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Industry
Wage Survey

•
/

Crude Petroleum
and Natural Gas
Production
August 1972
Bulletin 1797
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S

1973




B&yton & Montgomery Co.
Public Library
J A N 1 51 9 74
d o c u m e n t c o l l e c t io n

Industry
Wage Survey

Crude Petroleum
and Natural Gas
Production
August 1972
B ulletin 1797
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Peter J. Brennan, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

1973

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Preface

This bulletin summarizes the results o f a Bureau o f Labor Statistics survey o f
wages and related benefits in the crude petroleum and natural gas production industry
in August 1972.
The study was conducted in the Bureau’ s Office o f Wages and Industrial Relations.
Martin E. Personick o f the Division o f Occupational Wage Structures prepared the
analysis. Field work for the survey was directed by the Bureau’ s Assistant Regional
Directors for Operations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program o f industry wage studies, as well
as the addresses o f the Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end o f this bulletin.




in




Contents

Page
Summary

1

.................................................................................................................................

Industry characteristics
Employment

1
1
2

............................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................

Production........................................................................................................................
Method o f wage p a y m e n t................................................................................................

2

Unionization

2

...................................................................................................................

Occupational earnings

..............................................................................................................

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions

3

....................................................

3

..................................................................

4

Paid h o lid a y s ...................................................................................................................

4
4

Scheduled weekly hours and shift provisions

Paid vacations...................................................................................................................
Health, insurance, and retirement plans .........................................................................

4

Other selected b en efits.....................................................................................................

5

Tables:

1.

Occupational averages

....................................................................................

6

Earnings distribution:
2.

G asm en..........................................................................................................

7

3.

Mechanics, maintenance................................................................................

8

4.

Pumpers

9

5.

Roustabouts

................................................................................................... 10

6.

Truckdrivers

................................................................................................... 11

.......................................................................................................

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
7.

Scheduled weekly h o u rs ...................................................................................12

8.
9.
10.
11.

Shift differential provisions..............................................................................13
Paid h o lid a y s ................................................................................................... 14
Paid vacations .................................................................................................15
Health, insurance, and retirement p la n s ........................................................... 17

12.

Other selected b en efits.....................................................................................18

Appendixes:
A.

Scope and method o f s u rv e y ....................................................•............................. 19

B.

Occupational descriptions......................................................................................... 22




v




Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas
Production, August 1972

Summary

o f the production workers within the scope o f the
survey were in establishments primarily producing crude
petroleum.

Oil-well pumpers, the largest occupation among those
selected for study in the Nation’s crude petroleum and

Employment Total employment o f the industry at the

natural gas production industry, averaged $3.98 an hour

time o f the survey (August 1972) was estimated to be

in August 1972.1 This represented an increase o f $1.01

74,900, a decline o f about 18 percent from the level

an hour, or 34 percent, in their average straight-time

reported 5 years earlier. The number o f establishments

earnings since a similar survey was conducted 5 years

within the scope o f the study also dropped from 1,584
in August 1967 to 1,240 in August 1972. Average

earlier.2 Among the other 10 jobs selected to represent
the industry’ s occupational pay structure in August 1972,

employment per establishment, however, rose slightly,

average straight-time earnings ranged from slightly over

from 58 to 60 workers over the 5-year period.

$5 an hour for maintenance electricians and painters to
$3.21 for rotary floormen.

Production-worker employment, estimated at 43,500
in August 1972, was down about 16 percent since the

Among the regions and States studied separately,
occupational pay levels were usually highest in California

August 1967 study.

and generally lowest in the Border States o f Kentucky

and roustabouts

and West Virginia and in the Middle Atlantic region. In

studied, fell by about one-fourth between the two sur­

Texas, where slightly over one-third o f the industry’ s

veys.

production workers were employed, job averages usually

reported in drilling occupations, since most o f the indus­
try’ s well-drilling operations were performed by outside

fell at or slightly above their nationwide levels.

Employment o f oil-well pumpers

(laborers),

the

two largest groups

In both studies, relatively few workers were

contractors (industry group 138), who were excluded
from the surveys.4

Nine-tenths or more o f the industry’ s production
workers were in establishments providing paid holidays,
paid vacations, and at least part o f the cost o f life insur­
ance and various health insurance benefits. A majority
o f the workers were in establishments granting 9 paid
holidays annually and 2 weeks o f vacation pay after 1
year o f service, 3 weeks after 5 years, 4 weeks after 10

1 See appendix A for scope and method of survey, and ap­
pendix B for occupational descriptions. Wage data in this bulletin
exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends,
holidays, and late shifts.

years, and 5 weeks or more after 20 years.

2 For an account of the earlier study, see Industry Wage
Survey: Crude Petroleum and Natrual Gas Production, August
1967, Bulletin 1566 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1968).

Industry characteristics

3 A crude petroleum or natural gas establishment, for pur­
poses of this study, was defined to cover all oil and gas field activ­
ities of an operating company in the wage area for which separate
data are presented.

The study included establishments "primarily engaged
in operating oil and gas field properties, which includes
exploration for crude petroleum and natural gas; drilling,

4 Well-drilling activities were carried on by establishments
employing about one-fifth of the production workers estimated
to be in the scope o f the crude petroleum and natural gas produc­
tion studies. As reported in the Bureau’s monthly employment
and earnings series, the number o f production jobs in oil or gas
field services (well-drilling or geophysical and geological explo­
ration done on a fee or contract basis) declined slightly over the
5-year survey period, from 109,800 in August 1967 to 105,900
in August 1972.

completing, and equipping wells; operation o f separators,
emulsion breakers, desilting equipment; and all other
activities incident to making oil and gas marketable up
to the point o f shipment from the producing property .3
Also included in the study were establishments engaged
in the production o f oil through the mining and extrac­
tion o f oil from oil shale and oil sands. Over nine-tenths




1

The extraction o f crude petroleum and natural gas
through offshore operations is largely confined to the
Texas, Louisiana, and California coasts. Production o f
petroleum from offshore leases increased from 368.2
to 614.8 million barrels between 1967 and 1971, while

About three-fourths o f the industry’ s production
workers in August 1972 were concentrated in four
States:
One-third in Texas, one-sixth in Louisiana,
one-seventh in California, and almost one-tenth in
Oklahoma. Over three-fourths o f the employment in
Texas was in the inland section o f the State, whereas
the Louisiana Gulf Coast accounted for nine-tenths o f

the corresponding increase for natural gas was from
1,837.8 to 3,750.5 billion cubic feet. For 1971, offshore

the production workers in that State.

production o f crude oil represented about 18 percent,
and gas, about 17 percent, o f total production.

Four

Production. A slowdown in oil well drilling may partly

years earlier, the corresponding shares o f U.S. production

explain employment declines in the industry.

were 1 and 10 percent.8
1

The

Establishments having at

number o f producing oil wells in the Nation fell from

least part o f their operations offshore at the time o f the

565,289 in 1967 to 517,318 in December 1971. Still,

August 1972 survey employed 95 percent o f the produc­

the Nation’ s supply o f crude oil rose over the 4-year
span, as domestic production and imports increased
while exports dwindled.5 The Nation’s new supply
(additions to present stock) and foreign disposition o f

tion workers in the Louisiana Gulf Coast region, compared
with nearly three-fourths on the Texas G ulf Coast and
slightly over two-fifths in California.

crude petroleum (in millions o f barrels) for 1967 and

Method o f wage paym ent A ll production workers in the

1971 are shown below:

industry were paid on a time-rate basis.

Nine-tenths

1967
Domestic production............ ............
Imports ................................. ............
Exports ................................. ............

1971

were under formal wage plans, chiefly providing for

3,215.7
411.6
26.5

3,453.9
613.4
0.5

single rates for specified occupations; the remaining
workers were paid primarily according to their individual
qualifications.

Unionization.

The following tabulation shows the relative importance

Establishments having collective bargain­

ing agreements covering a majority o f their production

o f States in the production o f the Nation’s new supply
o f crude petroleum in 1971, as reported by the Bureau

workers employed two-fifths o f the industry’ s work

o f Mines,6 and illustrates the concentration o f activity

force.

in this industry:

three-fourths in California and one-half each in Texas

Geographically, the highest proportions were

and the Border States; in Louisiana and Oklahoma, two
State
T exas.......................................................................................
Louisiana ..............................................................................
C aliforn ia..............................................................................
O klahom a..............................................................................
Wyoming ..............................................................................
New M exico...........................................................................
A la sk a ....................................................................................
K ansas....................................................................................
Other S ta tes...........................................................................

major oil-producing States, the corresponding proportion
was slightly more than one-fourth. Text table 1 further
illustrates the wide variation in unionization by geo­
graphic area.

Percent
35.4
27.1
10.4
6.2
4.3
3.4
2.3
2.3
8.6

three-fourths (38 and 36 percent, respectively) o f the

5 See James G. Kirby and Betty M. Moore, “Crude Petro­
leum and Petroleum Products,” Minerals Yearbook, 1971 edition
(U.S. Department o f the Interior, Bureau of Mines), p. 855.
Preliminary estimates for 1972 show U.S. imports of crude
petroleum rose to 811.1 million barrels while exports fell to less
than 0.2 million. See December 1972 issue of Mineral Industry
Surveys: Crude Petroleum, Petroleum Products, and Natural
Gas Liquids (U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines),
p. 2.

Nation’s marketed production o f natural gas in 1971,
according to the Bureau o f Mines. Marketed production

6 Kirby and Moore, “Crude Petroleum and Petroleum
Products,” table 7, p. 888.

in the United States rose from 18.2 trillion cubic feet in

7 See William B. Harper and Leonard L. Fanelli, “Natural
Gas,” Minerals Yearbook, 1971 edition (U.S. Department of the
Interior, Bureau of Mines), p.765.

Texas and Louisiana together also accounted for nearly

1967 to 22.5 trillion in 1971. While gas exports were
nearly the same in 1967 and 1971—about 80 billion
cubic feet—imports rose sharply from 564 billion to over

8 Latest information available, Outer Continental Shelf
Statistics (U.S. Department of the Interior, April 1972).

934 billion during the 4-year span.7




2

Text table 1. Percent of workers in crude petroleum and
natural gas establishments with labor-management agreements
covering a majority of their production employees, August 1972

Region and State

Percent

United S ta te s .....................................
Middle A tlantic..................................... ..
Western Pennsylvania .............................
Border S ta te s.....................................................
Great L a k e s ........................................................
M idcontinent.....................................................
O klahom a................................................
Louisiana.............................................................
Gulf Coast................................................
Northern Louisiana...................................
T e x a s...................................................................
Gulf Coast................................................
Inland .....................................................
Mountain.............................................................
California ..........................................................

comparisons were possible, most pay levels in the Texas
Gulf Coast region were substantially higher than those
in the Texas inland area, and for two jobs (truckdrivers
and welders) they exceeded pay levels in California.
Occupational pay relationships also varied within
geographic areas. To illustrate, pumpers averaged 13
and 15 percent more than roustabouts in California and
the Mountain States; but the relationship was reversed
in the Middle Atlantic region, Border States, Great Lakes
region, and Midcontinent, where pay levels for rousta-

40-44
35-39
35-39
50-54
20-24
15-19
25-29
25-29
25-29
0- 5
50-54
55-59
50-54
10-14
75-79

abouts were from 2 to 13 percent above those o f
pumpers (table 1
).
Although earnings o f individuals in the occupations
studied were somewhat dispersed on a nationwide basis,
there were clusterings o f individual earnings within the
regions, States, and areas (tables 2 to 6). For example,
over two-fifths o f the roustabouts in the Great Lakes
and Mountain regions and close to half in Louisiana and
Texas had earnings between $4.40 and $4.50 an hour.

O f those workers in establishments with collective

Such clusterings reflected the high incidence o f single­
rate pay systems applying to specified jobs in this

bargaining agreements, most were represented by inde­
pendent unions (those not affiliated with the A F L -C IO )

industry.

or the Oil, Chemical and Atom ic Workers International
Union, an A FL-C IO affiliate.
Establishment practices and supplementary
wage provisions

Occupational earnings

Data were also obtained on selected establishment

Earnings gains for the seven nondrilling occupations

practices and supplementary wage benefits, including

included in both the 1967 and 1972 surveys ranged from
27 percent for oil field welders to 37 percent for roust­

work schedules, paid holidays, paid vacations, and speci­
fied health, insurance, and retirement plans.

abouts (laborers) and outpaced the 25 percent rise in
the Consumer Price Index during the 5-year span. Corre­
sponding pay increases in the three drilling occupations
studied averaged somewhat less—15 percent for rotary

Text table 2. Employment and average hourly earnings of
workers in the crude petroleum and natural gas production
industry

floormen, 16 percent for rotary drillers, and 21 percent
for derrickmen (text table 2).
Among the 11 occupations selected to represent the
industry’s pay levels in August 1972, average straight-time
earnings ranged from slightly over $5 an hour for main­

Occupation

tenance electricians and painters to $3.21 for rotary
floormen (drillers’ helpers). Oil-well pumpers, the most
populated occupation studied, averaged $3.98 an hour—

Roustabouts...................
Electricians, maintenance .
Gasmen...........................
Pumpers...........................
Mechanics, maintenance .
Truckdrivers...................
Welders, oil fie ld .............
Derrickmen.....................
Drillers, ro tary................
Floormen, r o t a r y ...........
Painters, maintenance . . .

7 cents more than roustabouts, who made up the second
largest group.
Among the regions, States, and areas studied sepa­
rately, job averages in August 1972 were usually highest
in California—5 to 24 percent above nationwide levels—
and generally lowest in the Border States o f Kentucky
and West Virginia and in the Middle Atlantic region
(text table 3).

In Texas, where slightly over one-third

o f the 43,500 production and related workers covered
by the survey were employed, job averages most com­
monly fell at or just above nationwide levels.




Average hourly earnings1
Employment,
Percent increase,
August August August 1967 to
1972
1972
August 1972
7,432
288
1,136
11,420
2,570
967
277
757
642
1,345
33

$3.91
5.05
4.65
3.98
4.78
3.78
4.47
3.46
4.09
3.21
5.04

37
36
34
34
32
28
27
21
16
15
(2)

1 Ex clu d e s prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
^ In 1967 survey, data did not meet p u blication criteria.

Where

3

Text table 3. Regional and State wage levels for selected occupations expressed as percents of nationwide averages, August 1972
[U.S. average, each occupation = 100]

Electri­
Mechanics, Painters,
Derrick- Drillers, cians, FloorRoust­ Truck- Welders,
men, Gasmen mainte­ mainte­ Pumpers abouts drivers oil field
men
rotary mainte­
nance
nance
nance rotary

Area

Middle A tlantic.....................
Western Pennsylvania. .
Border S ta te s........................
Great La k e s...........................
Midcontinent........................
Oklahoma...................
Lou isiana.............................
Gulf Coast...................
Northern Louisiana. . .
Texas.....................................
Gulf Coast...................
In la n d ........................
Mountain : ...........................
California.............................
N O TE:

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

97
83
—
—
-

—
97
85
—
—
—

—

—

_

—
—
—
—
-

—

—
—
_
-

—

—

—

86
86
62

103
88
—
—
—
—
—
—

97
97
98
98
—

99
—
99
96
105

—

97
95
102
106
—
104
104
104
95
111

76
76
74
94
95
96
—
101
104
100
105
107

_
—
—
—
-

—
—
—
93
93
—
—
105

78
79
73
87
88
95
110
111
104
101
111
99
112
119

85
89
84
90
91
95
108
109
94
103
108
101
99
108

104
104
98
106
79
90
98
96
—
104
130
101
118
124

94
94
87
—
77
77
92
93
—
102
120
97
107
115

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.

Scheduled weekly hours and shift provisions. Work

granted 10 days per year.
The largest proportions
receiving 6 paid holidays or less were two-fifths in the
Great
Lakes
region and one-third in Northern

schedules o f 40 hours a week were predominant in estab­
lishments employing nearly seven-eighths o f the produc­
tion workers in August 1972 (table 7). Such schedules
were in effect for at least seven-tenths o f the workers in
all regions and States studied, except the Great Lakes,
where the proportion was one-half. Schedules o f 48
hours or more applied to over one-fourth o f the workers

Louisiana.

Paid vacations.

Paid vacations, after qualifying periods

in the Great Lakes region but to one-tenth or less o f the

o f service, were provided by establishments employing
nearly all o f the production workers (table 10). Typical
vacation provisions for workers were: 2 weeks o f pay

workers in the other regions and States.
Some workers in the industry were found to be on
variable work schedules (See table 7, footnote 4, for one
example o f this situation). Variable work schedules
were in effect in establishments employing one-fifth o f
the production workers in the Midcontinent region,
about one-tenth each in the Great Lakes and Mountain
regions, and 5 percent or less elsewhere.
Seven-tenths o f the production workers were in

after 1 year o f service; 3 weeks’ pay after 5 years; 4
weeks’ pay after 10 years; and 5 weeks’ pay after 20
years. These typical vacation provisions generally covered
a smaller proportion o f workers in the Middle Atlantic
and Border States than in other geographic areas studied.
To illustrate, provisions for 3 weeks’ pay after 5 years o f
service applied to a majority o f workers in most regions
and States, but to only 13 percent o f the workers in the
Border States and to virtually none in the Middle Atlantic

establishments having formal provisions for late-shift

region.

work, usually providing 15 cents an hour for workers on
second shifts and 30 cents for those on third shifts

Health, insurance, and retirement plans. Life, hospital­

(table 8). About 6 percent o f the workers were actually

ization, surgical, medical, and major medical insurance,

employed on late shifts at the time o f the survey.

financed at least in part by the employer, were provided

Paid holidays.

(table 11). Three-fourths o f the workers were provided

to more than nine-tenths o f the production workers
Nine-tenths o f the production workers

formal sick leave (usually full pay without a waiting

covered by the survey were provided paid holidays,
usually 9 annually. Establishments granting at least 9

period); two-thirds, accidental death and dismember­
ment insurance; and one-fourth, sickness and accident
insurance.

paid holidays employed a majority o f the workers in
Oklahoma, the Louisiana Gulf Coast region, Texas, the
Mountain region, and California (table 9). The largest

For some o f these plans, the incidence varied widely
among the regions, States, and areas studied. For example,

proportion o f workers receiving more than 9 paid holi­
days was in the Border States, where one-third were




accidental death and dismemberment insurance covered

4

Thrift or savings plans, to which the employer makes
monetary contributions beyond administrative costs,
were provided by establishments accounting for nearly

less than half the workers in the Middle Atlantic States
and the Texas Gulf Coast area compared with about
nine-tenths o f the workers in California and Northern
Louisiana.
Retirement pension plans (other than Federal social
security) were available to nearly four-fifths o f the
workers covered by the survey. Such plans provide reg­
ular payments for the remainder o f the retiree’s life and

two-thirds o f the industry’s work force. The proportions
varied widely by geographic area—from one-tenth in the
Border States to more than nine-tenths on the Louisiana
Gulf Coast.
Nearly all o f the workers in establishments with

were typically financed wholly by the employer. The
proportion o f workers under pension plans ranged from
slightly over two-fifths in the Great Lakes region to

offshore operations were provided travel pay between
their reporting point and the site o f offshore operations
(table 12). In the major offshore locations, the Louis­
iana and Texas Gulf Coasts, most o f the workers travel­

over nine-tenths in California and the Louisiana and

ing to offshore sites received $1.60 to $1.65 per hour

Texas Gulf Coasts.
Provisions for lump sum payments on retirement
(severance pay) covered 7 percent o f the workers in the
Middle Atlantic region and were virtually nonexistent
elsewhere in the industry.

for travel time. In California, however, offshore workers
typically received their regular hourly wage rate as travel
payment.
Premium pay for offshore work was available to
nearly two-fifths o f the workers in Louisiana Gulf Coast

Other selected benefits. Jury-duty and funeral leave pay

establishments with such operations, but was nonexist­
ent elsewhere. Premium payments o f 20 cents per hour
and 4.5 percent o f the employee’ s straight-time wage

provisions were reported by establishments employing
nearly four-fifths o f the workers (table 12). A t least half
o f the workers received both benefits in all regions,
States, and areas except the Great Lakes, where the
proportion covered was approximately two-fifths.




rate were the two provisions found on the Louisiana
Gulf Coast.

5

T a b le 1. O c c u p a t io n a l a v e r a g e s
(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h ou rly ea rn in g s 1 o f production w o rk e rs in crude p e tro le u m and natu ral gas production esta b lish m en ts,
U nited States, se le c te d r e g io n s 2, and States, August 1972)
M iddle Atlantic
U nited State s^
T o ta l

Occupation^

E a rn ­
ings

W ork­
ers
D e r r ic k m e n ..................................
D r ille r s , r o t a r y .........................
E le c t r ic ia n s , m ain tenan ce . . .
F lo o r m e n , r o t a r y .......................
G a s m e n ..........................................
M e ch a n ic s, m a in te n a n c e ...........
P a in t e r s , m a in te n a n c e ..............
P u m p e r s .......................................
R o u s ta b o u ts ..................................
T r u c k d r i v e r s ...............................
W e ld e r s , o il f i e l d .......................

M idcon tinent
B o rd e r States

W e stern
P en n sylvan ia

E a rn ­
ings

W o rk ­
ers

757
642
288
1,345
1,136
2,570
33
11,420
7,432
967
277

$3.46
4.09
5.05
3.21
4.65
4.78
5.04
3.98
3.91
3.78
4.47

_

_

11
25
266
206
52
25

-

$4.01
3.61
3.11
3.32
3.95
4.22

W ork­
ers

11
25
209
166
52
25

T o ta l

E a rn ­
ings

W o rk ­
ers

_

_

G rea t L a kes

E a rn ­
ings

_

_

W ork ­
ers

E a rn ­
ings

W ork ­
ers

E a rn ­
ings

60
60
84
34
479
364
52

$3.34
3.97
3.30
4.50
3.46
3.53
4.01

$2.88
3.46
4.90
2.82

-

-

383
345
9
648
141
225
2,431
1,405
322
27

W ork ­
er s
D e r r ic k m e n ..................................
D r ille r s , r o t a r y .........................
E le c t r ic ia n s , m aintenance . . .
F lo o r m e n , r o t a r y .......................
G a s m e n ..........................................
M ech a n ic s, m a in te n a n c e ...........
P a in te r s , m a in te n a n c e ..............
P u m p e r s ........................................
R o u s ta b o u ts ..................................
T r u c k d r i v e r s ...............................
W e ld e r s , o il f i e l d ......................

1
2
3
4

-

62
245
2,116
1,235
33
56

-

$4.95
4.72
4.37
4.22
3.70
4.12

W o rk ­
ers
-

62
209
1,857
1,118
27
50

51
20
260
168
22
20

$2.87
3.52
2.90
3.27
3.71
3.88

N orth
Lou isian a

E a rn ­
ings

W ork­
ers

T o ta l

E a rn ­
ings

-

-

$4.95
4.91
4.40
4.28
3.63
4.16

259
117
-

$4.14
3.67
-

-

-

W ork­
ers
-

91
527
671
7
4,433
3,089
264
51

E a rn ­
ings
$5.00
4.83
4.83
4.69
4.03
4.02
3.94
4.58

E x clu d es p re m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olid ays, and late sh ifts.
F o r d e fin itio n o f r e g io n s shown in this and subsequent tables, see appendix A , table A - l , footnote 1.
V ir tu a lly a ll o f the w o r k e r s r e p o r te d in the se lec te d occupations w e re m en.
Inclu des data fo r r e g io n s in addition to those shown sep a rately .

NOTE:

Dashes in d ica te no data r e p o r te d or data that do not m eet pu blication c r it e r ia .




E arn ­
ings

_

_

9
117
133
1,456
866
134
27

$4.90
4.42
4.59
3.80
3.73
3.39
3.46

C a lifo rn ia

4.49
4.53
3.51
3.57
3.00
3.46

T e xa s

G ulf C oast

E a rn ­
ings

W ork­
ers

Mountain

$4.01
3.61
3.15
3.48
3.95
4.22

Lou isiana

T o ta l

Oklahom a

G ulf C oast
W ork ­
ers
148
151
7
899
851
28
12

E a rn ­
ings
$4.83
4.96
4.69
4.42
4.21
4.91
5.37

T e x a s Inland
W ork­
ers
-

66
379
520
3,534
2,238
236
39

E a rn ­
ings

W ork
er s

E a rn ­
ings

-

-

-

$4.98
4.83
4.79
3.93
3.94
3.82
4.34

11
52
122
677
409
27
13

$4.85
4.42
5.02
4.45
3.86
4.45
4.77

W o rk ers

E a rn ­
ings

-

99
85
597
20
758
550
195
77

$5.30
5.14
5.10
5.30
4.74
4.21
4.69
5.14

T a b le 2.

E a r n in g s d istrib u tio n :

G asm en

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f gasm en in crude p etrole u m and natural gas production establish m en ts by s tr a ig h t-tim e h ou rly ea rn in g s, 1
U nited States, s e le c te d r e g io n s , and States. August 1972)
M iddle A tla n tic
U nited State s^

H ou rly ea rn in gs ^

T o ta l
Under $3.40 . .
$3.40 and under $3.50 . .

W estern
Pennsylvan ia

Mountain
To ta l

Oklahom a

Gulf C oast

T o ta l

G ulf C oast

C a liforn ia

T e x a s Inland

.

352.9
47.1

4 14.2

4 17.1

9.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
27.3
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

_

.3
-

_
27.3
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

_
-

_
5.7
11.3
12.8
7.1
25.5

6.8
13.7
10.3
6.0
18.8

_
7.8
13.9
15.1
40.0

_
5.7
16.3
15.8
46.9

_
1.1
1.5
30.0
5.1
42.7

4.1
45.9
.7
43.9

_
2.1
23.7
6.9
42.2

17.3
71.2

-

8.0

$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90
$4.00

.
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.
.

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40
$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40
$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90
$5.00

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

.8
.5
4.0
2.1
1.8
20.8
7.2
32.0

$5.00
$5.10
$5.20
$5.30
$5.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$5.10
$5.20
$5.30
$5.40
$5.50

.
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.
.

_

_

3.2

4.5

72.7
-

7 2.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.8
7.2
2.0
2.6

_
-

_

_
-

8.5
14.9
-

10.3
17.1
-

4.1
9.4
-

4.8
10.5
-

5.4

-

-

-

6.8
.8
.8

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1,136
$4.65

11
$4.01

11
$4.01

51
$2.87

141
$4.49

117
$4.42

245
$4.72

209
$4.91

.7

-

-

1 E x clu d es p re m iu m p a y fo r o v ertim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olid ay s, and la te sh ifts.
2 Inclu des data fo r r e g io n s in addition to those shown se p a ra tely .
3 A ll w o r k e r s w e re at $2.30 to $2.40.
4 A ll w o r k e r s w e re at $2.10 to $2.20.
B ecau se of rounding, sums o f individual item s m ay not equal 100.




T o ta l

.

under
under
under
under
under

NO TE:

T e xa s

-

and
and
and
and
and

N um ber o f w o r k e r s . . .
A v e r a g e h ou rly ea rn in g s ^

L ou isian a

7.7
3.5

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

T o t a l .........................

M idcontinent
B o r d e r States

-

-

-

3.8
1.9
-

24.7
9.4

-

-

9.0

5.8

11.8

-

-

-

-

9.5
1.1
1.1

-

2.4

22.4
29.4

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

527
$4.83

148
$4.83

379
$4.83

52
$4.42

$5.14

85

T a b le 3.

E a r n in g s d istrib u tio n :

M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f m ain tenan ce m ech an ics in crude p e trole u m and natural gas production establish m en ts by s tr a ig h t-tim e h ou rly ea rn in g s*,
U nited States, s e le c te d re g io n s , and States, August 1972)

U n ite d S ta te s ^

B o r d e r S ta te s

T o ta l

U n d e r $ 3 . 4 0 ............................................
$ 3 . 4 0 a n d u n d e r $ 3 . 5 0 ....................

T exas

M i d c 'o n t i n e n t

M id d le A tla n tic
H o u rly e a rn in g s *

W e ste rn
P e n n s y lv a n ia

2 .0
.2

3 1 6 .0
8 .0

3 1 6 .0
8 .0

4 3 5 .0
1 0 .0

M o u n ta in

G re a t L ak es
T o ta l

_

_

O k la h o m a

T o ta l

G u lf C o a s t

C a lifo rn ia

T e x a s In la n d

8 .0

5 1 3 .6

3 .6

4 .6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

$ 3 .5 0
$ 3 .6 0
$ 3 .7 0
$ 3 .8 0
$ 3 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 .6 0
$ 3 .7 0
$ 3 .8 0
$ 3 .9 0
$ 4 .0 0

....................
....................
....................
....................
....................

.8
.3
.1
.2

2 0 .0
1 2 .0
1 2 .0
4 .0

2 0 .0
1 2 .0
1 2 .0
4 .0

2 9 .4
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

1 0 .0
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

~

$ 4 .0 0
$ 4 .1 0
$ 4 .2 0
$ 4 .3 0
$ 4 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

0
0
0
0
0

....................
....................
................ ....
....................
....................

2 .6
.5
6 .6

1 2 .0
8 .0
4 .0
-

1 2 .0
8 .0
4 .0
-

_

1 .3
6 .0

2 .5

2 .7
2 0 .4

-

4 .9
9 .2
1 .3

4 .0

.3
2 .1
1 7 .1

-

4 .0

1 0 .7
3 .1
6 .2
4 .4
1 3 .8

-

-

$ 4 .5 0
$ 4 .6 0
$ 4 .7 0
$ 4 .8 0
$ 4 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 4 .6 0
$ 4 .7 0
$ 4 .8 0
$ 4 .9 0
$ 5 .0 0

....................
....................
....................
....................
....................

.3
5 .4

1 1 .3
1 .2
7 .5

$ 5 .0 0
$ 5 .1 0
$ 5 .2 0
$ 5 .3 0

and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under

$ 5 .1 0
$ 5 .2 0
$ 5 .3 0
$ 5 .4 0

....................
....................
....................
....................

2 0 .8
8 .9
4 .6
1 2 .3

$ 5 . 4 0 a n d o v e r ........................................

4
4
4
4
4

.1
.2
.3
.4
.5

.9
2 2 .9

_

_

2 0 .0

-

-

2 0 .0

-

-

*

_

_

5 .0

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 8 .8

.9

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

3 .2

_

T o t a l ....................................................

1 0 0 .0

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s ........................
A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s * . . .

2 ,5 7 0
$ 4 .7 8

*
^
3
4
^

.1
3 .2
3 .4
1 .5
4 .9

_

-

7 .5
8 .3
_

2 .8

4 .0

9 .7

2 0 .0

6 .8
1 .5
3 0 .8

7 .0

1 .3
2 2 .5
4 .0
5 .3

1 1 .8
-

1 8 .2
8 .4
-

1 4 .3
1 4 .3
-

-

1 .3

2 .3

3 1 .1
8 .6
1 3 .2

2 9 .6
1 2 .7
3 .7

8 0 .3
8 .2

"

3 0 .0
1 1 .8
5 .8

1 .6

1 2 .6
1 9 .8
4 3 .4

.

_

_

.8

6 .1

6 .6

6 .0

-

4.4

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

25
$ 3 .6 1

25
$ 3 .6 1

20
$ 3 .5 2

34
$ 4 .5 0

225
$ 4 .5 3

133
$ 4 .5 9

671
$ 4 .8 3

1 51
$ 4 .9 6

520
$ 4 .7 9

122
$ 5 .0 2

597
$ 5 .1 0

-

B ecau se o f rounding, sums o f ind ividu al item s m ay not equal 100.




2 .5
4 .9

-

.4

.9

E xclu des p re m iu m pay fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h o lid a y s , and la te sh ifts.
N
Inclu des data fo r re g io n s in addition to those shown sep a ra tely .
A ll w o r k e r s at $2.70 to $2.80.
W o r k e r s w e r e d is trib u ted as fo llo w s : 30 percen t at $2.40 to $2.50, and 5 p e rcen t at $3.20 to $3.30.
W o r k e r s w e r e d is trib u ted as fo llo w s : 3.8 percen t at $2.30 to $2.40; 8.3 p ercen t at $2.70 to $2.80; and 1.5 p e rcen t at $3.30 to $3.40.

NO TE:

_
.4

.4

1 .2
"

.5

T a b le 4:

E a r n in g s d istrib u tio n :

P u m p e rs

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f pu m pers in crude p e trole u m and n atu ral gas prod u ction esta b lish m en ts by s tr a ig h t-tim e h ou rly ea rn in g s,*
U nited States, s e le c te d re g io n s , and States. August 1972)
M iddle A tla n tic
United
State s 2

H ou rly e a rn in g s *

T o ta l

M idcontinent
B order
States

W estern
Pen n sylvan ia

G rea t
L a k es

T o ta l

Lou isia n a

Oklahom a

T o ta l

Gulf
C oast

T exa s

N o rth ern
Lou isia n a

T o ta l

Mountain

C a lifo rn ia

G ulf
C oast

Texas
Inland
5.4

_

_
.
_
_
_

/
Under $2.00

3.2

. .

7.5

9.6

327.3

6.1

1.6

2.8

_

-

-

4.3

_

.8
1.6
4.2
.2
1.6

_
7.5

_

_

11.3

.5
4.6
18.8
_

.8
7.6
4.3
_

_

_
2.6
_
_

_
_

.7
_

_
_

0.4
8.1
-

.3
_

1.0
_

.9
_
.1
_

_
_
_
_

2.2

-

2.7

-

-

9.0
5.3
1.5
.8

_
_
_

2.5
2.7
4.1
.7
.5

3.2
.2
4.0
1.3
2.7

2.3
3.4
4.1
.5
-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

3.0
_

_
_

3.8
_

2.3
2.9
(4)

.2
_
.2

1.9
.2
.6
3.5
1.9

_

$2.00
$2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2.10 ...........
$2.20 ...........
$2.30 ...........
$ 2 .4 0 ...........
$2.50 ...........

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 .6 0 ...........
$2.70 ...........
$2.80 ...........
$ 2 .9 0 ...........
$3.00 ...........

2.5
2.7
2.1
.7
.5

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$3.10 ...........
$3.20 ...........
$3.30 ...........
$ 3 .4 0 ...........
$3.50 ...........

1.5
.2
1.0
2.4
2.3

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 .6 0 ...........
$3.70 ...........
$3.80 ...........
$ 3 .9 0 ...........
$4.00 ...........

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

]

1.5

5.7
-

-

-

-

1.9
-

1.9

-

-

3.5

3.5

2.3
(4)
1.0
-

9.6
-

_
1.5
8.8

_
11.3

8.3
1.5
2.1
.1

(4)
.9
.1
.4

-

-

6.3

6.3
4.8
1.4
.7
.1

-

-

_

-

1.5
1.5

2.9
_

.2
.1

_
_

1.3
10.0
1.9

-

-

.1
_
_

1.1

-

1.1

2.7
3.8
2.5

4.1
-

1.4
1.4
16.8
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

51.5

55.5

1.8
.4
.4
5.4
1.4

9.4
6.0

10.0
7.7

1.5
-

1.7
1.9
-

-

.8

$4.10 ...........
$4.20 ...........
$4.30 ...........
$ 4 .4 0 ...........
$4.50 ...........

1.4
1.1
.5
1.5
7.2

_
-

_
-

_
_

-

-

_
_
5.0
1.5

.8
18.8

$4.60 ...........
$4.70 ...........
$4.80 ...........
$ 4 .9 0 ...........
$5.00 ...........

19.7
15.9
7.3
1.7
3.7

-

-

_
-

12.5
10.6
-

-

-

-

3.0

-

-

-

T o t a l ..................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s ..............
A v e r a g e h o u rly e a r n in g s * . .

11,420
$3.98

266
$3.11

209
$3.15

260
$2.90

479
$3.46

2,431
$3.51

1,456
$3.80

$5.00 and o v e r

-

32.3
18.8

_

-

_

_

1.4
1.6
3.1
11.4

2.3
2.7
5.2
17.8
26.2
3.5
2.7
1.0

-

18.2
3.9
4.7
.6
.1

-

2.1

,

B ecau se o f rounding, sums o f individu al item s m ay not equ al 100.




.4
-

.4
6.9
1.2
_
-

_
_
1.3

1.2
_
_
_

1.6
1.5
-

_

19.1
-

.8
_
_
-

.9
.3
.2
2.2

.9
.3
_
-

1.5
_

.3

15.4

7.4
42.5
10.1
.5
10.1

55.6
6.9
_
_

-

13.3
38.1
8.8
.5
8.9

3.1

1.2

1.3

_

100.0

100.0

2,116
$4.37

1,857
$4.40

* E x clu d es p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on w eek end s, h olid a y s, and la te sh ifts.
2 Inclu des data fo r re g io n s in addition to those shown s e p a ra te ly .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d is trib u ted as fo llo w s : 26.9 percen t at $1.60 to $1.70 and 0.4 p e rc e n t at $1.70 to $1.80.
4 L e s s than 0.05 p e rc e n t.
^ W o r k e r s w e r e d is trib u ted as fo llo w s :
6.9 p ercen t at $5.20 to $5.30 and 5.2 p e rc e n t at $5.40 to $5.50.
NO TE:

-

1.5
_

1.1
.9
2.7
_
_
_

-

-

2.8
3.6
-

0.9
2.4
.9
1.5
2.4

_
_
_
_

2.4
_

_
_

.5
3.7
2.3

2.4
_

.
_
_

-

-

2.1
-

.9
_

_
_
_

20.8

.3
6.3

_

3.1
1.9
.4
1.6
4.9

2.7
4.8

3.8
2.4
.5
1.4
4.9

22.2
13.4
10.5
.7
3.0

15.7
23.9
17.1
.3
11.3

23.8
10.8
8.8
.8
.9 ,

4.0

1 6.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

259
$4.14

4,433
$4.03

899
$4.42

3,534
$3.93

677
$4.45

758
$4.74

/

35.3
22.2
9.3
_
1.2

3.4 ' /

32.3
14.9
.9
18.6
12.4
5 12.1

T a b le 5.

E a rn in g s d istrib u tio n :

R o u s ta b o u ts

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f roustabouts in cru de p e trole u m and natural gas production esta blish m en ts b y s tr a ig h t-tim e h ou rly e a rn in g s *,
U nited S tates, se le c te d re g io n s , and States, August 1972)
M id d le A tla n tic
H o u rly ea rn in g s*

United
States ^

T o ta l

W estern
P en n sylvan ia

M idcon tinent
B ord er
States

G rea t
L a k es

T o ta l

O klahom a

L ou isia n a
T o ta l

Gulf
C oa st

U nder $ 2 . 0 0 .....................................

0.7

5.8

7.2

9.5

-

-

-

-

-

0.8
3.2
4.6
3.0
6.6

1.3
5.2
2.3
2.4
2.5

_
0.2
.3
.2
1.0

_
-

6.6
4.6
3.0
1.4

3.8
5.4
2.5
-

-

-

_

_
13.9

$2.00
$2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 .1 0 ....................
$ 2 .2 0 ....................
$ 2 .3 0 ....................
$ 2 .4 0 ....................
$ 2 .5 0 ....................

.5
1.6
2.4
1.1
2.5

3.9
5.8
-

2.4
-

1.2
-

-

-

-

2.5
8.2
2.2

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 .6 0 ....................
$ 2 .7 0 ....................
$ 2 .8 0 ....................
$ 2 .9 0 ....................
$ 3 .0 0 ....................

4.0
2.3
2.3
.8
.9

9.7
3.9
.5

9.6
.6

6.0
3.0
-

1.1
1.1
6.9
.5
1.1

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 .1 0 ....................
$3.20 ....................
$ 3 .3 0 ....................
$ 3 .4 0 ....................
$ 3 .5 0 ....................

.7
.1
.9
1.6
2.8

_

_

_

.5
.5
28.6

.6
.6
29.5

1.2
51.8
3.6

12.6
18.7
-

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
u nder

$3.60 ....................
$3.70 ....................
$3.80 ....................
$ 3 .9 0 ....................
$ 4 .0 0 ....................

1.7
1.3
2.1
2.0
.2

11.2
-

12.7

-

-

2.2
-

.9
6.3
.6
1.5

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

and
and
and
and
and

u nder
under
under
under
u nder

$ 4 .1 0 ....................
$ 4 .2 0 ....................
$ 4 .3 0 ....................
$ 4 .4 0 ....................
$ 4 .5 0 ....................

_

8.5

_

_

-

_

Texas

N o rth ern
L ou isia n a
-

Texas
Inland

-

-

-

4.4

-

_ '

1.5
-

_

-

-

_

_

_

1.9
2.5
1.1
2.3

1.1
3.2
-

_

13.4
-

_

-

-

-

"

_
-

_

.2
-

.3
-

_
-

"

-

-

.7
5.6
5.4

1.7

_

2.3

17.9
-

3.7
2.6
3.1
1.1
-

_
1.0
.2

_
1.1
.3

_
-

2.3

2.5

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.8
2.3
6.4
19.9
35.3

1.0
22.3
6.3

1.2
27.7
7.8

_
13.1

_

2.5
5.8
8.1
25.9
18.4

1.2
2.7
.6
21.2
48.3

_

12.8

1.6

3.0
.2
23.1
50.2

-

5.1
3.4
30.8

.6
.1
1.1
23.1
47.8

$4.50 and o v e r ..................................

-

4.6
.1

-

-

5.0
3.6
1.1
1.5

5.7

4.1
.1

-

-

2.3
2.3
1.5
3.2

8.5
-

1.7
5.2

9.5
.6
.6
-

-

C a lifo rn ia

Gulf
C oast

1.7
3.4
2.6
10.3

_

M ountain

T o ta l

-

_

-

_

.4

3.7
3.0
.4

.2
2.9
-

_

.8

_

-

-

1.2
23.5
42.6

22.0
42.1

7.3
58.7
16.7
1.3

-

2.7
2.2
.4

.4
.7
22.1
61.5

-

-

11.6
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

41.2

1.6
3.6
5.0
22.7
15.6

2.8

_

_

_

_

_

_

9.6

9.4

312.0

2.0

2.4

1.8

1.7

4.4

T o t a l ...........................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s .......................
A v e r a g e H o u rly e a r n in g s * ...........

7,432
$3.91

206
$3.32

166
$3.48

168
$3.27

364
$3.53

1,405
$3.57

866
$3.73

1,235
$4.22

1,118
$4.28

117
$3.67

3,089
$4.02

851
$4.21

2,238
$3.94

409
$3.86

550
$4.21

1
3
3

E xclu des p re m iu m pay fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h o lid a y s , and la te sh ifts.
In clu des data fo r re g io n s in addition to those shqwn se p a ra tely .
A ll w o r k e r s at $4.50 to $4.60.

NOTE:

B ec a u se o f rounding, sums o f in d ividu al item s m ay not equal 100.




-

T $ b le 6.

E a r n in g s d istrib u tio n : T ru c k d riv e rs

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f t r u c k d r iv e r s in crude p e troleu m and natural gas production esta b lish m en ts by s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly earnings,^
United States, s e le c te d r e g io n s , and States, August 1972)
M id d le A tla n tic
H o u rly ea rn in g s 1

United
S tates3

T o ta l

W e stern
P en n sylvan ia

M idcontinent
B ord er
States

G reat
L a k es

T o ta l

Oklahom a

Texas

L ou isia n a
T o ta l

G ulf
C oast

U nder $2.20 ..............................................................
$2.20 and under $2.30 .............................................
$2.30 and under $ 2 .4 0 .............................................
$2.40 and under $2.50 .............................................

0.3
2.2
9.8

_

_

_

.

_

_

.

.

-

-

-

-

14.9
-

3.0
-

-

-

-

-

-

6.2
19.6

-

-

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90
$3.00

.............................................
.............................................
.............................................
.............................................
.............................................

7.3
6.3
1.8
3.7
.4

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

22.0
10.6
3.4
11.2
-

16.4
14.9
8.2
-

-

_
18.2

-

-

-

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 .1 0 .............................................
$3.20 .............................................
$3.30 .............................................
$ 3 .4 0 .............................................
$3.50 .............................................

2.6
-

_

_

-

-

59.3
-

-

-

5.8

5.8

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$3.60 .............................................
$3.70 .............................................
$ 3 .8 0 .............................................
$ 3 .9 0 .............................................
$ 4 .0 0 .............................................

.1
1.4
1.8
1.8
3.2

1.9
23.1

1.9
23.1

-

3.8

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.0

-

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$4.10 .............................................
$ 4 .2 0 .............................................
$ 4 .3 0 .............................................
$ 4 .4 0 .............................................
$4.50 .............................................

2.7
1.2
.9
2.1
15.9

$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 4 .6 0 .............................................
$4.70 .............................................
$4.80 .............................................
$ 4 .9 0 .............................................
$5.00 .............................................

14.1
2.1
10.0
.4
3.0

$5.00 and o v e r ...........................................................

1.9
.4
.5

_
18.2
9.1
_

5.8
11.5
-

-

T o ta l

Gulf
C oast

T e xa s
Inland

1.1
12.1

-

1.3
_
13.6

_

-

-

-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_

-

-

-

-

"

_

_

.

6.8

-

_

-

_
7.6

.
_
-

_
_

10.2
_
_

_

_

-

-

48.5
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

3.0

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

7.2
3.8

-

_

-

-

-

_

7.2

.

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30.8

27.3

-

-

-

-

-

6.4
3.4

_

_

9.1

6.4

23.1

23.1

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1.6
1.2
17.1

3.7
3.0
38.8

-

9.1

11.1

27.3
9.1

18.5
11.1

-

-

2.2

-

-

-

-

7.7
7.7

7.7
7.7

18.2

-

-

-

_

_

_

15.4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

46.2

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

14.8

_

-

3.0
31.8

-

3.4
30.5

_

_

29.6

-

55.6

42.6
7.2
36.9

42.9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.1

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

4.2

328.6

T o t a l ...................................................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s ...............................................
A v e r a g e h ou rly ea rn in g s ^ ....................................

967
$3.78

52
$3.95

52
$3.95

22
$3.71

52
$4.01

322
$3.00

134
$3.39

33
$3.70

27
$3.63

264
$3.94

E x clu d es p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s , and la te sh ifts.
Inclu des data fo r re g io n s in addition to those shown se p a ra te ly .
W o r k e r s w e r e d is trib u ted as fo llo w s : 7.1 percen t at $5.40 to $5.50 and 21.5 p e rcen t at $6.00 to $6.10.




_
_

17.3
-

30.8

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot e q u a l 100.

_
_

9.1
_
-

-

NOTE:

C a lifo rn ia

_
-

8.0
1.1
.4
1.5
4.5

1
^
3

_

Mountain

17.9
10.7

6.8
_

_

-

_

-

.4
1.7
5.1

-

_

_

-

8.7

1.3

_

4.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

28
$4.91

236
$3.82

27
$4.45

195
$4.69

T a b le 7.

S c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u rs

(P e r c e n t o f p rod u ction w o r k e r s in cru de p e tro le u m and natu ral gas production establish m en ts b y scheduled w e e k ly h o u r s ,1
United S tates, s e le c te d r e g io n s , and States, August 1972)
M id dle A tla n tic
W e e k ly hou rs

United
States ^

T o ta l

W estern
P en n sylvan ia

M id con tinent
B o rd e r
States

G reat
L a k es

L ou isia n a

Texas

T o ta l

Oklahom a

T o ta l

G ulf
C oast

N o rth ern
L ou isia n a

T o ta l

Gulf
C oast

Texas
Inland

M ountain

C a lifo rn ia

A ll w o r k e r s ............................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

R e g u la r w o r k w e e k ..........................
40 hou rs ........................................
44 hou rs ........................................
45 hours ........................................
48 hou rs ........................................
O v e r 48 h o u r s ............................
V a r ia b le w o r k w e e k ^ .......................

94
85
(3)
2
6
2
6

100
94

100
100

100
87
7

87
49

79
69

95
85

98
96

98
98

100
79

97
85

95
88

98
84

91
84

100
100

2

15
5
1
-

2
9
1
3

1
6
5

6
(3)
9

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

6
-

-

-

-

7
-

_

_

10
16
12
13

1
8
2
21

_
_

10
_

5

_

1
(3)
(3)
2

_
_
_
_

2
11
(3)
2

Data r e la te to the predom in a n t w o rk schedule fo r fu ll- t im e d a y -sh ift production w o r k e r s in each es ta b lis h m en t's la n d -b ased op eration .
Inclu des data fo r re g io n s in a ddition to those shown s e p a ra tely .
L e s s than 0.5 p e rc e n t.

No predom inant w o rk w e e k p r e v a ile d fo r m a jo rity o f w o rk e rs . In one esta b lish m en t, fo r ex am p le, em p lo y ees w ork ed 10 co n secu tive days at 12 hours p e r day and then
w e r e o ff 10 s tra ig h t da ys. O v e r a 3 -w e e k p e rio d , each em p loy ee w orked 11 da ys, o r an a v e r a g e o f 44 hours p e r calen d a r w eek .
NOTE:

B ecau se o f rounding, sums o f ind ividu al item s m ay not equal 100.




T a b le 8 .

S h if t d iffe re n tia l p ro v isio n s

(P e r c e n t o f prod u ction w o r k e r s by shift d iffe re n tia l p r o v is io n s 1 in crude p e tro le u m and n atu ral gas production esta b lish m en ts, U nited States, s e le c te d reg ion s,
and States, A ugu st 1972)
M id d le A tla n tic
Shift d iffe r e n t ia l

A ll w o r k e r s

.....................................................

United
States2

M idcontinent

T o ta l

W e stern
Pen n sylvan ia

States

G reat
L a k es

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

72.9
64.0
64.0
1.0
.2
3.5
.6
.2
.8
57.6
8.9

36.6
25.4
25.4

38.8
25.4
25.4

64.5
50.7
50.7

Lou isia n a

Texas
Mountain

C alifo rnia

100.0

100.0

100.0

71.7
69.2
69.2
_

81.5
72.1
72.1
18.2
_
_
_

97.7
86.9
86.9

T o ta l

Oklahom a

T o ta l

Gulf
C oast

N orth ern
L ou isia n a

T o ta l

G ulf
C oast

Texas
Inland

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

57.1
34.1
34.1

61.4
40.3
40.3

58.3
58.3
58.3
_
_

83.4
81.5
81.5
_
_
_
_
_
_

51.0
30.7
30.7
_
_
_
_
_
_

73.6
71.7
71.7
_
_

98.3
98.3
98.3
_
_
_
_

Second sh ift
W o r k e r s in es ta b lish m en ts having secondsh ift p r o v is io n s ..................................................
W ith sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ....................................
U n ifo rm cents p e r h o u r ............................
8 c e n t s .....................................................
9 cents .....................................................
10 cents .....................................................
11 cents .....................................................
12 cents .....................................................
13 cents .....................................................
15 cents .....................................................
W ith no sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ..............................

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
1.4
3.5
_
35.4
21.1

2.3
6.4
_
_
49.6
-

76.9
3.6

81.5
1.9

30.7
20.3

2.3
66.1
1.9

98.3
-

3.0
62.0
2.4

58.3
58.3
58.3
6.4

78.7
76.9
76.9

81.5
81.5
81.5

51.0
30.7
30.7

73.6
71.7
71.7

98.2
98.2
98.2

71.6
69.2
69.2

-

-

80.5
76.9
76.9
_
_
_
_
>
_

25.4

25.4

46.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

4.5
-

11.2

13.4

13.8

_
34.1
23.0

36.6
25.4
25.4

38.8
25.4
25.4

57.8
50.7
50.7

55.2
32.4
32.4

-

-

3.3
_
_

_
_

_

4.2
_

_

_

1.6
_

_
_

_

_

_
85.3
10.9

53.9
9.4

T h ird or other la te shift
W o r k e r s in es ta b lis h m en ts having th ird o r o th er la te - s h ift p r o v i s i o n s .........................
W ith sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ....................................
U n ifo rm cents p e r h o u r ............................
11 c e n t s .....................................................
15 cents .....................................................
16 c e n t s .....................................................
17 cents .....................................................
20 c e n t s .....................................................
25 cents .....................................................
30 cents .....................................................
W ith no sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a l ...............................
1
2

70.9
63.6
63.6
.6
1.9
2.0
.8
1.4
.2
56.8
7.3

-

25.4

-

25.4

-

-

56.4
40.3
40.3
3.5

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1.4

2.3

_

_

_

2.3
3.3

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

49.6
-

76.9
1.8

81.5

30.7
20.3

66.1
1.9

98.2

62.0
2.4

53.9
9.4

81.0
9.3

-

-

22.3
28.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.2
29.2
22.9

11.2

13.4

7.2

-

35.4
16.1

R e fe r s to p o lic ie s o f establishm ents eith e r cu rren tly op eratin g la te sh ifts o r having p ro v is io n s c o v e r in g la te sh ifts.
Inclu des data fo r r eg io n s in addition to those shown s e p a ra te ly .

NO TE:

B ecau se o f rounding, sums o f individu al item s m ay not equal to ta ls .




-

_

-

_
_
_

3.0
4.2

81.5
72.1
72.1

94.6
85.3
85.3

_
_

18.2

_
_

4.3

_
_
_

T a b le 9.

P a id h o lid a y s

(P e r c e n t o f prod u ctio n w o r k e r s in cru de p e tro le u m and natural gas prod u ction establish m en ts w ith fo r m a l p r o v is io n s fo r paid h olid ays,
U nited States, s e le c te d r e g io n s , and States, August 1972)
M id dle A tla n tic
N u m b er o f pa id h olid ay s

U nited
State s 1

T otal

W estern
Pennsylvan ia

M idcontinent
B o rd e r
State s

G rea t
L a k es

Lou isiana

Texas

T o ta l

Oklahom a

T o ta l

G ulf
C oast

N orth ern
Lou isia n a

T o ta l

G ulf
C oast

T exa s
Inland

Mountain

C a lifo rn ia

A l l w o r k e r s ............................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

W o r k e r s in es ta b lish m en ts
p r o v id in g paid h olid ay s^ . . . .
Under 5 d a y s ..........................
5 days ........................................
6 days ........................................
7 days ........................................
8 days ........................................
9 days ........................................
10 days .....................................
11 d a y s .....................................

89
1
5
8
4
12
58
1
(3)

100
-

91
7
(3)

90
7
4

98
11
1

88
5
4

93
-

2

92
9
3

100
-

7

2

2

12

39
_
4
34
-

82
84
14
11
3
4
46
-

84

1
10

93
15
6
30
11
32

78
-

6
6

100
11
3
74

63
-

78
-

82
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

-

7

22

18

16

8

9

W o r k e r s in es ta b lish m en ts
p r o v id in g no paid h olid a y s

*
^
^

. . .

-

15
8

-

5

_

6

Inclu des data fo r re g io n s in addition to those shown sep a rately .
L im ite d to fu ll-d a y h olid ay s p r o v id e d annually. A ddition a l h a lf-d ay h olid ays w e re p ro v id e d by som e es ta b lish m en ts.
L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.

NO TE :

B ecau se o f rounding, sums o f individu al item s m ay not equal to ta ls.




-

33
31

-

7

7

79
(3)

11
60
-

96
11
3
3
18
60
-

-

-

-

-

24
63
-

10

2

12

4

7

6

36
-

10
64
(3)

-

-

-

6

Table 10. Paid v a c a tio n s
(P e r c e n t o f prod u ction w o r k e r s in crude p e trole u m and natural gas production esta blish m en ts with fo r m a l p ro v is io n s fo r paid va ca tion s a fte r se lec te d p e riod s of s e r v ic e ,
United States, s e le c te d re g io n s , and a re a s , August 1972)
M idcontinent

M iddle A tla n tic
V a ca tion p o lic y

A ll w o r k e r s ...............................

United
State s *

B o rd e r
State s

G rea t
La k es

T otal

W estern
P en n sylvan ia

100

100

100

100

96
96

100
100

100
100

4

-

14
1
81
(3)

Lou isian a

T exa s
Mountain

C a lifo rn ia

100

100

100

100
100

96
96

87
87

100
100

3

-

4

13

-

7
90
-

6
94
-

7
_

_
_

_
_

89
-

87
_

100
-

9

2
95
-

100
-

2
94
-

87
_
_

100
-

48
52
-

2
27
68
-

-

-

16
84
-

2
31
_
63
_

_

9
9
82
-

26
_
60
_

9
_

4
9
5
82
-

21
48
31
-

2
16
14
64
-

6
10
84
-

2
19
_
16
59
-

21

2
16
10
-

-

2
19
_
10
65
_

T o ta l

Oklahom a

T o ta l

G ulf
C oast

N orth ern
Lou isian a

T o ta l

G ulf
C oast

Texa s
Inland

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100

82
82

94
94

93
93

100
100

100
100

100
100

97
97

-

"

18

6

7

-

-

82
18
-

78
22
-

60
40
-

27
4
50
-

35
59
-

10
83
-

2
8
89
1

2
9
89
-

2
1
92
(3)
(3)

15
85
-

17
83
-

100
-

15
4
56
6
-

2
92
-

1
92
-

2
8
89
1

2
9
89
-

91
-

1
29
2
64
(3)

6
93
1
-

8
92
-

87
13
-

3
21
6
47
4

1
49
44
-

1
33
-

-

59
-

13
8
* 79
-

1
17
2
16
61
(3)

6
19
73
1
-

8
10
83
-

18
76
7
-

3
21
6
8
39
4

1
36
15
42
-

1
26
10
56
-

6
8
9
77
-

1
16
(3)
12
1
64
1
(3)

6
19
51
23
-

8
10

4 13

1
34

1
26

4

56
26
-

52
28
7
-

-

-

-

3
17
6
12
39
4
-

M ethod o f paym ent
W o rk e rs in es ta b lish m en ts
p ro v id in g paid v a c a t i o n s ...........
L e n g t h - o f - t im e .........................
W o r k e r s in es ta b lish m en ts
p ro v id in g no paid va ca tion s . . .
Am ount o f va ca tio n pay^
A ft e r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek .......................................
O ve r 1 and under 2 w eek s . . .
2 w e e k s .......................................
3 w e e k s .......................................
A ft e r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek .......................................
O ve r 1 and under 2 w eek s . . .
2 w e e k s .......................................
O ve r 2 and under 3 w eek s . . .
3 w eek s .......................................
A ft e r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek .......................................
2 w e e k s .......................................
O ve r 2 and under 3 w eek s . . .
3 w eekj , .
.........................
O ve r 3 w eek s ............................
A ft e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek .......................................
2 w e e k s .......................................
O v e r 2 and under 3 w eek s . . .
3 w e e k s .......................................
4 w e e k s .......................................
O ve r 4 and under 5 w eek s . . .
A ft e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek .......................................
2 w e e k s .......................................
O v e r 2 and under 3 w eek s . . .
3 w eek s .......................................
O ve r 3 and under 4 w eek s . . .
4 w e e k s .......................................
O ve r 4 and under 5 w eek s . . .
5 w e e k s .......................................
See fo otn otes at end of tab le.




-

-

-

-

-■
3

-

14
45
-

5
61
-

11
77
8

-

-

-

-

7
82
9
-

91
9

-

48
31
_

69
_

-

-

5
9
85
-

-

8
_
19
60
_

91
_
_
9
_
4
87
_

_

_

8
_

9
_

19
_
60
_
\

_

_
90
_

2

Table 10. Paid v a c a tio n s —Continued
(P e r c e n t o f prod u ction w o r k e r s in cru de p e tro le u m and natural gas production establish m en ts with fo r m a l p ro v is io n s fo r paid va ca tion s a f t e r ' se lec te d p e rio d s o f s e r v ic e ,
U nited States, s e le c te d r e g io n s , and a re a s , August 1972)
M id dle A tla n tic
V a ca tion p o lic y

A l l w o r k e r s ...............................

United
State s *

M idcontinent
B o rd e r
State s

G reat
L a kes

To ta l

W estern
Pen n sylvan ia

100

100

100

100

1
16
(3)
8
8
1
61

6
19
5
69
_
1

8
10
-

_
13
_

1
16
(3)

6
19
5
(2)
48

8
10
6
25
52

53

-

-

-

Texa s

Lou isian a

Mountain

C a lifo rn ia

100

100

100

5
-

2
19
-

_

_

8
-

9
5
_
81

6
10
_

9
_
_

59

5
_

2
19
_

_

_

8

9

9
5
-

6
10
_

(3)
18
_

3

81
-

59
-

60

88

-

-

T o ta l

Oklahom a

T o ta l

G ulf
C oast

N orth ern
L ou isia n a

T o ta l

G ulf
C oast

Texa s
Inland

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

3
17
6
8
4
4
39

1
34
-

1
26
2
3
61

4
10
(3)
8

3
7
9
82

21
43
5
31

2
16
6
9
64

1
26
2
2
61

4
10
(3)
-

3
-

21
43
5
31

2
16
6
9
64

-

-

Am ount o f va ca tion p a y 2--C ontinued
A ft e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e :
1 w eek .......................................
2 w e e k s .......................................
O ve r 2 and under 3 w eek s . . .
3 w e e k s .......................................
4 w e e k s .......................................
O v e r 4 and under 5 w eek s . . .
5 w e e k s .......................................
A ft e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e : (4)
1 w eek .......................................
2 w eek s .......................................
O ve r 2 and under 3 w eek s . . .
3 w eek s .......................................
4 w eek s .......................................
O v e r 4 and under 5 w eek s . . .
5 w eek s .......................................
O ve r 5 and under 6 w eek s . . .

7

6
(3)
64
1

6
77

_
_

19
62
_
7

_
13
14
20
-

3
17
6
8
4
4
39
-

13
2
_
45
1
34
13
1
45
-

-

77

77

8

7

82
9

1 Inclu des data fo r re g io n s in addition to those shown sep a rately.
2 P e r io d s o f s e r v ic e w e r e a r b it r a r ily chosen and do not n e c e s s a r ily r e fle c t the individu al esta b lish m en t p ro v is io n s fo r p r o g r e s s io n .
tions in d ica ted at 10 y e a r s m a y include changes in p ro v is io n s occu rrin g betw een 5 and 10 y e a r s .
3 L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.
^ V a ca tion paym ents w e r e v ir t u a lly the sam e a fte r lo n g e r period s o f s e r v ic e .
NO TE :

B ecau se o f rounding, sums o f in dividu al item s m ay not equal to ta ls .




19
_
60

3
_
88

_

_
_

F o r ex am p le, the changes in p r o p o r ­

Table 11. Health, insurance, and retirement plans.
(P e r c e n t o f prod u ction w o r k e r s in crude p etrole u m and natural gas production establish m en ts with s p e c ifie d health, in su ra n ce, and r e tir e m e n t plans,
U nited S tates, s e le c te d re g io n s , and States, August 1972)
M id d le A tla n tic
T y p e o f plan*

A ll w ork ers

.............................................

W o r k e r s in es ta b lish m en ts p ro v id in g :
L if e in s u r a n c e ..................................................
N o n c o n trib u to ry p la n s ............................
A c c id e n ta l death and d ism em b e rm e n t
in su ra n ce .....................................................
N on c o n trib u to ry p la n s ............................
S ickness and a ccid en t in su ran ce o r
s ic k le a v e o r b o t h - * ....................................
Sickness and accid en t insurance . . . .
N o n c o n trib u to ry p la n s ...................
Sick le a v e (fu ll pay, no w aiting p e rio d )
S ick le a v e (p a r tia l pay o r w aiting
p e r io d ) ..................................................
H o s p ita liz a tio n i n s u r a n c e ............................
N o n c o n trib u to ry p la n s ............................
S u rg ic a l in s u r a n c e ..........................................
N o n c o n trib u to ry p la n s ............................
M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e ..........................................
N o n c o n trib u to ry p la n s ............................
M a jo r m e d ic a l in s u r a n c e ...............................
N o n c o n trib u to ry p la n s ............................
R e tir e m e n t p la n s 4 .............................................
P e n sio n p l a n s ..........................................
N on c o n trib u to ry p la n s ...................
S e v e ra n c e pay ..........................................
No p la n s ..............................................................

United
States^

M idcontinent
B o rd e r
States

G reat
L a kes

T o ta l

W e stern
P en n sylvan ia

100

100

100

100

94
43

92
50

91
46

65
23

49
33

83
27
18
63
10
97
33
97
33
96
33
93
31
78
78
58
(5)
2

L ou isia n a

Texas
Mountain

C a lifo rn ia

100

100

100

94
45

98
42

87
22

93
51

59
14

44
4

64
16

53
14

88
61

72
52
26
72

82
16
11
70

94
5
3
84

79
19
13
66

84
6
4
78

93
41
36
75

_

7
98
48
98
48
98
47
96
46
81
81
64

9
100
62
100
62
100
62
94
57
97
97
80

7
98
43
98
43
97
43
97
43
77
77
60

87
20
87
20
87
20
87
20
82
82
64

T o ta l

Oklahom a

T o ta l

Gulf
C oast

N o rth ern
L ou isia n a

T o ta l

Gulf
C oast

T e xa s
Inland

100

100

100

100

100

100

.100

100

99
24

85
34

90
35

88
50

100
55

100
59

100
22

97
43

44
24

69
15

67
20

70
22

61
33

57
16

54
16

93
21

93
81
71
30

92
78
66
28

80
18
7
55

57
18
12
38

67
25
6
44

60
7
6
58

97
50
33
65

100
50
33
64

2
90
45
90
45
81
45
65
28
82
82
40
7
-

3
94
46
94
46
84
46
72
32
85
85
40
8
-

18
100
25
100
25
100
25
93
18
80
80
35

1
87
24
87
24
85
22
69
14
44
44
40

5
98
22
98
22
92
22
87
22
51
51
39

1
99
33
99
33
88
33
81
33
69
69
50

24
100
19
100
19
100
19
100
19
94
94
74

26
100
20
100
20
100
20
100
20
96
96
78

100
11
100
11
100
11
100
11
73
73
31

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

13

2

1

-

-

-

2

-

2

_

_

16
100
35
100
35
100
35
100
35
91
91
60
(5)

13

1 Inclu des on ly those plans fo r which at lea st part of the cost is borne by the e m p lo y e rs and exclu des le g a lly req u ire d plans such as w o rk m en 's com pensation and s o cia l
s e c u rity ; h o w e v e r , plans re q u ir e d by State te m p o ra ry d is a b ility insurance la w s a re included i f the e m p lo y e r co n trib u tes m o re than is re q u ire d or the em p loyee r e c e iv e s ben efits
in e x c e s s o f the le g a l r e q u ire m e n ts .
2 Inclu des data fo r r e g io n s in addition to those shown se p a ra te ly .
3 U nduplicated to ta l o f w o r k e r s re c e iv in g sic k lea ve o r sickn ess and a ccid en t insurance shown s e p a ra te ly .
^ U ndu plicated to ta l o f w o r k e r s in plans having p ro v isio n s fo r pensions and se ve ra n c e pay plans shown se p a ra te ly .
^ L e s s than 0.5 p e rc e n t.
NOTE:

B ec a u se o f rounding, sums o f individu al item s m ay not equal to ta ls .




Table 12. Other selected benefits
(P e r c e n t o f prod u ction w o r k e r s in cru de p e tro le u m and natural gas production esta b lish m en ts having fo r m a l p ro v is io n s fo r fu n era l le a v e pay, ju ry -d u ty pay, th r ift or savings plans,
t r a v e l pay, and p re m iu m p a y fo r o ffs h o r e w ork, United States, selec te d re g io n s , and States, August 1972)
M iddle A tla n tic
Typ e o f b e n efit

W o r k e r s in es ta b lish m en ts with
p r o v is io n s fo r:
F u n era l le a v e p a y .......................
J u ry-d u ty p a y ...............................
T h r ift or sa vin gs p la n s 1 ...........
2
W o r k e r s in es ta b lis h m en ts with
o ffs h o re op era tion s .......................
W ith t r a v e l pay p r o v is io n s 3 . .
R e g u la r w age r a t e ..............
O ther tr a v e l paym ent^ . . .
W ith p re m iu m pay fo r
o ffs h o re w o r k .........................
C e n ts -p e r -h o u r ....................
20 c e n t s .........................
P e r c e n t ..................................
4.5 p e r c e n t ....................

U nited
State s 1

M idcon tinent
B o rd e r
States

G rea t
L a kes

To ta l

W estern
P en n sylvan ia

77
78
63

89
89
26

100
100
30

73
80
10

29
26
10
16

-

-

6
3
3
3
3

"

Texas
Mountain

C a liforn ia

74
76
64

71
71
69

89
89
60

11
6
6

-

N orth ern
L ou isia n a

T o ta l

G ulf
C oast

T exa s
Inland

99
100
91

92
92
36

77
78
69

87
87
84

87
79
21
58

96
86
23
64

-

25
20
7
13

72
70
31
40

34
16
16
18
18

38
18
18
20
20

-

-

-

-

T o ta l

Oklahom a

T o ta l

36
41
39

60
57
52

79
72
68

99
99
86

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

1 Inclu des data fo r re g io n s in addition to those shown sep a rately .
2 Inclu des only plans in which e m p lo y e r m akes m on eta ry contributions beyond a d m in is tra tiv e co sts.
^ P a y p r o v is io n s fo r t r a v e l betw een the w o r k e r 's rep o rtin g point and the site of o ffsh o re o p eration s.
^ A l l w o r k e r s r e c e iv e $1.60 to $1.65 p e r hour.




L ou isian a
Gulf
C oast

-

42
41
30
11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Scope of survey
The survey included establishments primarily engaged
in operating oil and gas field properties (industry 1311 as

The number o f establishments and workers actually
studied by the Bureau, as well as the numbers estimated
to be in the industry during the payroll period studied,
are shown in table A -l.

defined in the 1967 edition o f the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual, prepared by the U.S. Office o f
Management and Budget).

Method of study

Establishments primarily

engaged in performing oil field services for operators on
a contract, fee, or other basis (SIC 138) and separate
auxiliary units, such as central offices and research labo­
ratories, were excluded from the study.
The establishments studied were selected from those
employing eight workers or more at the time o f reference

Data were obtained by personal visits o f Bureau field
economists under the direction o f the Bureau’s Assistant
Regional Directors for Operations.
The survey was
conducted on a sample basis. To obtain appropriate
accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion o f large
than o f small establishments was studied. In combining

o f the data used in compiling the universe lists.

Table A-1. Estimated number of establishments and employees within scope of survey and number studied, crude petroleum and
natural gas production, August 1972
Workers in establishments

Number of establishments^

Within scope of study

Region1 and State

Actually studied

Within scope of study

Actually studied

Total3

Production workers

Total3

United States4 ................

1,240

242

74,895

43,468

43,821

Middle A tla n tic .............................
Western Pennsylvania...........
Border States...................................
Great L a k e s ...................................
Midcontinent ........................... .
O klahom a...........................
Louisiana........................................
Gulf C o a s t...........................
Northern Louisiana.............
Texas .............................................
Gulf C o a s t...........................
Inland...................................
Mountain........................................
California .....................................

31
23
42
100
349
165
114
59
55
427
98
329
100
72

16
12
12
22
53
28
35
19
16
61
25
36
22
18

1,203
968
1,964
3,028
13,980
7,647
13,854
12,299
1,555
27,912
7,871
20,041
3,470
10,244

925
776
1,510
2,261
7,552
4,123
7,260
6,599
661
15,261
3,408
11,853
2,345
6,181

940
783
1,418
830
5,147
3,861
10,330
9,550
780
16,169
4,772
11,397
1,405
7,396

1 T h e regions or their com ponents used in this study include: M iddle A tla n tic —New Y o rk and Pennsylvania; Western Pennsy l­
vania—A dam s. Cum berland, Ly co m in g , M ifflin , Perry, Tio ga , U n ion, and all other Pennsylvania counties west thereof; Border S ta te s—
K e n tu ck y and West V irgin ia ; G reat La k e s—Illin ois, Indiana, M ichigan, and O h io ; M idco ntinen t—Arkansas. Kansas, M ississippi,
Nebraska, and O klaho m a; Lou isiana G u lf C o a st—A voyelles. East Fe licia n a, Pointe Coupee, Rapides, St. Helena, Tan gipahoa, V ernon ,
W ashington, West Fiiicia n a , and all other Lou isiana parishes south thereof; Northern Lo u isia n a —all Lou isiana parishes not included
in the Lou isiana G u lf C oast; T e xa s G u lf C o a st—Bee. Brazos, Burleson, D ew itt, Fayette, Jasper, Kernes, Lavaca, Le e, Live O ak,
Madison, New ton, P o lk, R efugio , T r in it y , T y le r, W alker, and all other T e x a s counties east thereof; Te xa s In la n d —all T e x a s counties
not included in the T e xa s G u lf Coast; M ountain—A rizo n a , Colo rad o , Idaho, M ontana, New M exico, N orth D akota, Utah, and
W yom ing.
2 Includes on ly establishm ents w ith 8 w orkers or m ore at the tim e of reference of the universe data.
^ Includes executive, professional, office, and other w orkers excluded from the p roduction w orker category.
4 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately. A laska and Haw aii were not included in the stu dy.




19

the data, however, all establishments were given their
appropriate weight. A ll estimates are presented, there­
fore, as relating to all establishments in the industry,
excluding only those below the minimum size at the time
o f reference o f the universe data.

the rate, totaling, and dividing by the number o f indi­
viduals. The hourly earnings o f salaried workers were
obtained by dividing their straight-time salary by normal
rather than actual hours.

Scheduled weekly hours
Establishment definition
Data were obtained, where possible, on the predomi­
nant work schedule for full-time production workers
employed on the day shift. About 6 percent o f the
industry’s workforce were on a variable work schedule,
i.e., no predominant workweek (see table 7, footnote 4).

An establishment, for purposes o f this study, was
defined as covering all oil and gas field activities o f an
operating company in the wage area for which separate
data are presented. For areas including two States or
more, such as the Great Lakes region operating activities
crossing State lines were counted within the geographic
boundaries o f each State rather than combined into
one unit.

Shift provisions

Employment

either currently operating late shifts or having formal
provisions covering late-shift work.

The estimates o f the number o f workers within the
scope o f the study are intended as a general guide to the
size and composition o f the labor force included in the
survey, rather than a precise measure o f employment.

Supplementary wage provisions

Shift provisions relate to the policies o f establishments

Supplementary benefits were treated statistically on
the basis that if formal provisions were applicable to half
or more o f the production workers in an establishment,

Occupations selected for study

the benefits were considered applicable to all such
workers. Similarly, i f fewer than half o f the workers
were covered, the benefit was considered nonexistent in
the establishment. Because o f lenght-of-service and other
eligibility requirements, the proportion o f workers re­
ceiving the benefits may be smaller than estimated.

Occupational classification was based on a uniform
set o f job descriptions designed to take account o f inter­
establishment and interarea variations in duties within
the same job. (See appendix B for descriptions.) The
occupations were chosen for their numerical importance,
their usefulness in collective bargaining, or their repre­
sentativeness o f the entire job scale in the industry.
Working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners,
trainees, and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and
probationary workers were not reported in the selected
occupations.

Paid holidays. Paid holiday provisions relate to full-day
and half-day holidays provided annually to production
workers.

Paid vacations. The summary o f vacation plans is limited
to formal arrangements, excluding informal plans
whereby time o ff with pay is granted at the discretion

Wage data

o f the employer or the supervisor. The periods o f service
for which data are presented were selected as represen­

Wage information relates to average straight-time

tative o f the most common practices, but they do not

hourly earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime

necessarily reflect individual establishment provisions

and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.

for progression.

For example, the changes in propor­

Incentive payments, such as those resulting from piece­

tions indicated at 10 years o f service may include changes

work or production bonus systems, and cost-of-living

which occurred between 5 and 10 years.

bonuses were included as part o f the workers’ regular
pay; nonproduction bonus payments, such as Christmas

Healthy insurancet and retirement plans.

or yearend bonuses, were excluded.

presented for health, insurance, and retirement plans for

Data are

Average (mean) hourly rates or earnings for each

which all or a part o f the cost is borne by the employer,

occupation were calculated by weighting each rate (or

excluding programs required by law, such as workmen’s
compensation and social security. Among the plans

hourly earnings) by the number o f workers receiving




20

included are those underwritten by a commercial insur­
ance company and those paid directly by the employer
from his current operating funds or from a fund set aside
for this purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form o f life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type
o f insurance under which predetermined cash payments
are made directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly
basis during illness or accident disability. Information is
presented for all such plans to which the employer con­
tributes at least a part o f the cost. However, in New
York and New Jersey, where temporary disability insur­
ance laws require employer contributions,1 plans are
included only i f the employer ( 1 contributes more than
)
is legally required, or ( 2) provides the employee with
benefits which exceed the requirements o f the law.
Tabulations o f paid sick leave plans are limited to for­

Tabulations o f retirement pension plans are limited
to plans which provide, upon retirement, regular pay­
ments for the remainder o f the worker’s life. Data are
presented separately for retirement severance payments
(one payment or a specified number over a period o f
time) made to employees on retirement. Establishments
providing both retirement severance payments and retire­
ment pensions to employees were considered as having
both retirement pension and retirement severance plans.
Establishments having optional plans providing employ­
ees a choice o f either retirement severance payments or
pensions were considered as having only retirement
pension benefits.

Paid funeral and jury-duty leave. Data for paid funeral
and jury-duty leave relate to formal provisions for at
least partial payment for time lost as a result o f attending
funerals o f certain family members or serving as a juror.

mal plans which provide full pay or a proportion o f the
worker’s pay during absence from work because o f
illness; informal arrangements have been omitted. Sepa­
rate tabulations are provided for ( 1 plans which provide
)
full pay and no waiting period, and ( 2) plans providing
either partial pay or a waiting period.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for com­
plete or partial payment o f doctors’ fees. Such plans
may be underwritten by a commercial insurance company
or a nonprofit organization, or they may be self-insured.
Major medical insurance, sometimes referred to as
extended medical or catastrophe insurance, includes the
plans designed to cover employees in case o f sickness or
injury involving an expense which goes beyond the nor­
mal coverage o f hospitalization, medical, and surgical
plans.




21

Thrift or savings plans. Data relate to formal provisions
for a thrift or savings plan to which the employer makes
monetary contributions beyond administrative costs.
Travel and premium pay for offshore work. Information
is provided on the establishment’s formal pay provisions
for travel between the worker’s reporting point and the
site o f offshore operations, as well as the incidence and
amount o f premium pay for workers engaged in offshore
operations.

1 The temporary disability insurance laws in California and
Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.

A p p e n d ix B.

O c c u p a tio n a l D e s c rip tio n s

The primary purpose o f preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’ s wage surveys is to assist its
field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety o f
payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to
area. This permits the grouping o f occupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
Because o f this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability o f occupational content,
the Bureau’s job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments
or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’s field staff are
instructed to exclude working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, and handicapped,
part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

Derrickman

levers, pedals, and brakes to control draw works which
supply power necessary to lower and raise drill pipe and

Works on a rotary drilling rig, assisting in raising and
lowering casing and drill pipe and in carrying on drilling
operations. Work involves: From position near top o f
rig, guiding and attaching or detaching elevator to or from
upper end o f sections o f casing or drill pipe as it is being
run into or pulled out o f well; tending slush or mud

casing into and out o f well; checking operation o f slush
pumps to see that fluid, which cools bit, removes cuttings,
and seals walls o f well with clay, is circulating properly
and is o f correct consistency; inspecting core or cuttings
from well to determine nature o f strata drilled through;
fishing for and removing equipment lost in well, using

pumps which circulate a heavy mixture o f clay and water
through a drill pipe to flush out drillings and cool bit;

special tools at end o f drill pipe or cable; keeping record
o f location and nature o f strata, number o f feet advanced

cleaning, oiling, greasing, inspecting, and repairing pulley,
blocks, and cables that are used to raise and lower casing
and drill pipe; assists rotary driller to regulate valves in
controlling flow o f oil when well is brought in (first
begins flowing).

per shift, and materials used. May start flow o f well by
assisting shooter in low ering and setting o f f a charge o f
explosives in the strata and control flow o f well when it
comes in (first begins flowing) by capping it or regulating
control valves. Supervises and is assisted by workers,
such as derrickman and rotary floorman.

Driller, rotary
Electrician, maintenance
(Core driller; well driller)
Performs a variety o f electrical trade functions such
as the installation, maintenance, or repair o f equipment

Supervises drilling operations and operates draw works
that serve as a power distribution center for the raising

for the generation, distribution, or utilization o f electric

and lowering o f drill pipe and casing, and for rotation o f

energy in an establishment. Work involves most o f the

drill pipe in the well.

following:

Work involves:

Manipulating

Installing or repairing any o f a variety o f

electrical equipment such as generators, transformers,

levers and throttles to control speed o f rotary table
which rotates string o f tools, and to regulate the pres­

switchboards, controllers, circuit breakers, motors,
heating units, conduit systems, or other transmission

sure o f the tools at the bottom o f the well as indicated
by a gauge; connecting and disconnecting sections o f drill

equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts,

pipe as they run into or out o f well; selecting drill bits

or other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble

according to nature o f strata encountered and changing
them when dull or when strata change; manipulating

in the electrical system or equipment; working standard




computations relating to load requirements o f wiring or

22

electrical equipment; and using a variety o f electrician’s
handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In
general, the work o f the maintenance electrician requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

repairing regulators
instruments.

(governors)

and

other

control

Mechanic, maintenance
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment o f an
establishment. Work involves most o f the following:
Examining machines and mechanical equipment to diag­
nose source o f trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling
machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the
use o f handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing

Floorman, rotary
(Rotary driller helper; rotary helper; roughneck)

broken or defective parts with items obtained from stock;
ordering the production o f a replacement part by a
machine shop or sending the machine to a machine shop
for major repairs; preparing written specifications for
major repairs or for the production o f parts ordered from
machine shop; reassembling machines; and making all
necessary adjustments for operation. In general, the
work o f a maintenance mechanic requires rounded train­
ing and experience usually acquired through a formal

Assists in drilling operations and in running drill pipe
and casing in and out o f well. Work involves: Guiding
lower end o f sections o f drill pipe and casing to or from
well opening as derrickman handles upper end in running
sections into or out o f well; racking or unracking drill
pipe sections in order o f removal; helping connect or
disconnect joints between sections, using tongs or chain
wrenches to grip and turn pipe; inserting and removing
slips (curved metal wedges) used at top o f well to hold
drill pipe at desired point when it is being run into or

apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
Excluded from this classification are workers whose
primary duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.

out o f well; operating a cathead (power-driven winch),
the cable o f which is attached to the tongs or wrench to
loosen or tighten the joints; digging ditches, racking
tools, and cleaning up drilling floor or around rig;

Painter, maintenance

assisting in making repairs to drilling machinery, slush
pumps, and derrick.

Paints structures and equipment used in oil fields.
Work involves the following:
Knowledge o f surface
peculiarities and types o f paint required for different
applications; preparing surface for painting by removing

Gasman

old finish or by placing putty or filler in nail holes and
interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush.

( Gas-producer man; gas-plant operator)

May mix colors, oils, white lead, and other paint

Operates automatically controlled natural-gas treating
unit in oil or gas field to render gas suitable for fuel and
for pipeline transportation. Work involves most o f the
following: Opening valves to admit gas and specified
chemicals into treating vessel where moisture is absorbed
and impurities removed; adjusting control o f auxiliary
equipment, such as pumps, heating coils, and cooling

ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency. In
general, the work o f the maintenance painter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.

tower; reading temperature and pressure gauges and ad­
justing controls to keep heat and pressure at level o f max­
imum efficiency within safe operating limits; performing
routine tests or delivering samples to laboratory to deter­
mine qualities o f gas, such as B.T.U. value, flame candle-

Pumper

power, and specific gravity, and proportions o f elements,
such as methane, propane, and natural gasoline, draining
samples o f boilerwater from treating unit for laboratory

or Diesel) which drives the oil-well pumps used to lift oil

analysis; adding specified chemicals to water to keep

regulate flow o f oil from well to storage tanks or into

heating and cooling systems in working order.

May

pipe lines; reading meters and making daily production

adjust and repair gas meters and governors, using hand-

reports o f the amount and quality o f oil pumped; check­

tools.
May change charts on meters equipped with
automatic recorders and may advise and assist workers

from oil and making adjustments; lubricating and making




(Oil-well pumper; pumpman)
Operates the power unit (steam, gas, gasoline, electric,
from wells in which natural flow has diminished or
ceased.

Work includes:

Opening and closing valves to

ing pressure o f separator, which separates natural gas

23

actual drilling operations and those operations alone.
Roustabouts are employed after the well is finished.
They assist in various other functions encountered in
petroleum production.

minor repairs to pumps; and reporting major breakdowns
and well difficulties. May make regular tests o f oil for
bottom sediment and water.

Roustabout
Truckdriver
(Laborer)
Drives a truck in and around oil or gas fields to
Performs, upon assignment, any combination o f the
following tasks in and about oil fields: Digging trenches
for drainage around oil wells, storage tanks, and other
installations; filling excavations with dirt; loading and

transport crude petroleum, equipment, men, or supplies
between battery sites, rail points, and other unloading
docks. May also load or unload truck with or without
helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep truck

unloading trucks by hand or using handtrucks; assisting
pumpers in setting up pumps used to pump oil, gas,
water, or mud; bailing spilled oil into buckets and barrels;
cleaning machinery; cutting down trees and brush
around oil field installations; segregating pipe sections on
racks in material yard; and connecting tanks and flow
lines and performing other miscellaneous pipefitting
work. Casual laborers who are hired for sporadic needs
and maintenance floormen (gang pushers) should be

in good working order.

Driver-salesmen and over-the-

road drivers are excluded.
Welder, oil field

excluded from this classification.

Cuts, lays out, fits, and welds sheet metal, cast iron,
aluminum, and other metal or alloyed metal parts to
fabricate or repair oil field machinery, equipment, and
installations such as oil and gas-pipe lines and tanks,

Difficulties are sometimes encountered in distin­
guishing between roustabouts and roughnecks (rotary
floormen). Whenever such difficulties arise, roughnecks
should be considered as those workers who assist in the

pressure vessels, pump sections, heavy bases for drilling
equipment, drill pipes, or casings. The oil field welder
usually operates electric-welding and/or acetylene-welding
apparatus.




24

Industry Wage Studies
The most recent reports for industries included in the
Bureau’s program o f industry wage surveys since January
1960 are listed below. Copies are available from the
Superintendent o f Documents, U.S. Government Print-

ing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or any o f its regional sales offices, and from the Bureau o f Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C., 20212, or from any o f its regional offices shown on the inside back cover.

I. Occupational Wage Studies
Manufacturing
Price
Basic Iron and Steel, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1602 .............................................................................................. $0.55
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1732 .................................................................... 45
Cigar Manufacturing, 1972 BLS Bulletin 1796 ....................................................................................................... 65
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1748.................................................................................................30
Cotton and Man-Made Fiber Textiles, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1637......................................................................

1.00

Fabricated Structural Steel, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1695 ........................................................................................... 50
Fertilizer, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1763 .......................................................................................................................75
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1576 ............................................................................. 25
Fluid Milk Industry, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1464 ....................................................................................................... 30
Footwear, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1792 ..............................................................................................................
1.25
Hosiery, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1743 ......................................................................................................................... 75
Industrial Chemicals, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1768 ..................................................................................................... 80
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1626 ................................................ ........................................ 1.00
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1618....................................................................................... 55
Machinery Manufacturing, 1970-71. BLS Bulletin 1754 ..................................................................................

1.00

Meat Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1677.........................................................................................................
1.00
Men’s and Boy’s Separate Trousers, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1752 .........................................................................
.60
Men’ s and Boys’ Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1794......................................... 60
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 6 ............................................................................
.95
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1690 ..................................................................................... 60
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1679 ............................................................................................... 75
Nonferrous Foundries, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1726 ................................................................................................... 50
Paints and Varnishes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1739 ..................................................................................................... 60
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 9 ..........................................................................
1.25
Petroleum Refining, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1 7 4 1 ................................................................................................
.50
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 3 ........................................................................... 50
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1608 ................................................................................. 60
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1694 ............................................................................. 50
Structural Clay Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1697 .......................................................................... .................... 65
Synthetic Fibers, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1740..............................................................................................................40
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1757 ......................................................................................... 70

See footnote at end o f listing.




I. Occupational Wage Studies—Continued

Manufacturing-Con tinued

Price

West Coast Sawmilling, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1704 ............................................................................................ $0.45
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1728............................................................................. 35
Women’ s and Misses’ Dresses, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1783 ..............................................................................
(l)
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1793........................................................... 90
Wool Textiles, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1551................................................................................................................. 45
Work Clothing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1624 ............................................................................................................... 50

Nonmanufacturing
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1689 ............................................................................................. 50
Banking, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1703 ......................................................................................................................... 65
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1583 ............................................................................................... 50
Communications, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 5 1 ........................................................................................................... 30
Contract Cleaning Services, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1778............................................................................................. 85
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1566 ............................................................... 30
Educational Insitutions: Nonteaching Employees, 1968-69. BLS Bulletin 1 6 7 1 ................................................. 50
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1 6 1 4 ............................................................................................... 70
Hospitals, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1688 ................................................................................................................. 1.00
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1645....................................................................................... 75
Life Insurance, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1 7 9 1 ............................................................................................................... 85
Motion Picture Theaters, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1542 ............................................................................................... 35
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1967—68. BLS Bulletin 1638 ..............................................................
.75
Scheduled Airlines, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1734 ......................................................................................................... 45
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 2 ..................................................................... 60

II. Other Industry Wage Studies

Employee Earnings and Hours in Nonmetropolitan Areas o f the South and North Central Regions, 1965.
BLS Bulletin 1552 .............................................................................................................................................50
Employee Earnings and Hours in Eight Metropolitan Areas o f the South, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1533 .....................40
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail Trade, June 1966Retail Trade (Overall Summary). BLS Bulletin 1584..............................................................................
1.00
Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm Equipment Dealers, BLS Bulletin 1584-1 ....................................... 30
General Merchandise Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-2......................................................................................... 55
Food Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-3 .............................................................................................................. 60
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Stations. BLS Bulletin 1584-4................ .................................... 50
Apparel and Accessory Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-5 ..................................................................................... 55
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household Appliance Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-6 ................................. 50
Miscellaneous Retail Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-7.......................................................................................... 65

1 Price not yet available.




☆ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1973

0 - 5 4 3 - 759 (37)

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S

Region I
1603 JF K Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)

Region II

Region V I

1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Region III
P. O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)

Regions VII and VIII *
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St., NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Regions IX and X **
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)




**

Regions VII and VIII are serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco.

U.S. D EPA RTM EN T OF LABO R
BU REAU OF LABO R S T A T IS T IC S
WASHINGTON, D .C . 20212

TH IR D C LA SS MAIL
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID

U.S. DEPARTM EN T OF LABO R
OFFICIAL BUSINESS

P EN A LTY FOR PR IV A TE USE, $300




LAB - 441


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102