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Industry Wage Survey:
Nursing Homes and
Related Facilities, May 1976
U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1977
Bulletin 1964




Industry Wage Survey:
Nursing Homes and
Related Facilities, May 1976
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1977

Bulletin 1964




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D .C . 20402
Stock N o. 029-001-02046-5




Preface
This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of wages and supple­
mentary benefits in nursing homes and related facilities in 21 major metropolitan areas. Separate
releases for each of the areas included in the survey were issued earlier. Copies of these releases are
available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C. 20212, or any of its regional offices.
This study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of Wages and Industrial Relations. Sandra L.
King of the Division of Occupational Wage Structures prepared the analysis in this bulletin. Field­
work for the survey was directed by the Bureau’s Assistant Regional Commissioners for Operations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program of industry wage studies, as well as the
addresses of the Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end of this bulletin.
Material in this publication is in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission of
the Federal Government. Please credit the Bureau of Labor Statistics and cite the name and number
of the publication.




in




Contents
Page

Summary
.....................................................................................................................................................................................
Industry characteristics
.............................................................................................................................................................
Employment
.....................................................................................................................................................................
Type of care provided
.....................................................................................................................................................
Establishment size ...................................................................................
Ownership
.........................................................................................................................................................................
Unionization
.....................................................................................................................................................................
Staffing
.............................................................................................................................................................................
Occupational earnings .................................................................................................................................................................
Establishment practices and supplementarywage provisions ..................................................................................................
Scheduled weekly h o u r s .....................................................................................................................................................
Shift differential p r a c tic e s .................................................................................................................................................
Paid holidays
.....................................................................................................................................................................
Paid v a c a tio n s .....................................................................................................................................................................
Health, insurance, and retirementplans ..........................................................................................................................
Perquisites
..........................................................................................................................................................................

1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
5
5
5
5
5
5
6

Text tables:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Percent of full-time professional and nonprofessional employees in nursing homes and related
facilities, by selectedcharacteristics, May 1976 ..........................................................................................
2
Extent of coverage of collective bargaining agreements in nursing homes and related facilities,
May 1976
3
Number and percent of workers in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities,
21 areas combined, May 1976
3
Selected occupational pay relatives in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976 and in
nongovernment hospitals,August 1975 and January 1976, 20 areas ........................................................... 4
Percent of full-time professional and nonprofessional workers in nursing homes and related
facilities with provisions forselected perquisites, May 1976 ...........................................................................6

Reference tables:
Occupational averages:
1. Selected areas

.

. . . .

7

Occupational earnings:
2. Atlanta, Ga.............................................................................................................................................................. 9
3. Baltimore, Md....................................................................................................................................................... 11
4.
Boston, Mass......................................................................................................................................................... 13
5. Buffalo, N.Y..........................................................................................................................................................15
6. Chicago, 111............................................................................................................................................................ 17
7. Cincinnati, Ohio-Ky.-Ind..................................................................................................................................... 19
8. Cleveland, Ohio ............................................................................................................................................... 20
9. Dallas-Fort Worth, Tex........................................................................................................................................22
10. Denver-Boulder, Colo................................................................................................................................< . 23
•
11. Detroit, Mich........................................................................................................................................................ 24
12. Kansas City, Mo.-Kans.........................................................................................................................................25



v

Contents—Continued
Page

Reference tables
Occupational earnings—
Continued
13. Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.............................................................................................................................26
14. Miami, Fla.............................................................................................................................................................. 28
15. Milwaukee, Wis....................................................................................................................................................... 29
16. Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.-Wis........................................................................................................................... 30
17. New York, N.Y.-N.J..............................................................................................................................................31
18. Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J..............................................................................................................................................33
19. St. Louis, Mo.-Ill....................................................................................................................................................35
20. San Francisco-Oakland, Calif................................................................................................................................36
21. Seattle-Everett, Wash.............................................................................................................................................38
22. Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va............................
40
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
23. Scheduled weekly hours
.................................................................................................................................42
24. Paid holidays .....................................................................................................................................................43
25. Paid v a c a tio n s .....................................................................................................................................................44
26. Health, insurance, and retirement plans .........................................................................................................48
Appendixes:
A.
Scope and method of survey .................................................................................................................................50
B.
Occupational descriptions
.....................................................................................................................................53




VI

Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, May 1976
Area employment levels in nursing homes generally re­
flected the population sizes of the localities studied. The
New York area had the largest number (33,172), followed
by Los Angeles-Long Beach (31,016), Chicago (20,621),
Boston (19,923), Philadelphia (18,223), and Detroit
(15,071). Employment in the other 15 areas ranged from
3,886 in Miami to 13,831 in Minneapolis-St. Paul. (See ta­
ble A -l.)

Summary

Occupational pay levels in nursing homes and related
facilities were most often highest in the New York metro­
politan area and lowest in Dallas-Fort Worth in May 1976.
For each of the 21 metropolitan areas studied,1 separate
earnings information was developed for full- and part-time
workers in occupations selected from two major categories:
Professional and technical employees, and nonprofessional
employees.2
A majority o f the professional group of employees were
either general duty or licensed practical nurses. The average
earnings of general duty nurses ranged from $4.59 an hour
to $5.86 an hour in 20 of the 21 areas studied; in New
York, $7.35 was the hourly average. Pay levels for licensed
practical nurses usually fell between $3.50 and $4.50 an
hour; while head nurses most often earned between $5 and
$6.50 an hour.
Nursing aids, by far the largest occupation studied sepa­
rately, averaged between $2 and $3 in all areas except New
York where they averaged $4.83 an hour. Other nonprofes­
sional occupations studied included maintenance, house­
keeping, laundry, and food service employees.
A majority of the professional and nonprofessional
workers in nursing homes were provided with paid holidays
and paid vacations after qualifying periods of service. Vari­
ous health and insurance plans were also available to large
numbers of workers in the industry. The incidence of these
fringe benefits varied widely among the areas.

T y p e o f care p ro v id e d . Establishments operating primarily
to provide skilled nursing care employed about five-sixths
of the industry’s 152,000 full-time professional and non­
professional workers in the 21 areas. Employment in such
establishments ranged from slightly less than three-fifths of
the workers studied in Kansas City to virtually all in Denver-Boulder (text table 1). For purposes of this study,
skilled nursing care is that care provided daily by registered
professional or licensed practical nurses with requisite train­
ing and technical knowledge. Nursing homes in this group
include facilities which only admit persons requiring skilled
nursing care and also those that accept a limited number of
persons (a minority of the residents) who require only per­
sonal care or a place to live at the time of their admittance.
Establishments providing personal and residential care
but having skilled nursing care as a secondary function em­
ployed nearly one-sixth of the industry’s full-time work
force. Personal and residential care includes services such as
room and board, laundry, and help with correspondence
and shopping. It also includes assistance in bathing, dress­
ing, and feeding; help in walking and getting out of bed;
and preparation of special diets. Establishments in this cate­
gory are of two types: (1) those admitting a limited number
of persons who need skilled nursing care, and (2) those
maintaining infirmaries for persons who become ill and re­
quire skilled nursing care.
V. remaining 2 percent of the workers were employed
in escuolishments operated solely to provide personal and
residential care. All persons admitted are in reasonably
good health. They usually are transferred to a hospital or
another type of home when they become ill and require
skilled nursing care.

Industry characteristics
E m p lo ym en t. The 3,400 nursing homes (including related

facilities) within the scope o f the survey—
those with at least
20 beds—
employed about 255,000 workers in May 1976.
Of these workers, 152,000 were full-time professionals and
nonprofessionals, 70,000 were part-timers, and the rest
were executives, administrators, and members of religious
orders.
1See appendix A for scope and method of survey and definition
of terms used in this report. Earnings data exclude premium pay for
overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts as well
as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided in
addition to cash wages. Except where noted, earnings data relate to
full-time employees.
2 See appendix B for job descriptions.



E sta b lish m e n t size. Nursing homes with 100 to 199 beds

employed two-fifths of the work force covered by the sur­
vey. Homes with 200 beds or more employed nearly threetenths of the workers; those with 50 to 99 beds, one1

Text table 1. Percent of full-time professional and nonprofessional employees in nursing homes and related facilities,
by selected characteristics, May 1976
Extent of nursing
care provided

Area

Atlanta .............................................
Baltimore...........................................
Boston...............................................
Buffalo .............................................
Chicago.............................................
Cincinnati .........................................
Cleveland...........................................
Dallas-Fort Worth .............................
Denver-Boulder.................................
Detroit...............................................
Kansas C ity .......................................
Los Angeles-Long Beach ...................
Miami ...............................................
Milwaukee.........................................
Minneapolis-St. Paul .........................
New York .........................................
Philadelphia.......................................
St. Louis ...........................................
San Francisco-Oakland .....................
Seattle-Everett...................................
Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va....................

Establishment size (in beds)

Skilled
Skilled
No
nursing
nursing
skilled
care as
care as
20-49 50-99 100-199
nursing
primary secondary
care
function function
94
87
84
75
76
65
94
90
98
86
57
83
98
95
65
91
84
84
90
82
91

6
13
8
17
22
33
6
8
2
12
43
15
—

5
34
6
14
14
8
17
6

5
9
23
3
7
7
14
3

_
-

9
8
2
2
2
-

—

2
1
2
2

7
18
7
6
3
5
3
10
9
18
3
5

-

1
3
2
1
2
1
2

10
23
27
38
19
16
21
29
31
14
21
48
13
8
18
12
21
14
40
18
16

60
45
45
49
37
53
54
50
52
43
59
34
44
37
57
20
48
51
36
42
41

Type of ownership

200
or more

Proprietary
(profit)
home

25
23
5
10
37
25
11
19
17
36
2
12
37
51
21
66
21
26
7
38
39

73
74
68
47
74
49
64
82
94
85
64
78
69
76
66
48
55
72
82
55
58

Voluntary
Other
(churchnonprofit
related)
home
home
8
18
14
37
24
41
12
9
6
12
20
11
24
22
24
19
33
15
7
32
31

19
8
18
16
3
10
24
9
_

2
15
11
8
2
9
33
12
13
10
13
10

N O T E : Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.

fourth; and those with 20 to 49 beds, nearly one-tenth. The
proportion o f full-time workers in homes with 200 beds or
more ranged from two-thirds in New York to less than
one-tenth in Boston, Kansas City, and San FranciscoOakland (text table 1).

The highest proportion of part-time employees, those
regularly scheduled to work fewer hours than full-time em­
ployees, was among general duty nurses. Nearly 55 percent
of the general duty nurses were part-timers, as were 45 to
50 percent of the dietitians, occupational therapists,
grounds keepers, and food service helpers in the 21 areas
combined. Part-time workers were least prevalent in the
housekeeper occupation, accounting for 5 percent of the
workers. The proportion of part-time workers varied con­
siderably among the areas. For example, nearly threefourths of the general duty nurses in Boston and Buffalo
worked part-time, compared with slightly more than onefourth in Miami.
The extent to which nursing homes contracted out food
service operations was studied since this practice could af­
fect staffing patterns and, consequently, the industry’s
wage level and structure. However, only 44 of the 3,400
nursing homes surveyed had food prepared and served by
outside contractors; another 27 homes had food prepared
by contractors but served by their own workers. These 71
homes accounted for about 3 percent of the total profes­
sional-nonprofessional work force.

O w n ersh ip. Proprietary facilities—
those operated for prof­
it-accounted for about two-thirds of the industries full­
time professional-nonprofessional employment in the 21
areas. Homes that were church-related employed nearly
one-fifth and other nonprofit institutions, one-seventh.
U n ion ization . One-third o f the full-time nonprofessional
employees were in nursing homes with collective bargaining
agreements covering a majority o f these workers while
slightly more than one-seventh o f the professional workers
were in homes with such coverage. New York had the larg­
est proportion of union workers among nonprofessional
employees (four-fifths) and by far, the largest among pro­
fessionals (slightly less than three-fifths) (text table 2).
S taffin g. Nursing aids (orderlies) made up slightly more

than two-fifths of the total employment in the survey (text
table 3). None of the other jobs surveyed separately made
up more than 10 percent of the work force: proportions
ranging between 7 and 10 percent were recorded for food
service helpers, licensed practical nurses, general duty
nurses, and cleaners.



Occupational earnings

Occupational classifications studied separately were
chosen from two major categories—
professional-technical
2

Text table 2.
May 1976

Extent of coverage of collective bargaining agreements in nursing homes and related facilities,
Professional workers

Nonprofessional workers

Percent of workers in nursing homes with—
Area

Atlanta ...............................................
Baltimore...........................................
Boston.................................................
Buffalo ............................................. .
Chicago ...............................................
Cincinnati ...........................................
Cleveland.............................................
Dallas-Fort Worth ...............................
Denver-Boulder...................................
Detroit.................................................
Kansas C ity .........................................
Los Angeles-Long Beach .....................
Miami .......................„........................
Milwaukee...........................................
Minneapolis-St. Paul ...........................
New York ...........................................
Philadelphia.........................................
St. Louis .............................................
San Francisco-Oakland .......................
Seattle-Everett.....................................
Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va.

Majority
covered

Minority
covered

None
covered

Majority
covered

Minority
covered

None
covered

_

5-9
(1)

90-94
95+
95+
70-74
95+
95+
80-84
95+
95+
95+
95+
95+
95+
95+
95+
25-29
95+
95+
65-69
95+
95+

5-9
50-54
5-9
35-39
45-49
10-14
30-34
—
70-74
20-24
5-9
45-49
20-24
30-34
80-84
30-34
30-34
65-69
5-9
5-9

_

90-94
45-49
90-94
55-59
55-59
85-89
70-74
95+
95+
30-34
80-84
90-94
50-54
70-74
65-69
20-24
65-69
65-69
30-34
90-94
90-94

-

(1)
25-29
(1)
5-9
15-19
—

—
(1)
5-9
—
(1)
55-59
(1)
—
20-24
(1)
(1)

-

—
—

—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(1)
10-14
-

5-9
-

—

—
(1)
—
—

(1)
—
—
(1)
-

—
—
-

-

1 Workers in category, but made up less than 5 percent.

employees (including general duty, head, and licensed prac­
tical nurses; dietitians; and physical and occupational thera­
pists) and nonprofessional employees (nursing aids, cooks,
grounds keepers, housekeepers, food service helpers,
cleaners, and laundry and maintenance building workers).
These occupations, which accounted for about four-fifths
of the total employment within the scope of the survey,
were selected to represent the various pay levels and activi­
ties of nursing home employees.
Among professional-technical employees in the areas for
which information was available, full-time physical thera­

pists were highest paid in 10 areas. Their average hourly
earnings ranged from $4.76 in St. Louis to $8.01 in New
York (table 1). The range of earnings for general duty
nurses was typically between $4.50 and $5.50 an hour,
although the New York average was $7.35. General duty
nurses typically earned between 20 and 35 percent an hour
more than licensed practical nurses in the same area, but
between 5 and 20 percent an hour less than head nurses.
Licensed practical nurses usually averaged between $3.50
and $4.50 an hour; head nurses most often averaged be­
tween $5 and $6.50.

Text table 3. Number and percent of workers in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, 21 areas
combined, May 1976
Total employment1
Occupation

Professional and Nonprofessional Workers
Full time

Part time

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

All employees .........................................

255,102

100

151,919

100

69,623

100

Registered nurses..........................................................
Head nurses........................................................
General duty nurses...........................................
Licensed practical nurses.............................................
Nursing aids..................................................................
Cooks ..........................................................................
Housekeepers................................................................
Food service helpers ...................................................
Laundry workers.........................................................
Cleaners........................................................................
Maintenance workers...................................................
All other workers............................................. ............

19,249
2,733
16,516
19,530
105,497
8,191
1,595
25,949
5,846
18,999
3,947
46,299

8
1
7
8
41
3
1
10
2
7
2
18

9,881
2,349
7,532
12,699
77,378
6,611
1,508
13,925
4,157
15,042
3,003
7,715

7
2
5
8
51
4
1
9
3
10
2
5

9,368
384
8,984
6,831
28,119
1,580
87
12,024
1,689
3,957
944
5,024

13
1
13
10
40
2
(2)
17
2
6
1
7

1 Total em ploym ents also may include members of religious orders, and executive or adm inistrative personnel.
2 Less than 0 .0 5 percent.
N O T E : See appendix B fo r definitions of workers included in each occupation.




3

Averages for full-time dietitians were reported for only
eight areas. Their earnings ranged from $4.23 in Kansas
City to $6.62 in Milwaukee. Occupational therapists typi­
cally earned between $4 and $5 an hour, ranging from
$3.18 in St. Louis to $6.83 in New York.
Among the nonprofessional occupations studied, mainte­
nance workers were often highest paid. Average earnings for
these workers were typically between $3.50 and $4 an
hour, ranging from $3.03 an hour in Seattle-Everett to
$5.19 an hour in New York. Housekeepers, who supervise
the work of the nursing homes’ cleaning personnel and usu­
ally perform some o f the cleaning work, were also among
the highest paid in this group, averaging from $2.68 an hour
in Denver-Boulder to $5.68 an hour in New York. Cooks
and grounds keepers typically earned between $2.50 and
$3.50 an hour.
Nursing aids, by far the largest occupation studied sepa­
rately, averaged between $2 and $3 an hour in all areas
except New York where they averaged $4.83 an hour. Earn­
ings of nursing aids were typically 30 to 40 percent below
licensed practical nurses, 40 to 55 percent below general
duty nurses, and 50 to 60 percent below head nurses.
Food service helpers, laundry workers, and cleaners—
the
lowest paid nonprofessional workers along with nursing
aids—
nearly always averaged between $2 and $3 an hour.
Some occupational wage relationships varied among the
areas and contrasted sharply with relationships found in the

Bureau’s August 1975—
January 1976 survey of workers in
nongovernment hospitals.3 In the 20 areas common to both
surveys, general duty nurses in nursing homes averaged
from 52 to 141 percent more than nursing aids, and li­
censed practical nurses averaged 31 to 89 percent more
(text table 4). Corresponding ranges in hospitals were much
less— to 88 percent and 7 to 38 percent, respectively.
34
These disparities between nursing home and hospital pay
relationships resulted partly from the large differences in
average earnings o f nursing aids in the two types of facili­
ties. Hospital aids often averaged 20 to 50 percent more per
hour than their nursing home counterparts, while the wage
advantages for general duty and licensed practical nurses
working in hospitals typically were less than 10 percent.
For cleaners, a different pay relationship was observed.
In nursing homes, cleaners typically earned as much as or
slightly more than nursing aids while in hospitals their earn­
ings rarely came up to those of nursing aids.
Among the nine fully comparable areas in the May
19734 and May 1976 studies, average pay levels typically
increased between 20 and 30 percent. These increases in

3 See Industry Wage Survey: Hospitals, August 1975-January
1976, Bulletin 1949 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1977).
4 For an account of the earlier study, see Industry Wage Survey:
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, May 1973, Bulletin 1855
(Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1975).

Text table 4. Selected occupational pay relatives in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976, and in
nongovernment hospitals, August 1975 and January 19761, 20 areas
(Nursing aids' average earnings = 100)

General duty nurses
Area
Northeast:
Boston................................................................
Buffalo ..............................................................
New York .........................................................
Philadelphia............ ...........................................
South:
Atlanta ..............................................................
Baltimore............................................................
Dal las-Fort Worth .............................................
Miami ................................................................
Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va....................................
North Central:
Chicago..............................................................
Cleveland............................................................
Detroit................................................................
Kansas C ity ........................................................
Milwaukee..........................................................
Minneapolis-St. Paul .........................................
St. Louis............ ...............................................
West:
----Denver-Boulder.................................................
Los Angeles-Long Beach ...................................
San Francisco-Oakland .....................................
Seattle-Everett..................................... ..............

Licensed practical nurses

Cleaners

Nursing
homes

Hospitals

Nursing
homes

Hospitals

Nursing
homes

Hospitals

186
179
152
193

160
170
134
147

152
136
131
141

128
128
128
117

101
100
97
101

98
97
93
98

202
179
214
193
194

172
151
186
188
156

185
145
163
158
153

125
123
135
138
119

101
98
99
100
98

95
95
98
92
97

194
202
210
201
223
180
203

155
164
169
182
169
176
169

153
153
174
155
171
143
153

124
121
135
128
125
127
132

101
104
100
100
98
100
101

97
95
96
92
94
100
96

198
241
203
202

175
179
143
162

151
189
150
155

120
132
107
111

102
100
102
101

92
93
92
98

1 For hospitals, data for Los Angeles-Long Beach, San Francisco-Oakland, and S eattle-Everett are for January 19 76; data for other areas
are fo r August 1975.




4

earnings varied somewhat among occupations and areas.
For example, in Seattle-Everett, average earnings of cleaners
increased by 27 percent, while those of maintenance work­
ers rose by 9 percent. Corresponding increases in Buffalo
amounted to 20 and 36 percent.
The foregoing discussion was limited to full-time em­
ployees in selected jobs. Part-time workers were reported in
a majority o f the occupations in each of the 21 areas sur­
veyed. (See table 1.) Average hourly earnings for part-time
staff were typically less than for full-time staff in the same
job and area, but the earnings advantage for full-time work­
ers was generally small—
most often in the 1- to 10-percent
range. The full-time earnings edge was most pronounced for
cooks and maintenance workers, reaching nearly 35 percent
in some areas. In the few areas where comparisons were
possible, part-time physical and occupational therapists gen­
erally averaged more than their full-time counterparts. The
part-time advantage was substantial—
over 20 percent in
most cases.
Earnings of individual workers also varied within the
same job and geographic area (tables 2-22). Frequently,
hourly earnings of the highest paid workers exceeded those
of the lowest paid in the same job and area by $1.50 or
more. Thus, a number of workers in comparatively lowpaying jobs earned as much as or more than some workers
in jobs with significantly higher hourly averages.

S h ift d iffe re n tia l p ra ctices. In May 1976, about three-tenths

of the licensed practical and general duty nurses were em­
ployed on second shifts. One-fourth of the nursing aids,
one-seventh of the head nurses, and nearly one-tenth of the
cooks and food service helpers were also assigned to second
shifts. Fewer than 5 percent of the workers in the other
occupations were so employed. Third shifts furnished em­
ployment for approximately one-fifth of the nursing aids,
licensed practical nurses, and general duty nurses; one-tenth
of the head nurses; and less than 5 percent of the workers
in other occupations. Shift differentials were not common
in the industry, but were typical among the workers in
major occupations in New York, San Francisco, and Mil­
waukee, for practical nurses in Buffalo, and general duty
nurses in Boston. These differentials, usually on a centsper-hour or percentage basis, varied widely among areas
and, within areas, by occupation.
P aid h o lid a ys. Paid holidays were provided annually to a

majority of the full-time professional and nonprofessional
workers in each area (table 24). The number of holidays
varied considerably by area, but 6 or 7 days were most
common. A major exception to this pattern was New York;
where about four-fifths of both groups, professional and
nonprofessional, received 12 days or more.
Slightly more than two-fifths of the part-time nonsupervisory employees in the survey were provided paid holidays.
The proportion ranged from less than one-tenth in DallasFort Worth to more than four-fifths in Milwaukee, New
York, and San Francisco-Oakland.

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions

Information was also obtained on weekly work schedr
ules and the incidence of selected supplementary benefits,
including paid holidays, paid vacations, and health, insur­
ance, and retirement plans for workers grouped into two
major employment categories—
professional/technical (re­
ferred to as simply professional in the following sections)
and nonprofessional.

P aid vacation s. Paid vacations, after qualifying periods of

service, were provided to virtually all full-time professional
and nonprofessional workers in most areas (table 35).
Three-fourths of the part-time work force were in nursing
homes providing paid vacations. Typically, full-time work­
ers received at least 1 week of vacation pay after 1 year of
service and a minimum of 2 weeks after 2 years. Three
weeks of vacation were provided to a majority of the work­
ers in both occupational groups after 5 years of service in
about half of the areas studied, and after 10 years of service
in the remaining areas. Maximum provisions for more than
4 weeks of vacation pay were reported for two-thirds or
more of the workers in Buffalo, New York, and San Fran­
cisco-Oakland, and to less than one-half of the workers in
the other areas. In Chicago, such provision applied to
slightly more than one-half of the professional workers.

S ch ed u led w e e k ly hours. Weekly work schedules of 40

hours applied to at least three-fourths of the full-time pro­
fessional employees in 19 o f the 21 areas (table 23). In
Buffalo, 37%-hour schedules were in effect for about twofifths of the workers, while more than four-fifths of the
employees in New York had 35- or 37%-hour schedules.
Schedules of 40 hours applied to about three-fifths or more
of the nonprofessional workers in nearly all areas. Most of
the other workers had shorter schedules, typically 37%
hours.
Nearly one-tenth of the full-time general duty nurses in
the survey were employed by facilities that required them
to be “on call” beyond their regular hours of work. Nurses
were about evenly divided between those on call 24 hours a
day and those with shorter schedules. The proportion of
nurses in homes with on-call provisions was two-fifths in
Dallas-Fort Worth, about one-fifth in Kansas City and Los
Angeles-Long Beach, one-tenth in New York, and less than
one-tenth in the other areas.



H ealth, insurance, an d re tire m e n t plan s. Hospitalization,

surgical, and basic medical insurance, for which the em­
ployer paid at least part of the cost, were provided to a
majority o f the full-time professional and nonprofessional
workers in most areas (table 26). Formal sick leave plans—
either at full or partial pay, with of without a waiting
period were available to at least three-fourths of the work­
ers in 14 areas and to between one-fourth and two-thirds in
5

T ext table 5. Percent of full-time professional and nonprofessional workers in nursing homes and related facilities
with provisions for selected perquisites. May 1976
Professional
Area

Northeast:
Boston..................................................................
Buffalo..................................................................
New Y ork..............................................................
Philadelphia..........................................................
South:*
Atlanta..................................................................
Baltimore..............................................................
Dallas-Fort Worth.................................................
Miami....................................................................
Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va.......................................
North Central:
Chicago ................................................................
Cincinnati..............................................................
Cleveland..............................................................
D etroit..................................................................
Kansas City ..........................................................
Milwaukee ............................................................
Minneapolis-St. Paul.............................................
St. Louis................................................................
West:
Denver-Boulder ...................................................
Los Angeles-Long Beach.......................................
San Francisco-Oakland.........................................
Seattle-Everett.....................................................

Nonprofessional

At least 1
free meal

Uniforms,
Laundering,
or both1

At least 1
free meal

43
15
70
47

3
32
71
9

44
15
69
44

19
21
22
48
32

29
9
29

44
7
58

10

10
12
14
50
32

74
57
47
25
29
18
29
38

14
34
10
11
38
18
14
20

74
54
46
25
16
11
29
23

17
34
16
15
43
11
41
28

36
20
22
15

15
1
6
16

35
4
13
11

21
4
5
16

—

Uniforms,
laundering,
or both1
—

66
89
24

—

14

1 Includes homes th a t provided a m onetary allowance fo r uniform s, laundering, or both.
N O T E : Dashes indicate no data reported.

the other 7. At least one-half of the workers in a majority
o f areas were also provided other types o f benefits includ­
ing life and major medical insurance. Slightly more than
one-third o f the part-time workers were in nursing homes
providing some form of health and insurance benefits.
Retirement pension plans, other than social security, ap­
plied to three-fourths o f the full-time professional and non­
professional workers in New York, to about one-half of the
workers in Buffalo, and to less than two-fifths of the work­
ers in the other areas. Employers typically paid the entire
cost of these pensions. Slightly more than one-third of the




part-timers were in facilities providing retirement pensions.
P erq u isites. Earnings data in this report relate to cash sala­

ries and do not include the value of room, board, or other
perquisites. As illustrated in text table 5, New York led the
other areas in providing such perquisites; in that area, about
seven-tenths or more of the workers were granted free
meals and uniform-laundry benefits. In Chicago, threefourths of the workers were eligible to receive at least 1 free
meal. Free lodging was virtually nonexistent in the indus­
try.

6

Table 1. Occupational averages: Selected areas
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of nonsupervisory workers in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, 21 metropolitan areas. May, 1976)
Northeast
Boston
Occupation2

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

1 ,2 0 5
348
857
1,6 8 4
783
901
76
-

$ 5 .0 7
5 . 17
5 .0 3
4 .1 5
4 .2 3
4 .0 7
1 1 . 24
1 2 .0 5
7.1 3
6 .0 6
8 .1 3
5 .3 7
5 .4 4
5 .30
4 . 17
4 .2 3
4 . 13

Number
of
workers

North Central

South
New York

Buffalo

Philadelphia

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

291 ■ $ 4 .7 3
80
4 .7 6
21 1
4 .7 2
414
3 .5 8
25 2
3 .6 3
162
3 .4 9
18
9. 32
17
9. 56
17
7 .7 3
5 .8 9
7
10
9 .0 2
79
5. 38
59
5 .3 4
20
5. 49
21
6 .7 3
9
4.8 1
12
8 . 17

2 ,3 9 7
1 ,5 1 7
880
2,5 2 0
1 ,8 0 5
715

$ 7 .2 8
7. 35
7 .1 6
6 . 37
6 .3 1
6 .5 3
6 .4 3
6 .4 5
6 .1 9
8 .0 5

1,57 4
676
898
1, 448
1,00 7
441
7

Average
hourly
earnings

Atlanta
Number
of
workers

Baltim ore

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Dallas

Miami
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

347 - $ 5 .2 2
113
5 .3 1
234
5 . 17
593
4.2 5
412
4 . 32
181
4 .0 8
43
5 .63
43
5 .6 3
-

185
104
81
1 ,0 7 8
827
251
19
17
37
37
-

$ 4 .8 3
4 .9 0
4 .7 3
3 .7 0
3 .7 3
3 .6 3
4 .7 3
4 .6 3
5 .4 3
5 .4 3
_
-

231
169
62
387
316
71
7

3,7 6 8
3 ,3 0 5
463
456
413
43
34
13

2 . 28
2 .2 9
2 .2 4
2 .3 7
2 .3 8
2 .2 8
2 .6 1
2 .7 4
2 .5 4
2 .9 3
2 .9 3
2 .2 6
2 .2 7
2 .2 3
2 .2 7
2 .2 7
2 .2 3
2 . 27
2 .2 7
2. 25
3 .7 4
3 .7 8
-

1,81 0
1 ,7 4 6
64

Average
hourly
earnings

Washington

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Chicago

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

$ 5 .0 2
5 .1 7
4 .9 2
4 .0 8
4 .0 7
4 . 11
8 .5 3
8 .6 5
8 .3 2
7 .8 0
8 .8 4
5 .4 5
5 .6 2
5 . 11
_
-

1,66 6

Average
hourly
earnings

P R O F E S S IO N A L AND T E C H N IC A L
EMPLOYEES
G E N E R A L D O T Y N O R S E S ....................................................
P O L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
L I C E N S E D P R A C T I C A L N U R S E S ...............................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
D I E T I T I A N S ...................................................................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
P H Y S I C A L T H E R A P I S T S .....................................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
H E A D N U R S E S ................................................................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
O C C U P A T I O N A L T H E R A P I S T S ......................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................

66

31
15
16
460
254
206
44
19
25

100

91
9
49
48
432
394
38
41

22
19

8.01

. 40
8 .3 9
8 .5 0
7 .6 3
6 .8 3
8 .5 6
8

6

16

6
10

136
127
9
11

9
*

$ 5 .0 1
5 .1 8
4.8 8
3 .7 3
3 .7 9
3. 58
6.1 7
6 . 16
8 .2 5
6 .2 3
9.4 7
5 .6 8
5 .7 1
5 .2 4
5 .1 4
4.7 6
-

27 3
174
99
458
387
71
7
15

2.6 5

2 ,1 2 4
1 ,89 7
227
176
160
16

11

-

10
10

-

$ 4 .7 2
4.7,1
4.7 3
3 .4 3
3 .4 2
3 .4 9
6 .0 8
7 .6 2
7 .21
4 .8 3
4 .8 3
-

6

7
18
18
_
-

$ 5 .0 6
4 .9 7
5 .2 9
4 .0 4
4 .0 5
4 .0 0
6 .20

5 .5 7
7 .0 9
6 .3 0
6 .3 0
_
_

588
238
350
318
192
126
24
21
20
10
10

73
49
24
_
_
-

698
968
1 ,0 9 0
747
343
22

19
14
9
235
20 5
30
9
-

' $ 5 . 13
5 .2 7
5 .0 3
4 .1 0
4 . 14
4 .0 3
6 .7 4
6 .5 4
7 .7 7
7 .56
5 .66
' 5 .7 0
5 .3 8
5 .0 9
-

N C N P R O F E S S IO N A L EMPLOYEES
N U R S I N G A I D S ( O R D E R L I E S ) ...................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
C O O K S ....................................................................................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
G R O U N D S K E E P E R S ..................................................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
H O U S E K E E P E R S ............................................................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
FO O D S E R V I C E H E L P E R S .................................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
L A U N D R Y 8 0 R K E B S ..................................................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
C L E A N E R S , N U R S I N G H O M E ..........................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
M A I N T E N A N C E H O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G ..................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.




7 ,8 7 3
4 ,2 3 0
3 ,6 4 3
700
456
244
45
19
26
155
134
21

2 ,4 5 6
712
1,74 4
436
232
204
1 ,2 7 5
701
574
545
341
204

2 .7 2
2 .7 8
2.66

3 . 56
3 .7 4
3.2 1
3 .4 6
4 . 10
3 .0 0
3. 35
3 .4 7
2 . 59
2 .5 2
2.78
2 .4 2
2.71
2 .8 5
2 .5 5
2 .7 3
2 .8 2
2 .6 2
3 .5 4
3 .7 7
3 . 15

1 ,8 9 3
1,25 2
641
147
119
28
6

37
37

-

446
19 1
255
126
88

38
338
278
60
91
70
21

2 .6 3
2.66

2. 57
3 .1 0
3 . 14
2 .9 4
2 .9 2
3 .7 0
3 .7 0
-

2 .5 7
2. 66
2 .5 1
2 .5 6
2 .6 1
2 .4 5
2.6 5
2 .6 7
2. 56
3.5 7
3. 66
3 .3 0

1 1 ,6 1 0
9 ,7 8 0
1,83 0
572
528
44

49
48
204
190
-

3 ,2 6 4
2 ,5 4 5
719
456
429
27
2 ,9 3 3
2 ,7 5 0
183
520
499
21

4 .8 0
4 .8 3
4 .6 2
5 .5 8
5 .5 8
5 .6 3
4 .4 7
4 .4 8
5 .5 3
5 .6 8
4.6 0
4. 69
4 .2 8
4 .7 3
4 .7 4
4 .69
4 .6 6
4 .70
4 . 18
5 .2 0
5 . 19
5 .4 5

6 ,7 3 4
5 ,1 1 5
1 ,61 9
542
459
83
87
50
37
105
100

2 , 140
1 ,0 6 9
1 ,0 7 1
379
273
106
1,3 5 5
997
358
228
191
37

2 .68

2 .5 4
3 .3 4
3 .3 8
3 .1 1
2 .9 8
3 .0 5
2 .9 0
3 .7 2
3 .7 5
2 .5 5
2.6 7
2 .4 2
2 .7 2
2 .7 6
2 .6 1
2.6 3
2 .7 1
2 .4 1
3 .9 1
3 .9 7
3.58

7
7

46
44
336
264
72

112
101

11

324
299
25
70
46
24

2.3 3
2. 33
2.3 5
2 .6 4
2.6 5
2 .5 0
3 .4 6
3 .4 6
3 .3 7
3 .3 4
2. 33
2 .3 3
2 .3 0
2 .3 9
2 .3 9
2 .4 1
2 .3 5
2 .3 6
2.3 4
3 .7 4
3 .6 6
3 .9 1

2 ,9 0 1
2 ,4 1 9
482
175
160
15
18
14
29
29
765
501
264
128
93
35
632
563
69
84
73
11

2 .9 5
2 .9 7
2.81
3 .2 8
3 .3 4
2 .6 4
3 .3 0
3 .5 9
3 .7 1
3.71
2 .7 9
2.9 1
2 .59
2 .8 9
2 .9 9
2 .6 5
2.88

2.91
2 .59
3 .3 6
3.4 5
2 .7 8

21

57
57
770
595
175
265
226
39
656
574
82
57
52
"

100
86

14
6
6

27
27
337
310
27
78
75
302
288
14
73
73

2 .5 7
2 .5 7
2. 55
3 .C 6
3 .1 2
2 .7 4
3 .6 7
3 .6 7
3 .8 1
3 .8 1
2 .4 8
2. 49
2 .3 4
2 .4 8
2 .4 9
2 .5 7
2 .5 8
2 .4 3
3 .4 8
3 .4 8
-

2 ,6 3 5 ‘

2 .6 5

2 ,10 0

2.66

535
132
109
23
26
15

2 . 59

11

38
36
717
361
356
125
97
28
512
428
84
80
60
20

3 .3 3

3 .4 9
2 .6 0
3 .0 3
3 .2 4
2 .7 4
3 .7 8
3 .7 9
2 .4 8
2 . 58
2 .3 8
2 .5 8
2 .6 3
2 .4 3
2 .5 8
2 .6 1
2 .4 4
3 .7 2
3 .9 5
3 .0 6

8 ,0 3 3
5 ,9 0 6
2 ,1 2 7
590
477
113
31
23
87
85
2 ,2 5 6
1 ,0 9 2
1, 164
582
399
183
1,57 4
1,2 5 8
316
315
2 80
35

2 .6 7
2 .7 1
2 .55
3 .2 2
3 .29
2 .8 9
3 .22
3 .12
3 .6 5
3 .6 5
2 . 58
2 .7 3
2 .4 4
2 .6 3

2.68

2 .5 2
2 .7 0
2 .7 5
2 .5 3
3 .6 3
3 .7 2
2 .9 1

Table 1. Occupational averages: Selected areas— Continued
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of nonsupervisory workers in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, 21 metropolitan areas, May 1976)
West

North Centra -C o n tin u e d
Cincinnati
Occupation 2

Num ber
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Kansas C ity

Detroit

Cleveland
Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

> $ 4 .8 8
4 .9 2
4 .8 5
3 .6 6
3 .7 1
3 .5 4
6 .2 9
-

865
396
469
* 1 ,0 3 3
615
418
7
-

Milwaukee

Minneapolis-St. Paul

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Num ber
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

$ 5 .1 7
5 . 18
5 .1 6
4 .2 4
4 .2 9
4 . 17

159
59
24 1
176
65
9
7
7
36
36
7
-

' $ 5 .1 0
5 . 13
5 .0 7
4 .0 4
4 .0 7
4 .0 1
-

-

-

$ 5 .7 1
5 .8 6
5 .6 4
4 .4 5
4 .5 1
4 .4 1
7 .3 6
6 .6 2
7 .8 0
6 .2 8
6 .3 4
5 .8 7
5 .6 3
5 .0 5
6 .2 6

410
163
247
626
43 1
195

10

649
208
441
780
327
453
19
7

1 ,0 7 4
403
671
815
411
404

8 .1 0

$ 4 .6 8
4 .6 8
4 .6 9
3 .5 7
3 .6 0
3 .4 6
4 .8 2
4 .2 3
5 .6 9
5 .6 9
5 .2 5
5 .2 5
5 .1 9
-

2 .6 4
2 .6 3
2 .6 4
3 .0 4
3 . 10
2 .9 1
2 . 58
3 .3 7
3 .5 3

6 ,6 3 7
3 ,2 7 3
3 ,3 6 4
466
311
155
37
35
1 ,5 9 6
406
1 ,1 9 0
393
157
236
997
561
436
243
160
83

Los AngelesLong Beach

Denver

St. Louis

San FranciscoOakland

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

598
299
299
409
260
149
-

$ 4 .5 4
4 . 59
4 .5 0
3 .4 8
3 .5 1
3 .4 4
-

1 ,3 7 3
670
703
2 ,8 8 0
1 ,9 8 6
89 4
37
35
17
17
438
433

$ 5 .7 3
5 .7 4
5 .7 3
4 . 48
4 .5 0
4 . 43
4 .8 2
4 .8 2
6 .8 5
6 .8 5
7 . 10
7 .1 0

997
473
524
851
520
331
14
-

-

10
10

4 . 29
4 .2 9

10

-

Average
hourly
earnings

-

Average
hourly
earnings

Seattle-Everett
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

P R O F E S S I O N A L AMD T E C H N I C A L
EM P LO YEES
G E N E R A L D O T Y N U R S E S ........................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................
P A R T T I M E .............................................................
L I C E N S E D P R A C T I C A L N U R S E S ......................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................
P A R T T I M E .............................................................
D I E T I T I A N S ...................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................
P A R T T I M E .............................................................
P H Y S I C A L T H E R A P I S T S ........................................
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
P A R T T I H E .............................................................
H E A D N U R S E S ................................................................
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
P A R T T I H E .............................................................
O C C U P A T I O N A L T H E R A P I S T S ............................
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
P A R T T I H E .............................................................

289
135
159
63 2
402
23 0
23
19

6
98
74
24
7
7
-

$ 4 .9 3
5 .0 0
4 .8 7
3 .9 0
3 .9 5
3 .8 2
8 .0 7
-

8 .4 4
1 0 .8 3
5 .7 0
5 .8 4
5 .2 8
3 .5 3
3 .5 3

454
196
258
766
519
247
9
-

-

12

9 .5 3
1 0 .0 3
6 . 16
6 .1 6
5 .0 0
4 .8 1

-

8
67
67
*

12
7
-

-

-

6 - 1 0 .1 2
-

68
61
-

6 .0 9

6 .2 1
-

"

100

12
75

66
9
25
13

12

-

-

14

10
82
82
7
-

-

6 .3 6
6 .0 3
6 . 13
6 .1 3
4 .8 8
-

-

21
19
15

6
9

122
116
-

17
14

$ 4 .8 6
4 .9 C
4 .8 3
3 . 67
3 .6 8
3 .6 5
7 .5 5
7 .7 5
6 .4 0
4 .7 6
7 .5 0
5 .2 9
5 .2 4

10
8
74
73

$ 5 .2 7
5 .3 7
5 .1 9
3 .9 1
3 .9 8
3 .8 1
5 .7 4
7 .8 3
7 .7 8
6 .6 3
6 .6 2

891
372
519
507
324
183
9
-

8 .0 9
-

13

6
18

10
8
78
74

$ 4 .8 6
4 .9 0
4 .8 2
3 .6 9
3 .7 5
3 .5 8
6 .7 9
7 .5 4
7 .2 8
6 .2 5
8 .5 7
5 .2 4
5 .2 5

-

3 .5 5
3 . 18

-

-

"

-

*

6
7

6 .8 0
5 .0 7
8 .2 9

N C N P R O F E S S IO N A L E M P L O Y E E S
N U R S IN G A I D S ( O R D E R L I E S ) ......................... ■ 2 , 7 6 3
1 ,8 3 0
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
933
P A R T T I H E .............................................................
304
C O O K S ..................................................................................
198
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
10 6
P A R T T I M E .............................................................
40
G R O U N D S K E E P E R S ....................................................
19
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
21
P A R T T I M E .............................................................
44
H O U S E K E E P E R S .............................................................
44
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
P A R T T I H E .............................................................
836
F O O D S E R V I C E H E L P E R S .....................................
417
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
419
P A R T T I H E .............................................................
185
L A U N D R Y W ORK ERS.....................................................
146
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
39
P A R T T I H E .............................................................
587
C L E A N E R S , N U R S IN G H O H E ...............................
417
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
170
P A R T T I M E .............................................................
186
M A IN TE N A N C E W OR K ER S, B U I L D I N G . . . .
88
F U L L T I H E .............................................................
98
P A R T T I H E .............................................................

2 .4 0
2 . 43
2 .3 4

2 .6 6
2 .7 9
2 . 41
2 .7 2
3 . 12
2 .3 5
3 .8 1
3 . 81
2 . 40
2 .4 7
2 .3 2
2 .4 8
2 .5 1
2 .3 7
2 .4 9
2 .5 4
2 .3 5
3 . 11
3 .5 8
2 .7 0

• 3 ,2 3 7
2 ,5 1 8
719
253
198
55
60

21
39
54
52
730
372
35 8
198
144
54
470
345
125
143

86
57

2 .4 0
2 .4 3
2 .3 1
2 .8 1
2 .8 9
2 .5 3
2 .6 5
3 . 19
2 .3 6
3 .1 4
3 .1 5
2 .3 8
2 .4 3
2 .3 2
2 .5 1
2 . 56
2 .3 9
2 .4 8
2 .5 2
2 .3 6
3 .6 9
4 .0 1
3 .2 1

6 ,4 5 2
5 ,3 1 6
1 ,1 3 6
414
357
57

2 .4 6
2 .4 7
2 .4 1
2 .9 8
3 .0 2

11

3 .0 0
2 .9 3
-

7
87
87
1 ,5 2 7
986
541
291
238
53
1, 100
951
149

229
160
69

2 .6 8

3 . 59
3 .5 9
2 .4 4
2 .4 7
2 .3 8
2 .5 6
2 .5 9
2 .4 4
2 .4 7
2 .4 8
2 .4 2
3 .3 0
3 .4 4
2 .9 8

- 1 ,9 2 5 '
1 ,6 3 6
28 9
217
174
43
14
13
13
340
217
123
116
85
31
332
26 8
64
42
28
14

2 .3 3
2 .3 3
2 . 30
2 .5 1
2 .5 5
2 .3 5
2 .7 8
3 .4 5
3 .4 5
2 .3 1
2 . 33
2 .2 8
2 .3 5
2 .3 7
2 .3 0
2 .3 3
2 .3 4
2 .2 7
3 .5 8
3 .7 5
3 .2 6

4 ,6 1 4
2 ,4 2 1
2 , 19 3
226
153
73
15
60
46
14
983
346
637
257
144
11 3
580
347
233
19 4
115
79

'

2 .8 6
2 .4 4
2 . 57
2 .3 7
2 .6 0
2 .5 9
2 . 60
2 .5 5
2 .5 7
2 .5 1
3 .3 5
3 .5 5
3 .0 5

2 .8 0
2 .8 5
2 .7 5
3 .1 8
3 .3 0
2 .9 5
3 .9 0
3 .9 0
2 .6 3
2 . 82
2 .5 6

2 .6 8
2 .8 5
2 .5 7
2 .7 9
2 .8 5
2 .7 1
3 .4 3
3 .6 9
2 .9 3

4 ,5 9 7
3 ,7 8 3
814
467
357

110
44

20
24
75
74
1 ,0 8 5
556
529
379
2 94
85
889
678

211
158
14 4
14

2 .4 0
2 .4 1
2 .3 4
2 .6 2
2 .6 9
2 .3 8
2 .4 3
2 .5 1
2 .3 7
2 .9 8
2 .9 8
2 .3 5
2 .4 1
2 .3 0
2 .4 0
2 .4 3
2 . 31
2 .4 1
2 .4 4
2 .3 1
3 .6 2
3 .6 6
3 .2 4

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of changes in the sample composition and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
2 Part-time employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
NO TE:

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.




2 ,4 7 3
1 ,6 1 4
859
19 1
154
37

6
-

46
45
531
224
307
120
75
45
359
255
104
35
18
17

1 2 . 3 1 ' 1 3 ,7 5 7
2 . 32
2 .2 9
2 . 79
2 .8 0
2 .7 4
2 .6 9
2 .6 9

1 0 ,8 0 9
2 ,9 4 8
1 ,2 0 9
1 ,0 7 7
13 2
85
33
52

2 .6 8

201
201

2 . 27
2 .3 3
2 . 23
2 .3 2
2 .3 3
2 .3 0
2 .3 5
2 .3 7
2 .3 0
3 . 98
3 .5 5
4 . 43

2 ,7 4 8
1 ,8 2 6
922
534
430
104
2 ,3 7 7
2 ,0 5 2
325
330
28 2
48

'

2 .3 7
5 ,5 7 9
3 ,9 3 4
2 . 38
2 .3 1 | 1 ,6 4 5
2 .8 8
48 3
2 .9 1
37 1
2 . 68
112
2 .6 1
35
2 .7 5
12
2 . 53
23
3 .1 4
138
117
3 . 14
21
2 . 32
982
2 .3 3
533
449
2 . 29
319
2 .4 2
2 . 43
211
2 .3 8
108
2 .3 8
738
2 .3 7
561
2 .4 0
177
3 . 35
123
3 .3 1
85
3 .6 0
38

2 . 6 0 ' 4 , 146
2 ,5 5 8
2 .6 5
2 .4 9
1 ,5 8 8
371
3 .0 6
294
3 .1 2
77
2 .8 5
2 .9 1
16
2 .8 5
2 .9 4
13
2 .7 6
55
2 .8 1
55
2 .5 2
1 ,1 0 4
2 .5 0
2 .5 9
402
2 . 40
70 2
367
2 .6 6
2 .7 1
220
2 .5 8
147
2 .6 6
669
2 .7 1
471
198
2 .5 2
201
3 .8 3
152
4 .0 2
3 .4 0
49

2 . 40
2 .4 2
2 .3 6
2 .9 8
3 .0 6

2 .6 8
2 .4 4
-

2 .4 7
3 . 14
3 .1 4
2 .3 8
2 .4 6
2 .3 3
2 .4 3
2 .4 9
2 .3 4
2 .4 2
2 .4 4
2 .3 8
3 .0 0
3 .0 3
2 .9 0

Table 2. Occupational earnings: Atlanta, Ga.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number
of
workers

Occupation 3

Average
2.20
hourly
and
earnings2 under
2.30

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.20

3.30

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.20

3.30

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

and
over

21
8

42

24

a
-®

IQ

8

a
IT
17

-

-

P R O F E S S IO N A L AND T E C H N IC A L
EM PLO YEES

174
L I C E N S E D P R A C T I C A L N U R S E S ? .........................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................

<458
387

4 .7 1
3 .4 3
3 .4 2

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

4
4

-

_
-

_
-

29
27

36
33

2

95
81

14

66
52
14

109
93
16

70
61

13
31

22

13
9

29

2
2

2
2

-

•i
j

TTMK

7

2
2
2
2

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L

S R R Y T r R H R T . P E R S .....................T - - t _____
M E N , .........................................................................
W O M E N ............................................... T ...................
P U L L T I M E . .............................................................

POOD

M E N . . . ..................... ..
W O M E N .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P A R T T T M R ......................................... t
M R N ............... .............
W O M R N . , ___ 1 T _____ TT
.

. . .
. . .

..
T

W O R K E R S .......................... ... - T ____ T T T -

M R N ______T - - T
- - t t .................
W O M R N _______________ _______________________
pnT.T. T T M R __________________ __________ 1 T .
M R N ____ 7 _____ T T T t T
.T
W O M R N _________ T ............T

PART

.

_

T I M E ? .............................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




2 .3 3
2 . 32
2 .3 3
2 .3 3
2 .3 3
2 .3 3
2 .3 5
2 .3 5
2 .6 4
2 .6 5
2 . 50
3 • 46
3 .3 7
3 . 54
3 .2 4
2 .3 3
2 .3 7
2 .3 2
2 .3 3
2 .3 7
2 .3 3
2 .3 0
2 .3 5
2 .2 9
2 .3 9
2 . 50
2 .3 8
2 .3 9
2 • 50
2 .3 7
2 .4 1

4

2

_
-

-

_

_
-

52

2
2

2

69

~
L

*

4 . 83

2 ,1 2 4

6
1
1

7
5

2
3

EM PLO YEES

N U R S IN G A I D S
( O R D E R L I E S ) ...............................
MRN_____ , ____ T - - . , T - T , T - T ,
WOMRN_______ - ______________________________
FULL T I M E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
m e n ................................................................... T ____
WOMEN............. ....................... ............, T _______ f
P 1 R T T T M R - ........................._ T . .
WOMEN................ ........................................................
C O O K S ? .....................................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
1
P A R T T T M R .................................................T
c p n n N n s k r r p r r s ? ............................T
H O U S E K E E P E R S ...................................................................
M E N ...............................................................................
WOMEN ......................................................................

LAUNDRY

7 .2 1
7 77

10

mrn
h h in

5
_
-

4

11
F f lT T

77

13

121
2 ,0 0 3
1 ,8 9 7
105
1 ,7 9 2
227

211
176
160

16
7
46
19
27
336
46
290
264
31
233
72
15
57

112
14
98

101
14
87
11

1
' 7 2 28
79
1149
1087
67

1020
14 1
129
73 5
30

465
17
448
433
15
418
32
30
28
28

5

31

17

12

11
11

g

2

10

6
6

8
8

2
2

117

67

59
31
31
15
13

2
5
4

-

2

-

7211
20

41

45

4

191
1 63
13
150
48

37
39
4

25
23

2
2
35
30

°

12
11
22

54

37

■
j

2

13
13

6

7

o

14
15
g

18

13

4

2

2
2

2
2

2

2

2
2

7
7

%
6
7
7

_
-

2

5

_

10

3

4

-

-

-

5

3

-

-

2
2

16

9

2

3
7

-

-

_

2
2

_

-

16
16

9
9

4

2

2
4

2
2

6

2
16

9

2

g

2

g

9

2
2

7
7

7

g

18

7

7

2

2

2

2

_

_

-

-

_
-

-

3
3

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

-

_
-

_

-

2
2

_

-

-

_

-

2

-

-

_

g

20

2

Q

14

g

20

9

_

20

42
3

41

5

1
1

45
46

12

10

5
3

41
74 9
4

19
18
•
j

52

-j

2

37
31

90
90
59

2
72

35

14
Z

5

69
72

129

1

7

20

74

12
117
127

2
5

2

2
2
2

2
2
2

_
2

2
2
2
2

_

_

2

4

_

2

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

2
2

2

-

-

-

2

_

Table 2. Occupational earnings: Atlanta, Ga.1 Continued
—
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Num ber Average
2.20 ,
hourly
of
and
workers earnings2 under

Occupation3

2.30

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.20

3.30

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.20

3.30

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

and
over

51
12

0A
JO

9A
2U
10

11

7

n

4
2

1

2
2
2

6

8
6
2

8
4

2
2

2

3
-

4

“

2

3

IO K P R O F E S S I O M A L E M P L O Y E E S - C O H T IH O E D
O V lllV f iG
T

*

■ « rt

.
..............................................................
...

bamv *

DA

--

HfTBCTMfi DA D
m

nnifRM

' ******

.............. * * ................................
*

«TMV

babvb

86
238
299
80
219
oc
AJ
£

............................................• • • • • • • • • • •
19

H A I H T B M l i C E B O B K E B S , B U I L D I M G ? .............
F U L L T I H E ...................................................................
P 1 B T T H E ...................................................................

70
46
24.

1a or

186
32

0 ilQ
9 T1
2 • 36
2.50
2.3 0
9 31
1

166
28
138
9ft
||

2 • 33
2 • 34
3^74
3 .6 6
3.91

51
12
90

10

Vn

30
1ft
1
V
9ft
6V

2

5

-

73

11

*

]!

_

_

4
j|

2
2

4 •

2
2

_

1A
1O
2

lo
g
11n
u

9
6
3
6
£

*

4

_

_

2
2

-

-

-

-

_
-

2
2

2
2

6
6

4
4
-

4

4

4

6
4

_

6

6

~

”

1 T h e Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical area consists of Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett Counties.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those w orking a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 A ll workers were at $7.20 and over.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $6.80 to $7.00 and 7 at $7.20 and over.
7 All workers were at: $2.20 to $2.30.
8 All or virtually all workers were men.




-

4
2
2

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

~

Table 3. Occupational earnings: Baltimore, Md.1
(N um ber and straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976.)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number
of
workers

Occupation3

Average
hourly
Hnrfrr
earnings2 2.00

2.00
under
2.10

2.10

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.30

3.50

3.70

3.90

4.10

4.30

4.50

4.70

4.90

5.10

5.30

5.50

5.90

6.30

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.30

3.50

3.70

3.90

4.10

4.30

4.50

4.70

4.90

5.10

5.30

5.50

5.90

6.30

6.70

17
os
20
16

1a

71
77

P R O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
EM P LO YEES
7

PART

P R A C T IC A L

N U R S E S ? .........................

T T M E ...................................................................

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L

2 ,9 0 1
2 ,4 1 9
482
17 5

2 .9 5
2 .9 7
2 .8 1
3 .2 8
3 .4 6
3 .2 5
3 .3 4
3 .7 4
3 .2 9
2 .6 4
2 .7 8
3 .3 0
3 . 59
3^71
4 .2 6
3 • 53
3^71

23
3

8

5 .6 4

5*.31
5 . 17
j*
*
*

11
1^

/Q

80

61

7Q
28

8

7
224

22
51

2
21
70

V49
o

i
1f
85

'

8
2
uu
a
9
1
1

8

1^
*
2

0
2
2

5

~
2
2

2

_

' 7
q
8

77

~

”

U
:

54

-

-

-

-

—

22

77
19

EM P LO YEE S

NTTRS T N G A T D S (O R nE R T .T R S )4. __________ T t
FI1T.T. T T M E __________ _________ _ . T . T . ,
P A R T T T M E ............... - ..........................................
C O O K S ........................................................................................
M EN ...............................................................................
N O M EN .........................................................................
p n r.T. T T M E _____________________ T , -M E N . ..... .... . T ..... TT ____
W OM EN .......................... T .
P A R T T T M E ______________
W OM EN. ........................ ,
G R O U N D S K E E P E R S ® ......................
F U L L T I M E ........................ , T
HO IIS R K E E P E R S . ....... T ___ T T
M E N ...................................................................... T

WOMEN. _________________ T ______
FU L L T T M E ..........................................................
M E N ................... T T
W O M E N . ................, . T . T . t
FOOD S E RVICE H E L P E R S ...... T T .....
M E N . ............................................................................

WOMEN. ................ T .. t i - tt
F ULL T I M E .....................................T ____ ____ .
M E N ...............................................................................
W OMEN.........................................................................

P ART T T M E _______ T ..... *

T

T

M E N ......................................................................
WOMEN................................................................ T , ,

T.AHNDRT W O R K E R S ___________ T T T t T l .
M E N ......................................................................TT
WOMEN.................................. n ............................. T _
F U L L T I M E ? .............................. .......................... T ,
P ART T I M E ..................................... T ____ T1
W OM EN. .................................................................. T

See footnotes at end of table.




4 .0 8
5 .6 3
5 .6 4

40

L IC E N S E D

113
234
59 3
412
181
43
40

22
153
160
18
142
15

11
18
14
29

7
22
29
7

22
765
12 7
638
501
50
451
264
77
187
128

8
120
93
35
31

.

Il

-

-

-

45
23
22
4
4

235
184
51
4

157
55

123
103
20

230
204
26

2 .6 6

71
15
15

11

216
13
8

13 6
27
11

”

2

8
8
8

11
2
8

180
124
56
26

377
280
97
22

766
41
28

26
26

22
21

25
28

16
14

26

21
1
1

7S
25

14

_
_

3

_

~

~
2
2
2

*
63
16
47
13

-

_

13
50
16
34
3

97
14
83
46

4

10

10

o

14

3

g
g

67

58

1

11

25
19

~

56

ii
*77

on
2y
2

OA
”4

16

Q

27

12
18

42
51

3

3

54

17

56

8

14
14

~
8

1

_
7
3

1
ID
10
10
iIV
n

31

59

28

20

1K
21

13
7

~
17
12
8
8

7

86
83

~
*
*
JJ
*
*

10
■C
3
45

22
57

8

^8

20

31

45

9

8
2

if
17
11

2
•
7

2
~
2

2

14

1
1n
'11
8

~
'1

28

5

9

28

8
19

2
2
5
6
6
a
:

•

10 0
129
135
18
117
18

5

1
O
4
2

*
*
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

>

2
2

*
*

1
2
2
4

1
~
1

2
2

~
't
2
2
2
2

2
-

-

2

19

8

2

3

g

2

IS

8

2

4

2
2

~

10

*
•

-

4
6

“

4

*
*

6
2

~

1

2
2

2
2

”
r

3

8
*
*

153

39

2
2

“

6

2

17
12

16

0

1

*
*

OK

3 .5 3
2 .7 9
2 .8 3
2 .7 9
2 .9 1
3 .0 6
2 .8 9
2 .5 9
2 .6 9
2 .5 4
2 .8 9
2 .8 7
2 .8 9
2 .9 9
2 .6 5

255

2

-

-

-

*

Table 3. Occupational earnings: Baltimore, Md.1 Continued
—
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
N u m ber

A verage

2 .0 0

of

h o u r ly

w ork ers

e a r n in g s 2

2 .1 0

U n d er

and

2 .0 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .3 0

3 .5 0

3 .7 0

3 .9 0

4 .1 0

4 .3 0

4 .5 0

4 .7 0

4 .9 0

5 .1 0

5 .3 0

5 .5 0

5 90

6 .3 0

2 .2 0

O c c u p a tio n 3

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .3 0

3 .5 0

3 .7 0

3 .9 0

4 .1 0

4 .3 0

4 .5 0

4 .7 0

4 .9 0

5 .1 0

5 .3 0

5 50

5 .9 0

6 .3 0

6 .7 0

6 6

6 8

152

un d er
2 .1 0

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L

E M P L O Y E E S --

C O N T IN U E D

£. 0 O
O JZ

DAM P

VHT t

’P T M P

27

41

26

2 • 92

16

1 0

435

2 ,8 5

11

50

9Q

2 1

563

U fT P Q T lIC

p n U p u * ........................ * ..........................................’ *

* o
« / « oAoA

197

r*T V l t f V D C

2 ,9 1

13

43

39

H E N .............. .......................................................................

167

2^97

-

-

W O M E N ................................................................................
D 1P<P T T M fi

396

2 .8 9

-

-

-

30
W ORKERS,

B U I L D I N G ^ ..............

3 .* 3 6

FU LL

T I M E .........................................................................

73

3 . 45

D lp f P

<FTM P

11

;?

6 ^
10

25

1 0

26

1 2

44

52

26

13

40

56

8 8

49

50

60

60

152

7

64

2
5

6

8

12

5

5

8

23

6

2 0

8

64

2

3 5

27

18

44

42

26

40

5

17

2

3

12

2

52
g

8 8

14

1 2
5

'

jj

5

-

-

-

2

3

2 0

2

3

11

2

13

5

1

4

3

2

-

-

-

_

-

4

-

-

-

2

-

2 0

2

3

8

2

13

5

1

4

3

2

-

-

-

-

-

2 .5 3

84

5

7

2 .5 9
? _ g fl

39
M A IN T E N A N C E

69

60

1 w
In

!J

15
4

-

-

4

-

4

-

-

-

-

10

2 .7 8

1 Th e Baltimore Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of the city of Baltimore and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, and Howard Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected wage
movements because of change in sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average,
even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 All workers were at $6.30 to $6.70.
6 All or virtually all workers were men.




Table 4. Occupational earnings: Boston, Mass.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number
of
workers

Occupation 3

Average
hourly
earnings2

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

under
2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.40

16

69

52

-

-

-

-

8

8

11

66

61
384
192
192

41
189
98
91

57
144

33
14
19

2
(1

37
17

g

248
79
169
57
43
14

10

-

16 9
43
126
40
31
9

20 1

-

19 6
33
163
84
67
17

155

-

6.40
and
over

P R O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
EM PLO YEES

POLL

T I M E ..................................................................

L I C E N S E D P B A C T I C A L N O R S E S 4 .........................
.
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
D 1 D T fPT IIV
D H V C T n i Ip n fifi ID T C 1 »«

UnMRM
p n i ryr T T u p f
D 1P*P

-

- -

-

CC
31
28
15
16
13
460
254

T

ip T IIV

UOMfiH
n v in

unncvc^

PH TT TTM B
D I R T 1>TMV
r t r c n o iq iT n iiiT
T?nr t
P IP T

t r ib id t c v c

PART

...................................

C O O K S ....................................................................................
M E N . ........................................................................
WOMEN .............................
F U L L T I M E ..........................
M E N ...... ..............................................................
WOMEN .............................

P A R T TTMlt-.............
MRU . _
H O H E H •••••
G R O U N D S K E E P E R S ? ......................................................
p n r.T. T T H H .............- .................................

P A R T TTM*.
H O U S E K E E P E R S , ...............................................................
M E N ...............................................................................
IIONRH.................................................
T

PJTT.I. TTMB
M E N ..... .......... ... T ,
U D N E N _____ T ........ ¥
P APT TTKB . .

See footnotes at end of table.




4 .1 5
4 .2 3
4 .0 7
12

:

:

-

:

-

:

“

:

-

17
9

8

93
25

8

8

68

-

121
69
52

233
61
172

45 1
18 6
265

89
7

g

20

13
5
g

5

5

2
5

5g g

05

7 r 13

2 .7 2
2 .7 8

1

6

j:

1

OC
2b
1o
1£

1

n*
4 .1 /
4 . 23

7 ,8 7 3
4 ,2 3 0
3 ,6 4 3
700
157
5 43
456
138
318
244
19
225
45
19
26
15 5
48
107
134
46

'

;?

z.

6 .6 1
6 .0 6
8.* 13
7 .2 4
5 .3 7
5 .4 4
5

3

4.’ 13

11

15

;r

1
1

_ _

a
22

9

. ..

12 2
77
45

op
qo

6 17
^7

A 11
111
0Q
a y
82

~
_

1
1

a i\
1U
7

”

15
1V
1A

5
c

D

1

i"

a

2

15

72 9

00
22

1

EM PLO YEES

A ID S
( O R D E R L I E S )4. ...........................
T I M E ................................................................

TTN*.

5 . 17

44
19
25

^

T T M fi
TTM P

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L
N U R S IN G
FU LL

1 ,2 0 5
348
857
1 ,6 8 4
783
901

..

88
21

2 .6 6
3 .5 6
3 . 88
3 .4 6
3 .7 4
3 .9 4
3 .6 5
3 .2 1
3 .3 9
3 .1 9
3 .4 6
4 . io
3 . 00
3^35
3 .7 7
3 .1 6
3 .4 7
3 .8 3
3 .2 8
2 .5 9

454
164
290

-

903
381
522

-

845
365
480
28

1409
754
655

28
15
15
13

8

-

-

19

9
3

20

2
i
l
13

909
548
3 61
35
35
16
16
19

20
2

19
-

1103
653
450
92
25
67
41
18
23
51

252
155
117
17

100
69
14
55
48

44

45

2

-

5

3

117
18
99
81
18
63
36
36
15

216
108
108
80
28
52
45

22
23
35

7
7

5
5

5
5

25

44
13
31
39

64
25
39
56
25
31

22
25

q
22

10
29
5

8
8

29

12
9

q
26
29

-

-

5

10

3

3
2

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

-

-

-

-

5

11
6

-

-

5

12
9

5
3

10

q

5

11
6

26

3

2

5

5

-

2
2

8

2

29

_

g

-

:

-

•

-

-

5

-

2

15

8
8

31

7
7

-

-

5
5

-

2

13
15

-

15

8
2

3

17
17

3

3

407
310
Q1

~

2
17
£

2

20

9

5

2
2

692
382
310

-

5

~

385
273
9
9

13
-

6 58

2
2
*
*

17

31
3
28
29
3
26

2

7
5
7

5

2
2
13

~
o
g

12
1Q
1y
12
1Q
1?

7
7

J
5

-

-

Table 4. Occupational earnings: Boston, Mass.1 Continued
—
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly, earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Occupation 3

Number
of
workers

Average
2.20
hourly
and
earnings2 under
2.30

2.30

2.40

2.5 0

2.60

2.70

2.80

3 .00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.4 0

4 .60

4 .80

5 .0 0

5.20

5.40

5 .6 0

5.80

6.00

6.20

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4 .80

5 .00

5 .2 0

5.40

5.60

5 .80

6.00

6.20

6 .40

590
Q6
JO

200

298
6Q
oy

1 ZO
1 96
40

179

ZO
68

13

1A
IU
g

158
f
t
0 1i

116
31
85
no
HU

113
£A
ov

86

5

_

_

_

_

5

6 .4 0
and
over

N O N P B O F E S S IO N A L E M P LO Y E E S —
C O N T IN U E D
vnnn

c pd etpi

hvtdvdc

p n j f f t u .................................* * * * * * ................
t n T T tpTMV
M E * . . . . ................................................................
D1DT

VTM V
* .................................................................

t

in u n o v

a n fir v & c

ROHEN.......................................................................
VTVTT «PTM«
..................... .. ........................................
D1P<P fPTMV
{fO H VP.................................* ..........................* * *
r*T v m v D c
vn o cT u r damv
................................................................

n ip m

........................ * ...........................................
fpTMV
......................................................................

M A IN T E N A N C E N O B K ER S, B U IL D IN G ? ............
F U L L T I M B .................................................................
PANT T I M E ................................................................

1 456
it QC
HOJ
1 f 971
719
# 1Z

z

202

C IV
J IA
1 744

1146 i
436
379
ZD Z
36
1 Q6
I 30
o Ait
ZUH
21
183
1 #2 7 5
373
QA9
7U Z
7ft 1
/v 1
199
502
574
174
400
545
341
204

2 • 42

624
Q1
y i
533
6 11
O
24
07
D/
563

525

o*
2 • 40
2 «71

oz
496
43

454
64

#2 • 52
9 66
Z • 09
2 *7 8
2 1 85
9 76

\ \ 72
Z • Oj
9 /z
Z • 79
2 *8 8
2 *5 5
2 • 47
9 66
Z • DO
2 .7 3
2 • 85
O « QO
2 * 82
9 7J
Z • Q6
2 . 77
9 oz
z • 69
2 .7 3
2 • 57
3 ’54
.
3 .7 7
3 .1 5

40

^65
25
lift
Hv

48
_
10

23
9ft
ZV
3
17
126
27

22
5
17
1 04
22
82
8
4
4

54
liA
9A4
201
57
144
6ft
DO
32
26
143
25
118
22

22

38
162
Cft
ou
7
CO
DD
t1a n
HU

^96
14

114
14

1 53
14
a i

^116

1 AQ
2

1 9Q
^6

41
IU

33
zo

25

*
1u
31

99
23
13

17
111

"
__
93
in
JV

10
9 CA
2 DO
36

45
22
3
19

8
DZ
76
/O

6^

*

9A
30
10
3

6
51

•1 5
1c

0 1

16
12
4

13
1!

10
5

3
g
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
13

17
17

8
8

8

-

2
2

-

-

5
5

“

13
5
8

-

■

33
30
3

6
6

“

~

“

8

~

“

13

16

3

7
11

16
16

3

7

16

1!
*

_
58

*
7

81
28

3

_

67

73

37

19

1,

79
34
*»j
34

25
43
60
ou
25
35

in

00
88

11

1a
19
7
7

11
70
9V

37
10
IU

77

77
196
27
1 AQ
103

89
30
6Q
oy

21

to
JO
1

q j?

*•
' 7Q

0
a
42f it T 7TTMK 7 1
1A
71
14
IV
28
R7
39
1^
1q
114
u
96
42
ZD
34
21
17
112
7
3
59
14
14
53

77
7*
it

17

„

11
14
95
63
32

3

3

3

3

15
1A
IU

_

35
4D
1C
20
25
10
15
10
5

49
46
3

30
18
12

at
3
35
25

3

5
10

24
9
15
14

j?
j?

1A
IV

8
8

10
9
9

-

-

10
10
1A
1U
10

24
23
1

1 Th e Boston Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Suffolk County, 15 communities in Essex County, 30 in Middlesex County, 20 in Norfolk County, and 9 in Plym outh
County.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample com position, and shifts in employment among establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $7.00 to $7.20 and 65 at $7.60 and over.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $6.60 to $6.80 and 15 at $7.60 and over.
7 Workers were distributed as follows: 5 at $6.40 to $6.60; 12 at $6.60 to $6.80; and 12 at $7.00 to $7.20.
8 All or virtually all workers were men.




-

-

Table 5. Occupational earnings: Buffalo, N.Y.1
(Number and straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number
of
workers

Occupation 3

Average
hourly
earnings2

2.20
and
under
2.40

2.40

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.40

6.60

6.80

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3 80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.40

6.60

6.80

7.00

_
-

5
3

19

22
2

68

45
13
32

39
9
JU

7

2
2

_

_

23

45
14

39

-

-

_

1 1S
1 61
54

177

7.00
and
over

P R O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
EM PLO YEES
GENEBAL
POLL
PART

D O T Y N U R S E S ? ...........................................
T I M E ...................................................................
T I M E ...................................................................

POLL
PART

T I M E ...................................................................
T I M E ...................................................................

291
80

$ 4 .7 3
4 .7 6

_

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

17

1 6?

P H Y S T f A T . T H E R A P I S T S .................. 1 T . _ _
17
7 .7 3
H D M E N ............................................. T
14
7 .4 5
7
PI1T.T. T T M E .....................................
5 .8 9
6
WOMEN.........................................................................
5 .7 3
P A R T T T M E ................ ................................
10
9 . 02
Q
U O ME N . . .................................... ..........................
8 . 74
H E A D N U R S E S ? ...................................................................
79
5^38
E 1 T.T. T T M E ........................................................
1
59
5 . 34
P A R T T T M E ..............................................
T _ _ ^T
_ _
_
20
5 . 49
O C C U P A T I O N A L T H E R A P I S T S 4 .................................... 1
.
6 ! 73
2
g
F I7 LL T T M E ........................................................
, ..............
4 . 81
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................17
12
8l
N O N P B O P B S S IO N A L




_
-

”

”

34
18

35
15

2
9ft
22
6

_

10
10

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

4

_

_

_

2
1
1
4

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

1
1

2
2

'
”
1

5-f n
1/
17
6o
gy
7
'1

1

1

4
1

_

0

2

1
-

11

2

5

2
1
1

1

1
_

_

10
*

1

1

7
2

2
2
2
2
16
1 3
IC
1

1

9

10

9

_

8

J
:

1
2
1

_

1

_

_

5
3
2
-

-y

1

8o
o

-J

6
3
2
1

1
1

®7
7

EM P LO YEE S

N U B S IN G A I D S
( O B D E R L I E S ) ................................... 3 ' 2 . 6 3
■ 1 ,8 9
M E N ...............................................................................
2 .6 2
107
W OMEN.............................................. ...
..................
1 ,7 8 6
2 .6 3
P U L L T I M E ................................................................,
2 . 66
1 ,2 5 2
M E N ...............................................................................
69
2 .6 0
WOMEN.........................................................................
1 ,1 8 3
2 .6 7
P A S T T I M E . ........................................................................ 5 7
641
2.
M E N ..........................................................................................
38
2 .6 6
WOMEN .........................................................................TT . 5 6
603
2
C O O K S ........................................................................................
147
3.’ 10
o
M E N ...............................................................................
3 .9 8
W OMEN.........................................................................
139
3 .0 5
P U L L T I M E ...................................................................
119
3 . 14
7
M EN ...............................................................................
4 .0 5
W OMEN.........................................................................
11 2
3 .0 8
P A B T T I M E 4 ................................................................
28
2 .9 4
6
G R O U N D S K E E P E R S ? ....................................................,
2 .9 2
H O U S E K E E P E R S ...................................................................
37
3 .7 0
WOMEN.........................................................................
32
3 .6 6
P U L L T I M E ...................................................................
37
3 .7 0
WOMEN.........................................................................
32
3 .6 6

See footnotes at end of table.

69
58

_

386
30
356
2 06
18
188
180

12
168

560
31
529
340
23
3 17
220
3

2 12
20

-

20
14

43 6

310
119

317
19
298
244
14
230
73

5

5

12
424
317

7

114
27
27
22

22
22
17

119
Q

1 10
70
4

75
40
5
O
C
J D
40

40
32

54

5

20

1

1

46
3

IQ
i y

43
g

19

1

-j

g
12
12
12

6
5
4

8
6
6

2

1

5

1
2

2
5

_

_

-

-

1
1

_

_

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

-

_
_

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

3

_

3
3

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

2
_

14

22

17

5

5

1

3
3
3
3
3
3

3
3

1
1
1
1

3
3

32
g

12

4
2

4
2

1

2

1
1

g
3

1

”

0
3

~
'
'

“

-j

2
2
2

1

2

il
g

7

7

1

1

3

3
j:
*
*

3

3

1

1

3

_

Table 5. Occupational earnings: Buffalo, N.Y.1 Continued
—
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—

6 cupation 3

Num ber
of
workers

Average
2.20
hourly
and
earnings1 under
2
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2.40

2.40

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.40

6.60

6.80

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.40

6.60

6.80

7.00

. ..
1 DO
g

QC
70

CA
DU

_

10
10

10
10

7
£

M O M P B O F E S S IO M A L E M P L O Y E E S - C O M T IM O E D
- _ nn

$ 2 .5 7
at

1 na

z • DU

1 91

1Q1

.

.

' flfl

38
J Jo
41
B(TT T

»PT 1 B
1

H O M E N * ..• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
P A S T T I M E ...................................................................
WUBJSN • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • «• • • • • •
M I T UIHIXMI 1 1 1 U A D P BDC
D TTT T TlT U r9
VfTT T fllTMV
n mDIP flITICV
F A S T T l B f l * • « • • • «• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

^ /8
247
60
r:
51
7A
/V

21

O * ££
O K I
9

KO

9
7
/

17
l/

|

19
IZ

1

9
9

_
_

£

57
g
C
3 l1
55

14

- 11

49

1
2

ia

liO
on
on
io

_
a

9
9

10
1V

1

DO
JO

15
19
17
1f

1

zz

io

9

3U
J /

9 CO
J •D /
3 .6 6
J •J V

9Q

10
103

2
1011
1U

98
24
7H
i ii
77

1D
1

7K

2 66
2 .5 6

16

4

89
3

34
17
_

82
19
iq

3
3

18

1

14

up i

21
1Z
19
*

2
2
3

2
*
1

£

1

3

2

1

11

9

1

14

11
2

3

2
2

9
-

1
1

13

28

g

5
0

22

g
■
j

£

1

1 T h e Buffalo Standard M etropolitan Statistical Area consists of Erie and Niagara Counties.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for w ork on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those w orking a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 4 at $8.00 to $8.20 and 13 at $8.20 and over.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $7.20 to $7.40 and 8 at $8.20 and over.
7 W orker was at $7.20 to $7.40.
8 A ll workers were at $8.20 and over.
9 A ll or virtually all workers were men.




7.00
and
over

Table 6. Occupational earnings: Chicago, III.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
N u mber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number
of
workers

Occupation3

Average
hourly
Under
earnings2 2.20

2.20
and
under
2.30

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

and
over

ai

U9

1U7

ft9

in s

#;i

Ufl

40
114
74

66
103
80

121
95
58

84
6
6

292
34
28

91
15
11

109
2
2

67
51
51

41
-

*3

3'

P B O F E S S IO M A L AN D T E C H N IC A L
EM PLO YEES

2
2
L I C E N S E D P B A C T I C A L M O H S E S . .........................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................

1 ,0 9 0
747
343

4 .1 0
4 . 14

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

12
12

5
5

24
17

'

49
34
ID

11 2
77

167
118

93
60

50
50
208
114

•Hi

3

2
2

19

_ .

1
1

--------*L_
_

5
_
-

_
~ '
9

3
j?

3
235
OA J
AVC

5 .6 6
c /U
J . 7f\

^9

N O B S IN G A I D S ( O B D E B L I B S )4...............................
Rl1T.|r
t t
i ‘
P 1 R T T T K R ________________
C O O K S ........................................................................................
MEM.............................................................
W OMEN..........................................................
..
F O L L T I M E ...................................................................
HEM ...............................................................................
W OMEN.........................................................................
T T N V _____ _ *
T
MR 1
1

8 ,0 3 3
5 906
2 ,1 2 7
590
66
524
477
58
419
113

2 .6 7

W O M E N .. . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
c p n i n i n ^ k s r p r r ^ ........................
RT1T.T. I f T 1
*!*________ ___________________ t
H O O S B K E E P E B S ...................................................................
NRN _ _ T _____
___

105
31
23
87
17
70
85
17

1s
1O

WOMEN.........................................................................
< SR nvTri? h r t p p r c ;

M EN ...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
p n t.T. T T N * - - - M EN ...............................................................................
UD M RN ___
_____ . .
P A R T T T M R ......................
ifpir _ r
l i n M R H ......................

See footnotes at end of table.




'

in
10

25
16

37
34

16
14

36
29

2

22
21.

~

15
15

9^
1

1

12
12
81

EM PLO YEES

W OMEN.........................................................................
F O L L T I M E ...................................................................
tfpifl
T
pnnn

1

j.

5* 0 9

M O M P B O F E S S IO H A L

5c
D
2
e9

3

g

V n tI TTN B
n p i n n r iD C v « 4
VH T T V T M f
D in ip f T I V
n r r n D iT T n m T

-

68
2 256
* 526
1 ,7 3 0
1 ,0 9 2
299
793
1 ,1 6 4
227
937

_

819
368
451

800
C O
J IIA
288

-

12

9

-

12
12
12

2 .7 1
2 .5 5
3 l2 2
3 .7 8
3 .1 5
3 .2 9
3 .8 4
3 .2 2
2 .8 9
3 .3 2
2 .8 6
3 .2 2
3 .1 2
3 .6 5
3 . 90
3 .5 9
3 .6 5
3^59
2 .5 8
2 1 63
2 .5 6
2 .7 3
2 ! 73
2 .7 2
2 .4 4
2 . 50
2 .4 2

-

9
4
-

4
5
5

-

-

_

_

-

_

-

~

-

-

-

48

419
78
341
60
13
47
359

48

294

60
12
48
12
12

00

293
34
259
92
8
84
20 1
26
175

488
* HH
244
19
19
9
9
10

997
779
218

1 02
2
100
64
2
62
38

10
2
2

38

1

_

993
663
OW
J JOA
33
33
29
29
g

4

619 2051
4 6 4 18 33
155
25
9
3
22
9
17
7
1
16
7
g
2

347
77
36
4
32
36
4
32

2
g

411

j Hi
l

66
76
9
67
61
7
54
15

357
zy /
CA
Ov

75
64
11

79
4
75

45

5
37

6
39
32
4
28

8
29
37
8
29

71
4
67
g

2

-

1
1

_
-

2
2

_
-

5
5

1
1 68
48
120
43
22
21
125
26
99

-

2
2 52
72
180
166
50
116
86

_

2 26
47
179
111
31
80
115
16
QQ
j ,

159
56
103
1 15
39
76
44

5
396
96
300
260
49
211
136

64

27

5

17

89

_
_

3

3
£
£

11
2

13

£
£

11

20
3

10
13

2
5
1
4
5
1
4

z

13

2

19
17

_

2
5
5

39
J *
♦

9
11

17
20

~
_
5
3
3

8

16
IH
O

_

2

36
7
29
26
5
21
10
Iu
. 2
0
2
2

21
7
14
21
7
14

10
2
8
10
2
8

14
6
8
14
6
8

3
1
2
3
1
2

12
4
8
12
4
8

_
-

3

3

3

2

4
7
2
5
7
2
5

_
-

1

-

_

1

_
-

_
-

_
~

~
-

_
_
-

-

_
_
-

_

.

_

_

_
-

_
-

1

-j

9

8
8

5
9

_
-

3
3

3
3

2
3

2
2

1
1
1

_
-

10

9

17

1

8

5

_

3

3

2

2

_

_

_

_

_

_

18
94

11
39

3
10
■ -j
j

4
-

5
4

2
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
_

_
-

16

9
35
£

8
14
18
8

3
8

4

5

2

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

71

32
39
61
28
33
10

9fl

2

a

2

Table 6. Occupational earnings: Chicago, III.1 Continued
—
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—

Occupation3

Num ber
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings2

Under
2.20

2.20
and
under
2.30

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

7.00
and
over

78
5
73
44

60
1
59
14

40
5
35
28
5

78
5
73
68
5
63
10
170
54
116
15 0
49
101
20
5
15
2
2
-

24
4
20
18
3
15
6
12 0
40
80
114
36
78
6
4
2
13
10
3

106
9
97
86
9
77
20
292
113
179
244
98
146
48
15
33
1
1
-

18
2
16
18
2
16

59
4
55
42
4
38
17
122
51
71
106
47
59
16
4
12
24
21
3

17
17
15

4
4

15
2
72
53
19
68
49
19
4
4

14
4
10
12
2
10
2
51
26
25
45
20
25
6
6

11
10
1
11
10
1
-

6
6

11
11

3
3

2
2

2
2

6
6

11
11

3
3

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

32
25
7

16
12
4

4
4

14
14

19
19

28
28

15
13
2

6
6

8
8

3
3

1
1

-

-

-

~

12
12
“

10
10

“

36
36
~

NONPftOFESSIONAL EMPLOYEES-CONTINUED
LAUNDRY WORKERS.....................
MEN.............................
WOMEN..........................
FULL TIME........................
MEN............................
PART TIME........................
CLEANERS, NURSING HOME.............
MEN.............................
WOMEN..........................
FULL TIME........................
MEN ............................
WOMEN..........................
PART TIME........................
MEN.............................
WOMEN..........................
MAINTENANCE WORKERS, BUILDING9
.....
FULL TIME. ...... ......................
PART TIME........................

582
54
528
399
45

3C l
/
J OH
183
1 ,5 7 4
522
1 ,0 5 2
1 ,2 5 8
448
810
316
74
242
315
280
35

$ 2 .6 3
2 .6 1
2 .6 3
2 .6 8
2 .6 0
2 .6 9
2 . 52
2 .7 0
2 .8 8
2 .6 2
2 .7 5
2 .8 9
2 .6 6
2 .5 3
2 .8 0
2 .4 5
3 .6 3
3 .7 2
2 .9 1

lo 10
10

10
10

_
2

2
2
2

-

-

~

74
1
73
40
1
39
34
17 0
19
151
72
18
54
98
1
97
40
36
4

34
104
20
84
70
12
58
34
8
26
2
2

14
46
149
22
127
1 16
22
94
33

33
12
5
7

12
208
57
1 51
168
38
130
40
19
21
10
7
3

79
33
46
70
27
43
9
6
3
7
7
-

4
4

1 Th e Chicago Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Cook, Du Page, Kane, McHenry, and Will Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for w ork on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on arepresentative
sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons madewith previous studies may notreflect expected wage movements
because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even
though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those w orking a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were wom en.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $7.00 to $7.40; 2 at $8.20 to $8.60; and 1 at $9.40 and over.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 4 at $7.80 to $8.20; 4 at $8.60 to $9.00; and 1 at $9.40 and over.
7 Includes 2 full-tim e and 7 part-time workers.
8 Worker at $7.00 to $7.40.
9 A ll or virtually all. workers were men.
10 Workers were distributed as follows: 8 under $1.9 0 and 2 at $2.10 to $2.20.




■

-

-

Table 7. Occupational earnings: Cincinnati, Ohio-Ky.-Ind.1
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976.)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
O c c u p a tio n 3

Num ber
of
w o rkers

A verage
h o u rly

2 .2 0

earnings2

under
2 .3 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

and
over

11

15

36

73

47

24

13

_

_

_

-

75

65

1u
1 ft
177

:

:

43
32

51

_

51 0
*1A
lU

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
EMPLOYEES
GENBEAL DOTY NORSESt...............
LICENSED PRACTICAL NORSES..........
DIETITIANS..........................

289

632
402
230
23

$4
5
4
3
3
3
8

.9
.0
.8
.9
.9
.8
.0

3
0
7
0
5
2
7

|

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2
2

15
10

41
21
on
4\J

89
41

7

48

9 ft
zu

139

20
I 4

28
10

51

I I
3

0

131
46

22
5
17
2
2

28
1
1

27

14

2
-

-------“

1

_

-

_

12
y

m
in
10

5 .7 0
74

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS............

"

7

2 ,7 6 3
1 ,8 3 0

2 .4 0
2 .4 3

304
198
106
40
19
21
44
44
834
44
790
417
417

2 .6 6
2 .7 9
2 *4 1
2 .7 2
3 . 12
2 .3 5
3 .8 1
3 .8 1

2

3 .5 3
3 .5 3

_

1
1

_

2

_

4

7
2

;
**

l

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

3
3

2
2

"

-

17

7£

g
7
1

~

-

18
18

_

-

2

g

-

£
ij

a

_

NONPROFESSIONAL EMPLOYEES
NORSING AIDS (ORDERLIES)4...........
POLL TIME........................
D IP T

TTM P

COOKS ................................................................................................
PUTT
D IP T

T T MP
TTM P

GROONDS KEEPERS®....................
POLL TIME .........................................................................
D IP T

TTM P

HOOSEKEEPERS4 ......................................................................
.
POLL TIME .........................................................................
pnnn

c p p v y r’p

h p td p p c

M PM
UDM PN
p nTT

t

TTM P

P pPT T f^ F
M Pp
UAM P N
i n u r i R V H rtR iri? p < :4
P U T T T T MP

389
185
146
39

D IP T T T M P A T P A llP P C
M riP C T M A
MP N .
UOMP.N .
F IIT .T . T J K R
MPW_ M A M P M .-

.
-

2
2
2
2
2
2
2

.4 0
.4 7
.3 9
.4 7
.3 2
.4 9
.3 1

2 .4 8
2 .5 1
2 .3 7

1077
704
373
41
22
19
11
3
g

425
16
409
149
276
11
265
50
21

P A MP

_

83
504

___
1

PART TTN S
MPM
UA MP N

2 .6 7
2 .4 6

417
64
353

2
2
2
2

170
19
151

.5 4
! 70
.5 2
.3 5

2 .5 9
2 .3 2

MAINTENANCE WORKERS, BUILDING® ............... 1 8 6
3 . 11
POLL TIME .............................- ............................................. 5 8
88
3
PART TIME .........................................................................
98
2 .7 0

17
163
117
11
106

787
427
360
39
14
25
8
1
7

274
194
ou
0n

139
107

109
88

114
87

55
46

60
46

56
47

37
34

44
40

8
7
1

3
3

58
2 1
37
3

25
17

18
£

41
37

18
17
1
2

5
5

13
13

2
2

21
21

9
g

4

t u
un
3

115
70
54

57

CA
JW
33

130
55

2

-

-

1
2

124

^6
133
0

12

11
11
on
JU

-

4 2
ou
Jn

14

30
19
11

13
31
2 9
2

11
12
g
3

14
15

^4
54
53

22
27

7

-

44
2

29

50
15
35
39
10
29
11
5

q
29
17
12
5

~

11

^4
23
26

33
12
21
31
12

22
■
j

19
2

77

27
3

40
9

3
2

3
1

13
3

4
3

24

31

1

2

10

1

1

2
2

£

1
1

1
1

2
2

2
2

4
4

9
9

4
4

-

4

4

8

3

3

3

2

6

4

5

1

1

-

-

-

2

1

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

■
j

~

~

1

1
1
3
16
19

-O
1
12
1D
n

16

”

_
_

*
*

1
6
7
1
£

a

18Q
1
JO

2

16
£

g
3
3
g
3
3

1

1
■
J

2

~
1
1

17
£
11

12
12

12
10
2

12
1
11

-

1 Th e Cincinnati Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties, O hio; Borne, Campbell, and Kenton Counties, K y.; and Dearborn County Ind.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made w ith previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movement because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those w orking a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
s Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $7.20 to $7.60; 1 at $9.20 to $9.60; and 8 at $9.60 and over.
6 Includes 1 full-tim e and 5 part-time.
7 Workers were at $9.60 and over.
8 A ll or virtually all workers were men.




-

1U
1/1

8
_

1
1

63

6

2
2

-

-

-

_

57

20

2
2

g
_

53
78
1

50
5

2
2
11

-

**

-

-

-

g
/V

14

^1

9
9

-

10
1V
1ft

-

-

-

:

-

-

-

:

:

Table 8. Occupational earnings: Cleveland, Ohio1
(N um ber and straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
N umber
of
workers

Occupati on3

Average
hourly
earnings2

2.20

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3 .2 0

3.40

3.60

3.80

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6 .0 0

6. 40

6.80

7 .2 0

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4 .2 0

4.40

4. 60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.40

6. 80

7.20

and
over

2
2

under
2.30

2.30

6

35

35
8
27
30
28

62
20
42

83
38
45
1
1

34
17

64
38

38
17
21

52
22
30

25
11
14

P R O F E S S IO N A L AND T E C H N IC A L
EM P LO YEES

196
766
519
247

S'l 88
4 ,92
4

3 .66
3 .71
3 .54

2
2

45
17
28

126
75
51

146
92
54

919
142
70

£
82
67
15

15
20
1 V#
I 07
83

8
1

7
3
4

11
5
£

4
4

2

2
2
0

...................................................................

WOMEN
n v i n iinocsc^
v m T fpTMV
n r r n t n i < T n i i »T
V n T T (PTMV

• d v d s d t c 'p c ^
p

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L
N U R S IN G
JTflT.T

A ID S
«**7MR

P 8 ® T T T MF
r n n j r <?* . T ___
FtfT T
P iR T
connunc
FUTrT
D IP T

67
67
12

......................______________ ____________ ___
T

- T-

T

-TtTT

~ ~ t t IT

T T h R ________ T - - T - T - T T - 1 - - T T T *PTMV
. . . .

H O U S E K E E P E R S ...................................................................
W O M E N . ...................................
F U L L T I M E .....................
HON K M ........ .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
v n n n c v p v r r v ncr d v p c
FEFt

» * T T ___ T T T - - T K - - T T

tynifp|i

»ni T

--

TT-

____

f T N I ! ______

____

* * * * * * ..........................
D 1D V

VTM V

ffnjjpp**
t

in in o T

T

*

p

**

178
144
10

• • • • • •

• • • • •

NI THV

B BEH
AP
■O M N

. • • • •

.

See footnotes at end of table.




3,23 7
2 ,51 8
719
253
198
55
60
21
39
54
51
52
49
730
92
636
372
43
329
358
49
309
198
OA
*v

* ............... .

W O M EN * * ** * *
rk % Off

**

H nprvpc.

......

2

2
1
1

1
1

j
1

1
1

2

2

■
f
■
*

2

2
j
on
•
4
2

EM P LO YEES

(O R D E R L I E S )4. ............................

..................
TTH F
T T H F T T T - t T TT
rtED ED ^. .

1 0 .0 3
6 .16
6.16
5*. 0 0
4.81

.

.

.

.

134
54

10
44

2.40
2.43
2.31
2 .81
2 . 89
2 .53
2 .65
3 . 19
2 .36
3 .14
3 .11
3 .15
3 .12
2 .38
2.50
2 .36
2.43
2 .54
2.41
2.32
2 . 46
2 • 30
2^51
2.33
2^54
2 . 56
2 . 39
2^57
2 .39
2 .27
2 .42

1376
902
474
39
23
16
36
£

663
570
93
24
12
12

270
214
56
19
15

117
103
14
19
14

3

4
3
1

5

2
0

30

300
266
34
19
16

205
179
26
16
16

2

1

21
21
21
21

2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2

320
28
2 92
97

1 67
18
149
127

59
13
46
28

62

23

23
11
12
2

4

19
17

_
yV

4

58
32

4
_
_

3
2
1

27

60
53

55
51

4

2

7

4

3
1

24
24

17
17

28
28

3

£

2
1

_

29

6
7
0
10
5
5

1
1
1
1
2

£

18

c

£

14

12

5

14
14

12
g

14

3

7

2
4

5

2

13

7
Q
1

13

7

£

12

£

£
£

£

12
1

£

2

3

2

£

1

1

3

2

12

26

20

21
1
20

17

34
31

1

14

28

g

£

g

2
1

3

£

2
1

1
1
1
1

3

g

£

2

40
24

4
4
4
4

5

23

0

3
3
3
3

2
0
5
3

2

15

28
37

2
0
z

2

1
1

4

2

30
30

a

3
3
3
3

2

13
0
7
1

4

24
31
g
23

4

2

2
2

£

23
24

12

1

1
2

1
1

16
19

11 5
40
34
27

1

*
_

4

11

10

52

_

2

7
_
_

_

1
1
10

30
23

a7

g

123
120
3

2

_
_
_

JAR

0

1
1

_
_

223
18

61
55
£
g

a

21
0
£0
0

22

g
19

•
j

1
'

2
2
2
2

1
1
t
“
1

1
1
1
■
j

in
10
1

1
10
4
6
6

S'l A

*
6i

Table 8. Occupational earnings: Cleveland, Ohio1 Continued
—
(N u m b er and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—

Occupation 3

Number
of
workers

Average
2 .2 0
hourly
and
earnings13 under
24
8
7
6
5
2.30

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6 .0 0

6.40

6.80

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6 .0 0

6.40

6.80

7.20

12

24
g

13

34

34

Q

5

10

7
4

5
5

6

4
3

13
7

4
4

15
15

3
3

3
3

_

_

5

7.20
and
over

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L E M P L O Y E E S —
C O N T IN U E D
C L E A N S E S , N U B S IN G H O M E .....................................
M E N ...............................................................................
HO M EN ........................................................................
P U L L T I M E ...................................................................
m e n ...............................................................................
H O M E H .........................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
M EN ...............................................................................
H OM EN .........................................................................
M A IN T E N A N C E N O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G ? .............
P U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................

470
76
394
345
53
292
125
23
102

143
86

57

$ 2 .4 8
2 .6 8

2 .4 4
2 .5 2
2 .7 1
2 . 49
2 . 36
2 .6 3
2 .3 0
3 .6 9
4 .0 1
3 .2 1

187
15
172
110
10
100

62
5

44
7

47
4

57
52
5

37
32

43
40
3

2

3
g
g
2
7

16
22
7

6
7

g
2
7

47

30

77
5

10

12

37
7

72

10

5
7

1
6

2

2
1
1

4

6

5

-

1
1

12

-

5
7

2
2

3

2
3

3
1

15

3

4
4

12
22

£

24
30
£

30

£

12

4

24

18

o
*

4

4

2
2

4

2

5
5

5

4
3
3

27
8

19

12
1
11

9
8
1

1

1 Th e Cleveland Standard M etropolitan Statistical Area consists of Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, and Medina Counties.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made w ith previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $8.40 to $8.80 and 1 at $9.20 to $9.60.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $8.00 to $8.40; 3 at $8.40 to $8.80; 1 at $8.80 to $9.20; and 5 at $9.60 and over.
7 Workers were at $7.20 to $7.60.
8 A ll or virtually all workers were men.




0

_
_

3
3

_

_

1
1

_

_
_

Table 9. Occupational earnings: Dallas-Fort Worth, Tex.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Num ber
of
workers

Occupation 3

Average
hourly
Under
earnings1 2.20
2
6
5
4
3

2.20
and
under
2.30

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.20

3.30

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.20

3.30

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

and
over

1u
1A
5

£
3

33

12

15
g

19
15

1D
g

42
17

11

g
g

126
99
27

20 3
177
26

29
9
-

-

24
18

-

2-

-

-

P f i O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
EM P LO YEES

2
2
L I C E N S E D P R A C T I C A L N U R S E S ^ .........................
F U L L T I N E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................

1 ,0 7 8
827
251
17
17

4*73
3 .7 0
3 .7 3
3 .6 3
II

-

-

16
14

2

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

1
-

1

27
14
13

10 4
65
39

186
132
54

382
299
83

1

■
f

C*
.3

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L

3

! .....................................................................................
VT1T T fPTMP
n iDrp n TM V
c D n n u n c ifBBDSB*;®
Pff T T T T M V
D I P T *PTMP

3 ,7 6 8

2 .2 8

30

2727

483

182

2* 24
2 .3 7
2 .3 8
2 .2 8
2 .6 1
2 • 74
2 .5 4
2 . 93
3 .0 3
2 .9 0
2 . 93
o A3
J . WJ
2 •90

21
6

362
206
182
24
18

"*39
95
80
15

15
37
37

35
35

3

1

21
12
45
57

....................................................................................

jj®

u ptd v cc

....................................................................................

*rt m p

h^JJp p

........................................................

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D 1D T TTM P

12
45
770
77

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226

u n n tru c e :4

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D X D*P fpT MP

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pnjif p
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p

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* ............................................................* ....................

PART

T I M E .............................................................................

HOMEN .........................................................................
M A IN T E N A N C E W O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G ® .............
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................

10
22
20

64

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576
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204

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2 .2 5
2 . 27

439
82

2 * 25
2*25

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68

2

4

44

2 .2 2

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5
3
2

3

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3

5
3

3

-

7
7

_

-

-

_

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1
1

2
2

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7
7

-

-

-

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90
9

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io
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3 .7 4
3 .7 8

41
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57
52

1 ft

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19
19

483
574

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4

11

439
33

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2

g

~

2
2

9 fl

1/47
10/
u uu
t no

9Q

^5
23

359

16
29

20

^3

6

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3
3

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;

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1

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Z0

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3

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2

1

-

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12
10

1 The Dallas-Fort Worth Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Hood, Johnson, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwell, Tarrant, and Wise Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may reflect expected wage
movements, because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-tim e employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 All or virtually all workers were women.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $6.00 to $6.20; 2 at $6.60 to $6.80; and 4 at $6.80 to $7.00.
6 A ll or virtually all workers were men.




'Z

-

2

9
14
14

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3

2 .2 7
2 .2 7
2 . 23
2 .2 5
2 • 22
2 .2 7

83

n

7

g
g
g

? i t
0
7
2 . 207
9 33
4 . JO

HU M P

...............................................................

rz
^

•
j

177

PT V I U 1
PDC

80

6
595
Jv
545
175

* ....................................................................................

i iiiu n o T

76

•
j

13

463
456
413
43
34
13
57

HnM £)I
VFIT T «PTM P

pni t

if

z.
~

3

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cooks

Q v u x tm v

10

EM PLO YEES

( O R D E R L I E S ) 4. ............................

T> X D«P «TT MP

pnnn

6

4
4

77

A ID S

3

18

6
-

37

N U R S IN G

13

2

2

6

4

6

4

Table 10. Occupational earnings: Denver-Boulder, Colo.1
(N um ber and average straight time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number

Aver a ge

of

Occupatio n3

hourly

workers

earnings1
23

2 .0 0
and
unde r

2 .1 0
P R O FE S S IO N A L

AND

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2.40

2.50

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2.90

3 .00

3 .1 0

3.20

3 .30

3 .40

3 .60

3.80

4 .0 0

4 .20

4 .4 0

4 .60

4 .80

5 .0 0

5.20

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3 .0 0

3 .10

3 .2 0

3 .30

3 .40

3 .60

3 .80

4.00

4 .2 0

4 .40

4 .60

4 .80

5.00

5 .2 0

5.40

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

108

138
*7 Q
/O

TE C H N IC A L

EM PLO YEES

9
z.

3

149
N O N P R O F ES S IO N A L

N U R S IN G

A ID S

1

_

409
3 .4 4

2 ,4 7 3

2 .3 1

15

61

22

62

126

111

23

19
27

55

3

197
40
87

11
a

9

4A
IU

3

2

3

33

EM PLOYEES

( O R D E R L I E S ) .......................................

_

_

1376

270

107

70

40

22

8

24 7

558

99

63

38

21

8

22
on
Zv

1213

2

38

22

2

on
zu

~
43

165

^2

b

M E N ....................................................................................................

104

2 .2 8

_

-

73

10

10

5

6

_

C O O K S ...............................................................................................................

191

2 .7 9

-

-

17

13

28

29

19

M E N ....................................................................................................

28

3 .1 5

-

-

2

6

14
-

W O M E N ............................................................................................

163

2 .7 2

-

-

16

27

27

13

14

8
2
6

T I M E .....................................................................................

154

2 .8 0

-

-

28

16

8

7

M E N ....................................................................................................
HftMRN
_ _
_
...........................................T

28

3 .1 5

-

-

20
2

-

18
g

10
3

2
5
1

3

F U L L

p

RT

cp n n iin c!
H

o

n

TJM R

T

H O M R N ___________________ T __________ T T - t

RHT.T.

M R N _________ __________________________ T * .
s R B v rrR

h r i

.p

r

H D N X N ......................
R
riT.T. T T M R ....... .
. M R N _____________ _____ _ T ____ r T
.
H O M R N . ....... . . 7
DlP*p T T M R .
M R N ........
_1
BAM RN
T.A nnni?Y H O R K R R 9 . ...... 7 T n
t
H O M R N ................ ....................... T T T T RT1T T T T M R ________
..
r
PART T T M R ____________ T T _ , . T . T . _ TT
H O M R N ___________
PT.R^ H E R S ( priR^T NO H O U R _________
M ^ M _________ _
.
T
H O M R N ........................ ... .....................................................
R I . . T T M R _______________ . ,
ITT
M R N ....................
-H O M R N ____________________
PART TTMR. .. _____t
MRM - _
H O M R N ..........
W OBKERS,

3

5

7

B U I L D I N G ....................

1

1
27

-j

2 .6 9

£

2 .6 5
2 .7 0

45

2 .6 8

11

2 .6 5

3

5

2 .3 2

393

2 .2 6

224

2 .3 3

51

2 .4 1

25

11

173

2 .3 1

93

38
£ <
|

10

10

10

12 0
112

2 .3 3

75
45

2 .3 0

40

2 •3 2

2

15

£

16

5

2

38

255

72

V

49

3 4

10
1V

91C
Z 19

10
IU

10
IU

1 f. z
1o 9

2
2

1

49

28

1

32

23

22
17

7
7

177

77

53

54

2
2

2

1

8
8
-

5
5
5
-

8

2
1
1
2
1

2

5

_

_

_

-

3

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

5
-

-

_

-

-

-

5

_
-

2
2

2
5

-

-

-

5
-

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

_
_

_

_
_

1

-

-

-

1

2
2

1

]

3

-|
•
J

3

7

7

11 n
V

5
5
-j

3

g

3

4

g
g

_

3
3

-j

j
■
j

-J

27

2

3

2
15
3

14
Q

1

5

2
2

1

j.

2

1

4 /

3

30

21
21
11
10
10

2

1

7

34

5

1

•

1
2

2
2

1

<
1

3
3
3

359

2 .3 5

46

23

16

<1

i

3

1

154

- 2 .4 1

60

28

24

15

14

3

1

2

1

£

205

2 .3 1

117

49

22

255

2 . 37

123

52

33

108

2 .4 3

42

18

15

1
1

147

•^
j
£
C
J

g
19
13

2

1

g

3

i

3

2

1

2
1

2 .3 3

8 1

34

18

£

3
•
j

104

2^30

54

25

4

18
36

15

4

2
2

g
■
j

-

-

5

7

2 .3 5

1IB
A

13

46
58

2 .2 7

35

3 ^9 8

-

-

F U L L

T I M E ....................................................................................

18

3 .5 5

P A S T

T I M E .....................................................................................

17

4 .4 3

-

g

1

• -

1

-

<
1

_
-

1

1

_
-

2
2

1

6

1

3

2

5

1
-

5

1

3

1
1

5

1
-

-

1

1

1 Th e Denver-Boulder Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, and Jefferson Counties.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based
on a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made w ith previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.




5
-

-

1

5

3

-j
g

1 iI n
1 U

10

2 .3 3

2 .3 2

5

3

333

118

2 .2 6

9 99
z . zz

16

3

78

10

19
■
j

8
-

3
3

3

138

2 .2 3

g

9
9

22
2
20
21
2

-j

5

2 .6 8
2 .2 7

87

0

3
£

34

307

6

9
9

-j

531

r r s

M R N ............................... ...................... ... .......................... T _

M A IN TEN A N C E

2 .6 9

8
12

35

T

T T M R _________________ _________________ __________

H O M R N _________________________ __________

Roon

2 .7 2
2 .7 4

6
1
5
11

5

46
■1
j

T t7
t

126
37
g

v

m v p 'E p c

s : R i f t i
t ....................................... M R N ................ .....................................

1

_
-

_

11

_
11

-

1

_

Table 11. Occupational earnings: Detroit, Mich.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number

A v er a ge

of

hourly

workers

Occupatio n3
2
1

earnings2

2 .2 0
2 .3 0

2 .40

2.50

2 .60

2.70

2 .80

2.90

3.00

3 .10

3 .20

3 .40

3.60

3.80

4 .0 0

4 .20

4 .4 0

4.60

4 .80

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5.40

5 .80

6 .2 0

6.60

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

2 .4 0

2 .50

2.60

2 .70

2.80

2 .90

3 .0 0

3 .10

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .60

3.80

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .40

4 .6 0

4 .80

5.00

5 .2 0

5 .40

5.80

6.20

6.6 0

7.00

7 .4 0

over

2 ;?
16
19

31

9Q

35

77

1TO
7 9
1AC
IU j

36
*A

g

1

and
under
2.30

P R O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
EM PLO YEES4
$5

999

17

nnr

5 .1 8

UGO

5 .1 6
1 1/
1 fi

111

g

92

68
38

170

164

56

30

124

108

86

77

12

47

34

294

36

1 ,0 3 3

QA
ii 0
42
‘1 9
I

7f t

126

7 ft

13

oa
2 4

3

3

3

7

1O
3
1*

1 11
I

1A
1V

£

1 1

63
8c
D
2

12

I I

10

6

1 1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

:

:

4
b

2

18
6

7
/

2

10

in * n
_

2

N O N P B O F E S S IO N A L
N U R S IN G

A ID S

V flT T

2 .4 6

1^136

<I>T Mff

6 ,4 5 2

2

1642

910

687

387

241

41

370

288

132

112

80

83

40

10

2 .9 8

2

8

33

56

34

53

25

29

I T T If V

niD lf

EM PLO YEES

( O B D E R L I E S ) 4. ............................

TTM V

n * nm

4PTM V

414

28

CO DffTPV

49
i 6
1a

7

11

UPT n n cc

f j n n F N ................................................... *

2 ^68
3 .0 0

87

3^59

2

4

5

2

82

3 .5 5

2

4

5

87

3 .5 9

2

4

5

82

3 .5 5

2

4
183

1 ,5 2 7
Or tf t
Zv/u
.....................................

flriT T ffiTHff

1 ,3 2 7
986

2 .4 4

2*

874

*an

2

37

291

.............................................................. *

303

214

190

1 ,1 0 0
17 R
I/ O

niDin ipT MV

D ft D VT MV
«P

1

14

5

15

81

31

13

13
13

30

11

13

27

13

24

n

~

~

29

28

14

13

6

12

1

2J"

26

22

12

13

6

12

119

fl7

J

1 CO
12 6

177

128

126

26

^26

^27

164

123

2*41

49

3.*30

14

11

160

3 .4 4

5
g

9

11
j?

13

229

• 98

2

7

6

3

7

6

3

4

7

6

3

6

7

6

3

4

1
1

9 7

9

16

15

11
11

13

6

10

4

6

2
2
2
2

:

:

:

:

'3

9

13

16

16

37

10
21

19

16

9
9

18

m
•u

13

19

8

16

16

9

23

3

13

26

6

3

11
2

22

85

21
21

105

73

114

97

71

ia
12

^9

1^ 2

109

2
12

14

18

16

22

6

9

15

14

3

6

5

3

2

19

15

4

3
3

7
7

11
**

1 T h e Detroit Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne Counties.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for w ork on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on a representative
sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made w ith previous studies may not reflect expected wage movements
because of change in the sample com position, and shifts in em ploym ent among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts for example, could decrease an occupational average, even
though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those w orking a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were wom en.
5 Includes 4 full-tim e and 3 part-time workers.
6 All workers were at $9.80 and over.
7 Includes 5 full-tim e and 1 part-time w orker.
8 Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $8.60 to $9.00 and 3 at $9.80 and over.
9 A ll or virtually all workers were men.




-

1

90

13 3

^9

-

2

9a

^28

17

-

6

aft

c

179

* a^

2

12
9
9
2
2

63
1

2
2

*
*

2

13

61

39

9

4

9

2

f.

71

9

**

O9

J a

1
1
2
2
2
2

4
*
*

33

27

2 -4 8

2

8

68

2*52

69

2

116

109

M A IN T E N A N C E W ORKERS# B U I L D I N G ? ...........
F U L L T I M E ............................................................

2

19

228

9

5

119

135

1 jj9

18

1 7^
1na
99

2*48

................. * .............................................

15

5

215

816

J ® * * ' .................................................................

5

29

25

*aa
0 il-J
2 •H i
o • JV
& 5A

925

VIITT fPTMP

14

29

9

18

1
1

14

81

238

5

2
1

68

2

1

14

1

16 8

22
!?
2

10
1^

8

129

51

13

31

8

120

. Q

31

14

2

149

2 ! 56

14

18

2

129

^9

21

2

1 80

99

2
22
22

54

2

199

;?

12
1A
1V

8

258

^70

54

2

253

117

9

fjn ffp H .................................................................

PHT T <PTMV
n i Dip fpT MV
F*T P I HVDC
unDCTMC tlA|fV

458

62

g

9
2

g

9

^QQ
t in n in o v

1^

404
/i 7

2,2
9

f f n j j p y .................................................................
DiDffl mT If 1
7

_

'

88
86

114

29

11
7

<PT M V

H O U S E K E E P E R S ...................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................... ...
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
W OMEN.........................................................................

2

76
66

^57

ro n n iin c
VfTT T

844
764

1019

COOKS4 6
......................................................................................
8
7
» nT T

1389

3

2

3
3

4
4

5
5

-

-

-

-

"
-

Table 12. Occupational earnings: Kansas City, Mo.-Kans.1
(Num ber and average straight-time earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) o f Number
of
workers

Occupation 3

Average
hourly
earnings2

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .2 0

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6 .0 0

6.40

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6 .0 0

6.40

6.80

1

and
under

2
2

42

36

21

21

15
4
4

15

23
18
5

6.80
and
oJer

P R O F E S S IO N A L AND T E C H N IC A L
E M PLO YEES
GENERAL DUTY N U R S E S ............................................
F U L L T I M E ................................................................
PA R T T I M E ................................................................
L IC E N S E D P R A C T IC A L N U R S E S ...........................
F U L L T I M E ................................................................
PART T I M E ................................................................
D I E T I T I A N S ......................................................................
F U L L T I M E ............... .. ..............................................
P H Y S IC A L T H E R A P IS T S ............................................
F U L L T I M E ................................................................
HEAD N U R S E S ...................................................................
F U L L T I M E ................................................................
O C C U P A T IO N A L T H E R A P IS T S ................................
N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L
N U R S IN G
FULL

100

59
2 41
176
65

$ 4 .6 8
4 .6 8
4 .6 9
3 .5 7
3 .6 0
3 .4 6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

_

1

_
_

10
2
2

10

9
7

4 .2 3

7
36
36
7

5 .6 9
5 .2 5
5 .2 5
5 .1 9

1 ,9 2 5

2 .3 3
2 .3 3
2.30
2 .5 1
2 .5 5
2 . 35
2 .7 8
3 .4 5
3 .5 3
3 .4 5
3 .5 3
2 .3 1
2 .3 5
2 .3 1
2 .3 3
2 .4 1
2 .3 2
2 .2 8
2 .3 1
2 .2 8
2 .3 5
2 . 37
2 .3 0
2 .3 3
2 .3 7
2 .3 2
2 .3 4
2 .3 7
2 .3 4
2 . 27

19
9

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

_

_
-

_
_

47
31
16

_
-

1
1

67
49
18

1

_

58
46

1
12
11
1

12

2
2

2
2

_
_
_
28
20
8
1
1

_

_
_

A ID S
( O R D E R L IE S ) ..............................
T I M E ................................................................

8

4

8

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

1
1

_
_

1
1

3
3

1
1

2
2

1

_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

5
5

_
_

1
2
2

'

6
6

4
4

2
2

1
1

2
2

4

_
_
_

!

4

_

_
_
_

_
_

"

"

“ .

2

2
2

1
1

1

5
5

3
3

2
2

3

289
217
174
43
14
13
8

13
8

340
43
297
217
16
201

123
27
96
1 16
85
31
332
47
285
268
46

222
64
42
28
14

3 .5 8
3 .7 5
3 .2 6

_

_
_
_
-

566
8i 3
6 35 ! 519
47
17 8
69
11
39
10
1
30
4

-

275
244
31
50
50

_

159
136
23

57
51

22
20
2

-

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
-

10

16

10

12

9

11
7

140
16
124
65
3
62
75
13
62
48
31
17

1 40
13
127
106

35
7

6

1

16
4

100

23

12

34
7

11
6

27
28
23
5

4

133
15
1 13
85
15
70
48

108

84
13

44
1

-

-

-

1

2
2

1

-|

1

1

1
1

11

97
95

1
1

12

4
2
2
3
1
2
1

2

1

4

13

_

3

6

_

_

2

2

1

2

_

1

1

1

_

_

_

_

1

10

_

1

12

3

I

\

2
2

3

Z
.

1

1

“

2

~

2

■
j

ii

2
2

|

1

-j

15

11

12

2
2

57
13
44
56

19

4

7

14
19
5

4
4

14

4

2

4
7

1
}
1

3
4

1
2

1

1

17

6

6

6

-J

5

28
24

16
4

8

8

1

_
_
_
_
_

29
26

6

3

5

2
2

1
_

2

■“
2

“
_

_

_

_

_

~

_

3

_
-

1
1

-

2

-j

_
-

•j

~

z.

.J

1
1
6
5

~

~

7
3

4
4

1
1

4
4

6

3

3

The Kansas City Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Cass, Clay, Jackson, and Platte Counties, Mo.; and Johnson and Wyandotte Counties, Kansas.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments, are deisgned to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-tim e employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.




_

4
4

25
16
9

1
1

_

_
_
-

_
_

9
8
1

EM PLOYEES

P A R T T I M E .............................................................................
C O O K S .....................................................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................
P A R T T I M E .............................................................................
GR O UN D S K E E P E R S ..................................................................
H O U S E K E E P E R S ...........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................................
FO O D S E R V IC E H E L P E R S .................................................
M E N ...........................................................................................
W OMEN....................................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................
M E N ..........................................................................................
W O M EN ...................................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...............................................................
M E N ..........................................................................................
W OMEN....................................................................................
L A U N D R Y W O R K E R S ..................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
C L E A N E R S , N U R S IN G H O M E ..........................................
M E N ............................................................................. ...
W O M EN...................................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................
M E N ..........................................................................................
W OM EN....................................................................................
P A R T T I M E .............................................................................
M A IN T E N A N C E W O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G ..................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
'

159

_

_

2

_

1
1

1

<|

~

Table 13. Occupational earnings: Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Num ber
of
workers

Occupation 3

Average
hourly
earnings2

2.20
and
under
2.30

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.20

3.40

3.40

3.60

3.60

3.80

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.60

6.00

6.40

6.80

7.20

7.60

8.00

5.00

5.20

5.60

6.00

6.40

6.80

7.20

7.60

8.00

2.50

2.80

3.00

4.00

4.20

and
over

20
120

19 A

99A

19 1

99

152
34

48
_

”

_

196
_

39
•3U
g

69

37
60

710
596

63
67

55
48

34
24

549
180

61

43

24

12

10
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1

4.40

4.60

4.80

Q

2.40

2.60

2.60

9
9

99
22

P R O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
EM P LO YEES
AA
5 .7 4
L IC E N S E D

P R A C T IC A L

N U R S E S ............................

2 ,8 8 0

H O M E N .........................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................

2 ,6 9 6
1 ,9 8 6

H O M E N .........................................................................
D IP T T T H S 1
*
n T P*TT*PT 1 HC
u riM P ii
P f lT T 1>TMP
UOM FU
_
DHVQ T P S T
V R ID T
UHMRla _ _
T ............................
P FIT T T T M P
IirtM EM .........................- ..............................T
H R i p nriB < ;^c :4
fn n
T f i i p . . ..............................................

1 ,8 4 5
894
37
97

O C C U P A T IO N A L T H E R A P I S T S * .....................
F t T L L T I M E ...................................................................

10
10

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L
N U R S IN G

Mftp
PART

T f f i i?
___
T I M E ...................................................................

UrtMCU*

*

* *

................

C O O K S ........................................................................................
H O M E N .........................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
M EN ...............................................................................
H O M E N .........................................................................
D 1 D T *PT MP

-

-

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

_

8

36

24

33

5
5

_

5

8
8

36
33

24

6

33
25

8

33

8

25

8

14
106
71
14
57
49
5
5

!:

5

_

1 3 ,7 5 7
1 ,3 4 1
1 2 ,4 1 6
1 0 ,8 0 9
1 034
9*775
2 ,9 4 8
307
2 ,6 4 1
1 ,2 0 9
244
965
1 ,0 7 7
217
860
132
27
105

2 .3 7
2 .3 8
2 13 6
2 .3 8
2 .4 0
2 .3 8
2 .3 1
2 .3 0
2 .3 1

_

40

6798
618

40

t j j / 2773
444
234
4513 2539
1841
584
7n
174

£A
i
Hw

_

1037
132
905
898
109

691
692
90

448
329
3
3

893
37
856
610
24
586
283

776

1

6
6

C
j

j?

3

-

-

-

66

6

3
3

3
3

2 .8 8

.........

See footnotes at end of table.

33
52

89

96

83
84

6

84
71
5

78

66

94

12

-

2 .6 8

5

2 .7 0
2^67

5

2 .7 5
2 .5 3

139

811

120

119
JU

7 52
89
639
79
113
1A
IV

1 16

2 .9 3

2 .8 7
2 .9 1
2 .9 5
2 .8 9

3357
304

tin 6 1 8 0 3 0 5 3
hy

15




-

5

4 .5 0
4 .4 3
4 .8 2
4 .6 4
4 .8 2
4 .6 3
6 ! 85
6 .7 8
6 .8 5
6 .7 8
7 .1 0
7 1 10
4 .2 9
4 .2 9

r o n n iin c
P FIT T T T H P
D IR fp fPTIf P

-

99

3
3

”
j?
j?
j?
r
j?
_

6
1
1
56
g

6
47
47

”

~

g

an
9/
Q7
7/

uu

e66
66

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

:

-

:

99
32

30
91

-

-

-

5

-

_

1

EM P LO YEES

A I D S ( O R D E R L I E S ) ...............................
f l...................................................................

pnr t

35
25
17
14
17
14
4 38
433

4 .4 8
4 .5 1
4 .4 8
4 .5 0

18
822
56
766
493

3
12

91
94
3
91

25
7
*

i /

1J

3

g

14

401
32
3 69
JO U

11!
1 52

34
16

7

98
A il

11^
1 1-3

QA

113

81
3

14
328
41

1 31

8

25

72

10

32

19

1

10

23

19

1

9A
25

63
72

25

63

10

10

14
9
g

g

111
-

8

41
163
37
126
129
37
92
34

121
1 91

183
14

10

10

171

121

232

62

69

36

12

28

4

106
13 7
48
89
34
17
17

101
121
20
101

177
204
54
150
28

57
61
4
57

55
65
14
51

23
36
13
23

10
11
1
10

22
28

3
4

6
22

3

9

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

9

15

3

9
9

10

3
3

9

10

1

1
2
2

_

1
~
i:

_

1
*
*

1

15
5

3

:

-

5
5
5

Table 13. Occupational earnings: Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.1 Continued
—
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number
of
workers

Occupation 3

Average
hourly
earnings2

2 .2 0

--------------- 1
3.60
3.80

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

20

under
2.30

2 .2 0

2.30

13

24

23

37
15

22

17
o
g

21

18
23
e

3

18

g

121

59

48
73
95
33
62
26
15

22

4.00

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4 .8 0

5.00

5.20

5 .60

6 .0 0

6.40

6.80

7.20

7.60

8 .0 0

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5 .00

5.20

5.60

6 .0 0

6.40

6.80

7.20

7.60

8 .0 0

and
over

2
1
1
2
1
1

1

5

1

5

1

5

3

11
11

3
3

13
5

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L E M P L O Y E E S —
C O N T IN U E D
H O U S E K E E P E R S ...................................................................
W OMEN.........................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
m e n ...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
FO O D S E R V I C E H E L P E R S ...........................................
M E N ______________ T ____
............ .............. T T WOMEN.

p nT.T. T T M E ______

t
- t it
r
-t
M E N .............. T ____ T ____ T . T . T T .

,

W O M E N ...................................T
TT
P A R T T T M E ____________________ , _______

M E N ......................... ............................................ T , _
W O M E N . ................. ............ ....

L A U N D R Y W O R K E R S ..........................................................
M E N ........................................ T .......................... ,
WOMEN.........................................................................
F U L L T I M E . . ................ ........................, ____
M E N ...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
P A R T T I M E ................... ......................................... T .
WOMEN.........................................................................
C L E A N E R S , N U R S IN G H O M E .....................................
M E N .............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
P U L L T I M E ...................................................................
M EN .........................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
M EN ................ ........................................
W OMEN...................................................................T .
M A IN T E N A N C E W O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G ? .............
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................

201
68
133

201
68
13 3
2 ,7 4 8
1 ,5 3 4
1 ,2 1 4
1 ,8 2 6
1 ,0 4 9
777
922
485
437
534
73
461
430
67
363
104
98
2 ,3 7 7

1 ,0 2 1
1 ,3 5 6
2 ,0 5 2
889
1 ,1 6 3
325
13 2
19 3
330
282
48

$ 3 .1 4
3 .2 9
3 .0 7
3 .1 4
3 .2 9
3 .0 7
2 .3 2
2 .3 0
2 .3 4
2 .3 3
2 .3 0
2 .3 8
2 .2 9
2 .3 0
2 .2 7
2 .4 2
2 .4 7
2 .4 1
2 .4 3
2 .4 9
2 .4 2
2 .3 8
2 .3 9
2 .3 8
2 .3 5
2 .3 9
2 .3 7
2 .3 6
2 .3 8
2 .4 0
2 .3 1
2 .4 7
3 .3 5
3 .3 1
3 .6 0

11
20
20

13
13

13
24

11
20
11 1 6 0 4
964
8
3
5

5
g
3
3
5
5

640
983
651
332
62 1
313
308
235
25

210
5

5

-

-

_

178
19
159
57
51
1194
548
646
1009
458
551
185
90
95
50
47
3

599
325
274
384

201
183
215
124
91
105
15
90

88

13
152
72
80
14 4
69
75

Q
3

13
143
67
76
130
58
72
13
g

5
53

10
43
52

10

15
73
17
17
425
181
244
392
168
224
33
13

237
97
140
223
89
134
14
g

20
24
24

42

1
1

g

3/
J 7
49

1

3

1o
£

18

17

1

8

22

g

3

31

10
1U

9

g
14

a
1o

g

3

3

g
g

9

37
15

22
26

22
27

9

10

17
5

3

6
3

g

20
20

3

_

Q

1
1
”
y
g

g

ov
Zn

11

10

37
■
3

38

g

20

12

34
31
■
a

37
23

g
9

11
12

12
12

g

9
3

g

c

28
g

1
1
22
15
15
147
77
70
13 3

166
33
133
124

59
14

91
42

30

5

65
23
14
g

11

10

9
g

13
13

8

42
18
15

£
132
58
74
109

8
48
40

^8
■
3

g

12

15
^5
15

3

17

1'
/
g

11
8
1 .!

10

42
30

12

*
*
23

30

21

20
3

21

16

g

5

10
10

3

17

12

5

1 T h e Los Angeles-Long Beach Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Los Angeles County.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, boaru, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those w orking a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 3 at $8.00 to $8.40 and 3 at $8.40 to $8.80.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 35 at $8.00 to $8.40; 19 at $8.40 to $8.80; 5 at $8.80 to $9.20; 6 at $9.20 to $9.60; and 1 at $10.00 to $10.40.
7 A ll or virtually all workers were men.




5

8

4

9

2

_

_

_

_

_

Table 14. Occupational earnings: Miami, Fla.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number
of
workers

Occupation3

Average
hourly
earnings2

2 .2 0

and
under
2.40

2 .4 0

2.60

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.40

6.60

6.80

7.00

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3.00

3.20

3 .40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.40

6.60

6.80

7.00

7.20

-

-

-

-

-

18
16
2
62
45
17

4
2
2
36
26
10

11
8
3
141
11 7
24
2
2

14
11
3
40
33
7

10
7
3
66
58
8

23
17
6
4
4
-

6
4
2
5
3
2

36
33
3
2
2

38
30
8

24
20
4

23
9
14

4
2
2

6
2
4

3
3
-

4
2
2

1
1
-

2
2

-

-

-

-

2
2

7.20
and
over

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
EM PLO YEES
G E N E R A L D O T Y N U R S E S ? ...........................................
F U L L T I M E . / . ..........................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
L I C E N S E D P R A C T I C A L N U R S E S ? .........................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................

231

$ 5 .0 6

169

4 .9 7

62

5 .2 9

387

4 .0 4

316

4 .0 5

71

4 .0 0

7

7

oo

6
6

1

-

19
17
2

7 .0 9
6 .3 0

T ____ ___________ T - r . T _______

W OMEN .......................................................................
F U L L T I M E ................................................................
MR N __________________ _____________________________

WOMEN ......................................................................
C L E A N E R S , N U R S IN G H O M E ....................................
M EN ............................................................................
H O M R N ......................................................................

2 .5 7

418

409

796

113

31

40

1 ,7 4 6

2 .5 7

402

381

788

109

29

34

64

2 .5 5

16

28

8

4

2

_
1

2
6

_

6
2
4

-

*1

-

2

_

_

1

_

5

-

-

1

®3
1

100
20

3 .0 6

14

11

3 .4 5

-

4

-

-

3

3

80

2 .9 7

14

7

16

5

25

-

14

7

5

25

-

86

3 .1 2

20

3 .4 5

-

4

3 .0 1

14

3

14

2 .7 4

6

3 .6 7

66

16

5

-

3

3

9

22

-

4

7

-

3

6

-

27

3 .8 1
2 .4 8

149

56

112

86

2 .5 2

35

11

32

-

7

-

2 .4 6

114

45

80

310

2 .4 9

128

52

112

7

86

2 .5 2

35

11

32

-

7

224

2 .4 8

93

41

80

7

27

2 .3 4

21

4

-

-

78
7

2 .4 8

33

13

29

2 .6 2

2

71

2 .4 7

31

13

25

75
7

2 .4 9

30

13

29

2 .6 2

2

a

a

2
2
1
1
2
1
1
-

-

-

_

28

13

25

1

_

56

127
25

237

2 .5 2

12
44

10 2

53

123

12
4
8
12
4
8

15

7

2 .7 7

2 .5 8

14

2 .4 3

73
61

3 .4 8
3 .6 8

78

7
71

12

25

41

98
4

7

3

6
4

15

5

3
3

-

-

85

2 .5 3

2

6
6

1
2
1

2 .4 7

65

_
:

4
2
2
4
2
2

5
2

2
2

7
2
5

5
2
3

2
2

_

_

1

_

_

1

-

7
2

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

4
3
1
2
3
1
2

4

1

2

:

:

-

5

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

2 .5 7

288

2

8
6

-

2 .7 7

223

_
-

-

2
1

65

78

3

4
2
2
4
2
2

3

302

68

3

5

337
251

28

9
-

-

W O M E N . ............... .. ............................ ...
-----D I E T *I>T M R ? _____

M A IN T E N A N C E W O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G ...............
H E N ............................................................................

3
3

6

1 ,8 1 0

F U L L T I M E ................................................................
M EN ............................................................................

1
1

10
5
15

10
5
13
13

1
1

1
1

1
5
5

-

-

-

“

~

“

1
1

5
5

:

:

4
4

10
10

2
2

2
2

1
1
1
1

_
-

2
2

_
-

_

3
3

_
-

1 Th e Maimi Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Dade County.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made w ith previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those w orking a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 All or virtually all workers were women.
5 All workers were at $8.40 and over.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $7.20 to $7.40 and 2 at $8.40 and over.
7 All or virtually all workers were men.




_

_
1

2

-

EM P LO YEES

N U R S IN G A I D S
(O R D E R L I E S )45 ............................
.
7
6
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
C O O K S ........................................................................................
M EN ...............................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
M EN...............................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
P A R T T I M E 4 ................................................................
G R O U N D S K E E P E R S ? .......................................................
H O U S E K E E P E R S ? ................................................................
FO O D S E R V I C E H E L P E R S ...........................................
M EN ................................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
F U L L T I M E ................................................................
M EN ............................................................................
WOMEN .......................................................................
P A R T T I M E ? ................................................................
L A U N D R Y W O R K E R S ..........................................................
HEN

5

T H E R A P IS T S :

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L

ro

6

-

5 .5 7

18

-

6 .2 0

6
P H Y S IC A L

-

5
5

_

5
5

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table 15. Occupational earnings: Milwaukee, Wise.1
(N um ber and average straight-time ho urly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) o f—
Number
of
workers

Average
2 .2 0
hourly
and
earnings1 under
2
7
6
*
4
3

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5.00

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

6 .6 0

7.0 0

7 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5.20

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

6 .6 0

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

and
over

20

Occupation 3

2 .3 0

3

9
2

72

c. 0
03

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L
EM PLO YEES

18
15
P A R T T I M E .............................................................................

12

15
5
10
1u

14
11
3

109
24
85

146
R^

11
207
in 0
ur

136
58
7 0
/ ft

27

57
43

17
24
19

3 ft

1

6 .2 6

1

1U
1n
g

HA

49

' Q

2
~

in

1

“

*
*

”

2

1

"

-

_

9

'

61 2
12

~

“

*

_

19
12

1

'" * 0 7
5 .6 3

2 .6 4
2 .6 4
2 .6 3

88

'

4 ,6 1 4
4 ,1 8 2
2 ,4 2 1

1 ■ an
1JU
42

3

7 ] 80

12

225
55
170

1

-

-

1Z
11
,2

;

~

59

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L E M P L O Y E E S
N U R S IN G A ID S ( O R D E R L I E S ) ...................................
WOMEN....................................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
dadt

N
>
CO

ttnv

U D N 1?N
C O O K S i.................................................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................
PART TTM F
...............
........
G R O U N D S K E E P E R S ? ..............................................................
H O U S E K E E P E R S .............................................................................
M^!N

2 193
1 917
#226
153
73
15
60

g

W OM EN...................................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................
MEN _ T ____
_T_ T - T T- - TT.

54
46

WOMEN. - ............................T ...................................
P A R T T T M R 4 ______________________________ T .
___ _
FOOn S F R V T f F H F T P F R S -.
WOM EN . . T _______________T ____________ , , ,
PIIT.T. T T M F ......................
. . .
W O M E N . . ................ ............................................
P A R T T T M F _______________
WOMEN ........................... ...
T. A [IN n RY W O R K E R S ...............................T _________ T
M E N . ..........................................
__ _ _
UO M E N . .
FftT-T. T T M F 4 ......................

40
14
983
877
346
310
637
567
257
15
242
144
113

PART TT MR.............................. ..............................T
MEN- ......................................
WOMEN..........................................

C L E A N E R S , N U R S IN G H O M E ..........................................
m r n _____ T ____ T ________ T T - T - . T . , ,
WOMEN.............................. ... ................................
........... ...........................
p m .T . TTMF .
MEN. ........... .................................. .......... , t , t
UDMEN _
PART TTMF.............................................. ..
7
m e n .................................
W O M E N .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M A IN T E N A N C E W O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G ? ...........
F U L L T I M E ............................................................

P A R T T I M E ...................................................................

g

g

104
580
48
532
347
28
319
233
20

213
194
115
79

281
237
134

629
568
393

563
512
322

779
7 08
388

623
564
304

725
675
347

288
275
151

152
142
71
68

2 • 64
2 .6 5
3^04
3 .1 0
2 .9 1
2 ! 58
3 .3 7
4 .1 2
3 !2 9
3 .5 3
4 .1 2
3 .4 4
2 .8 6

2 .4 4
2 .4 5
2 .5 7
2 .5 8
2 .3 7
2 .3 7
2 .6 0
2 .4 5
2 .6 1
2 .5 9
2 .6 0
2 .3 0
2 .6 3
2 .5 5
2 .5 5
2 .5 5
2 .5 7
2 . 62
2 .5 7
2 .5 1
2 • 45
2 .5 1
3 .3 5
3 .5 5
3 .0 5

147
118

236
199

241
216

-

-

11
2
9

391
3 40
25
20
5

-

-

-

9
7

-

-

-

7

284
260
39
34
245
226
30

272
236

123
105
55
50

2

2
2
5

g

24
14
16
g
10

88

g
80
45

77

64
195
172
41

68

55
29

6

21

8
8
6

12

28

3

15
100

24
96

Q
45

53

98
56

85
56
g
48
40

42
36

2

2

3

42
3

42

37
27
16

-

-

6

3

11

4
7

11

g
3
3

3

1

_
-

*
1

13
97

56
44

2
2

2

25
19

46
44

12
11

65
63
38
37
27
26
18

49
25
24

11

20
12

0
2

28
14
15

2

81
74

49
41
32
29
17

39
26
15

9
88

137
132

2

-j

2

378
336

1
1

2

7

45
43
g
35

73
65
31
30
42
35
49

319
27 1
34
13

9

3

-j

35

9

2
7
6

3
3

42
35
17
18
17

-

162
138
89
78
73
ov
23
18

5

104
86

63
50
41
17
15

2

22
10

2

8

2
2

-

8

33
33

12

IQ
1U

5

9

29
27
19

33

6

27
19

4
4

14

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

3
3

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

14
11

,
O

0

3
3

2
2

8

_

9

4

-

2

-

-

2
2

-

2

4
3

6
6

6

7

7

3

3

1

6

7
7

5
7

3
3

3
3

1
1

~

*

8

_

3

5

5
1

9

1

1

Z.

9

5
5

\

"I

14

2

16
10

g

g
47
c
42
28

17

0

1n
1u
7

7

11
0

2

3

7

28

23

25

18

o c\
3

g

13

17
23

18
18

5

0

13
3

8

2
1

2

3

27

5

*

5

11
1
10
1V

10

3

25
19

15

5

2

1Q
9

2
1

11
1
10
IU
22
12
10

17

*i
g

1

1

3
2
1

11
6

5

7
7

7

"

1

8

7
4
3

16
13
3

1 The Milwaukee Standard M etropolitan Statistical Area consists of Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Washington, and Waukesha Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-tim e employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
s Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $7.40 to $7.80; 5 at $7.80 to $8.20; 1 at $8.20 to $8.60; and 2 at $9.00 to $9.40.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 7 at $7.40 to $7.80; 3 at $7.80 to $8.20; and 2 at $8.20 to $8.60.
7 A ll or virtually all workers were men.




-

z.

7

3
5

2

2

0

m s
92
32

70
66

40

1

2

9 v;
z0

17
14

197
178
94

10
8
2

11

5
3

"

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

Table 16. Occupational earnings: Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.-Wisc.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) o f—
Occupati on 3

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings1
2
7
6
5
4
3

2.20
and
under
2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

6.00

6.40

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4. 40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

6.00

6.40

6.80

11

2.20

2.30

19
4
15
113

94
oo
Z y

1 /iC
14 D
C4
D 1

*49

115

54
ft A
9U

o
3
5

6.80
and
over

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L
Em p lo y e e s
1 ,074
403

L IC E N S E D P B A C T IC A L N U R S E S ? .............................

11
815
411

2

2

2

4 .04

“

14

3

2

27

150

10
1

84

172

66

17

97

224
118
106

65
79

81
128
15

31

13
15

_

82
7

17

2

4 .88

-

2 .80
2 .82
2.80
2.85

4

204

455
7

4
4

200

448
129

53 7
39
498
2 56

2

12

59
145
a

12 7
326

141
5

321

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

566
94
472
289
49
240
27 7
45
23 2
29

1151
106
1045
50 4
65
439
647
41
606
25
19

557
29
528
30 4

-

94

Jo

“

2
2
2
o
2

12

O C C U P A T IO N A L T H E R A P IS T S ? ....................................

8

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

22

2

j*
*
*

j:

68
45

z /

25
72
28

2

2

1-

2

20
20

1 11
14
-

2
2
~
2

J2
2

g

20

3

-

-

'

-

-

•j

_

_

I

_

_

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L E M P L O Y E E S
N U R S IN G A ID S ( O R D E R L I E S ) ....................................
M E N ...........................................................................................
W OM EN....................................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................
M E N ...............................................................................
W O M EN....................................................................................
P A R T T I M E .............................................................................
MEN ............................_ _ ....................

W OMEN........................................................ ...........................
.................................................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................
P A R T T T M E .........................................................................
Hn n ^i ^ f CR Rp R pc ; ______________T _____T
.....................................................................
H O M E N.
ENT T. T J M E ...................................
WOMEN ________________________ T T T
T.,
EOOTT S E R V T C E H E L P E R S . . ........... ...............................
M EW .........................- - ..................................___________
HOM EN.
..........................................................
v n j. j. t T m r .................. ..................................................... ,
MEW ......................... ........................ .............
H O M EN . ........................................................................... ...
P A R T T I M E ........................................................ ....................
M EW t ........................................................... T
W OMEN....................................................................................
T .A nN D R Y W O RKERS? . . . . . . . _______ n __________
F U LT f T T M E . _____________ T . . T T 1 . . T , . TT
P A R T T T M E ............................................................................
C L E A N E R S , N U R S IN G H O M E ...........................................
MHW t T ................................................. T T ______ , _____
WOMEN . . . . . . __________ ___________________
E N LT. T T M E ..................... ......................................................
M E N ...........................................................................................
WOMEN- . . . . . .................................................T _____
P A R T T I M - - ____- __________
M E N ^ t - . . . . . . . ______________- - - t _____H O M E II............................... - __________T - T T ____ T
M A IN T E N A N C E W O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G ? ...............
E n i.T . T T M E . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................ ...
P A R T T T M E - - . . ___________________t __________
cooks!

6,637
559
6,07 8
3 ,27 3
296
2 ,97 7
3,364
263
3 ,10 1
46 6
311
155
37
33
35
31
1,59 6
183
1 ,41 3
40 6
32
374
1,190
151
1,039
393
1 57
236
997
208
789
561

102
459
43 6
106
33 0
243
1 60
83

59

2 .8 8
2.85
2.75
2 .77
2.75
3.18
3.30
2.95
3.90
3 .88
3.90
3 .88
2 .63
2 .5 7
2 .63
2 .82
2.75
2.82
2 .56
2.54
2 . 57

2 .6 8
2.85
2.57
2.79
2.96
2 .74
2.85
3 .01
2.82
2 .71
2 .92
2.65
3 .43
3 . 69
2 .93

4

4
4

5

f
t

10
10

688

649
19
630
34 9

244
281
27
2 54
25
13

95
593
319
41
278
369
54
315
45
24

337
300

12

21

13

12
7

293

20
7

21
8

10
294
25 3
19
234
18
14

**

556
70
486
OQO
287
40
247
269
30
239
32
16
16

32 3
38
285
1 92
29
1 63
131

122

g
1

688

197
g

&UQ

1 88

J7J

142

.

28 2
51

ia
14

4
4
4

4
4

-

10
10
266
38
228
24

3

21
50
2
48
14

200
15
1 85
19

155
27
128
26

146

20

33

12 9

1 10

g

12
13 4
36

3

19
181
15
16 6
59

21

q

108
31

101

53
57

23
81

2

10

g

60
18
42
113
11
102

_

55
29

71
42

14
36

29
28

34
39

53
56

2

_
_

2

2

7

34
7

26
16

3

16

4

37

49

8

22
11
11

1

7

57

7

1 76
34
1 42
48
45
12 8
31
97
37

12
25
93
22

71
43
5
38
50
17
33
3
3

1 08
99
40

170
19
151
58

36

51

68

112
12
100

5
63
30
15
15
78
24
54
27
7
20

51
17
34
5
5

43
18
25
157
16
141
101
g

93
56
g

48

73
30

96
13
83
43

59
29

30
47

36
53

27
40

47

8

2

77

/I

43

47

32

in

18

4
82
24
58
59
18
41
23

86
26
60
49
17
32
37
q

__

22
11
11
11
11

10

2
102

g

57

6

3

35
14

6

g

g

Z.

21
21

2
2
2
2

1

**

1

2

~

~

Z.
Zy

2

2

2

1

2

2

1

i

2

3
3

3
3

5
5
107
35
72
71
17
54
36
18
18

26
14
14
23
q

10

14

_

1

2

O
2

5
3

1
1

5

5

28
5

17
9

28

14

1

1

7

20

1

3

8

5
4

21

2

8

41

7

5

19

2

_

3

1 The Minneapolis-St. Paul Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, and Washington Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on a
representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 All or virtually all workers were women.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $7.2 0 to $7.60 and 1 at $8.40 to $8.80.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 7 at $6.80 to $7.20; 7 at $7.20 to $7.60; 3 at $7.60 to $8.00; and 3 at $8.00 to $8.40.
7 All or virtually all workers were men.




12
12

15

2

g

10

3

1
16

2

2

2

20

12

104

54
13
41
40
5

1Q
1 ft

52
84

69

32

3

21
21
-j

55

2
276
38
238

-J
'

26

2

4

35

11

7

j

8
8

2
2

4

3

3

1
1

3

3

_

Table 17. Occupational earnings: New York, N.Y.-N.J.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Occupation 3

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings2

2.20

2.40

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.40

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

7.40

7.80

8.20

8.60

under
2.40

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.40

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

7.40

7.80

8.20

8.60

9.00

9.00
and
over

"

-

_

_

_

2
2

155
93
62
389
343
46

239
1 48
91
1 54
128
26
13

343
244
99
995
684
311
35

304
228
76
269
150
119

226
83
514 3

-

76
28
48
358
284
74
7

46 7
309
158

_

75
33
42
95
46
49
9

118
103
15

-

89
53
36
5
3

96

_

104
26
78
33
14
19

105

_

3

9

7

18

13

35
31

7

18

13

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L
EM PLO YEES
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
p a r t T I M E .............................................................................
L IC E N S E D P R A C T IC A L N U R S E S 4 ............................
.
F O I L T I M E .............................................................................
P A R T T I M E .............................................................................
H O H E N ...................................................................................

VflT T 1<TMP
Ml? Ill
unMpii. _
D IR T TTNR
D H ? crriT * h fd i d tc tc
p
MEM
l i n M R N. _
F f l T T >PTNS
___
MFM r ___
10M EN•
H Kin jinnsR sf
FT1TT. T T N P
PART TTMR

_____

O C C U P A T IO N A L T H E R A P IS T S ? ................................
FIITT.
PART

2,397
1 ,517
8 80
2,520
1 ,805
715

$ 7 .2 8
7 .35
7.16
6 .37
6.31
6*53

94
91

6 .38
6.45
7.18
6 .40
6.19
8 .05
4 90
J
7 .26

-

_

_

_

3
3

45
29
16

15
15

23
23

50
42

8

^2
6
85
g
49

20
29
48
19
29
432
394
38
41

* TM1
T
?

22

ttn r

19

*
*

2
2

7

7
•
j

9.15
7 9 (i

2

1
6
■j

8.40

8 . jQ
o ty
8 . 50

5

7.63
6 .83
8 .* 56

2

7

3

3
3

2
2

68

4

28

86
41
45

2

1
1
3
4

2
5

16

'i
z.

19
19
4
4

12
16

7

4
■
j

3
4

1
12
33

3
93
78
15

3

1
2
3

1
2

m en

...............................................................................

WOMEN...................................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
men

...............................................................................

WOMEN....................................................................................
C O O K S .....................................................................................................
M E N ..........................................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................................
F U L L T I M E ............................................................................
M E N ..........................................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................................
P A R T T I M E ............................................................................
W OM EN....................................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.




1 1 ,6 1 0

1 ,2 2 1
1 0 ,3 8 9
9 ,780
1,056
8,72 4
1,830
165
1,665
572
427
145
52 8
415
1 13
44
32

4 .80
5.05
4 .77
4 .83
5 .06
4 .80
4 .62
4 . 99
4 .58
5 .58
5 . 80
4.94
5 .58
5 .76
4 .90
5.63
5 .07

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

452
24
428
272

10 4

20

860

20

848
677

8
96

12

88
8

260
1 80

80
16

12

135
4

85
4

271

404

1 107
107

13?

81
84
4

271
239

40 4
242

1000

80

239
32

24 2
162

877
1 30
7

1
9
9

32
26
7

162
16
11

1 2 3

21
27

9

19
22

8

9

120

8
120

20

669
18 3
4

20

17 9

4

22

11
27

4

17
5

12
168

8
8
8
8

_

16
8

6
8
8

22
17
5
4
4

_

15
4

8

21

977

100

7
15
4
4

16
11
5

_

10
2
8
8
2
4
4
4

570
31
539
502
31
471

68

2115
371
17 44

2011
353
1658
104
18

68

86

18

4
3
1
4

8
12
12

8
8
8
8

3
1

4880
5 61
4319
4040
444
3596
840
117
723
60
36
24
60
36
24

49 6
69
427
438

68
37 0
58

1
57
63
56
7
63
56
7

108
29
79
87
27
60

2
1
1

2

3

~

3

10

i

i
1
1

66

68
62

28
23

13
13

10

110
101

51
15
56
51

64
58

20
15

13
13

10
10

9
4
4

10
10

13

g
5
4

s

5
0

10

7
7

1

3

2

101

8

10

4

6
3

21

19
114

7o
Q

39

1

-j

5

1
4
5
4
56
56

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L E M P L O Y E E S
N U R S IN G A ID S ( O R D E R L I E S ) ...................................
H E N ..........................................................................................
W OM EN....................................................................................
F U L L T I M E .............................................................................

■
J

o
£

1

J

1

2
2

3

1
1

1
31

z.

8 .0 1

101

44
39
5

1
1

®130
118

12
96

1
5

Table 17. Occupational earnings: New York, N.Y.-N.J.1 Continued
—
(N u m b er and average straight-time h o urly earnings1 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time h o urly earnings (in dollars) of—
N um ber
of
workers

Occupation*

Average
hourly
earnings1

2.20
and
under
2.40

2.40

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.40

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

7.40

7.80

8.20

8.60

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.40

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

7.40

7.80

8.20

8.60

9.00

_
_

2
2

4
4
4

_
_
-

3
3
39

2
2

2
2

_
_

_
_

46

9

14

. 17

1

_
_
-

_

_

17

19
19
23

_

.

_
_

-

_
_
-

4
4

_
-

11

11

9
9

7
17
HA
1U

1
1

-

_

23

26
46
OA
aU
26
9
5
4
9
5
4

11

17

23
39

-

_
-

_
-

1

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

9.00
and
over

N O M P R O F E S S IO M A L E M P L O Y E E S —
C O N T IN U E D
G B O O ID S K E E P E R S 1 ....................................................
.0.
F U L L T I H E ...................................................................
H O U S E K E E P E R S ...................................................................
H I M . ________ t . . .................. T _____ T ,
B O M B S .........................................................................
F U L L T I H E ...................................................................
H t l .............................. ............ T _______
H O M E S .........................................................................
F O O D S E R V I C E H E L P E R S ...........................................
H E M ...............................................................................
H O M E S .........................................................................
F U L L T I H E ...................................................................
H E M ...............................................................................
S O H E H .........................................................................
P A R T T I M R - - ................................................. T _ T
MEM .............................. .. ..................... .................. ..
H O M E S ............................ .. ................................
L A U N D R Y H O R K E R S __________ T - - - ................. ...
ME M. ................................. T ........................
H O M E S . ..........................................................
FULL

T I M E . . . ...... ............ .......................... T ,

M E H ....... ........................................................................
H O M E S . ..............................................................
P A R T T T M E _________________________________
C L E A N E R S , N U R S I N G H O ME ...................... T T . ,

H E M ................................................................................
H O M E S .........................................................................
F U L L T I H E ...................................................................
H E M ...............................................................................
H O H E M . ......................................................................
P A R T T I M E ........................ .. ..................... , r - r *
M B S . ................................... ........................T _ _

H O H E M . ................................
M A IN T E N A N C E H O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G 1 . . . .
.0.
F U L L T I H E ............................................................
P ART

T T M E ________________ T T - -

T

T-

49
48
204

$ 4 .4 7
4 .4 8
5 .5 3

_
-

9
9
-

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

_

_

-

_

7
7

11

8

3

3

9

137
190
67
123
3 ,2 6 4
1 ,5 3 4
1 ,7 3 0
2 ,5 4 5
1 ,3 0 9
1 ,2 3 6
719
225
494
456

5.’ 3 5
5 .6 8
* on
>

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

11

8

3
3

3
3

9
9

120
336
429
119
310
27
2 ,9 3 3
1 ,6 8 7
1 ,2 4 6
2 ,7 5 0
1 ,5 9 9
1 ,1 5 1
183

5 .5 6
4 .6 0
4 .6 3
4 .5 7
4 .6 9
4 .6 4
4 .7 3
4 .2 8
4 .5 1
4 .1 7
4 .7 3
4 .7 8
4 . 72
4 .7 4
4 .7 7
4 .7 2
4 .6 9
4 .6 6
4 .8 0
4 .4 7
4 .7 0
4 .8 3
4 .5 1
4 .1 8

88

4 .0 2
5 .2 0
5 .1 9
5 .4 5

-

-

_

_

_

42
42
-

93
35
58
23
13

67

68

22
66
21

32
36
42
31

10

45

11

28
19
9
16
7
9

12
43
31

12

41
41
-j

1

70
/V

22
48
3

21

45

1

1

5
257

68
189
163
55
108

25
1H
Iu

1a
1H

17
A1
70

14

3

53
19
34
33
19
14

~
20

3
18
-

15

3
107
72
35
79
62
17

”

10

18
15
-

18

12
11

30

ia
i

_
-

4
300
131
169
167
108
59
1J J

_

11

11

23

245
80
165
198
72
126

650
372
278
512
319
193

1055
506
549
943
430
513

1 20

o1
2 -t
1o
1A

t1 1 ft
IU
A3
OO

A
TQ
1A
A

1A

o
*18
77
35

10
11
t
1H

9
105
47
58
79
42
37

zo
17
12

30
70
JU

14

3

-

Z\J
12

3

A

1a
11

53
67

112
53
59

CO

7A

85
/O

ZZ

51
9O
25
51

07

23

11
12
23

11
12

46
28
18
46
28
18

74
14
60
67
14
53

7

65

22
43
53

10
43

7o
/ f.
34
42
75
33
42

1

55
17
38
48
14
34
7

-

-

-

16
16

68

43
15
28
31
15

■
|

_
-

4
4

1
1

77
17

17
12

25

12
12

7
-

197
80
117
16 0

23
23

20

57
38
19
41
27

80
47
33
69
47

a

16

-

173
99
74
161
95
66

ii
1
1

30

12

_

34

22
12

11
17
17

18
18

7
7

139
80
59
139
80
CQ
JJ

41
34
'

4
4

7
-

-

*
*

0
5

_

11A
1157
704
453
1114
676

116
90
26
115
89
zo

15
113

111
2

1 The New Y o rk Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Bronx, Kings, New York, Putnum, Queens, Richmond, Rockland and Westchester Counties, N . Y a n d Bergen County,

N.J.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level o f occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because o f change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-tim e employees are those w orking a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 137 at $ 9 .0 0 to $9.40 and 6 at $ 9.40 to $9.80.
6 W orker at $ 9 .0 0 to $9.40.
7 Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $ 9 .0 0 to $9.40; 1 at $9.80 to $10.20; 1 at $10.60 to $11.00; and 4 at $11.40 and over.
8 Workers were distributed as follows: 43 at $ 9 .0 0 to $9.40; 41 at $9.40 to $9.80; 16 at $9.80 to $10.20; 2 at $10.20 to $10.60; 23 at $10.60 to $11.00; and 5 at $ 1 1.00 to $11.40.
9 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $ 9 .4 0 to $ 9 .8 0 and 5 at $9.80 to $10.20.
10 A ll or virtually all workers were men.




4

-

J?

2

1 ZZ

19
1^
13

g

58
58

580
374
206
56 1
361
9on
A VV

4
4
-

■
3
11

_

25
9O
xu

^7

5

9
4
-

14

0

13 0

10

4 .3 5

95
520
499

43
31

5

1

1

18

12
6

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

36
36

18
17

_

_

_

_

-

4
4

_

-

-

-

-

11

-

_

:
1

50
43

1 10

'

*

106

1

Table 18. Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number
of
workers

Occupation3

Average
hourly
earnings2

2 20
| Jpfjpp

i fnrjpr
2.30

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4. 40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

and
over

6

23

122

2
21

24

138
42
96

186
61

15 5
58

77
32

274
119

185
92
oo
y j

66

4

154
109
li C
4b

74
37

108
51

J /

b /

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
EMPLOYEES
GENERAL
POLL

D O T Y N O R S E S 4 ...........................................
.
T I M E ...................................................................

L I C E N S E D P R A C T I C A L N O R S E S 4 .........................
P O L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................

1,574
676
1,448
1,007
441

16
10

PART

T I M E ...................................................................

10
6

H S in

wnseRC^

|?nTT

1 36
127

'P T H W

D IP T

«P TM V

n m i D i T T m n i
PffT T

t h v d i d t

q i

«c 4

<PTMV

AID S

. .

...........................

T T M E ......... .................. ...............T ...................... . T - -

C O O K S ................................................................................................

m e n ....................................................................................................

WOMEN.........................................................................
P O L L T I M E .....................................................................................
M E N . ............................................................................
WOMEN ...................................................................................
P A R T T I M E .............................................................................
M P N .........................

s e r v ic e

u p T .p p R S .

. ., _ .

M E N .......................... .

T

. .

W O M E N .................................... T

P t l LI .

T T M E ............ ............... .....T . -

M E N ...................... ,

n

_ _

, _

W O M E N - .......... ... ....................... T .

PART

T I M E ...................................................................

M E N ____
W O M E N ............ T ..................

See footnotes at end of table.




6,734
5 ,11 5
1,61 9
542
165
377
459
1 43
316
83
22

WOMEN ...................................................................................
G RO O N D S K E E P E R S ? ...............................................................
P O L L T I M E .............................................................................
P A R T T T M E . .........................................................................
H O O S E K E E P E R S .............................................................................
M E N ................................................. ........................................
WOMEN ....................................................................................
P O L L T I M E .............................................................................
M E N ...........................................................................................
WOMEN ....................................................................................
pnnn

_

,

12

-

-

-

4

24
3

4

12

21

12
8

7
5

4

2

102

54
48

137
83
54

312
220

92

224
186
38

135
98
37

248
164
64

120

96
24

IO C

62
50

24
23

2
1

23
16

12

■
j

1

4
4

_

_

39
27

_

-

7
j*

1

2
2

*

5 11
67

3

3
2
1
1

C. l i t
3 • IH

8
1

8

J*
*
*

.J *
a

o c
2b
23

2

2
2

1n

i y
16
3

6
c.
o

1

20
20
2
2

24
24

8

8

8

2

EMPLOYEES

( O R D E R L I E S ) 4. ............................

P n T .T r T T M B .................... ...........

PART

3 .73
3.79
3.58
6 .17
6.16
8.25
7.83
6.23
9.47
9 • 82
5* 6 8
5 • 71
5 ,24

2
2

4 .76

N ONPROFESSIONAL
NORSING

11

$ 5 .0 1
5 . 18

61
87
50
37
1 05
18
87
100

18
82
2,140
516
1,62 4
1,069
275
794
1 ,071
2 41
830

2.65
2 .6 8

2 .54
3 .34
3.60
3 .23
3 . 38
3.70
3.24
3 .11
2.94
3.17
2 .98
3.05
2 .90
3 .72
4 .30
3.59
3 .75
4.30
3 .63
2 . 55
2.54
2 .55
2 .67
2 .62
2 .69
2 .42
2 .42

12 4
51
73

1 00 3
705
2 98
4

_
_

767
506
261
19
8

4
4

11

7

_

4
_

7

8 11
655
156
10
2
8

12
0

7

5
5

5
_

_

3
3
4
4

_

5

_

_

423
98
325

332
90

112

112

19
93
311
79
232

43
69

242

220

47
173

32
31

27
7

20

20
2

8
8

4
4
26 3
67
196
1 43
43
100
120

290
238
52
24
24
24

2

29
3

245

5 71
474
97
63

24

16

57
55

11

2

0

5
3

49

4 71
3 91
80
64
16
48
62
16
46

8

2

200

45
19
11
8

8

100

73
41
14
27
34
14

191
9
54
12

29
26
3
25
13
12

£

2

3

g

g

4

2

3

3

16
27
11

20

30

12

3

15

16

7

12

7

4

8

6
6

18
15

4
4

4

2

3

_

3
3
3

_

42
42

4

3

12
4

2
10
4
6

3

6

2

3

3

4

2

3

3

2

4

3

4

50

3

2
2

h

3

2

2

9

22

14

2

3

14

22

14
14

2

3

12

2

1

2

3

9
9

2

3

14

2

2

2

1

3

2

g

3

?

54
4

157

14
82

o
22

1

2

19

90
20

70
49
18
31
41

50
26
o

24
28

109

5
61

17

1
1

12

50
1o
1s

22

24
96
37

47
14

35
32

17

13

g

120

39

26

26

_

12

1

2

1

2

2

5

4

2

2

1

0

19
73
17
56
59

i

1
1

3

2

213
39
174
1 57
33
124
56

4

2
2

3

2

3

2

2

37

14

11

•
a

8

2

8

49

27

21

*

17

8

53
41

23
8

20

3

21

24

25
13

3

1 15
25
90
74

2

2

4

188
52
136
114
27
87
74

1
1

12

5

96

200

15
23

_
2

_

5

127
30
97
30
13
17
97
17
80

20

2

5

_

904
76 2
1 42
34

8

17

2

5

567
381
186
29
g

23

10
2
8

4

5
85

649
459
190
51
14
37
28

2

2

2
2

2

2

3
5

4

2

2

2

2

2

1

■
J
2

-J
-J
_

Table 18. Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, P a .-N J.1 Continued
—
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Num ber
of
workers

Occupation 3

Average
hourly
Under
earnings2 2.20

2.20
and
under
2.30

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

3
31
27
-

9
9

4
7
3

_

25
3

7.00
and
over

N O N P B O F E S S IO N A L E M P L O Y E E S —
C O N T IN U E D
T. AI1NT)RY W O R K E R S ...............................-r - - T ____
M E N ___ ____________ _________ ____ T ____ T
WOMEN.........................................................................
P U L L T I M E .............................................................................

M E N ...........................................................................................
W O M E N

p
CT.

ART

T T

RANRRS,

....... .............. ........... T . . . T . ........
M f 4 .....................
BriBSTHC
H O M E...............................

M E N _____________________________ T - - T - - T
W O M E N . ..............................
EtlT.T.

T J M E - _______ _______________

N R f l ................... .......... t . ,
U H M 17N .

PART

i-TiT_T

_ _ ....... * ............

T T M E . - ...............................

M E N _______ . . . . . . . _________________________
W O M E N ____. . . . . . . ________ . T . - T ____ ,

M A IN T E N A N C E W O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G 7. ...............
P U L L T I M E .............................................................................
P A R T T I M E ......................................

379
41
338
273
36
237
106
1 ,3 5 5
325
1 , 030
997
269
728
358
56
302
228
191
37

$ 2 .7 2
2 .9 1
2.* 7 0
2 .7 6
2 .9 0
2 .7 4
2 .6 1
2 .6 3
2 .7 2
2 .6 0
2 .7 1
2 .7 8
2 .6 9
2 .4 1
2 .4 5
2 .4 0
3 1 91
3 . 97
3 .5 8

4

40
o

41

43
g

37

17

44

32

37

4
-

38
19

38
31
3
28

37
37

34
31
3
28

14

40
33
4

28
24

36

2

1

-

2
17

4

21

28
16

242
53
189

144

112

90

2

37
75
130
16
114

-

-

12
23
13

10
5
3

*

10
1 £4

6
31

6

6
123
28

12

1 70
35
13 5
1 40
29

78

111

68

20

74

j.
91
14

89

65
g

6

34
7

66

24

9
7
2

6
6
-

3

7 1
Z 1

Q

30

12

C7
3 /

26

j:
181
37
14 4
30
114
37

_

11

26

*

3

22

2

7 fl

ifi

77
17

1A 7
1 7U

77

in

7/1

15

in

g

a

_ .

g

20
2
-

30
4
4

*

2

-

2

_

_
-

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
20

7
4
3

11
11

14

4

2

_

_

4

5
5

1

12

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

~

* 1

73

7Q
77

IQ

51
7

a

73
7 fl
37

IQ

2

a

1
1
1

3

1

1
1

27

17

10

16
16

13

21
6

7

*

5

8

8
8

23

20
3

1 T h e Philadelphia Standard Metropolitan Statistical area consists of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, M ontgomery, and Philadelphia Counties, Pa.; and Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester
Counties, N .J.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or otherperquisites, if any, provided.These surveys, based
on a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made w ith previous studies may not reflectexpected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those w orking a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $7.00 to $7.40; 2 at $7.80 to $8.20; 2 at $9.00 to $9.40; and 6 at $9.40 and over.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $7.00 to $7.40; 2 at $7.80 to $8.20; and 4 at $9.40 and over.
7 A ll or virtually all workers were men.
8 Workers were distributed 4s follows: 3 under $1.90 and 2 at $2.00 to $2.10.




-

g

-

10 0
1 nn

7

27

in

-

1
5
4

*
17L
'7W

17

2
2

35
30
5

2

-

Table 19. Occupational earnings: St. Louis, Mo.-lll.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory.employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
N um ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Occupati on3

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
Under
earnings2 2.30

2.30
and
under
2.40

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

2.90

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

30

53

123

46

Oft
38

00
82

83
34
49

27
8
19

34
18
16

3
3

os
os
IT
1ft
18

7.00
and
over

P R O F E S S I O N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L

E M PLO YEES

8

32
13

_
47
12

71
54

156
65

70
54
16

ft 1
67
14

9

3

1
i<
s

19
"I
3
1

z.

!
1

z.

Z

4
2
2

2
ZL

O C C U P A T IO N A L T H E R A P IS T S .......................................

17
14

3 .5 5
3 .1 8

_

4 ,59 7
3,78 3
814
46 7
35 7

2.40
2 .41
2 .34
2 ! 62
2 . 69
2.38
2.43
2 .51
2.37
2.98
2 .87
2.99
2.98
2 . 99
2.35
2.50
2.35
2.41
2 .51
2 . 40
2.30
2.50
2.29
2.40
2 .43
2 .31
2 .41
2 .49
2 .3 9
2 .44
2.55
2 .42
2.31
2 .31
3 .62
3 .66
3.24

1425
1 12 9
296
71
33
38
16

-

_

3

_

_

_

_

4

2
2

4

3

2

3

z.

_

_

_

IT
_

1ft
1ft
_

22

_

22

13
3

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

*
*
“

1c
10
15

~

11

1
1

2
2

_

_

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_

11

15
13

_

_

_

_

_
_

*
*
_

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L E M P L O Y E E S
N U B S IN G A ID S
ETTI.T. T T M E .
PART t t m e

( O B D E B L I E S ) ...................................
........................................ ........ T _ _
. . .

C O O K S .....................................................................................................
T T M 1?___________ 1
TTMP
k e e p e r s _____ T T t
t ____
T T M E ........................ T ................ T T U B .....................
H O U S E K E E P E R S ...................................................................

pm.T.
D IP T
GRnntins
p n i. T.
P ART

M E N ..........................................................................................
N O M EN ....................................................................................
P U L L T I M E .............................................................................
W OM EN....................................................................................

Ponn

s e r v ic e

h elper s

. .........................

M E M ___________________ ________________ ,
W OMEN ..........................................
E tlT.1. T T M E ______________ T .................T _ l r
M E M ....... ............... , ........................
H O M E N . . . __________ T T T T . T T 1 T T 1 T T t
P A R T T I M E ......... ...... T ..................................T
,
M E N __________ _______ , , _________ T .
H O M E N ....... .................... T ...........................
TT.
T . i n N n R T U O R R E R S _______
. . .
EI1T.T. T T M E .................................................
P 1 R T T J M P ......................
T T T *
C L E A N E R S , M f l R S T N O H O M E __________ ________
m e n ...............................................................................

H O M EN ............... - .................................................................
EFTT-T.

T T M E _______ ________ ____________ __________

M E N ..........................................................................................
H O M EN .........................................
PART

T T M E ............ _ ........ _______________

H O M EN ..........................................
M A IN T E N A N C E W O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G .........
P U L L T I M E .............................................................................
P A R T T I M E .............................................................................

110
44

20
24
75

6
69
74
69
1,085
60
1,025
556
28
528
529
32
49 7
379
294
85
889
138
7 51
678

102
576

211
175
158
144
14

6
10
4

4
4
4
452
18
434
1 55

1256
955
301
63
42

582
495
87
40

21
10
2

18

g
_
-

22

_
5

730
639
91
96
73
23

3
3

8
2
6
8
6

292
a

73
u

284
156

14 5
109

69
50

49
23

n

7

151
297
14
283
1 05
63
42
236
27
209
170

149
1 36

102

1

2

135
94
84

43
79
53
26
157

13 7

11
146
12 9

1 27

11
118
28
28

114
15

15 0

66

100

59
5
3

73

2

-

2
2

77
74

59
55

4

4

6
8

7

29
25

19
15

38

10
1V
1ft

21
& 1

5

0

7
_

2

1

2

8

6

4

20

6

8

2

_

_

2
2
2

8
8
8

6
6
6

_

_

-

-

_

15
S

3

6
6
6
10

2
2
2

39
o

16
19
16
g
-j

8
8
8

25

4
4
4
16

25
19

30
31

10
3

10

7
/

10

1

_

_

_

3
20

19
g

27
g

3
9
5

7

2

8
2

3

5
3

46
41

23

21

5

122

13

-

19
19
17
17

4

14
14
42
18
24
42
18
24

14
5
g

-j

3

_

_

2

_

_

_

_

-

_
_
_

2
2
2

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

5
3

10
10

7
7

3
3

8
8

_

3
3

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

1

2

2
2

5

2

_

8

19
15

13

2

8

4

10

8
4

8

13

2

8

19
15
4

4
4

2
2

24
24

7
7

-

-

-

-

g

_
_
_
_

1
■
j

g

-

_
_

4

8

3
8

6

q

10

8

2
2
14
-

12
2

34
30
4

15
15

-

2
2
-

13

11
2

2

1 T h e St. Louis Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of the city of St. Louis; the counties of Franklin, Jefferson, St. Charles, and St. Louis, Mo.; and the counties of Madison
and St. Clair, III.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based
on a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made w ith previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.




_

-j

3

20

45

93
85

4

10

10
248
50
198
1 48
23
1 25

7

2
3

3

”

5
5
5
1 54
g

-

35
33

193
175
18
40
40

165
1 59

_

Table 20. Occupational earnings: San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number

Aver a ge

of

hourly

Under

and

workers

Occupatio n3

earnings2

2 .2 0

under

2 .2 0

2 .30

2.40

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3 .00

3.20

3 .40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4 .2 0

4 .40

4.60

4 .80

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5.40

5.60

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

6 .60

7.00

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

2 .40

2.60

2.80

3 .0 0

3 .20

3 .40

3.60

3 .80

4 .00

4 .20

4 .40

4 .60

4.80

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5.60

5.80

6 .20

6.60

7 .0 0

7.40

7 .8 0

ove r

30

45

93

31
2

238

135

174

90

97

47

3

110

67

83

35

59

37

3

2 9

128

68

9 1

55

38

10

and

2 .3 0

P R O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
EM P LO YEES
GENERAL

DO TY

N U R S E S ? ...........................................

997

$ 5 .2 7

4

5 .3 7

2

17

8

D

52

2
851

3^91

520

3 .9 8

-

-

-

-

-

5

25

28

41

8

42

84

260

108

161

113

41

6

4

5

14

15

33

145

66

118

83

28

5

4

3

5

51

42

43

30

11
3

11 ^

2
2

5

-

-

-

-

5

4

27

L I C E N S E D P R A C T I C A L N O R S E S 4 .........................
.
P O L L T I M E ...................................................................

-

-

-

1

54
4

3

3

n u n

_

ynncvc4

V TITT

TTM V

n r r n D iip T n v ii

•77
< rn »D iB Tc ip < ^

M O N P R O F E S S IO N A L
N O R S IN G
FU LL

6 " 63

6

6 .6 2

£
~

10

5 ,5 7 9

2 .6 0

30

921

868

1499

1009

544

264

158

73

138

44

1

3 ,9 3 4

2 .6 5

30

513

486

1078

767

4 70

214

142

70

116

17

1

10
10

fPTMV

483

3 ! 06

-

35

32

73

29

120

67

44

30

14

2

-

3 .2 2

9A

69

29

109

44

31

30

48

22

100
18

13

46

22

91

37

29

22

28

12

2

8

_

2

8
2

5

~

“

H n M V H .............................................................................................
IPTMV

3 .1 2

62
TTM V

3 .0 8

3

112

V m

T

D IB f

e a v p i r c

”

2

TTM P

12

T T I I ^
138

..... ...................................................................................

u n y y y ....................................... * ..................................................

117

96

2 •53

127
*

*

*

• • • • • ’ •••

ipTME

See footnotes at end of table.




11

26

11

1 11
1
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lin e
HUO

338

9* A A
9

7f t

2 * J8

is

39

11
mV
I

y
”

97ft

1 ft 1
1 7Q

9 in
2 28

2
2

1A 9
Q7

97

9 9

18

”
2
_

, _
.

79

i10 i1
n
AO
131

94

10
7

-

1 ft

.
231

9 7

2
1 71

8

1
1

AQ

11
Sf t

7 7

1 24

S7

9 7

25

' 7Q

ft

^9

Aft

AS

91

Oli

1A
18

1
2

13
17

19

2 4

77

89

14

10
1u

y

7

fl 9

1 07
1A
10

~

y

AQ

107

43

1 88

42

y

1A
10

17

,

5
5

10

2

5

~

. 2

9 3
ZQ

91

~

O * CO
2 •59
2 .6 1
O CQ

4 49

mi l
t

BnMVH ......................... .. ...........................................
HOMER

o*cn

_

10

744

c OO
Do o

VTMV

fjn yyy* *

D IPT

11

2 .8 5

2 .5 0

~

2

2 .8 1
0 . DU
Aft

Q8 2
9 OO

r v t d v r c

y n M y y * * .....................................................................................
VnT T

3

T TM 17

c v o v T r v

3

^9
97
^7
7

2 .7 9

238

D 1PT

13

8

2 •76

117

TTM P . .

19

9 au
z . oo

21

vn nn

12

in

91

19

2 ^8 5

21
VTIT T

5

g 2 •94

n n n e p rw D V P e

s n ia v u *

20
10

9 * flA

2 ,8

98
n n lin e

99

2 |?
-

5

23

18

. JV

309

14
c p

20
2

30
7T1

H OM EN .............................................................................................
D IP T

12
12

17

£

7

17

£

£

2

5
5
6
73

1 ,6 4 5

C O O K S ................................................................................................................

VT1TT

g
g

EM PLO YEES

A I D S (O R D E R L I E S )4. ............................
T I M E ...................................................................

76

D 1D T

11
11
1

^9

19

'2
2
y

'
~

'
’
z
2

2

10
10
10
in
Iu

10
10
AA
22
22
17
99

22
y
9

22
1
1

2
2

2

2
2

2

2

2

2
0
2

2
1

10
10

1

4

5
5

-

1
1

2
2
2

1

-

-

-

~

“

*

“

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

1
2

10

5
5

-

Table 20. Occupational earnings: San Francisco-Oakland,Calif.1 Continued
—
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings3 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Occupation 3

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
Under
earnings3 2.20

2.20

2.30

2.40

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

7.40

2.40

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

7.40

7.80

7.80
and
over

48

45

72
g

50
g

44

28

10
2

q
y

2
48

43
26

64
53

42
33
g

37
24

28
28

g

Q

26
19
17

53
19

25
17
17

17

20
20

102

1 41
29

121

61

_
_

_

_

_

2
1

-

*

-

-

and
under
2.30

M O N P B O F E S S IO N A L E M P L O Y E E S —
C O N T IN U E D
T.k n N n n y H n R ir E R S ___ , T , . T _____T l T . T l l T
N K N ________________________________ _________
H O N R H ........................ .................................
T
l»nT.T. T T M P .__________________________ _________
M EM ................ .............................................................
HD MEN _ ................................................ ..................T
PABT T IM E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H O M EN _____________________ _________________
C L E A N E R S , N tlR S T N C H O M E __________ _________
m e m . ...........................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
MEM......................................................................................
H O M E !.................................................... ......................
P A B T T I M E .........................................................................
M E N ________ _______________________________ T
W O M E N .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M A IN T E N A N C E W O B K E R S , B U I L D I N G ? ..............
P U L L T I M E .........................................................................
P A B T T I M E ............................................................................

319
33
286

211
18
193
108
93
738
234
50 4
561
176
385
17 7
58
11 9
12 3
85
38

$ 2 .6 6
2 .8 5
2 .6 4
2 .7 1
2 .8 4
2 .7 0
2 . 58
2 .5 3

2 .6 6
2 .7 9
2 .6 0
2 .7 1
2 . 87
2 .6 4
2 .5 2
2 .5 7
2 .4 9
3 ! 83
4 .0 2
3 .4 0

21
21
5
5

5

27
27
146
33
11 3
98
25
73
48
g

30
72
59

21
38
43
g

11

112
1 25
19
106
16

10

44
77
84

21
63
37
23
14
4

5

40

34

-

-

-

-

2

~

11

2

g

11
~

7

20

10
2

28

g

8

7
8

74
33
41
65
33
32
g

13

53
27
26
51
27
24

7
1
8
2

1J
1R
1w
10

-j

10
5

1

•
j

5

7
g

10
4
g

3
3

17

11
6

2

5
15

1
5

2

~

7
5
2

5
8
7

9

7

41
52
15
37
g

13

8
3
5

12
12
-

5
3
2

4
4

-

13
13

6
6
-

10
7
3

8
5
3

_
_
-

T h e San Francisco-Oakland Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties.
3
Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample of establishments are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made w ith previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample compositions, and shifts in employment among establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those w orking a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
s Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $7.80 to $8.20 and 3 at $9.80 to $10.20.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $7.80 to $8.20 and 5 at $8.60 to $9.00.
7 A ll workers are at $ 10.20 and over.
* A ll or virtually all workers were men.
1




5
2
3

2
2

3
3
-

5
5

3

_

_

_

_

_

Table 21. Occupational earnings: Seattle-Everett, Wash.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Num ber of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Num ber
of
workers

Occupation3

Average
hourly
earnings2

2.20
under
2.30

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.20

6.60

7.00

7.40

7.40
and
over

84
54
30

27
11
16

26
12
14

-

_
-

-

-

-

3

-

58
40
18

238
92
146
3
3

29
9
20

3

_
_

101
35
66
14
11
3

-

_
_

103
42
61
17
17

-

_
_

31
8
23
57
43
14

3

_
_

P R O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
EM PLO YEES

P O L L T I M E ...................................................................
L I C E N S E D P R A C T I C A L N U R S E S ? .........................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A B T T I M E ...................................................................

891
372
507
324
183

$ 4 .8 6
4 .9 0
3 i6 9
3 .7 5
3 .5 8

_
_
-

_

6
2
4

60
38
22

149
65
84

139
10 4
35

178
63
115
1
1

_

T H E B A P I S T S ..............................................

18

7T 28

T I M E ...................................................................

10

n io in

inTICV

6^25
c 09
o •o z

8

8 .5 7
8 .6 4
5 .2 4
5^25
6 .8 0
6 .8 1
5 .0 7

a B in
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
O C C U P A T I O N A L T H E B A P I S T S ..................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
F t lL T . T T M E...................................................................
n 1 D fl fllTM
O
N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L
N U B S IN G
V ITT T

A ID S
iflTM P

C O O K S ........................................................................................
W OM EN.........................................................................
PITT T T T NP
WOMEN.........................................................................
D 1 D*P *PT MP

W OMEN.........................................................................
iPT Ml?

4 ,1 4 6
_ 9 c CO
2 357
1*588
1 ,4 5 8
371
38
333
294
31
263
77
7
70
16
13

n o n e p iv v d p d c
D riT T

IPT M P

WMN
0 E ................................
See footnotes at end of table.




3

_

3

3

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

1
1
1

3

-

-

3
-

4
-

3
-

7
7
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

4

19
15

2
2
2

1
1
1

1
1

-

2
-

7

6

2

4

23
23
-

4

1
1
1
7

4
-

4
-

4
-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

2

£

6

2

2
2
2
1
1
2
2

65

5

75
5

2

EM PLO YEES

( O R D E R L I E S ) ...............................

t> 1 D*P ip TIIV

fD o n lin e
n 1 p ip

11
6

52

4

FULL

7
78
74
13

4

2

1

g
P H Y S IC A L

71
43'
28

CO
52
55
52

2 .4 0
2 .4 0
2 .4 2
2 .4 2

1322

2*35
2 .9 8
2 .9 5
2 .9 8
3 .0 6

616
15

1108

660

430

225

172

468
438

301
281

167
153

' 90
79

177
30

50

29
15

118
46
3
43
30

1

1

80
37
4
33
28

1
14
15

29
16

16

15

. . .

14
3

5

AST

3 i0 5

4

11
5
5

382

12

1
12
12
12

2 .6 8
Z . 30
o 71

2 . 44
2 .4 7
3 .1 4
3 .1 3
3 .1 4
3 .1 3

g

7
£

1
1
5

5
5

22
1
21
17

2

62

25

4

^1

21
21

*
*

in!?

1 ?n
22

11

41
g

66
11

33
36

55
58
•7
j

29
5

47

7

1

Jj
23

1
22
18
17
5

31
31
31
31

12
1
11
12
1
11

11

10

11
7

10
10

7

10

*
*

5
*
*

_

■
f

3
~

2
2
2

24
9

138

.j

1
1

~
12
12
12

J*

7

j?
I?

_
g

7

6

*
*
*
*

;?

6

4

7

_

7
7

4

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

4

7

4

t|

_

_

Table 21. Occupational earnings: Seattle-Everett, Wash.1 Continued
—
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities. May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Occupation3

Number Average
2.2 0
of
hourly
end
workers earnings13 under
24
8
7
6
5
2.30

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6 .2 0

6.60

7.00

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.70

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80'

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6 .2 0

6.60

7.00

7.40

401

148
44
104
62
15
47

108
29
79
61
13
48
47
16
31
59
3

44
4

37

25

10

18

Q

2

40
26
4

37
27

16
19

8

22

27

10

2
3

16

18

7
12
3
2

18
16

10
10
1

4

3

2

29
3

3

7

16

26
19
i

4

3
2

7

18

4

2

26

15

0

3

10

18
17
5

5

3

3
4
4
7

5

7.40
and
over

N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L E M P L O Y E E S —
C O N T IN O E O
FO O D

S E R V I C E H E L P E R S ................ \ ......................
M E N - ............................................................................
w o m e n .........................................................................
P O L L T I M E ...................................................................
M EN ...............................................................................
B O M E N . ...............................- ...................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
M EN ...............................................................................
B O M E N .........................................................................
L A U N D R Y B O R K E R S ..........................................................
M E N . ........................................ ...................................
B O M E N ...................... ...............................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
M EN ................ .....................- ................. ....................
B O M E N .........................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
M EN ...............................................................................
B O M E N .........................................................................
C L E A N E R S , N U R S IN G H O M E.....................................
M EN ...............................................................................
B O M E N ......................- ...............................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
M EN ...............................................................................
B O M E N .........................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
M EN ...............................................................................
B O M E N .........................................................................
M A IN T E N A N C E B O R K E R S , B U I L D I N G . ............
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................

1 , 104
296
808
402
103
299
702
19 3
509
367
44
323

220
30
190
147
14
13 3
669

101
568
471
73
398
198
28
170

201
15 2
49

$ 2 .3 8
2 .3 4
2 .4 0
2 .4 6
2 .3 9
2 .4 9
2 .3 3
2 .3 1
2 .3 4
2 .4 3
2 .4 8
2 .4 3
2 .4 9
2 .5 3
2 .4 9
2 .3 4
2 .3 6
2 .3 4
2 .4 2
2 .5 3
2 .4 1
2 .4 4
2 .4 9
2 .4 3
2 .3 8
2 .6 2
2 .3 4
3 .0 0
3 .0 3
2 .9 0

31 3
1 06
20 7
76
30
46
237
76
161
117
19
98
44
*

102
299

111
32
79
290
70

220
86

29
57
35

g

2

12

77
56
5

32
73
7

51
30
4

66

26
1 58
13
145
126

184
26
158
95

86

21

8

74
89
5

11 8
32
5

84
19

27
18

11
8

11
7

33
24

2
22

11
11
123

56
41
3

12

g
g

38
18

12
4

g
<
I

1
18
60

8

11

115
94

49
42

8
86
29

10
32
18

1
29
17
17

4
62
13
49
54
g

33

45

21
4

8
4

17
14

8
1

29
g

9

18
16

2

2

2

5
2

2
2

~

5

2

10
2
3

12

”

3

10
10

2

”

3

4

4

12
2

12
21

4

1

2

*

14
9
5

18
9
9

15

g
3

g

11

31
23

4

8

12
7
5

15
15

3
3

4
4

2
2

1 T h e Seattle-Everett Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of King and Snohomish Counties.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or other perquisites, if any, provided. These surverys, based
on a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational
average, even though most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 A ll workers were at $9.80 and over.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $7.80 to $8.20 and 4 at $9.80 and over.
7 Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $7.80 to $8.20; 2 at $9.00 to $9.40; and 1 at $9.80 and over.
8 A ll or virtually all workers were men.




_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

~
”
“

Table 22. Occupational earnings: Washington, D.C.-M d.-Va.1
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—
Number
of
workers

Occupation3

Average
hourly
earnings2

2.20 *
2.30
and
under
2.40
2.30

2.50

2.50

2.60

2.80

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.60

7.00

7.40

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.60

7.00

7.40

7.80

1

2.40

2.60

3
3
86
58
28

54
9
45
69
41
28

46
20
26
33
21
12

79
23
56
13
1
12

55
21
34
2
2

156
59
97
2
2

89
37
52

44
18
26

37
29
8

2
1
1

21
20
1

1
1
-

7.80
and
over

P R O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
EM PLO YEES
G E N E R A L D U T Y N U R S E S ? ............................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
L I C E N S E D P R A C T I C A L N U R S E S ? .........................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
D I E T I T I A N S ? ......................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
P H Y S I C A L T H E R A P I S T S ..............................................
N OM EN ..........................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
N O M EN .........................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
H O M E N .........................................................................
H E A D N U R S E S ? ...................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
N O N P R O F E S S IO N A L

$ 5 .0 2
5 .1 7
4 .9 2
4 .0 8
4 .0 7
4 .1 1
8 .5 3
8 .6 5
8 .3 2
7 .8 6
7 .8 0
7 .1 5
8 .8 4
8 .4 8
5 .4 5
5 .6 2
5 .1 1

2 ,6 3 5
202
2 ,4 3 3
2 , 10 0
15 3
1 ,9 4 7
535
49
486
132
22
1 10
109
20
89
23
21
26
15
11
38
8
30
36
8
28

2 .6 5
2 .7 5
2 .6 4
2 .6 6
2 .7 7
2 .6 5
2 .5 9
2 .6 9
2 .5 8
3 .3 3
3 .9 9
3 .2 0
3 .4 9
4 .1 3
3 .3 4
2 .6 0
2 .6 0
3 .0 3
3 .2 4
2 .7 4
3 .7 8
3 .8 7
3 .7 5
3 .7 9
3 .8 7
3 .7 6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

•

-

—

—
—

—
—

3
2
3
3
3
3

7
7
5
5
-

-

-

-

-

4
4

6
5
1

-

3
3

5
5
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

2

16
9
7

39
24
15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

—

-

-

.

-

-

—

-

—

-

-

-

2
2

-

•
-

1
1
1
1

7
6
1

5
1
4

13
5
8

4
1
3

6
4
2

13
11
2

5
5

-

-

-

-

•

—

-

-

6
3
3

-

1
56
34
22

-

-

513
12
&9
6
4
2
5
4
-

EM P LO YEES

N U R S IN G

A I D S ( O R D E R L I E S ) ...............................
m e n ...............................................................................
N O H E N .........................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
m e n ...............................................................................
N O M EN .........................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
M E N ................................. .............................................
N O M EN .........................................................................
C O O K S . .....................................................................................
H E N ...............................................................................
H O M E N ........................................... ..............................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
h e n ...............................................................................
N OM EN.........................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
H O M E N .........................................................................
G R O U N D S K E B P E R S ? .......................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
P A R T T I M E ...................................................................
H O U S E K E E P E R S ...................................................................
m e n . ............................................................................
N O M E N .........................................................................
F U L L T I M E ...................................................................
m e n . .......................................... .................................
N O H E N .........................................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




588
238
350
318
192
12 6
24
21
20
17
10
8
10
9
73
49
24

312
18
294
234
13
221
78
5
73
6
6
-

266
7
259
20 1
3
198
65
4
61
-

287
21
266
227
17
210
60
4
56
2
-

392
27
365
28 2
15
267
110
12
98
11
-

2
2
-

-

-

2
3
-

-

-

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6
-

_

-

317
31
2 86
269
26
243
48
5
43
11
-

11
6
-

619
54
565
511
46
465
108
8
100
22
2
20
13
-

6
5
5
2
2
-

13
9
7
7
4
3
-

10
1
1
4
2
2
-

-

-

-

-

11
10
-

297
20
277
250
12
238
47
8
39
10
2
8
10
2
8
3 '
-

74
9
65
68
9
59
6
6
7
1
6
7
1
6
-

32
2
30
26
1
25
6
1
5
10
1
9
9
1
8
1
1
1
1

26
10
16
24
10
14
2
2
16
2
14
15
2
13
1
1
3
3

3
3

4

3
3

4
4

7
3
4
7
3
4

9
1
8
7
1
6

3

4

7
3
4
3
1
2
4
2
2
9
1
8
9
1
8

1
10
2
8
10
2
8

1
1
1
-

1

4

2

4
3

2
2

3
1
-

2
-

-

-

-

-

4
3
1
4
3
1

7
2
5
7
2
5

5
4
1
5
4
1

-

2
2

-

2
2

2
2

1
1

•

-

-

-

-

6
2
4
6
2
4

3
3
3

4
2
2
4
2
2

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1
1

-

3

-

~

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table 22. Occupational earnings: Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va.1 Continued
—
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of nonsupervisory employees in selected occupations in nursing homes and related facilities, May 1976)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of—

Number Average
hourly
of
workers earnings2

Occupation3

2 .2 0

and
under
2.30

2.30

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6.60

7.00

7,40

7.80
and

2.40

2.50

2.60

2.80

3.00

3.20

3.40

3.60

3.80

4.00

4.20

4.40

4.60

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6.60

7.00

7.40

7.80

over

117
44
73
34

71
23
48
45

157
55

72
33
39
46

64
17
47
45

8

1 1

22

11

N ONP R O FESSIO N A L E M P L O Y E E S -C O N TIN U ED
FOOD S E R V IC E H E L P E R S ......................................
MFW...... .....................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
v u j . j w j m ? . ___ T _ _ ..................................... r . T _ - T
M E N ...................................................... ... .........................................
W O M E N ................................... n
P tR T

TTI^F

______T ________ .,

..................................................

M E N . . _______________________ ______________________
W O M E N ................ ...........- i - T .a n w n R Y
IinR frFP C;
M E M ........

............................................

t

........................ T

. .

. .

W O M E N .................... ..................................T T ________________
F n i.T.

T T M F ...............................

. -

_

MEN .
T

T T M E ........................- i - T

. .

. .

.

..................................

W O M E N ..............................................................................
C T.E l NER

M n R S T NC

HOME

M E N ................................... ... .................. ................... ......................
W O M E N ...................................
E

n T.T.

T T M E _______________ T

____________ _________ t

M E N . _________________________ T _ T _ , ______ T - T - -

WOMEN...................................... , .......................
P» RT

10 1

260
356
164
192
125
17
108
97
12

W O M E N ................ ......................
P iR T

717
265
452
361

T T M E ........................ ... .................. ...........T

,

M E N .............................................................. T T . . T t T

T

W O M E N .........................................................................

M A IN TENA N C E WORKERS, B U IL D IN G .7 ...........
P O L L T I M E .....................................................................................
P A R T T T M E .................................................. ............... t - - t

85
28
23
512
147
365
428
104
324
84
43
41
80
60
20

$ 2 .4 8
2 .4 8
2 .4 8
2 .5 8
2 .6 3
2 .5 6
2 .3 8
2 .4 0
2 .3 7
2 .5 8
2 .5 4
2 .5 9

190
75
115
55
16
39
135
59
76
27

2 .6 3

16
1

2 .6 3
2 . 63
2 .4 3
2 .4 5
2 . 58

26
83
36
47
8

10 2

14
16

94
18
76
63
37
26
26

34
26
12

5

1

22

7

16

23

3

7

10

21

15

5

10
g

18

1

7
65

1

g

r

2 .6 6

g

56
51
3
48
14
5

8

82
23
59
57
8

49
25
15
10

46
12

34
30
5
25
1 6

7

g

3

5
111

29
82
10 1

24
77
10

5
5
1

_

3

11

15

1

34
19

12
3

4

27

12
8

5

2
1
1
-j

15
17
13

_

2
■
\

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1
-j

3

21
3
2

-j

13
9

1
10

-j

3

4

-|

2

3

3

3

4

2

g

10

1

4

2

2

3

3

2

2

3

2

o

2

103
36
67
91
28
63

60
16

12
3
4

7

4

16

4

2

g

3

2

7

7
2
5
7
2
5

,

7

53
14
39

25
10

15
25
10

15

7
3
-|

n

7
3

2

*
1

1
7

3

2

5
_

4
1

2
2

6
3

9

7

9

g

3
2

1

1 Th e Washington Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of the District of Colum bia; the cities of Alexandria, Fairfax and Falls Church, Va.; and the counties of Arlington,
Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince Williams, V a .; and Montgomery and Prince Georges Counties, Md.
2 Excludes prem ium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as the value of room, board, or perquisites, if any, provided. These surveys, based on
a representative sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments and different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though
most establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Part-time employees are those working a schedule calling for fewer hours than those of full timers.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $7.80 to $8.20; 2 at $8.20 to $8.60; 1 at $8.60 to $9.00; 1 at $9.40 to $9.80; 3 at $9.80 to $10.20; and 4 at $10.20 and over.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 3 at $9.00 to $9.40; 1 at $9.40 to $9.80; 1 at $9.80 to $10.20; and 4 at $10.20 and over.
7 A ll or virtually all workers were men.




_

1
2

■
j

20
5

3

■
j

•i
j

2 .5 5
2 .6 1
2 .7 6
2 .5 6
2 .4 4
2 .4 3
2 .4 6
3 .7 2
3 .9 5
3 .0 6

24
26

30
22

4

2

3

Table 23.

Scheduled weekly hours

(Percent of professional and non professional employees in nursing homes and related facilities by scheduled weekly hours,1 21 metropolitan areas, May 1976)

Northeast
Weekly hours
Boston Buffalo

New
York

South

Phila­
delphia Atlanta

West

North Central

Balti­
more

Dallas

Miami

Wash­
ington

100

100

100

100

Chi­
cago

Cincin­ Cleve­
nati
land

MinneMil­
Kansas apolisDetroit
City
St.
waukee
Paul

St.
Louis

San
Los
Fran- SeattleAngelesDenver
Long
cisco- Everett
Beach
Oakland

Professional and technical employees
All workers..............................................
Under 35 hours.............................................
35 hours.....................................................
Over 35 and under 37.5 hours..........................
37.5 hours...................................................
Over 37.5 and under 40 hours..........................
40 hours.....................................................
42.5 hours...................................................
44 hours.....................................................
45 hours.....................................................
Over 45 hours ..............................................

100

100

100

_
_
43
_
57
_

36
5
47
_
12
_

1
3
_
16
_
80
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

100

100

100

100

1
_
8
_
92

_
_
44
_
56

7
35
41
_
17

(2)
5
_
26
_
69

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

(2)

1
_
4
_
95
_

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

_
_
11
4
78
3

_
_
20
_
80
_

_
_
14
_
86
_

-

_
12
_
_
83
_
2

-

-

-

-

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

(2)
22
5
69

_
_
57
_
43

14
3
14
2
64

_
_
20
_
80

_
_
10
_
90

_

_

_

_
_
18
7
65
9

_

-

-

1

_
_
17
_
83
_

100

100

100

100

100

_
_
2
_
98
_

_
_
16
_
84
-

1
5
6
_
89
_

_
4
(2)
_
95
-

3

2
_
_
16
1
81
_

_
_
3
_
97
_

(2)

-

_
_
17
_
83
_
(2)

10
_
90
_

1
19
5
_
76
_

_
_
2
_
98
_

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

100

100

_
_
34
2
64

2
_
3
_
95

1
_
17
_
82

_

-

_

-

-

-

_
_

-

7
_
90
_
1

-

-

-

-

_
2
_
98
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

(2)
_
3
_
97
-

-

4

-

1
3
3
_
92
1
-

_
_

-

_
16
12
_
67
-

'

4

Nonprofessional employees
All workers..............................................
Under 35 hours.............................................
35 hours.....................................................
Over 35 and under 37.5 hours..........................
37.5 hours...................................................
Over 37.5 and under 40 hours..........................
40 hours.....................................................
Over 40 and under 42 hours...........................
42 hours ...
44 hours ...
45 hours.....................................................
Over 45 hours

A
H

-

2

1
_
_
15
_
83
-

_
_
8
_
92
-

_ ‘
_
20
_
80
-

5
4
31
1
59
-

(2)

-

-

-

1

1 Data relate to the predominant schedule for full-time day-shift workers in each facility. For an explanation of how unusual work schedules (e.g., alternating work weeks) were reported, see appendix A.
2 Less than 0.5 percent
NOTE:

Because of roundmg, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




3
_
97
-

-

Table 24. Paid holidays
(Percent of professional and nonprofessional employees in nursing homes and related fa cilitie s with form al provisions fo r paid holidays, 21 metropolitan areas, May 1976)

Northeast
Number of
paid holidays

B
oston Buffalo

South

N
ew
York

Phila­
delphia Atlanta

W
est

North Central

Balti­
m
ore

Dallas

Miami

W
ash­
ington

Chi­
cago

M
inneSt.
Cincin­ Cleve­
Kansas apolis- Mil­
Detroit
land
St. waukee Louis
nati
City
Paul

Denver

San
Ls
o
Angeles- Fran- SeattleLong
cisco- Everett
Beach Oakland

Professional and technical em
ployees
All workers........................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

W
orkers in establishments
providing paid holidays.........................................
Under 3 days.....................................................
3 days ..
4 days ..
4 days plus 5 half days.....................................
5 days ..
6 days ..
6 day plus 1 half day........................................
7 days ...............................................................
7 days plus 2 half days.....................................
8 days ...............................................................
9 days ...............................................................
10 days .............................................................
10 days plus 1 half day.....................................
11 days .............................................................
12 days .............................................................
13 days .............................................................
Over 13 days ......................................................

94
3
9
13
18
24
24
3
-

100

100

95

64
_
3

90
_
-

92
_
_

74
_
_
4
-

85
3

92
_
(')
(*)
-

6

2

29
38
5

1

10

21
20

1

8

25
-

8
1
1
6

99
_
_
_
_
41
_
32
_
13

94
_
5
7
-

32
7
-

78
_
_
_
_
3
55
14
_

53
_

28
15
7
-

94
_
_
3
23
34
-

81

1

99
_
_

100

_
_
(*)
_
5
(‘)
3
-

92
-

100

_
-

10

8

_
-

33
33
17

All workers........................................................

100

100

100

93
4
-

100

100

26
29
13
28
4

(*)
(*)

_

_

-

~

60
13
4

20

25
20

_
3
12

(*)
30
16
13
11

3
3
1

1
6

23
34
15
9
4
_
_

1

2

13
3
14
21

36
5
5
_
-

10

_

23
_

-

-

-

-

4

2

-

_
-

1
22

25
_
14

_
-

_

4
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

100

100

100

86

96
43
31

89

2

-

2

1

23
33
-

33
_
31
3
19

12

7

12

2

8

_
_
_
-

-

1

94
_
3
_
_
44
27
_
16
4
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
-

_

-

-

-

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

94

92

99
-

59

95
3
3
23
25

97
-

94
-

100

2

1

77
3

77
5

-

-

5
31
-

3
30
44

1

2

27
23

16
31

-

-

-

-

(')
30
29
4

65
4
39
18

11

24

15

14

20

-

2
10

72
_

12

_

2

_
_

_
_
13
13
_
44
4
4
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

100

100

100

100

48
_
4

93
4
7

99
_
(')

1
10

6

12

25
_

43
_
17
_

12

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

6

4
_
_
_
_
_

_
3
6

10

_
34
39
6

_
1

Nonprofessional em
ployees

W
orkers in establishments
providing paid holidays.........................................
Under 4 days......................................................
4 days plus 5 half days.....................................
4 days ...............................................................
5 days ...............................................................
5 days plus 3 half days.....................................
6 days ...............................................................
6 day plus 1 half day........................................
7 days...............................................................
7 days plus 1 or 2 half days.............................
8 days ...............................................................
9 days ...............................................................
10 days .............................................................
10 days plus 1 half day.....................................
11 days
1? Hay'
13 days .............................................................
O 13 days .....................................................
ver

12

13
15
24
20

5

1

1

4
(')
4
-

N TE: Because of rounding, sum of individual items m not equal totals.
O
s
ay

1

1

8

1

4
17
(*)
24

29
30
15

17
5

7
26
K
9

-

-

-

-

17
13
8

4
3

12

1 Less than 0.5 percent.




1

-

7
2

—

21

25
28
3

2

-

30
-

12

21
2

-

1
11

(')
3

8

-

6
2

-

1
1

15
-

-

2
2

-

(>)
1
1

10

67
6

-

-

10
12

-

1

1

36
34
15
2

-

76
2
-

2

12

2

11

33
9
_
_
_
-

_
44
_
18
_

9

-

6

3
_
_

12

37
34
4
-

11

_
46
_
4
2

_
_

1

2
~

~

—

1

—

~

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table 25.

Paid vacations

(Percent of professional and nonprofessional employees in nursing homes and related fa cilitie s with formal provisions fo r paid vacations after selected periods of service, 21 metropolitan areas, May 1976)

South

Northeast
Vacation policy
B
oston Buffalo

N
ew
Y
ork

Phila­
delphia Atlanta

Balti­
m
ore

North Central

Dallas Miami

Wash­
ington

Chi­
cago

W
est

M
inneSt.
Cincin­ Cleve­
Kansas apolis- Mil­
Detroit City
St. waukee Louis
nati
land
Paul

Denver

Ls
o
San
Angeles- Fran- SeattleLong
cisco— Everett
Beach Oakland

Professional and technical em
ployees
All workers.........................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

99
98

100

100
100

-

-

2

-

-

96
96
-

100

98

-

99
99
-

100

-

98
98
-

100
100

-

98
93
5

-

-

1

_
40

_
41
59
_
_
-

_
52
3
43
_
_
-

_
46
_
48
_
_

_
45
3
46
4

_
_
-

_
59
5
33
_
_
_
-

_
_
-

_
33
_
67
_
_
-

_
73
_
27
_
_
_
-

_
69
_
31
_
_
_
*
—

_
70

-

_
55
3
42
_
_
_
-

_
60
5
33

-

_
43
4
44
9
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

5
3
80

22
1

20
2

12
2

10
6

9

75
_

74

82

82

17
4
78

2

8

2

3
_
-

83
-

18
3
78
_

Method of payment
W
orkers in establishments
providing paid vacations........................................
Length-of-time payment........................................
Percentage payment.............................................

99
1

-

-

96
4

96
4

-

Am
ount of vacation* pay1
After 1 year of service-.
Under 1 week......................................................
1 week................................................................
O
ver 1 and under 2 weeks..................................
2 weeks..............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks..................................
3 weeks..............................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks..................................
4 weeks..............................................................
5 weeks..............................................................
After 2 years of service:
Under 1 week......................................................
1 week................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..................................
2 weeks..............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks..................................
3 weeks..............................................................
O 3 and under 4 weeks..................................
ver
4 weeks..............................................................
5 weeks..............................................................
After 3 years of service:
1 week................................................................
O 1 and under 2 w
ver
eeks
2 weeks..................
O 2 and under 3 weeks
ver
3 weeks..............................................................
O 3 and under 4 weeks..................................
ver
4 weeks..............................................................
5 weeks..............................................................
After 4 years of service:
1 week................................................................
O 1 and under 2 weeks..................................
ver
2 weeks..............................................................
O 2 and under 3 weeks..................................
ver
3 weeks..............................................................
O 3 and under 4 weeks..................................
ver
4 weeks..............................................................
5 weeks ..............................................................

 See footnotes at


end of table.

1

54
_
5
_
8

87
5
_
5
_
82
_
13
-

13
72
4
11

74
11

15
-

_
14
_
37
_
47
1

-

_
4
-

-

2

1

6

-

_
7
_
37
55

5
(2)
74

1

—

-

15
-

6

79

1

21

11

65
_

8

2
6

74

_
13

_
90
_
-

78

-

-

7
8

-

-

60
_
38
_
_
_
-

39
52

5
_
74
_

11

_
41
52
_
3
_
3
-

1

7
8

71
14

2
11

8

5
72
3
12

8

-

2
12

4
-

33
2

61
2

-

6

3
81
6

-

2

1

28

6

_
80
13
4
-

41

2
66
2

3
85
-

2

48
8

-

-

6

-

2

1

80
13
4
-

39

26
70

2

2

50
8

-

-

6

12

-

1
1

8

81
7
3
1

-

3
73
1

24
-

3
_
73
7
9
1
6

3
72
7

3
70
14
-

19
-

6

12

10
1
6

-

-

-

3
66
1

23
4
74
-

1

51
_
48
_
_
_
-

_
15

13
4
79
4
-

80
_
4
-

13
4
79
4
-

14
82
4
-

1

_
71
_
26
1

1

91
1
8

-

82
3
10
2

-

86
1
11

3
-

10
2

82
3
-

2

1

(2)
-

-

2

-

5
90
2
2

2

90
5
2
1

-

1

_
-

1

-

7

1

26
1

_
62
36
_

_
-

_
-

24
72
3
_
-

5
90
5
_
-

2

1

33
_
64
1

_
1
11

5
81
3
_
_
_

10
1

2

2

9
4

2

1

85
9
5
-

85
_

86
1

84
3
(2
)
-

_
79
_
18
-

_
79
14

6

7

-

1

2

85
9
5
-

85
-

9
4
83

10
1

1
2

82

1

2

3

4

67
27
5
-

6

-

-

-

6

_
-

2

_
68

16
15
-

Table 25.

Paid vacations—Continued

(Percent of professional and nonprofessional employees in nursing homes and related fa c ilitie s w ith form al provisions fo r paid vacations after selected periods of service, 21 metropolitan areas, May 1976)

Northeast
Vacation policy
B
oston Buffalo

South

N
ew
York

Phila­
delphia Atlanta

Balti­
m
ore

Dallas

North Central

Miami

W
ash­
ington

Chi­
cago

W
est

M
inneCincin­ Cleve­
St.
Kansas apolis- Mil­
nati
land Detroit City
St. waukee Louis
Paul

Ls
o
San
Angeles- Fran- SeattleDenver
Long
cisco- Everett
B
each Oakland

Professional and technical em
ployees
Amount o1| vacation pay1— Continiied
After 5 years of service:
1 week.......... I ..................................................
O 1 and under 2 weeks.................................
ver
2 weeks........
O 2 and under 3 weeks.................................
ver
3 weeks........
Over 3 and under 4 weeks.................................
4 weeks........
O 4 and under 5 weeks ..
ver
5 weeks........
After 10 years ol service:
1 week..........
O
ver 1 and u
rnler 2 weeks.................................
2 weeks........
O 2 and under 3 weeks.................................
ver
3 weeks.........
Over 3 and umler 4 weeks.................................
4 weeks.........
O 4 and umler 5 weeks ..
ver
5 weeks.........
Over 5 and under 6 weeks ..
6 weeks.........
After 15 years olI service:
1 week..........
O
ver 1 and under 2 weeks.................................
2 weeks.........
O 2 and under 3 weeks.................................
ver
3 weeks.........
Over 3 and under 4 weeks................................
4 weeks.........
O 4 and under 5 weeks.................................
ver
5 weeks.........
6 weeks.........
7 weeks.........
O 7 weeks ..
ver
After 20 years o1’ service:3
1 week..........
Over 1 and under 2 weeks.................................
2 weeks.........
O 2 and under 3 weeks.................................
ver
3 weeks.........
O 3 and under 4 weeks.................................
ver
4 weeks .........
O 4 and under 5 weeks.................................
ver
5 weeks.........
O 5 and under 6 weeks.................................
ver
6 weeks.........
7 weeks.........
O 7 weeks ..
ver
See fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le .




2

_
26
_
68

_
5
_
_

15
_
78
7
_
_

_
_
2

_
4
_
69
2
22

1

_
42

2

_
52

2

8

2

44
_

33
_
4
_
_

40
_
29
9
_

8

_

2

_
16
_
47

_
_
28

_
_
2

_
39
1

_
40
_
36
9

35

72

43

34

11

2

_
_
_

2

_

1

_
22

2

_
_
_

33
_
16

_
_

_
_

_

2

2

-

_
16

_
-

-

-

46
36
_
_

13
87
_
_

_

_

33
16

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

16

-

-

_

_

2

42

2
20

_
_
_
_

22

_
37
_
37

6

3
15
_
69
_
6

_
_

36
-

38
4

_
_
37
_
51

(2)

1
12

5

.(2)

_
65
23

22

38
4

6

7
9
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

22

_
37

_

_

_

-

-

_

_
_

_
_
29
_
43
_
27

(2
)

-

6

-

-

65
_
23
_
_

_

1

1

_

_

_

6

_

30
_
7
2 .

9
_
39

1

_

37

28

38

22

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

29
_

_

1

37

2

27

13

-

5

-

5

15

-

-

_

_

52

55

66

46

65

42

-

-

-

-

_

_

39
7

_

2

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

18

1
12

_

1

38

2

51

_

1

31

6
1

-

33

-

9

-

_
_
_
_
_

_

23
-

2

4
9

1

_

47
4
3

_

1

38

_
23
_
_
_
_
_

2

39
3
24

17
9

_

_
65
_

37

5

9

39

-

1
12

_

5
_
28

2

_

8

6

-

16

20

_

2

51

2

24

4

35

_

11

_
_

8

_
24

_
_
_

5
4
29

_

(2)

-

_

5
4
29
_
42
_

_
_

_
_
_

-

3

2

5
_
15
_
69
_

(2
)

_

41

-

1

_
_

_
_
5
_
46
_
41
7
_

_

62

_

-

_

52
_
38
_
3

2

_
13
_
69
_
15

_

_
_
_

-

-

4

9
_
27
_
59
_

6
1

_
_

_
_
_

_

_

65

_

_
_

_

_

-

33

_
_
_

1

9

1

39
3
18

_

-

_

_

31

-

28

_

19

5

2

2

_
37

-

39

_

1

7

2

-

-

_

3
_
_

2

_

52

1

22

1

31
7
_
_
_

8

_
26

_
_
_
_

30

9

29

5
4
29
_
43

_
_
_

-

39

22

_
_

5
_
15
_
74

_
_

-

_
41

6

_

_
_
7
_
55

8

_
_

_

34

2

4
_
39
3
33

2

46
_
_
_
_

_

2

44

_
_
_

1

50
_
4
_
_
_

_

29

87

_
_
_

17
73
_
_
_
_

2

_
48
7
40
_
4
_
_

_

6

_

15

7
_
82
_

_

37

_

1

27

2

1
2

_

3

38

1
10

_
13
_
69

8
1

41

_

40

2

16

9
_
27
_
59

5
4
36

1

53
_
41
_
_
_
_

_

21

-

63

6
1

5

_

2

-

_
_

_
23
5
55

_
_

1
2

1
10

_

-

-

6

4
_
46
9
25

39
_
46
_
_
_
_

_

_

6

-

1

65
_
3
_
3

2

_
45
5
46

_

1

22

13

6

37
_
_
_
_

9
2

_

_

1

_

_
_
28

_

_

2

_

7
_
50

1

45
4

1

44

4
4
63
_
25
_
4
_
_

2

1

_

9
_
45

2

36

_
3
2.
39
_
39
_
3
4
9

-

8

_
_
29
_
48

6

_

2

-

66

_
_

_
40
30
9
17

17
3

_
_

-

2

2

_
_
_

1

_
3

22

_
54

_

21

_
44.

2

1

2
-

. 1
_
19

2

-

3

15

•

20

_
_

(2)

_
_
65
_

2

1

_
_

_
23
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

(2
)

Table 25.

Paid vacations—Continued

(Percent of professional and nonprofessional employees in nursing homes and related fa cilitie s w ith form al provisions fo r paid vacations a fter selected periods of service, 21 metropolitan areas, May 1976)

Northeast
Vacation policy
Boston Buffalo

New
York

South
Balti­
Phila­
Atlanta
delphia
m
ore

North Central

Dallas Miami

W
ash­
ington

Chi­
cago

Cincin­ Cleve­
nati
land

Detroit

W
est

i►

MinneKansas apolis- Mil­
st,
St. waukee Louis
City
Paul

L
os
San
SeattleDenver Angeles- FranLong
cisco- Everett
Beach Oakland

N professional em
on
ployees
All workers.......................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100

100
100

100
100

100

99
98

100
100

1

-

-

-

-

-

99
99
-

100

96
4

100
100

-

94
94
-

100
100

-

96
96
-

100
100

-

98
96
3

-

1

_
42

97
_

_
52
48
_

_

_
29
5

_
67
_
33
_

_
46
7
46

_
69
_
30

_

_
70
_
26
_

_
75
3

56
_

49
51
_

1

21
1

_
45
_
55
_

_
81
_
18
_

_
84
_
16
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
5
85
_
3
-

16
83
-

7
90

48

-

-

6

6

-

42
_
-

-

-

-

3
84
_
7
-

8
2

4
4
81
-

-

-

8

1

72
16

91

10

2

-

5
-

34
4
58
-

Method of payment
W
orkers in establishments
providing paid vacations........................................
Length-of-time payment.......................................
Percentage payment.............................................

99

-

97
3

-

96
4

-

Amount of vacation pay1
After 1 year of service-.
Under 1 week......................................................
1 week...............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..................................
2 weeks..............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks..................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks..................................
4 weeks..............................................................
After 2 years of service:
Under 1 week......................................................
1 week................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..................................
2 weeks..............................................................
O 2 and under 3 weeks..................................
ver
3 weeks..............................................................
O 3 and under 4 weeks..................................
ver
4 weeks..............................................................
After 3 years of service-.
Under 1 week ......................................................
1 week................................................................
O 1 and under 2 weeks..................................
ver
2 weeks..............................................................
O 2 and under 3 weeks..................................
ver
3 weeks..............................................................
O 3 and under 4 weeks..................................
ver
4 weeks..............................................................
After 5 years of service:
Under 1 week ......................................................
1 week................................................................
O 1 and under 2 weeks..................................
ver
2 weeks ..............................................................
O 2 and under 3 weeks..................................
ver
3 weeks ..............................................................

 See footnotes at


end of table.

2

2

66

33
_

66

2

1

2

62
_
36
_

75
_

1

56
3
39
_

22
1

_
82
_
13
_

_

_

1

73

68

1
1

_
32
_

65
_
33

(2)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

2

11

27
5

_
28

_
24
4
70

_
16
5
78

_
13
78
7
_

_
17
4
78
_
_

_
25
5
69
_
_

_
27
_

1
1

_
23
5
67
_
_

_
5
_
94
_

1
22
12

_

-

(2)
-

-

-

-

7
3

-

-

1
1

8
2

88
1
1

87
_
1

-

85
7
5
-

18
5
77
-

-

-

-

-

12

2
-

1
1

64
3
30

13
13
72

23

1

1

13
87
-

18
82
-

-

-

-

87
5

8

83
9
-

(2)
95
4
i
i
(2)
90

-

-

-

1

3
28

8

1
8

-

2

11

-

1

1

_
_

71
_
_

-

(2
)

-

-

-

-

3
3

(2)

2

18

86

79
-

91
3

2

6

-

7
-

78
13
7
-

4
89
4

-

-

13
5
74
3
-

24
58

3
3
18

(2)
38

2
10

-

5
49

2
12

-

11

26
4

75

46

66

31

54
5
33

30

2

66

16
5
74
3
-

1

1

(2)
-

1

68

3
_

64
1

-

_

_

_

10
1

1
1

11
2

87
_

76

-

84
3
(2)
-

5

8

1

5
44

1

(2
)
-

2

84
4

79

23

6

-

-

-

68

77

32

1

44
4
49

4
49

1

64

10

2

33

30

2

(2
)

2

-

8

5
44

6

-

61

34

60
-

_

32

37

11

11

_

-

-

-

_

8
1

1
1

_
7

50
3
37

7
_

86

2

51
5
34

Table 25.

Paid vacations—Continued

(Percent of professional and nonprofessional employees in nursing homes and related fa cilitie s with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, 21 metropolitan areas, May 1976)

Northeast
Vacation policy
B
oston Buffalo

South

N
ew
York

Phila­
delphia Atlanta

Balti­
m
ore

North Central

Dallas Miami

W
ash­
ington

Chi­
cago

W
est

M
inneCincin­ Cleve­
Kansas apolis- Mil­
St.
nati
land Detroit City
St.
waukee Louis
Paul

Denver

Ls
o
San
Angeles- Fran
SeattleLong
cisco— Everett
Beach O
akland

Nonprofessional em
ployees
Amount of vacation pay1
—Continued
After 5 years of service:
Over 3 and under 4 weeks.................................
4 weeks.............................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks.................................
5 weeks..............................................................
After 10 years of service:
1 week...............................................................
O
vpr 1 and nnrlpr 9 w
ppkc
2 weeks.............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.................................
3 weeks......................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks.................................
4 weeks..............................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks.................................
5 weeks.........................................................
O 5 and under 6 weeks.................................
ver
After 15 years of service:3
1 week...............................................................
O 1 and under 2 weeks .................................
ver
2 weeks..............................................
O 2 and under 3 weeks.................................
ver
3 weeks.............................................................
O 3 and under 4 weeks.................................
ver
4 weeks.............................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks.................................
5 weeks........................................................
6 weeks.......................................................
7 weeks.............................................................
O 7 weeks......................................................
ver

-

62

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

-

3
-

-

-

4
-

(2)
-

3
-

_
-

-

-

-

3

-

(2
)

1

4

1

24

3

(2)

1

10

7

19
_
50
_
28
_
_

_
_
45
_
55
_
_

5
_
5
_
79

17
_
51
3
27
_
_
_

42
_
34
7

29

39
_
31

8

30

_
69
_

1

6

6

54

44
3
37
_
(2)

28
_
18

3
19
44
35
_
_
_

_
_
26
74
_
_
_

(2)
_
5
_
5
49

1

-

-

2

_

_

2

9
_

11

_
_
_

2

_
16
_
48
34
_

34
5

_

4
_
42
_
27
7
19
_
_
_

-

-

-

_

1

_

_

2

47
_
18
_
_
3
1

_
26
2

44
_
23
_
_
_
3
-

2

_
_
_
_
24
_
39
_
25
_
6
2

20

2
11

_
_
_

_
_

3
_

(2)

8

30

_
58
_
31
_

_
_

_

_
_
_

-

-

2

9

1
1

_
9

1

6

49

38

2

2

16
_

43
_
(2)

_
_
_

1

36

-

-

-

12

2

-

5

8

8

5
32

33

32

21

8

14

48

_
65

_
59

72

1

2

7

28

7
_
26
_
36

_

_
_

-

8

10

_
_
_

_
_
_

1

3
56

_
_

_

_
5
_
_

1

27
4
53

_
_
_

_
30
3
32
_
23

_
_
_
_

_

_
-

_
_
_
-

_

2

_
_
_

_

1
2

_

1

28

(2
)
1
I
5

2

11
1

27
6

43

45

Because of rounding, sum of individual items m not equal totals.
s
ay




7
36
1

32

40
4

7

_

9

12

_

61

12

(2
)

_

_
_

12

2

_

5

8

8

(2
)

32
_
48
_

21

6

14

5
32

30

5

36

61
_
15

51
_
37

66

42

46

30

38

13

1
12

61

18

1

6

8

3
46
_
40
1
2

_
-

2

_

_

7

1
1

2

13

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 Vacation payments, such as percent of annual earnings, were converted to an equivalent time basis. Periods of service were chosen arbitrarily and do not necessarily reflect individual establishment provisions for
progression. For example, changes indicated at 10 years m include changes that occurred between 5 and 10 years.
ay
2 Less than 0.5 percent.
3 Vacation provisions were virtually the sam after longer periods of service.
e

N TE:
O

_

2
1

_
_

2

_

1

-

_

5

-

Table 26.

Health, insurance, and retirement plans

(Percent of professional and nonprofessional employees in nursing homes and related fa c ilitie s w ith specified health, insurance, and retirement plans,1 21 metropolitan areas, May 1976)

Northeast
Type of plan
Boston Buffalo

South

N
ew
Y
ork

Phila­
delphia Atlanta

North Central

Balti­
m
ore

Dallas

Miami

Wash­
ington

Chi­
cago

W
est

M
inneSt.
Cincin­ Cleve­
Kansas apolis- Mil­
St.
nati
land Detroit City
waukee Louis
Paul

Denver

Ls
o
San
Angeles- Fran- SeattleLong
cisco- Everett
Beach Oakland

Professional and technical em
ployees
All workers........................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

44
39

51
51

92
92

47
45

55
13

86
86

61
28

86

62
48

73
54

51
49

47
43

72
62

42
41

69
47

76
48

40
35

14
8

70
25

39
29

20

57

37
33

15
15

91
9
1

36
34

19
5

63
63

37
18

54
36

58
45

52
36

32
30

40
37

54
45

37
36

48
28

55
29

29
24

4
_

54
17

31

20

21

17

84
37
33

100
10
10

93
8
1
79

84

63
_
_

93
62
61

48
_
_

84

95
13
7

80
13

79
34
33

91
29
26

75

83

_

3

27
3
_

83

11

47
5
5

96

22
10

80
27
18

77

6

62
24
24

75

100

93

68

63

89

40

81

95

75

46

60

89

23

76

43

26

15

37

71

65

-

14

-

_
74
70
74
70
74
70
60
56
25
25

8

3
_
77
48
77
48
70
41
70
41
18
18

_
3
3
90
47

5

9

38

2

6

81
51
80
50
78
50
72
46

72
46
72
46
62
36
50
42
23
23

3
(3)
60
42
59
40
55
37
34
23

52
18
52
18
52
18
41

40
_
83
30
83
30
83
30
81
30

12
12
12

15
15

12
12

22
22

24
_
_
95
39
95
39
95
39
81
33
13

18
_
_
91
52
90
52
91
52

12

4
3
61
19
61
19
61
19
59
18

32
3
3
9^
32
93
32
93
32
91
32

11

1
1

3
_
51
31
51
31
51
31
26
9

1

6
6

8

_
7

_
15

9
_

W
orkers in establishments providing:
Life insurance.....................................................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Accidental death and
dismemberment insurance...................................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Sickness and accident insurance
or sick leave or both2 ........................................
Sickness and accident insurance......................
Noncontributory plans....................................
Sick leave (full pay,
no waiting period)..........................................
Sick leave (partial pay
or waiting period)...........................................
Long-term disability insurance..............................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Hospitalization insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Surgical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Medical insurance................................................
Noncontributory pians .......................................
Major medical insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Retirement plans4 ................................................
Pensions...........................................................
Noncontributory plans....................................
Severance pay ..................................................
N plans.............................................................
o

2
2

83
34
83
34
83
34
80
30
23
23
23
-

88

64
88

64
88

64
8

10

7

4
4
96
96
96
96
94
93
84
84
76
76
76
-

64
49
63
49
61
48
45
38
34
34
26
-

1

8

3
67
5
67
5
64
5
60
5
15
15
_
25

8
8

6

5
47
47
30
-

100

100

100

100

100

44
37

48
48

94
94

54
52

31
24

13
13

91
91

85
32
27

100
8
8

80

100

21

_

_
61
14
61
14
61
14
51
14
22
22
8

8
8

86

_
-

46
87
47
74
37
35
35
29
_
-

12

21
20

9

21
1

22
21
11
1

16

15

22

10

18
_
5

_
50
32
50
32
50
32
46
27
16
16
14
_
30

_
64

_
_
20

_

20

_

20

_
16
_
2
2
2

1
1

8
8

3
_

12
8
1

6

17

10
5

88

52
19
19

-

12

_

2

_
19

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

49

86

64
50

49
46

49
46

78
72

61
36

66

42

58
53

13
7

66

64

59
47

25

85

47
25

88

6

28

36
29

15
14

35
32

17
4

73
72

29
15

56
40

56
43

35

31
29

41
40

53
49

20

44
25

49
27

21

4

22

16

-

50
19

30
23

15
14

97
79
79

83
16
13

65
_

92
56
55

46
_

85

94

76

56

54
5
5

79
24
15

42
5
5

76

95

22
22

2

5

93
42
39

27

10

5

76
34
33

80

8
8

11

-

-

1
1

74
4
_

96

63

65

91

38

83

94

73

43

57

89

15

75

38

26

17

41

73

55

-

16

-

-

8

2

3
3
3

7

3

2
2
1

36
5
-

-

35
-

14
3
3

10

37
-

21

18

1
10

5

Nonprofessional em
ployees
All workers.........................................................
W
orkers in establishments providing:
Life insurance.......................................... ...........
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Accidental death and
dismemberment insurance...................................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Sickness and accident insurance
or sick leave or both2 ........................................
Sickness and accident insurance.......................
Noncontributory plans....................................
Sick leave (full pay,
n waiting period)..........................................
o
Sick leave (partial pay
or waiting period)...........................................
Long-term disability insurance..............................
Noncontributory plans.......................................

 See footnotes at


end of table.

-

2
2

-

7
7

2 *
2

~

-

-

-

3
3

1
1

-

22

17

12

4

5
5

~

_
-

-

Table 26.

Health, insurance, and retirement plans—Continued

(Percent of professional and nonprofessional employees in nursing homes and related fa c ilitie s w ith specified health, insurance, and retirement plans,1 21 metropolitan areas, May 1976)

Northeast
Type of plan
B
oston Buffalo

South

New
York

Phila­
delphia Atlanta

Balti­
m
ore

North Central

Dallas Miami

Wash­
ington

Chi­
cago

W
est

M
inneCincin­ Cleve­
Kansas apolis- Mil­
St.
nati
land Detroit City
St. waukee Louis
Paul

Ls
o
San
Angeles- Fran- SeattleDenver
Long
cisco- Everett
Beach Oakland

Nonprofessional em
ployees
Hospitalization insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans......................................
Surgical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Medical insurance................................................
Noncontributoiy plans.......................................
Major medical insurance....................................
Noncontributory plans..................................
Retirement plans4 ....................
Pensions............................
Noncontributory plans
Severance pay......
No plans..................

78
33
79
33
79
33
78
33
24
24

22
4

6

84
65
84
65
84
65
51
51
37

98
97
98
97
97
96
82
81
78
78
78

54
45
39
37
37
34

-

_

_

6
6

-

2

70
57

64
4
64
4
56
4
51
4
16
16

56

66

9

-

23

49
15
49
15
49
15
45
15

_

68

90
87
90
87
90
87
90
87
25
25
17

_

2

20
20
7
29

82
58
82
58
75
51
75
51
17
17

88

11

47
73
35
33
33
28

81
53
80
52
76
52
47
27
14
14
9

_

_

_

-

47

86
46

88

4

14

69
41
69
41
64
36
48
41
23
23

21
1
20

49
33
49
33
49
33
19
7
23

22
11
1
20

45

21

31
7
30
7
30
7

25
17

22
1

11
11
11

19
19
14

12
12

4

30

22
44

21
43

_

59
18
59
18
59
18
58
17

86

9

27
83
27
81
27
23
23
19

60
44
60
44
58
42
28
13
28
28
28

14

7

27

27

86

19

3
3
3

80
32
80
32
80
32
78
32
9
9
3

94
40
94
40
94
40
81
36
13

63

6

W

19
19
16

12
8
1

1 Includes those plans for which the employer pays at least part of the cost and excludes legally required plans such as workers’ compensation and social security; however, plans required by State temporary disability
laws are included if the em
ployer contributes m than is legally required or the em
ore
ployees receive benefits in excess of legal requirem
ents. “Noncontributory plans” include only those plans financed entirely by the
em
ployer.
2 Unduplicated total of workers receiving sickness and accident insurance and sick leave shown separately.
3 Less than 0.5 percent.
4 Unduplicated total of workers covered by pension plans and severance pay shown separately.
N TE: Because of rounding, sum of individual items m not equal totals.
O
s
ay




78
39
77
39
78
39
76
38
23
23

12
8

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
The establishments studied were selected from those
which had 20 beds or more when the universe list was
developed from the Master Facilities Inventory by the U.S.
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.
Table A-l shows the number of establishments and
workers estimated to be within the scope of the survey, as
well as the number actually studied by the Bureau.

Scope of survey

The survey included proprietary and voluntary (non­
profit) establishments—
unlicensed facilities as well as those
licensed by the several States-operating as nursing homes
or as personal care homes. Types of establishments covered
by the study include: Skilled nursing care homes, convales­
cent homes, rest homes, personal care nursing homes, and
homes for the aged. Excluded from the survey were: Homes
operated by government agencies (local, State, and Fed­
eral); facilities operated as departments of hospitals; and
facilities established primarily to admit alcoholics, drug ad­
dicts, persons who have mental or communicable diseases,
and the blind.

Method of study

Data were obtained by personal visits of the Bureau’s
field staff to a representative sample of establishments
within the scope of the survey. To obtain appropriate

Table A-1. Estimated number of establishments and employees within scope of
survey and number studied, nursing homes and related facilities, 21 metropolitan
areas, May 1976
Num of establishments2
ber

W
orkers in establishments
W
ithin scope of study

Area1

W
ithin scope of
study

Actually
studied

Full-tim em
e ployees
Total3

Total, 21 areas .....................................................................
Northeast:
Boston....................................................................................
Buffalo ...................................................................................
New York................................................................................
Philadelphia....................................................................
North Central:
Chicago..................................................................................
Cincinnati................................................................................
Cleveland ...............................................................................
Detroit ....................................................................................
Kansas City............................................................................
Minneapolis-St. Paul.................................................................
Milwaukee...............................................................................
St. Louis ................................................................................
South:
Atlanta ...................................................................................
Baltimore................................................................................
Dallas.....................................................................................
Miami.....................................................................................
W
ashington .............................................................................
West:
Denver ....................................................................................
L s Angeles-Long Beach...........................................................
o
San Francisco-Oakland.............................................................
Seattle-Everett.........................................................................

Actually studied

Professional and
Nonprofessional
. technical

3,400

1,222

255,102

24,598

127,321

120,911

355
51
280
235

73
28
76
91

19,923
4,936
33,172
18,223

1,459
523
4,342
1,897

6,808
2,252
17,507
8,399

5,677
3,289
14,601
8,574

279
103
97
162
82
161

94
48
54

20,621
6,912
7,661
15,071
3,944
13,831
10,302
10,613

1,888
621
843
1,172
346
919
728
785

10,342
3,247
3,817
8,566
2,377
4,913
4,061
6,129

9,620
4,272
5,601
7,507
2,833
7,406

45

4,898
6,695
8,603
3,886
6,401

627
575
1,045
518
569

3,047
3,884
5,707
2,677
3,308

2,503
3,382
4,064
2,164
5,204

42
116
75
56

5,469
31,016
12,207
10,718

556
3,299
1,096
790

2,485
17,554
6,063
4,178

3,833
8,242
5,074
5,403

66
42
70
39
61

86
150
63
89
148
44
65

28
36
62

20

72
527
229

122

6,210
5,452

1 Standard M
etropolitan Statistical areas as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget through February 1974. For definitions of areas, see tables

2 - 22 .
2 Includes only those establishments with at least 20 beds at the time of reference of the universe data.
3 Includes executive and administrative employees, members of religious orders, part-time employees, and others excluded from the Full-time employee categories
show separately.
n
N TE Because of rounding, sum of individual items m not equal totals.
O :
s
ay




50

tions similar to those performed by employees under their
supervision were included only in those occupations in
which the occupational description was specifically de­
signed to include such workers.
Occupations were chosen from two major employment
categories: Professional/technical workers—
including head,
general duty, and licensed practical nurses; dietitians; and
physical and occupational therapists; and nonprofessional
workers-including nursing aids, cooks, ground keepers,
housekeepers, food service helpers, laundry workers, nurs­
ing home cleaners, and maintenance building workers.

accuracy at a minimum cost, a greater proportion of large
than of small establishments was studied. In combining the
data, however, all establishments were given an appropriate
weight. All estimates are presented, therefore, as relating to
all establishments in the industry, excluding only those
below the minimum size at the time of reference of the
universe data.

Establishment definition

An establishment is defined for this study as a single
physical location where nursing and/or personal care is
provided. An establishment is not necessarily identical with
a company, which may consist of one establishment or
more. The terms establishment, facility, and home are used
interchangeably in this bulletin.

Wage data

Information on wages relates to straight-time hourly
earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for work
on weekends, holidays, and late shifts as well as the value of
room, board, or other perquisites provided in addition to
cash payments. Cost-of-living bonuses were included as part
of the workers’ regular pay. Nonproduction bonus pay­
ments, such as Christmas or yearend bonuses, were ex­
cluded.
A verage (m ea n ) h o u rly rates o r earnings for each occupa­
tion or category of workers were calculated by weighting
each rate (or hourly earnings) by the number of workers
receiving the rate, totaling, and dividing by the numbers of
individuals. The hourly earnings of salaried workers were
obtained by dividing straight-time salary by normal rather
than actual hours.

Employment

Estimates of the number of workers within the scope of
the study are intended as a general guide to the size and
composition of the industry’s labor force, rather than as
precise measures of employment. Estimates of total
employment include full-time, part-time, executive, and
administrative employees as well as members of religious
orders. Volunteers were not considered as employees.

Full time and part time employees

Employees hired to work a regular weekly schedule were
considered full-time workers; those hired to work a sched­
ule calling for fewer weekly hours than the establishment’s
schedule for full-time employees in the same general type
of work were considered part-time workers.

Data on weekly hours refer to the predominant work
schedule for full-time production workers employed on the
day shift.

Occupations selected for study

Supplementary benefits

Occupational classification was based on a uniform set
of job descriptions designed to take account of variations in
duties within the same occupation among nursing homes
located in the same area or different areas. (See appendix B
for these descriptions.) The criteria for selection of the oc­
cupations were: The number of workers in the occupation,
the usefulness of the data in collective bargaining, and ap­
propriate representation of the entire job scale in the indus­
try. Apprentices, learner^ beginners, trainees, and handi­
capped, temporary, and probationary workers were not re­
ported in the data for selected occupations. Regularly em­
ployed part-time workers were included for the selected
occupations and wage data are presented separately for
these workers. Supervisors and working supervisors who
spend less than 20 percent of their time performing func­

Supplementary benefits in an establishment were con­
sidered applicable to all full-time professional and nonpro­
fessional workers if they applied to half of such workers or
more in the establishment. Similarly, if fewer than half of
the workers were covered the benefit was considered non­
existent in the establishment. Because of length-of-service
and other eligibility requirements, the proportion of work­
ers receiving the benefits may be smaller than estimated.




Scheduled weekly hours

P aid h o lid a ys. Paid holiday provisions relate to full-day and

half-day holidays provided annually.
P aid vacation s. The summaries of vacation plans are limited

to formal arrangements and exclude informal plans where­
by time off with pay is granted at the discretion of the
51

employer or supervisor. Payments not on a time basis were
converted; for example, a payment of 2 percent of annual
earnings was considered the equivalent of 1 week’s pay. The
periods of service for which data are presented represent
the most common practices, but they do not necessarily
reflect individual establishment provisions for progression.
For example, changes in proportions indicated at 10 years
of service may include changes which occurred between 5
and 10 years.

provides the employees with benefits which exceed the re­
quirements of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to formal
plans which provide full pay or a proportion of the work­
er’s pay during absence from work because of illness; infor­
mal arrangements have been omitted. Separate tabulations
are provided for (1) plans which provide full pay and no
waiting period, and (2) plans providing either partial pay or
a waiting period.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete
or partial payment of doctor’s fees. Such plans may be
underwritten by a commercial insurance company or a non­
profit organization, or they may be a form of self-insur­
ance.
Major medical insurance, sometimes referred to as ex­
tended medical or catastrophe insurance, includes plans de­
signed to cover employees for sickness or injury involving
expense which exceeds the normal coverage of hospitaliza­
tion, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to plans
which provide regular payments for the remainder of the
retiree’s life. Data are presented separately for retirement
severance pay (one payment or several over a specified pe­
riod of time) made to employees on retirement. Establish­
ments providing both retirement severance payments and
retirement pensions to employees were considered as having
both retirement pensions and retirement severance plans;
however, establishments having optional plans providing
employees a choice of either retirement severance payments
or pensions were considered as having only retirement pen­
sion benefits.

H ealth , insurance , an d re tire m e n t plans. Data are presented

for health, insurance, pension, and retirement severance
plans for which the employer pays all or a part of the cost,
excluding programs required by law such as workers’ com­
pensation and social security. Among plans included are
those underwritten by a commercial insurance company
and those paid directly by the employer from his current
operating funds or from a fund set aside for this purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form of life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of
insurance under which predetermined cash payments are
made directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly basis
during illness or accident disability. Information is pre­
sented for all such plans to which the employer contributes
at least a part of the cost. However, in New York and New
Jersey where temporary disability insurance laws require
employer contributions,1 plans are included only if the em­
ployer (1) contributes more than is legally required, or (2)
1The temporary disability insurance laws in California and
Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.




52

Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions
The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to
assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed
under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to
establishment and from area to area. This permits the grouping of occupational wage rates
representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on inter establishment and
interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau’s job descriptions may differ
significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other
purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’s field staff is instructed to exclude
members of religious orders, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, and handicapped,
temporary, and probationary workers.

Professional and technical employees

Dietitian

A professionally educated person who has a college de­
gree with a major in nutrition, or qualifying experience in
nutrition and management of food preparation and service.
Does at least on e of the following: (a) Plans menus, (b)
plans modifications of the normal diet for persons needing
special diet treatment, (c) instructs patients and/or employ­
ees in principles of nutrition and modifications of the nor­
mal diet, and (d) is responsible for selecting, training, and
supervising nonprofessional personnel who handle, prepare,
and serve food. In addition, usually performs several or all
of the following duties: Purchasing or requesting food,
equipment and supplies; inspecting the purchases received;
inspecting work areas and storage facilities for sanitation
and safety; maintaining food cost controls; and coordinat­
ing dietary services with other units.
E xclu des food service supervisors who are concerned
with day-to-day operations of preparing and serving meals
but who do not apply the principles of nutrition to meal
planning.

General duty nurse

A registered professional nurse who gives nursing care to
patients in a nursing home: Utilizes special skill, knowledge,
and judgment in observing and reporting symptoms and
condition of patient. Gives medication and notes reactions.
Maintains records on patient’s condition, medication, and
treatment. Assists the physician with treatment. May set up
equipment, prepare the patient, etc. May spend part of the
time instructing, supervising, or assigning duties to student
nurses, practical nurses, and nursing aids. May instruct pa­
tients and family. May assume some or all of the functions
of the head nurse in absence. May bathe and feed acutely ill
patients. May take and record temperatures, respiration,
and pulse.

Licensed practical nurse

Under supervision, performs selected and delegated nurs­
ing tasks in the care of patients (or residents). Duties in­
volve m o st o f th e fo llo w in g : Measuring and administering
simple medications as directed; applying simple dressings;
administering enemas, douches, perineal care, and other
treatments as directed; reporting general observations of pa­
tients’ condition; setting up treatment trays; and taking and
recording temperature, pulse, and respiration.
E xclu des practical nurses supervising other practical
nurses and receiving additional compensation for such
supervisory responsibilities.



Physical therapist

Treats disabilities, injuries, and diseases through the use
of massage, exercise, and effective properties of air, water,
heat, cold, radiant energy, and electricity, according to pre­
scription of a physician. May instruct students, interns, and
nurses in methods and objectives of physical therapy and
may supervise physical therapy aids. May consult with
other therapists to coordinate therapeutic programs for in­
dividual patients. Normally requires training in approved
53

school of physical therapy. Must be licensed in the State
where practicing.

Nonprofessional Employees

Nursing aid
Head nurse

Assists the nursing staff by performing routine duties in
the care of patients. Performs several of the following pa­
tient care services: 'Bathes bed patients or assists them in
bathing. Cares for patients’ hair and nails. Feeds or assists
patients to eat and brings patients between-meal nourish­
ment. Assists patients with bedpans and urinals. Keeps rec­
ords of patients’ food intake and output when ordered.
^Assists patients in undressing and provides nursing home
clothing, storing patients’ clothing and valuables. Assists pa­
tients in walking and transports patients to various rooms
by means of wheelchair or stretcher. Cleans and sterilizes
instruments and equipment. Makes occupied beds. May
clean rooms or equipment upon discharge of patients. May
take and record temperature, pulse, and respiration rate.

(Charge nurse)
Directly supervises and coordinates the activities of nurs­
ing personnel, including all registered professional nurses, in
a nursing home: Assigns patient care duties to (professional
and nonprofessional) nursing personnel and supervises and
evaluates work performance. Periodically visits patients to
insure optimal care and to ascertain need for additional or
modified services. Supervises the execution of doctors’ or­
ders and related treatments and the maintenance of nursing
records. Assists in the orientation of new personnel. Insures
the availability of supplies and equipment. Identifies nurs­
ing service problems and assists in their solution. May give
direct nursing care in selected situations (i.e., performs
duties of general duty nurse). May spend part of time super­
vising or instructing student nurses. May be responsible for
ward 24 hours a day in the sense that evening and night
nurses report to this nurse and this nurse is responsible for
assigning duties on other shifts.
E xclu des nurses who spend more than half their time in
the central supply unit or in instruction in the classroom,
and those who are given the title of assistant head nurse or
who receive extra pay as assistant supervisor.

Cook

Prepares, seasons, and cooks, by appropriate method,
soups, meats, vegetables, desserts, and other foodstuffs,
such as sauces, gravies, and salads. Excludes food service
supervisors and head cooks who exercise general supervision
over kitchen activities.

Grounds keeper

Occupational therapist

(Caretaker, grounds; gardener)

Plans, organizes, implements, and/or directs medically
oriented occupational therapy program to facilitate rehabil­
itation of persons mentally or physically impaired. Identi­
fies and selects activities—
utilizing creative and manual arts,
recreational and social aids, suited to individual’s physical
capacity, intelligence level, and interests— assist the pa­
to
tient in developing maximum independence in activities of
daily living. Teaches skills and techniques including inter­
personal and group process skills, to facilitate and influence
patient’s participation in program activities and goals. Eval­
uates progress, attitude, and behavior as related to patient’s
potential.^ Consults with other members of rehabilitation
team to coordinate therapeutic activities of individual pa­
tients. May direct activities of one or more assistants or
volunteer workers. May lecture to medical and nursing stu­
dents on phases of occupational therapy. Normally requires
training in an approved school of occupational therapy and
registration by the American Occupational Therapy Associ­
ation.
E xclu des the chief occupational therapist and those who
spend more than 20 percent of their time supervising other
occupational therapists in nursing homes where more than
one occupational therapist is employed.



Maintains and protects grounds surrounding buildings.
Duties involve m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g : Mowing lawns; trim­
ming hedges; raking and burning leaves and refuse; trim­
ming driveway and sidewalk edges; and, in winter, shoveling
snow from driveways and sidewalks and spreading sand,
salt, or ashes on icy surfaces to prevent slipping. May plant
and maintain flower beds or perform other landscaping
duties.

Housekeeper

Supervises the work of cleaning personnel of the estab­
lishment and usually performs some of the cleaning work.
Duties involve m o st o f th e fo llo w in g : Assigning cleaning
duties to workers, giving out supplies and equipment, and
inspecting work to determine that prescribed standards of
efficiency and cleanliness are met. May be in charge of
linens, cleaning equipment, and supplies, and take periodic
inventories, and may assign certain patients (or residents) to
assist employees in the cleaning work.
54

Food service helper

Cleaner, nursing home

Performs one or more of the following unskilled kitchen
duties: Cleans worktables, meat blocks, refrigerator, and
grease trays; sweeps and mops kitchen floors, obtains and
distributes supplies and utensils; and watches and stirs
cooking foods to prevent burning. Carries dirty utensils to
be washed and returns cleaned utensils and polished silver
to proper place in kitchen. Cleans pots and kitchen utensils.
Washes dishes by hand or machine. Carries out garbage.
Delivers food trays to patient or resident floor and collects
dirty dishes from trays. Assists in setting up trays. Dishes
up food. Cuts, peels, and washes fruits and vegetables.
Makes toast and beverages.

Cleans and services establishment premises. Performs one
or more of the following duties: Cleans, mops, and waxes
floors. Dusts furniture and equipment. Cleans window sills,
empties trash baskets, and arranges furniture and equip­
ment in an orderly fashion. Scours and polishes bathtubs,
sinks, mirrors, and similar equipment, and replenishes sup­
ply of soap and towels. Polishes brass and cleans and pol­
ishes glass panels in doors and partitions. Keeps utility stor­
age rooms in good order by cleaning lockers and equip­
ment, arranging supplies, and sweeping and mopping floors.
Performs a variety of related duties.
Maintenance worker, building

Laundry worker

(Building mechanic; building repairer)
Performs one or a combination of the nonsupervisory
duties required to operate the establishment’s laundry facil­
ities. Examples of such duties are: Operating washing or
dry-cleaning machines, pressing garments or flat-work by
hand or machine, operating an extractor to remove mois­
ture from material, and marking and sorting garments or
flat-work.




Keeps the physical structure of buildings in good repair
by performing painting, carpentry, and other maintenance
duties, and making minor repairs to mechanical equipment
usually found in such buildings. Is moderately skilled in the
use of the tools of various building trades rather than spe­
cializing in one trade.

55

Industry Wage Studies
The most recent reports providing occupational wage
data for industries included in the Bureau’s program of in­
dustry wage surveys since 1960 are listed below. Copies are
for sale from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Gov­
ernment Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or from
M anufacturin g

Basic Iron and Steel, '1972. BLS Bulletin 1839
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1975. BLS Bulle­
tin 1939
Cigar Manufacturing, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1796
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1944
Corrugated and Solid Fiber Boxes, 1976. BLS Bulletin
1921
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1935
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1763
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1972. BLS Bulletin
1803
Fluid Milk Industry, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1871
Footwear, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1946
Hosiery, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1863
Industrial Chemicals, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1768
Iron and Steel Foundaries, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1894
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1835
Machinery Manufacturing, 1974-75. BLS Bulletin 1929
Meat Products, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1896
Men’s and Boy’s Separate Trousers, 1974. BLS Bulletin
1906
Men’s and Boy’s Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Night­
wear, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1901
Men’s and Boy’s Suits and Coats, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1843
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1914
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1973-74. BLS Bulletin 1912
Nonferrous Foundries, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1952
Paints and Varnishes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1739
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1719
Petroleum Refining, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1948
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1975. BLS Bulletin
1923
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1844
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1969. BLS Bulletin
1694
Structural Clay Products, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1942
Synthetic Fibers, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1740
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1757



any of its regional sales offices, and from the regional of­
fices of the Bureau of Labor Statistics shown on the inside
back cover. Copies that are out of stock are available for
reference purposes at leading public, college, or university
libraries, or at the Bureau’s Washington or regional offices.
M a n u fa ctu rin g - C o n tin u e d

Textiles, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1945
Wages and Demographic Characteristics in Work Clothing
Manufacturing, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1858
West Coast Sawmilling, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1704
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1970. BLS Bulletin
1728
Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1908
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1974.
BLS Bulletin 1930
N on m a n u fa ctu rin g

Appliance Repair Shops, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1936
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1876
Banking, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1862
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1583
Communications, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1954
Contract Cleaning Services, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1916
Contract Construction, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1911
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1972. BLS
Bulletin 1797
Department Stores, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1869
Education Institutions: Non teaching Employees, 1968-69.
BLS Bulletin 1671
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1834
Hospitals, 1975-76. BLS Bulletin 1949
Hotels and Motels, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1883
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 16451
Life Insurance, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1791
Metal Mining, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1820
Motion Picture Theatres, 1966. BLS Bulletin 15421
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1976. BLS Bulletin
1964
Scheduled Airlines, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1951
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, 1970. BLS Bulle­
tin 1712

1 Bulletin out of stock.

Directory of National Unions
and Employee Associations
1975
Bulletin 1937
Directory:
Lists names and addresses o f—
• National and international unions
• State labor organizations
• Professional and public employee associations
Lists names of officers and key officials,
Publication and convention information,
and membership and number of locals.

Factbook:
Developments in the labor movement,
1974-75
Structure of the labor movement
Level, trend, and composition of membership
Extensive statistical appendixes
Bureau of Labor Statistics
U. S. Department of Labor

Directory Supplement:
Our looseleaf format for the 1975 Directory
will permit the replacement of Part II —
AFL-CIO departments, State organizations
and councils; other major labor organizations;
and individual unions and associations-in
the autumn of 1977. The availability of this
Supplement for purchase will be announced.

Order Form
Please send_____
copies of BLS Bulletin
1937, “ Directory of
National Unions and
Employee Associations,
1975“ Stock No. 029-001 02023-6, at $.2.75 each.
(25 percent discount for
order of 100 copies or
more mailed to one
address.)
Mail to nearest BLS
Regional Office or Supt.
of Documents.
□ $_____ Remittance
enclosed. (Make checks
payable to Superintend­
ent of Documents.)
□ Charge $_____ to
my Deposit Account No

Name

Superintendent
of Documents
U. S. Government
Printing Office
Washington, D. C. 20402

Firm or Organization
Street Address
City and State

Official Business

Zip Code

Penalty for private use, $300

For Prompt Shipment, Please Print or Type Address on Label Below
Name
Firm or Organization
Postage and Fees Paid
_______________________________________________________________________
U. S. Government
Street Address
Printing Office
_______________________________________________________________________ 375
City and State
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_______________________________________________________________________ Book Rate
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Book




☆

U.S. G OVERN M EN T PRINTING OFFICE : 1977

0 -2 4 1 -0 1 6

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
REGIONAL OFFICES

Region I

Region V

1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: (617) 223-6761

9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn Street
C hicago, III. 60604

Phone: (312) 353-1880

Region II

Region VI

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: (212) 399-5405

Second Floor
555 G riffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: (214)749-3516

Region III

Regions VII and VIII*

3535 Market Street
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: (215)596-1154

911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: (816)374-2481

Regions IX and X**

Region IV
1371 Peachtree Street, NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: (404)881-4418




450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415)556-4678

Regions VII and VIII are serviced by Kansas City
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20212

Postage and Fees Paid
U.S. Department of Labor
Third Class Mail

Official Business
Penalty for private use, $300




Lab-441


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102