View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY




Petroleum Refining
i

DECEMBER 1965

B ulletin No. 1526
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY

Petroleum Refining
DECEMBER 1965

Bulletin No. 1526
August 1966

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary

V
CSD

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 2 0 4 0 2 -




Price 30 cents




Preface
T h is b u lle t in s u m m a r i z e s the r e s u l t s of a B u r e a u of
L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s s u r v e y of w a g e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y b e n e ­
f i t s o f p r o d u c t io n an d r e l a t e d w o r k e r s in p e t r o l e u m r e f i n ­
e r i e s in D e c e m b e r 1965.
A p r e l i m i n a r y r e l e a s e on t h is s u r v e y w a s i s s u e d in
J u l y 1966.
C o p i e s a r e a v a i l a b l e f r o m the B u r e a u of
L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s , W ash in g ton , D. C. , 2 0 2 1 Z, o r an y o f i t s
regio n al o ffic es.
T h is stu d y w a s c o n d u c te d in the B u r e a u * s D i v i s i o n
of O c c u p a t io n a l P a y , T o iv o P. K an n in en , C hief, u n d er the
g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o f L . R. L i n s e n m a y e r , A s s i s t a n t C o m ­
m iss io n e r fo r
W a g e s and I n d u s t r i a l R e l a t i o n s .
The
a n a l y s i s w a s p r e p a r e d b y E d w a r d J . C a r a m e l a u n d e r the
i m m e d i a t e s u p e r v i s i o n of L . E a r l L e w i s . F i e l d w o r k fo r
the s u r v e y w a s d i r e c t e d by the A s s i s t a n t R e g i o n a l D i r e c ­
t o r s fo r W a g e s and I n d u s t r i a l R e l a t i o n s .
O th er r e p o r t s a v a i l a b l e f r o m the B u r e a u * s p r o g r a m
of in d u s t r y w a g e s t u d i e s a s w e ll a s the a d d r e s s e s of the
B u r e a u * s s i x r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s a r e l i s t e d a t the end of t h is
b u lle tin .




iii




Contents
Page
S u m m a r y ---------------------------------------------I n d u s t r y c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------P r o d u c t s and p r o c e s s e s -----L o c a t i o n ------------------------------------------------------------•-------------------------------------S i z e of e s t a b l i s h m e n t -----------------------------------------------------------------------------U n io n iz a tio n -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------M eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t -------------------------------------------------------------------------A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n i n g s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------E s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s ------------------------S c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s and s h if t p r a c t i c e s ---------------------------------------------P a i d h o lid a y s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------P a i d v a c a t i o n s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------H e a lth , i n s u r a n c e , and r e t i r e m e n t p l a n s -------------------------------------------------O th er s e l e c t e d b e n e f i t s -------------------------------------------------------------------------- —

1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
5
5
5
5
5
5

T ab les:
A v e ra g e hourly e a rn in g s:
1.
B y s e l e c t e d c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ----------— ---------------------------------------------

6

E a r n i n g s d is t r ib u t io n :
2.
A ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s

6

----------------------------------------------------------------------

O c c u p a t io n a l a v e r a g e s :
3.
A ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ---------------------------------------------------------------------4.
B y s i z e o f c o m m u n i t y -------------------------------------•------------------------------5.
B y s i z e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t ---------------------------------------------------------------

7
9
10

O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n i n g s :
6.
U n ited S t a t e s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------7.
E a s t C o a s t ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------8.
W e s t e r n P e n n s y l v a n i a - W e s t V i r g i n i a ------------------------------------------9.
M id w e s t I ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------10.
M id w e s t I I -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------11.
T e x a s —L o u i s i a n a G u lf C o a s t --------------------------------------------------------12.
T e x a s In lan cU N orth L o u i s i a n a - A r k a n s a s --------------------------------------13.
R o c k y M o u n t a i n ---------------------------------------------------------------------------14.
W e st C o a s t ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

E s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s :
15.
M eth od o f w a g e p a y m e n t --------------------------------------------------------------16.
S c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s ----------------------------------------------------------------17.
S h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l p r a c t i c e s -----------------------------------------------------------18.
P a i d h o lid a y s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------19.
P a i d v a c a t i o n s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------20.
H e a lth , i n s u r a n c e , and r e t i r e m e n t p l a n s -------------------------------------21.
O th er s e l e c t e d b e n e f i t s -----------------------------------------------------------------

21
21
22
22
23
24
25

A p p en d ix es:
A.
B.

S c o p e and m e th o d o f s u r v e y ---------------------------------------------------------- —O c c u p a t io n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s -----------------------------------------------------------------




v

26
30




Industry Wage Survey--Petroleum Refining, December 1965
S u m m a ry
S t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f p r o d u c t io n and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s in p e t r o ­
l e u m r e f i n e r i e s a v e r a g e d $ 3 . 4 5 in D e c e m b e r 1965.
A ll b u t 4 p e r c e n t o f the
7 3 , 3 1 8 w o r k e r s ( v i r t u a l l y a l l m e n ) c o v e r e d b y the B u r e a u ’ s s u r v e y 1 h a d e a r n ­
i n g s b e tw e e n $ 2 . 50 and $ 4 an houx----the m i d d l e h a lf o f the w o r k e r s e a r n e d f r o m
$ 3 . 22 to $ 3 . 72.
R e g io n a ll y , 2 the h i g h e s t a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s , $ 3 . 5 8 an h o u r , w a s r e c o r d e d
f o r the E a s t C o a s t .
W o r k e r s in the T e x a s — o u i s i a n a G u lf C o a s t r e g i o n , a t h ir d
L
of the i n d u s t r y ' s w o r k f o r c e , a v e r a g e d $ 3 . 5 2 an h o u r — the s a m e a s w o r k e r s in
the M id w e s t I r e g i o n , w h e r e o n e - s i x t h of the w o r k e r s w e r e e m p l o y e d .
A verage
e a r n i n g s in a l l b u t one (W e s t e r n P e n n s y l v a n i a - W e s t V i r g i n i a ) of the r e m a i n i n g
r e g i o n s w e r e b e tw e e n $ 3 . 2 6 and $ 3 . 4 4 an h o u r.
A m on g the o c c u p a t io n s s t u d ie d s e p a r a t e l y , s t i l l m e n ( c h ie f o p e r a t o r s ) w e r e
the h i g h e s t p a i d , with a v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s r a n g in g f r o m $ 3 . 8 3 to $ 3 . 9 1 d e ­
p en d in g on the type of s t i l l .
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s f o r the s e v e n s k i l l e d
m a in t e n a n c e t r a d e s s t u d ie d s e p a r a t e l y r a n g e d f r o m $ 3 . 5 9 to $ 3 . 6 9 .
L ab orers,
n u m e r i c a l l y m o s t i m p o r t a n t of the s e l e c t e d j o b s , a v e r a g e d $ 2 . 74 an h o u r .
P a i d h o l i d a y s and p a i d v a c a t i o n s , a s w e ll a s v a r i o u s t y p e s of h e a lt h , i n ­
s u r a n c e , and p e n s i o n b e n e f i t s , w e r e a v a i l a b l e to v i r t u a l l y a l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s .
In dustry C h a r a c t e r is t ic s
P e t r o l e u m r e f i n e r i e s w ithin s c o p e o f the s u r v e y 3 e m p l o y e d 7 3 , 3 1 8 p r o d u c ­
tion and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s in D e c e m b e r 1965— a d e c l in e in e m p l o y m e n t o f ab ou t
27 p e r c e n t s i n c e a s i m i l a r s u r v e y in J u l y 1959. 4 W hile the n u m b e r o f r e f i n e r ­
i e s c o v e r e d by the two s t u d i e s r e m a i n e d a b o u t the s a m e , e m p l o y m e n t w a s down
in o v e r f o u r - f i f t h s o f the 64 r e f i n e r i e s c o m m o n to both s u r v e y s a m p l e s .
T he
m e d i a n e m p l o y m e n t d e c l i n e a m o n g l a r g e r e f i n e r i e s (th o se with 1 , 0 0 0 w o r k e r s o r
m o r e in 1959) w a s 35 p e r c e n t , c o m p a r e d with 17 p e r c e n t f o r s m a l l e r r e f i n e r i e s .
Output p e r p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r m a n - h o u r in the i n d u s t r y i n c r e a s e d n e a r l y
4 0 p e r c e n t b e tw e e n 1959 and 1964, the l a t e s t d a te f o r w h ich i n f o r m a t i o n i s a v a i l ­
a b le.
T he i n c r e a s e w a s a c c o m p a n i e d b y a d e c l in e of 17 p e r c e n t in p r o d u c t io n
w o r k e r m a n - h o u r s and a 15 p e r c e n t g a in in output.
C om p u ter con tro l, im p ro v e d
i n s t r u m e n t a t i o n , and new p r o c e s s i n g t e c h n i q u e s , p a r t i c u l a r l y a m o n g l a r g e r p r o ­
d u c in g r e f i n e r i e s , a r e a m o n g the f a c t o r s c o n tr ib u t in g to the i n d u s t r y ' s i n c r e a s e d
p r o d u c t iv it y .

1 See appendix A for scope and method of study. Wage data presented in this bulletin exclude premium pay
for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 For definition of regions used in this survey, see table in appendix A.
3 Those with 100 workers or morej smaller refineries accounted for less than a tenth of the industry's labor force.
* See Wage Structure: Petroleum Refining, July 1959 (BLS Report 158, 1960).




2

T e c h n o l o g i c a l c h a n g e s o v e r the p a s t 6 y e a r s h a v e a l s o a f f e c t e d the r e l a t i v e
e m p l o y m e n t in c e r t a i n o c c u p a t i o n a l c a t e g o r i e s .
F o r ex am p le, still w o rk e rs
( s t i l l m e n , a s s i s t a n t s , and h e l p e r s ) on v a r i o u s t y p e s of e q u ip m e n t t o g e t h e r c o m ­
p r i s e d ab o u t o n e - t e n th of the p r o d u c t io n l a b o r f o r c e in 1959 c o m p a r e d with on efifth in 1965, with m o s t o f the r i s e t r a c e a b l e to i n c r e a s e s in the n u m b e r of
w o r k e r s on c r a c k i n g e q u ip m e n t, o th e r than c a t a l y t i c .
T h is d e v e l o p m e n t r e f l e c t s
p a r t l y the u s e of new m e t h o d s of c r a c k i n g in the i n d u s t r y , in c lu d in g the i n t r o ­
du c tio n in I9 6 0 of the h y d r o c r a c k i n g p r o c e s s , w h ich i s e x p e c t e d to r e p l a c e a s
m u c h a s 10 p e r c e n t o f the i n d u s t r y ’s c a t a l y t i c c r a c k i n g c a p a c i t y by 1970. 5 S u b ­
s t a n t i a l e m p l o y m e n t d e c l i n e s w e r e r e c o r d e d , on the o t h e r hand, f o r s o m e of the
i n d u s t r y ' s r e l a t i v e l y low s k i l l e d j o b s , n o ta b ly l a b o r e r s (down n e a r l y o n e - h a lf )
and m a i n t e n a n c e t r a d e s h e l p e r s (down ab o u t t w o - t h i r d s ) .
P r o d u c t s and P r o c e s s e s .
G a s o l i n e (in c lu d in g naphtha) w a s the m a j o r p r o d ­
u c t in r e f i n e r i e s e m p lo y in g m o r e than n in e - t e n t h s of the w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e
of the s u r v e y .
O th e r i m p o r t a n t p r o d u c t s of the i n d u s t r y in c lu d e d i s t i l l a t e fu e l
o i l, r e s i d u a l fu e l o i l, l u b r i c a t i n g o i l, an d a s p h a l t . W e s t e r n P e n n s y l v a n i a — est
W
V i r g i n i a (a c c o u n tin g f o r l e s s than 3 p e r c e n t o f the i n d u s t r y ' s l a b o r f o r c e ) w a s
the on ly r e g i o n in w hich m o r e than a tenth (58 p e r c e n t ) of the w o r k e r s w e r e in
r e f i n e r i e s p r i m a r i l y e n g a g e d in m a n u f a c t u r i n g p r o d u c t s o t h e r than g a s o l i n e ( m o s t l y
lu b ric a tin g o ils).
T e c h n o l o g i c a l d e v e l o p m e n t in the r e fin in g of p e t r o l e u m h a s b e e n m a k in g
s t e a d y p r o g r e s s s i n c e the in c e p tio n of the in d u s t r y . C h a r a c t e r i s t i c a l l y , p e t r o l e u m
r e fin in g i s a r e l a t i v e l y l a r g e - s c a l e m a n u f a c t u r i n g o p e r a t i o n in w hich f l u i d s and
g a s a r e p r o c e s s e d a lm o st ex c lu siv ely .
F r o m the r e c e i p t of c r u d e o il to the
s h ip m e n t of the f i n is h e d p r o d u c t , the flow of p r o d u c t io n is v i r t u a l l y c o n tin u o u s
in c l o s e l y i n t e r r e l a t e d re fin in g u n it s .
T h e s e f a c t o r s h a v e in flu e n c e d the high
d e g r e e of d i v e r s i f i c a t i o n o f p r o d u c t and a u t o m a t io n in the in d u s t r y .
L o catio n .
F o u r - f i f t h s of the p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e r e c o n c e n t r a t e d in fo u r
r e g i o n s ; the T e x a s — o u i s i a n a G u lf C o a s t r e g i o n a c c o u n t e d f o r o n e - t h i r d o f the
L
w o r k e r s , the M id w e s t I an d the E a s t C o a s t e a c h e m p l o y e d ab o u t o n e - s i x t h , and
s l i g h t l y m o r e than o n e - e i g h t h w e r e e m p l o y e d in the W e st C o a s t r e g i o n .
Re­
f i n e r i e s in m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s 6 e m p l o y e d m o r e than f o u r - f i f t h s of the i n d u s t r y ’s
w ork fo rc e .
The p r o p o r t i o n s of w o r k e r s in m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s w e r e n in e - t e n t h s
o r m o r e in fo u r r e g i o n s ; o n e - h a l f in the R o c k y M ou n tain r e g i o n ; t w o - f if t h s in the
M id w e s t II r e g i o n ; ab o u t o n e - f ift h in the T e x a s Inland— o r th L o u i s i a n a — r k a n s a s
N
A
r e g io n ; and l e s s than o n e -te n th in W e s t e r n P e n n s y l v a n i a — est V i r g i n i a .
W
S i z e of E s t a b l i s h m e n t .
R e f i n e r i e s with a 1, 000 w o r k e r s o r m o r e e m p l o y e d
a li t t le l e s s than h a lf of the i n d u s t r y ' s w o r k f o r c e .
The p r o p o r t i o n s of w o r k e r s
in s m a l l e r r e f i n e r i e s a m o u n te d to n e a r l y t h r e e - t e n t h s in the T e x a s — o u i s i a n a
L
G u lf C o a s t , o n e - t h i r d on the E a s t C o a s t , n e a r l y o n e - h a l f on the W e st C o a s t ,
ab ou t t w o - t h i r d s in the M id w e s t I, and n in e - t e n t h s o r m o r e in the o t h e r r e g i o n s .
U n io n iz a t i o n .
R e f i n e r i e s h a v in g l a b o r - m a n a g e m e n t c o n t r a c t s c o v e r i n g a
m a j o r i t y of t h e i r w o r k e r s a c c o u n t e d f o r n in e - t e n t h s o r m o r e of the w o r k f o r c e
in 6 of the 8 r e g i o n s ; in the M id w e s t II and E a s t C o a s t r e g i o n s , the p r o p o r t i o n s
w e r e s l i g h t l y s m a l l e r (84 an d 87 p e r c e n t , r e s p e c t i v e l y ) .
The O il,
C h e m ical
and A t o m ic W o r k e r s I n t e r n a t io n a l Union w a s the m a j o r union in the in d u s t r y .
A s u b s t a n t i a l n u m b e r of r e f i n e r i e s , p a r t i c u l a r l y on the E a s t C o a s t and the T e x a s —
L o u i s i a n a G u lf C o a s t , h ad c o n t r a c t s with in d e p e n d e n t u n io n s.
^ Technological Trends in Major American Industries (BLS Bulletin 1474, 1966).
The term "metropolitan area" as used in this bulletin, refers to the Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas
as defined by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget through March 1965.




3

M eth od o f W age P a y m e n t ,
A ll of the w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y th is stu d y w e r e
p a i d t im e r a t e s , n e a r l y a l w a y s u n d e r f o r m a l s y s t e m s p r o v i d i n g a s i n g l e r a t e
f o r s p e c i f i c o c c u p a t io n s (ta b le 15).
In a few i n s t a n c e s , h o w e v e r , r a n g e s of r a t e s
w e r e a p p l i c a b l e ; in one r e g i o n (W e st C o a s t ) n e a r l y o n e -te n th o f the w o r k e r s
w e r e p a i d r a t e s b a s e d on the q u a l i f i c a t i o n s of the in d iv id u a l e m p l o y e e .
In a
n u m b e r of r e f i n e r i e s the s a m e s i n g l e r a t e a p p l ie d to s e v e r a l o c c u p a t i o n s .
In
one r e f i n e r y , f o r e x a m p l e , one r a t e a p p l ie d to m o s t j o u r n e y m a n m a in t e n a n c e
j o b s , and a n o th e r to a l l s t i l l m e n , r e g a r d l e s s of the type of s t i l l o p e r a t e d .
A v e r a g e H o u r ly E a r n i n g s
E a r n i n g s of the 7 3 , 3 1 8 p r o d u c t io n and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s within s c o p e o f the
s u r v e y a v e r a g e d $ 3 . 4 5 an h o u r in D e c e m b e r 1965 7 (t a b le 1).
R e g i o n a l l y , the
h i g h e s t a v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s w e r e r e c o r d e d f o r the E a s t C o a s t ( $ 3 . 5 8 ) .
In
both the T e x a s — o u i s i a n a G ulf C o a s t and M id w e s t I r e g i o n s ( t o g e t h e r c o m p r i s i n g
L
h a l f o f the i n d u s t r y ' s e m p lo y m e n t ) e a r n i n g s a v e r a g e d $ 3 . 5 2 .
A v e ra g e e arn in g s
in a l l but one of the r e m a in in g r e g i o n s w e r e b e t w e e n $ 3 . 26 and $ 3 . 4 4 an h o u r.
E a r n i n g s of w o r k e r s in the W e s t e r n P e n n s y l v a n i a — e st V i r g i n i a r e g i o n a v e r a g e d
W
$ 2 . 6 0 an h o u r.
In d iv id u al e a r n i n g s of a l l but 4 p e r c e n t o f the w o r k e r s w e r e w ithin a r a n g e
o f $ 2 . 5 0 to $ 4 an h o u r ; e a r n i n g s o f the m id d le h a l f w e r e b e tw e e n $ 3 . 2 2 and
$ 3 . 7 2 (tab le 2).
V i r t u a l l y a l l o f the w o r k e r s in the W e s t e r n P e n n s y l v a n i a — est
W
V i r g i n i a r e g io n e a r n e d l e s s than $ 3 an h o u r , w h e r e a s a b o u t f o u r - f i f t h s o f the
w o r k e r s o r m o r e in e a c h of the o t h e r r e g i o n s e a r n e d m o r e than t h is a m o u n t.
O c c u p a t io n a l E a r n i n g s
O c c u p a t io n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s f o r w h ich a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s
a r e p r e s e n t e d in t a b le 3 a c c o u n t e d f o r s l i g h t l y m o r e than t h r e e - f i f t h s of the p r o ­
d u c tio n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by the stu d y .
S t i l l m e n on v a r i o u s t y p e s o f e q u ip m e n t
a v e r a g e d f r o m $ 3 . 8 3 to $ 3 . 91 an h o u r and w e r e the h i g h e s t p a i d w o r k e r s a m o n g
the j o b s s t u d ie d s e p a r a t e l y . T hey a v e r a g e d a p p r o x i m a t e l y 30 c e n t s an h o u r m o r e
than a s s i s t a n t s t i l l m e n ( $ 3 . 5 5 to $ 3 . 6 2 ) and ab ou t 40 to 50 c e n t s an h o u r m o r e
than s t i l l m e n h e l p e r s ( $ 3 . 37 to $ 3 . 4 2 ) . E a r n i n g s of the s e v e n j o u r n e y m e n m a i n t e ­
n an c e j o b s 8 s t u d ie d r a n g e d f r o m $ 3 , 5 9 f o r m e c h a n i c s to $ 3 . 6 9 f o r in s t r u m e n t
rep airm en .
M a in t e n a n c e t r a d e s h e l p e r s a v e r a g e d $ 3 . 0 7 an h o u r.
Laborers,
n u m e r i c a l l y the m o s t i m p o r t a n t j o b , a v e r a g e d $ 2 . 7 4 --- the s a m e a s the a v e r a g e
record ed fo r ja n ito rs.
P a r a f f i n p r e s s m e n (found a l m o s t e x c l u s i v e l y in the W e s t ­
e r n P e n n s y l v a n i a — est V i r g i n i a r e g io n ) h ad the lo w e s t a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s , $ 2 . 6 8
W
an h o u r.
7 The straight-time average hourly earnings in this bulletin differ in concept from the gross average hourly
earnings published in the Bureau’s monthly hours and earnings series ($3. 56 in December 1965). Unlike the latter,
the estimates presented here exclude premium pay for overtime, and for work on weekends, holidays, and late
shifts. Average earnings were calculated by summing individual hourly earnings and dividing by the number of
individuals; in the monthly series, the sum of the man-hour totals reported by establishments in the industry was
divided into the reported payroll totals.
The estimate of the number of production workers within scope of the study is intended only as a general guide
to the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey. It differs from the number published in the
monthly series (84,900 in December 1965) by the exclusion of establishments employing fewer than 100 workers and
by the fact that the advance planning necessary to make the survey required the use of lists of establishments as­
sembled considerably in advance of data collection. Thus, establishments new to the industry are omitted, as are
establishments originally classified in the petroleum refining industry but found to be in other industries at the time
of the survey. Also omitted are refineries classified incorrectly in other industries at the time the lists were
compiled.
8 Maintenance craft consolidation plans, which eliminate rigid lines of craft duties and use a team approach
with individuals performing a variety of maintenance tasks, were reported by about an eighth of the 110 refineries
visited during the survey. The 750 workers covered by such plans were not classifiable in the specific occupations
for which separate earnings information was developed.



4

A m o n g the r e g i o n s , o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e s w e r e u s u a l l y h i g h e s t in the E a s t
C o a s t , p a r t i c u l a r l y f o r jo u r n e y m e n m a in t e n a n c e j o b s , s t i l l m e n an d a s s i s t a n t s t i l l m e n (ta b le 3). H o w e v e r , a s i l l u s t r a t e d in the fo llo w in g t a b u l a t io n , e a r n i n g s in the
T e x a s — o u i s i a n a G ulf C o a s t and M id w e st I r e g i o n s s o m e t i m e s e q u a le d o r e x c e e d e d
L
the p a y in the E a s t C o a s t . A v e r a g e s in the W e s t e r n P e n n s y l v a n i a — est V i r g i n i a
W
r e g i o n w e r e g e n e r a l l y about 25 p e r c e n t b e lo w the n a t i o n a l a v e r a g e s .

Average hourly earnings as a percent of nationwide average

Occupation
Maintenance:
Electricians ------------------Helpers, trades---------------Instrument rep airm en -------Machinists---------------------Pipefitters---------------------Welders, h a n d --------- -----Processing:
Stillmen, catalytic
crackin g---------------------Stillmen, cracking, other
than c a t a ly tic --------------Stillmen, straigh t-ru n -----Stillmen, combination
u n its-------------------------Stillmen, assistant,
catalytic cracking----------Stillmen, assistant, cracking,
other than catalytic--------Stillmen, assistant,
straight-run -----------------Laborers------------------------Pum pm en---------------------Other:
Routine testers, laboratory —
Truckdrivers------------------Jan ito rs-------------------------

Western
East Pennsylvania— Mid­ Mid­
Coast West Virginia west I west II
103
102
106
102
103
105

101
98
98
100
101
100

98

100

_
-

99
97

107

95

96

100

95
98
93
95
96
96

102
102
102
101
102
101

96

103

102
99

96
92

102
-

95
90

104

75
74

West
Coast

96
103
96
98
98
98

99
102
98
99
98
101
102

76
81
76
74
75

104
106
104

Texas InlandTexasLouisiana
North Louisi­ Rocky
Arkansas Mountain
Gulf Coast ana—
95
93
95
94
91
93

96

104

105

_

101

96

102

_

98

98

105

76

100

96

102

95

_

96

103
103
106

75
87
74

99
107
104

93
100
94

_
99
103

93
99
91

96
100
95

96
101
92

103
100
104

74
79
77

97
101
102

94
94
95

106
106
100

90
94
91

91
97
93

95
96
103

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported, or data that do not meet publication criteria.

O c c u p a t io n a l p a y r e l a t i o n s h i p s a l s o v a r i e d s o m e w h a t b y r e g i o n (t a b le 3).
A v e r a g e e a r n i n g s f o r l a b o r e r s , f o r e x a m p l e , w e r e s l i g h t l y b e lo w t h o s e f o r j a n i ­
t o r s in t h r e e r e g i o n s ( E a s t C o a s t , T e x a s — o u i s i a n a G u lf C o a s t , and W e s t C o a s t ) ,
L
w h e r e a s l a b o r e r s in the o t h e r r e g i o n s a v e r a g e d f r o m 4 to 13 p e r c e n t m o r e than
jan ito rs.
A v e ra g e earn in g s fo r p ip e f it t e r s , a n u m e ric a lly im p o rtan t m ain ten an ce
jo b , e x c e e d e d t h o s e of j a n i t o r s b y 27 to 39 p e r c e n t a m o n g the r e g i o n s .
In d iv id u a l e a r n i n g s o f w o r k e r s in the s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e g e n e r a l l y
c o n c e n t r a t e d w ith in c o m p a r a t i v e l y n a r r o w l i m i t s , ev en on a n atio n w id e b a s i s .
F o r e x a m p l e , m o r e than t h r e e - f o u r t h s o f the 3 , 7 2 9 l a b o r e r s h a d e a r n i n g s within
a 3 0 - c e n t r a n g e , $ 2 . 6 0 to $ 2 . 9 0 an h o u r; f o u r - f i f t h s o f the 3 , 5 6 9 p i p e f i t t e r s
an d m o r e than n in e - t e n t h s of the 2 , 1 1 5 m a c h i n i s t s e a r n e d b e tw e e n $ 3 . 5 0 and
$ 3 . 8 0 an h o u r .
The c o n c e n t r a t i o n s w e r e m o r e a p p a r e n t in the r e g i o n s , w h e r e
the e a r n i n g s o f a m a j o r i t y of the w o r k e r s in m o s t j o b s f o r w h ich d a t a a r e show n
w e r e c l u s t e r e d w ith in r a n g e s o f 20 c e n t s an h o u r o r l e s s .
T he w i d e s p r e a d u s e
of s i n g l e - r a t e w a g e s y s t e m s c o n t r i b u t e s in p a r t to the c o m p a r a t i v e l y n a r r o w r a n g e
of e a rn in g s fo r w o r k e rs p e rfo rm in g s im i la r t a s k s .



5

E s t a b l i s h m e n t P r a c t i c e s and S u p p l e m e n t a r y W age P r o v i s i o n s
D a t a w e r e o b ta in e d on c e r t a i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s f o r p r o d u c t io n w o r k ­
e r s , in c lu d in g w o r k s c h e d u l e s , and sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a l s , and f o r s e l e c t e d s u p p l e ­
m e n ta ry w age b en efits.
S c h e d u le d W eek ly H o u r s and S h ift P r a c t i c e s .
W ork s c h e d u l e s o f 40 h o u r s
a w e e k w e r e in e f f e c t in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y in g v i r t u a l l y a l l the p r o d u c t io n
w o r k e r s ( t a b le 16).
T he on ly e x c e p t io n w a s in the M i d w e s t I r e g i o n , w h e r e a
s c h e d u l e o f 42 h o u r s a w e e k a p p l ie d to 10 p e r c e n t o f the w o r k e r s .
N e a r l y h a lf o f the i n d u s t r y ’ s p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e r e a s s i g n e d to r o t a t in g
s h i f t s , a l m o s t a l w a y s u n d e r a r r a n g e m e n t s w h e r e b y i n d iv id u a ls w o r k e d d a y , e v e ­
n in g , and n igh t s c h e d u l e s d u r in g a l t e r n a t i n g w e e k s ( t a b le 17).
W o r k e r s on e v e ­
n in g s c h e d u l e s t y p i c a l l y r e c e i v e d 8 c e n t s an h o u r , and t h o s e on n igh t s c h e d u l e s ,
16 c e n t s an h o u r a b o v e d a y r a t e s .
W o r k e r s on fix e d e x t r a s h i f t s a c c o u n t e d f o r
l e s s than 2 p e r c e n t o f the p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s .
P aid H o lid ay s.
P a i d h o lid a y s w e r e p r o v i d e d to w o r k e r s in a l l r e f i n e r i e s
v i s i t e d (t a b le 18).
T he m o s t c o m m o n p r o v i s i o n s in a l l r e g i o n s w e r e f o r 8 d a y s
a n n u a lly ; h o w e v e r , o n e - f o u r t h o f the w o r k e r s in the E a s t C o a s t r e g i o n w e r e p r o ­
v id e d 10 p a i d h o lid a y s o r m o r e .
P a i d V a c a t i o n s . P a i d v a c a t i o n s ( a f t e r q u a lif y in g p e r i o d s o f s e r v i c e ) w e r e
p r o v i d e d b y a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the s u r v e y ( t a b le 19).
In a l l but one r e g i o n ,
ty p ical p r o v isio n s fo r paid v a catio n s w e re 2 w e e k s ’ p ay a fte r 1 y e a r of s e r v ic e ,
3 w e e k s a f t e r 5 y e a r s , 4 w e e k s a f t e r 10 y e a r s , and 5 w e e k s a f t e r 20 y e a r s .
V a c a t io n p r o v i s i o n s w e r e s o m e w h a t l e s s l i b e r a l in the W e s t e r n P e n n s y l v a n i a W e st V i r g i n i a r e g i o n .
H e a lth , I n s u r a n c e , and R e t i r e m e n t P l a n s .
L ife , h o sp italizatio n , s u r g ic a l,
and m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e , f o r w h ich e m p l o y e r s p a i d a t l e a s t p a r t o f the c o s t , w e r e
a v a i l a b l e to m o r e than n in e - t e n t h s o f the p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s ( t a b le 20).
A sim i­
l a r p r o p o r t i o n w e r e p r o v i d e d p a i d s i c k l e a v e ( m o s t l y fu ll p a y , no w a it in g p e r i o d ) .
A c c i d e n t a l d e a th and d i s m e m b e r m e n t i n s u r a n c e w a s p r o v i d e d to a b o u t o n e - h a l f
o f the w o r k e r s , an d c a t a s t r o p h e ( m a j o r m e d i c a l ) i n s u r a n c e , to s e v e n - t e n t h s .
T h e in c i d e n c e o f s o m e o f t h e s e p l a n s v a r i e d c o n s i d e r a b l y , b y r e g i o n .
C atas­
t r o p h e i n s u r a n c e , f o r e x a m p l e , a p p l i e d to a b o u t t w o - f if t h s o f the w o r k e r s in the
E a s t C o a s t , c o m p a r e d w ith s e v e n - t e n t h s in T e x a s —L o u i s i a n a G u lf C o a s t , f o u r fifth s in M id w e s t I, an d v i r t u a l l y a l l in the M id w e s t II and R o c k y M o u n ta in r e g i o n s .
R e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n p l a n s (o th e r than s o c i a l s e c u r i t y ) w h ich p r o v i d e r e g u l a r
p a y m e n t s f o r the r e m a i n d e r o f the r e t i r e e ’ s l i f e , w e r e p r o v i d e d b y r e f i n e r i e s
e m p lo y in g p r a c t i c a l l y a l l o f the p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s .
O th er S e l e c t e d B e n e f i t s .
T h r i f t o r s a v i n g s p l a n s , f o r w h ich the e m p l o y e r
m a d e m o n e t a r y c o n tr ib u t io n s b eyo n d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e c o s t s , w e r e p r o v i d e d in e s ­
t a b l i s h m e n t s with n e a r l y f o u r - f i f t h s o f the w o r k e r s (t a b le 21).
P l a n t s e m p lo y in g
s e v e n - t e n t h s o f the w o r k e r s h ad p r o v i s i o n s f o r s e v e r a n c e p a y . 9 F o r m a l p l a n s
p r o v i d i n g p a y fo r f u n e r a l l e a v e and j u r y duty w e r e a v a i l a b l e to n e a r l y a l l p r o ­
d u c tio n w o r k e r s .

9

Pay to employees permanently separated from work through no fault of their own.




Table 1. Average Hourly Earnings:

0)

By Selected Characteristics

(Num ber and average stra igh t-tim e hourly ea rn in g s1 of production w orkers in petroleum refin eries by selected c h a ra c te ristic s,
United States and regio n s, D ecem b er 1965)
Wes tern
T exas—
T exas In lan dRocky
W est
Pennsy lvania—
M idwest II
M idw est I
Louisiana
North Louisiana—
Mountain
Coast
W est \Virginia
Gulf Coast
A rkansas
Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number Average
hourly
of
of
hourly
hourly - of
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
hourly
hourly
of
of
hourly
w orkers earnings workers earnings workers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings workers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings
UniLted
Sta tes

Item

Ectst
Co ast

A ll w orkers 2 --------------------------

7 3 ,3 1 8

$ 3 .4 5

1 1 ,0 6 6

$ 3 . 58

S ize of community:
M etropolitan areas 3 ------------------N onm etropolitan areas —J---------

6 0 ,2 1 0
1 3 ,1 0 8

3. 50
3. 23

9 ,9 2 9
-

3. 56

Size of establishm ent:
100—999 w o r k e r s -------------------------1 ,0 0 0 w orkers or m o r e -------------

3 7 ,5 4 7
3 5 ,7 7 1

3. 39
3. 52

3, 779
7 ,2 8 7

3. 61
3. 56

1 ,9 8 3

$ 2 . 60

1 ,8 7 6

2. 60

-

1 ,9 8 3

2. 60

7 ,9 0 2
4, 739

12 ,6 4 1

$ 3 . 52

7 ,4 6 8

$ 3 . 26

24 ,4 8 1

$ 3 . 52

1 1 ,5 6 1

3. 53

2 ,9 8 3
4, 485

3. 30
3. 23

2 4 ,481
-

3. 52

6, 621
“

3. 26

6, 893
1 7 ,5 8 8

3. 48
3. 54

"

3. 54
3. 49

"

3, 847

$ 3 . 26

2 ,0 6 6

$ 3 . 39

9 ,7 6 6

$ 3 . 44

3. 37
-

3. 44

3. 28

1 ,0 4 9
-

9 ,2 7 1

3 ,0 1 8

3 ,8 4 7
"

3. 26

2, 066

3. 39

4, 456
5 ,3 1 0

3. 43
3. 45

■

1 E xcludes p rem iu m pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late sh ifts.
2 V irtu ally all production w ork ers w ere men.
3 Standard M etropolitan S tatistical A r e a s as defined by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget through M arch 1965.
N O TE :

D ashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication crite ria .

Table 2. Earnings Distribution: All Establishments
(P ercen t distribution of production w orkers in petroleum refin erie s by average stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings, 1
United States and regions, D ecem ber 1965)

A verage hourly ea rn in g s1

United States

East Coast

Under $ 2 .5 0 --------------------------------------

1. 1

$2.
$2.
$2.
$ 2.
$2.

50
60
70
80
90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2.
$2.
$2.
$ 2.
$3.

60
70
80
90
00

------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------

1.
1.
3.
2.
3.

0
8
8
8
5

0.
.
1.
2.
3.

2
9
8
9
1

$ 3.
$3.
$3.
$3.
$3 .

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 .1 0
$ 3 . 20
$ 3 . 30
$ 3 . 40
$ 3 . 50

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.
4.
6.
6.
8.

8
9
7
5
0

3.
5.
6.
3.
5.

50
60
70
80
90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$3.
$ 3.
$ 3.
$3.
$4.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

11.
15.
15.
5.
4.

4
6
7
3
4

9.
10.
23.
10.
4.

M idwest II

Texas—
Louisiana
Gulf Coast

Texas InlandNorth Louisiana—
A rkansas

Rocky
Mountain

0. 4

0. 6

0. 4

1. 5

1. 2

18.
27.
18.
4.
3.

(2)
. 1
1. 4
2. 1
2. 6

1.
2.
4.
7.
6.

0
3
9
5
0

.
1.
5.
1.
1.

6
7
3
7
8

1.
1.
4.
5.
4.

9
2
5
8
8

.
1.
1.
4.
2.

5
8
4
1
4

0
0
9
4
9

60
70
80
90
00

(2)

M idwest I

3 26. 9

2
3
1
5
6

$3.
$ 3.
$ 3.
$3 .
$3.

W estern
P ennsylvaniaW est Virginia

2
7
9
8
4

. 1
-

_

. 1
-

-

W est Coast

( 2)
( 2)
0. 1
2. 1
1. 1
7. 0

3.
4.
5.
10.
5.

3
4
3
6
1

7.
10.
12.
10.
14.

2
7
3
0
3

5.
2.
3.
3.
7.

2
6
4
9
6

11.
9.
11.
9.
10.

2
5
6
1
2

2.
5.
8.
6.
23.

7
5
9
7
1

4.
5.
11.
8.
8.

7
3
9
3
4

15.
23.
7.
11.
6.

7
3
0
1
0

11.
3.
5.
.
1.

6
9
5
9
1

6.
25.
21.
2.
7.

5
3
8
5
2

14. 3
1. 6
10. 5
1. 8
-

18.
6.
9.
6.
.

8
6
6
5
2

20.
7.
16.
5.
1.

4
6
9
1
0

$ 4. 00 and o v e r ----------------------------------

2. 6

9. 3

1. 5

. 4

2. 7

. 5

Total -----------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

Number of w ork ers -------------------------A verage hourly ea rn in g s1----------------

73, 318
$ 3 . 45

1 1 ,0 6 6
$ 3 . 58

1, 983
$ 2. 60

12, 641
$ 3 . 52

7, 468
$3 . 26

24, 481
$3. 52

3, 847
$3 . 26

2, 066
$ 3 . 39

9, 766
$ 3 . 44

-

1 E xcludes p rem iu m pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 L e ss than 0. 05 percent.
3 W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s: 1 5. 8 percent at $2 . 40 to $2. 50; 9. 8 at $2 . 30 to $2 . 40; and 1. 3 percent at le ss than $2 . 30.

NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.




-

. 2

Table 3.

Occupational Averages:

All Establishments

(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in petroleum refineries, United States and regions, December 1965)
United States
Number
of
worker s
M aintenance:
C arpenters -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------E le c t r ic ia n s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------H elp ers, t r a d e s --------------------------------------------------------------------------Instrument rep airm en --------------------------------------------------------------M achinists -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------M echanics ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------P ip e fit te r s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------W eld e rs, h an d -----------------------------------------------------------------------------P r o c e s s in g :
Compounder s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------F ilt e r m e n --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------G a g e r s -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------L oad ers, tank cars or t r u c k s -------------------------------------------------Package f ille r s , m ach in e----------------------------------------------------------P r e ssm e n , p a ra ffin --------------------------------------------------------------------Pumpmen --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------P um pm en 's h e lp e r s --------------------------------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
catalytic crack in g---------------------------------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
cracking, other than c a talytic-----------------------------------------------Stillm en (ch ief op erators), stra ig h t-r u n -------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators), combination u n its ---------------------Stillm en, a ssista n t (assista n t operators),
catalytic crack in g---------------------------------------------------------------------Stillm en, assista n t (assista n t operators),
cracking, other than c a talytic-----------------------------------------------Stillm en, assista n t (assista n t operators),
st r a ig h t -r u n -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Stillm en, assista n t (assista n t operators),
combination u n it s ---------------------------------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' helpers),
catalytic crack in g--------------------------------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (op erators' helpers),
cracking, other than c a talytic-----------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' helpers),
str a ig h t-r u n -------------------------------------------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (operators* helpers),
combination u n it s ---------------------------------------------------------------------T r e a te r s, light o i l s --------------------------------------------------------------------T r e a te r s ' h elp ers, light o i l s ---------------------------------------------------Inspection and testing:
Routine t e s te r s , la b o ra to ry ------------------------------------------------------Recording and control:
Stock clerk s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------M aterial m ovem ent:
T r u ck d r iv er s2 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------Light (under 1 V2 ton s)----------------------------------------------------------Medium (1 V2 to and including 4 t o n s )-------------------------------Heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer ty p e )-------------------T ru ck ers, power (fo r k lift)-------------------------------------------------------C ustodial:
G u a r d s-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Jan itors------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------W atch m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

E ast Coast

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

958
419
141
623
115
143
569
722

$3 .
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

64
65
07
69
67
59
62
64

100
178
203
167
199
285
341
210

307
119
659
3, 729
1, 065
367
35
1, 699
641

3.
3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
2.
3.
3.

52
14
46
74
23
00
68
60
39

996
1, 281
1, 493
687

1,
2,
1,
2,
1,
3,
1,

A verage
hourly
earnings

72
77
14
92
75
75
74
84

12
18
73
17
18
48
41

62
14
_
459
83
65
_
246

3. 70
3. 87
_
2. 81
3. 44
3. 03
_
3. 80
_

35
68
8
240
57
28
31
71
-

3. 86

163

4. 02

-

3. 85
3. 91
3. 83

236
245
86

4. 07
4. 08
4. 10

18
29

_

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

W estern
P en nsylvaniaW est Virginia
Number
A verage
of
hourly
worker s
earnings

-

$2. 68
2. 77
2. 50
_
2. 80
2. 68
2. 67
2. 72
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

64
72
50
38
46
51
63
66

-

2, 90
2. 88
-

M idw est I
Number
of
w orker s

167
294
442
312
294
223
835
283
56

_

90
545
289
37
_
382
151

Midwest II

A verage
hourly
earnings

$3 .
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

45
47
01
45
49
38
46
48

63
61
12
63
62
64
56
68

60
105
212
105
122
99
219
170

3. 78
_
3. 48
2. 92
3. 42
3. 29
_
3. 76
3. 43

29
13
43
623
226
48
_
215
67

3. 35
3. 45
3. 15
2. 74
3. 10
3. 06
_
3. 39
3. 34

187

3. 92

125

3. 70

375
173
102

3. 91
3. 88
3. 99

233
111
99

3. 68
3, 58
3. 68

2, 090

3. 57

235

3. 76

-

490

3. 62

221

3. 43

2, 531

3. 55

289

3. 73

12

2. 70

906

3. 55

355

3. 41

2, 432

3. 62

419

3. 73

20

2. 71

213

3. 60

151

3. 35

1, 249

3. 57

-

-

73

3. 77

172

3. 42

659

3. 38

59

3. 50

145

3. 48

98

3. 13

513

3. 42

73

3. 59

253

3. 49

"

649

3. 40

89

3. 45

155

3. 47

60

3. 14

671
513
228

3. 37
3. 63
3. 52

-

80
22

3. 79
3. 47

26
-

2. 7 2
-

127
135
70

3. 55
3. 76
3. 71

“
62
24

"
3. 48
3. 27

2, 963

3. 48

529

3. 60

89

2. 58

416

3. 39

319

3. 27

713

3. 46

8

2. 52

154

3. 47

56

3. 13

176
84
"
-

3. 27
3. 23
3. 18

85
18
51
"
35

3. 05
3. 00
3. 03
“
3. 00

142
179
30

3. 13
2. 80
3. 01

34
79
26

2. 93
2. 60
2. 90

1, 397
124
326
96
244
632
762
96

-

-

-

99

3. 34

24
07
14
20
05

206
57

3. 25
3. 08

39
10
21

2. 56
2. 45
-

3. 05
2. 74
2. 79

135
88

3. 05
2. 86

-

2. 11
2. 36

3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

"

"

14
16

"

See footnotes at end of table.




-vl

Table 3.

Occupational Averages:

0
0

All Establishments— Continued

(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in petrdleum refineries, United States and regions, December 1965)

Department and occupation

M aintenance:
C arp e n ters----------------------------------------------------------------E le c t r ic ia n s -------------------------------------------------------------H elpers, t r a d e s ----------------------------------- '-------------------Instrum ent r e p a ir m e n --------------------------------------------M a c h in ists----------------------------------------------------------------M e ch an ic s------------------------------------------------------------------P ip e fit te r s ----------------------------------------------------------------W e ld e rs, hand -----------------------------------------------------------P r o ce ssin g :
Com pounders------------------------------------------------------------F ilt e r m e n ------------------------------------------------------------------G a g e r s -----------------------------------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s -------------------------------------------------------------------L oad ers, tank ca rs or t r u c k s ------------------------------Package f ille r s , m achine--------------------------------------P r e ssm e n , p a r a ffin ------------------------------------------------Pum pm en-------------------------------------------------------------------P um pm en 's h e lp e r s ------------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
catalytic crack in g-------------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
cracking, other than c a talytic---------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators), str a ig h t-r u n ----------Stillm en (chief op erators), combination units —
Stillm en, assista n t (assistan t op erators),
catalytic crack ing-------------------------------------------------Stillm en, assista n t (assista n t op erators),
cracking, other than c a talytic---------------------------Stillm en, a ssista n t (a ssista n t op erators),
stra igh t-ru n -----------------------------------------------------------Stillm en, assistan t (assista n t op erators),
combination u n its -------------------------------------------------S tillm en 1s h elp ers (o p era to rs' h elp ers),
catalytic crack in g-------------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' h elp ers),
cracking, other than ca ta ly tic ---------------------------S tillm en 's h elpers (o p era to rs' h elp ers),
s tr a ig h t-r u n -----------------------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' h elp ers),
combination u n it s -------------------------------------------------T r e a te r s, light o i l s ------------------------------------------------T r e a te r s' h elp ers, light o i l s -------------------------------Inspection and testing:
Routine te ste r s, la b oratory----------------------------------Recording and control:
Stock clerk s --------------------------------------------------------------M aterial m ovem ent:
T r u ck d r iv e r s2 ----------------------------------------------------------Ligh t(u n d er 1 Vz ton s)--------------------------------------Medium (1 V2 to and including 4 t o n s ) ----------Heavy (over 4 tons, other than tra ile r type)
T ru ck ers, power ( fo r k lift)-----------------------------------Custodial:
G u a r d s-----------------------------------------------------------------------Jan itors----------------------------------------------------------------------W atch m e n -------------------------------------------------------------------

Texas—
Louisiana
Gulf Coast
Number
A verage
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

430
576
808
659
1004
293
1398
689

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

69
72
12
77
70
63
70
69

27
46
96
44
33
86
84
70

91
16
350
1540
143
107

3.
3.
3.
2.
3.
3.

70
69
50
72
38
06

39
112
131
-

3. 35
2. 72
3. 04

91

567
236

3. 70
3. 47

-

3. 97

-

220

3. 91

105
52
120

-

116

-

3. 98

$3 .
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

38
48
85
50
46
34
29
38

_

263

Rocky Mountain
Number
of
w orkers

19
39
52
54
29
55
107
78
8

-

-

W est Coast

A verage
hourly
earnings

$3 .
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

55
51
16
54
60
51
53
58

143
163
255
274
417
537
181

3. 64
3. 65

3. 38

9

3. 39

-

-

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

64
69
00
63
68

_

-

-

115
72
-

2. 73
3. 30
-

95
64
59

2. 78
3. 15
2. 99

3. 29
-

73
-

3. 43

54
87

3. 31
3. 18

-

49

3. 79

3. 66
3. 51
3. 65

_

-

43

3. 85

60
31
121

3. 83
3. 81
3. 82
3. 49

27

3. 66

110

3. 50

117

-

144

3. 40

-

694

3. 63

-

662

3. 61

121

3. 39

-

54

3. 38

112

3. 49

125

3. 47

-

39

3. 55

457

3. 52

-

-

-

158

3. 68

-

208

3. 52

49

32

3. 43

-

-

-

258

3. 50

-

-

28

3. 28

205
47

3. 33
3. 55

.

_

3. 02

3. 20
3. 41

-

-

-

-

3. 80
3. 60

85
48
-

1142

3. 70

150

3. 13

112

3. 18

206

3. 29

330

3. 63

27

3. 16

14

3. 16

25

3. 24

445
83
69

3. 44
3. 11
3. 22

3. 04
2. 64
2. 99
3. 12
-

30
9
20

3. 15
3. 08
3. 18

324

3. 12

2. 76
2. 50

-

103
59

69

3. 14

92
6
38
17
-

266
290

3. 12
2. 75

33
27

-

-

1 E xcludes p rem iu m pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes a ll d riv ers re g a r d le ss of size and type of truck operated.


NOTE: Dashes


T exas InlandNorth Louisiana—
A rkansas
Number
A verage
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.

-

-

-

-

-

17

_

2. 54
“

-

50
49
50
•68
"

-

3. 19
3. 29
3. 01
'
2. 81

Table 4.

Occupational Averages:

By Size o f Community

(Number and average stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings1 of w orkers in selected occupations in petroleum refin eries in
m etropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas, United States and regions, Decem ber 1965)

United States
M e troN onm etropolitan
politan
areas
areas
A v e r - Num - A v e r Number
age
age
ber
hour ly
of
hourly
of
w ork- earn- w ork - ea rn ings
ers
mgs
ers
M ain tenan ce:
C arpenters --------------------------------------------------------E le c t r ic ia n s ------------------------------------------------------H elpers, t r a d e s ------------------------ -----------------------Instrum ent r e p a ir m e n ------------------------------------M a c h in is ts ---------- ■---------------------------------------------M echanics - —- —------ ------ ----------—------- ------- . . . . .
P ip e fit te r s ---------------------------------------------------------W e ld e rs, h an d --------------------------------------------------P r o ce ssin g :
Compounder s -----------------------------------------------------G a g e r s ----------------------------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s ------------------------------------------------------------L oad ers, tank c a rs or t r u c k s -----------------------Package f ille r s , m achine-------------------------------P um pm en------------------------------------------------------------P um pm en 's h e lp e r s -----------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
catalytic crack in g------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
cracking, other than catalytic -------------------Stillm en (chief op erators), s tra ig h t-r u n -----Stillm en (chief op erators),
combination u n its ------------------------------------------Stillm en, assista n t (assista n t op erators),
catalytic crack in g------------------------------------------Stillm en, a ssista n t (a ssista n t operators),
cracking, other than c a talytic--------------------Stillm en, assista n t (assista n t operators),
st r a ig h t -r u n ----------------------------------------------------Stillm en, a ssista n t (assista n t operators),
combination u n it s ------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' helpers),
catalytic crack in g------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' helpers),
cracking, other than catalytic--------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (op era to rs' helpers),
s tr a ig h t-r u n ----------------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' helpers),
combination u n it s ------------------------------------------T r e a te r s, light o i l s -----------------------------------------Inspection and testing:
Routine t e s t e r s , la b oratory---------------------------Recording and control:
Stock clerk s ------------------------------------------------------M aterial m ovem ent:
T ru ck d rivers 2--------------------------------------------------Medium (1 7 2 to and including 4 tons)-----T ru ck ers, power (fo r k lift)----------------------------Custodial:
G u a r d s ----------------------------------------------------------------J an itors----------------------------------------------------------------

861
243
731
384
917
973
3, 125
1, 377

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

66
69
10
72
68
64
64
69

97
176
410
239
198
170
444
345

244
581
2, 973
713
296
1, 354
556

3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.

66
50
77
30
07
68
40

63
78
756
352
71
345
85

2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.
3.

97
20
62
07
72
28
31

3 .9 2

300

3. 74

1,
1,
1,
1,

696

$3. 40
3. 44
2 .9 2
3. 52
3. 51
3. 33
3. 47
3. 46

72
76
14
95
73
75
71
84

11
18
71
17
16
44
41

$2. 68
2. 77
2. 50
2. 80
2 .6 8
2. 67
2. 72

161
281
340
273
271
223
829
255

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

63
61
11
63
62
64
56
69

25
44
90
35
56
53
90
57

419
57
65
225
-

3. 70
_
2. 80
3. 34
3. 03
3. 79
-

34
8
219
47
26
67
-

2. 64
2. 50
2. 38
2. 48
2. 51
2. 67
_

52
87
506
283
37
349
137

3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.

80
48
92
43
29
78
46

134

4. 00

-

171

3. 92

96
157
183
136
162
276
241
167
62
.

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

137
217

4. 05
4. 08

3. 69

86

4. 10

-

3. 41

203

3. 77

-

-

15
304
93
24
96
-

3. 37
2. 80
3. 12
3. 14
3. 43
-

14
29
319
133
24
119
57

30

3. 70

95

-

90

4. 02

-

-

449

3. 62

97

864

3. 55

182

3. 61

-

73

3. 77

-

-

109

3. 52

-

-

-

205

3. 53

3. 41

-

-

3. 87

_
26

498

3. 60

99

3. 34

188
_
57

3. 25

478

3. 89

209

3. 62

467

2, 061

3. 57

470

3. 45

176

3. 79

12

2. 70

2, 176

3. 65

256

3. 39

395

3. 74

20

2. 71

927

3. 59

322

3. 50

-

-

508

3. 43

151

3. 21

51

3. 47

-

384

3. 46

129

3. 29

49

3. 53

515

3. 45

134

3. 20

77

520
338

3. 40
3. 73

151
175

3. 27
3. 43

35

2, 460

3. 56

503

3. 10

635

3. 51

78

3. 09

1, 166
230
225

3 .2 9
3. 22
3 .0 8

231
96
19

2 .9 7
2 .9 5
2. 72
2. 84
2. 49

35
61
122
70
66
46
129
113

3. 91
3. 87

1, 623

95
139

45
58
10
51
53
46
51
52

351
147

3. 89
3. 96

3. 09
2. 80

3. 75
3. 65

110
66

-

18
29

2. 90
2. 88

898
1, 270

537
623

383
223

W estern
Texas In­
Texas—
P en nsyl­
land-North
Rocky
W est
M idwest I
Louisiana
M idwest II
va n ia -W e st
Louisiana—
Mountain
Coast
Gulf Coast
Virginia
A rkansas
M e tr o Nonm etro­
M e tro­
M e tro ­
Nonm etro­
M e tro­
Nonm etro­
M etro­
M e tro­
politan
politan
politan
politan
politan
politan
politan
politan
politan
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
areas
Num - A v e r - Num ­ A v e r ­ Num ­ A v e r ­ Num­ A v e r ­ Num ­ A v e r ­ Num ­ A v e r ­ Num ­ A v e r ­ Num ­ A v e r ­ Num­ A v e r ­
ber
ber
ber
ber
ber
ber
age
age
ber
age
age
age
age
ber
ber
age
age
age
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
hour ly
of
hourly
hourly
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
w ork - ea rn - w ork­ earn ­ w ork ­ ea rn ­ w ork­ earn­ w ork­ ea rn ­ w ork­ earn­ w ork­ ea rn ­ w ork­ earn­ w ork­ earn­
ers
er s
ers
ers
ers
ings
ings
ings
er s
ings
er s
ings
ings
ers
ers
ings
ings
ings
East Coast

3. 77
3. 69
-

$3. 45
3. 40
2. 94
3. 42
3 .4 6
3. 28
3. 42
3. 46

430
576
808
659
1004
293
1398
689

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

69
72
12
77
70
63
70
69

24
46
77
44
33
75
65
56

32
12
68
09
98
36
37

91
350
1540
143
107
567
236

3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.

70
50
72
38
06
70
47

33
73
99
_
65
-

3. 70

263

3. 97

-

3.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.
3.

150
61

3 .6 3
3. 50

220
-

11
_
34
_
29

$3. 47
_
3. 16
_
3. 49

134
163
255
253
417
_
480
166

$3. 65
3 .6 9
3. 00
3. 64
3. 68
_
3. 65
3. 66

3. 42
2. 64
3. 08
3. 34
-

49
31
33
-

2. 63
3. 24
3. 39
-

9
_
95
64
59
54
87

3. 39
_
2. 78
3. 15
2. 99
3. 31
3. 18

26

3. 76

43

3. 85

22

3. 59

60
31

3. 83
3. 81

19

3. 56

-

25

3. 57

117

-

3 .9 1
-

92
-

3 .7 1
3. 68

34

3. 63

116

3. 98

96

3. 44

124

3. 43

694

3. 63

-

160

3. 42

195

3. 40

662

3. 61

108

83

3. 41

68

3. 28

-

-

45

3. 45

158

3. 68

-

-

88

3. 13

208

3. 52

14

-

-

-

32

3. 43

-

-

-

41
48
86
50
46
38
35
45

$3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

-

-

-

-

3. 49

-

-

144

3. 40

-

-

-

125

3. 47

-

-

-

334

3. 55

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3. 38

3. 10
-

113

3. 53

-

51

3. 13

258

3. 50

-

-

-

28

3. 28

2. 72

115
135

3. 56
3. 76

14

3. 49

48

3. 48

103

3. 80

55
34

3. 26
3. 48

-

-

35

3. 54

83

2. 59

383

3. 40

152

3. 38

167

3. 16

1142

3. 70

117

3. 16

64

182

3. 30

8

2. 52

144

3. 48

28

3. 16

28

3. 10

330

3. 63

22

3. 12

-

39

158
84
21

3. 28
3. 23
3. 18

28
19
-

3. 18
3. 18
-

57
32
-

2. 98
2. 94
-

445
69
69

3. 44
3. 22
3. 14

83
38
-

3. 02
2. 99
-

14
8
-

132
156

3. 14
2. 87

17
36

2. 99
2. 74

43

2. 48

266
290

3. 12
2. 75

33
27

2. 76
2. 50

7

3. 08

-

2. 56
-

3. 09
2. 83

14

_
2. 11

-

83
50

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

-

-

3. 28

25

3. 24

3. 18
3. 26
-

324
50
50

3. 12
3. 19
3. 01

2. 59

68

2. 81

-

1 E xclud es p rem iu m pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late sh ifts.
Includes a ll d riv ers regard le ss of size and type of truck operated.

NOTE:




Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.

(0

Table 5. Occupational Averages:

By Size o f Establishment

( Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in petrolum refineries by size of establishment, United States and selected regions, December 1965)
United States

We stern
P en nsylvaniaW est Virginia

E ast <
Coast

M idwest I

1 0 0-999
w orkers
Number
A verage
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

10 0 -9 9 9
w orkers
Number
A verage
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

E stablishm ents with—
Department and occupation

Maintenance:
C arp en ters_______________________________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s ____________________ __
H e lp e r s, t r a d e s ________________________________________
Instrument rep a irm e n .
... ............
M achin ists
M ech anics _______________________________________________
P ip e fitte rs_______________________________________________
W e ld e r s, h and__________________________________________
P r o c e ssin g :
Com pounders ___________________________________________
G a g e r s ___________________________________________________
L a b o r e r s _________________________________________________
L o a d e rs, tank c a rs or t r u c k s ________________________
Package f ille r s , m achine____________
______________
P u m p m e n ________________________________________________
Pumpmen* s h e lp e r s____________________________________
Stillm en (chief o p erators),
catalytic cracking_____________________________________
Stillm en (chief o p erators),
crack ing, other than catalytic _____________________
Stillm en (chief op era to rs),
stra ig h t-r u n ___________________________________________
Stillm en (chief o p erators),
combination u n its _____________________________________
S tillm en , a ssistan t (assistan t
o p erators), catalytic c r a c k in g _____________________
S tillm en , a ssistan t (a ssistan t op erators),
cracking, other than catalytic _____________________
S tillm en , assistan t (assistan t op era to rs),
stra ig h t-r u n ___________________________________________
S tillm en , a ssistan t (assistan t op era to rs),
combination u n it s _____________________________________
Stillmen* s h elp ers (o p e r a to r s' h e lp e r s),
catalytic c r a c k in g ____________________________________
Stillmen* s h elp ers (o p era to rs' h e lp e r s),
cracking, other than catalytic _____________________
Stillmen* s h elp ers (o p era to rs' h e lp e r s),
stra igh t-ru n ---------------------------------------------------------------Stillmen* s h elp ers (operators* h e lp e r s),
combination u n its_________ T
__________________________
T r e a te r s , light o i l s ____________________________________
Inspection and testing:
Routine t e ste r s , la b oratory___________________________
R ecording and control:
Stock c l e r k s ____________________________________________
M aterial m ovem ent:
T ru ck d rivers 2 ----------------------------------- --------------------------Medium ( l 1 to and including 4 tons}
/?.
.......
T r u ck e r s, power (forklift)
_ ...
C ustodial:
Guards - --------------------------------------------------------------------------J a n it o r s _________________________________________________

See footnotes at end of table.




100-999
w orkers
Number
A verage
hourly
of
w orkers
earnings

1, 000 w orkers
or m ore
Number
A verage
of
hourly
earnings
w orkers

1 0 0-999
w orkers
Number
A verage
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

344
547
1,2 39
763
684
529
1 ,4 39
859

$ 3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

57
58
05
61
62
51
57
57

614
872
902
860
1 ,4 31
614
2, 130
863

$ 3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

67
70
09
77
69
66
65
71

44
48
61
146
58

150
314
1,9 8 3
868
115
1,0 3 2
424

3.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.
3.

28
40
73
21
87
50
37

157
345
1 ,7 4 6
197
252
667
217

3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.

75
52
76
31
06
75
42

28
93
-

3.8 1

264

732

$ 3.
3.
3.
_
3.
3.

1 ,0 0 0 w orkers
or m ore
Number
A verage
of
hourly
worker s
earnings

77
82

85
134
141
119
138
276
195
152

-

3. 54
2. 91
3. 78
-

34
366
42
58
201
-

4. 02

94

3. 92

69

4. 15

92

4. 14

-

45

74
77
77

893

3. 80

388

3. 97

144

4. 02

705

3. 79

788

4. 02

133

3. 78

109

4. 08

-

1,2 3 4

3. 53

856

3. 64

186

1 ,0 38

3. 48

1 ,4 9 3

3. 59

-

1,0 2 3

3. 54

1 ,4 0 9

3. 68

138

1,0 0 5

3. 53

244

3. 70

-

519

3. 35

140

3. 48

25

368

3. 42

145

3. 41

-

491

3. 37

158

3. 48

49

537
376

3. 36
3. 56

134
137

3. 41
3. 80

-

1,5 7 6

3. 32

1, 387

3. 66

214

278

3. 33

435

3. 54

27

672
204
54

3. 07
3. 13
2. 88

725
122
190

3. 39
3. 14
3. 10

109
-

253
303

2. 91
2. 65

379
459

3. 15
2. 80

40
33

3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
-

84
78
35
03
80

4. 04

578

$ 3 .7 3
3. 78
3. 13
3. 98
3. 74
3. 75
3. 73
3. 85

-

3. 58

$2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

68
77
50

35
8
240
57
28
71
-

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
-

64
50
38
46
51
66

80
68
67
72

-

$ 3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

68
65
13
65
68
67
66
70

61
369
230
257
116

3.
2.
3.
3.
3.

158

3. 92
3. 89

-

58
90
44
72
47

34

18

2. 90

284

2. 88

162

3. 88

91

4. 01

3. 77
3. 78

336

3. 65

12

2. 70

265

3. 60

20

2. 71

204

3. 60

69

3. 78

121

3. 47

186

3. 55

-

-

3. 44
-

128

3. 47

2. 72

97
100

3. 56
3. 77

89

2. 58

257

3. 43

8

2. 52

93

3. 52

39
10

-

3. 39
-

-

2. 56
2. 45
-

82
38
-

3. 27
3. 29
-

95
55

3. 11
2. 84

14

2. 11

77
101

3. 09
2. 71

40

3. 47

21

3. 96

26

3. 47

315

3. 69

3. 28

72

3. 36

3. 13
_
-

97

2. 93
2. 89

-

83
143
379
208
104
171
336
217

29

3. 43

12
18
73
17
18
48
41

-

Table 5.

Occupational Averages:

By Size o f Establishment— Continued

(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in petrolum refineries by size of establishment, United States and selected regions, December 1965)

Midwest II

T exas InlandNorth Lou isian a Arkansas

Texas—Louisiana Gulf Coast

Rocky Mountain

West Coast

Establishm ents with—
100-999
w orkers
Number
of
w orkers
M aintenance:
C arpenters
_ ..
E le ctricia n s
H e lp e r s, tra des .
Instrum ent repairm en
M achin ists
M ech anics .... ......
P ip efitters
W e ld e r s, hand
P r o ce ssin g :
Compounders
__
_
___
.
G a g e r s ________________________ _____________________________
L ab orers.
L o a d e rs, tank c a rs or trucks
.
.
.... _
Package f ille r s , m achine
Pum pm en
_
_
...
. _
Pumpmen* s h elp ers
. ...
. .......
Stillm en (chief op era to rs),
catalvtic cracking
.... _ ..........................
Stillm en (chief op era to rs),
crack ing, other than catalytic
Stillm en (chief op era to rs),
straight - ru n ................ .......................... ........................ ................
Stillm en (chief o p erators),
combination units .
S tillm en , assista n t (assistan t
op era to rs), catalytic cracking
____
S tillm en , assista n t (assistan t op erators),
cracking, other than c atalytic________________________
S tillm en , assista n t (assistan t op erators),
stra igh t-ru n _
S tillm en , assistan t (assistan t op erators),
combination units .
S tillm en 's h elp ers (op erators' h elp ers),
catalytic cracking_______________________________________
S tillm en 's h elp ers (op erators' h elp ers),
crack ing, other than catalytic________________________
Stillmen* s h elp ers (operators* h elp ers),
stra igh t-ru n _
Stillmen* s h elp ers (operators* h elp ers),
combination units
_
_ _
T r e a te r s , light o ils
_ ______
Inspection and testin g:
Routine t e s t e r s , laboratory
Recording and control:
Stock c lerk s
M aterial m ovem ent:
T ru ck d rivers 1 ------------------------------------------------------------------2
M edium (lV;> to and including 4 tons)
T r u c k e r s, power (forklift)
Custodial:
G u a rd s______________________________________________________
Janitors
___
____ .
.
.

49
95
207
92
109
79
201
156
21
29
528
215
40
199
67

1 ,0 0 0 w orkers
or m ore

1 0 0-999
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

$ 3 .4 6
3 .4 6
3. 01
3. 45
3. 50
3. 37
3 .4 6
3. 48
3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

69
104
340
149
159
57
209
146

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

32
12
74
10
05
39
34

.
138
462
83
_
246
106

_
3.
2.
3.
_
3.
3.

70
46

Number
of
w orkers

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

69
72
13
79
70
62
70
69

27
46
96
44
33
86
84
70

$3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

73
212
1 ,0 7 8
60
103
321
130

3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.

74
54
72
36
06
70
47

_
39
112
131
_
91

_
3.
2.
3.
_
3.

_

_

_

3. 70

113

3. 94

150

3. 99

3. 68

48

3. 87

172

3. 92

95

3. 56

121

3. 93

_

99

3. 68

108

3. 98

_

200

.3. 45

234

3. 62

460

3. 64

_

624

3. 61

38
48
85
50
46
34
29
38

35
72
04
29

_

Number
of
w orkers

19
39
52
54
29
55
107
78
8
_
115
72
_
73
_

49

100-999
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

Number
of
workers

55
51
16
54
60
51
53
58

70
_
30
160
172
_
308
93

3. 38
_
2. 73
3. 30
_

_
_
64
39

3. 43

50
83

_

3. 79

_

Average
hourly
earnings

$3.
_
3.
3.
3.
_

60
12
60
64

3. 61
3. 62
_
_
2. 81
3. 17
_
3. 30
3. 18
_

_

47

3. 81

_

23

3. 80

3. 66

52
_

105

3. 51

_

120

3. 65

27

3. 66

_

110

3. 50

82

3. 46

113

3. 34

_

3. 41

_

121

3. 39

_

114

3. 35

129

3. 56

_

_

54

3. 38

112

3. 49

109

3. 46

172

3. 42

130

3. 68

_

_

_

39

3. 55

402

3. 51

98

3. 13

140

3. 52

68

3. 52

3. 02

_

_

_

_

60

3. 14

_

75

3. 52

_

.

.
58

.
3. 48

_
39

_
3. 73

_
64

_
3. 85

85
48

3. 20
3. 41

_
_

253

3. 26

393

3. 52

749

3. 80

150

3. 13

112

44

3. 16

56

3. 46

274

3. 66

27

3. 16

14

77
47

3. 05
3. 03

58
19

3. 28
3. 47

387
_
68

3. 47
_
3. 14

92
38

3. 04
2. 99

30
20

215
250

3. 16
2. 76

33
27

2. 76
2. 50

_

-

34
65

.

.

2. 93
2. 57

_

51
40

_

2. 94
2. 73

_

49

_

_

_

321

.

_

100-999
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

361
472
468
510
845
236
1, 189
543

121

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.




44
71
39

10 0-999
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

213

1 E xcludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays and late shifts.
2 Includes a ll d r iv e r s reg a rd le ss of size and type of truck operated.

NOTE:

70
71
12
71
70
69
67
69

Number
of
w orkers

_

_

_

_

17

_
_

_

34

3. 53

3. 18

108

3. 27

3. 16

9

3. 14

3. 15
3. 18

185
28

3. 00
3. 26

_
_

2. 54

_
_

_
_

"

-

Table 6.

Occupational Earnings:

United States

1
0

(Distribution of workers in selected occupations in petroleum refineries by straight-time hourly earnings,1 December 1965)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings 1 of—
Departm ent and occupation

A ll production w o r k e r s --------------------------Maintenance:
C arpenters ______________________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s -------------------------------------------------------H elp e rs, t r a d e s ------------------------------------------------Instrum ents r e p a ir m e n ----------------------------------M a c h in ists---------------- ---------------------------------------M echanics ----------------------------------------------------------P ip e fit te r s -------------------------------------- ----------------W e ld e r s, hand__________________________________
P ro ce s sing:
C o m p o u n d ers----------------------------------------------------F ilte r m e n ________________________________________
G a g e r s -----------------------------------------------------------------Lahore r s ________________________________________
L o a d e rs, tank ca rs or t r u c k s -----------------------Package f ille r s , machine ------------------------------P r e s s m e n , paraffin ----------------------------------------P u m p m e n -----------------------------------------------------------P u m pm en 's h e lp e r s -----------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators), catalytic
c ra ck in g -----------------------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op era to rs), cracking,
other than c a ta ly tic --------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
stra ig h t- run ----------------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief o p erators),
combination u n its-------------------------------------------S tillm en , a ssistan t (assistant
o p erators), catalytic c r a ck in g -------------------S tillm en , assistan t (assistant op erators),
cracking, other than c a ta ly tic --------------------S tillm en , assistan t (assistan t op era to rs),
stra igh t-ru n ---------------------------------------------------S tillm en , a ssistan t (assistant op era to rs),
combination u n its-------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p e r a to r s' h e lp e r s),
catalytic c r a c k in g -----------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p e r a to r s' h e lp e r s),
cracking, other than catalytic --------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' h elp er s),
stra igh t-ru n ------------------------------- ----------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p e r a to r s' h elp er s),
combination u n its-------------------------------------------T r e a te r s, light o i l s -----------------------------------------T r e a te r s 'h e lp e r s , light oils -------------------------Inspection and testing:
Routine te s t e r s , lab oratory---------------------------Recording and control:
Stock c le r k s -------------------------------------------------------M aterial m ovem ent:
T r u ck d riv ers 2 ---------------------------------------------------Light (under lV2 tons) --------------------------------Medium (lV 2 to and including 4 t o n s ) ___
Heavy (over 4 tons, other than tra ile r
ty p e )-------------------------------------------------------------T ru ck ers, pow er (fo r k lift)-----------------------------C ustodial:
G u a r d s-----------------------------------------------------------------J a n it o r s --------------------------------------------------------------W atch m en ------------------------------------------------------------

$2.30 $2.40
Number Average
hourly Under and
of
w orkers earn ings 1 $2.30 under
$2.40 $2.50
73, 318

$ 3 . 45

$2.50

$2.60

$2.70

$2.80

$2.90

$3.00

$3.10

$3.20

$3.30

$3.40

$3.50

$3.60

$3.70

$3.80

$3.90

$2.60

$2.70

$2.80

$2 . 9 0

$3.00

$3.10

$3.20

$3.30

$3.40

$3.50

$3.60

$3.70

$3.80

$3.90

$4.00

ove r

703

1342

2420

2057

2530

3514

3580

4903

4739

5893

8348

11471

11523

3919

3237

1934

4
417
14
14

5
3
531
4
24
31

39
61
47
77

190

28
48
_
190
33
38
69
90

2

471
16
5

14
.
24
32
_
74
34

_
_
108
_
_
.
51

and

119

251

435
2

1

37
-

3
46

3

3
18
3
4
26
5

3
-

1

31

9
106

22

958
1,4 19
2, 141
1, 623
2, 115
1, 143
3, 569
1 ,7 22

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

64
65
07
69
67
59
62
64

-

-

307
119
659
3, 729
1, 065
367
35
1, 699
641

3.
3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
2.
3.
3.

52
14
46
74
23
00

36

172
27
14

20

476
19
4

8

-

4
14
-

6

60
39

-

146
4
-

33
-

19
-

996

3.

86

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

281

3. 85

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

1,4 9 3

3. 91

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

13

687

3. 83

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

8

-

-

4

14

24

47

090

3. 57

-

-

-

-

-

24

-

8

-

17

77

336

201

205

2, 531

3. 55

-

-

-

-

8

4

-

-

3

13

195

470

282

213

2, 432

3. 62

-

-

-

-

12

12

-

-

6

11

74

195

167

1, 249

3. 57

-

-

-

-

8

8

-

-

4

11

-

128

659

3. 38

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

-

48

71

108

69

513

3. 42

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

4

37

48

109

32

649

3. 40

-

-

-

-

-

14

-

3

35

76

56

69

671
513
228

3. 37
3. 63
3. 52

-

-

-

-

13

1

-

13
-

2

12
2

2

3

-

-

38
4
-

148
42
42

230
71
3

2, 963

3. 48

1

2

16

16

47

20

28

43

166

178

280

395

1,

2,

68

8

2

8

1

6
6

12

1

713

3. 46

-

-

3

4

1, 397
124
326

3. 24
3. 07
3. 14

-

-

17

9

1
10

-

7
-

96
244

3. 20
3. 05

-

-

-

8
11

-

632
762
96

3. 05
2. 74
2 . 79

1

28

7
7

29

42
-

22

8

1 Excludes p rem iu m pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays,

2 Includes all d riv ers regard le ss of size and type of truck operated.


$4.00

1

1
21

9

22

88

16

8

and late shifts.

12

2
2

83
7

4

47
-

8

7

1
2

16

8

3
418
5
5
-

33

-

2

10

12

20

37
4
1556
3
-

-

-

12

17
39

2
8

22

15

18
19
26

25

187
.
308
356
293
637
235

348
401
487
695
263
1159
616

5

12

8

_
141
_
9

2

66

25
242
28

85
151

30
37
_
132
24
108
40

36
18
195
24
130
5
129
140

131
_
150
_
_
90
177

_
347
24

319
9

88

8

1

4
829
48
48
5

4
262
28
60
-

27
114
168
109
4

12

2

-

29

23
168
39
89
65

8

-

8

-

-

8

43

61

13

8

-

-

16

48

25

74

8

-

-

1

50

46

60

21
1

8

133
34
_
80
156

310
658
_
380
905
355
1121

495
75
_
27
_

56

12

6

21
10

8

9

18
_
_
167
.

.
_
_
_
_
237
_

.
_
_
_
32
_

242

148

325

153

215

328

381

168

82

245

718

254

24

157

173

64

164

655

467

92

8

-

985

294

51

13

-

194

337

1361

59

4

-

347

119

239

314

71

-

.

150

103

35

65

-

-

-

37

156

-

88

-

-

-

181

95

42

78

-

-

-

125
16
45

109

8

83
28

57
24

84
-

20

27

84
54

349

342

445

213

81

68

273

22

6

_
_

4
_

11

-

-

4

27

38

47

58

91

114

140

73

19

44

18

32

6
2

14

202

224

6

1

6

213
_

50

38

6

7
4
3

59

13

308
49
95

130

4

181
9
24

_

9

_
_
.

_
.
_

_
.
_

-

-

4
34

17
107

11

78

51
-

_
_

.
-

3
-

_
.

.
.

_
.

.
-

35
155

41
108

202

10 1

163

1

4

27
-

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

8

60
19

10

-

16

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
8

242
3

1

43
74
2

13

Table 7. Occupational Earnings:

East Coast

(Distribution of workers in selected occupations in petroleum refineries by straight-time hourly earnings,1 December 1965)
Number of w orkers receiving stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings 1 of—
Departm ent and occupation

A ll production w ork ers -----------------------Maintenance:
C arpenters ---------------------------------------------------E le c t r ic ia n s -------------------------------------------------H e lp e r s, tr a d e s ------------------------------------------Instrum ent r e p a irm e n -------------------------------M a c h in ists----------------------------------------------------M echanics ----------------------------------------------------P ipefitte r s ----------------------------------------------------W e ld e r s, hand---------------------------------------------P r o c e ssin g :
C o m p o u n d er s------ ,---------------------------------------F ilt e r m e n -----------------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s -------------------------------------------------------L o a d e rs, tank cars or tr u c k s -----------------Package f ille r s , m achine--------------------------P u m p m e n -----------------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief o p era to rs), catalytic
c ra ck in g -----------------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op era to rs), cracking,
other than catalytic----------------------------------S tillm en (chief o p erators),
stra ig h t- run ----------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op era to rs),
combination u n its-------------------------------------S tillm en , assistan t (assistan t
o p erators),catalytic c r a c k in g --------------S tillm en , a ssistan t (assistant
operators), cracking, other than
c a ta ly tic -----------------------------------------------------S tillm en , assistan t (assistant
op era to rs), s t r a ig h t -r u n -----------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (op erators ' helpers),
catalytic c r a c k in g -----------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p e r a to r s' helpers),
cracking, other than catalytic----------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p e r a to r s' helpers),
stra igh t-ru n ---------------------------------------------T r e a te r s, light o i l s -----------------------------------T r e a te r s ' h e lp e r s, light o i l s -----------------Inspection and testing:
Routine te s te r s , la b o r a t o r y --------------------Recording and c on troll:
Stock C lerk s ------------------------------------------------M aterial m ovem ent:
T ru ck d rivers 23 --------------------------------------------Tru ck, pow er ( f o r k lift)----------------------------C ustodial:
G u a r d s-----------------------------------------------------------Janitors ---------------------------------------------------------

1
2
3

Number Average
hourly
of
Unde r
w orkers earnings 1
$ 2 . 70

11,

$ 2 . 70 $ 2 . 80
and
under
$ 2 . 80 $ 2 . 90

$2.

90

$ 3. 00

$ 3 . 10

$3.

20

$ 3 . 30

$ 3 . 40

$ 3 . 50

$ 3 . 60

$ 3 . 70

$ 3 . 80

$ 3 . 90

$ 4 . 00

$ 4 . 10

$ 4 . 20

$ 4 . 30

$ 3 . 00

$ 3. 10

$ 3 . 20

$ 3 . 30

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 . 50

$ 3. 60

$ 3 . 70

$ 3 . 80

$ 3 . 90

$ 4 . 00

$ 4 . 10

$ 4 . 20

$ 4 . 30

over

544

425

446

102

53

2

32
_
74
34

_
_
_
_
_
51

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
5
_
_
-

_
_
32
_
_
-

2

8

_
.
-

.
_
.
_
.

_
_
_
-

.
_
_
-

and

127

204

318

338

358

584

676

386

619

992

1106

2640

1148

72
77
14
92
75
75
74
84

-

-

-

-

-

-

68

101

-

-

-

-

34
-

-

7
-

13
30
30
29
9
72

85
99
45
138
276
195
98

_
35
25
_
-

70
87
81
44
03
80

3
-

-

207
-

31
4

5
-

2

8

8

_
5

-

21

6

10

.
_
30

15
_
4
39

15
_

14
-

19
-

-

7
13
-

12

-

9
15
-

36

88

9
.
.
_
16

163

4. 02

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

16

9

25

16

55

26

236

4. 07

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

47

5

4

164

-

245

4. 08

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

5

102

11 2

-

86

4. 10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

-

-

5

-

17

48

235

3. 76

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

32

145

50

8

-

-

-

066

$ 3 . 58

100

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

62
14
459
83
65
246

3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.

178
203
167
199
285
341
210

201

-

10

22

8

21

11

16

6

22

289

3. 73

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17

-

-

96

112

51

13

-

-

-

419

3. 73

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

20

349

42

4

-

_

-

59

3. 50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

14

26

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

73

3. 59

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17

32

-

24

-

-

-

-

-

-

89
80

-

-

-

-

-

-

33
7

3
-

14
-

42
-

14
4

7
-

13
-

_
_

-

6

27
5

12

22

3. 45
3. 79
3. 47

4
-

_
-

529

3. 60

-

-

-

-

-

22

28

68

77

85

70

105

12

9

25

8

7

13

99

3. 34

-

-

-

-

5

18

19

6

38

13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

206
57

3. 25
3. 08

-

-

-

14

8
1

117
42

38
-

11

-

-

-

32
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

135

3. 05
2 . 86

-

-

20

15

76

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

44

2

11

■

~

~

■

"

-

"

"

88

3 21

Excludes prem iu m pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes all d riv ers regard less of size and type of truck operated.
A ll w ork ers w ere at $ 2 . 60 to $ 2 .7 0.




-

1

14
-

10

19
■

-

_

Table 8. Occupational Earnings:

Western Pennsylvania—West Virginia

(Distribution of w orkers in selected occupations in petroleum refin eries by stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings,

Decem ber 1965)

1

Number of w orkers receiving straight--time hourly earnings
Number
of
workers

Departm ent and occupation

A ll production w ork ers

........... .

Maintenanc e:
Carpenters __ ________________ _______________________
E le ctrician s
H elp e rs, trades ______________________________________
M achin ists _____________________________________________
M echanics ... .....
........ _
P ip efitters
____ ... . ..
......... .
_
W e ld e r s, hand
P ro ce ssin g :
Compounders
___ ....
......
F ilterm en
G agers
L ab ore rs
L o a d e rs, tank ca rs or trucks _________,_____________
Package f i lle r s , machine
_
.......
P r e ssm e n , paraffin
......... .
Pumpmen
_ _ _
_
Stillm en (chief op era to rs), crack ing, other
than catalytic
Stillm en (chief o p e r a to r s), straight-run _________
S tillm en , a ssista n t (as sistant o p e r a to r s),
cracking, other than catalytic
S tillm en , a ssista n t (as sistant o p e r a to r s),
straight-run _________________________________________
T r e a te r s , light oils
. ......
Inspection and testing:
Routine t e s t e r s , laboratory ________________________
Recording and control:
Stock clerk s ___________________________________________
M aterial m ovem ent:
T ruck drivers 23
M edium (1 V2 to and including 4 tons)
Custodial:
Janitors ________________________________________________
Watchm en
___
... .

1
2
3

1, 983

12

18
73
17
18
48
41
35
68
8

240
57
28
31
71
18
29

A verage
hourly
earnings 1

$ 2 . 60

$2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

68

77
50
80
68

67
72

2. 64
2. 72
2. 50
2. 38
2 . 46
2. 51
2. 63
2 . 66

Under
'$ 2 . 30

$ 2 . 60

$ 2 . 70

$ 2 . 80

$ 2. 90

$ 3. 00

$ 2. 50

$ 2 . 60

$ 2. 70

$ 2 . 80

$ 2. 90

$ 3. 00

over

and

313

.
-

.
-

-

-

8
8

-

of—

$ 2. 50

194

127
-

1

$ 2. 40

27

360

549

2

1

27
_
-

3
46
-

3
3
3
26
5

3
-

6
6

3

374

96

67

12

2
2

_

-

8

1

7
16
33

2

-

_
_
_
5
_
-

37
3
_

-

1

31

2
10 2

5
3

22
1

27

12

10

14
4
14

6

8

-

33

19

8

7
4

3

-

4

2 , 90

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 . 88

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
-

12

13

16

16

47

7

3

4

13
13

8

13

_
_
-

5
16

1

1

.
5
5

.

4

-

8

1

12

2. 70

20

2. 71
2. 72

-

-

-

89

2. 58

1

2

8

2. 52

39

2. 56
2. 45

-

-

17

-

-

_

-

10

8
-

14

-

-

-

-

-

2 . 11

35

4

.

-

_

-

2. 36

-

5
16

-

-

26

10

14
16

E xcludes p rem iu m pay for ove rtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late sh ifts.
Includes a ll d riv ers r eg a r d le ss of siz e and type of truck operated.
W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s: 1 at $ 1. 30 to $ 1. 40; 4 at $ 1. 60 to $ 1. 70.




$ 2 . 30
and
under
$ 2 .4 0

-

_

_

-

-

Table 9. Occupational Earnings:

Midwest I

(Distribution of workers in selected occupations in petroleum refineries by straight-time hourly earnings, 1 December 1965)

Departm ent and occupation

A ll production w ork ers

__________________

M aintenance:
C arpenters ________________________ __________
E le ctrician s ___________________________________
H e lp e r s, trades _______________________________
Instrum ent rep airm en ________________________
M achin ists _____________________________________
M ech anics _____________________________________
.....
P ip efitters
W e ld e r s, hand ____________________ __________
P ro ce ssin g :
Com pounders ____________________________ ___
G age rs _ _______________________________________
L a b o re rs
__ __________________ ________ ___
L o a d e rs, tank ca rs or trucks ______________
Package fille r s , m achine
_________________
Pum pm en ______________________________________
P um pm en 's h elpers
Stillm en (chief op era to rs), catalytic
cracking ______________________________________
Stillm en (chief o p erators), cracking,
other than catalytic
S tillm en (chief op era to rs), straight-run ___
Stillm en (chief op era to rs), combination
units _________ ________________________________
S tillm en , assistan t (assistan t operators),
catalytic cracking __________________________
S tillm en , assistan t (assistan t operators),
cracking, other than catalytic
S tillm en , assistan t (assistan t operators),
stra igh t-ru n
S tillm en , a ssistan t (assistan t operators),
combination units
S tillm e n 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' h elp ers),
catalytic cracking
S tillm e n 's h elp ers (op erators' h elp ers),
crack ing, other than catalytic
S tillm e n 's h elp ers (op erators' h elp ers),
stra igh t-ru n
S tillm e n 's h elp ers (op erators' h elp ers),
com bination units
T r e a te r s , light oils
T r e a te r s ' h e lp e r s, light o i l s __ ____________
Inspection and testing:
Routine te s t e r s , lab oratory ________________
Recording and control:
Stock clerk s
_r .
_
M aterial m ovem ent:
T ru ck d rivers 23
M edium ( 1 V2 to and including 4 tons) __
T r u c k e r s, power (forklift) __________________
Custodial:
Guards
_ ._ ..
Janitors
W atchm en
____

1
2
3

Number
of
w ork­
ers

A ver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings 1

Number of w orkers receiving stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings
Under
$ 2. 70

of—

$ 2 . 80

$ 2.

90

$ 3. 00

$ 3. 10

$ 3. 20

' $ 3. 30

$ 3. 40

$ 3. 50

$ 3. 60

$ 3. 70

$ 3. 80

$ 3. 90

$ 4 . 00

$ 2.

90

$ 3. 00

$ 3. 10

$ 3. 20

$ 3. 30

$ 3. 40

$ 3. 50

$ 3. 60

$ 3. 70

$ 3 . 80

$ 3. 90

$ 4 . 00

over

2945

886

1406

755

189

-

and

12, 641

$3. 52

71

172

268

323

411

560

675

1346

651

167
294
442
312
294
223
835
283

$ 3 .6 3
3. 61
3. 12
3. 63
3. 62
3. 64
3. 56
3. 6 8

-

54

-

-

181

46
82

84
168

4
28

28
13

-

21

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

6
_

_

-

-

-

145

5
-

-

29

3

12
-

189
183

6
2

_
_

-

-

6
-

-

225

-

-

9

12

41
33
38
69
74

_
_

-

70
76
52
128

-

-

56
90
545
289
37
382
151

3. 78
3 .4 8
2. 92
3 .4 2
3. 29
3. 76
3 .4 3

-

1
10
-

9
17

21

21
_

26
4

30
16
16
26

55
14
23

24
42

_

19

-

_
_
_

-

-

-

79

216

-

4
168

6
-

-

-

-

-

58
16
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30

8

-

31
-

1983
.........If

100
-

38
54

101

26

385
168

22
20

4
28
-

2
10
_

_
_

_

-

8
-

12
_

_

_

16
24

26
9

118

98

16

-

-

-

187

3. 92

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

64

107

8

375
173

3. 91
3. 8 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

164
81

195
60

-

28

-

4

102

3. 99

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

47

37

18

490

3. 62

-

-

-

-

-

12

12

58

8

37

183

142

38

-

906

3. 55

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

265

16

40

571

14

-

-

213

3. 60

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

8

16

25

119

16

17

_

73

3. 77

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

32

37

145

3 .4 8

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

34

31

46

-

24

-

-

253

3. 49

-

-

-

-

-

16

37

32

-

104

-

64

-

-

155

3 .4 7

-

-

-

-

-

16

-

42

8

65

-

24

-

-

127
135
70

3. 55
3. 76
3. 71

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

94

8
6

-

-

-

-

-

34

25
4

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

18

16

45
24

42

-

-

-

416

3 .3 9

-

-

-

4

32

-

57

96

96

124

7

-

-

-

154

3 .4 7

-

-

-

1

20

10

2

24

7

46

12

-

32

-

176
84

-

-

-

-

4
4

63
45

16
6

89
25

4
4

-

-

-

_

_
_

21

3. 27
3. 23
3. 18

-

-

-

-

8

-

13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

142
179
30

3. 13
2 . 80
3. 01

2

_

-

27

1
-

-

-

-

_

_

10

26
36
4

70

332

8
21

-

-

-

_

_

_

"

“

"

“

"

“

"

6

“

80
"

-

_

8
-

4

16

“

E xclud es p rem iu m pay for overtim e and for work on w eekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes a ll d riv ers regard less of size and type of truck operated.
W o r k e r s w ere distributed as follow s: 15 at $ 1. 90 to $ 2; 12 at $ 2. 30 to $ 2. 40; 3 at $ 2. 40 to $ 2. 50; 2 at $ 2. 50 to $ 2. 60.




1

$ 2. 70
and
under
$ 2 . 80

Table 10. Occupational Earnings:

Midwest II

(Distribution of workers in selected occupations in petroleum refinerie.s by straight-time hourly earnings,1 December 1965)
Number of w orkers receiving stra igh t-tim e hourly earn ings 1
Departm ent and occupation

A ll production w ork ers -------------------------------Maintenance:
C arpenters -----------------------------------------------------------E le c t r ic ia n s ----------------------------------------------------------H elpers, t r a d e s ---------------------------------------------------Instrument r e p a ir m e n ----------------------------------------M a c h in ists-------------------------------------------------------------M e ch an ics--------------------------------------------------------------P ip e fit te r s ---------------------------- --------------------------------W e ld e rs, hand------------------------------------------------------P ro ce ssin g :
Compounders -------------------------------------------------------F ilte r m e n --------------------------------------------------------------G a g e r s -------------------------------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s ---------------------------------------------------------------L oad ers, tank ca rs or t r u c k s --------------------------Package f ille r s , m achine----------------------------------P um pm en---------------------------------------------------------------P u m pm en 's h e lp e r s --------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
catalytic c rack in g---------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
cracking, other than catalytic ----------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
s tr a ig h t-r u n -------------------------------------------------------Stillm en (chief op erators),
combination u n it s ---------------------------------------------Stillm en, a ssistan t (assistant
op erators), catalytic c r a c k in g ----------------------Stillm en, a ssista n t (a ssistan t op erators),
cracking, other than catalytic ----------------------Stillm en, a ssista n t (assistan t op erators),
s tr a ig h t-r u n -------------------------------------------------------Stillm en, a ssista n t (assistan t o p erators),
combination u n it s ---------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' h elp ers),
catalytic crack in g---------------------------------------------S tillm en 's h elp ers (o p era to rs' h elp ers),
s tr a ig h t-r u n -------------------------------------------------------T r e a te r s, light o i l s --------------------------------------------T r e a te r s' h elp ers, light o i l s ---------------------------Inspection and testing:
Routine te ste r s, laboratory -----------------------------Recording and control:
Stock c l e r k s ----------------------------------------------------------M aterial m ovem ent:
T ru ck d rivers 23 ----------------------------------------------------Light (under 1 V2 tons) ---------------------------------Medium (1 V2 to and including 4 t o n s ) ------T ru ck ers power (forklift) ---------------------------------Custodial:
G u a r d s -------------------------------------------------------------------Janitors -----------------------------------------------------------------W atch m en ---------------------------------------------------------------

1
2
3

Number
of
workers

7, 468

A verage
$ 2 . 50
hourly
Under
and
earnings 1
$2. 50 under
$ 2 . 60

$ 2.

60

$2 . 70

$ 2 . 80

$ 2 . 90

43

$3. 26

71

169

364

560

-

18
-

99
219
170

45
47
01
45
49
38
46
48

-

-

-

29
13
43
623
226
48
215
67

3.
3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.

35
45
15
74
10
06
39
34

26
-

_
54
-

-

125

3. 70

-

3.

-

105
122

233

$ 2 . 80

68

$ 2.

90

$3 . 00

$3 . 10

6

-

00

$ 3 . 10

448

538

3

24
-

$3 .

101

3
-

-

188
-

_
234
9
14
-

23
4
12

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

121

17
-

$3.

20

$ 3 . 30

$ 3 . 40

0 f—

$ 3 . 50

$3 . 60

$ 3 . 70

$ 3 . 80

$3 . 90

$4.

00

20

$3 . 30

$ 3 . 40

$3 . 50

$ 3 . 60

$3 . 70

$3 . 80

$ 3 . 90

$ 4. 00

796

915

747

1066

865

293

414

64

83

32

2

2

3
56
3

4
7

14
9
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

22

11

9

50
30
57

10

4

2

22

14
9
24

26
48
59
37
85
53

4
4
17
7

16
9
9
36
30

4
3
33
-

15
-

10

13
17

16

20
102

37

2

39

over

1

-

-

-

6

20

28
5
29

3

53
15
49
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

37

49

-

5

8

-

-

-

-

16

32

12

32

116

-

25

-

17

24

24

10 1
6

8

22

1

12

10

3. 58

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

40

-

5

3.

68

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

12

-

83

-

-

22 1

3. 43

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

24

63

73

61

-

-

-

-

355

3. 41

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

82

83

120

62

-

-

-

-

151

3. 35

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

6

40

49

37

13

-

-

-

-

172

3. 42

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

102

21

45

-

-

-

-

-

98

3. 13

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

41

28

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

60
62
24

3. 14
3. 48
3. 27

-

-

-

-

3

3
-

22

22

8
11

8

4

-

-

5
18

-

2

12

3

-

6

-

15
-

-

4
-

-

319

3. 27

-

-

-

-

1

27

56

47

83

19

59

4

-

-

-

-

23

56

3. 13

-

-

-

-

1

18

7

9

9

9

8

4

-

-

-

-

-

85
18
51
35

3.
3.
3.
3.

-

-

3
3
-

2
2

12

15

22

-

-

12

15
17

->

-

-

9
9
-

-

-

5
-

-

17
4
9
18

-

-

-

-

-

34
79
26

2. 93
2 . 60
2. 90

9
"

5

31
“

7
17

12

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

~

“

111

99

05
00
03
00

-

3

14
~

8
8

-

-

9
4
-

-

-

-

8

10

“

Excludes p rem iu m pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes a ll d riv ers r e g a r d le ss of size and type of truck operated.
W ork ers w ere distributed as fo llo w s : 6 under $ 1 .7 0 ; 2 at $2 to $ 2 .1 0 ; 2 at $ 2. 20 to $ 2. 30; and 4 at $ 2. 30 an $ 2. 40.




$3.

and

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

60
105
212

$ 2 . 70

2

"

-

Table 11. Occupational Earnings:

Texas—Louisiana G ulf Coast

(Distribution of w orkers in selected occupations in petroleum refin eries by stra igh t-tim e hourly earn ings,

Departm ent and occupation

A ll production w orkers
Maintenance:
Carpenters
E lectrician s
H elp e rs, trades _____________________
Instrum ent rep airm en
. .
M achin ists .. .
__ .........
M ech anics ____________________________
P ip efitters
. _
_
......
W e ld e r s, hand _______________________
P roce ssin g :
Compounders
_
__
F ilterm en
G a g e r s __ ____________________________
L ab orers _
_ _
L o a d e rs, tank ca rs or trucks _____
Package f ille r s , m achine _________
Pumpmen
_ _
P um pm en 's h elp ers _
_
...
Stillm en (chief op erators),
catalytic cracking
__
Stillm en (chief op erators),
crack ing, other than catalytic __
Stillm en (chief op erators),
combination units
Stillm en, assista n t (assistant
o p era to rs), catalytic cracking
Stillm en , assista n t (assistant
o p era to rs), crack ing, other than
catalytic _________ __________________
S tillm en , assista n t (assistant
o p era to rs), combination units __
S tillm en 's h elp ers (op erators'
h e lp e r s), catalytic cracking _____
S tillm en 's h elp ers (op erators'
h e lp e r s), crack ing, other than
catalytic
S tillm en 's h elp ers (op erators'
h elp ers), stra igh t-ru n
.. ..
T r e a te r s , light oils
..
T r e a te r s ' h e lp e r s, light oils
Inspection and testing:
Routine t e s t e r s , laboratory ._
Recording and control:
Stock clerk s
_
M aterial m ovem ent:
T ru ck d rivers 1 _ ______
2
Light (under l 1
/?tons) ___
M edium ( 1 V2 to and including
4 tons) ___________________________
T r u c k e r s, power (forklift)
____
Custodial:
Guards ___ _ ___ ____________ _____ ____
_
Janitors ______________________________

N um ­
ber
of
w orkel s

A verhourly
earn -

D ecem ber 1965)

Numbe r of w orkers receiving stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings
$2.
$ 2 . 60

60 ~

$ 2. 70

$

2.

under
$ 2 . 70

$ 2 . 80

"
$ 2.

80

$

90

“
$ 3. 00

$ 3 . 10

2 . 90

2 4 ,4 8 1

$3.52

247

408

1303

405

435

430
576
808
659
1,0 0 4
293
1, 398
689

$3.69
3.72
3.12
3.77
3.70
3.63
3.70
3.69

-

-

16
_
-

-

99
-

91
16
350
1, 540
143
107
567
236

3.70
3.69
3.50
2.72
3.38
3.06
3.70
3.47

4
93
-

313
-

4
961
_
_
_

115
18
-

34
_
36
-

263

3.97

-

-

-

-

220

3.91

-

-

-

-

116

3.98

-

-

-

694

3.63

-

-

662

3.61

-

158

3.68

-

208

3.52

-

1

of—

1

$ 3 . 10

$ 3 . 20

$ 3. 30

$ 3 . 40

$ 3. 50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 3. 20

$ 3 . 30

$ 3. 40

$ 3. 50

$ 3. 60

$ 3 . 70

$ 3. 80

$ 3 . 90

$ 4 . 00

$ 4 . 10

1263

645

844

956

1868

1581

6187

5331

601

1753

-

_
-

48
_
_
_
99
92

225
153
_
228
391
150
607
347

157
4 20
_
227
514
44
682
2 74

_
_
_
124
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
-

3
5
3
3
4

_
_
47

_
-

207
_
-

_
24

_
_
-

_
_

_
_

2

22

.
7
123

269
_

58
_
16
_
_
_
238
_

20

20

_
_
106
_
9

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

$ 3. 00

221

212

8

_
4
4
_

102

64
_
4
47
_

$ 3 . 60 T 3 7 70" $ 3 . 80 ' $ 3 . 90 ~ $4. 00 '$ 4 . 10 $ 4 . 20
~

$ 4 . 30

-

and

20

$ 4 . 30

over

290

127

37

200

_
_
_
46
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

14
_
_
_
.

10

_
_
_
_
_

41
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
.
_

2

_
_
_
_
_

$4.

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

8

20

_
26
_

1

7
_

_
13
13
_
33

25

13
4
145
_
52
5
.
54

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

16

32

175

16

16

.

8

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

12

52

156

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

36

15

65

_

_

8

-

-

-

-

-

66

4

28

404

180

4

_

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

92

58

60

284

168

-

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

.

_

2

_

18

72

66

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

6

88

31

35

33

_

_

_

_

_

-

12

21

6

8

_
_
_
_

32

3.43

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

12

_

_

20

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

258
103
59

3.50
3.80
3.60

-

-

-

-

-

3
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

16

3

42
21

4

36

8

_

_
_
_

_
_
.

4

11

25
_

8

.

_
_
_

_

6

42
33

_

6

152
_

_

1, 142

3.70

-

-

-

-

-

27

20

11

77

90

1 19

365

108

69

59

69

70

17

41

330

3.63

-

-

-

-

-

_

2

8

36

65

79

59

19

12

18

6

7

5

14

445
83

3.44
3.11

-

-

_
-

_
-

4
4

110

73
36

8

9

_
-

4
4

56
-

181
.

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_
_

_

69
69

3.22
3.14

-

-

-

-

-

22

8

_
-

_
_

_
-

_
_

_

_

_

_

_
.

_
_

_

3

_
-

9

1

30
65

266
290

3.12
2.75

17

53

151

61

10
6

77
13

26

136
■

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

_

_

'

~

_

_

“

■

“

-

-

-

6

39

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes all drivers regardless of size and type of truck operated.




1

-

-

-

|

_

Table 12.

Occupational Earnings:

Texas Inland—North Louisiana—Arkansas

00

(Distribution of w orkers in selected occupations in petroleum refin eries by straight-tim e hourly earnings,
N um -

A ll production w orkers

._ ._ ..

_ .

. .. ..

Maintenance:
C arpenters . . ... ..
___ ... ..
. . . ..
E le ctrician s _________________________________________
H elp e rs, trades ........................ ..
....
_ .
Instrum ent rep airm en ..................... _ _ _
M achin ists
.
.. ...........
_
M ech anics ............. .. ... .
.
_ ..... ..... . ...
P ip efitters ___________________________________________
W e ld e r s, hand ______________________________________
P rocessin g :
G agers ________________________________________________
L ab orers _____________________________________________
L o a d e rs, tank cars or trucks ____________________
Pumpmen ____________________________________________
Stillm en (chief o p erators), crack ing, other
than catalytic
.......... . __ .....
........... .
........ _
Stillmen (chief o p e r a to r s !, stra iph t-ru n
.. .
Stillm en (chief op erators), combination u n its__
S tillm en , a ssistan t (assistan t op erators),
crack ing, other than catalytic _________________
S tillm en , a ssistan t (assistan t op erators),
stra igh t-ru n _______________________________________
S tillm en 's h elpers (op erators' h elp ers),
catalytic cracking ________________________________
S tillm en 's h elp ers (op erators' h elp ers),
combination units _________________________________
T r e a te r s , light oils ________________________________
Inspection and testing:
Routine t e s t e r s , laboratory ;______________________
Recording and control:
Stock clerk s .
_
_
.
.. ..
M aterial m ovem ent:
T ru ck d rivers 34 . . ..
. . . . . . .
Light (under 1V2 tons)
............ .
...... ..... .
M edium ( 1 V2 to and including 4 tons) ._ _ .
_
Heavy (over 4 tons, other than
tra iler typ e )_____________________________________
Custodial:
Guards ________________________________________________
Janitors ______________________________________________

1
2
3
4

A ver-

of
w orkel S

Departm ent and occupation

hourly TTnrle-r
earn $ 2 .4 0
ings

3, 847

27
46
96
44
33
86

84
70
39
112

131
91
105
52

$3. 26

$3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

38
48
85
50
46
34
29
38

3.
2.
3.
3.

35
72
04
29

Number of w orkers receiving
$ 2. 40

$ 2 . 50

$ 2 . 60

under
$ 2. 50

$2.

60

"
$ 2. 70

29

74

48

-

-

-

5
-

-

-

13
-

-

-

-

29

-

10

8

$ 2 . 90

2 . 90

$ 3. 00

$ 3. 10

$ 3 . 20

$ 3. 30

173

222

184

431

364

7
-

26
-

30
-

4
17
-

3
4

2

8

21

8

-

14

15

2

-

2

10

12

3

4
18
39
16

17
5
-

10
1

-

14
-

20

25

-

50
-

-

-

-

-

8
8

1

-

12

$

2

. 80

$

$

2.

$ 3. 00

D ecem ber 1965)

stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings

80

6

$ 3 . 10

$ 3. 20 ' $ 3. 30

1
2

of—

$ 3. 40

$ 3 . 50
-

$ 3 . 40

$ 3. 50

$ 3 . 60

$ 3. 70

447

350

392

550

4
-

-

8

4
17
5
16

12

1

4
4
3
5
-

10
8

.
14
18

-

-

6

28

1

-

-

-

$ 3. 60

$ 3 . 70

$ 3. 80

$ 3. 90

$ 3. 80

$ 3. 90

over

63

403

70

4
7
_
-

.
-

.
-

and

18

-

17
28
23
30
30
25

10

8

24
_
-

7

-

13

6

16
24

5
29
35

-

48
15
23

28
16

_
-

2

1

120

3. 6 6
3. 51
3. 65

121

3. 39

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

5

34

1

58

17

3

-

3. 38

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

24

14

9

2

-

-

49

3. 02

-

-

-

-

10

-

-

19

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

85
48

3. 20
3. 41

-

-

-

-

1

-

38
4

16

2

-

30

-

-

12

12

4

-

5

5

4

150

3. 13

-

-

-

-

13

12

6

31

30

27

13

8

10

-

-

-

27

3. 16

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

4

5

12

-

-

2

-

-

-

92

3. 04
2. 64
2 . 99

-

-

1
1

4
4

12

49
25

13
-

4
-

1

-

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4
-

2

38

-

-

-

-

17

3. 12

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

33
27

2. 76
2. 50

49

-

16
9

4

-

-

13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

■

~

"

~

-

-

54

6

"

E xcludes p rem iu m pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
A ll w orkers w ere at $ 4 to $ 4 . 10.
Includes a ll d riv ers r e g a rd le ss of size and type of truck operated.
W o rk ers w ere distributed as follow s: 2 at $ 1. 60 to $ 1. 70; and 7 at $ 2. 30 to $ 2. 40.




$ 2. 70

1

1

8

1

1

'

-

8

"

"

2 16

'

Table 13.

Occupational Earnings:

Rocky Mountain

(Distribution of workers in selected occupations in petroleum refineries by straight-time hourly earnings,1 December 1965)

D epartm ent and occupation

A ll production w ork ers

__________________

M aintenance:
C arpenters _____________________________________
E le ctrician s
.... ...................
H elp e rs, trades
Instrum ent rep airm en _
............ .
M achinists
... .
.... .
M echanics
..
.. ...
_
P ip efitters
........
W e ld e r s, hand .
............
P rocessin g :
Compounders
...............
L ab orers ..
. . . .
L oa d e rs, tank cars or trucks _______________
Pumpmen
. . . . .
Stillm en (chief o p erators), catalytic
cracking .
Stillm en (chief op era to rs), combination
units ________
_
______
S tillm en , assista n t ^assistant op erators),
catalytic cracking
_
_____ ..... . ..
Stillm en , assista n t (assistant operators),
stra igh t-ru n
Stillm en , assistan t (assistan t op erators),
combination units
.............
Inspection and testing:
Routine t e s t e r s , laboratory
Recording and control:
Stock clerk s
.
. ..
M aterial movem ent:
T ru ck d rivers 2
. .
Light (under l 1 tons)
/?
____
.. .
M edium ( 1 V2 to and including 4 tons) __
Custodial:
Janitors

1
2
3

Number
of
workers

2

, 066

19
39
52
54
29
55
107
78

A verage
hourly
earnings

$ 3 . 39

$ 3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

55
51
16
54
60
51
53
58

Number of w orkers receiving stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings
1

2. 50
and
under
$ 2 . 60

$ 2 . 70

24

11

-

$ 2. 70

$

$

80

37

-

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

_

_

Under
$ 2 . 50

-

$

$ 3 . 00

$3.

$ 2 . 90

$ 3. 00

$ 3 . 10

28

85

49

_
_
_
_
-

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

$3.

1

20

$ 3. 30

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3. 5(T

$ 3. 20

$ 3 . 30

$ 3 . 40

$ 3 . 50

55

1 14

184

139

_
_

_
_

_
_

6

22

_
_
_
_

_
_
.
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
3

_
_
12

_

_
14
_
_

_
_
23

of—

22

10

3.

60

$ 3 . 70

$"3. 80

$ 3 . 90

$ 3. 60

$ 3 . 70

$ 3 . 80

$ 3 . 90

over

477

389

136

199

135

8

4
14

1
1

6
6

19
15
15
23
25

3

12
12

3
5
5

9
27
30

and
2.

-

-

_
_
_
_
_

_

20
2

_
_
_

28
52
18

4

4
36

4

4

23
9

9
_
-

_
9
_
_

_
32
_
_

49

3. 79

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

27

3.

66

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

8

3. 50

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

48

52

_

_

8

_

48

56

17

8

11 0

12

_
_

_
39

18

3. 38
2. 73
3. 30
3 .4 3

8

_

2

115
72
73

12

11 2

3. 49

-

-

_

_

_

_

39

3. 55

_

_

_

_

_

_

112

3. 18

_

_

_

_

15

6

14

3. 16

_

_

_

_

3

30
9

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

5
4

20

3. 15
3. 08
3. 18

1

4
16

17

2. 54

34

2

5

6

-

"

-

Excludes p r r x r -,m pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, h olidays, and late shifts.
Includes a ll d riv ers regard le ss of size and type of truck operated.
W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s: 3 at $ 2 to $ 2 .1 0 ; and 1 at $ 2 .2 0 to $ 2 .3 0 .




. 80

2 . 90

2

_
20

19

18

12

2

3

3
1
1

10

4
22

8

1

20

7
2

1

27
8

10

14
3

19

2

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table 14. Occupational Earnings:

W est Coast

8

(Distribution of workers in selected occupations in petroleum refineries by straight-time hourly earnings, 1 December 1965)
Number of w orkers receiving stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings
Departm ent and occupation

A ll production w ork ers

___________________

Maintenance:
C arpenters
_
E le ctrician s ____________________________________
H elp e rs, trades _______________________________
Instrum ent rep airm en ________________________
M achin ists ______________________________________
P ip efitters .
W e ld e r s, hand _
P roce ssin g :
Compounders
__
_
L ab orers
_ __
L oad ers, tank ca rs or trucks _______________
Package f i lle r s , machine
Pumpmen _______________________________________
P um pm en 's h elp ers ___________________________
Stillm en (chief op erators), catalytic
cracking
_
___
Stillm en (chief o p erators), cracking, other
than catalytic ________________________________
Stillm en (chief o p erators), s t r a ig h t -r u n __
Stillm en (chief op erators), combination
units ___________________________________________
Stillm en, assistan t (assistant op erators),
catalytic cracking
Stillm en , assista n t (assistant op erators),
crack ing, other than catalytic
Stillm en , a ssistan t (assistant op erators),
stra igh t-ru n _ _
_
Stillm en , assistan t (assistant op erators),
combination units ____________________________
S tillm en 's h elp ers (op erators' h elp ers),
stra igh t-ru n __________________________________
S tillm en 's h elpers (op erators' h elp er s),
combination units ____________________________
T r e a te r s , light oils ___________________________
Inspection and testing:
Routine t e s t e r s , la b o r a t o r y __________________
Recording and control:
Stock clerk s -------- -------------------------------------------M aterial m ovement:
T ru ck d rivers 3 ________________________________
M edium (IV 2 to and including 4 tons) __
Heavy (over 4 tons, other than
tra iler ty p e )-----------------------------------------------T r u ck e r s, power (forklift) _________ _______
Custodial:
Janitors ____________________ ____________ ___

1
2
3

Number
of
w orkers

9, 766

A verage
hourly
earnings 1

$ 3 . 44

$ 2. 70
$ 2. 70

$

2.

under
$ 2 . 80

$ 2.

of—

$ 3. 10

$ 3. 20

$ 3 . 30

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 . 50

$ 3 . 60

$ 3. 70

$ 3. 80

$ 3. 90

$ 3. 10

$ 3. 20

-

90

$ 3. 00

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3. 50

■
$ 3. 60

$ 3. 70

$ 3. 80

$ 3. 90

over

162

815

820

1 ,9 8 8

740

1 ,6 5 0

495

113

69
24
154

16
34
30
92
90
36

58
105
90
239
195
73

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

$ 2.

90

$ 3. 30

19

20 2

103

686

458

515

-

-

-

188
-

52
-

-

15
-

-

-

-

65
-

4
-

-

48
-

-

3
-

8

12

20

4
34
48

1,

143
163
255
274
417
537
181

$3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

64
69
00
63

9
95
64
59
54
87

3.
2.
3.
2.
3.
3.

39
78
15
99
31
18

43

3. 85

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

22

8

60
31

3. 83
3. 81

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23
23

37

III

3. 82

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

51

3. 49

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

17

53

17

22

-

-

144

3. 40

-

-

-

-

-

-

79

12

22

-

31

-

-

125

3. 47

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

34

40

29

16

-

-

457

3. 52

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

304

-

153

-

and

66

117

-

68

64
65

2 10

-

20

5
-

10

50
19

6

-

86

252
72
2

-

8

28

3. 28

-

-

-

-

-

8

13

-

7

-

-

-

-

205
47

3. 33
3. 55

-

-

-

-

-

-

70

30
-

-

13

-

12

105
-

-

12

10

206

3. 29

-

-

-

-

-

40

56

110

-

-

-

-

-

25

3. 24

-

-

-

4

-

-

5

16

-

-

-

-

-

324
50

3. 12
3. 19

-

-

-

145
-

14
14

34

58
-

104

2

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

49
50

3. 29
3. 01

-

-

-

-

48

-

11

2

-

37
-

-

-

-

-

-

68

2.

"

36

12

20

~

“

"

"

_

-

81

E xcludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
A ll w orkers w ere at $ 2. 60 to $ 2. 70.
Includes all d riv ers re g a r d le ss of size and type of truck operated.




1
2

$ 3 .0 0

80

_

1

~




Table 15. Method o f W age Payment
(Percent of production workers in petroleum refineries by method of wage payment, 1 United States and regions, December 1965)

United
States

East Coast

W es tern
Pennsylvania—
W est V irginia

M idwest I

Midwest II

--------------------------

100

100

100

10 0

100

10 0

100

10 0

100

T im e -r a te w orkers -----------------------F o rm a l plans
Single rate
Range of rates
Individual rates
___

100

100

10 0

100

10 0

10 0

100

10 0

100

99
96

100

99
90

10 0

10 0

99
99

99

10 0
10 0
-

91
91

Method of wage payment

A ll w orkers

1
2

1

2
1

95
5

99
1

10

97
3

T exas—
T exas InlandRocky
Louisiana North Louisiana—
Mountain
Gulf Coast
A rkansas

1

(2)

(2)

86

14
(2)

W est Coast

-

9

For definition of methods of wage payment, see appendix A .
L e ss than 0. 5 percent.

N O TE :

Because of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal totals.

Table

16 .

Scheduled Weekly Hours

(Percent of production w orkers in petroleum refin eries by scheduled w eekly hours,

W eekly hours

A ll w orkers
40 hours -------------------------------------------42 hours --------------------------------------------

D ecem ber 1965)

W estern
Pennsylvania—
W e st V irginia

M idw est I

100

100

100

10 0

100

100

10 0

100

10 0

100

90

100

100

100

100

100

United
States

E ast Coast

100

98
2

United States and region!

M idwest II

T exas—
T exas InlandRocky
Louisiana North Louisiana—
Mountain
Gulf C oast
A rkansas

10

Data relate to the predominant work schedule of full-time day-shift workers in each establishment.

W est Coast

N)
1
0

Table 17. Shift Differential Practices
(Percent of production workers assigned to rotating shifts 1 in petroleum refineries by amount of shift differential, United States and regions, December 1965)
W estern
Pennsylvania—
W est V irginia

E ast Coast

United States

M idw est I

Texas InlandNorth Louisiana— Rocky Mountain
A rkansas

D ay

E ve­
N ight
ning

16.
1.
.
.

16.
15.
14.
14.

1
3
2
2

1
8
5
2

-

-

1. 1
1. 1

0
8
6
2

D ay

E ve­
N ight
ning

E ve­
N ight
ning

D ay

E ve­
N ight
ning

D ay

E ve­
N ight
ning

12. 7
1 1 .5
11. 5
11. 5

-

-

16.
16.
16.
16.

2
2
2
2

15. 9
15. 9
15. 9
-

-

16.
.
.
.

16.
16.
16.
16.

16.
.
.
.

16.
16.
16.
16.

-

12. 6
1 1 .4
1 1 .4

3
8
8
8

3
0
0
0

16.
16.
16.
.

3
0
0
8

5
3
3
3

1
1
1
1

16. 1
16*1
16. 1
1. 1

D ay

1. 1
1. 1
.2

E ve­
N ight
ning

15. 6
3 .4
-

"

15.
15.
11.
10.

D ay

E ve­
N ight
ning

6
2
3
3

15. 5
15. 0
1 1 .6

15. 8

-

-

15.
15.
15.
15.

.7

16. 2
-

12. 8

D ay

.2

.2

-

16.
15.
14.
.

D ay

E ve­
N ig h t
ning

-

8
8
8
0

15. 8
15. 8
15. 8

17. 5

-

-

17.
17.
17.
17.

15. 0

-

-

"

-

17. 5

-

-

17. 4

-

-

-

15. 9

-

8. 5

-

-

15. 2

-

-

-

15. 0

'

"

'

'

“

‘

‘

"

-

10. 7

-

-

3. 4
3. 4
.5

3. 4
3 .4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

1. 1
1. 1

3 .4
3 .4

-

W o rk ers assign ed to rotating shifts su ccessive ly worked on the day, evening, and night schedules.

“

'

'

'

"

'

"

-

"

"

W ork ers employed on fixed extra shifts accounted for le ss than 2 percent of

B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual item s may not equal totals.

Table

18 .

Paid Holidays

(Percent of production workers in petroleum refin eries with form al provisions for paid holidays,
United States and regions, D ecem ber 1965)

N u m b e r o f p a id h o lid a y s

.. ..

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o ­
v id in g p a id h o lid a y s ..
7 d a y s _____________________________
8 davs
9 d a y s _____________________________
9 d a y s plu s 1 h a lf dav
10 d a y s ___________________________
12 d a y s ___________________________




17. 5
17. 5
17. 5

1 7 .4
17. 4
1 7 .4

1 7 .4
17. 4
17. 4
17. 4

-

-

5
5
5
5

1 7 .4

E ve­
N ight
ning

. 7

-

forc e.

A ll w o r k e r s

D ay

L. Q
V

14. 0

"

N O TE :

W est Coast

Schedules—

Shift d ifferen tials *
9
8

W ork ers assign ed to rotating
shifts ___________________________
Receiving shift d ifferen tial
Uniform cents per hour
8 cents ________________
9 c ents ________________
13 cents ______________
15 cents ______________
1 6 cents ______________
18 cents ______________
U niform percentage ____
5 percent _____________
Other _____________________

T exas—
Louisiana
Gulf C oast

M idwest II

U nited
States

E a st C oa st

W estern
P e n n sy lv a n ia —
W e s t V ir g in ia

M id w e s t I

M id w e st II

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
1
92
2
1
2
2

100

100
100

100

100

-

7
11
15

-

-

100
8
88
4
-

100

-

100
2
93
5

100

67

"

"

_

■

-

-

T e x a s—
T e x a s In la n d R ocky
L o u is ia n a N orth L o u is ia n a —
M ou n ta in
G u lf C o a s t
A rkan sas

-

-

99
1
-

93
7
-

W est C oa st

-

-

100

100

-

-

-

-

-

'

-

-

-

the labor

Table 19.

Paid Vacations

(P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in p e t r o le u m r e f in e r ie s w ith fo r m a l p r o v is i o n s fo r pa id v a c a t io n s
a fte r s e l e c t e d p e r io d s o f s e r v i c e , U nited Sta tes and r e g io n s , D e c e m b e r 1965)

Vacation policy

United States

A ll w o r k e r s--------------------------------------------------

East Coast

W e stern
Pennsylvania—
W est Virginia

Midwest I

Midwest II

Texas—
Louisiana
Gulf Coast

Texas InlandNorth Louisiana— Rocky Mountain
Arkansa s

W est Coast

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

1

79
-

100
100

100

96

-

21

"

"

-

3

-

-

26

8

71

100

74

7
93

Method of payment
W ork ers in establish m en ts providing
paid vac atio n s-----------------------------------------------------L e n g th -o f-tim e p a y m e n t-------------------------------P ercen tage p a y m e n t --------------------------------------O t h e r -------------------------------------------------------------------

-

97
3
“

84
16

5
95

21

46
54
-

5
95
-

_
4
92
4

_

_
16
84

_
-

Amount of vacation pay 1
A fter 1 year of service
week --------------------------------------------------------------------Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------1

8

6

1

94

92

-

100

A fter 2 y e a rs of service
week --------------------------------------------------------------------Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------1

2

( 2)
97
( 2)

_
100

_
-

-

-

-

100

100

100

100

-

-

-

-

4
9
4
83

15
85

27
73

46
54

-

_
17
83

_
27
73

_
46
54

100

10

20

90

80

46
54

100

1
10

4
16
80

46
54

4
16
80

29
71

A fter 5 ye ars of service
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------2 w eeks -------------------------------------------------------------------Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------------

( 2)
15
( 2)
84

_
6

100

_
94

"

100

A fte r 10 y e a rs of service
Over 1 and under 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------2 weeks ------------------------------------------------------------------Over 2 and under 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------4 w eeks -------------------------------------------------------------------

_

( 2)
14
84

6

_
56
44

94

-

84

4
4
9
83

13
87

6

100

94

"

13
87

9
91

62
38
"

13
87

( 2)
2

-

16

-

A fter 15 y e a rs of service
3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------------

_

A fte r 20 y e a rs of service
3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s-------------------------------------------------------------------5 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------------

2

_

11

6

87

94

_

_
9
91

89

_

_
_
100

A fter 25 y e a rs of service
3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------4 w eeks -------------------------------------------------------------------5 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------------

1

7
93

_
100

_
100

“

_
5
95

_
9
91

1
1

97

_

_
100

1 V a c a t io n p a y m e n t s , su ch a s p e r c e n t o f annual e a rn in g s , w e r e c o n v e r t e d to an e q u iv a le n t tim e b a s is .
P e r i o d s o f s e r v i c e w e r e a r b it r a r i ly c h o s e n and d o not n e c e s s a r i ly
the in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t p r o v is i o n s f o r p r o g r e s s i o n s . F or e x a m p le , the ch a n g e s in p r o p o r t io n s in d ic a t e d at 10 y e a r s m a y in clu d e ch a n g e s o c c u r r in g b e tw e e n 5 and 10 y e a r s .
2 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:




Because of rounding,

sums of individual items may not equal totals.

r e f le c t

Table 20.

Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans

(P ercent of production w orkers in petroleum r efin erie s with specified health, insurance, and retirem ent plans,
United States and r egio n s, Decem ber 1965)

United
States

Type of plan 1

A ll w o r k e r s _____________________ ______________
W ork ers in estab lish m en ts providing:
Life insurance
_ ____ __
_____ ____ _________
E m ployer financed ____
_____
____
_
Jointly financed
__ _____ __ _____ _ __
A ccid en tal death and
dism em b erm ent in su ra n ce__ __ __ _ _____
E m ployer financed
___
_______ __ ___
____ __ __ _________ „
Jointly financed
Sickness and accident insurance
on sick leave or both 2_____ ______________________
Sickness and accident in s u r a n c e ____ _____
E m p loyer fin a n c e d _______ ________ _ __
Jointly fin a n c e d _______ _____________________
Sick leave (full pay, no
waiting period)
................ .
Sick leave (p artial pay or
waiting period)
H ospitalization insurance _
___________________
E m p loyer financed
Jointly fin a n c e d _______________________________
Surgical insurance
E m p loyer fin a n c e d ____________________ _____
Jointly financed
M edical insurance
E m ployer fin a n c e d ____________________________
Jointly financed
Catastrophe insurance
_
E m p loyer financed
Jointly fin a n c e d _______ ________________________
Retirem ent plans:
P e n s io n s _______ _________ __________ ________
E m p loyer fin a n c e d ________________________
Jointly fin a n c e d ____________________________
L u m p -su m payments _________________________

East
Coast

W estern
P en n sylvan iaW est V irginia

M idw est I

Midwest II

T exas—
Louisiana
Gulf Coast

T exas InlandNorth Louisiana—
A rkansas

Rocky
Mountain

West
Coast

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
29
71

10 0

100

100

100

100

100

57
43

32
68

35
65

86

94
36
58

100

23
77

39
61

49
51

52
19
33

27
7

80
41
39

44
17
27

53
14
39

25
36

75
36
40

51
27
24

49
7
42

98

10 0

100

89

93

100

19
9

22

12

1
1

1
1
1
1

21
21

5

51
51
-

90
77
51
25

100

26
21

20

14

62

97
25
20

5

-

7
5

5
5
-

65

65

-

62

82

62

39

81

86

27

29

85

34

17

26

50

100
10

100

100

100

100

100

100

12
100

100

8

20

14

-

-

-

34

86
100

100
100

10 0

27
73

100
100

66
100

14

-

86

100
100

90
93

92

80

10 0

10

8

100
20

83
91

100

92

80
69

10

8

20

81
72
4
67

92
43

49
46

1

12

42

34

99
31
69
"

100

95
47
48

23
77

-

~

98
14
84
81
9
72

100
100

100

27
73

-

34

100

100

100

66
100

27
73
93

100

-

34

100

66
66

20

-

-

100

66

73

100

66

100

100

100

19
81

50
50

98
28
70

100
8

100

22

”

“

78

-

-

79
79
77
77
69
3

9

92

16
84
■

1 Includes only those plans for which at least part of the cost is borne by the em ployer and excludes legally required plans such as workm en 1 s compensation and social security;
how ever, plans required by State tem p orary disability insurance laws are included if the em ployer contributes m ore than is legally required or the em ployees receive benefits in ex ce ss
of the legal req u irem ents.
2 Unduplicated total of w ork ers receivin g sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately.

NOTE:

Because of rounding,




sums of individual items may not equal totals.




Table 21.

Other Selected Benefits

(Percent of production w orkers in petroleum refin eries providing funeral leave pay, jury duty pay, severance pay,
and thrift or savings plans, United States and regio n s, D ecem ber 1965)

Item

W o rk ers in establishm ents with
p rovisions for:
Funeral leave pay
________
Jury duty pay ______ __________
Severance pay 1 _________________
Thrift or savings plans 2 _______

1
2

E ast Coast

W estern
Pennsylvania—
W e st Virginia

M idw est I

M idwest II

100
10 0

100
100

100
100

100

100

10 0

100
100

96

100

10 0

10 0

100

70
78

41
73

10

84
85

79
71

69
96

67
59

79
58

93
60

United
States

99

92

T exas—
Texas InlandRocky
Louis iana North Louisiana—
Mountain
Gulf Coast
A rkansas

W est Coast

Pay to em ployees permanently separated from the company through no fault of their own.
Includes only those plans to which the em ployer makes monetary contributions beyond adm inistrative costs.

1
0

01

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Scope of Survey

The survey includes establishments primarily engaged in producing gasoline, ker­
osene, distillate fuel oils, residual fuel oils, lubricants, and other products from crude
petroleum, and its fractionation products either through straight distillation of crude oil,
redistillation of unfinished petroleum derivatives, cracking or other processes.
(Industry
Z911 as defined in the 1957 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual and 1963
Supplement, prepared by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget). Separate auxiliary units such as
central offices and research laboratories are excluded.
The establishments studied were selected from those employing 100 workers or more
at the time of reference of the data used in compiling the universe lists (unemployment
insurance listings compiled by the various States).
The number of establishments and workers actually studied by the Bureau, as well
as the number estimated to be within scope of the survey during the payroll period studied,
are shown in the following table:

Estimated Number of Establishments and Workers W ithin Scope o f Survey and Number Studied,
Petroleum Refining Industry, D ecem ber 1965 1
3
2

Number o f establishments
Region*-

W ithin scope
o f study 2

Workers in establishments
W ithin scope o f study

Studied
T o ta l3

Production
workers

Studied
T otal3

United States------------------------

186

110

9 9 ,9 8 4

7 3 ,3 1 8

75, 241

East C oast---------------------------------------Western Pennsylvania
West V i r g i n ia -----------------------------Midwest I -------------------------------------Midwest I I -------------------------------------Texas—
Louisiana Gulf C oast--------Texas Inland-North LouisianaArkansas---------------------------------------Rocky M o u n ta in ---------------------------West C o a s t--------------------------------------

19

12

1 5 ,0 2 3

1 1 ,0 6 6

1 3 ,1 8 4

13
35
31
33

10
19
18
19

2 ,8 3 4
1 7 ,4 8 4
9 ,6 5 6
3 3 ,3 3 4

1 ,9 8 3
1 2 ,6 4 1
7 ,4 6 8
2 4 ,4 8 1

2 ,3 1 5
1 2 ,8 9 7
7, 222
2 3 ,6 2 2

19
15
21

12
9
11

4 ,9 9 4
2 ,9 2 2
1 3 , 737

3 ,8 4 7
2 ,0 6 6
9 , 766

3 ,8 1 8
1, 760
1 0 ,4 2 3

1 The regions used in this study include:
East Coast— Connecticut, Delaware, District o f C olum bia, Florida,
Georgia, M aine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island,
South Carolina, Verm ont, Virginia, and the following counties in Pennsylvania:
Bradford, Colum bia, Dauphin,
Montour, Northumberland, Sullivan, York, and all counties east thereof; Western Pennsylvaniar-West Virginia— West
Virginia and those counties in Pennsylvania not included in the East Coast region; Midwest I— Illinois, Indiana,
Kentucky, M ichigan, Ohio, and Tennessee; Midwest II— Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota,
Oklahom a, South Dakota, and Wisconsin; Texas—
Louisiana Gulf Coast— the following counties in Texas: Aransas,
Brazoria, Calhoun, Cameron, Chambers, Fort Bend, Galvestion, Hardin, Harris, Jackson, Jasper, Jefferson, K enedy,
Kleberg, Liberty, Matagorda, Montgom ery, Newton, Nueces, Orange, Polk, Refugio, San Jacinto, San Patricio, T y le r,
Victoria, W aller, Wharton, and W illa cy ; the following parishes in Louisiana: A voyelles, East Feliciana, Pointe C oupee,
Tangipahoa, Vernon, Rapides, Washington, and West Feliciana, and all parishes south thereof; the following counties
in Mississippi:
George, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Pearl River, and Stone; and the following counties in A labam a:
Baldwin and M obile; Texas Inland-North Louisiana—
Arkansas Arkansas and New M exico and those parts o f the States
o f A lab am a, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas not included in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast; Rocky Mountain—
Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Utah, and W yom ing; and West Coast Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.
Alaska and Hawaii were excluded from the survey.
2 Includes only establishments with 100 workers or more at the tim e o f reference o f the universe data.
3 Includes executive, professional, office clerical, and other workers excluded from the production worker
category shown separately.




26

27
Method of Study

Data were obtained by personal visits of Bureau field economists under the direction
of the Bureau’s Assistant Regional Directors for Wages and Industrial Relations.
The survey
was conducted on a sample basis.
To obtain appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a
greater proportion of large than of small establishments was studied.
In combining the data,
however, all establishments were given their appropriate weight. All estimates are presented,
therefore, as relating to all establishments in the industry, excluding only those below the
minimum size at the time of reference of the universe data.
Establishment Definition
An establishment, for purposes of this study, is defined as a single physical location
where industrial operations are performed.
An establishment is not necessarily identical
with the company, which may consist of one or more establishments.
The terms "establishment" and "refinery" have been used interchangeably in this report.
Employment
The estimates of the number of workers within the scope of the study are intended
as a general guide to the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey.
The
advance planning necessary to make a wage survey requires the use of lists of establishments
assembled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied.
Production Workers
The term "production workers, " as used in this report, includes working foremen and
all nonsupervisory workers engaged in nonoffice functions. Administrative, executive, profes­
sional, and technical personnel, and force-account construction employees, who were utilized
as a separate work force on the firm ’s own properties, were excluded.
Occupations Selected for Study
Occupational classification was based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed
to take account of interestablishment and interarea variations in duties within the same job.
(See appendix B for these descriptions. ) The occupations were chosen for their numerical
importance, their usefulness in collective bargaining, or their representativeness of the
entire job scale in the industry.
Working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners,
trainees, handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers were not reported
in the data for selected occupations but were included in the data for all production workers.
Wage Data
The wage information relates to average straight-time hourly earnings, excluding
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
C ost-ofliving bonuses were included as a part of the worker’ s regular pay; but nonproduction bonus
payments such as Christmas or year-end bonuses were excluded.
Average (mean) hourly rates or earnings for each occupation or other group of
workers, such as production workers, were calculated by weighting each rate (or hourly
earnings) by the number of workers receiving the rate, totaling, and dividing by the number
of individuals.
The hourly earnings of salaried workers were obtained by dividing their
straight-time salary by normal rather than actual hours.
Size of Community
Tabulations by size of community pertain to metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas.
The term "metropolitan areas, " as used in this bulletin, refers to the Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Areas as defined by the U. S. Bureau of the Budget through March 1965.
Except in New England, a Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area is defined as a
county or group of contiguous counties which contain at least one city of 50, 000 inhabitants
or more.
Contiguous counties to the one containing such a city are included in a Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Area, if, according to certain criteria, they are essentially m etro­
politan in character and are socially and economically integrated with the central city.
In
New England, where the city and town are administratively more important than the county,
they are the units used in defining Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas.




28
Method of Wage Payment

Tabulations by method of wage payment relate to the number of workers paid under
the various wage systems.
Formal rate structures for time-rated workers provide single
rates or a range of rates for individual job categories.
In the absence of a formal rate
structure, pay rates are determined primarily with reference to the qualifications of the
individual worker.
A single rate structure is one in which the same rate is paid to all
experienced workers in the same job classification. Learners, apprentices, or probationary
workers may be paid according to rate schedules which start below the single rate and permit
the workers to achieve the full job rate over a period of time. Individual experienced workers
may occasionally be paid above or below the single rate for special reasons, but such pay­
ments are regarded as exceptions.
Range-of-rate plans are those in which the minimum
and/or maximum rates paid experienced workers for the same job are specified.
Specific
rates of individual workers within the range may be determined by merit, length of service,
or a combination of various concepts of merit and length of service.
Scheduled Weekly Hours
Data on weekly hours refer to the predominant work schedule for full-time production
workers employed on the day shift.
Shift Practices
Data relate to shift practices of establishments during the payroll period studied, and
are presented in terms of the proportion of production workers actually employed under the
conditions specified.
Workers assigned to rotating shifts variously work on day, evening,
and night shifts and workers assigned to fixed shifts regularly work on their assigned shift.
Supplementary Wage Provisions
Supplementary benefits were treated statistically on the basis that if formal provi­
sions were applicable to half or more of the production workers in an establishment, the
benefits were considered applicable to all such workers.
Similarly, if fewer than half of the
workers were covered, the benefit was considered nonexistent in the establishment.
Because
of length-of-service and other eligibility requirements, the proportion of workers receiving
the benefits may be smaller than estimated.
Paid Holidays.
provided annually.

Paid holiday provisions

relate to full-day and half-day holidays

Paid Vacations.
The summary of vacation plans is limited to formal arrangements,
excluding informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the discretion of the em­
ployer or the supervisor.
Payments not on a time basis were converted; for example, a
payment of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered the equivalent of 1 week’ s pay.
The
periods of service for which data are presented were selected as representative of the most
common practices, but they do not necessarily reflect individual establishment provisions
for progression.
For example, the changes in proportions indicated at 10 years of service
may include changes which occurred between 5 and 10 years.
Health, Insurance, and Retirement Plans.
Data are presented for health, insurance,
and retirement plans for which all or a part of the cost is borne by the employer, excluding
programs required by law, such as workmen’ s compensation and social security.
Among
the plans included are those underwritten by a commercial insurance company and those paid
directly by the employer from his current operating funds or from a fund set aside for this
purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form of life insurance. Sickness and accident insur­
ance is limited to that type of insurance under which predetermined cash payments are made
directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly basis during illness or accident disability.




29
Information is presented for all such plans to which the employer contributes at least a
part of the cost.
However, in New York and New Jersey, where temporary disability insur­
ance laws require employer contributions, 1 plans are included only if the employer (1) con­
0
tributes more than is legally required or (2) provides the employees with benefits which
exceed the requirements of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to formal plans which provide full
pay or a proportion of the worker's pay during absence from work because of illness; informal
arrangements have been omitted.
Separate tabulations are provided according to (1) plans
which provide full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans providing either partial pay or a
waiting period.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete or partial payment of
doctors' fees.
Such plans may be underwritten by a commerical insurance company or a
nonprofit organization, or they may be self-insured.
Catastrophe insurance, sometimes referred to as extended medical insurance, in­
cludes the plans designed to cover employees in case of sickness or injury involving an
expense which goes beyond the normal coverage of hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to plans which provide, upon retire­
ment, regular payments for the remainder of the worker's life.
Data are presented sep­
arately for lump-sum retirement pay (one payment or a specified number over a period of
time) made to employees upon retirement. Establishments providing both lump-sum payments
and pensions to employees upon retirement were considered as having both retirement pension
and lump-sum retirement pay.
Establishments having optional plans providing employees
a choice of either lump-sum retirement payments or pensions were considered as having
only retirement pension benefits.
Paid Funeral and Jury Duty Leave. Data for paid funeral and jury duty leave are
limited to formal plans which provide at least partial payment for time lost as a result of
attending funerals of specified family members or serving as a juror.
Severance Pay. Data relate to formal plans providing for payments to employees
permanently separated from the company through no fault of their own.
Thrift or Savings Plans. Thrift or savings plans are limited to those to which the
employer made monetary contributions, beyond administrative costs.

10 The temporary disability insurance laws in California and Rhode Island do not require em ployer contributions.




Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions

The primary purpose of preparing job descrip­
tions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field
staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers
who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and
different work arrangements from establishment to estab­
lishment and area to area.
This permits the grouping
of occupational wage rates representing comparable job
content. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment
and interarea comparability of occupational content, the
Bureau's job descriptions may differ significantly from
those in use in individual establishments or those prepared
for other purposes.
In applying these job descriptions,
the Bureau's field economists are instructed to exclude
working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners,
trainees, handicapped, part-time, temporary, and proba­
tionary workers.

CARPENTER,

MAINTENANCE

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain in good repair
building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions, doors,
floors, stairs, casings, and trim made of wood in an establishment.
Work involves most
of the following: Planning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models, or
verbal instructions; using a variety of carpenter's handtools, portable power tools, and
standard measuring instruments; making standard shop computations relating to dimensions
of work; and selecting materials necessary for the work. In general, the work of the main­
tenance carpenter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a for­
mal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
COMPOUNDER
(Blender)
Blends or compounds various lubricating oils and/or greases according to specifi­
cations.
Work involves most of the following: Ascertaining location of various oils to be
compounded and pumping or arranging for pumpman to transfer oils to proper lines; reg­
ulating valves to admit specified quantities of various ingredients to mixing tank, following
prescribed formulas; setting air and heat controls on kettles and tanks as necessary; and
maintaining record of composition, quantities of components used, density, and/ or other
pertinent information. May make simple control tests to determine whether products meet
specifications.
May also blend new mixtures of oils and submit them to laboratory for
analysis.
ELECTRICIAN,

MAINTENANCE

Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the installation, mainte­
nance, or repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of electric
energy in an establishment.
Work involves most of the following: Installing or repairing
’‘any of a variety of electrical equipment such as generators,transformers, switchboards,
controllers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems, or other transm is­
sion equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or other specifications; loca­
ting and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; working standard compu­
tations relating to load requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety
of electrician's handtools and measuring and testing instruments.
In general, the work
of the maintenance electrician requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.




30

31
FILTERMAN
(Filter-house operator; filter-plant treater; filterer)
Tends one or more units of filtering equipment (clay-filled vats or tanks) to remove
impurities and to improve color of the oil.
Work involves most of the following: Mixing
samples of clay and oil together to determine amount of clay necessary to obtain finished
product of desired color; directing helper who charges clay into filters; opening valves or
operating pumps to fill filter to proper level with oil; allowing oil to percolate through clay
by gravity, or admitting additional oil under pressure to force percolation; gaging and re­
cording amount of oil being filtered; inspecting oil for color; manipulating valves admitting
air or steam to filter in order to promote flow of oil and to wash down used clay before
it is dumped from filter; and blending several oils to obtain one of proper color. May also
tend equipment for burning clay to restore for reuse.
GAGER
(Battery gager; cracking gager; pressure-still gager; storage-area gager)
Gages quantity of oil in storage tanks and controls flow of oil into pipelines at
wells, in the field, or at the refinery.
Duties involve: Gaging and recording amount of
oil in tanks; determining temperature of oils; drawing and marking samples of oil; and
opening bleeder valves to drain off water. May operate pumps to circulate oil within tank
or to effect transfer within tank block.
GUARD
Performs routine plant protection duties, either at fixed post or on tour, maintain­
ing order, using arms or force where necessary.
Includes gatemen who are stationed at
gate and check on identity of employees and other persons entering.
HELPER,

TRADES, MAINTENANCE

Assists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades, by performing
specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a worker supplied with materials
and tools, cleaning working area, machine, and equipment; assisting worker by holding m a­
terials or tools; and performing other semiskilled or unskilled tasks as directed by jour­
neyman. The kind of work the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade.
In some trades, the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding materials and tools,
and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted to perform specialized machine
operations, or parts of a trade that are also performed by workers on a full-time basis.
INSTRUMENT REPAIRMAN
Installs, maintains, adjusts, and repairs manual, pneumatic, electric, and/or elec­
tronic measuring, recording, and regulating instruments in a refinery. Work involves most
of the following: Inspecting, testing, and adjusting instruments periodically, determining
cause of trouble in instruments not functioning properly and making necessary repairs or
adjustments; disconnecting inaccurate or damaged instruments and replacing them; exami­
ning mechanism and cleaning parts; replacing worn or broken parts; assembling instru­
ments and installing them on testing apparatus; and calibrating instruments to established
standards.
JANITOR
(Day porter; sweeper; charwoman; janitress)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas and washrooms, or
premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial or other establishment.
Duties
involve a combination of the following: Sweeping, mopping, and/or scrubbing and polishing
floors; removing chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures;
polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor maintenance services;
and cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Workers who specialize in window wash­
ing are excluded.




32
LABORER
Performs miscellaneous laboring tasks in plants or outside work areas , that require
no formal training or previous experience. Generally, learning how to do the work is lim ­
ited to gaining a familiarity with work areas, with acceptable ways of doing specific tasks,
and with safety regulations.
Usually average standards of performance are attained after
a brief period of service.
Specific assignments among laboring tasks include: Loading
and unloading, stacking, interprocess moving of m aterials, cleaning work areas and equip­
ment, digging and shoveling. Tools such as crowbars, picks, shovels, wheelbarrows, handtrucks, and other lifting and excavating devices may be employed on specific assignments.
LOADER, TANK CARS OR TRUCKS
(Rackman; tank-car loader; topman; truck loader)
Loads gasoline, kerosene, and/or various oils into tank cars or trucks according
to specifications.
Work involves: Connecting or assisting in connecting hose to coupling,
or swinging loading spout over dome; opening valves to allow liquid to flow into tank, or
starting or notifying pumpman to start pumps, and filling tank to proper level.
May per­
form a variety of other tasks relating to shipment of product.
May gage or sample ship­
ping tanks.
MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of metal parts of
mechanical equipment operated in an establishment.
Work involves most of the following:
Interpreting written instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using
a variety of machinist’ s handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and op­
erating standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard
shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds, and speeds of machining;
knowledge of the working properties of the common metals and other materials; selecting
standard m aterials, parts, and equipment required for his work; and fitting and assembling
parts. In general, the machinist's work normally requires a rounded training in machineshop practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment.
Work involves
most of the following: Examining machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose source
of trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling machines and performing repairs that mainly
involve the use of handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts
with items obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replacement part by a machine
shop or sending of the machine to a machine shop for major repairs; preparing written
specifications for major repairs or for the production of parts ordered from machine shop;
reassembling machines; and making all necessary adjustments for operation.
In general,
the work of a maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually ac­
quired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
Excluded
from this classification are workers whose primary duties involve setting up or adjusting
machines.
PACKAGE FILLER, MACHINE
Tends the operation of an automatic or semiautomatic machine which fills con­
tainers with specified weight or amount of commodity being packaged.
Work involves one
or more of the following: Feeding empty containers to machine; making minor adjust­
ments to weighting or dispensing devices in order to maintain proper operation; removing
filled containers from machine. Workers who tend filling machines that also cap or close
filled containers are included.




33
PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and pipefittings in
an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Laying out of work and measuring
to locate position of pipe from drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes
of pipe to correct lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting
machine; threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or power-driven
machines; assembling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; making standard
shop computations relating to pressures, flow, and size of pipe required; and making stand­
ard tests to determine whether finished pipes meet specifications. In general, the work of
the maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. Workers primarily engaged
in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating systems are excluded.
PRESSMAN, PARAFFIN
Removes from filter presses the accumulated wax extracted from paraffin distillate.
Work involves: Removing bolts and sliding head of press back to release filter plates; scrap­
ing accumulated wax off filter plates; lifting leaking plates from press, and installing new
plates in press; scraping wax in troughs into conveyor that carries it to melting pans; and
sliding head against plates and closing press.
PUMPMAN
(Pumper; transfer pumper; water pumper)
Responsible for operating one or more power-driven pumps to produce forced c ir­
culation of petroleum products and water through units during processing, or to effect the
movement of water, chemical solutions, or petroleum products from one tank or processing
unit to another or between tanks and processing units to points of loading or unloading trucks,
tank cars, or boats.
Work involves most of the following: Interpreting specifications to
determine which lines should be used for individual liquids; connecting lines from pumps to
storage tanks or processing units; regulating pipeline valves so that liquids are pumped ac­
cording to written specifications or oral instructions; checking measuring instruments or
gaging contents of storage tanks; and maintaining operational records or log.
May draw
samples from tanks or pipelines for laboratory analysis, or may make specific gravity,
visual color, or other tests to determine whether products are meeting specifications.
PUMPMAN’S HELPER
Opens and closes pipeline valves at direction of pumpman to divert flow of liquids
to proper location. May assist in starting or stopping pumps. May gage contents of tanks,
draw samples of products through bleeder valves on pipelines for laboratory analysis, or
make specific gravity and color tests.
ROUTINE TESTER, LABORATORY
Performs various standard laboratory tests on different petroleum products to de­
termine certain chemical and/or physical properties of the product, and submits results of
the tests to operators of the various departments, by which they control the distillation and
treating of the products. Work involves: Making various tests, such as viscosity, specific
gravity, flash and fire points, color, pour, water and sediment, melting point, penetration,
doctor solution, distillation and corrosion; and submitting results to chemist or to heads of
processing units. May interpret results of tests. Chemists and laboratory laborers (bottle
washers, etc.) are excluded.
STILLMAN
(Chief operator; first operator; process operator)
Responsible for the operation of one or a battery of stills in which crude or other
oil is heated and separated into its various components. Work involves: Directing and co­
ordinating the activities of the various crew members on the still; interpreting instructions
and operational requirements keeping informed of operating conditions; patrolling entire




34
unit periodically to check on operating conditions; observing instrument indications and chart
records of rates, pressures, temperatures, liquid levels, e tc.; directing the drawing of
periodic samples; interpreting results of tests; making or directing operation and control
changes as necessary to maintain operations within specified tolerances; maintaining or
directing the preparation of daily operational log or other records; and preparing equipment
for maintenance work and directing repairs. Stillmen on one-man operations are excluded.
For wage study purposes,
Stillman
Stillman
Stillman
Stillman

(chief
(chief
(chief
(chief

operator),
operator),
operator),
operator),

workers

are classified by type of still,

as follows:

catalytic cracking
cracking, other than catalytic
straight-run
combination units

STILLMAN, ASSISTANT
(Assistant operator; control man; first helper)
Helps Stillman maintain operation of stills in which crude or other oil is heated and
separated into its various components.
Work involves most of the following: Patrolling
unit or instrument panel regularly to check on operations; observing instrument indications
of pressures, temperatures, liquid levels, etc. , and recording readings on log or other op­
erational records; maintaining desired liquid levels in equipment and controlling tempera­
tures; adjusting or regulating manual or automatic controls to maintain operations within
specified tolerances; drawing periodic samples and/or running tests such as specific grav­
ity, viscosity, etc. , reporting frequently to Stillman as to operating condition of unit; and
lubricating and cleaning equipment. May check operation and adjust speed of pumps which
circulate products through unit, may make minor repairs to equipment.
For wage study purposes,
Stillman,
Stillman,
Stillman,
Stillman,

assistant
assistant
assistant
assistant

workers

(assistant
(assistant
(assistant
(assistant

are classified by type of still,

operator),
operator),
operator),
operator),

as follows:

catalytic cracking
cracking, other than catalytic
straight-run
combination units

STILLMAN'S HELPER
(O p erator

helper;

still firem a n )

Tends operation of burners to maintain required temperature in furnace of a petro­
leum products still. Work involves most of the following: Following instructions received
from stillman or Stillman's helper of previous shift specifying temperature to be maintained;
reading temperature, pressure, and flow gages to determine operation of still, and adjust­
ing valves controlling flow of fuel to burners; observing color of burner flames or gas i s ­
suing from stack, and regulating supply of air to obtain correct combustion; recording gage
and meter readings and/or other pertinent information on log sheet or other records; and
reporting irregularities of still operation to stillman.
May clean burners and/or remove
and replace plates covering openings that provide access to interior of still for cleaning.
For wage study purposes,
Stillman's
Stillman's
Stillman's
Stillman's

helper
helper
helper
helper

(operator's
(operators
(operator's
(operator's

workers
helper),
helper),
helper),
helper),

are classified by type of still,

as follows:

catalytic cracking
cracking, other than catalytic
straight-run
combination units

S*rOCK CLERK
Receives, stores, and issues equipment, material, merchandise, or tools in a
stockroom or storeroom. Work involves a combination of the following: Checking incoming
orders; storing supplies; applying identifications to articles; issuing supplies; taking peri­
odic inventory or keeping perpetual inventory; making up necessary reports; and requesting
or ordering supplies when needed. Stockroom laborers, toolcrib attendants, and employees
who supervise stock clerks and laborers are excluded.




35
TREATER
(Treater, first class)
Responsible for the treating of gasoline, kerosene, distilled oils, light oils, naphtha,
wax, and other petroleum products with chemicals, steam, water, or air to remove sulphur
and/or other impurities. Work involves most of the following: Interpreting instructions and
operational requirements; making frequent inspections of units to check on operations; ob­
serving and recording readings of temperature, pressure, flow gages, and meters; making
or directing operation and control changes as necessary to maintain operations; maintaining
daily log or other operational records; preparing equipment for maintenance work and test­
ing equipment after repairs have been made.
May direct activities of one or more helpers,
may operate pumps to circulate liquids through the units.
For wage study purposes,

workers

are

classified by type of oils processed, as

follows:
Treater, light oils (white products—gasoline, kerosene, naphtha,
solvants, etc.)
Treater, heavy oils (lube)
TREATER'S HELPER
(Treater, second class)
Assists treater in treating gasoline, kerosene, oils, wax and other petroleum pro­
ducts with chemicals, steam, water, or air to remove sulphur and/or other impurities.
Work involves most of the following: Patrolling unit regularly to check on operations and/or
equipment; making operating and control changes as directed; drawing off water and spent
chemicals after treatment and separation by valve manipulation; mixing chemical treating
solution and adding treating chemicals to oil; manipulating valves to charge equipment with
oils to be treated and to maintain level of oil and solutions in equipment; and maintaining
daily log or other operational records.
May operate or regulate speed of pumps to cir­
culate liquids through unit, or make chemical, specific gravity, color, or other tests to
determine whether treating process is being carried on properly.
For wage study purposes,

workers are

classified by type of oils processed, as

follows:
Treater's helper, light oils (white products—
gasoline, kerosene, naphtha,
solvants, etc.)
Treater's helper, heavy oils (lube)
TRUCKD RIVER
Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport m aterials, merchandise,
equipment, or men between various types of establishments such as: Manufacturing plants,
freight depots, warehouses, wholesale and retail establishments and/or between retail e s­
tablishments and customers' houses or places of business.
May also load or unload truck
with or without helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep truck in good working
order.
Driver-salesman and over-the-road-drivers are excluded.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by size and type of equipment,
as follows: (Tractor-trailer would be rated on the basis of trailer capacity. )
Truckdriver (combination of sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under 1 V2 tons)
Truckdriver, medium (l V2 to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than
trailer type)




36
TRUCKER, POWER
Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered truck or tractor to
transport goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other
establishment.
For wage study purposes,

workers

are classified by type of truck,

as follows:

Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)
WATCHMAN
Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property against fire, theft,
and illegal entry.
WELDER, HAND, MAINTENANCE
Performs the welding duties necessary to maintain plant machinery and equipment
in good repair, by fusing (welding) metal objects together in the fabrication of metal shapes
and in repairing broken or cracked metal objects.
Work involves most of the following:
Planning and laying out of work from written or oral instructions and specifications; knowl­
edge of welding properties of a variety of metals and alloys; setting up of work and deter­
mining operation sequence; welding a variety of items as necessary; ability to weld with
gas and arc apparatus.
In general, the work of the maintenance welder requires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.




Industry Wage Studies
T he m o s t r e c e n t r e p o r t s fo r i n d u s t r i e s in c lu d e d in the B u r e a u ' s p r o g r a m
o f i n d u s t r y w a g e s u r v e y s s i n c e J a n u a r y 1950 a r e l i s t e d b e lo w . T h o s e f o r w h ich
a p r i c e i s sh ow n a r e a v a i l a b l e f r o m the S u p e r in t e n d e n t o f D o c u m e n t s , U. S.
G o v e r n m e n t P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , W ash in g to n , D. C. , 2 0 4 0 2 , o r a n y o f i t s r e g i o n a l
s a le s o ffices.
T h o s e f o r w hich a p r i c e i s not show n m a y b e o b t a in e d f r e e a s
lo n g a s a s u p p l y i s a v a i l a b l e , f r o m the B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s , W ash in g to n ,
D. Co , 2 0 2 1 2 , o r f r o m a n y o f the r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s show n on the i n s i d e b a c k c o v e r .

I. Occupational Wage Studies
M an u factu rin g
B a s i c Ir o n and S t e e l , 1962.
B L S B u l l e t i n 1358 (30 c e n t s ) .
C a n d y and O th er C o n f e c t io n e r y P r o d u c t s , I9 6 0 . B L S R e p o r t 195.
^ C a n n in g an d F r e e z i n g , 1957. B L S R e p o r t 136.
C i g a r M a n u f a c t u r i n g 1964. B L S B u l l e t i n 1436 (30 c e n t s ) .
C i g a r e t t e M a n u f a c t u r i n g , 1965. B L S B u l le t in 1472 (20 c e n t s ) .
C o tto n T e x t i l e s , 1965. B L S B u l l e t i n 1506 (40 c e n t s ) .
D i s t i l l e d L i q u o r s , 1952. S e r i e s 2, N o. 88.
F a b r i c a t e d S t r u c t u r a l S t e e l , 1964. B L S B u l le t in 1463 (30 c e n t s ) .
F e r t i l i z e r M a n u f a c t u r i n g , 1962. B L S B u l l e t i n 13 62 (40 c e n t s ) .
F l o u r and O th er G r a i n M i l l P r o d u c t s , 1961. B L S B u l l e t i n 1337 (30 c e n t s ) .
F l u i d M ilk I n d u s t r y , 1964. B L S B u l l e t i n 1464 (30 c e n t s ) .
F o o t w e a r , 1965. B L S B u l le t in 1503 (50 c e n t s ) .
H o s i e r y , 1964. B L S B u l l e t i n 1456 (45 c e n t s ) .
I n d u s t r i a l C h e m i c a l s , 1955. B L S R e p o r t 103.
Ir o n and S t e e l F o u n d r i e s , 1962. B L S B u l l e t i n 1386 (40 c e n t s ) .
L e a t h e r T a n n in g and F i n i s h i n g , 1963. B L S B u l le t in 1378 (40 c e n t s ) .
M a c h i n e r y M a n u f a c t u r i n g , 1965. B L S B u l le t in 1476 (25 c e n t s ) .
M e a t P r o d u c t s , 1963. B L S B u l l e t i n 1415 (75 c e n t s ) .
M e n ' s and B o y s ’ S h i r t s ( E x c e p t W ork S h i r t s ) and N i g h t w e a r , 1964.
B L S B u l le t in 1457 (40 c e n t s ) .
M e n ' s and B o y s ’ S u it s and C o a t s , 1963. B L S B u l le t in 1424 (65 c e n t s ) .
M i s c e l l a n e o u s P l a s t i c s P r o d u c t s , 1964. B L S B u l l e t i n 1439 (35 c e n t s ) .
M i s c e l l a n e o u s T e x t i l e s , 1953. B L S R e p o r t 56.
M o t o r V e h i c l e s an d M o t o r V e h ic le P a r t s , 1963. B L S B u l l e t i n 1393 (45 c e n t s ) .
N o n f e r r o u s F o u n d r i e s , 1965. B L S B u l l e t i n 1498 (40 c e n t s ) .
P a i n t s and V a r n i s h e s , 1961. B L S B u l l e t i n 1318 (30 c e n t s ) .
P a p e r b o a r d C o n t a i n e r s and B o x e s , 1964. B L S B u l le t in 1478 (70 c e n t s ) .
P e t r o l e u m R e f in i n g , 1959. B L S R e p o r t 158.
P r e s s e d o r B lo w n G l a s s and G l a s s w a r e , 1964. B L S B u l le t in 1423 (30 c e n t s ) .
^ P r o c e s s e d W a s t e , 1957. B L S R e p o r t 124.
P u lp , P a p e r , and P a p e r b o a r d M i l l s , 1962. B L S B u l l e t i n 1341 (40 c e n t s ) .
R a d i o , T e l e v i s i o n , and R e l a t e d P r o d u c t s , 1951. S e r i e s 2, N o. 84.
R a i l r o a d C a r s , 1952. S e r i e s 2, N o. 86.
* R a w S u g a r , 1957. B L S R e p o r t 136.
S o u th e r n S a w m i l l s and P la n n in g M i l l s , 1962. B L S B u l l e t i n 1361 (30 c e n t s ) .
S t r u c t u r a l C l a y P r o d u c t s , 1964. B L S B u l le t in 1459 (45 c e n t s ) .
S y n th e tic F i b e r s , 1958. B L S R e p o r t 143.
S y n th e tic T e x t i l e s , 1965. B L S B u l l e t i n 1509 (40 c e n t s ) .
T e x t i l e D y e in g and F i n i s h i n g , 1961. B L S B u l l e t i n 1311 (35 c e n t s ) .

* Studies of the effects of the $1 minimum wage.



I. Occupational Wage Studies— Continued
M a n u f a c t u r i n g — C o n tin u ed
^ T o b a c c o S t e m m i n g an d R e d r y i n g , 1957. B L S R e p o r t 136.
W e st C o a s t S a w m i l l i n g , 1964. B L S B u l l e t i n 1455 (30 c e n t s ) .
W o m e n 's an d M i s s e s ' C o a t s and S u i t s , 1965. B L S B u l l e t i n 1508 (25 c e n t s ) .
W o m e n 's an d M i s s e s ’ D r e s s e s , 1963. B L S B u l le t in 1391 (30 c e n t s ) .
Wood H o u s e h o ld F u r n i t u r e , E x c e p t U p h o l s t e r e d , 1965. B L S B u l l e t i n 1496
(40 c e n t s ) .
*W o o d e n C o n t a i n e r s , 1957. B L S R e p o r t 126.
Wool T e x t i l e s , 1962. B L S B u l le t in 1372 (45 c e n t s ) .
W ork C lo th in g , 1964. B L S B u l le t in 1440 (35 c e n t s ) .
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g
A u to D e a l e r R e p a i r S h o p s , 1964. B L S B u l l e t i n 1452 (30 c e n t s ) .
B a n k in g , 1964. B L S B u l l e t i n 1466 (30 c e n t s ) .
B i t u m in o u s C o a l M in in g , 1962. B L S B u l l e t i n 1383 (45 c e n t s ) .
C o m m u n i c a t i o n s , 1964. B L S B u l l e t i n 1467 (20 c e n t s ) .
C o n t r a c t C le a n in g S e r v i c e s , 1965. B L S B u l l e t i n 1507 (30 c e n t s ) .
C r u d e P e t r o l e u m and N a t u r a l G a s P r o d u c t i o n , I 9 6 0 . B L S R e p o r t 181.
D e p a r t m e n t an d W o m e n ’ s R e a d y - t o - W e a r S t o r e s , 1950. S e r i e s 2, N o. 78.
E a t in g an d D r in k in g P l a c e s , 1963. B L S B u l l e t i n 1400 (40 c e n t s ) .
E l e c t r i c and G a s U t i l i t i e s , 1962. B L S B u l l e t i n 1374 (50 c e n t s ) .
H o s p i t a l s , 1963. B L S B u l le t in 1409 (50 c e n t s ) .
H o t e l s and M o t e l s , 1963. B L S B u l l e t i n 1406 (40 c e n t s ) .
L a u n d r i e s an d C le a n in g S e r v i c e s , 1963. B L S B u l l e t i n 1401 (50 c e n t s ) .
L i f e I n s u r a n c e , 1961. B L S B u l l e t i n 1324 (30 c e n t s ) .
N u r s i n g H o m e s and R e l a t e d F a c i l i t i e s , 1965. B L S B u l l e t i n 1492 (45 c e n t s ) .

II, Earnings Distributions Studies
F a c t o r y W o r k e r s ' E a r n i n g s — D i s t r i b u t i o n b y S t r a i g h t - T i m e H o u r ly
E a r n i n g s , 1958. B L S B u l l e t i n 1252 (40 c e n t s ) .
F a c t o r y W o r k e r s ’ E a r n i n g s — S e l e c t e d M a n u f a c t u r i n g I n d u s t r i e s , 1959.
B L S B u l l e t i n 1275 (35 c e n t s ) .
R etail T rad e:
E m p l o y e e E a r n i n g s and H o u r s , J u n e 1965—
B u il d in g M a t e r i a l s , H a r d w a r e , an d F a r m E q u ip m e n t D e a l e r s .
B L S B u l l e t i n 1501-1 (25 c e n t s ) .
G e n e r a l M e r c h a n d i s e S t o r e s . B L S B u l l e t i n 1 5 0 1 - 2 (40 c e n t s ) .
F o o d S t o r e s . B L S B u l le t in 1 5 0 1 -3 (30 c e n t s ) .
A u t o m o t iv e D e a l e r s and G a s o l i n e S e r v i c e S t a t i o n s .
B L S B u l l e t i n 1 5 0 1 - 4 (40 c e n t s ) .
A p p a r e l an d A c c e s s o r y S t o r e s . B L S B u l le t in 1 5 0 1 - 5 (45 c e n t s ) .
F u r n i t u r e , H o m e F u r n i s h i n g s , an d H o u se h o ld A p p l i a n c e
S t o r e s . B L S B u l le t in 1 5 0 1 - 6 (40 c e n t s ) .
M i s c e l l a n e o u s S t o r e s . B L S B u l l e t i n 1 5 0 1 - 7 (30 c e n t s ) .
E m p l o y e e E a r n i n g s in N o n m e t r o p o lit a n A r e a s o f the So u th an d N o r t h
C e n t r a l R e g i o n s , 1962. B L S B u l l e t i n 1416 (40 c e n t s ) .




* Studies of the effects of the $1 minimum wage.

* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1966 0 - 2 3 1 - 0 1 9




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES