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Industry Wage Survey:
Footwear, April 1975
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1977
Bulletin 1946




Industry Wage Survey:
Footwear, April 1975
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1977
Bulletin 1946




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government
Printing Office Washington, D .C . 20402
Stock N o. 029-001-02034-1




Preface
This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of Labor Statistics Survey of wages and related
benefits in the footwear manufacturing industry in April 1975. A similar survey was conducted in
March 1971.
Information is provided separately for major product branches in the industry. Separate summa­
ries were issued earlier for the following States and areas:
Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes:
Maine
Brockton, Mass.
Tennessee
Wisconsin
Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes:
Maine
Lawrence-Haverhill-Lowell, Mass.
Southeastern New Hampshire
Pennsylvania
Arkansas
Missouri
Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.
Misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes:
Missouri
Misses’ and children’s Goodyear-welt shoes:
Southeastern Pennsylvania

Copies of these summaries are available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C.
2 0 2 1 2 , or any of its regional offices.
This study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of Wages and Industrial Relations. Joseph C.
Bush of the Division of Occupational Wage Structures prepared the analysis in the bulletin.
Fieldwork for the survey was directed by the Assistant Regional Commissioners for Operations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program of industry wage studies, as well as the
addresses of the Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end of this bulletin. Material in this
publication is in the public domain and may be reproduced without permission of the Federal
Government. Please credit the Bureau of Labor Statistics and cite the name and number of the
publication.




in




Contents
Page

Summary ............................................................................................................‘..............................................................................
Industry characteristics..............................................................................................................................................................
P ro d u cts...................................................................................................................................................................................
E m ploym ent...........................................................................................................................................................................
Production and im p o rts..................................................................... ; .................................................................................
L ocation...................................................................................................................................................................................
Size of establishment ............................................................................................................................................................
Unionization...........................................................................................................................................................................
Occupation and sex ...............................................................................................................................................................
Method of wage paym ent.......................................................................................................................................................
Average hourly earnings....................................................................................................................................................................
Occupational earnings.......................................................................................................................................................................
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions......................................................................................................
Scheduled weekly hours and shift p ractices........................................................................................................................
Paid ho lid ay s............................................................................................................................................................................
Paid v a c a tio n s.........................................................................................................................................................................
Health, insurance, and retirement plans .............................................................................................................................
Other selected benefits ..........................................................................................................................................................

1

1
1
1

2
2
2’
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
4

4
4
4

Text tables:
1.
Percent of production workers in footwear plants by selected characteristics, United States,
April 1975 ................................................................................................................................................................. 2
2.
Pay relatives in footwear manufacturing, by type of footwear, United States, New England,
Southeast, April 1975 .................................
4
3.
Earnings distribution of selected occupations in the misses’ and children’s cement-process
(conventional-lasted) shoeplants, Missouri, April 1975 ...................................................................................... 5
Reference tables:
Average hourly earnings:
1. By selected characteristics ..............................................................................................................................

6

Earnings distribution:
2. Footwear industry ..........................................................................................................................................
7
3. Men’s Goody ear-welt dress sh o e s...................................................................................................................
8
4. Men’s Goody ear-welt work shoes...................................................................................................................
8
5. Men’s cement-process s h o e s ...........................................................................................................................
9
6 . Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes...................................................................................... 10
7. Misses’ and children’s cement-process(conventional-lasted) shoes ................................................................ 11
8 . Misses’ and children’s Goodyear-welt s h o e s ..............................................................................
11
Occupational earnings:
Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes—
9. All establishments ...............................................................................................................................................12
10. By size of com m unity...............
16
11. By size of establishment .................................................................................................................................... 19
12. Brockton, Mass.......................................................................................................................................................20




v

Contents—Continued
Page
R e fe re n c e tables - C o n tin u ed
O ccu pation al earnings - C o n tin u ed

13.
14.
15.
16.

M aine......................................................................................................................................................................22
T ennessee..............................................................................................................
23
W isconsin..............................................................................................................................................................25
All establishments .............................................................................................................................................. 27

Men’s cement-process shoes:
17. All establishments ...............................................................................................................................................29
Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes:
18. All establishments ...........................................................................................................................................
19. By size of co m m unity......................................................................................................................................
20. By size of establishment ...............................................................................................................................
21. By size of establishmentand size of com m unity...........................................................................................
22. A rkansas.............................................................................................................................................................
23. Lawrence -Lowell-Haverhill, Mass.......................................................................................................................
24. Los Angeles-Long Beach ................................................................................................................................
25. M aine..................................................................................................................................................................
26. M issouri.............................................................................................................................................................
27. Pennsylvania.....................................................................................................................................................
28. Southeastern New H am pshire.........................................................................................................................

33
40
45
48
51
53
55
57
59
61
64

Misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes:
29. All establishments ........................................................................................................................................... 66
30. M issouri............................................................................................................................................................. 68
Misses’ and children’s Goodyear-welt shoes:
31. All establishments ..............................................................................................................................................70
32. Southeastern Pennsylvania.................................................................................................................................72
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
33. Method of wage p aym ent................................................................................................................................... 74
34. Scheduled weekly hours ................................................................................................................................... 75
35. Paid h o lid ay s........................................................................................................................................................76
36. Paid vacations ..................................................................................................................................................... 76
37. Health, insurance, and retirement plans ......................................................................................................... 78
38. Other selected benefits ..................................................................................................................................... 79
Appendixes:
A.
Scope and method of survey..................................................................................................................................... 80
B.
Occupational descriptions ........................................................................................................................................84




VI

Footwear, April 1975
Summary

Industry characteristics

Straight-time earnings of production and related workers
in the leather footwear manufacturing industry averaged
$2.98 an hour in April 1975.1 This average was 23 percent
above the $2.42 average recorded for March 1971, the date
of a similar Bureau survey ,2 Workers in the New England
'
region, one-fourth of the 105,583 workers within the scope
of the Bureau’s survey, averaged $3.09. Averages for the
other regions ranged from $2.68 in the Border States to
$3.21 in the Great Lakes region.
Over .nine-tenths of the industry’s production workers
earned from $2.10 to $4.50 an hour. The middle group of
workers ranged between $2.32 and $3.39 an hour. Factors
contributing to this wide dispersion of earnings included
the variety of job skills required by the industry, extensive
use of incentive wage systems, and pay levels which varied
according to location and type of footwear.
Women’s cement process (conventional-lasted) shoes had
the highest employment level of the six industry branches
studied and accounted for approximately 3 out of every 10
workers in the industry; workers in these plants averaged
$2.89 an hour. Earnings levels in the other branches ranged
from $3.22 for workers in plants primarily making misses’
and children’s Goodyear-welt shoes to $2.83 for those in
misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventional-lasted)
shoe plants.
Wage levels also varied widely among occupations within
each industry branch. In the women’s cement process (con­
ventional-lasted) shoe plants, for example, average earnings
for a number of highly populated jobs were $2.87 for re­
pairers, $2.95 for fancy stitchers; $3.27 for cement process
sole attachers; and $3.72 for machine side lasters.
Paid holidays, paid vacations, and life, hospitalization,
and surgical insurance were provided to over nine-tenths of
the production workers. Sickness and accident insurance,
and private retirement pension plans covered nearly seventenths and two-thirds of the plantworkers, respectively.

P ro d u cts. The industry covered by this study makes a wide

variety of leather shoes in many combinations of sizes,
styles, and shapes, and by several different methods of con­
struction .3 Data in this report are tabulated separately for
six industry branches which accounted for slightly over
four-fifths of the industry’s labor force. Establishments in
these branches were classified according to the predominant
method of construction (bottoming, i.e., the means by
which the outsole is attached to the shoe) and type of shoe
manufactured—
men’s (dress and work), women’s, misses’,
children’s, and infants’. The distribution of production
workers in the branches for which data have been tabulated
is as follows:

Industry branches
All industry branches.....................

100

Men's Goodyear-welt dress shoes...................
Men's Goodyear-welt work shoes...................
Men's cement-process shoes.............................
Women's cement-process (conventionallasted) shoes..................................................
Misses' and children's cement-process
(conventional-lasted) shoes........................
Misses' and children's Goodyear-welt
shoes................................................................

19
7
14
31

All other ................................................<•...........

17

8
4

Other important types of leather footwear produced by the
industry include women’s cement-process (slip-lasted)
shoes, moccasin-constructed shoe with hand sewn plug,
women’s Littleway (McKay) shoes, and leather footwear
with vulcanized or injection-molded shoe construction.
E m p lo y m e n t. Footwear manufacturing plants within the

scope of this survey employed 105,583 production and
related workers in April 1975— decline of 27 percent since
a
the March 1971 survey. Employment declined most in the
New England (41 percent) and Middle Atlantic (36 percent)
regions, and in plants manufacturing women’s cementprocess, conventional-lasted shoes (42 percent) and men’s

1See appendix A for scope and method of survey and for defi­
nitions of the regions used in the study. Earnings data exclude pre­
mium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts.
2See Industry Wage Survey: Footwear, March 1971, Bulletin
1792 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1973).




Percent o f
production workers

3
For descriptions of various shoe construction methods, see
The A rt and Science o f Footwear Manufacturing (American Foot­
wear Industries Association, Arlington, Virginia, 1974).

1

Goodyear-welt dress shoes (26 percent). Plant closings were
the major cause of these employment reductions. There
were 434 establishments (those firms with at least 50 work­
ers) within the scope of the 1975 survey compared with
577 in 1971. The size of the average (mean) plant was
nearly the same in both the 1975 and 1971 surveys (275
and 284 in 1975 and 1971, respectively).

As in the 1971 survey, workers employed in metropolitan
areas accounted for slightly more than two-fifths of the
industry’s work force nationwide. Among the regions, the
corresponding proportions of workers in metropolitan areas
ranged from 5 percent for the Middle West to 77 percent
for the Middle Atlantic region. Variations by industry
branch ranged from approximately one-fourth to threefifths (text table 1).

P ro d u ctio n an d im p o rts. Production in the domestic foot­

wear industry has declined considerably, while imports have
skyrocketed. Approximately 26.7 million pairs of shoes
(except slippers and rubber footwear) were produced do­
mestically in April 1975— percent less than the 41.5
36
million pairs manufactured in March 1971.4 The domestic
production of men’s shoes decreased 14 percent and of
women’s and misses’, 48 percent. The United States im­
ported 58.3 million pairs of men’s leather shoes in 1974
compared ith 36.6 million in 1971— 59-percent in­
a
crease.5 Corresponding imports of women’s shoes were
103.5 million pairs in 1974 and 93.6 million in 1971 (an
8-percent increase). Imports of leather ski boots and other
athletic footwear were 8.7 million pairs in 1974 and 6
million in 1971 (a 45-percent increase).
In the leather footwear industry, productivity increased
slightly between 1971 and 1975. The 1975 index for out­
put per employee-hour of all employees was 107.7
(1967=100) compared with 105.9 in 1971.6 The increase
of 1.7 percent was significantly less than the 4.2 percent
reported for the index for all manufacturing industries in
1975.7

S ize o f esta b lish m en t. Establishments employing at least

250 workers accounted for three-fourths of the work force.
Regionally, the proportions ranged from slightly over ninetenths in the Southeast to one-half in the Pacific region.
Plants of this size employed at least six-tenths of the
workers in each of the industry branches studied separately.
U n io n iza tio n . Establishments which had labor-management
contracts covering a majority of their production workers
accounted for 45 percent of these workers. Such establish­
ments employed approximately three-tenths of the workers
in the New England and Middle Atlantic regions, one-third
in the Southeast, two-thirds in the Great Lakes region, and
four-fifths in the Middle West. The major unions in the
industry were the Boot and Shoe Workers Union and the
United Shoe Workers of America, both AFL-CIO affiliates.
O ccu p a tio n an d sex. Shoemaking includes the assembly of
many separate parts through a series of carefully controlled
hand and machine operations. Some occupations in shoe
factories require relatively short training periods, e.g., floor
workers; other jobs, such as vamp and whole shoe cutters,
are highly skilled. A large number of workers operate vari­
ous cutting, sewing, lasting, and bottoming machines.
Women, who constitute two-thirds of the industry’s
labor force, frequently are employed in top stitching, flt-

L o ca tio n . Five of the eight regions studied separately em­

ployed slightly over four-fifths of the work force. Of these
five major regions, New England employed one-fourth of
the work force, the Middle Atlantic and Southeast regions
employed one-sixth each, the Great Lakes and Middle West
regions employed approximately one-eighth each. Six of
the eight regions experienced employment declines since
1971, the date of the last survey, ranging from 41 percent
in New England to 8 percent in the Border States. The
Pacific region experienced an employment increase of 10
percent, and employment in the Southwest was essentially
unchanged.
The product mix varied among the regions. Workers in
New England, for example, constituted one-eighth of the
United States total in the misses’ and children’s cementprocess (conventional-lasted) shoe branch in contrast to
nearly one-third in plants making men’s cement-process
shoes.

T ext table 1. Percent of production workers
in footwear plants by selected characteristics,
United States, April 1975
Establishments Industry
branch

Men's Goodyear-welt
dress shoes......................
Men's Goodyear-welt
work shoes......................
Men's cement-process
shoes ...............................
Women's cement-process
(conventional-lasted)
shoes ...............................
Misses' and children's
cement-process (con­
ventional-lasted)
shoes ...............................
Misses' and children's
Goodyear-welt shoes . .

4 Current Industrial Reports, Shoes and Slippers, Series
M 31A(71)-3 and MA-31A(75)-1 (Bureau of the Census).
5 U.S. Imports for Consumption and General Imports, SICBased Products, Report FT210 (Bureau of the Census, 1971 and
1974).
6 Productivity Indexes for Selected Industries, 1976 edition,
Bulletin 1938 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1977).
1 Monthly Labor Review, October 1976, p. 95, table 31.




2

In metro­
politan
areas

With 250
workers
or more

With
union
contracts

56

92

47

46

81

53

37

88

51

37

69

49

27

59

34

43

83

26

ting, and inspection operations. Men are prevalent in last­
ing, bottom ing, and maintenance jobs.

which data could be published, the average wage advantage
for men ranged from 10 percent in the Southeast to 25
percent in both the Great Lakes and Pacific States. Such
differences in the average pay levels for men and women
occur for several reasons, including the variation in the
distribution o f the sexes among establishments with differ­
ing pay scales and among jobs with differing skill and pay
levels.
Differences in average earnings for men and women in
the same occupation and area may reflect minor differences
in duties performed. Job descriptions in wage surveys usu­
ally are more generalized than those in individual establish­
ments to allow for the minor differences among establish­
ments in specific duties performed. Also, production at
piece rates determines the earnings o f many workers. Varia­
tion in incentive earnings for individuals or among men and
women may be traceable to differences in work experience,
work flow , or other factors which the worker may or may
not control.
Regionally, average hourly earnings ranged from $2.68
in the Border States to $3.21 in the Great Lakes region.
Earnings in the Pacific, Middle West, Middle Atlantic, and
New England regions averaged between $2.98 and $3.09 an
hour. Workers earned $2.73 in the Southwest and $2.79 in
the Southeast—the two remaining regions. The regional
variations in pay levels resulted partly from differences in
the type o f footwear produced. Other factors, such as the
general differences in pay among regions, also were impor­
tant.
Among the six industry branches shown separately, aver­
age hourly earnings ranged from $2.83 for production work­
ers in misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventionallasted) shoes to $3.21 for workers in men’s Goodyear-welt
work shoes and $3.22 for workers in plants primarily pro­
ducing misses’ and children’s Goodyear-welt shoes. Earnings
relationships among the branches differed in the New Eng­
land and Southeast regions, the only regions providing suf­
ficient data for comparisons.
Workers in m etropolitan areas averaged $3.09 an h o u r -7
percent more than those in smaller communities. In all but
one region permitting comparisons, m etropolitan area
workers averaged from about 5 to nearly 10 percent more
an hour than those in smaller communities. In the Border
States, however, the averages were nearly identical.
Nationwide, em ployees in plants with 250 workers or
more averaged $3 an hour— percent more than those in
4
plants with 50 to 249 employees. The wage differences in
favor o f those in larger plants ranged from 5 to 9 percent in
6 o f the 8 regions studied separately. There was a 21-per­
cent difference in the Pacific region, and in the Middle
West, average earnings were nearly identical. The nation­
wide relationship resulted largely from the regional mix o f
the two size-groups.
These comparisons o f average hourly earnings do not
isolate the influence o f individual characteristics as a deter­
minant o f wages. The wage differences noted in the preced­
ing paragraphs may reflect the interrelationship o f factors

M e th o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t. Incentive wage systems, usually

based on individual piecework, applied to nearly threefourths o f the production workers (table 33). The propor­
tions o f incentive workers ranged from about one-half in
the Pacific region to approximately four-fifths in the Great
Lakes, Southwest, Border States, and Middle West regions.
Among the industry branches, incentive workers consti­
tuted between two-thirds and four-fifths o f the work force.
A majority o f the workers in nearly all o f the plant jobs
selected for separate study were paid incentive rates; occu­
pations which were usually time rated included repairers,
floor workers, inspectors (crowners), janitors, and mainte­
nance mechanics.
Time workers were about evenly split between formal
and informal rate structures, i.e. individual rates for jobs.
Of those paid in accordance with formal pay plans, twice as
many workers were under range-of-rate plans as were paid
single rates.

Average hourly earnings

Straight-time earnings o f the 105,583 production and
related workers covered by the survey averaged $2.98 an
hour in April 1975 (table l) .8
This wage rate was 23 percent higher than the, $2.48
recorded in the Bureau’s March 1971 study o f leather
footwear plants9 and compares with a 34-percent rise for
production workers in all manufacturing industries.10 In­
creases in regional averages for the footwear industry varied
from 21 percent in the Middle West to 28 percent in the
Southeast region. Between 1971 and 1975, wage increases
among industry branches ranged from 18 percent for
w om en’s cement process (conventional-lasted) shoes to 29
percent for m en’s Goody ear-welt work shoes. Wage gains in
the other branches fell between 22 and 27 percent.
In April 1975, men averaged $3.32 an hour, compared
with $2.82 an hour for women. Among the regions for

®The straight-time hourly earnings presented in this bulletin are
not comparable with the gross average hourly earnings published in
the Bureau’s monthly employment and earnings series. The monthly
series combines data for plants primarily manufacturing nonrubber
footwear designed for street, work, play, or sportswear and for plants
making house slippers as their primary product; the latter group and
all footwear plants employing fewer than 50 workers were not in­
cluded in this study. Estimates here exclude premium pay for over­
time and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Average
earnings were calculated by summing individual hourly earnings and
dividing by the number of individuals; in the monthly series, the
sum of the hours reported by establishments in the industry was
divided into the reported payroll totals.
*BLS Bulletin 1792
10 The Hourly Earnings Index, 1964-August 1975, Bulletin 1897
(Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1976). The index is adjusted for sea­
sonal variations, overtime, and interindustry employment shifts.




3

Text table 2. Pay relatives in footwear
manufacturing, by type of footwear, United States,
New England, Southeast, April 1975
Branch
Men's Goodyear-welt dress
shoes .........................................
Men's Goodyear-welt work
shoes .........................................
Men's cement-process shoes . . .
Misses' and children's cementprocess (conventionallasted) shoes .............................
Women's cement-process
(conventional-lasted)
shoes .........................................

United
States

New
England

Southeast

112

106

114

113
105

104
92

106
105

100

100

100

102

96

branches for which data could be published. Pasters,
backers, and fitters—also a numerically important group—
usually averaged between $2.59 and $3.05 an hour. Within
each industry branch, fancy stitches averaged from 13 to 33
cents more than pasters, backers, and fitters except for the
misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventional-lasted)
division where identical averages were recorded ($2.74).
Lasting operations, generally performed by m en, include
drawing the com pleted uppers over the last (a footlike
form) and attaching the insole. Machine assemblers for the
pulling-over operation averaged $2.80 to $3.36 an hour
among the branches for which data could be shown. Pull­
over-machine operators usually averaged from 4 4 to 92
cents an hour more than machine assemblers for pullover.
Average earnings for side lasters and toe lasters ranged from
$3.63 to $3.75 and from $3.51 to $3.87, respectively,
among the industry branches.
Bottom ing m ethods, as pointed out previously, differ by
type o f shoe construction. Goodyear stitchers in m en’s
Goodyear-welt dress shoe plants averaged $3.79 an hour,
about the same as their counterparts in m en’s Goodyearwelt work shoe plants and 10 cents more than those in
misses’ and children’s Goodyear-welt shoe plants. Sole at­
ta c h e s in plants making w om en’s cement-process shoes
(conventional-lasted) averaged $3.27 compared with $3.11
in plants making misses’ and children’s cement-process
(conventional-lasted) shoes.
Occupational averages are presented by size o f commu­
nity and size o f establishment for the two major industry
branches, m en’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes and w om en’s
cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes (tables 10-11
and 19-20). Also tabulated are job averages for m etropoli­
tan and nonmetropolitan areas by size o f establishment in
table 21.

105

such as degree o f unionization and m ethod o f wage pay­
ment.
Individual earnings o f 94 percent o f the production
workers fell within a range o f $2 to $4.50 an hour in April
1975 (table 2). Earnings o f the middle 50 percent o f the
workers were between $2.32 and $3.89 an hour. Nation­
wide, about 16 percent o f the workers were paid at or
slightly more than the $2.10 Federal minimum hourly wage
and less than $2.20 an hour. The heaviest concentrations of
workers at this earnings interval existed in the Border States
and Southwest. Among the industry branches studied sepa­
rately, proportions o f workers in the $2.10—$2.20 interval
ranged from nearly 8.5 percent in misses’ and children’s
G oody ear-welt work shoes to just under 19 percent in
m isses’ and children’s cement-process (conventional-lasted)
shoes (tables 3-8).

Occupational earnings

Earnings o f individual workers varied widely within the
same occupation and area (tables 12-15, 22-28, 30 and 32).
Frequently, hourly earnings o f the highest paid workers
exceeded those o f the lowest paid by $1.50 or more. Thus,
a number o f workers in comparatively low paying jobs
earned as much as or more than some workers in jobs with
significantly higher average hourly earnings. Text table 3
illustrates the overlap in earnings occurring between ma­
chine cutters o f vamps and whole shoes and fancy stitchers
o f misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventionallasted) shoes in Missouri.

Average hourly earnings o f workers in a number o f
occupations for the six industry branches shown separately
are presented in tables 9-32. These occupations, a relatively
small proportion o f those found in the industry, are ar­
ranged in the tables in the sequence o f major shoemaking
processes and were chosen primarily to represent wage
levels for the types o f skills and operations used in manu­
facturing footwear.
Cutting shoe uppers and linings—
the first o f the major
operations— usually performed on machines. Vamp and
is
whole shoe machine cutters, numerically the m ost impor­
tant job in this department, earned from $3.36 an hour in
the misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventionallasted) branch to $4.06 an hour in plants making m en’s
Goodyear-welt work shoes.
Fitting operations, which typically are performed by
wom en, involve assembling and stitching upper parts and
linings to make com plete shoe uppers. Fancy stitchers (who
sew decorative designs on shoe uppers) were numerically
the m ost important o f the selected jobs and had average
earnings ranging from $2.74 to $3.29 an hour among the




Establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions

For production workers, data were obtained on certain
establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions,
including work schedules; paid holidays and vacations; and
health, insurance, and retirement plans.
S c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u rs a n d s h ift p r a c tic e s . Eighty-eight

percent o f the production workers had weekly work sched-

4

o f service; these provisions were found m ostly in the Great
Lakes and Middle West regions.

Text table 3. Earnings distribution of selected
occupations in the misses' anc’ children's cement-process
(conventional-lasted) shoe plants, Missouri, April 1975

Average hourly earnings

Machine cutters,
vamps and
whole shoes

Health, insurance, and retirement plans. Slightly over ninetenths o f the production workers were provided with life,
hospitalization, surgical, and basic medical insurance fi­
nanced at least in part by the employer (table 37). Nearly
seven-tenths were covered by sickness and accident insur­
ance; about one-half were covered by accidental death and
dismemberment insurance; and about three-fourths by
major medical plans. These plans were usually financed
wholly by the em ployer rather than by joint employeremployee contributions. A majority o f the production
workers in each region, except the Pacific, were covered by
m ost health and insurance plans. In the Pacific, only onesixth o f the workers were under major medical plans and
none was covered by pay continuation plans in the event o f
sickness or accident.
Retirement pension plans, providing regular payments
for the remainder o f the retiree’s life (in addition to Federal
social security), were recorded in establishments employing
approximately two-thirds o f the plantworkers. Among the
regions, the proportions o f plantworkers covered by pen­
sion plans ranged from one-third in the New England region
to about nine-tenths in the Middle West and Great Lakes
regions. Severance pay, a lump-sum granted upon retire­
ment, was rarely reported.

Fancy stitchers

Under $ 2 . 4 0 ..................................
$2.40 and under $ 2 . 6 0 ..............
$2.60 and under $ 2 . 8 0 ..............
$2.80 and under $ 3 . 0 0 ..............
$3.00 and under $ 3 . 2 0 ..............
$3.20 and under $ 3 . 4 0 ..............
$3.40 and under $ 3 . 6 0 ..............
$3.60 and under $ 3 . 8 0 ..............
$3.80 and under $ 4 . 0 0 ..............
$4.00 and under $ 4 . 2 0 ..............
$4.20 and under $ 4 . 4 0 ...............
$4.40 and under $ 4 . 6 0 ..............
$4.60 and over .............................

2
3
5
1
6
4
7
7
4
4
6
3
11

33
16
11
13
4
8
5
3
5
2

Number of w o rkers..........

63

100

Average hourly earnings .

$3.84

$2.76

-

-

ules o f 40 hours (table 34). Three-fifths o f the workers in
the Middle West and all or nearly all o f the workers in the
Middle Atlantic, Southeast, and Pacific regions followed
40-hour work schedules. Schedules o f more than 40 hours
were rarely reported. The Border States, Southwest, Great
Lakes, and Middle West regions claimed most o f the
workers on less-than-40-hour schedules—32 hours being the
most prevalent practice. Virtually all o f the production
workers were employed on day shifts in April 1975.

Other selected benefits. Provisions for pay continuation
while attending funerals o f immediate relatives applied to
seven-tenths o f the production workers (table 38). Coverage
ranged from one-sixth o f the workers in the Pacific States
to at least nine-tenths in the Middle West and Great Lakes
regions.
Provisions for separation pay because o f technological
changes or plant closings were reported for slightly more
than one-fifth o f the production workers. Coverage, how ­
ever, was nonexistent in the Pacific region, while seventenths o f the workers in the Middle West were provided
such benefits.
Shoe factories providing paid jury-duty plans employed
one-half o f the production workers nationwide. Coverage
ranged from about nine-tenths in the Middle West to onetenth in the Pacific region.

Paid holidays. Nearly all o f the production workers were
employed in shoe factories providing paid holidays, usually
8 or 9 days annually (table 35). Significant provisions for
seven days or less were observed in the Middle Atlantic and
Southeast regions, and in the Border States, but in no
region did a majority o f workers receive less than 8 days.

Paid vacations. Virtually all production workers received
paid vacations after qualifying periods o f service (table 36).
Most o f the production workers received 1 w eek’s pay after
1 year of service, 2 weeks’ after 5 years, and 3 weeks’ after
15 years. About one-fifth o f the production workers were
in establishments providing 4 weeks’ vacation after 20 years




5

Table 1. Average hourly earnings: By selected characteristics
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of production workers in footwear manufacturing establishments by selected characteristics, United States and selected regions, April 1975)
United States'
Characteristic

Number
of
workers

ALL ifOB KEBS3 ............................................................ 1 0 5 , 583
HEM- . . . ................................................... ......... _ 3 2 , 829
HOHEM.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70,726
PREDOMINANT TYPE OF SHOE:4
HEN'S GOODYEAB-WELT DBESS SHOES.
HEM'S GdODYEAR-WELT WORK SH OES..
HEM'S CEHEWT-PROCESS SHOES..............
HOHEM'S CEHEMT-PROCESS
(CONTENTION AL-LASTED) S H O E S . . . .
H I S S E S ' AMD CHILDREN'S CEHEMTPROCESS (CONTEMTIOMAL-LASTED)
SHOES - - - - - ___ ______________________
H I S S E S ' AND CHILDREN'S GOODYEABHELT S H O E S - . - . . . - - . . . . . . - . _____

New England

Average Number
of
hourly
earnings1 workers
2
$ 2 .9 8 26,147
3.32
9,732
2 .8 2 16,415

Middle Atlantic

Average Number
hourly
of
earnings2 workers

Border States

Southeast

Southwest

Great Lakes

Middle West

Average Number Average Number
hourly
of
hourly
of •
earnings* workers earnings* workers

Average Number
hourly
of
earnings2 workers

Average Number
hourly
of
earnings* workers

16,919
5,538
11,381

$2.79
2.98
2.71

8,589
2,022
6,567

$2.73
3.04
2.64

14,233
3,564
10,669

$3.21
3.76
3.02

11,408
3,320
8,088

4,159
2,399
3,031

3.03
2.81
2.77

1,497
-

2.84
-

2,801
1,877
3,908

3.32
3.71
3.28

-

4,061

2.61

$3.09
3.45
2.87

17,908
5,967
11,290

$3.04
3.37
2.87

8 , 187
_

$2.68
_

20,462
7,165
15,022

3.16
3.21
2.97

3,493
1,958
4,807

3.32
3.27
2.89

1,296

2.95

2,479
-

2.68
-

32,830

2.89

9,457

3.00

5,674

2.91

3,085

2.76

2,009

2.77

8,657

2.83

1,152

3.14

1,633

2.93

1,923

2.5 4

1,109

2.65

4,012

3.22

1,158

43,580
62,003

3.09
2.89

16,827
9,320

3.18
2.93

13,833
4,075

3 . 10
2.83

1,861
6,326

2.67
2.68

5,235
11,684

2.90
2.75

7,622

2.71

2,204
12,029

SI Z E OF ESTABLISHMENT:
5 0 - 2 4 9 W O R K E R S . . . . . . . ............................
2 5 0 WORKERS OR M O R E . . ______ ________

25,677
79,906

2.89
7,516
3 .0 0 18,631

2.99
3.13

6,933
10,975

2.94
3.10

2,273
5,914

2.59
2.72

960
15,959

2.60
2.81

1,671
6,918

2.56
2.78

3,252
10,981

$3.00
3.32
2.87

SI Z E OF COHHDNITY:
METROPOLITAN A R E A S .
N O N M E T R O P O L IT A M




“

~

-

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings*

2,093
1,217
87 6

$2.98
3.25
2.60

2.87

AREAS. . . . . . . . . . -

Average Number Average
hourly
of
hourly
earnings* workers earnings*

Pacific

3,411

3.01

1,754

“

560
10,848

3.06
3.25

1,915
9,493

-

2.96

3.39
3.17

-

~

1,882

2.96

3.27
2.98

2,093

2.98

2.99
3.00

1,058
1,035

2.69
3.27

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. For definition of regions and areas used in this
4 Establishments were classified by major types of shoes produced during the preceeding year. The all-workers
and subsequent tables, see footnote 1 of table A-1 in appendix A.
total includes data for establishments producing other types of shoes in addition to those shown separately.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays and late shifts.
5 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget through
3 Includes data from establishments which were unable to provide separate data for men and women.
February 8, 1974.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.




Table 2. Earnings distribution: All production-workers
(Pr etd tribtio o poutio wr esb aeaes a h ehulyer ins Uite S te adslete r g n,Aril 17)
ecn is u n f r dc n okr y vr g tr igt-tim or an g, n d ta s n e c d eios p 95
United States2
Average hourly earnings1
Total

Men
_

New England ‘

Women

Middle
Atlantic
_

Border
States
_

Southeast

Southwest

_

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific
_

UNDER
$2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

$ 2 . 10 ............
AMD UNDER
AMD UNDER
AND UNDER
AMD UNDER

$ 2 . 2 0 ...........................
$ 2 . 3 0 ............................
$ 2 . 4 0 ............................
$ 2 . 5 0 ............................

(3>
15.6
8.5
5.7
5.7

9.4
5.9
3.8
3 .9

( 3)
18.3
9 .7
6.5
6.5

(3)
13.9
7.3
5.6
5 .3

8.8
7.6
6.0
6.4

28.8
9.7
7 .4
6 .8

18.5
8.7
5.8
7.6

31.6
8 .9
5.4
4.9

(3)
9. 1
5.8
4 .6
4 .4

(3)
11.3
14.1
5 .2
4.5

22 .6
9.6
6.2
4.0

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 2 . 6 0 ...........................
$ 2 . 7 0 ............................
$ 2 . 8 0 ...........................
$ 2 . 9 0 ............................
$ 3 . 0 0 ............................

6 .2
5.3
5.5
4 .7
4.1

4.9
4.2
5.3
4.3
4 .0

6.8
5.7
5.6
4 .9
4.2

6.4
5.5
4.7
4.2
4 .0

7.4
5.8
5.8
4 .0
3 .8

5.5
4.9
4 .9
3.8
4.1

7.9
5.6
5.1
6 .7
4.9

4.3
4.6
5 .3
3.9
2.7

5.4
5.4
6.3
5.0
4 .9

4.9
4.3
7.1
5.2
4.1

5.9
3 .4
3.6
2.5
2 .3

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 1 0 ............................
$ 3 . 2 0 ...........................
$ 3 . 3 0 ............................
$ 3 . 4 0 ...........................
$ 3 . 5 0 ............................

4. 1
3.5
3 .3
3.0
2.6

4. 1
3.8
3 .5
3.5
3 .2

4.0
3.4
3.2
2.9
2.4

4.2
3.7
3 .2
3.1
2.5

4.5
4.2
4.2
3 .9
3-5

3 .3
2.5
2 .2
2 .4
1.6

4.1
3.2
2.5
2.3
2.3

3 .4
2.7
2.8
2.3
2 .0

4.4
4. 1
4. 2
3.5
3 .0

3.7
3.7
3.6
3.3
2.5

4.1
3.2
2 .4
2 .4
2-3

$ 3 .50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD

UNDER
UMDBR
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 6 0 ............................
$ 3 . 7 0 ............................
$ 3 . 8 0 ...........................
$ 3 . 9 0 ............................
$ 4 . 0 0 ............................

2.4
2.2
1.9
1. 8
1.8

3.2
2.9
2.7
2.4
2 .5

2.1
1.9
1.6
1.5
1.5

2.4
2.4
2.2
1.8
2.2

3.2
2.8
1.9
2.0
2.2

1.7
1 .5
1 .2
.9
1.1

1.8
1.8
1.8
1.4
1.5

2.1
1.4
1.7
1. 3
1.2

2 .9
2.4
2 .4
2.4
2.0

2.1
2.2
1.9
1.8
1.6

2.8
2.2
2. 1
1.6
1.6

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD

UNDER
UNDER
UMDBR
UMDBR
UNDER

$ 4 . 1 0 ............................
$ 4 . 2 0 ............................
$ 4 . 3 0 ............................
$ 4 . 4 0 ............................
$ 4 . 5 0 ............................

1.6
1.4
1.2
.8
.8

2.6
2.3
1.9
1. 4
1.3

1.1
1.0
.8
.6
.6

1.7
1.6
1.5
1.0
1.0

2 .0
1.4
1 .2
.7
.7

1.0
.7
.7
.3
.3

.8
1.0
.6
.6
.5

1.1
-9
.8
.7
.6

2.2
2.0
1.4
1.2
1.2

1.4
1.8
1.3
.9
1.0

1.9
1.1
1.9
1.3
.9

$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 6 0 ............................
$ 4 . 7 0 ............................
$ 4 . 8 0 ............................
$ 4 . 9 0 ...........................
$ 5 . 0 0 ...........................

.8
.8
.6
.5
.4

1 .5
1.4
1. 1
1. 1
.8

.5
.5
.3
.3
.3

1.0
1.0
.7
.7
.5

1.1
.8
.6
.4
.4

.3
.4
.2
.3
.2

.4
.5
.2
-3
.3

.5
.6
.5
.3
.3

1.0
1.1
.9
1.0
.6

.8
.8
.7
.6
.5

.9
.7
1.2
.8
.5

$5.00
$5.10
$5.20
$5.30
$ 5 .40

AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD
AMD

UNDER
UMDBR
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 1 0 ............................
$ 5 . 2 0 ............................
$ 5 . 3 0 ............................
$ 5 . 4 0 ............................
$ 5 . 5 0 ............................

.4
.3
.3
.3
.2

.8
.7
.5
.7
. 6

.2
.2
.2
. 1
. 1

.4
.4
.5
.5
.3

.5
.5
.1
.3
.3

.3

. 1
.2
.1
.1
.1

.2
.1
.2
.3
.1

.5
.5
.4
.5
.5

.5
.4
.5
.2
.2

.4
.1
.4
.5
.3

$5.50
$5.60
$5.70
$5.80
$5.90

AND
AND
AMD
AMD
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 6 0 ...........................
$ 5 . 7 0 ............................
$ 5 . 8 0 ...........................
$ 5 . 9 0 ............................
$ 6 . 0 0 ............................

. 1
.2
.2
.2
. 1

.3
.3
.3
.4
.3

.2
.2
.3
.3
.2

.1
.2
.1
.1
(3)

.1
. 1
(3)
(3)
(3)

.3
.3
.3
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2
.1
.1

.2
.3
.2
(3)
(3)

.8

2. 1

.3

1.5

.4

.2

.1

.1

1.7

.8

1.4

ALL WORKERS........................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

NUMBER OF WORKERS......................................
AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS......................

105,583
$2.98

32,829
$3.32

70,726
$2.82

26,147
$ 3 . 09

17,908
$3.04

8,187
$2.68

16,919
$2.79

8,589
$ 2 .73

14,233
$3.21

11,408
$3.00

: 2.093
$2.98

$ 6 . 0 0 AND OTBR. •

I

.1
.1
.1
(3)
(3)

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data for Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.

3

f3)
(3 )

.1
.1
(3)
(3)
(3)

Less than 0.05 percent.

N T : Bcueo r ud gsmo iniv ul ite smynteul 10
OE eas f onin u s f d ida m a o qa 0.

Table 3. Earnings distribution: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes
(Pr etd tribtio o poutio wr esb aeaes igt-tim hulyer insUite S te adslete r g n, Aril 17)
ecn is u n f r dc n okr y vr g tra h e or an g, n d ta s n e c d eios p 95
United States2

Average hourly earnings1
Total

Men

Women

New
England

Border
States

Southeast

Table 4. Earnings distribution: Men’s Goodyear-welt work shoes
(Percent distribution of production workers by average straight-time hourly earnings, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

United States2

Great
Lakes

ONDER
$2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

$ 2 . 1 0 ............
AND UNDER
AND UNDER
AND UNDER
AND UNDER

$ 2 . 2 0 ............................
$ 2 . 3 0 ............................
$ 2 . 4 0 ............................
$ 2 . 5 0 ............................

(3)
1 2. 0
6 .7
5.0
4.3

8.6
4.6
3.5
3. 1

(3)
13.6
8.0
5. 9
5.0

8.6
6.4
5.7
3 .9

30.7
11.6
7.5
4.9

10.3
8.6
4.4
4 .2

5.6
3.0
4.4
5.7

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$ 2 .80
$2.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 2 . 6 0 ............................
$ 2 . 7 0 ............................
$ 2 . 8 0 ............................
$ 2 . 9 0 ............................
$ 3 . 0 0 .............................

4.9
4. 0
5 .2
5.5
4.8

3 .7
3.5
4 .6
3.5
4. 4

5.6
4.3
5.6
6 .7
5.0

6.4
4.2
5.4
3.5
4.2

5.2
4.5
4.6
3.8
3.0

4.8
3.9
5.5
11.0
7.7

6.4
4.8
4 .2
5 .7
5.2

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$ 3 .40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 1 0 .............................
$ 3 . 2 0 ............................
$ 3 . 3 0 ............................
$ 3 . 4 0 ............................
$ 3 . 5 0 ............................

4.6
3.8
3 .6
3. 1
3.3

3 .6
3. 6
3.2
3.4
4.2

5. 3
3.9
3.9
2 .9
2.8

5.3
4.5
4 .2
2 .8
3 .2

3.2
2.2
2.5
1.8
1.3

4.3
3 .3
2.7
2.5
2. 8

5.5
4.3
4.2
3 .2
3.6

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 6 0 ............................
$ 3 . 7 0 ............................
$ 3 - 8 0 ............................
$ 3 - 9 0 ............................
$ 4 . 0 0 ............................

2.7
2 .7
2. 1
2 .0
2.8

3. 2
2. 5
2. 9
2 .4
3.7

2.5
2.9
1.6
1.7
2.4

2.6
2. 1
2.3
1.7
2.7

2.5
1. 1
.7
.9
1.3

2.3
2 .4
2 .0
2.2
2 .7

3.0
2.7
2.7
1.9
2-4

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 1 0 ............................
$ 4 . 2 0 ............................
$ 4 . 3 0 ............................
$ 4 . 4 0 ............................
$ 4 . 5 0 ............................

2.0
1.9
1.4
1.0
1.0

3. 1
2.8
2.2
1. 4
1.2

1.3
1.4
.9
.8
.9

1.8
1.3
1.2
1.1
1.2

1.0
.7
.9
.3
.6

1.7
1.9
1.0
1.3
1.1

2.3
2.2
1.9
1.6
1.4

$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 6 0 ............................
$ 4 . 7 0 ............................
$ 4 . 8 0 ............................
$ 4 . 9 0 ............................
$ 5 . 0 0 ............................

1.2
1.3
.8
.9
.7

2.1
2.2
1. 5
1.6
.9

.7
.7
.4
.5
.6

1.0
1.4
.8
1.3
.7

.4
.7
.2
.2
.2

1.1
.9
.4
.8
.7

1. 1
1.0
. 9
1.4
.6

$5.00
$5.10
$ 5 .20
$5.30
$5.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 1 0 ............................
$ 5 . 2 0 ............................
$ 5 . 3 0 ............................
$ 5 . 4 0 ............................
$ 5 . 5 0 ............................

.6
.5
.4
.4
.3

1.2
. 9
.6
.8
.7

.3
.4
.3
. 2
. 1

.7
.5
.6
.7
.3

.5
. 1
(3)
(3)

$5.50
$5.60
$5.70
$5.80
$5.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 6 0 ............................
$ 5 . 7 0 ............................
$ 5 - 8 0 ............................
$ 5 . 9 0 ............................
$ 6 . 0 0 ............................

.2
.3
.2
.2
. 1

. 4
.3
.5
.3
.3

. 1
.3
(3)
. 1
. 1

.3
.3
.5
.3
. 1

.1
(3)
(3)
“

New
England

Southeast

Women

Average hourly earnings1
Total

Men

Great
Lakes

-

.2
.5
. 2
.3
. 1
.2
(3)
(3)
(3)

-

-7
.7
.6
.9
.4
.4
.5
.3
.3
.5

$2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 2 . 2 0 ............................
$ 2 . 3 0 ............................
$ 2 . 4 0 ............................
$ 2 . 5 0 ............................

9.2
6 .8
4 .9
6.5

6.1
5.4
3.6
5.7

11.2
7.8
5.7
7.1

3. 1
5 .3
5.5
10.1

14.9
11.8
5.9
7.5

5.4
2. 1
3.6
3. 4

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 2 . 6 0 ............................
$ 2 . 7 0 ............................
$ 2 . 8 0 ............................
$ 2 . 9 0 ............................
$ 3 . 0 0 ............................

5 .7
4.1
5. 1
4.6
3.2

3.8
3.5
5.7
4. 2
3.3

7 .0
4. 5
4. 8
4. 8
3.2

5.5
3.9
5.3
3.9
2 .9

7.9
5.5
5.2
6.3
3.7

4.5
2.8
2.9
3.1
3 .0

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 1 0 ............................
$ 3 . 2 0 ............................
$ 3 . 3 0 ............................
$ 3 . 4 0 ............................
$ 3 . 5 0 ............................

4.2
3.8
3 .5
3.7
3.5

5.0
3.5
2.7
4.0
3. 4

3.6
4.0
4. 0
3. 5
3. 5

3.9
4.5
3.3
3.7
3.8

4.6
3.8
2.7
2.6
2.8

3.6
2.8
4.2
4.6
4.2

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 6 0 ............................
$ 3 . 7 0 ............................
$ 3 . 8 0 ............................
$ 3 . 9 0 ............................
$ 4 . 0 0 ............................

2.3
2 .5
2.6
2.2
2.4

2.1
3.0
2.2
2.5
2.9

2 .5
2.1
2.9
2. 0
2. 1

3.0
3.8
2.7
2.6
2.8

2.1
1.5
1.6
1.3
1.6

1.9
2.6
3.8
2.7
3.4

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 1 0 ............................
$ 4 . 2 0 ............................
$ 4 . 3 0 ............................
$ 4 . 4 0 ............................
$ 4 . 5 0 ............................

2.2
2.6
1.8
1.5
1.4

2.6
2.9
2.4
1.8
1.8

1.9
2.3
1.5
1.3
1. 1

2.8
2.9
2.3
1.3
1.8

.8
1.2
.7
.9
.6

3.2
4.0
3. 1
2.5
1.9

$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 6 0 ............................
$ 4 . 7 0 ............................
$ 4 . 8 0 ............................
$ 4 . 9 0 ............................
$ 5 - 0 0 ............................

1.1
1. 2
.8
.8
.5

1. 5
1.6
1.1
1.3
.6

. 9
. 9
.5
.5
.4

1.4
1.4
.9
.8
.5

.4
.3
.1
.1
.2

2.0
2.3
1.1
2.0
1.0

$5.00
$5.10
$5.20
$5.30
$5.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 1 0 ............................
$ 5 . 2 0 ............................
$ 5 . 3 0 ............................
$ 5 . 4 0 ............................
$ 5 . 5 0 ............................

.4
.5
.4
.4
.6

.8
1.0
.7
.8
1.2

. 2
. 2
. 2
. 1
.2

.6
.3
.4
.8
.7

. 1
.3
.2
.1

.7
1.2
.6
.6
1.3

$5.50
$5.60
$5.70
$5.80
$5.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 6 0 ............................
$ 5 . 7 0 ............................
$ 5 . 8 0 ............................
$ 5 . 9 0 ............................
$ 6 . 0 0 ............................

.2
.4
.3
.2
.1

.2
.6
. 6
. 3
.3

.2
.3
. 2
. 1
(3)

.2
.4
.4
.1

.2
.2
.1

.6
.6
.9
.3
.3

$6.00

-

-

AND OVER..

.8

.8

.2

5.2

1.7

3.1

„

$ 6 . 0 0 AND OVER..
A LL WORKERS.........................................

1.3
100.0

3.0
100.0

. 4
100.0

4.0
100.0

. 5
100.0

. 1
100.0

1.5
100.0

ALL 'w o r k e r s ' . ..........................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

NUMBER OF WORKERS.......................................
AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS.......................

20,462
$ 3 . 16

7,434
$3.48

12,623
$ 2. 98

3,493
$ 3 . 32

2,479
$ 2 . 68

4,159
$ 3 . 03

2,801
$3.32

NUMBER OF WORKERS.......................................
AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS......................

7, 1 65
$3.21

2,853
$3.46

4,312
$3.04

1,958
$3.27

2,399
$2.81

1,877
$3.71

1
2

Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data for regions in addition to those shown
separately.




3

Less than 0.05 percent.

NOTE: Because of rounding sums o f individual items
may not equal 100.

1
2

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown
separately.

3

Less than 0.05 percent,

NOTE: Because of rounding sums o f individual items
may not equal 100.

Table 5. Earnings distribution: Men’s cement-process shoes
(Pr etd tr u no p dc nwr esb aeaes a h ehulyer insUite S te adslete r g n, Aril 17)
ecn is ibtio f routio okr y vr g tr igt-tim or an g, n d ta s n e c d eios p 95
United States2
Average hourly earnings1
Total

Men

Women

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Southeast

Great
Lakes

UNDER
$2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

(3 )
15.0
8 .9
6 .0
7.6

<3 )
16.9
7.7
6.3
6.0

_

6 .7
5 .8
3.3
3.9

14.6
5.8
4.3
4.9

11.8
4.8
6.8
12.0

5.6
5.4
3.0
4.7

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 2 . 6 0 ............................
$ 2 . 7 0 ............................
$ 2 . 8 0 ............................
$ 2 . 9 0 ............................
$ 3 . 0 0 ............................

7.0
6.6
7.5
5 .2
4.5

5.3
6.2
9.3
5 .7
4.5

7 .8
7 .0
7.0
5 .0
4 .6

7.8
7.5
6.0
4.9
4 .4

6.3
6.0
10.3
5.7
3. 1

11.2
9.3
6.4
6.0
4.8

3.9
5.0
9.0
5.2
5.5

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 1 0 ............................
$ 3 . 2 0 ............................
$ 3 . 3 0 ............................
$ 3 . 4 0 ............................
$ 3 . 5 0 ............................

4.0
3.6
3.3
2 .9
2.6

3.6
3.8
3.9
3 .2
3.0

4. 1
3.6
3 .0
2.8
2.4

3.3
3.2
2.5
2.3
2.7

5.8
3.2
4.1
3.0
2.2

4.0
3.9
2.7
3.0
2 .3

4 .8
4.5
4.6
3.6
3. 1

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90




<3 >
12.6
7 .9
5.2
6.5

_

$ 2 . 2 0 ............................
$ 2 . 3 0 ............................
$ 2 . 4 0 ............................
$ 2 . 5 0 ............................

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

CO

$ 2 . 1 0 ...........
AND UNDER
AND UNDER
AND UNDER
AND UNDER

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 6 0 ............................
$ 3 . 7 0 ............................
$ 3 . 8 0 ............................
$ 3 . 9 0 ............................
$ 4 . 0 0 ............................

2.5
2.2
2. 1
1.7
1.3

3.2
2.8
2.7
2 .2
1.8

2. 1
1.9
1.7
1 .5
1.0

2.0
2.4
1.7
.7
1.2

2.4
2.8
2.8
2.5
1.4

1.9
1 .6
1.7
1.6
1.1

4.0
2.7
2.9
3.1
1.4

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 1 0 ............................
$ 4 . 2 0 ............................
$ 4 . 3 0 ............................
$ 4 . 4 0 ............................
$ 4 . 5 0 ............................

1.3
1.4
.9
.7
.7

1-8
2.0
1.4
1. 4
1.1

1.1
1.1
.6
.3
.5

1.8
1 .4
.9
.5
.2

.9
1. 1
1. 1
1.1
.2

.7
.5
.2
.4
.3

1.4
2 .2
1.2
1.1
1.8

$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 6 0 ............................
$ 4 . 7 0 ............................
$ 4 . 8 0 ............................
$ 4 . 9 0 ............................
$ 5 . 0 0 ............................

.8
.8
.7
.4
.5

1.7
.8
1. 3
.9
1.3

.4
.7
.4
.2
.2

1.2
.7
.7
.5
.8

.7
.6
.2
. 1
.1

.1
.3
.2

1. 1
1.2
1.2
.7
.8

$5.00
$5.10
$5.20
$5.30
$5.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 1 0 ............................
$ 5 . 2 0 ............................
$ 5 . 3 0 ............................
$ 5 . 4 0 ............................
$ 5 . 5 0 ............................

.4
.3
.2
.3
.3

.6
.8
.4
.6
.8

.3
.1
.1
. 1
. 1

.5
.2
.2
.2
. 1

$5.50
$5.60
$5.70
$5.80
$5.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 6 0 ............................
$ 5 . 7 0 ............................
$ 5 . 8 0 ............................
$ 5 . 9 0 ............................
$ 6 . 0 0 ............................

. 1

.3
.2
.2
.3
.2

. 1
.1
.1
.1
( 3>

<3)
.1
.1
. 1

.7

1.3

.4

.3

.6

ALL WORKERS .......................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

NUMBER OF WORKERS.......................................
AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS......................

15,022
$2.97

4,602
$3.25

9,769
$2 . 83

4,807
$2.89

1,296
$ 2.95

3,031
$ 2.77

3,908
$ 3 .28

$ 6 . 0 0 AND OVER..

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown
separately.

-

3

_

.2
.9
.2
.3
.2

_
.1
.2
-

-

-

_
.1
( 3>
.1
. 1
.1
-

. 1
-

.7
.5
.4
.4
.8
.3
.2
.3
.2
. 1
1.7

Less than 0.05 percent.

N T : Bcueo r ud gsmo iniv ul ite s
OE eas f onin u s f d ida m
mynteul 10
a o qa 0.




Table 6. Earnings distribution: Women’s cement-process (conventional-iasted) shoes
(Percent distribution of production workers by average straight-time hourly earnings. United States and selected regions, April 1975)

United States2
Average hourly earnings*
Total

Men

Women

New
England

_

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Middle
West

Pacific

UNDER
$2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$ 2 .40

$ 2 . 1 0 ...........
AND UNDER
AND UNDER
AND UNDER
AND UNDER

<3)
18.8
9. 1
6.3
5.6

_

_

11.0
7.2
4.2
4.0

( 3)
21.8
9.9
7.1
6.2

_

$ 2 . 2 0 ...........................
$ 2 . 3 0 ...........................
$ 2 . 4 0 ...........................
$ 2 . 5 0 ...........................

16.2
8.3
5.8
5. 1

12.2
9 .9
7.2
7. 1

23.6
8 .2
8.1
6.8

15.4
6.5
5.5
10.9

41.5
8.2
4.4
4.4

7.9
14.0
6.3
4.7

23.4
10.0
6. 4
4.1

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 2 - 6 0 ............................
$ 2 . 7 0 ............................
$ 2 . 8 0 ...........................
$ 2 . 9 0 ...........................
$ 3 . 0 0 ...........................

6.4
5.5
5.0
4.2
3.8

5.5
3.7
4 .4
4.4
3 .7

6.8
6.2
5.2
4.1
3 .9

6.4
5.6
4.5
4.0
4.2

7.9
5.6
5.2
3 .3
3.8

5.6
5.2
5.3
5.0
4.3

11.6
8.3
4.7
6.3
3.6

4.2
5.1
4 .5
3.4
2.1

5.5
4.7
6.0
5.4
4.6

6.2
3.3
3.7
2.4
2.3

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 1 0 ............................
$ 3 . 2 0 ............................
$ 3 . 3 0 ............................
$ 3 . 4 0 ...........................
$ 3 . 5 0 ...........................

3.9
3.4
2.9
3. 1
2.4

4.1
4. 1
3. 1
3.6
2.8

3.9
3.2
2.9
2.9
2.2

4.5
3.6
2.8
3.1
2.0

3.5
4.1
3.4
4.0
3 .0

3.9
2.4
2.2
3.0
2.4

4.7
2.5
2.6
2.2
2.4

2.9
2.2
2.4
1.8
1.8

4.2
4.5
3.4
3.8
3.0

3.5
2.9
2.1
2.2
2.4

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 6 0 ...........................
$ 3 . 7 0 ............................
$ 3 . 8 0 ...........................
$ 3 . 9 0 ............................
$ 4 . 0 0 ...........................

2.2
2.1
1.8
1.6
1.7

3.4
3.2
2 .7
2.2
2.4

1.8
1.7
1.5
1.4
1.4

2.1
2.2
2.0
1.9
2.2

3.1
2.6
2. 1
1.9
1.0

1.1
1.5
1.8
1.4
1.3

1.4
2.3
2.2
.9
1.2

1.9
1.1
1.2
.9
.8

2 .4
2.5
1.7
1.9
2.2

2.7
2.3
1.9
1.4
1.6

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 1 0 ...........................
$ 4 . 2 0 ...........................
$ 4 . 3 0 ...........................
$ 4 . 4 0 ............................
$ 4 . 5 0............................

1.5
1.0
1.1
.7
.7

2 .7
1.8
1.9
1. 3
1. 3

1.1
.7
.7
.5
.5

1.7
1.3
1.3
1.0
1.0

1.7
.9
1.2
.6
.6

1.4
1. 1
.8
.4
.3

.5
.9
.8
.3
.2

.7
.3
.5
.4
.6

1.6
1. 1
1.1
.6
.8

1.6
1.2
2.0
1.2
.9

$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 6 0 ...........................
$ 4 . 7 0 ............................
$ 4 . 8 0 ...........................
$ 4 . 9 0 ............................
$ 5 . 0 0 ...........................

.7
.6
.5
.6
.3

1.4
1.2
1.1
1.2
. 6

.4
.4
.3
.3
.2

.8
1.0
.7
.8
.3

1.1
.4
.4
.4
.3

.3
-2
.2
.4
.3

.1
.5
.1
.2

.3
.6
.2
.2
.2

.9
.5
.5
.6
.6

.9
.7
1.3
.8
.5

$5.00
$5.10
$5.20
$5.30
$ 5 .40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 1 0 ............................
$ 5 . 2 0 ...........................
$ 5 . 3 0 ............................
$ 5 . 4 0 ...........................
$ 5 . 5 0 ...........................

.4
.2
.3
.2
.2

.9
. 4
.6
.6
.6

.2
.2
.2
.1
( 3>

.4
.4
.4
.3
.3

.5
.2
.1
. 1
. 1

.5
.2
.2
. 1
. 1

.3
. 1
.1

.1
.1
.2
.2
.1

.6
.4
.5
.3
.2

.4
. 1
.4
.5
.3

$5.50
$5.60
$5.70
$5.80
$5.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 6 0 ...................... ..
$ 5 . 7 0 ............................
$ 5 . 8 0 ...........................
$ 5 . 9 0 ............................
$ 6 . 0 0 ...........................

. 1
. 1
. 1
.1
. 1

.3
. 4
. 3
.5
.2

. 1
(3>
.1
<3 )
( 3>

. 1
. 2
.3
.3
. 1

. 1
.1
.1
.1
-

.
.
.
.

.1
. 1

.1
.1
( 3>

.3
.1
. 1
. 1
. 1

.3
.3
. 1
.1
. 1

$6.00

AND OVER..

.5

1.3

. 1

.8

.2

. 1

.1

-1

.6

1.6

ALL WORKERS.........................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

NUMBER OF WORKERS......................................
AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS......................

32,830
$2.89

9,067
$3.24

23,763
$2.76

9,457
$3.00

5,674
$2.91

3,085
$2.76

2,009
$2.77

4,061
$2.61

3,411
$3.01

1,882
$2.96

_

_

1
1
1
1

<
3)

_

( 3)

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3 Less than 0.05 percent.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
N O TE:

Because of rounding sums of individual items may not equal 100.

_

Table 7. Earnings distribution: Misses’ and children’s
cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes
(Percent distribution o f production workers by average straight-time hourly earnings, United States and selected
regions, A pril 1975)

United States2
Average hourly earnings1
Total

Women

$2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 2 . 2 0 ............................
$ 2 . 3 0 ............................
$ 2 . 4 0 ............................
$ 2 . 5 0 ............................

17.7
11.4
5.3
6 .5

18.9
13.3
5.0
6.9

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 2 . 6 0 ............................
$ 2 . 7 0 ............................
$ 2 . 8 0 ............................
$ 2 . 9 0 ............................
$ 3 . 0 0 ............................

6 .7
4.4
5 .8
4.4
4.8

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 1 0 ............................
$ 3 . 2 0 ............................
$ 3 . 3 0 ............................
$ 3 . 4 0 ............................
$ 3 . 5 0 ............................

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

Border
States

Table 8. Earnings distribution: Misses’ and children’s
Goodyear-welt shoes
(Percent distribution of production workers by average straight-time hourly earnings, United States and Middle Atlantic
regions, April 1975)

Middle
West

United States2

Average hourly earnings1
Total

Men

Women

Middle
Atlantic

36.3
7.3
7. 1
9.7

4.0
22.2
5.4
4.1

$2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 2 . 2 0 ............................
$ 2 . 3 0 ............................
$ 2 . 4 0 ............................
$ 2 . 5 0 ............................

8. 4
7.2
5.7
5.5

7 .5
4 .8
5.1
4.3

9 .0
8 .9
6.1
6 .3

0.9
7.1
9.8
10 . 1

6.7
4.5
6 .3
4. 4
4.8

6.1
5.4
3.5
2.5
5.6

5-0
4.4
7.0
5.2
4.3

$ 2 . 50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 2 . 6 0 ............................
$ 2 . 7 0 ............................
$ 2 . 8 0 ............................
$ 2 . 9 0 ............................
$ 3 . 0 0 ............................

5.8
4.9
4. 1
3.8
4 .4

5.3
3.2
3.2
2.9
2 .0

6. 1
6.0
4.6
4.4
6.1

11.7
9.2
7.9
5.2
3.5

4.2
3.2
4.0
2.7
2.5

4.6
3.1
3.8
2.5
2.8

2.6
2.9
2.1
1.8
.8

3 .5
2.9
3.5
2-8
3.3

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 1 0 ............................
$ 3 . 2 0 ............................
$ 3 . 3 0 ............................
$ 3 . 4 0 ............................
$ 3 . 5 0 ............................

3.4
5 .4
4 .0
3. 2
3. 1

3.6
5. 1
4. 2
2.8
4 .0

3.3
5.6
3.8
3 .6
2.4

5.5
5.6
3.6
3.0
3.6

$ 3 . 6 0 ............................
$ 3 . 7 0 ............................
$ 3 . 8 0 ............................
$ 3 . 9 0 ............................
$ 4 . 0 0 ............................

3.1
1.5
1.6
1.8
1.2

2.6
1. 4
1.3
1.7
1.1

1. 1
1.0
1.0
.3
.6

2.9
1.8
2 .7
1.6
1.5

$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 3 . 6 0 ............................
$ 3 . 7 0 ............................
$ 3 . 8 0 ............................
$ 3 . 9 0 ............................
$ 4 . 0 0 ...........................

2.9
2.8
2. 5
2.0
2 .7

3.1
2.6
2 .6
2.4
3 .0

2.7
2.9
2.4
1.8
2.5

2 .6
2.4
1.4
.9
1.6

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 1 0 ............................
$ 4 . 2 0 ............................
$ 4 . 3 0 ............................
$ 4 . 4 0 ............................
$ 4 . 5 0 ............................

.9
1. 1
1. 1
.7
.5

. 5
. 4
.9
.3
.3

.2
.3
.1
.2

1. 1
3.0
1.5
1.2
.7

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 1 0 ............................
$ 4 . 2 0 ............................
$ 4 . 3 0 ............................
$ 4 . 4 0 ............................
$ 4 . 5 0 ............................

1.9
1.6
1.7
1.5
.8

2.6
2.3
2.0
1.8
1.6

1.4
1.1
1.5
1.3
.2

.9
.6
.3
.6
.4

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 6 0 ............................
$ 4 . 7 0 ............................
$ 4 . 8 0 ............................
$ 4 . 9 0 ............................
$ 5 . 0 0 ............................

.4
.6
.2
.3
.2

.2
. 3
. 1
. 1
. 1

.2
.3
. 1
.2

.7
1.0
.5
.3
.3

$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 4 . 6 0 ............................
$ 4 . 7 0 ............................
$ 4 . 8 0 ...........................
$ 4 . 9 0 ............................
$ 5 . 0 0 ............................

1.3
1.1
1.0
.5
.7

1.8
1 .3
.7
.5
1.5

.9
.9
1.3
.5
.2

.2
.3
.2

$5.00
$ 5 . 10
$5.20
$5.30
$5.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 1 0 ............................
$ 5 . 2 0 ............................
$ 5 . 3 0 ............................
$ 5 . 4 0 ............................
$ 5 . 5 0 ............................

.2
.2
.2
. 1

.1
.1
.3
. 2

(3)

(3)

$5.00
$5.10
$5.20
$5.30
$5.40

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 1 0 ............................
$ 5 . 2 0 ...........................
$ 5 . 3 0 ............................
$ 5 . 4 0 ............................
$ 5 . 5 0 ............................

.6
. 4
.8
.9
.3

.7
.9
1 .0
1 .7
.7

.5
.1
.7
.3
-

$5.50
$5.60
$5.70
$5.80
$5.90

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 6 0 ............................
$ 5 . 7 0 ............................
$ 5 . 8 0 ............................
$ 5 . 9 0 ............................
$ 6 . 0 0 ............................

(3)

(3)
(3)

AND
AND
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER
UNDER

$ 5 . 6 0 ............................
$ 5 . 7 0 ............................
$ 5 . 8 0 ............................
$ 5 . 9 0 ............................
$ 6 . 0 0 ............................

.4
. 2
. 3
.3
.2

1.0
.2
.8
.6
.5

$6.00

AND OVER-.
ALL WORKERS...............

NUMBER OF WORKERS.......................................
AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS.......................
1 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and
for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to
those shown separately.




-

_
.1
.1

.4
.2
.1

-

-

.1

-

.1
-

(3)

-

.1
-2
. 2
-

-

. 1
.1
. 1

. 1

-

$5.50
$5.60
$5.70
$5.80
$5.90

.3

$ 6 . 0 0 AND OVER..

-

_
.2
.1
-

-

. 1
.3
-

. 1
.2
-

-

-

.2

. 1

1.9

4 .2

.3

. 2'

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

ALL WORKERS............................................

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

8,657
$2.83

5,901
$2.74

1,923
$ 2 . 54

1,754
$2-96

NUMBER OF WORKERS......................................
AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS......................

4,012
$3.22

1,633
$3 . 52

2,379
$ 3 .02

1,158
$2.87

3

-

Less than 0.05 percent.

NOTE: Because of rounding sums of indi­
vidual items may not equal 100.

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those
shown separately.

NOTE: Because of rounding sums of individual
items may not equal 100.




Table 9. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress sh o es-all establishments
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

New England

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Mean

255
77
170
143
39
100
45
67
22
45

$ 3 .5 2
3 .9 7
3 .3 2
3 . 47
3 .6 3
3 .4 1
3 .8 9
3. 40
4 .5 1
2 .8 5

$ 3 .3 3
3 .8 0
3 . 14
3 .3 3
3 .4 0
3 .2 8
4 . 13
3 .0 6
4 .5 0
2 .7 4

11
10

4 .3 5
4 .5 1

-

6 79
324
340
452
199
2 38
224
122
102

4 .0 5
4 .4 1
3 .7 3
4 .0 2
4 .4 0
3 .7 3
4 .1 3
4 .4 6
3 .7 4

3 .8 8
4 .2 5
3 .6 5
3 .7 6
4 .0 3
3 . 65
4 . 17
4 .4 1
3 .6 7

3 .2 0 3 .3 7 3 .0 2 3 . 183 .3 0 3 . 123 .2 6 3 .6 8 2 .8 8 -

4 . 65
5 .1 0
4 .2 4
4 . 54
5 .0 9
4 . 17
4 .8 9
5 . 11
4 . 54

116
99
108
91
-

4 .8 3
5 .0 7
4 .8 4
5 .1 0
-

4 . 49
4 .6 7

1 ,0 1 2
948

2 .9 5
2 .9 6

2 .8 0
2 .8 1

2 .3 3 2 .3 3 -

3 .2 7
3 .2 8

75
75

Hourly earnings2
Median

Middle range

Border States

Number
of
workers

Mean

Median

Middle range

39
21
18
31
15
16
-

$ 3 . 46
3 .5 1
3 .3 9
3 .3 7
3 .4 2
3 .3 2
-

$ 3 .2 8
3 . 28
3 .2 4
3 .1 1
3 . 19
3 .0 2
-

$ 2 .6 4 - $ 4 .0 6
2 .8 7 4 .0 0
2 .4 4 4 .1 0
2 .5 7 4 .0 2
3 .9 4
2 .7 4 2 .3 9 4 .2 2
-

-

-

-

Hourly earnings2

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

36
20
7
-

$ 3 .4 1
3 .1 2
3 .3 3
-

$ 3 .3 6
3 .3 6
-

-

-

-

83
-

3 .5 9

50
15
-

3 .2 7
3 .8 6
-

3 .3 7
2 .8 4
3 .3 7
-

2 .3 4 2 .8 0 -

4 .2 3
3 .7 8
4 .6 5
-

103
-

2 .7 0
-

2 .6 7
-

2 .2 5 -

3 .0 3
-

Middle range

SELECTED PBODUCTION OCCOPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE...........................
HEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
LEATHER....................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
SYNTHETICS............................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS...........................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
HAND...............................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE3 ....................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
LEATHER....................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN................................... ...............................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS...........................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................

$ 2 .6 5 - $ 4 .2 6
3 .1 7 4 .7 0
4 . 10
2 .4 9 2 .6 3 4 .1 4
4 .2 9
2 .8 8 4 . 13
2 .5 1 3 .0 9 4 .5 9
3 .8 7
2 .6 8 3 .7 7 5 .3 7
3 . 14
2 .4 2 -

-

-

-

4 .5 1
4 .7 4
-

3 .7 7 3 .9 9 3 .7 4 3 .9 9 -

5 .5 6
5 .7 8
5 .5 0
5 .7 8
-

3 .4 6
3 .4 6

3 . 17
3 . 17

2 .8 6 2 .8 6 -

3 .9 6
3 .9 6

-

.

-

$ 2 .6 4 2 .3 9 2 .6 6 -

$ 4 .0 0
3 .5 6
-

F IT T IN G :
FANCY STITCHERS....................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR F IT T E R S ,
UPPER, HAND4 .........................................................
SK IV ER S, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
LIN IN G S4 ....................................................................
SO CK-LINING STITCHERS
(SL IP-L A ST E D SHOES)4 ...................................
TOP STITCHERS4 ......................................................
VAMPERS4 .......................................................................

427

2 .8 2

2 .6 3

2 .2 5 -

3 . 13

37

2 .9 8

2 .7 7

2 .4 9 -

3 .3 4

25

2 .4 1

2 .4 0

2 .2 0 -

2 .5 5

292

3 .1 9

3 .0 9

2 .6 3 -

3 .5 5

64

3 .2 5

3 . 09

2 .9 7 -

3 .5 3

47

2 .7 9

2 .6 5

2 .2 4 -

3 -2 2

17
41 2
571

3 .6 8
3 .0 5
3 .1 2

3 .4 7
2 .9 4
2 .9 6

2 .2 9 2 .4 4 2 . 47-

4 .8 3
3 .5 4
3 . 56

67
74

3 .4 7
3 .7 1

3 -3 2
3 .5 4

2 .7 0 2 .9 7 -

3 .9 0
4 .2 1

82
73

2 .7 6
2 .7 5

2 .5 2
2 .4 7

2 .2 1 2 .2 0 -

3 . 12
3 .0 9

171
105
60
85
64
20

3 .3 6
3 .6 1
3 .0 2
3 .5 2
3 .6 7
3 .0 0

3 .0 4
3 .3 2
2 .6 8
3 .3 1
3 . 47
2 . 84

2 .4 1 2 .5 8 2 .3 9 2 .8 2 2 .9 3 2 .3 5 -

3 . 97
4 .3 7
3 .3 8
4 . 25
4 . 53
3 .5 6

24
21
13
13
-

4 .5 0
4 .7 9
4 .0 8
4 .0 8
-

4 -3 7
4 .3 8
-

3 .4 3 4 .1 8 -

30
-

2 .6 8
3 .3 0
-

2 . 54
-

2. 1 6 -

2 .9 5
-

29
188
203
164
19 0
151
13

3 .8 9
4 .0 2
3 .6 3
3 .6 9
3 .6 1
3 .6 8
3 .8 6

3 .7 7
3 .7 8
3 .3 1
3 .4 0
3 .2 9
3 .3 0
-

3 . 332 .9 8 2 .6 6 2 .6 2 2 .6 2 2 .6 0 -

4 . 52
4 .8 4
4 .3 8
4 .5 6
4 .3 8
4 .7 2
-

33
37
37
33
33
-

4 .7 0
4 .4 6
4 .4 6
4 . 53
4 .5 3
-

4 .1 4
4 .7 6
4 .7 6
4 . 85
4 .8 5
-

3 .5 7 3 .4 4 3. 4 4 3 .4 4 3 .4 4 -

5 .0 5
5 . 12
5 . 12
5 . 12
5 .1 2
-

2 .8 2
2 .9 3
2 .9 3
-

2 .8 6
2 .6 6
2 .5 9
-

2. 142 .2 0 -

3 .0 3
3 .2 0

2. 18-

3 .2 0
-

133
112

3 .8 3
3 .9 7

3 .6 9
3 .7 6

2 .9 1 3 .0 2-

4 .4 9
4 .7 4

27
27

4. 44
4 .4 4

4 .0 3
4 . 03

3 .4 4 3 .4 4 -

5 . 04
5 .0 4

3 .2 6
-

3 .0 8

2. 55-

3 .8 4

-

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, M ACHINE...
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS..............................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS5 ...............................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS5 ...................
SID E LASTERS, MACHINE...................................
MEN..........................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING...........................
MEN..........................................................................
CEMENT LASTING5 ..............................................
TOE LA STERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
See footnotes at end o f table

-

-

-

-

4 .8 0
4 .9 4
-

7
-

36

41
39
22

-

-

-

-




Table 9. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes-all establishments—Continued
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Mean

73
36
36
221
206
274
22 9
147
120
24
145
119
45
27
16
13
8
26
20
6
123
110
53
12
40
82
52
30
39
22
17

$ 3 .2 4
3 .5 8
2 .8 9
4 .5 9
4 .6 1
3 .7 9
3 .8 6
3 .5 9
3 .7 3
2 .9 0
4 .0 5
4 .1 7
3 .2 5
3 .3 8
3 .1 6
3 .8 6
4 .1 7
3 .7 4
3 .8 0
3 .5 3
3 .7 9
3 .8 9
2 .7 4
2 .8 5
2 .7 1
3 .0 1
3 .1 4
2 .7 9
2 .8 5
2 .6 8
3 .0 8

$ 3 .0 6
3 .3 7
2 .7 7
4 .5 2
4 .5 1
3 .7 8
3 .8 8
3 .6 7
3 .7 5
2 .7 9
3 .8 3
3 .8 8
3 .2 6
3 .3 7
3 .3 9
3 .5 5
3 .5 5
3 .6 1
3 .7 5
2 .5 2
2 .4 2
2 .6 6
2 .7 2
2 .4 7
2 .9 6
2 .5 0
3 .0 3

121
85
107
287
26 4
147
15
130

3 .2 9
3 .3 7
4 .4 5
2 .7 6
2 .7 4
3 .1 4
5 .0 6
2 .9 2

3 .0 8
3 .1 5
4 .1 9
2 .7 5
2 .7 2
2 .6 2
5 .8 3
2 .5 5

2 .4 5 2 .4 5 3 .4 4 2 .3 2 2 .3 0 2 .4 1 3 .0 6 2 .3 3 -

270
38
232
403
86
312
141
126
15
143

2 .7 1
2 .6 0
2 .7 3
2 .7 2
2 .9 2
2 .6 7
2 .5 0
2 .5 2
2 .2 9
3 .6 8

2 .7 0
2 .5 1
2 .7 3
2 .7 2
2 .9 0
2 .7 0
2 .4 2
2 . 50
2 .1 0
3 .8 1

2 .3 7 2. 302- 4 0 2 .3 5 2 .5 6 2 .3 5 2 .2 6 2 .2 6 2 .1 0 3 .2 2 -

Hourly earnings2
Median

Border States

New England

Number
of
workers

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

10
8
41
41
47
47
22
21
21
21
19
19
11
7
7
6
-

$ 3 .6 4
3 .9 5
5 .2 5
5 .2 5
4 . 42
4 .4 2
4 .0 8
4 .0 6
5 .5 5
5 .5 5
4 .6 4
4 .6 4
3 .3 3
3 .0 8
2 .9 1
2 .8 5
-

_
$ 4 .8 6
4 .8 6
4 . 27
4 .2 7
3 .7 4
3 .7 4
5 . 19
5 .1 9
_
4 .3 2
4 .3 2

3 .8 9
3 .9 9
5 . 33
2 .8 8
2 .8 9
3 .5 7
6 .7 1
3 .2 8

14
14
24
46
45
22
11
11

4 .0 5
4 .0 5
5 .0 6
2 .8 8
2 .8 5
4 .7 1
5 . 90
3 .5 2

2 .8 1
2 .7 4
2 .8 1
2 .9 0
3 .3 5
2 .8 1
2 .7 1
2 .7 1
2 .4 5
3 .9 4

64
8
56
49
24
2 5
25
24

2 .6 7
2 .8 2
2 .6 4
3 .0 1
3 .3 5
2 .6 8
2 .5 3
2 .5 5

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Median

Middle range

$ 3 .4 8
2 .9 3
2 .6 8
3 .1 4
_
_
_
_

Mean

$ 2 .8 9 - $ 4 .4 9
2 .4 9 3 .7 7
~
_
2 .1 0 3 .5 9
2 .5 9 3 .5 7
_
_
_
-

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM FIL L E R S......................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS........................................................
MEN........................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS...........................................
MEN........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE..............................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
INSEAMERS...................................................................
MEN........................................................................
INSEAM TRIMMERS...................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
JO IN T E R S, MACHINE..............................................
MEN........................................................................
ROUGHERS......................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS......................................................
MEN........................................................................
SHANKERS...................................... ..............................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SOLE-LEVELERS, MACHINE................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

$ 2 .3 7 - $ 3 .9 6
2 .6 2 4 .3 0
2 .2 5 3 . 16
3 .7 1 5 .2 9
3 .7 1 5 .3 5
2 .9 9 4 .4 4
3 .0 0 4 .4 5
2 .7 9 4 .2 1
2 .9 2 4 .3 3
2 .3 7 3 . 18
2 .9 5 4 .6 5
3 .3 3 4 .8 8
2 .7 1 3 .6 8
2 .7 5 3 . 92
2 .8 4 3 . 68
2 .8 2 4 .3 8
3 . 194 .3 6
2 .7 6 4 .5 8
2 .7 9 4 . 63
3 . 22
2 . 102 . 103 .2 2
2 . 163 .6 2
2 .2 4 3 .7 1
2 . 103 .4 5
2 .2 9 3 .2 9
2. 213 .0 5
2 .6 5 3 .2 9

-

_
$ 6 .3 0
6 .3 0
5 .1 8
5 .1 8
4 .3 6
4 . 37
6 .9 3
6 .9 3
_
_
_
_
-

_

$ 3 .9 3 3 .9 3 3 .2 5 3 .2 5 3 .3 1 3 .2 9 4 .2 0 4. 20_
_

_

3 .7 0 3 .7 0 -

4 .9 7
4 .9 7
-

-

-

-

_

-

_
_
_
_
-

_

_

10
7
39
38
22
27
8
_
_
_
17
9
8
12
8
-

25
13
20
-

_

$ 2 .4 6
2 .4 4
3 .5 9
3 .1 2
2 .8 6
3 .1 0
2 .8 3
_
_
_
2 .8 7
2 .3 5

2 .7 8
3 .3 4
3 .0 7
_

_

2 .5 2 _
_
-

_

2 .7 2
-

-

-

-

2 .3 3
2 .2 7
2 .3 4
-

-

"

_
_
_

2 .7 8
-

-

_
_
-

F IN IS H IN G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS...................................................
MEN........................................................................
EDGE SETTERS5 . . ..................................................
REPAIRERS..................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
TREERS...........................................................................
MEN........................................................................
W MEN...................................................................
O

5 .1 8
2 ,7 6
2 .7 6
3 . 73
-

-

3 .9 2 2 .4 0 2 .4 0 3 .0 6 -

6 .2 3
3 .2 5
3 .2 5
6 .1 8
-

2. 2 5 2 .2 0 2 .6 0 3 .0 9 2 .4 1 2 .2 0 2 .2 0 -

3 .0 0
3 .0 0
3 .4 5
3 .6 7
2 .8 5
2 .9 2
2 .9 3

~
-

2 .5 1
3 .1 5
-

2 .2 0 2 .4 9 -

-

-

3 .2 2
3 .6 7
-

-

-

-

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS........................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
INSPECTORS (CRCWNERS)...................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
JA N IT O R S.....................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE5 .............................
See footnotes at end of table

-

-

-

2 . 55
2 .5 3
2 .9 1
3 . 40
2 .6 0
2 .3 2
2 .3 7
-

-

-

-

-

29
26
57
51
_

-

-

2 .4 2
2 .4 3
2 .5 1
2 .5 0
-

-

-

12

2 .4 0
2 .3 8
2 .3 5
2 .3 5
-

3 .2 1

2 .2 6 2 .2 7 2 .2 5 2 .2 5 -

_

-

2 .5 0
2 .5 7
2 .7 3
2 .7 3
-

_

_

-




Table 9. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress sho es-all
establishments—Continued
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

Southeast
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Great Lakes

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

61
53
18
15
-

$3.43
3.34
3.29
3.22
-

$ 3 . 14
3.02
3. 14
3.14
-

51
51
-

3.38
3.38
-

3.36
3.36
-

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

$ 2 .5 8 - $3.62
3.61
2.5 9 2 .533 .39
2.4 8 3.32

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS# LINING# MACHINE...........................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER...................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS...........................
WOMEN...................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLB SHOE,
MACHINE......................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER...................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS:
WOMEN...................................................................

-

-

$ 2 .6 5 - $4.32
2.654 . 32
2.6 3 4.14
2 .644.00
3.063.06-

3. 70
3.70
-

37
34
14
13
23
21

$3.28
3.31
3.72
3.83
3.01
2.98

$2.94
3.01
2.80
2.76

146
41
105
63
12
51

4. 26
4.84
4.03
4.06
4 . 46
3. 97

4 . 18
4.69
4 . 00
3.98
3.9 7

3.454.1 2 3 .433 .403 .4 3 -

4.82
5.72
4 .59
4.5 9
4.3 6

54

4.09

4.12

3 .42-

4.64

105
105

3 . 43
3.43

3 . 19
3 . 19

2.632.63-

3.9 2
3.9 2

P IT T IN G :
PANCY STITCHERS...................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
PASTERS# BACKERS# OR FITTERS#
UPPER, HAND4 ........................................................
SK IV ERS, MACHINE# UPPERS OR
L IN IN G S .....................................................................
SOCK-LINING STITCHERS
(S U P -L A S T E D SHOBS)4. . * ..............................
TOP STITCHERS4 ......................................................
VAMPERS4 ......................................................................

_
300
-

_
2.76
-

_
2.65
-

_
2. 20-

_
3. 09
-

83

2.83

2.7 2

2.3 2 -

3.04

36

2.92

2.95

2.53-

3 . 34

45

3.62

3.45

3.03-

4.18

49
-

2.76
-

2.65
-

2 .34-

2.99

13
41
61

3.59
3.23
3.60

3 .18
3.46

2 .742.96-

3.57
3.89

21
-

2.73

2.49-

3.55

3.57
3.82
3.45
3.45
3.27

2.4 7 -

4.2 9

-

27
9
18
12
8

3.31

9

2.99
2.60

3.26
-

2.52-

4.1 7
-

46
47
22
47
22

3.61
3.21
2.9 8
3.21
2.98

3.58
3 . 12
2.60
3. 12
2.60

2.822 .532 .352 .532.35-

4.13
3.66
3.40
3.66
3.40

9
7
7
27
22
19
21
18

3.81
3.86
4.19
4.64
3.77
3.87
3.76
3.86

4.80
3.74
4.00
3.74
3 .96

3 .893 .253 .273 .233.25-

5.28
4.3 8
4.38
4.3 8
4.38

23
14

2.83
2.98

2.62
-

2.2 3 _

3.60
-

20
“

4.52

4 . 52
■

3 .72~

5.22

19
11
8
42
42
67
46
21
41
33

3.0 6
3.34
2.67
4 . 39
4.39
3.45
3.46
3.43
3.60
3.84

2.90
4. 46
4.46
3.24
3. 24
3-22
3.75
3.84

2.373 .9 7 3 .972.512.572.3 4 2 .873.44-

3.33
5.00
5.00
4 . 18
4.04
4.48
4.31
4 . 42.

14
11
35
31
37
31
6
21
16

3. 28
3.19
5.37
5 . 46
4.38
4.41
4.27
3 . 84
4.02

_
5.38
5.43
4.40
4.40

_
4.844. 844.084 .08-

_
6.25
6.2 6
4.8 6
4.96

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS POR PULLOVER, M ACHINE...
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS..............................................
WOMBN...................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS.................................................................
MEN........................................................................
TOE TO BALL.........................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS....................
SID E LASTERS# MACHINE...................................
MEN........................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING...........................
MEN........................................................................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC...................................................
MEN........................................................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:

BOTTOM FILLER S......................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS........................................................
MEN........................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS...........................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE..............................
MEN........................................................................
See footnotes at end of table

-

3.73
3.8 4

-

3 .463 .6 8 -

-

4.0 9
4.17




Table 9. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes-all
establishments—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

Great Lakes

Southeast
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings1
2
3
Mean

Median

Middle range

33
21
12
17
31
31
37
-

$3 .4 6
3.37
3.62
3.01
3. 51
3.51
3.03
-

$3.50
3.50
2.75
3 . 57
3 . 57
2.59
-

24
18
18
103
87
-

3.1 5
3.29
4.39
2.64
2.6 1
-

2.76
3.06
4.54
2.81
2.70
-

2 .6 6 2.654 .062.512.30-

_
84
72
40
40
72

_
2.73
2.73
2.51
2.51
3.68

_
2.81
2.81
2.71
2.71
3.94

2 .5 0 2.502 .302 .303.00-

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

22
20
8
20
15
8
6
10
7

$4.63
4.61
3.17
4.22
4.67
2. 94
2. 82
2.90
3.01

$ 4 .99
4.9 9

$ 4 .0 4 - $5.34
3.9 8 5.32
-

4.32
4.5 9
*

2 .974.1 8 -

29
19
10
15
35
34
51
50

3 . 48
3.37
3.67
4.74
2.82
2.83
3.02
3.00

3 . 12
3.12
4.88
2 .89
2.8 9
2.58
2.57

2.532.4 5 4. 172.462.4 3 2.542.53-

4.00
3.8 4
_
5.77
3.01
3.01
3.44
3.34

32
30
57
11
46
8
7
22

3.15
3.15
2. 92
2 . 90
2.92
2.58
2.65
4 . 16

2.8 7
2.87
3.02

2.842.8 5 2 .66-

3.44
3.30
3.1 8

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS~
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:— CONTINUED
INSEAMERS...................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
INSEAM TRIMMERS...................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS......................................................
MEN.........................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PBOCESS...........
WOMEN...................................................................
SOLE-LEVELERS, MACHINE.................................
WOMEN...................................................................

$ 2 . 7 9 - $ 4 . 03
2.953.86
2 . 143 . 68
2.784.48
2.784.48
2.1 0 3.69
-

-

-

-

-

4.8 6
5.57
-

_
-

FIN ISH IN G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS...................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
EDGE SETTERS5 .........................................................
REPAIRERS...................................................................
WOMEN........................................... .......................
TREERS............................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

3.87
4 . 16
4.82
2.81
2.81
-

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS.........................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
INSPECTORS (CRCWNERS)....................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
JANITORS......................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE5 ..............................

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends,
holidays, and late shifts. See Appendix A for methods used to compute
means, medians, and middle range of earnings. Medians and middle ranges are
not provided for jobs with fewer than 15 workers in a region.
3 Includes data fo r workers in classifications in addition to those

_
2.81
-

2.81
2.71
2.71
3.94

-

2.99
-

3.98

-

2.68-

3 .83-

-

3 .17
-

4 .78

shown separately.
A ll or virtually all workers are women.
s A ll or virtually all workers are men.

4

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet
publication criteria.




Table 10. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes-by size
of community
(Numbers and average straight-time hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

D p r m n ,o c p t o ,a s x
e a t e t c u a i n nd e

G e tL k s
ra ae
New E g a d
nln
U i e Sae1
n t d tts
erpltn
omtooia
Mtooia
e r p l t n N n e r p l t n Nonm t o o i a
Nnerpltn
omtooia
Mtooia
erpltn
ae s
ra
ae s
ra
aes
ra
aes
ra
aes
ra
v a
e g
vrg
vrg
vrg
Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Number Aorle
vrg
hu y
r
o
f
hul
ory
o
f
hul
ory
hul
ory
o
f
o
f
o
f
hul
ory
w r e s erig2 w r e s erig2
o k r anns o k r anns
w r e s e r i g 2 w r e s e r i g 2 w r e s e rig2
o k r a n n s o k r a n n s o k r a nns

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTINGJ
COTTERS, L I N I N G , MACHINE.............................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
LEATHER........................................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
SYNTHETICS ...............................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
HAND
MEN
COTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE
MEN
WOMEN
LEATHER
MEN
WOMEN......................................... .. ............................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS ...........................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

........

........................
......................
.....................
......................
....................
....................
......................

126
43
75
65
23
38

-

32
-

-

$ 3 .69
4.06
3.51
3.65
3 .75
3 . 64
3.40
-

-

8
7

4.44
4 .68

3 36
176
145
2 44
105

4 .05
4 .58
3.44
4 . 11
4.84

129
34
95
78

$3 . 3 6

62
16
35
10
25

3.27
3.50
3.40
4 .26
3 .05

-

-

3 .86
3.18
3 .31

-

16
13

-

13
10
-

3.64

-

3.64
3.57
-

23
8
15
18

$ 3.30

31

$ 3.12

3.31
3.30
3 . 17

29

3 . 10

-

23

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4 .06
4.21
3 .95
3.92
3 .90
3 . 92
4 .30
4.79
3.98

$3 . 6 8

-

57
56

5 .65
5 .69

59
43

4.03
4 .26

55
54

5.69
5 .73

53
37
-

3.94
4 . 18

-

21

124
35
89
45
39

-

-

-

3.01

2 .98

4.32
4.92
4 .08
4 .00
3 .92

21

2 .82

343
148
195
20 8
94
114
134
53
81

721
65 7

2 .89
2 .90

291
291

3 .09
3 .09

41
41

3 .37
3.37

34
34

3 .57
3 .57

79
79

3 .43
3 .43

202

2 .85

225

2 .79

18

2 .71

19

3.23

72

2.84

138
216
316

3 .28
3 .06
3 .09

154
196
255

3 . 12
3 .03
3 . 15

41
43
37

3 .21
3.38
3 .77

23
24
37

3.34
3.64
3 .65

37
31
53

3 .5 2
3 . 16
3.49

81
54
34
28

3 .53
3.70
3.50
3 .66
4.33
3.84
3 .99

90
51
39
51
36
15
100
109
90
19
107
88
19

3 .21
3 .50
2 .82
3 .54
3 .68
3 .20
3.75
3 - 45
3 . 45
3 .44
3.44
3.44
3.44

14
12
7
7
18
23
23

4.83
5.26
4.73
4.73
5.32
4 .71
4.71

10

4 . 04
4.16
3.33
3 .33
3 . 96
4 .04
4 .04

22

3.39
3 .8 2
3 .70
3 .42
4.69
3 .73
3.81

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

"

~

“

“

FITTING:
FANCY STITCHERS ...................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
PAS TER S, BACKERS, CB FI T TE RS ,
UPPER, HAND3 ........................................................
SKI VE RS , MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L I N I N G S 3 ..................................................................
TOP STITCHERS............................................................
VAMPERS3 ...........................................................................
LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MA CHINE...
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS.................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS4 .....................
S ID E LASTERS, MACHINE......................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING.............................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
CEMENT LASTING4 .............................................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC ...................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

88
94
74

83
63
-

11
57
44

-

3 .83
4.00

3.91

-

4 .10
4 .45

76
68

-

8

-

20
20

-

3 .63
3.66
3.40

13
13
-

-

4.80
4.80

5 . 14
5 . 14

9

6
6
15
14
14
-

13
13

14
14

-

4 . 11
4 .11

3.79
3 . 79
-

9

9

7
26
19
17
-

18
16

17

-

-

3 .72
3.80

4.54

-




Table 10. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes-by size of
community—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

G e tL k s
ra ae
New E g a d
nln
U i e Sae1
n t d tts
omtooia
Nnerpltn Nnerpltn
omtooia
Mtooia
erpltn
Nonm t o o i a
erpltn
Mtooia
erpltn
ae s
ra
ae s
ra
a es
ra
ae s
ra
aes
ra
vrg
vrg
vrg
vrg
Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Numbei A e a e Number A e a e
vrg
hul
ory
hul
ory
o
f
hul
ory
o
f
o
f
hul
ory
hul
ory
o
f
o
f
w r e s erig2 w r e s erig2 w r e s erig2 w r e s erig2
o k r anns o k r anns o k r anns o k r anns
w r e s e rig2
o k r a nns
SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM FI L LE RS ..........................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS.............................................................
HEN..............................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS...............................................
HEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHBRS, MACHINE................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN...................................... .. ...............................
INSEAHERS.........................................................................
HEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
INSEAH TRIMMERS........................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
JO IN T ER S, MACHINE..................................................
MEN...............................................................................
ROUGHERS...........................................................................
MEN..............................................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS..........................................................
HEN..............................................................................
SHANKERS...........................................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
SOLE ATTACHBRS, CEMENT PROCESS............
HEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
SOLE-LEFELERS, MACHINE....................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................

31
24
6
114
102
133
106
76
65
82
64
26
18
9

6
18
17
63
57
27
21
50
33
17
21
12
9

$ 3.48
3 .6 5
2 .8 2
4 .7 8
4.82
4 .0 5
4 .2 0
3 .7 9
3 .8 8
4 .2 5
4 .4 2
3 .1 4
3 .1 8
4 .0 0
4 .1 7
3 .8 3
3 .9 3
3 .9 8
4.1 1
2 .9 0
2 .8 2
2 .9 9
3 .0 9
2 .8 0
2 .8 3
2 .5 8
3 .1 7

42
12
30
107
104
141
123
18
71
55
16
63
55
8
19
9
10
8
60
53
26
7
19
32
19
13
18
10
8

$ 3 .0 6
3 .4 4
2.9 1
4 .3 8
4 .4 0
3 .5 4
3 .5 6
3 .4 0
3 .3 7
3 .5 6
2 .7 4
3 .7 9
3 .8 8
3 .1 9
3 .4 0
3 .7 9
3 .0 4
3 .5 4
3 .5 8
3 .6 6
2 .5 7
2 .5 3
2 .5 9
3 .0 3
3 .2 1
2 .7 7
2 .8 8
2 .8 0
2 . 97

3 .3 2
-

71
51
20
49
127
126
100
96

3 .2 7

_

22
22
24
24
13
13
17
17
11
11

_

_

19
19
23
23
9
8
8
8
-

_

-

6
-

$5 .8 3
5 .8 3
5 .0 6
5 .06
4 .28
4 .2 8
5 .7 6
5 .7 6
4 .9 9
4 .99
3 .6 3
-

$ 4.57
4 .5 7
3 .7 5
3 . 75
3 .7 8
3 .7 1
4 .1 6
4 .1 6
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

11
8
29
27
30
24
6
19
19
17
17
12
7
7
-

$ 3 .4 2
3 .3 6
5 .4 5
5 .5 4
4 .5 3
4 .5 9
4 .2 7
3 .6 2
4 .6 8
4 .6 6
4 . 10
4 .61
-

-

-

-

3 .0 6
2.9 1
-

FI N I S H IN G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS............ ..........................................
HEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
EDGE S ETTER S................................................................
R EPAI RERS .........................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
TREERS.................................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
See footnotes on following page.

50
58
160
13 8
47
11
34

-

4 .9 0
2 .7 3
2 .6 9
3 .6 0
5 .38
3 .0 8

3.33
3 .1 1
3 .9 1
2 .7 9
2 .79
2 .92
2.8 7

8
8
-

16
15
14
11
8
“

3 .9 6
3 .9 6
5 .48
3 .2 6
3 .2 0
6 .0 4
6 .49
-

8
31
31
11
8

4 .2 0
2 .6 9
2 .6 9
3 .3 8
3 .0 2

28
18
10
12
35
34
43
42

3 .5 2
3 .4 3
3 .6 7
4 .7 1
2 .8 2
2 .8 3
3 . 10
-

3 .0 8

Table 10. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes—by size of
community—Continued
(N um ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations, U nited States and selected regions, April 1975)
United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Metropolitan
areas
Number
of
workers

FLOOR WORKERS.............................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS)......................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
JANIT OR S............................................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE...................................

14 7
19
128
244
62
177
94
82
12
77

Average
hourly
earnings2

2 .7 6
2 .5 7
2 .7 9
2 .7 0
2.9 3
2 .6 2
2 .5 1
2.5 4
2 .2 9
3 .7 4

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends,
holidays, and late shifts.

00




New England

Nonmetropolitan
areas
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings2

12 3
19
10 4
159
24
135
47
44

2 .6 6
2 .6 3
2 .6 6
2.7 5
2 .8 9
2 .7 3
2 .4 9
2 . 50

-

-

66

3.61

3
4

Metropolitan
areas
Number
of
workers

41
6
35
39
21
18
11
11
-

Great Lakes

Nonmetropolitan
areas

Nonmetropolitan
areas

Average
Number Average
Number
hourly
of
hourly
of
earnings2 workers earnings2 workers

Average
hourly
earnings2

2 .74
2 .9 8
2 .7 0
3 .07
3 .3 8
2 .7 0
2 .7 7
2 .7 7

3 .0 0

-

23
-

21
10
-

7
14
13
-

-

2 .53
-

2 . 55
2 .7 8
-

2 .6 2
2 . 34
2 .3 6
-

26
-

25
40
7
33
-

19

-

2 .9 7
2 .S 7
2 .9 1
2 .9 8
-

4 .0 9

A ll or virtually all workers were women.
A ll or virtually all workers were men.

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet
publication criteria.

Table 11. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes-by size of establishment
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

New
England

United States1

50-249
workers
Number
of
workers

250 workers
or more

Average Number
hourly
of
earnings23 workers

Average
hourly
earnings2

Great Lakes

Establishments with—

Establishments withDepartment, occupation, and sex

New
England

United States1

Great Lakes

250 workers
or more

250 workers
or more

Department, occupation, and sex

Number Average Number Average
of
of
hourly
hourly
workers earnings2 workers earnings2

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS

50-249
workers
Number
of
workers

250 workers
or more

250 workers
or more

Average Number
hourly
of
earnings2 workers

Average
hourly
earnings2

9
6
20
16
18
18
12
11
14
14
12
11
7
6
8
-

$ 2 .7 5
2 .9 4
4 .4 9
4 .4 3
4 .2 8
4 .2 8
3 .7 3
3 .7 6
4 .4 5
4 .4 5
3 .7 7
3 .8 8
2 .4 6
2-44
2 .2 9
-

64
33
30
20 1
190
256
211
135
109
23
131
1 05
40
26
12
11
6
22
18
111
99
46
11
34
74
49
25
34
20
14

$ 3 .3 1
3 .69
2 .89
4 .6 0
4 .6 2
3 .7 5
3 .8 2
3 .57
3 .7 3
2 .8 7
4.0 1
4 .1 3
3 . 24
3 .4 0
3 .0 8
4 .0 2
4 .5 5
3 .9 1
3 .9 5
3 .7 9
3 .8 9
2 .7 8
2 .8 8
2 .7 6
3 .0 9
3 .2 0
2 .8 7
2 .85
2 .7 3
3 .0 1

8
7
37
37
42
42
18
17
16
16
16
16
9
6

8
.11
7
7
31

2 .9 2
4 .1 8
2 .6 7
2 .6 7
2 .6 5
2 .65

113
80
96
280
2 57
11 6
14
10 0

3 .0 9
3 .13
2 .6 8
2 .9 8
2 .6 3
2 .4 9

247
34
213
354
79
270
1 35
121
14
135

250 workers
or more

Number Average Number Average
hourly
hourly
of
of
workers earnings2 workers earnings2

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED

CUTTING:
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:

CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE......................
MEN.....................................................................
WOMEN...............................................................
LEATHER...............................................................
MEN.....................................................................
WOMEN...............................................................
SYNTHETICS.......................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS......................
WOMEN...............................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHCE,
HAND..........................................................................
MEN.....................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE3 ...............................................................
MEN.....................................................................
WOMEN...............................................................
LEATHER...............................................................
MEN.....................................................................
WOMEN...............................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS......................
MEN.....................................................................
WOMEN...............................................................

18
7
11
11
8
7
-

$4.11
4.4 2
3 .9 0
3 .8 5
4 .1 5
4.5 1
-

-

-

237
70
159
13 2
36
92
45
60
42

$3 .4 8
3 .9 3
3.2 8
3 .4 3
3 .6 7
3 .3 5
3 .8 9
3 .2 7
2 .8 3

35
19
16
27
13
14
-

$ 3.43
3 .5 2
3-32
3 .3 2
3 .4 1
3 .2 3
-

27
25
20
18

$ 3 . 11
3 . 10
2 .9 7
2 .9 3

8
8

4 .7 0
4 .7 0

-

-

-

-

55
21
34
32
16
22
18

4 .1 5
4.4 8
3 .9 5
4 .0 5
4.0 6
4 .2 2
3 .8 7

624
303
306
420
183
222
202
118
84

4 .0 5
4 .4 1
3.7 1
4 .0 2
4 . 42
3 .7 0
4.1 2
4 .4 1
3 .7 1

1 05
88
98
81
-

4 .9 1
5.2 0
4 .9 3
5 .2 5
-

110
35
75
41
35
-

4 .3 9
4 .9 2
4 .1 4
4 . 03
3 .9 4
-

61
61

3 .3 8
3 .3 8

951
887

2 .9 2
2 .9 3

63
63

3 .5 7
3 .5 7

62
62

3 .3 5
3. 35

F IT T IN G :
FANCY STIT CHE RS .......................................
WOMEN.........................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR F I T T E R S ,
UPPER, H AN D. .............................................
SKI VE RS , MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L I NI NG S 4 .........................................................
SOCK-LINING STITCHERS
( S L I P -L A S T E D SHOES)4........................
TOP STITCHERS4 ..........................................
VAMPERS4 ............................................................

42

2.7 9

385

2 .8 2

32

3 .0 7

58

2 .7 2

30

3 .3 9

262

3 .1 7

56

3 .3 0

29

3 .5 7

33
38

2 .9 9
3 .4 8

11
379
533

2 .9 8
3 .0 5
3.0 9

57
66

-

-

3 .5 9
3 .7 8

-

28
43

16
-

3 . 58

155
101
48
76
58
17

3 .3 4
3 .6 0
2-90
3 .5 7
3 .7 3
3 . 01

20
19

3 .8 6
3 .8 6
4 .3 3
3 .6 0
3 .1 4
3.1 3
3 .0 8
3 .0 6
-

171
188
150
176
13 8
12

4 . 06
3 ,6 7
3 .7 4
3 .6 5
3 .7 3
3 .8 5

_
28
33
33
29
29
-

4 .7 2
4 .5 9
4 .5 9
4 .7 0
4 .7 0
-

23
17
15
17
15
-

3.6 2
3.6 9

1 19
99

3.8 6
4 .0 1

23
23

4 .6 2
4 .6 2

”

-

12
9
6
-

3 .5 0
3 .1 0
3 .1 6

8
7
6
17
15
14
14
13
14
13

1 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
2 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3 Includes data fo r workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.




-

11
11

4 .7 7
4 .8 6
4 . 28
4 .2 8

19
9
10
7
-

9
6
25
25
28
22
6
17
17
15
9
6
6
-

$ 3 .3 9
3 .2 9
5 .5 5
5 .5 5
4 .4 7
4 .5 2
4 .2 7
3 . 62
4 .6 9
4. 67
4 . 88
-

6
-

$ 3 .9 0
4 . 10
5 .2 9
5-29
4 .3 9
4.3 9
4-28
4 .2 8
5 .6 6
5.6 6
4 .8 2
4 .8 2
3.3 7
3 .1 7
3 .0 2
-

3 .32
3.41
4 .4 8
2 .7 6
2 .7 4
3 .2 7
5 .2 4
3 .0 1

12
12
20
43
42
19
10
9

4.21
4.21
5 .3 0
2 .8 9
2 .8 6
5 .0 3
6 .2 3
3 .6 9

25
16
9

3 .63
3 .5 6
3 .7 4

22

2 .7 9
2 .8 0
3 .4 8
3 .4 7

2 .68
2 .5 7
2 .7 0
2 .7 3
2 .9 2
2 .6 7
2 .5 0
2 . 52
2.31
3 .6 6

57
52
38
21
17
24
23

2 .6 3
2 .6 4
3 .0 8
3 .3 9
2.7 1
2 .51
2 .5 3

22
21
29
7
22

2 . 97
2 .9 3
3 .0 2
2 . 91
3 . 06

-

-

3 .1 2
2 .8 0
-

-

3 .1 1
3 . 42

L AS TIN G:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, M A C H I N E .. .
MEN................................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS...................................................
MEN................................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
POLLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS3 . .................................................................
MEN................................................................................
TOE TO BALL...............................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS5 ......................
S I D E L A S T E R S , MACHINE.......................................
MEN................................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK L A S T I N G..............................
MEN................................................................................
CEMENT LASTING5 ...................................................
TOE LAS TER S, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC.........................................................
MEN................................................................................

BOTTOM FI L L E R S ...........................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS..............................................................
MEN...............................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS ...............................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE.................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
INSEAMERS.........................................................................
MEN................................................................................
INSEAM TRIMMERS........................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
J O IN T ER S, MACHINE..................................................
MEN...............................................................................
ROUGHERS............................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS...........................................................
MEN................................................................................
SHANKERS.............................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS............
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
SOLE-LEVELERS, MACHINE....................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................

3 .3 6
3 .8 2
2 . 95
3 .7 9
-

_
4 .6 3
3 .6 9
3 .7 7
3 . 69
3 . 77
-

F I N I S H IN G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS........................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
EDGE SETTERS5 ..............................................................
REPAIRERS.........................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
TREERS...................................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................

-

30

-

33
32
23
-

-

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS..............................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS).......................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
J ANI TO RS ............................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE5 .................................

23
19
49
7
42
6
8

-

4 .0 5

4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
5 A ll or virtually all workers were men.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.

-

-

-

-

16

-

4 .1 7

Table 12. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes-Brockton, Mass.1
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations April 1975)

D p r m n ,o c p t o ,ands x
e a t e t cuain
e

Number o w r e srciigsrih-ieh u l e r i g o —
f o k r e e v n ta g t t m o r y a n n s f
Number A e a e
vrg
$.0 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 64 68 72 76 80 8 0
24
.
h u l Un e a d $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $a 4
ory
o
f
dr n
n
d
w r e s eri g 3 $ . 0 u d r $ . 0
o k r an n s 2 4 n e 2 8
$ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 oe
3 0 3 2 3 4 3 6 3 8 4 0 4 2 4 4 4 6 4 8 5 0 5 2 5 4 5 6 5 8 6 0 6 4 6 8 7 2 7 6 8 0 8 4 vr
$.0
26

ssIlcied
E

$ 3 .7 1
4 . 32
3 . 13

-1 7 9
44
41 3 5

92
30
62

112
20

6

3 .8 4
3 . 95
3 .8 6
3 .9 9
3 .8 3
3 .9 7
3 .8 6
4 .0 3

-

-

-

49
49

5 . 84
5 .8 4

_

_

_

'

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS,
HEN.......................................... .
WOMEN....................................

"

3 . 57
2 .9 2
3 .8 6

2
10 2

-

2 .7 8
2 .8 5

11 4

_

4

1 ,4 5 2

704
748

92

14 7
48
99

153
54
99

113
55
58

92
50
42

80
42
38

71
45
26

41
28
13

1

-

-

1
1
1
1

2
2
1
1

2
2
2
2

1
1
1

2
2

2
2
2
2
1
1

2
2

1

1

2

12

34
15
19

26
14

39
25
14

50
38

27

12

5

22

30
25
5

17
13
4

20

9

27

15
5

8

22

17
16

21
20

1

5

1

16
16

14
14

9
9

16
16

1

pa.dmca.cjL occupations

CUTTERS, L I N I N G , MACHINE5 . . . .
IN CE N T I V E .......................................
HEN...............................................................
I NCE NT IVE ........................................
LEATHER.........................................................
I N CE NT IV E .......................................
HEN...............................................................
I N C E NT IV E .......................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE6 7 ......................................................
LEATHER.........................................................

11
8
10

7
8
7
7

1

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

2
2

1

1

1
1
1
1

1

-

1

1

1

2

-

3
3

1
1

4
4

1
1

3
3

3

4

1

1

2

1

3

4

1

1

2

-

1

1

1

1
1

3
3

1
1

17
13
4

3

2

2

3

_

_

_

1

1

3
3
3

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

5
5

1
1
1

3
3

-

1

2

1

2

-

-

1

-

_

_

_

'

'

6

-

1
1

85
5

1
1

4

'

9
4
5

_

-

1
1

5

3
3

3
3

2
2

2
2

1
1

1

4

1

1

1

2
2

4
4

3
3

1
1

2
2

FITTING:

N
>
O

FANCY STITCH ER S9 .....................................
TI ME ......................................................
INCE NT IV E ........................................
PAS T ER S, BACKERS, OR F I T T E R S ,
UPPER, HAND®.............................................
IN CE N T I V E .......................................
SK I V ER S , MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L I N I N G S® .........................................................
TIME ......................................................
I N C E N T I V E .......................................
TOP S T I T C H E R S . ..........................................
I NC E NT IV E .......................................
TAMPERS®............................................................
I N C E NT IV E .......................................

35
11

24
15
12

38
17
21

32
28
33
30

3 .1 8
3 .0 0
3 .3 3
3 . 43
3 .4 9
3 .8 8
3 .9 7

1

-

1

2

2
2

2
1
1

3

4

_

-

2
2

-

3

134
4

2
2

2
2

6

4

2
1

2
2

1
1

1

1

-

12 3

-

'

'

'

1
2

~

2

2

5

2
2

1
1

2

5
4

2

2

2

2

2

4

-

-

.
-

1

1

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

1
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

—

—
-

-

1
1

-

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE6 ' 7.
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS7 ................................................
IN CE N T I V E .............................. .. .......................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS6' 7..................
S ID E LASTERS, MACHINE5 7 ..................................
IN CE N T I V E ........................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING6 ...........................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC7 ......................................................
I N C E N T I V E ........................................................

EDGE TRIMMERS6, . . . . . ------GOODYEAR STITCHERS6 '7. . . HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE7
INC E NT IV E ........................
INSEAMERS6 ' 7....................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS7 ........................
I N CE NT IV E ........................
S ee fo o tn o te s a t en d o f table.




18
16
15

5 .4 2
4 .7 9
5 .0 3
6 .2 3
4 .9 2
5 .0 4
5 .0 8

12
11

5 .2 7
5 .4 3

18
16

6 .3 6
5 .4 2
4 .6 4
4 .7 3
6 .5 0
5 .3 8

11

7
6
12

10
9
12

9
7

4 .8 2

2

1

2

-

-

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

—
-

—
-

1

—
-

—
-

—
-

—
-

1
1

—
-

—
-

1

2

1

-

—
-

—

-

_
-

1

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

~

1

-

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

'

'

-

~

'

2

2
2

2
2

_

_

'

'

2
1

1

1

1

1
1

1
2
2
2
2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

—
-

—

—

1

2

2
1
1

—
-

—
-

1

1

2

3
3

2

-

2

3

2

-

1
1

1
1

_

_

-

1
1
1
1

-

-

-

1
1
1

-

-

-

2

-

-

2
1

1

1

-

2
1

2
2

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

1

-

-

1

1
1

-

-

1
1

~

"

1

“

1

1

1

“

1

1
2

1
1

-

2
2

-

1

-

1

-

1

-

1
1

1
1

1
1
1

-

-

2

1

-

2
1

1

-

5
-

1
1

1

2
1
1
1

.

—
-

1
1

-

1
1

142

—
is2

-

1
-

3

3

-

-

2

-

1
1

-

1
1

16 2
17 2
1

Table 12. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes-Brockton, Mass.1
—Continued
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

D p r m n ,o c p t o ,ands x
e a t e t cuain
e

SELECTED

Number A e a e
vrg
$.0 2 6 2 8 3 0 32 3 4 36 3 8 4 0 42 4 4 4 6 4 8 5 0 52
24
o
f
hul
ory
54 56 58 60 64 68 72 76 80 84
der d $ . Q $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0
w r e s e r i g 1 $n 4 une
o k r a n n s U . 0 ad r
ad
n
2
n $.0 $.0 $.0 $.0 $. 0 $.0 $.0 $.0 $.0 $.0 $.0 $.0 $.0 $.0
2 8 3 0 3 2 3 4 3 6 3 8 4 0 4 2 4 4 4 6 4 8 5 0 5 2 5 4 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 $ . 0 oe
5 6 5 8 6 0 6 4 6 8 7 2 7 6 8 0 8 4 vr
$.0
26

PR O D U C TIO N O C C U PA TIO N S—
C O N TIN U ED

F IN IS H IN G :
BOTTOM
R ncr c

S C O U R E R S 6 , 7 ................................................................
<;6 ,7

p t w c

R E P A I R E R S .............................................................................................
I N C E N T I V E ___________________________________
W O M E N _________________ ___________________________ _
T H r B H T T V P ____ ___
T R U E R * ? _______________

________

____

.

- - j u i r w u i ' p i ’ iMi

men

8 $3.99
12 6.31
12
3 38
.
8 3.74
11 3 . 3 1
7 3 . 69
11 6 . 1 2
8
7

1

_

_

_

_

_

2

_

2

-

1
1
1

1

2

1

2 .9 5

■
j

1

2
2

2

_

_

1
1
■
j
1

1

_

1

1

2
2
2
2

_

1

2

2

1

_

_

_

O

6 .4 9

1

_
2

2

2

WORKERS
T I M E - - ______________- _________________________

W OME N
T T M E ______ ____________________________ , _____T
IN SPEC TO R S
( C R O W N E B S ) .................................................
T T ME__________
__
M E N _________________ _________________________________
T T M E _____________________________________________
W O M E N .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
J A N T T O R S 2 1 / 7 ____________________________ ______________

10
32
20
23
15
g
8

2 . 93
3 .2 3
3 .0 8
3 .3 8
3 .2 6
2 . 86
3 .0 0

1

1

1

2
2

3
3
2
2

20 1

2

1

4

5

2

O
J

•J

2
2

1

1
1

1

1

5

3
2

1

5

1

1

5
5

5
5

3

5
5

5
5

2
4

2
4

6

1

1

1
5
-j

■
J

J

1

1
The area consists of Bridgewater, Brockton, Middleboro, Rockland and Stoughton, Massachusetts.
2
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approximately 67 percent of the
production workers covered by the survey were paid on an incentive basis.
3
Workers were distributed as follows: 84 at $2.00 to $2.20 and 95 at $2.20 to $2.40.
4
Workers were distributed as follows: 63 at $2.00 to $2.20 and 72 at $2.20 to $2.40.
5
Includes data fo r workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
6
A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.
7
A ll or virtually all workers were men.
8
Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $8.40 to $8.80; 2 at $9.20 to $9.60; and 1 at $9.60 to $10.00.
9
A ll or virtually all workers were women.
10
A ll workers were at $2.20 to $2.40.
11
Workers were distributed as follows: 3 at $2.00 to $2.20 and 1 at $2.20 to $2.40.




2

J

4

1

_

1

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

_

1

1

M ISC E L L A N E O U S:
FLOOR

_

-j

7 .0 4

12

11
8
1

Workers were distributed as follows:
A ll workers were at $2.20 to $2.40.
A ll workers at $8.40 to $8.80.
Workers were distributed as follows:
Workers were distributed as follows:
A ll workers were at $8.80 to $9.20.
A ll workers were at $2.20 to $2.40.
A ll workers were at $8.40 to $8.80.
A ll workers were at $2.20 to $2.40.
A ll or virtually all workers were paid

2 at $2.00 to $2.20 and 1 at $2.20 to $2.40.

1 at $9.60 to $10.00 and 1 at $10.00 to $10.40.
1 at $8.40 to $8.80 and 1 at $8.80 to $9.20.

on a time basis.

1
1
1

1
1

19l

1

Table 13. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes-Maine
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

N
>
K
>

1 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approxim ately 69 percent o f the
production workers covered by this study were paid on an incentive basis.
2 Includes data from establishments which were unable to provide separate data for men and women.
3 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.




A ll or virtually all workers were women.
A ll or virtually all workers were men.
Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
A ll or virtually all workers were paid on a tim e basis.

Table 14. Occupational earnings: Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes-Tennessee
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings o f Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Average $ 2 .1 0
hourly
and
earnings1 under
$ 2 .2 0

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS................. ................
HEN....................................................... .. ................
WOMEN.....................................................................

4 ,1 5 9
1 ,2 9 6
2 ,8 6 3

* 3 .0 3
3 .2 2
2 .9 5

42 8
108
320

358
78
280

185
59
126

176
52
124

198
32
166

161
46
115

229

61
53
18
15

3 .4 3
3 .3 4
3 .2 9
3 .2 2

_
-

6
6

4
3
2

-

6
6

-

2
2
2

4
4
-

51

3 .3 8

-

-

51

3 .3 8

-

-

288

2 .7 9

68

22
2
8

$2 . 2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90

$3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40

$4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.60 $ 6 .0 0 $6.40

$2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00

$3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60

$4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.60 $ 6 .0 0 $6.40 $6.80

86

143

456
96
360

322
117
205

180
55
125

137
38
S9

112

102

30
82

35
67

209
73
13 6

181
54
127

203
96
107

149
52
97

96
45
51

90
37
53

54
28
26

60
38

29
15
14

34

22

2
2

2
2

2
2

6
6

-

-

-

2
2

1
1
1
1

_
-

1

2

-

-

1
1
1
1

4
4

8
6

2
2

2
2

2
2

2
2

4

-

2

-

20

6
2

2
2

2
2

14

4

”

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

“

~

~

~

2

-

-

-

-

-

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE2 3 ....................
WOMEN.....................................................................
LEATHER.....................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE:
HEN...........................................................................
LEATHER:
MEN..........................................................................

-

4

2

2

2

-

4

1

1

4

3

7

3

4

5

6

5

4

2

-

4

1

1

4

3

7

3

4

5

6

5

4

7

17

20

9

23

15

17

17

13

16

4

4

10

8

3

2

9

2

-

2
3

7

1

-

-

-

2

4

6

2

5

2

-

3

4

2

-

-

-

2

-

-

4
-

2

P IT T IN G :
FANCY STITC H ER S:
IN CE N TIV E ....................................................
SK IV ERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L IN IN G S 3 ' 4 ...............................................................
rp/-vn C*!»T«PrUBDc3>4 ....................................................
iU r o x iT tn c n b

2 .9 2
o r£
Z . 7D

4

21

2 .9 9

3

-

-

3

4

-

3

2

-

-

-

_

-

9
46
47

3
-

-

-

1
1

-

-

2

-

2

2

2

2
1

6

1
1

2
2

8

1
1

1
1

2
2

2
2
2
2

5
-

-

5
-

-

2

1
1

22

2 .6 0
3 .6 1
3 .2 1
2 .9 8
3 .2 1
2 .9 8

-

23
14

2 . 83
2 .9 8

19

31
37

3 .0 6
3 .3 4
2 .6 7
4 .3 9
3 . 45
3 .4 6
3 .4 3
3 .6 0
3 .8 4
3 . 46
3 . 37
J . OZ
j« v l
3 . 51
3 .0 3

RnTTHM Q rn n p v D c
T HTHHTTVl?_____ _____ TT____
MEN3 ___________________________ __ .
EDGE SETTERS 3 5 .......................................................
BSP1TRVD<;6

24
18
18
18

3 .1 5
3 . 29
3 . 29
4 .3 9

0MEN.....................................................................

a/

36

3

6

2

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE3. .
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS:
WOMEN.....................................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS3 5 .................
SID E LASTERS, MACHINE 3 ..................................
HEN..........................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING............................
HEN..........................................................................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
CVMT«k nTOM IIPTf 3

22

47

4

2

6

1

4

n
3

g
•J

3
3
-

_
-

8

2
2

4
8

4
2

1

1

1
1

2

1

-

5

2

1

-

5

2

1

-

1
1

-

_

4
3

-

-

2

2

4

2

2

1

2

-

-

2

2

-

-

4
4
-

1
1

-

_
-

-

2
2

1

6

8

8

4
4
-

-

4
4

2
2

2

3

4

1
1
1

1

2

1

7

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

-

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

6
2
2

2

-

-

-

_
-

2

z

4

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM F IL L E R S 3 ....................................................
MEM..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS3 5 ....................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS 3 ..........................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE^...........................
MEN..........................................................................
INSEAMERS3 ..................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
THCV1M <PSTMMVSc3
ROUGH ROUNDERS3 5 ..................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS3 . . . .

11
8

42
67
46
21

41
33
33
21

1z
15

3
2
1

-

5
4

5
5
-

-

-

2
2
1

2

2
2

1
1

-

-

2
2

-

-

2

1

3
3
-

3

2

-

2
1

-

1

2
2

-

1

2

1

2
2
2

2
2
1

2

-

1

-

-

-

2

1

2

-

2

2

2

2

4

-

10

1
2

1
1

2
1

-

_
-

2
2
2

•j

2
1
2
2

1

-

2
1
1

-

1

3

4
2

-

2
2

-

-

1

2

1

-

2
2

6
6

-

2

2

-

2

-

2
2

2
2

5
5

7
7

3
3

1
1

2
2

2

1

2

4
4
5

4
4
_
5
3

2

-

5
5
5

5

3

14
14

2

-

-

2

4

2

2
2
2
2

2

1

~
4

1

-

2

-

3
5

2

-

2

“

-

5
-

2
2

_
-

2

-

3

2

4

2

_

_

4
4
2

-

2
2

-

2

-

2
2

2
*

-

4
4
-

_
-

2

_
-

_
_
-

2

2
2

2

_

_

_
-

F IN IS H IN G :

See footnotes at end of table.




2

. 61

1
-

4

1
1

-

_

4

-

3

1
1
1
1

58
42

2
2
2

1
1
-

-

-

-

2

2
2
2
-

4

4
4

4
_

-

T a b l e 14. O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n i n g s : M e n ’s G o o d y e a r - w e lt d r e s s s h o e s - T e n n e s s e e — C o n t in u e d
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Department, occupation, and sex

rv>

mumoer
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings1

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings o f $ 2.10
$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40
and
$3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.60 $ 6.00
$6.40
$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.60
$ 6.00 $6.40 $6.80

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
MISCELLANEOUS:
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS)6 .................................
HOMEN.............................................................
JA N IT O R S 5 6 ..........................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE5 6 .........................

84
72
72

$2.73
2 • 73
2.51
3. 6 8

2

4
4
5

6
6
11

4
4
~

14

6

2
2

~

22

12

~

40
40
-

nr . ' Exclu.des Premium pay fo r overtime and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approxim ately 69 percent of the
production workers covered by the study were paid on an incentive basis.
H
Includes data fo r workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
3 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.




4
-

4
4
-

-

22

2

-

2

-

-

36

A ll or virtually all workers were women.
A ll or virtually all workers were men.
A ll or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.

4

_

_

_

_

~

2

2

2

-

_
-

-

T a b le 15. O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s : M e n ’s G o o d y e a r - w e lt d r e s s s h o e s - W i s c o n s i n
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings o fDepartment, occupation, and sex

Number Average
hourly
of
workers earnings1

$2 10
u n rio r

$ 2.20
ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS.................................
WOMEN............................................... , ..................

157
42
1 15

$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 $5.60 $5.80 $ 6.00 $ 6.20 $6.40
—
and
$2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 $5.60 $5.80 $ 6.00 $ 6.20 $6.40 over

2 ,5 7 4
621
1 ,9 5 3

$ 3 .3 2
3 . 85
3 . 16

32
30
30
14

12

3 .3 7
3 .4 5
3 .4 0
3 .7 2
3 .9 7
3 .8 3
3 .9 7

135
39
96
52
42

4 .2 7
4 .8 8
4 . 03
4 .0 6
3 .9 5

54

4 .0 9

84
72

3 . 51
3 .7 2

6
2

69
65

2 .8 9
2 .9 3

41
38
35
33
50
46

3 . 66
3 .7 6
3 .2 3
3 . 30
3 . 69
3 .8 0

-

24

3

6

3 . 56
3 .7 5
3 .4 6
3 .4 4
3 .5 6
3 . 23
3 .4 0

9
6
7
7
24
17
16

3 . 81
4 .1 5
3 .8 6
4 . 19
4 .5 9
3 .8 5
3 .8 5

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

17

4 . 56

-

-

71
4
67

115

154
24
130

16 4
28
136

129
18

94

2

2
2
2

4
4
4

1
1
1
1

_
-

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1

-

4

21

111

106
18

88

272
35
23 7

228

195
41
154

163
38
125

131
26
105

107
36
71

123
41
82

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
1
1
1
1

3
3
3
_
_
_
_

3
3
3

2
2
1

1
1
1

1
1
1

_
_

_
_
_

6

5
5

10

2 48

20

91
36
55

63
29
34

51
25
26

36
16

40

21

20

20
20

2
2
2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

_
_
_
_
_
_

12

7

7

6
2

3
3
_

2
1
1

2

51
30

19

11
8•

24
18

6

22

7
4

9
9
-

22

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

7
4
3

_
_
_
_
_

4
44
_

14

8

11

14

8

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE2.........................
IN C E N TIV E....................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
LEATHER.....................................................................
IN C E N TIV E....................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
IN CEN TIV E....................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHCE,
MACHINE2'3..................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
LEATHER.....................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS:
WOMEN.....................................................................
p it t in g

12
13

_
-

-

1
2

-

-

-

-

-

2
1
1

-

-

-

1

-

1

4

3

4

1

2
-

-

2
2

4
4
4

1
1
1
1

-

1
1
1
1

_
_
_
_

_

10
1

8
1

10
1

7
3
3

9

6
6

3
9
5
5

12

12
2
10

1

2
2

_

_

_

1
1

5

6

4

4

2

-

1

2

2k

-

-

-

4
4

4
4

5
5

_

1
1

2
2

2
2

3
3

_

_

2
2

_

2
2

_
_

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

2
2

2
2

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

1
1

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_

1
1

2
2

_

-

1
1

_

-

2
2

2

1
1

_
_
_
_

_

1
1

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

62
2
2
2
2

4
4

1
1

2

4

-

1

-

2

4

4

4

4

3

4

2

1
1

8
8

4
4

6
6

5
5

2
2

7
7

5
5

4
4

6

_
_
_

2
1
1
1
1

1

3

4

_
_

1
6
2
2

9
5
5

6

_
_

1
6
2
2

-

1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2

5
7
4

-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_

5
5

4

1

5
3

2

:

PANCY STITCHERS 5 .................................................
IN C E N TIV E....................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR FIT T E R S ,
UPPER, HAND5 ..........................................................
IN CE N TIV E ....................................................
SK IV ERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L IN IN G S 5 .....................................................................
IN C E N TIV E....................................................
TOP STITCHERS 5 .......................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
VAMPERS5 ........................................................................
IN C E N TIV E....................................................

-

1

6

8
5

5
5

4
4

5
5

4
4

4
4

10
10

10
10

2
2

3
3

2
2

1
1

1
1

-

5

1

-

4
3

-

_
-

3
3
5
5

4
4
4

3
3

7
7

1
1
2

5
5

2
2

3
3

5

2
2
1

_
_

6

2
2

3
3

7
7

6
6

6
6

4
4

2
2

1
1

_
-

1
1

2
2

_
_
3
3

1
1

3

_
_
_

_
_

2
2
1
1

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

-

1

1

_

1
1

1
1
1

-

-

-

2
1
1
1

1

-

1

-

2
1

2
1

1

_
-

-

1
1
2

2
2

-

3

3

1
1

3
3

-

1

_

1

-

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS POR PULLOVER, MACHINE3 . .
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS....................................... ..
IN CEN TIV E....................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS2 ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ..................................................
MEN..........................................................................
TOE TO BALL..........................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS3'7.................
SID E LASTERS, MACHINE3 .................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING............................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC 3 .................................................
See footnotes at end of table




8

16

11
10
7

2
1

-

-

-

1
1
1
-

_

1
1

4

2
2

-

_

_

-

1
1
1

-

-

2

-

2

_
-

1

1
1

_
-

_
_

_
-

1
1
1
1
1

1
1

-

1
1
1

1
1
1
1

-

-

1

-

1
1

1

1

■
j

1

_
_

1
1
1
1
1

1
2

_

2
2
2

_
_
_
_

3
3

1
1

1
1
1
1

_
_
_
_

2
_

_
_

1

1
•j

_

-

1
1

1
1
1

1
2
2

_
_

1
2
1

4
4

1
1

-

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

_

1

3

_

3

_

_

-

1

1
1
1

3

1
1

1
_

1

3

"

_

1

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

1

1

-

-

1

_

T a b le 15. O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n i n g s : M e n ’s G o o d y e a r - w e lt d r e s s s h o e s - W i s c o n s i n — C o n t in u e d
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings o f—

Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Average $ 2.10
hourly
$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 $5.60 $5.80 $ 6.00 $ 6.20 $6.40
earnings1 nnripr
2
and
$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 $5.60 $5.80 $ 6.00 $ 6.20 $6.40 over

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM F IL L E R S .......................................................
IN C E N TIV E ....................................................
.......................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS3 4
MEN..........................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS 3 .........................................
MEN..........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE3 ............................
INSEAMERS3 ..................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
*pnjNMli!P^____
_
.
IN C E N T IV E ....................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS.......................................................
IN C E N TIV E....................................................

13

12
10

9
32
28
34
28
19

21
19

8

7
18
17
13

12

SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS............
-fu r
- - _____ - - - - ___ t SOLE-LEVELERS, MACHINE.................................
IN CEN TIV E....................................................
tf nm?M? _ _ ____________________ _ _

7
g
9

8
6

$ 3 .2 2
3 .3 1
3 . 12
3 .2 2
5 .3 9
5 .4 8
4 .3 3
4 .3 4
3 . 80
4 . 59
4 .5 7
3 .1 7
3 . 21
4 . 26
4 .3 9
4 .8 0
5 . 02

2^86

2 . 98
2 .9 4
3 .0 4
3 .0 8

1

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

3
3

2
2

_
-

1
1
1

4
4

_
-

1
1

_
-

2
1
2
1
1

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1
1

1
1

1
1

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

_

1
1

-

1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

1
1

-

1
1

2
1
2
1
1
1

~

-

-

_
-

2
2
1

_
-

-

2

-

-

1
1
2

1
1

-

4
3

_

2
2

-

-

1
1
1
1
_
3
3

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

1

-

1
1

1

■
j
4

2
2
1
1

1
1
1

-

1
4

2
2

3
3

1
1
2
2
6
6

_
3
3

1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5

2
2
2
1
1

2
1

1
1

-

1
1

_

1
1
1

1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
_

_

1

_
-

2
1
1

1
1
3

_

1

1
1

2
1
1
1
1
1
1

_
-

2
2

1
1

_

_

-

-

1

1

2
2
2
2

_

_

2

-

c
5
-

84

-

1

1

2

4
-

2

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

2
2
2

1
1
1

_

]

_

_

_

-

_

_

1
1

_
-

2

_
-

_
-

-

-

2

_
-

_
-

-

-

2

3
3

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

2
2

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

2
2
1

2
1

2
2

1
1

2
2
2

-

3

1

2
2

-

_
4
4

2
2

4
4

-

_
-

5

2
2
2

4

3

1

1

1

F IN IS H IN G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS3 ..................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
EDGE SETTERS.............................................................
Tlir'PM'PTVI?
MEN..........................................................................
IN CEN TIV E....................................................
Dpn »TP1?DC5
TREERS5..........................................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................

12

3 .5 0
3 .3 6
3 .7 5
4 .8 7
5 .0 5
5 .0 5
5 .2 6

32
18
47
29

2 .6 4
2 . 93
3 .2 1

26
17
9
14
13
13

2
2

2
2

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

5
3

1

-

-

2
2
6
3

_

3

2
1
1
1

1

1
1

1

_
-

-

_
-

3
-

2
1
1

-

_
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

2

1

1

4

1

1

7

2

6

3

1
1
2

15

2

5
4

_

3

3
3

14
Q

_

2

10

13

3
6

10

11

5

-

3

1
1

~

2

-

2
2

1
1

2
2

3

-

_

3
~

-

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1

1
1

-

-

-

2
2
2
2
1

-

2

2

1

1
1
1

1
1
1

_
3
3

4

-

-

1
1

2
2

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS5 .......................................................
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS)9. .................................
............"

*

.............

......................

Tft UT mADc9
MECHANICS,

MAINTENANCE^9 . . . . . . . . . . .

29

22
54
9
45

6
20

3 . 10
3 . 06
2 .9 0
2*91

2! 61
2 .7 0
4^15

2

3
~

_

_

1

3

1 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approximately 81 percent of the
production workers covered by the study were paid on an incentive basis.
2 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
3 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.
4 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $6.80 to $7.00; 2 at $7.20 to $7.40; and 1 at $7.60 and over.




1
1

3

4

z.
*

6

1

2

6

A ll or virtually all workers were women.
A ll workers were at $6.40 to $6.60.
A ll or virtually all workers were men.
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $6.40 to $6.60; 1 at $6.60 to $6.80; 1 at $6.80 to $7.00 and 1 at $7.20 to $7.40.
A ll or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.

T a b le 16. O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s : M e n ’s G o o d y e a r - w e lt w o r k s h o e s - a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

New England

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Mean

Median

Middle range

106
41
65
69
28
41
14
6
8

$3.29
3.25
3.32
3.28
3.14
3.38
3.37
3.08
3.59

$3.05
3.09
3.02
3.01
2.75
3.10
-

$ 2 .3 4 - $3.83
3.92
2.202.453.72
3.71
2.203.78
2.1 8 3.67
2 .58-

36
25
-

$3.41
3.42
-

$3.25
3 .36
-

36 5
238
127
351
228
123

4.06
4.30
3.63
4.10
4.35
3.64

3.74
4.00
3.33
3.82
4.01
3.33

3 . 143.352.623 . 15 3.372.6 2 -

93
81
12
93
81
12

4.21
4.35
3 . 28
4.21
4.35
3.28

4.0 5
4.20
4 . 05
4.20
“

363

3.29

3.12

2 .48-

3.93

11

2.83

180

3.05

2. 87

2.32-

3.52

58

2.95

2.84

2 .40-

3 . 49

96
299
236

3.29
3 . 16
3.23

3.17
3. 10
3.16

2.562.492.5 0 -

3.92
3.73
3.66

23
41

3.77
3.34

3.70
3.2 5

3 .272.82-

93
75
18
22
20
35
26
9

3.29
3.34
3.10
3.20
3.22
3.48
3.56
3.25

3.12
3.15
3.10
3. 16
3.16
3.36
3.25
-

2.592.572.762.702.7 0 2.732 .89-

3.79
3.89
3.23
3.95
4 . 11
4.15
4.19
-

23
15
8
11
10
-

3-68
3.84
3.37
2. 89
2.92
-

3 . 41
3.7 9
-

16
11
12
11*
83
80
70
10
62
57
18
13

3.13
3.24
3.15
3.24
4.0 5
3.72
3.71
3.75
3.64
3.66
3.98
3.94

2.90
4.07
3.69
3.60
3.49
3. 46
4.15
-

2.663. 282.9 0 2 .9 3 2.862 .893.35-

3.41
4 . 51
4.33
4.34
4.16
4.19
4.72
-

18
20
20
20
20
-

3.76
4.09
4.09
4.09
4.09
-

20
20

4.10
4 . 10

21
35
35
“

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Great Lakes

Southeast

Number
of
workers

Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Middle range

Median

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, LINING, MACHINE3 .........................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
LEATHER....................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
SYNTHETICS.............................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE3 ....................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
LEATHER.....................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................

4.72
4.94
4 . 17
4.80
5.02
4.20

$2.87- $ 3 .7 6
2 .8 5 3.7 2
-

27
13
14
17
10
6
-

$2.36
2.24
2.47
2.18
2.15
2.96
-

$2.20
2.2 0
-

$2.102 .10-

$2.28
2.20
-

23
14
22
14
-

$4.29
4.24
4.34
4.24
-

$ 3 . 97
4.03
-

$2.983 .02-

$4.89
5.03
-

4.97
5.05
4.97
5.05
-

127
73
54
113
63
50

3. 10
3.19
2.9 9
3.10
3.20
2.98

3 . 16
3.27
2.77
3 . 16
3 . 27
2.69

2.562.8 2 2.392. 5 7 3.0 1 2 .39-

3.54
3.54
3.5 8
3.48
3.48
3.4 9

104
55
49
104
55
49

5.12
5.65
4. 52
5 . 12
5.65
4.52

4.81
5.31
4 . 23
4 . 81
5.31
4 . 23

3 .9 3 4.2 7 3.463 .9 3 4 .273.46-

6.32
6.48
5.27
6.32
6.48
5.27

_

193

3.00

2.75

2 .2 7 -

3.67

_

56

2.74

2.53

2. 1 0 -

3.3 5

44

3.52

3.26

2.47-

4.01

4.21
3.6 1

23
75
109

2.67
2.57
2.88

2.61
2.50
2.53

2.2 7 2. 2 3 2. 2 0 -

2.93
2. 68
3.3 8

29
52

3.69
3.74

3 . 61
3.53

2.803 .1 7 -

4.36
_
4.03

3.003 .0 8 -

4.32
4.54
-

37
33
20
18
-

2.80
2.80
3 . 11
3.11
-

2.69
2.65
3.06
3.06
-

2.262. 2 6 2 .6 9 2.6 8 -

3.16
3. 16
3.46
3.46
-

19
13
6
15
9
6

3.88
4.32
2.94
3.85
4.00
3.62

3 . 70
_
3.75
-

3.1 0 -

4.71
_
_
4.27
-

3.88
3.95
3.95
3.95
3.95
-

3 .3 8 3 .4 5 3.453 .4 5 3.45-

4.10
4.78
4.78
4.78
4.78
-

30
24
20
20
-

3.65
2.92
2.84
2.93
-

3.95
2.70
2.63
2.70
-

2.862 .602.582.60-

4.36
3.1 2
3.09
3.1 2
-

23
24
19
10
10
14
9

4.77
4.29
4.34
4.28
4.28
4.30
4.40

4.96
4.27
4 . 33
-

4.06
4 . 06

3.5 2 3 .52-

4.72
4.72

15
15

3.07
3.07

2.8 7
2.87

2 .7 5 2 .75-

3.32
3.32

22
18

4.18
4.34

4.09
4. 19

16
9
35
42
27
15

2.62
2.52
3.69
3.15
2.80
3.77

2 . 47
3.42
2.96
2.83
4.11

2. 1 0 -

2.9 6
4. 49
3.48
3.05
4.77

12
7
22
32
29
~

3.52
2. 62
5.79
4.48
4.68
-

3.583 .703 .5 8 3.7 0 -

PITTING:
PANCY STITCHERS4 ..................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR FITTERS,
UPPER, HAND4 ..........................................................
SKIVERS, MACHINE, UPPERS 06
LININGS4 .....................................................................
TOP STITCHERS4 .......................................................
VAMPERS4 .......................................................................

-

_

_

_

_

_

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE...
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
BED-MACHINE OPERATORS....................................
MEN..........................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS...............................................
MEN..........................................................................
W
OMEN.....................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS3 ...............................................................
MEN..........................................................................
TOE TO BALL..........................................................
MEN..........................................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS5 ....................
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE....................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING............. ............
MEN..........................................................................
CEMENT LASTING.................................................
MEN..........................................................................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC....................................................
MEN..........................................................................

73
69

3.87
3.89

3.86
4.00

3 .273.2 7 -

4.37
4.42

42
22
20
91
129
111
18

3 . 10
3.52
2.65
4.45
3.76
3.80
3.55

2.91
3. 04
2.50
4.09
3.87
3.87
3.21

2.342.802.2 1 3. 28 3.003.032 .46-

3 . 41
3.84
3.00
5. 27
4.45
4.46
4.29

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
3 .4 3 -

3.903.883.76_
-

-

5.81
4.75
4.75
_
-

-

-

_

-

-

-

3.713.91-

4.68
4.81

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM FILLERS.......................................................
MEN.................................... ....................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS5 .......................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS............................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
See footnotes at end o f table




-

-

4.83
4.01
4.01
“

4.71
4.04
4.04
"

-

3.8 3 3.7 1 3 .71~

-

6.0 7
4.42
4 . 42
”

-

-

2.842.502.4 2 2.51-

_

_

_

-

-

-

5. 60
4 . 59
4 . 66
-

4 .104 .144 .28“

7 . C8
5.04
5. 10

T a b l e 16. O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n i n g s : M e n ’s G o o d y e a r - w e lt w o rk s h o e s - a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s — C o n t in u e d
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

U i e Sae1
n t d t t s2
D p r m n ,o c p t o ,ands x
e a t e t cuain
e

Number
o
f
w r e s Mean
okr

New E g a d
nln

H u l erig3
o r y anns
M d l rne
id e ag
Mda
ein

Number
o
f
w r e s Mean
okr

Suhat
otes
Number

H u l erig3
o r y anns
Mda
ein

M d l rne
i d e ag

w r e s Mean
okr

H u l erig3
o r y anns
Iein
Mda
M d l rne
i d e ag

Number
o
f
w r e s Mean
okr

G e tL k s
ra ae
H u l erig3
o r y anns
i d e ag
Mda
e i n M d l rne

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:— CONTINUED
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE.........
MEN.......................
WOMEN.....................
INSEAMERS.....................
MEN.......................

1 $3.51 ' 1
1
1 3.51
. 2
1
3 4 1

58
11
24
17
7
8

13
-

6

75
27
7
20
57
33
24
7
6

3.87
3.29
3.04
2.93
3.29
3.55
3.85
3.55
2.94
2.57
3.07
3.06
3.23
2.83
3.50
3.72

3.82
2-89
2.70
-

-

3.25
2.79
2.89
2.98
3.07
2.93

“

2.852.502.412.882.342.522.352.602.20-

-

4 . 58
3.39
3.39
-

-

3.97
3.28
3.49
3.51
4.07
3.27

-

-

20
-

-

4 . 12
3. 64
-

-

-

-

$3.66
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$3. 14- $ 4 .0 9
-

~

-

15
13
24
17
7
12
7
26
12
7
23
12

-

3.02 $2.71
3.14
2.88 2.75
2.93
2.75
2.84
2.51
-

-

3.10
2.72
2.86
2.88
2.75

-

2.75
3.08
-

2.77
-

2.47- $3.57
-

-

2 46- 3.33
.
2.6 8 -

l
00
fC
N

WOMEN.....................................................................
INSEAH TRIMMERS....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
ROUGHERS.......................................................................
MEN...........................................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS5 .....................................................
SHANKERS........................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
MEN.......................
WOMEN.....................
SOLE-LEVELERS, MACHINE..........
MEN.......................

6
50 $3.43 $3.24 $2.56- $4. 1
43 3.54 3.26 2.73- 4 27
.
7 2.76
69 3.78 3.67 2.83- 4 4
.7

2 .35-

-

3.31
-

1 $3.65 $3.38 $2.78- $4.70
7
13 3.82
23 4.45 4.39 3.93- 5.38

3. 43
-

19
16
-

4.49
4.35
-

3.33

20

3.53

-

-

-

-

-

-

4.47
4.32
3.73

-

3 .933 .1 1 -

-

5.38
-

-

5.38
-

-

-

-

-

2 .7 2 -

-

4.19

F IN IS HI N G:
BOTTOM SCOURERS....................................................
MEN.......................
EDGE SETTERS ...................
MEN.......................
REPAIRERS.....................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
TREERS.............................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
FLOOR WORKERS..........................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
INSPECTORS (CECWNERS)....................................
HEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
JANITORS 5 .....................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE5 ...............................

39
37
14
12
85
6

79
72
67
112
29
83
164
26
138
66
77

3.43
3.4 8
3.1 8
3.36
2.96
2.61
2.99
3.08
2.98
2.76
2.92
2.70
2.96
3.79
2.80
2.70
3.78

3.07
3 . 18

-

2.81
2.81
2.86
2.73
2.65
2.57
2.67
2.73
4.10
2.63
2.56
3.88

2.402.39-

-

2.462.522.232.202.502.402.552.372.9 0 2.322.303.29-

4.02
4.03

-

3.24
3.24
3.58
3.47
2.87
3.44
2.81
3.36
4.31
2.83
2.87
4.03

12
12

-

22
22
44

16
28
48
39
14
13

3.68
3.68

-

2.85
2.85
2.89
3. 08
2.78
2.91
2.71
2 . 35
3.95

-

2.57
2 . 57
-

2.65
2.8 3
2.58
2.70
2 . 60
-

-

2.442.442.542 .3 32 .5 6 2 .422.38-

-

2.84
2.84
3.28
4.00
3.0 8
2.93
2.72
-

_
6

34
34
29
7

22
43
43
22
31

-

-

2.86
2.77
2.77
2.59
2.49
2.63
2.48
2.48
2.42
3.6 4

2.79
2.79
2.56
2 . 56
2.40
2.40
2.39
3.94

1 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were women.
2 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. See appendix A for methods
5 A ll or virtually all workers were men.
used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges o f earnings. Means and middle ranges are not provided for jobs w ith fewer than
15 workers in a region.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.
3 Includes workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.




-

2.2 0 2 .20'8 2.562 .202. 2 0 2. 2 2 3.22-

_
3.1 5
3.15
2.80
2.81
2.81
2.81
2. 67
3.94

10
10

-

34
29
23
21
24
19
52
37
23
20

4.54
4.54

-

3.05
3 . 12
3.78
3.75
2.73
2.64
3.57
3.43
3.20
4.14

_
2.75
2 . 81
3.59
3 . 53
2. 69
2.68
3 . 90
3 . 86
3 .3 3

4.04

-

2 .3 7 2 .402 .782 .6 7 2 .36-

2.362.80-

2.602 .833 .7 5 -

-

3.27
3.29
4.60
4.55
2.94
2.78
4 . 10
4.10
3.45
4.69




T a b le 1 7 . O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s : M e n ’s c e m e n t - p r o c e s s s h o e s - a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Number
of
workers

Middle Atlantic

New England

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Hourly earnings3
Mean

Median

Middle range

165
73
86
94
31
61
46
30
25
12
13

$ 3 .4 1
3 .4 5
3 .3 1
3 .6 2
3 .9 4
3 .4 3
3 .3 2
3 .1 9
2 .8 2
2 .8 4
2 .8 0

$ 3 .2 6
3 . 15
3 . 23
3 .4 8
3 .6 3
3 .4 4
3 . 17
2 .7 7
2 .6 5
-

$ 2 .6 5 - $ 3 .8 9
4 . 13
2 .5 0 2 .8 7 3 .5 4
2 .9 4 4 .0 5
4 . 57
2 .9 7 2 .9 4 3 .8 8
2 .5 1 3 .9 4
3 .9 4
2 .2 5 2 .4 5 2 .9 6
-

6

4 .5 4

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings3
Mean

Median

Middle range

$ 3 . 12
3 .1 3
3 .5 3
3 .5 3
2 .9 1
2 .9 1
-

$ 2 .8 8
2 .7 7
3 . 47
3 .4 8
2 .7 7
2 . 51
-

$ 2 .3 5 - $ 3 .4 7
2 .2 4 3 .5 4
2 .9 5 4 .0 9
2 .7 8 4 .1 1
2. 132 .8 9
2 .1 3 2 .9 1
-

Hourly earnings

Number
of
workers

Mean

Median

Middle range

$ 3 .9 6
4 .2 4
-

$ 3 .7 4
-

$ 3 . 4 0 - $ 4 .2 3
-

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE...........................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER...................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SYNTHETICS...........................................................
MEN........................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHITICS...........................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHCE,
h a n d ! ...........................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLB SHOE,
MACHINE......................................................................
MEN4 ......................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER...................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHITICS...........................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

-

-

-

39
35
16
15
17
16
-

56 5
308
22 2
403
186
182
142
103
39

3 .7 6
3 .9 9
3 .5 3
3 .7 1
3 .9 5
3 .5 5
3 .9 5
4 .1 3
3 .4 6

3 .6 1
3 .6 9
3 .4 4
3 .5 4
3 .6 4
3 .4 4
3 .7 2
4 .0 3
3 . 54

3 .0 5 3 .1 4 3. 082 .9 8 2 .9 7 3 .0 4 3 .3 4 3. 473 .1 2 -

4 .2 1
4 .6 4
3 . 88
4 . 17
4 . 68
3 .9 3
4 .3 5
4 .6 4
3 .7 1

143
127
16
88
75
13
-

3 .7 9
3 .8 6
3 .2 3
3 .8 8
3 .9 8
3 . 30
-

3 .7 0
3 .7 2
3 . 15
3 .7 4
3 .7 9
-

3 .1 5 3 .2 5 2 .3 8 3 .1 7 3 .3 7 -

16
6
-

-

-

4 .3 9
4 .4 1
4 .0 7
4 .5 2
4 .5 9
“

45
-

3 .3 1
-

-

3 .2 1
-

-

2 .7 1 -

-

3 .8 8
“

-

3 . 18

2 . 88

2 .6 7 -

3 .6 1

P IT T IN G :
FANCY STITCHERS5 ................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR F IT T E R S,
UPPER, HAND5 ........................................................
SEWERS, HAND
(MOCCASIN-CONSTRUCTED SH O ES).............
SK IV ERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L IN IN G S ......................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SOCK-LINING STITCHERS
(SL IP-L A ST E D SH OES)......................................
WOMEN...................................................................
TOP STITCHERS5 .....................................................
VAMPERS........................................................................
WOMEN.............................. ....................................

747

2 .7 8

2 .6 3

2 .3 3 -

3 .0 9

220

2 .8 1

2 . 65

2 .3 5 -

3 .1 5

38

53 7

2 .5 9

2 .4 1

2 .2 0 -

2 .7 8

115

2 .4 4

2 .3 0

2 .1 6 -

2 .6 0

-

51

3 .8 7

3 .7 2

3 .1 3 -

4 .3 6

-

-

11

3 . 18

285
2 68

2 .9 7
2 .9 6

2 .7 8
2 .7 8

2 . 412 .4 0 -

3 .3 4
3 .3 4

62
62

2 .8 4
2 .8 4

2 .7 2
2 .7 2

2 .4 0 2 .4 0 -

3 .1 5
3 .1 5

18
-

3 .1 1
-

2 .9 6
-

2 .6 1 -

3 .7 9
-

24
21
43 6
489
463

3 .0 4
3 .0 6
2 .9 8
3 .0 3
3 .0 3

3 . 11
3 . 13
2 .7 6
2 .8 6
2 .8 6

2 . 8 22 .8 52 .4 4 2 .4 8 2 .4 8 -

3 .2 2
3 .2 2
3 .3 4
3 .4 7
3 . 47

99
151
148

3 .0 6
3 .0 9
3 .0 9

2 .8 9
2 . 97
2 . 97

2 .4 5 2 .6 0 2 .6 0 -

3 .4 0
3 .5 1
3 .5 0

24
36
-

3 .1 7
2 .8 2
-

3 . 14
2 .7 7
-

2 .6 3 2. 38-

3 .8 2
3 .0 4
-

139
77
56
48
35
13
61
42
17

3 .0 6
3 . 11
2 .9 3
3 .5 4
3 .7 9
2 .8 6
3 .4 0
3 .3 4
3 .5 0

2 .7 5
2 .8 7
2 .5 7
3 .2 9
3 . 83
3 .4 0
3 .2 3
3 . 47

2 .2 1 2 .2 5 2 .2 0 2 .7 5 3 .0 3 2 .7 5 2 .7 5 3 . 18-

3 . 60
3 .6 5
3 .2 9
4 . 18
4 .2 9
3 .7 3
3 .7 2
3 . 57

_
6
15
15

_
3 . 42
3 .4 4
3 .4 4

-

_
-

-

-

13
7

3 .1 2
_
-

15

3 .1 0

3 .5 3

2 .1 6 -

3 .7 1

-

97
90
75

3 -6 9
3 .7 7
3 .6 9

3 . 49
3 .5 0
3 .4 9

2 .6 7 2 .7 0 2 . 7 2-

4 .2 0
4 .4 0
4 . 10

9
9
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, M ACHINE...
MEN...... ............................................ ....................
WOMEN...................................................................
BED-MACHINE OPERATORS...................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS.............................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
PLATFORM-COVER LASTERS
(SLIP-L A STE D SH OES):
MEN.........................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS4 .............................................................
MEN........................................................................
TOE TO BALL3 .....................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

-

_
-

. 3 . 15
3 . 15

2 .6 6 2 .6 6 -

-

r
3 .1 5
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

4 .5 3
4 .5 3
-

-

4 .0 1
4 .0 1
-

_
-




T a b l e 1 7 . O c c u p a t io n a l e a r n in g s : M e n ’s c e m e n t - p r o c e s s s h o e s - a l l e s t a b lis h m e n t s — C o n t in u e d
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Number
of
workers

Middle Atlantic

New England

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Hourly earnings2

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings3

Mean

Median

53
50
128
118
48
80
70

$ 3 .9 8
4 .0 2
3 .6 5
3 .6 9
3 .8 9
3 .5 1
3 .5 5

$ 4 .0 1
4 .0 1
3 .4 6
3 .4 9
3 . 89
3 .2 5
3 .3 0

$ 2 .8 0 3 .0 4 2 .8 7 2 .8 8 3 .2 6 2 .8 3 2 .8 4 -

$ 4 .7 3
4 .8 7
4 . 16
4 . 21
4 .7 2
4 .0 1
4 .0 5

30
28
29
29
12
17
17

$ 4 .0 8
4 .1 3
4 . 19
4 .1 9
4 .9 8
3 .6 4
3 .6 4

$ 4 .0 4
4 .0 4
4 .1 5
4 . 15
3 .9 7
3 .9 7

61
-

3 . 51

3 . 44
-

2 .9 8 -

4 .0 6
-

26
25

3 .7 6
3 .7 8

3 .6 3
3 .6 4

39
8
31
117
95
63
37
69
48
8
32
30
80
52
26
22
41
24
16
20 9
156
9

3 .0 6
3 .1 5
3 .0 4
4 .2 9
4 .2 0
3 .3 0
3 .6 9
3 .3 2
3 .5 2
3 .8 5
3 .3 2
3 .3 5
3 .4 3
3 .5 2
3 .4 1
3 .3 9
3 .1 5
3 .2 9
2 .9 9
3 .2 3
3 .3 3
3 .0 7

2 .8 5
2 .6 0
3 . 94
3 .9 2
3 .0 8
3 .9 4
3 .1 3
3 .2 9
3 .2 1
3 .3 1
3 .2 9
3 .4 4
3 .3 6
3 . 18
2 .6 9
2 .6 9
3 . 12
3 .0 5
3 .1 5
“

2 .4 5 2 .4 5 3 .4 1 3 .4 9 2 .5 5 2 .8 6 2 .6 8 2 .7 7 2 .8 9 2 .9 0 2 .6 3 2 .7 5 2 .7 6 2 .7 6 2 .4 0 2 .4 7 2 .4 6 2 .6 2 2 .6 8 -

3 .6 2
3 .7 2
4 .9 1
4 .6 4
3 .9 6
4 .5 0
3 .7 5
4 . 13
3 .5 1
3 .5 8
3 .9 3
3 .9 8
3 .8 0
3 .7 1
3 .5 6
3 .9 4
3 . 17
3 .7 4
3 .8 5

7
26
26
15
14
17
17
15
15
7
7
9
6
55
51

3 . 59
4 .3 0
4 . 30
3 . 50
3 .4 8
3 . 25
3 .2 5
3 .6 3
3 .6 3
3 .7 4
3 .7 4
2 .6 2
2 .7 9
3 .5 2
3 -5 2
“

3 .9 0
3 .9 0
3 .7 8
3 .2 4
3 .2 4
3 .4 7
3 . 47
3 . 37
3 .4 4

48
55
51
165
154
251
2 10

3 .1 0
3 .8 2
3 .8 6
3 . 14
3 .1 4
2 .9 9
2 .9 4

2 .7 1
3 .5 5
3 .6 4
2 .7 3
2 .7 3
2 .8 7
2 .8 3

2 .3 7 3 .0 7 3 .0 7 2 .5 0 2 .5 0 2 .4 4 2 .4 1 -

3 .8 5
4 .9 3
4 .9 9
3 . 61
3 .5 4
3 .4 4
3 . 37

65
61
51
19

268
59
209
321
271
93
81
12
119

2 .7 3
2 .8 8
2 .6 8
2 .7 4
2 .7 0
2 .5 7
2 .5 1
2 .9 8
3 .6 2

2 .6 3
2 .7 0
2 .5 6
2 . 70
2 .6 2
2 .5 5
2 .5 0
3 . 48

2 .5 0 2 .5 1 2 .5 0 2 .5 0 2 .4 9 2 .3 0 2 .2 5 3 .2 5 -

2 .8 5
3 .3 4
2 .8 1
2 .8 7
2 .8 3
2 .7 1
2 . 60
3 .8 8

82
15
67
76
75

Middle range

Mean

Middle range

Median

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings
Mean

Median

Middle range

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
L A STIN G :— CONTINUED
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS......................
MEN.........................................................................
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE...................................
HEN.........................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING3 ........................
CEMENT LASTING.................................................
MEN.........................................................................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC...................................................
MEN.........................................................................

$ 3 .4 3 - $ 4 .6 3
3 .4 5 4 .6 6
3 .4 5 4 .9 5
3 .4 5 4 .9 5
4 .2 3
3 .0 0 4 .2 3
3 .0 0 -

16
14
-

$ 3 .1 2
3 .0 7
-

$ 3 .1 1
-

3 .4 2 3 .4 3 -

4 .2 4
4 .2 4

20

3 .4 4
~

3 .4 4
-

3 .5 7 3 .5 7 2 .9 9 3 .0 5 3 .0 5 3 .3 3 3 .3 3 3 .0 0 3 .0 0 ~

4 .5 0
4 .5 0
3 .9 6
3 .5 1
3 .5 1
4 .2 0
4 .2 0
-

~

$ 2 .5 8 - ' $ 3 .4 6
2 .7 7 -

3. 95
-

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM F IL L E R S ......................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS.........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS...........................................
MEN.........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE..............................
HEN.........................................................................
INSEAHERS3 .................................................................
LITTLEWAY STITCHERS.........................................
MEN.........................................................................
ROUGHERS......................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS......................................................
MEN.........................................................................
SHANKERS......................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
MEN.........................................................................
SOLE-LEVELERS, MACHINE.................................

-

3 .9 7
3 .9 7

-

14
-

2 .9 4
-

30
”

2 .8 3
“

-

9

3 .2 7

-

-

-

2 .6 1
“

2 .2 8 -

-

3 .3 1
-

F IN IS H IN G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS...................................................
EDGE SETTERS............................................................
MEN.........................................................................
REPAIRERS....................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
T R E E R S ..........................................................................
WOMEN..................................................................

2 -6 7
2 .6 6
3 .0 1
2 .6 6

2 .5 3
2 .5 3
2 .9 9
2 .4 3

2 .3 2 2 .3 1 2 .4 3 2 .2 7 -

2 .7 9
2 .7 9
3 .2 C
2 .8 1

11
-

2 .9 1
-

2 .5 5
2 .3 4
2 .5 9
2 .4 5
2 .4 5
2 .4 1
2 .4 0
-

2 .4 2
2 .3 0
2 . 44
2 .5 0
2 .5 0
2 -5 0
2 .4 5
~

2 .2 5 2 .1 0 2 .2 5 2 .2 2 2 .2 2 2 .2 0 2 .1 8 “

2 .8 1
2 .5 1
2 .8 8
2 .5 5
2 .5 5
2 .5 5
2 .5 5
~

22
16
25
-

2 .7 2
2 .6 8
2 .8 3
2 .5 3
2 .5 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS.........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS)...................................
WOMEN....................................................................
JAN ITORS.......................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE3 ..............................
See footnotes at end of table.

44

40
-

7
7

-

-

2 .6 1
2 .6 3
2 .7 0
■

2 .6 0 2 .6 0 2 .4 5 -

2 .7 5
2 .7 5
2 .8 9
-




Table 17. Occupational earnings: Men’s cement-process shoes-all
establishments—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

Southeast
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Great Lakes

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

34
9
25
22
18

$2.79
2.62
2.85
2.93
2.99

$2.62
2.62
2.82
2.96

$ 2 .4 5 - $2.97
—
3.05
2 .433.17
2.462 .433.34

136
90
46
107
44

3.38
3.45
3. 24
3.17
3.25

3 . 11
3.09
3 . 11
2-97
3.06

2.832.862.722.802.71-

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Middle range

Median

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, LI NING , MACHINE...........................
MEN.........................................................................
HOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER...................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHCE,
MACHINE4 ...................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER...................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

$3.13- $4 .^ 0
3.89
3.103.1 0 4.20
3.89
2.99-

60
48
48
40

$3.83
3.58
3.88
3.58

$ 3 . 52
3.5 0
3.54
3.51

3.81
3.72
3.81
3.56
3.81

172
123
130
103

3. 93
3.66
4.00
3.69

3.61
3.5 5
3 . 64
3.5 5

3.2 3 3 .193.213 .1 7 -

4.29
3.90
4.49
4.10

2.92

2.74

2 .27-

3.31

FITT ING :
FANCY STITCHERS5 ................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, CR FIT TE R S,
UPPER, HAND5 .........................................................
SKIVERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
LIN IN G S......................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
VAMPERS.........................................................................
HOMEN...................................................................

272

2.72

2.62

2 .44-

2.9 8

120

111

2.42

2.35

2. 10-

2 . 47

-

60
59
77
77

2.73
2.73
3.04
3.0 4

2.54
2.53
2.93
2.93

2 .342 .3 4 2 .482.48-

3.05
3.06
3 . 51
3.51

101
99
165
165

30
15

2.72
2.62

2.57
2.39

2 .202 . 10-

2.83
2.73

-

-

-

-

-

14

3.51

-

-

-

3.29
3.26
3.08
3.08

3.14
3.11
2.78
2-78

2 .522.522.4 4 2 .4 4 -

3.73
3.68
3.59
3.59

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE...
HEN.........................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS:
WOMEN...................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS:4
MEN.........................................................................
TOE TO BALL3 ......................................................
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE...................................
MEN.........................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING?.........................
CEMENT LASTING.................................................
MEN.........................................................................

-

-

-

-

-

35
30
37
37
28
28

2.99
3.11
3 . 20
3.20
3.07
3.0 7

2.78
2.85
3 . 17
3.17
3. 15
3 . 15

2 .572.6 2 2 .832.832 .832 .83-

3.58
3.60
3.47
3.47
3.27
3.2 7

29
29
11
“

4.03
4.03
3.70
•

4.07
4.07
“

3 .383.38-

4.30
4.30
“

32
24
8
30
18

3.18
3.32

3.31
3.45
-

2 .722.82-

26
26
29
14
22

5.01
5.01
3.73
4.64
3.68

4 . 84
4.8 4
3 .52
3 . 51
-

4 .504.502 .682.8 1 -

5.39
5 .39
4.65

' 60
43
“

2.71
2.77
“

6
45
10

3. 27
3.58
3-49

3 . 42
~

2.92”

3.98
“

17
14

3.62
3.74

3.43
-

3 . 0 5-

4.41

27
~

4.53
~

4.99
~

3.4 8 -

5.33
“

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
EDGE TRIMMERS.........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE..............................
MEN.........................................................................
ROUGHERS......................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
SHANKERS:
WOMEN...................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
HEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

-

2.59
3.66
4.04

3.60
3 . 92

3.183.54-

3.63
3.69
3.96
4.31

2.63
2.63

2.5 2 2.53-

2.95
2.99
“

-

-

-

-

-

4.06
-

FI NIS HIN G:
BOTTOM SCOURERS...................................................
MEN.........................................................................
EDGE SETTERS:
MEN........................................................................
TREERS............................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

95
91

2.87
2.89

2.85
2.85

2 .482 .48-

3.13
3.13




Table 17. Occupational earnings: Men’s cement-process shoes-all
establishments—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Southeast
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
worker

Great Lakes

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

$2.60
2.61
2.65

$2.51
2. 51
2.56
2.56
2.39
2.39

Number

Middle range

worker

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE3 ..............................

68
66
43
”
43
17
17
“

~

2.65
2.46
2.46
~

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and fo r work on weekends,
holidays, and late shifts. See appendix A for methods used to compute
means, medians, and middle range of rates. Means and middle ranges are not
provided fo r jobs w ith fewer than 15 workers in a region..

$2.512 .512 .482.4 8 2.312 .31-

$2 . 56
2.56
2.62
2.62
2.39
2.39

_
139
24
115
22
14
48

_

_

$2.90
3.01
2.88
2.93
2. 78
3.95

$2.83
2.87
2.75
2.90

$2.672 .8 4 2.622.56-

$3.16
3.2 4
3 . 13
3 . 25

3.88

4.40

_

00
1

INSPECTORS (CRCWNERS)...................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN................... ..
JANITORS. ........................................... ..

•c?

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS........................................................

3 A ll or virtually all workers were men.
4 Includes data for classifications in addition to those shown
separately.
5 A ll or virtually all workers were women.




Table 18. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-all
establishments
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

New England

Hourly earnings2

Middle Atlantic

Hourly earnings2

Number
of
workers

Mean

Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

354
217
137
156
83
73
116
88
28
82
46
36

$3.37
3.65
2.94
3.05
3.44
2.61
3.53
3.59
3.33
3.76
4 . 11
3.32

$3.09
3.32
2.70
2.85
3 . 16
2.55
3.24
3.35
3.04
3.38
3.72
2.93

$ 2 .5 5 - $3.99
2.854.38
2.333- 30
2.453.39
2 .784.02
2 . 16 2.85
2.704 . 15
2 .834.20
2 .5 0 4.01
2.754.71
3.135.21
2 .534.08

62
56
6
7
44
41
11
11
-

$4.26
4. 33
3.63
3.97
4.04
4.06
5.34
5.34
-

$ 4 . 10
4.32
4 . 00
3.99
-

96
64
32

3.64
3.93
3.08

3.66
4.02
2.70

2 . 7 23.302 .41-

4.38
4.53
3.65

-

-

-

934
438
4 96
5 35
184
351
106
86
20
2 93
168
125

3.57
4.0 5
3. 14
3.42
3.81
3.21
4.05
4.29
3.04
3.65
4. 19
2.93

3.43
3 . 99
3.04
3.32
3.76
3 . 19
3.90
4.01
2.65
3.60
4. 19
2.72

2.7 7 3 .392.4 9 2.733 . 182 .613 .2 0 3 .4 0 2.382.733.572.3 1 -

4.21
4.76
3.63
4.04
4 . 44
3.69
5.01
5 . 14
3.60
4.36
4.78
3.33

201
178
23
84
68
16
64
57
7
53
53
“

4.38
4.41
4.12
3 . 92
3. 86
4.18
4.64
4.72
3. 99
4.78
4.78

4.26
4.2 8
4.02
3.86
3.81
4.22
4.80
4.82
4.62
4.62

3 .6 6 3 .6 6 3 .653.423 .3 6 3 .6 7 3.853 .8 5 4 .1 4 4.1 4-

1,841
142
1, 699

2.95
3.6 3
2.89

2.75
3. 50
2.69

2.313 .052 .27-

3.40
3.89
3.31

445
4 37

3.26
3 . 25

3.17
3 . 16

1,443
75
1,368

2.62
2.36
2.64

2. 43
2 . 17
2.45

2. 172 .102. 19-

2.93
2.50
2.93

2 12
2 02

2.70
2.70

2.52
2 . 52

45
12
33

3.14
3.69
2.94

3.03
2.75

2.442.3 0 -

3.78
3.27

-

349
21
3 28

2.7 9
3.40
2.75

2 . 64
3.24
2.61

2.3 0 2 .7 0 2.2 8 -

3.18
3.60
3 . 11

58
53

2.88
2.84

2.7 4
2 . 65

2.2 7 2.21-

3.30
3.21

58
54

2.93
2.83

2.79
2.60

2.4 0 2.40-

3.20
3.19

59

2.95
4.3 0
2.76
2.9 1
3.67
2.86
2.90
2.85

2.75
2.68
2.81
3 . 53
2.74
2.82
2.75

2.3 1 2. 282.333.202 .292.3 6 2 .35-

3.39
3 . 12
3 . 30
3.95
3.24
3.29
3.21

2 55
8
247
89
-

3.10
3.53
3.09
3.04
3.04

3 .00
3.00
3 . 00
3.00

2 .6 3 2 .6 22.702 .70-

3.49
3 . 46
3.28
3.28

32
32
196
36
160
97
8
89

2.90
2.9 0
3.16
3.86
3.01
3.13
3.77
3.07

2.7 5
2.75
3 . 12
3.67
3.04
2.95
2.95

2 .632 .632.6 6 3 .382.602 .512.4 5 -

3.21
3.21
3.55
4.07
3.38
3.53
3.44

Mean

Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range2

77
58
19
21
19
40
28
12
16
11
-

$3.39
3.43
3.28
3.42
3.45
3.39
3.35
3.49
3.35
3.58
-

$3.22
3.24
2.91
2.89
2.78
3.4 0
3.40
3.27
-

$ 2 .6 5 - $3.9 9
2.713.99
2 .543.96
2.7 0 4.59
2.6 0 4 . 59
2 .6 2 4.00
2.6 2 3.99
2.9 6 3.6 7
-

41
37
-

3.44
3.56
-

3.33
3.58
-

2.703 .0 5 -

4.02
4.22
-

5.0 8
5.11
4.5 6
4.29
4.26
4.6 6
5.36
5.3 7
5.47
5.47
-

147
75
72
72
29
43
30
25
45
21
24

3.51
3.63
3.38
3.77
3.59
3.89
3.36
3.46
3.19
3.88
2.58

3.46
3.6 2
3.35
3.77
3.56
3.8 7
3.20
3.20
3.11
3.91
2.25

2.8 6 3 .1 1 2 .483 .202.8 0 3.322.933. 1 7 2 .253. 4 7 2.25-

4.07
4.0 7
3.9 4
4.48
4.43
4.60
3.8 6
4.00
3.80
4.36
3 .05

2 .642.64-

3.72
3.72

378
41
337

2.97
3.65
2.88

2.81
3.6 8
2.73

2 .363 .302 .33-

3.42
3.80
3.3 5

2 .142. 1 3 -

3.0 4
3.06

248
24 4

2.89
2.88

2.72
2.71

2.4 0 2.40-

3.25
3.23

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE...........................
HEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
LEATHER...................................................................
HEN.........................................................................
NOHEN....................................................................
SYNTHETICS...........................................................
HEN.........................................................................
NOHEN...................................................................
LEATHER AND SINTBETICS............................
HEN.........................................................................
NOHEN...................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHCE,
HAND..............................................................................
HEN.........................................................................
NOHEN...................................................................
CUTTERS, VAHP AND NBCLE SHCE,
HACHINE......................................................................
HEN.........................................................................
HOHEN...................................................................
LEATHER....................................................................
HEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SYNTHETICS...........................................................
HEN.........................................................................
HOHEN...................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS...........................
HEN.........................................................................
NOHEN...................................................................

$3.31- $5.04
3. 3 4 5.10
3 .0 6 4.67
3.0 6 4.66
-

-

FITTING:
FANCY STITCHERS...................................................
HEN.........................................................................
NOHEN...................................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR FIT TE R S,
UPPER, HAND...........................................................
HEN.........................................................................
NOHEN...................................................................
PLATFORH-COVER STITCHERS
(SLIP -LAS TE D SHOES)......................................
HEN.........................................................................
NOHEN...................................................................
SKIVERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L IN IN G S ......................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SOCK-LINING STITCHERS
( SL IP -L AST ED SHOES)......................................
HEN.........................................................................
HOHEN...................................................................
TOP STITCHERS........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
HOHEN...................................................................
VAHPERS.........................................................................
HEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

7

52
1,066
66
1, 000
457
399

89

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-




Table 18. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-all
establishments— Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations. United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

Number
of
workers

Middle Atlantic

New England

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Hourly earnings2

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Mean

Median

$3.18
3.30
3.00
4.00
4.24
2.89
3.09
3.22
2.73

$3.16
3.27
2.81
4. 04
4.22
2.76
2.95
3.00
2.67

$2.502.6 6 2.343. 003 .522.582 .322.5 0 2.10-

$3.62
3 . 69
3 . 56
4.73
4.89
2.99
3.62
3.82
3 . 11

38
29
39
39
24
23
-

$3.51
3.56
4.62
4. 62
3.36
3.31
-

$3 . 38
3 . 41
4.42
4 . 42
3.23
3.22
-

3.36
3.68

3 . 10
-

2 .66-

4.42
-

-

-

-

3.78
3.87
3.03
3.77
3.8 6
3.03
3.62
3.72
3.82
3 .1 4
3.74
3.74
3.7 3
3.6 9
3.92
2.82

3 . 67
3.85
2.89
3.65
3.85
2 . 89
3.49
3.66
3.74
3.00
3.71
3.71
3 . 69
3.58
3.75
2.63

3.003.132.7 6 3.003 . 132 .762 .842.9 0 3 .012 .323 .0 5 3.013 . 192 .763 .012.2 0 -

4.36
4.46
3.60
4.33
4 . 42
3.60
4.27
4 . 39
4 . 50
3.78
4.41
4 . 41
4 . 41
4.37
4.64
3 . 23

46
45
46
45
-

3.51
3.43
3.93

3 . 40
3.33
-

2.7 5 2 .79“

4.05
3.92
*

70

2 .8 8

12

3.21
2.81
3.28
3.34
3.12
2.98
3.19
3. 15
3.27
2.62
3.08
3.45
2.97
3.47
3.34
3.53
3.06
3.36
3.60
2.69

2.63
2.59
3.10
3.33
2 . 86
3.02
3.37
3 . 10
3. 19
2.58

2 .352.342.452.492.382 .1 0 2.502. 5 9 2 .872 . 14-

3. 46
3.42
3 . 88
3 . 98
3.81
3.50
3.59
3 . 55
3.71

Middle range

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Middle range

Median

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE...
MEN..........................................................................
NOMEN....................................................................
BED-MACHINE OPERATORS....................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS..............................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
PLATFORM-COVER LASTERS
(SLIP-L AST ED SHOES)......................................
MEN..........................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-KACHINE
OPERATORS.................................................................
MEN............................ .............................................
WOMEN....................................................................
TOE TO BALL.........................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS3 ................
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE...................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING...........................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
CEMENT LASTING.................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................

211

128
83
112

92
20

155
112

43
17
12

160
143
17
158
141
17
82
593
5 05
88

318
287
31
275
218
57
88

74
14

-

22

168
165
85
84
83
81
10
10

“

4.13
4 . 14
4 . 13
4.14
3 . 50
4.13
4.14
3.70
3.70
4.56
4.60
-

4 . 14
4.15
4 . 14
4.15
3 . 49
3.95
3.96
3 . 68
3.67
4.53
4. 57
-

3.83
3.83
“

~

3.00
2.89
3.20
3.36
3.26
3.33
-

_
$ 3 .05
3.10
3.52
3.53
-

$3.123.2 6 3.913.912.842 .8 43.633.593.633.593. 1 8 3 .4 2 3 .4 3 2. 962.9 6 3 .863.86“

$3.80
3.70
5.32
5.32
3.87
3.86
4.74
4.76
4.74
4.7 6
3.99
4.76
4.7 6
4.04
4.05
5.30
5.41
~

6

$3.22
3.40
2.93
3.74
3.08
3.10
2.93

$3.21
3.26
2.82
2.96
2.96
-

6

3.38

-

45
28
17
12

52
46

-

$2.50- $3.53
4.23
2. 603.37
2 .35~
~
2 .503.60
3-61
2. 4 6 -

~

~
“

19
16
85
54
31
35
23
50
31
19

3.41
3.50
3.41
3.50
4.02
3.58
3.66
3.43
3.62
3.46
3.55
3.81
3.12

3.3 6
3.3 8
3.36
3.38
3.68
3.33
3.33
3.37
3.71
3.68
3.23
3.33
2.93

2.953. 1 5 2. 953.1 5 3.482. 902 .902.873.092.332.852.922.50-

3.62
3.74
3.6 2
3.7 4
4.51
4.15
4.28
3.9 6
4.42
4.28
4.01
4.40
3.77

37
31
“

3.94
3.69
"

3.75
3.67
~

3.263 .20-

4.50
4.16

26
17
26
23
45
37

2.80
2.58
3. 44
3.51
3.28
3.36

8

2 .8 8

2.63
2.59
3 . 41
3.41
3 . 18
3.35
-

2 .452 .342.6 7 2.762.913. 1 0 -

21

19
21

”

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM F I L L E R S ......................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS..........................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS............................................
MEN.........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE..............................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
HEEL-SEAT SI T T E R S , MACHINE......................
MEN..........................................................................
INSEAMERS....................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
ROUGHERS.......................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS.......................................................
HEN..........................................................................
W MEN....................................................................
O
See footnotes at end of table.

58
129
92
37
55
35
165
135
30
12
6
11

7
182
110

72
75
55

20

-

3 . 20
3.38
2 . 80
3.38
3.74
2.62

-

2 .572.812 . 182 .702.992.25-

2 .8 8
-

3 . 90
3.98
3.61
3.94
4. 23
2.78

13
11

13
10

39
34
-

37
32
11
11

“

-

3 . 97
4.09
4 . 26
4 . 26
“

$ 2.87- $3.50
2 .903.5 2
3.154.80
5.12
3 . 13~

-

42
32
10

26
24
~

-

3.39
3.56
2.81
3.35
3.46
“

-

3.46
3.52
3 .38
3.38
-

-

2.3 7 3. 2 6 2. 903.0 2 ~

3.07
2.63
4.15
4 . 19
3.69
3.72
-

4.00
4.0 3
3.79
3.80




Table 18. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-all
establishments—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Hourly earnings2

Number
workers

Mean

Median

149
82
67
545
321
224
16
14

$2.84
3.07
2.56
3.27
3.66
2.73

$2.60
2.76
2.41
3 . 10
3.62
2.56
2 . 98
-

Middle Atlantic

New England

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Middle range

Hourly earnings2

Number
of
workers

Mean

34
25
9
157
127
30
-

$3.11
3. 12
3. 08
3.94
4 . 17
2.98
-

Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Middle range

Median

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING: — CONTINUED
SHANKERS...........................................................
WEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
MEN...................................................... .................
WOMEN..................................................................
SOLE-LEVELERS, MACHINE-............................
MEN...................................................... .................

2 .8 6

2.81

$2.262 .462.2C 2 .482 .922.152.6 2 -

$3.20
3.47
2.87
3.93
4.20
3.06
3.20

-

$3.01
2 . 91
3.95
4.13
2 . 67
-

$2.32- $ 3 .4 8
3.70
2.253.0 5 4.70
3.464.85
2.463.14
-

38
16
22

140
79
61
-

-

$2.75
3.27
2.38
3.19
3.37
2.97
-

$2.49
3.36
2.38
3 . 16
3.48
2 . 86
-

$2.302.502.2 2 2.612.872 .26-

3.35
3.37
-r
4.01
4.01
2.85
3.82
2.97
2.95

_
2.47
4.07
2.46
2.80
2.80

_
2-353 .602.332.5 3 2. 5 3 -

_
3.27
4.40
3.00
3.45
3 . 44

2.52
2.53
2.52
2.53
2. 58
2.52
2.35
4.43

2 . 50
2.40
2.50
2 . 38
2.37
2.30
4.75

2.302.2 5 2.302. 2 5 2.2 4 -

2.65
2.64
2.65
2. 64
2.61
2.43
5.00

-

$2.97
3.47
2-46
3.67
3.77
3.31
-

-

-

FI N I S H I N G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS...................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
EDGE SETTERS...........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
REPAIRERS...................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
TREERS...........................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

-

17
21

19
6 00
31
569
480
69
411

_
-

_
-

_
-

2.602.4 7 3.142 .252 .982 .252 .45-

_
-

3.06
3.78
3.92
2.87
3.6 2
2.83
3.15
3.74
3.05

2.81
3.67
3.67
2 . 55
3.70
2.51
2.96
3 . 59
2.85

2 .3 8 -

3.22
4.66
4.72
3.30
4 . 17
3 . 16
3 . 55
4.39
3.49

2.51
2.50
2.51
2.67
2.94
2.61
2.36
3. 76

2.46
2.30
2. 50
2 . 54
2.94
2.49
2.26
3. 57

2.252 . 202 . 262.2 5 2 . 382 . 252 . 103.15-

2.69
2.65
2 . 69
2.93
3.20
2 . £1
2 . 50
4 . 12

2 .8 8 -

_
174
169
62
35
27

_
2.54
2. 53
3.52
4.04
2.84

2.41
2 . 41
3.28
3.93
2.71

190

2.60
2.70
2.52
2.50
2. 63
2.46
2 . 36
4,00

2 . 50
2 . 50
2.42
2.37
2 . 63
2.36
2.25
4.22

_
-

_
-

2.1 5 2. 1 5 2.7 1 3.3 0 2.4 5 -

2 .6 8

2.252.30-

2.85
3 . 00
2.81

-

2 .6 8

4.09
4.55
3 . 16

8
6

7
7

135
20

115
63
62

2 .6 8

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR W O R K E R S . . . . .............................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN................................... ...............................
INSPECTORS (CRCWNERS)...................................
M E N . . ........... .......................................... . . . .
WOMEN. . . . ................................... ..
JANITOR S 3 ............................................ . . . . ______. . .
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE3 ....................................
See footnotes at end of table.

701
213
488
563

95
463
185
164

86

104
94
18
76
44
22

2 .2 5 -

2.252.262.2 52.1 0 S„ 2 9-

2 .6 6

185
45
140
95

2.87
2.47
2,46
4.43

84
39
26

11

2 .2 3 -

3. 6 6 -




Table 18. Occupational-earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-all
establishments—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

Border States
Department, occupation, and sex

Southwest

Southeast

Number
of
workers

Mean

33
25
23
19
-

$ 3 .3 1
2 .9 6
2 .6 7
2 .5 3
-

$ 2 .7 1
2 .5 5
2 .5 5
2 .5 4
-

124
109
61

3 .0 2
3 .0 1
3 .3 7

2 . 90
2 .8 3
3 .4 3

2 .5 1 2 .4 7 2 .9 5 -

194
194

2 .6 9
2 .6 9

2 .5 6
2 .5 6

2 .1 5 2 .1 5 -

Hourly earnings2
Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Middle range

Median

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE...........................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
LEATHER....................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
SYNTHETICS............................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE.......................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
LEATHER....................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................

_
-

_
-

_
-

3 .4 3
3 .5 0
3 .7 7

63
30
33
36

$ 3 .0 3
3 .5 1
2 .6 0
2 .8 1

$ 2 .7 9
3 .3 8
2 .5 3
2 .5 4
“

3 .0 0
3 .0 0

163
159

2 .7 1
2 .7 1

2 .5 6
2 . 56

2 .3 7 2 .3 6 -

115
113

2 .5 9
2 .6 0

2 .4 3
2 .4 7

2 . 94
2 .9 4
2 .6 0
2 .7 8
-

2 .4 3
2 .4 9
-

$ 2 .2 9 - $ 4 .4 6
2 .2 9 3 .0 0
2 .2 6 3 .0 0
2 .2 5 2 .6 7
-

~

-

_
-

31
7
24
19
18
11

$ 2 .8 1
3 .6 5
2 .5 7
2 .5 4
2 .5 1
3 .0 4

$ 2 .7 0
2 .4 7
2 .4 6
2 .3 4
-

125
25
100
101

3 .0 5
4 .3 9
2 .7 1
2 .9 6
“

2 .7 6
4 .6 1
2 .6 2
2 .6 2
-

2. 253 .7 8 2 .2 0 2 .2 4 -

3 .4 1
5 .1 0
2 .8 6
3 .2 5
-

2 .8 6
2 .8 5

200
197

2 .6 5
2 .6 3

2 .3 7
2 .3 7

2 .1 0 2. 1 0 -

3 .0 2
3 .0 0

2 .2 9 2 .3 0 -

2 .6 9
2 .6 9

136
125

2 .4 9
2 .5 2

2 .2 0
2 .2 0

2. 102 .1 0 -

2 .7 0
2 .7 5

2 .2 0 2 .1 4 “

2 .6 2
3 .3 6

52
52
91
91
69
69

2 .6 4
2 .6 4
2 .6 5
2 .6 5
2 .5 8
2 .5 8

2 .5 2
2 .5 2
2 .5 2
2 .5 2
2 .3 7
2 .3 7

2. 1 0 2. 102 .1 1 2. 112 .1 0 2 .1 0 -

2 .9 0
2 .9 0
3 .0 4
3 .0 4
3 .0 1
3 .0 1

13
8
-

2 .4 3
2 .2 9
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

7
7
47
35
21
21
26
-

3 .6 4
3 .6 4
3 .2 2
3 .6 0
4 .2 7
4 .2 7
2 .3 7
-

2 .7 4
3 .3 6
4 .4 6
4 .4 6
2 .2 7
-

-

-

$ 2 .2 0 - $ 3 .4 5
2 .3 5 4 .3 1
2. 102 .8 3
2. 102 .9 7
“

$ 2 . 1 7 - $ 3 .0 8
2. 112 .8 6
2. 102 .9 2
2 .1 0 2 .8 9
-

F IT T IN G :
FANCY STITCHERS....................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OB F IT T E R S ,
UPPER, HAND............................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
SK IV ER S, MACHINE, UPPERS OB
L IN IN G S .......................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
TOP STITCHERS.........................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
VAMPERS.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................

-

-

-

-

-

59
59
161
161
62
62

2 .6 7
2 .6 7
2 .6 3
2 .6 3
2 .7 6
2 .7 6

2 .6 1
2 .6 1
2 .4 3
2 .4 3
2 .5 9
2 .5 9

2 .3 1 2 .3 1 2 .1 0 2 . 102 .3 4 2 .3 4 -

2 .9 5
2 .9 5
2 .9 4
2 .9 4
3 .2 5
3 .2 5

11
11
52
17
-

29
20
12

2 .7 3
2 .9 5
3 .2 4

2 .3 5
2 .6 7
-

2 .1 0 2 .2 9 -

2 .7 5
3 . 60
-

-

40
38
-

3 . 11
3 .1 1
-

3 .0 9
3 . 11
-

2 .3 8 2 .3 7 -

3 .3 8
3 .3 8
-

30
30
30
30
13
19

LASTING :
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, M AC HINE...
WOMEN....................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS..............................................
MEN..........................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS.................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
TOE TO BALL.........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
SID E LASTERS, MACHINE...................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING...........................
MEN..........................................................................
CEMENT LASTING.................................................
HEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

-

-

“

_

9

10

3 .3 6
3 .3 6
3 .3 6
3 . 36
3 .2 8
2 .9 3
2 .7 8
3. 07

_
3 . 40
3 .4 0
3 .4 0
3 .4 0
2 .8 6
~

2 .8 1 2 .8 1 2 .8 1 2 .8 1 2 .3 0 ~

_
4 .0 9
4 .0 9
4 .0 9
4 . 09
3 .3 2
-

~

~

-

2 .1 9 2 .5 8 4 .1 9 4. 192 .1 0 -

-

4 .2 6
4 .5 1
4 .6 2
4 .6 2
2 .5 8
-




Table 18. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-all
establishments—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

Border States
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Mean

13
7

$ 2 .8 5
2 .6 2

11
11
11
7
20
11
48
-

3 .0 7
2 .9 6
3 .1 1
3 .1 3
2 .7 8
2 .2 3
2 .4 3
-

$ 2 .3 6
2 . 17
-

49
47
61
55

3 .4 9
3 .5 0
2 .9 1
2 .8 1

3 .3 5
3 .3 5
2 .7 6
2 .6 9

57
57
86
76
“

2 .4 5
2 .4 5
2 .4 9
2 .4 3
-

2 .3 4
2 .3 4
2 .3 5
2 .3 5
-

Southwest

Southeast

Hourly earnings2
Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS”
CONTINUED
LA STI NG :— CONTINUED
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC...................................................
MEN.........................................................................

-

-

-

-

~

-

~

-

-

“

"

■

13
11

$ 2 .7 9
2 .8 4

15
9
6
27
24
14
8
62
17
45

2 .9 5
3 .5 2
2 .1 0
2 .9 4
2 .9 7
2 .4 3
2 .4 6
2 .5 9
3 .4 5
2 .2 7

$ 3 . 19
2 .6 1
2 .2 1
-

63
63
40
40

2 .8 7
2 .8 7
4 .0 2
4 .0 2

2 .5 3
2 .5 3
4 .0 1
4 .0 1

2 .3 5 2 .3 5 3 .3 7 3 .3 7 -

_
69
90
76
30
34

2 .2 9
2 .5 0
2 .5 2
2 .2 2
3 .3 9

2 . 10
2 .3 0
2 .3 0
2 .1 0
3 .4 0

2. 1 0 2. 102. 102. 103 .0 5 -

-

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM FI L L E R S......................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS........................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE..............................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
ROUGHERS......................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS......................................................
MEN.........................................................................
SHANKERS......................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
HEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

$ 2 . 1 0 - $ 3 . 14
2 .6 4
2 .1 0 “

14
17
20
12
10
41
22

$ 3 .5 9
2 .6 0
2 .7 2
2 .9 0
2 .8 4
2 .7 9
2. 56

$ 2 . 53
2 .6 9
2 .6 6
2 . 61

2 .4 4 2 .3 8 2 . 172 . 1 5-

4 . 57
4 .6 1
3 .3 6
3 . 30

23
21

3 .3 3
3 .2 6
-

3 .6 3
3 .3 8

2 .2 5 2 .2 5 2 .2 5 2 .2 4 ~

2 .6 3
2 .6 3
2 .7 0
2 .5 2
~

25
22
11

$ 2 .2 0 - $ 2 .8 0
3 .0 6
2. 102 .3 5 3 .1 0
2 .3 5 2 .7 5

-

2 . 18
3 .7 1
2 . 10

$ 2 .1 0 - $ 3 .6 2
3 .9 5
2 .1 0 4 .1 3
2 .1 0 2 .8 1
2 .1 0 3 .8 0
2 .5 7 2 .2 3
2. 1 0 -

FINISHING:
REPAIRERS...................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
TREERS............................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

-

-

2 .8 5 2 .8 5 -

-

3 .6 9
3 .6 9
-

-

3 .1 6
3 .1 6
4 .7 4
4 .7 4

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS........................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS)...................................
WOMEN...................................................................
JA N IT O RS ? ...................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE?..............................
See footnotes at end of table.

2 .6 6
2 .6 4
2 .5 6
■

2 .5 1
2 .5 1
-

2 -5 1 2 .5 1 ~

2 .8 6
2 .7 7
-

-

-

2 .3 4
2 .7 5
2 .7 5
2 .2 4
3 .5 1




Table 18. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-all
establishments—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)
Pacific
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Mean

Median

46
8
38
35
29
-

$2 .7 2
3.31
2 .6 0
2 .5 5
2 .5 4
-

$2 .5 5
2.5 5
2 .5 3
2 .5 3
-

-

-

-

Middle West

Great Lakes

Hourly earnings2
Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

Mean

Median

36
16
17
12

$ 3 .0 5
3 .4 2
3 . 18
3 .3 2

$ 2 . 81
3 .3 2
2 .8 1
-

$ 2 .5 4 2 .7 5 2 .5 8 -

$ 3 .4 5
3 .7 9
3 .5 0
-

50
50
-

$ 3 .5 2
3 .5 2
-

$3 .3 2
3 .3 2
-

$3. 003. 0 0 -

$ 4 . 13
4 . 13
-

SELECTED PBODOCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L I N I N G , MACHINE.............................
MEN................................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
LEATHER..........................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS..............................
WOMEN..........................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE.............................................................................
MEN................................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
LEATHER.........................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS.............................
HEN...............................................................................

$ 2 .2 0 2. 162 .2 3 2 .2 6 -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 2.75
2 .7 3
2 .7 3
2.7 3
-

100
44
56
36
32
62
38

3 .8 2
4 .0 6
3 .6 3
3.5 8
3 .5 0
3 .9 8
4.09

3 .6 9
4. 02
3 .5 7
3 .3 6
3 .3 5
3 .8 8
4 .1 2

3 .2 8 3 .5 1 3 .2 2 3 .2 5 3 .2 0 3 .5 3 3 .5 4 -

4 .3 1
4 .7 0
4 .0 2
3 .8 7
3.71
4 .5 0
4 .6 7

51
41
31
25
~

3.8 0
3 .8 9
3 .8 3
3 .7 7
-

3 .8 8
3 .8 3
3 .9 2
3 .83
“

3. 3 4 3 .4 9 3 .2 6 3. 19-

4 .36
4 .3 7
4 .4 2
4 .59
-

_
-

216
216

2 .8 1
2 .81

2 . 45
2 .4 5

2 .2 0 2 .2 0 -

3 .2 5
3 .2 5

92
86
6

3 .61
3 .6 3
3 .3 5

3 .4 8
3 .4 8
-

3 .0 1 3 .0 2 -

4 .1 0
4 . 10
-

160
158

2.6 0
2 .6 0

2 .3 0

2 .2 0 2 .2 0 -

2 .9 0
2 .9 2

212
46
1 66

2.3 8
2 .3 0
2.4 1

2 .2 0
2 . 13
2 .2 5

2. 102. 10 2 .1 0 -

2 .5 0
2 .44
2 .5 5

13
9

3 .5 2
3.88

26
12
14

2 .92
3 .1 5
2 .7 2

FITTING:
FANCY STI T CH E RS ........................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
PAST ER S, BACKERS, OR F I T TE R S ,
UPPER, HAND.................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
PLATFORM-COVER STITCHERS
( S L I P -L A S T E D S H O E S ) .........................................
MEN................................................................................
S KI V ER S , MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L I N I N G S .............................................................................
MEN................................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................

SOCK-LINING STITCHERS
( SL IP -L AST ED SHOES)......................................
TOP STITCHERS.........................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
VAMPERS.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

44
-

2 .8 7

-

-

-

-

44

2.8 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

152

-

-

-

2 .3 1
2 .7 4
-

2 .7 4

-

2 .3 1 -

2 .3 1 -

-

3 .1 4

3 .1 4

-

2 .9 9

2 .7 3

2 .2 0 -

3 .4 1

-

-

-

-

7

18
18

3 .75
3 .2 5
3 .2 5

21
21

2.5 4
2.5 4

2 .3 0
2 .3 0

2 .1 0 2 .1 0 -

2 .8 6
2 .8 6

152
55
54

2 .9 9
2 .8 2
2 .7 9

2 .7 3
2 .8 3
2 . 83

2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .2 7 -

3 .41
3 .1 5
3 .1 4

-

“

28
18
10

3.4 3
3.3 5
3 .5 7

3 . 22
3 . 18

2 .6 7 2 .6 8 -

3 .9 4
3 .6 4

38
21

3 .2 9
3 .3 7

3 .4 0
3 .2 8

2 .6 4 2 .9 8 -

3 .7 4
3 .9 0

-

-

2 .6 9
-

2 .3 6 -

-

-

-

-

3 .1 5
3 .1 5

2 .9 4 2 .9 4 -

3 .4 3
-

3 .5 9
3 .5 9

-

-

-

-

“

-

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE...
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

-

“

-

-

-

"

“




Table 18. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-all
establishments—Continuea
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations. United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

Pacific
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Mean

Median

$ 3 .1 8
3 .2 2
3 .8 5
“

$ 4 .0 3
-

Middle West

Great Lakes

Hourly earnings1
2
Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Middle range

Median

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
LA STI NG : — CONTINUED
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS..............................................
MEN.........................................................................
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE...................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING..............................
MEN...............................................................................

13
9
60
“

_

“

_

$ 3 .2 4 ~

_

$4 .6 3
-

12
8
68
64

$ 3 .2 6
3 .2 7
3 .9 5
3.99

_

$ 3 .7 7
3 . 77
-

_

_
-

$3.2 7 3 .3 0-

$ 4 . 52
4 .5 2
-

3 .4 1 -

4 .6 2

6
6

$ 3 .8 1
3.8 1

-

-

10
8

3 .0 4
3 . 19

10
10
6

4 .2 2
4.2 2
3 .4 0

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:

EDGE TRIMMERS.............................................................
HEN.........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE..............................
MEN.........................................................................
ROUGHERS......................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SHANKERS......................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

-

13
12
12

10

32
14

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 .8 7
3 .8 9
3.1 5
-

3 .2 0

3 .5 5
3 .6 0

3 .3 7
-

2 .9 8 -

-

-

3.9 6
-

18
9
17
15
21
11
10
18
8

3 .9 0
2 .7 0
2 . 95
3 .3 7

9

4.01
3 .7 0
2.9 0
2 . 96
3 .3 9
2 .9 9
3 .8 2
2.6 8
2 .7 7
3 . 18

52
52
10 0
97

3 .3 2
3 . 32
3 . 13
3 .1 4

2 .8 9
2 . 89
2 .9 3
2 .9 1

2 .5 6 2 .5 6 2 .4 9 2 .4 7 -

37
35
83
17
66
16
31

2.71
2.70
3 .0 2
3 .5 0
2.9 0
2.66
3 .6 8

2 . 69
2 .6 9
2 .8 1
3 .1 4
2. 76
2 .7 4
3 .7 0

2-502 .5 0 2 .6 9 2 .9 4 2 .6 3 2 .5 0 3 .5 0 -

-

-

2 .3 22 .4 5 2 .9 2 -

-

3 .3 1
3 .3 1
3 .8 4

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .6 1

2 .3 5 -

2 .8 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
9
-

-

3.2 9
3.2 9
_
_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
10
-

3 .5 9
3.6 9
-

-

3 .6 9
3 .6 9
3 .6 1
3 .7 0

52
50

2 .4 9
2 .4 4

$2 .4 6
2 .4 6

2 .8 7
2 .86
3 .1 9
4 .2 2
2 .8 8
2 .8 0
3 .9 3

_

FINISHING:
REPAIRERS...................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
TREERS............................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

_

83
68

-

3 .2 6
3 . 10

_

3 . 13
2 .9 3

_

-

2 .3 5 2 .2 6 -

3 .9 4
3 .7 0

$ 2 .2 5 2. 2 5 -

$2.6 0
2 .56

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS.........................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS)...................................
HEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
j a n i t o r s ! ...................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE!..............................

_

-

-

11
8

_

-

-

-

2 .4 3
3 .7 2

-

-

~

_

~

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. See
appendix A fo r methods used to compute means, medians, and middle ranges of earnings. Means and

2

-

“

-

8
-

6

2 .7 2
-

-

4.8 8

-

-

middle ranges are not provided for jobs w ith fewer than 15 workers in a region.
3 A ll or virtually all workers were men.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.

-

-




Table 19. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted)
shoes-by size of community
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

U i e Sae 2
n t d tt s
D p r m n ,o c p t o ,a ds x
e a t e t cuain n e

Nnerpltn
omtooia
Mtooia
erpltn
aes
ra
aes
ra
vrg
vrg
Number A e a e Number A e a e
hul
ory
hul
ory
o
f
o
f
w r e s erig w r e s erig
o k r anns o k r anns

M d l Al n i
i d e tatc
New E g a d
nln
Nnerpltn
omtooia
Mtooia
erpltn
Mtooia
erpltn
Nnerpltn
omtooia
ae s
ra
aes
ra
ae s
ra
ae s
ra
vrg
vag
Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e r e Number A e a e
vrg
vrg
ory
hul
ory
o
f hul
o
f
hul
ory
hul
ory
o
f
o
f
w r e s erig w r e s erig w r e s erig w r e s erig
o k r anns o k r anns o k r anns o k r anns

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L I N I N G , MACHINE.............................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
LEATHER.........................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.......................................................... ............
SYNTHETICS................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS
MEN
WOMEN
CUTTERS, YAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
HAND
MEN
WOMEN.........................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE............................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
LEATHER.........................................................................
MEN........................ .. ...................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
S Y NT H E TI C S ................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
LEATHER AND S Y NTHETI CS ..............................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................

........
......................
.....................
........................
......................

57
48
9
15
15
32
24
10

$ 3 .3 8
3 .2 9
3 .8 5
3 .1 3
3 .1 3
3 .4 8
3 .3 1
3 .4 3

29
27
-

3 .3 4
3 . 43
-

4 .1 6
4 . 16
4 . 15
3 . 90
3 .7 7
4 . 25
4 .1 9
4 .2 9
4 .80
4 .80
-

93
64
29
41
28
15
~

3 .5 4
3 .6 5
3 .2 9
3 .8 7
3 .6 2

148
148

2 .9 5
2 .9 5

254
29
225

86
86

2 .5 0
2 . 50

171
167

24
20

$ 4.25
4 .4 8

4 .1 2
4 .0 8
-

17
16
-

3 .9 1
4 . 01
-

20
10
10
-

$ 3.42
4 .0 6
2.7 7
-

8
-

3.0 3
-

$ 3 .5 8
3 .6 0
3.4 1
3 .4 0
3 .4 9
2 .6 8
3 .7 6
3 .6 9
4 .0 5
3.5 9
3 .6 7

-

18 9
74
115
86
21
65
52
36
16
51
17
34

$ 3 .2 0
3 .7 3
2 .8 5
2.7 7
3 . 29
2 .6 0
3 .2 5
3 .4 5
2 .8 0
3.8 7
4 .8 6
3 .3 7

50
48
-

3 .7 8
3 .8 5
-

46
16
30

3 .4 9
4 .1 4
3 .1 5

-

279
219
60
127
92
35
72
62
10
80
65
-

4.01
4 .1 7
3 .4 5
3 .8 7
3 .83
3 .9 6
4 .2 5
4 .3 9
3 .3 8
4-03
4 .4 3
-

655
219
436
408
92
316
34
24
10
213
103
110

3 .3 7
3 .9 4
3 .0 9
3 . 28
3 .8 0
3 .1 3
3 .6 4
4 .0 3
2 .7 0
3 .5 1
4 .0 4
3 .0 1

10 4
99
29
28
43
39
32
32
-

4 .5 8
4.6 1
3 .9 7
3 .9 9
4 .8 6
4 .9 2
4 .77
4 .7 7

97
79
18
55
40
15
21
18
21
21
“

685
127
558

3 .2 8
3.6 1
3 . 21

1,1 5 6
1 ,1 4 1

2 .7 5
2 .7 4

297
289

3 .41
3 .4 0

570
60
510

2 .7 0
2.4 1
2 .7 4

873
858

2-57
2 .58

126
116

2 .83
2 .8 6

22
11
11

3 .3 9
3.8 1
2 .97

23
22

2 .8 9
2 .9 2

-

96
21
75

2 .9 8
3 .4 0
2 .8 7

253
253

2 .7 2

21

2 .7 2

16

3 . 13
3 .07

37
37

2 .7 4
2 .7 4

36
32

2 .9 5
2 .7 9

22
22

2.9 0
2.9 0

29
7
22
343
63
280
184

3.3 1
4 .30
2 .9 9
3.2 9
3 .6 8
3 .2 0
3 .1 8

30
30
723
720
273

3 .1 4

273

133
7
1 26
39
39

3 .1 9
3.6 7
3 . 16
3 .2 8
3 .2 8

122
121
50

126

2 .6 0
2 .6 0
2 .7 3
2 .7 3
2 .7 1
2 .7 1

3 .0 1
3 . 01
2 .8 5
2 .8 5

18
18
151
34
117
85
8
77

2 .7 9
2 .7 9
3 .2 6
3 .8 6
3 .0 9
3 . 13
3 .7 7
3 .0 6

14
14
45
43
12
12

3 .0 3
3.0 3
2 .8 2
2 .7 7
3 .11
3.11

-

38
36

$ 4 .27
4 .2 5

165
143
22
70
62
8
64
52
12
31
29

-

-

-

27
25
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

54
11
43
31
50
“

3 .4 5
3 . 47
3 .4 4
3.65
3.67
“

2 .9 8
3 .6 2
2 .9 0

124
112

2.9 4
2.86

3 .01
3 .01

77
77

2 .6 2
2 .6 2

-

-

3 .9 4

F IT TIN G:
FANCY S T I T C H E R S .......................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
P A S T E R S , BACKERS, OR F I T T E R S ,
U P P ER , HAND................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
PLATFORM-COVER STITCHERS
( S L I P - L A S T E D S H O E S ) .........................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
S K I V E R S , MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L I N I N G S ............................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
S O C K- L I N IN G STITCHERS
( S L I P - L A S T E D S H O E S ) .........................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
TOP S TI T C H E RS .............................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
VAMPERS...............................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.50

-

-

-

-

-




Table 19. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted)
shoes-by size of community—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

U i e Sae2
n t d tts
D p r m n ,o c p t o ,a ds x
e a t e t cuain n e

M d l Al n i
i d e tatc

New E g a d
nln

omtooia
Mtooia
erpltn
Nonm t o o i a
erpltn
Mtooia
erpltn N n e r p l t n
omtooia
Mtooia
erpltn N n e r p l t n
aes
ra
ae s
ra
ae s
ra
ae s
ra
ae s
ra
ae s
ra
vrg
Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e
vrg
vrg
vrg
vrg
vrg
hul
ory
ory
o
f
hul
ory
o
f
o
f
hul
ory
ory
o
f hul
o
f
hul
ory
o
f hul
w r e s e r i g w r e s eri g w r e s er i g w r e s e r i g w r e s eri g w r e s e r i g
o k r a n n s o k r an n s o k r an n s o k r a n n s o k r an n s o k r a n n s

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
LASTING :
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, M A C H I N E .. .
HEN...............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
BED-MACHINE OPERATORS......................................
HEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS..................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
PLATFORM-COVER LASTERS
(S L I P- L A ST E D S H O E S) .........................................
MEN..............................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS......................................................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
TOE TO BALL.............................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................... .. ..........................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS?.....................
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE......................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING..............................
MEN.............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
CEMENT LASTING....................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC.......................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................

70
44
26
50
50
57
55
-

$ 3.47
3 .6 7
3 .1 4
4 .5 0
4 .5 0
3 .3 8
3 .3 7
-

141
84
57
62
42
20
98
57
41

$ 3 .0 3
3 . 10
2 .9 3
3 .5 9
3 .9 3
2 .8 9
2 .9 2
3 .0 8
2 .6 9

21
13
39
39
13
12
-

$3 .6 9
3.8 9
4 .6 2
4 .6 2
3 .5 9
3 .5 0
-

17
16
11
11
-

$3.27
3 . 29
3 . 09
3 .0 9
-

9
9

4 .0 4
4 .0 4

8
-

2 .5 8
-

-

-

-

-

47
46
45
44
22
267
237
30
88
73
15
17 9
164
15

3 .8 9
3 .9 0
3 .8 6
3 .8 6
4 .3 7
3 .9 6
4.0 2
3 .5 1
3.7 1
3 .7 3
3 .6 3
4 .0 8
4 . 15
3 .3 9

11 3
97
16
11 3
97
16
60
326
268
58
230
214
16
96
54
42

3 .7 3
3 .8 6
2-99
3 .7 3
3 .8 6
2 .9 9
3 .3 5
3 .5 2
3 .6 4
2 .9 5
3 .7 5
3 .7 4
3 .8 2
2 .9 6
3 .2 3
2 .6 1

22
21
22
21
6
119
117
45
45
74
72
-

45
39
-

3 .7 8
3 .5 6
-

43
35
8

3 . 23
3 .2 9
2.9 7

-

42
12
30
59
54
63
58
-

2 .8 5
3.2 1
2.7 1
3 .5 9
3 .6 5
3 .3 9
3 .4 3
~

2 .9 1

13

28
70
38
32
39
19
102

4 . 14
4.1 6
4 . 14
4 . 16
3 .7 8
4 .3 1
4 .3 3
3 .7 5
3 .7 5
4 .6 5
4.6 9
-

24
24
24
24
16
49
48
40
39
9
9

-

33
18
15
35
34
-

$ 3 . 10
3 .2 4
2 .94
3 .1 8
3 .20
-

12
10
17
12
-

$ 3 .5 4
3 .6 8
2 .86
2 .8 0
-

-

-

-

17
17
17
17
52
33
23
11
29
22
-

3 .4 5
3 .4 5
3 .4 5
3 .4 5
3 .6 2
3 .4 6
3 .6 7
3 .3 9
3-57
3 .49
-

11
33
21
12
12
12
21
12

-

32
26
-

3 .8 9
3 .58
-

-

-

20

2 .91

4 . 13
4 .1 3
4 . 13
4 .13
3 .3 9
3 .6 7
3 . 67
3 .6 3
3 .6 3
3 .8 5
3 .8 5
-

3.89
3.5 2
3.9 8
2.71
3 .5 3
3.5 3
3.51
2.71
-

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM FIL LER S ..........................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS.............................................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS...............................................
MEN..............................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE................................
MEN..............................................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

28
-

77

25

-

2.9 1
3.0 1
2 .8 9
3 .1 5
2-88
3 . 17
3 .0 0
3 . 15
2 .5 5

-

11
11
9

29
29

3 .0 0
-

2 .8 9
3 .3 7
3 .4 5
3 .43
3 .4 3

_
-

10
~

-

2-77
-

-

11
24
21
21
21

-

2 .66
3 .3 8
3 .44
3 .3 8
3 .3 8

6
-

6
24
16
8

2.41
-

2 .4 1
3 . 19
3 .3 5
2 .8 8




Table 19. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional'
lasted) shoes-by size of community—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings' of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

D p r m n ,o c p t o ,a ds x
e a t e t cuain n e

M d l Alni
i d e tatc
U i e Sae 2
n t d tt s
New E g a d
nln
Nnerpltn
omtooia
Mtooia
erpltn
Mtooia
erpltn
Nonm t o o i a
erpltn
Mtooia
erpltn N n e r p l t n
omtooia
aes
ra
aes
ra
ae s
ra
aes
ra
aes
ra
ae s
ra
vrg
vrg
Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e
vrg
vrg
vrg
vrg
ory
ory
hul
ory
o
f hul
o
f
hul
ory
o
f
hul
ory
o
f
hul
ory
o
f hul
o
f
w r e s eri g w r e s eri g w r e s er i g w r e s er i g w r e s e rig w r e s e rig
o k r ann s o k r an n s o k r an n s o k r an n s o k r a nns o k r a nns

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS"
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND M A K IN G :

—

CONTINUED

HEEL-SEAT SIT TE R S, MACHINE......................
MEN.........................................................................
INSEAMERS ....................
MEN......................
ROUGHERS.....................
MEN......................
WOMEN.....................
ROUGH ROUNDERS.....................................................
MEN......................
WOMEN.....................
SHANKERS.....................
MEN......................
WOMEN....................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

-

-

60 $3.91
58 3.93
-

31
26
52
40
12
231
155
76

-

3.46
3.62
3.12
3.28
2.58
3.62
3.94
2.96

1 $3.08
2
6 3.45
1
1 2.97
7 3.47
122 3.06
52 3.08
70 3.05
44 3.29
29 3.58
1
5 2.71
97 2.69
42 2.87
55 2.55
314 3.02
.
166 3 39
148 2.60

-

-

—
20 $4.63
1
9 4.70
-

2
1
1
7
100
76
24

-

3.31
3.38
4.01
4.33
2.98

-

1
3
8
57
51

■
—
$3. 20
3 18
.
2. 79
2.59
3.82
3.91

-

-

-

—
1
7
13
-

~
—
—
26 $3.68
26 3.68
-

22
20
22
14
102
59
43

-

3.32
3.44
3.04
3.44
3.22
3.46
2.90

~
—
—
1 $2.91
6
6 3.08
10 2.81
~
1
6 2.36
14 2.39
38 3.12
20 3.08
1
8 3.16

FI N I S H I N G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS...................................................
MEN.........................................................................
EDGE SETTERS...........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
REPAIRERS....................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
TREERS............................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

-

-

-

13
13
251
25
226
147
42
105

4.05
4.05
2.77
3 68
.
2 67
.
3.05
3.73
2.78

321
136
185
155
30
125
69
39

2.55
2.55
2.55
2.63
2.75
2.60
2.37
4 29
.

343
3 33
27
306

2.95
2.70
3.34
3.65
2.94
3.37
2.94
3.19
3.74
3 . 14

91
89
45
28
1
7

2.74
3.66
4.26
2.67

80
1
7

380
77
303
408
65
343
116
125

2.47
2.41
2 48
.
2.68
3.03
2.62
2.35
3.59

102
52
50
56
1
6
4
0
28
1
4

2.74
2-82
2.66
2.63
2.60
2.63
2.47
4.26

88
34
54
38
36
1
6

20
7
8
6
349
6

-

-

2.74
-

83
-

7

-

-

-

-

47
-

“
-

2.32
2.31
3. 16
3.19

88
17
71
39
38

2.95
3.79
2.75
3.21
3.18

44

24
24

2.66
2.57
2.58
2.58

2 44
.
2.53
2.39
2.31
2.28
2. 18
3.54

161
41
120
65
-

2. 53
2.55
2.52
2. 50
2.50
2.33
4.13

24
20
30
25
1
3
1
1

2.45
2.48
2.58
2.58
2.38
4.84

“

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS.........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS)...................................
MEN......................
WOMEN.....................
JANITORS 3 .....................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE3 .........
See footnotes at end of table.

8

59

26
15




Table 19. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventionallasted) shoes-by size of community—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings' of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

D p r m n ,o c p t o ,a ds x
e a t e t cuain n e

B r e Sae
o d r tts
Suhet
otws
G e tL k s
ra ae
Mdl Ws
ide et
Pcfc
aii
Nonm t o o i a
e r p l t n N n e r p l t n Nonm t o o i a Nonm t o o i a
omtooia
erpltn
erpltn
Mtooia
erpltn
aes
ra
ae s
ra
ae s
ra
ae s
ra
aes
ra
Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e Number A e a e
vrg
vrg
vrg
vrg
vrg
o
f
hul
ory
o
f
hul
ory
o
f
hul
ory
o
f
hul
ory
o
f
hul
ory
w r e s eri g w r e s eri g w r e s e rig w r e s e rig w r e s eri g
o k r an n s o k r an n s o k r a nns o k r a nns o k r ann s

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, LINING, MACHINE...........................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER...................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
SYNTHETICS............................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS...........................
WOMEN...................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE......................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN....................
LEATHER....................
MEN......................
WOMEN....................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS:
MEN......................

31 $3.33
23 2.95
-

121
106
-

-

3.00
2.99
-

31 $2.81
7
3.65
24 2.57
19 2.54
1
8 2.51
1
1 3-04
-

125
25
100
101
-

-

40 $2.74
8 3.31
32 2.60
-

-

-

-

3.05
4 39
.
2.71
2.96
-

25
-

4.05
-

-

-

~

_
-

-

-

_

-

-

1 $3.49
5
3.29
3.41

50 $3.52
50 3.52
-

-

13
1
1
95
40
55
36
32
34

3.80
4 0
. 1
3.64
3.58
3.50
4.04

51
41
31
25
-

_

-

-

-

92
86
6

3.61
3.63
3.35

-

212
46
166

2.38
2.3C
2.41

-

13
9

3.52
3.88
2.92
3.15
2.72
3.75
3.25
3.25
-

-

3.80
3.89
3.83
3.77
-

FITT ING :
FANCY STITCHERS ................
MEN......................
WOMEN...................................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR FI TTE R S,
UPPER, HAND...........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
PLATFORM-COVER STITCHERS
(SLIP-LASTED SHOES)......................................
MEN.........................................................................
SKIVERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
LININGS......................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN....................
SOCK-LINING STITCHERS
(SLIP-LASTED SHOES)......................................
TOP STITCHERS.........................................................
MEN......................
WOMEN.....................
VAMPERS......................
WOMEN....................

191
191

2.65
2.65

-

-

-

-

200
197

2.65
2.63

136
125

2.49

-

-

-

-

-

-

40
40

18
1
8

2.45
2.45

135
135
48
48

25
15
1
0
12
8

3.22
2.99
3.57
3.07
3.06

36
19
1
1

5
2

2.64
2.64
2.65
2.65
2.58
2.58

13
8

2.43
2.29

-

2.59
2.59
2.75
2.75

2.58

-

52
91
91
69
69

-

2. 58

146

-

2.64

156
156
61
61

148

-

2.64

-

-

-

-

56

-

-

-

2.52

56

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.89
2.89
2. 80
2.80
2.75
2 75
.

26
12
14
7
18
18
-

3.22
3.25
3.29
3.32

6
6

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE...
MEN......................
WOMEN.....................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS..............................................
MEN........................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS.................................................................
TOE TO BALL.........................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

_

-

19
1
1

-

-

-

2.89
3.17

-

-

~

“

-

7
7

-

3.64
3.64

~

-

7

-

-

3.81
3.81

-

-

-

-

“

“

~

~




Table 19. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional'
lasted) shoes-by size of community—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings' of workers in selected occupations. United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)

Border States
Department, occupation, and sex

Southwest

Great Lakes

Middle West

Pacific

Nonmetropolitan
areas

Nonmetropolitan
areas

Nonmetropolitan
areas

Non metropolitan
areas

Metropolitan
areas

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average Number Average
hourly
hourly
of
earnings workers earnings

Number Average
hourly
of
workers earnings

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
LASTING: — CONTINUEE
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE...................................
MEN........................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING...........................
HEN........................................................................
CEMENT LASTING................................................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC...................................................
MEN........................................................................

40
38
-

$3.11
3.11
-

47
35

-

-

13

_
-

_
-

21
21

26
11

$3.22
3.60
4.27
4.27
2.37

57
45
-

$3.83
4.16
-

62
-

$ 3 . 90
-

2.79
2.84

-

“

-

-

_

3.92
3.92
3.1 5
3.22
3.54
3.42
3.73

15
15
14
18
9
9
17

-

$3.04
3 . 19
-

~

“

10
8

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
EDGE TRIMMERS........................................................
MEN........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE..............................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
ROUGHERS......................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS......................................................
MEN........................................................................
SHANKERS......................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

-

11

7
19
11

-

3.11
3 . 13
2.78
2.23

-

-

“

-

-

_
15
9
6

27
24
-

14

2.9 5
3.52
2 . 10
2.94
2.97
-

11
11

12

-

62
17
45

2.43
2.46
2.59
3 . 45
2.27

24
15
9

2.87
2.87
4.02
4.02

77
64

8

8

8
-

4.08
2.91
2.96
3 . 48
3.10
3 . 86
2.6 9
2.77
-

9

3 . 18

-

10
10
6

9
9
12
10

4.22
4.22
3.4 0
3.2 9
3.29
3.59
3-69
"

FI N IS H IN G :
REPAIRERS...................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
TREERS...........................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................

45
45
49
43

3.53
3.53
2.94
2.83

63
63
40
40

57
57
84

2.4 5
2.45
2.49

69
90

-

-

3.27
3 . 10

-

-

•

-

52
50
-

2.49
2.44
-

-

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS.............................................................
WOMEN........................................................................
INSPECTORS (CRCWNERS)......................................
MEN...............................................................................
WOMEN.........................................................................
J A N I T O R S ? ......................................................................MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE3 ................................
1
holidays,
2
3

-

74

-

2.43

-

-

“

~

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends,
and late shifts.
Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
A ll or virtually all workers were men.

-

-

76
30
34

-

-

-

33

-

31
76
14
62

2 .2 2

11

3.39

~

2.29
2.50
-

2 . 52

2.43
“

-

29

2 .75
2.75
3.05
3 . 56
2 . 93
-

3.68

-

8
6

-

2.72
-

4.88

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet
publication criteria.

Table 2 0 . Occupational earnings: Women's cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes— by size of establishment
(Number and average straight time hourly earnings' of workers in selected occupations, United States and select'd regions, April 1975)
United States*

New England

Middle Atlantic

Border States

Southwest

G reat Lakes

Establishments w ith —
D epartm ent, occupation, and sex

50-249
work ers

250 workers
or nore

50-249
workers

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

147
93
54
60
34
26
43
29
14
44
30
14

$ 3 .2 8
3 .6 4
2 .6 6
3 . 02
3 .3 8
2 .5 6
3 .3 2
3 .5 6
2 .8 3
3 .6 0
4 .0 3
2 .6 7

2 07
124
83
96
49
47
73
59
14
38
16
22

$ 3 .4 4
3 .6 5
3 . 13
3 .0 7
3 .4 9
2 .6 3
3 . 65
3 . 61
3 .8 4
3 .9 6
4 .2 7
3 .7 3

26
24

59
40

3 .3 5
3 .7 5

37
24

4 . 11
4 . 23

_

314
159
155
142
60
82
34
26

3 .7 3
4 .1 9
3 .2 6
3 .7 8
4 .1 0
3 .5 5
3 .4 8
3 .8 3

620
279
341
393
124
269
72
60
12
155
95
60

3 .4 8
3 .9 7
3. 08
3 .2 9
3 .6 7
3 . 11
4 . 33
4 . 49
3 .5 0
3 .5 8
4 .0 4
2 . 84

76
64
12
33
21
12
6
6

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2 5 0 workers
or more
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

50-249
workers
Number
oL
workers

2 5 0 workers
or more

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2 5 0 workers
or more
Num ber
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

5 0 -2 4 9
workers
Num ber Average
hourly
of
workers earnings

2 5 0 workers
or more

2 50 workers
or more

Number Average Number
of
of
hourly
workers earnings. workers

Average
hourly
earnings

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE............
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
LEATHER.....................................................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
SYNTHETICS.............................................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS............
MEN..........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHCE,
HAND................................................................
MEN...........................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE........................................................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
LEATHER.....................................................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN........................ .. ........................
SY N TH ETIC S...........................................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS............
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................

-

138
73
65

-

3 .7 4
4 .3 9
3 .0 1

$ 4 . 28
4 .4 0

36
32

$ 4 . 25
4 . 28

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15
14
-

3 .6 0
3 .6 9

29
27

-

-

-

37
37

_

_

“

4 .4 4
4 .4 4
4 .4 3
4 .0 7
3 .8 6
4 .4 3
4 .9 8
4 .9 8

-

-

11
9
-

“

125
1 14
11
51
47
-

58
51
7

-

-

4 .6 8
4 .6 8

-

16
11

-

-

-

4 .2 7
4 .2 4

. 46
39
7
19
19

$ 3 . 37
3 .4 9
2 .7 0
3 .4 5
3 . *. 5
3 .2 7
3 .4 6

-

4 .3 4
4 .3 9
3 .7 9
3 .8 3
3 . 86
-

4 .6 1
4 .6 9
3 . 99
-

“

3 .4 2
3 .5 7

64
43
21
29
12

3 .8 2
3 .9 6
3 .5 4
3 .9 6
4 . US

_

17
13

_

_
_
_

_
_

29
19

3 .4 4
3 .2 9

_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_

-

3 .3 5
3 .5 8

35
31

-

$ 3 .4 2
3 .2 9
3 .6 2

_

-

_

31
19
12

-

-

-

83
32
51
_
_
_

12

3 .2 6
3 .1 8
3 .3 2
I

”

_
_
_
_
_

$ 2 . 62

_

23
17

2 .5 4
2 .4 7

_
_

17

_
_

_

40
8
32

_

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

:

-

3 .1 7

“

_
_

$ 3 .3 1

-

7

3 . 60

-

-

11
“

-

64
35
29

3 .7 8
4 .0 4
3 . 46

-

3 . 16

43

3 . 11

3 .1 8

41
30

3 .0 4
3 . 14

28

3 .0 2

-

79

-

-

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

_

94

$ 2 .7 8
3 . 31
2 .6 5

2 . 47

_

_
_
_

_
_

. 26

3 .1 2

_
_

_

_
_

_
_
_

$ 3 .5 4

-

17

_
_
■ i

-

3 .9 5
4 .1 8

25

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

:
-

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

:
-

-

40
31
9

4 .0 0
4 . 13
3 . 57

2 .7 9

-

-

‘

F IT T IN G :
FANCY STITC H ER S.....................................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR F IT T E R S ,
UPPER, HAND.............................................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
PLATFORM-COVER STITCHERS
(SL IP-L A ST E D SH O ES).......................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
SK IV ERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OB
LIN IN G S........................................................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
SO CK-LINING STITCHERS
(SL IP-L A ST E D SH O ES)........................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
TOP STITC H ER S..........................................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
VAMPERS...........................................................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................
See footnotes at end o f table




604
98
506

2 .9 8
3 .6 0
2 .8 6

1 ,2 3 7
1 ,1 9 3

521
51
470

2 .5 0
2 .3 8
2 .5 1

922
24
898

33
12
21

2 .9 7
3 .6 9
2 .5 6

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

145
15
130

2 .8 4
3 .2 2
2 .8 0

204
198

2 .7 2

20

38
7
31
341
59
282
172
12
160

3 .1 8
4 .3 0
2 .9 2

21

2 .5 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

2 .9 9
3 .7 1
2 .8 4
2 .8 7
3 .7 1
2 .8 1

-

-

-

21
725
-

718
285
-

239

2 .9 3
-

2 .9 0
2 .6 9
2. 3 1
2 . 70

-

2 .7 6
-

-

2 .5 3
2 .8 7
—

2 .8 7
2 .9 2
-

2 .8 7

138

3 .3 3

307

3 . 22

3 .3 1

307

3 .2 2

156
41
115

3 . 06
3 .6 5
2 .8 5

222

130

222

2 .9 0

9Q

2 .6 6

122

2 .7 2

116

2 .6 6

132

3 .1 0

-

-

86

-

24
-

-

74
7
67
27
27

-

-

-

2 .6 6

-

116

-

-

-

3 . 18
3 .4 5
3 .1 6
2 .9 5
2 .9 5

-

2 .7 4

-

3 .0 4
2 .9 9

-

34
,

-

33

-

181
—

180
62
-

62

_

112
_

-

2 .7 4

2 .6 3
_
_

-

2 .7 6

_

35
-

-

2 .9 4
_

31

2 .7 7

-

24

2 . 84

-

-

-

3 .0 7
—

3 .0 6
3 .0 8
-

3 .0 8

_

-

_

132

_
-

23
_

23

_

_
-

_
-

3 .1 0

_

_

_

_

-

-

143'

2 .4 9

-

-

158

143

2 .4 9

-

-

158

2 .7 9

65

2 . 46

-

-

117

2 .5 6

65

2 .4 6

117

2 . 56

_

2 .9 0

_

_

_

27

2 .6 4

27

2 .6 4

116

2 .9 8

-

116
26

2 .9 8
2 .8 5

-

25

2 .7 9

_
2 .9 1
_

2 .9 1

40

-

25

2 .5 3

2 .6 5

25

2. 53

_

40

_

_
_

_

,

_

_

-

2 .6 5

_

_

_

_

_

_

24

2 .9 4

-

112
36
76
58
8
50

3 .0 9
3 .8 6
2 .7 3
3 .1 8
3 .7 7
3 .0 8

64

3 .2 5

128

2 .5 5

62

2 .4 8

64
39

3 .2 5
3 .0 5

128

2 .5 5

62
21

-

39

_

3 .0 5

_

_

_
-

_

_

21

-

-

2 . 48
2 .2 5

-

-

2 .2 5

-

Table 20. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-by size of establishment—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings' of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)
New England

United States2

Middle Atlantic

Border States

Southwest

I

Great Lakes

Establishments with—
Department, occupation, and sex

250 workers
or more

50-249
workers
Number
of
workers

50-249
workers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

250 v
vorkers
or rnore
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

50-249
workers
Number
of
workers

250 workers
or more

Average Number
hourly
of
earnings workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$ 3 .0 8
3 .3 8
2 .5 9
4.-14
4 .2 7
3 .0 7
3 . 15
2 .6 9

$ 3 .2 5
3 .2 3
3 . 28
3 .9 7
4 .2 3
3 . 10
3 .2 8
2 .7 4

16
15

$ 3 .2 4
3 .2 9

22

$ 3 . 70
3 .8 5

23

14

18

$ 3 .3 1
3 .5 9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30
30

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19
19
19
19

3 .8 0
3 .8 0
3 .8 0
3 .8 0

27
26
27
26

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

250 workers
or more
Number Average
hourly
of
workers eanrings

50-249
workers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

250 workers
or more
Number Average
hourly
of
workers earnings

250 workers
or more
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, M A C H IN E...
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
BED-MACHINE OPERATORS....................................
MEN...........................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS ...............................................
HEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
PLATFORM-COVER LASTERS
(SL IP-L A ST E D SH OES).......................................
MEN..........................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS..................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
TOE TO BALL..........................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS?....................
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE....................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING............................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
CEMENT LASTING..................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC ....................................................
MEN..........................................................................

89
55
34
17
13
61
50
11

122

73
49
95
79
94
62
32

10

3 .4 4
3 .7 0

-

50
47

3 .8 3
3 .9 2

110

12

-

48
45

-

3 .7 9
3 .8 8

96
14
110

36
152
133
19
85
83
67
50
17

4 . 00
3 .6 1
3 .7 9
2 .3 3
3 .8 3
3 .8 6
3 .3 2
3 .6 6
2 .3 1

96
14
46
441
3 72
69
233
2 04
29
208
168
40

57
53

3 . 16
3 .2 2

21

32

2 .7 7
3 .2 1
2 .5 1
3 .5 5
3 .6 4
3 .1 0
3 .3 8
3 .3 6
3 .1 1
3 .2 5
2 .5 2
2 -8 4
3 .6 3
3 .6 3
3 .3 7
3 .7 9
2 .5 5
3 .4 7
3 .6 8

-

-

31

-

3 .7 6
3 .8 4
3 . 17
3 .7 6
3 .8 4
3 . 17
3 .3 3
3 .7 6
3 .8 3
3 .3 6
3 .7 1
3 .6 9
3 .8 1
3 .8 1
4 .0 0
3 .0 3
4 . 17
3 .9 7

12
11

-

9
53
51
-

32
32
21

19
-

-

3 .4 2
3 .3 0

-

3 .3 6
3 .8 2
3 .8 5
3 .6 9
3 .6 9
4 .0 3
4 .1 2
-

6

3 .3 1
3 .3 1

9
-

3 .3 9
-

6

12
12

-

115
114
-

53
52
62
62

4 .6 2
4 . 62
3 .3 1
3 .3 1

4 .3 7
4 .3 9
4 .3 7
4 .3 9
-

4 .2 7
4 . 27
-

3 .7 0
3 .7 0
4 .7 5
4 .7 5

29
27

11

32
30
-

14
14
18
16

3 .1 6
3 .1 9

4 .2 4
3 .7 1
3 .8 2
3 .8 4
3 .8 4
3 .6 2
3 .8 0

-

-

-

-

-

23
23

3 .5 1
3 .5 1

20

2 .8 7
2 .5 8
3. 68
3 .8 5
3 .3 6
3 .4 1

-

-

22

-

23
19

$ 3 .1 3

-

-

13

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 3 .0 0
3 .2 3
-

2 .9 8
2 .9 7

-

-

15
9
-

-

“
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

53
24
29
21

32
17
-

3 .5 0
3 .4 6
3 .5 2
3 .4 8
3 -5 1
3 .2 4
-

-

-

“

~

~

“
-

~
-

-

-

8

$ 2 . 43
-

2 .2 9

26
18
-

$ 3 .4 9
3 .3 5
-

25
-

$ 3 . 13
3 .2 7
-

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“
-

“
-

-

-

-

-

22

13
11
11

-

9
-

3 .2 4
3 . 22
-

11

6

-

4 . 03
-

-

-

“

“
~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 .0 7
3 .7 4
3 .9 3
3 .9 3
-

60

3 . 85

~

49

-

-

-

-

-

48
-

-

-

-

-

-

9
7

2 .5 8
2 .6 1

-

~
■
-

~
2 .4 8
2 . 10
-

-

-

-

~

3 .7 4
-

3 . 73
-

“

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM F IL L E R S .......................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS..........................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS............................................
MEN..........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE...............................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
HEEL-SEAT S IT T E R S , MACHINE......................
INSEAMERS.....................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
ROUGHERS.......................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS.......................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
SH ANKERS.......................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
See footnotes at end o f table




12
20

59
49
10

28
26
78
63
15
10
6
6

65
43
22

34
29
-

50
30
20

-

2 .7 9
3 .0 1
2 .4 5

38
38
70
43
27
-

9
87
72
15
-

117
67
50
41
26
15
99
52
47

2 .9 6
2 .9 6
3 .0 5
3 .0 0
3 . 13
2.6 8

3 .1 9
3 .2 9
2 .7 2
3 .3 2
3 .3 6
3 . 28
3 .2 7
3 .5 1
2 .8 5
2 .8 7
3 . 10
2 .6 0

-

21

19
-

15
13
10

7
“

-

3 .0 3
3 .1 1
-

4 .2 2
4 .4 7
-

3 .2 9
3 .5 6
”

11

11

18
15
-

22

19
-

2 .8 9
2 .8 9
3 .5 3
3 .6 2
3 .8 0
3 .8 3
-

1 1

17
14
31
27
-

22

18
-

-

-

20

24
18

3 .0 4
2 .9 5
, 3 . 29

19

6

18
12

7

-

3 .2 6
3 .5 0
3 .3 0
3 .4 4
-

2 .8 9
3 .2 1
2 .3 4

-

9
9
14
10

-

20

14
-

19
15

2 .9 8
2 .9 8
3 .0 9
3 .2 6
-

3 .5 2
3 .6 5
-

2 .6 2
-

2 .4 0

-

11

7
-

3 .1 1
3 . 13
-

8

6

”
~
“
-

16
-

2 .8 7
-

7
-

8

2.20

~

-

1 1
10

-

“
~
3 .9 5
3 .9 8
“

~
~
-

10

“
~

12
10

~

4 . 14
*
~
2 .7 5
2 . 82
~

~

”
“

~
~

19

-

-

-

-

11

-

-

-

~
“
3 .3 9
2 .9 9
3 . 94

~

2 .2 8
~

8

“

-

3 .2 5
~

8
-

-

14
■

2 . 71

8

2 .7 7

Table 20. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-by size of establishment—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings' of workers in selected occupations. United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)
United States2

New England

Middle Atlantic

Border States

Southwest

Great Lakes

250 workers
or more

50-249
workers

250 workers
or more

Establishments with—

Department, occupation, and sex

50-249
workers
Number Average
of
hourly
workers earnings

250 workers
or more

50-249
workers

250 workers
or more

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

338
193
145

$ 3 .3 2
3 .7 1
2 .8 1

69
46
-

$ 3 .6 7
4 .1 5

_
-

_
-

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

50-249
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

81
7

$ 4 . 15
4 .1 7
3 .8 8

67
48
19

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

7
7
89
17
72
16

250 workers
or more

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number Average
hourly
of
workers earnings

Number Average
hourly
of
workers earnings

250 workers
or more

Number Average Number Average
of
hourly
of
hourly
workers earnings workers earnings

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING: — CONTINUED
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
HEN..........................................................................
NOHEN....................................................................

207
128
79

$ 3 .1 9
3 .5 7
2 .5 8

9
18
16
242
26
216
118
108

2 .9 0
3 .6 1
3 .7 6
2 .6 7
3 .6 8
2 .5 5
2 .9 2
3 .9 0
2 .8 3

251
84
167
178
33
145
75
76

2 .5 1
2 .5 8
2 .4 7
2 .6 0
2 .8 4
2 .5 4
2 .3 6
3 .9 8

-

88

$ 3 .1 C
3 .2 8

73

2 .6 6

42

-

$ 3 .2 8
3 .1 2

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

21

2.

$ 2 .3 4

26

27
_

11

10

$ 3 .5 8
_

3 .6 7

38
31
7

$ 3 . 29
3 .3 2
3 . 17

F IN IS H IN G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS....................................................
EDGE SETTERS............................................................
MEN..........................................................................
REPAIRERS .............................................................................................
HEN.....................................................................................................
WOMEN.............................................................................................
TREERS ........................................................................................................
HEN....................................................................................................
WOMEN.............................................................................................

10

_
-

358
-

3 .0 1
-

51
-

353
362
59
303

3 .0 1
3 .2 2
3 .7 1
3 . 13

48
15

450
129
321
385
62
323

2 .5 1
2 .4 5
2 .5 3
2 .7 0
3 . 00
2 .6 4
2 .3 6
3 . 57

70
35
35
28

9
-

2 .3 8
-

2 .3 7
3 .4 0
3 .8 6

-

123
-

2 .6 1
-

_

4 .0 1
4 .0 1
2 .8 9
3 .8 8
2 .6 5
2 .5 9

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

46
-

2 .7 8
-

-

35
-

$ 3 .8 7
-

28
_

2 .6 0
■

-

-

_
_
_

3 .4 9

-

36
72

3 . 49
3 . 24

21

2 .8 8

15

2 .4 7

47

3 .1 0

32

3 .0 1

22

3 . 61

64

2 .6 6

120

2 .5 7

68
12

2 .6 1
2 .7 0
2 .6 0
2 .4 8

40

2 .3 8

_

_

2 .66

2 .4 7
2 .4 7

2 .5 0

51
69
66
13
53
36
13

117
33

45

2 .7 6
2 .5 5
2 .6 1

-

_
_

-

_

-

-

-

2 -7 3
3 . 10
-

35
-

3 .8 7
-

28
22
-

2 .6 0
3 .6 1
-

79
-

_
_

36

47
26

-

43
47

_
_

_

2 .6 0
3 .5 6
4 . 11

121

_

3 .3 0
-

3 .1 4

_

_

69

_

_

3 .2 5

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS..............................................................................
MEN....................................................................................................
WOMEN.............................................................................................
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS).................................................
HEN....................................................................................................
WOHEN.............................................................................................
JANITORS3 .............................................................................................
.
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE. .........................................

110

88

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.




-

23
8

9

-

2 .5 1
2 .5 3
4 .3 1

2 . 50
2 . 45
2 .4 6
2 .4 5
2 .3 3
3 .7 8

-

25
-

19
22
19

-

2 .6 7
-

2 .7 0
2 .3 6
4 .6 9

56
70
-

65
-

-

2 .4 7
-

-

45
62
-

52

-

2 .5 0
2 .5 7
-

2 .4 9

-

-

-

-

-

28
56
_

42
17
17

-

2. 39
2 .3 6
-

2. 34
2 .3 0
3 .5 6

-

_

-

_
_

-

-

3 All or virtually all workers were men.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.

31

2 . 70

29
58
13
45
8
18

2 .6 9
3 . 01
3 . 35
2 . 91
2 .5 5
3 .5 2




Table 21. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-by size of
establishment and size of community
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings' of workers in selected occupations. United States and selected regions, April 1975)
Middle A tlantic

New England

United States2

Border States

Great Lakes

Establishments w ith —

Department, occupation, and community size

50-249
workers
Number Average
of
hourly
workers earnings

250 workers
or more
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

50-249
workers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

50-249
workers

250 workers
or more
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

250 workers
or more
Number Average
of
hourly
workers earnings

250 workers
or more
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

250 workers
or more
Number Average
hourly
of
workers earnings

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
c u t t in g :

CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
LEATHER:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
SYNTHETICS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS............................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
COTTERS, VAMP AND NHOLE SHOE,
HAND:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONHETROPOLITAK AREAS............................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND NHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
LEATHER:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
SYNTHETICS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS............................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONHETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................

$ 4 .0 5
4 .6 0

23
13

$ 4 . 41
3 .9 6

31
-

$ 3 .2 6
-

25

$ 3 .5 4

36

$ 2 .8 1

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

15
-

3 .1 3
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 .8 8
3 .3 2

9

3 .5 9
3 .6 1

18

4 .3 9
4 .0 7

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
31

_
4 .0 8

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

3 .4 3
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

3 .5 9
3 .0 7

18
-

4 .1 3
-

.

_

-

-

3 . 29
-

.

-

23
-

.

-

-

-

-

-

134
180

4 .0 3
3 .5 1

145
4 75

4 .0 0
3 .3 2

39
37

4 .3 2
4 .5 6

65
60

4 .7 4
3 . 91

39
-

4 .0 0
-

S4

3 .1 6

-

-

59

$ 3 .7 4

66

76

3 .9 9
3 .5 9

61
332

3 .7 3
3 .2 1

17
16

3 .9 1
4 .2 4

_
39

_
3 .7 6

13
-

4 .4 2
-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

27
-

3 .6 4
-

45
27

4 .6 2
3 .8 5

6

4 .9 8
-

37

4 . 84
4 .1 9

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

41
97

4 .3 3
3 .4 9

39
116

3 .7 2
3 .5 3

_
4 .8 0

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

21

~

~

“

”

”

~

~

35

236
368

3 .4 0
2 .7 1

449
78 8

3 .2 2
2 .7 7

82
56

3 .4 8
3 .1 1

215
92

3 .3 8
2 .8 5

83
-

3 .2 2
-

-

-

-

-

-

314
207

2 . 47
2 .5 4

256

3 .0 0
2 .5 8

48
42

2 .7 4
2 .5 6

78
44

2 .8 9
2 .4 3

69
-

2 .7 3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

.

.

77
70

$ 3 .4 1
3 .1 4

$ 3 .7 3
3 .2 3

11

33
27

3 . 17
2 .8 4

59

_
2 .7 3

20

3 .5 1
3 . 16

44
29

20

3 .6 5
3 .5 4

32
27

23
24

88

119
_

15

6

_

11

21

10

-

-

_
3 . 97

F IT T IN G :
FANCY STITC H ER S:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
PASTERS, BACKERS, CR FIT T E R S,
UPPER, HAND:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
PLATFORM-COVER STITCHERS
(SL IP -L A S T E D SHOES) :
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
SK IV ERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L IN IN G S:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
See footnotes at end of table.

20

3 .4 3

54
91

2 .9 1
2 .8 0

666

42
162

3 .0 8
2 .6 7

10

14

3 .0 5
3 .0 4

11

23

3 . 21
2 .5 5

20

3 . 02
“

40

2 .6 5

~

23

-

2 . 63




Table 21. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-by size of
establishment and size of community—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings' of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)
United States 2

New England

Middle Atlantic

Border States

Great Lakes

250 workers
or more

250 workers
or more

Middle West

Establishments with—
Department, occupation, and community size

50-249
workers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

250 workers
or more
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

50-249
workers

250 workers
or more

Number Average Number Average
hourly
of
of
hourly
workers earnings workers earnings

50-259
workers
Numuer
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number Average Number Average
of
hourly
of
hourly
workers earnings workers earnings

250 workers
or more
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS-CONTINUED
F IT T IN G :— CONTINUED
SO CK-LINING STITCHERS
(SL IP-L A ST E D SHOES):
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
TOP STITCHERS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
TAMPERS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONHETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................

29
9

$ 3 .3 1
2 .7 5

21

$ 2 .5 3

-

-

129

3 .3 5
2 .7 7

214
511

3 .2 6
2 -7 1

28
46

$ 3 .3 9
3 .0 6

73
99

3 . 18
2 .6 4

111

3 . 18
2 .7 5

-

174

12

30
59

3 .2 1
3 .0 1

40
82

3 .6 7
3 .0 5

7
9

11

4 .6 1

39
56

4 .4 7
3 .6 2

-

3 .4 9
2 .9 6

7
-

212

-

-

-

18
-

$ 2 .7 9
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

105
76

$ 3 . 13
2 .9 8

78
-

3 .2 6
-

128

$ 2 .5 5

-

-

99

$ 2 .7 1

3 .0 7

24
38

3 .5 4
2 .7 8

52
-

3 .2 2
-

-

~

14

$ 2 .5 2

-

-

3 . 19
3 .2 7

14
-

3 .9 5
-

13
-

3 .0 2
-

,-

-

_
23

3 .2 7

_
23

30
-

4 . 62
-

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

-

6

3 .8 6
2 .7 6

20

_
_

_
_

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
BED-MACHINE OPERATORS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONHETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
PLATFORM-COVER LASTERS
(SL IP-L A ST E D SHOES):
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONHETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
TOE TO BALL:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONHETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
SID E LASTERS, MACHINE:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONHETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
CEMENT LASTING:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONHETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
See footnotes at end of table.

-

-

32
29

3 .2 9
2 .8 2

25
69

8

4 .0 5

-

19
31

3 .9 4
3 .7 6

28
82

3 .8 6
3 .7 2

10

17
31

3 .8 4
3 .7 6

28
82

3 .8 6
3 .7 2

10
-

17
19

4 .4 8
3 .5 8

41

3 .2 4

60
92

3 .4 9
3 .6 8

207
23 4

26
59

3 .4 8
3 .9 8

34
33
27
30

-

-

-

3 .3 7
-

6

-

3 .8 7
-

12

3 .8 7

12

15

-

15

-

-

-

-

-

4 .1 0
3 .4 5

33
20

3 .7 8
3 .8 9

62
171

3 .8 1
3 .6 7

19

3 .8 3

21

3 .5 1
3 .1 3

145
63

4 .2 2
2 .8 7

20
-

3 .9 8

54

3 .2 0
3 .1 2

18
13

4 .6 6
3 . 49

-

-

-

-

3 .2 1
-

15

3 .0 0

10

_
3 . 12

3 .0 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4 .3 6
4 .3 8

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_
-

4 .3 6
4 .3 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

-

-

_

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

“

~

57

_
3 .8 3

_
43

_
3 . 64

_
4 . 16

_
43

_
3 .6 4

-

4 . 52
3 .5 2

11

3 .4 6

-

-

-

-

_
45

4 .9 0
3 .7 0

-

8

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

86

29
-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

“

18

3 .4 6
~

3 .3 1

_
_

_
_

-

-




Table 21. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-by size of
establishment and size of community—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations. United States and selected regions, A pril 1975)
New England

United States1
2

Middle A tlan tic

Border States

Great Lakes

2 5 0 workers
or more

2 5 0 workers
or more

Establishments w ith —

Departm ent, occupation, and com m unity size

5 0-249
workers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

2 5 0 workers
or more
Number
of
wokrers

Average
hourly
earnings

50-249
workers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

50-2 4 9
workers

2 5 0 workers
or more
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number Average Number Average
hourly
hourly
of
of
workers earnings workers earnings

2 5 0 workers
or more
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINDED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM F IL L E R S :
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
EDGE TRIMMERS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONHETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS:
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
HEEL-SEAT SIT T E R S , MACHINE:
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
INSEAMERS:
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
RODGHERS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
ROUGH ROUNDERS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
SHANKERS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................

BOTTOM SCOURERS:
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
EDGE SETTERS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
REPA IRER S:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
TREERS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................

8

$ 2 .9 0
2 .4 0

20

$ 2 .7 9
3 .1 2

40
19

3 .6 0
3 .4 4

19
51

3 .5 8
2 .8 5

12

3 .6 0

_

24

18

_

-

-

8

-

$ 3 .5 5
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
-

_
9

_

_

$ 4 .0 3

_
2 .7 4

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

4 .5 9
-

_
13

_

3 .7 4
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

3 .1 9

13
-

16

_
3 .5 0

_
-

_

_
-

16
-

3 .2 5
-

_

-

_
-

11

_
$ 3 .1 1

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

6

3 .9 1
-

15
9

3 .0 7
2 .9 8

10

-

3 .4 3
-

_
16

_
2 .8 7

_

-

_
3 .3 0

_
13

_
2 .7 3

46
23

3 .4 9
4 .0 2

54
34

4 . 45
3 .6 8

52

3 . 13

_

_

_

_
36

_
3 .2 8

_
-

_
-

11

18
16

3 .3 1
3 .6 4

13
28

3 .6 6
3 .0 8

21

3 .3 4
2 .3 8

31

29

68

2 .9 7
2 .8 2

117
90

3 .3 2
3 .0 3

1 14
2 24

3 .9 2
3 .0 2

15
6

-

6

_
22

3 .5 9

10

_

2 .8 5

165
285

_

_

3 .8 3
3 . 18

2 .5 4
2 .4 5

$ 4 .3 6

_

26
91

156
95

_

7

-

_

3 .9 7
2 .7 1

105
257

_

_

34
31

2.88

_
-

_

_

2 .9 5

_
-

_

_

42
76

_
-

_

3 .6 3

2 .7 8
3 .1 3

-

_
-

_

6

127
231

-

3 .6 1
-

_

_

2 .7 6
2 .5 7

-

15
-

3 .4 5
-

_

124
118

-

_
-

13
-

2 .8 4

_
-

-

_
-

3 .6 4
-

10

3 .8 3
3 .3 4

$ 3 .0 3
-

14
-

27
60

7

-

3 .2 4
2 .5 0

3 .3 0
2 .9 5

10
8

15

_
-

36
42

3 .5 2
3 . 04

$ 2 .8 9
-

11
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2 .9 7
-

_
55

_
3 .8 7

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

.

_

-

-

-

“

73

$ 3 .3 2

67

3 .2 8

-

-

45

-

27

2 .7 5

-

-

51

3 .0 4

_
-

_

_

_

-

6

2 .6 1

_

_

-

-

.
16

.
3 . 51

30

2 .5 3
2 .2 7

70
53

2 .8 0
2 .3 6

57
-

3 .1 2
3 . 26

13

3 .3 2

32
15

$ 3 .7 9
3 .0 6

_

2 .5 6
2 .4 8

47
23

55

2 .7 8
2 .3 9

21

.

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
INSPECTORS (CRCWNERS) :
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
JA N ITO RS:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE:
METROPOLITAN AREAS...................................
NONMETROPOLITAN AREAS...........................

126

2 .8 5
2 .4 9

103
28 2

2 .5 1
2 .7 6

20
8

25
50

2 .4 1
2 . 34

44
66

2 .3 5
2 .3 6

_
-

24
52

4 .4 8
3 .7 5

15
73

4 .0 0
3 . 48

52

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.

7
~

2 .6 9
2 .5 8
2 .7 0
2 .3 7
■ _
4 .0 4
“

65

2 .5 0

-

_

_

_

62

2 .5 7

36
30

2 .5 8
2 .2 9

12

-

2 .9 6
-

24

2 .4 1
2 . 16

16
-

2 .3 6
-

_
-

_

11

4 .6 5
“

_

_

12

_

_

-

-

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.

Table 22. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Arkansas
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings o f -

Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings 1

in
and

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS............- _________
MEN...........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................

4 ,0 6 1
645
3 ,4 1 6

$2 . 2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60

$2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00

$3.10

$3.20 $3.30

$3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.80

$4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00

$5.20 $5.40

$2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70

$2 . 20

$2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10

$3.20

$3.30

$3.50 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00

$4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20

$5.40 $5.60

118
36
82

91
16
75

96
9
87

3

1
1

$ 2 .6 1
2 . 89
2 .5 5

1686
194
1492

. 81
3 .6 5
2 .5 7
7 . SU
? - 51
3 .0 4

8

1

-

-

8

1

332
61
271

178
16
162

155

177

_
-

4
4

22

170
27
143

209
22

187

184
25
159

117

137
20

87
14
73

$3.40
72
52

72
19
53

_
_

_
_

20

79
32
47

93
18
75

70
13
57

43

1

2
1
1

_
_

_

2
2

5
3

37

7
4
3

_
_

_
_

_

5
5
3

1

26

32
16
16

12

8
1

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

5
5

3

5

2

-

4
3

2

1

3

11

17
5

11

38
13
25

12

31

9

16
5

$5.60
and
over
11

7
4

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE2 ' 3 ....................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
SYNTHETICS___________________________ _
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE2 ' 3 ................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
LEATHER.....................................................................

31
7
24
19
18
11

125
25

2

1

1

p

100
101

3 .0 5
4 .3 9
2 .7 1
2 .9 6

26
26

200

2 . 65

136
12 5

2 .4 9
2 .5 2

52
91
69

-

11
10

76

14

12

20

58
47

26
26

3
3

5
5

2 . 64
2 . 65
2 .5 8

15
28
25

2

4
5

2

10

4

7

2

4
3

13
g

2 . 43
2 .2 9

6
5

2

2
2

_

_

_

7
7
47
35

3 .6 4
3 . 64
3 .2 2
3 .6 0
4 .2 7
2 . 37

3
3
3

-

4
4

3
3

1
3

3

-

-

2

-

22

11

-

4
1

-

2

3

2
2
2

3
3
1

7
7
7

2
1
2

1

4

11

9

6

5

8

5

3
3

7
7

5
5

4

5

1

1

1

1
1

1
1

_
_
_

_

2
2

_
-

2

-

]
1

10

13
13

-

_

•j
*

1

5

6

2

-

10

10

\
2

-

1

4
4
4

_
-

3
3
3

5

8
1

1

-

2

1

2

2
2

4
5

7
4

1
1

-

-

4

7

4

10

_
1

1

2
1

3

3

1
1

F IT T IN G :
FANCY STITC H ER S 3 ' 4 ............................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR F IT T E R S ,
UPPER, HAND3 ..........................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
SK IV ERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L IN IN G S 3 ' 4 ................................................................
TOP STITC HER S 3' 4 _______________________ VA MPRRS3' 4 _______ _________________________

4

3

5
5

3
3

7
7

1

2

g

4

5
4

_

_

_

-

2

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

2

7

3

_

4

5

-

-

1
1

1
1

4
4

2
2

2
2

-

1
5
3

3

_

3

3

_

2

2

1

_

_

2
2

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

1
1

1

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

4
4
4

_
-

2
2

1
1
1

_
-

-

_

2

1

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE3 . .
iinMRN_____________ __________
PULLING AND LASTING-BACHINE
OPERATORS 3 _______________________ ____
TOE TO RAT.T__________ ____ ____
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE3 .................................
MEN...........................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING 6 .........................
CEMENT T ASTTNO____ ______________
.
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC 3 ..................................................
MEN..........................................................................

21

26
13
11

2 .7 9
2 .8 4

_

_

1
1

1

3
3

_
-

_
-

-

2

2

2

2

1
1
12

12

4
4

_

1

z
2

3
3
3

2

_

_

_
-

3
3
3

-

_

_

E1

Z

2

_

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

1

-

1

1

3
3
3

4
4
4

2

2
2
2

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
iT TA rnuD C
m r n T iiv 3
MPW _
UHN * m
r
nnitcHED c:3
IIDMP I
.H
SH ANKERS3
UflMPN
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS3 . . . .
MEN..........................................................................
UDM 'E
M
meet

1J

9

£
27
24
14
62
17
45

2 95
3.’ 52
2 . 10
2 • 94
2 .9 7
2* 46
2 .5 9
3 .4 5

1

1

i.

,

*
*

*
*

1

1

!
1

1

2
~

33
-

~

4
1
3

3
-

_
-

1

15
3
4
1

”
4
4

6

_
-

_
-

4
1

1
1

_
-

_
-

3
-

1
1

_
-

-

4
4

1
1

_
3
3

2
2
2
2

3
3
-

_
-

1
1
5
5

1
1

-

_
-

2

2

1
1

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1

1
1
1
1

1
1
2
2

1
1
2
2

1
1
2
2

_
-

3
3
3
3

_
3
3

_
2
2

3

F IN IS H IN G :
REPAIRERS 4 ..................................................................
IN CEN TIV E.....................................................
TREERS 4 ..........................................................................
INCENTIVE....................................................
See footnotes at end of table.




63
48
40
37

2 .8 7
3 .0 3
4 .0 2
4 . 16

13
12
1
1

-

2
2
-

4
4
1
1

3
3
“

2
1
•

2
2
-

1
1
-

3
3
2
2

3
3
1
1

_
-

6
6

-

Table 22. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Arkansas—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations, April 1975)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings o f—
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
$2.10
hourly
$2.20
earnings1
3
2
under
$2.30
$2.20

$2.30

$2.40 $2.50 $2.60

$2.70 $2.80

$2.90 $3.00 $3.10

$3.20

$3.30

$3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20

$4.40

$4.60 $4.80 $5.00

$5.20 $5.40

$2.40

$2.50 $2.60 $2.70

$2.80 $2.90

$3.00 $3.10 $3.20

$3.30

$3.40

$3.50 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00

$4.60

$4.80 $5.00 $5.20

$5.40

$5.60

-

-

$4.20 $4.40

$5.60
and
over

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCOPATIONSCONTINDED

cn
N
>

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS:
WOMEN....................................................................
INSPE CTO RS (CROWNERS).................................
T IM E .................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
T IM E .................................................................
JA N IT O R S.......................................................................
HEN7 .......................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE6' 7 .....................

69
90
64
76
50
30
27
34

$ 2 .2 9
2 .5 0
2 .3 5
2 .5 2
2 .3 3
2 . 22
2 .2 4
3 .3 9

40
33
27
25
19
16
13

11
9
6
9
6
8
8

1
11
11
11
11
-

-

2
2
2
2
2
2
2

1
1
-

1
-

1
1

5
4
5
4
-

8
10
9
8
7
3
3

3
2
1
-

1 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approxim ately 80 percent of the
production workers covered by this study were paid on an incentive basis.
2 Includes data fo r workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
3 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.




2
1
1
1
1

3
3
2
1

11

1
1

5

-

-

_

3

3

1

5

_

_

_

3

3

1

1

3

3

9

-

4

A ll
A ll
A ll
A ll

1

or virtually all workers were women.
workers were at $6.00 to $6.20.
or virtually all workers were men.
or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.

1

-

-

-

-

-

Table 23. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Lawrence-Lowell-Haverhill1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number o f workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings o f—
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
$2.10 $2.15
hourly
earnings2 and
under $2.20
$2.15

$ 2.20

$ 2.25 $ 2 .30

$2.35

$2 .4 0 $2.50

$ 2.60 $ 2.80 $3.00

$3.20 $3.40

$ 3.60 $ 3 .80

$2.25

$ 2.30 $2.35

$ 2 .40

$ 2.50 $2.60

$2.80

$ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .20

$ 3.40 $3.60

$3.80

133
56
77

340
84
256

269
68
201

2 ,9 0 3
994
1 ,9 0 9

$ 3 .2 8
3 .7 1
3 .0 6

MACHINE3 ...........................

17

4 . 10

2

HEN................................................................................
TlirPM«PTVP
SYNT H ET ICS..................................................................

16
11

4 .0 3
4 .3 7
3^94
3 . 81

2
1

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS....................................
MEN................................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................

189
30
159

75
11
64

47
1
46

95
33
62

32
6
26

58
27
31

179
42
137

110
31
79

124
42
82

$4.00

$ 4.20 $4.40

$ 4 .60

$ 4.80 $ 5 .00

$5 .2 0 $ 5.40

$ 4.00 $4.20

$ 4 .4 0 $ 4 .60

$ 4 .8 0

$5 .0 0 $ 5.20

$ 5.40

$5.60 $5.80

$ 5.60 $5.80 $6.00

111
67
44

102
47
55

71
40
31

75
41
34

65
35
30

2

3

1

1

1

2

1

-

-

2

3

1

1
■
j

1

2

_

-

_

-

2
2

1

-

-

3
3

6
6
3

1
1

5
4
3

4
4
3

4
4
•j

158
72
86

267
70
197

198
37
161

_

1

_

1

1

_
1
-

1

_
3
-

1
1

1

2
2

2
2
2
1
•j

4
4

50
29
21

38
22
16

18
12
6

$ 6.00
and
over

37
36
1

43
39
4

1
1

-

_

1
■
j

_

_

-

19
16
3

_

3
3
2

e
>2

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS,

L IN IN G ,

C U T T E R S, VAMP AND WHOLE SHO E,
MACHINE3' .....................................................................
MEN................................................................................
C» urpll’ 'PTr'C
P

10
g
45
41

4 .8 9
4 .9 5
J . 1J

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
•J

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

1
1

4
2
2

1
1

4
4

13
P IT T IN G :
FANCY ST IT C H E R S4' 6 ..................................................
P A ST E R S, BACKERS, CR F IT T E R S ,
U P P E R , HAND..................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .........................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ........................................................
S K IV E R S , MACHINE, UPPERS OB
T TUT HCC4,6
TOP S T IT C H E R S4' 6. ......................................................
VAMPERSS..............................................................................

154

3 . 59

1

_

_

_

2

_

1

5

8

5

37

20

15

12

11

9

4

5

4

5

6

2

_

1

1

_

57
52
51
48

3 . 19
3 .2 5
3 . 26
3 . 30

1
1
1
1

1
1
-

2
2
2
2

4
1

-

1
1
1
1

-

5

6

6
6
6
6

2
2

4
4
4
4

5

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1

-

5
5
5

1
1
1
1

-

5
5

7
7
6
6

5

-

-

4
4

4
3
4
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

£
64
25

3 • 32
3^43
3 .5 5

-

-

-

-

3
-

13
4

12
3

3
1

_

_

2
-

1
1

_

_

-

1
1

1

3

3
1

2

-

2
-

4

-

1

_

-

1
-

-

-

-

57

5 .1 1

2

4

8

_

5

6

_

7

1

5

Sg

2

1

5

4

5
5
5

1
-

5

2

2
■
j

11
3

5

2

L A STIN G :
S ID E L A ST E R S, MACHINE3' 4' 7. ...........................
rVMPKip T ICVTMr

5

5

O

BOTTOMING AND M AKING:
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE7 ..............................
T MPPMTTVP
QWft MY PD C
T wr'pii'p J VP
MEN................................................................................
T lir,PM
T»T VP
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PRO CESS............
t nr* v w t vp

T M PUT»T VP
r*
See footnotes at end of table.




15
12
g
0
7
£
41

3 .4 0
3 m 47
3*94
4 • 03
4 . 16
4 .3 1
4 .6 8

Jo

ii

38

4 . 67
4 .7 6

oc
j j

7&

1
1

2

6
||
3
3
1

“
1

1

3
J
1
-j

1

1

1
1
2
2
2

3

4

1
3

J

z

n

2

1
1
2
2
2

1
2

6
0

4

4

||
u

*
*

*
*

3

3

3

3
3

3
3

_

1
1

6
O

£

3
J
3

1
1

•J

_

2

3

z
2

Table 23. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Lawrence-Lowell-Haverhill1
—Continued
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

1 In this study the area is lim ited to Lawerence and Lowell, Massachusetts.
2 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approxim ately 73 percent of the
workers were paid on an incentive basis.
3 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.




5
6
7
8
9

A ll workers were at $6.00 to $6.20.
A ll or virtually all workers were women.
A ll or virtually all workers were men.
Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $6.00 to $6.20; 1 at $6.20 to $6.40; 4 at $6.40 to $6.60 and 2 at $7.20 and over.
A ll or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.

Table 24. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.1
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number o f workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings o f—
Department, occupation, and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS....................................
MEM................................................................................
WOMEN..........................................................................

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings2

$2.10
and
under
$2.20

$2.20

$2.30

$ 2 .40

$ 2 .50

$2 .6 0

$2 .7 0

$ 2 .80 $ 3 .00

$ 3.20

$3 .4 0

$ 3 .6 0

$ 3.80 $4.00 $ 4 .20 $4.40

$ 4.60

$ 4.80

$5.00 $ 5 .20

$ 5 .40

$ 5.60

$5.80 $6.00

$2.30

$ 2.40

$ 2 .50 $ 2 .6 0

$ 2.70

$ 2.80

$3.00 $ 3.20

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 .6 0

$ 3 .8 0

$4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $ 4.60 $ 4.80

$ 5.00

$5.20 $ 5.40

$ 5 .6 0

$ 5.80

$6.00 $6.20

1 ,8 8 2
1 ,1 5 2
730

$ 2 .9 6
3 . 24
2 .5 1

440
1 97
243

188
79
109

120
63
57

78
25
53

117
44
73

63
43
20

70
47
23

89
51
38

121
89
32

80
55
25

97
81
16

80
69
11

57
49
8

52
47
5

59
58
1

32
30
2

38
26
12

25
24
1

50

3 .5 2

1

2

_

2

_

2

3

2

9
4

9

3

2

2

1

2

3

3

2

41

3 .6 8

1

1

-

1

-

3

2

5

9

3

1

2

1

2

3

3

51
38
41
32
31
25

3 .8 0
3 .8 4
3 .8 9
3 .7 9
3 . 83
3 .7 7

1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1

-

-

4

-

-

2
2
2
2
1
1

3
3
3
3
3
3

4

-

4
4
4
4
4
4

7

-

2
2
2
2
2
2

7

-

-

7
3
3
7
3

2
2
2
2
2
2

7
3
7
3
1
1

3
3
1
1
3
1

92
86
6

3 . 61
3 .6 3
3 .3 5

-

_
-

-

3
3

6
4
2

3
3

4
4

7
7

10
10

3
3

22
20
2

3
3

5

5

-

4
1

4

6
6

2
2

212
170
46
43
166
127
39

2 . 38
2 .2 8
2 .3 0
2 .3 0
2 . 41
2 . 28
2 .8 3

94
92
26
25
68
67
1

32
29
4
4
28
25
3

21
16
3
2
18
14
4

8
4
3
2
5
2
3

11
10
5
5
6
5
1

10
5
2
2
8
3
5

3

10
3

1

2

3

10
3
7

14
3
2
2
12
6

(|
2
■
j
-j
3
<
1
2

13
10
g

3 . 52
3 . 82
3 . 88

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

26
15
11
12
7
14
6

2 . 92
2 . 40
3 .6 3
3 .1 5
2 . 59
2 . 72
3 .3 7

4
4

7

3 .7 5
3! 25

9
8
1

17
17
-

_

_

2

_

_

2
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
3
3

3
1
3
1
1
1

5
5

2
2

_

-

2
2

11
11
-

7
7
-

2
2
-

_

_

1

_

_
_
_

-

_
_
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

1
1

1
1

$6.20 $6.40
and
over

$6.40

15
15
-

9
9
-

_

_

1

_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_
_

_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

6
6

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING :
CUTTERS, L I N I N G , MACHINE3 ...........................
TT MR___________________ ________ _______
IN C E N T IV E ........................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHO E,
MACHINE4 ..........................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .........................................................
MEN.................................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .........................................................
LEATHER5 .......................................................................
*
MEN.................................................................................

-

-

7
4
-

1

1

P IT T IN G :
FANCY ST IT C H E R S5 ......................................................
MEN................................................................................
WOMEN______ _ ____ _______ _________________
P A S T E R S , BACKERS, OR F IT T E R S ,
UPPER, H A N D . . . . . ______ ________ __________
TT ME___________________________________
MEN___________________________ __________
TT ME_______________________________
W O M E N . . . . . . . . . . _____. . . . ___________
T IM E . ...................................................
IN C E N T IV E __________ ______ __________
PLATFORM-COVER STITCH ERS
(S L I P -L A S T E D S H O E S )..........................................
I NCENTTVE__________________ __________
MEN5 ______________________________________
S K IV E R S , MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L I N I N G S ...........................
T IM E ___________________________________
' I N C E N T I V E .................................. .. .................
M E N . . . . . . . . . .................. ...................................
TTME_____________________ _______ _______
WOMEN__________________ _________ _______
IN C E N T IV E . . . . . ........................... ..
SO C K -L IN IN G STITCH ERS

(<t I . T P — . A <?TRP < H n T «5)5 ___________
t
?
TOP STITCH ERS3' 5 .........................................................

18

_

1
1

1

2

5

1

2

-

2
2
1

-

3
3
■
Ja

1
1

4

4
4
2

2
2

-J
1

-|
2
2

1
1
1

1

1

2

2

2

2

2
1

2
2

1

1
1

2
2

1
1

2
2
2

1

1

2
2

2

_

1

1
1

2
2 .

-

1

1

2
2

4
4

3

_

1

1

1
2

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

4

4

4

-

-

-

-

1

_
-

1
1

_
-

_

1

-

2

~

4

-

-

1

1

-

-

3

-

1
1

_
-

-

L A ST IN G :
heet

.— r
<;

»t

t

»<;v f b q

g

3 /5

S ID E L A S T E R S , MACHINE:
STAPLE OR TACK L A STIN G ............................

3 .8 1

10

3 .0 4

-

-

2

4

-

-

10
9
6
9
3

4 .2 2
4 .3 7
3 . 40
3 . 29
3 .4 4
3 .5 9
4 .2 5
3 . 69
4 .2 5

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2

1

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

1
1

2
2

1

1
1

1
1
1

_
_
_

_
_
..

_
_
_

_
_
_

1

-

-

-

-

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
EDGE TRIMMERS3 ............................... ........................
IN C E N T IV E ....................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE ..............................
ROUGHERS3 .................................... .. ....................... ........
T

NCR NT T V R_____

__________

SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PR O C E SS ...........
IN C E N T IV E ........................................................
MEN..........................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ....................................................
See footnotes at end o f table




12

7
10

7

2
2

2
1

“

-

_
~

2

-

2

”

_
“

1

1

“

1
1
1
1

-

2
1
1
1
1

_
~

2

“

_
-

?
_
~

_

1
1

_
-

2

_
_
_

2
2

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

1
1
1

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

f

1
1

Table 24. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.1
—
3
2
Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

cn

1 The Los Angeles—Long Beach Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Los Angeles County.
2 Excludes premium pay lo r overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approxim ately 56 percent of the
production workers covered by the u ud y were paid on a time basis.
3 A ll or virtually ail workers were men .




Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.
A ll or virtually all workers were paid on a tim e basis.
A ll or virtually all workers were women.

Table 25. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Maine
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Department, occupation, and sex

Number Average $2.10
hourly
of
and
workers earnings3 under
$2.15

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS..................................
m e n . ............................ ..
WOMEN.....................................................................

$2.15

$2.20

$2.25 $2.30

$2.35

$2.40

$2.45 $2.50

$2.20

$2.25

$2.30 $2.35

$2.40

$2.45

$2.50 | $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.60

110
10
100

142
30
112

89
18
71

57
29
28

46
10
36

-

-

2,301
7 33
1 ,568

$2.76
2 . 94
2.67

3 82
66
316

13

9
7

3.05
3 . 08
3.01
3.06
2.94
2.96
3 . 01
3.06

-

—
-

—
-

“

~

“

56
38
18
45
30
15

4 . 02
3.95
4.17
3 . 93
3 . 76
4.28

157
64
93

73
10
63

139
40
99

$2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.60

113
35
78

90
47
43

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1

—
-

-

-

1
1
1
1

92
28
64

$3.80

$3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80
$4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00

96
33
63

85
46
39

85
32
53

58
30
28

82
33
49

111
37
74

87
32
55

76
41
35

53
14
39

30
21
9

20
11
9

2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

“

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1

-

-

1
1

-

-

5
3
2
4
3
1

1
1
1
1

12
8
4

6
5
1

$5.00
and
over
10
3
7

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:

Ol
"nI

CUTTERS, L I N I N G , MACHINE2 .........................
INCENTIVE....................................................
M E N . . . . . . . . ...................................................
INCENTIVE.....................................................
SYNTHETICS.............................................................
INCENTIVE....................................................
HEN..........................................................................
INCENTIVE.....................................................
COTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE2' ...............................................................
M E N - . - . - ............................... ..
WOMEN.....................................................................
LEATHER.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M E N ............................
WOMEN.....................................................................

11

9
7
10
8

-

-

-

2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1

-

—
-

—
-

~

-

-

-

-

-

—
-

3
3
3
3

4
2
2
3
2
1

7
4
3
7
4
3

7
6
1
6
5
1

7
6
1
5
4
1

1
1

7
4
3
6
4
2

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
2
3
4
1
3

-

—
_

—
-

2
2
1
1

~

5
3
2
2
2

'
FI T T I N G :
FANCY STITCHERS 5 .................................................
INCENT IVE ....................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR F I TT ER S,
UPPER, HAND5 ..........................................................
INCE NTIV E....................................................
SKIVERS, MACHINE, UEEERS OR
LININGS 5 .....................................................................
INCE NTIV E....................................................
TOP STITCHERS 5 .......................................................
INCE NTIV E....................................................
VAMPERS3' 5 ..................................................................

83
77

2.

62
2.65

20
19

5
5

5
3

2
2

7
7

7
4

_

3
3

-

40
37

2.53
2.56

13
12

4
4

3
2

1
1

2
1

1
1

-

16
15
56
49
25

2 .6 6

1
1
1
1
4

1
1
2
1

1
1
1

2
2
2
1
1

2
1
4
4

-

-

-

6
1

-

1
1
1

2.69
2 . 94
3.04
2.90

5
5

4
4

6
6

1
1

2
2

_
-

3
3

2
2

2
2

1
1
3
3

_

1
1
2

1
1
4
4
3

3
3
3
3
2

_
-

5
5
1

2
2

3
3

-

3
3
4

1
1

2
2

_

_

-

-

1
1
3
3
2

1
1
4
4

2
2

4
4

1
1

3
3

2
2

_

_

-

-

_
-

1
1
5
5
2

1
1
1

1
1

-

-

1
1

3
3

2
4

-

3

3

3

-

4
4
~

-

1
1

-

1
1

1
1

1
1

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

3
3
~

~

-

1
1

-

~

“

-

2
2
2

1
1
1

_
-

1
1

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

_
-

1

'
LASTING:
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS 3' 6 ..........................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS 3' 6 ..........................................................
TOE TO BALL...............................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS 3 , 6 ..............
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE2 3 ' 6 .........................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING............................
See footnotes a t end of table.




8

2.76

8
8

3.94
3.94
3.55
3 . 28
3 . 26

16
30
28

-

-

~

-

~

1

1
1

-

~

-

1
1

1

1
1

-

1
1

1

2
2

1

1
1
1

-

3
3

1

1
1
1

1

1

-

1

1
1

~

-

-

-

1
1
2
2
1

1
1

2
1
1

1
1
1
2
2

3

1
1
1

Table 25. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Maine— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings o f workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings o f Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Average $2.10
hourly
and
earnings1 under
2
$2.15

$2.15 $2.20 $2.25 $2.30

$2.35 $2.40 $2.45

$2.50

$2.20 $2.25, $2.30 $2.35 $2.40 $2.45 $2.50 $2.60

$2.60
$2.70

$2.70
$2.80

$2.80 $2.90
$2.90

$3.00 $3.10 $3.2C

$3.00 $3.10

$3.30 $3.40

$3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.60

$3.60 $3.80 $4.00
$3.80 $4.00

$4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00
and
$4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 over

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:

Ol
00

SHANKERS.......................................................................
INC ENTIVE....................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS............
INC ENTIVE....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
INCENTIVE....................................................

33
28
27
24

$2.93
3.02
3.43
3.51
3 . 56
3.64

43
34
16

2.28
2 . 21
3.19

26

2 . 40
2 . 31
2^45
2.26
2.28
2 . 17

8
7

1
1
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

1

-

-

1
1

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1

_
-

2
2

_
-

1

1

2

2

1

1
1
1

1
1
1

2

2
1

-

-

-

1

“

1

5
3
5
3

2
1
1

-

1
1
1
1

1
1

-

2
1
2

1
1

1
1

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1
1

2

2

2

1

2
2

2

-

3
3
3
3

1

-

1

2

2

2
2
2

1

2

-

1

1

1

2

2

-

2

1
1
1

_
4
4
4
4

_
-

_
-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

FINISHING:
REPAIRERS 5 ..................................................................
TREERS 3 4.........................................................................
.

17
13

8

4

1

1

6

_

2

_

_

1

-

2
2

1

-

1

1

-

-

-

1

-

2

-

1

2

2
2

4

2

_

_

1

_

1

1

-

-

1

_

1

1

H I SC E LL M-BQILS:

FLOOR WORKERS7 .......................................................
_____ _______
MFN
WOMEN.....................................................................
INSPECTORS (CBOWNERS) 5 ..................................
t i m e ..................................................................
u j'n n p c0' '

g

18

18
13
13

3

_

1

2
1
3
1

g

-

3

4

3

4
4

3

3
2

2

3

1

1

8

1
1

1 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approxim ately 71 percent of the
production workers covered by the study were paid on an incentive basis.
2 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
3 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.
4 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $5.00 to $5.20 and 1 at $6.00 to $6.20.




10
2

A ll or virtually all workers were women.
A ll or virtually all workers were men.
A ll or virtually all workers were paid on a tim e basis.

Table 26. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Missouri
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of w
orkers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number o w r e srciigsrih-ieh u l e r i g o —
f o k r e evn ta g t t m o r y a n n s f
Department, occupation, and sex

ALL

P R O D U C T I O N W O R K E R S .............................................
M E N ....................................................................................................
W O M E N .............................................................................................

SELECTED

P R O D U C T IO N

Number Average $ 2.10
$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60
of
hourly
and
workers earnings1 under
$2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70
$ 2.20
3 ,4 1 1
771
2 ,6 4 0

$ 3 .0 1
3 . 29
2 . 93

268
19
249

476
62
414

216
20
196

4
1
2
1

$2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.40 $5.80
and
$2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.40 $5.80 over

162
22
140

186
38
148

159
28
131

203
41
162

185
44
141

-

6
2
2
4
2
2

-

-

-

4
2
2
2
2
2

5
2
2
2
2
2

-

2

-

2

-

1
-

1
1
-

4

157
54
103

144
35
109

154
45
109

115
35
80

128
40
88

103
32
71

82
25
57

3
3
3
2

-

84
32
52

59
27
32

138
45
93

92
21
71

56
20
36

57
18
39

2
-

-

1

-

-

2
2
2
2

-

1
1
-

-

35
14
21

40
18
22

59
21
38

25
11
14

28
4
24

-

-

1

OCC U PA TIO N S

C U T T IN G :
C U T T E R S ', L I N I N G ,
M A C H I N E 2 .................................
W O M E N .............................................................................................
I N C E N T I V E .......................................................................
L E A T H E R A N D S Y N T H E T I C S .....................................
I N C E N T I V E ......................................................................
W O M E N ............................................................................................
I N C E N T I V E .......................................................................
C U T T E R S , VA MP AND WHOLE S H O E ,
M A C H I N E 2’ 3 .....................................................................................
M E N ....................................................................................................
W O M E N ............................................................................................
L E A T H E R ............................................................................................
W O M E N ............................................................................................
L E A T H E R A N D S Y N T H E T I C S .....................................
M E N ....................................................................................................

5
2
9
8
2
2

-

2
-

-

-

12

3
3
3
3
3
3

-

-

11

3 .4 1

-

-

100
44

3. 82

-

56
36
32
62

3 .6 3
3 .5 8

-

36
16
15
17
14

38

.0
.4
.4
.1
.3
.3

4 .0 6

3 . 50
3 .9 8
4 .0 9

-

-

-

1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1

-

1
1
1
-

-

-

3

2
-

-

-

1
1
-

1
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1
-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

3
1

3
1

2
-

5
-

5

2
1

5
-

7
1
6
3

-

3

7
5
2
-

5

1

7
-

3
3
-

9
4
5
4

1
1

2
2
2
-

1
4
4

7
-

~

■

~

“

1
1

1
3
3

2
2
2
1
1

-

1

2
-

1

-

-

7
7

2
2

-

1

-

-

1

-

2
2

-

-

~

2

-

5
1
4
2

8
4
4
2

7

2
3

5

1

2
6
4

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

5

5

6

5

3

-

1
3
1

2
3
1

4

6
-

2
3
2

1
3
1

1
4
2

3
-

-

4
5

2
4

-

2
2

4

■

3

3

4

9

6

2

1

-

2

-

1

-

-

2

-

1

1
-

2
-

-

1

1
1
1
1
1

4
4

2
3
2

2

2

4

-

2

-

-

2
2

-

-

5
4

3
3

“

FIT T IN G :
F A N C Y S T I T C H E R S 3’ 4. ...........................................................
PASTERS,
B A C K E R S , OR F I T T E R S ,

216

2 . 81

31

51

14

18

11

2

8

6

6

9

5

9

3

5

UPPER,
H A N D ! ..............................................................................
I N C E N T I V E ......................................................................
S K I V E R S , M A C H I N E , U P P E R S OR
L I N I N G S 3’ 4 .....................................................................................

160
151

2 .6 0
2 .6 1

17
17

62
58

14

11

9
8

6
6

2
2

4
4

6
6

4

7

5

8

3

4

4
4

7

4

8

3

1
1

44

4

7

1

3

-

5

6

3

3

-

3

1

-

152
55

25
5

24
9

8
5

3

12
2

4
1

2
2

11

9

5

3

6

1

4

1

10

5

2

2

2
2

3
4

1

T O P S T I T C H E R S 3..........................................................................
V A M P E R S 3’ 4 .............................................................................................

2 . 87
2 .9 9

7

4

3

1

3

3

2

“

2

~

1

1

_

6
3
2
2
2

1
-

2
1
-

2
1
2
2
2

-

-

4
4

3
-

-

4
2

3
-

1
-

4

-

2
2

-

-

1
1

-

-

2
4
4

1

2 .8 2

3
3

-

-

-

1

2

1

“

3

2
4

-

“

“

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

L A ST IN G :
A S S E M B L E R S FOR P U L L O V E R ,
M A C H IN E 3. .
M E N ....................................................................................................
H E E L - S E A T L A S T E R S ...............................................................
I N C E N T I V E .......................................................................
M E N ....................................................................................................
I N C E N T I V E .......................................................................
S ID E LA STER S,
M A C H I N E 2’ 3 ......................................
S T A P L E O R T A C K L A S T I N G ......................................

See footnotes at end of table.




38
21
12
11

8
7
68
64

3 .2 9
3 .3 7
3 .2 6
3 .2 9
3 .2 7
3 .3 2
3 .9 5
3 .9 9

-

2
4
2

-

1
1

-

-

-

1

1

1

1

2
”

-

1
1

1

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

2
2

1

-

-

3

2

2

3

2

2

-

-

-

7

-

4

7

~

4

-

3
3

4
2
2

-

-

4

3

4

3

-

1
1
1
1

5
4

2
2

1

1
1

1
1
1
1

5

-

5

4

5

“

4

4

1

-

2
2

4
4

Table 26. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Missouri—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number o w r e srciigsrih-ieh u l e r i g o —
f o k r e evn tag t t m o r y a n n s f
Department, occupation, and sex

SELECTED

Number Average $ 2.10
$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60
hourly
of
and
workers earnings1 under
3
2
$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70

$2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.40 $5.80
and
$2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.40 $5.80 over

PR O D U C TIO N O C C U PA T IO N S—
C O N TIN U ED

BOTTOMING AND M AKING:
EDGE

T R I M M E R S ..............................................................................
I N C E N T I V E .......................................................................
M E N ....................................................................................................

HEEL

ATTACHERS,

M A C H I N E ..........................................

I N C E N T I V E .......................................................................
M E N .....................................................................................................
I N C E N T I V E .......................................................................
R O U G H E R S .......................................................................
I N C E N T I V E ....................................................
M E N ..........................................................................
I N C E N T I V E .......................................................................

18
16
9
17
16
15
14

21

19

11

9

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

2
2
2
2

-

2
2
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

2
2
2
2
2
1
2

-

-

1
-

1
1

2
2

2

-

-

-

-

1

2
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

1

3
3

1
1

-

1
1
-

2
2
2
2
1
1
-

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
-

-

2
2

-

1
1

-

-

2
1

1

1
1
1
-

1
1

1
1
-

-

-

5
5

1
2
2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

1

-

-

3
3

1
1

-

-

1
1
2

-

1

-

1

-

4
4
2

1

1
1

3

-

-

-

1

2
2

-

3 . 18

~

~

~

“

~

1

~

3

“

~

2

1

~

1

~

~

~

3 .3 2
3 . 13

2
2

5
5

2

2
6

5
3

2

3

7
7

2

-

2

-

2

13

37
32
35

2 .7 1
2 .7 1
2 .7 0

-

2
2
2

2
2
2

2

4
4
4

83
51
17
9

3 .0 2
2 .7 1
3 . 50
3 .0 4
2 .9 0
2 . 64
2. 66
2 .6 7

1

4

2

7
7

-

2

-

~

S H A N K E R S .................................................................................................
I N C E N T I V E .......................................................................
W O M E N ? ..........................................................................................

18
17

2.68

8

2 .6 9
2 .7 7

9

52

-

1
1
1
1

-

3

1

-

-

1

1
1
1

-

10

ATTA C H ER S, CEMENT ER C C ESS
W O M E N .............................................................................................

-

1
-

N O M E N ? ..........................................................................................

SOLE

$ 4 .0 1
4 . 10
3 .7 0
2 .9 0
2 .8 9
2 . 96
2 .9 6
3 .3 9
3 .4 8
2 .9 9
3 . 10
3 .8 2

-

2
2
-

2
2
1
~

-

-

-

1
1

~

-

1

~

~

4

-

-

-

~

1
1

~
~
-

“
1

-

~

~

3

-

~
~
~

-

~
-

-

1
1
~
~
~

~
~
~
”

2

2

'

F IN IS H IN G :
R E P A I R E R S 4 ..................................................................
T R E E R S 3 , 4 .......................................................................

100

5

8

4

-

4

5

5

1

2

-

3

3

5

2
2

1

5

7

1

1

'

4

1

4

1

1

M ISC ELLA N EO U S:
FLOOR

W O R K E R S ..........................................................
T I M E .......................................................................

W O M E N ..........................................................................

T I N £ ............... .................................................
( C R C W N E R S ) .......................................
T I M E .......................................................................
M E N ................................................................................

IN SPE C T O R S

T I M E .........................................................................................
W O M E N .............................................................................................
T I M E .......................................................................

..........................................................................
M E N .......................................... ......................................
M E C H A N I C S , M A I N T E N A N C E 5' 6 ..............................

JA N IT O R S5

66

42
16
15
31

1

2

3
3

-

-

-

4

3

-

2
1

3

-

1

-

2

2

2
1
-

10
10

10
10

5

4

4

4
4
4

3

3
3

3

4
4
4
4

6

3

4

3
11

-

-

6
6

1
1

7
7

4
4

19
19

11

6
-

1
2

4

2
2

-

4

5

3 .6 8

1 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approxim ately 81 percent of the
production workers covered by the study were paid on an incentive basis.
2 Includes data fo r workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
3 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.




5

1

1

-

2

-

-

5

4

-

-

2

1

-

1
1

-

-

-

1

-

2

-

-

-

3

-

-

2

-

-

-

1
1

5

1

-

-

-

-

-

5

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

5

19
19

-

4
4
-

1

~

3

2

4

2

11

1

2

"

"

2

5
8
8

4 A ll or virtually all workers were women,
5 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.
6 A ll or virtually all workers were men.

Table 27. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Pennsylvania
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of w
orkers in selected occupations, April 1975)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
Number Average $2.10
and
of
hourly
workers earnings1 under
$2.20

Department, occupation, and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS.................................
MEN...........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................

$2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50

$2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10

$3.20 $3.30 $3.40

$2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60

$2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20

$3.30 $3.40 $3.50

303
98
205

213
46
167

202

1
1

1
1
1
1

4

1
1

2
4

1
•j

-

-

1
1

1
1

4
-

1

1

-

-

3

4 ,0 0 2
1 ,2 9 0
2 ,7 1 2

$ 2 .8 5
3 .0 2
2 .7 7

567
135
432

460
156
304

317
60
257

45
38
35
28

3 .2 1
3 .3 5
3 . 19
3 .3 7
3 . 31

4
4
-

_
-

3
3

2.

4

-

3

239
53
186

48
154

130
58
72

171
57
1 14

141
53

1

3
3
1

1

$3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40
and
$3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 over

88

64
27
37

57
38
19

31

24
14

10

4

11

19
9
1C

6

55
46

2

6
11

4
4
4
4

-

3
3
3
3

-

-

3
3
1

-

-

-

-

4
4

-

3
3

-

-

3

1

-

-

-

4
4

2
2

-

2
2

2
2

-

-

-

3
3
3
3
3

5
5
5
5
3
-

4
4

3
3
3
3
-

-

1
1
1
2
2

-

-

-

-

_
-

2
2

1
1
1

-

2

1

2
2
2
2 ,

2
2

1
1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

66 111

100

147
64
83

118
38
80

106
47
59

47
41

23
43

38
73

6
6
6
6

4
4
3
3

3
1
-

-

2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1

-

2

1

1

-

3
3

-

1

1

-

2
2

-

88

17 4

66

108

130
30

101

20

17

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE2 .........................
IN C E N TIV E ....................................................
MEN...........................................................................
IN C E N TIV E.....................................................
LEATHER.....................................................................
SYNTHETICS 3 ..........................................................
MEN..........................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
HAND................................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE........................................................................
IN CEN TIV E.....................................................
MEN...........................................................................
IN C E N TIV E ....................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
IN CE N TIV E.....................................................
LEATHER....................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
SYNTHETICS.............................................................
IN C E N TIV E ....................................................
MEN...........................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS 3 .........................
unflpp*

............

.......

-

.

10
12

66

1
1
2

1

1
1

1

2

1
2

1
1
1

1

2

2

24
18

3 .5 0
3 .5 3

-

29
27

3 . 34
3 .4 3

2

4

-

-

-

2
2

-

5
5

-

-

3
3

-

-

3
3

-

-

2
2

-

-

87
78
48
41
39
37
26

3 . 29
3 . 28
3 .6 5
3 .6 6
2 .8 5
2 .8 4
3 .4 6
3 . 52
3 . 31
3 .1 3
3 .5 3
3 . 19
3 . 88
2 .5 8

5
5

12
12

-

3
3
3
3
-

3
3

2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1

4
4

4

3
-

7
7
5
5

1
1
1
1

6
6
1
1

2
2
2
2

5
5

1
1
1
1

6
6

5

2
2

5
5

4
-

-

-

10

16
9

11

45

21

24

2
2
3
3

1

-

2
2
1
2
2

-

12
12
-

12
12

1
1

-

2
2

2
2
1
1
2

-

1
1

-

1
1

3
3
3
2

1
1

2

4

1

-

-

2

-

2

2
2

3

2
2
2

1
2
2

1
1
1
1
3
2
1

2

-

1

-

-

1
1

5
5

-

3
3
3
3
-

1

-

-

1

2
1
2
2
2
2

1
1

-

3
3
2

2

-

1

1
1
1

1

1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
3

2

-

-

1
1
1
4
3
1

4
4
-

2
2
1

12
12
11

3

3

3

3

3
3

3
3

3
3
3
3

4

2
2

6
6

8
6

7
7

2
2

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

3
2
■
j

3

2
2

1
1

1
2

F IT T IN G :
FANCY ST IT C H E R S....................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................... - .............
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR F IT T E R S ,
UPPER, HAND4..........................................................
IN CE N TIV E.....................................................
SK IV ER S, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
LIN IN G S 4 .....................................................................
TIM E .........................................................................................
IN C E N TIV E .......................................................................
SO CK-LINING STITCHERS
/ CT T D . T

\

C T \

201

20

12

186
188
174

2 . 98
3 . 03
2 .9 7
3 .0 2

17

10

175
142

2 .9 6
3 .0 2

20

8
6

43
12
31

2 .7 7
2 .3 8
2 .9 2

2
2

17

20
15

-

10

12

4
2
2

12
12

7

9
7
9
7

10
10

8
6
8
6

19
18
16
16

7
7
7
7

15
15
12
12

14
14
14
14

5
5
5
5

11
11
9
9

6
6
6
6

3
3
3
3

11
10

15

6

14
12

4
4

10
10

8
8

7
5

10
10

6

4

9
7

3

10

3
1
2

4

3

3

1

2

2

-

-

3

1

2

2

-

-

17
13
17
13

11

-

5

3

C UA

T M r T? M*PT V P

See footnotes at end of table.




Q

j
2-

on
8

8

7

8

!

5

4

2

11

4

8
6

2
2

1

1

-

1

1

z

2

4

3

1

z
2

7
7

6
6

1

11

2

-

Table 27. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Pennsylvania—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number o w r e srciigsrih-ieh u l e r i g off o k r e e v n t a gttm o r y a n n s
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Average $2.10
hourly
and $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50
earnings1 under
$2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60

$2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10

$3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80

$2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20

$3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $4.00

$4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40
and
$4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 over

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
F IT T IN G :— CONTINUED
TOP STITC HER S..........................................................
IN C E N TIV E....................................................

114

100

$ 3 .0 7
3 . 16

9
7

4
3

WOMEN.....................................................................
IN CE N TIV E ....................................................
VAHPERS..........................................................................
IN CEN TIV E....................................................

107
93
93
76

3 . 03
3 .1 2
3 . 16
3 .3 1

9
7
4
4

4
3

NOMEN.....................................................................
IN C E N TIV E....................................................

85

3 .1 0
3 . 26

4
4

2

68

2

-

“

6
1

6
1
13
5
13
5

4
4

2
2

5
5

14

4
4

2
2

5
5

14

8

3
3

8

2

2

7

-

6

2
2

2

7

-

6

2
2

2

3

8

3
3

1
1
1
1

12
12

1
11
11
-

4

2

8
8

8

2
2

8
8

-

1

2
1
2
2

2
2
4
4

3
3

1
1

1

4

8
8

9
9

8
8
5
5

9
9
3
3

5
5

3
3

4
4

4
4

1

2

3

7
7
3
4
4

8
8
11

5
5

3
3

8
8

_
-

7
7

2
2

2
2

1
1

_
-

_
-

_
-

1
1

1
1

5
5
4
4

3
3

8
8

_
-

2
2

1
1
1

1

1
1
-

-

-

2
2
2

“

2

2
2

5
5
3
3

2
2

_
3
3

_
-

4
4

2
2
2
2

-

3
3

2
2

1
1

3
3

2
2

3
3

4
4

2
2

1
1

3
3

2
2

1
1

2

3

1

4
3

2
2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

2
2

2
2

■
j

•j

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE3 . .
MEN..........................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS 3 ............................................
MEN...........................................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS3'5.................
SIDE LASTERS, MACHINE?..................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING............................
CEMENT LA STING.................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC 3 ..................................................
MEN..........................................................................

26
18
42
39

11

60
40

20
21
15
39
25
14

3 .1 4
3 .1 0
3 .0 4
3 . 04
3 .7 0
3 .3 0
3 .3 3
3 .2 4
3 .4 2
3 .1 5
3 .'2 3
3 . 43

4
4

-

-

1
1

6
6

2
1
1
1

3

6

3

1

1
2
1
1
2

-

2.88

2

33
27

3 .9 8
3 .7 1

-

19
15

2 .8 4
2 .8 1
2 .6 1
2 .4 4
3 .3 4
3 .4 6
3 . 41
3 .5 6
3 .2 4
3 .2 8
3 .3 3
3 .3 8
3 .3 4
3 .2 7
3 .5 5
3 .4 9

5

1

4

2
1
1
-

2

5
4
3
3
-

2
2
2
1

-

-

2
1
2
2
1

-

1

3
3
-

-

1

1

-

1

-

“

2
2

1
1

~

-

1

3
2
3
2
1
1
1
1

-

1

-

1

-

-

1

-

1

-

1

1

7
5

2

-

-

-

1
1

-

1

7
5

2

-

1

-

1
1
1
1

7

6
1
5
il

2
2

3

1
2
1

-

-

2
1
1

3
3

“

4
4

2

2
2

3

2
1

-

3

2
1
-

2

-

2
1
1

2
2
1
1
3

1

-

1

-

-

1

-

1
1
1
2

-

2
1
1

2

-

-

2
2

1

-

-

1
1

-

-

1

1

-

2
2

4
3

-

-

1

1
1

1
1

2
2

2
2

3
3

-

1

-

-

2

2
3

4

2
2
4
o
-

2
2

2

1
1
1
1

2

2

-

2

-

-

-

_
-

-

3

2

2
2

*

-

64
-

2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1

2
2
1
1

-

-

1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2

-

2
2

1

-

1
1

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
DA'Pirntl PTTTPBC
T IIPVIIIPTW

12

IN C E N TIV E ....................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS..........................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
IN CEN TIV E....................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE...............................
IN CEN TIV E....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
ROUGHERS........................................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
IN C E N TIV E....................................................
See fo o tn o te s at e nd of table.




9

21

19
18
16
24
22
20
18
31
28
24
21

2
2
2
2
-

2
2
2
2
3

3
2
2

_
5
3
4

2
1

1
1
1
4
4
-

2
2
2
2

-

1

1
3
3
3
3

-

-

-

1
-

1

3

3

2

3
-

-

-

5
3
2

-

-

~

1
1
1
1

-

-

2

2
2
2

3
3

2

3

3

3

3
3

2
2

5
5
5
5

2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
-

1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

1
1

~

“

“

2
2
2
2

2
2
-

2
2

2
2
4
4
4
4
7

6

7

6

2
2

2

1
1
1
1

-

Table 27. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Pennsylvania—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of w
orkers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number o w r e srciigsrih-ieh u l e r i g o —
f o k r e e v n ta g t t m o r y a n n s f
Number
of
workers

Department, occupation, and sex

Average $ 2.10
$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50
hourly
and
earnings1 under
$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60

$2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10

$3.20 $3.30

$2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20

$3.30 $3.40

$3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40
and
$3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 over

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:— CONTINUED
BOUGH ROUNDEBS........................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
HEN..........................................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
THrvu<PTVV

CO

11

13

11

27
25
13

11

T NrVHfPTVP
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEHENT PROCESS...........
IN C E N TIV E....................................................
HEN3 ........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
IN C E N TIV E ....................................................

o>

15

14
108
99
62
46
40

$ 3 .2 0
3 .5 2
3 .3 7
3 .5 2
7 .7 1
2 . 74
3 .1 4
3 .2 3
2 .3 5
3 .0 4
3 . 12
3 .2 1
2 .8 2
2 .9 2

2

-

2
2
2
10
2
2
8
2

-

3
3

3
8
8
5
3
3

q

4
1
1

-

3
3

3
4
4

1
1

2
2
2

6

20

-

2

-

2
4

-

3

4
3

-

1
1

1

-

1
1

1
6

7
7

3
3

3

-

2

4
4

3
3

4
4

5
4

7

2

5

2
2
2
2
1

_
-

2
2
2
2

_
-

_
-

3
3
3
3

_
-

4

_
-

_
-

2
2
2
2

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2
2
2

_
-

*
*

6
1
1

7
7
3
4
4

6
6
2

10
10
6

1
1
1

4
4

4
4

-

4

4

4
4
4

-

4
-

5
5
5

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

2
2
2
2

1
7
7

_
-

6
6

4
4
4
-

3

1
1

-

3
3

7
7

6
1
1

2
2
2

5

-

3

1

4

-

8
8
3

3
3
3

1
1

-

2
2
2

-

1
1

-

8
2
6
6
2
2

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

F IN IS H IN G :
REPAIRERS.....................................................................
TIM E..................................................................
IN CEN TIV E.....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
TIM E..................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
•PTM1
?
T _________
- INCENTIVE....................................................

89
59
30
13

6

76
53
23
40

2 -7 8
2 .5 7
3 . 20
3 .5 2
3 .1 7
2 .6 5
2 . 50
3 .0 1
2 .9 8

13

12
1
1
-

6
6
-

2
2
4

12
12

4

3

-

6

5
3
0

3
3
-

15
5
-

1

5

6
1

7

6
3

20

3
4

1

4

8
1
2

7

g

19

13

7
8

q

15
5

4
1

1
1

-

2
1
1

_
-

1
1

-

1
1

-

2
2

2
2

-

2
2

_

_

4

2

1

3

5
1
4

5
1
4
2
2

1
1

1
1

4

2
2

-

2

2

-

1
1
1
1
1

2
2

-

-

1
10

_
-

4

-

1
1

2

-

-

2

_

_

2
2

4

2
2

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

-

-

-

-

_

“

1

1
1

-

MISCELLANEOUS:
im p ic p p *;7________
M ffl
JZ
_____________

ft .n n p

INSPECTORS

____
___

--

(CROWNEBS)....................................

78
25
53
85
65

IN CEN TIV E....................................................

20
11

WOMEN.....................................................................

q
74
56
18

IN CE N TIV E............................................... . .
.Ti MT'pnocS, 7
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE5' 7- .........................

21

17

2. 60
2 . 65
2 .5 8
2^53
2 . 36
3! 10
2 .5 8
2 .5 3
2! 53
2 .3 3
3 .1 3
2 . 30
4 .7 0

4

2
9
g
_

9
g

4

29
28

1
3
9

26
26

7

g

10
8
4

2
2
6

2
2
8
4

8

4

g

1

8
11
4

4

_
4

4
1

3
10
5
4
1

■
j
■
j
4

3
1

3
3

3

_

2
2

3

2

1 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for work on weekends, holidays and late shifts. Approximately 72 percent of the
production workers were paid on an incentive basis.
2 Includes data fo r workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
3 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.




2
2
4

2
2

2
2
3

2
1
2
2
1

_

_

•j

2

2

1

2
1

2

1

1

2
1

2

1

_

1

2

1

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

_

1

A ll
A ll
A ll
A ll

_

1

1

1

_

_

1

2

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

1

1

1

_

_

1

2

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

-

-

-

1

-

2

-

-

2

-

2

-

5

3

1

or virtually all workers were women.
or virtually all workers were men.
workers were at $5.60 to $5.80.
or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.

Table 28. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Southeastern New Hampshire1
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number o w r e srciigsrih-ieh u l e r i g o —
f o k r eevn tagttm o r y a n n s f
Department, occupation, and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS.................................
SEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................

Number
of
workers

Average
$ 2.10
hourly
$2.15 $ 2.20 $2.25 $2.30 $2.35
and
earnings 2
under
$2.20 $2.25 $2.30 $2.35 $2.40
$2.15

2 ,8 0 9
835
1 ,9 7 4

$ 2 .9 3
3 .3 9
2 .7 3

22
18

4 .5 3
4 . 45

47
36

114
14

$3.40

$3.60 $3.80

$4.00 $4.20

$4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20

$5.40 $5.60 $5.80

$2.50 $2.60

$2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40

$3.60

$3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40

$4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40

$5.60 $5.80 $ 6.00

140
25
115

223
29
194

183

212

11

100

13 0
23
107

68

115

227

19
19
-

12
12

-

_
-

4

12
12

$6.00
and
over

21

28
28
~

“

2
2

2
2

2

4

63

2

4
4

1
1

6
3
2

2
2

4

2
2

1
1
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

2
2
-

“

“

-

52
160

130
41
89

105
31
74

131
54
77

96
54
42

69
26
43

45
26
19

60
28
32

48
32
16

15
9

166

1
1

86

113
33
80

72
38
34

$2.60 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20

4 .9 5
4 .6 4

57
31

549
46 3

$2.40 $2.50

2
2

_
-

1
1

2
2

_
-

2
2

_
-

3
3

-

-

1

3

3
3

4
3

6

1
1

4

5

4

2

-

2
2

4

8

11

1

2
2

-

-

-

€1

6

-

8

15

6

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE3' 4' 5 ..............
SYNTHETICS.............................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHCE,
MACHINE ' 7 ..................................•............................
SYNTHETICS.............................................................
T TPl'TUVD Alin CVMTUPT’TrC

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

2

4

1

1

1

z

1

F IT T IN G :
FANCY STITCHERS 4' 7 .................... ,.......................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR F IT T E R S ,
TIDDBO tl|U n 7
IN CEN TIV E.....................................................
SK IV ERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OH
L IN IN G S ? .....................................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
TOP STITCHERS 4 7 ..................................................
'
ua y n oo e 7
IN CE N TIV E....................................................

12 4
70
23
47
24

22

118
16

12

_

-

2 . 43

37

2 .5 3

23

2 .9 7
3 .0 5
2 .9 6
2 .8 1
2 .7 1

8
6
11

-

2

-

3 .3 0
J • ^7
3 . 25
3 .2 4
3 .9 4

-

-

1

1
1

3 .2 0

7

_

1

9

9

2

g

15
5

11
5

15

10

10

12

5

1

n

-

_

5

-

-

2

1

5

5

3

-

2

1

-

-

5

1
1

5

2
2
12

1
1
22

-

3
3

3
3

1

-

-

-

2
2
15
5
1

-

6

1
1
2

-

-

-

-

4
4

3
Z

2
-j

7

1
1

-

4
4

-

6

1

6

9

1

2

2

2

Z

1
1

_

z.
2

2

2

-

-

4
4

1
1
1

-

6

3

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER,
TUPPUIPTUV

M A C H IN E...

INCENTIVE.....................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS 4 ............................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS4................................................................
HEN...........................................................................
TOE TO BALL..........................................................
HEN..........................................................................
SID E LASTERS, MACHINE4' 5 ............................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING............................
CEMENT LASTING..................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




20
19

12
11
7

19

18
19
18
57
50
7

1
1

4 .0 0
4 .0 1
4 .0 0
4 . 01
3 .7 9
3 .8 6

-

3 .3 3

1

1
1
1

-

-

2
2
2
2

-

1
-

1
1

1

~

-

“

1
1

-

-

2
2
“

2
2
2
2
1
1

-

3

3
1
1

4
4
”

2
2
1
1
1
1
5
5

“

3

2
1
1

2

-

2
2

-

2
2

2
2
1
1
1

-

1

1

5

-

3

8
7

1

2

1

z

8
8
“

4
4

1

3

-

3

-

6
6

-

-

-

4

4
4
4

4
“

1

1

1

1
1
1

1
1
1

1
1

3

2
2
“

“

2
1

1

Table 28. Occupational earnings: Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted)shoes-Southeastern New Hampshire1
—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
Number
of
workers

Department, occupation, and sex

Average
hourly
earnings

$2.10
and
$2.15

$2.15

$2.20 $2.25

$2.20 $2.25 $2.30

$2.30 $2.35

$2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20

$3.40

$3.60 $3.80 $4.00

$4.20 $4.40 $4.60

$4.80 $5.00 $5.20

$5.40 $5.60

$2.35

$2.50 $2.60 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40

$3.60

$3.80 $4.00 $4.20

$4.40 $4.60 $4.80

$5.00 $5.20 $5.40

$5.60 $5.80 $6.00

$2.40

$5.80

$6.00
and
over

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
B O TTO M IN G

AND

M A K IN G :

HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE4 ............................
ROUGHERS........................................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
MEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
qh nnrPDQ^
MEN..........................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT EBOCESS4 ____
HEN...........................................................................

8
9
6
8

1 -j

$2 .8 6
3 .2 9
3 . 47
3 . 30
2 .3 7

_

_

_

_

_

2

1

1

_

_

2

1

2

2
2

-

2

1
—
3

2
-

8

2 . 27

38
33

-

60
54
57
51

2 .5 3
2 .3 3
2 .5 2
2 .3 1

23
23
23
23

-

43
38

2 .5 5
2 . 54

10
10

3
3

16
15
27

2 . 78
2 .7 4
2 . 42
2 .4 1

-

-

2

2

2

2

_

1

2

6
6

-

2

2

-

1

2

1
-

1
1

2

-

4

2

1

-

2

2

4
4

2

1

3

-

-

-

-

2

1

3

_
2

_
3
3
3

-

2
2

2
-

4. 38
4 .5 1

2

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

1

1
1
1
1

2
2
2

3

-

18
18
18

n

_

3

-

3

4
4

-

2
-

1
1

5
5

3
2

_

2

6

_

5
5

3

3
2
3

_

-

_

1
1
n
n

2
2
2

2
1

-

_

2
3
3

_
3

2

-

-

-

2

2

4

1

1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
1

4
4

3
3

F IN IS H IN G :
nvD iypppQ

TIM E..................................................................
WOMEN.............................................................................................

1
1

2

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS..............................................................................
■"FI*

*

***

TIM E..................................................................
.................

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23

INSPECTORS

(CROWNERS).................................................

20
12

IN CEN TIV E....................................................
MEN.....................................................................................................
WOMEN.............................................................................................
TIM E ..........................................................................................

8
8
12

2 .4 8

9

2 .2 8

2^49
2 . 41
2. 62
2 .5 1

5

3
3

2
2

1
1

4
5

1
1
1

2

2

2
2

2
2

-

-

~

“

1

-

-

-

2
2

1
1

1
1

5
-

2
n
3

2

2

2
-

-

1
1
2

-

-

1 Southeastern New Hampshire consists o f the area extending south from Farmington and Pittsfield and east from Manchester
and Nashua, N.H.
2 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approxim ately 70 percent of the
production workers covered by the study were paid on an incentive basis.
3 Includes data fo r workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.




-

1

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

A ll or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.
A ll or virtually all workers were men.
Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $6.80 to $7.00 and 1 at $7.20 and over.
A ll or virtually all workers were women.

1
1

2
2

2
2

1
1

2
2

2
2




Table 29. Occupational earnings: Misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoesall establishments
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations. United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Border States

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2

Number
of
workers

Middle West

Hourly earnings2

$ 3 .4 7
3 .5 7
3 .3 7
3 .2 2
3 .4 0

$ 3 .2 5
-

$ 2 .8 4 -

$ 4 .0 9
-

63
38
25
31
23
-

3 .8 4
4 .0 7
3 .4 9
3 .6 7
3 .7 9
-

3 .7 1
4 .0 5
3 .3 7
3 .7 7
4 .0 4
-

3. 1 1 3 .4 1 3 .0 1 3 . 163. 4 0 -

4 .3 4
4 .4 1
3 .7 7
4 .2 2
4 .3 0
-

100
100

2 .7 6
2 .7 6

2
2

. 61
. 61

2 . 282 .2 8 -

3. 0 6
3 .0 6

2 .6 1
-

62
62

2 .9 7
2 .9 7

2 -7 8
2 .7 8

2. 20-

3 .3 4
3 .3 4

2 .8 5
2 .7 5
-

23
23
67
67
55
55

3 .1 2
3 .1 2
2 .9 9
2 .9 9
2 .7 9
2 .7 9

3 .0 0
3 .0 0
2 .8 3
2 .8 3
2 .6 9
2 .6 9

2 .7 6 2 .7 6 2 .5 3 2 .5 3 2. 202. 2 0 -

3 .5 2
3 . 52
3 .3 7
3 .3 7
3 .1 4
3 . 14

26

3 .0 0
3 .1 0
-

2 .9 7
3 .0 2
-

2 .4 3 2 .6 0 -

3 .3 4
3 .3 5
-

3 . 55
4 . 10
4 . 10
3 .5 7
~

3 .0 0 2 .9 2 3 .0 3 2 .7 8 “

3 .8 9
4 . 48
4 .5 3
4 .4 1
~

Middle range

18
15
-

$ 2 .5 5
2 .6 5
-

$ 2 .2 8
2 .4 4
-

$2 . 1 0 - $ 2 .7 6
2 .1 6 2 .8 7
-

4 . 04
3 .8 8
4 . 54
5 . 11
4 .0 1

-

-

-

-

-

2 . 202 . 14-

3 .0 7
2 . 98

_
-

_
-

-

-

_
-

2 .2 5 2 .2 5 -

2 .9 2
2 .9 2

31
-

2 .4 3
-

2 .3 2
-

2

.
.
.
2.
2.
2.

2 .5 1
2 . 29
-

2 .3 4 2. 1 0 -

$ 3 .2 2
3 .1 7
4 .7 5
4 .3 1
3 .0 5
3 .0 1
2 .9 5
3 .0 5

$ 3 .0 1
2 .9 9
2 .9 4
2 .9 9
-

3 .3 6
3 .1 7
3 .9 6
4 .6 2
3. 4 5

3 .1 8
3 .0 8
4 .0 0
4 . 45
3 . 49

2 .5 3 2 .3 9 3 . 134 .0 9 2. 88-

62 4
536

2 .7 4
2.68

2 .5 5
2 .5 1

294
278

2 .7 4
2 .7 5

2 .6 3
2 .6 3

133
125
335
31 7
291
265

2.8 6

2 .8 5
2 .8 0
2 .7 8
2 .6 2
2 .6 2

2 .7 7
2 .7 7
2 .7 3
2 .7 1
2 .4 1
2 . 41

2 .8 0
2 .8 4
3 .0 6
2 .2 9

2 .7 1
2 .4 0
2 . 96
-

2

3 .4 9
3 .5 3
3 .5 8
3 .6 1
3 .4 7
3 .7 4
3 .7 6
3 .9 0
3 .5 8
-

3 .4 4
3 .3 2
3 .4 4
3 .5 1
3 .2 5
3 .7 2
3 .8 8
4 . 10
3 .5 0

Hourly earnings2
Medain

Median

Median

Number
of
workers

Mean

Mean

Middle range

Mean

Middle range

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE...........................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
LEATHER....................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
SYNTHETICS............................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS...........................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN................................................................. ..
CUTTERS, TAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE3 ....................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
LEATHER....................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS...........................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................

76
47
8

6
50
18
7
11

294
220

71
31
40

$ 2 . 2 5 - $ 3 .8 0
2. 223 .6 3
2 .2 6 3 .6 3
3 .4 4
2 . 21-

19
10

9
12

8

P IT T IN G :
FANCY STITC H ER S................................ ..................
WOMEN....................................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR P IT T E R S,
UPPER, HAND............................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
SK IV ERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
L IN IN G S .......................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
TOP STITCHERS.........................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
VAMPERS.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................

2
2

2121-

2 .66

161 41817-

3 . 40
3 .3 7
3 .2 2
3 . 18
3 .0 0
3 .0 0

22

2

50
-

2 . 58
-

. 222 . 152. 20-

3 .0 6
3 .2 7
3 .9 9
-

_
7
-

_
2 .3 6
-

2 .7 4 2 .7 4 2 . 862 .8 4 2 .9 9 2 .7 7 2 .7 7 2 .8 3 2 .7 3 -

4 . 06
4 .0 7
4 .0 7
4 .0 7
4 .1 0
4 . 46
4 .4 8
4 .6 6
4 . 15
-

-

.
-

10-

-

-

2

.

20-

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, M ACHINE...
MEN.........................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS..............................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS3 ...............................................................
MEN..........................................................................
TOE TO BALL.........................................................
MEN..........................................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS......................
SID E LASTERS, MACHINE...................................
MEN.........................................................................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING 4 .........................
CEMENT LA STING.................................................
MEN..........................................................................
See footnotes at end of table

89
46
33
11

78
70
70
63
39
102

89
50
52
-

~

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

22

20

37
36
30
7
7

-

3 .6 1
3 .9 0
3 .9 3
3 .7 1
4 .6 9
4 . 69




Table 29. Occupational earnings: Misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoesall establishments—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, April 1975)
United States 1
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Mean

98
59

$ 3 .6 0
3 .7 1

$ 3 .3 9
3 .5 0

78
-

3 .4 1
2 .9 0
2 .7 7
2 .8 7
3 .2 5

3 .2 5
2 . 55
3 . 11
3 .8 8
2 .4 1
2 . 43
2 .8 7

Border States

Hourly earnings2
Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Middle West

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

$ 3 .0 4
-

$ 2 .9 7
-

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings 2
Mean

Median

Middle range

SELECTED PBODOCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
LA ST IN G :— CONTINUED
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC...................................................
MEN.........................................................................

$ 3 .2 3 - $ 4 .1 0
4 . 14
3 .2 3 -

22

2 .8 1 2 . 102. 503 .2 6 2 .3 1 2 .3 1 2 .4 3 -

4 . 14
3 .5 3
3 .8 3
4 .6 8
2 -7 5
2 .7 5
3 .8 3

_
-

2 .3 5 2 .3 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 4 2 .2 8 -

3 .8 9
3 . 12
2 .9 9
3 .3 3
3 .2 9

25
-

2 .3 2 2 .5 0 2 .3 0 2 .5 0 2.203 .4 8 -

2 .9 0
2 . 96
2 . 90
3 .0 6
2 .8 1
4 .2 2

$ 2 .9 2 -

$ 3 .2 0
-

-

-

-

$ 3 .0 7
2 .9 9
_
3 .4 3
3 .4 8
-

$ 2 .5 8
_
_
_
-

$ 2 .3 7 _
_
_

$ 3 .4 8
_
_
_
_
_
_

3 .9 4
4 .0 1

4 .0 6
4 .1 5

3 .7 4 3 .7 5 -

4 .1 8
4 .1 8

_
3 .3 2
3 .3 2
3 .0 2
2 .9 9

_
3 .2 1
3 .2 1
2 .8 5
2 .8 4

2 .7 3 2 .7 3 2. 5 3 2 .4 6 -

-

-

-

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
EDGE TRIMMERS........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS...........................................
MEN........................................................ ...............
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE..............................
MEN.........................................................................
LITTLEWAY STITCHERS 4 ......................................
ROUGHERS......................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS......................................................
MEN.........................................................................
SHANKERS......................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PRCCESS...........
MEN.........................................................................

10

9
20
11
6

2 .6 8

104
-

165
~

3 .2 3
3 .9 2
4 .2 0
2 .5 1
2 .4 4
2 .5 5
3 .1 1
“

18
119
113
178
13?

3 .1 3
2 .7 4
2 .7 1
2 .9 5
2 .8 5

3 .0 2
2 .4 4
2 .4 0

117
18
99
163
43
63

2 .6 2
2 .7 4
2 .6 0
2 .8 3
2 .4 3
3 .7 9

2 .66

22
11

32
10
20

_

i

_

“

“

_
-

_
-

15
14
14
13
_
24
17

_

_

_

_

F IN IS H IN G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS...................................................
REPAIRERS....................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
TREERS............................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

2.86

2 .7 9

_

_
2 .3 9
-

_
2

.
-

10

_
2

.
-

10

_
-

2 .3 2
-

_
23
23
49
44

_

_

3 .9 6
3 .9 6
3 .3 3
3 .3 2

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS.........................................................
HEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS)...................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
JA N ITO RS 4 ...................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE4 ..............................

2 .7 0
2.66

2 .7 5
2 .3 3
3 .7 5

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays and late shifts. See
appendix A for methods used to compute means, medians and middle ranges of earnings. Median and
middle ranges are not provided for jobs with fewer than 15 workers in a region.

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
4

-

-

47
14
33
19

3 .1 3
3 .3 9
3 .0 1
-

3 .9 7

_
_
2 .88

2 .7 9
-

4 .2 0

_

_

-

-

_
2 .7 4 2 .7 3 -

3 .5 5
3 .4 6

-

3 .6 6 -

_

4 .3 5

Includes data for workers in addition to those shown separately.
All or virtually all workers were men.

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.

Table 30. Occupational earnings: Misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Missouri
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Department, occupation, and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS.................................
HEN..........................................................................
NOHEN.....................................................................

Number
of
workers

Average $ 2 . 1 0
$ 2 . 2 0 $2.30 $2.40
and
hourly
earnings1 under
$2.30 $2.40 $2.50
$2 . 2 0

1 ,7 5 4
509
1 ,2 4 5

$ 2 .9 6
3 .3 3
2 .8 0

71

19
12
8

3 .4 7
3 . 57
3 .3 7
3 .2 2
3 .4 0

63
38
25
31
23

$2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30

$3.40

I
--------- 1 -------$3.50 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20

$2.60 $2.70 $2.80

$2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40

$3.50

$3.60 $3.80

389
70
319

94
24
70

62

_

4

_

_

-

2
2

3 .8 4
4 .0 7
3 .4 9
3 . 67
3 .7 9

-

100

2 .7 6

12

15

62

2 .9 7

7

14

23
67
55

3 . 12
2 .9 9
2 .7 9

5
5

1

1

3
16

4
1

1

1

26

3 .0 0
3 .1 0
3 .9 0
3 .7 1
4 .6 9

-

1
1

37
30
7

2
2
2

15
14
14
13
24
17

3 .0 7
2 .9 9
3 .4 3
3 .4 8
3 .9 4
4 .0 1

8

63

72

$2.50 $2.60 $2.70

10

123
17
106

88
20
68

77
15
62

_

2

3
1
2
1

54
16
38

2

-

2
1
1
1
1

7

4

5

1
1

2

2

1

-

2

3
3

1
1

5
3
1

1

49
15
34

58
15
43

-

-

2
1
1
1
1

-

-

5

1

3

1

6

-

1

-

2

-

1

4
3

1

1
1
1

1

"

_
-

2
1
1
1
1

62
18
44

26
17
9

80
29
51

62
24
38

75
13
62

$4.60 $4.80 $5.00

51
24
27

50
19
31

91
34
57

$4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 $5.60
and
$5.20 $5.40 $5.60 under

$4.00 $4.20 $4.40
71
51
20

47
30
17

26
15

12
8

11
6

-

2
2

11

4

5

1

~

1
1

“
~

-

1

~

-

41
1
41

1

12

9
3

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , HACHINE2' 3 ....................
HEN...........................................................................
NOHEN.....................................................................
LEATHER AND SYNTHETICS............................
NOHEN.....................................................................
CUTTERS, VAHP AND NHOLE SHOE,
HACHINE 2' 3 ................................................................
HEN..........................................................................
NOHEN.....................................................................
LEATHER.....................................................................
HEN...........................................................................

10

9

2

-

-

-

1

1

1

2

-

-

-

2

2

1

1

1

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

6

5

11

4

-

-

1

3

1

1

4

5
4

3

4

5

4

-

1

-

-

1
1

1

-

-

“

7

2

8

3
3
4
4

2

5
1

1
1
1

4
4

-

1

1

1

2
2
2

4
4
4
4

1
1

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

3
3
-

3

1

6
6

5
5

~

1

1

2

2
1

-

-

1

1

1

1

1
1

2
2

—

-

-

-

~

-

4
54

-

1

“

11

4

-

2

6

4

1

3

5

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

2

-

4

3

1

2

-

-

4

-

4

-

1

-

-

1

1

3

-

4
4

-

-

1

4

2

2

2

“

~

-

2

“

-

1

3

-

3

2

3
3

2
2

1

3

2
2
1
1

-

5
5
-

-

”
3

“

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

~

3

"

F IT T IN G :
FANCY STITC H ER S 3' 6 ............................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, CR F IT T E R S ,
UPPER, HAND3 ' 6 ....................................................
SK IV ER S, HACHINE, UPPERS OR
L IN IN G S 3' 6 ................................................................
TOP STITCHERS 3 ' 6 ..................................................
VAHPERS3' 6 ..................................................................

6

1

2

1
~

2

“

-

LASTING:
ASSEHBLERS FOR PULLOVER, HACHINE3 . .
HEN.................................... .....................................
SIDE LASTERS, HACHINE 3' 7 ............................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING............................
CEHENT LASTING..................................................

22

6

3
-

1
1

-

2

3
3

2
2

1

1
1

1

2
1

4
4

1
1

-

-

7

2
2

1
1

~

2

6
1

-

2
2

2
2

2

"

2
1

~

~

'

3
1
82

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
EDGE TRIHHERS 3 .......................................................
HEN..........................................................................
ROUGHERS3 .....................................................................
HEN..........................................................................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEHENT PROCESS3 . . . .
HEN..........................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.




1
1

-

3
3

_

-

1
1

2
2

-

-

-

4
4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

2
2
1
1

-

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

—

2
2

1
1

-

~

1
1

“

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

2
2

-

4

4

7

3

2

2

6

2

1
1

1
1

1
1
1
1

1
1

1
1

-

-

~

-

-

-

~

~
"

-

~

"

”
“

Table 30. Occupational earnings: Misses’ and children’s cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes-Missouri—Continued
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
$2.10 $2.20,
hourly
$2.30 $2.40
earnings1 and
2
under
$2.30 $2.40 $2.50
$2.20

$2.50

$2.60

$2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30

$2.60 $2.70

$2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40

$3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 $5.60
and
$3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.40 $5.60 under

$3.50

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
FINISH ING :

o>

CO

REPAIRERS346 .............................................................
'
TREERS3 ..................................................................... ..
BOMEN.....................................................................

23
*19
44

$ 3 .3 2
3 .0 2
2 .9 9

47
34
14
33
21
19

3 . 13
2 .9 9
3 .3 9
3 .0 1
2 .7 6
3 .9 7

_
-

2
8
8

1
3
3

_
1
1

_
1
1

1
1
1

-

_

-

1
1
1

-

-

18
17

-

-

18
17

1

-

6

3
3

1
9
8

_
1
1

_

7
7
3

-

1
-

4

-

1

:

1

-

-

-

-

_
7
5

1
~

_
4
4

2
2
1

2
2
2

4
3

1
-

-

1
1
1

1

3
“

10

2

~

~

1
-

~

1
1
1

2
-

8

-

2

_
-

2

-

_

_

_

“

1
1

~

■

1
1

-

-

-

MISCELLANEOUS:
INSPECTORS (CROWNERS)....................................
TIME..................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE7' 9 .........................

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays and late shifts. Approximately
production workers covered by the study were paid on an incentive basis.
2 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
3 All or virtually all workers were paid on an incentive basis.
4 All workers were at $5.60 to $5.80.




86

percent of the

-

1

-

1
1

-

3
2
2
1

1

1

2

6

3

5
4

1

1

1

Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $5.60 to $5.80 and 2 at $6.80 and over.
All or virtually all workers were women.
All or virtually all workers were men.
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $5.60 to $5.80 and 1 at $6.00 to $6.20.
All or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.

-




Table 31. Occupational earnings: Misses’ and children’s Goodyear-welt
shoes-all establishments
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations. United States and Middle Atlantic region, April 1975)
Middle Atlantic

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

37
15
22
23
10
13

$ 3 .2 5
3 .7 2
2 .9 3
3 .6 9
9 .1 7
3 .2 3

$ 3 .0 0
3 .3 9
2 . 51
3 .3 9
-

159
118
91
138
100
38

9 .0 2
9 . 15
3 .6 9
9 .0 8
9 .2 8
3 .5 7

3 .8 8
3 .9 2
3 .5 5
3 . 96
9 .0 0
3 .9 0

3 . 193 .3 1 2 .6 5 3 . 193 .3 2 2 .6 5 -

157

3 .1 8

3 .0 7

92

3 .0 2

2 .9 7

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings3
Mean

Middle range

Median

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE3 ........................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER...................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
CUTTERS, TAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE?...................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
LEATHER...................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

-

-

-

-

-

8
6
-

$ 2 .9 8
3 .1 2
-

9 .7 5
5 . 19
9 .6 0
9 .9 0
5 . 20
9 .9 3

99
25
29
99
25
29

3 .9 5
3 .7 7
3 . 12
3 . 95
3 .7 7
3 . 12

$ 3 .3 2
3 .9 8
2 .6 5
3 .3 2
3 .9 8
2 .6 5

2 .6 0 -

3 .5 7

36

2 . 88

2 .7 5

2. 99-

3 .5 8

9

2 .6 0

91
97
36
32

2 .6 1
2 . 91
3 .0 5
3 .0 1

2 .9 8
2 .7 8
3 .0 0
2 .9 2

2 .9 5 2 .5 0 2 .5 9 2 .5 5 -

2 .7 3
3 .2 2
3 .2 9
3 .2 6

3 .2 0
-

2 .9 1 -

3 .5 0
-

$ 2 .3 0 - $ 3 .9 9
2 .8 1 9 .7 0
3 .2 9
2 .2 0 9 .6 0
2 .5 9 -

$ 2 .6 5 - $ 3 .7 5
3 .7 5
3 .3 0 3 .7 5
2 .5 5 3 .7 5
2 .6 5 3 .7 5
3 .3 0 3 .7 5
2 .5 5 -

F IT T IN G :
FANCY STITCHERS 4 ................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR FIT T E R S,
UPPER, HAND?........................................................
SK IV ERS, MACHINE, UPPERS OR
LIN IN G S 4 ...................................................................
TOP STITCHERS 4 .....................................................
VAMPERS........................................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

-

2 .6 9 -

3 .1 9
-

95
139
172
16
156

2 .9 9
3 .2 9
3 . 27
3 .6 1
3 .2 9

2 .7 6
3 . 12
3 . 20
3 . 99
3 .1 2

2 .9 5 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 3 .2 5 2 .5 6 -

3 .3 1
3 .8 0
3 .7 8
3 .8 9
3 .7 7

63
98
15
23
19

3 .2 1
3 .0 0
3 .9 0
3 .6 2
3 .7 1

3 . 20
2 .8 2
9 .0 3
3 .5 8
3 . 83

2 .5 6 2 .9 0 3 .5 7 3 .0 5 3. 20-

3 .8 9
3 .5 0
9 .2 6
9 . 18
9 . 29

29
-

3 .0 1
-

20
20
97
65
58

5 .1 2
5 .1 2
3 .7 3
3 .7 5
3 .7 6

6 .2 0
6 .2 0
3 . 60
3 . 51
3 .5 0

3 .5 7 3 .5 7 3 . 133 .0 3 3 .0 9 -

6 .3 9
6 . 39
9 . 57
9 .9 3
9 .3 7

9
19
19

3 .7 8
3 .9 9
3 . 99

-

-

-

91
37

3 .5 2
3 .5 9

3 . 90
3 . 90

2 .9 1 3 .0 1 -

9 . 12
9 .0 7

8
8

3 .7 8
3 .7 8

-

“

“

27
13
19

2 .9 9
3 .3 8
2 .5 9

2 .6 5
~

2 .1 0 -

3 .9 1
-

10
~

3 . 16
“

~

“

“

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, M ACHINE...
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
HEEL-SEAT LASTERS.............................................
MEN........................................................................
PULLING AND LASTING-MACHINE
OPERATORS5 ..............................................................
TOE TO BALL........................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS5 ...................
SID E LASTERS, MACHINE3 ' 5 ...........................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING...........................
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC...................................................
MEN........................................................................
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:
BOTTOM FILLER S......................................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.




Table 31. Occupational earnings: Misses’ and children’s Goodyear-welt
shoes-all establishments—Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations. United States and Middle Atlantic region, April 1975)
Middle Atlantic

United States1
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
Mean

Median

Middle range

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings2
*
Mean

Median

Middle range

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
BOTTOMING AND MAKING:— CONTINUED
EDGE TRIMMERS.........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
GOODYEAR STITCHERS...........................................
MEN.........................................................................
HEEL ATTACHERS, MACHINE..............................
MEN.........................................................................
INSEAMERS 5 ........... . ..................................................
INSEAM TRIMMERS5 .................................................
ROUGH ROUNDERS6 ...................... - ..........................
SOLE ATTACHERS, CEMENT PROCESS...........
MEN.........................................................................
SOLE-LEVELERS, MACHINE.................................
MEN.........................................................................

67
58
9
95
80
16
13
43
18
29
37
21

18
13

$ 4 .4 3
4 .6 0 ,
3 .3 5
3 . 69
3 .8 0
3 .7 5
3 .6 4
4 .4 1
3 .5 8
3 .7 0
3 .2 1
3 .4 5
2 .9 5

$ 4 .7 0
4 .9 3
3 .6 3
3 .8 7
3 .6 2
4 . 09
3 .6 2
3 .5 5
2 .5 8
2 .5 8
2 .6 5

$ 3 .4 0 - $ 5 .3 3
3 .5 7 5 .3 3
3 .1 2 4 .2 7
3 .3 0 4 .3 9
4 .2 3
3 .0 5 3 .3 8 5 .3 2
3 .8 7
2 .7 8 3 . 134 .0 1
2 .2 5 3 .6 0
2 .3 5 3 .7 8
3 .5 6
2 .4 5 -

2 .88

23
18
27
14
6

14
10
8
-

11

“

$ 3 .2 9
3 . 46
3 .2 8
3 .6 5
3 . 27
3 .5 4
3 .0 0
2 . 85
2 .5 0
-

$ 3 .3 1
3 . 43
3 .1 0
-

$ 2 .7 0 - $ 3 .5 5
3. 153 .6 0
2 .9 0 3 .6 2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

F IN IS H IN G :
BOTTOM SCOURERS5 .................................................
EDGE SETTERS 5 ........................................................
REPAIRERS....................................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
TREERS............................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................

21

25
1 09
20

89
35
22

2 .7 9
4 . 14
2 .6 8

2 .5 7
2 .7 0
5 .0 1
3 .6 3

_

2 . 65
4 .0 2
2 .3 5
2 . 35
2 .3 5
4 . 16
3 .8 0

2 .2 5 3 .1 0 2 .2 5 2 .3 0 2 .2 5 3 .6 0 2 .7 3 -

3 .0 5
4 .6 1
3 .1 0
2 .7 5
3 . 10
7 .2 4
4 . 14

2 .7 5
2 .7 5
2 .7 5
2 .5 1
2 .5 2
2 .5 0
2 -4 5
3 .7 7

2 .4 0 2 .4 0 2 .4 0 2 .3 0 2 .3 1 2 .3 0 2 .2 5 2 .9 0 -

3 . 00
2 .9 9
2 .9 9
2 .9 0
3 .1 5

30

2.86

-

10

46
38
-

_

_

3 .1 6
2 .6 2
2 .6 5

2 . 41
2 .4 1

_
2 .3 0 2 .3 0 -

2 .88

2 .9 9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS.........................................................
MEN.........................................................................
WOMEN...................................................................
INSPECTORS (CROWN I R S ) ....................................
MEN........................................................................
WOMEN................................... ...............................
JANITORS 5 ...................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE5 ..............................

59
26
33
97
38
59
26
30

2 .7 7
2.8 2

2 .7 4
2 .6 8

2 .7 3
2 .6 4
2 .4 9
3 .6 9

1 Includes data for regions in addition to Middle Atlantic.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends,
holidays and late shifts. See appendix A for methods used to compute
means, medians, and range of earnings. Medians and middle ranges are not
provided for jobs with fewer than 15 workers in a region.

2 .5 7
3 .9 8

-

13
19
8

2 .7 8
-

2 .6 5
2 .7 1
3 .1 4
~

2 .6 3
-

2 .3 1
“

2 .4 5 2 .3 0 ~

2 .7 5
2 .9 4
■

3 Includes workers in classifications in addition to those shown sepa­
rately.
4 All or virtually all workers were women.
5 All or virtually all workers were men.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet
publication criteria.

Table 32. Occupational earnings: Misses’ and children’s Goodyear-welt shoes-Southeastern Pennsylvania1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
Department, occupation, and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS.................................
HEN..........................................................................
WOMEN....................................................................

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings 2

$2 . 1 0
and $ 2 . 2 0 $2.30 $2.40
under
.&L2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50
10
1

72

101

8

9

64

26
75

109
34
75

998
375
623

$ 2 .8 4
3 .0 7
2 . 69

8
6

2 . 98
3 . 12

-

-

1

-

39
29

3 .2 0
3 .0 8
3 . 54
3 . 38
3 .0 3
3 .2 0
3 . 08
3 . 54
3 .3 8
3 .0 3

-

"
-

“
-

'
4
4

“

~

2 . 90
2 .9 5

-

9

2 .6 0

-

-

4

39
25
14
41
29

2 .5 7
2 .6 1
2 . 49
2 . 86
2 .7 6
3 . 12
3 .0 2
2 . 93
3 .3 1

“

3
3

3
1

12

2

3
“

3 . 44
3 . 52
3 .3 6
3 .9 5
3 .3 5
3 . 53
3 .4 6
3 .3 5
3 . 53
3 . 46

-

-

-

-

$2.50 $2.60

$2.70 $2.80

$2.90 $3.00 $3.10

$3.20

$3.30

$3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70

$3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20

$2.60 $2.70

$2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20

$3.30

$3.40

$3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80

$3.90 $4.00 $4.20

1 14
36
78

99
24
75

66
20

1
1

1
1

1

6
6

5
5

-

46

56
18
38

38
9
29

60
26
34

59
29
30

32
18
14

31
18
13

36
25

22

20

14
13

14

11

8

7
13

7

1

1

1
1

-

1
1

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
1
1
2

2
1
1

3

3

1

1
2

~

~

1

1

1

1
2

2
2

2

~

1

“

8

12
12

$4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20

$5.40

5
5
“

4
3

1
1

2
1

1
1

1

“

1

~

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

“
“

-

-

~

~

2

-

1
1

“

~

~

18
13
5

8
6

-

2

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING:
CUTTERS, L IN IN G , MACHINE3 .........................
LEATHER....................................................................
CUTTERS, VAMP AND WHOLE SHOE,
MACHINE.......................................................................
TIM E..................................................................
IN CEN TIV E....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................
LEATHER.....................................................................
TIM E..................................................................
IN CEN TIV E....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
WOMEN.....................................................................

10

19
20

39
29
10

19
20

-

-

-

2

-

2

6
6
6

4
4

~

2
2

-

1

1

-

-

-

5
5
5

-

-

-

2
1
1
1

2
1
1
1
1
2

2

1
1
1

1
2

'

1

“

3
3
3
3
3
3
~

2
1
1
2

-

-

-

2
2
1

2

3

2

3
3

-

1
2
1
1
1
1

2
2

-

4
3

3
2

1
1

2
1

2
2

-

1

-

1

“

-

1

-

-

~

3

1
1

1
1

1
1

2
1
1

2

1

~

1
1

-

-

2
2

2

1

-

-

1
1

3
3
3
3

2
1
1

1
1
2

2

-

2

1
1

-

1

~

-

~

-

1
1

-

2
1
1

2
2

-

1
1

5

~

-

-

9
8

2
1

1

1

-

15

4
3

5

1

3

1

17
16

2
1

3

6

'

2

1
1
2

1

3
~

1
1

-

“

~

~

-

-

1

-

-

-

1
2
2

~

~

”

1

2

F IT T IN G :
FANCY STITCHERS 4 ..................................................
TIM E..................................................................
PASTERS, BACKERS, OR F IT T E R S ,
UPPER, HAND4 ..........................................................
SK IV ERS, MACHINE, UEEERS OR
l i n i n g s ! ....................................................................
TIM E..................................................................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
TOP s t i t c h e r s ! .......................................................
TIM E..................................................................
IN C E N TIV E....................................................
VAMPERS4 ................. .. ...................................................
TIM E..................................................................
IN CENTIVE.....................................................

28
21

12

30
23
7

2

2

1

1

1

2
1
1

9
9
~

3
2
1

“

2
1
1

1
1

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

1

1

-

-

2

1

-

4

2
2

~

~

1
1
1

2

-

2
1
2

2

1
1

”

1

1

1

-

-

-

1

1

~

“

”

”

1

”

1

~

”

“

“
~
”

1

3
3

“

~

~

LASTING:
ASSEMBLERS FOR PULLOVER, MACHINE----IN CEN TIV E....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
PULLOVER-MACHINE OPERATORS5 ....................
SID E LASTERS, MACHINE....................................
IN CENTIVE...................................................
MEN............................................... ..........................
STAPLE OR TACK LASTING............................
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.




13
10

7
7
10
6

9
10
6

9

-

-

-

~
-

-

-

-

1

1

1
1

~
3

2
2

1

-

3
3

2

1

-

3

2

2

~

2
2
2
2
2
2

-

-

1

-

-

-

1
1

~

■ -

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

1

1

-

-

“

~

1

1

4
3
3
-

1

-

-

-

-

-

~

~

1
1

1

1
1
1
1

~

-

~

1

-

“
“
~

~

~

“
~
~
“

~
“
“

Table 32. Occupational earnings: Misses’ and children’s Goodyear-welt shoes-Southeastern Pennsylvania1 —Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, April 1975)

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
$ 2.10
$ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40
hourly
earnings1
2 and
3
$2.30 $2.40 $2.50
$2.20

$3.70 $3.80 $3.90

$4.00

$4.20 $4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.2

$3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00

$4.20

$4.40 $4.60 $4.80 $5.00 $5.20 $5.4i

$2.50 $2.60 $2.70

$2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10

$3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60

$2.60 $2.70 $2.80

$2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20

$3.30 $3.40 $3.50

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS-CONTINUED
L A STIN G :— CONTINUE!
TOE LASTERS, AUTOMATIC OR
SEMI-AUTOMATIC 5.............. ..................................

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

2

1

2
_

_

1

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1

1

3

1

BOTTOMING AND MAKING:

■
vj

CO

BOTTOM F IL L E R S .......................................................
EDGE TRIMMERS..........................................................
TIM E________________________________
IN CE N TIV E....................................................
MEN. . .................................
T I M E . . . . ......................... .......... ..................
IN C E N TIV E_______________________
GOODYEAR STITCHERS............................................
TIM E..................................................................
MEN..........................................................................
TIM E..................................................................
INSEAMERS.....................................................................
IN CEN TIV E.....................................................
MEN..........................................................................
IN CE N TIV E ....................................................
INSEAM TRIMMERS5 ......... ................- .....................
ROUGH ROUNDERS5 ....................................................
f in ish in g

6
17

10

7
16

10
6

27

22
14
9
14
7

12
7
10

8

2 .8 4
3 .3 1
3 . 19
3 . 47
3 .3 5
3 . 19
3 .6 1
3 .2 8
3 .1 0
3 .6 5
3 .4 2
3 .5 4
3 .7 3
3 . 60
3 .7 3
3 .0 0
2 .8 5

_

_

-

_

2

1

_

_

_

-

-

1
1
1
1

_
~
-

1
1

_
_
-

2
2

_
_
_
-

2
1
1

1
1

1

_

2
2

I
_

1

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

1
1

_
_
_
3

2

1

2
1

1

_
_
_
_
_
1
2

4
4
_
_
_
_
_

1
1

_
2
2

1
1

2
2

1
1

1
1

~

2
2
1
1

2
2
1
1

1
1

2
2

3

1

_
_
_

2

1

_
_
_
_
_
_

1

1

1
1
1

2

1
2
1
1

4

z

4

2
2
1
1
1
1

1
1
1

4

1

3

1

1
1
2
2

1

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
1

-

1

-

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

1

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

1

_

1
1

2
2
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

2

_
_

1

;

EDGE SETTERS...... ....................................................
R E P A I R E R S . . . . . . ....................................................
T I M E .. __________ ___________________
IN C E N T IV E . . ...................... .. .....................
WOMEN....................................................................
TIM E . . . . .............................. ........................
IN CE N TIV E......... ..........................................

6
40
28
12
38
28
10

3 .3 9
2 . 64
2 .5 7
2 .8 1
2 .6 5
2 .5 7
2 .8 7

7

_

6
1
7
5

11
11
11
11

5

1
1
1
1

1
2

2

1

4
4
-j
3

2
2

1

2

2

2

2

1

2
3

1

1
~

1
2

1

1
2

i

_

I

1

1
1

1
~
1

1
1
2
1

2
2
2

1

MISCELLANEOUS:
FLOOR WORKERS6 ___________________ T __ W O M E N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........................
INSPECTORS (CRCWNERS)....................................
T IM E ................................................................
MEN.......................................................................

16
13
17
15

6

2 . 65
2 .6 5
2 .7 6
2 .6 2
3 .4 1

*
)

1
1
4
4

3

4

2
4
4

1

1

1

1
1

1

1 The Southeastern Pennsylvania area consists of Berks, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, and Schuylkill counties.
2 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approximately 63 percent of the
production workers covered by the study were paid on a time basis.
3 Includes data fo r workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.




1
_

2

2
'

_

1
1

I

I

1
1
1
1
1

A ll or virtually all workers were women.
A ll or virtually all workers were men.
A ll or virtually all workers were paid on a tim e basis.

2

1
1

-

1

_
_
_
_

1
1
1
1




T ab le 33.

M ethod o f w age paym ent

(Percent of production workers in footwear manufacturing establishments by method of wage payment,1 United States and selected regions, April 1975)

United
States2

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

All workers.......................................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Time-rated workers...............................................................
Formal plans....................................................................
Single rate....................................................................
Range of rates............................................................
Individual rates................................................................

26
13
4
9
14

30
13
6
7
17

36
12
(*)
12
24

19
9
1
8
10

25
15
12
3
10

21
7

19
17
1
15
2

16
12

-

12
3

51
1
(3)
1
50

Incentive workers.................................................................
Individual piecework.......................................................
Group piecework...............................................................
Individual bonus..............................................................
Group bonus .....................................................................

74
72
1
1
(3)

70
68
2

64
64
-

81
81
-

84
84
1

49
49
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(*>

75
74
(a)
-

-

-

Method of wage payment

1 For definition of method of wage payment, see appendix A.
2 Includes data for tyie Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.
3 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

7
14
79
78
1
-

-

81
72
8
2

-

T ab le 34.

Scheduled w eekly hours

(Percent of production workers in footwear manufacturing establishments by scheduled weekly hours,1 United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Weekly hours
All workers.

C
JI




Under 32 hours........................
32 hours....................................
35 hours........................
Over 35 and under 40 hours
40 hours ........................
42 hours............................
48 hours...................................

United
States2

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

8

26

17
16

85

72

3
7

(*
)

1
88

7

1
2

11
3

(3
)
92

97

(3
)

1

1 Data relate to the predominant schedule for full-time day-shift workers in each establishment.
2 Includes data for the Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.
3 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.

1
89

100

1

5
62

100

T ab le 35.

Paid holidays

(Percent of production workers in footwear establishments with formal provisions for paid holidays, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Number of
paid holidays

United
States'

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

All workers......................................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Workers in establishments
providing paid holidays..................................................
Under 4 days ...................................................
4 days ...............................................................
5 days ....................................................
5 days plus 2 half day
6 days ......................
6 days plus 2 half days.............. .............
7 days .................................................................
7 days plus 1 or 2 half days.....................................
8 days ...................................................................
8 days plus 1 or 2 half days.....................................
9 days ....................................................................
9 days plus 1 or 2 half days.....................................
10 days ................................................................
11 days .................................................................
Over 11 days ................................................................

98
1
4
2
(2)
9
3
12
3
20
1
37
1
3
2
(2)

94
_
_
3
_
6
_
10
6
18
5
31
3
6
6
-

100
_
5
(2)

99

100
6
18
7

100

100

100

100

1

10

11
17
16
4
26
_
15
3
2
_
1

_
_
_
25

1
7

22
2
31

2

26

37

12

18

18

54

2
-

-

-

1

18
6
11

(2)
7

61

84

(2)

13

(2)
2

7

1

-

26
6
58

-

1 Includes data for the Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.
2 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

G)




Table 36.

Paid vacations

(Percent of production workers in footwear establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Vacation policy
All workers......................................................................

United
States'

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

98
55
43

94
42
52

100
80
20

100
46
54

99
10
89

95
48
47

100
72
28

100
95
5

100
90
10

1
93
1
3
(3)

_
86
3
4
-

_
92
1
5
2

_
98
_
2
-

_
99
_
_

11
80
_
4
-

(3)
96
3
_

_
100
_
_

_
90
_
10

Method of payment

Workers in establishments
providing paid vacations..................................................
Length-of-time payment..................................................
Percentage payment........................................................
Amount of vacation pay 2
After 1 year of service:

Under 1 week...................................................................
1 week...............................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..........................................
2 weeks .............................................................................
3 weeks ............................................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

-

______________ L

-




T a b le 36.

Paid vacatio n s—Continued

(Percent of production workers in footwear establishm ents w ith form al provisions for paid vacations afte r selected periods of seivice. United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Vacation policy

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

73
9
16
2

77
23
-

99
_
-

_
72
9
13
-

65
9
24
2

77
23
-

2
(a)
92
1
1
(3)

4
82
3
5
-

4
1
93
-

2
44
7
45
(3)

4
45
7
38
-

2
19
3
63
8
(*)

4
26
54
3

United
States'

England

(3)
85
6
7
n

84
4
5
-

(*)
71
8
17
1

- Middle
Atlantic

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

91
4
-

(3)
76
18
4
_

94
5
1
-

90
_
10

70
9
19
-

77
7
11
-

(3)
54
16
26
3

92
5
4
-

_
90
_
_
10

3
97
-

2
97
-

95
-

1
96
3
-

_
100
-

_
_
90
_
_
10

3
58
9
28
2

3
69
28
-

2
43
54
-

44
14
37
-

_
39
16
46
_

_

_
58
_
32
10

3
25
6
56
2
2

3
45
52

23
14
58
_

_

_

-

2
13
57
27

-

-

-

3
25
1
52
17
1
2

3
45
35
17
-

2
13
38
27
19
_
-

23
14
50
8
-

_
(3)
_

-

-

-

Pacific

Amount of vacation pay‘— Continued
After 2 years of service:
Under 1 week..................................................................
1 week..............................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks..........................................
2 weeks ............................................................................
3 weeks ............................................................................
After 3 years of service:
Under 1 week..................................................................
1 week..............................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks.........................................
2 weeks ............................................................................
Over 2 weeks.................. ...............................................
After 5 years of service:
1 week..............................................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks.........................................
2 weeks ............................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.........................................
3 weeks ............................................................................
4 weeks ............................................................................
After 10 years of service:
1 week..............................................................................
2 weeks ............................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks
3 weeks ............................
4 or 6 weeks..................
After 15 years of service:
1 week..............................................................................
2 weeks ............................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.........................................
3 weeks ............................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks.........................................
Over 4 weeks..................................................................
After 20 years of service:4
1 week..............................................................................
2 weeks ............................................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.........................................
3 weeks ............................................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks.........................................
4 weeks............................
. .
Over 4 and under 5 weeks
5 weeks ............................
Over 5 weeks..................

-

2
18
1
50
6
19
(3)
(*)
(3)

-

4

26
47
3
15
-

•

1
_
78
19
_

59

4
5
91
_

2
5
93
_
_
_
2
_

_
_
_

28
3

64

90

_
34
_

_
_

_

10

_

-

-

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
2 Vacation payments, such as percent of annual earnings, were converted to an equivalent time basis. Periods of service were chosen arbitrarily and do not necessarily reflect individual
establishment provisions for progression. For example, changes indicated at 10 years may include changes that occurred between 5 and 10 years.
3 Less than 0.5 percent.
4 Vacation provisions were virtually the same after longer periods of service.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

_
_
_
90
_
_

10




T ab le 37.

H ealth , insu ran ce, and retirem en t plans

(Rercent of production workers in footwear establishments with specified health, insurance, and retirement plans,1 United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Type of plan
All workers.......................................................................

United
States1
2

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

92
47

90
66

87
59

93
48

100
27

78
36

100
51

99
8

74
74

51
33

67
41

49
43

49
44

53
27

39
32

57
30

24
6

16
16

70
69
50

72
72
47

51
50
44

93
81
51

60
59
42

46
46
39

94
92
63

98
98.
83

-

1

-

-

15

-

-

-

1
1
1
98
57
97
57
91
53
75
41
67
65
60
3
1

-

Workers in establishments providing:
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans.................................................
Accidental death and
dismemberment insurance...........................................
Noncontributory plans.................................................
Sickness and accident insurance
or sick leave or both3 ..................................................
Sickness and accident insurance............................
Noncontributory plans............................................
Sick leave (full pay,
no waiting period)....................................................
Sick leave (partial pay
or waiting period).....................................................
Long-term disability insurance
Noncontributory plans......
Hospitalization insurance....
Noncontributory plans.................................................
Surgical insurance..........................................................
Noncontributory plans.................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans.................................................
Major medical insurance................................................
Noncontributory plans
Retirement plans4 ....
Pensions..................
Noncontributory plans
Severance p a y ..............................................................
No plans............................................................................

2
1
93
43
93
43
91
43
73
29
37
37
35
4

1 Includes those plans for which the employer pays at least part of the cost and
State temporary disability laws are included if the employer contributes more than
include only those financed entirely by the employer.
2 Includes data for the Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.
3 Unduplicated total of workers receiving sickness and accident insurance and sick
4 Unduplicated total of workers covered by pension plans and severance pay shown

1

6

2

99
73
98
73
86
60
59
32
71
71
50
-

100
43
97
43
97
43
76
15
88
65
65
23
—

100
46
100
46
93
46
82
46
68
68
68
—

~

7
7
100
82
100
82
73
63
80
70
61
61
61
—

3

-

100
45
100
45
97
45
80
36
93
89
87
4
"

96
77
96
77
96
77
93
80
91
91
91
1

100
100
100
100
100
100
16
16
58
45
45
13
"

excludes legally required plans such as workers’ compensation and social security; however, plans required by
is legally required or the employees receive benefits in excess of legal requirements. ‘‘Noncontributory plans”
leave shown separately.
separately.




T ab le 38.

O ther selected b en efits

(Percent of production workers in footwear establishments providing funeral leave pay, jury duty pay, and technological severance pay,1 United States and selected regions, April 1975)

Item

United
States1
2

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

Pacific

72
50
22

72
28
1

69
25
2

59
43
18

64
64
45

59
47
19

90
79
30

96
93
70

16
10
—

Workers in establishments
with provisions for:
Funeral leave p a y ........................................................
Jury duty leave p ay.....................................................
Technological severance pay......................................

1 For definition of items, see appendix A.
2 Includes data for the Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Scope of survey

Production workers

T h e su rvey in c lu d e d e sta b lish m e n ts en gaged prim arily in

T h e term s “ p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s” and “ p r o d u c tio n and

th e p r o d u c tio n o f b o o ts and sh o e s (e x c e p t h o u se slippers

related w o r k e r s,” u sed in te r c h a n g e a b ly in th is b u lle tin , in ­

and rubber fo o tw e a r ) d esig n ed prim arily fo r str e e t, w o rk ,

clu d e w o rk in g supervisors and all n o n su p e r v iso r y workers:

p la y , or sp ortsw ear (In d u stry 3 1 4 1 as d e fin e d in the 1 9 6 7

en gaged in n o n o ffic e a ctiv ities. A d m in istra tiv e, e x e c u tiv e ,

e d itio n o f th e S tan d a rd In d u stria l C lassification M anual ,

p r o fe ssio n a l, and te c h n ic a l p e r so n n e l, and fo r c e -a c c o u n t

prep ared b y th e U .S . O ffic e o f M an agem en t and B u d g et).

c o n str u c tio n e m p lo y e e s , w h o are u sed as a separate w o r k

S ep arate au xiliary u n its su ch as cen tral o ffic e s w ere e x ­

fo r c e o n th e firm ’s o w n p r o p e r tie s, are e x c lu d e d .

clu d e d .
T h e esta b lish m e n ts stu d ie d w ere se le c te d fro m th o se

Occupations selected for study

e m p lo y in g 5 0 w ork ers or m o r e at th e tim e o f referen ce o f
th e d ata u se d in c o m p ilin g th e u n iverse lists.
T h e n u m b er o f e sta b lish m e n ts and w ork ers stu d ie d b y

O c c u p a tio n a l c la ssific a tio n w as b a sed o n a u n ifo r m set

th e B u reau , as w e ll as th e n u m b er e stim a te d to b e w ith in

o f jo b d e sc r ip tio n s d esig n ed to tak e a c c o u n t o f in te r e sta b ­

sc o p e o f th e su rvey d uring th e p a y r o ll p eriod stu d ie d , is

lish m e n t and in ter are a va ria tio n s in d u tie s w ith in th e sam e

sh o w n in tab le A - 1.

jo b . (S e e a p p e n d ix B fo r th ese d e sc r ip tio n s .) T h e criteria
for s e le c tio n

o f th e o c c u p a tio n s w ere:

T h e n u m b er o f

w o rk ers in th e o c c u p a tio n ; th e u se fu ln e ss o f th e d ata in

Method of study

c o lle c tiv e bargaining; and ap p rop riate r e p r e se n ta tio n o f th e
en tire jo b scale in th e in d u str y . W orking su p ervisors, ap­

D a ta w ere o b ta in e d b y p erso n a l v isits o f th e B u reau ’s
field

s t a ff to

a rep resen ta tiv e

sam p le

p r e n tic e s, learn ers, b eg in n ers, train ees, and h a n d ic a p p e d ,

o f e sta b lish m e n ts

p a rt-tim e, te m p o r a r y , and p r o b a tio n a r y w ork ers w ere n o t

w ith in sc o p e o f th e su rvey. T o o b ta in ap p rop riate accu racy

rep o rted in th e d ata fo r se le c te d o c c u p a tio n s b u t w ere

at a m in im u m c o s t, a greater p r o p o r tio n o f large th an o f

in c lu d e d in th e d ata fo r all p r o d u c tio n w ork ers.

sm all esta b lish m e n ts w as stu d ie d . In c o m b in in g th e data,
how ever,

all

esta b lish m e n ts

w ere

given

an

ap p ropriate

Wage data

w e ig h t. A ll e stim a te s p r e se n te d , th e r e fo r e , relate to all
e sta b lish m e n ts in th e in d u str y , e x c lu d in g o n ly th o se b e lo w

In fo r m a tio n

th e m in im u m size at th e tim e o f referen ce o f th e u niverse

o n w ages relates to straigh t-tim e h o u r ly

earnings, e x c lu d in g p rem iu m p a y for o v e r tim e and for w o r k

data.

o n w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s, and la te sh ifts. In cen tiv e p a y m e n ts,
su ch as th o s e resu ltin g fro m p ie c e w o r k or p r o d u c tio n b o n u s

Establishment definition

sy s te m s, and co st-o f-liv in g b o n u se s w ere in c lu d e d as p art o f
th e w o r k e r s’ regular p a y . N o n p r o d u c tio n b o n u s p a y m e n ts,

A n e sta b lish m e n t is d e fin e d for th is stu d y as a single

su ch as C hristm as or y e a r e n d b o n u se s , w ere e x c lu d e d .

p h y sic a l lo c a tio n w h ere m a n u fa c tu r in g o p e r a tio n s are p er­

A verage (m ea n ) h o u rly rates o r earnings fo r ea c h o c c u p a ­

fo r m e d . A n e sta b lish m e n t is n o t n ecessa rily id e n tic a l w ith a

tio n or c a te g o r y o f w ork ers, su ch as p r o d u c tio n w ork ers,

c o m p a n y , w h ic h m a y c o n sist o f o n e esta b lish m e n t or m o re.

w ere ca lc u la te d b y w e ig h tin g e a c h rate (o r h o u r ly earn in gs)
b y th e n u m b er o f w o rk ers receivin g th e rate, to ta lin g , and
d ivid in g b y th e n u m b er o f in d ivid u als. T h e h o u r ly earnings

Employment

o f salaried w o rk ers w ere o b ta in e d b y d iv id in g straig h t-tim e
salary b y n o rm a l rather th a n a ctu a l h ou rs.

E stim a te s o f th e n u m b er o f w ork ers w ith in th e sco p e o f

T h e m edian d esig n a tes p o sitio n ; th a t is, o n e -h a lf o f th e

th is stu d y are in te n d e d as a general gu id e to th e size and

e m p lo y e e s su rv ey ed receiv ed m o re th a n th is rate and on e-

c o m p o s itio n o f th e in d u s tr y ’s la b o r fo r c e , rather th an as

h a lf received less. T h e m id d le range is d e fin e d b y tw o rates

p recise m easu res o f e m p lo y m e n t.

o f p a y su ch th a t o n e -fo u r th o f th e e m p lo y e e s earn ed less




80

Table A-1. Estimated number of establishments and employees within scope of survey
and number studied, footwear manufacturing industry, April 1975
Number of
establishments1
2
Product branch, region,1

and area

Workers in establishments

Within scope of study

Within
scope of
study

Actually
studied

Actually studied
Production
workers

Total3

All establishments:
United States4 .................................................................................................
New England ...............................................................................................
Middle A tla n tic ............................................................................................
Border S tates...............................................................................................
Southeast ......................................................................................................
Southwest......................................................................................................
Great L a k e s .................................................................................................
Middle W e st.................................................................................................
P ac ific ............................................................................................................
Men’s Goodyear-welt dress shoes:
United States4 .................................................................................................
New England5
M a in e .........
Brockton, Mass
Border States
Southeast.......
Tennessee...
Southwest......................................................................................................
Great Lakes5 ................................................................................................
W isconsin.................................................................................................
Men’s Goodyear-welt work shoes.United States4 .................................................................................................
New England ...............................................................................................
Southeast......................................................................................................
Great L a k es .................................................................................................
Men’s cement-process shoes:
United States4 .................................................................................................
New England ...............................................................................................
Middle Atlantic
Southeast.......
Great Lakes ...
Women’s cement-process (conventional-lasted)
shoes:
United States4 .................................................................................................
New England5
M a in e .........
Lawrence-Haverhill-Lowell, Mass.........................................................
Southeastern New Hampshire............................................................
Middle Atlantic5
Pennsylvania...........................................................................................
Border S tates...............................................................................................
Southeast......................................................................................................
Southwest......................................................................................................
Arkansas..................................................................................................
Middle W e st.................................................................................................
Missouri.....................................................................................................
P ac ific ............................................................................................................
Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif...........................................................
Misses’ and children’s cement-process
(conventional-lasted) shoes:
United States4 .................................................................................................
New England ...............................................................................................
Middle A tla n tic ...........................................................................................
Border S tates...............................................................................................
Southeast......................................................................................................
Middle W e st.................................................................................................
Missouri.....................................................................................................
Misses’ and children’s Goodyear-welt shoes:
United States4 .................................................................................................
Middle Atlantic5 ..........................................................................................
Southeastern Pennsylvania.................................................................

434
117
91
30
52
32
56
42
11

306
84
56
22
37
18
46
34
8

119,187
29,938
20,769
8,847
18,432
9,675
16,626
12,435
2,336

105,583
26,147
17,908
8,187
16,919
8,589
14,233
11,408
2,093

91,826
23,747
15,129
6,577
13,378
6,539
14,200
10,312
1,901

53
12
3
6
7
10
10
3
13
12

46
12
3
6
6
6
6
3
12
11

23,465
3,977
1,437
1,709
2,617
4,559
4,559
1,761
3,272
2,988

20,462
3,493
1,295
1,452
2,479
4,159
4,159
1,497
2,801
2,574

20,944
3,977
1,437
1,709
2,372
2,701
2,701
1,761
3,111
2,827

24
6
7
8

23
6
6
8

8,110
2,180
2,671
2,230

7,165
1,958
2,399
1,877

7,820
2,180
2,381
2,230

48
17
6
9
10

36
12
5
6
8

17,083
5,441
1,376
3,270
4,870

15,022
4,807
1,296
3,031
3,908

13,458
3,998
1,252
2,343
4,130

152
43
10
10
13
34
22
11
8
19
19
14
14
10
10

105
33
10
8
9
22
14
8
5
10
10
11
11
7
7

36,885
10,847
2,727
3,259
3,204
6,527
4,547
3,396
2,207
4,624
4,624
3,742
3,742
2,077
2,077

32,830
9,457
2,301
2,903
2,809
5,674
4,002
3,085
2,009
4,061
4,061
3,411
3,411
1,882
1,882

27,497
8,978
2,727
2,907
2,165
4,479
3,159
2,376
1,413
3,114
3,114
3,084
3,084
1,642
1,642

42
7
9
9
5
7
7

22
3
3
5
3
6
6

9,399
1,255
1,761
2,073
1,229
1,908
1,908

8,657
1,152
1,633
1,923
1,109
1,754
1,754

5,159
555
702
1,068
762
1,587
1,587

16
7
5

12
6
5

4,451
1,286
1,100

4,012
1,158
998

3,358
1,193
1,100

,

1 The regions used in this study include: New Eng/a/id-Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont; M iddle Atlantic-H&N Jersey, New York, and
Pennsylvania; Border States -Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; Southeast -Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina, and Tennessee;Southwest -Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas;GreatLakes-\\\'m\s, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin;/W/dd/elVesMowa, Kansas,
Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota; and Pac/f/c-California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.
2 Includes only those establishments with 50 workers or more at the time of reference of the universe data.
3 Includes executive, professional, office, and other workers excluded from the production worker category shown separately.
4 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. Alaska and Hawaii were not included in the study,

s I c u e data f r a e s ( r S ate) i a d t o t t o e shown s p r t l .
nlds
o ra o t
n diin o h s
eaaey




81

Supplementary benefits

th a n th e lo w e r o f th ese rates and o n e -fo u r th earn ed m ore
th a n th e h igh er rate.

S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e fits in an e sta b lish m e n t w ere c o n s id ­
ered ap p lica b le to all p r o d u c tio n w ork ers i f th e y a p p lied to

Size of community

h a lf or m o re o f su c h w o rk ers in th e esta b lish m e n t. S im i­
la rly , i f fe w e r th a n h a lf o f th e w ork ers w ere c o v e r e d , th e

T a b u la tio n s b y size o f c o m m u n ity p erta in to m e tr o p o li­

b e n e fit w as co n sid e r e d n o n e x is te n t in th e estab lish m en t.,

tan and n o n m e tr o p o lita n areas. T h e term “m e tr o p o lita n

B ecau se o f len g th -o f-se r v ic e and o th e r e lig ib ility r e q u ir e ­

areas,” as u sed in th is b u lle tin , refers to th e Standard

m e n ts, th e p r o p o r tio n o f w ork ers receivin g th e b e n e fits

M e tr o p o lita n S ta tistic a l A reas as d e fin e d b y th e U .S . O ffic e

m a y b e sm aller th an e stim a te d .

o f M a n a g em en t and B u d g et th r o u g h F eb ru ary 8 , 1 9 7 4 .
E x c e p t in N e w E n glan d , a Standard M e tr o p o lita n S ta tis­

Paid holidays.

tica l A rea is d e fin e d as a c o u n ty or group o f c o n tig u o u s

P aid h o lid a y p ro v isio n s relate to fu ll-d a y ancl

h a lf-d a y h o lid a y s p ro v id ed an n u a lly .

c o u n tie s w h ic h c o n ta in s at lea st o n e c ity o f 5 0 ,0 0 0 in h a b i­
ta n ts or m o r e . C o u n tie s c o n tig u o u s to th e o n e c o n ta in in g

Paid vacations.

su c h a c ity are in c lu d e d in a S tan d ard M e tr o p o lita n S ta tisti­

to

cal A rea if, a cco rd in g to certa in criteria, th e y are e sse n tia lly

fo rm a l

T h e su m m aries o f v a c a tio n p lan s are lim ite d

arran gem en ts

and

e x c lu d e

in fo r m a l

p lan s

w h e r e b y tim e o f f w ith p a y is gran ted at th e d isc r e tio n o f

m e tr o p o lita n in ch aracter and are so c ia lly and e c o n o m ic a lly

th e e m p lo y e r or su p ervisor. P a y m e n ts n o t o n a tim e basis

in te g r a te d w ith th e cen tra l c ity . In N e w E n glan d , w h ere th e

w ere c o n v e r te d ; fo r e x a m p le , a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t o f

c ity an d to w n are a d m in istra tiv ely m o r e im p o r ta n t th an th e

an nual earnings w as co n sid e r e d th e eq u iv a le n t o f 1 w e e k ’s

c o u n ty , th e y are th e u n its u sed in d e fin in g S tan d ard M etro ­

p a y . T h e p e r io d s o f service fo r w h ic h d ata are p r e se n te d

p o lita n S ta tistic a l A reas.

rep resen t th e m o s t c o m m o n p r a c tic e s, b u t th e y d o n o t
n ecessa rily r e fle c t in d iv id u a l e sta b lish m e n t p r o v isio n s for
p ro g ressio n . F o r e x a m p le , ch an ges in p r o p o r tio n s in d ic a te d
at 10 yea rs o f service m a y in c lu d e ch an ges w h ic h occu rred

Method of wage payment

b e tw e e n 5 and 10 years.
T a b u la tio n s b y m e th o d o f w age p a y m e n t relate to the
n u m b er o f w o rk ers p aid u n d er th e variou s tim e and in ­

Health, insurance, and retirement plans.

c e n tiv e w a g e sy s te m s. F o rm a l rate stru ctu res for tim e-rated

for h e a lth , in su ra n ce, p e n sio n , and re tir e m e n t severance

w o rk ers p rovid e sin gle rates or a range o f rates for in d iv id ­

p lan s for w h ic h th e e m p lo y e r p a y s all or a part o f th e c o s t,

D ata are p resen ted

ual jo b c a te g o r ie s. In th e ab sen ce o f a fo rm a l rate stru ctu re,

e x c lu d in g program s req u ired b y la w su ch as w o r k e r s’ c o m ­

p a y rates are d e te r m in e d p rim arily b y th e q u a lific a tio n s o f

p e n sa tio n and so cia l se c u r ity . A m o n g p lan s in c lu d e d are

th e in d iv id u a l w ork er. In a sin gle rate stru ctu re th e sam e

th o se u n d e r w r itte n b y a co m m e r c ia l in su ran ce c o m p a n y

rate is p a id to all e x p e r ie n c e d w ork ers in th e sam e jo b

and th o s e p aid d ir e c tly b y th e e m p lo y e r fro m his cu rren t

c la s sific a tio n .

o p eratin g fu n d s or from a fu n d se t aside for th is p u rp o se.

(L earn ers,

a p p ren tices,

or

p r o b a tio n a r y

w o rk ers m a y b e p aid a cco rd in g to rate sch e d u le s w h ic h
start b e lo w

D e a th b e n e fits are in c lu d e d as a fo rm o f life insurance,,

th e sin gle rate and p erm it th e w ork ers to

S ick n ess and a c c id e n t in su ran ce is lim ite d to th a t ty p e o f

a ch iev e th e fu ll jo b rate over a p e r io d o f tim e .) A n e x p e r i­

in su ran ce u n d er w h ic h p r ed eterm in ed cash p a y m e n ts are

e n c e d w o rk er o c c a sio n a lly m a y b e p aid ab o v e or b e lo w the

m a d e d ir e c tly to th e in su red o n a w e e k ly or m o n th ly basis

sin gle rate fo r sp ecia l reason s, b u t su c h p a y m e n ts are e x c e p ­

during illn e ss or a c c id e n t d isa b ility . In fo r m a tio n is p r e ­

tio n s. R an ge-of-rate p lan s are th o se in w h ic h th e m in im u m ,

se n te d for all su ch p lan s to w h ic h th e e m p lo y e r c o n tr ib u te s

m a x im u m , or b o th o f th e se rates p aid e x p e r ie n c e d w ork ers

at lea st a part o f th e c o st. H o w ev er, in N e w Y o rk and N e w

fo r th e sam e jo b are sp e c ifie d . S p e c ific rates o f in d ivid u al

J ersey , w h e r e tem p o ra ry d isa b ility in su ran ce la w s require

w o rk ers w ith in th e range m a y be d ete r m in e d b y m erit,

e m p lo y e r c o n tr ib u tio n s ,1 p lan s are in c lu d e d o n ly i f th e

le n g th

e m p lo y e r ( 1 ) c o n tr ib u te s m o re th an is le g a lly req u ired , or

o f service, or a c o m b in a tio n o f th ese. In cen tiv e

w o rk ers are cla ssifie d u n d er p ie c e w o r k

or b o n u s plan s.

( 2 ) p ro v id es th e e m p lo y e e s w ith b e n e fits w h ic h e x c e e d th e

P ie c e w o r k is w o r k fo r w h ic h a p r e d eterm in ed rate is paid

req u irem en ts o f th e law .

fo r ea c h u n it o f o u tp u t. P r o d u c tio n b o n u se s are for p r o d u c ­

T a b u la tio n s o f p aid sick leave plan s are lim ite d to form al

tio n over a q u o ta or fo r c o m p le tio n o f a task in less th an

p lan s

standard tim e.

w o r k e r ’s p a y d u rin g ab sen ce fro m w o r k b e c a u se o f illn ess;

w h ic h

p ro v id e

fu ll

pay

or

a p r o p o r tio n

o f the:

in fo rm a l arran gem en ts h ave b e e n o m itte d . S ep arate ta b u la ­
tio n s are p ro v id ed fo r ( 1 ) p lan s w h ic h p ro v id e fu ll p a y and

Scheduled weekly hours
D ata o n w e e k ly h ou rs refer to th e p r e d o m in a n t w o rk
sc h e d u le for fu ll-tim e p r o d u c tio n w ork ers e m p lo y e d o n th e

lrThe temporary disability insurance laws in California ancl
Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.

d a y sh ift.




82

n o w a itin g p e r io d , and ( 2 ) p lan s p ro v id in g eith er p artial p ay

lish m en ts p ro v id in g b o th r etirem en t severan ce p a y m e n ts

or a w a itin g p erio d .

and r etirem en t p e n sio n s to e m p lo y e e s w ere co n sid ered as

M ed ical in su ran ce refers to p lan s p rovid in g for c o m p le te

h aving b o th r etirem en t p e n sio n s and r etirem en t severance

or partial p a y m e n t o f d o c to r s ’ fees. S u ch plan s m a y be

plans; h o w e v e r , e sta b lish m e n ts h avin g o p tio n a l p lan s p r o ­

u n d erw ritten b y

vid in g e m p lo y e e s a c h o ic e o f eith e r r etirem en t severan ce

a co m m e r c ia l in su ran ce c o m p a n y or a

n o n p r o fit o rg a n iza tio n , or th e y m a y b e a form o f self-in ­

p a y m e n ts or p e n sio n s w ere co n sid e r e d as h avin g o n ly retire­

surance.

m e n t p e n sio n b e n e fits.

M ajor m e d ic a l in su ran ce, so m e tim e s referred to as e x ­
te n d e d m e d ic a l or ca ta stro p h e in su ran ce, in c lu d e s plans

Paid funeral and jury-duty leave.

d esign ed to cover e m p lo y e e s for sick n ess or in ju ry in v o lv in g

ju r y -d u ty leave relate to form al p lan s w h ic h p ro v id e at lea st

an e x p e n se w h ic h e x c e e d s th e n orm al coverage o f h o sp ita li­

partial p a y m e n t for tim e lo s t fro m a tte n d in g funerals o f

z a tio n , m e d ic a l, and surgical p lan s.

sp e c ifie d fa m ily m em b ers or serving as a ju ror.

D ata for p aid fu n eral and

T a b u la tio n s o f r etirem en t p e n sio n s are lim ite d to plan s
w h ic h p rovid e regular p a y m e n ts fo r th e rem ain d er o f th e

Technological severance pay.

r etiree’s life . D ata are p r esen ted sep a ra tely for retirem en t

p rovid in g fo r p a y m e n ts to e m p lo y e e s p e r m a n e n tly sepa­

D ata relate to form al plans

severance p a y (o n e p a y m e n t or several over a sp e c ifie d

rated fro m th e c o m p a n y b e c a u se o f a te c h n o lo g ic a l change

p eriod o f tim e ) m a d e to e m p lo y e e s o n retirem en t. E stab ­

or p la n t clo sin g .




83

Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions

T h e p rim ary p u r p o se o f prep arin g jo b d e sc r ip tio n s fo r th e B u rea u ’s w age su rveys is to
assist its fie ld s t a ff in c la ssify in g in to ap p rop riate o c c u p a tio n s w o rk ers w h o are e m p lo y e d
u n d er a v a riety o f p a y r o ll title s and d iffe r e n t w o r k arran gem en ts fro m e sta b lish m e n t to
e sta b lish m e n t and fro m area to area. T h is p erm its th e g ro u p in g o f o c c u p a tio n a l w age rates
rep resen tin g co m p a ra b le jo b c o n te n t. B ecau se o f th is em p h a sis on in te r e sta b lish m e n t and
in terarea co m p a r a b ility o f o c c u p a tio n a l c o n te n t, th e B u reau ’s jo b d esc r ip tio n s m a y d iffer
sig n ific a n tly fro m th o s e in u se in in d iv id u a l e sta b lish m e n ts or th o s e p rep ared for o th er
p u rp o ses. In a p p ly in g th e se jo b d e sc r ip tio n s, th e B u reau ’s fie ld s t a ff is in str u c te d to e x c lu d e
w o rk in g su p ervisors, ap p ren tices, learn ers, b eg in n ers, tra in ees, and h a n d ic a p p e d , p a rt-tim e,
te m p o r a r y , and p ro b a tio n a r y w o rk ers.

Assembler for pullover, machine

u p p er in ste a d

tem-wiping

o f u sin g a b ove m e th o d s. ( 3 )

Cement sys­

to e in p la ce and h o ld in g it w ith w ip er; tr im ­

Prepares th e u p p er fo r la stin g b y assem b lin g th e c o u n te r

m in g o f f su rp lu s to e b o x , lin in g and u p p er, b y h a n d , c lo se

and u p p er and o p era tin g a m a c h in e to ta c k th e u p p er to th e

to in s o le ; a p p ly in g c e m e n t to in so le b e tw e e n lin in g and

la st. W ork in v o lv es: P lacin g c o u n te r s o n rack o f pan c o n ­

u p p er at to e an d fo ld in g over la stin g a llo w a n c e o f u p p er an d

ta in in g c e m e n t, lo w e r in g rack in t o p an to a p p ly c e m e n t to

stic k in g it in in s o le . I f th e h e e l a lso is la s te d in th e p ro cess ,

c o u n te r s; in sertin g c e m e n te d c o u n te r b e tw e e n lin in g and

an a u to m a tic a lly -fe d h a n d ta c k in g d ev ice is u se d to drive:

u p p er at th e h e e l; se ttin g a p ie c e o f w a x or tissu e p aper

ta ck s th r o u g h th e u p p er at th e h e e l.

n e x t to lin in g to fa c ilita te rem oval o f last after c o m p le tio n
o f o p era tio n s; p la cin g u p p er o n la st m a k in g certa in th a t
h e e l seam is in c e n te r o f rear o f last; se ttin g last o n a ja c k

Bottom filler

and p u sh in g ja c k in to m a c h in e w h ic h a u to m a tic a lly drives
ta c k s th r o u g h th e u p p er in t o th e h e e l seat and h e e l seam .

(C u sh io n c e m e n te r ; in s o le filler)
F ills d ep r e ssio n in fo rep a rt o f sh o e w ith c o m p o s itio n

Bed-machine operator

p a ste o f gro u n d co rk an d c e m e n t to form c u sh io n for fo o t.

(B e d laster; b e d -la stin g m a c h in e oep rator; h e e l and fo r e ­

Bottom scourer

p art la ster)
C o m p le te s th e o p e r a tio n s o f draw in g th e to e , or to e and

(B o tt o m b u ffe r ; b o tt o m san d er)

h e e l, o f th e u p p er o f a sh o e .tig h tly over th e last. W ork
S m o o th s and c le a n s o u ts o le s o f c o m p le te ly c o n str u c te d

in volves: S e ttin g sh o e o n m a c h in e w ith so le u p , and m a n ip ­

sh o e s b y h o ld in g again st revolvin g ab rasive-covered w h e e l o f

u la tin g h a n d levers c o n tr o llin g a series o f w ip ers (fr ic tio n

b u ffin g m a c h in e .

p u lle r s) w h ic h d raw th e u p p er over ed ge o f in so le at to e or
to e

an d h e e l; h o ld in g u p p er in p la ce w ith th e w ip ers;

Cutter, lining, machine

secu rin g u p p er at th e to e in o n e o f th e fo llo w in g w ays:
( 1 ) McKay

system —ta ck in g

u p p er, u sin g a u to m a tic a lly fe d

h a n d ta c k in g d e v ic e , th e ta ck s rem ain in g in th e fin ish ed
sh o e . ( 2 )

Welt system —p assin g

C u ts p arts o f sh o e lin in g fro m lea th er or fa b rica ted

a w ire from an an ch or tack

m aterials (in c lu d in g im ita tio n le a th e r ), b y m ea n s o f a c lic k ­

w h ic h is d riven o n o n e sid e o f th e sh o e an d a rou n d th e draw n-

ing m a c h in e . W ork in v o lv es: S e ttin g lin in g m a teria l, u su a lly

in u p p er at th e t o e , t o th e o p p o s ite sid e w h ere it is w o u n d

in m u ltip le p ile s, o n c u ttin g tab le o f m a c h in e ; se le c tin g

a rou n d a n o th e r a n ch o r ta c k , t o h o ld u p p er in p la c e u n til it

p ro p er d ie and se ttin g it in p la c e o n m aterial; d ep ressin g

is s titc h e d t o in s o le b y a la te r o p e r a tio n ; or m a y sta p le

lever to ca u se u p p er arm to d rop a u to m a tic a lly o n th e die




84

w ith s u ffic ie n t fo r c e to c u t m aterial to th e shape and size o f

n ish ed ; a p p ly in g a c o a tin g o f w a x to ed ge o f sole and

die. E x c lu d e c lo th lin in g c u tters and crip p le c u tters.

rep eatin g b u rn ish in g o p e r a tio n .

F or w age su rvey p u rp o ses. C u tters, lin in g , m a ch in e are
classified b y ty p e o f m a teria l c u t as fo llo w s:
L eath er

Edge trimmer

S y n th e tic s
L eath er and S y n th e tic s

(E d ge trim m in g-m ach in e o p era to r; trim m er, ap ex; trim ­
m er, m argin )

Cutter, vamp and whole shoe, hand

T rim s, c u ts to size, and sm o o th s th e ed ge o f sh o es b y
tu rn in g and m a n ip u la tin g th e su rfaces o f th e so le s against
th e revolvin g c u ttin g to o l o f an ed g e-trim m in g m a c h in e .

(Carver; cu tter; o u ts id e , han d ; c u tte r , sam pler; c u tte r o u t,
u p p er; u p p er lea th er c u tte r )
C uts vam p s and u p p ers o f sh o es fro m sk in s or h id e s w ith
a h an d k n ife . W ork in v o lv e s

most o f the following :

S e le c t­

Fancy stitcher

in g h id es or sk in s o f d esired th ick n ess and q u a lity ; n o tin g
lo c a tio n o f d e fe c tiv e sp o ts in m a teria l, and d ir e c tio n o f

(A p p liq u e stitc h e r ; b lin d -ro w stitch er; e tc h in g stitch er;

grain o f le a th e r , se ttin g p a ttern o n m a teria l in su ch a w a y as

e y e le t-r o w stitch er; strip p er, stitch in g ; trim m in g stitch er)

to o b ta in a m a x im u m n u m b er o f p ie c e s , and in su ch rela­
tio n to th e grain o f th e lea th er th a t th ere w ill b e a m in i­

O p erates a p ow er-d riven sew in g m a c h in e to stitc h d e c o ­

m u m o f stretch in g o f m a teria l in p ro cessin g sh o e; d raw ing

rative d esign s o n sh o e u p p ers, su ch as o u tlin in g e y e le t ro w ,

k n ife alon g edge o f p a ttern , c u ttin g part to desired sh ape;

stitc h in g im ita tio n fo x in g s or fa n c y p a n el d esign s, running

b u n d lin g c u t p ie c e s and m ark in g size o n to p p ie c e for

ex tra row s o f stitc h in g , and stitc h in g p ip in g and orn am en tal

id e n tific a tio n .

leath er strips (a p p liq u e ). W ork in volves: In sertin g m aterial
un d er th e presser fo o t and n e e d le o f m a ch in e; d ep ressin g
lever to start m a c h in e ; gu id in g m aterial b y h an d (u su a lly

Cutter, vamp and whole shoe, machine

alo n g p r ev io u sly m ark ed lin e s o n m aterial) as stitc h in g is
p erfo rm ed . E x c lu d e stitch ers o n b a sic c o n str u c tio n (c lo se r s)

C uts parts o f sh o e u p p ers from h id e s, sk in s or fab ricated

and F ren ch cord stitch ers.

m aterials, b y m e a n s o f a c lic k in g m a c h in e . W ork involves:
S e ttin g le a th e r or o th e r sh o e m a teria l o n c u ttin g tab le o f
m a ch in e; se le c tin g p rop er d ie and se ttin g it in p lace on
m aterial; d ep ressin g lever to ca u se u p p er arm to drop a u to ­

Floor worker

m a tic a lly o n th e d ie w ith su ffic ie n t fo rce to cu t m aterial to
th e size and shape o f th e d ie.

(A ssem b ler; r o u te r )

F or w age su rvey p u rp o ses, C u tters, V a m p and w h o le
sh o e , m a ch in e

D elivers fin ish e d p r o d u c ts to s to c k r o o m or sh ip p in g

are c la ssified b y ty p e o f m aterial c u t as

ro o m

fo llo w s:

and k e e p s sto c k and d istrib u tes p artially fin ish ed

m aterials u se d in th e m a n u fa ctu re o f fo o tw e a r to variou s
L eath er

d ep a rtm en ts to k e e p w ork ers su p p lied w ith m aterial, usin g

S y n th e tic s

tru ck or carrying m a terial. M ay p erfo rm sim p le m ach in e

L eath er and sy n th e tic s

o p e r a tio n s u n d er d ir e c tio n o f w o rk in g su p ervisors, su c h as
te m p e r in g so le s an d m o ld in g e d g e s o f so les.

Edge setter
(E d g e b u rn ish er, ed g e k itte r )

Goodyear stitcher

S h ap es and p o lish e s th e ed ge o f th e so le o f th e sh o e b y
h o ld in g it against th e h o t iro n o f an e d g e -se ttin g m a ch in e.

O p erates a G o o d y e a r stitc h in g m a ch in e to a tta c h th e

W ork in volves: B rushing a filler so lu tio n over edge o f so le as

o u ts o le to th e w e lt o f th e sh o e. W ork in volves: S e ttin g th e

far b a c k as th e h e e l lin e , to fill an y sm all h o le s and to

sh o e , sole side u p , 'o n tab le rest o f m a ch in e u n d ern ea th

so fte n th e lea th er fo r th e b u rn ish in g o p era tio n ; se le c tin g

n e e d le , and g u id in g sh o e w ith h a n d as n e e d le sew s arou n d

prop er size ir o n b u rn ish in g b lo c k and se ttin g stem o f b lo c k

sh an k and fo rep a rt o f sh o e , th e s titc h e x te n d in g from a

in to m a c h in e h o ld e r ; h e a tin g iro n to p ro p er tem p eratu re;

ch an n el th a t w as c u t fo r it in b o tt o m o f o u ts o le , th rou gh

h o ld in g ed ge o f so le against revolvin g su rface o f h e a te d

o u ts o le to u p p er su rface o f w e lt. T he w e lt e x te n d s arou n d

ir o n , m a n ip u la tin g sh o e u n til en tire ed ge has b e e n bu r­

th e ed ge o f th e so le as far b a ck as th e b reast o f th e h eel.




85

Heel attacher, machine

ch in e and s titc h in g th ro u g h w e lt, u p p er, and lin in g , and
in so le lip against w h ic h u p p er and lin in g have b e e n la ste d .

(L e a th e r or rubber h e e l attach er; h eelin g -m a ch in e op era­
tor; lea th er h e e le r )

Inseam trimmer (goodyear-welt shoes)

N a ils h e e ls to sh o e s b y m a c h in e . W ork in volves: P lacin g
sh o e o n a m e ta l m o ld and p u ttin g h e e l in p o s itio n o n sh o e;

O p erates a m a c h in e th a t trim s ed ges o f in seam to rem o v e

sw in gin g n ail p la te in to p la ce over th e h e e l w h ere nails are

e x c e ss m aterial p rior to a tta c h m e n t o f m id so le or o u ts o le .

d ro p p ed a u to m a tic a lly in to a n o th e r p la te over th e h e e l;

W ork in volves: T u rn in g setsc r e w s th a t lo c k re c ip r o c a tin g

m a n ip u la tin g f o o t lever to drive n ails th ro u g h h e e l and h e e l

b la d e o n to m a c h in e sh aft; d ep ressin g p ed a l th a t w ith d r a w s

seat and c lin c h th e m to in so le o n in sid e o f sh o e.

p resser d e v ic e , p e r m ittin g a lin e m e n t o f e x c e ss m a teria l w ith
c u ttin g ed g e o f b la d e; releasin g p ed a l th a t r eco ils presser

Heel-seat fitter, machine

d e v ic e , fo r c in g e x c e ss m a teria l u n d er b la d e; g u id in g sh o e
against c u ttin g ed ge to trim o f f e x c e ss m aterial.

O p erates a m a c h in e to c u t o u t a p ie c e arou n d th e ou ter
m argin o f th e h e e l seat, p rep aratory to h e e l atta ch in g . W ork

Inspector (crowner)

in volv es: S e ttin g gage o n m a c h in e fo r size o f h e e l to be
fitte d and ad ju stin g p in sto p fo r right or le ft sh o e ; p ressing

(E x a m in e r )

sh o e against sta tio n a r y h o r iz o n ta l k n ife in m a c h in e to cu t
E x a m in e s sh o e p arts, p a r tly fin ish e d sh o es in variou s

th ro u g h th e h e e l seat b e tw e e n th e u p p er and th e so le u n til
strik es a sto p gage; o p era tin g m a ch in e

stages o f m a n u fa c tu r e , or fin ish e d sh o e s b e fo r e p a ck in g .

w h ic h a u to m a tic a lly cu ts a U -sh ap ed p ie c e from th e h e e l

W ork in v o lv e s in s p e c tin g fo r th e fo llo w in g im p e r fe c tio n s:

seat so

Irregularity o f lea th er su rfaces; m isp la c e d or in c o m p le te ly

c o u n te r o f sh o e

th a t th e h e e l fits p r o p e r ly w h e n a tta c h e d . T h is

m a c h in e o p e r a tio n is u su a lly p e r fo r m e d o n w o m e n ’s p o p u ­

driven tack s; u n e v e n n e ss an d in c o r r e c t a m o u n t o f stitc h in g ;

lar and m e d iu m -p r ic e d sh o e s.

in sid e m isa lig n m en t; im p ro p er p r o p o r tio n o f to e tip . M ay
c o rrect m in o r d e fe c ts or im p e r fe c tio n s and reject m ajor
d e fe c ts fo r rep ro cessin g in p rop er d e p a r tm e n t.

Heel-seat laster

Janitor

O p erates a h e e l-se a t la stin g m a ch in e w h ic h draw s th e
h e e l s e c tio n o f th e sh o e u p p er tig h tly over th e la st and

C leans an d k e e p s in an ord erly c o n d itio n fa c to r y w o r k ­

a u to m a tic a lly ta ck s th e ed ges to th e h e e l seat o f th e in so le .
W ork in volves: S e ttin g sh o e o n m a c h in e and m a n ip u la tin g

ing areas and w a sh r o o m s, or p rem ises o f an o ff ic e , apart­

c o n tr o ls w h ic h cau se th e w ip er p la tes to draw th e u p p er

m e n t h o u s e , or co m m e r c ia l or o th e r e sta b lish m e n t. D u tie s

and lin in g e v e n ly over th e h e e l sea t and m a c h in e a u to m a ti­

in v o lv e a co m b in a tio n o f th e fo llo w in g : S w eep in g , m o p p in g

c a lly drives ta c k s th ro u g h u p p er and in so le .

or scru b b in g, and p o lish in g flo o rs; rem o v in g ch ip s, trash,
and o th e r refu se; d u stin g e q u ip m e n t, fu rn itu re or fix tu r e s;
p o lish in g m e ta l fix tu r e s or trim m in gs; p ro v id in g su p p lies

Injection-molding-machine operator

and

m in o r

m a in te n a n c e

services;

clea n in g

la v a to ries,

sh o w ers, and rest ro o m s. W orkers w h o sp ecia lize in w in d o w

O p erates an in je c tio n m o ld in g m a c h in e th a t sim u lta n e ­

w ashing are exclu ded.

o u sly m o ld s and a tta ch es so le and h e e l u n its to a ssem b led
u p p ers. W ork in v o lv es: P lacin g a ssem b led u p p er in p o s itio n

Jointer, machine

in lo a d in g sta tio n o f th e m a c h in e ; clo sin g m o ld and in je c t­
in g m o lte n charge o f so lin g c o m p o u n d in to ca v ity fo rm ed

(J o in te r c u tte r , m a c h in e ; jo in te r ; jo in t m ak er, m a c h in e )

b e tw e e n b o tt o m o f th e m o ld and sh o e b o tto m ; and re m o v ­
in g sh o e fro m m a ch in e after so lin g c o m p o u n d h as set up

T rim s and sh ap es o n a jo in tin g m a c h in e th e ed ge o f th e

and c o o le d .

sh an k so le o f sh o e s at th e jo in t b e tw e e n sh a n k and h e e l,
startin g w h ere ed ge trim m er leaves o f f and c o n tin u in g to

Inseamer

th e h e e l lin e . H o ld s sh o e again st k n ife o f jo in tin g m a c h in e ;
m o v e s sh o e again st k n ife to m a in ta in ev en p ressure for a

(G o o d y e a r -w e lt-se w in g -m a c h in e

o p erator; w e lt

sew er;

n ea t trim m in g.

ep p ler w e lte r )

Littleway stitcher

O p era tes a G o o d y e a r stitc h in g m a c h in e th a t sew s a nar­
row strip o f le a th e r ( w e lt ) a u to m a tic a lly fed from a roll on
th e m a c h in e to th e lip o f th e in so le o f th e sh o e . W ork

O p erates a lo c k s titc h se w in g m a c h in e to a tta c h th e o u t­

in v o lv es: G u id in g sh o e , so le u p w ard , u n d er n e e d le o f m a ­

so le b y s titc h in g th r o u g h th e u p p er, lin in g , and in s o le o f




86

shoe, except at heel seat. Work involves: Setting the shoe,
sole side up, on shoe rest o f machine beneath needle and
guiding shoe with hand as needle sews around the shank
and forepart o f shoe.

Platform-cover laster (slip-lasted shoes)

(Wrapper laster)
Operates a machine to sm ooth platform cover or wrap­
per around the platform or platform and heel. Work in­
volves: Setting upper (into which last has been inserted and
platform or platform and heel has been previously posi­
tioned) into machine; starting machine which wipes previ­
ously cemented cover or wrapper tightly around platform
or platform and heel; removing work from machine and
examining for maintenance o f quality standards.

McKay stitcher

Operates a McKay sewing machine to attach the outsole,
midsole, or platform by chainstitching through the upper,
lining, and insole o f shoe, except at heel seat. Work in­
volves: Setting the shoe, sole side up, on shoe rest o f
machine underneath needle, and guiding shoe with hand as
needle sews around the shank and forepart o f shoe.

Platform-cover stitcher (slip-lasted shoes)

(Wrapper stitcher)

Mechanic, maintenance

Operates a power-driven sewing machine to stitch plat­
form covers and also heel covers on shoe uppers which are
to be processed by the slip-lasted m ethod. Work involves:
Fitting the platform and heel cover (strip o f leather or
cloth) to the upper; placing work under needle, starting
machine, steering work against guide for proper stitching;
and removing com pleted work from machine.

Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment o f an estab­
lishment. Work involves m ost o f the following: Examining
machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose source o f
trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling machines and
performing repairs that mainly involve the use o f hand tools
in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective
parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the produc­
tion o f a replacement part by a machine shop or sending of
the machine to a machine shop for major repairs or for the
production o f parts ordered from machine shop; reassem­
bling machines, and making all necessary adjustments for
operation. In general, the work o f a maintenance mechanic
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience. E x c lu d e d from this classification are workers
whose primary d uties involve setting-up or adjusting ma­
chines, and workers who specialize in the adjustment and
repair o f a particular type o f machine and whose period o f
training is substantially shorter than that required for a
maintenance mechanic as described above.

Pullover-machine operator

(Pullers-over, machine)
Operates a machine in which the upper at the toe and
along the sides o f the front o f the shoe is pulled over and
tacked temporarily to the last to give preliminary shaping
to the front part o f the upper and to attach it to the insole
and the last. Work involves: Setting shoe in holding jib o f
machine; depressing lever to rotate mechanism that closes
top and side jaws on edge o f upper; positioning upper on
last by manipulating tip levers to align center o f upper on
center o f last; depressing lever to rotate mechanism through
second half o f travel, and to drive tacks at toe and along the
side o f the shoe, which hold upper in position until stapled
or tacked along entire edge. Exclude workers operating
machines that combine pulling and lasting (see P U L L IN G

Paster, backer, or fitter, upper, hand

(Backer; backing paster; backing cementer; canvas
backer, upper; cementer, upper to lining; fitter, upper to
lining; paster, line and brush, hand; paster; plain paster;
reinforcer, paster; quarter and lining fitter; upper dou­
bler)

A N D L A S T IN G - M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R ).

Pulling and lasting-machine oeprator

Operates machine that draws upper over last and joins
upper to insole bottom by cement. Work involves: Making
adjustments on machine to govern action o f wipers; placing
shoe in steamer to soften leather; positioning shoe in ma­
chine; and starting machine. Operators o f machines that
pull and last only one part o f a shoe (toe, side, heel seat,
etc.) are e x c lu d ed .
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by the
parts o f the shoe that are pulled and lasted as follows:

Reinforces vamps, tops, straps, and other parts o f shoes,
by pasting to each a piece o f cut-to-size canvas, thin leather,
or other lining material (doubler). Work involves o n e o r
m o re o f the f o llo w in g : Pressing doubler against cementcovered roll and sticking doubler to leather parts; using
backing tape which is so prepared that it sticks when
pressed on other material with a hot iron. May paste rein­
forcing over only a portion o f upper that is exposed to
extra wear or strain. May use simple machine to apply glue
or other adhesives to various parts o f shoe.




Toe to ball
Other
87

Shanker

Reparier

(Shank tacker; shank-piece placer; shank-piece tacker)

(Blemish remover)
Corrects imperfections in the finish o f the completed
shoe. Work involves m ost o f the following: Removing
stains, scratches, blemishes, and loose threads; blending
various shades o f fluid, wax filler or crayon to affected part
o f shoe. May use hand spray gun with colored dope to
cover blemished area.

Attaches shank piece to the shank section o f shoe to
support the arch o f the shoe.

Side laster, machine

Operates a machine to last the sides and shanks o f the
upper. Work involves: Drawing out lining and upper with
hand-pincers, holding shoe so that pincers o f machine grasp
edges o f upper and draw them evenly and closely about the
last, and secures upper at sides and shanks to bottom by
using staples and tacks o r cement.
For wage study purposes, Side lasters, machine are classi­
fied by the type o f lasting as follows:

Rough rounder

(Forepart rounder; rough-rounding-machine operator;
sole rounder)
Trims the edge o f outsole and w elt o f the shoe, by use of
a rounding and channeling machine so that the edge will
extend the desired distance from shoe upper. Work in­
volves: Setting shoe in machine so that bottom o f shoe is
toward the cutting knife, and bottom o f guide rests against
upper o f shoe; guiding shoe in vertical position along bot­
tom o f guide so that edge is trimmed at right angles to the
bottom o f the shoe entirely around the perimeter o f the
sole o f the shoe. The machine may also cut a channel in
bottom o f outsole near edge, in which the thread is em­
bedded when sole stitching is done.

Staple or tack lasting
Cement lasting

Skiver, machine, uppers or linings

(Skiver, outside)
Operates a machine that skives (pares) or bevels shoe
uppers or linings to reduce them to an even thickness or to
insure thinner seams or tapering edges when parts are joined
together. Work involves: Feeding part between pressure
rollers o f machine to cutting knives which bevel edges or
reduce part to uniform thickness, or setting part in guide
bed o f machine and depressing lever to bring cutting knives
into operation.

Rougher

(Rougher for cem ent, bottom rougher)
Sock-lining stitcher (slip-lasted shoes)

Roughens sole o f the shoe by holding it against wire
roughing wheel o f a machine which cleans and prepares sole
for cementing; o r may roughen sole for cementing by
feeding it between a rubber presser roller and an abrasivecovered roller.

Operates a power-driven sewing machine to stitch sock
linings to uppers which will be slip-lasted. Work involves:
Fitting the upper to the sock lining according to markings;
lowering presser foot to hold materials, starting machine,
feeding sock lining and upper under needle, steering mate­
rial against pin guides; and removing com pleted work from
machine.

Sewer, hand (moccasin-constructed shoes)

Sole attacher, cement process

(Moccasin sewer)
Sews plugs in moccasin-constructed shoes by hand. Work
involves m o s t o f the f o llo w in g : Soaking parts in water to
soften them; positioning lasted shoe on pin jack; pulling
and tacking parts to last; punching stitch openings in parts
with awl; inserting thread through punched openings to join
plug with upper; removing tacks and shaping seam with
lasting tool; and sm oothing and polishing seams using rub­
bing sticks. May also raise decorative stitches (kicker) in
backstay o f casual shoes. H a n d w hip pers a n d lacers , w h o
lace plugs

(Compo-conveyor operator; sole layer, machine; sole­
laying machine operator; soler)
Operates a sole-laying machine to c e m e n t outsoles p e r­
to the uppers o f shoes. This operation does not
relate to the positioning o f soles in the Goodyear-welt or
other types o f construction. Work involves: Setting toe part
o f shoe on which outsole has been positioned and heel part
o f last directly below corresponding jacks (lugs) o f ma­
chine; pressing air pedal (which opens valve on pipe leading
to air compressor storage tank) to fill the air cushion and

m a n e n tly

to uppers throu gh p re p u n c h e d holes , are ex­

cluded.




88

force the shoe against the jacks which hold the outsole
firmly in place while the cement dries. May also, prior to
p e r m a n e n t attachment o f outsole, brush a coat o f solvent
over the inner surface o f the outsole from the heel seat to
the toe and press outer sole on shoe, being certain that
edges o f sole project evenly over edges o f shoe.

Work involves: Fitting lining to upper and lining already
fitted or cemented together; setting parts into machine at
heel seam, lowering guide down to the edge o f top o f upper
and guiding parts through machine by hand to complete
stitching and trimming operation.

Sole leveler, machine

Treer

(Polisher, uppers; shoe treer)

(Beater out, leveling machine; inseam leveler; leveler)

Cleans and finishes shoes by removing spots and discol­
orations; may also rub uppers with a hot iron to smooth
out wrinkles. Work involves m o s t o f th e f o l lo w in g : Setting
shoe on a treeing form, the shape o f the last, and depressing
lever expanding form so that shoe will fit tightly over it;
brushing, cleaning, dressing and finishing shoe according to
the kind o f leather or material; applying color stain or
bleach to blemished spots; smoothing out wrinkles in the
uppers with a hot iron.
Do not include shoe dressers, who may be called treers
in some plants but perform only a minor part o f the work
described above.

Flattens the insoles or outsoles o f shoes which have had
a ridge raised around the sole by the stitching machines.
Sets shoe on last o f machine with sole uppermost; depresses
treadle to start machine and guides the shoe on the form
under the roller back and forth and from side to side.

Thread laster (stitchdown shoes)

(Stitchdown-thread laster; Puritan laster)
Operates a stitchdown thread-lasting machine to last
shoes by sewing shoe uppers to insoles. Work involves:
Pulling shoe upper over last to which an insole has been
tacked; setting last and upper into machine, starting ma­
chine which sews the upper to the insole, and guiding the
shoe in such a manner that the feeder guide pulls the upper
tightly around last.

Vamper

(Vamp closer; vamp stitcher; zigzag seamer)
By use o f a power-driven sewing machine, sews together
the forepart o f the upper (tip and vamp) and the two
quarters o f a shoe. Work involves: Setting overlapped edges
together under presser foot and needle o f machine; depress­
ing lever to start machine and guiding material through
stitching process; sewing top to entire lower part o f upper
when shoe has a cut separate from quarters, or has a whole
vamp. Parts are sometimes first pasted together by another
worker to insure more accurate stitching.

Toe laster, automatic or semi-automatic

Operates an automatic or semi-automatic machine to
draw the toe section o f shoe upper tightly over the last.
Work involves: Making adjustments to machine to govern
action o f wipers, placing shoe in steamer to soften toe
section; inserting shoe in machine and operating foot
treadle to bring wipers against shoe upper and draw edges
against the last; wrapping wire loop around temporary
anchor tacks on side o f shoe to hold toe section in place or
by means o f cement, tacks or staples, fastens upper to
innersole.

Vulcanizer

Tends machine that vulcanizes synthetic composition
outsoles to shoe uppers. Work involves: Positioning upper
on heated metal last; seating precut outsole in cavity o f
mold and pulling lever to invert last; starting machine that
lowers lasted upper into die cavity and vulcanizes outsole to
upper.

Top stitcher

Operates a sewing machine to stitch the lining to the
upper part o f a shoe and to trim o ff excess edges o f lining.




89

Industry Wage Studies
The m ost recent reports providing occupational wage
data for industries included in the Bureau’s program o f
industry wage surveys since 1960 are listed below. Copies
are for sale from the Superintendent o f Documents, U.S.
Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or
from any o f its regional sales offices, and from the regional

M a n u fa c tu rin g

Basic Iron and Steel, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1839
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1975. BLS Bulle­
tin 1939
Cigar Manufacturing, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1796
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1944
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1935
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1763
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1972. BLS Bulletin
1803
Fluid Milk Industry, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1871
Footwear, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1946
Hosiery, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1863
Industrial Chemicals, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1768
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1967. BLS Bulletin 16261
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1835
Machinery Manufacturing, 1974-75. BLS Bulletin 1929
Meat Products, 1974, BLS Bulletin 1896
Men’s and Boys’ Separate Trousers, 1974. BLS Bulletin
1906
Men’s and Boys’ Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Night­
wear, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1794
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1843
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1914
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1973-74. BLS Bulletin 1912
Nonferrous Foundries, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1952
Paints and Varnishes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1739
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1719
Petroleum Refining, 1976 BLS Bulletin 1948
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1975. BLS Bulletin
1923
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1844
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1969. BLS Bulletin
1694
Structural Clay Products, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1942
Synthetic Fibers, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1740
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1757
Textiles, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1945




offices o f the Bureau o f Labor Statistics shown on the
inside back cover. Copies that are out o f stock are available
for reference purposes at leading public, college, or univer­
sity libraries, or at the Bureau’s Washington or regional
offices.

M a n u fa c tu rin g -

C o n tin u e d

Wages and Demographic Characteristics in Work Clothing
Manufacturing, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1858
West Coast Sawmilling, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1704
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1970. BLS Bulletin
1728
Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1908
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1974.
BLS Bulletin 1930
N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

Appliance Repair Shops, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1936
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1876
Banking, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1862
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1583
Communications, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1909
Contract Cleaning Services, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1916
Contract Construction, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1911
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1972. BLS
Bulletin 1797
Department Stores, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1869
Educational
Institutions:
Non teaching
Employees,
1968-69. BLS Bulletin 1671
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1834
Hospitals, 1975-76. BLS Bulletin 1949
Hotels and Motels, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1883
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1 6 4 5 1
Life Insurance, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1791
Metal Mining, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1820
Motion Picture Theaters, 1966. BLS Bulletin 15421
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1973. BLS Bulletin
1855
Scheduled Airlines, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1951
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, 1970. BLS
Bulletin 1712
1 Bulletin out of stock

☆ U S GOVERNMENT P I IN O F C :17 0-241-016
..
R NT G F I E 97

Bureau of Labor Statistics
Regional Offices

Region IV
1371 Peachtree Street, NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
P h on e:(404)881-4418

Regions VII and VIII*
911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: (816)374-2481

Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N Y. 10036
Phone: (212)399-5405

Region V
9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: (312)353-1880

Regions IX and X**
450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
P h on e:(415)556-4678

Region III
3535 Market Street
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
P hone:(215)596-1154

Region VI
Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone:(214)749-3516

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: (617)223-6761




*Regions VII and VIII are serviced
by Kansas City
** Regions IX and X are serviced
by San Francisco

U. S. D e p artm en t of L abor
B ureau of L abor S ta tistics
W ashington, D.C. 20212

P o s ta g e an d F e e s P aid
U.S. D e p artm en t of L abor
Third C lass Mail

Official B u sin e ss
Penalty for private use, $300




Lab-441


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102