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INDUSTRY WADE SURVEY




Machinery Manufacturing
I

A P R I L -J U N E 1965

Dayton << M o n tg o m ery Co.
Public Library

AFR6

1966

0OCUIULENJ mUMjfWN

B u lle tin N o. 1 4 7 6

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BU R EAU OF LABO R S T A T IS T IC S
A r t h u r M. Ross, C o m m is s i o n e r




INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY
Machinery Manufacturing
A P R IL -J U N E 1965

Bulletin No. 1476
Febru ary 1966

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

A rthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 2 0 4 0 2 - Price 25 cents










Preface
T his bulletin su m m ariz e s the r e su lts of a B u reau
of L ab o r S ta tistic s su rvey of occupational w ages in the
m achin ery (except e le c tric a l) m anufacturing in d u stries in
21 a r e a s in A pril—
June 1965. It is the 19th in a s e r ie s
of B u reau su rv e y s in th ese in d u strie s. Wage data w ere
obtained, la rg e ly by m a il, fro m estab lish m en ts v isite d by
B u reau field econ om ists in the M arch -M ay 1964 study.
P e rso n a l v is it s w ere m ade to nonrespondents and to r e ­
spondents reportin g unusual changes sin ce the prev iou s
su rvey .
O ccupational data a r e p resen ted for the m achin ery
in d u stries a s a whole in each a r e a and se p a ra te ly in s e ­
lected a r e a s fo r sp e c ia l d ie s and to o ls, die s e t s , jig s and
fix tu re s, and m achin e-tool a c c e s s o r ie s and m easu rin g d e­
v ic e s. The d istrib u tion s of w o rk e rs by occupational e a rn ­
ings contained in se p a ra te a r e a r e le a s e s a r e included h ere
for s ix jo b s. D ata on wage p ra c tic e s and supplem en tary
benefits w ere not obtained in the cu rren t study; how ever,
such inform ation fro m the prev iou s study is b rie fly su m ­
m ariz e d in this bulletin.
S e p arate r e le a s e s fo r the a r e a s , iss u e d within a
few months a fte r the p ay ro ll perio d studied, m ay be ob­
tained fro m the B ureau of L ab o r S t a t is t ic s , W ashington,
D. C. , 20212, or fro m any of its region al o ffic e s.
T his study w as conducted in the B u re a u 's D ivi­
sion of O ccupational P ay, Toivo P. Kanninen, C hief, under
the g e n eral d irection of L . R. L in sen m ay er, A ssis ta n t
C o m m issio n er, O ffice of W ages and In d u strial R elation s.
The an aly sis, w as p re p are d by F r e d W. M ohr, under the
im m ediate su p erv isio n of L . E a r l L ew is. F ie ld work for
the su rvey w as d irected by the A ssis ta n t R egion al D ir e c ­
to r s fo r W ages and In d u strial R elation s.
Other re p o rts a v ailab le fro m the B u re a u ’s p r o ­
g ra m of in dustry wage stu d ie s, a s well a s the a d d r e s s e s
of the B u re a u 's s ix region al o ffic e s, a r e liste d at the end
of this bulletin.

iii




Contents
P age
S u m m a r y ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------In d u stry c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s --------------------------------------------------------------------------T y p e s o f p r o d u c ts ------------------------------------------------------------------------------E m p lo y m e n t l e v e l s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------E s ta b lis h m e n t s i z e -----------------------------------------------------------------------------U n io n izatio n and m eth o d o f w age p ay m en t, M arc h — ay 1 9 6 4 -----------------M
T r e n d s in e a r n i n g s -----------------------------------------------------------O c c u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s , A p r il— n e 1 9 6 5 ---------------------------------------------------Ju
S u p p le m e n ta ry w a g e b e n e fit s , M arc h — ay 1 9 6 4 ----------------------------------------M
P a id h o lid a y s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
8
8

H ealth , in s u r a n c e , and p e n sio n p l a n s ----------------------------------------------------

8

T a b le s:
O c c u p a tio n a l a v e r a g e s :
2. W o m e n ----------------------------------------------3. B y m eth o d o f w age p a y m e n t------------------------------------------4. S p e c ia l d ie s and t o o ls and m a c h in e - to o l a c c e s s o r i e s -------------------

11
12
13

E a r n in g s d is tr ib u tio n :
5. T o o l and d ie m a k e r s (o th e r th an jo b b in g ) -----------------------------------6 . M a c h in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s , p ro d u c tio n , c l a s s A -----------------------------7. M a c h in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s , p ro d u c tio n , c l a s s B -----------------------------8 . M a c h in e -to o l o p e r a t o r s , p ro d u c tio n , c l a s s C -----------------------------9. A s s e m b l e r s , c l a s s B ---------------------------------------------------------------10, L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g -----------------------------------------------------

15
16
17
18
19
20

C h a rt:
P e r c e n t in c r e a s e in a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u rly e a r n in g s , n on ­
e l e c t r i c a l m a c h in e r y m a n u fa c tu rin g in 21 a r e a s , Ja n u a r y 1958
to s p e c if ie d d a t e s ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5

A ppen dixe s :
A.
B.

S c o p e and m eth o d of s u r v e y -----------------------------------------------------O c c u p a tio n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s --------------------------------------------------------------




v

21
24

Industry Wage Survey---Machinery Manufacturing, April—June 1965
Summary
Average straight-time hourly earnings of production and related workers
in the nonelectrical machinery industries increased 2. 5 percent between M a r c h M a y 1964 and April-June 1965, in 21 metropolitan areas studied by the Bureau
of Labor Statistics.1 As in the survey m a d e a year earlier, pay levels were
highest in San Francisco-Oakland and Detroit, and tool and die makers were gen­
erally the highest paid of the occupational group studied.

Industry Characteristics
Types of Products. Machinery (nonelectrical) manufacturing, as defined
for this study, included establishments which m a y be grouped in nine general
product categories, according to the principal product manufactured. As indicated
in the following tabulation, the distribution of workers a m o n g these major product
groups in the 21 areas combined was similar to the nationwide distribution.
Percent of workers
21 areas
studied
22

18

17
16

14
15

11
10
9
6
5
4

Metalworking machinery and equipment-----Construction, mining, and material­
handling machinery and equipment—------ General industrial machinery and equipment Special industry machinery, except
metalworking machinery—------------------Office, computing, and accounting machines
Miscellaneous machinery---------- ------------Engines and turbines-------------------- -------Service industry machines —------------------Farm machinery and equipment ------------- --

Nation­
wide

11
10
12
5
7
8

The predominant types of machinery manufactured, however, differed
a m o n g areas.
F or example, a majority of the workers in Denver and Houston
and almost half of those in Dallas were in establishments primarily manufacturing
construction, mining, and material-handling machinery; a majority in Detroit and
Worcester were in metalworking machinery and equipment plants. In Los AngelesLong Beach and San Francisco-Oakland, no one major product category accounted
for as m a n y as a fourth of the workers. 1
2

1 See appendix A for scope and method of survey and definitions of the areas.
in the respective areas, see table in appendix A.
2 Nationwide employment as reported in the Bureau's payroll employment series.
July and August 1965.)




1

For the payroll period studied
,c .
(See Employment and Earnings,

2

E m p l o y m e n t Levels. Total employment within scope of the study was
about 630, 000— nearly two-fifths of the nationwide employment in the nonelectrical
machinery industries. 3 A s indicated in the following tabulation, the approximate
numbers of employees in the areas varied from 107,000 in Chicago to less than
5,000 in Portland, O r eg., and Denver.

Number of workers
Chicago —--------------------------------- ------------- -------Detroit — —------------------------- -------------—----- ----Los Angeles-Long Beach— -------------- ---------- -—------Milwaukee, Cleveland, and Philadelphia - ——- —---- —
Minneapolis-51. Paul, Newark and Jersey City,
Hartford, and New Y o rk ---------------------------—------Boston, Houston, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh----------- -----San Francis co-Oakland, Buffalo, Baltimore,
Dallas, and Worcester —.........................................................
Portland, O reg., and Denver —— —— — ——— — —

107,000
72,000
55,000
40,000-50,000
31,000-34,000
16,000-23,000
9,000-14,000
Less than 5,000

Since the 1964 study, total employment in the 21 areas had increased 4 percent
compared with a nationwide average increase of 7 percent.
A m o n g the areas,
increases w e r e greater than 10 percent in Minneapolis—St. Paul and Pittsburgh
and exceeded the nationwide average rate of increase in four additional areas
(Baltimore, Buffalo, Dallas, and Portland).

Establishment Size. Thirty-eight percent of the workers covered by the
study wer e in establishments with fewer than 250 workers, 45 percent were in
establishments with 250 to 2,499 workers, and 17 percent were in establishments
employing 2,500 workers or more.
A majority of the workers in N e w York,
Portland, and San Francis co-Oakland and nearly half in Detroit, Denver, and
Los Angeles— Long Beach were in establishments with fewer than 250 workers.
A m o n g the other areas, the proportions of workers in this establishment-size
group ranged f r o m one-sixth in Milwaukee to m o r e than two-fifths in Boston.
Establishments with 2,500 workers or m o r e accounted for slightly m o r e than
two-fifths of the workers in Hartford and Milwaukee, approximately a third in
Houston and Minneapolis— St. Paul, and smaller proportions in the seven other
areas where establishments of this size were found.

Unionization and Method of W a g e Payment, M a r c h - M a y 1964.
Plant­
wide information on unionization and method of wage payment was not obtained
in the 1965 survey.
However, a brief s u m m a r y of these items from the 1964
study is included below. 4
In 1964, establishments having labor-management contracts covering a
majority of their workers employed seven-tenths of the production workers in
the 21 areas combined. Such contract coverage included m o r e than nine-tenths
of the workers in Pittsburgh, Portland, St. Louis, and San Francis co-Oakland;
m o r e than three-fourths in Milwaukee, Hartford, Buffalo, Detroit, Cleveland,
and N e w a r k and Jersey City; and two-fifths or m o r e in the remaining areas.
3 Ibid.
4 For details, see Industry Wage Survey: Machinery Manufacturing, March-May 1964 (BLS Bulletin 1429, 1965).
April-June 1965 data may not have been the same as those shown for 1964, since changes may have occurred during
the interval between the studies.



3

Incentive wage system s were reported by some establishm ents in all
areas except D allas, Portland, and San F ran cis co-Oakland at the time of the
1964 study. One-fourth or m ore of the workers were paid on this b asis in
Milwaukee, Hartford, Pittsburgh, and W orcester; m ore than one-eighth in B alti­
m ore, Newark and Je r se y City, Buffalo, Cleveland, St. JLouis, Chicago, Phila­
delphia, Boston, and New York; and sm aller proportions in the other are as.
Trends in Earnings
Average straight-tim e hourly earnings of production w orkers in the
21 areas increased 2.5 percent between March—
May 1964 and April—
June 1965,
compared with an in crease of 2.7 percent for each of the 2 preceding y ears.
(See table on next page and chart on page 5 . ) Increases of 3 percent or more
between 1964 and 1965 were recorded in seven are as and were largest in San
F ran cisco—
Oakland (5. 3 percent) and Portland (4 percent). Milwaukee, Newark
and Je rse y City, New York, and Pittsburgh were the only are as in which the
rate of increase was le ss than 2 percent. General wage changes usually account
for much of the year-to-year movement in w ages, although other factors such
as labor turnover, incentive earnings, and changes in employment in establish ­
ments with different pay levels also affect the trend in wages.
Average hourly earnings of tool and die m akers (other than jobbing) in
all areas combined increased by 2.7 percent (9 cents) between 1964 and 1965,
while earnings of mate rial-handling lab orers rose 2 percent (5 cents).
Since
1945, when the Bureau initiated this se rie s of occupational wage relationship
studies for the machinery industries, average earnings for these occupations have
increased 153 percent and 200 percent, respectively, compared with 169 percent
for all production w orkers.
The following tabulation shows the percent increase in wages of all p ro ­
duction w orkers and the two occupations mentioned above for each of the 5-year
periods since 1945.
Percent increase between—
1945-50

1950-55

1955-60

1960-65

All production workers —------ ---- -------

4 4 .7

30.9

24.2

14.5

Laborers, material handling - ——- ——
------Tool and die makers
(other than jobbing) —-----------------

S3.6

3 3 .9

26.3

15.4

2 8.0

24.4

15.6

The rate of increase was much greater in the e arlie r periods than m ore recently.
The all production w ork ers1 increase for 1945—
50, for example, was three tim es
as great as their 1960— increase (44.7 percent compared with 14.5 percent).
65
The rate of increase for material-handling laborers greatly exceeded the rate of
increase for tool and die m akers between 1945 and 1955, due largely to uniform
cents-per-hour in creases. Since 1955, the difference in rates of increase for
these two jobs has been sm all; between 1955 and I960, the percent increase was
slightly greater for lab orers than for tool and die m akers whereas in ihe 1960—
65
period the reverse was true.
Occupational Earnings. April—
June 1965
Tool and die m akers generally had the highest average hourly earnings
among the occupational groups studied in April—
June 1965 (table 1.) Average
earnings for men producing or maintaining tools and dies used in the establish­
ments in which these workers were employed (i. e . , other than jobbing) ranged




4'

from $2.94 an hour in D allas to $3.97 in San F ran cisco—
Oakland; in five other
a re a s, their average hourly earnings exceeded $ 3 .6 0 . In 10 of the 13 are as for
which data are also shown for tool and die m akers producing tools and dies for
sale (i. e. , jobbing), average hourly earnings of the two groups of tool and die
m akers differed by le ss than 5 percent.
Indexes1 of Average Straight-Time Hourly Earnings2 of Ptoduction Workers in Machinery Manufacturing
in Selected Areas9 and Occupations, April—
June 1905 and Marcb-May 19644
and Percent Change in Selected Periods 5
Indexes
(1958-59=100)
Area and occupation

All areas combined-----

Percent increase from—

May Mar. —
June Mar. —
May Jan. 1960
Apr.— Mar.— Mar. -May Mar. —
1964 to
1963to
1962 to
1961 to
to
June
May
May Mar. —
Apr. —
June Mar. —
May Mar. -June Mar. —
May
1965
1964
1965
1964
1963
1962
1961

Jan. 1959
to
Jan. 1960

121.1

118.2

2.5

2.7

2.7

2.8

3.1

4.1

124.7
122.9
122.3
121.4
123.6
121.9
118.4
118.4
125.1
116.0
120.9
119.7
124.1
121.4
120.4
119.8
114.2
129.1
126.0
126.0
122.1

121.5
120.4
118.6
118.8
120.5
118.4
115.1
115.4
122.3
113.5
116.5
118.2
121.2
119.4
118.6
116.8
112.3
124.1
122.2
119.6
118.3

2 .6
2.0
3.1
2 .2
2 .6
3 .0
2 .9
2.6
2.3
2 .2
3.8
1.3
2 .4
1.7
1.5
2.6
1.7
4 .0
3.1
5.3
3 .2

3 .0
1.4
3 .2
3.7
2 .5
4 .0
2 .6
2.1
3 .9
1.4
1.1
2.6
4.1
4 .7
3.1
2.3
1.2
3.1
2.1
2.9
2.1

4 .9
2.8
3 .5
3.1
2.7
2 .6
2 .5
2 .4
3 .2
1.9
3.1
2 .5
2 .5
2.7
3 .0
1.2
.6
2.9
3 .4
3.3
3.7

1.9
3.0
1.9
3.0
3.8
2 .6
1.1
2.0
2 .4
2.1
3.2
3 .0
2.0
3.0
3.7
2 .4
1.6
3 .5
5.1
2 .5
2.7

4 .3
4.3
4 .0
1.5
2.1
3.1
3 .2
2.8
4.7
^ .2
3 .0
3.5
5.9
4.1
4 .0
3.2
2.9
2.1
4 .4
3.0
5 .2

2.8
5.1
3 .4
4 .3
6 .8
3.0
3.6
4.1
4 .7
7 .4
4 .0
3.9
3.9
1.4
2.9
4 .2
2.8
9.1
3.7
2.5
1.8

122.0

119.6

2 .0

3.3

2.9

2.3

4 .0

3 .4

122.4

119.2

2.7

3.3

2 .4

2.7

3.6

3.9

Areas
Baltimore -------------------Boston-----------------------Buffalo....................................
C h ic a g o --------------------Cleveland —------- ------—
D a lla s-----------------------D en ver----------------------D e tro it----------------------H artford--------------------Houston --------------------Los Angeles-Long Beach--M ilwaukee--- -------------Minneapolis-51. P a u l-----Newark and Jersey City---New Y o rk -------------------Philadelphia----------------Pittsburgh-------------------Portland (Oreg.)------------St. Louis--------------------San Francisco-Oakland----W orcester-------------------Occupations
Laborers, material
handling ------------------Tool and die makers
(other than jobbing) —- —

1 For the methodology used in constructing the indexes, see appendix A.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3 For definition of areas, see appendix A, p. 22.
4 For the 1945-62 indexes, see appendix B of BLS Bulletin 1352; for the 1963 index, BLS Bulletin 1429, p. 3.
5 Data for periods shown as January cover various months of the winter.
^ This decrease was the result of changes in incentive earnings and in the proportions of workers in some job
classifications in establishments having different pay levels.

Men machine-tool operators (class A) who set up their own machines
and perform a variety of machining operations to close tolerances, averaged from
$2.66 an hour in Dallas to $3. 58 in San F ran cis co-Oakland and $3. 61 in St. Louis.
Area average earnings for the intermediate group of machine-tool operators
(class B) ranged from $2.16 to $3.07 an hour and for those performing m ore
routine, repetitive machining (class C) from $1.76 to $ 2 .8 4 . Differences in av­
erage hourly earnings for cla ss A and c lass B operators varied from le ss than
20 cents in Newark and Je rse y City, Philadelphia, and Cleveland to 50 cents or



5

Percent Increase in Average Straight-Time Hourly Earnings,
Nonelectrical Machinery Manufacturing in 21 Areas,
January 1958 to Specified Dates
Percent




Percent

6

more in D allas, Detroit, San Fran cis co-Oakland, Denver, Los Angeles—
Long Beach,
and St. Louis. C lass B o p erato rs1 average hourly earnings exceeded those for
c la ss C operators by le ss than 20 cents in Hartford, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, and
Portland and by m ore than 50 cents in Cleveland, Philadelphia, Newark and
Je rse y City, New York, and Chicago.
In m ost a r e a s, jan itors, porters, and cleaners were the lowest paid of
the jobs for which data are shown for men. Their hourly earnings averaged
from $ 1. 58 in Dallas to $ 2. 65 in San Franc is co-Oakland. Mate rial-handling
lab o rers' average hourly earnings were le s s than $2. 25 in seven are as and m ore
than $2.50 in five a re a s.
Occupational wage relationships differed among a r e a s, as indicated in
the following tabulation in which averages for men in selected occupations in
seven a re a s are shown as percents of the averages for janitors in the re sp e c ­
tive a r e a s. For example, in Houston, tool and die m akers averaged 73 percent
more than janitors and in Detroit, 45 percent m ore. Average earnings for
c la ss A assem b lers in these two are a s exceeded the averages for jan itors by
41 and 38 percent, respectively. In St. Louis, c la ss A and cla ss C machine-tool
operators averaged m ore than janitors by 56 and 10 percent, respectively; in
Hartford, the corresponding differences were 39 and 22 percent.
Relative occupational pay levels
(Janitors=100)

Occupation
Tool and die makers
(other than jobbing) - ——--------Machine-tool operators,
toolroom—--------- -—- — -------Electricians, maintenance ——----Machine-tool operators,
production, class A ——---------- ---------Inspectors, class A —--------- ------ ---------Assemblers, class A ------ ------ -— ---------Inspectors, class B ——- —--------- ---------Machine-tool operators,
production, class B ---------- ------ ---------Assemblers, class B ——- —------ Inspectors, class C — ------------—
Machine-tool operators,
production, class C ——------ —
Assemblers, class C —------ ------- ----------

Phila­
del­
Hous­
ton
phia

Chi­
cago

166

173

162

145

163

159

155
150

163
167

157
155

150
145

153
152

156
150

139
130
130
119

144
143
140
146

154
162
141
156

145
140
140
128

136
136
138
116

156
136
136
122

147
147
137
124

125

139
119
127

141
129
125

130
124
116

116
114
112

129
123
120

119
117
105

113
94

122
116

102
106

105
105

110
104

104
96

Hart­
ford

105

Detroit St. Louis

Los AngelesLong Beach

Women, accounting for a relatively sm all proportion of the w orkers in
machinery manufacturing establish m en ts,5 were m ost commonly employed in
routine assem bly and inspection or repetitive machining operations. Averages
of $2 or m ore were recorded for c la ss C asse m b le rs in seven a r e a s, c la ss C
inspectors in seven a re a s, and c la ss C machine-tool operators in six are a s
(table 2). Women employed in these jobs averaged $ 2 .7 0 or more in Detroit
and $ 2. 33 or more in Cleveland and Hartford.

5
At the time of the 1964 study, women accounted for as many as a tenth of the plant workers in only five
areas—Baltimore, Hartford, Los Angeles—Long Beach, St. Louis, and San Francisco—Oakland.




7

The following tabulation, in which are a average earnings for production
workers are expressed as a percent of the average for Chicago, 6 shows that wage
levels were highest in San F ran cis co-Oakland and Detroit and lowest in D allas,
Relative area pay levels
(Chicago=100)
San Francisco-Oakland--------------------------- —
Detroit ———— ----------- ---------- ------ —— «
Portland, O reg., andSt. Louis—----- -----------Milwaukee —------------- ---------------------------Cleveland—----------------------------------------—Pittsburgh ----------- ------------- ----—------- ----Chicago —-------------------------------------------—
Buffalo, Hartford, Los Angeles-Long
Beach, and Newark and JerseyCity———-------Denver —----------------- ---------------------------Baltimore, New York, and Philadelphia —— —
Houston and Minneapolis-St.Paul ———— —
Worcester ------------------------------------------ —
Boston —-----------------------------------------------D allas--------------------------------------------------

111
108
106
103
102
101
100
97
95
94
92
91
89
79

Thus, the average pay level in the San Fran cisco—
Oakland area exceeded the
Dallas pay level by 41 percent. A wage spread of 21 percent existed between
the second highest area (Detroit) and the second lowest area (Boston) in the
pay ranking.
Incentive-paid w orkers generally had higher average earnings than tim erated workers in the sam e occupation and are a (table 3). The differences, how­
ever, varied considerably among occupations and a r e a s.
Data are presented in table 4 for selected occupations in establishm ents
prim arily manufacturing special dies and tools, die se ts, and jig s and fixtures
in Chicago, Cleveland, and Detroit; machine-tool a c c e sso rie s and m easuring de­
vices in Chicago and Detroit; and a combination of these two industries in Boston,
Hartford, Los Angeles—
Long Beach, Milwaukee, Newark and Je rse y City, and
New York. 7
The earnings distributions of men in six occupations are shown in tables
5— 8 The spread in earnings differed by are a and occupation. For example,
10.
81 percent of the c la ss A machine-tool operators in Portland had hourly earnings
of $ 3.30 to $ 3 .4 0 and 66 percent in San Fran cis co-Oakland, $ 3 .5 0 to $3.60;
whereas in Detroit and Milwaukee le ss than 15 percent of the workers in this
occupation had earnings within any 10-cent interval shown in table 6. In Detroit,
the range of hourly earnings of the middle half of the c lass B assem b lers was
$2.91 to $2.99; the corresponding range for c la ss C machine-tool operators
was $ 2.45 to $2 .9 7 .
Ten men's jobs common to all areas (assem bler, classes A and B; inspectors, class A; janitors, porters, and
cleaners; laborers, material handling; machine-tool operators, production, classes A, B, and C; tool and die makers
(other than jobbing); and welders, hand, class A), were used in computing the index. To minimize interarea dif­
ferences in occupational composition, weights expressing constant employment relationships based on total employ­
ment in the respective jobs in all 21 areas were used. Aggregates were computed for each area by multiplying the
average straight-time hourly earnings for the jobs by these weights and totaling. The ratio of these aggregates formed
the basis for the index.
7 The area releases mentioned in the preface also provide separate data for oilfield machinery in Los AngelesLong Beach, paper and printing machinery in New York, and textile machinery in Philadelphia.
8 The separate area releases include distributions of workers' earnings for additional occupations.




8

Supplementary Wage Benefits, March-May 1964
Information on supplementary wage benefits was not obtained in the 1965
study. Data for production w orkers from the 1964 study are briefly sum m a­
rized below. 9
At the time of the 1964 survey, nearly a ll w orkers in the nonelectrical
machinery industries in the 21 a re a s studied were employed in establishm ents
providing paid holidays, paid vacations, and health and insurance benefits.
Paid Holidays. A m ajority of the workers in Boston, Newark and Je rse y
City, New York, Philadelphia, and W orcester were employed in establishm ents
which granted 8 holidays or more annually. Six days or m ore were usually pro­
vided in the other a r e a s.
Paid Vacations. Paid vacations of at le ast 1 week after 1 year, and
2 weeks after 5 y ears of serv ice were provided in establishm ents employing nearly
all w orkers covered by the study. In a ll except four a r e a s , three-fourths or
m ore of the workers were in establishm ents providing at le a st 3 weeks after
15 y ears of serv ice.
Health, Insurance, and Pension P lan s. Life, hospitalization, and su r­
gical insurance (with the employer paying at le a st part of the cost) were available
to nine-tenths or m ore of the w orkers in nearly all a re a s. Sickness and accident
and m edical insurance also were usually provided in m ost a re a s.
Pension plans (providing regular payments on retirem ent in addition to
social security benefits) were reported by establishm ents employing a m ajority of
the w orkers in m ost a re a s.

9 Op. c it., footnote 4.




Tabic 1. Occupational Averages: Men
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of men in selected occupations in machinery manufacturing, 21 selected areas, April-June 1965 2)

Occupation

A ssem b lers, c la ss A _________________________
A ssem b lers, c la ss B _________________________
A ssem b lers, c la ss C
_
E lectrician s, m aintenance__________________
Inspectors, cla ss A __ __________________
Inspectors, cla ss B __ __ _ ________
Inspectors, cla ss C __________________________
Janitors, porters, and c le a n e r s_____________
Laborers, m aterial handling___________ _ .
M achine-tool operators, production,
cla ss A 3 __________ _
. _
Autom atic-lathe operators, class A ______
D rill-p ress operators, radial, class A ___
D rill-p ress operators, single- or
m ultiple-spindle, cla ss A _______ Engine-lathe operators, cla ss A ------ --------Grinding-machine operators, class A _____
M illing-m achine operators, class A _____
Screw -m achine operators, automatic,
cla ss A _____ __________ ________
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw m achine), cla ss A _______ ___
M achine-tool operators, production,
cla ss B 3 ____________________ ___ _
Autom atic-lathe operators, class B ___ ___
D rill-p ress operators, radial, class B ___
D rill-p ress operators, sin gle- or
m ultiple-spindle, cla ss B _______________
Engine-lathe operators, cla ss B __________
Grinding-machine operators, class B _____
M illing-m achine operators, class B ______
Screw -m achine operators, automatic,
cla ss B ___________________________ _____ ,
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw m achine), cla ss B . -------M achine-tool operators, production,
c la ss C 3 ________ ______ ______________ ___
D rill-p ress operators, radial, class C __ _
D rill-p ress operators, single- or
m ultiple-spindle, cla ss C ______ .
Engine-lathe operators, c la ss C
Grinding-machine operators, class C _____
M illing-m achine operators, cla ss C _______
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw m achine), cla ss C ___________
M achine-tool operators, toolroom ----- ------ T—.
M achinists, production____ __________
Tool and die m akers (jobbing) ___________— ,
Tool and die m akers (other than jobbing)
W elders. handf cla ss A _ ___________
W elders, hand, cla ss B ________________ _

Northeast
South
Newark and New York Philadelphia Pittsburgh W orcester
Boston
Buffalo
Hartford Jersey City
Baltimore
Dallas
Houston
Num­ A ver­ Num­ A ver­ Num­ A ver­ Num­ A ver­ Num­ A ver­ Num­ A ver- Num­ A ver­ Num­ A ver­ Num­ A ver­ Num­ A ver­ Num­ A ver­
ber age ber age ber age ber age ber age ber age ber age ber age ber age ber age ber age
of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of
of
work­ earn­ work­ earn­ work­ earn­ work­ earn­ work­ earn­ work­ earn­ work­ earn­ work­ earn­ work­ earn­ work­ hourly work­ hourly
ers ings ers ings ers ings ers ings ers ings ers ings. ers ings ers ings ers ings ers earn­ ers earn­
ings
ings
534 $2. 94 310 $3. 14 299 82 .90 798 $3. 11 888 $3. 08 883 $2.89 384 $3. 32 278 $2 .88 190 $3. 30 191 $2.53 412 $2. 70
565 2. 50 169 2.77 649 2. 53 960 2.70 635 2.48 532 2.46 242 3.03 171 2.61 144 2.63 201 2. 13 193 2.48
_ _
_
212 2. 15 134 2.50 622 2. 35 445 2. 39 990 2.02 572 1.94
99 2. 34
281 1.62 99 2. 23
47 3. 11 57 3.06 100 3.23 136 3. 33 68 3. 15 133 3. 10 131 3. 15 36 2.97
51 2.95
29 2.67 117 3. 20
216 2.92
92 3. 18 197 2.89 259 3.03 235 3. 10 410 2. 97 200 3.29 115 2.79
94 2.99
53 2.75 183 3. 11
206 2. 54 82 2.95 293 2.66 216 2.81 164 2. 88 285 3. 02 76 2.92 46 2.73
45 2.81
62 2. 34 152 3. 00
_
68 2.25
26 2.25 590 2.50 187 2.48 108 2. 08
32 2.63
7 2. 27
12 2. 18
23
215 1.96 159 2.22 254 2.23 313 1.95 279 2.04 375 2.07 168 2. 29 105 2.04 108 1.92 158 1.58 331 2. 40
1.92
_
252 2.18 104 2.44 329 2.21 485 2. 18 461 2. 12 357 2. 27 265 2.45
81 2. 17
134 1.73 258 2. 05
1,580 2.87 820 2.97 1,470 3. 10 1,685 3. 04 2,556 3. 04 2,718 2.98 1,903 3. 17 805 2.86 914 3.01 660 2. 66 1,503 2.96
_ _
_ _
_
- 9 3. 37 39 3.21
37 3. 12
54 2.75 110 2. 96
100 2.90
58 3.05 115 3. 08 121 3. 18 295 2. 88 124 2.89
67 2.82
35 3.30
25 2.43 72 2.88
_ _
90 2.96
7 2.71
40 3. 16 65 2.76 120 3.02 151 2.73
20 3.03
20 3.08
17 2. 34 83 2.83
192 2.81 141 2.94 200 3. 11 300 2.97 394 3. 08 350 2.99 324 3.22
91 2. 75
3.
213 2.89 101 3.11 442 3. 10 194 3.05 193 3. 10 394 2.91 262 3. 09 189 2. 78 109 2.99 150 2. 72 223 2. 08
42 3. 10 85 2.71 123
93
- 140 2.94
148 3. 14 412 3.01 572 3. 06 282 2. 94 303 3. 16 118 2.93
86 3. 28 68 2. 67 202 2. 94
_ _ _
_
55 3.00
111 3. 18 45 3. 22 45 3. 28
10 3. 08
14 3. 07
27 2. 56
- 257 2.84
185 2.97 241 3. 10 195 3. 09 409 2.93 228 3. 15 123 2.81 132 3.05 175 2. 64 361 2. 96
676 2. 50 616 2.74 1,992 2.78 1.829 2.95 1,587 2.61 1,976 2. 88 658 2.83 601 2.61 327 2.66 333 2. 16 591 2. 71
- _ _
_ _
_ _
- - 60 3. 17
17 2. 82
25 2. 62
_ _
_
38 2.51
48 2. 78 50 2.59
61 2.63 135 2.65
38 2. 55
46 2.63
46 2. 09 55 2. 68
55 2.46
26 2. 38 179 2.70 137 2. 54 104 2.56
75 2.48
28 2.74
76 2. 64 46 2. 67 48 1.95 40 2. 63
24 2.73 129 2.63
62 2. 58 195 2.71 169 2.65 153 2.80
97 3. 19 39 2. 57
33 2. 59
_ _
_ _
_ _
103 2.65 118 2. 87 775 2. 79
71 2.63
193 2. 54
26 2. 14 85 2. 81
69 2. 60 24 2. 96 234 2. 58 103 2. 77 249 2. 68 250 2. 74
37 2.93
85 2. 72
37 2.75
49 2. 27 89 2. 77
_ _
_ _
_ _
_
_
- . .
244 3. 05
113 2.50 611 2.75 119 2.86 107 2.98
76 2. 82 296 2.99
50 2. 62
33 2. 70
29 3.05
76 2. 14 140 2. 74
320 2.03
76 2. 68 1,392 2.73 461 2. 39 1,081 2.04 805 2. 34 112 2. 69 104 2. 24 318 2.25 156 1.76 241 2. 35
_
_
_
25 2. 35 53 2. 49
32 2.49
9 1.96
13 1.97
33 2. 09
_
53 2. 12 23 2.45 192 2. 72 186 2. 45 231 2.01 147 2. 12
42 1. 76
- _
_ _
_
_ _
_
- . »
41 2.38
36 1.92
_
_
_
- 33 2. 24
750 2.85
26 2. 29
63 2. 78
30 2. 24
7 2.40
29 2. 52
- - . _
157 2.54
62 2.47
15 2.22
20 2. 53
_ _
_ _
_ _
_
- . 72 2. 59
16 2. 76
71 2. 20
50
81 2.87 216 3. 14 395 3. 15 757 3. 14 217 3. 06 384 3.21 138 3. 24 34 2. 79 177 2. 94 73 2.88 185 2. 30
3. 13
- 274 2.94
97 2.98 127 3. 02 276 3. 27 252 2.93 171 3. 20 24 2.83
99 2. 65 494 3. 10
_
_
347 3.23 212 3.25 326 3.05 638 3.25 391 3. 38 1,215 3.42
108 3. 25 77 3. 15 481 3. 26 314 3.41 274 3. 37 291 3.43
72 3.31
81 3.01
62 2.94 114 3. 33
59 3.23
245 2. 79 239 3.10
56 3. 24 222 3.23 165 3.31 488 3.01 200 3.05
27 3.01 127 2.95 349 2.51 835 2.77
75 2.66 65 2. 69
37 2.61 105 2.88 204 2. 69 414 2.78
15 2,77
75 2.65 276 2. 08 379 2. 67
•
1

See footnotes at end of table.




<0

Table 1. Occupational Averages: Men— Continued

o

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1 of men in selected occupations in machinery manufacturing, 21 selected areas, April-June 1965*)
North Central
Occupation

A ssem blers, cla ss A ------ ----- ---- ---------- --------A ssem blers, class B — ------ ----------- ------------A ssem b lers, class C — --------------------- ---------- E lectricians, maintenance — ----- — ...— ---- ——
Inspectors, class A .......—----------------------------Inspectors, class B ---------- —------------------------Inspectors, class C-------------------- ------------- ---Janitors, p orters, and cleaners---------- ---- ——
Lahore r s, m ate rial handling-----------------------M achine-tool operators, production,
class A1
3-----------------------—-----------------------------2
Autom atic-lathe operators, class A ------ —
D rill-p ress operators, radial, cla ss A —
D rill-p ress operators, sin gle- or
m ultiple-spindle, class A ----------------------Engine-lathe operators, cla ss A -------- ------Grinding-machine operators, class A ------M illing-m achine operators, class A -------Screw-m achine operators, autom atic.
class A -------------------- -------------- — ----------Turret-ladle operators, hand (including
hand screw m achine), class A ----------- ---M achine-tool operators, production.
class B3------ ---- ---- -----------------------------------——
Autom atic-lathe operators, class B _
D rill-p ress operators, radial, class B---D rill-p ress operators, sin gle- or
m ultiple - spindle, cla ss B ----------------------Engine-lathe operators, cla ss B— ----------Grinding-machine operators, class B------M illing-m achine operators, cla ss B—
Screw -m achine operators, autom atic,
class B— ----- —— ------------ -----------------------Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw m achine), class B ---------------M achine-tool operators, production.
class C3
- - D rill-p ress operators, radial, class C _
D rill-p ress operators, sin gle- or
m ultiple-spindle, cla ss C----------------------Engine-lathe operators, class C -------------Grinding-machine operators, class C ----M illing-m achine operators, class C —
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw m achine), cla ss C----- — ------M achine-tool operators, toolro om ---------------M achinists, production---------------------- ----- ---Tool and die m akers (jobbing)
... — .
Tool and die make rs (other than jobbing)------W elders, hand, class A — ----- ---- ----------- ------W elders, hand, class B ---- --------- .

Chicago
Num­ Aver­
ber
age
of hourly
work­ earn­
ers ing 8
3,452 $3.12
2,712 2.76
1, 136 2. 37
365 3.46
839 3.13
748 2.85
388 2.59
1, 146 2.23
2, 158 2.33
8,579 3.23
310 3.34
865 3.15
297 3.05
1, 168 3.22
1,298 3.24
863 3.23
175 3.37
1,219 3.29
4,050 2.91
157 3.21
295 2.93
631 2.87
219 2.84
800 2.82
499 2.95
64 2.91
623 2.88
1,944 2.28
108 2.49
593 2.14
84 2. 39
305 2.30
147 2.45
108 2.47
1,660 3.51
84 3.61
1,739 3.99
755 3.61
2, 138 3.14
754 3.21

Cleveland
Num­ Aver­
ber
age
of hourly
work­ earn­
ers ings
1,094 $3.24
1,000 3.02
310 2.55
194 3.25
318 3.11
243 3.04
84 2.80
503 2.34
469 2.50
4,659 3.18
40 3.19
294 3.12
202 3.32
401 3.14
775 3.25
671 3.23
313 3.21
676 3. 13
1,965 2.99
97 2.79
94 2.91
279 3.16
348 3.00
304 3.07
194 3. 00
52 2.86
208 2.87
670 2.48
7 2.46
170 2. 35
- 180 2.47
57 2.53
107 2.48
839 3.21
- 853 3.35
195 3.49
450 3.07
352 2.86

Detroit
Num­ A ver­
ber
age
of hourly
work­ earn­
ers ings
759 $3.52
1,383 2.93
677 2.68
214 3.72
545 3.49
502 2.98
106 2.86
1, 141 2.56
696 2.78
5,469 3.48
40 3.20
64 3.53
73 3.27
561 3.52
2, 388 3.48
666 3.51
175 3.41
619 3.25
5,206 2.97
96 3.09
420 2.74
460 2.89
348 3.20
1,724 2.99
738 2.94
205 3.16
511 3.00
1,199 2.69
19 2.60
161 2.69
- 348 2.60
219 2.80
25 2.71
4,805 3.84
- 4,604 3.95
578 3.72
359 3.29
493 2.89

Milwaukee
Num­ A ver­
ber • age
of hourly
work­ earn­
ers
ings
766 $3.28
1,355 2.96
577 2.79
234 3.40
546 3.21
456 2.97
138 2.59
445 2.44
785 2. 54
2,460 3.28
93 3.27
213 3.19
100 3. 18
259 3.27
268 3.33
242 3.34
90 3.35
537 3.22
1,723 2.95
73 2.77
424 2.89
258 2.92
179 2.87
165 3.12
189 3.04
26 3.05
194 3.01
415 2.50
37 2. 35
91 2.75
- 57 2.31
66 2.77
39 2.30
529 3.38
- 334 3.66
291 3.69
588 3.18
598 3.01

Minneapolis— St. Louis
St. Paul
Num­ A ver­ Num­ Aver­
ber
age ber
age
of hourly of hourly
work­ earn­ work­ earn­
ers ings ers ings
310 $3. 14
717 $2.79
1,504 2.47
454 2.84
236 2.52
433 2.40
82 3.18
59 3.51
314 2.92
109 3.14
235 2.61
164 2.82
- 55 2.78
321 2.21
177 2.31
374 2.41
386 2.33
765 3.61
1,840 2.95
98 2.97
53 3.46
125 2.93
38 3.16
- 141 2.84
- 316 2.90
134 2.95
54 3.59
121 2.96
79 3.45
71 3.23
“ “
416 2.97
62 3.33
1,154 2.64
487 2.97
- - 161 2.70
■ “
- 260 2.56
- 71 2.72
22 2.76
53 2.91
71 2.66
50 2.95
19 2.59
■ *
87 2.80
89 2.67
207 2.20
198 2.55
” "
“ •
67 2.37
99 2.40
- 19 2.93
- 36 2.44
" “
“ "
- 20 2.42
356 2.94
329 3.54
- 283 3.48
148 3.43
337 3.88
217 3.76
279 3. 34
664 2.93
319 3.20
228 2.76
81 2.54

Denver
Num­ A ver­
ber
age
of hourly
work­ earn­
ers ings
78 $2.98
54 2.50
20 2.31
- 46 3.08
- - 56 2.05
■
328 3. 18
- *
- 32 3. 17
- 30 3.54
“ “
81 3.27
115 2.61
- 22 2.69
15 2.54
9 2.72
- 15 2.60
■
23 2. 57
13 2. 36
“ “
- - - " “
- - - - 43 3.19
102 3.00
~

West
Los A ngeles- Portland
Long Beach
Num­ Aver­ Num­ Aver­
ber
age ber
age
of hourly of hourly
work­ earn­ work­ earn­
ers ings ers ings
1,454 $2.98
351 $3.32
- 773 2. 54
13 2.73
709 2. 08
122 3.26
9 3. 32
641 3.18
39 3.35
- 225 2.69
- 54 2.28
64 2.56
710 2.17
340 2.52
89 2.75
4,851 3.20
686 3. 33
- 151 3. 19
285 3.05
83 3. 31
- 160 2.83
784 3.23
197 3. 34
24 3.28
1,338 3.27
451 3. 12
122 3.34
98 3. 25
“
786 3.18
66 3.32
1,693 2.58
102 2.99
- - 146 2. 67
32 2.97
267 2.49
37 2.98
- - - 185 2.61
215 2.45
6 3.00
” “
■ "
228 2.85
17 3.01
438 2. 26
45 2. 84
■ ”
* ~
61 2. 06
- - - 55 2.14
- “ “
“ “
36 2. 08
- 1,005 3.38
19 3.44
90 3. 34
1,033 3.31
- 760 3.63
6 3.87
388 3.46
3. 18
523 3.33
1,673
308 2.61
” “

Siin
F ran<lisco—
Oak land
Num­ Aver­
ber
age
of hourly
work­ earn­
ers ings
183 $3.56
270 3.06
- 33 3.97
153 3.44
- - 124 2.65
47 2.90
1,348 3.58
20 3.62
50 3.60
- 193 3. 59
- “ "
76 3. 50
175 3.56
390 3.07
- 62 3. 11
131 3. 09
- 48 3.06
“
" “
64 3.02
342 2.75
’
150 2.78
- - “ “
- 92 3.67
304 3.55
- 120 3.97
655 3.51
“ ”

1 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Payroll periods covered in individual areas are indicated in die table in appendix A.
3 Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately. The separate area releases include average hourly earnings for automatic-lathe operators,
class Q in Chicago ($2. 69); and screw -m achine operators, automatic, class C, in Chicago ($2.42), Cleveland ($2. 61), Detroit ($2.6 2), and Minneapolis-^St. Paul ($2.26).
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication criteria.



.Table 2. Occupational Averages: Women
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1 of women in selected occupations in machinery manufacturing, 9 selected a r e a s,2 April-June 1965)
Northeast
Occupation1

A ssem b lers, cla ss B
A ssem b lers, cla ss C,
Inspectors, cla ss B _
Inspectors, cla ss C M
M achine-tool operators, production,
cla ss C »,___ ___________ !■ _______________
D rill-p ress operators, sin g le- or
m ultiple-spindle, c la ss C
Grinding-machine operators, class C
M illing-m achine operators, class C .

Boston

Hartford

Number
of
workers
98
61

Number

Average
hourly
earnings
$ 1 .9 2
1.96

New York
Average
hourly
earnings
$2 .4 1
2.41
2. 37

of
w orkers
199
943
506
223
171
30

Number
of
workers
65
496
15
68

2.37
2.44
2. 17

74

Average
hourly
earning 8
$ 1 .8 9
1.72
2. 57
2.14

Philadelphia
Number
Average
of
hourly
workers
earnings
228
$2. 17
346
2 . 22

1.74

201

North Central

A ssem b lers, cla ss B ..........................
A ssem b lers, cla ss C
■—
Inspectors, cla ss **
Inspectors, cla ss C —..................... .................
M achine-tool op erators, production,
cla ss C* _ _ _________________________
*
D rill-p ress operators, sin g le- or
m ultiple-spindle, cla ss C ......................
Grinding-machine operators, class C,
M illing-m achine operators, class C •

Chicago
Number
Average
of
hourly
workers
earnings
106
$ 2 .6 0
2,180
1.89
46
2.46
166
2.09
488
204
37
47

2.10
2. 11
2. 16
2 .2 6

Cleveland
Number
Average
of
hourly
workers
earnings

Detroit

86
179

$2*43
2. 55

Number
of
workers
16
680
85
458

127
7
30
“

2. 33
1.98
2. 30
•

22 4
69
67
68

_

Average
hourly
earnings
$2. 95
2.74
2.99
2.70
2. 76
2.68
2. 74
2.8 3

St. Louis
Number
Average
of
hourly
earnings
workers
$2. 52
9
604
2.60
.
287
2.40
.

2. 44

West
Los A ngelesLong Beach
Number Average
of
hourly
workers
327
$2.16
1,497
1.90
94
2. 52
74
2. 27

.

„

-

-

.

_
_

-

-

1 Excludes premium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
1
The separate area releases also include average hourly earnings for women assem blers, class A in New York ($2.26); assem blers, class C in Newark and Jersey City ($2.27),
Dallas ($ l. 48)* and M inneapolis-St. Paul ($2); janitors in Chicago ($2.02); m achine-tool operators, production, cla ss A in Newark and Jersey City ($2.5 6), New York ($2.50), and Chicago
($3. 14); m achine-tool operators, production, class B in Chicago ($2.44) and Detroit ($3.03); and m achine-tool operators, production, class C in W orcester ($ 1 .9 4 ) and Baltimore ($2.48).
* Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication criteria.




Table 3. Occupational Averages: By Method of Wage Payment

1
0

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings1 of men in selected occupations in machinery manufacturing, 12 selected a r e a s,2 April—
June 1965)

Occupation

A ssem b lers, class A:
Tim eworkers-------------------------------------------------------Incentive w orkers------------------------------------------------A ssem b lers, class B:
rPim
f t _________________
- _ - .-__
A ssem b lers, class C:
Incentive w orkers— ----------- ------------- —----------------M achine-tool operators, production, class A:
Incentive w orkers------------------------------------------------M achine-tool operators, production, class B:
Tirnw ftrV*rfi
___________
M achine-tool operators, production, class C:
Timewo rke rw ,
............ . . .. . . _______ ^___

Boston
Number Average
hourly
of
workers earninss
$2.75
3.40
2.44
2. 77

378
156
462
103

-

-

Hartford
Number Average
hourly
of
workers earninss

Northeast
Newark and
New York
Jersey City
Number Average Number Average
hourly
hourly
of
of
workers earninss w orkers earninss

166
133
134
515
212

$2.86
2.95
2. 60
2.52
2. 30

670
128
664
296
233

$3. 08
3.27
2. 54
3.07
2. 37

773
115
609
26
643
347

$3.03
3.42
2.46
3.02
1.85
2. 34

821
62
497
35
556
16

$2.85
3.35
2. 45
2.61
1.92
2.70

“

~

97
74
59
40

$2 .53
2.71
2. 21
2.53

2. 74
3. 24

812
658

2.96
3. 27

1,435
250

3.03
3. 06

2,318
238

3.00
3. 38

2,366

2.92

619
186

2. 74
3. 25

583
93

2.44
2.83

895
1,097

2. 60
2.92

1,688
141

2.95
2. 94

1,512

2. 58

1, 361
615

2.63
3.42

368
233

2. 47
2.83

768
624

2. 57
2.91

354
107

2. 28
2. 74

997
_

2.05
_

543
_

2._ 20

84
20

2. 18
2.50

-

-

_

_

North Central

Baltimore
Number Average
of
hourly
workers earninss
A ssem blers, class B:
Inffntiwa u/nrVors..................... _
. .
A ssem blers, cla ss C:
Tim fwnTkt,>f
In^fnt'VA n/nrkerfl
M achine-tool operators, production, class A:
Inrontiy* i^nrir»r«.. ........
M achine-tool operators, production, class B:
Incentive workers----- ------------------------------------------M achine-tool operators, production, cla ss C:
...
Incentive w orkers-------------------------------------------------

W orcester
Number Average
of
hourly
workers earninss

1, 182
398

South

A ssem blers, class A:

Philadelphia
Number Average
hourly
of
workers earninss

58
132
112

_
694
220
287

Chicago
Number Average
of
hourly
workers earninss

Cleveland
Number Average
of
hourly
workers earninss

Milwaukee
Number Average
of
hourly
workers earninss

St. Louis
Number Average
hourly
of
workers earnings
_

West
Los A ngelesLong Beach
Number Average
hourly
of
workers earninss

2,854
598
2,156
556
957
179

$3. 10
3. 22
2.69
3.07
2. 25
3.01

787
307
624
376
192
118

$3 .03
3.79
2.73
3.50
2.44
2.74

485
281
834
521
208

$3.07
3.64
2. 76
3.28
2. 38

272

2. 89
3.38

6,414
2,165

3. 18
3.40

3,653
1,006

3. 05
3.64

1,255
1,205

3. 10
3.46

336
429

3. 34
3.83

4,604
247

$3. 19
3.47

-

2,684
1,366

2.74
3. 24

1,342
623

2.77
3.47

1,075
648

2.81
3. 18

224
263

2. 79
3. 14

1,661
32

2. 58
2. 92

2. 22

1,737
207

2. 23
2.68

656
14

2.47
3. 19

281
134

2.34
2.83

147
51

2. 39
3. 00

-

$2.91
3.47
2. 58
_

_

_

_
$2. 57

_

_
_
_
_

„

-

1 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 The separate area relea ses also include average hourly earnings for tim e-rated m achine-tool operators, production, cla sses A and B in Buffalo ($2.89 and $ 2.71, respectively) and
in Pittsburgh ($3.0 6 and $2.76); incentive workers in the class B category in Buffalo ($2.99); and for additional occupations in som e areas.
NOTE: D ashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication criteria.




Table 4. Occupational Averages: Special Dies and Tools and Machine-Tool Accessories
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of men in selected occupations in establishm ents prim arily manufacturing special dies and tools
and m achine-tool a ccessories, 9 selected areas, April—
June 1965)

Occupation 2

E lectricians, m aintenance___ __ __ ---- ----Inspectors, c la ss A _________ ____
Inspectors, c la ss B __________________________
Janitors, porters, and c le a n e r s_____________
Laborers, m aterial handling_________________
M achine-tool operators, production,
cla ss A 5
Engine-lathe operators, c la ss A _______ ___
Grinding-machine operators, class A _____
M illing-m achine operators, class A
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw m achine), class A
M achine-tool operators, production,
c la ss B 5
_
__
Engine-lathe operators, class B
Grinding-machine operators, class B _____
M illing-m achine operators, class B .
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
hand screw m achine), class B
M achine-tool operators, production,
cla ss C 5 --------.. . .
Grinding-machine operators, class C -------M illing-m achine operators, class C ______
M achine-tool operators, toolroom _
Tool and die m akers (jobbing)_________ ______
Tool and die m akers (other than jobbing)------W elders, hand, cla ss A . __
See footnotes at end of table,




Chicago
M achine-tool
Special dies
a c c e sso r ie s4
and tools 3
Number
Average
Average
Number
of
hourly
of
hourly
earnings
workers
earning 8
workers

Cleveland
Special dies
and tools 3
Number
Average
of
hourly
earnings
workers
$3. 18
3. 37
2.09
2. 34

6
77
40

$3. 57
1.95
2. 39

10
40
27
77
26

$3. 12
3.02
2. 76
2.18
2.41

8
14
62
10

"
-

“
-

500
66
258
86
31

3.28
3. 25
3.31
3.14
3. 04

”
-

-

2.94
2.69
"
-

438
31
166
77
68

2.84
2.96
2.85
2.91
2.80

215
16
“
-

2.71
2.77
“
"

58
809
1,701
14

2.13
3. 70
3. 99
3. 29

236
80
46
55
41
9

2.23
2. 17
2. 26
3. 15
3. 73
3.55

14
522
842
14

2.43
3. 14
3. 35
3. 14

161
63

-

-

“
-

Detroit
Special dies
and tools 3
Number
Average
of
hourly
earnings
workers
33
18
375
178

$ 3 .94
4.03
2.57
2.87

Machine -tool
a ccesso ries4
Number
Average
of
hourly
workers
earnings
82
60
155
16

$3. 34
3. 14
2.43
2.92

■

1,845
168
1,095
310
72

3. 39
3.42
3. 39
3.45
2.98

262
34
“

3. 13
3.21
-

1, 123
35
661
317
50

3.04
3.00
2.90
2.98
2.71

202
4, 340
4,580
25

2.58
3,86
3.95
3.73

434
264
109
92
41
14

2.55
2.51
2.59
3.72
3.68
3.33

-

“

Table 4. Occupational Averages: Special Dies and Tools and Machine-Tool Accessories— Continued
(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 of men in selected occupations in establishm ents prim arily manufacturing special dies and tools
and m achine-tool accessories, 9 selected areas, April-June 1965)

Occupation*

E lectrician s, maintenance —................................. —
Tn>p«rtor«r rl*«a A .......
.
Tncjutrl'nra j rla — B
a
Janitors, porters, and c le a n e r s_________......
Laborers, m aterial handling
M achine-tool operators, production.
claa* A *
_________ _
_____________
fT.ngin—
-lafrh—nparatnrar rlaaa A . . . . . .
Grinding-machine operators, cla ss A .___
M illing-m achine operators, c la ss A .........
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
M achine-tool operators, production,
Grinding-machine operators, c la ss B ..........
fiilling.Tnarhin* np»ratnr«J clata B
Turret-lathe operators, hand (including
h^nd arrauf m achine), cla ss B ... __
M achine-tool operators, production,
c i?. . r *
________ _______
Grinding-machine operators, c la ss C .......
M illing-m achine operators, c la ss C ..............
np*n»nM ) fnnlrnntm
Tool and die m akers (jobbing) ___________
Tool and die m akers (other than jobbing)_____
W elders, hand, c la ss A _________ — __________

Newark and
Los A ngelesMilwaukee
Jersey City
Long Beach
4
*
Special dies and to o ls9 and m achine-tool a c c e sso r ie s1*
Number Average Number Average Number Average
Average
hourly
of
of
hourly
hourly
of
hourly
earnings workers earnings w orkers earnings workers earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

11
9
13

*2.95
2.60
1.81
.

6
60
45
21
10

$3 .00
2.83
2.51
1.98
2.19

114
.
97

85
59

2.87
.
2.93
•

538
91
281
35
9

3.17
3.06
3.21
3.04
2. 97

357
63
186
16
.

3.26
3.24
3. 36
3. 22
-

115
15

2. 52
2.45

534
40
329
92
21

2. 58
2. 46
2.61
2.50
2.89

170
_
48
26
42

82
19
*

1.95
2.16
’
_
3. 20
•
"

175
32
137
278
42
"

2.14
•
2.23
2. 77
3.07
3.01
*

.
*
762
735
48
72

236
•
*

New York

Hartford

Boston

-

$ 3. 37
.
1.89
-

7
9
-

$3.69
2.04
-

•
-

-

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

6
24
70
21

$3 .0 0
3.06
1.67
1.71

.
25
29

.
$1 .77
1. 70

140
8
77

3. 19
3.03
3. 14

192
-

3. 11
-

-

-

8

3.25

-

2. 55
.
2. 70
2. 65
2.60

71
13
25

2.71
2. 69
2.71

170
.
74

2. 64
2.61

317
16
-

2. 54
2.73
-

•
"
3.41
3.63
3.40
3. 25

49
36
•
234
334
-

2. 27
2. 29
"
3.41
3.66
-

179
23
•
501
638
-

2.23
2. 22
“
2.98
3. 25
-

125
”
150
384
-

1.98
-

-

-

-

2.92
3. 38
-

1 Excludes premium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
.
* The separate area relea ses also include average hourly earnings for the following occupations in special dies and tools plants and/or m achine-tool accessories plants m 1 or 2 areas:
A ssem blers, c la sses A, B, and C; inspectors, class C; drill-press operators, radial, class B; d rill-p ress operators, sin g le -o r m ultiple-spindle, classes B and C; engine-lathe operators,
class Ci screw -m achine operators, autom atic, classes A, B, and C; turret-lathe operators, hand (including hand screw machine), class C; m achinists, production; and w elders, hand, class B.
9 Includes die sets and jigs and fixtures.
4 Includes m easuring devices.
* Includes data for operators of other machine tools in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE: D ashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication criteria.




Table 5. Earnings Distribution: Tool and Die Makers (Other Than Jobbing)
(Percent distribution of men by straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 in machinery manufacturing, 21 selected areas, April-June 1965)
South

Northeast
Average hourly earnings?

$2. 40 and under $2. 50 -------------$ 2. 50 and under $ 2. 60 — —-----$2. 60 and under $2. 7 0 -------------$2. 70 and under $2. 80 -------------$ 2 .80 and under $ 2 .90 -------------$2 .90 and under $ 3 .0 0 -------------$ 3.00 and under $ 3 .1 0 -------------$3 .10 and under $3. 2 0 -------------$3. 20 and under $3. 3 0 -------------$3. 30 and under $3. 4 0 -------------$ 3. 40 and under $ 3. 50 -------------$3. 50 and under $3. 6 0 ----- -------$3. 60 and under $3. 70 -------------$ 3. 70 and under $ 3. 8 0 ------ ----- $ 3. 80 and under $ 3.90 -------------$3 .90 and under $4 .00 ------------$4 .00 and under $ 4 .1 0 ------------$4 .10 and o v e r --------------------------T o ta l_____________________
Number of workers —-----— ----- —
Average hourly earnings1-----------

West

San
L08
Newark
Fran­
M il­ Minne­ St.
leve­
and New Phila­
Boston Buffalo Hart­ Jersey York delphia P itts­ W orces­ B alti­ Dallas Hous­ Chi­ Cland Detroit waukee apolis— Louis Denver A ngeles- Port­ cisco—
ton cago
Long land Oak­
burgh ter m ore
ford
St. Paul
Beach
City
land
_
_
_
1.2
0.9
.4
0. 3
2.8 11.7 4.0
5 .4
3.8
7 .4
6.4
1.0
8.3
5.2
17.6 23.4 24. 3 10.2
13.9 23.4 10.2 20.7
5 .4
7 .4
2.6
6.0
13.0 24.7 15.6 7.0
3. 3 10.2
2.8
6.5
_
2.8
5.0 11.5
20.4 2.6
.6
2. 2
_
4. 1
1.9
.
17.3 23.6
.2
.
.9
_
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
77 481 314
108
$3. 25 $3. 15 $3.26 $3. 41

_
1.1
2.6
4 .4
6.9
5.5
8 .4
25.2
3.6
22.3
10.9
5.8
2.2
1.1
100.0
274
$3. 37

_
"
2.1
4.1
8.2
6.9
10.0
3.4
12.4
14.8
9. 3

.7

2.1
17.2
.3
1.0
7.6
100.0
291
$3.43

■
_
2.5
40.7
15.3 23.5
3.7
14.8
1.2
34.7
6.2
6.9
30.6 7 .4
12.5
_
_
100.0 100.0
72
81
$3. 31 $3.01

_ 2 8.0
.
_
_
_
0.5
6. 5
1.7 11. 3
~
■
"
"
~
“
_
6.5
3 .4
0 .5
1.6
5.1
1.1
0. 3 1.1
24. 2
1.6
5. 3 3.7
4 .5
3.2
6.7
15.3
3.5
2.6 12. 3 2.6
10.2 29.0
“ 19.3
2 .4 16.1
3.5
.5
2.2
3.0
18.6 4 .8
81.6
8. 2 19.5
11.7 27.6
22.0
4.1
7.8
9 .6 17. 2
1.6
6.1 11.1
23.7
6.5
7.1
5.8
8.9 29.2
3.6
1.2 29.9 10.0
“ 10.7
_
_
_
_ 34.2 10.8 10.9 17.5
7.5
1.7
3.2
6.7 54.7
8 .2
3.6
3.8
1.1
5.9
2.1
5.8
1.7
2.6
1.4
6.9
1.9
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
114 755 195 578 291
279
62
59
$3. 23 $2 .94 $3.33 $3.61 $3.49 $3.72 $3. 69 $3 .3 4

1 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes 1. 6 percent at $2. 20 and under $2.30; and 1. 6 percent at $2. 30 and under $2. 40.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sum s of individual item s may not equal 100,




North Central

■
•
23.3
2.3
2.8 14.0
.5 39.5
11.6
4. 1 9 .3
2. 3
8 .8
“
_
43. 3
34. 1
1.4
.9
1.8
100.0 100.0
43
217
$3.76 $3. 19

.
_
“
"
■
0. 3
2.6
2.6
"
_
4.1
11.6
35.8
29.9
2.8
_
10. 3
66. 7 36.7
- 33. 3 8. 3
- 51.7
3.3
100.0 100.0 100.0
6 120
388
$3.46 $3. 87 $3.97

Table 6. Earnings Distribution: Machine-Tool Operators, Production, Class A

0

(Percent distribution of men by straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 in m achinery manufacturing, 21 selected areas, April—June 1965)
Average hourly earnings 1

$2. 30 and under $ 2 .4 0 —— — —
$2. 50 and under
$2. 60 and under
$2. 70 and under
$2. 90 and under
$3. 00 and under

$2. 60—— —
$2. 70——
$2. 80— —
$3. 00— —
$3. 10-------------

$ 3. 30 and under $ 3. 40—---------$3. 60 and under
$3. 70 and under
$3. 80 and under
$3. 90 and under
$4. 00 and under
$4. 20 and under

$3. 70———
$3. 80------ ----$3. 90———
$4. 00———
$ 4 .1 0 ———
$4. 30———

T o ta l-----------------------------Average hourly earnings 1 —-----

Northeast
South
North Central
West
ban
Newark
Los
Fran­
and New Phila­
Chi­
Mil­ Minne­ St.
Boston Buffalo Hart­ Jersey York delphia Pitts­ Worces­ Balti­ Dallas Hous­ cago Cleve­ Detroit waukee apolis— Louis Denver Angeles- Port­ cisco—
ford
burgh ter more
ton
Long
land Oak­
land
St. Paul
City
Beach
land
0. 2 *1.2
0. 1
.
.4
.7
.5
.3
1. 1 2.0
1.7
.6
.3
1.9
1.5
7.2
2.0
1.1
10. 6 2.6
3. 7 3.4
11.0
7. 1 3.9
6.5
18. 0 8.7
7.9 12.5
17. 2 6.1
8.2
9.3
8.2 19.0
6. 7 6.2
5.0 14.3 21.4 14.1
4. 2 13.0 11.2 8.6
9.5
5.3 18.2
8.2
2. 2 2.4
9.7 21.2
1.2
2.2
1.3
3.9
1.5
.5
2.4
1.7
.2
2.0
.8
.9
.8
1.8
.1
1.7
.7
.4
.1
1.2
.4
.1
.4
_
_
.4
.2
.1
.3
.7
.6
1.0
1.2
.9
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
1,580
820 1,470 1,685
$ 2 .87 $2. 97 $3.10 $3.04

0.4
.4
1. 1
1.2
2.0
2.7
6.0
11.4
10.8
24.0
14.7
8.7
6.8
4.7
3.0
1.4
.3
.2
.1
.1
.
100.0
2,556
$3.04

_
.
.
1.1
.
1.0
1.9 0.2
5.4
.6
5.2
1.2
8.8
6.0
15.0 12.7
28.4 13. 7
10.2 15.8
3.5 11.4
4.3
9.9
5.3
5.0
3.0
2.9
1.5 9.0
1.4 3.8
1.2
1.6
4. 1
.9
.3
1.4
.7
.7
.4
.1
.
.2
.3
100.0 100.0
2,718 1,903
$2.98 $3.17

1.5
1.5
3. 1
1.9
3.2
7. 6
8.4
20.0
13.4
12.3
8. 1
6.8
3. 1
2.9
1. 1
1.0
.7
.4
.6
.6
.2
.7
.2
.5
100.0
805
$2.86

0.3
_
_
.
.
.
0.5
_
_
6. 1
0. 1
(3)
_
.l
9.7
.1
0.8
(3)
8.2
1.0
. 1 0.3
1. 1 0.2
2.0 13.5
1.0
.4
.3
.3
6.8 16.4 3.6
1.2
1.0
.8
12.4 13.5
3.3
6. 1 3.0
2.8
25.8 13.0 25.9
7.7 15.5
3.0
7.5 10.0 22.2
9.7 14.8
2.4
26.4
7. 1 26.6
9.3 19.5
3.9
4.2
7.5 10.5
8.8
6.8
.9
1.2
.6
7.2
9.2 11.2 11.0
.
.6
.3 15.3
9.0
5.9
.5
. 1 12.0
3. 7 7.8
_
. 1 10.4
3.2 14.4
.9
_
1.2
2.3 10.4
. 1 1.9
2.1
.1
.8
2.0 10.4
.
2.1
. 1 1.3
2. 1 4. 2
1.2
1.5
5.4
1. 1
_
_
2.2
2.2
.6
1.6
.
1.6
1.4
.4
.8
_
.
1.0
.8
1.4
.7
.5
1. 1 3.3
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
914 660 1,503 8,579 4,659 5,469
$3.01 $2.66 $2.96 $3.23 $3. 18 $3.48

1 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes 0. 7 percent under $2.
2 L ess than 0.0 5 percent.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sum s of individual item s may not equal 100.




0. 1
_
_
_
0.1
_
_
_
.1
. 1 0.3
(3)
0. 1
.3
.3
1. 2
3.5
1.3
.8
.9
5.2
.7
1.6 4. 3
3. 1
.8 16.8
10.9
7.2
22.8
1.3 11. 6
11.2
16. 1
.9 13. 7
23.3
9.3
4.4
6. 7
7.2
10. 7
9.5
3.9
4.5
8.4
8.4
5.5
2.3
11.8
7.8
2. 7
.5 10.5
3. 7
12. 6
.6 15.3
1.5
9.8
2.5
3.6
3.3
2.4
2. 7
. 2 11.6
2.9
_
2.4
7.3
1.5
1.2
6. 1 2. 7
_
.8
2.7
3. 7
.
2.4
2.4
.7
_
.6
2.0
4.0
1.7
8.4
2. 1
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
2,460 1,840
765 328
$3.28 $2. 95 $3. 61 $3. 18

_
_
_
_
_
0. 1
_
.5
_
1.0
_
.9
6.2
0.4
8. 7
.6
12.0
.6
12. 6 2. 6
_
31.7
8. 7 81.3
7.5 14.4
_
6.3
_
.8
_
1.2
_
.2
.4
_
.2
.1
_
.4
.2
100.0 100.0
4,851
686
$3.20 $3.33

„
_
_
.
_
_
_
«.
_
_
16.2
65.7
8.5
3.5
5.0
.1
1.0
_
_
100.0
1,348
$3. 58

)

Tabic 7. Earnings Distribution: Machine-Tool Operators, Production, Class B
(Percent distribution of men by straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 in machinery manufacturing, 21 selected areas, April—
June 1965)
Average hourly earnings1

South
Northeast
North Central
West
Newark
Los
and
Phila­ P itts­
Chi­ leve­
Mil­ Minne­ St.
ngelesBoston Buffalo Hart­ Jersey New delphia burgh W orces­ Balti­ Dallas Hous­ cago Cland Detroit waukee apolis— Louis Denver A Long Port­
ford
York
ter m ore
ton
land
St. Paul
City
Beach

Under $ 1 .7 0 —
----- ----0.4
0.5
$ 1 .7 0 and under $ 1. 8 0 -----------0.3
.1
.6
.4
$ 1.80 and under $ 1. 90 .5
$ 1. 90 and under $ 2. 00 . — —
2.2
8 .4
1.8
$2. 00 and under $ 2. 1 0 -----------$ 2. 10 and under $2. 20 _ __
5.0
2. 1
2.1
1.5
3. 1
$ 2. 20 and under $ 2. 30 - - —
10.8
.6
4 .2
$ 2. 30 and under $ 2.40
11. 1
$ 2. 40 and under $ 2. 50 - 13.8
1.0 8.4
1.5.5 17.5 9 .0
$ 2. 50 and under $ 2. 6 0 -----------$ 2. 60 and under $ 2. 70 . —
9 .6 10.7 9.4
$ 2.70 and under $ 2. 8 0 -----------8.6 19.6 8.3
6.4 16.7 11.8
$ 2. 80 and under $ 2. 9 0 -----------1.2 17.5 9 .0
$2. 90 and under $3. 00
1.3 6 .0 14.4
$ 3. 00 and under $ 3. 1 0 ---------—
$ 3. 10 and under $ 3. 2 0 -----------1.3
3.6 9.3
1.6
1.0
3.8
$ 3. 20 and under $ 3. 3 0 ________
$ 3. 30 and under $ 3 .4 0 ---------—
.2
2.6
.6
.4
$ 3.40 and under $ 3. 5 0 -----------.8
.3
_
.6
$ 3. 50 and under $ 3. 60
.6
.3
$ 3. 60 and under $ 3. 7 0 ---------—
.1
$ 3. 70 and under $ 3. 80
.3
$ 3. 80 and under $ 3. 9 0 ---------- —
$ 3.90 and under $4. 00 —
.2
.2
•1
_
.2
$4. 00 and over —
.3
Total
,__,T
1.,,
100.0 100.0 100.0
676 616 1,992
Number of workers
A verage hourly earnings1
— — $2 .50 $2.74 $2 .78

0.9
1.9
.8
1.0
_
.8
1.2
.7
2 .4
.2
6.5
3.9
6 .7
5.9
6 .0
3.8
18.7 12.3
6 .8 11.7
5 .8 31.5
9 .6 12.9
5.8
1.8
10.5
1.7
2. 3
.8
1.0
1.2
1. 1 2.7
1.4
1.9
1.0
.2
2.6
1.7
1.7
1.7
1. 1
.
5.7
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
1,829 1,587 1,976 658
$2.95 $2.61 $2. 88 $2 .83
0.3
1. 1
1.0
.7
1.9
4. 1
6.9
3.2
7.5
7. 1
9. 1
22.4
16.9
16.0
1.4
.3
.1
.1
_

0.5
1. 1
.8
3.2
3. 1
5.5
9.4
3.5
17.3
11.9
10.7
14.7
9.1
3.5
5.4
.2
•
.1
.1
.
-

0.3
.
.
0. 3 2.4
.
.
1.7
2.7
.8
. 3 14.4
1.7
“
_
_
_
3.3
2.8 18.0
0.1
4 .2
2. 1 18.6
.5
.3
0.3
1.5 13.8
3.2
1.4
1.7
0.2
0. 1
.9
13.3
3. 1 16.5
5 .2
4 .7
1.2
3.7
1.9
13.3
8.6
9.0
8 .0
7. 1 2.4
2.9 4 .6
15.5 17. 1 3.6
6 .4
9 .3
8 .2
3. 1 8. 1
.
13.0 29.7
19.6 11.5 17.6
4 .2 10.9
8.5
7. 3
.6 12.4 11.1 10.6
7.5 13.8
6 .0 18.0
18.8 11.9 12.5
6.3 12.9
4 .3
3.4
18.4 8.6 15.3 20.7
8.5
_
3.0
.6
9 .4
2 .0
5 .0 15.7
8 .0
2.4
2.8
6.5
1.2
3.8 10.4 7. 3
.3
5.5
1.3
.7
3.0
9. 1 4 .4
1.5
.3
.7
3. 1 2.2
8.7
7. 1
1.5
. 2 3.3
2.6
4.8
4 .2
.8
.6
.2
1.5
1.0
1.9
2.9
.
.
.3
.4
2.5
.9
.9
2. 1
.
.
.6
.7
3. 1
.3
.9
.9
.
.
.
.3
2.2
1.1
.8
.3
1.2
1.3
.3
_
_
_
.3
2.8
4 .8
.8
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
601
327
333 591 4, 050 1,965 5, 206 1,723
$2.61 $2. 66 $2. 16 $2.71 $2.91 $ 2 .99 $2.97 $2 .95

Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, sums of individual item s may not equal 100.




.
0.8
.8
2.7
3.6
9 .9
17. 1
25.8
21.9
10.8
3.5
1.7
.4
.6
.3
.2
_
.
.
.
_

.
.
.
0.9
_
1.7
.
4. 3
2.3
3.5
7. 0
2.9
4.1 14.8
10.9 12.2
12.7 23.5
20.7 12.2
6.6
7 .0
7 .2
6. 1
3.3
.9
1.7
3.9
2.9
.9
3.5
.9
7 .0
.9
2.1
1.7
.
2. 1
.
.6
.
1.2
.2
_
6 .0
100.0 100.0 100.0
1,154 487
115
$2 .64 $2 .97 $2.61

.
.
.
2.0
_
4.5
.
9.2
.
9.0
.
7. 1
3. 1
_
10.5
5.8
3.9
18.4 5.9
16.2 3.9
8.2 32.4
1.5 24.5
.6 29.4
.
3.7
_
.i
.1
.
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_

San
Fran­
cisco—
Oak­
land
.
_
_
.
.
_
-

_

.
1.5
.
21. 3
16.9
48.5
9.7
2. 1
_
_
_
_
.

100.0 100.0 100.0
1,693
102 390
$2. 58 $2.99 $3.07

Table 8. Earnings Distribution: Machine-Tool Operators, Production, Class C

0
0

(P ercen t distribu tion of men by straigh t-tim e hourly earn in gs 1 in m ach in ery m an ufacturin g, 21 se le c te d a r e a s , A pril— n e 1965)
Ju

Average hourly earnings1

South
Northeast
North Central
West
Newark
Los
Chi­ leve­
Mil­ Minne­ St.
and
New Phila­
ort­
Boston Buffalo Hart­ Jersey York delphia P itts­ W orces­ B alti­ Dallas Hous­ cago Cland Detroit waukee apolis— Louis Denver A ngeles- Pland
ton
burgh ter more
ford
Long
St. Paul
City
Beach

$ 1. 30 and under $ 1. 4 0 -----------$ 1.40 and under $ 1. 50
_
_
_
$ 1. 50 and under $ 1. 6 0 ---- ---- —
5. 0
$ 1. 60 and under $ 1. 70 $ 1. 70 and under $1. 8 0 ________
13. 1
1.2
$ 1.80 and under $ 1 .9 0 -----------14.4
1.9
4 .2
$ 1. 90 and under $ 2. 00
6 .3
_
3.2
$2. 00 and under $2. 10 . _
20.6
2.6
1.7
$ 2 .1 0 and under $2. 20
9.7
20.3
$ 2. 20 and under $ 2. 3 0 -----------5.3
6.7
6 .6 10.5 4.5
$ 2. 30 and under $ 2 .4 0 -----------$ 2.40 and under $ 2. 50 1.6
1.9
3.9
$2. 50 and under $ 2. 6 0 -----------1. 3 15.8
1.7
2.0
$2. 60 and under $ 2. 70 . .
. 3 2.6
17.1 21.7
$ 2 .7 0 and under $2. 80 ---26.3 29.0
$ 2 .8 0 and under $2. 9 0 -----------14.5 4 .4
$ 2. 90 and under $ 3. 00 _ _ ---$ 3. 00 and under $ 3. 10 — —-----1.3
3.3
2.4
$ 3. 10 and under $ 3. 2 0 -----------2.5
$3. 20 and under $3. 3 0 ---- ---- —
2.8
$ 3. 30 and under $ 3.40
.3
2.1
$ 3.40 and under $ 3. 5 0 ----- ------_
3.2
.3
$ 3. 50 and ov er------------------ —---T o t a l ....................
- 100.0 100.0 100.0
Number of w orkers-----------------320
76 1,392
Average hourly earnings1---------- $ 2.03 $2 .68 $2.73

0.9
.3
_
_
1.4 0.4
0.4 7. 1 1.9
4 .3 13.6 4 .8
6. 1 14.6 5 .8
2.8 12.2 2.6
_
12.6 15.3 10.8
5.4
3.6 6. 1
9.5
6.2 10.6 5.4
10.2 5.2 9.7
2.7
5.2
6.8 11.6 22.3
8.0
6 .3 16.8 6 .2
15.2 2.9 7 .0
9.8
.4 6.5 17.0
5.2
2.8
1.5 17.9
6 .9
4 .8
.3
.6
.i
1. 1 16.1
.7
1.7
.6
2.7
.4
.1
.1
.5
.2
.2
.6
“
_
_
.i
.5
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
112
461 1,081 805
$ 2. 39 $2.04 $2. 34 $2.69

1 E x clu d es p rem iu m p ay fo r o v ertim e and fo r work

on w eekends, h olid ay s, and late sh ifts.

NOTE? B e c a u se of rounding, su m s o f individual item s m ay not equal 100.




10.3
8.3
“
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
3.8
12.2
0.5
5.8
9.6
1.5
4.8
2.5
21.8
1.4
3.8
9.9
15.4
1.4
6 .3
11. 1
2.9 10.5
3.9
_ 30.8
7.7 14.9 7 .0
3.3
7.7 22.3
5.8
7.7
11.6
6 .2 14.9 4 .8
3.4 20.0
7.7
15.0
2.0
7.7
27.9 21.7
3.2 14.9
19.2 20.4
9.3
5 .4
2 .4
8.5
25.6 17.7 15.4
15.4 16.0
10.4 10.3
8 .2
2 .2 14.2
11.6 20.2
7.7
22.0
8 .6 12.6
8.8
9 .0 13. 1 18. 1
4 .8 16.2
_ 14.9 8 .0 19.9 6 .2
6.7
3. 1
5.5
1.9 21.7 15.4
1.0
2 .2
2. 1 7.6 29.9
8.8
1.7
10.6
7. 1 7.7
_
2. 1 6. 1 1.5
1.0
.3
6.3
1.4
3.0
3.9
_ 15.4
.
1.0
.3
3.3
1.4
2.7 13.3
5.8
1.0
.4
5. 1 11.6
1.3
2.7
.5
_
_
_
_
_
.i
.6
1.2
3.4
.8
1.2
.4
.3
1.1
. 1 11.4
2.2
1.0
1.0
.4
.4
1.0
7.2
5 .5
.5
.4
.4
.5
1.9
.8
.2
.1
.5
2.0
_
_
_
.
_
.2
.1
7 .6
2.9
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
104 318
156 241 1,944 670 1,199 415
207
198
13
$2. 24 $2.25 $1 .76 $2. 35 $2.28 $ 2.48 $2 .69 $ 2 .50 $2. 20 $ 2. 55 $2. 36

“
_
_
0.7
6 .2
2. 1
7. 3
_
9.6
7. 1
.
7.5
.
21.9
19.6
_
15. 1
2.5
4 .4
.2 42.2
.
15.6
.2 37.8
_
.
.
“

San
Fran­
cisco—
Oak­
land
.
_
.
_
14. 9
_
28. 1
57. 0
_
_

100.0 100.0 100.0
438
45 342
$2. 26 $2 .84 $2.75

Table 9. Earnings Distribution: Assemblers, Class B
(Percent distribution of men by straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 in machinery manufacturing, 20 selected areas, April—
June 1965)
A verage hourly earnings 1
$ 1.50
$ 1. 60
$ 1. 70
$ 1.90

and under
and under
and under
and under

$ 1. 60----- ---- —
$ 1. 70-----------$ 1.8 0-----------$ 2 .0 0 .......... ......

$ 2 .10 and under $2. 20—— ——
$ 2. 20 and under $ 2. 30-------------

$3. 20 and under $3. 30—— —
$3. 30 and under $ 3 .4 0 — —
$ 3 .5 0 and under $3. 60— —
$ 3. 70 and under $ 3 .8 0— ——
$ 3. 80 and under $ 3 .9 0———
$3. 90 and under $ 4 .0 0 ------ ----$ 4. 00 and over---------- -------------Total
- Number of w orkers— — ---------A verage hourly earnings 1 —

Northeast
Newark
and New Phila­
Boston Buffalo Hart­ Jersey York delphia P itts­ W orces­
ford
burgh ter
City
_
0 .8
3.1
.
3.4
3.1
_
.
.
0 .4
0.2
2 .2
0.2
1.9
.
.
.
.
.7
3.3
1.9
2.2
.4
.4
_
_
.2
4.1
1.0
5.8
8 .8
•
1.5
2.2
10.2
6.0
3.9
9 .9
•
.
14.6
5.2
9 .6
7.6
7.8
1.1
.
4 .6
9.0
5.5
1.2
6.1
5.0
8.8
34.2
2. 1
10.5
25. 1 8.3
17.6 11.3 13.3
3.4
29.2
7.7
16.0
5 .0
8 .8
2.2 17.0
6.5
8.8 12.4
3.3
8.3
3.4 13.2
19.9
7.3 12.4
9.4 15.9 11.7
14.0
9.1
8.9
3.2 37.3
4 .0
8 .2
8.6
2.0 24.2 17.8
.7 18.9
7.8 10.9
.4 10.3
7.0
2.9
8.5
.4
1.2
.6 13.2
.6
4 .6
2.9
.
.4
.6
.2
10.0
1.1
.9
.
.
.2
2.4
1.7
.2
.6
.6
.
7.3
.3
.8
1.1
1.2
.9
.2 16. 1
.5
.3
.2
.6
_
_
.3
.3
.8
.6
.6
.
.
.4
.4
.
.
.
.
•
.2
.
.
•
.
.
.
.2
9. 1
.4
1.2
.
.
.7
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
565 169
960 635 532 242
171
649
$2. 50 $2. 77 $2. 53 $2. 70 $2 .48 $ 2 .46 $3.03 $2.61

South
B alti­ Dallas Hous­
ton
more
.
.
1.4
2.1
2 .8
3.5
1.4
6 .2
18.1
31.2
20.8
6.9
.7
.7
1.4
1.4
.
-

_




*1.5
4 .0
12.9
7.0
6.5
8.5
8.5
11.4
20.4
12.9
5.0
.
.
1.5
_
.
-

.7
.7
.
.
100.0 100.0
144 201
$2. 63 $2.13

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
* Includes 0.5 percent at $1.40 and under $1.50.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual item s m ay not equal 100.

North Central

_
5.2
.
3 .6
2. 1
8.3
20.2
5.2
18.7
6.2
16.1
14.0
.5
.
-

_

-

.
.
100.0
193
$2 .48

MinneChi­ C leve­
M il­ a p
cago land Detroit waukee St. olisPaul
_
_
.
.
.
.
..
_
.
.
_
.
1.1
.9
_
_
_
1.7
.
.
4 .7
.
.
5.8
.
5 .2
0 .7
0 .4
7.3
1.3
6.1
6.9
5. 1 2.0
2.2
9 .4
.
8. 7 20. 1
11.7
14.5 32.9
9 .5
6 .2
7 .6
4 .5 13.2
7.3
11.2
1.8 62.6 5 .7
9.3
4 .8
10.6
2.5
6 .8
1.8
4 .0
3.8
3 .4
2.7
3.7
1.0
2.3 10.6 20.7
.5
2 .6
1.0
_
.2
2.2
.9
.
.2
4 .5
.8
.3
1.9
.9
.
.7
1.2
2.9
.7
.4
2.0
2.2
1.6
5 .9
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
2,712 1,000 1,383 1,355
$2 .76 $3 .02 $2.93 $2 .9 6

_
.
3.2
2.5
4 .9
5 .6
18.2
7.2
5.2
22.9
4 .3
11.5
10.3
1.4
1.3
.4
.1
.8
.1
.1
.1
.1
100.0
1,504
$2 .47

West
Los
Angeles— San
St.
Louis Denver I Long Francisco—
Beach Oakland
.
_
_
.
.
.
.
.
.
_
.
.
0.6
_
_
0 .2
6.1
_
1.3
3.7
.
9.2
11.7 18.5
.
4 .6 13.0
26. 1
15.4 16.7
3.6
_
11.6
22.0
_
15.0
2.0 22.2
.
8.7
11.7 25.9
.
2.2
1.0
2.9
4. 1
48.1
1.3
_
1.0
.9
10.2
47.0
.9
.
.
1.5
1.3
_
.
6.4
1. 1
1.1
_
_
1.8
2 .9
.
4 .0
.
.
4 .8
3.3
2 .2
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0
454
54
773
270
$2. 84 $2 .50 $2.54
$3.06

Table 10. Earnings Distribution: Laborers, Material Handling
(Percent distribution of men by straight-tim e hourly earnings 1 in machinery manufacturing, 19 selected areas, Aprii-June 1965)

Average hourly earnings 1

Northeast
South
North Central
West
Newark
Los
San
and New Phila­
Mil­ Minne­ St.
Boston Buffalo Hart­ Jersey York delphia Pitts­ Worces­ Dallas Hous­ Chi­ Cleve­ Detroit waukee apolis— Louis Angeles- Portland Francisco—
ford
burgh ter
ton cago land
Long
St. Paul
Oakland
City
Beach

_
$ 1.40 and under $ 1. 50 -----------$ 1. 50 and under $ 1. 6 0 ------------0.4
$ 1. 60 and under $ 1. 70——
------.8
$ 1. 70 and under $ 1. 80--------- —
7.5
$ 1. 80 and under $ 1. 90
7.5
$ 1. 90 and under $ 2. 00
2.4
$2. 00 and under $2. 1 0 ------------- 11.5
$2. 10 and under $2. 20------------- 24.2
$2. 20 and under $2. 30------------7. 1
$2.30 and under $2.40 ------------$2. 40 and under $2. 50------------- 13.9
9.9
$2.50 and under $2. 60------------- 13.5
$2. 60 and under $2. 70------------1.2
$2. 70 and under $2. 80
$2. 80 and under $2. 9 0 ------------$2. 90 and under $3. 00------------_
$3. 00 and under $3.10
-•
$3. 10 and under $3. 20— ------$3. 20 and under $3. 30— ------$3.30 and over --------Total-------------------------- 100.0
252
Average hourly earnings 1—
---- $2. 18

.

_

_
.
.

_

2._ 1
3.3
8.2
_
12.2
- 28.0
17.3
51.0 14.9
11.5
.3
37.5 1.5
4.0
8.2
-

-

-

-

_
_
-

_
.
.
-

_

0.8
1.2
4. 7
3. 1
32.0
2.3
11.3
5.2
13.8
4.9
9.5
5.8
1.0
3. 7
.6
_
_
-

9.8
2.2
10.8
9.3
5.4
3.5
4. 1
9.5
2.6
8.9
6.7
9.1
7.2
8. 7
.9
.2
_
.
1 .1
-

_

_

4.8
9.2
3.4
.6

_
_
_
_

-

-

_

4.5
7.6
12.3
49.0
7.3
1. 1
.3
_
-

12. 1
.
11. 7
23.4
14.0
24.2
4. 2
3.0
_
3.0
_

*19.4
7.5
11.9
1.2 12.7
9.0
4.9
11. 1 27. 6
37.0
8. 2
8.6
3.0
. 7
9.9
_
18.5
3. 7
_
.
.

_

1._ 2
.
_

2.3
.
3.7
2.3
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
104 329
485 461
357 265
81
$2.44 $2.21 $2. 18 $2. 12 $2.27 $2.45 $2. 17
_
-

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_
_
_
1.7
1.3
_
_
_
_
4. 1
.3
. 2
.5 0.8
.2
4. 1
1.8
_
_
. 2
0. 6
5.3 14.2 12.4
_
10.2
9.8
2.2
9.9 42.7 12. 1
_
12.4
15.2 42.2 2.8
9.4
24.5
3.3 11.6 13.9 10.4
6.8
_
20.0
3. 7 20.5 16.3 8.0 15.6
2.2
_
14.2
7.6 10. 1
7.9 16.2 12. 6
_
4. 7 37. 6 29.4 10.2 2. 1
6.2 80.9
_
5.8 13.9
.3
.5 28.2
. 1
2. 1 17.1
4.5
_
n
1.9
4.9
_
_
_
_
_
_
4.6
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
. 2
1. 1
.4
.4
.9
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
134
258 2,158 469
696
785
374 386
340
$1.73 $2.05 $2. 33 $2. 50 $2. 78 $2.54 $2.41 $2.33 $2.52 $2. 89
75

1 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes 3 .0 percent at $ 1 .2 5 and under $1.30$ and 13.4 percent at $1.30 and under $1 .40.
3 L ess than 0.05 percent.
NOTE: B ecause of rounding, stuns of individual item s may not equal 100,




3. 1
15. 1 _
.8
3. 1 3.9
22.5 7.5
4.3 9.5
9.3 4.6
8.5 5.4
1.6 12. 7
7.4 7.3
3.5 6.6
14.3 9.7
1.6 29.2
1. 6 3.2
3. 1 .2

_
-

_
_

-

_

12. 8
55.3
23.4
8.5
100.0
47
$2. 90

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Sco p e of S u rv ey
T h e s u r v e y in c lu d e d e s t a b li s h m e n t s p r i m a r i l y e n g a g e d in m a n u fa c t u r in g m a c h in e r y ,
e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ( m a jo r g r o u p 35 a s d e fin e d in th e 1957 e d itio n o f th e S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r ia l
C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l, p r e p a r e d b y th e U . S . B u r e a u o f th e B u d g e t).
T h is m a jo r g r o u p in ­
c lu d e s e s t a b li s h m e n t s e n g a g e d in m a n u fa c tu r in g m a c h in e r y a n d e q u ip m e n t, o th e r th an e l e c ­
t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t ( m a jo r g r o u p 36) a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t ( m a jo r g ro u p 3 7 ).
M a c h in e s
p o w e r e d b y b u ilt - in o r d e t a c h a b le m o t o r s o r d i n a r i l y a r e in c lu d e d in m a jo r g r o u p 3 5 , w ith
th e e x c e p tio n o f e l e c t r i c a l h o u s e h o ld a p p l ia n c e s ( m a jo r g r o u p 3 6 ). P o r t a b le t o o l s , b oth e l e c ­
t r i c a n d p n e u m a tic p o w e r e d , a r e in c lu d e d in m a jo r g r o u p 3 5 , b u t h a n d to o ls a r e c l a s s i f i e d in
m a jo r g r o u p 3 4 . S e p a r a t e a u x i l i a r y u n its su c h a s c e n t r a l o f f i c e s o f th e f i r m s s t u d ie d w e r e
e x c lu d e d .
T h e stu d y c o v e r e d e s t a b li s h m e n t s w ith 20 w o r k e r s o r m o r e a t the t im e o f r e f e r e n c e
o f th e d a t a u s e d in c o m p ilin g th e u n i v e r s e l i s t s .
A ls o in c lu d e d w e r e e s t a b li s h m e n t s w h ich
e m p lo y e d 8 to 19 w o r k e r s a n d p r i m a r i l y m a n u fa c t u r e d s p e c i a l d i e s a n d t o o l s , d ie s e t s , j i g s
a n d f i x t u r e s , o r m a c h in e - t o o l a c c e s s o r i e s a n d m e a s u r in g d e v i c e s ( i n d u s t r i e s 354 4 an d 3 5 4 5 ).
T h e n u m b e r o f e s t a b li s h m e n t s a n d w o r k e r s a c t u a l l y s t u d ie d by th e B u r e a u , a s w e ll
a s th e n u m b e r e s t im a t e d to b e in th e i n d u s t r ie s d u rin g the p a y r o l l p e r i o d s t u d ie d , a r e sh ow n
in th e fo llo w in g t a b le .

Estimated Number of Establishments and Workers Within Scope of Survey and Number Studied,
Machinery Industries, 21 Areas, ApriL-June 1965

A rea1

Payroll
period

Nurnber of
establishments2
Within
Studied
scope of
study
5.099

971

629.374

396,729

April
May
June
May
May
June
May
May

181
82
172
283
445
308
107
50

44
24
40
56
87
60
30
19

22,632
11,945
31,343
32,250
31,190
39,664
16,023
9,420

14,757
7,430
25,570
19,864
17,085
23,876
11,799
7,886

June
April
April

52
72
94

18
27
29

10,297
9,886
16,929

8,493
6,829
12,404

June
May
June
May
May
May

787
313
851
178
169
126

119
63
102
45
36
34

107,130
41,123
72,320
49,852
33,878
16,391

62,388
24,259
40,897
40,542
23,904
12,601

May
May
June
May

29
620
45
135

14
80
17
27

3, 256
55,374
4,620
13,851

2,624
22,298
3,363
7,860

Total, 21 areas -----------------Northeast:
Boston-------------- ------ -————
Buffalo--------------------------------Hartford-------------------------- ----Newark and Jersey C ity ----------- —
New Y o r k --------------—---------—
Philadelphia--------------------------Pittsburgh----------------------------W orcester----------------------------South:
B altim ore---------——----- -———
Dallas - — - —---------- ------- -—Houston----------------- -------------North Central:
Chicago —-------------- -—------ -—
C levelan d----------------------------Detroit------------------------------ —
Milwaukee —-------------— ———
Minneapolis-St. Paul—— ------- —
St. Louis—-----—-------------------—
West:
D e n v e r ------- -—- — —---------- Los Angeles-Long Beach -—- ——
Portland----------------- -------------San Francisco-Oakland ——
—

Wofkers in
establiishments
Within
scope of
Studied
study

For definitions of areas, see p. 22.
2 Includes only establishments manufacturing special dies and tools, die sets, jigs and fixtures,
or machine-tool accessories and measuring devices which employed 8 workers or more, and other
machinery establishments with 20 workers or more at the time of reference of the universe data.




21

22
Method of Study
Data were obtained from establishm ents surveyed the previous year, principally by
m ail but in some instances by personal v isits of Bureau field econom ists under the direction
of the Bureau's A ssistan t Regional D irectors for Wages and Industrial Relations. The survey
was conducted on a sam ple b a sis. To obtain appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a
greater proportion of large than of sm all establishm ents was studied. In combining the
data, however, all establishm ents were given their appropriate weight. All estim ates are
presented, therefore, as relating to all establishm ents in the industry group in the a re a s,
excluding only those below the minimum size at the time of reference of the universe data.
A rea Definitions
The are as studied were Standard Metropolitan Statistical A reas as defined by the
U .S. Bureau of the Budget in 1961, except Hartford (Hartford and New Britain SM SA's and
B ristol), Newark and Je rse y City (a combination of the 2 SM SA's), and W orcester (W orcester
SMSA, except Northbridge), and included: Baltimore*—Baltim ore city and Anne Arundel,
Baltim ore, C arroll, and Howard Counties, M d.; Boston—Suffolk County, 15 communities
in E sse x County, 29 in M iddlesex County, 19 in Norfolk County, and 9 in Plymouth County,
M a s s .; Buffalo— E rie and N iagara Counties, N. Y .; Chic ago— Cook, Du Page, Kane, Lake,
McHenry, and Will Counties, 111.; Cleveland— Cuyahoga and Lake Counties, Ohio; D allas—
Collin, D allas, Denton, and E llis bounties, T e x .; Denver— Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder,
Denver, and Jefferso n Counties, C o lo .; Detroit— Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne Counties,
M ich.; H artford—Avon, Berlin, Bloomfield, B risto l, Canton, Cromwell, E ast Hartford,
E ast Windsor, Enfield, Farmington, Glastonbury, Hartford, M anchester, New Britain,
Newington, Plainville, Rocky Hill, Simsbury, South Windsor, Southington, Suffield, Vernon,
West Hartford, W ethersfield, Windsor, and Windsor Docks, Conn.; Houston:—H arris County,
T e x .; Los Angeles-»Long Beach—L os Angeles and Orange Counties^ C a lif.; Milwaukee—
Milwaukee and Waukesha Counties, W is.; Minneapolis-St. Paul—Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin,
Ram sey, and Washington Counties, M inn.; Newark and Je rse y City— E sse x , Hudson, M orris,
and Union Counties, N. J . ; New York—New York City (5 boroughs), and N assau, Rockland,
Suffolk, and W estchester Counties, N. Y .; Philadelphia—Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Mont­
gomery, and Philadelphia Counties, P a ., and Burlington, Camden, and G loucester Counties,
N. J . ; Pittsburgh—Allegheny, Beaver, Washington, and Westmoreland Counties, P a .; P o rt­
land—C lackam as , Multnomah, and Washington Counties, O re g ., and Clark County, W ash.;
St. Louis-—St. Louis city and Jefferson , St. C harles, and St. Louis Counties, M o., and
Madison and St. C lair Comities, 111.; San F ran cis co-Oakland—Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin,
San F ran cisco , San Mateo, and Solano Ciounties, C a lif.; and W orcester— W orcester City and the
towns of Auburn, Berlin, Boylston, Brookfield, E ast Brookfield, Grafton, Holden, L eicester,
Millbury, Northborough, North Brookfield, Oxford, Shrewsbury, Spencer, Sutton, Upton,
West borough, and West Boylston in W orcester County, M ass.
Establishm ent Definition
An establishm ent, for purposes of this study, is defined as a single physical lo ca­
tion where industrial operations are perform ed. An establishm ent is not n ecessarily identical
with the company, which may consist of one establishment or m ore.
Employment
The estim ates of the number of workers within the scope of the study are intended
as a general guide to the size and composition of the labor force included in the survey.
The advance planning n ecessary to make a wage survey requires the use of lists of estab ­
lishm ents assem bled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied.
Production Workers
The term "production w orkers, " as used in this bulletin, includes working foremen
and all nonsupervisory w orkers engaged in nonoffice functions. Adm inistrative, executive,
professional and technical personnel, and force-account construction employees, who were
utilized as a separate work force on the firm 's own properties, were excluded.




23
Occupations Selected for Study
Occupational classification was based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed
to take account of interestablishm ent and in terarea variations in duties within the sam e job.
(See appendix B for these job descriptions. ) The occupations were chosen for their num erical
importance, their usefulness in collective bargaining, or their representativeness of the entire
job scale in the industry. Working su p erv iso rs, apprentices, le arn ers, beginners, trainees,
handicapped, part-tim e, tem porary, and probationary workers were not reported in the data
for the selected occupations.
Wage Data
The wage information relates to average straight-tim e hourly earnings, excluding
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Incentive
payments, such as those resulting from piecework or production bonus system s and costof-living bonuses, were included as part of the w orkers' regular pay; but nonproduction
bonus payments, such as C hristm as or yea rend bonuses, were excluded.
Average hourly rates or earnings for each occupation were calculated by weighting
each rate (or hourly earnings) by the number of workers receiving the rate, totaling, and
dividing by the number of individuals. The hourly earnings of salaried workers were obtained
by dividing their straight-tim e salary by normal rather than actual hours.
Occupational employment estim ates refer to the total for all establishm ents within
the scope of the study and not to the number actually surveyed. Because of the variation
in occupational structure among establishm ents, estim ates of occupational employment are
subject to considerable fluctuation attributable to sampling. Hence, they serve only to indicate
the relative num erical importance of the jobs studied. The fluctuations in employment do
not m aterially affect the accuracy of the earnings data.
Wage Trends
The machinery index se rie s has been developed from data obtained in the B u reau 's
program of occupational wage surveys and is based on straight-tim e hourly earnings of men
production w orkers in the following occupations: A ssem b lers (c la sse s A, B, and C); electri­
cians, maintenance; in spectors (c la sse s A, B, and C); jan ito rs, p o rters, and clean ers;
lab o rers, m aterial handling; machine-tool operators, production (c la sse s A, B, and C);
m achinists, production; tool and die m akers (other than jobbing); and w elders, hand, c lass A.
Data for these and other occupations are shown in table 1.
The area indexes are constructed to reflect changes in average hourly earnings but not
changes in the proportion of w orkers in the separate occupations. F or each area, an ag gre­
gate of earnings was obtained by weighting the average straight-tim e hourly earnings for the
respective occupations by a set of weights, based on average employments in the occupations
in that area for the y e ars 1964 and 1965. The percent of change was determined by comparing
this aggregate with the aggregate for the previous year; the current index was computed by
applying this percent of change to the previous index (in this c ase , 1964) for the area.
The composite index for all are as combined is constructed so as not to reflect changes
induced by changes in the relative importance of the industries among the areas studied. The
composite index was obtained by following techniques sim ilar to those used in determining
area indexes. An aggregate of earnings was obtained by weighting the average straight-tim e
hourly earnings for the selected occupations in the are a s by a set of weights, based on
average employments in the machinery industries in these a re a s for the y ears 1964 and 1965.
The percent of change was determined by comparing this aggregate with the aggregate for
the previous year and the current index computed by applying this percent of change to the
previous index (1964) fo r all are as combined.
From time to time, the index procedure is revised to bring the weighting pattern
up to date by changing the set of occupational weights and the area weights. The new indexes
are linked to the existing ones to form a continuous se r ie s.
F o r a m ore detailed description of the procedure used and information regarding
the 1945— indexes, see appendixes B and C of B L S Bulletin 1352. See BL»S Bulletin 1429
62
for the 1963 index.




Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions
T h e p r i m a r y p u r p o s e o f p r e p a r in g jo b d e s c r i p t i o n s f o r th e
B u r e a u 's w a g e s u r v e y s i s to a s s i s t i t s f i e l d s t a f f in c l a s s i f y i n g in to
a p p r o p r i a t e o c c u p a t io n s w o r k e r s w ho a r e e m p lo y e d u n d e r a v a r i e t y
o f p a y r o l l t i t l e s a n d d if f e r e n t w o r k a r r a n g e m e n t s f r o m e s t a b lis h m e n t
to e s t a b li s h m e n t an d f r o m a r e a to a r e a .
T h is p e r m i t s th e g ro u p in g
o f o c c u p a t io n a l w a g e r a t e s r e p r e s e n t i n g c o m p a r a b le jo b c o n ten t.
B e c a u s e o f t h is e m p h a s i s on in t e r e s t a b li s h m e n t an d i n t e r a r e a c o m ­
p a r a b i l i t y o f o c c u p a t io n a l c o n te n t, th e B u r e a u 's jo b d e s c r i p t io n s m a y
d i f f e r s i g n if i c a n t l y f r o m t h o s e in u s e in in d iv id u a l e s t a b li s h m e n t s o r
t h o s e p r e p a r e d f o r o th e r p u r p o s e s . In a p p ly in g t h e s e jo b d e s c r ip t io n s ,
th e B u r e a u 's f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s a r e i n s t r u c t e d to e x c lu d e w o rk in g
s u p e r v i s o r s , a p p r e n t i c e s , l e a r n e r s , b e g in n e r s , t r a i n e e s , h a n d ic a p p e d ,
p a r t - t i m e , t e m p o r a r y , a n d p r o b a t io n a r y w o r k e r s .
A SSEM BLER
(B e n c h a s s e m b l e r , f l o o r a s s e m b l e r ; j i g a s s e m b l e r ; lin e a s s e m b l e r ; s u b a s s e m b l e r )
A s s e m b l e s a n d / o r f i t s t o g e t h e r p a r t s to f o r m c o m p le te u n its o r s u b a s s e m b l i e s a t
a b e n c h , c o n v e y o r lin e , o r on th e f l o o r , d e p e n d in g u pon th e s i z e o f th e u n its an d the
o r g a n iz a t io n o f th e p r o d u c tio n p r o c e s s .
W ork m a y in c lu d e p r o c e s s i n g o p e r a t io n s r e q u ir in g
th e u s e o f h a n d to o ls in s c r a p i n g , c h ip p in g , a n d f ilin g o f p a r t s to o b ta in a d e s i r e d f it a s
w e ll a s p o w e r t o o l s an d s p e c i a l e q u ip m e n t w h en p u n c h in g , r iv e t in g , s o ld e r in g , o r w e ld in g
o f p a r t s i s n e c e s s a r y . W o r k e r s w ho p e r f o r m a n y of t h e s e p r o c e s s i n g o p e r a t io n s e x c l u s iv e l y
a s p a r t o f s p e c i a l i z e d a s s e m b l i n g o p e r a t io n s a r e e x c lu d e d .
C l a s s A . A s s e m b l e s p a r t s in to c o m p le te u n its o r s u b a s s e m b l i e s th a t r e q u ir e f ittin g
o f p a r t s a n d d e c i s i o n s r e g a r d i n g p r o p e r p e r f o r m a n c e o f a n y co m p o n e n t p a r t o r th e
a s s e m b l e d u n it. W ork in v o lv e s a n y c o m b in a tio n o f th e fo llo w in g : A s s e m b l i n g f r o m
d r a w i n g s , b lu e p r in t s o r o th e r w r it t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; a s s e m b l i n g u n its c o m p o s e d o f a
v a r i e t y o f p a r t s a n d / o r s u b a s s e m b l i e s ; a s s e m b l i n g l a r g e u n its r e q u ir in g c a r e f u l fit t in g
a n d a d ju s t in g o f p a r t s to o b ta in s p e c if i e d c l e a r a n c e s ; a n d u s in g a v a r i e t y of h an d an d
p o w e r e d t o o l s a n d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g in s t r u m e n t s .
C l a s s B . A s s e m b l e s p a r t s in to u n its o r s u b a s s e m b l i e s in a c c o r d a n c e w ith s t a n d a r d
an d p r e s c r i b e d p r o c e d u r e s . W ork in v o lv e s a n y c o m b in a tio n of th e fo llo w in g : A s s e m b l i n g
a lim it e d r a n g e o f s t a n d a r d an d f a m i l i a r p r o d u c t s c o m p o s e d o f a n u m b e r o f s m a l l - o r
m e d i u m - s iz e p a r t s r e q u ir in g s o m e f it t in g o r a d ju s t in g ; a s s e m b l i n g l a r g e u n its th a t
r e q u ir e l it t l e o r no f it t in g o f c o m p o n e n t p a r t s ; w o rk in g u n d e r c o n d itio n s w h e r e a c c u r a t e
p e r f o r m a n c e a n d c o m p le tio n o f w o rk w ith in s e t t im e l i m i t s a r e e s s e n t i a l f o r s u b se q u e n t
a s s e m b l i n g o p e r a t i o n s ; an d u s in g a l im it e d v a r i e t y o f h an d o r p o w e r e d t o o l s .
C l a s s C . P e r f o r m s s h o r t - c y c l e , r e p e t i t i v e a s s e m b l i n g o p e r a t i o n s . W ork d o e s n ot
in v o lv e a n y f it t in g o r m a k in g d e c i s i o n s r e g a r d i n g p r o p e r p e r f o r m a n c e of th e co m p o n e n t
p a r ts o r a sse m b lin g p ro c e d u re s.
A U T O M A T IC -L A T H E O P E R A T O R
( A u t o m a t ic - b e t w e e n - c e n t e r s - la t h e o p e r a t o r ; a u t o m a tic - c h u c k in g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r ;
a u to m a tic -tu r re t-la th e o p e ra to r)
O p e r a t e s on e o r m o r e la t h e s e q u ip p e d w ith a u t o m a tic f e e d m e c h a n is m s f o r a c t u a t in g
th e c u ttin g t o o l s o v e r th e c o m p le te w o r k c y c le . A u to m a tic la t h e s m a y d if f e r a s to ty p e of
c o n s tr u c tio n ( h o r iz o n t a l o r v e r t i c a l ) ; n u m b e r o f s p in d le s ( s in g l e o r m u ltip le ); m e th o d o f f e e d
(h a n d - fe e d , a u t o m a tic - c h u c k in g , o r h o p p e r - f e e d ) ; m e th o d of h o ld in g th e w o rk (in c h u c k s o r
b e tw e e n c e n t e r s ) ; a n d m e th o d o f p r e s e n t i n g th e t o o l s to th e s t o c k in s e q u e n c e ( t u r r e t s ,
s l i d e , r e v o lv in g w o r k s t a t i o n s ) .
( F o r d e s c r i p t io n o f c l a s s of w o r k , s e e m a c h in e - t o o l
o p e r a t o r , p r o d u c t io n .)




24

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D R IL L -P R E SS O PERA TO R ,

R A D IA L

O p e r a t e s on e o r m o r e t y p e s o f r a d i a l - d r i l l i n g m a c h in e s d e s ig n e d p r i m a r i l y f o r th e
p u r p o s e of d r il l i n g , r e a m in g , c o u n t e r s in k in g , c o u n t e r b o r in g , s p o t - f a c in g , o r ta p p in g h o le s in
la r g e o r h eavy m e tal p a r ts .
S e v e r a l t y p e s of r a d i a l d r i l l s a r e in u s e , th e m o s t co m m o n
ty p e b e in g d e s ig n e d s o th a t th e t o o l h e a d an d s a d d le a r e m o v a b le a lo n g a p r o je c t in g a r m
w h ich c a n b e r o t a t e d a b o u t a v e r t i c a l co lu m n an d a d ju s t e d v e r t i c a l l y on th a t co lu m n . ( F o r
d e s c r i p t io n of c l a s s of w o rk , s e e m a c h in e - t o o l o p e r a t o r , p r o d u c tio n .)
D R IL L -P R E S S O P E R A T O R , S IN G L E - O R M U L T IP L E -S P IN D L E
O p e r a t e s on e o r m o r e t y p e s of s i n g l e - o r m u lt ip le - s p in d le d r i l l - p r e s s e s , to p e r f o r m
su c h o p e r a t io n s a s d r il l i n g , r e a m in g , c o u n t e r s in k in g , c o u n t e r b o r in g , s p o t - f a c in g , and ta p p in g .
D r i l l - p r e s s o p e r a t o r s , r a d i a l , a n d o p e r a t o r s o f p o r t a b le d r il l i n g e q u ip m e n t a r e e x c lu d e d .
( F o r d e s c r i p t io n o f c l a s s o f w o rk , s e e m a c h in e - t o o l o p e r a t o r , p r o d u c tio n .)
E L E C T R IC IA N ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

P e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r i c a l t r a d e fu n c tio n s su c h a s th e i n s t a lla t io n , m a in te n a n c e ,
o r r e p a i r o f e q u ip m e n t f o r th e g e n e r a t in g , d is t r ib u t io n , o r u tiliz a t io n of e l e c t r i c e n e r g y in
a n e s t a b lis h m e n t .
W ork in v o lv e s m o s t of th e fo llo w in g : I n s t a llin g o r r e p a i r i n g a n y of a
v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t su c h a s g e n e r a t o r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s , s w it c h b o a r d s , c o n t r o l l e r s ,
c i r c u i t b r e a k e r s , m o t o r s , h e a tin g u n it s , c o n d u it s y s t e m s , o r o th e r t r a n s m i s s i o n e q u ip m e n t;
w o rk in g f r o m b l u e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , la y o u t o r o th e r s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; lo c a t in g an d d ia g n o s in g
t r o u b le in th e e l e c t r i c a l s y s t e m o r e q u ip m e n t; w o rk in g s t a n d a r d c o m p u ta tio n s r e la t i n g to lo a d
r e q u ir e m e n t s o f w ir in g o r e l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t; an d u s in g a v a r i e t y of e l e c t r i c i a n 's h a n d t o o l s an d m e a s u r in g an d t e s t i n g in s t r u m e n t s . In g e n e r a l, th e w o rk o f th e m a in te n a n c e e l e c ­
t r i c i a n r e q u i r e s ro u n d e d t r a in in g an d e x p e r ie n c e u s u a l l y a c q u i r e d th ro u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n ­
t ic e s h i p o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .
E N G IN E - L A T H E O P E R A T O R
O p e r a t e s an e n g in e la th e f o r sh a p in g e x t e r n a l a n d in t e r n a l c y l i n d r i c a l s u r f a c e s
of m e t a l o b je c t s .
T h e e n g in e la th e , b a s i c a l l y c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y a h e a d s to c k , t a i l s t o c k ,
an d p o w e r - f e d to o l c a r r i a g e , i s a g e n e r a l- p u r p o s e m a c h in e t o o l u s e d p r i m a r i l y f o r t u r n ­
in g . It i s a l s o c o m m o n ly u s e d in p e r f o r m in g su c h o p e r a t io n s a s f a c i n g , b o r in g , d r il l i n g
an d t h r e a d in g , a n d e q u ip p e d w ith a p p r o p r i a t e a t ta c h m e n t s , m a y b e u s e d f o r a v e r y w id e
v a r i e t y of s p e c i a l m a c h in in g o p e r a t i o n s .
T h e s t o c k m a y b e h e ld in p o s it io n b y th e la th e
" c e n t e r s " o r b y v a r i o u s t y p e s o f c h u c k s an d f i x t u r e s .
B e n c h - la t h e o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a t ic la th e o p e r a t o r s , s c r e w - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , a u t o m a tic , an d t u r r e t - l a t h e o p e r a t o r s , h an d
(in c lu d in g h an d s c r e w m a c h in e ) a r e e x c lu d e d . ( F o r d e s c r i p t io n o f c l a s s of w o rk , s e e m a c h in e t o o l o p e r a t o r , p r o d u c tio n .)
G R IN D IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
( C e n te r le s s - g r in d e r o p e r a to r ; c y lin d r ic a l- g r in d e r o p e r a to r ; e x te r n a l- g r in d e r o p e r a ­
to r ; in te r n a l- g r in d e r o p e r a to r ; s u r fa c e - g r in d e r o p e r a to r ; U n iv e r sa l- g r in d e r o p e ra to r)
O p e r a t e s on e o f s e v e r a l t y p e s o f p r e c i s i o n g r in d in g m a c h in e s to g r in d in t e r n a l an d
e x t e r n a l s u r f a c e s o f m e t a l p a r t s to a sm o o th an d e v e n f in is h an d to r e q u ir e d d im e n s io n s .
P r e c i s i o n g r in d in g i s u s e d p r i m a r i l y a s a fin is h in g o p e r a t io n on p r e v i o u s l y m a c h in e d p a r t s ,
an d c o n s i s t s of a p p ly in g a b r a s i v e w h e e ls , r o ta t in g a t h ig h s p e e d s to th e s u r f a c e s to b e g ro u n d .
In a d d itio n to th e t y p e s of g r in d in g m a c h in e s in d ic a t e d a b o v e , t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n in c lu d e s
o p e r a t o r s o f o th e r p r o d u c tio n g r in d in g m a c h in e s su c h a s : S i n g l e - p u r p o s e g r i n d e r s ( d r i l l
g r i n d e r s , b r o a c h g r i n d e r s , sa w g r i n d e r s , g e a r - c u t t e r g r i n d e r s , t h r e a d g r i n d e r s , e t c .)
an d a u t o m a tic a n d s e m ia u t o m a t ic g e n e r a l p u r p o s e g r in d in g m a c h in e s . O p e r a t o r s o f p o r t ­
a b le g r i n d e r s a r e e x c lu d e d . ( F o r d e s c r i p t io n o f c l a s s o f w o rk , s e e m a c h in e - t o o l o p e r ­
a t o r , p r o d u c tio n .)
IN S P E C T O R
I n s p e c t s p a r t s , p r o d u c t s , a n d / o r p r o c e s s e s . P e r f o r m s s u c h o p e r a t io n s a s e x a m in in g
p a r t s o r p r o d u c t s f o r f la w s a n d d e f e c t s , c h e c k in g t h e ir d im e n s io n s an d a p p e a r a n c e to d e ­
t e r m in e w h e th e r th e y m e e t th e r e q u ir e d s t a n d a r d s an d s p e c if i c a t io n s .




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IN S P E C T O R — C o n tin u ed
C l a s s A . R e s p o n s ib le f o r d e c i s i o n s r e g a r d i n g th e q u a lit y o f th e p r o d u c t a n d / o r
o p e r a t i o n s . W ork in v o lv e s a n y c o m b in a tio n of th e fo llo w in g : T h o ro u g h k n o w le d g e of
th e p r o c e s s i n g o p e r a t io n s in th e b r a n c h of w o r k to w h ich h e i s a s s i g n e d , in c lu d in g th e
u s e o f a v a r i e t y o f p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g i n s t r u m e n t s ; in t e r p r e t in g d r a w in g s an d s p e c i ­
f ic a t i o n s in in s p e c t io n w o rk on u n its c o m p o s e d of a l a r g e n u m b e r o f co m p o n e n t p a r t s ;
e x a m in in g a v a r i e t y o f p r o d u c t s o r p r o c e s s i n g o p e r a t i o n s ; d e t e r m in in g c a u s e s of f la w s
in p r o d u c t s a n d / o r p r o c e s s e s an d s u g g e s t in g n e c e s s a r y c h a n g e s to c o r r e c t w o r k m e th o d s;
an d d e v is in g in s p e c t io n p r o c e d u r e s f o r n ew p r o d u c t s .
C l a s s B . W ork in v o lv e s a n y c o m b in a tio n of th e f o llo w in g ; K n o w le d g e o f p r o c e s s i n g
o p e r a t io n s in th e b r a n c h of w o rk to w h ich h e i s a s s i g n e d , lim it e d to f a m i l i a r p r o d u c t s
a n d p r o c e s s e s o r w h e re p e r f o r m a n c e i s d e p e n d e n t on p a s t e x p e r ie n c e ; p e r f o r m i n g in ­
sp e c t io n o p e r a t io n s on p r o d u c t s a n d / o r p r o c e s s e s h a v in g r i g i d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s , b u t w h e re
th e in s p e c t io n p r o c e d u r e s in v o lv e a s e q u e n c e of in s p e c t io n o p e r a t io n s , in c lu d in g d e ­
c i s i o n s r e g a r d i n g p r o p e r f i t o r p e r f o r m a n c e o f s o m e p a r t s ; a n d u s in g p r e c i s i o n m e a s ­
u r in g i n s t r u m e n t s .
C l a s s C . W ork in v o lv e s a n y c o m b in a tio n o f th e fo llo w in g : S h o r t - c y c l e , r e p e t it iv e
in s p e c t io n o p e r a t i o n s ; u s in g a s t a n d a r d iz e d , s p e c i a l - p u r p o s e m e a s u r in g in s tr u m e n t
r e p e t i t i v e l y ; a n d v i s u a l e x a m in a tio n of p a r t s o r p r o d u c t s , r e je c t in g u n its h a v in g o b v io u s
d e f o r m it i e s o r f l a w s .
JA N I T O R ,

PO R TER , OR C LEA N ER

(S w e e p e r ; c h a r w o m a n ; j a n i t r e s s )
C le a n s a n d k e e p s in a n o r d e r ly c o n d itio n f a c t o r y w o rk in g a r e a s an d w a s h r o o m s , o r
p r e m i s e s of an o f f i c e , a p a r t m e n t h o u s e , o r c o m m e r c i a l o r o th e r e s t a b lis h m e n t . D u t ie s in ­
v o lv e a c o m b in a tio n of th e fo llo w in g : S w e e p in g , m o p p in g , o r s c r u b b in g , p o lis h in g f l o o r s ;
r e m o v in g c h ip s , t r a s h , a n d o th e r r e f u s e ; d u stin g e q u ip m e n t, f u r n i t u r e , o r f i x t u r e s ; p o lis h in g
m e t a l f i x t u r e s o r t r i m m i n g s ; an d p r o v id in g s u p p lie s an d m in o r m a in te n a n c e s e r v i c e s ; c le a n in g
l a v a t o r i e s , s h o w e r s , an d r e s t r o o m s . W o r k e r s w ho s p e c i a l i z e in w in dow w a s h in g a r e e x c lu d e d .
L A B O R E R , M A T E R I A L H A N D L IN G
( L o a d e r a n d u n lo a d e r ; h a n d le r an d s t a c k e r ; s h e l v e r ; t r u c k e r ; s t o c k m a n o r s t o c k
h e l p e r ; w a r e h o u s e m a n o r w a r e h o u s e h e lp e r )
A w o r k e r e m p lo y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u fa c t u r in g p la n t, s t o r e , o r o th e r e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t w h o se d u t ie s in v o lv e on e o r m o r e o f th e fo llo w in g : L o a d in g an d u n lo a d in g v a r i o u s
m a t e r i a l s an d m e r c h a n d is e on o r f r o m f r e ig h t c a r s , t r u c k s , o r o th e r t r a n s p o r t in g d e v i c e s ;
u n p a c k in g , s h e lv in g , o r p la c in g m a t e r i a l s o r m e r c h a n d is e in p r o p e r s t o r a g e lo c a t io n ; an d
t r a n s p o r t in g m a t e r i a l s o r m e r c h a n d is e b y h a n d tru c k , c a r , o r w h e e lb a r r o w . L o n g s h o r e m e n ,
w ho lo a d an d u n lo a d s h ip s , a r e e x c lu d e d .
M A C H IN E -T O O L O P E R A T O R ,

P R O D U C T IO N

O p e r a t e s on e o r m o r e n o n p o r ta b le , p o w e r - d r iv e n m a c h in e t o o l s in o r d e r to sh a p e
m e t a l b y p r o g r e s s i v e l y r e m o v in g p o r t io n o f th e s t o c k in th e f o r m o f c h ip s o r s h a v in g s , o r
by a b r a sio n .
F o r w a g e stu d y p u r p o s e s , t h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n i s lim it e d to o p e r a t o r s o f th e
fo llo w in g t y p e s of m a c h in e t o o l s :
A u to m a tic la t h e s
B o r in g m a c h in e s
D r ill p r e s s e s , r a d ia l
D r i l l p r e s s e s , s i n g l e - o r m u lt ip le - s p in d le
E n g in e la t h e s
G e a r - c u t t in g m a c h in e s
G e a r - f i n i s h in g m a c h in e s
G r in d in g m a c h in e s

M a c h in e t o o l s , m i s c e l l a n e o u s 10
M illin g m a c h in e s
P la n e rs
S c r e w m a c h in e s , a u t o m a tic
S c r e w m a c h in e s , h an d
Sh ap ers
T u r r e t l a t h e s , a u to m a tic
T u r r e t l a t h e s , han d

10 Operators required alternately to operate more than one type of machine tools as listed above are to be classified as
machine-tool operator, miscellaneous.




27
M A C H IN E -T O O L O P E R A T O R , P R O D U C T IO N — C o n tin u ed
C l a s s A . S e t s up m a c h in e s b y d e t e r m in in g p r o p e r f e e d s , s p e e d s , to o lin g an d o p e r a ­
tio n s e q u e n c e o r b y s e l e c t i n g t h o s e p r e s c r i b e d in d r a w in g s , b l u e p r in t s , o r la y o u t s ; m a k e s
n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s d u r in g o p e r a t io n w h e re c h a n g e s in w o r k an d se t u p a r e r e l a ­
tiv e l y fr e q u e n t an d w h e r e c a r e i s e s s e n t i a l to a c h ie v e r e q u i s i t e d im e n s io n s o f v e r y
c lo se to le r a n c e s.
C l a s s B . S e t s up
to o lin g , a n d o p e r a t io n
o th e r s ; and m a k e s a ll
to a c h ie v e v e r y c l o s e

m a c h in e s on s t a n d a r d o r ro u g h in g o p e r a t io n s w h e r e f e e d s , s p e e d s ,
s e q u e n c e a r e p r e s c r i b e d o r m a in t a in s o p e r a t io n se tu p m a d e b y
n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s d u rin g o p e r a t io n w h e r e c a r e i s e s s e n t i a l
t o l e r a n c e s o r w h e r e c h a n g e s in p r o d u c t a r e r e la t i v e l y fr e q u e n t.

C l a s s C . O p e r a t e s m a c h in e s on r o u tin e an d r e p e t it iv e o p e r a t i o n s ; m a k e s o n ly m in o r
a d ju s t m e n t s d u r in g o p e r a t i o n s ; a n d w h en t r o u b le o c c u r s s t o p s m a c h in e a n d c a l l s f o r e m a n ,
le a d m a n , o r se t u p m a n to c o r r e c t th e o p e r a t io n .
M A C H IN E -T O O L O P E R A T O R ,

TO OLROOM

S p e c i a l i z e s in th e o p e r a t io n o f o n e o r m o r e t y p e s o f m a c h in e t o o l s su c h a s j i g
b o r e r s , c y l i n d r i c a l o r s u r f a c e g r i n d e r s , e n g in e l a t h e s , o r m illin g m a c h in e s in th e c o n s t r u c ­
tio n o f m a c h in e - s h o p t o o l s , g a g e s , j i g s , f i x t u r e s , o r d i e s . W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f th e f o l ­
lo w in g ; P la n n in g a n d p e r f o r m i n g d if f ic u lt m a c h in in g o p e r a t i o n s ; p r o c e s s i n g i t e m s r e q u ir in g
c o m p lic a t e d s e t u p s o r a h ig h d e g r e e o f a c c u r a c y ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g
i n s t r u m e n t s ; s e l e c t i n g f e e d s , s p e e d s , to o lin g a n d o p e r a t io n s e q u e n c e ; a n d m a k in g n e c e s s a r y
a d ju s t m e n t s d u r in g o p e r a t io n to a c h ie v e r e q u i s i t e t o l e r a n c e s o r d im e n s io n s . M a y b e r e ­
q u ir e d to r e c o g n iz e w h en t o o l s n e e d d r e s s i n g , to d r e s s t o o l s , a n d to s e l e c t p r o p e r c o o la n t s
an d c u ttin g an d lu b r ic a t in g o i l s .
M A C H IN IS T ,

P R O D U C T IO N

F a b r i c a t e s m e t a l p a r t s in v o lv in g a s e r i e s o f p r o g r e s s i v e o p e r a t i o n s . W ork in v o lv e s
m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g : I n t e r p r e t in g w r itte n in s t r u c t i o n s an d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; p la n n in g a n d la y in g
ou t w o r k ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f m a c h i n i s t 's h a n d to o ls a n d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g in s t r u m e n t s ; s e t ­
tin g u p a n d o p e r a t in g s t a n d a r d m a c h in e t o o l s ; sh a p in g m e t a l p a r t s to c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s ; m a k in g
s t a n d a r d sh o p c o m p u ta tio n s r e la t i n g to d im e n s io n s o f w o r k , t o o lin g , f e e d s an d s p e e d s o f
m a c h in in g ; k n o w le d g e o f th e w o rk in g p r o p e r t i e s o f th e c o m m o n m e t a l s ; s e l e c t i n g s t a n d a r d
m a t e r i a l s , p a r t s a n d e q u ip m e n t n e e d e d f o r h i s w o r k ; fit t in g a n d a s s e m b l i n g p a r t s . In g e n e r a l,
th e m a c h i n i s t 's w o r k n o r m a lly r e q u i r e s a ro u n d e d t r a in in g in m a c h in e - s h o p p r a c t i c e u s u a lly
a c q u i r e d th ro u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .
M IL L IN G - M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
(M illin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r ,

a u t o m a tic ; m illin g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r , h an d)

P e r f o r m s a v a r i e t y o f w o r k su c h a s g r o o v in g , p la n in g , a n d sh a p in g m e t a l o b je c t s on
a m illin g m a c h in e , w h ich r e m o v e s m a t e r i a l f r o m m e t a l s u r f a c e s b y th e c u ttin g a c tio n of
m u ltito o th e d r o t a t in g c u t t e r s o f v a r i o u s s i z e s a n d s h a p e s . M illin g - m a c h in e ty p e s v a r y f r o m
th e m a n u a lly c o n t r o lle d m a c h in e s e m p lo y e d in u n it p r o d u c tio n to f u lly a u t o m a tic (c o n v e y o r fe d ) m a c h in e s fo u n d in p la n t s e n g a g e d in m a s s p r o d u c tio n . F o r w a g e stu d y p u r p o s e s , o p e r a ­
t o r s o f s i n g l e - p u r p o s e m i l l e r s s u c h a s t h r e a d m i l l e r s , d u p li c a t o r s , d i e s i n k e r s , p a n to g r a p h
m i l l e r s , a n d e n g r a v in g m i l l e r s a r e e x c lu d e d . ( F o r d e s c r i p t io n o f c l a s s o f w o r k , s e e m a c h in e to o l o p e r a t o r , p r o d u c tio n .)
S C R E W -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R , A U T O M A T IC
O p e r a t e s on e o r m o r e m u lt ip le - o r s i n g l e - s p in d l e a u t o m a tic s c r e w m a c h in e s . A u to ­
m a t ic s c r e w m a c h in e s a r e p r o d u c tio n tu r n in g m a c h in e s w ith a u t o m a t i c - f e e d c y c le d e s ig n e d
to p r o d u c e p a r t s f r o m b a r o r tu b e s t o c k f e d a u t o m a t ic a lly th ro u g h s p i n d le s o r th e h e a d s to c k .
T h e s e m a c h in e s , e q u ip p e d w ith f r o m on e to e ig h t s p in d le s o r a t u r r e t , a u t o m a t ic a lly p e r f o r m
a n d r e p e a t a c y c le o f o p e r a t io n s on e a c h le n g th o f s t o c k f e d in to th e m a c h in e . ( F o r d e ­
s c r i p t i o n o f c l a s s o f w o r k , s e e m a c h in e - t o o l o p e r a t o r , p r o d u c tio n .)




28
T O O L A N D D IE M A K E R
(D ie m a k e r ; j i g m a k e r ; t o o l m a k e r ; f ix t u r e m a k e r ; g a g e m a k e r )
C o n s t r u c t s a n d r e p a i r s m a c h in e - s h o p t o o l s , g a g e s , j i g s , f i x t u r e s o r d i e s f o r f o r g i n g s ,
p u n ch in g , an d o th e r m e t a l - f o r m in g w o rk . W ork in v o lv e s m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g : P la n n in g an d
la y in g ou t o f w o r k f r o m m o d e l s , b l u e p r in t s , d r a w in g s , o r o th e r o r a l an d w r itte n s p e c if i c a t io n s ;
u s in g a v a r i e t y of to o l an d d ie m a k e r 's h a n d to o ls an d p r e c i s i o n m e a s u r in g i n s t r u m e n t s ; u n d e r ­
sta n d in g o f th e w o rk in g p r o p e r t i e s of c o m m o n m e t a l s a n d a l l o y s ; s e t tin g u p an d o p e r a t in g
o f m a c h in e t o o l s a n d r e la t e d e q u ip m e n t; m a k in g n e c e s s a r y sh o p c o m p u ta tio n s r e la t i n g to
d im e n s io n s of w o r k , s p e e d s , f e e d s , an d t o o lin g o f m a c h in e s ; h e a t - t r e a t i n g o f m e t a l p a r t s
d u r in g f a b r i c a t io n a s w e ll a s o f f in is h e d t o o l s an d d i e s to a c h ie v e r e q u ir e d q u a l it i e s ; w o rk in g
to c l o s e t o l e r a n c e s ; f it t in g an d a s s e m b l i n g o f p a r t s to p r e s c r i b e d t o l e r a n c e s a n d a llo w a n c e s ;
and se le c tin g a p p ro p ria te m a t e r ia ls , to o ls , and p r o c e s s e s .
In g e n e r a l, th e t o o l an d d ie
m a k e r 's w o r k r e q u i r e s a ro u n d e d t r a in in g in m a c h in e - s h o p a n d t o o lr o o m p r a c t i c e u s u a l l y a c ­
q u ir e d th ro u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g an d e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r w a g e stu d y p u r p o s e s ,

t o o l a n d d ie m a k e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d a s f o llo w s :

T o o l a n d d ie m a k e r (jo b b in g)
W o rk e r m a k in g d i e s an d t o o l s ,
p r o d u c t o f a n e s t a b lis h m e n t .

d ie

se ts,

j i g s an d f i x t u r e s ,

e t c .,

as

th e

end

T o o l a n d d ie m a k e r (o th e r th a n jo b b in g )
W o rk e r m a k in g a n d / o r m a in ta in in g d i e s a n d t o o l s ,
e t c ., f o r u s e w ith in an e s t a b lis h m e n t .
T U R R E T -L A T H E O PER A TO R ,

d ie s e t s ,

ji g s and fix tu r e s,

H A N D (IN C L U D IN G H A N D -S C R E W M A C H IN E )

O p e r a t e s a la th e e q u ip p e d w ith a t u r r e t u s e d to p r e s e n t a n u m b e r of c u ttin g t o o l s ,
r e q u ir e d f o r a c y c le o f m a c h in in g o p e r a t i o n s , to th e w o r k in s e q u e n c e . O p e r a t io n s c o m ­
m o n ly p e r f o r m e d on a t u r r e t la th e in c lu d e t u r n in g , f a c i n g , b o r in g , d r il l i n g , an d t h r e a d in g .
T h e o p e r a t o r r o t a t e s o r in d e x e s th e t u r r e t to b r in g th e t o o l s to w a r d th e w o r k f o r e a c h o p e r a ­
tio n . In d iv id u a l w o r k p i e c e s , su c h a s f o r g in g s an d c a s t i n g s , a r e h e ld in a ch u c k o r th e la th e
m a y b e e q u ip p e d w ith a b a r s t o c k f e e d in g d e v ic e to p r e s e n t th e c o r r e c t le n g th o f s to c k to th e
t o o l s a t th e b e g in n in g o f e a c h c y c le o f o p e r a t i o n s . ( F o r d e s c r i p t io n o f c l a s s of w o r k , s e e
m a c h in e - t o o l o p e r a t o r , p r o d u c tio n .)
W E L D E R , HAND
F u s e s (w e ld s) m e t a l o b je c t s b y m e a n s o f an o x y a c e t y le n e t o r c h o r a r c w e ld in g a p ­
p a r a t u s in th e f a b r i c a t io n o f m e t a l s h a p e s a n d in r e p a i r i n g b r o k e n o r c r a c k e d m e t a l o b je c t s .
In a d d itio n to p e r f o r m i n g h an d w e ld in g o r b r a z i n g o p e r a t io n , th e w e ld e r m a y a l s o l a y out
g u id e l in e s o r m a r k s on m e t a l p a r t s a n d m a y cu t m e t a l w ith a c u ttin g t o r c h .
C l a s s A . P e r f o r m s w e ld in g o p e r a t io n s r e q u ir in g m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g : P la n n in g
a n d la y in g ou t o f w o r k f r o m d r a w in g s , b l u e p r in t s , o r o th e r w r it t e n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; k n o w l­
e d g e of w e ld in g p r o p e r t i e s o f a v a r i e t y o f m e t a l s a n d a l l o y s , s e t tin g up w o rk a n d d e ­
t e r m in in g o p e r a t io n se q u e n c e ; w e ld in g h ig h p r e s s u r e v e s s e l s o r o th e r o b je c t s in v o lv in g
c r i t i c a l s a f e t y a n d lo a d r e q u ir e m e n t s ; w o rk in g f r o m a v a r i e t y o f p o s i t io n s .
C l a s s B . P e r f o r m s w e ld in g o p e r a t io n s on r e p e t it iv e w o r k , w h e r e no c r i t i c a l s a f e t y
an d lo a d r e q u ir e m e n t s a r e in v o lv e d ; w h e r e th e w o r k c a l l s m a in ly f o r o n e - p o s itio n w e ld ­
in g ; an d w h e r e th e la y o u t an d p la n n in g of th e w o r k a r e p e r f o r m e d b y o t h e r s .




Industry Wage Studies
T h e m o s t r e c e n t r e p o r t s fo r in d u s t r ie s in clu d ed in the B u r e a u ’ s p r o g r a m
o f in d u stry w a g e s u r v e y s sin c e Ja n u a r y 1950 a r e lis t e d b elo w . T h o se fo r w hich
a p r ic e is show n a r e a v a ila b le fr o m the S u p e rin te n d e n t o f D o c u m e n ts, U . S .
G o v e rn m e n t P r in tin g O ffic e , W ash in gton , D. C . , 20402, o r an y o f it s r e g io n a l
s a l e s o f f ic e s . T h o se fo r w h ich a p r ic e is not show n m a y be o b tain ed f r e e a s
long a s a su p p ly is a v a ila b l e , fr o m the B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s , W ash in gton ,
D. C . , 2 0 212, o r fr o m an y o f the r e g io n a l o f fic e s show n on the in sid e b a c k c o v e r .

I. Occupational Wage Studies
M an u fa c tu r ing
B a s i c Iron an d S t e e l, 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1358 (30 c e n ts).
C an dy an d O th er C o n fe c tio n e ry P r o d u c t s , I9 6 0 . B L S R e p o r t 195.
❖ C an nin g and F r e e z in g , 1957. B L S R e p o rt 136.
C ig a r M a n u fa c tu rin g , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1436 (30 c e n ts).
C ig a r e tt e M a n u fa c tu rin g , I9 6 0 . B L S R e p o rt 167.
C otton T e x t i l e s , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1410 (40 c e n ts).
D is t ille d L iq u o r s , 1952. S e r i e s 2, N o. 88.
F a b r ic a t e d S t r u c t u r a l S t e e l, 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1463 (30 c e n ts).
F e r t i l i z e r M a n u fa c tu rin g , 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1362 (40 c e n ts).
F lo u r an d O th er G r a in M ill P r o d u c t s , 1961. B L S B u lle tin 1337 (30 c e n ts).
F lu id M ilk In d u stry , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1464 (30 c e n t s ).
F o o tw e a r , 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1360 (45 c e n ts).
H o s ie r y , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1456 (45 c e n ts).
In d u s tr ia l C h e m ic a ls , 1955. B L S R e p o r t 103.
Iro n an d S t e e l F o u n d r ie s , 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1386 (40 c e n ts).
L e a t h e r T an n in g an d F in is h in g , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1378 (40 c e n ts).
M a c h in e ry M a n u fa c tu rin g , 1964. B L S .B u lle tin 1429 (35 c e n ts).
M e a t P r o d u c t s , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1415 (75 c e n ts).
M en ’ s and B o y s , S h ir t s (E x c e p t W ork S h ir ts ) an d N ig h tw e a r, 1964.
B L S B u lle tin 1457 (40 c e n ts).
M en ’ s an d B o y s 1 S u its an d C o a t s , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1424 (65 c e n ts).
M is c e lla n e o u s P l a s t i c s P r o d u c t s , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1439 (35 c e n ts).
M is c e lla n e o u s T e x t il e s , 1953. B L S R e p o r t 56.
M o to r V e h ic le s an d M o to r V e h ic le P a r t s , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1393 (45 c e n ts).
N o n fe rr o u s F o u n d r ie s , I9 6 0 . B L S R e p o r t 180.
P a in t s an d V a r n i s h e s , 1961. B L S B u lle tin 1318 (30 c e n ts).
P e t r o le u m R e fin in g , 1959. B L S R e p o r t 158.
P r e s s e d o r Blow n G l a s s an d G l a s s w a r e , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1423 (30 c e n ts).
❖ P r o c e s s e d W a ste , 1957. B L S R e p o r t 124.
P u lp , P a p e r , an d P a p e r b o a r d M i l l s , 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1341 (40 c e n ts).
R a d io , T e le v is io n , an d R e la te d P r o d u c t s , 1951. S e r i e s 2, N o. 84.
R a ilr o a d C a r s , 1952. S e r i e s 2, No. 86.
❖ R aw S u g a r , 1957. B L S R e p o r t 136.
So u th ern S a w m ills an d P la n in g M ills , 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1361 (30 c e n ts ).
S t r u c t u r a l C la y P r o d u c t s , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1459 (45 c e n ts).
S y n th etic F i b e r s , 1958. B L S R e p o r t 143.
S y n th etic T e x t il e s , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1414 (35 c e n ts ).
T e x t ile D yein g an d F in is h in g , 1961. B L S B u lle tin 1311 (35 c e n ts).
❖ T o b a c c o S te m m in g an d R e d ry in g , 1957. B L S R e p o r t 136. *
*

Stud ies of the e ffe cts of the $1 m inim um w ag e. .




I. Occupational Wage Studies— Continued
M a n u fa c tu rin g — C on tinu ed
W est C o a s t S a w m illin g , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1455 (30 c e n t s ).
W om en ’ s and M i s s e s ’ C o a ts an d S u it s , 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1371 (25 c e n ts).
W om en ’ s an d M i s s e s ' D r e s s e s , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1391 (30 c e n ts).
Wood H o u seh o ld F u r n it u r e , E x c e p t U p h o lste r e d , 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1369
(40 c e n ts).
^W ooden C o n t a in e r s , 1957. B L S R e p o r t 126.
W ool T e x t i l e s , 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1372 (45 c e n ts).
W ork C lo th in g , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1440 (35 c e n ts).
N o n m an u factu rin g
A uto D e a le r R e p a ir S h o p s, 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1452 (30 c e n ts).
B a n k in g , 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1466 (30 c e n t s ).
B itu m in o u s C o a l M in in g, 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1383 (45 c e n ts).
C o m m u n ic a tio n s, 1964. B L S B u lle tin 1467 (20 c e n t s ).
C o n tra c t C le a n in g S e r v i c e s , 1961. B L S B u lle tin 1327 (25 c e n ts).
C ru d e P e t r o le u m an d N a tu r a l G a s P r o d u c tio n , I9 6 0 . B L S R e p o r t 181.
D e p a rtm e n t an d W om en ’ s R e a d y -to -W e a r S t o r e s , 1950. S e r i e s 2, N o. 78.
E a tin g an d D rin k in g P l a c e s , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1400 (40 c e n ts).
E le c t r ic and G a s U t il it ie s , 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1374 (50 c e n ts).
H o s p it a ls , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1409 (50 c e n ts).
H o te ls an d M o t e ls , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1406 (40 c e n ts).
L a u n d r ie s an d C le a n in g S e r v i c e s , 1963. B L S B u lle tin 1401 (50 c e n ts ).
L ife I n su r a n c e , 1961. B L S B u lle tin 1324 (30 c e n ts).

II. Other Industry Wage Studies
F a c t o r y W o r k e r s' E a r n in g s — D istrib u tio n by S t r a ig h t - T im e H o u rly E a r n in g s
1958. B L S B u lle tin 1252 (40 c e n ts).
F a c t o r y W o r k e r s' E a r n in g s — S e le c t e d M a n u fa ctu rin g I n d u s t r ie s , 1959.
B L S B u lle tin 1275 (35 c e n ts).
R e t a il T r a d e :
E m p lo y e e E a r n in g s in R e t a il T r a d e , Ju n e 1962 (O v e r a ll S u m m a r y o f the
In d u stry ). B L S B u lle tin 1380 (45 c e n ts).
E m p lo y e e E a r n in g s a t R e t a il B u ild in g M a t e r i a l s , H a r d w a r e , an d F a r m
E q u ip m en t D e a l e r s , Ju n e 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1380-1 (25 c e n ts).
E m p lo y e e E a r n in g s in R e t a il G e n e r a l M e r c h a n d ise S t o r e s , Ju n e 1962.
B L S B u lle tin 1380-2 (45 c e n ts).
E m p lo y e e E a r n in g s a t R e t a il F o o d S t o r e s , Ju n e 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1 380-3
(40 c e n ts).
E m p lo y e e E a r n in g s a t R e t a il A u to m o tiv e D e a le r s an d in G a s o lin e S e r v ic e
S t a t io n s , Ju n e 1962. B L S B u lle tin 138 0 -4 (40 c e n ts ).
E m p lo y e e E a r n in g s in R e t a il A p p a r e l an d A c c e s s o r y S t o r e s , Ju n e 1962.
B L S B u lle tin 1380-5 (45 c e n ts).
E m p lo y e e E a r n in g s in R e t a il F u r n it u r e , H om e F u r n is h in g s , an d H o u seh o ld
A p p lia n c e S t o r e s , Ju n e 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1 380-6 (40 c e n ts).
E m p lo y e e E a r n in g s in M is c e lla n e o u s R e t a il S t o r e s , Ju n e 1962.
B L S B u lle tin 1380-7 (40 c e n ts).
E m p lo y e e E a r n in g s in N o n m e tro p o lita n A r e a s o f the Sou th an d N o rth C e n tr a l
R e g io n s , Ju n e 1962. B L S B u lle tin 1416 (40 c e n ts). *
*

Studies of the e ffe c ts o f the $1 m inim u m w age.




* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1966 0 - 2 0 6 - 7 1 2




BUREAU OF LA B O R STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102