View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

L. 2. 2 :
9-C73

Industry Wage Survey:
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats,
April 1979
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
October 1980
Bulletin 2073




Industry Wage Survey:
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats,
April 1979
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner
October 1980
Bulletin 2073




For sale by the Superintendent o f Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D .C . 20402—Price $3.75




Preface

This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of
Labor Statistics survey of wages and related benefits in
the men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing indus­
try in April 1979. A similar study was conducted by
the Bureau in April 1976.
A summary of the 1979 study providing national and
regional information and separate releases for the fol­
lowing locations were issued earlier: The States of Geor­
gia and Kentucky; Bristol County, Mass.; and the met­
ropolitan areas of Atlantic City and Vineland-MillvilleBridgeton, Baltimore, Los Angeles-Long Beach, New
York, and Philadelphia. For Baltimore, New York, and
Philadelphia, releases were also issued separately for
regular (inside) and cutting shops; and for New York
and Philadelphia, for contract shops. Copies of these
publications are available from the U.S. Department of




Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C.
20212, or any of its regional offices.
The study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of
Wages and Industrial Relations. Sandra L. King of the
Division of Occupational Wage Structures presented the
analysis in this bulletin. Fieldwork for the survey was
directed by the Bureau’s Assistant Regional Commis­
sioners for Operations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program
of industry wage studies, as well as the addresses of the
Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end of this
bulletin.
Unless specifically identified as copyright, material
in this publication is in the public domain and may, with
appropriate credit, be reproduced without permission.

iii




Contents

Page

Sum m ary...............................................................................................................
Industry characteristics..........................................................................................
Employment.......................................................................................................
Location.............................................................................................................
Type of shop .....................................................................................................
Products and processes......................................................................................
Sex of w orkers...................................................................................................
Unionization......................................................................................................
Method of wage paym ent..................................................................................
Average hourly earnings........................................................................................
Occupational earnings ..........................................................................................
Establishment practices and supplementary wage
provisions...........................................................................................................
Work schedules..................................................................................................
Paid holidays.....................................................................................................
Paid vacations....................................................................................................
Health, insurance and retirement plans ...........................................................

1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
4
4
4
4
4
5

Reference tables:
1. Average hourly earnings by selected
characteristics .................................................................................... 6
2. Average hourly earnings and employment
characteristics—selected States and areas.......................................... 7
3. Earnings distribution: All production
workers................................................................................................ 8
Occupational averages:
4. All sh o p s................................................................................................ 9
5. By size of community............................................................................. 11
6. By type of shop...................................................................................... 13
7. By size of shop ...................................................................................... 15
8. By labor-management contract coverage.............................................. 19
Occupational earnings:
9. Atlantic City and Vineland-MillvilleBridgeton, N .J.—All sh o p s............................................................... 21
10. Baltimore, Md.—All shops................................................................... 23
11. Baltimore, Md.—Regular and cutting
s h o p s..........................
26
12. Bristol County, Ma.—All shops..............................................................29
13. Georgia—All sh o p s............................................................................... 32
14. Kentucky—All shops............................................................................... 34
15. Los Angeles-Long Beach—All shops.................................................... 35
16. New York, N.Y.-N.J.—All shops ..........................................................36
17. New York, N.Y.-N.J.—Regular and cutting shops............................... 42
18. New York, N.Y.-N.J.—Contract shops ................................................ 45
19. Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J.—All shops........................................................ 50



v

C ontents— Continued
Page

Reference tables:
Occupational earnings—Continued
20. Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J.—Regular and
cutting shops........................................................................................
21. Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J.—Contract shops................................................
Earnings relationships:
22. Selected regions, States, and areas.........................................................
Establishment practices and supplementary wage
provisions:
23. Method of wage payment .......................................................................
24. Scheduled weekly hours...........................................................................
25. Paid holidays ..........................................................................................
26. Paid vacations..........................................................................................
27. Health, insurance, and retirement p la n s......................................

56
60
63

64
65
65
66
68

Appendixes:
A. Scope and method of survey ....................................................................... 69
B. Occupational descriptions .......................................................................... 72




vi

Men’s and Boys’ Suits and
Coats, April 1979

Summary

two regions—the Middle Atlantic (44 percent) and the
Southeast (21 percent). The Great Lakes and Border
States each employed about one-tenth. None of the re­
maining regions employed more than 6 percent of the
industry’s work force.
Nearly four-fifths of the work force in this industry
were employed in metropolitan areas. All or virtually
all of the workers in the New England, Middle Atlan­
tic, and Pacific regions were employed in metropolitan
areas, as were four-fifths in the Southwest and Great
Lakes; nearly two-thirds in the Border States; and slight­
ly more than one-third in the Southeast.
Nearly one-half of the industry’s workers were in
eight locations studied separately. Employment in these
industry centers ranged from 864 in Los Angeles-Long
Beach to over 5,000 in the New York metropolitan area
(5,836) and Philadelphia (7,116). The other five—At­
lantic City, Baltimore, Bristol County, Kentucky, and
Georgia—each reported employment between 1,500
and 4,100.

Straight-time hourly earnings of production and re­
lated workers in the men’s and boys’ suit and coat man­
ufacturing industry averaged $4.93 in April 1979.1
Average (mean) earnings of the production work force
within the scope of the survey were 24 percent above the
level of earnings recorded in April 1976, when a similar
survey was conducted.2 Excluding the upper and lower
fourths of the earnings array, the middle 50 percent of
the workers earned between $3.80 and $5.79 an hour in
April 1979.
Regionally3 the highest average was reported in the
,
Middle Atlantic States—$5.28 an hour—and the lowest
in the Southwest—$3.63. Nationwide, occupational av­
erages were usually highest among cutting room work­
ers and lowest for janitors and work distributors. Sew­
ing-machine operators, slightly more than two-fifths of
the work force and numerically the most populous oc­
cupational group, averaged $4.90 an hour in coat fab­
rication and $4.80 in trouser fabrication.
Establishments having collective bargaining agree­
ments covering a majority of their production workers
accounted for four-fifths of the industry’s work force.
With few exceptions, contracts were with the Amal­
gamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union (AFLCIO). These contracts usually provided for nine paid
holidays annually; paid summer and Christmas vaca­

Type o f shop. Three types of shops were included in
the survey: (1) “Regular” or “inside” shops own the
materials and perform all or nearly all of the required
manufacturing operations. These shops accounted for
nearly 80 percent of the workers in the survey. (2) Con­
tract shops, employing nearly 19 percent of the work­
ers, perform manufacturing operations on materials
owned by others. The Middle Atlantic region accounted
for two-thirds of the 11,533 workers employed in con­
tract shops. (3) Cutting shops own the material and cut
the cloth, but deliver it to contract shops for the re­
maining processes. These shops employed about 2 per­
cent of the workers.

tions; and health, insurance, and retirement benefits.

Industry characteristics
The 351 establishments covered by the
April 1979 survey—those with at least five workers—
employed 61,408 production and related workers. Na­
tionwide, employment in the men’s and boys’ suit and
coat manufacturing industry decreased by nearly 2,700
workers, or 4 percent, since the April 1976 survey. Re­
gionally, changes in employment levels ranged from
declines of 36 and 31 percent, respectively, in the Pa­
cific and Great Lakes States to a doubling of employ­
ment to 2,847 workers in the Southwest. In the Middle
Atlantic, the largest region, employment fell by nearly
one-tenth.

E m ploym ent.

1Earnings data in this bulletin exclude premium pay for overtime
and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. (See appendix
A for scope and method o f survey.)
2See Industry Wage Survey: Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats April
1976, Bulletin 1962 (Bureau o f Labor Statistics, 1977).

In April 1979, nearly two-thirds of the pro­
duction workers in the survey were concentrated in

Location.




3For definition of regions used in the survey, see appendix A, table
A -l; for definitions o f areas, see tables 9-21.

1

study, the proportion of workers in union establishments
was just over four-fifths in Kentucky, nearly seveneighths in Baltimore, and all or virtually all in each of
the remaining areas, except Georgia where none of the
establishments visited were operating under labor-man­
agement agreements.
In April 1979, the Amalgamated Clothing and Tex­
tile Workers Union (ACTWU) was the bargaining agent
for nearly all contracts in the industry.

Three-fifths of the industry’s
production workers were employed in establishments
which manufactured men’s suits as their principal prod­
uct in April 1979. Plants that primarily manufacture
men’s tailored jackets accounted for one-fourth of the
workers; most of the remainder of the work force were
employed in establishments chiefly producing uniforms.
(See table 2 for selected area detail.) Among the re­
gions, the proportion of workers in plants primarily
manufacturing men’s suits ranged from nine-tenths in
the Pacific to two-fifths in the Southwest and Great
Lakes.
More than 150 distinct operations are required to
make a suit, and more than 75 to make an overcoat.
Although smaller shops have combined many opera­
tions into a single job, the number of occupational clas­
sifications is still relatively large. After a suit has been
designed and patterns made in various sizes, garment
parts are marked, cut, and then prepared for sewing by
fitters who sort, match, and trim small parts and mark
locations for pockets, buttons, belt loops, and so forth.
Workers engaged in sewing usually are assigned a spe­
cific task in the assembly process, such as sewing on
buttons, sewing backs to fronts, or setting sleeves. Dur­
ing the process, seams are pressed and the garment is
inspected periodically for proper workmanship.
Workers engaged in sewing operations, performed
either by hand or machine, accounted for one-half of
the industry’s production workers. Sewing-machine op­
erators made up slightly more than two-fifths of the
work force and greatly outnumbered workers in hand­
sewing operations, v ho usually are employed on high­
er priced garments. The proportion of hand-sewing
workers in the industry has been declining since the
1960’s as machine production techniques have gained
in importance. For example, in 1963, nearly 14,000
workers were engaged in hand-sewing operations. Their
ranks dropped to approximately 7,000 by 1973, and to
2,700 in the current study.
P roducts an d processes.

Three-fourths of the work­
ers were paid on an incentive basis, typically under in­
dividual piecework plans4 Incentive pay systems ap­
.
plied most commonly to markers, pressers, spreaders,
sewing machine operators, shapers, and to most of the
hand-sewing occupations. Regionally, Tie proportions
of incentive workers ranged from slightly more than
one-half in New England to nearly seven-eighths in the
Southeast. In surveyed areas, the proportions ranged
from slightly more than one-half in Bristol County,
Mass., to nine-tenths in Kentucky.

M eth o d o f wage paym ent.

Average hourly earnings
Straight-time earnings of the 61,408 production and
related workers covered by the study averaged $4.93
an hour in April 1979. 5 Regionally, hourly averages
ranged from $3.63 in the Southwest to $5.28 in the
Middle Atlantic (table 1).
The level of earnings in April 1979 ($4.93) was 24
percent above the average recorded in the Bureau’s

4Average earnings reflect not only piecework rates but also work­
er productivity. Earnings for piece rate jobs cannot measure accu­
rately differences in pay rates per unit of work because o f differences
in experience, effort, workflow, and other factors which the individ­
ual may or may not control.
5Straight-time average hourly earnings in this bulletin differ in con­
cept from the gross average hourly earnings published monthly in
the Bureau’s periodical Employment and Earnings ($5.08 in April
1979). Unlike the latter, estimates presented here exclude premium
pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Average earnings were calculated by summing individual hourly
earnings and dividing by the number of individuals; in the monthly
series, the sum o f the hours reported by establishments in the indus­
try was divided into the reported payroll totals. The estimate o f the
number of production workers within the scope o f the study is in­
tended only as a general guide to the size and composition of the la­
bor force included in the survey. It differs from the number published
in the monthly series (74,600 in April 1979) by the exclusion of job­
bers and establishments employing fewer than five workers. Planning
for the survey required that lists o f establishments be assembled con­
siderably in advance o f data collection. Thus, establishments new to
the industry are omitted, as are establishments originally classified in
the men’s and boys’ suit and coat industry but found to be in other
industries at the time o f the survey. Also omitted are establishments
manufacturing men’s and boys’ suits and coats, but classified incor­
rectly in other industries at the time the lists were compiled.

In April 1979, nearly four-fifths of the
industry’s production workers were women. They con­
stituted at least two-thirds of the workers in each re­
gion and outnumbered men in such occupational cate­
gories as fitters, inspectors, sewing-machine operators,
shapers, thread trimmers and basting pullers, and in
most hand-sewing jobs. Men, on the other hand, were
predominant in cutting jobs and in finish-pressing
classifications.

S ex o f workers.

Unionization. Establishments operating under labormanagement agreements employed four-fifths of the
production workers in the industry. On the regional
level, the proportion of workers in union establishments
ranged from over nine-tenths in the Middle Atlantic,
New England, and Pacific regions to one-sixth in the
Southwest. In the eight locations selected for separate



2

April 1976 survey ($3.97). This increase, averaging 7.5
percent annually, resulted mostly from general wage
adjustments granted under a collective bargaining
agreement between the Amalgamated Clothing and
Textile Workers Union (ACTWU) and the Clothing
Manufacturers’ Association of the United States. This
agreement, which expires in September 1980, provided
for a wage adjustment effective October 1, 1979, not
reflected in the survey data6 The wage adjustment pro­
.
vided for a 20 cents an hour increase for workers on a
40-hour week and 22.2 cents for those on a 36-hour
week. In addition, workers on a 40-hour week received
a 10-cent cost-of-living adjustment, and those on a 36hour week, an 11.1 cent adjustment, also effective Oc­
tober 1, 1979.
Hourly averages for men, one-fifth of the work force,
were $5.81—24 percent more than the $4.70 rate for
women. The earnings advantage for men ranged from
9 percent in New England to 27 percent in the South­
west. Women worked primarily in low-paying occupa­
tional categories such as sewing-machine operators and
hand finishers, whereas men were predominant in high­
er paying jobs, such as cutters and markers, finish pressers, and sewing-machine adjusters.
Differences in average pay levels for men and wom­
en may result from several factors, including variation
in the distribution of the sexes among establishments
and, as indicated above, among jobs with disparate pay
levels. Differences noted in averages for men and wom­
en in the same job and area may reflect possible minor
differences in duties. Job descriptions used to classify
workers in wage surveys usually are more generalized
than those used in individual establishments because es­
tablishments differ in specific duties performed. As
noted earlier, earnings in some jobs are determined
! largely by production at piece rates. Incentive earnings
for individuals or sex groupings vary according to work
experience, effort, workflow, or other factors which
the worker may or may not control.
Nationwide, workers in metropolitan areas averaged
$5.11 an hour, 19 percent more than the $4.31 average
for workers in nonmetropolitan areas (table 1). In the
two regions where comparisons were possible, workers
in larger communities held a 17-percent wage advan­
tage in the Southeast, but averaged slightly less than
their counterparts in smaller communities in the Bor­
der States.
Average hourly earnings for the eight centers of the
industry studied separately ranged from $4.05 in the
State of Georgia to $5.54 in the Philadelphia metropol­
itan area (tables 9-21).
Nationally, hourly earnings for employees in shops
with 500 workers or more averaged $5.15; those in mid­
dle-sized shops (250-499 workers), $4.90; and smaller
shops (5-249 workers), $4.69 (table 1). This pattern held
in New England, the Middle Atlantic, and the Southeast,
the three regions permitting comparison.



Workers in plants operating under labor-management
agreements averaged $5.17 an hour, 32 percent more
than the $3.93 average for workers in plants without
agreements (table 1). In the Southeast, the only region
where earnings of union and nonunion workers could
be compared, union workers held a 17-percent wage
advantage.
Nationwide, straight-time earnings of workers in reg­
ular shops averaged $4.96 an hour, 5 percent more than
the $4.72 average recorded for contract shops. Cutting
shop employees—about 2 percent of the work force—
averaged $6.53. In the Middle Atlantic, the only region
permitting comparison, regular shop employees aver­
aged 8 percent more than their counterparts in contract
shops. The national pay relationship by type of shop
was influenced by the mix of regional and area employ­
ment in the various shops of the industry. To illustrate,
about 70 percent of the workers in contract shops, which
tailor goods owned by others, were in the Middle At­
lantic, the highest paying region; however, only 38 per­
cent of the regular shop employees were located there
in April 1979.
About 95 percent of the 61,408 production workers
earned between $2.90 and $8 an hour (table 3). The
middle 50 percent of the production work force earned
between $3.80 and $5.79. About 2 percent of all men
and 7 percent of all women earned between $2.90, the
Federal minimum at the time of the survey, and $3. At
$7.50 and over, the corresponding proportions were 17
and 3 percent. Regionally, earnings near the Federal
minimum accounted for three-tenths of the workers in
the Southwest, nearly one-tenth in the Southeast, and
6 percent or less in the remaining regions. At the up­
per end of the array, the proportion of workers earn­
ing $7.50 an hour or more did not exceed 9 percent in
any region.
The basic survey tabulations did not attempt to iso­
late and measure any of the preceding characteristics
as individual determinants o f wage levels. However, a

multiple regression was run in which the effects of in­
dividual survey characteristics were isolated to a mea­
surable degree. In several cases there were marked dif­
ferences in average earnings differentials produced by
cross-tabulation (simple regression) as discussed in this
section of the report, and those derived from multiple
regression. For example, production workers in metro­
politan areas averaged 80 cents an hour more than those
in small communities (table 1), but apparently only about
three-tenths (25 cents) of the differential can be attrib­
uted solely to classification by size of community. More­
over, for cloth cutters, regression results indicate no
6 Under this contract, wage adjustments also were granted in June
1977, January 1978, and October 1978. Workers also received a
cost-of-living adjustment in October 1978 and October 1979. For de­
tails o f the contract, see “Developments in Industrial Relations,”
Monthly Labor Review, September 1977, p. 45; and Current Wage De­
velopments, July 1977, p. 1 and 8.

3

($5.46 - $4.79). Men final inspectors averaged 8 percent
more in New York than in Philadelphia ($5.44 - $5.04),
whereas women in Philadelphia held a 10-percent ad­
vantage over their New York counterparts ($4.49 $4.09).
Occupational pay levels also varied by size of com­
munity (table 5), type of shop (table 6), size of shop
(table 7), and by labor-management contract coverage
(table 8).
Earnings of individual workers varied widely within
the same job and area (tables 9-21). For some jobs, par­
ticularly those typically paid under incentive systems,
the difference between the highest and lowest paid
worker exceeded $4 an hour.

significant influence of community size on wage levels,
while the cross-tabulated difference of large to small
communities for this classification was slightly more
than $2 an hour. Evidently, other factors closely cor­
related with large community size—unionization and
location in high-paying regions outside the Southeast—
had a large positive effect on the survey differential re­
ported by size of community. (Detailed multiple regres­
sion results are available upon request.)

Occupational earnings
The survey also developed separate earnings infor­
mation for a number of individual occupations selected
to represent the skills and manufacturing operations
found in the industry (table 4). These jobs accounted
for three-fourths of the 61,408 production and related
workers within scope of the April 1979 survey. Nation­
wide, pay levels in the industry were usually highest
among cutting room employees and lowest for janitors
and work distributors. The average for cloth cutters
and markers ($7.13, the highest paid job studied) ex­
ceeded the average for janitors ($4.02, the lowest paid)
by 77 percent. In addition to cloth cutters and markers,
nationwide averages for workers exceeded $6 an hour
in the following jobs: Cloth cutters ($6.98), lining cut­
ters ($6.85), markers ($6.27), and adjusters ($6.05).
Sewing-machine operators, two-fifths of all produc­
tion workers and numerically the most populous job in
the industry, averaged $4.90 in coat fabrication and
$4.80 an hour in trouser fabrication. Their earnings,
however, varied by specific task performed. For exam­
ple, operators who baste front edges and bottoms of
coats with a temporary removable chain stitch (basters)
averaged $5.28 an hour—13 percent more than opera­
tors who make sleeves ($4.68). In trouser fabrication,
operators who sew on waistband linings averaged
$5.32—17 percent more than the $4.55 hourly average
for serging operators who make covering stitches over
raw edges of cloth to prevent ravelling.
In April 1979, occupational pay averages among re­
gions and areas varied widely, as indicated in table 22
which compares nine selected jobs with nationwide av­
erages. Occupational averages were usually highest in
the Middle Atlantic States and lowest in the Southwest.
Averages for most occupations presented for the Mid­
dle Atlantic were from 5 to 15 percent higher than their
respective nationwide averages; in the Southwest, most
averages were at least 20 percent below the correspond­
ing nationwide average.
Occupational pay relationships also varied by local­
ity studied and by sex. In Baltimore, for example, sew­
ing-machine operators making coats averaged 3 percent
more than their counterparts in New York ($5.43 $5.26); however, operators fabricating trousers aver­
aged 14 percent more in New York than in Baltimore



Establishment practices and supplementary
wage provisions
Information was obtained for production workers on
work schedules and on various supplementary benefits
including paid holidays, paid vacations, and health, in­
surance, and retirement pension plans.
W ork schedules. Work schedules of 40 hours a week
were in effect in establishments employing 95 percent
of the production workers. All of the remaining work­
ers had weekly schedules of fewer than 40 hours,
ranging from 28 to 40 (table 24).
Nearly one-tenth of the production workers were in
plants that had provisions for late shifts. The most com­
mon differentials reported were 10 cents per hour or
10 percent over day-shift rates for second shift and 20
or 30 cents for third shifts. In April 1979, however, less
than 1 percent of the industry’s production workers
were employed on other than day shifts.

Virtually all production workers were
in establishments providing paid holidays, typically 9
days annually (table 25). Holiday provisions were some­
what more liberal in the Middle Atlantic and Border
States regions (where most received 9 days and about
one-eighth of the work force received 10 days) than in
the Southwest (where workers typically received 6 days
or less). Where Amalgamated Clothing and Textile
Workers Union (ACTWU) provisions applied, holiday
pay was computed as follows: For time-rated employ­
ees, the rate of pay for each holiday is one-fifth of the
employee’s current weekly rate; for incentive workers,
the pay equals eight times the employee’s straight-time

P a id holidays.

average hourly earnings, as computed for determining
the first week’s summer vacation pay.
Virtually all production workers were
in establishments providing paid vacations after quali­
fying periods of service (table 26). Establishments hav­
ing agreements with the ACTWU usually provided
summer vacation pay as follows: One-half week’s pay

P a id vacations.

4

after 6 but less than 9 months of service; three-fourths
of a week’s pay after 9 months but less than 1 year of
service; and 2 weeks’ pay after 1 or more years of serv­
ice. The first week of vacation pay is computed as fol­
lows: For time-rated workers, the current straight-time
weekly rate; for incentive workers, 40 times the em­
ployee’s straight-time average hourly earnings for the
4 consecutive busiest weeks of the most recent vacation
year (beginning June 1st of the previous calendar year
and ending May 31st of the current vacation year). The
second week’s vacation pay equals the first week’s va­
cation pay for employees with at least 1,000 hours
worked during the year ending May 31; for those with
fewer than 1,000 hours, the second week’s vacation pay
amounts to 2.5 percent of the employee’s straight-time
earnings during the year ending May 31. In addition,
employees with 1 year of service or more on Decem­
ber 1 receive 1 week of vacation pay at Christmas,
computed in a manner similar to pay for the second
week of summer vacation. In computing Christmas va­
cation pay, the vacation year ends November 30. Time­
rated workers receive their current rate minus one-half
of the wage increase, if any, paid on June 1 of the cur­
rent vacation year and minus three-quarters of the in­
crease, if any, paid in October of the current vacation
year. Piece-work employees receive 40 times their av­
erage hourly earnings for the four consecutive busiest
weeks in the vacation year minus one-half of the June
wage increase and one-quarter of the October increase.
For employees in other establishments, typical vaca­
tion provisions amounted to 1 week of vacation pay
after 1 year of service, and at least 2 weeks after 3 years.
About one-third of these workers could receive a max­
imum vacation of 3 weeks or more after 10 years of
continuous service.

cent of gross wages each pay period to the fund. Em­
ployee benefits provided by this fund included $3,000
life insurance; sickness and accident insurance; and sur­
gical, medical, and hospitalization benefits. Surgical,
medical, and hospitalization benefits are also provided
for the families of employees.
Services of a union health center were available to
employees in eight areas—Baltimore, Chicago, Eastern
Pennsylvania, Lehigh Valley, New York, Philadelphia,
Rochester, and Scranton-Wilkes Barre. Employers con­
tribute specified percentages (2 percent or less) of gross
wages to maintain these facilities. In New York and
Philadelphia, employees also contributed to health
centers.
Among other establishments, most workers were pro­
vided life, hospitalization, surgical, basic medical, and
major medical insurance coverage for which employ­
ers typically paid all of the cost (table 27).
Retirement benefits were provided by establishments
employing nearly nine-tenths of the industry’s produc­
tion work force (table 27). For ACTWU members, em­
ployers contribute 6.9 percent of gross wages payable
each pay period to the Retirement Fund of the Amal­
gamated Insurance Fund. The fund provides minimum
retirement payments of $110 a month, in addition to
Federal social security, to qualified workers beginning
at age 65. Additional payments are made to eligible
workers for each year of service over 20 and for aver­
age annual earnings over $5,000 for the highest 5 of the
7 years immediately preceding retirement. There is no
limit on the monthly benefit for employees first eligible
for retirement on or after January 1, 1978. Workers
who retired prior to that date are limited to a maximum
monthly benefit of $200. If otherwise eligible, workers
may retire on disability with full benefits, or at age 62
with reduced retirement benefits.
Retirement pensions, in addition to Federal social se­
curity, applied to about one-half of the non-ACTWU
work force. Employers paid the entire cost of these
pension benefits for virtually all workers covered.

H ealth , insurance , a n d retirem ent plan s .

Health and in­
surance benefits were provided to workers in establish­
ments with ACTWU contracts through the Social In­
surance Fund of the Amalgamated Insurance Fund. At
the time of the survey, employers contributed 6.7 per­




5

Table 1. Average hourly earnings by selected characteristics
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments by selected characteristics, United States and selected regions, April 1979)
United States2

New England

Middle Atlantic

Border States

Southeast

Southwest

Number
of work­
ers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of work­
ers

Average
hourly
earnings

$3.63
4.53
3.56

5,589
989
4,600

$5.23
6.06
5.05

1,038
322
716

$5.15
6.00
4.76

2,273
-

3.73
-

4,556
-

5.39
-

1,038
-

5.15

4.37

1,286

3.74

5,583

5.23

961

5.16

4.36
-

1,074
-

3.86
-

5.28

-

961
-

5.16

-

4,730
-

-

Item

Number
of work­
ers

All production workers3 ...................................
Men ................................................................
W om en...........................................................
Size of community:
Metropolitan areas........................................
Nonmetropolitan areas ................................
Type of shop:4
Regular shops...............................................
Regular shops withCutting and sewing
operations...............................................
Sewing operations o n ly..........................
Cutting shops................................................
Contract shops..............................................
Size of establishment:
5-249 workers ...............................................
250-499 workers...........................................
500 workers or m ore....................................
Labor-management contract coverage:
Establishments withMajority of workers covered....................
None or minority of workers
Covered .....................................................

61,408
12,578
48,318

$4.93
5.81
4.70

3,728
1,079
2,649

$5.00
5.32
4.88

27,075
7,605
19,470

$5.28
6.07
4.97

7,534
6,176

$5.02
4.88

13,027
1,433
11,594

$4.34
4.98
4.26

2,847
209
2,638

47,985
13,423

5.11
4.31

3,728
-

5.00
-

26,759
-

5.28
-

4,827
2,707

5.00
5.05

4,571
8,456

4.79
4.09

48,949

4.96

3,088

5.02

18,383

5.37

6,543

4.96

12,535

39,087
9,409
926
11,533

4.94
4.98
6.53
4.72

2,725
-

5.03

4.98
4.56

11,785
-

4.83

5.48
5.16
6.69
4.95

5,380
892

556

11,890
6,493
752
7,940

20,046
15,895
25,467

4.69
4.90
5.15

1,052
987
1,689

4.88
4.92
5.14

10,859
5,063
11,153

49,561

5.17

3,728

5.00

26,891

11,847

3.93

-

-

1
2
this
3
4

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of work­
ers

-

Average
hourly
earnings

-

Number
of work­
ers

-

Average
hourly
earnings

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of work­
ers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of work­
ers

Average
hourly
earnings

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.01
5.35
5.51

2,650
2,779

4.50
5.34

1,385
5,793
5,849

4.14
4.20
4.52

1,393
-

3.29
-

1,472
-

4.40
-

5.28

6,638

5.21

5,406

4.74

-

-

4,973

$5.29

-

-

7,621

4.05

2,384

3.43

-

-

-

-

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. For definition of regions used in
or subsequent tables, see appendix A.
Includes workers in establishments for which information by sex was unavailable.
Three types of shops are included in this survey: Regular or inside shops which own the




Number
of work­
ers

Pacific

Great Lakes

-

991
-

-

-

-

-

-

5.21
-

material and perform all of the manufacturing operations; cutting shops which own and cut the
material and deliver it to contract shops; and contract shops which perform tailoring operations for
the owners of the goods.

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or data do not meet publication criteria.

Table 2. Average hourly earnings and employment characteristics-selected States and areas
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings,1 and percent distribution of production workers in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)
Percent of production workers in establishments according to -

State or area

All workers

Major product2

Average
hourly
earnings
Men’s suits

States
Georgia...............................................................
Kentucky ............................................................
Areas
Atlantic City and VinelandMillville—
Bridgeton..........................................
Baltimore............................................................
Bristol County...................................................
Los Angeles-Long B each...............................
New York ..........................................................
Philadelphia ......................................................

4,088
3,120

$4.05
4.99

88
73

1,567
2,540
2,732
864
5,836
7,116

4.76
5.22
4.88
5.33
5.26
5.54

48
96
36
92
40
61

Men’s
separate
tailored
coats

Boys’
tailored
coats

23
34
3
50
26

28
4
23

3

10
4

Metro­
politan
areas

Nonmetro­
politan
areas

5-249
workers

250-499
workers

500
workers or
more

10
13

Uniforms

27

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late
shifts.
2 Overall data includes products in addition to those shown separately.




Men’s
overcoats
and
topcoats

Size of establishment

Size of community

90
87

7
11

42
22

51
67

65
36
22
57
81
29

64
36
43
19
28

100
100
100
100
100
100

35

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals,

42

43

Table 3. Earnings distribution: All production workers
(Percent distribution in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, United States and selected regions, April 1979)
"T
United States1
Hourly earnings
Total2
Number of workers ........................... 61,408
Average hourly earnings3 ................. $4.93
Under $2.90 ........................................
$2.90 and under $ 3 .0 0 .....................

Men

Women

12,578 48,318
$5.81
$4.70

_

(4)
5.8

2.1

(4)
6.8

New
Eng­
land

Middle Border
Atlantic States

3,728 27,075
$5.00 $5.28
_

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

7,534 13,027
$5.02 $4.34

2,847
$3.63

5,589
$5.23

_

_

2.2

(4)
3.1

(4)
5.7

(4)
8.0

30.3

3.2

$3.00
$3.10
$3.20
$3.30
$3.40
$3.50
$3.60
$3.70
$3.80
$3.90

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$ 3 .1 0 .....................
$ 3 .2 0 .....................
$ 3 .3 0 .....................
$ 3 .4 0 .....................
$ 3 .5 0 .....................
$ 3 .6 0 .....................
$ 3 .7 0 .....................
$ 3 .8 0 .....................
$ 3 .9 0 .....................
$ 4 .0 0 .....................

2.1
3.0
3.0
2.0
1.8
2.9
2.0
2.4
2.4
2.4

1.7
1.4
2.0
1.1
1.0
3.1
1.2
2.0
1.3
1.1

2.3
3.5
3.3
2.2
2.1
2.9
2.2
2.5
2.7
2.7

.8
3.5
3.2
1.2
.9
5.3
1.7
2.9
2.0
2.2

1.6
1.7
2.6
1.6
1.3
2.3
1.6
1.8
1.9
1.8

2.4
1.8
2.3
1.1
1.2
1.8
1.7
2.0
1.9
2.4

2.8
5.2
2.4
3.7
3.7
3.9
2.9
3.8
3.8
3.5

5.3
11.7
5.4
3.0
3.1
3.0
2.7
4.0
3.4
2.7

1.7
1.7
5.3
1.0
.8
2.9
1.3
1.6
1.4
2.2

$4.00
$4.10
$4.20
$4.30
$4.40
$4.50
$4.60
$4.70
$4.80
$4.90

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$ 4 .1 0 .....................
$ 4 .2 0 .....................
$ 4 .3 0 .....................
$ 4 .4 0 .....................
$ 4 .5 0 .....................
$4.60 .....................
$ 4 .7 0 .....................
$ 4 .8 0 .....................
$ 4 .9 0 .....................
$ 5 .0 0 .....................

3.0
2.5
2.5
2.4
2.6
2.7
2.5
2.4
2.8
2.7

1.8
1.2
1.6
1.6
1.4
2.0
1.5
1.5
2.0
2.0

3.3
2.9
2.8
2.6
2.9
2.8
2.7
2.6
3.1
3.0

3.6
3.0
2.7
1.4
2.5
2.4
2.7
2.3
3.4
4.2

3.0
2.3
2.3
2.2
2.5
2.9
2.4
2.4
2.6
2.7

3.1
2.5
1.9
2.1
2.9
2.7
3.0
2.5
2.7
2.7

3.3
3.3
3.7
3.5
3.0
3.0
2.8
2.6
3.7
2.9

2.6
2.3
2.5
1.7
1.5
.9
1.5
1.1
1.8
.8

1.7
2.0
1.9
2.1
2.0
2.0
2.3
2.5
2.6
2.6

$5.00 and under $ 5 .1 0 .....................
$5.10 and under $ 5 .2 0 .....................

2.8
3.1

2.6
2.3

2.9
3.4

4.2
2.5

3.3
3.0

2.7
5.0

2.1
3.1

.7
.9

2.5
2.8

United States1
Pacific

Hourly earnings
Total2

1,038 $5.20 and
$5.15 $5.30 and
$5.40 and
.2 $5 50 and
2.4 $5.60 and
$5.70 and
1.6 $5.80 and
2.5 $5.90 and
5.2
1.2 $6.00 and
1.1 $6.10 and
2.0 $6.20 and
1.6 $6 30 and
1.3 $6.40 and
1.5 $6.50 and
2.3 $6 60 and
$6.70 and
2.0 $6 80 and
2.2 $6 90 and
2.8
2.0 $7.00 and
2.6 $7.10 and
1.9 $7 20 and
3.3 $7 30 and
2.3 $7 40 and
2.0 $7 fiO and
2.8 $7 60 and
$7.70 and
4.1 $7 80 and
$7 90 and
3.9

Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
Includes data for workers in establishments where sex of incumbent was not identified.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Less than 0.05 percent.




Women

Middle Border
Atlantic States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

Pacific

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$5.30 ...
......
$ 5 .4 0 .....................
$ 5 .5 0 .....................
$5.60
. ..
$ 5 .7 0 .....................
$ 5 .8 0 .....................
$ 5 .9 0 .....................
$ 6 .0 0 .....................

2.7
2.4
2.1
2.1
2.2
1.9
1.9
1.7

2.0
2.1
1.9
2.2
2.6
2.4
2.4
1.9

2.9
2.5
2.2
2.0
2.0
1.8
1.8
1.6

2.4
2.6
1.9
2.5
2.1
2.1
1.9
1.6

2.8
2.7
2.4
2.1
2.6
2.2
2.2
2.1

3.0
2.6
3.1
2.4
2.5
2.1
2.6
1.8

2.6
1.8
1.3
1.4
1.2
1.2
1.0
.8

0.8
.4
.3
.6
.6
.3
1.0
.4

3.7
3.0
2.8
3.0
2.9
2.9
2.2
2.2

2.5
3.9
1.9
4.1
1.3
2.0
1.2
1.7

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$ 6 .1 0 .....................
$ 6 .2 0 .....................
$ 6 .3 0 .....................
$6 40
$6.50 .....................
$ 6 .6 0 ....................
$6 70
$ 6 .8 0 .....................
$6 90
$7 00

1.7
1.4
1.4
1.4
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.0
.9
.8

2.2
1.7
2.1
2.2
1.5
1.9
1.7
1.8
1.4
1.8

1.5
1.3
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.0
.9
.7
.7
.6

1.8
1.0
1.8
2.0
1.0
1.6
1.6
1.1
.8
.8

1.9
1.8
1.7
1.7
1.5
1.7
1.5
1.3
1.1
1.0

2.1
1.4
1.6
1.8
1.6
1.0
1.2
1.2
1.0
.8

.9
.8
.8
.5
.7
.4
.3
.3
.4
.3

.5
.2
.4
.1
.2
.4
.1
.2
i

2.1
1.8
1.7
1.9
1.6
1.4
1.4
1.0
1.0
1.4

2.4
2.2
.9
2.5
.8
1.3
.9
2.0
1.3
2.5

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$ 7 .1 0 .....................
$ 7 .2 0 .....................
$7 30
$7.40
......
$7 80

.8
.8

1.7
1.7
1.6
1.2
1.2
1.3
1.9
1.0
.9
.9

.6

.8
.6
1.2
.9
.5

1.8
.7
.6
.6
.7
.7
.2
.3
.3
.1

.3
.2
.2
.2
.1
.1
.1
.1
.2
.1

.2
.2

.6
.3
.1
.2

.8
1.0
.8
.8
.6
.6
1.0
.6
.5
.5

1.0
1.3
.9
.5
.9
.7
.4
.6
.5

.6

1.0
.3
.7
.6
.3
1.2
.2
1.4
.3
.8

2.8

5.6

2.3

.8

4.6

2.8

$7 fiO

$7 70
$ 7 .8 0 .....................
$7 90

under !|lft OO

$8.00 and o v e r ..................................
1
2
3
4

Men

New
Eng­
land

.6
.6
.5
.5
.6
.4
.4
.3
3.5

*11.1

.5
.3
.4
.3
.3
.2
.3
.2
.2
1.5

.6

(4)

.1
(4)

(4)
.1

5 Workers were distributed as follows: 3.5 percent at $8 and under $8.50; 2.4 percent at $8.50 and under $9; 1.9
percent at $9 and under $9.50; 1.3 percent at $9.50 and under $10; and 2.0 percent at $10 and over.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.

Table 4. Occupational averages: All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, United States and selected regions, April 1979)
New England Middle Atlantic Border States

United States2
Total1
Occupation




Southwest

Great Lakes

Pacific

Women

Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
Num­
Num­
ber of
ber of
Num­
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
hourly
age
age
age
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
work­
work­
ber of
ber of
ber of
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
hourly
hourly
hourly
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
work­
work­
work­
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
earn­
earn­
earn­
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ers
ers
ers
ings
ings
ings

Cutting
Cutters, cloth....................................................
912 $6.98
Cutters, lining...................................................
313 6.85
604 7.13
Cutters and markers, cloth............................
M arkers.............................................................
371 6.27
Spreaders.........................................................
395 5.25
Coat fabrication
Basters, hand...................................................
495 5.48
Button sewers, h a n d .......................................
163 5.07
Buttonhole makers, h a n d ..............................
175 5.02
Collar setters, hand.........................................
155 5.46
Finishers, h a n d ................................................ 1,263 4.80
Fitters................................................................
614 5.43
Inspectors, final ............................................... 1,255 4.32
Pairers and turners.............. ...........................
683 4.72
Pressers, finish, hand ....................................
641 5.91
Pressers, finish, machine .............................. 2,776 5.78
Sewing-machine operators3 .......................... 23,594 4.90
Basters........................................................... 2,688 5.28
Button sewing ...............................................
526 4.90
Buttonhole making.......................................
411 4.88
Collar preparing, except piecing
or padding....................................................
440 5.12
Collar setting.................................................
812 5.21
Facing tacking...............................................
284 4.67
Fell body lining, bottom and
sid e................................................................
760 4.98
Join shoulder, clo th .....................................
426 4.96
Join side seam s............................................
668 4.90
Join undercollar, join sleeve
lining, or piece pockets.............................
1,103 4.85
Lining maker, bo dy......................................
873 5.09
Pad collar and lap e ls ..................................
238 5.14
Pocket setting and tacking......................... 2,040 5.09
Sew darts, cloth............................................
478 5.01
Sew edge ta p e ..............................................
640 5.27
Sew in sleeve................................................ 1,102 5.17
Sleeve making, cloth...................................
970 4.68
Tape armholes..............................................
403 4.88
Shaper ..............................................................
414 5.24
Tailors, all around............................................
398 5.28
Thread trimmers and basting pullers........... 1,344 4.48
Underpressers.................................................. 2,686 5.23
Trouser fabrication
Inspectors, fin a l...............................................
265 4.69

See footnotes at end of table.

Men

Southeast

773 $7.27
7.08
271
541
7.31
230 7.22
267 5.22

131 $5.23
42 5.37
63 5.58
133 4.62
128 5.32

129
10
56
20
135
69
349
1,684
1,236
166
40

5.99
6.32
6.25
5.30
7.13
5.17
6.81
6.45
5.96
5.96
5.85

342
163
165
99
1,243
469
1,186
649
292
1,082
22,230
2,500
503
371

5.29
5.07
4.94
5.01
4.79
4.95
4.27
4.71
4.82
4.76
4.83
5.23
4.85
4.78

28
52
17

5.95
5.86
4.81

410
760
267

34
43

5.78
6.01

58
21
167
74
112
36
23
117
227

6.37
6.71
6.23
6.27
6.44
5.54
5.75
5.69
5.51

-

-

84
34
43
58
17
159
1,369
75
34
26

4.99
5.11
4.53
4.69
5.69
6.63
5.17
5.32
5.45
5.11

5.44
4.84
5.03
5.73
4.51
5.71
4.44
4.86
6.51
6.35
5.24
5.59
5.10
5.16

5.06
5.16
4.66

24
25
12

5.04
5.31
6.07

204
462
123

722
392
621

4.94
4.90
4.81

38
20
34

5.16
5.57
4.74

4.82
4.99
4.98
4.99
4.89
5.14
5.01
4.65
4.78
5.03
4.93
4.46
4.78

83
53
9
131
29
31
56
40
22
15
22
60
187

4.66

14

1,104

5.81

12

5.35

251

-

413 $8.14
135 7.78
292 7.99
122 8.02
102 6.19
365
72
96
97
721
351
622
345
279
1,172
10,074
1,184
228
210

1,060
813
215
1,869
450
564
980
934
376
295
167
1,324
1,554

-

60 $6.83
27 6.16
26 6.95
17 6.82
47 5.24

33 $4.93
20 4.58
41 4.62
45 3.80

-

121
128
74
117
320
2,993
503
60
43

40
278
153
56
765
5,741
539
121
77

5.24
5.46
4.96

65
86
42

4.94
5.24
4.92

94
186
84

4.87
4.79
3.81

-

392
184
329

5.31
5.25
5.27

111
65
81

4.71
5.25
4.97

182
108
172

4.23
4.23
4.33

-

5.19
5.38
4.98
5.54
5.43
5.27
5.41
5.12
5.09
5.85
5.33
4.19
5.16

540
394
151
989
210
349
480
434
207
222
248
690
1,367

5.03
5.34
5.38
5.43
5.16
5.45
5.61
4.89
4.96
5.45
5.28
4.70
5.55

141
106
19
260
68
74
201
72
53
55
15
130
331

4.74
4.95
5.72
5.22
5.84
5.17
4.97
4.83
5.01
5.21
5.45
4.53
5.26

249
238
518
128
120
268
242
87
81
_
276
483

4.34
4.79
_
4.37
4.46
5.01
4.59
4.11
4.56
4.63
_

_

3.99
4.26

_
_
_
_

5.16

117

4.83

27

4.93

49

3.97

-

-

-

-

_
4.19
_
5.21
4.07
4.08
4.59
5.11
4.40
4.57
4.26
4.38

-

-

-

42
19
11
17

160 $5.77
28 5.47
37 4.95
126 5.42
130 5.07

4.96
4.65
5.70
5.26
5.16
4.78
5.23
5.33
5.29
5.05
5.26
5.00
5.01

-

-

123 $6.06
26 6.77
101 6.92
45 5.89
44 5.31
-

-

10
-

17

3.88

37
25
13

5.74
4.71
5.50

_

_

_
3.81
_

23
28
28

6.73
5.11
4.55

_
_

_
_

3.42
_
_
_
_
3.80
3.24
_
_
_
_

5.27
4.84
5.53
5.19
4.56
5.01
5.13
4.97
4.99
5.29
5.44
4.74
5.41

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

40
52
24
79
23
46
55
136
22
27
73
138
287

_

5.50
_

-

35

5.52

-

-

-

7
-

13
_
_
_
_
21
17

16 $6.36
15 6.09
_
_
_

_
158
1,545
280
39
35

_
_
3.51
3.57
_
3.23

_
_

-

-

_
_
_
4.78
4.50
5.34
6.26
5.24
5.54
6.05
4.61

-

38
1,254
_
12

77 $6.31
72 6.37
_
8 5.25
_
_

55
59
35

-

_
_
_
_
73
421
_

_

22

_

_
_
5.90
4.79
_
_
_

_

Table 4. Continued—Occupational averages: All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, United States and selected regions, April 1979)
New England Middle Atlantic Border States

United States2
Total1
Occupation

Pressers, finish ................................................
Sewers, h a n d ...................................................
Sewing-machine operators3 ...........................
Attach fly ........................................................
Attach waistband..........................................
Attach zippers...............................................
Bartacking......................................................
Join se am s....................................................
Make pockets................................................
Piecing flys ....................................................
Piecing pockets.............................................
Serging...........................................................
Sew on waistband lining..............................
Stitch pockets ...............................................
Thread trimmers and basting pullers...........
Underpressers..................................................
Miscellaneous
Adjusters (repairers)........................................
Janitors.............................................................
Packers.............................................................
Stock clerks, garments...................................
Stock clerks, piece goods..............................
Work distributors .............................................

Men

181 $5.83
14 6.51
149 6.04

345
560
339
309
144
1,136

333
456
203
152
133
559

6.05
4.02
4.41
4.54
4.51
4.10

6.08
4.03
4.80
5.08
4.54
4.15

144 $4.35
84 5.22
3,897 4.76
173 4.82
224 4.97
88 4.96
333 4.84
451 4.85
363 4.96
93 5.19
190 5.06
263 4.50
104 5.22
241 4.98
145 4.40
306 5.01
12
98
132
157
571

5.44
3.97
3.82
4.03
4.04

14 $6.10
164 5.35
7 4.87
7 5.64
7 5.51
15 6.41
14 5.62
6 5.38
9 4.35
12
25
19
128

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. For definition of regions
used in this or subsequent tables, see appendix A.




Southwest

Pacific

Great Lakes

Women

Aver­
Aver­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Aver­
age
Aver­
age
Aver­
ber of
Num­
ber of
ber of
Num­
Num­
hourly
hourly
age
age
age
work­
work­
ber of
ber of
ber of
work­
earn­
hourly
hourly
earn­
hourly
ers
work­
work­
work­
ers
ers
ings
earn­
earn­
earn­
ings
ers
ers
ers
ings
ings
ings
325 $5.17
87 5.23
4,075 4.80
179 4.81
230 4.99
95 5.05
340 4.88
482 4.94
377 5.01
102 5.23
190 5.06
273 4.55
112 5.32
245 5.01
153 4.48
469 5.37

Southeast

7.64
3.52
4.52
3.83

105 $5.95
52 4.87
1,640 5.40
66 5.50
109 5.41
37 5.51
160 5.13
217 5.43
201
5.48
59 5.70
75 5.27
102 4.88
64 5.72
109 5.58
48 4.88
223 5.87
102
229
94
96
67
404

6.70
4.11
5.22
5.12
4.53
4.20

Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
age
age
age
age
age
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
work­
work­
work­
work­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
ers
ers
ers
ers
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings

28 $4.57
552 4.65
33 4.38
28 4.95
10 5.62
44 4.58
68 4.82
57 4.11
11 4.58
7 4.76
48 4.36
17 4.80
37 4.73
46 4.27
72 4.95
46
66
38
21
28
77

6.46
3.91
4.37
5.13
5.36
4.45

92 $4.57
588 3.94
24 4.17
41 4.00
11 4.20
41 4.10
76 3.93
30 4.04
26 3.91
42 4.01
9 3.72
54 4.00
29 3.99
54 4.41
128
163
75
92
24
360

5.23
3.82
4.37
3.84
3.76
3.71

15 $3.52
393 3.24
7 3.31
14 3.74
12 2.95
31 3.38
17 3.63
7 3.19
26 3.20
9 3.69
17
12
6
20

4.94
3.72
4.20
3.44

54 $5.29
557 5.19
24 5.28
22 5.85
12 5.51
69 5.34
57 5.22
31 5.33
12 4.68
55 5.51
40 5.10
9 5.43
21 5.49
13 5.46
87 5.33
33
-

127

6.90
-

5.05

3 Includes data for workers in classification in addition to those shown separately.

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or data do not meet publication criteria.

16 $5.06
142 4.49
-

-

-

-

-

9

4.27

Table 5. Occupational averages by size of community
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, by size of community, United States and
selected regions, April 1979)
New England

United States2
Metropolitan
Occupation




Metropolitan

Southeast

Nonmetropolitan

Metropolitan

Southwest

Nonmetropolitan

Metropolitan

Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
of
of
of
hourly
of
of
of
of
of
of
workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings

Cutting
Cutters, cloth....................................................
783
Cutters, lining...................................................
277
Cutters and markers, cloth............................
514
297
M arkers.............................................................
Spreaders.........................................................
285
Coat fabrication
480
Basters, hand...................................................
Button sewers, h a n d .......................................
144
163
Buttonhole makers, h a n d ..............................
Collar setters, hand.........................................
139
Finishers, h a n d ................................................ 1,167
Fitters................................................................
538
Inspectors, fin a l...............................................
962
Pairers and turners..........................................
562
Pressers, finish, hand .....................................
530
Pressers, finish, m achine.............................. 2,100
Sewing-machine operators3 .......................... 18,147
Basters........................................................... 2,114
Button sewing ...............................................
419
Buttonhole making........................................
337
Collar preparing, except piecing
or padding....................................................
376
Collar setting.................................................
650
Facing tacking...............................................
186
Fell body lining, bottom and
side................................................................
613
Join shoulder, clo th ......................................
328
Join side seam s............................................
507
Join undercollar, join sleeve
lining, or piece pockets.............................
881
Lining maker, b o dy.......................................
707
Pad collar and lap e ls ...................................
204
Pocket setting and tacking.........................
1,596
Sew darts, clo th............................................
369
Sew edge ta p e ..............................................
520
Sew in sleeve................................................
822
Sleeve making, cloth....................................
753
Tape armholes..............................................
325
Shaper ..............................................................
339
Tailors, all around............................................
393
Thread trimmers and basting pullers........... 1,102
Underpressers.................................................. 2,256
Trouser fabrication
Inspectors, fin a l...............................................
188

See footnotes at end of table.

Nonmetropolitan

Border States

Middle Atlantic

$7.26
6.98
7.30
6.69
5.47

129
36
90
74
110

$5.23
5.87
6.18
4.59
4.68

60
27
26
17
47

5.52
5.14
5.07
5.61
4.83
5.47
4.42
4.87
6.12
6.11
5.09
5.45
5.13
5.06

15
19
12
16
76
293
121
676
5,447
574
107
74

4.46
4.55
4.37
4.18
5.17
4.01
4.01
4.75
4.27
4.69
4.01
4.07

84
34
43
58
17
159
1,369
75
34
26

5.18
5.36
5.03

64
162
98

4.72
4.61
3.99

5.12
5.20
5.15

147
98
161

5.07
5.27
5.40
5.35
5.19
5.44
5.34
4.83
4.99
5.37
5.30
4.59
5.42
4.73

$6.83
6.16
6.95
6.82
5.24

413
135
292
122
102

$8.14
7.78
7.99
8.02
6.19

4.99
5.11
4.53
4.69
5.69
6.63
5.17
5.32
5.45
5.11

365
72
96
97
721
351
622
345
279
1,172
10,074
1,184
22 8
210

5.44
4.84
5.03
5.73
4.51
5.71
4.44
4.86
6.51
6.35
5.24
5.59
5.10
5.16

24
25
12

5.04
5.31
6.07

204
462
123

4.39
4.16
4.13

38
20
34

5.16
5.57
4.74

222
166
444
109
120
280
217
78
75
242
430

3.98
4.32
4.15
4.40
4.54
4.65
4.15
4.41
4.62
3.97
4.23

83
53
9
131
29
31
56
40
22
15
22
60
187

77

4.59

14

-

27
20
37

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

67
36

$6.40
6.20
6.05

85
14
_
59
94

$5.22
5.66
4.53
4.70

103
47
280
2,034
214
32
31

4.59
4.60
5.92
4.91
4.92
5.17
4.90

10
_
175
106
24
485
3,707
325
89
46

4.19
_
3.77
3.85
4.24
4.64
4.12
4.35
3.93
4.02

10

75

-

$5.31
4.58
4.71
-

7
12
27
81
57
61
158
1,761
269
48
31

_
13
162
1,232
234
12
12

$4.56
_
5.49
5.30
4.97
5.23
4.73
4.85

5.24
5.46
4.96

49
55
29

4.54
5.20
4.90

31
-

5.31
-

59
69
_

5.35
5.14
-

35
117
75

4.06
4.59
3.78

-

-

392
184
329

5.31
5.25
5.27

65
50
48

4.80
5.54
5.21

15
-

4.28
-

86
39
51

4.29
4.56
5.14

96
69
121

4.18
4.04
3.99

-

_

5.19
5.38
4.98
5.54
5.43
5.27
5.41
5.12
5.09
5.85
5.33
4.19
5.16

540
394
151
989
210
349
480
434
207
222
248
690
1,367

5.03
5.34
5.38
5.43
5.16
5.45
5.61
4.89
4.96
5.45
5.28
4.70
5.55

85
66
17
162
38
41
80
48
27
31
15
89
251

5.18
5.00
5.83
5.42
6.62
5.05
5.15
4.90
5.30
5.43
5.45
4.62
5.36

56
40
98
30
24
26
24
41
80

4.08
4.88
4.90
4.85
4.69
4.71
4.92
4.33
4.96

93
_
199
57
48
126
64
42
33
85
168

5.04
5.03
4.68
6.04
4.68
4.22
4.83
4.78
_
4.25
4.61

156
114
319
71
72
142
178
45
48
_

3.92
4.17
_
3.96
4.29
4.33
4.50
4.07
4.30
4.52
_

191
315

3.88
4.08

11
_
13
_
_
_
_

5.16

108

4.74

22

5.09

-

-

41

4.06

-

-

-

-

-

$5.97
6.51
6.76
5.92
5.08
6.00
5.70
5.01
4.79
4.68
5.17
5.27
5.11
5.29
5.06
5.08

-

-

112
19
45
39
40

15
-

-

-

3.25

3.50
_
_
3.21
_
_
_
_
-

Table 5. Continued—Occupational averages by size of community
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, by size of community, United States and
selected regions, April 1979)
United States2
Metropolitan
Occupation

Pressers, finish ................................................
Sewers, h a n d ...................................................
Sewing-machine operators3 ...........................
Attach fly ........................................................
Attach waistband..........................................
Attach zippers...............................................
Bartacking......................................................
Join se a m s ....................................................
Make pockets................................................
Piecing fly s ....................................................
Piecing pockets.............................................
Serging...........................................................
Sew on waistband lining..............................
Stitch pockets...............................................
Thread trimmers and basting pullers...........
Underpressers..................................................
Miscellaneous
Adjusters (repairers)........................................
Janitors.............................................................
Packers.............................................................
Stock clerks, garments...................................
Stock clerks, piece goods..............................
Work distributors .............................................

New England

Metropolitan

Nonmetropolitan

Nonmetropolitan

Metropolitan

Nonmetropolitan

Metropolitan

Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
Number age
hourly
hourly
hourly
of
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
of
of
of
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
of
of
workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
191
81
3,137
132
175
75
267
372
323
88
150
202
99
170
98
324

$5.68
5.23
4.90
4.89
5.13
5.18
4.98
5.06
5.11
5.30
5.25
4.63
5.46
5.11
4.59
5.57

134
938
47
55
20
73
110
54
14
40
71
13
75
55
145

$4.45
4.47
4.59
4.55
4.56
4.49
4.52
4.46
4.77
4.31
4.31
4.27
4.76
4.27
4.93

14
164
7
7
7
15
14
6
9
-

$6.10
5.35
4.87
5.64
5.51
6.41
5.62
5.38
4.35
-

105
52
1,573
61
102
34
160
208
196
58
75
101
64
92
48
190

$5.95
4.87
5.37
5.42
5.35
5.45
5.13
5.41
5.46
5.69
5.27
4.88
5.72
5.44
4.88
5.94

19
463
29
21
37
57
51
7
42
16
33
64

$4.72
4.62
4.40
5.07
4.49
4.78
4.11
4.76
4.38
4.76
4.72
4.91

211
429
196
215
117
791

6.54
4.15
4.68
4.81
4.72
4.26

134
131
143
94
27
345

5.29
3.61
4.05
3.94
3.60
3.71

12
25
19

7.64
3.52
4.52
3.83

102
227
91
96
67
404

6.70
4.11
5.18
5.12
4.53
4.20

23
38
32
13
26
49

6.61
3.96
4.22
5.08
5.35
4.18

-

128

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. For definition of regions
used in this or subsequent tables, see appendix A.




Southwest

Southeast

Border States

Middle Atlantic

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23
28

$6.31
3.83

-

-

-

-

35
68
15
6
73

$5.98
4.25
4.11
4.78
4.20

92
458
20
33
9
35
56
30
14
38
42
29
54

$4.57
3.98
4.18
4.00
4.22
4.20
4.02
4.04
4.10
3.99
4.08
3.99
4.41

93
95
60
83
18
287

4.94
3.52
4.44
3.82
3.42
3.58

_
351
12
10
23
13
22
-

13
10
6
-

-

3 Includes data for workers in classification in addition to those shown separately.

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or data do not meet publication criteria.

_
$3.25
3.82
2.96
3.55
3.80
3.16
4.90
3.84
4.20
-

Table 6. Occupational averages by type of shop
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, by type of shop, United States and selected regions,
April 1979)
United States2
Regular
Occupation




Contract

Regular

Middle Atlantic

Contract

Regular

Border States

Southeast

Southwest

Contract

Great Lakes

Pacific

Regular

Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings

Cutting
Cutters, cloth....................................................
706 $6.72
Cutters, lining...................................................
263 6.64
Cutters and markers, cloth.............................
447 6.83
308 6.15
M arkers.............................................................
337 5.28
Spreaders.........................................................
Coat fabrication
Basters, hand...................................................
349 5.64
Button sewers, h a n d .......................................
135 5.12
Buttonhole makers, h a n d ...............................
144 4.99
Collar setters, hand.........................................
113 5.56
922 5.07
Finishers, hand ... ............................................
Fitters................................................................
495 5.36
Inspectors, fin a l...............................................
958 4.42
Pairers and turners..........................................
514 4.79
Pressers, finish, hand .....................................
523 5.87
Pressers, finish, machine ............................... 2,082 5.81
Sewing-machine operators3 .......................... 18,183 4.92
Basters........................................................... 2,217 5.23
Button sewing ...............................................
395 4.98
Buttonhole making........................................
292 4.97
Collar preparing, except piecing
or padding....................................................
351 5.09
Collar setting.................................................
652 5.13
Facing tacking...............................................
236 4.67
Fell body lining, bottom and
sid e................................................................
593 4.90
Join shoulder, clo th ......................................
327 4.92
Join side seam s............................................
517 4.87
Join undercollar, join sleeve
lining, or piece pockets.............................
869 4.91
Lining maker, b o dy.......................................
690 5.11
Pad collar and lap e ls ...................................
178 4.98
Pocket setting and tacking......................... 1,553 4.98
Sew darts, cloth............................................
365 5.02
Sew edge ta p e ..............................................
488 5.34
Sew in sleeve................................................
917 5.07
Sleeve making, cloth....................................
787 4.67
Tape armholes..............................................
305 4.91
Shaper ..............................................................
343 5.26
Tailors, all around............................................
350 5.30
Thread trimmers and basting pullers........... 1,007 4.46
Underpressers.................................................. 2,261
5.18
Trouser fabrication
Inspectors, final ...............................................
255 4.67

See footnotes at end of table.

New England

66 $6.41
20 6.89
43 5.04
54 4.84

27 $6.84
16 6.08
17 7.16
15 7.04
41 5.27

-

6 $5.05

261 $8.00
104 7.47
168 7.77
90 7.72
74 6.33

40 $6.85
11 7.16
24 5.42

123 $6.06
18 6.70
80 6.87
45 5.89
44 5.31

160 $5.77
28 5.47
37 4.95
126 5.42
130 5.07

12 $3.82
20 4.58
12 4.18
21 3.32

16 $6.36
12 6.02
-

77 $6.31
72 6.37
8 5.25
-

-

_
-

_
399
-

-

144
28
31
42
317
119
289
169
118
694
5,396
471
131
119

5.12
4.88
5.17
5.20
4.00
5.71
3.98
4.50
6.05
5.71
4.82
5.55
4.67
4.66

31
32
48
16
117
1,109
45
28
24

5.10
4.72
4.62
5.77
6.74
5.24
5.51
5.63
5.13

11
10
42
260
30
6
-

3.97
5.05
6.33
4.86
5.02
4.60
-

219
46
65
69
431
253
418
201
194
651
6,356
819
140
103

5.65
4.79
4.97
5.74
4.85
5.68
4.53
5.23
6.49
6.70
5.33
5.59
5.26
5.65

144
26
31
28
286
98
196
144
85
521
3,712
365
88
107

5.12
4.94
5.17
5.69
3.98
5.79
4.25
4.34
6.55
5.90
5.08
5.60
4.84
4.68

42
17
11
17
103
122
59
273
2,538
432
47
38

4.96
4.72
5.70
5.26
5.13
4.82
5.12
5.20
4.96
5.23
4.92
4.91

10
40
278
153
56
765
5,741
539
121
77

_
4.19
5.21
4.07
4.08
4.59
5.11
4.40
4.57
4.26
4.38

_
300
11
7

_
3.88
4.03
3.46

158
1,543
280
39
35

4.78
4.50
5.34
6.26
5.24
5.54
6.05
4.61

89
160
48

5.24
5.52
4.68

19
13
-

5.06
5.80
-

12
-

4.77
-

131
331
86

5.24
5.43
5.20

73
131
37

5.22
5.55
4.40

54
69
35

4.84
5.09
4.70

94
186
84

4.87
4.79
3.81

17
-

3.88
-

37
25
13

5.74
4.71
5.50

-

_

167
99
151

5.27
5.13
4.99

16
28

5.42
4.63

8
6

5.32
5.25

255
114
194

5.29
5.54
5.50

137
70
135

5.35
4.80
4.94

89
40
71

4.69
4.85
4.90

182
108
172

4.23
4.23
4.33

_

-

_
3.81
-

23
28
28

6.73
5.11
4.55

_

_
_

234
183
58
487
113
152
185
183
98
71
41
337
425

4.63
4.98
5.64
5.46
4.97
5.06
5.67
4.75
4.77
5.11
4.96
4.55
5.50

73
40
93
21
24
45
29
17
10
20
45
152

5.31
5.44
5.80
5.92
5.28
5.55
5.33
5.17
6.06
5.40
4.34
5.32

10
13
38
8
7
11
11
-

4.32
5.18
4.91
4.15
5.25
4.85
4.59
-

355
237
99
585
127
216
323
282
116
163
218
414
1,013

5.33
5.56
5.25
5.40
5.22
5.72
5.55
4.95
5.11
5.54
5.26
4.70
5.54

185
157
50
404
83
133
157
152
91
59
23
276
354

4.47
5.01
5.63
5.47
5.06
5.03
5.73
4.77
4.77
5.22
5.27
4.71
5.58

102
98
13
215
56
62
184
59
51
53
15
103
295

4.46
4.93
5.51
5.09
5.86
5.15
4.90
4.70
5.03
5.18
5.45
4.53
5.21

249
238
518
128
120
268
242
87
81

4.34
4.79
4.37
4.46
5.01
4.59
4.11
4.56
4.63

-

276
483

3.99
4.26

_
21
12
_
_
_

3.75
_
3.80
3.38
_
_
_
_

40
52
24
79
23
46
55
134
22
27
73
138
287

5.27
4.84
5.53
5.19
4.56
5.01
5.13
4.98
4.99
5.29
5.44
4.74
5.41

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

10

5.17

14

5.16

-

110

4.81

-

-

24

4.89

49

3.97

-

-

35

5.52

-

-

-

-

-

-

15
35

3.73
4.50
-

-

-

7
-

8

55
59
35

_
_
_
_
_
4.83
-

Table 6. Continued— Occupational averages by type of shop
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, by type of shop, United States and selected regions,
April 1979)
United States2
Regular
Occupation

New England

Contract

Regular

Contract

Regular

Southeast

Contract

Southwest

Great Lakes

Pacific

Regular

Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Aver­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
Num­
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
age
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
ber of
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
work­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
earn­
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ers
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings
ings

Pressers, finish ................................................
318 $5.16
Sewers, h a n d ...................................................
85 5.18
Sewing-machine operators3 ........................... 3,855 4.86
Attach fly ........................................................
172 4.79
Attach waistband..........................................
225 4.96
Attach zippers...............................................
94 5.03
Bartacking......................................................
335 4.87
Join se a m s ....................................................
473 4.94
Make pockets................................................
363 5.00
Piecing flys ....................................................
98 5.14
Piecing pockets.............................................
189 5.05
Serging...........................................................
266 4.53
Sew on waistband lining..............................
111 5.31
Stitch pockets...............................................
240 5.03
Thread trimmers and basting pullers...........
151 4.48
Underpressers..................................................
459 5.35
Miscellaneous
Adjusters (repairers)........................................
302 6.00
Janitors.............................................................
477 4.05
Packers.............................................................
287 4.34
Stock clerks, garments...................................
259 4.40
Stock clerks, piece goods..............................
123 4.62
Work distributors .............................................
943 4.16

_
-

_
-

43 $6.46
66 3.77
13 3.86
6 4.54
181 3.78

14 $6.10
164 5.35
7 4.87
7 5.64
7 5.51
15 6.41
14 5.62
6 5.38
9 4.35
9
23
12

6.86
3.49
4.41

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16 $3.58

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. For definition of regions used
in this or subsequent tables, see appendix A.




Border States

Middle Atlantic

101 $5.91
50 4.77
1,604 5.39
62 5.47
107 5.37
36 5.48
158 5.11
213 5.42
191 5.49
55 5.59
75 5.27
101 4.87
64 5.72
109 5.58
46 4.92
218 5.84
74
150
54
62
50
243

6.72
4.26
5.49
4.95
4.77
4.46

_
-

_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

28 $6.66
62 3.76
10 3.64
6 4.54
149 3.80

25 $4.66
505 4.64
30 4.35
25 4.93
10 5.62
41 4.56
63 4.88
55 4.05
11 4.58
6 4.48
42 4.30
16 4.71
32 4.83
46 4.27
67 4.92
40
64
33
14
24
71

6.55
3.90
4.28
5.00
5.63
4.40

92 $4.57
588 3.94
24 4.17
41 4.00
11 4.20
41 4.10
76 3.93
30 4.04
26 3.91
42 4.01
9 3.72
54 4.00
29 3.99
54 4.41
122
163
75
92
24
352

5.27
3.82
4.37
3.84
3.76
3.72

15 $3.52
258 3.41
7 3.31
14 3.74
12 2.95
31 3.38
17 3.63
7 3.19
26 3.20
9 3.69
17
12
6
20

4.94
3.72
4.20
3.44

54 $5.29
_
555 5.20
24 5.28
22 5.85
12 5.51
69 5.34
57 5.22
29 5.39
12 4.68
55 5.51
40 5.10
9 5.43
21
5.49
13 5.46
87 5.33
33
-

127

6.90
-

5.05

3 Includes data for workers in classification in addition to those shown separately.

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or data do not meet publication criteria.

16 $5.06
_
142 4.49
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table 7. Occupational averages by size of shop
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, by size of shop, United States and selected
regions, April 1979)
New England

United States2
5-249 workers

250-499 workers

Occupation

500 workers or
more

5-249 workers

250-499 workers

Middle Atlantic
500 workers or
more

5-249 workers

250-499 workers

Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average
hourly of work­
hourly of work­
hourly of work­
of work- hourly of work- hourly of workhourly of work­
hourly of work­ hourly
ers
ers
earnings
earnings
ers
earnings
ers
ers
earnings
ers
earnings
ers
earnings
earnings
ers
earnings
Cutting
Cutters, cloth....................................................
Cutters, lining...................................................
Cutters and markers, cloth............................
Markers.............................................................
Spreaders.........................................................
Coat fabrication
Basters, hand...................................................
Button sewers, h a n d ......................................
Buttonhole makers, h a n d ..............................
Collar setters, hand........................................
Finishers, h a n d ................................................
Fitters................................................................
Inspectors, final ...............................................
Pairers and turners.........................................
Pressers, finish, hand ...............................
Pressers, finish, machine ..............................
Sewing-machine operators3 ..........................
Basters...........................................................
Button sewing ...............................................
Buttonhole making........................................
Collar preparing, except piecing
or padding....................................................
Collar setting.................................................
Facing tacking...............................................
Fell body lining, bottom and
side................................................................
Join shoulder, clo th .....................................
Join side seam s...........................................
Join undercollar, join sleeve
lining, or piece pockets.............................
Lining maker, b o dy......................................
Pad collar and lap els..................................
Pocket setting and tacking.........................
Sew darts, clo th...........................................
Sew edge ta p e .............................................
Sew in sleeve................................................
Sleeve making, cloth...................................
Tape armholes..............................................
Shaper ..............................................................
Tailors, all around............................................
Thread trimmers and basting pullers...........
Underpressers..................................................
Trouser fabrication
Inspectors, final ...............................................

See footnotes at end of table.




$7.26
7.04
7.01
6.16
5.84

-

82
65
42
532
275
569
270
278
1,083
9,548
1,328
197
118

5.37
4.90
5.30
5.24
5.83
4.44
5.02
6.11
6.07
5.04
5.31
5.21
5.12

-

5.42
5.60
5.08

157
392
124

5.34
5.18
4.81

189
128
175

5.06
5.01
4.76

322
146
255

5.04
5.21
5.23

4.52
4.84
5.24
4.85
4.79
4.90
5.07
4.60
4.68
5.20
5.26
4.17
4.90

249
258
74
455
142
138
284
267
105
116
87
368
742

5.10
5.23
4.75
5.51
5.20
5.51
5.12
4.53
5.26
4.91
5.35
4.57
5.29

452
245
75
840
190
266
542
426
162
183
184
563
1,260

5.02
5.30
5.40
5.08
5.03
5.48
5.25
4.82
4.79
5.47
5.25
4.66
5.36

4.06

93

4.90

127

4.75

418
108
309
134
129

$6.94
6.92
7.04
6.78
4.77

206
59
48
74
101

$6.64
6.27
8.35
5.60
4.91

295
68
79
83
523
207
412
236
224
916
7,746
628
176
215

5.30
4.82
5.15
5.34
4.35
5.06
4.23
4.18
5.72
5.48
4.64
5.18
4.47
4.57

83
13
31
30
208
132
274
177
139
777
6,300
732
153
78

5.76
4.53
4.96
6.00
4.81
5.19
4.21
4.97
5.80
5.73
5.01
5.33
4.99
5.37

151
229
117

4.63
4.93
4.37

132
191
43

249
152
238

4.84
4.69
4.65

402
370
89
745
146
236
276
277
136
115
127
413
684
45

288
146
247
163
165
-

15
17
10

46
17
20
64
488
32
12
10
7
14
-

$6.26
6.78
4.76

-

4.73
4.02
4.57
5.82
4.81
4.93
4.35
4.38

-

4.93
4.91
-

-

10
45
427
-

6
-

5.49
5.40

-

-

58
10
9
19
15
7

4.44
5.17
5.20
4.37
5.57
5.04
4.60
4.93

14
25
45

5.29
3.87
4.82

6
8
16
21
-

-

~

-

-

13

24
8
13
-

17
72
-

$4.11
7.09
5.15
-

12
7
10
26
16
7
50
454
34
9

$7.20
6.60
6.89
5.97

207
51
177
68
.33

$8.14
8.02
7.87
8.06
5.77

5.33
6.86
7.25
5.56
5.67
5.27

247
57
61
58
380
117
269
161
116
596
4,406
336
108
130

5.33
4.83
5.02
5.70
4.26
5.52
4.27
4.13
6.60
5.78
4.92
5.38
4.67
4.77

18
136
65
102
69
68
245
1,891
308
34
30

5.55
5.67
4.37
5.46
4.43
5.44
5.79
6.37
5.51
5.67
5.73
6.07

36
10
47
17
28
-

$7.65
7.69
8.45
6.40

5.88
-

-

-

80
148
66

5.03
5.33
4.72

50
71
16

5.42
6.13
4.82

4.28

_

_
_

141
90
148

5.08
4.96
4.95

104
31
52

5.51
5.34
5.07

237
225
58
466
86
157
168
172
101
73
63
223
379

4.72
5.10
5.41
5.11
5.03
5.06
5.42
4.68
4.73
5.41
5.47
4.51
5.25

73
69
35
155
50
58
103
101
45
55
58
191
271

5.22
5.18
5.35
6.09
4.84
5.54
5.41
4.74
5.43
5.00
5.17
4.81
5.72

16

4.56

36

4.93

5.53
6.00
5.98
4.10
5.01
-

37

5.64
-

11

5.98
5.41
6.31
_
4.72
5.55

-

-

24
9
18
70
-

-

Table 7. Continued— Occupational averages by size of shop
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, by size of shop, United States and selected
regions, April 1979)
New England

United States2
5-249 workers

500 workers or
more

250-499 workers

Occupation

5-249 workers

Middle Atlantic

250-499 workers

500 workers or
more

5-249 workers

250-499 workers

Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average
hourly
hourly of work­ hourly of work­ hourly of work­ hourly of work­ hourly of work­
of work­ hourly of work­ hourly of work­
earnings
ers
earnings
ers
earnings
ers
ers
earnings
earnings
ers
earnings
earnings
ers
ers
earnings
ers
Pressers, finish................................................
Sewers, h a n d ...................................................
Sewing-machine operators3 ...........................
Attach fly ........................................................
Attach waistband..........................................
Attach zippers...............................................
Bartacking......................................................
Join se a m s ....................................................
Make pockets................................................
Piecing fly s ....................................................
Piecing pockets.............................................
Serging...........................................................
Sew on waistband lining..............................
Stitch pockets...............................................
Thread trimmers and basting pullers...........
Underpressers..................................................
Miscellaneous
Adjusters (repairers)........................................
Janitors.............................................................
Packers.............................................................
Stock clerks, garments...................................
Stock clerks, piece goods..............................
Work distributors .............................................

87
27
1,179
56
46
36
67
110
111
26
32
80
33
45
37
90

$4.62
4.95
4.09
4.09
4.58
4.34
3.72
4.25
4.51
4.62
4.26
3.99
5.18
4.49
3.70
4.96

53
24
1,201
57
61
25
76
153
93
29
56
71
31
96
32
153

$4.99
6.19
4.86
4.98
4.96
5.63
4.98
4.95
5.16
5.46
4.48
4.86
4.74
5.06
4.28
5.36

185
36
1,695
66
123
34
197
219
173
47
102
122
48
104
84
226

$5.48
4.79
5.25
5.28
5.15
5.38
5.23
5.28
5.26
5.42
5.62
4.73
5.79
5.18
4.89
5.54

97
155
188
93
61
356

6.17
3.78
4.08
4.81
4.63
3.88

104
154
62
77
34
289

5.98
3.99
4.30
4.21
4.12
3.99

144
251
89
139
49
491

6.03
4.19
5.21
4.55
4.62
4.31

Middle Atlantic
500 workers or more
Number
of workers
Cutting
Cutters, cloth....................................................
Cutters, lining...................................................
Cutters and markers, cloth.............................
Markers.............................................................
Spreaders.........................................................
Coat fabrication
Basters, hand...................................................
Button sewers, han d .......................................
Buttonhole makers, h a n d ...............................
Collar setters, hand.........................................
Finishers, h a n d ................................................
Fitters................................................................
Inspectors, fin a l...............................................

See footnotes at end of table.




170
74
46
52

_
_
_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

30

$3.74

17

$3.56

$3.93

4.98
5.78
5.34
4.34
5.69
6.27
3.83
4.79
4.94
4.34
3.99

Southwest

Southeast

$8.25
7.63
8.00
6.39

-

47
16
28

-

-

76
-

5.94
4.63

16
-

9
25
43
48

$5.78
6.74
6.53
4.88
3.96
_
_
5.11
4.44
4.30
4.61

37
23
_
38
25

$6.34
_
5.50
_
_
_
5.34
4.63

71
15

_
3.86

5.45
5.68
6.18
5.67
4.98
5.47
5.37
6.20
5.10
4.75
4.80
5.92
3.99

22
49
12
15

7.37
4.14
5.36
5.61

68

4.32

Great Lakes

$4.67
3.04

27
-

Average
hourly
earnings

$5.10
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

82
50

132

4.30

15

Number of
workers

-

4.98
4.35

_
_
_
125

334
19
16
12
17
48
49
16
11
10
10
36
10

-

34
54

$4.85

$5.68
5.50
5.54
5.85

60
13

$6.17
5.44

_

27

5-249 workers

500 workers or more

250-499 workers

$5.67
4.60
5.16
4.66
5.31
4.56
4.29
5.10
5.41
5.49

40
93
53
44
28
206

_
_

_
_

_
_

17

Border States
5-249 workers

_

_

Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
of workers
of workers
of workers
of workers
of workers
earnings
earnings
earnings
earnings
earnings
earnings

169
251

_

24
16
310
10
16
13
18
36
32
11
18
20
13
14
42

_

19

-

Table 7. Continued— Occupational averages by size of shop
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, by size of shop, United States and selected
regions, April 1979)

500 workers or more

Southwest

Southeast

Border States

Middle Atlantic

5-249 workers

500 workers or more

250-499 workers

5-249 workers

Great Lakes

Occupation
Number
of workers
Pairers and turners..........................................
Pressers, finish, hand .....................................
Pressers, finish, m achine..............................
Sewing-machine operators3 ..........................
Basters...........................................................
Button sewing ...............................................
Buttonhole making........................................
Collar preparing, except piecing
or padding....................................................
Collar setting.................................................
Facing tacking...............................................
Fell body lining, bottom and
side................................................................
Join shoulder, clo th ......................................
Join side seam s............................................
Join undercollar, join sleeve
lining, or piece pockets.............................
Lining maker, b o d y.......................................
Pad collar and lap els..................................
Pocket setting and tacking.........................
Sew darts, clo th............................................
Sew edge ta p e ..............................................
Sew in sleeve................................................
Sleeve making, cloth...................................
Tape armholes..............................................
Shaper ..............................................................
Tailors, all around............................................
Thread trimmers and basting pullers...........
Underpressers..................................................
Trouser fabrication
Inspectors, final ...............................................
Pressers, finish ................................................
Sewers, h a n d ...................................................
Sewing-machine operators3 ..........................
Attach fly ........................................................
Attach waistband..........................................
Attach zippers...............................................
Bartacking......................................................
Join s e a m s ....................................................
Make pockets................................................
Piecing fly s ....................................................
Piecing pockets.............................................
Serging...........................................................
Sew on waistband lining.............................
Stitch po ckets...............................................
Thread trimmers and basting pullers...........
Underpressers..................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
Average
Number
Number
Number
Number
Number
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
of workers
of workers
of workers
of workers
of workers
earnings
earnings
earnings
earnings
earnings
earnings
$4.12
4.18
5.18
4.37
4.55
4.18
4.62

90
38
352
2,562
345
33
41

$4.20
4.73
5.26
4.52
4.63
4.35
4.37

_

5.04
-

37
98
59

4.82
4.62
4.00

42
74

4.17
4.38

119
52
63

5.52
5.56
5.94
6.17
6.38
5.31
5.32
4.96
5.87
5.55
4.90
5.72

72
147
42
90
95
31
90
202

4.73
4.42
4.42
4.51
4.13
4.25
3.85
4.26

5.22
5.27
4.68
5.21
5.63
5.48
5.38
5.16
5.45

15
333
10
18
15
36
21
30
12
-

3.70
3.81
4.04
3.80
4.19
3.65
3.94
3.92
3.36
-

115
95
331
3,777
540
86
50

$5.53
6.91
7.34
5.47
5.68
5.38
5.62

26
10
90
986
135
15
26

$4.59
5.07
4.60
4.30
4.73
3.61
4.66

41
111
1,127
188
37
9

$5.55
5.58
5.57
5.60
5.50
5.63

243
-

5.35
-

26
26
13

3.75
4.12
3.70

25
37
19

5.25
5.70
5.70

-

147
63
129

5.39
5.63
5.72

42
14
30

4.10
4.26
4.51

32
43
24

5.31
5.61
5.63

-

230
100
58
368
74
134
209
161
61
94
127
276
-

5.29
5.99
5.38
5.55
5.51
5.88
5.85
5.21
4.99
5.75
5.23
4.78
-

60
50

3.88
4.42
4.50
5.54
4.73
4.27
4.26
4.17
5.01
4.90
3.91
4.50

55
35
14
103
38
24
66
41
22
27
66
178

65
54
27
996
37
77
12
125
133
120
32
48
74
34
60
24
132

4.84
6.63
4.86
5.46
5.64
5.27
6.38
5.27
5.50
5.55
5.53
5.40
4.87
5.97
5.43
5.57
5.96

4.48
4.56
4.07
4.02
4.82
3.77
4.16
3.84
3.69
3.89
4.11
4.30

16
202
15
9
14
26
17
18
33

97
7
23
34
19
14
16
10
49
116
7
15
272
15
13
24
32
43
26
6
16
32

40
8
329
2,568
174
67
23

70
-

Number of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

_
$3.47
3.27
3.03

_
358
11
22

-

-

-

4.51
4.55
4.65

-

-

12
-

4.97
-

125
67
309
73
59
154
127
55
45
142
238

4.32
4.26
4.52
4.43
4.80
4.65
4.02
4.36
4.85
4.24
4.29

-

-

3.03
3.03
-

12
22
85

4.35
5.01
4.53

30

4.09
4.43
4.44

330
7
8
12
23
12
6
21
-

3.04
3.31
3.19
2.95
3.11
3.28
3.20
3.08
-

99
-

4.01
-

17
39

36
454
9

10
14

_

_
$4.86
4.69
4.32
-

-

Table 7. Continued— Occupational averages by size of shop
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, by size of shop, United States and selected
regions, April 1979)
Border States

Middle Atlantic
500 workers or more

Southeast
250-499 workers

5-249 workers

Great Lakes

Southwest

5-249 workers

500 workers or more

Occupation
Number
of workers
Miscellaneous
Adjusters (repairers)........................................
Janitors.............................................................
Packers.............................................................
Stock clerks, garments...................................
Stock clerks, piece goods..............................
Work distributors .............................................

40
87
29
37
30
130

Average
Average
Number
Number
hourly
hourly
of workers
of workers
earnings
earnings

$6.78
4.40
5.93
5.13
4.85
4.48

11
25
25

$7.00
3.74
4.16

22

5.38

16
20
7

$6.22
4.20
4.41

58
77
32

$5.32
3.84
3.71

26

4.40

13
158

3.80
3.68

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. For definition of regions
used in this or subsequent tables, see appendix A.




Average
Average
Average
Average
Number
Number
Number
hourly
hourly
hourly
hourly
of workers
of workers
of workers
earnings
earnings
earnings
earnings

57
72
33
37
11
152

$5.09
3.79
4.93
3.78
3.70
3.74

10
7

Number of
workers

$5.20
3.14

3 Includes data for workers in classification in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or data do not meet publication criteria.

Average
hourly
earnings

Table 8. Occupational averages by labor-management contract coverage
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, by labor-management contract coverage, United States
and selected regions, April 1979)
New England

United States2

Middle Atlantic

Border States

Southwest

Southeast

Great Lakes

Pacific

Establishments with-

Occupation

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

Cutting
Cutters, cloth....................................................
765 $7.32
Cutters, lining...................................................
282 7.02
Cutters and markers, cloth.............................
557 7.31
Markers.............................................................
251 7.08
248 5.85
Spreaders.........................................................
Coat fabrication
Basters, hand...................................................
484 5.52
Button sewers, h a n d .......................................
157 5.10
Buttonhole makers, h a n d ..............................
171 5.04
Collar setters, hand.........................................
136 5.67
Finishers, h a n d ................................................ 1,235 4.82
Fitters................................................................
592 5.49
Inspectors, final ............................................... 1,016 4.49
Pairers and turners..........................................
602 4.83
Pressers, finish, hand .....................................
584 6.12
Pressers, finish, machine .............................. 2,242 6.07
Sewing-machine operators3 .......................... 18,722 5.15
Basters........................................................... 2,334 5.42
Button sewing ...............................................
427 5.17
Buttonhole making........................................
357 5.04
Collar preparing, except piecing
or padding....................................................
409 5.20
Collar setting.................................................
682 5.36
Facing tacking...............................................
207 5.04
Fell body lining, bottom and
side................................................................
662 5.12
Join shoulder, clo th ......................................
361 5.16
Join side seam s............................................
576 5.06
Join undercollar, join sleeve
lining, or piece pockets.............................
937 5.04
Lining maker, bo d y.......................................
746 5.24
Pad collar and la p e ls ...................................
229 5.17
Pocket setting and tacking.........................
1,726 5.29
Sew darts, cloth............................................
404 5.19
Sew edge ta p e ..............................................
569 5.42
Sew in sleeve................................................
941 5.32
Sleeve making, cloth....................................
774 4.87
Tape armholes..............................................
350 4.99
Shaper ..............................................................
352 5.36
Tailors, all around............................................
361 5.35

See footnotes at end of table.




None or
minority
covered

Majority
covered

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

Majority covered

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

147 $5.16
31 5.32
47 4.97
120 4.59
147 4.24

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

60 $6.83
27 6.16
26 6.95
17 6.82
47 5.24

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

407 $8.17
133 7.82
280 8.01
122 8.02
102 6.19

84
34
43
58
17
159
1,369
75
34
26

.
4.99
5.11
4.53
4.69
5.69
6.63
5.17
5.32
5.45
5.11

359
72
96
97
717
351
618
345
279
1,168
10,046
1,184
228
210

5.45
4.84
5.03
5.73
4.50
5.71
4.44
4.86
6.51
6.35
5.24
5.59
5.10
5.16

3.95
4.40
3.69

24
25
12

5.04
5.31
6.07

204
462
123

98
65
92

4.02
3.90
3.89

38
20
34

5.16
5.57
4.74

166
127
9
314
74
71
161
196
53
62
37

3.79
4.16
4.34
4.03
4.04
4.10
4.28
3.94
4.10
4.55
4.56

83
53
9
131
29
31
56
40
22
15
22

5.19
5.38
4.98
5.54
5.43
5.27
5.41
5.12
5.09
5.85
5.33

19
28
22
239
81
57
534
4,872
354
99
54

3.97
3.76
3.71
3.59
3.84
3.67
4.56
3.95
4.39
3.74
3.82

31
130
77

-

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

114 $6.13
22 7.12
97 6.97
38 6.10
-

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

-

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

79 $6.34
54 6.55
51 5.95

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

81 $5.21
21 5.13
72 4.57
79 4.51

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

-

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

31 $4.87
38 4.51
43 3.70

111
113
69
267
2,616
478
48
35

4.74
5.70
5.44
5.33
4.95
5.36
_
5.56
5.26
5.35
5.44
5.30

146
80
42
405
2,622
257
65
40

4.36
4.25
4.74
5.43
4.74
4.74
4.56
4.70

_
_
132
73
14
360
3,119
282
56
37

_
3.76
3.89
4.15
4.74
4.11
4.42
3.91
4.02

5.24
5.46
4.96

56
75
34

5.13
5.50
5.30

73
81
15

5.12
5.03
4.18

21
105
69

4.00
4.61
3.73

-

-

392
184
329

5.31
5.25
5.27

96
60
72

4.95
5.38
5.16

101
56
101

4.25
4.40
4.61

81
52
71

4.20
4.04
3.93

-

-

540
394
151
987
210
349
480
434
207
218
248

5.03
5.34
5.38
5.43
5.16
5.45
5.61
4.89
4.96
5.44
5.28

101
88
17
227
64
65
188
62
44
48
11

5.26
5.13
5.77
5.46
5.91
5.45
5.04
5.07
5.27
5.36
6.32

138
267
71
68
136
84
45
38
-

4.69
4.66
4.77
5.60
4.78
4.25
4.87
4.63
-

111
90
251
57
52
132
158
42
43
-

3.90
4.14
4.07
4.08
4.23
4.39
4.04
4.22
4.62
-

18
11
15

Majority covered

None or minority covered

36
1,098
9

3.47
3.43
3.03

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

60 $6.59
68 6.34
_
7 4.87
-

-

14
-

3.03
3.03
-

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

16 $6.36
15 6.09
_
-

_
_
4.78
4.53
5.38
_
6.30
5.32
5.68
6.05
4.61

_
399
-

13

5.74
5.50

.
-

-

23
25
22

6.73
5.32
4.47

_

_
_

32
43
23
62
23
38
52
122
22
_
60

5.54
4.66
5.46
5.32
4.56
5.12
5.07
5.06
4.99
5.46

-

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

55
53
34
_
142
1,336
242
39
35
37

10

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

-

_
_
4.83
-

Table 8. Continued— Occupational averages by labor-management contract coverage
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, by labor-management contract coverage, United States
and selected regions, April 1979)
United States2

New England

Middle Atlantic

Border States

Southwest

Southeast

Great Lakes

Pacific

Establishments with-

Occupation

Majority
covered

Num­
ber of
work­
ers
Thread trimmers and basting pullers...........
Underpressers..................................................
Trouser fabrication
Inspectors, fin a l...............................................
Pressers, finish ................................................
Sewers, h a n d ...................................................
Sewing-machine operators3 ...........................
Attach fly ........................................................
Attach waistband..........................................
Attach zippers...............................................
Bartacking......................................................
Join s e am s....................................................
Make pockets................................................
Piecing fly s ....................................................
Piecing pockets.............................................
Serging...........................................................
Sew on waistband lining..............................
Stitch pockets...............................................
Thread trimmers and basting pullers...........
Underpressers..................................................
Miscellaneous
Adjusters (repairers)........................................
Janitors.............................................................
Packers.............................................................
Stock clerks, garments...................................
Stock clerks, piece goods..............................
Work distributors .............................................

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

None or
minority
covered
Num­
ber of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

1,123 $4.63
2,336 5.40
5.00
5.58
5.27
5.17
5.15
5.27
5.35
5.14
5.28
5.22
5.34
5.35
4.84
5.55
5.36
4.76
5.55

68
119
945
41
47
21
60
108
61
9
37
63
15
54
43
66

3.78
4.46
3.59
3.66
3.89
3.98
3.65
3.75
3.96
4.04
3.86
3.57
3.80
3.76
3.75
4.24

218
412
273
236
120
837

6.58
4.24
4.43
4.77
4.65
4.31

127
148
66
73
24
299

5.16
3.43
4.36
3.80
3.78
3.48

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

221 $3.73
350 4.08

197
206
85
3,130
138
183
74
280
374
316
93
153
210
97
191
110
403

Majority covered

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

60 $4.19
187 5.16
14
14
164
7
7
7
15
14
6
9
-

12
25
19

690 $4.70
1,365 5.55
117
105
52
1,640
66
109
37
160
217
201
59
75
102
64
109
48
223

4.83
5.95
4.87
5.40
5.50
5.41
5.51
5.13
5.43
5.48
5.70
5.27
4.88
5.72
5.58
4.88
5.87

7.64
3.52
4.52

102
229
94
96
63
404

6.70
4.11
5.22
5.12
4.62
4.20

-

-

-

3.83

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. For definition of regions used
in this or subsequent tables, see appendix A.




Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

5.16
6.10
5.35
4.87
5.64
5.51
6.41
5.62
5.38
4.35
-

128

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

None or minority covered

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

113 $4.73
287 5.51

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

95 $4.27
199 4.53

495
28
25
10
35
59
51
11
41
15
32
65

5.17
4.77
4.83
4.54
5.16
5.62
5.00
5.11
4.21
4.58
4.60
5.01
5.01
5.13

-

39
55
34
17
28
64

6.47
4.08
4.42
5.28
5.36
4.69

26
55
30
41
8
100

24
23

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

5.94
4.52
3.99
3.90
4.00
4.25

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

181 $3.85
284 4.07
48
92
494
20
35
10
34
67
30
26
32
9
40
22
48

3.93
4.57
3.86
4.14
4.01
4.22
3.91
3.97
4.04
3.91
3.99
3.72
3.91
4.19
4.34

102
108
45
51
16
260

5.04
3.47
4.63
3.79
3.64
3.50

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

_
-

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings
_
-

330 $3.04
7 3.31
8 3.19
12 2.95
23 3.11
12 3.28
6 3.20
21 3.08
-

-

-

10
7

-

5.20
3.14
-

Majority covered

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

_

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings

_

267 $5.45
32
44
493
24
9
64
48
18
10
52
37
7
18
10
80

5.61
5.29
5.24
5.28
5.57
5.38
5.34
5.77
4.62
5.53
5.20
5.48
5.65
5.94
5.35

Num­
ber of
work­
ers

_
-

Aver­
age
hourly
earn­
ings
_
-

-

16 $5.06
142 4.49
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

122

5.08

3 Includes data for workers in classification in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data or data do not meet publication criteria.

-

Table 9.

Occupational earnings: Atlantic City and Vineland—M illville—Bridgeton, N .J.1—All shops

(Number and average straight-time hourly earning*3 of w orken tn selected occupation! in men's and boys* tuit >nd coat manufacturing establishment!, April 1979)

Number
O c c u p a t i o n a n d sex

ALL

of
wor kers

P R O D U C T I O N WORK? R S - . . . . . . . . . . . .
M E N ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
W O M F N ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

A . 60

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

42
5

59
13
46

93
12
81

81
8

83
14
69

59
12
47

69
7

73

62

71
18
53

5
5
5

1
1

1

2
2
2
3

5
1
5
1

$ 4 .7 6
5 .9 1
4 .3 5

122
22
100

151
21
130

130
15
115

82
12
70

F IN IS H E R S , H A N D .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV F .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
W O M FN ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T MrCKlTY ii C

47
35
43

3 .7 0
3 .9 7

18
8
18

1
1
1

5
5

3 .5 5

8
6
7

5

F ITTF R S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
* I N C E N T I V E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
W O M E N ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN SP E CTO R S* F I N A L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TIM E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U D M F N ______
_____. . . . . . . _____. . . . . . . .

37
18
31

4 .7 7
5 .9 3
4 .1 0
4 .0 8
4 .1 7
3 .8 9
7 .3 1
4 .5 8
3 .9 3
4 .6 4

6

1
3

2

_

6

3

2

2
2
2

_
_

3
1
3

25

78

25
2

72
2
2

P R O D U C TIO N

COAT

TIM E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TKlfCUTTWC
COLLAR

PR EPA R IN G ,
D a n n TMc . . . .

FELL

EXCEPT

8 .6 0

6 .4 0

6 .0 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

70
11
59

48
12
36

48
14
34

50
12
38

3
_
_

3
3

x

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .6 0

9 .2 0

50
41
49

47
29
18

51
28
23

37
26

20
12
8

18
17
1

17
15
2

9
8
1

8
8

3
3

9
9

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

_
_

_

1
1

1
1

_

_
_

x

_

5 .4 0

9 .8 0 L 0 .4 0 L1 .0 0
AND
OVER
9 . 8 0 1 0 .4 0 L I . 0 0
9 .2 0

11

LIN IN G ,

BOTTOM

JO IN UNDERCOLLAR, JO IN SLEEVE
L I N I N G , O R P I E C E P C C K E T S .........................
LIN IN G
M A K E R . B O D Y . . . . . . . . . . ...............
PAD

COLLAR
A N D L A P E L S ......................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . ............................................. ...
P O C K E T S E T T I N G AND T A C K I N G . . . . • • •
IN CEM T I V E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU F n C P T A D P _________
. ..
SFW I N S L E F V F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I N C E N T I V E . . . . . . . . . . . . ......................
Cl CC U P MAlf T MC _ n n T U
TMTPMTTUP
TAPE A R M H O L E S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S H A P F R S . . . . . . . . _______ _______________________

See footnotes at end o f table.




13
3
25
6

5 .5 5
5 .2 6
4 .2 9
3 .9 0

_

_
_

_

8

2
6

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

6
2
8

2
2
2

3
1
2

4
5
4
5

32
7

28
2

28
2

1
44
8

25

26
1

26
2

_

_

4

2
60
21
39
2

A

1

1

1
1
1
4
4
3
_

2
3

x

34
2

40
3

1
30
2

36
1
2

32

37
2

28
5

5

_

-

_

4

1
2
2
2
x
1
3

1
x
x
x

3
3
2
2
1
1

_
_
2
2

1
1
_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_
_

2

3

1

6

9

37
2

41

17
2

19

22

45
1

16
2

35

35
4

41
2

15

19
2

22
3

44
5

14
8

2

1
1

_

1

_

x

x

2

x
_

2

1

_
_

1

_

35

x

3

2
2

1
2
2
2
x
x

1

f
1
1

x
x
x

3
3

_

2

1

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_

_
_

12
19

5
11
1

19
5

10

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
x
x

_

_
_
_

_
8

6

8

1

x

x

x

x
x

_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
3
x

_
4

_

_

_

_

2

8
1

_

_

_
_

_

6

_

4

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

18
24

2

1

1

2

3

5 .3 8

2

1
3

_

3

x

1

_

_

3

_

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

-

2
2

_

-

_

-

-

-

_
_

_

1

_

£

1

2

£
3

4

4

_

_

AND

J O I N S H O U L D E R , C L O T H .................. .......................
i n t M ST DP SPAMS
_________________________

MPN_______t t r i t M i i i i . M i

32
19
27
72
67 2
61
611
56

f

_
_

P IEC IN G

S E T T IN G ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BOW

8 .0 0

O C CU P ATIO N S

IN C E N T IV E ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BUTTONHOLE M A K IN G .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C O I l AR

37

U N D C L L A R S ) CF
6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0 7. 60

F A B R IC A T IO N 4

PRESSERS, F IN IS H ,
M A C H I N F i •••••••••
S E W I N G - M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R S ? •• .........................
T IM F .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
R A S T E R S .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OI IT THAI CCU T Mr

no

R E C E I L V I N G S T R A I G H T - T I H E H O U R L ^ E A R N II N G S
4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .00 5 .2 0
5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 .0 0

3 .0 0

1 ,5 6 7
404
1 , 16 3

SELECTED

N U F B E R OF WOFU E R S
4 .0 0 4 .2 0
A . 40

2 .8 0
AN D
hourly 2
earnings2 U N D E R
3 .0 0
Average

*

* ■

11

5 ll4

_

■C
s
3 5

A 5?

2

65
24
14
12
63
5 5
c c.
32
27

4 .0 7
4 .4 4
5 .0 6
5 .4 0
4 .6 6
4 .5 1
A K?

6
1

15
5

2
2

4
2
6
8

2 2
18
16
f

4 .9 2
5 .2 0
4 *^16
4 .6 0
5 .5 9
6 .1 1

3

5
2
2

1
1
4

_

4
3

6
2

4

1
1
2
3

_
_

1

2

2

9
9

|
1
l

_

6
8

2
5
1

.
_

1

_
5

1

4
2

2

4

3

1
1
3
3

-

1

_

1
2

*
2

2
-

5
3

1
1

_

I
1

_
_
2

3
3

f

7
7

1
1

1

1
1
4

1

2

1

2
1

x

1

x

3
3

2
3

5

2

1

x

1

_

x
4
4

x
x

4
3

1

x
fx

£
£
3
4

1
1
g
7

1
2

x

1
1

5
3

x
x

2

3
3

1
3
3

1

x

8
5

5

x

2

1

1
1

x
1
1

x

2

x

3
4
4

1

x
x

1

1

2
2

1

x

_

2

x

x

2
2

1

2

1

1
1

_

Table 9. Continued—Occupational earnings: Atlantic City and Vineland—M illville—Bridgeton, N .J.1—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earning*? of workers In selected occupations In men's and boys* w it and coat manufacturing establishment!, April 1979)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING S TR A IG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS C IN D CL LARS I OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

.6
.0 .2 .4 .60
.20 .4 .60
.8 0 0
.2 .4 .6
.4 .8
2 0 3.00 3 0 3 0 3 0 3.80 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 4.80 5.00 5 5 0 5 5.80 6 .0 0 6 0 6 0 7.20 7 0 8 .00 8.60 9.20 9 01 .4 1 1 .0 0
.8

Average
hourly 2 AND
earnings UNDER

.2 .4 .6 .80 .0 .20 .4 .6 .8
.8 .2
3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 4.00 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 5 0 5 5 0 5 0 5 0 6 .0 0 6.40 6 0 7 0 7.60 8 .0 0
.0 .2 .4 .6 .8

8

.6 9.20 9 0 01 1 .0 0
0
.801 .4

AND
CVER

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT FAB R ICATION— CONTINUED
THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING
PULI F
R
...............
T Kir*CUT Tli c
ijNPFRPRFS
^ . T TT T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
h f n

. . . . . . . t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3
1
9
2
5
1
4
5
2

40
.4
34
*6
47
* 9
58
.6
5.84

$

2
*

3

4

1

2
2
1

4
3

3
3

3

1

2

_

2
1

l

_

1
1

3
3
_

2
2
2
2

2
2
2

2
1
1

1

_

4
4

_
_

_
_

_
_

3

4
4

1

4

2

2

2

2

2

4
1
1

2

2
11
10

2
2
2

_

3
2

3

2

3
3

_

4
4

3
3

2
2

_

_
_

_
_

MISCELLANEOUS

41
.1
37
. 2
*9
_ 45
69 35
. 5
4*
fo
10

!?

jn a v

r\ T f>TO T a I I T H D

f8

3

7A

3 1
o
c.
1 1*
9
17
6 1
C

2
2

5

g
g

2

3
3

1
2
2
2
2

1

1 The A tlantic C ity and Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton combined metropolitan area consists of Atlantic and Cumberland counties.
3
Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative
sample o f establishments, are designed to measure the level o f occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with
previous studies may not reflect expected wage movements because of changes in the universe over time and associated necessary change
in the sample composition and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could
decrease an occupational average, even though most establishments increased wages between the periods being compared.




_
_
_

2
2
3
4
s
6
7
*

2
2
2

3
3

2
2
2

2
2

2

Approximately 72 percent of the production workers covered by the survey are incentive-rated.
Where separate information is not shown by method o f wage payment, all or virtually all workers are incentive-rated.
All or virtually all workers are men.
All or virtually all workers are women.
Includes sewing machine operators in addition to those shown separately.
All or virtually all workers are time-rated.

_

2
2

Table 10. Occupational earnings: Baltimore, M d.1—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys* suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS.. . . . . . . . . . . .

Number
of
workers

Average
2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 . 1 0
hourly
AND
earnings2 UNDER
3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 . 2 0

2 ,5 4 0

$ 5 .2 2

17
45
38
42
35

6 .6 8
6 .7 6

7
12
11
9
23
51
21
30

6 .0 0
5 .7 0
5 .5 6
5 .8 7
5 .1 8
4 .8 5
4 .3 8
5 .1 7

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

NUMBER OF MOfIKERS RECEIVING 5TRA1IG H T -I IME HOURLY EARN 1NGS U N DOLLAR S ) OF—
3 . 6 0 3 . 8 0 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 .6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 . 4 0 5 . 6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

9 .2 0 9 .6 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

9 .6 0 1 0 . 0 0

178

91

48

89

68

69

90

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_

2
2
2

2

3

2
2

2
2

2
2

4
4

2

3

4 .6 0

77

92

____

-

_
-

4 .2 0 4 . 4 0

100

4 .8 0 5 .0 0

103

1 24

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

9 .2 0

1 47

1 09

111

1 23

119

210

166

202

95

34

42

17

12

17

7

1

2
j
10

_

9
5

1
1
3

_

1
j

l
3
1
3

-

-

-

-

-

“
:
_

3

2
2

T

t

4J

9

7

1R
_

”

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING

CUTTERS, l I N I K o l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CUTTERS AKO MARKERS, CLOTH.......................
M E N .• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • • •
T I M f ___ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6 .8 6
6 .8 8

-

_

2
2

_

2
-

-

i
i
_

_

2

_

2
2

1
l
3
1

_

-

-

-

1

20
8
i i
XX
24
21
24
7 1

2
2
4
*¥

4
4

COAT FABRICATION
BUTTONHOLE MAKERS, HAND.*5. •
..............
COLiAR SETTERS, H A N D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WOMEN.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
f i n i s h e r s , h a n o - - 5^ ________ ___________ _
F IT T E R S ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T IM E ........................
IN C E N T IV E .......... . . . . . . . . .
WOMEN:
IN C E N T IV E • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
INSPECTOR S • F IN A L 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
I N f fN T I V F r . - - . T - . T - T - T T - T - - T
PAIRERS AND TURNERS. . . . . . . . . . . . - . . .
T Kir CluT IUC
PRESSERS* F I N I S H , M A C H I N E . . . . . . . . . .
in c e n t iv e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MEN......................................................................
SEWING—
MACHINF O P E R A T O R S . . . . . . . . . . .
T I M E . ___. . . . . . _____. . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E ...................
WOMEN.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T IM E ........................
IN C E N T IV E ...................
R A S T E R S ............. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T IM E ........................
IN C E N T I V E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WOMEN.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TI M
E
. . . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E ...................
BUTTON S E W I N G .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E ...................
BUTTONHOLE M A K IN G *. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 NCE K T lV E e e e e o e e e e e e e e e e e e e e
COLLAR S E IT lN G t *

See footnotes at end o f table.




1
1

_
_

x

2
_
_

i

-

1

_
_

-

_
_

_
_

2
2

2
5
3
4

2
2

2

1
1
1
2
4
4

5 .1 7
4 .4 0
4 -4 6
5 .4 0

2
1

97
92
57
9 32
136
796
7 97
135
662
158
12
1 46
136
12
124
36
28
13
9
23

5 *8 0
5 .9 2
6 .4 7
5 .4 3
4 .0 2
5 .6 7
5 .2 6
4 .0 1
5 .5 1
5 .5 9
4 .9 0
5 .6 4
5 .4 6
4 .9 0
5 .5 1
5 .2 1
5 .6 9
5 .1 0
5 .5 6
5 .4 9

2
2

3
2

_
_

2
3

52
24
28
52
24
28
A

25
16
9
25
16
9
4

4
4

4
4

4
4

4

2

j

2

1
1

3
3

3
2

2
2

17
9

15
6
9
15
6
9
1

21
a
15
21
6
15
6

15
3
12
15
3
12

1
1

18
5
13
16
5
11
5
1

6

a

1

a

a
_
_

\
l

4
x
x

_
_
2

_
_
-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

i
i
2

3
3
3
29

22
28

21
29

20

21
4

x

2
2

a

2
3
1
30

x

1
1

17
9

3

3
3
2

2

_
_
2

3

_
32
9
23
30
9
21
5
5
5
5
_
_
_
1

£
2

4

1

1
3

a

a

a
l
5

a
3
5
2
2
_

a
a

4
4
4
4
3
3

2
2
4

a
a
3
35
3
32
31
3
28

2
1
7
5
2
2
1
52
45
50

a

44

4

a

2
2
4
2
2
5
5
2
2

3
7

a
3
7

j

4
2
2

.

2

2
2
7
7
3
Ov

3

2
1
10
1v
lA
8
61

5
30

6

61
52

56
io

45

52
14

io
17
X *5

25
e

14
10

15
11
XX

5

£
1

1
3

1
30
14
9
35

1

J
2

1

2
2
2
2
5
i
X

1
X

2
2

2
2
3

2

3
57
43
53
14
39
7
2
3
7
2
5
2

~

3
37
28
*25
2
2
4
2
2

l

i

1

4
48
6
42
46
£
4n
15

3
3
3
4
■
2
59
49
47
pn

56
45
4
41
5

20
16

5
3

16

3
2
o
£

l

14
15
X3
J
14

l

*

2

2
2
g

*

2

3
9
8
1 A£
a
J
101
90
3
87
16
2
15
x*t
2

2

2
2

5

1
3
1

1
_

~
j

_
*
2

*

2
_

14

3

13

2

7
_

*
~
J

j
£

_
c,

p\
■

_

J

’I
3

l

4

1

_

_

1V
XA
2
i
X

2
1
2

2

j
i

Table 10. Continued—Occupational earnings: Baltimore, Md.1
—All shops
d u m b er and average straight-time hourly earnings3 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boyt' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

SELECTED

Number Average 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 . 4 0
AND
of
hourly
workers earnings2 U N D E R
3 . 0 0 3 .1 0 3 . 2 0 3 .4 0 3 . 6 0

[QLLAFt s i o r
NUMBER CF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-1LJLME-JHOURLY EAR>^JN £S _ ( I N C
3 . 6 0 3 .8 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 . 8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 . 4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 4 0 6 . 8 0 7 . 2 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4,. 2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0 5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0 6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

9 .2 0 1 9 . 6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

9 .2 0

9 .6 0 1 0 . 0 0

P R O D U C T IO N
OCCUPATIONS—

CONTINUED
COAT FABRICATION— CONTINUED
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS— CONTINUED
FACING TACKING5 ..............................................
.
FE LL BOOY L IN IN G , BOTTOM AND
S I OE...................................................................... ..
I N C E N T I V E . . . . .....................................
WOMEN................................................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . ................................. ..
J O IN SHOULDER, CLOTH?..............................
J O IN S I OE SEAMS.......................................
W OMEN.......................................................... ..
J O IN UNCERCGLLAR, J O IN SLEEVE
L IN IN G , OR PIE CE POCKETS...................
I N C E N T I V E . . ............................................
WOMEN................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
L IN IN G MAKER, BOOY......................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
W OMEN............................................. ..
IN C E N T IV E ...................... .........................
PAD COLLAR AND L A P E L S . . . . . . ..............
IN C E N T IV E .................................................

16

$ 4 .8 7

2

-

4

-

-

-

-

1

-

—

-

-

-

-

1

1

1
1

4
4

-

2
2

-

—

~

-

—

42
39
38
35
37
25
21

5 .0 5
5 .1 7
4 .9 0
5 .0 2
5 .8 2
5 .5 3
5 .1 4

2
2
2
2
-

2
2
2
2

-

-

-

5
5
5
5
2
2

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

4
3
4
3
2
—

2
2
2
2
1
1

3
3
3
3
-

4
4
4
4
-

3
3

1
1
1
1
8
3
3

1
2
2

4
4
4
4
2
2
-

1
1
1
1
5
2
2

6
6
4
4
6
3
3

3
3
1
1
4
2
2

“
-

2
2
2
2
2
-

1
1
1
1
_
-

-

“
-

-

1
1
1
1
3
-

-

”
“
-

5
3
5
3
-

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
-

2
2
2
2
-

-

1
1
1
1
-

-

1
1
1
1
4
3
4
3
-

4
3
4
3
-

6
6
6
6
-

-i
2
2
2
2
-

9
8
8
7
1
1
l
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
-

4
4
2
2
3
3
1
1
-

-

1
1
1
1
“
-

1
1
1
1
-

2
1
1
2
1
1
-

-

1
1
1
1
•
-

4
1
3
4
1
3
1
-

_

2
2
-

_

5

2

6

2

2

7
6

3
2

5
5

2
2

6
5

2
2

2
-

6
4
-

2
2
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
3
1
1
2
2

3
1
1
2
2
1
4
4

4
-

—
—
-

5
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2

2
2
-

_
—
2
2
-

2
4
4
4
2
2
4
5
5
-

5
4
-

_
2

4
4
4
4
1
1
I
1
2
1
1
-

7

3
2
2
2
-

3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
3
2
1
—
-

2
2
2
2
4
4
4
4
3

-

_
1
1
1
1
-

10
10
8
8
1
1
1
1
4
4
2
2
11
1
10
11
1
10
4
2
1
2
1
3
—
1
3
3

2
2
2
2
-

_

1
1
1
1
1
l
1
1
3
3
1
1
6
-

4
4
2
2
4
4
4
4
-

1
-

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
5
5
-

3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
-

7
4
3
7
4
3
R
3

6
6
4
4
1
1
1
1
5
1
4
5
1
4
4
4
4
4
1
3
2
1
1

-

2
2
-

_

_

3
3
3

6
4
2

-

-

63
58
54
49
24
21
22
19
13
12

I N C E N T IV E ..............................................
POCKET SETTING AND TACKING.................
T IM E .............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN..............................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ......................... ................... .
SEW DARTS, CLOTH?.........................................
SEW EOGE TAPE....................................................
_
fKirCMTfWP_________

10
87
14
73
79
13
66
32
23
20

IN C E N T IV E .................................................
SEW IN S L EE V E -................................................
SLEEVE MAKING, CLOTH?..............................
IN C E N T IV E ......................................
TAPE ARMHOLES.............. .. ..................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . . ...................................
S H A P E R S ? ..............................................................
t a t i ro c
Al i AD/iiiaan

18
43
30
26
17
16
10

5 .2 5
5 .4 0
5 .1 4
5 .3 0
5 .5 4
5 .8 5
5 .5 7
5 .9 2
6 .0 0
6 .0 9
5 .9 4
6 .0 4
5 .6 6
4 .0 6
5 .9 9
5 .5 4
3 .9 9
5 .8 4
6 .7 4
5 .1 9

10
THREAC TRIMMERS AND BASTING
PULLERS......................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WCMEN................................... .........................

See footnotes at end o f table.




5 *02
5 .1 8
5 .5 4
5 .1 7
5 .2 0
5 .5 1
5 .5 7
6 .8 2
5 .4 5
6*22

64
59
52

4 .7 7
4 .7 8
4 .5 0

t

6
t

-

2
2
2
2
-

1
1
1
1
-

1
1
1
1
-

2
2
-

-

1

5
5
5
5
1

_

1
1
2
1
1
-

1
3
1
1
1
1
-

J

2
2
2

_
-

2

3
1
3

-

-

2
2
-

2
2
2

_
2
3
3
1
1
-

4
4
4

-

-

4
3
4

4
4
4

1
-

—
—

1
1
1

6
6
4

2
2
2

3
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
6
5
1
1
2

3
3
1

1
1
1

7
7
7

1
I
1

_

_

-

-

5
-

4
3
3
1
1
2

2
2
2

3
3
1

_

1

_

1

2
-

-

-

_

l

1
1
1
1

~

3
3
1

-

-

1
2

Table 10. Continued—Occupational earnings: Baltimore, Md.1—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earning^ o f workers in selected occupations in men's and boys* suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)
NUMBER

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

OF

WORKERS

Average 2 . 9 0 3 . 0 0 3 . 1 0 3 . 2 0 3 . 4 0 3 . 6 0 3 . 8 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0
AND
hourly
UNDER
earnings3
3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 . 4 0 3 . 6 0 3 . 8 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0

R E C E IV IN G

S TR A IG H T-T IM E

HOURLY

EA R N IN G S

C IN

DOLLARS!

4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0 6 . 0 0

4 .6 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

3
3

_

7
7

7
7

4 . 8 0 5 .0 0

OF—

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

6 .4 0 6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

9 .2 0 9 .6 0 1 0 .0 0

12
12

6
6

7
7

9
9

6
6

8
8

2
2

-

4
4

_

2

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_
—

_
-

1
1

_
_
_

_
_
_

9 .2 0 9 .6 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CO NTINU ED.
COAT FABRICATIO N— CONTINUED
UNDEKPRESSERS..............................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................

109
103

$ 5 .8 8
6 .0 2

13
13
7
205
23
1 82

6 .4 5
4 .4 1
4 .4 8
3 .3 4
4 .7 9
4 .1 4
4 .8 7

22
12
10
10
9
19
28
26
21
19
20
16
15
35
32

4 .1 0
4 .0 3
4 .0 9
4 .9 3
5 .0 8
4 .5 6
4 .9 2
5 .0 7
4 .6 3
4 .6 6
4 .4 0
4 .7 5
4 .0 3
5 .1 3
5 .3 4

12
17
17
15
20

6 .0 6
3 .8 0
4 .2 8
4 .2 0
4 .5 8

11
7

4
4

-

_

-

-

1
1

_

_

_
-

-

6
6

3
3

3
2

4
4

3
3

3
2

_

-

2
2

1
1

3
1
2

1
1

1
1
1
15
2
13

8
2
6

9
9

8
8

5
5

25
25

16
1
15

12
1
11

1

2

1

_

-

_

1

1

-

_

-

_

_

1
1
1

1
1

_
-

_
_

_•

_

1
1

_
_

_

5
5

1
1

6
6

_

_
_

_

-

_
_

J
_

7

?
2

5
5

2
2

4
4

1
1

3
3

2
2

-

1

1

2

2

f
1

1

-

-

TROUSER FABRICATIO N
I NCPPrTAB C. P t M A l l _____________________
WOMEN. T T T -T fT T -r-r-T T T -T _________ PRESSERSr F I N I S H ................................... ..
WOMEN. T T . - r r T . T . T . - r . - r T ____ ______
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS............................
T IM E .............. ..............................................
IN C E N T IV E ..............................................
WOMEN:
T IM E ...................................... .......................
ATTACH F L Y i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
kO M FN.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ATTACH WAISTBAND..........................................
IN C E N T IV E .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B AR TACKING i. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
J O IN SEAMS...................... .................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . .............. .........................
MAKF POCKETS*. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
fN fF M T f VF____________ ___ _______
S E R G IO ___ . . . . ________________________
$ T IT C H P C C K E T S i-. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN C F K T rv p ___________ T ___________
UNDERPRESSERS.............. .......................... ...............
IN C E N T IV E ..........................................

29
4
25

2
2
4
4
5
1
4

_
12
2
10

2
2
3
3

8
2
6

7
7

9
—
9

5
1
4

7
7

6
6

-

4

1
1

3
3

1
1
1

-

3

_
1

2
2

—

_

_

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

4
4
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
2
2

1
1
1
1

—

_
-

-

-

1

2

_

_
_

-

2
2

3
3

-

1
1

1
1
1
”

_
-

1
1
_

_

1
_
-

_

-

6
4
2

4

_
_

1
1

1
1
9
3
6

_
1
1
8
6
4
2
2
4
4
4
4
2

2
3
3

_

_
_
_
_
-

1
1
1
-

-

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2

2
2

3
2
2
2

2
1
1
2

_
2

2
2
2

_

_
_
1
1
1

J

3

2
2

3
3

_

1
1

1
1
1
-

1
1
1
1
1

_

_

-

1
1
_

1
1

_
-

:
—
i
A
2
2
1

l
1

_

_

7
2

_

_
-

_

_

-

-

-

~

MISCELLANEOUS
ADJUSTERS * R F D A IR F R S lV -tfT T T -T T * T * T .
JAN { TO R S -_________ rT- T t T t T t T T T f T t t t T r
p a c k e r s ____ T1T. f l . t r T t l I t l t r t r t t t T t
T I M F . . . . . . . . ___ T T ______________
kHAK O l ^ T « IB l| T p # S - - - T-r t T t t _______ tT T

3
5

1
1
1
2

1
1
1

2
2
2

1
3
3
1

1 The Baltim ore Standard Metropolitan Area consists o f the city o f Baltimore; and the counties o f Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll,
Harford, and Howard.
1 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative
sample o f establishments, are designed to measure the level o f occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with
previous studies may not reflect expected wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among
establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most establishments




2
3
2
2

7
7

:
_
1
X

_
2

increased wages between periods being compared. Approximately 6 8 percent o f the production workers covered by the survey are incen­
tive-rated.
3 All or virtually all workers are men.
4 All or virutally all workers are incentive-rated.
5 All or virtually all workers are women.
4 Ajl or virtually all workers are time-rated.

Table 11. Occupational earnings: Baltimore M d.1—Regular and cutting shops
(Number and average ttraight-tlme hourly earning** o f worker* in selected occupations in men*» and boy** suit end coat manufacturing estebliihmentt, April 1979)
Number
of

O c c u p a t i o n a nd sex

w o rk e r s

ALL

P R fQ U C T ICN

SELECTED

W O R K E R S ___________ . . . . . .

S TR A IG H T-T IM E
i.8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

> .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

45

50

58

62

81

70

46

I

_

_

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

NUP I B E R
3 .6 0 3 .8 0

F WORKERS
4 .0 0 4 .2 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

41

51

50

_

_

1*609

S 5 .1 2

163

79

43

68

50

32
14

P R C D U C TIC N

R E CE I VIN O
4 .4 0 4 .6 0

2 .9 0
AN D
ho urly
earnings1 U N D E R
3 .0 0

Av er age

6*70
6 .3 3

_

_

_

_

_

C IN O O L LA R S ) O F —
6 .0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

9 .2 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

9 .2 0

9 .6 0 1 0 .0 0

82

67

101

118

122

72

25

23

13

11

13

5

4

HOURLY

_

_

_

_

_

_

20
8
11
24

2

_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

1

-

-

-

-

-

_

1
1
1

_

_

-

_

_,

-

-

-

-

__
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

2
2
2

2
2
2

_
_
_

5

7

I
6
6

EARK I N G S
5 .8 0

9 .6 0

C C C U P A TIC N S

C U TTIN G

TIM E

2
_

2

17
45
38

6 .6 8
6 .7 6

35

6*88

7

-

-

-

1
1

_

_

33
21
12

6 .0 0
5*70
5 .5 6
5 .8 7
5 .1 8
4 .5 9
4 .3 8
4 .9 5

kCMEK:
IN fE K T IV E ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
is if n c r Tfioc
c ta j Ai 5

12

PA1RFRS

20

CUTTERS

AND

MARKERS,

01 O T H ____ . . . . . .

T IM E •••••••••••••••••••••••>
^ ^ U f * * * * * * * ...................... . . # • • • • • • •

CCAT

_

_

_

_

_

_

1
1

w
e

_

2

1

1
1
2

~

1
1

2

2
>
10
4
9
5

F I N I S H E R S * H A N O i v . 5. ...........................................
e i t t e r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TIM E
1 NC E N T I V E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

T U R N E R S - - - ____ _____ . . . . . . .

U iC C lT VOC
n n rrrrn r
r tiiT fu

uiAin

12
11
9
23

13
11

tu rc iT iU C

21
24
1

4
4
4
4

-

-

1

1
1
1

7

c

1

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

1

_
_

_

2

-2
2

_

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

2
2

2
2

2

2

4 .9 5

2

2

5 .2 1

2

f

5 l9 1
6 .4 6

-

1

2
_
_

_

_
_

2
2

2
2
1
4
4

_
_

_
_

_

-

-

-

1

-

I
I

_

_
_

2
2
1

_

1*
1
I

2
1
1
1

2
1
1

-

3

3

2
1

5
1

2
2

_
_

_
_

1

1

4
2
2

1
2

1

2

2

L

1

1

j

1

1
1

_
_

1
2
2
2

2

_

j

_

2
4
4

1
2
2

2

_
_

2
_

_

_

_

_

. 1

1

1
4
4

*
£
2

2

2
3

~

1

3
3

1
1
1

1
1
1
1

f r
. .
. .
. .

—
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .

50
486
97
389

5
5
3
5

.8
.2
.8
.6

2
7
2
3

2
46
22
24

22
14
8

22
4

14
4

4

4

2

2
15
9

6

11
4
7

2

15
6
9

12
2
10

WGMEH:
R A S T E R $ _________ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I N D E N T I V E . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . .
B U T T O N S E W I N G .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
o iiY t r kiur.i c ai A if t n r 5
F E L L BCCY L IN IN G *
BO TTO M AND
S ID E • • • • .• • • • • • • • • • • ............
I N C E N T I V E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

97
87
82
23

3 .8 2
5 .6 8
5 .7 2
5 .1 9
4 .6 9

20
17

5 .3 4
5 .6 7

12
15
14

5 .6 8
5 .5 4
5 .5 6

J O IN UNDERCLLLAR* JO IN SLEEVE
L I N I N G * O R P I E C E P O C K E T S . . . ...............
IN C E N T IV E ...................

24

4 .8 7
5 .0 6




*
_

l
6

■
3
C
4

4
2

_

3

3

2

_
16
4
12

i
_
_

1

i

14
4

18
4
14

10

2
14
2
12

6

3

1

5

3
1

4
2

1

2

I

4

3

5

15
5

25
11

21
2

33
1

10

14

19

12
3
9

30
3
27

11
I

1

3
2

2

l

12
12
1

5
5
2

2
2

1
1

3
3
j

32

-

_

_

2
2

2

4

1
1
3

30

29

5
33

35

30

29

6
6

10
10
1

_

_

_

_

8

3
7

33

8

7

5

7

9
9
2

5
5
2

2
2

_

2
2

2
2

2
2

1
1

-

2

_

1
1
1

2

_
_
_

1

S H O U L D E R * C L O T H ? . . . . . ......................
S IC E S E A M S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I N C E N T I V E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

See footnotes at end o f table.

*
_

4

2
7

2

2
35

2
PRESSERS* F IN IS H * AACH l Nf *
5 Pm in g ~ m a c m in e o p e r a t o r s . .
T I M F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I N C E N T IV E ........ . .

JO IN
J O IN

2

FA B R IC A TIO N

B U T T C N H C L E M A K E R S * H A N O I '.5..............................
f fll 1 A R S E T T E R S , H A N D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
in c e n t iv e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

AN D

2

2

21

2
2

2

_
_

2
2

4

-

_

1
1

_
_

-

2

-

2
2

-

-

_

2

-

-

1
1

_

1
1

_

-

-

4

-

1
_
-

2
2

_

_
-

1
1
-

_
_

■-

4

1
_

_

_

-

1
2
1

1

1
1

1
_

• _

2

_

2
2

2
2

2
2

1
1

3

3
2

3
3

3

1
1

3

-

3

1
1

3

_

_

.

_

-

-

-

1

_

~

-

_

_

_

-

2
2

2
2

-

~

”

~

“

Table 11. Continued—Occupational earnings: Baltimore M d.1—Regular and cutting shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings* o f workers In selected occupations in men's and boys* suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

SELECTED

CCAT

3 .4 0

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAI G H T-TIM E HOURLY’ EARf INGS I I N C
I0LLARSI OF—
3 . 6 0 3 .6 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 4 0 6 . 8 0 7 . 2 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1
1
-

-

■-

Number Average
2 . 9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0
hourly
AND
of
workers earnings1 UNDER
3 . 0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 . 4 0

Occupation and sex

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

2
2
2
2
—

-

-

-

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
- ’

3
3
1
1
-

4
1
3
4
1
3

1
1
1
1

1
- ■
1
1
1
1
-

1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2

1
1
1

2
2
1
1

4 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

9 .2 0

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
2

1
1
l
1
3
3
5

1
1
1
1

-

2
2
2
2

-

-

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1

1

1
1
1

5

1

2

2

2

-

2

1
1

1
1

1
1

2
-

5
5

5
4

1

2
2

2
2

2
1

-

2
-

1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
-

1
-

1
5
-

5
2
1
3
3

4
2
1
4
4

3
3
■4
3
3
2
2
1
1

2
2
1
1
“

1
1
1
-,
2
2
-.

-

-

1
3
3
3
3
1
-

2
■
-!
.-f
~
-

-

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

2
-

3
3
1
1

1
1
3
2

2
2
3
3

2
2
1
1

3
3
4
4

_
9
9

6
4
4
4

1
1
3
3

3
3
7
7

_
6
6

_
6
6

_
2
2

_
-

6
6

2
2

21
21

2
13
13

■11
10

1
-

—

1
1

-

-

1
1
1
1
1
1
“

1
~

3
5
5
3
3
-

2
1
1
-

-

-

-

1

-

-

6
6
-

-

-

-

-

-

2

4

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

P R C CU CTIC N C C C U P A T IO N S -CQNT1NUEC
F A B R IC A T IO N —

S E W IN G -M A C H IN E

C O N TIN U ED

OPERATORS—

C O N TIN U ED

T I M E . . . . . ...............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ........................................................
S E W E D G E T A P E .................................................................
I N C E N T I V E . . ........................................................
S E W I N S L E E V E t ...............................................................
S L E E V E M A K I N G * C L O T H .........................................
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................................
W C M E N ...................................................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................................
T A P E A R M H O L E S ! ...............................................................
S H A P E R S ................................ ....................... ....................................
TA ILO R S *
A L L A R O U N D . . ............... ..............................
T I M E ...............................................................................

16
14
14
12
7
6
42
a
34
35
8
27
11
9
26
17
16
16
15
15
8
15
10

$ 5 .6 8
6 .0 5
5 .7 5
6 .1 9
5 .8 5
6 .0 0
5 .4 9
3 .5 7
5 .9 4
5 .1 2
3 .5 7
5 .5 8
5 .0 6
5 .5 5
5 .4 5
4 .9 6
4 .9 7
4 .8 4
4 .8 4
5 .6 3
7 .0 5
5 .4 5
6 .2 2

TH R E A C TR IM M E R S AND B A S T I N G
P U L L E R S ..................................................................... ...................
I N C E N T I V E ............................................. ...
O N O E R P R E S S E R S ......................
I N C E N T I V E . ...........................................................

37
32
73
68

4 .9 7
5 .0 1
6 .0 0
6 .1 9

L I N I N G M A K E R * B O D Y .................................................
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................................
W O M E N ......................... .........................................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . . . . . . ............... ...
PAD

C O LL A R AND L A P E L S .
I N C E N T I V E . .................................................... ...
P O C K E T S E T T I N G A N C T A C K I N G ......................
T I M E .................. .............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................................
W O M E N ................................ ..................................................

-

-

2
2
-

£
4
2
6
4
2
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
-

-

2
2
2
2

2

2

2
-

2
-

2
3
3
3
3
1
-

■•. -

1
1
1
1
1
2
-

-

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
■
*
-

6
6
10
6

2
2
4
4

2
-

-

-

-

2
1
-

2
2

1
1

2
2
2
2

1
1
1
_
-

-

*

‘
TROUSER

FA B R IC A TIO N

I N S P E C T O R S * F I N A L 4 ........................................................
.
P R E S S E R S s F I N I S H ........................................................... .
S E W I N G - M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R S ................................ ...
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................................
A T T A C H F L Y ! .........................................................................
A T T A C H W A I S T B A N D ! ................................... ...
B A R T A C K I N G .4 .................. ................ .............................. ...
JO IN

S E A M S ............................................................................
I N C E N T I V E ............... ...............................................
M A K E P O C K E T S ! ..................................................................
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................................
s e r g ik g ! ...............................................................
S T I T C H P O C K E T S ! ............... ..................................... ...

See footnotes at end o f table.




10
10
158
144
9
7
16
23
21
19
17
14
11

4 .2 1
4 .6 7
4 .8 1
4 .8 7
3 .8 2
4 .8 7
4 .5 1
5 .1 0
5 .3 1
4 .5 0
4 .5 3
4 .2 5
5 .0 7

.
29
25
1
8
6
4

2
2
£
4

_

2
4
2
2
-

12
10
3
-

2
2
-

-

1

_

2
2
2

1
-

4
4
2

-

1
-

1
1
1
l

2
5
-5
- 1

4
4

1

5
5
2

1
1
-

7
7
-

3
2
4
4
-

-

■1
1

-

-

2

2

2
2

1
7
5
—

1
1
1

12
10
2
1
-

2
1
-

8
£
1
1
1
1
-

i
5
5
1
1
1

2

Table 11. Continued—Occupational earnings: Baltimore M d.1—Regular and cutting shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boyt* suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

Number Average “ 2T9TT 7 7 W
hourly
ANO
of
workers earnings9 UNDER
3 . 0 0 3 .1 0

3 .1 0

4
2

_

_

5

.
_

3 .2 0 3 7 W

3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 . 6 0

NUMBER OF WORKERS R E CE IVING S TR A IG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS I I N DOLLARS) OF—
3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4700" 4 .2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 4 0 6 . 8 0 7 .2 0
3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

-

1
1

1
I

2
2

2
2

2
2

~
r
J

2
2

2
2
2
2

2

3
3
1

4 .8 0 5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

7 .6 0 8 . 0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

9 .2 0 9 . 6 0

9 .2 0

9 .6 0 L 0 .0 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

_

5
5

2
2

4
4

_

2
2

2
2

_

-

_

-

1

1

SELECTED PRCCUCTIGN OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
TROUSER FABRICATIO N— CONTINUED
UNDEKPRESSERS...................... .................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................

30
28

$ 5 .1 0
5 *26

5

6 *2 6

15
14

j
4 *2 0
4 .3 7

_

-

_

2
2

_
-

1
1

_

-

MISCELLANEOUS
ADJUSTERS

Ififc P A IR E R ^ li1 _____ _______ _
_____ T _______T _ T __________ T - T - - T
,
p a r x f o 5 T _ T . . T - T _____M T f i i t u M i
J1
___________T. r f T t T 1 I t t T t t t r
^flBK
_____- Tr TT - r t TI T

1
4

”

j
_

1 See footnote 1, table 10.
3 All or virtually all workers are men.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative sample
of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies
may not reflect expected wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with
different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most establishments increased wages be­
tween periods bemg compared. Approximately 62 percent of the production workers covered by the survey are incentive-rated.




2

2
3
2
2

/ ~
1

1
3
1

4 All or virtually all workers are women.
5 All or virtually all workers are incentive-rated,
4 All or virtually all workers are time-rated,

2

__

1

_
-

_

_
-

Table 12. Occupational earnings: Bristol County, Mass.—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

of
workers

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS2 . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
M E N ...........................
WOMEN. ............................................. ...............

Average 2 .9 0 3 .0 0
AND
hourly
earnings1 UNDER
3 .0 0 3 .3 0
1■

2 ,7 3 2
755
1 ,9 7 7

$ 4 .8 8
5 .0 5
4 .6 1

22
15
13

6 .6 3
6 .6 7
5 .0 6
4 • 33

33
ii
35
22
13
33
20
13

5* 08
4 .5 4
4 .5 3
3 .9 6
5 .5 0
4 .5 7
3 .9 6

264
104
160

3 .6 0

OF(KtKS K t u t j i/iN G STRAI G H T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS
NUk BER a F W
3 .9 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 5 0 4 .8 0 5* 10 5 .4 u ? . 7 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 3 0 6 . 6 0 6 . 9 0 7 .2 0 7 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .9 0

4 .2 0

226
53
1 73

183
47
1 36

256
55
201

6 .0 2

12
11
33
24

79
32
47

3 .3 0

4 . 50 4 . 8 0
184

213

5 .1 0

5 . 40 6 . 70 6 . 0 0

167

245

30
174

132

i £ J

89

L

1 36

to /

3 00

*
4
3
2
1
1

6 .3 0

6 .6 0

6 .9 0

7 .2 0

7 .5 0

7 .8 0

121
38
83

105
31
74

65
21
44

55
20
35

49
23
26

36
13
23

I I N DOLLARS! OF—
7 .8 0 8 . 1 0 8 .4 0 8 .7 0

9 .0 0

9 .3 0

8 .7 0 9 . 0 0

9 .3 0

9 .6 0

9
3
5

7
3
2

8 . 10 8 .4 0
19
g
11

21
12
9

12
g
4

1

10
3
7

1

9 .9 0 1 0 . 2 0 1 0 .5 0
AND
OVER
9 .9 0 LO .2 0 1 0,.50

* .6 0

4
3
1

2
1
i

3
3

5
3

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
.CUTTING3

CUTTERS• L I N I N G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TfMP
MARKERS ........................
TIM E .............. .................................... ..
S P R E A D E R S ......................................................
T I MF

2

6 .6 8
2
2
1
1

_
_

3
3

2
2

2
2

5
5

2
2
1
1

2

2

A
1
1
1
3

2

3
1

7

_

1
2

l
1
1

2
2
1

_

1
1
1

_
_

_

_

_

1

l
1

_

_

_
_

_
_
_

i

2

2

£

2

L

■
*
i

3

2
2
2
3
2
3

L

COAT FABRICATIO N
F ir

t f r s ____________ T______ - r . _ T - - TTT, T
T I M F . _____________________________
INSPECTORS, F IN A 1 _______________ T T T T, T IM F ________________________T ___ r T
IN C E N TI VF_ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WOMEN. . . . . . . . . . ________________ . .
I I MF________________ TT-, T TT
INCFNT I
PAIRFftS AND TIIHUFO ^. . .
T IM F ___- ______ T_ _ TT_ _ T T.TTir .

18

1
1
”
3
*

4« 0 9
4 e 17
T il

W O M E N ____^ ____

T IM F ______
_ - T - T , T T .,
PRESSERS, F IN IS H , HAND.............. ..................
INC ENT I y E____________ T ____Tlr
PRESSERS, F I N I S H , MACHI Nfii . . . . . . . . .
T. , tl ,
T I M E ________ , T
IN C E N T IV E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . _____
SEW ING-MACHINE OPERA TORSt*.5. . . . . . . . .
T I M E ___ T _ - T - - r T _ tT
.
IN C E N TI V E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . _____
BASTERS . . . . . . . . _____ ________________
IN C E N TI VE. . . . . . . . . . . . ________
BUTTON S E W IN G ...............
T IM F

_______________

IN C E N T IV E .. . . . . . . ______________

ft 1IT T flN H E Il

E

15
9
g
125
85
1 ,0 7 2

4 * 19
5 .5 8
5 .6 4
6 .4 4
5 .0 6
7 .0 9
5 .0 8

812
49
41
31

5 I 28
5 .2 6
5 .4 4
5 .5 6

21

_

3
3

1

36
17
19
2

6 .0 8

8
~

TT

C CL LA R PREPARING, EXCEPT P IE C IN G
OR PADD I N G . __________
IN T E N T h / F _____

__

See footnotes at end o f table.




1o

20
16

1
1

f

1
62
24
38
3
3
l

*

1
1
6
4
j
59
14
45
3
2
1
1

f

1
1
4
4

10
8
2
119
53

*

*

2

2
1
1
7

4

72
20
52

89
31
58

7
3

5
*

1
1

1

1

A

2

£

1
J

“
1

2
1

3
2

3

3

1

1

2

3

7

12

7

10

4,

12
53

7
33

10
22

15

33
j
1

22
3
3

15
2
2

_

_

145
50

g
3
3

3
1

2

115
3A
64

i£>
76

13
63
4
59

1

£

5

1

4

_

1

4
3
1

**

53
j

1

1

2
1

3
1

1

*

1

1

i

£

2

1
1
5

58
58
2
2
2

1
1

1

2
c

4
1
3

3

~

1

£

2

4

R . ft?
? DC
*

*

3
2
1

1

4
i

1

7
1

*

4 .6 8

5 . 02

J
£

3

3

2

11
1
1
1
1

”

1

~

MAK JK)E.

T I M F .................... T_______ .
IN C F N T I UE ____ T______

2

3
3
_

*

£

2
~

7
~
*

i

1

2

1
3

1

4
1
3

1

1
1
4

2

4

3

4
15

2
5

4
7

3
7

6
j

15

5

7
2
2
1

7
1
1
2

1

2
2

2

3

_

1

3

1

2

1
1

1

i

Table 12. Continued—Occupational earnings: Bristol County, M ass.—A 1 shops
*
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments. April 1979)

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

2 . 90 3 .0 0
Average
AND
hourly
earnings1 UNDER
3 .0 0 3 .3 0

NUMBER GF WORKERS RE C E IVIN G STRAIGHT-1riM E HOURL1 EARNINGS CIN DOLLARS) OF—
4 .2 0 4 . 5 0 4 .8 0 5 .1 0 5 .4 0 3 . 7 0 6 . 0 0 5 .3 0 6 . 6 0 6 .9 0 7 .2 0 7 .5 0 7 .8 0 8 . 1 0 8 .4 0 8 . 7 0

3 .3 0

3 .6 0 3 .9 0

3 .6 0

3 .9 0 4 . 2 0 4 .5 0

4 .8 0 5 . 1 0

5 .4 0

5 .7 0

o .00

3
3
-

6 .3 0

6 .6 0

6 .9 0

-

1

2
2
1
1

1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
2
2
1
1

-

4
4
1
6
6
1
1
3
3
5
5
2
2
1
1
1

2
2
6
5
5
1

2
2
2
6
6
4
4
1
1
1
1
-

1
1
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
2
2
1
1
—
*

-

1

_

2

11
1
10
11
1
10
-

1
5
5
5
5
-

4
4
4
—
4
—

2
9
9
9
9
-

7 .2 0 7 . 5 0

7 .8 0

8.10

1

1

1

~

2
2

9 . JO 9.->J 9 • toO 9 .9 0 1 0 . 2 0 1 0 .5 0
AND
OVER
9 .3 0 9 .O J 9 .9 0 LO . 2 0 1 0 .5 0

1
1

8 .4 0

8 .7 0

9 .0 0

~

1

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT FA B R IC A TIO N — CONTINUED
SEW ING-MACHINE OPERATORS— CONTINUED
COLLAR S E T T IN G .................................................
IN C E N TIV E .................................................
FACING TACKING................................. ..
FELL BODY L IN IN G , BOTTOM AND
S ID E .......................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
J O IN SHOULDER, CLOTH................. ..
IN C E N TIV E .................................................
JO IN SIDE SEAMS......................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
J O IN UNDERCOLLAR, JO IN SLEEVE
L IN IN G , OR P IE C E POCKETS....................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
L IN IN G MAKER, BODY......................................
POCKET SETTIN G AND TAC KING .................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . ......................................
SEW DARTS, CLOTH...........................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
SEw EDGE TAPE...................................................
IN C E N T IV E ...............................
SEW I N SLEEVE....................................................
IN C E N T IV E ..............................................
SLEEVE MAKING, CLOTH................. ...............
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
TAPE A R M H O L E S ......................... ..
IN C E N TI VE................................. ...............
SHAPERS......................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING
PULLERS...................................... .. .............................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
UNDERPRESSERS.................... .................................
T IM E .................- .................... ....................
IN C E N T IV E ....................
M E N ................................
T IM E ...................... .......................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
W O M E N .........................................................
IN C E N T IV E .........................................
See footnotes at end of table.




21
17
9

$ 5 .1 5
5 .1 7
6 .3 4

13
12
15
14
27
25

2
2
-

2
-

3
3
1

2
2
2

4
2

1
1
—
6
6

1
-

2
2
4
4
4
4

1
1

-

“

•
—
3
2
-

5
3
2
4
3
3
1
1
6
5
1
1
2
2
2

10
8
5
9
7
4
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1

3
3
2
6
6
3
2
4
4
1
1
-

4
4
2
5
5
2
1
7
6
-

6
4
5
15
12
3
3
4
3
6
6
2
1
4
4
-

5
5

8
2
6
13
6
7
11
5
6
2
1

10
8
2
15
6
9
15
6
9
-

-

~

1
1
-

2
2

“

5 . 56
5 .6 6
5 .4 1
5 .4 8
4 .5 5
4 .4 8

1
I
-

_
1
1

_
3
3

_
4
4

65
57
40
94
79
22
16
26
22
43
39
28
25
14
12
10
8
6

4 .9 9
5 .1 1
5 .2 9
5 .3 2
5 .4 7
5 .4 1
5 .9 4
5 .0 4
5 .0 3
5 .2 3
5 .2 3
4 .8 5
4 .9 4
4 . 93
4 .8 7
5 .6 1
5 .6 9
5 .3 3

_!
-

3
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1

4
2
2
5
3
3
3
2
2
3
2
2
2
-

54
25
29
156
43
1 13
1 45
38
107
11
6

4 .1 3
4 .0 3
4 .2 1
4 .9 8
3 .9 0
5 .4 0
4 .9 8
3 .9 2
5 .3 5
5 .1 0
6 .2 3

3
3
2
2
2
2

4
2
2
14
10
4
13
9
4
1
“

8
1
7
10
6
4
8
4
4
2
-

-

“

-

1

c

c

2

2
3
2

3

2

3

12
to
5
4
to
4
3
3
3
1
1
-

11
11
4
8
8
3

2
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
-

5
2
3
16
4
12
16
4
12
-

6
3
3
13
3
10
13
3
10
-

2
2
11
3
8
9
2
7
2
1

-5
2
3
8
2
6
7
L

5
1
1

y

2
2
2
2
1
1
-

1
1

1
1

1
1
“

~

-

2
2
3
3
-

1
1

1
1

1
1
1

-

—
-

-

"

1
1
1

~

-

1
1
“

—
~

-

~

“

_

6
6
6
6
-

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
-

_

7
7
6
6
1
1

7
7
6
6
1
1

1
1
1
1
-

—
—
"

—
—
-

1
1
1
1
-

l
1
1
1
-

2
2
1
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
1
1
2
2

1
1
-

1
3
3

2
2

-

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

Table 12. Continued—Occupational earnings: Bristol County, Mass.—All shops

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekend!, holiday!, and late ih ift!. Theie survey!, based on a representative sample o f establish­
ments, are designed to measure the level o f occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected
wage movement! because o f changes in the universe over time and associated necessary change in the sample composition and shifts in employments among
establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most establishments increased wages
between the periods being compared.




2 Approximately 55 percent of the production workers covered by the survey a n incentive-rated.
3 All or virtually all workers are men.
4 All or virtually all workers are women.
s Includes sewing machine operators in addition to those shown separately.
6 All or virtually all workers are time-rated.

Table 13. Occupational earnings: Georgia—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers In selected occupation* In men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS................................
HEN................................................................... .
M HEN.............................................................. .
O

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKER* K E L L I V1 NG STRAIG HT-T I ME HOURLY EARNINGS ( I N DOLLARS) O F -Average 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 . 2 0 3 .4 0 3 . 6 0 3 .8 0 4 . 0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 U 9 . 0 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 . 20 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 .0 0 6 .2 0 6 .4 0 6 .6 0 6 .8 0
AND
hourly
earnings1 UNDER
3 . 00 3 .2 0 3 . 4 0 3 .6 0 3 . 8 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 .6 D 4 .B J 3 .0 0 5 . 2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 2 0 6 .4 0 6 .6 0 6 .8 0 7 .0 0

4 ,0 8 7
553
3 ,5 3 4

$ 4 .0 5
4 .5 6
3 .9 6

538
12
526

397
17
3 80

2 92
21
2 71

282
32
250

44
39
14
12
38
33
27
23

5 .7 5
5 .8 2
4 .7 4
4 .8 4
5 .2 0
5 .3 5
5 .3 4
5 .5 0

-

1
1
1
-

1
1

1
1
2
1
-

10
38
25
36
11
25

4 .9 9
4 .9 0
5 .4 7
4 .9 6
3 .8 0
5 .4 7

337
72
265

306
31
275

296
26
270

301
54
247

263

5
5
4
4

A

it

2 41

1 94
33
1 39

223
64
159

155
31
124

152
27
125

97
25
72

61
19
42

60
18
42

56
21
35

33
11
22

1
1
2

2
2
3
2
2
2
1
1

3
3
1
1
2
2
1
1

8
8
-

7
7
1
1
1
1
1
1

10
8
2
2
l
1
-

-

1
1
1
1
1
1

8
7
5
4
5
4

1
1
4
4
4
4

13
1
12

12
1
11

7 . J J 7 • EJ

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

7 • 4 J 7 .oO 8 .0 0

8 .9 0

8 .8 0

4
4

3
3

_

~

2
2
2
2
2
2

~

-

*

2
1
i

3
A
2

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

7 .9 0

-

2
2

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING
CUTTERS, C L O T H ? ...............................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . . . . . ..........................
CUTTERS* L IN IN G ......................................
HEN................................................................... .
MARKERS.......................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ...............................................
MEN.............................. ............................
IN C E N T IV E ...................................... ..
WOMEN:
IN C E N T IV E .................................... ..
SPREADERS..................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ..............................................
H E N . . . . ........................................................ .
T IM E ........................................................... .
INCE NTI VE.............................................. .

2

_
-

1
4
-

4
4

-

_
-

1
1
-

1
—
1
-

2
1
2
1

1
1
1
1

-

-

2

2

-

-

2
2

1
1

~

‘

"

i
1
-

5
4
1
5
2

-

-

L

3
3
3
*

c
-

-

-

-

-

2
2
1
1

1
1
-

-

1
3
1
3
2
1

-

2

-

_

1

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
1
2

X
-

3
3
3

4
4
4

1
1
1
1

_

6
6
6

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

4
3
4
1
3

1
2
2
2

-

A

1
1
1
l

-

3

1

2

3

4

1

6

1

i

2

1

_

1

_

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1
2
2

2
1
1

1

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
10
10
5
5
5
20
3

—

—

-

-

1
1
1
1
6

-

-

8
8

-

-

5
5
2
3
3
18
9

-

-

8
8
2
6
6
22
5

-

-

1
1

1

-

-

1
3
3

-

_
-

-

-

1

'

COAT FABRICATION
INSPECTO RS, FIN A L3 ................. .......................
.
T IM E ............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ..............................................
PAIRERS AND TURNERS...................... ..
MOHEN..............................................................
PRESSERS, F I N I S H , H A N D . .. ......................
M O H E N . . . . . . .................................... ..
PRESSERS, F I N I S H , MACHINE......................
IN C E N T IV E ..............................................
MEN.............................. ....................................
MOHEN................................................. ..
IN C E N T IV E .............................................. .
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS3 . ...................
.
BASTERS.................................................................
BUTTON SEWING.............. .................... ............
BUTTONHOLE MAKING......................................
COLLAR PREPARING, EXCEPT P IE C IN G
OR PADDING......................................................
COLLAR SETTIN G .............................................. .
FACING T A C K I N G . . . . ...................... ............
FELL BODY L IN IN G , BOTTOM AND
S ID E .....................................................................
J O IN SHOULDER, CLOTH.............................
J O IN SIDE SEAMS........................................... .

46
9
37
14
11
7
6
177
154
70
107
86
1 ,5 2 1
183
21
18

4 .0 4
3 .7 9
4 .1 0
3 .6 5
3 .8 3
4 .2 1
4 .0 7
4 .6 9
4 .8 9
4 . 86
4 .5 8
4 .8 8
4 .1 8
4 .4 7
3 .8 9
4 .2 1

11
47
14

4 .4 5
4 .8 3
4 . 45

_

37
20
26

4 .5 9
4 .1 4
4 .5 1

_
-

-

4
4
1
3
3
63
-

1
-

-

~

8
5
1
7
4
142
9
5
2

2

5

3

5

3

8

a

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
1
1
2
2
12
8

3
-

5
-

-

-

3
1
1

8
1
1

3
3

-

13
11

-

4

4

8

9
9
98
14
1

2
3
3
2
2
16
4
2
14
2
135
5
1
_

_

1
2

-

1
1
1

1
4

2
1
1




4

5
4
3
2
1
1 33
18
3
4

2
2
1

1
8
3

1
2
2

-

-

3
2
1

1
l
2

7
3
9

-

1
1
-

"

See footnotes at end o f table.

4

92
15
2

9
8
3
6
5
147
21

1

-

1 49
15
3
-

1

-

9
9
5
4
4
1 37
12
2
4
1
1

~
3
1
.»

iJ

-

-

6
6
6
67
7
1

2

-

1

-

E
1

7
~

1

7
1

ID
9
1
1
92
13

3

1

2
1
10
10
5
5
5
74
17
1
2
8
2
2
3
3

-

—
-

-

15
15
6
9
9
70
11

26
26
7
19
19
34
2
1

-

1
2

8

~

5

-

2

1

~

~

1

14
2

-

5
2

1
1
~

~

“

~

-

-

-

1

-

-

4

4
4

1

1
A
1

-

1
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

A

1

~

-

~

~

-

-

Table 13. Continued—Occupational earnings: Georgia—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers In selected occupation! in men*« and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

N U M B ER OF

Number Average 2 .8 0 3 .0 0
AND
hourly
of
workers earnings1 UNDER
3 .0 0 3 .2 0

Occupation and sex

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0 3 .8 0

W O RKE RS K E u t IV 1 N G S I R A I G H T - T i ME H O U R L Y

E A R N IN G S

3 . 8 0 4 . 0 0 4 .2 0

4 . 4u 4 . 60 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

4 .0 0

4 .6 0

4 . BO 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6.00

(IN

D O LLARS)

OF-

6 . 20 6 .4 0 6 . 60 6 . 8 0

6 . 2 0 6 .4 0

6 .6 0

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

1

1
1

1

7. 00 7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0 8 . 0 0

l.

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

-

-

-

-

-

7 .4 0

oO 8 . 0 0

-

-

-

-

-

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

~

-

6 .8 0

8 .4 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT FA BR IC A TIO N — CONTINUED
S E m ING -MACHINE OPERATOR S— CONTI NUED
JO IN UNDERCOLLAR, J O IN SLEEVE
34
POCKET SETTING AND TA C K IN G ................
SEM EDGE TAPE...................................................
SEW I N SLEEVE ••
...........................................................
C i C CD C uA V IMP
taoc
Afiyuni cc

r i flT L
i

$ 4 .2 2

109

4 .2 1

39
74

10 1

4 .3 3
4 .5 1
4 .0 0

1

SHAPERS .............................................................................................3 0
WOMEN............................................................................... 27
...
THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING
89
P U L L E R S .. ...............................................................................
f MT C I U T I L/C
73
11Alii CU OD CCC CD c3
1 28
IN C E N T IV E ............................................ ..
110

4 .9 1
4 .8 6
3 .9 7
4 .1 9
4 .0 7
4 .2 5

1

3

6
1
1
1

5

1
2

9

3
7

7

1
1

-

10

11

3

1
1
10

-

-

-

-

4

10
10

16

1
2

1
3

5

12

8

'
19

*
_

9

6

1

"

11
1
8
6
11

8
2

6

8
1

4

l

4

2

6

1
1

2
2

11
11

11
11

5

5

a

17
17

4

__
25

l i

7

__

5

1
1
8

2
1

2
-

1
1
1
2

1

1
1

3

2

3

5
5

10
1

6
3

5

6
12
7
2
2

26
5

1

3

9

1
4
3

2
2

2
2

2
1

2
2

1
1

-

2

6

1

1
1

2
2

-

3

3

1

2

-

1

i

-

2
2

5
5
9

2

3

-

9

j

*

9
9

8

2

3

5

1

1
2

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

1

i

_

2

_

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

*
:

*

11

7

3

TROUSER F A B R IC A T IO N 3
INC OLTinOC
C lk lfti
f Mr* C W T I UC
C C U fKi r _ U A T U f M C H O CD A T D D
AT T A f U Cl V
m i m CC AM C
0 i c r t Mil o n ric ctc
CCU/I T Ai/I
._
S T IT C H POCKETS................................................
THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING
Dl If ^ C p
1 fl Ail CU O O C C C C D C

16
14

4

-

11
* .

7

4* 04

10
18
14

3 .7 4
A . lf / li
l
4 .0 3

10

3 .9 6

1

1
1
1

2

1
_

_
4

-

1
1

i

2

.

_

*

1i
16

.
_

2

_

1

1

1

2

1
1

i

"

4

~

-

1

2

15

1

.
37

1

”

*

1

*

-

-

4

7

7

-

1
1

-

-

MISCELLANEOUS 5
ADJUSTERS (R E P A IR E R S )..
.IAN I TOR S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
uhmcm

D AT 1TC 0 C
M CK|
c rn r i
u rj)

a

r ic o u c .
n

• • • • • • * • • • • • • • • •

*

46
46
tf
14
10

c a d iic m t c

5 .2 5
3 .6 0
3 . 70
3 .3 5
3 .5 8

_

1

i cT o raiiT r.D C

MEN.....................................................................
*

3 80
3 .6 6
3 .8 6
*

~

2

5

7

13

2

11

2
3

£

_

** a J

18
116
61

5

7
1
1
2
22

.
2

2

3

1
1

7
1

1
1

1
1

44

12
3

1

i

_

-

-

_

_

■
*
2

1
1

1
1

12
11
1

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative sample
of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies
may not reflect expected wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments with
different pay levels. Such sifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most establishments increased wages between
periods being compared. Approximately 83 percent of the production workers covered by the survey are incentive-rated.




_
3

1
1

7
1
41
27
14

2
2

1
1

*
i

3

1

-

-

1
2 All
3 All
All
5 All

4

or virtually all workers are men.
or virtually all workers are women,
or virtually all workers are incentive-rated,
or virtually all workers are time-rated,

-

-

-

-

-

Table 14. Occupational earnings: Kentucky—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys* suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

N U M B ER

Occupation and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS.. . . . . . . . . . . .
M E N ...........................
WOMEN.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Number
of
workers

3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0
Average
hourly UNDER AND
earnings1 3 .0 0 JNDER
3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0

110
6
104

85
4
81

OF

W ORKERS R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E

H OURLY

E A R N IN G S

( IN

DO LLARS)

OF—

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 - 40 4 . 6 0

4 . 8 0 5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6.00

6 .20

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0 5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6.00

6.20

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0

8.00

118

107
1
106

127
2
125

134
4
130

167
10
157

146
4
142

3 00
42
2 58

186
17
169

190
18
172

155
15
140

142
20
122

121
19
10 2

117
25
92

85
14
71

62
12
50

48
5
43

42
7
35

32
8
24

44
19
25

30
6
24

1
5

4

2
2

2
5

3
1

9

1

3

4

_

_
_

_
_

3
27
17
3
3
5
87
20

_
_

_

2

_

1

1

10
38
10

2
33

3* 120
289
2 ,8 3 1

$ 4 .9 9
5 .8 7
4 .9 0

230
4
2 26

119
11
108

15
87
21
15
9
186
1 ,3 5 5
241
15
13

4 .5 6
4 .9 3
4 .8 9
5 .2 3
5 .2 3
5 .1 7
4 .9 3
5 .2 0
4 .4 1
4 .8 4

1
5
2

2

_

1

14
108
4
1
2

4
61
6
3

8
39
1
2
1

23
34
17

5 .5 0
5 .2 4
4 .2 7

1
3
1

2
1
3

2

63
47
103
32
37
28
28
28
24

4 .2 2
4 .9 3
4 .9 1
4 .9 5
5 .1 2
4 .5 4
4 .6 8
4 .7 7
4 .7 7

424
3
12
1

2
4
3
2
2
5
1

_

1
4
3

_

4
1
2
2
2
2
2

3
3
1
1

1
1
1
3
2

41
97
81

4 .3 3
4 .8 8
4 .7 2

5
7
7

3
3
3

2
1
1

2
1
1

29
35
31
10
35
29
23
17

3 .9 3
3 .9 6
4 .9 6
4 .5 7
4 .4 5
4 .2 7
3 .9 7

3
1

9

4

z

*

5
5
5

5

1 18

163
1
162

8 . 0 0 8 .4 6
AND
OVER
8 .4 0

22
21

38
14
24

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
COAT FA B R IC A TIO N 2
BUTTON SE mERS* H A N D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INSPECTORS. E IN A l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T I M F . . ____. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PAIRERS AND T U R N E R S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T IK E ................... .........................................
PRESSERS* F IN IS H * M A C H IN E .• • • • • • • • .
SEW TNG-MACH IN F OPERATORSi. . . . . . . . . .
B A S T E R S ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUTTON S E W I N f . . . . . . ...................
BUTTONHOLE M A K IN G .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
COLLAR PREPARING, EXCEPT P IE C IN G
OR P A D D I N G . . . . . . ........... ..
COLLAR S E T T IN G ............. ............................ ..
.ID 1 N S Hr.UIDFR, C l OTH. . . . . . . . . . . . .
J O IN UNDERCOLLAR, J O IN SLEEVE
L IN IN G * f)R P I F CE POCKETS_____ . - L IN IN G MAKER* R O D Y .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
POCKET SETTING AND T A C K I N G . . . . . . .
SFW nARTS, C l O T H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SEW EDGE TAPE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SLEEVE MAKING, C L O T H .• • • • • • • • • • . •
TAPE ARKHCLES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SHAPERS..
IN C E N T IV E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING
PI H I E R S .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
U N D F R P R F S S F R S ---------------------WOMEN*

2

_

_

2

3

_
_

1

3
44
7

_

1
3
1
1
1
5
53
14

_
3

_
_
7
49
10

_
1

1

1
1

1

1
2
4

2
4

1
6
58
12
1
1
1
3

_

13
53
8
1
1

4

_
_

_
_
11
81
15

7
83
18
2
3

6
3
7
2
1

4
3
5
3
4
1
2
4
1

2
2
7
2
4
3
3
1
1

1
1
3
4
5
2

2
2
4
5
2
2

3
3

2
2

1
1
1

_

_

1
1
1

_
_

4
12
12

2
10
7

1
4
3

1
5
3

3
2

1
2
1

_
_

2

2

1

13

_

_

_

3
4
3

2
7
7

1
3
2

_
_
_

_
_
_

1
1

12
11
3
25
19
13
7

5
8
7

3

1

_

1

?
_

I
_

1
1

_

_

8

4

2

1

_

1

1
l

1
3

1

_
1
1

1
3
3
2

2
4
1
1
1
2
2

_

_

_
_

1
3
1

3
30
11

_

3
7
5

1
6
6

11
60
17

1
6
1

4
1
1
1
1

1
1
1

9
74
13

_

3
6
9
1
1
1
1
3
3

3
6
6

10
76
19
3

_
_
_

1
2
1

7
1
7

2
3
3

8
72
12
1
1

1
5
5
8
74
11

_

_
_

1
1

_
_
_

_

_

2

3
3
2

2
2
6
1
1
3
1
1
1

3
7
2
2

13
84
9

_

2

3

3
18
1

_

_
_
2
18
2

_

1
2

1

_
_

2
2
1
2

1
1

1
1

1
1

3
1
2

1
1

_

_

1

1

1

_
_

_
_
-

1
1
1

2
2

3

4

4

2

_

_

_

1

_
2
10
3

-

_
_
20
14
5

_
_
_
l
15

_

_

1

_
_

2

2
1

1

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
1
1
1

_
_

_
_
_

-

_
_
l
11
2

_
_
12
2

_

_

2

1
2

_

_

1
2

6

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

1
1

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

1

MISCELLANEOUS

:

11 C T C O C I D C D A f U F O C I 5. 6
_______ _ _
JANI TO Rsi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
An

STUCK C IFR K S * G A R M E N T S . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WORK Of STRTTUTO RS-- - - - ___ . . . . . . . . . .

_

5

2

j!
5

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative
sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with
previous studies may not reflect expected wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment
among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most
establishments increased wages between periods being compared. Approximately 90 percent of the production workers covered by the
survey are incentive-rated.




2
3
4
5
4

«
.

5

_

All or virtually all workers are women.
All or virtually all workers are incentive-rated.
Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $2.40 to $2.60, and 23 at $2.80 to $3.
All or virtually all workers are time-rated.
All or virtually all workers are men.

1

_

_

_

Table 15. Occupational earnings: Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.1—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

3 .6 0

NUMBER t)F WORKERS RECEl VING S T R A IG H T -!‘ IME HOURLY EARNINGS ( I N D CLLARS I OF—
3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .4 0 A .8 0 5 .2 0 5 .6 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0 7 . 6 0 8 . 0 0 8 .4 0 8 .8 0 9 . 2 0 9 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .4 0

4 .8 0

5 .2 0

5 .6 0

30
7
23

27

34
4
30

76
14
62

95
13
82

111
22

89

114
23
91

1
10
10

2
12
12

2
20

5
24

5
49
45

2

22

5
42
38

6

18

43
37

25
25

*

1
2

Number Average
3 .0 0 3 . 2D 3 .4 0
hourly UNDER
of
AND
workers earnings2 3 .0 0 UNDER
3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0

Occupation and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKER s i ..............................
MEN...........................................................
WOMEN.............................................. .... ................

A
27 6
58 8

$ 5 .3 3
6 . 12
4 .9 7

73
32 7

5 .9 0
5 .1 4

86

15

25

21

6

11

9

14

7
14

2

25

6 .0 0

55
8

47

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

78
31
47

50
20

49
38

27
17

30

11

10

11

19
9

6
10
10

8 .0 0

28
24
4

8 .4 0

5
5
-

8 .8 0

5 .2 0

9 .6 0

-

18
18

2
2

-

1 0 .0 0

10

.0 0 I D . 40 1 0 .8 0

10 .4 0 L D .8 0

1 1 .2 0

1 1 .2 0

1 1 .6 0

12.

00

L I . 60 1 2 . 0 0 1 2 .4 0

.
~

_

.

-

2
2

-

-

2
2

“

-

-

“

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
COAT FAB RICATIO N
PRESSERS, F I N I S H , MACHINE........................
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS...........................
T W fFN TIU P , T . T - T - T

_
4

v elO

**

5# 37
27

2
11
11

1

4

1

4
33
31

29
29

2
2

MISCELL AN ECUS
STOCK CLERKS, GARMENTS:
M F N . _____ . . .

_____ _________________ t t . . .

10

nr^TRTRIITnRFL4 ,. ________ T T T T » » , . . . . .

9

MF N . ___ _____- T T T _____ T T T T T ' r * . , .

WORK

6

..

1

~

2

“

1

*

1

3
3

1 The Los Angeles—Long Beach Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Los Angeles County.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative
sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with
previous studies may not reflect expected wage movements because of change in the universe over time and associated necessary change in




2

1

1

the sample composition and shifts in employment among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could de­
crease an occupational average, even though most establishments increased wages between the periods being compared.
3 Approximately 78 percent of the production workers covered by the survey are incentive-rated.
4 All or virtually all workers are time-rated.

Table 16. Occupational earnings: N ew York, N.Y.—N.J.1—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

N U M ESR OF W O RKERS R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T - T IM E

Occupation and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS*. . . . . . . . . . . .
HEN. . . . . . . _____________
W O M E N... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Number
of
workers

5 , 836
2^688
3 , 148

Average
3 .0 0 3 . 20 3 .4 0
AND
hourly UNDER
earnings2 3 .0 0 UNDER
3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0

$ 5 .2 6
5 .9 9
4 .6 3

242
48
1 94

228
57
171

303
76
227

273
83
190

H O U R LY E A R N IN G S

( IN

DCLLARS)

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0 5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

5 .0 0 5 . 2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

3 18
109
2 09

208
48
160

335
75
260

23 8
65
173

27 4
12 1
152

239
102
137

160
73
87

323
231
92

285
15 7
1 28

362
208
154

291
171
120

285
88
1ST

251
10 2
149

229
93
136

C F --

6. 80 T 7 7 0 7 7 6 0 “ 8 . 0 0 8 7 6 IF 9 . 20 9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0
AND
CVER
7 .2 0 7 .6 0 8 . 0 0 8 . 6 0 9 . 20 9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0
76
66
10

58
51
7

79
69
. 10

26
24
2

_
,
.?

_
g

_

_

15

2

12
8

41

10

2

8

41

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_

243
1 49
94

1 54
128
26

132
109
23

178
139
39

31
29
2

5
5

1«
;
14
1
1
1
15

30
20
1A

46
46

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
C U T T IN G 3
1
1

75

CLOTH......................

21
103

n*~nn
0 61
8 .8 2

IN C E N T IV E ................................................
MAQircoc . . . .
IKJrPKlTTUC

69
c 1
18

9 .4 2
1 0 .5 2
11 • 41
X1 a
Ti

18 3
32
151
59
16
43

5 .1 2
5 .1 0
5 .1 2
5 .4 9
5 .4 5
c c.

_
_
_

16

4 . 76

-

CUTTERS AND MARKERS,

~
l
11

20
20

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*
-

2

4

2
412

2

7

2

-

2
1
1

2

3
3

1
1

3
3

_

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
_

_
_
_

3
3
3
3

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

6

2

6
6

2
2

_
_

_

*

1
1

COAT FAB RICATION
BASTERS, HAND. ........................................... ..
T I M F . . . . ___. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I N C E N T I V E . . . . ................... .................
M E N .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T IM F . . . . _______ __________________
TKirPWTTV/P
................................
WOMEN:
RIITTHIU CCUESC

UAMO5

TM rC M TTU C ._
_
BUTTONHOLE MAKERS, H A N D . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
^
TT* i r i f l _ 1 T I T -_ f |? 1B
_
LinapK).. T r r TT . TT T f T n t
-T T «
t KirCMTT UC
COLLAR SETTERS, H A N D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I NCENTIV E . ........................................
M F N .. . . . . . _____ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I N C E N T I V E . . . . . . . . . . . ................
F IN IS H E R S , H A N D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I N C E N T I V E . . . . .....................................
F I T T E R S .. ................................................................ ..
T IM F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M E N . . . . ___________ . . . . ____. . . . . . .
T IM E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T k irP M T lV P -.................
W O M E N .........................
IN C E N T IV E ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

See footnotes at end o f table.




J\
L*
OA
JW
49
13
36
q
AA
*r W

5

5 . 56
5 .4 5
6.21
6 .2 5
4 .7 0
4 .1 2
4 .1 4
6 .2 7
5 .5 8
6 .7 7
7 .0 3
5 .9 6

27
17

4 . 90
4 .9 8

4

_
_

6
3
3
3

4
4

32
4
28
4
4

8

8

8

7

8

8

8
3

7

16
6
10

14
8
6
12
6

3

5

3
3

5
5

1
-

-

1

-

-

6

3

*
~
_

”

4 75
5 I 12
5 .1 9
5 .1 0
6 .2 6
4 .8 7

37
31
21
15
16
219
286
76
32
44
49
22

4

5
1

*
4
3

1
3
4

3

4

_

4

4
1
1

1

_
_
_
13
13
2

1

6

1
1
A
4

1

6
6

g
8
_

_
_
_
52
47
3
3

2
1

2
2

_

2

2

2
1
1
1
26
23
_
_
_

*
_
_
43
27
1
1

1

z.

_

-

-

23
20
4
2

2

2

11

_

4

2

4

1
i
1

4

x

26
26
_
_

20
20
2

2

14
14
4
1
3
3

_
_

2
2

j.

-

1
2
9

1

2

2
2

2

~

_
1

6
i0
1n

_

_

28
28
2

-

1
14
12
6
6
5
5
1

7
4
4
1
1
10
10
7
3
4
7
3

2

16

14

4

16
7

14
8

4

-

25
3
22
6
3
3

-

_

j

3

6

_
_

4

2

3
2

3

4

2

2

~

~
7
_

2

2

3
3
3
2
21
17
5
1
4

2
2
2
2

_

7
7
2

4
4
3

2
2

3

2
5
4

_

3
3

7
7
7
7
3
3
_
_
_
_
~
_

6
6
2
2
9
9
9
9

1

4

1
1

4
4

3
3

1
1
1
1

_
3

_
_
_
_

_

„

1
1
4
1
3
3

3
1

2

2
2

2

2

_

2

1

1

_

2
2

4
4
1
1

1

6
3
3
6
3

_
_

_

x

2

2
2
2
_

I

2

Table 16. Continued—Occupational earnings: New York, N .Y.—N.J.1—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

___________________________________ fiiii)BER
3 .0 0 3 . 20 3 .4 0 3 . 6 0 3 . 8 0 4 .0 0
Average
AND
hourly UNDER
earnings1 3 .0 0 UNDER
3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 . 0 0 4 .2 9

wonIKERS RECEJ VIMG S T R A IG H T -7’INE HI0URLV’ EARN INGS ( I N i Cl LARS) OF __
4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0 6. 80 7 . 2 0 7 .6 0

8 . 0 0 8 .6 0

7 .6 0 8 . 0 0

8 .6 0 9 .2 0

if

4 .4 0

4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

5 .9 0 5 .2 0

5 .4 0

3
2

3
3

5 .6 0

5 .8 0 6 . 0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

5
3
3

-

_
-

-

_

9 .2 0 9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 6
ANO
OVER
9 . 8 9 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT FAB RICATIO N— CONTINUED
INSPECTO RS, F IN A L ................................... ..
T IN E ..............................................................

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

2
2

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

7
7
7
7
10
1
9
40
4
36
29
4
25
11
11
10
10
3
3
7
7

-

_
1
1
1
1
-

-

$ 4 .4 3
4 .4 2

2
2

4
4

4
4

9
7

16
2

2
-

7
2

14
10

5
4

5
3

3
3

1
WOMEN.............................................................

99
59

£

~

*
2

”
l

~

J

*

74

4 .0 9

2

4

3

9

16

2

6

14

5

2

_

-

_

_

4

2

2

*

_

PAIRERS AND TURNERS...................... .................

2

3

-

2

IN C E N T IV E ................................................
M E N . . . ................ .......................... .................
T I M F . ________________ __________TT
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
^r)MPNTT - - » TTTT____ T T -T » » » T » * . .
T 1 MF- _ t t _
IN C E N TIV E . . . . . * . « « « « « « • • • • • •
PRESSERS, F I N IS H , HAND.................................
T I M E . . . . . . . . . . . . ..............................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
PRESSERS, F I N IS H , M A C H IN E *......................
TIM E . ......................... ......................... ..
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
SEW ING-MACHINE OPERATORS...........................
TIME............ ..................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
MEN......................................................................
T I M E . . . . . .............................................. ..
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
BASTERS...................................................................
T IM E . ................... .. ....................................
IN C E N T IV E ...............................................
M E N . . . ..............................................................
T IM E .............................................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . ............ ............................
WOMEN................................................................
TIM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
BUTTON SEW ING...................................................
TTMF* . . . _________________________
I N C E N T I V E . . . ................................
MEN....................................................................
kdflMFN____ ____ Tn T . T . T . r . , . . . , ■■
T I M P , ___ T_____ r r t r r w w t a • *
IN r F N T T V F . __________,

See footnotes at end of table.




_
-

_
-

_
-

2

2
50
21
17
6
11
33
23
10
99
15
84
83
15
68
290
81
209
1 ,5 1 9
556
1 , 26 3
639
215
A24
1,280
341
939
250
73
17 7
91
28
63
15 9
45
114
47
18
29
10
37
i i
1i
c

o

4 . 60

-

5 .0 0
5 .0 8
4 . 78
5 .2 4
4 .3 5
4 .1 8
4 .7 4
6 .3 6
5 .9 3
6 .4 4
6.68
5 .9 3
6 .8 4
5 .8 5
5 .4 3
6.02
5 .2 6
4 .6 7
5 .5 0
5 .8 4
5 .2 3
6 .1 5
4 .9 7
4 .3 1
5 .2 1
5 .2 2
4 .3 9
5 .5 6
5 .6 2
4 .8 8
5 .9 5
4 .9 9
4 .0 9
5 .3 4
4 .8 7
4 .5 0
5 .1 1
5 .5 8

_
-

2
-

_

_
2

*
A# Z 8
4»85

_
2
2
2
2
45
24
21
1
1
44
24
20
8
4
4
8
4
. 4
-

-

2

2
1
1
42
16
26
8
8
34
8
26
8
2
6
8
2
6
2

2
-

-

_

_

£
2

9
t.

2
2
78
37
41
11
5
6
67
32
35
19
8
2
4
2
2
6
6
2
2
2

£

2

c

-

1
1
2
_

6
4

11
1
10
3
1
2
10
5
5
76
31
45
17
2
15
59
29
30
6
4
2
2
2
4
4
-

-

-

11
6
5
86
31
55
15
4
11
71
27
44
15
9
6
4
4
11
c

,
_

4
4

5

6

5

2
2

-

3
1

2
2

_

1

2

5

3
_
3

2
_

5
3
1

2
_
1
1
1
1
7
4
3
123
42
81
28
12
16
95
30
65
18
9
9
9
6
3
9
3
6
1
1
t
~

2
1
1
1
1
3
3
89
47
42
27
19
8
62
28
34
6
6
2
2
4
4
4
_
4

_
6
6
6
6
6
6
106
28
78
25
7
18
81
21
60
13
5
8
2
2
11
5
6
2

_
12
4
8
103
34
69
24
12
12
79
22
57
18
11
7
6
4
2
12
7
5
6

2
-

_
-

_

2

2
4
4
89
30
59
26
13
13
63
17
46
18
3
15
4
4
14
3
11
7
7
-

_

_
1
i
X

1

*
_
12
4
8
68
19
49
12
3
9
56
16
40
12
3
9
6
1
5
6
2
4
2

1
-

2

2

_

c

2
-

2

V4
3

5
5

4

-

3
2

_
-

_

1

_

_

_

7
3
4
3
3
11
2
9
103
44
59
31
14
17
72
30
42
8
8
2
2
6
6
2

1
1
1
1
15
4
11
79
27
52
29
15
14
50
12
38
4
4
1
1
3
3
-

2
-

_
-

2
2
2
2
2
11
2
9
51
10
41
9
2
7
42
8
34
3
3
3
3
2
2
-

_

2

2
-

2
2

_
-

_

2

_

2

15
15
11
11
38
6
32
12 0
10
11 0
49
6
43
71
4
67
12
12
10
10
2
2
2

_

-

8
1
7
8
1
7
17
1
16
83
83
24
24
59
59
12
12
3
3
9
9
2

14
1
13
14
1
13
18
1
17.
59
7
52
41
4
37
18
3
15
15
3
12
14
3
11
1
1
-

2
-

_
-

*
_

2
3
3
3
3
11
3
8
122
44
78
46
18
28
76
26
50
8
3
5
8
3
5
2

2
2
2
2
48
18
30
140
25
115
57
22
35
83
3
80
23
3
20
6
2
4
17
1
16
-

2
3

2
-

_
-

2

2

4
4
4
4
30
17
13
122
41
81
72
41
31
50
50
16
6
10
9
6
3
7
7
5

_
2

11
8

c

2
2

_

-

10
10
10
10
8
1
7
57
5
52
34
4
30
23
1
22
3
3
3
2
-

2
2
2
2
2
1
1
18
18
10
10
8
8
3
3
3
3
1

-

-

_
-

_
-

1
1

-

-

-

4
4
2
2
2
2
-

-

-

-

3
3
3
3
2
2
11
11
7
7
4
4
1
1
1
1
-

1
1
4
.4
4
4
-

-

Table 16. Continued—Occupational earnings: New York, N.Y.—N.J.1—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments. April 1979)

Occupation and sex

3 .0 0 3 . 20 3 .4 0 3 .6 0
Number Average
AND
of
hourly UNDER
workers earnings1 3 .0 0 UNDER
3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 2 .8 0

NUMBER OF WORKERS R E C E IVIN G S T R A IG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS U N l ) CL LARS ) OF —
3 . 8 0 ~470CT 4 .2 0 “4740T 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0 7 .6 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

8
2
6
“
g
2
6

5 .0 0 5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 . 6 0 8 .0 0

9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 .0 0
AND
CVER
8 . 6 0 9 . 20 9 . 8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 .0 0

8 .0 0 8 . 6 0

9 .2 0

SELECTEO PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT FAB RICATION— CONTINUED
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS— CONTINUED
BUTTONHOLE MAKING.........................................

73

$ 5 .0 6

-

IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................

37
26

5’. 4 4
5 .8 6

_

9
_

-

4

5

4

4

8

2

3
-

4
2

_

4

2

4
1

4

2
"

1

IN C E N T IV E ................. ...............................

9

7 .2 5

-

-

-

2

-

T IM E . ...........................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
COLLAR PREPARING, EXCEPT P IE C IN G
OR PADDING.........................................................

19
28

4 .2 5
4 .8 6

-

-

6
3

2

3
-

43

4 .9 2

-

1

2

-

4

31
15
7

5# 17
5 *9 0
4 .2 7
4 .3 9
4 .4 2
5 .4 7
4 .9 1
5 .7 5
5 .7 8
6 .21
5 .3 0
4 .7 3
5 .5 4
5 .3 6
5 .8 5
5 .5 9

1 Kir C T Tli c
M
T IM E .............................................. .. ............
WOMEN.................................................................
IN C E N TIV E • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
COLLAR S E T T IN G ................................................
TIM E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
M E N ............... .....................................................
IN C E N T IV E .• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
WOMEN.............................. .................................
TIM E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
FACING TAC KING ................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN.............. .................................................
FELL BODY L IN IN G , BOTTOM AND
S ID E .........................................................................
T IM E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN................................................................... .
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
J O IN SHOULDER, CLOTH................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
M E N .. .................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................... ............... ..
WOMEN...............................................................
J O IN S ID E S E A M S ................................ ..
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ......................................
..
W O M E N .............................................................
T IM E ............................ ... ...................................... ...
f k irC M T T U C

See footnotes at end of table.




28
23
63
21
42
22
13
41

12
29
17
9
8
97
18
79
29

20
68
59

38
34
15

11
23
66

22
44
27
14
13
39

8

1
4
4
4
4
-

2
2
-

5 .2 4
5 .1 2
5 .2 7
5 .5 8
5 .6 6
5 .1 0

-

_

"

5U4
5 .4 4
5 .5 4
5 .2 2
5 .4 7
5 .5 8
5 .3 9
5 .5 2
5 .3 2
5 .9 4

_
4
4
-

-

6 .2 5
5 .0 1
5 .3 1

_

_

_

4

-

-

-

-

-

3

6

2

3

2

2
2
-

4
2
1
1
1
1
-

2
2
1
1
1

3
3
4
4
4
4
1
l
1

4
4
4

1
1
1

4
4
4

6
6
4
4

4
3
3
3
3

1

4
4
4
4
-

2
2

_
2
2

-

-

4
4
2

2

2
2

2

~

1
-

2

-

2
-

2

*

2

2
”

-

2

-

2

-

-

2

6

7

_

5

5

”

~

”

2

-

_

_

5

-

-

-

-

6

5
2

-

-

3

-

“

?
2
2

-

“

**

~

2
2

:

:

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

*

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

4
-

-

5

3

-

-

-

-

3
3

2

-

3

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

3

7

3

7
7
5
1
4
1
4
4
-

3
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
l

1
2
4
4
4
8
-

_
2
2
2
2
-

6
6
6

5
4
1
4
-

16
4
12
4
4

3
3
1
1

1

12

11
5
6
1
1

2

10

6
4
4
-

1

3

_
-

4

2
4
-

“

5
5
1
2
2
2
2
-

4
4

3

z.

4
4
1
1
3

1
-

1
1
1
-

4
8

1

2

~

4
4
"

2

4

2

4

1
,-

1
2
2

"

5
5
6
4

2
4
4
1
3

_
4
4
4
4

_

-

3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

8
8
8

1
1
1

J

8

2
2
2
2

8
7
1
7
7

1
-

2

2
-

_

4

*
_

2

1

z

_
-

“

2
2

2

-

2

-

-

>
-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

- .

3
3

2

_
5
1
4
1
1
4
1
3
-

9
9
9
9
2
2
2

-

_
2
1
1
2
1
1
-

_
1
1
-

1
1
1
1
-

-

2
2
2
2
-

6
4
2
4
-

5
5

7
7

2
2

2
2

3
1
2
1
-

1
1
1
1

2

3

5

6
6
3
3
3

~

“

-

2
2

2
2
-

3
-

2
-

1

1

*

“

-

.1 ]

1
1
4
4
4
4
2

2

2
2

2

2

3

4
4
4
4
4

4
4
4

5
9
3
6
9

4
4

-

6
-

2

5

~

2

"

_

1

1
3

_
7
4
3
7
3
1
1
1

-

2
-

4
-

2
2
2
2
2
~

2

7
7
3
3
4
5
5

1
-

-

“

2

1

3
3
3

1
1

1

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

~

1
1
1

1
.-

-

-

-

- .
- ,
~ •

-

1
1
1
“

-

-

-

-

-

~

Table 16. Continued—Occupational earnings: New York, N.Y.—N.J.1—All shops
(Number and average itraight-time hourly earning!* o f workers In selected occupation, In man's and boy«' suit and coat manufacturing establishment*, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

~ 3 7 o < 3 .2 0
r
Average
hourly UNDER AND
earnings3 3 .0 0 JNDER
3 .2 0 3 .4 9

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

NUMBER O f WORKERS R E C E IV IN G S TR A IG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS ( I N DCLLARS1 OF —
3 . 8 0 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0 7 .6 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

5
1
5
1
4

10
10
3
3
7
7
1

2
2
2
2
8

6

8
4
4
4
4
1

3
3
3
3
4

2
2
2
2
13

4
8
4
2

6
6
6
6

1
1
1
-

2
4
2
-

13
-

-

-

5 .0 0 5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

4
4
10

4

4
3
1
1
3
2
-

13
13
-

1
1
1
1
5
4
3
1
1
4
2
-

6
1
1
9
5
4

4
2
2
2
2
-

_
-

_
-

4
2
2
2

-

4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

9 . 2 0 9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0
AND
CVER
8 . 6 0 9 . 2 0 9 . 80 L 0 .4 0 1 1 .0 0

8 .0 0 8 .6 0

5 .8 0 6 . 0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

1
1
1
1
14

8
8
3
3
5
5
8

6
6
2
2
4
4
10

3
3
3
3
12

8

3

-

1
1
3

_
1

11
6
3
8
8
1

8
3
3
5
5
5

10
10
10
-

12
9
9
3
3
-

8
4
4
4
4
2

3
3
3
6

_
1

3
1
1
2
2
4

2

-

1
-

1
-

1
4

-

-

2
2
2

6
6
6

1
1

4
4

2
-

-

-

-

-

2

-

25
6
19
13
6
7
12
12
2

8
1
7
1
1
7
7
2

15
15
4
4
11
11
-

8
8
2
2
6
6
-

_
12
12
10
10
2
2

_
27
4
23
14
4
10
13
13

2
2
2
2
-

-

-

-

2

2
2

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT F A B R IC A T IO N -C O N T IN U E D
SEMING-MACHI NE OPERATORS— CONTINUED
J O IN UNDERCOLLAR, J O IN SLEEVE
L IN IN G , OR P IE C E PGCKETS...................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
M EN. . . . . . . . . . .....................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . .....................................
W O M E N . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................... ..
I N C E N T I V E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...........
L IN IN G MAKER, B O DY ....................................

64
46
18
10
46
36
117

$ 4 .9 5
5 .1 8
5 .1 4
5 .5 3
4 .8 7
5 .0 8
5 .4 0

2

1

4
4
-

IN C E N T IV E . .............................................
MEN........... ............................................ ..
I N C E N T IV E ............................................
WOMEN...................... .........................................
IN C E N T IV E .............. .................................
PAD COLLAR AND L A P E L S . . . . ...................

98
31
28
86
70
43

5 .5 8
6 .2 3
6 .2 9
5 .1 0
5 .3 0
5 .6 4

2
-

1
1
1
-

6

2
4
2
-

1
1
1
3

IN C E N T IV E ................. ..............................
MEN........................... ..........................................
f M T C M T T u r._____
WOMEN.............. ............................... .................
t f Mr. _____________
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
POCKET S ETTIN G AND TACKING.................
T IM E . ...........................................................
IN C E N T IV E ........................................
M E N . . . . ...........................................................
TIM E .................................
INCENT I V E ................. .. ............................
WOMEN..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ............... ..............................
SEW DARTS, CLOTH...........................................
J Jiip T
T T_

29
21
17
i »
22
1v
Xft
12
19 8
46
15 2
92
28
64
196
88
40

6^25
6 .7 1

-

_
-

2
2

-

3
-

2
-

_
-

_

4

_

3

2

6

_

-

_

_

_
-

2
2
2
2
2

_

2
5
2
3
3
3
2
-

9
9
4
4
5
5
2

10
5
5
4
1
3
6
2
-

5
5
l
1
4
4
9

3
2
1
2
2
1
1
2

_

1
1
1
-

3
4
4
4
4
-

2
2

_
-

-

-

_
2

_
-

6
7

2
2
*

”

11

2

6

_

_

4

6

_

2

6
4

_

_

2

-

-

-

6
2

4
2

_

_

_

-

-

-

4

2
4

-

2

-

-

2

2

-

-

2

4

-

-

_rr _ _^

IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN.......................................................... ...
T T M F ____ , ____ T _____

TM rP M TIU C ________ .
SEW EDGE TAPE...................................................
T I M F ____________________________
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
MEN.....................................................................

31
36
5
77
74
22
52
42

4. 63
1 70
5# 17
5 .3 3
6 .1 2
5 .5 8
6 .2 8
6 .2 1
5 .9 6
6 .3 2
6 .0 4
6 .2 5
5 .3 0

-

5 .4 6
5 .1 1
7J
1
e 91

_
-

_
-

5 .2 4
4 96
5 I 36
5 .8 0

-

2

-

2

-

-

5^71
4 .5 1

_

_

-

2

2
9

2

2

a
Ti

_

-

1

1

1

_

1
5
.5
4
4
1
1
5

1
8
5
3
8
5
3
4

1
16
10
6
5
3
2
11
4
2

8
8
2
2
6
6
4

11
1
10
4
1
3
7
7
4

4
4

_
-

_
4
_

g

-

3

-

_

-

-

3
2

3
2
1
2

2
1
1

1

j

4
2

-

2
13
9
4
5
5
8
4
-

2
2
1
1
1
1
-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

_

-

-

_

-

_

-

1
1
1
1
-

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

2
2
2

_

2

_

6

6
4

4

4

2

5

-

_

-

_

2
6

4
2

4

2
1

5
5

_
-

-

_

•

6
6

10
7
3
10

-

-

_

6

2

3

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

4

1
1

5

■

2
2

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

2

4

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

2
2

-

_
-

_

-

-

T TMC

IN C E N T IV E ...........................................................
WOMEN...............................................................................
T 1 MF____ _____________
Tt
IN C E N T IV E ................................................

See footnotes at end o f table.




29
32
23

4 .9 2

*

j

_

Table 16. Continued—Occupational earnings: N ew York, N.Y.—N.J.1—All shops
(Number and average (traight-time hourly earning*1 o f worker* in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

N U M B ER
Occupation and tax

Num ber
of
w orkers

OF W ORK E P S

R E C E IV IN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E

( IK

O CLLARSI

OF —

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0 6 . 0 0

6 .4 0

6 .e o

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 . 0 0 8 .6 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0 8 . 0 0

8 .6 0 9 .2 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0 4 . 6 0

4 .8 0

UNDER
3 .2 0 3 .4 0

3 .0 0

H O U R LY E A R N IN G S

5 7 & C T 5 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

5 .0 0 5 . 2 0

-

10
10

3
3

2
1
2
-

1
1
1
1
16
4
12

4
4
4
3
3

4
4
4
4
5
2
3

2
2
2
2
5
5

—
2

—
16

—
3
3
-

—
5
2
3
2

—
5
5
2

4

-

2

2

3
3

3 .0 0 3 .2 0
Average
AND
hourly UNDER

9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 L I . 0 0
AND
CVER
9 . 8 0 L 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0
9 .2 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS —
CONTINUED
COAT FAB RICATIO N— CONTINUED
SEWl NG-MACHI NE OPERATORS— CONT INU ED
SEW IN SLEEVE...................................................
I N C E N T IV E ... . • • ......................

W O M E N ...........................................................
SLEEVE MAKING, CLOTH................................
T I M E . . . . . .................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN................................................................
T IM E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
TAPE ARMK3LES...................................................
TIM E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................... .............

75

TO
*4
40
31
99
16
83

22
15
77
9

68
60
17
43
17

10
WOMEN...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
SHAPERS.........................................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
T I M E . . . ................. .. .................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN................................................................
T IM E . ...........................................................
T A IL O R S , ALL AROUND.........................................
T I M E . . . . ..................................................
MEN. . . . ................
THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING
PULLERS5 ........................ .........................................
.
TIM E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
UNOERPRESSERS......................... ..............................
T I M E . . . . ...................................................
INCENTIV ........................................... ..
MEN......................................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN................................................................
I N C E N T IV E ................... ..

See footnotes at end o f table.




43
33
56
25
27
40
18

22
16

11
34
32
29
14 5
33

112
23 2
85
14 7

210
83
127

22

20

$6 .2 7
6.3 1
6 .6 5
6 .6 5
5 .74
4 .9 4
3 .9 3
5.13
5 .4 1

2
2

6.00

2
2
2
—

4 .8 0
3 .7 6
4 .9 4
4 .9 3
4 .7 7
5.0 0

2
2
2
2

_
5
5
4

—

1
1
4

-

4

4

4

—
10
10
2
2

—
3
3
8
8
-

2

4

12
2
2

4 .6 2
4 .04
4 .7 9
5.28
5.4 8
5.1 7
5.4 5
5.5 2
5 .4 0
3 .71
3 .7 0

2
2
2
2
2
2
-

12
1
11
4
2
2
4
2
2
-

4
4

4
4

5
5
-

11
9
2
6

5
5
~
17
17
20
8
12
14
8
6
6
6

4

2
5
5
1
1
6
4
2
10
2
8
8
2
6

2
2

2
2
1
l

1
1
-

5
3
2
11
3
8
7
3
4
4
4

3
3
3
3
-

-

-

-

1
1
1
1
-

6
3
3
3

3
2
2
1

14
2
2
12

2
—
2

—

1
1
1

—

—

—

—

—

—

3
1
1
1"
-

3
10
7
3
7
3
3
2
2
2
2
-

3
1
1
1

1
3
1
2
3
2
5

12
2

2
6

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

1
1

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
3

”,

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

~

1
1
1

3
3
3

16
16
16

1
1
1

3

11
1
10
10
2
8
10
2

4
1
3
16
1
15
16
1
15
-

_
5

2
2
21
11
10
21
11
10
-

_
-

2
2
2
2
2
2
-

_
5
2
3
5
2
3

2
2
11

6
2
4
15
4
11
15
4

20
7
13
18
8
10
18

10
2
8
8
2
6
2
2

9
1
8
10
3
7
8
3
5
2
2

19
11
8
3

*

6
6
5
5
1
-

-

-

4

1
1
1
1
1

2
-

3
3
3

6

7
7
5
5
2
-

-

-

8

7
7
2
2
5
2

-

1
1
1

10
-

5
5
5
5
14

4

4

3
3
-

15
11
8
4
7
3

3
3

7
3
4

3

8
8
4
4
4
6

6
2

2
2

-

1
2

4
4
3
3
1
12
3
9
9
6
3

-

7
3
4

3
2

3
3
—
3

4

2
2
-

2

3

1
1
1
1
1
—
1

2
2
2
-

2
2
2
2
2
2

8
2
-

4

2
2
2
3
3
—
3

2
2
2
-

6 . 10
6 .3 9
4 .4 7
4 .5 7
4 .5 2
4 .0 7
5.0 1
4.5 3
4 .5 8
4.5 0
4 .4 9
3.2 3
5.5 0
5 .5 6
5 .5 8

5
5
1
1

2
2
4

2
2
2
2

8

-

2
2
6
2

3
3
3

1

4
5
1

4
-

7

1
6
5
1
4
2
2

l

2
2
2
2
-

9

2
11
9
2

2
2
2
-

4
4

l

2
2
-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

1

-

—
-

-

3
2

-

-

-

1
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

-

1

-

3

1

11

1
1

.~
"

_

4

-

-

8

_

-

8

_

_

- 11
1
10
11
1
10

4
14
5
9
14
5
9

5
1
4
5
1
4

5
2
3
5
2
3

8
7
4

2
2
2
2

4
4
4
4
-

8
4
2
2
4
2
2

1

3
1
2
3
1
2

3

7
4
3

1

1
1
-

Table 16. Continued—Occupational earnings: New York, N .Y.—N.J.1—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earning** of workert in lelected occupations In men's and boyi' suit and coat manufacturing ettablithments, April 1979)

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

3 .0 0 3 .2 0
Average
AND
hourly UN0ER
earnings2 3 .0 0 UNDER
3 .2 0 3 . 4 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

NUMBER DF WORKERS RECEI VING STRA1 G H T-TIM E fOURLY EARI4INGS ( I N DOLLARS) OF—
3 . 8 0 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0 5 .4 0 5 . 6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . AO 6 .8 0 7 .2 0 7 .6 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .4 0

4 .2 0

5 .0 0 5 . 2 0

4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

2
23
10
7
16
8

12
8
4
8
4

5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

2
24
20
8
16
16

-

_

1
9
7
2
7
5

7 .6 0 8 .0 3

8 . 0 0 8 .6 0

8 .6 0 9 .2 0

9 .2 0

9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0
AND
CVER
9 . 8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS —
CONTINUED
1

TROUSER FABRICATIO N

M E N . . . . . . . ...................................................
PRESSERS, F I N I S H . . . . . . . . ...........................
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS.............. ............
I N C E N T I V E . . . . ... ..................................
MEN................................. ....................................
WOMEN................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................... ............................
a t t am
ri w6
ATT APU U lT C T II AMOS 6
ATTArU 7YDDCD(
f AIPCUT f If e

1v
IA
a
20

C fll

133
74
141
104

4 .7 8
4 .8 9
5 .4 6
5 .4 3
5 .9 3
5 .2 1
5 .2 3

8
l t

tfcirC M T IV C _______________________
MAKE POCKETS.........................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
W OMEN................................................ ..
o T c n Air ci i/c

-

2
2
2

2
8
8
2
6
6

-

* J
6 » 48
5 «06

2 1 5

31
22
8
23

4 .7 1
5 .8 2
5. 64
5 .66
5 .6 5
5 .9 7
5 .8 3
6 .9 5
5 .6 3

19

WOMEN.................................................................
m r u ccamc
TKir CUT fUC
.....................

_

2
2

8
8
2
6
6

2
_

-

-

4* 64

9
c. c

14
15
A4

5
4
1
4
4

3
3
3
2
1
2
2

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
5
4
5
4

6
5
6
5;

2
2
2
2

-

2

—

3
3
3
16
8
6
10
6

_

i

-

6
3
6
3

2 i
l
2 !
-

2
14
6
10
4
4

3
8
4
8
4

2
1
2
1

1
17
7
10
7
7

10
6
7
3
3

_
8
4
4
4
4

_
1
1

-

:
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

3
3
7
7
2
2
2

2
2
2
-

4

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

1
1

1
4
4
4

_
-

_
-

j:
1

4
I
i
* ,
|
7
7

:

-

2
1
2

-

-

2•
*

|

2
2

-

2
2
2

3
3
2
1

-

7

-

-

2
2
2

3
3
7
7
3
3
3

-

4

-

-

4
4
-

-

4

-

-

1
1
1

2
2
2

1
7
3
3
4
4
4

1

7

4

2
2

4
_

2
2

2

THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING

14
9
6
8
7

2
10
2
10
2

4

MISCELLANEOUS7
ADJUSTERS (R E P A IR E R S )3 . . . .
.

...........................

• A k itrn o c S
. _ . . ..
_______ _
T _ ____pT
r
f I CPirC . f l AD MCkI T C

16
? ft2
2 7

D A rvP oc

3

c m rv

34
32
14
56
43

STOCK CLERKS « P IE C E GOODS3 ......................
.
unfix m C T O f R l t T H D ^ ______________________ _ _
MEN .....................................................................................

7 .0 2

-

_

-

7

-a. « 7I
J O

5 .1 5
5 .2 0
5 .4 4
5 .5 4
3 .9 4
4 .0 1
3 .9 7

£

-

-

4

7
5

_

4

7
7

2
-

_

-

7
7

2
£

£

&

2

10
10
10

-

3
1

2
2

-

7
' _
_

14
2
2

2

-

4
2

3
3

9
6

-

-

-

_

3
3
-

-

2

-

2

_

-

_

1

3

1

1
A

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23

_

3
5

1

-

7

-

1 The New York Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Bronx, Kings, New York, Putnam, Queens, Richmond, Rockland,
and Westchester Counties, N.Y., and Bergen County, N.J.
1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative
sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with
previous studies may not reflect expected wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among
establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most establish­
ments increased wages between periods being compared. Approximately 60 percent of the production workers covered by the survey are




4
4

20

3
3

1O
A ft
18

2
-

-

-

incentive-rated.
3 All or virtually all workers are men.
4 Workers were distributed as follows: 6 at $11 to $11.60; 4 at $11.60 to $12.20; and 2 at $14.60 and over.
5 All or virutally all workers are women.
‘ All or virutally all workers are incentive-rated.
7 All or virutally all workers are time-rated.

-

Table 17. Occupational earnings: N ew York, N.Y.-N.J.1—Regular and cutting shops
n
m

(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys* suit and coat manufacturing establishments. April 1979)

3 .6 0

NUF PFB 3F W KERS
OF
3 . 8 0 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 A . 40 4 . 6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

86
43
45

80
25
55

101
28
73

98
37
61

te

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

2 *2 9 3
l , 330
1 ,0 6 3

ALL PRODUCTION W O RK ER S.......................... ..
M E N ...........................
W OMEN... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Average
2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 . 20 3 .4 0
hourly
AND
earnings2 UNDER
3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0

$

5 . 55
6.22
4 .7 1

91
32
59

74
26
48

103
49
54

96
28
68

4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

109
37
72

91
41
50

ICLLARS) OF—
VING STRAl GHT-1 IME HOURLY EARN INGS ( I N C
4 .8 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 . 2 0 7 .6 0

8 . 0 0 8 .6 0

8 .6 0 9 . 2 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

12 2
65
57

85
32
53

147
46
101

70
30
40

5 .8 0 6 . 0 0
164
1 35
29

1 28
89
39

9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1. 0 0
*ND
OVER
9 . 8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0

9 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8.00

121
58
63

99
60
39

116
93
23

66
56
10

75
65
10

79
68
11

42
39
3

6
6

31
29
2
4
1
7
5
2
1
1

5
5

15
14
1

30
20
10
g

23

4

23

15
15

15
5
10

23
33

57
57

15
15

43
43

g

4

42 0

g
2
2
41

4

20
4
4
2

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTTIN G
0 "9
7 .5 1
TO
21
103
3A

CUTTERS ANO MARKERS* CLOTH......................
T I M E .• • • • • • • • • • • • « • • • • • • • • • •
A! AD IT CD C

2 1
18

T l ur CMT T w C

H A N D ...................... i
t i m e . ........................ ... .....................................1 !
WONF N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T IM E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BUTTON SEWERS* HAND. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
BUTTONHOLE MAKERS* HAND.....................................
WOMEN* • • • • • * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
F IN IS H E R S , HAND ............................................. ...
..
F IT T E R 9 .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
r Tki At

47
20
22
10
18
18
13
92
18
29

T Jup
* 2

T I ME.
DATDCDC

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A Kin TII OK lCPC

IN C E N T IV E ........................ .. .........................
M E N .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PRES^FRS* F IN T R H , h a n d . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P R E 99FR S , F I N I S H , MACHINF . . . . . . . . . .
SEWING-MACHINE OPERA T O R S . . . . . . . . . . .
T I M F . ............ ..
IN C E N T IV E ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M E N ...........................
INCFM TIV F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WOMEN... . . . . . . . . . . ___. . . . . . . . .
T IM F .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . r .
T NCFNTIV F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B A S T E R S . .. . ............« . . . ............. ..
T IM F . ...........................................................
IN C F N T T V F ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

..........................

T IM E .. . . . . . . . . . .
WOMEN.. . . . . . . . . . . .
T
I
M
IN C F N T T V F .. . . . . .

. . . . . .
. . . . . .
E
. . . . . .

See footnotes at end o f table.




-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

2

1
11
9
2

2

4
12
12
8

-

-

2

8

-

-

-

4

2
s12
12

_

_

41

1
1

'1

COAT FAB RICATIO N
BA9TFRS t

T kICO c r TOO C

o”a
9 61
8 .8 2
7 .6 0
9 .4 2
1 0 . 52
1 1 .4 1

1

. . . . .
. . . . .
.
. . . . .

.
.
.
.

22
6
12
11
6
37
60
52 2
145
373
15 3
70
265
66
3 03
76
22
54
25
1 1
51
11
40

5 .1 5
5 .2 8
4 .6 5
4 .9 9
4 .5 5
5 .0 4
4 .8 9
4 .3 9
4 .6 2
4^45
3 *87
3^91
5 . 05
5 .3 8
6 .0 8
5 .9 2
5 .1 3
4 .9 0
5 .2 2
5 .4 5
5 .8 4
5 .0 0
4 .6 3
5 .0 8
4 .9 3
4 .0 6
5 .2 8
4 .8 1
4 . 50
4 .9 8
3 .6 2
5 .3 6

_
_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_
_

Z
_

_
_

4
4

2
2
4

4
4
4

-

_

-

-

4
2

4

5
5

1

2

1
1

2

~

*

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
2

5

12
1
1

4

4

9
2

2

2

~

2
_

2

_

, .

in

4
4
_

_
2

2

_

_

2
16
2
14

_

_

-

-

_

2

_

1
3
34
8
26
6
3
28
5
23
8

.

3

10
4
6
1
1
9
5
_
_

6
2
4

3
29
7
22

2

if
_

2

6
2
4
4

12

2
2

2

_
4
2
2

12
2

2
2

_
_

_

29
7
22
5
5
_

_
5
5

1
25
7
18
8
5
17
4
13
8
3
5

2

6

1
1

2
2

19
3
16
4
4
15
3
12
3
1

1

3
3
3
3
7

5
2
2
2

-

4

-

-

6
6
21
5

_
_
_

1
30
13
17
12
2
18
3
15
6

2

6

6

2
2

4

6

4

3
_
_

6
3
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

6

_

2

_

1

1

_

-

-

1
1

_

2
35
19
16
15
2
20
6
14
4

2
27
9
18
9
4
18
4
14
2

4

4

2

_

_

4
1

4

2

3

_
_
_

4

2

3

_

6
2
34
13
21
8
3
26
8
18
3
1
2

_

4
28
4
24
6
2
22
22
4
4
4
4

3
1
2

_

_
_
_
_

3
_
_

_
_
_
_

3
3
_

1

_

_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1
1
2
1

_

_

_

1
2
37
12
25
8
5
29
9

3
9
22
1
21
4
3
18

7
3
24

18
3

4
4
14
3
11
8
7
6
2
4
1

20

3

1

1

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

_

■_

_

_

_

_

1
1

_

_

3
2

-

_

1
1
1
1

3
3

1

2

6

_

1

1
2
1
1

_

_

1

l

2

_

8
8

4
4
4
4
1

3
2
3
9
2
7
_

9
2
7
_
_

_

3
25
13
12
16
3
9
9
_
_

_
_
_
_

43
19
24
20
5
23
4
19
3

2
2
2
8
31
7
24
8
3
23
2
21
10

3

8

_

2

2
3

18
2

24
6
6
18

5
5
7
7
4
4
3
3
1

1
1
12
1
11
4
4
8
1
7
2

_

1
4
4
1
1
3
3
1

_
_

1
•
_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
-

_
_
_

2
2

_
3

2
8

3

8

2
2

_
_
_

3

1

l

3

1

1

2
2

_
_
_

_
1

1

1
1
l
_
_
_

_

1

1

_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

Table 17. Continued—Occupational earnings: New York, N.Y.-N.J.1—Regular and cutting shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in men's and b oy,' tuit and coat manufacturing e»tabli»hments, April 1979)____________

O c c u p a tio n a n d sex

Num ber
of
w o rk e rs

Ave ra ge
h o u r ly

2. 80 3 .0 0 3 .2 0
ANO
UNDER
3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

NUMBER OF WORKERS R E C E IVIN G STRAI GHT-1‘IME HOURLY EARNINGS I I N DCLLARS) OF —
3 . 8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0 7 . 60 8 . 0 0 8 . 6 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

1

4
4
-

2
2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1

5 .0 0 5 . 2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0 5 . 8 0

7 .6 0 8 . 0 0

6 . 0 0 6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

2
2
2
2

—

_

_

-

-

4
2
2
2

9 7 2 U 9 .8 0 1 0 . 4 0 i i . o o
AND
CVER
8 . 6 0 9 . 2 0 9 . 8 0 L 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT FAB RICATIO N— CONTINUED
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS— CONTINUED
BUTTON SEWING...................................................
BUTTONHOLE MAKING........................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN................................................................
IN C E N TIV E . * . . . « « « « « . . . . . . . . .
COLLAR PREPARING, EXCEPT P IE C IN G
OR PADDING........................................................
IN C E N T I V E . . ................................... ..
WOMEN................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ......................... ......................
COLLAR S E TT IN G .................................................
FAC IN G T AC K I N G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN........................................................
FELL BODY L IN IN G , BOTTOM AND
S ID E ................................................. ......................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
J O IN SHOULDER, CLOTH................................
J O IN SIDE SEAMS............ .................
TIM E ..............................................................
J O IN UNDERCOLLAR, J O IN SLEEVE
L IN IN G , OR P IE C E POCKETS...................
L IN IN G MAKER, BODY.....................................
WOMEN......................... .....................
PAD COLLAR AND LA P E LS .............................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ........................................
POCKET SETTIN G AND TACKING.................
IN C E N T IV E .......................................

10

7

$ 4 .4 9
5 .1 7
5 .0 3
5 .3 1
5 .0 3

18
13
16
13
19
16
8
7

4 .4 1
4 .3 1
4 .3 8
4 .3 1
5 .5 6
5 .3 5
5 .8 9
5 .6 0

48
40

5 .1 7
5 .1 8
5 .9 3
5 .3 3
6 .1 8

18
7

11

10
12

See footnotes at end o f table.




-

—

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

2
2

15

11

12

-

2
2
2
2

_
-

-

2
2
2
2
1
-

—

—

-

-

2
2
2
2
-

—

—

-

4
4

1
1

-

2

—

2
•-

1
1
1

-

1
-

4
4
4
4
1
-

1

_
-

_

1
2
2

_

—

—

3
2
-

4
8

2
2
-

2
2
2

—
—

•

-

-

-

7

-

-

—

—

—

•

4

—

—

_
-

2

_
-

l
-

~

-

-

-

3
3
2

5
5
2

l
-

“

-

1
1

5
1

4
4

3
3
-

_

3
3
3
3

-

1
1
1

4 •
1
1
1

-

2
2
-

—

-

•

2
2

_

_

_

_

-

4
4

7
7

4
4

-

-

-

-

1
1

3
3
1
2
2
2
2

1
1

3
3

2
1

—
-

—
-

l
—
—
—
-

_
-

2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2

—

—

1
1
1

-

—

2
2

—

—

2
2

3
3

—
-

—

—

2
2
2

“

-

1
2
2
2

-

—

1

6
2
-

4
-

4
-

“

1
1

4

—

4
1
1

2
2
2
2
2

-

-

—

2
2

—

—

2

2
2

-

1
1
2
2
2
-

-

—
-

4

6
6
2
2

_

-

1

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

~

-

-

-

-

”

2

-

2

2
2
3

3
3

-

-

-

-

2
2

3
-

-

5
5

1

6
6

2
2

2
2

-

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
1

-

-

-

1
1
1
1
2
2

2
2
2
2
1
1

—
-

—

-

—

—

5
5

1
1
3
3

-

1
-

-

1
1
1
1

4
3
2
—
-

—
-

1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1

5
1
1
1
2
2
2
4

—
-

—
-

1

—

-

2
2

2
2
2

1

4

-

—

—
-

-

1
3
3
3

16
16
16

1
4
4

—

4
-

“

_

1

-

-

_
-

-

—

_

7
7

_

-

_

-

3
2

—
-

-

_

4
4
-

_

-

4
4

-

2

2
-

2
-

2

24
22

20

—

l

11

13
9
16
8
8
23
19
19
13

2
2
2
2

-

40
35
19
11
7
38
34

—

-

-

11

-

—

-

-

8

10
SEW EDGE TAP e I I I I . I I I I I I I I I . I I I I ;
I N C E N T IV E .............................................
MEN.....................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
sew i n
s l e e v e ...................................................
MEN.............. ......................... ............................
WOMEN................................................................
SLEEVE MAKING, CLOTH................................
IN C E N T IV E .............. .................................
TAPE ARMHOLES.................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN...................... .........................................
T A IL O R S , ALL AROUND............................. ..
T IM E ..............................................................
M E N . . . . . .............................. ..

-

_

1
1
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

1
2
2

-

"

"

1
-

—
-

3

-

-

-

2
1
1

—
—

-

-

-

-

—
l

-

—
-

-

1

*

1

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

—
—

—
-

-

-

—
-

—
-

—
“

-

1
1
—

Table 17. Continued—Occupational earnings: New York, N.Y.-N.J.1—Regular and cutting shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boyt* suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

Number Average 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 . 20 3 .4 0 3 .6 0
of
hourly
AND
2
workers earnings1 UNDER
3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 . 8 0

NUf1BER ()F W
OPtKERS R E C E IVIN G S TR A IG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARN INGS ( I N C
>CLLAFIS I OF —
3 . 8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 . 2 0 7 .6 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

6

_

4

-

4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

2

4

4

-

2

_

2

6

2

-

2

-

20
14

12
8

14
8

-

5 .8 0 6 . 0 0

6 .4 0

8 .0 0 8 . 6 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8

4

-

1

-

1

-

8 .0 0

8 .6 0 9 .2 0

9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0
ANO
OVER
9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 .0 0
9 .2 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT FABRICATIO N— CONTINUED
THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING
0 ‘ H_LFD c
UNDERPRESSERS........................................................

$ 4 .3 1
4 .9 3

MEN......................................................................

17
80
15
74

4 .9 8

4

6

IN C E N T IV E .................................................

61

5 .0 6

2

179
111

5 .3 6
4 .9 8

2
2

TROJSER

4

6

6

2

6

5
1
5

6

_

6

4

4

6

-

4

8
6

8
6

4
4

2
2

5
5

5
5

6

6

2

2

6

1
3

-

-

2

1

-

-)

2

1

-

-

2

1

-

3

8

4

-

2

8

4

-

1

-

14
6

18
10

4
2

6

8
4

-

_

-

-

-

4
-

-

-

-

2
2

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

“

-

6

2

2

-

4

2

2

5
5

8
8

12
2

12
6

~

"

~

~

2

_

_

*

2

1

4

FABRICATION

SEW ING-MACHINE OPERATORS...........................
WOMEN.................................................................
AT T Af U TT50C0C
m i Al C C AUC

MAKE P O C K E T S ... ........................................................

i n

21
8

««!
5 65
6 .2 8
6 .9 5

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

1

_

-

2

28

4 .0 3

3

5

3

2

-

-

-

1

-

1

12

27
29
14

5 l 20
5 .5 9
3 .9 4

-

-

_

_

2

-

_

_

-

10

2
-

-

2

^g

8
8

-

2

4

-

2

_

20
5

-

-

2

-

_

2

2

2

-

MISCELLANEOUS
JA N lT OR S * #

• * • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • # • • «

D A f V CD c

STOCK CLERKS*
STOCK CLERKS*

GARMENTS........................................
P IE C E GOODS..............................

-

-

1 See footnote 1, table 16.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative
sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with
previous studies may not reflect expected wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment
among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most
establishments increased wages between periods being compared. Approximately 58 percent of the production workers covered by the
survey are incentive-rated.




- i

_

d

1

18
-

All or virtually all workers are men.
Workers were distributed as follows: 18 at $11 to $11.60; and 2 at $12.80 to $13.40.
Workers were distributed as follows: 6 at $11 to $11.60; 4 at $11.60 to $12.20; and 2 at $14.00 and over.
All or virtually all workers are women.
All or virtually all workers are incentive rated.
All or virtually all workers are time-rated.

Table 18. Occupational earnings: New York, N.Y.—N.J.1—Contract shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations In men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS................................
HEN......................................................................
WOMEN................................................................

Number Average
3 .0 0 3 .2 0
hourly UNDER AND
of
workers earnings2 3 .0 0 UNDER
3 .2 0 3 .4 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3F
NUMBER C WORKERS RECEI VING STRAIGHT- 1
riME HOURL'T EAR!'IIN G S ( I N t)CLLARS) CF —
3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0 7 .6 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

1 54
31
1 23

200
27
173

177
55
122

2 30
66
164

128
23
105

234
47
187

140
28
112

1

-

3

-

3 , 44 3
1 ,3 5 8
2 ,0 8 5

$ 5 .0 5
5 .7 6
4 .5 9

34

5 .4 2

25
22
31
28
27
24
25
IS
18
12
226
19 7
58
24
34
42
15
27
16
70
46
24
18
1A
Xu
52
36
38
28
10
11
27
23
62
15
47
46
15
31
23 0
81
149

4 .9 9
4 .9 9
5 .1 7
5 .1 9
4 .8 5
4 .8 4
5 .7 8
5 .6 7
6 .2 6
6 .3 3
4 .0 1
4 .0 5
6 .7 8
5 .8 2
7 .4 7
7 .4 0
6 .5 0
7 .9 0
5 .1 8
4 .5 6
4 .4 2
4 . 83
5 .6 5
5 . 51
4 .1 8
4 .1 1
4 .4 4
4 .2 6
4 .9 6
4 .9 2
4 .2 5
4 .1 8
6 .5 2
5 .9 3
6 .7 2
7 .1 5
5 .9 3
7 .7 4
5 .8 3
5 .4 3
6 .0 5

151
16
1 35

4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

8 . 0 0 8 .6 0

9 . 80 1 0 .4 0 L1 .0 0
AND
CVER
9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0

9 .2 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .00

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

192
111
81

127
56
71

88
72
16

57
44
13

99
71
28

34
27
7

25
18
7

-

176
51
125

160
61
99

107
28
79

18 9
89
100

92
56
36

90
43
47

159
96
63

1 57
68
89

241
1 50
91

4

5

7

9
9
3

3
3
3

-

3
3
1
1
1
1
9
7
1
1
- ;
1 i
3 !
3

2
2
2
6
6
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
1
-

19

3
3

13
6
6
3

2
2
2
2
4
4
4
4
1
1
11
8
3
7

16
7
7
3
3
1
1
1
1
6
6
8
8
8
8
5
3
3

4
4
-

2
1
1
1
1

7 .6 0 8 . 0 0

8 . 6C 9 .2 0

22
12
10

11
9
2

3
3

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
COAT FA B RICATIO N
4
HE N. • • • • • • . . . . . • • • . . . . . . . . . « • •
BUTTON SEWERS, H A N D ,.....................................
I NCEMTI V F t i l l T T tT T T T -* T ___r BUTTONHOLE MAKERS, HAND.............................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN................................................................
INCENT I V E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
COLLAR SETTERS, H A N D ,• • • • • • • • • • • • • •
INCE NTIV E • • • • • • « . , . • • • • * • , • •
MEN.....................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
F IN IS H E R S , HAND3 ................................................
.
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
F IT T E R S ........................................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
MEN.....................................................................
TIM E .............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN................................................................
INSPECTO RS, F IN A L ..............................................
T IM E ..............................................................
J
FKJT TV p r - T MEN......................................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
PAIRERS AND TURNERS........................................
TIM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
MEN......................................................................
WOMEN................................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
PRESSERS, F I N I S H , HAND................................
TIM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
MEN...................................................... .. ............
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ,• • * , , , , . , , , , , , , , « ,
PRESSERS, F I N IS H , M A C H lN E t.. . . . . . . .
T I M E . ...........................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................

See footnotes at end o f table.




-

-

-

-

1
1
1
1
4
4
3
3
4
4

40
35
2
2
2
3
3

1
1
1
1
22
19
7
7

-

-

-

4
4
-

3
3
2
2
2
2
-

7
7
2
2
2
2
-

8
8
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
~

-

-

“

8
6
2

1
1
1
1
39
23
1
1
1
6
2
4

6
6
6
6
19
19
-

4
4
1
1
1
1
19
16
4
2
2
4
6
1
5

22
22
12
8
4

16
16
4
3
1

6
1
5
5
5
5
-

12
8
3
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1

4
3
5
3
2
2
3
3
-

2
2
3
3
3
-

4
4

8
4
4

3
3

6
2
3
3
1
2
2
9
1
8
1
1
10
5
5

_
6
4
2
2
4
4
11
4
7

4
4
“

2
2

10
10
4
1
3
3
3
1
2
2

-

2
1

3
3
3
3
2
2

2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2

1

2

2

2

1

2
2
4
2
2
4
2
-

_
2
2
1
1
1
7
3
4
3
3

_
-

_
4
4
4
4

-

-

-

_
2
2
2
2

-

-

9
2
7

13
4
9

8
2
6

27
17
10

11
3
8

40
18
22

2
2

7
4
7
4
1
1
1
1
9
9
7
3
4
7
3
4

-

3
3
_

_

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

4
4
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

3
3
-

1
1
1
1
4
1
3
3
3
1
-

3
1
2
2
2
1
-

2
2
2
-

3
3
3
3
4
4
1
1
1
1
-

6
3
3
6
3
3
-

2
2
2
-

_
_

6
_
6
6
6
_
_

_
_

_

_

_
10
1
9
10
1
9
14
1
13

_
2
2
2
2
5
1
4

_
9
9
9
9
7
1
6

_
_
_

_
_
_

2
2

3
3
3
3
2
2

_
_
12
12
8
8
29
6
23

2
2
2
1
1
1
1
14
1
13

_

2
_
_

-

2
2
1
1
-

_
_
_
-

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

-

_

_
_
-

-

-

2
2
2
2
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

-

_

-

-

-

Table 18. Continued—Occupational earnings: New York, N .Y.—N.J.1—Contract shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earning*1 o f workers in selected occupations in man's and boyt* tuit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)______________

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

NUMBER OF WOfIKERS R E C E IVIN G STRAI 5H T -1 riME
3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0

3 .6 0

2 .8 0

4 .0 0

62
35
27
7
3
4
55
32
23
8
6
2
2
2
6
6

57
24
33
15
4
11
42
20
22
10
4
6
4
4
6

57
28
29
13
2
11
44
26
18
3
3
3
3

4
2

-

2

6
4

2

2

1

-

-

-

Average
3 .0 0 3 .2 0
hourly UNDER
ANO
earnings 3 .0 0 UNDER
3 . 20 3 .4 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

89
34
55
22
9
13
67
25
42
10
7
3
7
4
3
3
3

59
34
25
15
9
6
44
25
19
-

4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

5 .0 0 5 . 2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

76
35
41
22
9
13
54
26
28
6
6
2
2
4

42
15
27
21
12
9
21
3

42
8
34
9
2
7
33
6

.-

h 0URL\ f

5 .6 0

1
EARNIIN G S ( I N C CL LARS) CF —
5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0 7 .6 0

8 . 0 0 8 .6 0

8.00

8 .6 0 9 .2 0

5 .8 0 6 . 0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 . 20 7 .6 0

9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 L1700
AND
CVER
9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0

9 .2 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT FABRICATIO N— CONTINUED

9

1 , 3 97
$ 5 .3 1
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS...........................
407
4 .5 8
TIM E ...............................................................
5 .6 1
9 90
IN C B IT IV E . .............................................
M E N . . . ............................................ ..
486
5 .9 6
5 .2 9
13 2
T IM E ..............................................................
25 4
6.21
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
4 .9 6
911
WOMEN................................................................
27 5
4 .2 4
TIM E ..............................................................
5 .2 7
63 6
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
174
5 .3 4
BASTERS...................................................................
51
4 .5 3
T IM E ..............................................................
5 .6 8
12 3
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
66
M E N . . . ................. ............................................
5 .9 2
17
5 .1 2
TIM E ...............................................................
49
6 .20
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
4 .9 9
108
WOMEN.............................................. .................
34
TIM E .................................................................... 4 . 2 4
...
74
IN C E N T IV E ......................................................... 5 .3 3
37
BUTTON SEW ING ............................................................ 4 .9 8
23
IN C E N T IV E ......................................................... 5 .2 3
6 .4 7
6
MEN......................................................................
4 .6
31
WOMEN............................................................................ 9
4 .2 8
11
T I M E * • •• . . . . «
•
•
20
IN C E N T IV E ......................................................... 4 .9 1
55
5 .0 2
BUTTONHOLE MAKING ................................................

35
20
IS

35
20
15
8

36
14
22
8
8
28
6
22
4

4

4
8
4
4

4
4

2

2

-

-

2

2
9

-

-

4
4

_

g
-

18
14
&
3

6 .0 9

« urciITT U
C

12
1
10

4 .!>o

COLLAR S E T T IN G ....................................
...................
.
44
I N C E N T I V E . . . . .............................................
36

-

1
1

t fate

IN C E N T IV E .• • • • • • • • • • • • • « .

5 l7 9

5 .4 3
5 .6 9

3
“

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

6

-

-

-

-

6

4

4

-

-

_

7
2
5

_

“

_

7
2
5

-

3

3

~

2

3

3

-

2

-

-

2

5

2
2

2

3

See footnotes at end o f table.




_

-

2
-

2
4

5

“

4
1

~

j
3

4

3

1
4
4

2

_

-

-

2

-

3

-

-

-

4

_

4

-

2
2

_
-

£

3

~

4
4

-

1
1

7

_

2

-

-

2

2
3
2

-

-

2
2

2
6

-

_

_

_

-

2

1
3

4

2

-

-

4
4

.

59
59
18
18
41
41
9
9
3
3
6

45
4
41
33
3
30
12
1
11
14
3
11
14
3
11
-

-

-

2
2

6
2

-

2

-

-

2
2

-

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

79
25
54
26
3
23
53
22
31
5
3
2
5
3
2
2

109
18
91
49
17
32
60
1
59
13
1
12
4
4
9
1
8

2

_

-

6
*

4
1

18 1 27
j

- 1
1
- 1
-

-

1
1

5

~

4
”

2

“

-

4
4

5
5

_

~

-

-

2

-

-

-

2
3

-

-

-

-

3
2

-

-

-

-

~

“

“

”

*■

2

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

2
1
1
1

4
4
2
2
2
2
-

1
1
1

4
4
4
4
-

-

-

-

11
11
7
7
4
4
1

-

-

-

-

”

“

-

-

-

-

-

“
-

-

-

5

1

-

-

~

•

4
3

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

-

2
2

2
2

“

2

4
_

14
14
9
9
5
5
2
2
2

-

_

_

-

8

8
9
9
3
3
6

45
4
41
30
4
26
15
15
1
1
1
1

2
1
X

5

_

33
4
29
25
4
21

6

_

3

2

~

“

2

-

-

-

3
-

“

“

3

■

-

-

-

-

3

t
1

4
4

_
-

3
3

1
4
4

4
4

5
5

4
4

3

3

5
5

1
_

-

-

3
2

-

-

4

1

_

_

3

_

-

98
9
89
45
5
40
53
4
49
10
10
8
8
2

_

-

2

4
.

4

3
3
3

97
28
69
56
.2 8
28
41
41
16
6
10
9
6
3
7

9
X

-

a it
0.

W O M E N . . . . . .............................................................5 . 1 1
33
25
IN C E N T IV E ......................................................... 5 .3 7

c

54
11
43
11
11
43
11
32
14
3
11
4
4
10
3
7
6

4
2

-

T t lie

30
IN C E N T IV E ......................................................... 5^54
19
6 . 20
MEN ..................................................................................
5 .2 5
turcuTtuc
7. c.3
^9
r
36
T T lie
3 *8 3
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
21
4^1
COLLAR PREPARING. EXCEPT P IE C IN G
25
5 .2 8
OR PAODIWG.........................................................

75
30
45
18
8
10
57
22
35
14
7
7
2
2
12
7
5
6

72
15
57
17
2
15
55
13
42
10
4
6
2
2
8
4
4

43
12
31
4
4
39
12
27
4|
4
4

4
4

_
~

_

_

1

-

1

-

1
1

-

- :

1
1

-

2
2

1
1

2

-

1
~

“

-

1
”,

“

“

Table 18. Continued—Occupational earnings: New York, N .Y.—N.J.1—Contract shops
(Number and average »traight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

_

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average
3 .0 0 3 . 20 3 .4 0 3 .6 0
hourly UNDER
AND
earnings 3 .0 0 UNDER
3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0

NUM BER CF WOR KERS RECE] V IN G S TR A IG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS U N DOLLARS) OF
3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .3 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0 T76(F 8 . 0 0 8 . 6 0 9 7 2 0 9 . 80 1 0 . 4 0 r i r o o
AND
CVER
4 . 0 0 4 .2 0 4 . 4 0 4 .6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 4 0 6 .8 0 7 .2 0 7 .6 0 8 . 0 0 8 . 6 0 9 . 2 0 9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT FAB RICATIO N— CONTINUED

SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS— CONTINUED
FELL BODY LININ G* BOTTOM AND
S ID E ............... .............................................

li&Tmi:::::::::::::::::

W O M E N ..............................................
TIM E.....................................................
INCENTIV E .......................................
J O IN SHOULDER* CLOTH.........................
IN C E N TIV E ........................................
MEN...................................................
IN C E N TIV E .......................................
WOMEN............. .......................................
JO IN SIOE SEAM S....................................
TIM E ................................................... .
IN C E N TIV E .......................................
M E N . . . . .............................................. ..
IN C E N TIV E .......................................
WOMEN.....................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................. ..
JO IN UNDERCOLLAR* JO IN SLEEVE
L IN IN G , OR P IECE POCKETS.............
IN C E N TIV E ........................................
MEN.........................................................
WOMEN...................................................
I N C E N T I V E .... .............................
L IN IN G MAKER, BODY............. ..
IN C E N TIV E .......................................
M E N .... ................................................
IN C E N T IV E .......................................
WOMEN...................... ..............................
PAD COLLAR AND LAP ELS......................
IN C E N TIV E ........................................
M E N .........................
WOMEN*.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
POCKET S ETTIN G AND TACKING.......... ,
TIM E ....................................................
IN C E N TIV E ....................................... ,
MEN..........................................................
TIM E....................................................
IN C E N TIV E .................... ..................
WOMEN.....................................................
IN C E N TIV E .......................................
SEW DARTS* CLOTH ............... ..................
IN C E N TIV E ................................ ..
WOMEN............... ................................ ..
IN C E N T IV E ....................................

See footnotes at end o f table.




4$
10
39
33
9
24
28
24
10
6
18
54
14
40
20
13
34
27

$ 5 .3 1
5 .1 3
5 .3 6
5 .1 1
4 .8 4
5 .2 1
5 .2 6
5 .3 8
4 .6 7
4 .7 6
5 .5 9
5 .4 0
5 .1 5
5 .4 9
5 .9 2
6 .2 5
5 .0 9
5 .1 2

53
40
13
40

4 .7 0
4 .9 8
4 .9 1
4 .6 4
4 .9 2
5 .5 3
5 .5 7
6 .0 5
6.10
5 .2 7
6 .3 9
7 .3 4
7 .7 1
4 .8 2
6 .1 3
5 .5 7
6 .3 3
6 .3 1
6.00
6 .4 3
5 .9 5
6 .2 4
5 .3 4
5 .5 2
5 .1 1
5 .2 8

31
77
72
26
23
51
24
18
13
11
16 0
42
11 8
82
24
58
78
60
34
29
30
25

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3
3
3

-

-

4
-

-

4

-

-

2
-

4

5

4

5
5

-

-

4
4

-

4
4
4

5
-

-

-

2
2

4
4
1
1
3
1

-

-

-

4
-

-

-

2
-

-

2

-

-

4
4

-

2
2
2
-

-

-

-

-

_

-

4

4

-

-

-

4

4
-

2
2
6
4

-

-

10
10
3
7
7
1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

6
-

6
2

-

1
1

2
2

1

-

2

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

4
2

-

-

-

1
1

2

-

-

-

2
2
2
2
2
2

-

-

2

-

2
2

-

-

4
4

-

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

4

-

-

-

1
1
1

2
-

-

-

4

-

2

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

3

-

6
6
6

2
-

5

-

-

-

1
1
1

3
3
3

2

5
5

-

-

-

-

“

-

“

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6
4
4
2
2

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
4
4
4

-

-

-

-

4
4
l
1
3
2

1
1
1
1

"

-

2
2
9
6
7
4

2
2
-

-

5
2
-

2
3
3
4
4
4
4

-■

"

-

14
11
6
3
8

7
7
3
4
4
4
4
3
3
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

6
6
6

1
1
1

7

5

7

9

6

10

-

-

-

-

5
4

7

9
4

6
2

10
10

-

-

10

11
4

4
5
5

2

-

6
14
13
6
7
7
7

-

7
2

14
10
4
3
3

20

-

6
4
2
6
4
2

4
4

2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2

-

-

-

-

3
2
-

5
5

3
3

■

-

-

7
3

2
5
5

-

-

4
1
1
5
5
5
5

-

-

4
4
♦
-

A

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

2
3
3

-

10
10
-

10

-

12
12
9
9
3

-

2
11
8
3
4
4

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

2

-

8
7
1
7

-

2

-

-

6

-

-

-■
-

4
5

1
1
1
1
l
1

8
3

2

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
6
6

3
3

1

-

2

4
4

-

2

3
5
5

-

3
3

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

4
3
1

-

1

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

2
2

2

-

3
-

3
3

-

-

4
4

4
4

9
5
4
4
1
3
5
1

1
1

-

-

2
2
2
2

2
2

2

-

-

-

1
1

8

-

-

1
-

4
3

5

-

4
4

4
4

2

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

3
-

-

-

-

6
3

4

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

1
1
-

3
1
2
2

1
1

-

-

6

-

2
8
4
4
4
4
1
1
1
1

2

1
-

-

-

3

2
4
1
3

3
3
3

-

4

1
4

-

8
5
3
7
5
2
4
2
2

-

2

4

-

-

-

-

12
4
8
8
4
4
-

-

7
7

2

-

2

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

24
4
20
14
4
10
10
10
-

-

2

2
-

2
2
-

2
2
-

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

-

Table 18. Continued—Occupational earnings: New York, N .Y .—N .J.1—Contract shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys* suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

of

Average
3 .0 0 3 .2 0
hourly UNDER
AND
earnings 3 .0 0 JNDER
3 . 20 3 .4 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

S
NUMBER OF WORKERS R E C E IVIN G : TR A IG H T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS U N DCLLARSI OF
3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . a i r 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 ( ) 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0 6 .8 0 7 . 2 0 T

3 .6 0 3 . 8 0 4 . 0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

T a t r8

7 . 60 8 . 0 0

. 0 0 8 .6 0

8 .6 0 9 . 2 0

9725

9 .8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 00
AND
CVER
9 . 8 0 1 0 .4 0 1 1 . 0 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
COAT FAB R IC A TIO N — CONTINUED
SEW ING-MACHI NE OPERATORS— CONTI NUED
SEW EDGE T A P E ...................................................
TIM E ...............................................................
IN C E N TIV ..................................................
MEN......................................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
TIM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
SEW IN SLEEVE...................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
MEN......................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
SLEEVE MAKING, CLOTH.................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . .....................................
MEN......................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ...........................................
TAPE ARMHOLES...................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
WOMEN................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
SHAPERS........................................................................
T I ME. . . .
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
h e in c e n t iv e : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :
WOMEN................................................................
T IM E ............................... ..............................
THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING
p u l l e r s ! . . . ................................... ..
T IM E ............ ............................ ....................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
UNOERPRESSERS.........................................................
TIM E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ...................................... ..
MEN......................................................................
T IM E ......................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................

See footnotes at end o f table.




59
18
41
29
9
20
30
9
21
59
54
36
32
23
76
64
21
14
55
50
41
30
10
31
23
38
23
15
22
10
16
11

$ 5 .0 7
4 .7 6
5 .2 0
5 .6 4
6 .0 5
5 .4 5
4 .5 2
3 .4 7
4 .9 7
6 .3 9
6 .4 4
6 .5 7
6 .6 1
6 .10
4 .9 6
5 .1 4
5 .4 4
6 .0 8
4 .7 8
4 .8 7
4 .8 4
5 .0 6
5 .9 7
4 .4 8
4 .7 4
4 .7 6
4 .0 6
5 .8 4
4 .9 5
5 .1 1
4 .4 9
3 .2 3

12 8
26
102
15 2
70
82
136
70
66

4 .6 6
3 .8 9
4 .8 6
5 .4 7
5 .6 9
5 .2 8
5 .7 0
5 .6 9
5 .7 2

4
4
4

-

—
-

3
3
2
2
1

3
2
1
2
2
1

—
-

2
2
-

4
4
4
4
4
3
3
-

4
4
-

3
3
-

1
2
2
2
3
3
-

1
1
1
1
1
1
-

3
3
-

2
2
3
3
3
-

3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
-

4
4
4
2
2
4
2

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
-

3
3
2
2
2
2
-

1
1
-

3
3
-

-

2
—
2
2
2
-

11
7
4
2
2
9
7
2
-

2
2
2
2
-

6
6
4
4
2
2
-

2
1

-

2
2
2
2
-

-

5
4

-

8
8
-

-

2
-

14
10
-

-

1
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5

4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5

8
8
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1

8
8
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2

14
10
-

17
17
14
8
6
8
8

6
4
2
4
4
2
2

5
3
2
6
2
4
2
2
“

16
7
9
12
8
4
12
8
4

-

“
12
1
11
-

-

9
1
8
6
6
2
2

9
1
8
4
3
1
4
3
1

11
7
4
3
3
-

3
3

8

8

4
4
4
4

4
1
3
14
1
13
14
1
13

_

2

3
1
2
3
1
2

2
17
11
6
17
11
6

4
4
*4
4
-

2
2
2
2
-

9
7
2
9
7
2
-

3
3
1

4
4
-

1
—
1
-

3
3
3

-

—
-

-

-

-

-

1
2

4

1

3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3
3
3
12
9
9
6
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
-

8
8
4
4

15
11
8
4
7
3
2

4
7
7
2
2
5
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
2
2
-

1
5
5
3
3
2
1
1
1
-

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
1
1
3

4
4
4
4
-

3
3
3
3
-

-

-

5
5
3
3
2

2
5
5
5
5
9
9
2
2
7
7
2
2
2
2
-

-

-

4

-

-

8

3
1
2
3
1
2

4
10
5
5
10
5
5

5
1
4
5
1
4

4
2
2
4
2
2

8
7
4
3
7
4
3

4

4
4
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
-

2
2
1
1
2
2
2
2

-

2

-

2

5

3
1
2
3
1
2

2
2
2

3
2
l
3
2
1

2
5
3
2
5
3
2

4
12
4
8
12
4
8

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

1
1
1
1

4
4
4
4
~

8
4
2
2
4
2
2

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
**

-

-

-

-

~

1 See foonote 1, table 16.
2 Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and for w ork on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative
sample o f establishments, are designed to measure the level o f occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with
previous studies m ay not reflect expected wage movements became o f change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment
am ong establishments w ith different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though m ost




establishments increased wages between periods being compared. Approxim ately 62 percent o f die production workers covered by die
survey are incentive-rated.
2 A ll or virtually all workers are women.
4 All or virtually all workers are men.
* A ll o r virtually all workers are time-rated.

Table 19. Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, P a.-N .J.1—All shops
(Number and average rtraight-time hourlyjwm ingt1 o f worker, in telectod occupation! in man*, and boyt* suit and coat manufacturing ettabfahmentt, April 1879)

Occupation and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS.........................
M E N .. ....................................................
W O M E N * . . . . . . . . . ..............................

Num ber
of
workers

Average 2 . 9 0 3 . 3 0
AN D
hourly
earnings UNOER
3 .3 0 3 .7 0

3 .7 3

4 .1 0

4 .5 0

4 .1 0

4 .5 0

4 .9 0

603
1 50
453

670

7 ,1 1 6
2 ,2 7 3
6 ,8 4 3

$ 5 .5 4
6 .2 9
5 .1 9

461
1 14
347

450
99
351

571

14 2
90
41
37
35
31
82
37
27

8 .2 4
7 .2 9
7 .6 7
7 .0 1
8. 10
7 .3 7
7 .6 5
6 .7 4
7 .2 1
5 .4 7
6 .1 6
6 .2 8

-

-

-

112
459

111
559

N U 8IB E R O F WOR K E R S R E C E I V IN G ST R A 1 < ?H T- T IM E H C U R L I EA RN | N G S ( I K O C L L A R S ) CF —
4 . 9 0 5 . 3 0 5 . 7 0 6 . 1 0 6 . 5 0 6 . 9 0 7 . 3 0 7 . 7 0 8 . 1 0 8 . 5 0 8 . 9 0 9 . 3 0 9 . 7 0 1 C . 10 1 0 . 5 0 1 0 . 9 0 1 1 . 3C 1 1 . 7 0 1 2 . 1 0 L 2 . 5 0 1 2 . 9 0 1 3 . 3 0
ANO
CVER
5 . 3 0 5 . 7 0 6 . 1 0 6 . 5 0 6 . 9 0 7 . 3 0 7 . 7 0 8 . 1 0 8 . 5 0 8 . 9 0 9 . 3 0 9 . 7 0 1 0 . 1 0 1 0 . 5 0 1 0 . 9 0 1 1 . 3 0 1 1 . 7C L2 . 1 0 1 2 . 5 0 L 2 . 9 0 1 3 . 3 0

8 51
151
700

677
183
494

524
171
353

466
1 71
295

403
131
272

290
153
137

616
289
12 7

198
90
108

143
83
60

117
70
47

81
42
39

57
49

1

9
9
-

l
-

8
2

5
-

6

11

-

-

-

64
64
23
23
23
23
67
15
15
-

14

10

27
19

17
15

4

8

2

1

8

9

12
8

41
26
15

8
1

5
5

5
5

3
3

5
5

3
-

-

-

3
-

1

8

2

1

1

2

1

1

-

-

-

-

4

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS
CUTT ING

.3

C U TTER S . CLOTH .........................................
T IN E ...................................................
C U TTER S . L IN IN G .......... .. ............................
T IN E .............................. .....................
NEN.................... .....................................
TIM E. ................................................
CUTTERS AND NARKERS, CLO TH ?'...........
MARKERS4 . ........................................................
.
N E N .....................................................

WOMEN....................................................
SPREADER S... ................................................
NEN..........................................................

10
23

20

-

2
2
-

-

1
1

1
1

8
8

3
3
3
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
-

3

-

6
6

4
4
-

1
6

7
7

1
1

4
4
3
3

-

3
-

3
-

a
-

11
2

1

8

1

1

4

-

-

-

—

1

2

8
1
1
1
21

9

1

8

1

1

7
7

5

3
-

3
3

1
i

5

1
6

2
2
2
2
8
-

-

-

1

1
1

-

2
2

-

1
-

-

5
-

1
-

2
-

-

-

1

-

-

1
1

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

_

_

_

.

_

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

COAT FA B R IC A TIO N
BASTERS, HAND5 .............................
.
M E N . . . . . ................. ..
WONEN......................... ...
COLLAR SETTERS, HAND........... .
IN C E N T IV E ...................... .
F IN IS H E R S , HAND6 ...................... .
.
IN C E N T IV E ...................... .
F IT T E R S .............. ................................
T IN E ...............................
IN C E N T IV E ........................
N E N . . . . ................................. .
T IN E .................... ...............
WOMEN.......................................
T IM E ..............
INSPECTO RS, FIN A L4 .................
.
NEN........................................... .
WOMEN......................... ............. .
PAIRERS AND TURNERS?........... .
T IN E .................................... .
IN C E N T IV E ...................... .
PRESSERS, F IN IS H , H A N D ....
T IM E ....................................
IN C E N T IV E ...................... .
M E N . . . . ..................................
T I M E . . ...............................
IN C E N T IV E ...................... .
WONEN...................................... .

See footnotes at end o f table.




48
7
41
32
30
7
131
108
83

20
63
62

12
21
8
245
26
215
144
46
98
79
5
70
65
9
60

10

6 .1 5
8 .2 7
5 .7 9
5 . 75
5 .7 3
7 .3 9
4 .6 8
4 .7 1
6 .9 2
5 .3 5
7 .4 1
7 .6 0
5 .8 8
4 .9 2
4 .6 6
4 .5 5
5 .0 4
4 .4 9
4 .9 5
4 .0 1
5 .3 9
6 .7 9
5 .5 6
6 .9 5
7 .0 9
5 .5 6
7 .3 2
4 .7 2

1

—

1

13

.

.

—
-

4
4
-

3
3
-

3
3
3
-

2
2

9
7

7
7

-

2

8
6

13
13
5
3

1
2
2

8
8

26

11

21

20

3
-

4
3

7
3

19

-;
-

3

1

2
1

1

2

-

-

5
5

1

3

1

2

3
-

23
-

4
3
45
4
41

42

45

70

11

1

6

8

3

-

41
16

39
23

62

1

8
8
3

6
17

5
7
4
4

8
11
2
9

12

-

-

3
18

23
16

12
6
2

8
8
1

11
5

6

-

-

4
-

2
1

1

4

-

1
1

-

1

2
-

2
2

2
1
2
2
-

1

6
5

2
2
-

13
7

1
6
1
-

6
1

12

2
2

2

-

2
2

-

4

2
2
3

2
1
-

1
-

1
-

1

.

_

_

_

-

3

—

-

-

-

1
1
1

3
3
-

-

-

-

1
1
1

-

4

9

3

6

4

1

9
9

3
3

6
6

4
4

1
1

-

_
-

_

3

1
1
1

-

1

2

-

1
1

2
2

-

1

1
1
2
1
1
2
1

9

5

2

1

4

3

-

-

-

-

9

5
29
3
26
29
3
26

2
8

1
3

4
3

3
3

-

-

2

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

3
3

3
3

3
3

- '
-

-

2
2

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

3

3

3

-

-

2

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
-

1

2
2
1

4
4
3
-

8

4
5

3

1

5
4

8
1

1

-

-

-

-

1
l

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

5

2
1
1
8

1
1
1

1

2
1

2
2
3

2
1
1

7
-

6

-

-

1
1

6

-

1

5
5

1

2
2
4

2

Table 19. Continued—Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, P a.-N .J.—A ll shops
(Number and im a g e rtriight-tim e hourly terningi* o f w o rk e r in wltctad occupetiow in twn's and boys’ suit «nd coat menuficturinfl wtebiiihments. April 1979)

COAT

1/1

SELECTED

l

Number
of
workers

Occupation and sex

4 .1 0

4 .5 0

N U M B E R IF WOP K E P S R E C E 1 V IN G
4 .9 0 5 .3 0 5 .7 0 6 .1 0 6 . 5 0 6 .9 0

4 .5 0

4 .9 0

5 .3 0

5 .7 0

6 .1 0

6 .5 0

6 .9 0

7 .3 0

7 .7 0

8 .1 0

8 .5 0

8 .9 0

9 .3 0

11

31
19

11

30
26
27

21

11

15
7

14

5
4

26
23
24
3

29
25
28

35
29
35
4

27
27
27

12
12
12

15
15
15

8
8
8

10
10
10

10
10
10

3
3
3

3
3
3

9
9
9

4
4
4

1
1
1

6

1

6

5

27
-

15
-

8

10

10

9
-

4
-

2

-

-

1

-

3
-

3

-

-

-

1

1
1

-

3
183
62

6
6
212

29
-

12

4

21
2
2

24

7
4
176
59
117
7
5

23
3
3
295
72
223
35

14

3
1 32
48
84

8
12

32
31
32
x
31

213
25
188
50
14
36
163

193

116
116
26

105
9
96

90
-

47
-

38
-

35

192
18

90
13

47
9

38

34
7

1

-

-

-

26
90
90
17

7
14
84

13
77
77
24

9
38
-

Average
2 .9 0 3 .3 0 3 .7 0
hourly ?
AN D
earnings U N D E R
3 .3 0 3 .7 0 4 .1 0

S T R A IG H T - 1 r j M f ifO U R L It e a r m
7 .3 0 7 . 7 0 8 .1 0 8 .5 0 8 .9 0 9 . 3 0

U N P ( U A R S J CF —
9 . 7 0 1 0 . 1 0 1 0 . 5 0 1 0 . 9 0 1 1 . 3 0 L I . 7 0 1 2 . 1 0 1 2 . 50 1 2 . 9 0 L 3 . 3 0
AND
CVER
9 . 7 0 L 0 . 1 0 L 0 . 5 0 L 0 . 9 0 L I . 3 0 1 1 . 7 0 L2 . 1 0 L 2 . 5 0 L 2 . 9 0 1 3 . 3 0

P R O D U C T IO N O C C U P A T IO N S —
C O N T IN U E D
F A B R I C A T I O N — C O N T IN U E D

1

12
6

4

9

P R E S S E R S . F I N I S H , M A C H IN E ....................
I N C E N T I V E ............ . .............. ..
M E N . .................................................. ..

368
2 99
328

6 6 .8 2
7 .2 5
7 .0 9

4

I N C E N T I V E ...................... ................
W OMEN.....................................................
IN C E M T IV E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S E W I N G - M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R S ......................
T I M E .................................. ................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . . .............................
M E N . . . . ........................... .....................
T I M E ....................................
I N C E N T I V E ................ ......................
W O M E N * .................................................
T I M E . . . . . .......................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . . .................... ..
B A S T E R S .............. .................................................

277
60

7 .4 3
4 .6 4
5 .0 3
5 .6 1
4 .6 4
5. 84
6 .4 7
5 .7 2
6 .6 4
5 .5 2
4 .5 1
5 .7 5
5 .9 3

1
-

▼T UC

22
2 ,5 5 1
472
2 ,0 7 9
262
50
a 2
2 ,2 8 9
422
1 ,8 6 7
354

6 .0 6
6 .6 4
5 .8 3

-

112
39
73
4

4
108
39
69
5

6
3
3
126
45
81

12

2
169
54
115
13
5

181
62
119

8
-

4

10
12

4

10

3
8

3

7

1
2

2
2

I N C E N T I V E ................................................
M E N ......................................................................
W OMEN.....................................................

323
45
3D9
■ an
WV

IN C E N T I V .........................................
B U T T O N S E W I N G * . . . . .............. ............ ..
I N C E N T I V E . . ...................... ............
B U T T O N H O L E M A K I N G .................. ..

279
69
55
47
t7
i r
30

5 .9 6
5 .4 4
5. 70
5. 74

_

s

6 .0 2
6 .3 6
5 .6 2
5 .2 5
5 .9 0

_

49
15
34
44
Xz
31
115

5 .8 5
5 .4 6
6 .0 3
5 .7 0

-

5. 86
5 .8 5

-

96

6 .0 1

X

20

5 .9 7
6 .1 6
5 .8 2
C I D
7 .VU
5 .9 8

22

251
55
196

8
3
5
243
52
191
17

W O M E N ..• • • • • • • • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E * . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ?..
C O L L A R P R E P A R IN G , E X C E P T P I E C I N G
Oft P A D O I N G ......... ..................... .
T I M E . . . ......................... .............. ..
IN C E N T I V E . ............................ • • • •
W O M E N . . . ..............................................
I N C E N T I V E .................. .....................
C O L L A R S E T T I N G ................ .......................

fu r c v r r u c

______ _

_______

39
l7
X e

22

M E N .............. .........................................
TkftTCttTTUC_________________________

j f

W OM EN...................................... .

95

I N C E N T I V E ..................................... .

See footnotes at end o f table.




79

1

A *tft

7

K

1

16
5

11

44
7
41

39
9
31

42
5
37

17

14

6
11

1

10

4

40
4
36

34
3
3
7

37
5

36
9
9

31

37

8
8

-

2

4

4

11
11
11
2

x

4
x

34

2

44

13
4
4

15
17
14

2

8
2
6

2

1

1
1
1

2
2
2

2
2
2

l

2
6
3

2
6
6

3

4
\

8
2
6

6
3

1
9

7
2
1
8
7
1

2
x

1

3
1

3

3

3
3

11

6

3

3

9

4
7

5

4-

2
1

6
2

11
4

2
1
-

9
9

4
4

7
19
U

6
2

2

X

1
6
3
1

3

15

2
1
20

12
1
1

19
3
3

14

17
l

3

6

6

4
7

12

3

3

6

2

7

3

1

1

7
4

3

3

21

11

17

2
2

3
18
189

1

152
40

15

2
|
1

9

201
21

4

6

22
g

27
260
64
196
48
4

2
2
210

183
40

296
87
209
44

13

c

8

16
19

17
175
175
42

13

2
2

92

220

1A
lv

1

I N C E N T I V E ............

5

121
2
2

11
8

3

3
11

16

13
xx
3
3

10
2
8

-

9
4
4

2

-

11
11

16
-

5
-

3

16

5

3

1
6

6
6

-

-

1

1
4
4

1

27
27

28
-

7
-

15
-

38

28

7

1

6

6

15
3

1
1
-

6
2

6
2

13

24
5
19

4

4

13

19

4

4

1
1
1

1

_
-

—

-

_
-

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

2
82
14

x

1

_

2

_

1

_

_

1
1
l

-

-

2
2
-

-

1
6

4

6

8
0

2

4

13
13

1

4

4

-

3

3

-

3

_

_
_
_
-

1
1
-

-

_
_

_

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2
2
2

_

_
-

_
-

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

4

_

-

_
-

4

_
_
_
-

-

2
2
2

6

_
_
_
-

1

4
-

_

4

-

4

2

5

—

1

-

4

3

-

1
-

-

6

-

1
1
1

1

-

_

1

-

4

_

1
-

-

4

4

-

-

-

5

x

-

-

_

4

4

1
-

_

3
3
3

-

3
-

-

1
J

4
-

-

1
-

-

_
-

3

-

1

-

_

_
_

1

_
-

1

1

2
2
2

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
-

_
-

-

_

_

-

-

1
-

-

-

1
1

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

1
-

-

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table 19. Continued—Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, PA.-N.J.1—A ll shops
(Num br and averagt «tr«ight-tiim hourly w n in gi1 of workwt in

Occupation and sax

occupations in m tn't m d boyi* suit and coat manufacturing wttbHtfinwntt, April 1979)

Average 2 .9 0 3 .3 0
AND
hourty2
earnings UNDER
3 . 3 0 3 .7 0

of

3 .7 0

4 .1 0

4 .5 0

t .10

4 .5 0

4 .9 0

NUM PER 0 F WORKERS RECE1[VING S TR A I GHT-T IME hIQURLYr ea r n JNGS ( I N DCLLARS) CF —
4 . 9 0 5 .3 0 5 .7 0 6 . 1 0 6 . 5 0 6 . 9 0 7 . 3 0 7 .7 0 8 . 1 0 8 .5 0 8 . 9 0 9 . 3 0 9 . 7 0 1 0 . 1 0 1 0 . 5 0 L 0 .9 0 11 .3 0 1 1 .7 0 1 2 . 1 0 L 2 .5 0 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0
MID
CVER
5 . 3 0 5 .7 0 6 . 1 0 6 .5 0 6 . 9 0 7 .3 0 7 . 7 0 8 . 1 0 8. 50 8 .9 0 9 . 3 0 9 . 7 0 1 0 . 1 0 L 0 .5 0 1 0 . 9 0 L I . 3D 11 .7 0 1 2 . 1 0 1 2 . 5 0 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS —
CONTINUED
COAT FAB RICATIO N— CONTINUED
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS— CONTINUED
FAC IN G T A C K IN G ....................................... ...
T IM E . ...........................................................
IN C E N T IV E ......................... ......................
WOMEN................. ..............................................
T IN F .
IN C E N TIV E .1 1 1 1 2 . . . . 1 1 1 1 . . . . .
FELL BODY L IN IN G , BOTTOM AND
S I D E . . . . ..............................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
J O IN SHOULDER, CLOTH.................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
J O IN SIDE S EA M S ,...........................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
J O IN UNDERCOLLAR, JO IN SLEEVE
L IN IN G , DR P IE C E POCKETS...................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................

WOMEN................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
L IN IN G MAKER, BODY......................................
T I M E . . . ......................................................
IN C E N T IV E ...............................................
MEN......................................................................
WOMEN................................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
PAD COLLAR AND LAPELS6 ...........................
.
POCKET SETTING*AND TACKING.................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN................ ........................ • • • « ...............
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN...................... .................... ....................
IN C E N T IV E ...............................................
SEW DARTS, CLOTH.............. ............................
TIM E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
W O M E N ..........................................................
IN C E N TIV e l I H I I I I I I I I I I I I I

See footnotes at end o f table.




ll

$ 5 .2 4
4 .3 3
5 .5 4
5 .3 2
4 .4 3
5 .5 4

3
2
1
1
1

2
2
2
2

4
4
4
4

5
4
1
5
4
1

4

4

3

“

3
2
1
3
2
1

4

1

25
31
6
25

4
4

4
4

4
4

3l
3

11
1

4

4

4

3

1

9*
26
73
52
46
8
44
41
101
80

5 .7 7
4 .5 6
6.20
5 .2 9
5 .4 1
6 .0 0
5 .1 6
5 .2 8
5 .6 5
6 .01

2
1
1
3
3
3
3
7
7

1
1
4
1
4
1
9
3

2
2
4
4
4
4
11
8

17
12
5
2
2
2
2
8
5

6
2
4
1
1
1
1
8
3

17
8
9
12
12
12
12
8
4

9
1
8
11
8
4
7
7
8
8

13
13
3
3
3
3
4
4

10
10
4
4
3
1
1
5
5

5
5
3
3
3
3
3
3

1
1
2
2
2
2
4
4

2
2
10
10

2
2
2
2
1
1
1
7
7

154
134
14
11
140
123
11 1
14
97
15
96
14
82

5 .7 1
5 .8 6
6 .0 9
6 .2 5
5 .6 7
5 .8 2
5 .6 7
4 .0 8
5 . 90
7 .7 0
5 .3 5
4 .0 8
5 .5 7
5 .1 7
5 .3 0
5 .4 5
5 .6 2
6 .22
6 .4 9
5 .3 5
5 .5 1
5 .1 4
4 .1 4
5 .4 0
5 .0 9
4 .1 4
5 .3 5

9
6
9
6
4

5
5

5
5
5
5
3
2
1
-

16
16
1
1
15
15
14

23
17
2
2
21
15
16
2
14
l
15
2
13
4
4
26
15
26
15
20
5
15
20
5
15

23
17
5
2
18
15
5
1
4
5
1
4
5
5
30
19
7
6
23
13
6

14
14
14
14
10

9
9
9
9
3

14
14
2
2
12
12
12

10
10
3
3
7
7
3

1
1
1
1
4

10
10

3

12
1
11

3
2
1

3

3

1

4

3 3

8

30

27
2 89
235
32
27
257
2D 8
72
15
57
68
15
53

5
5

3

2
1

7
2
7
2
17
6
11
17
6
11

3

3

3

3
17
12
17
12
7
3
4
6
3
3

29
19
4
1
25
18
4
2
2
4
2
2

3
24
21
1
1
23
20
2
2
2
2

-

5
5
5

3

1
4
3

1
2
2
15
12
15
12
9
3
6
9
3
6

5
-

-

14
14
14
2
2
38
33
38
33
5
2
3
5
2
3

10

1
2

-

-

-

-

~

4

-

"

-

“

3
3
-

5
5
-

2
2
-

1
1

1
1

2
2

1
1

4
4

1
1
-

5
5

4
4

6
6

-

-

5
5
7

4
4
1

6
6
1

3

2

7

1
1
-

1
1

3

2

2
1

2

14
14
2
2
12
12
2

1
5
5
1
1
4
4
-

1
4
4
4
4
2

6
3

2
2

-

2
2

-

2
2

-

3

2

-

2

2

"

17
15
4
4
13
11
3

1
2
2
13
13
4
4
9
9
6

6
6

3
3

2
2

2
2

6

3

2

2

1
-

-

~
-

-

“

~

“
”
~

”

~
~

“

-

-

~
-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

1
1

~

-

-

-

~

“

1

-

-

1
1

~
-

-

“
-

~

-

“

~

“

-

3
3
3
3

-

~
~
~

-

-

~

1
1
1
1
1
1
2

11
2
2
19
18
5
4
14
14
2

-

-

4
1
1
6
6
6
6
-

2
2
2
24
21
2
2
22
19
2

-

-

~

-

-

“

“

~

-

“
~

“

~

“

2
“
4
4
2
2
2
2

2
2

1
1
-

-

2
2

1
1

-

-

-

-

~
-

-

~

~

“
"

~

~

“
~

[

Table 19. Continued—Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.—N .J.1—A ll shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings3 o f workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average 2 .9 0 3 .3 0
hourly,
AND
earnings UNDER
3 .3 0 3 .7 0

3 .7 0

4 .1 0

4 .5 0

NUMBER OF WORKERS R E C E IVIN G
4 . 9 0 5 .3 0 5 .7 0 6 . 1 0 6 . 5 0 6 . 9 0

$.10

4 .5 0

4 .9 0

5 .3 0

5 .7 0

6.10

3
2
1
3

6
6
6

14
4
10
14

3
3
3

10
10
10

6
4
3
1
4
1
7
1

10

3
12
8
4
1
1
11
3
9
j

9
1
8
1
8
1
7
5
5
3
3
2
2

10
5
5
5
5

7

6

6
6
6

6

6

5

STRAI G HT-TIM E HOURLY EARN
7 . 3 0 7 .7 0 8 . 1 0 8 .5 0 8 . 9 0

6 .5 0 6 . 9 0

7 .3 0

7 .7 0

8 .10

8 .5 0

17
17
6
11

10
10
2
8

6
6
2
4

2
2
-

3
3
1

2
2
-

2

2

2

11
13
1
12
7

8
5
5
1
1
4
4
5

4
5
5
1
1
4
4

2

2

12
3
9

6

2

3
3
3
3
-

3

-

1
1
1
1

6

4

5
5

6

2
1

_
-

3
3

_
-

1
1

5
2

4
1

5
5

6
-

1
3

_

3
2

_
-

1
-

2
1
1
7
3
4

1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1

5
5
5
5
1
4
3
2
2

_
-

1
1

2
1
i
10

_
-

_
-

2

3
3
3
1

_

1

2
2
2

1
-

-

10

_

1
1
1

1
5

2

-

1

2

_

_

_

3
5

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

8 .9 0 9 . 3 0 9 . 7 0 L 0 . 1 0 1 0 , 5 0 1 0 . 9 0 1 1 . 3 0 1 1 . 7 0 1 2 . 1 0 L 2 . 5 0 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS —
CONTINUED
COAT F A B R IC A TIO N — CONTINUED
SEW ING* MACH I NE OPE RA TOR S— CONTI NU EO
SEW EDGE T A P E ...................................................
TIM E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
MEN......................................................................
WOMEN.................................................................

99
8
91
21
78

$6.12
4 .3 9
6 .2 7
7 .4 0
5 .7 7

-

4
1
3
1
3

2

IN C E N T IV E .................................................
SEW IN SLEEVE...................................................
T IN E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
M E N . . . . ...........................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN.................................... ............................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
SLEEVE MAKING* CLOTH.................................

71
10 3
26
77
24
19
79
58
88

IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
TTMC
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
TAPE ARMHOLES...................................................
T TliC
_
_ _______ _ _ _
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN................................................................
INTENT TV F __________________ _ _ TT
SHAPERS.........................................................................
T I ME* • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
IN C E N T IV E .................... * ..........................
M E N . . . . ...........................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
W OMEN... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _______
T T UP_____________________________ ______
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
T A IIO R S , A ll AR n iN O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _T
T IM E .............................................................................
I N ^ F N T T V F-t t i - i t i t r i t i i i m
M E N .. ........................................................................

79
81

W OME N. T T T T _ r ____________1
________ _ T T

TIM E .............................................................................
THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING
P U LLE R S * ...................................................................................

19

5 .9 0
6 .0 8
4 .8 8
6 .4 8
6 .6 4
6 .4 1
5 .9 1
6. 50
5 .2 3
4 . 89
5 .2 7
5 .1 9
4 . 89
5 .2 2
5 .2 0
4 .6 4
5 .3 7
5 .1 9
5. 30
6 .0 4
5 .6 0
6 .1 5
6 .4 9
6 .5 5
5 .6 2
5. 23
5 .7 4
5 . 18
5 .0 4
5 .8 5
5 .4 6
4 . 69
4 .6 6

220

4 .8 8

72
68
16
52
64
50
51
10
41
25
21
26
6
20
58
48
10

37
2 1

1
I N T E N T TV F ___________________________ T _ _

UNDERPRESSERS ......................................................................
T IM E .............................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ............................................................
MEN......................................................................................
T I M F ______ . . . . . . . . . . . . . ____________
IN C E N T IV E ............................................................
WOMEN...............................................................................
T IM E .............................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ............................................................

See footnotes at end o f table.




18 7
309
53
256
228
27
201

81
26
55

4
3
1
1
1
3
7

3
7
3
4
7
4
4

1
8
4
4
8
4

7
7

4
4

6

6

5

7
1

7
1

4
4
2
2
2
2
1
1
1

5
9

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
_
1

1
2

6

9
9
9
6

6

1
1
5
5
1

6.10

4 .4 5
6 .4 4
6 .4 6
5 . 10
6 .6 5
5 .0 7
3 .7 8
5 .6 8

14
19
5
14
7
3
4
7
4
-

8
7
j
6

7
5
2
7
2
8
4
4
1
1
7
4

6

6

3
6
6

4
4
3
1

2
2

_

-

1
3
3
1
1

2
2

2
2

2
2

2

2

-

2

5
7
2
5
19
2
17
19
17
5
2
3
2
2
3
2
1
5
5

1
8
8

7
7

3
16
14

2
6

6
1

4

6

3
1
1
12

1

6
6

4
_

4

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

1

2

_

6

1

9
7
5

1

7
5
9
3
3

10

28

23

28
9

41

24

20

7

18

3

8

2

4

4

5
16

21
11

18

20

7

2

4
25

4

4
5

11

11

8

2

1

2

3

2

8

21

11
10
1

8

5
14
5
9

16
7
9

23
8
15
14

3
24

8

29
4
25
25
4

18
26

7
14
7

36
14
3

22

7
4
3

19
18
7

2
-

6

4

4

-

2

3

4

7

1

2

1

_

_

1

1

2

2

Q7

5 .0 4

6

7
4
3
7
3
2
2
1
1
1

6

6
1
1
5
5
19
5

12

6
2

21

1

5
22
-

-

22

26

19

21

8
9

19
3

21

2

-

-

3

5

1

-

2

20
-

13

3
18
17
3
14
4

-

2
-

16
13

23

20

22
2

18

13
13

2
2

13
3

20

18

13

3

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

2
-

7

4

3

3

2

-

24
17

5

5

16

1

17
7

21

9 . 70|L 0 * 10|10 .50pi0 .9 D |il .3 0 f i l . 7 0 | I 2 . 1 0 | l 2 . 5 0 | 2 . 9 0 * 3 . 30
AND

Table 19. Continued—Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa. N.J.1—All shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings3 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average 2 .9 0 3 .3 0
hourly2
AND
earnings UNDER
3 .3 0 3 .7 0

___________NUMBER OF W
OPIKEPS RECEI VING STRA1 GHT-T IME HOURLY EARNINGS ( I N DCLLARS) 0F —
3 . 70 4 . 10 4 .5 0 4 .9 0 5 .3 0 5 .7 0 6 . 1 0 6 .5 0 6 .9 0 7 . 3 0 7 .7 0 8 . 1 0 8 .5 0 8 . 9 0 9 .3 0 9 .7 0 L0 . 1 0 1 0 .5 0 1 0 .9 0 11 .3 0 1 1 .7 0 1 2 . 1 0 1 2 .5 0 L 2 .9 0 1 2 . 30
AND
CVER
4 . 10 4 .5 0 4 .9 0 5 .3 0 5 .7 0 6 . 1 0 6 .5 0 6 . 9 0 7 .3 0 7 . 7 0 8 . 1 0 8 .5 0 8 .9 0 9 . 3 0 9 . 7 0 1 0 . 1 0 1 0 .5 0 1 0 .9 0 1 1 .3 0 1 1 . 7 0 L2 . 1 0 1 2 .5 0 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED
TROUSER FABRICATIO N
INSPECTO RS, F I N A L , ...........................................
T IM E .................................... ..........................
PRESSERS, F I N I S H ................................................
T I ME* • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
MEN......................................................................
TIM E ...............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
SEWERS, HAND...........................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
WOMEN...............................................................................
TIM E .............................................................................
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS6 ........................
.
IN C E N T IV E .............................................. ...
ATTACH FLV .........................................................................
ATTACH WAISTBAND............................................

41
25
50
6
44
47
6
41
19
11
17
11
507
449
23
21
36

$ 4 .5 4
4 .4 6
6 .12
6 .1 6
6.11
6 .11
6 .1 6
6 . 11
4 .8 6
4 .9 0
4 .9 3
4 .9 0
5 .3 5
5 .3 8
5 .2 2
5 .2 2
5 .5 8

1 *5
I t

IN C E N T IV E ................................................
BARTACK IN S ............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ............................................................
1O f ki

c C AUC

IN C E N T IV E ............................................................

n t r/> * k i r i

i / ff5

P IE C IN G POCKETS..............................................
Tkirrkir ru c
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
SEW ON WAISTBAND L IN IN G ........................
* AirCkA TT \ t c
S T IT C H P O C K E TS..
THREAD TRIMMERS AND BASTING
P U L L E R S ....................................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
UNDERPRESSERS.........................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
MEN........... ..........................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................

I I

42
38
70
66
15
25
19
32
30
25
23
23

5 l5 4
5 .1 3
5 .1 6
5 .4 6
5 .4 6
6 .00
5 .2 9
5 .4 6
4 .8 4
4 .8 4
5 .4 9

“

2
1

12
11

27
27

46
43
6

-

2

2

4
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
46
45
1
1
1

1

_

4
2
2

1
9
8

4
1
2
2
2
2
-

-

3

4
3
-

4
4

6
5
3
3
3
3
“

6

-

3
1
2
_

2

1
1

_
3

2
1

3

4
4
2
-

15
9
2
-

1
11
-

2
2
2
4
1
4
1
75
59
1
1
6

2
1
1
6
5
5
5
74
55
6

11
10
10
3
2
3
2
37
34
3

5

6

_

-

-

11
1
2
2

5
5
2
2
1
4
2

7
7
10
8
2
4

2
2
5
5
1
2

5
1

12
2

3
3
3

2
1

1

2

2
1
6
3
3
6
3
3
-

4
3
1
4
3
1
1

59
46
1
1
4

42
40
2
2
2

1
3
3
10
8
4

1
3
1
5
5

2
2

2
2
1
1
4

3

1
X

1
2

3

5

3

-

1

1

2
2

3
3

5
5

3
2

-

1
1

l

2

3

5

2

-

28
28

18
18
2

19
19
1
1
3

8
8

1
1
1
7
7
2

2
2
2
1
1

1

1

1

-

1
1

1
1

1

1

-

1

1

5
5

5
5

6
6

1

1

-

1

1
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

-

2
2

1

2
j

2

-

3
3
1.
j

1
1
1
3
3
j
2
2

-

1
1

j

*

1
j
2

1
2
2

2
2

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

l

1

1
1

5 ll6

1

31
28
40
36
37
33

5 .0 4
5 .1 4
6.12
6 .1 4
6 .20
6 .2 4

4
4
-

3
3
-

1
1
3
3
3
3

5
8
5
3
3
3
3

2
2
1
1
1
1

1
1
5
5
2
2

1
1
9
7
9
7

3
3
2
2
2
2

2
2
4
2
4
2

1
1
1
1
1
1

2
2
3
3
3
3

2
2
3
3
3
3

1
1
1
1
1
1

34
72
68
32

7 .2 4
4 .1 4
4 .1 3
5 .4 7

2
2

16
16
-

1
23
23
4

18
15
2

-

5
4
4

2
4
4
1

5
2
2
7

6
-

1
-

1
-

4
-

-

-

-

-

2
1
1

-

9

2

1

~

-

1

1
1
1
1

3
3
3
3

-

1
1
1
“

1
-

2
-

3

-

-

1
-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

“

"

~

-

MISCELLAN EOUS4
ADJUSTERS (R EPAIRERS I 3 .................................
.
J A N ITO R S ......................................................................
MEN......................................................................
PACKERS* ......................................................................................

See footnotes at end o f table.




-

2
-

"

”

Table 19. Continued—Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.—N.J.1—All shops
(Number *n d «v«rafle straight-time hourly earnings8 of worker* in selected occupations in men's and boys' »uit end coat manufacturing establishments. April 1979)

_______
Occupation and sex

SELEC T ED

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS R E C E IVIN G S T R A IG H T -T IM E HOURLY EARNINGS

Average
2 .9 0 3 .3 0 3 .7 0 4 .1 0
hourly 2
AND
earnings UNDER
3 . 3 0 3 . 7 0 4 . 10 4 . 5 0

r 8710“ 1 7 5 0 * I T U "

4 .5 0

4 .9 0

5 .3 0

5 .7 0

6 .1 0

6 .5 0 i t h t 7 .3 0 r m

4 .9 0

5 .3 0

5 .7 0

6 .1 0

6 .5 0

6 .9 0

7 .3 0

7 .7 0

8 .1 0

-

2
2

6
6

5
5

5
5

4
4

2
2

~

A

A

5

11
11
i 1
1\

y
y

£
3

1
j
j

11

y

3

(IN

O C LIA R S I OF—

"1 7 7 1 n r r n H 7 5 0 r o r u T T 7 3 0 IT T 7 0 r z r r a 1 2 .5 0 T271Q 1 5 7 1 0
/N O
CVER
9 * 7 0 L0 .1 0 1 0 .5 0 1 0 .9 0 1 1 .3 0 1 1 . 7 0 L 2 .1 0 1 2 . 5 0 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0

j

8 .5 0

8 .9 0

9 .3 0

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

P R O D U C T IO N O C C U P A T IO N S —
C O N T IN U E D

M I S C E l L AN E O U S - - C O N T IN U E D
STOCK

C L E R K S , G A R M E N T S ...........................
M E N . . . ......................... .........................
S T O C K C L E R K S , P I E C E G O O D S1 ....................
3
2
.
WORK D I S T R I B U T O R S . . . • • • • • • • • • • • • . • •

42
39
32

1A C
ID 5
9 9

93

$ 5 .3 2
5 .4 2
4 .6 2
4 .3 9

2
2
6
i e

A ^7
.

15
15

A* 23

5
4

2
2

2
jj

8
8

ZT
Z1

7
5
7
13

4

xo
13

29
1A

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

_____ 1
______

1 The Philadelphia, Pa.—
N.J. Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia wages between periods being compared. Approximately 64 percent of the production workers covered by the survey are incentive-rated.
Counties, Pa., and Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, NJ.
3 All or virtually all workers are men.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative sample
4 All or virtually all workers are women.
s All or virtually all workers are incentive-rated.
of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous
studies may not reflect expected wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establish­
4 All or virtually all workers are time-rated.
ments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most establishments increased




Table 20. Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.—N.J.1—Regular and cutting shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979/

Occupation and sex

ALL PRODUCTION WORKERS.................................
MEN.............................................. - ....................
WOMEN................................................................

2 .9 0 3 .3 0
Number Average
AND
of
hourly 2
workers earnings UNDER
3 .3 0 3 .7 0

3 .7 0

4 . 10 4 .5 0

NUN BER CF W
ORKERS RECEIVING STRAI GHT-T 1ME HIGURLY. e a r n JNG§ ( IN DGLLAt<SJ LIF —
4 .9 0 5 .3 0 5 .7 3 6 . 1 0 6 .5 0 6 .9 0 7 .3 0 7 .7 0 8 ., 10 8 ..5 0 8 .9 0 9 . 3 0 9 . 70 i o . io : 1 0 .5 0 1 0 .9 0 ]L I . 3 0 !.1 .7 0 1 . 2 . 1 0 L2 . 50 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0
ANu

4 .1 0

4 . 50 4 .9 0

5 .3 0

5 .7 0

468
79
389

621
114
507

478
146
332

387
139
248

2

-

4

1

OVER

4 ,8 8 8
1 ,7 0 2
3 , 186

$ 5 .6 2
6 .4 1
5 .1 9

277
65

212

308
76
232

374
77
297

118

8 .3 7

-

-

-

3 72
108
2 64

6 . 10 6 .5 0

323
123

200

6 .9 0

7 .3 0 7 .7 0

.
8 . 1 0 8 ,, 5 ) 8 ,.9 0 9 .3 0 9 . 70 1 0 . 1 0 1 0 .5 0 ]L0 .9 0 1 1 . 3 0 ] L I .7 0 12 . 1 0 l. 2 . 5 0 L 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 ^

2 75
103
172

183
99
84

291
2 27
64

118
53
65

1

9

40
Art
4U

“

63
38
25

47
41

33
24
9

14
1C
4

27
19

16
14

6

8

2

8
1

8

5

6

11

5

1

8

-

2

5
5

5
5

3

5

-

3

-

-

3

2

1

1

81
56
25

11

1

9

94
58
36

2

1

-

7
4

3

SELECTED PROOCCTICN OCCUPATIONS
CUTTING
CUTTERS, C L O T H i...................................................

7

6

....................................................... ..

00

7 .6 5
6 .7 8
7 .3 3

_________

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

_

23
23

-

4

_

5.47

19

6 .3 8

_

40

6 .3 3

1
1

31

5 .7 7
7 .8 0

3

4

3

:

_

_

5

-

-

1
1

3

3
3

_

7
7

9

1

5

1

1

9

7

9

1
2
2

65
15
15

1

2

2
2

2
2

_

2

1
1

6

2

3

-

10

COOC A P, COf 4
MF N .

34
24

9

3
3
3

T IM F * * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * ** * *
MARKERS? ................................
MEN......................................................................

8
0
3
3

_
-

1
1

1

_
_

_

1

2
2

_

_

"

1
1
1

-

-

1

-

-

-

1
1

_

_

„

_

_

_

COAT FA BR IC ATIO N
BASTERS,
f

n( I A ft

HAND5 ......................................................
.

SFTTFH

,

H A N D . . . . . . . . . ________

6

-

-

3

4

-

3

KEN......................................................................................
CIMTChCDC
UAMn6
f Air C AIT 1UC

81

F IT T E R S .........................................................................................

68

4 * 75
7 .2 8

2

12
1

1

61

7 .5 1

2

1

1

7

5.28

IN C E N T IV E . .
MEN:
iwcDcrrncc

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

c imai 4

WOMEN
PAIRERS AND TURNERS ..................................................
INC E N T IV E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P iiF S S F ftS , F IN I S H , H A N D 5 . . ____ . . . . . . .
M FN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PRESSERS, F I N I S H , MACHINE ..............................

164
79
15
64
56
48
2 04

5 .1 7
4 .5 1
5 .0 3
4 .3 2
5 .2 0
6 .8 7
7 .2 6
7 .3 4

-

g

8
0

3

3
8
2
6
2
1

15
_

29

15

27
5

4

2

4

7
8

4

6

2

2

4

8

4

1

2

3
3

4

1
2

4

30

38

60

6
6
6

29

33

53

10
2
8

8

11

7

8

_

_

5

8

6

5
7

4

3
2

3

4

2

7
3

5

1

1
9

19

9
5

19
16

7 .4 5
7 .5 4

IN C E N T IV E ................................................

175

7 .6 8

-

6

l

4

4

5

16

SEWING-MACHINE OPERATORS ..........................

1 ,4 6 2

5 .6 9

53

66

92

84

1 ,3 2 1
177

5 .7 6
6 .4 5

52
4

57
4

79

77

173
30
143

M F N . ........ .. ................. ..

2

2

160
33
127
4

177
24
153
27

TN C FN T TV F..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UflM F N ____. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

153
1 ,2 8 5

6 .5 0
5 .5 9
4 .8 1
5 .6 7

4

3
62

2
90
13
77

2
82

IN C E N T IV E ....

-

1

6
2

1
1X 7
I 1 *

IN C E N T IV E .................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




1 ,1 6 8

49

1
48

54

7

75

10
1

3
156
32
124

9
163
29
134

7

20
150
17
133

I

2
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

_

I

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

1
1

-

1

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

3

-

-

2

9

3

6

4

l

1

2

-

1

1

-

-

2

9

3

6

4

1

1

2

_

1

1

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_
_

„

_

_

9

4

1

2

3

“

1

3
3

9
9

4
4

1
1

2
2

3
3

5

1

2

1

2

3

1

2

2
1
1

3

18
18
14

1
3
3
11

4

9

14
14

15
15

ii
ii

4
4

9
9

10
2
8
8
2
6

18

15
16

16
17

13

15

14

15

ii

4

9

135

141
7
1 34
32
5
27
1 09

111

71

54

29

18

11 0

71
16

46
6
40
13

54

29

18

5

18
5

22

5
13

22

13

g

126
19

3

16
116
0

11 0

3
3

2

2

13

1
12
98

16
55

98

55

2
107

„

1

5
5
5
18

4
4

3

192
187

IN C E N T IV E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MEN......................................................................

5

7

5

3
2

2

5

2

3
3

1

1
2
1

6

1

’

18
2

4
3

-

4

1

10
2
8
1

7

20

4
3

*

15

8
g

33
2
31

46

7
7

_

3
3
8

8

8
8

3
3
3

-

10

3

8
8

10
10

3
3

8

8

10

3

3

9

4

1

2

3

-

1

19

9

10

5

3

1

1

4

-

-

-

-

9

10

5

3

1

1

4

_

_

4

l

1

4
5

1

1

_

_

14

9

4

3

1

1

4

14

5

9

4

3l

1

1

4

1
1
4

_

_

-

-

1
1

„

_
_

_

_

_
_

_

-

Table 20. Continued—Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.—N.J.1—Regular and cutting shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

___________________________________ NUN BER OF WORKERS .RECEIVING .ST-RA1 G HT-TIM E FCURLY EARf*I I NG S ( I N DOLLA RS) OF —
Average 2 .9 0 3 .3 0 3 .7 0 4 .1 0 4 .5 3 4 .9 0 5 .3 0 5 . 70 6 . 1 0 6 .5 0 6 .9 0 7 .3 0 7 .7 0 8 . 1 0 8 .5 0 8 .9 0 9 . 3 0 9 .7 0 1 0 . 1 0 L 0 .5 0 1 0 .9 0 1 1 .3 0 1 1 .7 0 1 2 . 1 0 L2. 50 1 2 .9 0 L 3 .3 0
AND
AND
hourly
OVER
earnings UNDER
3 .3 0 3 .7 9 4 .1 9 4 . 5 0 4 .9 0 5 .3 0 5 .7 0 6 . 1 0 6 .5 0 6 .9 0 7 .3 0 7 .7 0 8 . 1 0 8 .5 0 8 .9 0 9 .3 0 9 . 70 1 0 . 1 0 1 0 .5 0 L 0 .9 0 1 1 .3 0 L I . 70 1 2 . 1 0 1 2 .5 0 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0

SELECTED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS—
CONTINUED.
CCAT F A B R IC A T IO N -C O N T IN U E D
SEN ING—
MACHIN E OPERATORS— CONTINU ED
IN C E N T IV E ................................................

180
30

5 .9 3

5

7

2

8

9

19

27

21

1

19
Q| lTTDM CCU fM r
33
29

BUTTONHOLE MAKING.........................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
COLLAR PREPARINGt EXCEPT P IE C IN G
n o DAnniKin
....................................... ......................
mi i

8

25
21

5 .5 9
5 .9 6
6 .0 5
6 .3 6
5 .8 3
5 .9 4

64
59
15
49
44
23
18

5 .6 7
5 .3 5
5 .7 3
5 .7 4
5 .9 0
5 .6 8
5 .6 9
5 .2 8
5 .5 4

45
42
42
39
29
26

5 .8 3
5 .9 2
5 .8 2
5 .9 2
5 .5 7
5 .6 1

21

23

c ^T T fw n
IN C E N T IV E ............* ..................................

ao

ftr n ^ p N * * * * *
"
*
|K |r p N T |Y p T . . 1 1 r ___T _ _ T T
c ar iMn t at is i m n 6
TT_ TT- - ___T _ T _ _ ^ T T
FELL BODY L IN IN G , BOTTOM AND
S ID E .........................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
i n i K ; Qunm n c o . r i n r u .................................
IN C E N T IV E ............................................................

11

2

2
2

6
6

5
3

4

-

2
2
1
1
1

-

1

2
1

-

-

-

2
2

6
6

4

3

1

2

1

2
2

2
2

4

6

”

_

£

j

2
2

l j

2

7

6
6
2
2

4
2
1
1

3

11
11
1
10
10
4

1
1

3

3
3
3
3

9
7
9
7

4
4
3
3

4
4
3
3

1

3

10

6

1

1
1

1
1
1
1

-

5
5
5
5

3

1

-

-

5 .4 1
6 .1 6
6 .2 6

3
5
5

1
1
1

-

4
4

5 .9 8
6 .2 7
5 .9 4
6 .2 6
5 .9 3

1

5

1
1
1

5

*

*

2
1
2
1

7

7

3
3

2

22
22

19
19

5

1
1
1

4
4

2
2

1

-

3
3

3

-

3
3
3

21
21
2

-

3

2
2
1
1
1

3
3
7

5

7

1

-

-

2
2

-

1
1

1
1

-

4
4

-

2
2
2

1

_

_

-

-

_

_

-

_

_

2
2

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

.
_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1
1
1

-

2

*

1

_

2

4

2
2
3
3

3
3

7
7
7
7

-

1
1

1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2

1

-

_

4

_

**
1
1
1

1
9
3
3

2

2

4
4

10

2

13
13
2

2

2

-

31
30
9

2

4

~
Z

2
2
2
2

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1
1

2

-

_

_

1

_

1

1

3

7

3

4

-

1

1

_

-

1

-

-

-

.

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

-

5
5

3
3

4
4

1
1

5
5

2
2

1
1

4
4

-

1

-

-

1

4
4

3
4
4

1

3

3
5
3

6

2
2

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

_
-

5

2

11

14

10

1

5

4

4

-

-

3

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

_

5
-

2
1
1

11
12
12

_

5
7

4

4

_

_

4

-

1
1

3
-

_

1

_
3

-

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

-

1

J
I-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

,
-

_
-

6 .00

WOMEN...............................................................................
J O IN SIDE SEAMSf ......................................................
i
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
J O IN UNDERCOLLAR, J O IN SLEEVE
L IN IN G , OR PIECE POCKETS^.................
#PM_________ ____________________ ___
WOMEN........................................................
L IN IN G MAKER, BODY......................................
WOMEN........................................... ....................
o>n r n i t aw aajh i a o p i c ®
1
TM £ MT T UP
P
Dnr ii-ct c c T T iw n Aun T A rirtK in 5

55
51
111
12

99
63
52
.

WOMEN...................... .........................................
SEW DARTS, C L O T H * ......................................

See footnotes at end of table.




J
:

_
20

142
47

1
1

6 *1 7
5 .2 6
5 .1 5

_

_

1

3
1 8

2
12

13
12

1
13

10

_

18
4
14

9

8

11
2

9

8

2
2

2
2

3

9
9
9

16

12

9

8

17

9

25

13

11

8

6

4

2
2

2
2

5

11
11

4

5

3
3

2

20
l

19
-

3
7
3
1

1
1
”

1O

2

Z

1

2
2

I

_

1

6

5

4

2

1

2

-

2
2

4

2
2

-

-

-

2
2

2

-

1

-

_

„

.
-

1

-

Table 20. Continued— Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.— N.J.1— Regular and cutting shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings* of w
N U f-

Occupation and sex

Number Average 2 . 9 0
AND
of
hourly 2
workers earnings UNDER
3 .3 0

SELECTED

3F WORKERS RECEIVING

BER

STRAI G HT-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS ( I N

DOLLARS)

OF —

3 .3 0

3 .7 0

4 . 10

4 .5 0

4 .9 0

5 .3 0

5 .7 0

6 .1 0

6 .5 0

6 .9 0

7 .3 0

7 .7 0

B . 10

8 .5 0

8 .9 0

9 V 3 * “9 7 T5 T'C TTG

r r . ”9 ?

3 .7 0

4 .1 0

4 . 50

4 .9 0

5 .3 0

5 .7 0

6 .1 0

6 .5 0

6 .9 0

7 .33

7 . 70

8 .1 0

8 .5 0

8 .9 0

9 .3 0

9 . 7 0 1 0 .1 0 1 0 . 5 0 1 0 . 9 0

i

4
2
-

3
3
-

2
2
-

4
2
-

3
3
4
4
1
1
3
3
7
6
7
6
1

rr;. 3 3 n r,r r u

T T .3 ^ 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 ”

r r m

AND
LVER
i . i30

u ,. 7 0

1 2 ,. 1 0 1 2 . 5 0 1 2 ,. 9 0 1 3 . 3 - '

P R O D U C T IO N O C C U P A T IO N S —
C C N T IN U E O

CCAT FABRICATIO N— CONTINUED
SEEING-MACHINE OPERATORS— CONTINUED
SEW EDGE TAPE...................... ............................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
SEW IN SLEEVE...................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ......................... ................. ..
SLEEVE MAKING* CLOTH.................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ......................... .......................
TAPE ARMHOLES...................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN.................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ........................................ ..
SHAPERS.........................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . . ............................. ..
W O M E N ..........................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
TAILORS* ALL AROUND2 ......................................
WOMEN.................................................................
THREAC TRIMMERS AND BASTING
PU LLE R S t....................................................................
IN C E N T IV E ................................................
UNDER PRESSERS.......................................................
T IM E .............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
M E N ...................................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
WOMEN.............................. .................................
IN C E N T IV E ........................... ....................

61
57
15
14
46
43
55
52
16
15
39
37
57
51
54
48
32
30
30
28
34
31
20
19
14
12
48
19

S 6 .4 1
6 .5 4
7 .1 6
7 .4 1
6 .1 6
f c .2 5
6 .3 2
6 .3 5
6 .7 2
6 .5 5
6 .1 5
6 .2 7

1
1
1
1
-

-

2
1
1
1

1

1
2
2
-

1
6
4
-

2
2

6
4
5
5
4
4
3
3

6

1

5

1

-

1
1

99

4 .6 8

7

14

13

5
5
1
4

14
5
3

13
12

2

48
39

4 .7 1
6 .1 7
4 .6 9
6 .3 3
6 .5 1
6 .6 2
5 .1 7
5 .3 5

6
6
10
4
6
8
4

21

14

19
13
3
10

9
9
15

2
2

6
3

12
21
1
20
17
16
4
4

3
3
2
1

1
1
4
1

12
3
3
9
9

41
25
50
6
44
47
6
41

4
4
6
6
6
6
6
6

4
1

4
3

-

4

4
4

15
9

1

-

2

2
3

2

2

11

1
6

6

3
3

10
10
4
4
6
6
9
9

9
9
2
2
7
7
5
5

6
6

3
3
6

1
1
4
4
3
3
3
3
1

1
1
4
4
2
2

2
2
4
4

3
3

3
3
1
1
2
2
2
2
-

2
2
2
2

2
2
-

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
-

-

-

-

3
2
2
1
1
6
6
6
6

1
1
-

-

-

-

2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
-

-

3
3
3
3
-

-

1
1
-

-

-

1
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i

-

-

-

-

-

3

"

1
1
1
1
1
1

93
189
19
170
141
131

5

2

5 .3 0
5 .3 0
6 .0 6
6 .0 9
6 .5 8
6 .5 7
5 .3 3
5 .3 3
5 .0 9

6
6
-

1
1
3
3
14

1
1
-

1
1
2

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

9
8
1
1
8
7
4
4
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
13
11
13
11
4
2
1
1
3
1
5

3
3
3
3
1
1
2
2
1

4
4
4
4
1
1

4 .6 6

-

1
1
5
5
5
5
3
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
8

5 .2 8
5 .3 3
5 .2 5
5 .3 0
5 .41
5 .4 2

-

1
1
-

14
9
14
9
2
2
2
2

-

7
7

1
1
1
4
4

6
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
4
4

2
2

6
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1

5
5

2
2
-

2
2
5
5

1
1
1
1

3
3
3

1
1
-

-

-

1
1
1
1
-

2
2
-

2
2

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

9

2

4
4
18

6
6
15

3

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

_

3
13

11

14

9

7

11

2

2

4

1

-

1

18
17
17

15
10
10
5
5

l?
10
10
3
3

11
9
9

14

9
8
8

7
7
7

11
11
11

2
2
2

2
2
2

4
4
4

1
1
1

-

1

1

-

1

1
1

1
1

-

-

1
1

1

1

-

1

1

-

1
1
1
1
-

-

-

-

1
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

11
11
3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

--

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

7
8
9
4
6
4

i

1

1
1
1
5
4
3
2
2
2
-

1
1
3
3
3
3

i
i

-

-

-

-

1
1
1

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

TROUSER FABRICATIO N
INSPECTORS. FIN A L6 ........................... ...............
.
T IM E ..............................................................
PRESSERS* F I N I S H .................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E .................................................
MEN......................................................................
T IM E ..............................................................
IN C E N T IV E ........................................

See footnotes at e n d o f table.




.5 4
.4 6
.1 2
.1 6
.1 1
.1 1
.1 6
.1 1

6
5
3

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

3
3

3

2

2

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

11
10

3

3

2

1

10

3

2

-

3

3

1
4
3
1
4

2

3

5

3

2
2

3
3

5
5

3
2

2

3

5

2

-

3
1

-

Table 20. Continued—Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.—N.J.1—Regular and cutting shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings3 of workers in selected occupations in man's and boys* suit and coat manufacturing establishments. April 1979)

Occupation and sex

Number
of
workers

Average 2 .9 0 3 .3 0 3 .7 0
hourly.
and
earnings UNDER
3 .3 0 3 .7 0 4 .1 0

4. 10 4 .5 0

NUMBER OF WORKERS R E C E I V I NG S T R A IG H T -T IM E HOURLY E A R N IN G S ( I N D O LLA R S) OF —
4 .9 0 5 .3 0 5 .7 0 6 . 1 0 6 .5 0 6 .9 0 7 .3 0 7 .7 0 8 . 1 0 8 .5 0 8 .9 0 9 . 3 0 9 .7 0 1 0 . 1 0 LQ. 50 L 0 .9 0 L I . 30 1 1 .7 0

4 .5 0 4 .9 0

5 .3 0

5 .7 0

5

3

_

1

6

.

10

6 .5 0

6 .9 0

7 .3 0 7 .7 0

8 .5 0 8 .9 0

8.10

9 .3 0 9 . 7 0 L0.10 1 0 .5 0 L 0 .9 0 L 1 .30 1 1 .7 0

1 2 .1 0

12. 50 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0
AND
OVER
1 2 .5 0 12. 90 1 3 .3 0
1 2 .1 0

SE LE C T EO P RO D U CTIO N O C C U P A T IO N S—
CO N T IN U E D
TRCU SER F A B R IC A T IO N — C O N T IN U E D
36
11

NOMEN.. . ................

17

4 .9 3

507
449
23

5 .3 5
5 .3 8
5 .2 2
5 .2 2
5 .5 8
5 .5 9
5 .5 4
5 .1 3
5 .1 6
5 .4 6
5 .4 6

1

2

_

1

i

_

3

4

27
27

4-6
43

46
45

75
59

74
55

37
34

59
46

42
40

6

1

6
2
4

1

1

4
5

3
(,

1

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

I N C E N T I V E . . . . .............................
i=LY
T
TNC F NT T V F ____ _____ . . . . . . . . . .
a t t a c h W M S T P A N f1
i i i i i •i i
ATTArw

att

T W rP M J fy F
____T
BAR T A C K IN G . ........................ ..
IN C E N T IV E . . . .
sea m s
, T T T T T T T T l t I ______ t - - t
I Mr FNT I V F _ T T T T T T ____________
_
P IF r iN fft f| y S 5 , , T . . t T T - T _________ T,
P I E C IN G P O C K E T S . . .
T Mr F WT T Vp T T - T -T T T r _______ T T T
S E R G IN G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
| Mf F N T IV ^ tt t .
SEW ON W A IST B A N D L I N I N G ...................
I NT FNT I VF t i > •
iT t
c n ir n p n r t f e T c 6 _
THREAD T R IM M E R S AND B A S T IN G
P U L L E R S ^ ...................................................
W O M EN .._______________. . . ________
UNDER P R E S S E R S ........................................ .
I N C E N T IV E .................. .................
P E N . . . . . . . . . . . . . ____ . . . . . ______
IN C E N T IV E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

36
13
11

42
38
70
66

15
25
19
32
30
25
23
23
31
28
40
36
37
33

6.00

12
11

2

1

4
4

3
3

3

3
1
2
2

5 .2 9
5 .4 6
4. 84
4 .8 4
5 .4 9
5 .4 6
5 .1 6

”
1
1
1
1
1

3

5 .0 4
5 .1 4

4
4

3
3

3

6.12

6 .1 4
6.2 0

6 .2 4

_

_

2
2
6
6

3
1
2
2
1
1

1
1

3
3
3
3

1
1
1

4
3

1
1

1
1
1
3
3
1

8

5
5

7
7

2
2

3
3

3
I

2
2
1

10
8
2

5
5

10
8

5

4

2
2

4

4
4
5
3
3

1
2

9

5
5
1
1
5
8

5
3
3
3
3

2
12
12
2
2

5

19
19
1
1

1
1
1

I
7
7

1

3

2
2

2
2

2
2

3
3
3

1
1

4

1

1
1
2

*

2

2

1
1
1
1

3
3

2
2

1
1

1
1

3
3

2
2

1
1
1

5
5

2
2
2

4

1

2

9
7
9
7

2

2

1

2
3

5

3

1

4

2
2

2
4

2
2

3

1
1
1

2
2

1
1

2

1

3
3

3

5

1

1

1

3

2

1
1

5

2

1
2

2
2

2
2
2

8

1

2

1

11
11
1

18
18
2

28
28

1
1
1

6

-

-

-

-

^ffirK

fl FKKS,

OARMfNTS
____ i
t - r
ri
p|Frp
_____ T
H I S T R I f l l l T D R S ______ T T T ____________ T

MFN____ i
WORK

T I M E . . . ..................................................
M E N . . . . . ................................................. ..............

26
52
49
32
41
38
31
78
72
66

7 .0 4
4 .2 7
4 .2 7
5 .4 7
5*45
4 .7 3
4 .5 5
4 .3 9
4 .3 5

12

12
12

17
14

4
2

4

4
5

2
7

5
5

7
7

2

y
_

4
7

15
15
15

11
11
11

4
4

~

7

4

18
18
12

7
7
7

9

5
5
5

-

•

"

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

3
3

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

~

1

1

1
j

3
3

1
1
1
1

1

1

1
1

1

1

1

2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative
sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with
previous studies may not reflect expected wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among
establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most establish­
ments increased wages between periods being compared. Approximately 64 percent of the production workers covered by the survey are

3

1

”

incentive-rated.
3 All or virtually
4 All or virtually
s All or virtually
6 All or virtually

all
all
all
all

-

*

1
1

2

5
6

1 See footnote 1, table 19.




2

5

2

-

-

-

-

1
l

1

1
1

“

1
1

1
1
1

1

-

1

M IS C E L L A N E O U S 4
A D JU STE RS ( R E P A IR E R S I 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
2
.
>AK|I T T R < ; ____ T T ______ T T T t T T ____ TTTTt
MEN. .............................. ...................
P ACK ERS3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ____ _
.

-

-

workers are men.
workers are time-rated.
workers are incentive-rated.
workers are women.

_
-

-

_
_

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
-

_
_

_

_
_

Table 21. Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.—hi.J.1—Contract shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings3 of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys' suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

Occupation and sex

A ll

PRGQLCTICN WORKERS.. . . . . . . . . . . .
M F N .. . . . . . . ________ . . . . . . . . . . . .
k C M E N . . . .......................................................

Number Average 2 .9 0 3 .3 0
AND
hourly2
of
workers earnings UNDER
3 .3 C 3 .7 0

2 ,2 2 8
571
1 ,6 5 7

$ 5 .3 9
5 .9 4
5 .2 0

15
13
6

1 84
49
135

5 .2 8
5 .4 5
6 .20

142
23
119

3 .7 0 4 .1 0 4 .5 0

NUF BER ]F WGRKERS RECEIVING STRA1 G HT-TIM E HOURLY' EARNINGS I I N DOLLARS) OF —
4 . 9 0 5 .3 0 5 . 7 0 6 . 1 0 6 .5 0 6 .9 0 7 .3 0 7 .7 0 8 . 1 0 8 . 5 0 8 .9 0 9 .3 0 9 . 7 0 1 0 . 1 0 1 0 .5 0 1 0 .9 0 1 1 .3 0 1 1 .7 0 L2 . 10 1 2 .5 0 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0

4 .1 C 4 .5 0 4 .9 0

5 .3 0

5 .7 0

6 .1 0

6 .5 0

202
32
170

2 30
37
193

199
37
162

1 37
32
105

143
48
95

19 7
35
162

231
42
189

6 .9 0

128
28
10C

7 .3 0 7 . 70 8 . 1 0
107
54
53

125
62
63

80
37
43

9 .7 0 L0 . 1 0 1 0 .5 0 1 0 .9 0 1 1 .3 0 1 1 .7 0 1 2 . 1 0 1 2 .5 0 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0 1 3 .7 0

8 .5 0

8 .9 0

9 .3 0

49
25
24

36
14
22

18
4
14

10
8
2

8
2
6

2
2

_

_

1
1

_

_

_

_

1
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

SELECTED PRLDUCT10N 0CCLPAT1CNS
CLAT FABRICATIO N

1
ij

4 .6 6

T IM E .
PRESSERS, F I N I S H ,

H A N D .............

PRESSERS, F I N I S H , NAG HINF. . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E ...................
H f - h)_____________ _ ____ . . . . . . . . . . . .
SEN I NG -**Af H 1 N f nPFft ATf,ftS_______. . . . .
M F N .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
N . ______ . . . . . ____. . . . . . . . . . .
BASTERS:
MEKJ_______________________
-7
T I MF______________________________
CELLAR PREPARING, EXCEPT P IE C IN G
r o D i n n i k r . ___________________
T IM E • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • • • •
IN C E N T IV E .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
fc^Mf K_________ _______________ . . . . . . .
T IM E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I NT E N T IV F .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
r r . l 1 AR S E T T IN G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IN C E N T IV E .
in tc n iiv c ...• • • • • • • «
FELL BCOY L IN IN G , BOTTOM AND
c i ns-3__________________________
T IM E ..............................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




55
55
51
65
31
23
21
164
107
141
1 ,0 8 9
331
26
1 ,0 0 4
3 05
15
26
14
13

7 .2 0
5 .1 8
5 .2 3
5 .2 4

8 5

~

26
8
18
24
6
18
51
10
7
8
7

5 .7 2
4 .5 7

*
~
,

if
13
13

i *«

i

3

2

i

4
1
4
59
38

6

6

3
66
39
2

3
84
46
5

23
6
12
99
55

9
3
5
91
22
4

5
2
3
139
62
6

59
38

64
37

79
41

87

133

_

*
_

3
2
2

99

_
-

*

_

i
_

_

1

_

_

_

ii
8
11
75

8
8
8
72

11
9
11
82

11
11
18
17
18
45

2

11
7
11
118
48
8

20
14
20
59

16
16
16
36

8
8
8
18

6
6
6
20

I
_
_
16

2
2
2
4

2

18

5

10

8

5

2

6

2

2

110

73

54

77

35

51

31

16

19

14

2

6

1

2

_
_

3

4

_

_

_

*

_
_
_
_

-

-

I
_
_
_

6
2

2
2

I

I
_
_
_

2

1

5

_

3

_

2

I

5
1
4
5
1
4
12
1

6
5
1
6
5
1
4

1

2

_

2
2
2

3
2

1
9

f

_

_

_

2

8
6

_
_

4

8
2

2

3

4

_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_

4

4

4

_
_

2
2
2

*
*
*

1
8
6

1
1

_

5
1

9

6

2

3

**

8

3
3
3
3
12
12

2
2

1

2
2

1
1
10
7

_
_

n
in
_

6 .0 1
5 .6 8
6 .1 6
5 .9 9
5 .4 8
6 .1 6
6.00
5 .1 6
5 .5 2
5 .4 5
5 .5 2

54
23

”
2
2

A

1

1

1A
1A
14
6
2
1

4 *36
4 .4 1
4 .8 5
3 .8 6
6 .6 0
6 .7 0
6 .1 7
6 .9 0
6 .4 8
5 .5 1
4 .4 7
6 .5 1
5 .3 6
5 .4 3
4 .3 9

1
1

1

2

4

2

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

Table 21. Continued—Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.—N .J.1—Contract shops
(Number and average straight-time hourly earning,* of workers in selected occupations in men's and boys* suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)

O ccu pation and sex

________________________ NUM BER q F WORKERS R E C E IV IN G S T R A I G H T -T IM E HOURLY EA R N IN G S ( I N DOLLA R S) 0 F—
3 .7 0 4 .1 0 4 . 5 0 4 .9 0 5 .3 0 5 .7 0 6 . 1 0 6 .5 0 6 .9 0 7 .3 0 7 .7 0 8 . 1 0 8 .5 0 8 .9 0 9 .3 0 9 . 7 0 1 0 . 1 0 1 0 .5 0 1 0 .9 0 1 1 .3 0 1 1 .7 0 1 2 . 1 0 1 2 .5 0 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0

Num ber Average
2 .9 0 3 .3 0
hourly,
of
ANO
w orkers earning] UNDER

3 .3 0

SE L E C T E D

3 .7 0 4 .1 0 4 .5 0 4 . 9 0

5 .3 0 5 .7 0 6 . 1 0 6 .5 0

6 .9 0

7 .3 0 7 . 7 0 8 . 1 0

8 .5 0 8 .9 0

9 .3 0 9 .7 0 1 0 . 1 0 1 0 .5 0 1 0 .9 0 1 1 .3 0 1 1 .7 0 1 2 . 1 0 1 2 .5 0 1 2 .9 0 1 3 .3 0 1 3 .7 0

PRODU CTIO N O C C U P A T IO N S—
CO N TIN U ED

COAT F A B R IC A T IO N — C O N TIN U E D
S E n lN G -M A C H IN E OPERATO RS— CO N TIN U E D
£
?n

1

29
J O IN U N DERCO LLAR, J O IN S L E E V E
L I N I N G , OR P IE C E P O C K E T S3 ............
.
t lu rc L T i we
i i k i i h i f i u A v c c . nnnv

8
3

-

-

5

5
5

3

4

3

16
£
io
16
£

2

WGMEN.......................... ................. . .

44

5 .0 1
5 .3 1
4 .8 9
3 .7 8
5 .2 3
4 .6 7

11

3.10

IH C E h T IY F
t
POCKET S E T T IN G AND T A C K IN G ............
IN C E N T IV E ....................................
# T T T ____T _______________
WOMEN................ ...............................
I N C E N T IV E ....................................
_
CCW H A D TC. r i T T N 3 . _

33
127
81

4 .9 7
5 .5 4

6

6.10

3

12

6 .3 2
5 .4 6
5 .9 7
5 .1 3

3

11
11

37

I k.r t lT T tic

(P L

PDCF T A P P _______________________
I N C E M I V f TTt t r t - - t TT-TTT ->T-TWOMEN........................................ ..
I N C E IiT IV E t t T - t t i'- t t T . f > . . . i t
( t L tk Cl CC-li£___________________ _
_
WOMEN................................................
S L E E V E M A K IN G , CLO TH:
hOMFN-TT____ T - T T ____ T , T I T t T T T - .
f
ENT I V f u M T T - l I t T t t T f T f T
TA PE ARM HO LES.....................................
t M r F k T 1UP __ __________________
^ M f M _____ ____ TT1___ , T t T T T t t I , T
( t l f f k l l UE T - r _____ T T * T T * « « * T T
5 HAPP 0 C___________ ________ T . r T r T T I I T T
I n c f k t I y p ______ _ T ___ TT t i t T .
_
ffM f
T. Tf T t t t - TT.
tf ttt f
tt
J N C F K T I V F - T ________T - T T T . . . . T T

T A IL O R S , ALL ARCUND .................. .
THREAC T R IM M E R S ANO B A S T IN G
P U LLERS:
T l t t P ____________

_________ jT

l^ n f R P R F S ^ F R ? ? - - __________ ___ _______ _
T J M F t _________ T T
T . T . t , , , , TT
M EN .......................................
T I M F T _________ T r . r r T . r T T r T T . .
WOMEN......................... ........... .........

See footnotes at end o f table.




43
26
4B

115
72
25
13
38
34
32
28
48
40

5 .6 5
5 .8 2
5 .2 1

3
4
3

4

4

6

9
4

3

9
4

•
a

3

_

2
2
2
2

5.35

5 .8 0
5 .6 7

3
3
3

22

5 .0 7
5 .0 7
5 .0 1
5 .3 0
5 .1 0
5 .3 0

j,7

6.01

10
12
8
10

6 .3 4
5 .9 6
6 .3 5
5 .6 1

27

3 .9 1
5 .9 9
4 .3 1
6 .3 9
5 .1 7
4 .9 3

3

27
24
36

22
34

120
34
87
17
33

a
c

1

3
£

1
11
1

10

3
11
11
2
2
9

a

2

3

8

13
4

3
14
4

13

11

10

£
£

2

6

10
8
10
8

1
1
6

2
1

£
£
3

_

£
5
5
5
5

9
5

-

8
8

1
1
4

6
1

4

5

£

_

_

2

2
12
2
2

-

2

4

1
4

2
6
£
£
£

1
1

4

3

3
3

-

-

-

2

-

-

_

*

2

-

_

_

_

_

-

7
7
3
4
4

8
8

4
4

_
-

2
2

4
4

2
2

2
2

8
8

4
4

_
-

2
2

4
4

_

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
-

_
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

_

_

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

2

5
5

4

5
5

3
-

4
4
4
4

7
7
5
5

1
1
2

9
9

1
8
8
1
1
1
1

2

2
2

4

2
2

_

2
2

o
£

_

_

2

2
2

2

_

_

_

&

£

4

1

2

2

2

2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

4

_

1
1
1

_

2

-

_

_

4

4
4
4
4

_

_
~

_

-

_

*

2
-

4
1
1

-

3
-

_

_

if

1
1

_
?
2

2

_

3

3

1

8

4

11

11

3
8
3

8
1

1

5

2

11

7

3

2

-

4

-

2
3

7

5

9

£

9

4
2
1

8

7
4

3

4

5

2

13
4

3

5
8

1
1

g

3

14

3
3
3
_

3

3

8
1
2
2
2

3
3
3
l

5

3

13

2
2

5

2
2

10

5
5

£

2

2

14

£
3
3

9

£

2

*

3
3

11

3

1
1

3

2

1

_

~~

8

3

-

1

10

3

_

16

8
3
2

2

14

11

2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

£

Table 21. Continued—Occupational earnings: Philadelphia, Pa.—N .J.1—Contract shops

1 See footnote 1, table 19.
3 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys, based on a representative
sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with
previous studies may not reflect expected wage movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment
among establishments with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most




establishments increased wages between periods being compared. Approximately 60 percent of the production workers covered by the
survey are incentive-rated.
3 All or virtually all workers are women.
4 All or virtually all workers are time-rated.
s All or virutally all workers are men.




Table 22. Earnings relationships: Selected regions, States, and areas
(Regional, State, and area average hourly earnings as a percent of national averages of selected occupations among production workers in men’s
and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments, April 1979)
(National average = 100)
Coat fabrication
Region, State, and area

Trouser fabrication

Miscellaneous

All pro­
duction
workers

Fitters

101
107
102
88
74
106
104

94
105
95
96
87
88
83

115
110
91
88
73
108
102

105
107
103
90
73
107
98

93
105
101
89
77
106
93

118
115
88
88
68
102
98

111
112
97
82
67
108
93

126
111
107
86
82
114
90

98
112
97
69
64
91
85

93
103
109
91
84
123
104

82
101

76
109

81
89

85
101

89
97

89
82

80
100

87
105

49
99

89
112

96
106
99
108
107
112

88
89
94
83
115
127

126
100
111
102
101
118

93
111
104
105
107
115

98
106
92
93
103
109

87
1Q8
92
94
118

107
100
101
95
114
111

113
100
124
90
116
119

85
95
81
89
124
107

87
112
93
104
98
107

SewingCutters
Pressers, SewingThread Pressers,
finish,
and
machine
machine Adjusters
trimmers
finish
markers
machine operators
operators

Work
distribu­
tors

Regions
New England....................................................
Middle Atlantic..................................................
Border S tates...................................................
Southeast..........................................................
Southwest.........................................................
Great Lakes......................................................
Pacific................................................................

States
Georgia..............................................................
Kentucky..................................... .....................

Areas
Atlantic-City and VinelandMillville-Bridgeton.........................................
Baltimore...........................................................
Bristol County...................................................
Los Angeles-Long Beach ...............................
New Y o rk ..........................................................
Philadelphia......................................................

NOTE:

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet

publication criteria.

Table 23. Method of wage payment
(Percent of production workers in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments by method of wage payment,1 United States
and selected regions, States, and areas, April 1979
Method of
wage payment

United
States2

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Pacific

All workers.............

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Time-rated workers....
Formal plans...........
Single r a te ............
Range of rates.....
Individual rates .......

25
10
3
6
16

46
2

29
5
2
3
24

20
14
(3
)
14
6

15
10
5
5
4

21
11
5
6
10

23
22
6
15
1

31
31
24
7
(3
)

Incentive workers......
Individual piecework
Group piecework....
Individual bonus .....
Group bonus...........

75
74
(3
)
1
(3
)

71
70
1
(3
)
(3
)

80
80

85
85

79
79

77
71

69
69

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(3
)

-

6
-

-

2
43
54
54
(3
)
-

States

-

Areas

o>




Georgia

Kentucky

All workers.............

100
17
5
2
3
12

Incentive workers......
Individual piecework
Group piecework....
Individual bonus .....
Group bonus...........

83
82
1

-

Los
AngelesLong
Beach

New York

Phila­
delphia

100

100

100

100

100

32
27

45

-

-

-

28

27
5

45

22
22
19
3
(3
)

40
2
2

-

38

38
11
2
9
28

72
72
-

90
90
-

Bristol
County

28

10
8
1
7
2

Baltimore

100

100

Time-rated workers ....
Formal plans...........
Single r a te ............
Range of rates.....
Individual ra te s .......

Atlantic
City and
VinelandMillville—
Bridgeton

68
68
-

55
55
(3
)

78
78
-

60
59
1

62
60
2

1

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

\ )

1 For definition of method of wage payment, see appendix A.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown
separately.
3 Less than 0.5 percent.

-

-

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not
equal totals,




Table 24. Scheduled weekly hours
(Percent of production workers in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments by scheduled weekly hours,1 United States
and selected regions, April 1979)
New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Pacific

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

(3
)
1
1
(3
)
1
1
1
95

_
-

ft

-

United
States2

Weekly hours
All workers....................................................
28 hours............................................................
30 hours............................................................
32 hours............................................................
36 hours............................................................
37.5 hours.........................................................
38 hours............................................................
Over 38 and under 40 hours..........................
40 hours............................................................

-

100

1 Data relate to the predominant schedule for full-time day-shift
workers in each establishment.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown
separately.

1
2
1
95

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
4
4
89

100

100

(3
)
100

-

100

3 Less than 0.5 percent.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not
equal 100.

Table 25. Paid holidays
(Percent of production workers in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid holidays, United
States and selected regions, April 1979)
Number of
paid holidays

United
States1

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Pacific

All workers....................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Workers in establishments
providing paid holidays..................................
4 days .............................................................
5 days .............................................................
5 days plus 1 or 2 half d a y s .......................
6 days .............................................................
6 days plus 1 or 2 half d a y s .......................
7 days .............................................................
7 days plus 1 or 2 half d a y s .......................
8 days .............................................................
9 d ays........ ....................................................
10 days...........................................................

99
(2
)
7
(2
)
1
2
3
(2
)
9
69
7

100
-

100

100
-

100
2
30

89
7
7
14
35
9
16
-

99
-

96
-

-

-

-

1
43
53
-

1 Includes data for regions
separately.
2 Less than 0.5 percent.

in

addition

to

-

-

-

-

ft

100
those

shown

2
84
14

-

-

3
9
1
76
11

9
29
30
-

-

ft
13
87
-

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not
equal totals.




Table 26. Paid vacations
(Percent of production workers in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments with formal provisions
for paid vacations after selected periods of service, United States and selected regions, April 1979)
Vacation policy

United
States1

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

All workers....................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

Workers in establishments having
contracts with the ACTWU2 ..........................

78

97

88

41

16

76

Method of payment
Workers in other establishments
providing paid vacations................................

21

3

12

59

72

23

13
1
5
1
2

-

2
6
4

36
4
18
-

72
-

13
(4
)
11

2
6
4

15
4
38
2

70
3
-

11
1
11

2
6
4

15
38
4
2

26
46
-

13

-

11

10
26
12
11

19
54

-

-

-

4
-

10
18
12
7
4

19
7
46
-

1
22
-

8
_
4
-

10
22
12
7
4

19
7
_
46
-

1
22
-

8
4
-

10
26
12
7
4

19
7
46
-

1
22
-

Amount of vacation pay3
After 1 year of service:
1 w e e k ............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks..........................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks..........................
3 weeks ..........................................................
After 2 years of service:
1 w e e k ............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 w eeks..........................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks..........................
3 weeks ..........................................................
After 3 years of service:
1 w e e k ............................................................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks..........................
3 weeks ..........................................................
After 5 years of service:
1 w e e k ............................................................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks................
3 weeks ..........................................................
After 10 years of service:
1 w e e k ............................................................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks.........................
3 w eeks..........................................................
Over 3 and under 4 w eeks..........................
After 12 years of service:
1 w e e k ............................................................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks..........................
3 weeks ..........................................................
Over 3 and under 4 w eeks..........................
After 15 years of service:
1 w e e k ............................................................
2 weeks ..........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks..........................
3 w eeks..........................................................
4 weeks ..........................................................
See footnotes at end of table.

(4
)
2
1
-

8
1
9
1
2

(4
)
2
1

5
12
2
2

(4
)
2
1

3
9
3
6

-

-

(4
)
2
1

8
_
4

3
5
3
7
1

-

(4)
2
1
-

8

3
6
3
7
1

(4)
2
1
-

3
7
3
7
1

(4
)
2
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
22
-

Table 26. Continued— Paid vacations
(Percent of production workers in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments with formal provisions
for paid vacations after selected periods of service, United States and selected regions, April 1979)
Vacation policy

Amount of vacation pay3
—Continued
After 20 years of service:5
1 w ee k.............................................................
2 weeks ...........................................................
Over 2 and under 3 w eeks..........................
3 w eeks...........................................................
4 w eeks...........................................................
Over 4 and under 5 w eeks..........................

o>
■ ^i




United
States1

3
7
3
7
0
1

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those
shown separately.
All or virtually all of the
establishments in the New England and Pacific regions
had contracts with the ACTWU.
2 Workers covered by these contracts usually
received a summer vacation with one-naif week’s pay
after 6 but less than 9 months of service; three-fourths
week’s pay after 9 months but less than 1 year of
service; and 2 weeks’ pay after 1 year of service or
more. The first week of vacation pay is computed as
follows:
For time-rated workers, the employee’s
current regular weekly rate; for incentive workers, 40
times the employee’s straight-time average hourly
earnings for the four consecutive busiest weeks of the
most recent vacation year ending May 3.1. The second
week’s vacation pay equals pay for the first week for
employees with at least 1,000 hours worked during the
year ending May 31; for those with less than 1,000
hours, the second week’s vacation amounts to 2.5

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

(4
)
2
1

8
-

-

4
-

-

-

Southeast

Southwest

10
26
12
7
4

19
7
-

44
3
-

Great
Lakes

1
22
-

-

percent of the employee’s straight-time earnings during
the year ending May 31. The Christmas vacation pay
is computed in a manner similar to the second week of
summer vacation pay.
A number of ACTWU
establishments had different vacation provisions, mostly
in the method of computing pay.
3 Vacation payments, such as percent of annual
earnings, were converted to an equivalent time basis.
Periods of service were chosen arbitrarily and do not
necessarily reflect individual establishment provisions
for progression. For example, changes indicated at 10
years may include changes that occurred between 5
and 10 years.
4 Less than 0.5 percent.
5 Vacation provisions were virtually the same after
longer periods of service.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual
items may not equal totals.

Table 27. Health, Insurance, and retirement plans
(Percent of production workers in men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing establishments with specified health, insurance, and retirement plans,1 United States and selected regions, April 1979)
Type of plan
All workers.....................................................

Workers in establishments having
contracts with the ACTWU4 ...........................

CD

00

Workers in other establishments providing:
Life insurance.................................................
Noncontributory plans.................................
Accidental death and
dismemberment insurance .........................
Noncontributory plans.................................
Sickness and accident insurance
or sick leave or both5 ...................................
Sickness and accident insurance.............
Noncontributory plans..............................

Middle Border
United
States2 Atlantic States
100

78

100

97

100

88

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

100

100

41

16

76

18
13

3
3

10
5

52
38

84
44

11
11

14
10

2
2

5

47
38

26

11
11

8
8
6

3
3
3

4
4
4

18
18
5

46
44
44

11
11
11

1 Includes those plans for which the employer pays at least part of the cost and excludes
legally required plans such as workers’ compensation and social security; however, plans
required by State temporary disability laws are included if the employer contributes more than is
legally required or the employees receive benefits in excess of legal requirements.
“Noncontributory plans” include only those plans financed entirely by the employer.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. All or virtually all of the
establishments in the New England and Pacific regions had contracts with the ACTWU.
3 Less than 0.5 percent.
4 Employers having contracts with the ACTWU contributed 6.7 percent of gross wages each
pay period to the Social Insurance Fund of the Amalgamated Insurance Fund. Employee
benefits provided by this fund include $3,000 life insurance; sickness and accident insurance;
and surgical, medical, and hospitalization benefits.
Surgical, medical, and hospitalization
benefits are also provided for the families of the employees. Employers also contributed 6.9
percent of gross wages payable each pay period to the Retirement Fund of the Amalgamated
Insurance Fund. The fund provides minimum retirement payments of $110 a month, in addition
to Federal social security. Additional monthly payments are made to eligible employees for




Middle Border
United
States2 Atlantic States

South­
east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

100

Type of plan

Workers in other establishments providing:
Sick leave (full pay,
no waiting period) .....................................
Sick leave (partial pay
or waiting period) ......................................
Hospitalization insurance .............................
Noncontributory plans................................
Surgical insurance.........................................
Noncontributory plans................................
Medical insurance.........................................
Noncontributory plans................................
Major medical insurance..............................
Noncontributory plans................................
Retirement plans6 ..........................................
Pensions.......................................................
Noncontributory plans.............................

(3
)
2
21
14
21
14
21
14
19
13
14
14
13

-

-

-

-

3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2

12
4
12
4
12
4
12
4
5
5

-

8
59
40
59
40
59
40
53
35
43
43
39

3
-

72
44
72
44
72
44
65
44
35
35
35

-

22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22

each year of service over 20 years and for average annual earnings over $5,000 for the highest
5 of the 7 years immediately preceding retirement. If otherwise eligible, workers may retire on
disability at full benefits, or at age 62 with reduced benefits.
A number of ACTWU
establishments had different health, insurance and pension benefits. Most differences were in
the amounts which establishments contributed to the social retirement funds. In addition, a
union health center was available in eight areas-Baltimore, Chicago, Eastern Pennsylvania,
Lehigh Valley, New York, Philadelphia, Rochester, and Scranton-Wilkes-Barre. To maintain
these centers, employers contributed specified percentages (2 percent or less) of gross wages.
In Philadelphia and New York, employees also made contributions to health centers.
5 Unduplicated total of workers receiving sickness and accident insurance and sick leave
shown separately.
6 Unduplicated total of workers covered by pension plans and severance pay shown
separately.

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

Appendix A. Scope and
Method of Survey

Scope of survey

letin, include working supervisors and all nonsupervisory workers engaged in nonoffice activities. Adminis­
trative, executive, professional, and technical person­
nel, and force-account construction employees, who are
used as a separate work force on the firm’s own prop­
erties, are excluded.

The survey included establishments engaged primar­
ily in manufacturing men’s, youths’, and boys’ suits,
coats, and overcoats (part of SIC 2311 as defined in the
1972 edition of the S ta n d a rd In du strial Classification
M a n u a l prepared by the U.S. Office of Management
and Budget). Included in the study were establishments
manufacturing tailored suits, separate coats or jackets,
overcoats and topcoats, uniforms, and suit vests. Job­
bers who perform only entrepreneurial functions, such
as buying material arranging for all manufacturing to
be done by others, and selling the finished product,
were excluded from the survey, as were separate aux­
iliary units such as central offices.
Establishments studied were selected from those em­
ploying five workers or more at the time of reference
of the data used in compiling the universe lists. Table
A-l shows the number of establishments and workers
estimated to be within the scope of the survey, as well
as the number actually studied by the Bureau.

Occupational classification
Occupational classification was based on a uniform
set of job descriptions designed to take account of in­
terestablishment and interarea variations in duties with­
in the same job. (See appendix B for these descriptions.)
The criteria for selection of the occupations were: The
number of workers in the occupation; the usefulness of
the data in collective bargaining; and appropriate rep­
resentation of the entire job scale in the industry. Work­
ing supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, train­
ees, and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and proba­
tionary workers were not reported in the data for se­
lected occupations but were included in the data for all
production workers.

Method of study

Wage data

Data were obtained by personal visits of the Bureau’s
field representatives to a sample of establishments with­
in the scope of the survey. To obtain appropriate ac­
curacy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large
than of small establishments was studied. All estimates
are presented, therefore, as relating to all establishments
in the industry, excluding only those below the mini­
mum size at the time of reference of the universe data.

Information on wages relates to straight-time hourly
earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Incentive
payments, such as those resulting from piecework or
production bonus systems, and cost-of-living bonuses
were included as part of the workers’ regular pay. Non­
production bonus payments, such as Christmas or yearend bonuses, were excluded.
Average (m ean) hourly rates or earnings for each oc­
cupation or category of workers, such as production
workers, were calculated by weighting each rate (or
hourly earnings) by the number of workers receiving
the rate, totaling, and dividing by the number of indi­
viduals. The hourly earnings of salaried workers were
obtained by dividing straight-time salary by normal (or
standard) hours to which the salary corresponds.

Establishment definition
An establishment is defined for this study as a single
physical location where manufacturing operations are
performed. An establishment is not necessarily identi­
cal with a company, which may consist of one estab­
lishment or more.

Employment
Estimates of the number of workers within the scope
of the study are intended as a general guide to the size
and composition of the industry’s labor force, rather
than as precise measures of employment.

Size of community
Tabulations by size of community pertain to metro­
politan and nonmetropolitan areas. The term “metro­
politan areas,” as used in this bulletin, refers to the
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by
the U.S. Office of Management and Budget through

Production workers
The terms “production workers” and “production
and related workers,” used interchangeably in this bul­



69

ment. Similarly, if fewer than half of the workers were
covered, the benefit was considered nonexistent in the
establishment. Because of length-of-service and other
eligibility requirements, the proportion of workers re­
ceiving the benefits may be smaller than estimated.

February 1974. Except in New England, a Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Area is defined as a county or
group of contiguous counties which contains at least
one city of 50,000 inhabitants or more. Counties con­
tiguous to the one containing such a city are included
in a Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area if, accord­
ing to certain criteria, they are essentially metropolitan
in character and are socially and economically integrat­
ed with the central city. In New England, where the
city and town are administratively more important than
the county, they are the units used in defining Stand­
ard Metropolitan Statistical Areas.

P a id holidays .

Paid holiday provisions relate to fullday and half-day holidays provided annually.

P a id vacations .

The summary of vacation plans is lim­
ited to formal arrangements and exclude informal plans
whereby time off with pay is granted at the discretion
of the employer or supervisor. Payments not on a time
basis were converted; for example, a payment of 2 per­
cent of annual earnings was considered the equivalent
of 1 week’s pay. The periods of service for which data
are presented represent the most common practices, but
they do not necessarily reflect individual establishment
provisions for progression. For example, changes in
proportions indicated at 10 years of service may include
changes which occurred between 5 and 10 years.

Labor-management agreements
Separate wage data are presented, where possible,
for establishments that had (1) a majority of the pro­
duction workers covered by labor-management con­
tracts, and (2) none or a minority of the production
workers covered by labor-management contracts.

Method of wage payment
Tabulations by method of wage payment relate to
the number of workers paid under the various time and
incentive wage systems. Formal rate structures for time­
rated workers provide single rates or a range of rates
for individual job categories. In the absence of a formal
rate structure, pay rates are determined primarily by
the qualifications of the individual worker. A single rate
structure is one in which the same rate is paid to all
experienced workers in the same job classification.
Learners, apprentices, or probationary workers may be
paid according to rate schedules which start below the
single rate and permit the workers to achieve the full
job rate over a period of time. An experienced worker
occasionally may be paid above or below the single
rate for special reasons, but such payments are excep­
tions. Range-of-rate plans are those in which the min­
imum, maximum, or both of these rates paid experi­
enced workers for the same job are specified. Specific
rates of individual workers within the range may be
determined by merit, length of service, or a combina­
tion of these. Incentive workers are classified under
piecework or bonus plans. Piecework is work for which
a predetermined rate is paid for each unit of output.
Production bonuses are for production in excess of a
quota or for completion of a task in less than standard
time.

Health, insurance, and retirement plans
Data are presented for health, insurance, pension, and
retirement severance plans for which the employer pays
all or a part of the cost, excluding programs required
by law such as workers’ compensation and social secu­
rity. Among plans included are those underwritten by
a commercial insurance company and those paid direct­
ly by the employer from his current operating funds or
from a fund set aside for this purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form of life insur­
ance. Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that
type of insurance under which predetermined cash pay­
ments are made directly to the insured on a weekly or
monthly basis during illness or accident disability. In­
formation is presented for all such plans to which the
employer contributes at least a part of the cost. How­
ever, in New York and New Jersey, where temporary
disability insurance laws require employer contribu­
tions,1plans are included only if the employer (1) con­
tributes more than is legally required, or (2) provides
the employees with benefits which exceed the require­
ments of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to
formal plans which provide full pay or a proportion of
the worker’s pay during absence from work because of
illness; informal arrangements have been omitted. Sep­
arate tabulations are provided for (1) plans which pro­
vide full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans pro­
viding either partial pay or a waiting period.
Long-term disability insurance plans provide pay­
ments to totally disabled employees upon the expiration

Scheduled weekly hours
Data on weekly hours refer to the predominant work
schedule for full-time production workers employed on
the day shift.

Establishment practices and supplementary
wage provisions
Supplementary benefits in an establishment were con­
sidered applicable to all production workers if they ap­
plied to half or more of such workers in the establish­



1The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island do
not require employer contributions.

70

of sick leave, sickness and accident insurance, or both,
or after a specified period of disability (typically 6
months). Payments are made until the end of disability,
a maximum age, or eligibility for retirement benefits.
Payments may be full or partial, but are almost always
reduced by social security, workers’ compensation, and
private pension benefits payable to the disabled
employee.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for com­
plete or partial payment of doctors’ fees. Such plans
may be underwritten by a commercial insurance com­
pany or a nonprofit organization, or they may be a form
of self-insurance.
Major medical insurance, sometimes referred to as
extended medical or catastrophe insurance, includes

plans designed to cover employees for sickness or in­
jury involving an expense which exceeds the normal
coverage of hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to plans
which provide regular payments for the remainder of
the retiree’s life. Data are presented separately for re­
tirement severance pay (one payment or several over
a specified period of time) made to employees on re­
tirement. Establishments providing both retirement sev­
erance payments and retirement pensions to employees
were considered as having both retirement pensions and
retirement severance plans; however, establishments
having optional plans providing employees a choice of
either retirement severance payments or pensions were
considered as having only retirement pension benefits.

Table A-1. Estimated number of establishments and employees within scope of survey and number studied,
men’s and boys’ suit and coat manufacturing industries, April 1979
Number of
establishments3
Region1 and area2

Within
scope of
study

Actually
studied

Workers in establishments
Within scope of study
Actually studied
Total4

Production workers

United States5 .............................................................

351

173

70,430

61,409

47,968

New England6 .......................................................................
Bristol County.................................................................
Middle Atlantic6 ....................................................................
Atlantic City and Vineland-MillvilleBridgeton.....................................................................
New York ........................................................................
Philadelphia.....................................................................
Border States6 ......................................................................
Baltimore.........................................................................
Kentucky ............................................................................
Southeast6 ............................................................................
Georgia...............................................................................
Southwest.............................................................................
Great Lakes..........................................................................
Pacific6 ...................................................................................
Los Angeles-Long Beach..............................................

24
10
179

15
9
75

4,229
3,031
30,642

3,728
2,732
27,075

3,912
2,930
18,861

7
91
34
41
17
8
41
12
17
26
17
11

5
32
18
26
13
8
21
10
9
13
8
5

1,737
7,001
7,929
8,493
3,038
3,367
14,640
4,468
3,286
7,260
1,185
986

1,567
5,836
7,116
7,534
2,540
3,120
13,028
4,088
2,847
5,589
1,038
864

1,377
3,392
6,023
6,354
2,159
3,367
8,772
4,096
2,505
6,052
817
697

2 See individual area tables 9-21 for definitions of selected
areas.
3 Includes only those* establishments with 5 workers or more at
the time of reference of the universe data.
4 Includes executive, professional, office, and other workers in
addition to the production worker category shown separately.
5 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown
separately. Alaska and Hawaii were not included in the study.
6 Includes data for areas in addition to those shown
separately.

1 The regions used in this study include N ew England—
Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode
Island, and Vermont; M iddle A tlantic— Hew Jersey, New York, and
Pennsylvania; B order S tates— Delaware, District of Columbia,
Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; Southeast—
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina, and Tennessee; Southwest— Arkansas, Louisiana, New
Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas; G reat Lakes— Illinois, Indiana,
Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin; Pacific— California,
Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.




71

Appendix B. Occupational
Descriptions

of a spreading machine. Cuts each ply to length from
the bolt of material.

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions
for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to assist its field rep­
resentatives in classifying into appropriate occupations
workers who are employed under a variety of payroll
titles and different work arrangements from establish­
ment to establishment and from area to area. This per­
mits the grouping of occupational wage rates represent­
ing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis
on interestablishment and interarea comparability of oc­
cupational content, the Bureau’s job descriptions may
differ significantly from those used in individual estab­
lishments or those prepared for other purposes. In ap­
plying these job descriptions, the Bureau’s field repre­
sentatives are instructed to exclude working supervi­
sors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, and hand­
icapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary
workers.

Coat Fabrication
BASTER, HAND
Arranges and hand-sews parts of garments together
with long stitches, usually to hold parts together tem­
porarily until they are stitched by others. Includes hand
basters who sew lining and padding into shoulders and
around armholes of coats.

BUTTON SEWER, HAND
Sews buttons to garments by hand, using needle and
thread. In addition, may match buttons or mark loca­
tions of buttons.

BUTTONHOLE MAKER, HAND
Sews buttonholes in garments by hand.

Cutting

COLLAR SETTER, HAND

CUTTER, CLOTH

Bastes top collar and under collar to neck of coat
and tacks collar corner by hand; tacks gorge seam open.

Cuts cloth (other than linings) by hand or machine
after pattern has been outlined on materials by the mark­
er. Workers who m ark and cut are to be classified as:
Cutters and markers (see below).

FINISHER, HAND
Performs one or more of the following hand opera­
tions: Sewing or felling lining to lining, or lining to
cloth at the armholes, shoulders, sleeve bottoms, body
lining, top and undercollar to neck of coat, and felling
corners where it is impractical or undesirable for the
various machines to be used-such as corners between
facing and bottom turnup, openings with thick seams,
etc.

CUTTER, LINING
Cuts out body linings, stays, sleeve linings and/or
other parts of the inner lining from single or multiple
layers of fabric. May also mark the outline for the cut­
ting operation.

CUTTER AND MARKER, CLOTH

FITTER

Arranges patterns on material (other than linings) and
marks outlines of pattern with chalk an d cuts material
by hand or machine. May assemble various parts of
garment, matching stripes or plaids where required; may
also spread or lay-up layers of fabric.

(Trimmer)

MARKER

Sorts, matches, and trims garment parts and linings
preparatory to the sewing operations. This classifica­
tion excludes workers who do only such single opera­
tions as stamping, marking sizes, marking stitches, etc.

Arranges patterns on materials to be cut and marks
outline with chalk.

INSPECTOR, FINAL

SPREADER

(Examiner)

Spreads (lays-up) multiple layers of cloth smoothly
and evenly on a cutting table by hand or with the aid

Examines and inspects completed coats prior to press­
ing or shipping. Work involves: Determining whether




72

lining to cloth forepart at side seams and bottom of coat
with a machine designed to join parts by means of a
blind stitch which does not show in the front side of
the cloth.
Join shoulder, cloth —Joins shoulder of cloth forepart
to back.
Join side seam s —Joins back to forepart (front) of
garment.
Join undercollar, join sleeve lining, or piece p o ck ets —
Includes operators who join undercollar cloth and un­
der collar canvas; or join top-sleeve lining to under­
sleeve lining; or sew cloth and lining facings to the
pocket lining and may also make the cash pocket.
L in in g m aker, body —Sews lining to facing and makes
inside breast pocket by machine (double needle knife
machine or Reese pocket machine).
P a d collar a n d lapels —Joins (pads or quilts) collar and
lapel or forepart to canvas by numerous rows of blind
stitching.
P o c k e t se ttin g a n d ta ck in g —Sews flap and bosom to
front, cuts open, turns, tacks corners, and sews around
silesia pocket; sets outside welt, cuts open, tacks corner,
and sews around silesia pocket.
Sew darts, cloth —Sews the “darts”, “gores,” or
“clams” in the body at the waist of coat front (cloth).
Sew edge tape —Sews narrow tape down front edges
of coat and across bottoms after facing is first attached
to front by hand or machine basting. Usually performed
on sewing machine with cutting attachment.
Sew in sleeve —Sews completed sleeves to the body
of the coat.
Sleeve m arking, cloth —Sews in seam of cloth, makes
turn-ups with wigan, sews elbow seam, and makes sleeve
vent by machine.
Tape arm holes —Sews a narrow tape and/or bias strip
to the armholes of either, or both, front and back parts
of coat.

the coats conform to shop standards of quality and
marking defects such as dropped stitches, bad seams,
etc. In addition may make minor repairs.
Thread trimmers who may only casually inspect gar­
ments are not included in this classification. In many
shops manufacturing inexpensive garments, there will
be no inspectors falling within this description; in those
shops whatever inspection is carried on is usually per­
formed by thread trimmers.

PAIRER AND TURNER
Pairs or brings together parts of the garment for as­
sembly, or turns various parts, excluding front edges
and collars.

PRESSER FINISH
Performs the fin a l pressing operations on completed
coats by means of a hand pressing iron, or a pressing
machine which is heated by gas or steam. Workers who
press only a portion of the completed garment are also
included in this classification.
Workers are to be classified according to the type of
pressing equipment used.

Presser, finish, hand
Presser, finish, machine
SEWING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a standard industrial machine or a specialpurpose sewing machine to perform the stitching in­
volved in making parts of garments in joining various
garment sections together, or in attaching previously
completed garment parts to partially completed
garments.
Sewing-m achine operators working on coat fabrication
are to be classified according to the follow in g breakdow n :
B asters —Bastes front edges and bottoms of the coat

SHAPER

with a temporary removable chain-stttch. Also, include
ju m p-stitch m achine operators who baste armholes, can­
vas shoulder pads, facings, linings, vents, or yokes.
B utton sewing —Operates a button-sewing machine
that automatically sews buttons to garments or garment
parts.
Buttonhole m akin g —Operates a buttonhole machine
that automatically cuts and stitches buttonholes in gar­
ments or garment parts.
C o lla r p rep a rin g , e x c e p t p ie c in g o r p a d d in g —Bastes
top collar to under collar and bastes edge all around
with jump stitch machine.
C ollar setting —Bastes top collar and under collar to
neck of coat by machine; or sews top collar to gorge
and across neck with a plain sewing machine and bastes
or sews undercollar to neck with a zigzag machine.
Facing tacking —Tacks facing to front with blind stitch
machine.
F ell body lining, bottom a n d side —Fells (joins) body



Shapes edge and bottom with a clicker machine by
pairing fronts, placing them on block, setting metal dies
on fronts, and clicking machine. Include workers who
mark and trim lapels, front edge, bottom of coat, and
under collar with shears or special pattern (’’shaper” or
“undercollar shaper”). The lower part of the front edge
and bottoms may also be marked with the aid of spe­
cial patterns.

TAILOR, ALL-AROUND
Performs several or all of the hand basting, hand
sewing, and sewing machine operations included in the
making of a coat.

THREAD TRIMMER AND BASTING PULLER
Trims loose thread ends and removes basting threads
of coats prior to pressing.
Workers who also carefully examine and inspect gar­
ments are classified as inspectors, final.
73

UNDERPRESSER
Uses hand iron, machine iron, or powered press to
press various parts of coat such as armholes, darts, long
seams, short seams, etc., during the fabricating process.

Trou se r Fabrication
INSPECTOR, FINAL
(Examiner)
Examines and inspects completed trousers prior to
pressing or shipping. Work involves: Determining
whether the trousers conform to shop standards of qual­
ity and marking defects such as dropped stitches, bad
seams, etc. In addition, may make minor repairs.
Thread trimmers who may only casually inspect gar­
ments are not included in this classification. In many
shops manufacturing inexpensive garments, there will
be no inspectors falling within this description; in those
shops whatever inspection is carried on is usually per­
formed by thread trimmers.

Piecing f ly s —Performs operations for preparing the
fly prior to attaching fly to trousers, exclusive of zip­
per sewing.
Piecing p o ck ets —Sews cloth facings to pocket linings
before linings are sewed to the trousers.
Serging —Makes covering (or overlooking, overcast­
ing, or serging) stitch over raw edges of cloth on a
special machine to prevent ravelling.
Sew on w aistband lining —Sews waistband lining to
cloth waistband, or to top of trousers when there is no
separate cloth waistband, on a plain or special machine.
Stitch po ck ets —Stitches around edge of pocket lining,
after the pockets have been turned, as a reinforcing
seam.

THREAD TRIMMER AND BASTING PULLER
Trims loose thread ends and removes basting threads
of trousers prior to pressing.
Workers who also carefully examine and inspect gar­
ments are classified as inspectors, final.

UNDERPRESSER

PRESSER, FINISH

Uses hand iron, machine iron, or a powered press to
press garment parts such as pockets, seams, etc., during
the fabricating process.

Performs all the final pressing operations, both tops
and legs, on completed trousers, by means of steam
pressing machine. Workers who press only a portion
of the completed garment are not included in this
classification.

Miscellaneous
ADJUSTER

SEWER, HAND

(Sewing-machine repairer)

(Finisher)

Adjusts and repairs sewing machines used in the es­
tablishment. Work involves most of the following: Ex­
amines machines faulty in operation to diagnose source
of trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling machines,
replacing broken or worn out parts or performing oth­
er repairs, and reassembling machines; adjusting ma­
chines to function efficiently by turning adjustment
screws and nuts; regulating length of stroke of needle
and horizontal movement feeding mechanism under
needle; replacing or repairing transmission belts; pre­
paring specifications for major repairs and initiating or­
ders for replacement parts; using a variety of hand tools
in fitting and replacing parts. May also do adjustments
on pressing machines.

Performs sewing operations by hand including sew­
ing on buttons, making buttonholes, sewing on size tick­
ets, stitching edges, closing openings that have been left
by various hand or machine operations, etc.

SEWING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Sewing-machine operators working on trouser fabri­
cation are to be classified according to the following
breakdown:
A ttach f l y —Attaches either/or both right and left fly
to trousers.
A ttach waistband —Attaches cloth waistband all
around top of trousers.
A ttach zipper —Sews zipper to either/or both left and
right flys.
B artackin g —Sews bartacks at various parts of gar­
ment, such as at ends of pocket openings, at the bottom
of fly opening, at top and bottom of belt loops, and/or
buttonhole ends for reinforcement, on a specially de­
signed sewing machine.
Join seam s —Joins front and back legs at inner or out­
er seam, or joins right and left halves of trousers at the
center, back, or seatseams.
M a k e pockets —Makes either complete front, side or
back pockets, or complete pockets exclusive of sewing
facings (piecings) to pocket linings.



JANITOR
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory
working areas and washrooms, or premises of an office
or other establishment. Duties involve a com bination o f
the fo llo w in g : Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and pol­
ishing floors; removing chips, trash, and other refuse;
dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing met­
al fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor
maintenance services; cleaning lavatories, showers, and
restrooms. Workers who specialize in window washing
are excluded.
74

PACKER
Places finished garments in shipping containers. In
addition, may also seal or close container, and/or place
shipping or identification marks on container.

STOCK CLERK, GARMENTS
Receives completed garments, stores garments ac­
cording to size, style, and color; and prepares garments
for shipment. May also assemble parts (coats, vests, and
trousers) into completed garments and keep records of
garments received and prepared for shipment.
This classification does not include stockroom help­
ers or employees who supervise stock clerks and helpers.

STOCK CLERK, PIECE GOODS
Receives bolts of cloth (piece goods) and checks the
receipts against orders; arranges the cloth in bins or on




shelves according to style, quality, and color; and is­
sues cloth to cutting department according to requisi­
tions. May also keep inventory records of stock and
notify the proper official when cloth is needed; and is­
sue linings and findings such as buttons, thread, and
tape.
This classification does not include stockroom help­
ers or employees who supervise stock clerks and helpers.

WORK DISTRIBUTOR
(Bundle carrier)
Carries or trucks garments in various stages of com­
pletion to the worker who is to perform the next op­
eration on the garment. May exercise some discretion
in distributing work, but has no supervisory
responsibilities.

75

Industry Wage Studies

The most recent bulletins providing occupational
wage data for industries included in the Bureau’s pro­
gram of industry wage surveys are listed below. Copies
are for sale from the Superintendent of Documents,
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.
20402, or from any of its regional sales offices, and
from regional offices of the Bureau of Labor Statistics
shown on the inside back cover. Copies that are out of
stock are available for reference purposes at leading
public, college, or university libraries, or at the Bureau’s
Washington or regional offices.

Manufacturing
Basic Iron and Steel, 1978-79. BLS Bulletin 2064.
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1975. BLS
Bulletin 1939
Cigar Manufacturing, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1976
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1944
Corrugated and Solid Fiber Boxes, 1976. BLS Bulletin
1921
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1935
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1763
Fluid Milk Industry, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1871
Footwear, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1946
Grain Mill Products, 1977. BLS Bulletin 2026
Hosiery, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1987
Industrial Chemicals, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1978
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1894
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1973. BLS Bulletin
1835
Machinery Manufacturing, 1978, BLS Bulletin 2022
Meat Products, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1896
Men’s and Boy’s Shirts and Trousers, 1978. BLS
Bulletin 2035
Men’s and Boy’s Suits and Coats, 1979. BLS Bulletin
2073
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1974. BLS Bulletin
1914
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1973-74. BLS Bulletin 1912
Nonferrous Foundries, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1952
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1970. BLS Bulletin
1719'
Paints and Varnishes, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1973




Petroleum Refining, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1948
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1975. BLS
Bulletin 1923
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1977. BLS Bulletin
2008
Semiconductors and Related Devices, 1977. BLS Bul­
letin 2021
Shipbuilding and Repairing, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1968
Structural Clay Products, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1942
Synthetic Fibers, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1975
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1967
Textiles, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1945
Wages and Demographic Characteristics in Work
Clothing Manufacturing, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1858
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1970. BLS Bul­
letin 1728'
Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1977. BLS Bulletin 2007
Wood Household Furniture, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1930
Nonmanufacturing
Appliance Repair Shops, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1936
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1978. BLS Bulletin 2060
Banking and Life Insurance, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1988
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1999
Communications, 1978. BLS Bulletin 2071
Computer and Data Processing Services, 1978. BLS
Bulletin 2028
Contract Cleaning Services, 1977. BLS Bulletin 2009
Contract Construction, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1911
Department Stores, 1977. BLS Bulletin 2006
Educational Institutions:
Nonteaching Employees,
1968-69. BLS Bulletin 1671'
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1978. BLS Bulletin 2040
Hospitals, 1978. BLS Bulletin 2069
Hotels and Motels, 1978. BLS Bulletin 2055
Metal Mining, 1977. BLS Bulletin 2017
Oil and Gas Extraction, 1977. BLS Bulletin 2014
Scheduled Airlines, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1951
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, 1970. BLS
Bulletin 1712'

'Bulletin out o f stock.

☆ U. S. G O VERNM EN T P R IN TIN G O F F IC E : 1980

341-270/4061

Rent or Buy?
Evaluating Alternatives
in the Shelter Market
“Rent or Buy? Evaluating Alternatives in
the Shelter Market” helps a person or
family compare the financial aspects of
owning and renting shelter suited to their
needs. A step-by-step procedure for
making the comparison is outlined and
fully illustrated. Space is provided to help
determine:
• The monthly outlay to own a house
of your choosing before and after tax
saving from homeownership.
• The proceeds if you were to sell the
house after a given period of time.
• The amount you can spend for rent
and be as well-off financially after a
given period of time as if you bought.
The pamphlet, first issued in 1974, has
been updated to depict more recent
economic conditions that affect shelter
decisions.

Rent or Buy?
Evaluating Alternatives
in the Shelter Market
U S Department ot Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1979
Bulletin 2016

It

U.S. Department of Labor
B u reau of La b o r S tatistics

Fill out and mail this
coupon to BLS
Regional Office
nearest you or
Superintendent of
Documents, U.S.
Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C.
D.C. 20402. Make
checks payable to
Superintendent of
Documents.



Please send — copies of “Rent or Buy? Evaluating Alternatives in the Shelter
Market,” Bulletin 2016, Stock No. 029-001-02309-0, at $1.50 each.
□

Remittance is enclosed.

□

------------

Charge to GPO deposit account no.

Name
Address ---------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------City, State, and Zip Code ___________________________________________

Bureau of Labor Statistics
Regional Offices

Region IV
1371 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30367
Phone: (404) 881-4418

Regions VII and VIII
911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: (816) 374-2481

Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N Y. 10036
Phone: (212) 944-3121

Region V
9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: (312) 353-1880

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415) 556-4678

Region III
3535 Market Street
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: (215) 596-1154

Region VI
Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: (214) 767-6971

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: (617) 223-6761





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102