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In d u stry
W a g e S u rve y

Paints and
Varnishes,
November 1970
B u lle tin 1739
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1972




Industry
Wage Survey

Paints and
Varnishes,
Novem ber 1970
Bulletin 1739
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
J. D. Hodgson, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner
1972




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D .C . 20402 - Price 60 cents




Preface
This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of wages
and supplementary benefits in the paints and varnishes manufacturing industry in
November 1970. A similar survey of this industry was made in November 1965.
Separate releases were issued earlier for Atlanta, Ga.; Baltimore, Md.; Boston, Mass.;
Chicago, 111.; Cleveland, Ohio; Dallas, Tex.; Detroit, Mich.; Houston, Tex.; Kansas City,
Mo.-Kans.; Los Angeles-Long Beach and Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove, Calif.;
Louisville, Ky.-Ind.; Newark and Jersey City, N.J.; New York, N.Y.; Paterson-CliftonPassaic, N.J.; Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J.; Pittsburgh, Pa.; St. Louis, Mo.-Ill.; and San FranciscoOakland, Calif. Copies of these releases are available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D. C. 20212, or any of its regional offices.
This study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of Wages and Industrial Relations.
The analysis was prepared by Homer W. Jack in the Division of Occupational Wage
Structures. Field work for the survey was directed by the Assistant Regional Directors for
Operations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program of industry wage studies, as well as
the addresses of the Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end of this bulletin.




iii




Contents
Page
1
1
1
1
2
tO tO tO

Summary ........................................................................................................................................................
Industry characteristics .................................................................................................................................
Products and processes ..................................................................................................................
Employment trends ........................................................................................................................
Location ............... ! .........................................................................................................................
Establishment size
Union contract coverage
Method of wage payment
Average hourly e a rn in g s.................................................................................................................................
Occupational earnings ....................................................................................................................................
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions ...................................................................
Scheduled weekly hours and shiftpractices ................................................................................
Paid h o lid a y s ........................................................................................................................... *. . .
Paid vacations .................................................................................................................................
Health, insurance, and retirement p l a n s ........................................................................................
Other selected benefits ..................................................................................................................

2
3
3
4
4
4
4
4

Tables:
Average hourly earnings:
1. By selected characteristics

.....................................................................................

5

...................................................................................................

6

Occupational averages:
3. All establishments ...................................................................................................
4. By size of establishment ........................................................................................
5. By labor-management contract coverage and size of establishm ent....................

7
9
10

Earnings distribution:
2. All establishments

Occupational earnings:
6. Atlanta, Ga.................................................................................................................. 11
7. Baltimore, Md.............................................................................................................. 12
8. Boston, Mass................................................................................................................ 13
9. Chicago, 111................................................................................................................... 14
10. Cleveland, Ohio ...................................................................................................... 15
11. Dallas, Tex................................................................................................................... 16
12. Detroit, Mich............................................................................................................... 17
13. Houston, Tex............................................................................................................... 18
14. Kansas City, Mo.-Kans................................................................................................ 19
15. Los Angeles-Long Beach and Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove, Calif....................20
16. Louisville, Ky.-Ind...................................................................................................... 21
17. New York, N .Y ......................................................................................................... 22
18. Newark and Jersey City, N J ........................................................................
23
19. Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, N.J...................................................................................... 24




v

C o n ten ts----- C o n tin u ed
Page

Tables— Continued
Occupational earnings— Continued
20. Philadelphia, Pa.-NJ...................................................................................................
21. Pittsburgh, Pa...............................................................................................................
22. St. Louis, Mo.-Ill..........................................................................................................
23. San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.....................................................................................

24
25
26
27

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
24. Method of wage p a y m en t........................................................................................
25. Scheduled weekly hours ........................................................................................
26. Shift differential provisions.....................................................................................
27. Shift differential practices .....................................................................................
28. Paid holidays ............................................................................................................
29. Paid vacations .........................................................................................................
30. Health, insurance, and retirement p la n s ................................................................
31. Other selected benefits ...........................................................................................

28
29
31
33
35
37
45
49

Appendixes:
A. Scope and method of survey ................................................................................................
B. Occupational descriptions......................................................................................................

50
54




P a in ts and V a rn is h e s , N o v e m b e r 1 9 7 0

dental death and dismemberment insurance, major
medical insurance, and retirement pension plans were
also widespread in the industry.

Sum m ary

Straight-time hourly earnings of production and re­
lated workers in establishments manufacturing paints
and varnishes averaged $3.31 in November 1970.1 Earn­
ings of over 90 percent of the 30,863 production
workers covered by the survey were within a range of $2
to $4.50 an hour, with workers in the middle half of the
array earning between $2.85 and $3.77. Men accounted
for 95 percent of the plant work force and averaged
$3.35 an hour; women, commonly employed as labelers
and packers, averaged $2.64.
Among the eight regions for which separate data are
presented, average hourly earnings were lowest in the
Southeast ($2.60) and highest in the Pacific region
($3.82). Employees in the Great Lakes and Middle
Atlantic regions, who together represented three-fifths
of the industry’s work force, averaged $3.47 and $3.33
an hour, respectively. The lowest average earnings in the
18 metropolitan areas studied separately were recorded
in Baltimore ($2.76) and the highest in San FranciscoOakland ($4.16).2
Of the occupations selected for separate study,
average hourly earnings ranged from $2.86 for labelers
and packers to $3.86 for general utility maintenance
men. Hand or machine fillers, numerically the most
important job studied, averaged $3.18.
Paid holidays and paid vacations were provided by
establishments employing all nonsupervisory plant and
officeworkers. At least part of the cost of life, hospitali­
zation, surgical, and medical insurance was provided by
establishments employing nine-tenths or more of the
employees in both groups. Other benefits such as acci-

Industry characteristics

Products and processes . Ninety-six percent of the 30,863

production workers covered by the survey were in
establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing
paints and other surface coatings such as varnish,
lacquer, and enamel. Four percent were in establish­
ments manufacturing such allied products as putties and
calking compounds, wood fillers and sealers, and paint
and varnish removers.
Paint is a mixture of pigments suspended in a liquid.
The liquid, either oil or water, is called a vehicle and
binds jtogether the pigment particles which give the paint
its color. Varnish, which contains no pigment, is used in
making paints and finishes. Enamels are paints with
varnish or synthetic resin vehicles that dry with hard
glossy surfaces. Lacquers are finishes which are charac­
terized by their quick drying speed and are used mainly
for mass-produced items rather than for buildings.
Paint manufacturing is a batch process as opposed to
a continuous production process (used in many other
chemicals industries). Mixing, usually the first step,
blends the pigments with part of the vehicle to form a
paste. This mixed paste is ground to break down the
agglomerates of pigment that remain after mixing. The
product of the grinding operation is too thick for use
and must be mixed with additional liquids as specified
by formula. After this mixture is prepared and approved
by the laboratory, it is ready for packaging.

1See appendix A for scope and method o f survey. Wage data
contained in this bulletin exclude premium pay for overtime and
for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 For definitions o f regions, see appendix A, table A -l, foot­
note 1; for definitions of areas, see footnote 1, tables 6 through 23.
3See Employment and Earnings Statistics for the United
States, 1909-1970 (BLS Bulletin 1312-7, 1970) and Employ­
ment and Earnings, Vol. 16, Nos. 11 and 12 and Vol. 17, Nos. 1
through 9.




E m ploym en t trends . The number of production workers

in the paint and varnish industry tends to be highest in
the summer and lowest in the winter. From 1960
through 1970, the maximum monthly variation in any
year ranged from 2,500 to 4,000 workers. Average
annual employment in 1970 was 8 percent higher than
in I960.3
1

L ocation. About one-third of the production workers in

Average hourly earnings

November 1970 were employed in the Great Lakes
region, one-fourth in the Middle Atlantic, one-eighth in
the Pacific, and less than one-tenth in each of the other
five regions studied separately.
More than nine-tenths of the work force were em­
ployed in metropolitan areas.4 Two-thirds of the
workers were employed in the 18 metropolitan areas
studied separately, with the largest numbers in Chicago
(3,629), Los Angeles-Long Beach and Anaheim-Santa
Ana-Garden Grove (2,053), Newark and Jersey City
(1,770), and Philadelphia (1,618).

Straight-time hourly earnings of the 30,863 produc­
tion workers covered by the study averaged $3.31 in
November 1970. (See table l.)5 This average was 29
percent higher than the $2.56 recorded in a similar study
5 years earlier.6 Regionally, corresponding increases
ranged from 24 percent in the Middle West to 34 percent
in New England.
In November 1970, earnings averaged less than $3 an
hour in the Southeast ($2.60), Border States ($2.83),
and Southwest ($2.90). In the other five regions studied
separately, wage levels ranged from $3.12 an hour in
New England to $3.82 in the Pacific. Workers in the
Great Lakes and Middle Atlantic States, the two major
regions for the industry, averaged $3.47 and $3.33,
respectively.
Nationally, and in the seven regions where com­
parisons were possible, employees in plants employing at
least 100 workers averaged more than those in smaller
plants. Wage advantages in the larger establishments
ranged from about 6 percent in the Border States, the
Southeast, and the Pacific to 20 percent in the Middle
Atlantic region.
In establishments where labor-management contracts
covered a majority of the production workers, earnings
averaged $3.47 an hour; in establishments without such

E stablishm ent size . Production workers covered by the

survey were about evenly divided between establish­
ments employing 100 workers or more (15,933) and
those employing from 8 to 99 workers (14,930). The
proportions of workers employed in establishments with
8 to 99 workers ranged from three-fourths in New
England to one-third in the Great Lakes.
Union contract coverage. About two-thirds of the work
force were employed in establishments having collective
bargaining agreements covering a majority of their
production workers. Such establishments employed
four-fifths of the workers in the Middle Atlantic and
Pacific regions, two-thirds in the Middle West and Great
Lakes, two-fifths in New England, one-third in the
Southwest, and slightly over one-fourth each in the
Border States and Southeast. The International Brother­
hood of Painters and Allied Trades and the Oil, Chemical
and Atomic Workers International Union (both AFLCIO) were important unions in the industry; however, a
substantial number of workers were employed in estab­
lishments having contracts with other unions, including
the International Union of District 50 Allied and Tech­
nical Workers of the United States and Canada (Ind.).

4
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the
U.S. Office o f Management and Budget (formerly U.S. Bureau of
the Budget) through January 1968.
5The straight-time average hourly earnings in this bulletin
differ in concept from the gross average hourly earnings pub­
lished in the Bureau’s monthly hours and earnings series ($3.52
in November 1970). Unlike the latter, the estimates presented
here exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on week­
ends, holidays, and late shifts. Average earnings were calculated
by summing individual hourly earnings and dividing by the num­
ber o f individuals; in the monthly series, the sum of the man­
hour totals reported by establishments in the industry was
divided into the reported payi oil totals.
The estimate of the number o f production workers within
the scope o f the study is intended only as a general guide to the
size and composition o f the labor force included in the survey. It
differs from the number published in the monthly series (38,600
in November 1970) by the exclusion o f establishments employ­
ing fewer than 8 workers, and by the fact that the advance
planning necessary to make the survey required the use o f lists of
establishments assembled considerably in advance o f data collec­
tion. Thus, establishments new to the industry are omitted, as
are establishments originally classified in the paints and varnishes
industry but found to be in other industries at the time o f the
survey. Also omitted are establishments manufacturing paints,
varnishes, and allied products but classified incorrectly in other
industries at the time the lists were compiled.
6For an account of the earlier survey, see Industry Wage
Survey: Paints and Vamishesy November 1965 (BLS Bulletin
1524,1966).

M eth od o f wage paym ent. Practically all of the produc­

tion workers were time-rated. (See table 24.) Formal rate
structure plans providing single rates for specific job
categories covered slightly more than two-fifths of the
workers in the study, while formal ranges of rates
applied to about one-third. Informal plans with wages
primarily determined by the qualifications of the indi­
vidual worker applied to one-fourth of the work force.
Regionally, the most common pay systems were formal
single rate plans in the New England, Middle Atlantic,
and Great Lakes regions; individually determined rates in
the Border States, Southeast, and Southwest; and single
rates and ranges of rates, applying to nearly equal pro­
portions of workers, in the Middle West and Pacific
regions.




2

coverage, the average was $3.03. This general relation­
ship was found in all regions; the differences ranged
from less than 10 percent in New England and the
Middle Atlantic and Great Lakes States to 20 percent in
the Border States.
The exact influence on wages of any one factor such
as size of establishment or extent of unionization was
not isolated in this survey. Thus, the wage differences
noted in the preceding paragraphs and in the following
discussion of occupational earnings may reflect the inter­
relationship of a number of factors. For example, the
proportion of workers in union plants was higher in
establishments with 100 workers or more (three-fourths)
than in smaller establishments (slightly more than
one-half).
Men averaged $3.35 an hour in November 1970
compared with $2.64 for women. This relationship held
in each of the selected regions and areas where compari­
sons were possible. Differences in average pay levels for
men and women may be the result of several factors,
including differences in the distribution of the sexes
among establishments and among jobs having disparate
pay levels. For example, 36 percent of the women,
compared with 5 percent of the men, were employed as
labelers and packers—
one of the lowest paying jobs in
the industry. Differences noted in averages for men and
women in the same job and geographic location, how­
ever, may reflect minor differences in duties. Job
descriptions used in classifying workers in wage surveys
are usually more generalized than those used in indi­
vidual establishments because allowance must be made
for minor differences among establishments in specific
duties performed.
Slightly over nine-tenths of the production workers
earned between $2 and $4.50 per hour. (See table 2.)
Earnings of workers in the middle half of the array fell
between $2.85 and $3.77. The following tabulation indi­
cates the spread in earnings for the middle half of the
workers in each region:
New England .
Middle Atlantic
Border States .
Southeast . . .
Southwest . . .
Great Lakes . .
Middle West .
Pacific ...........

for labelers and packers to $3.86 for general utility
maintenance men. (See table 3.) Hand or machine fillers,
numerically the most important job studied, averaged
$3.18. Occupational averages were usually highest in the
Pacific and lowest in the Southeast.
Within a given region, janitors and labelers and
packers were typically the lowest paid jobs; general
utility maintenance men, varnish makers, and tinters
usually were the highest paid. In most of the regions,
average earnings for the highest paying job exceeded
those for the lowest paying job by about 40 to 45
percent.
Where comparisons were possible, occupational
averages were usually found to be higher in establish­
ments employing 100 workers or more than in smaller
establishments and higher in union establishments than
in nonunion establishments. (See tables 4 and 5.) This
relationship between union and nonunion plants gen­
erally held, even when comparisons were limited to estab­
lishments in the same size category.
Earnings of individual workers varied widely within
the same job and area in many instances. (See tables
6-23.) In a number of jobs, hourly earnings of the
highest paid workers exceeded that of the lowest paid by
$1 or more. Thus, a number of workers in comparatively
low-paid jobs (as measured by the average for all
workers) earned more than some workers in jobs for
which significantly higher averages were recorded. The
following tabulation illustrates the overlap in earnings
which occurred between male labelers and packers and
male tinters in the Chicago area, despite an 88-cent dif­
ference in the hourly averages for the two jobs:
Number o f workers

Hourly earnings
Under $3.00 ........................
$3.00 and under $3.20 . . . .
$3.20 and under $3.40 . . . .
$3.40 and under $3.60 . . . .
$3.60 and under $3.80 . . . .
$3.80 and under $4.00 . . . .
$4.00 and under $4.20 . . . .
$4.20 and o v e r ..................... .

$2.84-$3.40
2.90- 3.73
2.45- 3.25
2.08- 3.07
2.44- 3.39
3.06- 3.88
2.95- 3.59
3.62- 4.14

Total

Labelers
and packers
62
10
28
26
3
-

10

.....................

139

Average hourly earnings . . .

$3.14

Tinters
_
4
4
4
13
56
45
37
163
$4.02

Occupational earnings
Establishment practices and supplementary

Occupations selected to represent various pay levels
in the industry covered almost two-thirds of the plantworkers included in the study. Among these occupa­
tions, average (mean) hourly earnings ranged from $2.86




wage provisions

Data were also obtained on selected establishment
practices and supplementary benefits for production and

3

liberal in the Middle Atlantic, Pacific, and Great Lakes,
than in the other five regions.

offlceworkers, such as work schedules, paid holidays,
paid vacations, and health, insurance, and retirement
plans.

H ealth , insurance , and retirem ent plans. Life, hospitali­

Scheduled w eekly hours and shift practices . Weekly

zation, surgical, and medical insurance, financed at least
partly by the employer, were provided by establishments
employing nine-tenths or more of the plant and officeworkers. (See table 30.) Formal sick leave plans were
provided by establishments employing slightly more
than three-fifths of the plantworkers and nearly seventenths of the offlceworkers. Almost three-fifths of both
groups were covered by sickness and accident insurance.
Accidental death and dismemberment and major medical
insurance plans also applied to a majority of the
workers. The incidence of some of these plans varied
widely among the regions. For example, major medical
insurance applied to about one-fourth of the plantworkers in the Middle Atlantic region, compared with
over nine-tenths in the Pacific States; for offlceworkers
the proportions ranged from slightly under one-half in
the Mi d d l e A t l a n t i c to over nine-tenths in the
Southwest.
Retirement pension plans, in addition to Federal
social security, covered four-fifths of the plantworkers,
and three-fourths of the offlceworkers. For plantworkers, the proportions ranged from slightly over twofifths in the Southeast to nine-tenths in the Border
States. For offlceworkers, the range was two-fifths in
New England to nine-tenths in the Border States. Em­
ployers usually paid the total cost of retirement pension
plans in most regions.

work schedules of 40 hours applied to over nine-tenths
of the production workers and four-fifths of the officeworkers. However, there were significant differences
among regions in hours worked. For example, about
one-sixth of the plantworkers in the Border States
worked 44 hours a week and slightly over two-fifths of
the offlceworkers in the Middle Atlantic region were
scheduled to work fewer than 40 hours.
At the time of the survey, about 10 percent of the
workers were employed on second shifts and less than 3
percent on third or other late shifts. (See table 27.)
Nearly all of these workers received premium pay above
day-shift rates—
most commonly 10 cents an hour for
second shifts and 15 cents for the third shift.
Paid holidays. All production and offlceworkers were in

establishments providing paid holidays, usually 8 to 10
annually. (See table 28.) Regionally, holiday provisions
varied widely. For example, 56 percent of the pro­
duction workers in the Border States and 71 percent in
the Southeast received less than 8 days, whereas in New
England and the Middle Atlantic regions, the majority of
the production workers were provided 10 holidays or
more annually.
Paid vacations. All establishments provided paid vaca­

tions to both plant and offlceworkers after qualifying
periods of service. (See table 29.) Typically, plantworkers received 1 week of vacation pay after 1 year of
service, 2 weeks after 2 years, 3 weeks after 10 years,
and at least 4 weeks after 20 years. Approximately onethird of the workers were in establishments providing at
least 5 weeks after 25 years of service. Vacation plans
for offlceworkers were similar to those for plantworkers,
except that 2 weeks’ pay was usually provided after 1
year of service. Vacation policies were generally more




O ther selected benefits. Approximately four-fifths of the

plant and offlceworkers were in establishments providing
pay for jury duty leave and funeral leave. (See table 31.)
Plants providing supplemental unemployment benefits
employed less than one-tenth of the employees in both
groups. Almost four-fifths of the plantworkers were in
establishments providing protective garments (other than
boots, glasses, hats, and gloves) or monetary allowances
for such articles, or a combination of these.

4

T a b le 1. A v e ra g e h ourly earnings: B y selected ch arac teris tic s
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly ea r n in g s 1 o f p ro d u ctio n w o r k e r s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n ts
by s e le c t e d c h a r a c t e r is t ic s , U n ite d S ta te s and s e le c te d r e g io n s , N o v em b er 1970)
U n ited S ta te s 2

N ew E n gland

M id dle A tla n tic

B o e d e r S ta te s

Num ­
ber
of
w ork­
ers

A ver­
age
h o u rly
earn-

N um ­
ber
of
w ork­
ers

A ver­
ag e
h o u r ly
earn­
in g s

Num ­
ber
of
w ork­
ers

A ver­
age
h o u r ly
earn­
in g s

Num ­
ber
of
w ork­
ers

A ver­
age
h o u r ly
earn­
in g s

Num ­
b er
of
w ork­
ers

A ver­
age
h o u r ly
earn­
in g s

N xxmber
of
w ork­
ers

A ver­
age
h o u r ly
earn­
in g s

A ll p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r
_ _
M e n -----------------------------------------------------------------W om en
.
,
.

3 0 ,8 6 3
2 9 ,2 5 7
1 ,6 0 6

$ 3 .3 1
3.35
2 .6 4

766
766
-

$ 3 .1 2
3 .1 2
~

7 ,9 7 7
7, 764
213

$ 3 .3 3
3 .3 5
2 .7 3

1 ,7 5 1
1 ,5 9 3
158

$ 2 .8 3
2 .8 8
2 .3 2

2 ,5 2 5
2 ,4 8 2
43

$ 2 .6 0
2.6 1
2 .3 6

1 ,8 6 9
1 ,8 2 3
46

$ 2 .9 0
2 .9 2
2 .2 4

S iz e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t :
8— w o r k e r s _______________
99
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e .

1 4 ,9 3 0
1 5 ,9 3 3

3 .0 8
3.53

-

-

4 ,0 8 2
3 ,8 9 5

3 .0 3
3 .6 5

937
814

2 .7 5
2 .9 2

1 ,3 1 9
1 ,2 0 6

2.5 3
2 .6 8

1 ,2 2 6
643

1 9 ,9 2 1
1 0 ,9 4 2

3.4 7
3.0 3

325
441

3 .1 7
3 .0 8

6 ,4 6 4
1 ,5 1 3

3 .3 8
3 .1 4

483
1 ,2 6 8

3.2 1
2 .6 8

704
1 ,8 2 1

2 .8 4
2.5 1

620
1 ,2 4 9

I te m .

________________

L a b o r -m a n a g e m e n t c o n tr a c ts :
E s t a b lis h m e n ts w ith —
M a jo r ity o f w o r k e r s c o v e r e d _____________
N on e o r m in o r ity o f w o r k e r s c o v e r e d ____

_

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n c lu d e s d ata fo r th e M ountain re g io n in addition to th o s e show n s e p a r a te ly .
N O TE :

D a s h e s in d ic a te n o d ata r e p o r te d o r data that do not m e e t p u b lica tio n c r it e r ia .




S o u th e a st

S o u th w est

G rea t L a k es
Num ­
ber
of
w ork­
ers

M id dle W est

P a c ific

A ver­
a ge
h o u r ly
earn­
in g s

Num ­
ber
of
w ork­
ers

A ver­
age
h o u r ly
earn­
in g s

N um ­
ber
of
w ork­
ers

A ver­
age
hou rly
earn­
in g s

1 0 ,4 3 1
9 ,5 4 3
888

$ 3 .4 7
3 .5 5
2.61

1 ,8 1 0
1 ,7 0 6
104

$ 3 .2 5
3.26
2.99

3 ,5 8 6
3 ,4 3 3
153

$ 3 .8 2
3.86
2.94

2.73
3 .2 4

3 ,5 6 7
6 ,8 6 4

3 .16
3 .6 3

925
885

3.06
3.45

2 ,1 3 0
1 ,4 5 6

3.73
3.95

3 .1 8
2 .7 7

7, 184
3 ,2 4 7

3 .5 0
3 .4 2

1, 182
628

3.42
2.93

2, 944
642

3.93
3.32

T a b le 2 . E arn in g s d istribu tion : A ll es tab lis h m en ts
( P e r c e n t d is tr ib u tio n o f p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s in p a in ts and v a r n ish e s m anufacturing e s ta b lis h m e n ts by a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -t im e h ourly e a r n in g s, 1
U n ited S ta te s and s e le c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
U nited S ta tes 2
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1
T otal

Men

W om en

N ew
England

M iddle
A tla n tic

B order
S ta te s

S o u th ea st

S outhw est

G reat
L ak es

M iddle
W est

P a c ific

$ 1 .6 0
$ 1.70
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .9 0

and
and
and
and

und er
u nd er
un d er
un d er

$ 1 .7 0 ................... ............. .....................
$ 1 .8 0 ..................... .............................. —
$ 1 .9 0 ........-_____ __________ ____ $ 2 .0 0 ...................................... ..............

0.6
.5
1.1
1.1

0.5
.4
.9
1.0

1.9
2 .4
3.5
3.5

0 .8
1.6
.8
-

( 3)
0.1
.3
.4

1.9
.8
.5
1.5

4 .2
2.2
7.3
6 .5

0.7
1.2
3.3
2.9

0.1
.5
.4
.2

0.6
.3
.2
.7

0.2
.2
.9

$ 2 .0 0
$ 2 .1 0
$ 2 .2 0
$ 2 .3 0
$ 2 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
un d er
un d er
u n d er
un d er

$ 2 .1 0 _ ......... ------- ------------------------$ 2 .2 0 .......................................................
$ 2 .3 0 ..................... .................................
$ 2 .4 0 --------- ----------------- ------- -----$ 2 .5 0 ------------------------- ------- -------

2.4
1.6
1.6
1.8
2 .4

2.2
1.4
1.4
1.4
2.2

7.2
6 .8
4 .7
8.0
6 .7

2.3
2.7
1.0
.1

1.3
1.0
1.2
1.1
2.0

6 .3
3.4
2 .3
4 .5
7.1

6.0
5.7
2 .9
6.1
6 .0

5.9
3.7
3.9
1.8
3.8

1.6
1.2
1.1
1.3
1.6

3.1
.9
3.7
2.0
3.0

.7
.1
.4
.3

$ 2 .5 0
$ 2 .6 0
$ 2 .7 0
$ 2 .8 0
$ 2 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

un d er
und er
u n d er
un d er
u n d er

$ 2 .6 0 ----------------------- ----------------$ 2 .7 0 ----------------------------------------$ 2 .8 0 ----------------------------------------$ 2 .9 0 ----------------------------------------$ 3 .0 0 ------------ -------- — ......................

3.6
2.9
3.6
3.3
3.8

3.4
2.7
3.7
3.3
3.8

8.0
7.1
2.6
3.4
3.9

3.1
2.0
5.6
11.9
6 .0

5.7
3.7
5.0
3.1
3.3

6.1
4 .0
2 .8
5.5
8.7

6 .4
4.5
4 .2
4 .8
3.7

4 .9
2 .8
5.7
3.9
6.0

1.8
2 .8
3.3
3.0
4 .0

2.0
1.7
3.1
2.2
3.3

1.2
1.1
.4
1.0
.3

$ 3 .0 0
$ 3 .1 0
$ 3 .2 0
$ 3 .3 0
$ 3 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
un d er
un d er
u nd er
un d er

$ 3 .1 0 ----------------------------------------$ 3 .2 0 -------------------------------- ------ —
$ 3 .3 0 — .............. ................ ................ $ 3 .4 0 ---------------------- ----------- -........
$ 3 .5 0 ------------------ ------- --------------

4 .7
4 .8
5.4
6.7
7.0

4 .7
4 .7
5.5
6 .8
7.2

4 .2
5.5
4 .9
5.2
3.5

11.4
9 .4
11.4
5.1
4 .2

5.3
4 .6
7.2
7.1
9.1

6.1
8.8
10.1
8.7
2.7

6 .3
3.4
3 .8
4 .5
3 .8

7.7
4 .9
4.7
8.0
9.0

3.8
4 .5
4 .8
7.6
7.0

4 .5
9.3
5.7
7.6
11.5

1.1
1.8
1.2
2.9
4.5

$ 3 .5 0
$ 3 .6 0
$ 3 .7 0
$ 3 .8 0
$ 3 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

und er
u nd er
und er
u nd er
und er

$ 3 .6 0 ............................... -......................
$ 3 .7 0 ................... ........... .......................
$ 3 .8 0 ---- -------- ------------ ------ - ..........
$ 3 .9 0 ------------- ----------------- ---------$ 4 .0 0 ------------------------------------- —

6.5
6.0
5.0
4 .9
3.3

6.7
6.2
5.2
5.1
3.5

2.6
1.3
1.3
.7
.6

3.8
5.7
1.2
1.3
1.7

6.7
5.0
6 .3
3.6
3.0

3.6
1.1
1.6
.2
1.0

1.5
1.5
.7
1.3
.2

2.2
3.5
3.2
2.3
1.0

9.1
7.3
4.1
4 .9
4 .7

11.2
5.3
3.9
3.5
1.8

4.2
11.4
11.8
15.6
5.6

$ 4 .0 0
$ 4 .1 0
$ 4 .2 0
$ 4 .3 0
$ 4 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

u nd er
un d er
u n d er
u n d er
un d er

$ 4 .1 0 ---------------------- -------- ---------$ 4 .2 0 — ............................. ........ -..........
$ 4 .3 0 .............—------ ---------------------$ 4 .4 0 ----------------------------------------$ 4 .5 0 .............. —---------------------------

3.0
2.6
1.8
1.4
1.2

3.2
2.7
1.9
1.5
1.2

.2
.2

.9
.9
.4
1.3
1.0

3.5
2.1
1.4
.9
1.1

.8
“

.8
.6
.3
.1
.2

1.3
.8
.1
.2

3.4
2.0
1.8
1.8
1.7

2 .4
3.3
.4
.2
.3

4 .7
8.5
6.4
4.1
2.0

$ 4 .5 0
$ 4 .6 0
$ 4 .7 0
$ 4 .8 0
$ 4 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u nd er
u n d er
u nd er
u n d er

$ 4 .6 0 ...........- ....................... ..................
$ 4 .7 0 .............. ........................................
$ 4 .8 0 ----------------------- ------------ ----$ 4 .9 0 ........................... — ......................
$ 5 .0 0 -----------------------------------------

1.5
.9
.8
.4
.5

1.6
.9
.9
.5
.5

-

.7
.9
.8

2.3
1.2
.2
.8
~

"

.1
.1
■

.1
.3
2
.1

2.0
1.4
1.6
.4
.9

.2
.4
.2
.1

2.1
.4
1.4
.8
1.2

$ 5 .0 0 and o v e r _________________ -___ - ____________ -

1.1

1.2

.1

_

.3

_

.4

100.0

100.0

-

"
-

_

_
.

2.2

1.2

1.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

T o ta l........................................................................... —

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

N u m b er of w o r k e r s -------- ------ -------------------------------

3 0 ,8 6 3

2 9 ,2 5 7

1 ,6 0 6

766

7 ,9 7 7

1 ,7 5 1

2 .5 2 5

1 ,8 6 9

1 0 ,4 3 1

1 ,8 1 0

3 .5 8 6

$ 2 .6 4

$ 3 .1 2

$ 3 .3 3

$ 2 .8 3

$ 2 .6 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .4 7

$ 3 .2 5

$ 3 .8 2

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1-----------------------------------

$ 3 .3 1

$ 3 .3 5

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts .
2 In c lu d e s data fo r th e M ountain r e g io n in addition to th o s e show n s e p a r a te ly .
3 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t.
NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not equal 100.




T a b le 3 . O c c u p a tio n a l averag es: A ll establishm ents
(N um ber and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s ,
U n ited S ta te s and s e le c t e d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
U n ited S ta te s 2
O ccu p a tio n and s e x

N ew E n gland

M id d le A tla n tic

N u m ber
of
w orkers

M ean 3

F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e _______________________
M e n ___________________________________________
W o m e n ________________________________________
J a n ito r s (680 m e n , 37 w o m e n ) _________________
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s -----------------------------------------M e n ___________________________________________
W o m en ------------------------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g
( 1 ,3 9 9 m e n , 18 w o m e n ) _______________________
M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l u t ility (a ll m e n ) ___
M ix e r - g r in d e r s :
M ix e r s (a ll m e n ) _____________________________
G r in d e r s (a ll m e n )___________________________
• C om b in ation m ix e r - g r i n d e r s (a ll m e n ) _____
Ship p in g and r e c e iv in g c le r k s :
S hipping c le r k s (288 m e n , 5 w o m e n )________
R e c e iv in g c le r k s (a ll m e n ) ______ ____________
Ship p in g and r e c e iv in g c le r k s (a ll m e n ) ____
Tank c le a n e r s ( a ll m e n )_________________________
T e c h n ic ia n s ( 1 ,0 5 8 m e n , 59 w o m e n ) ___________
T e s t e r s , p r o d u c t (686 m e n , 93 w o m e n )________
T in t e r s (a ll m en )_________________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s (a ll m e n ) _________________________
V a r n is h m a k e r s ( a ll m e n ) _____________________ __

3 ,4 2 9
3 ,2 8 6
143
717
2 , 172
1 ,6 0 1
571

$ 3 .1 8
3.2 0
2.85
3 .0 0
2.86
2.9 4
2.62

$ 3 .3 0
3.31
3 .0 4
3. ,13
2.86
2.9 3
2.5 5

$ 2 .8 5 — 3 .5 7
$
2 .8 6 - 3 .5 7
2 .2 8 - 3.3 3
2 .6 1 - 3 .3 7
2 .3 9 - 3 .3 5
2 .5 0 - 3 .4 3
2 .1 5 - 3 .1 1

80
80
_
_
48
48
~

1 ,4 1 7
1 ,0 3 8

3 .0 7
3.86

3 .1 8
3 .8 7

2 .6 0 - 3 .4 4
3 .5 0 - 4 .1 7

1 ,7 2 0
809
2 ,0 5 9

3.36
3.46
3.2 4

3 .4 7
3 .5 4
3.3 1

3 .0 2 - 3.7 3
3 .1 9 - 3 .7 8
2 .8 2 - 3 .6 7

293
218
356
423
1, 117
779
1 ,5 0 2
911
689

3.4 9
3 .2 7
3 .3 4
3.1 2
3.6 2
3.4 2
3 .7 7
3.3 9
3 .6 9

3 .5 0
3 .2 4
3 .3 2
3 .2 4
3 .5 9
3 .4 7
3 .8 4
3 .3 9
3 .7 4

3 .0 5 - 3.8 9
2 .7 4 - 3 .7 0
3 .0 1 - 3 .8 0
2 .7 5 - 3 .4 8
3 .1 4 — 4 .0 5
2 .8 8 - 3 .9 2
3 .4 3 - 4 .1 3
2 .8 7 - 4 .0 6
3 .4 1 - 4 .0 5

30
8
54
28
10

3 .4 7
3 .5 4
3 .5 7
3 .5 5
3 .0 5

F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e ____ ___________________
M e n __________________________ _________________
W o m e n _____________________ _______ ___________
J a n ito r s ___________________________________________
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s __________________________
M e n ___________________________________________
W o m en ________________________________________
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g ___________________
M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l u t il it y ______________
M ix e r - g r in d e r s :
M ix e r s ________________________________________
G r in d e r s ----------------------------------------------------------C om b in ation m ix e r - g r i n d e r s ________________
Shipping and r e c e iv in g c le r k s :
Shipping c l e r k s _______________________________
R e c e iv in g c l e r k s --------------------------------------------Shipping and r e c e iv in g c l e r k s ----------------------T ank c le a n e r s ____________________________________
T e c h n ic ia n s
V.........
T e s t e r s , p rod u ct________t-----------------------------------T in t e r s . --------------------------------------------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s _____________________________________
V a r n is h m a k e r s ---------------------- ----------------------------

147
136
11
41
211
132
79
62
73

$ 2 .9 1
2.96
2.31
2.3 5
2 .5 2
2 .7 2
2 .2 0
2.91
3.1 5

$ 3 .0 0
3 .0 2

$ 2 .8 0 -$ 3 .2 7
2 .8 4 - 3 .2 7

326
326

$ 2 .5 1
2.5 1

$ 2 .5 0
2 .5 0

-

-

2 .2 0
2 .5 0
2.7 5
2.25
3 .1 0
3 .2 5

1 .9 5 2 .2 8 2 .3 5 1 .6 0 2 .7 6 3 .1 0 -

2.8 6
2 .9 0
3.0 3
2 .5 5
3 .2 0
3 .4 5

30
233
203
30
186
79

2 .3 0
2 .2 8
2 .3 0
2 .1 0
2 .4 1
3 .2 8

2.3 5
2 .2 0
2 .3 0
2 .1 0
2 .3 9
3 .3 3

2 .1 9 1 .8 5 1 .9 0 1 .8 5 1 .8 6 2 .8 9 -

146
41
110

3.11
3.1 5
2.83

3.1 5
3 .2 7
2.9 6

2 .8 0 - 3 .3 4
2 .8 5 - 3 .3 9
2 .4 1 - 3 .3 0

109
68
214

2 .5 8
2 .7 3
2.6 3

13
23
21
23
72
41
95
93
21

3.02
2 .8 7
3 .0 6
2.81
3.13
2.6 3
,3 .2 6
2 .7 7
3 .3 5

2.7 5
3.2 5
2 .9 7
3.2 5
2.6 3
3 .3 0
2.6 5
3 .3 5

2 .6 0 3 .0 1 2 .4 5 2 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .9 7 2 .4 0 3 .2 5 -

22
20
51
50
95
52
85
101
32

3 .0 4
2.6 1
2 .7 2
2 .5 3
3 .1 9
3 .2 3
3 .1 2
2 .5 6
2 .6 2

H o u rly e a r n in g s 1
M edian 3

M id dle ra n g e 3

N u m b er
of
w orkers

H o u rly e a r n in g s 1

S e e f o o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




H ou rly e a r n in g s 1

M ean 3

M edian 3

$ 3 .1 9
3 .1 9
_
_
2 .8 2
2 .8 2
_

$ 3 .0 1
3.01
.
_
3 .0 3
3.0 3
_

$ 2 .9 5 -$ 3 .2 9
2 .9 5 - 3.29
_
_
2 .6 4 - 3 .1 4
2 .6 4 - 3 .1 4
_

851
816
35
163
593
535
58

$ 3 .1 7
3 .1 9
2.86
3 .09
2.91
2 .91
2 .85

$ 3 .2 8
3.29
3.11
3.19
2 .83
2.83
2 .75

$ 2 .8 1 —
$3.4 9
2 .8 5 - 3.49
2 .2 0 - 3.29
2 .9 4 - 3.39
2 .5 0 - 3.39
2 .5 4 - 3.39
2 .5 0 - 3.23

39
25

2 .8 0
3 .4 8

3 .0 2
3 .4 4

2 .2 5 - 3 .1 7
3 .3 2 - 3 .6 0

332
220

3 .0 9
3 .7 5

3 .2 4
3.76

2 .6 7 - 3 42
3 .4 8 - 4 .05

47
24
39

3 .4 2
3 .2 2
3 .2 9

3 .4 9
3 .0 7
3 .3 0

3 .2 2 - 3 .6 0
3 .0 5 - 3 .4 0
3 .1 0 - 3 .4 5

545
169
503

3 .4 2
3 .51
3 .1 8

3 .4 7
3 .5 0
3 .2 9

3 .1 1 - 3.76
3 .2 0 - 3 .78
2 .7 6 - 3.47

74
52
89
77
278
200
317
181
215

3.31
3 .2 4
3 .2 8
3 .3 0
3.51
3 .2 9
3 .6 9
3 .7 0
3 .5 4

3.42
3.21
3.23
3.35
3.63
3.31
3 .7 2
3.66
3.63

3 .2 1 - 3 .7 7
2 .7 4 - 3 .59
2 .9 5 - 3.72
3 .1 9 - 3.46
3 .1 9 - 3.86
2 .7 5 - 3.75
3 .45— 3.95
3 .2 5 - 3.85
3 .3 8 - 3.76

2.51
2 .5 0
2 .5 0
2 .3 7
2.9 9
3.8 1

266
245
21
41
152
143
9
85
69

$ 2 .7 1
2 .7 7
2 .11
2 .4 8
2 .7 7
2.81
2 .15
2 .7 4
3 .5 2

$ 2 .7 9
2.85
1.95
2.40
2.83
2 .9 0
_
2 .8 8
3 .62

$ 2 .1 5 —
$3.1 6
2 .2 5 - 3.16
1 .9 5 - 2.15
2 .1 0 - 2 .90
2 .4 6 - 3 .04
2 .5 2 - 3 .24
_
2 .1 0 - 3.23
3 .2 9 - 3 .8 8

2 .6 5
2 .7 4
2 .5 0

2 .1 9 - 2 .9 0
2 .2 5 - 3 .2 3
2 .0 0 - 3 .0 7

82
39
162

3 .0 8
2 .76
2 .86

3 .2 0
2.83
3 .0 0

2 .8 6 - 3.45
2 .3 4 - 3 .1 8
2 .3 5 - 3.30

3 .0 0
2 .3 5
2 .9 0
2 .4 8
3 .0 2
3 .1 7
3 .1 6
2 .5 0
2 .7 5

2 .9 5 2 .2 0 2 .2 0 2 .0 0 2 .7 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 7 2 .4 0 1 .9 0 -

22
18
16
24
78
56

3 .2 0
2 .95
3 .2 0
2 .6 9
3 .2 4
3 .1 7
3 .23
2 .4 6
3 .4 7

3.31
2.79
2.89
2 .8 8
3 .3 0
3 .0 4
3 .3 0
2.23
3 .5 7

2 .7 9 2 .5 2 2 .8 8 2 .5 0 2 .8 8 2.74r2 .7 9 2 .0 0 3 .4 7 -

-

10
-

i

-

3 .1 4
-

B o r d e r S ta te s

-

N u m b er
of
w orkers

M id d le r a n g e 3

-

-

_
.

_
_

-

3 .5 0
3 .4 5
3 .5 0
"

-

3 .1 3 - 3.8 6
_
3 .1 6 - 3 .9 0
3 .3 0 - 3 .5 6
-

M ean 3

S o u th e a st

-

-

-

3 .1 5
3 .2 5
3 .2 0
3 .4 3
3.2 5
3 .5 8
3 .1 5
3 .5 0

M edian 3

M id dle r a n g e 3

S ou th w est
$ 2 .0 0 -$ 2 .9 2
2 .0 0 - 2 .9 2
-

3 .2 8
3 .0 2
3 .3 5
3 .1 9
3 .5 8
3 .6 9
3 .3 5
2.8 5
3 .0 4

88
61
33

3.71
3 .42
3.46
2 .9 8
3 .70
3 .72
3 .6 0
2 .95
3 77

T a b le 3 . O c c u p a tio n a l av erag es : A ll estab lish m en ts— Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings 1 of workers in selected occupations in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments
United States and selected regions, November 1970)
'
G reat L a k es
O ccu p atio n and s e x

F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e ________
M e n ..........................................................
W o m en __________ _____ _________
J a n ito r s —_____ _______________ _____
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s _____________
M e n _____________________________
W o m e n _________________________
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g _____
M a in ten a n ce m e n , g e n e r a l u tility
M ix e r - g r in d e r s :
M ix e r s --------------------------------------G r in d e r s _____________ _________
C om b in ation m ix e r - g r in d e r s
Shipping and r e c e iv in g c le r k s :
Shipping c l e r k s ________________
R e c e iv in g c l e r k s _______________
Shipping and r e c e iv in g c le r k s
Tank c le a n e r s _____________________
T e c h n ic ia n s ________________________
T e s t e r s , p rod u ct__________________
T in t e r s _____________________________
T ruckd r iv e r s ______________________
V a r n ish m a k e r s __________ ______ ...

N u m b er
of
w orkers

M id dle W est

H ourly ea.rnings 1

N u m b er
of
w orkers

M ean 3

M edian 3

1 ,0 1 7
968
49
337
605
324
281
545
378

$ 3 .3 7
3.38
3.0 7
3.15
2.93
3.21
2.6 0
3.3 2
4 .1 2

$ 3 .4 1
3.4 2
3.33
3.31
2.94
3.22
2.4 0
3.3 0
4 .0 2

$ 3 .1 0 -$ 3 .5 7
3 .1 0 - 3 .5 7
2 .6 5 - 3 .3 8
2 .8 8 - 3.3 6
2 .4 1 - 3 .3 8
2.86— 3.4 6
2 .1 5 - 3.1 5
2 .8 8 - 3 .7 0
3 .7 8 - 4 .4 0

203
190

451
340
630

3.41
3.6 8
3.35

3.52
3.63
3.3 8

3 .0 5 - 3.61
3 .5 4 - 3.85
3 .0 0 - 3 .6 7

86
62
104
162
443
282
557
232
259

3.73
3.46
3.4 4
3.30
3.90
3.65
3.93
3.56
3 .8 8

3.6 2
3.3 9
3.3 2
3.4 0
3.89
3 .6 7
3.9 0
3.39
3.96

3 .3 8 2 .9 4 3 .2 4 2 .9 3 3 .3 5 3 .1 8 3 .5 7 3 .0 5 3.46—

M id dle ra n g e 3

4 .2 3
3 .9 0
3 .5 5
3.53
4 .4 6
4 .1 2
4 .1 5
4 .1 9
4 .0 6

P a c ific

H o u rly e a r n in g s 1
M ean 3

M edian 3

M iddle ra n ge 3

$ 3 .0 7
3 .0 7

$ 3 .1 9
3.23

_

_

53
133
68
65
124
72

2 .9 8
3 .0 4
3.0 8
3 .0 0
3.11
3.6 5

3 .0 8
3.1 9
3 .4 2
3 .0 4
3.21
3 .8 2

2 .9 1 2 .9 6 2 .4 0 2 .9 6 2 .8 9 3 .4 1 -

145
61
97

3.3 2
3.1 8
3.2 9

3.5 3
3.35
3.19

20
10
18
25
42
52
60
48
39

3 .0 4
3 .3 8
3.2 3
2.9 4
3.41
3 .3 9
3.6 9
3 .1 4
3.73

3 .3 0
3.0 5
3.2 5
3.5 3
3 .8 0
3 .1 0
3.69

-

3 .1 0
-

$ 2 .6 8 — 3 .4 3
$
2 .6 0 - 3.43

N u m ber
of
w orkers

H ourly e a r n in g s 1
M ean 3

M edian 3

$ 3 .6 1
3 .62
3.44
3.05
3 .4 8
3.65
2 .99
3.45
4 .4 9

$ 3 .6 5
3.65

3.31
3.43
3 .4 8
3 .1 9
3 .38
4 .1 7

524
511
13
43
188
139
49
44
114

3.52
3.64
3 .67
3.11
3.69
4 .4 0

1 .9 2 3 .2 9 3 .5 4 2 .6 9 3 .0 4 4 .1 3 -

. - 3 .58
2 .8 3 - 3 .60
3 .1 9 - 3.41

189
61
292

3 .85
3 .85
3.91

3 .84
3 .74
3.86

3 .7 5 - 3 .88
3 .6 2 - 3.88
3 .7 3 - 4.16

2 .6 3 - 3 .4 7

51
22
52
60
73
87
236
162
77

4 .01
4 .0 7
4 .0 4
3 .2 9
3.95
3.63
4 .2 1
4 .1 0
4 .1 9

4 .0 4
4 .1 0
4 .1 4
3.49
3.81
3.76
4 .1 3
4.13
4 .13

3 .7 4 3 .9 9 3 .8 9 2 .8 8 3 .4 6 3 .3 2 4 .1 3 4 .0 6 3 .9 9 -

_

31
9
_

3 .3 0 2 .7 4 3 .0 0 2 .8 5 3 .3 9 2 .5 1 3 .6 9 -

3 .4 8
3.19
3.89
3 .88
4 .0 6
3 .54
3.85

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ifts .
I n c lu d e s data fo r th e M ountain r e g io n in a d d itio n to th o s e shown s e p a r a te ly .
S e e ap p en d ix A fo r m eth o d u s e d in co m p u tin g m e a n s, m e d ia n s , and m id d le - r a n g e s . M ed ia n s and m id d le - r a n g e s a r e not p r o v id e d fo r jo b s w ith l e s s than 15 w o r k e r s .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a te no data r e p o r te d o r data that do not m e e t pu b lication c r it e r ia .




M id dle range 3

$ 3 .5 6 — 3 ,7 4
$
3 .5 7 - 3.74
3.63
3.74
3.82
3.43
3.76
4 .93

4 .25

4.14
4 .2 7
3.64
4 .7 4
4 .1 0
4.31
4.21
4.25

Table 4. O ccupational averages: By size of establishment
(N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts a n d v a r n i s h e s m a n u f a c tu r in g e s ta b l is h m e n t s b y s iz e o f e s ta b l is h m e n t ,
U n ite d S t a te s a n d s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
B o r d e r S ta te s

M id d le A tla n tic

U n ited S ta tes

S ou th east

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith—
S e x and o c c u p a tio n
N u m ber
of
w orkers

A verage
ho u rly
ea r n in g s

100 w o r k e r s
or m ore
N u m b er A v e r a g e
h o u rly
of
e a r n in g s
w orkers

N u m b er
of
w orkers

A verage
h o u rly
ea r n in g s

100 w o r k e r s
8— w o r k e r s
99
or m o re
N u m b er A v e r a g e N u m b er A v e r a g e
of
h o u r ly
h o u r ly
of
e a r n in g s
w o r k e r s e a r n in g s w o r k e r s

100 w o r k e r s
o r nrlo re
N u m b er A v e r a g e
of
h ou rly
w o r k e r s ea r n in g s

8— w o r k e r s
99
N u m b er
of
w orkers

A verage
hou rly
e a rn in g s

100 w o r k e r s
or nlo r e
N u m ber A v e r a g e
h ou rly
of
w o r k e r s ea r n in g s

M en

M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l u t il it y ---------------------G r in d e r s ---------------------------------------------------------------M ix e r . g r in d e r s ________ _
____ ___
Shipping r l e r k s ______
_ . ___ ,,■■
■■
R e c e iv in g c l e r k s __ _____________ ___ ________________
Shipping and r e c e iv in g c l e r k s ---------------------------Tank; f l ^ ^ n e r s____ri______________________ _________
T e c h n ic ia n s ______ ___ ___ ____________ _
T e s t e r s , product
___ __ _ _
______ -___
T r u c lc d r iv e r s ____
V a r n is h m a k e r*

_ ______ -___ . . . . . . . r
. __
_

r
m

1 ,5 6 3
204
1 ,0 4 6
485
368
833
360
1 ,2 7 0
165
123
314
164
480
236
830
662
209

$ 2 .9 6
2. 54
2. 75
2. 68
3. 67
3. 18
3. 25
3. 13
3. 35
3. 12
3. 28
2 .8 0
3 .4 6
3. 20
3. 68
3. 32
3. 38

1 ,7 2 3
476
555
914
668
887
449
789
123
94
41
259
578
450
672
249
480

$ 3 .4 2
3. 22
3. 31
3. 28
3 .9 7
3. 53
3. 63
3 .4 3
3. 71
3 .4 6
3. 83
3. 33
3 .7 9
3. 70
3 .8 9
3. 59
3. 82

440
50
367
135
102
257
99
343
52
37
78
21
152
94
194
117
99

318

2 .4 5

253

2. 83

-

$2. 89
2. 80
2. 64
2. 76
3. 65
3. 15
3. 34
3. 04
3. 22
3. 15
3. 18
3. 09
3. 38
3. 06
3. 60
3 .4 2
3. 17

376
106
168
197
118
288
70
160
22
15
11
56
117
86
123
64
116

$ 3. 53
3. 28
3. 50
3. 32
3. 83
3 .6 6
3. 74
3 .4 7
3. 53
3 .4 8
3 .9 7
3. 37
3. 72
3 .6 8
3. 84
4. 21
3. 85

58
21
116
25
32
101
22
57
9
21
8
30
16
59
49

$2. 70
2 .2 1
2. 67
2. 68
3. 03
3. 12
3. 16
2. 74
2. 94
3. 06
2 .4 7
3. 30
3. 05
3. 26
2 .7 9

78
11
16
37
41
45
53
15
34
8
36
44
_

$3. 16
2 .4 3
3. 08
3. 06
3. 24
3. 10
2 .9 2
2 .9 9
3. 09
2. 87
3. 26
2. 76
_

171
11
149
83
31
58
29
110
15
11
49
21
55
21
47
77
_

$2. 36
2. 29
2. 20
2. 19
3 .6 1
2. 74
2 .4 4
2 .6 1
2 .9 5
2 .4 9
2. 68
2. 17
3. 14
3 .4 4
3. 02
2 .4 0
_

155
19
54
103
48
51
39
104
7
9
29
37
29
38
24
24

29

3. 20

52

1 .9 3

27

2. 71

21

2. 23

-

$2. 68
2. 30
2. 59
2 .5 9
3. 07
2 .4 1
2. 94
2. 65
3. 24
2. 76
2 .7 9
3. 16
3. 17
3. 23
3. 06
2. 51

W om en
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s - ----------------------------------------

-

Southw est
8— w o r k e r s
99

8— w o r k e r s
99

P a c ific

M id d le W est

G re a t L a k es
100 w o r k e r s
or m ore

100 w o r k e r s
or m ore

8— w o r k e r s
99

"

100 w o r k e r s
or m o r e

8— w o r k e r s
99

100 w o r k e r s
or m o r e

M en

_

F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e -----------------------------------Tanit^ r °
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s -----------------------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a te r ia l h a n d lin g -----------------------------M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l u t il it y ____________ __
G r in d e r 8________
Shipping c l e r k s _

__ ___ ___ ___________ ___ _

Shipping and r e c e iv in g c l e r k s -------------------------- T an k c le a n e r s ,
........ „ LM
L_
T e c h n ic ia n s-^ - -r- .
__
T e s t e r s , p r o d u c t_________________________________

$2. 66
2. 29
2. 67
2 .4 6
3 .4 6
2. 98
2. 59
2. 74
2. 99
2. 68
3. 19
2. 66
3. 13
2. 84
3. 13
2. 35
_

-

-

165
22
94
52
35
60
27
123
13
12
15
21
49
23
59
52

80
17
49
32
34
12
39
9
6
_
29
29
29
9
24

$3.
2.
3.
3.
3.

00
78
09
19
58

3. 15 •
3. 23
3. 50
3 .4 9
-

3 .4 2
3 .4 9
3 .4 6
3. 07
3 .4 9

289
21
104

6
11
24
33
20
12
39

$3. 36
3. 20
3. 38
3. 21
_
3. 38
3 .0 2
3 .4 5
_
3 .6 1
2 .8 2
3. 37
3. 56
3 .8 5
3 .6 5
3. 73

34
97
32
197
38
13
46
38
32
21
165
116
37

$3. 58
2 .4 5
3 .6 1
4 . 32
3. 84
3 .6 8
3 .9 0
3 .9 3
4 . 13
4 . 02
3 .0 8
3 .4 6
3 .8 7
4 . 21
4 .0 9
4 . 11

17

2 .7 8

2!

2 .9 8

88
32
38
72
_
80
19
29

16
14
15
17
40
36
_

$2. 82
2. 65
2 .7 2
2 .9 6
3. 31
3. 25
3. 25
3. 22
2. 77
_
3. 22
3. 03
3. 51
3. 11
3. 60
2 .9 7
_

48

3. 07

274
51
142
108
83
168
88
326
25
29
84
40
116
41
214
188
39

$ 3 .0 1
2 .4 4
3. 03
2 .9 1
3. 89
3. 03
3 .4 6
3. 10
3. 59
3 .1 5
3i 37
2. 75
3 .8 9
3. 32
3. 77
3 .6 1
3 .4 5

694
268
182
42 0
295
283
252
304
60
32
19
122
299
209
343
44
220

$3. 53
3. 29
3. 35
3 .4 6
4 . 19
3 .6 3
3. 76
3 .6 3
3 .8 1
3 .7 4
3. 75
3 .4 7
3 .9 7
3 .8 3
4 . 03
3. 35
3 .9 6

102
20
30
52
29
65
42
68
14

140

2. 39

141

2 .8 1

_

-

W om en
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s ------------------------------------------

-

-

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and la te sh ifts,
In c lu d e s d ata fo r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e show n se p a r a te ly .




222
22
35
39
80
92
29
95
13
9
22
33
50
71
46
40

$3. 67
3. 62
3. 74
3 .4 0
4 . 56
3 .8 6
4. 04
3 .9 4
4. 23
3 .9 9
3. 66
4 .4 8
3. 82
4. 22
4 . 13
4. 26

T able 5. Occupational averages: By labor-m anagement contract coverage and size of establishment.
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c te d o ccu p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s by la b o r -m a n a g e m e n t
c o n tr a c t c o v e r a g e and s iz e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t , U n ited S ta te s and s e le c te d r e g io n s , N o v em b er 1970)
U n ited S ta te s 2

M id dle A tla n tic

S o u th ea st

G reat L ak es

P a c ific

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith—
S e x , o c c u p a tio n , and s iz e
o f e s ta b lis h m e n t

M a jo r ity
covered
A ver­
Num ­
b er
age
h o u r ly
of
earn­
w ork­
in g s
ers

None o r m in o r ­
ity c o v e r e d
Num ­
A ver­
ber
ag e
of
h o u rly
w o rk ­
earn­
ers
in g s

M a jo rity
covered
Num ­
A ver­
ber
a ge
h o u r ly
of
w o rk ­
earn­
ers
in g 8

None o r m in o r ­
ity c o v e r e d
Num ­
A ver­
b er
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork­
earn­
ers
in g s

M a jo rity
covered
Num ­
A ver­
ber
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork­
earn­
ers
in g s

None o r m in o r ­
ity c o v e r e d
Num ­
A ver­
b er
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork­
earn­
ers
in g s

M a jo r ity
N one or m in o r ­
M a jo rity
N one o r m in o r ­
ity c o v e r e d
covered
covered
ity c o v e r e d
N u m ­ 'A v e r ­ N u m ­
A v e r ­ N um ­
A v er­ Num ­ A ver­
b er
b er
ber
b er
a ge
age
age
a ge
of
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
of
h ou rly
w ork­
ea rn ­ w ork­
e a r n ­ w ork­
ea rn ­ w ork­ ea rn ­
ers
ers
in g s
in g s
ers
ers
in g s
in g s

M en
F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e .
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s ___________________________
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e _____________ ____
J a n ito r s .................................. ............................ ..........
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s ___________________________
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e _____ ____ _______
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s _____________________
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s ...___________ _____________
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e __________________
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g _____________
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s ----------------------------------------100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e - _____ ___________
M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l u t il it y ________
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s .................................. ...................
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e __________________
M ix e r s ................... ............................ ................. ........
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s .......................... ............................
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e ------------------- ------G r in d e r s _______ ______________ ________ ____
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s .......................................................
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e --------------------------M ix e r - g r in d e r s ..................... ...................................
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s .......................................................
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e --------------------------Shipping c l e r k s ......... .............- ...............................
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s .......................................................
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e --------------------------R e c e iv in g c l e r k s __________________________
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s ___________________________
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e --------------------------Shipping and r e c e iv in g c l e r k s ------------------8 -9 9 w o r k e r s ___________________________
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e --------------------------Tank c le a n e r s _____________________________
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s ------------------ ---------------------100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e --------------------------T e c h n ic ia n s ________________________________
8— w o r k e r s ___________________________
99
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e --------------------------T e s t e r s , p r o d u c t---------------------------------------8 -9 9 w o r k e r s ___________________________
100 w o r k e r s or m o r e —..................... ...........
T in t e r s ...........................................................................
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s —............................-......................
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e __________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s —------------------ --------------------1—
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s .......................................................
100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e __________________
V ar n ish m a k e r s ___________________________
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s ----------------------------------------100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e __________________




2 ,2 2 7
906
1, 321
502
111
391
1 ,0 7 7
632
445
906
2 79
627
671
217
454
1, 149
49 3
656
552
224
328
1 ,3 1 8
716
602
190
115
75
143
80
63
153
125
28
300
98
202
621
244
377
46 3
103
360
962
478
48 4
481
310
171
507
134
373

$ 3 .3 3
3 .1 4
3.4 6
3.15
2.7 7
3.2 6
3 .0 7
2 .8 8
3.3 5
3.1 7
2 .8 9 .
3.3 0
3.91
3 .6 9
4.0 1
3.4 5
3 .2 8
3 .5 9
3.5 2
3.3 5
3 .6 4
3.4 3
3 .2 9
3.6 0
3 .5 3
3.4 5
3 .6 6
3.37
3.25
3.5 3
3 .5 6
3.5 2
3.7 6
3 .2 9
3.0 2
3.42
3 .6 3
3.41
3.77
3.6 2
3 .2 4
3.72
3 .8 4
3 .7 8
3.91
3 .8 6
3.81
3 .9 3
3 .8 3
3 .5 8
3.92

1 ,0 5 9
657
402
178
93
85
524
414
110
493
206
287
365
151
214
571
340
231
257
136
121
741
554
187
98
50
48
74
43
31
202
189
13
123
66
57
437
236
201
223
133
90
540
352
188
430
352
78
182
75
107

$2.93
2.71
3.30
2.63
2.26
3.0 4
2 .6 8
2 .5 4
3 .1 8
2 .8 9
2 .4 0
3.2 4
3.7 8
3.63
3.8 9
3 .1 8
3.0 4
3.37
3.32
3.07
3.60
2.9 0
2.91
2 .8 8
3.45
3.12
3.80
3.06
2.87
3.31
3 .1 8
3.12
3.9 9
2.71
2.46
3.0 0
3.66
3.52
3.82
3.3 4
3.16
3.60
3.65
3.5 4
3.86
2 .8 8
2 .8 8
2.85
3.31
3.0 4
3.50

704
344
360
134
40
94
449
303
146
283
91
192
175
89
86
464
213
251
129
86
43
413
253
160
68
48
20
47
33
14
50
45
-

71
18
53
199
109
90
128
42
86
264
160
104
128
68
60
156
55
101

$3.22
2.91
3.51
3.17
2 .8 4
3.31
2 .9 3
2 .6 9
3 .4 4
3.16
2.8 0
3.3 4
3 .6 9
3 .5 8
3 .8 0
3.41
3.16
3.63
3.41
3.30
3.62
3.2 6
3 .1 3
3.4 7
3.27
3.17
3.51
3 .2 0
3 .0 8
3.47
3 .3 9
3.3 7

112
96
_

22
10
12
86
64
-

49
44
_

45
13
32
81
44
37
40
-

90
90
-

39
33

$ 2 .99
2 .8 3
_

2 .8 8
2.6 5
3 .0 8
2.81
2 .4 4
-

2 .7 0
2 .6 9
_

3 .9 8
4 .1 6
3.91
3.45
3 .0 8
3 .8 8
3.8 2
-

2 .7 8
2 .7 8
_
-

3.1 3
2.91

-

-

-

3 .2 9
3.06
3.3 7
3.52
3.37
3 .6 9
3 .4 9
3 .0 9
3 .6 8
3 .6 8
3 .5 9
3.8 2
3.86
3.52
4 .2 4
3 .6 9
3.46
3.81

6

3.32

-

-

70
43
-

52
52
-

3.5 4
3 .3 9
-

3 .0 4
3 .0 4
-

53
34

3.7 6
3 .6 3

-

-

53
49
-

59
44

3.31
3 .2 8

105
30
75
13
_

11
78
_

27
77
_

23
_

20
22
-

12
39
-

30
38

$2.75
2 .2 9
2 .9 4
2 .3 5
_

2 .3 4
2.4 6
_

2 .6 3
2 .8 3
_
_

3 .5 8
_

3.63
2 .5 8
_

2.71
2 .7 9
-

2.9 2
3.26

-

-

221
141
80
17
9
8
125
98
27
109
56

$ 2 .39
2 .3 7
2 .4 3
2.2 6
2.27
2 .2 6
2 .2 0
2.11
2.5 5
2 .1 2
2 .1 0

56
28
28
87
48
39
29
20

3.16
3.65
2 .6 7
2 .5 8
2.8 0
2.31
2.6 5
2.5 0

_

-

176
100
_

8

2.81

-

_

14
10

-

_

_

6

2.4 7

_

_
_

_

_

21
-

17
18
-

13
16
-

14
20

3.01
-

3 .1 9
3.12
_

3 .2 0
3.23
_

3.33
3.3 0

-

-

19

3.31

_
-

_

-

-

-

3.12
2 .8 0

9

2.8 6

-

_

14
8
6
47
46
_

29
17
12
74
50
24
34
19
15
65
46
19
88
72
16
23
_

_

_

2 .4 9
2.61
_

3.17
3 .1 0
_

2.6 7
2 .6 0
2.7 7
2.6 5
2 .6 4
_

2 .1 9
2.1 6
2.22
3.1 6
3.16
3.15
3.31
3.5 3
3.02
3.06
3.02
3.1 5
2 .4 8
2 .3 8
2.9 2
2.5 2
_

661
179
482
261
38
223
277
128
149
340
84
256
249
50
199
300
95
205
245
54
191
492
225
267
48
13
35
43
17
26
56
41
15
130
30
100
265
60
205
191
22
169
360
113
247
142
106
36
214
26
188

$3.3 8
3.11
3 .4 8
3.17
2.53
3 .2 8
3.20
3.01
3.36
3.24
3.00
3.32
3.96
3.70
4 .0 2
3 .4 4
3 .24
3.54
3.71
3 .59
3 .74
3.41
3.15
3 .64
3 .6 8
3.85
3 .62
3.43
3.23
3.56
3 .4 8
3 .4 0
3 .70
3.32
2.80
3.47
3 .73
3.61
3.77
3.67
3.07
3.75
3.89
3.71
3 .9 8
3.76
3.86
3.45
3 .8 9
3.26
3.97

307
95
212
58

$3.39
2.81
3.65
3 .10

45
47
14
33
188
24
164
129
33
96
151
73
78
95
34
61
138
101
37
37

3.36
3.26
3.23
3 .2 8
3 .54
2 .5 9
3 .6 8
4 .4 4
4 .1 8
4 .5 3
3 .33
2.77
3.86
3.61
3 .2 4
3.82
3.15
2 .9 9
3.59
3.83

_

_

_

_

25
18

4 .0 8
3.53

47
43

3.39
3 .3 4

_
_

_
32
_

_
_

_
3.21
_

22
150
56

3 .50
4 .3 3
4 .2 0

59
19
40
197
101
96
90
82
8
45
13
32

4 .0 0
3.62
4 .1 9
4 .0 0
3 .8 4
4 .1 7
3.25
3 .2 8
2.87
3.85
3 .84
3.85

_

_

429
227
202
31
9
22
112
79
33
36

$3.67
3.65
3 .6 9
3 .4 8
3.15
3.62
3 .6 8
3.65
3.75
3 .3 8

31
108
34
74
177
85
92
61
32
29
238
155
83
49
38
11
20
13
7
35
29

3.31
4 .5 2
4 .3 2
4 .61
3 .8 4
3.83
3.86
3.85
3 .6 8
4 .0 4
3 .8 8
3 .8 4
3.95
4 .01
3 .9 3
4 .2 7
4 .0 8
4 .1 3
3 .9 8
4 .0 4
4.01

40
22
18
61
28
33
67
21
46
199
140
59
139
95
44
77
37
40

3.57
3 .4 8
3 .6 8
3.97
3.36
4 .4 8
3.84
3.87
3.82
4 .2 3
4 .2 3
4 .2 3
4 .1 7
4 .1 8
4 .1 4
4 .1 9
4.11
4 .2 6

_

_

_

82
62

$3.35
3.30

27
25

3.50
3.49

54
42

4 .0 4
4 .1 0

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

17
17

_
20
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
37
25
_

23
21
_
_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

4.05
4 .05
2 .73

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

4 .1 0
4 .06

_

3.73
3.70

_
_
_

T ab le 5. Occupational averages: By labor-m anagem ent contract coverage and size of establishm ent— Continued
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n ish e s 'm a n u fa c tu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s by la b o r -m a n a g e m e n t
c o n tr a c t c o v e r a g e and s iz e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t , United S ta te s and s e le c te d r e g io n s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
U nited S ta te s 2

M id dle A tla n tic

S o u th e a st

G reat L a k es

P a c ific

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith—
S e x , o c c u p a tio n , and s iz e
o f e s ta b lis h m e n t

Maj o r ity
None oi : m in o r cov ered
ity cc>vered
N um ­
A ver­
Num ­
A ver­
ber
ag e
ber
age
of
h o u rly
of
h o u r ly
w ork­
earnw o rk ­
earn­
ers
in g s
ers
- i g g g . ..-

M a jo r ity
covered
Num ­
A ver­
ber
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork­
earn­
ers
in g s

None o r m in o r ­
ity c o v e r e d
Num ­
A ver­
ber
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork­
earn­
ers
in g s

M a jo r ity
covered
Num ­
A ver­
ber
age
of
h o u r ly
earn­
w ork­
ers
in g s

None o r m in o r ­
ity c o v e r e d
Num ­
A ver­
b er
age
of
h o u r ly
w ork­
earn­
ers
in g s

M a jo r ity
N one o r m in o r ­
covered
ity c o v e r e d
Num ­
Num ­ A ver­
A ver­
ber
ber
age
a ge
of
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
w ork­
earn­
w ork­ earn ­
ers
ers
in g s
in g s

M ajority
None o r m in o r ­
covered
ity c o v e r e d
Num ­ A ver­
Num ­ A ver­
b er
b er
age
a ge
of
h ou rly
of
h o u r ly
w ork­ earn ­
w o rk ­ e a r n ­
ers
ers
in gs
in g s

W om en
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s _____________________
8 -9 9 w o r k e r s ----------------------------------------100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e __________________

345
201
144

$2.75
2 .5 8
2 .9 9

226
117
109

$2.41
2 .2 3
2 .6 0

36
9
27

_

$2.96
2.3 5
3.16

.

_
_

„
_

_

189

$2.52

_

92

$2.76

67

_

2 .9 0

74

2.72

_

_

13
13

_

$3.15
3.50

_

'
1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 In c lu d e s d ata fo r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o s e show n s e p a r a te ly .
N O TE : D a s h e s in d ic a te no d a ta r e p o r te d or data that do not m e e t p u b lica tio n c r it e r i a .

T a b le 6 . O c c u p a tio n a l earnings: A tlan ta, G a .1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d p ro d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

O ccu p a tio n

A ll p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s 3---------------------------

ber
of
w o rk ers

ag e
$2 .0 0
h o u r ly
e a r n ­ Under
$ 2 .00 und er
in g s
$ 2 .1 0

629

$3.11

105
23
33
60
28
15
60
9
6
15
22
21
18
11

2 .9 8
3 .1 4
2.7 6
3.12
3.82
2 .5 7
3.4 0
2 .3 8
2.8 2
3.45
3.02
3.25
3.51
3.43

4

$ 2 .10

N u m ber o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s <
$2.20 $2.30 $ 2 .40 $ 2 3 0 $ 2.60 $ 2 .70 $ 2 .8 0 "$2^0 $ 3 .0 0 $3.10 $ 3 .20 $ 3 .30 $3.40 $3” 50 ■$3T0 $3.70 " $ 0 6 $3790 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40

$2 .2 0

and
$ 2 .30 $2.40 $2.50 $ 2 .60 $ 2 .70 $ 2 .80 $2 .9 0 $ 3 .00 $ 3 .10 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .3 0 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 o v e r

24

36

19

14

10

12

18

19

35

39

51

45

37

84

_

15
_
6
3

1
3
1

2
_
1

1
_
_

6
_
_
1
_
2

2
_
1
2
_
3

8
_
1
2
_
_

1
_
1
1
_
1
1

3
_
6
2
_
_
1

20
1
4
3
.
_
4

13
_
3
2
2
4
1

24
2
_
23
_
_

_
-

_
_
1

_

_
12
1
1
_
_
1
1

_

2
_

_

1

_

69

15

22

8

32

4

6

6

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
6

_
_
_
_

_

_

_
_

20

S e le c t e d p r o d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s 3
F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e _________________
G r in d e r s ___________________________________
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s -------------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a te r ia l h a n d lin g -------------------M a in ten a n ce m e n , g e n e r a l u t il it y -----------M ix e r s -------------- ----------------- -----------------------M ix e r - g rin d e r s -------------- -------------------------R e c e iv in g c le r k s
_ _
___
Shipping c l e r k s -----------------------------------------Shipping and r e c e iv in g c l e r k s ____________
Tank c le a n e r s _____________________________
T e c h n ic ia n s ------------------------------------------------T e s t e r s , p r o d u c t----------------------------------------

_
-

-

_

-

-

4
4
-

_
_
-

-

_
3

-

4
1
3

-

-

6
4

-

-

2
1
3
-

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

_
.

_

-

-

-

_
_

_
3
3
1

2
1

_
_

3
1

•
1 T h e A tla n ta S tandard M e tr o p o lita n S ta tis tic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f C la y to n , Cobb, D eK alb , F u lto n , and G w innett C o u n tie s.
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
3 V ir tu a lly a ll p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s w e r e m en ; data fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s w e r e lim it e d to m e n .




_
2
6
2
1
1

1
_

1
_

_
_
_
8
1
1

_
5

_

_

13
5

_
_
2

22

6

_
9

_

_

_

3

_
8

_
_

1
1

1

1
1

1
2

_

_

_

5

_
_

4

2

3

_

12

_

_
_
_
_
4

_

_

_

1

_

_

1
7

j

3
2

_

_

_

_

4

•

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

Table 7. Occupational earnings: Baltimore, Md.1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c te d pro d u ctio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

Num-

O cc u p a tio n and s e x

A ll p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s —
M e n ___________ __ ____
W o m e n __ __ ____ ___

Aver­
f—
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings o
age
of hourly Under $1.90 $1.$5 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70$3.80 $3^0 $4.00
and
work- earn- $1.90
under
ere
mgs
$1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80$3.90 $4.00 $4.20
700
592
108

$2.76
2.86
2.19

65
14
14
30
18

2.82
2.83
2.46
2.77
2.67

31
48
39
6
12
23
19
30
36
19

3.31
2.93 .
2.82
2.83
2.49
2.97
2.86
3.30
2.88
3.40

47
22
325

6
1
5

6
6

-

_
_
_
-

_

-

35
29
6

27
18
9

13
9
4

28
20
8

22
11
11

62
45
17

31
22
9

32
30
2

_
_
-

6
3
3
3

1
_
1
_
-

_
_
_
-

2
_
4
_
-

3
_
_
3
1

3
2
_
_
-

2
_
1
-

2
2
3
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

_
_
-

-

_
_
_
_

_
_

4
_
2

64
63

61
60
1

46
45
1

84
82
2

41
41
”

18
5
2
11
3

8
_
2
2
2

9
.

2
3

6

_

_

_

5
3

_
_

2

1
-

1

1

_
9
_

_
2
13

1
3
_

12
23
4

3
2
_

6
_
1

_
_
3

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

4

1

20
19
1

19
19
“

31
31
■

3

_

9
9
“

_
_

_

_
_
_

-

3
3
■

4
4
“

5
5
■

3

_
_

4
4
~

S e le c t e d p r o d u c tio n o c cu p a tio n sm en
F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e —
G rin d e r s ----------------------------J a n ito r s -.
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s —
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l han d lin g .
M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l
u tilit y —
M ix e r s — — — — .
M ix e r - g r in d e r s ------R e c e iv in g c le r k s —
Tank c le a n e r s ------T e c h n ic ia n s -------T e s t e r s , p r o d u c t—
T in te r s T r u c k d r iv e r s -----V a r n is h m a k e r s .

_
_
42

2
_
_
_

-

1

_
_
_
-

.

_

1

1

_
_

_

6

2.31
2.03
2.44

*24

3

'

'

1
2

4
1

1

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

“

1
1

1
_

_
_
_
_

1

_

2

4

4

_
_

_

_

4

“

“

“

•”

1

6
"

3

6

9

'

'

2
2
3
_

_

2
1

1

3
2
5

1

1

«

_
_

4

1

5

_

1
7
2
1

4

_

5
3
6

2
1
2

3
3
5

_

_

5
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

-

!
_
_

_

_
_
_

1
1

1

1

1

_
_
_
_
1

'

'

_

_

_
_

_

2

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

"

1
'

T h e B a lt im o r e Sta n d a rd M e tr o p o lita n S t a tis tic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f B a ltim o r e C ity; Anne A r u n d e l, B a lt im o r e , C a r r o ll, H a rfo r d , and H ow ard C o u n tie s.
E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w o rk o n -w eek en d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ifts .
W o r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u te d a s fo llo w s : 24 at $ 1.60 to $ 1.65 and 1 at $ 1.75 to $ 1 .8 0 .
W o r k e r s w e r e d is tr ib u te d a s f o llo w s : 1 at $ 1.6 0 to $ 1.65 and 1 at $ 1.75 to $ 1 .8 0 .
A ll w o r k e r s w e r e at $ 1 .6 0 to $ 1 .6 5 .




2
_
2
1

_

5
2
'

1
2
3
4
5

1
-

3

4

3
2

-

3
_
2

_
1
3
3
5

'

5

_

2
6

3

_

'

1
1
60
7

2
4

1
_
1

”

_

S e le c t e d p r o d u c tio n o ccu p a tio n sw om en
F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e —
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s —
T e s t e r s , p r o d u c t— 1
5
4
3
2

-

'

‘

'

T ab le 8. Occupational earnings: Boston, M ass.1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d p r o d u ctio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

Occupation

All production workers 3--------

Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings 2

456

$3.28

65
22
34
24

3.10
3.24
3.13
3.10

20
42
15
7
20
8
29
20

3.46
3.39
3.32
3.25
3.38
3.54
3.62
3.62

$2.60
and
under
$2.70

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40
$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80

$2.70

$2.80

$2.90

$3.00

$2.80

$2.90

$3.00

$3.10

$3.20

$3.30

$3.40

$3.50

$3.60

4

33

42

80

53

84

27

23

22

38

_

2
-

2
2
1

26

-

5
9
13
1
1

7
_
1
1
2

20
2
9
10

_
3
_
-

_
1
_
_

_
_
_

3
5

9
_
1
2
-

2
2
6
_
4
2

4
2
4
1
_
3
2

3
5
5
_
1
2
2
2

5
9

2

$3.70

" 3 " 0 $4.00
$.9"

$4.20

$4.40

$4.60

$3.90

$4.00

$4.40

$4.60

$4.80

8

6

9

8

4

12

$3.80

$4.20

1

Selected production occupations 3
Fillers, hand or machine-------Grinders____________________
Labelers and packers----------Laborers, material handling----Maintenance men, general
u ility— -------------------t
Mixers______________________
Mixer-grinders--------------Receiving clerks-------------Technicians ----------------Testers, product-------------Tinters---------------------Truckdrivers -- -----------

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

2
-

2
-

-

-

-

-

1
_
_
1
2

_

_

_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

4
1
4
_
5

1
1
1

3
3

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_
2
7

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

2
5

_
_

2

_

3

1

_
1
1

1

7

_

2

_

_
_
_
2

_
_
_

“

4

_
_

_
_
“

The Boston Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Suffolk County, 15 communities in Essex County, 30 in Middlesex County, 20 in Norfolk County, and 9 in Plymouth County.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s i t .
hfs
3 All production workers were men.




T ab le 9. O ccupational earnings: Chicago, III.1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c te d prod u ction o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lish m e n ts * N o v e m b e r 1970)

Occupation and sex

All production workers—
Men ______________

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
$3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $37 $57)0 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $5780
3.20] $3.30 $3.40 “
of
hourly Under $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2770 "$2780 $2.90 $3.00 $37To $
and
work­ earn­ $2.00 under
and
ers
ings 1
2
$2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 over

90

3,629
3 140
,
489

$3.45
3.56
2.74

36
6
30

54
18
36

46
1
1
35

41
12
29

118
43
75

61
32
29

84
61
23

95
78
17

162
145
17

105
99
6

148
139
9

201
169
32

164
131
33

345
299
46

252
236
16

394
378
16

239
234
5

109
104
5

170
163
7

168
162
6

244
238
6

92
92

U

Selected production occupationsmen
Fillers, hand or machine___
Grinders________________
Labelers and packers______
Laborers, material handling Maintenance men, general
utility
----------------Mixers----------------Mixer-grinders----------Receiving clerks---------Shipping clerks Shipping and receiving clerks___
Tank cleaners--------------TechniciansTesters, product—
Tinters-------Truckdrivers—
Varnish makers---------------

22
1
1

350
122
139
187

3.38
3.62
3.14
3.19

75
108
257
18
20
35
51
131
.58
163
33
63

3.99
3.41
3.29
3.50
3.71
3.49
3.36
3.92
3.79
4.02
4.16
3.94

18
205

3.38
2.61

-

-

-

-

-

14

3
2
20

3
24
14

6
12
6

23
22
4

4
2
2
6

17
1
7
13

-

-

-

12
-

12
-

-

6
-

5
6
1

1
36
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
21
1

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

1
4
-

3
-

7
3
6
4
5
-

-

4

-

-

-

-

*53
53
”

173
173

_
.
-

_
_
-

_

_

_

_
_

"

-

53
53

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
4

48
27
6 . 1
3
4
1
1
2

24
3
24
21

36
7
21
29

103
22
5
10

15
50
1
11

_
15
3
-

_
13
38
_
5
13
6
2

2
2
13
3
6
10
4
4
2

4
41
28
_
3
7
2
7
2

6
18
.
_
8
7
2
10

-

-

5
6
6
4

-

_

10
8
6

20
8
.
1
1

5
7
10
5

1
-

_
-

1
1
1
19
1
2
.
1
7
3
3

18
3
28
2
2
_
_
10
5
21

5
6
1
1
4

31
5
4
5

_

_
_

11
_
_
3

5
2
35

24
1
1
45

_
8
7
23

2
_
_
5
8

_

5
5

5

1
3
9
3
6
6
-

6
6
2
4

8
5

6

“

15
10

2
4

5

_

1

20

_

“

_

_
_
14
_

_
_
_
9
_
9

20

“

6

1

8

27

4

6

“

3

1

1

~

“

“

“

_

Selected production occupationswomen
Fillers, hand or machineLabelers and packers---

36

35

6

19

12

6

9

6

13

2

1

16

1 The Chicago Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Cook, OuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry, and Will Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s i t .
hfs




T ab le 10. Occupational earnings: Cleveland, O h io 1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly ea r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d p r o d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

Occupation

All production workers—
Men — ---- -- --- -—
-

Num- AverNumber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
ber
age
hourly $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80
of
work­ earn­ and
and
ings2 under $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30
ers
$2.10
$3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 over
1,323 $3.44
1,207 3.51
116 2.62

2
2
■

1
8
1
5
3

1
1
5
6

31
1
30

18
18
■

-

-

-

-

_
_
5
-

_
_
1
_
_

1
_
2

47
31
16

77
41
36

5
-

29
28
1

38
38

5

-

7

-

-

-

2
5

_
-

1
2

_
_
_
1
1
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
2
1

21
_
_
_

_
1
_
_
_
.
3

_

_

-

-

5

1
_
8
_
_
_
_
_
2
2
7

26
24
2

16
13
3

67
66

2
_
_
_
3
5
_
5
_
2

1
_
*
_
6
1
_
2
_
_

5
_
10
12

_
_

_
_

1

35
33
2

84
72
12

83
81
2

179
179
■

202
200
2

40
40

50
50

65
65

77
77

86
86

1
1
1
1

22
22

9
9

4

6
1
2
13
8

7
1
8
1
14

49
2
1
2

12
8
10
“

6

2
_
2
-

16
2
2
4
2

1
5
_
-

5
_
-

2
1
5
_
_
_
12
5

5
29
48
1
8
_
_
10
7

9
_
4
_
_
_
_
5

5
4
5

.

6
_
3
_
3
4
_
13

-

_

4

_

6
5
2
_
1
1
_
3
16
3
13

17
1
1
.
_
1
_
4
10

_

10
3
7
1
_
_
_
_
4
5
6

_
_
_
_
_
2
2
_
_
10

_
_

1
_
2
_
_
5
1
_
5

_
_
_
1
_
_
_
_
_
6
1

_

-

-

Selected production occupations 3
Fillers, hand or machine------Grinders________________ __
Labelers and packers__________
Laborers, material handling---Maintenance men, general
u ility_ — ________- — ____
t
_
__
Mixers Mixer-grinders--Receiving clerks-Shipping clerks Shipping and receiving clerks Tank cleaners_____________
Technicians-------------T ruckdrivers __________ —
Varnish makers - — _____ ___

1
2
3
4

121
36
30
48
54

3.45
3.49
3.25
3.39
3.11

64
110
89
6
15
17
21
57
71
25
37

3.87
3.24
3.56
3.69
3.86
3.35
3.44
3.86
3.80
3.27
3.99

_
2
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

5
_
-

5
_
5
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

_
_

_

_

-

The Cleveland Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, and Medina Counties.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s i t .
hfs
Data for selected occupations were limited to men.
All workers were at $5.20 to $5.40.




6
6
1
_
_
1
3
5
_

-

15
3
2
3
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

-

_
-

6

-

1
2
8
1

1
1

1

_

_
_
_
_
42
_
_
1
.
_

T a b le 11. O ccupational earnings: Dallas, T e x .1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d p r o d u ctio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

-Occupation

Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

Aver­
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
age
hourly Under $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20” $4.40
and
earn­
and
l
ander
ings 2 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20
$2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 over

All production workers 3________

868

$3.10

12

69

17

23

9

36

34

17

56

16

105
8
9
59
49

2.92
3.46
2.85
2.99
2.81

.

3

14

6

-

-

-

-

.
14

.
_
.

_
3
_

3
_
_
_
_

7
_
4
6
8

_
_
«
10
_

5
_
_
4

4
_
_
5
_

_
_
_
_

_

37
41
79
7
14
33
24
25
21
17

3.75
3.24
3.02
3.28
3.41
3.75
3.30
3.77
2.94
3.75

-

-

-

-

-

14
_
.
_
_

_
6
.
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
4
_
_

_
_
2
2
_
_
_
_
7

_
_
_
_

_
_
8
_
2
_
3
_

_
_
3
_
_
1
1
_
_

_
_
_
_
2
_
_
_
3

20

55

29

37

107

125

19

61

1
_
1

10

5

5

11

24
7

4
1

3

_
2

1
_
2

2
20
12

2
7

_
_

8

_
_
4
_
1
_
1

4
8
4
_
_
5

_
2
4

_
20
4
3

2

6

1
1
1

2

57

34

7

21

4

3

_

7

1
6
1

2

2

“

■

Selected production occupations 3
Fillers, hand or machine.-----Grinders____________________
Janitors____________________
Labelers and packers------- --Laborers, material handling____
Maintenance men, general
u
tility_____________________
Mixers--------------------Mixe r-grinders_______________
Receiving clerks------------Shipping clerks--------------Technicians-----------------Testers, product-------------Tinters_____________________
Truckd rivers---------------Varnish makers______________ _

-

-

-

.
_
• _

-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
4
_
2
19
_
_
1
_
4

2

_
_

1

1 The Dallas Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Kaufman, and Rockwall Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late sh f s
it.
3 Virtually al production workers were men; data for selected occupations were limited to men.
l




11

7
2

_
1

12

3

1

3

2

_
8
2
9

5
6
9
8

5

1
2

1

10

5

“

_
j
1

'

_

1

j

T able 12. Occupational earnings: Detroit, Mich.1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 of w o r k e r s in s e le c te d p ro d u ctio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

Occupation

N u m ­ Averber
age
o
f hourly
work­ earn­
ers ings 2

All production workers 3________ 1,457 $3.86

$2.80
Under and
$2.80 under
$2.90

$2.90

$3.00

$3.00

$3.10

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
$3.10” $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20
and
$3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $a.2 o over

14

1

7

10

8

132

61

112

136

177

100

158

64

124

99

121

55

56

16

6

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
.
2
_

12
_
13
_

14
_
2
_
17

4
19
4
2
_

20
19
3
10
4

2
7
_

_
2
_

_
7

_

-

-

_

12

_
2

_
9
-

_
_
_
_
>

16
16
11
1
16

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
-

_
_
12
_
_
2
_
6

_
5
15
_
_
12
.
4

3
_
_
_
_

2
1
_
6
1
_
1
6
6

1
_
.
1
_
.
7
30
_
9

7
_
.
_
5
1
14
9
12

5
_
_
3
_
2
_
12
16

_
_
19
_
7
2
12
_
_

16
_
_
.
_
1
6
5
_
17

_
_

1
_
-

_
18
_
10
2
2
_
3

_
_

3

_
16
_
3
6

_
_
_
„

4

_
_
_
_
_
1
2

1
2

Selected production occupations 3
Fillers, hand or machine____ ___
Grinders_______________ _____
Janitors____________________
Labelers and packers__________
Laborers, material handling-.___
Maintenance men, general
u ility_____________________
t
Mixers_____________ _______
Mixer-grinders_______________
Shipping and receiving clerks---Tank cleaners________________
Technicians__________________
Testers, product_____________
T inters_____________________
Truckdrivers---------------Varnish makers--------------

68
70
35
22
51

3.74
3.87
3.74
3.83
3.92

_
.
_
-

.
_
_
-

_
.
_
-

-

-

-

34
40

4.39
3.53
3.91
4.02
3.87
3.68
3.91
4.14
3.91
4.26

-

.
-

_
_
1
-

.
_
-

-

-

-

46

10
21
27
53
74
62
52

-

-

3
-

_

-

6

4

_
-

1 The Detroit Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s i t .
hfs
3 Virtually all production workers were men; data for selected occupations were limited to men.




3

10
8

3

3

_

_

_

_

_
_
3
_

_
_

Table 13. Occupational earnings: Houston, Tex.1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c te d pro d u ctio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f—

A ll p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s —*-------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------

Der
of
vork-

age
hourly
earn­

ers

O ccu p atio n

ings 2

504
478
26

$3.03
3.08
2.14

1
_
1

5
5
"

7
5
2

6
4
2

12
_
12

6
4
2

9
8
1

-

78
17
37
22

2.97
2.70
2.88
2.92

_
_

1
_
_

2
_
_

.
_

_
_

.
-

2
3
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

22
19
43
6
6
20
14
25
9
15

3.46
3.32
3.03
2.97
3.46
3.24
3.36
3.29
2.80
3.21

_
_
_
_ ,
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
1
_
_
_

.
_
2
_
_

_
_
1
-

_
_
_
_

_
1
-

_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
-

_
_
1

_
_

$1.75

$1.80 $1.85

$1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 f L 6 0 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00.

under

$1.85 $ 1 . 9 0

"
"
"
$1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00

$1.80

20
18
2

28
28
■

15
15
"

40
38
2

1
_
6
2

4
_
6

4
_
2

3
2
_
5

4
_

-

11
2
3
2

_
_
1
1
_

_
_
3
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
1
2
-

_
_

_
_

1
_
_

_
_

_
2
_
2

_
_
3

2
3
1
2
4
3
3

_
_
2
_
2
1
1
2

17
17

"

7
7
~

_
_

2
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

■

25
25
“

73
71
2

51
51

45
45

33
33

22
2
16
5

16

7

2

_

_

"

5
6

-

1
4
4
_
1
-

_
_
8
_
4
2
8
-

3
_
2
_
_
1
1
1

_

41
41

20
20

5
5

3
3

5
5

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

-

8
.
14
2
•2
-

4
.
-

1

12
12

and
over

18
18

S e le c t e d p ro d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s
F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e -------------L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s ------- -— ------L a b o r e r s , m a te r ia l h and ling ------M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l
u til ity -------------------------- -------- --------M i x e r - g r i n d e r s -----------------------------R e c e iv in g c le r k s --------- -----------------Shipping and r e c e iv in g c l e r k s -----T e c h n ic ia n s ------------------------------------T e s t e r s , p r o d u c t---------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s —------------------------------V a r n is h m a k e r s — ----------------- -------

1

“

T h e H ou ston Sta n d a rd M e tr o p o lita n S t a tis tic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f B r a z o r ia , F o r t B en d , H a r r is , L ib e r ty , and M o n tg o m e r y C o u n tie s.
E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
D ata fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s w e r e l im it e d to r.^ n .
A ll w o r k e r s w e r e a t $4 to $ 4 .2 0 .
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $4 to $4.20; 1 at $ 4 .2 0 to $4 .4 0 ; and 1 at $ 4 .6 0 to $ 4 .8 0 .




-

5
1

1
2
3
4
5

9
3
2
1
3
3
_

5

-

9
4

1
_
1
2
-

1

_
_

_
_
_
2
-

-

-

-

1
_
_
2

_
_
_
_

2
43
1
53
1
-

-

-

-

-

Table 14. Occupational earnings: Kansas City, Mo.—Kans.1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 of w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d p ro d u ctio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

O ccu p a tio n and s e x

A ll p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s _____________
M e n ______________________________
W om en _________________________

Num ­
b er
of
w ork­
ers

A verage
h o u r ly
earn­
in g s 2

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s of—
U nder
$ 2 .6 0

549
531
18

$ 3 .6 1
3.61
3 .4 3

2
2
-

50
26
37
44

3.45
3.6 8
3.46
3.42

-

12
27
6
10
10
15
9
24

3.7 3
3.5 2
3.31
3.8 8
3.7 3
3.77
4 .1 4
3.71

7

3.43

$2.60
and
under
$ 2 .7 0
3
3
-

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .8 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .0 0

$ 3 .1 0

$ 3 .2 0

$ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .6 0

$ 3 .7 0

$ 3 .8 0

$ 3 .9 0

$ 4 .0 0

$ 4 .2 0

$ 2 .8 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .0 0

$ 3 .1 0

$ 3 .2 0

$ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .6 0

$ 3 .7 0

$ 3 .8 0

$ 3 .9 0

$4.00

$ 4 .2 0

over

9
9
-

67
66
1

116
101
15

129
129

82
82
-

16
16
-

16
16

22
22

22
22

_

14

11
10
14
10

1

2

4

1
14

23
1
19
13

2
8

2
2

_

_

_

_

and

2
2
-

-

5
4
1

8
8
-

_

12
12
-

_

38
37
1

S e le c t e d p r o d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s —
m en
F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e __________
G r in d e r s _____ -______________________
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s _________
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h and ling ____
M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l
u t ilit y _____________________________
M ix e r s ---------------------- -----------------Tank c le a n e r s _______________________
T e c h n ic ia n s _________________________
T e s t e r s , p r o d u c t-.__________________
T in t e r s ---------------------------------------------T ru ck d r i v e r s ________________________
V a r n is h m a k e r s —___________________

_
_

.

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_
-

_

_

_
_

1

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

-

_

2

_
_

_

_
_
_

.
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

1
1

1
3

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

_
_
_
_

_

_

_

_

-

2
-

-

_
_

_
_

2

2
15

4
4

2

_

1
4
2

_

_

2

5
4
7

2
3

18

4

2

-

-

-

-

-

4
4
4
3

-

S e le c t e d p r o d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s—
w om en
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s __________ -___

* The Kansas City Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Cass, Clay, Jackson, and Platte Counties, Mo.; and Johnson and Wyandotte Counties, Kans.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late sh f s
it.




-

-

Table 15. Occupational earnings: Los Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim—Santa Ana—Garden Grove, Calif.1
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings 2 of workers in selected production occupations in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments, November 1970)

O ccu p ation and s e x

A ll p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s _____________
M e n ---------------------------------------------W o m en -----------------------------------------

Num ­
ber
of
w ork­
ers

A verage
h o u r ly
earn­
in g s 2

2, 053
1 ,9 7 3
80

$ 3 .7 3
3 .7 7
2 .8 2

75
48
3 27

21
20
1

11
9
2

290
46
13
82
36

3 .5 0
3 .6 9
3 .3 9
3.61
3 .3 8

12
-

5
3

_

-

52
154
122
17
34
38
36
43
43
140
132
32

4 .1 6
3 .8 0
3 .8 0
4 .1 0
4 .0 0
4 .0 9
3 .4 3
3 .5 7
3 .6 8
.4.19
4 .0 3
4 .0 7

-

-

12
38

3 .4 0
2 .7 8

N u m b er of w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s of—
Under
$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .50
and
und er
$ 2 .6 0

$ 2 .6 0

$ 2 .70

$ 2 .8 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .0 0

$ 3 .1 0

$ 3 .2 0

$ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 .5 0

$3.60

$ 3 .7 0

$ 3 .8 0

$ 3 .9 0

$ 4 .0 0

$ 4 .2 0

$4.40

$ 4 .6 0

$ 2 .7 0

$2 .8 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .0 0

$ 3 .1 0

$ 3 .2 0

$ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .6 0

$ 3 .7 0

$ 3 .8 0

$3.9 0

$ 4 .0 0

$ 4 .2 0

$ 4 .4 0

$4.6 0

over

6
6
-

36
28
8

10
10

28,
28
-

61
43
18

30
29
1

273
273
-

198
198
-

44
44
-

2
1
2

4
2

_

3
4
5

18
4
2

_

_

2
-

_
_
-

_
-

9

-

-

-

4

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

7
4

-

1
3

1
3

7
9
-

-

-

-

“

.

_

_

and

99
92
7

102
98
4

81
75
6

204
203
1

317
312
5

326
326
-

87
87
-

10 '
3
-

7
4
2
-

27
3
3
-

10
6
8
10
6

95
10
2
20
10

72
10
26
1

22
9
1
5

_

_

3
9
-

1
_
-

3
_
.

2
-

1
11
1
2
2

1
2
8

1
7
6
1
6

2
19
9
1
10

1
84
57
1
7
1
6
4

-

1
"

3
16
4
2
12
3
3
10
1
10
10
2

1
19
5
4
1
6
3
2

29
4
3
10
6
11
7
6
73
74
21

3
6
4
14
16
1
4
25
29
3

3

1

l

44
44
-

S e le c t e d p ro d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s—
m en
F i l l e r s , hand or m a c h in e ---------------G r in d e r s _____________________________
J a n ito r s — ___-_______________________
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s ______________
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g --------M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l
u t ilit y ---------------------------------------------M ix e r s ---------------------------------------------M ix e r - g r in d e r s --------------------------------R e c e iv in g c l e r k s -----------------------------Shipping c le r k s _ -------------------------Shipping and r e c e iv in g c l e r k s -------Tank c le a n e r s ----------------------------------T e c h n ic ia n s* ------------------------------------T e s t e r s , p rod u ct-----------------------------T in te r s _______ -___ -_______ __________
T r u c k d r iv e r s -----------------------------------V a r n is h m a k e r s -------------------------------

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

-

"

-

1
5
-

-

-

12

-

5

-

-

-

8
-

3

_

-

-

4

-

-

3

-

-

15
3
-

_

7
-

S e le c t e d p r o d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s—
w om en
F i l l e r s , hand or m a c h in e ---------------L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s ----------------------

1
2
3
4

The Los
Excludes
Workers
Workers

_

_

_

4 11

1

2

8

.

4
13-

_

1

_

2

Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim-Santa Ana—Garden Grove Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas consist of Los Angeles and Orange Counties.
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s i t .
hfs
were distributed as follows: 16 at $1.90 to $1.95; 4 at $2 to $2.10; and 7 at $2.30 to $2.40.
were distributed as follows: 4 at $2 to $2.10 and 7 at $2.30 to $2.40.




_

_

_

_

_

Table 16. Occupational earnings: Louisville, Ky.—Ind.1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 of w o r k e r s in s e le c te d p ro d u ctio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

O ccu p ation and s e x

A ll p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s _____________
M e n _______ _____________________
W o m e n ___________________________

Num ­ A verber
a ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork­ earn ­
ers
in g s 1
2

N u m b er of w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s of—
U nder
$ 1 .9 0

$ 1 .9 0
and
und er
$ 2 .0 0

$ 2 .0 0

$ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .2 0

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .4 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .6 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .8 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .0 0

$ 3 .1 0

$ 3 .2 0

$ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .6 0

$ 3 .7 0

$ 3 .8 0

$ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .2 0

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .4 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .6 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .8 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .0 0

$ 3 .1 0

$ 3 .2 0

$ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .6 0

$ 3 .7 0

$ 3 .8 0

over

23
22
1

10
9
1

5
5
-

20
20
-

54
38
16

48
37
11

50
50
-

117
117
-

103
102

29
29

32
32

16
16

10
10

4
4

2
_
2
_

8
2
1
2

2
_

5
4
1
6

37
3
10
19

8
13
2
3

_
_

_
4
1
_
_

_
6

_

3
5

1
20
24

9
2

2

_

_

1
2

3
1
1
2

2
11
1
1
1
7

2
8

4

2

3
1
2

and

569
532
37

$ 3 .1 2
3 .1 4
2.81

1
1
-

5
5
-

3
2
1

13
12
1

10
5
5

71
27
23
44

3.09
3 .3 2
2 .9 8
3.0 1

_
_
1

_
.
_

_
_
_
1

4
_
_
_

_
_
_

30
53
35
11
29
35
24

3 .0 8
3.13
3.23
3.1 6
3.36
3.4 5
3.11

.
_
_
_
_

4
_
_
»
_
_

-

-

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

4
_

8
8

8
8

_

_

_
_
_

_
5
_

5
_
1
7

_
_
_
_

_
_

_
4
_
_

_
1

_
_

_
4

_

_
_
2
_
_
_
2

_
_
2
_
_
_

S e le c t e d p ro d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s 3
F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e —
G r in d e r s ____________________________
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s ______________
L a b o r e r s , m a te r ia l h a n d lin g ______
M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l
u tilit y __________________ ___ ________
M ix e r s _________ ______ _____________ _
M ix e r - g r i n d e r s ------------------------------T ank c le a n e r s _______________________
T e c h n ic ia n s _________________________
T in t e r s ---------------------------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s _______________________

-

_
_
_

_
_
_
1

1

_

_

'

1 T h e L o u is v ille S ta n d a rd M e tr o p o lita n S t a tis tic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f J e ff e r s o n C ounty, K y.; and C la r k and F lo y d C o u n tie s, Ind.
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ifts .
3 D ata fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s w e r e lim ite d to m en .




4

8
7
1

4
_
5
1
11
6

_
2
9

_
2
8

Table 17. Occupational earnings: New York, N.Y.1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d pro d u ctio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

AverNumber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnipgs ofage
of
hourly $1.85 $1.90 $1.95 $2 .0 0 $2.10 $2 .2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2 .6 0 $2.70 $2.80 $2 .9 0 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40
work­ earn­ under
"
- '“
“
"
- and
ers
ings 2 $1.90 $1.95 $2.0 0 $2 .1 0 $2.2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 over
Num-

Occupation

All production workers_________

1,482
1,436

$3.00
3.02

11
11

7
7

_
9
_
_
_

-

12
10

44
28

41
39

40
36

8

10

-

-

_
-

_
19
1

7

6

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

4
_

-

_
3

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
-

_
_

-

123

131
131

87
82

60
58

95
94

85
85

71
71

28

10

12

_
3

22
11

_

_

_

_

17
_

105
105

63
63

74
74

21
21

43
43

59
59

12

1

15
14

5
3
29
9

46
40

59
56

107
105

120

3
-

4
-

12

11

-

1

9

5
14
5

11
11

50
50

11
11

26
26

Selected production occupations 3
Fillers, hand or machine------to

163
39
12

K>

Labelers and packers---------Laborers, material handling---Maintenance men, general

169
55
34
86

Mixer-grinders------- ----- -—
Shipping clerks----- ------- — —
Shipping and receiving clerks — —
T echnicians— — ----- -------Testers, product----------- Tinters------------------Truckdrivers-------------Varnish makers------------

134
12

23
24
22

82
35
22

2 .9 0

3.50
2.62
2.74
2.70
3.94
3.08
3.11
3.73
3.42
3.42
2.91
3.66
3.46
3.85

1

_
*

2

1

28
5

1

17
-

2
1

1
1

1

4

4
-

1

-

15

-

3

-

.

3
4
3

4

6

1

1

3

1

-

1

_
-

2
12

_
2
1

7
_
_

_

_
-

_
3
4

.
_
_

_
-

3
_
14

_

5
-

2

3
3
1

2

9

_
_

12

5

11

1
7

6

_

10

10

_
_

3

-

-

-

-

_

_

3
3
3

1

1

_
-

-

2
2

_

10
6
1

1

_

3

-

_
_

3
2

-

10

16

_
6

7
3

_

_
_

1

3

3

4

_
_

-

_
-

_

1

.

1
22
1

4
1

4

_
-

4

23

.

14

10

10

3
3

2
2

3

1

_•
_
_

7

_
'

11
12

3

6
1
3

16
_

5
1

1
1
3

6
2

_
-

_
_

-

_
_
4
_

1
1

1
1
1

2

5
13

1

1

1

4 12
3

'

1 The New York Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of New York City (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Counties), and Nassau, Rockland, Suffolk, and Westchester

Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s i t .
hfs
3 Data for selected occupations were limited to men.
4 All workers were at $4.40 to $4.60.




Table 18. Occupational earnings: Newark and Jersey City, N.J.1
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings 2 of workers in selected production occupations in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments, November 1970)

Occupation

All production workers_________
Men_____________________
Wnmnn

Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

AverNumber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
age
2.0 0
hourly $and $2 .1 0 $2.2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00
earn­ under
ings 1 $2.1 0
2
$2 .2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2 .6 0 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20

1,770 $3.34
1,718 3.35
52 2.94

27
27

3.24
3.51
3.21

_
_

-

23
23

13
13

8
8

144
124
20

28
20
8

31
27
4

43
43

5 * 118
1
51 118

84
84

199
198
1

99
99

186
182
4

155
147

178
177

8

1

33
4
4

43
_
_

12
6

1
8

12

2

2

97
91
6

66
66

71
71

101
101

19
19

7
7

6
6

_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

12
12

4
4

Selected production occupations 3
Fillers, hand or machine------Grinders-------------------Janitors-------------------Labelers and packers__________
Laborers, material handling____
Maintenance men, general
utility
_____________________
Mixers--------------------Mixer-grinders_______________
Receiving clerlcR
Shipping clerks_______________
Shipping and receiving clerks____
Tank cleaners _
_ _ __
Technicians__________________
Testers, product-------------Tinters_____________________
Truckdrivers----------------

202

50
44
113
72
91
154
136
15
17
27
32
83
52
95
25

2.92

3.06
3.69
3.32
3.25
3.39
3.40
3.20
3.24
3.74
3.65
3.66
3.54

-

-

-

2

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

21

6

_
_
-

_

_
.
-

6

_
_
-

_
_
-

6

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
-

19
-

_
20

_
_
_
-

25

_

18

10

_
10

_
6

_
_
-

•5
_
2
6

1

_
_
21

-

32
3

3
4
_

10
1
1

6

-

_

5
-

_
5

12

1

1

_
_
5

5

_
-

2

2

-

_
14

6

-

_
-

_
4
7
2

28
_

32

-

_
8

4
5
3

8

7
11

_

27

6

-

15
14
9

4
-

2
11
6

7
5
12
5

_

13
7
4

17
48

2
1

2
2

5

_
4

_

7
_
_

_

_
_
_

1

_
_

_
1

1

2

2
2

9

7
_

14
_
5

11

35
23

1
6

1
1

_

8

_

4

_
13

8

3
9

13

7

1

4

6




_

_
_
_
_

j
2

4
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

4
_

_
_

_
_

4
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

1

_
3

_
_

_

20
5
4

10
1
11
1

10
2

3
_

2

1

2

4

_
_

_
_

.
_

4

17

3

“

2

22

1

7

_
_

_

_
5

'
1 The Newark and Jersey City Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas consist of Essex, Hudson, Morris, and Union Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s i t .
hfs
3 Data for selected occupations were limited to men.

7
4

2

4
3
4
9
16

6
2

7
5

_

'

'

'

_
_

T a b le 19. O c c u p a tio n a l earnings: P a te rs o n —C lifto n —P assaic, N.J.
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c te d prod u ction o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

Num- Aver-

Occupation

All production workers 3 ________

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
of hourly $2 .1 0 $2 .2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60$2.70$2.80 $2 .9 0 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20$3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4760 $4.80 $5.00 $5720
workand
under
$2 .2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70$2.80$2.90 $3.00$3.10 $3.20 $3.30$3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 over
597

$3.15

4

60
30
28

2.81
3.33
2.75

2

9
46
14
18

4.06
3.38
3.51
3.70
3.85
3.43

4

12

4

7
9

78

38

28

18

29

2

28

4
4

2

4

28

37

2

6

38

21

42

33

36

_

_

14

10

3

37

5

2

3

-

6

2

Selected production occupations 3
Fillers, hand or machine____ _
_
Grinders___________________ _
Laborers, material handling---Maintenance men, general
Shipping and receiving clerks — ___
Technicians— ----- --------- T inters
T ruckdriver s
______

16

34

-

_

4
4

10

2

6

.

_

2

2

4

2
2

2

.

_

.
.

_

_

_

-

2

-

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

.
_

.

_

_

_

.

8
.

4

8
_

_

_

_

_

2

_

_

-

.

-

2

26

8

-

6
2

.
_

_

-

4

4

2
2
8

_
_

2

2
2

4

_
_

_

_

4

4

_

_

2
2
6
8

2
.
-

_

1

_

_

_

_

4

_
_

8
2

_

_

-

2

2

_

_

-

2

1 The Paterson—Clifton-Passaic Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Bergen and Passaic Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s i t .
hfs
3 Virtually all production workers were men; data for selected occupations were limited to men.

T a b le 2 0 . O c c u p a tio n a l earn ing s: P h ilad elp h ia , P a.—N .J .1
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings 2 of workers in selected production occupations in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments, November 1970)

Occupation

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings o f
oer
age
$330 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60
hourly Under $1.95 $2.0 0 $2 .1 0 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 J 3 A 0
of
and
work­ earn­ $1.95 under
and
ers
ings 2
$2 .0 0 $2.1 0 $2 .2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 over

All production workers 3 -------- 1,618

$3.56

20

6

20

152
23
52
92
64

_
3.24
3.71
3.25
2.62 4 12
3.11

_
-

9
-

19
123
46

3.65
3.45
2.94
3.20
3.14
3.75
3.58
4 01
3.84

15

1
4

2

.
-

8

30

69

37

_
-

13
-

2
6

2

17
_
17
9

2

2

30

33

76

74

2

5

14
_

_
-

7
_
7

12

4

6

6

5

3
5

_
-

1
11

2
1

4
-

3
-

2

6
1

-

-

4

-

1

1

6

2

-

96

95

103

106

80

12

45

51

7

5
4
.

10
2

16
.
_
_
_

2

24
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

18
_
_

64

110

122

162

140

2

_
_

20
11

_
_
_
_

, _
_
_
_

Selected production occupations 3
Fillers, hand or machine_______
Gr inders_ ___ _________ _ ___
_
_
Janitors— . . _______ ______
__. .
Labelers and packers--- ------Laborers, material handling---Maintenance men, general
u ility___________________ _
t
Mixers--------------------Mixer-grinders--------------Receiving clerks— -----------Technicians-----------------Testers, product------------X iM ir lc d r iv e r s

3
2
3
4
5

8

38
27
40
33
38

*

2

9
-

-

7
-

2

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

3

3
-

-

-

3

.

-

2

2

1

2

-

3

7
14
-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

(y

3
5

_

2
12
6
2

1

»
4

13

12

-

-

1

-

19
-

1

2
10
2

3

_

_
7

11

6

1

_

_

2

-

2

16

.
_

_

14

35

11

3
-

-

_

_

2

.

_

_

.

-

-

2

4

3

1

_

-

2

.
_

8

-

-

7

5

-

1

5

Q
7

1

71
bl

2

2

_
_

2
3

“

2

2

-

3
20

5 13

.

The Philadelphia Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties, Pa.; and Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, N.J.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and forwork on weekends, holidays, and late sh f s
it.
Virtually all production workers were men; data for selected occupations were limited to men.
Workers were distributed as follows: 6 at $1.85 to $1.90 and 6 at $1.90 to $1.95.
All workers were at $4.60 to $4.80.




Table 21. Occupational earnings: Pittsburgh, Pa.1
(N um ber and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d p ro d u ctio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu r in g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

Occupation and sex

Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

All production workers- ______ - 529
M en_____________________
512
Wo m e n ___________________
17

AverNumber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
age
hourly Under $2.00 $2 .1 0 $2 .2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 ■$3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 "$4.80
and
earn­ $2.0 0
and
under
ings 2
$2.1 0 $2 .2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 over
$3.30
3.32
2.44

3

5

-

-

5
3

3

5

2

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

-

11
11

_

24
24
_

9
9
_

19
19
_

_

_

22
22

_

16
14

47
47

24
23

47
45

1

2

2

61
61

76
76

23
22
1

58
58

40
40

15
15

10
10

2
10
2

2

4

4
4

2
2

2
2

_
_

2

-

-

5
5

Selected production
occupations— men
Janitors
.
Labelers and packers__________
Laborers, material handling____
Maintenance men, general
_____________________
u
tility
Mixe r-grinders_______ _______ _
Shipping clerks_______________
Technicians—___ _____________
Testers, product______________
T in ers— _t
__________ _____ _
Varnish makers_ ___________

8

13
30
33
18
21

3.09
3.27
3.14
3.65
3.53
3.23
3.41

35
14
14
43

2.30

_

3.53
3.40

9

_
_

2.9 0

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

-

5

2

-

3
2
6

6

5

4

5
_
3
3

_
_
4

2
1
8
2

3

_

_

_

_

_

2

4

-

-

-

18

3

3
5

_
-

_
3

_
_

_

1

2

2

_

_

_

_

_

1

1
1

2

1

9

_
_

1
1
1

1
2

_

-

-

6

-

2

2

_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_
5

1

1

_

_

_

1

-

2

-

2

5

2

_

_

-

-

-

4

-

-

"

“

_

_

1

_

2

3

_

1
2

4

2

_

9

1

1
2

_

_
_

7

2

_
_

_

8

7

2

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

Selected production
occupations— women
Labelers and packers__________

"

The Pittsburgh Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Allegheny, Beaver, Washington, and Westmoreland Counties.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s i t .
hfs




-

Table 22. Occupational earnings: St. Louis, Mo.—III.1
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 2 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c te d pro d u ctio n o c c u p a tio n s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n t s , N o v e m b e r 1970)

AverNumber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
per
age
$2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00
2 .1 0
of
hourly Under $and $2.2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2 .6 0
and
work- earn- $2.10 under
$2 .2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2 .6 0 $2.70 $2.80 $2 .9 0 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 over
Num -

Occupation and sex

All production workers___
M e n --------- -----. .
.
Wo m e n -------------

672
602
70

$3.26
3.29
3.00

58

3.26
3.18
2.82
3.23
3.09

10

4
4

1
1

7
3

6
6

6
6

12
12

9
9

46
46

18
14
4

39

46

20

20
26

19

150
133
17

83
83

63
63

14
14

11
11

49
49

26
25

17
17

2
2

31
31

5
5

9
9

3
3

3
3

9
9

1

Selected production
occupations— men

K>

ON

Fillers , hand or machine----- -Grinders-------------------Janitors--------------------Labelers and packers—----- --Laborers , material handling---—
Maintenance men, general
utility
--------------------Mixers_____
— -------Mixer-grinders---- — — ------—
Shipping and receiving clerks---Tank cleaners_____— — -------T echnicians— _____- . ----- -— —
Testers, product---- — --------

12

16
13
50
22

55
63

3.59
3.45
3.26

8

32
15

2.90
3.44
3.05
3.83
3.48

Labelers and packers---------- 1 47
2

3.07

T ruckdrivers---- - ---- -— .
—

14
23
22

4
_

-

-

.
-

1
-

_
_
_

-

.

_
_
-

-

_

"
_
.
_

-

-

-

-

_

_
"
_
4

-

2

_
-

-

-

1
-

1

_

_
_
_
_
-

_
-

2
2

-

1

_

-

3

_
_
-

-

_

3

-

-

-

1

28
4

8
1

4

-

5

1

1
1

5

_
-

-

-

11

2

3

_

_

_

2

1

-

_

1
2

2
1
1

_

4

2

1
1
1

1
1

7

5
4

2
1
-

-

-

10

11

_

_
5
7

8

41

-

_
3
2
2

7

4

2
1
2
6

-

2
-

1
1

_

2

2
11

1

9
9
4

4

-

-

1
2

_

1

-

“

-

1

_

6

1

-

-

-

1
1

-

4
-

_
-

1

-

1

1
2

-

1

1

1
-

-

4
4
3

_
-

1

1

1

.

1

4

.

5

3

1

1

r
3

1

5

2

1

1

7

1

_

4

-

-

8

.

2

-

1

_

3

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

_
-

1

_
-

3

-

-

-

-

1

Selected production
occupations— women
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

2

15

13

16

-

-

-

-

-

>

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 The St Louis Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of the city of S . Louis; the counties of Franklin, Jefferson, S . Charles, and S . Louis, Mo.; and the counties of Madison and
.
t
t
t
S . Clair, 1 1
t
1.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s i t .
hfs




T ab le 2 3 . O ccupational earnings: San Francisco—O akland, C alif.1
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings 2 of workers in selected production occupations in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments, November 1970)

Occupation and sex

A l l p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s - ----------------- ----------------

Number Average
of
hourly
workers earnings 2 Under
$3.40

952
926
26

$4.16
4.18
3.71

3
3

133
15

3.88
3.76
3.88
4.94
4.04
3.89
4.11
4.43
4.45
4.38

-

$3.40
and
under
$3.50

$3.50

$3~60

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
$3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 w

$3.60

$3.70

$3.80

-

26
18

144
136

2

8

8

.
-

4
.
-

2

$3.90

$4.00

$4.20

17
17
“

146
143
3

93
90
3

135
133

3
,
-

4
7

30

1

8

23
_
7
32
_

2

$4.40

$4.60

164
164
■

80
80

$5.40- T5/66 T

$4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 $5.60 $5.80
54
54
“

58
58

_
_
_
_

O

"$67oo'
and
$6 .0 0 over

_
_

5
5

2
2

7
7

12
12

1

3
3

-

S e le c t e d p r o d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s — m en

K>
F i l l e r s , hand o r m a c h in e ______________ ___ __
J an it o r s _____ ____________ _____________________
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s __________________ __ ___
M a in te n a n c e m e n , g e n e r a l u t il it y ___________
M ix e r - g r in d e r s — _____________________________
Tank c le a n e r s ____________ ..___________________
T e s t e r s , p r o d u c t__________ _________________ _
T in t e r s -------------------------------------------------------------T ruckd r i v e r s . _________________ _______________
V a r n is h m a k e r s ______________________________

21

49
102
8
21

41
21

33

1

-

'

S e le c t e d p r o d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s — w om en
L a b e le r s and p a c k e r s _____ ___________________

64

11

3.72

-

-

3
_
_
“

51

4

-

3

'

2

2

5
“

2

_
-

2

_
_
_
5
6 .

_
“

12
1
8
1

2

-

_
_
10

13
_
_
20

_
18

-

9
_
7
_
_
3
13
_

_
13

_
4
_

10

2

2

-

-

-

20

3

The San Francisco-Oakland Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties,
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late sh f s
it.




_
_
_
3

-

_
_

_
_

_
_
-

-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

12

T a b le 2 4 . M e th o d o f w a g e p a ym en t
(Percent of production workers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments by method of wage payment,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)

Regions
Method of wage payment1

All production workers--- --------- -Time-rated workers------------ -— ______
Formal plans________.
________ _____ r
__
Single rates_____ ______ _________ __
Range of rates___ _________ ______
Individual rates_
_ ___________ _____

United
States 2

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Atlanta

Baltimore

Boston

Chicago

Cleveland

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
75
44
31
25

97
76
45
31

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

75
56
19
25

56

100

100

49
17
32
51

57
28
29
43

82
51
32
18

100

76
36
40
24

90
44
45

73
51

75
9

22

66

89
61
28

10

27

25

11

81
26
55
19

87
59
28
13

Dallas

All production workers —

New
England

Areas

21

Detroit

Houston

22

34
44

Kansas
City

Areas— Continued
Los AngelesNewark
Long Beach
and
New
and Anaheim— Louisville Jersey
York
Santa AnaCity
Garden Grove

Paterson—
Clifton—
Passaic

Philadelphia Pittsburgh

S . Louis
t

San
Francis coOakland

---- --— — -

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Time-rated workers-------------------F o r m a l plans_______ __________
Single rates™_____________ ______ _
Range of rates . . --- — _____ . . . _
..
. . __ _
Individual rates-------------------- . .
.

100
68

100

100
66

100

100

100

100

100

82

100

100

100

87

7A

100

23
45
32

50
16
34

6

8

58

64

54
46

81
75

81
13

74
18

22
20

12

8

25

46

57
13
44
43

64
51
14
36

100
100

86

93
7
7

1 For definition of method of wage payment, see appendix A. 1 percent of the workers were paid under incentive pay systems.
2 Includes data for the Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal tota s
l.




a*
64
19
17

6

19

99
1

T a b le 2 5 . S cheduled w eekly hours
(Percent of production and officeworkers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments by scheduled weekly hours,1
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)

Regions
Weekly hours

United
States 1

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Areas

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Atlanta

Baltimore

Boston

Chicago

Production workers
All workers_______________________
Under 40 hours
______________________
40 hours_____________________________
Over 40 and under 44 hours_______________
44 hours-.----------------------- Over 44 and under 49 hours ------------49 hours and over______________________

100

100

1

5
80
5
9

93
1
2
2
1

100

(
3)
99
1

-

100

100

_
84
16
_
■

_
87
4

100

100

93
_
_
4
3

6

3

100

2
88
2

5
2

*
100

95
_
_
5
-

(
3)

Cleveland

100

100

100

_
_
_
"

"

9
91
_
_
"

96

100

_

100

4
-

100

100

94

100

6

-

Areas— Continued
Dallas

All workers- --------------------Under 40 hours-----------------------40 hours----------------------------Over 40 and under 44 hours_______________
44 hours _____________________________
Over 44 and under 49 hours_______________
49 hours and over______________________

See footnotes at end of t b e
al,




100

.
100
-

_
.

Detroit

Houston

Kansas
City

100

100

100

_

_

100

-

-

_

_
_

66

3
1
7
14

100

Louisville

Newark
and
Jersey
City

New
York

Paterson—
Clifton—
Passaic

100

100

100
100

.

100

Los AngelesLong Beach
and Anaheim—
Santa AnaGarden Grove

100

Pittsburgh

S . Louis
t

San
FranciscoOakland

100

100

100

100

100

91

100

100

_
_

_

Philadelphia

2
100

_
_

100
-

_
_

100

_
_
_

98
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
9

T ab le 2 5 . Scheduled w eekly hours— Continued
( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c tio n and o f fic e w o r k e r s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts b y sc h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s . 1
U n ited S t a te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N b v em b e r 1970)

Regions
Weekly hours

United
States 2

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Areas

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Atlanta

Baltimore

Boston

100

100

100

100

100

3

5

97

5
90

Chicago

Cleveland

Officeworkers
All workers-------------------- -------------------------------------------------Under 35 hours------------------------------------------------------------------------35 h o u rs

_

_

_______ ____ ____ ______ _____________

36 hour s— ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Over 36 and under 37V hours---------------------------------------i
3 7 l/2 hours-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Over 37V2 and under 3834 hours___________
/
3fi3 /4 h o i^ r js

.......

..

.

.. .

100

100

100

9

10
1

9

16

(
3)
2

(
3)
1
6
1
10

81

100

100

100

100

100

5

< *)

100

11

19
76

4
80

16

2
2
12

1

82

16
56

5

3

6

94

100

81

100

13
87

100

74

Area s - ontinued
— C
Dallas

.Detroit

Houston

Kansas
City

Los AngelesLong Beach
and Anaheim— Louisville
Santa AnaGarden Grove

All workers-----------------------------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

Under 35 hours-----------------------35 hours----------------------------36 hours----------------------------Over 36 and under 37 V hours— -----------i
37V hours---------------------------i
Over 37V2 and under 3834 hours------------------------ ------/
3834 hours-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------/
40 hours-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

100

100

-

100

34
66

96

1 Data r e la t e to the p r e d o m in a n t w o r k s c h e d u le o f f u ll- tim e d a y -s h ift w o r k e r s in e a c h e s ta b lis h m e n t.
2 I n c lu d e s data fo r the M ountain r e g io n in a d d itio n to th o se show n s e p a r a te ly .
3 L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.
N O TE : B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not equal 100.




100

Newark
and
Jersey
City
100

New
York

Paterson—
Clifton—
Passaic

100

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

S . Louis
t

San
FranciscoOakland

100

100

100

100

5
19

_

_

_

_

_

_

36
-

19
15

4

-

-

-

-

23

23

30

-

-

-

53

41

-

37

-

7

100
-

6

10

10

-

-

13
76

13
81

-

16

90

74

-

T ab le 2 6 . S h ift differential provisions
(Percent of production workers by shift differential provisions 1 in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)

Regions
Shift differential

United
States 2

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

69.7
69.0
66. 3
2.5
.6
.2
1.4

60. 1
54.8
54.8
8.5
_
-

64. 4
63.9
60. 6
.9
-

60.4
5 1
7.
57. 1
5.7
1.8

48. 8
48.8
48. 8
_
_
_
3.5

27.6
.5
8.0
3.8
1.9
12.9
.6
.4
2 0
.
2.4
1.2
2.2
1.0
1.2

32.6
5.2
8 5
.
-

27-4
-

14.4
8.7
_
21. 6
_
4.9
_
-

.3
.1
.8

_
_
5 2
.

60. 5
60. 3
58.6
.7
.3
7.7
.3
1.4
.2
.3
19.4
1.4
.7
8.2
.2
8.6
.9
12
.
.7
2.7
2.0
.3
1 3
.
1.7
17
.
.1

3.3
8
3 .0
3
33.0
8 5
.
13.6
5 7
.
5 2
.
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
5.2

Areas
Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Atlanta

Baltimore

Boston

Chicago

Cleveland

53. 0
51. 1
51. 1
_
_
2.7
4 8
.

74.4
73.8
69.8
5 0
.
.7
.2
2 3
.

88. 1
88. 1
82.7
7 1
.
-

88. 8
88.8
87. 8
_
_
-

71.2
71. 2
71. 2
_
_
-

59. 3
51.2
51.2
_
_
_
-

69.3
60. 5
60. 5
1.3
4
_
_
-

73.4
73.4
68. 3
7.5
_
_
-

82. 2
82. 2
8 2
2.
_
_
-

24.8
_
1.8
4 3
.
_
10.9
_
_
3.4
-

22. 1
_
_
_
21.4
_
_
-

3 .2
6
4.6
4.9
_
8 1
.
.5
_
5.8
1.5
4. 1
30
.
1 1
.

3 .8
0
_
12.4
32.4
_
_
-

12.4
_
43.7
1 .3
5
11.6
3.6
1 3
.
-

35.9
_
7 3
.
1.3
7
10.7
_
_
_
-

20. 3
_
_
_
18.6
_
12 2
.
-

32.0
_
_
_
_
1 .3
4
_
_
_
_
_
-

39.7
_
6.2
4 1
.
_
6.8
1.5
_
_
2.5
5 1
.
1.9
3.2

59.7
_
_
22.4
_
_
-

_
_
32
.

_
-

_
_
1.9

_
_
.6

5.4
_
-

_
1.0
-

.
-

_
_
8 1
.

_
_
8 8
.

_
_
-

.
_
-

3.3
6
3 .3
6
3.3
6
8.2
5 7
.
8 7
.
_
_
6 2
.
_
7.5
_

38.9
38.9
38.9
_
_
13.9
3 5
.
_
_
1 .5
4
.
4. 3
2 7
.
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

42.8
42.8
42.8
_
_
_
_
4 8
.
1.1
4
_
9.0
_
_
_
14.9

77.8
77.8
77.8
_
11.5
_
_
48.6
_
_
5 3
.
_
12.4
-

83. 9
83.9
82.9
_
3.7
_
_
_
_
4.9
2.8
58.9
.
.
7.6
_

63.9
63.9
63.9
.
_
_
_
_
_
35.9
17. 3
10.7
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

32.7
23.9
23.9
14. 3
_
_
_
_
9.6
.
_
_
_
_
_
_
«
.
_

61. 5
61.5
59.6
12.6
_
_
_
21.8
_
_
6 2
.
1.5
15.0

74. 1
74. 1
74. 1
_
51.7
32
.
1.3
9
«
_
.
.

Southeast Southwest

Second s
hift
Workers in establishments having
second-shift provisions________________
With shift differential_________________
Uniform cents per hour________ _____
5 cents___ ______— — _ ____
_
6 cents
__—__ _.
_________ , __
_
7 cents______ .
____ ,
____________
8 cents---------------- — _ _
10 cents----------------------11 cents________ _________
12 cents------ --------------13 cents------ --------------14 cents_______________________
15 cents_______________________
16 cet- —.. _„T„
rtg ._^ T _________ ____
_
_
17 cents___________________ . _
_,
18 c««ts - _
_
_
_
20 c n s - ____ .
et-.
_______ ,
________
25c ents_______________________
_
Uniform percentage--— __ _________
5 percent— ------------------. 0 percent_______ ______________
1
8 hours 1pay for
7 V2 hours' work---- ----------Other------------------------- With no shift differential— _____ _

1 .4

7 .2
1 1 .7
1 .7

7 .8

1 .4
3 .3

3 .3

.5

,

Third or other late shift
Workers in establishments having third- or
other late-shift provisions_____ ____ _____
With shift differential----------------Uniform cents per hour____________ 5 cents_„
________ , ___________
_
6 cents---- ------- -- -- 10 cents__________________ __
11 cents- _ _____________
_
__12 cents— _____________ _____ 13 cents_____________ _________
14 cents__________________ ___ _
15 cents____ ________________ _
16 cents— 1
____________________ _
17 cents— — — — — — _____________
18 cents----------------------19 cents____ ________________ —
20 cents----------------------22 cents_____r
________________
23 rents__ _
24 rents____
_ _
25 cents— ___ , _________ __ _
__
_
27 cents----------------------30 cents___ _____________ _____
40 cents--------- ------- — _
Uniform percentage_____________
_ .
10 percent_ _ — — -- --------- Other — -------------------------With no shift differential---------------

*1

5 5 .5
5 5 .5
5 3 .0

7 .7

.
.
.6
13.9
4 8
.
10
.
_
1 .0
1
4 8
.
_
1 3
.
7.8
_
2.6
2 6
.
„

_

_
_
_

,
67. 2
67.2
64. 3
1.6
.7
7.7
_
3.4
_
28. 0
_
2.6
.5
13.6
_
_
_
1.5
.
.9
3.9
3.0
3 0
.
_

_
-(
-*

4.9
_
_
_
_
10
.

_
_
'

See footnotes at end of table.




3 9 .0

39.0
39.0
_
_
20. 3
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
*
_
_
18.6
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
8.8

_
_
«
_
2.5
_
1.9
1.9
_
'

T a b le 2 6 . S h ift differential provisions— Continued
(Percent of production workers by shift differential provisions 1 in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)

Areas^-Continued
Shift differential
Dallas

Second sh f
it
Workers in establishments having
second-shift provisions —--—- --------With shift differential_________________
Uniform cents per hour ------------5 cents -- — -- ---- - 6 cents------- -- ------------7 cents ------ ----------------8 cents _______________________
9 cents____ ___ _ _ _
_ ______ ____ _
10 cents--------------- -----1 cents.......------ ------------1
12 cents.-.___ —,
______ .
________
13 cents— . . — _
— —
- ---------- -----14 cents— 15 cents.--— - ------------- —
16 cents..---- ---------------—
17 cents—
18 cents-------------- — —
20 cents
. -------- ----—
- . ----------- . .
.— .
25 cent8Uniform percentage.---------- — — —
5 percent---------------------- . ----------- ----- 10 percent- . .
8 hours ’pay for
7V2 hours' work-----------------Other — —— —— — — — — — — — —
With no shift differential--------------Third or other late s
hift
Workers in establishments having third- or
other late-shift provisions-------------With shift differential----------------Uniform cents per hour------------5 cents
6 cn* ™
et*
________
10 cents— -- --- --------. . - . .
.- .
11 cents.---------------------12 cents---- --- . . ------ --- . .
..
..
13 cents.— — — — — — — — — — —
14 cents----------------------15 cents.---------- — ------- -16 cents----------------------17 cents.
_ ___
_
18 cents— — — —
— — — — — — ——
19 cents- — -------- -------20 cents
22c ents
23 cents
24 cents— —— — — — — — — — — — — ——
—
25 cents----------------------27 cents----------------------30 cents----------------------40 cents----------------------Uniform percentage---------------10 percent_____________________
Other — — — — — — — — — — —— — — — —
With no shift differential— ---- ---- —

Detroit

Houston

51.4
51.4
51.4
26.6
24.8
“

73.4
73.4
57.0
1.2
24. 6
17.4
13.7
16.4
16.4
“

74.0
74. 0
74.0
1.1
0
17.9
9 1
.
36.9
~

-

-

72. 1
72. 1
55.7
42.0
13.7
16.4
16.4
”

63.9
63.9
63.9
17.9
1.3
2
33.7
-

89.4
89.4
89.4
.
89.4
“

-

55.2
55.2
55.2
.
30.4
1 .3
2
-

Kansas
City

-

12.5
-

■

-

-

-

89.4
89.4
89.4
.
89.4
.
“

Los AngelesLong Beach
and Anaheim—
Santa AnaGarden Grove

Louisville

Newark
and
Jersey
City

New
York

85.6
85.6
85. 6
9.4
71. 3
4.8
■

69.2
69.2
69.2
17.6
5 6
.
19.2
26.9
“

74.7
74. 7
71.2
4.7
47. 5
14.4
4 7
.
3.4
3.4

3 1
9.
36.4
31.5
1 .5
3
6 7
.
3.6
7.8
4.9
4.9

15.9
15.9
.
15.9
15.9

75. 3
75. 3
75. 3
30. 3
6.7
38. 3
”

72. 1
72. 1
64. 9
46. 0
18.9
7.2
7 2
.

"

-

-

2.7

-

-

-

-

83.9
83.9
83.9
6 5
.
13
.
76. 1
-

63.6
63.6
63.6
17.6
26. 9
19.2
-

68. 5
68. 5
66.9
5 2
.
2.9
23.2
1 .0
1
4 7
.
14.4
5.6
1.6
1.6
"

2.9
2.9
“

15.9
15.9
15.9
15.9
-

64. 0
64. 0
64.0
9.0
16.6
38. 3
-

72. 1
72. 1
64.9
6 0
.
49.8
9 1
.
7.2
7 2
.
“

91. 1
91. 1
91. 1
-

-

23. 1
23. 1
20.2
13.5
6.7
-

-

■

-

■

1 Refers to policies of establishments either currently operating late s i t or having provisions covering late s
hfs
hifts.
2 Includes data for the Mountain region i addition to those shown separately.
n
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




-

Paterson—
Clifton—
Passaic

~

Philadelphia

-

“

Pittsburgh

S . Louis
t

100.0
100. 0
100. 0
19.0
6.7
14 3
.
“

1 9 .0

57.7
14 3
.
-

San
Francis coOakland

100. 0
100. 0
100. 0
57. 7
28.7
1 .7
3
-

100. 0
100. 0
100. 0
.
,
57.7
28. 7
1 .7
3
-

-

-

"

-

T able 2 7 . S h ift differential practices
(Percent of production workers employed on late shifts in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)

Regions
Shift differential

United
States 1

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Areas

Southeast Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Atlanta

Baltimore

Boston

Chicago

Cleveland

7.2
7.2
7.2'
.
2
-

20.2
20.2
20.2
11.3
5.2
3.7
“

9.8
6.8
6.8
2.6
3.7
.
6
3.0

0.9
.
4
.
4
.
4
.
4

10.9
10.9
10.8
11
.
5.5
.
5
1.2
16
.
.
2
.
7
•
1
.
1
~

10.6
10.6
10.6
6.3
4.2
“

3.8
3.8
3.8
3.0
.
8
-

0.3
.
3
.
3
.
3
-

-

2.1
2.1
2.1
12
.
.
2
.
1
.
5
.
1
-

2.9
2.9
2.9
2.1
.
8
"
-

Second s i t
hf
Workers employed on second s i t -------hf.
Receiving shift differential.-----------Uniform cents per hour------------5 cents--------- -------------6 cents---------- ----------7 cents__________________ ____ —
8 cents________________________
10 cents________ _____________
11 cents______________________ 12 cents____________ ____ __ ____
13 cents----------------------14 cent8__
___ ___________
15 cents_____________ __________
16 cents_______________________
17 cents.____________ _________
18 cents----------------------20 cents--------------- -----25 cents____ — ---------------Uniform percentage________________
5 percent..____________________
10 percent--------------------With no shift differential--------------

9.0
8.8
8.5
.
1
.
1
(
2)
.
2
3.6
.
1
.
8
.
5
.
5
16
.
.
2
.1
.
2
.
4
.
1
.
3
.
2
(
2)
.
3

16
.
13
.
13
.
10
.
.
3
.
3

9.4
9.2
9.1
3.4
.
4
19
.
18
.
.
5
.
9
.1
.
1
.
1
.
2

7.7
6.5
6.5
2.7
2.1
15
.
.
2
1
.2

10.1
10.1
10.1
.
6
6.6
13
.
.
9
.
6
-

7.2
6.3
6.3
.
1
3.8
2.4
1.0

11.5
11.2
10.5
.
4
.
3
.
4
5.1
.
7
.
8
1
.4
.
1
12
.
.
1
.
7
.
7
(
2)
.
3

3.6
2.9
“

5.0
5.0
5.0
.
3
14
.
11
.
15
.
.
7
“

2.5
2.5
2.2
(
2)
.
1
.
7
(
2)
(
2)
.
1
(
2)
.
4
(
2)
.
3
.
2
.
1
.
1
(
2)

-

2.9
2.9
2.9
(
2)
.
6
.
1
.
7
1
.0
.
5

0.4
.
4
.
4
.
3
.
1
-

-

-

-

.
2
.
2
(
2)

-

.
1
.
1
-

1
.0
1
.0
1
.0
.
8
.
2
-

1.7
1.7
1.7
.
3
.
3
1.0
-

3.3
3.3
2.7
.
2
1.4
.1
(
2)
.
6
(
2)
.
3
.
6
.
6
-

3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
-

18
.
18
.
15
.
.
9
.
1
.
6
.
3

.6

Third or other late s i t
hf
Workers employed on third or other
late shifts______ __ ____. .
_
._ _
Receiving shift differential____________
Uniform cents per hour------------10 cents- ------- -------------12 cents_ __________ _______ ___
_
15 cents_________ _____________
16 cents
___
_ _ __ ____
17 cents______ „„___________ _
_
18 cents_______________________
19 cents_____ _________________
20 cents_______________________
22 cents______ _______________
23 cents.______ _ _____ _______
_
24 cents----------------------25 cents_______________________
27 cents--------— -------30 cents------ --------------. ____
40 cents..__________ _____ . .
Uniform percentage--------- ------10 percent...____ _____ ______ __
Other _____________ __ ___ __ ____
_ _
With no shift differential______________

See footnotes at end of table,




-

-

T a b le 2 7 . S h ift differential practices— Continued
(Percent of production workers employed on late shifts in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)

Areas— Continued
Shift differential

Los AngelesLong Beach
and Anaheim—
Santa AnaGarden Grove

Louisville

Newark
and
Jersey
City

New
York

Pater sonCliftonPhiladelphia
Passaic *

San
FranciscoOakland

Detroit

Houston

Kansas
City

15.1
15.1
10.1
•
>
.
3.9
4.1
2.1

Dallas

5.2
5.2
5.2
.
4
.
4.8
"

7.8
7.8
7.8
7.8
-

4.0
4.0
4.0
2.5
15
.
•
*

11.6
11.6
11.6
5.3
6.3
“

7.9
7.9
7.9
5.3
1.4
13
.
“

3.4
2.5
2.1
13
.
.
7
.
4
.
4
.
9

_
“

13.1
13.1
13.1
6.7
2.2
4.3
“

13.0
13.0
12.1
10.2
1.9
.
9
.
9
"

3.4
3.4
3.4
.
4
1.5
1.5
“

9.0
9.0
9.0
4.2
2.2
2.6
-

1
.8
18
.
1
.8
18
.
-

-

0.6
.
6
.
6
.
6
-

0.9
.
9
.
9
.
9
-

1.2
12
.
1.2
.
5
.
8
-

-

-

2.7
2.7
2.7
.
1
.
2
2.5
-

8.7
8.7
7.9
.
2
7.5
.
2
.
8
.
8
-

-

4.2
4.2
4.2
19
.
.
2
2.1
-

Pittsburgh

S . Louis
t

Second sh f
it
Workers employed on second s i t ---— — --hf.
Receiving shift differential____________
Uniform cents per hour_____________
5 cents__ .. _ ___ __
..
._
_____ _
6 cents___________ _____ _ ___ _
__
7 cents _________ _______________
8 cents_______ ___ __ _ ____—
_
_
10 cents_ _ _ _________ ______ _
_
11 cents_
_ _______________— . .
.
12 cents---- ----------- _ --13 cents____ ____ _______ _____ _
14 cents--------- — ------ ---15 cents_ _________ ____ ______
_
16 cents----------------------17 cent* , - „
-r
18 cents___ _____ __ ______ ____
_
20 cents...------ — ----- — ------25 cents™..--------- --------Uniform percentage_— _ ---------5 percent_____ ___ ___
_____ _
10 percent-------- ----- ---With no shift differential-- -- _ -----

8.6
8.6
8.6
•
_
6.3
.
.
2.3
•
-

*
5.0
5.0
"

Third or other late s i t
hf
Workers employed on third or other
late shifts __________ ___ _ _ _ _ ____ __ _ _
____
_ _
Receiving shift differential------------ Uniform cents per hour------------ 10 cents----------------------12 cents....____ ___ ____ _
________
15 cents___________ _______ _
16 cents--------- ---- ---17 cents----------------------18 cents----------------------19 cents. ----- -- _ --------_
20 cents______ _____ ________ ___
22 cents...._____ _____ _____ _
_
23 cents-----------— - —
24 cents-------------25 cents-------- ----- ----- -27 cents_______________ _____ ___
30 cents---- — ---- --- ------40 cents--------------- ------Uniform percentage. _ ---- — _____
10 percent------------------- . .
..
Other------ ------------ ---With no shift differential-------- •
-----

2.5
2.5
2.5
.
7
.
7
1.2
-

8.1
8.1
4.0
3.0
1.0
-

4.0
4.0
-

1 Includes data for the Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.
2 Less than 0.05 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




T a b le 2 8 . P aid h o lid a ys
(Percent of production and officeworkers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid holidays,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)

Regions
Number of paid holidays

United
States 1

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Areas

Southeast Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Atlanta

Baltimore

Boston

Chicago

Cleveland

Production workers
All workers--------

_ ________

Workers in establishments providing
paid holidays_____________ _ ..
_ .______ _
5 days_ ________________ _ ________
_
_
5 days plus 1 and 2 half days---------6 days____________ — -------6 days plus 1 half day_______ _ ___ __.
_
_
6 days plus 2 and 3 half days ___ __ ____
7 days_____________ _______ _____
7 days plus 1 half day__ _____________
7 days plus 2 half days_____ _ _.
_ __
8 day s___________________ _______ _
8 days plus 1 half day. - — _____
8 days plus 2 half days_____ __ _____ _
9 days. — -- ----- . ... ..... .
9 days plus 1 and 2 half days______
10 days. _____ __ __ __________
10 days plus 1 half day_____ _ ______
11 days________________
_____ __
11 days plus 1 and 2 half days_ ______ _
_
12 days_______________________ ____
13 days--------------- - - ---

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
3
(
2)
10
1
2
7
1
3
14
2
1
33
1
8
(
2)
7
1
4
1

100
-

100
1
1
.
1
4
_
1
11
(
2)

100
22
_
34
2
_
13
.
_
10
_
19
_
.
_
_
-

100
13
3

100
.
_
9
1
3
7
3
4
16
2
(
2)
38
1
11
_
5
_
.

100
.
_
9
1
_
18
2
22
5
19
6
15
.
.
_
3
_

100
1
5
_
.
3

100
_
_
.
_
_
3
_
_
_

11

_

_
_
„
-

_
5
«
.
50
_
42
.
_
-

100
_
_
10
_
3
_
5
8
21
3
1
34

100
_

72
1
4
_
.
_
.
-

100
6
.
_
_
22
.
.
7
_
._
64
.
_
_
_
_
.
“

100
_

26
2
11
1
18
3
17
4

100
4
27
14
2
7
2
24
8
_
9
3
_
.
.
-

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
2
(
2)
8
2
1
6
2
3
14
4
1
36
1 ‘
12
1
4
(
2)
3
1
(
2)

100

100
1

100
4

100
14

100
9
5
24
2
1
8
.
25
.
27
1
-

100
.
7
2
2
4
4
4
17
1
1
43
_
11
4
.

100
_
.
4
2
8
3
16
2
48
6
10
.
.
2
.

100
1
.
6
1
_
10
2
8
(
2)

100
5
_
_
_
18
_
5
_
_
73
_
_
_
-

100

-

5
.
3
.
9
1
3
.
45
25
.
"

IJ

5
9
_
_
23
_
_
29
.
_
1
_
_
-

-

1
13
(
2)

34
_
6
12
_
20
19
_
_
9

_

_

4

_

_
4
10
3

_
57
6
12

_
-

7
_
_
"

100

100

100

100
_
.
_
.
3
_
_
_
_
_
4
.
55
_
38
.

100
_
_
10
2
_
_
6
7
19

100
_
_
2
2
_
4
2
_
_
.
5
42
_
39

Officeworkers
All workers. ------- ---------- ---Workers in establishments providing
paid holidays_________ ___ ________ _
5 days__________________ __________
5 days plus 1 and 2 half days__________
6 day8_________ . .
. ______ _________. .
..
6 days plus 1 and 2 half days___ ______
6 days plus 3 and 4 half days---------7 days________ _________________ _
7 days plus 1 half day ______ _________
7 days plus 2 half days--------------8 days ______________ _____________ _
8 days plus 1 half day _________ ______
8 days plus 2 half days_ _____ ____ _
_
9 days-------- ------------ -----9 days plus 1 and 2 half days__________ _
10 days______ ______________________
10 days plus 1 half day_______ ________
11 days___________________________
11 days plus 2 half days _____________
12 days-------------- ------ ------- 13 days _______ ___ _____________
14 days_______________ __ ______ ___

-

-

-

4
-

3
1
1
4
1
10

30
12
8
3
25
6
12
.
-

19
2
•
13
22
30
.
.

-

4
28
44
-

21
.
_

See footnotes at end of table.




-

*

-

1
25
3
26
2
7
2
11
2
(
2)

-

.
.
.
_

.
_

.
_

.
_

_
_

68
1
4
_
.
_
_
_

.
_

_
34
3
12
_
_
26
13
12
.
.
.
.
_

.

_
44
_
4
.
7
_
_
_

3
_
_
_

T ab le 2 8 . Paid holidays— Continued
(Percent of production and officeworkers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid holidays,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)
A r e a s — C ontinued
N u m b e r o f p a id h o lid a y s
D a lla s

D e tr o it

H ouston

K a n sa s
C ity

L os A n g e le s Long B e a c h
and A n a h e im Santa A n a G ard en G ro v e

L o u is v ille

N ew a rk
and
J ersey
C ity

N ew
Y o rk

P a te rso n C lifto n P a s s a ic

P h ila d elp h ia

P itts b u r g h

St. L o u is

San
F r a n c is c o O akland

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s --------------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p aid h o lid a y s -----------------------------------------------------5 d a y s _________________________________________
5 d a y s p lu s l and 2 h a lf d a y s ------------------------6 d a y s _________________________________________
6 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf day------------------------------------6 d a y s p lu s 2 and 3 h a lf d a y s ------------------------7 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------7 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf day------------------------------------7 d a y s p lu s 2 h a lf d a y s -----------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

14
-

100
_
_
_

100
_
_

100

4
-

100
2

100

25
4
-

7

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

_

_
19

_

_

_

22
8 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf day------------------------------------8 d a y s p lu s 2 h a lf d a y s ----------------------------------9 d a y s --------------------------------------------------------------9 d a y s p lu s 1 and 2 h a lf d a y s ------------------------1 0 d a y s_______________________________________ 1 0 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y ______________________ _

-

3
3
12

39
-

3
23
5
35
-

10

16

d a y s p lu s 1 and 2 h a lf d a y s ----------------------1 2 d a y s ---------------------------------------------------13 d a y s--------------------------------------------------------------

11

-

-

'

"

8

34

6

100

100

100

100

-

-

2

12

4
-

_
7
5
50

.
_
_
_
3
_
-

_
_
_
_
5
.
.

»
_
_
_
_
4
_

-

1

6

9

63
40
3

76
.
5
-

1

2

6

22

6

17

57

1

20

-

_
_

_
_
_

59
Q
O

2

27
.

“

“

.
“

_
“

_
14
. j
17
_
37
15
7

4
8

_
21

_
3
_
19
15
47
“

29

_
_
_
22

_
52
_

.
26

_
7

_

20
6
2

4

_
_
_
7

4

"

_
“

_
_

"

-

95
_

_

O ffic e w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s __________________

___________

d a y s p lu s 1 and 2 h a lf d a y s ------------------------d a y s p lu s 3 and 4 h a lf d a y s ------------------------7 d a y s -------------------- ---------------- --------------------7 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf day------------------------------------7 d a y s p lu s 2 h a lf d a y s ----------------------------------8 d a y s --------- ----------------------------------------------------8 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf day------------------------------------8 d a y s p lu s 2 h a lf d a y s -------------------------------- —
________________________________
9 days
9 d a y s p lu s 1 and 2 h a lf d a y s ------------------------1 0 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------------1 0 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y -----------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

15
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

13

.

2

15

-

2

19

-

12

W o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s ’p r o v id in g
p aid h o lid a y s -------------------------- ------------ -------------5 d a y s _________________________________________
5 d a y s p lu s 1 and 2 h a lf d a y s ------- -----------------

100

6

-

3
-

2

5
-

-

13
-

16

_
.

-

58
5
16

_
.
92

-

-

6
6

d a y s p lu s 2 h a lf d a y s ---------------------------------d a y s-------------------------------------------------------------13 d a y s —_______________________________________
11

12

8

17
49
-

-

21
2

53
*
11

52
25

1

82

_

10

-

45
-

66

22

8
-

-

8
1

-

-

-

2

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may npt equal 100.




3

8
10

2

11

19

.
7
-

4
4
9

-

9

31
-

18
-

1 In c lu d e s d ata fo r th e M ountain r e g io n in a ddition to th o s e show n s e p a r a te ly .
2 L e s s than 0 .5 p e r c e n t.
NOTE:

3
11

-

-

13
7

2
-

17
14
41
-

.
6
-

7
22

~
24
9

-

-

3
7
47

53
24

-

16

3

9

10

-

-

-

4

6
-

22

8

-

-

-

-

T ab le 2 9 . Paid vacations
(Percent of production and officeworkers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)
R e g io n s
V a c a tio n p o lic y

United
S ta tes 1

New
E ngland

M iddle
A tla n tic

B order
S ta te s

S o u th ea st

A reas

S o u th w est

G re a t
L a k es

M id dle
W est

P a c ific

A tlanta

B a ltim o r e

B o sto n

C h icago

C lev ela n d

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100
100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100

100

100

100
100

100

80
-

100
100

100

96
4
“

-

”

98
-

87
13

M ethod o f p a y m en t
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s ---------------------------------------------------L e n g t h - o f- t im e p a y m e n t-------------------------------P e r c e n ta g e p a y m e n t---------------------------------------O th e r ----------------------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

95
5
“

100

92
3
5

92

■

73
(3)
27
(3 )

61
39
-

56
44
-

65
35

A fte r 2 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
1 w e e k _______________________________ ________
O ver 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s ----------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------

33
3
64

16
84
-

72

A fte r 3 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
1 w e e k _________________________________________
O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s -----------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s -----------------------------3 w e e k s and o v e r ---------------------------------------------

5
3
87
3

96
3
1

8

95
3

“

2

85
15
"

87
-

78
-

75
5

11

21

21

-

1

"

11
12

48
40
-

55
45
"

44

77
-

51

41
3
54

2

2

2

4
94

“

-

20

2

'

A m ount of v a c a tio n p a y 2
A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v i c e :
1 w e e k _________________________________________
O ver 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ----------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s -----------------------------

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w e e k —_______________________________________
O ver 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s -----------------------------?. w**ekp
_ ....
_ . _.
.......
O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ___________________
^ w eeks
O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ----------------------------A fte r 10 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
1 w eek „
?. weftkfi
_
O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s -----------------------------3 w e e k s _______________________________________
O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s -----------------------------4 w e e k s _____________________ —-----------------------A fte r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek -------------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s __ __ _____ _______ ___ ________________
3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ----------------------------4 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------

1

1

1
1

82
4
12

(3 )
1

25
2

61
3




100

"
37
63
-

8

-

1
11

31
69
-

63
5
20

1

See footnotes at end of table.

11

89
"

26
1
1

12

6
1

2
12

12
12

85
7

85
"

71
5

1

(3)
70
9
20

18
1

56
7
18
6

55
8

28
2

3
97
~

78
5
"

9
91
-

58
3
39
-

60
33
5
3

9
29
62
-

-

47
39
5
9

9
19
64
9

21

73
3
3

-

26
74
-

12

6

2

3
91
3

2

1

-

(3)
83
4

80
4
17
"

12
1

85
16
-

86

100

14
-

-

2

73
27
-

65
-

98
"
1

10

99
-

70

91

69

1

20
11

-

31
38

-

-

-

21
2

6

66

3
7
6

62
7
24

64
12

86

14

~

8

21

3

20

90
4
-

20
11

-

64
36
-

78
22

-

27

6

36

8

94
-

59
3

6
8
86

8

92
59
8

33
"
-

3
97
-

1

1

93
3
3

-

-

100

88

-

8

18
82
"

77
23

1

3

17
77
2

4

10

2

14

-

6

78
17

43

82

86

65

20

8

26

9

-

26

1
8

56
9
35
100

85
9
7
13
87
13
54
9
25

T ab le 2 9 . Paid vacations— Continued
(Percent of production and officeworkers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)
R e g io n s
V a c a tio n p o lic y

U n ited
S ta te s 1

N ew
E n gland

M iddle
A tlantic

B order
S ta tes

S o u th ea st

A reas

S o u th w est

G re a t
L a k es

M id dle
W est

P a c ific

A tlan ta

B a ltim o r e

B o sto n

C h ic a g o

C le v e la n d

-

13

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s — C on tinued
A m ount of v a c a tio n p a y 2— C on tinued
A fte r 20 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
1 week___________________________ ______________
2 w e e k s - -------------------------------- ------—----------------3 w e e k s _______________________________ ________
O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s -----------------------------4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O ver 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s -----------------------------5 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------6 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------A fte r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek --------------------------- ----------------------------------2 w e e k s _______________________________________
3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s -----------------------------4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O ver 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s — -------------------------5 w e e k s _______________________________ ________
O ver 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s —--------------------------O ver 6 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------- -—
A fte r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w e e lL .-------------------------------- --------------------------2 w e e k s _____________ ______ ——------------------------3 w e e k s --------------------- — ------- — -----------------------O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s -----------------------------4 w e e k s ______________________________ —----------O ver 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s
-------------------------....
——
_ ____
O ver 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s —--------------------------O ver 6 w e e k s —------------------------------------------------M axim u m v a c a tio n a v a ila b le :
1 w e e k —_______________________________________2 w e e k s . ____ —---------------- -------- ——----------—-----3 w e e k s --------------------------------------——---------------O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s —---- — ------------------4 w e e k s _____________________— — ------------------O ver 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s -----------------------------5 w e e k s ___________________ ______________ _____
O ver 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s — -------------------------6 w e e k s ------------------------—---------------------------------O ver 6 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of table,




1
11

27
(3 )
49
3
8
1

1
11

19
(3 )
39
1

27
3

31
45
24
-

1
11

1

30
2
1

1
11

19
(3)
36
1

23
2
8
1

48
6

16

21

46
30
3
-

2

31
27
42
-

1

19
(3 )
36

6
20
1

31
27
42
“
31
27
42
-

-

-

6

21

15

29
47
3
-

1

40
29
6
2

-

-

6

21

15

29
47
3

1

36
34
6

3
-

-

6

21

15

29
47
3

1

36
20
6

14
3

44
29
19
5
3
"

9
16
32
43
-

44
25
18
5

9
16
26
34
15
-

8

-

44
25
18
5
8

44
25
18
5
6

3

9

6

25
59
3
7
"
6

16
44
2

30
2

-

16

6

26
33
16
-

16
40

9
16
26
33
16
-

2

35
1
1

-

64
-

2

14
29
56
14
-

6

10

2

13
23
59
“

26

37
54
-

29
54
17
-

6

10

2

13
23
59
-

26
33

37
54
-

21

7

12

1

76
15

1

2

27

10

26
33

29
54
5
-

6

16
40

6

14
77
4
-

-

-

20
11

8

"

-

-

33
20
11

“

8

“

-

-

20
11

-

8

-

-

6

10

2

13
23
55
4

26
. 33

37
54
-

20

11
8

14
46
40
14
15
71
~
14
15
71
14
15
71
-

1
21

71
2

4
1

7
59
30
2

1

7
55
34
2

~
1

7
55
30
2

4

2

86

13
46
42
13
39
48
13
39
48
-

T able 2 9 . Paid vacations— Continued
(Percent of production and officeworkers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service.
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)
A r e a s — C on tinued
V a c a tio n p o lic y
D a lla s

D e tr o it

H o u sto n

K a n sa s
C ity

L os A n g e le s Long B e a c h
and A n a h e im —
Santa A n a G ard en G ro v e

L o u is v ille

N ew a rk
and
J ersey
C ity

P a terso n CliftonrP a s s a ic

N ew
Y ork

P h ila d e lp h ia

P itts b u r g h

St. L ou is

San
F r a n c is c o O akland

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s
100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100
"

100
100
-

100
70
30
-

100
100
“

100
94
7
-

100
100
.

100
94
6
-

100
100
_

100
100
.
'

100
100
_

100
100
_

100
100
_

-

100
69
31
-

-

-

A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v i c e :
1 w e ek--------------------------------------------------------------O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s
—
2 w eek s—
------- —
O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s .
—

98
2
-

100
-

65
35
-

88
6
6
-

95
_
5
-

48
_
52
-

59
_
41
-

34
_
66
-

63
.
37
-

59
_
38
-

68
_
32
-

85
8
7
-

67
.
33
-

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 W^e.k------------,----------- n— „----------------------------,--O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s
_ —
2 w eeks
_ _
O v er 2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------

59
41
-

50
50
*

28
_
72
-

_
94
6

3
_
97
-

_
_
100
-

20
_
80
-

3
_
97
-

22
13
65
-

52
1
47
-

52
_
49
-

76
8
16
-

_
_
100
-

16
84
-

.
_
100
-

_
.
94
6
-

1
_
99
.
-

_
_
100
_

_
_
100
_

_
100
_

100
_

-

8
13
79
_
-

10
2
72
17

-

_
_
89
11
-

61

— —
___

20
80
"

-

-

-

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e : ,
1 w eek.
— ---------—
- —
O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s
.
—
2 w eek s. ..
—
.
O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s — — — — — — —
3 w eek s.
—
O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s —
— — ...—

16
_
84
-

.
97
3
-

_
100
-

_
.
94
6
-

_
92
_
8
-

_
_
100
_
_
-

_
_
84
11
5
-

_
_
89
3
8
-

84
_
16
-

_
_
86

19
-

_
_
92
_
8
-

16
12

-

.

.

14

_
6
94

9
_
91

-

-

.

_

-

"

-

-

-

19
_
70
11
-

_
10
3
87
_
-

19

-

21
_
79
_
-

_
30

72

19
16
65

_
9
91
_

_
21
79
_

_

_

_
8
65
11
16

_
10
82
_
8

M eth od o f p a v m e n t
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id v a c a tio n s — —
——
— — —————
L e n g t h - o f- t im e p a y m e n t _____________________
P e r c e n ta g e p a y m e n t— — — —
— —
O th e r ------- — ----------------- — -----------------------------A m ou n t o f v a c a tio n p a v 2

A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek.
.

_

2 w eek s—
—
---- — —
—
O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s — — — —
3 w e e k s and o v e r -

__ __

A fte r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 We »k------------------------r,-n---------------------------- r
-----O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s -----------------------------3 w eeks .
.
.
—
O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s -----------------------------4 w eeks
A fte r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek— — .
________ . . —
2 w e e k s __ ____
___
___
3 w eeks
----- -----_
___
O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s
—
4 w gftk a ----------------------------------- --- --------------------5 w eeks
.
_____
_

See footnote at end of table,




.

16
12
53
-

18

.

86

_

_

_

3
82
9
6

7
93

94

_

6

_
.

_

_
_

_
52

_

.

48
-

_
5
82
13
_

_
2
38
21
38
_
13
2
25
21
38

_
2
27
23
48

39

_

_
_
_

81

_

60
_
11

_
_

81
_
19

_
_

_

14
_

81
-

_
_
100
_
_

_
_
86
_
14
_

_
57
_
43

T ab le 2 9 . Paid vacations— Continued
(Percent of production and officeworkers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)
A r e a s — C on tinued
V a c a tio n p o lic y
D a lla s

D e tr o it

H ouston

K a n sa s
C ity

L o s A n g e le s Long B e a c h
and A n a h e im Santa A n a G a rd en G ro v e

L o u is v ille

N ew a rk
and
J ersey
C ity

N ew
Y ork

P a t e r s o ir C lif t on—
P a s s a ic

P h ila d e lp h ia

P itts b u r g h

St. L o u is

San
F r a n c is c o O akland

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s — C on tinued
A m ount of v a c a tio n p a v 2— C o n tin u ed
A fte r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e ek---------—------- —----------------- -— —-------- —----2 w e e k s ------------ — -------------------------------------------3 w e e k s -----—------------------------- — --------------------- —
O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ----------- -----------------4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v er 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s — ------- -----------------5 w e e k s -------- —--------------------— —— -------- — -----6 w e e k s ----------------- — --------------------- — ---- —
-----A fte r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e ;
1 w eek --------------------------— ---------- ------------ -------- 2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v er 3 and un d er 4 w e e k s ------------------- -— ----4 w e e k s -----—-------- ------- ------- ---------------—----------O v er 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s -----------------------------5 w e e k s --------------------— ----------------------- — ------ —
O v er 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s — — -------- — —— O v er 6 w e e k s ---------------------- — — -------------------A fte r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek --------------------------------------------------------------2 w eeks
,___< . - _________________________
3 w e e k s — ---------------—----------------- — ----------—----O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s --------------------— -----4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v er 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s ------— ------- ------- ----5 W66k8 ,
__r _ --------■ !!■ ■ --1 , ■ , --r -r r t
_
■ ■ ---r — ----r i--- tr
O v er 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s —— —------- —— — —
O v er 6 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------M axim u m v a c a tio n a v a ila b le :
1 w eek --------------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s — -------- ----------------------- ------------- ---------O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ............................... ........
4 w eeks
------—-------- —
----------------------------O v er 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s ---- — — ----------- -----5 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v er 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s
6 w e e k s ------------- -----—— -— ------------------------- ----O v er 6 w e e k s ---- -------------------------- ------------ — —

See footnote at end of table,




16
12
26
46
"

3
43
46
9
-

7
24
69
-

88
6
6
-

9
14
77
“

21
5
74
"

8
18
62
11
-

10
19
71
-

5
33
63
-

2
23
4
10
19
42
-

33
56
11
-

48
53
"

86
14

16
12
14
25
33
-

3
43
12
34
9

7
24
69
*

4
90
6
-

9
14
6
71
-

21
79
-

6
15
46
22
11
"

10
19
69
2
-

5
19
77
"

2
12
4
14
49
19
-

20
70
11
-

21
79
-

44
56
-

16
12
14
25
33
"

3
43
12
34
9

7
24
65
3
-

4
90
6
-

9
14
6
71
-

21
79
-

6
15
36
32
11
“

10
19
69
_
2
-

5
19
77
-

2
12
4
14
49
17
2

20
58
_
22
-

21
71
7
-

44 '
56
-

16
1*2
14
25

3
43
12

7
24
65

4
90

9
14
6

21
79

6
15
36

10
19
69

5
19
77

2
12
4
14

-

20
58

21
71

44

-

32
11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

33

34

3

6

71

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

-

-

2

2

-

10
17
38

_

22

-

7

-

42

-

-

-

-

-

14

T ab le 2 9 . Paid vacations— Continued
(Percent of production and officeworkers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)
A reas

R e g io n s
V a c a tio n p o lic y

U nited
S ta te s 1

New
England

M id dle
A tla n tic

B order
S ta te s

S o u th e a st

S o u th w est

G re a t
L ake 8

M id d le
W est

P a c if ic

A tlan ta

B a ltim o r e

B o s to n

C h icago

C lev ela n d

O ffic e w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s _________________________________

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
97
1
3

100
100
•

100
98
2
•

100
100
■

100
90
10

100
100
■

100
95
5

100
100
"

100
95
2
3

100
76
24

100
100
“

100
100
■

100
92
8

100
100
■

M eth od o f p a y m e n t
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id v a c a tio n s — ------------------------------------------------L e n g t h - o f- t im e p a y m e n t-------------------------------P e r c e n ta g e p a y m e n t..
- — .... — ..
O th e r ---------------------------------------------------------------A m ou n t o f v a c a tio n p a y 2
A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v i c e :
1 We ek—
. nrr-..n-______________________
O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s __________________ 2 weeks. . . .
—
— . — *...
O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ___________________

42
(3 )
57
1

64
36
-

26
_
71
3

60
_
40
-

68
_
33
-

48
_
50
-

37
_
63
-

72
1
27
-

44
_
57
-

41
_
59
-

88
_
12
-

62
_
38
-

21
_
78
-

50
_
50
-

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e ;
1 w eek —
_
_
. . . __
---O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s -----------------------------2 w e e k s —— -----------------------------------------------------O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ------------------------------

13
1
81
4

30
70
-

6
2
86
6

9
12
79
-

36
5
49
10

20
_
80
-

14
(3 )
81
5

18
.
81
1

2
_
95
3

25
_
50
24

17
6
76
-

9
_
92
-

_
(3 )
91
8

47
42
11

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
U n der 2 w e e k s
- — - ...
—
2 w e e k s ---------------------------- ,____________________
O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ___________________
3 w eeks r
,
O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s
- . ___
.. ...

1
78
5
15
1

100
_

3
89
_
8
-

5
81
10
4
-

3
75
9
14
-

(3)
74
7
18
-

_
89
1
10
-

_
83
3
14
-

_
71
24
5
-

6
94
_
_

_
100
_
_

-

(3)
71
5
20
3

-

-

(3 )
84
8
7
-

_
63
14
23
-

A fte r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e ;
1 w eek __________ _______________ ___ _____ _____»
2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s . — — -----3 w eeks
______ ___—
O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s __
4 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------

(3 )
23
1
61
6
9

51
_
49
-

17
(3)
56
8
18

64
3
25
8

_
42
_
47
10
2

3
40
_
46
9
3

_
18
1
65
7
9

_
16
1
77
_
6

_
12
_
78
3
7

_
23
_
48
24
5

_
66
6
28
_

_
26
_
75
_

-

-

_
17
_
71
8
3

_
11
_
64
11
14

A fte r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek.
. . . . .
. ... — _
2 w eeks — .
.
—
___ —-------3 w e e k s ______ ___ ____________ —__ — _______ __ _
O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s —
__—
4 w e e k s ___ „__________________ ________________
5 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------

(3)
12
51
7
28
1

44
56
-

_
8
43
7
38
5

_
21
62
3
8
6

_
32
47
10
12
-

3
31
34
9
24
-

_
8
49
11
32
-

_
4
89
_
7
-

_
10
57
3
31
-

_
9
39
24
27
-

82
6
12
-

_
17
83
.
-

_
7
55
16
22
-

.
11
13
14
62
-

A fte r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e ;
1 w eek—
________________________
2 w e e k s -----_
__ — . . _ . . .
... _
3 w e e k s - - __
...
. . __
—
4 w eek s. . . — ..
O v er 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s _________________ —_
5 weeks. . .
. . . .
6 w eeks ..
..
—.

(3 )
12
26
48
4
10
(3)

44
42
14
_
.

_
8
19
47
6
20

_
21
51
17
3
8

_
29
23
36
10
2

3
27
26
41
_
3

_
8
19
61
5
8

4
80
10
_
7

_
10
21
62
_
7

_
9
18
44
24
5

_
_
79
15
6

_
17
57
26
.

_
7
19
62
8
3

.
11
.
75
_
14

See footnotes at end of table.




_

_
_

_

_

T ab le 2 9 . Paid vacations— Continued
(Percent of production and officeworkers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)
R e g io n s
V a c a tio n p o lic y

U n ited
S ta te s *

N ew
E n gland

M iddle
A tlan tic

B order
S ta te s

S o u th e a st

A reas

S ou th w est

G re a t
L a k es

M id dle
W est

P a c if ic

A tlan ta

B a ltim o r e

B o s to n

C h ica g o

C le v e la n d

O ff ic ew o rke r s— C o ntin ued
A m ou n t o f v a c a tio n p a y 2— C o n tin u ed
A fte r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w e ek______ — — — __ ___— — ___ _
2 w e e k s ---- -------------------------- ----------------- ---------3 w e e k s _____________________ _— — _________
5 w e e k s --------------------- — —------- ------- ----------——
O v er 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s ------------------------. —
O v er 6 w e e k s ----------------------------------— ------------

(3)
12
17
46
21
4
(3 )

44
22
34
-

A fte r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek ------------------------------------------ -----------------2 w e e k s -------------------------- ------ —----------------------3 w e e k s ------- _____------ ——--------------- -----— ---- ----4 w e e k s ----------- ---------------- ------------------------------5 w e e k s — — ------- ---------------- ----------- ---------------O v er 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s ------— ------------------O v er 6 w e e k s ---------------- -----------— ------ — — -----

(3)
12
17
43
25
4
(3)

44
22
34

M a x im u m v a c a tio n a v a ila b le :
1 w e ek— — -— — — —— —------------------------------2 w e e k s ----------------- -------------------------- --------------3 w e e k s ---- —----------- —------------------------- — -------4 w e e k s --------------------- — -----------—------------- — —
5 w e e k s ----------------- — ----------— ------------- ---------O v er 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s ----------------------------6 w eeks — — — — —
— — —
—
O v er 6 w e e k s —-----— ------— ---------— —
—

(3 )
12
17
43
19
4
5
(3 )

44
22
34
-

See footnotes at end of table.




-

-

-

6
16
44
28
6
1

21
30
38
8
3

6
16
40
32
6
1

21
30
38
8

6
16
40
20
6
12
1

21
30
38
8

-

29
23
33
6
10
-

3
27
23
31
17
_

29
23
33
6
10

3
27
23
30
17
_

3

-

3

-

29
23
33
4
10
2

3
27
23
30
17
_
_

_

_

_

_

8
13
51
24
5
-

4
10
79
7

10
20
40
30

_

_

9
18
44
5
24

-

40
54

_

_
17
21
62

6

_

-

_
8
13
46
29
5
-

_
_

7
10
49
25
8

_

_

_

10
20
40
30

_

_

9
18
44
5
24

-

-

_
_

40
54 '

_
_

6

_

_

_
17
21
62
_

_

_

_

4
10
78
2

10
20
40
27

9
18
44

_
40
54

_
17
21
62

_

_

_

6

3

24
5

_
_
_

_
_

6

_
7
10
42
32
8

-

8
13
46
24
5
5

64
25
-

-

4
10
78
9

11

_
11
61
28
-

7
10
42
29
8
3

22
61
28

T a b le 2 9 . P aid v a c a tio n s — C ontinued
( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c tio n a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in p a in ts a n d v a r n i s h e s m a n u f a c tu r in g e s ta b l is h m e n t s w ith f o r m a l p r o v is i o n s f o r p a id v a c a tio n s a f t e r s e le c te d p e r i o d s of s e r v i c e ,
U n ite d S t a te s , s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s a n d a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
A r e a s — C ontinued
V a c a tio n p o lic y
D a lla s

D e tr o it

H ouston

K a n sa s
C ity

L os A n g e le s Long B e a c h
and A n a h eim — L o u is v ille
Santa A n a G ard en G ro v e

N ew ark
and
J ersey
C ity

N ew
Y ork

P a te rso n C lifto n —
P a s s a ic

P h ila d elp h ia

P itts b u r g h

St. L ou is

San
F r a n c is c o O akland

Off ic e w o rk e r s— C ontinued
A ll w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100
■

100
100
~

100
100

100
100

100
100
_
-

100
100
_

100
100
_

100
100
_

100
100
_

100
100
_

100
100
_

100
100

-

-

-

-

37
63
-

50
50
-

19

65

22

49
32

35

78

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek _________________________________________
O ver 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s __
2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s _

100

A fte r 5 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
U nder 2 W e e k s________________________________
2 w e e k s _______________________________________
O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ___________________
3 w e e k s _______________________________________
O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ___________________

78
22
-

M ethod o f p a y m en t
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s __________________________________
L e n g t h - o f- t im e p a y m e n t-------------------------------P e r c e n ta g e p aym en t---------------------------------------O th e r ----------------------------------------------------------------

-

-

"

"

100
91
4
5

36

85
1
14
-

50
51
-

28

15
_
85
-

36

72

29
_
71
-

50

65
"

50
-

62

2
98
-

2
98
-

99
1

4
91
5

_
100
-

3
_
81
16

_
_
100
-

6
15
80
-

18
7
75

88

_
56

-

-

_
99
1

12
-

44
-

"

_
83
5
13
-

_
62
16
22
-

_
97
_
3
-

-

-

-

_

14

28-

20

-

_

_

_

81
5
-

41

55
16
9

80

46

-

_

-

-

28
41

11
43
16
21
9

18
82

24
61
15

-

-

28
5
37

11
17
48
16
9

18
26
57

24
35
41

-

A m ou n t of v a c a tio n p a y 2
A fte r 1 y e a r of s e r v i c e :
1 w eek _________________________________________
O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s __________________
2 w e e k s ________________________ _______________
O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ___________________

A fte r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
1 w eek _________________________________________
2 w e e k s _______________________________________
O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s —__________________
3 w e e k s _______________________________________
O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ___________________
4 w e e k s _______________________________________

-

-

-

69
_

31
-

-

-

-

27

11

19

-

-

-

52
22
"

80

70

1
99

-

-

-

9

11

"

27
25
22
27
"

9
77

5
51

_
99

-

-

-

13
-

44
-

1
-

12
61
5
22
-

27
19
55

9
19
72

5
28
57

_
94
5

12
26
62

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

11

1

-

31

-

31

93

2
66

6

56

62
32

45

100

_

_

50

92

90

8

10

7
-

32

18
32

_

_

20

54

_
14
2
39
13
32

_
25

_

_

42

11

58

79

-

10

12
88

11
49

25
32

_
-

40

27
23

12
65
24

11
10
70

50

-

10

25
32
18

A fte r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :

7
3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ___________________
4 w e e k s _____________ ---------------------------------------5 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------

_

9
22

_
_

_

3
31
15
52
-

43
_

A fte r 20 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s _______________________________________
4 w e e k s _______________________________________
O ver 4 and u n d er 5 w e e k s -----------------------------5 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------

S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d of ta b le ,




_

-

-

3
28
19
15
35

T able 2 9 . Paid vacations— Continued
(Percent of production and officeworkers in paints and varnishes manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service,
United States, selected regions and areas, November 1970)
A r e a s — C on tinued
V a c a tio n p o lic y
D a lla s

D e tr o it

H ouston

K a n sa s
C ity

L os A n g e le s Long B e a c h
and A n a h e im — L o u is v ille
Santa A n a G ard en G ro v e

N ew a rk
and
J ersey
C ity

N ew
Y ork

P a te rso n C lifto n —
P a s s a ic

P h ila d elp h ia

P itts b u r g h

St. L o u is

San
F r a n c isc o Oakland

O ffic e w o r k e r s — C on tinued
A m ount o f v a c a tio n p a y 2— C on tinued
A fte r 25 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
1 w eek --------------------------- -------------------------------2 w e e k s __-________________ __________________
3 WAeks
4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------5 w e e k s _______________________________________
O v er 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s _________ ________
O v er 6 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------A fte r 30 y e a r s of s e r v ic e :
1 w eek --- ------------------------------ ---------------------------2 w e e k s _________________ __________ _____________
3 w e e k s _____________ __________ ______ _______ _
4 w e e k s —— — — — — — —— — — — — — — — —
5 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v er 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s ____________________
O v er 6 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------M a x im u m v a c a tio n a v a ila b le :
1 w e e k ------- -------------- ------------ ---------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s _____ —------------------------------- — _ -------4 w e e k s --------------- ---------------------------------------5 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O ver 5 and u n d er 6 w e e k s — -------- --------------6 w e e k s — —— —— — — — — — —— — ———— —

27
11
28
34
-

9
19
27
45
_
-

5
28
57
11
-

2
97
1
-

12
26
34
28
-

28
41
31
-

4
16
39
26
16
"

18
26
57
-

24
35
41
-

3
15
23
43
15
-

22
28
50
-

12
9
79
"

11
10
46
33
"

27
11
28
34

9
19
27
45

2
97
1

-

-

28
41
31
-

4
16
37
28
16
~

24
35
41

-

12
26
34
28
-

18
26
57

-

5
28
55
13
-

3
15
23
43
13
2

22
19
59
-

12
9
73
6
“

11
10
46
33
-

-

4
16
37
28
16
-

ri
10
46
24
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

27
11
28
34
-

9
19
27
45
-

5
28
55
13
-

2
97
1
-

12
26
34
28
-

28
41
31
-

-

-

"

-

-

18
26
57
-

-

24
35
41
-

-

-

-

3
15
23
11
13
32
2

22
19
59
-

12
9
73
6
-

1 I n c lu d e s data fo r th e M ountain r e g io n in a d d itio n to th o s e show n s e p a r a te ly .
2 V a c a tio n p a y m e n ts , s u c h a s p e r c e n t o f an n u al e a r n in g s, w e r e c o n v erted to an e q u iv a le n t tim e b a s i s . P e r io d s o f s e r v i c e w e r e a r b itr a r ily c h o s e n and do n ot n e c e s s a r i ly r e f l e c t the ind ivid u al
e s ta b lis h m e n t p r o v is io n s fo r p r o g r e s s io n . F o r e x a m p le , the ch a n g e s in p ro p o rtio n s in d ic a te d a t 10 y e a r s m a y in c lu d e c h a n g e s o c c u r r in g b e tw e e n 5 and 10 y e a r s .
3 L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.
NO TE :

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not equal to ta ls .

T able 3 0 . H ealth, insurance, and retirement plans
( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c tio n and o f fic e w o r k e r s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith s p e c if ie d h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , and r e tir e m e n t p la n s
U n ite d S t a te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
*
R e g io n s
T yp e o f p lan 1

U n ited
S ta te s 1

N ew
E ngland

M id dle
A tla n tic

Border
S ta te s

S o u th e a st

A reas

S o u th w est

G rea t
L a k es

M id d le
W est

P a c ific

A tlan ta

B a ltim o r e

B o sto n

C h icago

C levelan d

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s _________________________________
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L ife i n s u r a n c e _______
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s ____________________
A c c id e n ta l d eath and d is m e m b e r m e n t
in s u r a n c e ____________________________________
N on c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r
s ic k le a v e or b o t h 3__
_
_ _ ^ „
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e _________
N on c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s _
S ic k le a v e (fu ll p a y , no w a itin g
p e r io d ) ___________________________________
S ic k le a v e (p a r tia l p a y o r w a itin g
p e r io d ) ---------------------------------------- 1________
H o sp ita liz a tio n in s u r a n c e . _ _
.
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s . .
.
S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e —
_
_ .
_
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s __________________ _
M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e ______
. _
_ .
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p la n s
. _ _
M ajor m e d ic a l i n s u r a n c e . _ _
N on c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s _ _ .
R e tir e m e n t p la n s
__
_
..... .......
P e n s io n s - . . .
_ ...
.
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s _________________
S e v e r a n c e pay--------------------------------------------N o p l a n s -----------------------------------------------------------

*

S e e f o o tn o te s at end o f t a b le .




100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

96
75

97
77

93
80

96
53

94
50

93
56

96
77

100

70
54

83
65

60
49

60
42

72
34

77
47

70
55

87
58
41

97
71
56

91

65
51
29

66

92

43

87
70
61

38
25

66

66
86

51

70
58

37

82

55

60

1
1

30

31

22

23

26
98
69
96

97
74
97
74
97
74
83
65
50
50
50

1
6

5
99
50
99
50
73
38

19
90
29

14
97
50
97
50
95
50
90
37
71

26
99
63
98
62
92
56
54
29
83
82

42

66

85
93
78
87
72
70
55
82
82
75

99
91
99
91
99
91
92
81
87
87
87

68
90
62
58
35
80
79
70

2

-

3

68

97
85
95
83
84
71
26
18

86
86
81
1

66
27
91
91
70
3

86

25
92
31
80

22

45
45
38
_

5

60
1
1

41

3

68
3

91
75

100

100

100

100

100

98
85

96
89

92
49

100

89
79

68

76

80
71
53
16

88
7
3

_

1

39
96
45
96
45
96
45
70
19
64
64
64

_

4

100

100

79

99
81

92
92

79
36

77
59

81
65

73
73

68

90
90

100
98
8
6

90
50
42

97
62
62

32

87

6
98
44
98
44
98
44
76
28
94
94
69
9

100
74
100
74
100
74
93
74
54
54
54

25
42

100
55
100
55
96
50
43
26
85
85
67
5

1
1
43
91

60

91
60
78
48
62
32
89
84
84
5

T ab le 3 0 . Health, insurance, and retirement plans— Continued
( P e r c e n t of p r o d u c tio n and o f fic e w o r k e r s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith s p e c if ie d h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , and r e tir e m e n t p la n s ,
U n ited S t a te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
A r e a s — C on tinued
T yp e o f p la n 1
D a lla s

D e tr o it

H ouston

K a n sa s
C ity

L o s A n g e le s Long B e a c h
and A naheim rSanta A n a G ard en G ro v e

L o u is v ille

N ew a rk
and
J ersey
C ity

N ew
Y ork

P a terso n C lifto n —
P a s s a ic

P h ila d e lp h ia

P itts b u r g h

St. L o u is

San
F r a n c is c o Oakland

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s ---- -— —

—

------------- — -------

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L ife in s u r a n c e ------- ----------- — --------- N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s ----A c c id e n ta l d eath and d is m e m b e r m e n t
in s u r a n c e -------- ------------------------------N o n co n tr ib u to ry p la n s _ __ _ _ _ __ ___
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e or
s ic k le a v e o r both 5 ____ ______ __ ___ __
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e —
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p la n s ______ _
S ic k le a v e (fu ll p a y , no w a itin g
p e r io d ) — -------------- — — — ----S ic k le a v e (p a r tia l p a y o r w a itin g
p e r io d ) — ---- — --------------------- — ----— ------- ----- H o s p ita liz a tio n in s u r a n c e ---N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s ------- -— ----------------S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e —----------------— -----— — _
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s ------- —-------- ------ -—
M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e ---------------- -------- ---------------N o n co n tr ib u to ry p la n s _ _________ ____ ___
M ajor m e d ic a l in s u r a n c e — - -------- - —
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s ___________ ________
R e tir e m e n t p l a n s 4 --------------- ------ ----------- _
P e n s i o n s _________—------------------------- -— -----N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s ------------------------S e v e r a n c e pay---- -— -------- ------------ ——
N o p la n s — --------- — -----------— ------------

S e e fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le ,




100

100

100

100

98
67

97
83

100

98
67

72
72

63
38

100

100

100
100
100
100
100

22

72
72

62
54

74
74

23

54

28

22

30

13

58
41

98
61
98
61
98
61
82
45
75
57
30
19

2

100
84
97
81
97
81
50
34

86
86

81
-

70

100
44
100
44
91
44

100
26
78
78
51
-

6
89

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
-

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

98
92

98
91

94
85

95
92

96
85

92
80

100
85

100
100

90
87

74
74

60
50

87
84

58
47

47
42

37
37

81
81

87
_
_

86
62
62

92
47
37

97
84
78

80
43
43

100
79
19

93
93
93

83
69
69

100
100
86
86
100

73

65

71

80

50

29

7

2
1

8
100
97
100

_
99
95
99
95
85
81
37
37
82
82
69
_

37
92
79
92
79

7
96
91
96
87
96
87
34
30
92
92

26

1
0
77
98
91
98
91
98
91
94
87
90
90
90
-

2

7

100
88
100
88
63
51
69
38
91
91

86
-

96
69
96
69
87
53
30
23
87
87
87
-

97
90
87
15

1
2

92
92
89
-

86
1
2

75

4
87
85
85

2

86
9

100
91
81
72

68

59
53
44

100
100
83
_

14
42
58

100
100
100
100
100
100
86
86
95
95
95

_

T ab le 3 0 . Health, insurance, and retirement plans— Continued
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c tio n and o f fic e w o r k e r s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith s p e c if ie d h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , and r e tir e m e n t p la n s ,
U n ite d S t a t e s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
R eg i on s— C ontin ued
T yp e o f p la n 1

U n ited
S ta te s 1

N ew
England

M id dle
A tla n tic

B order
S ta te s

S o u th e a st

S o u th w est

A r e a s — C ontinued
G rea t
L a k es

M id dle
W est

P a c ific

A tlan ta

B a ltim o r e

B o sto n

C h icago

C levelan d

O ffic e w o r k e r s
A l l w o r k e r s _________________________________
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L ife in s u r a n c e ________________________________
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s ____________________
A c c id e n ta l d eath and d is m e m b e r m e n t
in s u r a n c e ____________________________________
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p la n s ____________________
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r
s ic k le a v e or both 3________________________ _
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e _________
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p la n s
S ic k le a v e (fu ll p a y , no w a itin g
p e r io d ) ___________________________________
S ic k le a v e (p a r tia l p a y o r w a itin g
p e r io d ) ___________________________________
H o s p ita liz a tio n in s u r a n c e ____________________
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s ____________________
S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e _______________ ____________
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s ____________________
M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e ___________________________
N o n co n tr ib u to ry p la n s
M ajor m e d ic a l in s u r a n c e __________________ _
N on c o n tr ib u to r y p l a n s ____________________
R e tir e m e n t p la n s *___________________________
P e n s io n s -----------------------------------------------------N o n co n tr ib u to ry p l a n s -------------------------S e v e r a n c e pay _____________________________
N o p l a n s ______________________________________

S e e f o o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le,




100

100

100

100

100

100

100

95
62

98
75

93
75

90
51

97
41

93
52

98
64

65
40

86
66
100

47
36

56
40

74

22

72
46

68

88

44
92

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

93
58

96
46

82
48

96
64

100

96
72

65
41

84

29

64
31

74
48

84
77
26

84
77

68

94
94
61

100

20

100
41

1
2

63

88
52

48
32

93
77

90
51
30

91
69
29
79

86

57
43

88

64
41

70
54

79
69
52

72
25
15

34

53

83

51

54

30

59

54

18

72

57

36

79

42

16
96
57
95
53
90
49
72
34
75
74
59
3

-

1
1

4
97
39
97
39
80
33
78
30
90
90
70

15
95

9
96
32
96
32
93
32
95
28
80
64
47
15
4

22

46

7
97
63
97
63
97
63

23
96
18
96
18
96
18
91
14
73
73
73

3
94
31
94
31
94
31
91
31
95
95
79

_

36

87
56
35

1

100
74
100
74
100
74
71
49
41
41
41
-

92
76
89
73
83
65
45
33
79
79

68
1
(5 )

-

22

90
17
93

21
89
22

52
52
49
-

2

60

97
58
97
50
92
45
73
33
75
73
56

6

100
44
96
40
90
34
85
29
85
85
34
-

84
23

88

48
77
77
74
-

2

-

5

-

100
62
100
62
100
62
94
62
55
55
55
-

100
68
100
47
94
41
71
37
69
69
56
9

_

96
37
96
37
96
37
84
25

88

84
70
4

T ab le 3 0 . H ealth, insurance, and retirem ent plans— Continued
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c tio n and o f fic e w o r k e r s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lish m e n ts w ith s p e c if ie d h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , and r e tir e m e n t p la n s ,
U n ited S t a te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
A r e a s — C on tinued
T yp e o f p l a n 1
D a lla s

D e tr o it

Los A n g e le s Long B e a c h
and Anaheim rSanta A n a G ard en G ro v e

N ew a rk
and
J ersey
C ity

N ew
Y ork

P a terso n Cliftonr—
P a s s a ic

San
F r a n c is c o Oakland

H ouston

K a n sa s
C ity

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
13

94
60

95

51

88

94
84

79
70

94
85

93
79

97
52

100
86

92
65

65
51

76
76

57
47

70
61

56
46

52
46

28
28

84
70

53
27

83
17
17

80
49
49

100
55
39

83
44
33

69
28
28

78
29

91
78
78

78
56
56

95
26
16

79

64

52

61

69

54

91

28

76

4
99
60
99
60
99
60
87
46
81
81
74
-

9

23
91
65
91
65
84
49
47
27
79
79
76
-

9
74
55
74
55

93
87
93
87
83
78
28
28
54
54
39
“

26
93
74
93
74
84
64
28

85
85
85
85
85
85
47
47
97
97
78
3

16

3
97
71
97
71
97
71

L o u is v ille

P h ila d e lp h ia

P itts b u r g h

St. L o u is

O ffic e w o r k e r s
A ll w o r k e r s ———------------------------------ —------ —
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L ife in s u r a n c e ___ ,__— — — —— — —— ——
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p l a n s -----------------------------A c c id e n ta l d e a th and d is m e m b e r m e n t

100

100

97

97
87

68
68

67
67

82
45
29

97
59
59

97
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s ——————
— —
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r
s ic k le a v e o r b o t h 3 ——————
—— ——
—
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e —— —
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s —— — — — —
S ic k le a v e (fu ll p a y , no w a itin g
p e r io d ) ----------------------------------------------------S ic k le a v e ( p a r tia l p a y o r w a itin g
p e r io d ) ---------— . — -------- —— — — — —
H o s p ita liz a tio n in s u r a n c e -----------------------------N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s ——————— ——
S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e — —
— —— —— —
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s ————— —— —
M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e —— —— —
——
—
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p l a n s -----------------------------M a jo r m e d ic a l in s u r a n c e — ———
— ——
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p l a n s - — — — —— ——
R e tir e m e n t p la n s 4 —
— — —— — —
P e n s io n s —
—
—
——
——— —
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p la n s —— — —
S e v e r a n c e pay— ————— -----------------------N o p l a n s --------------------------------------------- ------------

51
41

100
15
13

53

54

95

22

44

3

97
32
97
32
97
32
94
29

88
67
38

2
1

100
66
99
65
99
65
73
39
78
78

66
-

100
34
100
34
89
34

100
24
93
78
60
15

100
13
91
89

1
1
6
68
100
13
100
13
100
13
100
13
100
100

3

1

16
-

1

100
74
100
74
75
49
71
39

88
88
78
-

68

49
25
13
49
49
38
-

100

20

81
78
73
3

100
97
84
81
69
65
69
65
69
69
61
-

88
6
1
79
79
79
3

In c lu d e s o n ly t h o s e p la n s fo r w h ic h at l e a s t p a r t of th e c o s t i s b o rn e by th e e m p lo y e r and e x c lu d e s le g a lly r e q u ir e d p la n s su ch a s w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n sa tio n and s o c ia l s e c u r it y ; h o w e v e r , p la n s
r e q u ir e d b y S ta te t e m p o r a r y d is a b ilit y in s u r a n c e la w s a r e in c lu d e d i f the e m p lo y e r c o n tr ib u te s m o r e than i s le g a lly r e q u ir e d o r th e e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e b e n e fits in e x c e s s o f the le g a l r e q u ir e m e n ts .
" N o n c o n tr ib u to r y plan s" in c lu d e o n ly t h o s e p la n s fin a n ce d e n t ir e ly b y the e m p lo y e r .
I n c lu d e s d ata fo r th e M ountain r e g io n in a d d itio n to th o s e show n s e p a r a te ly .
U n duplicatqd t o ta l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s ic k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e show n s e p a r a te ly .
U n d u p licated to ta l o f w o r k e r s in p la n ts h a v in g p r o v isio n s fo r p e n sio n and s e v e r a n c e pa y p la n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
L e s s than 0 .5 p e r c e n t.

2
3
4
5

N O TE ;

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not equal to ta ls .




T a b le 31. O th e r s e le c te d b en efits
( P e r c e n t o f p r o d u c tio n and o f fic e w o r k e r s in p a in ts and v a r n is h e s m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fu n e r a l le a v e pay, ju r y duty pay, su p p le m e n ta l u n e m p lo y m e n t b e n e f it s ,
and c lo th in g p r o v is io n s , U n ited S t a te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , N o v e m b e r 1970)
A reas

R e g io n s
U n ited
S ta te s 1

T yp e o f b e n e fit

N ew
E ngland

M iddle
A tla n tic

B order
S ta te s

S o u th e a st

M id dle
W est

G rea t
L a k es

S ou th w est

A tlanta

P a c ific

B o sto n

C h icago

C lev ela n d

92

B a ltim o r e

93
92

100
90
1
2

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith
p r o v is io n s fo r :
F u n e r a l le a v e pay____________________________
J u r y du ty pay_________________________________
S u p p le m e n ta l u n e m p lo y m e n t b e n e f it s --------- —
P r o t e c t iv e c lo t h in g ....................... ...............................
C loth in g p r o v id e d --------------------------------------M o n e ta r y a llo w a n c e g i v e n ------------------------C o m b in a tio n o f c lo th in g and m o n e ta r y
a llo w a n c e _________________________________

83
77
7
78

66
9
3

79
76
3
58
56
-

2

87
78
14
80
78

1
1

75
69
-

72
18
42

1
2

62
69
3

58
72

42

45
23

90
87

66
1
1
1
2

68
-

84
51

93
91

86

90
80

-

66

86
5
66

27
39

63
-

84

-

-

3

-

91
84
5

86

89

87
83
4

93
92
~

-

-

78
77
-

77

1
1

25
41

8
86
78
6
2

-

89
89
-

66

1

-

-

86
2

92
92
-

O ffic e w o r k e r s
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith
p r o v is io n s fo r :
F u n e r a l le a v e p a y ---------------------------------J u r y duty pay-----------------------------------------S u p p le m e n ta l u n e m p lo y m e n t b e n e f it s —

82
83
9

81
79

2

85
82

76
70

2
1

75
82

86

61
79
“

2

95
98
“

90
9

71
62
“

■

75
93
39

A r e a s — C ontinued

D a lla s

D e tr o it

H ouston

K a n sa s
C ity

L o s A n g e le s Long B e a c h
and A n a h eim —
Santa A n a G ard en G ro v e

L o u is v ille

N ew a rk
and
J ersey
C ity

N ew
Y ork

P a te r s o n —
C lifton ^
P a s s a ic

San
F r a n c is c o Oakland

P h ila d elp h ia

P itts b u r g h

St. L o u is

94
83
40
47
45
"

100
100

100
100

100

7
65
58
"

_

-

65
41
24

76
76
-

7

-

-

86
100

82
95

P r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith
p r o v is io n s fo r :
F u n e r a l le a v e pay____________________________
J u r y du ty pay--------------------------------------------------S u p p le m e n ta l u n e m p lo y m e n t b e n e f it s -----------P r o t e c t iv e c lo t h in g ----------------------------------------C lo th in g p r o v id e d --------------------------------------M o n e ta r y a llo w a n c e g i v e n ------------------------C o m b in a tio n of c lo th in g and m o n e ta r y
a llo w a n c e _________________________________

52
63
-

70
26
44
-

97
93
34
96
90
-

6

80

100
_
68

100
100
_

94

1
1

59
9

84

*

-

82
36

_

80
78
-

2

53
73

_

68

92
93
-

23
38

84
84
-

7

-

84
42

73
82

-

1
6

88
88
-

80
67
13

-

-

73
45

70
76
7

2

92

O ffic e w o r k e r s
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith
p r o v is io n s fo r :
F u n e r a l le a v e pay____________________________
J u r y du ty pay--------------------------------------------------S u p p le m e n ta l u n e m p lo y m e n t b e n e f it s ________

1 In c lu d e s
NOTE:

60
77

98
97
9

86
100

100
100

data fo r the M ountain r e g io n in a d d itio n to th o se show n s e p a r a te ly .

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq u a l t o ta ls .

74
51

47
64

86
98

83
70
39

100
100
6

A p p e n d ix A . S c o p e and M e th o d o f S u rv e y
Scope of survey

and composition of the labor force included
survey. The advance planning necessary to make
survey requires the use of lists of establishments
bled considerably in advance of the payroll
studied.

The survey included establishments primarily engaged
in manufacturing paints (in paste and ready mixed
form), varnishes, lacquers, enamels and shellac; putties
and calking compounds; wood fillers and sealers; paint
and varnish removers; paint brush cleaners; and allied
paint products (industry 2851 as defined in the 1967
edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual,
prepared by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget,
formerly Bureau of the Budget). Separate auxiliary units
such as central offices, warehouses, and separate research
facilities were excluded.
The establishments studied were selected from those
employing eight workers or more at the time of refer­
ence of the data used in compiling the universe lists.
The number of establishments and workers actually
studied by the Bureau, as well as the number estimated
to be within the scope of the survey during the payroll
period studied, are shown in table A -l.

in the
a wage
assem­
period

Production and officeworkers

The term “production workers,” as used in this
bulletin, includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers engaged in nonoffice functions. Admin­
istrative, executive, professional, and technical personnel
and force-account construction employees, who were
utilized as a separate work force on the firm’s own
properties, were excluded.
The term “ officeworkers,” includes all nonsupervisory officeworkers and e x c l u d e s administrative,
executive, professional, and technical employees.
Occupations selected for study

Method of study

Occupational classification was based on a uniform
set of job descriptions designed to take account of inter­
establishment and interarea variations in duties within
the same job. (See appendix B for these descriptions.)
The occupations were chosen for their numerical impor­
tance, their usefulness in collective bargaining, or their
representativeness of the entire job scale in the industry.
Working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners,
trainees, and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and
probationary workers were not reported in the data for
selected occupations, but were included in the data for
all production workers.

Data were obtained by personal visits of the Bureau’s
field staff. The survey was conducted on a sample basis.
To obtain appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a
greater proportion of large rather than small establish­
ments was studied. In combining the data, however, all
establishments were given their appropriate weight. All
estimates are presented, therefore, as relating to all
establishments in the industry, excluding only those
below the minimum size at the time of reference of the
universe data.
Establishment definition

Wage data

An establishment, for purposes of this study, is de­
fined as a single physical location where industrial opera­
tions are performed. An establishment is not necessarily
identical with the company, which may consist of one or
more establishments.

Information on wages relates to straight-time hourly
earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Incentive
payments, such as those resulting from piecework or
production bonus systems, and cost-of-living bonuses
were included as part of the workers’ regular pay; but
nonproduction bonus payments, such as Christmas or
yearend bonuses, were excluded.

Employment

Estimates of the number of workers within the scope
of the study are intended as a general guide to the size




50

Table A -1. Estimated number of establishments and workers within scope of survey, and number studied, paints and
varnishes manufacturing, November 1970
Number of
establishments
Region 1 and area2

Within
scope of
study 3

Workers in establishments
Actually
studied

Within scope of study

Actually
studied
T otal4

Production
workers

Officeworkers

Total

United States5 . . . .

1.045

370

57,657

30,863

9.400

39,040

New England ..........................
B o sto n .................................
Middle Atlantic .....................
Newark and Jersey City . .
New Y o rk ............................
Paterson—Clifton—
Passaic ...............................
Philadelphia........................
Pittsburgh.............................
Border States ..........................
B altim ore.............................
Louisville.............................
Southeast .................................
A tla n ta .................................
Southwest ...............................
D allas....................................
Houston...............................
Great Lakes .............................
Chicago ...............................
Cleveland.............................
Detroit ...............................
Middle West ............................
Kansas C ity ..........................
St. Louis...............................
Pacific ......................................
Los Angeles—Long Beach
and Anaheim—
Santa
Ana—Garden Grove . . . .
San Francisco—Oakland . .

49
22
265
59
83

20
13
97
23
25

1,570
878
14,130
2,859
2,404

766
456
7,977
1,770
1,482

259
141
2,163
417
295

920
668
9,912
1,999
1,339

27
37
17
54
20
13
90
20
80
26
18
272
90
29
33
58
12
27
170

11
13
11
23
10
10
32
10
32
11
10
86
27
13
13
27
7
12
49

945
2,888
1,148
3,339
1,465
1,085
4,492
1,195
3,297
1,380
914
20,268
6,947
3,037
2,704
3,028
1,064
1,120
7,159

597
1,618
529
1,751
700
569
2,525
629
1,869
868
504
10,431
3,629
1,323
1,457
1,810
549
672
3,586

108
410
187
391
195
104
680
266
532
207
166
3,462
1,266
641
462
624
367
173
1,204

500
2,332
1,036
2,185
1,071
968
3,138
1,004
2,159
935
731
14,150
4,527
2,566
2,263
2,389
978
801
3,975

94
28

27
13

3,843
1,808

2,053
952

659
364

2,140
1,483

T h e regions used in th is s tu d y in clu d e : N e w E n g la n d —C o n n e c tic u t. M a in e , M assachusetts, N e w H a m p s h ire , R h o d e Island ,
and V e rm o n t; M id d le A t la n tic —N e w Jersey, N e w Y o r k , and P ennsylvania; B o rd e r S ta te s —D e la w a re , D is tric t o f C o lu m b ia , K e n tu c k y ,
M a ry la n d , V irg in ia , and W est V irg in ia ; S o u th e a s t—A la b a m a . F lo rid a , G eorgia, M ississippi, N o r th C aro lin a , S o u th C a ro lin a , and
Tennessee; S o u th w e s t—A rkansas. L o u is ia n a , O k la h o m a , and T e x a s; G re a t Lakes—Illin o is . In d ia n a , M ic h ig a n , M in n e s o ta , O h io , and
W isconsin; M id d le W est—Io w a . Kansas, M issouri, N eb raska, N o rth D a k o ta , and S o u th D a k o ta ; and P a c ific —C a lifo rn ia . N ev a d a , O re g o n ,
and W ashin gton . A laska and H a w a ii w e re n o t in clu d e d in th e s tu d y .
F o r d e fin itio n o f areas, see fo o tn o te
o f tables
th ro u g h
.
^
In clu d e s o n ly establishm ents w ith
w o rk e rs o r m o re a t th e tim e o f refe re n c e o f th e universe d a ta .
In clu d e s e x e c u tiv e , professional, and o th e r w o rk e rs e x c lu d e d fr o m th e p ro d u c tio n and o ffic e w o rk e r categories show n
sep arately.
In cludes d a ta fo r th e M o u n ta in reg ion in a d d itio n to th o se show n s ep arately.

2

8

1

6

23

5

two rates of pay; one-fourth of the employees earned
less than the lower of these rates and one-fourth earned
more than the higher rate.

Average (mean) hourly rates or earnings for each
occupation or other groups of workers, such as produc­
tion workers, were calculated by weighting each rate (or
hourly earnings) by the number of workers receiving the
rate, totaling, and dividing by the number of individuals.
The hourly earnings of salaried workers were obtained
by dividing their straight-time salary by normal rather
than actual hours.
The median designates position, that is, one-half of
the employees surveyed received more than this rate and
one-half received less. The m iddle range is defined by




Labor-management agreements

Separate wage data are presented, where possible, for
establishments having (1) a majority of the production
workers covered by labor-management contracts, and (2)
none or a minority of the production workers covered
by labor-management contracts.
51

Method of wage payment

service and other eligibility requirements, the proportion
of workers receiving the benefits may be smaller than
estimated.

Tabulations by method of wage payment relate to the
number of workers paid under the various time and
incentive wage systems. Formal rate structures for time­
rated workers provide single rates or a range of rates for
individual job categories. In the absence of a formal rate
structure, pay rates are determined primarily by the
qualifications of the individual worker. A single rate
structure is one in which the same rate is paid to all
experienced workers in the same job classification.
Learners, apprentices, or probationary workers may be
paid according to rate schedules which start below the
single rate and permit the workers to achieve the full job
rate over a period of time. Individual experienced
workers occasionally may be paid above or below the
single rate for special reasons, but such payments are
exceptions. Range-of-rate plans are those in which the
minimum and/or maximum rates paid experienced
workers for the same job are specified. Specific rates of
individual workers within the range may be determined
by merit, length-of-service, or a combination of various
concepts of merit and length of service. Incentive
workers are classified under piecework or bonus plans.
Piecework is work for which a predetermined rate is paid
for each unit of output. Production bonuses are based
on production over a quota or for completion of a task
in less than standard time.

Paid holidays . Paid holiday provisions relate to full-day

and half-day holidays provided annually.
Paid vacations. The summaries of vacation plans are

limited to formal arrangements, excluding informal plans
whereby time off with pay is granted at the discretion of
the employer or supervisor. Payments not on a time
basis were converted; for example, a payment of 2 per­
cent of annual earnings was considered the equivalent of
1 week’s pay. The periods of service for which data are
presented represent the most common practices, but
they do not necessarily reflect individual establishment
provisions for progression. For example, the changes in
proportions indicated at 10 years of service may include
changes which occurred between 5 and 10 years.
Health , insurance , and retirem ent plans. Data are pre­

sented for health, insurance, pension, and retirement
severance plans for which all or part of the cost is borne
by the employer, excluding programs required by law,
such as workmen’s compensation and social security.
Among the plans included are those underwritten by a
commercial insurance company and those paid directly
by the employer from his current operating funds or
from a fund set aside for this purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form of life insur­
ance. Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that
type of insurance under which predetermined cash
payments are made directly to the insured on a weekly
or monthly basis during illness or accident disability.
Information is presented for all such plans to which the
employer contributes at least a part of the cost. How­
ever, in New York and New Jersey, where temporary
disability insurance laws require employer contribu­
tions,1 plans are included only if the employer (1)
contributes more than is legally required or (2) provides
the employees with benefits which exceed the require­
ments of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to
formal plans which provide full pay or a proportion of
the worker’s pay during absence from work because of
illness; informal arrangements have been omitted.
Separate tabulations are provided for (1) plans which
provide full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans
providing either partial pay or a waiting period.

Scheduled weekly hours

Data on weekly hours refer to the predominant work
schedule for full-time production (or office) workers
employed on the day shift.
Shift provisions and practices '

Shift provisions relate to the policies of establish­
ments either currently operating late shifts or having
formal provisions covering late-shift work. Practices
relate to workers employed on late shifts at the time of
the survey.

Supplementary wage provisions

Supplementary benefits were treated statistically on
the basis that if formal provisions were applicable to half
or more of the production workers (or officeworkers) in
an establishment, the benefits were considered appli­
cable to all such workers. Similarly, if fewer than half of
the workers were covered, the benefit was considered
nonexistent in the establishment. Because of length-of-




1The temporary disability insurance laws in California and
Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.
52

Medical insurance refers to plans providing for com­
plete or partial payment of doctors’ fees. These plans
may be underwritten by a commercial insurance
company or a nonprofit organization, or they may be a
form of self-insurance.
Major medical insurance, sometimes referred to as
extended medical insurance, includes the plans designed
to cover employees for sickness or injury involving an
expense which exceeds the normal coverage of hospilization, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to
plans which provide regular payment for the remainder
of the retiree’s life. Data are presented separately for
retirement severance pay (one payment or several over a
specified period of time) made to employees on retire­
ment. Establishments providing both retirement sever­
ance pay and retirement pensions to employees were
considered as having both retirement pension and retire­
ment severance plans. Establishments having optional




plans providing employees a choice of either retirement
severance pay or pensions were considered as having
only retirement pension benefits.
P a id fu n e r a l a n d ju r y d u t y le a ve .

Data for paid funeral
and jury duty leave are limited to formal plans which
provide at least partial payment for time lost as a result
of attending funerals of specified family members or
serving as a juror.

Data relate to
formal plans designed to supplement benefits paid under
State unemployment systems.

S u p p le m e n ta l u n e m p lo y m e n t b e n e fits .

Data relate to formal provisions for
protective garments, such as coveralls, overalls, coats,
smocks, and acid-resistant clothing, worn in lieu of or
over the employees’ personal clothing; provisions for
boots, glasses, hats, and gloves were excluded.
C lo th in g a llo w a n c e .

53

A p p e n d ix B .

O c c u p a tio n a l D e s c r ip tio n s

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys
is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are
employed under a variety o f payroll titles and different work arrangements from
establishment to establishment and area to area. This permits the grouping of
occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this
emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational con­
tent, the Bureau’s job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in
individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these
job descriptions, the Bureau’s field economists are instructed to exclude working
supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, and handicapped, part-time,
temporary, and probationary workers.

labeled containers into boxes or cartons. This is a pro­
duction job and excludes shipping packers.

FILLER, HAND OR MACHINE
Fills tubes, drums, or other containers with finished
products. Work involves any o f the following: Filling
containers by hand, using a dipper or spatula; filling con­
tainers to weight or volume by setting them on scales
adjusted to proper weight and controlling flow of prod­
uct from a filling spout; or adjusting filling machine to
fill container to correct volume and feeding containers
into machine. In addition, may cap filled containers or
may clean equipment at end o f batch or day.

LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(L oad er and unloader; handler and stacker;
shelver; trucker; stockman or stock helper; ware­
houseman or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing
plant, store, or other establishment whose duties involve
one or more o f the following: Loading and unloading
various materials and merchandise on or from freight
cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking,
shelving, or placing materials or merchandise in proper
storage location; transporting materials or merchandise
by hand truck, car, or wheelbarrow to proper location.
Longshoremen, who load and unload ships, are ex­
cluded.

JANITOR
(Cleaner, porter; sweeper; charwoman; janitress)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory
working areas and washrooms, or premises of an office.
Duties involve a combination o f the following: Sweep­
ing, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; remov­
ing chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment,
furniture, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or trim­
mings; providing supplies and minor maintenance serv­
ices; cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Work­
ers who specialize in window washing are excluded.

MAINTENANCE MAN, GENERAL UTILITY
Keeps the machines, mechanical equipment and/or
structure of an establishment (usually a small plant
where specialization in maintenance work is impractical)
in repair. Duties involve the performance of operations
and the use of tools-and equipment of several trades,
rather than specialization in one trade or one type of
maintenance work only. Work involves a combination o f

LABELER AND PACKER
Pastes identifying labels on cans or other containers
by hand or by means o f a labeling machine, and/or packs




54

the following: Planning and laying out of work relating
to repair o f buildings, machines, mechanical and/or elec­
trical equipment; repairing electrical and/or mechanical
equipment; installing, aligning, and balancing new equip­
ment; repairing buildings, floors, stairs, as well as making
and repairing bins, cribs, and partitions.

directing others in verifying the correctness of shipments
against bills of lading, invoices, or other records; check­
ing for shortages and rejecting damaged goods; routing
merchandise or materials to proper departments; main­
taining necessary records and files.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified as
follows:

MIXER-GRINDER
Tends equipment which mixes and/or grinds liquid
and solid ingredients used to make products such as
paints, varnishes, lacquers, enamels, and shellacs. Work­
ers who operate equipment to only crush, grind, or
pulverize dry materials or dry pigments are excluded.
For wage survey purposes, workers are to be classified
according to whether the equipment they tend does
both mixing and grinding or is limited to only one oper­
ation, as follows:
Mixer—
Tends equipment which mixes pigments with
a portion o f the vehicle (which may consist o f oils,
varnishes, and alkyd resins) to form a smooth uni­
form paste ready for the grinding operation. (See
Grinder.) Work involves the following: Selecting,
weighing, and measuring out pigments and selecting
quantities o f vehicle required by formula or batch
ticket; charging or loading ingredients into mixer; and
operating equipment. May also clean mixer.
Grinder—
Tends equipment which grinds paste re­
ceived from mixing machines to insure proper disper­
sion o f mixed paste in the vehicle. (See Mixer.) Work
involves the following: Setting controls o f mills, start­
ing flow o f paste, and rerunning batch when neces­
sary. May also operate screening equipment.

Shipping clerk
Receiving clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
TANK CLEANER
(Tank washer; chipper)
Cleans tanks, vats, kettles, and chutes used in produc­
tion o f paint products. Work involves most o f the fo l­
lowing: Disconnecting pipelines and locking safety de­
vices on agitator switches; examining interior of tanks to
determine cleaning method; connecting hoses to pneu­
matic chisel and ventilating equipment; starting pump to
draw residual liquid from tank; chipping and scraping
caked material from interior o f tanks and removing
scrapings from tank; and scrubbing interior of tanks.
May presoak tank with caustic solution, haul kettles and
chutes to burning area, and burn off residue in vessels.
TECHNICIAN
(Laboratory assistant)
Performs routine, predetermined chemical tests under
the supervision o f a chemist or foreman to determine
whether purchased raw materials meet specifications
and/or whether processing is being performed according
to plant standards or specifications. In addition, may
perform some o f the duties of the PRODUCT TESTER,
such as conducting physical tests to determine viscosity,
color, and weight. Employees performing the duties of a
technician as part o f a training program leading to posi­
tions as professional chemists are excluded.

C om bin ation Mixer-Grinder—
Tends operation of
equipment which performs a combination o f the
operations indicated under mixer and grinder. Equip­
ment may perform one or more o f these operations
automatically.

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is
responsible for incoming shipments o f merchandise or
other materials. Shipping work involves: A knowledge of
shipping procedures, practices, routes, available means of
transportation, and rates; and preparing records o f the
goods shipped, making up bills o f lading, posting weight
and shipping charges, and keeping a file o f shipping
records. May direct or assist in preparing the merchan­
dise for shipment. Receiving work involves: Verifying or




55

TESTER, PRODUCT
(Inspector)
Conducts standard and routine simple physical tests
to determine quality, viscosity, color, and weight of
paint products. Tests consist of comparisons between
finished products and standard samples or specifications.
Workers performing chemical as well as physical tests are
classified as TECHNICIANS.

TINTER

load or unload truck with or without helpers, make
minor mechanical repairs, and keep truck in good work­
ing order. Driver-salesman and over-the-road drivers are
excluded.

(Color matcher, enamel maker)
Colors or tints paints. Work involves a combination o f
the following: Blending basic color pigments in correct
proportions to match standard color sample or according
to specifications; using hand paddle or power mixer to
mix ingredients thoroughly; checking weight and/or
viscosity o f batch against sample or specifications, and
making necessary additions to mixture to meet require­
ments. In addition, may add thinner to ground paint.

VARNISH MAKER
(Kettleman; oil cooker; varnish cooker)
Cooks necessary ingredients such as synthetic resins
and gums in kettle (either open or closed kettle) to make
various types of varnishes and oils according to specifica­
tions. Work involves: Regulating controls for tempera­
ture; adding ingredients according to formula or other
specifications; checking viscosity of batch and deter­
mining when it meets the standard sample. In addition,
may also add thinner to the mixture. Employees tending
equipment that performs one or more of the above
operations automatically are included.

TRUCKDRIVER
Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to trans­
port materials, merchandise, equipment, or men be­
tween various types o f establishments such as: Manufac­
turing plants, freight depots, warehouses, wholesale and
retail establishments, or between retail establishments
and customers’ houses or places o f business. May also




56

In d u s tr y W a g e S t u d ie s
The most recent reports for industries included in the
Bureau’s program o f industry wage surveys since January
1960 are listed below. Copies are available from the
Superintendent o f Documents, U.S. Government Print-

ing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or any o f its regional sales offices, and from the Bureau o f Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C., 20212, or from any o f its regional offices shown on the inside back cover.

I. Occupational Wage Studies
Manufacturing
Price
Basic Iron and Steel, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1602 .............................................................................................................. $0.55
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1732 ...................................................................
.45
Cigar Manufacturing, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1581 ..............................................................................................................
.25
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1472 .....................................................................................................
.20
Cotton and Man-Made Fiber Textiles, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1637 ................................................................................ 1.00
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1695 ..................................................................................................
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1531
.....................................................................................................
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1576 ................................................................................
Fluid Milk Industry, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1464 ..............................................................................................................
Footwear, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1634 ............................................................................................................................. ...
Hosiery, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1562 ....................................................................................................................................
Industrial Chemicals, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1529 ..............................................................................................................
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1626 .....................................................................................................
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1 6 1 8 ............................................................................................
Machinery Manufacturing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1664 .....................................................................................................
Meat Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1677 .......................................................................................................................
Men’s and Boys’ Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1968
BLS Bulletin 1659 ............................................................................................................................................................
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 6 .........................................................................................
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1690
.........................................................................................
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1679 .....................................................................................................

.50
.30
.25
.30

.75
.70
.40
1 00

55
55
1 00

65
1

qq

.60

.75

Nonferrous Foundries, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1726 ...........................................................................................................
.50
Paints and Varnishes, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1524 ..................................................................................................... ...
40
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1719 ...................................................................................... 1.25
Petroleum Refining, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1526 ..............................................................................................................
.30
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 3 ................................................................................
.50
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1608 ......................................................................................
.60
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1694
................................................................................
.50
Structural Clay Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1697 .....................................................................................................
.65
Synthetic Fibers, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1540 ............................................................................................................................ 30




I. Occupational Wage Studies—
Continued

Synthetic Textiles, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1509 ................................................................................................................. $0.40
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1965—
66. BLS Bulletin 1527 ............................................................................................. 45
West Coast Sawmilling, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1704
................................................................................................................45
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1728 ....................................................................................... 35
Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1649 .......................................................................................................45
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1651 ..................................................................60
Wool Textiles, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1 5 5 1 ..................................................................................................................................45
Work Clothing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1624 .............................................................................................................................. 50
Nonmanufacturing
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1689 ..................................................................................................
.50
Banking, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1703 ........................................................................................................................................... 65
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1583
.....................................................................................................
.50
Communications, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1696 ............................................................................................................................ 30
Contract Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1644 ..................................................................................................
.55
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1566 .................................................................
.30
Educational Institutions: Nonteaching Employees, 1 9 6 8 -6 9 . BLS Bulletin 1 6 7 1 ............................................................ 50
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1614 ............................................................................................................. 70
Hospitals, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1688 ................................................................................................................................. 1.00
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1645 ....................................................................................................75
Life Insurance, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1569 ............................................................................................................................... 30
Motion Picture Theaters, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1542 .............................................................................................................35
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1 9 6 7 -6 8 . BLS Bulletin 1638 ................................................................................75
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 2 ............................................................................... 60

II. Other Industry Wage Studies
Employee Earnings and Hours in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the South and North Central Regions, 1965. BLS
Bulletin 1552 .......................................................................................................................................................................... 50
Employee Earnings and Hours in Eight Metropolitan Areas of the South, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1533 ...................
.40
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail Trade, June 1 9 6 6 Retail Trade (Overall Summary). BLS Bulletin 1584 ......................................................................................... 1.00
Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm Equipment Dealers, BLS Bulletin 1584-1 ............................................. 30
General Merchandise Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-2 ....................................................................................................... 55
Food Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-3 ..........................................................................................................................
.60
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Stations. BLS Bulletin 1 5 844 ............................................................... 50
Apparel and Accessory Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-5 .........................................................................................
.55
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household Appliance Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-6 ...............................
.50
Miscellaneous Retail Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-7 ...............................................................................................
.65




☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1972 O - 484-791 (90)

BUREAU

OF LABOR

ST A T IST IC S

R E G IO N A L O FFIC E S

PUERTO RICO

Region I
1603-JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III, 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)

1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region VI
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Regions V II and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 10th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

Region II




Regions V II and V III will be serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X will be serviced by San Francisco.

U .S. D E P A R T M E N T O F LABO R
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

T H IR D CLASS M A IL

WASHINGTON. D.C. 20212
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PE NALTY FOR PR IVA TE USE, $300




POSTAGE AND FEES PAID

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102