View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

L J l , 3,'

I(o3

Dayton & M o n tg o m e ry Co.

f

P u blic L ib rary

OCT 141969
DOCUMENT COLLECTION

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY




FOOTWEAR
MARCH 1968

B ulletin No. 1634
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY
FOOTWEAR
M ARCH 1968

B ulletin No. 1634
July 1969
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
George P. Shultz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STA T ISTIC S
Geoffrey H. Moore. Com missioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 2 0402 - Price 75 cents







Preface
This bulletin sum m arizes the re su lts of a B ureau
of L abor S tatistics survey of w ages and supplem entary
benefits in the footw ear m anufacturing in du stry in M arch
1968. Inform ation is rep o rted sep arately for m ajo r p ro d ­
uct branches in the industry. S eparate re le a se s w ere
issu ed e a rlie r, usually w ithin a few m onths of the payroll
period studied, for the following States and a re a s.
M en's G oodyear-w elt d re ss shoes
M aine
B rockton, M ass.
W isconsin
W om en's cem ent-p ro cess (conventional-lasted) shoes
M aine
B oston-L ynn, M ass.
H averhill, M ass.
L aw rence-L ow ell, M ass.
W o rcester, M ass.
S outheastern New H am pshire
New York, N. Y.
A rkansas
M issouri
Los A ngeles-L ong Beach, Calif.
M isse s' and ch ild ren 's G oodyear-w elt shoes
S ou theastern- Pennsylvania
Copies of these re le a se s a re available from the B ureau
of L abor S tatistics .W ashington, D.C. , 20212, or any of its
regio nal offices.
This study was conducted in the B u reau 's Office of
W ages and In d u strial R elations. The analy sis in this bu l­
letin was p rep ared by C harles M. O' Connor in the D ivi­
sion of O ccupational W age S tru ctu res. F ield w ork for the
survey was d irected by the A ssistan t R egional D irecto rs
for O perations.
O ther re p o rts available from the B u reau 's prog ram
of in du stry wage studies, as w ell as the a d d re sse s of the
B u reau 's eight regional offices, a re listed at the end of
this bulletin.




iii




Contents
S u m m ary -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Industry c h a ra c te ris tic s -____________________________________________________________________
P ro d u c ts__________________________________________________________________________________
L o catio n ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Size of e sta b lish m e n t_____________________________________________________________________
U nionization______________________________________________________________________________
O ccupations and s e x --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------M ethod of wage p ay m en t_________________________________________________________________
A verage hourly earnin gs ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------O ccupational e a rn in g s _______________________________________________________________________
E stab lish m en t p ra c tic e s and supplem entary wage p ro v isio n s______________________________
Scheduled weekly h o u rs __________________________________________________________________
P aid holidays -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------P aid v a c a tio n s-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------H ealth, in su ran ce, and pension p la n s ___________________________________________________
P aid funeral le a v e ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------T ables:
A verage hourly earnin gs:
1. By selected c h a ra c te ris tic s _____________________________________________________
E arn in gs distribu tio n:
2. Footw ear in du stry _______________________________________________________________
3. M en's G oodyear-w elt d re s s s h o e s ---------------------------------------------------------------------4. M en's G oodyear-w elt w ork s h o e s ----------------------------------------------------------------------5. M en's c e m e n t-p ro c e ss s h o e s ____________________________________________________
6. W om en's ce m e n t-p ro c e ss (conventional-lasted) sho es___________________________
7. W om en's L ittlew ay (including McKay) s h o e s____________________________________
8. M isse s' and c h ild re n 's ce m e n t-p ro cess (conventional-lasted)shoes ___________
9. M isse s' and c h ild re n 's G oodyear-w elt shoes __________________________________
10. M o ccasin -co n stru cted shoes with hand-sew n p lu g _______________________________
O ccupational earnin gs:
M en's G oodyear-w elt d re ss shoes—
11. All e sta b lish m e n ts____________________________________________________________
12. By size of com m un ity_________________________________________________________
13. By size of e sta b lish m e n t______________________________________________________
14. By size of estab lish m en t and size of com m un ity_____________________________
15. M ain e--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------16. B rockton, M ass ______________________________________________________________
17. W isconsin _____________________________________________________________________
M en's G oodyear-w elt w ork shoes—
18. All e s ta b lish m e n ts____________________________________________________________




v

Page
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
8
9
10
10
11
12
12
13
13
14
16
17
18
20
22
24
26

Contents— Continued
Page
T ables— Continued
O ccupational earn in g s— Continued
M en’s c e m e n t-p ro c e ss shoes—
19. All e sta b lish m e n ts------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------W om en's c e m e n t-p ro c e ss (conventional-lasted) shoes—
20. A ll e sta b lish m e n ts____________________________________________________________
21. By size of com m un ity-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------22. By size of e sta b lish m e n t______________________________________________________
23. By size of estab lish m en t and size of com m unity______________________________
24. M ain e--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------25. Boston—Lynn, M ass ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------26. H av erh ill, M ass --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------27. L aw rence—Low ell, M ass -------------------------------------------------------------------------------28. W o rcester, M ass _____________________________________________________________
29. S outheastern New H a m p sh ire -------------------------------------------------------------------------30. New York, N. Y _______________________________________________________________
31. A rkan sas --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------32. M isso u ri ----33. Los A ngeles—Long Beach, C a lif ______________________________________________
W om en's L ittlew ay (including McKay) shoes—
34. All e s ta b lish m e n ts-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------M isse s' and c h ild re n 's c e m e n t-p ro cess (conventional-lasted) shoes—
35. All e sta b lish m e n ts____________________________________________________________
M isse s' and c h ild re n 's G oodyear-w elt shoes—
36. A ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s ______________________________________________________________________
37. S ou theastern P ennsylvania ----------------------------------------------------------------------------M o ccasin -co n stru cted shoes w ith hand-sew n plug—
38. A ll e s ta b lish m e n ts____________________________________________________________
E stab lish m en t p ra c tic e s and supplem entary wage prov isio ns:
39. M ethod of wage paym ent _________________________________________________________
40. Scheduled weekly hours _________________________________________________________
41. P aid holidays ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------42. P aid vacations -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------43. H ealth, in su ran ce, and pension p la n s ___________________________________________
44. P aid funeral leave -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------A ppendixes:
A. Scope and m ethod of s u rv e y _________________________________________________________
B. O ccupational d escrip tio n s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




vi

27
28
31
33
34
36
38
40
41
43
44
46
48
49
51
53
54
55

56
58

59
59
60
61
62
63
64
69

Industry Wage Survey—

Footwear, March 1968
level recorded in A pril 1965. 3 Annual p ro ­
duction of footw ear (except slip p ers and ru b ­
b er footw ear) during this perio d totaled 536
m illion p a irs in 1965, 548 m illion in 1966,
and 504 m illio n in 1967, the la te st y ear for
which inform ation is available. 4

Sum m ary
S traig h t-tim e earnin gs of production
and related w o rk ers in the footw ear m anu fac­
tu ring in du stry averaged $ 2 .10 an hour in
M arch 1968. O ne-fourth of the 172, 381 w o rk ­
e rs covered by the B u reau 's s u rv e y 1 had
earnin gs at or n ear the $1.60 an hour F e d e ra l
m inim um wage in effect for m anufacturing
estab lish m en ts at the tim e of the s u r v e y .
E arn in gs of the re s t of the w o rk ers w ere
w idely d isp e rse d . This d isp e rsio n of e a rn ­
ings reflected c h a ra c te ris tic s of the in du stry
such as its wide d istrib u tio n am ong sections
of the country w here pay levels v ary , the
wide range of w o rk er sk ills u tilized , and the
extensive use of piece ra te s as a m ethod of
wage paym ent.
■ Workers in New E ngland, accounting
for 36 p e rc e n t of the in d u stry 's em ploym ent,
averaged $ 2 .2 4 an hour. Among the other
regions studied se p a ra te ly , wage levels ranged
from $ 2 .1 4 in the G reat L akes to $ 1 .8 8 in
the B o rd er S tates. 2
W orkers in plants p rim a rily m anu fac­
tu ring w om en's ce m e n t-p ro c e ss (conventionallasted) shoes accounted for slightly m o re than
tw o-fifths of the in d u stry 's labor force and
averaged $2. 12 an hour. In the o ther seven
in d u stry branch es studied se p a ra te ly , hourly
av erag es ranged from $1.90 to $ 2 .2 6 . E a rn ­
ings levels also varied by size of com m unity,
size of estab lish m en t, and occupation.
W ork schedules of 40 hours a week
applied to nine-ten ths of the production and
o f f i c e w o rk e rs. F ootw ear m an u factu rers
typically provided both groups of w o rk ers with
6 or 8 paid ho lidays, annually; 1 week of
vacation pay after 1 y e a r of se rv ic e and at
le a st 2 w eeks afte r 5 y e a rs; and various health
and in su ran ce ben efits. Slightly m ore than
tw o-fifths of the production and office w o rk ­
e rs w ere covered by re tire m e n t pension plans.

In the nonrubber footw ear in d u stry ,
productivity advanced in 6 of the 9 y e a rs b e ­
tw een 1957 and 1966. G ains in output p er
m an-ho ur for all em ployees in this in du stry
v aried con sid erab ly from y ear to year; the
annual ra te , how ever, averaged 1.2 p ercen t—
sub stantially below the 3. 7 p ercen t rep o rted
for m anufacturing in d u stries as a whole. 5
S ubstitute products (notably ru b b ercanvas footw ear) and i m p o r t e d shoes a re
among the com p etitors of d o m estically p ro ­
duced leath er footw ear. F ro m 1965— do­
67,
m estic production of vulcanized shoes and
slip p ers with fab ric uppers equaled ap p ro x i­
m ately 25 p ercen t of d o m estically produced
non ru b b er footw ear; 6 im p o rts of non rubb er
footw ear equaled 14 p e rc e n t of dom estic p ro ­
duction in 1965, 15 p ercen t in 1966, and
22 p ercen t in 1967. 7
Such com petition encourages m o d ern ­
ization of e q u i p m e n t , developm ent of new
p ro d u cts, and im provem ent in m e t h o d s of
o p e r a t i o n . Innovations and im provem ents
1 See appendix A for scope and method of survey. Earn­
ings data in this bulletin exclude premium pay for overtim e and
for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
^ For definition of regions, see appendix A table, footnote 1.
Date of a similar survey conducted by the Bureau, see
Industry Wage Survey: Footwear, April 1965, BLS Bulletin 1503
(1966).
Current Industrial Reports, Shoes and Slippers, Series
M 31A(67)-13, U. S. Bureau of the Census.
5 Source: Indexes of Output Per Man-Hour: Selected In­
dustries, 1939 and 1947-67 (BLS Bulletin 1612, pp. 66-68, 1968),
and Indexes of Output Per Man-Hour for the Private Economy,
1947-67 (March 1968 supplemental release to BLS Bulletin 1249),
and unpublished data.
6 Op. c it ., Current Industrial Report, M 31A(67)-13, p. 13
and M 31A(66)-13, p. 10.
^ U. S, Imports of Footwear (Other Than Rubber) Including
Vinyls, 1965-1967, U. S. Department of Com m erce, Business and
Defense Services Administration, March 1968.

Industry C h a ra c te ristic s
• F ootw ear m anufacturing plants cov­
ered by the survey em ployed 172,381 p ro d u c­
tion w o rk ers in M arch 1968—alm o st the sam e




1

2
contributing to in c re a se d savings in l a b o r
cost and im proved efficiency in recen t y ears
include: (1) Injection m olding m achines that
autom atically m old p la stic shoe bottom s, in ­
cluding heel and sole, d ire c tly to a leath er
o r synthetic upper; (2) im proved vulcanizing
equipm ent th at autom atically m olds a com ­
plete rubb er shoe bottom onto le a th e r o r fab ­
ric uppers; (3) new techniques of th e rm a la s t­
ing and h e a t-se ttin g m achines t h a t speed
lasting o p e ra tio n s; (3) autom atic heel-attaching
and h e e l-trim m in g m achines; (5) m achines
that com bine pulling and lasting op eratio ns;
(6) conveyors that rep laces racks and baskets
fo rm e rly used to m ove m a te ria ls and shoes
in p ro c e ss; (7) com puters th at control con­
veyor sy stem s for d istrib u tin g and storing
shoes; and (8) the developm ent of m an-m ade
m a te ria ls used as a sub stitute for le a th e r in
shoe up p ers. 8
P ro d u c ts . The in d u stry m akes a wide
v a r i e t y of shoes in m any com binations of
siz e s, sty les, and sh ap es,.an d by se v e ra l d if­
fere n t m ethods of con struction . 9 D ata in this
re p o rt a re tabulated se p a ra te ly for eight in ­
d u stry b ra n c h e s, to gether a c c o u n t i n g for
seven -eigh ths of the in d u stry 's lab or fo rce.
C lassificatio n of estab lish m en ts into th ese
branch es was based on the p r e d o m i n a n t
m ethod of co n stru ctio n (bottom ing, i. e. , the
m eans by which the outsole is attached to the
rem ain d er of the shoe) and type of shoe m an ­
ufactu red— m en 's (d re ss and w ork), w om en's,
m is s e s ', c h ild re n 's and in fan ts'. P lan ts en­
g a g e d p rim a rily in m anufacturing w om en's
cem e n t-p ro c e ss (conventional-lasted) shoes
accounted for slightly m o re than tw o-fifths
of the in d u stry 's production w o rk ers; another
o n e-six th w ere in plants p rim a rily m aking
m en 's G oodyear-w elt d r e s s shoes. P lan ts
m aking m i s s e s ' a n d c h ild re n 's c e m e n t p ro c e ss (conventional-lasted) sho es, account­
ing for about 6 p ercen t of the in d u stry 's w ork
fo rc e, h a d the highest e m p l o y m e n t level
am ong the o ther six in d u stry branch es studied
sep arately .
L ocation. F our of the seven regions
studied se p a ra tely accounted for slightly m ore
than th re e -fo u rth s of the w ork force: New
England, th re e -e ig h th s; M iddle A tlan tic, onesixth; and the G reat L akes and M iddle W est,
approxim ately one-eighth each. S i n c e the
A pril 1965 survey , em ploym ent ro se 54 p e r ­
cent in the P acific S tates, the sm a lle st r e ­
gion in em ploym ent. E m p l o y m e n t levels
am ong the other regions w ere up 28 p e rcen t
in the B o rd er S ta te s, 16 p e rc e n t in the South­
w est, and 3 p e rc e n t in New England; and down
17 p e rc e n t in the G reat L akes, 11 p e rc e n t in
the M iddle A tlan tic, and 3 p e r c e n t in the
M iddle W est.



The regio nal m ix v aried sub stantially
among the eight in d u stry b ranch es studied.
New E ngland, for e x a m p l e , accounted for
n early 86 p ercen t of the e m p l o y m e n t in
plants p rim a rily m anufacturing m o c c a s i n con structed (hand-sew n plug) s h o e s , com ­
p ared with only 14 p ercen t of the w o rk ers in
plants m aking m is s e s ' and c h ild ren 's cem entp ro cess (conventional-lasted) shoes. A pprox­
im ately tw o-fifths of the w o rk ers in plants
m a k i n g w om en's cem en t-p ro cess (conven­
tio n al-lasted ) shoes and slightly m ore than
o n e-th ird of those in p l a n t s m aking m en's
G oodyear-w elt d r e s s s h o e s w ere in New
England.
As in 1965, w o rk ers in m etropo litan
a re a s 10 accounted f o r slightly m ore than
tw o-fifths of the in d u stry 's lab or fo rce. C o r­
responding p r o p o r t i o n s ranged from oneeighth in the Southw est to m o re than ninetenths in the P acific region; in New England
and the M iddle A tlantic regio n, the p ro p o r­
tions w ere on e-h alf and fo u r-fifth s, re sp e c ­
tively. V ariations b y in d u stry branch are
shown below:
Item

Percent of workers
in metropolitan areas

Men's Goodyear-welt dress s h o e s ----------------------Men's Goodyear-welt work s h o e s ----------------------Men's cement-process s h o e s -----------------------------Women's cem ent-process (conventionallasted) s h o e s ---------------------------------------------------Women's Littleway (including McKay)
shoes---------------------------------------------------------------Misses' and children's cem ent-process
(conventional-lasted) shoes-----------------------------Misses' and children's Goodyear-welt
shoes---------------------------------------------------------------M occasin-constructed shoes with
hand-sewn p lu g------ ----------------------------------------

47
15
27
52
28
36
43
19

Size of E stab lish m en t. E stab lish m en ts
em ploying at le a st 250 w o rk ers accounted for
alm o st four-fifth s of the w ork fo rce. In New
E ngland, the p rop ortio n was fo u r-fifth s and in
the M iddle A tlantic region, n early th re e -fifth s.
The prop ortio n of w o rk ers in plants of this
size varied con sid erab ly by in du stry branch:
8 Technological Trends in Major American Industries, BLS
Bulletin 1474, pp. 191—195 (1966). See also "Output Per ManHour in the Footwear Industry, " Monthly Labor Review, April 1966,
pp. 401—404.
9 For descriptions of various shoe construction methods, see
How American Shoes Are Made. United Shoe Machinery Corpora­
tion, Boston, M ass., 1966, or Footwear Construction Definitions,
National Shoe Manufacturers Association, In c., New York, N. Y .,
1963.
19
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined by the
U. S. Bureau of the Budget through April 1967.

3
Item

Percent of workers
in establishments with
250 workers or more

Men's Goodyear-welt dress s h o e s ----------------------Men's Goodyear-welt work s h o e s ----------------------Men's cem ent-process s h o e s -----------------------------Women's cem ent-process (conventional lasted) s h o e s ---------------------------------------------------Women's Littleway (including McKay)
shoes---------------------------------------------------------------Misses' and children's cem ent-process’
(conventional-lasted) shoes-----------------------------Misses' and children's Goodyear-welt
shoes---------------------------------------------------------------M occasin-constructed shoes with
hand-sewn p lu g------------------------------------------------

91
62
83
85
71
76
61
87

U nionization. E stab lish m en ts which
had lab or-m anagem ent co n tracts covering a
m ajo rity of th e ir p r o d u c t i o n w o rk ers a c ­
counted for slightly m ore than on e-h alf of the
in d u stry 's production w o rk e rs. The p ro p o r­
tions of w o rk ers in such estab lish m en ts w ere,
appro xim ately , one-fifth in the B o rd er S tates,
tw o-fifths in New E ngland, on e-h alf each in
the M iddle A tlantic and Southw est reg io n s,
tw o -th ird s in the P a c ific , sev en -ten th s in the
G reat L ak es, and seven -eigh ths in the M iddle
W est. Among the in d u stry branch es studied
se p a ra te ly , the p ro p o rtio n of w o rk ers in union
estab lish m en ts a m o u n t e d to: O ne-fifth in
m o ccasin -c o n stru cted (with hand-sew n plug)
shoe plants; n e a rly th re e -te n th s in w om en’s
L ittlew ay shoe p l a n t s ; tw o-fifths in m en ’s
G oodyear-w elt w ork shoe plants; slightly m ore
than one-half each in m en 's G oodyear-w elt
d re ss shoe and m en 's c e m e n t-p ro c e ss shoe
plants; and betw een th re e -fifth s and tw o -th ird s
in each of the th re e rem aining b ran ch es. The
m ajo r unions in the in d u stry a re the United
Shoe W orkers of A m erica and the Boot and
Shoe W orkers Union, bothA F L -C IO affiliates.
O ccupations and Sex. Shoem aking in ­
cludes the assem b ly of m any se p a ra te p a rts
through a s e rie s of carefu lly con trolled hand
and m achine o p eratio n s. The types of o ccu ­
pations found in shoe fa c to rie s v ary f r o m
those requiring r e l a t i v e l y sh o rt train ing
p e rio d s, e. g. , floor boys and g irls , to highly
skilled jobs such as vam p and whole shoe
c u tte rs. A la rg e num ber of w o rk ers o p erate
vario us cutting, sew ing, la stin g , and bo ttom ­
ing m achines.
W omen, slightly m ore than th re e -fifth s
of the lab or fo rc e , freq uently a re em ployed
in top stitching , fitting , and inspection o p e r­
ation s. M en, on the other hand, a re p re v ­
alent in vario us cutting, lastin g , bottom ing,
and m aintenance jo bs.



M ethod of Wage P aym ent. Incentive
wage sy ste m s, usually based on individual
p i e c e w o r k , applied to sev en -ten th s of the
production w o rk ers (table 39). The p ro p o r­
tions of incentive w o rk ers ranged from about
tw o-fifths in the P a c i f i c region to n early
fo u r-fifth s in the M iddle W est. Among the
in d u stry b ran ch es, incentive w o rk ers c o n sti­
tuted betw een th re e - and fo u r-fifth s of the
em ploym ent. A m ajo rity of the w o rk ers in
n early all of the plant jobs selected for se p a ­
ra te study w ere paid incentive ra te s; o ccu ­
pations w hich w ere usu ally tim e rated included
floor boys and g irls , in sp ecto rs (cro w n ers),
ja n ito rs , arid m aintenance m echan ics. T im e­
rated w o rk ers usually w ere paid under in fo r­
m al sy stem s which determ in ed ra te s p r im a r ­
ily according to an individual's qualifications.
A verage H ourly E arnings
S traig h t-tim e earnings of the 172,381
production w o rk ers covered b y the survey
a v e r a g e d $2 .10 an hour in M arch 1968
(table 1). 11 This level of earnin gs was an
in c re a se of n early 19 p ercen t over the a v e r­
age of $1 .7 7 reco rd ed in A p ril 1965, and
com pared w ith in c re a se s of 17 to 22 p ercen t
in all reg io n s, except the P acific, w here wage
levels ro se 10 p ercen t. 12
The 63,412 m en, about th ree-eig h th s of
the in d u stry 's production w o rk e rs, averaged
$ 2 .3 7 an hour in M arch 1968; the 108,969
w om en averaged $ 1 .9 3 . Wage advantages for
m en over wom en w ere found in all regions
and ranged from 57 cents an hour in New
E n g l a n d to 26 cents in the Southw est and
25 cents in the B o rd er S tates. D ifferences
11 The straight-tim e hourly earnings presented in this bul­
letin are not comparable with the gross average hourly earnings
published in the Bureau's monthly hours and earnings series. The
monthly series combines data for plants primarily manufacturing
nonrubber footwear designed for street, work, play, or sportswear
and for plants making house slippers as their primary product; the
latter group and footwear plants em ploying fewer than 50 workers
were not included in this study. Additionally, unlike the monthly
series, the estimates presented here exclude premium pay for
overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Average earnings were calculated by summing individual hourly
earnings and dividing by the number of individuals; in the monthly
series, the sum of the man-hour totals reported by establishments
in the industry was divided into the reported payroll totals.
The estimates of the number of workers within scope o f the
survey are intended only as a general guide to the size and com*
postion of the labor force covered by this survey. The advance
planning necessary to make the survey required the use of lists
of establishments assembled considerably in advance of data col­
lection. Thus, establishments new to the industry are om itted,
as are establishments originally classified in this industry but found
to be in others at the tim e of the survey. Also om itted are foot­
wear establishments classified incorrectly in other industries at the
tim e the lists were com piled.
12 Op. c it ., BLS Bulletin 1503.

4
in average pay lev els for m en and w om en a re
influenced by se v e ra l fa c to rs, including v a ri­
ations in the d istrib u tio n of the sexes among
estab lish m en ts with differing pay sc a le s and,
as pointed out in the d iscu ssio n of in du stry
c h a ra c te ris tic s , am ong jobs w ith differing
sk ill and pay lev els. D ifferences in av erag es
fo r m en and w om en in the sam e job m ay also
re fle c t m in or differen ces in du ties. To allow
fo r m in o r differen ces in specific duties p e r ­
form ed , job d escrip tio n s u s e d in in du stry
wage survey s usually a re m ore g en eralized
than those found in individual estab lish m en ts.
A lso, earnin gs for m any jobs in the in du stry
a re d eterm in ed larg ely by production at piece
ra te s . V ariation in incentive earnin gs for
individuals o r sex groupings m ay be tra c e a b le
to d ifferen ces in w ork ex p erien ce, w ork flow,
o r o th er fa c to rs which the w o rk er m ay or
m ay not control.
R egionally, av erag e hourly earnings
ranged fro m $ 2 .2 4 in New England to $ 1 .8 8
in the B o rd e r S tates. A verages in the r e ­
m aining regions w ere: G reat L ak es, $ 2 .1 4 ;
P a c ific , $ 2 .1 0 ; M iddle A tlantic, $ 2 .0 5 ; and
M iddle W est, $2. The regional v ariatio n s
in pay levels resu lted p a rtia lly fro m d iffe r­
ences in the type of footw ear produced. O ther
fa c to rs, how ever, including the g en eral dif­
feren ces in pay am ong reg io n s, also w ere
im p ortant.
Among the eight in du stry b ra n ch es,
pay levels ranged from $2. 26 for w o rk ers in
plants predo m inan tly m anufacturing m occasinco n stru cted shoes (with hand-sew n plug) to
$ 1 .9 0 fo r those m aking w om en's L ittlew ay
(including M cKay) shoes. N eith er of th ese
b ra n c h e s, how ever, accounted for m ore than
5 p e rc e n t of the w o rk ers covered by the s u r ­
vey. On the o ther hand, th re e -fifth s of the
w o rk e rs w ere e m p l o y e d in the two m ajo r
b ra n c h e s— w om en's c e m e n t-p ro c e ss (conventio n a l-la ste d ) shoes and m en 's G oodyear-w elt
d re s s shoes— w here ho urly earnin gs averaged
$ 2 .1 2 and $ 2 .1 5 , resp ectiv ely . A v e r a g e
hourly earnin gs since the 1965 su rvey w ere
up app ro xim ately 11 p e r c e n t in w om en's
L ittlew ay (including M cKay) shoes, 16 p e rc e n t
each in m o c c a sin -c o n stru c te d shoes and m en ’s
G oodyear-w elt d re s s sho es, and 19 p e rc e n t
in each of the five rem aining b ran ch es.
E arn in gs relatio n sh ip s am ong b ranch es
differed by location. F o r exam ple, earnings
fo r the m en 's G oodyear-w elt d re ss shoe group
av erag ed 22 cents an hour m ore than those
fo r the w om en's c e m e n t - p r o c e s s (conventio n a l-la ste d ) group in the G reat L akes r e ­
gion ($ 2 .2 8 and $2 .0 6 ) and 15 cents an hour



m o re in New E ngland ($2. 35 and $ 2 .2 0 ); this
relatio n sh ip w as re v e rse d in the M iddle W est,
w here w o rk ers in the w om en's b ranch a v e r­
aged 10 cents an hour m ore than those in the
m en 's b ran ch ($2. 06 and $ 1. 96). P lan t lo ca­
tion contributed to the relativ ely low level of
earnin gs in the m en 's G oodyear-w elt d re ss
shoe bran ch in the M iddle W est. W hereas all
w o rk ers studied in th is group w ere em ployed
in nonm etropolitan a re a s , slightly m ore than
tw o-fifths of the w o rk ers in w om en's cem entp ro c e ss (conv ention al-lasted ) shoe plants w ere
in the h ig h er paying m e t r o p o l i t a n a re a s.
M isso u ri accounted for n early all of the em ­
ploym ent in b o t h in d u stry b ranch es in that
region.
Among the a re a s and S tates studied
se p a ra te ly , averag e ho urly earnin gs ranged
fro m $ 1 .9 0 in w om en’s c e m e n t - p r o c e s s
(conv ention al-lasted ) shoe plants in A rkansas
to $2. 74 in the sam e in d u stry branch in the
New Y ork m etro p o litan a re a . (See individual
a re a ta b le s .) E arn in gs l e v e l s also varied
am ong four production cen ters fo r th is branch
in M assach u setts: $ 2 .2 7 in B oston-L ynn,
$ 2. 31 in H av erh ill, $ 2 .3 2 in L aw rence-L ow ell,
and $ 2 .4 6 in W o rcester.
W orkers in m etro p o litan a re a s a v e r­
aged $2. 17 an hour— 13 cents m ore than those
in sm a lle r com m unities. R egionally, w here
com p ariso ns w ere p o ssib le, m etro p o litan a re a
av erag es w ere fro m 8 to 14 cents an hour
h igh er than those in nonm etropolitan a re a s.
W orkers in estab lish m en ts which had
250 em ployees or m o re av eraged $2. 10 an
h o ur, c o m p a r e d w ith $ 2 .0 7 for those in
sm a lle r p lan ts. This relatio n sh ip , w ith wage
advantages r a n g i n g fro m 8 to 12 cents an
h o ur, h e l d i n 4 o f t h e 5 r e g i o n s p e r ­
m itting co m p ariso n s. In the M iddle A tlantic
region, w o rk ers in plants w hich had few er
than 250 em ployees av eraged 7 cents an hour
m ore than those in la rg e r plants ($ 2 .0 8 and
$ 2 .0 1 ); th is v ariatio n is p a rtly due to the
h eav ier concentration of em ploym ent in sm all
than in larg e plants in the relativ ely high-wage
New Y ork a re a .
The exact influence on w ages of indi­
vidual fa c to rs, such as size of com m unity and
size of estab lish m en t, cannot be iso lated in
th is type survey. T hus, the wage differen ces
noted in the preceding p arag rap h s and in the
following d iscu ssio n of occupational earnings
m ay re fle c t the in terrelatio n sh ip of th ese and
o th er fa c to rs, i n c l u d i n g unionization and
m ethod of wage paym ent.

5

About on e-fou rth of the w o rk ers w ere
paid at o r slightly above the F e d e ra l m in i­
m um wage for m anufacturing e stab lish m en ts,
earning $ 1 .60 but le ss than $ 1 .6 5 an hour
(table 2). A side from this group, individual
earnin gs w ere w idely d isp ersed ; the m iddle
half of the w o rk ers earned betw een $ 1 .6 5 and
$ 2 .3 6 . The p ro p o rtio n of w o rk ers earning
betw een $ 1 .60 and $ 1 .6 5 was high est in the
B o rd er S tates (41 p ercen t) and low est in the
P acific (9 p ercen t). C orresponding p ro p o r­
tions for the in du stry branch es studied se p a ­
ra te ly r a n g e d from tw o-fifths in w om en's
L ittlew ay (including McKay) shoe plants to
o n e-six th in m o c casin -c o n stru cted shoe plants
(tables 3—10).
O ccupational E arnings
A verage hourly earnings of w o rk ers
in a num ber of occupations for eight in du stry
b ranch es a re p re se n te d in tab les 11—38. The
production jo b s, a relativ ely sm all p ro p o r­
tion of those found in the in d u stry , a re a r ­
ranged in the sequence of m ajo r shoem aking
p ro c e sse s and w ere chosen p rim a rily to re p ­
re se n t wage levels for the types of sk ills and
op eratio ns used in m anufacturing footw ear. 13
F o r a m a jo rity of th ese jobs p erm ittin g com p a risio n , wage levels w ere 15 to 25 p e rc e n t
high er in M arch 1968 than in A p ril 1965.
Cutting shoe uppers and linings— firs t
of the m ajo r o p eratio n s— is usually p erfo rm ed
on m achines. A verage hourly earnings for
vam p and whole shoe m achine c u tte rs ranged
from $3 .0 9 in m is s e s ' and c h ild re n 's Goody e a r-w e lt plants to $2. 11 in plants m aking
w om en's L ittlew ay (including McKay) shoes
in M arch 1968. In the l a t t e r b ran ch , the
num bers- of m en and wom en in the job w ere
about equal; in the o ther in d u stry b ran ch es,
m en su b stan tially outnum bered wom en.
F ittin g o p eratio n s, which typically a re
p erfo rm ed by w om en, involve assem bling and
stitching upper p a rts and l i n i n g s to m ake
com plete shoe u p p ers. F ancy stitc h e rs (who
sew d eco rativ e designs on shoe uppers) w ere
n u m erically m o st im p ortant of the selected
jobs and had average earnings ranging from
$ 1 .8 4 to $ 2. 20 am ong the b ran ch es. P a s te r s ,
b a c k e rs, and fitte rs — also a n u m erically im ­
p o rtan t group— usu ally averaged betw een 7 and
34 cents an hour le ss than fancy s titc h e rs.
L asting o p e ra tio n s, g en erally p e r ­
form ed by m en, include draw ing the com ­
pleted uppers over the la s t (a footlike form )
and attaching the in so le. M achine a s s e m ­
b le rs for the pulling over operatio n averaged
$ 1 .9 6 to $2. 54 an hour am ong the branch es



for which data could be shown. W here com ­
p a riso n was p o ssib le, p u llo v er-m ach in e o p e r­
a to rs usually averaged from 31 to 58 cents
an hour m o re than m achine a sse m b le rs for
p u llover. A verage earnings for side la s te rs
and toe la s te rs ranged from $2.11 to $ 2 .9 4
and from $ 2 to $ 2 .8 6 , resp ectiv ely , am ong
the in d u stry b ran ch es.
Bottom ing m eth ods, as p o i n t e d out
p rev io u sly , differ by type of shoe c o n stru c ­
tion. G oodyear stitc h e rs in m en 's G oodyearw elt d re ss shoe plants averaged $ 2 .7 6 an
h o ur, 19 cents m ore than th e ir co u n terp arts
in m en 's G oodyear-w elt w ork shoe plants and
9 cents le ss than those in m is s e s ' and ch il­
d re n 's G oodyear-w elt shoe p lan ts. Sole atta c h e rs in plants m aking w om en's cem entp ro c e ss shoes (conventional-lasted) averaged
$2. 65, com pared w ith $2. 34 in plants m aking
m is s e s ' and ch ild ren 's cem en t-p ro cess (con­
v en tio n al-lasted ) shoes.
Among the few occupations for which
data a re p resen ted for both sex es, m en u su ­
ally had higher average earnings than wom en.
This app ears to re su lt as m uch from d iffe r­
ences in the d istrib u tio n of the sexes am ong
estab lish m en ts with d issim ila r pay le v e ls, as
from v ariatio n s in earnings betw een m en and
wom en in the sam e estab lish m en t. F o r ex­
am ple, am ong plants m anufacturing w om en’s
cem en t-p ro cess (conventional-lasted) shoes in
M isso u ri, m en em ployed as vam p and whole
shoe m achine cu tters averaged 57 cents an
hour m o re than wom en in this job (table 32).
Of the 21 plants v isited , how ever, only 11 em ­
ployed both m en and wom en in the job; in
six of th ese, w om en averaged m ore than m en.
O ccupational averages a re p resen ted
by size of com m unity (tables 12 and 21) and
size of estab lish m en t (tables 13 and 22) for
the two m ajo r i n d u s t r y b ran ch es, m en 's
G oodyear-w elt d re ss s h o e s and w o m e n ' s
cem en t-p ro cess (conventional-lasted) shoes.
N ationally, and a m o n g regions p erm ittin g
c o m p a risio n s, occupational a v e r a g e s w ere
usu ally higher in m etro p o litan a re a s than in
nonm etropolitan a re a s — a p a tte rn f o u n d in
m any o ther in d u strie s.
By size of estab lish m en t, such a d ef­
in ite p a t t e r n did not e x i s t . In w om en's
cem ent-p r o c e s s (conventional-lasted) shoe
p lan ts, for exam ple, em ployees in the la rg e r
estab lish m en ts (250 w o rk ers o r m ore) a v e r­
aged m o re than those in sm a lle r p l a n t s in
” Wage data for five office clerical jobs also are presented
in a number of these tables.

6

New E ngland, but in the M iddle A tlantic r e ­
gion and in the nationw ide co m p ariso n s, this
relatio n sh ip was r e v e r s e d . The app aren t
anom aly— sm all estab lish m en ts paying m o re ,
on the av e ra g e , than la rg e estab lish m en ts—
can be p a rtly explained by a d isp ro p o rtio n ate
d istrib u tio n of em ploym ent in the two e sta b ­
lish m en t size categ o ries am ong regions and
a re a s w ith d ifferen t pay le v e ls. To illu s ­
tr a te , the relativ ely high paying New Y ork
m etro p o litan a re a accounted for n e a rly onehalf of the M iddle A tlantic re g io n 's em ploy­
m ent in w om en's c e m e n t-p ro c e ss shoe plants
having few er than 250 w o rk ers and for only
about one-eighth of the em ploym ent in la rg e r
p lan ts. O ccupational av erag es a re p re sen ted
for m etro p o litan and nonm etropolitan a re a s
by size of estab lish m en t in tab les 14 and 23.
E a r n i n g s of individuals p erform ing
sim ila r task s also v aried w ithin the sam e
estab lish m en t, p a rtic u la rly for jobs typically
paid under incentive wage sy ste m s. In m any
in sta n c e s, the h i g h e s t paid w o rk er earned
at l e a s t 50 cents an hour m o re than the
low est paid w o r k e r in the sam e job and
estab lish m en t.
E stab lish m en t P ra c tic e s and S upplem entary
Wage P ro v isio n s
D ata also w e r e obtained for production
and office w o rk ers on c e rta in estab lish m en t
p ra c tic e s , including w ork schedules and s e ­
lected supplem entary wage benefits such as
paid ho lidays, paid v aca tio n s, and h e a l t h ,
in su ra n c e , and re tire m e n t pension p lan s.
Scheduled W eekly H o u rs. W ork sch ed ­
ules of 40 hours a w eek w ere in effect in
plants accounting for nin e-ten th s of the p ro ­
duction and office w o rk ers (table 40). Such
schedules also w ere predo m inan t in each of
the regions studied se p a ra te ly .
P aid H olidays. P aid holidays w e r e
provided to n early all of the production and
office w o rk ers (table 41). The m o st com m on
p ro v isio n s for production w o rk ers w ere 6 full
day s, annually, in the B o r d e r S tates and
M iddle A tlantic regions; and 8 full days in
the f i v e o ther regions studied sep arately .
F o r office w o rk e rs, the m o st com m on p ro v i­
sions for full-d ay holidays w ere 5 or 8 annu­
ally in the Southw est, 6 in the M iddle A tlan tic,
6 o r 7 in the B o rd er S ta te s, and 8 days in
all other regio ns.
P aid V acatio ns. P aid vacatio ns, after
qualifying p erio d s of se rv ic e , w ere provided
by plants accounting for v irtu ally all of the
p r o d u c t i o n and office w o rk ers (table 42).
T ypical vacation p rov isio ns fo r production



and office w o rk ers w ere 1 week of vacation
pay after 1 y ear of serv ice and at le a st 2
weeks after 5 y ears in each of the selected
reg io n s. A pproxim ately on e-h alf of the w ork­
e rs in both groups w ere provided 3 weeks of
vacation pay after 15 y e a rs of serv ice; such
p ro v isio n s w ere found m o st freq uently in the
G reat L akes and M iddle W est reg io n s.
H ealth, In su ran ce, and P en sio n P la n s.
L ife, h o sp italizatio n , and su rg ical in su ran ce
w ere provided by estab lish m en ts em ploying
n in e-ten th s of the production w o rk ers (table
43). M edical in su ran ce and sick n ess and a c ­
cident in su ran ce applied to about seven -tenth s
of the w o rk ers; accid ental death and d ism em ­
b erm en t in su ran ce, to tw o-fifths; and c a ta s ­
trophe in su ran ce, to n early one-fifth. At
le a st p a rt of the cost of all th ese plans was
financed by em ployers; for m o st of the b en e­
fits, how ever, em ployers usu ally paid the
to tal cost. The incidence of health and in ­
su ran ce plans v aried am ong the selected r e ­
gions. The pro p o rtio n s of w o rk ers provided
su rg ical in su ran ce, for exam ple, ranged from
seven -tenth s in the B o rd er S tates to all o r
v irtu ally all in th e Southw est and P acific
regions.
R etirem en t pension p lan s, providing
reg u lar paym ents for the rem ain d er of the
r e tir e e 's life (other than benefits available
under F e d e ra l so cial secu rity ), w ere provided
by estab lish m ents em ploying slightly m o re
than tw o-fifths of the w ork fo rce. P ension
p lan s, n early alw ays financed wholly by em ­
p lo y e rs, applied to th re e -te n th s of the w o rk­
e rs in New England and the M iddle A tlantic
regio n, tw o-fifths in the B o rd er S tates, onehalf in the S o u t h w e s t and P acific S tates,
th re e -fo u rth s in the M iddle W est, and n early
n in e-ten th s in the G reat L akes region.
The pro p o rtio n s of office w o rk ers cov­
ered by such h ealth , in su ran ce, and pension
plans w ere g en erally sim ila r to those of p ro ­
duction w o rk ers. In addition, s i c k leave
plans applied to n early o n e-fou rth of the office
w o rk ers but w ere v irtu ally nonexistent for
production w o rk ers.
P aid F u n eral L eav e. N early on e-h alf
of the production w o rk ers and a s l i g h t l y
sm a lle r p ro p o rtio n of the office w o rk ers w ere
in estab lish m ents p r o v i d i n g paid leave to
attend funerals of im m ediate fam ily m em b ers
(table 44). F o r production w o rk e rs, the p ro ­
po rtion s covered ranged from le ss than onetenth in the P acific region to n early tw ot h i r d s in the M iddle W est; and for office
w o rk e rs, from on e-fou rth in the M iddle A t­
lantic r e g i o n to n e a r l y tw o -th ird s in the
M iddle W est.

Table 1. Average Hourly Earnings: By Selected Characteristics
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o urly e a rn in g s 1 of p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs in fo o tw e a r m a n u fa c tu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts by se le c te d c h a r a c te r is tic s ,
U nited S ta te s and se le c te d re g io n s, M a rc h 1968)
U nited S ta te s 2
New E ngland
N um ber A v erag e N u m b er A v erag e
of
h o urly
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs ea rn in g s w o rk e rs e a rn in g s
A ll w o rk e rs ----------------------------------------------------------------- 172, 381 $2. 10 62, 239 $2. 24
M en ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 63, 412
2. 37 24, 857
2. 58
W o m en -------------------------------------------------------------------- 108, 969
1.93 37, 382
2. 01
P re d o m in a n t type of shoe: 3
M en 's G o o d y e a r-w e lt d r e s s sh o e s --------------------- 29, 133
2. 15 9, 788
2. 35
M e n 's G o o d y e a r-w e lt w o rk sh o e s ----------------------8, 278
2. 04 1, 925
2. 18
M e n 's c e m e n t-p ro c e s s s h o e s ------------------------------2. 21
5, 647
2. 09 2, 581
W o m en's c e m e n t-p ro c e s s
2. 12 31, 380
(c o n v e n tio n a l-la ste d ) sh o e s---------------------- --------- 76, 400
2. 20
W o m en's L ittle w a y (in clu d in g M cK ay) sh o e s -----5, 422
2. 01
1. 90 1 ,984
M is s e s ' and c h ild re n 's c e m e n t-p ro c e s s
(c o n v e n tio n a l-la ste d ) s h o e s ------------------------------2. 02 1, 348
2. 24
9, 916
M is s e s ' and c h ild re n 's
.
.
2. 23
G o o d y ear - w e lt s h o e s ----------------------------------------6, 126
M o c c a sin -c o n stru c te d sh o e s w ith
2. 26 6, 804
2. 28
7, 927
C h a ra c te ris tic

M iddle
N u m b er
of
w o rk e rs

A tla n tic
A v e ra g e
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
$2. 05
29, 839
12, 068
2. 29
17, 771
1 .8 7
-

15, 109
_

1, 740
-

-

2. 12
_

1. 94
-

B o rd e r S ta te s
S o uth w est
G re a t L ak es
N u m b er A v e ra g e N u m b er A v e ra g e N u m b er A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
of
h o u rly
h o u rly
of
w o rk e rs e a rn in g s w o rk e rs e a rn in g s w o rk e rs e a rn in g s
8, 544 $1. 88 9, 348
$1. 93 22, 447 $ 2 . 14
2, 474
2. 06 2, 688
2. 11 6, 673
2. 50
6, 070
1.81 6, 660
1. 85 15, 774
1. 98
-

4, 462
-

-

1. 92
-

-

2, 890
-

-

1. 90
-

M iddle W est
P a c ific
N u m b er A v e ra g e N um ber A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs e a rn in g s w o rk e rs e a rn in g s
18, 550
5, 716
12, 834

$2. 00
2. 24
1. 90
1. 96

2, 208
1, 052
1, 156

6, 927
1, 748

2. 28
2. 27

2, 592

8, 312
1, 235

2. 06
2. 08

9, 111
-

2. 06

1, 616
-

1, 919

1. 99

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

.

_

.

.

.

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2. 17
-

.

-

$2. 10
2. 29
1 .9 3

_

-

S ize of c o m m u n ity :
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s 4 -------------------------------------------N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ----------------------------------------

75, 736
96, 645

2. 17 32,331
2. 04 29, 908

2. 30 23, 875
2. 17 5, 964

2. 06
1. 98

5, 668

1. 90

8, 221

6, 315
1. 91 16, 132

2. 24 4, 128
2. 10 1 4,422

2. 08
1. 98

2, 056

2. 07

S ize of e sta b lish m e n t:
50-249 w o rk e rs ---------------------------------------------------250 w o rk e rs o r m o r e -------------------------------------------

37, 763
134, 618

2. 07 12, 185
2. 10 50, 054

2. 16 12, 243
2. 26 17, 596

2. 08
2. 01

6, 670

1. 89

1, 142
8, 206

1. 86 5, 274
1. 94 17, 173

2. 05 1, 176
2. 17 17, 374

1. 89
2. 01

1, 334

2. 10

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w e ek en d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts .
2 In c lu d es d a ta fo r re g io n s in ad d itio n to th o se show n se p a ra te ly . F o r d e fin itio n of re g io n s an d a r e a s u se d in th is and su b se q u e n t ta b le s , se e ta b le in a p p en d ix A and in d iv id u a l a r e a ta b le s .
3 E s ta b lis h m e n ts w e re c la s s ifie d on the b a sis of th e m a jo r ty p es of sh o e s p ro d u c e d d u rin g the p re c e d in g y e a r. The a ll- w o r k e r s to ta l ab o ve in c lu d e s d a ta fo r e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro d u c in g
o th e r ty p e s of sh o e s in ad d itio n to th o se show n s e p a ra te ly .
4 S ta n d ard M e tro p o lita n S ta tis tic a l A re a s as defin ed by the U. S. B u re a u of th e B u d g et th ro u g h A p ril 1967.
N O T E : D a sh e s in d ic a te no d ata re p o rte d o r d ata th a t do not m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r it e r ia .




00

Table 2. Earnings Distribution: Footwear Industry
(P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n of p ro d u ctio n w o rk e rs by a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a r n in g s ,1 U nited S ta te s an d s e le c te d re g io n s, M arch 1968)
A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1
U nder $ 1 - 6 0 _____________________________________
$ 1. 60 an d u n d e r $1. 65 -------------------------------------$1. 65 and u n d e r $1. 7 0 -------------------------------------$1. 70 and u n d e r $1. 75 -----------------------------------$ 1. 75
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .8 5
$ 1 .9 0
$1. 95
$ 2 . 00
$2. 10
$ 2 . 20
$ 2 . 30
$ 2. 40

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
u n der
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 .8 0 -------------------------------------$ 1 .8 5 -------------------------------------$ 1 .9 0 -------------------------------------$ 1 .9 5 -------------------------------------$2. 00 -------------------------------------$2. 1 0 -------------------------------------$2. 2 0 -------------------------------------$2. 3 0 -------------------------------------$2. 4 0 -------------------------------------$ 2. 5 0 -------------------------------------

$ 2 . 50
$ 2 . 60
$ 2 . 70
$ 2. 80
$ 2. 90
$ 3 . 00
$ 3. 10
$ 3. 20
$ 3 . 30
$ 3 . 40
$ 3 . 50
$ 3 . 60
$ 3. 70
$ 3. 80
$ 3. 90

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
u n der
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$2. 6 0 ------------------------------------$2. 7 0 -------------------------------------$2. 8 0 -------------------------------------$2. 9 0 -------------------------------------$3. 0 0 -------------------------------------$3. 1 0 -------------------------------------$3. 2 0 -------------------------------------$3. 3 0 -------------------------------------$3. 40 -------------------------------------$3. 5 0 -------------------------------------$ 3. 6 0 ------------------------------------$3. 7 0 -------------------------------------$3. 8 0 -------------------------------------$3. 9 0 -------------------------------------$4. 0 0 --------------------------------------

U nited S tates 2
T otal

M en

0. 4
26. 2
6. 0
6. 7
5. 4
4. 2
3. 6
3. 1
2. 7

0. 3
16. 8
4. 0
4. 7

5. 8
4. 4
4. 3
3. 7
3. 2
3. 1
2. 4
2. 1
1. 7
1. 4
1. 4
1. 1
1. 0
.9
.8

4. 0
3. 2
2. 7
2. 6
2. 1
5. 7
4. 6
5. 0
4. 3
3. 8
4. 6
3. 6
3. 1
2. 8
2. 5
2. 6
2. 1
1. 9
1 .9
1. 6

W om en

New
E n g lan d

M iddle
A tla n tic

B o rd e r
S ta te s

0. 4
31. 7
7. 2
8. 0
6. 3
4. 8
4. 2
3. 4
3. 0

0. 4
22. 2
5. 3
6. 4
4. 4
3. 8
3. 4
2. 9
2. 1

0. 2
28. 6
5. 7
6. 7

0. 3
41. 0
7. 3
5. 8

5. 9
4. 3
3 .9
3. 4
2. 8

5 .9
3. 7
4. 3
3. 7
3. 4

4. 8
4. 5
3. 3
3. 0
2. 8
5. 5
3 .9
3. 2
2. 8
2. 4

2. 3
1. 7
1. 5
1. 1
.8
.7
.6
.4
.3
.3

3. 6
2. 6
2. 7
2. 3
1 .9
2. 0
1. 6
1. 4
1. 4
1. 2

.2
.1
.1
.1
.1
.3

7. 9
4. 4
3. 4
3. 0
2. 3
5. 2
4. 4
3. 8
3. 5
2. 9
3. 0
2. 6
1. 8
1. 5
1. 3
1. 1
1. 0
.9
.8
.6
.5
.4
.4
.4
.2

.7
.5
.5
.4
.3

1. 5
1. 1
1. 1
1. 0
.7

T o t a l -----------------------------------------------------------

1. 7
100. 0

4. 1
100. 0

100. 0

1. 1
.9
.9
.8
.6
3. 3
100. 0

N u m b er of w o r k e r s -------------------------------------------A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 — — -------------------—----

172, 381
$ 2 . 10

63, 412
$ 2 . 37

108,969
$1. 93

6 2 ,2 3 9
$2. 24

$ 4 . 00 and o v e r ---------------------------------------------------

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eek en d s, h o lid ay s, an d la te sh ifts.
2 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r th e S o u th ea st re g io n in a d d itio n to th o se show n se p a ra te ly .
3 L e ss th an 0. 05 p e rc e n t.
N O TE: B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m ay not equ al 100.




G re a t
L ak es

M iddle
W est

0. 8
34. 9
5. 7
8. 6

0. 4
16. 7
5. 6
6. 8
6. 9
4 .9
4. 6
3. 7
3. 4
6. 6
5. 7
5. 3
4. 7
3. 6

1. 5
100. 0

2. 9
1. 5
1. 2
.7
.7
.4
.5
.5
.2
.3
.1
(3)
.1
.1
(3)
.2
100. 0

5. 4
3. 6
3. 3
2. 7
3. 4
5. 3
5. 0
4. 0
3 .9
3. 6
2. 5
1. 9
1. 1
1. 0
.5
.7
.6
.4
.4
.2
.2
.1
.1
.3
100. 0

0. 4
30. 8
6. 6
7. 0
4. 3
3. 0
3. 7
3. 1
3. 8

1. 3
100. 0

100. 0

1. 1
100. 0

29, 839
$ 2 . 05

8 ,5 4 4
$ 1 .8 8

9, 348
$ 1 .9 3

22, 447
$2. 14

18, 550
$2. 00

2, 208
$ 2 . 10

S o uth w est

3. 5
2. 6
2. 2
1.9
1. 7
1. 8
1. 2
1. 0
1.1
.9
.7
.5
.4
.4
.3

6. 0
4. 8
4. 5
3. 6
3. 3
2. 7
2. 4
1. 8
1.4
1. 2
.9
1. 0
.7
.6
.4
.4
.3
.3
.2
.1
.5

P a c ific
9. 0
22. 2
12. 0
4. 7
4. 0
3. 2
2. 4
1 .9
5. 4
4. 6
3. 1
2 .9
2. 0
2. 2
3. 2
2. 4
1. 8
1. 4
2. 1
1. 2
1. 3
1. 6
1. 2
1. 2
.5
.4
.4
.3




Table 3. Earnings Distribution: Men's Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes
(Percent distribution of production w orkers by average straigh t-tim e hourly earnings, 1
United States and selected regions, March 1968)
A v erag e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1
U n d er
$ 1 .6 0
$1. 65
$1. 70

$ 1 . 6 0 ---- -----------------------------------—-------— —
an d u n d er $ 1 .6 5 — — -------------------------------an d u n d er $1. 70 — -----------------------------------an d u n d e r $1. 7 5 ---------------------------------------

$ 1 .7 5
$1. 80
$ 1. 85
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1 .9 5
$2. 00
$2. 10
$2. 20
$2. 30
$2. 40

an d
and
and
an d
an d
an d
and
an d
and
an d

under
under
u n d er
u n d er
under
under
u n d er
under
u n d er
u n d er

$ 1 .8 0 --------------------------------------$1. 8 5 --------------- ----------------------$ 1 .9 0 ---------------------------------- ----$ 1 .9 5 —------------------------------------$2. 0 0 ------------------------------—------$2. 1 0 --------------------------------------$2. 2 0 --------------------------------------$2. 3 0 --------------------------------------$2. 4 0 --------------------------------------$2. 5 0 ---------------------------------------

$2. 50
$2. 60
$2. 70
$2. 80
$ 2 . 90

and
an d
an d
an d
an d

u n d er
u n d er
under
under
under

$2. 6 0 --------------------------------------$2. 7 0 --------------------------------------$2. 8 0 --------------------------------------$2. 9 0 --------------------------------------$3. 0 0 ---------------------------------------

$3. 00
$3. 10
$3. 20
$3. 30
$3. 40

an d
an d
and
and
an d

under
u n d er
under
u n d er
under

$3. 1 0 --------------------------------------$3. 2 0 --------------------------------------$3. 3 0 --------------------------------------$3. 4 0 --------------------------------------$3. 5 0 ---------------------------------------

$3. 50
$3. 60
$ 3. 70
$ 3. 80
$3. 90

and
an d
and
an d
an d

u n d er
u n d er
under
u n d er
under

$3. 6 0 --------------------------------------$3. 7 0 --------------------------------------$3. 8 0 --------------------------------------$ 3. 9 0 --------------------------------------$4. 0 0 ---------------------------------------

United States 1

New

Great
Lakes

T o ta l

M en

W om en

E ngland

0.
25.
5.
5.

3
3
3
0

0. 4
17. 2
4. 6
3. 1

0. 3
30. 5
5. 7
6. 1

(J )
8. 1
4. 9
4. 4

5. 2
4. 2
3 .9
3. 3
3. 1
5. 6
4. 5
4. 4
4. 3
3. 1
3. 1
2. 6
2. 2
1. 8
1. 6
1. 7
1. 2
1. 3
1. 0
1. 0
.7
.6
.7
.4
.4

2. 6
3. 2
2. 7
2. 5
2. 6

6. 9
4. 8
4. 7
3. 8
3. 5

5. 4
4. 7
5. 0
5. 0
3. 4
4. 0
3 .9
2. 7
2. 7
2. 4

5. 8
4. 3
4. 0
3 .9
2 .9
2. 5
1. 8
1. 8
1. 1
1. 0

0. 1
20. 6
3. 3
5 .9
3 .8
3. 6
3. 1
2. 8
2. 4
5. 3
3. 5
4. 3
4. 3
4. 0
3. 6
2. 7
3. 0
2. 2
2. 2

2 .8
2. 0
2. 2
2. 1
2. 2

.9
.7
.6
.3
.3
.4
.2
.2
.1
.1

Middle
West

9. 5
4. 6
5. 5
4. 1
3. 6

0. 7
36. 7
4. 7
4. 2
3. 6
3. 0
3. 5
3. 4
5. 4

6. 5
5. 4
5. 4
5. 6
3. 1
4. 0
3. 1
2. 6
2. 7
2. 2

6. 3
6. 4
4. 4
2. 8
2. 2
2. 5
2 .9
1. 5
1 .9
.9

2. 6
1. 5
1. 6
1. 8
1. 5

.9
.5
.1
.5
.1

$4. 00 an d o v e r -----------------------------------------------------

2. 2

1. 3
1. 2
1. 5
1. 0
1. 0
4 .8

.5

1 .9
1 .8
2. 1
1. 4
1. 7
1. 3
1. 2
1. 5
.9
.9
4. 7

T o t a l -----------------------------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b er of w o rk e rs ----------------------------------------------A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1------------------------------------

29, 133
$ 2 . 15

1 1 ,3 9 0
$2. 42

17, 743
$ 1 .9 7

9, 788
$ 2 . 35

6, 927
$ 2 . 28

2, 592
$ 1 .9 6

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e an d fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s, an d la te s h ifts .
2 In c lu d es d ata fo r re g io n s in ad d ition to th o se show n s e p a ra te ly .
3 L e ss th an 0. 05 p e rc e n t.
N O TE: B e c a u se of ro u n din g, su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not e q u al 100.

.9
.8
.5
.5
.5
2. 4

.2
-

.2
.5

Table 4. Earnings Distribution: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Work Shoes

Table 5. Earnings Distribution: Men’s Cement-Process Shoes

(P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n of p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs by a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o urly e a rn in g s , 1
U n ited S ta te s and se le c te d re g io n s, M arch 1968)

(P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n of p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs by a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s ,1
U n ited S ta te s and New E n g lan d re g io n , M a rc h 1968)

A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1

U nited
S ta te s 2

New
E ngland

G re a t
L ak es

T o tal

M en

W om en

0. 1
16. 2
5. 8
11. 1

0. 2
28. 2
7. 5
12.6

0. 3
19. 7
3. 0
5 .7

0. 3
4. 3
6. 9
4. 3

6. 1
5. 2
5. 0
5. 1
2 .9
4. 2
4. 9
3.6
3. 5
2 .4

3 .9
3. 8
3. 1
7 .4
2. 1

12. 0
5. 5
7. 0
2. 4
4. 3

7. 1
5 .4
4. 9
3 .6
3. 8

4. 4
5. 3
4. 7
5. 0
4. 3

4. 9
2. 6
3. 4
3 .4
2. 4

3. 8
3. 4
3. 1
2. 5
2. 9
2. 1
1. 5
1 .4
2. 3
.9
1. 3
.6
.5
.4
.7

U n d er
$ 1 .6 0
$ 1 .6 5
$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 . 6 0 -------------------------------------------------and unde r $ 1 .6 5---------------------------------and unde r $ 1 .7 0----------------,----------------and unde r $ 1. 7 5----------------------------------

$ 1 .7 5
$ 1. 80
$ 1. 85
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1 .9 5

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 .8 0 -------------------------------$ 1. 85---------------------------------$ 1 .9 0 ---------------------------------$ 1 .9 5 ---------------------------------$ 2 . 00---------------------- --------

0. 2
22. 9
6. 7
11. 9
5. 6
4. 6
4. 3
3. 7
2. 4

$ 2 . 00
$ 2 .1 0
$ 2 .2 0
$ 2. 30
$ 2 . 40

and
and
and
and
and

under
unde r
under
under
under

$ 2 . 1 0 -------------------------------$ 2. 2 0---------------------------------$ 2. 30---------------------------------$ 2. 40---------------------------------$ 2 .5 0 ----------------------

5. 0
4. 0
4. 0
3. 5
3. 1

$ 2 .5 0
$ 2 .6 0
$ 2 .7 0
$ 2 .8 0
$ 2 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
under
under
unde r
under

$ 2 .6 0-------------------------- ----$ 2 .7 0 ---------------------------------$ 2 .8 0 ---------------------------------$ 2 .9 0---------------------------------$ 3. 00----------------------------------

3. 2
2. 3
2. 2
1.8
1.7

5. 1
3 .9
3. 4
2. 1
1. 8
6. 0
3. 1
4. 5
3 .4
3 .9
4 .6
3. 3
3. 5
2. 8
2. 5

$ 3. 00
$ 3. 10
$ 3. 20
$ 3. 30
$ 3. 40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3. 10---------------------------------$ 3. 20------------------------------$ 3. 30--------------- ---------------$ 3. 40---------------------------------$ 3. 50----------------------------------

1.2
.9
.9
.9
.5

2. 0
1. 2
1. 2
1. 7
1.1

$ 3. 50
$ 3 .6 0
$ 3. 70
$ 3. 80
$ 3. 90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3. 60------------------------------$ 3 .7 0 ---------------------------------$ 3. 80---------------------------------$ 3. 90---------------------------------$ 4. 00----------------------------------

.7
.4
.3
.2
.2

1. 2
.7
.6
.4
.5

$ 4. 00 and o v e r -----------------------------------------------

.8

1.6

1 .9
1.4
1 .0
.9
.9
.5
.6
.5
.2
(3 )
.3
(3 )
(3 )
.1

T o ta l-----------------------------------------------------N u m b er of w o rk e rs ------- -----------------------------A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1-----------------------------

100. 0
8, 278
$ 2 . 04

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

1. 8
100. 0

3, 861
$ 2 . 20

4 .4 1 7
$ 1. 91

1, 925
$ 2. 18

1, 748
$ 2 . 27

s h ifts.

1 .6
.7
1. 1
.9
1. 0
1. 5
.3
.3
.3
.3
1 .4

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s, and late
2 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r re g io n s in ad d itio n to th o se show n s e p a ra te ly .
3 L e ss th an 0. 05 p e rc e n t.
N O TE: B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u al ite m s m ay not eq u al 100.




A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1

U n ited
S ta te s 2
T o ta l

M en

W om en

0. 7
28. 4
3. 9
5. 1

0. 2
16. 8
3. 0
6. 0

1. 0
36. 0
4. 5
4. 5

O

New
E n g lan d

U n d er
$ 1. 60
$ 1 .6 5
$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 . 6 0 __________________________________
and u n d e r $ 1 .6 5 _______________________
and unde r $ 1 .7 0---------------------------------and unde r $ 1.7 5_______________________

$ 1 .7 5
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .8 5
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1. 95

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
unde r
under
under
under

$ 1. 8 0_______________________
$ 1. 8 5_______________________
$ 1. 90_______________________
$ 1. 95_______________________
$ 2 . 00_______________________

5. 2
5. 8
3. 1
3 .4
3. 0

5. 0
4. 4
3. 0
2. 7
2. 7

5. 3
6. 7
3. 1
3. 9
3 .2

1. 2
22. 9
5. 7
4. 3
4. 5
4. 4
2. 8
2. 4
2. 0

$ 2. 00
$ 2 .1 0
$ 2 .2 0
$ 2 .3 0
$ 2 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

unde r
unde r
under
under
under

$ 2. 10_____ ________________
$ 2 .2 0_______________________
$ 2. 30_______________________
$ 2. 40_______________________
$ 2 .5 0 _______________________

4. 9
5. 0
4 .6
4. 1
2. 6

5. 5
4. 3
4. 4
3. 8
2. 2

5. 5
4. 3
4. 6
4. 5
3. 1

$ 2 .5 0
$ 2 .6 0
$ 2 .7 0
$ 2 .8 0
$ 2 .9 0

and
and
and
and
an d

unde r
under
under
under
under

$ 2. 6 0_______________________
$ 2 .7 0 _______________________
$ 2. 80_______________________
$ 2. 90_______________________
$ 3. 00_______________________

$ 3. 00
$ 3 .1 0
$ 3. 20
$ 3 .3 0
$ 3. 40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 .1 0_______________________
$ 3 .2 0 _______________________
$ 3. 30_______________________
$ 3. 40_______________________
$ 3. 50_______________________

2. 8
3. 5
2. 7
1.7
1. 4
1.7
.9
.9
1. 0
.3

4. 0
6. 1
4. 8
4. 5
3. 3
2. 6
5. 5
4. 4
2. 2
2. 3

3. 0
2. 2
1.6
1.4
.8
.7
.6
.5
.3
.1

3. 8
2. 3
3. 9
2. 9
2. 5
2. 2
1.4
1. 7
1. 1
.4

$ 3. 50
$ 3. 60
$ 3. 70
$ 3. 80
$ 3. 90

and
an d
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3. 60_______ _____________
$ 3 . 70_______________________
$ 3. 80_______________________
$ 3. 90_______________________
$ 4 . 00_______________________

.5
.4

.1
.1
.2
_

.7
.5
.5
.5
.4

$ 4 . 00 and o v e r -----------------------------------------------

1. 8
100. 0

1.1
.8
.3
.9
.5
4. 1

.3

3. 1

100. 0
2 ,2 1 3
$ 2 . 32

100. 0
3, 434
$ 1. 93

100. 0

T o ta L __

_____ ____________ ___ __

N u m b er of w o r k e r s ___________________________
A v erag e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1___________________

.2
.4
.2

5, 647
$ 2 . 09

3. 1
1. 3
1.7
2. 0
.7

-

2, 581

$ 2 . 21

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s,
and la te s h ifts.
2 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r re g io n s in ad d itio n to New E n g lan d .
N O TE: B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not e q u al 100.

Table 6. Earnings Distribution: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes
(P e rc e n t d istrib u tio n o f p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs by a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s , 1
U n ited S ta te s and se le c te d re g io n s, M arch 1968)
A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1

United S ta te s 2
T o tal

M en

New
E ngland

M iddle
A tla n tic

B o rd e r
S tate s

0. 1
23. 7
4. 7
7. 0
4. 6
3. 8
3. 9
2. 9
2. 0

0. 2
25. 4
4. 6
6. 0
8. 6
4. 1
3. 5
3. 0
2. 7

0. 3
38. 0
6. 9
5. 1
5. 5
4. 8
3. 5
3. 4
2. 7

0. 7
41. 5
5. 6
6. 9
4. 5
3. 5
2. 8
2. 4
3. 8

0. 9
22. 1
5. 7
8. 0

5 .9
3. 5
4. 4
3. 5
3. 0

W om en

5. 1
4. 7
4. 1
3. 5
3. 0
3. 1
2. 6
1. 8
1. 8
1. 5
1. 1
1. 3
1. 0
1. 1
.7

4. 3
5. 8
2. 2
3. 3
3. 0

6. 8
5. 8
5. 2
4. 3
3. 8

1. 4
2. 1
1. 7
.4
.6
.8
1. 0
.1
.6
(3)
.3
( 3)
.1
.5

3. 5
2. 2
1. 9
1. 5
1. 4

U nder
$ 1, 60
$ 1 .6 5
$1. 70

$ 1, 60 ------------------------------------------------------and u n d er $ 1, 65 ------------------------------------and u n d e r $ 1 .7 0 ------------------------------------and u n d e r $1. 75 -------------------------------------

$ 1 .7 5
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .8 5
$1. 90
$ 1 .9 5

an d
an d
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 . 8 0 ------------------------------------$ 1 .8 5 ------------------------------------$ 1 .9 0 ------------------------------------$1. 95 ------------------------------------$ 2. 00 -------------------------------------

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.

10 ------------------------------------2 0 ------------------------------------30 ------------------------------------40 ------------------------------------50 -------------------------------------

5 .9
4. 3
4. 4
3. 6
3. 2

$2. 50
$2. 60
$2. 70
$2. 80
$ 2. 90
$ 3. 00
$ 3. 10
$ 3. 20
$ 3. 30
$3. 40
$ 3. 50
$3. 60
$ 3. 70
$ 3. 80
$3. 90

an d
and
and
an d
an d
an d
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$2. 60 ------------------------------------$2. 70 ------------------------------------$ 2 . 80 ------------------------------------$2. 90 ------------------------------------$3. 00 ------------------------------------$3. 10 ------------------------------------$3. 2 0 ------------------------------------$3. 30 ------------------------------------$3. 40 ------------------------------------$3. 5 0 ------------------------------------$ 3. 6 0 ------------------------------------$3. 70 ------------------------------------$ 3 .8 0 ------------------------------------$ 3. 9 0 ------------------------------------$4. 0 0 -------------------------------------

3. 2
2. 5
2. 2
1. 8
1. 5
1. 5
1. 3
1. 0
1. 0
.8
.7
.6
.5
.5
.4

$ 4. 00 and o v e r ---------------------------------------------------

2. 7

100. 0

.3
100. 0

2. 6

T o ta l ----------------------------------------------------------

1. 9
100. 0

6. 0
4. 5
3. 7
2. 9
1. 9
2. 2
1. 7
1. 7
1. 0
.9
.5
.3
.8
.3
.4
.1
( 3)
.2
.1
( 3)
.4

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b er of w o rk e rs -------------------------------------------A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1---------------------------------

76, 400
$ 2. 12

26, 166
$2. 44

50, 234
$1. 95

31, 380
$ 2. 20

15, 109
$2. 12

4, 462
$ 1 .9 2

0. 3
25. 3
5. 5
7. 0
5. 6
4. 0
3. 8
3. 1
2. 6

0. 1
15. 7
3. 2
4. 1

0. 4
30. 4
6. 7
8. 5

4. 1
2. 6
2. 7
2. 5
1. 9
5. 5
4. 4
5. 1
4. 0
3. 6
4. 8
3. 7
3. 3
3. 1
2. 7
2. 8
2. 6
2. 0
2. 2
1 .8

6. 3
4. 8
4. 4
3. 5
3. 0

1. 8
1. 4
1. 3
1. 2
.9
4. 7

6. 1
4. 3
4. 0
3. 4
2. 9
2. 4
1. 8
1. 7
1. 2
.9
.8
.7
.4
.4
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1

3. 7
2. 6
2. 6
2. 3
1. 7
2. 1
1. 6
1. 3
1. 3
1. 1
1. 1
.9
.8
.7
.5

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w ee k e n d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts .
2 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r the S o u th ea st re g io n in a d d itio n to th o se show n s e p a ra te ly ,
3 L e ss th a n 0. 05 p e rc e n t.
NO TE: B e c a u se of ro u n din g, su m s of in d iv id u al ite m s m ay not e q u al 100.




.6
.6
.4
.5
.4

S o u th w est

G re a t
L ak es

4. 9
5. 0
4. 3
3. 3
3. 1

M iddle
W est

P a c ific

0. 3
26. 6
6. 6
7. 3
4. 4
2. 9
4. 0
3. 0
3. 2

0. 1
6. 1
17. 5
13. 9
4. 8
3. 2
4. 0
2. 6
2. 6

6. 1
4. 8
5. 0
4. 0
4. 3
3. 3
2. 6
2. 2
1. 4
1. 3

1. 3
1. 3
.6
.6
.6
.4
.4
.3
.3
.1

.9
1. 2
.7
.8
.4

5. 2
5. 0
3. 7
3. 4
2. 5
2. 1
3. 8
2. 8
2. 4
1. 6
2. 4
1. 5
1. 4
1. 7
1. 5

.6
.4
.5
.4
.2

1. 4
.5
.4
.6
.4

100. 0

.6
100. 0

.7
100. 0

1. 2
100. 0

2, 890
$ 1 .9 0

8, 312
$2. 06

9, 111
$2. 06

1, 616
$ 2 . 17

Table 8. Earnings Distribution: Misses’ and Children’s Cement-Process
(Conventional-Lasted) Shoes

Table 7. Earnings Distribution: Women’s Littleway
(Including McKay) Shoes
(P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n of p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs by a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e
h o u rly e a rn in g s , 1 U nited S ta te s and
New E ngland re g io n , M a rc h 1968)
A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1
U nder
$1. 60
$1. 65
$1. 70

$1.
and
and
and

6 0 ---------------------------------------u n der $1. 6 5 ---------------------u n der $1. 7 0 ---------------------u n d e r $1. 7 5 ----------------------

U nited S tates 2
T o ta l

10

(P e rc e n t d is trib u tio n of p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs by a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e
h o u rly e a rn in g s , 1 U nited S ta te s and
se le c te d re g io n s, M arch 1968)

M en

W omen

New
England

1. 8
34. 5
6. 7
4. 1

1. 4
42. 5
9. 6
5. 0

3. 5
28.8
11. 5
4. 3

U n d er
$ 1 .6 0
$ 1 .6 5
$1. 70

$ 1. 6 0 ---------------------------------------and u n d e r $ 1. 6 5 ---------------------and u n d e r $ 1. 7 0 ---------------------and u n d e r $1. 7 5 ----------------------

2 .6
2. 6
2. 4
1. 5
3. 4

5. 0
2. 7
3. 1
2. 9
2. 5
5. 3
4. 5
3. 5
3. 6
2. 3

2. 8
2. 4
2. 4
2. 7
2. 7
7. 4
4 .8
4. 1
3.9
2 .9
2. 5
2. 0
1. 5
1.9
1. 4

$ 1. 75
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .8 5
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1 .9 5
$ 2 . 00
$2. 10
$2. 20
$2. 30
$2. 40

and
and
and
and
an d
and
an d
and
and
an d

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$2. 50
$2. 60
$2. 70
$2. 80
$2. 90

and
and
and
an d
an d

1. 0
.8
.8
1.6
.3

$3. 00
$ 3 .1 0
$3. 20
$3. 30
$ 3 . 40

.6
.2
.5
.2
.3

$3. 50
$3. 60
$3. 70
$3. 80
$3. 90

A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1

U nited S ta te s 2
T o ta l

M en

W om en

New
E n g lan d

G re a t
L ak es
18. 9
6. 4
6. 0
5. 3
6. 2
2. 5
5. 9
2. 5
8. 7
7. 0
6. 2
3. 6
4. 8

7. 7
5. 9
4. 8
3. 8
2. 3

M iddle
W est

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
u n d er
under
under

$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.

1 0 ---------------------2 0 ---------------------3 0 ---------------------4 0 ---------------------5 0 ----------------------

1. 5
40. 3
8. 8
4. 7
4. 4
2. 7
3. 0
2. 5
2. 7
5. 3
4. 7
3. 8
3. 6
2. 8
2. 4
1. 1
.7
1. 2
.6
.5
.4
.4
.8
.1

$3. 50
$3. 60
$3. 70
$3. 80
$3. 90

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
under
under
u n d er
under

$3. 6 0 ---------------------$3. 7 0 ---------------------$3. 8 0 ---------------------$3. 9 0 ---- ----------------$4. 00 ----------------------

.2
.1
.2
.1
.1

.5
.2
.4
.2
.4

$4. 00 and o v e r ------------------------------------

.4

.8

.2

.5

$4. 00 and o v e r ------------------------------------

.3

T o t a l -------------------------------------------

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

T o t a l -------------------------------------------

100. 0

.9
100. 0

100. 0

1. 5
100. 0

100. 0

.6
1. 3
1. 1
.5
.3
_
.2
.5
.2
.3
100. 0

N u m b er of w o rk e rs ----------------------------A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1------------------

5 ,4 2 2
$1. 90

1, 480
$2. 04

3, 942
$1. 85

1,984
$2. 01

N u m b er of w o r k e r s -----------------------------A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 ?----------------

9, 916
$2. 02

3, 126
$2. 24

6, 790
$1. 92

1, 348
$ 2 . 24

1, 235
$2. 08

1 ,9 1 9
$ 1 .9 9

$ 1 .7 5 and
$ 1 .8 0 and
$ 1. 8 5 and
$1. 90 and
$1. 95 and
$2. 00 and
$2. 10 and
$2. 20 and
$2. 30 and
$2. 40 and
$2. 50 and
$2. 60 and
$2. 70 and
$2. 80 and
$2. 90 and

under
u n der
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
u n d er
under
under
under
under

$ 1 .8 0 ---------------------$ 1 .8 5 ---------------------$ 1 .9 0 ---------------------$1. 9 5 ---------------------$2. 0 0 ---------------------$2. 1 0 ---------------------$2. 2 0 ---------------------$2. 3 0 ---------------------$2. 4 0 ---------------------$2. 5 0 ---------------------$2. 6 0 ---------------------$2. 7 0 ---------------------$2. 8 0 ---------------------$2. 9 0 ---------------------$3. 0 0 ----------------------

$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.
$3.

5. 5
5. 3
4. 7
3. 5
4. 1
2. 4
2. 6
1. 4
1. 6
1. 3
1. 3
1. 2
.5
2. 2
.4

2. 4
.5
.5
1. 0
.3
.2
.1
.3
.3
.2
-

.1
-

1 E x clu d es p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eek en ds, h olidays,
and la te sh ifts.
2 In c lu d e s d ata fo r re g io n s in a d d itio n to New E ngland.
N O TE: B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m ay not equ al 100.




$ 1 .8 0 ---------------------$ 1 .8 5 ---------------------$ 1 .9 0 ---------------------$ 1 .9 5 ---------------------$2. 00 ---------------------$2. 1 0 ---------------------$2. 2 0 ---------------------$2. 3 0 ---------------------$2. 4 0 ---------------------$2. 50 ----------------------

0. 5
28. 2
4. 9
6. 6
5. 1
4. 1
3. 5
3. 6
2. 9
7. 1
4. 8
4 .9
4. 0
4. 6

0. 5
19. 4
3. 8
3. 8
3. 8
3. 2
2. 2
4. 0
2. 1

0. 6
32. 3
5. 4
7 .9
5. 8
4. 6
4. 1
3. 5
3. 3

6. 2
4. 5
7. 1
4. 6
6. 7

7. 5
4. 9
3 .9
3. 7
3. 6

21. 0
3. 5
4. 7
5. 1
3. 9
3. 3
3. 1
1. 9
6. 9
3. 8
4. 3
4. 4
4. 7

under
under
under
under
under

$2. 6 0 ---------------------$2. 7 0 ---------------------$2. 8 0 ---------------------$2. 9 0 ---------------------$3. 0 0 ----------------------

3. 0
2. 5
1. 9
1. 6
1. 1

4. 4
4. 0
3. 1
2. 2
2. 2

1. 3
1. 7
1. 4
1. 3
1. 7

under
under
under
under
under

$3. 1 0 ---------------------$ 3 .2 0 ----------------------$3. 30 ---------------------$3. 40 ---------------------$3. 5 0 ----------------------

1. 0
.9
.9
.3
.4

2. 5
2. 2
2. 0
.6
.8

4. 6
3. 4
4. 1
2. 0
1. 9
1. 5
2. 7
2. 1
.8
.8

2. 3
2. 6
2. 2
1. 7
1. 0

an d
and
and
and
an d

2. 4
1. 7
1. 3
1. 3
.6
.3
.3
.4
.i
.2

1. 1
1. 0
.5
.5
.7

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$3. 6 0 ---------------------$3. 7 0 ---------------------$3. 80 ---------------------$3. 9 0 ---------------------$4. 0 0 ----------------------

.4
.2
.4
.2
.1

.8
.8
.9
.6
.3

.2
.1
( 3)

1. 6
.4
1. 0
.4
.4

.1

.7
.5
.6
.2
.5

0. 5
22. 9
6. 1
14. 6
5. 9
3. 3
3. 3
3. 3
3. 4

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s, and la te sh ifts.
2 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r re g io n s in a d d itio n to th o se show n s e p a ra te ly .
3 L e ss th a n 0. 05 p e rc e n t.
N O TE: B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m ay n o t e q u al 100.

Tabic 9. Earnings Distribution: Misses’ and Children’s
Goodyear-Wclt Shoes

Table 10. Earnings Distribution: Moccasin-Constructed Shoes
With Hand-Sewn Plug

(Percent distribution of production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly earnings, 1
United States and Middle Atlantic region, M arch 1968)
A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1

$ 2. 00
$ 2 . 10
$ 2.20
$ 2. 30
$ 2.40

$ 2. 50
$ 2.60
$ 2.70
$ 2.80
$ 2 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$ 3. 40

and u n d e r
and u n d e r
and u n d e r
and u n d e r
and u n d e r
and u n d e r
and u n d e r
and u n d e r
and u n d e r
and u n d e r

$ 3. 50
$ 3. 60
$ 3. 70
$ 3. 80
$ 3. 90
$ 4. 00

and
and
and
and
and
and

$ 3. 00
$ 3. 10
$ 3. 20
$ 3. 30

0. 1
19. 3
5. 0
5. 3

0 .2
8. 5

3. 6
3. 2

27. 5
6. 0
6. 9

24. 0
7 .6
10 . 8

$ 1 .8 0 ---------------------------------$ 1. 85__________________ —
$ 1 .9 0 ---------------------------------$ 1. 9 5 ----------------------- -------$ 2. 00—-------------------------------

5. 1
5 .6
4. 3
3. 4
2. 8

4 .6
4. 7
4. 4
3 .7
2. 1

5 .4
6. 4
4. 3
3. 2
3. 3

4. 8
7. 9
4. 5
3 .9

$ 2. 10-_____________________

6. 5
5 .7
4. 8
4. 0
3 .6

5. 5
5. 8
5. 8
5 .6
3 .9

7. 2
5 .6
4. 0
2. 9
3 .4

6. 3
4 .9
3 .7
4. 3
2. 8

$ 2 . 6 0 ______________________

4. 2
2. 3
2. 1
1 .4
1 .7

5. 8
3 .4
3. 7
2. 0
2. 3

3. 0
1. 5

.9
.9

1. 3

3. 6
1 .7
2 .6
.5
1. 5

1. 2
1. 0

2. 2

.6
.3
.2
.3
.2

$ 2 . 2 0 ______________________
$ 2. 30------ -----------------------$ 2 . 4 0 ______________________
$ 2 . 5 0 ------------- -------------------$ 2 . 7 0 ---------------------------------$ 2 . 8 0 ______________________
$ 2. 90______________________
$ 3. 00----------------------------------

$ 3. 10______________________
$ 3. 20______________________
$ 3 . 3 0 ______________________
$ 3 . 4 0 ______________________
$ 3. 50 _________ — - —

u n d e r $ 3. 6 0 ______________________
u n d e r $ 3. 70______________________
u n d e r $ 3. 80---------------------------------u n d e r $ 3. 90 ____________________
u n d e r $ 4 . 00______________________
o v e r _____________________________

Total

W om en

2 .6

1 .2
1. 0
.8

2. 4

.9

.4
.9
.3
1. 1
.7

.7
.4

.9
.6
.3

1 .6
.6
1. 2
1. 1
.5

.1
.3
.6
.3
.2

4 .6

8. 8

1 .4

_

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

6. 126
$ 2.23

$ 2 . 52

2 ,6 3 5

3, 491
$ 2 . 02

1, 740
$ 1. 94

.9

.2

-

.3

-

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s, an d la te
2 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r re g io n s in ad d ition to M iddle A tlan tic.
N O TE: B e c a u se of ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u al ite m s m ay n o t e q u a l 100.




New
E n g lan d

T o ta l

M en

W om en

0. 8
1 7.2
10. 6
4. 4

0 .4
10. 0
5. 1
3. 2
3. 8
3. 0
1 .4
2. 3
2. 3

1.1
24. 8
16.4
5 .6

0. 8
18. 0
10. 9
4. 5

6 .4
4. 1
3. 9
2. 1
2. 2

4 .9
3. 3
2. 4
1. 9
1 .8

6. 5
4. 2
3. 7
3. 3
2 .4

U n d er
$ 1 .6 0
$ 1 .6 5
$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .6 0 ....................................................
and unde r $ 1 .6 5-______________________
and u n d e r $ 1. 70_______________________
and unde r $ 1 .7 5_________- _____-____

$ 1 .7 5
$ 1. 80
$ 1 .8 5
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1 .9 5
$ 2. 00
$ 2 .1 0
$ 2. 20
$ 2 . 30
$ 2 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

unde r
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$ 1 .8 0_______________________
$ 1. 85_______________________
$ 1 .9 0 _______________________
$ 1. 95---------------------------------$ 2 . 00-_________-___________$ 2. 10_______________________
$ 2. 20_____________________
$ 2. 30_____ ________________
$ 2 .4 0 _______________________
$ 2 .5 0 ________ ______________

$ 2 .5 0
$ 2 .6 0
$ 2 .7 0
$ 2. 80
$ 2. 90
$ 3 .0 0
$ 3. 10
$ 3. 20
$ 3. 30
$ 3. 40
$
$ 3. 50
$ 3. 60
$ 3 .7 0
$ 3. 80
$ 3. 90

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

unde r
unde r
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$ 2. 6 0 __ __ ____ —____
$ 2 .7 0_______________________
$ 2. 80_______________________
$ 2 .9 0 _______________________
$ 3. 00 ___ ____ -_____ $ 3. 10_______________________
$ 3. 20__________________ —__
$ 3. 30_______________________
$ 3. 40_______________________
$ 3. 50_______________________

3. 5
2 .9
2 .7
3. 0
2. 4

5. 7
4. 2
4. 2
4. 1
4. 4
4. 7
3 .9
3. 7
3 .9
3. 5

1 .9
1. 5
1 .4
2. 0
1. 8

2 .9
2. 3
2 .4
3. 5
3. 1

.9
.7
.4
.4
.5

5. 7
3 .6
3. 7
3. 5
3. 1
3 .4
2. 8
2. 9
3. 1
2 .6
2. 1
1.6
1.4
2. 3
2. 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 3. 60_______________________
$ 3. 70— ___________________
$ 3. 80_______________________
$ 3. 90_______________________
$ 4 . 00__________________-___ -

.9
.9
.7
.9
.6

1.6
1.5
1 .4
1.6
.9
5. 1

.

.3
.2
1
.2
.2

1. 1
1. 0
.8
1. 1
.6

1 0 0 .0

1. 1

U n ited
S ta te s 1

A v erag e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1

A tla n tic

M en

N u m b er of w o rk e rs ---- ------------ - _ -------A v erag e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1__________________
s h ifts.

M id d le

T o tal

U nder $ 1 . 6 0 - — - - ------ —--------$ 1 . 6 0 and unde r $ 1 .6 5---------------------------------$ 1 . 6 5 and unde r $ 1. 7 0---------------------------------$ 1 . 7 0 and unde r $ 1. 7 5---------------------------- —
$ 1.75
$ 1. 80
$ 1 .8 5
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1.95

U nited
S ta te s 1

(Percent distribution of production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly earnings, 1
United States and New England region, M arch 1968)

T„tal

$ 4 . 00 and o v e r

__— -

— ___ —

- -

N u m b e r o f w o rk e rs ___________________________
A v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1____________ ______
s h ifts .

5. 1
3. 5
2 .6
2. 2
2. 3
6. 1
4. 2
4. 0
3. 7
3 .4

2. 2
1.8
1.7
2. 0
1.2

2 .9
100. 0

100. 0

.5
100. 0

100. 0

3. 3

7, 927
$ 2 .2 6

4, 059
$ 2 . 54

3, 868
$ 1. 97

6, 804
$ 2 . 28

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s, and late
2 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r re g io n s in a d d itio n to New E n g lan d .
N O TE: B e c a u se o f ro u n d in g , su m s of in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t e q u a l 100.

Table 11. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— All Establishments
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U nited S ta te s and se le c te d re g io n s , M a rc h 1968)
D e p a rtm e n t, o c c u p a tio n , and se x

U nited S ta te s 2
N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M edian 3 M iddle3
ra n g e

S e le c te d p ro d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s
C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e ---------------------M e n ----------------------------------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------C u tte rs , vam p and w hole sh o e , hand
(29 m e n , 11 w o m en )----------------------------C u tte rs , vam p and w hole sh o e ,
m a c h in e — ---- ----------------------—-----------—
0 n ———
——-----—— -—— — — — ——
—
------- —— ------- ——
W o m e n ------------------------------------------------

431
198
233

$
2. 32
2. 54
2. 13

$
$
1 .7 5 -2 . 74
1 .8 7 -3 . 11
1 .7 3 -2 . 38

N ew E n g lan d
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
N u m b er
of
M
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M ed ian 3 ra niddle
ge 3

G re a t L ak es
N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M ed ian 3 M iddle 3
ra n g e

M id d le W est
N um ber
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M ed ian 3 M iddle 3
ra n g e

$
2. 80
2. 84
2. 68
-

$
2. 82
2. 75
2. 93
-

$
$
2. 2 1 -3 . 29
2 .2 5 -3 .4 1
1 .9 8 -3 . 20
-

109
27
82
-

$
2. 39
2. 85
2. 24
-

$
2. 33
2. 69
2. 20
-

$
$
1 .9 1 -2 . 70
2. 3 1 -3 . 36
1 .8 7 -2 .4 5
-

47
28
19
-

$
2. 11
2. 26
1 .8 9
-

$
1 .9 9
2. 09
1 .9 5
-

$
$
1 .6 5 -2 .3 5
1 .6 0 -2 .7 8
1 .6 9 -2 .0 2
-

40

2. 84

$
2. 15
2. 45
2. 00
2. 85

1 .6 0 -3 .7 8

123
91
32
-

1 ,0 2 5
754
271

2 .9 2
3. 14
2. 29

2 .7 5
3. 07
2. 19

2. 16 -3 . 55
2. 38-3. 77
1 .8 6 -2 . 61

320
319
-

3 .7 6
3. 77
-

3. 75
3. 76
-

3. 1 9 -4 . 31
3. 23—1. 32
-

240
139
101

3. 07
3. 37
2. 65

3.01
3. 35
2. 60

2. 5 6 -3 . 54
2. 9 6 -3 . 74
2. 2 9 -2 .9 1

101
83
18

2. 41
2. 40
2. 44

2. 35
2. 30
2. 39

2 .0 4 -2 . 78
2 .0 5 -2 . 70
2 .0 1 -2 .9 2

1 ,3 7 3

1 .99
1. 84
2. 13
2 .0 7
2. 17
2. 15

1 .8 6
1.70

1. 6 0-2. 17

216
108

2. 39
1 .9 0

2. 25
1. 74

1 .8 8 -2 . 71
1 .6 0 -2 . 14

236

2. 22

2. 14

1 .8 5 -2 . 49

114

192

157
201
201
185

2. 36
2. 32
2 .6 6
2. 61

2.
2.
2.
2.

14
19
56
52

2. 0 3 -2 . 75
1 .8 4 -2 . 66
2. 3 0 -2 . 98
2. 2 8 -2 . 86

140
167
153
150

1 .6 5 -2 . 01
1 .8 6 -2 . 45
1 .9 0 -2 . 57
2. 0 0 -2 . 59
1 .9 9 -2 . 55

1 .6 3
1 .6 0

1 .7 1 -2 . 42
1 .6 0 -2 . 30
1 .7 0 -2 . 44
1 .7 0 -2 . 42

1 .7 6
2. 15
2. 18
2. 24
2. 24

52

2 .0 3
1 .9 3
2. 05
2 .0 2

1 .8 8
2. 18
2. 25
2. 34
2. 33

1 .7 6
1 .7 3

1 .6 0 -1 .8 3

1 .6 0 -1 .9 9

72
82
82
82

1. 72
1. 77
1 .7 5
1 .7 5

1. 61
1. 65
1. 65
1 .6 5

1 .6 0 -1 .7 4
1 .6 0 -1 .8 7
1. 6 0 -1 . 85
1 .6 0 -1 .8 5

2. 18
2. 45
2. 67
2. 18

56
27
15

18
39
58
50

1 .7 5 -2 . 53
1. 8 4 -2 . 64
2. 2 6 -2 .9 5

27
26
-

2. 15
2. 16
-

26

2.
2.
2.
2.

2 .0 3
2. 51
2. 72

2. 06
2. 07
-

1 .9 4 -2 . 34
1 .9 4 -2 . 34
-

2. 72
2. 56
2. 64

27
88
87

2. 3 1 -3 . 62
2. 3 1 -3 . 66
2. 3 9 -2 . 99
2. 4 6 -3 . 58

2 .9 2
2. 61
2. 75

2. 97
3. 03
2. 66
3 .0 3
3. 66
3. 31

3. 05
3. 11
2. 56
2. 87

309
332
257

1. 8 0 -2 . 66
1. 8 8 -3 .0 0
2. 36 -2 . 99
1. 8 5 -2 .7 8
2. 29 -3 . 34
1 .9 6 -3 . 17
2. 14 -3 . 14

79
71
31

108

2. 36
2. 54
2. 65
2. 42

3 .0 7 -1 . 13
2. 8 5 -3 . 7 3

63
73

3. 33
2. 88

3. 19
2. 78

2. 21

3 .2 9

2. 7 0 -3 , 80

59

3. 23

3. 10

2. 3 0 -3 . 42
2. 7 3 -3 . 81

1 .8 3 -2 . 66
1 .7 2 -2 . 28

69

3. 40
3. 27
3. 16

144
59
85
389
439
221
246
33
20
193
69
20
49
81
54

2 .0 4
2. 36
1 .8 2
3. 15

1.79
2. 20
1 .6 5
3 .0 6

1 .6 0 -2 . 36
2 .0 3 -2 . 59
1 .6 0 -1 .9 1
2. 57 -3 . 75

2. 35
2. 52
1 .9 4
3 .9 8

2. 05
2. 48
3. 94

1 .6 6 -2 .7 0
1 .8 8 -2 . 87
3. 5 4 -4 . 27

2 .0 9
2. 03
3. 21

1 .9 5
1.91
3. 15

1 .7 3 -2 .4 9
1 .7 4 -2 . 30
2. 8 8 -3 . 59

3. 26

3. 11

2. 6 2 -3 . 73

30
24
89
100

2. 98

2 .9 5

2. 6 3 -3 . 38

3. 27
3. 82
3. 47
3. 56
3. 40
2. 37
2. 42
2. 28
2. 23
2. 23

3. 04
3. 83
3. 28
2. 44
2. 05
2 .0 5

2. 7 6 -3 . 78
3. 2 2 -4 . 29
_
2. 8 2 -3 . 83
1 .9 9 -2 .6 2
1. 7 0 -2 . 46
1 .7 0 -2 . 46

55
56
14
7
46
16
14
23
11

2. 64
3 .0 7
2. 32
2. 64
2. 83
1 .9 6
1 .9 4
2 .0 7
2. 19

2. 64
3 .0 9
2 .7 7
1 .8 6
1 .9 0

2. 2 5 -3 . 06
2. 5 6 -3 . 51
2. 3 7 -3 . 27
1 .8 5 -2 .0 9
1. 7 5 -2 . 32

F ittin g
F a n c y s titc h e rs (1 ,3 7 3 w o m en , 1 m an)—
P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f it te r s , u p p e r,
hand (50 2 w o m en , 18 m e n ) ----------------S k iv e rs , m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r lin in g s
(497 w o m en , 2 m e n )----------------------------Top s titc h e rs (641 w o m en , 3 m e n )------V^TTipc rs — —
—— ——— — — — — — — ———
W o m e n ------------------------------------------------

499
644
788
769
263
178
50

1

7

2. 04

37
41

2. 30
2. 13

27

2. 02

2 .0 3
1 .8 5

11
7
37
53

2. 02
2. 24
2. 51

2. 22

2. 21

2. 08

1 .9 6 -2 . 51

23
25
18
9
-

2. 16
2. 40
2. 39
2. 04
-

2 .0 3
2. 34
2. 31
_

1 .9 6 -2 . 46
2 .0 3-2 . 82
2. 1 1 -2 .6 2
_
-

B otto m in g and m ak in g
B otto m f ille r s ---------------------------------------M en -------— ------------- —-— -------— --------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------E dge tr im m e r s (382 m e n , 7 w om en) —
G o o d y ear s titc h e rs (433 m e n , 6
w om en) — —------------- —— — ———————
H e e l a tta c h e r s , m a c h in e (212 m e n , 9
w om en) — — —— —------------------- — ----—
In s e a m e rs (231 m e n , 15 w o m e n )---------J o in te r s , m a c h in e ---------------------------------M e n ----------------------------------------------------Rough ro u n d e rs (192 m e n , 1 w om an) —
S h a n k e rs -------------------------------------------------M en ------------- — ------— —-— -— — — —
W om en ------------------—————---------------S o le - le v e le r s , m a c h in e ------------------------Men ----------------------------------------------------S ee fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




2. 76

2. 66

2. 2 1 -3 . 23

38
27
11
126
135

2. 69
2 .9 5
2. 60
2. 97
2. 80
1 .99
2. 19
1. 92
1 .99
2 .0 7

2. 60
2. 74
2. 50
3. 04
2. 67
1 .8 5
2 .0 9
1.77
1 .8 6
1.89

2. 2 1 -3 .0 5
2. 28 -3 . 49
1. 7 5 -3 . 18
2. 25 -3 . 54
2. 2 7 -3 . 15
1 .6 5 -2 . 15
1 .6 6 -2 . 49
1 .6 5 -1 .9 9
1. 6 4 -2 . 22
1. 6 7 -2 . 25

65
75
12
10
59
18
11
7
21
21

1 .6 0 -1 .7 7

2. 5 8 -3 . 85

rvO

2. 23

o

L a stin g
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e -----—— —— — — — — — — — ——
— —
——
B e d -m a c h in e o p e ra to rs (a ll m e n ) -------H e e l-s e a t la s te r s (98 m e n , 10
w om en) -----------— -—-------------- --------------P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e ra to rs (301 m e n ,
8 w o m e n )----------------------------------------------S ide la s t e r s , m a c h in e (326 m e n ,
6 w om en) ------------------------------------ ——----Toe l a s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r s e m ia u to m a tic (241 m e n , 16 w o m e n )----------------

520

_

1 .6 4 -2 . 26

_

2. 1 4 -2 . 78

Table 11. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— All Establishments— Continued
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a r n in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U nited S ta te s and s e le c te d re g io n s , M a rc h 1968)
D e p a rtm e n t, o c c u p a tio n , and sex

U nited S ta te s 2
N um ber
H ourly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M ed ian 3 M iddle 3
ra n g e

S e le c te d p ro d u c tio n
o c c u p a tio n s— C ontinued
F in ish in g

Nev • E n g lan d
N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
M iddle
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M edian
ra n g e 3

G re a t L ak es
H o u rly ea rn in g s 1
N u m b er
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M edian 3 M iddle 3
ran g e

M iddle W est
N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M ed ian 3 M iddle 3
ran g e

B ottom s c o u r e r s ------------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------Edge s e tte r s (204 m e n , 4 w om en) -------R e p a ir e r s ------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------------------------------------T r e e r s -------------------------------------------------------------------M e n -------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -------------------------------------------------------------

159
123
208
329
318
330
104
226

$
2. 31
2. 43
3. 10
1 .94
1 .9 3
2. 18
2. 58
1.99

$
2. 05
2. 17
3. 08
1 .7 6
1 . 76
1 .99
2. 53
1 .8 6

$
$
1 .6 9 -2 . 67
1. 7 0 -2 . 82
2. 5 8 -3 . 56
1 . 6 5 -2 . 08
1 . 6 5 -2 .0 6
1 .6 5 -2 .5 3
1 . 9 4 -3 . 14
1 . 6 4 -2 .1 7

35
35
84
82
77
79
57
22

$
3. 24
3. 24
3. 63
2. 19
2. 13
2. 69
2. 92
2. 09

$
3. 23
3. 23
3. 56
1 .9 5
1 .9 4
2. 76
3.01
1.81

$
$
2. 6 5 -3 . 57
2. 6 5 -3 . 57
2 .9 5 —1. 22
1 .7 6 -2 . 42
1 .7 6 -2 . 37
2. 0 7 -3 . 21
2. 5 2 -3 . 37
1 .6 5 -2 . 33

50
28
79
101
101
136
7
129

$
2. 31
2. 56
2 .9 5
2. 01
2. 01
2. 15
2. 89
2. 11

$
2. 14
2. 47
3. 11
1 .8 7
1 .8 7
2. 00

$
$
1 .7 5 -2 . 71
2. 0 5 -2 . 97
2. 6 0 -3 . 35
1 .7 6 -2 .0 9
1 .7 6 -2 . 09
1 .7 2 -2 . 38

1 .9 9

1 .7 0 -2 . 36

-

M isc e lla n e o u s
F lo o r boys (o r g irls ) ------------------------------------M e n -------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------------------------------------In sp e c to rs (c ro w n e r s ) -----------------------------------M e n -------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------------------------------------J a n i t o r s ----------------------------------------------------------------M e n ---------------------------------— —- —----------------------—
M e c h a n ic s, m a in ten a n c e (a ll m e n ) ---------S e le c te d o ffice o c c u p atio n s

498
156
342
547
205
342
20 5
183
157

1.78
1. 70
1. 82
1.92
2. 10
1. 81
1. 70
1.70
2. 47

1 .70
1. 65
1 .7 8
1 .80
2. 00
1 .70
1 .6 2
1 .6 2
2. 37

1 . 6 3 -1 .8 7
1 . 6 0 -1 . 70
1 . 6 5 -1 .9 1
1 .6 5 -2 .0 8
1 .8 1 -2 . 40
1 .6 5 -1 .9 3
1 .6 0 -1 .7 7
1 .6 0 -1 .7 7
2. 2 2 -2 . 75

159
36
123
158
85
73
50
47
12

1.80
1 .7 2
1 .8 2
2. 02
2. 21
1 .7 9
1 .7 7
1 .7 5
2. 48

1 .7 3
1 .7 0
1 .7 9
1 .9 4
2. 13
1 .7 5
1 .7 0
1 .70
-

1 .6 6 -1 .8 8
1 .6 0 -1 .7 2
1 .6 9 -1 .9 0
1 .7 5 -2 . 23
1 .9 6 -2 . 49
1 .6 0 -1 .9 3
1. 6 0 -1 .8 4
1 .6 0 -1 .8 2
-

125
21
104
129
46
83
46
38
39

1 .9 6
1 .9 6
1 .9 5
2. 16
2. 37
2 .0 5
1 .7 5
1 .7 7
2. 70

1 .9 2
1 .9 5
1 .9 2
2. 02
2. 31
1 .9 5
1 .7 4
1. 75
2. 71

1 .7 8 -2 . 04
1 .7 5 -2 .0 4
1 .8 0 -2 .0 3
1 .8 8 -2 . 31
2. 0 0 -2 . 69
1 .8 5 -2 . 09
1 .6 5 -1 .8 3
1 .6 5 -1 .8 3
2. 3 8 -2 . 95

40
10
30
44
7
37
20
20
18

1. 65
1. 62
1. 66
1 .8 7
1 .9 6
1 .8 5
1 .6 6
1 .6 6
2. 32

C le rk s , g e n e ra l (406 w om en, 1 m an) —
C le rk s , p a y ro ll (a ll w o m e n ) ----------------------S te n o g ra p h e rs, g e n e ra l (a ll w o m e n ) -----T y p is ts , c la s s B (a ll w o m e n ) --------------------

407
177
71
80

1. 79
1.85
1.97
1. 77

1.73
1.80
2. 00
1. 75

1 .6 5 -1 .8 8
1 .6 5 -1 .9 4
1 .8 3 -2 . 10
1 .6 5 -1 .8 0

151
92
19
15

1.84
1 .8 0
2. 05
1. 77

1 .8 0
1 .7 3
2. 03
1.73

1 .6 8 -1 .9 7
1 .6 1 -1 .8 8
1. 9 6 -2 . 16
1 .6 6 -1 .8 4

135
24
25
37

1 .8 0
2. 07
2. 02
1.81

1.75
2. 00
1. 92
1 .8 0

1 .6 5 -1 .8 8
1. 7 8 -2 . 31
1 .8 5 -2 . 02
1. 6 8 -1 .9 0

-

8

1. 89

-

-

16
15
17
18
18

$
1 .9 2
1 .9 3
2. 44
2. 04
2. 04
-

-

$
1 .8 3
1 .8 3
2. 62
1 .9 2
1 .9 2
-

1 .6 2
-

1 .6 2
1 .6 9
1 .6 7
1 .6 2
1 .6 2
2. 37

-

$
$
1 .7 0 -2 . 04
1 .6 9 -2 . 04
1 .9 5 -2 . 74
1 .6 2 -2 . 20
1 .6 2 -2 . 20
-

-

1 . 6 0 -1 . 64

1 . 6 0 -1 . 67
1. 6 5 -1 .9 1
-

1 .6 5 -1 .9 2
6 2 -1 .7 2
1 .6 2 -1 .7 2
2. 1 6 -2 . 42
1.

-

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on w e ek en d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts .
2 In clu d es d a ta fo r re g io n s in ad d itio n to th o se show n s e p a ra te ly .
3 See ap p en d ix A fo r m eth o d u sed to com pute m e a n s, m ed ia n s, and m id d le ra n g e s of e a rn in g s. M ed ian s and m id d le ra n g e s a re not p ro v id e d fo r jo b s w ith fe w e r th an 15 w o rk e rs in a re g io n .
N O TE: D ash es in d ic a te no d ata re p o rte d o r d ata th a t do not m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r ite r ia .




Table 12. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes—By Size of Community

0)

(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o uriy e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U n ited S ta te s and s e le c te d re g io n s, M a rc h 1968)

Sex. d e p a rtm e n t, and o c cu p atio n

U nited
M e tro p o litan
a re a s
N um ber A v erag e
h o urly
of
w o rk e rs e a rn in g s

S ta te s 2
N o n m etro p o litan
a re a s
N um ber A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs e a rn in g s

New E n g lan d
M e tro p o lita n
N o n m e tro p o lita n
a re a s
a re a s
N u m b er A v erag e N u m b er A v erag e
of
h o u rly
h o u rly
of
w o rk e rs e a rn in g s w o rk e rs e a rn in g s

M EN
C u ttin g

G re a t
M e tro p o lita n
a re a s
N u m b er A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs e a rn in g s

_

L ak es
N o n m e tro p o lita n
a re a s
N u m b er A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs e a rn in g s

M iddle W est
N onm et ro p o litan
ar< ja s
N u m b er A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs e a rn in g s

_

14
82

$ 2. 47
3. 24

28
83

$ 2. 26
2. 40

_

22

3. 57
3. 51

24
39
46
31

2. 37
3. 19
2. 69
3. 07

26
37
41
27

2. 16
2. 30
2. 13
2 .0 1

3. 62
2 .9 5
3. 35
3. 17

32
25
15
13

3. 33
3. 14
3. 14
2. 80

55
73
40
32

3. 13
2. 93
2. 95
2. 86

37
52
25
18

2. 51
2. 22
2. 40
2. 39

32

3. 00

36

2 .9 9

39

3. 03

17

2. 44

12
20
8

_

2 .0 4
1. 68
2. 48

.
17
10
9

2. 7 2
1. 88
2. 74

_

10
29
28
30

1. 85
2. 16
1. 72
2. 69

10
7
20
18

1. 62
1. 96
1. 66
2. 32

-

29
-

2. 63
-

19
-

2. 19
-

63
90

2. 26
2. 68

19
18

1. 89
2. 44

135
64
103
111
115

2. 42
1. 94
2. 32
2. 27
2. 6 3

80
44
52
88
70

2. 34
1. 84
2. 45
2. 36
2 .5 9

75
51
51
61
48

2. 36
1. 94
2. 36
2. 37
2. 54

161
141
89
105
102

2. 15
1. 85
2. 08
2. 17
2. 23

114
52
72
82
82

1.76
1. 73
1. 72
1. 77
1 .7 5

1.86
1. 94

62
8

2. 15
2. 55

15
-

2. 06
-

29
52

2. 27
2. 20

72
77

1. 90
2. 05

18
-

2. 04
-

1. 78
1. 78

64
40

1. 91
1. 84

59
33

1. 73
1. 73

35

_

73
48

1. 91
1. 96

30
37

1. 66
1. 85

C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e --------------------------------------C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e, m a c h in e -------------

101
370

$ 2 .8 2
3. 24

97
384

$ 2 . 25
3. 04

70
207

$ 2 . 98
3. 64

21
112

$ 2 . 38
4. 01

57

L a stin g
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e ---------------------P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e ra to rs ---------------------------------Side la s t e r s , m a c h in e -------------------------------------------T oe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r se m ia u to m a tic -----------

78
138
148
105

2. 87
3. 12
2. 83
3. 14

100
163
178
136

2. 28
2. 73
2 .4 3
2. 49

43
53
57
48

3. 40
4. 05
3. 39
3. 51

28
35
29
21

2. 47
3. 07
3. 17
2. 79

22
-

E dge tr im m e r s ------------------------------------------------------G o o d y ear s titc h e r s ------------------------------------------------In s e a m e rs ---------------------------------------------------------------Rough ro u n d e rs ------------------------------------------------------F in ish in g

176
185
102
82

3. 33
2. 98
3. 37
3 .0 2

206
248
129
110

3. 03
2. 61
2. 71
2. 64

69
82
48
33

4. 27
3. 45
4. 09
3. 58

57
52
27
26

E dge s e t t e r s ---- -------- ---------------------------- -------- —
M isc e lla n e o u s

98

3. 50

106

2. 79

52

4. 02

F lo o r b o ys _____________________________ _____________
In sp e c to rs (c ro w n e rs) -------------------------------------------J a n ito r s ______________________________________________
M e ch an ics, m a in te n a n c e ----------------------------------------

47
119
74
58

1.79
2. 20
1.76
2. 52

109
86
109
99

1.66
1. 96
1. 66
2. 45

15
73
27
-

1.81
2. 24
1. 80
-

65
53

2. 03
2. 18

168
218

2. 17
2. 32

-

F an cy s titc h e rs —.......-----------------------------------------P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f itte r s , u p p e r, h a n d ---------S k iv e rs, m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r lin in g s — ------------- —
T op s titc h e rs ----------------------------------------------------------V a m p e r s -----------------------------------------— ------------- . . . . . .
F in ish in g

616
187
233
268
335

2. 01
1. 89
2. 19
2. 10
2. 21

757
315
264
37 3
434

1.97
1. 83
2 .0 7
2. 04
2. 10

R e p a ire r s ___________________________________________
T r e e r s _______________________________________________

137
96

2 .0 3
2. 06

181
130

139
142

1.89
1. 86

203
200

_

$ 3. 55

B o tto m in g and m ak in g

W OM EN
C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a ch in e ------------ . . . . --------------------C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e, m a c h in e ------------F ittin g

M isc e lla n e o u s
F lo o r g irls __________________________________________
In sp e c to rs (c ro w n e rs) -------------------------- ---- ------------

1 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts,
1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication c rite ria.



_

2. 16

Table 13. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes—By Size of Establishment
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e stra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U n ited S ta te s and s e le c te d re g io n s, M a rc h 1968)
U nited S ta te s 2
S ex, d e p a rtm e n t, and o ccup atio n

50-249
w o rk e rs
N u m b er A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

N ew E n gland

250 w o rk e rs
o r m o re
N um ber
A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

M iddle W est

G re a t L ak es

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith—
250 w o rk e rs
5 0 -249
o r m o re
w o rk e rs
A v e ra g e
N um ber
A v e ra g e
N u m b er
of
h o u rly
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

250 w o rk e rs
o r m o re
N um ber
A v e ra g e
h o u rly
of
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

250 w o rk e rs
o r m o re
N um ber
A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

MEN
C utting
27
82

$ 2. 75
3. 22

171
672

$ 2 . 51
3. 13

75
277

$ 2 . 88
3. 81

_
28

_
$ 3 . 01

22
111

$ 2 . 90
3. 46

28
83

$ 2 . 26
2. 40

A s s e m b le r s fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e ___________________
P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e ra to rs __________________________
Side la s t e r s , m a c h in e _____ _____________________ ..
Toe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r se m ia u to m a tic ___
B o tto m in g an d m aking

19
31
34
22

2. 86
3. 11
2. 84
2. 94

159
270
292
219

2.
2.
2.
2.

50
89
58
76

63
76
72
63

2. 99
3. 70
3. 35
3. 28

.
15
12
10

_
3. 00
2. 69
2. 81

22
46
58
43

2. 28
3. 44
2. 90
3. 36

26
37
41
27

2. 16
2. 30
2. 13
2. 01

Edge tr i m m e r s ---------------- -----------------------------------------G o o d y ear s t i t c h e r s _____________________________________
I n s e a m e r s __ __________________________________________
Rough ro u n d e rs ___ ___ _______________ __________
F in ish in g
Edge s e tte r s _ ___________ _______________________

51
62
31
31

3. 18
2. 98
3. 04
2. 68

331
371
200
161

3.
2.
2.
2.

17
73
99
82

112
116
67
51

4. 00
3. 31
3. 87
3. 44

21
32
15
15

3. 26
3. 20
3. 07
2. 83

66
66
40
30

3. 18
2. 88
3. 08
2. 85

37
52
25
18

2. 51
2. 22
2. 40
2. 39

39

2. 89

165

3. 18

68

3. 67

19

2. 63

56

3. 14

17

2. 44

31
28
25

2. 09
1. 73
2. 54

174
155
132

2. 10
1. 70
2. 46

71
43
12

2. 24
1. 75
2. 48

13
22
19

2. 24
1. 73
2. 64

33
16
20

2. 42
1. 82
2. 76

7
20
18

1. 96
1. 66
2. 32

167
97
66
97
83

2. 04
1. 78
2. 15
1. 94
2. 23

1, 206
405
431
544
686

1. 99
1. 87
2. 13
2. 09
2. 14

175
98
135
167
155

2. 46
1. 92
2. 40
2. 38
2. 67

69
67
34
49
39

2. 04
1. 75
2. 12
1. 94
2. 17

167
125
106
117
111

29
94
20
37
38

114
52
72
82
82

1. 76
1. 73
1. 72
1. 77
1. 75

R e p a i r e r s --------------------------------------------------------------------M isc e lla n e o u s

36

1. 89

282

1 .93

65

2. 17

22

1. 84

79

2. 05

18

2. 04

F lo o r g ir ls _____________________________
In s p e c to rs (c ro w n e rs) _________________________________

34
29

1. 99
1. 86

308
313

1. 80
1. 81

121
67

1. 82
1. 7b

26
19

2. 01
1. 87

78
64

1. 94
2. 10

30
37

1. 66
1. 85

C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e ______________________________
C u tte rs , v am p an d w hole sh o e , m a c h in e ____________
L a stin g

M isc e lla n e o u s
In s p e c to rs (c ro w n e rs) — ____________________________
J a n i t o r s ___ _______________ _____ _____ ___________
M e c h a n ic s, m a in te n a n c e ______________________________

WOMEN
F ittin g
F an cy s titc h e r s
— . ------- ----------------- -----------P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f itte r s , u p p e r, h a n d _________
S k iv e rs, m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r lin in g s __________________
Top s titc h e rs ---------------------------------------------------------------V a m p e r s ------ ------- ------------ ---------------------- -----------F in ish in g

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and for w o rk on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s, an d la te s h ifts .
2 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r re g io n s in ad d itio n to th o se show n se p a ra te ly .
N O TE: D a sh e s in d ic a te no d ata re p o rte d o r d ata th a t do not m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r it e r ia .




2.
1.
2.
2.
2.

Table 14. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes—By Size of Establishment and Size of Community
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in se le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U n ited S ta te s an d se le c te d re g io n s , M a rc h 1968)
U nited S tate s 2
Sex, d e p a rtm e n t, o c c u p a tio n ,
and c o m m u n ity siz e

M EN
C utting
C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e, m ach in e :
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s __________________________________
N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ------------ ----- -------------------L astin g

50-249
w o rk e rs
N u m b er A v erag e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

250 w o rk e rs
o r m o re
A v e ra g e
N um ber
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

46

$ 3 .4 1

15
22

3. 29
2. 75

12

2. 80

Edge trim m e rs :
M e tro p o lita n a re a s ----------------- ------- ----------------N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ------------------------------------------G o o d y ear s titc h e rs :
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s -------------------------------------------------N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ------------------------------------------F in ish in g

33
42

3. 24
2. 98

165
206

Edge s e tte rs :
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s -------------------------------------------------N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s — ---------- -------------------------

23

2. 65

17

2. 12

16
15

1. 73
2. 66

P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e ra to rs :
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s __________________________________
N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s __ ------------------------------------Side la s t e r s , m ach in e:
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s -------------------------------------------------N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s -------------------------------------------Toe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r se m ia u to m a tic :
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s __________________________________
N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ------------------------------------------B o ttom ing and m ak in g

-

N ew E n gland

G re a t L a k e s

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith—
250 w o rk e rs
5 0 -249
o r m o re
w o rk e rs
N um ber
A v e ra g e
N u m b er
A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

M iddle W est

250 w o rk e rs
o r m o re
A v e ra g e
N um ber
h o u rly
of
e a rn in g s
w o rk e rs

250 w o rk e rs
o r m o re
A v e ra g e
N um ber
of
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
w o rk e rs

334
338

$ 3 . 27
2. 99

177
100

$ 3. 74
3. 94

24

$3. 10

53
58

$ 3 . 63
3. 30

83

$ 2. 40

122
148
136
156
95
124

3. 14
2. 67

45
31

30

"
3. 10

37

49
23

9
10

3. 50

2. 82
2. 38

2. 70

36

2. 69

41

2. 30
2. 13

3. 14
2. 46

42
21

4. 15
3. 05
3. 43
3. 17
3. 53
2. 79

-

-

20
23

3. 59
3. 16

27

2. 01

3.
2.
2.
2.

37
99
98
53

61
51
72
44

4. 34
3. 61
3. 51
3. 00

17

*
3. 31

3. 37
3. 04

37

2. 51

28

3. 16

28
38
21
45

3. 07
2. 80

52

*
2. 22

82
83

3. 54
2. 83

42
26

4. 04
3. 08

13

2. 86

26

3. 12

17

2. 44

105
69
62
93

2. 22
1. 93
1. 77
1. 65
2. 55
2. 41

59
12

2. 28
2. 04

13

2. 24

17
16

2. 72
2. 09

7

1. 96

23
20

1. 80
1. 68

16

1. 73

12

1. 72

20

1. 66

8

2. 48

13

2. 72

17

2. 66

18

2. 32

158
173

M isc e lla n e o u s
In s p e c to rs (c ro w n e rs):
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s --------- --------------------------------------N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ------------------------------------------J a n ito rs :
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s ---- ----------------- — ----------------N o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s — ------------- --------------------M e c h a n ic s, m ain ten a n c e :
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s __________________________________
N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ------------------------ ----------------See fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




48
84

Table 14. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— By Size of Establishment and Size of Community— Continued
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in se le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U nited S ta te s an d se le c te d re g io n s , M a rc h 1968)
U nited S ta te s 2
S ex, d e p a rtm e n t, o c cu p atio n ,
an d co m m u n ity siz e

50- 24 9
w o rk e rs
N u m b er A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

N ew E n g lan d

250 w o rk e rs
o r m o re
N u m b er
A v e ra g e
of
h o u rly
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s

M iddle We st

G re a t L a k e s

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith—
250 w o rk e rs
50- 249
o r m o re
w o rk e rs
A v e ra g e
N um ber
A v e ra g e
N um ber
of
h o u rly
of
h o u rly
e a rn in g s
w o rk e rs
e a rn in g s w o rk e rs

250 w o rk e rs
o r m o re
N um ber
A v e ra g e
h o u rly
of
e a rn in g s
w o rk e rs

250 w o rk e rs
o r m o re
N u m b e r A v e ra g e
h o u rly
of
w o rk e rs e a rn in g s

WOMEN
F ittin g
F a n c y s titc h e rs :
N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s — — — ------ — - — —
P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f itte r s , u p p e r, hand:
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s _________________________________
N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ____________________________
S k iv e rs , m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r linin gs:
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s ____ ______ _____ —
N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ----- ----- ---------------------- —
T op s titc h e rs :
N o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s ---------------------- ----------------V a m p e r s:
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s -------------------------------------------------N o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s ------------ ------- — --------F in ish in g
R e p a ire rs :
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s — --------------- ---------N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s _____________________________

105
67
-

$ 2 . 04
1. 82
-

38

2. 17

59

1. 98

-

41

-

2. 23

107
68
56
42

$ 2 . 49
2. 41

_
43

1. 97
1. 85

2. 20
2. 05
2. 14
2. 06
2. 20
2. 08

89
46

554
652
157
248

$ 2 . 01
1. 96

205
226
230
314
293
393

1. 93
1. 83

_
118

_
$ 2. 18

114

$ 1. 76

92

1. 88

52

1. 73

2. 35
2. 48

49
24

_
$ 2 . 09
1. 80
2. 16

41
65

2. 45
2. 05

72

1. 72

89
78
93
62

2. 35
2. 42

37

2. 01

68

2. 26

82

1. 77

2. 68
2. 65

25

2. 22

77

2. 23

82

1. 75

20

1. 84

121
161

2. 04
1. 86

52

2. 19
"

18

1. 85

54

"
1. 92

"
18

2. 04

-

2. 02

135
173

1. 89
1. 73

1. 91
1. 73

24

2. 02

"
49

1. 85

30

1. 66

128
185

1. 86
1. 77

62
59
34
33

1. 87

29
35

2. 22
1. 99

37

1. 85

-

-

M isc e lla n e o u s
F lo o r g irls :
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s
- ---- — ------N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s — — ------- -----_ —
In s p e c to rs (c ro w n e rs):
M e tro p o lita n a r e a s -------------------------------------------------N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ----------------------------------------

30
-

15

-

1. 83

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w e ek en d s, h o lid a y s, an d la te s h ifts.
2 In c lu d e s d a ta fo r re g io n s in ad d itio n to th o se show n se p a ra te ly .
N O TE: D a sh e s in d ic a te no d ata re p o rte d o r d ata th a t do not m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r it e r ia .




1. 82
1. 73

13

Table 15. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— Maine
( N u m b e r and a v e r a g e straight-time hourly earnings 1 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h 1968)

S ex, d e p a rtm e n t, and o c c u p a tio n
A ll p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs ______________
S e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ei a

A v e rage
h o u rly
e a rn m gs

$ 1 .6 0
and
u n der
$ 1 .6 5
3, 597 $2. 21 966
1 ,482 2. 49 297
2, 115 2. 01 669

$1. 65
$ 1 .7 0
216
48
168

N u m b e r of w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tr a ig h t- tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s of$ 1 .7 0 $1. 75 $1. 80 $1. 85 $1. 90 $1795 $2. 00 $2. 10 $2. 20 $2. 30 $2. 40 $2. 50 $2. 60 $2. 70 $2. 80 $2. 90 $3. 00 $3. 20 $3. 40 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $4. 00
$ 1 .7 5 $1. 8C $ 1 .8 5 $1. 90 $1. 95 $2. 00 $2. 10 $2. 20 $2. 30 $2. 40 $2. 50 $2. 60 $2. 70 $2. 80 $2. 9C $3. 00 $3. 20 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .6 0 $3. 80 $4. 00 $4. 20
93
72 162 111 168 114 129 144 105 123 102
93 117
129 183 117
99
27
21
99
69
69
21
72
33 24 48
27
66
42
66
48
81
45
54
54
72
57
57
39
51
66
21
27
96 159 69
72
54
51
96
96
48
81
63
60
48
21
69
60
42
18
69
3

$4. 20
and
over
69
66
3

MEN

C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e _____ __ _
In c e n tiv e ------------------------------------------C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e,
------------------------------------------L a s tin g 3
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e __
B e d -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s _____________
P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e ra to rs __________
Toe l a s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r

27 2. 54
24 2 .6 6

3

105 3 .7 2
103 3. 76

-

’
-

-

-

-

-

2. 98
2. 55
2. 70
3. 18
3. 36
20 2. 80

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

10
41
50
17
26
22
6
7

2

-

-

1

-

-

19
15
9
32
30

2
2

1
1

1'
1

3
3

2
2

4
4

:

1

1

1

2

4

_
_

1

-

1

1

_
-

_
-

_
2

_
-

_
-

3

_
2

-

-

-

2

1

2

-

1

*
2

-

3

3

2
4

-

5
5

1

6

3

:
4

2
3
2

2
1

_
_

1
_

2
_

2

i

3

2

2
2

2

-

3
2

-

4
4

-

-

-

“

3

4
4
5

1
1
11
11

1
1
8
8

12
12

10

4

32
2 12

3
-

_
-

1
-

1
-

_
.

1
-

7

2
9

6

;

2

3
1

1

"

“

B o tto m in g and m ak in g 3
B otto m f il le r s --------- ----- ------------------— --------------------In s e a m e rs ____
Rough ro u n d e rs ________________________

2. 18
3.81
2. 84
3. 35
3 .4 3
2. 96
2. 38
1 .99

2

3

1

-

-

-

-

i

i

6
1

1
4

3
3

2

F in ish in g 3
26 2. 92
25 2. 86

E dge
T rfe rs
M isc e lla n e o u s
TanitoV* ^all f \ m m )
M e c h a n ic s, m a in ten a n c e
S e e footnotes at e n d of table.




14

1.65
2 .6 9

8

3

4
6

3
6

Table 15. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— Maine— Continued
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, M a rc h 1968)

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w e ek en d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts . A p p ro x im a te ly 75 p e rc e n t of the p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs c o v e re d by the stu d y w e re p aid on an
in c e n tiv e b a s is .
2 W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d as fo llow s: 9 at $ 4 .2 0 to $ 4 .4 0 ; 5 a t $ 4 .4 0 to $ 4 .6 0 ; 4 a t $ 4 .6 0 to $ 4 .8 0 ; 4 a t $ 4 .8 0 to $ 5 ; and 10 a t $5 and o v e r.
3 A ll w o rk e rs w e re p aid on an in cen tiv e b a s is .
4 W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d as fo llow s: 6 at $ 4 .2 0 to $ 4 .4 0 ; 1 at $ 4 .4 0 to $ 4 .6 0 ; 1 at $ 4 .6 0 to $ 4 .8 0 ; 1 a t $ 4 .8 0 to $ 5 ; and 2 at $ 5 and o v e r.




Table 16. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— Brockton, Mass.1
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s
N u m - A v e r-

S ex, d e p a rtm e n t, and o ccu p atio n
A ll p ro d u c tio n w o r k e r s __
M e n _____________________
W o m e n __________________
S e le c te d O ccu p atio n s
M EN
C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e _______
T i m e __________________________
I n c e n tiv e _____________________
C u tte rs , v a m p an d w hole shoe,
m a ch in e ________________________
In c e n tiv e _____________________
F ittin g
V a m p e r s ------In c e n tiv e _
L a stin g
A s s e m b le r s fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e
(all in c e n tiv e )______________________
B e d -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s ------------------T im e ______________________________
H e e l-s e a t la s t e r s (a ll in c e n tiv e ) —
P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e ra to rs (all
in c e n tiv e ) __________________________
Side la s t e r s , m a ch in e (a ll
in c e n tiv e ) ---------------------------------------Toe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r s e m i­
a u to m a tic __________________________
I n c e n tiv e __________________________
B o tto m in g and m ak in g
B ottom f ille r s --------------------------------In c e n tiv e -------------------------- T-------Edge tr im m e r s (a ll in c e n tiv e ) ____
G o o d y ear s titc h e r s (a ll in c e n tiv e ).
H eel a tta c h e r s , m a c h in e __________
In c e n tiv e ________________________
In s e a m e rs (a ll in c e n tiv e )------- ——
J o in te rs , m a c h in e ------------------. -----I n c e n tiv e _________________________
Rough ro u n d e rs (a ll in c e n tiv e )-----Sole - le v e le r s , m a c h in e -----------------In c e n tiv e __________________ ______
F in ish in g
B o tto m s c o u re rs (a ll in c e n tiv e )
Edge s e tte r s (a ll in c e n tiv e ) -----T r e e r s -------------------------- --------------In c e n tiv e ___________ _____
M isc e lla n e o u s
F lo o r boys (a ll tim e ) --------In s p e c to rs (c ro w n e rs)
(a ll tim e ) ____________ _____
J a n i t o r s ------- —------- —----------T i m e -----—----------------------See fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




of h o u rly $ 1.60 $ 1.65 $ 1.70 $ 1.75 $
w o rk - e a rn - unde r
$ 1.65 $ 1.70 $ 1.75 $ 1.80 $
3, 663 $2. 47 624 48 302
86
24
61
18
1,854 2. 78 264
24 241
68
1, 809 2. 14 360

42
34

2. 85
2. 40
2. 96

135
134

3. 28
3 .4 5

of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, M a rc h 1968)

N u m b e r of w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s of—
$ 1.95 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 1 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2.30 $ 2.40 $ 2.60 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3.00 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3.40 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3.80 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4 .8 0
and
1.85 $ 1 . 9 0 $ 1.95 $ 2 . 0 0 $ 2 . 1 0 $ 2 . 2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2.80 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3.40 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $4.2C $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0 $ 4 .8 0 o v e r
115 141 1 0 1
98 2 1 2 106 143 183 337 190 140 133 128
95 1 1 0 100
43
48
38
18 . 124
47
37
35
42
97
34
73
71 195 1 1 1
95
93
83
32
15 115
76 1 01
56
37 42
104
72
70 1 1 2 142
57
3
68
66
56 115
45
27
17
17
6
6
6
79
9
39
1.80 $ 1.85 $

1.90

8

23
12
10
12

31
36
26
24
13
12
41
51
26
23
29
10
9
17

3. 69
2. 58
2. 53
3. 55
4. 15
3. 48
3. 72
3. 81

-

3. 29
4. 20
2. 97
3. 09

-

1. 73

4
_

21

18

-

-

-

3

3

1
2

2
1

-

2
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i
i
-

-

2

-

1

4
4

3
3

2
2

6

13
13

5
5

10
10

8
8

2
2

2
2

3
3
-

3

2

5
5
-

6

1

3

_

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

1

_

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

2
2

2

2

2
2

-

-

1

-

-

"

_
-

1
1

1

-

i
-

-

2
2

i

i
i

2
1

4
4

'

-

-

2

-

3

-

.

_

_

_

_

*

2
2

4

1

-

1
1

-

-

4
4

1

3
*

1

3
3

2
2

7

2
2

2
2

-

4

_

1

-

4
4
4
-

3
3
4
1
-

1

7
5
5
1
3

2
2

1
2

1
1

"

12

1
1

“

1
1

-

3
-

-

.

.

'

'

-

2

-

3
-

1

3

1

-

2

-

1

2

1

4

2

3

2

1

37

3
4
4

5
3
3

2

3

1

1

-

3

2
2

1
1

3
3

1
1

2
2

1
1

.

_

2
2
2
2

3
3
*

1
1
1

1
2

6

3
3

6

1
1

8
8

4

3
3

2

6
6

17
17

3

3
4
4

2
2
2

i
1
5
6
-

1
2

1
1
2

5

5
3
3
2
3
“

"

3
4
4

3
1
*

-

-

-

18

3
3

17
17

-

-

-

2

16
15

14
14

-

-

-

-

2

11
11

5
5

-

-

-

4
4

2

-

-

5
5

3
3

2

2

4
•

*

3

2

1

5
5

“

'

2
1
1
1

1
2
2

1

5

3
1

-

17
39
26
23

2. 36
1 . 82
1. 84

2
2

2

12
10

10

-

"

2. 57
2 . 62
4. 39
3. 65
3. 13
3. 22
4. 31
3. 56
3. 70
3. 79
2. 23
2. 27

50

-

-

2

-

2

2

-

4
4
5
5

3. 86
3. 86

12
10

2

I

2

*

.

4

2
1
1
6
1
1
1

"

.

-

6

5
1
1

3
2
2

*

.

2
2

4
i
i

-

-

3

3
4
2
2
1

-

1
1

_

-

1
1
1
1

4

1
1

"

_

4
-

_

*

14
’ 6
69
7 4

“

1

.

"

4
"

-

1
8 10
1
1

-

-

-

-

.
8

Table 16. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes---- Brockton, Mass.1 Continued
—
(N um ber and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 2 o f w o rk e rs in se le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, M a rc h 1968)

The a r e a c o n s is ts of A b ington, A von, B ra in tre e , B rid g e w a te r, B ro c k to n , M id d le b o ro , R o ck lan d , S to u g hton , W eym ou th , and W h itm a n , M a ss.
E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts . A p p ro x im a te ly 59 p e rc e n t of the p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs c o v e re d by th e stu d y w e re p aid on an in c e n tiv e
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 3 a t
$ 5 to $ 5. 20;1at $ 5. 60 to
$ 5.
80; an d 3 a t $ 5. 80 an d o v e r.
$ 4 . 80
to
$ 5;4 at $ 5
to $ 5.
20;
4 a t $ 5. 20 to $ 5. 40; and 3 a t
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 3 a t
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 3 a t $ 5. 40 to $ 5.60; 1 a t $ 5. 60 to $ 5 . 80; an d 2 a t $ 5. 80 an d o v e r.
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 3 a t $ 4 . 80 to $ 5; 3 a t $ 5 to $ 5. 20; 1 a t $ 5. 20 to $ 5. 40; an d .2 a t $ 5. 40 an d o v e r.
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 3 a t $ 5 .2 0 to $ 5 .4 0 and 1 a t $ 5 .4 0 and o v e r.
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 1 a t $ 4. 80 to $ 5; 2 a t $ 5 to $ 5. 20; and 7 a t $ 5. 20 to $ 5. 40.
In su ffic ie n t d a ta to w a rra n t p u b lic a tio n of se p a ra te a v e ra g e s by m eth o d of w age p a y m e n t, p re d o m in a n tly in c e n tiv e w o rk e rs .




$ 5. 40 an d o v e r.

Table 17. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— Wisconsin

10

A

(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, M a rc h 1968)
N u m b e r of w o rk e rs re c e iv i ng s tr a ig h t- tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s of—
N um - A v e rage
of h o u rly $1.60 $1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00
and
u n d er
$1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 o v e r
87 118 114 157 161
50
33 52
All p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs ---------------------------------- 4, 151 $2. 24 319 262 209 490 201 183 145 124 272 222 214 243 121 163 120
91
41
55
54
54
30 64
46
27
18
56
56
71
25
37
50 107 125
82
38
30 42
47
57
M e n -------------------------------------------------------------- 1,271 2. 62
59
64
50
64
12
96 104
63
50
36
3 10
W o m en --------------------------------------------------------- 2, 880 2. 07 272 208 179 426 155 156 104 106 216 167 158 172
9
S e le c te d o c cu p atio n s
S ex, d e p a rtm e n t, and o cc u p a tio n

M EN
C utting
13
11
98

2. 80
3. 00
3. 37

1
1

-

2
-

-

.
-

-

-

.
-

1
1

.
-

-

1
1

-

1
1

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

1

1

2

10
6
34
32
35

2 .9 7
3 .3 9
3. 10
3. 15
2 .9 7

-

-

-

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

2
-

2
2
2

5
3
2

1
1
-

2
4

31

3. 33

-

*

-

-

-

*

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

E dge tr im m e r s (a ll in c e n tiv e )---------------------G o o d y ear s titc h e r s (a ll in c e n tiv e )---------------H eel a tta c h e r s , m a c h in e ------------------------------In cen tiv e ---------------------------------------- -----------Rough r o u n d e r s ----------------- ----------------------------T i m e ----------------------------------------------------------In c e n ti v e ---- ----------— -------- ---------------------—
S o le -le v e le rs , m ach in e (all in c e n tiv e ) -------F in ish in g

52
58
27
23

3. 30
3. 06
2 .6 0
2 .6 5

-

2
2
-

.
3

1

1
1
_
-

4
2
1

1
2
2

1
1
-

1
_
-

-

2 .9 0
2. 38
3. 05
2. 12

-

-

28
6
22
8

2
-

1
1
*

1

i
3
3
3
1
1
-

1
3
2
2
2
2
-

2

B o tto m s c o u re rs (a ll in c e n tiv e ) -------------------E dge s e t t e r s --------------------------------------------------In c e n tiv e -------------------------------------------------- —
T r e e r s ^ b / ------------------------------------------------------M isc e lla n e o u s

17
49
45
7

2. 63
2. 97
3. 04
2. 89

1
-

.
-

i
i
i
-

1
-

_
2
-

_
-

1
-

2
2
-

2

4
*

.
2
2
1

1
3
3
-

1
1
-

F lo o bo s (a ^ tim e )
In sp e c to rs (c ro w n e rs )-----------------------------------T im e _____ _______ —_______________________

28
20

2 .4 7
2. 26

-

-

_
-

-

2
2

2
2

2
2

-

1
1

2
2

2
2

4
4

M e c h a n ic s, m a in ten a n c e (a ll tim e ) ---------------

27

2. 72

*

2

-

2

57
45

2. 25
2. 36

2
-

4

-

4

72

2 .6 1

"

~

"

C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e ------------------------------In c e n tiv e ----------------------------------------------------C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e , m a c h in e
(a ll in c e n tiv e )---------------------—-----------------------L a stin g
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a ch in e
h in e o p erato r* 3 ^ b /
H e e l-s e a t l a s t e r s -------------------------------------------In c e n tiv e ----------------------------------------------------P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ------------------------In c e n tiv e ______________________ —------————
Side la s t e r s , m a c h in e (a ll in c e n tiv e ) ----------Toe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r se m ia u to m a tic
(a ll in c e n tiv e )-----------------------------------------------B o tto m in g and m ak in g
b'd

2

5

4

1
1

i
1

1
1

-

1
1

2

1
1
12

4

13

14

12

3

2

3
1

1
1
3

1
1
1
1
1

10
10
3

6
6
4

3

3

3

6

2

i
i
4
4
5
2

3
2

i
2
2
2

2
2
4
2

4
i
1
i
i

3
3
2
2
1
1

12
5
2
2
4
4

5
13
2
2
4
4

5
10
-

5
4
1

3
6
1
1
1
1

1
2
2
-

1
3
1
*

_
2
2
-

_
-

1
1
1
-

1
8
8
-

1
-

1
-

-

4

4

_
-

2
i

2

2

2

-

1

2

5

2
2
2

18

2
2
-

1
1
3
3
1

4

3

4
-

6
-

1
1

7
5
1
1
1
1

2
2

1
1

1
12
12
3

1
5
5
-

_
1
1
*

.
3
3
-

2
1
1
1

1
-

4
-

_
-

_
-

-

.
-

4

3

2

3

-

-

-

WOMEN
C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e ------------------------------I n c e n tiv e ----------------------------------------------------C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e , m a c h in e
(a ll in c e n tiv e ) ----------------------------------------------See fo o tn o tes at end of ta b le .



4

3
3

1
1

-

2
2

1
1

7

3

3

1

5
5

7

7

6
6

2

2

1
1

3
3

-

_

_

-

3

3

2
2

-

_

1
1

-

-

'

3

4

_

6

4

4

11

6

5

4

2

3

5

6

1

3

2

1

2

_

_

Table 17. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— Wisconsin— Continued
(N um ber and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in se le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, M a rc h 1968)
N um - A v e r-

S ex, d e p a rtm e n t, and o ccup atio n

ber
age
of h o u rl y
w ork­ earn ­
e r s ing s 1

N u m b e r of w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tr a ig h t- tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s of—

S I . 60 $ 1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $ 1.80 $1.85 $ 1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $ 2.40 $2.50 $ 2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $ 2 .9 0 JTToo $ 3.20 $3.40 $ 3.60 $3.80 $4.00
and
an d
under
$1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $ 1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $ 2.50 $ 2 .60 $ 2.70 $2.80 $ 2 .9 0 $3.00 $3*20 13*40 $3.60 $ 3.80 $4*00 o v e r

S e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s— C ontinued

WOMEN—Continued
F ittin g
F an cy s t i t c h e r s ----------------- -----------— ------------I n c e n tiv e ----------------- -----------—--------------------P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f it te r s , u p p e r, hand —
T i m e ----------------------------------------------------------I n c e n tiv e ----------------------------------------------------S k iv e rs , m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r li n i n g s ----------In c e n tiv e ----------------------------------------------------Top s t i t c h e r s -------------------------------------------------I n c e n tiv e ----------------------------------------------------V a m p e rs ---------------------------------------------------------I n c e n tiv e --------------------- -------------------------------

185 $2. 25
167 2. 30
144 1 .88
33 1 .67
111 1 .94
92 2. 17
86 2. 19
97 2. 23
85 2. 30
81 2. 35
75 2. 35

9
5
29
14
15
3
3
3
1
2

4
2
15
6
9
3
3
4
2
1
1

1
1
14
6
8
4
2
5
1
4
4

16
14
22
5
17
8

6

8
8
4
4

13
7
9
2
7
3
3
6
4
2
2

6
6
7
-

7
3
3
2
2
2
2

8
8
8
-

2
2
4
-

“

4
2
2
5
5
3
3

8
8
8
2
-

17
13
10
-

10
12
10
7
7
7
7

23
23
6
-

6
7
7
11
11
9
9

14
14
1
-

1
4
4
5
5
11
11

14
14
6
-

6
11
11
5
5
4
4

9
9
5
-

5
4
4
7
7
5
5

12
12
4
-

4
4
4
7
7
4
2

6
6
-

5
5
2
2
5
5

10
10
2
-

2
6
6
9
9
2
2

6
6
2
-

2
2
2
-

5
3

3
3

4
4

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3
5
5
3
3

2
2
4
4

i
i
3
3

1
1

3
3

"

1
1

-

-

-

21
15
7

2. 06
2. 22
2. 21

4

B ottom f ille r s ---------------------------------------In c e n tiv e ------------------------------------------H eel a tta c h e r s , m a c h in e 3b / ----------------J o in te r s , m a c h in e (all in c e n tiv e ) -------S h an k e rs — --------------------------------------------I n c e n tiv e -------------------------------------------Sole a tta c h e rs , c e m e n t p ro c e s s Va/ —
S o le -le v e le rs , m a c h in e (a ll in c e n tiv e )

17
13

2

7
12

1 .9 3
2. 02
2 .4 6
1 .99
2. 00

9
6

2. 05
1 .9 3

_

“

2
“

18
11

1 .86
1.71

4
4

2
1

64
35
29
83

1
1

1
1

59

2. 06
1 .8 0
2. 36
2. 10
2. 28

59
47
51
25
8

1 .9 4
1 .8 9
2. 11
1.9 1
1 .6 9

F in ish in g
B otto m s c o u r e r s --------------------------------------------T im e ----------------------------------------------------------R e p a ir e r s --------------------------------------------------------T i m e ----------------------------------------------------------I n c e n tiv e ---------------— ---------------------------------T re e r s -------------------------------------------------------------In c e n tiv e ----------------------------------------------------M isc e lla n e o u s
F lo o r g i r l s -----------------------------------------------------In sp e c to rs (c ro w n e rs )-----------------------------------T i m e ----------------------------------------------------------J a n ito rs (all tim e ) -------------------------------------------

6

4
2
“

2
2
“

1
1

-

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

3

1
1

2
"

.

-

4
4

2
2

13
12
1

6

-

-

-

“

*

"

-

1

-

3
1

i
i

-

-

-

2

-

19
5

9
5

-

3
3
2

1
1

.

2

2
-

3

3

2
3
1

16

23

-

-

-

-

2
15
12

12
12

2

1

2
1

3
1

14
2

13

9
9
5

17

“

2
2

1
1

-

4
2
2

2

“

3

2
2
4

2

3
2
2

5
5

7

-

1

i
i
"

2

4

3

2
2
1

-

-

“

1
1

-

1
1

-

-

-

1

-

-

1
*

_

1

_

_

1

1

1

-

-

4
3

z
-

1
1
1

2
3
3

11
7
8
7

-

1
-

1
-

4
4

2
-

“

3
3
“

3
3
1

3
3

.

1
1

1
2

1

1
3

2

-

-

-

_

7
7

2
3
3

2

7
6
6
3

4
4

3

4

-

5

1

i
i

-

7

3
-

10
2
6
3

1

-

-

7

1

2

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

1

*

1
*

2

1

*

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

"

“

-

-

3
3
3

-

2

-

3
2
1

-

*

_

_

-

1
1

-

-

1

1
1

1

-

.

1
4

”

4

-

-

-

7
1

-

-

-

3
1
1

-

-

2
3

-

2
1

-

-

1
5
5

_
-

3

3

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

*

L a stin g
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e ----I n c e n tiv e ----------------------------------- ;-------H e e l-s e a t la s t e r s 3b / ---------------------------B o tto m in g an d m aking

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

.

_

"

“

"

“

i
“

3

3

-

-

3
4
4

-

3

1
1

-

*

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

“

“

1
1

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

.
.

2

2

1

O ffice
C le rk s , g e n e ra l --------------------------------------------C le rk s , p a y r o l l ---------------------------------------------S te n o g ra p h e rs , g e n e r a l-------------- —---------------T y p is ts , c la s s B ---------------- ----------------------------

114
14
19
29

1.
2.
2.
1.

79
05
02
77

4
5

4

3

-

2

-

4

6

5
1
1
3

4

3

1

_
-

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts . A p p ro x im a te ly 70 p e rc e n t of th e p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs c o v e re d by the study w e re p aid on an
in c e n tiv e b a s is .
2 W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s fo llow s: 9 a t $4 to $ 4 .2 0 an d 9 a t $ 4 .2 0 and o v e r.
3 In su ffic ie n t d a ta to w a rra n t p u b lic a tio n of se p a ra te a v e ra g e s by m eth o d of w age p a y m e n t; (a) p re d o m in a n tly tim e w o rk e rs ; and (b) p re d o m in a n tly in c e n tiv e w o rk e rs .




Table 18. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Work Shoes— All Establishments
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U nited S ta te s and s e le c te d re g io n s, M a rc h 1968)
U nited S tates 2
D e p a rtm e n t, o c c u p a tio n , and sex

N u m b er
of
w o rk e rs

M ean 3

H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
M iddle
M edian 3
ran g e 3

N um be r
of
w o rk e rs

New England
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
M iddle
M ean 3
M edian 3
ran g e 3

S e le c te d p ro d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s
C utting
$
$
$
$
$
$
2. 02
1 .9 0
1 .6 0 -2 . 38
121
1. 96
2. 09
29
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e -------------------------------------2. 25
2. 08
1 .6 0 -2 . 69
46
M en ------------------------------------------------------------------24
1. 94
1. 85
1. 6 3 -2 . 19
75
1.89
W om en -------------------------------------------------------------1 .99
2. 80
87
2. 79
2 .4 6
2. 0 4 -3 . 13
403
2. 62
C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e , m a c h in e ----------2. 86
2. 87
2.61
2. 15-3. 31
78
2. 76
279
M en ------------------------ ------------ ------—-------------------2. 21
2. 17
124
2. 30
1. 7 7 -2 . 59
9
W om en -------------------------------------------------------------F ittin g
1. 6 7 -2 . 28
225
1.83
1. 99
F an cy s titc h e r s (224 w o m en , 1 m a n ) ----------------P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f it te r s , u p p e r, hand
1. 77
1. 65
1. 70
1 .6 0 -1 .8 5
1.81
59
168
(165 w o m en , 3 m e n ) ------------------------------------------S k iv e rs , m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r lin in g s
24
2. 62
2. 68
2. 22
1 .8 3-2 . 50
96
2. 09
(95 w o m en , 1 m an ) -------------------------------------------2. 12
2. 05
1.92
1.80
1 .6 4 -2 .0 7
58
253
Top s titc h e r s (a ll w o m e n )-----------------------------------2. 52
2. 43
1 .7 4 -2 .4 0
54
204
2. 15
2. 00
V a m p e rs (196 w om en, 8 m e n ) ----------------------------L astin g
2. 80
2. 93
1 .7 7 -2 . 87
22
2. 32
2.21
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e --------------------89
2. 74
2. 90
2. 40
2. 25
71
1 .8 6 -2 . 91
19
M en ------------------------------------------------------------------1 .7 6 -2 .5 5
8
2. 36
45
2. 19
1.91
H e e l-s e a t l a s t e r s -------------------------------------------------2. 36
1. 7 7 -2 . 62
8
2. 25
1. 95
36
M en ------------------------------------------------------------------P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e ra to rs (76 m en ,
2. 70
2. 70
2 .2 2 -3 . 14
18
3. 47
3. 71
78
2 w o m e n )-------------------------------------------------------------3. 18
2. 60
2. 0 6 -2 .9 9
22
3. 09
106
2. 58
Side la s t e r s , m a ch in e (104 m en , 2 w o m e n )------Toe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r se m ia u to m a tic
21
2. 77
2. 5 1
2 .0 2 -2 .9 4
2. 56
2. 56
89
(83 m e n , 6 w o m e n )--------------------------------------------B o tto m in g and m aking
2. 03
10
2. 11
40
2. 16
1 .7 0 -2 . 38
B o tto m f ille r s ------------------------------------------------------2. 12
2. 32
1 .9 2 -2 .9 5
8
26
2. 09
M en ------------------------------------------------------------------22
3. 30
2. 70
2. 54
2. 0 3 -3 . 28
3. 35
103
Edge tr im m e r s (101 m e n , 2 w o m e n )-----------------2. 16-2. 96
38
2. 88
2. 90
2. 57
2. 58
152
G o o d y ear s titc h e r s (all m e n )------------------------------10
2. 35
2. 25
1 .8 5 -2 . 80
2. 69
60
H eel a tta c h e r s , m a c h in e (59 m en 1 w o m a n )-----2 .7 6
20
3. 20
3. 08
78
2. 75
1 .8 8 -3 . 29
In s e a m e rs (a ll m e n ) --------------------------------------------2. 68
2. 70
2. 51
2. 52
1 .9 9 -2 . 88
16
72
Rough ro u n d e rs (a ll m e n ) -----------------------------------8
1. 77
32
1.96
1.63
1. 6 0 -2 . 22
S h an k e rs ---------------------------------------------------------------1.75
2. 17
1 .6 0 -2 . 24
17
M en ------------------------------------------------------------------1.60
1 .6 0 -1 .6 8
15
1.73
W om en ------------------------------------------------------------F in ish in g
1 .7 4 -2 .0 2
1.82
1.82
103
1 .90
1.91
19
R e p a ire rs (97 w o m en , 6 m e n ) ----------------------------1. 60
1 .6 0 -2 . 10
87
1. 86
T r e e r s (83 w o m en , 4 m e n ) ------------------ -------------M isc e lla n e o u s
34
2. 00
1.95
1 .7 0 -1 .9 2
114
1.85
1.76
F lo o r boys (o r g i r l s ) -------------------------------------------1 .7 0 -1 .9 0
17
1 .95
1. 90
74
1. 84
1. 76
W om en -------------------------------------------------------------1. 94
1.94
1.82
1. 7 0 -1 . 90
42
188
1. 75
In sp e c to rs (c ro w n e rs )------------------------------------------1. 7 0 -2 . 00
1. 98
45
M en ------------------------------------------------------------------9
1.91
1. 79
1. 92
W om en -------------------------------------------------------------1. 6 7 -1 .9 0
33
143
1. 7 1
1. 93
1. 79
92
1. 70
1. 6 0 -1 . 75
20
1. 77
1.68
1. 74
J a n ito rs (85 m e n , 7 w o m e n )-------------------------------2. 80
10
93
2. 56
2. 50
2. 2 5 -2 . 76
M e c h a n ic s, m a in ten a n c e (a ll m e n ) --------------------S e le c te d o ffice o c c u p a tio n s
95
1 .7 0 -1 .9 2
1.81
1.83
1.84
1. 85
26
C le rk s , g e n e ra l (a ll w o m e n )------------------------------1 .8 0 -2 . 00
1.95
20
1. 94
1.90
C le rk s , p a y ro ll (a ll w o m e n )-------------------------------53
1. 92
1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s, and la te sh ifts.
2 In c lu d es d a ta fo r re g io n s in ad d itio n to th o se shown se p a ra te ly .
3 See a p p en d ix A fo r m eth o d u sed to co m p ute m e a n s, m e d ia n s, and m id d le ra n g e s of e a rn in g s. M ed ian s and m id d le ra n g e s
reg io n .
N O T E : D ash es in d ic a te no d a ta re p o rte d o r d ata th a t do not m eet p u b licatio n c r ite r ia .



$
$
1 .6 8 -2 .
1 .6 7 -2 .
2. 2 8 -3 .
2. 3 0 -3 .
-

22
12
36
37

-

G re a t L ak es
N um be r
of
w o rk e rs

M ean 3

28
6
22
105
75
30

$
2. 32
2. 74
2. 20
3. 00
3. 19
2. 50

$
2. 23
2. 08
2. 69
3. 04
2. 32

$
$
1 .8 5 -2 .
1 .8 0 -2 .
2. 2 9 -3 .
2. 4 7 - 5 .
2. 13-2.

H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
M iddle
M edian 3
ran g e 3
72
60
52
74
52

116
34

2. 13

2. 00

1. 7 5 -2 . 34

1. 6 0 -1 . 76

1.96

1 .8 4

1. 6 5 -2 . 13

2. 2 9 -2 . 88
1 .7 6 -2 . 4 3
2. 0 0 -3 . 08

27
43
50

2. 22
2. 10
2. 21

2. 20
1.89
2. 17

1 .8 7 -2 . 40
1. 8 0 -2 . 20
1 .8 0 -2 . 43

2. 3 4 -3 . 38
2. 2 6 -3 . 20
-

2. 65
2. 87
2. 21
2. 27

2. 9 8 -3 . 81
2. 6 6 -3 . 51
2. 4 3 -2 . 83

20
15
15
9
11
22
24

2. 65
2. 99
2. 97

2. 57
2. 87
1. 98
2. 91
2. 94

2. 2 8 -3 . 03
2. 5 4 -3 . 05
1. 7 4 -2 . 47
2. 7 1 -3 . 40
2. 7 5 -3 . 21

2. 8 3 -3 . 72
2. 6 8 -3 . 19
2. 8 6 -3 . 7 1
2. 5 3 -2 . 89
-

7
22
22
11
14
12
9
-

2. 52
3.41
2. 88
2. 87
3. 39
3. 23
2. 31
-

3. 36
2. 88
-

2. 7 6 -3 . 86
2. 6 0 -3 . 30
-

1 .8 2 -1 . 97
-

29
21

1 .9 2
2. 31

1. 83
2. 38

1 .8 0 -2 . 00
2. 11-2. 54

1 .8 2 -2 . 23
1 .8 2 -2 . 00
1 .8 9 -1 . 94
1 .8 9 -1 .9 4
1. 6 0 -1 .9 4

26
22
43
14
29
22
23

1. 88
1.90
1. 88
1.95
1 .84
1. 86
2. 80

1. 76
1. 76
1.76
1. 76
1. 76
2. 76

1. 7 5 -1 .8 6
1. 7 5 -1 . 81
1. 7 4 -1 .9 6
1. 7 1 -1 . 85
1. 7 1-1. 97
2. 5 2 -3 . 07

1 .6 5 -1 .8 9
1. 7 9 -2 . 10

33
7

1. 93
2. 00

2. 00

1. 7 6 -2 . 05
-

-

-

-

a r e not p ro v id e d fo r jo b s w ith fe w e r th an 15 w o rk e rs in a




Table 19. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Cement-Process Shoes— All Establishments
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o urly e a r n in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U n ited S ta te s and New E n g lan d re g io n , M a rc h 1968)
U n ited S ta te s 2
D e p a rtm e n t, o ccu p atio n , and sex

N u m b er
of
w o rk e rs

New E n g lan d
N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

H o u rly e a rn i n g s 1
M iddle
M ean 3
M ed ian 3
ran g e 3

M ean 3

H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
M id d le
M ed ian 3
ra n e e 3

S e le c te d p ro d u c tio n o ccu p atio n s
C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m ach in e (42 w om en,
18 m e n )------------------------------------------------------------C u tte rs , vam p and w hole sh o e, m a c h in e -------M en ----------------------------------------------- ------------...
W om en ----------------------------------------------------------

$
2. 07
2. 78
2. 98
2. 35

$
1 .6 0
2. 55
2. 85
2. 32

118
65
180
203

1. 95
1 .8 8
2. 12
1 .9 6
2. 13

69
49
20
34
48

2. 04
2. 07
1 .9 7
2. 21
2. 11

32

60
255
173
82

$
$
1. 6 0 -2 . 12
2. 2 3 -3 . 20
2. 4 0 -3 . 51
1 .9 8 -2 . 60

20
91
75
16

1 .8 2

1. 6 5 -2 . 17

42

1.73
2. 00
1.91
1 .9 4

1 .6 0 -2 . 09

35

1 .7 2 -2 . 28
1 .6 0 -2 . 23
1 .6 8 -2 . 45

26
82
107

$
$
1 .9 2 -3 .
2. 5 8 -4 .
3. 0 0 -4 .
1 .9 8 -2 .

$
2. 80
3. 36
3. 60
2. 22

$
2. 51
3. 34
3. 54
2. 07

2. 19
1 .8 0
2. 31
2. 17
2. 34

2. 05

1. 6 8 -2 . 55

1. 60
2. 12
2. 16
2 .2 9

1. 6 0 -1 .8 7
1 .8 8 -2 . 52
1 .8 1 -2 . 43
1 .8 9 -2 . 7 3
1 .9 6 -2 .8 5
1 .9 6 -2 . 8 3
.
2. 2 4 -2 . 87
-

33
14
26
32

F ittin g
F a n c y s titc h e r s (131 w om en, 1 m a n ) -------------P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f itte r s , u p p e r, hand
(117 w o m en , 1 m a n ) --------------------------------------S k iv e rs , m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r linin gs
(64 w o m en , 1 m a n )-----------------------------------------T op s titc h e r s (a ll w o m e n )--------- —-------------------V a m p e rs (200 w om en, 3 m e n ) ----------------------- —
L astin g
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e —--------------M en _______________—__________________ __— _
W om e n _________________ _____________ ____
H e e l-s e a t la s te r s (33 m e n , 1 w o m a n )------------S ide l a s t e r s , m ach in e (47 m en , 1 w o m a n )----T oe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r se m ia u to m a tic
(a ll m e n ) ----------------------------------------------------------

132

26
26
20
73
35

29
24
-

15
10

2 .4 5
2. 49
2 .4 8
2. 77

2. 26
2. 34
2. 61
-

2. 52

1.87
1 .9 0
1 .8 4
2. 11
1. 77
2. 12

1 .6 0 -3 . 28

8

3. 12

-

80
25

2 .7 3
2. 37

2. 38
1 .97

1 .8 5 -3 . 36
1. 9 2 -3 . 07

16
12

3. 28

2 .4 9 -3 .8 1

55

2 .4 5

2. 30

1 .6 0 -2 . 84

24

3. 26
2 .8 9
2 .9 3

2. 84

2. 4 3 -3 . 40

69

1 .9 7

1. 71

1 .6 0 -2 . 20

36

2. 02

1. 65

1. 6 0 -2 . 37

F lo o r boys (o r g i r l s ) ---------------------------------------M en --------------------------------------------------------------W om e n __________________ ____________________
In sp e c to rs (c ro w n e rs )--------------------------------------M en
W om en
_J a n ito rs (a ll m en) --------------------------------------------M e c h a n ic s, m a in ten a n c e (a ll m e n ) ------------- —
S e le c te d office o ccu p atio n s

68
26
42
107
31
76
39
42

1 .8 2
1 .8 4
1 .8 2
1 .9 1
1 .9 7
1 .8 9
1 .7 2
2 .4 6

1. 78
1 .8 3
1 .7 6
1 .85
1. 85
1 .8 6
1 .7 0
2. 37

1 .6 5 -1 .8 8
1 .6 5 -1 .8 7
1 .6 5 -1 . 92
1 .8 0 -2 . 03
1 .8 5 -2 . 03
1 .7 4 -2 . 03
1. 6 5 -1 . 78
2. 2 0 -2 .7 6

29
14
15
37
23
Id
11
7

1.87
1. 86
1.87
1.89
1.91
1.87
1 .8 0
2. 80

1 .8 0
1 .8 6
1.85
1.85
-

1 .6 1 -1 . 96
1. 7 0 -1 .9 9
1 .8 0 -1 . 85
1 .8 5 -1 . 85
_

C le rk s , g e n e ra l (all w o m e n )---------------------------C le rk s , pay ro ll (all w o m e n )-------------------------—

40
41

1 .9 4
1 .8 0

1 .9 5
1 .7 5

1 .8 4 -2 . 06
1 .6 5 -1 . 94

15
23

1 .8 9
1. 75

1. 93
1. 65

B o tto m in g and m aking
E dge tr im m e r s (a ll m e n )---------------------------------H eel a tta c h e rs , m ach in e (24 m en , 1 w om an) —
Sole a tta c h e r s , c e m e n t p ro c e s s (47 m en ,
8 w om en) -------------------------------------------------------F in ish in g
R e p a ire r s (68 w om en, 1 m a n ) ----------------------- —

1 .6 0 -2 .
1. 6 0 -2 .
1 .6 3 -2 .
1 .6 0 -2 .
1 .6 0 -2 .

-

-

-

M isc e lla n e o u s
-

-

-

-

-

1 .7 5 -2 . 00
1 .6 0 -1 .8 3

1 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e an d fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts .
2 In clu d es d ata fo r re g io n s in addition to New E ng lan d .
3 See appen d ix A fo r m eth o d u se d to co m p u te m e a n s, m e d ia n s , and m id d le ra n g e s of e a rn in g s . M e d ian s and m id d le ra n g e s a r e n o t p r o ­
v id ed fo r jo b s w ith fe w e r than 15 w o rk e rs in a re g io n .
N O T E : D ash es in d ic a te no d ata re p o rte d o r d a ta th a t do n o t m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r ite r ia .

10
-4

Table 20. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes—All Establishments
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U n ited S ta te s and s e le c te d re g io n s , M a rc h 1968)
New E n g lan d

U nited S ta te s 2
D e p a rtm e n t, o c c u p a tio n , and se x

N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M edian3 M iddle3
ran g e

N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s
of
w o rk e rs M e a n 3 M e d ia n 3 M iddle3
ra n g e

M iddle A tla n tic
N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M e d ia n 3 M iddle3
ra n g e

B o rd e r S ta te s
N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M e d ia n 3 . M iddle3
ra n g e

S e le c te d p ro d u c tio n o c c u p a tio n s
C uttin g
950
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e ------------------------M e n _____ — ------------------------------595
W om e n __________________________________
355
462
C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e , h an d -----M e n _________________________ ____________
329
W o m e n _________________________________
133
C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e ,
m a c h in e ---------------------------------------------------- 2, 060
M e n ____________________________________ 1, 545
515
W o m en -------------------------------- — ----- F ittin g
F a n c y s titc h e r s ---------------------- ------------ M e n _____________________________________
W o m en ________________________________
P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f it te r s , u p p e r,
h and_______________________________________
W o m e n _________________________________
S k iv e rs, m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r lin in g s -----W om en___________________________________
Top s tic h e r s ------- ------------------------------- —

3, 529
150
3, 379
2, 532
2 ,4 7 0
855
782
2 ,3 1 3
100
W o m en __________________________________ 2, 213
V am pe r s ___________________________________
856
825
W o m en ------ ----------------- -------------------

L a stin g
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e -------827
M e n _________________ ___________________
598
W o m en ______________ ____________ ___
229
B e d -m a c h in e o p e ra to rs (472 m e n ,
481
9 w o m e n )_____-_______ -________________ __
H e e l-s e a t la s te r s (367 m e n , 25 w o m en )—
392
P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e ra to rs (479 m e n ,
1 w o m a n )____________________________
480
Side la s t e r s , m a ch in e (1 ,2 2 0 m e n ,
1,236
16 w om e n
Toe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r
688
se m ia u to m a tic - - — ------- — —
634
M e n --- ---------------------------------------------------B o tto m in g and m ak in g
254
B o tto m f ille r s ------------------------------------------W o m en _________________________________ 212
Edge tr im m e r s — ---- --------------------- ---------386
M e n --------- ----------------- -------------------------357
H eel a tta c h e rs , m a c h in e __________________
492
M en ____________________________________ _
426
H e e l-s e a t f it te r s , m a c h in e (46 m e n ,
55
9 w om en) —— — — — — — — — — — —
Rough ro u n d e rs __________________________________
245
M en __________________________________ _
201
Shanke r s __________________________________________
422
300
M e n ______________________________________________
122
W om e n
Sole a tta c h e rs , c e m e n t p r o c e s s ----------------- 1,0 3 0
M en— — — — — — — — — — — — —
899
131
W o m en __________________________________
 See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .


$
2. 54
2. 81
2. 09
2. 82
3. 10
2. 15

$
2. 37
2. 67
1. 90
2 .6 9
3 .0 0
2. 00

$
$
1. 8 5 -3 . 00
2. 11-3. 31
1 .6 3 -2 . 36
2. 1 3 -3 .4 5
2. 5 0 -3 . 83
1. 7 5 -2 . 40

327
279
48
32
30
-

$
2 .9 5
3. 06
2. 30
2. 81
2. 78
-

$
2. 89
2. 96
2. 21
2. 88
2. 82
-

$
$
2 .2 5 -3 .4 5
2. 3 8 -3 . 51
1. 7 4 -2 . 71
2. 5 7 -3 . 00
2. 5 7 -3 . 00
-

187
147
40
148
148
-

$
2. 71
2 .9 1
1. 97
3. 44
3. 44
-

$
2. 54
2. 78
1 .7 6
3. 70
3. 70
-

$
$
1. 8 9 -3 . 26
2. 2 1 -3 . 54
1 .6 5 -2 . 20
2. 7 2 -4 . 10
2 .7 2 -4 . 10
-

65
45
47
-

$
1. 92
1 .9 4
2. 46
-

$
1 .7 4
1. 73
2. 18
-

$
$
1. 6 0 -2 . 24
1. 6 0 -2 . 30
1 .9 5 -2 . 75
-

2. 87
3. 05
2. 34

2. 76
2 .9 5
2. 24

2. 2 8 -3 . 37
2. 5 0 -3 . 51
1. 8 8 -2 . 69

837
783
54

3 .2 3
3. 28
2. 57

3. 21
3 .2 6
2. 42

2. 6 7 -3 . 68
2. 7 3 -3 . 71
2. 0 3 -3 . 16

345
213
132

2 .6 8
2. 96
2. 22

2. 57
2. 81
2. 07

2. 0 7 -3 . 06
2 .4 4 -3 .4 3
1.7 3 -2 . 59

138
61
77

2. 33
2. 44
2. 25

2. 28
2. 48
2. 21

2. 0 0 -2 . 64
2. 1 4-2. 70
1. 8 4 -2 . 54

2. 15
2. 74
2. 12

2. 01
2. 58
2 .0 0

1. 7 3 -2 . 41
2. 0 0 -3 . 24
1. 7 3 -2 . 38

2 .2 8
2. 38
2. 28

2. 18
2. 18

2. 06
1. 95
2. 46
2. 06
2. 32
3. 50
2. 08
1. 92
1 .92

1 .7 9
1.79
1. 79
1.79
1. 90
1. 90
1 .8 0

1. 60
1 .6 0
1.71
1.71
1 .6 9

1 .6 0 -1 .
1. 6 0 -1 .
1. 6 0 -2 .
1. 6 0 -2 .
1 .6 0 -1 .

955
248
239

1 .7 0
1. 70
2. 08
2. 09
2. 23
2. 50
2. 22
2. 04
2. 00

179
179
154
154
58
58
183

1. 6 0 -1 . 93
1. 6 0 -1 . 93

1 .90
1. 90
2. 17
2. 17
2. 31
2. 48
2. 30
2. 21
2. 19

2. 00
3 .4 4
1.91
1. 85
1 .8 0
2. 20
1 .97
2. 10
3 .4 8
1 .9 2
1. 75
1. 72

1 .7 0
1. 70

1 .6 0 -2 . 13
1 .6 0 -2 . 11
1. 7 0 -2 . 39
1 .6 9 -2 .3 4
1. 7 1 -2 . 44
2 .2 5 -3 .4 9
1 .7 0 -2 . 39
1. 6 0 -2 . 16
1 .6 0 -2 . 14

632
67
565
532
477
184
133
297
49
248
217
203

1 .7 0 -2 .4 1
2. 7 8 -3 . 95
1 .6 9 -2 . 27

1.76
1. 75
2. 01
1.98
2. 03
2 .7 2
2. 02
1.84
1.83

1. 8 7 -2 . 59
1. 8 7 -2 . 59
1 .6 0 -2 . 11
1. 6 0 -2 . 11
1 .7 8 -2 .4 1
1 .7 8 -2 . 41
1. 9 5 -2 .5 8
2. 1 5-2. 88
1 .9 5 -2 . 58
1. 8 0 -2 . 49
1. 8 0 -2 .4 3

2. 18
3. 33
2. 04

1. 93
1. 91
2. 15
2. 06
2. 15
2. 94
2. 12
1. 99
1. 97

1, 599
11
1, 588
914
908
275
268
988

183
46
46

1. 80
1. 71
1. 71

1 .6 9
1 .6 0
1. 60

1. 6 0 -1 . 91
1. 6 0 -1 . 79
1. 6 0 -1 . 79

2. 54
2. 71
2. 11

2 .5 0
2. 72
1.92

1. 9 0 -3 . 02
2. 13-3. 12
1 .6 4 -2 .4 2

294
230
64

2 .9 2
3. 03
2. 54

2. 83
2. 96
2. 50

2. 4 4 -3 . 33
2. 5 4 -3 . 38
1. 9 2 -3 . 04

134
96
38

2 .4 5
2 .6 9
1. 86

2. 36
2 .7 6
1.75

1. 8 0 -2 . 98
2 .2 0 -3 . 12
1 .6 3 -1 . 97

71
35
36

2 .9 7
2 .2 5

2. 5 0 -3 . 48
1. 8 8 -2 .6 6

252
127

3. 19
2. 56

3. 09
2 .4 3

2 .6 5 -3 .8 0
2. 1 2 -2 .8 9

56
125

2 .7 5
2. 16

2. 96
1. 88

2. 3 5 -3 . 17
1 .6 0 -2 .6 1

41
21

1.81
1 .9 9
1 .6 9
2 .2 6
1. 90

1 .6 0 -2 . 50
1. 6 0 -2 . 62
1. 6 0 -2 . 02

3. 03
2. 32

2. 03
2. 22
1. 84
2. 38
2. 09

2. 1 0-2. 57
1 .6 1 -2 . 28

3. 12
2. 88

3. 10
2 .8 8

2 .4 6 -3 . 71

178

3 .4 8

3. 54

2. 9 8 -4 .0 6

94

2. 85

2. 75

2. 0 9 -3 . 38

3. 31

3. 28

2. 7 8 -3 . 72

195

2. 55

2 .4 8

2. 62
2 .6 7

2 .4 6
2 .5 4

2. 0 4 -3 . 15
2. 0 7 -3 . 21

158
158

3 .2 6
3. 26

3. 30
3. 30

2 .6 9 -3 .7 4
2. 6 9 -3 . 74

220
208

2. 39
2. 42

2 .2 3
2. 26

1. 8 9 -3 . 07
1. 9 0 -2 . 77
1. 9 1 -2 . 88

2 .6 5
2. 31

1. 9 1 -3 . 25

510

29
71

2 .6 1

2. 32 -3 . 40

13
13

2. 52
2. 52

2. 15
-

1. 7 2 -2 . 68
-

2. 00
1.93
2. 92
2. 97
2 .4 6
2. 54

1. 81
1.75
2. 89
2.95
2. 37
2. 51
2. 37
2. 18
2. 30
1. 93
2. 00
1. 74
2 .5 4
2 .6 2
2. 00

1 .6 0 -2 . 24
1 .6 0 -2 . 14
2. 3 5 -3 . 44
2. 3 8 -3 .4 6
1. 85-2. 89
2. 0 0 -2 .9 4

50
49
126
118
171
157

2. 05
2. 06
3. 20
3. 26
2 .5 9
2 .6 3

2. 00
2. 02
3. 09
3. 11
2. 51
2. 54

1 .6 1 -2 . 28
1 .6 1 -2 .2 8
2 .6 8 -3 . 74
2. 7 0 -3 . 74
2. 0 0 -3 . 03
2. 10-3. 05

102
76
55

53
123
118

1. 95
1.75
3. 05
3. 09
2 .6 0
2 .6 3

1 .7 5
1 .6 0
2. 70
2. 75
2 .6 7
2 .6 9

1 .6 0 -2 . 22
1 .6 0 -1 . 81
2. 3 2 -3 .6 8
2. 3 2 -3 . 71
2. 0 0 -3 . 12
2. 0 5 -3 . 13

12
12
42
42
29
24

1. 91
1. 91
2. 50
2. 50
2. 43
2. 60

1. 8 1 -2 . 95
1. 7 8 -2 . 63
1. 8 0 -2 . 80
1 .6 5 -2 . 33
1. 7 1 -2 . 51
1 .6 0 -2 . 06
2. 0 2 -3 . 18
2. 08 -3 . 29
1. 6 6 -2 . 48

30
26
187
136
51
445
411
34

14
38
33
72
48
24
231
208
23

2. 88
2. 62
2 .7 3
2. 02
2. 14
1.79
2. 26
2. 27
2. 12

2 .6 3
2 .6 8
1. 84
1 .9 8
1. 71
2. 10
2. 10
2. 00

2. 0 0 -3 . 13
2. 13-3. 17
1 .6 0 -2 .2 4
1 .6 4 -2 .4 9
1 .6 0 -2 . 01
1 .7 1 -2 .6 5
1 .7 0 -2 .5 5
1. 8 2 -2 . 37

2. 53
2. 33
2 .4 1
2 .0 9
2. 19
1.86
2 .6 5
2. 73
2. 13

33

-

-

2. 90
3. 03
2. 14
2. 22
1.93
3. 12
3. 17
2. 54

-

2. 80
3 .4 6
1. 96
2. 00
1. 90
3. 10
3. 16
2 .4 8

-

2. 3 1 -3 . 53
2 .4 1 -3 .6 0
1 .6 6 -2 . 33
1 .7 0 -2 . 51
1 .6 3 -2 . 11
2 .5 6 -3 .6 4
2 .6 2 -3 .6 7
2. 0 7 -2 . 95

1 .6 0 -2 . 35
1 .6 0 -2 . 24
1. 7 8 -2 . 87
1. 7 1 -2 . 32
1 .6 9 -2 .6 8
2. 7 6 -4 .0 7
1 .6 4 -2 . 33
1 .6 0 -2 . 14
1 .6 0 -2 . 13

-

.
.

21
16
_
63
56
7

.

2. 02
2. 07
_

2. 09
2. 11
1. 90

-

_
-

2. 40
2 .4 0
2. 20
2 .7 3
_
.

1. 97
2. 05
_
1 .9 6
1 .9 8
-

94
94
14
14
91

-

_
-

1. 7 9 -3 . 40
1 .7 9 -3 . 40
1 .6 0 -3 . 35
2. 10-3. 35
.
_
-

1. 7 8 -2 .
1. 8 3 -2 .
_
1. 6 2 -2 .
1. 6 0 -2 .
-

19
39
34
35

Table 20. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— All Establishments— Continued
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U nited S ta te s and se le c te d re g io n s , M a rc h 1968)
D ep artm ent, occup ation , and aex
S e le c te d p ro d u c tio n
o c c u p a tio n s— C ontinued
F in ish in g
B ottom s c o u r e r s ___——----------------------------M e n __________________ —_________________
Edge s e t t e r s ..-------- ---- --------- ----------- -------M e n ___________________________ _. . . _____
R e p a ire r s ______________________________ ___
W o m en _____ ____________________ __.. . . .
T r e e r s ____________________________________ _
M e n ___________________ __________________
W o m en — ------------------------------------------M isc e lla n e o u s
F lo o r b o ys (o r g i r l s ) _____________________
M e n ___________ _____________ __________
W o m e n __________________________________
In sp e c to rs (c ro w n e rs )____________________
M en ——____ ________ ___________________
W om en
J a nito r s _______________ _____________ ____
M e n _____________________________________
M e c h a n ic s, m a in te n a n c e (all m e n )______

United S tate! 3
Num ber
H ourly earnings 1
of
w orkers M ean J M edian1 M iddle5
range

New England
H ourly earn in gs 1
Num ber
of
iddle
w ork ers M ean 5 M edian3 M n g e 3
ra

M iddle A tlantic
Num ber
H ourly ea rn in g s 1
of
w ork ers M e a n 3 M edian3 M iddle3
ran g e

B ord er S tates
N um ber
H ourly earnings 1
of
w o rk ers M ean 3 M edian3 M iddle3
range

206
176
177
168
1,749
1,659
1, 354
585
769

$
2. 53
2. 64
2. 97
3. 02
1 .98
1.92
2. 36
2. 76
2. 06

$
2 .4 5
2. 55
2 .9 3
2 .9 6
1.80
1. 80
2 .2 9
2 .7 4
1.96

$
$
1. 8 7 -2 .9 7
1. 9 4 -3 . 21
2. 3 5 -3 .4 7
2 .4 7 -3 . 50
1 .6 9 -2 . 03
1 .6 8 -1 . 97
1. 8 0 -2 . 76
2. 3 4 -3 . 15
1 .6 8 -2 .3 3

29
28
56
55
834
830
441
390
51

$
2 .7 6
2. 80
3. 11
3. 11
1 .8 4
1. 84
2. 81
2. 83
2. 65

$
2. 56
2 .5 9
3. 01
3. 05
1 .79
1 .7 9
2. 77
2. 83
2. 56

$
$
2. 2 5 -3 . 01
2. 2 9 -3 . 01
2 .6 1 -3 .4 3
2. 6 1 -3 . 44
1. 7 0 -1 . 85
1. 7 0 -1 . 85
2. 4 0 -3 . 15
2 .4 2 -3 . 17
2. 3 5 -2 . 88

72
65
38
36
336
258
155
83
72

$
2. 89
3. 02
3. 33
3. 40
2 .2 4
1.97
2 .4 5
2. 84
2. 01

$
2. 81
2. 89
3. 16
3 .4 9
1. 85
1. 78
2. 16
2. 74
1 .97

$
$
2. 1 6 -3 .4 5
2 .4 5 -3 . 50
2. 5 0 -4 . 08
2. 73—4. 09
1 .6 8 -2 .4 2
1 .6 5 -2 . 10
1. 8 9 -2 .7 9
2. 2 1 -3 . 35
1. 6 8 -2 . 14

_
13
13
72
72
128
26
102

$_
2. 33
2. 33
2. 09
2. 09
2. 11
2 .4 1
2. 03

_
_
1. 87
1 .8 7
2. 06
2 .4 8
1 .9 2

_
_
1 .6 0 -2 . 38
1. 6 0 -2 . 38
1. 7 3 -2 .4 2
2. 12-2. 75
1. 7 0 -2 . 34

1,436
536
900
1, 111
341
770
429
412
257

1.76
1, 76
1.76
1. 88
2. 03
1. 82
1.69
1. 70
2. 56

1.71
1 .70
1 .73
1. 75
1.90
1. 72
1.65
1 .65
2 .4 3

1. 6 0 -1 .8 2
1 .6 0 -1 . 80
1 .6 2 -1 .8 4
1 .6 5 -2 .0 0
1 .7 0 -2 . 30
1 .6 2 -1 . 88
1. 6 0 -1 . 75
1 .6 0 -1 .7 5
2. 2 3 -2 . 75

585
181
404
323
123
200
117
116
23

1. 78
1. 76
1 .7 8
1. 82
1. 90
1.76
1.65
1 .6 5
3. 00

1. 73
1 .7 0
1 .75
1 .7 3
1. 82
1 .70
1 .6 0
1 .6 0
2. 75

1 .6 0 -1 . 90
1 .6 0 -1 . 80
1. 6 0 -1 . 90
1 .6 5 -1 .8 9
1 .6 6 -2 . 12
1. 6 2 -1 . 77
1 .6 0 -1 .6 5
1. 6 0 -1 . 65
2. 3 3 -3 .6 3

406
238
168
305
124
181
107
98
67

1. 76
1. 76
1. 77
1.97
2. 13
1.86
1. 73
1. 74
2. 52

1 .7 0
1. 70
1 .7 0
1 .8 3
2. 00
1.75
1.75
1 .75
2. 35

1. 6 0 -1 . 80
1 .6 0 -1 . 80
1 .6 3 -1 . 83
1 .6 4 -2 . 14
1 .7 5 -2 . 35
1. 6 0 -2 . 00
1 .6 2 -1 . 80
1. 6 5 -1 .8 2
2. 2 5 -2 . 73

58
48
82
11
71
30
28
29

1.66
_
1.67
1. 80
2. 32
1. 72
1. 62
1 .6 3
2. 25

1 .64
_
1 .6 4
1 .7 0
_
1.70
1 .6 0
1 .6 0
2. 05

1. 6 4 -1 . 70
_
1. 6 4 -1 . 71
1 .6 7 -1 .7 5
1. 6 7 -1 . 75
1. 6 0 -1 . 60
1. 6 0 -1 .6 2
2. 0 0 -2 . 43

711
600
65
25
75

1.89
1. 89
2. 18
2. 13
1. 89

1.81
1. 80
2. 10
1.95
1. 80

1. 7 0 -2 . 00
1. 7 0 -2 . 00
1. 8 8 -2 .2 7
1. 8 7 -2 . 19
1. 7 0 -2 . 00

148
356
18
“

1 .7 8
1 .8 0
1. 99
-

1.75
1.75
2. 00
-

1. 6 5 -1 . 88
1. 7 0 -1 . 88
1. 8 8 -2 . 12
*

233
95
12
21
36

1. 88
2. 10
2. 18
2. 14
1 .9 3

1. 80
1. 90
1 .9 5
1 .75

1 .7 0 -1 .9 0
1. 7 0 -2 . 25
1. 8 7 -2 . 19
1. 7 0 -2 . 19

50
23
-

2. 10
2. 11
*

2. 00
2. 13
-

1 .7 6 -2 . 25
1. 9 4 -2 . 25
-

$

$-

$
_

S e le c te d office o c c u p a tio n s
C le rk s , g e n e ra l (675 w o m en , 36 m e n )__
C le rk s , p a y ro ll (all w o m e n )-------------------S te n o g ra p h e rs , g e n e ra l (a ll w o m en )____
T y p is ts, c la s s A (all w o m en )-----------------T y p is ts , c la s s B (all w om en)

S outhw est
S e le c te d p ro d u c tio n o c cu p atio n s
C uttin g
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e ------------- ----M e n ------------ ---------------------------------------W o m en ____________________________
C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e , h and-----M e n _________________________ _
W om en _______________ ________________
C u tte rs , v am p and w hole shoe,
m a c h in e .__________________________________
M en .__ ----- --------------------- ----W o m en -------------------------------------------------F ittin g
F a n c y s titc h e r s ---------------- ----------------------M
_ _ _ ___
W o m en ___ _ _ -------------- _ -------P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f it te r s , u p p e r,
h and _ _____ _ ____---- ----------- _
W o m en — _____ ________________________
S k iv e rs , m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r lin in g s____
W om en ______________ _
Top s titc h e r s - ___ ______________________
M e n _____ _ _ ________________________
W o m e n _____________________ _
V a m p e rs - —
_____ __________ __
W o m en -------------------------------------------------See fo o tn o te s at en d of ta b le .



G re a t L a k e s

62
16
46
-

$
1. 96
2 .4 4
1. 80
-

$
1. 70
2. 42
1.65
-

$
$
1 .6 0 -2 .2 1
2. 10-2. 78
1. 6 0 -1 . 86
-

82
55
27

2. 35
2. 57
1.89

2. 16
2. 52
1.84

1. 8 1 -2 . 81
2. 1 0-3. 05
1. 6 6 -2 . 09

97
97
132
132
42
42
99
99
“

1. 77
1. 77
1.76
1.76
1.78
1.78
1. 77
1.77
-

1 .60
1. 60

1. 6 0 -1 . 87
1. 6 0 -1 . 87
1 .6 0 -1 .9 0
1 .6 0 -1 .9 0
1 .6 0 -1 . 86
1. 6 0 -1 . 86
1. 6 0 -1 . 91
1. 6 0 -1 .9 1
-

1.60
1. 60
1. 65
1.65
1 .6 0
1 .6 0
-

94
25
69
71
58
264
176
88
428
428
246
245
92
92
244
244
116
116

M id d le W est

P a c ific

$
2. 13
2. 37
2. 05
2 .2 2
2. 19
2. 75
2. 80
2. 64

$
1. 99
2. 42
1 .95
2. 14
2. 06
2 .6 7
2 .7 6
2 .6 0

$
$
1 .6 5 -2 .4 2
1 .7 1 -2 .7 5
1 .6 5 -2 . 15
1. 8 6 -2 . 44
1. 8 4 -2 . 43
2. 3 1 -3 . 09
2. 4 0 -3 . 10
2. 1 8 -2 .9 6

134
46
88
104
72
32
206
100
106

$
2. 31
2 .4 6
2 .2 3
2. 77
2 .9 9
2 .2 9
2. 55
2. 84
2. 27

$
2. 16
2. 39
2. 10
2 .6 4
3 .0 7
2. 23
2. 42
2. 75
2. 28

$
$
1. 9 0 -2 . 72
2. 0 5 -2 . 85
1 .7 1 -2 .4 1
2. 2 2 -3 . 36
2. 4 2 -3 . 46
1 .7 0 -2 .5 9
2. 0 7 -2 . 85
2. 3 0 -3 . 12
1. 8 9 -2 . 55

17
13
10
10
-

$
2 .6 5
2. 57
2. 82
2. 82
-

$
2. 64
-

$
$
2. 2 0 -3 . 00
-

40
36
-

3. 25
3. 25
-

3. 19
3. 20
-

2. 8 8 -3 . 48
2. 9 7 -3 . 48
-

1. 99
1 .9 9
1. 98
1 .9 8
2. 07
2. 07
1 .9 4
1 .9 4
1. 89
1. 89

1. 87
1. 87

1. 6 7 -2 . 22
1 .6 7 -2 .2 2

296
296

2. 01
2. 01

1.95
1.95

1 .7 4 -2 . 18
1 .7 4 -2 . 18

76
41
35

2. 37
2 .4 9
2 .2 3

2 .4 0
2. 55
2. 22

2. 12-2. 65
2. 3 2 -2 .6 5
1 .9 5 -2 .4 6

1. 84
1 .8 3
2. 06
2. 06
1.86
1. 86
1 .7 9
1. 79

1. 6 6 -2 . 16
1 .6 6 -2 . 15
1 .7 1 -2 .4 4
1 .7 1 -2 .4 4
1 .6 5 -2 . 11
1. 6 5 -2 . 1 1
1 .6 2 -2 . 00
1 .6 2 -2 . 00

298
298
119
119
317
.
317
81
80

1. 96
1. 96
2. 02
2. 02
2. 06
.
2. 06
1. 99
1. 98

1. 88
1. 88
1.89
1 .8 9
1 .9 0
1. 90
1. 92
1. 92

1 .6 2 -2 . 21
1 .6 2 -2 . 21
1 .6 2 -2 .2 9
1 .6 2 -2 . 29
1 .6 5 -2 . 29
1 .6 5 -2 . 29
1 .7 2 -2 .1 2
1 .7 2 -2 . 12

37
37
28
17
72
16
56
11

2. 07
2. 07
2. 18
2. 19
2. 18
2. 31
2. 14
2. 50

1 .9 2
1 .9 2
2. 01
2. 22
2. 1 1
2. 16
2. 04

1 .7 5 -2 . 39
1 .7 5 -2 . 39
1. 9 0 -2 . 41
1. 9 0 -2 . 41
1. 8 7 -2 . 52
1. 9 9 -2 . 66
1 .7 8 -2 . 39

_

"

-

Tabic 20. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— All Establishments— Continued

8

(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in se le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U nited S ta te s and se le c te d re g io n s, M a rc h 1968)
D e p a rtm e n t, o ccu p a tio n , and se x

S outhw est
N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M e a n 3 M ed ian 3 M iddle3
ra n e e

S e le c te d p ro d u c tio n
o c c u p a tio n s— C ontinued
L a stin g
$
$
$
$
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e --------2. 03 1.66 1. 6 0 -2 . 31
39
^Aen_______________________________ _____
35
1. 98 1.62 1 .6 0 -2 . 07
W o m en ------------------------------------------------B e d -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s __________________
_
13
2. 22
H e e l-s e a t l a s t e r s ------------------------------------2. 30 2. 38 2. 0 0 -2 .4 2
P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e r a to r s -------------------21
2. 40 2 .4 3 2. 0 8 -2 . 70
46
Side la s t e r s , m a c h in e -----------------------------Toe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r
2. 09 2. 05 1 .7 9 -2 . 36
s e m ia u to m a tic ---------------------------------------59
36
2. 09 2. 09 1 .7 9 -2 . 39
M e n ------------------------------------------------------B otto m in g and m ak in g
_
B ottom f il le r s _____________________________
W o m en __________________________________
14
2. 19
Edge t r i m m e r s ----------------------------------------2. 22
13
M e n _____________________________________
2. 33 2. 37 1 .9 4 -2 . 69
17
H eel a tta c h e rs , m a c h in e -------------------------M pn
r ____ _______
14
2. 46
H e e l-s e a t f itte r s , m a c h in e ---------------------Rough ro u n d e rs __________________________
M e n ------------------------------------------------------1.88 1.74 1 .6 4 -2 . 21
16
S h a n k e rs_________________ ________________
^ en
16
1 .88 1.74 1. 6 4 -2 . 21
W o m e n ___________________ ______
Sole a tt a c h e r s , c e m e n t p r o c e s s ------------35
2. 08 1 .88 1. 6 0 -2 . 43
M e n __
16
1. 88 1 .6 0 1 .6 0 -2 . 03
W o m en -------------------------------------------------F in ish in g
B otto m s c o u r e r s __________________________
2. 17
9
8
2. 10
M e n _____________________________________
Edge s e tt e r s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ _
_
M en _
__________________________________________________________________
87
R e p a ir e r s _____________________________________________________________ 1. 6 0 -1 . 76
1. 79 1 .60
1. 6 0 -1 .7 6
87
,_____________________________________________________.6 0
W om en -r,_____
1. 79 1
r p p r s _____________________________________________
_
61
2. 07 2. 04 1. 7 5 -2 . 31
M e n ______________________________________
_
_______
_
60
2. 08 2. 04 1 .7 5 -2 . 31
W o m en -------------------------------------------------M isc e lla n e o u s
68
1 .68 1. 64 1. 6 0 -1 . 75
F lo o r boys (o r g i r l s ) ------------------------------M e n _____________________________________
W o m e n __________________
25
1.66 1.63 1 .6 2 -1 . 75
50
In s p e c to rs (c ro w n e rs )__________________—
1. 73 1.67 1 .6 0 -1 .7 7
M e n ---------------------------------------------- -------37
1.75 1 .7 0 1 .6 0 -1 .8 0
W o m e n _________________________________
- .
J a n ito r s -----------------------------------------------------M e n ____________ __________________
20
M e c h a n ic s, m a in te n a n c e -------------------------2. 32 2. 32 2. 14-2. 40
S e le c te d o ffice o c c u p a tio n s
C le rk s , g e n e r a l__________________________
23
C le rk s , p a y r o l l--------------------------------------1. 80 1.78 1 .7 2 -1 . 88
S te n o g ra p h e rs , g e n e r a l-------------------------T y p is ts , c la s s A ----------—-----------------------T y p is ts , c la s s B — ------------------ --------------"
_
"

G re a t L ak es
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
N u m b er
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M e d ia n 3 M iddle3
ra n e e

M iddle W est
N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M e a n 3 M ed ian 3 M iddle3
ran g e

$
3. 11
3. 11
2. 57
3. 51
2. 99
-

$

2. 3 2 -3 . 41
2. 4 1 -3 . 41

8
8
6
8
15
-

2. 95
-

$
2. 6 9 -3 . 30
-

3. 08
3. 08
2. 10
2. 1 1
2. 29
2. 44
1. 95
2. 15
1 .74
2. 56
2. 56
-

2. 5 7 -3 . 41
2. 5 7 -3 . 35
1. 7 4 -2 . 85
1. 7 4 -2 . 77
1 .7 8 -2 . 52
1 .7 0 -2 . 52
1 .7 5 -2 . 21
1. 8 3 -2 . 49
1 .6 4 -1 . 98
2. 2 9 -2 . 89
2. 2 8 -2 . 89
-

15
10
9
9
8
8
8
7
12
11
12
11
-

2. 78
2. 89
3. 16
3. 16
2. 69
2. 69
3. 53
3. 68
2. 36
2. 42
3. 39
3. 42
-

2. 79
-

2. 1 3 -3 . 59
-

2. 43
2. 48
3. 04
3. 36
2. 17
2. 17
2. 19
2. 36
2. 17

2. 32
2. 32
3. 07
3. 36
2. 01
2. 01
2. 12
2. 24
2. 08

1 .9 6 -2 . 70
2. 0 0 -2 . 70
2 .4 0 -3 . 54
2. 8 7 -3 . 59
1 .7 2 -2 . 48
1. 7 2 -2 . 48
1 .9 0 -2 . 45
1. 9 9 -2 . 48
1 .8 8 -2 . 41

7
-

126
22
104
146
14
132
61
60
48

1 .7 4
1 .7 3
1. 75
1.87
1. 99
1. 85
1.66
1 .66
2. 50

1 .7 5
1 .75
1 .7 4
1. 72
1 .7 0
1.65
1.65
2. 47

1. 6 3 -1 .8 0
1 .7 0 -1 . 80
1. 6 2 -1 . 80
1 .6 2 -1 . 97
1 .6 2 -1 . 97
1. 6 0 -1 .7 0
1 .6 0 -1 .7 0
2. 3 7 -2 .6 5

42
51
12
16

1. 85
1 .85
2. 09
1. 75

1. 81
1. 85
-

1 .7 0 -1 . 97
1. 7 0 -2 . 00
1 .6 9 -1 .8 0

103
72
31
49
42
55
145

$
2. 46
2 .6 6
2. 02
3. 09
2. 38
3. 07
2. 80

$
2. 35
2. 76
1 .8 5
3. 09
2. 34
3. 00
2. 72

$
$
2. 0 4 -2 .8 6
2. 13 -3 . 03
1 .6 0 -2 . 31
2. 8 1 -3 . 63
1 .9 7 -2 . 66
2. 7 3 -3 . 34
2. 2 4 -3 . 20

52
36

2. 37
2. 56

2. 22
2. 25

2. 0 8 -2 . 59
2. 2 2 -2 . 98

122
80
42
53
44
63
159
110
107

40
38
71
59
55
38
12
58
44
47
28
19
106
65
41

1. 93
1. 91
2. 58
2. 73
2. 26
2 .4 6
2. 40
2. 14
2. 17
2. 14
2. 30
1. 90
2. 13
2. 34
1.81

1. 83
1 .7 4
2. 51
2. 60
2. 23
2 .4 7
2. 10
2. 10
1. 98
2. 26
1. 74
2. 01
2. 32
1 .66

1. 6 0 -2 . 13
1 .6 0 -2 . 09
2. 0 2 -3 . 08
2. 3 5 -3 . 18
1 .6 9 -2 . 62
2. 1 9-2. 71
1. 7 0 -2 . 35
1. 7 6 -2 . 38
1.6 3-2 . 50
1.7 3-2 . 66
1.6 3-2 . 22
1 .6 8 -2 . 43
2. 0 0 -2 . 55
1 .6 4 -1 .7 5

44
35
29
29
146
142
219
45
174

2. 11
2. 16
2. 77
2. 77
2. 09
2. 08
2. 09
2. 64
1.95

1. 89
2. 15
2. 90
2. 90
1 .9 9
1. 99
1 .8 0
2. 69
1 .7 0

130
109
1 18
24
94
69
66
46

1.79
1.78
1.95
2. 23
1. 87
1.75
1 .75
2. 59

1. 80
1 .8 0
1. 82
2. 10
1. 80
1. 70
1. 70
2. 52

186
25
"

1. 92
1. 91
~
“

1 .8 9
1. 92
“

$
$
1. 9 0 -2 . 99
2. 2 4 -3 . 08
1 .6 0 -2 .2 3
2. 4 0 -3 . 26
1 .9 5 -2 . 38
2. 4 8 -4 . 06
2. 3 6 -3 . 03

2. 85
2. 87

$
2. 48
2. 70
1. 96
2. 96
2. 25
3. 39
2 .7 9
2. 68
2 .7 3

14
14
59
54
55
43
8
43
35
39
24
15
99
90
9

1. 95
1. 95
3. 03
3. 01
2. 27
2. 27
1. 87
2. 27
2. 28
2. 05
2. 19
1. 83
2. 59
2. 59
2. 65

1 .6 5 -2 . 37
1 .6 6 -2 . 53
2. 3 5 -3 . 04
2. 3 5 -3 . 04
1 .7 0 -2 . 41
1. 7 0 -2 . 41
1 .6 0 -2 . 42
1. 8 5 -3 . 13
1 .6 0 -2 .2 8

26
22
27
22
160
160
237
34
203

1. 7 0 -1 . 85
-

1. 6 8 -1 . 85
1 .7 0 -2 . 07
1. 8 5 -2 . 53
1 .6 8 -1 . 99
1 .6 5 -1 . 75
1. 6 5 -1 .7 5
2. 2 5 -2 . 90
1. 7 5 -2 . 04
1 .8 0 -2 . 02
"

P a c ific
N u m b er
H o u rly e a rn in g s 1
of
w o rk e rs M ean 3 M e d ia n 3 M iddle3
ra n e e

$
2. 48
2. 71
2. 04
3. 04
2. 17
3. 32
2 .7 2

-

1. 75

1 E x clu d es p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on w eek en ds, h o lid ay s, and late s h ifts.
2 In clu d es d a ta fo r S o u th ea st reg io n in addition to those show n s e p a ra te ly .
3 See appendix A fo r m ethod u sed to com pute m e a n s, m e d ia n s, and m iddle ra n g e s of e a rn in g s . M edians and m id d le ra n g e s a r e n o t pfOVUtog
a re g io n .
 N O TE: D ash es in d icate no d a ta re p o rte d o r d ata th at do not m e e t p u blication c r it e r ia .


( o f

-

36
35
8

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

2. 01
2. 01

-

2. 09
2. 44
2. 00

-

1 .9 3
1. 93

1. 8 8 -2 . 14
1. 8 8 -2 . 07
-

-

-

1. 84
1. 85
-

1. 76
1. 96
2. 04
1. 93
1. 95
-

-

1. 7 0 -1 .9 9
1 .6 3 -2 . 10
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17
11
15
14
12
10
-

2. 54
-

$

-

"

jab* w ith few er than 15 w o rk e rs in

Table 21. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— By Size of Community
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 1 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, U n ited S ta te s an d s e le c te d re g io n s , M a rc h 1968)

S ex, d e p a rtm e n t, an d o ccup atio n

U nited S ta te s 2
N ew E n gland
M iddle A tla n tic
B o rd e r S ta te s
M e tro p o litan
N o n m e tro p o lita n
N o n m e tro p o lita n
M e tro p o lita n
M e tro p o lita n
N o n m e tro p o lita n
N o n m e tro p o lita n
a re a s
a re a s
a re a s
a re a s
a re a s
a re a s
a re a s
N u m b er A v erag e N u m b er A v erag e N u m b er A v e ra g e N u m b er A v erag e N u m b e r A v e ra g e N um be r A v e ra g e N u m b er A v e ra g e
of
of
h o u rly
of
hourly
h o u rly
h o u rly
h o u rly
h o u rly
of
of
of
h o u rly
of
w o rk e rs e a rn in g s w o rk e rs e a rn in g s w o rk e rs e a rn in g s w o rk e rs ea rn in g s w o rk e r s e a rh in g s w o rk e rs ea rn in g s w o rk e rs ea rn in g s

MEN
C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a ch in e _________________________
C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e , m a ch in e ____

$ 2. 40
2. 75

_
46

_
$ 2. 48

_

24
12
22
51
7

2. 07
2. 23
2. 57
2. 10
2. 30

_

19
15
11
43

2. 64
2. 69
2. 18
2. 10

_

_
24

_
2. 48

377
821

$ 2. 85
3. 10

218
724

$ 2 . 75
3. 00

190
471

$ 2. 83
3. 22

89
312

$ 3. 54
3. 36

139
195

$ 2 . 94
2. 97

8
18

A s s e m b le r s fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e ____________
B e d -m a c h in e o p e ra to rs —
- _
H e e l-s e a t la s t e r s _____ ___
P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ______________________
Side la s t e r s , m a c h in e _____________ _____ .. __
Toe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r s e m ia u to m a tic ________
B o tto m in g and m ak in g

287
250
207
24 8
587
368

2. 91
3. 13
2. 29
3. 29
3. 08
2. 82

311
22 2
160
231
633
266

2. 51
2. 96
2. 39
2. 94
2. 71
2. 46

139
170
65
101
295
89

3. 02
3. 24
2. 55
3. 54
3. 37
3. 38

91
81
60
77
215
69

3. 04
3. 09
2. 60
3. 40
3. 22
3. 10

82
38
112
81
169
191

2. 78
2. 98
2. 15
2. 86
2. 61
2. 42

10
13
18
17

Edge tr i m m e r s _____ ______________________________
H eel a tta c h e r s , m a c h in e ___ ____________________
S h an k e rs _ __________________________________________
Sole a tta c h e rs , c e m e n t p ro c e s s __________________

215
251
151
496

3. 09
2. 63
2. 34
2. 78

142
175
149
403

2. 80
2 .4 1
2. 03
2. 66

77
104
71
240

3. 17
2. 65
2. 43
3. 19

41
53
65
171

3 .4 1
2. 60
2. 00
3. 13

45
102
45
187

3. 20
2. 68
2. 16
2. 29

16
21

2. 30
2. 1 1

Edge s e tte r s ________________________________________
T r e e r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------M isc e lla n e o u s

119
375

3. 18
2. 71

49
210

2. 62
2. 86

47
254

3. 13
2. 75

_
136

_
2. 99

31
83

3. 52
2. 84

_
-

F lo o r boys
In s p e c to rs (c ro w n e rs) _________ __________________
J a n i t o r s _____ ___ ________ — __________________
M e c h a n ic s, m a in te n a n c e ___________________________

319
215
237
104

1. 76
2. 09
1. 70
2. 67

217
126
175
153

1. 74
1. 91
1. 69
2. 48

71
59
69
10

1. 78
2. 05
1. 66
2. 82

no

64
47
13

1. 75
1. 76
1. 63
3. 14

231
120
85
53

1. 76
2. 14
1. 73
2. 56

13
14

1. 83
2. 36

10
21
19

2. 39
1. 63
2. 16

89
175

2. 28
2. 26

266
340

2. 02
2. 38

15
17

2. 55
2. 49

33
37

2. 19
2. 61

24
98

2. 07
2. 23

16
34

1. 84
2. 19

35
63

1. 89
2. 27

1, 703
1,099
390
1, 037
352

2. 09
1.95
2. 08
2. 15
2. 02

1. 676
1, 371
392
1, 176
473

2. 15
1. 88
2. 04
2. 08
1. 93

867
411
146
508
117

2. 14
1. 92
2. 17
2. 22
2. 15

721
497
122
447
122

2 .4 5
1. 88
2. 16
2. 39
2. 23

457
392

no

191
188

2 .0 8
2. 00
2. 08
2. 15
1. 93

108
85
23
57
15

1. 88
1. 75
1. 98
1. 87
1. 80

151
143
35
125
41

1. 77
1. 78
1. 86
1. 74
1. 71

834
254

1. 96
2. 05

825
515

1. 89
2. 06

453
14

1. 91
2. 46

377
37

1. 75
2. 71

217
61

2. 01
2. 04

41
11

1. 78
1. 88

44
35

2. 24
2. 04

408
327

1. 79
1. 84

492
44 3

1. 74
1. 81

168
101

1. 84
1. 79

236
99

1. 74
1. 74

152
139

1. 77
1. 86

16
42

1. 71
1. 86

40
51

1. 67
1. 73

L a stin g

_
-

_

F in ish in g

_
-

2. 36
2. 75
2. 34
2. 38

-

_

_

_

WOMEN
C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e ___________________________
C u tte rs , v a m p and w hole sh o e , m a c h in e _____
F ittin g
F a n c y s titc h e rs ----------------------------------------------------P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f itte r s , u p p e r, h a n d ______
S k iv e rs, m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r lin in g s . —
T op s t i t c h e r s __ ___________________________________
V a m p e r s ------------------------------------------------------------------F in ish in g
R e p a ir e r s __
T r e e r s ___ —

— _____ _____ _________ , ______

M isc e lla n e o u s
F lo o r g ir ls
____________ __ _____ ________
In s p e c to rs (c ro w n e rs) _____________________________
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




Table 21. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— By Size of Community— Continued
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e straight-time hourly earnings

1 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, United States a n d selected regions, M a r c h 1968)

Southwest

Great Lakes

Nonmetropolitan
a r eas
Average
Number
hourly
of
earnings
workers

Sex, d e p a r t m e n t , a n d occupation

Metropolitan
areas
Number
Average
of
hourly
workers
earnings

Middle W e s t

N o n m e tropolitan
areas
Number
Average
of
hourly
workers
earnings

Metropolitan
areas
Number
Average
of
hourly
workers
earnings

Pacific

Nonmetropolitan
areas
Number
Average
of
hourly
workers
earnings

Metropolitan
areas
Average
Number
of
hour l y
e arnings
workers

MEN
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e _____________________________
Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe, m a c h i n e ____________

•

_

$ 2. 44
2. 57

30

35
-

1. 98
-

9
-

2. 79

11
21

2. 31

8

2. 49
3. 57
2. 94

16
55

$2. 65

23
146

$2. 37
2. 83

17
33

63
41
29
42

Z . 64

32

3. 06
2. 38
2. 91
2 . 80

-

$2. 69
3. 16

29
67

3. 04

48
47
26
32
105
53

$2. 32
2 . 68

13
36

$ 2. 57
3. 25

Lasting
A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e __________________
B e d - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s -------- --------------------H e e l - s e a t l a s t e r s ---------------------------------P u l l o v e r - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s _________________________
Side lasters, m a c h i n e ---------------------------T o e lasters, a u t omatic or s e m i a u t o m a t i c -----------

46
36

2. 30
2. 40
2. 09

13
14
16

2. 22
2. 46
1 . 88

13

21
-

-

-

121
-

-

7
30
50
54

-

2 . 21
3. 57
3. 20
3. 20

2.
2.
2.
3.
2.
2.

48
87
15
14
49
52

8
-

6
8
14

3. 11
2. 57
3. 51
3. 03

-

-

9

8
11
11

3.
2.
2.
3.

Bottoming and m a king
E d g e t r i m m e r s _______________________________________
H e e l attachers, m a c h i n e
---------------------------S h a n k e r s ____ _ ----- _ ----- --- ---- —
Sole attachers, c e m e n t p r o c e s s ----------------------

11

3. 31

7

2 . 62
2 . 60

48
31

6
8

2. 27

57

2. 77

21

-

-

-------- —
— ---

_

-

8

-

-

-

F l o o r b o y s — -------- --------------------- —
Inspectors ( c r o w n e r s ) ----------------------------- --J a n i t o r s ----------------------------------------------M e c h a n i c s , maintenance
—
___ __ —
—

_

22

2 . 60
2. 43
2. 22
2. 35

41
15
28

2. 77
2. 37

3. 14

2. 61
2. 27
2. 16
2. 52

2. 74

13
28
19
62

3. 54
2. 43

_

_

21

13

2. 25

-

-

9
27
13

1. 73
1. 65
2. 60

13
33
35

1. 72
1. 98
1. 67
2. 46

14

69
96

2 . 10

2. 19

170
228
59
167
54

2 . 26

16
69
42
42

Finishing
E d g e setters _________
____
T r e e r s ______ —

____
— —

—
—

-------— ----

-

33

18

_

_

Miscellaneous

-

20
-

-

-

2. 32

28

1 . 80

14
19

6

-

-

_

2. 22

1. 70
2. 74

14
38
40

1. 79
2. 57

2 . 08

55
69

2. 04
2. 71

12

_

_

1. 95

-

-

2. 15
2. 30

-

-

-

-

1. 99
1. 94

35
37
17
56

2.
2.
2.
2.

35

2 . 01

WOMEN
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e ________________ ___________
Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe, m a c h i n e ____________

46
27

1. 89

2. 41

-

-

-

-

Fitting
F a n c y stitchers
----- — --------------------------- -----P asters, b a c k e r s , or fitters, upper, h a n d __________
Skivers, m a c h i n e , u p p e r s or linings -----------------------------T o p stitchers ____________________________ ______________
V a m p e r s _________________________________________________

97
132
42
99

1.
1.
1.
1.

77
76
78
77

107

2 . 08

1. 89

321
177
73
192
104

1.
1.
2.
1.
1.

96
98
07
91
89

126
70
60
150
26

68

1. 98

19
52

2. 08
2 . 02

12

2. 03
2. 03
1 95
.

2. 10

2. 02

23
07
19
14

1 . 88

Finishing
R e p a i r e r s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------T r e e r s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

87
60

2. 08

16
31

2. 40
1 . 82

126
143

2. 04
1. 98

61
62

2. 11
2 . 18

99
141

2 . 21
2 . 16

25
37

1 . 66
1. 75

20
21

1. 79
1. 71

89
73

1. 78
1. 92

44
32

1. 75
1. 96

60
100

1. 75

_

1 . 82

11

1. 79

-

-

Miscellaneous
F l o o r girls ____ ___________________________________________
Inspectors ( c r o w n e r s ) — _____- ---------------- --------------------------—

1 E xcludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE: D ashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication criteria.



.

2. 04

Table 22. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— By Size of Establishment
( N u m b e r and a v e r a g e straight-time hourly e a r n i n g s 1 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations,

United States

2

United States a n d selected regions, M a r c h 1968)

N e w England

B o r d e r States

M i d d l e Atlantic

Great Lakes

Middle W e s t

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
a ge
of
hour l y
w o r k ­ earn­
ings
ers

2 50 w Drkers
or n o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
age
of
hourly
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s with—

Sex, d e p a r t m e n t , a n d occupation

MEN

50-249
workers
N u m ­ A v e rber
age
of
hourly
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
age
of
hourly
w o r k ­ earn­
ings
ers

50-249
workers .
N u m ­ A v e rber
age
of
hourly
w o r k ­ earn­
ings
ers

2 50 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ A v e rber
age
hourly
of
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

50-249
workers
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
ag e
hourly
of
w o r k ­ earn­
ings
ers

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ A v e rbe r
age
hourly
of
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
age
of
hour l y
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e --------------------------------------Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe, m a c h i n e ---------------------

134
229

$3. 05
2.96

461
1, 316

$2. 75
3. 07

51
137

$2. 71
3. 03

228
646

$3. 13
3. 33

60
47

$3. 58
3. 27

87
166

$2. 46
2. 87

-

_

61

$2.44

102

2 . 82
3. 62
2. 64
3. 34
3. 06
2.90

496
418
313
403
1,087
561

2 . 68

54
54
76
133
73

37
34
23
26
58

3. 01
3. 84

193
217

2 . 86

102

3.92
3. 33
3.42

152
45 2
137

3. 03
3. 09
2. 51
3.40
3. 30
3. 24

38
16
23
38
40
32

2.81
3. 26
2. 58
3. 00
2. 76
2. 75

58
34
99
56
147
176

2 . 61
2. 71
2. 07
2. 74
2. 53
2. 35

26
41
16
29
62
7

73
93
41
132

3. 26
2 . 66
2. 32
2.87

284
333
259
767

2.
2.
2.
2.

90
51
17
71

3.73
2. 54

2 . 00
2. 96

97
116
123
344

3. 16
2 . 66
2. 24
3. 20

20

41
13
67

46

3.45
2. 85
2.43
2. 72

33
80
36
162

2 . 88
2. 52
2. 04
2. 14

33
18
13
50

51
113

3. 26

117
472

2. 91
2. 78

15
59

3. 30
2. 77

40
331

3. 05
2.84

24
51

3. 65

12

2 . 68

2 . 62

32

2. 90
3. 19

7
26

60
47
65
41

1.76
2. 39
1.74
2. 59

476
294
347
216

1. 75
1.97
1.69
2. 55

7

1.71

174
116

51
29
26
14

1. 76
2. 69
1.76
2. 38

187
95
72
53

1. 76
1. 96
1.73
2. 55

43
65

1. 93

2 . 28

312
4 50

15

2. 75

28
117

564
384
133
275
108

2. 05
1.80
1.97
2 . 11
2 . 02

2, 815
2 , 086
649
1,938
717

1.92
1. 95
2. 05
2. 15
1 . 82

264

112

1.82
1.99

1, 395
657

129
103

1.75
1. 75

771
667

-

-

46

$2. 85

100

66

2.66

48
34
54
137
36

3. 11
2.44
3. 04
2 . 82
2. 56

80
53
33
62
155
107

156

$2. 46
2. 84

Lasting
A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e ---------------------------B e d - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------------H e e l - s e a t l a s t e r s ----------------------------------------------P u l l o v e r - m a c h i n e operators ---------------------------------Side lasters, m a c h i n e — 1--------------------------------------T o e lasters, a u t o m a tic or s e m i a u t o m a t i c -------------- ------

2. 98

2 . 28
3. 08
2. 87
2. 64

21

2. 04
2. 37

2 . 08
2. 65

2 . 12
2. 30

2. 71
3. 04
2 . 16
3. 35
2. 72

2.86

B o t t o m i n g a nd m a k i n g
E d g e t r i m m e r s ------------------------------------------------H e e l attachers, m a c h i n e --------------------------------------S h a n k e r s -------------------------------------------------------Sole attachers, c e m e n t p r o c e s s -------------------------------

21

38

12

2. 03

52
35
28
62

2.
2.
2.
2.

84
50
30
36

54
43
24
90

3.
2.
2.
2.

2 . 29
2. 41

29
45

2. 77
2. 64

22

3. 35
2. 36

2. 31
2. 54

2 . 12

01
27
19
59

Finishing
E d g e setters ---------------------------------------------------T ree r s ------------------------------ -----------------------------

34

Misce l l a n e o u s
F l o o r b o y s -----------------------------------------------------Inspectors ( c r o w n e r s ) -----------------------------------------Janitors --------------------------------------------------------M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e ---------------------------------------

-

-

*

-

18

1.76
1. 91
1. 64
2.97

2 . 11

-

-

2. 35

-

-

40
40

2. 39
2.64

2 . 13

302
155

1,286
753

113
80

803
192

2. 30
1. 92
2. 23
2. 33
2 . 18

693
43

1.85
2. 70

42

2 . 00
2 . 02

216
51

1.97

66

2 . 09

21

2 . 01

57

1.93

349
169

1.77
1.77

42

1. 72

126
154

1. 78

1.86

48
59

1. 67
1. 72

-

14

-

1 . 68

102

-

-

22

21

2 . 20

28
23

2. 32
1.62
2. 14

59
41

1. 76
2 . 61

14
59
48

2. 07
2 . 16

39
74

1 . 86
2 . 22

64
73

2. 04
2. 77

106

45 2
397

2. 07
1.96

112
211

2 . 06

172

2. 07
1.94

173
148
43
165
46

1. 77
1. 78
1 . 82
1.75
1.71

374
207
79
21 9
89

11

1. 73
1. 99

1 . 66
2. 50

WOMEN
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e --------------------------------------Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe, m a c h i n e ---------------------

-

-

88

2. 23
2. 27

F itting
F a n c y stitchers ------------------------------------------------Pasters, b a c k e r s , or fitters, upper, h a n d -------------------Skivers, m a c h i n e , u p p e r s o r l i nings ------------------------T o p s t i t c h e r s --------------------------------------------------V a m p e r s --------------------------------------------------------

1.93

2 . 18

152
47

1. 77
1.97
2. 17
2 . 22

1.94
2. 07

137

1.77

1.77
1.83

55
31

2 . 08
2 . 12
1.96

68

200

21
37
31

1. 98

2 . 01

1. 93
1. 91

296
298
119
317
80

118
157

2. 14
1. 98

160
2 03

2. 17
2. 17

99
79

1.79
1. 91

104
132

1.75
1.85

2 . 02
2 . 11

1. 96

2 . 02
2 . 06
1. 98

Finishing
R e p a i r e r s ------------------------------------------------------T r e e r s -----------------------------------------------------------

-

-

Misce l l a n e o u s
F l o o r girls -----------------------------------------------------Inspectors ( c r o w n e r s ) --------------------- ---------------------

1 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y for o v e r t i m e a nd for w o r k on w e e k e n d s , holidays, a n d late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those s h o w n separately.
NOTE:

Dashes




indicate no data

reported or data that do not m e e t publication criteria.

1.84
1.72

*

*

Table 23. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— By Size of Establishment and Size of Community
( N u m b e r a nd a v e r a g e straight- ti m e hourly e a r n i n g s 1 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, United States a n d selected regions, M a r c h 1968)
United States

2

N e w England

M i d d l e Atlantic

B o r d e r States

Great Lakes

Middle W est

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
age
of
hour l y
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
a ge
of
h o urly
work­
ings
ers

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
a ge
of
hourly
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s with—

Sex, d e p a r t m e n t , occupation, an d c o m m u n i t y size

2 50 w o r k e r s
50-249
w o r k e rs
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­ N u m ­ Aver­
ber
age
ber
age
of
hourly
of
hourly
work- earn­ w o r k ­ earn­
ings
ers
ings
e rs

50-249
workers
N u m ­ Aver­
age
b er
hourly
of
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

25 0 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
a ge
of
hourly
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ing s

50-249
workers
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
age
of
hourly
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

25 0 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
age
of
hour l y
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

M E N
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e :
M e t r opolitan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe, m a c h i n e :
M e t r opolitan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s --------------------------------------

119
-

$3. 10
-

258
203

$2. 73
2. 76

45
-

$ 2 . 62
-

145
83

$ 2 . 89
3. 56

60
-

$3. 58
-

79

173

3. 03

648

3. 12
3. 02

101

3. 05

370
276

3. 27
3. 41

47

3. 27

148
18

2 . 88
2. 75

46

$2. 48

2. 90
2. 52

32
-

3. 06
-

107

86

3. 01
3. 06

32
-

2.95
-

50
-

2. 67
-

24

2. 07

-

-

-

668

-

-

-

-

8

$2. 47
2. 4 0

-

-

17
29

$2. 69
2. 32

30
126

$2. 65
2. 90

33
67

2 . 68

9
57

2. 79
2. 64

32
48

3. 04
2. 48

40

3. 10

47

2. 87

8

-

7
26

2 . 21

-

3. 16

Lasting
A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e :
M e t r opolitan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------B e d - m a c h i n e operators:
M e t r opolitan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------H e e l - s e a t lasters:
M e t r o politan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------Side lasters, m a c h i n e :
M e t r opolitan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s --------------------------------------

81
-

2. 94
-

206

53
-

3. 65
-

2. 99
2. 96

34
-

3. 84
-

136
81

3. 10
3. 09

16
-

3. 26
-

22

221

-

2. 78
-

41
-

2. 55
-

166
147

2. 23
2. 34

16
-

2 . 68

49
53

2. 51
2. 51

20

2.49
-

92
7

2. 07
2 . 00

Ill
-

3. 13

476
611

3. 07
2. 71

48

3. 33

247
205

3. 38
3. 21

37
-

2 . 80

132
15

2. 55
2. 34

50
-

3.44
-

165
119

2. 98
2. 78

13
-

3. 43
-

64
33

3. 12
3. 22

14
-

3. 93
-

31
-

80
-

2 . 69

171
162

2 . 60
2. 4 0

34
-

2. 44
-

70
46

2. 76
2. 53

35
-

2. 96
-

109
-

2. 85

387
380

2. 76
2. 65

53

2. 84
"

187
157

3. 29
3. 10

40
-

2. 80

41
-

3. 39
-

78
39

3. 07
2. 59

10

3. 25
-

37

3. 09
-

21

3. 82
-

10

-

100

2 . 60

275
197

2. 75
2. 83

46

2. 63

2 . 62

32

290
197

-

-

-

-

2. 23

26

2. 49
2. 43

51

2 . 10

19
118

2. 92
2 . 80

50
105

3. 20
2. 49

2. 87
-

11
19

2. 64

41

3. 31
2. 71

41
13

2 . 61

67
13

2. 53
2. 45

2 . 69

7
28

2 . 62

15

2 .47

15
28

2 . 26
2. 27

147
15

8

2 . 06

43

2 . 10

54

2. 27
2. 37

28
62

2. 74
2. 52

2. 89
-

-

8
21

2. 77
2. 77

18
-

3. 54
-

3. 19
-

21

-

24

33

2. 87

13

2. 43
2. 25

-

9
13

1. 73
1. 72

12

2. 15

B o t t o m i n g an d m a k i n g
Edge trimmers:
M etropolitan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------H e e l attachers, m a c h i n e :
Metro p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------Sole attachers, c e m e n t process:
Metro p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s --------------------------------------

-

-

2. 15

3. 14

Finishing
E d g e setters:
Metro p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------T reers:
Metro p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s --------------------------------------

-

r

-

-

208
123

2. 77
2. 96

51

-

66
-

-

108

1.78
1. 76

51
-

1. 76
-

180
-

1. 76
-

53
63

2. 07
1 .76

29
-

2 . 69

91
-

57
45

1.66

26
-

1. 76

59
13

1.71
1.83

6
12

2. 69
3. 11

11

2. 48

42

2. 58
2. 45

.

1.96

-

-

-

2. 48

Miscellaneous
F l o o r boys:
M e t r opolitan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s --------- ---------------------------Inspectors (crowners):
Metro p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------Janitors:
Metro p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e nance:
M e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s --------------------------------------

S e e footnotes at end of table.




56
-

1.76
-

263
213

1.77
1. 74

43
-

2.40
-

172

2 . 02

_

.

122

1.90

-

-

56
-

1. 75
-

181
166

1.69
1.69

12

30

2 . 69

74
142

2 . 66
2. 50

"

.
"

1.69
.

1.63

-

-

_

11

-

-

-

-

.

10

2. 39

11

2. 14

12

1. 98

21

1.63

25
34

1. 71
1. 79

27
32

1. 65
1.67

19

2 . 16

37

2. 57

13
35

2 . 60
2. 46

Table 23. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes—By Size of Establishment and Size of Community— Continued
( N u m b e r an d a v e r a g e straight-time hourly earnings

1 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, United States an d selected regions, M a r c h 1968)

United States

2

N e w England

J

B o r d e r States

M i d d l e Atlantic

Great Lakes

Middle W e s t

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
a ge
hourly
of
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
age
hour l y
of
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
age
hourly
of
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s with—

Sex, d e p a r t m e n t , occupation, an d c o m m u n i t y size

WOMEN

50-249
workers
N u m ­ Aver­
ber
age
hourly
of
w o r k ­ earn­
ers
ings

250 w o r k e r s
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­
b er
age
hourly
of
w o r k ­ earn­
ings
ers

50-249
workers
N u m ­ Aver­
age
b er
hourly
of
w o r k ­ earn­
ings
ers

250 w o r k e r s
25 0 w o r k e r s
50-249
workers
or m o r e
or m o r e
N u m ­ Aver­ N u m ­ Aver­ N u m ­ Aver­
b er
age
ber
a ge
ber
age
of
hour l y
hourly
of
of
hourly
w o r k ­ earn­
w o r k ­ earnw o r k ­ e a rners
ers
i n g
ers
■-infis..,
-jP.fi,s. .

Cutting
Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe, m a c h i n e :
Metr o p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s --------------------------------------

$2.49
-

132
318

$2. 19
2.42

-

-

-

-

372
-

2 . 10

1, 331
1,484

2. 09
2. 17

228
-

268
-

1.84
-

831
1, 255

1.98
1.89

87
-

2. 07
-

303
346

181

2. 19
-

856

43
-

37

$ 2 . 61

-

-

-

-

$ 2 . 16
-

639
647

2. 13
2.47

68 $2. 05

103
-

1. 77
-

308
4 45

1. 97
1. 89

47
-

2 . 18

2. 09
2. 07

43
-

2. 05
-

103
97

2 . 22
2. 25

15
-

2. 15
2. 09

102

1 , 082

2. 17
-

4 06
397

2. 24
2. 42

642
753

1. 99
1.91

106

1.80
-

347
346

154
503

2. 07
2. 07

-

-

6

-

-

37

63

$2. 27

66

$2. 92
2. 76

96

$2. 30

1. 99

151

1. 77

92
2 82

2. 07
1. 95

126
170

2. 03
1. 99

345
52

1. 97
1.83

1. 78

47
160

2. 05

143

2 . 01

70
228

2. 03
1.94

2. 19
-

95
17

2 . 06
2 . 08

35

1.86

16
63

2 . 11

60
59

2. 10

19
-

2. 54
-

172
39

2 . 11

125

1. 74

36
183

2. 03
1. 91

150
167

2 . 10
2 . 02

1.95
1.76

39
-

2. 03
-

178
38

2 . 00

44

2. 24

14
104

2. 32

2 . 11

61
99

2 . 11
2 . 21

2. 64
2. 71

21

2 . 02

40

2. 05

-

-

-

11

1.88

35

2. 04

137

2 . 00

62
141

2 . 18
2 . 16

1.84
1. 74

-

-

116

10

1.79
1. 74

40

1. 67

-

222

88

1. 78

44
60

1. 75
1. 75

74
95

1.80
1. 75

130
24

1.83
2. 05

51

1.73

67

1. 78
1. 94

32

“

100

1.96
1.82

89
28

$2. 15
2. 17

389
63

2 . 08

7

Fitting
F a n c y stitchers:
Metr o p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------Past e r s , b a c k e r s , o r fitters, upper, hand:
M e t r o politan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------Skivers, m a c h i n e , u p p e r s or linings:
M e t r o politan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------T o p stitchers:
M e t r opolitan a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s --------------------------------------

-

-

-

-

-

-

1. 93

-

-

-

2. 14

1.95

Finishing
Repairers:
M e t r opolitan a r e a s ----------------------------------- — ----N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -------------------------------------T reers:
Metr o p o l i t a n a r e a s , ----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s ---------------------- ---------------

192
-

1.87

100

2 . 01

-

-

1. 79

-

-

-

Misce l l a n e o u s
F l o o r girls:
M e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s ----------------------------------------—
N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s ----------------- --- ----------------Inspectors (crowners):
M e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s -----------------------------------------N o n m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s --------------------------------------

96
-

1. 77
-

312
459

1.80
1.74

41
-

1.86

64

1.81

*

263
404

1.84
1.83

27

1.74

*

-

"

1 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y for o v e r t i m e an d for w o r k on w e e k e n d s , holidays, a n d late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those s h o w n separately.
NOTE:

Dashes




indicate n o data reported or data that do not m e e t publication criteria.

127

9

2. 36
“

12

Table 24. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Maine
1 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h 1968)

( N u m b e r a nd a v e r a g e straight-time hourly earnings

Num Sex, d e p a r t m e n t , a n d occupation

All production w o r k e r s ________
M e n __________________________
W o m e n ______________________

of
worker s

7, 121
2 , 453
4,668

AverN u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
age
$ 1.60 $ 1.65 $ 1.70 $ T 7 5 $ 1.80 $ 1.85 $ 1 .90' 1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $ 2.30 $ 2 . 4 0 $ 2.50 $ 2.60 $ 2.70 $ 2.80 $ 2.90 $ 3.00 $ 3.10 $ 3.20 $ 3.40 $ 3 . 6 0 $ 3.80 $ 4 . 0 0
$
hourly
and
and
under
ings 1
$ 1.65 $ 1.70 $1.75 $ 1.80 $ 1.85 $ 1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $ 2.30 $ 2 .40 $ 2.50 $ 2.60 $ 2.70 $ 2.80 $ 2.90 $ 3.00 $ 3.10 $ 3.20 $ 3 . 4 0 $ 3.60 $ 3.80 $4.00 o ve r
$2. 04
2. 29
1. 90

2,357
616
1,741

440
90
350

340
105
235

419
58
361

235
39
196

223

1

4

68
155

198
55
143

140

66
74

364
1 14
250

253
80
173

334
129
205

294
76
218

5
5

235
109
126

250
130

4
4

8
8

120

202
108
94

141
92
49

112
54
58

118
70
48

73
52

21

106
92
14

41
41

47
30
17

109
95
14

2

1

8
8

11
11

13
13

17
16

38
38

52
46

6

Selected occupations

MEN
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e (all
i n c entive)--------------------Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe,
m a c h i n e ______________________
I n c e n t i v e ____________________

40

2 . 49

2

2

2

2

147
145

3. 10
3. 10

_

_

_

2
2

_

2
_

i

2

4

2

1

5
5

3
3

7
7

2

2

5

4

8
7

5
5

6
6

6
6

18
18

1
7
7

13
13

Lasting
A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e
(all incentive)_______________________
B e d - m a c h i n e ope r a tors (all
i n c entive)___________________ ________
H e e l - s e a t lasters (all incentive)____
P u l l o v e r - m a c h i n e operators (all
i n c entive)---------------------------Side lasters, m a c h i n e — ______________
I n c e n t i v e __________________ _________
T o e lasters, automatic or s e m i ­
automatic (all incentive)____________

42

2. 72

_

_

_

2

80
24

2. 72
2. 52

.

_

_

_

61
103

102

3. 10
3. 07
3. 07

29

2. 94

22
21

2. 56
2. 59

27
15
19

2. 52
2. 72
1 . 88

64

_

-

2
1

-

1

-

6
6

1
8
8

1
12
12

4
9
9

3
3
3

6
12
12

9
9

12
12

2

2

-

2

-

4

4

4

-

2
2

6
6

2
2

2
2

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

_

_

_

-

5

_

2
2

1

3

_

_

_

.

4

2

2

2

2

_

5

4

i

2

1

8
2

8
2

4

9

7

5

-

-

-

2
2
2

2
2
2

4

1
8
7

2
8
8

2

2

-

-

2

4

1

-

1

3

-

_

_

i

4

5

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

i

-

2
2

1
1

2

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

-

*

1
1

-

-

1

1

-

6

3
4

_

_

-

.

4

_
3
3

_
_

-

1
1

_

2

1

1

2

2

7

3

8

7
-

1
2

8

5

_

2

_

_

5
5
5

1

2
7

2
2
2

B o t t o m i n g and m a k i n g
E d g e t r i m m e r s _______________________
Incentive ____________________.______
H e e l attachers, m a c h i n e (all
R o u g h r o u n d e r s (all incentive) ______
S h a n k e r s (all incentive)______________
Sole attachers, c e m e n t p r o c e s s

-

_

2
2

_

1
-

-

_

4

-

_

2
2

_

_

_

-

2
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

2

-

3

4

-

2

-

1
1

3

4

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

2 . 86

-

-

-

-

2

i

-

2

6

-

2

6

5

3

1

4

2

-

4

4

13

2

4

2

1

19
87
80

2 . 59
2. 38
2. 35

1

2

2
2

-

2
2

4
4

2
2

2
2

4
4

17
17

4
4

2
1
1

2
2

3
4
4

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

4

2
2

13

"

4
4

2
12
12

6

6
6

“

"

“

“

34
23
32

1. 71
1. 65
1 . 61
2. 85

-

2
1

2

"

i

"

1

“

1

2

“

1

1
1

Finishing
E d g e setters (all incentive) __ _______
T r e e r s — ___________________________ _—

4
3

-

6

Miscellaneous
F l o o r boys (all t i m e ) _________________
Inspectors (cro w n e r s) (all time)— ---Janitors (all t i m e ) -------------------M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e (all t i m e ) __

S e e footnote at e n d of table.




12

8

9

15
29

-

1

12
6
1

1
1
1

-

‘

“

“

2
2

2

-

"

Table 24. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Maine— Continued
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations, M arch 1968)
Sex, d e p a r tm e n t, and o ccupation

Num ­ A ver­
ber
age
of hourly
w o rk e r s ings 1

$ 1.60 $ 1.65 $ 1.70
and
u n der
$ 1.65 $ 1.70 $ 1.75

Number of w orkers receiving straigh t-tim e hourly earnings of—
1.75 $ 1.80 $ 1.85 $ 1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2 . 1 0 $ 2.20 $ 2.30 $ 2 . 4 0 $ 2 . 5 0 $ 2 .60 $ 2 . 7 0 $ 2.80 $ 2 . 9 0 T T T o o f X T o $ 3 . 2 0 $3. 4 0 $3. 6 0 T T M W T .oo
and
1.80 $ 1.85 $ 1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $ 2.30 $ 2.40 $ 2.50 $ 2 . 6 0 $2.70 $ 2 .80 $ 2 . 9 0 $ 3.00 $ 3 . 1 0 $ 3 . 2 0 $ 3.40 $ 3.60 $3. 8 0 $ 4 . 0 0 o v e r

S e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s— Continued

WOMEN
Cutting
C u t te r s , lining, m a c h in e (all
incen tiv e) _____________________________
C u t te r s , v a m p and whole shoe,
m a c h in e (all in c e n tiv e ) ---------------------

-

27 $2. 00

4

25

2. 59

2

-

-

359
357

2. 04
2. 04

7
7

26
26

161
153
72
236
234
36

1.91
1. 92
2. 06
2. 11
2. 11
1. 93

93
91
77
75
16
30
30
7

8
6
7
8
8
1

8
19

2. 18
1. 76

2
6

5

128
58

1. 76
1. 70
1. 90

49
34

24

21

12
7

3

5

123
59
46
13

1. 72
1. 72
1. 69
1 . 82

56
23
19

66
1. 73

14

1

4

-

-

2

3

24
24

14
14

10
10

6
2

5
5
4
9
9
3

3

5

3

2
1

1

12
12

15
15

33
33

27
27

5
5

4
4

3
3

6
6

7
7

_

_

5
9
9

•
3

2

1

2

-

1

6
1

2

10
10

18
18

18
18

12
12

5
5

4
4

5
5

7
14
14

4

_

4

1

-

-

-

-

1

2

-

1

2

8
8

6
6

8
8

5
5

1
1

-

4
4

-

-

2
2

4
4

6
6

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

i

-

-

-

*

-

3
3
3

_

3
4
4

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

Fitting
F a n c y s t i t c h e r s ----------------------------------I n c e n t i v e ____ — --------------------------P a s t e r s , b a c k e r s , or f i t te r s ,
u p p e r, h a n d -------- --------------------------I n c e n t i v e _________________________
S k iv e rs , m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r
linings (all i n c e n tiv e ) ----------------------Top s t i t c h e r s --- ------- ---------------------In cen tiv e __ ----------------- -----------V a m p e r s (ail incen tiv e) — ---------B ottom ing and m ak in g
Bo tto m f i l le r s (all i n c e n tiv e ) ------------S h a n k e rs (all i n c e n tiv e ) ---------------------F in ish in g
R e p a i r e r s ____ — ------------------------------------T i m e -------------------------------- ------ ----- ________---In cen tiv e _
—
----------M is c e lla n e o u s
F lo o r g i r l s (all t i m e ) ----------------------------------In s p e c to r s ( c r o w n e r s ) ------------------------------T i m e _________ _______________________________
I n c e n t i v e -------------------------------------------------------Office
C l e r k s , g e n e r a l — __ _______________
C l e r k s , p a y ro ll ---------------- -----------------------

186

18

100

1.

15

4

9

-

4

4

6
8
8
2

6
6

6

2

2
-

9

3

28

6
3

-

8
8

20
20

3

3

1

3

-

13

17

_

2

6
2

71
56
15

8
6
2

4

19
19
18

8

4

3

1

4

22

-

1
1

3

2

2

24
24

29
27
3

2

2

1

5

1

1

1
1

2
2

3

“

3

“

2

1

10

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

~

2

2

“

4

-

22
22

"

9
9

2
9
9
3

-

1
_

2
2

2
2
_
-

2
-

-

2
2

“

"

"

-

3

1

1
1

-

*

7

20
20

6
6
8

6
6
1
1

3
3

2
2

"

2
2

2
“

2

"

2
2

2

Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. A pproxim ately 74 percent of the production w orkers covered by the study were paid on an incentive b a sis.




Table 25. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Boston—Lynn, Mass.
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 2 of w orkers in selected occupations, M arch 1968)

All p ro d u c tio n w o r k e r s __ . . ________
M e n ____________________ ___________
W o m e n ________________ __ ________

of h o urly $ 1.60 $ T 5 s $ 1.70 $ 1.75
w o rk u n der
ei o
$ 1.65 $ 1.70 $ 1.75 $ 1.80 $
3, 264 $2. 27 515
67 423 205
1, 338 2. 68 122
16 52
87
1,926 1. 98 393
51 371 118

Number of w orkers receiving straigh t-tim e hourly earnings of—

$ 1.85 $ 1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2 .1 0 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2.30 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2.60 $ 2.80 $ 3.00 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3.40 $ 3 .6 0 $3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .40 $1750
and
1.85 $ 1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2 .1 0 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2.50 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 3.00 $3 .2 0 $ 3.40 $ 3.60 $ 3.80 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .60 ove r
92 163 100
72 218 126 123 117
87 132 155 107 124
88
94
73
32
33
25
14
79
21
23
28
8 106
50
51
43
30
97
71
77
55
78
68
25
12
31
79
79
29
71 140
72
64 112
72
76
74
57
53
52
n
76
27
8
16
5
2
2
3
o>

Sex, d e p a r tm e n t, and o ccupation

S e le c te d o c c up a tio ns
MEN
Cutting
C u t te r s , lining, m a c h i n e _____________
T i m e ______ ______ _________ _______
C u t te r s , v a m p and whole shoe,

36
6
30
85
80

3. 25
2. 12
3 .4 8
3. 40
3.40

-

2
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2

3
-

1
-

-

_
-

2
1

_
-

3
1

3
-

4
-

8

2
-

5
-

3
-

1
-

1

_

_

6
1

_

4

1

6
5
4

5
5

12
12
7

6
6
4

2
2
-

3
_

13

-

2
-

_

.

_
_

_
_

4

3
3
-

1
1
1

54
4
4
3

.
-

.
_
-

1
1
-

.
_
-

2

3

1

-

3

2
2

1
1

_

_

_

-

-

-

Fitting
________ _

26

2. 52
2. 82

_

_

1

_

-

_

-

_

5

2

3

_

.

6

2

1

3

2

A s s e m b l e r s fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h i n e __

3 .4 8
2. 58

.

_

.

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

6

1

.

3

_
_

_

4

2
1

4

_

2
2

_

H e e l - s e a t l a s t e r s (all i n c e n t i v e ) ____
* * * 7 ^ ^ * ^ 1 " ........ ..
Side l a s t e r s , m a c h i n e ------------------------In centive _ ___ ___ __ ________
Toe l a s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r s e m ia u to m a tic (all in cen tiv e) __ — __
Bottom ing and m a k in g

29
14
55
50

3. 56
3. 64
3. 61

.
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

3
3

4
2

3
1

-

1
1

-

-

1

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

3

-

1

3

5
5
3

Ed e
^ ^ In c V n ti v V
H eel a t t a c h e r s , m a c h i n e _____________
I n c e n t i v e _________«.__________________
Shanke r s ________________________ ______
I n c e n t i v e ____________ ___________ _
Sole a t t a c h e r s , c e m e n t p r o c e s s
(all i n c e n t i v e ) -----------------------------------

20
16
10
8

2
2
-

_
-

-

_
2

-

_
-

.
-

2
2
-

2
-

2
-

_
2
1

1
1
-

_
-

1
1
-

1
1

1
1
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

2

-

2

*

-

2
2
2
2
3

1
1
1
1

53

2. 77
2. 94
2 .4 7
2. 58
3. 18

9

6

7

2

4

1
1
7

39
35

2. 74
2. 81

-

_

-

_

1

_

1

_

_

_

5
5

11
9

2
2

2
2

3
3

2
2

3
3

2
2

i
1

3
3

16
11

1. 85

Top s ti t c h e r s 3a /

—

L a stin g

39

3

1

1

8

3
3

F in ish in g
T r e e r s ____
— — —
In cen tiv e M is c e lla n e o u s 6
Tfl
Tarvitnra

(r 7*ownf»r q)
'

See footnotes at end of table.




6
3

1
1

1

1

Table 25. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes--- Boston—Lynn, Mass.1— Continued
(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a i g h t - t i m e h o urly e a rn in g s 2 of w o r k e r s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, M a r c h 1968)
Sex, d e p a r tm e n t, and occup atio n

N u m - A v e rN u m b e r of w o r k e r s re c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a rn in g s of—
of ho urly TT760 $ 1.65 $ i .70 $ 1.75 TTTso $ 1.85 $ 1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2 .10 $ 2.20 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2.40 $ 2.50 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2.80 $ 3.00 $ 3.20 $ 3 .40 $ 3.6o $ 3.80 $4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 $ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .6 0
w o rk - and
un der
$ 1.65 $1.70 $ i .75 $ 1.80 $ 1.85 $ 1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $ 2.30 $ 2.40 $ 2.50 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2.80 $ 3.00 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3.40 $ 3 .60 $ 3.80 $ 4 .0 0 $4.20 $ 4 .40 $ 4 .6 0 o v e r

S e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s— Continued
WOMEN
F itting
F a n c y s t i t c h e r s -------------------------------T im e -----------------------------------------------In c e n tiv e ____________________________
P a s t e r s , b a c k e r s , or f i t te r s ,
u p p e r, hand --------------------------------------T im e ............. .......................................... ....
In c e n tiv e ----------------------------------------S k iv e rs , m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r
lining s .... .......
Tnr.enti v e __
Top s t i tc h e r s __________________________
T im e ___________________ ___________
In cen tiv e ----------------------------------------V a m p e r s _______________________________
In cen tiv e ----------------------------------------Bottom ing and m ak in g

167 $2. 18
55 1. 95
112 2. 30
1. 87
1. 72
1. 98

2
2

2
2

8
4
4

9
6
3

3
3
1
1

32
19
13
2
2
2
2
3
3

6
3
3
2
2
1
1

11
6
5

1
1
1
1
-

11
5
6
4
4
4
3
1
1
1

14
5
9
5
4
1

12
2
10

2
2
4
4
-

-

2

11
1
10

5
5

12
1
11

4
4

7
7

3
3

-

-

-

1
1

4
4
2
1
5
1
4
1
1

2
2

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5
2
2

3
3
3
3
4
4
-

2
2
2
2
1
1

5
5
"

2
2
-

"

4
4
-

1
1
'

1
1
2
2

~
-

"

*
2
2

"

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
5
9
2
2
4
4
7
1
6
-

-

-

-

3
2
1

9
2
7
2
2

5
5
2
2
3
3

3
2
1
“

23
18
5
2
2
4
2
6
2
4
3
2

-

-

-

-

-

47

4
-

3
-

2
2
1

3
3

3
3
3

2
"

-

-

-

2

3

1
2

2
2

6

-

1

96
38
58
26
22
61
9
52
22
20

2. 20
2. 22
2. 35
2. 01
2. 41
2. 39
2. 4 3

18
6
12
2
2
1
1

B ottom fil le r s 3b / _____________________
F in ish in g

14

2. 44

-

2

-

-

2

R e p a i r e r s (all tim e ) ---------------------------

74

1. 79

6

4

11

5

F lo o r g ir l s (all tim e) _________________
I n s p e c to r s ( c r o w n e r s ) ---------- -----------T im e .............................................................
Office

23
19
15

1. 83
1. 99
1. 84

1
*

1
-

5
4
4

2
4
4

C l e rk s , g e n e r a l _______________________
C l e rk s , p a y r o l l -----------------------------------

28
35

1. 82
1. 96

6

2

5

3
4

7
1
6

9
9
1
1

-

.
-

M isc e lla n e o u s

1
2
3
4
5
6

7

2

-

i

4
4

1

5

1

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

The B o sto n -L y n n A r e a c o n s is ts of B e v e rly , Boston, C a m b rid g e , C h e ls e a , E v e r e t t , Lynn, S a le m , S to n e ha m , and W a ke fie ld , M a s s .
E x c lu d e s p r e m i u m pay for o v e rtim e and for w o rk on w e ek en ds, h o lid a y s, and la te sh ifts. A p p ro x im a te ly 51 p e r c e n t of the p ro d u c tio n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by the study w e re paid on a tim e b a s is .
In su fficie nt da ta to w a r r a n t publication of s e p a ra te a v e ra g e s by m e th o d of wage p a y m e n t; (a) p r e d o m in a n tly t i m e w o r k e r s , o r (b) p re d o m in a n t ly in c e n tiv e w o r k e r s .
W o r k e r s w e re d is t r ib u te d a s follows; 3 at $ 4. 80 to $ 5 and 1 at $ 5 . 60 to $ 5 . 80.
W o r k e r s w e re di s tr ib u te d a s follows; 1 at $ 4. 60 to $ 4. 80; 2 a t $ 5. 20 to $ 5 .4 0 ; and 1 a t $ 6 to $ 6 . 20.
All w o r k e r s w e re paid on a tim e b a s is .




Table 26. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Haverhill, Mass.

*

(N um ber and a v e r a g e s tr a i g h t - ti m e h o u rly e a rn in g s 2 of w o r k e r s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, M a r c h 1968)
N u m b e r of w o r k e r s re c e iv in g s tr a i g h t - t i m e hou riy e a r n in g s of---$1.60 $1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40
h ourly
e a r n - u n der
and
"
“
"
~
“
"
"
“
"
"
~
"
“
*
$1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 o v e r
$ 2. 31
33
3 429
73 165 126 132
92
62
94
57
89 80 305 104
57
68
78
63
67
41
34
22
32
59
2 .8 5
17
3 64
15
10
23
23
8 49
22
24
33
36
57
23
55
63
64
56
41
39
49
31 ■ 22 32
2. 00
- 365
74 70 282
16
81
65 116
93
96
70
38
37
34
18
23
3
3
3
19

Num- A v erSex, d e p a r tm e n t, and o c cupation
A il p ro d uc tio n w o r k e r s ............................
Men _______________________________
W o m e n .........................................................
S e le c te d o c c up a tio ns
M EN
Cutting
In c e n tiv e ...................................................
C u t te r s , v a m p and whole
sh o e, m a c h i n e .............................................
In cen tiv e ____________________________
L a stin g
A s s e m b l e r s fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e
(all in c e n tiv e ) ______ _________ ________
B e d -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s (all
in c e n tiv e )_____________________________
H e e l - s e a t l a s t e r s ____________ _____ ___
I n c e n t i v e ____________________________
P u llo v e r - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s
(all in c e n tiv e ) ____ ___________________
Side l a s t e r s , m a c h i n e .................................
I n c e n t i v e ___________________ ________
B ottoming and m a k in g
Edge t r i m m e r s _______ ________________
Incentive ___________ ________________
H eel a tt a c h e r s , m a c h in e
(all incentive) ..............................................
S h a n k e rs (ail in c e n tiv e ) _____ _________
Sole a t t a c h e r s , c e m e n t p r o c e s s ...........
I n c e n t i v e _____ ___________ _____ ____
F in ish in g
T r e e r s .............................................. ....................
I n c e n t i v e ____________________________
WOMEN
Fitting
F a n c y s t i tc h e r s _______________________
Incentive __________ _________ _______
P a s t e r s , b a c k e r s , o r f i t te r s ,
u p p e r, h a n d ........................ ......................... .
Incentive ___________________________
S k iv e rs , m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r
linings ----------------- ------- __ ________
I n c e n t i v e .......................................................
Top s t i tc h e r s ..................................................
I n c e n t i v e _____ _____ ___ _______...
V a m p e r s (all incentive) .............................
F in ish in g
R e p a i r e r s (all t i m e w o r k e r s ) ..................
M isc e lla n e o u s
F lo o r g irls (ail t i m e ) _________________
I n c e n t i v e ______ _________________ ___
Office
C l e r k s , g e n e r a l ................... .......................C l e r k s , p a y r o l l ..............................................

of
workBI •
2 ,3 6 5
859
1,506

21

3. 35

77
67

3. 20
3. 29

26

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

_

-

-

-

1
1

3
3

2
2

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

i
2
2

-

3. 04

33
11
9
17
48
46

3. 78
2. 74
2. 79

-

-

-

-

3.49
3. 58
3. 66

-

-

-

-

8
7
13
11
31
30

3. 32
3. 37
2. 63
2. 50
3. 30
3. 31

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

55
51

3. 12
3. 20

-

-

-

-

-

-

132
122

2. 11
2. 13

-

15
15

5
5

5
5

77
71
17
13
105
97
15

1.92
1.93

1
1
-

-

1
1

2. 11
2. 09
2. 15
2. 17
2. 35

1
1

-

33
29
3
3
-

3
1
-

7
7
1
1
5
5
2

84

1.86

-

-

-

-

25

1.98

-

-

1

4

8

1.79

-

-

4

15
26

1.87
1.90

-

-

3
1

3

1
1
-

_

_

_

_

_

6

2

1

3

1

1

_

1
1

7
5

8
8

11
7

6
6

5
5

5
5

3
3

5
5

3
1
1

*1

1
1

3
-

4
-

2
2

2
2

i
-

1

-

1

4

-

4

4

1

5

1

-

1

1

2

-

2
2

-

9
_

3
-

5
_

4
.
_

-

i
_
-

-

9
9

1
_
-

3
1
1
4
1
i

5
1
1

1
2
2

1
-

1
1

1
3
3

2
4
4

1
9
9

1
15
15

3
4
4

2
3
3

1
1
1

i
4
4

-

1
1
1
3
2

1
1
_
5
5

1
1
_
5
5

1
_
1
i

_
2
2

2
2
_
_
1
1

_
-

i
1
1
i

i
1
_
1
i

-

3
1
-

2
2

i
3
3

2
-

1
-

-

1
1
1
1

1
1

_
-

-

1
1

1
1
4
3
3

-

1
2
1
1

_
i
_
-

-

-

4
-

_
-

2
2

3
3

2
2

2
2

3
3

-

9
9

9
9

5
5

4
4

4
4

3
3

1
1

1
1

3
3

15
5

8
8

6
6

11
11

6
6

6
6

1
1

_

_
_

4
4

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

_

i
i
3
3
1

2
2
1
i
9
9
-

1
i
_

-

5
5
1
1
8
8
2

-

_
_

3
3
2
2
27
21
3

3
3
-

_
-

5
5
2
2
4
4
-

3
3
-

_
_

8
8
2
2
i
1
1

15
15
-

12
12

5
3
1
1
5
5
-

19
19
2
2
6
2
18
18
1

2
2

-

1
1
2

1
1
2

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

74

8

2

-

-

2

3

11

-

4

3
2

2
-

1
1
2
-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

3
5

5

-

2
1

2
4

-

1
1

-

1 The a r e a is li m ite d to the city of H a v e rh ill, M a ss.
2 E x c lud e s p r e m iu m pay fo r o v e r tim e and for work on w eek en ds, h o lid a y s, and late sh ifts.
in centive b a s is .



3

14
14
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

A p p ro x im a te ly 67 p e rc e n t of the p ro d u c tio n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by the stu dy w e r e paid on an

Table 27. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Lawrence—Lowell, Mass.1
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 2 of w orkers in selected occupations, M arch 1968)

All p ro d uc tio n w o r k e r s ---------------------^4 en _____
W o m e n --------------------------------------------S e le c te d o ccup atio ns

1.75 $ 1.80 $
1.80 $ 1.85 $
148 162
54 48
94 114

1.85 $
1.90 $
90
26
64

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s re c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u rly e a rn in g s of—
$ 4 .06 $"4720
1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2 .00 $ 2 .1 0 $ 2 .20 $ 2.30 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .7 0 $ 2.80 $7790 $ 3.00 $ 3.20 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3.60
*
- and
*
*
1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2 .10 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2.30 $ 2.40 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2.60 $ 2.70 $ 2.80 $ 2 .9 0 $ 3.00 $ 3.20 $ 3.40 $ 3.60 $ 3 .8 0 $ 4 .0 0 $ 4 .2 0 ove r
43
96 49
87
51 190 116
91
69
67
55 248 111 155 122 n o 154 102 128
77
37
37
12 119
76
63
40
65
30
83 46
66
69 46
15
31
9 81
14
50
40
3
6
80
62
71
6 27
71
90
71
56
52 46 167
39
91

_O

of hourly TT760 $ 1.65 $ 1.70 $
w o rk - e a r n - u n der ei $ 1.65 $ 1.70 $ 1.75 $
3,4 42 $2. 32 655 186 157
17 34
1, 351 2. 67 170
2,091 2. 09 485 169 123

ifi

N u m - A v e r-

Sex, d e p a r tm e n t, and o c cupation

MEN
Cutting
C u t te r s , lining, m a c h i n e -------------------In cen tiv e _
_
— ------ ------C u t te r s , v a m p and whole shoe,
------- ------------ ------- m a c h in e
In c e n tiv e _
-----

39
28
78
69

2. 70
2. 77

1
1

-

_
-

1
1

-

2
2

-

-

3
-

-

3. 32
3. 34

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

1
1
1

4
4
2
2

2
2

4
3
4
4

5
3
4
4

4
4

-

1

4
2
2
i
1

-

4
1

5
3

1
1

1
1

12
10

4

1

4

5

2

6

2

3
1
1
4
4

3
3
1
1

1
1

12

3

_

-

5

3
1
4
4

2
2
3
3

4
2
10
8

-

1

1

-

1
1

1
1

1
1

9
9

5

36
-

8
7

6
4

1
1
7
7

4

4
4

5

5

7

7

5

5

3

3
3
3
3

2

-

-

6

*
6

3

2
2
2
2

5
5

2
2

-

L a stin g
A s s e m b l e r s fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e
(all in c e n t i v e ) -----------------------------------B e d -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s (all
incentive) ______ ______________________
H e e l - s e a t l a s t e r s ______________________
In c e n tiv e _ — __ -------------------- —
P u llo v e r - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s (all
incen tiv e)
— -----------Side l a s t e r s , m a c h in e (all
incen tiv e)
_ - ---- — — -------

14

3. 24

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

40
12
7
13

3. 59
2. 33
2. 31

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

1
-

1
3
2
1

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

57

3. 57

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

-

_
3
2

_
-

1

2
2
-

2
1
-

1
1
1

2
2
1
1

-

1
1
-

-

-

3

'

1

4

_

5
5

3
3

.

3. 90

6

2
1
3

1

1

1

2
1

46
5 10

B ottom ing and m ak in g
Edge t r i m m e r s _ ---- ---- -----------------

20

3. 48

Heel a t t a c h e r s , m a c h in e -------------------I n c e n t i v e ------ ----------------- -----------S h a n k e rs —______ ____________ ______
I n c e n t i v e ____ ______________________
Sole a t t a c h e r s , c e m e n t p r o c e s s
(all in cen tiv e) - ------- — -----------F in ish in g

26
23
20
16
64

2. 85
2. 96
2. 86
3. 12

1
-

.
-

3
3
-

1
-

3. 37

-

-

-

-

T r e e r s _____ _____ ___ — -----------I n c e n t i v e ----------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s

34
33

2. 80
2. 81

_

_

_

-

-

2
2

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

F lo o r b o ys (all t i m e ) _________________

15
16

1. 82
1. 60

3
16

3

1

1

_

1

-

1

4

1

_

.

2
2
1
1

1
1

3

4

i
1

_

4
4

4
4

1

-

_

-

2
2
2
3
2

-

-

*

5

*

2
2
2
2
2
2
‘ 13

_
-

-

See footnotes at end of table.




•u

Table 27.

Occupational Earnings:

W om en’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Lawrence—Lowell, Mass.’—Continued

(N um ber and a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 2 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, M arch 1968)

1 The L a w re n c e —L o w ell a r e a
2 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r
in c e n tiv e b a s is .
3 W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s
4 W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s
5 W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s
6 W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s




fo r th is stu d y in clu d es M eth u en, M a ss.
o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eek en ds, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts .
fo llow s:
follow s:
follow s:
follow s:

4 at $4. 40
2 at $4. 40
2 at $4. 20
2 at $ 4. 20

to $4. 60 and
to $4. 60 and
to $ 4 . 40; 4 at
to $ 4 .4 0 ; 4 at

A p p ro x im a te ly 65 p e rc e n t of the p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs c o v e re d by th e stu d y w e re p aid on an

2 a t $4. 80 to $ 5.
4 a t $4. 60 to $ 4 . 80.
$5 to $ 5 .2 0 ; and 4 a t $ 5 .2 0 an d o v e r.
$ 4 .4 0 to $ 4 .6 0 ; 2 a t $ 4. 60 to $ 4 .8 0 ; and 5 a t $ 4 .8 0 to $ 5.

Table 28.

Occupational Earnings:

W om en’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes—— orc’cstci', Mass.
W

(N u m b er and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 2 of w o rk e rs in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, M arch 1968)

Sex, d e p a rtm e n t, and o c cu p atio n
A ll p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs ----W o m e n ---------------------------

N u m b e r of w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tr a ig h t-tim e e a rn in g s of—
N um ­ A v e r­
ber
age
of h o u rly $1.60 $1755 $1770 $1.75 $1.80 $1. 85 $1790 $1795 $ 2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2750 $2750 $2.70 $2.8(fl$?T73ffT."do $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20
and
and
w o rk ­
u n der
e rs
$1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2,20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2,90 $3.00 $3.20 $3,40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 o v er
108
108
1, 920 $2. 46 315
30
3 84
36
552 3. 00
24
78
1, 368 2. 25 279

S e le c te d o c cu p atio n s

MEN
C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a ch in e
(a ll in c e n tiv e ) — — ------------------C u tte rs , v a m p and w hole sh o e,
m a c h in e ------------------------------ ——
In c e n tiv e L astin g
A s s e m b le r s fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e —
(a ll in c e n tiv e )-----------------------------------H e e l-s e a t la s te r s
(a ll in c e n tiv e ) —
Side la s t e r s , m a c h in e (a ll in c e n tiv e )
B o tto m in g and m ak in g
Sole a tta c h e rs , c e m e n t p ro c e s s
(a ll in c e n tiv e )----------------------------------M isc e lla n e o u s
F lo o r b o ys (a ll tim e )--------J a n ito rs (a ll tim e)---------------

3. 76
3 .8 6

3.83
2 .7 0
3. 77

WOMEN

F ittin g
F a n c y s titc h e rs (a ll in c e n tiv e )--------P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r fitte r s ,
u p p e r, h a n d -------------------------------------S k iv e rs, m a c h in e , u p p e rs o r lin in g s
(a ll in c e n tiv e )----------------------------------T op s titc h e r s (a ll in c e n tiv e )------------B o tto m in g and m aking
S h an k e rs (a ll in c e n tiv e ) —
Sole a tta c h e r s , c e m e n t p ro c e s s
(a ll in c e n tiv e ) — —---------------------F in ish in g
R e p a ire r s (a ll t i m e ) ------------------T r e e r s (a ll in c e n tiv e )-----------------M isc e lla n e o u s
F lo o r g ir ls (a ll tim e ) -----------------O ffice
C le rk s , g e n e r a l-----------------------------------C le rk s , p a y r o l l --------------------—-------------

,17

1 The W o rc e s te r a r e a c o n s is ts of H udson, M a rlb o ro , S p en c e r, W a re , W e b ste r, an d W o rc e s te r, M a ss.
2 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w e ek en d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts. A p p ro x im a te ly 65 p e rc e n t of the p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs c o v e re d by th e stu d y
in c e n tiv e b a s is .
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 45 a t $ 4 .2 0 to $ 4 .4 0 and 39 a t $ 4 .4 0 an d o v e r.
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 1 a t $ 4 .4 0 to $ 4 .6 0 4 a t $ 4 .8 0 to $ 5 ; 2 a t $ 5 .2 0 to $ 5 .4 0 ; an d 2 a t $ 5 .4 0 to $ 5 .6 0 .
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 4 a t $ 4 .2 0 to $ 4 .4 0 1 a t $ 4 .6 0 to $ 4 .8 0 ; 2 a t $5 to $ 5 .2 0 ; 2 a t $ 5 .2 0 to $ 5 .4 0 ; and 4 a t $ 5 .4 0 an d o v e r.
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 4 a t $4. 20 to $ 4 .4 0 1 a t $ 4 .4 0 to $ 4 .6 0 ; 1 a t $ 4 .8 0 to $ 5 ; an d 1 a t $ 5 .2 0 to $ 5 .4 0 .
W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d a s follow s: 3 a t $4. 20 to $4. 40 3 a t $ 4 .4 0 to $ 4 .6 0 ; 1 a t $ 4 .6 0 to $ 4 .8 0 ; and 1 a t $ 5 .2 0 to $ 5 .4 0 .



sre p aid on an

Table 29. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Southeastern New Hampshire
( N u m b e r a n d average straight-time hourly earnings 2 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h

N um - A v e r-

S ex, d e p a rtm e n t, and o c cu p atio n
A ll p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs ----------------------M e n -------------------------------------------------W o m en ______________________________
S e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s
M EN
C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e _____________
In c e n tiv e ___ __-____________________
C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e,
hand (all tim e ) ----------------------------------C u tte rs , v am p and w hole sh o e,
m a c h in e ________ ________ ______ _____
T im e _______________________________
In c e n tiv e . - _________________ —

of h o urly $ 1 .6 0 $ 1 .6 5 $ 1 .7 0
w o rk Under
t
<ri •
$1. 65 $1. 70 $1. 75
10,464 $2.21 2805 465 432
3, 715 2. 55 640 90 72
6 ,7 4 9 2. 02 2165 375 360

N u m b er of w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tr a ig h t-tin le h o u rly ea rnings of—
$ 1.75 $1. 80 $1. 85 $1. 90 $1. 95 $2. 00 $2. 10 $2. 20 $2. 30 $2. 40 $2. 50 $2. 60 $2. 70 $2. 80 $2. 90 $ 3 . 0 0 $3. 20 $ 3 .4 0 $3. 60 $3. 80 $4. 00 $4. 20
and
$ 1 .8 0 $1. 85 $ 1 .9 0 $1. 95 $2. 00 $2. 10 $2. 20 $2. 30 $2. 40 $2. 50 $ 2 .6 0 $2. 70 $2. 80 $2. 90 $3. 00 $ 3 . 2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $3. 6C $3. 80 $4. 00 $4.20 o v e r
421 483 289 304 219 661 326 459 318 347 324 227 280 291 243 4 7 7 297 246 168 130 1 14 138
132 105
87
84 165
45 216
96 141 168
69
99 123 126 132 2 9 4 192 183 129
99 105 123
63
31
15
289 378 220 217 174 445 242 294 222 206 156 128 157 165 11 1 183 105
39
9

1
1
_
-

1
1
-

-

1
1

1
-

-

-

-

92 3. 06
89 3. 09
12 2. 53

2
2
-

265 3. 33
15 2 .4 1
250 3. 39

2
2

1968)

1
1
-

1
1
-

-

-

2
2
-

2

3
2
1

1
1

1
1

2
2

2
2

1
1
2
2
-

-

1
1
1

-

2
-

-

1
-

2
-

_
5
5
2
2
3
3

2
2
1
1

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

6
3
2

22
11
i

3

2
4
"

5
6

4
4

1

2
2
-

3
1
2

4
2
2

2
2
1
-

4
4
3

-

2
-

-

-

2

9
6

5
5
-

1
1
4

5
5

i

3
3
-

1
1
-

4
4
-

4
4
-

9
9
4

9
9
-

6
6
-

7
7
-

3
3
-

4
4
-

8
8
-

5
3
2

4
1
3

8
8

7
7

13
13

20
3
17

11
11

6
6

13
3
10

26
26

52
52

17
17

23
23

15
15

26
26

1
1
1
1
3
-

4
4
1
1
2
-

5
5
2
2
2
-

5
3
2
2
4

3
3
7
3
-

5
5
3
1
2

7
7
1

15
15
12
12
5

5
5
3
3
1

7
7
2
2
-

2
2
4
4

5
5
7
7
-

2
2
9
9
-

3
3
-

i

2

8
8
7
7
4
2

2

5

3

10

13

5

6

3

2

7

11

12

5

1
4

31

23

24

6

1
5

5
10

5
5

3
3

2
2

2
1

2
2

1
1

4
4

4
4

4
4

11
11

6
6

19
6
6

4
4

2
2

7
7

5
2
2
2
10
10

2
3
3
-

2

_

4
4
i

6
3
3
4

2
1
1
3

3
_
_
_

6
_
_
-

4
_
_
_

6
6

4
1
1
3
3

5
_
-

i
3
3

6
6

27
26

3
13
12

_
12
12

22
22

.

4
4

2
2

7
7

11
11

j
7'
7

23
23

19
19

6
6

2
1

-

1

L a stin g
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e ----In c e n tiv e „ _ ,
B e d -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s ------ ------In cen tiv e
_ --------------------- — H e e l-s e a t la s t e r s (a ll in c e n tiv e )-------P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e ra to rs
(all in c e n tiv e ).------- --------------------------Side la s t e r s , m a ch in e
(all in c e n tiv e ) ________________________
T oe l a s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r
s e m ia u to m a tic ______ ——
In c e n tiv e ____ ______________________

78
76
69
63
35
54

2. 97
2. 99
3. 19
3. 24
2. 52

3. 39
172 3. 21
64 3. 25
63 3. 26

1
-

-

1
1

1
1
_
4
4
1
1
3
3

1
1
3
1
2
5
5

6
6
4
4

3

1
1
1
4
1
3
1
1

3
3

1

B o tto m in g and m aking
Edge
In c e n tiv e _____________________________
H eel a tta c h e rs , m a c h in e _____________
In c e n tiv e------------- -------------------------S h a n k e rs___ ___________________________
T im e ------------------------------------------------In cen tiv e __________________________
Sole a tta c h e rs , c e m e n t p r o c e s s -------In c e n tiv e _____________________________

39
46
43
53
11
42
146
144

3. 50
2. 36
2. 35
2. 12
1. 90
2. 18
3. 17
3. 17

•16
2
14
1
1

-

3
3
-

F in ish in g
(all in rp n tiv p )
T r e e r s -------------------------------------------------In c e n tiv e _______ -__-_________________
M isc e lla n e o u s

108 2. 98
107 2. 98

4
4

-

-

32
8
24

6
8

In sp e c to rs (c ro w n e rs) (all tim e )-------J a n ito rs (a ll tim e ) ------------------------------S ee footnotes




at e nd of table,

87
59
31

1. 76
1 .85
1.63

*

-

3

-

-

_
3
3
1
1
-

2
2
1
1

-

1
1
1
1
1
1

-

1
1
5
2
3
3
3

_

-

1
1

3
3

2
2

2
2

3
3

.

8
1

2

4

1

-

“

3

4

4

.
1
_

_

3

6
_

_

_

IV

_
5
5

-

4
4

-

19

-

4
4

-

Table 29. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Southeastern New Hampshire1—Continued
(N um ber and a v e ra g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s 2 of w o rk e rs in se le c te d o c c u p a tio n s, M a rc h 1968)

1 S o u th e a ste rn New H a m p sh ire c o n s is ts of the a re a exten d in g so u th fro m F a rm in g to n and P itts fie ld and e a s t fro m M a n c h e ste r and N a sh u a , N. H.
2 E x c lu d e s p re m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w e ek en d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts . A p p ro x im a te ly 67 p e rc e n t of the p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs c o v e re d by the stu d y w e re p aid on an
in c e n tiv e b a s is .
3 W o rk e rs w e re d is trib u te d as fo llow s: 3 at $ 4 .4 0 to $ 4 .6 0 and 3 a t $ 5 to $ 5 .2 0 .




Table 30. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— New York, N.Y.
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e straight-time hourly earnings 2 of production w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h 1968)

Num ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs
A ll p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs -------------------------- 2 ,9 8 6
M e n ----------------------------------------------------- 2, 019
967
W o m en -------------------------—-------------------S e lected o cc u p a tio n s
M EN
C utting
C u tte rs , lin in g , m a c h in e ------------—------77
T im e --------------------------------------------------21
In c e n tiv e -------------------------------------------56
C u tte rs , vam p and w hole sh o e , hand —
116
In c e n tiv e ------— ---------------------------------114
C u tte rs , vam p and w hole sh o e,
m a c h in e -----------------------------------------------52
In c e n tiv e ------------------------—----------------45
F ittin g
F a n c y s t i t c h e r s -------------------------------------59
In c e n tiv e ----------------------------------------- —
57
P a s te r s , b a c k e rs , o r f itte r s ,
u p p e r, h an d ------------ -----------------------------41
In c e n tiv e -------------------------------------------39
S k iv e rs, m a ch in e, u p p e rs o r
36
Top s titc h e rs (a ll in c e n tiv e )------— ------39
L a stin g
41
A s s e m b le rs fo r p u llo v e r, m a c h in e -----40
In c e n tiv e -------------------------------------------16
21
H e e l-s e a t l a s t e r s ------------- ■—----------- ------S ex, d e p a rtm e n t, and o c cu p atio n

P u llo v e r-m a c h in e o p e ra to rs
(a ll in cen tiv e)
----------------------------Side la s t e r s , m a c h in e — -----------------------In c e n tiv e -------------------------- ----------------Toe la s t e r s , a u to m a tic o r
s e m ia u to m a tic -------------------------——------In c e n tiv e -------------------------------------------B o ttom ing and m ak in g
B o tto m f ille rs (a ll in c e n tiv e )---------------Edge tr im m e r s (a ll in c e n tiv e ) ------------H eel a tta c h e r s , m a c h in e
(a ll in c e n tiv e )--------------------------------------Rough r o u n d e r s ---------------— ----------------S h an k e rs (a ll in c e n tiv e )------------------------Sole a tta c h e rs , c e m e n t p r o c e s s ----------I n c e n tiv e -------------------------------------------F in ish in g
B ottom s c o u re rs — --------------------------------In c e n tiv e -------------------------------------------Edge s e tte r s (a ll in cen tiv e)-------------------R e p a ir e r s -----------------------------------------------In c e n tiv e ................ .............................. .............
See fo o tn o tes a t end of ta b le .




A v e r1 .6
h o u rly $ and 0
e a r n ­ u nder
in g s 2 $ 1.65
$2. 74 245
3. 02 116
2. 16 129

N u m b e r of w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s of—
$1. 65 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .7 5 $ 1 .8 0 $1. 85 $1. 90 $ 1 .9 5 $2. 00 $2. 10 $2. 20 $2. 30 $ 2 .4 0 $2. 50 $2. 60 $2. 80 $3. 00 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .4 0 $3. 60 $3. 80 $4. 00 $4. 20 $4. 40 $ 4 .6 0
and
$ 1 .7 0 $1. 75 $ 1 .8 0 $1. 85 $ 1 .9 0 $ 1 .9 5 $2. 00 $2. 10 $2. 20 $2. 30 $2. 40 $2. 50 $2. 60 $2. 80 $3. 00 $ 3 .2 0 $3. 40 $ 3 .6 0 $3. 80 $4. 00 $4. 20 $4. 40 $4. 60 ove r
35
81
35 133 126 111 112
82 100 200 148 161 155 165 141 124 135
115 54 252
39
93
75
69
22
98
11 42
18
16
76
63
58
45
63 140 117 139 139 148 131 109 131
46
74
59
69
89
32 154 24
21
52
54
37
37
60
22
4
57
63
31
16
17
10
4
39
19
15
1
69

-

3
3
-

-

3
3
-

-

-

-

3. 36
2. 08
3. 83
3 .7 3
3 .7 3

1
1
-

2
2
-

3
2
1
-

3. 79
4. 00

-

1
-

-

-

2
2
-

1
1
-

3
2
1
-

2
2

-

-

1
1
-

1

-

3

1

1

-

-

1

-

6
6
11
11

1

-

-

-

1

1
1

5
5

1
1

6
1
5
6
6

2
2
13
13

6
6
12
12

8
8
34
34

8
8
6
6

2
2
5
5

9
_
39
6
6

1

4
4
7
5
4

4

4

5

4

4

5
5

6

1

6

4

5

9
8

46

3
2

4
4

7
6

2
2

5
5

6
6

3
3

6
6
6
6

6
6

5
4

7
7
-

5
5

5
5

12
12
.
-

2
2
_

_
_

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

2
2

-

1
1

1
1
-

3. 75
3. 60

2
2

_
-

1
-

-

1
1
-

1

1

2

6

1

-

4

4

5

-

3

5

*

66

4
4

1
1

-

-

1
1

2
2

_

_

_

1
1

75
1
1
4
84

_
_

.
2
-

3
3

2
2.

1
_
7

2
2
3
5

4
’4
83
1

7

5
2

1
2

3. 16
3. 17
3.26
2. 83

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

3
3

3
3

i
-

3
3

5
5

8
8

6
6

3
3

-

_

_

-

-

3

_

-

-

_

3

_

1

.

3

2

2

2

4

29 3 .7 4
42 3. 32
39 3. 39
30 3 .2 5
28 3. 34

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
6
6

2
7
7

3
2

3
1
1
4
4

1
4
4

-

3
-

2
5
5

-

1
-

i
i

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

1
-

3
3

4
4

1
1

15
19
38
22
18
14
31
29

2. 70
3. 86

1
-

*

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

1
-

-

1

3

-

i
2

1

1

2

3
4

3
3

1
*

5
2

2
2

3
2
1
1

1
-

-

*
1
1
1

2
6
4

3

-

2
2
-

1
*

4
-

1
2
2

1
4
1
1
6
6

36
34
24
54

3. 34
3 .4 3
3. 83
3. 67

_

_

6
6
_
2

2
2
2
1

4
4
_
_

46
64

3. 89
3. 15

1
18

i
5

1
i
2
1
_
9

3. 17
2. 92
3. 15
2 .6 7
3. 09
3. 16

6

1

3. 50
3. 51
3.29
3. 33

3
3
6
6
-

3
3
4
4

-

2
1
1
3
3
-

-

2
-

-

1

-

-

1
1

1

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

3
2

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
1

1

-

-

-

2
2
“

_
_

1
1
_

_

-

-

-

-

“
_
_
2
2
6

.
_
_
-

3
3

_
-

4
_
2

L i_

1
1
4
4

4
-

2
2

3
6
6
2
2

1
i

i
i

3
2
2
-

4

1
1

5
3

-

i
3
4
-

1
2
2

2
2

2
2

5
1
1
1

1
2
1
-

8
8
_
7

3
3
_
3

_
_
3
4

7
4

6

3

4

3

3

_
_
9
14
14
1

1

1

_
_

Table 30. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— New York, N.Y. ---- Continued
( N u m b e r a n d ave r a g e straight-time hourly earnings 2 of production w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h 1968)

N e w Y o r k S tandard Metropolitan Statistical A r e a consists of N e
Y o r k City ( Bronx, Kings, N e w Y o r k , O u e e n s .
an d R i c h m o n d Counties) a n d N a s s a u , R o c k land, Suffolk , a n d W e s t c h e s t e r
Counties, N . Y ,
A p p r o x i m a t e l y 61 p e rcent of the production w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y the study w e r e paid on an
2 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y for ov e r t i m p and for w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , holidays, and late shifts.
incentive basis.
$ 4.80
an d
4 at $ 4. 80 to$ 5.
3 W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 5 at $ 4. 60 to
4 W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 4 at $ 4. 60 to
$ 4.80;
1
at
$ 4. 80
to$ 5;and 1
at $ 5to
$ 5. 20.
5 W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 5 at $4. 60 to $4. 80 and 1 at $4. 80 to $5.
6 W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 2 at $4. 60 to
$4. 80;
2
at
$4. 80
to$5; a n d 2at $ 5 to
$5. 20.
7 W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 2 at $ 4. 60 to
$ 4.80;
1
at
$ 4. 80
to$ 5;an d 2at $ 5to
$ 5.20.
8 All w o r k e r s w e r e at $ 4. 60 to $ 4. 80.
W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 1 at $ 4 . 6 0 to $4.80; 2 at $ 4 . 8 0 to $5; an d 1 at $ 5 to $5.20.
Insufficient data to w a r r a n t publication of separate averages by m e t h o d of w a g e p a y m e n t ; (a) p r e d o m i n a n t l y t i m e w o r k e r s , or (b) p r e d o m i n a n t l y incentive w o r k e r s .




Table 31. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Arkansas
( N u m b e r an d a v e r a g e straight-time hourly earnings

Sex, d e p a r t m e n t , a n d occupation

All p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s --------------M e n --------------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------

1

of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h

1968 )

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
age
$1.60 $1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50
of
hourly
U n d e r a nd
w o r k ­ earnand
$1.60 under
ers
ings 1
$1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 o v e r
2,890
808
2, 082

$1.90
2. 12
1.82

21
3
18

1199
213
986

162
45
117

200
58
142

130
28
102

1

125
27
98

167
66
101

65
26
39

100
15
85

81
14
67

69
26
43

109
17
92

96
56
40

86
47
39

-

-

-

-

_

1

1

2

-

1

1

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

41
22
19

2

-

3

_

_

2

-

1

1

-

6

1

6

-

2

4

2

4

-

-

2

2

1

I

-

-

-

60
27
33

48
25
23

11
9
2

16
14
2

24
19
5

4
4
-

18
12
6

1

.

6

-

28
12
16

1
1
-

29
22
7

-

1

_

3

*

3

_

1

-

1

Selected occupations

MEN
Cutting 2
16

2.44

-

-

2

55

2. 57

-

6

-

35

1. 98

-

19

2

-

21
46

2. 30
2.40

-

4

-

-

2

-

-

2

2

4

2

2

2

11

2

-

2

-

2

8

1

-

-

-

-

36

2. 09

-

6

-

2

2

-

4

-

-

4

4

-

6

2

4

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

E d g e t r i m m e r s ------------------------

13

2. 22

-

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

3

-

-

2

_

_

_

2

-

_

-

_

_

_

S h a n k e r s -------------------------------

16

1. 88

-

5

-

4

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

2. 10

-

2

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

1

1

20

2. 32

2

-

7

-

4

3

1

-

3

46

1. 80

2

-

3

_

2

27

1.89

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

_

.

-

2

2

_

-

_

-

i
-

-

1
-

_
-

_
_

_

-

_
-

_
_

_
-

-

1

-

-

-

1
-

_
_

2

2
1

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

4

5

1
1

.
.

3
3
2

-

_
_

_
.
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

2

-

-

-

-

-

Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e ------------Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe,
m a c h i n e -----------------------------L asting2
A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e ---

Side lasters, m a c h i n e ----------------T o e lasters, a u t o m atic or
s e m i a u t o m a t i c ----------------------Bottoming and m a k i n g 2

.

Finishing 2
B o t t o m s c o u r e r s ----------------------Miscellaneous
janitor® (ail time)
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e (all t i m e ) ---

14

WOMEN
Cutting 2
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e ------------Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe,
m a c h i n e ------------------------------

-

22

8

3

-

-

2

1

1

2

_

6

5

1

-

3

1

-

2

2

5

4

5

7

3

1

-

11
-

4
-

1

-

-

Fitting 2
97

1. 77

-

59

2

3

2

5

132
42
99

1. 76
1.78
1. 77

-

10
5
1

5
5

1
4
7

5
2
3

3
2
5

3
2
4

7
-

-

74
20
53

16

1. 88

87
40
60

1.79
2. 01
2. 08

-

49
8

6

8

3
3
-

3

-

7

8
6
6

1

5

4

-

4

25

1.66

-

13

5

-

7

31

F a n c y s t i t c h e r s ----------------------P asters, b a c k e r s , or fitters,
u p p e r h a n d ---------------------------Skivers, m a c h i n e , u p p e r s or linings—
T o p stitchers --------------------------

1. 68

3

9
2
9

5

Bottoming and m a k i n g 2

Finishing
R e p a i r e r s __________ ___________ __ _
I n c e n t i v e --------------------------T r e e r s (all incentive)----------------Miscellaneous
F l o o r girls (all t i m e ) -----------------Time

'

;

16

2

6

1

-

-

2
2

6

5

2
2
6

3

-

-

_
_

2
2
2

2

15

Office
23

1

Excludes

2

All w o r k e r s




premium

p a y for o v e r t i m e a nd for w o r k on w e e k e n d s , holidays, an d late shifts.

w e r e paid on an incentive basis.

Approximately

77

p e rcent of the production w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y the

study w e r e

paid o n a n incentive

Table 32. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Missouri
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e straight-time hourly earnings

NumSex, d e p a r t m e n t , a n d occupation

Aver-

of
work-

hourly

of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h

1968 )

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earn i n g s of-fT76C $ 1.65 $ 1.70 $ 1.75 $ 1.80 $ 1.85 $ 1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2 .10 $ 2.20 $ 2.30 $ 2.40 $ 2 . 5 0 $ 2.60 $ 2 . 7 0 $ 2 . 8 0 $ 2.90 $ 3.00 $ 3.20 $ 3.40 $3. 6 0 $ 3.80 $ 4 . 0 0
a nd

$1.60
mgs 1

All production w o r k e r s
___ ________
M e n _
_
Women
_________
________ ____

1

$ 1.65 $ 1.70 $ 1.75 $ 1.80 $ 1.85 $ 1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2.00 $ 2 . 1 0 $ 2.2C $ 2.30 $ 2.40 $ 2 .50 $ 2 .60 $ 2.70 $ 2.80 $ 2.90 $ 3.00 $ 3.20 $3. 4 0 $ 3.6C $ 3.80 $ 4 . 0 0 o v e r
57
54
3

66
54
12

1
1

-

-

7
7

5
5

3
3

7
7

9
9

1
1

4
4

1
1

8
8

9
5
6
18

6
3
4
8

5
3
7
6

3
2
3
9

1
4
6

1
38
~
4 17
2

2

11

8

12

6

4

8

6
7
7

1
"

10
1
1

7
-

7
-

3
-

3
3

3
"
-

5
5

1
5
5

2
8
8

1
5
5

3
1
8
8

3

-

3

1
1
1

1
1
1

'

"

*

1
1
3
1

~
-

-

-

~
-

9

2

5

“

2421
312
2109

600
109
491

667
147
520

40 5
68
337

263
45
218

361
81
280

271
46
225

294
33
261

557
94
4 63

4 33
133
300

45 2
178
274

364
96
268

395
135
260

298
79
219

235
120
115

196
57
139

129
66
63

114
72
42

194
123
71

130
76
54

95
75
20

2
2

1
1

1
1

-

1
1

-

2
2

4
4

5
4

2
2

4
4

1
1

2
2

-

5
5

4
4

1
1

1
1

6
6

2
2

1
1

2
-

-

-

-

1
1
-

2
2

2
2

-

i
i

2
1
1

5
5

2
2

3
3

4
i
3

7
4
3

1
1

1
1

-

7
1
6

10
10

-

2
2

2
2

2
2

1
1

1
1

2
2

2
2

2
2

7
7

5
5

5
5

8
8

2
2

7
6

8
8

4
4

5
4

12
12

2
4
a

2
1

1
2
1

2
3
1

2
1
1

2
3
5

2
2
4
3

-

-

2
3
2

3
3
5

3
4
2
2
3

2
3
1
2
4

2
11
6

3
3
2
4
21

4
i
3
2

10
1
2
3

6
1
1
7

2
2
12

7
13
1
18

2. 86

*

4

1

3

-

-

2

3

2

-

3

8

-

17

3

6

4

-

3. 01
2. 27
2. 29
1. 81
2. 28
2. 19
2. 59
2. 60

-

-

-

-

-

2
1
1
5
1

3
1
1

-

2
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
8

3
2
2
2
2
8
8

-

-

7
7
1
4
i
i

7
2
2

3
3

1
-

2
-

1

2
2
1
1

4
1

-

1
2
-

1
5
5
2
2
-

-

6
6
4
6
-

1
12
12

10
1
6
6

2
4
10
8

6
6

2.48
2. 52
3. 35
2. 36

-

1
-

4

1

2
2
1

3

1

-

-

*

1

1

“

1

2
2

-

1

2

-

1. 73
1 99
.
1. 79
1.

-

5

-

7

5

5

14
10
60

-

3

1
1
15

3
3
21

"
4

2
2

1
1

-

’ 48

2. 50

9. Ill
2, 316
6, 795

$2. 06
2. 39
1. 95

30
-

46
45

2.46
2. 47

_

72
8
64

2. 99
2. 52
3. 04

-

100
98

2. 84
2. 84

-

-

-

80
53
33
62
155

2.
3.
2.
3.
2.

71
04
16
35
72

-

107

54
43
41
7
35
24
90
86

30

84
63
21

Selected occupations
M E N
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e
----------Incentive --------------------------Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe,
h a n d _ __ ------ ------ —
T i m e — _________ ___ ____ ___
I n c e n t i v e __ ______ ______ __ ____ ___
Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe,
m a c h i n e __
-----I n c e n t i v e __ ___ __ ~ __

-

2

Lasting 2
A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e —
B e d - m a c h i n e o p e r a tors
-----H e e l - s e a t lasters
---- ----------P u l l o v e r - m a c h i n e o p erators -------Side lasters, m a c h i n e
— —
.
T o e lasters, a u t o m atic or
semiautomatic
B o t t o m i n g an d m a k i n g
E d g e t r i m m e r s (all incentive)------H e e l attachers, m a c h i n e ------------I n c e n t i v e _______________ _________ __
H e e l - s e a t fitters, m a c h i n e 5 -------R o u g h r o u n d e r s (all incentive)------S h a n k e r s (all incentive)-------------Sole attachers, c e m e n t p r o c e s s ----Incentive _
—

3
3

1

-

*

-

2
2

1
1
3

*

‘3

“

5
1

"
-

-

"
~

~

'

'

-

-

Finishing
Bottom scourers—
---------------I n c e n t i v e _____________ ___________
E d g e setters (all i ncentive) _________
T r e e r s (all i n c e n t i ve)----------------

22
21
22
34

2
2
-

2

3

3

4

1

1

-

-

6

2

8

3

6

2

3

2
1
1

3
-

-

2

1
1

_

Miscellaneous
F l o o r b o y s (all time) Inspectors ( c r o w n e rs)
-----i m e _______________________________
Janitors (all time)
__ ________
M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e (all
time)

T

S e e footnotes at en d of table.




22

66

2

20

-

-

2

-

2
-

-

-

2

7

4

3

"

"

Table 32. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Missouri— Continued
( N u m b e r an d a v e r a g e straight-time hourly earnings 1 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h

Sex, d e p a r t m e n t , a n d occupation

8

1968)

N u m ­ Aver­
N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly ear n i n g s ofbe r
age
$ l.$0|$ 1.65)$ 1.70 $ 1.751$ 1.80 $ 1.85)$ 1.90 $ 1.95
$
2.20 $ 2 . 3 0 $ 2.40 $ 2.50 $ 2.60 $ 2.70 $2. 8 0 $ 2.901$ 3.001$ 3.201$ 3.401$ 3.601$ 3.80 $ 4 . 0 0
hourly
of
U n d e r and
w o r k ­ earna nd
$ 1.60 u n d e r
ers
ings 1
$ 1.65 $ 1.70 $ 1.75 $ 1,80 $ 1.85 $ 1.90 $ 1.95 $ 2 ,00
$ 2 ,20 $ 2,30 $ 2.40 $ 2.50 $ 2,60 $ 2 .70 $2. 8 0 $2. 9 0 $ 3 . 0 0 $ 3 . 2 0 $ 3.40 $ 3 . 6 0 $ 3.80 $4. 0 0

$ 2.00 2.10 $

$ 2.10

Selected o c cupations—

C ontinued

WOMEN
Cutting
$2.
2.
2.
2.

_
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e ____ _ ____
Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe, h a n d incentive ___________________ ._____
Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe,
m a c h i n e (all incentive)_______

23
23
29
33

2. 27

Fitting
F a n c y stitchers (all incentive)_____
Past e r s , b a c k e r s , or fitters,
upper, h a n d
I n c e n t i v e _______ — __________
Skivers, m a c h i n e , u p p e r s or
linings
Incentive
T o p stitchers (all incentive)______
V a m p e r s (all incentive)____ _ _____

296
298
296

1. 96
1. 97

119

2. 02

317
80

2. 05
2. 06
1. 98

110

Lasting
2. 04
2. 04

A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e .
.

2 . 21

H e e l - s e a t lasters (all incentive) ___
B o ttoming and m a k i n g 2

1.
2.
2.
1.
2.

B o t t o m fillers <
______________________
H e e l attachers, m a c h i n e ___________
R o u g h r o u n d e r s __________ — ________
S h a n k e r s _____________________________
Sole attachers, c e m e n t process..._

95
28
23
83
65

2.
1.
2.
2.
2.

18
77
31
17
17

Finishing
R e p a i r e r s _______
T i m e _________
I n c e n t i v e _____
T r e e r s ___________
I n c e n t i v e -----

158
38

120

203

202

Miscellaneous
F l o o r g i r l s ____ _______

104

Inspectors ( c r o w n e r s ) .

132
92

101

1. 75
1. 74
1. 85

1.68

Office
Clerks, g e n e r a l ___________
Clerks, p a y r o l l ------ --- -S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n eral..— .
Typists, class B __________

1. 85
1. 85
2. 09
1. 75

1 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m pa y for o v e r t i m e an d for w o r k on w e e k e n d s , holidays, an d late shifts.
A p p r o x i m a t e l y 73 per c e n t of the production w o r k e r s c o v e r e d
incentive basis.
2 All w o r k e r s w e r e paid on a n incentive basis.
2 W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 2 at $4. 20 to $4. 40; 2 at $4. 40 to $4. 60; 1 at $4. 60 to $4. 80; 2 at $4. 80 to $ 5; a n d 1 at $ 5 to $ 5. 20.
4 W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 3 at $ 4 to $ 4. 20; 2 at $ 4. 20 to $ 4. 40; 5 at $ 4. 40 to $ 4.60; 1 at $ 4. 60 to $4. 80; 5 at $ 4. 80 to $ 5; a n d 1 at $ 5 . 8 0 to $6.
5 Insufficient data to w a r r a n t publication of separate a v e r a g e s by m e t h o d of w a g e p a y m e n t , p r e d o m i n a n t l y incentive w o r k e r s .
6 W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 1 at $ 4 . 4 0 to $4.60; 1 at $ 4 . 8 0 to $5; a n d 1 at $ 5 . 4 0 to $5.60.




b y the study w e r e

paid o n a n

Table 33. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif.1
\iN u m o e i

Sex, d e p a r t m e n t , a n d occupation

All p r o duction w o r k e r s -------------M e n ---------- — *------------------W o m e n --------- -------------------

N u m ­ AverN u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
ber
age
$1.60 $1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $ 1.95 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $ 2.90 $3.00 $ 3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60
hourly
of
and
worku n der
CIO
$1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1.90 $1.95 $ 2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $ 3.00 $3.10 $ 3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 o v e r
1,616
762
854

$2. 17
2. 40
1.96

13
9

2. 57
2. 83

10

2. 82

-

-

-

-

-

36
32

3. 25
3. 26

_

_

_

_

_

"

“

41
27

2. 49
2. 51

-

-

*

*

11
16
10

2. 16
2. 31
2. 48

_

1

_

-

-

-

8
6
6
8
7
14

3.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.

99
3 77
22

282
46
236

224
55
169

78
41
37

52
21
31

64
30
34

42
21
21

42
8
34

84
29
55

55
31
24

41
14
27

34
25
9

61
37
24

45
33
12

38
27
n

26
17
9

38
23
15

24
20
4

23
23

28
28

24
24

-

-

-

1
1

3
3

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

'

-

-

1

-

5
1

80
41
39

60
34
26

1
1

2

49

23
17
6

40
9

2
2

-

-

2

-

-

-

7
7

_

2
2

3
3

6
56

*

Selected occupations

MEN
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e -----------I n c e n t i v e --------— ---------------Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe,
h a n d 4 b/.---------------- -----------Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe,
m a c h i n e ----------------------------I n c e n t i v e ----— — -------------------

1

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

1

3

1

_

_

_

_

.

_

_

_

"

“

5
5

1
1

_

"

3
3

“

4
4

4
1

9
3

9
6

2
2

3
3

2
2

*

-

*

-

-

-

_

„

_

.

_

1

*

.

_

_

_

2
2

2
2

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

1
1
1

“

“

“

*

1
1

-

.

-

2
1

2
2

2
2

-

•

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

2
2

-

"

“

2

1
1
2

“

"

-

-

“

“

1
1

1
1

-

_

_

_

-

2
2

_

“

“

Fitting
F a n c y s t i t c h e r s --------------— -----I n c e n t i v e -------------------------Skivers, m a c h i n e , u p p e r s or
linings 4 a /--------------------- — — —
T o p s t i t c h e r s ------------- ----------I n c e n t i v e ----------------—

“

“

“

3
2

3
1
*

-

1

3
2

“

“

3
3

3
3

1
3
1

1
-

_

1

-

-

“

-

“

Lasting
A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e —
I n c e n t i v e ----------- --------------H e e l - s e a t lasters 4b / --- -— ......--- . .
.
P u l l o v e r - m a c h i n e operators — — ----I n c e n t i v e ----- --------------------Side lasters, m a c h i n e (all incentive).

11
26
57
51
50
03

1
1

1

-

1

4

“

1

1
1

-

1

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

1

“

“

“

“

“

“

”

"

“

“

"

.
-

1
1

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

1
1

-

-

1
1

-

-

2
2

-

_

1

2

1

3
63
2

Bottoming and making
E d g e t r i m m e r s — --------------------I n c e n t i v e -------------------------H e e l attachers, m a c h i n e -------- — — —
I n c e n t i v e -----------------—
R o u g h r o u n d e r s (all incentive)-----S h a n k e r s ------------ --------- — ------I n c e n t i v e --------— ------ --------Sole attachers, c e m e n t p r o c e s s - ---I n c e n t i v e ---------— ------ --------- -

9

7
8

6

7

11

3. 16
3. 37
2. 69
2. 93

3. 68

11
10

2. 42
2. 59
3.42
3.53

14

1.95

9

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

1

See

footnotes at en d of table.




-

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

1

4

-

-

2

1

1

*

-

3

-

3

2
2
1
1

3
3

-

-

-

2

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

1
1

-

2

-

1

Miscellaneous
Janitors (all t i m e ) ---- — -------------

.
-

-

1
1
8
88

Table 33. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif.1
—Continued
( N u m b e r an d a v e r a g e straight-time hourly earnings 2 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h 1968)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

T h e L o s A n g e l e s - L o n g B e a c h St a n d a r d
E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y for o v e r t i m e an d
Includes 1 w o r k e r at $ 1 . 5 0 to $1.55.
Insufficient data to w a r r a n t publication
Workers were
distributed as follows:
Workers were
distributed as follows:
Workers were
distributed as follows:
Workers were
distributed as follows:




Metropolitan Statistical A r e a consists of L o s A n g e l e s County, Calif.
for w o r k on w e e k e n d s , holidays, an d late shifts. A p p r o x i m a t e l y 57 p e rcent of the production w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y the study w e r e paid o n a t i m e basis.
of
3
2
1
5

separate
at $ 3 . 6 0
at $ 3 . 6 0
at $ 4 . 1 0
at $ 3 . 6 0

av e r a g e s
to $ 3 . 7 0
to $ 3 . 7 0
to $4.20;
to $3.70;

by m e t h o d of w a g e p a y m e n t ; (a) p r e d o m i n a n t l y t i m e w o r k e r s ,
a nd 3 at $ 3 . 7 0 a n d over.
a nd
1 at $ 3 . 7 0 a n d over.
1 at
$ 4 . 2 0 to $4.30; and 1 at $ 4 . 6 0 to $4.70.
2 at
$ 3 . 8 0 to $3.90; and 1 at $ 3 . 9 0 to $4.

or

(b) p r e d o m i n a n t l y

incentive w o r k e r s .




Table 34. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Littleway (Including McKay) Shoes— All Establishments
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations, United States and New England region, M arch 1968)
United States 2
D e p a r t m e n t , occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

N e w England

H o u r l y earnings 1
Mean 3

Median3

Middle
r a nge 3

Number
of
workers

H o u r l y earnings 1
Mean 3

Middle
range 3

Median 3

Selected production occupations
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e ---------------------Mpn
Cutters, v a m p an d w h o l e shoe, m a c h i n e -----M e n _ --------------------- ------ — _____

$

$
2. 29
2. 22
1.73
2. 25

$
$
1.75-2. 69
1. 88-2. 71
1.60-2.33
1. 70-2. 99

9
7
78
69

1. 84

1.75

1. 60-2. 02

1.72

1.60

1.60- 1 . 7 7

1. 85
1.86
1.88

1.60
1.63
1.78

1. 60-1. 92
1.60-2. 00
1.60-2. 08

34
18
297
144

2.
2.
2.
2.

166
99
95
125
89

32
36
11
44

$
2. 38
2.28
2. 99
2. 96

$
3. 05
2. 95

$

$
2.28-3.47
2.28-3. 39

42

1.83

1. 83

1.60-1.99

30

1.84

1.77

1.60-1. 92

33
22
33

2. 01
1.88
1. 85

1.75
1.79
1.70

1. 60-2. 19
1.60-2. 07
1.60-2. 01

Fitting
F a n c y stitchers (all w o m e n ) ------------------Pasters, backers, or fitters, upper, hand
(98 w o m e n , 1 m a n ) _
______ _____
Skivers, m a c h i n e , upp e r s or linings
(all w o m e n ) .
T o p stitchers (123 w o m e n , 2 m e n ) -----------V a m p e r s (all w o m e n )
Lasting
A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e
(28 w o m e n , 13 m e n ) .
-------------------- —
—
_
P u l l o v e r - m a c h i n e operators (37 m e n ,
7 w o m e n ) _____ _____________ _______ . . __ ____________ __ ______ __
T o e lasters, automatic or s e m i a u t o m a t i c
(36 m e n , 16 w o m e n ) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

41

1. 96

1. 91

1. 60-2. 23

9

2.23

-

-

44

2. 27

2.25

1.66-2. 57

7

2.66

-

-

52

2. 00

1.74

1.60-2. 27

11

2. 58

-

-

34
35
20
91
78

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

17
11
11
23
28

2. 08
1.79
2. 00
2. 22
2. 25

1.91-2. 30
1.72-2. 31
1.74-2. 31
1. 68-2. 44
1 . 70-2.46

76

1.69

1.60

150
41
109
67
31

1. 67
1.64
1.69
1. 84
1.64

36
31

1.73
1.76

B o t t o m i n g a nd m a k i n g
E d g e t r i m m e r s (18 m e n , 16 w o m e n ) ----------------------------H e e l attachers, m a c h i n e -----------------------------------------------------------------M e n ------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- _____ _____ —
—
Littleway stitchers__ _
_
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

M en

_

32
28

2. 63
2.45
2.69
2.74

2. 43
2.45

_
2. 25-3. 26
2. 24-3. 26

1 . 60-1. 66

35

1.67

1 .60

1. 60-1. 65

1.65
1.60
1.65
1.70
1 . 60

1. 60-1. 70
1.60-1.65
1. 6 0 - 1 . 7 3
1. 61-2. 02
1.60-1.65

73

1.68
1.63
1.69
1.68
1.66

1 .60
1.60
1.65
-

1.60-1.65
1.60-1. 60
1.60-1. 70
-

1.70
1.70

1.65-1.76
1.65-1. 90

11

7

-

_
-

Finishing
R e p a i r e r s (all w o m e n ) ----------------------------------------------------------------------M i s c e l laneous
F l oor b o y s (or girls)___________________________________________________
M e n ---------------------------------- --------- ------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n _____ ___ _____ . ________ _________ _______
.
.
Inspectors ( c r o w n e r s ) (all w o m e n ) -----------------------------------Janitors (all m e n )
-------- -

20

53
9
7

-

*

Selected office occupations
Clerks, general (all w o m e n ) ------------------------------------------------------Clerks, payroll (all w o m e n )
—

15

.
1.81

_
1 .90

_
1.67-1.90

1 Excludes premium pay for overtim e and for work on w eekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to New England.
3 See appendix A for method used to compute m eans, m edians, and m iddle ranges of earnings. M edians, and middle ranges are not provided
for jobs with fewer than 15 workers in a region.
NOTE; Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication criteria.

Table 35. Occupational Earnings: Misses’ and Children’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— All Establishments

2

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, M arch 1968)
N e w England

United States 2
Department,

occupation, a n d s ex

Number
of
workers

H o u r l y earnings 1
M e a n 3 Median 3

Middle
range 3

Number
of
workers

Great Lakes

H o u r l y earnings 1
Mid d l e
r a nge 3

M e a n 3 Median 3

Number
of
workers

Middle W e s t

H o u r l y earni n g s 1
Middle
ran g e 3

M e a n 3 Median 3

Number
of
workers

H o u r l y earni n g s 1
Middle
ra n g e 3

M e a n 3 Median 3

Selected p r o duction occupations
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e _______________________
M e n ______ ____ ___ _____ ________________ ____
W o m e n _______________________________________
Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe, m a c h i n e -----Men W o m e n ---------------------------------------

$
2. 81-3. 50
2. 81-3. 52
-

12
10
43
21
22

$
2. 28
2. 30
2. 34
2. 47
2. 22

2. 24
2. 50
1.99

2. 24

1.82-2. 51

63

1. 99

1. 73

1.60-2. 24

27

1. 84

2. 25
2. 18

2. 32
2. 05

2. 00-2. 48
1. 84-2. 53

27
46
37

17
13
-

3. 09
3. 20
-

9
12
13

3. 06
2. 35
3. 35

3. 00
-

2. 50-3. 55
-

24
24
-

$
2. 00
2. 20
1.95
2. 44
2.66
2. 06

$
$
1.75-2. 43
1. 87-2. 74
1. 73-2. 28
1. 96-2. 90
2.22-3. 03
1.71-2.49

14
9
25
24

1.91

1.81

1. 60-2. 09

64

2. 23

1. 84

1. 72

1.60-1. 93

37

1. 98

150
350
321

1.99
1.92
1. 93

1.92
1. 80
1. 86

1.69-2. 19
1.60-2. 14
1.67-2. 10

54
28

160
85
75
31
78
49
139

2. 23
2. 37
2. 07
2. 56
2. 28
2. 67
2. 49

2. 10
2. 17
2. 00
2. 71
2. 21
2.62
2. 50

1. 8 0 -2.49
1. 84-2. 88
1.77-2.29
2. 00-2.96
1.73-2. 74
2.25-3. 01
1. 86-3. 03

96

2.4 0

2.41

2.03-2.69

-

92
34
40
34
24
146
107
39

2. 52
2. 19
2. 34
1. 84
1. 83
2. 34
2.42
2. 11

2. 53
2. 09
2. 24
1.65
1.70
2. 31
2.43
2. 09

2. 06-2. 89
1.60-2. 59
1. 78-2. 76
1.60-1.98
1. 6 0 - 1 . 9 3
2. 06-2.57
2. 10-2. 68
1.69-2. 38

6
9
7
22
22

163
171
24
147

2.
2.
3.
2.

01
18
04
04

1. 80
2. 08
3. 03
1.96

1.65-2.23
1.65-2. 38
2. 71-3. 57
1.60-2.27

21
19
19
-

1.79
3. 21
3. 21
-

154
31
123
163

1.72
1.70
1.72
1. 74
1. 82
1.70
1.60
2. 28

1.62-1.77
1.63-1.76
1. 62-1. 79
1 . 67-1.93
1.74-2. 10
1.65-1.88
1.60-1.64
2. 2 2 -2.55

13
-

1.79
1.84
1.73

130
82
58

1.73
1. 72
1. 73
1. 85
1. 95
1.82
1.65
2. 34

69
59

1.83
1. 89

1.75
1. 89

1.60-2. 00
1.80-1.96

124
54
70
279
175
104

$
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

566
374

17
34
04
48
68
15

-

$
2.75
3. 05
3. 18
3. 18
-

$

$
3. 20
3. 15
-

$

$

$
-

$
2. 35
2.59
2. 13
2. 78
2. 94
2 .46

$
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

30
52
11
74
91
45

$
$
1.97-2. 55
2. 0 9 - 2 . 9 4
1.93-2.40
2. 34-3. 03
2. 49-3. 21
2.22-2.75

1. 81-2. 79
1. 79-3. 03
1.83-2. 63

33
16
17
69
46
23

1.95

1.66-2. 19

117

1.92

1.79

1. 65-2. 10

1.77

1.62-2. 01

98

1.86

1.73

1.6 0 - 1 . 8 6

2. 08
2. 06
1.95

1. 98
2. 04
1. 86

1.80-2. 29
1.81-2. 18
1. 73-2. 17

45
59
82

1.96
2. 01
1. 91

1. 88
1. 85
1. 80

1. 68-2. 03
1.7 3 - 2 . 2 1
1.73-2. 02

2. 15
2. 15
2.45
2. 85

2. 18
2. 18
-

1. 99-2. 29
-

28
19
11
14
30

2. 35
2. 52
2. 14
2. 51
2.43

2. 08
2. 36
2 .47

1.88-2.86
1. 87-2. 93
1.85-2.96

18

2. 15

1. 90

1.60-2. 19

31
6
10
-

2. 15
2. 52
2. 00
-

2. 05
-

1.75-2.40
-

Fitting
F a n c y stitchers (564 w o m e n ,
2 m e n ) _________
Paste r s , b a c k e r s , or fitters, upper, h a n d
(37 3 w o m e n , 1 m a n ) --------------------------Skivers, m a c h i n e , u p p e r s or linings
(all w o m e n ) ____________________________________
T o p stitchers (347 w o m e n , 3 m e n ) ___________ _
V a m p e r s (318 w o m e n , 3 m e n ) ________________
Lasting
A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e
---------M e n ____ ___ ___ __________________ ______ ______
W o m e n ---- ------ ----------------- B e d - m a c h i n e ope r a t ors (30 m e n , 1 w o m a n ) — --Heel-seat lasters (64 m e n , 14 w o m e n ) --------P u l l o v e r - m a c h i n e operators(48 m e n , 1 w o m a n ) .
Side lasters, m a c h i n e (134 m e n , 5 w o m e n ) ___
T o e lasters, a u t o matic or s e m i a u t o m a t i c
(87 m e n , 9 w o m e n ) ____________________________

-

-

10
-

11

-

1.99-2.29
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
7
-

3. 03
3. 08
-

2.76-3. 10
2. 76-3. 10
-

17

2. 35

9

2. 29

-

1.80-1. 80
2. 78-3. 59
2. 78-3. 59
-

23
13
-

2. 25
2. 20
-

13

2.20

2. 22
-

30
30
26

1.73
1.73
1. 82

1.75
1.75
1. 79

-

Bottoming and m a k i n g
E d g e t r i m m e r s (89 w o m e n , 3 m e n ) -----------H e e l attachers, m a c h i n e (32 m e n , 2 w o m e n ) __
R o u g h r o u n d e r s (39 m e n , 1 w o m a n ) ----------S h a n k e r s_____________-___ -______________-________
W o m e n .._______ __ ___ ___ _______ _________
Sole attachers, c e m e n t p r o c e s s _____________
M e n -----------------------------------------W o m e n ________________________ _______________

-

2. 86
2. 13
1.62
2. 93
2. 93
-

2. 97
2. 97
-

-

-

-

2. 47
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

27
14
13

2. 15
2. 31
1. 98

2. 12
-

1. 98-2. 36
-

27
40
-

2. 06
2. 01
-

2. 03
1.86
-

1.87-2.21
1.60-2. 24
-

37

1.95

1. 81

1.60-2. 13

1. 6 0 - 1 . 7 7
1.60-1.77
1.70-1. 84

35
7
28
42

1.77
1.68
1.79
1. 99
2. 00
1.99
1.64
2. 37

1.74
1. 74
1. 88

1.65-1.75
-

2. 26-2. 49
-

-

1.81-2. 30
-

-

Finishing
R e p a i r e r s (159 w o m e n , 4 m e n ) _ -------------Tre e rs
-. - - _............... ..... .... .
.
M e n __________________________________________
W o m e n _______________________________________

1. 80
3. 07
3. 07
-

Miscellaneous
F l o o r b o y s (or girls)---------------------------Men
_ _ _ ______ _
o m e n ______ _____________________ _____ __ ____ ______________
Inspectors ( c r o w n e r s) — ----------------------------------------------------------------- -

W

M e n - ___________ ___________________________________________________ _

W o m e n __________________________________________________________________________________
Janitors (all m e n ) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e (all m e n ) -----------------------— — —

33

8

14
-

13
-

-

-

1.72
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23
12

8

-

-

1.78
1. 76
2. 58

1.72

1. 90
1. 90

1.75

-

-

-

1. 70-1. 84
-

-

8

34
18
13

-

1. 95
1.62
-

1.65-1.84
1.68-2. 19
-

1.73-2. 19
1.60-1.65
-

Selected office occupations
C l erks, g eneral (all w o m e n )
Clerks, payroll (all w o m e n )

____ _ _
---------------------------------------------------------

13

7

1. 87
1.85

-

-

-

-

15

7

-

1.70-2. 06
-

7
14

1.91

-

-

1.

*

-

88

1 Excludes premium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 See appendix A for method used to compute m eans, m edians, and middle ranges of earnings. M edians and m iddle ranges are not provided for jobs with fewer than 15 w orkers in
a region.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication criteria.






Table 36. Occupational Earnings: Misses’ and Children’s Goodyear-Welt Shoes— All Establishments
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations, United States and Middle Atlantic region, M arch 1968)
United States 2
D e p a r t m e n t , occupation, an d sex

Number
of
workers

M i d d l e Atlantic

H o u r l y earnings 1
Mean 3

Median 3

Middle
r a nge 3

Number
of
workers

H o u r l y earnings 1
Mean 3

Median 3

Middle
range 3

Selected production occupations
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m a c h i n e (60 m e n ,
37 w o m p n )
.
_ _
Cutters, v a m p an d w h o l e shoe, m a c h i n e _____
M e n _________________________________________
W o m e n --------------------------------------

97
202
167
35

$
2. 47
3. 09
3. 23
2. 42

$
2. 10
2. 65
2. 74
2.45

$
$
1. 8 5 - 2 . 7 4
2. 34-3. 39
2. 36-3. 68
2. 27-2. 59

26
47
34
13

$
2.13
2. 52
2. 51
2. 56

$
2. 00
2. 55
2. 50

360

2. 18

151

1.84

2. 05

1. 7 5 - 2 . 4 0

110

2. 00

1. 99

1. 75-2. 10

1.61

1. 6 0 - 1 . 8 6

46

1.66

1. 6 0

1. 6 0 - 1 . 6 5

152
149
206

2. 03
2. 22
2. 29

1.85
2. 06
2. 12

1.64-2. 22
1. 75-2. 45
1.75-2. 50

56
37
37

1.75
2. 03
2. 09

1. 65
1.88
2. 17

1.60-1. 79
1.75-2. 25
1.71-2.48

74
39
76
112

2.
2.
2.
2.

42
24
92
94

2.41
2. 14
2.61
2.62

2.
1.
2.
2.

56
39
28
19

20
13
19
27

2.
2.
2.
2.

12
11
55
13

2. 11
2. 49
2. 00

2. 00-2. 28
2. 30-2. 58
1. 85-2. 31

70

2. 86

2. 78

2. 46-3. 24

19

2. 39

2. 47

2. 21-2. 59

35
125
123
34
68
52

2. 19
3. 03
2. 85
2. 54
3. 01
2. 71

1.80
2.60
2.69
2.41
2.47
2. 58

1.60-2.26
2. 10-3. 82
2. 39-3. 23
2. 03-2. 91
2. 19-3. 07
2. 12-3. 08

11
34
27
9
16
16

1.74
2. 38
2. 70
2. 12
2. 30
2. 20

2. 35
2. 76
2.43
2. 15

2. 1 0 - 2 . 6 0
2. 51-2. 90
2. 0 5 - 2 . 6 3
2. 0 0 - 2 . 3 8

53
126
114
94
53

3. 15
1. 98
2. 02
2. 9 9
2. 01

2. 94
1.80
1. 80
2. 50
1.95

2.73-3.71
1.65-1. 92
1.65-2. 16
1. 89— 4. 26
1. 70-2. 34

16
66
54
18
18

2. 53
1.79
1.82
1.74
1.74

2. 55
1.70
1.78
1.70
1.70

1. 94-3. 03
1.65-1. 80
1. 66-1. 80
1.65-1.72
1.65-1. 72

115
69
87
35
52
38
47

1. 88
1. 92
2. 03
1.94
2. 09
1.67
2.65

1. 84
1. 84
1. 90
1.82
2. 26
1.60
2. 51

1. 70-2. 00
1. 70-2. 05
1.67-2. 33
1. 67-2. 06
1. 67-2. 37
1 . 60-1.70
2. 26-3. 00

17
13
18
10
8
16
14

1. 87
1 . 88
1.86
1. 87
1.84
1.63
2. 68

1.80
-

1.70-2. 00
-

1.85
-

1.61-2. 03
-

1.60

1.60-1.66

101
35

1.94

1. 94

2. 16

1.99

1.69-2. 13
1.86-2.24

29
12

1.89
2. 49

-

$
$
1. 93-2. 27
2. 36- 2 . 7 0
2. 33-2. 70
-

Fitting
F a n c y stitchers (356 w o m e n , 4 m e n ) _________
Pasters, backers, or fitters, upper, hand
(all w o m e n )
- ------------- — Skivers, m a c h i n e , u p per or linings
• (150 w o m e n , 2 m e n ) ------------------------T o p stitchers (1 35 w o m e n , 14 m e n ) -----------V a m p e r s (190 w o m e n , 16 m e n ) — -----------Lasting
A s s e m b l e r s for pullover, m a c h i n e
(56 m e n , 18 w o m e n ) ------------------------H e e l - s e a t lasters (35 m e n , 4 w o m e n ) ________
P u l l o v e r - m a c h i n e operators (all m e n )
____
Side lasters, m a c h i n e (all m e n ) __ _
T o e lasters, automatic or semia u t o m a t i c
(69 m e n , 1 w o m a n )
-

00-2.
95-2.
35-3.
18-3.

B o t t o m i n g and m a k i n g
B o t t o m fillers (21 w o m e n , 14 m e n )
E d g e t r i m m e r s (122 m e n , 3 w o m e n ) --------G o o d y e a r stitchers (122 m e n , 1 w o m a n ) ----H e e l attachers, m a c h i n e (31 m e n , 3 w o m e n ) __
I n s e a m e r s (all m e n ) --------------------------R o u g h r o u n d e r s (all m e n ) ------------- --------

_

-

Finishing
E d g e setters (51 m e n , 2 w o m e n ) _____________
R e p a i r e r s ________________ __ ___ _____________
W o m e n ______________________________________
T r e e r s ___________ _
—
------------ - --W o m e n -------------------------------------M iscellaneous
F l o o r b o y s (or girls)
__________________________
W o m e n - _______
_ ---- ----Inspectors ( c r o w n e r s )----------------------------------------------------------------------——— — — —
_ _ —
W o m e n __________
Janitors (all m e n )
— - ----------- —
------------M e c h a n i c s , m a i n t e n a n c e (all m e n ) -------- -------------------- —

M e n — _______ __ __

____ ____

_
-

-

Selecteti office occupations
Clerks,
Clerks,

general (all w o m e n ) _____________ ___________ _________
payroll (all w o m e n ) ________________ _________________

1 Excludes premium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to Middle Atlantic.
3 See appendix A for method used to compute m eans, m edians, and middle ranges of earnings.
provided for jobs with fewer than 15 workers in a region.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication criteria.

1.89

“

1.71-2. 00

-

M edians and m iddle ranges are not

Table 37. Occupational Earnings: Misses’ and Children’s Goodyear-Welt Shoes— Southeastern Pennsylvania1
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e straight-time h o u r l y earnings 2 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h

S e e footnotes at end of table.




1968)

g

Table 37. Occupational Earnings: Misses’ and Children’s Goodyear-Welt Shoes— Southeastern

Pennsylvania1—Continued

( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e straight-time hou r l y earnings 2 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, M a r c h

1968)

1 T h e S o u t h e astern P e n n s y l v a n i a a r e a consists of Berks, Dauphin, Lanc a s t e r , L e b a n o n , a n d Schuylkill Counties.
2 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y for o v e r t i m e a n d for w o r k on w e e k e n d s , holidays, a n d late shifts.
A p p r o x i m a t e l y 50 per c e n t of the product i o n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d
incentive basis.
3 All w o r k e r s w e r e at $3. 80 to $3. 90.
4 Insufficient data to w a r r a n t publication of separate a v e r a g e s b y m e t h o d of w a g e p a y m e n t ; (a) p r e d o m i n a n t l y t i m e w o r k e r s , or (b) p r e d o m i n a n t l y incentive w o r k e r s .




b y the study

were

paid o n an




Table 38. Occupational Earnings: Moccasin-Constructed Shoes With Hand-Sewn Plug— All Establishments
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e straight-time hourly earnings 1 of w o r k e r s in selected occupations, United States a n d N e w E n g l a n d region, M a r c h

United States 2
Department,

occupation, an d sex

Number
of
workers

Number
of
workers

H o u r l y earnings 1
Mean 3

Median 3

1968)

N e w England

Middle
r a nge 3

H o u r l y earnings 1
Mean3

Median 3

Middle
range 3

Selected production occupations
Cutting
Cutters, v a m p a n d w h o l e shoe, m a c h i n e -----M e n __________________________________________

244
210

$
3. 06
3. 10

$
3. 03
3. 14

$
$
2. 55-3. 56
2. 5 6 -3.61

210
179

$
3. 15
3. 20

$
3. 14
3. 24

$
$
2. 65-3. 64
2. 66-3. 68

122

2. 20

2. 05

1.75-2. 58

79

2. 33

2. 32

1. 88-2. 77

75
1,599
1,324
275

1. 84
2. 91
3. 00
2. 49

1.71
2. 85
2. 94
2. 40

1.65-1.
2. 36-3.
2. 43-3.
2. 01-2.

96
42
47
82

54
1,450
1, 177
273

1. 78
3. 00
3. 11
2.50

1.71
2. 93
3. 05
2. 40

1. 65-1.
2. 44-3.
2.61-3.
2. 02-2.

93
60

2. 20
2. 10

2. 10
2. 02

1. 90-2. 45
1.75-2. 40

78
42

2.24
2. 16

2. 14
2. 08

1. 9 3 - 2 . 4 8
1. 76-2. 45

23

2. 46

2.25

2. 07-2. 83

23

2. 46

2. 25

2. 07-2. 83

36
42
39
90

2. 97
2. 61
2. 89
2. 76

2. 81
2. 57
2.91
2. 65

2.
2.
2.
2.

51
00
32
18

30
27
33
76

3.
2.
3.
2.

2.
2.
2.
2.

98
82
92
76

2.53-3.73
2. 37-3. 16
2. 63-3. 47
2. 44-3. 20

25

2. 44

2. 51

2. 05-2. 73

15

2. 57

2. 51

2. 45-2. 73

27
114

3. 04
1.73

3. 06
1.65

2. 50-3. 58
1.60- 1 . 7 6

23
103

3. 14
1.68

3. 33
1.65

2.71-3.71
1.60-1.73

130
52
78
76
42

1.70
1.69
1. 71
1.82
1.69

1.65
1.65
1.65
1.80
1.69

1.60-1.75
1.64-1. 70
1. 60-1. 76
1.65-1. 86
1.60-1.73

115
47
68
63
35

1.69
1.68
1.70
1. 80
1.70

1.65
1. 65
1.65
1.75
1.69

1.60-1.70
1. 60-1. 65
1. 60-1. 75
1. 65-1. 83
1. 60-1. 75

35
82

1. 77
1.76

1.73
1.71

1. 69-1. 84
1.65-1. 85

30
77

1.76
1. 76

1.71
1.70

1.68-1. 82
1.65-1.83

Fitting
F a n c y stitchers (all w o m e n ) ------------------Pasters, ba c k e r s , o r fitters, upper, ha n d
(all w o m e n )
S e w e r s , h a n d (m o c c a s i n - c o n s t r u c t e d s h o e s )—
M e n __ ___ _____ ______________________ __ ____
W o m e n _______ ____________________________ __
Skivers, m a c h i n e , u p p e r s or linings (90
women, 3 men)
T o p stitchers (all w o m e n )

88
46
58
83

Lasting
H e e l - s e a t lasters (all m e n ) --------— --------B o t t o m i n g an d m a k i n g
E d g e t r i m m e r s (34 m e n , 2 w o m e n ) ____________
G o o d y e a r stitchers (40 m e n , 2 w o m e n ) -------H e e l attache rs , m a c h i n e (all m e n ) -----------Littleway stitchers (84 m e n , 6 w o m e n ) — ------Sole attachers, c e m e n t - p r o c e s s (22 m e n ,
3 women)
_
—
_ _
„ _

42-3.
14-3.
39-3.
32-3.

13
82
03
83

Finishing
E d g e setters (all m e n ) _________________________
R e p a i r e rs (all w o m e n ) ----- -------------------Misce l l a n e o u s
F l o o r boys (or girls)
___________________________
M e n _____________________ ___________________
W o m e n _______ __ ___ ____ ___ ______ ______ __
Inspectors (cro w n e r s ) (67 w o m e n , 9 m e n ) ---Janitors (all m e n ) _________________________ — ---Selected office occupations
Clerks, general (all w o m e n )
Clerks, payroll (all w o m e n ) ___________________

1 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y for o v e r t i m e an d for w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , holidays, a n d late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to N e w England.
3 Se e ap p e n d i x A for m e t h o d u s e d to c o m p u t e m e a n s , m e d i a n s , a n d m i d d l e ran g e s of earnings.
vided for jobs with f e w e r than 15 w o r k e r s in a region.
NOTE:

Dashes

indicate no data reported or data that do not m e e t publication criteria.

Medians

and middle

r a n g e s a r e not p r o ­




Table 39. Method of Wage Payment
(Percent of production w o r k e r s in footw e a r m a n u f a c t u r i n g establishments b y m e t h o d of w a g e p a y m e n t ,
United States a n d selected regions, M a r c h 1968)

United
State s 2

M e t h o d of w a g e p a y m e n t 1

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

All w o r k e r s -----------------------

100

100

100

100

Incentive w o r k e r s ---- ----- ------------Individual p i e c e w o r k -------------- G r o u p p i e c e w o r k --------------------Individual b o n u s ---------------------G r o u p b o n u s --------------------------

70
67

68
67
1

62
61

76
75

(J)
(3 )

(3)
1

T i m e - r a t e d w o r k e r s ----------- — -----—
F o r m a l plan — — — — — — — — — — —— — —
---— ■
—
Single r a t e ----- ------ — —
R a n g e of r a t e s --------------------Individual rates-----------------------

30
7
2
5
23

38

24
6
4
3
17

1
2
3

(3 )
2
1

(3)
32
4
2
2
29

4

4

35

Southwest

100

77
75
2
(3 )
23
6
(3 )
6
17

Great
Lakes

100

Middle
West

100

76
68
3
5

79
79
(3 )
-

24
15
3
13
9

21
9
1
8
12

Pacific

100
37
37
-

63
1
1
62

F o r definition of m e t h o d of w a g e p a y m e n t , see a p p e n d i x A.
Includes data for the Southeast region in addition to those s h o w n separately.
L e s s than 0. 5 percent.

NOTE:

B e c a u s e of rounding,

s u m s of individual i t e m s m a y not equal totals.

Table 40. Scheduled Weekly Hours
(Percent of production and office w o r k e r s in footw e a r m a n u f a c t u r i n g establishments b y scheduled w e e k l y hours, 1
United States a n d selected regions, M a r c h 1968)

United
State s 2

W e e k l y h ours

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Production w o r k e r s

----- --------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

32 h o u r s ---------------------------------40 h o u r s ------------------- -------------O v e r 40 a n d u n d e r 44 h o u r s ------ ----—
44 h o u r s — — — — — —
—— —
— — — —
44 Vz h o u r s — — —
—
— — — — — — --—
45 h o u r s ---------------------------------48 h o u r s ------------------ — --------------

3
90
1
1

.

2
87

_

5
89

3
84
4
1
8

_

_

91
-

100

-

-

All w o r k e r s ------------------------

100
2
4

All w o r k e r s —

(3 )
4
2

96
-

1
-

-

96
-

-

4
-

-

100

-

-

-

•

4

■

100

2
7
2

-

100

100

100

100

100

100

1

7

_

_

_

_

5
88

-

92
8

-

-

90

98
2

100

100

3

7

5

-

Office w o r k e r s

3 7 lk h o u r s ---------------------------------37 */r h o u r s ----------- *
-------------------------------40 h o u r s ------------------------------------------------O v e r 40 h o u r s ------------------------------ --------Under

1
2
3

93

2

9
*

*

90
10

Data relate to the p r e d o m i n a n t w o r k schedule for full-time day-shift w o r k e r s in e a c h establishment.
Includes data for the Southeast region in addition to those s h o w n separately.
L e s s than 0. 5 percent.

NOTE:

B e c a u s e of rounding,

s u m s of individual i t e m s m a y not equal totals.

-

■

_

'




8

Table 41. Paid Holidays
(P e r c e n t of production an d office w o r k e r s in f o o twear m a n u f a c t u r i n g establishments with f o r m a l provisions for p aid holidays,
United States a n d selected regions, M a r c h 1968)

United
States 1

N u m b e r of paid holidays

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
State s

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Production w o r k e r s

All w o r k e r s -------------------W o r k e r s in establishments providing
paid holidays------------------------L e s s than 5 d a y s -----------------5
d a y s ---------------------------5 d a y s plus 2 half d a y s -----------6 d a y s -----------------------------6
d a y s plus 1 half d a y ----------6 d a y s plus 2 half d a y s -----------7 d a y s ------ ----------------------7
d a y s plus 1 half d a y ----------7 d a y 8 plus 2 half d a y s -----------8 d a y s -----------------------------8 d a y s plus 1 half d a y ------------9 d a y s -----------------------------M o r e than 9 d a y s ----------------W o r k e r s in establishments providing
no paid h o l i d a y s ---------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

98
5
5

98
2
3

100
5
12

95

100
4
10

96

100

100

-

18
2
1
14
4

15

30
3
3
14
7

57

26

15
1
5
8

-

-

-

-

*

40
3
3
1

36
1
7
3

12
13

22
-

49

61
1
2
1

81
2

73
-

2

2

-

5

4

-

-

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
3
6

98
1
2

100
4
15

98

100
3
40

99

100

100

-

21
2

12

32
3

34

11

-

-

21
8

12
4
2
37
2
4
4

13
8
4
39
1
6
10

13
6

38

9

4

1

2

\

-

-

(2 )

-

1

-

-

)

(2 )
(2 )
18
9

-

-

-

-

16

10

-

“
1
-

27
-

16

-

-

Office w o r k e r s

All w o r k e r s ------ -------------W o r k e r s in establishments providing
paid h o l i d a y s -----------------------L e s s than 5 d a y s -----------------5
d a y s ---------------------------5 d a y s plus 1 or 2 half d a y s ------6 d a y s -----------------------------6
d a y s plus 1 half d a y ----------6 d a y s plus 2 half d a y s -----------7 d a y s plus 1 half d a y ------------7 d a y s plus 2 half d a y s --- -------8 d a y s -----------------------------8 d a y s plus 1 or 2 half d a y s ------9 d a y s -----------------------------M o r e than 9 d a y s ---------- --- ---W o r k e r s in establishments providing
n o paid h o l i d a y s ---------------------

1
2

(2 )

B e c a u s e of rounding,

-

(2 )

-

(2 )

_
-

21

-

46
-

_

-

-

11
11

26

37

-

(2 )
6

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

-

-

-

Includes data for the Southeast region in addition to those s h o w n separately.
L e s s than 0. 5 percent.

NOTE:

-

s u m s of individual i t e m s m a y not equal totals.

-

i
55

-

-

71

54

Table 42. Paid Vacations
( P ercent of production a n d office w o r k e r s in footwear m a n u f a c t u r i n g e s t a blishments with f o r m a l provisions for paid vacations after selected p eriods of service.
United States an d selected regions, M a r c h 1968)
United
New
Middle
States 1 E n gland Atlantic

V acation policy

Border
States

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

New
United
States 1 E n g lane

Middle
Atlantic

Production w o r k e r s
All w o r k e r s _____ ___________ ___ ______ ____ ____

Border
States

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Office w o r k e r s

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

98
60
37
1

98
43
54
1

100
51
48

100
77
23
-

95
73
16
6

100
100
-

100
93
7
-

98
84
13

(2)

96
92
4
-

98
88
10
-

95
77
17
1

100
94
6
_

100
100
_

96
92
5
_

100
100
_

100
100
_

2

2

-

4

-

5

-

*

2

2

5

-

-

4

2
94

2
94
2

-

9
80
-

2
89
-

-

3
53
-

-

_

88
-

19
55
-

_

99
1
_

57
_

7

86
14

100
_
_

(2)

2
92
1
4
_
-

_
83
5
12
_
-

9
80
7
_
-

.
72
_
28
_
-

_
83
_
17
_
.

(2)
10
2
84
r)
1
(2)

1
11
1
81
4
-

18
3
77
2
-

_
29

(2)
9
1
71
3
14
(*)

1
9
1
59
1
26
-

(2)
8
1
35
n
52
1
(2)
8
1

M e t h o d of p a y m e n t
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s hments providing
paid v a c a t i o n s _______________________________________
Length-of-time p a y m e n t
— --------------------P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t ______________________________
Other
____
____ — __
______ ____ ____
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s providing no
___ _____ _________
paid vacations
__ ____ _____

(2)

-

A m o u n t of vacation pay 3
After 1 y e a r of service:
U n d e r 1 w e e k ____________ ________________________
1 week
__
_
__ ____ _____
_ ____
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r Z w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s ____________ ______________________ _________
After 3 ye a r s of service*
U n d e r 1 w e e k _______ ____ __________ _______________
1 week
„
______ ______
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
?. w p p W s __ _
_ _____
.
3 weeks
, ,. , ,
.
.,..., ...................
________ ___________ ___ ___
4 w e e k s __________
After 5 y e a r s of service:
U n d e r 1 w e e k __
1 week
„ ___ ____ __ ____ ________ __
___
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s _. _ ___ _____ ____________ ___ ___ ________
_
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 weeks
............
___________ ____ ______________ —
4 weeks
After 10 y e a r s of service:
Under 1 week
_
1 week
____ _
_
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
O v e r 2 a nd u n d e r 3 w e e k s ________________ _______
3 weeks
—
_
—
— ___
___
— —
O v e r 3 w e e k s ______________________________________
After 15 y e a r s of service:
Under 1 w e e k . . . .
___
.. ____
. ..
1 week
— ____ _ _ _____ ________
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s _________________________
2 w e e k s ____________________ __________ ____________
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s _________________________
3 weeks _
__ ____ — ____ ____
_ __ ______
O v e r 3 w e e k s ___ _________________________________
After 20 y e a r s of service:
Under 1 week - -- __ . ,
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s __________________ — ____
2 weeks
.
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s __ ________
_
____
3 weeks
— — ____ ___
____
____
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ____
_ ________
4 weeks
__
___
__
__
After 25 y e a r s of service:
______ __ _ ______________ ______
Under 1 week
1 week
__
__
___
__
_
____
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ---- ------------- -2 weeks
___
— ____
______
O v e r 2 a nd u n d e r
w e e k s ___________________ .
3 w e e k s _____________________ _______________________
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s _________________________

3

4 weeks

- .....................................................................................

(2 )
2
1
83
5
9
_

y

51
(?)
1
(2)
8
1
ft
51

V)
3

-

-

-

100
_

93
-

1
67
-

(2)
52
-

9

89
2
3

7

30

46

7

26

44

39

89
2
9
_
-

.
58
14
23
_
-

.
96
_
4
_
-

_
93
.
.
_
7

1
49
2
45
(2)

(2)
45
(*)
52
_
-

_
79
2
15
_
-

19
55
_
26
_
-

_
50
2
48
.
-

_
24
4
68
(2)

_
12
84
-

1
99
.
-

_
1
93
1
_
-

_
3
_
97
_
.
-

_
20
_
73
_
.
7

_
6
1
88
1
2
-

_
6
_
88
4
_

_
13
2
80
_
_
-

_
16
84
_
_
-

_
_
_
100
_
_
_

_

_

(2)
2
89
5
(*)

(2)

15
_
64
20
1

12
_
84
-

_
1
_
99
.
-

_
_
_
75
17
3
_

_
3
_
97
_

_
20
_
73
_
_
7

_
6
1
78
1
12
_

_
5
_
71
r
21
_

_
11
_
68
_
16
_

_
16
_
84
_
_

_
_
_
100
_
_
_

1
9
1
39
1
47
-

13
58
•
26
3

12
45
39
-

1
50
49
-

14
80
1

3
.
7
91
-

20
73
.
7

_
5
1
43
49
_

_
5
_
55
38
.

10
_
61
24
_

_
16
_
31
.
54
.

_
_
63
_
37
_

1
9
1
39
1
47
-

13
57
27
1
2

12
45
39
_

1
50
49
_

3

-

_

si
38
_
-

10
60
25
_
-

16

-

5
1
42
r
46
_
3

-

7
91
.
-

20
73
.
7

5

-

_
13
1
72
2
7

31
54
_
-

_
63
_
37
_
-

13
57

12
13

1
50

13

3
7

5
1
40

5
_
55

10
60

16
_
28

_
63

27

71
_

49
.

61

91
-

20
73
_
_

46
_

38
_

25
.

57
_

37
_

-

1
9
1
39
1
47
_

"

1
2

“

“

2

19

“

7

4

“

"

99
_
-

_

_

(2 )

(2)

84
5
7
_

99
_
_

71
_
.
_
_
29
71
_
_
_

_

_

(2)

(2)

25
_
71
_

ii
_
89

71
_
_
-

_
29

-

_

(2 )

(2)

_
29

23
2
57
_
14

11
_
89

71
_
.

_

_

-

-

(2)

(2)

.
29

23

11

71

54
_
19

89

_
_

"

1 Includes data for the Southeast region in addition to those s h o w n separately.
2 L e s s than 0. 5 percent.
3 V a c a t i o n p a y m e n t s , s u c h as percent of annual earnings, w e r e c o n v e r t e d to a n equivalent t i m e basis.
P e r i o d s of service w e r e arbitrarily c h o s e n a n d d o not necess a r i l y reflect
individual e s t a b l i s h m ent provisions for progression.
F o r examp l e , the c h a n g e s in proportions indicated at 15 y e a r s m a y include c h a n g e s w h i c h o c c u r r e d b e t w e e n 10 a n d 15 years.
NOTE:

B e c a u s e of rounding,




s u m s of individual items m a y not equal totals.

Table 43. Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
( P e r c e n t of production a n d office w o r k e r s in footwear m a n u f a c t u r i n g establishments with specified health, insurance, a n d p e n s i o n plans,
United States a n d selected regions, M a r c h 1968)

T y p e of plan 1

United
New
State s 2 En g l a n d

Middle B o r d e r
Atlantic States

Southwest

Great
.L a k e s

Middle
West

Pacific

United
New
Mid d l e
States 2 E n g l a n d Atlantic

Production w o r k e r s
All w o r k e r s ---------------------------------

Border
State s

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Office w o r k e r s

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

90
53
36

87
69
18

85
61
24

90
38
52

96
55
41

89
29
60

97
40
57

100
100

92
56
36

90
71
20

89
56
33

86
57
29

96
32
64

90
42
48

99
38
61

100
100

43
22
21

55
39
16

38
23
16

23
13
10

24
11
13

42
3
39

21

51
28
23

59
41
18

43
21
22

29
29

51
8
43

46
19
27

31

17
17

68
67
50
17

70
70
53
18

48
47
36
11

75
75
36
39

52
52
50
2

92
88

-

-

-

-

-

76
65
45
20
36

54
52
43
9
2
2
87
53
35
85
49
35
34
18
16
2

69
63
36
27
42

39
39
37
2

-

73
65
41
23
23
1
88
50

93
79
24
54
37
2
78
27
51
78
27
51
63
26
37
48

W o r k e r s in esta b l i s h m ents providing:
Life i n s u r a n c e --------------------------------E m p l o y e r fina n c ed------------------ *
------Jointly fina n c e d ----------------------------A c c idental dea t h a n d d i s m e m b e r m e n t
i n s u r a n c e ------------------------------------E m p l o y e r f i n a n c ed-------------------------Jointly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------Sickn e s s a n d accident i n surance or
sick leave or both 3 --------- — --------------Sickn e s s a n d accident i n s u r a n c e ----------E m p l o y e r financed---------------------Jointly f i n a n c e d ------------------------Sick leave (full pay, n o waiting period)--Sick leave (partial p a y or waiting period)—
Hospitalization i n s u r a n c e --------------------E m p l o y e r f i n a n c ed-------------------------Jointly fina n c e d----------------------------Surgical i n s u r a n c e ----------------------------E m p l o y e r f i n a n c ed---------------------- .
--Jointly f i n a n c e d ---------------------------M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e ----------------------------E m p l o y e r fina n c ed-------------------------Jointly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------C a t a s t r o p h e i n s u r a n c e ------------------------E m p l o y e r fina n c ed-------------------------Jointly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------R e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n ---------------------------E m p l o y e r fina n c ed-------------------------Jointly f i n a n c e d ----------------------------N o p l a n s ----------------------------------------

1
91
60
32
90
58
32
69

44

25
19
8
11

44
44

(4)
2

4

7
77
32
45
72
32
39
70
31
39
14

3
1
30
30

10
43
43

98
83
15
97
82
15
67
52
15
20
10
10
50
50

-

-

-

-

3

1

4

2

92
54
38
91
53
38
79
43
36
20
9
11
29
29

1
91
67
24
88
62
26
29
19
10

4

49
38
4
82
39
42
82
37
45
66
35
31
42
6
36
89
87
1
1

-

21
87
87
81
6
-

95
88

7

95
88

7

95
88

7

4
3
1
76
76

-

_
-

-

_
-

100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
12
12
-

48
48

-

-

3

"

39
88
49
39
71
41
30
30
13
17

44
43
1
1

-

90

51

39
90
50
39
82
46
36
31
16
15
20
20

-

-

(4 )

75
40
35
67
40
27
65
39
27
10
10

2
30
30

48
48

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

98
53
45
98
53
45
82
37
45
50
9
41
68
68
-

2

7

40
88
88
1
1

-

31
80
80
61
19
1
-

95

77

18
95

77

18
95

77

18
10
1
8
75
70
5

(4 )

-

-

19
-

19
-

100
71
29
100
71
29
100
71
29
41
41
-

45
28
17

-

1 Includes only those plans for w h i c h at least part of the cost is b o r n e b y the e m p l o y e r .
Legally required plans s u c h as w o r k m e n ' s c o m p e n s a t i o n a n d social security w e r e excluded;
however,
those plans required b y State t e m p o r a r y disability insurance laws ar e included if the e m p l o y e r contributes m o r e than is legally requ i r e d or the e m p l o y e e s receive benefits e x ­
ceeding legal r e q u i r e m e n t s .
Includes data for the Southeast region in addition to those s h o w n separately.
3 U n d u p licated total of w o r k e r s receiving sick leave or sickness an d accident i n surance s h o w n separately.
4 L e s s than 0. 5 percent.
NOTE:

B e c a u s e of rounding , s u m s of individual i tems m a y not equal totals.







Table 44. Paid Funeral Leave
(Percent of production and office w o r k e r s in f o o twear m a n u f a c t u r i n g establishments providing paid funeral leave,
United States a n d selected regions, M a r c h 1968)

F u n e r a l leave p a y 1

United
State s 2

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

Production w o r k e r s
100
W o r k e r s in establishments
providing paid funeral leave — ----- ---

100

100

48

57

31

100

100

100

100

100

29

40

51

65

7

Office w o r k e r s
All w o r k e r s -----------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

W o r k e r s in establishments
providing paid funeral l e a v e -----------

44

47

24

50

31

47

65

-

1
2

F o r definition, see appendix A.
Includes data for the Southeast region in addition to those s h o w n separately.

Appendix A. Scope and Method o f Survey

Scope of Survey
The survey included estab lish m en ts engaged p rim a rily in the production of boots and
shoes (except house slip p e rs and ru b b er footw ear) designed p rim a rily fo r s tre e t, w ork, play,
o r sp o rtsw e a r (industry 3141 as defined in the 1967 edition of the S tandard In d u strial C la ssi­
fication M anual, p re p a re d by the U. S. B u reau of the Budget). S eparate au x iliary units such
as c e n tra l offices w ere excluded.
The estab lish m en ts studied w ere selected from those em ploying 50 w o rk ers o r m o re
at the tim e of refe re n c e of the data used in com piling the u n iv erse lis ts .
The num ber of estab lish m en ts and w o rk ers actu ally studied by the B u reau , as w ell
as the num ber estim ated to be w ithin scope of the survey during the p ay ro ll p erio d studied,
a re shown in the table on the following page.
Industry B ranches
The cla ssific a tio n of estab lish m en ts by in d u stry b ranch was determ in ed on the b asis
of the p rin c ip a l type of footw ear m anufactured. F o r exam ple, if the value of an e sta b lish ­
m e n t's prod uct was 60 p e rc e n t w om en's L ittlew ay shoes and 40 p e rc e n t w om en's cem entp ro c e ss (conventional-lasted) shoes, all w o rk ers in th at estab lish m en t w ere included in the
w om en's L ittlew ay shoe branch.
M ethod of Study
D ata w ere obtained by p e rso n a l v isits of B u reau field staff under the d irectio n of the
B u re a u 's A ssista n t R egional D ire c to rs for O p eratio ns. The survey w as conducted on a
sam ple b a sis. To obtain a p p ro p riate accu racy a t m inim um cost, a g re a te r p ro p o rtio n of
la rg e ra th e r than of sm all estab lish m en ts was studied. In com bining the data, how ever,
all estab lish m en ts w ere given th e ir ap p ro p riate w eight. All estim ates a re p re se n te d , th e re ­
fo re , as relatin g to all estab lish m en ts in the in d u stry , excluding only those below the m in i­
m um size at the tim e of re fe re n c e of the u n iv erse data.
E stab lish m en t D efinition
An estab lish m en t, fo r p u rp o ses of this study, is defined as a single ph ysical location
w here in d u stria l operations a re p erfo rm ed . An estab lish m en t is not n e c e ssa rily id entical
w ith the com pany, which m ay .co n sist of one estab lish m en t o r m o re. "E stab lish m en t" and
"plant" have been used interchan geably in this bulletin.
E m ploym ent
The e stim a te s of the num ber of w o rk ers
as a g en eral guide to the size and com position
The advance planning n e c e ssa ry to m ake a wage
lish m en ts assem b led con sid erab ly in advance of

w ithin the scope of the study a re intended
of the lab or fo rce included in the survey.
survey re q u ire s the use of lists of e sta b ­
the p ay ro ll p erio d studied.

P ro du ctio n W orkers
"P rod uction w o rk e rs, " as used in this b u lletin , include w orking forem en and all nonsu p e rv iso ry w o rk ers engaged in nonoffice functions. A d m in istrativ e, executive, p ro fessio n al,
and tech n ical p erso n n el, and fo rc e -a c c o u n t co n struction em ployees, who w ere u tilized as a
se p a ra te w ork fo rc e on the firm 's own p ro p e rtie s, w ere excluded.




64

E stim a te d N u m b er of E sta b lis h m e n ts and W o rk ers W ithin S cop e o f the S u rv e y and N u m b er S tud ied,
F o o tw e a r M a n u fa ctu rin g E s ta b lis h m e n ts , M a rch 1968
In d u stry b ra n c h , r e g i o n ,1 and a r e a 2
A ll e sta b lis h m e n ts: 5
U n ited S ta te s 6 ________________________________________________
N ew E n g la n d ________________ -___ ___ ___ __ _____ ____ _
M idd le A tla n tic . ___________ ___
__ ___ ___
B o r d er S t a t e s . ___________ _____ ______________________
S o u th w est—_-__________________________________________
G re a t L a k e s ___ _____ ______ _____ ___ ____ ______ ____ __ __
M id d le W e s t .. ___ __________ ____ . ._ _______
P a c i f ic --------------------------------------------------------------------------------M en 's G o o d y e a r -w e lt d r e s s sh o e s :
U n ited S ta te s 6 ________________________________________________
N ew E n g la n d 7 ________________ _________________________
M a in e_________ __________________________________ ________
B ro c k to n , M a ss ______________________________________
G re a t L ak es 7______________________________________________
W is c o n s in ______________________________________________
M idd le W e s t _______________:________________________________
M en 's G o o d y e a r -w e lt w o r k s h o e s :
U n ited S ta te s 6 ________________________________________________
N ew E n g la n d ---------------------------------------------------------------------G re a t L a k e s _______________________________________________
M en 's c e m e n t - p r o c e s s sh o e s:
U n ited S ta te s 6 _____________________________________________
N ew E n glan d _____________________________________________
W o m e n 's c e m e n t-p r o c e s s (c o n v e n tio n a l-la ste d ) sh o e s :
U n ited S ta te s 6 ________________________________________________
N ew E n g la n d 7 ____ —___ ____ ___ ____
M a in e------------------------------------------------------------------------------B o sto n -L y n n , M a s s ____ ____________________________
H a v e r h ill, M a ss_________________ ___ _____________
L a w r en c e -L o w e ll, M a ss-----------------------------------------W o r c e s te r , M a s s ______________________________________
S o u th e a ste r n N ew H a m p sh ir e __________________ ____
M id d le A tla n tic 7 ____________________________ — --------N ew Y ork , N . Y . _____________________________________
B o r d e r S t a t e s _______________ ________________________ —
S o u th w e s t__________________________________________________
A r kans a s ___ __________________ ___ _____ ____ __ __ ____
G re a t L a k e s -------------- -------------------- ---------- ----------------M idd le W e s t_________________________________________ ____
M is s o u r i — - _ __ _____ — _____ ___ —
P a c i f ic _____________________________ ____________ ________
L o s A n g e le s-L o n g B e a c h , C a lif ____________________
W o m en 's L ittle w a y (in clu d in g M cK ay) sh o e s:
U nited S ta te s 6 ________________________________________________
N ew E n g la n d ______________________________________________
M is s e s ' and c h ild r e n 's c e m e n t - p r o c e s s (c o n v e n tio n a lla ste d ) sh o e s:
U n ited S ta te s 6 ________________________________________________
N ew E n g la n d _______________________________________________
G re a t L a k e s _______________________________________________
M idd le W e s t_______________________________________________
M is s e s ' and c h ild r e n 's G o o d y e a r -w e lt sh o e s :
U n ited S ta te s 6 ________________________________________________
M id d le A tla n tic 7__________________________________________
S o u th e a ste r n P e n n s y lv a n ia __________________________
M o c c a s in -c o n s tr u c te d sh o e s w ith h a n d -se w n p lu g:
U n ited S t a t e s 6 ________________________________________________
N ew E n g la n d ___ ___________________________________________

N u m b er of
e sta b lis h m e n ts 3
W ith in
sco p e
S tud ied
o f stud y

W o rk ers in e sta b lis h m e n ts
W ithin sc o p e of tudy
P ro d u c tio n
O ffice
w ork ers
w orkers

T o ta l 4

Studied
T ota l

674
238
159
30
27
85
56
15

434
163
81
17
18
64
47
9

1 9 1 ,9 0 1
6 9 ,1 4 1
33, 520
9, 197
1 0 ,1 9 7
2 6 ,1 3 9
2 0 , 002
2 ,4 4 6

1 7 2 ,3 8 1
6 2 ,2 3 9
2 9 ,8 3 9
8, 544
9, 348
2 2 ,4 4 7
1 8 ,5 5 0
2, 208

9, 013
3, 254
1 ,5 3 0
254
381
1, 851
7 34
95

1 3 8 ,8 9 4
5 4 ,2 7 0
1 9 ,5 9 6
5, 850
6 ,6 0 5
2 2 ,1 2 1
1 6 ,8 6 3
1 ,6 2 5

87
33
10
13
20
16
6

57
23
7
10
17
13
5

3 3 ,1 2 9
1 1 ,2 3 2
3, 909
4, 331
7, 664
5, 126
2, 764

2 9 ,1 3 3
9, 788
3, 597
3, 663
6, 927
4 , 151
2, 592

2, 532
782
169
376
819
587
70

2 3 ,0 2 6
8, 394
2, 846
3, 624
7, 268
4 , 730
2 , 452

34
8
11

24
7
8

8, 278
1 ,9 2 5
1 ,7 4 8

427
97
116

7, 269
1 ,8 8 2
2 , 171

22
12

18
10

9, 848
2, 163
2 ,6 4 9
6 ,2 9 7
2, 975

5 ,6 4 7
2 ,5 8 1

240
165

5, 328
2 ,5 7 4

273
112
21
15
11
11
5
34
64
21
14
9
9
26
28
28
10
10

183
76
14
11
9
8
4
22
40
13
8
6
6
19
21
21
7
7

8 4 ,3 3 6
3 4 ,3 2 9
7, 812
3, 660
2 ,6 1 2
3 ,6 9 4
2 ,0 6 9
1 1 ,4 1 6
1 6 ,9 7 0
3 ,4 6 4
4, 820
3, 122
3, 122
9, 568
9, 912
9, 912
1 ,7 5 5
1 ,7 5 5

7 6 ,4 0 0
3 1 ,3 8 0
7, 121
3, 264
2, 365
3 ,4 4 2
1 ,9 2 0
1 0 ,4 6 4
1 5 ,1 0 9
2 , 986
4, 462
2 , 890
2 , 890
8 , 312
9, 111
9 ,1 1 1
1 ,6 1 6
1 ,6 1 6

3, 622
1, 369
360
182
112
98
71
427
845
200
154
95
95
641
350
350
51
51

6 2 ,9 3 6
2 6 ,3 7 8
5, 352
3, 169
2, 290
3, 049
1 ,6 4 3
8, 819
1 2 ,1 2 5
2 ,6 6 0
2, 928
2, 332
2, 332
7 ,6 9 5
7 , 555
7, 555
1, 309
1, 309

26
12

16
7

6 ,4 6 8
2, 190

5 ,4 2 2
1, 984

240
88

4 , 369
1 ,7 0 9

43
9
6
6

30
7
5
6

1 0 ,8 1 3
1 ,4 7 1
1, 394
2, 172

361
46
70
116

8, 306
1 ,3 1 8
1 ,2 1 4
2 , 172

26
12
8

17
7
6

6, 872
1 ,9 5 2
1 ,3 5 6

9, 916
1 ,3 4 8
1, 235
1, 919
6 , 126
1 ,7 4 0
1, 183

298
80
72

21
17

20
16

8, 857
7, 494

7, 927
6 , 804

355
333

5, 046
1, 189
1, 040
8, 687
7, 324

1 T he r e g io n s u se d in th is stu d y in c lu d e : N ew E ngland-— C o n n ec ticu t, M a in e, M a s s a c h u se tts, N ew H a m p sh ir e , R hode
Isla n d , and V erm o n t; M id d le A tla n tic — N ew J e r s e y , N ew Y ork , and P en n sy lv a n ia ; B o r d er S ta te s — D e la w a r e , D is tr ic t o f C olu m b ia ,
K en tuck y, M a ryla n d , V ir g in ia , and W e st V ir g in ia ; S o u th w e st— A r k a n sa s, L o u isia n a , O klah om a, and T e x a s; G re a t L ak es —
I llin o is , In dian a, M ich ig a n , M in n eso ta , O h io, and W isc o n sin ; M id d le W est— Iow a, K a n sa s, M is s o u r i, N eb r a sk a , N orth D akota,
and South D ak ota; and P a c ific — C a lifo r n ia , N ev a d a , O reg on , and W ash in gton .
2 S ee in d iv id u a l a r e a t a b le s , fo r d e fin itio n s o f a r e a s stu d ie d se p a r a te ly .
3 In clu d es o n ly e sta b lis h m e n ts w ith 50 w o r k e r s o r m o r e at the tim e of r e fe r e n c e o f the u n iv e r se d ata.
4 In clu d es e x e c u tiv e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and o th e r w o r k e r s e x c lu d e d fro m the p ro d u ctio n and o ffic e w o r k er c a t e g o r ie s .
5 In clu d es d ata fo r in d u stry b r a n c h e s in ad d ition to th o se sh ow n se p a r a te ly .
6 In clu d es d ata for r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o se sh ow n s e p a r a te ly . A la sk a and H aw a ii w e r e n ot in clu d ed in the stud y.
7 In clu d es d ata fo r a r e a s (or S ta te s) in a d d ition to th o se sh ow n s e p a r a te ly .




Office W orkers

"O ffice w o rk e rs, " as used in th is bu lletin , include all n o n su p erv iso ry office w o rk e rs.
O ccupations S elected for Study
O ccupational cla ssific a tio n w as based on a uniform set of job d escrip tio n s designed
to take account of in te re sta b lish m e n t and in te ra re a v ariatio n s in duties w ithin the sam e jo bs.
(See appendix B for thes« job d e sc rip tio n s. ) The occupations w ere chosen fo r th e ir n u m e r­
ical im p o rtan ce, th e ir u sefulness in collective bargaining, o r th e ir re p re se n ta tiv e n e ss of
the e n tire job scale in the in du stry . W orking su p e rv iso rs, ap p ren tices, le a rn e rs , b eg in n ers,
tra in e e s , and handicapped, p a rt-tim e , tem p o ra ry , and p ro b atio n ary w o rk ers w ere not r e ­
p o rted in the data for selected occupations, but w ere included in the data for all p ro d u c­
tion w o rk e rs.
Wage D ata
The wage inform ation re la te s to average stra ig h t-tim e hourly earn in g s, excluding
p rem iu m pay for o v ertim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holidays, and late sh ifts. Incentive
pay m ents, such as those resu ltin g from piecew ork o r production bonus sy stem s and co stof-living bonuses, w ere included as p a rt of the w o rk e rs' reg u lar pay; but nonproduction
bonus p ay m ents, such as C h ristm as or yearen d bo nu ses, w ere excluded.
A verage (m ean) hourly ra te s o r earnin gs for each occupation o r other group of w o rk ­
e rs , such as m en, w om en, or production w o rk e rs, w ere calcu lated by w eighting each rate
(or hourly earnings) by the num ber of w o rk ers receiving the ra te , totaling, and dividing
by the num ber of individuals. The hourly earnings of sa la rie d w o rk ers w ere obtained by
dividing stra ig h t-tim e s a la ry by n o rm al ra th e r than actu al h o u rs.
The m edian designates position; th at is, on e-h alf of the em ployees surveyed receiv ed
m o re than this ra te and one-half receiv ed le s s . The m iddle range is defined by two ra te s
of pay; on e-fou rth of the em ployees earned le ss than the low er of th ese ra te s and o n e-fou rth
earned m ore than the high er ra te .
Size of Com m unity
T abulations by size of com m unity p e rta in to m etro p o litan and nonm etropolitan a re a s.
"M etropolitan a re a , " as used in this b u lletin , re fe rs to the S tandard M etropolitan S ta tistic a l
A reas as defined by the U. S. B u reau of the Budget through A pril 1967.
E xcept in New E ngland, a S tandard M etropolitan S tatistica l A rea is defined as a county
o r group of contiguous counties which contains at le a st one city of 50, 000 inhabitants o r
m o re. Contiguous counties to the one containing such a city a re included in a S tandard
M etropolitan S ta tistic a l A rea, if, acco rding to c e rta in c rite ria , they a re essen tially m e tro ­
po litan in c h a ra c te r and a re socially and econom ically in teg rated w ith the ce n tra l city. In
New E ngland, w here the city and town a re a d m in istrativ ely m ore im p o rtan t than the county,
they a re the units used in defining S tandard M etropolitan S ta tistic a l A reas.
M ethod of Wage P aym ent
T abulations by m ethod of wage paym ent re la te to the num ber of w o rk ers paid under
the v ario us tim e and incentive wage sy stem s. F o rm al rate stru c tu re s fo r tim e -ra te d w o rk ers
provide single ra te s o r a range of ra te s for individual job cate g o rie s. In the absen ce of a
fo rm al ra te s tru c tu re , pay ra te s a re d eterm in ed p rim a rily w ith re feren ce to the q u alifica­
tions of the individual w o rk er. A single rate stru c tu re is one in which the sam e rate is
paid to all exp erienced w o rk ers in the sam e job classificatio n . L e a rn e rs , ap p ren tices, or



67

pro b atio n ary w o rk ers m ay be paid according to ra te schedules w hich s ta r t below the single
ra te and p e rm it the w o rk ers to achieve the full job ra te over a perio d of tim e. Individual
exp erienced w o rk ers m ay occasionally be paid above o r below the single ra te for special
re a so n s, but such paym ents a re reg ard ed as exceptions. Range of ra te plans a re those in
w hich the m inim um a n d /o r m axim um ra te s paid exp erienced w o rk ers for the sam e job a re
specified. Specific ra te s of individual w o rk ers w ithin the range m ay be determ in ed by m e rit,
length of se rv ic e , or a com bination of v ario u s concepts of m e rit and length of se rv ic e .
Incentive w o rk ers a re c la ssifie d under piecew ork or bonus plans. P iecew o rk is w ork for
w hich a p re d e te rm in e d ra te is paid for each unit of output. P roduction bonuses a re based
on production in excess of a quota or for com pletion of a job in le ss than stan d ard tim e.
Scheduled W eekly H ours
Data on w eekly hours re fe r to the predom inant w ork schedule for fu ll-tim e p ro d u c­
tion w o rk ers (or office w o rk ers) em ployed on the day shift.
S upplem entary W age P ro v isio n s
Supplem entary benefits w ere tre a te d s ta tistic a lly on the b asis that if fo rm al prov isio ns
for supplem entary benefits w ere applicable to one-half or m ore of the production w o rk ers
(or office w o rk ers) in an estab lish m en t, the benefits w ere co n sid ered applicable to a ll such
w o rk ers. S im ilarly , if few er than on e-h alf of the w o rk ers w ere cov ered , the benefit was
co n sid ered nonexistent in the estab lish m en t. B ecause of le n g th -o f-se rv ic e and other e lig i­
bility re q u ire m e n ts, the prop ortio n of w o rk ers receiving the benefits m ay be sm a lle r than
estim ated .
P aid H olidays. P aid -h oliday provisions re la te to full-d ay and h alf-d ay holidays p ro ­
vided annually.
P aid V acatio ns. The su m m aries of vacation plans a re lim ited to fo rm al a rra n g e ­
m en ts, excluding in fo rm al plans w hereby tim e off w ith pay is g ranted at the d isc re tio n of
the em ployer or the su p e rv iso r. P aym ents not on a tim e b a sis w ere converted; for exam ple,
a paym ent of 2 p ercen t of annual earn in g s was co n sid ered the equivalent of 1 w eek's pay.
The p erio d s of se rv ic e for w hich data a re p resen ted w ere selected as re p re se n ta tiv e of the
m ost com m on p ra c tic e s , but they do not n e c e ssa rily re fle c t individual estab lish m en t p ro ­
visions for p ro g re ssio n . F o r exam ple, the changes in pro p o rtio n s indicated at 15 y e a rs
of serv ic e m ay include changes which o c c u rred betw een 10 and 15 y e a rs.
H ealth, In su ran ce, and P ension P la n s . D ata a re p resen ted for health, in su ran ce,
and pension plans for which a ll or a p a rt of the cost is borne by the em ployer, excluding
p ro g ram s req u ired by law , such as w o rk m en's com pensation and social secu rity . Among
the plans included a re those u n d erw ritten by a co m m ercial in su ran ce com pany and those
paid d ire c tly by the em ployer from his c u rre n t operating funds o r from a fund se t asid e
for this purpose.
D eath benefits a re included as a form of life in su ran ce. S ickness and accid ent in ­
su rance is lim ited to that type of in su ran ce under w hich p red eterm in ed cash paym ents a re
m ade d ire c tly to the in su red on a w eekly or m onthly b a sis during illn e ss or accident d is ­
ability. Info rm ation is p resen ted for all such plans to w hich the em ployer co n trib u tes at
le a st a p a rt of the co st. H ow ever, in New Y ork and New J e rs e y , w here tem p o ra ry d is ­
ability in su ran ce law s re q u ire em ployer con tribu tions, 1 plans a re included only if the e m ­
ployer (1) co n trib u tes m ore than is leg ally re q u ire d , or (2) provides the em ployees with
benefits which exceed the re q u ire m e n ts of the law.
l

The temporary disability insurance laws in California and Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.




68

T abulations of paid sick leave plans a re lim ited to fo rm al plans which provide full
pay or a p ro p o rtio n of the w o rk e r's pay during absence from w ork because of illn e ss; in ­
fo rm al a rra n g e m e n ts have been om itted. S ep arate tabulations a re provided according to
(1) plans w hich provide full pay and no w aiting p erio d , and (2) plans providing eith er p a rtia l
pay or a w aiting period.
M edical in su ran ce re fe rs to plans providing for com plete or p a rtia l paym ent of doc­
to rs ' fe e s. Such plans m ay be u n d erw ritten by a co m m ercial in su ran ce com pany or a
nonprofit o rg an izatio n , o r they m ay be se lf-in su re d .
C atastrophe in su ra n c e , som etim es re fe rre d to as extended m ed ical in su ran ce, includes
the plans designed to cover em ployees in case of sick n ess o r in ju ry involving an expense
w hich goes beyond the n o rm al coverage of ho sp italizatio n , m ed ical, and su rg ic a l plans.
T abulations of re tire m e n t pensions a re lim ited to plans w hich provide, upon r e tir e ­
m ent, re g u la r paym ents for the re m a in d er of the w o rk e r's life.
P aid F u n eral L eave. D ata fo r paid funeral leave relate to fo rm al p ro v isio n s for a t le a st
p a rtia l paym ent for tim e lo st as a re su lt of attending fu n erals of specified fam ily m em b ers.




Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions

The p rim a ry purpose of p rep arin g job d escrip tio n s
for the B u reau 's wage survey s is to a s s is t its field staff
in classify ing into ap p ro p riate occupations w o rk ers who
a re em ployed under a v a rie ty of pay ro ll title s and d ifferen t
w ork arra n g e m e n ts from estab lish m en t to estab lish m en t
and from a re a to a re a . This p erm its the grouping of
occupational wage ra te s re p resen tin g com parable job con­
tent. B ecause of this em phasis on in terestab lish m en t and
in te ra re a co m p arab ility of occupational content, the B u­
re a u 's job d escrip tio n s m ay differ significantly from those
in u se in individual estab lish m en ts o r those p rep ared for
other p u rp o ses. In applying these job d escrip tio n s, the
B u reau 's field econ om ists a re in stru cted to exclude w o rk ­
ing su p e rv iso rs, a p p re n tic e s, le a rn e rs , beg in n ers, tr a in ­
ee s, and handicapped, p a rt-tim e , te m p o ra ry , and p ro b a­
tio n ary w o rk e rs.
P lan t O ccupations
ASSEMBLER FOR PULLOV ER, MACHINE
P re p a re s the upper for lastin g by assem bling the counter and upper and operating
a m achine to tack the upper to the wooden la st. W ork involves: P lacing cou nters on rack
of pan containing cem ent, low ering ra c k into pan to apply cem ent to cou nters; in sertin g
cem ented counter betw een lining and upper at the heel; setting a piece of wax or tissu e pap er
next to lining to fa c ilita te rem o val of la s t a fte r com pletion of o p eratio n s; placing u p per on
la st m aking c e rta in th at heel seam is in cen ter of re a r of last; and setting la s t on a jack
and pushing jack into m achine which autom atically d riv es tacks through the upper into the
heel seat and heel seam .
BED-MACHINE OPERATOR
(Bed la s te r; b ed -lastin g m achine o p erato r; heel and fo re p a rt la ste r)
C om pletes the op eratio ns of draw ing the toe, Or toe and h eel, of the upper of a shoe
tightly over the la st. W ork involves: Setting shoe on m achine w ith sole up, and m anipu­
lating hand le v e rs controlling a se rie s of w ipers (friction p u llers) w hich draw the upper
over edge of insole at toe o r toe and heel; holding upper in place w ith the w ip ers; securin g
upper at the toe in one of the following w ays: (1) M cKay system — tacking upper, using
au to m atically -fed hand tacking device, the tack s rem aining in the finished shoe. (2) W elt
sy stem — passing a w ire from an anchor tack, w hich he d riv es on one side of the shoe,
around the draw n -in upper at the to e, to the opposite side w here he winds it around another
anchor tack, to hold upper in place until it is stitched to insole by a la te r operation; or
m ay staple upper in stead of using above m ethods. (3) C em ent sy stem — wiping toe in place
and holding it with w iper; trim m ing off surplus toe box, lining and u p p er, by hand, close
to insole; and applying cem ent to insole betw een lining and upper at toe and folding over
lasting allow ance of upper and sticking it in insole. If the heel also is lasted in the p ro c e ss,
an au to m atically -fed hand tacking device is used to drive tacks through the upper at the heel.
BOTTOM F IL L E R
(Cushion cem en ter; insole fille r)
F ills d ep ressio n in fo re p a rt of shoe with com position paste of ground co rk and cem ent
to form cushion for foot.




69

70
BOTTOM SCOURER
(Bottom buffer; bottom sander)
Sm ooths and clean s ou tsoles of com pletely co n stru cted shoe by holding ag ain st r e ­
volving a b ra siv e -c o v e re d w heel of buffing m achine.
CU TTER, LINING, MACHINE
Cuts p a rts of shoe lining from le a th e r or fab ricated m a te ria ls (including im itatio n
le a th e r), by m eans of a clicking m achine. W ork involves: Setting lining m a te ria l, usu ally
in m ultiple p lie s, on cutting table of m achine; selecting p ro p er die and setting it in place
on m a te ria l; and d ep ressin g le v e r to cause upper arm to drop au to m atically on the die with
sufficient force to cut m a te ria l to the shape and size of die.
CU TTER, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE, HAND
(C arv er; c u tter; o u tsid e, hand; c u tte r, sam p ler; cu ttero u t, up per; u p per le a th e r cu tter)
Cuts vam ps and u p pers of shoes from skins or hides with a hand knife. W ork in ­
volves m o st of the follow ing: S electing hides or skins of d esired th ick n ess and quality;
noting location of defective spots in m a te ria l, and d irectio n of g rain of le a th e r, setting p a t­
te rn on m a te ria l in such a way as to obtain a m axim um num ber of p ieces, and in such r e ­
lation to the g rain of the le a th e r that th ere w ill be a m inim um of stretch in g of m a te ria l in
p ro cessin g shoe; draw ing knife along edge of p attern , cutting p a rt to d e sire d shape; and
bundling cut pieces and m arking size on top piece for id entification.
CU TTER, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE, MACHINE
Cuts p a rts of shoe u p pers from h id es, skins or fab ricated m a te ria ls , by m eans of a
clicking m ach in e. W ork involves: Setting le a th e r or other shoe m a te ria l on cutting tab le of
m achine; selecting p ro p e r die and setting it in place on m a te ria l; and d e p re ssin g le v e r to
cause upper a rm to drop auto m atically on the die w ith sufficient fo rce to cut m a te ria l to the
size and shape of the die.
EDGE SETTER
(Edge b u rn ish e r, edge k itter)
Shapes and po lishes the edge of the sole of the shoe by holding it ag ain st the hot
iro n of an ed g e-settin g m achine. W ork involves: B rushing a fille r solution over edge of
sole as fa r back as the heel lin e, to fill any sm all holes and to soften the le a th e r for the
burnishing operation; selecting p ro p er size iro n burnishing block and setting stem of block
into m achine holder; heating iro n to p ro p er te m p e ra tu re ; holding edge of sole ag ain st r e ­
volving su rface of heated iro n , m anipulating shoe un til e n tire edge has been burnished; and
applying a coating of wax to edge of sole and repeating burnishing operation.
EDGE TRIMMER
(E d g e-trim m in g -m ach in e o p erato r; trim m e r, apex; trim m e r, m argin)
T rim s, cuts to size, and sm ooths the edge of shoes by turning and m anipulating the
side su rfa c e s of the so les ag ain st the revolving cutting tool of an ed g e-trim m in g m achine.
FANCY STITCHER
(Applique stitc h e r; blin d-row stitch er; etching stitch er; ey elet-ro w stitc h e r; strip p e r,
stitching; trim m in g stitch er)
O p erates a p o w er-d riv en sewing m achine to stitch deco rativ e designs on shoe u p p ers,
such as outlining eyelet row , stitching im itatio n foxings or fancy panel d esig n s, running
ex tra row s of stitching , and stitching piping and orn am en tal le a th e r s trip s (applique). W ork
involves: In sertin g m a te ria l under the p re s s e r foot and needle of m achine; d ep ressin g lev er
to s ta rt m achine; and guiding m a te ria l by hand (usually along p reviou sly m ark ed lin es on
m a te ria l) as stitching is p erfo rm ed .



71
FLOOR BOY (OR GIRL)
(A ssem bly boy; floor m an; ro u ter)
D eliv ers finished products to stock room o r shipping room and keeps stock and d is ­
trib u tes p a rtia lly finished m a te ria ls used in the m anu facture of footw ear to vario us d e p a rt­
m ents to keep w o rk ers supplied w ith m a te ria l, using tru c k or carry in g m a te ria l. May
p erfo rm sim ple m achine op erations under directio n of forem an , such as tem p erin g soles
and m olding edges of so les.
GOODYEAR STITCHER
O perates a G oodyear stitching m achine to attach the outsole to the w elt of the shoe.
W ork involves; Setting the shoe, sole side up, on table r e s t of m achine underneath needle,
and guiding shoe w ith hand as needle sew s around shank and fo re p a rt of shoe, the stitch
extending from a channel th at was cut for it in bottom of ou tso le, through outsole to upper
su rface of w elt. The w elt extends around the edge of the sole as far back as the b re a s t
of the heel.
H EEL ATTACHER, MACHINE
(L eather or ru b b er heel a tta c h e r; heelin g-m ach in e op erato r; le a th e r heeler)
N ails heels to shoes by m achine. W ork involves: P lacing shoe on a m etal m old
and putting heel in position on shoe; swinging n ail plate into place over the heel w here n ails
a re dropped autom atically into another plate over the heel; and m anipulating foot le v e r to
drive n ails through heel and heel seat and clinch them to insole on inside of shoe.
H EEL-SEA T FIT T E R , MACHINE
O perates a m achine to cut out a piece around the ou ter m arg in of the heel seat,
p re p a ra to ry to heel attaching. W ork involves: Setting gage on m achine for size of heel
to be fitted and adjusting pin stop for righ t or left shoe; p ressin g shoe ag ain st statio n ary
ho rizon tal knife in m achine to cut through the heel seat betw een the upper and the sole until
counter of shoe s trik e s a stop gage; and operating m achine which auto m atically cuts a
U -shaped piece fro m the heel seat so that the heel fits p ro p erly when attached . T his m achine
operation is usu ally p erfo rm ed on w om en's popular and m ed iu m -p riced shoes.
H EEL-SEA T LASTER
O perates a h e e l-s e a t lasting m achine which draw s the heel section of the shoe upper
tightly over the la s t and autom atically tacks the edges to the heel se a t of the in so le. W ork
involves: Setting shoe on m achine and m anipulating con trols which cause the w iper p lates
to draw the upper and lining evenly over the heel se a t and m achine autom atically d riv es
tacks through up per and insole.
in s e a m e r

(G oo dy ear-w elt-sew ing-m achine o p erato r; w elt sew er; eppler w elter)
O p erates a G oodyear stitching m achine th at sews a n arro w s trip of le a th e r (welt)
autom atically fed from a ro ll on the m achine to the lip of the insole of the shoe. W ork
involves: Guiding shoe, sole upw ard, under needle of m achine and stitching through w elt,
up per, and lining, and in sole lip ag ain st w hich upper and lining have been lasted .
INSPECTOR (CROWNER)
(E xam iner)
E xam ines shoe p a rts , p artly finished shoes in vario us stag es of m an u factu re, or
finished shoes before packing. W ork involves inspecting fo r the following im p erfectio n s:
Irre g u la rity of le a th e r su rfaces; m isp laced or incom pletely driven tack s; unevenness and
in c o rre c t am ount of stitching; inside m isalinem ent; and im p ro p er prop ortio n of toe tip. May
c o rre c t m inor defects or im p erfectio n s and re je c t m ajo r defects for rep ro cessin g in p ro p er
d ep artm ent.




72
JANITOR
C leans and keeps in an o rd e rly condition facto ry w orking a re a s and w ash ro o m s, or
p re m ise s of an office, ap artm en t house, or co m m ercial or o ther estab lish m en t. D uties
involve a com bination of the follow ing: Sweeping, m opping o r scru bb ing , and polishing flo o rs;
rem oving chips, tra s h , and other refu se; dusting equipm ent, fu rn itu re or fix tu res; polishing
m etal fix tu res o r trim m in g s; providing supplies and m in o r m aintenance se rv ic e s; and c le a n ­
ing la v a to rie s, show ers, and re s t ro o m s. W orkers who sp ecialize in window w ashing a re
excluded.
JO IN TER, MACHINE
(Joint c u tte r, m achine; jo in ter; jo in t m ak er, m achine)
T rim s and shapes on a jointing m achine the edge of the shank sole of shoes at the
joint betw een shank and heel, sta rtin g w here edge trim m e r leav es off and continuing to the
heel line. H olds shoe ag ain st knife of jointing m achine; and m oves shoe ag ain st knife to
m ain tain even p re s s u re for a neat trim m in g .
LITTLEW AY STITCHER
O perates a lo ck stitch sewing m achine to attach the outsole by stitching through the
up per, lining, and insole of shoe, except a t heel seat. W ork involves: Setting the shoe,
sole side up, on shoe r e s t of m achine beneath needle and guiding shoe w ith hand as needle
sew s around the shank and fo re p a rt of shoe.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
R ep airs m ach in ery or m echan ical equipm ent of an estab lish m en t. W ork involves
m ost of the following: E xam ining m achines and m echan ical equipm ent to diagnose sou rce
of trou ble; dism antling o r p a rtly dism antling m achines and p erfo rm in g re p a irs th at m ainly
involve the use of handtools in scraping and fitting p arts; replacing broken or defective p a rts
w ith item s obtained from stock; o rd erin g the production of a rep lacem en t p a rt by a m achine
shop or sending of the m achine to a m achine shop for m ajo r re p a irs; p rep arin g w ritten
specificatio ns for m ajo r re p a irs or for the production of p a rts o rd ered from m achine shop;
and reassem b lin g m achines, and m aking all n e c e ssa ry adjustm en ts for op eratio n. In g en eral,
the w ork of a m aintenance m echanic re q u ire s rounded train in g and exp erience usu ally a c ­
q u ired through a fo rm al a p p ren ticesh ip o r equivalent train ing and ex p erien ce. E xcluded
from th is cla ssific a tio n a re w o rk ers w hose p rim a ry duties involve settin g -u p or adjusting
m achines, and w o rk ers who sp ecialize in the ad ju stm en t and re p a ir of a p a rtic u la r type of
m achine and whose perio d of train in g is su b stan tially sh o rte r than th at req u ired for a m a in ­
tenance m echanic as describ ed above.
PA STER, BACKER, OR FIT T E R , U P P E R , HAND
(B acker; backing p a ste r; backing cem en ter; canvas b ack er, upper; cem en ter, upper
to lining; fitte r, upper to lining; p a s te r, line and b ru sh , hand; p a ste r; plain p a ste r;
re in fo rc e r, p a ste r; q u a rte r and lining fitter; upper doubler)
R einforces vam ps, to ps, s tra p s, and other p a rts of shoes, by pasting to each a piece
of c u t-to -s iz e canvas, thin le a th e r, or other lining m a te ria l (doubler). W ork involves one
or m o re of the following: P re ssin g doubler ag ain st cem en t-co v ered ro ll and sticking dbubler
to le a th e r p a rts; and using backing tape which is so p re p a re d that it stick s when p re sse d
on o th er m a te ria l w ith a hot iro n . M ay paste rein fo rcin g over only a portion of upper that
is exposed to e x tra w ear o r stra in . May u se sim ple m achine to apply glue or other adh e­
sives to vario us p a rts of shoe.



73

PULLOVER-M ACHINE OPERATOR
(P u lle rs -o v e r, m achine)
O p erates a m achine in which the upper at the toe and along the sides of the front
of the shoe is pulled over and tacked te m p o ra rily to the la st to give p re lim in a ry shaping
to the fro n t p a rt of the upper and to attach it to the insole and the la st. W ork involves:
Setting shoe in holding jig of m achine; d ep ressin g lev er to rotate m echan ism that clo ses
top and side jaw s on edge of upper; positioning upper on la st by m anipulating tip le v e rs to
align cen te r of upper on ce n te r of la st; and dep ressin g lev er to ro tate m echan ism through
second half of tra v e l, and to driv e tacks at toe and along the side of the shoe, w hich hold
upper in position until stapled o r tacked along en tire edge. Exclude w o rk ers operating
m achines th at com bine pulling and lastin g .
REPAIRER
(B lem ish rem o v er)
C o rre c ts im p erfectio n s in the finish of the com pleted shoe. W ork involves m o st of
the following: Rem oving sta in s, sc ra tc h e s, b lem ish es, and loose th read s; and blending various
shades of fluid, wax fille r or crayon to affected p a rt of shoe. M ay u se hand sp ray gun with
colored dope to cover blem ished a re a .
ROUGH ROUNDER
(F o re p a rt rounder; roug h-rounding-m achine o p erato r; sole rounder)
T rim s the edge of outsole and w elt of the shoe, by use of a rounding and channeling
m achine so that the edge w ill extend the d e sire d distance from shoe up per. W ork involves:
Setting shoe in m achine so th at bottom of shoe is tow ard the cutting knife, and bottom of
guide re s ts ag ain st upper of shoe; and guiding shoe in v e rtic a l position along bottom of guide
so that edge is trim m e d at rig h t angles to the bottom of the shoe e n tirely around the p e­
rim e te r of the sole of the shoe. The m achine m ay also cut a channel in bottom of outsole
n ear edge, in w hich the th re a d is em bedded when sole stitching is done.
SEW ER, HAND (MOCCASIN-CONSTRUCTED SHOES)
(M occasin sew er)
Sews plugs in m o c c a sin -c o n stru c te d shoes by hand. W ork involves m o st of the fo l­
lowing: Soaking p a rts in w ater to soften them ; positioning lasted shoe on pin jack; pulling
and tacking p a rts to last; punching stitc h openings in p a rts with awl; in sertin g th read through
punched openings to join plug with upper; rem oving tacks and shaping seam w ith lastin g tool;
and sm oothing and polishing seam s using rubbing sticks. M ay also ra ise d eco rativ e stitch es
(kicker) in b ack stay of casu al shoes. Hand la c e rs , who lace plugs to u p pers through p e r ­
foratio ns prepunched by m achine a re excluded.
SHANKER
(Shank ta c k e r; shank-piece p lacer; shank-piece tack er)
A ttaches shank piece to the shank section of shoe to support the a rc h of the shoe.
SIDE RASTER, MACHINE
O perates a m achine to la s t the sid es and shanks of the up per. W ork involves: D raw ­
ing out lining and upper with hand p in cers; holding shoe so that p in cers of m achine g ra sp
edges of upper and draw them evenly and clo sely about the la st; and m anipulating lev er of
m achine to op erate device which d riv es stap les or tacks through the upper at the sides and
shanks. E xcludes side la s te rs using cem ent o r o ther adhesives to secu re u p pers at shoe
sides and shanks.




74

SKIVER, MACHINE, U PPERS OR LININGS
(Skiver, outside)
O perates a m achine th at skives (pares) or bevels shoe u p p ers or linings to reduce
them to an even th ick ness or to in su re th in ner seam s or tap erin g edges when p a r ts a re
joined to g eth er. W ork involves: Feeding p a rt betw een p re ssu re ro lle rs of m achine to c u t­
ting knives which bevel edges or reduce p a rt to uniform th ick n ess, or setting p a rt in guide
bed of m achine and d ep ressin g le v e r to bring cutting knives into operation.
SOLE ATTACHER, CEMENT PROCESS
(C om po-conveyor o p erato r; sole la y e r, m achine; so le-lay in g m achine o p erato r; so ler)
O perates a sole-layin g m achine to cem ent ou tsoles prem anen tly to the uppers of sho es.
This operation does not re la te to the positioning of soles in the G o od year-w elt o r o th er types
of con struction . W ork involves: Setting toe p a rt of shoe on which outsole has been p o si­
tioned and heel p a rt of la s t d ire c tly below corresp on din g jack s (lugs) of m achine; and p r e s s ­
ing a ir pedal (which opens valve on pipe leading to a ir c o m p re sso r sto rag e tank) to fill the
a ir cushion and force the shoe ag ain st the jack s w hich hold the outsole firm ly in place while
the cem ent d rie s . May also , p rio r to p erm an en t attach m en t of o u tso le, b ru sh a coat of
solvent over the inner su rface of the outsole from the heel seat to the toe and p re s s ou ter
sole on shoe; and being c e rta in that edges of sole p ro ject evenly over edges of shoe.
SOLE L E V ELER , MACHINE
(B eater out, leveling m achine; inseam lev eler; lev eler)
F latten s the in so les or outsoles of shoes which have had a ridge ra ise d around the
sole by the stitching m achines. Sets shoe on la st of m achine with sole u p perm ost; and
d e p re sse s tre a d le to s ta rt m achine and guides the shoe on the fo rm under the ro lle r back
and forth and from side to side.
TOE LASTER, AUTOMATIC OR SEMIAUTOMATIC
O perates an autom atic o r sem iautom atic m achine to draw the toe section of shoe upper
tightly over the la st. W ork involves: M aking adjustm en ts on m achine to govern action of
w ip ers, placing shoe in ste a m e r to soften toe section; in sertin g shoe in m achine and o p e r­
ating foot tre a d le to bring w ipers ag ain st shoe upper and draw edges ag ain st the last; and
w rapping w ire loop around te m p o ra ry anchor tacks on side of shoe to hold toe section in
place o r by m eans of cem ent, tacks o r sta.ples, fasten s upper to in n e rso le .
TOP STITCHER
O perates a sewing m achine to stitch the lining to the upper p a rt of a shoe and to
trim off ex cess edges of linin g. W ork involves: F itting lining to u p per to obtain p ro p er
allow ance for in se rtio n of counter o r receiving upper and lining alread y fitted or cem ented
to gether; and setting p a rts into m achine at heel seam , low ering guide down to the edge of
top of u p p er, and guiding p a rts through m achine by hand to com plete stitching and trim m in g
operation.
TREER
(P o lish e r, u p p ers; shoe tre e r)
C leans and finishes shoes by rem oving spots and d isco lo ratio n s, and rubbing u p p ers
w ith a hot iro n to sm ooth out w rin k le s. W ork involves m o st of the following: Setting shoe
on a treein g form , the shape of the la st, and d ep ressin g lev er expanding form so th at shoe
w ill fit tightly over it; brush ing , cleaning, d re ssin g and finishing shoe according to the kind
of le a th e r o r m a te ria l; applying color stain or bleach to blem ished spots; and sm oothing out
w rin k les in the u p p ers w ith a hot iro n .
Do not include shoe d r e s s e rs , who m ay be called tr e e r s in som e plants but p erfo rm
only a m inor p a rt of the w ork d escrib ed above.



75

VAMPER
(Vamp c lo se r; vam p stitc h e r; zigzag seam er)
By use of a p o w er-d riv en sewing m achine, sew s to g eth er the fo re p a rt of the upper
(tip and vamp) and the two q u a rte rs of a shoe. W ork involves; Setting overlapped edges
together under p re s s e r foot and needle of m achine; dep ressin g lev er to s ta rt m achine and
guiding m a te ria l through stitching p ro c e ss; and sewing top to en tire low er p a rt of upper when
shoe has a cut sep arate from q u a rte rs , o r has a whole vam p. P a rts a re som etim es firs t
pasted together by another w o rk er to in su re m ore a c cu rate stitching.
Office O ccupations
CLERK, GENERAL
Is typically req u ired to p erfo rm a v ariety of office o p eratio n s, usu ally because of
im p racticab ility of specializatio n in a sm all office or because v e rsa tility is e sse n tia l in
m eeting peak re q u ire m e n ts in la rg e r offices. The w ork g en erally involves the use of in d e­
pendent judgm ent in tending to a p a tte rn of office w ork from day to day, as w ell as know l­
edge relatin g to phases of office w ork th at occur only occasionally. F o r exam ple, the range
of op erations p erfo rm ed m ay entail a ll o r som e com bination of the follow ing: A nsw ering
co rresp o n d en ce, p rep arin g b ills and invoices, posting to v ario u s re c o rd s, p rep arin g p ay ro lls,
filing, etc. May o p erate vario us office m achines and type as the w ork re q u ire s.
CLERK, PAYROLL
Com putes w ages of com pany em ployees and e n ters the n e c e ssa ry data on the pay ro ll
sh eets. D uties involve; C alculating w o rk e rs' earnin gs based on tim e o r production re c o rd s;
and posting calcu lated data on pay ro ll sheet, showing inform ation such as w o rk e r's nam e,
w orking days, tim e, ra te , deductions for in su ran ce, and to tal wages due. M ay m ake out
paychecks and a s s is t p ay m aster in m aking up and distrib u tin g pay envelopes. M ay use a
calculating m achine.
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
P rim a ry duty is to take dictation , involving a n o rm al routine vocabulary, from one
or m o re p erso n s e ith e r in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ila r m achine; and tra n sc rib e
dictation. M ay also type from w ritten copy. M ay m ain tain files, keep sim ple re c o rd s or
p erfo rm o ther relativ ely routine c le ric a l ta sk s. May o p erate from a stenographic pool.
Does not include tra n sc rib in g -m a c h in e w ork.
TYPIST
U ses a ty p e w rite r to m ake copies of v ario us m a te ria l or to m ake out b ills, a fte r
calculations have been m ade by ano th er p erso n . May include typing of sten cils, m a ts, or
sim ila r m a te ria ls for use in duplicating p ro c e sse s. May do c le ric a l w ork involving little
sp ecial train in g , such as keeping sim ple re c o rd s, filing reco rd s and re p o rts, or sorting and
distribu tin g incom ing m ail.
C lass A . P e rfo rm s one or m ore of the following: Typing m a te ria l in final form
when it involves com bining m a te ria l from se v e ra l so u rces or resp o n sib ility for c o rre c t
spelling, sy llabication, punctuation, e tc ., of technical or unusual w ords o r foreign language
m ate ria l; and planning layout and typing of com plicated sta tistic a l tab les to m ain tain u n i­
form ity and balance in spacing. M ay type routine form le tte rs varying details to suit
circu m sta n c e s.
C lass B. P e rfo rm s one or m o re of the follow ing: Copy typing from rough or c le a r
d rafts; routine typing of fo rm s, in su ran ce p o licies, e tc .; and setting up sim ple stan d ard
tab ulatio ns, or copying m ore com plex tab les alread y se t up and spaced p ro p erly .






Industry W age Studies
The m o st re c e n t re p o rts for in d u strie s included in the B u reau 's p ro g ra m of in d u stry
wage su rv ey s since Jan u ary I960 a re listed below . T hose fo r w hich a p ric e is shown a re
availab le from the S uperintendent of D ocum ents, U. S. G overnm ent P rin tin g O ffice, W ashing­
ton, D. C. , 20402, o r any of its reg io n al sa le s offices. T hose fo r w hich a p ric e is not shown
m ay be obtained fre e as long as a supply is av ailab le, from the B u reau of L abo r S ta tistic s,
W ashington, D. C. , 20212, o r from any of the regio nal offices shown on the in side back co v er.
I.

Occupational Wage Studies

M anufacturing
B asic Iro n and S teel, 1967. BLS B ulletin 1602 (55 cents).
Candy and O ther C onfectionery P ro d u c ts, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1520 (30 cents).
♦ Canning and F re e z in g , 1957. BLS R eport 136.
%
C igar M anufacturing, 1967. BLS B ulletin 1581 (25 cents).
C ig arette M anufacturing, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1472 (20 cents).
Cotton T e x tile s, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1506 (40 cents).
D istilled L iq u o rs, 1952. S e rie s 2, No. 88.
F a b ricate d S tru c tu ra l S teel, 1964. BLS B ulletin 1463 (30 cents).
F e rtiliz e r M anufacturing, 1966. BLS B ulletin 1531 (30 cents).
F lo u r and O ther G rain M ill P ro d u c ts, 1967. BLS B ulletin 1576 (25 cents).
Fluid M ilk Indu stry, 1964. BLS B ulletin 1464 (30 cents).
F o o tw ear, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1503 (50 cents).
H o siery , 1967. BLS B ulletin 1562 (70 cents).
In d u strial C h em icals, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1529 (40 cents).
Iron and Steel F o u n d ries, 1967. BLS B ulletin 1626(40 cents).
L eath er Tanning and F in ishing, 1968. BLS B ulletin 1618 (40 cents).
M achinery M anufacturing, 1966. BLS B ulletin 1563 (70 cents).
M eat P ro d u c ts, 1963. BLS B ulletin 1415 (75 cents).
M en's and B o ys' S hirts (E xcept W ork Shirts) and N ightw ear, 1964. BLS B ulletin 1457 (40 cents).
M en's and B oys' Suits and C o ats, 1967. BLS B ulletin 1594 (75 cents).
M iscellaneous P la stic s P ro d u c ts, 1964. BLS B ulletin 1439 (35 cents).
M iscellaneous T e x tiles, 1953. BLS R eport 56.
M otor V ehicles and M otor V ehicle P a rts , 1963. BLS B ulletin 1393 (45 cents).
N onferrous F o u n d ries, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1498 (40 cents).
P ain ts and V arn ish es, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1524 (40 cents).
P ap erb o ard C o ntainers and B oxes, 1964. BLS B ulletin 1478 (70 cents).
P etro leu m R efining, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1526 (30 cents).
P re s s e d o r Blown G lass and G lassw are, 1964. BLS B ulletin 1424 (30 cents).
♦ Processed W aste, 1957. BLS R eport 124.
P ulp, P a p e r, and P a p e rb o a rd M ills, 1967. BLS B ulletin 1608 (60 cents).
Radio, T elev isio n, and R elated P ro d u c ts, 1951. S eries 2, No. 84.
R ailroad C a rs, 1952. S e rie s 2, No. 86.
♦ Raw S ugar, 1957. BLS R eport 136.
Southern Saw m ills and Planing M ills, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1519 (30 cents).
S tru c tu ra l C lay P ro d u c ts, 1964. BLS B ulletin 1459 (45 cents).
Synthetic F ib e rs , 1966. BLS B ulletin 1540 (30 cents).
S ynthetic T e x tile s, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1509 (40 cents).
T extile Dyeing and F in ishing, 1965—66. BLS B ulletin 1527 (45 cents).
♦ Tobacco Stem m ing and R edrying, 1957. BLS R eport 136.
♦ Studies of the effects of the $1 m inim um wage.




I. Occupational Wage Studies— Continued

M anufacturing— C ont inu ed
W est C oast Saw m illing, 1964. BLS B ulletin 1455 (30 cents).
W om en’s and M is s e s' Coats and S uits, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1508 (25 cents).
W om en's and M is s e s' D re s s e s , 1966. BLS B ulletin 1538 (30 cents).
Wood H ousehold F u rn itu re , E xcept U p ho lstered, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1496 (40 cen ts).
♦ Wooden C o n tain ers, 1957. BLS R eport 126.
Wool T e x tile s, 1966. BLS B u lletin 1551 (45 cents).
W ork C lothing, 1968. BLS B ulletin 1624 (50 cents).
N onm anufacturing
Auto D ealer R epair Shops, 1964. BLS B ulletin 1452 (30 cents).
B anking, 1964. BLS B ulletin 1466 (30 cents).
B itum inous Coal M ining, 1967. BLS B ulletin 1583 (50 cents).
C om m unications, 1967. BLS B ulletin 1615 (30 cents).
C o n tract C leaning S e rv ic e s, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1507 (30 cents).
C rude P e tro le u m and N atural Gas P ro d u ctio n , 1967. BLS B ulletin 1566 (30 cents).
D ep artm ent and W om en's R ead y-to-W ear S to res, 1950. S eries 2, No. 78.
E ating and D rinking P la c e s, 1966—67. BLS B ulletin 1588 (40 cents).
E le c tric and Gas U tilitie s, 1967. BLS B ulletin 1614 (7 0 c e n ts).
H o sp itals, 1966. BLS B ulletin 1553 (70 cents).
H otels and M otels, 1966—67. BLS B ulletin 1587 (40 cents).
L aundry and C leaning S e rv ic e s, 1966. BLS B ulletin 1544 (60 cents).
Life In su ran ce, 1966. BLS B ulletin 1569 (30 cents).
M otion P ic tu re T h e a te rs, 1966. BLS B ulletin 1542 (35 cents).
N ursing Hom es and R elated F a c ilitie s , 1965. BLS B ulletin 1492 (45 cents).
II.

Other Industry Wage Studies

F a c to ry W o rk e rs' E arnings— D istrib u tio n by S traig h t-T im e H ourly E arn in g s, 1968.
BLS B ulletin 1252 (40 cents).
F a c to ry W o rk ers' E arnings— S elected M anufacturing In d u strie s, 1959.
BLS B ulletin 1275 (35 cents).
E m ployee E arnings and H ours in N onm etropolitan A reas of the South and N orth C en tral
R egions, 1965. BLS B ulletin 1552 (50 cents).
E m ployee E arn in gs and H ours in E ight M etropolitan A reas of the South, 1965.
BLS B ulletin 1533 (40 cents).
E m ployee E arnings and H ours in R etail T rad e, June 1966—
R etail T rad e (O verall S um m ary). BLS B ulletin 1584 ($1).
Building M a te ria ls, H ardw are, and F a rm E quipm ent D e a le rs. BLS B ulletin 1584-1
(30 cents).
G en eral M erchan dise S to res. BLS B ulletin 1584-2 (55 cents).
Food S to res. BLS B ulletin 1584-3 (60 cents).
A utom otive D ealers and G asoline S erv ice S tations. BLS B ulletin 1584-4 (50 cents).
A p p arel and A c c e sso ry S to re s. BLS B ulletin 1584-5 (55 cents).
F u rn itu re , Home F u rn ish in g , and H ousehold A ppliance S to res. BLS B ulletin 1584-6
(50 cents).
M iscellan eou s S to res. BLS B ulletin 1584-7 (65 cents).

♦

Studies of the effects of the $1 m inim um wage.




* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1969 0 —356*109

\

Region I
Region II
1603-B Federal Building
341 Ninth Ave.
Government Center
New York, N. Y. 10001
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region VI
Region V
Federal Office Building
219 South Dearborn St.
911 Walnut S t., 10th Floor
Chicago, 111. 60604
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312) Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region VII
337 Mayflower Building
411 North Akard St.
Dallas, Tex. 7S201
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Region VIII
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)




U.S. D EPA R TM EN T OF LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W A S H IN G T O N , D .C .

20212

OFFICIAL BUSINESS




P O ST A G E A N D F E E S P A ID
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R

(----------------------------------------- 1
j^ T H IR D

CLASS

M A IL j


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102