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L X .3 <
| 7/ 2

Pressed or
Blown Glass
and Glassware,
May 1970

Dayton & Montgomery

Co.

Public Library

SEP 141971

BULLETIN 1713
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




DOCUMENT COLLECTION




Industry
W ag e Survey

Pressed or
Blown Glass
and Glassware,
May 1970
BULLETIN 1713

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
J. D. Hodgson, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Goeffrey H. Moore, Commissioner




1971

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price 50 cents
Stock Num ber 2901-0667




P re fa c e
T h is b u lletin s u m m a r iz e s the re su lts of a Bureau of
L a b o r S ta tistics s u r v e y of w ages and r e la t e d b en e fits in
the p r e s s e d o r blown g la s s and g la s s w a r e in d u stry in M a y
1970.
A s i m i l a r s u r v e y was conducted in M a y 1964.
An advance tabulation, p ro v id in g national and r e g io n a l
in fo rm a tio n , was issu ed e a r l i e r .
C o p ies of this r e l e a s e
a r e a v a ila b le f r o m the U.S. D e p a rtm e n t o f L a b o r , Bureau
o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s, Washington, D.G. Z0Z1Z, or any of its
r e g io n a l o ff ic e s .
T his study was conducted in the B u re a u 's O ffic e of
W ages and In d u s tria l R e la tio n s . The a n a lysis was p r e p a r e d
b y Sandra L . M as on in the D iv is io n of Occu pational W age
S tru ctu re s .
F i e l d w o r k f o r the s u r v e y was d ir e c t e d by the
A s s is t a n t R e g io n a l D ir e c t o r s f o r O p era tio n s.
Other r e p o r t s a v a ila b le f r o m the B u rea u 's p r o g r a m
o f in d u stry wage studies, as w e ll as the a d d r e s s e s o f the
B u rea u 's r e g io n a l o f f ic e s , are lis t e d at the end of this
bulletin.




iii




Page

S u m m a r y ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Industry c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y m e n t t r e n d s __________________________________________________________________
L o c a t i o n _______________________________________________________________________________
S iz e o f e s t a b lis h m e n t --------------------------------------------------------------------------------T y p e o f c o m p a n y ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------U n io n iz a t io n ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------S e x _____________________________________________________________________________________
M ethod o f w a ge p a y m e n t ---------------------------------------------------------------------------A v e r a g e h o u rly e a r n in g s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------O ccupational e a r n i n g s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------E s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and s u p p le m e n ta ry w age p r o v i s i o n s ---------------------------Scheduled w e e k ly h o u r s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------Shift p r o v is io n s and p r a c t i c e s ____________________________
P a id h o lid a y s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------P a id v a c a t i o n s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------H ealth , in su ra n c e, and r e t i r e m e n t p l a n s ________________________________________
O th er s e le c t e d b e n e fit s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
5
6
6
6
6
6
7
7

T a b le s :
A v e r a g e h ou rly earn in gs:
1. B y s e le c t e d c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s _____________________________________________

8

E arn in gs
2.
3.
4.

d istribu tion :
P r e s s e d o r blown glasS and g l a s s w a r e ________________________________
G lass c o n t a in e r s __________________________________________________________
P r e s s e d or blown gla ss and g l a s s w a r e , exc e p t c o n t a in e r s ________

9
10
11

Occupational a v e r a g e s :
G la s s c on tain ers:
5. A l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s _______________________________________________________
6. By s i z e o f c o m m u n it y -----------------------------------------------------------------7. By s i z e o f e s t a b lis h m e n t ________________________________________________
8. By m eth od o f w a ge p a y m e n t ---------------------------------------------------------

12
14
15
16

P r e s s e d o r blown g la ss and g l a s s w a r e , e xcept c on tain ers:
9. A l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s _______________________________________________________
10. B y s i z e o f c o m m u n it y ---------------------------------11. B y s i z e o f e s t a b lis h m e n t --------------------------------------12. By m ethod o f w a ge p a y m e n t ---------------------------------------------------------

17
18
19
20

E s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and s u p p le m e n ta ry w a ge p r o v is io n s :
G la s s c on tain ers:
13. M ethod o f w a ge p a ym e n t-------------------------------------------------------------14. Scheduled w e e k ly h o u rs --------------------------------------------------------------15. Shift d if f e r e n t ia l p r o v i s i o n s --------------------------------------------------------16. Shift d if f e r e n t ia l p r a c t i c e s ----------------------------------------------------------_
17. P a i d h o l i d a y s ______________________________________________________________
18. P a id v a c a t io n s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------19. H ealth , in su ra n c e, and r e t i r e m e n t p la n s_____________________________
20. Other s e le c t e d b e n e f i t s __________________________________________________

21
21
22
22
23
24
25
26




v

Page

T a b le s — Continued
E sta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and s u p p le m e n ta ry w a ge p r o v i s i o n s — Continued
P r e s s e d o r blow n g la s s and g l a s s w a r e , exc e p t con ta in ers:
21. M ethod o f w a ge p a y m e n t----------------------------------------------------------------22. Scheduled w e e k ly h o u rs ____________________________________________________
23. Shift d if f e r e n t ia l p r o v i s i o n s -----------------------------------------------------------24. Shift d if f e r e n t ia l p r a c t i c e s ________________________________________________
25. P a id h o l i d a y s ________________________________________________________________
26. P a i d v a c a t io n s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------27. H ealth , in s u ra n c e , and r e t i r e m e n t p la n s --------------------------------------28. Other s e le c t e d b e n e f i t s ____________________________________________________

27
27
28
28
29
30
31
32

A p p en d ix es :
A . Scope and m eth od o f s u r v e y ------------------------------------------------------------------B. Occu pational d e s c r ip t io n s -----------------------------------------------------------------------

33
36




In d u s try W a g e S u r v e y —

P ressed or B low n G lass and G lassw are, M ay 1 9 7 0
Summary

S tra ig h t-tim e e a rn in g s o f p ro d u ctio n and
re la te d w o r k e r s in th e p r e s s e d o r blow n
g la s s and g la s s w a r e in d u s trie s a v e r a g e d
$3.09 an hour in M a y 1970. W o rk e r s in
g la s s c o n ta in e r p la n ts, tw o -th ir d s o f the
89,923 w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by the s u rv e y ,^
a v e ra g e d $3.12— 8 cents an hour m o r e
than the 29,629 w o r k e r s in es ta b lis h m en ts
m ak in g o th e r ty p es o f p r e s s e d o r blow n
g la s s and g la s s w a r e .
M en , a p p ro x im a te ly tw o - th ir d s o f the
p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s in each in d u stry, a v ­
e ra g e d $3.33 an hour in g la s s c o n ta in e r
plants and $3.21 in o th e r g la s s w a r e e s ta b ­
lis h m e n ts .
C o rre s p o n d in g a v e r a g e s f o r
w om en w e r e $ 2 .7 4 and $ 2.64 an hour.
A m o n g the occu p ation s stu died s e p a ­
r a te ly , a v e r a g e h o u rly ea rn in g s in g la s s
c o n ta in e r plan ts ra n ged fr o m $2.60 fo r
ja n ito r s to $4.37 f o r fo r m in g -m a c h in e up­
k eep m en . T h e ran ge in th e o th e r g la s s ­
w a r e plants w as fr o m $2.50 f o r c a r r y - in
b oys o r g i r l s to $4.29 f o r g la s s b lo w e r s .
S e le c t o r s , n u m e r ic a lly the m o s t im p o r ­
tant jo b stu d ied , a v e r a g e d $2.72 an hour
in g la s s c o n ta in e r p la n ts, c o m p a re d with
$2.63 an hour in the o th e r p r e s s e d o r
b low n g la s s w a r e in d u stry .
W ithin each
in d u s try , occu p a tio n a l a v e r a g e s a ls o v a r ­
ie d by lo c a tio n , s iz e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t, and
m eth od o f w age p aym en t.
V ir tu a lly a ll e m p lo y e r s in both in d u s­
t r ie s gra n ted th e ir p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s
paid h o lid a y s (u s u a lly 8 days annually)
and paid v a c a tio n s (t y p ic a lly 1 w eek a fte r
1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e , 2 w eek s o r m o r e a ft e r
5 y e a r s , and 3 w eek s o r m o r e a fte r 10
y e a r s ). E m p lo y e r s a ls o t y p ic a lly paid at
le a s t p a rt o f the c o s t o f v a r io u s h ealth ,
in su ra n ce, and r e t ir e m e n t p en sion plans
fo r th es e w o r k e r s .
industry characteristics

G la s s m a n u fa ctu rin g m a y be c la s s ifie d
into th re e s e p a ra te in d u s trie s :
T h e fla t




g la s s in d u stry , in clu d in g e s ta b lis h m en ts
p r im a r ily p ro d u cin g sheet, p la te and flo a t,
la m in a ted , and s a fe ty g la s s ; the g la s s
c o n ta in e r in d u s try , p ro d u cin g c o n ta in e rs
fo r p ro d u cts such as fo o d , b e v e r a g e s ,
d ru gs, c o s m e t ic s , and hou seh old and in ­
d u s tria l c h e m ic a ls ; and the p r e s s e d o r
b low n g la s s and g la s s w a r e , e x c e p t c o n ­
ta in e r s , in d u s try , m a n u fa ctu rin g ite m s
such as ta b le w a r e , a r tw a r e , in d u s tria l
and illu m in a tin g g la s s w a r e , and te c h n ic a l
and s c ie n tific g la s s w a r e fr o m g la s s p r o ­
duced in the sam e e s ta b lis h m en t.
T h is
study in clu d es data f o r the g la s s c o n ­
ta in e r in d u s try and the o th e r p r e s s e d o r
blow n g la s s and g la s s w a r e in d u s trie s , but
exclu d es the fla t g la s s in d u stry.^
M o s t glass is m a d e by m e ltin g s ilic a (in
the fo r m o f sand) w ith an a lk a li (such as
soda o r potash ) and an oth er base in g r e ­
dient (u s u a lly lim e ).
C u lle t, o r cru sh ed
g la s s , c o m m o n ly is added to hasten m e lt ­
in g and to m a k e th e batch m o r e w o rk a b le .
O th er in g r e d ie n ts , such as o x id es o f v a r i ­
ous m e ta ls (e .g ., ch ro m iu m , c o b a lt, iro n ,
o r n ic k e l) m a y be added f o r c o lo r . F u sed
to g e th e r in fu rn a c e heats o f about 2 ,70 0
d e g r e e s F ., the m a t e r ia ls b e co m e a liq u id
that can then be p ou red o r ca s t; in the
v is co u s state, it can be blow n and fo r c e d
to take the shape o f a m o ld .
The m a n u fa ctu re o f g la s s co n ta in e rs is
h ig h ly m e c h a n iz e d . R a w m a t e r i a l s , a fte r
bein g m ix e d in la r g e h o p p e rs , a r e c a r r ie d
to m e ltin g fu rn a c e s by o v e rh e a d r a ils o r
m o v in g b e lts . T h e m o lte n g la s s is au to­
m a tic a lly fe d in to the m o ld s o f a f o r m ­
ing m a ch in e and blow n to shape by c o m ­
p re s s e d a ir . (N on e o f the e s ta b lis h m en ts
1 See appendix A for scope and method of survey. Wage
data contained in this bulletin exclude premium pay for
ov-ertime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Also excluded from the study are establishments pri­
marily producing textile glass fibers which are included in
the pressed or blown glass and glassware, except containers,
industry as defined in the 1967 edition of the Standard IndusClassification Manual, prepared by the U. S. Office of
Management and Budget.

1

in the B u re a u 's s a m p le predom inantlyu sed hand m eth od s to p ro d u ce g la s s c o n ­
t a in e r s .)
T h e c o n ta in e rs p ass on m o v ­
in g b e l t s th rou gh an n ealin g o ven s, o r
le h r s , to be c o o le d s lo w ly , and a r e then
in s p e c te d and p ack ed , o r sent to the
fin is h in g d e p a r t m e n t f o r d e c o ra tio n .
T h e p r e s s e d o r b low n g la s s and g la s s ­
w a r e , e x c e p t c o n ta in e rs , in d u s try a ls o is
p re d o m in a n tly m e c h a n ize d .
A bou t on etenth o f the p ro d u c tio n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d
by the s u rv e y , h o w e v e r , w e r e in plants
p r im a r ily m a k in g hand p r e s s e d a r t ic le s
and o n e -s ix th w e r e
in es ta b lis h m en ts
m o s tly p r o d u c i n g hand b low n ite m s .

w o rk ers
t ia lly b y
in d ic a t e d

in

such

re g io n
in th e

areas

v a r ie d substan-

fo r e a c h in d u s try , a s
f o l l o w i n g
t a b u la t io n :

Glass
containers
United States------------ —
Middle Atlantic -----------Border States-----------------Southeast----------------------Southwest —------------ ----Great Lakes—----- ---------Pacific----- -------------——

47
23
62
79
64
33

Other pressed or
blown glass
and glassware
42
56
11
-

42
-

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that
do not meet publication criteria.

E m p lo ym e n t t r e n d s .
E m p lo y m e n t in
g la s s co n ta in er p lan ts in M a y 1970 (60,294
p ro d u ctio n and r e la te d w o r k e r s ) w as up
a p p ro x im a te ly 16 p e rc e n t o v e r the le v e l
r e c o r d e d in M a y 1964 (5 1 ,8 4 8 w o r k e r s ),
th e d a t e o f a s im ila r B u reau stu d y.3
P r o p o r tio n a te ly , t h e la r g e s t in c r e a s e s
(a p p ro x im a te ly 30 p e rc e n t each ) w e r e
r e c o r d e d in the Southw est and P a c ific
r e g io n s .
( F o r r e g io n a l d e fin itio n s , see
appen dix t a b l e A - l . )
E m p lo y m e n t in ­
c r e a s e d 9 p e rc e n t in th e M id d le A tla n tic
and 14 p e rc e n t in the G re a t L a k e s , the
tw o la r g e s t r e g io n s in t e r m s o f in d u stry
em p lo ym e n t. D u rin g the 1964—70 p e rio d ,
e m p lo y m e n t in the o th e r g la s s w a r e , e x ­
c ep t c o n ta in e rs , in d u s try re m a in e d v i r ­
tu a lly the sam e n a tion w id e, d ro p p ed in the
tw o m a jo r re g io n s --- the M id d le A tla n tic
(10 p e rc e n t) and the G re a t L a k e s (3 p e r ­
cen t) and r o s e by 6 p e rc e n t in the B o r d e r
S tates.

S iz e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t. E m p lo y m e n t in
in d ivid u a l esta b lis h m en ts r a n g e d fr o m
fe w e r than 100 w o r k e r s to o v e r 2 ,00 0 .
L e s s than o n e-ten th o f the in d u s tr ie s 1
p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s w e r e in plants h avin g
20 to 249 w o r k e r s , c o m p a re d w ith s e v e n tenths in plants h a vin g 500 w o r k e r s o r
m ore.
A s the fo llo w in g tab u la tion in d i­
c a te s , plan ts h avin g 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e
e m p lo y e d n e a r l y th r e e -fo u r th s o f the
g la s s c o n ta in e r w o rk f o r c e and a p p r o x i­
m a te ly tw o -th ir d s o f the w o r k e r s in the
oth er

in d u s try :

Glass
containers
United States------- ---- —----Middle A tlantic------——----Border States---------------- ----Southeast----------------——----Southwest------------ ----- -----Great Lakes---------------—----Pacific--------—------------------

L o c a tio n .
T h e M id d le A tla n tic and
G re a t L a k e s r e g i o n s each had about
th re e -te n th s o f th e w o rk fo r c e in g la s s
c o n ta in e r m a n u fa ctu rin g in M ay 1970.
T h e P a c ific r e g io n accou n ted fo r about
o n e -s ix th ; the B o r d e r S ta tes, Southeast,
and Southw est, le s s than o n e-ten th each.
In the o th er p r e s s e d o r b low n g la s s w a r e
in d u s try , the M id d le A tla n tic and G rea t
L a k e s r e g i o n w o r k e r s , to g e th e r w e r e
s e ve n -te n th s o f the w o rk f o r c e . M o s t of
the re m a in in g th re e -te n th s o f the w o r k e r s
w e r e e m p lo y e d in the B o r d e r S tates.
S lig h tly fe w e r than o n e -h a lf o f the p r o ­
du ction w o r k e r s in the g la s s con ta in er
in d u s try and about tw o - fifth s in the oth er
g la s s w a r e in d u s try w e r e e m p lo y e d in
m e tro p o lita n a r e a s .4 T h e p e rc e n ta g e s o f




g la s s w a r e

73
73
85
61
56
81
66

Other pressed or
blown glass
and glassware
65
71
51
-

76

-

NOTE; Dashes indicate no data reported or data that
do not meet publication criteria.

P la n ts h a vin g 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e have
e m p lo y e d the la r g e m a jo r it y o f the in d u s­
tr ie s * p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s o v e r th e p ast
d eca d e.
F o r e x a m p le , at the tim e o f
the B u re a u 's 1964 study, p ro p o rtio n s o f
w o r k e r s in such plants w e r e s e ve n -te n th s
o f the to ta l in the g la s s c o n ta in e r in d u s try
3 See Industry Wage Survey: Pressed or Blown Glass and
Glassware. May 1964 (ELS Bulletin 1423, 1965).
4 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined
by the U. S. Office of Management and Budget through
January 1968.

2

and tw o -th ir d s o f a ll w o r k e r s in the
o th e r g la s s w a r e in d u s tr y .5 In I960, c o r ­
resp o n d in g p ro p o rtio n s w e r e e igh t-te n th s
and f iv e - eigh ths .6

m o r e than o n e -h a lf o f the w o rk fo r c e ,
c o m p a re d w ith a p p ro x im a te ly tw o -fifth s
in the G re a t L a k e s and P a c if ic re g io n s
and o n e -fo u rth in the M id d le A tla n tic .
In the o th e r g la s s w a r e in d u s try , p r o p o r ­
tio n s o f in c e n tiv e w o r k e r s w e r e o n e -th ir d
in the M id d le A tla n tic and B o r d e r States
and tw o - fifth s in th e G re a t L a k e s re g io n .

T y p e o f co m p a n y, M u ltip la n t c o m p a ­
n i e s 7 e m p lo y e d nine-tenths o f the w o r k e r s
in the g la s s c o n ta in e r in d u s try and s e v e n tenths in the o th e r p r e s s e d o r blow n g la s s
and g la s s w a r e in d u s try .
O f the r e g io n s
stu died s e p a r a te ly f o r th e la t t e r in d u stry ,
it w as on ly in the B o r d e r States that a
m a jo r it y o f the p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s w e r e
in s in g le -p la n t co m p a n ie s .

Average hourly earnings

P ro d u c tio n w o r k e r s in p r e s s e d o r
blow n g la s s and g la s s w a r e m a n u fa ctu rin g
a v e r a g e d $3.09 an hour in M a y 1970.
(S ee ta b le l . ) 8 A m o n g the re g io n s studied
s e p a r a te ly , a v e r a g e s ra n g ed fr o m $2.81
an hour in th e Southw est to $3.48 in the
P a c ific .
W o rk e r s in the M id d le A tla n tic
and G rea t L a k e s r e g io n s , th e tw o m o s t
im p o rta n t in te r m s o f in d u s try e m p lo y ­
m en t, a v e r a g e d $3.09 and $3.13 an hour,
r e s p e c t iv e ly .
E a rn in g s o f p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s in
g la s s c o n ta in e r plants a v e r a g e d $3.12 an
hou r, c o m p a re d w ith $3.04 fo r th o se in
o th e r p r e s s e d o r b low n g la s s and g la s s ­
w a re p la n ts.
A m o n g the th r e e re g io n s

U n io n iz a tio n . A l l o f th e g la s s c o n ta in e r
e s ta b lis h m en ts and n e a r ly a ll o f the o th e r
p r e s s e d o r b low n g la s s and g la s s w a r e
plants in clu d ed in the B u re a u 1 sam p le
s
r e p o r t e d la b o r-m a n a g e m e n t c o n tra c ts
c o v e r in g a ll o r a m a jo r it y o f th e ir p r o ­
duction w o r k e r s .
T h e A m e r ic a n F lin t
G la ss W o rk e r s Union o f N o rth A m e r ic a
(A F L - C I O ) u s u a lly had c o n tra c ts c o v e r in g
w o r k e r s in th e m o ld -m a k in g d ep a rtm en ts
in both in d u s trie s and a ls o the p ro d u ctio n
w o r k e r s in the o th er p r e s s e d o r blow n
g la s s w a r e in d u stry .
T h e G la s s B o ttle
B lo w e r s A s s o c ia tio n o f the U n ited States
and Canada (A F L r-C IO ) t y p ic a lly had c o n ­
tr a c ts c o v e r in g p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s , in
the g l a s s co n ta in e r in d u s try , ou tside
th ose in the m o ld -m a k in g d e p a rtm e n ts .

5 Op. cit. , BLS Bulletin 1423.
6 See Wage Structure? Pressed or Blown Glass and Glass­
ware , May 1960 (BLS Report 177, 1961).
7 Multiplant companies include those operating two es­
tablishments or more either in the glass container industry,
the other pressed or blown glass and glassware industry, or
in a combination of the two industries.
® The straight-time hourly earnings in this bulletin are
not comparable with gross average hourly earnings published
in the Bureau's monthly hours and earnings series ($3.54
for glass containers and $3. 28 for other pressed or blown
glass and glassware in May 1970). Unlike the latter, the
estimates presented here exclude premium pay for overtime
and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Aver­
age earnings were calculated by summing individual hourly
earnings and dividing by the number of individuals; in the
monthly series, the sum of the man-hour totals reported by
establishments in the industry was divided into the reported
payroll totals.
The estimates of the number of workers within scope of
the survey are intended only as a general guide to the size
and composition of the labor force covered by this survey.
They differ from those published in the monthly series
(67,800 in glass containers and 46,700 in other pressed or
blown glass and glassware in May 1970) by the exclusion of
establishments employing fewer than 20 workers and of those
principally engaged in producing textile glass fibers. Also,
the advance planning necessary to make the survey required
the use of lists of establishments assembled considerably in
advance of data collection. Thus, establishments new to
the industry are omitted, as are establishments originally
classified in these industries but found to be in others at
the time of the survey. Also omitted are glassware plants
classified incorrectly in other industries at the time the lists
were compiled.

S e x . M en accou n ted fo r s lig h tly m o r e
than t h r e e - fift h s o f the w o rk fo r c e in
g la s s c o n ta in e r plants and s even -ten th s
in o th e r g la s s w a r e e s ta b lis h m e n ts . T h is
sa m e g e n e ra l r e la tio n s h ip h eld in the
r e g io n s shown s e p a r a te ly f o r each in ­
d u s try.
Jobs in w h ich m en con stitu ted
a ll, o r n e a r ly a ll, o f the w o rk fo r c e in ­
clu d ed m ain ten a n ce occu p a tio n s, fo r m in g m a ch in e o p e r a to r s , and m a t e r ia l handling
la b o r e r s . W om en w e r e l a r g e l y e m p lo y e d
as c a rto n a s s e m b le r s , in s p e c to rs , and s e ­
le c t o r s . T h e o ffic e jo b s studied a ls o w e r e
s ta ffe d a l m o s t e x c lu s iv e ly by w om en .
M eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t. A p p r o x i­
m a te ly tw o - th ir d s o f the p r o d u c t i o n
w o r k e r s in both in d u s trie s w e r e p aid on
a tim e b a s is , u s u a lly un der fo r m a l plans
that h ave a s in g le ra te f o r a g iv e n o c c u ­
pation . (S ee ta b le s 13 and 21.) In c e n tiv e
s y s te m s , ty p ic a lly in d ivid u a l o r group
bonus p lan s, w e r e m o s t p re v a le n t in the
B o r d e r States in the g la s s c o n ta in e r in ­
d u s try.
T h e r e th ey a p p lied to s lig h tly




3

p e r m ittin g such c o m p a ris o n s fo r both in d u s tr ie s , a v e r a g e e a rn in g s in the oth er
p r e s s e d o r blow n g la s s w a r e in d u s try in
the M id d le A tla n tic ($ 3 .1 8 ) and G rea t
L a k e s ($ 3 .1 5 ) w e r e , r e s p e c t iv e ly , 13 and
3 cen ts an hour h ig h e r than in the g la s s
c o n ta in e r in d u stry . In the B o r d e r S tates,
a v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s w e r e 38 cen ts
h ig h e r in g la s s c o n ta in e r plan ts ($ 3 .1 2
c o m p a re d w ith $ 2 .7 4 ). T h is r e v e r s e r e ­
la tio n s h ip in the B o r d e r States fa v o r in g
the g la s s c o n ta in e r in d u s try r e fle c t s , at
le a s t in p a rt, its h e a v ie r c o n ce n tra tio n in
m e tro p o lita n a r e a s and in la r g e r * e s ta b ­
lish m en ts, c o m p a re d w ith the o th e r g la s s ­
w a r e in d u stry.
(S ee tab u lation s under
In d u stry c h a r a c t e r is t ic s .)
A s in d ic a te d
la t e r in th is d is c u s s io n , w o r k e r s in m e t ­
r o p o lita n a re a s and l a r g e r e s ta b lis h m en ts
g e n e r a lly had h ig h e r a v e r a g e e a rn in g s
than th ose in s m a lle r co m m u n itie s and in
e s ta b lis h m en ts e m p lo y in g fe w e r than 500
w o rk ers.
T h e le v e l o f e a rn in g s f o r p ro d u ctio n
w o r k e r s in M a y 1970 ($ 3 .0 9 ) w as 34 p e r ­
cen t h ig h e r than the a v e r a g e r e c o r d e d
in a s im ila r study in M a y 1964 ($ 2 .3 1 ).9
D u rin g the 1964r-70 p e r io d , the annual
r a te o f i n c r e a s e 1 in a v e r a g e ea rn in g s
0
w as 5 p e rc e n t; it am ounted to 5.3 p e r ­
cen t in g la s s c o n ta in e r plan ts and 4.5
p e rc e n t in o th e r p r e s s e d o r b low n g la s s
and g la s s w a r e p la n ts.
A v e r a g e annual
r a te s o f in c r e a s e v a r ie d som ew h at by
r e g io n . In g la s s c o n ta in e r m a n u fa ctu rin g,
fo r e x a m p le , s tr a ig h t- tim e ea rn in g s r o s e
4.7 p e rc e n t an nu ally in the B o r d e r S tates,
5 p e rc e n t in the South w est and P a c if ic r e ­
g io n s , 5.2 p e rc e n t in the M id d le A tla n tic ,
5.7 p e rc e n t in the G re a t L a k e s , and 6
p e rc e n t in the Southeast. In c r e a s e s in the
o th e r g la s s w a r e in d u s try w e r e 4 p e rc e n t
an nu ally in the B o r d e r S ta tes, 4.3 p e rc e n t
in the G re a t L a k e s , and 4.8 p e rc e n t in the
M id d le A tla n tic .
M e tro p o lita n a r e a w o r k e r s a v e ra g e d
m o r e than t h e i r c o u n te rp a rts in non­
m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s in M a y 1970. In the
g l a s s c o n ta in e r in d u s try , th is p a tte rn
h eld in the tw o r e g io n s fo r w h ich s iz e o f
com m u n ity data cou ld be p re s e n te d — the
M id d le A tla n tic ($ 3 .1 1 and $ 3 .0 3 ), and the
G re a t L a k e s ($ 3 .1 4 and $ 3 .1 1 ).
In the
G re a t L a k e s r e g io n , the o n ly one p e r ­
m ittin g such c o m p a ris o n s in the o th er
g la s s w a r e in d u s try , m e tr o p o lita n a r e a
w o r k e r s a v e r a g e d 18 cen ts an hour m o r e
than th o se in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ($3.25
c o m p a re d w ith $ 3 .0 7 ).




W o rk e r s in e s ta b lis h m en ts h a vin g 500 .
e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e a v e ra g e d $3.16 in
g la s s c o n ta in e r p lan ts and $3.10 in o th e r
g la s s w a r e p la n ts.
In b o t h in d u s trie s ,
th e s e a v e r a g e s w e r e 18 cen ts h ig h e r than
th o se r e p o r te d in p lan ts e m p lo y in g 20—
499
w o rk ers.
Data f o r b o t h e s ta b lis h m en t
s iz e grou p s cou ld be shown o n ly fo r the
Southeast and Southw est re g io n s in the
g la s s c o n ta in e r in d u s try .
(S ee ta b le 1.)
•W o rk ers in the l a r g e r plants a v e r a g e d
$3.02 in the Southeast and $2.87 in the
Southw est— r e s p e c t iv e ly , 16 and 10 cen ts
an hour m o r e than th e ir co u n te rp a rts in
s m a lle r p la n ts.
It is not p o s s ib le in a s u r v e y such as
th is to is o la t e and m e a s u re the e x a c t in ­
flu e n c e o f any one c h a r a c t e r is t ic as a
d e te rm in a n t o f w a g e le v e ls . A s an illu s ­
tr a tio n o f in t e r r e la tio n s h ip s , in g l a s s
c o n ta in e r p lan ts in the G re a t L a k e s r e ­
gion , s lig h tly le s s than tw o -th ir d s o f the
w o r k e r s in plants e m p lo y in g 500 w o r k e r s
o r m o r e w e r e in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ;
the c o r re s p o n d in g p ro p o r tio n fo r s m a lle r
e s ta b lis h m en ts (20—
499 e m p lo y e e s ) w as
ju s t o v e r th r e e - fo u r th s .
In both g la s s in d u s tr ie s , m e n 's a v e r a g e
h o u rly ea rn in g s w e r e 22 p e rc e n t h ig h e r
than th o se r e c o r d e d f o r w o m en .
M en
e a rn e d $3.33 an hour in g la s s co n ta in e r
e s ta b lis h m e n ts , c o m p a re d w ith $2.74 fo r
w o m en . In th e o th e r g la s s in d u s try , c o r ­
resp o n d in g a v e r a g e s w e r e $3.21 and
$2.64. T h is g e n e ra l r e la tio n s h ip h eld , fo r
both in d u s tr ie s , in each o f the s e le c te d
r e g io n s f o r w h ich data a r e p re s e n te d .
D iffe r e n c e s in a v e r a g e p ay le v e ls fo r m en
and w o m en m a y be the r e s u lt o f s e v e r a l fa c to r s , in clu d in g d iffe r e n c e s in the d is ­
trib u tio n o f the s e x e s am on g e s ta b lis h ­
m en ts and, as p o in ted out in the d is c u s ­
sion o f in d u s try c h a r a c t e r is t ic s , am ong
job s h a vin g d iffe r e n t pay le v e ls .
A ls o ,
d iffe r e n c e s n oted in a v e r a g e s f o r m en and
w o m en in th e sam e jo b m a y r e f le c t m in o r
d iffe r e n c e s in d u ties.
Job d e s c r ip tio n s
u sed in c la s s ify in g w o r k e r s in w a g e s u r ­
v e y s a r e u s u a lly m o r e g e n e r a liz e d than
th ose u sed in in d iv id u a l e s ta b lis h m en ts
b eca u se a llo w a n c e m u s t be m a d e f o r
m in o r d iffe r e n c e s am on g e s ta b lis h m en ts
in s p e c ific d u ties p e r fo r m e d .
9 Op. c it ., ELS Bulletin 1423.
The compound effect of changes in average hourly
earnings was taken into account in computing the annual
rate of increase between the May 1964 and May 1970
surveys.

4

In d ivid u a l e a r n i n g s
ra n g ed w id e ly :
F e w e r than 1 p e rc e n t in the g la s s c o n ­
ta in e r in d u s try r e c e iv e d le s s than $2 an
hour and n e a r ly 4 p e rc e n t e a rn e d $4.50 o r
m o r e . (S ee ta b le 3.) In the o th e r p r e s s e d
o r blow n g la s s and g la s s w a r e in d u stry,
the c o rre s p o n d in g p e rc e n ta g e s w e r e 5 and
n e a r ly 4.
(S ee ta b le 4 .)
A s in d ic a te d
in the fo llo w in g tab u la tion , the ra n ge o f
ea rn in g s o f the m id d le h a lf o f the p ro d u c ­
tio n w o r k e r s v a r ie d c o n s id e r a b ly am on g
the s e le c te d r e g io n s :
Glass
containers
United States -----------Middle A tlan tic.............
Border States--------------Southeast-------------------Southwest----------------Great Lakes--------------Pacific.............................

$2.62—
$3.44
2.61“ 3. 30
2 .7 0 - 3. 46
2 .5 3 - 3.11
2 .4 9 - 2.94
2.61— 3.46
2.98—3. 86

m o ld m a k e r s and $4.29 fo r g la s s b lo w e r s .
A v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s o f $4 o r m o r e
w e r e r e c o r d e d f o r the fo llo w in g o ccu p a ­
tio n a l gro u p s:
M a in ten an ce m a c h in is ts
($ 4 .0 8 ), fo r m in g -m a c h in e u p k e e p m en
($ 4 .1 1 ), hand g la s s w a r e p r e s s e r s ($4 .2 2 ),
and m e ta l m o ld m a k e r s ($ 4 .2 8 ). A l l o f the
w o r k e r s in th es e jo b s w e r e m en . S e le c ­
to r s , o n e -e ig h th o f the w o rk fo r c e and
n e a r ly a ll wom en, a v e r a g e d $2.63 an h our.
F o r occu p ation s p e r m ittin g c o m p a ris o n
am on g a ll s ix re g io n s studied s e p a ra te ly
in g la s s c o n ta in e r m a n u fa ctu rin g, h ig h est
a v e r a g e s w e r e r e c o r d e d in the P a c ific
r e g io n and lo w e s t in the Southw est. T h e
h o u rly w a g e advan tage f o r P a c ific w o r k ­
e r s o v e r th o s e in the Southw est ran ged
fr o m 41 cen ts fo r s e le c t o r s to 85 cents
o r s lig h tly a b ove f o r tan km en and batch
m ix e r s .
S im ila r c o m p a ris o n s f o r the
th re e s e l e c t e d
r e g io n s in the o th er
p r e s s e d o r blow n g la s s and g la s s w a r e
in d u stry r e v e a le d h ig h e s t a v e r a g e s t y p i­
c a lly in th e G re a t L a k e s and lo w e s t in
the B o r d e r S tates. T h e s p re a d in h o u rly
a v e r a g e e a rn in g s b etw een . th es e tw o r e ­
gions ran ged fr o m about 15 cents fo r
m a t e r ia l handling la b o r e r s and s e le c to r s
to m o r e than 80 cents fo r le h r te n d e r s ,
m a in ten a n ce m e c h a n ic s , a n d p r e s s e d w a re punty g a th e r e r s . A nu m ber o f f a c ­
to r s m a y h a ve co n trib u ted to th is w id e
v a r ia tio n . F o r e x a m p le , the in c id e n c e o f
in c e n tiv e w age s y s te m s is s lig h tly m o r e
p re v a le n t in the G rea t L a k e s (41 p e rc e n t)
than in the B o r d e r States (33 p e r c e n t).
A ls o , s lig h tly o v e r o n e -h a lf o f the w o r k ­
e r s in the B o r d e r S tates w e r e in plants
h a vin g 500 e m p lo y e e s o r m o r e and about
on e-ten th w e r e e m p lo y e d in m e t r o p o li­
tan a r e a s ; w h e r e a s , in the G re a t L a k e s ,
c o rre s p o n d in g p ro p o rtio n s w e r e t h r e e fou rth s and s lig h tly o v e r tw o -fifth s . Thu s,
the in flu e n ce s o f in c e n tiv e w age s y s te m s ,
l a r g e e s ta b lis h m e n ts , and la r g e c o m ­
m u n itie s a r e r e fle c t e d to a g r e a t e r exten t
in the w a g e le v e ls in the G re a t L a k e s than
in the B o r d e r S tates.
In both in d u s tr ie s , n a tion w id e o ccu p a ­
tio n a l a v e r a g e s w e r e g e n e r a lly h ig h e r
in m e tro p o lita n than in n o n m e tro p o lita n
a r e a s , and h ig h e r in plants h a vin g 500
w o r k e r s o r m o r e than in s m a lle r e s ta b ­
lish m en ts. (S ee ta b le s 6 and 10, 7 and 11.)
T h e s e re la tio n s h ip s h eld in a ll r e g io n s
fo r w h ich s iz e o f com m u n ity and s iz e

Pressed or blown
glass and glassware,
except containers
$2. 58~$3. 40
2. 74- 3. 57
2 .3 4 - 3. 01

2 .6 3 - 3.48

F a c to r s co n trib u tin g to the d is p e r s io n o f
in d ivid u a l ea rn in g s in clu d e the u se o f in ­
c e n tiv e w a g e s y s te m s , th e v a r ie t y o f
s k ills r e q u ire d , and d iffe r e n c e s in p ay
le v e ls am on g e s ta b lis h m e n ts .
Occupational earnings

S e p a ra te in fo rm a tio n w as ob tain ed fo r
a n u m b er o f o ccu p a tio n a l c la s s ific a tio n s ,
r e p r e s e n tin g s e v e n -te n th s o f the p ro d u c ­
tio n w o rk f o r c e in the g la s s co n ta in e r
in d u s try , and n e a r l y
o n e -h a lf in the
o th er g la s s w a r e in d u s tr y .1 (S ee ta b le s 5
1
and 9.) T h e s e jo b s w e r e s e le c te d to r e p ­
re s e n t the v a r io u s a c t iv it ie s p e r fo r m e d
by p ro d u c tio n and r e la te d w o r k e r s in the
in d u s tr ie s .
In g la s s c o n t a i n e r p la n ts, a v e r a g e
h o u rly e a rn in g s ra n g ed fr o m $2.60 fo r
ja n ito r s to $4.37 fo r fo r m in g -m a c h in e
upkeep m en . O th er jo b s f o r w h ich e a r n ­
in gs a v e ra g e d m o r e than $4 an hour
w e r e fo r m in g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s ($ 4 .0 3 ),
m a in ten an ce m a c h in is ts ($4.18), and m e ta l
m o ld m a k e rs ($ 4 .3 5 ). A l l o f th e w o r k e r s
in th es e jo b s w e r e m en . S e le c to r s , who
ex a m in e g la s s w a r e fo r d e fe c ts , accou n ted
fo r s lig h tly m o r e than o n e -fo u rth o f the
w o rk f o r c e .
T h e y w e r e m o s t ly w om en
and a v e ra g e d $2.72 an h ou r.
In the o th e r p r e s s e d o r b low n g la s s and
g la s s w a r e in d u stry , a v e r a g e s fo r the o c ­
cupations stu died s e p a r a te ly ra n g e d fr o m
$2.50 fo r c a r r y - i n boys and g i r l s and
$2.52 fo r ja n ito r s to $4.28 f o r m e ta l




11 Separate earnings data were obtained for a few office
jobs and are also presented in tables 5 and 9.

5

o f esta b lis h m en t e a rn in g s c o m p a ris o n s
cou ld be shown.
W ithin the sam e jo b ,
a v e r a g e s a ls o w e r e h ig h e r f o r in c e n tiv e p a id w o r k e r s than f o r w o r k e r s p aid on a
tim e b a s is .
(S ee ta b le s 8 and 12.)
W h ere c o m p a r i s o n s w e r e p o s s ib le
w ith in the sam e occu p atio n , m e n 's a v e r ­
a ge h o u rly e a rn in g s w e r e u s u a lly h ig h e r
than th o se r e c o r d e d f o r w om en .
(S ee
ta b le s 5 and 9.) T h e am ount o f such d i f ­
fe r e n c e s v a r ie d s u b s ta n tia lly by re g io n .
In s o m e in s ta n c e s , w o m e n 's a v e ra g e s
w e r e h ig h e r than m e n 's .
F o r e x a m p le ,
in g la s s c o n ta in e r p la n ts, w om en c a rto n
a s s e m b le r s in th e M id d le A tla n tic and
Southw est e a rn e d , r e s p e c t iv e ly , 3 and 35
cen ts an hour m o r e than m en . A s noted
e a r l i e r , d iffe r e n c e s in pay le v e ls f o r m en
and w o m en in the sa m e occu p atio n m a y be
due to s e v e r a l fa c t o r s .

In the o th e r p r e s s e d o r b low n g la s s ­
w a r e , e x c e p t c o n ta in e rs , in d u s try , m o r e
than n in e-ten th s o f th e w o r k e r s w e r e in
e s ta b lis h m en ts that had fo r m a l p r o v i ­
sion s f o r s e c o n d -s h ift w o rk , and s e v e n eigh th s o f th e w o r k e r s w e r e in plan ts that
had p r o v is io n s fo r th ird o r o th e r la te
s h ifts .
(S ee ta b le 23.)
O n e -fifth o f th e
p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s w e r e e m p lo y e d on
secon d s h ifts , and o n e -s e v e n th w e r e on
th ird o r o th e r la te s h ifts .
M ost com ­
m o n ly , d iffe r e n t ia ls am ounted to 10 cen ts
f o r secon d sh ifts and 12 o r 14 cen ts f o r
th ird o r o th e r la te s h ifts . (S ee ta b le 24.)

P a id h o lid a y s . E s ta b lis h m e n ts e m p lo y ­
in g n e a r ly a ll the p ro d u ctio n and o ffic e
w o r k e r s in both in d u s trie s p ro v id e d p a id
h o lid a y s an nually. (S ee ta b le s 17 and 25.)
N e a r ly a ll p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s in g la s s
c o n ta in e r plan ts r e c e iv e d 8 d a ys; w h e re a s
s lig h tly m o r e than o n e -h a lf o f th e ir coun­
te r p a r ts in the o th e r g la s s w a r e in d u s try
w e r e p r o v id e d w ith 8 d a ys, o n e -fo u rth
r e c e iv e d 7, and o n e -s e v e n th r e c e iv e d 9
d a ys.
In th e la tt e r in d u stry , p r o v is io n s
fo r 8 d ays o r m o r e a p p lie d to substan­
t ia lly g r e a t e r p ro p o rtio n s o f the w o r k e r s
in the M id d le A tla n tic and G re a t L a k e s
r e g io n s than in th e B o r d e r S ta tes. M o s t
o f th e o ffic e w o r k e r s in both in d u s trie s
w e r e p ro v id e d at le a s t 8 p aid h o lid a y s
a yea r.

Establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions

Data w e r e ob tain ed f o r p ro d u ctio n and
o ffic e w o r k e r s on c e r ta in e s ta b lis h m en t
p r a c t ic e s , in clu d in g w o rk sch ed u les and
s e le c te d su p p lem e n ta ry w a g e b e n e fits , in ­
clu d in g p aid h o lid a y s , p aid v a c a tio n s , and
h ealth , in s u ra n ce , and r e t ir e m e n t p lan s.
Schedu led w e e k ly h o u r s .
A c y c lic a l
w o rk sch edu le o f th r e e 4 0 -h ou r w eek s and
one 4 8 -h ou r w e e k a p p lie d to th r e e -fo u r th s
o f the w o r k e r s in g la s s c o n ta in e r plants
and to s lig h tly o v e r o n e - fifth in o th e r
g la s s w a r e e s ta b lis h m e n ts . (S e e ta b le s 14
and 22.)
In g la s s c o n ta in e r m a n u fa c tu r­
in g , r e g io n a l p ro p o rtio n s o f w o r k e r s on
th is c y c lic a l sch edu le ra n g e d fr o m t h r e e eigh th s in the B o r d e r States to s e v e n eigh th s in the Southeast and G re a t L a k e s .
A 4 0 -h ou r w o rk w e e k a p p lie d to t h r e e fifth s o f the plant w o r k e r s in the o th e r
p r e s s e d o r b l o w n g la s s w a r e in d u stry .

P a id v a c a tio n s . P a id v a c a tio n s , a fte r
q u a lify in g p e r io d s o f s e r v ic e , w e r e p r o ­
v id e d in a ll e s ta b lis h m en ts stu died. (S ee
ta b le s 18 and 26.)
In both in d u s trie s , a
m a jo r it y o f the p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s r e ­
c e iv e d at le a s t 1 w e e k o f v a c a tio n p ay
a fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e , 2 w e e k s o r m o r e
a fte r 5 y e a r s , and at le a s t 3 w eek s a fte r
10 y e a r s .
N e a r ly s e v e n -e ig h th s o f the
p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s in g la s s c o n ta in e r
p la n ts, and s e ve n -te n th s in o th e r g la s s ­
w a r e p la n ts, w e r e p ro v id e d w ith at le a s t
4 w eek s o f v a c a tio n pay a fte r 20 y e a r s
o f s e r v ic e .
V a c a tio n p r o v is io n s v a r ie d
w id e ly b y r e g io n .
F o r e x a m p le , g la s s
c o n ta in e r p l a n t s p ro v id in g at le a s t 4
w eek s o f v a c a tio n p ay a fte r 20 y e a r s e m ­
p lo y e d n in e-ten th s o f the w o r k e r s in the
M id d le A tla n tic r e g i o n c o m p a re d w ith
about o n e -h a lf in the B o r d e r S ta tes. C o r ­
re s p o n d in g p ro p o rtio n s in the o th e r g la s s ­
w a r e in d u s try w e r e a p p ro x im a te ly fo u r fifth s and s lig h tly m o r e than o n e -th ir d .

S h ift p r o v is io n s a n d p r a c t ic e s . A l l
o f the esta b lis h m en ts in th e g la s s c o n ­
ta in e r in d u s try had fo r m a l p ay p r o v is io n s
fo r seco n d - and t h ir d - s h ift w o rk .
(S ee
ta b le 15.) A bou t o n e -fo u rth o f the p r o ­
du ction w o r k e r s a c tu a lly w e r e on secon d
s h ifts and th ey n e a r ly a lw a ys r e c e iv e d a
1 0 -cen t d iffe r e n t ia l ab o ve th e ir d a y -s h ift
r a te s .
A s im ila r p ro p o r tio n w as e m ­
p lo y e d on th ird o r o th e r la te s h ifts , and,
w ith fe w ex c e p tio n s r e c e iv e d a 1 4 -cent
d iffe r e n t ia l.
(S ee ta b le 16.)



6

F o r o ffic e w o r k e r s , ty p ic a l p r o v is io n s
w e r e at le a s t 2 w eek s o f v a c a tio n pay
a fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e , at le a s t 3 w eek s
a fte r 10 y e a r s , and at le a s t 4 w eek s a fte r
20 y e a r s . S lig h tly m o r e than o n e - h a lf o f
the o ffic e w o r k e r s in the o th e r g la s s w a r e
in d u s try w e r e in plants p ro v id in g o v e r 5
but under 6 w eek s o f v a c a tio n pay a fte r 25
y e a r s o f s e r v ic e .
P r o v is io n s f o r m o r e
than 4 w e e k s , h o w e v e r , w e r e r a r e in the
g la s s co n ta in e r in d u stry .

r e g io n a l v a r ia tio n s w e r e n oted f o r a ll o f
th es e b e n e fits e x c e p t l i f e , h o s p ita liz a tio n ,
and s u r g ic a l in s u ra n ce .
R e tir e m e n t p en sion p la n s, in ad d ition to
F e d e r a l s o c ia l s e c u r ity , a p p lie d to n in etenths o r m o r e o f the p ro d u ctio n and
o ffic e w o r k e r s in both in d u s tr ie s .
Em ­
p lo y e r s ty p ic a lly p aid the to ta l co s t o f
th es e p lan s.
R e tir e m e n t s e v e r a n c e pay
plans w e r e v ir t u a lly n o n ex isten t.

H ealth , in s u ra n ce , and r e t i r e m e n t
p la n s . L i f e , h o s p ita liz a tio n , and s u r g ic a l
in su ra n ce w e r e p ro v id e d by e s ta b lis h ­
m en ts e m p lo y in g n e a r ly a ll o f the p r o ­
duction w o r k e r s in both in d u s tr ie s . (S ee
ta b le s 19 and 27.) A ls o , a c c id e n ta l death
and d is m e m b e rm e n t in su ra n ce b e n e fits
a p p lied to fo u r - fift h s o f th e w o r k e r s . In
the g la s s co n ta in e r in d u stry , m e d ic a l in ­
su ran ce was p r o v id e d by a ll e s ta b lis h ­
m en ts v is ite d ; m ajor- m e d ic a l in su ra n ce,
by plants e m p lo y in g s e v e n -e ig h th s o f the
w o r k e r s ; and sic k n e ss and a c c id en t, by
th o se e m p lo y in g fo u r - fift h s . P ro p o r tio n s
o f w o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m en ts p ro v id in g
th es e b e n e fits in the o th e r g la s s w a r e in ­
d u s try w e r e , r e s p e c t iv e ly , th r e e - fo u r th s ,
t h r e e - fift h s , and s e v e n -e ig h th s .
These
b e n e fits , fo r w h ich e m p lo y e r s paid at
le a s t p a rt o f th e c o s t, g e n e r a lly w e r e
a v a ila b le to s im ila r p ro p o rtio n s o f the
o ffic e w o r k e r s .
In ad d ition , a p p ro x i­
m a te ly fo u r - fift h s o f the in d u s tr ie s ' o ffic e
w o r k e r s w e r e c o v e r e d by s ic k - le a v e
p lan s, u s u a lly fu ll pay, no w a itin g p e rio d .
T h e in c id e n c e o f m o s t o f the h ealth and
in su ra n ce b e n e fits studied in g la s s c o n ­
ta in e r m a n u fa ctu rin g v a r ie d l i t t le am ong
the s e le c te d r e g io n s . In the o th e r g la s s ­
w a r e in d u s try , h o w e v e r , s u b s t a n t i a l

O th er s e le c te d b e n e fit s . N e a r ly a ll the
p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s and a p p ro x im a te ly
fo u r - fift h s o f th e o ffic e w o r k e r s in the
g la s s c o n ta in e r in d u s try w e r e in e s ta b ­
lis h m e n ts h a vin g p r o v is io n s f o r fu n e ra l
le a v e and ju r y duty p ay.
(S ee ta b le 20.)
In the o th e r g la s s w a r e in d u s try , fu n e ra l
le a v e pay b e n e fits a p p lied to about fo u r fifth s o f th e p ro d u c tio n w o r k e r s and ju r y
duty pay, to n e a r ly th r e e -fo u r th s .
Ap­
p r o x im a te ly s e v e n -e ig h th s o f the o ffic e
w o r k e r s w e r e in plan ts w ith p r o v is io n s
f o r th es e tw o b e n e fits . T h e in c id e n c e o f
th es e p r o v is io n s was c o n s id e r a b ly g r e a t e r
in the M id d le A tla n tic and G re a t L a k e s
re g io n s than in the B o r d e r S ta tes.
(S ee
ta b le 28.)
T e c h n o lo g ic a l s e v e r a n c e pay p lan s,
p ro v id in g p aym en ts to e m p lo y e e s p e r m a ­
n en tly s e p a ra te d fr o m the com p an y b e ­
cau se o f a te c h n o lo g ic a l change o r plant
c lo s in g , w e r e a v a ila b le to th re e -te n th s
o f the p ro d u ctio n and o ffic e w o r k e r s in
g la s s c o n ta in e r plants. Such p lan s a p p lied
to su bstan tial p ro p o rtio n s o f w o r k e r s
in e ith e r grou p in the M id d le A tla n tic ,
B o r d e r S tates,
Southw est,
a n d G re a t
L a k e s r e g io n s .
T e c h n o lo g ic a l s e v e r a n c e
p ay w as v ir t u a lly n o n existen t in the o th e r
g la s s w a r e in d u stry .




7

T a b le 1. A v e ra g e h ou rly earn ing s: B y s e le c te d ch arac teris tic s
( N u m b e r o f p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 in p r e s s e d o r b l o w n g l a s s and g l a s s w a r e m a n u f a c t u r i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s b y s e l e c t e d c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ,
U ni t e d S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M a y 1970)

U ni te d S t a te s 2
Number
of
workers

Item

Average
hourly
earnings

Mid dl e Atlan tic
Number
of
workers

B o r d e r States

Ave r a g e
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Southeast
Number
of
w orkers

Southwest

Average
hourly
earnings

G reat Lakes

P acific

Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

28, 205
17,494
10, 711

$3. 13
3. 38
2. 73

9, 593
6, 077
3, 516

$3.48
3. 76
3. 00

17,500
10, 325
7, 175

3. 12
3.40
2. 72

9, 287
5, 771
3, 516

3.49
3. 78
3. 00

5, 853
11, 647

3. 14
3. 11

8, 581
-

3.48
-

-

14, 180

3. 16

.
6, 173

.
3. 53

-

10, 705
7, 169
3, 536

3. 15
3. 35
2. 75

-

-

All e s ta b l is h m e n t s
89, 923
58, 840
31, 083

$3. 09
3. 29
2. 71

27, 771
18, 612
9, 159

$3. 09
3. 29
2. 70

12, 788
8, 801
3, 987

$2. 89
3. 05
2. 55

4, 733
3, 464
1, 269

$2. 95
3. 05
2. 69

5, 013
3, 171
1, 842

$2. 81
2.96
2. 55

M e n __________ ________________________________
W o m e n ___ __________________________________

60, 294
38, 026
22, 268

3. 12
3. 33
2. 74

18, 119
11, 523
6, 596

3. 05
3. 25
2. 69

5, 171
3, 509
1, 662

3. 12
3! 29
2. 75

4, 733
3, 464
1, 269

2. 95
3. 05
2. 69

4, 28U
2, 662
1, 618

2. 85
2.99
2. 57

Siz e of commun.ii.,:
M e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s 3 ------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s — -----------------------------

28, 596
31, 698

3. 17
3. 07

4, 154
13, 965

3. 11
3. 03

-

-

3, 746

2.99
-

2, 731
-

2. 84

Si ze of e s t a b l i s h m e n t :
20—
499 w o r k e r s - . ----500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e .

16, 095
44, 199

2. 98
3, 16

13, 286

3. 12

-

-

-

-

1, 863
2, 870

2. 86
3. 02

1, 887
2, 393

2. 77
2. 87

A ll p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------M e n ------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n --------------------------------------------------------------

29, 629
20, 814
8, 815

3. 04
3. 21
2. 64

9,652
7, 089
2,563

3. 18
3. 35
2. 72

7, 617
5, 292
2, 325

2. 74
2. 89
2. 41

Si ze of c o m m u n i t y :
M e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s 3 --------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------

12, 383
17, 246

3. 12
2. 99

5, 405
-

3. 13
-

6, 786

2. 75

Si ze of e s t a b l i s h m e n t :
20—
499 w o r k e r s --------------- ------------------------------500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e -------------------------------------

10, 283
19, 346

2. 92
. 10

6, 832

3. 25

3, 899

2. 78

T y p e of p r o d u c t a n d m e t h o d of m a n u f a c t u r e : 4
T a b l e w a r e , a r t w a r e , i n d u s t r i a l and
i l l u m i n a t i n g g l a s s w a r e -------------- ----------------H a n d — ------ ------------------------------------------------M a c h i n e ------------- ---------------------- ------------------T e c h n i c a l and s c i e n t i f i c g l a s s w a r e --------------

23,
7,
15.
5.

3.
2.
3.
3.

6, 750

3. 14

6, 195

2. 72

A ll p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s - - — ----------------M e n -------------------- —
--------- ---------------- -----W o m e n - ------------------- --------------------------------------Glass co ntainers

— — — - - - ____
----------- ------------- —

j

P r e s s e d o r b l o w n g l a s s an d g l a s s w a r e ,
except co ntainers

1
2
3
4

03t
2~u
7 4
. 12

!

01
82
10
23

-

5, 649

-

3. 16

-

-

-

“

»

-

-

-

4, 492
6, 213

3. 25
3. 07

-

-

-

-

-

-

8, 086

3. 13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8, 597
7, 412

3. 13

-

-

-

-

-

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and 1 -r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h ol i d a y s , and l a t e s h i f t s .
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d i t i o n to f i o s e s ho wn s e p a r a t e l y .
A l a s k a and H a w a i i w e r e not i n c l u d e d i n t he st u dy .
S ta n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a s a s d e f i n e d b y the U. S. O f f i c e of M a n a g e m e n t and B u d g e t t h r o u g h J a n u a r y 1968.
D a t a f o r a l l p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s i n c l u d e o t h e r p r o d u c t s in a d d i ti on to t hos e s h o wn s e p a r a t e l y .

NOTE:

Dashes




in dica te

no d a t a

rep o rt ed

or data

t hat do not m e e t p ub l i c a t i on c r i t e r i a .

-

-•

3. 13

-

T a b le 2 . E arn in g s d istribu tion : P re s s e d or blow n g lass and g la s s w a re
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n of p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s by a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , 1 U ni ted S t a t e s an d s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , Ma y 1970)
Uni ted S t a te s 2
A verage hourly e a r n i n g s 1
2

M id d l e A t l a n t i c
T o ta l

U n d e r $ 1 . 7 5 ----------------

-------------------------------------------------

Men

0. 1

0. 1

B o r d e r S t a te s

Southeast

(3 )

0. 1

0. 1

Southwest

G reat Lakes

Pacific

(3 )
“
4
. 2
. 2
1. 0

(3
")

0. 1
. 2
1
! 2

(3 )

. i

7.
2.
6.
13.

1
7
6
0
6

0. 1

. 2
. 2
. i

11.
9.
17.
3.
3.

7
2
5
4
4

Women

(3 )

(3 )

0. 4

1
3
3
3
3

0. 3
. 6
. 7
. 1
. 3

(3 )
(3 )
(3 )
3)
(3 )

1. 0
2. 3
2. 9
1.4
1. 3

2
7
4
2. 2
3. 0

3
4
1. 8
2. 8
9. 0

0. 3
. 2
. 6
1. 3
4. 5

9
2
1. 8
6. 6
5. 4

$1.75
$1.80
$1.85
$1.90
$ 1 . 95

an d
an d
an d
an d
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 . 8 0 ---------- ------------ ----------------------$ 1 . 8 5 ----- —
— _________
$ 1 . 9 0 ------- _ _________________
$ 1 . 9 5 ----------------------------------------$ 2. 00 ------------- --------------------------- -

.
.
.
.
.

$ 2 . 00
$ 2 . 10
$ 2 . 20
$2.30
$2.40

an d
an d
a nd
an d
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 . 10--- ----- ------------- ------------ „
$ 2 . 20______ - - _____ __ _____
$ 2 . 30 - - --------------- ---------- ------$ 2. 40--- _____
____
______
$ 2 . 5 0 - - „ ______
_ _______ __

3
6
9
2. 4
5. 1

$2.50
$2.60
$ 2 . 70
$ 2. 80
$2.90

an d
and
an d
and
a nd

under
under
under
under
under

2. 60 ___
____
$2.70 — ___
...
$ 2 . 8 0 ------------------- ---------$ 2 . 9 0 — ____
_______ ___
$ 3 .0 0 — . .
—_
______

12.
9.
9.
7.
8.

4
2
9
5
0

5.
7.
8.
6.
5.

7
3
6
9
7

25.
12.
12.
8.
12.

1
8
4
8
3

13. 5
9.6
12. 6
10. 1
6.4

14.
7.
10.
2.
9.

4
0
0
8
1

$ 3.
$3.
$3.
$ 3.
$ 3.

00
10
20
30
40

a nd
an d
an d
an d
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3. 10 . _ „
_ .
___
$ 3 . 2 0 — --------------- -------$ 3 , 3 0 ----------------------------- .
$ 3. 40 — . . . ___ ________
$ 3. 50 — — „
___

5.
4.
4.
2.
3.

3
0
0
7
0

6.
5.
4.
3.
4.

0
3
4
6
1

4.
1.
3.
1.
.

0
6
4
0
9

5.
3.
2.
2.
3.

9
8
9
2
3

3.
2.
3.
2.
2.

4
6
7
2
4

3. 2
1. 3
1. 1
1. 7
1.4

1. 7
2. 8
2. 1
1. 6
1.4

6.
3.
3.
3.
3.

$3.50
$3.60
$ 3 . 70
$ 3. 80
$ 3. 90

an d
an d
an d
a nd
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 . 6 0 ----------- _
$3.70
$ 3 . 80- - - - - - $3.90
— ____
$ 4 . 00
_ - „ __

2.
2.
2.
1.
2.

3
3
1
9
4

3.
3.
3.
2.
3.

2
3
0
8
6

.
.
.
.
.

7
3
3
1
1

2. 3
1.9
1. 6
2. 0
3. 0

1.
1.
2.
2.
1.

7
7
2
3
7

2. 1
2. 5
1. 2
1.4
2. 2

.8
1. 9
.9
1. 2
2. 4

2. 7
2. 9
2. 1
1.4
2. 1

0
4
8
6
1. 6

$ 4 . 00
$ 4 . 10
$ 4 . 20
$ 4 . 30
$4.40

an d
an d
an d
and
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$ 4 . 10
$4 . 20
$ 4 . 30
$ 4 . 40
$4.50

1. 8
1. 8
2. 5
1 .4
1. 1

2.
2.
3.
2.
1.

8
8
8
2
6

. 1
(3 )
(3 )

2. 2
1. 9
2. 9
1. 5
.7

1.
2.
2.
.
.

2
1
0
7
6

1.
2.
3.
1.
.

1.
1.
2.
.
.

2. 1
1. 9
2. 5
1.9
1. 2

1. 3
1. 2
1. 6
1. 8
2! 9
4 1 2 .4

$ 4 . 50 an d o v e r .

$

____________
_
_ ________
____
___ . . .
_„
_ . ..
__________
. _____ —
____
----_

--- - --

Total

___
____
_. ..
____
_
_____
___

_ . -

. . .

— ___ , _ - _

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s -----

_ - __

A verage hourly e a r n i n g s 1

—

_____

.
.
.
.

.
.
.

.
.
.

3. 6

.
.

(3 )
(3 )

5. 5

n

.
.

-

.
_
(3 )

7. 2
6. 0
27.
6.
12.
7.
4.

5
7
7
0
3

1
2
2
0
8

Because




of rounding,

sum s

. 8

1. 2
5. 3
11 .3
12. 5
8. 2
7. 3
8. 3
3
9
8
4
3

.6

2. 3
. 7
2. 1
8. 2

15. 2
6. 4
8. 9

11 . 3
4. 3
3 .4
3.
2.
3.
2.

2. 6

1. 9

2. 1

1. 0

3. 3

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

89, 923

58, 840

31, 083

27, 771

12, 788

4, 733

5, 013

28, 205

9, 5 9 3

$3. 29

$2. 71

$3. 09

$2. 89

$2. 95

$2. 81

$3. 13

$ 3 .4 8

.

____________

1 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l id a y s , and l a t e s h i f t s ,
2 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d it i o n to t h o s e sh o wn s e p a r a t e l y .
3 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.
4 I n c l u d e s 1 . 2 p e r c e n t a t $ 4 . 5 0 to $ 4 . 6 0 ; 2 . 3 p e r c e n t at $ 4 . 6 0 to $ 4 . 7 0 ; 3 . 3 p e r c e n t a t $ 4 . 7 0 to $ 4 . 8 0 ; an d 5 . 7 p e r c e n t a t $ 4 . 8 0 an d o v e r .
NOTE:

4
1
3
5
2

-

10 0 .0

______1 0 0 . 0 _______ k

_ __ _

. ___

.

$3. 09

... .
-

1
4
4
2
3

of in d iv id u a l i t e m s

m ay not equal

100.

T a b le 3 . E arn in g s d is trib u tio n : G la s s co n tainers
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n of p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s ,, 1 U n ited S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g io n s , M ay 1970)
U n it ed S t a t e s 2
M id d l e A t l a n t i c

B o r d e r S t a te s

Southeast

So u t h w e s t

Great Lakes

0. 2

(3 )

_

0. 1

1. 1

_

_

(3 )
.3
.4
1. 4
8. 5

(3 )
0. 1
(3 )
.2
4. 1

_
(3 )
7. 2
6. 0

.
8.
1.
6.
7.

1
5
8
1
7

(3 )
0. 1
.5
5. 7

(3 )
0. 5

13.
10.
19.
3.
3.

3
3
5
5
6

13 .9
12. 3
8.0
6. 8
10. 1

2. 2
.6
1.9
8. 2
15. 7
6. 6
9. 2
11. 4
4. 4
3.4

A v erag e hourly e a r n i n g s 1
Total

Me n

U n d e r $ 2 . 00 _________________________________ ____

0. 1

(3 )
4

$ 2 . 00
$ 2 . 10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

and
and
and
and
a nd

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 . 10---------------------------------------$ 2 . 2 0 -------------------------------- ------$ 2 . 3 0 ---------------------------------------$ 2 . 4 0 -------------------------------- ------$ 2 . 5 0 ----------------------------------------

(3 )
.6
.2
1. 2
4. 2

(3 )
0. 8
. 1
1. 1
1. 6

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

an d
a nd
an d
a nd
a

under
under
under
under
^uder

$ 2 . 6 0 ------------------------ --------------$ 2 . 7 0 ---------------------------------------$ 2 . 8 0 ---------------------------------------$ 2 . 9 0 --------------------------- -----------$ 3 . 0 0 ------------------------------- -------

14.
9,
11.
7.
9.

7
6
1
1
3

7. 0
7. 9
9.7
6.6
5.7

$ 3. 00
$3.10
$ 3 . 20
$3.30
$3.40

a nd
an d
an d
an d
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 . 1 0 ---------------------------------------$ 3. 20 ------------- ------ -------------------$ 3 . 30---------------------------------------$ 3 . 4 0 ---------------------------------------$ 3 . 5 0 ----------------------------------------

4.
3.
4.
2.
3.

9
7
1
5
1

5.
5.
4.
3.
4.

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$ 3. 80
$ 3. 90

an d
an d
an d
an d
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 . 6 0 ---------------------------------------$ 3 . 7 0 ---------------------------------------$ 3 . 8 0 ---------------------------------------$ 3. 90 ---------------------------------------$ 4 . 00 ----------------------------------------

2.4
2. 3
2. 2
1. 8
2. 2

3.4
3. 6
3. 3
2.9
3. 4

.6
.2
. 3
(3 )
. 1

2. 1
1. 5
1. 7
1 .6
1. 8

$ 4 . 00
$ 4 . 10
$ 4 . 20
$ 4 . 30
$4.40

a nd
an d
a nd
an d
an d

under
under
under
under
under

$4.
$4.
$4.
$4.
$4.

1. 9
1.4
3. 1
1. 6
1. 2

3.
2.
4.
2.
1.

(3 )
(3)
(3)

2. 3
1. 2
3.9
1. 5
. 8

Pacific

W om e n

10---------------------------------------20-------------------------------- ------30—
-------- ----------------------------4 0---------------------------------------50-------- --------------- ------- --------

3
2
4
5
4

1
3
8
5
9

-

0. 8
. 2
.2

27.
12.
13.
7.
15.

8
5
5
9
6

17.
12.
15.
8.
7.

6
1
1
6
0

16.
5.
16.
3.
14.

1
8
4
7
4

27.
6.
12.
7.
4.

5
7
7
0
3

4.
1.
3.
.
.

3
2
5
8
8

4.
3.
2.
1.
3.

9
0
3
6
1

3.
2.
5.
2.
3.

8
8
5
2
5

3.
1.
1.
1.
1.

2
3
1
7
4

1. 8
3. 0
2. 1
1.7
1. 6

5.
2.
3.
3.
3.

2. 5
2. 5
3. 1
3.4
2. 4

2. 1
2. 5
1. 2
1.4
2. 2

1. 0
2. 1
1. 0
1.4
2. 7

2. 8
3. 0
1. 9
1.4
2. 2

3.
2.
4.
2.
2.

2. 2
2. 2
2. 6
1. 2
.9

1.
2.
3.
1.
.

1. 6
1. 1
2. 1
.6
.3

2. 1
1. 5
3. 2
2. 1
1. 2

1. 4
1. 3
1. 7
1. 8
3. 0

1
2
2
0
8

9
9
1
0
4

1
5
0
7
5

$ 4 . 50 a nd o v e r ------------------------------------ ----------------

3. 6

5. 7

( )

3

2. 0

1.4

2. 1

.5

2.9

T o t a l ---------------------- ------ ------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s ----------------------- ------- -------- ------

60, 294

38, 026

22, 268

18, 119

5, 171

4, 733

4, 280

17, 500

9, 287

A v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1—
--------------------------------

$3. 12

$3. 33

$2. 74

$3.05

$3. 12

$2.95

$2. 83

$3. 12

$3 . 4 9

1 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e an d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l id a y s , and la t e s h i f t s .
2 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d i t i o n to t h o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t .
4 I n c l u d e s 1 . 2 p e r c e n t a t $ 4 . 5 0 to $ 4 . 6 0 ; 2 . 3 p e r c e n t at $ 4 . 6 0 to $ 4 . 7 0 ; 3 . 3 p e r c e n t a t $ 4 . 7 0 to $ 4 . 8 0 ; a n d 5 . 3 p e r c e n t a t $ 4 . 8 0 an d o v e r .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




s u m s of in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l 100,

4 12. 1

T a b le 4. E a rn in g s distribution: P re s s e d or blow n g lass and g la s s w a re , e x c e p t co n tain e rs
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n of p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s by a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , 1 U n i t ed S t a t e s a n d s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M a y 1970)
United States 2
A v erag e hourly earnings 1
T otal

Men

Women

M id d l e
Atlantic

Border
States

Great
Lakes

U n d e r $1. 7 5 ..................... .......................................................

0. 2

0. 3

(3)

0. 1

0. 7

$1. 75
$1. 80
$1. 85
$1.90
$1. 95

and
and
and
and
a nd

under
under
under
under
under

$1. 80 __________________________
$ 1 . 8 5 ----------------------------------------$1. 9 0 __________________________
$ 1 . 9 5 __________________________
$2. 00 __________________________

. 5
1. 1
1 .4
.7
.7

.2
.7
•9
.9
.7

1. 0
2. 0
2. 5
.4
.5

(3)
. 1
. 1
. 1
(3)

1.
3.
4.
2.
2.

7
9
8
3
2

0. 1
_
_

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.

00
10
20
30
40

a nd
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2. 10__________________________
$2. 20__________________________
$2. 30---------------------------- -------- —
$ 2 . 4 0 __________________________
$ 2 . 5 0 __________________________

.
.
2.
4.
6.

7
4
2
9
8

.6
.4
1. 0
4. 2
5.4

.
.
5.
6.
10.

9
5
2
5
1

.8
.3
1. 8
3. 3
5. 3

1.
.
2.
10.
8.

5
4
6
9
9

(3)
.2
2. 0
2. 4
4. 5

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.

50
60
70
80
90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 . 6 0 __________________________
$ 2 . 7 0 ----------------------------------------$ 2 . 8 0 ----------------------------------------$2. 9 0 __________________________
$3. 0 0 __________________________

7.
8.
7.
8.
5.

9
5
4
5
3

3.
6.
6.
7.
5.

5
3
6
4
8

18.
13.
9.
11.
3.

3
6
3
0
9

5.
4.
8.
12.
5.

7
9
0
9
2

13.
7.
5.
2.
5.

3
9
6
1
4

7.
12.
8.
8.
5.

0
8
5
1
4

$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
a nd
a nd
and

under
under
under
under
under

$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.

10----------------------------------------20 __________________________
30----------------------------------------4 0 __________________________
50 __________________________

6.
4.
4.
3.
2.

1
6
0
2
9

7. 3
5. 4
4.4
3.9
3. 6

3.
2.
3.
1.
1.

5
7
1
6
1

7.
5.
4.
3.
3.

9
3
2
3
7

3.
2.
2.
2.
1.

2
4
6
2
7

7.
5.
4.
4.
3.

0
7
8
1
1

$3. 50
$3. 60
$3. 70
$3. 80
$3.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.
$4.

60 __________________ ____ ___
70 __________________________
80 ----------------------------------------9 0 __________________________
00__________________________

2.
2.
1.
1.
2.

2
2
9
9
8

2.
2.
2.
2.
3.

.
.
.
.
.

9
6
2
2
1

2. 8
2. 7
1.6
2. 8
5. 2

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

2
1
6
5
2

2. 6
2. 7
2. 6
1.4
2. 0

$4. 00
$4. 10
$4.20
$4. 30
$4. 40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$4.
$4.
$4.
$4.
$4.

10----------------------------------------20----------------------------------------30----------------------------------------4 0 ----------------------------------------5 0 __________________________

1.
2.
1.
1.
.

6
6
3
2
8

2. 2
3. 6
1.9
1.7
1. 2

. 1
(3)
(3)

1.
3.
1.
1.
.

.6
2. 0
1. 6
.4
.4

2. 0
2. 7
1.4
1. 6
1. 3

3. 6

5. 1

(3)

3. 8

2. 2

3. 8

________________________

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s ______________________________

29,629

20,814

8,815

9,652

7,617

10, 7 05

A v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1______________________

$3. 04

$3. 21

$2. 64

$3. 18

$2. 74

$3. 15

$ 4 . 5 0 a n d o v e r ----------------------------------------------------T o t a l ______________




1 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s ,
2 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s in a d d it i o n to t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 L e s s t h a n 0. 05 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,

8
9
6
7
9

holidays,

s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l 100.

(3)

and late shifts.

9
2
0
5
7

-

T a b le 5 . O c c u p a tio n a l a v erag es : G la s s c o n ta in e rs —all es tab lis h m en ts
( N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s , U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g i o n s , M a y 1970)
U n ite d S ta te s
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

B o r d e r S ta te s

M id d le A tla n tic

H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
M id d le
ran g e3

M e a n 3 M e d ia n 3

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
M id d le
ran g e3

M e a n 3 M e d ia n 3

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

S o u th e a s t

H o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1
M id d le
ran g e 3

M e a n 3 M e d ia n 3

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

H o u rly e a r n in g s 1
M id d le
range 3

M e a n 3 M e d ia n 3

S e le c te d p r o d u c t i o n o c c u p a tio n s
$ 2 .5 4 - $ 2 .9 4
2. 60— 2. 97
2. 5 4 - 2. 89
2. 9 8 - 3. 26
2. 7 6 - 3. 27
2. 6 7 - 3. 20

1 ,3 3 8
214
1 ,1 2 4
101
76
62

2. 88
3. 89
4 . 03

2. 77
3. 91
4 ,0 2

2 . 4 8 - 3. 19
3. 6 4 - 4 . 10
3. 7 0 - 4. 33

no
1 ,2 9 8

3. 75
3. 92

4. 37

4 .4 5

4. 0 4 - 4. 73

3. 11
2 .9 3
2. 98
2. 88
2 .6 0
2. 61
2. 55

3. 06
2. 87
3. 01
2. 78
2. 55
2. 58
2 .4 9

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

2. 80
3. 14
4 . 18
3 .8 3
4. 35
3. 82
2. 72
2. 71
2. 72
3. 24

2.
3.
4.
3.
4.
3.
2.
2.
2.
3.

2. 6 6 2. 9 0 3. 8 7 3. 5 7 4. 2 4 3. 5 0 2 .5 9 2. 5 4 2. 5 9 2 .9 5 -

76
80
74
15
03
90

$2.
2.
2.
3.
2.
2.

72
02
16
01
:.b
91
61
60
61
17

7957—
5357515146-

$2.
2.
2.
3.
3.
2.

77
74
77
13
00
88

$2.
2.
2.
3.
2.
2.

71
67
71
06
91
80

$2.
2.
2.
3.
2.
2.

62— 2 .8 6
$
6 7 - 2. 87
6 1 - 2. 86
0 5 - 3. 23
8 0 - 3. 13
7 9 - 2. 86

323
265
43
30

3. 82
4 . 02

3. 5 7 - 3 .9 6
3. 6 5 - 4 . 24

414

$2. 80
2. 77
3. 18
2. 87

$ 2. 81
2. 70
3. 03
2 .6 5

3

3 ^

$2. 67—
$2. 97
2. 6 3 - 2 .9 7
3. 0 3 - 3. 54
2. 5 7 - 3. 27

339
174
165
7
43
26

3. 6 7 - 4 . 15

$2.
2.
2.
3.
2.
2.

62
54
71
17
70
55

$2. 53
2. 53
2. 46
2 .6 6
2. 53

$ 2 .4 6 — 2 .6 7
$
2 . 4 8 - 2 .6 0
2. 3 4 - 2 .9 9
2. 6 3 - 2 .7 5
2. 5 1 - 2. 55

73
38
339

2. 83
3 .7 0
4 . 03

2 .7 9
3. 62
4. 04

2. 7 7 - 2 .8 0
3. 5 8 - 3. 87
3. 7 3 - 4 . 23

453

4 . 35

4 . 44

4. 0 6 - 4 . 60

130

4. 2 .

-+. 07

3. 9 1 - 4 . 23

154

4 . 31

4 . 16

3 . 9 6 - 4 . 55

20
22
39
13
63
63
54

75
420
231
189
181
175
-

3. 31
3. 01
3. 06
2. 95
2. 62
2. 62
-

3. 12
3. 06
3. 04
3. 06
2. 58
2. 58
-

2. 8 7 2. 85—
2. 8 7 2. 7 6 2. 5 4 2. 5 4 -

3. 91
3. 09
3. 13
3. 09
2. 63
2. 63
-

24
64
48
16

3. 11
_
2. 54
2. 55
2. 51

3. 20
2. 51
2. 51
2. 50

3. 2 0 2. 5 1 2. 5 1 2. 4 9 -

3. 20
2. 53
2. 53
2. 52

21
375
125
48
47
-

3. 01
2. 67
2. 82
2. 38
2. 38
-

3. 06
2. 53
2. 77
2 .4 6
2 .4 6
-

2 .9 3 2. 5 3 2 .6 0 2. 3 5 2. 3 5 -

3. 06
2 .7 8
2 .8 6
2 .5 4
2. 54
-

2 .9 8
3. 13
4 . 35
4. 02
4. 33
4. 02
2. 90
2. 82
2 91
1.47

965
57
65
229
502
21
5 ,4 3 1
981
4 ,4 5 0
103

2. 73
3. 04
4 . 02
3. 64
4 . 24
3 .4 3
2. 68
2. 70
2. 67
3. 21

2. 70
2 .9 3
4 . 04
3. 70
4 . 24
3. 50
2. 60
2. 60
2. 60
3. 17

2. 6 7 2. 8 8 3. 8 7 3. 3 9 4. 2 4 3 .4 6 2. 6 0 2. 6 0 2. 5 9 3. 1 0 -

2. 72
2 .9 3
4 . 16
3 .9 1
4 . 26
3. 50
2. 76
2. 82
2. 76
3. 19

168
1 ,6 0 2
.
_
34

_
4 . 27
2. 71
_
_
3. 21

_
4 . 24
2. 70
_
_
3. 06

_
_
4. 33
4. 2 4 2. 5 4 - 2 .9 7
_
_
_
_
3. 0 3 - 3 .4 1

370
20
36
106
1 ,0 9 1
294
797
52

2. 63
3. 73
3 .6 2
4 . 25
2. 67
2. 73
2. 65
2. 96

2. 55
3 .6 7
3. 55
4 . 24
2 .6 0
2 .7 5
2. 59
2 .9 5

2. 3 9 3. 6 7 3 .5 5 4. 2 4 2. 5 7 2 .7 2 2. 5 1 2 .8 8 -

2. 72
3 .6 9
3 .8 7
4 . 27
2 .7 8
2 .7 5
2. 82
2 .9 5

3. 06

3. 13

rsi

70
67
71
10
99
84

$2.
2.
2.
3.
3.
2.

2 .6 8

2 . 6 0 - 2. 86

3.
3.
3.
3.
2.
2.
2.

3. 08

2. 98

2. 7 5 - 3 .4 3

699

3. 05

2 .9 8

2 . 7 9 - 3. 15

119

3. 22
2 .6 9

3. 22
2 .6 3

2. 8 7 - 3 .4 3
2. 6 0 - 2. 76

96
15

3. 03
2. 75

2 .9 8
2. 74

2. 8 4 - 3. 13
2. 6 4 - 2. 88

-

286

2. 83

2. 80

2. 3 0 - 3. 32

92

2. 39

2. 07

2. 0 3 - 2. 65

-

123
101
15
81

2. 83
2 .8 9
3. 00
2. 86

2.
2.
2.
3.

2 .4 0 2. 5 4 2. 5 8 2. 3 0 -

3. 16
3. 32
2 .9 6
3 .2 9

43

2. 81

2. 67

2. 4 1 - 3. 07
-

12
_

-

-

-

-

00

A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s -------------------------------4 , 107
M e n _____________________________________
1 ,3 2 2
Wom e n _______ ______ ____ ________________ 2 ,7 8 5
227
B a t c h - a n d - f u r n a c e m e n ( a l l m en )_________
B a tc h m i x e r s ( a ll m e n ) ___________________
359
C u l le t h a n d le r s ( a l l m en )_______________ 298
D e c o r a ti n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s
42 3
(236 w o m e n a n d 187*m e n ) _______________
408
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a ll m en )_____
F o r m i n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ( a ll m e n ) ___ 4 ,0 1 8
F o r m in g -m a c h in e u p k eep m en
1 ,6 3 7
( a ll m e n ) __________________________________
H e lp e rs , m a in te n a n c e tra d e s
( a ll m e n ) ---------------------------------------------------309
2 ,3 9 6
I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l ---------------------------------------M e n ___________ ____ _______________ _
1 ,1 1 0
1 ,2 8 6
W o m e n _________________ -_______________
J a n i t o r s ------------------------------------------------------675
592
M e n _____________________________________
83
W om en _____- _______ —----------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d lin g
3 ,0 8 1
( 3 ,0 7 8 m e n a n d 3 w o m e n )----------------------210
L e h r t e n d e r s ( a ll m en )------------- ------------M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a l l n . n)----------339
873
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a l l m en )-----------1 ,6 6 6
M o ld m a k e r s , m e t a l ( a l l m e n )-------------------72
P i p e f i t t e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a l l m en )----------S e l e c t o r s ----------------------------------------------------- 1 7 ,1 4 3
M e n _____________________________________
2 ,2 3 6
1 4 ,9 0 7
W o m en
343
T a n k m e n ( a ll m e n ) ------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k lif t)
2 ,3 3 7
( 2 ,3 3 6 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n )----------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( o th e r th a n f o rk lif t)
( a ll m e n ) _________________________________________
318
W a tc h m e n ( a ll m en )-----------------------------------91

3 .4 4

247

2. 76

-

10

2. 55

-

"

-

S e l e c t e d o f fic e o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , g e n e r a l (253 w o m e n
a n d 33 m e n ) —
____________________
C l e r k s , p a y r o l l (1 1 4 w o m e n
a n d 9 m en )-— - — ------------------- -----------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ----------------------------T y p i s t s , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) ____________ _
T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n )--------------------

67
80
73
21

-

11
■

-

2. 76
“

-

-

'

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




3. 20
“

-

-

-

10

2. 62

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
"

_
_

2 .4 9
2. 28

-

_

9
10

■

%
”

“

”

T a b le 5. O c c u p a tio n a l averag es: G la s s co n tain e rs—all e s ta b lis h m e n ts — C o n tin u e d
( N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s , U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g i o n s , M ay 1970)
S o u th w e s t
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

G reat L akes

H o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1
a 'a n 3

M e d ia n 3

M id d le
ran g e 3

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

P a c if i c

H o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1
M ean3

M id d le
ran g e 3

M e d ia n 3

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

H o u rly e a r n in g s 1
M ean3

M e d ia n 3

M id d le
ran g e 3

S e l e c t e d p r o d u c t i o n o c c u p a tio n s
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s _____________________
M e n -------- -------- --------- ----------------------------W o m e n ------— _____________ ______________
B a t c h - a n d - f u r n a c e m e n ( a l l m en )-________
B a tc h m i x e r s ( a l l m e n ) __________________
C u lle t h a n d le r s ( a l l m en )__________________
D e c o r a ti n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s
(236 w o m e n a n d 187 m e n ) _______________
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a l l m en )-———
F o r m i n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ( a l l m e n ) ___
F o rm in g -m a c h in e u p k eep m en
( a l l m e n ) . _______________________________
H e lp e rs , m a in te n a n c e tra d e s
( a l l m e n ) __________________________________
I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l ___________ -______________
M e n — __________ - ______________________
W o m e n ___________________ ____________
J a n i t o r s ------------------------------------------------------M e n --------------------------------------------------------W o m e n _________________ -_________ - _____
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d lin g
( 3 ,0 7 8 m e n a n d 3 w o m e n )_______________
L e h r t e n d e r s ( a l l m e n )______________
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a l l m en )_______
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a l l m e n ) ____ __
M o ld m a k e r s , m e t a l ( a l l m en )_____________
P i p e f i t t e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a ll m en )_______
S e l e c t o r s ______________ __________________
M e n -------------------------------------------------------W o m e n --------------------------------------------------T a n k m e n ( a ll m e n ) ________________________
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k lif t)
(2 , 336 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n )_______________
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( o th e r th a n f o rk lif t)
( a ll m e n ) --------------------------------------------------W a tc h m e n ( a l l m e n )-_______________________

362
114
248
20
59
20

$2. 56
2. 32
2 .6 7
2 .9 6
2 .5 9
2 .4 8

$2. 61
2. 17
2 .7 0
2 .9 5
2. 54
2. 52

$2. 43— 2 . 70
$
2. 1 7 - 2 .4 7
2 . 5 6 - 2 .7 0
2. 5 0 - 3. 19
2. 3 9 - 2. 66
2. 1 7 - 2 .5 8

1 ,0 4 7
297
750
57
77
102

$ 2 .7 1
2. 85
2. 65
3. 21
3. 21
2 .9 3

$ 2 .6 0
2 .6 3
2. 54
3. 10
3. 13
2 .8 4

$2. 5 1 -$ 2 . 91
2 . 6 3 - 2 .9 7
2 . 4 7 - 2 .8 7
2 . 9 8 - 3 .2 6
2 . 9 8 - 3 .4 8
2 . 7 2 - 3 .2 6

594
373
221
16
57
52

$3. 03
3. 07
2 .9 6
3 .7 4
3 .4 4
3. 24

$2. 95
3. 13
2 .8 8
3 .4 9
3 .4 1
3. 20

$2. 90—
$3. 15
2 . 9 4 - 3. 15
2 . 8 7 - 3 .2 1
3 . 4 9 - 3 .7 4
3 . 2 6 - 3 .6 5
3 . 0 7 - 3 .2 1

26
31
277

3 .0 3
3 .6 8
3. 82

2. 87
3 .6 6
3. 89

2. 8 7 - 3. 30
3. 3 7 - 3. 97
3 . 6 1 - 3 .9 9

51
118
1, 108

2 .9 9
3 .9 2
4 . 06

2 .9 7
3 .9 6
4 . 10

2 . 6 2 - 3 .2 7
3. 8 2 - 4. 03
3 . 6 9 - 4. 33

29
53
492

3. 54
4 .4 4
4 . 51

3. 37
4 . 32
4. 46

3. 3 7 - 3 .9 1
4 . 2 2 - 4 .4 4
4 . 3 7 - 4 .6 4

119

4 .2 1

4. 23

3. 8 9 - 4 . 36

513

4 . 29

4 .4 5

4 . 0 1 - 4 .7 2

233

4 .8 5

4 .7 6

4 . 6 6 - 5. 01

19
207
67
42
39

2 .7 9
2. 17
2. 77
2. 51
2. 51

-

2 .7 7
2 .5 2
2 .8 3
2. 37
2. 37
-

2 .4 9 2. 1 7 2. 5 5 2 .4 1 2 .4 3 -

139
526
193
333
242
200
42

3. 01
3. 10
3. 05
3. 13
2 .5 6
2. 58
2 .4 9

2 .9 9
3. 09
3 .0 8
3. 28
2. 54
2. 59
2 .4 8

2. 7 4 2 .8 6 3. 0 1 2 .7 8 2 .5 1 2 .5 1 2 .4 6 -

3. 15
3 .4 0
3. 09
3 .4 1
2 .6 3
2 .6 3
2 .5 3

25
381
211
170
95
80
15

3. 52
3. 37
3. 57
3. 13
2 .9 4
2 .9 6
2. 79

3 .4 7
3. 39
3. 55
3 .2 1
2 .9 5
2 .9 5
2 .8 3

3. 1 5 3 .2 2 3 .5 3 2 .9 8 2 .9 0 2 .9 0 2 .7 8 -

221
21
82

2 .5 8
2 .7 1
4 . 06

2. 60
2. 69
4 . 24
2. 60

2. 88
3. 28
4 . 06
3 .7 9
4 . 29
3. 89
2. 68
_
2. 68
3. 21

2 .7 8
3 .0 2
4 .0 2
3 .8 b
4. 24
3 .9 7
2. 60

2. 7 0 2 .9 5 3. 8 7 3. 5 7 4. 2 4 3. 8 5 2. 5 7 -

3. 06
3 .5 2
4 . 22
4 . 02
4 . 33
4 . 02
2. 86

310

3. 07

_

3 . 0 2 - 3. 13

69
121
256
_
2 ,5 0 8

3. 08
_
4 .9 2
4 . 25
4 . 88

4 .8 8
4 . 22
4 .7 2

4 . 6 3 - 5. 35
4 . 0 6 - 4 .4 4
4 . 7 2 - 4 . 75

2 .9 9

2 .9 6

2 . 9 0 - 3. 18

2 .6 6
2 .9 3

882
53
127
268
526
20
5 ,2 8 4
_
5 , 176
57

2. 60
3 .2 3

2. 5 7 - 2. 86
2 . 7 9 - 3 .7 5

2 ,3 6 7
69

2 .9 7
3. 70

2 .9 6
3 .7 2

2 . 9 0 - 3 .0 2
3 . 4 7 - 3 .9 8

-

-

-

2 .4 0 2 .6 8 3. 8 7 2 .4 3 _
2 .4 3 2 .6 9 -

3 .0 5
2. 85
3. 13
2. 54
2. 54
2 .7 2
2 .7 6
4 . 27

_

_

_

3 .8 1
3 .6 3
3 .7 0
3 .2 8
2 .9 8
2 .9 8
2 .9 2

_

_

1 ,1 6 7
999
28

2. 58
2. 54
2 .8 3

177

2. 74

2. 74

2 . 6 9 - 2 .8 6

669

3. 09

2 .9 6

2 . 7 5 - 3 .4 4

378

3. 55

3. 57

3 . 3 1 - 3 .8 6

19
9

2. 74
2. 52

2. 69
-

2 . 6 9 - 2 .7 1
-

80
32

3. 23
2 .6 4

3. 32
2 .6 3

2 . 9 4 - 3 .4 3
2 . 6 1 - 2 .6 5

49
17

3 .7 8
2 .8 7

3. 78
3. 01

3 . 7 8 - 3 .7 8
2. 5 9 - 3. 11

14

2. 55

-

2 . 8 5 - 3 .0 8

13
10
-

2 .4 4
2 .6 3
"

-

-

2. 60
2 .7 7

2 .7 0

_

_

_

S e l e c t e d o f fic e o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , g e n e r a l (2 5 3 w o m e n
a n d 33 m e n ) ______ -_______________________
C l e r k s , p a y r o l l (114 w o m e n
a n d 9 m en )________________________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n )_____
T y p i s t s , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n )_______ -____
T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n )_____________

_

_
_
-

113

3. 12

3 .0 7

2 . 6 5 - 3 .8 3

30

2 .9 9

2 .9 4

28
53
_
-

2. 83
2 .9 7
.

2 .6 7
2. 94

2 . 4 0 - 3. 18
2 . 5 7 - 3 .6 2

14
9

3. 32
2. 90

_

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d .fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o l id a y s , a n d l a t e s h if t s .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to th o s e show n s e p a r a t e l y .
S e e a p p e n d ix A f o r m e th o d u s e d in c o m p u tin g m e a n s , m e d i a n s , a n d m id d le r a n g e s o f e a r n i n g s .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a te no d a ta r e p o r t e d o r d a ta th a t d o n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .




-

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

M e d ia n s a n d m id d le r a n g e s a r e n o t p r o v id e d f o r e n t r i e s of f e w e r th a n 15 w o r k e r s .

T a b le 6 . O c c u p a tio n a l averag es: G la s s co n tain e rs—by size o f co m m u n ity
( N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a nd a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s

in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in m e t r o p o li ta n a n d n o n m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s , U n ited S ta te s a n d s e le c te d re g io i i, M ay 1970)

U ni t e d S t a t e s 2
Metropolitan
areas
O c c u p a t i o n and s e x

Mid dle Atla nt ic

N onmetro­
pol it an
areas

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
i ng s

Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
ho urly
earn­
i n gs

604
81
182
172
119
189
1,813
740
503
226
1, 263
107
175
422
719
1,026
197
1,206

$2. 86
3. 34
3. 10
2. 94
3. 21
3.99
4. 06
4. 27
3. 07
2. 65
2. 81
3. 27
4. 39
3. 95
4. 46
2. 74
3. 25
3. 18

718
146
177
126
68
219
2,205
897
607
366
1,815
103
164
451
947
1,210
146
1,130

$2.
3.
2.
2.
3.
3.
4.
4.
2.
2.
2.
3.
3.
3.
4.
2.
3.
2.

A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n ------------------------------------------------- 1 , 2 6 3
S e l e c t o r s -------------------------------------------------------------------- 7 , 0 3 9

2. 79
2. 77

1,5 22
7,868

Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

M e tr op olita n
areas
Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
ho urly
earn­
i n gs

Southeast

N on m etro­
p ol i t a n
areas
Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
i n gs

Southwest

Me tr op olita n
areas
Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
ho urly
earn­
i n gs

M e tr op olitan
areas
Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
ho urly
earn­
i n gs

Great Lakes
M etr op olitan
areas
Num­
be r
of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

Pacific

N onm etro­
p ol i t a n
areas
Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
i n gs

Me tro politan
areas
Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
ea r ni ng s

Me n
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n __________________________
B a t c h - a n d - f u r n a c e m e n ------------------------------------------B a t c h m i x e r s _________________________________
G u l l e t h a n d l e r s _______________________________
D e c o r a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e ------------------------------------F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p m e n -----------------------------I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l ------------------------------------------------------J a n i t o r s ------------------------------ '--------------------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g --------------------------------L e h r t e n d e r s _________________________________
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ---------------------------------------M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ----------------------------------------M o l d m a k e r s , m e t a l ------------------------------------------------S e l e c t o r s -------------------------------------------------------------------T a n k m e n --------------------------------------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r kl i f t )---------------------------------------

_

_

-

-

74
05
95
84
34
81
00
46
91
59
78
01
95
72
26
68
23
98

31
240

2. 70
2. 68

261
1,002

23

$3. 09
-

-

22
300
74

3. 81
4. 05
4. 43

-

$2.
3.
2.
2.

73
14
96
97

171
7
35
24

73
89
33
05
64
71

34
257
110

-

3.
3.
4.
3.
2.
2.

-

54
17
68
56

_

_

.

.

_

_

_

_

15
9

$2. 76
2. 63

3. 71
3. 96
4. 10

152
62

22
32
21
40
322
187

$3.
3.
3.
4.
4.
3.

$2.
3.
2.
2.
-

_

3. 17
3. 14

88
998
379
187
139
628
52
46
201
386
801
72
459

2.9 9
4. 03
3. 63
4. 24
2. 66
3. 23
3. 00

44
185

3. 03
2. 85

20
101

2.92
2. 71

863
3,448

2. 73
2. 66

1 16
7 67

2. 86
2. 66

775

-

-

-

-

2. 74

334
-

1 16

158
79
53
30

-

4. 24

-

-

-

31
256
-

10
34
95
_

-

2. 43
2. 74
-

3. 79
3. 65
4. 25
_

-

17
136
-

51
-

-

3. 69
4. 05
-

2. 52
2. 65
-

4. 05
-

2. 82
2. 82

$2.
3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
4.
4.
3.
2.
2.
3.
3.
3.
4.

81
05
16
83
34
84
04
49
04
58
88
11
99
77
27

285
16
55
52
29
41
430
207
179
64
256
69
121
226

4. 92
4. 24
4. 90

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
4.
4.
4.
3.
2.
3.

04
74
45
24
54
48
44
77
57
97
07

57
85
54
31
81
34

209
39
55
70
7
78
786
326
161
145
706
32
98
178
424

233

3. 15

40
436

3. 15
3. 06

59
360

3. 61
3. 56

282
1,724

2. 68
2. 75

468
3,4 52

2. 63
2. 65

221
2, 175

2. 96
2. 97

_

55
176
21
29
90
102
_
_

32
14
30
07
12
94

-

2.
2.
3.
4.
3.
4.

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

Women

1 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and for w o r k on w e e k e n d s ,
2 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s in a d d i t i o n to t h o s e sho wn s e p a r a t e l y .

NOTE:

ho lid ay s,

and l a t e

shifts.

D a s h e s i n d ic a te no d a ta r e p o r t e d o r d a ta th a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .




_

_
2. 52

T a b le 7 . O c c u p a tio n a l averages: G lass co n tain e rs—by size o f e s tab lis h m en t
( N u m b e r of w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s ,
Uni t ed S ta t e s 1
2

U nited S tates and s e le c te d re g io n s,

Mi ddle Atla nti c

M a y 1970)

Southeast

Southwest

G re a t Lakes

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h—

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

500 w o r k e r s
o r m o re

20-499
w o rk e rs
N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
ag e
h o u r ly
e a rn ­
in g s

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v er­
ag e
h o u r ly
e a rn ­
in g s

768
140
157
76
9
77
1, 233
554
60
511
111
889
59
68
277
382
771
98
687
37
18

$2 .6 9
3.14
2.77
2.7 0
3.06
3.76
3.9 4
4 .1 8
2.85
2.71
2.63
2.71
2.89
4.21
3.71
4 .3 4
2.63
3.16
2.8 4
3.27
2.73

554
87
202
222
178
331
2, 785
1 ,0 8 3
249
599
481
2, 189
151
271
596
1 ,2 8 4
1 ,4 6 5
245
1, 649
281
73

$ 2 .9 4
3.18
3.23
2.96
3.27
3.92
4 .0 7
4 .4 7
3.18
3.21
2.61
2.83
3.24
4.1 7
3.89
4.3 5
2.75
3.27
3.19
3.21
2.67

536
396
3, 858

2.59
2.79
2.65

2, 249
890
1 1 ,0 4 9

2.78
2.93
2.74

500 w o r k e r s
o r m o re
N um ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

2 0 -4 9 9
w o rk ers

500 w o r k e r s
o r m o re

A v er­
ag e
h o u r ly
e a rn ­
in g s

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
e a rn ­
in g s

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

.

147
_
31
-

$ 2 .5 5
_
2 .6 4
_
3.58
3.92
4 .1 0

.
_
_
_
56
24
209
79
18

2 0 -4 9 9
w o rk ers

500 w o r k e r s
o r m o re

500 w o r k e r s
o r m o re

500 w o r k e r s
o r m o re

A v e r­
ag e
h o u r ly
e a rn ­
in g s

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
e a rn ­
in g s

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v er­
age
h o u r ly
e a rn ­
in g s

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
ag e
h o u r ly
e a rn ­
in g s

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
e a rn ­
ings

_

16
49
19
_
19
140
64
_

_
10
_
_
12
137
55
12
_
27
100
_
_
_
54
_
16
84
_
-

_
$3.0 5
.
_
3.60
3.75
4. 13
2.81
_
2.51
2.66
_
_
_
4 .08
_
2.93
2.87
_
-

31
57
76
28
113
827
361
109
113
182
735
40
91
158
448
_
49
527
80
28

$3.29
3.27
2.90
3.31
3.93
4 .08
4.47
3.07
3.14
2.58
2.91
3.39
4 .04
3.81
4.28
_
3.21
3.17
3.23
2.66

219
_
37
_
29
37
312
133
23
145
53
191
_
49
91
162
_
43
279
_
7

$3.04
_
3.54
_
3.54
4.53
4.45
4.82
3.57
3.60
2.97
3.08

_
574

„
_
2.53

672
292
4, 276

2.67
3. 14
2.72

151
_
1 ,4 3 8

3.01
.
2.98

M en
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s __ _
____ _
B a t c h - a n d - f u r n a c e m e n ___-__________ ________
B a tc h m i x e r s _________________ _________________
C u l le t h a n d l e r s __ ___________________________
D e c o r a ti n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s --------------------------E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n te n a n c e --------------------F o r m i n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ____________________
F o r m i n g - m a c h in e u p k e e p m e n ------------------H e l p e r s , m a in te n a n c e t r a d e s ----------------------------I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l ________________________________
J a n i t o r s --------------------------- --- --- „ ___ __ _
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d li n g _____ - ____________
T-eh r t e n d e r s
_
.
___
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e - _________ __________
M e c h a n ic s , m a i n t e n a n c e ________________ _______
M o ld m a k e r s , m e t a l _____________ __ _________
S e le c to rs — —
— ___ __ _
____
_______
__
____ _______ _ ____
T a n k m e n —------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( fo r k lif t) _____ ________ __
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( o th e r th a n f o r k l if t ) - __
W a tc h m e n —
____ _____ ____
__ _ — ___

.
54
62
26
94
928
328
65
168
135
600
29
61
159
396
_
87
483

-

$ 3 .0 8
2.88
3.70
3.77
4 .0 6
4 .4 7
3.40
3.15
2.62
2.75
3.15
4.0 3
3.69
4 .2 5
.
3.25
3.19

-

-

-

14
130
75
-

-

9
92
_
6
_
49
_
24
94

2.4 8
2.6 0
_
3.71
_
4 .2 6
_
2.9 2
2.73

-

-

-

38
278
_
_
17
57
_
28
152
10

_
2.77
2.5 5

121
437

15

2.76

-

889
3, 404

2.83
2.7 0

.
61
360

-

_
$ 2 .8 9
3.77
4 .1 0
4 .5 0
3.0 4
_
2.36
2.6 4
_
_
3.67
4 .2 5
_
3.0 0
2.7 8
_
2.55

12
121
_
_
46
28
_
12
93
_
-

$ 2 .9 0
2.49
2.45
_
3.73
3.88
4.27
_
_
2.07
2.51
_
_
3.78
4.01
_
2.69
2.61
_
-

2.78
_
2.73

59
42
425

2.56
2.66
2.56

-

_

5.04
4.36
4.98
3.69
3.61
.
2.78

W om en
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ____________ _________
I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l - ----------------- ---- __ ___ _ S e le c to rs
__ ___ _________ ____ ___—

1
2

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f or w o r k on w e e k e n d s ,
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s in a dd it io n to t h o s e shown s e p a r a t e l y .

NOTE;

D ashes




indicate

no d a t a r e p o r t e d

holiday s,

and l a t e

o r d a t a t h a t do n o t m e e t p u b l i c a t i o n

s hi f t s .

criteria.

T a b le 8 . O c c u p a tio n a l a v erag es : G la ss co n tain e rs—by m etho d o f w a g e p aym en t
(N u m b e r of w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s , U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g i o n s , M ay 1970)
U n ite d S ta te s 2
T im e w o rk e rs
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v erag e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

M id d le A tla n tic

I n c e n tiv e
w o rk ers
N um ber
of
w o rk ers

T im e w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

$ 3 .0 6
3 .5 8
3.33
3.21
3.66

168
95
69
54

$ 2 .6 5
3.13
2.93
2.8 0

-

G reat L akes

In c e n tiv e
w o rk ers
N um ber
of
w o rk ers

T im e w o rk e rs

P a c if ic
In c e n tiv e
w o rk ers

A v erag e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v erag e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

_
_
_
_
$ 3 .8 1

_
39
51
64
13
118
139
135
469
36
256
512
40
360

_
$ 3 .0 5
3 .0 4
2 .7 8
3.21
3 .9 2
3.01
2.9 7
2 .7 4
3.03
3.7 5
4 .2 8
2.9 8
2 .8 2

906
480
_
413
17
_
_
309

394
2, 819

2 .5 0
2 .5 8

356
2, 357

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

T im e w o rk e rs

I n c e n tiv e
w o rk ers

A v erag e N um ber A v erag e N um ber
of
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
of
e a r n i n g s w o r k e r s e a r n i n g s wo r k e r s

A v erag e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

M en
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s — ------------------------------------B a t c h - a n d - f u r n a c e m e n ------- ------------------------------B a tc h m i x e r s _____________________________________
G u lle t h a n d l e r s -------— _
____
__________ ____
D e c o r a ti n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ______________
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e _____________________
F o r m i n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------F o r m i n g - m a c h in e u p k e e p m e n ------------------ --------H e l p e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e t r a d e s -----------------------------I n s p e c t o r s , f i n a l -------------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d l i n g ___ ____ _____
___
L e h r t e n d e r s --------------------------------------------------------M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ------------------------------------M o ld m a k e r s , m e t a l --------------------------------------------T a n k m e n ----------------------------------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) ______ ______________

1 ,0 8 7
197
276
216
111
408
718
219
299
842
2, 361
162
813
1 ,5 6 8
288
1 ,6 1 5

$ 2 .7 4
3.09
2.94
2.78
2.9 8
3.89
3.68
4 .0 2
3.11
2.83
2.72
3.0 0
3.79
4 .3 0
3.16
2.94

235
30
83
82
76
3, 300
1 ,4 1 8
268
717
48
60
98
55
721

4 .1 0
4 .4 3
3.45
3 .0 4
3.61
4 .4 2
5 .1 0
3.65
3.41

110
69
190
938
48
211
502
97
491

3.36
2.9 8
2.72
2.9 2
3.61
4 .2 4
3.1 8
2.8 7

1 ,5 5 1
9 ,9 3 5

2.60
2.65

1, 234
4 , 972

2.9 2
2.86

695
3, 859

2.63
2.6 4

-

-

-

3.7 5
-

_
_
_
23
-

1, 169
445
9
-

-

3 .9 8
4 .3 6
3.6 9
-

208

3.4 8

429

2.99

_
_
26
38
-

_

4 .1 3
4 .31
_
3.03
3.81
_
_
_
3.41

326
_
41
_
20
53
21
129
286
_
105
172
53
297

$ 3 .0 8
_
3.44
_
3.39
4 .4 4
3 .40
3 .50
3 .0 8
_
4 .1 6
4 .71
3.69
3.56

_
16
18
492
223
_
82
_
_
_
_
16
81

.
_
$ 3 .4 4
3.37
_
_
4.51
4 .86
_
3.68
_
_
_
_
3.72
3.52

2 .82
2 .80

118
1 ,5 8 5

2.86
2.90

782

.
3.11

_
$ 3 .5 4
3 .1 8
-

.

W om en
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ______________ _____________
S e l e c t o r s ---------------------------------------------------------------

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , a n d l a t e s h if t s .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e show n s e p a r a te l y .
NOTE:

D a s h e s i n d i c a t e n o d a t a r e p o r t e d o r d a t a t h a t do n o t m e e t p u b l i c a t i o n c r i t e r i a .




T a b le 9 . O c c u p a tio n a l averag es: P re s s e d or blow n g lass and g la s s w a re , e x c e p t c o n ta in e rs —all e s ta b lis h m e n ts
(N u m b e r of w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s , U n ite d S t a te s a n d s e le c te d r e g i o n s , M a y 1970)
U n ited S ta te s 2
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

M id d le A tla n tic

H o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1
M e a n 3 M e d ia n 3

M id d le
range 3

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

B o r d e r S t a te s

H o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1
M id d le
ran g e 3

M e a n 3 M e d ia n 3

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

G reat L akes

H o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1
M id d le
ran g e 3

M e a n 3 M e d ia n 3

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

H o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1
M id d le
ran g e 3

M e a n 3 M e d ia n 3

S e l e c t e d p r o d u c t i o n o c c u p a tio n s
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ----------— _________ ___
203
M e n ------------------------- ------ ----------_ _ ----------82
W om en—
— ___
121
B a t c h - a n d - f u r n a c e m e n ( a l l m e n ) ________
46
B a tc h m i x e r s (190 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n )____
191
B l o w e r s (384 m e n a n d 26 w o m e n ) ____—
410
C a r ry - in boys (o r g irls )
739
M en— . . .
__
__ __
646
W nm pri
,
„
---93
C u lle t h a n d l e r s ( a l l m e n ) -------------------------82
C u t t e r s , d e c o r a t iv e (62 w o m e n
a n d 33 m e n ) .
— —
—
95
D e c o r a ti n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s
(290 w o m e n a n d 107 m e n ) —. —__—
—__
397
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a l l m e n ) ____
187
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ( a l l m e n ) ——
491
F o rm in g -m a c h in e u p k eep m e n
( a ll m e n )—
.
_ ___
155
G a t h e r e r s , b lo w p ip e ( a ll m e n ) _______ ____
373
G a t h e r e r s , p r e s s e d - w a r e p u n ty
(350 m e n a n d 2 w o m e n )
— - — ____
352
G rin d e rs , g la s s w a re .
____
_____
510
M e n -------------------------------------------- ------- —
393
W om en
—
— —
117
H e l p e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e t r a d e s ( a ll m e n ) —
110
I n s p e c t o r s , f in a l (487 w o m e n
a n d 221 m e n )
____
____ ___ __
708
J a n ito rs —
--------—
300
M en
_ — —
— ------- . __
237
W om en
___ — ___ __ ____
63
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d lin g
(1 ,2 6 7 m e n a n d 52 w o m e n ) ______
1 ,3 1 9
L e h r t e n d e r s (135 m e n a n d 8 w o m e n ) —
143
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a l l m e n ) ---------475
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a ll m e n ) — ____
286
475
M o l d - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s ( a ll m en )
191
P i p e f i t t e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e ( a l l m e n ) ______
106
P r e s s e r s , g l a s s w a r e , h a n d ( a ll m e n ) —
288
S e le c to rs
------— ----3, 725
M e n .. — —
__ _
______
109
W om en
—_ _
_ —
3 ,6 1 6
T a n k m e n ( a ll m e n ) —
__ — ____ __________
372
T r a n s f e r m e n (503 m e n a n d 14 w o m e n )—
517
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( fo r k lif t)
(487 m e n anH 2 w o m e n ).
489
W a r m in g - i n b o y s ( a l l m en )
390
W a tc h m e n ( a ll m en )
— ._
__ ____
92

$ 2 .7 0
2 .5 0
2.83
3.2 0
2 .9 5
4.2 9
2 .5 0
2 .5 2
2.3 7
2 .8 2

$2.71
2.40
2.79
3.19
2.88
3.94
2.40
2.41
2.34
2.80

$ 2 .4 0 — 3 .0 1
$
1 .9 b - 2.71
2 .5 9 - 3.0 7
2 .5 0 - 3.47
2 .6 6 — 3.2 3
3 .3 5 - 4 .9 7
2 .3 4 - 2 .5 8
2 .3 4 - 2 .6 2
2 .3 4 - 2.41
2 .6 0 - 3.09

_
_
38
89
174
171
13

3.06

3.09

2 .0 8 - 3.45

-

2.8 0
3.86
3.92

2.73
4.00
4.12

2 .4 7 - 3.07
3 .7 7 - 4 .0 0
3 .4 6 - 4 .3 5

195

4.11
3.7 2

4.19
3.45

3 .7 4 - 4 .5 0
3 .0 8 - 4 .1 9

3.82
2.7 3
2.7 8
2.55
2.83

3.66
2.48
2.49
2.38
3.00

3 .2 8 2 .3 3 2 .3 3 2 .2 8 2 .8 1 -

2 .8 4
2.5 2
2.5 6
2.38

2.81
2.61
2.63
2.57

2.7 2
2.7 6
4 .0 8
3.69
4 .2 8
3.87
3.88
4 .2 2
2.63
2.72
2.63
3.05
3.12
3.02
2 .7 4
2.61

-

_
_
_
_
$ 3 .0 9
4.4 1
2 .5 6
2.57
_
3 .2 4

_
_
_
_
$ 3 .1 6
4 .0 6
2.4 7
2.4 8
_
_

_

_

2 .8 6

2.81

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_
_
_
$ 2 .8 6 — 3 .2 3
$
3 .6 5 - 4 .9 7
2 .3 7 - 2 .6 4
2 .3 7 - 2 .6 5
_
_
_

_
_

22
43
212
351
293
_
24

_
_
$ 2 .9 6
2.5 9
4 .0 4
2 .2 6
2.2 7
_
2.6 3

.
_
_
$ 2 .4 9
2 .6 0
3.7 9
2 .3 4
2 .3 4
_
2 .7 0

130

_

_

_
$ 2 .4 9 — 3 .2 9
$
2 .5 7 - 2.79
3 .3 0 - 4 .6 5
2 .3 0 - 2.38
2 .2 7 - 2 .4 0

_

2 .4 7 - 2.91

94
18
84
40
205
173
32
38

$ 2 .9 7
_
2.93
3.58
3.08
4 .13
2.87
2.91
2 .64
2.91

$ 2 .7 9
2.79
3.47
3.14
4 .0 5
2 .78
2 .95
2.45
2 .80

$2.71—
$3.21
2 .7 9 3 .2 5 2 .8 3 3 .3 1 2 .4 5 • 2 .4 7 2 .4 0 2 .6 3 -

3.14
3.78
3.25
4 .69
3.23
3.26
2.59
3.13

51

2 .5 1 - 3.06
_
_

2.5 3

2 .17

1 .9 5 - 3.15

_

_

_

103
29

2 .5 7
3 .6 2

2 .7 0
3 .5 0

1 .8 8 - 3.05
3 .5 0 - 3.89

79
75
374

2.96
3.98
3.94

2.85
4 .0 0
4 .0 8

2 .5 9 - 3.36
3 .7 7 - 4.11
3 .4 8 - 4.41

31
241

3 .7 6
3 .4 6

3 .92
3 .38

3 .4 1 - 4 .2 3
3 .0 8 - 3 .8 8

115
35

4 .2 3
3.96

4.T1
3.93

3 .7 9 - 4 .5 2
3 .0 7 - 4 .5 7

133
223

3 .2 2
2 .3 0

3 .3 0
2.3 3

2 .8 3 - 3 .66
2 .2 8 - 2.38

91
127

4 .3 6
2.96

4.09
2 .52

3 .7 0 - 5.05
2 .5 0 - 3:49

66
42

2 .1 9
2 .5 0

2 .2 8
2 .5 3

1 .8 2 - 2 .36
1 .9 5 - 2 .98

36
15

3.12
3.28

3.16
3.37

2 .8 5 - 3.53
3.17— 3.37

84
55
35
20

2.5 9
2 .2 7
2 .3 5
2.11

2 .6 8
2 .3 4
2 .4 7
1.98

2 .6 8 1 .9 5 2.14r*
1 .8 1 -

2 .76
2.57
2.59
2.41

162
118
100

3.12
2 .6 4
2.65

3 .20
2.65
2.66

2 .9 5 - 3.35
2 .5 8 - 2 .68
2 .5 8 - 2.71

418
61
47
62
113

2 .6 8
2 .4 0
3 .9 8
3 .1 0
4 .2 6

2 .6 8
2 .3 4
4 .1 0
3 .3 2
4 .2 6

2 .6 5 - 2.71
1 .96— 2 .6 0
4 . 0 4 - 4 .1 0
2 .6 6 - 3.61
4 . 2 4 - 4 .2 6

10
90
979

3.4 9
3.91
2 .5 4

378
32
110
87
270
47
24
89
2, n o

2.81
3.23
4.21
3.98
4 .2 8
3.82
3.91
4 .55
2.69

2 .74
3.08
4 .1 6
3.95
4 .2 0
3.90
3.97
4 .48
2.61

2 .7 1 2 .8 3 4 .1 6 3 .8 0 4 .1 6 3 .4 2 3 .6 6 4 .1 6 2 .5 9 -

2 ,0 7 7
103
400

2.69
3.16
3.15

2.61
3.18
2 .9 4

2 .5 9 - 2 .7 4
2 .6 9 - 3.29
2 .8 1 - 3.43

237

3.14

3.10

2 .8 7 - 3 .10

40

2.77

2 .8 0

2 .6 0 - 2.95

_

_

_

60

3 .9 8

3.87

3 .2 9 - 4 .6 6

4 .3 0
3 .0 4
3 .0 4
2 .9 6
3 .0 0

128
140
125
15

4 .0 7
3 .2 0
3.2 5
2.7 9

3.79
3 .0 4
3 .0 4
2.6 7

3 .4 1 2 .4 4 2 .4 6 2 .1 8 -

_

_

2 .7 9 2 .3 8 2 .4 7 2 .1 4 -

2.9 3
2 .7 4
2.79
2.69

105
81
24

2 .5 6
2 .6 0
2 .4 3

2 .7 0
2.7 9
2.69

2 .2 9 - 2.79
2 .4 5 - 2.79
2 .2 2 - 2 .7 0

2.71
2.65
4.16
3.82
4.24
3.91
4.00
4.03
2.59
2.79
2.59
2.94
2.94

2 .6 6 2 .3 4 —
4 .0 5 3 .6 1 4 .1 6 3 .4 2 3 .7 9 3 .6 5 2 .5 2 2 .3 3 2 .5 2 2 .6 0 2 .8 1 -

2.8 3
3 .1 4
4 .2 0
3.9 8
4 .3 3
4 .3 8
4 .0 0
4 .6 0
2 .7 0
2 .9 3
2 .7 0
3 .3 2
3.33

370
38

2 .7 2
2 .9 7

2 .7 6
3.11

2 .6 6 - 2.8 3
2 .7 9 - 3.1 8

_

_

3 .7 8
4 .2 5
4 .0 2

3.98
4 .1 6
4 .1 4

_

.

109
449
36
413
110
75

4 .2 0
2 .6 3
2 .7 5
2 .6 2
3 .36
3 .10

3.93
2.59
2 .8 0
2.51
3 .34
3.33

3 .6 6 - 4 .5 0
2 .4 4 — 2 .8 0
2 .7 5 - 2.8 2
2 .4 3 — 2.79
2 .7 1 - 3.81
2 .5 8 - 3.33

2.92
2.66
2.68

2 .8 7 - 3 .10
2 .5 0 - 3.11
2.34r- 2 .9 5

131

2 .9 6

2 .8 8

2 .7 5 - 3.05

27

2 .5 6

100

2 .0 0

1.93

1 .8 1 - 2 .2 0

63

2 .2 7

2 .1 7

1 .8 8 - 2 .5 0

28

2.18

2 .0 0

1 .9 7 - 2 .2 4

34
46

2 .5 5
2 .9 8

2 .4 0
3.1 2

2 .0 5 - 3.13
2 .2 8 - 3 .6 4

24
15

2 .8 3
3.0 8

2 .7 7
3 .1 0

_

_

2 .5 3 - 3.03
2 .7 9 - 3.38

28
61
21

2.73
2.38
2.16

2 .5 2
2 .2 5
2 .16

2 .2 5 - 3.29
2 .0 2 - 2.63
2 .0 0 - 2.18

20

2 .4 4

2.1 9

2 .1 6 - 2 .66

-

_

-

99
56
111
_

-

_

2 .6 8

_

4 .4 8
3 .5 2
3.55
3 .4 0

-

_

3 .6 1 - 3 .9 8
4 .1 6 - 4 .3 3
3 .6 5 - 4 .3 9

_

_

2 .0 2 - 2.95

_

_

_

942
130
_

_
191
23

_

_

_

2 .5 5
2 .74

_
_

2 .4 5
2 .4 2

_
_

3 .8 5
2 .5 3
_

2 .5 3
2.59
_

_
2 .5 5
2 .6 8

_

_
_

3 .5 8 - 4 .1 6
2 .5 2 - 2.53

_

_

_

2 .5 2 - 2.53
2 .5 8 — 2.77

_
_

2 .2 5 - 2 .66
1 .9 6 - 2.81

_

2.89
3.71
4 .2 0
4 .0 6
4 .3 9
3.91
4 .0 0
4 .8 9
2 .7 4

S e l e c t e d o f fic e o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , g e n e r a l (200 w o m e n
a n d 12 m e n ) —
- —
_ _
—
C l e r k s , p a y r o l l (80 w o m e n
a n d 12 m e n ) ----------------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n )_____
T y p i s ts , c l a s s A ( a ll w o m e n )— — —
T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n )

212

2.15

2.05

1 .8 5 - 2 .3 8

92
123
47
45

2.6 6
2.69
2.41
2.26

2.53
2.58
2.30
2.13

2 .1 2 2 .2 0 2 .1 6 1 .8 7 -

3.1 4
3.3 0
2.71
2 .5 0

_

21

_

_

2 .1 2

1.99

1 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , a n d l a t e s h if t s .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
S e e a p p e n d ix A f o r m e th o d u s e d in c o m p u tin g m e a n s , m e d i a n s , a n d m id d le r a n g e s o f e a r n i n g s .
N O TE :

D a s h e s in d ic a te no d a ta r e p o r te d o r data that do not m e e t p u b lica tio n c r it e r ia .




_

1 .7 9 - 2.21

_

_

M e d ia n s a n d m id d le r a n g e s a r e n o t p r o v id e d f o r e n t r i e s o f f e w e r th a n 15 w o r k e r s .

T a b le 10. O c c u p a tio n a l av e ra g e s : P re ss ed or blow n glass and g la s s w a re , e x c e p t co n ta in e rs —by size o f co m m un ity
( N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in m e t r o p o li ta n a n d n o n m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s , U n ite d S ta te s a nd s e le c te d r e g i o n s , M ay 1970)
M id d le A tla n tic

U n ite d S ta te s 2
M e tr o p o lita n a r e a s

N o n m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s

N o n m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s

G reat L akes

B o r d e r S t a te s

M e tr o p o li t a n a r e a s

M e tr o p o lita n a r e a s

N o n m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x
N um ber
of
w o rk ers

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

19
70
210
45
54
68
170
57
174
19
84
378
42
162
91
128
149
151
208
220

$ 3 .5 3
3.11
2.69
2.99
3.2 8
3.89
3 .9 8
4 .2 8
3 .8 7
3 .1 4
2.49
2.6 6
3 .0 0
4 .0 5
3.71
3 .9 8
4 .1 9
3.35
3.2 5
3.05

27
120
43 6
37
53
119
321
98
176
91
153
889
93
313
195
63
139
221
295
267

$ 2 .9 6
2.86
2.44
2,62
3.25
3.84
3.89
4 .0 1
3.80
2.7 7
2.6 0
2.7 4
2.66
4 .0 9
3.6 8
3.65
4 .2 5
2.8 4
3.0 4
2.99

65
1 ,4 9 6

2 .8 7
2.7 0

52
2 ,1 2 0

2.15
2 .5 7

A v erag e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

_
24
141
13
35

_
$ 3 ,0 9
2.6 0
3.24
3 .4 8
-

_
38
289
24
35
26
31
90
42
30
405
52
47
62
-

25
44
158
55
15
31
9
46
19
33
124
108

4 .1 0
4 .0 4
4 .3 0
3.28
2.64
3.52
4 .3 2
3 .9 0
3.46
3.46
3.21

.
868

.
2.84

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v erag e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

_
68
117

_
$ 2 .9 7
2.87
-

M en
B a t c h - a n d - f u r n a c e m e n -------- ------- ----------------------B a tc h m i x e r s _____________________________________
C a r r y - i n b o y s — ......... -..........------- ----------------- ------—
C u l le t h a n d l e r s ------------------------------- --------------------D e c o r a ti n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s --------------------------E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e --------------------------------F o r m i n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------F o r m i n g - m a c h in e u p k e e p m e n ........... ............. ............
G a t h e r e r s , p r e s s e d - w a r e p u r ity ------------------------H e l p e r s , m a in te n a n c e t r a d e s -----------------------------J a n i t o r s __________________________________________
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d li n g -----------------------------L e h r t e n d e r s --------------------- ---------------------------------M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e ------------ ------- ---------------M e c h a n i c s , m a in te n a n c e -------------------------------------M o l d - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------------P r e s s e r s , g l a s s w a r e , h a n d ----------------- -------------T a n k m e n ------------------------------------- -------------------------T r a n s f e r m e n —-------------- ---------------- ------- ------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) ------------------------------

92

2.9 8

-

_
$ 2 ,5 7
2 .2 7
2.63
3 .1 4
3 .62
3.76
3 .2 8
2 .50
2.33
2.69
2.36
3 .9 8
3 .1 0
2 .72
-

14
382

2.7 7
2.61

43
880

2.06
2.56

-

105
27
199
20
102
Ill
94
86
-

-

4 .1 1
-

2.4 2
2.6 7
2.99
4 .0 4
4 .0 2
4 .2 4
3 .4 7
-

-

127
-

_
16

_
$ 3 .5 4

-

-

3.07
-

-

31
216
63
69
323
23
68
43
61
70
262

W om en
G r i n d e r s , g l a s s w a r e -------------------------------------------S e l e c t o r s ......... ........... ----------------------------------------------

1
2

E x c lu d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , a n d l a t e s h if t s .
I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .

N O TE:

D a s h e s i n d ic a te no d a ta r e p o r t e d o r d a ta t h a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .




_

-

3.80
3.87
4.51
2.66
2.78
3.12
4 .0 0
3.68
4 .60
3.02
3.02
-

T a b le 11. O c c u p a tio n a l earnings: P re s s e d or blown g lass and g la s s w a re , e x c e p t c o n ta in e rs —by size o f e s ta b lis h m e n t
(N u m b e r of w o r k e r s a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s , U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g i o n s , M ay 1970)
U n ite d S ta te s 2

M id d le A tla n tic

B o rd e :r S ta te s

G reat L akes

E s t a b l i s h m e n ts w ith —
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

2 0 -4 9 9 v o r k e r s
N um ber
of
w o rk ers

500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e
N um ber
of
w o rk ers

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v erag e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

A v erag e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s

M en
B a tc h m i x e r s _____________________________________
B l o w e r s __________________________________________
C a r r y - i n b o y s ____________________________________
C u l le t h a n d l e r s __________________________________
D e c o r a ti n g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s __________________
E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e ______________________
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ________________ ____
F o r m i n g - m a c h in e u p k e e p m e n _________________
G a t h e r e r s , b lo w p ip e ____________________________
G r i n d e r s , g l a s s w a r e ____________________________
J a n i t o r s __________________________________________
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r i a l h a n d lin g
L e h r t e n d e r s ____________________________________
M a c h i n i s t s , m a i n t e n a n c e _______________________
M e c h a n ic s , m a i n t e n a n c e _ _
M o ld m a k e r s , m e t a l _____________________________
M o l d - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s ___________________________
T a n k m e n ----------------------------------------------------------------

108
280
517
45
36
28
118
-

266
290
94
252
51
66
45
223
-

$ 2 .8 1
4 .3 3
2 .5 5
2 .6 6
2 .9 7
3 .7 8
3 .3 2
3 .6 6
2 .8 8
2.4 2
2.5 9
2.71
3.7 6
3 .5 0
4 .3 8
-

190

2 .7 6

.
31
798

2.2 3
2 .5 0

82
104
129
37
71
159
373
132
107
_
143
1 ,0 1 5
84
409
241
252
175
182

$ 3 .1 4
4 .4 1
2.4 0
3 .0 2
3.4 2
3 .8 7
4 .1 1
4.1 1
3.8 7
_
2.66
2.75
2 .8 0
4 .1 3
3.7 2
4 .1 9
3.8 9
3.35

24
_
13

$ 3 .2 5
_
2.96

14
_

_
_
_
_
_
11
_
233
21
_
_
24
111
69

_
_
_
_
_
3.0 6

_
23

4 .1 5
4 .0 2
3 .7 0

112
32
2, 818

2.8 8
2.53
2.6 7

17
250

2.6 0
2.63

_

2.8 0
3.0 4

_
_

_

_
_

$ 2 .9 5

35

$3.1 9

18

2.87

3 .67

59
293
107

3.93
4.11
4 .1 4

58
316
28
87
70
146
43
67

2.64
2.78
3.17
4.21
4.01
4 .16
3.68
3.21

_
_

22
372

2.39
2.69

_
54

3.17

_

_

_

46

3.05

9

2.34

W om en
A s s e m b l e r s , c a r t o n s ___________ ______________
J a n i t o r s _____ ______ ________ _________ ____________
S e l e c t o r s _________________________________________

_

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , a n d la t e s h if t s .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e show n s e p a r a te l y .
NOTE:

D a s h e s i n d ic a te no d a ta r e p o r t e d o r d a ta t h a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .




87

2.97

1, 850

2.71

T a b le 12. O c c u p a tio n a l averag es: P re s s e d or blow n glass and g la s s w a re , e x c e p t co n ta in e rs —by m e th o d o f w a g e p aym en t
( N u m b e r of w o r k e r s and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 1 in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s ,

U n i t e d S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s ,
Mi ddle Atla ntic

U ni t ed St at e s 1
2
Tim eworker s

M a y 1970)

I nc en t iv e w o r k e r s

T im ew ork er s

B o r d e r S ta t e s

Incentive w o r k e r s

T im eworkers

Great Lakes
T im ew orkers

Incentive w o r k e r s

O c c u p a t i o n and s e x
N um ber
of
workers

Average
ho urly
earni ngs

Number
of
w ork er s

Average
hourly
earn in gs

Number
of
workers

Average
ho u rly
earni ng s

N um be r
of
workers

Average
ho u rly
earni ng s

N um be r
of
workers

Average
hourly
earni ng s

_
42
26

_
$2.57
3. 62

-

-

Number
of
workers

Average
hou rly
earn in gs

N um be r
of
workers

Average
hourly
earni ngs

Men
B a t c h - a n d - f u r n a c e m e n ----------------------------------------Batch m ixe rs_
_
----- ------------------------------ ----D e c o r a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------E l e c t r i c i a n s , m a i n t e n a n c e -----------------------------------F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s — _______________
F o r m i n g - m a c h i n e u p k e e p m e n ____ __________
G r i n d e r s , g l a s s w a r e ----------------------------------------------H e l p e r s , m a i n t e n a n c e t r a d e s ----------------- -------------L e h r t e n d e r s -----------------------------------------------------------M o l d - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s -------------------------------------------T a n k m e n -------------------------------------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r , f o r k l i f t -------------------------------------

3.82
2. 51
2.81
2. 70
3.65
2.90
2. 92

23
69
413
124
100
21
127
84
104

_
$ 3. 3 3
3.49
4. 05
4 . 18
3.58
3.14
3.98
3. 56
3.38

68
33
51
1 14

2. 73
2. 56

28
919

3.04
2. 82

27 2

36
167
38
159
31
29 3
103
114
64
288
383

$3.15
2.90
2. 87
3.86

459
2, 697

-

_

_
24
-

.
$ 3.08
-

2.90
2. 96
3.09
2.88

_
14
30
-

57
11 0
59

.
$3 .10
3. 57
-

3. 67
4. 02
3.59
-

42
52
1 27

2. 50
2. 36
2 . 72

17
43
81
15 1

3. 27
3.68
3. 07
3.02

_
296
95
27
22
86

2.51
2. 50

56
1,60 3

2 . 70
2. 58

47 4

-

18
76
53
-

$ 3 . 58
3,01
3. 96
-

_
$4.13
4. 30
3.85
3.49
3. 35

W om en
Inspectors,
Selectors

1
2

f i n a l -----------------------------------------------------

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f or w o r k on w e e k e n d s ,
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s in a d d i t i o n to t h o s e sho wn s e p a r a t e l y .

NOTE:

D ashes




indicate

no d a ta

rep o rted

holidays,

and l a t e

_

s hi f t s .

o r d a t a th a t do not m e e t p u b l i c a t i o n c r i t e r i a .

.

2. 61

_

141

_
2. 63

57
818

_

_

3.03

T a b le 13. G la s s containers: M ethod o f w a g e p aym en t
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s b y m e th o d of w a g e p a y m e n t, U n ite d S t a te s a n d s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M ay 1970)
M e th o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t 1

A ll w o r k e r s ------------ --------- ----------------------------

U n ite d
S t a te s 2

M id d le
A tla n tic

100

B o rd e r
S ta te s

S o u th e a s t

S o u th w e s t

G re a t
L akes

P a c if i c

100

100

100

100

T i m e - r a t e d w o r k e r s ------------------------------------------F o r m a l p l a n ---------------------------------------------------S in g le r a t e ------------------------------------------------R a n g e o f r a t e s ____________________________
I n d iv id u a l r a t e s ______________________________

67
67
58
9
(3 )

75
75
74
1
-

49
49
42
7
-

78
78
74
4
(3 )

86
86
59
27
-

57
57
46
11
-

61
61
44
17
(3 )

I n c e n tiv e w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------------In d iv id u a l p i e c e w o r k ________ ________________
G r o u p p i e c e w o r k -------------------------------------------I n d iv id u a l b o n u s --------------------------------------------G r o u p b o n u s ----------------------------------------------------

33

25

51

22

-

-

-

14
12
2

43
_
_
20
23

39

-

3
16
14

19
12
19

21
4

100

5
17

100

7
12
20

1 F o r d e f in itio n o f m e th o d of w a g e p a y m e n t, s e e a p p e n d ix A .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 L e s s t h a n 0 .5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .

T a b le 14. G lass containers: Scheduled w eekly hours
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t i o n a n d o ffic e w o r k e r s b y s c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s o f d a y - s h i f t w o r k e r s .
W e e k ly h o u r s

U n ite d
S t a te s 2

M id d le
A tla n tic

U n ite d S t a te s a n d s e le c te d r e g i o n s , M ay 1970)
B o rd er
S t a te s

S o u th e a s t

S o u th w e s t

G re a t
L akes

P a c if i c

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s --------------------------------------- ----------4 0 h o u r s ------------------------------------------------------------4 8 h o u r s --------------------------------------------------------------C y c l ic a l w o r k w e e k s 3 ___________________________
4 0 , 4 0 , 4 0 , a n d 4 8 h o u r s ________ _______ ____

10 0

100

10 0

100

_

36
26
38
38

6

9
2

-

89
76

10 0

80

100

10 0

10 0

7
_
92
54

13
_
87
87

_
94
76

100

10 0

100

100

_

_
_
_
26

.
_
_
29

.
_
5

_

_

71

95

_
95
89

6

O ffic e w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s _______ _____ ____________________

100

10 0

35 h o u r s --------------------------------------------------------------3 6 V4 h o u r s ____________________________________ _
3 7 V2 h o u r s ----------------------------------------------------------3 8 3 h o u r s ----------------------------------------------------------/4
39 h o u r s -------------------------------------- ------- ----------------40 h o u r s --------------------- -------- ----------------- ---------------

3

_

2

6

1
14
3
77

_
13




_

81

100

29
_
-

18
-

29
41

-

_

82

74

1 D a ta r e l a t e to p r e d o m in a n t w o r k s c h e d u le f o r f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s in e a c h e s ta b l is h m e n t .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 I n c lu d e s o t h e r r e g u l a r l y a lt e r n a t in g w o rk w e e k s c h e d u le s in a d d itio n to t h e o n e s h o w n s e p a r a te l y .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l 100.

-

T a b le 15. Glass containers: S hift differential provisions
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s b y s h if t d i f f e r e n t ia l p r o v i s i o n s , 1 U n ite d S t a te s a n d s e le c te d r e g i o n s , M ay 1970)
S h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l

U n ite d
S ta te s 2

M id d le
A tla n tic

B o rd e r
S ta te s

S o u th e a s t

S o u th w e s t

G reat
L akes

P a c if i c

S e c o n d s h if t
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g s e c o n d s h if t p r o v i s i o n s _______________________ _____ ___
W ith s h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l ------------------------------------U n if o r m c e n ts p e r h o u r -------------- ------------10 c e n ts -------------------------------------------------12 c e n ts --------------------------------------------------

100.0
100.0
100.0
9 5 .7
4 .3

1 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
100.0
87 .6
12.4

1 0 0.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
-

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
-

100.0
100.0
100.0
9 1 .6
8.4

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
"

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
.6
9 9 .4

100.0
100.0
10 0 .0
1 0 0.0

100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
8.4
9 1 .6

100.0
100.0
100.0
_
100.0

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

S o u th w e s t

G re a t
Lakes

P a c if i c

T h i r d o r o t h e r l a t e s h if t
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g t h i r d - o r
o t h e r l a t e - s h i f t p r o v i s i o n s ------------------------------W ith s h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l ------------------------------------U n if o r m c e n ts p e r h o u r ---------------------------12 c e n t s -------------------------------------------------14 c e n t s ___________________________ ____ _

-

100.0

1 R e f e r s to p o l ic i e s o f e s ta b l is h m e n t s e it h e r c u r r e n tl y o p e r a t in g l a t e s h if t s o r h a v in g p r o v is i o n s c o v e r in g l a t e s h if t s .
2 I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .

T ab le 16. Glass containers: Shift differential practices
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d o n l a t e s h if ts b y a m o u n t o f p a y d i f f e r e n t ia l , U n ite d S t a te s a n d s e le c te d r e g i o n s , M ay 1970)
S h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l

U n ite d
S ta te s 1

M id d le
A tla n tic

B o rd er
S t a te s

S o u th e a s t

S e c o n d s h if t
W o r k e r s e m p lo y e d o n s e c o n d s h if t_____________
R e c e iv in g s h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l ------------------------ —
U n i f o r m c e n ts p e r h o u r --------------------------- 10 c e n ts ________________________________
12 c e n ts --------------------------------------------------

27.1
27.1
27.1
25 .9
1.2

27.6
27 .6
27 .6
2 4 .0
3 .5

2 6 .0
2 6 .0
2 6 .0
2 6 .0
-

26 .3
26 .3
26 .3
26 .3
-

2 8 .4
2 8 .4
2 8 .4
26.1
2.3

2 8.5
2 8.5
2 8.5
28.5

23.1
23.1
23.1
23.1
-

2 6 .0
2 6 .0
26 .0
.2
2 5 .8

2 6 .0
2 6 .0
2 6 .0

2 6 .0
2 6 .0
2 6 .0

2 3 .8
2 3 .8
2 3 .8

2 7 .0
2 7 .0
2 7 .0
2.3
24.6

28.1
28.1
28.1
_
28.1

21.9
21.9
21.9
_
21.9

T h i r d o r o t h e r l a t e s h if t
W o r k e r s e m p lo y e d o n t h i r d o r
o t h e r l a t e s h if t------------ -------------------------------------R e c e iv in g s h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l __________________
U n if o r m c e n ts p e r h o u r __________________
12 c e n t s ______ __________________________
14 c e n t s --------------------------------------------------




-

2 6 .0

1 I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i te m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .

-

2 6 .0

-

2 3 .8

T a b le 17. G la s s containers: Paid holidays
( P e r c e n t -of p r o d u c t i o n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s f o r p a i d h o l i d a y s , U n i t e d S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s ,
U ni t ed
States 1

N u m b e r of p a i d h o l i d a y s

Mid dle
Atla ntic

Border
States

Southeast

M a y 1970

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Pacific

Prod uctio n w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s __________

_
_

_ --------

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
paid ho liday s _
_ --------------------------------7 d ay s —
---------- -------- ------ ----------------------8 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------------8 d a y s p l u s 1 h a l f d a y ___ _________ _
_ 9 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
7
93
-

100
100
-

■

'

■

_

100
92
2
6

(2 )
97
(2 )
(2 )

"

O ff ic e w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s ---------------------------------

-

-------

.

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
p a i d h o l i d a y s _____ _
---------------------- ----------4 d a y s ------------------- -— -----------------6 d a y s ------------—_ ------------ - -----—- — 6 d ays plus 1 half day ..
---------------------------7 d a y s ------ ------------------- ------------------ --------------8 d a y s ________________________
_
_ ____
8 d a y s p lu s 1 h a l f d a y .
...
___ _
9 days. ----------- _ -------------------------------------10 d a y s p l u s 1 h a l f d a y ------------------------ --------




1
2

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
1

100
96
4

100
71
29

100
18
68
13
-

100
3
42
56
-

100
90
1
9

100
7
57
8
23
5

(2 )
1
3
80
3
8
4

I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s i n add it io n to t h o s e s h o wn s e p a r a t e l y .
L e s s t h an 0. 5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i t e m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .

T a b le 18. G la s s co n tain e rs : P aid vacations
( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c t i o n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i th f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s f o r p a i d v a c a t i o n s a f t e r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s of s e r v i c e ,
U ni t e d
States 1

V a c a ti o n po licy

Middle
Atlantic

Border
St a te s

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

P acific

U n i t e d S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s ,

Uni ted
St ates 1

Mi ddle
At lanti c

Border
States

Pr od uction w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s ____

_____

______________

M a y 1970)

Southeast

Southwest

G re at
Lakes

P a c if ic

O ff ic e w o r k e r s

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
93
7

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
67
33

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
100

100
100

-

100
96
4

100
100

-

100
92
8

100
100

"

53
47
-

61
39
-

31
69
-

65
35
-

49
51
-

27
73
-

90
10
-

14
2
84

20
5
76

1

14
7
79

10

20

5

99

90

80

95

35
35
31
_

59
17
24
_

26
69
5
_

59
35
6

31
51
18

18
60
21
_

92
5

100

7
93

97

100

100

51
49
-

44
56
-

31
69
_

65
35
_

49

95

97

93

100

100

100

92
8

81
19

100
_

100
_

67
33

40
60

95
5

15
81
4

10
83

52
48

Me th od of paym en t
W o r k e r s in es ta b l i s h m e n t s pr ov id in g
p a i d v a c a t i o n s ___ _________ _
___ _
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t _ _ ______ _
_
_
P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t _______________________
Am ou nt of V a c a ti o n pa y 2
A f t e r 1 y e a r of s e r v i c e :
1 w e e k ____________
_____________________
O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s _________________
2 w e e k s _ _______________ _______________
_
A f t e r 2 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
1 w e e k ____ _ ___________
_
_ __
_ _
_
_
O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s _________________
2 w e e k s _______ _
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s _
_ _
_
_______
A f t e r 5 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s ________________________ _ _ _ _ _
_
_
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s _ _ _ ____
_ _
_ __
_
3 w e e k s _______ _____ ________
_____
A f t e r 10 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s ____
____
___________________ _
3 w e e k s ---- ---------------------- ------ -- ------------------ -O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s . - _ _
_
A f t e r 15 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
3 w e e k s ____ _____________________ _______
O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ____ _ _ ______
A f t e r 20 y e a r s of s e r v i c e : 4
3 w e e k s -------------------------- ---------- -. ..
____
4 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------- _ _
O v e r 4 and u n d e r 5 w e e k s ________
__

8

6

1

94

(3 )
97
1

42
58
_

82
18

98
2

-

_

_

89
11

100
_

90
10

74
26

71
29

73
27

84
16

18
82

15
67

18
82

_

100

_

_

51
_

18

5

7
3

(3 )
2
98

3

4

_

_

3

100
_

100

6
94

97

100

7
93

99
1

99
1

100

93

100

100

100

10
90

95

10
90

16
84

99

_

5

7

_
100

31
69

1

1 Includes data for r eg io n s in addition to those s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
2 T h e a m o u n t of v a c a t i o n p a y i n t h i s t a b u l a t i o n i s e x p r e s s e d i n t e r m s of t h
j t h of t i m e c o v e r e d b y t h e p a y m e n t , m ure
a g a i n s t the w o r k e r s ' r e g u l a r w or k w e ek ,
Thu s, es tablishm en ts
p r o v i d i n g 48 h o u r s ' v a c a t i o n p a y w e r e c l a s s i f i e d a s g r a n t i n g 1 w e e k i f t h e e o r k s c h e
w a s 4 8 h o u r s , b u t o v e r 1 a n d , ul
, 3k s
h e w o r k s c h e d u l e w a s l e s s t h a n 48 h o u r s , M a n y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
m a i n t a i n e d r e g u l a r l y c h a n g i n g w o r k s c h e d u l e s ( e . g . , 40 h o u r s f o r t he f i r s t 3 w e e k s a w
48 h o u r s f o r t h e f o u r th ) ; ’
,, u^ h i n s t a n c e s ,
- ^ v i s i o n s f o r 48 h o u r s ' v a c a t i o n p a y w e r e c o n s i d e r e d as o v e r 1
and u n d e r 2 w e e k s . V a c a t i o n p a y m e n t s , s u c h as p e r c e n t of a n n u a l e a r n i n g s , w e r e c o n v e r t e d t o a n e q u i v a l e n t t i m e ^ a s i s . P e r i o d s o f s o r v w e w e r e a r b i t r a r i l y c h o s e n and do not i t e c e s s a r i l y r e f l e c t t he
i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r o v i s i o n s f o r p r o g r e s s i o n . F o r e x a m p l e , t he c h a n g e s i n p r o p o r t i o n s i n d i c a t e d a t 10 y e a r s r a y i n c l u d e c h a n g e s o c c u r r i n g b e t w e e n 5 and 10 y e a r s .
3 L e s s t h a n 0. 5 p e r c e n t .
4 V a c a t i o n p r o v i s i o n s w e r e v i r t u a l l y t he s a m e a f t e r l o n g e r p e r i o d s of s e r v i c e .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l t o t a l s .

T a b le 19. G la s s c o n tain e rs : H e alth , insurance, and re tire m e n t plans
( P e r c e n t it p r o d u c tio n a n d j 1

■ e r s- : n < s ta b l is h m e n ts w ith s p e c if ie d h e a lth , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e t i r e m e n t p la n s , U n ite d S ta te s a n d s e le c te d r e g i o n s , M a y 1970)
•

T ype o f p la n *

U n ite d
S ta te s 2

M iddle
A tla n tic

B o rd e r
S ta te s

S o u th e a s t

S o u th w e s t

G reat
L akes

P a c if i c

U n ite d
S ta te s 2

M id d le
A tla n tic

B o rd er
S t a te s

P r o d u c ti o n w o r k e r s

S o u th e a s t

S o u th w e s t

G reat
L akes

P a c if ic

O ffic e w o r k e r s

10
0

A ll w o r k e r s _________________________________ ___ 100

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0

10
0
2
2
6
6

10
0

10
0
1
2

10
0

10
0
4

32

2
2

96

31

10
0

99

36

10
0

10
0

33

10
0

42

27

10
0
14

10
0
2
1

10
0

80

18

36

89
31

81
4

94
32

84
19

70
16

10
0

79
42

94
27

82

96

76
76

10
0
10
0

10
0
10
0

10
0
10
0

99
69

31

4

2
1
2
1
6

10
0
6
8

10
0
10
0

10
0
10
0
63

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L i f e i n s u r a n c e ________________________________
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s . . . ........... ......................
A c c id e n ta l d e a th a n d d i s m e m b e r m e n t
i n s u r a n c e ......... ....................... .................... ...................
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ____________________
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u ra n c e o r
s ic k l e a v e o r b o th 3_________________________
S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e _________
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s _________________
S ic k l e a v e (fu ll p a y , no w a itin g
p e r i o d ) . ................ ....................... ..............................
S ic k le a v e ( p a r t i a l p a y o r w a itin g
p e r i o d ) _________________________________ _
H o s p i ta l iz a t io n i n s u r a n c e ____________________
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ....................................... .
S u r g ic a l i n s u r a n c e ___________________________
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ____________________
M e d ic a l i n s u r a n c e ____________________________
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p l a n s ____________________
M a jo r m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e ____________________
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p l a n s ____________________
R e t ir e m e n t p l a n s 4___________________________
P e n s io n s - ....................................................................
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s _________________
S e v e r a n c e p a y ...........................................................

10
0
19
81
18
79
79

1
1

1
1

1
2
8
8
8
8

36

.

-

-

.

.

_

_

_

99
17

-

-

-

-

_

.

10
0
17
10
0

10
0
18
10
0
18
10
0

17
87
18
97
97
94

18
81
18
95
95
95

10
0
36
10
0
36
10
0
36
10
0
36
10
0
10
0
74

10
0
1
2
10
0
1
2
10
0
1
2
90
1
2
10
0
10
0
10
0

10
0
17
10
0
17
10
0

10
0
4
10
0
4
10
0

17
89
17

4
81

10
0
10
0
10
0

8

93
93
93

94
32

10
0
32
10
0
32
10
0
32
10
0
10
0
10
0

2
1

33

7

3

85
61
18

85

79

96

60

3
99
15

10
0
15
10
0

1
0
10
0
16
10
0
16
10
0

15
95
16
97
96
89

16
91
16
94
94
90

1
1

1

_

10
0
3
10
0
3
10
0
3
10
0
3
10
0
10
0
10
0

_

10
0
42
10
0
42
10
0
42
93
42
92
92
92

34

_

10
0
27
10
0
27
10
0
27
94
27

10
0
10
0
90

8
10
0
8
8

2
1
10
0

14

15
5

92

95

_

10
0
1
1
10
0
1
1
10
0
1
1
96
13
97
97
90

96
14

10
0
14
10
0
14
10
0
14
10
0
96
77
4

" N o n c o n t r i b u to r y p l a n s " in c lu d e o n ly t h o s e p la n s fin a n c e d e n t i r e l y b y th e e m p l o y e r .
L e g a lly r e q u i r e d p la n s s u c h a s w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n s a tio n a n d s o c ia l s e c u r i t y a r e e x c lu d e d ; h o w e v e r , p la n s
r e q u i r e d by S ta te t e m p o r a r y d i s a b i li ty i n s u r a n c e la w s a r e in c lu d e d i f t h e e m p lo y e r c o n tr i b u te s m o r e th a n i s le g a lly r e q u i r e d o r th e e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e b e n e f i ts in e x c e s s o f l e g a l r e q u i r e m e n ts .
I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
U n d u p lic a tc d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s ic k l e a v e o r s ic k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
U n d u p lic a te d t o ta l o f w o r k e r s c o v e re d b y p e n s io n s o r r e t i r e m e n t s e v e r a n c e p a y sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
L e s s t h a n 0 .5 p e r c e n t .

2
3
4
5




T a b le 2 0 . G la s s co n tain ers: O th e r se lecte d benefits
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c tio n a n d o f fic e w o r k e r s in e s ta b l is h m e n t s p ro v id in g f u n e r a l l e a v e p a y , j u r y d u ty p a y , a n d t e c h n o lo g ic a l s e v e r a n c e p a y ,
U n ite d S t a te s a n d s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M ay 1970)
I te m 1

U n ite d
S ta te s 2

M id d le
A tla n tic

B o rd er
S ta te s

S o u th e a s t

S o u th w e s t

G reat
Lakes

P a c if i c

P r o d u c ti o n w o r k e r s
W o r k e r s in e s ta b l is h m e n t s w ith
p r o v is i o n s fo r:
F u n e r a l l e a v e p a y -------------------- ... _________
J u r y d u ty p a y ---------------- -------------------------------T e c h n o lo g ic a l s e v e r a n c e p a y _____________ _

10
0

99

10
0
10
0

30

39

10
0
10
0
"

10
0
10
0
1
0

10
0
10
0

10
0
10
0

37

43

10
0
10
0

10
0

94

10
0
6

O ffic e w o r k e r s
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith
p r o v is i o n s fo r:
F u n e r a l l e a v e p a y -----------------------------------------J u r y d u ty p a y --------------------- -----------------------------T e c h n o lo g ic a l s e v e r a n c e p a y ________________




1
2

79
84
29

F o r d e f in itio n o f b e n e f i ts , s e e a p p e n d ix A.
I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .

10
0
10
0
30

30
30
37

60
82

32

91

48

49
58




T a b le 21. P re ss ed or blown glass and g la s s w a re , ex ce p t co n tainers: M eth o d of w ag e p aym en t
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s by m e t h o d of w a g e p a y m e n t ,

Me th od of wage paym ent 1

A l l w o r k e r s ----

--------------------

U n i t e d S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s ,

United
States 2

_ _________

M a y 1970)

Mi ddle
Atla nti c

Border
States

Great
Lakes

100

100

100

100

T i m e - r a t e d w o r k e r s _____
______ _________
F o r m a l p l a n ___________________
________
S i n g l e r a t e ____ _____ ___ _________
R a n g e of r a t e s ___
____ _______ _ _
I n d i v i d u a l r a t e s ________________

65
61
35
26
4

68
61
21
40
7

67
63
45
17
4

59
44
15

I n c e n t i v e w o r k e r s . . . - _ ______
_____ ______
Individual pi ec e w o rk
. __
____
G r o u p p i e c e w o r k ____ . . .
. _ ___
I n d i v i d u a l b o n u s _________
____
G r o u p b o n u s _____________ .
____

35
8
2
11
15

32
14
2
10
5

33
14
2

41

9

14
27

1
2
3

8

59

(3 )

F o r d e f i ni t io n of m e t h o d of w a g e p a y m e n t , s e e a p p e n d i x A .
I n c l u d e s d at a f o r r e g i o n s i n a ddi tion t o t h o s e s ho wn s e p a r a t e l y .
L e s s t h an 0.5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e of r ou nd ing ,

s u m s of i n d i v i d u a l i t e m s m a y not e q u a l t o t a l s .

T a b le 2 2 . P re ss ed or blown glass and g la s s w a re , ex ce p t co n tain ers: S c h e d u le d w e e k ly hours
( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c t i o n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s by s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s of d a y - s h i f t w o r k e r s , 1
U n i t e d S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M a y 1970)
United
States 2

W eek ly hours

Mid dle
At la nti c

Border
States

Great
Lakes

100

100

100

85
-

2
88
_

15
9

10
10

28
24
47
47

Productioni w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s _____________

_ ______
_

_

100

35 h o u r s ________________
. . . _____________
40 h o u r s ________________ _ .
_ ________. . .
48 h o u r s ___ ______
. _ _ . _____ ___
_
_
C y c l i c a l w o r k w e e k s 3 ______ _ __________
40, 40, 40, and 48 h o u r s _______
_
_ .

1
62
9
28
22

O ff ic e w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s _____________

____________

35 h o u r s ____ _ . . .
____
_ _ _ ________
_
_
_ ______ _ _
_
3 6 Vs h o u r s . . . ___ _ _______
3 7V2 h o u r s ___ _____________ ______________
O v e r 37V2 and u nd e r 40 h o u r s .
..
---------------40 h o u r s — ___ _ _____ _ _
_
_
_
_ _
_
50 h o u r s
— ___ .
. . .
_____ _
___ _

1
2
3

100

100

100

100

1
2
1
4
86
6

1
_
_

3

1
8

7
92

D a t a r e l a t e t o p r e d o m i n a n t w o r k s c h e d u l e f o r f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s in e a c h e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
I n c l u d e s d at a f or r e g i o n s i n addi tion to t h o s e s ho wn s e p a r a t e l y .
I n c l u d e s o t he r r e g u l a r l y a l te r n a t i n g w o r k w e e k s c h e d u l e s i n a d d it io n t o t he one s h o wn s e p a r a t e l y .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e of r ou nd ing ,

s u m s of i n d i v i d u a l i t e m s m a y not e q u a l 100.

_
.

97

_
72
20

T a b le 2 3 . P re s s e d o r b lo w n g la ss and g la ss w a re, e x ce p t
co n tain e rs : S h ift d iffe re n tia l p ro vision s

T a b le 2 4 . P re s s e d or blow n glass and g la s s w a re , e x ce p t
containers: S h ift d iffe re n tia l p ractices

( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s b y s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l p r o v i s i o n s ,
U n i t e d S t a t e s a n d s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M a y 197 0)
United
Sta tes 1
2

S h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l

( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d on l a t e s h i f t s b y a m o u n t of p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l ,
U n i t e d S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M a y 1970)

Middle
Atlantic

Border
S t a te s

Great
Lakes

United
St ates 1

S h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l

Middle
A tla n ti c

Border
St ates

Great
Lakes

S e c o n d shi ft
W o r k e r s in es ta b l i s h m e n t s havi ng
s e c o n d - s h i f t p r o v i s i o n s — - ______ - _______
Wi t h s hi f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ________
___ ___
U n i fo r m cents pe r h o u r _
_
_
— ___
3 c e n t s ________________
_______
4 c e n t s ______ ________ _ _ _____ __
5 c e n t s ________ __ _ _ _____ _
_
6 c e n t s ____
________
____ . _ _
9 c e n t s „ _____ ____ ______ ______
10 c e n t s . _________
_ _ _ _____ . . .
1 1 c e n t s _ ____ _________ __________
_
12 c e n t s -------------------------------------------U n i f o r m p e r c e n t a g e ___ _____
____
3 p e r c e n t ----------. _ - _ ------- -- . —
_
_
_
W i t h no s hi f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ___ - _

S e c o n d shi ft
95. 8
94.0
92.9
7.8
4. 0
13.1
4. 2
5.6
50. 5
3.1
4. 5
1.1
1.1
1.8

93.8
93.8
90.3
9. 1
4. 6
1. 7
_
66.0
-

8 6. 7
84.9
84.9
1.6
1. 5
8.9
3. 5
1. 5
2. 1
1.8
1. 5

85.7
85.7

20.8

5 1. 7

8.8
3.5
3.5
-

93.5
93.5
93.5
18.9
34.4
3.6
_
18.3
12.0
6.3
-

100.0
100.0
100.0
_
7.0
6.2
9.1
1 5. 5
62 .2
_
_
-

-

-

-

-

W o r k e r s e m p l o y e d on s e c o n d
s h if t ____________________
________________
R e c e i v i n g shi f t d i f f e r e n t i a l ________________
U n i f o r m c e n t s p e r h o u r _________
____
3 c e n t s _ ________ ______
_
____
4 merits__ — _ . _______ _______ —
_
5 c e n t s _______ _____ _____ . . . _ _____
6 c e n t s ------------------------------ ------- -------9 c e n t s ---------_ _ --------------------------10 c e n t s ____ .
________ ___
11 c e n t s ____ — — ___ ____ _____
.
_________ _______
12 c e n t s _______
R e c e i v i n g no s h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l _______
____

20.5
20.0
20.0
1.1
1.1
1. 9
.9
1.3
11.3
.7
1.7
.6

19.7
19.7
19.7
2. 1
1. 8
-

14.7
14.3
14.3
.2
.5
.5
.4
.3
.4
3. 7
.3
5.8
2. 1
.4

15 . 2
1 5. 2
15.2
.7

22.4
22.4
22.4
1.8
-

2.7

7.4
1.7
5.6
2.6
3.3

-

-

13.1
-

21.3
21.3
21.3
1.4
1.1
3.5
1 5. 2
_
-

T h i r d or o t h e r l a t e shi f t
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g t n i r d or o t h e r l a t e - s h i f t p r o v i s i o n s _____
— _
W i t h s h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l ___
_„
. . . _ „_
_
U n i f o r m c e n t s p e r h o u r _ - -----------------3 c e n t s „ _____ _ ______
_ _
_
_
4 cents _ _ . _
---------------------- --------5 cents
.
— _
_
„ ________
6 cents _
_ _ ----— ------ ------------8 cen ts _
_ _ . _
_ _
_
_ _______
9 c e n t s _________ ______
_________
10 c e n t s ---------------------------------------------------1 1 c e n t s --------------------- . . __________
------------- -------- ---- _
12 c e n t s — -------13 c e n t s _____
___ _____ _ _ _
_
14 c e n t s ----------------------- ----15 c e n t s __________________ _________
W it h no s h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l ____
____
. .

T h i r d o r o t h e r l a t e shi ft

3.7

27.7

85 .7
4.6
1. 7
-

6.4
_
_

21.2

10.4
1.8

1 R e f e r s to p o l i c i e s of e s ta b l i s h m e n t s ei the r c urre nt ly operating
p r o v isio n s c o ve rin g la te sh ifts.
2 I n c l u d e s d at a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d it io n t o t h o s e sho wn s e p a r a t e l y .

74 .5
74.5
74 .5

9 5 .9
95.9
95.9

6.3
-

_
_

28.0
3.6
-

5. 4
24.6

2
.1
7.0
4. 3
-

4.9

4.1
6.0
6.3
40 .0

6.5

2 .2
1

-

-

late shifts

W o r k e r s e m p l o y e d on t h i r d o r o t h e r
l a t e shi ft__________
______ _____________
R e c e i v i n g shi f t d i f f e r e n t i a l _______________
U n i f o r m c e n t s p e r h o u r -----------------------4 c e n t s ----------------------------------------5 c e n t s _______ _
_ . . . ____________
6 c e n t s ____
_
_
_ ______________
_
8 c e n t s _________ ____ _
— _ ---------9 c e n t s ____________________________
11 c e n t s ____________
______ ______
12 c e n t s _________
_ ______ ______
_
13 c e n t s . ____
___________________
14 c e n t s _________ ___________ ____
15 c e n t s ----------------------------------------------------R e c e i v i n g no s hi f t d i f f e r e n t i a l _________

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l to ta ls .

1.0
-

8.3
-

5 .2
-

-

2.0
-

_

.5
4.2
1.5

or h a v i n g
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d i t io n to t h o s e s h o wn s e p a r a t e l y .
NOTE:

NOTE:

-

8.2
8.2
8.2

B e c a u s e of r o u nd i ng ,

s u m s o f i n d i v i d u a l i t e m s m a y not e q ua l t o t a l s .

18.9
18.9
18.9
-

1.4
1. 1
-

1. 2
1.6
.3
8.5
4. 7




T a b le 2 5 . P re ss ed or blown g lass and g la s s w a re , ex c e p t co n tainers: P aid holidays
( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c t i o n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i th f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s f or pa i d h o l i d a y s ,
U n i t e d S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M a y 1970)
U ni t ed
States 1

N u m b e r of pa id h ol i d a y s

M iddle
Atla nti c

Border
States

Great
L ak es

P r od u c ti on w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s ___________

_____

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p ro v i d i n g
p a i d h o l i d a y s -------------------------------------------------------6 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------7 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------7 d a y s pl us 1 h a l f d a y _____________________
7 d a y s pl us 2 h a l f d a y s -----------------------------------8 d a y s ___________________________________
8 d a y s pl us 1 h a l f d a y _____________________
9 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------R e c e i v i n g no pa i d h o l i d a y s ___________________

100

100

100

100

98
3
26

100
3
19
_
3
73
2
_

100
10
53
_
_

100
_

18
3
15

67
_

-

-

(2)
1
53
1
14
2

11
_
_

22

O ff ic e w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s _____________________________
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o vi d in g
p a i d h o l i d a y s ______________________________
6 d a y s ___________________________________
6 d a y s pl us 2 h a l f d a y s -----------------------------------7 d a y s ___________________________________
7 d a y s pl us 1 h a l f d a y _____________________
7 d a y s pl us 2 h a l f d a y s ___________________
8 d a y s ___________________________________
8 d a y s pl us 1 h a l f d a y _____________________
8 d a y s pl us 2 h a l f d a y s ___________________
9 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------R e c e i v i n g no p a i d h o l i d a y s ___________________

1 I n c l ud es d a ta for r e g i o n s
2 L e s s t han 0. 5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

in a d d i ti on to t h o s e

B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g ,

sum s

100

100

100

100

98
2
1
12

100
2
2
4
_
1
91
1

100
4
_

100
_
_

48
_
_

9

43

68

(2)
1
75
(2)
1
7
2

s h o wn

o f in d iv id u a l ite m s

.

.

5

.

_

separately.

m ay

not eq u al to ta ls .

_

_
22

T a b le 2 6 . P re s s e d o r b lo w n g lass and g la s s w a re , ex ce p t containers: P aid vacatio n s
( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c t i o n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith f o r m a l p r o v i s i o n s for pa id v a c a t i o n s a f t e r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s of s e r v i c e ,
Vacation policy

Uni t ed S t a t e s 1

Mi ddl e A t l a n t i c

B o r d er States

G reat Lakes

U ni t ed S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s ,
U ni t ed S t a t e s 1

Prod u cti on w o r k er s

Middle At lantic

M a y 1970)
B o r d e r S t a t es

J

G r e a t Lake s

O ffice w or k er s

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
72
28

100
49
51

100
82
18

100
85
15

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

-

-

65
9
26

52
48

82
18

64
26
10

15
32
52

7
13
80

33
31
36

16
72

56
11
7
26

29
4
18
48

78
3
18

64
26
10

10
(3 )
37
52

2
1
17
80

33
31
36

7
82
12

50
11
13
24
1

26
4
22
48
-

59
22
18
-

64
26
6
4

(3 )
39
52
-

1
1
18
80
-

27
37
36
-

7
82
12
-

1
53
21
26

3
29
20
48

82
18

51
39
10

(3 )
47
53
-

1
18
81
-

64
36
-

88
12
-

31
3
40
26

23
3
27
48

63
18
18

11
5
74

20

10

(3 )
27
52
-

12
1
7
80
-

53
11
36
-

15
73
12
-

9
63
2
26

52
48

23
59
18

4
81
5
10

8
34
52
6
-

2
18
80
-

34
24
36
7
-

1
70
12
18
-

9
20
2
43
26

22
30
48

23
41
18
18

4
2
5
79
10

8
16
24
52
-

2
10
8
80
-

.34
19
11
36
-

1
25
63
12
-

9
20
2
43
6
20

A l l w o r k e r s _________________________________________

22
30
3
46

23
41
18
13
5

4
2
5
79
4
6

8
11
29
1
52

2
10
8
80

34
19
5
7
36

1
7
81
12

Method of pa ym ent
W o r k e r s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g pa i d v a c a t i o n s ----------L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t -------------------------------------------------------P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t ........ ................. —............... - .................... ........

-

A m o u n t of v a c a t i o n p a y 2
A f t e r 1 y e a r of s e r v i c e :
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u nd e r 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------A f t e r 2 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
1 w e e k ________________________________________________
O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s _____________________________
2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------A f t e r 3 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
1 w e e k ________________________________________________
O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------A f t e r 5 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
O v e r 1 and u n d e r 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------A f t e r 10 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------- — -----------------O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 and u n d e r 5 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------A f t e r 15 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s ______________________________________________
3 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 and u n d e r 5 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------A f t e r 20 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 and u n d e r 5 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------O v e r 5 and u n d e r 6 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------A f t e r 25 y e a r s of s e r v i c e : 4
2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s ........................................ ......................
4 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------5 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 5 and u n d e r 6 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6

9

12

1 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a dd i t i o n to t h o s e s ho wn s e p a r a t e l y .
2 T h e a m o u n t of v a c a t i o n p a y in t h is t a b u l a t i o n is e x p r e s s e d in t e r m s of the l e n g t h of t i m e c o v e r e d b y the p a y m e n t , m e a s u r e d a g a i n s t the w o r k e r s ' r e g u l a r w o r k w e e k .
Th us, establi sh m en ts
p r o v i d i n g 48 h o u r s ' v a c a t i o n p a y w e r e c l a s s i f i e d a s g r a n t i n g 1 w e e k i f the w o r k s ch e d ul e w a s 48 h o u r s , but o v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s i f the w o r k s c h e d u l e w a s l e s s t han 48 h o u r s .
M an y es tablishm en ts
m a i n t a i n e d r e g u l a r l y c h a n g i n g w o r k s c h e d u l e s ( e . g . , 40 h o u r s f or the f i r s t 3 w e e k s and 48 h o u r s fo r the fo urt h) ; in s u c h i n s t a n c e s , p r o v i s i o n s f o r 48 h o u r s ' v a c a t i o n p a y w e r e c o n s i d e r e d as o v e r 1 and
u nd e r 2 w e e k s .
V a c a t i o n p a y m e n t s s u c h a s p e r c e n t of annual e a r n i n g s , w e r e c o n v e r t e d to an e q u i v a l e n t t i m e b a s i s .
P e r i o d s of s e r v i c e w e r e a r b i t r a r i l y c h o s e n and do not n e c e s s a r i l y r e f l e c t the
individual es ta b lis h m en t p ro v is io n s .
F o r e x a m p l e , the c h a n g e s in p r o p o r t i o n s i n di c a t ed at 10 y e a r s m a y i n c l u d e c h a n g e s o c c u r r i n g b e t w e e n 5 and 10 y e a r s .
3
4

L e s s th an 0.5 p e r c e n t .
V aca ti o n pr ovis io ns w ere

NOTE:

Because




the

of r o u n d i n g ,

same

su ms

aft er

longer

of i n d i v i d u a l

periods
it em s

of s e r v i c e .

m a y not e q ual t o t a l s .

T a b le 2 7 . P re s s e d or b lo w n g la s s and g lassw are, ex c e p t co n tainers: H e a lth , insurance, and re tire m e n t plans
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t i o n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s wi th s p e c i f i e d h e a l t h ,

T y p e of p l a n 1

insurance,

and r e t i r e m e n t p l a n s ,

U ni t ed S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s ,

M a y 1970)

Uni t ed
S t a t es 2

Mid dle
Atla nti c

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

96
15

97
16

96
21

100
13

99
11

99
5

100
19

100
18

81
10

82
10

65
17

93
6

94
10

94
2

80
28

100
18

88
87
13

94
94
13

74
74
15

98
98
14

96
93
11

98
97
5

100
85
26

98
98
18

-

-

-

.

81

92

65

75

-

-

-

100
11
100
11
52
11
77
6
97
97
94

100
35
100
35
87
35
76
25
88
88
76

2
98
12
99
12
50
13
85
9
94
93
88
3

-

96
15
96
15
74
15
59
11
92
92
86

89
6
89
6
83
6
32
6
94
94
89

1
100
32
100
32
75
32
76
20
81
81
67

5
97
18
100
18
93
18
78
18
98
94
89
11

Border
St a te s

Great
Lake s

U ni t ed
States 2

Middle
At la nti c

Pr od u c ti on w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------------------

Border
States

G re at
Lakes

O ffice w o r k e r s

W o r k e r s in es ta b l i s h m e n t s provid ing:
L i f e i n s u r a n c e ____________________________
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s --------------------------------A c c i d e n t a l d e a t h a nd d i s m e m b e r m e n t
i n s u r a n c e _______________________________
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s --------------------------------S i c k n e s s and a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e o r
s i c k l e a v e o r b o t h 3 - ------- -------------------------------S i c k n e s s and a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e --------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s _______________
S i c k l e a v e ( f ul l p a y , no w a i t i n g
p e r i o d ) --------------------------------------------------------Sick lea ve (p a r tia l p a y or waiting
p e r i o d ) -------------------------------------------------------H o s p i t a l i z a t i o n i n s u r a n c e _________________
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ------------------------------ _
S u r g i c a l i n s u r a n c e -------------- ---------------------1----N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s --------------------------------M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e --------------------------------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s --------------------------------M a j o r m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e --------------------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s _________________
R e t i r e m e n t p l a n s 4 _______ _ _____________
_
P e n s i o n s _______________________________
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ______________
S e v e r a n c e p a y ------------------------------------------------

(5 )

98
3
98
3
18
3
95
2
99
99
97

1 " N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s " i n c l u d e o n l y t ho se p l a n s f i n a n c e d e n t i r e l y b y the e m p l o y e r .
L e g a l l y r e q u i r e d p l a n s s u c h a s w o r k m e n ' s c o m p e n s a t i o n and s o c i a l s e c u r i t y a r e e x cl u de d; h o w e v e r , p l a ns
r e q u i r e d b y S ta t e t e m p o r a r y d i s a b i l i t y i n s u r a n c e l a w s a r e i n c l u de d if t he e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t e s m o r e t ha n i s l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d o r the e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e b e n e f i t s i n e x c e s s of l e g a l r e q u i r e m e n t s .
2 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s i n a d d i t i o n to t h o s e sh o wn s e p a r a t e l y .
3 U n d u p l i c a t e d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s i c k l e a v e or s i c k n e s s and a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e sh o wn s e p a r a t e l y .
4 U n d u p l i c a t e d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y p e n s i o n s or r e t i r e m e n t s e v e r a n c e p a y s h o wn s e p a r a t e l y .
5 L e s s t h a n 0. 5 p e r c e n t . '







T a b le 2 8 . P re s s e d or blow n glass and g la s s w a re , e x c e p t containers:
O th e r s e le c te d benefits
( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c t i o n and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g f u n e r a l l e a v e p a y , j u r y d ut y p a y ,
and t e c h n o l o g i c a l s e v e r a n c e p a y , U ni t e d S t a t e s and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , M a y 1970)
U ni t e d
St ates 1
2

I t em 1

Middle
Atla nt ic

Border
States

Great
Lake s

Pr od u c ti on w o r k e r s

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h
p r o v i s i o n s for:
F u n e r a l l e a v e p a y ---------------------------------------------T n - r w r l n t y p a y .............
......
.
TorVipnlnrYi pq 1
pa v
.....
....

82
73
5

67
48
_

84
76

98
94
13

59
43

91
98

O ff ic e w o r k e r s

W o r k e r s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i th
p r o v i s i o n s for:
Tnr^r

rhify

p a y ........

........... ...................... ....

....

T e c h n o l o g i c a l s e v e r a n c e p a y --------------------------

1
2

87
85

2

F o r d e f i n i t i o n of b e n e f i t s , s e e a p pe n di x A.
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e g i o n s in a d d it io n to t ho se sh o wn s e p a r a t e l y .

95
92

8

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
prepared by the U.S. Office of Management
and Budget). Separate auxiliary units, such
as central offices, were excluded. Establish­
ments selected for study were drawn from
units employing 20 workers or more at the
time of reference of the data used in compiling
the universe lists.
The number of establishments and workers
studied by the Bureau, as well as the number
estimated to be within the scope of the survey
during the payroll period studied, are shown
in table A- 1.

Scope of survey

The survey included establishments p rim ar­
ily engaged in manufacturing glass containers
for com m ercial bottling and packing and for
home canning, as well as those p rim arily
engaged in manufacturing other glass and
glassware, pressed, blown, or shaped from
glass produced in the same establishment
(industries 3221 and 3229, except textile glass
fibers, as defined in the 1967 edition of the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual, as

Table A - l . Estimated number of establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied,
pressed or blown glass and glassware industries,1 May 1970
Number of
establishments 3
Industry and region2

Workers in establishments
Within scope of study

Actually
studied

Production
workers

Office
workers

Total

107,246
35,082
14,639
5, 567
5,750
33,114
11,033

89,923
27, 771
12, 788
4,733
5,013
28,205
9,593

7,475
3,307
898
206
308
2,102
564

86,138
29,514
10,429
5,155
5,028
25,345
8,682

73
17
5
10
10
16
13

68,656
20,617
5,828
5, 567
4,845
19,775
10,700

60,294
18,119
5,171
4, 733
4,280
17, 500
9 ,287

3,083
954
299
206
207
821
555

55,543
16,518
4,773
5,155
4 ,5 2 7
14,601
8 ,645

50
16
14
14

38,590
14,465
8,811
13,339

29,629
9,652
7,617
10,705

4,392
2,353
599
1,281

30,595
12,996
5,656
10,744

Within
scope of
study

Actually
studied

A ll establishments:
United States 5 - -----------------------------------------------------------------------Middle A tla n tic-------------------------------------------------------------------Border States------------------------------------------------------------------------Southeast-----------------------------------------------------------------------------Southwest ---------------------------------------------------------------------------Great Lakes--------------------------------------------------------------------------P a cific---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

226
66
42
12
19
54
27

123
33
19
10
13
30
14

Glass container establishments:
United States 3 ------------------------------------------------------------------------Middle A tla n tic-------------------------------------------------------------------Border States------------------------------------------------------------------------Southeast------------------------------------------------------------------------------Southw est----------------------------------------------------------------------------Great Lakes-------------------------------------------------------------------------P a cific------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -

108
32
7
12
12
25
18

Other pressed or blown glass and glassware establishments:
United States 5 ------------------------------------------------------------------------Middle A tla n tic-------------------------------------------------------------------Border States------------------------------------------------------------------------Great Lakes---------------------------------------------------------------------------

118
34
35
29

T otal4

* Establishments primarily engaged in the manufacture of textile glass fibers were excluded.
2 The regions used in this study include: Middle A tlantic—New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; Border States—Delaware. District
of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; Southeast—Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina, and Tennessee; Southwest—Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas; Great Lakes—Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota,
Ohio, and Wisconsin; and P acific— California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.
3 Includes only establishments with 20 workers or more at the tim e of reference of the universe data.
4 Includes executive, professional, and other workers excluded from the separate production and office worker categories.
® Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. Alaska and Hawaii were not included in the study.

was studied. In combining the data, however,
all establishments were given their appropriate
weight. All estimates are presented, th ere­
fore, as relating to all establishments in the
industry, excluding only those below the m ini­
mum size at the time of reference of the
universe data.

Method of study

Data were obtained by personal visits of the
Bureau's field staff. The survey was conducted
on a sample basis. To obtain appropriate
accuracy at minimum cost, a greater propor­
tion of large rather than small establishments




33

by weighting each rate (or hourly earnings) by
the number of workers receiving the rate,
totaling, and dividing by the number of individ­
uals. The hourly earnings of salaried workers
were obtained by dividing their straight-tim e
salary by normal rather than actual hours.
The median designates position; that is, onehalf of the employees surveyed receive more
than this rate and one-half receive less. The
middle range is defined by two rates of pay;
one-fourth of the employees earned less than
the lower of these rates and one-fourth earned
more than the higher rate.

Establishment definition

An establishment, for purposes of this study,
is defined as a single physical location where
industrial operations are perform ed. An e s ­
tablishment is not necessarily identical with
the company, which may consist of one or
more establishments.
Employment

Estimates of the number of workers within
the scope of the study are intended as a general
guide to the size and composition of the labor
force included in the survey. The advance
planning necessary to make a wage survey
requires the use of the lists of establishments
assembled considerably in advance of the
payroll period studied.

Size of community

Tabulations by size of community pertain to
metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The
term "m etropolitan area, " as used in this bul­
letin, refers to the Standard Metropolitan Sta­
tistical Areas as defined by the U.S. Office of
Management and Budget through January 1968.
Except in New England, a Standard M etro ­
politan Statistical A rea is defined as a county
or group of contiguous counties which contains
at least one city of 50,000 inhabitants or m ore.
Counties contiguous to the one containing such
a city are included in the Standard M etropolitan
Statistical Area, if according to certain c r i­
teria, they are essentially metropolitan in
character and are socially and econom ically
integrated with the central city. In New Eng­
land, the city and town are adm inistratively
more important than the county and they are
the units used in defining Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Areas for that region.

Production and office workers

The term "production w o rk e rs," as used in
this bulletin, includes working foremen and all
nonsupervisory workers engaged in nonoffice
functions. Adm inistrative, executive, p rofes­
sional, and technical personnel and forceaccount construction employees, who were
utilized as a separate work force on the firm 's
own properties, were excluded.
The term "o ffic e w o rk e rs," includes all
nonsupervisory office workers and excludes
administrative, executive, professional, and
technical employees.
Occupations selected for study

Occupational classification was based on a
uniform set of job descriptions designed to
take account of interestablishment and in ter­
area variations in duties within the same job.
(See appendix B for these descriptions.) The
occupations were chosen for their numerical
importance, their usefulness in collective b ar­
gaining, or their representativeness of the
entire job scale in the industries. Working
supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners,
trainees, and handicapped, part-tim e, tempo­
rary, and probationary workers were not r e ­
ported in the data for selected occupations, but
were included in the data for all production
w ork ers.

Method of wage payment

Tabulations by method of wage payment r e ­
late to the number of workers paid under the
various time and incentive wage systems.
Form al rate structures for time-rated workers
provide single rates or a range of rates for
individual job categories. In the absence of
a form al rate structure, pay rates are d eter­
mined p rim arily by the qualifications of the
individual worker. A single rate structure is
one in which the same rate is paid to all
experienced workers in the same job c la s s ifi­
cation. Learners, apprentices, or probationary
workers may be paid according to rate sched­
ules which start below the single rate and
perm it the workers to achieve the full job
rate over a period of time. Individual e x p e ri­
enced workers occasionally may be paid above
or below the single rate for special reasons,
but such payments are regarded as exceptions.
Range of rate plans are those in which the
minimum or maximum rates paid experienced
workers for the same job are specified. Spe­
cific rates of individual workers within the
range may be determined by m erit, length of
service, or a combination of various concepts
of m erit and length of service. Incentive
workers are classified under piecework or
bonus plans. Piecew ork is work for which a

Wage data

Information on wages relates to straighttime hourly earnings, excluding premium pay
for overtim e and for work on weekends, holi­
days, and late shifts. Incentive payments,
such as those resulting from piecework or
production bonus systems and cost-of-livin g
bonuses, were included as part of the worker's
regular pay; but nonproduction bonus payments,
such as Christmas or yearend bonuses, were
excluded.
Average (mean) hourly rates or earnings for
each occupation or other group of workers,
such as production workers, were calculated




34

predetermined rate is paid for each unit of
output. Production bonuses are based on pro­
duction over a quota or for completion of a
task in less than standard time.
Scheduled weekly hours

Data on weekly hours refer to the predom­
inant work schedule for full-tim e production
(or office) workers employed on the day shift,
regardless of sex.
Shift provisions and practices

Shift provisions relate to the policies of
establishments either currently operating late
shifts or having form al provisions coveting
late-sh ift work. Practices relate to workers
employed on late shifts at the time of the
survey.
Supplementary wage provisions

Supplementary benefits were treated statis­
tically on the basis that if form al provisions
were applicable to half or m ore of the pro­
duction workers (or office workers) in an
establishment, the benefits were considered
applicable to all such workers. Sim ilarly, if
few er than half of the workers were covered,
the benefit was considered nonexistent in the
establishment. Because of len gth -of-service
and other eligib ility requirements, the propor­
tion of workers receiving the benefits may be
sm aller than estimated.
Paid holidays. Paid holiday provisions r e ­
late to full-day and half-day holidays provided
annually.
Paid vacations. The summaries of vacation
plans are lim ited to form al arrangements,
excluding inform al plans, whereby time off
with pay is granted at the discretion of the
em ployer or supervisor. Payments not on a
time basis were converted; fo r example, a
payment of 2 percent of annual earnings was
considered the equivalent of 1 week* s pay.
The periods of service fo r which data are
presented represent the most common prac­
tices, but they do not necessarily reflect
individual establishment provisions for pro­
gression. F or example, the changes in pro­
portions indicated at 10 years of service may
include changes which occurred between 5 and
10 years.
Health, insurance, and retirem ent plans.
Data are presented for health, insurance, pen­
sion and retirem ent severance plans fo r which
all or part of the cost is borne by the em ployer,
excluding only programs required by law, such
as workmen*s compensation and social secu­
rity. Among the plans included are those
underwritten by a com m ercial insurance com­
pany, and those paid d irectly by the employer
from his current operating funds or from a
fund set aside for this purpose.




35

Death benefits are included as a form of
life insurance. Sickness and accident insur­
ance is lim ited to that type of insurance under
which predetermined cash payments are made
d irectly to the insured on a weekly or monthly
basis during illness or accident disability.
Information is presented for all such plans to
which the employer contributes at least a part
of the cost. However, in New York and New
Jersey, where tem porary disability insurance
laws require em ployer contributions, 1 plans
are included only if the employer (1) contri­
butes m ore than is lega lly required, or (2) pro­
vides the employees with benefits which exceed
the requirements of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick-leave plans are
lim ited to form al plans which provide full pay
or a proportion of the w orker's pay during
absence from work because of illness; informal
arrangements have been omitted. Separate
tabulations are provided according to (1) plans
which provide full pay and no waiting period,
and (2) plans providing either partial pay or
a waiting period.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing
for complete or partial payment of doctor's
fees. These plans may be u n d e r w r i t t e n
by a com m ercial insurance company or a non­
profit organization, or they may be a form of
self-insurance.
Major m edical insurance, sometimes r e ­
ferred to as e x t e n d e d m edical insurance,
includes the plans designed to cover em ­
ployees for sickness or injury involving an
expense which exceeds the normal coverage of
hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans.
T a b u l a t i o n s of retirem ent pensions are
lim ited to plans which provide regular pay­
ments for the remainder of the re tire e 's life.
Data are presented separately for retirem ent
severance pay (one payment or several over
a specified period of time) made to employees
on retirem ent. Establishments providing both
retirem ent severance payments and retirem ent
pensions to employees were considered as
having both retirem ent pension and retirem ent
severance plans. Establishments having op­
tional plans providing employees a choice of
either retirem ent severance pay or pensions
were considered as having only retirem ent
pension benefits.
Paid funeral and jury duty leave. Data for
paid funeral and jury duty leave relate to fo r ­
mal provisions for at least partial payment
for time lost as a result of attending funerals
of specified fam ily members or serving as
a juror.
Technological severance pay. Data relate
to form al plans providing for payment to em ­
ployees permanently separated from em ploy­
ment because of a technological change or
plant closing.
1 The temporary disability insurance laws in California and
Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.

Appendix B. Occupational D escriptions
The prim ary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau1 wage
s
surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations
w orkers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different
work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to
area. This perm its the grouping of occupational wage rates representing
comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment
and interarea com parability of occupational content, the Bureau's job de­
scriptions may d iffer significantly from those in use in individual establish­
ments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job d escrip­
tions, the Bureau's field staff is instructed to exclude working supervisors,
apprentices, learn ers, beginners, trainees, and handicapped, part-tim e,
tem porary, and probationary workers.
Plant Occupations

ASSEMBLER, CARTONS

C A R R Y-IN BOY (OR G IR L)

Assem bles c a r t o n s from prepared box
blanks. Work involves folding the box blanks
along scored lines and fastening the edges to ­
gether by one or m ore of the following meth­
ods: Coating flaps with glue and pressing them
together; interlocking the corners by means
of tabs; sealing edges with strips of gummed
tape; or stapling edges together by means of
power-stitching machines or hand staplers.
BATC H -A N D -FU R N A C E MAN

C arries heated, form ed glass articles by
tongs or on a pronged fork to the lehr (r e ­
heating oven) and places them on the conveyor
moving through the lehr.
C U LLE T HANDLER
Works as a m em ber of a crew that tends a
machine to wash and crush refuse glass.
C U TTER , DECORATIVE
Cuts monograms or ornamental designs on
glassware with an abrasive wheel. Work in­
volves the following: Selecting and mounting
proper abrasive wheel on lathe; moistening
revolving wheel with a wet abrasive agent;
and holding glassware against edge of wheel,
turning and twisting article so that design or
pattern w ill be properly cut in the article.
May cut d e s i g n s deeper on ware having
pressed designs. In addition, may trace or
mark pattern on the glassware before doing
the cutting.

Controls automatic equipment to weigh, mix,
and m elt ingredients to make glass. Work in­
volves the following: Adjusts panel controls to
transfer specified amounts of ingredients from
storage bins to automatic weigh hopper and
batch m ixer; pulls le v e r to dump blended mix
into furnace; reverses gas fire to equalize
heat in furnace; regulates temperature ac­
cording to specifications. May collect samples
of molten glass fo r analysis.
BATCH MIXER

DECORATING-MACHINE O PERATO R

Blends or mixes various glass-making in­
gredients in controlled amounts, according to
formula, by hand or machine. Work involves
the follow ing; Weighing out specified amounts
of ingredients such as sand, soda, lim e, borax,
feldspar, and coloring; and mixing them either
by hand or machine. In addition, may load
ingredients into mixing machine.
BLOWER

(Silk-screen decorator;
squeegee operator)

(Glass blow er)
Blows or inflates ball of molten glass,
gathered on the end of a blowpipe, into desired
shape and size, either with or without the aid
of a metal mold. In addition, may dip end
of blowpipe into molten glass to gather the
proper amount for the article to be made.




36

stencil applicator;

Decorates glassware by a silk-screening or
stain less-steel screening process. Work in ­
volves most of the follow ing: F illin g recep ­
tacle with paint, placing glassware in machine,
bringing silk (or stainless steel) screen into
position with ware, setting guide ro llers or
squeegee in operation to f o r c e the paint
through the screen to decorate the glassware
with the desired design, removing ware from
machine, inspecting for defects in decoration,
and placing ware on conveyors fo r baking
oven. Operators of decorating machines de­
signed to p erform one or m ore of the above
operations automatically are to be included.

Pressing the glass against revolving abrasive
wheels and moving or turning the glass from
one position to another to grind all surfaces
evenly.

E LEC TR IC IAN , M AINTENANCE
P erform s a variety of electrical trade func­
tions such as the installation, maintenance, or
repair of equipment for the generating, d is tri­
bution, or utilization of electric energy in an
establishment. Work involves most of the fo llowing: Installing or repairing any of a variety
of electrical equipment such as generators,
tran sform ers, switchboards, controllers, c ir ­
cuit breakers, m otors, heating units, conduit
systems, or other transm ission equipment;
working from blueprints, drawings, layout, or
other specifications; locating and diagnosing
trouble in the electrica l system or equipment;
working standard computations relating to load
requirements of wiring or electrica l equip­
ment; using a variety of electrician's handtools
and measuring and testing instruments.
In
general, the work of the maintenance e le c tri­
cian requires rounded training and experience
usually acquired through a form al apprentice­
ship or equivalent training and experience.

H E LPE R , TRADES, M AINTENANCE
Assists one or m ore w orkers in the skilled
maintenance trades, by perform ing specific or
general duties of le s s e r skill, such as keeping
a worker supplied with m aterials and tools;
cleaning working area, machine and equip­
ment; assisting w orker by holding m aterials
or tools; perform ing other unskilled tasks as
directed by journeymen. The kind of work the
helper is perm itted to p erform varies from
trade to trade. In some trades the helper is
confined to supplying, lifting and holding m a­
teria ls and tools and cleaning working areas;
and in others he is perm itted to p erform spe­
cialized machine operations, or parts of a
trade that are also perform ed by workers on
a fu ll-tim e basis.
INSPECTOR, F IN A L

FORMING-MACHINE O PERATO R

P erform s final inspection on glasswares,
examining for defects in the ware and any
decoration t h e r e o n .
May wrap and pack.

Tends the operation of an automatic machine
that forms bottles or other containers from
molten glass. Work involves the following:
Regulating flow of molten glass to molds on
machine; regulating and setting lubrication
valves to prevent the glass from sticking to
the molds; and occasionally checking com ­
pleted article by weighing it on scales, or
measuring it with gauges or calipers. In ad­
dition, may make minor adjustments to the
machine.

JANITOR
(Sweeper; charwoman; jan itress)
Cleans and keeps in an ord erly condition
factory working areas and washrooms, or
prem ises of an office building. Duties involve
a combination of the following: Sweeping,
mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors;
r e m o v i n g chips, trash, and other refuse;
dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; p ol­
ishing metal fixtures or trim m ings; providing
supplies and minor maintenance services;
cleaning lavatories, showers, and restroom s.
W orkers who specialize in window washing are
excluded.

FORMING-MACHINE U P K E E P MAN
Adjusts and repairs the automatic feeding,
flowing, and forming machines used to manu­
facture glasswares. Assists in setting up and
adjusting the machinery for job changes.
GATHERER, B LO W PIPE

LABORER, M A T E R IA L HANDLING

Gathers desired amount of molten glass on
end of a blowpipe. Work involves the follo w ­
ing: Dipping end of blowpipe into molten glass
and carrying ball of molten glass on end of
blowpipe to the blower. In addition, may blow
into pipe to begin inflation of glass before
handing pipe to blower for completion of
process.

(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker;
shelver; trucker; stockman or stock helper;
warehouseman or warehouse helper)

Gathers desired amount of molten glass on
end of an iron rod. Work involves the follo w ­
ing: Dipping end of iron rod into molten glass
and carrying ball of molten glass on end of
rod to the presser.

A w orker employed in a warehouse, manu­
facturing plant, store, or other establishment
whose duties involve one or m ore of the fo l­
lowing: Loading and unloading various m a­
teria ls and merchandise on or from freight
cars, trucks, or other transporting devices;
unpacking, shelving, or placing m aterials or
merchandise in proper storage location; trans­
porting m aterials or merchandise by hand
truck, car, or wheelbarrow. Longshoremen
who load and u n l o a d ships are excluded.

GRINDER, GLASSWARE

LEHR, TENDER

Grinds or smoothes the edges, rim s, ridges,
rough surfaces, etc., of glassware on an ab­
rasive wheel. Work involves the following:

Regulates temperature of a reheating oven
(lehr) used to anneal or fire -g la z e glass or
glass articles. May arrange glass articles

GATHERER, PRESSED-WARE PU N TY




37

MOLD-PRESS OPERATO R

according to size and shape on lehr conveyor,
so that maximum quantity w ill be carried in
oven, or worker may place glass in oven by
means of a long paddle.

(Press-m achine operator)
Tends a m old-press machine that automati­
cally casts glassware from molten glass.
Work involves most of the following: Turning
valves to c o n t r o l mold temperatures and
timing of plunger turntable. Adjusting flow
valve and shear tim er to regulate quantity of
molten glass d elivered from feeder to mold;
setting lubrication valves to prevent glass
from sticking to molds; examining glassware
for defects, such as lines and bubbles.

MACHINIST, M AINTENANCE
Produces replacement parts and new parts
in making repairs of m etal parts of mechani­
cal equipment operated in an establishment.
Work involves most of the follow ing: Inter preting written instructions and specifications;
planning and laying out of work; using a v a ­
riety of m ach in ists handtools and precision
measuring instruments; setting up and oper­
ating standard machine tools; shaping of metal
parts to close tolerances; making standard
shop computations relating to dimensions of
work, tooling, feeds and speeds of machining;
knowledge of the working properties of the
common metals; selecting standard m aterials,
parts and equipment required for his work;
fitting and assembling parts into mechanical
equipment. In general, the m ach in ists work
norm ally r e q u i r e s a rounded training in
machine-shop p r a c t i c e usually a c q u i r e d
through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

P IP E F IT T E R , M AINTENANCE
Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or
other types of pipe and pipefittings in an e s ­
tablishment. Work involves most of the fo l­
lowing: Laying out of work and measuring to
locate position of pipe from drawings or other
written specifications; cutting various sizes of
pipe to correct lengths with chisel and ham­
m er or oxy acetylene torch or pipe-cutting m a­
chine; threading %
pipe with stocks and dies;
bending pipe by hand-driven or pow er-driven
machines; assembling pipe with couplings and
fastening pipe to hangers; making standard
shop computations relating to pressures, flow,
and size of pipe required; making standard
tests to determine whether finished pipes m eet
specifications. In general, the work of the
maintenance pipefitter requires rounded train ­
ing and experience usually acquired through a
form al apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience. W orkers p rim arily engaged
in installing and repairing building sanitation
or heating systems are excluded.*
•

M ECHANIC, M AINTE NANCE
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment
of an establishment. Work involves most of
the follow ing: Examining machines aijd m e­
chanical equipment to d i a g n o s e source of
trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling m a­
chines and perform ing repairs that mainly in ­
volve the use of handtools in scraping and
fitting parts; replacing broken or defective
parts with items obtained from stock; ordering
the production of a replacement part by a m a­
chine shop or sending of the machine to a
machine shop fo r m ajor repairs; preparing
written specifications for m ajor repairs or for
the production of parts ordered from machine
shop; reassem bling machines; and making all
necessary adjustments for operation. In gen­
eral, the work of a maintenance mechanic r e ­
quires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a form al apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience. Excluded
from this classification are workers whose
prim ary duties involve setting up or adjusting
machines.

PRESSER, GLASSWARE, HAND
•

Molds (p resses) molten glass into specified
shape. Work involves the following: Shearing
off desired amount of molten glass from iron
rod (gathering iron ) held by gatherer over
mold, and allowing it to drop in mold; p osi­
tioning mold under plunger of press; and fo r c ­
ing a metal plunger into the mold, causing the
glass to fill the space between the plunger
and the mold. In addition, may, when glass
has cooled, open the mold, rem ove article
and send it to lehr for annealing or to other
workers for further processing.
SELECTOR
(Selector and packer)

M OLDMAKER, M E T A L

Examines glassware visually and with sim ­
ple gauges for defects, such as bubbles or
seeds in ware, scratches on surface, ware
out of shape, and bad finish, as the ware is
received from the annealing ovens. Selects
accepted ware and packs in cartons or puts in
trays fo r transfer to other workers for fu rthur processing. May keep records of rejected
glass.

Constructs and/or repairs metal molds.
Work involves most of the following: Laying
out and marking metal blanks or castings ac­
cording to blueprints or drawings; using handtools and various metalworking machines to
cut and shape the parts to dimensions and
specifications outlined; and fitting and assem ­
bling parts together to form complete mold.




38

port goods and m aterials of all kinds about
a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other
establi shment.
F o r wage study purposes, workers are cla s­
sified by type of truck, as follows:

TANKM AN
(Furnace operator; teaser)
Feeds raw m aterials to the glass-m elting
tank. R everses the gas fire at stated intervals
from one side of the gas-and-air regenerative
chambers to the other side to equalize heat in
tank. Regulates draft dampers which control
pressure on inside of melting tank and regu­
lates pressure of gas fed to tank.

Trucker, power (fo rk lift)
Trucker, power (other than fork lift)
W ARM ING-IN BOY
Reheats glassware in a furnace for further
processing. Work involves the follow ing: In­
serting glassware attached to blowpipe or held
by long-handled pincers (snaps) into furnace
(glory hole) until it has softened; and rem ov­
ing and passing heated glassware to another
w orker.

TRANSFER MAN
(F lo o r boys)
Removes glassware from rotating stations of
a glass form ing machine with the aid of hand
tongs and places ware on conveyors or sta­
tions of other machines for further form ing.

W ATCHM AN
TRUCKER, POWER

Makes rounds of prem ises periodically in
protecting property against fire , theft, and
illeg a l entry.

Operates a manually-controlled gasolineor electric-p ow ered truck or tractor to tran s­

Office Occupations

CLERK, GENERAL

type or sim ilar machine; and transcribe dicta­
tion. May also type from written copy. May
maintain file s , keep simple records or p e r­
form other relatively routine c le ric a l tasks.
May operate from a stenographic pool. Does
not include transcribing-m achine work.

Is typically required to perform a variety of
office operations, usually because of im prac­
ticability of specialization in a small office
or because versa tility is essential in meeting
peak requirements in la rg e r offices. The work
generally involves the use of independent judg­
ment in tending to a pattern of office work
from day to day, as w ell as knowledge relating
to phases of office work that occur only occa­
sionally. F o r example, the range of operations
perform ed may entail all or some combination
of the following: Answering correspondence,
preparing bills and invoices, posting to v a ­
rious records, preparing payrolls, filin g, etc.
May operate various office machines and type
as the work requires.

T Y P IS T
Uses a typew riter to make copies of various
m aterial or to make out b ills after calcula­
tions have been made by another person. May
include typing of stencils, mats, or sim ilar
m aterials for use in duplicating processes.
May do c leric a l work involving little special
training, such as keeping simple records,
filin g records and reports, or sorting and
distributing incoming m ail.
Class A . P erform s one or m ore of the fo l­
lowing: Typing m aterial in final form when
it involves combining m aterial from several
sources or^ responsibility for correct spell­
ing, syllabication, punctuation, etc., of tech­
nical or unusual words or foreign language
m aterial; and planning layout and typing of
complicated statistical tables to maintain uni­
form ity and balance in spacing.
May type
routine form letters varying details to suit
ci r cum st anc e s.

CLERK, P A Y R O L L
Computes wages of company employees and
enters the necessary data on the payroll
sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers*
earnings based on tim e or production records;
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, show­
ing information such as worker*s name, w ork­
ing days, tim e, rate, deductions fo r insurance,
and total wages due. May make out paychecks
and assist paymaster in making up and d is­
tributing pay envelopes. May use a calculating
machine.

Class B. P erfo rm s one or m ore of the fo l­
lowing:
Copy typing from rough or clear
drafts; routine typing of form s, insurance
policies, etc.; and setting up simple standard
tabulations, or copying m ore complex tables
already set up and spaced properly.

STENOGRAPHER, G ENERAL
P rim a ry duty is to take dictation, involving
a normal routine vocabulary, from one or
m ore persons either in shorthand or by Steno-




39




In d u stry W a g e S t u d i e s
The m o s t re c e n t r e p o r ts fo r in d u s trie s
included in the Bureau* s p ro g r a m o f in d u stry w age s u rv e y s sin ce Jan u ary 1950
a re lis te d b e lo w .
T h o s e fo r w hich a
p r ic e is shown a r e a v a ila b le fr o m the Sup erin ten d en t o f D ocu m en ts, U. S. G o v e r n m ent P r in tin g O ffic e , W ashington, D. C . ,

I.

20402, o r any o f its r e g io n a l s a le s o ffic e s .
T h o se fo r w h ich a p r ic e is not
shown m a y be obtained f r e e as lon g as
a supply is a v a ila b le , fr o m the B u reau
o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s , W ash ington , D . C . ,
20212, o r fr o m any o f the r e g io n a l o ffic e s
shown on the in s id e b a ck c o v e r .

O ccu p ation al W a ge Studies
M an u factu rin g
P r ic e

B a s ic Iro n and S teel, 1967. B L S B u lle tin 1602_______________________________________ $0. 55
Candy and O th er C o n fe c tio n e ry P ro d u c ts , 1965. B L S B u lle tin 1520------------------. 30
^Canning and F r e e z in g , 1957. B L S R e p o rt 136--------------------------------------------------- F r e e
C ig a r M an u factu rin g, 1967. B L S B u lle tin 1581_______________________________________
. 25
C ig a r e tte M an u factu rin g, 1965. B L S B u lle tin 1472___________________________________
. 20
C otton and M a n -M a d e F ib e r T e x t ile s , 1968. B L S B u lle tin 1637-----------------------1. 00
D is tille d L iq u o rs , 1952. S e r ie s 2, N o. 88--------------------------------------------------------- F r e e
F a b ric a te d S tru ctu ra l S teel, 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1463--------------------------------------F e r t i l i z e r M an u factu rin g, 1966. B L S B u lle tin 1531------------------------------------------F lo u r and O th er G ra in M ill P ro d u c ts , 1967. B L S B u lle tin 1576-----------------------F lu id M ilk In d u stry, 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1464________________________________________
F o o tw e a r, 1968. B L S B u lle tin 1634------------------------------------------------------------------H o s ie r y , 1967. B L S B u lle tin 1562______________________________________________________
In d u s tria l C h e m ic a ls , 1965. B L S B u lle tin 1529------------------------------------------------Iro n and S teel F o u n d rie s , 1967. B L S B u lle tin 1626__________________________________

. 30
.3 0
. 25
. 30
. 75
.7 0
.4 0
1.00

L e a th e r Tann ing and F in is h in g, 1968. B L S B u lle tin 1618---------------------------------M a c h in e ry M an u factu rin g, 1968. B L S B u lle tin 1664-----------------------------------------M e a t P ro d u c ts , 1969. B L S B u lle tin 1677______________________________________________
Men* s and B o y s 1 S h irts (E x c e p t W o rk S h irts) and N ig h tw e a r, 1968.
B L S B u lle tin 1659_________________________________________________________________________
M e n 's and B oys* Suits and C oats, 1967. B L S B u lle tin 1594-----------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s P la s t ic s P ro d u c ts , 1969. B L S B u lle tin 1690-----------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s T e x t ile s , 1953. B L S R e p o r t 5 6 _______________________________________
M o to r V e h ic le s and P a r ts , 1969. B L S B u lle tin 1679________________________________

.5 5
.6 5
1.00
. 65
. 75
. 60
F ree
.7 5

N o n fe rro u s F o u n d rie s , 1965. B L S B u lle tin 1498____________________________________
P a in ts and V a rn is h e s , 1965. B L S B u lle tin 1524-----------------------------------------------P a p e rb o a rd C o n ta in e rs and B o x e s , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1478---------------------------P e tr o le u m R e fin in g , 1965. B L S B u lle tin 1526------ -------------------- -----------------------P r e s s e d o r B low n G la ss and G la s s w a re , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1424-------------------^ P r o c e s s e d W a ste, 1957. B L S R e p o rt 124_____________________________________________
Pu lp, P a p e r, and P a p e rb o a rd M ills , 1967. B L S B u lle tin 1608-------------------------R ad io, T e le v is io n , and R e la te d P ro d u c ts , 1951. S e r ie s 2, N o. 8 4 ------------------R a ilr o a d C a rs , 1952. S e r ie s 2, N o. 8 6 -----------------------------------------------------------*R a w Sugar, 1957. B L S R e p o r t 136--------------------------------------------------------------------

.4 0
.4 0
. 70
.3 0
. 30
F ree
. 60
F ree
F ree
F ree

*

Studies o f the e ffe c t s o f the $1 m in im u m w age.




I.

O ccu pation al W age Studies— Continued
M an u factu rin g— C o nt i nue d
P r ic e

Southern S a w m ills and P la n in g M ills , 1969. B L S B u lle tin 1694___________________ $0. 50
S tru ctu ra l C la y P ro d u c ts , 1969. B L S B u lle tin 16*97__________________________________
.6 5
Synthetic F ib e r s , 1966. B L S B u lle tin 1540____________________________________________
.3 0
Synthetic T e x t ile s , 1965. B L S B u lle tin 1509----------------------------------------------------.4 0
T e x t ile D y ein g and F in is h in g , 1965-66. BL£> B u lle tin 1527--------------------------------.4 5
* T o b a c c o S tem m in g and R e d ry in g ,
1957. B L S R e p o r t 13 6-F ree
W est C o a s t S a w m illin g, 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1455____________________________________
. 30
W o m en 1s and M is s e s 1 C oats and Suits, 1965.
B L S B u lle tin 1508----------------------. 25
W o m en ’ s and M is s e s ’ D r e s s e s , 1968. B L S B u lle tin 1649___________________________
.4 5
W ood H ou sehold F u rn itu re , E x c e p t U p h o ls te re d , 1968. B L S B u lle tin 1651______
.6 0
^W ooden C o n ta in e rs, 1957. B L S R e p o rt 126------------------------------------------------------- F r e e
W o o l T e x t ile s , 1966. B L S B u lle tin 1551------------------------------------------------------------.4 5
W o rk C loth in g, 1968. B L S B u lle tin 1624______________________________________________
.5 0
N on m an u factu rin g
Auto D e a le r R e p a ir Shops, 1964.
B L S B u lle tin 1452_______________________________
. 30
Banking, 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1466_________________ ____________________________________
. 30
B itu m in ou s C o a l M in in g, 1967. B L S B u lle tin 1583-------------------------------------------. 50
C om m u n ication s, 1969. B L S B u lle tin 1696------------------------------------------------------. 30
C o n tra c t C lea n in g S e r v ic e s , 1968. B L S B u lle tin 1644--------------------------------------. 55
C rude P e tr o le u m and N a tu ra l Gas P ro d u c tio n , 1967. B L S B u lle tin 1566----------. 30
D e p a rtm e n t and W o m en ’ s R e a d y - t o - W e a r S to res , 1950. S e r ie s 2, N o . 78-------- F r e e
E atin g and D rin k in g P la c e s , 1966—67. B L S B u lle tin 1588__________________________
.4 0
E d u cation al In stitu tio n s: N on teach in g E m p lo y e e s , 1968—
69. B L S B u lle tin 1671—
.5 0
E le c t r ic and Gas U tilit ie s , 1967.
B L S B u lle tin 1614_______________________________
.7 0
H o s p ita ls , 1969. B L S B u lle tin 1688------------------------------------------------------------------1. 00
H o tels and M o te ls , 1966-67. B L S B u lle tin 1587______________________________________
.4 0
L a u n d ry and C lea n in g S e r v ic e s , 1967—68. B L S B u lle tin 1645---------------------------.7 5
L if e In su ran ce, 1966. B L S B u lle tin 1569----------------------------------------------------------. 30
M otio n P ic tu r e T h e a te r s , 1966. B L S B u lle tin 1542------------------------------------------.3 5
N u rsin g H om es and R e la te d F a c ilit ie s , 1967—68. B L S B u lle tin 1638-----------------. 75
II.

O ther In d u stry W age Studies

F a c to r y W o r k e r s 1 E a rn in g s— D is trib u tio n by S t r a ig h t-T im e H o u rly E a rn in g s ,
1958. B L S B u lle tin 1252___________________ ____________________________________________
F a c t o r y W o rk e rs* E a rn in g s— S elected M an u factu rin g In d u s tries , 1959.
B L S B u lle tin 1275_________________________________________________________________________
E m p lo y e e E a rn in g s and H ou rs in N o n m e tro p o lita n A r e a s o f the South and
N o rth C e n tra l R e g io n s , 1965. B L S B u lle tin 1552-------------------------------------------E m p lo y e e E a rn in g s and H ou rs in E igh t M e tro p o lita n A r e a s o f the South, 1965.
B L S B u lle tin 1533_________________________________________________________________________
E m p lo y e e E a rn in g s and H ou rs in R e ta il T ra d e , June 1966—
R e t a il T ra d e (O v e r a ll S u m m ary). B L S B u lle tin 1584____________________________
B u ild in g M a te r ia ls , H a rd w a re , and F a r m E qu ip m en t D e a le r s .
B L S B u lle tin 1584-1__________________________________________________________________
G e n e ra l M e rc h a n d is e S to re s . B L S B u lle tin 1 5 8 4 -2 -------------------------------------F o o d S to re s . B L S B u lle tin 1 5 84 -3 --------------------------------------------------------------A u to m o tiv e D e a le r s and G asolin e S e r v ic e S tation s. B L S B u lle tin 1 5 8 4 -4 ____
A p p a r e l and A c c e s s o r y S to re s . B L S B u lle tin 1584-5-----------------------------------F u rn itu re , H om e F u rn is h in g s , and H ou seh old A p p lia n c e S to re s .
B L S B u lle tin 1584-6_____________________________________________ __________ _________
M is c e lla n e o u s R e ta il S to re s . B L S B u lle tin 1584-7--------------------------------------*

Studies o f the e ffe c ts o f the $1 m in im u m w a ge.




☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING O F FIC E : 1971 O - 484-782 (6)

.4 0
. 35
. 50
.4 0
1.00
. 30
. 55
.6 0
. 50
. 55
. 50
.6 5

BUREAU OF LABOR STA TISTIC S
RE G IO N A L O F F I C E S

Region I
1603-A Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617

Region V
219 South Dearborn St.
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)

Region II
341 Ninth Ave., Rm. 1025
New York, N.Y. 10001
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region VI
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Regions VII and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 10th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556^678 (Area Code 415)




# Regions VII and VMM
* * Regions IX and X will

be serviced by Kansas City,
serviced by San Francisco.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B U R E A U OF LA B O R S T A T IS T IC S

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20212

POSTAGE AND PEES PAID
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
I

O F F IC IA L B U SIN E SS
PE N A LTY FOR P R IV A TE USE, $300




THIRD CLASS MAIL

l


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102