly employment and earnings series ($5.12 for glass
containers and $4.70 for other pressed or blown glass and glassware
in May 1975). Unlike the latter, the estimates presented here ex­
clude premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holi­
days, and late shifts. Average earnings were calculated by summing
individual hourly earnings and dividing by the number of individ­
uals; in the monthly series, the sum of the employee-hour totals
reported by establishments in the industry was divided into the
reported payroll totals.
The estimates of the number o f workers within the scope of the
survey are intended only as a general guide to the size and composi­
tion of the labor force covered by this survey. They differ from
those published in the monthly series (104,400 in May 1975 for the
two industries combined) by the exclusion of establishments em­
ploying fewer than 100 workers and of those principally engaged in
producing textile glass fibers. Also, the advance planning necessary
to make the survey required the use of lists of establishments assem­
bled considerably in advance of data collection. Thus, establish­
ments new to the industries are omitted, as are establishments
originally classified in these industries but found to be ip others at
the time of the survey. Also omitted are glassware plaijf^ classified
incorrectly in other industries at the time the lists were compiled.




United
States1

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Great
Lakes

104
104

107
100

123
97

98
109

106

107

101

103

108

99

112
110
110
103

125
114
112

116

108

117

119

102
103
107

96
102
105

103
108

103
100
106

111

109

117
112

102
100

108

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
N O T E : Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not
meet publication criteria.

3

usually were lowest in the Border States and somewhat
higher in the Middle Atlantic and Great Lakes regions.
Occupational averages were usually higher also in glass
container plants in metropolitan than in nonmetropolitan
areas (table 6); no such consistent pattern emerged in the
other segment (table 10). Averages for both industries were
usually higher in plants of 500 workers or more than in
those with 100 to 499 (tables 7 and 11). In the few
instances where comparisons were possible, incentive paid
workers averaged more than time workers in the same job
(tables 8.and 12).
Individual earnings of workers in the selected occupa­
tions in the glass container industry were closely concen­
tra te d . E x ce p t for forming-machine operators and
upkeepers (jobs for which a majority of workers were paid
on an incentive basis), the spread of the middle range of
earnings for occupations nationwide was typically less than
50 cents an hour. The spread was usually larger (commonly
at least 70 cents) in the other glassware industry.

ployed on second shifts, and about one-sixth were on third
or other late shifts (table 24). The most commonly received
differentials were 12 or 14 cents per hour for second shift,
and 14, 16, or 18 cents for third or other late shifts.

Paid holidays. All establishments in the Bureau’s sample
provided paid holidays (tables 17 and 25). Ten holidays per
year applied to five-sixths of the glass container workers
and to just under half of the other pressed or blown glass­
ware workers. Other common provisions in the latter indus­
try were 7 holidays (one-sixth of the workers) and 8 ,9 , or
11 days (about one-tenth each).

Paid vacations. All establishments studied in both industries
provided their workers with paid vacations after qualifying
periods of service (tables 18 and 26). In both industries, a
majority of workers received at least 1 week after 1 year of
service, at least 2 weeks after 2 years, 3 weeks or more after
10 years, 4 weeks or more after 20 years, and at least 5
weeks after 25 years of service. Provisions were slightly,
more liberal in glass container plants.
Regionally, vacation provisions varied considerably in
the pressed or blown glassware, except containers, industry.
For example, 4 weeks or less was the maximum vacation
for a majority of Border States workers; in the Great Lakes,
however, seven-tenths of the workers were in plants provid­
ing at least 5 weeks after 25 years. Provisions were relative­
ly uniform among the regions studied separately in the glass
containers industry.

Establishm ent practices and supplem entary wage
provisions

For production workers, data were obtained on certain
establishment practices, including work schedules and shift
provisions and practices, and on selected supplementary
wage benefits, including paid holidays, paid vacations, and
health insurance and retirement plans.

Scheduled weekly hours. A cyclical (regularly alternating)

Health, insurance, and retirement plans. At least nine-tenths

work schedule of three 40-hour weeks and one 48-hour
week applied to three-fifths of the workers in the glass
container industry and to just over three-tenths in the other
glassware industry (tables 14 and 22). The second most
common alternating schedule was 40, 40, 48, applying to
one-fifth of all workers.
Regionally, in glass container establishments, propor­
tions of workers on the 40, 40, 40, 48 schedule ranged
from about two-fifths in the Middle Atlantic and Border
States to three-fourths in the Southwest. Most of the re­
maining glass container plants had nonalternating schedules
of 40 hours. Just under half of the workers in the other
glassware industry were in plants operating on a 40-hour
nonalternating week.

of the workers in both industries were in establishments
providing some or all of the cost of life, sickness and acci­
dent, hospitalization, surgical, medical, and major medical
insurance (tables 19 and 27). Accidental death and dismem­
berment insurance applied to nearly all glass containers
workers and to four-fifths of the other glass workers. Long­
term disability insurance applied to less than a fifth of the
workers.
Retirement pension plans, in addition to Federal social
security, were provided in plants employing all glass con­
tainer workers and nearly all of the workers in other
pressed or blown glassware establishments. Severance pay
upon retirement was not provided by any establishments
visited.
Most of the health, insurance, and retirement plans in
the pressed or blown glassware, except containers, industry
were jointly financed. By contrast, nearly all plans in the
glass container industry were noncontributory.

Shift provisions and practices. Virtually all workers in the
glass container industry were in plants with formal provis­
ions for both second and third or other late shifts in May
1975 (table 15). About one-fourth of the production work­
ers actually were employed on second shifts, and ninetenths of these workers received 14 cents an hour above
day-shift rates (table 16). A similar proportion was em­
ployed on third or other late shifts; nine-tenths of these
workers received an 18 cents-per-hour differential.
More than nine-tenths of the workers in the other glass­
ware industry were in plants that had formal provisions for
late shifts (table 23). About one-fourth were actually em­




Other selected benefits. Nearly all workers were in estab­
lishments providing funeral and jury duty leave in May
1975 (tables 20 and 28). Technological severance pay, pro­
viding payments to workers permanently separated from
their jobs because of technological change or a plant clos­
ing, applied to a third of the glass container workers, but to
only a small proportion of workers in the other glassware
industry.
4

the glass container workers, and to just over half of the
other glass industry’s workers. These plans commonly
called for quarterly adjustments of 1 cent an hour in wage
rates for each 0.5 index point rise in the national CPI
(1967 = 100), with a maximum adjustment of 8 cents in
any year.

Dental insurance plans, which cover normal dental care,
such as extractions and bridge and crown work, were avail­
able to virtually all glass container workers and to nearly
two-fifths of the other glassware workers.
Cost of living adjustments—
nearly always based on the
BLS consumer price index (CPI)—
applied to nine-tenths of




5

Table 1. Average hourly earnings:

By selected characteristics

( N u m b e r o f p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 in p r e s s e d o r b lo w n g l a s s w a r e m a n u f a c t u r i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ,
U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g io n s , M ay 1975)

UNITED STATES 2/
NCMbEK
AVERAGE
OF
HOoRLY
WORKERS
EARNINGS

ITEM

ALL

MIDDLE
NUMBER
OF
WORKERS

ATLANTIC
AVERAGE
HOURLY
e a r n i n g s

BORDER
NUMBER
OF
WORKERS

STATES
AVERAGE
HOURLY
EARNINGS

S0UTHEAS T
NUMBER
AVERAGE
OF
HOURLY
WORKERS
EARNINGS

SOUTHWEST
NUMBER
OF
wURKtRS

GREAT
NUMBER
CF

LAKES

PACIFIC
NoMbEK
AVtRAGE
CF
HOURLY
WUsKckS
EARNINGS

AVERAGE
HGORl Y
EARNINGS

WORKERS

-

_

27,278

-

16,650

4 . 77

l u , 3 17
c , 6 17

*4.69

-

10,134

4 . 00

3 ,285

4.42

AVERAGE
HOURLY
E a R N I i mG S

ESTABLISHMENTS
J / ...................................................... ........................

90,919

*4.54

26,427

*4.55

10,698

*4.31

6,143

M E N ............................................... .................................................................... ...............................
U M E N . ................................................................................................. ........................... ...

5fc,z2C
29,434

4.76
4.04

16,128
8,525

4.62
4.02

7,458
3,200

4.51
3.84

3,797
1,764

4 . 6*t
4 .lu

62,591
39,866
20,407

4.63
4.89
4.14

li,o 6 7
5,568

4.65
4.90
4.07

4,225
3 , G79
1,146

4.o4
4.81
4.18

6,143
3,797
1,764

4.5o
4.84
4 . lu

3,321

*4.35
4 . 5o

17,533
10,496

'i , 8 3 3
o ,245

4.02

6,541

4.57
4 . 89
4.10

4.91
5.19

1, 7 3 5

3 , 1 73

4.43

4.59

5,196

4.53

2,75 5

4.41

9,247

4.58

o ,458

4.52

2,701

4.36

8,286

4.55

-

3,501

4-35

4 . 40
4.62

*4.91

-

3,965
13,548

2 ,290

-

/,543

4.52

5,745
6,152
3,593

4 . 30
4.57

ALL

PisUCuLTlCN

wukKEPS

m

GLASS
ALL

FROCuuTIUN

*4.5o

i / ........................................... ...............................

M E N ....................................................................................................................................................
WOMEN.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
o iZ E OF C L M M U M T Y :
M E T R O P O L IT A N AREAS

16,062

£ / ........................................ ....................... ... .................

4<c» 3 5 6

4.66

3,118

2C,235

4.55

13,063
4,555

4.66

A R E A S ...................................................... ..............................

4.65

S I Z E OF E S T A B L I S H M E N T :
100-455
W U K K t h S . .............................................................................................. ... .
500
WORK ERS OK M O R E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

17,037
45,354

4.51
4.66

3,361

4 . 49

-

14,701

4.65

3,783

* 4 . 66

j / ........................................................................... ...

26,326
16,354
9,027

4 .32
4.54
3.82

10,365
6,461
2 ,9 5 7

4.47

M t N .................................... ......................................... ....................................................................
M E N .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.67
3.92

6,473
4,415
2,054

4.31
3.66

5 ,4oo

-

PKcSSEO

OK

BL CRN

EXCEPT
ALL

PRGOUc T l O N

GLASS

ANC

-

2,538

*4.53
4.5/

3,605

GLASSWARE,

m u

4.10

S / .................................................. ... ...............................

13,945

4.36

6,437

4.37

-

................................. ...................................................

14,363

4.27

3,926

4.65

4,371

100-499
W O R K E R S ........................................ ... ..............................................................
5 0 0 W O R K E R S O R M O R E .......................... .................................................................

9,326

4 .07

4,216

4.61

“

22,085
6,513

4.27

7,281

H A N D .................................................................................. .......................................................

3 .91

M A C H I N E . ........................................ ... ................................................ ...............................
T E C H N I C A L AND S C I E N T I F I C
G L A S S W A R E . . .................................

15,372
3,162

4.42
4.7E

1,562
5,715

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4.01

4.45

2,216
6,145

3.98

15,002

-

-

*4.01

NCNMETR0P0L1TAN
SIZE

TYPE

OF

CF

-

CONTAINERS

WORKERS

SIZE
CF C O M M U N I T Y :
METROPOLITAN ARcAS

5.15

CLNTAINEKS

WORKERS

NGNMETRCFCLITAN

*4.47

a r e a s

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.82

4,255

4.45

5,490

4.18

-

ESTABLISHMENT:

PRCCUCT

ANL

METHOD

OF

MANUFACTURE:

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8,112

-

-

-

8,215
1,252

4.35
3.55

-

-

-

-

6,

4.42

-

-

‘

'

* 4 . 34

-

jj/

TABLEW ARE, Ak TWARE,
i n d u s t r i a l
AND
I L L U M I N A T I N O G L A S S m A R E ................... ...........................................................

4.33
3.81
4.46

4,644
3,365
-

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r tim e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s a n d la te s h if ts .
2 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s in a d d i t i o n to t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
A la s k a a n d H a w a ii
w e r e n o t i n c l u d e d in t h e s t u d y .
3 I n c lu d e s w o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s f o r w h ic h i n f o r m a tio n by s e x w a s u n a v a ila b le .
4 S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a s a s d e f i n e d b y t h e U . S . O f fic e o f M a n a g e m e n t
an d B u d g et th ro u g h F e b r u a r y 1974.

*4.02
3.93
—

-

-

-

523
“*

'




-

“

*

5 D a ta
s e p a ra te ly .

NOTE:

fo r

'

a ll

D ashes

________________l

p ro d u c tio n

in d ic a te

w o rk e rs

no d a ta

.

in c lu d e

re p o rte d

o th e r

o r d a ta

p ro d u c ts

in

~

a d d itio n

to

th o s e

th a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n

show n

c r itie r a .




Table 2. Earnings distribution: Pressed or blown glass and glassware— all establishments
( P e r c e n t d i s tr i b u ti o n of p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s by a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g io n s , M ay 1975)

AVERAGE

ECUPLY

EARNINGS

1/

UNITED

STATES

2

1

WICDLE

S T A M I C

E CROE R

S T A T SS

1CTAL

WCNEN

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

.3

.4

C3 *

2.8

.1
.6
1.4

.6
1.6
1.6

1.4

.9

LNCER

$ 3 . 0 0 . . . .

$3.00

AND

LNCER

$ 3 . 1 0 .............................

.2

$3.10
$3.20
$3.30

AN C
ANO
AND

UNCEP
LNCER
UNCEP

$ 3 . 2 0 . . . . ...............
$ 3 . 3 0 . . . . ...............
$ 3 . 4 0 . . . . . . . . .

.9
1.4

$3.40

AND

LNCER

$ 3 . 5 C . .........................

$3.50
$3.60

UNCER
UNDER

$ 3 . 6 C .............................

$3.70
$3.80

ANC
AND
ANO
ANC

$3.90

AND

UNCER
UNCEP
LNCER

$4.00

ANC

UNCEP

$4.10
$4.20

AND
ANC

LNDER
UNCER

$4.30
$4.40

ANC
AND

UNCER
LNCER

$ 4 . 4 0 .............................
$ 4 . 5 0 .............................

$4.50
$4.60
$4.70

ANC
AND

UNCER

$ 4 . 6 0 .............................
$ 4 . 7 0 .............................
$ 4 . 8 0 .............................

$ 3 . 7 0 .............................
$ 3 . E C .............................
$ 3 . 9 0 ......................... ...
$ 4 . 0 0 .............................

4.3

UNCER

AND

LNCER

$ 4 . 9 0 .............................
$ 5 . 0 0 .............................

$5.00
$5.10
$5.20

AND
AND
AND

UNCEP
UNDER
UNCER

$ 5 . 1 C .............................
$ 5 . 2 0 .............................
$ 5 . 3 0 .............................

$5.30
$5.40

ANC
AND

LNCER
UN0ER

$ 5 . 4 0 .............................
$ 5 . 5 0 .............................

AND

LNCER

$5.60

AND

$5.70
$5.80
$5.90

ANO
ANO

UNDER
UNCER
LNCER

AND

UNDER

$ 5 . 6 0 . . . ..................
$ 5 . 7 C .............................
$ 5 . 8 0 .............................
$ 5 . 9 0 .............................
$ 6 . 0 0 .............................

$6.00
$6.10

AND
ANO

UNDER
UNDER

$ 6 . 1 0 .............................
$ 6 . 2 0 .............................

$6.20

AND

UNDER

$6.30
$6.40

ANO
ANC

UNCER
UNDER

$ 6 . 3 0 ......................
$ 6 . 4 0 . . . . . . . . .
$ 6 . 5 0 . . . . . . . . .

$6.5C

ANO

CVER.,

AVtKAoc

UE

16.0

1.2

1.3

1.5

.9

1.5

1.4

.7
.9

4.4
3.5
5.4

2.9

2.1
5.9

8.6
8.2

8.0

-

.3

_

2.3

_

€31

.2
1.1
1.6

100.0

6.2

-

4.0
1.4

*
_

.6
1.6

1.5
2.9
7.8
4.1

1.6

5.8

4 .4

21.1

LAKES

100.0
(3 )
.7
1.9

1.0
•6
.4
1.4

•3

1.6

13.8
2.5

7.2

2.1

6.9
2.5

5.4

4 .2

8.3
3 .6

5.5
4.9

4.5

4.9

3.8

2.9

2.1

1.3

3.1

3.9
3.6

1.5
•6
.4

2.9

1.6

1.8

3.2

2.6

2.5
3.6

1.4

1.9

1.1

1.2

1.2

1.3
1.4

l . l

1.3

1.9

1.3

2.0

.9

1.4
1.4

1.2

1.8

1.0
1.2

.1
.1
.1
.1
(3)

1.0
1.0
1.1

1.7

1.1
1.2

6.6

3 .0

1.4
.4

.8

2.1
.6
.8

.5
1.5

1.4
2.7

(3)
(3 )

2.5

1.3

(3)
(3 )

1.1
.6

2.0
1.6

(3 )
13 >

2.5
.9

(31
(3)

2.3

1.4

(3)

•6

1.1
1.9

2.9

1.1
.6

1.7
.9

1.2

3.5

1.7
1.7

•4

1.3

.1

4 / . . . ......................

EARNINGS

1 / . . . .

.9

1.3

.3

1.1
1.8
1.6

1.0
.8

.7

1.7

.8

1.4

.8
2.1
.7
.5

.5

.7
2.3

.8
.7

(3 )

4.4

2.8

4 .2

2.0

28,427

1 C , C9 8

0,143

21,278

$4.54

$4.78

*5,434
$4.04

$4.31

$4.56

$4.47

B ecause

.3

•6

5.6

N O TE:
e q u a l 1 00.

•9
.7

1.7

1.1

4 I n c lu d e s w o r k e r s
w a s u n a v a ila b le .

.8

1.3

58,2*0

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r tim e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s ,
h o lid a y s , an d la te sh ifts .
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t.

2.0

1.1

90,919

$4.59

7.8

1.0
1.6
1.2

.4
1.3

1.3

2.0

4.1

2.6
2.0
1.1

2 .4

1.7
.9

1.3
.9

8.3

21.1

.7

1.0
.6

.9

•4
.5
4.1
23.5

.6

1.4

1.8

(3)

14.5
15.9
3.7

8.7
5.9

•4

_
_
_

25.2
17.8

5.1

1.3

_

_
_

4.3
6.9

2.1
1. 8

(31

7.8

4.3

2.6
1.6

100.0

6.7

26.8
20.7
4.4

8.0

PACIFIC

1.7

.7

10.0

11.3

GREAT

3.7

hUPKtRS

EUukLY

3.2
6.4

12.1

LNCER
UNDER

NUKbtK

1.1
2.0
1.8

$ 4 . 3 C .............................

AND

$5.50

1.2
1.2

$ 4 . 1 C .............................
$ 4 . 2 0 .............................

AND

$4.60
$4.90

SCUTHEAST

1C 0 . 0

.4

T O T A L .....................................................

PEN

in

3.0

.8

1.9

.8
7.7
10,317
44.89

e s ta b lis h m e n ts f o r w h ic h in f o r m a tio n b y s e x

of ro u n d in g

su m s

of in d iv id u a l i te m s

m ay not




Table 3. Earnings distribution: Glass containers
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s b y a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - ti m e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g io n s , M ay 1975)

AVERAGE

HOURLY

EARMNGS

1/

T O T A L ...................................................................

UNITED
TOTAL

100.0

UNDER

$ 3 . 0 0 . . . .

S3.00
$3.10
$3.20

ANC

UNCEP
UNCEP

$3.40

ANC
ANC

UNCEP
UNDER

$3.50

ANC

$3.60
$3.70

ANC
ANC

UNCER
UNDER

$3.80
$3.90

ANC
ANC

UNDER

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20

ANC
ANC

UNCER
UNDER

ANC
ANC

UNCER
UNDER

ANC

UNCEP

$4.80

ANC
ANC
ANC
ANC

UNCEP
UNDER
UNCER
UNCEP

$ 4 .9 0 ...

3.1
1.9

$4.90

ANC

UNCEP

$ 5 .0 0 ...

1.3

$5.00

ANC

UNCER

$ 5 .1 0 ..,

1.3

$5.10
$5.20
$5.30

ANC
ANC

UNCER
UNCEP

$ 5 .2 0 ..,
$ 5 .3 0 ..,

$5.40

ANC
ANC

UNDER
UNCER

$ 5 . 4 0 . .,
$ 5 .5 0 ..,

$5.50

$ 5 .6 0 ..,
$ 5 .7 0 ...

$3.30

$4.30
$4.40
$4.50
$4.60
$4.70

ANC
A M

(3)

BORDER

9TATCS

S r ,U T H ^ A S T

SOUTHWEST

100.0

100.0

GREAT

LAKES

100.0
13)

100.0

100.0
-

(3)

-

(3)

100.0
-

_

_

-

_

_

(3 )

(3)

-

-

-

(3 )

(3)
(3 )

-

-

-

.1

(3)
. 1

.4

.5

-

4.2

-

.4

_

-

.3
.7

$ 3 .7 0 ..
$ 3 . 8 0 . .,
$ 3 .9 0 ..,
$ 4 .0 0 ...

UNCEP

PACIFIC

100.

o

(3 )

-

-

$ 3 .6 0 ..

UNDER

$ 4 .1 0 ..
$ 4 .2 0 ...
$ 4 .3 0 ...
$ 4 .4 0 ...
$ 4 .5 0 ...
$ 4 .6 0 ..,
$ 4 .7 0 ...
$ 4 a £ C ••,

•1

.1

1.0

2.7

.1
.6

.7

.4

1.5

.3

1.1
6.6
19.6
13.7
4.4
9.1
5.7
5.2
3.6

1.2
•6

1.0
1.0

UNDER

ANC

UNCER
UNCEP
UNDER

$ 5 .8 0 ..,
$ 5 .9 C ...

ANC

UNCER

$ 6 .0 0 ..,

$6.00
$6.10

UN0ER

$6.20
$6.30

ANC
ANC
ANC
ANC

1.2
2.0

$6.40

ANC

UNCER
UNDER
UNDER
UNCER

$ 6 .1 0 ...
$ 6 .2 0 ..,
$ 6 .3 0 ..,
$ 6 .4 0 ..,
$ 6 .5 0 ...

$6.50

ANC

OVER..
Wb RK6R$

_

.1
.2

•1

ANC
ANC

hUUhtY

ATLANTIC

WCPEN

13)

ANC

-AvfcKAbt

(3)

MICDLE

t

$ 3 .2 0 ..

$5.60

Lb

100.0

I

$ 3 .3 0 ..
$3 « 4 C . .
$ 3 .5 0 ..

$ 3 .1 0 ..

UNCEP

$5.70
$5.80
$5.90

NJMufch

STATES
REN

1.1

.6

EARNINGS

2.6
1.6

1.6

_
-

1.9

-

13)
-

1.2

-

9.1

6 .7

4 .5

7.8

1.7
15.0

.7
7.0

1C.1
9.2
4.1
9.3
6.4

36.2
23.6
5.1
9.2

26.4

16.1
25.7

25.2
17.8

24.4
8.4

20.3
18.7

.3

6.6

3.6
5.9

4.2
23.4

2.9

5.7

5.5
4.6
4.3

5.0
1.7

2.5

.4

1.8

1.6

.4

•8

1.2

.8

*

13.8
4.0
6.9

2.0
3.3
1.4

8.3

8.2
6.0

7.8

3.6

3.4

5.4

2.9
5.0

1.3

1.3

2.7
4 .7
3.3

1 .7
2.9

2.6

2.3

1.0
2.1
.8
1.6

1.4

3.3

1.2
.4

2.1
1.8
1.2

_

1.3

.6

C3 )
13)

1.4
.7

2 .4
.7

.5
1.5

1.5

(3 )

.9

1.6

.6

-

2.1
1.5
2.4

•3
-

1.4

2.2

-

.9

1.3

1.4

2.1

-

1.3
.7

1.7
3.1
1.9
l.C
6.7

-

6^,391
$4.63

35,866
$4.6 5

1.0
1.6

1.2

1.1
2.8

.8

(3 )
-

5.6

4.3
4 / ...,

1.4

.1

.

1.1
1.2
1.3
1.3

1.2
1.2
.6

.6

2.0

1

2.2
.9

cU,4U7
$4.14

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s ,
h o l id a y s , a n d l a t e s h if t s .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
3 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .

5.2

16,062
$4.65

2.7
4,2*5
$<t.64

1.6
.3

2.1
.8
.7

.6
.8
2.1

.2
2.4

-

.8

1.7

.5

.7

.9

2.4

.1

-

.7

1.0
1.6
1.2

.7

3.0
1.5

1.0
1.0

.7

1.7
3.3

2.4

1.1

.8

.4
.9
1.3

1.2
.2

.7
.5

0

4.2

2.7

c , 14i
$4.56

5 , 5f c b
$ 4 .j S 0

2 .4

.8

.4

8.6
21.9
4.1

8.1
2.1
3.7

2.1

.9
.4
. 1

1 .4

.8
1.0
1.2

.9
.7

1.7
1.3

.3
.3

2.2

1.0
.8
1.8

1.9
.7

1.0
.7

1.5
2.7

1.8

.8

.7

1.9

.7

.9

2.2

8.1

$ 4. i» /

5,0
$4.5i

4 I n c lu d e s w o r k e r s in e s ta b l is h m e n t s f o r w h ic h i n f o r m a tio n b y s e x
w a s u n a v a ila b le .
NO TE:
e q u a l 100.

B ecause

of r o u n d in g ,

su m s

of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t




Table 4. Earnings distribution: Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers
( P e r c e n t d is tr ib u tio n o f p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s b y a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t- tim e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g io n s ,

AVERAGE

ECLRLY

EARNING?

UNITEC

1/
TCTAL

ANC
AM.

UNCER

100.0
1.0

1.4

.3

5.1

4.3

2.8

S3.10
$3.20

ANC

UNCER
UNCER

$ 3 . 1 0 .............................
$ 3 . 2 0 .............................
$ 3 . 3 0 .............................

$3.30
$3.40

ANC
ANC

UNCER
UNDER

$ 3 . 4 0 .............................
$ 3 . 5 0 . . . ..................

3.7
3.1

S3.50
S3.6C

ANC
ANC
ANC
ANC

UNDER
UNCER
UNDER

$ 3 . 6 0 .............................
$ 3 . 7 0 .............................

3.2
4.1

$ 3 . 6 0 .............................
$ 3 . 9 0 . . . ..................
$ 4 . 0 0 .............................

4.C

$3.70
S3.80
$3.90

ANC

UNDER
UNDER

ANC

UNCER

$4.00
$4.10

ANC

$4.20
$4.30
S4.4C

ANC
ANC
ANC

UNDER
UNDER

S4.50
$4.60
S4.70

ANC
AND
ANC

UNCER
UNDER
UNDER

$4.80
$4.90

ANC
ANC

UNDER

UNCER
UNDER

$5.00

ANC

$5.10
$5.20

ANC
ANC

$5.30
$5.40

ANC
AKC

$5.50
$5.60

ANC
ANC
ANC
ANC
ANC

S5.70
$5.80
$5.90
$6.00
$6.10
$6.20
$6.30

ANC
ANC
AND
ANC

UNDER
UNCER

UNDER

$ 4 . 1 0 .............................
$ 4 . 2 0 .............................

4
4
4
4
5

.6
.7
.8
.9
.0

0 .............................
0 .............................
0 .............................
0 .............................
0 .............................

$ 5 . 1 0 . . . . . . . . .

$ 5 . 5 0 .............................

UNDER
UNCER
UNCER

$ 5 . 6 0 . . . . . . . . .
$ 5 . 7 0 . . . . . . . . .

8.0
8.5

$ 5 . 8 0 . . .....................
$ 5 . 9 0 .........................
$ 6 . 0 0 .............................

4.7
7.4
4.9

1.0
1.4

1.1
1.7
1.5
.9

1.6
•6
•e
2.3

$ 1

................................

M N U S

!/ • • • •

5.1

7.1
4.8

10.8

3.1
3.0

4 .7

1.8

4 .0
2 .3

6.8

1.5
1.4

5.0
4.5

1.5

2.2
2.1
1.0

2.1

.3
.4
.3

1.7

.2
.2
.2
.2
.1

16,354
$4.54

1.4

.9

2.1
2.1

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e a n d fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s ,
h o lid a y s , an d la te s h ifts .
* I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s in a d d i t i o n to t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 L e s s t h a n 0 . 05 p e r c e n t .

. 8

1.9

.8

•4

.9
4.9
.9

.5
.4
.7

.7

1.3

2.6

l.C
.7
°. 4
.7
3 .1

.2

3.1

2.9

10,365
$4.47

.6
.8
1. 1

.3

.8

•8
.4

• L

1.3
1.3

1.4

.7

1.1

(3 )
(3)
(3 )

In c lu d e s w o r k e r s
w a s u n a v a ila b le .

•6

.7

.1

9 , C27
$ 3 . 6c

1.5

1.2
1. 6

2.0

1 . 1

(3 )
(31

26,328
$4.32

1.8

1.0
1.2

1.3

m

3.4

3.9

1.5

1.6

(31

1.7

7.5
4 .1

1.3

(3 )
•1

1.3

.6

3.8
1 .3
2 .4
17.5

14.1
2.7

.9

l.C

4.9

1.7

4 -4

1.2

.7
.4

2.5
4.8

12.2

2.8

1.2

6.0
6.1

2.3

1.3
2.5

2.3

12.1

1.0

l.C

6.6

12.2

1.9

2.4

h

3.8
10.3

4.2

l.C
3.4
1.4

1.2

$ 6 . 5 0 .............................

1.9

l . l
2 .4

16.3
5.6

1.4
2.4

.8

(3)

.5

3.5
6.9

8.2

1.3

2.2
1.2
1.8

1C 0 . C

.4
2.9

1.0

1.6

rtcRKERS
t
H ju KLY E A

6.1
6.0

LAKES

.1

4.8
8.3

3.6

$ 6 . 1 C .............................

CVER.,

4.1

6.6

GREAT

4.6

3.9

2.5

1.7

$ 6 . 2 0 .............................
$ 6 . 3 0 .............................
$ 6 . 4 C .............................

ANC

2.6
2.0
2.1

STATES

100.0

(3)

4.3
4 .0

2.9

UNDER

$6.50

2.8

BORDER

100.0

5.3

2.1

UNCER
UNDER
UN0ER
UNDER

C

8.0
6.2

3.9

UNCER

ANC

AVcKAGc

4.4

$ 4 . 5 0 .............................

$ 5 . 2 0 .............................
$ 5 . 3 0 ......................
$ 5 . 4 0 .............................

$6.40

N u M d t h

2.8

4.C
5.4

UNDER
UNCER

UNDER
UNDER

•6

$ 4 . 3 0 .............................
$ 4 . 4 0 .............................

$
$
$
$
$

ATLANTIC

1.9

1.7
4.3

MIDDLE

100.0

1.1

$3. D O ....

S3.00

2 / ______________________
WO ME N

1C C . 0

T O T A L ------UNDER

STATES
ME N

M ay 1975)

.4

6

, 4 7. 3
$4.1C

.8
.7
1.4
9,745
$4.3C

in e s

NOTE:
B ecause
n o t e q u a l 100.

of ro u n d in g ,

s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y

Table 5. Occupational averages: Glass containers— all establishments
(N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s , U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g io n s ,
U n ite d S ta te s 3
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x 2

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

M a y 1975)

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M i d d le
ra n g e 4

M ean 4

M e d ia n 4

304
19 8
324
456

$ 4 .5 4
4 .5 6
4 . 35
4 . 76

$ 4 .4 6
4 .6 6
4 . 36
4 . 67

4 , 11 5
1 ,9 4 2
634

5 .9 2
6 . 58
4 .4 5

6 .0 7
6 . 77
4 . 36

4 . 55

4 .4 5

4 . 39“

4 . 65

4 . 36
4 .4 7
4 . 36
4 . 05
4 .0 2
4 .0 5

4 . 1 3 - 4 . 58
4 . 2 6 - 4 . 65
4 . 0 9 - 4 .4 3
4 . 0 1 - 4 . 18
4 . 0 1 - 4 . 07
4 . 0 1 - 4 . 18

505
271
234
5 , 122
1, 361
3 , 761

M e d ia n 4

$4.
4.
4.
4.

_

4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M ean 4

S o u th e a s t

B o r d e r S ta te s

M i d d le A t l a n t i c
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

M i d d le
ra n g e 4

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M i d d le
ra n g e4

M ean4

M e d ia n 4

$ 4 .5 3
_
4 . 10
4 . 79

$ 4 . 55
3 . 86
4 . 67

$ 4 . 2 9 ~ $ 4 . 78
_
_
3 . 8 0 - 4 . 54
4 . 6 7 - 5 . 13

5 . 84
_
4 . 38

5 . 53
4 . 36

5 . 2 8 - 6. 36
_
_
4 . 3 6 — 4 . 54

4 . 41
4 . 57
4 . 30
4 . 10
_

4 . 59
4 . 67
4 . 25
4 . 14
„

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M i d d le
ra n g e 4

M ean4

M e d ia n 4

29
14
25
55

$ 4 .4 1
4 . 70
4 . 14
4 . 66

$ 4 .4 4
_
4 . 18
4 . 64

$ 4 . 2 b — 4 . 46
$
4 . 0 6 - 4 . 25
4 . 5 0 - 4 . 74

440
216
53

5. 94
6. 64
4 . 34

5 . 97
6 . 79
4 . 36

5 . 66— 6 . 29
6 . 2 9 - 7. 10
4 . 2 7 - 4 . 36

S e le c te d p ro d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s

$ 4 .4 5
4 . 76
4 . 34
4 . 72

5 . 4 2 - 6 . 34
6 . 0 6 — 7 . 08
4 . 3 3 - 4 . 62

1, 192
599
172

6 . 14
6 . 90
4 . 36

6 .0 8
6 .9 5
4 . 33

4 . 36
4 .4 2
4 . 30
4 . 04
4 .0 2
4 .0 4

4 . 36
4 .4 7
4 . 36
4 .0 1
4 . 01
4 .0 1

.

_

-

'

-

$ 4 . 3 6—$ 4 .
4 .7 1 - 4.
4 . 2 4 - 4.
4. 6 5 - 4.
6 .0 2 6. 7 7 4. 3 3 _
4. 2 7 4 . 36—
4. 154. 0 1 4 .0 1 4 .0 1 -

.

55
79
36
78

32

6 . 35
7. 13
4 . 36

317

18
23

35

_
4 .4 8
4 . 48
4 . 43
4 . 04
4 . 02
4 . 05

-

_
86
35
51
1 ,5 6 0
-

.

-

-

-

-

4. 2 5 4 .5 1 4 .0 1 —
4. 0 1 _
-

-

4 .4 1

4 . 29

4 . 1 8 - 4 . 58

6 .4 3

6 . 28

6. 2 8 -

6. 79

663

486
17 4
319
1 ,3 5 2
68

5 .7 1
4 . 53
5 .9 3
5 . 65
5 . 73

5 . 65
4 .4 1
5 . 65
5 . 73
5 .9 0

5 . 5 6—
4. 2 6 5 .5 6 5 .4 1 5. 3 3 -

5.
4.
6.
5.
5.

90
72
25
90
90

5 . 62

5. 2 2 -

106
314
16

5 .9 2
5 .4 3
5 .2 9

5 . 65
5 . 62
5 . 33

5 . 62
5 .0 4 5 .2 5 -

6 .5 0
5 . 90
5 . 33

4 , 719
1, 7 8 9
2 , 831
603
477
126

4 . 18
4 .3 1
4 . 10
3 . 97
4 .0 0
3 .8 7

3 .9 8
4 . 18
3 .9 8
3 .9 4
3 . 97
3 .9 2

3 . 9 4 - 4 . 35
3 . 9 4 - 4 . 76
3 . 9 4 - 4 . 18
3 . 8 9 - 4 . 04
3 . 9 2 - 4 . 14
3 . 8 3 - 3. 98

1, 198
444
754
131
106
25

4 . 15
4 . 32
4 . 04
3 . 90
3 .9 6
3 . 67

3. 94
3 .9 8
3 .9 4
3 .9 4
3 .9 4
3 .9 4

3 . 94—
3 .9 4 ^ 3. 9 4 3 .9 4 3. 9 4 3. 3 7 -

4.
5.
4.
3.
3.
3.

18
08
00
98
98
98

202
61

3, 164

W o m e n ..............................................................................

370
1 ,9 1 2

4 . 28

4 . 18

4. 15-

4 .4 5

851

4 . 18

4 . 17

4. 17-

4 . 21

168

4 .3 1

4 .4 5

4. 17-

2', 9 2 3
227
74

4 .5 8
4 .4 3
4 . 16

4 . 36
4 .5 4
3 .8 9

4 . 3 6— 4 . 67
4 . 3 3 - 4 . 55
3. 8 6 - 4 .5 6

907
71

4 .4 8
4 .4 4

4 . 39
4 .4 1

4 . 39
4. 3 3 -

4 .4 7
4 . 67

101

4 .4 3

4 . 37

4. 17-

109
_

6 . 31
5. 48

6 .2 8

_

6. 2 8 -

_

6. 31
5. 65
_

150

6 . 36

.

_

„
.

.
_

61
-

5 .6 7
-

4 . 19
4 . 39

_
_

_
_
_

«

.

6. 28
.
_
•

5 . 73
.

4 . 14
4 .3 1

..
4 . 67
4 . 67
4 . 67
4 . 18
_
-

-

6 . 28— 6. 39
_

-

.
.

-

5. 6 2 -

5 . 77
-

_

_

4 . 26
4 .2 3
4 . 27
4 . 07
4 . 06
4 . 08

4 . 29
4 .2 9
4 . 29
4 . 05
4 . 04
4 . 04

4. 0 4 4 .0 4 —
4. 0 4 4 . 04—
4. 0 4 4. 0 1 -

_

_

4. 2 9 -

4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.

36
29
42
12
07
15

50

4 .4 9

4 .4 5

144

6 .4 6

6 . 39

53
17

5 . 67
4 .8 1

5 .5 6
4 . 95

5 .5 6 r 4 .4 4 -

5 . 73
5 . 19

5 .5 1 -

5 . 73
-

_

121
-

-

5 . 65
-

-

5 .6 2
-

_
•

4 . 08
4 . 17
4 .0 2
3 . 94
3 .9 5
3 . 87

4 .4 5

304

4 . 17

4 . 18

4. 12-

4 . 26

4 . 67

296

4 . 37

4 . 36

4. 3 3 -

4 . 36

.
_

_
_

.

_

.

3. 98
3 .9 8
3 .9 8
3. 94
3 . 94

4 . 54
6 . 77

507
160
293
72
61
11

4 . 1 0 - 4 . 18
3 . 9 2 - 4 . 76

.
_
.

_

255
76
179
1 ,5 2 8
240
1 ,0 3 2

1

W o m e n ..............................................................................
D e c o ra to r s :
D e c o r a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s (2 4 4 m e n ,
1 2 6 w o m e n ) .............................................................
M o ld s h o p :
M o ld m a k e r s - m e t a l 5 .....................................................
M a in te n a n c e : 5
E l e c t r i c i a n s m a i n t e n a n c e ..................................................
H e l p e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e t r a d e s ........................................
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ..........................................
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ..........................................
P i p e f i t t e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e ..................................................
M is c e lla n e o u s :
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s .....................................................

34
38
32
11
10
11

87
36
81
156

00

W o m e n ..............................................................................
S e l e c t o r s ................................................................................

205
2, 414
940
1 ,4 7 4
1 8 ,1 0 6
3, 766
1 3 ,4 2 5

45
74
33
67

78
78
54
91

$ 4 . 3 6— 4 .
$
4 .4 7 - 4.
4. 1 8 - 4.
4 . 64— 4 .

0

B a tc h h o u s e a n d f u r n a c e : 5
B a t c h m i x e r s .....................................................................
B a t c h - a n d f u r n a c e - o p e r a t o r s ...............................
C u l l e t h a n d l e r s ...................................................................
F u r n a c e o p e r a t o r s ..........................................................
M a c h in e f o r m in g :
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s 5..................................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p e r s 5........... . ...................
M o ld p o l i s h e r s (5 8 8 m e n , 14 w o m e n ) ..............
A n n e a lin g :
L e h r t e n d e r s (2 0 4 m e n , 1 w o m a n ) .......................
S e le c tin g a n d in s p e c tin g :
I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l .............................................................

_

3. 9 7 3 . 96r3 .9 7 —
3. 8 0 3. 8 0 .

4.
4.
4.
3.
4.

12
15
12
98
04

.

L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g (3 , 1 1 7 m e n
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r f o lk lif t (2 ,9 1 2 m e n
11 w o m e n ) .......................................................... ...
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r , o t h e r t h a n f o l k l i f t 5 ..............
W a t c h m e n 5 .............................................................................................

S ee fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le ,




“

“

-

_

_

_

-

-

"

.

.

-

"

-

-

-

_

"

“

"

“

“

Table 5. Occupational averages: G lass containers—all establishments— Continued
(N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s , U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g io n s , M a y 1975)
S o u th w e s t
Q c c u p a t i o n a n d s e x 13
2

N um be r
w o rk ers

G reat L akes

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M ean4

M e d ia n 4

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

M i d d le
ra n g e 4

P a c ific

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M ean 4

M e d ia n 4

68
51
87
99

$ 4 . 54
4 .6 5
4 . 34
4 . 70

$ 4 .4 6
4 . 66
4 . 27
4 . 65

1, 10 6
530
140

5 . 60
6 . 11
4 . 36

5 . 31
• 6 .0 6
4 . 36

N um be r
of
w o rk e rs

M i d d le
ra n g e 4

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M e d ia n 4

M id d le
ra n g e 4

88
07
60
11

$ 4 . 81
5 .0 4
4 . 51
5 .0 3

$ 4 . 73—$ 5 . 0 8
5 . 0 4 - 5 . 14
4. 5 1 - 4 .5 8
4 . 9 5 - 5 . 32

6. 22
6 . 73
4 . 84

6 . 35
6 . 77
4 . 72

6. 1 0 6. 6 3 4. 68-

6 .4 5
7 . 17
4 . 87
5 .8 8

M ean4

S e le c te d p ro d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s
B a tc h h o u s e a n d fu r n a c e : 5
B a t q h m i x e r s ........................................................................
B a t c h - a n d f u r n a c e - o p e r a t o r s . ...............................
C u l l e t h a n d l e r s ...................................................................
F u r n a c e o p e r a t o r s ............................................................
M a c h in e f o r m in g :
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s 5.......................'............
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p e r s 5....................................
M o ld p o l i s h e r s (5 8 8 m e n , 14 w o m e n ) .................
A n n e a lin g :
L e h r t e n d e r s (2 0 4 m e n , 1 w o m a n ) ......................
S e le c tin g a n d in s p e c tin g :
I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l ................................................................
M e n .........................................................................................
W o m e n ................................................................................
S e le c to r s
................................................................................
M e n .........................................................................................
W o m e n ................................................................................
D e c o r a to r s :
D e c o r a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s (2 4 4 m e n ,
1 2 6 w o m e n ) ...........................................................................
M o ld s h o p :
M o ld m a k e r s - m e t a l 5 .......................................................
M a in te n a n c e : 5
E l e c t r i c i a n s m a i n t e n a n c e ..........................................
H e l p e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e t r a d e s ..................................
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ............................................
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ...............................................
P i p e f i t t e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e ............................................
M is c e lla n e o u s :
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ........................................................
M e n .........................................................................................
W o m e n ................................................................................
J a n i t o r s ......................................................................................
M e n .........................................................................................
W o m e n ................................................................................
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g (3 , 117 m e n
4 7 w o m e n ) .............................................................................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r fo lk lift (2 ,9 1 2 m e n
11 w o m e n ) .............................................................................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r , o t h e r t h a n f o l k l i f t 5 ..............
W a t c h m e n 5......................................... ......................................

18
62
26
31
338
171
78
-

$ 4.
4.
4.
4.

34
16
23
48

$ 4 .3 6
4 .4 7
4 .4 2
4 .3 6

5 . 70
6 . 47
4 . 28

5 . 78
6 . 67
4 . 33

-

-

$4.
3.
4.
4.

1 7—$ 4 . 71
3 7 - 4 . 61
1 7 - 4 .4 2
36— 4 . 6 6

5. 1 3 5. 8 2 4. 16-

26 9
_
119
1, 783
52 2
1, 261

3 . 98
_
4 . 25
3 . 99
4 . 02
3 .9 8

4 .0 4
_
4 . 17
4 .0 1
4 .0 4
4 .0 1

3. 4 4 _
4. 0 4 4. 0 1 4. 0 1 3 . 91

6 . 07
7 .0 6
4 . 36

5 .0 6 5 .7 0 4. 3 3 -

67
72
54
74

54
20
78
80

6. 07
6 .4 6
4 .4 7

624
295
136

$ 4.
5.
4.
5.

28

4 . 87

4 . 45

4 .4 5 -

5 . 79

22

5 . 30

5 . 16

4. 83-

4 . 32
4 .4 4
4 . 28
4 .0 7
4 . 23
4 .0 6

4 . 36
4 .4 2
4 . 27
4 . 05
4 . 18
4 . 05

4. 114. 2 6 4 .0 9 4 .0 1 4. 0 4 4 .0 1 -

4 .4 3
4 . 67
4 .4 2
4 .° 1 8
4 . 18
4 . 18

3 82
208
174
2, 9 9 7
636
2, 170

4 . 75
4 . 73
4 . 76
4 .4 1
4 . 42
_

4 . 68
4 . 65
4 . 71
4 . 39
4 . 37
_

4 . 5 8 - 4 . 93
4 . 5 8 - 4 . 92
4 . 6 4 - 4 . 97
4 . 3 7 - 4 . 52
4 . 3 7 - 4 . 52
_
_

4. 9 0 - 4 .9 9

46

4 . 34

4 . 38

4 . 26— 4 .4 5

48

4 . 41

4 . 54

4. 0 8 -

4 . 78

24

4 . 97

4 . 90

120

6 . 38

6 . 28

6. 2 8 -

6 .3 6

516

6 . 31

6 . 28

6 .2 8 -

6. 39

286

6 . 99

6 . 87

6. 8 7 -

6 .9 4

37
8
16
112

5 .5 6
5 .5 6
5 .5 7
_

5. 5 6 5 .5 0 5. 5 5 -

5 .9 0
_
5 .5 8
5 .7 7

140
39
112
431

-

5 . 62
4 . 57
5 .5 5
5 . 63
-

5 . 71
4 . 28
5 . 62
5 . 65
_ °

5 .5 8 4. 275 .5 6 5 .4 1 _

5 . 77
4 . 51
5 . 71
5 . 73
.

83
42
18
276
_

6 . 18
4 . 89
6 . 66
6 .0 6
_

5 .9 8
4 . 78
6 .5 6
6 . 11
_

5 .9 1 4. 3 7 6. 5 6 5 .9 1 _

6 . 11
5 . 32
6. 94
6 . 11
_

397
27 7
170
38
35
.

4 . 03
4 . 07
3 . 98
3 . 83
3 . 83
_

3 .9 4
3 .9 7
3. 94
3 .9 4
3. 94
_

3 .9 8
4 . 80
3 .9 8
3 .9 4
3 . 94
3 .9 2

3 .9 4 4 .0 0 3 .9 4 3. 8 3 3. 8 3 3 .8 6 —

4 . 18
4 . 80
4 . 04
3 . 98
3 . 98
3 .9 6

826
3 65
416
114
106
_

4 . 40
4 . 38
4 .4 1
4 . 28
4 . 28
_

4 . 39
4 . 37
4 . 52
4 . 32
4 . 32
_

4. 3 5 4. 3 5 4. 3 0 4. 2 1 4. 2 1 _

4 . 52
4 . 39
4 . 52
4 . 33
4 . 33
_

179

4 . 02

4 . 17

234
-

4 . 29
-

4 . 36
-

"

"

-

-

5 . 69
4 . 39
5 .9 6
5. 56
_

3 .9 8
3 .9 8
3. 94
3 .9 8
3 .9 8
_

1 ,4 6 7
434
1 ,0 3 3
193
130
63

4 . 18
4 . 66
4 . 05
3 .9 2
3 .9 3
3 .9 1

3. 8 3 -

4 . 17

1 ,0 4 6

4 .2 4

4 . 17

4. 11-

4 .4 5

59 3

4 . 62

4 . 53

4 .4 5 -

4 . 73

4. 29-

4 . 36
-

802
-

4 .4 9
-

4 . 36
-

4 . 36— 4 . 67
-

515
6

5 . 20
4 . 56

4 . 79
-

4. 7 2 -

6 .0 0
_

~

"

"

“

-

3. 8 9 3. 9 3 3. 8 9 3. 8 6 3. 8 7 _

“

-

"

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r tim e an d f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , an d la te s h if ts .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s f o r w h ic h in f o r m a tio n f o r m e n a n d w o m e n s e p a r a t e l y w a s
u n a v a ila b le .
3 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d i t i o n to t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
4 S e e a p p e n d ix A f o r m e th o d u s e d in c o m p u tin g m e a n s , m e d ia n s , a n d m id d le r a n g e s o f e a r n in g s ;




4 5 —$ 4 .
3 7 - 4.
1 7 - 4.
6 4r- 4 .

825
194
631
4 , 743
196
4, 079

-

4 . 36
_
4 . 45
4 .0 4
4 . 04
4 .0 4

$4.
4.
4.
4.

“

"

“

_

-

m e d i a n s a n d m i d d l e r a n g e s a r e n o t p r o v i d e d f o r e n t r i e s o f f e w e r t h a n 15 w o r k e r s .
5
A ll m e n .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a te no d a ta r e p o r t e d o r d a ta th a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .

-

Table 6. Occupational averages: G lass containers—by size of community
(N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s ,

U n i t e d S t a t e s a n d s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M a y 1 975)

O c c u p a tio n

A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s . .....................................
B a t c h m i x e r s .......................................... ..
B a t c h - a n d f u r n a c e - o p e r a t o r s .................
C u l l e t h a n d l e r s ..................................................
D e c o ra tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r s . . . . . .
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e .........................
F o rm in g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r s
.................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p e r s .................
F u r n a c e o p e r a t o r s ............................ ..
I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l ...............................................
J a n ito rs
......................... .. ......................................
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g . . . . . . .
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ............................
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ............................
M o l d m a k e r s , m e t a l . . . . ............................
M o l d p o l i s h e r s .....................................................
S e l e c t o r s ...................................................................
N) T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) .......................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( o th e r th a n f o r k lif t)

3, 190
198
92
238
179
3Z2
2 , 71 6
1, 168
342
1, 521
388
1, 983
220
928
1 , 307
417
12, 4 5 8
1, 9 6 4
130

$ 4 .2 3
4 . 54
4 .7 5
4 . 38
4 . 52
5. 74
5. 96
6 . 63
4 . 78
4 . 42
4 . 01
4 .2 9
5 .9 5
5. 68
6 . 46
4 . 45
4 . 13
4 . 65
4 . 48

B o rd e r S ta te s

No n m e tro p o lita n
areas
A v e ra g e
N um ber
h o u rly
of
e a rn in g s
w o rk e rs
1, 5 2 9
106
10 6
86
191
164
1, 3 9 9
774
114
893
215
1, 181
99
424
605
217
5, 6 4 8
959
97

$4. 08
4 . 53
4 . 39
4 . 27
4 . 31
5 . 65
5 .8 4
6 . 51
4 . 69
4 .2 1
3 .9 1
4 .2 6
5 .8 9
5 . 58
6 . 35
4. 44
4 . 07
4 . 43
4 . 37

M e tro p o lita n
areas
A v e ra g e
N um ber
h o u rly
of
e a rn in g s
w o rk e rs
863
52
24
66
-

74
753
379
112
355
71
511
76
294
458
101
3, 1 3 9
629
56

$ 4 . 14
4 .4 7
4 . 77
4 . 37
-

‘ 5 .4 0
6 . 12
6 .8 9
4 . 73
4 . 36
3 . 96
4 . 12
5. 76
5. 40
6 . 30
4 . 36
4 . 04
4 . 48
4 . 49

N o n m e tro p o lita n
areas
A v e ra g e
N um ber
h o u rly
of
e a rn in g s
w o rk e rs
335
35
-

15
-

35
439
220
44
150
60
340
30
205
71
1, 9 8 3
278
15

$ 4 . 16
4 . 42
4 .2 3
5 . 64
6 . 16
6 .9 2
4 . 69
4 . 37
3 .8 3
4 . 26
6 . 31
6 . 33
4 . 35
4 . 03
4 .4 7
4 . 28

M e tro p o lita n
areas

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r tim e a n d fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s ,
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a t e ly .




M e tro p o lita n
a re ;as
N um ber
A v e ra g e
h o u rly
of
e a rn in g s
w o rk ers

829
32
52
27
57
58 9
247
56
516
103
513
84
166
245
67
2, 643
43 1

$ 4 .2 1
4 . 45
4 . 40
4 . 67
5. 7 4
5 . 73
6 .2 4
4 . 72
4 . 31
3 . 93
4 . 19
6 .0 8
5 . 55
6 . 34
4 . 38
4 . 06
4 . 52

132
23
263
60
19
51
25
21
132
30
1, 34 8
74

$ 4 .2 4
4 . 43
5 .7 3 •
6 . 64
4 . 72
4 . 35
3 .8 4
5. 63
6 . 34
4 . 36
4 . 09
4 . 45

~

N o n m e tro p o lita n
areas
638
36
35
83
517
283
43
309
90
533
28
265
271
73
2 , 100
371

$ 4 . 12
4 . 62

_
4 .2 5
_

5 . 66
5 . 46
6 . 00
4 . 68
4 . 32
3 . 91
4 .2 9
5. 60
5 . 58
6 .2 9
4 . 33
4 . 08
4 . 46
“

131
14

_
11
_

21
163
62
27
51
19
116
8
_

67
38
858
117

$ 4 . 38
4 . 33

_

4 .2 7
_

5 . 67
5 . 51
6 . 08
4 . 45
4 . 44
3 .8 6
4 . 13
5 . 54
-

6 .4 5
4 .2 3
3 . 96
4 . 34

P a c ific

266
56
15
24
-

175
109
218
19
63
-

58
53
40
92 5
117

“

$ 3 .8 6
4 . 07
4 .2 1
4 . 38
-

5 .8 8
6 . 70
3 .8 8
3 .8 1
3 . 82
-

5 . 45
6 .2 9
4 . 32
4 . 02
4 . 24

M e tro p o lita n
a r e ;as
$ 4. 4 0
4 .8 8

781
49
-

.

70
24
81
553
232
78
334
98
568
18
247
265
12 0
2, 806
466
6

'

and la te

s h ifts .

NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a te no d a ta

re p o rte d

10
40
70
13
48
69
97
60
66
41
93
17
10
67
50
34
07
37

:

N o n m e tro p o lita n
areas

M e tro p o lita n
areas

* 4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
5.
5.
6.
4.
4.
3.
4.
6.
5.
6.
4.
4.
4.

430
20
14
20
37
44
355
168
46
150
66
187
8
119
124
51
1, 528
224

S o u th w e s t

G reat L akes

A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ....................................
B a t c h m i x e r s ........................................................
B a tc h - an d f u r n a c e - o p e r a to r s . . . . . .
C u l l e t h a n d l e r s .....................................................
D e c o r a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ..............
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e ....................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ....................
F o rm in g -m a c h in e u p k e e p e rs . . . . . . . .
F u r n a c e o p e r a t o r s .................................... ..
I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l ................. .
J a n i t o r s ....................................................................
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g .................
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ............................
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ............................
M o l d m a k e r s , m e t a l ................. .. ................
M o l d p o l i s h e r s .............. .....................................
S e l e c t o r s ......................... ........................................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) .......................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( o th e r th a n f o r k lif t)

S o u th e a s t

M e tro p o lita n
areas
A v e ra g e
N um ber
h o u rly
of
e a rn in g s
w o rk ers

M i d d le A t l a n t i c

U n ite d S ta t e s 1
2
M e tro p o lita n
areas
A v e ra g e
N um ber
h o u rly
of
e a rn in g s
w o rk ers

o r d a ta th a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n

c r ite ria .

4 . 61
4 . 97
6 . 18
6 . 26
6 . 82
5 . 12
4 .7 6
4 . 28
4 . 62
6 . 66
6 . 08
6 . 96
4 . 73
4 . 41
5 . 26
4 . 56

Table 7. Occupational averages: G lass containers— by size of establishment
( N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 i n s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s , U n i t e d S t a t e s a n d s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M a y 1975)
U n ite d S ta t e s 2

M i d d le A t l a n t i c

B o r d e r S ta te s

S o u th e a s t

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith —
O c c u p a tio n

1 0 0 -4 9 9 w o r k e rs
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ....................................... ................................
B a tc h m ix e r s
....................................................... ................................
B a t c h - a n d f u r n a c e - o p e r a t o r s ............................0.......................
C u l l e t h a n d l e r s ............................................
D e c o r a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s .............. .......................... .. .
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e ............................ ..
F o rm in g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r s
.......................................... ..
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p e r s .......................................................
F u r n a c e o p e r a t o r s .............................................................................
I n s p e c to rs , fin a l
................................................................................
J a n ito rs
...................................................................................................
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g .....................................................
M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n c e
....................................................... ..
M o l d m a k e r s , m e t a l ........................................................................ M o l d p o l i s h e r s .........................................................................................
S e le c to r s
...................................................................................................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) ..........................................................

1, 57 0
86
152
93
54
137
1, 150
65 3
125
973
133
750
334
480
202
4, 834
78 5

A v e rag e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
$ 4 .0 3
4 .3 9
4. 45
4 .2 1
4 .2 3
5. 53
5 .7 8
6. 3 5
4. 67
4 .2 0
3 .8 8
4. 12
5 .4 5
6 .4 7
4. 35
4. 04
4. 3 5

500 w o r k e rs o r m o re
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs
3, 149
218
46
231
31 6
349
2, 9 6 5
1, 2 8 9
331
1, 44 1
470
2, 414
1, 018
1 ,4 3 2
432
13, 2 7 2
2 , 138

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
$ 4 .2 6
4 . 59
4 . 91
4 . 41
4 . 44
5 . 78
5 . 97
6 . 69
4 . 79
4 . 44
4 . 00
4 . 33
5. 71
6 . 41
4 . 49
4 . 14
4 . 66

1 0 0 -4 9 9 w o r k e r s
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs
224
32
28
_
-

22
242
129

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
$ 3 . 96
4 . 35
4 . 67
_
5. 02
5 . 94
6 . 56

-

-

4 .2 2
4 . 15
_
6 .2 8

169
-

176
97
870
179

-

4 . 00
4 . 33

S o u th e a s t— o n t i n u e d
C

1 0 0 -4 9 9 w o r k e r s

A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ..........................................................................
B a tc h m ix e r s
...........................................................................................
B a t c h - a n d f u r n a c e - o p e r a t o r s .......................................................
C u l l e t h a n d l e r s ........................................................................................
D e c o ra tin g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r s
..................................................
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e .......................................................... ..
F o rm in g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r s
.......................................................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p e r s .......................................................
F u r n a c e o p e r a t o r s ................................................................................
In s p e c to rs , fin a l
...................................................................................
J a n ito rs
...................................................................................................... ..
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g .......................................................
M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n c e
...............................................................
M o l d m a k e r s , m e t a l ...........................................................................
M o ld p o l i s h e r s
........................................................................................
S e l e c t o r s .............................................................................................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) ...............................................................

E x c lu d e s p re m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e an d fo r w o rk on w e ek en d s, h o lid a y s ,
I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a t e ly .




500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

$4. 19
4 . 50
_
4 . 35

166
28
_
_

$ 4 .2 2
4 . 52
_
_
_
5. 90
_
_
_
_
_
5 . 72
6 . 32
4 . 36
4 . 09
4 . 50

244
_
14
11
30
176
81
24
_
15
102
52
64
30
787
97

974
55
_
75
-

-

87
950
470
128
336
- 101
67 5
263
566
146
4 , 2 52
728

5.
6.
7.
4.
4.
3.
4.
5.
6.
4.
4.
4.

S o u th w e s t

500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e

500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e

263
20
-

47
23
264
135
31
205
57
2 02
69
80
23
741
199

an d la te

$ 4 . 12
4 . 48
-

4. 49
5 . 60
5 . 90
6 . 73
4 . 59
4 .2 2
3 .9 5
4 .2 1
5 . 72
6 . 40
4 .2 7
4 . 07
4 . 36

s h ifts .

341
12
62
22
24
29
250
144
14
246
26
162
79
83
60
1, 2 7 3
180

NOTE:

-

59
19
00
74
44
96
18
57
31
36
04
52

_
285
_
_
_
_
_
54
137
32
1, 4 5 6
74

1 0 0 -4 9 9 w o r k e rs

G reat L akes

$ 4 . 02
4 . 15
4 . 16
4 . 15
4 . 38
5 . 59
5. 80
6 . 58
4 . 39
3 . 92
3 .8 1
4 . 00
5 . 58
6 . 30
4 . 33
3 .9 9
4 .2 5

1 0 0 -4 9 9 w o r k e r s
508

$ 3 . 92

_
22
21
264
17 4
32
278
41
244
70
113
45
1, 100
193

_
4 . 17
5. 53
5 .4 4
6 . 00
4 . 61
4 .2 4
3 . 96
4 . 10
5 .4 1
6. 44
4 . 17
3 . 94
4 .2 8

_

D a sh e s in d ic a te d no

_

.

d a ta

re p o rte d

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
$ 4 . 03

_

4 . 78
4 . 09
5. 72
5. 99
6. 4 9
4 . 74
_
3 . 91
4 . 08
5. 57
6 . 54
4 . 39
4 . 07
4 . 38

P a c ific

500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e
959
58
65
34
119
842
356
67
547
152
802
361
403
95
3, 6 4 3
609

$4. 31
4 . 56
.
4. 39
4 . 96
5. 72
5. 65
6 . 17
4. 75
4 . 35
3 . 91
4. 29
5 . 59
6 .2 8
4 . 45
4 . 11
4 . 56

500 w o r k e rs o r m o re
633
43

$ 4. 40
4 .8 8

-

58
24
68
478
202
61
237
101
544
218
192
108
2, 433
429

o r d a ta th a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n

4 . 62
4 . 97
6 . 23
6 .2 7
6 .8 9
5. 14
4 . 82
4 . 28
4 . 61
6 . 11
7 .0 5
4 .8 8
4 .4 2
5 .2 9

c r ite ria .




Table 8. Occupational averages: Glass containers —by method of wage payment
(N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a r n in g s 1
U n ite d S ta t e s 2
O c c u p a tio n

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ......................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ........................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p e r s ...................
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g ...........................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) ...........................

4, 01 9
604
377
2, 925
2, 741

M i d d l e .A t l a n t i c

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

Jlncej n t i v e
w o r lk e r s
N um ber
A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk ers
e a rn in g s

$4.
5.
5.
4.
4.

700
3, 511
1, 56 5
239
182

T im e w o r k e r s

09
37
88
23
55

$4.
o.
A.
4.
4.

T im e w o rk e r s
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

86
01

1, O i l

$ 3 . 98

84
99

768
858

4, 13
4. 45

1 08 5
PQA
23 7
992
1
669

$ 3. 96
5 48
c QO

S o u th e a s t

In c e n tiv e
w o rk e rs
N um ber
A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

_

c;
0 7/ D

187
1, 192
597

$ 5 . 06
6 . 14
6. 91

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs
480
52
304
296

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e a n d fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , a n d la te
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .

te ria .

4 20

NOTE:

N um ber
of

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
ea rn in g s

_

_
369
164

$ 6 . 03
6. 87

59 2
259
-

$ 6 . 26
6 . 84
-

$4.02
5.93
4 . 17
4 . 37

G reat L akes
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ......................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s .........................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p e r s ................................
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g .........................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) ......................

In c e n tiv e
T*Vo t* a

T im e w o rk e rs

P a c ific
826

o 12
0 n
293

$ 5 . 65
6 . 26

■
133

4 . 99

491
515

$4. 40
4 . 55
5 . 20

-

D a s h e s in d ic a te no d a ta r e p o r te d o r d a ta th a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n s <

Table 9. Occupational averages : Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers— all establishments
(N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s ,

U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g io n s ,

U n ite d S ta te s 3
O c c u p a tio n an d s e x 2

B a tc h h o u s e a n d fu r n a c e :
B a t c h m i x e r s 5. .........................................................................
B a t c h - a n d f u r n a c e - o p e r a t o r s 5 ...............................
C u l l e t h a n d l e r s (1 2 3 m e n , 1 w o m a n ) ....................
F u r n a c e o p e r a t o r s 5 ...........................................................
M a c h in e f o r m in g :
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s 5....................................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p e r s (1 6 5 m e n ,
1 w o m a n ) .................................................................................
M o ld p o l i s h e r s ( 1 4 4 m e n , 13 w o m e n ) .................
M o l d - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s (3 7 9 m e n ,
14 w o m e n ) ..............................................................................
H a n d F o rm in g :
G a t h e r e r s , b l o w p i p e 5........................................................
G a t h e r e r s , p r e s s e d - w a r e p u n ty .5............................
G r i n d e r s , g l a s s w a r e ........................................................
M e n ..................................................................... ^ ................
W o m e n . . . . ' ......................................................................
P ro sse rs
g l a s s w a r e h a n d 5 .........................................
R e h e a t e r s (2 3 3 m e n , 3 w o m e n ) ...............................
A n n e a lin g :
C a r r y - i n l a b o r e r s (6 5 2 m e n , 6 4 w o m e n ) . . . .
L e h r t e n d e r s (1 0 7 m e n , 4 2 w o m e n ) ....................
S e le c tin g a n d I n s p e c tin g :
I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l .....................................................................
M e n . .........................................................................................
W o m e n .................................................................................
S e l e c t o r s ...................................................................................
M e n ........................................................................................
W o m e n .................................................................................
D e c o r a to r s :
C u t t e r s , d e c o r a t i v e (2 7 m e n , 48 w o m e n ) . . .
D e c o r a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s (8 7 m e n ,
3 3 0 w o m e n ) ...........................................................................
M o ld S h o p : 5
M o l d m a k e r s , m e t a l .......................................................
M a in te n a n c e :
E l e c t r i c i a n , m a i n t e n a n c e , 5 .......................................
H e lp e rs , m a in te n a n c e tra d e s (1 9 0 m e n ,
1 w o m a n ) ................................................................................
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e 3 ..........................................
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e 5.............................................
M is c e lla n e o u s :
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s .......................................................
M e n ...........................................................................„............
W o m e n ................................................................................
J a n i to r s . • .................................................................................
M e n .........................................................................................
W o m e n ................................................................................
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g (6 6 9 m e n ,
9 4 w o m e n ) ................................................................•............
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r , f o r k l i f t (4 9 0 m e n
2 2 w o m e n ) ..............................................................................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r, o th e r th a n f o r k lift
(7 3 m e n , 7 w o m e n ) ........................................................
W a t c h m e n 5 ................................................................................

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

1975)

M i d d le A t l a n t i c
N um ber
of
w o rk ers

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M i d d le
ra n g e 4

M ean4

M e d ia n 4

152
61
124
38 2

$ 4 .0 8
4 . 39
4 . 18
4 .3 2

4 . 06
4 .5 6
4 . 17
4 .2 5

$ 3 . 4 9 —$
3 .8 3 4 .0 0 3 . lb= -

428

5 .5 0

5 .3 7

5. 1 5 -

16 6
157

5 . 86
4 . 17

6 .2 4
4 . 29

5 .4 1 3 .7 8 -

4.
4.
4.
4.

54
68
39
94

61

M ean4

M e d ia n 4

6 .0 6

$ 4 .2 8
_
4 . 34
4 . 13

$ 4 . 30
.
4 . 39
4 . 25

-

34
154

B o r d e r S ta te s

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1

5 .4 7
_

M i d d le
_____ r a n g e 4____

$ 2 . 9 1 —$ 4 . 60
.
4 . 1 0 - 4 . 39
3 . 5 1 - 4 . 30

17
_

5 .5 2
_

6 . 00

169

5 . 69

54

6. 26

127
117
84
33
80

4 . 79
3 .7 6
3 .7 1
3 .8 6
5 . 52

4 . 38
3 .5 0
3 .5 0
3 .9 0
4 . 92

4.
3.
3.
3.
4.

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

S o u th e a s t

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M ean 4

M i d d le
ra n g e 4

M e d ia n 4

$ 3 .7 5
.
4 .2 4
4 .0 9

$ 3 .4 9
_
4 . 11
3 .8 9

.

-

-

6 . 36
4 . 52

-

.

-

•
-

_
_

_
_

.
_

46
40
104

$ 3 . 35—$ 4 . 21
_
4 . 0 0 - 4 . 31
3 . 4 8 - 4 . 54
.

352

5 . 67

5 .5 8

5. 1 5 -

.
_

.
103

.
4 . 16

.
3 . 97

_
_
3 . 5 9 - 4 . 77

_

•

_

_
.
33
_
_
84
43

_

5. 3 3 _

5 .4 7
.

6 .0 0

5 .0 6 -

6. 36

.

_

_

6 . 64

5 . 0 2 — 6 . 97
65
90
90
90
10

14 7
132
91
146
42
104
71

5 . 80
5 .2 6
5 . 53
3 . 32
3 .5 0
3 .2 5
6 . 23

5 .4 6
4 . 66
5 . 17
3 .2 9
3 .2 9
3. 26
5 . 82

4 . 74—
4. 174. 793. 1 3 3. 2 3 3. 1 3 5 .4 1 —

6. 63
6. 17
6. 29
3 .4 1
4 . 03
3 .4 1
6. 77

.

5 .4 8

4. 71-

5 .9 9
5 . 13
4 .9 4
3 .4 9
3 . 60
3 . 38
5 .5 7
3 .9 1

5 . 64
4 . 72
4 .5 6
3 .3 3
3 .3 8
3 .3 1
5 .0 8
3 .8 9

4 . 91—
4 .2 7 4. 253 .1 7 o 3 .2 9 3. 1 6 4 . 73—
3. 6 4 -

716
149

3 . 63
4 . 12

3 .5 2
4 .0 3

3 .2 8 3 .7 1 -

3 . 87
4 .4 8

119
24

3 .7 9
4 . 22

3 . 39
4 .4 3

3 . 3 0 - 4 . 24
4 . 01— 4 . 4 7

280
-

3 . 37
_

3 .3 1
_

3 .2 1 _

3 . 59
_

948
222
726
4 ,2 0 4
1 87
4, 017

3 .9 6
4 .0 8
3 .9 2
3 . 83
3 .8 9
3 . 83

4 . 10
4 . 10
4 . 10
3 .8 1
3 .9 0
3 .8 1

3 .6 7 3 .9 5 3 .4 2 3. 7 1 3. 6 7 3 .7 1 -

4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.

705
131
574
927
.6 1
866

3 . 89
3 .9 6
3 . 88
3 . 83
3 . 87
3 .8 3

4 . 10
4 . 10
4 . 10
3 . 67
4 .0 5
3 . 67

3 .4 2 3. 6 7 3. 2 4 3. 6 5 3 .6 7 3. 6 5 -

100
_
67
988
69
919

3 .9 3
_
3 .9 2
3 .7 8
3 . 69
3 . 79

3 . 85
_
3 . 85
„ 3 .7 5
3 . 74
3 . 75

3 .8 5 _
3. 8 5 3 .7 3 3. 3 3 3. 7 5 -

4 . 13
_
4 . 06
3 . 88
3 .9 7
3 . 85

5 . 35

11
24
11
05
05
05

1433332476-

4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.

11
10
11
05
05
05

_

75

4 .8 8

5 . 18

4 . 20

_

«.

_

_

417

4 . 18

4 . 16

3 . 6 4 - 4 . 56

234

4 . 26

4 . 28

3. 7 4 -

4. 60

-

-

44 9

6 . 26

6. 28

6. 1 7 -

6. 28

114

6 . 16

6. 28

5. 7 2 -

6 . 33

109

6 . 19

6 . 11

6 . 1 1 — 6. 28

248

5. 64

5. 75

5 .4 3 -

5 .8 3

-

50

5. 39

5. 56

5. 0 3 -

191
487
308

4 . 20
5 .8 5
5 .5 5

4. 30
6 . 01
5 . 75

4 . 1 1 - 4 .3 0
5. 5 8 5 .4 0 -

6 . 01
5 . 88

29 3
186
107
257
206
51

4 .0 2
4 . 04
4 .0 1
3 . 84
3 . 83
3 .9 0

4 . 13
4 . 13
4 . 14
3 .9 5
3 .9 5
3 .9 4

3 .9 5 4. 0 2 3. 7 3 3 .7 7 3 .7 1 3 .8 1 —

4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.

-

-

_

4.
3.
3.
3.
5.

-

-

_
-

5. 98

.
5 . 88

_
.
5 . 4 6 — 5 . 88

_
.

14
13
14
05
05
05

57
18
39

3 . 87
_

3 . 65
_

3. 6 5 _
.

4 . 21
_

« 29
28
_
53
45
-

3 .4 1
3 . 39
_
3 .4 4
3 . 35
.

3 .3 5
3 .3 5
_
3 . 64
3 .5 0
_

2 . 8 4 - 3 .9 1
2 . 84— 3 .9 1
_
3 . 2 2 - 3 . 79
3 . 1 9 - 3 . 77
■-

3 .6 9

3 .7 7

3. 6 4 -

_

-

3 . 70

_
3 .4 2

_
_
-

_
-

«
_
-

763

3 . 69

3 .8 6

3 .2 1 -

4 . 05

21 1

3 . 86

4 . 06

3 . 3 1 — 4 . 10

102

512

4 . 14

4 . 17

4 .0 3 -

4 . 32

81

4 . 10

3 .8 9

3. 8 9 -

4 . 30

-

80
53

4 .0 2
3 .5 3

4 . 17
3 .4 5

3 .8 5
3 .3 2 -

4 . 17
3 . 60

22
"

3 . 84

3 .9 0

3 .3 8
“

4 . 23

-

•

-

_
5 . 68

_
.

“

"

15

_
-

_

-

114

88
18

.
-

_
-

.
3. 3 7 -

M id d le
ra n g e 4

M e d ia n 4

$ 3 .9 9
4 .0 2
4 .0 8
4 .5 6

5 .3 3

97
75
17
53
90
50
83
20

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M ean4

$ 4 .0 7
4 .0 6
3 .9 7
4 . 62

395

6.
5.
5.
3.
3.
3.
5.
4.

N um be r
of
w o rk ers

36
32
35
87

247
242
319
298
147
151
23 5
236

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r tim e an d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , a n d la t e s h if ts .
2 I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s f o r w h ic h in f o r m a tio n f o r m e n a n d w o m e n s e p a r a t e l y w a s
u n a v a ila b le .
» 3 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d i t i o n to t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
4 S e e a p p e n d ix A f o r m e th o d u s e d in c o m p u tin g m e a n s , m e d ia n s , a n d m id d le r a n g e s o f e a r n in g s ;




M ay

_
-

$ 3 . 79— 4 .
$
3 .5 3 - 4.
3. 6 0 - 4.
4. 12- 4.

6. 15

.

3 .2 9
_
_
5. 06
3 . 86

_
_
3 . 17
_
_
4 . 85
3! 89

_
_
_
3 . 1 7 - 3 . 17
_
_
_
_
4 . 47— 5 . 13
3 ’ 7 9 - 3 . 89
.

_
31

.
4 . 70

_
4 . 56

_
4 .4 9 -

_
_

_

_
_
_
3 . 81
_
3 . 81

-

2, 088
_
2. 057
_

3 . 85
_
3 .8 4

_
_
3. 8 1 _
3. 8 1 -

_
5. 13

_
_
4 . 01
_
4 . 01

_

145

4 . 12

4. 14

3 . 8 1 — 4. 3 4

222

6. 34

6 . 28

6. 2 8 -

6. 28

39

5. 51

5. 43

5. 2 2 -

5. 86

_

_

123
90

6 . 09
5 .4 2

6 . 28
5 .4 3

6 . 2 5 - 6. 28
5 . 0 6— 5 . 82

95
.

4 . 27
_
3 .9 3
3 .9 8
3 . 78

4 . 14

-

88
65
23

_

_

4. 14_

4 . 41
_

_
3 . 88
3 . 91
3 . 81

3 .8 1 3 .8 1 3. 7 7 -

4 . 26
4 . 29
3 . 88

_

_

421

3 .5 7

3 . 63

3 . 1 3 - ° 3 .9 2

-

308

4 . 14

4 . 21

3 .9 7 -

4 . 34

-

-

_
3. 0 7 -

.
3 .4 5

3 . 86

4 . 33

25

-

3 .2 9

-

3 . 32

m e d i a n s a n d m i d d l e r a n g e s a r e n o t p r o v i d e d f o r e n t r i e s o f f e w e r t h a n 15 w o r k e r s .
5 A ll m e n .
NOTE:

46
56
29
74

D a s h e s in d ic a te no d a ta r e p o r te d o r d a ta th a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .




Table 10. Occupational averages: Pressed or blown glassware, except containers— by size of community
( N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 i n s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s , U n i t e d S t a t e s a n d s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M a y 1975)
U n ite d S ta te s 1
2
O c c u p a tio n

M e t r o p o l i Ltan a r e a s
N um be r
of
w o rk ers

A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ..................................................................
B a t c h m i x e r s ........................................................................................
C a r r y - i n l a b o r e r s ...........................................................................
C u l l e t h a n d l e r s ...................................................................................
D e c o r a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ......................................... .
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e .......................................................
F u r n a c e o p e r a t o r s ...........................................................................
G a t h e r e r s , b l o w p i p e ................................. T , . . .
G a t h e r e r s , p r e s s e d w a r e p u n t y ..........................................
G r i n d e r s , g l a s s w a r e .....................................................................
I n s p e c t o r s , " f i n a l ..............................................................................
J a n i t o r s ...................................................................................................
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g ...............................................
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ..........................................................
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ..........................................................
M o l d m a k e r s , m e t a l .....................................................................
S e l e c t o r s .................................................................................................
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) .....................................................

210
58
244
48
286
73
162
35
141
104
38 0
98
242
130
90
198
1, 76 0
244

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
$ 4 .0 1
4 .0 7
3 . 52
4 . 16
4 . 14
5 . 62
4 . 05
5 . 32
4 . 78
3 . 69
3 .7 9
3. 83
3 . 82
° 5 .8 2
5 . 38
6. 34
3 . 88
4 . 22

M i d d le A t l a n t i c

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs
83
94
472
76
131
175
22 0
207
178
194
568
159
521
35 7
218
251
2, 4 4 4
268

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and
la te s h ifts .
2 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d i t i o n to t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .

A v e ra g e
hou rly
e a rn in g s

B o r d e r S ta te s

M e tro p o lita n a r e a s

N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s

N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

$ 4 .0 5
4 . 09
3 . 69
4 . 20
4 . 26
5 . 64
4 . 52
5 . 10
5 .0 7
3 . 38
4 . 07
3 . 85
3 . 63
5 . 86
5 . 62
6 . 19
3 . 80
4 . 07

NOTE:
c rite ria .

42
37

A v e rag e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v e rag e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

4 . 32
_

25
41
214
33
_

28
104
_

5 .4 6
3 . 88
_

43
88
119

5 .4 4
4 . 10
5 . 30

88
91

4 . 50
3 . 70

15
172
84
35
64
61 0

3 .4 1
3 . 74
5 . 51
5 .4 8
6 . 38
3 . 72

142
100
41
94

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

$ 3 .4 2
3 . 75
3 . 28
4 . 33

3 . 32
3 . 93
3 .4 6
3 . 72

_

21
_

$ 3 . 74
4 . 03

G reat L akes
N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s

_

_

in d ic a te

_

60

re p o rte d

3 . 53

53

5 . 51

144

m

923

d a ta

4 . 66

_

4 . 00

3 . 81

no

$ 3 . 99

38 7

_

-

D ashes

25

A v e rag e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

or

d a ta

th a t

do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n




Table 11. Occupational averages: Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers—by size of establishment
( N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n s ,
U n ite d S ta te s

U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e l e c t e d r e g io n s ,
M i d d le A t l a n t i c

M ay 1975)

B o r d e r S ta te s

G reat L akes

1 0 0 -4 9 9 w o r k e r s

500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith —
O c c u p a tio n

1 0 0 -4 9 9 w o r k e r s
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A s s e m b le rs , c a rto n s
...................................
B a tc h m ix e r s
..........................................................
B l o w e r s .................................... ..
.
C a r r y - i n l a b o r e r s .............................. ...................
C u l l e t h a n d l e r s ........................................................
D e c o r a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s .....................
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e .............................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ........... ..
.
F u r n a c e o p e r a t o r s ................... ..
.
G a t h e r e r s , b l o w p i p e ..........................................
G a t h e r e r s , p r e s s e d w a r e p u n t y ..................
G r i n d e r s , g l a s s w a r e ..........................................
In s p e c to r s , fin a l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
J a n ito rs
................................................................ . .
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g .......................
L e h r t e n d e r s ......................................
.
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ...............................
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ..................................
M o l d m a k e r s , m e t a l ..............................
M o l d - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s .............. ..........................
P r e s s e r s , g la s s w a re , h an d . . . . . . . . . .
S e le c to r s
.................................... ..
.
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) ........................ .

153
85
217
478
45
38
63

232
222
270
226
243
55
101
27
79
90
113
130
202
800
34

500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v e rag e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
$ 3 . 95
3 . 84
5. 7 6
3 .4 4
4 . 10
3. 43
5 . 51
4 . 10
5. 14
4 . 74

3. 33
3. 97
3 .4 3
3 . 31
3. 40
5 .4 6
5 .4 6
6. 29
5. 22
5 . 32
3 . 83
3. 98

’

140
67
30
_
79
379
185
360
150
49
72
705
202
662
122
408
218
336
263
3, 4 0 4
478

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r tim e a n d f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s ,
h o lid a y s , an d la te s h ifts .
2 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d i t i o n to t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .

A v e rag e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
$ 4 . 11
4. 39
7. 65
-

4 . 23
4 .2 5
5. 68
5. 6 4
4 . 67
6 . 05
3. 98
3 . 95
3 .9 5
3 . 74
4. 28
5. 93
5. 5 8
6. 24
5. 3 9
"
3 . 83
4 . 15

500 w o r k e rs o r m o re
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

34
_
-

34
-

-

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

29
35
147
280
20

$3.
3.
5.
3.
4.

-

-

-

-

16

$ 4 . 54
-

_
4. 34

-

-

41
57
80
37
04

4 . 95
-

84
23
543
145
20

4 . 62
6 . 79
_
3 . 90
_
4 . 14
4 .3 6

85
132
91
130
31
21
_

3 . 88
5 .2 6
5 . 53
3 . 22
_
3 . 25
3 . 17

_
76
112
12
756
75

_
6. 09
6 . 10
9. 22
3 . 79
4 . 16

_
51
71
385
10

_
6. 29
6 .2 3
3 . 77
4 . 42

_

N O TE: D ashes
p u b lic a tio n c r it e r i a .

_

in d ic a te

_

no

d a ta

_
_

re p o rte d

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs
95
22

_

_
25
141
30
352
43
_
_
83
411
31
103
62
202
1 ,9 6 5
299

o r d a ta

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
$ 4 . 27
4. 20
_

_

3 .9 1
4 . 14
5 . 68
5 . 67
4 . 60

_

_
_
3 .9 5
3 . 57
4 . 70
6 . 21
5. 37
6. 3 4
-

3 .8 6
4 . 16

th a t do n o t m e e t

Table 12. Occupational averages:

Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers-by method of wage payment

( N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s . U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g io n s ,
U n ite d S ta te s 2
O c c u p a tio n

T im e w o r k e r s
N um be r
of
w o rk e rs

A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s .............................................................
B a t c h m i x e r s ...........................................................................
B l o w e r s ...................................................................................
C a r r v - i n l a b o r e r s ..........................................................
D e c o r a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s .......................................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s .............................................
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p e r s ..........................................
F u r n a c e o p e r a t o r s .............................................................
G a t h e r e r s , p r e s s e d w a r e p u n t y ....................................
G r i n d e r s , g l a s s w a r e .............................................................
I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l .............................................................
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g .............................................
M o l d - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s ..........................................................
P r e s s e r s , g l a s s w a r e , h a n d ...............................................
S e l e c t o r s . . . ...........................................................................

19 8
116

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

$ 3 .9 0
4 .0 2

33 1
156

5 . 73
4 . 43

218
850
615
213

yo

36
235
385
261
402

3 .4 9
3 .8 7

101
314

3 .4 4

Dj
aq
Do

3 , 13 9

. yO

3 . 67
5 . 29
3 . 77

..

A v e rag e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
4 a

N um be r
of
w o rk ers

on

45
34

4 28

5.’ 57
4 . 02

h o lid a y s ,

$ 3 . *78
4 . 32

-

C CQ
D . DO
A .Uf
D /V7

148

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

-

3* 75
4 .'3 6

234
1, 0 6 5

QQ
70

E x c lu d e s p re m iu m p a y f o r o v e r tim e an d fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s,
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d i t i o n to t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .




T im e w o r k e r s

3 . 83
4 94
3 62
3 .9 3
3 75

317
j

M i d d le A t l a n t i c

In c e n tiv e w o r k e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

M a y 1975)

27
"
119
-

4 .4 0

7
44
660
138

and

N um be r
of
w o rk e rs

4 .0 1
3 .9 2
3 . 88

la te

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

$ 4 .2 2
3 . 79

-

102

700

B o rd e r S ta te s

In c e n tiv e w o r k e rs

127
-

4 . 79
-

73
107

3 .8 5
s h ifts .

-

3 .8 2
5 .4 4

T im e w o rk e rs
N um be r
of
w o rk e rs
29
45
”

$ 3 .4 1
3 . 73
-

96

-

-

14 6
100
102

73 9

NOTE:

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

_

4 .0 6
-

3 . 32
3 . 93
3 .6 9

3 . 70

G reat L akes

In c e n tiv e w o r k e rs
N um ber
of
wo rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

N ubober
of

.
.
-

91

.

$ 5 . 80
3 .5 9
_
_
-

5 .5 3

-

_

-

_
28
_

N um ber
of
wo rk e rs

_
$ 3 .9 6

3 . 67

_
79
_

.

-

In c e n tiv e w o r k e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly

57

.
-

14 7
150

_

T im e w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s

_
_

_

88
334
37

_

$ 4 .4 0
5 . 75
6. 42

4 . 60
_

_

_

-

_

_

346

3°. 5 4

1 ,4 9 9

3 . 75

75

1

-

D a s h e s in d ic a te no d a ta r e p o r te d o r d a ta th a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .

3 . 68




Table 13.

Glass containers:

Method of wage payment

(Percent of production workers by method of wage payment. United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Method of
wage payment1

United
States1
2

Border
States

Middle
Atlantic

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Pacific

All workers.......................................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Time rated workers............................................. .................
Formal plans .....................................................................
Single rate.....................................................................
Range of rates..............................................................
Individual rates...... :..........................................................

87
87
69
18
(3)

85
85
79
5

90
90
39
51
-

90
90
61
29

92
92
46
46

86
86
69
17

-

-

89
89
81
8
(3)

Incentive workers...................................................................
Individual piecework..........................................................
Group piecework ...
Individual bonus...
Group bonus ........

13
(3)
(3)
7
5

15
_
10
5

10
_

10
_
1
8
2

8
2
5
1

14
1
_
9
4

11
_
_
3
8

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Pacific

•

6
4

-

.

1 For definition of method of wage payment, see appendix A.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

Table 14.

Glass containers:

Scheduled weekly hours

(Percent of production workers by scheduled weekly hours, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Weekly hours1

United
States2

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

All workers.......................................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

40 hours.................................................................................
42 hours.................................................................................
48 hours .................................................................................
Cyclical work weeks3 ............................................................
40, 40, 40, and 48 hours...............................................

11
2
1
86
58

21

5

_

_

_

25

-

-

-

-

8

-

12
82
56

-

-

-

-

100
63

100
76

92
71

75
53

79
39

1 Data relate to the predominant schedule for full-time day-shift workers in each establishment.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 Includes other regularly alternating workweeks in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

-




Table 15.

Glass containers:

Shift differential provisions

(Percent of production workers by shift differential provisions, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Shift differential1

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

100.0
100.0
100.0
3.2
2.6
.3
91.1
1.5
1.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
_
4.6
.9
94.6
-

100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
10.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
8.1
4.7
83.9
3.4

99.9
99.9
99.9
3.2

100.0
100.0
100.0
-

-

-

7.7

22.0
.9
77.1

-

-

-

-

-

-

United
States2

Pacific

Second shift
Workers in establishments with
second shift provisions.......................................................
With shift differential.......................................................
Uniform cents per hour...............................................
10 cents ....................................................................
12 cents ....................................................................
13 cents ....................................................................
14 cents ....................................................................
16 cents ....................................................................
17 cents ....................................................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

89.7
-

100.0
-

-

81.2
5.4
13.4

-

-

100.0
100.0
100.0
-

99.5
.5

Third or other late shift
Workers in establishments with third
or other late shift provisions............................................
With shift differential .......................................................
Uniform cents per hour
14 cents ...........................
16 cents
17 cents
18 cents
........................................
20 cents
........................................

.3
87.5
1.3

-

100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

86.6
13.4

1 Refers to policies of establishments currently operating late shifts or having provisions covering late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE.

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

100.0
100.0
100.0
10.3

89.7
~

100.0
100.0
100.0
8.1
4.7

99.5
99.5
99.5
-

-

-

87.3

99.5

—

~




Table 16.

Glass containers:

Shift differential practices

(Percent of production workers employed on late shifts by amount of pay differential, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Shift differential

United
States'

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

25.4
25.4
25.4
.8
.7
.1
23.1
.3
.3

23.8
23.8
23.8

26.2
26.2
26.2

25.7
25.7
25.7

26.7
26.7
26.7
2.5

21.1
21.1
21.1

21.1
-

24.1
24.1
24.1
.8
1.6
.1
21.3
.3

Pacific

Second shift
Workers employed on second sh ift......................................
Receiving differential........................................................
Uniform cents per hour................................................
10 cents
12 cents
13 cents
14 cents
16 cents.....................................................................
17 cents ....................................................................

-

-

-

-

-

28.5
28.5
28.5
2.2
1.4

-

-

-

-

1.1
.2
22.4
-

26.2
-

-

22.8
22.8
22.8
4.1
.2
18.5
-

-

24.2
-

-

21.1
1.4
3.2

-

24.3
.6
-

26.0
26.0
26.0

24.4
24.4
24.4

26.1
26.1
26.1
2.2
1.4

-

-

Third or other late shift
Workers employed on third
or other late shift...............................................................
Receiving differential ........................................................
Uniform cents per hour................................................
14 cents ....................................................................
. 16 cents ....................................................................
17 cents ....................................................................
18 cents ....................................................................
20 cents ....................................................................

1

20.8
20.8
20.8

-

-

25.1
25.1
25.1
2.5
-

-

-

-

-

-

26.0
-

21.2
3.2

22.6
-

22.4

20.8

-

-

-

-

-

Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.

NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

Table 17. Glass containers:

Paid holidays

(Percent of production workers in establishments with formal provisions for paid holidays, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Number of
paid holidays

United
States'

Middle
Atlantic

All workers........................................................................

100

100

100

Workers in establishments
providing paid holidays......................................................
8 days...............................................................................
9 days ...............................................................................
10 days .............................................................................
11 days.............................................................................

100
3
8
83
5

100
7
5
88

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

-

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

100

100

100

100

100
12

100

100

100

-

-

77
10

100

100
0 4
12
79
5

-

-

Pacific

-

-

6
81
14

26
74
-




Table 18.

Glass containers:

Paid vacations

(Percent of production workers in establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service,
.United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Vacation policy

All workers........................................................................

Border
States

South­
east

Great
Lakes

Pacific

100

100

100

100
100

100
100

100
53
47

South­
west

United
States'

Middle
Atlantic

100

100

100

100

100
93
7

100
100

100
100

100
100

-

-

-

-

45
55

57
43

49
51

51
49

37
63

21
79

68
32

(3)
4
87
9

1
5
89
5

100
-

90
10

95
5

10
86
5

72
28

91
9

95
5

100
-

90
10

95
5

95
5

72
28

11
89

7
93

18
82

9
91

16
84

2
98

31
69

5
77
17

12
67
21

100
-

83
17

5
71
24

86
14

7
72
22

1
4
75
17
2

1
82
17
-

18
51
31
-

5
72
23
-

4
83
12
-

83
13
5

7
5
66
16
7

1
1
3
15
76
3

-

12
32
51

4
13
83

-

4
13
83

7
14
79

5

-

-

-

Method of payment
Workers in establishments
providing paid vacations....................................................
Length of time payment...................................................
Percentage payment..........................................................

"

Amount of vacation pay2
After 1 year of service:
1 week................................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............................................

After 2 years of service:
1 w eek................................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks ............................................
2 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................................

After 3 years of service:
2 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................................

After 5 years of service:
• 2 weeks..............................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................................

After 10 years of service:
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................................
3 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks ............................................

After 15 years of service: 0
Over 2 and under 3 weeks ............................................
3 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks ............................................
4 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks .............................................

After 20 years of service-.
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .............................................
3 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks ............................................
4 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks ............................................
5 weeks ................... ?
.........................................................

See footnotes at end of table.

5
12
77
7

5
17
73
4

Table 18.

Glass containers:

Paid vacations—Continued

(Percent of production workers in establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service,
United States and selected regions, May 1975)

United
States1

Vacation policy

South­
east

Border
States

Middle
Atlantic

South-­
west

Great
Lakes

7
14
73
7
7
14
73

Pacific

Am
ount of vacation pay2
After 25 years of service:

NO
CO




1
1
3
3
4
14
74

Over 2 and under 3 weeks .............................................
3 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks ............................................
4 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks .............................................
5 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 5 and under 6 weeks .............................................

-

5

5

-

-

-

7
87

26
69

4
6
10
10
70

-

5
18
77

4
6
2
5
84

-

-

-

-

-

12
5
26
56

-

-

5
1
11
83

7
-

-

After 30 years of service:4
Over 2 and under 3 weeks .............................................
3 weeks ...........................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks
4 weeks ...........................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks .............................................
5 weeks ..............................................................................
Over 5 and under 6 weeks ............................................

1
1
3
3
2
6
84

5
1
94

In c lu d e s d a ta f o r re g io n s in a d d it io n t o t h o s e s h o w n

-

5
-

95

w e e k s . V a c a t io n

p a y m e n ts , such as p e r c e n t o f a n n u a l e a r n ­

ings, w e r e c o n v e r te d t o a n e q u iv a le n t t i m e basis. P e rio d s o f

s e p a r a te ly .
2

12
5
82

-

T h e a m o u n t o f v a c a tio n p a y

in th is t a b u l a t io n is e x ­s e rv ic e w e r e c h o s e n a r b i t r a r i ly a n d d o n o t n e c e s s a rily r e f le c t

p ress ed in te r m s o f t h e le n g th o f t im e c o v e r e d b y t h e p a y m e n t

in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t p r o v is io n s f o r p r o g re s s io n . F o r e x ­

m e a s u re d a g a in s t t h e w o r k e r s ' r e g u la r w o r k w e e k . T h u s , e s ta b ­

a m p le ,

lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g 4 8 h o u rs ' v a c a tio n p a y w e r e c la s s ifie d as

t h a t o c c u r r e d b e t w e e n 5 a n d 1 0 y e a rs .

3

g r a n t in g 1 w e e k if t h e w o r k s c h e d u le w a s 4 8 h o u rs , b u t o v e r
1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s if th e w o r k s c h e d u le w a s less t h a n 4 8
h o u rs .
w o rk

M any

e s ta b lis h m e n ts

m a in t a in e d

r e g u la r ly

c h a n g in g

4

changes

in d ic a te d

a t 1 0 y e a rs m a y

in c lu d e c h a n g e s

Less t h a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t.
V a c a t io n p r o v is io n s w e r e v i r t u a ll y t h e s a m e a f t e r lo n g e r

p e r io d s o f s e rv ic e .

s c h e d u le s (e .g ., 4 0 h o u rs f o r t h e f ir s t 3 w e e k s a n d 4 8

h o u rs f o r

th e

f o u r t h ) ; in such in s ta n c e s , p r o v is io n s f o r 4 8

h o u r s v a c a tio n p a y w e r e c o n s id e re d as o v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items
may not equal totals.

Table 19.

Glass containers:

Health, insurance, and retirement plans

(Percent of production workers in establishments with specified health, insurance, and retirement plans, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Type of plan1

All workers........................................................................

United
States2

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Pacific

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
98

100
99

100
95

100
87

100
100

100
100

100
100

96
94

88
87

100
95

100
87

100
100

100
100

100
100

90
90
87

91
91
91

100
100
95

100
100
76

100
100
100

100
100
100

57
57
57

10

9
9
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

16
16
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

33
33
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

Workers in establishments providing:

fO
4

Life insurance.....................................................................
Noncontributory plans...................................................
Accidental death and
dismemberment insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans...................................................
Sickness and accident insurance
or sick leave or both3 ....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance...............................
Noncontributory plans...............................................
Sick leave (partial pay
or waiting period).......................................................
Long-term disability insuiance
Noncontributory plans ..
Hospitalization insurance .
Noncontributory plans ..
Surgical insurance ..........
Noncontributory plans...................................................
Major medical insurance..................................................
Noncontributory plans...................................................
Retirement plans .............................................................
Pensions..........................................................................
Noncontributory plans...............................................

(4)
13
12
100
94
100
94
100
94
100
100
100

-

100
94
100
94
100
94
100
100
100

-

12
12
100
95
100
95
100
95
100
100
100

-

100
76
100
76
100
76
100
100
100

*




“ N o n c o n t r ib u t o r y p la n s '* in c lu d e o n l y t h o s e p la n s f i ­
n a n c e d e n t i r e l y b y t h e e m p lo y e r . L e g a lly r e q u ir e d p la n s s u c h
as w o r k e r s c o m p e n s a t io n a n d so c ial s e c u r ity a r e e x c lu d e d ;
h o w e v e r , p la n s r e q u ir e d b y s ta te t e m p o r a r y d i s a b i li t y la w s a re
in c lu d e d i f t h e e m p lo y e r c o n tr ib u t e s m o r e t h a n is le g a lly
r e q u ir e d o r t h e e m p lo y e e s re c e iv e b e n e fits in e x c e s s o f leg al
r e q u ir e m e n t s .

Table 20.

Glass containers:

In c lu d e s d a ta f o r re g io n s in a d d it io n t o th o s e s h o w n
s e p a r a te ly .
3
U n d u p lic a t e d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s re c e iv in g s ickn es s a n d
a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e a n d s ick le a v e s h o w n s e p a r a te ly .
N O T E : B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y
n o t e q u a l t o ta ls .

Other selected benefits

Percent of production workers in establishments with formal provisions for other selected benefits, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Type of benefit*

United
States2

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Pacific

100
100
54
84
100
100

100
100
35
95
90
90

100
100
9
100
100
100

Workers in establishments
with provisions for-.
Funeral leave..........................................................................
Jury duty leave.......................................................................
Technological severance p ay................................................
Dental plans...........................................................................
Cost-of-living adjustments...................................................
Based on BLS consumer price index.............................

100
100
34
%
89
89

For definition of items, see appendix A.
Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.

100
100
31
99
88
88

100
100
77
100
82
82

100
100
37
100
85
85

Table 21. Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers: Method of
wage payment
(Percent of production workers by method of wage payment, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

United
States1
2

Method of
wage payment1

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

100

100

100

100

All workers................................................................................................

Great
Lakes

a

Time rated workers........................................................................................
Formal plans...............................................................................................
Single ra te ..............................................................................................
Range of rates......................................................................................
Individual rates.........................................................................................

68
68
41
27
(3)

66
66
21
45

71
71
45
26
(3)

62
62
58
4
-

Incentive workers...........................................................................................
Individual piecework..................................................................................
Group piecework........................................................................................
Individual bonus........................................................................................
Group bonus ..............................................................................................

32
2
5
16
9

34
2
4
22
6

29
5
1
13
10

38
1
10
13
13

1 For definition of method of wage payment, see appendix A.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 Less than 0.5 percent.

N)

NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

CJ1




Table 22. Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers: Scheduled
weekly hours
(Percent of production workers by scheduled weekly hours, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Weekly hours1

United
States2

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

All workers............................................................................................

100

100

100

32 hours.........................................................................................................
40 hours
48 hours
Cyclical work weeks3 ......................................................................................
40, 40, 40, and 48 hours .......................................................................

1
47
9
43
33

_

6
46

1 Data relate to the predominant schedule for full-time day-shift workers in each establishment.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 Includes other regularly alternating workweeks in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

53
-

-

47
34

48
48

Great
Lakes

100
_

48
26
27
12




Table 23. Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers: Shift
differential provisions
(Percent of production workers by shift differential provisions, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Shift differential1

United
States2

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Great
Lakes

98.7
98.7
98.7
3.6
1.9
2.8
11.0
9.2
1.0
39.0
6.1
18.6
3.8
1.7

100.0
100.0
100.0

94.4
94.4
94.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
10.3
_
8.1
8.5
5.2
_
33.2
3.5
31.2
_

93.2
93.2
93.2
3.6
4.8
7.4
2.9
2.8
20.4
6.6
26.6
5.8
10.6
1.8

94.8
94.8
94.8
_
8.1
5.3

Second shift
Workers in establishments with
second shift provisions.................................................................. .............
With shift differential...............................................................................
Uniform cents per hour........................................................................
4 cents................................................................................................
5 cents................................................................................................
7 cents
8 cents
10 cents
11 cents
12 cents
13 cents
14 cents
15 cents ..............................................................................................
18 cents ..............................................................................................

-

-

5.3

14.1
32.6
_
21.2
16.2
3.9
6.3
-

13.3
_
_
57.6
-

12.9
6.3
4.6

-

Third or other late s h ift
Workers in establishments with third
or other late shift provisions.....................................................................
With shift differential...............................................................................
Uniform cents per hour........................................................................
6 cents ................................................................................................
8 cents
10 cents
11 cents
12 cents
14 cents
15 cents .............................................................................................
16 cents .............................................................................................
17 cents .............................................................................................
18 cents ..............................................................................................
19 cents ..............................................................................................

-

51.9
_
18.6
6.3
4.6
-

1 Refers to policies of establishments currently operating late shifts or having provisions covering late shifts.
* Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

78.6
78.6
78.6
_
8.0
11.6
-

°

_
-

18.4
25.2
15.4
-

100.0
100.0
100.0
10.3
_
13.7
8.1
3.5
33.2
_
25.9
5.4 • •




Table 24. Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers: Shift
differential practices
(Percent of production workers employed on late shifts by amount of pay differential, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Shift differential

United
States1

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Great
Lakes

23.2
23.2
23.2
.5
.8

25.3
25.3
25.3
2.3

20.8
20.8
20.8

22.6
22.6
22.6
1.5

-

-

-

-

2.0
1.6
10.0
1.7
5.3
1.2

2.9
14.7
3.5
1.9

2.8
_
8.2
1.1
9.0
-

-

-

6.9
6.3
4.3
1.1
2.2
-

16.9
16.9
16.9
.5
.9
.6
3.8
1.0
5.7
1.5
2.5
.4

17.3
17.3
17.3
2.4

10.7
10.7
10.7
-

20.1
20.1
20.1
1.5

Second s h if t

Workers employed on second s h ift..............................................................
Receiving differential.................................................................................
Uniform cents per hour.........................................................................
4 cents................................................................................................
5 cents................................................................................................
7 cents................................................................................................
8 cents
.........................................
10 cents
.........................................
12 cents
.........................................
13 cents
.........................................
14 cents
.........................................
15 cents
.........................................
18 cents
..........................................

-

-

-

Third o r o th e r la te s h if t

Workers employed on third
or other late sh ift........................................................................................
Receiving differential ....
- Uniform cents per hour
6 cents...................
8 cents...................
10 cents .................
14 cents ..............................................................................................
15 cents
16 cents
17 cents
18 cents
19 cents ..............................................................................................

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

-

_

.6

_

1.4

9.5

-

-

_

4.1
1.4

1.4
4.4
4.2

1.0
7.8

-

-

-

-

7.3
1.1

_




Table 25.
holidays

Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers:

Paid

(Percent of production workers in establishments with formal provisions for paid holidays, United States and selected regions, May 1975)1

Number of
paid holidays

United
States'

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Great
Lakes

All workers.................................................................

100

100

100

100

Workers in establishments
providing paid holidays.....................................................
7 days ......................................................................
8 days......................................................................
9 days ......................................................................
10 days .....................................................................
11 days .....................................................................
12 days .....................................................................

100
16
11
11
47
11
5

100
10
8
5
64

100
33
19
10
37

13

-

100
13
10
14
37
26
-

1 Includes data for regions ^ addition to those shown separately.
in
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

_

_




Table 26.
vacations

Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except container^:

Paid

(Percent of production workers in establishments with formal provisions for
paid vacations after selected periods of service, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Vacation policy

All workers..............................................

United
States1

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Great
Lakes

100

100

100

100

100
58
42

100
45
55

100
74
26

100
65
35

56
17
27

36
19
45

74
_
26

73
24
3

46
2
23
29

32
_

46
_

23
45

19
35

30
7
33
28
1

32
_

38
_

23
45
_

27
29
6

47
26
27

36
19
45

65
9
26

53
44
3

28
2
41
2
27

23
_

44
_

32

45

20
9
26

27
5
64

5
32
19

7
46
21

45

17

Method of payment
Workers in establishments
providing paid vacations.....................................................................................
Length of time paym ent....................................................................................
Percentage paym ent............................................................................................

Amount of vacation pay2
After 1 year of service:
1 week ....................................................................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..............................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks..............................................................................

After 2 years of service:
1 w e e k ....................................................................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..............................................................................
2 w eeks...................................................................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks..............................................................................

67
5
24
3

After 3 years of service:
1 w e e k ....................................................................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..............................................................................
2 w eeks...................................................................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks..............................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks..............................................................................

27
20
50
3

After 5 years of service:
2 weeks ...................................................................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks..............................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks..............................................................................

After 10 years of service:
2 w eeks...................................................................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks...............................................................................
3 w eeks...................................................................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks...............................................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks...............................................................................

_

Aftei 15 years of service:
2 w eeks...................................................................................................................
3 weeks ...................................................................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks...............................................................................
4 weeks ...................................................................................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks..............................................................................

See footnotes at end of table.

3
32
28
9
25

_

_

_

3

_
27
44
26
3

Table 26. Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers:
vacations—Continued

Paid

(Percent of production workers in establishments with formal provisions for
paid vacations after selected periods of service, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Vacation policy

United
States1

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Great
Lakes

Amount of vacation pay2
After 15 years of service:
Over 5 and under 6 weeks.............................................................................

2

9

After 20 years of service:
2 w eeks..................................................................................................................
3 w eeks..................................................................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks.............................................................................
4 weeks ..................................................................................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks..............................................................................
Over 5 and under 6 weeks..............................................................................

1
6
3
37
26
27

After 25 years of service:

CO

o




2 w eeks.................................................................................................................
3 weeks ..........................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks
4 weeks ..........................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks.............................................................................
5 w eeks..........................
Over 5 and under 6 weeks
6 w eeks..........................

1
6
3
28
2
9
34
17

8
8
28
11
45

_

7
8

_

38
21
26
7
8

8
8
28
_
_

38

17
39

41
7

_

7
8

_
_

After 30 years of service:3
2 weeks ..................................................................................................................
3 w eeks..........................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks
4 w eeks..........................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks
Over 5 and under 6 weeks
6 weeks ..........................
Over 6 and under 7 weeks.............................................................................

1
6
3
28
2
34
11
16

8
8
28

_
17
_

39

38

_

41
7

_
_
_
53
44
3

_
_
_
27
5
26
42

_
_
_
_

27
5
42
26

-

I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g io n s in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e
t io n p a y w e r e c o n s id e r e d as o v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s .
s h o w n s e p a r a te ly .
V a c a t i o n p a y m e n t s , s u c h as p e r c e n t o f a n n u a l e a r n i n g s ,
2
T h e a m o u n t o f v a c a t i o n p a y in t h i s t a b u l a t i o n is w e r e c o n v e r t e d t o a n e q u i v a l e n t t i m e b a s is . P e r i o d s o f
e x p r e s s e d in t e r m s o f t h e le n g th o f t im e c o v e r e d b y t h e
s e r v i c e w e r e c h o s e n a r b i t r a r i l y a n d d o n o t n e c e s s a r il y
p a y m e n t m e a s u r e d a g a in s t t h e w o r k e r s ' r e g u la r w o r k
r e f l e c t i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r o v is i o n s f o r p r o g r e s ­
w e e k . T h u s e s t a b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g 4 8 h o u r s ' v a c a t io n
s io n . F o r e x a m p l e , c h a n g e s i n d i c a t e d a t 1 0 y e a r s m a y
p a y w e r e c la s s i f i e d a s g r a n t i n g 1 w e e k i f t h e w o r k s c h e d ­
in c lu d e c h a n g e s t h a t o c c u r r e d b e tw e e n 5 a n d 1 0 y e a rs .
u le w a s 4 8 h o u r s , b u t o v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s if t h e
3
V a c a t io n p r o v is io n s w e r e v ir t u a l l y t h e s a m e a f t e r
w o r k s c h e d u l e w a s less t h a n 4 8 h o u r s . M a n y e s t a b l i s h ­
l o n g e r p e r i o d s o f s e r v ic e .
m e n ts m a in t a in e d
r e g u l a r l y c h a n g in g w o r k s c h e d u l e s
(e .g ., 4 0 h o u rs f o r th e fir s t 3 w e e k s a n d 4 8 h o u rs f o r th e
NO TE:
B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l
f o u r t h ) ; in s u c h i n s t a n c e s , p r o v is i o n s f o r 4 8 h o u r s ' v a c a ­
ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l to t a ls .




Table 27. Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers:’
Health, insurance, and retirement plans
(Percent of production workers in establishments with specified health, insurance, and retirement plans, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Type of plan1

All w orkers...........................................................................................................

United
States1
2

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Great
Lakes

100

100

100

100

100
43

100
44

100
41

100
42

78
26

85
40

70
20

71
13

96
96
37
5
5
100
35
100
35
91
32
98
98
93

95
95
36
100
41
100
41
95
36
100
100
100

89
89
29
12
12
100
41
100
41
100
41
92
92
77

100
100
42
100
24
100
24
82
24
100
100
95

Workers in establishments providing:
Life insurance.......................................................................................................
Noncontributory p lan s .....................................................................................
Accidental death and
dismemberment insurance..............................................................................
Noncontributory p lan s .....................................................................................
Sickness and accident insurance
or sick leave or both .....................................................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ..............................................................
Noncontributory p lan s ................................................................................
Long-term disability insurance....................... .................................................
Noncontributory p lan s ................................ ....................................................
Hospitalization insurance..................................................................................
Noncontributory p lan s .....................................................................................
Surgical insurance...............................................................................................
Noncontributory p lan s ....................................................................................
Major medical insurance ..................................................................................
Noncontributory p lan s .....................................................................................
Retirement plans ...............................................................................................
Pensions.............................................................................................................
Noncontributory p lan s ................................................................................

" N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s " i n c l u d e o n l y t h o s e p la n s
f i n a n c e d e n t i r e l y b y t h e e m p l o y e r . L e g a l l y r e q u i r e d p la n s
s u c h a s w o r k e r s ' c o m p e n s a t i o n a n d s o c ia l s e c u r i t y a r e e x ­
c l u d e d ; h o w e v e r , p la n s r e q u i r e d b y s t a t e t e m p o r a r y d i s ­
a b i l i t y la w s a r e i n c l u d e d i f t h e e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t e s

m o r e t h a n is l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d o r t h e e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e
b e n e f i t s in e x c e s s o f le g a l r e q u i r e m e n t s ;
2
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g io n s in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e
show n

s e p a r a te ly .

Table 28. Pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers:
selected benefits

Other

Percent of production workers in establishments with formal provisions for other selected benefits, United States and selected regions, May 1975)

Type of benefit1

United
States2

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Great
Lakes

Workers in establishments
with provisions for:
Funeral le a v e .............................................................................................................
Jury duty le a v e ..........................................................................................................
Technological severance p a y .................................................................................
Dental p la n s ..............................................................................................................
Cost-of-living adjustments....................................................................................
Based on BLS consumer price index ............................................................
Based on other m easure...................................................................................

1
2

For definition of items, see appendix A.
Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.

99
98
5
38
55
53
2

NOTE:
equal totals.

100
100
27
56
56

93
93
12
21
48
48

-

-

-

100
100
5
64
53
48
5

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not




Appendix A.

Scope and Method of Survey

Scope of survey

Products

The survey included establishments engaged primarily in
manufacturing pressed or blown glass and glassware (Indus­
try group 322, except textile glass fibers, as defined in the
1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual, prepared by the U.S. Office of Management and
Budget). Manufacturers o f textile glass fibers and separate
auxiliary units such as central offices were excluded.
Establishments studied were selected from those em­
ploying 100 workers or more at the time o f reference o f the
data used in compiling the universe lists. Table A-l shows
the number of establishments and workers estimated to be
within scope o f the survey, as well as the number actually
studied by the Bureau.

Classification of establishments by product was based on
the principal type of glassware manufactured. For example,
if 60 percent of the total value of an establishment ^ pro­
duction was technical glassware and 40 percent was table
ware and artware, all workers in that establishment were
considered as producing technical and scientific glassware.

Method of study

Data were obtained by personal visits of the Bureau’s
field staff to a representative sample of establishments
within the scope of the survey. To obtain appropriate

Table A-1. Estimated number of establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied, pressed or
blown glass and glassware industries,1 May 1970
N um ber of
C r f o k l IrU m an

W o r k e rs in e s ta b lis h m e n ts —
W ith in s c o n e o f s tu d v

I n d u s t r y a n d r e g io n 2

W it h in
S cop e o f
S tu d y

A c t u a l ly
S t u d ie d

A c t u a lly
S t u d ie d

T o t a l4

P r o d u c t io n
W o r k e rs

P a c i f i c .......... ............................. ...................................

190
53
32
15
20
44
22

119
28
19
12
15
26
15

109,530
36,021
12,704
7,123
7,311
32,309
12,093

90,919
28,427
10,698
6,143
6,328
27,278
10,317

85,543
27,468
10,334
6,149
5,916
24,557
9,150

G la s s c o n t a in e r e s ta b lis h m e n ts :
U n it e d S t a t e s 5 .................................................................
M id d le A t l a n t i c ..........................................................
B o r d e r S t a t e s ...............................................................
S o u t h e a s t ............... .......................................................
S o u t h w e s t ....................................................................
G r e a t L a k e s .................................................................
P a c i f i c ...................................... ................ ..

119
29
6
15
16
29
21

81
17
6
12
12
17
14

72,024
20,842
4,848
7,123
6,272
19,900
11,543

62,591
18,062
4,225
6,143
5,460
17,533
9,833

55,484
15,468
4,848
6,149
5,033
13,890
8,600

71
24
26
15

38

37,506
15,179
7,856
12,409

28,328
10,365
6,473
9,745

30,059
12,000
5,486
10,667

A l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts :
U n it e d S ta te s 5 ..................................................................
M id d le A t l a n t i c ..........................................................
B o r d e r S t a t e s ...............................................................
S o u t h e a s t .......................................................................
S o u t h w e s t ....................................................................
G r e a t L a k e s .................................................................

O t h e r p re ss e d o r b lo w n glass a n d g la s s w a re
e s ta b lis h m e n ts :
U n it e d S t a t e s 5

..................................................................

M id d le A t l a n t i c ..........................................................
B o r d e r S t a t e s ......................... ....................................
G r e a t L a k e s ............. ....................................................

11

13
9

1 Establishments primarily engaged in the manufacture of textile
glass fibers were excluded.
2 The regions used in this study include: M iddle A tlantic— New
Jersey, New Y o rk , and Pennsylvania; Border States— Delaware, D is­
trict of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia;
Southeast— Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina,
and South Carolina; Southw est— Arkansas, Oklahom a, Louisiana,
and Texas; Great Lakes— Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota,




Ohio, and Wisconsin; and Pacific— California, Nevada, Oregon, and
Washington.
3 Includes only establishments with 100 or more workers at the
time of reference of the universe data.
4 Includes executive, professional, and other workers excluded
from the production worker category.
5 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown
separately. Alaska and Hawaii were not included in the.study.

33

the workers’ regular pay. Nonproduction bonus payments,
such as Christmas or yearend bonuses, were excluded.
Average (mean) hourly rates or earnings for each occupa­
tion or category of workers, such as production workers,
were calculated by weighting each rate (or hourly earnings)
by the number o f workers receiving the rate, totaling, and
dividing by the number of individuals. The hourly earnings
o f salaried workers were obtained by dividing straight-time
salary by normal (or standard) hours to which the salary
corresponds.
The median designates position; that is, one-half of the
employees surveyed received more than this rate and onehalf received less. The middle range is defined by two rates
of pay such that one-fourth of the employees earned less
than the lower of these rates and one-fourth earned more
than the higher rate.

accuracy at a minimum cost, a greater proportion of large
than o f small establishments was studied. In combining the
data, however, all establishments were given an appropriate
weight. All estimates are presented, therefore, as relating to
all establishments in the industry, excluding only those
below the minimum size at the time of reference of the
universe data.
Establishment definition

An establishment is defined for this study as a single
physical location where manufacturing operations are per­
formed. An establishment is not necessarily identical with a
company, which may consist o f one establishment or more.
Employment

Size of community

Estimates o f the number o f workers within the scope of
the study are intended as a general guide to the size and
composition o f the industry’s labor force, rather than as
precise measures o f employment.

Tabulations by size of community pertain to metropoli­
tan and nonmetropolitan areas. The term “metropolitan
areas,” as used in this bulletin, refers to the Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the U.S. Office
of Management and Budget through February 1974.
Except in New England, a Standard Metropolitan Statis­
tical Area is defined as a county or group of contiguous
counties which contains at least one city of 50,000 inhabi­
tants or more. Counties contiguous to the one containing
such a city are included in a Standard Metropolitan Statisti­
cal Area if, according to certain criteria, they are essentially
metropolitan in character and are socially and economically
integrated with the central city. In New England, where the
city and town are administratively more important than the
county, the former are the units used in defining Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Areas.

Production workers

The terms “production workers” and “production and
related workers,” used interchangeably in this bulletin, in­
clude working supervisors and all nonsupervisory workers
engaged in nonoffice activities. Administrative, executive,
professional, office, and technical personnel, and forceaccount construction employees, who are used as a separate
work force on the firm’s own properties, are excluded.

Occupations selected for study

Occupational classification was based on a uniform set
of job descriptions designed to take account of interestab­
lishment and interarea variations in duties within the same
job. (See appendix B for these descriptions.) The criteria
for selection of the occupations were: The number of work­
ers in the occupation; the usefulness o f the data in collec­
tive bargaining; and appropriate representation o f the entire
job scale in the industry. Working supervisors, apprentices,
learners, beginners, trainees, and handicapped, part-time,
temporary, and probationary workers were not reported in
the data for selected occupations but were included in the
data for all production workers.

Method of wage payment

Tabulations by method of wage payment relate to the
number of workers paid under the various time and in­
centive wage systems. Formal rate structures for timerelated workers provide single rates or a range of rates for
individual job categories. In the absence of a formal rate
structure, pay rates are determined primarily by the qualifi­
cations o f the individual worker. A single rate structure is
one in which the same rate is paid to all experienced work­
ers in the same job classification. (Learners, apprentices, or
probationary workers may be paid according to rate
schedules which start below the single rate and permit the
workers to achieve the full job rate over a period of time.)
An experienced worker occasionally may be paid above or
below the single rate for special reasons, but such payments
are exceptions. Range-of-rate plans are those in which the
minimum, maximum, or both of these rates paid experi­
enced workers for the same job are specified. Specific rates
of individual workers within the range may be determined

Wage data

Information on wages relates to straight-time hourly
earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for work
on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Incentive payments,
such as those resulting from piecework or production bonus
systems, and cost-of-living bonuses were included as part of




34

by merit, length of service, or a combination of these.
Incentive workers are classified under piecework or bonus
plans. Piecework is work for which a predetermined rate is
paid for each unit of output. Production bonuses are for
production in excess of a quota or for completion of a task
in less than standard time.
Scheduled.weekly hours

Data on weekly hours refer to the predominant work
schedule for full-time production workers (or office work­
ers) employed on the day shift.
Shift provisions and practices

Shift provisions relate to the policies of establishments
either currently operating late shifts or having formal pro­
visions covering late-shift work. Practices relate to workers
employed on late shifts at the time o f the survey.
Supplementary benefits

Supplementary benefits in an establishment were consid­
ered applicable to all production workers if they applied to
half or more of such workers in the establishment. Similar­
ly, if fewer than half of the workers were covered, the
benefit was considered nonexistent in the establishment.
Because of length-of-service and other eligibility require­
ments, the proportion of workers receiving the benefits
may be smaller than estimated.
Paid holidays. Paid holiday provisions relate to full-day and
half-day holidays provided annually.
Paid vacations. The summary of vacation plans is limited to *
formal arrangements and excludes informal plans whereby
time off with pay is granted at the discretion of the em­
ployer or supervisor. Payments not on a time basis were
converted; for example, a payment of 2 percent o f annual
earnings was considered the equivalent of 1 week’s pay. The
periods o f service for which data are presented represent
the most common practices, but they do not necessarily
reflect individual establishment provisions for progression.
For example, changes in proportions indicated at 10 years
of service may include changes which occurred between the
fifth and the 10th years.
Health, insurance, and retirement plans. Data are presented
for health, insurance, pension, and retirement severance
plans for which the employer pays all or a part of the cost,
excluding programs required by law such as workers’ com­
pensation and social security. Among plans included are
those underwritten by a commercial insurance company and
those paid directly by the employer from his current oper­
ating funds or from a fund set aside for this purpose.

insurance under which predetermined cash payments are
made directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly basis
during illness or accident disability. Information is pre­
sented for all such plans to which the employer contributes
at least a part of the cost. However, in New York and New
Jersey, where temporary disability insurance laws require
employer contributions,1 plans are included only if the em­
ployer (1) contributes more than is legally required, or (2)
provides the employees with benefits which exceed the re­
quirements o f the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to formal
plans which provide full pay or a proportion of the work- °
er’s pay during absence from work because of illness;
informal arrangements have been omitted. Separate tabula­
tions are provided for (1) plans which provide full pay and
no waiting period, and (2) plans providing either partial pay
or a waiting period.
Long-term disability insurance plans provide payments
to totally disabled employees upon the expiration of sick
leave, sickness and accident insurance, or both, or after a
predetermined period o f disability (typically 6 months).
Payments are made until the end of disability, a maximum
age, or eligibility for retirement benefits. Payments may be
full or partial, but are almost always reduced by social
security, workers’ compensation, and private pension bene­
fits payable to the disabled employee.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete
or partial payment of doctors’ fees. Such plans may be
underwritten by a commercial insurance company or a non­
profit organization, or they may be a form of selfinsurance.
Major medical insurance, sometimes referred to as ex­
tended medical or catastrophe insurance, includes plans de­
signed to cover employees for sickness or injury involving
an expense which exceeds the normal coverage of hospitali­
zation, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to plans
which provide regular payments for the remainder o f the
retiree’s life. Data are presented separately for retirement
severance pay (one payment or several over a specified
period of time) made to employees on retirement. Estab­
lishments providing both retirement severance payments
and retirement pensions to employees were considered as
having both retirement pensions and retirement severance
plans; however, establishments having optional plans pro­
viding employees a choice of either retirement severance
payments or pensions were considered as having only retire­
ment pension benefits.
Paid funeral and jury-duty leave. Data for paid funeral and
jury duty leave relate to formal plans which provide at least
partial payment for time lost as a result of attending funer­
als of specified family members or serving as a juror.

Death benefits are included as a form of life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of



The temporary disability insurance laws in California and
Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.

35

Technological severance pay. Data relate to formal plans
providing for payments to employees permanently separat­
ed from the company because o f a technological change or
plant closing.

covering such services that are part of medical dental plans
are included; however, dental plans are not to be confused
with coverage of oral surgery or dental care required as a
result of an accident, which is often included in other
health insurance plans.

Dental plans refer to formal plans providing for payment
o f the cost of normal dental care, such as fillings, extrac­
tions, X-rays, and bridge and crown work. Dental plans

Cost-of-living adjustments refer to periodic general wage
adjustments made in keeping with changes in the BLS con­
sumer price index or some other measure.




36

Appendix B.

Occupational Descriptions

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to assist
its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a
variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment
and from area to area. This permits the grouping of occupational wage rates representing
comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea com­
parability of occupational content, the Bureau’s job descriptions may differ significantly from
those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying
these job descriptions, the Bureau’s field staff is instructed to exclude working supervisors,
apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and proba­
tionary worker^.

or without the aid of a metal mold. In addition, may dip
end of blowpipe into molten glass to gather the proper
amount for article to be made.

Assembler, cartons

Assembles cartons from prepared box blanks. Work in­
volves folding the box blanks along scored lines and fasten­
ing the edges together by one or more o f the following
methods: Coating flaps with glue and pressing them to­
gether; interlocking the corners by means of tabs; sealing
edges with strips of gummed tape; or stapling edges togeth­
er by means o f power-stitching machines or hand staplers.

Carry-in laborer

Carries heated, formed glass articles by tongs or on a
pronged fork to the lehr and places them on the conveyor
moving through the lehr.

Batch mixer

Cullet handler

Blends or mixes various glass-making ingredients in con­
trolled amounts, according to formula, by hand or machine.
Work involves the following: Weighing out specified
amounts of ingredients such as sand, soda, lime, borax,
feldspar, and coloring; and mixing them either by hand or
machine. In addition, may load ingredients into mixing
machine.

Works as a member of a crew that tends a machine to
wash and crush refuse glass.
Cutter, decorative

Cuts monograms or ornamental designs on glassware
with an abrasive wheel. Work involves the following: Select­
ing and mounting proper abrasive wheel on lathe; moisten­
ing revolving wheel with a wet abrasive agent; and holding
glassware against edge of wheel, turning and twisting article
so that design or pattern will be properly cut in the article.
May cut designs deeper on ware having pressed designs. In
addition, may trace or mark pattern on the glassware before
doing the cutting.

Batch-and-furnace operator

Controls automatic equipment to weigh, mix, and melt
ingredients to make glass. Work involves the following:
Adjusts panel controls to transfer specified amounts of in­
gredients from storage bins to automatic weigh hopper and
batch mixer; pulls lever to dump blended mix into furnace;
reverses gas fire to equalize heat in furnace; regulates tem­
perature according to specifications. May collect samples of
molten glass for analysis.

Decorating-machine operator

(Silk-screen decorator; stencil applicator;
squeegee operator)

Blower

Decorates glassware by silk-screening or stainless-steel
screening process. Work involves most o f the following:
Filling receptacle with paint, placing glassware in machine,
bringing silk (or stainless-steel) screen into position with

(Glass blower)
Blows or inflates ball o f molten glass, gathered on the
end of a blowpipe, into desired shape and size, either with



37

ware, setting guide rollers or squeegee in operation to force
the paint through the screen to decorate the glassware with
the desired design, removing ware from machine, inspecting
for defects in decoration, and placing ware on conveyors
for baking oven. Operators of decorating machines designed
to perform one or more of the above operations auto­
matically are to be included.

Gatherer, blowpipe

Gathers desired amount of molten glass on end of a
blowpipe. Work involves the following: Dipping end of
blowpipe into molten glass and carrying ball of mojten glass
on °end o f blowpipe to the blower. In addition, may blow
into pipe to begin inflation o f glass before handing pipe to
blower for completion of process.

Electrician, maintenance
Gatherer, pressed-ware punty

Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as
the installation, maintenance, or repair o f equipment for
the generating, distribution, or utilization of electric energy
in an establishment. Work involves m ost o f the following:
Installing or repairing any of a variety of electrical equip­
ment such as generators, transformers, switchboards, con­
trollers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit
systems, or other transmission equipment; working from
blueprints, drawings, layout, or other specifications; locat­
ing and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equip­
ment; working standard computations relating to load
requirements o f wiring or electrical equipment; using a
variety o f electrician’s handtools and measuring and testing
instruments. In general, the work of the maintenance elec­
trician requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

Gathers desired amount o f molten glass on end of an
iron rod. Work involves the following: Dipping end of iron
rod into molten glass and carrying ball of molten glass on
end of rod to the presser.
Grinder, glassware

Grinds or smoothes the edges, rims, ridges, rough sur­
faces, etc., o f glassware on an abrasive wheel. Work involves
the following: Pressing the glass against revolving abrasive
wheels and moving or turning the glass from one position to
another to grind all surfaces evenly.

Helper, maintenance trades

Assists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance
trades, by performing specific or general0duties of lesser
skill, such as keeping a worker supplied with materials and
tools; cleaning working area, machine and equipment;
assisting worker by holding materials or tools; performing
other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind
of work the helper is permitted to perform varies from
trade to trade: In some trades the helper is confined to
supplying, lifting, and holding materials and tools and
cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted to
perform specialized machine operations, or parts o f a trade
that are also performed by workers on a full-time basis.

Forming-machine operator

Tends the operation o f an automatic machine that forms
bottles or other containers from molten glass. Work in­
volves the following: Regulating flow o f molten glass to
molds on machine; regulating and setting lubrication valves
to prevent the glass from sticking to the molds; and occa­
sionally checking completed article by weighing it on scales,
or measuring it with gauges or calipers. In addition, may
make minor adjustments to the machine.
Forming-machine upkeeper

Inspector, final

Adjusts and repairs the automatic feeding, flowing, and
forming machines used to manufacture glasswares. Assists
in setting up and adjusting the machinery for job .changes.

Performs final inspection on glasswares, examining for
defects in the ware and any decoration thereon. May wrap
and pack.

Furnace operator
Janitor

(Teaser)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory work­
ing areas and washrooms, or premises of an office building.
Duties involve a combination o f the following: Sweeping,
mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips,
trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or
fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing
supplies and minor maintenance services; cleaning lava­

Feeds raw materials to the glass-melting tank. Reverses
the gas fire at stated intervals from one side o f the gas- and
air-regenerative chambers to the other side to equalize heat
in tank. Regulates draft dampers which control pressure on
inside o f melting tank and regulates pressure o f gas fed to
tank.



38

the machine to a machine shop for major repairs; preparing
written specifications for major repairs or for the produc­
tion of parts ordered from machine shop; reassembling ma­
chines; and making all necessary adjustments for operation.
In general, the work of a maintenance mechanic requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a
formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experi­
ence. Excluded from this classification are workers whose
primary duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.

tories, showers, and restrooms. Workers who specialize in
window washing are excluded.
Laborer, material handling

(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; truck­
er; stock helper or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing
plant, store, or other establishment whose duties involve
one or more o f the following: Loading and unloading vari­
ous materials and merchandise on or from freight cars,
trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing materials or merchandise in proper storage loca­
tion; transporting materials or merchandise by hand truck,
car, or wheelbarrow. Longshoremen, who load and unload
ships are excluded.

Mold polisher

(Mold cleaner)
Polishes or cleans bottle-forming molds and components
by tending one or more of a variety of machines, including
a vacu- or vapor-blasting machine. May also soak molds in
cleaning or rust-preventive compounds; rub molds with oil,
abrasives, or brush; and store molds or transfer them to
production areas.

Lehr tender

Regulates temperature o f a reheating oven (lehr) used to
anneal or fire-glaze glass or glass articles. May arrange glass
articles according to size and shape on lehr conveyor, so
that maximum quantity will be carried in oven or may
place glass in oven by means o f a long paddle.

Mold maker, metal

Constructs and/or repairs metal molds. Work involves
most o f the following: Laying out and marking metal
blanks or castings according to blueprints or drawings; using
handtools and various metalworking machines to cut and
shape the parts to dimensions and specifications outlined;
and fitting and assembling parts together to form complete
mold.

Machinist, maintenance

Produces replacement parts and new parts in making re­
pairs of metal parts of mechanical equipment operated in
an establishment. Work involves most o f the following: In­
terpreting written instructions and specifications; planning
and laying out of work; using a, variety of machinist’s handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and
operating standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to
close tolerances; making standard shop computations relat­
ing to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds and speeds of
machining; knowledge of the working properties of the
common metals; selecting standard materials, parts, and
equipment required for his work; fitting and assembling
parts into mechanical equipment. In general, the ma­
chinist’s work normally requires a rounded training in
machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Mold-press operator

(Press-machine operator)
Tends a mold-press machine that automatically casts
glassware from molten glass. Work involves most o f the
following: Turning valves to control mold temperatures and
timing of plunger turntable. Adjusting flow valve and shear
timer to regulate quantity of molten glass delivered from
feeder to mold; setting lubrication valves to prevent glass
from sticking to molds; examining glassware for defects,
such as lines and bubbles.
Pipefitter, maintenance

Mechanic, maintenance

Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of
pipe and pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves
m ost o f the following: Laying out of work and measuring
to locate position of pipe from drawings or other written
specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct
lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or
pipe-cutting machine; threading pipe with stocks and dies;
bending pipe by hand-driven or power driven machines;
assembling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to

Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an estab­
lishment. Work involves most o f the following: Examining
machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose source of
trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling machines and
performing repairs that mainly involve the use of handtools
in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective
parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the produc­
tion of a replacement part by a machine shop or sending of




39

hangers; making standard shop computations relating to
pressures, flow, and size of pipe required; making standard
tests to determine whether finished pipes meet specifica­
tions. In general, the work o f the maintenance pipefitter
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience. Workers primarily engaged in installing and re­
pairing building sanitation or heating systems are excluded.

face, ware out o f shape, and bad finish, as the ware is
received from the annealing ovens. Selects accepted ware
and packs in cartons or puts in trays for transfer to other
workers for further processing. May keep records o f reject­
ed glass.

T ransferer
Presser, glassware, hand

Removes glassware from rotating stations of a glass
forming machine with the aid of hand tongs and places
ware on conveyors or stations of other machines for further
forming.

Molds (presses) molten glass into specified shape. Work
involves the following: Shearing off desired amount of
molten glass from iron rod (gathering iron) held by gatherer
over mold, and allowing it to drop in mold; positioning
mold under plunger o f press; and forcing a metal plunger
into the mold, causing the glass to fill the space between
the plunger and the mold. In addition, may, when glass has
cooled, open the mold, remove article and send it to lehr
for annealing or to other workers for further processing.

Trucker, power

Operates a manually-controlled gasoline- or electricpowered truck or tractor to transport goods and materials
of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or
other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type
of truck, as follows:

Reheater

Reheats glassware in a furnace for further processing.
Work involves the following: Inserting glassware attached to
blowpipe or held by long-handled pincers (snaps) into
furnace (glory hole) until it has softened; and removing and
passing heated glassware to another worker.

Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)

Selector
Watchman

(Selector and packer)
Examines glassware visually and with simple gauges for
defects, such as bubbles or seeds in ware, scratches on sur­




Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting
property against fire, theft, and illegal entry.

40

A nnouncing:
LOWER SUBSCRIPTION PRICES
The Government Printing Office has announced lower subscription prices for seven B L S periodicals.
The new prices are based on postal classification changes initiated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Monthly Labor Review

$20 per year

Single copy $ 2.40
Foreign rate $25.00

Employment and Earnings

$24 per year

Single copy $ 2.70
Foreign rate $30.00

Current Wage Developments

$12 per year

Single copy $ 1.35
Foreign rate $16.00

Wholesale Prices and Price Indexes

$16 per year

Single copy $ 1.80
Supplement $ 2.70
Foreign rate $20.00

$9 per year

Single copy $ .75
Foreign rate $11.00

Chartbook on Prices, Wages, and
Productivity

$11 per year

Sing!e0copy $ .95
Foreign rate $14.00

Occupational Outlook Quarterly

$4 per year

Single copy $ 1.30
Foreign rate $ 5.00

CPI Detailed Report

Subscribe to these U. S. Department of Labor periodicals by writing to the Superintendent of
Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402. Checks should be made
payable to the Superintendent of Documents.




☆ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1976 0 - 2 1 0 - 8 8 2 (190)

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
REGIONAL OFFICES

Region I

1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: (617) 223-6761

Region II

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: (212) 399-5405

Region III

3535 Market Street
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: (215) 596-1154

Region IV

1371 Peachtree Street, NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: (404) 526-5418




Region V

9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago , III. 60604
Phone: (312) 353-1880

Region V I

Second Floor
555 G riffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: (214) 749-3516

Regions V I I and V I I I *

911 Walnut Street
Kansas City. Mo. 64106
Phone: (816) 374-2481

Regions IX and X * *

450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415) 556-4678

Regions VII and VIII are serviced by Kansas City
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20212

Postage and Fees Paid
U S. Department of Labor
Third Class Mail

Official Business
Penalty for private use, $300




Lab-441


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102