View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY




FOOTWEAR
I
A p ril 1965

Bulletin No. 1503
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

X5 7

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY

FOOTWEAR
April 1965

Bulletin No. 1503
June 1966

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C., 20 4 0 2 - Price 50 cents







Preface

This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau
of Labor Statistics survey of wages and supplementary
benefits in the footwear manufacturing industry in April
1965. Information is reported separately for major product
branches in the industry. Separate releases were issued
earlier, usually within a few months of the payroll period
studied, for the following States and areas:
Men's Goodyear-welt dress shoes
Brockton, Mass.
Wisconsin
Women's cement-process (conventional-lasted)
shoes
Maine
Boston—
Lynn, Mass.
Haverhill, Mass.
Lawrence—
Lowell, Mass.
Worcester, Mass.
Southeastern New Hampshire
New York, N. Y.
Arkansas
Missouri
Los Angeles—
Long Beach, Calif.
Misses' and children's Goodyear-welt shoes
Southeastern Pennsylvania
Copies of these releases are available from the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, Washington, D. C. , 20212, or any of
its regional offices.
This study was conducted in the Bureau*s Division
of Occupational Pay, Toivo P. Kanninen, Chief, under the
general direction of L. R. Linsenmayer, Assistant Com­
missioner, Office of Wages and Industrial Relations. The
analysis was prepared by George L. Stelluto, under the
immediate supervision of L. Earl Lewis. Field work for
the survey was directed by the Assistant Regional Direc­
tors for Wages and Industrial Relations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’ s pro­
gram of industry wage studies, as well as the addresses
of the Bureau’ s six regional offices, are listed at the end
of this bulletin.




lit




Contents

Page
Summary______________________________________________________________________
Industry characteristics_______________________________________________________
Products____________________________________________________________________
Location____________________________________________________________________
Size of establishment_______________________________________________________
Unionization________________________________________________________________
Occupations and sex________________________________________________________
Method of wage payment____________________________________________________
Average hourly earnings_______________________________________________________
Occupational earnings_________________________________________________________
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions__________________
Scheduled weekly hours_____________________________________________________
Paid holidays_______________________________________________________________
Paid vacations______________________________________________________________
Health, insurance, and pension plans_______________________________________
Nonproduction bonuses_____________________________________________________

1
1
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
5
7
7
7
7
7
7

Tables:
Average hourly earnings:
1. By selected characteristics— footwear industry_____________________
Earnings distribution:
2. Footwear industry___________________________________________________
3. Men's Goodyear-welt dress shoes___________________________________
4. Men's Goodyear-welt work shoes____________________________________
5. Men's cement-process shoes________________________________________
6. Women's cement-process (conventional-lasted)shoes________________
7. Women's cement-process (slip-lasted) shoes_______________________
8. Women's McKay (including Littleway) shoes_________________________
9. M isses' and children's cement-process (conventionallasted) shoes_______________________________________________________
10. M isses' and children's Goodyear-welt shoes------------------------------11. M isses', children's, and infants' stitchdown shoes----------------------12. Moccasin-constructed shoes with hand-sewn plug------------------------Occupational earnings:
Men's Goodyear-welt dress shoes—
13. A ll establishments______________________________________________
14. By size of establishment________________________________________
15. By size of community___________________________________________
16. By size of establishment and size of community--------------------17. Brockton, Mass__________________________________________________
18. Wisconsin________________________________________________________

8
9
10
10
11
12
13
13
14
15
16
16

17
19
20
21
23
25

Men's Goodyear-welt work shoes—
19. A ll establishments______________________________________________

27

Men's cement-process shoes—
20. A ll establishments______________ •
----------------------------------------

28




v

Contents— Continued

Page
Tables— Continued
Occupational earnings— Continued
Women's cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes—
21. A ll establishments_______________________________________________
22. By size of establishment_________________________________________
23. By size of community____________________________________________
24. By size of establishmentand size of community__________________
25. M aine____________________________________________________________
26. Boston—
Lynn, Mass______________________________________________
27. Haverhill, M ass_________________________________________________
28. Lawrence—
Lowell, M ass_________________________________________
29. Worcester, Mass_________________________________________________
30. Southeastern New Hampshire____________________________________
31. New York, N. Y __________________________________________________
32. Arkansas_________________________________________________________
33. M issouri_________________________________________________________
34. Los Angeles—
Long Beach, Calif__________________________________

29
31
33
35
37
39
41
42
44
45
47
49
51
53

Women's cement-process (slip-lasted) shoes—
35. A ll establishments_______________________________________________

55

Women's McKay (including Littleway) shoes—
36. A ll establishments_______________________________________________

56

M isses' and children's cement-process (conventional-lasted)
shoes—
37. A ll establishments_______________________________________________

57

M isses' and children's Goodyear-welt shoes—
38. A ll establishments_______________________________________________
39. Southeastern Pennsylvania_______________________________________

58
59

M isses', children's, and infants' stitchdown shoes—
40. A ll establishments_______________________________________________

60

Moccasin-constructed shoes with hand-sewn plug—
41. A ll establishments_______________________________________________

61

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
42. Method of wage payment.____________________________________________
43. Scheduled weekly hours______________________________________________
44. Paid holidays________________________________________________________
45. Paid vacations_______________________________________________________
46. Health, insurance, and pension plans_______________________________
47. Nonproduction bonuses______________________________________________

62
62
63
64
65
66

Appendixes:
A. Scope and method of survey_____________________________________________
B. Occupational descriptions_______________________________________________

67
71




vi

Industry W age Survey
Footwear, April 1965
Summary
Straight-time earnings of production and related workers in the footwear
manufacturing industry averaged $1.77 an hour in April 1965. Nearly a fifth
of the 173,804 workers covered by the Bureau's survey1 had earnings at or
within a few cents of the Federal minimum wage ($1.25), which applied under
the Fair Labor Standards Act at the time of the study. Earnings of the remainder
of the workers were widely dispersed, reflecting such characteristics of the in­
dustry as its wide distribution among sections of the country with differing pay
levels, the wide range of worker skills utilized, and the extensive use made of
piece rates as a method of wage payment.
Workers in New England, accounting for nearly 35 percent of the indus­
try's employment, averaged $1.91 an hour, the same as workers in the Pacific
region.
Pay levels among other regions studied separately ranged from $1.83
in the Great Lakes to $ 1.58 in the Southwest. 2
Workers in plants prim arily engaged in manufacturing women's cementprocess (conventional-lasted) shoes accounted for slightly more than two-fifths
of the industry's labor force and averaged $1.78 an hour. Average hourly
earnings of workers in the other nine product branches studied separately ranged
from $ 1.94 to $ 1. 57. Earnings data were also tabulated by size of community,
size of establishment, and for selected representative occupations.
A large majority of the workers had weekly work schedules of 40 hours,
and were employed in plants providing at least six paid holidays, paid vacations,
and various types of health and insurance benefits.
Industry Characteristics
Footwear manufacturing plants within the survey scope employed nearly
174, 000 production workers in April 1965— a decline of about 5 percent since a
similar study conducted in April 1962. 3 While the domestic production of shoes
(except slippers and rubber footwear) declined from 543 million pairs in 1962
to 519 million pairs in 1963, it had increased to 542 million pairs in 1965.4
Output per man-hour for production workers in the industry increased by
nearly 3 percent between 1962 and 1964, the latest date for which information is
available.5 Substitute products (notably rubber-canvas footwear) and imported
shoes are among the competitors of domestically produced leather footwear.
The
See appendix A for scope and method o f survey.
Earnings data in this bulletin exclude
overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.

prem ium pay for

See table in appendix A for definition o f regions.
For an account
Bulletin 1360 (1963).
4
Censu^

Current Industrial

o f the Bureau's

e arlie r study,

Industry W a g e

Survey:

Footwear,

Reports, Shoes and Slippers, Series M 31A (64)-13 and M 3 1 A (6 5 )-1 2 ,

See "Output Per M an-H our:

Footwear Industry," Monthly Labor R e v ie w , A p ril

study covers establishments prim arily engaged
footwear.




see

U . S.

1966, pp.

in manufacturing footw ear including slippers,

A p ril

1962,

BLS

Bureau o f the

401— 404.

This

but excluding rubber

2

domestic production of shoes and slippers with soles vulcanized to fabric uppers
increased from 162 to 166 million pairs between 1964 and 1965. 6 Shoe imports
(except slippers and rubber footwear) increased from about 20 million pairs in
1962 to 30 million pairs in 1964 and reached approximately 7 5 million pairs
in 1965.7
Products. The industry makes a wide variety of shoes in many different
combinations of sizes, styles, and shapes and by several different methods of
construction. 8 Data in this report are tabulated separately for 10 product
branches, together accounting for over nine-tenths of the industry1s labor force.
Classification of establishments by product branches was based on the predominant
method of construction (bottoming, i. e. , the means by which the outsole is
attached to the remainder of the shoe) and type of shoe manufactured— men's
(dress and work), women’ s, m isses', children's, and infants'. Plants prim arily
engaged in manufacturing women's cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes
accounted for slightly more than two-fifths of the industry's production workers;
another fifth were in plants prim arily making men's Goodyear-welt dress shoes.
Plants making misses' and children's cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes,
accounting for about 6 percent of the industry's work force, had the highest
employment level among the other eight product branches studied separately.
Location. Three of the nine regions studied in this survey together
accounted for seven-tenths of the work force: New England, one-third; Middle
Atlantic, one-fifth; and Great Lakes, one-sixth.
The regional mix varied sub­
stantially among the product branches. New England, for example, accounted
for 75 percent of the employment in plants prim arily manufacturing moccasinconstructed (hand-sewn plug) shoes, compared with only 2 percent of the workers
in plants making m isses', children's, and infants' stitchdown shoes. Slightly
more than four-tenths of the workers in plants making women's cement-process
(conventional-lasted) shoes and three-tenths of those making men's Goodyear-welt
dress shoes, were in New England.
Metropolitan areas 9 contained slightly more than two-fifths of the labor
force. The proportions ranged from about an eighth in the Southwest to nine-tenths
in the Pacific region and, in the three major regions, amounted to a third in the
Great Lakes, half in New England, and four-fifths in the Middle Atlantic. The
proportions also differed by industry branch, as indicated below:
Percent o f workers in
metropolitan areas
M en's G ood y ea r-w e lt dress shoes---------------------------------------------------M en's G ood y ear-w elt work shoes---------------------------------------------------M en's cem ent-process shoes-----------------------------------------------------------W om en's cement-process (con vention al-lasted) shoes-----------------W om en 's cement-process (slip -lasted ) shoes--------------------------------W om en's M cK ay (including Littlew ay) shoes---------------------------------

46
21
27
47
47
21

Misses' and children's cement-process
(con vention al-lasted) shoes---------------------------------------------------------Misses' and children's G ood y ear-w elt shoes-----------------------------------

38
42

M isses', children's, and infants' stitchdown sh o e s-----------------------M occasin-constructed shoes with hand-sewn plug--------------------------

18
45

7

U . S. Bureau of the Census, op. c i t . , did not provide inform ation on rubber footw ear prior to 1964.
Source:
U . S. Departm ent o f Com m erce.

8

For descriptions o f the various shoe construction methods, see H ow A m e ric a n Shoes A re M a d e , U nited Shoe

M achinery Corporation, Boston, M a s s ., 1961 or Footwear Construction D efinitions,
Association, I n c ., N ew York , N . Y . , 1963.
Standard M etropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined by the U . S.




N ational

Shoe

Bureau of the Budget in 1961.

Manufacturers

3

Size of Establishment. Plants employing 250 workers or more accounted
for nearly four-fifths of the work force; three-fifths in the Middle Atlantic region,
about three-fourths in New England, and nearly seven-eighths in the Great Lakes.
The proportions of workers in larger establishments, as well as the median plant
employment size, also varied by industry branch:
Percent o f workers
in establishments
with 250 workers
or more
M en's G o o d y ea r-w e lt dress shoes--------------------------------M en's G o o d y ea r-w e lt work shoes--------------------------------M en's cem ent-process shoes----------------------------------------W om en's cement-process (con vention al-lasted) shoes
W om en's cement-process (slip -lasted ) shoes-------------W om en's M cK ay (including Littlew ay) shoes-------------Misses' and children's cem ent-process
(con vention al-lasted) shoes--------------------------------------Misses' and children's G ood y ea r-w e lt shoes---------------M isses', children's, and infants' stitchdown sh o e s----M occasin-constructed shoes with hand-sewn plug-------

M edian
plant
em ploym ent
size

92
77
85
84
43
69
71
71
48
86

317
256
306
308
204
200
292
249
172
292

Unionization. Establishments with labor-management contracts covering
a majority of their production workers accounted for slightly more than half of
the industry's labor force. The proportions were about two-fifths in the Border
States and Southwest, nearly half in New England and the Middle Atlantic, approxi­
mately seven-tenths in the Great Lakes and Middle West, and a little over
three-fourths in the Pacific.
The major unions in the industry are the United
Shoe Workers of America and the Boot and Shoe Workers Union. The extent of
labor-management contract coverage varied by product branch, with the pro­
portions of workers in union establishments amounting to a tenth in women's
McKay shoe plants; nearly two-fifths in misses', children's, and infants' stitch­
down shoes; approximately half in six branches; and about two-thirds in both
men's Goodyear-welt dress shoe plants and misses' and children's Goodyear-welt
shoe plants.
Occupations and Sex. Shoemaking includes the assembly of many sepa­
rate parts through a series of carefully controlled hand and machine operations.
The types of occupations found in shoe factories vary from those requiring rela­
tively short training periods, e. g. , floor boys and girls, to highly skilled jobs
such as vamp and whole shoe cutters.
The industry employs a large number
of workers to operate the various machines used in cutting, sewing, lasting, and
bottoming operations.
Women, accounting for nearly three-fifths of the labor force, are com­
monly employed in fitting and stitching operations. Men, on the other hand, are
predominant in cutting, lasting, and bottoming jobs, as well as in plant main­
tenance work.
Method of Wage Payment. Incentive systems of wage payment, mostly
based on individual piecework, applied to seven-tenths of the production workers
(table 42). The proportions of incentive workers among the regions ranged from
nearly half in the Pacific to about four-fifths in the Border States, Great Lakes,
and Middle West. Among the industry branches, incentive workers comprised
between three- and four-fifths of the employment. A majority of the workers in
nearly all of the jobs selected for separate study were paid incentive rates;
occupations which were usually time-rated included floor boys and girls, inspec­
tors (crowners), janitors, and maintenance mechanics.
Tim e-rate systems in
the industry were for the most, part informal, the rates being determined pri­
marily in relation to the qualifications of the individual employees.




4

Average Hourly Earnings
Straight-time earnings of the 173, 804 production workers covered by the
survey averaged $ 1.77 an hour in April 1965 (table l ) . 1 This was an increase
0
of 8 percent above the average recorded in April 1962 ($1.64). 1
1
Comprising nearly three-fifths of the workers covered by the survey,
women averaged $ 1.60 an hour in April 1965. The average for men was $2.02.
Differences in average pay levels for men and women may be the result of several
factors, including variations in the distribution of the sexes among establishments
and, as pointed out in the discussion of industry characteristics, among jobs with
disparate pay levels. Differences noted in averages for men and women in the
same job and area may also reflect minor differences in duties. Job descriptions
used in classifying workers in wage surveys are usually more generalized than
those used in individual establishments because allowance must be made for
possible minor differences among establishments in specific duties performed.
Also, earnings for many jobs in the industry are largely determined by production
at piece rates. Variation in incentive earnings for individuals or sex groupings
may be traceable to differences in work experience, work flow, or other factors
which the worker may or may not control.
Regionally, average hourly earnings were highest in New England and the
Pacific region ($1.91 in both) and lowest in the Border States and Southwest
region ($1.59 and $1.58, respectively).
Workers in the Great Lakes region
averaged $ 1.83 an hour, compared with $1.70 for workers in the Middle Atlantic
region and $1.67 for those in the Middle West. Regional variations in pay
levels were only partly due to differences in the product mix.
Other factors,
including the general differences in pay among regions, appear to be more
important.
Nearly a fifth of the workers earned $ 1.25 but less than $ 1. 30 an hour
(table 2). Except for this clustering at or near the Federal minimum wage
($1.25), individual earnings were widely dispersed, with the middle half of the
workers earning between $1.35 and $2. 03. The proportions of workers earning
$1.25 and under $1.30 ranged from 2 percent in the Pacific to 32 percent in
the Southwest.
Among the 10 product branches for which separate data were tabulated,
production workers' averages ranged from $1.94 in plants primarily manufac­
turing moccasin-constructed shoes (with hand-sewn plug) to $ 1. 57 for those
making misses', children's, and infants' stitchdown shoes.
These products,
however, accounted for only 3, 323 and 4,440 workers, respectively. Workers
in plants prim arily making women's cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes
averaged $1.78.
In this numerically largest product-branch, regional averages
ranged from $1.92 in the Pacific and $1.88 in New England to about $1.55 in
both the Border States and Southwest. As pointed out in the discussion of in­
dustry characteristics, the regional mix, as well as other characteristics that
have a bearing on wages (e. g. , establishment size), varied substantially among
the product branches.
The straight-tim e hourly earnings (exclu ding prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends,

holidays,

and late shifts) presented in this bulletin are not com parable with the gross average hourly earnings published in the
Bureau’ s monthly hours and earnings series.
The monthly series provides com bined data for plants
prim arily
manufacturing footwear (excep t rubber) designed for street, work, p lay, or sportswear, and for plants making
houseslippers as a primary product, whereas the latter group o f plants were not covered by this survey.
The estimates o f the number o f workers within scope of the survey are intended only as a general guide to the
size and composition o f the labo r force in footwear plants covered by the survey.
11 BLS Bulletin 1360, op.




cit.

5

Earnings relationships among the various product branches differed byregion. Averages for the men's Goodyear-welt dress shoe branch, for example,
exceeded those in the women's cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoe branch
by 16 cents an hour in New England and 19 cents in the Great Lakes; this
relationship was reversed in the Middle West, where workers in the women's
branch averaged 5 cents more than tho*se in the men's branch. In the Middle
West, metropolitan areas (where earnings levels were higher than in smaller
communities) accounted for a third of the work force in women's cement-process
(conventional-lasted) shoe plants but for only a very small proportion of the
workers in men's Goodyear-welt dress shoe plants. Missouri accounted for
nearly all of the employment in both industry branches in that region.
Among the areas and States for which separate data were tabulated,
average h o u r ly earnings ranged from $1.53 in women's cement-process
(conventional-lasted) shoe plants in Arkansas to $ 2. 45 in the same product branch
in the New York area (see individual area tables).
Earnings levels varied for
the four production centers in this branch in Massachusetts: $ 1.85 in Lawrence—
Lowell, $1.96 in Boston—
Lynn, $2.02 in Worcester, and $2.04 in Haverhill.
Workers in establishments with 250 workers or more averaged $ 1.78 an
hour, 4 cents more than workers in smaller plants.
This relationship held in
all but one of the regions permitting comparisons, with average wage advantages
ranging from 5 to 15 cents an hour. In the Middle Atlantic region, workers in
plants with less than 250 workers averaged 9 cents more than those in larger
establishments, $1.76 compared with $1.67.
This is partly explained by the
heavier concentration of small than of large plants in the relatively high-wage
New York area.
Workers in establishments in metropolitan areas averaged $ 1. 86 an hour,
compared with $1.71 for workers in smaller communities. Metropolitan area
averages were higher than those for nonmetropolitan areas in each of the regions
where comparison was possible, ranging from 3 to 18 cents an hour.
It is not possible in a study of this type to isolate the influence on wage
levels of any one of the characteristics described above because of their inter­
relationship. Some examples of this interrelationship have been included in the
discussion of industry characteristics.
Moreover, other characteristics, such
as extent of unionization and method of wage payment, may also affect wage levels.
Occupational Earnings
Average hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations for 10 pro­
duct branches are presented in tables 13 through 41; with the jobs arranged in the
sequence of major shoemaking operations. Occupations were chosen prim arily to
represent wage levels for the types of skills and manufacturing operations in the
industry.
Cutting shoe uppers and linings— first of the major operations— is usually
performed on clicker machines, although some hand cutting is done. Average
hourly earnings for vamp and whole shoe machine cutters ranged from $2. 73 an
hour in misses' and children's Goodyear-welt plants to $1.71 in plants making
m isses', children's, and infants' stitchdown shoes. In the latter product branch,
nearly three-fifths of the vamp and whole shoe machine cutters were women,
whereas men accounted for a large majority of the workers in the job in nearly
all other product branches.




6

Fitting operations, which are typically performed by women, involve
assembling and stitching upper parts and linings to make complete shoe uppers.
Fancy stitchers (who sew decorative designs on shoe uppers) were numerically
most important of the selected jobs and had average earnings ranging from $ 1.82
to $1.48 among the product branches.
Pasters, backers, and fitters— another
numerically important job category— usually averaged between 7 and 22 cents an
hour less than fancy stitchers.
Lasting operations, generally performed by men, include drawing the
completed uppers over the last (a footlike form) and attaching the insole. Machine
assemblers for pullover had averages ranging from $1.65 to $2.26 among the
branches for which data could be shown.
Where comparison was possible,
pullover-machine operators usually averaged between 38 and 48 cents an hour
more than machine assemblers for pullover. Average earnings for side lasters
and toe lasters ranged from $1.94 to $2.52 and from $2.02 to $2.51, respec­
tively, among the product branches.
As pointed out previously, bottoming methods differ by type of shoe
construction.
Goodyear stitchers in men's Goodyear-welt dress shoe plants
averaged $ 2. 32 an hour, 9 cents more than their counterparts in both the
men's Goodyear-welt work shoe and misses' and children's Goodyear-welt shoe
branches. Sole attachers in plants making women's cement-process shoes aver­
aged $2.31 in the conventional-lasted branch and $ 2. 15 in the slip-lasted branch,
compared with $2.04 in plants making misses' and children's cement-process
(conventional-lasted) shoes.
Among the few occupations for which data are presented for both sexes,
men usually had higher average earnings than women.
This appears to result
as much from differences in the distribution of the sexes among establishments
with dissimilar pay levels, as from variations in earnings between men and women
in the same establishment. For example, among plants manufacturing women's
cement-process (conventional-lasted) shoes in Missouri, men employed as vamp
and whole shoe machine cutters averaged 24 cents an hour more than women in
this job (table 33). Of the 26 plants visited, however, only 11 employed both
men and women in the job, and in 8 of these women had higher average earnings
than men.
Occupational averages are presented by size of establishment (tables
14 and 22) and size of community (tables 15 and 23) for the two major prod­
uct branches, men's Goodyear-welt dress shoes and women's cement-process
(conventional-lasted) shoes.
While occupation averages were usually higher in
metropolitan areas than in nonmetropolitan areas, there seemed to be a lack of
any consistent pattern of job averages by size of establishment. In the men* s
Goodyear-welt dress shoe plants, occupational averages in plants with 250 workers
or more were usually higher than in smaller plants in both regions for which com­
parisons were possible (New England and Great Lakes); this relationship was
reversed, however, on a nationwide basis.
The nationwide anomaly can be
partly explained by a disproportionate distribution of employment in the two
establishment-size categories among regions with different pay levels.
For
example, New England and the Great Lakes— two of the relatively high pay­
ing regions— accounted for nearly seven-eighths of the employment in men's
Goodyear-welt dress shoe plants with fewer than 250 workers compared with
slightly more than half of the employment in larger plants. Occupational averages
are presented for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas by size of establish­
ment in tables 16 and 24.
Earnings of individuals performing similar tasks also varied within the
same establishment, particularly for jobs typically paid under incentive wage
systems. In many instances, the highest paid worker earned over 50 cents an
hour more than the lowest paid worker in the same job and establishment.




Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Data were also obtained for production workers on certain establishment
practices, including work schedules, and selected supplementary wage benefits
such as paid holidays, paid vacations, and health, insurance, and pension plans.
Scheduled Weekly Hours. Work schedules of 40 hours a week were in
effect in plants accounting for nine-tenths of the production workers (table 43).
The 40-hour schedule was predominant in each of the locations and product
branches for which data were tabulated separately. In the Southeastern Pennsyl­
vania area, however, nearly half of the workers in plants making misses1 and
children's Goodyear-welt shoes had work schedules of 44 hours a week.
Paid Holidays. Paid holidays were provided by establishments employ­
ing nearly all production workers (table 44). The most common provisions for
paid holidays were 5 or 6 annually in the Middle Atlantic region, 6 in the Border
States, and 8 in all other regions. Paid holidays typically granted in the industry
were New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and
Christmas Day; other holidays frequently reported included Good Friday, Inde­
pendence Day (Fourth of July), Veterans Day, and Christmas Eve. In some in­
stances, the paid holidays granted conformed to local practices. For example,
Patriot's Day (April 19), commonly observed in New England, was granted to
over nine-tenths of the workers in men's Goodyear-welt dress shoe plants in
Brockton, Mass.
Paid Vacations. Paid vacations, after qualifying periods of service,
were provided by plants accounting for virtually all production workers (table 45).
Typical vacation provisions in each of the selected regions were 1 week of vaca­
tion pay after 1
year of service and 2 weeks after 5 years. About three-tenths
of the industry's
workers were in plants providing 3 weeks'
paid vacation after
15 years of service; such provisions were most frequently reported in the Great
Lakes and Middle West regions, applying to about seven-tenths and eight-tenths
of the workers, respectively. In the Border States, three-fourths of the workers
were in plants
granting 3 weeks' paid vacation after 25
years of service.
Four-week paid vacation provisions were rarely found in the industry.
Health. Insurance, and Pension Plans. Life, hospitalization, and sur­
gical insurance, for which employers paid at least part of the cost, were provided
by plants employing more than four-fifths of the production workers (table 46).
Sickness and accident and medical insurance was available to three-fifths of the
workers; accidental death and dismemberment insurance, to approximately a third;
and catastrophe insurance, to less than a tenth.
The proportions of workers
provided the benefits mentioned above varied among the selected regions.
To
illustrate, the proportions of workers in plants providing medical insurance
ranged from two-fifths in the Middle Atlantic region to over nine-tenths in the
Middle West.
Retirement pension plans, providing regular payments for the remainder
of the retiree's life (other than benefits available under Federal social security),
were in effect in plants employing slightly more than two-fifths of the labor force.
The proportion of workers covered by such plans, which were entirely financed
by employers, were two-thirds or more in three regions, slightly more than
two-fifths in the Border States and Southwest, three-tenths in New England, and
nearly a sixth in the Middle Atlantic.
Nonproduction Bonuses. Nonproduction bonuses, usually Christmas or
year end (but most commonly profit-sharing plans in the Great Lakes region),
were provided by plants accounting for a fourth of the industry's work force
(table 47). The proportions ranged from half in the Middle Atlantic to a tenth
or less in three regions.




Table 1. Average Hourly Earnings: By Selected Characteristics— Footwear Industry

0
0

(Num ber and a verage straight-tim e hourly earnings1 of production w orkers in footwear manufacturing establishments by selected ch aracteristics,
United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
United States2
New England
Middle Atlantic
B order ( tates
S
Southwest
G reat Lakes
M iddle W est
P a c ific
Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verag e Number A verage •Number A verage Number A verag e Number A verage
of
hourly
hourly
hourly
of
of
of
hourly
of
hourly
hourly
of
hourly
of
of
hourly
w orkers earnings w orkers earnings .workers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings

C h aracteristic

A ll w orkers
W om en. _ _
M en ____ __

_

__

__
_. _

Predom inant type o f shoe:3
M en 's Goody e a r-w e lt dress sh oes__________
M en's G oodyear-w elt w ork sh oes._______ ___
M en 's cem en t-p rocess shoes________________
W om en's cem en t-process
(conventional-lasted) sh oe s._______________
W om en's cem en t-process
(slip -la sted ) shoes_________________________ _
W om en's M cK ay (including
L it t le w a y ) s h o e s

.

_

__

M iss es' and ch ildren's cem en t-process
(conventional-lasted) sh oes________________
M is s e s ' and ch ildren's
G oodyear-w elt shoes _______________________
M is s e s ', ch ild ren 's, and infant's
stitchdown shoes ____ ____________________ __
Moccasin-constructed shoes with
hand-sewn plug_________ _____ ________ ______

173,804
103,207
70,597

$1. 77
1. 60
2.02

60,400
34,551
25,849

$1.91
1. 68
2. 21

33,404
18,712
14,692

30,958
7,499
7, 208

1. 86
1.71
1.75

9,831
1,679
3,526

2. 04
1.80
1.80

-

74,922

1. 78

31,888

1.88

13,691

5,406

1.67

-

8, 335

1.71

4,683

1.76

10,096

1.70

2,076

1. 80

8, 207

1. 88

-

$1.70
1. 52
1.94
.
-

6,692
4,474
2,218
-

1.76

3,834

2,514

1. 64

-

987

.

8,077
5, 600
2,477
.
-

1,785

1.69
1.61
1.69

-

-

1,692

1. 55

2,480
-

1,826

26,978
17, 240
9,738

$1.83
1. 66
2. 14

19,213
11,935
7,278

$1.67
1. 57
1.85

1,435
744
691

_
-

7,828
2, 113
2,448

1.97
1.82
1.84

2,472

1.65
_

-

9,403

1. 78

9,566

-

-

-

-

1. 53
-

1.64

-

-

1.70

-

-

1, 133
-

1, 179

1. 57

2,085

1.69

$1.91
1. 68
2. 16
_
_
-

1.90

1, 155

1. 70

-

"

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

1.92

-

-

970

-

-

4,440

1.57

-

3, 323

1.94

2,478

1.96

-

50—249 w o r k e r s
38, 320
250 w orkers o r m o r e _____________________ ___ 135,484

1. 74
1.78

13,521
46,879

1. 83
1.93

12,913
20,491

1. 76
1.67

1,006
5,686

l . 54
1.59

1,064
7,013

1. 86
1.71

32, 373
28,027

1.98
1.83

26,981
6,423

1. 73
1.61

1,642
5,050

1. 61
1. 58

7, 015

-

$1. 58
1. 53
1. 70

1. 68

2, 124

-

$1.59
1. 51
1.73

Size o f establishment:

Size o f community:
M etropolitan areas 4 ____________ ____________
Nonm etropolitan areas
_ _
_
_ ____

76,721
97,083

-

1. 45
1. 60
-

1. 58

3,953
23,025

1. 73
1. 85

1,828
17, 385

1. 54
1.69

1,435

1.91

8,733
18,245

1.95
1.77

3,520
15,693

1. 79
1.65

1, 290

1. 89

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately. For definition o f regions and areas used in this and subsequent tables, see table in appendix A and individual area
tables.
3 Establishments w ere cla ssified on the basis of the m ajor types o f shoes produced during the preceding year. The a ll-w ork ers total above includes data for establishments producing
other types o f shoes in addition to those shown separately.
4 The term "m etropolitan area, " as used in this study, re fe rs to Standard Metropolitan Statistical A reas as defined by the U. S. Bureau o f the Budget in 1961.
NOTE:

Dashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not meet publication crite ria .




Tabic 2. Earnings Distribution: Footwear Industry
(P ercen t distribution of production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly ea rn in gs,1 United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States 2
A vera g e hourly earn in gs1
Total

Women

Men

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

0. 2

0. 2

0. 1

0. 1

0. 1

18. 5
6.4
6.7
5.4
4. 7

23. 0
7. 8
8. 2
6.5
5.8

11.9
4.4
4. 6
3.7
3. 0

15. 3
5. 7
6.6
4. 8
3.8

21. 1
7. 5
7. 5
5. 8
4.9

60___________________________
70___________________________
80____________________ ____
90 ____ _____________________ _
00___________________________

8.7
7.4
6. 2
5.2
4.5

9.9
8.6
6.4
5. 0
4. 3

7. 0
5.7
5.8
5.4
4.7

8. 3
6.6
5.5
4. 6
4. 2

under
under
under
under
under

$2. 10________________ ..._____ __
$2. 20___________________________
$2. 30___________________________
$2. 40 _______________ ___ __
__ .
$2. 50_________ ___ _____

4. 3
3.5
3. 0
2.4
2.0

3.4
2.6
2. 1
1. 5
1. 1

5.6
4.9
4. 2
3. 7
3. 2

under
under
under
under
under

$2. 60____ _____________ _________
$2. 70___________________________
$2.80___________________________
$2. 90
______
__________
$3. 00________________________ __

2.0
1.5
1. 2
1. 0
.8

.9
.7
.4
.4
.2

3.5
2.7
2.4
2. 0
1. 7

Under $1. 25______________________________________
$1. 25
$1. 30
$1.35
$1.40
$1.45

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1. 30___________________________
$1. 35___________________________
$1. 40_________ ___________ _____
$ 1. 45___________________________
$1. 50___________________________

$1. 50
$1. 60
$1.70
$1. 80
$1.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1.
$1.
$1.
$1.
$2.

$2. 00
$2. 10
$2. 20
$2. 30
$2. 40

and
and
and
and
and

$2. 50
$2. 60
$2. 70
$2. 80
$2. 90

and
and
and
and
and

$3. 00 and o v e r____ ___________________________ ___
Total_______________________________________
Number o f w orkers __________ _________ _
______________ ____ ____
A vera g e hourly earn in gs1

Border
States

0. 3

Southwest

Great
Lakes

M iddle
West

P a cific

0. 1

0. 1

0. 1

0. 1

8
0
6
2
2

31. 8
5.7
8. 1
6. 0
5. 2

12.7
3.7
5. 3
5.4
5. 7

19. 3
6.7
7. 3
5. 8
5.4

2. 3
8.9
7.7
5. 2
4. 7

9.3
6. 7
6. 1
4.6
4. 1

8. 3
8.4
6.0
6.9
3.9

7. 8
8. 0
5.7
4.7
3.4

9.4
8. 3
6. 8
6. 3
5.7

9.2
8. 5
6. 8
6. 3
5.4

8.8
7.8
9.0
5. 6
4. 8

4.6
3.6
3. 3
2. 8
2. 5

4. 0
3. 1
2.7
1.9
1.6

2. 8
2.9
1. 8
1. 5
1. 1

3. 3
1. 8
1.6
2.4
1. 2

5. 0
4.6
3.6
3. 1
2.5

4. 0
3. 3
2.7
1.9
1.6

5. 2
3. 6
4. 2
3.4
2. 1

2. 6
1.9
2. 0
1. 5
1.4

1.7
1.4
.8
.9
.6

.9
.6
.6
.4
.3

1. 3
.4
.5
.5
.1

2. 5
1.9
1. 6
1. 3
1. 0

1.4
.8
.7
.5
.4

3. 1
2. 1
1. 5
2. 2
1.4

25.
10.
7.
5.
4.

4. 5

.8

9.9

8.4

3. 6

.4

.4

3. 7

1. 6

6. 3

100.0

100. 0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100. 0

100. 0

100.0

100. 0

173,804
$1.77

103, 207
$1.60

70,597
$2.02

60,400
$1.91

33,404
$1. 70

6,692
$1.59

8,077
$1. 58

26,978
$1. 83

19,213
$1. 67

1,435
$1.91

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and for w ork on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
NO TE:

Because o f rounding,




sums of individual items may not equal 100.

<
0

Table 3. Earnings Distribution: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes

Table 4. Earnings Distribution: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Work Shoes

(P ercen t distribution o f production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly
earnings, 1 United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United St ate s 2
A vera g e hourly earnings 1
Total

Women

Men

New
England

Great
Lakes

United States 2

Middle
West

A verage hourly earnings 1
Total

_

_

•*«> _________
—
4045__________
50- - -

9. 2
7. 0
6.6
7. 3
4.9

11.9
2.9
5.6
5.6
8. 5

$1.
$1.
$1.
$1.
$2.

An
70__________ r__
ftp_______ .____
9o_______ _____
00- -

8.3
7.7
6.4
5.8
5.2

10.
7.
7.
5.
4.

2
0
1
1
7

6. 2
8. 5
5.7
6. 6
5.8

10.4
6. 2
7.4
6.9
5. 5

10.6
8.7
5.7
6.3
4.6

and under
and under
smd under
and under
and under

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.

10— — —— __
20—
_I~I
3040.................
50..................-

4.8
3.9
2. 5
1.9
2. 1

3. 2
2. 4
1. 6
1. 2
1.

1

6. 5
5. 5
3.4
2.8
3. 1

6. 0
3. 5
2.9
2.4
2.9

4.3
5. 5
2.6
2.4
2.7

and
and
and
and
and

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$3.

60__ — __ ___
70___________ —
80....................
90—___________
00----------------

1.9
1. 2
1. 3
.7
.8

4
5
3
3
3

3.7
2.0
2. 3
1. 1
1.4

3. 3
1. 5
1.9
.7
1. 0

1.9
1.6
2.3
1.2
1. 2

-

-

14.2
5.8
5.7
5. 1
4.8

17.7
6.9
7. 5
6.7
5.9

10. 1
4.4
3.7
3.2
3.6

11.6
3.9
5.3
4.8
3.5

7.6
2.7
4.1
4.4
6.4

18.3
3.6
7.6
6.3
6.3

$ 1. 25
$ 1. 30
$ 1.35
$ 1.40
$ 1,45

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1.
$1.
$1.
$1.
$1.

$ 1. 50
$ 1.60
$ 1. 70
$ 1. 80
$ 1. 90

sind under
and under
and under
and under
and under

$ 1.60_____________
$ 1.70_____________
$ 1.80---$ 1.90
$ 2. 00—

8. 3
7. 5
6.3
5. 5
5.3

9.5
9.4
7. 2
5.6
5. 5

6.9
5.4
5.2
5.4
5. 1

7.8
6.0
5.7
4.7
5.4

7.7
7.9
6.8
6.7
5.9

11.0
11. 2
6.4
7.4
7. 0

$
$
$
$
$

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2. 10—
---$ 2. 20---$ 2. 30_____________
$ 2. 40_____________
$ 2. 50- —
----

4. 5
4.4
3. 5
2.7
2. 3

3. 5
2.7
2. 8
2. 1
1.6

5.7
6.3
4.3
3. 5
3. 1

4.8
4.0
4.0
2.9
2.9

4.6
5.0
4.3
3.7
3. 1

4.3
2. 1
2.0
2. 2
1. 1

$ 2. 00
$2.10
$ 2. 20
$ 2. 30
$ 2. 40

$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.

50
60
70
80
90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2. 60_________—
$ 2. 70.____ — ___
$ 2. 80_____
$ 2. 90- ---- —
$ 3. 00-----------------

2. 2
1.8
1. 5
1.2
1.0

1. 5
.9
.6
.5
.1

3. 1
2.8
2. 5
2.2
2.0

2.4
1.9
2. 1
1.8
1.8

3.7
2. 5
2. 6
2. 0
1.4

1. 5
.2
.6
.1
-

$ 2. 50
$ 2. 60
$ 2. 70
$ 2. 80
$ 2. 90

6. 1

1.4

11.6

12.3

6.8

.7

100. 0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

30,958
$ 1. 86

16,667
$ 1.67

14,291
$2.07

9,831
$2.04

7, 828
$1.97

2,472
$1.65

Under $1.25-----

under
under
under
under
under

(*>

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

( 3)

Number o f w orkers_________________
Average hourly earnings
— . -

2. 2

4

4. 2

2. 5

4. 0

100.0

$ 3. 00 and over

100.0

Number o f w orkers___— A verag e hourly earnings 1—-------- —

Great
Lakes

10. 8
7.7
4.6
5.4
2.8

0.2

1.30_____________
1.35. ___
1.40- __ ___ __ _
1.45—
______
1. 50.
— __

Total_____________

New
England

6
8
4
8
8

0. 1

$
$
$
$
$

$ 3. 00 and o v e r _____________________

_

Men

25.
7.
7.
5.
7.

0.3

and under
and under
and under
and under
and under

1. 50
1. 60
1.70
1. 80
1.90

Women

18.5
7.7
6. 1
5.6
5.4

0.2

$ 1.25
$ 1. 30
$ 1 .35
$ 1. 40
$ 1. 45

Under $ 1 . 2 5 ....................................

O

(P ercen t distribution of production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly
earnings, 1 United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)

100. 0

100.0

100. 0

100.0

7,499
$ 1.71

3,946
$ 1. 57

3, 553
$ 1.87

1, 679
$ 1.80

2, 113
$ 1.82

1 Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 L ess than 0. 05 percent.

Because o f rounding, sums o f individual item s may not equal 100.




NOTE:

Because o f rounding,

sums of individual item s may not equal 100.




Table 5. Earnings Distribution: Men’s Cement-Process Shoes
(Percen t distribution o f production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly ea rn in gs,1
United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
United States 2
A vera g e hourly earnings1
To tal

Women

Men

New
England

Great
Lakes

0. 3

_

0. 1

0.4

$1. 25
$1. 30
$1. 35
$1.40
$1.45

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1. 30------------ — -----------------$1. 35____________________—
____
$1. 40______ ___________ ________
$1. 45___________________ ....___
____________ _____ __
$1. 50.

20. 1
4.8
5.4
6.6
4.8

25.9
5. 5
5.9
7. 1
5.6

10.7
3.6
4.6
5.9
3.4

18. 3
6. 1
5. 8
4.9
5.4

12.4
1.9
4. 3
8.4
3.4

$1. 50
$1. 60
$1. 70
$1. 80
$1. 90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1. 60__________________________
$1. 70______________ ________ _
$1. 80________ _______ ____
$1.90 _______________________ _
$2. 00______________________ ____

8. 3
8. 3
6.0
5.5
5.0

9.2
8. 8
6. 1
5.5
4.4

6.8
7. 5
5.6
5.6
5.9

8. 1
6.7
5. 2
5. 5
5.0

8.6
8. 7
6.9
6. 2
6. 7

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.

00
10
20
30
40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2. 10__________________________
$2. 20__________________________
$2. 30__________________ ________
$2. 40____ ________ ___________
$2. 50______
____________

4.4
3. 3
3. 1
2.4
2. 1

4. 3
3.5
2. 1
1.4
1. 1

4.4
3. 1
4. 8
4. 0
3. 7

4. 5
3. 1
3.7
2.8
2.8

6.4
5. 3
3.9
3.0
2.0

$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.
$2.

50
60
70
80
90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2. 60__________________________
$2. 70__________________________
$2. 80_________________________ _
$2. 90 ____ ___ ________ .. ..
$3. 00_______________________ ___

1.8
1.7
1. 1
.7
.8

.9
.7
.4
.2
.2

3.2
3. 2
2. 1
1. 5
1.7

2. 2
1.7
1. 5
.9
1.0

2.0
2.4
1. 1
.7
•9

Under $1.25............ ............................................

0. 2

$3. 00 and o v e r_________________________________ _

3.7

.8

8. 5

4. 5

4.4

T o ta l ___________________ _______________ _ .

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

Number o f w o rk ers____ ____ _____ ....___________
A vera g e hourly earnings 1__________ __________ _

7, 208
$1. 75

4,462
$1.60

2,746
$1.99

3,526
$1. 80

2,448
$1.84

1 Excludes premium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r w ork on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
NO TE: Because o f rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.

Table 6. Earnings Distribution: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes

10

(P e rc e n t distribution of production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly earnings, 1 United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States 1
2
A vera g e hourly earnings

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

B order
States

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.3

19.4
7.0
6.8
5.6
5.4

31.9
8.5
6.4
5.6
4.3

1

Total

Under

$1 .2 5_

.

___

$1.25

an d u n d e r

________________________

$1 , *0. _

_ _

__________

________________

Women

Men

0.2

0.2

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

P a cific

0.1

0.2

0.2

42.9
4.6
7.2
5.9
4.2

15.4
3.6
5.2
5.5
4.9

17.8
8.3
7.1
5.9
5.1

2.7
8.3
8.4
5.5
5.0

Southwest

18.4
6.3
6.7
5.3
4.6

22.7
7.9
8.1
6.4
6.0

11.4
3.7
4.5
3.4
2.3

15.5
5.8
7.0
4.8
3.9

9.0
7.4
6.1
5.1
4.0

10.3
8.8
6.4
4.9
4.0

6.8
5.0
5.6
5.3
4.0

8.7
7.2
5.6
4.5
3.5

9.1
7.3
6.1
4.8
3.8

8.8
7.6
5.5
6.0
2.9

5.9
4.6
5.5
4.5
3.0

10.2
7.9
6.9
6.0
5.6

9.2
7.7
6.7
6.1
4.9

6.5
7.8
9.7
6.1
4.6

4.2
3.5
2.9
2.3
2.0

3.3
2.7
2.2
1.4
1.2

5.6
4.7
4.1
3.9
3.5

4.5
3.4
3.2
2.7
2.3

3.7
3.3
2.4
1.9
1.6

3.0
2.8
1.8
1.1
1.1

2.1
2.1
1.5
2.1
.8

5.3
4.9
3.5
3.2
2.9

4.2
3.5
2.9
1.7
2.1

4.6
3.1
4.9
3.7
1.5

.9
.7
.5

4.0
2.8
2.7
2.4
2.1

2.6
1.9
1.9
1.6
1.4

1.8
1.5
.9
1.0
.8

.9
.5
.6

2.4
1.2

.4

____________________________________

2.1
1.5
1.3
1.1
1.0

.9
.8

1.5
1.0
.8
.6
.5

3.3
2.4
1.6
2.2
1.5

$3.00 and o v e r _______________ __ __ _____________

5.1

.7

12.2

7.8

5.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

74,922
$1.78

46,434
$1.60

28,488
$2.08

31, 888
$1.88

$ 1 .4 5

and u n d e r

$ 1 .5 0 _

$ 1 .5 0

and u n d e r

$ 1 ,A 0

_

____

$ 1 .8 0

and u n d e r
and u n d e r

$1,Q 0

_

_

$ 2 .0 0

____ __________________________

and u n d e r
and u n d e r

$ 2 .1 0

___

$ 2 .1 0

$ 2 ,2 0

_______

$2 .6 0

and u n d e r

$ 2 .7 0

_ _

_ _

$ 1 .9 0

$ 2 .0 0

and
$ 2 .9 0

vender

$7 ,9 0

and u n d e r

$ 3 .0 0

______

___

_____

_

_________
______

___

_________

_

________________
_______________

____________________________
. . .

_

_

.

.

.

T o tal ................. ............................................ ..........
A verag e

Jim irly e a r n i n g s

1

.4

.3

1 Excludes premium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.




_

100.0

13,691
$1.76

.7

.6
.4

.3
.3
.3

.2
.6

2.4

2.3

6.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

3, 834
$1.55

2, 480
$1.53

9,403
$1.78

9, 566
$1.70

1, 133
$1.92

Table 7. Earnings Distribution: Women’s Cement-Process (Slip-Lasted) Shoes

Table 8. Earnings Distribution: Women’s McKay (Including Littleway) Shoes

(P ercen t distribution o f production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly
earnings, 1 United States and Middle Atlantic, A p ril 1965)
2

(P ercen t distribution o f production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly
earnings, 1 United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)

United States 2
A vera g e hourly earnings 1
Total

Under $ 1.25_______________________

Women

Men

United States 2

Middle
Atlantic

0. 1

_

0.2

Average hourly earnings 1
Total

0. 1

Under $ 1.25.............................. .....

Women

Men

0. 3

0. 3

0. 1

$ 1.25
$1.30
$1.35
$ 1.40
$1.45

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1. 30-------------- —
$ 1.3 5_ ------- ---$ 1.40---------------$ 1 .45 ______ __ _
$ 1.50----------- -----

14. 9
8. 1
11. 2
5.9
4.8

16. 8
9.7
14.3
6.0
5.3

11.5
5.4
5.9
5.8
4.0

18.2
6. 1
9.7
7. 1
5.4

$ 1. 25
$ 1. 30
$1.35
$ 1.40
$ 1. 45

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$
$
$
$
$

1.30.
____ —
1. 35_____________
1.40---------------1.45---------------..
1. 50------

27.7
5.4
6. 1
4.4
4.8

31. 5
6.6
6. 8
5. 1
5.7

21. 5
3. 5
5. 1
3. 3
3.3

$1.50
$ 1.60
$1.70
$ 1.80
$1.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1. 60---------------$ 1. 70---------------$ 1.80------------ —
$ 1.90---------------$ 2. 00_____________

10. 5
7. 0
6.7
4.8
5. 1

11.7
7. 1
6.0
4.3
4.6

8.4
6.9
7.9
5.5
6.2

13.3
7.4
6.7
4.6
5.0

$ 1. 50
$ 1. 60
$ 1. 70
$ 1. 80
$ 1.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 1.60---------------$ 1.70---------------$ 1. 80_________ — .
$ 1.90---------------$ 2. 00
-------

7.4
7.2
4.9
4. 5
4. 7

8.2
7.9
4. 2
4.9
5. 1

$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2. 10---------------$ 2. 20_____________
$ 2. 30.------- ------ —
$ 2. 40_____________
$ 2. 50.____ ______

5.4
3.6
3.8
1. 7
1.4

3.8
3.3
2.3
1.5
1. 1

8.3
4. 1
6.4
2.2
1.7

3.5
1.9
2.4
1.4
1.8

$ 2. 00
$ 2. 10
$ 2. 20
$ 2. 30
$ 2. 40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2. 10____________
$ 2. 20— _
----$ 2. 30— ------ —
$ 2. 40---------------$ 2. 50----------------

4. 1
3.4
2.3
2.9
1.8

$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.
$ 2.

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2. 60---------------$ 2. 70— — — $ 2. 80---------------$ 2. 90_____________
$ 3. 00_____________

1. 5
1. 1
1. 0
.7
.7

00
10
20
30
40

Number o f w ork ers.______________ —
A verag e hourly earnings 1------------

4. 9

2. 3

9. 6

5.4

100. 0

$ 2. 50 and o v e r ________ ____ ______

100. 0

100.0

100.0

5, 406
$ 1.67

3,440
$ 1.58

1,966
$ 1.81

2, 514
$ 1.64

50
60
70
80
90

New
England

0.3
25.
4.
6.
4.
4.

Middle
Atlantic

_

2
3
5
0
2

34.0
4.7
7.8
6.0
2. 5

6. 1
6.0
6. 0
4. 0
3.9

7.2
6.9
4. 8
4. 7
4.7

6. 5
6. 5
4.0
2. 7
3. 6

4.0
2.2
1. 6
1.8
1.4

4. 1
5.3
3.3
4.8
2.7

4. 2
4. 0
2.8
2.6
2. 3

4.4
2.3
1.9
2.6
1.5

.7
.3
.3
.5
.2

2.9
2. 3
2. 3
1.0
1.7

1.9
1.7
1. 6
.8
1. 2

.8
.9
1.2
.9
.6

$ 3. 00 and o v e r --------------------------1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays,
late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to Middle Atlantic.
NOTE:

3. 0

.7

6.8

4. 2

4. 5

Total______________

100.0

100.0

100.0

100. 0

100.0

Number o f w orkers— _________ ____
A verage hourly earnings 1.— .— ----

8,335
$ 1.71

5, 173
$ 1.59

3, 162
$ 1.89

4, 683
$ 1.76

987
$ 1. 68

and

Because of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal 100.




1 Excludes premium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r w ork on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

Because o f rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal 100.




Table 9. Earnings Distribution: Misses’ and Children’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes
(P ercen t distribution o f production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly earnings ,
United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
United States

A v e ra g e hourly earnings 1

Under $1.25

_____________ ____

_______________

2

New
England

Men

( 3)

0. 1

_

_

20.4
5. 5
6. 8
5. 7
4.9

23.9
7. 0
7. 8
6.4
5. 5

13. 3
2.5
4.9
4. 4
3. 7

19. 0
5. 5
7. 8
5. 2
4. 5

11. 3
9. 3
7. 5
4.9
4. 2

7.9
5.6
7. 0
6. 1
5. 8

4. 6
6. 3
4. 6
4. 1

10. 5
6. 3
4. 4
5.0
4. 3

7.4
4. 1
4. 3
3. 1
3. 3

6. 7
2.4
2. 2
1.9
2. 2

$1. 25
$1. 30
$1. 35
$1. 40
$1. 45

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1. 30.........................................
$1. 35__________________________
$1. 40__________________________
$1. 45__________________________
$1. 50_____ ____________________

$1. 50
$ 1. 60
$1. 70
$1. 80
$ 1.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1. 60_
______ __ _____
$ 1 . 70__ ___________________
$1. 80______________________
$1. 90 _ __
____
__ __ _
$ 2 . 00 --------- ------- -------------

$ 2 . 00
$ 2 . 10
$2. 20
$2. 30
$2. 40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 . 10_ __ _________________
________
$ 2 . 2 0 ____________
$2. 30 ___
____ ____ __ _ _
$2. 40__ ___________ ____________
$2. 50__________________________

5.0
2.4
2. 7
1. 8

1.8

8
1.6
1.9
1. 2
1. 0

$2. 50
$2 . 60
$2. 70
$ 2 . 80
$2. 90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2. 60__________________________
$ 2 . 7 0 „____ ___ ______ __....
$2. 80__________________________
$ 2 . 90 __________________________
$3. 00__________________________

1.9
1. 6
.8
.8
.6

.7
.7
.3
.3
.2

1. 3

2. 7
2. 6
1. 2
1. 5
1. 0

1. 8
100 . 0
10,096

.6
100 . 0

4. 1

5.4

100 . 0

6,730
$1.59

3,366
$ 1.90

$3. 00 and o v e r ___________________________________
Total_______________________________________
Number o f w o rk ers_____________ -___ - .
_ _
A v e ra g e hourly earn in gs 1
___ _____ __________ _

1
2
3

Middle
Atlantic

Women

Total

10 . 2
8. 1
7. 3
5. 3
4. 7

$1. 70

3.

4. 2
3. 5
1. 6

1.8

Because o f rounding, sums o f individual items may not equal 100.

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

0. 2

_

_

_

25. 3
4.9

24. 5
4. 3
10. 5
5.9
5.4

28.6
6. 1

15.2
6. 3

6 .0
5. 3
3. 6

8 .8

8. 8
8. 2

6 .6

5. 3
4. 7
9.9

12 . 2

7.4
5.4
3. 3

6.9
3. 3
3. 6

4.9
2. 6
3. 1
2. 3
2.4

4. 6
1. 5
2. 3
1. 8
1. 3

4. 1
1. 0
2. 0
1. 0
.8

2.4

2. 1

1. 3
2. 3

6 .0
5.0
5. 6
10. 6
10 . 1
8. 3

6.9
7. 1
3. 5
3. 6
3. 8
1.9
1. 3

1. 2

1. 0
100 . 0

.3

.4

100.0

2. 2
1. 2
.9
.8
1. 1
100 . 0

100 . 0

100 . 0

2,076
$ 1. 80

1,785
$1.69

1,826
$1. 64

1, 179
$1. 57

2,085
$1. 69

Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
L ess than 0. 05 percent.

NO TE:

12

.3
.7
.7
-

_
-

-

.9
.9
.9
.6




Tabic 10. Earnings Distribution: Misses’ and Children’s Goodyear-Welt Shoes
(Percen t distribution of production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly earnings,
United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States

A vera g e hourly earn in gs 1
Total

Under $1.25_____________________________________

0.1
11.1
5.3
8.1

$1.25
$1.30
$1.35
$1.40
$1.45

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1.30..-----------------------------$1.35_________________________
$1.40_________________________
$1.45______________ _____ _____
$1.50______________ __ ____

$1.50
$1.60
$1.70
$1.80
$1.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1.60___________ ____________ _
$1.70_______________________ __
$1.80_________ _____________ __
$1.90_________ ____
___
$2.00_________________________

7.6
7.6
5.8
4.7

$ 2.00
$ 2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2,10 _________________________
$ 2 . 20 ..----------- ---------- -----$2.30_________________________
$2.40_______ — ________
_
$2.50___________________ ____

3.6
4.1
3.0
2.5
1.9

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$2.60.______ _ _ __
___
$2.70 — ______________
___
$2.80____ .. _________ ____
$2.90_________________________
$3.00__________ _______ _____ __

$3>00

and o v e r _________________________________
T o ta l— ----

-------------------

-

—

Number of w o r k e r s .----------------- ---------- .
A vera g e hourly earnings 1 _______________ ______

1
2
3

5.7
5.4

8.2

2.1
2.2
1.8
.9
.7

2

Women

Men

Middle
Atlantic

(3)

0.1

0.2

14.1
5.7
9.2
7.8
7.2

7.6
4.9
6.9
3.3
3.4

14.4

9.1
9.0

7.1

8.8
12.1
7.9
6.1
10.2

4.8
4.1

7.8
7.8
5.2
4.5

8.2
6.6

5.2

6.0
6.8

2.9
2.9
2.3
1.4

4.4
5.5
3.9
3.9
2.9

1.4

2.9
3.7
2.9
1.3

1.0

.8
.8
.6
.2

1.2

2.1
1.6
.8
1.0

.7
.4

.2
.2

_

2.8
2.2
10.7
2.8
7.7

Middle
West

.
22.4
4.1
7.6
5.0
4.6

12.9
6.5
6.7
7.4
7.6

8.5
9.9

5.4
3.3
3.5

1.4
4.1

2.7
3.1

1.6
1.1

2.6
2.0

2.1
2.8

1.9

6.1

7.4
4.5

2.6
2.3
2.0

1.4
.5
.5

7.4

3.3

12.3

.7

3.5

2.3

100.0
8 , 207
$ 1.88

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

4,429
$1.70

3,778
$ 2.10

2, 124
$1.61

970
$1.90

1, 155
$1.70

Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
L e s s than 0.05 percent.

NO TE:

3.8
3.5

Great
Lakes

Because of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal 100.

Table 11. Earnings Distribution: Misses’, Children’s, and Infants’ Stitchdown Shoes

Table 12. Earnings Distribution: Moccasin-Constructed Shoes W ith Hand-Sewn Plug

(P ercen t distribution of production w ork ers by average straight-tim e hourly
earnings, 1 United States and Middle Atlantic, A p ril 1965)

(P ercen t distribution of production w orkers by average straight-tim e hourly
earnings, 1 United States and New England, A p r il 1965)

A vera g e hourly earnings

United States

1
Total

Under $1.25________________________

Women

Men

0.1

0.1

0.1

37.1

17.1
9.2
4.4

$1.25
$1.30
$1.35
$1.40
$ 1.45

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1.30_____________
$1.35_____________
$1.40____________ _
$1.45______
$1.50___________ _

29.8
10.4

$1.50
$1.60
$1.70
$1.80
$1.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1.60__________
$1.70_____________
$1.80_____ _______
$ 1.90 ___________ _
$ 2 .00 _____________

8.4
7.8
7.0
5.0
3.7

9.1

$ 2.00
$ 2.10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 .10 _____________
$ 2 . 20 . _________ __
$2.30_____________
$2.40_____________
$2.50.____________

2.5

1.3
.9

6.1

5.1
4.3

1.8
2.1
1.2

11.1

7.2
4.6
5.2

8.6

5.8
4.0
2.5

$2.50 and o ver ___________________ __

4.1

T o ta l_________________________

100.0

1.1
(3)
.2
1.2
100.0

4,440
$1.57

2, 817
$1.46

Number of w o r k e r s ._______________
A vera g e hourly earnings 1 _________

2

.7

Middle
Atlantic

0.1
22.2
7.3
8.7
4.3
5.0

6.0

2.7
7.1
6.5
9.0
6.5
5.7

7.0
4.8

8.0

6.7
3.9

4.6
3.5
3.9
3.3
1.5

3.5
3.1
3.5

8.9

8.3

100.0

100.0

1,623
$1.75

1,692
$1.69

2.1

1.4

A verag e hourly earnings

Total

NO TE;

Because of rounding,




sums of individual items may not equal 100.

Women

0.1

Under $1.25____

0.2
15.2
14.1

$ 1.25
$ 1.30
$ 1.35
$1.40
$ 1.45

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1.30_____________
$1.35_____________
$1.40___________
$1.45 ..............
$1.50_____________

12.7
7.9
5.2
5.0
2.4

$ 1.50
$ 1.60
$ 1.70
$1.80
$1.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$1.60.................
$1.70_____________
$1.80_____________
$1.90_____________
$ 2 .0 0 _____________

7.0
5.2
4.3
4.4
5.4

$ 2.00
$ 2.10
$ 2.20
$2.30
$2.40

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 .1 0 _____________
$ 2 .20 _____________
$2.30 ________
$2.40_____________
$2.50_____________

4.7
5.0
4.2
4.7
3.1

$2.50
$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2.90

and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under

$ 2 .60 _____________
$2.70____
$2.80_____________
$2.90_____________
$3.00.................

$3.00 and o v e r __________________ __

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to Middle Atlantic.
3 L e s s than 0.05 percent.

United States

1

Total____________
Number of w orker s ____ _________ _
A verag e hourly earnings 1 _________

3.3

2.8
2.6

1.7
1.4

8.2
10.8
2.8
8.2

3.9
6.5
4.5
5.1
4.7
3.3

1.8
3.1
1.8
1.2
1.8

.3
.7

100.0

.6
1.1
100.0

3, 323
$1.94

1,302
$ 1.66

6.9

2
Men

New
England

_

_

11.1

11.9
10.4
5.2
5.1
1.3

4.0
3.3

1.2
2.1
6.2
6.1

6.9
5.0
3.6
4.4
5.4

2.9
4.3
5.7
4.7
5.7
5.7
4.0

3.8
5.2
4.3
3.8
3.6

4.6
3.5
4.0
2.3
1.9

3.5
2.7
2.9
1.9
1.3

10.6
100.0
2 , 021
$ 2.11

8.0
100.0

6.1

2,478
$1.96

1 Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to New England.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal 100.

0)




Table 13. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— All Establishments
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations,
United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
Qf
w orkers

2

A verage
hourly
earnings

New England
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Great' Lakes
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Middle West
Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Cutting
Cutters, fa b ric lining, machine______________
Men _____________ —
____ _ _______ ______ .
Cutters, leather lining, machine____
_ W omen __________________ _____ ____________
Men _____
__
_________ ________ ______
Cu tters, vamp and whole shoe, hand
(63 men and 3 women) ____________________ _
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine______
Women __________ ____
_ _ _____ ______ __
M en ------------------------------------------------------

$2.03

18
18
19

$1.97
1.97
1.96

47
19

$2.34
2.56
2.13
1.99
2.47

-

-

_
295
54
241

_
2.69
2.25
2.79

_
104

2.62

382
380

2.75
2.98
2.98

84

_
2.09
2.09
2.09

1,285

1.71

239

2.02

240

1.90

124

1.47

622

1.55

112

1.61

250

1.53

32

1.38

536
628
777
730

1.81
1.79
1.90
1.85

1.98
1.96
2.36
2.29

155
178
194

1.95

192

2.08
2.07

67
71
52
52

1.47
1.45
1.49
1.49

58
38
35

37
35
9
30
38

1.58
1.56
1.79

85

2.07
2.23
2.31
2.85
2.48

35

1.91

12
_
12

1.88
1.88
2.22

129

102

292
135
157

66
1,213
241
972

2.10
2.02
1.86

2.16
2.72
2.47

1.88

34
33
96
19
77

8

$2.50
2.53
2.44
2.34
2.47

25
15

66

8

20

2.01

Fitting
Fancy stitchers (1, 275 women and 10 men) —
P a sters, backers, or fitters , upper,
hand (a ll women)__________ ________ _______ ___
S kivers, machine, uppers or linings
(533 women and 3 men)_______ ____ ________
Top stitchers (619 women and 9 men)_________
V ampe r s ___ __________ __________________ ________
W om en -------------------------------------------------

176

201

205
160

2.01

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pullover, m a c h in e ______ __
Men ________ ________________ ___ _____-_____ _
Bed-machine operators (a ll m en )----------------H eel-s ea t la sters (142 men and 3 women).----P u llover-m ach in e operators (a ll men)________
Side la sters , machine (a ll men)-- ----------------Toe la sters , automatic or semiautomatic
(289 men and 6 women)
_ ___ _ __ _____

281
236
56
145
345
350
295

2.10
2.20

73
72
28
40
98

2.50
2.05
2.55
2.33

102

2.98
3.00
2.59
2.48
3.26
2.90

2.46

77

2.92

85

2.81

1.94
2.33
2.33
2.67
2.54

88

2.01

1.79

Bottoming and making
Bottom fille r s
... ____ __ ____
______
Women _ _________________________
_______
Men
. ____ __
...
____ _____
Edge trim m ers (a ll men)
....
_____
_
Goodyear stitchers (497 men and 8 women)—
H eel attachers, machine (230 men
and 2 women),m
..
_r
Ins earners (267 men and 5 women)__________ —
Jointers, m ach in e. --------------------------------Men _____ ____ ___________ ____ _______________ _
Rough rounders (a ll men)---------------------------Shankers .
___ _____ _________ _____ __
__
Women
______ _ _ __ _____
______
Men _____________________ . . . .
_ _
Sole le v e le r s , machine___________ — __________

See footnotes at end of table.

1.87

39

2.11
1.88

43
33

2.03
2.72
2.32

6

81
440
505

33
125
147

2.15
3.50
2.76

118
118

232
272
55
45
216
78
47
31

2.23
2.61
2.19
2.32
2.55
1.80
1.75
1.87
1.81
1.81

63
85

2.74
3.37

58
62

3.12
2.15

49
18
15
_
28

149

68

100
88

1.68

21
21

63
26
13
13
34
32

2.68
2.68

1.88

2.42
1.95
1.96

10

20
12

20

2.39
2.84
1.89
2.06
2.61
1.81
1.82
_
2.04
2.09

38
69

21

1.70

23
_

1.85
1.80
.

_
_

1.37
_
_
_

20
8

1.88




Table 13. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— All Establishments— Continued
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations,
United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States
D epartm ent, occupation, and sex

Number
of
w orkers

2

A verage
hourly
earnings

New England
Number
of
w orkers

A vera g e
hourly
earnings

G reat'Lakes
Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Middlfe West
Number
Qf
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Finishing
Bottom s c o u re r s ---------------------------------------M en ______________ ________ _______ ______ _
Edge setters (274 men and 4 wom en)__________
R e p a ir e r s ----------------- --------- — -----W om en____ _________________________________
T r e e r s ___________________ _______________ ______
W om en
_ _ __________________________ ____
Men -------------------------------------------- ------

151
130
278
370
357
311
179
132

$2.04
2.09

420
278
142
643
384
259
249

1.52
1.55
1.47

2.68

1.64
1.63

2.01

1.76
2.36

40
40
93
113
104
87
-

$2.55
2.55
3.11
1.78
1.75
2.48
-

82

2.48

128
93
35
219
114
105
58
55
19

1.54
1.57
1.45
1.71
1.57
1.87
1.43
1.43
2.44

59
41
93

101
101

147
127

20

$2.15
2.34
2.58
1.73
1.73
1.84
1.78
2.24

11
11

$1.54
1.54

26
25
_
_

1.63
1.62
_
_

-

-

-

-

Miscellaneous
F lo o r boys (o r g ir l s )______________________ __
W om en---- ------------------------------------------..........
M en..
__
Inspectors (c r o w n e r s )_________________________
W om en _______________________________________
M en _____________ ___________________________
Janitors---- ----------------------------------------------M en _____ ____ ___ ___ __ ___ _____ __ ______ ____
Mechanics, maintenance (a ll men)___________

1
2

226

149

1.66

1.57
1.80
1.44
1.44

2.20

Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NO TE:

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication crite ria .

117
89
_

166
111

55
80

66

36

1.62
1.63
_
1.82
1.70
2.05
1.57
1.59
2.41

31
24
_
51
41

1.42
1.43
_
1.52
1.48

28
28
24

1.42
1.42

10

1.66

2.02

Table 14. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— By Size of Establishment
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1 o f w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States

New England

G reat Lakes

Establishments with—
Sex, department, and occupation

50—249 workers

250 w orkers or m ore

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

124
82
59
57
64

$1.71
1.43
1.76
1.71
1.89

1, 151
540
474
562

666

$1.71
1. 57
1. 82
1. 80
1. 85

35

1.71

322

17
27

1.48
1. 55

15
97

2. 50
2 . 50

50—
249 w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

250 w orkers or m ore

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

29
30
29

$1.76
1. 55
1. 87
1. 80
2. 24

159
91
146
166
131

$2. 13
1. 62
2 . 00
1.98
2. 30

1. 62

18

1. 87

86

357

1. 56
1. 57

7
14

1.41
1.61

86
100

142
875

2. 13
2. 63

9
55

2.68
2 . 68

325

216
314
326
261

2 . 12
2. 52
2. 32
2.48

17
14

2. 56
2.67
2.41

407
459
240
197

2.71
2. 31
2.62
2. 56

14
18
9

3. 46
2. 55
3. 01
2.70

28

2.88

246

2. 67

14

34
18
14

1. 82
1.47
2. 33

225
208
135

1. 80
1.44
2. 19

22
6

Number
of
w orkers

Number
of
w orkers

50—
249 w orkers

250 workers or m ore

A verag e
hourly
earning s

Number
of
w orkers

39
58
23
23
29

$ 1. 61
1. 39
1. 61
1.65
1. 64

201
192

1.72

15

1.59
1. 56

6
8

2. 44
3. 04

28

8
6
11

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Women
Fitting
Fancy stitch ers______________________________ ____
P a s te rs , backers, o r fitte rs , upper, hand____
Skivers, machine, uppers or l in i n g s ----------------Top stitch ers_____________________ _________ __
V a m pers_____________ __ ____ ____________ _ _____

70

21

132
154
163

$1.95
1.58
2 . 00
2 . 06
2. 15

1. 55

86

1. 76

1. 52
1.49

83
103

1. 64
1. 72

2. 32

15
213

2.61
2. 85

2.45
3. 05
2. 37
2 . 26

30
81
79
71

2. 17
2. 83
2 . 49
2.93

104
98
51
44

2. 71
2. 57
2 . 89

Finishing
R e p a ir e r s --------------------------------------------------M iscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls _________ -_________ __________ .____
Inspectors (c r o w n e rs )_____
__ _______

261

Men
Cutting
Cutters, leather lining, machine_______________
C u tters, vamp and whole shoe, m achine._____ _

68

_

_

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r p u llover, m achine____________
_ __
Pu llover-m a ch in e opera tors________ ___
Side la sters , m ach in e__ ____ _________
T o e la sters , automatic or sem iautom atic—
___

20
31
24
28

3. 03
2.77
2.47
2. 38

10
10

3. 64
3. 04
2. 67
2.79

62
81

88

67

2.90
3. 30
2.94
2. 94

7

Bottoming and making
_

E d g e t r im m e r s

__

_ __
_

__________

Goodyear stitch ers __ ______ ________
__ _
Ins earner« _ _
- _______ __________
.______ .
Rough rounders _______________ ___ _____ ___ ____ ____

33
38
27
19

2 . 88

11

111

3. 50
2.79
3. 46
3. 19

14

129
71
54

-

2. 38
2. 85
2.61
-

3. 21

77

3. 12

9

2.58

82

2 . 61

1. 81
1.41

83
49
17

1.89
1.44
2. 46

2. 04
1.46

47
55
29

2. 05
1.62
2.41

12
11

2.66

Finishing
Edge setters_______________ —____________________
M iscellaneous
Inspectors (crow n ers) —__ ____________ ___ ______
Janitors.—
Mechanics, maintenance.
___ __ __ — .... . . .

1
2

Excludes prem ium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NO TE:

Dashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication crite ria .




8
11
7

2 . 39

Table 15. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— By Size of Community
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 o f w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
United States
Sex, department, and occupation

Metropolitan areas

2

New England

Nonmetropolitan areas

M etropolitan area?

G reat Lakes

Nonmetropolitan areas

Metropolitan areas

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

444
230
261
262

$2.04
1. 57
1.93
1.95
2. 09

831
392
27 2
353
468

$1. 63
1. 53
1. 69
1. 67
1. 72

164
71
116
136
103

$ 2 . 10
1. 65
2. 03
1.97
2.41

65
41
59
60
57

$ 1. 80
1. 53
1. 88
1.92
2 . 08

65
74
70

147

2.42

210

1. 59

82

1.69

104

1. 75

91
152

1. 66
1. 62

187
232

1. 50
1. 53

39
74

1. 59
1.61

54
40

1. 56
1. 49

_
47

95
464

2. 31
2. 73

62
508

1.93
2. 51

63
239

2. 52
2.95

14
141

2. 24
3. 05

_

83
152
167
133

2. 74
2.99
2 . 61
2.79

153
193
183
156

2 . 20
2 . 08
2 . 20

1. 90

51
69
77
55

3. 24
3. 44
2.98
3. 17

29
25

187

2.98
2. 64
3. 21
2. 96

253
307
153

76
85
52
40

3.78
3. 27

49
62
30
23

2 . 68

122

2. 54
2. 13
2 . 18
2. 23

2 . 82

114
94

161

2. 87

113

2.43

58

3. 38

33

2. 70

55
134
91
37

1. 57
1.91
1. 55
2. 34

87
125
135

1.41
1.69
1. 37
2. 15

23
82
28

1.47
1. 90
1. 51
2. 31

23
27
19

Nonmetropolitan areas

A verag e
hourly
earning s

Number
of
w orkers

$ 2 . 19
2. 23
2. 37

163
178
90
103

122

$1. 85
1. 51
1. 77
1. 85
1.91

65

1. 63

_
1.73

49
64

1. 56
1. 68

100

_
3. 08

141

8

2 . 06
2. 58

2.42
2 . 81
2 . 66
2. 30

_
39
44
33

_
3. 21
2. 57
3. 19

30
49
41
49

2. 32
2. 56
2 . 39
2 . 60

3.41

52
46

2 . 88
2. 75
3. 29
2.99

64
40
30

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Women
Fitting
Fancy stitchers-____________ -_________-__________
P a s te r s , backers, or fitte rs , upper, hand—
___
S kivers, machine, uppers or linings _ ___ __
Top stitch ers_____________________________________
Vam pers _______ _____ -__________________ ________

266

_
-

Finishing
R e p a ir e r s --------------------------------------------------M iscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls _________ ______________________________
Inspectors (crow n ers)___________________________ _
Men
Cutting
Cutters, leather lining, machine_______________
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______
Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover, m achine—____-______
P u llo ver -machine operator s_______ -____ -___ ___
Side la sters , m achine___________________________
T o e la sters , automatic o r sem iautom atic____—

21
22

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers _________ ____ _______ ___________
Goodyear s titch ers_____ -______________________ —
Ins earners_____ _______________________________ —
Rough rounders__ ______________________________

190

3. 55

2. 75
2. 87

22

19

66

2. 51

2 . 49
2 . 60

2. 37

Finishing
Edge setters___________ _________________________ _

38

2. 54

M iscellaneous
F lo o r b o y s-------------------------------- ----------------Inspectors (c r o w n e rs )____ —____________________
Janitors___________________________________________
M echanics, maintenance-------------------------------

1
2

112

Excludes prem ium pay fo r o vertim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NOTE:

Dashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not meet publication crite ria .




10

12

1. 42
1.78
1. 35
2.44

_

30
-

9

_

2 . 16
2 . 68

_
25
25
27

_
1.91
1. 45
2. 32

Table 16. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— By Size of Establishment and Size of Community
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1 of w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States 2

New England

Great Lakes

Establishments with—
Sex, department, occupation, and
community size

50—
249 workers

250 w orkers or m ore

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

65
59

$1.75

1.66

379
772

19
63

1.54
1. 39

211
329

1. 57
1. 56

29
30

1. 78
1.73

232
242

1.95
1.69

28
29

1.79
1. 64

238
324

1.97
1. 67

31
33

2.09
1. 70

231
435

2.09
1. 72

18
17

1. 75
1. 67

129
193

87
174

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

50—
249 w orkers

250 w orkers or m ore

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

$1.79

110
49

16

1. 56

55
36

26

1. 82

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

50—
249 w orkers
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

250 w orkers or m ore
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Fitting
Fancy stitchers:
_
M etropolitan a r e a s _____________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s ______________ __
_
P a s te rs , backers, o r fitte rs , upper, hand:
M etropolitan areas __________________ ___
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s ___ _______________
Skivers, machine, uppers or linings:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s __________________
Top stitchers:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s __________________
Vam pers:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s __________________

$ 1.

88
1.62

26

90
56

$2. 25
1. 85

1. 68

1. 53

2 . 09

1. 85

$ 1 . 62

$1.91

1. 38
1. 63

63
69

2 . 22
1. 81

110
56

2 . 00
1.94

1.67

72
82

2. 25
1. 89

79
52

2.44
2 . 08

1. 68

65
98

2.44
1.96

1.66
1. 59

66

1. 66
1.92

1.67
1. 50

35
51

1. 62

62

1. 61

38

1.49

46
57

1. 72
1. 72

191
134

3. 00
3. 09

100
113

3. 08
2. 64

3. 24

55
26

2. 89

3. 49

37
44

3. 27
2.45

2.76

65
23

3. 02
2. 71

43
36

2. 57
2.40

3.02

47

3. 20
2. 34

33
38

3. 19
2. 70

24

Finishing
R ep airers:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s __________________

20

M iscellaneous
F lo o r g irls :
M etropolitan areas _______________ ______
Nonm etropolitan areas ____________ ______
Inspectors (crow n ers):
M etropolitan a r e a s ________________ ______
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s ______________ ___

14
13

1.66
1.44

138
219

1. 54

50
47

2.71
2 . 28

414
461

2. 74
2.53

17
14

3. 01
2.47

135
179

2.99
2. 17

13
11

2.73
2. 17

154
172

9
19

2 . 89
2. 14

124
137

1. 61
1. 57

Men
Cutting
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine:
M etropolitan a r e a s __________________ ___
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s __________________
Lasting
Pu llover-m a ch in e operators:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s __________________
Side la sters, machine:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s __________________
T oe la sters , automatic o r semiautomatic:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s _________ ___ _____

See footnotes at end of table,




2 . 60
2. 07
2.79
2. 21

20

2 . 26

Table 16. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— By Size of Establishment and Size of Community— Continued

1
0
1
0

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1 o f w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States

New England

Great Lakes

Establishments with—
Sex, department, occupation, and
community size

50—
249 workers
Number
of
w orkers

250 w orkers or m ore

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

A verage
hourly
earnings

14
19

$3. 22
2. 63

173
234

21

17

2 . 60
2. 52

173
286

2. 64

13
15

3. 16
2. 63

148
98

23

1. 81

111

50—
249 w orkers
Number
of
w orkers

250 w orkers or m ore

50-249 w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

$3. 39

64
47

$3. 58
3. 39

13

69
60

2. 87
2.69

2. 84
2.40

46
31

3. 40
2. 70

1.93

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

250 w orkers or m ore
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

M en— Continued
Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers:
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________
Goodyear stitchers:
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________

$2.96

2. 53

2 . 11

12
16

51
53

$ 2 . 89
2. 54

11

45
53

2. 74
2.42

9

53
29

2. 65
2. 53

29
18

2. 17

2. 04

$2. 38

Finishing
Edge setters:
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________
M iscellaneous
Inspectors (crow n ers):
M etropolitan a r e a s __________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s ______________
Janitors:
M etropolitan a r e a s __________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s ______________
M echanics, maintenance:
M etropolitan a r e a s ________________ ...
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s ______________

1
2

11

7
11

1. 83
1.44
1.50

114

l. 68

60
23

1.93
1. 78

84
124

1. 56
1. 35

24
25

1.53
1. 34

9

1. 50

16

2. 31
2.67

6

2 . 49

8

2 . 80

21

2. 27

35
12

100

2. 36
2 . 13

Excludes premium pay fo r o vertim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not meet publication crite ria .




10
7

1. 86

Table 17. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— Brockton, Mass.1
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 2 o f production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Sex, department, and
occupation

A ll production w o rk ers____
W om en _________ ... ._____
M an ----------------------------

Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings of—
age
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40
of
hourly $1.25
w ork­ earn­ and
and
in gs 2 under
ers
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $2.00 $2.10 $2,20 $2,30 $2,40 $2,$0 $2 , 6 Q $2,§0 $3.00 $3,20 $3,40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 over
4, 311 $ 2 . 12
2,097 1. 82
2, 214 2. 40

245
160
85

196
123
73

289
231
58

248

157
109
48

202

141

233
170
63

279
193

82

86

188
82
106

1
1
22
21

6
6

3
3

10
10

24
15

7
7

12
11

3

_

166

343

202
83
119

208
82
126

13
13

7
7

2
2

6
6

7

4

212

111

108
52
56

116
44
72

98
46
52

8
8

6
6

9
9

7
7

6
6

3

_

1
1

202

1
1

69
143

189
78

166
38
128

142
39
103

126
28
98

85
9
76

97

69
133

6
6

4
4

2
2

3
3

2
2

_
_

2
2
5
10

1
1
2
2

-

11
86

52
3
49

31
_
31

34

1

33

65
9
56

Women
Fitting
Fancy stitch ers_____ _
Incentive.________________
P a s te rs , backers, o r
fitte rs , upper, hand______
Tim p
S kivers, machine, uppers
or linings._________
_ .
T im e_____________________
Inc entiv e______ __________
Top stitchers fb/____________
Vam pers 3b/ . .. ..____ ____

140
130
56
25
31

2. 05
2 . 08

_
-

1. 59

2
2

1. 37
1. 78

88 1. 89

48
40
74
60

1.76
2.05
2.03
2. 52

3
3
5

2

3

_

-

-

_

_

2

-

-

_
_
-

1

3

2
1

2
1
1
5
-

2
2
1
_
1
1
-

3
_
3
4

1

5
3

2
10

3

3

3

3

3

48
44
4
4
3

2
2
2

7
9

3

1

3

2

4
9

3
5

2
2
2

3
3

5
5
7

5

5

2

5

2

1
1

-

_

3

4

5

1
1

_

_

3

4

_
3
4

1

_

"

3

2
2
3
1

6

6
2

-

1
1
2

_

_
_

1
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

7

_
_
4

-

-

1

~

-

-

-

"

1

-

1

"

~

“

_

_

1

_

_

-

.
-

-

_

_
_

Finishing
R e p a ir e rs ___________________
T im e „ ________________ ....
Inc entiv e__________ ______

39

1. 81

23

1. 57
1.98

27
44

1.49
1. 61

49

2 . 49

2

-

16

_
-

.
-

_
-

-

.
"

8
8
-

3
3

5
5
-

7

2

2

2

5

1
2

2

1
1

2

3

1

1
1

Miscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls 3a / ______________
Inspectors (crow n ers) 3a/—>

_

2

_

8

6

3

1
1

5

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

.
-

1

7

7
4

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

5

2

1

"

1

3

4

1

3

3

5

_

-

_

-

-

_

_

3

4

3

3

5

-

-

Men
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m ach in e__
T im e
Inc entiv e__________ ______
F abric lining „________________
Tim p
Inc entiv e _ ______ __________
Leather lining fb / — ___ ____
C u tters , vamp and whole
cV a p
i
Vian ri ^
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine 3b / ____________

10

39
15
9

6

34

2. 03
. 61
2. 33
2. 03
2.79
2. 56

8

2. 85
3. 19

-

-

_

-

-

2

1

8

4
4
4
4
4

2
1

-

1
1

6

2
3
2
2

1

-

-

2

2

7

4

_ _
1 3
2 1
6 2

8

-

-

-

3

3

1

3. 18

29

-

-

3

2
1
2
2

2.75

160

-

2
2

2

3

1

2

2

1

2
1

_ _

_

_

3

-

-

1

2
2

1
1

1 1
25

15

14

6 6

1
1

1
1

-

18

11

21

1
1

2
2

4
4

15

5

1

_

-

-

-

_
1

_

_

-

_

3

5

4

-

1
1

1
1

Fitting
Vam pers ________________________
In c e n tiv e

20

See footnotes at end o f table.




-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

1

1

1

1

-

10

CO

10

Table 17. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— Brockton, Mass.1— Continued
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings

Sex, department, and
occupation

Num- A v e r age
hourly $ 1 . 2 5
of
w ork­ ea rn ­ and
in gs 1 under
2
ers
$ 1 .3 0

2 o f production w orkers

•It

in selected occupations, A p r il 1965)

Number of workers receivin g straight- time hourly earnings of—
$ 1 .3 0

$ 1 .3 5

$ 1 .4 0

$ 1 .4 5

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1 .6 0

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .8 0

$ 1 .9 0 $ 2 .0 0

$ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .2 0

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .4 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 1 .3 5

$ 1 .4 0

$ 1 .4 5

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1 .6 0

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .8 0

$ 1 .9 0

$ 2 .0 0 $ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .2 0

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .4 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .8 0

$ 3 .0 0

$ 3 .2 0

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 .6 0

$ 3 .8 0

$ 4 .0 0

$ 4 .2 0

$4733

$ 3 .0 0

$ 2 .6 0

$ 2 .6 0

$ 3 .2 0

$ 3 .4 0

$ 3 .6 0

$ 3 .8 0

$ 4 .0 0

$ 4 .2 0

$ 4 .4 0

over

and

Men— Continued
Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover,
machine 3b / _______________
Bed-machine
operators 3a / ______________
H eel-seat la sters 3b/____ operators 3b/ ______________
Side la sters,
machine 3b/_______________
Toe la sters, automatic
or semiautomatic 3b/_____

26

$3. 63

13

2. 22

17

2 .7 9

45

3. 5 3

47

3. 0 8

32

16

"

2

“

1

8

2

“

“

-

'

"

2

"

-

"

-

-

-

1

■

-

-

-

-

-

-

“
“

-

~

3

“

"

1

l

2

1

1

1

7

5

2

-

-

-

2

-

'
-

-

-

"

“

-

"

~

5

3

3

1

4

1

'

1

-

~

1
1

2. 40
3. 61

■

-

-

3 . 31

45

■

"

“

"

1

"
■

~

3

3

3

2

7

8

6

3

2

1

6

2

7

10

5

5

1

3

4

2

1

1

1

1

6

2

2

6

3

3

1

1

4

1

■
1

'

Bottoming and making
Bottom fille r s 3
b/------------Edge trim m ers 3b/-----------Goodyear stitchers 3b/_____
H eel attachers,
machine 3b/ _______________
Ins earners 3b / ______________
Jointers, machine -----------Incentive_________________
Rough rounders 3b/ _________
Shankers 3b / ______________ —
Sole le v e le rs , machine____
Incentive_________________

61

3 .9 1

-

.
-

1

2

-

-

_
-

2. 64

31

-

_
-

_
-

2. 98

27

_

17

2. 4 3

13

2. 23

3

2

3

-

_

1

-

1

2

2

8

3

7

3

5

3

4

6

3

5

4

5

“

_
-

_

-

9

3

7

2

12

2

1

1

2

2

-

“
“
“

2

20

1. 9 7

16

_

_

-

“

1

-

4

2

2

5

1

-

4

2

1

1

2

7

2

3

-

7

3

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

3

-

1

2

2

2

2

1

2

2

2

2

-

1

1

-

1

1

~
“

“

2

3

7

1

1

1

1

1

4

-

"

”

“

-

2

-

“

"

2

1

-

1

"
“

~
“

“
“

”

1

■
-

3

2

-

1

1

"
“

4

“

"

3
3

1

5

“

"

3

-

“
"
■

1

2

1

.

.

_

2

_

2

1

_

2

-

1

1

2

2

2

-

-

6

7

4

6

7

3

-

2

8

1

"

-

"

"

5

1

2

1

5

10

5

3

_
3

_

_

6

-

_
-

_

4

_
-

-

-

5

2

2. 04

17

_

-

3. 29

8

1

1

-

2. 6 0

24

_

1

3

_

2

2. 62

2

1
1
1

1

-

1

1

8

"
"

1

1

'

Finishing
Bottom scourers
____
Edge setters^b/--------------- T r e e rs \ / __________________

48

2. 45

2

_

3. 4 3

51

-

-

13

2

2

3

1
2

Miscellaneous
F lo o r boys 3a/______________Inspectors (Frow ners) 3a/_Janitors 3a/_________________-

1
2
3

14

1. 4 1

2

4

61

1. 9 7

-

3
-

1. 4 5

5

1

25

2

4

2

2

1

1

2

-

_
12

3

_

1

8

4

23

-

-

1

1

The Brockton area includes Abington, Avon, Braintree, Bridgewater, Brockton, M iddleboro, Rockland, Stoughton, Weymouth, and Whitman, Mass.
Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to w arrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.




■

■

"

“

Table 18. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes— Wisconsin
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)
Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings of—
Sex, department, and
occupation

A ll production w ork ers____
W om en__________________
M en______________________

age

$1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1.90 $2.00 $2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50
and
and
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $2.00 $ 2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 over

ber
of
w orkers

earnings 1

4, 782
2, 946
1, 836

$1.93 415
1.76 301
2 . 21 114

152
115
37

175
129
46

156
109
47

333
273
60

1

1

1

_

-

364
280
84

385
319

66

328
249
79

294
219
75

3

2

292
225
67

241

2

161

80

250
134
116

217
123
94

210
87
123

157
63
94

216
87
129

149
15
134

100

127
27

5
-

1

1

-

76

6o

47
3
44

37
.
37

48

64

36

13
13

24
24

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

-

1

2

-

-

2
2

_
.

_
_

-

.
_
_

_
_
_

_

-

-

-

12

60
_

12

16
3
13

Women
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 2 b/_______________
Fabric lining 2 b/________
Leather lining 2 b/_______
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine 2 b/________

1

35
7
28

2. 15
2 . 19
2. 13

-

_

34

2. 35

-

-

-

-

-

-

206
176

2 . 00

1.92

7

1

3

2
2

24

12
8

225
54
171

1.52
1.31
1. 58

65
32
33

16

6
6
22
22

105
109
116

2 . 08

-

1

-

1

1
1

2

4
4

-

1
2
2

3

1

3

2
1
1
6

17
15

17
17

22
22

13
13

18
18

15
15

6
6

11
11
11

_

-

5
3

4
4

_

2
13
13

2
-

6

2
1

13
13

3
3

-

2

1
1

1
1

9
9

1
1

4
4

.
-

_
_

5
5

_
_

2
2

4

5

_

Fitting
Fancy s t it c h e r s ____________
In c e n tiv e ________________
P asters, backers, or
fitters , upper, h a n d ___
T im e ____________________
In c e n tiv e ________________
Skivers, machine, uppers
or linings 2 b/
_______
Top stitchers 2 b/_________
Vam pers_____ ______ ________
Tim e.......................... ......
In c e n tiv e ______ ____ ____

1

8
8

15

1

14

8

5
3

2
1
2

16

2

3
3
-

6
11
4
2
2

1

-

2

2

-

-

29
29

2

4
3
7
5

105

1.40
2. 15

-

16

1.78

-

1

25
7
13

1.60

1.66
1.86

1

7

1.89

-

-

1.71
1.73
1. 51
2. 05
1.91

_
-

_

.

.

2

2

2

2

2

2

-

3

_

11

10

2

1

3
3

1.93
1.99

26

9
13

9
3

2
2

11
1
10

2

3

1

1
1

2

10
10

13
13

13

6

7

7
9

7

2

8

13
7

3

3

3

3

3

9

10
10

4

10
12
12

1

1

1

2

3
-

_

-

_
-

9
4

8

1
1
9

6
2
2

5

12
8
8

"

-

-

2
-

.
-

_
-

2

4
4

_
3
4

_
-

_
_

.
.
_

9

8
8

4

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

7
5

4

6
6

-

9

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pullover,
machine 2 b/_______________
Bottoming and making
Bottom fille r s 2 b/__________
Jointers, machine 2 b/______
ShanWprQ ^ h /
|
Sole leve le rs ,
machine 2 b/______________

.

3
-

-

-

5

‘

“

4

10
9
1

5

2
-

_
3

2

1

1

2

3

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

_

_

_

_

-

_

.

.

.

-

-

2

_

3
5

_

1

-

-

.

4

2

-

4

2

2

-

2

Finishing
Bottom scou rers 2 b/ ______
R e p a ir e rs ___________________
T im e_____________________
In c e n tiv e ________________
T r e e rs 2 b / ________________

12
66
39
27
50

-

-

1

19
19
-

8

4

4

.
5
3

2

_

2

2

_
5
5

3

5

4

14
14
13

21

-

4
2

3
3

2

-

4

2

2

3

2

2

2

8

_

5

Miscellaneous
T 1nr»r girl s ^ a /
T
Inspectors (crow n ers)
T im e ____________________
Janitors 2 a/_________________

44
74
52

10

See footnotes at end o f table.




1.63
l ! 72
1.69
1.45

2
2

1

1

2

2

2

1

4

_

_

2

4
4
3

1

9
9
5

6

4
23

7

2

2

9
5

-

_

Table 18. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Dress Shoes----Wisconsin— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Sex, department, and
occupation

Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings ofNum- A v e r age
$2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50
hourly $1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60
of
w ork- earnand
ings 1
ers
$3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 over
$L30 $1 .35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 lL.9,0 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60
$ 2., 8-0

Men
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 2 b/______________
Fa bric "lining 2 b / ______
Leather lin in g*^/ _____
Cutters, vamp aricHvhole
shoe, machine 2 b/ ______

10

$2.41
2 . 80
2.05

182

2. 65

22

28

2. 36
2. 36

48
45

2. 72
2. 76

46

2. 54

53
48

2. 77
2 . 82

19
9

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

1
1
2
_

-

-

2
2

4

-

3

2

-

2
2
1
1

-

-

2
2
1

_

_

_

-

-

-

“

-

2

3

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

1

_

.

_

.

3

-

1
2
12

1
1

-

-

2
2

2
2

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

24

14

15

13

11

3

4

6

6

2
1

2

‘

-

-

4
4

.

6
6
2

1
1

1

-

2
2
6
6
1

3

11
11

3
3

5
5

6
6

3

8

3

3
3

10
2

5

2

-

-

6
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

5

-

-

1

-

4
5

1
1

-

4

8
1

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

1

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

16

7

9

7

10

1
11

3

4
5

4
3

-

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pullover,
machine 2 b/_____________
H eel-s ea t l a s t e r s 2 b/_____
Pullove r -machine
operators _______________
In c e n tiv e ______________
Side lasters,
m achine 2 b/............. .......
Toe la sters, automatic
or sem iautom atic_______
Incentive_______________

1

2

'

-

2
1

2
2
_

2
3

1

-

-

-

-

2

2
2
2

1

_

3
-

2
2
-

6

4

1
1
6
6
2
5
3

3

2

5
3
3

8
8
11
_

10
2
2

-

I

1
2
2

1
1
1
2

2

1

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

3
3

2
2
1
1
1

6

6

“

-

-

1
1

2
2

'

-

-

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers 2 b/_........
Goodyear stitchers 2 b/—
Heel attachers,
machine 2 b/____________
H eel-s ea t fitters ,
machine 2 b/____________
Ins earners"^)/___________
Jointers, m achine 2 b/
___
Rough rounders 2 b/TT---Sole leve le rs ,
machine 2 b/____________

69

66

32

2 . 80
2 . 60
2 . 28

29

1.77
2. 73
1.96
2 . 61

15

21
20

2. 35
2. 58
2. 24

-

-

-

_

_

.

.
_

_

_

1.93

7
38

6

-

-

1
1
2

-

2

1

_

.

_

2
1

2

_

-

_

-

1

1

2

1

1

2

-

-

3

-

4

-

-

4

_

.

1

2

_

.

_

1

1

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
3

3

2

2
2

4

2
2

-

-

3

10
2

1
1

2

1
1

5
4

5

"

-

2

3

7

3

2

3

2
12
1

1
2

-

_

.

7
3

6

1

7

3
3
-

5
-

-

2
1

1

4

2
1

1

"

3

-

"

-

"

"

"

■

-

-

2
2
2

12

1
2

5

2
2

-

2

3

1

~

~

3

"

-

“

1
1

“

-

2
-

Finishing
Bottom scou rers 2 b/
________
Edge s e tte r s 2 b/____________
T r e e rs 2 b/__________________

49

_

'

'

'

'

4

-

1
2

-

1
1

_

2
2

2
2

1
1

1
2

1
1

1

4

4

1

6

3

2

'

Miscellaneous
__
Inspectors (crow n ers) 2 a/
Janitors 2 a/_________________
Mechanics,
maintenance 2 a/-------------

34
27

20

2 . 12
1.54
2.43

1
-

14

2
1

2
4

1
2

2

6

1

9

4

2

3

4

“

'

“

1

6

2

1

1

2

Excludes prem ium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to warrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.




-




Table 19. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Goodyear-Welt Work Shoes— All Establishments
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations,
United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States
Department, occupation, and sex

Number
of
w orkers

2

New England

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

G reat Lakes

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

$1. 71
1.65

Cutting
Cutters, leather lining, machine___________
_
W om en_______________________
_________
Men ___________ ______ _____
_____ ___,
Cu tters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______
___
Women ______ __ ________
__ _
Men __ ______________________

71
46
25
405
69
336

$ 1 . 80
1. 74
1.92
2 . 20
1. 83
2 . 28

181
167

_
_
_
78
7
71

_
.
_
$2. 36
1. 89
2.41

18
13
_
114
24
90

1. 62

10

1. 77

107

1. 72

1.44

61

1. 44

31

1.48

1. 83
1. 84
1.98

31
53
56
50

1. 78
1. 71
1. 89
1. 83
2 . 39

17
14

2. 46
2. 54
1.97
2. 14

2.49
1.99
2.62

Fitting
Fancy stitchers (180 women and 1 man)_______
P a s te rs , backers, or fitters, upper, hand
(163 women and 4 men)_____________________ __
Skivers, machine, uppers or linings
(98 women and 1 man)_____ _ _ _
_ ___
Top stitchers (268 women and 2 men)_______ __
V a m p ers___ ______ _________ _____________ ____
W om en._______ ____ ____________ ____ _______
M en ___________________________
______ _

99
270

220

206
14

1. 66

21

1. 64
1. 74
1. 72
2 . 11

65
55
48
7

1.95
1.98

19
17

1.98

1.96

6

2. 07
2. 04
1.93
1.93

12

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pullover, m achine____________
Men _
_______ _
_ _ _ .
___
H eel-sea t la sters — ___ —____ ___ _________ __
Men
_
_
P u llover-m a ch in e operators (80 men
and 2 wom en)_________ __
Side la sters , machine (96 men
and 2 women) ___________________________ _
T o e la sters , automatic or semiautomatic
(106 men and 3 women)____ _________________ _

84
75
43
37

1. 88

1.92

6
6

2 . 38
2 . 08
2 . 16

19

2 . 82
2 . 51

20

2. 34

93
145

1. 86
1.95
2. 55
2. 23

8
6

1. 88
2 . 01

25
30

2.71
2.41

54
83
75

2 . 09
2. 24
2 . 11

11

2 . 18

19
15

2. 31
1.54
1.60

1.46
1.47

82
98
109

16

7
23

2. 54

19

2.49

29

2. 51

13
_
30
33

2 . 69

2. 77
2. 33

14
23
18

2 . 39
2.47
2. 35

.
17
-

.
1.49
-

47
25

30
25
41
30

1.47
1.45
1. 58
1. 53
1. 71
1.48
2. 32

Bottoming and making
Bottom fille r s ______ __ ____
_ _ _ __ __
M en __________________________________ . ____
Edge trim m ers (89 men and 4 women)_________
Goodyear stitchers (140 men and 5 women)
H eel attachers, machine (51 men
and 3 w om en). ________ _ ____________ _ _
Inseam ers (81 men and 2 women) _____ ________
Rough rounders (74 men and 1 woman) _

33

22

1. 94

_

2. 50

Finishing
Edge setters (25 men and 1 woman) _ __
R ep airers (103 women and 8 m e n )___ _______
T r e e r s (58 women and 6 m e n )__________ _____

26
111
64

10

2.51
1. 52
1.89

Miscellaneous
F lo o r boys (o r g ir ls )________________________ ___
Women _ _ __
_ _ _ _
_ T ___
T
Inspectors (crow n ers) ______________________ ___
Women _ ________
_
^
M en __ _______ ________ ___________ ____ ____ _
Janitors (83 men and 10 women)________________
M echanics, maintenance (a ll men)_____________

1
2

114

86

172
123
49
93
71

1. 49

1.48
1.53
1. 38
2 . 16

11
8

13

Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NO TE:

Dashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication c rite ria .

46
34
37
28
9
25

22

1.47
1. 50
1. 52
1.45
1.77
1.43
2.40




Table 20. Occupational Earnings: Men’s Cement-Process Shoes— All Establishments

1
0

00

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings' of w orkers in selected occupations,
United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
United States
Departm ent, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

2
1

New England

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Great Lakes

A vera g e
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

$ 2 . 28
2. 99
2. 05
3. 07

168
103
65

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Cutting
Cu tters, leather lining, machine
(22 men and 4 w om en )_________________________
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______
W om en ________________________________________
M e n -------------------------------------------------------

26
407
216
191

$ 2 . 06
2. 25
1. 74
2. 83

262

1.51

75

1. 66

47

1. 36

199

1. 54

54

1. 50

109

1.64

128
191
312

1. 68
1. 82

1. 64

40
89
140

56
74
126

1. 67
1. 70
1. 80

16
137

11

126

8

$1.
2.
2.
2.

78
17
05
37

Fitting
Fancy stitchers (a ll w om en )---------------------- P a s te r s , backers, or fitters , upper, hand
(a ll w om en )____________________________________
S kivers, machine, uppers or linings
(126 women and 2 m en)________________________
Top stitchers (a ll w om en )______________________
V am pers (302 women and 10 m e n )_____________

1. 82
1. 80
1.97

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover, m achine____________
W om en_______________ ________________________
M en ___________________________________________
H eel-sea t la s t e r s _______________________________
W om en________________________________________
M en _________
______________________________
P u llover-m a ch in e operators (43 men
and 12 women) . .._____________________________
Side la sters, machine (a ll m e n )________________
T o e la sters , automatic or semiautomatic
(67 men and 6 w om en )_________________________

73
18
55
47

12

35
55
37
73

1

80
1. 63
1. 85
2. 04
1. 74
2. 14

2. 28

36
31
15
_
15

2 . 01
2 . 02
2. 04
2. 04

37
13
24
24

8

1. 59
1.49
1. 65

2 . 20
1. 80

16

2. 40

16

2. 15

2 . 88

1. 94

19
-

2. 48
-

2. 23

15

1.94

38
16

10
-

2. 56
2. 29
1. 53
-

68
9
12
8

2 . 28

37

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers (a ll m e n )_______________________
H eel attachers, machine (a ll men)__ ___________
Shankers_________________________________________
M e n _______________________ __________ ______
Sole attachers, cement process (61 men
and 22 women) _ _ ____ _____________ ____

114
31

2 . 68

14

1.95
1. 67
1. 68

83

1.97

22

28
83

1. 63
1. 52

38

2. 04
1. 49

1. 46
1.48
1.43
1. 50
1.46
1.61
1.40
2. 15

50
33
17
93
69
24
24
~

1. 50
1. 50
1. 49
1. 48
1. 44
1.61
1. 38
"

22

1.50
1.79
1. 83

2 . 13

Finishing
Bottom scou rers (24 men and 4 women)._______
R ep airers (81 women and 2 men)_______________

12

12
17

1. 34
1. 66

M iscellaneous
F lo o r boys (o r g ir ls )____________________________
W om en_____ ___________ _____ __ __ __________ _
M en _______ ________________ ______ _________ _
Inspectors (c r o w n e rs )__________________________
W om en________________________________________
M en ____ ______ _________________ ________ ___ _
Janitors (51 men and 1 w om an)________________
M echan ics, maintenance (a ll men)_____________

1
2

100
67
33
197
147
50
52
30

Excludes premium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NO TE:

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication c rite ria .

28

22
88

62
26
14
18

1. 50
1. 52
1. 54
1.51
1. 61
1.46
2 . 11

Table 21. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— All Establishments
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings
United States2
Department, occupation, and sex

1 of workers

New England

in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)

Middle Atlantic

B order States

Southwest

G reat Lakes

Middle West

Pacific

Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage
of
hourly
hourly
of
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
of
hourly
of
of
of
hourly
of
of
workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings

Cutting
Cutters, fabric lining, machine-------------------471
114
W om en---------------------------------------- — M en ------------------------------------------------------357
Cutters, leather lining, machine------------------431
W om en ______ ________________ ________________
199
M en __ ______ __ ____ _______ ____________ _____
232
C u tters, vamp and whole shoe, hand-------------399
Women -_______ ____ ___ ___ _______ _________ __
68
M en ------------------------------------------------------331
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine--------- 2, 199
Women ____________ _________ ___________ _
479
M en ------------------------------------------------------- 1,720

$ 2.20
1.76
2.34
1.98
1.75
2. 17
2.59
1.89
2.73
2.41
1.92
2. 55

68

205
16
189
105
9
96
28
27
948
63
885

$2. 57
2 . 10
2.69
2.35
1.92
2.39
2. 53
2 . 50
2.78
1.95
2.84

1, 332
1, 310

1.90
1.90
2.04
1. 57
1.57
1.83
1.84
2.04
2.04
2.09
1.83
1.83

557
465
92
487
468
175
142
236
192
44
232

19
49
49
9
40
131
131
359
127
232

$1.97
1.76
2. 05
2.62
2 . 10
2.74
3.01
3.01
2.08
1.91
2 . 18

_
141
87
54

$ 1.61
1.54
1. 51
1.61
_
1.91
1.79
2 . 10

8
11
15
11
20

1.80
1.65
2. 58
1.59
1. 55
1.82
1.60
1.95
1.70
3.05
1.67
1.61

154
154
105
105
51
51
114
114
39
39

1. 50
1. 50
1.45
1.45
1.47
1.47
1.52
1.52
1.48
1.48

61
61
-

36

22

34

22

19

15
_
64
25
39

$1.89
1.48
2 . 19
1. 55
1.50
1.37
1.37
_
2 . 10
1.75
2. 33

57
32
25

88
6
66
20

82

46
294
73

221

$2.06
1.83
2. 35
1.71
1.72

1.66

2.34
1.96
2. 51
2.39
2 . 20
2.45

55
14
41
106
58
48

6
6
11

31
90
225
76
149

$1.98
1.73
2.08
1.74
1.74
1.74
2. 53
2.05
2.70
2.08
1.92
2 . 16

1. 56
1. 56
1.55
1. 55
1.62
1.62
1.67
1.67
1.52
1.52

70
29
41
33
32
16

121

13
13
37
34

$ 1.86
-

1.86

2. 52
2.67
2.67
2. 58
2.59

Fitting
Fancy stitch ers__________________________________
W om en __ ____ ____ ___ ________________________ _
M en _
_
____
P a s te rs , backers, o r fitte rs , upper, hand-----W om en ----- ---- ----------------------------------S kivers, machine, uppers o r linings----------W o m en _____ _____ __ _______ __ ___________ ____
Top stitch ers----- --------------------------------W om en ___________________ __ _____ __________ _
M en _______ ____________________
____________
V a m p ers----------------------------------------------------W om en --------------- ------ -------------------------

3,270
3, 110
160
2 , 118
2,095
790
742
2,050
1,921
129
779
743

1.75
1.72
2.35
1. 55
1. 54
1.71

1.65

828
828
238
228
956
913
43
271
262

903
153
750

2.26
1.94
2.32

368
54
314

2.64
2. 53
2.65

140
29

2.05
1.79
2 . 11

54
28
26

1. 51
1.35

1.68

29
26

804
410

2.68
2.00

410
158

2.92
2.25

109

2.36
1.75

49
18

2.09
1. 73

25
13
24
37
32
32

1.66
1.86

1.82
2.38

1.68

12

212

86
86

14
14
60
60
-

1.33
1. 33
_
1. 36
1.36
1.44
1.44
1.42
1.42
_
_

524
515
227
227
105
105
236
233
124
124

1.64
1.63
1. 57
1. 57
1.64
1.63
1.53
1. 53

427
427
259
259
138
138
297
297
52
52

108
7

101

2.36
1.97
2.39

134
19
115

2.07
1.79
2 . 11

19
19

2.47
2.47

126
49

2 . 10

2. 58

75
54

2.61
1.89

15

1.79

2. 15

94

2.44

100

2.52

2. 14

2.01
2.01

145
37
37

2.42
2.42
2.42

156
127
127

2.14
2.46
2.46

_
-

42
39
115

1.65
1.65
2.30
2.36
2.06
2.19

126
123
37
34

2.07
1.94
2.05
1.78
1.64
1.85

44
36
43
18
25

-

1.66
1.66

11

56
19
16
9

1.94
1.83

2.01

1.72
1.71
1.70
1.67

1.90

1.85
-

2 . 12
1.97

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover, m achine---------------W omen —------------------------------------------------M e n ------------------------------------------------------Bed-m achine operators (800 men
and 4 wom en)--------------------------------------------H eel-s ea t lasters (395 men and 15 wom en)-----P u llover-m ach in e operators (719 men
and 1 woman)----- ------------------------------------Side la sters, machine (1,097 men
and 7 wom en)--------------------------------------------T oe la sters , automatic o r sem iautom atic------M en -------------------------------------------------------

111

86

720

2.64

293

3. 02

127

2.43

39

1.99

1, 104
727
711

2. 50
2.51
2.52

499
252
252

2.89
3.01
3.01

152
180
164

2.28
2. 15
2. 15

56

22
22

1.68

178
153
645
614
405
381

1.63
1.57
2.43
2.46
2. 14
2. 17

16
16

1.71
1.71
2.76
2.77
2.42
2.43

1.61
1.46
2. 58
2.69
2.06
2.08

15
14
40
40
16
16

47
204
176
373
109
264

2.07
1.71

1.90
1.90

1.64
1.65

2.01
1.94

8
12
7
7

3.00
2.46
3. 10
3. 10

Bottoming and making
Bottom fille r s - ------------------------------------------Women __________-____ ________________ _____ _
Edge tr im m e r s -------------------------------------------M en ------------------ ----------------------------H eel attachers, machine________________________
Men —_________ ____ __ ________________ ________ _
H eel-s ea t fitte rs , machine (43 men
and 4 wom en)----------- -------------- ------- - _.
Rough rounders-------------------------------------------Men - --------------------------------------------------- Shankers__________________________________________
W om en ______ _____ _________ ___ ___ _______
M en --------- ---- --------------------------------_
Sole attachers, cement p r o c e s s --------------Women ___________________ ________ ____ ________
Men __ __________________ ____________________
See footnotes at end o f table.




922
100

822

1.93

2.01

1.66

1.73
2.31
1.83
2.36

211

206
144
141

6

47
43
175
48
127
417
23
394

2. 19
2.30
2.29
1.74
1.73
1.74
2.62
2.29
2.64

60
47
75

68

108
104
24
24

60

18
42
152

11

141

2. 19
2.19
1.69
1.47
1.79
2 . 18
1.77

2.21

10

15
-

9
44

6

38

1.44
1.42
2.03
2.03

1.66
1.66

1.45
1.56
-

1.60
1.67
1.46
1.71

_
26
26
15
14

2.00
2.00
1.63
1.66

-

-

11
10

32
7
25

1.66
_

1.61
1.76
1. 57
1.81

102

60
47
15
42
36
46
15
31
107
-

76

2.00
2 . 16

21
20

102

7
95

1.72
1.74
2.29
2 . 29
1.95
1.98
1.83
1.87
1.62

1.66

1.59
2.14
2.14
2. 14

8

9

8

9
9
-

6
6
9
.

8

25
_

12

2 . 12
2.37
2.49
2.34
2.34
2.61
2.61
2.03
-

1.95
2.23
-

2.66

Table 21. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— All Establishments— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States2
Department, occupation, and sex

New England

Middle Atlantic

Number A verage Number Average Number
hourly
of
of
hourly
of
w orkers earnings workers earnings w orkers

B order States

Southwest

Great: Lakes

Middle West

P a cific

A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage Number A verage
hourly
hourly
of
hourly
of
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
hourly
earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings w orkers earnings

Finishing

18
9

Bottom s c o u re r s -----------------------------------------174
M en -------.-----------------------------------------------330
Edge s etters-----------------------------------------------316
M en ---- ------------------------------------------------R e p a ir e r s --------------------------------------------------- 1,931
W om en------------------------------------------------- — 1,853
T r e e r s -------- --------------------------------------------- 1,417
W om en--------------------------------------------------749
M en --------------------------------------------------------

68
6

$2. 16

$2.05
. 18
2. 63

2.36

46
34
107
98
999
994
512
39
473

1. 51
1. 55
1.44
1. 55
1.50
1. 67
1.38
1.39
. 22

518
324
194
384
244
140
107
104
48

1.45
1.46
1.44
1.52
1.47
1.62
1. 32
1.32

22
.2
2.47
2.49
1.58
1.53

20
.0
18
.6

2
28
.6
1. 50
1. 50
2.43
2.08
2.46

46
46
52
52
335
275
157
96
61

$2.39
2.39
2.84
2. 84
1.79
1. 50
1.89
1. 54
2.43

7

6

16
16
56
56
91
61
30

$1.63
1.57
. 20

2
20
.2
1.74
1. 74
1.64
1. 54
1.84

1
0
6

7
7
75
74
80
76
'

$1.67
1.95
1.83
1.83
1.41
1.41
1. 59
1.61
"

65
38
27
38
32

1.37
1. 35
1.40
1.42
1.41

31
31

8
6

83
160
158

20
2
167
53

$2. 11
. 11
. 16
. 16
1.67

2
2
2
16
.6
1.87
1.77
2. 15

38
37
57
55
203
203
267
228
39

$2. 22
2. 23
2. 36
2. 38
1.60
1.60
1.75
1.70

158
113
45
192
156
36
67
60
49

1.44
1.43
1.45
1. 52
1. 50
1.59
1. 34
1. 34
. 10

21
.0

6
-

-

40
39

8
-

-

$2.76
_
-

16
.6
16
.6
1.99
-

-

M iscellaneous
F lo o r boys (o r g ir ls )------------------------------------- 1,234
803
W om en________________________________________
431
M en -------------------------------------------------------Inspectors (c r o w n e r s )---------------------------------- 1, 171
830
W om en--------------------------------------------------341
M en -------------------------------------------------------388
Janitors------------------------------------------------------371
M en -------------------------------------------------------270
Mechanics, maintenance (a ll men) ----------------

2

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r o vertim e and for work on weekends,
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

26
.6

21
1
109
12
0
20
1
10
2
90
91
87
54

1.81

2 19
.

1.40
1. 51
1.43
1.62
1.40
1.41
2. 24

holidays, and late shifts.

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication c rite ria .




57
49
79
71

8

28
26
28

1.39
1. 38
-

1.48
1.45
1.70
1.29
1.29
1.82

-

1
1
1
1
17

-

1. 31
1. 31
2.07

140
116
24
193
150
43
59
58
52

1. 50
1.48
1. 57
1.74

16
.6
21
.0
1. 53
1. 53
. 22

2

2

33

2
2
1
1
16
-

9
9

1. 53
1. 53
1.52
1.65
-

1.64
1.64

Table 22. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— By Size of Establishment
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1 of w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
United States

New England

Middle Atlantic

Establishments with—
Sex, department, and occupation

50—
249
w orkers
Average
Number
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

250 workers
or m ore
Number
A verage
of
hour ly
w orkers
earnings

56-249
w orkers
Number
A verag e
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

250 w orkers
or m ore
Number
A verage
of
hourly
w orkers
earning s

50-249
w orkers
A verag e
Number
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

256 w orkers
or m ore
Number
A verage
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

Women
Cutting
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______

54

$1.83

425

$1.93

445
374
129
247
132

1.78
1.58
1.65
1.89
1.75

2,665
1,721
613
1,674

1. 71
1. 54
1. 67
. 81
1. 63

235
137
39

348
104

. 89
1. 55

1,505
645

133
144

2. 05
1. 45

57

$1.94

13

$2. 23

114

$1. 87

53

$1.93
1. 64
1. 84
. 09
1. 87

1,075
691
189
793
209

1. 89
1. 55
1. 84
2. 03
1.82

132
30
45
38

1.71
1. 56
1. 51
1. 74
1. 76

379
336

12
1
147
174

1. 63
1. 55
. 62
1.69
1. 58

1. 53
1.70

183
-

1. 51
-

811
35

1. 50
2. 15

57
25

1.69
. 68

218
71

1.45
1.49

670

1.45
1. 51

41
45

1.47
1.49

283
199

1.46
1.47

2
2

_

_
1. 40

81
98

1.47
1.44

2. 54

289
178
1,451

2. 38
2. 04
2. 55

38
16
145

2. 37
. 68
2.77

151
80
740

17
19
41

. 09
2.99
2. 34

32

2. 03
2. 52
2. 14

2.43
2.91
1.95
2.74
2.63
2.50

619
678
319
601
949
628

2. 30
2. 64
2. 03
2.61
2.48
2. 52

52
74
27
45
71
24

2. 75
3. 01
2.09
3. 18
2.91
2.97

262
334
131
247
427
228

2 90
.
2 28
.
2.99
2 88
.

30

2.
3.
2.
2.
2.
2.

73
49
130

2.64
2. 33
1.73
2.50

514
308
215

62
9

2. 42
2. 13
1. 73
2. 34

39
33
24
63

2.50
1. 54
2. 51

167
108
103
331

2. 74
2.41
1.79
2. 67

2
2
8

56
91

2. 85
2. 33

260
577

2.41
2. 37

54

2. 76
. 26

2

78
419

26
.6

2
2

2.49

31

1.46

355
284
295
241

1.44
1.62
1. 37
. 20

1. 50

16
23
"

174
124
81
44

1.44
1.62
1. 32
2. 64

31
25
28
7

Fitting
Fancy stitchers ___
. .. ____ ____ _ __ _____
P a s te rs , backers, or fitte rs , upper, hand-----Skivers, machine, uppers or linings______ _____
Top stitch ers____________ ... ________ _______ ____
V a m pers-----------------------------------------------------

61
1

1

10
2

2

8
6

1

Finishing
R e p a ir e r s ________________________________________
T r e e r s ---- ---------- ----- ------------ .. -----

1

1

M iscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls _______ _________ _____ __ ... .....
Inspectors (crow n ers) ______ _______ _____

66
8

Men
Cutting
Cutters, fa b ric lining, m ach in e________________
Cu tters, leather lining, machine..__ _______ ____
C u tters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______

6
8

54
269

2 18
.
261
.

2

28
.6
2. 34
2. 85

2

2
1
191

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r p u llover, m ach in e.____ _______
Bed-machine o p era to rs_____ . ____ ___ _____
H eel-sea t la sters
..
____ ___...__ _____
P u llover-m a ch in e opera tors________ ____ ____
Side la sters , m ach in e___
___ ______
_____
T o e la sters , automatic or sem iautom atic.____

131

12
2
76
118
148
83

2. 64

3. 02

2
2

23
39
31
23

30
04
03
58
52
58

8
6
60
8
8
16
1
141

2. 05
. 19
1. 64
2. 36
2. 23
. 08

3. 22
2.43
2.51
2. 76

51
82
34
108

2.51
1.98
1.62
2. 04

3. 09
2.59

30
30

1.42

71
65
59
47

81

2

2

Bottoming and making
Edge t r im m e r s ______ ____ ___ _________ __________
H eel attachers, machine------------- -------- .........
Shankers..
—
...__ ___ ____ ____
Sole attachers, cem ent p r o c e s s __ _____________

10
0

2 88
.

17

33

Finishing
Edge setters ...
T reers
__ ___

_
__

.

___ _______
___ _______ ____

2
0

2 66
.
2. 27

M iscellaneous
hnye
Inspectors (crow n ers) _______ ____ ____ ______ _
.Tanitors
..........
_ __
M echanics, maintenance____ ___________________
See footnotes at end o f table.




76
57
76
29

189
.

1.44
2.43

2

2
0

162
.

1. 33
“

2 16
.

1. 52
2. 50

1. 39
1.41
1. 35
. 20

2

9

Table 22. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— By Size of Establishment— Continued

8

(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1of w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
Border States

Southwest

Great Lakes

Middle West

Establishments with—
Sex, department, and occupation

250 workers
or m ore
A verage
Number
hourly
of
w orkers
earnings

50—
249
workers
A verage
Number
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

250 w orkers
or m ore
A verage
Number
hourly
of
w orkers earnings

250 w orkers
or m ore
Number A verag e
hourly
of
w orkers ea rning s

50-249
w orkers
Number A verage
hourly
of
w orkers earnings

250 w orkers
or m ore
Number A verag e
of
hourly
workers earnings

6(5-249
w orkers
A verag e
Number
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

Women
Cutting
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______

72

$1.90

13

$1. 57

73

$2. 20

$1. 39
_
1. 54
-

41
83
_
38
-

1. 30
1. 36
_
1. 35
-

512
217
96
228

10
2

. 62
1. 58
. 60
. 62
1. 54

1. 32
1. 35

53
58

1.45
1. 69

148
152

1. 67
1. 79

1. 43
1. 34

28
17

1. 33
1.48

108
131

168
.

1
1

2 19
.

25
_
205

2. 50

2. 35
. 61
2. 17
2.45
2. 40
2.42

74

$1.92

Fitting
Fancy stitch ers_____________________ _____________
P a s te r s , backers, or fitte rs , upper, hand__...
Skivers, machine, uppers or linings___
___
Top stitch ers..
__
, ,
V am pers_______________________________ __________

12
2
95
42
104
34

1. 53
1.46
1.49
1. 52
1.47

47
46

l. 82
l. 57

45

6
6

1. 39
1. 45

_
53

2 11
.

2
0
_

2
2
-

1
1
1

33
23
17
17
13

$1.49
1. 54
1. 48
. 62
1. 58

1

394
236

11
2

280
39

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

57
55
64
67
50

29
32

39
-

1
1
19
9

$1. 83
1. 71
1. 67
1. 85
1.97

Finishing
R ep airers - _ _ ___ ___
_____
__
T r e e r s --------------------------------------------------------

2
1
18

2
0

1. 64
1.47

183

16

22
1

1. 59
1. 72

17
16

1.42
1. 38

96
140

1. 44
1. 51

7
15

2. 07
2. 23

37
41
134

1. 83
. 19
. 79
. 08

103
71
48
90
141
117

2. 15
. 60
1. 87
2. 56
2. 17
2. 49

108
33
23
87

2. 32
1.99
. 61
. 19

8
8
1
2

2 39
.

16
.6

-

M iscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls - ___ _ _
______
_ _
Inspectors (c r o w n e rs )________________ _______ _

1
0

15

1. 49

2
2
-

1. 53
-

Men
Cutting
Cutters, fabric lining, m ach in e___________ ____
Cutters, leather lining, machine_______________
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______

-

-

38

_
2. 34

2. 35
-

2 11
.
168
.

2. 15

6

34

186
.
2 59
.
-

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover, m a ch in e...__________
Bed-machine op era to rs________________________ _
H eel-sea t la s t e r s __________________________ _____
P u llover-m ach in e o p era to rs____________________
Side la sters , m achine___________________________
To e la sters , automatic or semiautomatic

24
43

1
1

35
55

2
1

1. 69

2 02
.
1. 83
2 00
.
166
.
1.93

5
_
-

6
1
1

1. 64
_
. 11
1. 64

2

2
1
25
1
0
2
0

166
.
2 01
.
2. 04
2 11
.

31
-

2. 14
-

94
117
43
91
134
34

2
0
1
1
1
0

2 01
.
1. 76
161
.
181
.

97
47
30
71

2.
2.
1.
2.

80
53

2. 14
2. 15

24
39
54
52

1. 57
2. 03
1. 53
. 22

2

1
2
-

1
0
1
0
15

2
1
2

2

19
-

1
1
8
1
2
7

2. 47
1.93
3. 00
2. 46
3. 10

Bottoming and making
Edge tr im m e r s _______________________ __________
Heel attachers, machine_______________ ____ _____
Shanke r s____________________ ___________ _______ _
Sole attachers, cement p r o c e s s ________________

33
15
7
33

2. 09
. 68
1.69
1. 70

15
30

2. 17
1. 84

1

6
-

1. 97
_

25

33
19
85
14

15
-

8

2 11
.
1. 56

1
2

9

249
.

2. 34
1.95

2 66
.

Finishing
T r e e r s __________________________________ _________

-

.

-

■

53
37

-

-

2. 03

-

M iscellaneous
F lo o r b o y s _________________________ _______ ___ ___
Inspectors (c r o w n e rs )____ _____________ ________ _
Janitors__________________ __________________ ______
M echan ics, maintenance______________....__ _____

.

7
24
25

_

1. 57
1. 29
. 82

1

_

_

-

-

8

‘

"

-

-

13

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication c rite ria .




-

1. 29
1. 83

2

_

7

.
-

1.97

43
30
56
42

1. 45
1. 58
1. 34
. 12

2

1
1
-

9

1. 52
1. 64
“

Table 23. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— By Size of Community
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1 of w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
United States 2
Sex, department, and occupation

Metropolitan
areas
Number
A verage
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

New England

Nonmetropolitan
areas
Number
A verage
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

Metropolitan
areas
Number
A verag e
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

Middle Atlantic

Nonmetropolitan
areas
Number
A vera g e
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

Metropolitan
areas
Number
A verag e
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

Nonmetropolitan
areas
Number
A verage
of
hourly
w orkers
earnings

Women
Cutting
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, m achine.______

8

132

$1.94

347

$1.91

1,447
916
349
812
347

1.79
1.59
1.75
1.90
1.71

1,663
1, 179
393
1, 109
396

1. 65
1. 50
1. 59
1. 77
. 60

718
340
127
440

885
248

1. 58
1.70

1.48
1. 67

481

501

299
318

1. 77
1.48

504
512

1.42
1. 51

98
109

177
128
812

2. 46
2. 40
2. 67

180
104
908

341
325
188
306
494
330

2.48
2. 71
2. 04
2. 85
2.72
2.76

409
475
207
413
603
381

247
219
123
373

2.77
. 26
1.85
2. 56

172
370

2.75
2. 40

28
9

$2. 26

108

$1. 90

19

47 3
141

$1.93
1. 55
1. 87
2. 07
1. 84

379
391
115
159
182

1. 67
1. 57
. 62
1.74
. 62

77
27
33
30

1.59
1. 79

513
28

2 20
.

1. 42

247
87

1. 50
1. 54

1. 55
1.46

226
135

1.42
1.48

97
90

2.93

76
27
416

2. 54
2. 84
2. 73

41
40
204

2. 72
2.97
2. 37
3. 21
2.97
3. 24

158
238
77
168
229
123

$1.95

Fitting
Fancy stitch ers___________________________ ___ _
P a s te r s , backers, o r fitte rs , upper, hand..___
Skivers, machine, uppers or linings___ ________
Top stitchers
____ ____________ __________ _
V a m p e r s ___________
_ _ ___________

1

11
2

188
.
159
.
182
.
2 00
.
182
.

592
488

11
0

1
1

8
6

1. 55
1. 47
1. 51
1. 53
1. 55

Finishing
R e p a ir e rs _________ ._________ ...._______ _________
T r e e r s ___________________________________________

98
6

1
1

M iscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls ______________ ___________________ _____
Inspectors (crow n ers) . ......_______ ________ __ ___

2 29
.

1
2

1. 44

30

2. 04
2. 74
2. 23

_
28

1. 42
1. 40

Men
Cutting
Cu tters, fabric lining, machine ...._____ _______
C u tters, leather lining, machine_______________
C u tters, vamp and \^hole shoe, machine___ __ _

2 22
.
1. 90
2.43

113
69
469

2 66
.
2 22
.

8

2 12
.
_
181
.

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover, m achine__________ _
Bed-machine operators ______ _____ ________
H eel-s eat la s t e r s ____________ ___ _____... .__ _
P u llo ver -machine o p era to rs_______ ______ ...____
Side la sters , m ach in e__________ ____________ ____
T o e la sters , automatic or sem iautom atic____

2 19
.
266
.
1.99
2.47
2. 32
2. 31

156
170
81
124
269
129

367
162
141
449

2. 24
2. 04
1. 63
. 20

117
89
54
195

2. 48
1.91
2. 76

144

2 18
.

75
277

2. 64
2.43

90
77
64
15

1.45
1. 74
1. 34
2.77

2
2
2
2

2 16
.

. 59
. 89
2. 13
. 88
. 79
2. 78

96
94
72
109
127
131

89
52
73
199

2. 69
2. 34
. 62
2. 53

55
90
39

16
1

2. 13
1. 83
2. 31

16
9

23

2. 79
2. 50

46
61

2.91
2.43

104
63
40
33

1.44
1. 47
1. 31
2.61

90
83
74
40

1.42
1. 64
1.41
2. 29

2.42
1. 75
2.48
2. 37
. 22

2

15
14

1
1
18
2
0
33

1.83
2.03
1. 72
. 11
1.78
1. 87

2

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers __ ______________________ ____
H eel a ttach ers. machine___________
________
Shankers_____________________ ___ __ __ ___ ___ _____
Sole attachers. cem ent p r o c e s s ____ ____ _ __

2

2

282
.

1

2 82
.

13
14
_
26

2 12
.
1.72
_
1.74

Finishing
Edg e s ette rs
__ _____________________ .
T r e e r s -------------------------------------------------------

2. 32

_
-

M iscellaneous
F lo o r b o y s____ _______________ ________... .___
Inspectors (crow n ers)
---------------------- ___
J a n
i t o r s ______________ _ _ —, .
_ r
Mechanic s , maintenance________ _______ ____ __
See footnotes at end o f table,




20
2
190
197
84

1.44
1. 72
1. 38
2. 35

21
1
151
174
186

1.44

160
.
139
.
2 16
.

1
2

1. 32

13
14

1. 39
2. 09

_

_

8

Table 23. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— By Size of Community— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
Border States
Sex, department, and occupation

Southwest

Nonmetropolitan
areas
A verage
Number
of
hourly
earnings
w orkers

Nonmetropolitan
areas
Number
A verage
hourly
of
ea rnings
w orkers

Great Lakes
Metropolitan
areas
Number A verage
hourly
of
w orkers earnings

M iddle West

Nonmetropolitan
areas
Number A verage
hourly
of
w orkers earnings

Metropolitan
areas
Number A verag e
of
hourly
w orkers earnings

P a cific

Nonmetropolitan
areas
Number A verag e
of
hourly
w orkers earnings

Metropolitan
areas
Number A verag e
of
hourly
w orkers earnings

Women
Cutting
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______

82

$1.79

25

Fancy stitch ers__________________________________
P a s te rs , backers, or fitte rs , upper, hand____
Skivers, machine, uppers o r linings___________
Top stitch ers_____________________________________
V am pers__________________________________________

118
90
42
74
31

1.46
1.45
1.46
1.45
1. 47

61
14
60
-

1. 33
1. 36
1.44
1. 42
-

41
24

1. 76
1. 42

74
76

1. 61

40
59

1.40
1.46

38
32

.
35

_

11

2 . 00

70

$1. 75

Fitting

86

112

Finishing
R e p a ir e rs ________________________________________
T r e e r s --------------------------------------------------------

47
24
39

21

$ 2 . 16

$ 1 . 86
1. 81
2. 03
1. 86
-

403
180
105
194

112

1. 56
1. 51
1. 66
1. 58
1. 50

1.99

74

164
58
55
106

12

$1. 72
1.73
1. 83
1. 86
1. 77

$1.91

263

1. 46
1. 50
1.48
1. 57
1.45

29
32

83
191
40

39
-

201

39

1.90

137
128

1. 61
1. 74

70
59

1. 62
1. 86

133
169

1. 59
1. 65

1. 35
1.41

23
43

1. 60

1. 56

93
107

1. 46
1. 68

50
38

1.45
1. 56

63
118

1. 42
1. 48

2 . 19
2. 33

2.42

39

38

2. 38

2 . 33
2 . 61

30
40
117

1.95
1. 62
2. 04

1. 72
2. 15
1. 78
1. 82
1. 64
1.90

26
25

2 . 01

20

2 . 66

24
37
32

25
7
13
29

2. 52
1. 83
2 . 82
2. 76
3. 12

2.48
1. 83
2.92
2 . 50
2.91

75

1.98
2. 15
2. 14
2 . 01

1.92
2. 52
1.90
2 . 28
2 . 00
2. 19

1.99
1. 73
1. 71
1. 74

26
14

2. 30
1. 87

1. 41

M iscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls _______________________________________
Inspectors (c r o w n e rs )________________________ _

11

19
9

22
-

$1. 83
1.71
1. 67
1. 85
1.97

1. 66
-

1. 53
-

Men
Cutting
Cutters, fabric lining, m ach in e________________
Cutters, leather lining, machine_______________
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, m achine.______

-

-

_
-

23

2. 34

-

183

-

11
8

2.46

32

2.
2.
2.
2.
2.

40

6
-

34

1 . 86
2 . 59

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover, m ach in e_____________
Bed-machine o p e ra to rs _________________________
H eel-sea t la s t e r s ________________________________
P u llover-m ach in e operators-------------------------Side la sters , m achine___________________________
T o e la sters , automatic or sem iautom atic_____

22
29
11

30
45

22

11

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers ...________________ ___________ ____
H eel attachers, machine____________________ ____
Shankftrs
_
_
_
Sole attachers, cement p r o c e s s ..__________ ____
Finishing
Edge setters____ _______ _____________________ —
T r e e r s --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

38
13

6

29

10
28

1. 65

8

17
9
7

25

2 . 00
1.66
1. 61
1. 81

11

2. 64
2 . 18
2. 05
2. 58

7

1. 83

18

2 . 61

10

-

-

81

101

41
81
115
-

32
59
14
38
34

85
38
24
65

2. 30
2 . 19
1.79
2. 09

65
50

2. 03
2. 14

-

14
37
42
48

42
14

10
21
22

23

68

39
63
114
79

7

2. 47
1.93
3. 00
2.46
3. 10

2.49
2. 34
1.95
2 . 66

19
-

11
8
12

2. 75
2. 05
1. 61
2.48

15
74

2. 05
1.93
1. 58
2. 04

8
8
12

2. 85
2. 14

33
16

2. 07
1 . 81

-

1.48
1. 56
1. 35
2. 23

28
30
34
37

1.43
1 . 60
1. 33
2 . 06

81

20

9

-

M iscellaneous
F lo o r b o y s ___ ______________ _______ . . . ____ . . . _____ _____ . . . .
Inspectors (c r o w n e rs ).. -------------- ---------------------- ----- ----Janitors __________________________________________________________
M echan ics , maintenance _____ _____ _____

1
2

.

.

_

.
1.

27

-

18

22

1

-

29
82

11
17

1.40
-

1. 31
2. 07

.

12
12
6

Excludes prem ium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NO TE:

Dashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not meet publication c rite ria .




.
2. 24
1.40
2. 25

22
31
46
46

1

.

60

1.92
1. 57
2 . 22

17

6
12

26

11
-

9
"

1. 52
-

1. 64
"

Table 24. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— By Size of Establishment and Size of Community
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1 of w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States

2

New England

Middle Atlantic

G reat Lakes

Middle West

Establishments with—
Sex, department, occupation, and
community size

250 w orkers
50-249
o r m ore
w orkers
Num­ A v e r ­ Num­
A ver­
ber
age
ber
age
of
of
hourly
hourly
w ork­
earn­ w ork­
earn­
ers
ings
ers
ings

50-249
w orkers
Num­ A v e r ­
ber
age
of
hourly
w ork ­
earn­
ers
ings

250 w orkers
or m ore
Num­ A v e r ­
ber
age
hourly
of
w ork­
earn­
ers
ings

50-249
w orkers
Num­ A v e r ­
ber
age
of
hourly
w ork ­ earn­
ers
ings

250 w orkers
250 w orkers
or m ore
or m ore
A v e r ­ Num­ A v e r ­
Num­
ber
age
ber
age
of
hourly
of
hourly
w ork ­
earn­ w ork ­
earn­
ers
ings
ers
ings

50-249
w orkers
Num­
A ver­
ber
age
of
hourly
w ork ­
earn­
ers
ings

250 workers
or m ore
Num­
A ver­
ber
age
hourly
of
w ork­
earn­
ers
ings

Cutting
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s _______________ __

20

112

100

34

$2. 17
1. 64

313

$1.90
1. 94

270
175

1. 89
1. 62

1, 177
1,488

1. 85
1. 66

160
75

$1.94
1.91

558
517

$2 . 02
1.93

60
-

$ 1. 82
-

120

1. 58
1. 56

662
1,059

1.60
1. 50

79
58

1. 55
1.75

430

261

1. 60

102

1. 53

1. 62

-

84
45

1. 74
1.49

265
348

1. 60

1.75

30
9

1. 86
1.78

97
92

124
123

1.93
1. 85

688
986

1. 89
1. 76

62
58

232
116

1. 60
1. 43

653
852

1. 58
1.49

122

60
44

1. 66
1. 39

188
457

1. 71
1. 70

75
58

2. 53
1.42

224
446

1. 51
1.42

17
24

1.49
1.45

83
61

1. 47
1.43

235
451

1.49
1. 53

25

20

52

16

2 . 18
2 . 18

125
164

2. 58
2. 23

30

8

186
83

2.51
2.59

626
825

2. 72
2.42

94
51

$ 1.

86

70

$ 2 . 16

72

$1.91

159
235

1. 72
1.46

1.46

55
181

1.71
1.51

1. 46

49
72

1. 87
1.49

1. 88

Fitting
Fancy stitchers:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s __________________
P a s te r s , backers, o r fitte rs , upper, hand;
M etropolitan a r e a s __________ ___________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s _____________ ____
S kivers, machine, uppers or linings:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s ___________ ______
Top stitchers:
M etropolitan a r e a s ______________________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s _______________ __

254

2 . 01
2. 17

378
415

1. 53
1.47

359
452

1. 80
1. 88
2 . 00
2 . 06

23
24

319
60

1. 64
1.59

109
403

1.84
1. 56

28

289
47

1. 55
1. 53

41
176

1.85
1. 52

20

1. 54
-

92

20

1.64
1. 54

18
78

1. 86
1. 55

11

1. 94

135

1. 70

192

36

1. 81

-

_

$1.45
_

_

_

11

.

100

1. 58

1.65

180

15
133

2. 05
1. 62

17

1. 60

67
116

1. 58

27
125

1.99
1.74

13

1.44

56
156

1. 87
1.67

1.41

48
48

1.45
1.42

36
104

1. 57
1.49

1. 56

Finishing
R ep airers:
M etropolitan a r e a s _________________ _____
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s ______________ ___
T r e e rs :
M etropolitan a r e a s _______ ____ ___________
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s ________ _________

61

_

_

1. 61
1.41

55
"

1. 70
-

1.95

19

1. 75

7
28

2 . 20

202

81

1. 56
1.42

1. 41
1. 58

84
115

1.47
1.47

2 . 59

2. 31

83

2 . 79

2. 63
3. 03

375
365

192

1.45

-

68

1.48

_

_

1.61

M iscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls :
M etropolitan a r e a s ____________ ____
Nonm etropolitan a r e a s __.__________ _
Inspectors (crow n ers):
M etropolitan a r e a s ____ _____ ____ ____
Nonm etropolitan areas ___ __ _______

71
-

-

_

_

10

1.48
1.41

17
91

1.59
1.47

15

76

22

1.44
1.42

25
106

1.66
1. 68

14

2.01
23

2. 34

-

29
176

2.55
2 . 49

13

_

_

1. 37

Men
Cutting
Cu tters, fabric lining, machine:
M etropolitan areas _
Nonm etropolitan areas «,
Cu tters, vamp and whole shoe, machine:
M etropolitan a r e a s ____________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s ______ ___ ___ ___

See footnotes at end o f table,




68

15
-

2. 09
-

26

2. 53
3.00

38

2.43

166
25

2 . 69

6

2. 15

2 . 18
1. 87

11
-

_

2. 24

26

2. 42
1.98

30
104

2.01

2.63

Table 24. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— By Size of Establishment and Size of Community— Continued
(Num ber and a verage straight-tim e hourly earnings1 o f w orkers in selected occupations, United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United States

2
1

New England

Middle Atlantic

Great Lakes

Middle West

Establishments with—
Sex, department, occupation, and
community size

50-249
w orkers
A verNumage
ber
hourly
of
earnw orkers
ings

250 w orkers
or m ore
Num- A v e r age
ber
of
hourly
w ork- earners
ings

250 workers
50-249
or m ore
w orkers
A ver­
Num- A v e r - Num­
age
age
ber
ber
hourly
hourly
of
of
earn- w ork­
earn­
w orkers
ings
ers
ings

50-249
w orkers
Num­ A v e r ­
ber
age
hourly
of
w ork ­
earn ­
ers
ings

250 w orkers
250 w orkers
50-249
or m ore
or m ore
w orkers
Num­ A v e r ­
Num­ A v e r ­ Num­
A ver­
ber
age
ber
age
age
ber
hourly
of
hourly
of
of
hourly
wo rkearn ­ w ork­
earn­ w ork ­
earn­
ers
ings
ings
ings j ers
ers

250 w orkers
or m ore
Num­
A ver­
ber
age
of
hourly
w ork­
earn­
ers
ings

M en— Continued
Lasting
A ssem b lers for pu llover, machine:
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________
Bed-machine operators:
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________
H eel-sea t lasters:
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________
Side lasters, machine:
Metropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________

32

92
39

$2. 42
2.43

249
370

$2. 50
2. 17

20

78
44

2. 94
2. 85

247
431

2. 64
2. 64

41
33

55

21

2 . 01

1.93

133
186

104
44

2. 70
2. 46

56
44

2 . 88
2. 34

2 . 08

$2 . 59
3. 01

2.96
3. 07

1.99

18
9

2 . 08
2 . 12

390
559

2.73
2. 31

47
24

2. 97
2 . 79

191
323

2. 74
2. 23

24
15

2. 03

68

124
138

$2. 75
2. 53

28
-

$2. 32

129
205

2. 97
2 . 86

17
-

3. 41
-

77
-

63

2. 45
2. 13

-

1.93
-

51
9

29

2. 54

98
18

68
222

205

2. 97
2 . 79

2. 85
2.93

93
74

2 . 82
2. 65

24
9

2. 48
2. 54

65
43

2. 48
2. 30

2. 43

21

13

$2 . 10
1. 78

14
80

$2. 50
2. 32

101

16

1. 68
1.41

_
39

2. 33
1. 73

114

2 . 20

20

66

37

$2. 57
1.91

_
64

_
2. 51

13
35

1. 87
1. 88

_
2. 04

37
104

2 . 66
2 . 00

12

2 . 11

39
69

2 . 80
2. 04

_

_

14
19

2. 05
1. 94

9

$1. 98

2. 73
2 . 59

_

_

_
2. 17

_

2. 71
2. 34

10

_

-

Bottoming and making
Ldge trim m ers:
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________
H eel attachers, machine:
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________
Sole attachers, cement process:
Metropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s -----------------------------

2 . 22

13
-

3. 49
-

42
-

20

2. 46

70

91
39

2 . 39
2 . 13
2 . 61
2 . 26

282
410

2. 54
2 . 20

40
23

2 . 66

155
176

2. 85
2. 51

28
•

43
13

3. 06
2. 17

129
131

2 . 18

2. 64

15
-

2. 77
-

60
18

2 . 61
2 . 80

74
17

2. 33
2. 32

2. 42
2. 32

42

2. 13

235
184

2. 49

281

2 . 49

57
16

162
146

2 . 61
-

14
83

2. 04
1. 65

9
38

2. 90
*

12
88
20

2 . 12
1.68

63

18
-

3. 29
-

28
-

2. 67
-

15
65

31

2 . 59

30

2. 27

_
50

-

8

2 . 61
2 . 28
2 . 18
2. 19
2. 44
2 . 10

_
7

_
1. 51

20

67

2. 51
2 . 10

F in ish ing

Edge setters:
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________
T r e e rs :
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s _______________________

296

'

M iscellaneous
F lo o r boys:
M etropolitan a r e a s ___________________________
Nonmetropolitan a r e a s ______________________ _
Inspectors (crow n ers):
M etropolitan a r e a s ---------------------------------Nonmetropolitan a r e a s ----------------------------Janitors:
M etropolitan a r e a s ---------------------------------Nonmetropolitan a r e a s ----------------------------Mechanics, maintenance:
M etropolitan a r e a s ---------------------------------Nonmetropolitan a r e a s ____________________ —

1
2

64

12

42
15
54

22
11

18

31
“

-

1. 69
-

69
55

1. 74
1. 46

25
-

1. 34
1. 40

16
7

1. 34
1. 29

48
33

1. 33
1. 31

23
-

2. 33
2. 14

.

14
30

2. 77
2. 58

_

_

"

"

1. 59

148
136

1. 64
1.60

1. 48
1. 35

143
152

2. 52
2. 38

73
168

8

_
_

Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NOTE:

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication crite ria .




1. 42

1. 44
1. 43

13
7

2 . 16
1. 54
-

21

2. 03
_
2. 14

_

32

-

'

77
97

1.43
1. 44

2 . 00

'

1. 52
1. 46

156
199

1.46
1.45

'

2 . 62
_

2. 87
2 . 08

23
14

2. 14
1. 86

17
26

1. 48
1. 43

'

12

1. 41
1. 32

22

1. 60

58
~

1. 42
-

9
30

51

8

1. 35
1. 35

_
45

35

2 . 29

59

12

1. 94

6
46

-

-

2. 34
1.93

_

_

_
1. 57

_

_

-

-

2. 25

_
7

2 . 22

6
24

-

_
1. 97

1. 56
1. 58

25
31

1. 35
1. 34

12
30

2. 23
2 . 08

Table 25. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Maine
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earn in gs 1 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Sex, department, and
occupation

o
00

Number of w orkers receivin g straight- time hourly earnings ofNum- A v e rage
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $ 1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50
hourly $1.25
of
w ork- earn- and
and
under
ei s
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1,60 $1.70 $1.80 $1,90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2 , 2 Q$2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2,60 $2.70
$2,9Q $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 over

8 , 122
4,900
M en_____________________ _ 3, 222

A ll production w ork ers____

$1.70 1683
1.56 1122
1.92 561

823
646
177

469
307

162

427
328
99

317
271
46

747
491
256

537
353
184

503
337
166

423
265
158

1
2

4

1
2

11
11

58
39

33
30

286
172
114

377
195
182

•

-

4

7

26
25

234
105
129

262
114
148

-

-

2

-

1

2

5

7

6
2

24
24

22
22

19
19

8
8

14
14

198

66

132

184
45
139

162
43
119

56

12

71

2

74

44

69

73

-

54
_
54

42

6

48
3
45

-

-

-

-

1

2

48

33

6

34
4
30

39

17

6
11

49
_
49

Women
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 2 b/______________ _
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine 2 b/ ________ _

16

1.97

1

1

1

54

1.85

-

4

7

307
284

1.75
1.76

11
11

33
33

243
26
217

1.53
1.30
1.56

70

13

49

13

54
270
59

1.86

1.67

8

1.79

3
5

7
15
3

14

2.19

-

17

1.48

5

2

283
235
48

1.41
1.38
1.54

54
46

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

4

"

1

6
6

5
5

4
4

2
2

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

2

-

-

"

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

4

_

_

4

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
2
2

_

3

4

3

Fitting

P a sters, backers, or
fitte rs , upper, hand______
Incentive______ _________
S kivers, machine, uppers
or linings 2 b/------------------Top stitchers 2 b/____________
Vampprs

21

14

29

2

20
2

19

24

9

3

5

4

9

12
12
22
22

14

27

18

19

24

9

3

5

4

8
8
1
1

4
9
3

3
4
3

2
10
1

34

6
10

3
25
3

4
27

2
8

2
8

6

5
7

2
8

*

-

2

-

2

1

2

57
51

6

20
19
1

70
65
5

44
41
3

14
9
5

21

28

31
23

7

8
8
10
1

1

40
4

2

27

2
2

23

17

2

1

1

"

2

3

-

1

1

11

6
6

4

2
2

-

1

8
1

4

-

-

"

2

-

-

2
2
6

_

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover,
machine 2 b/________________

2

Bottoming and making
Shankers 2 b/_______________ _
Finishing
R e p a ir e rs ___________ ________

8

4
7

4

2
2

1
1

Miscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls 2 a/_____________
Inspectors (cro w n ers)_.____
TimP
Incentive
_
lr

120

82
44
38

1.42
1.46
1.34
1.60

67
53

2.18

188

2.41

12

4
3

1

8

8

23
13

11
2

8
2
2

14

8
8

4
7

10
-

-

7

7
7

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

5
4

5
5

6
6

5
5

3
3

2
2

6

15

13

14

19

18

Men
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 2 b / 3 ______________
F abric lining _ _ _ _
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine 2 b/__ ____ _

See footnotes at end of table.




2.12

_

■

9

2

_

4
3

2

1

3

2

4

3

2
10

1

l

3
3

3
3

4

7

7

2
2
8

3

8

1
1
11

8

3

1

^4

CO

Table 25. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Maine— Continued
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earn in gs1 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Sex, department, and
occupation

ber
of
w ork-

Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings of—
age
$1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50
hourly
and
and
earnunder
ings
$3*10 $3,2.P $3.30 $3.40 1 L 10 . over
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $ If 50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $-L3.0 $ 2.00
$a..8 Q $2.30 I L i H M . 5 Q . U M 1 & L 2 S I $48Q.
,i

Men— Continued
Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover,
machine 2 b/______________ _
Bed-machine
operators 2 b/_____________ _
H eel-sea t la sters 2 b /_____ —
P u llo ver -machine
operators 2 b/__ __
Side la sters,
machine 2 b/_________ _______

76

$2.28

-

145
41

2.53

1.92

"

_

85

2.60

108

2.27

1

2

1

1

-

-

-

2

4

_

1

2

■

4

1

6

•

_

_

_

2.60

54

2

-

-

7

l

3
5

2
2

4

6
2

5

2

-

1

3

2

4

1
2

11

9

3

9

14

16

13

12

3

2

_

7

4

1
6

2

2

3

4

4

5

2

2

"

3

3

2

4

-

-

-

2

4

2

5

1
2
11

14

6

2
11

-

10
2

6

3

5

5

-

3

“

“

“

5

2

1

5

5

7

7

3

4

4

2
2

-

_

1
1

_

2

2
1
1
_

_

3

3

_

5

-

5.
13

7

4

3

13

6

8

10

11

2

2

4

3

5
_
_

3
_
_

3
_
3

4

5

6

2
1

"

6
2

2

_

7

-

-

3

2

4

8
6

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers 2 b/ _________
Heel attachers,
machine 2 b/______________ rm mf)prB 2 h/. .. _ _
Shankars 2 b/_ _____________
Sole attachers, cement
process 2 b/ _____________

36
27
37

2.21
2.19
1.59

8
1
2

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

_
5

_
5

_
5

_
_

13

_

_

_

3

_

5

4

_
_

97

2.23

_

9
27
106

1.81
2.09

.

2.20

_
_

-

2

36
52
25

1.41
1.40
1.30

14
15
17

4

27

2.55

1

_

3
4

2
10

4
_

4
_

8
4
2

11

7

9

2

_

4

2
1
1
1
6

_

-

1

1

1

2

_

_

_
_

_

_

7

2

-

1

-

2

"

"

-

-

1

2

-

Finishing
Bottom scou rers 2 b/ _____ _
Edge setters 2 b/___________
T r e e rs 2 b/ 17.-------------

1

_
_

.
_

3

2

3

2

2

1

-

4

-

-

-

2

3

5

2

-

8

8

2

7

3
3

2

4

11

-

-

5

2
1

2

6

5

9

10

3

5

3

12

-

-

7

2

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

1

6

3

-

5

-

2

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

_

2

-

-

1

1

2

M iscellaneous
F lo o r boys 2 a/ ---------------- -Inspectors Tcrowners) 2 a/ —
Janitors 2 a/. _____________
Mechanics,
maintenance 2 a/ —------------

8

5

12
"

1
1

1

10

3

1

1

2

Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to w arrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.
Includes data fo r w orkers in classification in addition to those shown separately.




Table 26. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Boston—Lynn, Mass.1
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earn in gs2 o f production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Sex, department, and
occupation

A ll production w o rk ers_____
W om en------------------------M an-----------------------------

Number of w orkers receivin g straight- time hourly earnings of—
Num- A v e rage
$1.25 $1.30 $T3F $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 15740
hourly
of
and
w orkers
in gs 2 under
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $ 1,90 $1,70 $1,99 $ 1,90 $2,99 $2.10 $2.20 $2,?9 $2.49 $2.50 $2.60 $2,§9 $3.00 $3,29 $3.40 $ 3,60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 over

3,881 $1.96
2,284
1.69
2. 35
1,597

337
228
109

20

484
393
91

83
63

166
135
31

156
118
38

380
285
95

352
256
96

215
153
62

3

18

7

20

2

3

5
5

158
no
48

133
91
42

141
95
46

16

31
14
17

12
12

16
3
13

13

5

5

5

5

5

5

183
91
92

no
52
58

12
12
2
2
2
2
3
1

10
10

■

1

2
1
1
1

2
1
1

102

69
28
41

96
38
58

2
2
2
2

3
“

6
6
2
2
1
1
3
2

“

•

5
4

47
55

139
43
96

149
30
119

10
120

90
9
81

81
7
74

53

28

52

27

19
19

6
6

4

3

3

_

_

_

_

_

_

4

3

3

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

-

>

_

_

_

>

_

-

-

-

130

1

1

21
21

Women
Fitting
Fancy stitch ers----------------Incentive----- — ---------P a sters, backers, or
fitte rs , upper, hand-------T im e_____________ ________
Incentive__________________
Skivers, machine, uppers
or linings------ -------- ----T im e ------------------------- Incentive----------------------Top stitchers 3 b/--------------Vam pers 3 b/----------------------

1.96

-

3

-

2. 04

_

3

_

1.62
1.43
1.69

5
5
-

55
25

1.87
1.71
1.93
2.08
2.08

“

117

1.58

2

159

120
110
32
78
30

8
22

2
2
1
1

32
18
14

2
2
13
7

3

2
1
1
1

14
3

11

1
1
2
1

6
1
1
2

3
-

4
3
4

1

g

2

g

2

2
2

2

1

9

3

-

-

_

-

■

5

1

1

4

2
2
8
1

1
12
8

5
3

6

-

”

3
3

93

3

1

1

3

4

1
1

1
1

1
1
3
2

3

1
2
1

4

7
7

2
2

1
1
1
1
5
2

3
3

“

“

”

-

-

4

2
2

7
3
4

-

2
2

3
3

4

9
9

8
_
8

1
12
1
11

_

_

_

_

.

3
3

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

2
1

-

_

1
1
1

1
1
1

-

"

1
1

4
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

“

"

-

"

-

5
4

4

2
2

2
2

_

-

1
1

_
-

9

13
.
13

6
_
6

4
_
4

4
_
4

_
_

_

_

_

Finishing
Ponairorc 3 a /
ep
e
— /

j

Miscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls 3 a /-----------------Inspectors (crow n ers) 3 a/ —

20

14

1.56
1.51

41
26
15

2.84
2.90

_

1

_

l

1

1

Men
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 3 b/--------------------F abric lining 3 b / ______ —
Leather lining^b/________
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, m achine---------------T im e ---------------------------In cen tive.. ----------- -— —

2.86

-

6
88

3.24
2.69
3.28

"

■

9
25

2.06
2 . 16
2.18

-

-

94

-

■

-

-

-

"

"

“

_

1

_

_

-

-

-

_

1
1

-

1
1
1

2
2

-

-

1
1

_
■

1

4
4

1
2
2
-

-

2
2

1
6
_
6

1

3

10
1

-

Fitting
Fancy stitchers 3 b/_______ __
Top stitch ers____ ________ .
Incentive--------------- -------

22

See footnotes at end o f table,




-

1
1

1
1

3

1
3
2

_

4
4

_

2

1
1

_
3

2

l

1
1

1

1

_

_

!

1
1

4
4

*

o

'table 26. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Boston—Lynn, Mass.1— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 2 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p r il 1965)

Sex, department, and
occupation

Number of w orkers receivin g straight- time hourly earnings ofNum- A v e r age
ber
$2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40
hourly $1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $2.00 $ 2.10 $2.20
of
and
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
___
_
_
_
and
ings* unde i
ers
> ,i_2
S i.30 S i .35 S i.40 Si. 45 Si .50 S i.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $2.00 $ 2.10 $2,20 $2,3„P $2,40 $2.50 $2.60 $ 2JL0„ $3,00. 3 3 Q .&LAQ $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 over

_

_

_

_

_

_

Men— Continued
Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover,
machine 3 b/----------------Bed-m achine
operators 3 b/--------------H eel-sea t
lasters 3 b/ -----------------Pu llo ve r - mac hine
operators 3 b /--------------Side la sters,
machine 3 b/----------------Toe la sters , automatic
or semiautomatic 3 b/ —

$2.80

9

2. 78

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

18

2. 27

-

-

2

1

-

-

2

1

-

-

26

3.49

39

3. 19

22

1

2.84

55

2

3. 20

-

-

2

~

-

-

1
2

1

-

1
1
1

2

3

1

2

8

3

5

3

-

-

-

-

-

4

3

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

3

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

1

-

1

2
2

-

2
1

2
1
6
1

6
2

1
1

2
1

4

-

3

1

5

5

1
1

-

5

1
2

2
1

2

_

_

-

-

“

“

“

2

1

2

■

"

2

2
1

2
2

-

-

■

_
-

1

3

i

l

34

“

6
1

-

1

5

-

4

6

6

10

2
2
6
11

1

3

6

_

-

-

-

1

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m e rs 3 b/--------H eel attachers,
machine 3 b/----------------Shankers__________________
Incentive------------------Sole attachers, cement
process 3 b / _____________ 1
3
2

2
2
1

_
-

_

1.92

1
1

_
-

49

2.83

-

-

-

-

9
13
55

2. 17
3. 23
2.63

29
14
15

1.49
1.98
1.44

6

3. 19

13
9

6

2.49
1.76

_
“

"

-

1

-

1
1
2

1
1
1

1
1

1
2

-

-

3

_

1

_

-

-

-

2

1

2
2
2

4

2
2
-

-

-

1

4

15

8

4

1

1

2

3

5

1
1
1

1
6

2
1
“

Finishing
Bottom scou rers 3 b / ------Edge setters 3 b/------------T r e e r s 3 b/ --------------------

1
1

1

1
2

1
2

4

3

2

1
6

3

1

3

7

-

2

1

1

3

Mis c ellaneous
F lo o r boys 3 a / ---------------Inspectors (crow n ers) 3 a / Janitors 3 a/-------------------M echanics,
maintenance 3 a / ------------

1
2
3

4
-

2

1
1

-

4

3

2

-

-

-

3

5

-

8
2

2
1

2
-

2
1

2

3

1

1

3

1

The Boston—
Lynn area consists o f B e verly , Boston, Cambridge, Chelsea, E verett, Lynn, Salem, Stoneham, and W akefield, Mass.
Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to warrant presentation o f separate averages by method o f wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.




1

-

2

Table 27. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Haverhill, Mass.
2 of production

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings

Sex, department, and
occupation

w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Number of workers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings ofNum­ A v e r ­
age
ber
S I.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1.90 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2 . 8 b $2.90 $3.00 $$.20 $3.46 $$.60 O T
hourly
of
and
w ork­ earn ­
and
under
ers
in gs 2
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1.90 $2.00 $ 2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 over

A ll production w o rk ers____ 2,955
W om en__________________ 1,771
M en ---------------------------- 1, 184

$2. 04
1. 72
2. 51

14

8
6

7

1
6

342
310
32

112
92
20

109
94
15

112

159
85
74

71
40
31

105
34
71

62
22

40

75
35
40

133
29
104

52
15
37

93
9
84

25
3

22

96
18
78

89
17
72

56
_
56

70

75
37

69

32
3
29

23
23

37
37

7

25

14

1

2

13

2

-

-

-

2

-

_

-

_

_

.

10
6
13
2

6
2

6
1

6
1

4
3

4
-

3

1
1

-

1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

-

4

-

3

-

3
3
-

7

3

14

4

7

4

4

3

1

3

3

3

4
-

3
-

-

-

-

-

6

2

4

1

1

-

-

4

3

1
1
2
2
2

2

-

1

-

3

-

-

-

1

3

301
249
52

432
388
44

214
131
83

134
94
40

13

12

23

26

9

6

1
8

11
-

2
2
10
1

17
3

-

2

2

1
1

1

Women
Fitting

147

1.91

_

-

3

2

86

1. 57

2

-

29

5

19
114
30

1. 88
1.95
1. 86

-

-

1
6
1

2

4

12
1
5
1

R ep airers 4a/..___..._______ _

106

1. 61

-

-

-

1

-

2

98

3

Miscellaneous
TM
T
• ,1 3 /
,.
Inspectors (crow n ers) 3a/__

12

6

5

1

-

1

3

1. 57

4

27
18
9

2. 72
2. 87
2. 42

-

-

-

-

95

2. 85

-

-

-

34

2 . 81

_

.

.

40
15

3. 27
2. 57

Fancy stitchers 3b / _______ —
P a s te r s , backers, o r
fitte rs , upper, hand 3b/ __
Skivers, machine, uppers
or linings 3b / ______ _____
Top stitchers 3b / ___________
Vam pers 3b/.-_____ -__ -_____
Finishing

3

2
8
1
2

15

5

3

1

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

_

.

_

_

3

1

Men
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 3b / ______________ _
Fa bric lining \ > f _________
Leather lining^b/_______
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine 3b/______ —

1
1

2
2

1
1

2

1
1
6

4

1
1
2

_

1

2

1

1

1

1

3

-

2

1

-

3

2

-

2
1
2
1
1

1

-

-

-

-

3

1

5

-

-

1

1
1

6
6

1
1

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

13

2

3

5

5

_

2

_

-

-

5
-

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover,
machine 3b / __ ....____ _____
Bed-machine\
operators 3b/ . ..___________
H eel-sea t la sters 3b/_______
P u llo ver -machine
operators 3b / ----------------Side la sters ,
machine 3b/ -------------------Toe la sters, automatic
o r semiautomatic 3b/__....

32

3. 15

58

3. 23

27

3. 28

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3. 09

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1
1
2
4

Bottoming and making

Edge trim m ers 3b/ _________
H eel attachers,
md r V i i n p j
Shankers 3b 7 --------------------Sole attachers, cement
process 3b / .._ ___________ _

19
17

2. 87
1.99

_

_

-

-

-

2

-

5

4

1

-

2
1

33

2 . 88

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

"

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

1

_
_

2

_

_

5

3

2

2

3

1

4

14

68

2.94
2. 71

14

1. 55

Miscellaneous

F lo o r boys 3a/__.____________

2
2

-

2
4
3

-

-

_

_

_

8

-

1

_
5

-

1

_

8

3
4
4

4

_
2

2

3

_

_

5

6

2

1

5

1

-

5

3

9

17

7

-

5

5

5

2

3

4

1

4

3

3

1

-

-

-

-

5

1

1

1

1
1
1
2

3
_

1

2

2

_

6

5

5

4

2

3
4

The area is lim ited to the city of Haverhill, Mass.
Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to w arran t presentation o f separate averages by method o f wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.




1
8
1

4

2

20

Finishing
E dge s e tte rs ^ /
T r e e r s 3h/

6

8
6

1

_

_
_

Table 28. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Lawrence—Lowell, Mass.
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings

Sex, department, and
occupation

A ll production w ork ers____
M en ----------------------------

2

of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Number of w orkers receivin g straight- time hourly earnings of—
Num­ A v e r ber
age
$1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $ 2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00
hourly $1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45
and
and
w ork- earn- under
ings 2
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 over
3,833 $1.85
1.62
2, 393
2. 24
1,440

173
141
32

321
238
83

223
160
63

172
143
29

323
249
74

131
95
36

164

103

78

42

2
2

2
2

13
_
13

14

15

13

14

2
2

2
2

2
2
2
8
2

1

244
184
60

146
98
48

1
1

750
558
192

-

1

100

86

61

92
33
59

20

40

51

70

25

82
13
69

80

40

16

34

11

41

43

74

64

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

6
6

5

3

-

3

*

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

1
1
1
1

-

5

2
2

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i
9

_

3

2
1

6
2

3
.

3

1

i
-

2
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

"

2

~

■

i

■

~

■

■

“

■

~

1
1

2
2

“

“

1

1

-

“

5

4

7

12

1

1

1
2
1
1

2
6

“

5

7

7

-

1

1

3

95
45
50

18

20
20

73
37
36

63

45
55

69
3

2

189
133
56

6

6

6

6
12

66

Women
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
Fa bric lining 3 b/ ----------

6
6

2 . 01
2 . 01

148
37

111

1.91
1.70
1.98

70
27
43

1. 50
1.29
1.63

21

28
49

1.85
2. 15
1.76

2
1

6

2. 25

117

27
33

Fitting
Fancy stitch ers---------------Incentive---------------------Pa sters, backers, or
fitters , iipppr, hand
Trirpnl-i vp
Skivers, machine, uppers
or linings 3 b/----------------Top stitchers 3 b/-------------V am pp r s 3 h/
__________

68

2
2

2
_

34

3

4

-

_

2

1
_
1
2
1
1

10
4
6

5

2

5

3

4

1

20
11
9

1
1

36

20
16

3

3

2
2
1
1

5

1
2

2
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.47

5

1

7

19

35

40

7

1 . 50
1.37

5
3

1
10

8

1

3

6

1
2

1

3

3
3

2
2

2
2

13

3
-

1

3

3
5

8

3
3

5

12
12
2
2
1
4
1

1

-

1

_

1

2

2
2

4
3

■

1
1

3

1

1
1

-

5

5

3

5

4

17

14

1
1
1
1
2

2

2

4

-

2

-

3

1
2

2

1
1

-

-

3
4

4

1
4

1
2

1

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

1

5
5
3

1

4
4

2
12

4

i

2
2
1

1

-

-

-

"

*

Bottoming and making
Sole attachers, cement
process 3 b / -------------------Finishing
R ep airers

3 a / ------------------

M iscellaneous
FI n n r gi rl s ^ a / __ ___
Inspectors (crow n ers) 3 a/ —

5

5

2

-

"

Men
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 3 b/ * ---------------Fabric lining 3 b/---------Cutters, vamp and whole
s no e , m ac nine D —————
/

26

21

2. 30
2 . 21

-

-

-

2 . 89

1
1

-

7

2
1
6

3

2

8

1

5

-

-

3

4
-

1

-

-

1
1

1
1
2

'

Lasting
A ssem blers fo r pullover,
machine 3 b/-------------------Bed-machine
operators 3 b/_____________
H eel-sea t la sters 3 b / -------Pu llover-m achine
operators 3 b/----------------Side la sters, machine 3 b/ —
Toe la sters, automatic
or semiautomatic 3 b / ------

31

2. 76

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

3

-

3

-

28
24

2. 95
2 . 26

2

-

2

-

-

2

-

2

-

2

2

1
1

17
50

3. 17
3. 01

4

1

10

3. 19

See footnotes at end o f table.




1

-

2
1

4

1
1

-

-

1

1

2

1

3

2
1

3

1

3
-

Table 28. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Lawrence—Lowell, Mass.1— Continued
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 2 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

1
2
3
4

The Law rence— o w ell area fo r this study includes Methuen, Mass.
L
Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to w arrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers,
Includes data fo r w orkers in classification in addition to those shown separately.




and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.

A

)

0

Table 29. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Worcester, Mass.
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earn in gs2 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Sex, department, and
occupation

A ll production w orkers..
W om en_______________
M en -----------------------

Number of workers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings of—
Num- A v e r age
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $ 1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.80 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40
hourly $1.25
of
and
and
w orkings 13 under
2 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.80 *3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 $4.20 $4.40 over
1,424
768

$2.02
1.75
2.52

2 , 192

281
232
49

135
113

22

77

95
91
4

107
89
18

66
11

3
_

2
2
1

6
8

■

■

202
171
31

104
76
28

108
92
16

91
52
39

10
6
3
2

86

1

no
65
45

60
26

13

18

9

2
2

6
7
1

3
7

2

1

1

39
38

91
72
19

35
3
32

8

3

72
54
18

82
37
45

131
57
74

87
25
62

4

13

1
6

3

2

51

43

6

3

2

_

10

5

_

_

1

2
'

71
13
58

1
1

5
5

10

n

44

21
21

18
18

11

_

_

-

'

54

'

8

'

1
1

3
3

-

-

-

5
5

5
5

2
2

4
4

2
2

1

_

,

-

_

5

3

2

2

-

9
9

24
24

Women
Fitting
Fancy stitchers 3 b/----——
P a sters, backers, or
fitte rs , upper, hand 3 b/ —
Top stitchers 3 b/-------------Vam pers 3 b/--------------------

117

1.69
2.23
1.95

93
25

1.40
2.23

1

2.13

104
69
13

22
1

7
_

-

"

-

31
“

2
10

2
6

-

3

3

11

6
2
2

11

15

5
~

1
2

26
~

6

1

5
5

2

4

1

4
7
3

_
4

1

1

10
1

5
_

_

Finishing
R ep airers 3 a/ .
T r e e rs 3 b / ----

19
■

9
"

8

1

1

2

M iscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls 3 a/____________
Inspectors (crow n ers) 3 a/—

22
39

1.51
1.38

24
24

3.15
3.33

4
9

1

3

4

3.10
3.10

62
50

1

7 .

Men
Cutting
Cu tters, lining,
machine 3 b/
Fabric lining 3 b/--------Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine —----------Incentive— ----------------

1
1
_

_

“

"

_

_

“

“

"

1

*

3

1

1

1

1

3
3

7
7

3

1

3

3

“

1

1
1

6
6

9
9

5

2

4
4

1

2

4

4

3

_

1
1
6
6

'

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover,
machine 3 b/______________
Bed -machine
operators 3 b/H eel-s ea t la sters 3 b/-.
Pu llo ver -machine
operators 3 b/Side la sters, m achine 3 b/—

l

3

1

22

2.84

7C\

11
21

4

2.62

44

3.44
2.98

32

2,88

9

1.51

1

_

1
2
2

j

-

-

-

-

“

-

2

-

3

"

2

2

-

2

3

1

5

-

•

-

-

-

-

1

2

2
2

2
2

7

4
5

-

6

2

2

-

-

-

-

9

3

3
5

2

1

5

-

-

-

1
2
1

"

3

-

-

-

-

-

6

5

j
“

Bottoming and making
Sole attachers, cement
process 3 b/-------------------M iscellaneous
F lo o r boys 3 a/ ---------------1

2
3


4

-

-

-

-

*

2

•

-

-

The W orcester area consists of Hudson, M arlboro, Spencer, W are, W ebster, and W orcester, Mass.
Excludes premium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to w arrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.



-

Table 30. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Southeastern New Hampshire
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings
Num-

Sex, department, and
occupation

2 of production w orkers

in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Number of w orkers receivin g straight- time hourly earnings of-

A verage
$1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1.90 $2.00 $ 2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00
hourly
and
w ork- earnand
under
ci H
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $2,10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2,40 $2.50 $2,60 $2,70 $2.80 $2,90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 over

A ll production w ork ers____ 8,985 $1.95
1. 71
W om en___________________ 5,411
2. 31
M en ____ a__________-_____ 3, 574

668

1465
1159
306

542
377
165

405
318
87

451
375
76

355
289

66

461
207

459
311
148

474
325
149

370
242
128

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

8
8
6
6
10

21
1
20
11
2
8
2

41
3
38

28
3
25

33
_
33

42
3
39

15

17

14

6

12
23
6

394
235
159

350
205
145

-

-

33

17
17

24
24

339
249
90

294
182

112

314
154
160

221
84
137

236
83
153

245
83
162

-

-

2

15

14
14

9
9

5

4

233
60
173

193
69
124

149
39

110

294
35
259

157
33
124

-

-

1

-

3
3

-

1
1

1
2

101
21

99

12

51

80

87

50

126
9
117

-

-

-

1

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_

1

Women
Cutting
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine 3b/_________

6

2. 71

-

356
16
340

1. 90
1.98
1.90

15
_
15

182

1.56

51

70
291
71

1. 84
2 . 10
1. 78

8
6
6

23

2.45

12

1.92

-

Fitting
Fancy stitch ers...__________
T im e_____________________
Incentive_________________
P a s te r s , backers, or
fitte rs , upper, hand h > / __
Skivers, machine, uppers
Top stitchers h i/ ^
Vam pers h i / ________________

6
_
6
22
1

5
5

8
1

4
4

3
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

6
6

11

83
82

7

3
16

4

22
22
1
1
12
1

3

4

3

-

3

4
4

35

2

32
7

-

1

1

1

-

-

42
40

40
39

3

_
_

10

8

3

7
23
7

3

22

2
22

-

2

6
6
13
8

1

-

2
2

4

16
1

6
1
5

1

18
3

1
1
10
2

4

2

1

2

-

2

1

-

3

3

3

3

5

3

3

3

3

_

_

_
3

3

1
1

2

5

6
6

3
26

1

_

6
2

2

_

_

_ _

7

3

7

4

3

2

_

_
_

1

4

10

-

1

-

3

-

-

_

_

_

1
1

_

1
1

4
3

1

8
7
1

5

25

1
1

1

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover,
machine 3b/ _______________
Bottoming and making
Shankers 3 / _____________ ___
b
Finishing
R e p a ir e r s ___________________
T im e_____________________
Incentive

38

1. 57
1. 45
2. 19

89
53
29
24

1.49
1. 53
1.40
1. 70

86

2.60
2 . 80

1
1

2.42

-

239

201

_ 10
1

19
15
4

1

2

1

2
1

_

1
2

2
2
2

1
1
1

_

6
6

_

1
1

_

M iscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls 3a / ______________
Inspectors (c r o w n e rs )____ _
T im e_____________________
Inc ent iv e__ ___________ ....

10
15
13

2

16
4
3

1

12
7
6
1

-

-

-

-

13

2
1
1

3
3

1
2

13

8

3
5

10
2
2

5

2
2

3

1
1

2
2

-

2
2

7
5

3

-

1
1

.

1

2
1

Men
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 3b/ _______________
Fabric lining \ / _________
Leather lining 3b/______ _
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, hand 3 a / ____________
Cutters, vamp"and whole
shoe, machine 3b/_________

1
1

5

1
1

5

6
2

3

14

2 . 26

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

274

2.96

.

_

_

_

1

2

1

4

5

See footnotes at end of table.




3

2
1
1

41
45

-

2
1

-

-

-

4

3

-

-

2
2

4

10

13

4

2
2

3

1
2

3

4

9

12

6
6
1
8

4

2
2
2
11

2
2

2
1

8
2
6

4

6
2

2
1
1

-

-

1
1

1
1

-

21

14

14

18

49

24

12

12

4

3

Table 30. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Southeastern New Hampshire1— Continued
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earn in gs 1 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)
2
Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings of—
Sex, department, and
occupation

age
ber
hourly $1.25
of
and
w ork- earnings 2 under
ers
$1.30

$1 .30 $1 .35

$1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1.90 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00
and

$1 .35 $1 .40

$1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 over

Men— Continued
Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover,
machine ^b / _____________
Bed-machine
operators 3b/ ___________
H eel-sea t
la sters ^b/_______________
Pu llov er -machine
operators
--------------Side la sters,
machine 3b/ _____________
Toe la sters, automatic
o r semiautomatic 3b/___

99 $2. 77
156

3. 05

41
89

1
-

1
2
1

1
1

2 . 29

1

-

3. 17
2.95

-

61

3. 26

61

3

-

-

2
2

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

3

-

1

-

-

1
1

-

173

-

-

-

2. 77

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

2

-

3

6

3
3

1

-

1

-

1
2
2
1
6
1

1
1
6
1

3
-

5

2
1

9

7

4

15

6

10

4

3

4

11

9

4

-

-

-

2

3

7

4

9

17

2

1

3

6
6
1
8
12
1

8
11
1

5

3

9

14

1
20

6

29

17

15

9

11

5

5

10

7

7

2

5

9

-

9
27

2
12
-

-

8

4
5

3

6
2

2
1
11
1

2

6

4

3

2

3

3

9

3

10

4

5

2

2

3
-

3
-

5

2

-

1

2

2

4

-

~

4
"

-

“

3
-

3

13

12

15

10

12

19

12

4

6

3

7

8

8

2

7

5

-

-

3

-

1
2

5

3

-

-

1

4
2

5

10
1

1
21
1
2

5
15
3

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers V _______
H eel attachers,
machine 3 b/_____________
Shankers 3~b7______________
Sole attachers, cement
process 3b/______________

1

2. 34
1. 78

2

7

4

119

2. 77

1

-

-

“

6
1

9

12

2

5

7

“

.

.

6

5

4

3

1
1

3

-

-

1

3

1

2

1

2

2

5

3

“

.

1

50
43

.

-

1

4
3

3

3

6

2

6

9

4
25

17

4
14

13

12

2

1

2

1

2

1

1

3

2

"

"

6

3

2

1

4

2

1

1
1

Finishing
Edge setters ^b/_________
T r e e r s ________________

23
146

2 . 88
2. 56

1

'

Miscellaneous
F lo o r boys 3a/____________
Inspectors Tcrowners) 3a/
Janitors 3a / ______________
M echanics,
maintenance 3a /-----------

69
54
24

1.45
1. 70
1. 30

13

8

2. 75

■

7

12

9

4

3

1

6

~

3

“
'

1
2
3

11
11

'

3

1

1

'

Southeastern New Hampshire consists of the area extending south from Farmington and P itts fie ld and east from Manchester and Nashua, N .H .
Excludes prem ium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to w arrant presentation o f separate averages by method o f wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.




Table 31. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— New York, N.Y. 1
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 2 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Sex, department, and
occupation

A ll production w orkers..
W om en_______________

Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings ofNum- A v e r age
$1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00
hourly
of
w ork- earnand
"
"
under
mgs
ei s
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1.?0 $ 2,00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2,70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00 over
34

2
2

4
4
_

4
4

59
18
41

84
27
57

12
4
8

_

1
1

_
_

5
4

1

4

“

■

"

■

"

-

2

-

2

3

2

-

-

-

1
1

“

-

1

-

-

"

-

-

_

_
_

2
2

-

_

-

_

2.11

“

"

1

~

_

2

■

11

1.99

-

-

-

-

-

1

7

1.44

-

1

1

1

1

3.01
3.03

-

-

“

-

-

89

3.29

15

2.59

-

-

-

-

70
61

2.83
2.90

-

"

-

27
9
18
31
14

3.06
2.16
3.51
3.35
2.73

76

114

56

94

4
4

4
_
4

120

83

75
9

65
4

162
14
148

116

1

62

115

61

_

_

_

"

_

_

“

~

“

"

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

4
4

18

10

2
2
12

2
2
6

1

-

-

-

3
3

7
7

4
4

9

3

.

9

2

3
_

10

2
2
2

“

“

“

■

61

130
5
125

_

_

1

_

■

"

1

-

-

-

-

63
_
63

75
_
75

_

_

_

-

_

.

3

29
28

117
31

108
54
54

9
3

_
_

1.93
1.79
2.05
2.52

1
1

68

86

108
63
45

2
_
2

67
30
37
9
7

2.69

10

148
80

83
29
54

55
31
24

1.88

50
35
15

48
38

71
47
24

$2.45

24

94
71
23

55
31
24

2, 293
680
1,613

86

20

20

8

23
97

75

66

2
_
2
1

1
1
2

”

1

Women
Fitting
P a sters, backers, or
fitters , upper, hand
Tim e_________________
Incentive______ ___ ___
Top stitchers 3 b/______
Vam per s 3 b/__ _________

2
2

-

_

Finishing

T r e e rs

3 b/______________

8

6

6
2
1

4

1

3
-

■

1
1

-

-

2
2
1

-

1

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

6
1
1
1
1

6

4
4

5
5

1
1

_

_

_

-

■

1

2
2

1

-

Miscellaneous
F lo o r g irls

3 a/_________
Men
Cutting

Cutters, lining,
machine 3 b/ ____________ _
Leather lining 3 b/__ _____
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, hand 3 b / ____________
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine 3 a/ ________

1

Fittin g
Fancy stitch ers----------------Incentive..
S kivers, machine, uppers
o r linings_______ __________
Tim e_____________________
Incentive.__ _
Top stitchers 3 b/..
V a m p e rs 3 b/-

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

2
2
2
2

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

5

_

1

3
3

3

2

-

1
1

-

1

1

1
2

7

5

5

5

4

3

-

-

1
1
8
2

-

2
2

8
6

1
1

4
4

5
5

5
5

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

_
3

_

1

”

-

_
3

2
1

3
3

8
2

4

4

-

1

1

_

_

_

5
3

8
7

2
2
1
“

_

1
1
7

-

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover,
machine 3 b/_______ ____ ...
Bed-machine
operators 3 b / _-_____ ____
H eel-sea t
la sters 3 b / -----------------P u llo ver - machine
operators 3 b/._------------Side la sters,
machine 3 b /_____________
Toe la sters , automatic
or sem iautomatic 3 b/___

29

2.63

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

_

.

2

2

1

4

1

1

2

13

3.67

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
2

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

-

2

1

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

12

2.27

23

3.18

23

3.08

13

3.23

See footnotes at end of table.




-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

2
2

-

-

2
1

-

3

-

1
2
1
2
1
-

5

_

1

_

_

_

-

-

4

-

-

5

1
1
6

-

-

-

-

2

3

1

7

-

-

1
1

3

-

1

3

-

7

1
2

Table 31. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes---- New York, N.Y.1— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earn in gs 2 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

1 The New York Standard M etropolitan Statistical A rea consists of New York City (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Counties) and Nassau, Rockland, Suffolk, and
W estchester Counties, N .Y.
2 Excludes prem ium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3 Includes data fo r w ork ers in cla ssification in addition to those shown separately.
4 Insufficient data to w arrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.




Table 32. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Arkansas
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings

1 of production

w orkers in selected occupations, A p r il 1965)

Num­ A v e r Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings of—
ber
age
hourly $1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20
of
w ork­ earn­ and
and
ers
ings 1 under
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $ 1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 over

Sex, department, and
occupation

1064
855
209

113

15

1.48
1.50
1.37

5
7
7

25

1.75

10

61

1.33

50

2

_

2

-

86

1.36

57

.5

3

4

3

14
60

1.44
1.42

-

2

1

37

5

7

1.57

2

-

74
34
40
76

1.41
1.30
1.51
1.61

55

1.73

38
32

A ll production w o rk ers----- ~ ---------Women ---------------------- ---------- ---------Men ------ ---- --------------------------- — —

2,480 $1.53
1, 718 1.45
762 1.71

179
97
82

147

_
-

1

_
3

_
-

-

"

1

1.35
1.41

11

2.19

39

2.33

1
2

26
25

2^01

1.65

9

24
37

1.98
2.15
2.14

3
4

32

2.01

2

88

25

110

37

103
85
18

147
103
44

_
-

_
-

113
81
32

137

111

36

52
59

101

75
43
32

53
23
30

51
32
19

36
19
17

51
9
42

_
-

1

_

_

20

12

16

3
9

3
13

10
2
8

4
3

1

6
_
6

2
_
2

7
_
7

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

-

1

1

-

-

*

5
15

23
4
19

_

_

3

1

Women
Cutting
Cu tters, fa b ric lining, machine 2 b/------------- .
Cutters, leather lining, machine^b/---------—
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, hand 2 b/„_---- .
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine zb/---------- --------- ----------- -—

8
11

1

_

1
1

1

_

-

1

2
1

1

-

-

3

2
1

1

1
1

_

_

7

2

2

1
2
1

-

-

-

-

3

4

1

-

1

1
1
1

1

2

-

-

-

1

1

-

1

3
3

4

2
2

"

Fitting
Fancy stitchers 2 b/_____ ._________________ ____
_
P a sters, backers, or fitte rs ,
upper, hand 2 b/___ _
- -— —------- -----------S kivers, machine, uppers or
linings 2 b/___ . _,_______________ _____________
_
Top stitchers 2 b/___ __ __
____________ -

8

1

1

_

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

"

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

x

3

1

-

1

1

3

1

.

Bottoming and making
Sole attachers, cem ent process 2 b / -------------

-

-

Finishing

0 j*0
Tpr
T ir«o
Incentive

21 1.29

—

----------

----—

—

—

22
21
1
23
16
7

6
6
2
1

6
2
8

27
27

3
5

2
2

10
2

3
7

5
5

_

_

_

_

-

3

-

2
1

_

_

1

-

-

-

_

-

_

2
2
8
8

3

1
2

4
4

8
8

3
3

2
2
6
6

l

1
2
2

j

2
2

2
2

1

3

_

"

3

1

2
2
1
1
1
1

2
2

1

_

_

_

_

-

1

-

-

-

-

_

2

_

_

-

4

3

2

_
_
_

_
_

x
_
x
_

M iscellaneous
Flrtnr gi'rla ^ aj/
TpeporfArfi | A tim o re| ^ St j

17

8

6

3

1

1

2

1

Men
Cutting
Cutters, fa b ric lining, m ach in e 2 b / _
Cu tters, vamp and whole
shoe, m achine 2 b/
_
_ _

_ _

-

2

_

_

_

3

_

-

6

2

2

_

1
6
i
-

j
_
-

2
1
1
1

2
1
1
2
1

1

4

_

_

1

_

2

2

3

1

3

_
_
_

Lasting
oc orviKl ore -fay» pn 11Axror ^
^hj/
Bed -machine operators 2 b/--------—
—
H eel-s ea t la sters 2 b/_____ __________ ____ ____ _
Pu llover-m achin e operators 2 b/______________
Side la sters , m achine 2 b/
__ ___
Toe la sters , automatic
or sem iautomatic 2 b/_ — _
__
-----See footnotes at end o f table.




11

7

2

_
-

”

1
2

2

-

1

2
1
1
3

-

1

-

1

'z

1
1

1

7

1

-

2

_

4

4

3
4

1
2
6

“

5

1
6
2

1

1

3

2

1

1
1
1

■

1

_
_

_

1

“

1

_

_
_
_
•

Table 32. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes----Arkansas— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to w arrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.




Table 33. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Missouri
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)
Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings of—

Num- A v e r -

Sex, department, and
occupation

A ll production w ork ers-----W om en__ ________________

$1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50
hourly
of
w ork- earnand
“
"
"
"
"
under
ers
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3,00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 over
9,510 $1. 70
6,273
1 . 58
3,237
1.92

1693
1349
344

788
634
154

674
501
173

560
382
178

489
409
80

871
629
242

730
535
195

642
426
216

586
340
246

466
279
187

9

4
4

4

1

6
1

7

3

5

8
2
6

397
197

332
150
182

5
3

_

200

279
155
124

165
73
92

197
78
119

101

141
40

93
19
74

1
1
-

2
2

-

2
2

-

1

3

3

1

2

5

81
30
51

59
9
50

46
16
30

39
3
36

51
3
48

27
3
24

1
1
2

1
1

-

-

-

2
2

-

2

-

-

-

1

2

1

1

17

18
_
18

69
9
60

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

1

_

_

1
16

Women
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 2 b/------ ------- -----Fabric lining 2 b / ---------Leather lin in g ^ W __ -— Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, hand 2 b / --------- -----Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine 2 b / __ — ___

72
14
58

1.74
1.73
1.74

2
12

6
1

1

5

-

2
2

3
_
3

31

2.05

4

1

-

-

1

74

1.92

1

3

2

-

4

426

1. 56

113

26

27

29

259

1. 55

62

19

16

137

1.62

50

1.67
1. 53

44
71
14

5
18
5

14

2

1
8

3

3

4

4

2
8

15

54

34

34

29

24

18

29

11

9

6

10

4

15
5

30
3

31
8
21

18

10
8
16
1

-

1
1

2

1
12

296

21
10

15
3

6

4

5
30

2

4
16
3

Bottoming and making

18

1 . 82

1

-

-

1

>

2

2

1

3

20

1.74

-

-

-

-

4

5

3

2

2

18

1 .* 66

2

2

-

2

-

3

1

l

4

7

2. 14

R ep airers ---------------- -------

202

Incentive------------- —-----T r e e rs 2 b/ -----------------------

51
151
227

1 . 60
1.42
1.66

Bottom fille r s 2 b/------------Rough rounderT^b/----------Shankers 2 b/--------------------Sole attachers, cement
process 2 b / ------------ ------Finishing

M iscellaneous

F lo o r g ir ls 2 a/----------—----Inspectors (T ro w n e rs )------T im e---------------------------

5

6
10

4

8
6

8

4

6

4

4

-

7
9

3

2

3
7

-

-

1

3

12

1

2
1

4

8

1
1
1
2

-

-

1

*

1
1

4
3

'

Lasting
A ssem blers fo r pullover,
machine 2 b/ ------------------

14

3

4

Fitting

Fancy stitcher s 2 b/_________
P asters, backers, or
fitters , upper, hand 2 b/__
S kivers, machine, uppers
or linings 2 b/----------------Top stitchers " b/-------------Vam pers f_b/---------------------

1
1

112
155
103

1.71

1.43
1. 50
1.41

3

32
4
28
26

15
13

20
16

19

4
9

16

6
24
21

30
30
29

5
4

2

12
4
8
10
24

21
21

13
3

10

25
3

22

15

24

3

24
5

22

13

2

2
_
2

7
3
4

2

3

1
1
2

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

8
8
12

6
6
8

5
7

2
2

2
2

_

3

7

2

2

"

"

-

-

2

2
2

2

5

4

3
3

_

_

_

3

3

1

"

14
23

11
3
8
16

21

20
12

14

4
7

5

-

10

3

1

_

_

4
3

5
4

3

1

1

1

23
5
18

21

14
_

4

1

13
13

5

1
1

1

1

“

Men
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 2 b/.— _____
Fabric lining 2 b/
Leather lining^b/.

89
41
48

See footnotes at end o f table




1.89

2 . 08
1.74

15
3

12

2
_
2

1
1

2

-

3

5

5
5

8

4
4

6
3
3

1

3

2
1

2
2

_

_

_

0
1

Table 33. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Missouri— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly ea rn in gs1 of production w orkers in selected occupations, A p ril 1965)

Sex, department, and
occupation

Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings ofNum­ A v e r ­
age
ber
$1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $ 2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50
hourly
of
and
and
w ork ­ earn ­
ings 1 under
ers
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 a i o 11-30 $1.40 $3.50 over

Men— Continued
Cutting— Continued
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, hand 2 b/ Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, machine 2 b / --------

1
1

1
2

3
5

4

2

9
-

90

$ 2. 70

149

2 . 16

-

115
53

2 . 11
1.88

2
7

1
6

3

4

6

10

16

9
3

9
3

3

4

9

10

2

3

10

7

14

6
10

4
4

11
2

3
4

4

3

4

5

4

4

5

4

4

4

4

5

8

9

3

4

3

3

2

*

"

8

4

10

2

1

2
1

15
3

Lasting
A ssem blers fo r pullover,
machine 2 b/-----------------H eel-sea t la sters 2 b / ------Pullo ve r - m achine
operators 2 b/---------------Side la sters ,
machine 2 b /-----------------Toe la sters , automatic or
semiautomatic 2 b/ — ------

99

2. 52

156

2. 14

126

2. 47

3

2

1
1
1

-

3

3

5

-

12
6

1
1

-

-

3

1

.

-

-

2
1

_

1
1
1

2

4
3

4

4

8

5

1

8

5

7

4

4

14

13

9

7

7

12

10
12

7

12

12

3

4

1
2

-

11

4

7

16

7

8

15

9

4

3

7

8
2

10
6

6

7

11

12

10

4

3

4

5

3

-

-

1

2
2

_

_

_

_

9

5

3

2
3
1
1

2

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

14

11

7

3

2

6

4

3
3
7

1
2

1

2

5
4

3

4

3

1

-

-

-

-

2

4

8

3

7

-

11
1

1
6
1

_

4

6

-

2

6
6
1

11

7

2

4
4

2

1

10

3

6

2

3

-

1
1

4

-

2

4

3

!

2

5

7

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

3

2

-

-

2
6
2

2
2

2
2

1
1

-

1

3

-

-

2

4

2

-•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

3

4

9

1

-

3

-

-

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers 2 b/ ------- —
H eel attachers,
machine 2 b /______________
H eel-sea t fitters ,
hand 2 b /__________________
Rough rounders 2 b/---------Shankers 2 b/------------------Sole attachers, cement
process 2 b/ —--------------- -

34

2 . 29
1 .98

35
25

1.64
1 . 88
1. 59

95

37
55
39

122

5

1
1

2. 14

2

-

2. 23
2. 38

3
3

2
1
_
1
1

_
3
-

-

_
3

1
1
1

4

_

4

5

1

1
6

1
10

2

3

7

9

2

1
2
2

3
4
3

3

2

1
2

5

5

4

1
1
1
1

-

4

2
2

2

2
2
1
1

-

2

1
1

13

5

4

6
2
1
3
-

10
2

1

1

Fin i shing
Bottom scourers 2 b / -------Edge setters 2 b/------------- .
T r e e r s 2 b / ----------------------

2.01

'

2

_

_

'

11
11

3

2
1

_

2

'

4
4

1

M iscellaneous
F lo o r b o y s ------------ -—
T im e ________________
Incentive---------------Inspectors (crow n ers) ..
T im e--------------------Janitors 2 a/---------------Mechanics,
maintenance 2 a/-------

45
36
9
36
31
59

1.45
1.43
1. 51
1 . 59
1. 51
1.34

2 . 11

13

2
2
11

21

12

2
2
_
1
1
2

"

“

“

”

“

10
10
_
2
2

_

.
4
3

4

2
2

4
4

8
1
7
14
14

_

1
1
1
1

-

6

-

1

1

'
Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
to w arrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers,

 Insufficient data


and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.

Table 34. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif.1
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 2 o f production w orkers in selected occupations, A p r il 1965)

Sex, department, and
occupation

A ll production w o rk ers__
W om en________________
M en ___________________

Number o f w orkers receivin g straight- time hourly earnings of—
Num- A v e r age
$1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1.90 $2.00 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40
hourly
of
w ork- earn- Under and
and
$1.25 under
ers
$1.30 $1,3? $1,40 $1,45 $1.50 $1.60 S i.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $2.29 $2.20 $2.50 $2,4P $2.5P $2.69 $2.70 $2 .fi0 $2.90 $3,00 $?,lo $3,20 $5,30 $3.40 over
1, 133 $ 1.92
608
1. 68
2 . 20
525

1
1

20
12

32

95
80
15

95
77
18

62
46
16

56
33
23

.

2
2

2
.
2

.

.

-

-

-

7
7
-

_

3
-

74
49
25

88

57
31

no

52
26
26

52
18
34

3

2
1

42

68

69
40
29

5

2

4

1

_

3

3

3

2
_
2
2
2

2
1

3

1

3

1
1
_
“

11

55
18
37

42
17
25

3

1

37
5
32

27
9
18

18
16

20

16

1
12

18
3
15

12
12

_
■

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

1

_

-

-

1

-

-

2

-

3

1
1

5
_
5

1
1

1

"

-

-

2
2

35
24

17
7

10

2

25
5

17

1

13

5
_

26

1

5

25

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

_
-

_
_
•

-

Women
Fitting
1. 84
1. 70

Fancy stitch ers__________ __

29

Incentive________________
P a s te r s , backers, or
fitte rs , upper, hand__ ___
T im e____________________
Incentive________________
Skivers, machine, uppers
or linings ^a/______________
Top s titch ersfb / ___________
Ya m pers 3b/________________

19

1.90

32
17
15

1. 71
1.44
2.03

_

_

_

.

2
2

4
4

-

-

-

-

_

_

_
"

-

~

_
“

1

19
9

1. 67
1. 85
1.97

39

1.66

-

-

2

2

1

22

1. 53

-

-

1

2

3

12
6

2 . 16
1. 86

_

_

.

-

_

_

_

_

-

"

-

~

_
_
“

.

2
2

.
_

.
.

.

“

"

“

"

10

11

.

-

.

_

2
2

-

-

_

1

5
3

2

3

1
2
1
6

1
2
2
2

1
1
1
1

3
3

"

4

“

“

1
2
2

2

4

5

18

4

-

1

8

2

2

-

4

_

3
3

-

1

_

-

1

_

2
2

i

1

-

-

-

i

_

_

1
1

_

1

3

_

_

5
3

"

3

“

"

2

2
1
1
2
1
1

3

4

6
2
1

2
_
2

6
_
6

2
1
1

-

”

3
”

”

“
'

'

-

“

1

1
2

1

_

2

-

“

1

_

_
3
"

1

1

Finishing
R ep a irers 3a /_________
M iscellaneous
F lo o r g ir ls W ________
Men
Cutting
Cutters, lining,
machine 3b / 4 _____________
Fa b ric lin in g __________
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, hand^b/___________
Cutters, vamp and whole
shoe, m ach in e_______ ___
T im e___________________
Inc entiv e____ .__________

13

2. 67

34

2 . 59

6

28

Fitting
Fancy stitch ers___________
T im e _ _ ________________
Incentive..
V a m p e rs fa / _______________

41

12

29
7

2.42
2.63

2.01
1. 82
2 . 09

2. 33

~

1
1

1
4

_
_

1

_

1

"

2
2
1

6
5
1
1

1
2

1

4

1

2
3

1
2

2
2
2

2
2

-

-

1
1

-

-

'

1

1
3
3

'

'

'

'

'

,

,

_

1

~

"

1
1

1
1
1

Lasting
A ssem blers fo r pu llover,
machine 3b / ______________
H eel-sea t la sters *b/______
P u llo v e r -machine
operators f b j ___ ___ .......
Side la sters , m achinefb/..
T o e la sters , automatic
o r sem iautomatic *b /

-

-

~

3

~

-

3
- '

3
3

1

3.00
2.46

_

.

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3. 10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2. 47
1.93

7

See footnotes at end o f table,




-

11
8
12

19

3
-

2

3

-

1

-

_

1

_

_

-

-

-

1
2

_

3

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

_

-

1

2

-

-

-

1

_

-

_

1

1
2

1
-

_

1

1

-

3
-

-

-

-

1

-

j

1

-

-

~

1

1
1

1
-

2

Table 34. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif.1— Continued
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings

Sex, department, and
occupation

2 o f production w orkers

in selected occupations, A p r il 1965)

Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings ofNum- A v e r age
ber
$1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $ 1.90 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $ 2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40
hourly
of
and
and
w ork- earn- Under
under
ings 2 $1.25
& M 0 ££££.
$2.90 $ 3 . 0 0 S1 JQ. £1 , 20S I.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $ l r$0 $1,60 $ 1,70 $ 1,50 $ 1,90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10
U J U L $2 .5 0
m s
fl, $ 2 . 7 0

Men— Continued
Bottoming and making
FHge trim m ers 3h/
Heel attachers,
machine ^b/_______________
Rough rounders *h /
____
Sbankers 3h/
Sole attach ers, cement
process 3b/________________

8

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

l

2

_

_

_

1

_

_

1

1

~

_

■

3

2

_

_

_

-

_

-

2

-

$2.49

8

2. 34
2 . 61
1.95

12

2 . 66

"

1. 52
1. 64

.

9

6

"

_

_

1

_

1

-

-

2

_

_

1
1

l

1
1

1
1

_

_

_

_

l

■

■

”

1
1
1

3

■

1

■

-

-

-

1

_
-

1

_

_

1

2

1

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

l

_

-

l

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

_

1

1
1

1
1
1

"

_

2

l
"

‘

-

-

1

'

Miscellaneous
boys 3 /„ „
a
__
Janitors 3a/Hl_______________
"F lo o r

1
2
3
4

11
9

.

2

_

_

-

4

2
1

1
1

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

The Los A ngeles—
Long Beach Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea consists of Los Angeles and Orange Counties.
Excludes prem ium pay fo r o vertim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to w arrant presentation of separate averages by method of wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.
Includes data fo r w ork ers in cla ssifica tion in addition to those shown separately.




-

-

-




Table 35. Occupational Earnings: Women’s Cement-Process (Slip-Lasted) Shoes— All Establishments
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations,
United States and M iddle Atlantic, A p r il 1965)1
2
United States
Department, occupation, and sex

2

Middle Atlantic
A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

38
27
187
148

$1. 78
1.92
2. 30
2. 36

15
14
62
58

$1.97
1.99
2 . 08
2. 09

218

1. 63

93

1.68

97
118
71

1. 50
1.96
2 . 01

33
79
41

1. 52
1. 78
1. 94

Cutting
Cu tters, fabric lining, machine______________ _
M en __________________________________________
Cu tters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______
M en _____________ __________ _______________ ___
Fitting
Fancy stitchers (214 women and 4 men)_______
P a s te r s , backers, or fitters , upper, hand
(85 women and 12 men)------------- -____________
P la tfo rm -c o v e r stitchers------------.------------ ---W om en __________ _ ____________ __________ ___
S kivers, machine, uppers or linings
(43 wom en and 2 men) —----------------------------Sock-lining stitchers (87 women
and 21 m
e
n
) ___________________________
V am pers (a ll w om en )___________________________

45
108

66

1. 61

6

1. 77

1.99
1. 79

65
26

1.93
1. 58

Lasting
P la tfo rm -c o v e r lasters (38 men
and 3 wom en)--------------------------------------------

2 . 13

2. 14

Bottoming and making
Sole attachers, cement process (42 men
and 1 woman) ----------- ------------------- -----------

43

2. 15

29

2 . 20

55

1.48

21

1. 54

105
59
46
57
33
24

1. 47
1.47
1. 48
1. 41
1. 46
2.46

53
27
26
25
16
9

1.43
1.43
1.43
1. 37
1. 61
2. 40

Finishing
R ep a irers (51 women and 4 men)_______________
Miscellaneous
F lo o r boys (o r g ir ls )___________________ _________
W om en_______________________________________
Mm
Inspectors (crow ners) (54 women and 3 men)_„_
Janitors (a ll men)____________________________ —
M echanics, maintenance (a ll men)--- ------------

1
2

Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to the Middle A tlantic.




Table 36. Occupational Earnings: Women’s McKay (Including Littleway) Shoes— All Establishments
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations,
United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
United States
Departm ent, occupation, and sex

2

New England

Middle Atlantic

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Number
of
workers

A vera g e
hourly
earnings

42
28
370
264

$2. 14
2. 24
2 . 11
2. 30

214

1. 54

87

1. 64

169

1.47

49

1. 56

-

1. 44
1. 57

63
25
34

1. 78
1. 88
1. 59

15
-

2 . 09
2 . 21

18
7

11
20

2. 23
2. 30
2 . 18
2 . 12

Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Cutting
Cu tters, fa b ric lining, m achine________________
Men
_
____ _
______ ____
____
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______
M en -------------------------------------------------------

17
13
191
177

$2. 17
2 . 11
2. 52
2. 54

_
-

37
29

_
$1. 87
1.93

Fitting
Fancy stitchers (193 women and 21 m e n )______
P a s te r s , backers, or fitte rs , upper, hand
(a ll w om en )____________________________________
S kivers, machine, uppers or linings
(125 women and 6 m en)________________________
Top stitchers (260 women and 1 man)__________
V am pers (a ll w om en )___________________________

131
261
76

1. 68

1. 74
-

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover, machine____________
W om en________________________________________
Men
___ _
_ _
H eel-sea t lasters (28 men and 3 women)_______
Pu llover-m a ch in e operators (38 men
and 3 w om en )__________________________________
Side la sters , machine (41 men and 2 women)—
T o e la sters , automatic or semiautomatic
(a ll men)---------------------------------------------------

37
19
18
31

1.97
1.96

41
43

2 . 01

2. 25

17
23

2. 55
2 . 28

41

2.40

26

2 . 68

2 . 21
1.96
2 . 02

25
32
26

66

2 . 39
2 . 08
2. 07
2 . 28

58

2. 32

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers (39 men and 10 w om en)________
H eel attachers, m a ch in e_______________________
Men ______ ______________ ________________ ____
L ittlew ay s titc h e rs ______________________________
M en -------------------------------------------------------

49
54
37
114

101

2. 25
2. 19

180
54

1. 41
1. 66

81
14

1. 48
1. 55
1. 40
1. 54
1. 32
2 . 01

91
59
32
56
15

1.44
1.44
1.46
1.46
1. 32

_

1. 88
1. 88
2 . 02
2 . 08

40

1. 31
1. 33
-

1. 79

191

_

6
6
14
12

Finishing
R ep airers (179 women and 1 m an)_____________
T r e e r s (46 women and 8 men)__________________

1.41

M iscellaneous
F lo o r boys (o r g ir ls )____________________________
Women _________ _________________ ______ ___ _
M en _______ __________ ____ ______ ____________
Inspectors (crow n ers) (80 women and 8 men)__
Janitors (a ll men)_______________________________
Mechanics, maintenance (a ll men)_____________

1
2

101
90
88

25
18

6

Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NO TE:

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication crite ria .

2.92

21

-

Table 37. Occupational Earnings: Misses’ and Children’s Cement-Process (Conventional-Lasted) Shoes— All Establishments
(Num ber and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupatioiis, United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
United States
Departm ent, occupation, and sex

Number
of
w orkers

2
1

A verage
hourly
earnings

New England
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Middle Atlantic
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Southwest

G reat Lakes

Middle West

Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

9
_

_
7

„
$ 1. 86

23

1.98
_

28
-

1.81
1. 82
-

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

14

67
26
41

$1.97
2 . 06
1.97
1. 99
2. 15
1. 96
2. 27

1.45

83

1. 61

_

72

1. 56

44
76
79

1.70
1. 56
1. 62

36

2. 03
1.83
2 . 10

Cutting

20

-

$2 . 12
2 . 10
-

64
_
54

2. 40
_
2.48

63
.
51

Cutters, fa bric lining, m ach in e________________
M en ______ _____________________________________
Cutters, leather lining, m achine._________ _____

73
51
62

$1. 96
2. 04
2. 07

13

Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______
W om en______________________________________
Men _____ _________________________________

317
103
214

2. 15
1. 92
2 . 26

12

16
-

$1. 77
1. 84
-

-

$2. 14
_
-

_
2. 24

49
_
33

2 . 10

2 . 18

21

8
11

Fitting
Fancy stitchers (a ll w om en )____________________
P a s te r s , backers, o r fitte rs , upper, hand
(a ll w om en )_________________ __________ _________
S kivers, machine, uppers o r linings
(a ll women) ___________________ , ___________
_
Top stitchers (a ll w om en )__ ____ ____________
Vam pers (231 women and 2 m en)____ ___________

433

1. 54

90

1. 66

61

1.48

116

1. 43

45

367

1. 47

44

1. 51

70

1.42

101

1. 44

_

157
250
233

1.66
1. 63
1. 68

20

41
46

I. 70
2 . 06
1.91

28
38
25

1. 83
1. 68
1.69

38
_

1. 51
_

15
29
27

162
59
103

1.94
1. 90
1.97

27
7

2 . 49
2. 58
2.46

22

_
.

1.99
_
_

41
_
_

95
64
79

2.07
1.99
2. 33

14
-

2. 15
-

19
16
.

2. 41
1.98
_

_
_

135

2 . 28

25

2.62

16

2. 32

30

106

2. 14

-

35

2 . 19

153

2. 24

2.53

18

2. 03
2 . 18
1. 62
1. 57
2. 04
2. 15

21
8
6
10
6
26
22

26

24
57
39
23
146
96

6

2 . 09

_
2. 05
-

183
158
25

1. 57
1. 57
1.47
2. 23

152
116
36
188
136
52
72
56

1.44
1.44
1.45
1.58
1. 52
1. 72
1. 35
2 . 10

-

-

1. 62

1.48
1.47

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover, m ach in e. ____ ____
Women ___________ __ _____________________
Men _____ _________-__ ______ __ ________
Bed-m achine operators (86 men
and 9 wom en)___________________________________
H eel-s ea t la sters (a ll m e n )_______ ____________
Pu llover-m a ch in e operators (a ll m en)_________
Side la sters , machine (132 men
and 3 w om en)________ ,.
___
___________
T o e la sters , automatic o r semiautomatic
(a ll men) ____ _________ _____
_____
Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers (a ll m e n )__ __________ _____
H eel attachers, machine (22 men
and 2 w om en)___________
Rough rounders (a ll m en)__ ____________ ______ ...
Shankers ___________ ____ ______
____ ____
W om en____________________
__________ ____,
Sole attachers, cem ent p r o c e s s _____________ __
M en -------------------------------------------------------Finishing
R ep airers (198 women and 4 men) ____________
T r e e r s ____________ r
______ .___ __ ...
, ____ ,
__
„
W o m e n __T — _______
____________
Men ______ _________ _ _ ____

202

20
-

2. 87

1.66
_
_

18
13
_

1. 77
1.69

_
_
_

8

_

_
2. 13
_

2. 03

67
13
26
38

1.90
1. 88

1.97

1.97
-

2 . 18

2. 14
2. 87
1. 53
1.45
2 . 48
2. 54

_
_
_
37

20

_
_
_
1.93
2 . 01

_
_
_
_
31
-

20
20

1.46
2. 32
_
2. 32

40
_
_
-

1.44
_
_
-

52
60
60
-

1. 51
1.43
1.43
-

34
26

1.47
1.48
1.47
1. 56
1.55
_
1.29
“

_
_
_
16
16
_

_
_
1.83
1. 83
_

48
35
13
47
32
_
_

1. 38
1. 38
1. 38
1.43
1.43
_
_
1.95

38

_

10

26

_
_

48
_
_

1. 97
_
_
_
_
1.82
1.94

-

1. 77
1. 53
1. 51
-

24
17
7
54
39
15
17
15

1. 44
1.42
1.48
1.62
1. 52
1. 87
1. 37
2 . 08

_
_
_
13
7

_
1.87
1.90

_
_
_
_
27
16

18
_
_

1. 63
_
_

36
57
53

-

-

M iscellaneous
F lo o r boys (o r g ir ls )___________ ...______________
Wornen_____ „ _______________________ .. _____ „T.
M en _____ ,__________________________ _______ .
_
Inspectors (c r o w n e rs )__________ ________________
W omen _ . . . . _______ ... .__ ......... ..... .. __ ........
M en _____ ___ ______________,___ ,______ _____„
Janitors (70 men and 2 w om en )_______________ _
Mechanics, maintenance (a ll men) ________ __

1
2

8
23
20
6
"

-

Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NO TE:

Dashes indicate no data reported o r data that do not m eet publication crite ria .




"

10

12
12

_
28
_
_

10

1.44
1.44
_
1.64
_
1. 33
-




Table 38. Occupational Earnings: Misses’ and Children’s Goodyear-Welt Shoes— All Establishments
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 o f w orkers in selected occupations.
United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
United States
Departm ent, occupation, and sex

2

Number
of
workers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

43
85
53
278
36
242

$ 1. 82
2. 24
2. 58
2. 73
2 . 11
2 . 82

G reat Lakes

Middle Atlantic
Number
of
w orkers

A vera g e
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earning s

M iddle West
Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Cutting
Cutters, fabric lining, machine
(38 men and 5 w om en )_________________________
Cu tters, leather lining, machine______ _________
Men
____
_________________________
Cu tters, vamp and whole shoe, machine_______
W^m^n
____
.......
...
M en ------------------------------------------------------Fitting
Fancy stitchers (431 women and 9 men)________
P a s te r s , backers, o r fitte rs , upper, hand
(224 women and 1 man)________________________
S kivers, machine, uppers or linings
(154 women and 4 men)________________________
Top stitchers (193 women and 9 men)__________
V am pers (258 women and 26 m en )_____________

440
225
158

202

284

12

$ 1. 81
2 . 39
_
2. 45

$1. 70
1. 68
1. 71
2. 17

1.92
2 . 21

37
_
31

$2. 57
_
2 . 62

43
_
37

93

1.59

35

1.91

62

1. 71

66

1. 40

18

1. 55

37

1.45

1. 76
1.75
1. 86

49
53
69

1. 46
1. 51
1. 62

17
29
29

1. 67
1. 67
1. 77

28
42
38

2 . 00

30

1.96

9

2. 30

19

-

7
17

1. 82
1. 60

15

21

16
63
9
54

1. 66
1. 47
1. 64

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover, machine (92 men
and 10 w om en )________________ ___ _______ ______
Bed-machine operators (67 men
and 1 wom an)___________________________________
H eel-s ea t lasters (37 men and 4 women)_______
Pu llo ver-m a ch in e operators (a ll men)_________
Side la sters , machine (a ll m e n )________________
Toe la sters , automatic o r semiautomatic
(a ll m en)________________________________________

102
68
41
122
136

2. 25
1.96
2.46
2. 52

118

2.43

Bottoming and making
Bottom fille r s __________ _________________________
M en ______________________ _____________________
Edge trim m ers (161 men and 1 wom an)________
G oodyear stitchers (168 men and 2 w om en )___
H eel attachers, machine (50 men
and 3 w om en)___________________________________
Ins earner s (a ll m en)_________ __________________
Rough rounders (64 men and 1 w om an)________
Sole le v e le rs , machine (20 men
and 8 wom en)___________________________________

41

22

1. 94
2. 27

12
13
27
26

9
13

1. 89
2. 77
2. 84

20

1. 74
2.43
2. 33

27

1.92

17

2 . 79

19

2. 05

1. 61
1.69
2. 15
2 . 01

18
14

_
_
2. 71
2. 33

27
28

2. 36
2 . 20

12

2. 23

53
90
65

2 . 28
2 . 51
2 . 21

18
27
17

1. 85
1. 96
2 . 01

8
6

2 . 28
2 . 62

28

1.95

10

1. 68

7

1. 84

84
167
155

28
65
57
24

71

2. 55
1. 67
1. 65
2. 51
1. 77

141
90
153
95
58
44
39

1. 51
1. 56
1. 72
1. 68
1. 78
1.43
2. 27

20

2 . 68

121

22

2 . 22
1. 45
1.43
1.46
1. 42

M iscellaneous
F lo o r boys (o r g ir ls )________________ ____________
W om en______ ____ ___________________________ _
Inspectors (c r o w n e rs )__________________ ________
W omen __________ ___ ________ ______ ______
Men
____
____ ______
Janitors (a ll m en)_______________________________
M echan ics, maintenance (a ll men)_____________

1
2

23
31
14
17
-

8

1. 53
1. 54
1. 53
1.60
1.47
-

2. 24

Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.

NO TE:

6

9
36
42

162
170

Finishing
Edge setters (a ll m en)__________________ -_______
R e p a ir e r s ______ __ _____ ___________ ___ __ ____
W omen ______ „ __ ____ ____ ______ ___________
T r e e r s ___________________________________________
W om en________________________________________

1. 89

1. 75
1. 88
2.03
1. 82

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication c rite ria .

-

8

_

7

12
10

18
16
13

1. 81
1. 72
2 . 01
1. 86

16

1. 38
1.40
1. 74
1. 59
1. 98
1. 35
■

22
22

2. 64
1. 75
1. 72
1. 75
1. 75

11

6
6
11

1.71
1. 71
1.93
1. 61

31
19

14
13

19
-

-

-

2 . 00
2. 17
2 . 00

12

12
12

Table 39. Occupational Earnings: Misses’ and Children’s Goodyear-Welt Shoes— Southeastern Pennsylvania1
2 o f production w orkers

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings

Sex, department, and
occupation

in selected occupations, A p r il 1965)

Number of w orkers receivin g straight-tim e hourly earnings ofNum- A v e r age
$1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2.00 $ 2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $T50
hourly $1.25 $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50
of
and
w ork- earnand
under
ers
mgs
$1.30 $1.35 $1.40 $1.45 $1.50 $1.60 $1.70 $1.80 $1.90 $ 2,00 $2,10 $2,20 $2.30 $2,40 $2.50
$2,70 $2.80 $2.90 $3,00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 over
_
4
102 81 124 130 132 73 78 52 41 26 21
3
2
2 2
13
4
2
11
6
6
104
157
118
1, 294 $1. 63
_
_
_
_
_
1
14
2
2
683
76
71
60
17
7
6
4
3
1
1. 50
98
97
78 58
79
9
4
2
64
43
34
20 17 10 11
2
3
2
2 “
5
5
25
21 24 23
72 56
48
611
1. 78
59
59

$?,*>o

A ll production w o r k e r s ____
M en ________-____________

'

Women
Fitting
Fancy stitchers ^a/ ________
P a s te r s , backers, or
fitte rs , upper, hand____ _
Incentive______________ __
S k ivers, machine, uppers
or linings_________________
Incentive_______________
_
Top stitch ers_______________
T im e_____________________
Vam pers 3b/ _______________

M iscellaneous

F lo o r g ir ls 3a / _____________
Inspectors (crow n ers) *b/_

12

13
-

3
3

2

6
2

4

6

8
2
1

4

_

20

1.40
1.44

8
8

6

33
15
37
23
39

1.48
1. 50
1. 52
1. 46
1. 62

4
4
5

2

2
_
2
2

3

3

6

27

1.48

5

1

10
12

1.66
1 . 66

2

2

23

_
_

_
_

_

13

1. 73
1. 80
1.78
1.69

-

"

33

2 . 12

-

Finishing

R ep airers 3b/_______________

10

1. 59

38

63

3

5
_
-

6
2
-

10
2
2

5

1

3
3

_
_

-

2
1
1

3

_

2

,

2

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

_
-

-

-

-

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

2

2

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

1

-

-

_

1

3

-

-

-

-

1

-

3

3

8
2
2
2

6
2

4

5

-

1
1
6
1
1

2

-

5

2

1

2

2

"

”

2
1

2

"

"

"

“

2
2
_
2

2
2

-

9

3

-

1

_

_

-

-

-

4
5

2
2
2

-

2
2
_
2

3

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

2

1

-

5

7

6

1

1

-

4
-

3

3
4

_

3

1

_

_

3
3

4
4

2
6
6

5
3

2

l

5

1
1
_
2

“

>

-

2

_

1

_

1
1

-

2

2

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

2

-

-

Men
Cutting
Cutters, lining, m achine..,
Incentive___________ _
F abric lining 3a /______ ..,
Leather lining 3b/______
Cutters, vamp ancTwhole
shoe, machine 3b/_______ _

10
10

j

1

-

1

j

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

"

-

1

3

-

-

2

-

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pu llover,
machine 3b/ _____________ _
H eel-sea t la sters 3b/_._____
P u llo v e r -machine
operators ^b/____________ _
Side la sters , machine^b/_
T oe la sters, automatic
o r sem iautomatic 3b/___ _

16

10

2 . 02
1.88
2 . 08

1

-

-

-

“

_

_

1

_

_

1.76

-

-

-

-

1

_
5

20

2 . 00

-

1

-

-

-

-

2
2

23
24

2. 14
2.07

2

1

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

H

_
_

_
_
-

2

1

3

10

1. 83
1.94
2. 05

13

2. 65

18
19

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers V . ________
G oodyear stitchers \ > ! ____
H eel attachers,
machine 3a / ____________ _
In sea m ersT .____ ____ _____ _
Rough rounders 3b / ________

16

_

_
.
"

_
.

_
_

2

1

b l --------------

M iscellaneous
Inspectors (crow n ers) 3a /..
Mechanics,
maintenance 3a/__________

4

2

1

7

!

!

1

3

3
_

4
_

2
~
4

2

3
_

2
2

5
-

1

1
2

2

2
1

8
1

12

2

1

-

3
-

1
1

13

1.50

-

i

2

1

1

4

2

2. 15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

6

2

-

-

-

1
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

3

1

1

3

-

1

-

-

2

-

-

2

6

6

1

-

2

“

Finishing
Edge s e tte r s J

1

The Southeastern Pennsylvania area consists of Berks, Dauphin, Lancester, Lebanon, and Schuykill Counties.
Excludes prem ium pay fo r o vertim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Insufficient data to w arrant presentation o f separate averages by method o f wage payment; (a) predominantly tim ew orkers, and (b) predominantly incentive w orkers.







Table 40. Occupational Earnings: Misses’, Children’s, and Infants’ Stitchdown Shoes— All Establishments
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations,
United States and Middle Atlantic, A p ril 1965)
United States
D epartm ent, occupation, and sex

Number
of
workers

2

Middle Atlantic
A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Cutting
Cutters, fa bric lining, m achine-------------------M en ___________________________________________
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine--------M en -------------------------------------------------------

21
201
88

$1.47
1.35
1.71
2.17

88

70

$1.74
1.45
2.04
2.15

320

1.48

46

1.82

76

1.34

20

1.37

64

268

1.48
1.45
1.41

28
47
75

1.61
1.90
1.62

39

1.65

52

88

1.74
2.13
1.75

-

32

2.40
_

41

2.02

36

13
7

Fitting
Fancy stitchers (314 women and 6 men)---------P a sters, backers, or fitte rs , upper, hand
(a ll w om en )--------------------- -----------------------S kivers, machine, uppers or linings
(a ll w om en )_________....___ — _________ -________
Top stitchers (197 women and 5 men)------------Vam pers (261 women and 7 men)-------------------

202

Lasting
A ssem b lers fo r pullover, machine
(22 men and 17 wom en)________________________
Pu llover-m achin e operators (50 men
and 2 wom en)--------------------------------------------Thread la sters (a ll m en)------------------------------Toe fo rm e rs (a ll m en)---------------------------------Tpe la sters , automatic or semiautomatic
(39 men and 2 wom en)..________________________

42
_

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers (a ll men)_______________________ _
Goodyear stitchers (115 men and 5 w om en)___
H eel attachers, machine (a ll men)----------------Rough rounders (a ll m en).—----------- ---------------

46
50

2.27
2.04
1.67
1.69

25
99

81

120

31
48

11

2.54
2.37
1.73

23

1.86

1.69
1.44

74

1.45

1.35
1.34
1.35
1.35
1.32

45
27
18
9

1.40
1.40
1.39

Finishing
Bottom scou rers (24 men and 1 woman)---------R ep airers (a ll wom en)____________ ______________

_

Miscellaneous
F lo o r boys (o r g ir ls )_______ -______________ ______
W om en ___.. . __ _____ ________ ....._____
M flr i

_ .

.

.

.

.......................

-

Inspectors (crow n ers) (30 women and 3 men) —
Janitors (a ll m en)__ _____________________________
Mechanics, maintenance (a ll m en).----------------

1
2

100

53
47
33
26
28

2.01

Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to Middle Atlantic.

NO TE:

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication c rite ria .

11

-

1.33
2.32




Table 41. Occupational Earnings: Moccasin-Constructed Shoes W ith Hand-Sewn Plug— All Establishments
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in selected occupations,
United States and New England, A p r il 1965)
United States
Department, occupation, and sex

2

New England

Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

107
83

$2.42
2.55

129
28
51
27

1. 83
1. 68

Number
of
w orkers

A verag e
hourly
earnings

Cutting
Cutters, vamp and whole shoe, machine____ __
Men ___________________ ____________________

86
67

$2. 40
2. 52

1. 59

93

1. 55

1. 67

11

1. 82

36

1. 87

Fitting
Fancy stitchers (128 women and 1 man)________
P a s te r s , backers, or fitters , upper, hand
(a ll women) ------------------------------------ ------S kivers, machine, uppers or linings
(a ll w om en )_____________________ _______ ______
Top stitchers (a ll w om en )-------------------- ---- ---

21

1.66

Lasting
H eel-s ea t la sters (a ll m e n )__________

2. 17

2. 17

________

Bottoming and making
Edge trim m ers (a ll m e n )______ _______________
G oodyear stitchers (a ll m en )-----------------------H eel attachers, machine (a ll men)----------------L ittlew ay stitchers (a ll m en )___________________
Sole attachers, cement process (14 men
and 2 w om en)--------------------------------------------

2. 84
2. 51

16
40

2. 64
2. 25
2 . 12
2. 31

13
31

16

2 . 11

11

2 . 08

2. 14
1. 52

14
30

2. 33
1.44

29
19

1.48
1.41
1.62

21
11
10

1. 51
1.40
1. 62

39

1.45
1.40

23

21

18

12

2 . 12

2. 32

Finishing
Edge setters (a ll men)_______________________ ___
R ep a irers (a ll women)____________________._____

20
37

M iscellaneous
F lo o r boys (o r g ir ls )_________ _________ __ ____
Worn en ___ ______ ______________________ ____
Men ____ ____ __ .._____ _______
______
Inspectors (crow n ers) (27 women
and 12 m en)__ __________
_______ _ __ ____
Janitors (a ll men)---------------------------------------

10

10

Excludes premium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to New England.

30

8

1.43
1.40




Table 42. Method of Wage Payment
(P ercen t o f production w orkers in footwear manufacturing establishments by method o f wage payment,
United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
Method o f w age payment 1

United
States 2

100

A ll w orkers

New
England

100

Incentive w orkers _ ___________________________
Individual piecew ork ______________ __ -____
Group p ie c e w o rk ____________________________ _
Individual bonus________________________ __ _
Group bonus--------------------------------------------

71
69
( 3)

1
1

(?)
(?)
( 3)

T im e -ra te d w ork ers _ __________________________
F o rm a l pla n ____ ________ ____________ _____
Single r a t e _____ ________________ _______
Range o f rates ______
___ ____
_
Individual ra tes____ ______ ________ _______

29
7
4
3

31
5
4

1
2
3

22

69

68

1

26

Middle
Atlantic

100
61
61
(?)
( 3)
39
3
3
35

Border
States

100

Southwest

100

83
83
( 3)
-

74
73

17

26
3
3
23

8

4
4

10

-

1
1

G reat
Lakes

Middle
West

100

100

78
70
( 3)
3

81
80
( 3)
-

6
22

P a c ific

100
47
47
-

-

-

53

5
14

13
3
9
9

-

19
5

-

1

1
1

52

F o r definitions o f methods o f wage payment, see appendix A.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
L ess than 0. 5 percent.

NO TE:

Because o f rounding, sums o f individual items may not equal totals.

Table 43. Scheduled Weekly Hours
(P ercen t o f production w orkers in footwear manufacturing establishments by scheduled w eekly hours ,
United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United
States 2

W eekly hours

A ll w ork ers- _

__

______

________ __

Under 32 h ou rs__________________________________
32 hours ____ _________ _______________________
O ver 32 and under 40 hours____________________ _
40 h o u rs ..______ ____ ____________ ________ _
44 hours _____________________ ______ ____ — _
O ver 44 hours

1
2
3

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southwest

100

100

100

100

100

100

!
4

.

.
_
95

.
9
77
13

.

_
7

1
2
2

91

-

1
1

98

2

6
2

92
-

3

Data relate to the predominant work schedule for fu ll-tim e day-shift w orkers in each establishment.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
L ess than 0. 5 percent.

NO TE:

G reat
Lakes

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

1
1
2

89

1
Middle
West

100
( 3)

6

1
88
1
4

P a c ific

100
-

100
-




Table 44. Paid Holidays
(P ercen t of production workers in footw ear manufacturing establishments with form al provisions fo r paid holidays,
United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)

Number of paid holidays

United
States 1

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southwest

A ll w ork ers________________________________

100

100

100

100

100

W orkers in establishments providing
paid h olid a y s_________________________ _______

96

97

98

100

8
12

6
8

5
26

_
7

86
12

-

-

-

14
-

23
9

54
13
27

L ess than 5 d a ys____________________________
5 d a y s______________ ____________________ _
5 days plus 2 half d a ys_____________________
6 d a y s_______________________________________
6 days plus 1 or 2 half days________________
7 d a ys__________________________________ ___
7 days plus 1 or 2 half days______________ 8 d a y s___________________________ ____ — M ore than 8 days____________________________
W orkers in establishments providing
no paid h olidays____________________________ -

1
2

(2)
15
3
14
3
36
4
4

20

5
36

8

3

10
5
12

9

2

Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
L ess than 0. 5 percent.

N O T E : Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

-

26
4
44

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

P a cific

100

100

100

96

99

100

_

1
2

_

11

(2)
14
13
13
4
41

-

1

14

4

-

5
-

22
68

i

-

-

10
11
79
-




Table 45. Paid Vacations
(P ercen t o f production w orkers in footwear manufacturing establishments with form al provisions fo r paid vacations
after selected periods of service, United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)
United
States 1

Vacation policy

AU w ork ers_________________________________

100

New
England

100

Middle
Atlantic

100

B order
States

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

P a cific

100

100

100

100

95
71
23
-

99
76
23
-

100

100
90
10

5

100

Southwest

(2)

-

94

Method o f payment
W orkers in establishments providing
paid vac ations________ ____________ ________ _
L en gth -of-tim e paym ent___ ____ _________
Percen tage payment----- _-------------------------O th er_______________________________________
W orkers in establishments providing
no paid vacations----------- ----------------- -------Amount of vacation pay 3

A fter 1 year of service:
Under 1 week-_-_______ _____ ________-_______ 1 we e k——— ——— — —— ——— —— —— —— —
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s -----------------------2 w e e k s ----- — ------------------------------------A fter 3 years of service:
Under 1 week_______________________________ _
.............. . ..........
1 wook
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ___________________
2 w eek s____ ________________________________
A fte r 5 years o f service:
Under 1 week___________________ ____________
1 week_______________________________________ —
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s -----------------------2 w e e k s __________ _____ ________________ __
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s-----------------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------A fte r 10 years of service:
Under 1 week_______________ ________________
1 week_________________ _____________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s -----------------------2 w e e k s _______________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______ ____________
3 w eek s------------------------------------------------

100

99
63
36
(2)

99
50
49
( 2)

1

1

1
1

3
93
3

( 2)
99
_
-

88

90
3
5

3
92
( 2)
4

(2)
93

88

86
8

1
15
1

2
16
1

( 2)
24
3
71
-

4
96
-

27
_

( 2)

4
96
_
-

68

4
_
56
39

27
_
36
32

( 2)
19
72

1
6
1

4
19
77
_

-

-

27
_
36
32
_
“

2
94
(2)

2

1

81
( 2)

79
-

1

2
13
1

1

13
(2)
79
4

2

A fter 15 years of service:
Under 1 week______ ___ ______ ______________
1 week__________ — __ ____________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ___________________
2 w e e k s __ _________________ ____-_________ ____
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -------------------- -—
3 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------

31

A fte r 25 years of service:
Under 1 week------------------------------------------1 week_________________________________________
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s -----------------------2 w eek s----------------------------------- -----------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ___________________
3 w eek s__________________________________ —
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s ___________________
4 w eek s--------------------------------------------------

13
( 2)
52
( 2)
32
(*)
( 2)

1

13
( 2)
54

1

1

2

81
(2)

2

2
1

13
75
-

8

2
1

13
75
-

8
-

99
53
45

6
1

20

74

1

4
( 2)
19
_
72

2
6

1
2
3

95
5
-

9
3

9
3

86
8
-

_

100

_
83
9
7

94

1

_
90
-

5

10

-

3

11

3

2
(2)
98
-

27
-

( 2)

_
-

-

-

100

2

68

-

99
( 2)
-

78

21
1
(2)

28
72
( 2)
28
69

1
2

-

1
94
1
-

3
_
93
3

1

_
3
_
13

1

82

3
_
13
82
_

1

_
-

-

_
89
_
-

11

_
89
_
_

11

_
89
_
_

11

_
89
_
_
_
-

Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
L ess than 0. 5 percent.
Vacation payments such as percent of annual earnings w ere converted to an equivalent tim e basis. P eriod s of service w ere a rb itra rily
chosen and do not n ecess a rily re flect individual establishment provisions fo r progression. F o r example, the changes in proportions indicated
at 10 years may include changes which occurred between 5 and 10 years.
NOTE:

Because of rounding,

sums of individual items may not equal totals.




Table 46 . Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
(P ercen t of production w orkers in footw ear manufacturing establishments with specified health, insurance, and pension plans,
United States and selected regions, A p r il 1965)
Type o f plan 1

A l l w orkers

United
States 2

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

P a c ific

__ ______

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

83
41
41

77
60
17

87
65

91
15
76

80
23
58

94

89
89

36

45
31
14

48
40

15

8

14
5
9

62
62
44
18

63
63
45
18

46
46
33
13

82
82
42
40

-

-

W orkers in establishments providing:
L ife insurance. _______
E m ployer financed___
Jointly financed__
_ ,
A ccidental death and dismemberment
insurance.... . ____ _____ .... _____ _.
E m ployer financed.....___________________
Jointly financed _
„
____
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick lea ve or both 3 ____ ______ __ __ ________
Sickness and accident insurance..________
Em ployer financed___
Jointly financed. _______ ______
Sick leave (fu ll pay, no
waiting p eriod )..________ ________ ___ ___
Sick leave (partial pay or
waiting period )—___ ________ _______ __
Hospitalization___________ _ ____
Em ployer financed._______________________
___ _
Jointly financed—___ ___ ______ __
Surgical insurance
_
__ ___
_
___
Em ployer financed
_ .
Jointly finaneed______________________ .___
M ed ica l insurance ------------------ ---------------___
. . _
Em ployer financed
Jointly financed ___ —______ —____ — .
Catastrophe insurance_____________ _________
E m ployer financed____ _____________ _____
Jointly financed
___
_______ ______
R etirem ent pension.—..______—______________
Em ployer financ ed-------------------- -------- ,
Jointly financed
_ _ __ __^
No plans ___
__ __
r
. . ___

20

1
87
54
33
85
52
33
62
39
23
7
3
4
43
43
-

5

82
48
34
81
47
34

66

38
28

6
2

4
31
31
-

10

22

68
1
66
20
_
20
52
52
41

10

_
90
63
27
87
59
28
40
17
23
3
.
3
15
15
_
3

3
84
42
42
82
42
40
77
37
40
_
_
_
44
44
.

2

26
3
24
78
76
42
34
_

.
95
59
36
95
59
36

68

41
27

20
8
12

42
42
_
5

2
83
37
47
83
37
47
53
28
25
7
5

2

85
85
.

2

10

84

21
_
21
88
88
77
11

12
12

_
_
_
.
.

_
(4)
94
84

_
89
89

94
84

89
89

93
84
9
4
_
4
79
79

77
77
_
_
_
_
67
67
.

10

10

2

11

1 Includes only those plans fo r which at least part o f the cost is borne by the em ployer. L e g a lly required plans such as w orkm en's
compensation and social security w ere excluded; how ever, those plans required by State tem porary disability insurance laws a re included if the
em ployer contributed m ore than is legally required or the em ployees received benefits in excess o f legal requirem ents.
Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 Unduplicated total o f w orkers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately.
4 L ess than 0. 5 percent.
N O TE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items m ay not equal totals.




Table 47. Nonproduction Bonuses
(P ercen t of production workers in footwear manufacturing establishments with specified types o f nonproduction bonuses,
United States and selected regions, A p ril 1965)

Type of bonus

A ll w orkers
W orkers in establishments with
nonproduction bonuses_________________________
Christm as o r yearen d_______________________
P r o fit sharing_________________________ _____
O th er_______________ _______ ______
_____
W orkers in establishments with
no nonproduction bonuses_____________________

1
2

United
States 1

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

100

100

100

26

10
6

50
48
-

19
5
1

74

3
( 2)

90

1

50

Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
L ess than 0. 5 percent.

NO TE:

Because o f rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

B order
States

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

P a c ific

100

100

100

100

100

14

25
16

9

5
-

86

39
13

4
-

-

4

-

-

21
6

75

61

96

8

-

-

100

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Scope of Survey
sh o
or
C la
S ep

T h e s u r v e y in c lu d e d e s t a
e s (e x c e p t h o u s e s lip p e r s a n d
sp o r tsw e a r
(in d u s tr y 3 1 4 1
s s ific a tio n M a n u a l a n d 1 9 6 3
a r a te a u x ilia r y u n its s u c h a s

a t th e

b li s h m e n t s p r i m a r i l y e n g a g e d in t h e p r o d u c t io n o f b o o t s
r u b b e r fo o tw e a r ) d e sig n e d p r im a r ily fo r s tr e e t, w o r k ,
a s d e f in e d in t h e 1 9 5 7 e d it io n o f th e S ta n d a r d I n d
S u p p le m e n t, p r e p a r e d b y th e U . S . B u r e a u o f th e B u
c e n t r a l o f f ic e s w e r e e x c lu d e d .

T h e e s t a b lis h m e n t s s tu d ie d w e r e s e le c t e d fr o m t h o s e e m p lo y in g 5 0 w o r k e r s
t im e o f r e f e r e n c e o f th e d a ta u s e d in c o m p ilin g th e u n iv e r s e l i s t s .

and
p la y
u str i
d g e t)

or m ore

T h e n u m b e r o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s a n d w o r k e r s a c tu a lly s t u d ie d b y th e B u r e a u , a s w e ll
a s th e n u m b e r e s t im a t e d to b e w ith in s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y d u r in g th e p a y r o ll p e r io d s t u d ie d
a r e s h o w n in t h e t a b le o n t h e f o llo w in g p a g e .
In d u str y B r a n c h e s
T h e c la s s if ic a t io n o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s b y in d u s tr y b r a n
o f th e p r in c ip a l ty p e o f fo o tw e a r m a n u fa c tu r e d . F o r e x a m
m e n t's p r o d u c t w a s 6 0 p e r c e n t w o m e n 's M c K a y s h o e s a n d 4 0
( c o n v e n t io n a l- la s t e d ) s h o e s , a l l w o r k e r s in th a t e s t a b li s h m
M cK ay sh oe b ran ch .

c h w a s d e te r m in e
p le , if th e v a lu e
p e r c e n t w o m e n 's
e n t w e r e in c lu d e d

d

o n th e b a s is
o f a n e s ta b lis h
c e m e n t-p r o c e ss
in th e w o m e n '

M e th o d o f S tu d y

D a ta w e r e o b ta in e d b y p e r s o n a l v i s it s o f B u r e a u f ie ld e c o n o m is t s u n d e r th e d ir e c t io n
o f th e B u r e a u 's A s s is t a n t R e g io n a l D ir e c t o r s fo r W a g e s a n d I n d u s tr ia l R e la tio n s . T h e s u r v e y
w a s c o n d u c te d o n a s a m p le b a s i s . T o o b ta in a p p r o p r ia te a c c u r a c y a t m in im u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r
p r o p o r tio n o f la r g e r a th e r th a n o f s m a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s w a s s t u d ie d . In c o m b in in g th e d a ta
h o w e v e r , a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s w e r e g iv e n th e ir a p p r o p r ia te w e ig h t. A ll e s t im a t e s a r e p r e s e n t e d
t h e r e f o r e , a s r e la t in g to a l l e s t a b li s h m e n t s in t h e in d u s t r y , e x c lu d in g o n ly t h o s e b e lo w t h
m in im u m s iz e a t th e t im e o f r e f e r e n c e o f th e u n iv e r s e d a ta .
E s ta b lis h m e n t D e fin itio n
A n e s ta b lis h m e n t, fo r p u r p o s e s
w h e r e in d u s tr ia l o p e r a tio n s a r e p e r fo r m
th e c o m p a n y , w h ic h m a y c o n s is t o f o n e
a n d " p la n t" h a v e b e e n u s e d in t e r c h a n g

o f th is stu d y ,
e d . A n e sta b
e s ta b lis h m e n t
e a b ly in t h is

is d e fin e d a s a s in g le p h y s ic a l lo c a t io n
lis h m e n t is n o t n e c e s s a r il y id e n t ic a l w ith
or m ore.
T h e t e r m s " e s ta b lis h m e n t"
b u lle tin .

E m p lo y m e n t

T h e e s t im a t e s o f th e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s w ith in th e s c o p e o f th e stu d y a r e in te n d e d
a s a g e n e r a l g u id e to th e s i z e a n d c o m p o s it io n o f th e la b o r f o r c e in c lu d e d in t h e s u r v e y
T h e a d v a n c e p la n n in g n e c e s s a r y
to m a k e a w a g e s u r v e y
r e q u ir e s th e u s e o f lis t s
e s t a b li s h m e n t s a s s e m b l e d c o n s id e r a b l y in a d v a n c e o f t h e p a y r o l l p e r i o d s t u d ie d .
P r o d u c tio n W o r k e r s

T h e t e r m " p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s ," a s u s e d in t h is b u ll e t i n , in c lu d e s w o r k in g f o r e m e n
a n d a l l n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s e n g a g e d in n o n o f f ic e f u n c t io n s . A d m in is t r a t iv e , e x e c u t i v e
p r o f e s s io n a l, a n d te c h n ic a l p e r s o n n e l, a n d fo r c e -a c c o u n t c o n s tr u c tio n e m p lo y e e s , w h o w e r e
u t i l i z e d a s a s e p a r a t e w o r k f o r thee o inr m ' s o w n p r o p e r t i e s , w e r e e x c l u d e d .
c f




67

68
E s tim a te d N u m ber o f E sta b lish m en ts and W o r k e rs W ith in Scope o f the S u rvey and N u m ber Studied,
F o o tw e a r M an ufactu ring E sta b lish m e n ts, A p r i l 1965
N u m ber o f
esta b lish m en ts
In du stry bran ch , r e g io n ,

1 and

a re a

23

A l l esta b lish m en ts:
U nited S ta te s 5____ ____ ____ __ ____
____ _____ __
.
N ew England
T _____
M id d le A t la n t ic ___ ________________________
B o rd e r States ______ __
___ ___________ __________________ __
Southwest— _____ ____________ ________ ______________________________
G re a t L a k e s _____________ _______________________________ ________ ____________
M id d le W e s t ______
_
__
_ ________________________________________
P a c i f i c __________ _
M en 's G o o d y e a r-w e lt d r e s s shoes:
U nited States 5
_ ----------------------------------------------------------N ew E n gla n d 6 _______________________________________________________________
B roc k ton , M a ss
_______________________________________________
G re a t L a k e s 6_______________ _______________________________
W is cons i n ___ ___ ___ ______________ ______ _____________________
M id d le W e s t _______________________________________________
M e n 's G o o d y e a r - w e lt w o r k shoes:
U n ited S ta te s 5_________________________________________________
N ew England
. ..
_
___, ___ . .
G re a t L a k e s __________________ __ ______ ___________________
M e n 's c e m e n t-p ro c e s s shoes:
U nited S ta te s 5 __________ _____________________ ___ ___
____
__ _
N e w England
_ _ _ _ _ _________________ _______ _________
Prrfiat T le ft s _ _ _____
W om en 's c e m e n t-p ro c e s s (c o n v e n tio n a l-la s te d ) shoes:
U nited S ta te s 5____________________________________________________________________
N ew E n gla n d 6 _______ ___ ____ __________ __________________________
M a in e _____________ _____ ____________________________________________________
Boston—L yn n , M a s s ___________________________________
H a v e r h ill, M a s s ________________________________________
La w r enc e— o w e l l , M a s s ____________ ________________
L
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s ______________________________________
S ou theastern N e w H a m p s h ire________________________
M id d le A tla n tic 6
„
__ ____________________ _
N ew Y o r k , N . Y ____ «._______________ ____________________
B o rd e r States _______ _______ ______________ _________ ________
S o u th w e s t __________
„
______________________________ _______
A rk a n sa s ______________________________________________________ __ _
G r eat L a k e s _______________________________________ ________ _____ ___________
M id d le W e s t 6________________________________________________________________
M is s o u r i________ ________ ___ __ _______ ____________
________________
P a c i f i c ____ ________ ____________ _____________
L o s A n g e le s —L ong B each , C a l i f _____________________
W om en 's c e m e n t-p ro c e s s (s lip - la s t e d ) shoes:
U n ited States 5______ __ _______________________
_____ _
M id d le A tla n tic _________ _____________________ __________
W o m en 's M c K a y (in clu d in g L ittle w a y ) shoes:
U nited S ta te s 5___________________________________ _______ _______ _ _______
N ew England __________________________________________ ____________________
M id d le A t la n t ic _____________________________________________________________
M is s e s ' and c h ild re n 's c e m e n t-p ro c e s s
(c o n v e n tio n a l-la s te d ) shoes:
U nited S ta te s 5______________________________________________________ __________
N ew England ___ ___________________________________ _____________ _ —
M id d le A tla n tic __ __ __________ ______________________________________
Southwest __________________ _________________________
__ —
------G re a t L a k e s _______ ____ _____ _________ ________ ____ _________ __ __
M id d le W e s t ________________________________________________
M is s e s ' and c h ild re n 's G o o d y e a r - w e lt shoes:
U nited S ta te s 5 ______________ ____________ _______________
M id d le A tla n tic 6___________________________________________
S ou theastern P e n n s y lv a n ia _______________ _________ _
G re a t L a k es , ____ ____
_____ __ ____ ____ ______ ________________
M id d le W e s t .........................................................................................................
M is s e s ', c h ild r e n 's , and in fa n ts' stitch dow n sh oes:
U n ited S ta te s 5 ________ _________________________ ____ ___ ________ —
M id d le A t la n t ic _____________________________________________________________
M o cca sin -co n stru c te d shoes w ith han d-sew n plug:
U nited S ta te s 5 —
------------— --------------------------------- ----------------N ew England _____ _______ — ___________________ _______________
_

W ithin
scope
o f study

657

220

W o r k e rs in esta b lish m en ts

3

W ith in scope o f study
Studied

456
168
95
15
17
67
54

T o t a l4

192 , 661

P ro d u c tio n
w ork ers
173,804
60,400
33,404

Studied
T o ta l

8,077
26,978
19,213
1,435

141,447
53,410
22,633
4,8 69
5,958
24,350
18,309
1,492

11

66,687
37,161
7,2 42
8,959
30,462
20,998
1,608

7

61
25
13
19
14
5

35,917
11 , 340
5,085
9,4 55
5,770
2,683

30,958
9,831
4, 311
7,8 28
4 ,7 8 2
2,472

23, 293
8,645
4,561
7,9 36
4,251
1,845

27

24

8
8

8,5 23

7, 218

2,427

7,499
1,679
2, 113

18

7,8 18
3,884
2,600

7, 208
3,526
2,448

5,792
3,014
2 , 111

81,899
34,618
8,855
4,299
3, 193
4,0 91
2, 332
9,7 38
15, 334
2,705
4, 100
2,673
2,673

65,892
27,803
6,373
3,703
2,549
3,700
1,754
8 , 191
11,502

10,452
10,380
1,263
1,263

74,922
31,888
8 , 122
3,881
2,955
3,833
2 , 192
8,985
13,691
2,293
3,834
2,480
2,480
9 ,4 0 3
9,5 66
9,5 10
1, 133
1, 133

170

22

26
90
62
13
97
35
16
25

20

8

9
24
14

6

254
103
19
16
14
13

6

26
58
17

11

7
7
25
31
30
9
9
27
14

11

5
196
80
14
14

10
11

5

20

39

12

9
7
7
16
27
26
9
9

1 ,8 8 6

1 0 ,2 2 2

6 ,6 9 2

1 ,8 8 6

2, 171

2 ,0 9 0

3,274
2,6 73
2,673
7, 380
9 , 102
9,0 30
1,263
1,263

10
22

5,819
2,704

5,406
2,514

4, 189
1,943

9 , 120

13
3

5, 144
1,053

8 , 335
4 ,6 8 3
987

6 , 367
4 ,0 1 8
733

39
13
7
5
4

28

11

11,013
2, 294

4
3
3
5

2,007
1,264
2, 328

31
13

25

11
6

9 , 106

8

5
4

4
4

2,408
1,482
1, 150
1,237

8 , 207
2, 124
1,294
970
1, 155

23
13

13
7

4,7 68

1 ,8 6 8

4 ,4 40

2,6 33

9
7

3,609
2,718

3,323
2,478

3,410
2, 519

35
19
5

6

10

8

19

1 ,9 0 0

1 0 ,0 9 6
2,076
1,785
1,826
1, 179
2,085

1 ,6 9 2

7,8 54
1,897
1, 184
1,247
959
1,957
7,281
1,999
1,073

896

1, 237

901

1 The regions used in this study include: New England— Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island,
and Vermont; Middle Atlantic— New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; Border States— Delaware, District of Columbia,
Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; Southwest— Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas; Great Lakes—Illinois,
Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin; Middle West— Iowa, Kansas, M issouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South
Dakota; and Pacific— California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.
2 See individual area tables, for definition of areas studied separately.
3 Includes only establishments with 50 workers or more at the time of reference of the universe data.
4 Includes executive, professional, office, and other w o r k e r s excluded from the production-worker category.
5 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown s e p a r a te ly . Alaska and Hawaii were not included in the study.
6 Includes data for areas (or States) in addition to those shown separately.




O c c u p a tio n s

S e le c te d

fo r

S tu d y

O c c u p a tio n a l c la s s if ic a t io n w a s b a s e d o n a u n ifo r m s e t o f jo b d e s c r ip t io n s d e s ig n e d
to ta k e a c c o u n t o f in t e r e s t a b lis h m e n t a n d in t e r a r e a v a r i a t io n s in d u t ie s w it h in th e s a m e jo b
(S e e a p p e n d ix B fo r t h e s e jo b d e s c r ip t io n s .) T h e o c c u p a tio n s w e r e c h o s e n fo r t h e ir n u m e r ic a l
im p o r t a n c e , t h e ir u s e f u ln e s s in c o l l e c t i v e b a r g a in in g , o r t h e ir r e p r e s e n t a t i v e n e s s o f th
e n t ir e jo b s c a l e in t h e in d u s t r y . W o r k in g s u p e r v i s o r s , a p p r e n t i c e s , l e a r n e r s , b e g i n n e r s
t r a in e e s , h a n d ic a p p e d , p a r t - t im e , t e m p o r a r y , a n d p r o b a t io n a r y w o r k e r s w e r e n o t r e p o r te d
in t h e d a ta f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s , b u t w e r e in c lu d e d in t h e d a ta f o r a l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s .
W a g e D a ta
p
p
o
p

T he w age
r e m iu m p a y fo r
a y m e n ts, su ch a
f-liv in g b o n u s e s ,
a y m e n ts, su ch a

in fo r m a tio n r e la t e s to a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly
o v e r tim e a n d fo r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , a n d
s t h o s e r e s u lt in g fr o m p ie c e w o r k o r p r o d u c tio n b o n
w e r e in c lu d e d a s p a r t o f th e w o r k e r s ’ r e g u la r p a y ; b u
s C h r is tm a s o r y e a r e n d b o n u s e s , w e r e e x c lu d e d .

A v e r a g e h o u r ly r a t e s o r e a r n in g s fo r e a c h o c c u p a tio n o r
s u c h a s m e n , w o m e n , o r p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s , w e r e c a lc u la t e d
h o u r ly e a r n in g s ) , b y th e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g th e r a t e
th e n u m b e r o f in d iv id u a ls . T h e h o u r ly e a r n in g s o f s a la r ie d w o r k e r s
s t r a ig h t-t im e s a la r y b y n o r m a l r a th e r th a n a c tu a l h o u r s .
S iz e

e a r n in g s , e x c lu d in g
la te s h if t s . I n c e n tiv
u s sy ste m s and c o st
t n o n p r o d u c tio n b o n u s

o th e r g ro u p o f w o r k e r s ,
b y w e ig h tin g e a c h r a te (o
, to ta lin g , a n d d iv id in g b
w e r e o b ta in e d b y d iv id in g

o f C o m m u n ity

T a b u la tio n s b y s iz e o f c o m m u n ity p e r t a in to m e tr o p o lita n a n d n o n m e tr o p o lit a n a r e a s .
T h e t e r m " m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a ," a s u s e d in t h is b u l l e t i n , r e f e r s to t h e S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l it a n
S t a t is t i c a l A r e a s a s d e f in e d b y th e U .S . B u r e a u o f t h e B u d g e t in 1 9 6 1 .

E x c e p t in N e w E n g la n d , a S ta n d a r d M e t r o p o lit a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a i s d e f in e d a s a
c o u n ty o r g r o u p o f c o n tig u o u s c o u n tie s w h ic h c o n ta in s a t le a s t 1 c it y o f 5 0 , 0 0 0 in h a b ita n ts
o r m o r e . C o n t ig u o u s c o u n t ie s to t h e o n e c o n t a in in g s u c h a c i t y a r e in c lu d e d in a S ta n d a r d
M e tr o p o lita n S t a t is t ic a l A r e a , if , a c c o r d in g to c e r ta in c r it e r ia , th e y a r e e s s e n t ia lly m e t
r o p o lit a n in c h a r a c t e r a n d a r e s o c i a l l y a n d e c o n o m ic a lly in t e g r a t e d w it h t h e c e n t r a l c i t y
In N e w E n g la n d , w h e r e th e c it y a n d to w n a r e a d m in is t r a t iv e ly m o r e im p o r t a n t th a n th e
c o u n ty , t h e y a r e th e u n it s u s e d in d e f in in g S ta n d a r d M e t r o p o lit a n S t a t is t i c a l A r e a s .
M e th o d

of W age P aym en t

T a b u la tio n s b y m e th o d o f w a g e p a y m e n t r e la t e to th e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s p a id u n d e r
th e v a r io u s tim e a n d in c e n tiv e w a g e s y s t e m s . F o r m a l r a te s t r u c tu r e s fo r tim e - r a t e d w o r k e r s
p r o v id e s in g le r a t e s o r a r a n g e o f r a t e s fo r in d iv id u a l jo b c a t e g o r ie s . In th e a b s e n c e o f
f o r m a l r a te s t r u c t u r e , p a y r a t e s a r e d e te r m in e d p r im a r ily w ith r e f e r e n c e to th e q u a lif ic a t io n s
o f th e in d iv id u a l w o r k e r . A s i n g le r a t e s t r u c t u r e is o n e in w h ic h th e s a m e r a t e i s p a id t
a l l e x p e r ie n c e d w o r k e r s in t h e s a m e jo b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . L e a r n e r s , a p p r e n t ic e s , o r p r o b a
tio n a r y w o r k e r s m a y b e p a id a c c o r d in g to r a t e s c h e d u le s w h ic h s t a r t b e lo w th e s in g le r a te
a n d p e r m it th e w o r k e r s to a c h ie v e th e f u ll jo b r a t e o v e r a p e r io d o f t im e . I n d iv id u
e x p e r ie n c e d w o r k e r s m a y o c c a s io n a lly b e p a id a b o v e o r b e lo w th e s in g le r a t e fo r s p e c ia
r e a s o n s , b u t s u c h p a y m e n ts a r e r e g a r d e d a s e x c e p tio n s . R a n g e o f r a te p la n s a r e t h o s e i
w h ic h th e m in im u m a n d /o r m a x im u m r a t e s p a id e x p e r ie n c e d w o r k e r s fo r th e s a m e jo b a r e
s p e c if ie d . S p e c if ic r a t e s o f in d iv id u a l w o r k e r s w ith in th e r a n g e m a y b e d e te r m in e d b y m e r it ,
le n g th o f s e r v ic e , o r a c o m b in a t io n o f v a r io u s c o n c e p t s o f m e r it a n d le n g th o f s e r v ic e
I n c e n tiv e w o r k e r s a r e c la s s if ie d u n d e r p ie c e w o r k o r b o n u s p la n s . P ie c e w o r k is w o r k fo
w h ic h a p r e d e t e r m in e d r a t e is p a id fo r e a c h u n it o f o u tp u t. P r o d u c t io n b o n u s e s a r e b a s e d
o n p r o d u c t io n in e x c e s s o f a q u o ta o r f o r c o m p le t io n o f a jo b in l e s s th a n s t a n d a r d t i m e
S c h e d u le d
w ork ers

W e e k ly

H ours

D a ta o n w e e k ly h o u r s r e f e r to th e p r e d o m in a n t w o r k s c h e d u le fo r f u ll- t im e p r o d u c tio n
e m p lo y e d o n th e d a y s h ift.




70
S u p p le m e n ta r y W a g e P r o v is io n s

S u p p le m e n ta r y b e n e fits w e r e tr e a te d s t a t is t ic a lly o n th e b a s is th a t if fo r m a l
v is io n s fo r s u p p le m e n t a r y b e n e fit s w e r e a p p lic a b le to h a lf o r m o r e o f th e p r o d u c tio n w
in a n e s t a b li s h m e n t , th e b e n e f it s w e r e c o n s id e r e d a p p lic a b le to a l l s u c h w o r k e r s . S im
if fe w e r th a n h a lf o f th e w o r k e r s w e r e c o v e r e d , th e b e n e fit w a s c o n s id e r e d n o n e x is
th e e s ta b lis h m e n t.
B e c a u s e o f le n g t h - o f - s e r v ic e an d o th e r e lig ib ility r e q u ir e m e n
p r o p o r tio n o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g th e b e n e fit s m a y b e s m a lle r th a n e s tim a t e d .
P a id H o lid a y s .
p r o v id e d a n n u a lly .

P a id -h o lid a y

p r o v is io n s

r e la te

to

fu ll-d a y

and

h a lf-d a y

h o

P a id V a c a t io n s . T h e s u m m a r y o f v a c a tio n p la n s is lim it e d to fo r m a l a r r a n g e m
e x c lu d in g in fo r m a l p la n s w h e r e b y t im e o ff w ith p a y is g r a n te d a t th e d is c r e t io n
e m p lo y e r o r th e s u p e r v is o r . P a y m e n ts n o t o n a tim e b a s is w e r e c o n v e r te d ; fo r e
a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t o f a n n u a l e a r n in g s w a s c o n s id e r e d th e e q u iv a le n t o f 1 w e e k
T h e p e r io d s o f s e r v ic e fo r w h ic h d a ta a r e p r e s e n t e d w e r e s e le c t e d a s r e p r e s e n t a t iv e
m o s t c o m m o n p r a c t ic e s , b u t th e y d o n o t n e c e s s a r ily r e f le c t in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n
v i s i o n s f o r p r o g r e s s i o n . F o r e x a m p le , th e c h a n g e s in p r o p o r t io n s in d ic a t e d a t 15 y
s e r v ic e m a y in c lu d e c h a n g e s w h ic h o c c u r r e d b e tw e e n 10 a n d 15 y e a r s .
H e a lth , I n s u r a n c e , a n d P e n s io n P la n s . D
a n d p e n s io n p la n s fo r w h ic h a ll o r a p a r t o f th e
p r o g r a m s r e q u ir e d b y la w , s u c h a s w o r k m e n 's
th e p la n s in c lu d e d a r e t h o s e u n d e r w r itte n b y a
p a id d ir e c t ly b y th e e m p lo y e r fr o m h is c u r r e n t
fo r th is p u r p o s e .

a ta a r e p r e s e n te d fo r h e a lth , in s u
c o s t is b o r n e b y th e e m p lo y e r , e x
c o m p e n s a tio n a n d s o c ia l s e c u r it y .
c o m m e r c ia l in s u r a n c e c o m p a n y a n
o p e r a tin g fu n d s o r fr o m a fu n d s e

D e a th b e n e f it s a r e in c lu d e d a s a fo r m
o f lif e in s u r a n c e . S ic k n e s s a n d a c
in s u r a n c e is lim it e d to th a t ty p e o f in s u r a n c e u n d e r w h ic h p r e d e te r m in e c c a s h p a
a r e m a d e d ir e c t ly to th e in s u r e d o n a w e e k ly o r m o n th ly b a s i s d u r in g i l l n i s s o r a
d is a b ilit y . I n fo r m a tio n is p r e s e n t e d fo r a ll s u c h p la n s to w h ic h th e e m p lo y e r c o n t r ib
l e a s t a p a r t o f t h e c o s t . H o w e v e r , in N e w Y o r k a n d N e w J e r s e y , w h e r e t e m p o r a r y d i
i n s u r a n c e l a w s r e q u i r e e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t i o n s , 12 p l a n s a r e i n c l u d e d o n l y i f t h e e m
(1 ) c o n t r ib u t e s m o r e th a n i s le g a lly r e q u ir e d , o r (2 ) p r o v id e s t h e e m p lo y e e s w it h b
w h ic h e x c e e d th e r e q u ir e m e n t s o f th e la w .
p
a
w
a

T a b u la tio n s
a y o r a p r o p o r tio n
r r a n g e m e n ts h a v e
h ic h p r o v id e f u ll
w a itin g p e r io d .

of
of
b
pa

p a id
th e w
een o
y and

s ic k le a v e p la n s a r e lim it e d to fo r m a l p la n s w h ic h p r o v id
o r k e r ’ s p a y d u r in g a b s e n c e f r o m w o r k b e c a u s e o f il l n e s s ; in
m it t e d . S e p a r a te ta b u la t io n s a r e p r o v id e d a c c o r d in g to (1
n o w a it in g p e r i o d , a n d (2 ) p la n s p r o v id in g e i t h e r p a r t ia l

M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e r e f e r s to p la n s p r o v id in g
d o c t o r s ' f e e s . S u c h p la n s m a y b e u n d e r w r itte n b y a
n o n p r o fit o r g a n iz a tio n , o r th e y m a y b e s e lf - in s u r e d .

fo r c o m p le te o r p a r t ia l p a y m
c o m m e r c ia l in s u r a n c e c o m p a n

C a ta str o p h e
in s u r a n c e , s o m e tim e s r e fe r r e d
to a s e x te n d e d m e d ic a l in s u
i n c lu d e s t h e p la n s d e s i g n e d t o c o v e r e m p l o y e e s in c a s e o f s i c k n e s s o r in j u r y in v o l
e x p e n s e w h ic h g o e s b e y o n d th e n o r m a l c o v e r a g e o f h o s p it a liz a t io n , m e d ic a l a n d s u r g ic a l
m e n t,

T a b u la tio n s o f r e t ir e m e n t p e n s io n s a r e lim it e d to p la n s w h ic h
r e g u la r p a y m e n ts fo r th e r e m a in d e r o f th e w o r k e r ’s lif e .

p r o v id e ,

upon

r

N o n p r o d u c tio n B o n u s e s . N o n p r o d u c tio n b o n u s e s a r e d e fin e d f o r t h is s tu d y a s b o
th a t d e p e n d o n f a c t o r s o t h e r th a n th e o u tp u t o f th e in d iv id u a l w o r k e r o r g r o u p o f w
P la n s th a t d e fe r p a y m e n ts b e y o n d 1 y e a r a r e e x c lu d e d .

12 The temporary disability insurance laws in California and Rhode Island do not require em ployer contributions.




Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions
T h e p r im a r y p u r p o s e o f p r e p a r in g jo b d e s c r ip t io n s
fo r th e B u r e a u 's w a g e s u r v e y s is to a s s i s t it s f ie ld s t a ff
in c la s s if y in g in to a p p r o p r ia te o c c u p a tio n s w o r k e r s w h o
a r e e m p lo y e d u n d e r a v a r ie t y o f p a y r o ll t it le s a n d d if f e r e n t
w o rk a r r a n g e m e n ts fr o m
e s ta b lis h m e n t to e s ta b lis h m e n t
an d fr o m
a r e a to a r e a .
T h is p e r m it s th e g r o u p in g o f
o c c u p a tio n a l w a g e r a t e s r e p r e s e n t in g c o m p a r a b le jo b c o n ­
te n t.
B e c a u s e o f th is
e m p h a s is o n in te r e s ta b lis h m e n t
a n d in t e r a r e a c o m p a r a b ility o f o c c u p a tio n a l c o n te n t, th e
B u r e a u 's jo b d e s c r ip t io n s m a y d if f e r s ig n if ic a n t ly fr o m
t h o s e in u s e in in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t s o r t h o s e p r e p a r e d
fo r o th e r p u r p o se s .
In a p p ly in g t h e s e jo b d e s c r ip t io n s ,
th e B u r e a u 's f ie ld e c o n o m is t s a r e in s tr u c te d to e x c lu d e
w o r k in g s u p e r v is o r s , a p p r e n t ic e s , le a r n e r s ,
b e g in n e r s ,
tr a in e e s ,
h a n d ic a p p e d ,
p a r t-tim e , te m p o r a r y , an d p r o ­
b a tio n a r y w o r k e r s .

A SSEM B LE R

F O R P U L L O V E R , M A C H IN E

P r e p a r e s th e u p p e r fo r la s tin g b y a s s e m b lin g th e c o u n te r an d u p p e r , an d o p e r a tin g
a m a c h in e to ta c k th e u p p e r to th e w o o d e n la s t .
W o r k in v o lv e s :
P la c in g c o u n te r s o n r a c k
o f p a n c o n t a in in g c e m e n t , lo w e r in g r a c k in to p a n to a p p ly c e m e n t to c o u n t e r s ; in s e r t in g
c e m e n t e d c o u n te r b e tw e e n lin in g a n d u p p e r a t th e h e e l; s e t t in g a p ie c e o f w a x o r t i s s u e
p a p e r n e x t to lin in g to f a c ilit a t e r e m o v a l o f la s t a f te r c o m p le tio n o f o p e r a tio n s ; p la c in g
u p p e r o n la s t m a k in g c e r t a in th a t h e e l s e a m i s in c e n t e r o f r e a r o f la s t ; a n d s e t t in g l a s
o n a ja c k a n d p u s h in g ja c k in to m a c h in e w h ic h a u t o m a t ic a lly d r iv e s t a c k s th r o u g h th e u p p e r
in to th e h e e l s e a t a n d h e e l s e a m .
B E D -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
(B e d la s te r ; b e d -la s tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r ; h e e l an d fo r e p a r t la s te r )

C o m p le t e s th e o p e r a t io n s o f d r a w in g th e t o e , o r to e a n d h e e l, o f th e u p p e r o f a
s h o e t ig h t ly o v e r th e la s t . W o r k in v o lv e s : S e ttin g s h o e o n m a c h in e w ith s o le u p , a n d m a n ip ­
u la t in g h a n d le v e r s c o n t r o llin g a s e r i e s o f w ip e r s ( f r ic t io n p u lle r s ) w h ic h d r a w th e u p p e r
o v e r e d g e o f in s o le a t to e o r to e a n d h e e l; h o ld in g u p p e r in p la c e w ith th e w ip e r s ; s e c u r in g
u p p e r a t th e to e in o n e o f th e fo llo w in g w a y s :
(1 ) M c K a y s y s t e m — ta c k in g u p p e r , u s in g
a u t o m a t ic a lly - f e d h a n d ta c k in g d e v ic e , th e ta c k s r e m a in in g in th e f in is h e d s h o e .
(2 ) W e l
s y s t e m — p a s s in g a w ir e fr o m
a n a n c h o r ta c k , w h ic h h e d r iv e s o n o n e s id e o f th e s h o e
a r o u n d th e d r a w n - in u p p e r a t th e t o e , to th e o p p o s it e s id e w h e r e h e w in d s it a r o u n d a n o th e r
a n c h o r t a c k , to h o ld u p p e r in p la c e u n t il it i s s t it c h e d to in s o le b y a la t e r o p e r a tio n ; o
m a y s ta p le u p p e r in s te a d o f u s in g a b o v e m e th o d s .
(3 ) C e m e n t s y s t e m — w ip in g t o e in p la c e
a n d h o ld in g it w ith w ip e r ; t r im m in g o f f s u r p lu s to e b o x , lin in g a n d u p p e r , b y h a n d , c l o s e
to in s o le ; a p p ly in g c e m e n t to in s o le b e t w e e n lin in g a n d u p p e r a t t o e a n d fo ld in g o v e r la s t in g
a llo w a n c e o f u p p e r a n d s t ic k in g it in in s o le .
If th e h e e l a ls o i s la s t e d in th e p r o c e s s , a
a u t o m a t ic a lly - f e d h a n d ta c k in g d e v ic e is u s e d to d r iv e ta c k s th r o u g h th e u p p e r a t th e h e e l.
BO TTO M

F IL L E R

(C u s h io n c e m e n te r ; in s o le f ille r )
F ills d e p r e s s io n in
c e m e n t to fo r m c u s h io n fo r




fo r e p a r t
fo o t.

of

71

sh oe

w ith

c o m p o s itio n

p a ste

of ground

cork

and

72

BO TTO M SC O U R ER
(B o tto m b u ffe r ; b o tto m sa n d e r )
S m o o th s an d c le a n s o u ts o le s o f c o m p le te ly c o n s tr u c te d
r e v o lv in g a b r a s iv e - c o v e r e d w h e e l o f b u ffin g m a c h in e .

sh oes

b y h o ld in g

C U T T E R , L IN IN G , M A C H IN E
C u ts
le a th e r ) b y
in m u ltip le
o n m a te r ia l;
s u ffic ie n t fo
F or

p a rts
m eans
p lie s ,
and d e
r c e to

o f s h o e lin in g f r o m le a t h e r o r f a b r ic a t e d m a t e r ia ls (in c lu d in g im
o f a c lic k in g m a c h in e .
W o r k in v o lv e s :
S e ttin g lin in g m a t e r ia l,
o n c u ttin g ta b le o f m a c h in e ; s e le c t in g p r o p e r d ie a n d s e ttin g it
p r e s s in g le v e r to c a u s e u p p e r a r m to d r o p a u to m a tic a lly o n th e
c u t m a t e r ia l to th e sh a p e a n d s iz e o f th e d ie .

w age

stu d y

p u rp o ses,

w ork ers

are

c la s s ifie d

by

ty p e

o f lin in g ,

as

F a b r ic lin in g (in c lu d in g im it a t io n le a th e r )
L e a t h e r lin in g
C U T T E R , V A M P A ND W H O LE SH O E, H AND

(C a r v e r ; c u tte r , o u ts id e , h a n d ; c u tte r , s a m p le r ; c u tte r o u t, u p p e r ; u p p e r le a th e r
C u ts v a m p s a n d u p p e r s o f s h o e s fr o m
s k in s o r h id e s w ith a h a n d k n if e .
in v o lv e s m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g :
S e le c tin g h id e s o r s k in s o f d e s ir e d t h ic k n e s s a n d
n o tin g lo c a t io n o f d e f e c t iv e s p o t s in m a t e r ia l, a n d d ir e c t io n o f g r a in o f le a t h e r
p a tte r n o n m a t e r ia l in s u c h a w a y a s to o b ta in a m a x im u m n u m b e r o f p ie c e s , a n d
r e la t io n to th e g r a in o f th e le a t h e r th a t th e r e w ill b e a m in im u m o f s t r e t c h in g o f
in p r o c e s s in g s h o e ; d r a w in g k n ife a lo n g e d g e o f p a tt e r n , c u ttin g p a r t to d e s ir e d s h a
b u n d lin g c u t p ie c e s a n d m a r k in g s i z e o n to p p ie c e f o r id e n t if ic a t io n .
C U T T E R , V A M P A N D W H O L E S H O E , M A C H IN E
C u ts p a r ts o
a c lic k in g m a c h in e .
o f m a c h in e ; s e le c t in
ca u se upper arm
th e s iz e an d sh a p e

f s h o e u p p e r s fr o m h id e s , s k in s , o r fa b r ic a te d
W o r k in v o lv e s :
S e ttin g le a th e r o r o th e r s h o e
g p r o p e r d ie a n d s e ttin g it in p la c e o n m a t e r ia l;
to d r o p a u t o m a t ic a lly o n th e d ie w ith s u f f ic ie n t
o f th e d ie .

m a te r ia ls , b y m e
m a te r ia l o n c u tti
an d d e p r e s s in g
fo r c e to c u t m a

ED G E SE T T E R

(E d g e b u r n is h e r , e d g e k itte r )
S h a p e s a n d p o lis h e s th e e d g e o f th e s o le o f th e s h o e b y h o ld in g it a g a in s t
ir o n o f a n e d g e - s e t t in g m a c h in e .
W o r k in v o lv e s :
B r u s h in g a f ille r s o lu tio n o v e r
s o le a s fa r b a c k a s th e h e e l lin e , to f ill a n y s m a ll h o le s a n d to s o fte n th e le a th e r
b u r n is h in g o p e r a tio n ; s e le c t in g p r o p e r s iz e ir o n b u r n is h in g b lo c k a n d s e ttin g s t e m
in to m a c h in e h o ld e r ; h e a t in g
ir o n to p r o p e r t e m p e r a t u r e ; h o ld in g e d g e o f s o le
r e v o lv in g s u r f a c e o f h e a te d ir o n , m a n ip u la tin g s h o e u n til e n t ir e e d g e h a s b e e n b u r n is h
a p p ly in g a c o a t in g o f w a x to e d g e o f s o le a n d r e p e a tin g b u r n is h in g o p e r a tio n .
E D G E T R IM M E R

( E d g e - t r im m in g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r ; t r im m e r , a p e x ; t r im m e r , m a r g in )
T r im s , c u ts to s i z e , a n d s m o o th s th e e d g e o f s h o e s b y tu r n in g a n d m a n ip
th e s id e s u r f a c e s o f th e s o le s a g a in s t th e r e v o lv in g c u ttin g to o l o f a n e d g e -tr im m in g m
F A N C Y S T IT C H E R
(A p p liq u e s t it c h e r ; b lin d - r o w
s titc h in g ; tr im m in g s titc h e r )
su ch

as




s titc h e r ;

e tc h in g

s titc h e r ;

e y e le t-r o w

s titc h e r ; s

O p e r a te s a p o w e r - d r iv e n s e w in g m a c h in e to s t it c h d e c o r a tiv e d e s ig n s o n s h o e u
o u tlin in g e y e le t r o w , s t itc h in g im it a t io n fo x in g s o r fa n c y p a n e l d e s ig n s ,

73
F A N C Y S T I T C H E R — C o n tin u e d

e x t r a r o w s o f s t it c h in g , a n d s t it c h in g p ip in g a n d o r n a m e n t a l le a t h e r s t r ip s (a p p liq u e ).
W ork
in v o lv e s :
I n s e r tin g m a t e r ia l u n d e r th e p r e s s e r fo o t a n d n e e d le o f m a c h in e ; d e p r e s s in g le v e r
to s t a r t m a c h in e ; a n d g u id in g m a t e r ia l b y h a n d ( u s u a lly a lo n g p r e v io u s ly m a r k e d lin e s o n
m a te r ia l) a s s titc h in g is p e r fo r m e d .
F L O O R B O Y (O R G IR L )
( A s s e m b ly b o y ; flo o r m a n ; r o u te r )
K e e p s s t o c k a n d d is t r ib u t e s p a r t ia lly f in is h e d m a t e r ia ls u s e d in th e m a n u f a c t u r e o f
fo o tw e a r to v a r io u s d e p a r t m e n ts to k e e p w o r k e r s s u p p lie d w ith m a t e r ia l, u s in g tr u c k o
c a r r y in g m a t e r ia l. M a y p e r f o r m s im p le m a c h in e o p e r a tio n s u n d e r d ir e c t io n o f f o r e m a n , s u c h
a s t e m p e r in g s o le s a n d m o ld in g e d g e s o f s o le s .
G O O D Y E A R S T IT C H E R
O p e r a te s a G o o d y e a r s t itc h in g m a c h in e to a tta c h th e o u ts o le to th e
W o r k in v o lv e s :
S e ttin g th e s h o e , s o le s id e u p , o n ta b le r e s t o f m a c h in e
a n d g u id in g s h o e w ith h a n d a s n e e d le s e w s a r o u n d s h a n k a n d f o r e p a r t
e x te n d in g fr o m a c h a n n e l th a t w a s c u t fo r it in b o tto m o f o u t s o le , th r o u g
s u r fa c e o f w e lt.
T h e w e lt e x te n d s a r o u n d th e e d g e o f th e s o le a s fa r
o f th e h e e l.

w e lt o f th e s h o e .
u n d e r n e a th n e e d le
o f s h o e , th e s titc h
h o u t s o le to u p p e r
b a c k a s th e b r e a s

H E E L A T T A C H E R , M A C H IN E
(L e a th e r o r r u b b e r h e e l a tta c h e r ; h e e lin g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r ; le a th e r h e e le r )
N a ils h e e ls to s h o e s b y m a c h in e .
W o rk in v o lv e s :
P la c in g s h o e o n a m e ta l
a n d p u ttin g h e e l in p o s it io n o n s h o e ; s w in g in g n a il p la t e in to p la c e o v e r th e h e e l
n a ils a r e d r o p p e d a u t o m a t ic a lly in to a n o th e r p la t e o v e r th e h e e l; a n d m a n ip u la tin g fo o t
to d r iv e n a ils th r o u g h h e e l a n d h e e l s e a t a n d c lin c h th e m to in s o le o n in s id e o

m o ld
w her
le v e r
f sh oe

H E E L F L A N G E R (S T IT C H D O W N S H O E S )
(H e e l fo r m e r )
th e
h ee
w ip
dow

O p e ra te
la s t , w ith
l s e a t o f th e
e r p la te s to
n o n to th e

s a m a c h in e to d r a w th e h e e l
th e e d g e o f th e u p p e r a n d lin in g
la s t.
W o rk in v o lv e s :
S e ttin g sh
sm o o th an d sh a p e th e h e e l s e c tio n
p r o je c tin g e d g e o f th e o u t s o le .

s e c tio n o f th e u p p e r o f a sh o e tig
tu r n e d o u t, to s e c u r e a sn u g fit
o e o n m a c h in e a n d d e p r e s s in g le v
a n d p r e s s th e p r o je c tin g e d g e o f

h tly o v e r
a r o u n d th e
e r c a u s in g
th e u p p e r

T h is o p e r a t io n is u s u a lly p e r f o r m e d a f t e r th r e a d la s t in g .
O n s o m e in fa n ts ' s h o e s ,
h o w e v e r , th is o p e r a tio n e lim in a te s th r e a d la s tin g .
C e m e n t is a p p lie d to e d g e s o f u p p e r
lin in g , a n d o u t s o le , a n d m a c h in e
s im u lta n e o u s ly la s t s an d s m o o th s o u t th e h e e l s e a t
H E E L -S E A T F IT T E R , H A N D
T
in v o lv e s :
concave
co n fo rm
w o m e n 's

r im s th e h e e l s e a t o f a s h o e b y
U s in g a h a n d k n ife to t r im
s h a p e , a n d m o ld in g th e h e e l
w ith th e b a s e o f th e h e e l to b
h ig h q u a lity s h o e s .

h a n d in p r e p a r a t io n f o r a t t a c h in g th e h e e l .
W ork
th e h e e l s e a t o f th e o u ts id e o f th e s h o e to g iv e it
s e a t b y p o u n d in g w ith a h a m m e r , th e n s h a p in g it to
e a tta c h e d .
T h is o p e r a t io n i s u s u a lly p e r f o r m e d o n

H E E L -S E A T F IT T E R , M A C H IN E

O p e r a te s a m a c h in e to c u t o u t a p ie c e a r o u n d th e o u te r m a r g in o f th e h e e l s e a t,
p r e p a r a to r y to h e e l a tta c h in g .
W o r k in v o lv e s :
S e ttin g g a g e o n m a c h in e fo r s iz e o f h e e l to
b e f it t e d a n d a d j u s t in g p in s t o p f o r r ig h t o r le f t s h o e ; p r e s s in g s h o e a g a in s t s t a t io n a r y h o r i ­
z o n t a l k n ife in m a c h in e to c u t th r o u g h th e h e e l s e a t b e tw e e n th e u p p e r a n d th e s o le u n ti
c o u n te r o f s h o e s t r ik e s a s t o p g a g e ; a n d o p e r a tin g m a c h in e w h ic h a u t o m a t ic a lly c u t s o u t a
U -s h a p e d p ie c e fr o m th e h e e l s e a t s o th a t th e h e e l fits p r o p e r ly w h e n a tta c h e d .
T h is m a c h in e
o p e r a t io n i s u s u a lly p e r f o r m e d o n w o m e n 's p o p u la r a n d m e d iu m - p r ic e d s h o e s .




74
H E E L -SE A T L A ST E R
O p e r a t e s a h e e i - s e a t - l a s t i n g m a c h in e w h ic h d r a w s th e h e e l s e c t io n o f th e s h o e
tig h tly o v e r th e la s t a n d a u to m a tic a lly ta c k s th e e d g e s to th e h e e l s e a t o f th e in s o le
in v o lv e s :
S e ttin g s h o e o n m a c h in e a n d m a n ip u la tin g c o n t r o ls w h ic h c a u s e th e w ip e
to d r a w th e u p p e r a n d lin in g e v e n ly o v e r th e h e e l s e a t a n d m a c h in e a u to m a tic a lly d r iv e
th r o u g h u p p e r an d in s o le .
IN S E A M E R
(G o o d y e a r - w e lt - s e w in g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r ; w e lt s e w e r ;
O p e r a t e s a G o o d y e a r s t itc h in g m a c h in e th a t s e w
a u to m a tic a lly fe d fr o m
a r o ll o n th e m a c h in e to th e
in v o lv e s :
G u id in g s h o e , s o le u p w a r d , u n d e r n e e d le o f
u pper,
and
lin in g ,
an d in s o le
lip
a g a in s t w h ic h
u

e p p le r w e lte r )
s a n a r r o w s tr ip o f le a th e r
lip o f th e in s o le o f th e s h o e
m a c h in e a n d s t itc h in g th r o u
p p er and
lin in g
have bee

IN S P E C T O R (C R O W N E R )
(E x a m in e r )
E x a m in e s s h o e p a r t s , p a r t ly fin is h e d s h o e s in v a r io u s
f in is h e d s h o e s b e f o r e p a c k in g .
W o rk in v o lv e s in s p e c tin g fo r
I r r e g u la r ity o f le a th e r s u r f a c e s ; m is p la c e d o r in c o m p le te ly d
in c o r r e c t a m o u n t o f s titc h in g ; in s id e m is a lin e m e n t ; a n d im p r o p e r
c o r r e c t m in o r d e f e c t s o r im p e r f e c t io n s a n d r e j e c t m a jo r d e f e c t s
d e p a r tm e n t.

sta g e s o f m a n u fa ctu
th e fo llo w in g im p e r
r iv e n ta c k s ; u n e v e n n
p r o p o r tio n o f to e tip
fo r r e p r o c e s s in g in

JA N IT O R
C le a n s a n d k e e p s in a n o r d e r ly c o n d itio n f a c t o r y w o r k in g a r e a s a n d w a s h
o r p r e m is e s o f a n o f fic e , a p a r tm e n t h o u s e , o r c o m m e r c ia l o r o th e r e s ta b lis h m e n t.
in v o lv e a c o m b in a tio n o f th e fo llo w in g : S w e e p in g , m o p p in g o r s c r u b b in g , a n d p o lis h in g
r e m o v in g c h ip s , t r a s h , a n d o th e r r e f u s e ; d u s tin g e q u ip m e n t, f u r n itu r e o r f ix t u r e s ; p
m e t a l f ix t u r e s o r t r im m in g s ; p r o v id in g s u p p lie s a n d m in o r m a in te n a n c e s e r v ic e s ; a n d c
l a v a t o r i e s , s h o w e r s , a n d r e s t r o o m s . W o r k e r s w h o s p e c i a l i z e in w in d o w w a s h in g a r e e x
J O IN T E R , M A C H IN E
(J o in t c u t t e r , m a c h in e ; jo in te r ; jo in t m a k e r , m a c h in e )
T r im s a n d s h a p e s o n a jo in tin g m a c h in e th e e d g e o f th e sh a n k s o le o f s h o e s
jo in t b e tw e e n s h a n k a n d h e e l, s t a r t in g w h e r e e d g e t r im m e r le a v e s o ff a n d c o n tin u in
h e e l lin e .
H o ld s s h o e a g a in s t k n if e o f jo in tin g m a c h in e ; a n d m o v e s s h o e a g a in s t
m a in ta in e v e n p r e s s u r e fo r a n e a t tr im m in g .
L IT T L E W A Y S T IT C H E R
O p e r a te s a lo c k s t it c h s e w in g m a c h in e to a tta c h th e o u t s o le b y s t itc h in g th r o u
u p p e r , lin in g , a n d in s o le o f s h o e , e x c e p t a t h e e l s e a t .
W o rk in v o lv e s :
S e ttin g t
s o le s id e u p , o n s h o e r e s t o f m a c h in e b e n e a t h n e e d le a n d g u id in g s h o e w ith h a n d a
s e w s a ro u n d th e sh a n k an d fo r e p a r t o f sh o e .
M cK A Y S T IT C H E R
O p
c h a in s titc h
in v o lv e s :
g u id in g s h

e r a te s a M c K a y s e w in g m a c h in e to a tta c h th e o u t s o le , m id s o le , o r p la t fo
in g th r o u g h th e u p p e r , lin in g , a n d in s o le o f s h o e , e x c e p t a t h e e l s e a
S e ttin g th e s h o e , s o le s id e u p , o n s h o e r e s t o f m a c h in e u n d e r n e a th n e e
o e w ith h a n d a s n e e d le s e w s a r o u n d th e s h a n k a n d f o r e p a r t o f s h o e .

M E C H A N IC , M A IN T E N A N C E

R e p a ir s m a c h in e r y o r m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t o f a n e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W o rk in
m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g :
E x a m in in g m a c h in e s a n d m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t to d ia g n o s e s o
tr o u b le ; d is m a n t lin g o r p a r t ly d is m a n t lin g m a c h in e s a n d p e r f o r m in g r e p a ir s th a
in v o lv e th e u s e o f h a n d to o ls in s c r a p in g a n d fit t in g p a r t s ; r e p la c in g b r o k e n o r d e f e c t iv
w ith it e m s o b ta in e d fr o m s to c k ; o r d e r in g th e p r o d u c tio n o f a r e p la c e m e n t p a r t b y a




75
M E C H A N I C , M A I N T E N A N C E — C o n tin u e d

s h o p o r s e n d in g o f th e m a c h in e to a m a c h in e s h o p fo r m a jo r r e p a ir s ; p r e p a r in g w r itt e n s p e c i ­
f ic a t io n s fo r m a jo r r e p a ir s o r fo r th e p r o d u c tio n o f p a r t s o r d e r e d fr o m m a c h in e sh o p ; a n
r e a s s e m b lin g m a c h in e s , a n d m a k in g a l l n e c e s s a r y a d j u s t m e n t s fo r o p e r a t io n . In g e n e r a l, th e
w o r k o f a m a in te n a n c e m e c h a n ic r e q u ir e s r o u n d e d tr a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d
th r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t tr a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .
E x c lu d e d fr o m th is
c la s s if ic a t io n a r e w o r k e r s w h o s e p r im a r y d u tie s in v o lv e s e t t in g u p o r a d ju s tin g m a c h in e s
a n d w o r k e r s w h o s p e c ia liz e in th e a d ju s t m e n t a n d r e p a ir o f a p a r t ic u la r ty p e o f m a c h in e a n d
w h o s e p e r io d o f tr a in in g is s u b s t a n t ia lly s h o r te r th a n th a t r e q u ir e d fo r a m a in te n a n c e m e
c h a n ic a s d e s c r ib e d a b o v e .
F A S T E R , B A C K E R , O R F IT T E R , U P P E R , H A N D

(B a c k e r ; b a c k in g p a s t e r ; b a c k in g c e m e n t e r ; c a n v a s b a c k e r , u p p e r ; c e m e n t e r , u p p e r to
lin in g ; f it t e r , u p p e r to lin in g ; p a s t e r , lin e a n d b r u s h , h a n d ; p a s t e r ; p la in p a s t e r ; r e in ­
f o r c e r , p a s t e r ; q u a r te r a n d lin in g f it t e r ; u p p e r d o u b le r )

R e in f o r c e s v a m p s , t o p s , s t r a p s , a n d o th e r p a r ts o f s h o e s , b y p a s tin g to e a c h a
p ie c e o f c u t - t o - s i z e c a n v a s , th in le a t h e r , o r o t h e r lin in g m a t e r ia l (d o u b le r ) .
W o rk in v o lv e
o n e o r m o r e o f th e fo llo w in g :
P r e s s in g d o u b le r a g a in s t c e m e n t - c o v e r e d r o ll a n d s t ic k in
d o u b le r to le a t h e r p a r t s ; u s in g b a c k in g ta p e w h ic h is s o p r e p a r e d th a t it s t ic k s w h e n p r e s s e d
o n o t h e r m a t e r ia l w ith a h o t ir o n .
M a y p a s t e r e in fo r c in g o v e r o n ly a p o r tio n o f u p p e r th a
is e x p o s e d to e x t r a w e a r o r s t r a in . M a y u s e s im p le m a c h in e to a p p ly g lu e o r o th e r a d h e s iv e s
to v a r io u s p a r ts o f s h o e .
P L A T F O R M -C O V E R
(W r a p p e r la s te r
O p e ra tes a
p la tfo r m a n d h e e l.
fo r m
o r p la tfo r m
w h ic h w ip e s p r e v io
h e e l; an d r e m o v in g

L A S T E R (S L IP -L A S T E D

SH O ES)

)

m a c h in e to s m o o th p la tfo r m c o v e r o r w r a p p e r a r o u n d th e p la tfo r m o r
W o r k in v o lv e s : S e ttin g u p p e r (in to w h ic h la s t h a d b e e n in s e r t e d a n d p la t
a n d h e e l h a d b e e n p r e v io u s ly p o s itio n e d ) in to m a c h in e ; s t a r t in g m a c h in e
u s ly c e m e n t e d c o v e r o r w r a p p e r tig h tly a r o u n d p la t fo r m o r p la tfo r m a n d
w o r k fr o m m a c h in e a n d e x a m in in g fo r m a in te n a n c e o f q u a lity s t a n d a r d s .

P L A T F O R M -C O V E R S T IT C H E R (S L IP -L A S T E D
(W r a p p e r s titc h e r )
O p e r a te s a p o w e r -d r iv e
c o v e r s o n s h o e u p p e r s w h ic h a r e
F ittin g th e p la tfo r m
and h eel
u n d e r n e e d le , s ta r tin g m a c h in
m o v in g c o m p le te d w o r k fr o m m

SH O ES)

n

s e w in g m a c h in e to s t it c h p la t fo r m c o v e r s a n d a ls o h e e l
to b e p r o c e s s e d b y th e s lip - la s te d m e th o d .
W o rk in v o lv e s
c o v e r ( s t r ip o f le a t h e r o r c lo th ) to th e u p p e r ; p la c in g w o r
e , s t e e r in g w o r k a g a in s t g u id e fo r p r o p e r s t itc h in g ; a n d r e
a c h in e .

P U L L O V E R -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
( P u l l e r s - o v e r , m a c h in e )
O p e r a t e s a m a c h in e in w h ic h th e u p p e r a t th e to e a n d a lo n g th e s id e s o f th e fr o n t
o f th e s h o e is p u lle d o v e r a n d ta c k e d t e m p o r a r ily to th e la s t to g iv e p r e lim in a r y s h a p in
to th e fr o n t p a r t o f th e u p p e r a n d to a tta c h it to th e in s o le a n d th e la s t .
W o rk in v o lv e s
S e ttin g s h o e in h o ld in g jig o f m a c h in e ; d e p r e s s in g le v e r to r o t a t e m e c h a n is m th a t c l o s e
to p a n d s id e ja w s o n e d g e o f u p p e r ; p o s itio n in g u p p e r o n la s t b y m a n ip u la tin g tip le v e r
to a lin e c e n t e r o f u p p e r o n c e n t e r o f la s t , d e p r e s s in g le v e r to r o ta te m e c h a n is m th r o u g
s e c o n d h a lf o f t r a v e l, a n d to d r iv e ta c k s a t to e a n d a lo n g th e s id e o f th e s h o e , w h ic h h o l
u p p e r in p o s itio n u n til s t a p le d o r ta c k e d a lo n g e n t ir e e d g e .
R E P A IR E R
(B le m is h r e m o v e r )
C o r r e c t s im p e r f e c t io n s in th e f in is h o f th e c o m p le te d s h o e .
W o r k in v o lv e s m o s t o f
th e fo llo w in g : R e m o v in g s t a in s ,
s c r a t c h e s , b le m is h e s , a n d lo o s e t h r e a d s ; a n d b le n d in
v a r io u s s h a d e s o f flu id , w a x f i lle r o r c r a y o n to a f fe c te d p a r t o f s h o e .
M ay u se hand sp ra
g u n w ith c o lo r e d d o p e to c o v e r b le m is h e d a r e a .




76
RO UG H R O U N D ER
(F o r e p a r t r o u n d e r ; r o u g h - r o u n d in g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r ; s o le r o u n d e r )
T r im s th e e d g e o f o u t s o le a n d w e lt o f th e s h o e , b y u s e o f a r o u n d in g a n d c h
m a c h in e s o th a t th e e d g e w ill e x te n d th e d e s ir e d d is t a n c e fr o m s h o e u p p e r .
W ork
S e ttin g s h o e in m a c h in e s o th a t b o tto m o f s h o e is to w a r d th e c u ttin g k n if e , a n d
g u id e r e s t s a g a in s t u p p e r o f s h o e ; a n d g u id in g s h o e in v e r t ic a l p o s it io n a lo n g b o tto m
s o th a t e d g e is tr im m e d a t r ig h t a n g le s to th e b o tto m o f th e s h o e e n tir e ly a r o u n d
im e te r o f th e s o le o f th e s h o e .
T h e m a c h in e m a y a ls o c u t a c h a n n e l in b o tto m
n e a r e d g e , in w h ic h th e th r e a d is e m b e d d e d w h e n s o le s t it c h in g is d o n e .

an
in
bo
o
th
of

SH ANK ER
(S h a n k ta c k e r ; s h a n k - p ie c e p la c e r ; s h a n k - p ie c e ta c k e r )
A tta c h e s sh a n k p ie c e to th e sh a n k s e c tio n o f s h o e

to

su p p o r t th e

arch

o f th e

S ID E L A S T E R , M A C H IN E
O p e r a te s a m a c h in e
D r a w in g o u t lin in g a n d u p p
g ra sp ed g es of u p p er and
le v e r o f m a c h in e to o p e r a te
s id e s an d sh a n k s.
E x c lu d e
a t sh o e sid e s an d sh a n k s.

to la s t th e s id e s
e r w ith h a n d p in c e
d r a w th e m e v e n ly
d e v ic e w h ic h d r iv
s id e la s t e r s u s in g

an d sh a n k s o f th e u p p e r .
W o r k in
r s , h o ld in g s h o e s o th a t p in c e r s o f
an d c lo s e ly a b o u t th e la s t , an d m a n i
e s s ta p le s o r ta c k s th r o u g h th e u p p e r
c e m e n t o r o th e r a d h e s iv e s to s e c u r e

S K IV E R , M A C H IN E , U P P E R O R L IN IN G S
(S k iv e r , o u ts id e )
O p e r a t e s a m a c h in e th a t s k iv e s (p a r e s ) o r b e v e ls
th e m to a n e v e n t h ic k n e s s o r to in s u r e th in n e r s e a m s
jo in e d to g e t h e r . W o r k in v o lv e s : F e e d in g p a r t b e tw e e n p r e s
k n iv e s w h ic h b e v e l e d g e s o r r e d u c e p a r t to u n if o r m t h ic k
o f m a c h in e a n d d e p r e s s in g le v e r to b r in g c u ttin g k n iv e s

sh oe
or
su re
n ess
in to

u p p e r s o r lin in g s to
ta p e r in g e d g e s w h e n p
r o lle r s o f m a c h in e to
, o r s e t t in g p a r t in g u
o p e r a tio n .

S O C K -L IN IN G S T IT C H E R (S L I P -L A S T E D S H O E S )
O p e r a te s a p o w e r - d r iv e n s e w in g m a c h in e to s t itc h s o c k lin in g s to u p p e r s w
b e s lip - la s t e d . W o r k in v o lv e s :
F ittin g th e u p p e r to th e s o c k lin in g a c c o r d in g to
lo w e r in g p r e s s e r f o o t to h o ld m a t e r ia ls , s t a r t in g m a c h in e , f e e d in g s o c k lin in g
u n d e r n e e d le , s t e e r in g m a t e r ia l a g a in s t p in g u id e s ; a n d r e m o v in g c o m p le t e d
m a c h in e .

h ic
m
an
w o

SO LE A T T A C H E R , C EM E N T PR O C ESS

( C o m p o -c o n v e y o r o p e r a to r ; s o le la y e r , m a c h in e ; s o le - la y in g m a c h in e o p e r a to r ;
O p e r a t e s a s o le - la y in g m a c h in e to c e m e n t o u t s o le s p e r m a n e n tly to th e u p p
sh oes.
W o rk in v o lv e s :
S e ttin g to e p a r t o f s h o e o n w h ic h o u t s o le h a s b e e n p o s itio
h e e l p a r t o f la s t d ir e c t ly b e lo w c o r r e s p o n d in g ja c k s (lu g s ) o f m a c h in e ; a n d p r e s s in g a i
(w h ic h o p e n s v a lv e o n p ip e le a d in g to a ir c o m p r e s s o r s t o r a g e ta n k ) to f i l l th e a ir
a n d f o r c e th e s h o e a g a in s t th e j a c k s w h ic h h o ld th e o u t s o le f i r m ly in p la c e w h ile th e
d r ie s .
M a y a ls o , p r io r to p e r m a n e n t a tta c h m e n t o f o u t s o le , b r u s h a c o a t o f s o lv e n t o
in n e r s u r f a c e o f th e o u ts o le fr o m
th e h e e l s e a t to th e to e a n d p r e s s o u te r s o le
b e in g c e r t a in th a t e d g e s o f s o le p r o j e c t e v e n ly o v e r e d g e s o f s h o e .
S O L E L E V E L E R , M A C H IN E
(B e a t e r o u t, le v e lin g m a c h in e ; in s e a m le v e le r ; le v
F la tte n s th e in s o le s o r o u ts o le s o f s h o e s
th e s o le b y th e s titc h in g m a c h in e s .
S e ts sh o e o n la
d e p r e s s e s tr e a d le to s t a r t m a c h in e a n d g u id e s th e
an d fo r th an d fr o m s id e to s id e .




e le r )
w h ic h h a v e h a d a r id g e r a is e d
s t o f m a c h in e w ith s o le u p p e r m
sh o e o n th e fo r m u n d e r th e r o ll

77
TH R EAD

L A S T E R (S T IT C H D O W N S H O E S )

(S titc h d o w n -th r e a d la s t e r ; P u r ita n la s t e r )
O p e ra tes
to in s o le s . W o r k
s e ttin g la s t a n d
a n d g u id in g th e s h

a

s titc h d o w n t h r e a
in v o lv e s :
P u llin g
u p p e r in to m a c h in
o e in s u c h a m a n n e

d -la s tin g m
sh oe u pp er
e , s ta r tin g
r th a t th e fe

a c h in e to la s t s h o e s b y s e w in g s h o e u p p e r s
o v e r la s t to w h ic h a n in s o le h a s b e e n t a c k e d ,
m a c h in e w h ic h s e w s th e u p p e r to th e in s o le ,
e d e r g u id e p u lls th e u p p e r t ig h t ly a r o u n d la s t .

T O E F O R M E R (S T IT C H D O W N S H O E S )
O p e r a t e s m a c h in e to s m o o th a n d s h a p e th e u p p e r le a t h e r a t to e o f s h o e to c o n f o r m
to th e sh a p e o f th e la s t .
W o r k in v o lv e s :
C lo s in g s w it c h to s t a r t e l e c t r i c a l h e a t in g u n it
s e t t in g s h o e o n m a c h in e w ith b o tt o m o f s o le f la t o n b o tt o m p la t e o f u n it a n d w ith p r o j e c t in g
e d g e o f o u t s o le a t to e o f s h o e u n d e r th e w ip e r p la te a n d th e h e e l a g a in s t th e b a c k r e s t ; a n d
d e p r e s s in g le v e r , c a u s in g w ip e r p la te s to m o v e fo r w a r d a g a in s t to e o f s h o e a n d th e n s lid e
d o w n th e t o e , s m o o th in g th e le a t h e r .
If m a c h in e i s n o t e q u ip p e d w ith h e a t in g e le m e n t , s h o e
is h e a te d in s t e a m b o x b e fo r e p r e s s in g .
T h is o p e r a t io n is u s u a lly p e r f o r m e d a f t e r th r e a d la s t in g .
O n s o m e in fa n ts ' s h o e s ,
h o w e v e r , th is o p e r a tio n e lim in a te s th r e a d la s tin g .
C e m e n t is a p p lie d to e d g e s o f u p p e r
lin in g , a n d o u t s o le a n d m a c h in e s im u lt a n e o u s ly la s t s a n d s m o o th s o u t th e to e .
T O E L A S T E R , A U T O M A T IC O R S E M IA U T O M A T IC
O p e r a te s a n a u to m a tic
u p p e r tig h tly o v e r th e la s t.
a c tio n o f w ip e r s , p la c in g s h o e
a n d o p e r a tin g fo o t t r e a d le to
la s t ; a n d w r a p p in g w ir e lo o p
s e c t io n in p la c e o r b y m e a n s

o r s e m ia u to m a tic m a c h in e to d r a w th e to e s e c t io n o f s h o e
W o rk in v o lv e s :
M a k in g a d j u s t m e n t s o n m a c h in e to g o v e r n
in s t e a m e r to s o f t e n to e s e c t io n ; in s e r t in g s h o e in m a c h in e
b r in g w ip e r s a g a in s t s h o e u p p e r a n d d r a w e d g e s a g a in s t th e
a r o u n d t e m p o r a r y a n c h o r t a c k s o n s id e o f s h o e to h o ld to e
o f c e m e n t, ta c k s o r s t a p le s , fa s te n s u p p e r to in n e r s o le

T O P S T IT C H E R
O p e r a t e s a s e w in g m a c h in e to
tr im
o ff e x c e s s e d g e s o f lin in g .
W
a llo w a n c e fo r in s e r t io n o f c o u n te r o r
t o g e t h e r , s e t t in g p a r t s in to m a c h in e
o f u p p e r , a n d g u id in g p a r t s th r o u g h
o p e r a tio n .

s t it c h th e lin in g to th e u p p e r p a r t o f a
o rk in v o lv e s :
F ittin g lin in g to u p p e r to
r e c e iv in g u p p e r a n d lin in g a lr e a d y fit t e d
a t h e e l s e a m , lo w e r in g g u id e d o w n to th
m a c h in e b y h a n d to c o m p le te s t itc h in g

s h o e a n d to
o b ta in p r o p e r
o r ce m e n ted
e e d g e o f to p
a n d tr im m in g

TR EER
(P o lis h e r , u p p e r s; sh o e tr e e r )
C le a n s a n d f in is h e s s h o e s b y r e m o v in g s p o t s a n d
w ith a h o t ir o n to s m o o th o u t w r in k le s .
W o rk in v o lv e s
o n a tr e e in g fo r m , th e sh a p e o f th e la s t , a n d d e p r e s s in
w i l l f i t t i g h t ly o v e r it; b r u s h in g , c l e a n in g , d r e s s i n g a n d
o f le a t h e r o r m a t e r ia l; a p p ly in g c o lo r s t a in o r b le a c h to
w r in k le s in th e u p p e r s w ith a h o t ir o n .

d i s c o l o r a t i o n s , a n d r u b b in g u p p e r s
m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g : S e ttin g sh o e
g l e v e r e x p a n d in g f o r m s o t h a t s h o .e
f in is h in g s h o e a c c o r d in g to th e k in d
b le m is h e d s p o t s ; a n d s m o o th in g o u t

D o n o t in c lu d e s h o e d r e s s e r s , w h o m a y b e c a lle d
o n ly a m in o r p a r t o f th e w o r k d e s c r ib e d a b o v e .

tr e e r s

in

so m e

p la n ts b u t p e r f o r m

V A M PER

(V a m p c lo s e r ; v a m p s titc h e r ; z ig z a g s e a m e r )
B y u s e o f a p o w e r -d r iv e n s e w in g m a c h in e , s e w s to g e th e r th e fo r e p a r t o f th e u p p e r
(tip a n d v a m p ) a n d th e tw o q u a r t e r s o f a s h o e .
W o rk in v o lv e s :
S e ttin g o v e r la p p e d e d g e s
to g e th e r u n d e r p r e s s e r fo o t a n d n e e d le o f m a c h in e ; d e p r e s s in g le v e r to s t a r t m a c h in e a n d
g u id in g m a t e r ia l th r o u g h s t it c h in g p r o c e s s ; a n d s e w in g to p to e n t ir e lo w e r p a r t o f u p p e r w h e n
s h o e h a s a c u t s e p a r a t e fr o m q u a r te r s , o r h a s a w h o le v a m p .
P a r ts a r e s o m e tim e s f ir s t
p a ste d to g e th e r b y a n o th e r w o r k e r to in s u r e m o r e a c c u r a te s titc h in g .







Industry Wage Studies
The most recent reports for industries included in the Bureau's program
of industry wage surveys since January 1950 are listed below. Those for which
a price is shown are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U. S.
Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. , 20402, or any of its regional
sales offices. Those for which a price is not shown may be obtained free as
long as a supply is available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington,
D. C. , 20212, or from any of the regional offices shown on the inside back cover.

I. Occupational Wage Studies
Manufacturing
Basic Iron and Steel, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1358 (30 cents).
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, I960. BLS Report 195.
^Canning and Freezing, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Cigar Manufacturing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1436 (30 cents).
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1472 (20 cents).
Cotton Textiles, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1410 (40 cents).
Distilled Liquors, 1952. Series 2, No. 88.
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1463 (30 cents).
F ertilizer Manufacturing, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1362 (40 cents).
Flour and Other Grain M ill Products, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1337 (30 cents).
Fluid Milk Industry, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1464 (30 cents).
Footwear, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1360 (45 cents).
Hosiery, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1456 (45 cents).
Industrial Chemicals, 1955. BLS Report 103.
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1386 (40 cents).
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1378 (40 cents).
Machinery Manufacturing, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1476 (25 cents).
Meat Products, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1415 (75 cents).
Men's and Boys' Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1964.
BLS Bulletin 1457 (40 cents).
Men's and Boys1 Suits and Coats, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1424 (65 cents).
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1439 (35 cents).
Miscellaneous Textiles, 1953. BLS Report 56.
Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Parts, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1393 (45 cents).
Nonferrous Foundries, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1498 (40 cents).
Paints and Varnishes, 1961. BLS Bulletion 1318 (30 cents).
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1478 (70 cents).
Petroleum Refining, 1959. BLS Report 158.
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1423 (30 cents).
^Processed Waste, 1957. BLS Report 124.
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard M ills , 1962. BLS Bulletin 1341 (40 cents).
Radio, Television, and Related Products, 1951. Series 2, No. 84.
Railroad Cars, 1952. Series 2, No. 86.
*Raw Sugar, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Southern Sawmills and Planing M ills, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1361 (30 cents).
Structural Clay Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1459 (45 cents).
Synthetic Fibers, 1958. BLS Report 143.
Synthetic Textiles, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1414 (35 cents).
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1311 (35 cents).
^Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1957. BLS Report 136.
*

Studies of the effects o f the $1 minim um wage.




I. Occupational Wage Studies— Continued
Manufacturing— Continued
West Coast Sawmilling, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1455 (30 cents).
Women's and Misses' Coats and Suits, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1371 (25 cents).
Women's and Misses' Dresses, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1391 (30 cents).
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1496
(40 cents).
^Wooden Containers, 1957. BLS Report 126.
Wool Textiles, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1372 (45 cents).
Work Clothing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1440 (35 cents).
Nonmanufacturing
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1452 (30 cents).
Banking, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1466 (30 cents).
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1383 (45 cents).
Communications, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1467 (20 cents).
Contract Cleaning Services, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1327 (25 cents).
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, I960. BLS Report 181.
Department and Women's Ready-to-Wear Stores, 1950. Series 2, No. 78.
Eating and Drinking Places, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1400 (40 cents).
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1374 (50 cents).
Hospitals, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1409 (50 cents).
Hotels and Motels, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1406 (40 cents).
Laundries and Cleaning Services, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1401 (50 cents).
Life Insurance, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1324 (30 cents).
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1492 (45 cents).

II. Other Industry Wage Studies
Factory Workers' Earnings— Distribution by Straight-Time Hourly Earnings,
1958. BLS Bulletin 1252 (40 cents).
Factory Workers' Earnings— Selected Manufacturing Industries, 1959.
BLS Bulletin 1275 (35 cents).
Retail Trade:
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade, June 1962 (Overall Summary of the
Industry). BLS Bulletin 1380 (45 cents).
Employee Earnings at Retail Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm
Equipment Dealers, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-1 (25 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail General Merchandise Stores, June 1962.
BLS Bulletin 1380-2 (45 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Food Stores, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-3
(40 cents).
Employee Earnings at Retail Automotive Dealers and in Gasoline Service
Stations, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-4 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Apparel and Accessory Stores, June 1962.
BLS Bulletin 1380-5 (45 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household
Appliance Stores, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-6 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Miscellaneous Retail Stores, June 1962.
BLS Bulletin 1380-7 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the South and North Central
Regions, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1416 (40 cents).

*

Studies o f the effects o f the $1 m inim um w age.




☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1966 O - 221-072




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES