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INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY




Life Insurance
l
O C T O B E R -N O V E M B E R 1966

1569

Bulletin No.

8B9P

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Y

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY

Life Insurance
OCTOBER-NOVEM BER 1966

1569

Bulletin No
October 1967

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20 4 0 2 - Price 30 cents







P refa ce

This bu lletin su m m a riz e s the resu lts o f a B u ­
reau o f L a b or S ta tistics s u rv e y o f w ages and su pp lem en ­
ta ry ben efits fo r em p lo y e e s in hom e o ffic e s and reg ion a l
head o ffic e s o f the life in su ra n ce in d u stry in O ctob er—
N ovem b er 1966.
Separate r e le a s e s fo r the fo llo w in g a rea s w ere
issu ed e a r lie r , u su a lly w ithin a few months o f the p a y­
r o ll p e rio d studied:
Atlanta, B a ltim o re , B oston, C h i­
ca g o, D allas, Des M oin es, H ouston, J a ck so n v ille , L os
A n geles—
Long B each and A naheim —
Santa Ana— arden Grove,
G
M inneapolis—
St. Paul, New Y o rk and Newark, and P h ila ­
delphia.
C opies o f th ese r e le a s e s a re a vaila b le fr o m the
B ureau o f L a b or S ta tistics, W ashington, D .C ., 20212, or
any of its reg io n a l o ffic e s .
This study was con d u cted in the B u re a u 's O ffice
o f W ages and Industrial R ela tion s by the D iv isio n o f O c cu ­
pational P ay.
The a n a lysis was p re p a re d by C h arles E.
Scott, J r. , under the im m edia te su p e rv is io n o f L. E a rl
L e w is.
F ie ld w ork fo r the s u rv e y was d ir e cte d by the
A ssista n t R egion a l D ir e c to r s fo r W ages and Industrial
R ela tion s.
Other re p o r ts a vaila b le fr o m the B u rea u 's p r o ­
gra m of in d u stry wage stu dies, as w ell as the a d d re s s e s o f
the B u rea u 's s ix reg ion a l o f fic e s , a re lis te d at the end o f
this bulletin .




iii




C o n te n ts
Page
S u m m a r y ___________________________________________________________________________________
In d u stry c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ____________________________________________________
O c c u p a tio n a l e a r n in g s ___________________________________________________________________
E s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le m e n ta r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s _______
S ch e d u le d w e e k ly h o u rs and s h ift p r a c t i c e s ______________________________________
P a id h o lid a y s __________________________________________________________________________
P a id v a c a t i o n s _________________________________________________________________________
H ealth, in s u r a n c e , and p e n s io n p la n s ______________________________________________
N o n p r o d u c tio n b o n u s e s _______________________________________________________________
F r e e l u n c h e s __________________________________________________________________________

1
1
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
4

T a b le s :
A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s :
1. S e le c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s _________________________

5

O c cu p a tio n a l e a r n in g s :
2. A tla n ta , G a ...........................................................................................................................
3. B a lt im o r e , M d......................
4. B o s to n , M a s s _________________________________________________________________
5. C h ic a g o , 111____________________________________________________________________
6. D a lla s , T e x .......................
7. D e s M o in e s , Iow a ________________________
8. H ou ston , Tex__......... ......
9. J a c k s o n v ille , F l a _____________________________________________________________
10. L o s A n g e le s —L o n g B e a c h and A n a h e im —
Santa
A n a— a rd e n G r o v e , C a lif__________________________________________________
G
11. M in n e a p o lis —
St. P a u l, M in n ________________________________________________
12. N ew Y o r k and N ew ark , N. Y . —N. J _________________________________________
13. P h ila d e lp h ia , P a . - N . J _ ....... - ..........

20
21
22
24

E s t a b lis h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le m e n ta r y w a g e p r o v i s io n s :
14. S ch e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s ______________________________________________________
15. P a id h o lid a y s _______ __________ _______ _________ _______________________ ____ —
16. P a id v a c a t i o n s ____________________________________________________
17. H ealth, in s u r a n c e , and p e n s io n p la n s _____________________________________
18. N o n p r o d u c tio n b o n u s e s _______________________________________________________

25
26
27
29
31

A p p e n d ix e s :
A . S c o p e and m e th o d o f s u r v e y ____________________________________________________
B . O c c u p a tio n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s _______________________________________________________

32
35




v

11
12
13
14
16
17
18
19




Industry Wage Survey--Life Insurance, O ctober—N ovem ber 1966
Summary

areas studied separately accounted for threefifths of the total nonsupervisory office em ­
ployment. The large majority of the 31, 500
workers employed in the combined area of
New York and Newark were located in New
York City. Employment levels in the remain­
ing areas ranged from 7, 600 in Boston to
about 700 in Baltimore. The only major life
insurance area n o t studied separately is
Hartford, Conn.

Average (mean) weekly salaries of em ­
ployees in 34 representative occupations in
life insurance offices in Octobex^-November
1966 ranged from $332 for actuaries (class
A), performing highly complex studies, to $63
for routine file clerks (class C). Men sub­
stantially outnumbered women in each of the
occupations with weekly averages of more
than $125. Women, predominant in most of
the clerical jobs studied, accounted for threefourths of the 112,000 nonsupervisory office
employees in establishments covered by the
Bureau’ s study.1

Home offices accounted for more than
nine-tenths of the employees covered by the
survey. The proportions of employees in
regional head offices amounted to one-fifth
in the Pacific, one-sixth in the Southwest,
slightly more than one-eighth in the South­
east, and one-tenth or less in the remaining
regions.

Occupational averages tended to be high­
est in the Middle Atlantic region, the largest
region in terms of employment, and lowest
in the Middle West. Among the 12 areas sur­
veyed separately, highest earnings were usu­
ally recorded in the New York and Newark
area and lowest in Dallas. 2

Mutual companies— those owned by policy­
holders— accounted for three-fifths of the of­
fice employment covered by the survey. Such
companies accounted for more than ninetenths of the employees in the Middle Atlantic
region, two-thirds in New England, and nearly
three-fifths in the Great Lakes. Most of the
employees in the Border States, Southeast,
and Southwest were employed by stock com ­
panies. In the Middle West and Pacific r e ­
gions, employment was about equally divided
between the two types of companies.

Paid holidays and paid vacations were
provided by all of the establishments visited
during the survey. Various types of employee
health, insurance, and pension plans were
also widespread in the industry.
Industry Characteristics
Life insurance c o m p a n i e s employed
480, 000 workers in October—
November 1966.
Approximately one-third of this employment
was in home and regional head offices covered
by this survey.3

Four-fifths of the office employees were
in companies which handled other types of
insurance (e.g., a c c i d e n t , hospitalization,
fire) in addition to life insurance. Offices of
companies dealing exclusively in life insur­
ance comprised nearly two-fifths of the work
force in the Great Lakes and Middle West,
one-fourth in the Border States, one-sixth in
the Middle Atlantic region, and one-tenth or
less in the other regions.

The Middle Atlantic region accounted for
one-third of the 112,000 nonsupervisory office
employees within scope of the survey. P ro ­
portions in other regions included one-fifth in
the Great Lakes, one-sixth in New England,
and one-tenth or less in each of the others.
Home offices and regional head offices of life
insurance companies are located almost ex­
clusively in metropolitan a r e a s .4* The 12

Home and regional head offices of life
insurance companies varied greatly in em ­
ployment size.
Two-fifths of th e offices
covered by the survey had fewer than 100
workers, three-tenths employed between 100
and 250, and one-eighth, between 250 and
500. Slightly less than 10 percent had more
than 1, 000 employees; a few of these em ­
ployed more than 5, 000.

1 See appendix A for scope and method of survey and
appendix B for occupational descriptions.
2 For definitions of regions, see footnote 1, appendix A
table; and for definitions of areas, footnote 1, tables 2 through 13.
3 Employment and Earnings, BLS, Vol. 13, Nos. 7 and 8,
1967.
Life insurance companies have large numbers of sales
personnel who are usually not employed in home offices and
regional head offices.
4 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined by the
U. S.

Establishments with collective bargaining
agreements covering a majority of their non­
supervisory office employees accounted for
less than 5 percent of the industry's office

Bureau of the Budget through March 1965.




1

2
employment.
These establishments, located
almost entirely within the Great Lakes, South­
west, Middle Atlantic, and New England r e ­
gions, accounted for less than one-tenth of
the employment in each region.
Formal systems providing a range of
rates for specified occupations were the basis
of wage payment for seven-eighths of the of­
fice employees.
Earnings for virtually all
of the remaining office workers were deter­
mined primarily in relation to the qualifica­
tions of the individual.
Formal rate-range
systems applied to over nine-tenths of the
employees in the New England, Middle Atlan­
tic, Middle West, and Pacific regions.
In
the remaining regions, the proportions were
four-fifths in the Great Lakes, about seventenths in the Border States and Southeast, and
three-fifths in the Southwest.
A large majority of the employees in life
insurance offices have clerical jobs.
These
occupations include secretaries, stenogra­
phers, typists, general clerks, and operators
of bookkeeping or other kinds of office m a­
chines found in most offices. Others have
jobs unique to the insurance industry, such
as policywriters (typists), p o l i c y change
clerks, and insurance checkers. Some are
in positions of considerable responsibility
which require extensive knowledge of one or
more phases of the life insurance business,
such as underwriters and claims adjusters.
Professional workers account for com ­
paratively few of the jobs in life insurance
offices. One profession for which data are
provided in this report is actuaries.
These
workers make statistical studies relating to
various kinds of risks to determine the p re­
mium charge on each type of policy.
Insurance companies w e r e among the
first business firm s to use electronic com­
puters. A few companies installed s u c h
equipment in the first half of the 1950’ s; by
1963, the overwhelming majority of life in­
surance companies had installed electronicdata processing equipment (EDP) and applied
it to various functions and operations.
The
application of computers has been directed to
most of the large volume insurance opera­
tions, such as premium billing and account­
ing, commission accounting, and r e l a t e d
recordkeeping, which form erly required large
numbers of clerical employees. Increases in
employment in occupations related to EDP
have been accompanied by employment de­
clines in such clerical jobs as tabulatingmachine operators, calculating-machine oper­
ators, and routine clerical and recordkeeping
personnel. 5

This general pattern is revealed, to some
extent, in a comparison of occupational e m ­
ployment levels between the Bureau's Octo­
ber—
November 1966 and May—
July 1961 6 in­
dustry wage surveys of life insurance offices.
Although the two surveys do not provide a
precise measure of the magnitude of changes
in occupational employments, some general
observations on the direction of the changes
can be made. Substantial increases were
noted in the number of console operators and
programers, and smaller increases were
recorded in the number of systems analysts
and keypunch operators. The numbers of
assem blers, tabulating-machine operators,
premium acceptors, and clerks in every cat­
egory studied (i.e ., accounting, correspond­
ence, file, policy evaluation, and premium
ledger card), declined. Employment of actu­
aries, stenographers, typists, and under­
writers i n c r e a s e d or remained virtually
unchanged.
Occupational Earnings
The 34 occupations studied, accounting
for about 34,000 employees, were selected
to represent salary levels for the various
types of activities performed by employees
in home offices and regional head offices.
Average salaries for a large majority of these
occupations were 15 to 25 percent higher in
October—
November 1966 t h a n in May—
July
1961, when the Bureau conducted a similar
study. 7
Nationwide average weekly salaries in
Octobe ^N ovem ber 1966 for jobs predomi­
nantly staffed by men ranged from $332 for
class A actuaries to $76 for class C tabu­
lating-machine operators (table 1). Averages
above $125 a week were recorded for most
of the jobs in which men were in the majority,
including actuaries, class A claim approvers,
electronic-data processing programers, s y s ­
tems analysts, and underwriters. Women,
on the other hand, were predominant in the
clerical occupations studied.
Numerically
important clerical jobs included: Class C
file clerks ($63), class B typists ($ 6 6.50),
class B keypunch operators ($70.50), and gen­
eral stenographers ($74.50).
Among the jobs for which data are p re­
sented in all regions, averages were usually
highest in the Middle Atlantic and lowest in
the Middle West. There were, however, some
notable exceptions to this pattern. Averages
for clerical jobs in the Pacific, for example,
frequently exceeded those recorded in the

Industry Wage Survey:
BLS Bulletin 1324, 1962.
Impact of Office Automation in the Insurance Industry,
7 Ibid.
BLS Bulletin 1468, 1966.
5




Life Insurance,

May—
July 1961,

3
Middle Atlantic region, and in several in­
stances, job averages in the Southeast and
Southwest were lower than those in the Mid­
dle West.
Among the 12 areas selected for separate
study, earnings were highest in New York
and Newark and lowest in Dallas (tables 2
through 13). As indicated in the following
tabulation, earnings in the highest paid area
were nearly 22 percent above those in the
lowest. 8
Relative pay levels
(United States=100)
New York and Newark---------------------------------------------Los Angeles—
Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa Ana—
GardenGrove--------------------------------------Boston-----------------------------------------------------------------------Chicago------------------------------------------------------------Baltim ore--------------------------------------------------------Houston------------------------------------------------------------Philadelphia----------------------------------------------------A tla n ta ----------------------------------------------------------------------Minneapolis—
St. P a u l----------------------------------------------Jacksonville--------------------------------------------------------------Des Moines------------------------------------------------------D a lla s -------------------------------------------------------------------------

112

Number of women employed as—

105
104
Average weekly earnings

103
101
101
100
97
96
94
93
92

Interarea differences in average earnings
varied substantially by occupation. To illu s­
trate, class B typists in Chicago averaged
21 percent more than t h o s e i n Dallas,
whereas the corresponding spread was only
4 percent for general stenographers.
Several of the occupations selected for
separate study were staffed almost entirely
by either men or women. Among those oc­
cupations in which both men and women were
employed, men usually averaged more than
women, even when comparisons were limited
to the same area. Differences in average
earnings for men and women in the same area
and occupational classification may be due to
several factors, including variation in the
distribution of the sexes among establish­
ments having different pay levels and possible
minor differences in assigned duties. Job
descriptions used to classify workers in wage
surveys are usually more general than those
used in individual establishments in order to
allow for minor differences in duties that may
exist among establishments. A lso, to the
extent that individual pay rates are adjusted
on the basis of length of service, longer
average service for one sex can result in
higher average pay when both sexes are em ­
ployed within the same rate range.
8 These comparisons are based on occupations for which
earnings data were available in each area. In each area, aver­
age weekly earnings for men in 10 jobs and for women in 15 jobs
were multiplied by the nationwide employment in die respective
occupations, and the products were totaled.
The totals are ex­
pressed as percentages of the similar total for the Nation.




Earnings of individuals varied substan­
tially within the same job and locality. In
many instances, weekly earnings of the high­
est paid employees exceeded those of the
lowest paid in the same job and area by $50
or more. Some employees in comparatively
low-paid jobs earned more than those in jobs
which averaged significantly higher. F o r
example, the following tabulation reveals con­
siderable overlapping of individual salaries
for women employed as class A correspond­
ence clerks and class A keypunch operators in
New York and Newark, despite a $36 differ­
ence in the weekly averages for the two jobs.

Class A
correspondence
clerks

_

Class A
keypunch
operators

Under $8 5 ----------------------------------$85 and under $90--------------------$90 and under $ 95--------------------$95 and under $10 0 ------------------$100 and under $110----------------$110 and under $120----------------$120 and o v e r ---------------------------

1
4
22
31
36

Total number of workers--

94

304

Average weekly earnings---------

$125

$89

Establishment Practices
Wage Provisions

-

109
84
33
41
34
3

-

and Supplementary

Data were also obtained on weekly work
schedules and selected supplementary bene­
fits, including paid holidays and vacations and
health, insurance, and pension plans for nonsupervisory office employees.
Scheduled Weekly Hours and Shift P ra c­
tic e s. Weekly work schedules of 37.5 hours
or less were in effect at the time of the study
in establishments accounting for about fourfifths of the nonsupervisory office employees
(table 14). The Southwest, Middle West, and
Pacific regions were th e only regions in
which a majority of th e employees were
scheduled to work longer than 37.5 hours a
week. Average weekly schedules in the three
major regions were 36.0 hours in the Middle
Atlantic, 37.0 in New England, and 37.5 in
the Great Lakes.
Very few office workers (about 1 V 2 p er­
cent) were employed on late shifts in Octobea>-November 1966; practically all of these
were electronic data processing or related
employees.
Paid Holidays. A ll of the establishments
visited during the study granted paid holidays
to nonsupervisory office employees (table 15).
The number of paid holidays provided annually

4
varied substantially among and within the
selected regions. Most common provisions
among the three major regions were 12 or
13 days annually in the Middle Atlantic, 10 or
11 days in New England, and 6 or 7 days in
the Great Lakes. Provisions for half holidays
(in addition to full holidays), were reported
by establishments accounting f o r at least
one-tenth of the office employment in most
regions.

and dismemberment insurance applied to
slightly more than half of the employees and
sickness and accident insurance, to slightly
over two-fifths.
The incidence of certain
benefits varied somewhat by region. The pro­
portions of employees in establishments pro­
viding accidental death and dismemberment
insurance, for example, ranged from nearly
two-fifths in the Border States to two-thirds
in New England.

Paid Vacations. Paid vacations w e r e
provided to all nonsupervisory office em ­
ployees after qualifying periods of service
(table 16). Provisions applying to a majority
of the employees included: 2 weeks of vaca­
tion pay after 1 year, 3 weeks after 10 years,
and 4 weeks after 20 years of service. P ro ­
visions tended to be more liberal in th e
Middle Atlantic than in the other regions,
particularly after longer qualifying periods
of service.

Pensions— providing r e g u l a r lifetime
payments to the employee on retirement, in
addition to Federal social security benefits—
applied to nearly all employees.

Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans.
Life, hospitalization, surgical, medical, and
catastrophe insurance, financed at least in
part by the employer, were available to more
than nine-tenths of th e office employees
(table 17). Sick leave (mostly at full pay
with no waiting period) was provided to twothirds of the employees. Accidental death




Nonproduction Bonuses.
Nonproduction
bonuses, typically paid at Christmas or yearend, were provided by establishments em ­
ploying slightly more than one-third of the
office employees (table 18). The proportions
of employees provided such bonuses ranged
from about three-fifths in the Southwest and
Middle West to one-sixth in the Pacific.
Free Lunches. Establishments employ­
ing three-tenths of the employees provided
free lunches. Although this benefit was most
prevalent in the Middle Atlantic region, it
was reported by s o m e establishments in
nearly all the regions.

Table 1. Average Weekly Earnings:

Selected Occupations

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s 1 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in h o m e o f f i c e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f f i c e s of
life in s u ra n ce c o m p a n ie s , U n ited S tates and s e le c t e d r e g i o n s , O c t o b e r —N o v e m b e r 1966)
U n ited State s 2
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s A (1 8 8 m e n and 2 w om en)_____
A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s B (311 m e n and 16 w o m e n )___
A s s e m b l e r s (1 ,0 0 2 w o m e n and 44 m en)_________
C a r d - t a p e - c o n v e r t e r o p e r a t o r s (1 1 0 m en
and 17 w om en )_____________________________________
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A _________________________
M e n _______________________________________________
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B________________________
M e n _____________________________________________ _
W o m e n ________________________ _________________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A _______________ ______
M e n ___________________________ __________________
W o m e n . _________________ _______________________
C l e r k s , a cc o u n tin g , c l a s s B _______________ ____
W o m e n ____ _____________________________________
C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s A________________
M e n ___________ _________________________ ________
W o m e n _______ ________________________ _________
C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s B _______________
M e n _______________________________________________
___
W o m e n _____________________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s A (3 9 4 w o m e n
and 11 m e n )___ ____________________________ ________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B ( 1 ,4 8 3 w o m e n
and 20 m e n )________________________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s C ( 2 ,6 1 7 w o m e n
and 68 m e n )..
_____________________ ____________
C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n _______________ ________
W o m e n __________________________________ _______
C l e r k s , p r e m i u m - l e d g e r - c a r d (7 8 0 w o m e n
and 16 m e n ) . . ____ ________________________________
C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s
M e n _______________________________________________
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A (1 ,2 1 2 w o m e n
and 4 m e n ) _________________________________________
K ey p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B (2 , 277 w o m e n
and 1 m a n )________________________________________
P r e m iu m a c c e p t o r s (5 1 8 w o m e n and 9 m e n ) ___
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c data
p r o c e s s in g , c l a s s A ______________________________
M e n _______________________________________________
W o m e n __________________________ _ ____________
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c data
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s B________________________ _____
M e n ___________________________ __ _____ ______
W o m e n ____________________________________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l (a ll w o m e n )_____________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n io r ( 1, 557 w om en
and 16 m e n )________________________________________
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s A (2 2 3 m en
and 19 w om en )
....
...........
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s B
... . . ..
............
M en .
.
.
..
W o m e n . ...
...
. . ...
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A .
M en .
. _
W o m e n ____________________________________________

See footnotes at end of table.




N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

Ne^v E n g lan d

W eek ly e a r n in g s 1
M ean 3

M ed ia n 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

$ 27 7.5 0 —$ 38 1.5 0
1 9 5 .5 0 - 2 4 4 .00
74.0 0
6 3 .0 0 -

190
327
1, 046

$ 332.00
220.00
68.5 0

$ 31 3.0 0
2 2 1 .00
6 6 .0 0

127
229
160
500
231
269
073
198
875
907
827
123
244
479
113
183
930

108.00
152.50
169.50
120.50
145.00
99.5 0
97.5 0
113.50
94.0 0
7 3.00
72.5 0
118.50
142.00
106.50
9 6 .5 0
122.50
91.0 0

110.00
150.00
168.50
115.50
144.50
9 8.0 0
9 5 .0 0
110.00
9 2.5 0
7 1.50
71.0 0
113.00
146.00
104.00
91.0 0
124.50
8 6 .0 0

9 9 .0 0 1 2 0 .5 0 1 4 4 .0 0 9 2 .5 0 1 2 3 .5 0 8 0 .0 0 8 3 .0 0 9 8 .0 0 8 1 .0 0 6 3 .5 0 6 3 .0 0 9 7 .0 0 1 2 1 .0 0 8 9 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 1 0 3 .0 0 7 5 .0 0 -

122.00
182.50
2 01 .00
146.50
167.50
115.50
109.50
128.50
105.00
8 2.0 0
8 1.0 0
143.00
161.50
119.00
113.50
139.50
104.00

1,

1,
1,

1,

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

M id d le A tla n tic

W eek ly e a rn in g s 1
M ean 3

M ed ia n 3

41
72
64

$ 33 6.0 0
2 24 .50
6 7.5 0

$ 3 2 6.0 0
2 2 3 .0 0
6 5 .5 0

28
16
51
109
16
93
232
229
11
_
47
7
40

152.50
169.00
123.50
9 7 .5 0
103.50
9 6 .5 0
7 1 .5 0
71.5 0
121.50
93.5 0
119.00
8 9.0 0

154.50
170.00
122.00
9 7.5 0
102.50
9 7 .0 0
7 0 .5 0
7 0.0 0
8 7 .0 0
8 5.0 0

M id d le ra n g e 3

$ 2 9 7 .5 0 —$ 3 7 4 .0 0
2 0 4 . 00 - 2 4 6 .5 0
6 3 .5 0 6 7 .5 0
1 4 0 .0 0 1 6 3 .0 0 1 1 2 .5 0 8 3 .5 0 9 2 .0 0 8 3 .GO63.G O 6 3 .0 0 _
7 9 .5 0 _
7 8 .0 0 -

170.00
178.00
146 .50
110.00
115.50
109.50
7 9.0 0
7 9 .0 0
_
103.00
9 6 .0 0

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

W e e k ly e a rn in g s 1
M ean3

M ed ia n 3

79
95
-

$ 3 5 4 .5 0
2 3 5 .5 0
-

$ 32 6.5 0
2 3 3 .5 0
-

62
34
28
93
76
151
29
122
174
148
172
73
99
297
_
211

116.50
177.00
187.50
165.00
1 67.00
102.50
123.00
9 8 .0 0
8 2 .0 0
8 1 .0 0
137.50
155.50
124.50
120.50
_
116 .50

116.00
169.00
183.00
170.00
169.00
9 9.0 0
116.00
9 6.5 0
7 7.0 0
7 7.00
130.50
161.00
118.00
125.00
_
119.00

M idd le ra n g e 3

$ 30 1.0 0 —$403.50
2 2 0 .5 0 - 247.50
1 0 8 .5 0 1 5 0 .5 0 1 6 6 .0 0 1 4 5 .GO1 4 8 .5 0 8 3 .5 0 1 0 5 .5 0 8 3 .5 0 7 0 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 1 1 4 ,5 0 1 4 4 .0 0 1 0 9 .0 0 9 8 .0 0 9 4 .5 0 -

127.00
215.00
216.50
189.00
190.50
116.00
145.00
110.50
86.50
88.00
163.50
173.00
132.50
145.00
_
139.00

405

8 0.0 0

76.0 0

6 9 .0 0 -

8 8 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

81

9 5.0 0

98.0 0

8 5 .GO- 107.00

1, 503

6 7.0 0

6 5 .0 0

6 0 .GO-

72.5 0

198

6 7.5 0

6 3 .5 0

6 3 .5 0 -

73.5 0

200

77.0 0

7 7.00

6 8 .0 0 -

2, 685
1, 134
1, 045

6 3 .0 0
8 2.0 0
8 1 .0 0

6 2.5 0
7 9.00
7 8.5 0

58.GO6 9 .0 0 6 9 .0 0 -

6 7.0 0
92.5 0
92.0 0

284
67
61

6 5 .0 0
81.0 0
8 0.5 0

6 2 .0 0
8 0 .0 0
79.0 0

6 1 .0 0 6 9 .GO6 8 .0 0 -

7 0. 00
9 2.0 0
9 2.0 0

1, 065
278
243

6 6 .5 0
8 8 .0 0
88.0 0

6 5.0 0
8 4.0 0
8 5.0 0

6 3 .GO- 70.00
7 4 .0 0 - 100.00
7 5 .0 0 - 100.00

796
470
417

7 0.0 0
116.00
118.00

7 0.00
112.00
113.00

61. GO- 77.5 0
98. 0 0 - 130.00
1 0 0 .GO- 131.50

87
80

110.50
112.00

_
109.00
111.00

1 0 0 .0 0 1 0 1 .5 0 -

122.50
125.00

98
94

137.00
138.00

139.00
141.50

1 1 2 .5 0 - 157.00
113.50— 158.00

-

84.00

1, 216

8 5 .0 0

84.0 0

78.GO-

91.0 0

128

8 7 .0 0

8 5.0 0

7 8 .5 0 -

9 7 .0 0

345

8 8 .0 0

87.0 0

8 3 .0 0 -

92.50

2, 278
527

7 0 .5 0
7 4 .5 0

6 9 .0 0
7 0.00

6 3 .0 0 6 4 .5 0 -

76.0 0
84.00

191
38

7 4.5 0
76.0 0

7 6 .0 0
6 9 .5 0

6 8 .0 0 6 1 .5 0 -

8 0 .0 0
9 0 .0 0

695
89

7 2.5 0
81.0 0

71.0 0
82.0 0

65. GO68. 0 0 -

77.00
90.00

532
430
102

163.00
167.00
146.50

161.50
167.50
143.00

1 4 4 .5 0 1 5 0 .0 0 1 2 4 .5 0 -

182.50
184.00
164.00

58
37
21

162.50
167.00
155.00

159.00
159.00
152.00

1 4 7 .GO- 173 .00
149. o o - 176.50
1 3 8 .0 0 - 164.50

124
107
17

181.00
180.50
186.00

184.00
184.00
184.50

1 7 2 .5 0 - 192.50
1 7 2 .5 0 - 188.50
1 7 1 .0 0 - 201.50

8 34
581
253
2, 310

133.50
138.50
122.50
7 4 .5 0

134.00
138.00
122.50
7 4.00

1 1 5 .5 0 - 153.00
1 2 0 .0 0 - 154.00
1 0 4 .GO- 142.00
67. 0 0 8 2.0 0

101
69
32
154

130.50
133.50
123.00
73.0 0

126.50
132.50
121.00
7 2.5 0

1 1 9 .0 0 - 144.00
1 2 1 .0 0 - 145.00
1 1 7 .5 0 - 131.50
6 9 .GO- 77.0 0

236
169
67
691

157.00
158.50
153.50
79.5 0

156.50
158.50
153.00
79.00

1 4 8 .0 0 - 168.50
1 5 0 .5 0 - 170.00
1 4 2 .0 0 - 163.00
7 3 .0 0 85.00

1, 573

8 9 .5 0

9 0 .0 0

8 0 .GO-

98.0 0

253

8 5.5 0

8 5 .0 0

79.GO-

9 2.5 0

-

242
308
247
61
417
292
125

193.00
172.50
176.50
156.00
113.00
115.00
108.50

193.50
170.50
175.50
148.00
111.00
113.00
110.00

1 7 8 .0 0 1 4 8 .0 0 1 5 2 .5 0 1 3 0 .5 0 1 0 2 .0 0 1 0 2 .5 0 1 0 0 .5 0 -

2 1 4 .0 0
199.50
2 0 2 .00
174.50
121.00
124.00
114.00

27
61
38
23
48
31

194.00
154.50
158.50
148.00
106.50
105.00

1 92.50
156.50
162.50
144.00
104.50
102.00

1 8 5 .0 0 1 3 8 .0 0 1 4 4 .0 0 1 3 0 .5 0 1 0 0 .5 0 9 9 .5 0 -

2 0 1 .5 0
169.50
170.50
165.00
110.00
108.00

50
_
_

123
77

-

2 1 1 .5 0
_
_
_
112.50
112.00

2 0 6 .5 0
_
_
_
113.00
113.00

-

-

1 7 8 ,5 0 - 231.00
_
>
_
_
_
_
1 0 3 .0 0 - 120.00
1 0 2 .0 0 - 120.00

Table 1.

Average Weekly Earnings:

Selected Occupations— Continued

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s 1 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in h o m e o f f i c e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f f i c e s o f
li fe in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , O c t o b e r — o v e m b e r 1966)
N
U nited S tates 2
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

T a b u la t in g - m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B_________
M en
_
W o m e n ____________________________________________
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C _________
M en
W om en
T a p e li b r a r ia n s (3 9 w o m e n and 32 m e n )_________
T y p is t s , c l a s s A ( l , 817 w o m e n and 2 m e n ) ____
T y p is t s , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n )_____________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s A _____________________________
M e n ________________________________________________
W o m e n ____________________________________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s B _____________________________
M en _______ _______________________________________
W o m e n ____________________________________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C _____________________________
__
M en
_

S ee fo o t n o t e s a t en d o f ta b le,




M id d le A t la n t ic

N ew E n g lan d

W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

M ean3

M e d ia n 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

843
373
470
627
327
300
71
1 ,8 1 9
4 ,6 9 7
367
328
39
463
348
115
737
481
256

$94 .00
9 7.0 0
9 2 .0 0
7 6.00
7 6.0 0
7 6.0 0
101.50
7 8.00
6 6 .5 0
185.50
189.00
156.00
156.50
161.00
143.50
130.00
140.00
111.50

$ 9 4 .50
9 5 .0 0
9 4 .5 0
7 5 .0 0
7 5 .0 0
76.0 0
101.00
7 7 .0 0
6 5 .0 0
182.00
185.00
152.00
153.50
159.50
140.50
127.50
133.00
114.50

$ 8 6 .0 0 — 1 0 1 .0 0
$
8 6 .5 0 - 106 .50
8 4 .0 0 - 100.00
6 8 . 5 0 - 8 4 .0 0
6 9 . 0 0 - 8 3 .0 0
6 7 . 0 0 - 8 4 .5 0
8 5 .0 0 - 116.00
7 0 .5 0 - 8 4 .0 0
6 0 . 0 0 - 7 1 .5 0
1 5 8 .0 0 - 2 1 1 .5 0
1 6 3 .0 0 - 2 1 4 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0 - 183 .50
1 3 4 .0 0 - 174.00
1 3 6 .5 0 - 181 .50
1 2 3 .0 0 - 159.00
1 0 7 .5 0 - 151 .50
1 1 5 .5 0 - 163 .00
8 7 . 5 0 - 135.50

86
62
24
62
42
20
12
146
423
68
59
9
92
61
31
95
63
32

W eek ly e a r n in g s 1
M ea n 3

$ 9 3 .0 0
9 2 .5 0
9 5 .0 0
8 3 .0 0
8 3 .0 0
8 2 .5 0
101 .50
7 9 .5 0
6 8 .0 0
167.50
168 .50
164.00
150.00
152.00
145.50
121.50
121.50
122.00

M ed ia n 3

$ 9 2 .0 0
9 0 .5 0
9 5 .5 0
8 2.5 0
8 2 .5 0
8 4.0 0
-

78.5 0
6 7 .5 0
177.00
179.50
146.00
150.50
144.50
1 22.50
121.00
1 25.00

M id d le ra n g e 3

$ 8 5 .5 0 — 9 8 .5 0
$
8 5 .5 0 - 9 8 .0 0
8 8 .0 0 -1 0 0 .0 0
7 9 . 0 0 - 8 7 .0 0
7 9 . 0 0 - 8 5 .5 0
7 6 . 5 0 - 9 1 .5 0
7 1 . 5 0 - 8 6 .5 0
6 3 . 0 0 - 7 4 .0 0
1 5 3 .5 0 -1 8 8 .5 0
1 5 3 .5 0 -1 9 0 .0 0
1 3 4 .0 0 -1 6 5 .0 0
1 3 4 .0 0 -1 6 7 .0 0
1 3 4 .5 0 -1 5 4 .5 0
1 1 0 .5 0 -1 3 4 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0 -1 3 1 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0 -1 3 3 .5 0

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

272
150
122
436
1, 396
51
50
60
55
200
-

54

W eek ly e a r n in g s 1
M ea n 3

-

$ 7 7 .5 0
73.0 0
8 3 .0 0
8 2 .5 0
7 1 .0 0
2 2 7 .0 0
2 2 6 .5 0
186.50
186.00
162.00
-

137.11

M ed ia n 3

-

$ 7 6 .0 0
7 0 .5 0
8 2 .5 0
8 2 .0 0
7 0 .0 0
2 1 8 .5 0
2 1 8 .5 0
1 91.50
191 .50
167.00
-

142 .00

M id d le ' ra n g e 3

-

$ 7 0 .0 0 — 84 .00
$
6 6 . 0 0 - 7 8 .0 0
7 7 . 0 0 - 88.0 0
-

7 7 . 0 0 - 86.0 0
6 5 . 0 0 - 7 5 .0 0
2 1 1 .5 0 -2 4 9 .5 0
2 1 1 .0 0 -2 4 9 .5 0
1 6 9 .5 0 -2 0 0 .5 0
1 6 9 .5 0 -2 0 0 .5 0
1 4 1 .0 0 -1 7 9 .5 0
-

1 2 5 .5 0 -1 5 3 .0 0

Table 1.

Average Weekly Earnings:

Selected Occupations----Continued

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s 1 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in h o m e o f f i c e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f f i c e s o f
life in su ra n ce c o m p a n ie s , U n ited S tates and s e le c t e d r e g i o n s , O c t o b e r — o v e m b e r 1966)
N
B o r d e r S tates
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

...................... _ _
A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s A
_
.
A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s B ______________________ _____ _____
A s s e m b le rs
_
......
C a r d -t a p e -c o n v e r t e r
o p e r a t o r s _ ____
_ _
_
. _
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A_________________________
M e n _______________________________________________
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B _____________________ ___
M en
. . ..
........ .
...........
W om en
......
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A______________________
M en
. ......................
_. . _ _
W o m e n ____________________________________________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n t in g , c l a s s B______________________
W om en
.. .. '____
C le rk s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e ,
c la s s A
____
M e n . . . .................................... ..............................................
W om en _ _
_
.
........... . . _ .....
C le r k s , co r r e s p o n d e n c e ,
cla s s B
.
.
M en
_
_
_ . ___ ___
W om en
C le rk s , file , c la s s A .
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B ...
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s C _ . ...
C l e r k s , p o l i c y e v a lu a tio n
_. _
W o m e n ____________________________________________
C l e r k s . p r e m iu m - le d g e r - c a r d _ _
C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s ... _
. ...
_
M en ....................
K eyp u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A^
K ey p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ...............
.
._
P r e m iu m a c c e p t o r s ........................ ..................................
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c data
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s A...
........
M e n _____________________ __________________________
W om en
............... _.
___
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s B______________________________
M e n ____________ _______ ___________________________
W om en _
__________ _______
S ten og ra p h ers, g e n e ra l
. . .
....
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n io r _
S v s te m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s A
. _
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s B ._
_ .......... _
.
M e n _______________________________________________
W om en . . . .
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s A_____________ _____________ ___________ _______
M en
. . .
W om en
__ ......... .

See footnotes at end of table.




N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

S ou th ea st

W e e k ly e a rn in g s 1
M ean 3 M ed ia n 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

Sou th w est

W eek ly e a r n in g s 1
M ea n 3

M ed ia n 3

W e e k ly e a rn in g s 1

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

M ea n 3

M ed ia n 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

7
24
64

$ 2 8 5 .5 0
166.50
6 3 .5 0

$ 1 6 1 .5 0
6 1 .0 0

$ 132.00—$ 19 3.5 0
5 9 .0 0 - 6 7.0 0

111.00
2 0 0 .5 0
2 0 2 .0 0
138.00
158.00
9 2.5 0
100.00
128.00
9 7 .5 0
7 1.00
71.0 0

30
22
45
16
29
123
26
97
263
251

147.00
167.00
9 8 .0 0
137.00
76.5 0
9 2 .0 0
9 7 .0 0
9 1 .0 0
7 1.5 0
7 1 .0 0

153.00
158.00
9 7 .0 0
127 .00
6 6 .0 0
9 0 .0 0
100 .00
9 0 .0 0
6 8 .0 0
6 8 .0 0

M id d le, ra n g e 3

8
19
93

$ 3 0 6 .5 0
193 .50
6 2 .0 0

$ 19 8.0 0
6 0 .0 0

23
20
15
61
28
33
124
19
105
243
238

100.50
157.50
180 .00
1 08.00
142.00
7 9 .0 0
9 3 .5 0
1 10.50
9 0 .5 0
6 6 .5 0
6 6 .0 0

104.00
158.50
173.00
104.00
140.50
78.5 0
9 0 .5 0
104.50
87.5 0
6 4 .5 0
6 4.5 0

86
18
68

9 5 .0 0
135.50
8 4 .0 0

81.0 0
143.00
8 1.0 0

7 9 .5 0 9 6.0 0
9 8 . 0 0 - 174.00
7 9 .5 0 8 4.00

87
10
77

9 9.0 0
148.00
9 3 .0 0

9 1 .0 0
.
9 1 .0 0

8 3 .5 0 - 106.00
_
_
8 3 .0 0 - 104.50

6 7 .0 0 - 104.00
6 2 .0 0 - 6 9 .0 0
5 4 .0 0 - 6 6 .0 0
6 5 .0 0 8 6 .0 0
6 5 .GO- 8 5 .0 0
6 9 .5 0 8 3 .0 0
8 5 .GO- 111.00
8 6 .5 0 - 111.50
7 6 .5 0 - 9 2 .5 0
6 4 .0 0 7 6 .5 0
-

77
75
18
144
473
123
119
156
54
42
210
415
48

7 7 .0 0
7 6 .0 0
7 6 .5 0
6 4 .5 0
5 9 .5 0
7 4 .5 0
7 4.5 0
6 5 .5 0
1 10.00
112.00
7 9 .5 0
6 4 .5 0
7 0 .5 0

75.0 0
_
7 5.00
71.5 0
6 3 .0 0
5 8.00
7 4.0 0
7 4 .0 0
6 7 .0 0
108.00
109.00
8 1.0 0
6 4 .5 0
6 9 .0 0

6 9 .0 0 8 4.0 0
_
6 8 .5 0 8 2.00
6 9 .0 0 77.5 0
5 7 .5 0 - 6 7.5 0
5 5 .5 0 - 6 4.0 0
6 2 .0 0 84.0 0
6 2 .0 0 84.0 0
5 4 .0 0 74.00
9 3 . 0 0 - 124.50
9 7 . 0 0 - 124.50
7 2 . 0 0 - 85.5 0
5 8 .5 0 - 6 9 .0 0
5 6 . 5 0 - 84.0 0

133
13
120
52
149
180
100
88
65
45
45
80
204
60

7 4 .5 0
106.00
7 1.0 0
7 0.5 0
6 2 .5 0
5 7.0 0
8 3 .0 0
8 2.0 0
6 2 .5 0
112.50
112.50
81.0 0
6 9 .5 0
78.0 0

7 2 .5 0
_
7 1.5 0
6 8 .0 0
6 1 .0 0
5 7 .0 0
8 1 .0 0
8 1.0 0
6 0 .0 0
113.50
113.50
8 0 .0 0
6 9 .0 0
6 9 .5 0

6 7 .0 0 - 80.5 0
_
_
6 4 .0 0 - 7 7.50
6 0 .5 0 - 7 5.00
5 5 .0 0 - 6 7 .0 0
5 3 .0 0 - 6 0.5 0
6 9 .0 0 - 92.0 0
7 1 .5 0 - 90.0 0
5 7 .0 0 - 68.0 0
9 3 .5 0 - 128.50
9 3 .5 0 - 128.50
7 2 .5 0 - 9 0 .0 0
6 1 .0 0 - 7 5.00
6 3 .0 0 - 7 8.50

130.00
-

1 1 6 .0 0 - 134.50
-

65
54
-

162.50
166 .00
_

158.00
163.00
.

1 3 9 .5 0 - 185.00
1 4 7 .0 0 - 185.00
.

68
54
14

1 54.00
161.50
126.00

160.00
161.50
_

1 38.SO­ 173.00
U S . 0 0 - 180.50
_
«

105.50
110.50
94.00
76.50
85.00
142.50
-

108 .50
115 .00
7 4 .0 0
8 4 .5 0
-

9 5 .0 0 - 115.50
1 0 6 .0 0 - 115 .50
6 4 .5 0 - 8 4 .0 0
7 6 .0 0 - 9 3 .0 0
-

134
77
308
175
18
26
_

1 13.00
126.50
6 7 .0 0
8 4 .5 0
1 99.50
147 .50

115.50
121.00
6 6 .0 0
8 3.0 0
2 0 7 .5 0
144.00
_

9 4 .5 0 1 0 9 .5 0 _
5 9 .0 0 7 4 .0 0 1 9 0 .5 0 1 3 2 .5 0 _

81
51
30
221
109
27
17
16
_

124.00
128.00
117.00
7 0.5 0
9 0 .5 0
192.00
144.50
148.00

127.00
1 27.00
1 21.00
7 0.0 0
9 1 .5 0
181.50
152.50
1 52.50
_

1 1 5 .0 0 115.50—
1 0 8 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 8 1 .5 0 1 8 1 .5 0 1 3 2 .5 0 1 3 7 .0 0 _

112.50
112.50
112.50

114.50
-

1 0 3 .5 0 - 120.50
-

67
47
20

108 .00
113 .00
9 7 .0 0

25
19

1 20.00
125.50

1 15.50
123.50

1 0 7 .0 0 - 150.00
1 0 4 .5 0 - 151.00

-

9
-

$281.50
-

20
11
9
54
50
143
135

116.50
127.00
103.50
97.50
96.00
75.00
74.50

11
7

115.00
116.00

21
14
13
61
65
70
69
72
23
21
34
103
10

90.00
86.00
8 5.50
6 6.00
60.00
78.00
78.00
76.50
99.50
100.50
86.00
71.50
69.50

100.50
6 7 .0 0
5 8 .0 0
7 5 .5 0
7 5 .0 0
7 8 .5 0
9 8 .0 0
9 8 .0 0
8 7 .0 0
7 2 .0 0
-

23
13
10

130.50
137.00
122.00

29
20
9
92
15
7
17
10
7

$ 1 2 6 .0 0
9 8 .0 0
9 4 .0 0
7 5 .0 0
7 4 .0 0
-

-

-

$ 92 .00 —$ 1 4 0 .0 0
8 6 .5 0 - 109.00
8 5 .5 0 - 108.50
6 8 .5 0 - 8 2.0 0
6 7 .5 0 8 0 .0 0
-

-

_

106.50
111.50
100.00

$ 1 7 7 .5 0 —$ 2 0 7 .0 0
5 7 .5 0 - 6 6.0 0
9 3 .0 0 1 4 2 .5 0 1 5 5 .0 0 7 8 .5 0 1 2 4 .0 0 6 3 .5 0 8 1 .0 0 9 8 .0 0 8 1 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 6 0 .0 0 -

129.00
138.50
74.0 0
9 4.0 0
2 11 .50
165.50

9 3 . 5 0 - 116.00
9 6 . 0 0 - 121.00
8 8 . 0 0 - 1 11.50

9 2 .5 0 1 4 5 .5 0 6 6 .0 0 111.00—
6 0 .0 0 8 3 .0 0 8 6 .5 0 8 3 .0 0 6 0 .5 0 6 0 .GO-

179.00
2 02.50
115.00
169.00
98.5 0
102.50
104.50
9 9.50
8 1.00
80.0 0

138.50
139.50
135.00
7 8.50
100.50
208 .00
152.50
157.50
_

Table 1.

Average Weekly Earnings:

Selected Occupations— Continued

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s 1 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in h o m e o f f i c e s and r e g i o n a l h ea d o f f i c e s o f
life in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , O c t o b e r — o v e m b e r 1966)
N

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
_____
M e n ________________________________ __ _________
W om en _
.
............ _ ..................... . ..... .
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C .......
M e n __________________________________ ___________
W om en
......
.
. ....
. .......
T a p e li b r a r ia n s
T y p is t s , c l a s s A _____________________________________
T y p is t s , c l a s s B ____________________________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s A _____________________________
M e n ________________________________________________
W o m e n ____________________________________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s B _____________________________
M e n ________________________________________________
W o m e n ____________________________________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C _____________________________
M e n ________________________________________________
W o m e n ____________________________________________

See fo o t n o t e s at en d o f t a b le .




N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

32
19
13
35
10
25
-

39
233
6
6
-

18
12
6
44
32
12

W eek ly e a r n in g s 1
M ean 3

M ed ian 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

$ 93 .50
100.00
84.0 0
74.0 0
7 3.00
74.0 0

$95.50
97.00
_
74.00
74.00

$ 8 8 .0 0 —$ 1 0 3 .0 0
9 4 . 5 0 - 107.00
_
6 3 . 5 0 - 8 2 .5 0
6 4 . 0 0 - 8 1 .0 0
6 6 . 5 0 - 7 6.0 0
5 9 . 0 0 - 7 4.0 0

-

74.5 0
6 8 .0 0
2 32 .00
232 .00
-

163.00
169.50
150.50
126.50
130.50
116.00

-

74.00
68.0 0
-

159.50
125.50
136.00

S ou th w est

S ou th ea st

B o r d e r States

-

1 5 4 .0 0 - 179.00
1 0 9 .5 0 - 144.50
1 0 9 .5 0 - 153.00

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

96
34
62
66
17
49
6
132
423
21
19
37
32
115
68
47

W e e k ly e a rn in g s 1
M ea n 3

M ed ia n 3

$ 8 3 .5 0
8 5 .5 0
8 2 .0 0
6 7 .5 0
6 8 .5 0
6 7 .0 0
9 1 .5 0
6 8 .5 0
6 0 .0 0
2 02 .00
2 06 .00

$ 8 3 .0 0
9 2.5 0
8 2 .5 0
6 7 .0 0
6 5 .0 0
6 7 .5 0

-

169.50
168.50
110.50
128.50
8 4.0 0

-

6 4 .5 0
5 9 .0 0
2 0 4 .0 0
2 0 4 .5 0
173.00
1 71.50
113.00
128.00
7 2 .0 0

M id d le ra n g e 3

$ 7 7 .5 0 —$ 92 .50
7 8 .5 0 - 9 7 .0 0
7 7 . 5 0 - 8 9 .0 0
6 4 .0 0 - 7 2 .5 0
6 0 . 0 0 - 7 2 .5 0
6 4 . 5 0 - 7 0 .0 0
6 1 . 0 0 - 7 4 .5 0
5 5 .5 0 - 6 3 .5 0
1 7 6 .5 0 -2 1 4 .0 0
1 7 9 .5 0 -2 1 4 .0 0
1 4 6 .0 0 -1 8 7 .5 0
1 4 5 .0 0 -1 8 5 .5 0
8 7 .5 0 -1 3 4 .5 0
1 1 1 .0 0 -1 4 5 .5 0
5 9 .0 0 -1 0 5 .5 0

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

63
40
23
44
17
27
8
230
456
40
37
32
25
7
60
30
30

W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1
M ea n 3

$ 8 9 .5 0
9 5 .5 0
7 9.0 0
6 8 .0 0
7 4.0 0
6 4 .0 0
105 .50
7 2.5 0
6 2 .0 0
174 .00
1 75.00
1 63.50
1 72.50
1 30.50
1 16.50
129.00
1 03.50

M ed ia n 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

$ 8 6 .5 0
8 7 .5 0
77.5 0
6 7 .0 0
71.5 0
6 3 .5 0
72.0 0
6 1 .0 0
173.00
173.00
138.50
156.00
114.50
119.50
102.00

$ 7 7 .5 0 —$96 ,00
8 1 .0 0 -1 1 3 .0 0
7 4 .0 0 - 86.5 0
6 0 . 0 0 - 74.00
6 9 . 0 0 - 7 5.00
5 7 .5 0 - 6 8.0 0
-

6 6 . 0 0 - 77.50
5 7 . 5 0 - 6 6 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0 -2 1 1 .5 0
1 4 4 .5 0 -2 1 1 .5 0
1 2 7 .0 0 -1 9 8 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0 -1 9 8 .0 0
9 6 .5 0 -1 3 4 .5 0
1 0 7 .5 0 -1 5 6 .0 0
8 7 .0 0 -1 1 7 .5 0

Table 1. Average Weekly Earnings:

Selected Occupations— Continued

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s 1 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in h o m e o f f i c e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f f i c e s o f
life in s u ra n ce c o m p a n ie s , U n ited Sta tes and s e le c t e d r e g i o n s , O c t o b e r — o v e m b e r 1966)
N
G re a t L a k es
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s A
... _ ....
A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s B ________________________________
A s s e m b l e r s .........................
C a r d -ta p e -c o n v e r te r
o p e ra to rs
_
.. ._
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A________________________
M e n _______________________________________________
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B________________________
M en
_
. . . .
W om en
. . .
...
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A_____________________
M en
W o m e n ___________________________________________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B_____________________
. ........ _
W om en
_
. . . . . ....................
C le rk s , co r re s p o n d e n c e ,
c l a s s A_
..
. .............
............. ...
. _ _
...
M en
Wom en
_
. . . . . . .
......
C le rk s , c o r re sp o n d e n c e ,
cla s s B
...
___
._
M e n ______________________________________________
W om en
.
................ _
C le r k s , file , c la s s A
_ . ....
_ .. .. _
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B _____________________________
C le rk s , file , c la s s C
...
. _
......
C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n -. _
.
..
W o m e n ___________________________________________
C le rk s , p r e m iu m - le d g e r -c a r d
... . . . .
C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s
__
M en
_
.............
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A ...........
K ey p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ____________________
P r e m iu m a c c e p t o r s
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s A_____________________________
M e n .. ._
.............. .
..................
W om en
........
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s B__________ __________________
............... .
M en ____ __ ....
W o m e n ........................................................ .......................
S ten ogra p h ers, g en era l
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r _________________ __________
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s A
. ..
............... . ... .
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s B ..................................
M en
..........
W om en
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s A _.
........ .
. _ _ ........
. ....
M en
...................
_
.
..
W o m e n _ .........

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

M id d le W est

W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1
M ean 3

M ed ia n 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

38
70
147

$ 317.50
225.00
6 6.00

$ 2 9 7 .5 0
2 19 .50
6 2 .5 0

18
72
52
158
55
103
310
78
232
424
410

97.50
150.50
163.00
109.00
123.00
101.50
99.50
119.00
93.00
75.50
75.00

9 9 .0 0
150.00
158.50
107.50
124.50
103.50
9 8.0 0
115.00
9 3.5 0
75.0 0
75.0 0

8 7 .5 0 1 1 9 .5 0 1 3 1 .0 0 9 2 .5 0 1 1 1 .5 0 8 6 .5 0 8 1 .0 0 1 0 1 .5 0 7 7 .5 0 6 5 .5 0 6 4 .5 0 -

183
70
113

118.50
139.00
105.50

314
42
272
87
454
336
342
312
148
96
73
246
408
205

$ 2 3 7 .0 0 —$ 3 7 5 .0 0
1 8 9 .5 0 - 2 48 .00
5 9 . 0 0 - 7 1.0 0

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

P a c if i c

W e e k ly e a rn in g s 1
M ean 3

M ed ia n 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1
M ea n 3

M ed ia n 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

$ 22 1.0 0 —$ 262.50
_
_

23
35

$ 16 3.5 0
6 8 .0 0

$ 16 5.5 0
6 8 .0 0

$ 1 2 2 .5 0 —$ 1 9 6 .0 0
6 5 .0 0 7 1 .0 0

6
15
_

$ 2 7 5 .0 0
2 4 5 .0 0
_

$ 2 4 1 .0 0
_

107.50
176.00
184.50
125.00
136.50
113.00
113.50
132.50
108.50
8 5.0 0
84.0 0

15
12
108
9
99
243
240

_
178.00
191.50
89.5 0
104.50
8 8 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
6 9 .5 0

_
183.50
_
89.0 0
8 9 .0 0
6 9 .0 0
6 9 .0 0

_
_
1 2 8 .0 0 - 2 1 7 .5 0
_
_
_
_
7 9 .5 0 - 100.50
7 9 .5 0 - 9 6 .5 0
6 1 .0 0 77.5 0
6 1 .GO- 7 6 .5 0

_
11
_
16
14
_
71
15
56
91
82

_
134 .00
_
140 .50
142 .50
_
111 .00
1 18.50
109 .50
8 7 .0 0
8 7 .5 0

_
_
_
127.50
_
_
109.50
112.00
107.50
8 6 .5 0
86.0 0

_
_
_
1 1 5 .0 0 _
_
9 7 .GO9 6 .5 0 9 7 .GO76.G O 7 6 .0 0 -

112.00
145.50
104.00

1 0 0 .0 0 - 144.00
1 2 7 .0 0 - 150.50
9 5 . 0 0 - 112.00

92
46
46

118.50
131.00
106.50

1 08.50
126.50
103.00

9 9 .0 0 - 135.00
1 0 4 .0 0 - 157.50
9 6 .5 0 - 115.50

74
17
57

127 .00
134.50
124 .50

126.50
132.50
121.00

1 1 5 .5 0 - 139.50
1 2 7 .5 0 - 146.00
1 0 9 .5 0 - 139.00

91.00
114.00
87.50
80.00
66.50
60.50
81.50
79.50
71.50
112.00
116.00
84.50
70.50
72.50

9 0 .0 0
115.50
8 5 .0 0
7 8.0 0
6 6 .0 0
6 0.0 0
7 9.5 0
7 7.5 0
6 9.0 0
113.00
115.50
85.0 0
6 8 .5 0
70.0 0

7 6 .0 0 1 0 2 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 7 0 .5 0 6 0 .0 0 5 6 .5 0 6 8 .0 0 6 7 .0 0 6 3 .5 0 9 8 .0 0 1 0 1 .5 0 7 7 .5 0 6 3 .5 0 6 5 .0 0 -

105.00
124.50
100.50
8 5 .5 0
72.0 0
6 5 .0 0
9 1.0 0
88.0 0
77.5 0
124.00
129.00
9 2 .5 0
78.5 0
7 9.0 0

114
96
72
144
139
73
73
42
50
45
83
133
36

9 2 .5 0
8 6.5 0
7 3.0 0
6 2 .0 0
5 6.5 0
7 2.0 0
7 2.0 0
6 7 .5 0
106.50
107.00
80.5 0
6 3 .0 0
6 8 .0 0

9 0 .5 0
8 6 .5 0
70.5 0
6 1 .0 0
5 5 .5 0
71.5 0
71.5 0
6 5 .5 0
1 01.00
1 02.00
8 1 .0 0
6 2 .5 0
6 4 .5 0

7 2 .0 0 - 107.50
6 9 .0 0 9 6 .0 0
6 6 .5 0 - 7 8 .0 0
5 6 .5 0 - 6 6 .0 0
5 3 .0 0 - 5 9 .0 0
6 2 .5 0 79.0 0
6 2 .5 0 - 7 9 .0 0
6 0 .0 0 7 2.0 0
9 1 .5 0 - 115.00
9 2 .GO- 115.50
75.G O - 8 6 .0 0
5 6 .5 0 - 6 7 .0 0
6 0 .GO- 78.0 0

88
80
90
137
67
66
64
17
17
80
104
18

9 4 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
_
7 0 .0 0
6 4 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
8 8.5 0
7 2 .5 0
128 .00
128 .00
9 0 .5 0
7 9 .0 0
8 7.5 0

9 1 .5 0
9 0 .0 0
_
6 9 .0 0
6 4 .0 0
83.0 0
83.0 0
72.5 0
112.00
112.00
8 9 .0 0
79.0 0
8 4 .0 0

8 5 .0 0 _
8 0 .0 0 _
6 4 .5 0 5 9 .0 0 7 7 .0 0 7 7 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 1 1 2 .0 0 1 1 2 .0 0 8 3 .0 0 7 0 .5 0 7 8 .5 0 -

96
77
19

154.00
159.00
132.50

151.00
156.00
124.50

1 3 8 .5 0 - 170.00
1 4 4 .5 0 - 175.00
1 2 3 .5 0 - 144.50

42
35
7

146.50
150.00
128.50

144.00
148.50
_

1 3 8 .5 0 - 158.00
1 3 8 .5 0 - 161.50
_
_

56
53

178.00
178.00
..

167.50
167.50
_

1 5 1 .0 0 - 203 .00
1 5 0 .0 0 - 203.00
_
_

167
134
33
496
342
63
36
32

129.50
132.50
118.50
73.00
83.50
182.50
159.50
160.50

129.00
131.00
121.00
72.5 0
81.0 0
197.50
158.00
160.00

1 1 8 .5 0 1 2 0 .5 0 1 1 2 .0 0 6 7 .0 0 7 5 .5 0 1 7 9 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0 1 5 0 .0 0 -

47
32
15
149
149
25
10
10

122.50
123.50
119.50
70.0 0
85.0 0
182.50
155.00
155.00

120.00
119.00
121.00
6 9 .0 0
8 5 .0 0
181.00

1 1 5 .5 0 1 1 4 .0 0 1 1 5 .5 0 6 6 .GO7 8 .0 0 1 6 7 .5 0 -

39
29
10
144
45
25
26

1 41.00
144.50
1 31.00
8 6 .0 0
101 .50
2 0 1 .5 0
1 68.50

126.50
126.50
_
8 6 .5 0
104.00
2 1 0 .0 0
176.00
_
_

1 2 1 .0 0 - 169.50
1 2 1 .0 0 - 174.50
_
_

-

91
71
20

-

114.00
117.50
103.00

-

112.00
115.00
100.50

143.50
144.50
131.50
7 8.5 0
8 8 .0 0
2 0 8 .00
175.00
177.50

-

1 0 3 .0 0 - 123.00
1 0 5 .0 0 - 129.00
9 8 . 5 0 - 111.00

_

12
10

_

111.00
111.00

132.50
134.50
123 .50
7 5 .0 0
9 2 .5 0
187.00

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_

_
_

-

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
157.00
_
_
123.50
132.50
123.00
9 5.00
9 7.00

103.00
_
98.50
_
72.00
69.0 0
99.00
9 9.00
75.00
138.50
138.50
97.0 0
8 6.50
102.00

8 1 .GO- 92.50
9 2 .0 0 - 109.50
1 8 4 .5 0 - 220 .50
1 6 3 .5 0 - 186.50
_
_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

See footnotes at end of table.




(0

Table 1. Average Weekly Earnings:

Selected Occupations— Continued

O

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s 1 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in h o m e o f f i c e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f f i c e s o f
life in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s , O c t o b e r — o v e m b e r 1966)
N
G re a t L ak es
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ________
M en
.
W om en.....
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C ________
.................... .
M en .
_
W om en
_
. . .
... .... __
T a p e li b r a r ia n s
_
.
T y p is t s , c l a s s A ____ ________________________________
T y p is t s , c l a s s B ------ ------------------------------------------------U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s A _____________________________
........................... .
M en
. .
W o m e n ____________________________________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s B _____________________________
M e n ________________________________________________
W o m e n .......................... ........................... ............. .............
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C ____________________________
M e n ________________________________________________
W o m e n .............. .................................................... .............

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

101
43
58
77
50
27
12
506
1, 330
109
95
14
141
109
32
114
81
33

M ean 3 M ed ia n 3

$87 .00
9 4 .5 0
81.5 0
79.5 0
80.0 0
78.0 0
94.0 0
7 7.50
6 4 .5 0
182.00
187.00
147.00
145.00
148.00
133.50
121.00
122.50
118.00

$ 87 .00
9 3 .0 0
8 3 .5 0
8 0 .0 0
80.0 0
80.0 0
75.50
6 5 .0 0
186.00
189.50
143.00
145.00
124.50
123.00
124.00
118.00

P a cific

M id d le W est

W eek ly e a r n in g s 1
M id d le ra n g e 3

N u m b er
of
e m p lo y e e s

$ 7 5 .0 0 — 9 7 .0 0
$
7 9 .5 0 -1 0 0 .5 0
6 7 .5 0 - 9 3 .5 0
7 1 .5 0 - 8 6 .5 0
7 1 .5 0 - 8 6 .5 0
6 9 .5 0 - 34.0 0
6 9 . 0 0 - 8 5 .5 0
5 9 .0 0 - 6 9 .0 0
1 6 1 .5 0 -2 0 2 .5 0
1 6 5 .0 0 -2 0 2 .5 0
1 2 6 .0 0 -1 6 4 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0 -1 6 5 .0 0
1 1 5 .5 0 -1 5 3 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0 -1 3 3 .0 0
1 1 0 .0 0 -1 3 1 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0 -1 3 3 .0 0

44
12
32
24
8
16
132
222
31
25
29
17
12
52
28
24

W eek ly e a r n in g s 1
M ea n 3

M ed ia n 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

$ 8 6 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
7 1 .5 0
7 5 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
7 4 .0 0
6 2 .0 0
1 62.00
1 70.50
144 .50
155 .50
129.00
103.00
119 .50
8 4 .0 0

$ 83 .00
8 2.0 0
7 1.50
7 0.00
72.5 0
6 0 .5 0
161.50
171.00
.
138.50
154.00
_
109.00
119.50
76.0 0

$ 8 1 .0 0 — 9 2 .5 0
$
8 0 .0 0 - 8 8 .5 0
6 4 . 5 0 - 7 4 .5 0
6 3 . 5 0 - 7 2 .0 0
6 8 . 0 0 - 7 9 .5 0
5 7 . 5 0 - 6 5 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0 -1 7 9 .0 0
1 5 6 .0 0 -1 7 9 .0 0
_
1 3 5 .0 0 -1 5 4 .5 0
1 5 1 .5 0 -1 6 3 .5 0
_
8 2 .5 0 -1 2 4 .5 0
1 1 4 .0 0 -1 2 6 .0 0
6 4 .0 0 -1 0 5 .0 0

W eekly Warnings 1

Number
of
em ployees

M ean 3

M edian 3

M iddle range 3

48
42
6
191
178
38
.
_
51
34
17
54
30
24

$ 9 9 .5 0
9 8 .5 0
107 .00
8 1 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
179 .50
.
152 .00
154 .00
148.50
129 .00
135 .00
121.50

$ 9 7 .5 0
9 6 .5 0
_
.
8 0 .0 0
7 0 .5 0
168 .50
.
.
150 .00
151 .00
149 .00
130 .50
130 .50
130 .50

$ 9 2 .5 0 - $ l 10.00
9 1 . 5 0 - 1 08.00
_
7 5 . 5 0 - 8 5 .5 0
6 8 . 0 0 - 7 4 .0 0
1 5 2 .5 0 - 2 0 2 .5 0
_
.
1 2 6 .0 0 - 172.00
1 2 4 .0 0 - 172.00
1 3 9 .0 0 - 165.00
1 0 7 .5 0 - 143.50
1 0 7 .5 0 - 143.00
1 0 0 .0 0 - 142.50

1 E a r n in g s r e la t e to r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t im e s a la r ie s that a r e paid fo r sta n d a rd w o r k w e e k s .
M e a n s , m e d ia n s , and m id d le ra n g e s o f e a r n in g s a r e rou n d ed t o the n e a r e s t h a lf d o lla r .
2 In c lu d e s da ta f o r the M ou n ta in r e g i o n in a d d itio n to t h o se r e g io n s show n s e p a r a t e ly .
F o r d e fin it io n o f r e g io n s sh ow n in th is and su b se q u e n t t a b le s , s e e fo o t n o t e 1, a p p e n d ix A ta b le .
3 T he m e a n f o r e a c h o c c u p a t io n is co m p u te d b y m u ltip ly in g e a ch ra te b y the nu m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv in g the r a t e ; the su m o f t h e se p r o d u c t s is d iv id e d b y the n u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s
in the j o b .
T h e m e d ia n d e s ig n a t e s p o s it i o n , that i s , h a lf o f the e m p lo y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e iv e d m o r e than the ra te show n and h a lf r e c e iv e d l e s s .
T h e m id d le ra n g e is d e fin e d b y 2 ra te s
o f p a y ; a fo u r t h o f the e m p l o y e e s e a r n e d l e s s than the lo w e r o f th e se r a t e s and a fo u r t h e a r n e d m o r e than the h ig h e r r a t e .
M e d ia n s and m id d le r a n g e s a r e o m it t e d f o r o c c u p a t io n s that had
fe w e r than 15 e m p l o y e e s in a r e g i o n .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a t e n o da ta r e p o r t e d o r data that d o not m e e t p u b lica tio n c r i t e r i a .




Table 2.

Occupational Earnings:

Atlanta, G a.1

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s o f—

A v e r a g e (m ean)
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A—
W o m e n ----------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B ----------------------W om en
C le rk s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c la s s B
(33 w o m e n and 1 m a n )..
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B (1 3 w o m e n
and 1 m a n ) _
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s C (5 w o m e n
and 4 m e n ) C l e r k s , p o l i c y e v a lu a tio n (1 4 w o m e n
and 1 m a n ) C le rk s , p r e m iu m - le d g e r -c a r d
( a ll w o m e n ) .
C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s (a ll m en ) —
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(5 0 w o m e n and 4 m e n ) ----------K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(a ll w o m e n ) P r e m iu m a c c e p t o r s ( a ll w o m e n )----------P r o g r a m e r s , e le c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s A (a ll m e n )------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l (a ll w o m e n )---S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r (a ll w o m e n ) -----T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s A (a ll m e n )..
T y p is t s , c l a s s B (a ll w o m e n )--------------------U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C -------------------------------M e n --------------------------------------------------------------

a re

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

$50
W eek ly
W eek ly
and
h o u r s 1 e a rn in g s 2 u n d er
2
3
(Standard) (Standard)
$55

34
30
36
34

38.
38.
37.
37.

0
0
5
5

$ 9 4 .5 0
9 0. 50
7 6. 00
7 4. 00

_
_

34

37. 5

14

38. 0

$60

$65

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$105

$110

$115

$120 $125

$130

$140 $150

$160

$60 . $65

$70

. $75

. $80

$85

$90 • $95

$100

$105

$110

$115

$120

$125 $13.0

$140

$150 $160

over

_
7
7

1
1
11
11

8
8

$55

and

-

1
1

_
1
1

7 6. 00

-

-

2

1

4

7 0 . 50

-

-

3

5

2

_

5
5
5
5

10
10
1
-

4
4

5
5

6
5

-

-

-

-

"

22

1

1

2

-

1

2

2

3

4

-

2

1

-

-

-

9

39. 0

59. 00

2

3

2

38. 5

85. 00

-

2

1

1

-

-

1

2

14
11

38. 0
38. 0

7 7. 00
1 1 8 .5 0

.

_

-

-

2
-

7
-

2
-

:

1

1

54

37. 5

85. 00

-

-

-

-

3

1

34

2

8

1

37
11

37. 5
37. 5

7 0. 50
8 5. 00

1
-

_

2

-

-

18
-

9
3

5
2

1
3

1
-

-

7
42
27

37. 5
38. 0
37. 5

1 7 1 .5 0
81. 50
86. 50

_

_

_

-

-

-

1
1

6
-

14
1

6
11

7
1

5
9

13
67
17
14

37.
38.
37.
37.

1 2 1 .0 0
6 6. 50
1 1 5 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0

_

4

28

16

8

9

1

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

1
4
4

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

"

5
0
5
5

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

-

2

1

2

1

-

-

1

4

1

1

1
2

2

33

2
4

1

1
1
1

1

1
1

-

_

1

_
1

6

1

2
2

-

1 T h e A tla n ta S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f C la y to n , C o b b , D eK a lb , F u lto n , and G w innett C o u n tie s .
2 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly
r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r and a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s fo llo w s :
2 at $ 1 8 5 to $ 1 9 0 ; and 1 at $ 2 2 5 to $ 2 3 0 .




-

2

-

1
-

1
1

2

15

-

_

4

_

_

_

3
2

1
1

1
1

1
1

1
1

hou rs.

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h ou rs

Table 3.

Occupational Earnings:

Baltimore, Md.

10

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices* and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
A v e r a g e (m ean)
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B (5 m e n
and 1 w o m a n )______________________________________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A_____________________
W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(a ll w o m e n ) -----------------------------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l (a ll w o m e n )____________
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C
(5 w o m e n and 4 m e n )------------------------------------------T y p is t s , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n )------------------------------U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C (7 m e n
and 5 w o m e n )---------------------------------------------------------

a re

N um be r
of
w ork ers

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f—

$50
W eek ly
W eekly
and
h ou rs 2 e a rn in g s 2
u n d er
(Standard) (Standard)
$55

$55

$60

$65

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$105

$110

$115

$120

$125

$130

$60

$65

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$105

$110

$115

$120

$125

$130

$135

6
11
9

38. 0
37. 5
37. 0

$ 1 4 3 .0 0
1 01 .50
97. 50

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

3
2

1
1

-

-

2
2

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

1
1

1
-

33
1
-

27
38

38. 5
37. 0

73. 50
68. 00

-

1
1

1
18

4
4

10
7

8
3

2
2

1
2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
58

38. 5
38. 5

82. 50
64. 50

-

-

-

-

16

14

13

3
3

1
1

3
1

-

1

3

1
7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

37. 0

1 21 .50

1

1

2

-

4

1 T h e B a lt im o r e S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f the c it y o f B a lt im o r e ; and the c o u n tie s o f A nne A r u n d e l, B a lt im o r e , C a r r o ll , and H ow a rd .
2 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a rn in g s c o r r e s p o n d t o th e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
r o u n d e d t o the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r
and a v e r a g e w e e k ly
e a rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf
d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o l l o w s :
1 at $ 1 5 0 to $ 1 5 5 ;
1 at $ 17 0 to $ 1 7 5 ; and 1 at $ 1 8 5 to $ 1 9 0 .
4 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o l l o w s :
1 at $ 1 4 0 to $ 1 4 5 ;
2 at $ 1 5 0 to $ 1 5 5 ; and 1 at $ 1 6 5 to $ 1 7 0 .




44

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s

Table 4.

Occupational Earnings:

Boston, Mass.

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
A v e r a g e (m ea n )
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s B -------------------------------------------------M e n _______________________________________________
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A (10 m e n and
9 w o m e n ) ----------------------------------------------------------------C le r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A ______________________
W o m e n ____________________________________________
M e n _______________________________________________
C le r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B ------------------------- ------ W o m e n ____________________________________________
C l e r k s , f i le , c l a s s B ______________________________
W o m e n ____________________________________________
C le r k s , f i le , c l a s s C ---------------------------------------------W o m e n ____________________________________________
C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n (21 w o m e n
and 5 m e n ) _________________________________________
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A (a ll w o m e n ) _____
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n )______
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s A ______________________________
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s B ______________________________
M e n _______________________________________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l (a ll w o m e n )_____________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r ( a ll w o m e n ) ______________
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s A (6 m e n and
3 w o m e n ) ___________________________________________
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s B ________________________
M e n -----------------------------------------------------------------------T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A:
M e n __
......
...
T y p is t s , c l a s s A (a ll w o m e n )_____________________
T y p is t s , c l a s s B (a ll w o m e n )_____________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s A ____________________________
M e n _______________________________________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s R
_
_....................... . _
M e n _______________________________________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C ____________________________
M e n _______________________________________________

of
w ork ers

26
25
19
44
36
8
92
90
106
102
165
163

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s o f—

$65
W e e k ly
W eekly
U n der and
h ou rs2
e a r n in g s 2_
u n d er
$ 65
(Standard) (S ta n da rd )
$70

37. 0
37. 0
37.
37.
37.
36.
37.
37.
37.
37.
37.
37.

5
0
5
5
0
0
5
5
0
0

$ 2 2 8 . 00
2 2 7 .5 0
158.
99.
98.
105.
72.
72.
67.
67.
64.
64.

$70

$75

$80

$75

$80

$90

$90

$ 100 $ 110 $ 120

$ 130

$140

$ 150

$ 160

$ 170

$ 180

$ 190

$200

$220

$ 100 $ 110 $ 120 $ 130

$ 140

$ 150

$ 160

$ 170

$ 180

$190

$200

$ 22 0

over

and

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

7
7

3 16
15

00
50
50
00
50
00
00
00
00
00

21
21
61
59
4 118
118

19
19
26
26
30
28

2
2
23
22
6
6
10
10

6
6
8
8
6
4
4
4

4
3
1
16
15
6
6
3
3

9
7
2
5
5
1
1
-

10
7
3
_
-

11
10
1
-

3
-

1
2
1
1
-

4
-

2
_
-

4
-

2
_
-

1
_
_
_

1
_
_
_

1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

26
29
48

37. 0
37. 0
37. 0

87. 50
80. 00
74. 50

3

1
13

3
3
9

2
10
14

11
16
8

6
1

2
-

1
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

18
12

37. 0
37. 0

1 5 9 .5 0
1 5 9 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

8
7

7
2

2
2

-

-

-

-

32
28
69
195

37. 0
3 7 .0
37. 5
3 7 .0

145. 00
1 4 4 .5 0
72. 50
87. 00

1
-

23
-

20
7

17
32

7
84

1
56

1
1
16

-

4
4
-

3
2
-

11
10
-

10
8
-

3
3
-

-

-

-

_
-

_
_
-

9
33
20

37. 5
37. 5
37. 5

1 9 9 .0 0
155. 00
1 5 6 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
-

5
4

5
2

4
3

9
6

1
4
2

3
2

5
_

3
_
_

_
_
_

22
79
237
29
26
35
19
25
12

37. 5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
37. 0
3 7 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .0
37. 0
3 7 .0

105. 00
7 8. 50
6 8. 00
185. 50
1 8 7 .0 0
155. 50
164. 50
131. 00
133. 00

97
-

18
53
-

15
49
_

9
35

28
3
-

5
5
-

12
4
-

3
-

2
-

_

-

-

_
-

_
_
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

1
1
6
4

6
2
11
5

_
9

4
2
1

3
2
10
9
-

6
4
2
2
-

_
_
11
11
1
1
-

_
_
5
5
_
_
-

_
_
4
4
2
2
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

1

3
1

-

3
2

1 T he B o s t o n S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S ta tis tic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f S u ffo lk C ounty, 15 c o m m u n it ie s in E s s e x C ounty, 30 in M id d le s e x C ounty, 20 in N o r fo lk C ou n ty, and 9 in P ly m ou th
C ou n ty .
2 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o rk w e e k f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a rn in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h ou rs
a r e ro u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r and a v e r a g e w e e k ly ea rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d as fo llo w s : 8 at $ 2 2 0 to $ 2 4 0 ; 6 at $ 2 4 0 to $ 2 6 0 ; 1 at $ 2 6 0 to $ 2 8 0 ; and 1 at $ 2 8 0 to $ 3 0 0 .
4 I n clu d e s 1 w o r k e r at $ 5 5 to $ 6 0 .




Table 5.

Occupational Earnings:

Chicago, 111.

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s of-

A v e r a g e (m ean)
O c c u p a tio n and s e x

A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s A (a ll m e n ) -----------A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s B (a ll m en ) ________
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A (29 m e n
and 5 w o m e n )
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B --------------------------M e n ________________________________________
W o m e n -------------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A _______________
M e n -------------------------------------------------------------W om en
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B (92 w o m e n
and 2 m en ) .
C le rk s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c la s s A
(33 w o m e n an d 3 m e n ) _________________
C le rk s , co r r e s p o n d e n c e , c la s s B
(32 w o m e n and 11 m e n )-----------------------C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s A (3 5 w o m e n
and 2 m e n ) ______________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B (1 2 3 w o m e n
and 4 m e n ) ---------------------------------------------C le rk s , file , c la s s C
(a ll w o m e n ) _____________________________
C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n (62 w o m e n
and 6 m e n ) ______________________________
C le rk s , p r e m iu m -le d g e r -c a r d
(a ll w o m e n ) _____________________________
C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s (19 m e n and
2 w om en ) _
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s c l a s s A
(a ll w om en ) _
K ey p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(a ll w o m e n )----------------------------------------P r e m iu m a c c e p t o r s (8 8 w o m e n and
3 m e n )--------------------------------------------------P r o g r a m e r s , e le c t r o n i c data
p r o c e s s in g , c l a s s A (1 9 m e n
and 1 w o m a n ) P r o g r a m e r s , e le c t r o n i c data
p r o c e s s in g , c l a s s B --------------M e n ----------------------------------------W om en
S ten og ra p h ers, g en era l
(a ll w o m e n )__________________________
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s A (9 m e n
and 3 w o m e n )-.
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s B (11 m e n
and 1 w o m a n )---------------------------------------------T a b u la tin g - m a c hine o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(28 m e n and 5 w o m e n )-----------------------------T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(1 6 m e n and 4 w om en )
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C
(23 m e n and 5 w o m e n )------------------------------

of
w ork ers

10
10

$55
W eek ly
W eek ly
h ou rs 2 e a rn in g s 2 1 nHf*t
1
(S tandard) (S tandard)
$60

37. 5
37. 5

$ 3 0 6 .5 0
1 9 9 .5 0




$65

$70

$7 5

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110 $120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$180

$200

$220 $240

$65

$70

$7 5

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120 $130

$140

$150

$160

$180

$200

$220

$240 o v e r

and

-

-

-

“

-

"

-

1

-

7

-

-

3 10
2

1
11
11

1
7
3
4
15
2
13

3
7
2
5
7
2
5

3
10
6
4
21
1
20

5
12
7
5
12
5
7

3
8
4
4
7
4
3

1
10
7
3
-

4
-

4
2
2
-

2
-

5
-

1
-

2
-

"

-

-

-

7

11

4

5
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

1

-

-

2
2

6
6

10
2
8

5
12
12

9
9

3

17

20

16

11

5
5
5
5
5
5
5

1 5 8 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 7 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0
99. 50
1 1 3 .5 0
97. 00

94

37. 5

7 9. 00

36

37. 5

1 0 5 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

4

4

2

1

10

7

7

1

-

-

-

-

-

43

37. 5

1 0 4 .0 0

-

-

-

-

6

3

2

2

2

14

8

3

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

37

37. 5

84. 00

-

-

4

2

10

8

5

2

3

1

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

127

37. 5

72. 50

2

12

40

27

25

15

6

64

38. 0

63. 50

46

24

29

5

68

37. 5

89. 00

-

2

4

6

9

11

9

7

6

8

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

31

38. 0

74. 50

3

8

3

13

2

2

34
62
31
31
112
16
96

37.
37.
37.
37.
37.
37.
37.

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

4

7

4

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

10

16

16

30

15

15

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

6

31

7

12

6

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

13

9

6

5

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

10

1

10
8
2

11
9
2

4
3
1

11
10
1

4
4

1

10
5
5

21

37. 5

1 1 9 .0 0

111

37. 5

90. 50

71

37. 5

79. 00

-

2

91

38. 0

70. 50

4

22

20

37. 5

1 6 8 .0 0

54
40
14

37. 5
37. 5
37. 5

1 3 3 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0
1 1 9 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1
1
"

-

-

"

-

1

6

17

24

26

22

12

-

-

-

5

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

115

37. 5

8 1 .5 0

12

37. 5

2 0 7 .0 0

5

4

3

12

37. 5

1 6 5 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

2

2

6

-

-

-

33

37. 5

1 1 9 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

10

6

10

2

-

3

1

-

-

-

-

20

37. 0

94. 50

-

-

-

-

3

-

3

1

1

12

28

37. 5

86. 50

2

1

2

7

8

3

3

'

See footnotes at end of table.

$60

2

Table 5.

Occupational Earnings:

Chicago, 111.1 Continued
—

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
A v e r a g e (m ean)
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

T y p is t s , c l a s s A (a ll w o m e n )-----T y p is t s , c l a s s B (a ll w o m e n )____
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s A (2 8 m e n
and 2 w o m e n )-------------------------------U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s B ----------------M e n ---------------------------------------------W om en
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C _
M e n ------------------------------

of
w ork ers

W eek ly
W eek ly
h o u r s 1 e a rn in g s 2
2
4
3
(Standard) (Standard)

171
320

37. 5
37. 5

$ 8 7 .5 0
7 3 . 00

30
26
18
8
15
9
6

3 7 .5
37. 5
37. 5
37. 5
37. 5
37. 0
37. 5

1 8 2 .5 0
1 3 8 .5 0
1 4 8 .5 0
115. 50
1 3 2 .0 0
135. 50
1 2 7 .0 0

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - tim e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f—
$55

$60

$65

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$180

$200

$220

$240

i J ci
$60

$65

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$180

$200

$220

$240

over

-

27

100

4
72

42
73

22
31

24
7

38
8

24
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
1
2

6
2
4

4
3
3

_

_

_

10
3
3

_

_

1
4
4

8

-

2
5
5

3

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

2
2

1
1

5
2
3

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

and

-

-

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

2
2

16

1

2
2
3
2
1

-

_

2

1 T h e C h ic a g o S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f C o o k , D u P a g e , K ane, L a k e , M c H e n r y , and W ill C o u n tie s .
In 1961 the a r e a w as lim it e d to C o o k C ounty.
2 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s
a r e r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r and a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s fo l lo w s :
3 at $ 2 4 0 to $ 2 6 0 ; 2 at $ 2 6 0 to $ 2 8 0 ; 2 at $ 3 0 0 to $ 3 2 0 ; 1 at $ 3 2 0 to $ 3 4 0 ; and 2 at $ 3 4 0 and o v e r .
4 In c lu d e s 2 w o r k e r s at $ 4 0 to $ 4 5 .




Table 6.

Occupational Earnings:

Dallas, Tex.1

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
A v e r a g e (m ea n)
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A s s e m b l e r s _____________________________
W o m e n ______________________________
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B
(1 6 w o m e n and 5 m e n ) ______________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A ________
W o m e n ______________________________
M e n __________________________________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B________
W o m e n ______________________________
C le rk s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , cla s s A
(3 5 w o m e n and 2 m en)_______________
C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s B__
W o m e n ______________________________
M e n __________________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s A (a ll w o m e n )_
_
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n )__
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s C (a ll w o m e n )...
C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n _____________
W o m e n ______________________________
C le r k s , p r e m iu m -le d g e r -c a r d
(a ll w o m e n )____________________________
C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s (a ll m e n ) _________
K ey p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(a ll w o m e n ) ___________________________
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(a ll w o m e n ) ___________________________
P r e m iu m a c c e p t o r s (21 w o m e n
and 2 m en)_____________________________
P r o g r a m e r s , e le c t r o n i c data
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s A _________________
M e n __________________________________
P r o g r a m e r s , e le c t r o n i c data
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s B_________________
W o m e n _______________________________
M e n __________________________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a ll w om en ).
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n io r ( a ll w om en )
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s A (5 m e n and 1 w o m a n )______
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s B_________________________________
M e n __________________________________
T y p is t s , c l a s s A ( a ll w o m e n )------ -----T y p is t s , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n )________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s A (1 8 m e n
and 2 w o m e n )_________________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s B (5 m e n
and 5 w o m e n )_________________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C _______________
W o m e n _______________________________
M e n ___________________________________

of
w ork ers

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f—

$50
W eek ly
Weeklyand
h o u r s 13 e a rn in g s 2
2
un d er
(S tandard ) (Standard)
$55

$55” $60

S65” $70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110 $120

$130

$140 '$ 1 5 0 w

$170

$180 T T 9 0 ~ $200

$60

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120 $130

$140

$150

$180

$190

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

6
5
1
4
4

6
4
2
4
3

3
2
1
3
3

8
7
1
4
3

2
6
3
3

1
3

2

5
4
1
9
8

2
2
2
_
2
1

3

-

-

-

2
5
5
_
_
4

3
3
3
_
4
2

9
4
2
2
_
_

6
5
4
1
_
_

4
1
_
1
_
_

1
2
_
2
_
2

4
_
_
_
2

5
2
_
2

1
_
_
_

7
7

3
3

1
1

1
1

4
4

3
3

1
1

2
1

4

and
$65

51
48

39.5
39.5

$ 62.00
62.0 0

1
1

17
15

23
23

8
7

21
40
28
12
99
94

39.0
38.5
38.5
39.0
39.0
39.0

90.50
8 9.00
85.5 0
9 6.00
66.5 0
6 6.00

_
_
_
.

_

3
_
.
_
30
30

9
1
1
_
18
17

37
47
37
10
10
56
74
30
27

38.5
38.5
38.5
38.5
39.0
38.5
39.0
39.0
39.5

9 5.00
78.00
6 9.0 0
110.00
77.50
6 3.5 0
5 6.50
8 5.50
8 0.50

13
20

4 0.0
39.0

67.0 0
107.50

30

39.0

82
23

-

_
12
33
-

_
.
25
25
_

_

$170

$200

over

-

-

-

-

-

.

.

2

_

.

.

.
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

.
_
_
_

1
2

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

1

4

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4
1
22
12
1
1

_

_

7

1

-

-

-

-

2
-

3
1

2

3

1

2

8 0.00

-

-

1

3

4

12

2

-

6

2

39.0

67.0 0

-

20

21

14

11

10

2

2

2

39.0

70.50

-

3

7

7

-

2

2

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
11

39.0
39.0

167.50
178.00

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

_

-

2
"

1

-

-

4
2

2
2

2
2

3
3

1
1

20
6
14
19
30

39.0
39.0
39.5
39.0
39.0

114.50
104.00
119.00
7 8.00
8 8.00

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_
2

_
_
_
.
7

.
_
.

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

.
_

_
_

_

_

_
_

4

1
_
1
3
3

5
_
5

-

_
_
.
3
4

7
2
5

-

_
_
_
3
1

1
_
1

-

1
1
_
6
4

6

38.5

112.00

16
13
110
152

39.0
39.5
39.0
39.0

8 3.0 0
8 2.0 0
7 2.50
6 0.5 0

_

_

_

_
7

_
52

18
80

_
24
11

2
2
25
-

3
3
30
1

4
4
7
1

5
2

1
1
6

_

_
_

_
_

.
_

.
_

.
_

_

20

39.0

154.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
19
11
8

38.5
38.5
3 8.5
38.5

140.00
98.5 0
94.5 0
105.00

_

_

_

_ _

_

_

_

_

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_

3
3

2
2

2
1
1

2

1

>

.

2

1

8
8
_
4
26
_

11
11
_
3
10
3
5
5

$160

2

-

.
_
_
_
1

_
_

5
3
2
_
5

_
.
_
2
1

3

_
_

_

2

1

1
1

_
_

_
_

.
_

-

2

3

3

2

1

3

3

2

-

1

2
5
3
2

2
2
2

2
1

2
1

_

.
_

.

_

_

_

32

_

_

_

_

1

1

_

_

'

1 T he D a lla s S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f C o llin , D a lla s , D en ton , and E l li s C o u n tie s .
2 S ta n da rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th eir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e se w e e k ly h o u r s .
a r e r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h ou r and a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e at $220 t o $ 23 0.




A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s

Table 7.

Occupational Earnings:

Des Moines, Iowa

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
A v e r a g e (m ean)
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B
(9 m e n and 1 w o m a n )______________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B
( a ll w o m e n ) _________________________
C le rk s , c o r re s p o n d e n c e ,
c l a s s A ______________________________
M e n ________________________________
W o m e n _____________________________
C le rk s , co r re s p o n d e n c e ,
c l a s s B (27 m e n and 1 w o m a n ) __
C le rk s , f ile , c la s s A
( a ll w o m e n ) _________________________
C le r k s , file , cla s s B
( a ll w o m e n ) _________________________
C le r k s , file , cla s s C
( a ll w o m e n ) _________________________
C l e r k s , p o l i c y e v a lu a tio n
(a ll w o m e n )
C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s (17 m e n and
3 w o m e n ) ...................
_ ...............
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(a ll w o m e n )
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(^11 ummpn^
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c d a ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s A (11 m e n
and 3 w o m e n )_______________________
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s B ( a ll m e n )___
S te n o g ra p h e rs, g en era l
( a ll w o m e n ) _________________________
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s A
fa ll m
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s B (1 4 m e n and 2 w o m e n ) __
T y p is t s , c l a s s A (a ll w o m e n )______
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s A (6 m e n
and 1 w o m a n )_______________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C (5 m e n
and 4 w o m e n )_______________________

of
w ork ers

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s o f —

$50
$55
W eek ly
W eek ly
h o u r s 1 e a rn in g s 2
2
u n d er
(Standard) (Standard)
$60
$55

$60

TTF T 75

$80

$85

$90

$80

$ 85

$90

$95

$~95" $ 100 $ 1 1 0 $ 120 $ 130 $ 140 $ 150 $ 160 “$ 1 7 0

$ T s o ' $ 190 $'200

$210

$ 100 $ 110 $ 120 $ 130 $ 140 $ 150 $ 160 $ 170 $ 180 $ 190 $ 2 0 0 $ 210

over

and
$65

$70

$75

10

39. 0

$ 1 5 4 .0 0

44

39. 0

68. 00

"

11

13

4

5

3

7

19
8
11

38. 5
38. 0
39. 0

1 2 4 .0 0
1 5 0 .0 0
1 0 5 .0 0

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
-

2
_
2

_
_

_

-

2

2

-

2

3

2

-

-

-

1

1
1
_

2
2
_

2
1
1

_
_
_

1
1
_

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1

28

38. 5

80. 00

-

5

5

5

3

1

3

10

38. 0

79. 50

-

-

“

4

3

2

-

47

38. 5

62. 00

1

17

18

9

38. 0

5 5 .0 0

13

12

2

2

2
1
1

-

1

2

1

-

1

16

37. 5

76. 50

_

20

38. 5

98. 00

_

21

38. 5

83. 00

34

38. 0

66. 00

14

38. 0

1 4 6 .5 0

6

39. 0

1 4 1 .50

42

39. 0

67. 50

6

39. 0

1 9 7 .00

16
19

38. 5
39. 0

81. 50
72. 00

7

39. 0
38. 0

1 0 4 .5 0

10

5

8

2

4

7

4

2

4

_

1

2

3

1

1

1

7

1

2
1
-

4

10

16

-

-

-

-

-

"

2

5

5

i

1

2

2

2

2

-

-

-

2

-

2

1

1

1
3
4

1
-

7

4
8

4

3

1

1

1

1

4

4

1

1

1 5 7 .5 0

9

3

1
4

7
3

1

2
i

“

2

2

“

-

1

"

1

1 T h e D e s M o in e s S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A rea' c o n s is t s o f P o lk C ou n ty .
2 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e se w e e k ly h o u r s ,
r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r and a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .




1
1
_

1
5

1
1
_

4
_
4

2

26

3
_
3

"

-

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a re

Table 8.

Occupational Earnings:

Houston, Tex.1

00

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
A v e ra g e (m ea n )
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

of
w ork ers

W eek ly
W eek ly
h o u r s 13 e a rn in g s 2
24
(S tandard ) (Standard)

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s ; r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s o f—
$50
aj d j.
$55

“$55” ~$6 0 “ ~$6 F

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$105

$1 10

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170 $180

$190

$200

$65

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$1 00

$105

$11 0

$12 0

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180 $ 1 9 0

$2 00

over

and
$60

$70

C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A
35

6

C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s ( a ll m e n ) ________
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(a ll w o m e n ) --------------------------------------K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(31 w o m e n and 1 m a n ) -------------------P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c data
p r o c e s s in g , c l a s s A (1 5 m e n
and 1 w o m a n )------------------------------------P r o g r a m e r s , e le c t r o n i c data
p r o c e s s in g , c l a s s B -----------------------M e n -------------------------------------------------S ten og ra p h ers, g en era l
( a ll w o m e n ) --------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n io r
T y p is t s , c l a s s A (a ll w o m e n )_______
T y p is t s , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n )_______
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s A (13 m e n
^nr\ 1 xxri-ipp^pj
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s B ( 6 m e n
and 1 w o m a n )-------------------------------------

37. 5

$229. 0 0

7

37. 5

1 5 9 .5 0

50

38. 5

80. 00

-

2

4

5

8

9

7

2

12

38. 5

75. 50

-

-

1

2

4

2

1

2

48

37. 5

62. 50

2

9

30

3

2

1

1

24

38. 0

95. 50

1

-

2

-

-

2

2

11

C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B
(5 m e n and 2 w o m e n ) _
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B
(a ll w o m e n ) --------------------------------------C le rk s , c o r re s p o n d e n c e ,
c l a s s B (a ll w o m e n ) ________________
C le rk s , file , c la s s C
(a ll wnmf^n) _
C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n
( a ll w o m e n ) --------------------------------------C le rk s , p r e m iu m -le d g e r -c a r d

6 9 . 00

2

5

13

39. 5
37. 5

1 2 4 .0 0

19

38. 0

9 0 . 00

-

-

-

-

-

2

32

37. 5

74. 50

-

-

6

8

7

16

37. 5

1 6 5 .0 0

-

-

-

-

15
11

37. 5
38. 0

1 3 3 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0

-

-

-

-

41

39. 0

79. 50

-

-

-

5

31
52
46

37. 5
37. 0
37. 0

94. 00
74. 50
6 6 . 50

14

38. 0

212.00

7

37. 5
38. 0
38. 0

178. 50
1 4 0 .5 0
1 4 2 .5 0

9

A/for.

7

1

1

-

-

-

1

3

1

-

5

5

1

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

1

1

2

2

8

-

-

_

-

-

-

_

_

1

-

3

8

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

4

4

3

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

4

4

1

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

3

1

1

-

3
3

2
2

4
3

-

_

_
_

_
_

_

12

3

10

7

4

5

4

4

3

2

5

8
2

4
5

1

4 10

-

_

_

-

-

-

.

1

_

_

_

2

1

3

_

1

3
3

_
3

3

_
-

_
7

4
18

15
9

5
3

4
13
7

-

_

_

-

_

_

2

2

1 T h e H ou ston S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f H a rr is C ou n ty.
2 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k
f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the
e a rn in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e s e
w e e k ly
a r e r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h ou r and a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf
d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o l l o w s :
1 at $ 2 0 0 to $ 2 1 0 ; 1 at $ 2 1 0 to $ 2 2 0 ;
1 at $ 2 2 0 to $ 2 3 0 ; 1 at $ 2 4 0 to $ 2 5 0 ; and
1 at $ 2 8 0 to $ 2 9 0 .
4 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o l l o w s :
7 at $ 2 1 0 to $ 2 2 0 ; 1 at $ 220 to $ 2 3 0 ; and 2 at $ 2 5 0 to $ 2 6 0 .




-

2
1

3

h ou rs.

A v e r a g e w e e k ly

h ou rs

Table 9.

Occupational Earnings: Jacksonville, Fla.1

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
A v e r a g e (m ea n )
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B -.
W o m e n ------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A
(4 w o m e n and 2 m e n )________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B__
W o m e n _______________________
C le rk s , co r re s p o n d e n c e ,
c l a s s B (1 5 w o m e n and 1 m a n ) ____
C le rk s , file , c la s s B
(a ll w o m e n )
C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n ____________
W om en
C le rk s , p r e m iu m - le d g e r -c a r d
(a ll w o m e n ) ______________________
C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s -----------------------M e n -------------------------------------------K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
( a ll w o m e n ) ____________________
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s A __________
M e n ____________________________
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s B --------------------S ten ogra p h ers, g en era l
( a ll w o m e n ) ---------------------------------T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s B (2 5 w o m e n and 4 m en )
T y p is t s , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n )----U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C (1 7 m e n
• and 5 w o m e n )____________________

of
w ork ers

W eek ly
W eek ly
h o u r s 1 e a rn in g s 2
2
(S tandard ) (Standard)

N u m b er• o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s o f—
$45

$50

$50

$55

$ 1 1 5 .5 0
9 6 .0 0

22

3 7 .0
37. 0
37. 5

92. 50
6 2 .0 0
6 1 .5 0

16

3 7 .5

7 7 .5 0

-

-

19
17
14

3 7 .5
36. 5
3 7 .0

6 4 .5 0
7 9 .0 0
8 4 .0 0

2

3

_

24
17
14

3 7 .0
3 7 .0
37. 5

68.00

5

66

3 7 .0

68.00

16
14

3 7 .5
37. 5

1 7 4 .0 0
1 7 4 .0 0

19
16

37. 5
37. 5

1 2 4 .0 0
1 2 8 .0 0

55

3 7 .0

6 5 .0 0

29
116

36. 5
3 7 .0

8 2 .0 0
6 0 .5 0

22

3 7 .0

1 3 7 .0 0

6
6

25

$60

$65| $ 7 0

$75

$80

$85

$90

$60

$65

$70

$80

$85

$90

$95

2
2

-

-

1
1

-

2
2

-

1

_

2

1

_

2

$95

$ 1 00 $ 1 10 $ 1 2 0

$130

$ 140 $ 1 5 0

$160

-

-

_

_

-

7
7

-

_
-

_

_

_

9

-

6

4
4

-

2

5

3

1

4

3

2

_
-

2
1

1
1

2
1
1

2

_

1

3

4

$ 1 00 $ 1 1 0

$ 1 20 $ 130 $ 140 $ 150 $ 160 $ 170 $ 1 8 0

1

-

-

$190 $ 2 0 0

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

over

2

-

5
5

“

"

$200

and
$75

1

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

4

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

.

_

_

_

1
1

2
2

4
4

2
2

1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

2

3

1

3
1
1

4
4

4
3

4

3
3

1
1

-

-

_

_

-

_

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

3

1
1

2
2

3
3

4
3

1
1

_

_

_

.

"

-

-

-

7

-

-

-

1 1 8 .5 0
1 1 8 .0 0
6

1

5

_

_

_

_
1

_
7

_
5

_

2

1

-

4

57

16

_
_
14

_
31

9

_
_

10

_

_

9

3

5

_

_

_

-

2

_
_

1

_

12

7

5

3

1

3
4

5

6

9

1
1

3

2

2

2
2

4
3

5
5

1
1

2
2

2

4

3

2

4

-

-

1

2
11

_

2
2

6

3

1 T h e J a c k s o n v il le S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S ta tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f D u v a l C ou n ty .
2 S ta n d a rd (hours r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a i g h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a rn in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
a r e ro u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r and a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .




$ 1 70 J $ 180 $ 1 9 0

-

37. 5
3 8 .0

9

T55

A v e r a g e w e e k ly

hours

Table 10.

Occupational Earnings:

Los Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim—Santa Ana—Garden Grove, Calif.

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n i n g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in h o m e o f f i c e s and r e g i o n a l h ea d o f f i c e s o f
life in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , O c t o b e r 1966)
A v e r a g e (m ea n )
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B :
M en _
... ... .. _ . _
.........
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A
W om en
_
...
......
M en
_
,
..
.
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B _____ _
W om en
C le r k s , co r r e s p o n d e n c e , c la s s A
W om en
C le r k s , co r r e s p o n d e n c e , c la s s B
W o m e n ____________________________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B _.
W om en
C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s (a ll m en)
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s A .......................
...............
M en
................... .
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c data
p r o c e s s i n g , c l a s s B (4 w o m e n
and 3 m en )
_ ..
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n io r ( a ll w o m e n )
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c la s s B
M en
T y p is t s , c l a s s A _
................. .
W om en.
T v p is t s , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n )
............... ...
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s B
W om en
_
...........................
M e n _______ _________________________________ ___
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C
M e n ________________________________________________

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

49
44
32
28
57
56
63
62
7

39.0
38.0
38.0
37.5
38.0
38.5
38.0
38.0
38.0
38.0
38.0
38.0
38.0

$12 6.5 0
106.00
106.00
106.50
80.50
80.50
122.50

31
28

8

39
29
10

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f—

$"6 o
W e e k ly
W eek ly
and
h ou rs 2
e a rn in g s 2
u n d er
(Standard) (Standard)
$65

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

$65

~ $70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

over

and

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
12
11

_
_
_
_
15
14
_
_
7
7
4
4
-

_
7
7
_
_
3
3

_
_
15
15

1
1

1
1

_

92.50
92.00

-

6 8 .0 0
6 8 .0 0

145.00

23
23
-

_
27
26
_

_
_
_
7
7
-

38.5
38.5

185.50
186.00

_

_
.

_
_

_
-

7
16

39.0
37.5

136.50
103.00

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

34
31

38.0
38.0
38.0
3 7.5
38.0
38.5
38.0
3 8.5
37.5
37.5

99.00
98.50
82.00
82.00
70.50
141.00
143.50
139.00

-

-

_

_

_

1
1

_
23
23
49

_
30
29
16

110

109
125
38
15
23
22
10

121 .00

126.00

121.50

_
47
_
_

-

49

1
1

_

-

_

_

-

-

_
_
_

_
3
3
_
9
6

_
10
6

4
3
3
_
_

_
3
3
_
3
3
_
_

2
8

5
3
_

2
2
1
1

1
8
8

_

_

_

_

_
_

7
7

6
6

9
7

_
_
_
_

_
.
_

_
4

1

1

2

3 12
10

1
_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
5
3

_
3

_

_

_
_

_
_
_

1

1

2

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

2
2

_
_

_

_

_

_

2

1

_
5

1

1

3

2
2

1
_

3
3
17
17
_
_

9

10
10

8
6

4
4

_
_

5
5
_
_
_
_
_

5
5

_
_
_

_

_
5
3

_

>

_
_

_

>

_

6
1

10

6

5
3

3

2

6
2
1

_
_

4

_

8
8

12
12

8
11
11
1

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

2

6

_
_

10
10

_
18
18
3
_

_
_
_
_
_

6
6

2
2

9
9
_
_
_

1

2

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

4
3
.
_
_
_
_

2

_
_

_

5
_
_
_
_

2

7
4

2

_

3
1
2

4

3

_

2

_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_

1
2

_

_
_

6
2

4

_

“
'

'

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
”

'

T he L o s A n g e le s —L o n g B e a c h and A n a h e im —
Santa Ana— a r d e n G ro v e Sta n da rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a s c o n s is t o f L o s A n g e le s and O ra n g e C o u n t ie s .
G
2 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e se w e e k ly h o u r s .
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s
a r e r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h ou r and a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r ib u t e d a s f o l l o w s :
2 at $180 to $190; 1 at $190 to $ 20 0; 2 at $200 to $210; 1 at $210 to $ 22 0; 3 at $220 to $ 23 0; 1 at $240 to $ 25 0; 1 at $250 to $ 260; and 1 at
$260 t o $ 27 0.
4 In c lu d e s 2 w o r k e r s at $50 to $ 55 ; and 1 at $55 to $60.




Table 11.

Occupational Earnings:

Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minn.1

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
A v e r a g e (m ea n )
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s A (a ll m e n ) _______
A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s B (a ll m e n )
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B
(8 w o m e n and 4 m e n )_______________
C le r k s , a cc o u n tin g , c l a s s A
(a ll w o m e n ) ______________ ____________
C le r k s , a cc o u n tin g , c l a s s B

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s i r e c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s o f—

$ 50 "$55~ $ 6 0
W eek ly
W eek ly
h o u r s 13 e a rn in g s 2
24
u n d er
(S tandard ) (Standard)
$ 55 $60 $65

7
10

it s f

lf7 0 ~ $ 7 5 T 8 C T

$85

$90

$ 100 $ 110 $ 1 2 0

$ 130 $ 1401 $ 150 $ 160 $ 170 $ 180 $ 190 $ 2 0 0 $ 2 2 0 $ 2 4 0
and

$70

$75

■

-

$80

$85

$90

-

-

~

2

$ 100 $ 1 1 0

37. 5
38. 0

$ 3 4 6 . 50
2 3 8 .0 0

-

"

"

'

~

■

“

2

3

6

6

10

~

2

7

18

8

9

11

8

3

$ 120 $ 130 $ 140 $ 150 $ 160 $ 170 $ 180 $ 190 $ 2 0 0

$220

$240

over

1
1

2

1
2

35
43

"

"

1

-

“

'

-

1

_

1

1

1

“

2

"

4

1

"

"

"

"

"

-

-

1

"

"

“

1

"

"

~

-

_

-

1

7

2

7

i

5

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

1

T h e M in n e a p o lis —St.

37. 5

1 0 7 .5 0

3 8. 5

8 2 .0 0

“

~

2

82
C le r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e ,
c l a s s A (1 8 w o m e n and 2 m e n ) ___
C le r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e ,
c l a s s B (4 7 w o m e n and 1 m a n ) ___
C le r k s , fi le , c l a s s A
( a ll w o m e n ) ............................. ..................
C le r k s , fi le , c l a s s B
(2 9 w o m e n and 1 m a n ).
C le r k s , f i le , c l a s s C
(4 2 w o m e n and 5 m en )
_
C le r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n
(3 2 w o m e n and 2 m en ) .....
C o n s o le o p e r a t o r s (21 m e n
and 10 w o m e n ) .........
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(a ll w o m e n )
K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(a ll w o m e n )
P r o g r a m e r s , e l e c t r o n i c da ta
p r o c e s s in g , c l a s s A (1 0 m e n
and 7 w o m e n )
_
_
S ten og ra p h ers, g e n e ra l
(a ll w o m e n )
S ten og ra p h ers, s e n io r
( a ll w o m e n ) _
___
S y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , c l a s s A
(1 2 m e n and 2 w o m e n ) _____________
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s B (5 m e n and 4 w o m e n )_____
T y p is t s , c l a s s A (a ll w o m e n )
T y p is t s , c l a s s R (a ll w o m e n )
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s A (1 6 m e n
and 4 w o m e n )
.................
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s R
M e n .................
W o m e n _ ............... .. ...
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C
M en _ ..........
W om en
_ . _

12
38

37. 5

7 3 .0 0

1

_

23

"

"

'

■

■

"

4

7

4

3

1

"

“

6

2

13

3

7

9

4

1

1

2

2

2

1

5

3

1

4

1

5

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

20

38. 5

1 0 2 .5 0

48

38. 5

8 7 .0 0

~

“

9

38. 0

7 5 .0 0

“

3

-

-

1

-

30

3 8 .0

6 9 .5 0

_

2

10

2

6

3 8 .5

5 8 .0 0

16

16

3 8 .0

8 3 .0 0

_

_

4

7

4

3

4

_

5

2

3 8 .5

1 0 9 .0 0

_

_

_

_

_

2

1

8

4

8

24

37. 5

7 9 .0 0

_

_

4

1

1

6

4

4

4

61

3 8 .0

6 5 .5 0

_

3

35

14

4

1

4

15

6

10

4

2

_

5

10

6

4

17

3 8 .0

1 3 9 .0 0

41

3 8 .0

7 3 .0 0

_

4

25

37. 5

8 8 .0 0

_

_

14

3 8 .0

2 0 4 .5 0

9
45
107

3 8 .0
38. 0
38. 0

8 7 .0 0
6 7. 50
6 2 .5 0

20
22
13
9
24
13
11

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
38. 0
37. 5
3 8 .0
3 8. 0
3 8 .0

1 9 8 .0 0
1 4 7 .5 0
1 5 6 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 3 0 .5 0
1 2 0 .5 0

_ ,

2

1

1

4
_

_

2

34

_
_

_

-

-

-

20
43

12
19

9
4

5
3
5

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

P a u l S tandard M e t r o p o lit a n S ta tis tica l A r e a c o n s is t s o f A nok a,

-

2
1

_

3

-

1

_

_

3

_

_
_

_
4
4

D ak ota,

H en n ep in ,

1

R a m se y ,

_

_

_

1
1

_

_

1
1

4
3
1

9
6
3

4
2
2

6
4
2
1

_

_

1
1
1

_
_
_

_

6
3
3
2
2

_

i
_

i
_
_

6
3
3

W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r ib u t e d a s fo llo w s :
W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r ib u t e d a s fo llo w s :




1 at $ 3 0 0 to $ 3 2 0 ; 2 at $ 3 6 0 to $ 3 8 0 ; and 2 at $ 4 8 0 to $ 5 0 0 .
1 at $ 2 8 0 to $ 3 0 0 ; 1 at $ 3 2 0 to $ 3 4 0 ; and 1 at $ 3 4 0 to $ 3 6 0 .

_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

1

and W a sh in g to n C o u n t ie s .

2 Standard hours r e fle c t the workweek fo r which em ployees r e c e iv e their regular straigh t-tim e sa la rie s and the earnings co rre sp o n d to these w eekly h ours.
are rounded to the n ea re st half hour and average weekly earnings to the nearest half d o lla r.
3
4

'

5

31

"

15

34

_

10

47

-

A verage weekly hours

Table 12.

Occupational Earnings:

New York and Newark, N.Y.—N .J.1

1
8

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, November 1966)
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f—

A v e r a g e (m ea n )
O c c u p a t io n and s e x

A c tu a r ie s , c la s s A _________________
M en ______________________________
A c tu a r ie s , c la s s B _________________
M en _______________ _______________
C a r d -ta p e -c o n v e r te r o p e r a to r s ____
M en ______________________________
C laim a p p rov ers , c la s s A_____ ____
C laim a p p rov ers, c la s s B_________
C le r k s , accounting, c la s s A_______
W o m e n _____________ _____________
M en ________________________ |
_____
C le r k s , accounting, c la s s B_______
W om en ___________________________
M en ______________________________
C le r k s , co rre s p o n d e n ce ,
c la s s A ____________________________
W om en ___________________________
M en ______________________________
C le r k s , co rre s p o n d e n ce ,
c la s s B____________________________
W om en ___________________________
C le r k s , file , c la s s A ______________
W om en ___________________________
C le r k s , file , c la s s B ______________
W om en ___________________________
C le r k s , f ile , c la s s C ______________
W om en ___________________________
C le r k s , p o lic y evaluation__________
C on sole op era tors (a ll m e n )_______
Keypunch op e r a to r s , c la s s A
(a ll w om en )_______________________
Keypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s B
(a ll w om en )_______________________
P rem iu m a c c e p t o r s ------------------------W om en ___________________________
P r o g r a m e r s , ele ctr o n ic data
p r o c e s s in g , c la s s A----------------------W om en___________________________
M en _______________________ ______
P r o g r a m e r s , ele ctr o n ic data
p r o c e s s in g , c la s s B---------------------W om en ___________________________
M en ______________________________
Stenographers, general
(a ll women) _____|
---------------------------System s analysts, c la s s A ------------M en ______________________________
T abulating-m achine op e r a to r s ,
c la s s A -------------------------------------------M en ______________________________
T abulating-m achine op e r a to r s ,
c la s s B:
M en ______________________________

S ee fo o t n o t e s at en d o f ta b le,




N u m ber
of
w ork ers

~$5o“ w
” $70" *$75" ~$80"
W eek ly
W e e k ly
and i _ j
_ ;
e a rn in g s 2 U n der
hour s 2
_ | _ ,
!
(S ta n da rd ) (S tandard ) $ 60
$70 $75 $80 $85
$65

$85

$90
:

-

$95

_

-

$120 1 m o
~

$100 J n o
-

-

.

$140

$180

$150
-

-

-

-

-

$200

3 6.5
3 6.5
3 6.0
3 6 .0
3 6.5
3 6.5
3 6.0
3 6.5
3 6.0
3 6.0
3 5.0
3 5.0
3 5.5
3 5.5
3 5.5
3 5.0

$ 3 5 5 .5 0
3 5 6 .0 0
2 3 7 .00
2 3 7 .50
117.50
117.00
181.00
195.00
166.50
169.50
105.00
101.50
122.50
8 6 .0 0
8 5 .5 0
8 7 .5 0

164
94
70

3 5.5
3 5.5
3 5.5

138.50
125.00
157.00

249
166
61
60
185
180
921
891
226
30
77

3 5.5
3 5.5
3 5.5
3 5.5
3 5.5
3 5.5
3 6.0
3 6.0
3 6 .0
3 6.5
3 5.5

124.50
121.00
101.50
101 .50
7 7.5 0
7 8 .0 0
6 7.5 0
6 7 .5 0
9 0 .5 0
9 0 .0 0
145.50

3 6.0

8 9.0 0

-

610
51
50

3 6.0
3 6.0
3 6.0

7 3 .0 0
8 7.0 0
8 7 .0 0

4
4
4

113
13
100

36.5
3 6.0
3 6.5

1 83.50
193.00
182.50

3 6.0
3 6.0
3 6.0

158.50
155.00
159.50

587
42
38

3 6.0
35.5
3 6.0

8 0 .0 0
2 17 .00
2 2 0 .0 0

35.5
3 5.5

112.50
113.50

.

_

-

-

-

91

3 6.0

107.00

-

-

-

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

-

109
67

$100

_

216
59
157

$95

-

304

$90

$160

$180

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

5
5

13
13

15
15

2

_

_
_

_

21
21
1

5
5

2
1

-

-

1

3

2
2
8
8

6
6

1

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

2
2

6
6

3
3
-

7

23

6
1

20

28
19
9

_

.

_ _

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

22
21
1

7
5

3
3

2

_

7

4
4
"

12
12

1
1

4
4

16
13
3

2
2
12
11
1

3

2

2

_

_

_

6

16
15

3

4
2

2
1

3

8

6
1

_

7
7
-

4
3
1

"

2
1

29

34
31
3

8

12

7

7

.
_

17
9

1
2
2

9
3

17

10

20

31

7

14
9
9

20

-

_

2
2

12
10

2
2

4
4
35
35
67

_
_

_
_

_

_

_
_
_

_

-

_

10
8
1
1

4
3
5
5
23
23

12
11

22

1

3

38
27

15
15

3
_

and
over

2
2

6
6

6
6

14
13

31
30

15
15

14
14

-

-

-

7
7

-

15
13

6
6
10
10

-

29
21

-

-

-

-

4

3
-

-

2
2

3

-

5
3

-

-

-

1
1

-

14
30
18
14
16
27
396 266 108
385 255 1 0 2
32
11
2
_
10
3

24

46
46
78
77
25

2

6

66

$280

$280

$240

$260

-

3 70

69
3
3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

■

2

~

“

-

"

-

9
3

19

42

6

_

_

-

-

-

6

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

13

31

6

-

"

-

-

64
36

22

5

_

_

_

_

-

-

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

23

12
12
12
1
1
1
1
21

43

19

-

-

-

1

2

4
4

1
1

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

8

7

11

16

18

3

-

"

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
1

56
4
52

13
3

-

-

2

2
2

$260
-

-

$220

$200

_

-

$240

_

78
77
83
81
61
60
28
22
86
69
95
79
16
128
102
26

_

$220

-

-

-

5
5
16
16
2
2

21
20
2
2
1
1

4
4

-

-

7

7

-

3

19

85

84

33

41

34

129

53

13
14
14

7

_

-

2
2

19
7

18

_

106
5
5

2
2

8
8

1
1

-

3

58 2 0 2

1

-

1
1

2

1
1

-

6
6

6

-

-

3

_

_

_

-

-

-

2
1

2

_

1

_

84

90

107

141

101

41

15

11
2

9

2

2

3
3

5

10

2
1

-

"

39
16
23

65
19
46

74
15
59

21

_

_

_

_

_

4
17

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
8

-

33
3
30

3
3

6
6

1
1

3
3

6

_

_

„

_

1

1

1

2
2

5
4

35

39

21

20

19
15

6

-

-

3

2
2

8

18

6

16

21

15

1

3

1

9
7

10
10

Table 12.

Occupational Earnings:

New York and Newark, N.Y.—N.J.1 Continued
—

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 13 o f e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in h o m e o f f i c e s and r e g i o n a l h ea d o f f i c e s o f
2
li fe in s u r a n c e c o m p a n i e s , N o v e m b e r 1966)
A v e r a g e (m ea n )

O ccupation and sex

T a bulating-m achine o p e r a to r s ,
c la s s C _____________ ________________
______________________ ________
T yp ists, c la s s A (a ll w om en)______
T yp ists, |class B (a ll w om en)______
U n derw riters, c la s s A _____________
M en .
_________ __ __ ______
U n derw riters, c la s s B ____________ _
___
Men
__
U n derw riters, c la s s C _____________
W om en __
__ __ __ _ ____ _

of
w ork ers

259
141
402
1,285
44

43
51
46
177
50

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f—

$60 $65
Weekly
Weekly
i and
hour s 2 earning s 2 'Under
[under
|$60
(Standard) (Standard)
$65 $70

36.0
36.0
36.0
36.0
36.0
36.0
36.0
36.0
36.0
35.5

$77.50
72.50
83.50
71.00
234.50
234.00
189.50
189.50
165.50
137.50

1
4
3

-

37
37
3
294

-

$85

$75

$90

$95

$100

37
11
66
53

17
3
34
17

1
13
7

$130 $146

$150 Too

$180 $200 $220 TZ40"1"$250" $280
and

26 52
23 38
10 46
341 284

-

$100 $110 W o

$70 ""$75" $80

-

$80

$85

38 41
18
8
67 130
182 103

-

-

-

-

-

$110 $120 $130 $140 $150 $160 $180 $200 $220 $240 $260 $280

7
1
24
1

9
9

1
3

2

1
1
-

6
3

-

17
10

2

-

-

19
11

3
2
24
12

1
1
10
10
54
5

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

15
15
17
14
14

3
3
2
2
14

15
14
-

4
4

19
18
18

-

over

.
2
2
_
_

1 T h e N ew Y o r k and N e w a rk Standard M e tr o p o lita n S ta tis tica l A r e a s c o n s is t o f N ew Y o r k C it y and N a s s a u , R o c k la n d , S u ffo lk , and W e s t c h e s t e r C o u n t ie s , N .Y .; and E s s e x , M o r r i s ,
and U n ion C o u n t ie s , N .J .
2 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s
a r e ro u n d e d t o the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r and a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s fo l lo w s : 28 at $280 t o $320; 14 at $32 0 to $ 3 6 0 ; 7 a t $360 t o $ 4 0 0 ; 11 at $400 to $ 44 0; 3 a t $440 to $ 4 8 0 ; 1 at $480 t o $ 5 2 0 ; and 6 a t $520 and o v e r .




Table 13.

Occupational Earnings:

10

Philadelphia, Pa.— .J.1
N

*

(Number and average straight-time weekly hours and earnings 2 of employees in selected occupations in home offices and regional head offices of
life insurance companies, October 1966)
A v e r a g e (m ean)

O ccupation and s

A c t u a r ie s , c l a s s B (a ll m e n ) ______________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A _______________
W o m e n _____________________________________
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B
(a ll w o m e n ) _________________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s A (7 w o m e n and
2
m e n )_____________________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n )------------C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n ___________________
W o m e n _____________________________________
C l e r k s , p r e m i u m - l e d g e r - c a r d ------------------W o m e n _____________________________________
K ey p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(a ll w o m e n ) --------------------------------------------------K e y p u n ch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
( a ll w o m e n ) _________________________________
P r e m iu m a c c e p t o r s (a ll w o m e n )__________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a ll w o m e n )______
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(4 m e n and 4 w o m e n )______________________
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s B _______________________________________
M e n _________________________________________
T a b u la t in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C
(4 m e n and 3 w o m e n )______________________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s B ( a ll m e n ) _________
U n d e r w r it e r s , c l a s s C _____________________
M e n _________________________________________1
4
3
2

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f—

W eek ly
W eek ly
hou r s 2
e a rn in g s 2
(S tandard ) (Standard)

$60

$65

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$ 100 $ 110 $ 120

$ 130 $ 140 $ 150

$ 160 $ 1 7 0

$60

$65

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$ 1 00

$ n o $ 120 $ 130

$ 140 $ 150 $ 160

$ 170 $ 180 $ 1 90 $ 2 0 0

-

and

36. 5
35. 5
35. 5

$ 2 2 7 . 00
96. 50
9 4 . 00

_

-

“

16

36. 0

73. 50

-

2

9
15
38
33
9
7

36.
36.
36.
36.
35.
35.

83.
66.
74.
74.
67.
68.

_
_

5
0
0
0
5
5

00
50
50
00
00
50

37

36. 5
35. 0
35. 5
37. 5

70. 00
78. 50
75. 50

8

35. 0
35. 5
36. 0

94. 50
9 6 . 00

2
2

11
11

2
2

5

3

2

1

_

_

1

2

2

2

1
1

6
1
1

4
2

14
7
9
20

17

36.
37.
37.
37.

0
0
0
0

77. 50
1 6 7 .0 0
1 3 4 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0

6

6

-

5

4

1

7
4

over

3
3

1

8
6

-

10
8
2

-

5
3
3
3
3

-

3

1 2 4 .5 0

20

-

2
2

82. 00

45
16
75

$210

38

39
33

10

$ 180 $ 190 1 ) 200 “ $ 2 1 0

$55
and

_

4
15
14
-

-

-

_

_

3

4

7

10

8

2

12

11
1

1
1

3
-

16

2

3
3

-

3

2

16

4
9
15

.

_

12
2

1

6

15

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

_

_

_

_ _

1

5

-

-

-

-

-

5
4

_

1

_

1

2

1

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

2

1
2
2

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2
2

2
1
1

-

3
3

3
3

-

1
1

-

1
1
1

1
2
1

-

2

_
_

3

7

-

2
2

_
_

2

-

2
2

-

6

42
1
1

1 T he P h ila d e lp h ia S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a tis t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f B u c k s , C h e s t e r , D e la w a r e , M o n t g o m e r y , and P h ila d e lp h ia C o u n t ie s , P a . , and B u r lin g t o n , C a m d e n , and G lo u c e s t e r
C o u n t ie s , N .J .
2 S ta n da rd h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th eir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t - t im e s a la r i e s and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e se w e e k ly h o u r s .
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s
a r e ro u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r and a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s to the n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d as f o l lo w s :
2 at $ 2 2 0 to $ 2 3 0 ; 2 at $ 230 to $ 2 4 0 ; 3 at $ 2 4 0 to $ 2 5 0 ; and 1 at $ 2 5 0 to $ 2 6 0 .
4 W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d as f o l lo w s :
1 at $ 2 1 0 to $ 2 2 0 ; and 1 at $ 2 2 0 to $ 2 3 0 .




Table 14.

Scheduled Weekly Hours

(Percent of nonsupervisory office employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance companies by scheduled weekly hours, 1
United States, selected regions and areas, October—
November 1966)
R e g io n s
U nited
Sta tes 2

W e e k ly h o u r s 1

M id d le
A t la n t ic

100

100

100

A l l n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f f i c e e m p l o y e e s _____ _

U n der 35 h o u r s ______________________________________
35 h o u r s _
O v e r 35 and u n d e r 36*/4 h o u r s ___________________
3 6 V4 h o u r s _
_
_
______
O v e r 3 6 V 4 and u n d e r 3 7 x/2 h o u r s ________________
3 7 V 2 h o u r s ______________
_____ _____ ________
O v e r 3 7 V 2 and u n d er 383/4 h o u r s _________________
383/4 h o u r s ________________________ _______________
O v e r 383/4 an d u n d er 40 h o u r s _______________ _____

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s _____________________________

N ew
E n g lan d

B order
Sta tes

P a c if i c

100

100

100

1

3

4

2

7

5
14
57

5

Sou th w est

100

100

100

16

(3 )
11
12
11
11
38
1
7
2
8

17
24
60

3 7.0

6

41
2
13
15
21

3 7.0

3 6.5

3 8.5

(3 )
20
1
15
6
28

1
(3)

3 7.5

2
21
4
11
14
36
4
2

13

(3 )
21
37
15
9
18

3 6.0

G re a t
L akes

M id d le
W e st

S ou th ea st

23
5
32
2
29

41

8
3
9
3 7.5

3 8 .5

3 8.0

25
32

S e le c t e d a r e a s
L o s A n g e l e s -1
L o n g Bfeach
jand A n a h e im - M in n e a p o lis —
St. P a u l
Santa A n a G arden G rov e

N ew Y o r k
and
N e w a rk

A tlan ta

A l l n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f f i c e e m p l o y e e s _______

U n der 35 h o u r s _____________________________________
35 h o u r s
_
_
_
....
O v e r 35 and u n d e r 3 6 1/* h o u r s .
3 6 V 4 h o u r s ______ ___________________________________
O v e r 3 6 x/ a and u n d e r 3 7 1/? h o u r s . .
3 7 1/? h o u r s ___ _
_ _ __ =
._ ______ _ _ __
O v e r 3 7 V 2 and u n d e r 383/4 h o u r s _________________
383/4 h o u r s ___________________________________________
O v e r 383/4 and u n d e r 40 h o u r s ___________________
40 h o u r s __ _

1
2
3

B a lt im o r e

B o s to n

C h ic a g o

D a lla s

D es
M o in e s

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

5

2
20
6

_
_

_

.
_

3

_

12
3
84

16

15

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

30
3

4
12
84

_
_
_
_

2

_

45

54

80

49

19
42
17
3
19

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

6

14

3

44

28

-

.
-

-

_

_

_

9

39

_
_

41
32
12

.

1

22
6
21
33
18

H ou ston

_

49

15

J a c k s o n v ille

4
67

_

P h ila d e lp h ia

100

4
24

_
_

62
_

_

_

_
_

_

11

4

D ata r e la t e to the p r e d o m in a n t w o r k s c h e d u le f o r fu l l- t im e d a y -s h ift e m p lo y e e s in e a c h e s t a b lis h m e n t .
I n clu d e s da ta f o r the M ou n ta in r e g io n in a d d ition to th o se r e g io n s sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
L e s s than 0 .5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE;

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,




su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n ot eq u a l 100.

10
0 !

Table 15.

Paid Holiday?

(Percent of nonsupervisory office employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance companies with formal provisions for paid holidays
United States, selected regions and areas, October—
November 1966)
R e g io n s
N u m b e r o f pa id h o lid a y s

U nited
States 1

B order
Sta tes

S ou th ea st

S ou th w est

G rea t
L a k es

M id d le
W e st

100

100

1 00

100

100

100

100

100

100
2
1
11

E m p lo y e e s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
pa id h o l i d a y s _______________________________________
5 d a y s _____________________________________________
5 d a y s plu s 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s ___________________
6 d a y s _____________________________________________
6 d a y s plu s 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s ___________________
7 d a y s _____________________________________________
7 d a y s plu s 1, 2, 3, o r m o r e h a lf d a y s --------8 d a y s _____________________________________________
8 d a y s p lu s 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s ___________________
9 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------------------9 d a y s plu s 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s ___________________
10 d a y s ____________________________________________
11 d a y s ____________________________________________
11 d a y s plu s 1 h a lf d a y _________________________
12 d a y s ____________________________________________
12 d a y s p lu s 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s __________________
13 d a y s ____________________________________________

M id d le
A tla n tic

100

A ll n o n s u p e r v is o r y o f f i c e w o r k e r s _________

New
E ngland

100

100

10 0

100

100

100

100

100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23
-

13
7
44

-

5
9
38
37
7

9
4
16
9
32

17
15

24

20

( 2)
4

( 2)
38

10

15

12

1

6
21

-

3
4
7

61
14
-

4
-

4
12

3
8
2
2

3
11

9
2

8

-

2
8

3
1
1

P a c ifi c

1

9

( 2)
( 2)

4

-

-

6

-

5

-

-

1

7
5
19
25
19
-

-

( 2)

14
-

11

2
2

21

_

16

-

2
12

3

6

-

1

37

"

48

-

_

"

"

S e le c t e d a r e a s
L os A n g e le s L on g B e a ch
M in n e a p o lis —
and A n a h e im —
St. P au l
Santa A n a G a r d e n G ro v e

New Y o r k
and
N ew a rk

A tlan ta

A l l n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f f i c e e m p lo y e e s .

E m p lo y e e s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
pa id h o l i d a y s --------------------------------------------5 d a y s __________________________________
5 d a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y ---------------------------

6 days________________________________
6 d a y s plu s 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s ----------------

7 d a y s ____________________________________
7 d a y s plu s 1, 2, o r 3 h a lf d a y s _____
8 d a y s ____________________________________
8 d a y s p lu s 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s ---------------9 d a y s ____________________________________
9 d a y s p lu s 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s __________
10 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------11 d a y s ___________________________________
11 d a y s plu s 1 h a lf d a y -----------------------12 d a y s ___________________________________
12 d a y s plu s 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s ------------13 d a y s ___________________________________

1 I n clu d e s d a ta f o r the M ou n ta in r e g io n
2 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

B a lt im o r e

B os ton

C h ic a g o

D a lla s

D es
M o in es

H ou ston

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

_
_
.
_

_
_

_
-

100
20

100

7

_
_

-

3
2

-

-

_
_

9

_

-

_

.
_

4
7
28

-

-

.

_

12
8

_

32
5
26
9

_
_
_
_
_
_

3
36

_

_
2
_
_
_

14
_

20
1

-

77

25

29

7

39

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

8

13
3

19

5

-

_

3
39

-

_

.

83
16

.
.

7

_
_
20
_
_
_
5

2

in a d d ition to th ose re g io n s

show n s e p a r a t e ly .

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




13
63
4

21

_
_

39
20

J a c k s o n v ille

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

3

_

_

-

54

62

33
44

_
_
_

_

_
_
_

_
_

_

2
2

50
_

42

P h ila d e lp h ia

-

4
-

9
26
62

Table 16.

Paid Vacations

(Percent of non supervisory office employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance companies with formal provisions for paid vacations
after selected periods of service, United States, selected regions and areas, October—
November 1966)

U nited
S tates 1

V a c a t io n p o l ic y

A ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f f i c e e m p lo y e e s

R e g io n s
N ew
E ng lan d

M id d le
A tla n tic

B order
S ta tes

S ou th ea st

100

100

1 00

100

10 0

10 0

1 00

100

100

100
100

100
100

1 00
100

100
100

1 00
100

100
100

1 00
100

100
1 00

100
100

1
1

3

18

1

5

3

100

93
4

97

82

99

95

95

95

( 3)
94

( 3)
99

6

1

94

99

94

98

5
95

6

2

79

81
16
3

Sou th w est

G reat
L a k es

M id d le
W est

P a c ific

M eth od o f p a y m e n t
E m p lo y e e s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
pa id v a ca tion s... ...
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t ......
A m ou n t o f v a c a t io n pa y 2
A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ______________
___
O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s _____
2 w e e k s _______

4
_ _

1

94

O ver 2 w eeks

1

5

2

A ft e r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
1

_

96
3

1 00

59
38
4

1 w e e k _____________
2 w eeks
O v e r 2 w e e k s .......... ...

68

6

A fte r 5 y e a r s of s e r v ic e
2 w e e k s __________ _

O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s
3 w eeks or m ore

27
5

18
77
5

73
24
3

2
1

39
18
43

85
14

87
13

1

16
4

72
28
( 3)

A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w eeks _
.
..............
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s
3 w eeks
...
.. ..
O ver 3 w eeks

20
6

20

72

71

9

1

92
4

53

71
9

14

2

45

21

85

1

42
19
37
2

11

89
( 3)

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s __ _____
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s
3 w eeks
.
_
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s
4 w eeks or m ore
_ ...

5
5

1
20

-

11
1

66
20

64
7
7

54
40

72
13
3

1
11

-

5

2

13

32

41

3

55

45

47

93
4

40

39

4

6

17
3
65
14
-

23

5

6

52

83

77

11
2

11
2

6

12

( 3)
79
21

( 3)

A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w eeks
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s
3 w e e k s ___________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s
4 w e e k s __
_ . .........
O v e r 4 w e e k s _______

4
_

59

19

5

3

42

34

79

48

31

57

17

51

2

1

1

1

( 3)

2

A f t e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s _______________
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s
3 w e e k s __________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s
4 w eeks
O v e r 4 w e e k s ____ __

S ee fo o t n o t e s a t end o f t a b le .




4
( 3)
13

1

-

5

13

19

5

2

l

3

1

2

30

18

34

44

7

86
11

56
42

65

53
14

34

19
4
61

51

11

11

2

73
19

1

61
21

"

( 3)

Table 16.

Paid Vacations--- Continued

(Percent of nonsupervisory office employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance companies with formal provisions for paid vacations
after selected periods of service, United States, selected regions and areas, October—
November 1966)
S e le c t e d a r e a s
V a c a t io n p o l ic y
A tlan ta

A ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f f i c e e m p l o y e e s

..

B a lt im o r e

B o s to n

C h ic a g o

D a lla s

De s
M oin e s

H ou ston

J a c k s o n v ille

L os A n g e le s L on g B e a ch
M in n e a p o lis —
and A n a h eim —
St. P au l
Santa A n a G arden G rove

New Y o r k
and
N ew a rk

P h ila d e lp h ia

100

100

100

10 0

100

1 00

1 00

100

100

1 00

1 00

1 00

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
10 0

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

1 00
1 00

9
91
-

5
95
-

.
-

2

_
.

8

_
_

17
_
83
-

4
.
96
-

_
_
95
5

9
16
75
-

9
91
-

3
97
-

95
5

80

95
5
-

M eth od o f p a y m en tE m p lo y e e s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g
pa id v a ca tion s...
.
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m en t
A m o u n t o f v a c a t io n p a y 1
2
A fte r 1 y ea r of s e r v ic e
1 w eek

....
_ ...............
...
O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s _________________________
2 w e e k s _______________________________________________
O v e r 2 w e e k s ________________________________________

_
98
-

100

_

_

.

2

100

1 00

10 0

-

_
82
18

-

-

-

98
-

72
16

57
42

100

20

-

12

1

-

75
25
-

46
54
-

38
62
-

41
59
-

2

8

73

3
89
-

20

66
20

7
-

14
-

37
63
-

3

98
-

95
-

.
72
16

1

17

8

6

3

70

20

9

16
14
54
9

2

12

92
_
-

.
.
5
95
-

34
64
-

100

-

-

92
-

100

-

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k _________________________________________________
2 w e e k s _______________________________________________
........ .................. .
... _
O ver 2 w eek s

100

_
_
100

-

_

_

_

_

100

100

94

100

-

-

6

-

50
49
( 3)

61
39
-

8

87
5

87
4
9

3
_
97
( 3)

7
93
-

93
5

33
62
-

_
64
36
( 3)

_
_
61
39
-

3
_
17
_
80
-

_
60
_
40
-

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
2 w e e k s _______________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s
_ ..
3 w eeks or m o re
. .. _ ....

A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s _______________________________________________

O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s
3 w e e k s _______________________________________________
O v e r 3 w e e k s ________________________________________

2

1
1

3
4
93
-

A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s _______________________________________________

O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s _________________________
3 w e e k s ___________ _______________________ __________ _
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s
.. . ..
4 w e e k s o r m o r e ____________________________________

36
64
-

89
-

36
64
-

3
28
_
70
-

5
6

20

63
_
-

A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s _______________________________________________

O v e r 2 and u n d e r 3 w e e k s _________________________
3 w e e k s _______________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d e r 4 w e e k s _________________________
4 w e e k s _______________________________________________
O v e r 4 w e e k s ________________________________________

1

14
_
48
20

17
-

8

6

87
4
-

_
30
_
63
-

A f t e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e
2 w e e k s _______________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s _________________________
3 w e e k s _______________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s _________________________
4 w e e k s ______________________________________________
O v e r 4 w e e k s ________________________________________

36

3

.

-

-

-

-

31

8

-

13

-

-

-

32

89
”

84
16

-

1

NOTE:

Because of rounding,

sums of individual items may not equal totals.

_

_
23
7
70
-

6

_
_

2

_
94
5

_
_
100

_
-

_

_
13
_
87
-

3

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

48

83

16

17

3

4
7
50
39

1

13

14

8

6

-

_

-

_

_

_

66
20

37
“

8

24
54

18

64
33

“

62

1 I n clu d e s data f o r the M ou n ta in r e g i o n in a d d itio n to th o se r e g io n s show n s e p a r a t e ly .
2 P e r i o d s o f s e r v i c e w e r e a r b i t r a r i l y c h o s e n and d o n ot n e c e s s a r i ly r e f le c t the in d iv id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t p r o v is i o n s f o r p r o g r e s s i o n .
at 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e m a y in c lu d e ch a n g e s in p r o v is io n s o c c u r r in g b e tw e e n 5 and 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e .
3 L e s s than 0 .5 p e r c e n t .




_

_
_
48
46

_

_

_

52
47

87
"

F o r e x a m p le , the ch a n g e s in p r o p o r t io n s in d ic a t e d

Table 17.

Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans

(Percent of nonsupervisory office employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance companies with specified health, insurance, and pension plans,
United States, selected regions and areas, October—
November 1966)
R e g io n s
T y p e o f p la n 1

A l l n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f f i c e e m p l o y e e s _____ _

E m p lo y e e s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L ife in s u r a n c e
___
_ __
__ ___ __
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d — _ —
_
.
J o in t ly fin a n c e d _
A c c id e n t a l d ea th and d i s m e m b e r m e n t
in s u r a n c e
_
___
_
_
_ _
— _
_ _ _ _
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d _
J o in t ly fin a n c e d S ic k n e s s and a c c i d e n t in s u r a n c e
o r s i c k le a v e o r b o t h 3________________________
S ic k n e s s and a c c i d e n t in s u r a n c e __________
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d _______________________
J o in t ly fin a n c e d ____ — _ - _________
S ic k le a v e (f u ll p a y , n o
w a itin g p e r io d ) _
_______
S ic k le a v e (p a r t ia l p a y o r
w a itin g p e r io d ) — —
— — __
______
H o s p it a liz a t io n in s u r a n c e — _ __ _
_
_
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d _ __ _____
J o in t ly fin a n c e d —__ — --------- -----S u r g i c a l in s u r a n c e
— _ —
_
__
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d — —
________
__
_ — —
J o in t ly fin a n c e d —
M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e
_____ — — —
___
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d _
_ _ _ __
J o in t ly fin a n c e d — — - - _ — C a t a s t r o p h e in s u r a n c e
— ________ —
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d ______
__ __ _
J o in t ly fin a n c e d — —
_ _________ _ __ __
R e t i r e m e n t p e n s io n ____ - ________
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d ____ __
— ______ —
J o in t ly fin a n ce d __
_
___
N o p la n s
__ _
_ _ __
__ _ _

S e e fo o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




U n ited
S tates 2

N ew
E n g lan d

100

100

99
44
55

100

55
16
39

66

87
43
18
25

6
6
15
97
25
73
96
24
73
94
23
71
94

2
1
73
97
56
41
( 4)

74
26

M id d le
A tla n tic

B order
S ta tes

S ou th ea st

S ou th w est

100

100

100

10
0

100

100

100

99
27
73

100

99
26
73

99
24
75

98
64
33

100

10
0

54
46

41
59

60
16
44

48
23
25

64
36
28
99
87
26
61

63
37

G re a t
L akes

M id d le
W e st

P a c ific

46
9
37

64

48

2
1

55

41

75
44
40
4

96
49

84
27

83
18

81
44
23

83

38

15

7

83
38
9
29

67

52

84

74

70

71

72

78

-

37
99
14

_

_
94

5
97
32
65
92
28
63
82

1
1

2
2
100

31
35

100
47
53

100
47
53

100
47
53
97
44
53

100
90
1
0

1
1

86
99
14

86
99
14
85
98
9
89
99
44
55
( 4)

38
17

1
2

8
6
42
44

8
6

42
44
78
42
36
91
53
39
93
23
69

8

1
1

22
72
94

22

72
91

22
70
89

20

69
95
55
40

6

_
93
17
75
93
17
75
93
17
75
93
17
75

8
8
54
34

2
1

2
1

60

8
8
25
63
96
58
39

1
1
3
9

93
34
59
93
29
64
93
34
59
90
29
61

100
43
57

5
95

10
0
5
95

100
5
95
96
5
91
98
62
36

Table 17.

8

Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans— Continued

(Percent of nonsupervisory office employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance companies with specified health, insurance, and pension plans,
United States, selected regions and areas, October—
November 1966)
S e le c t e d a r e a s
T ype o f p la n 1
A tlan ta

A l l n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f f i c e e m p l o y e e s —-----—

E m p lo y e e s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L ife in s u r a n c e ___________________________________
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d ___________________________
J o in t ly fin a n ce d ______
___________________ —
A c c id e n t a l dea th and d is m e m b e r m e n t
j^ a n ra n rp
1
, ,
,
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d -----------—--------------------------J o in t ly fin a n ce d ----------------------------------------------S ic k n e s s and a c c i d e n t in s u r a n c e
o r s i c k le a v e o r b o t h 3 ------------------------------------S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e _
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d _— —
__ ___ __
— - J o in t ly fin a n ce d — ----- _
S ic k le a v e (fu ll p a y , no
w a itin g p e r io d )--------------------------------------------S ic k le a v e (p a r t ia l p a y o r
w a itin g p e r io d ) _ ----- ------------ --------H o s p ita liz a t io n in s u r a n c e — - — ----- —----E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d ___________________________
J o in t ly fin a n c e d —_____________________________
S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e --------------------------------------------—
--------E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d ---------------J o in t ly fin a n c e d - — --------- -------- --------- —
M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e -------- ---------------— — —
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d ------------------------- ----- —
J o in t ly fin a n c e d —----- — ------------------ ----- _
C a ta s tr o p h e in s u r a n c e — ---------- —------ .------------E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d - _________ _ -----------J o in t ly fin a n c e d — --------- — ------------- —
R e t ir e m e n t p e n s io n - -------- -------- — ----- E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d ________________________ —
J o in t ly fin a n c e d ——
_—__ —
—_________
N o p l a n s --------------------------------------------------------------—

B a lt im o r e

B os ton

C h ica g o

D a lla s

D es
M o in e s

H ou ston

J a c k s o n v ille

L os A n g e le s L ong B each
M in n e a p o lis —
and A n a h eim —
St. P a u l
Santa A n a G a r d e n G ro v e

N ew Y o r k
and
N e w a rk

P h ila d e lp h ia

100

100

1 00

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
6

100
20

100

94

80

46
54

96
47
49

100

84
16

98
16
83

100

76
24

93
43
49

100

35
65

19
81

91
9

91
26
65

44
_
44

86

76
7
69

33
4
29

53
53

64
9
55

82
17
65

84
44
40

46
46

49
9
39

11

100

55

86

-

2

100
6
6

2

55

38

51
4
4

-

18
18
-

97
36
61

89
42
39
3

99
54

-

84
84
-

60
40

100

2

93
55

100

29
14
15

42

74
-

93

55

68

90

47

51

94

85

100

47

48

74

91
59
32
91
59
32
91
59
32
91
59
32
87
9
78

91
70

-

3
99
5
94
92
5
87
92
5
87
78
5
73
98
40
57

97

92
24
67
92
24
67
92
24
67

-

-

-

3

42

100
6

100

100

100

100

100
100

23
77

9

94

3
97

91

100

100

100

3
97

23
77

96
53
43
96
52
43
96
52
43
92
49
43
96
87

22

91
70
22

91
70
22

95
76
20

94
94

70
16

1 00

70
30
1 00

70
30
1 00

70
30
1 00

70
30
1 00

98
2

20

78
97
20

78
97
20

78
97
20

78
96
61
34

18
82

100

24
76
100

28
72

100
6

-

94

100

100
6

94
94

100

100

3
97

100

100

-

3
97
97
90
7

23
77
96
19
77

94
99

6

94
94
85

9

100

95
91
3

100

69
31

12

9
91

99
9
90
99
5
95
99
39
60
( 4)

11

-

9

1 I n clu d e s o n ly th o s e p la n s f o r w h ic h at le a s t p a rt o f the c o s t is b o rn e b y the e m p lo y e r and e x c lu d e s le g a ll y r e q u i r e d p la n s , su ch a s w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n s a t io n and s o c i a l s e c u r it y ;
h o w e v e r , p la n s r e q u i r e d b y S tate t e m p o r a r y d is a b ilit y in s u ra n ce la w s a r e in clu d e d if the e m p lo y e r co n t r ib u t e s m o r e than is le g a ll y r e q u i r e d o r the e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e b e n e fit s in e x c e s s
o f the le g a l r e q u i r e m e n t s .
2 I n clu d e s da ta f o r the M ou n ta in r e g i o n in a d d itio n to th ose r e g io n s sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 U n d u p lic a te d to t a l o f e m p l o y e e s r e c e iv in g s ic k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .
4 L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,




s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y not eq u al t o t a ls .

Tabic 18. Nonproduction Bonuses
j( Percent of nonsupervisory office employees in home offices and regional head offices of life insurance companies with specified types of nonproduction bonuses,
United States, selected regions and areas, October—
November 1966)
R e g io n s
T yp e o f bonus

Sta tes 1

M id d le
A tla n tic

B order
S ta tes

S ou th ea st

S ou th w est

G rea t
Lakes

M id d le
W est

P a c ific

100

100

1 00

1 00

1 00

10 0

1 00

10JO

100

35
23
3

33
19
14

19

32
32

44
42

56
54

2

-

51
38
3

55
52
3

16

-

8

_

17

-

-

3

10

_

-

65

A l l n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f f i c e e m p l o y e e s ----------

N ew
E n gland

67

81

68

56

44

49

45

84

E m p lo y e e s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith
n o n p r o d u c t io n b o n u s e s ____________ - ____________
C h r is t m a s o r y e a r e n d __________________________
P r o f i t sh a r in g s ___________________________________
O t h e r ______________ ___ _____________________ _
E m p lo y e e s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith no
n o n p r o d u c t io n b o n u s e s ___________________________

1
1

10

5

S e le c t e d a r e a s

Atlanta

A ll n on su p erv isory o ffic e e m p lo y e e s______

E m ployees in establishm ents with
nonproduction bon u se s______ . ___
_______
C h ristm as o r yearend _____________________P r o fit sh a rin g .________________________________
O th e r ___ ___ ________________________________
E m ployees in establishm ents with no
nonproduction bon u ses_________________________

1 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r the M oun tain
2 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .

NOTE;

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,




B altim ore

Boston

Chicago

D allas

Des
M oines

Houston

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

67
67

52
52

2
2

28
21

54
54

-

-

-

45
37
8

37
37

-

-

Jacksonville

100

100

-

5
5
-

20
1
19

8
( 2)
8

-

54
47
7
-

95

46

80

92

-

-

-

7

-

-

-

48

98

72

46

55

63

100

su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n ot e q u a l t o t a ls .

Philadelphia

100

33

r e g io n in a d d ition to th o se r e g io n s sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .

New Y ork
and
Newark

100

-

-

Los A n g e le s Long B each M inneapolis—
and Anaheim —
St. Paul
Santa A n a Garden G rove

100

-

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
The establishments studied were selected
from those employing 50 employees or more
at the time of reference of the data used in
compiling the universe lists.

Scope of Survey
The study covered home offices and re ­
gional head offices of life insurance com­
panies (part of industry group 631 as defined
in the 1957 edition of the Standard Industrial
Classification Manual and the 1963 Supple­
ment, prepared by the U.S. Bureau of the
Budget).

The number of establishments and em ­
ployees actually studied by the Bureau as well
as the number estimated to be within the
scope of the survey during the payroll period
studied are shown in the following table:

Estimated Number of Establishments and Employees Within Scope of Survey and Number Studied,
Life Insurance Industry, October-November 1966

Number of establishments 1
3
*
R egion1 and area 2

Employees in establishments
Within scope of survey
Nonsupervisory
Total4
office
employees

Studied

Within
scope of
study

Studied

United States 5 ---------------------------------------------

393

217

1 5 7 ,5 4 7

1 1 2,255

1 38,396

New England----------------------------------------------------------Boston----------------------------------------------------------------Middle A tlan tic----------------------------------------------------New Yoik and Newark------------------------------------Philadelphia------------------------------------- --------------Border States----------------------------------------------------------Baltimore----------------------------------------------------------Southeast----------------------------------------------------------------Atlanta--------------------------------------------------------------Jacksonville------------------------------------------------------Southwest--------------------------------------------------------------Dallas----------------------------------------------------------------H ouston------------------------------------------------------------Great Lakes------------------------------------------------------------Chicago------------------------------------------------------------Minneapolis-St. Paul--------------------------------------Middle W est----------------------------------------------------------Des M o in es------------------------------------------------------Pacific--------------------------------------------------------------------Los Angeles-Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa Ana-Garden Grove-------------------------------

20
8
52
26
14
31
8
67
9
6
60
16
8
91
21
10
37
8
25

16
6
27
13
9
21
6
36
7
6
33
12
6
43
13
7
23
7
15

2 2 ,0 7 4
1 0 ,0 2 0
5 1 ,8 1 5
4 5 ,3 7 2
5 ,0 0 0
6 ,1 0 7
1 ,4 8 3
1 6,132
1 ,9 0 4
3 ,3 7 4
1 1 ,9 0 0
3 ,9 8 7
2 ,5 8 1
2 8 ,9 4 9
8 ,3 8 9
3 ,9 8 6
8 ,3 7 4
2 ,4 0 4
1 0 ,7 2 4

1 7 ,0 1 7
7 ,6 3 4
3 5 ,8 1 5
3 1 ,5 5 6
3 ,4 2 4
3 ,7 9 2
694
1 2 ,3 8 4
1 ,5 0 0
2 ,8 4 0
8 ,2 5 4
2 ,9 1 6
1 ,7 4 2
2 0 ,1 2 8
4 ,6 0 0
3 ,0 6 8
5 ,9 7 5
1 ,8 5 0
7 ,8 3 5

2 1 ,6 9 4
9 ,8 4 0
4 9 ,0 5 7
4 3 ,6 4 4
4 ,4 2 0
5 ,4 0 3
1 ,383
12,871
1 ,6 1 4
3 ,3 7 4
9 ,4 7 9
3 ,5 7 7
2 ,4 2 6
2 2 ,5 4 3
7, 363
3 ,4 8 0
7, 064
2 ,3 4 2
9 ,7 2 7

7

7

6 ,6 3 8

4 ,4 8 8

6 ,6 3 8

Total

1 The regions used in this study include:
New England— Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island,
and Vermont; Middle Atlantic— New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; Border States— Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky,
Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; Southeast— Alabam a, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and
Tennessee; Southwest— Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas; Great Lakes— Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and
Wisconsin; Middle West— Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota; and Pacific— California, Nevada, Oregon,
and Washington.
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the U .S . Bureau of the Budget through March 1965, except New York
and Newark and Los Angeles-Long Beach and Anahein>-Santa Ana-Garden Grove, which are combinations of 2 SMSA's.
3 Includes only establishments with 50 employees or more at the time of reference of the universe data.
4 Includes executive, professional, and other employees excluded from the nonsupervisory office employee category.
5 Includes data for the Mountain region in addition to the regions shown separately. Alaska and Hawaii were not included in
the study.

Method of Study
Data were obtained by personal visits of
Bureau field economists under the direction
of the Bureau's Assistant Regional Directors
for Wages and Industrial Relations. The sur­
vey was conducted on a sample basis. To
obtain appropriate accuracy at minimum cost,




32

a greater proportion of large rather than
small establishments was studied. In com­
bining the data, however, all establishments
were given their appropriate weight. All e s ­
timates are presented, therefore, as relating
to all establishments in the industry group,
excluding only those below the minimum size
at the time of reference of the universe data.

33
Establishment Definition
An establishment, for purposes of this
study, is defined as a single physical location
where the operations of the home office or a
regional head office are performed. A re­
gional head office is defined as one having all
or nearly all of the normal life insurance ad­
ministrative functions, including underwriting.
An establishment is not necessarily identical
with the company, which may consist of one
or more establishments.

Average (mean) weekly earnings for each
occupation were calculated by weighting each
rate (or weekly earnings) by the number of
workers receiving the rate, totaling, and di­
viding by the combined number of observa­
tions. The median designates position— half
of the employees surveyed received more
than the rate shown and half received less
than the rate shown. The middle range is
defined by two rates of pay; a fourth of the
employees earned less than the lower of these
rates and a fourth earned more than the
higher rate.

Employment

Scheduled Weekly Hours

The estimates of the number of em ­
ployees within the scope of the study are in­
tended as a general guide to the size and
composition of the labor force included in the
survey. The advance planning necessary to
make a wage survey requires the use of lists
of establishments assembled considerably in
advance of the payroll period studied.

Data r e f e r to the predominant work
schedule for full-tim e nonsupervisory office
workers employed on the day shift.

Nonsupervisory Office Employees
The term "nonsupervisory office em ­
p lo y e e s," as used in this bulletin, includes
all nonsupervisory employees of the estab­
lishment, except those engaged in custodial,
maintenance, and related work. Administra­
tive and executive employees were excluded.
Occupations Selected for Study
Occupational classification was based on
a uniform set of job descriptions designed to
take account of inter establishment and inter­
area variations in duties within the same job.
(See appendix B for these descriptions.) The
occupations were chosen for their numerical
importance, and their representativeness of
the entire job scale in the industry. Working
supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners,
trainees, the handicapped, part-tim e, tem ­
porary, and probationary workers were not
reported in the selected occupations.

Supplementary Wage Provisions
Supplementary benefits were treated sta­
tistically on the basis that if formal pro­
visions were applicable to half or more of
the nonsupervisory office employees in an
establishment, the benefits were considered
applicable to all such employees. Similarly,
if fewer than half were covered, the benefits
were considered nonexistent in the estab­
lishment. Because of length-of-service and
other eligibility requirements, the proportion
of employees receiving the benefits may be
smaller than estimated.
Paid Holidays. Paid holiday provisions
relate to full-day and half-day holidays pro­
vided annually.

Wage Data

Paid Vacations. The summary of vaca­
tion plans is limited to formal arrangements,
excluding informal plans whereby time off
with pay is granted at the discretion of the
employer or the supervisor. The periods of
service for which data are presented were se­
lected as representative of the most common
practices, but they do not necessarily reflect
individual establishment provisions for pro­
gressions. For example, the changes in pro­
portions indicated at 5 years of service in­
clude changes in provisions which may have
occurred after 4 years.

Average weekly hours were rounded to
the nearest half hour and average weekly
earnings to the nearest half dollar. Standard
hours reflect the workweek for which em ­
ployees receive their regular straight-time
salaries; earnings correspond to these weekly
hours.
Cost-of-living allowances were in­
cluded as part of the em ployee^ regular
salary, but nonproduction bonus payments,
such as Christmas or yearend bonuses, were
excluded.

Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans.
Data are presented for health, insurance, and
pension plans for which all or a part of the
cost is borne by the employer, excluding pro­
grams required by law, such as workmen's
compensation and social security. Among the
plans included are those underwritten by a
commercial insurance company, and those
paid directly by the employer from his cur­
rent operating funds or from a fund set aside
for this purpose.




34
Death benefits are included as a form of
life insurance. Sickness and accident insur­
ance is limited to that type of insurance under
which predetermined cash payments are made
directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly
basis during illness or accident disability.
Information is presented for all such plans to
which the employer contributes at least a part
of the cost. However, in New York and New
Jersey, where temporary disability insurance
laws require employer contributions,9 plans
are included only if the employer (1) contrib­
utes more than is legally required or (2) pro­
vides the employees with benefits which ex­
ceed the requirements of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are
limited to formal plans which provide full pay
or a proportion of the employee *s pay during
absence from work because of illness; in­
formal arrangements have been omitted. Sep­
arate tabulations are provided according to

9 The temporary disability insurance laws in California and
Rhode Island do not require employer obntributions.




(1) plans which provide full pay and no waiting
period, and (2) plans providing either partial
pay or a waiting period.
Medical insurance refers to plans provid­
ing for complete or partial payment of doc­
tors* fees. Such plans may be underwritten
by a commercial insurance company or a
nonprofit organization, or they may be se lfinsured.
Catastrophe insurance, sometimes re ­
ferred to as extended medical insurance, in­
cludes the plans designed to cover employees
in case of sickness or injury involving an ex­
pense which goes beyond the normal coverage
of hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations of retirement pensions are
limited to plans which provide regular pay­
ments upon retirement for the remainder of
the employee's life.
Nonproduction Bonuses.
Nonproduction
bonuses are defined for this study as bonuses
that depend on factors other than the output
of the individual employee or of a group of
employees. Plans that defer payments beyond
1 year were excluded.

Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions
for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field staff in
classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are
employed under a variety of payroll titles and different
work arrangements from establishment to establishment
and from area to area.
This permits the grouping of
occupational wage rates representing comparable job con­
tent. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment
and interarea comparability of occupational content, the
Bureau's job descriptions may differ significantly from
those in use in individual establishments or those pre­
pared for other purposes. In applying these job descrip­
tions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed to
exclude working supervisors, apprentices, learners, be­
ginners, trainees, handicapped, part-tim e, temporary,
and probationary workers.

ACTUARY
Performs life insurance actuarial studies and assignments, applying actuarial theory
and practice. Work involves any or a combination of the following: Determines actuarial
bases for premium rates, dividends, reserves, and nonforfeiture benefits; conducts mortality,
statistical, underwriting, or expense allocation studies; prepares gain and loss exhibits; and
drafts and files insurance and annuity contract form s. Do not include company officers.
For wage study purposes, actuaries are to be classified as follows:
Class A . Performs highly complex and specialized actuarial studies, including the
development of new life insurance products. Provides technical instruction and advice to
lower level actuaries. May lead a group of actuaries in accomplishing actuarial projects.
Position requires attainment of Fellow in the Society of Actuaries.
Class B. Perform s complex actuarial studies and projects such as mortality in­
vestigations, competitive comparisons, loading and expense studies, etc. Provides
technical assistance and advice to lower level actuaries and clerks. Position requires
attainment of Associate in the Society of Actuaries.
ASSEMBLER
Assem bles applications, form s, status information, correspondence, and other nec­
essary data to be used by others.
CARD- TAPE-CONVERTER OPERATOR
Operates a series of machines that automatically transcribe data from punch cards
to reels of magnetic tape, or a series of machines that perform the reverse operation, for
use in automatic data-processing equipment. Has a full knowledge of converter operations
for all basic jobs processed. Work consists of most of the following: Wires plug board,
making circuit connection according to prepared diagrams, to print data in desired format;
mounts reels of tape on spindles and places stacks of punch cards in hopper of reading and
recording machines, and starts machines; observes operation of machines and reports m al­
functioning to supervisor; marks identification on magnetized reels of tape or drawers of
punched cards at end of run; and maintains control sheet. May also operate standard
punched-card equipment. Do not include trainees that do not have a full knowledge of con­
verter operations.




35

36

CLAIM APPROVER
Reviews life insurance claims to determine the extent of the company's liability and
approves or disapproves claims in accordance with policy provisions; and compares data on
application, death certificate, or physician's statement with policy file and other company
records to ascertain completeness and validity of claim.
For wage study purposes,

claim approvers are to be classified as follows:

Class A . Reviews and approves death claims (other than double indemnity) which
normally do not exceed $50, 000; reviews and recommends approval of claims above
these lim its; and position usually requires at least 2 years of life insurance experience.
Class B. Reviews and approves death claims (other than double indemnity) which
are clear cut and do not exceed $25, 000; and may review death claims above $25, 000
and recommend approval by an approver at a higher level.
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A . Under general direction of a bookkeeper or accountant, has responsibility
for keeping one section or more of a complete set of books or records relating to one
phase of an establishment's business transactions. Work involves posting and balancing
subsidiary ledger or ledgers, such as accounts receivable or accounts payable; examining
and coding invoices or vouchers with proper accounting distribution; and requires judg­
ment and experience in making proper assignations and allocations. May assist in prepar­
ing, adjusting, and closing journal entries; and may direct class B accounting clerks.
Class B. Under supervision, performs one routine accounting operation or more,
such as posting simple journal vouchers or accounts payable vouchers, and entering
vouchers in voucher registers; reconciling bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers
controlled by general ledgers, or posting simple cost accounting data. This job does
not require a knowledge of accounting and bookkeeping principles but is found in offices
in which the more routine accounting work is subdivided on a functional basis among
several workers.
CLERK,

CORRESPONDENCE

Composes and writes letters to policyholders, other individuals, or other business
establishments in reply to correspondence received or to requests for information.
Class A . Conducts correspondence with policyholders, field representatives, law­
yers, doctors, and other individuals regarding complaints, inquiries relating to various
branches of the insurance business, contractual provisions, and other related matters.
Work requires detailed knowledge of policy contracts and interpretation of company policy.
Class B. Conducts correspondence with policyholders and field representatives
regarding inquiries of various kinds; and quotes values and issues instructions regarding
the completion of forms for surrenders, loans, policy changes, reinstatements, claim s,
and other related matters. Work requires knowledge of standard company practices and
regulations regarding policy contracts that are embodied in manuals or other written
materials.
CLERK, FILE
Class A . In an established filing system containing a number of varied subject
matter files, classifies and indexes file material such as correspondence, reports, tech­
nical documents, etc. May also file this material. May keep records of various types
in conjunction with the files. May supervise a small group of lower level file clerks.
Class B. Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by simple (subject matter)
headings or partly classified material by finer subheadings. Prepares simple related
index and cross-reference aids. As requested, locates clearly identified material in files
and forwards material. May perform related clerical tasks required to maintain and
service files.




37
CLERK,

F I L E — Continued

Class C. Performs routine filing of material that has already been classified or
which is easily classified in a simple serial classification system (e.g., alphabetical,
chronological, or numerical). As requested, locates readily available material in files
and forwards material; and may fill out withdrawal charge. Perform s simple clerical and
manual tasks required to maintain and service files.
CLERK,

POLICY EVALUATION

Calculates cash surrender and loan value of policies. Work involves: Determining
the kind of insurance and record of payments made from card file; looking up rate in book
and making calculations; and entering amount on a special form. In addition, may handle
reinsurance data.
CLERK,

PREMIUM-LEDGER CARD

Keeps card records or other records of all premium transactions and changes in
type of policy. Work involves: Transcribing premium payments from daily listings, and
keeping a check on the due date so as to put through records of cancellation if premiums
are not paid. May check and send out premium payments. General clerks are excluded.
CONSOLE OPERATOR
Monitors and controls a large-scale electronic computer by operating a central
control unit known as a console. Has a general knowledge of programing.
Work consists
of most of the following: Studies program instruction sheet to determine equipment setup;
mounts reels of tape on designated magnetic tape units which extract in-put or record out-put
data; switches auxiliary equipment into circuit to close loop and effect feedback of data;
starts and operates electronic computer that reads and processes data; makes corrections
to computer to overcome operating problems or special conditions; reviews machine error
messages, and reports machine malfunctioning to supervisor; and maintains operating records.
May assist programer in testing and debugging program.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Class A . Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combination keypunch machine
to transcribe data from various source documents to keypunch tabulating cards. Performs
same tasks as lower level keypunch operator but, in addition, work requires application
of coding skills and the making of some determinations; for example, locates on the
source document the items to be punched, extracts information from several documents,
and searches for and interprets information on the document to determine information
to be punched. May train inexperienced operators.
Class B. Under close supervision or following specific instructions, transcribes
data from source documents to punched cards. Operates a numerical and/or alpha­
betical or combination keypunch machine to keypunch tabulating cards. May verify cards.
Working from various standardized source documents, follows specified sequences which
have been coded or prescribed in detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or
interpreting of data to be punched. Problems arising from erroneous items or codes,
missing information, etc., are referred to supervisor.
PREMIUM ACCEPTOR
Accepts, records, and proves remittances received from policyholders and the field
offices in connection with premiums, interest on policy loans, or to cancel or reduce policy
loans. Endorses checks, issues receipts, and maintains records of remittances held pending
adjustments. May conduct correspondence with field offices regarding such remittances.
PROGRAMER, ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING
Class A . Under general supervision, prepares difficult and complex programs for
solutions of problems or processing of business data by means of an electronic computer.
May act as leader over subordinate programers.
Work consists of most of the follow­
ing: Analyzes problems outlined by superior or systems analyst, and designs detailed




38
PROGRAM ER,

E L E C T R O N IC

DATA

P R O C E S S IN G — Continued

program s, flow chart, and diagrams indicating mathematical computations and sequence
of machine operations necessary to copy and process data and print solution; codes,
tests, and debugs programs; corrects program errors by revising instructions or altering
sequence of operations; and prepares instruction sheet to guide computer operator during
run. Position usually requires 3 years of programing experience.
Class B. Under supervision, prepares comparatively simple programs or single
phase of complex programs for solution by means of an electronic computer. Prepares
flow charts and diagrams; and codes, tests, and debugs programs. Position usually requires
a college degree, preferably in mathematics, or equivalent experience. Does not include
workers with less than 1 year programing experience.
STENOGRAPHER,

GENERAL

Prim ary duty is to take and transcribe dictation from one person or more, either
in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine, involving a normal routine vocabulary.
May also type from written copy. May maintain files, keep simple records or perform
other relatively routine clerical tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool. Does not
include transcribing-machine work.
STENOGRAPHER,

SENIOR

Prim ary duty is to take and transcribe dictation from one person or more, either
in shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine, involving a varied technical or specialized
vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific research. May also type from
written copy. May also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc.
or
Perform s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and r e ­
sponsibility than stenographer, general, as evidenced by the following; Work requires high
degree of stenographic speed and accuracy; a thorough working knowledge of general business
and office procedure and of the specific business operations, organization, policies, proce­
dures, files, workflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in performing stenographic duties and
responsible clerical tasks such as, maintaining followup files; assembling material for
reports, memorandums, and letters; composing simple letters from general instructions;
reading and routing incoming mail; and answering routine questions, etc. Does not include
transcribing-machine work.
NOTE: This job is distinguished from that of a secretary in that the secretary normally
works in a confidential relationship to only one manager or executive, and performs more
responsible and discretionary tasks as described in that job definition.
SYSTEMS ANALYST
Prim arily responsible for devising computer system requirements and layout, and
developing procedures to process data by means of an electronic computer system. Work
consists of most of the following: Confers with other technical personnel to determine
problem and type of data to be processed. Analyses problem in terms of equipment capacity
to determine technique and formulate computer system requirements most feasible for proc­
essing data. Prepares definition of problem together with recommendations for equipment
needed for its solution from which programer prepares flow charts and computer instruc­
tions. Directs and coordinates installation of computer system. Devises data verification
methods, and establishes standards for preparation of operating instructions. May schedule
data processing activities and supervise preparation of program. Do not include workers
primarily engaged in programing.
(See program er.)
For wage study purposes,
Class A .
programs.

systems analysts are to be classified as follows;

Responsible for complex projects which usually include several computer

Class B. Under supervision, responsible for less complex projects or segments of
complex projects.




39
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Class A . Operates a variety of tabulating or electrical accounting machines, typically
including such machines as the tabulator, calculator, interpreter, collator, and others.
Performs complete reporting assignments without close supervision, and performs diffi­
cult wiring as required.
The complete reporting and tabulating assignments typically
involve a variety of long and complex reports which often are of irregular or nonrecurring
type requiring some planning and sequencing of steps to be taken. As a more experienced
operator, is typically involved in training new operators in machine operations, or
partially trained operators in wiring from diagrams and operating sequences of long and
complex reports. Does not include working supervisors performing tabulating-machine
operations and day-to-day supervision of the work and production of a group of tabulatingmachine operators.
Class B. Operates more difficult tabulating or electrical accounting machines such
as the tabulator and calculator, in addition to the sorter, reproducer, and collator. This
work is performed under specific instructions and may include the performance of some
wiring from diagrams. The work typically involves, for example, tabulations involving
a repetitive accounting exercise, a complete but small tabulating study, or parts of a
longer and more complex report. Such reports and studies are usually of a recurring
nature where the procedures are well established. May also include the training of new
employees in the basic operation of the machine.
Class C. Operates simple tabulating or electrical accounting machines such as the
sorter, reproducing punch, collator, etc., with specific instructions. May include simple
wiring from diagrams and some filing work.
The work typically involves portions of
a work unit, for example, individual sorting or collating runs, or repetitive operations.
TAPE LIBRARIAN
Maintains library of reels of magnetic or punched paper tape used for automatic
data-processing purposes. Work consists of most of the following: Classifies and catalogs
reels of tape in accordance with such factors as content of data and type of routine; assigns
code conforming with standardized system; prepares record for file reference; stores reels
according to classification and catalog designation; issues reels and maintains charge-out
records; and inspects returned reels to determine if tape needs replacing due to wear or
damage. May perform minor repair to damaged tape.
TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to make copies of various material or to make out bills after
calculations have been made by another person. May include typing of stencils, mats, or
similar materials for use in duplicating processes. May do clerical work involving little
special training, such as keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and
distributing incoming mail.
Class A . Perform s one or more of the following: Typing material in final form
when it involves combining material from several sources, or responsibility for correct
spelling, syllabication, punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual work or foreign language
material; and planning layout and typing of complicated statistical tables to maintain uni­
formity and balance in spacing. May type routine form letters varying details to suit
circumstances.
Class B. Perform s one or more of the following: Types copy from rough or clear
drafts; routine typing of form s, insurance policies, etc.; and setting up simple standard
tabulations, or copying more complex tables already set up and spaced properly.
UNDERWRITER
Reviews, evaluates, and takes action to approve or decline applications for new
insurance, changes of plan, and reinstatement of benefits where no major medical impairment
is involved.




40
U N D E R W R IT E R — Continued

For wage study purposes, underwriters are classified as follows;
Class A . Reviews and approves life insurance applications which normally do not
exceed $ 7 5 ,0 0 0 (other than double indemnity); reviews and recommends approval on ap­
plications above these lim its; and recommends declination on applications to $ 7 5 ,0 0 0 and
concurs on lower level declinations. Answers insurance inquiries from the field offices.
May determine extra premium rate for out-of-ordinary applications. Position usually
requires at least 5 years* life insurance experience and may require successful completion
of several insurance courses given by HOLU or LOMA. May also direct work of under­
writers at lower classifications.
Class B . Reviews and approves life insurance applications which normally do not
exceed $50, 000 (other than double indemnity); and reviews and recommends approval on
applications above these lim its. Declinations must be concurred in by another under­
writer. May determine extra premium rate for out-of-or dinary applications. Position
usually requires at least 2 years' life insurance experience and successful completion
of at least two specialized courses given by HOLU or LOMA.
Class C. Reviews and approves life insurance applications which are clear cut and
do not exceed $25, 000 (other than double indemnity). May review applications above
$25, 000 and recommend approval. Declinations require concurrence by another under­
writer, generally at a higher level. Do not include trainees with less than 6 months*
experience in underwriting.




Industry Wage Studies
The most recent reports for industries included in the Bureau*s program
of industry wage surveys since January 1950 are listed below. Those for which
a price is shown are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S.
Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C ., 20402, or any of its regional
sales offices. Those for which a price is not shown may be obtained free as
long as a supply is available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington,
D .C ., 20212, or from any'of the regional offices shown on the inside back cover.

I. Occupational Wage Studies
Manuf actur ing
Basic Iron and Steel, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1358 (30 cents).
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1520 (30 cents).
* Canning and Freezing, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Cigar Manufacturing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1436 (30 cents).
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1472 (20 cents).
Cotton Textiles, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1506 (40 cents).
Distilled Liquors, 1952. Series 2, No. 88.
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1463 (30 cents).
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1531 (30 cents).
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1337 (30 cents).
Fluid Milk Industry; 1964. BLS Bulletin 1464 (30 cents).
Footwear, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1503 (50 cents).
Hosiery, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1456 (45 cents).
Industrial Chemicals, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1529 (40 cents).
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1386 (40 cents).
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1378 (40 cents).
Machinery Manufacturing, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1563 (70 cents).
Meat Products, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1415 (75 cents).
Men*s and Boys* Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1964.
BLS Bulletin 1457 (40 cents).
Men*s and Boys* Suits and Coats, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1424 (65 cents).
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1439 (35 cents).
Miscellaneous Textiles, 1953. BLS Report 56.
Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Parts, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1393 (45 cents).
Nonferrous Foundries, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1498 (40 cents).
Paints and Varnishes, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1524 (40 cents).
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1478 (70 cents).
Petroleum Refining, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1526 (30 cents).
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1423 (30 cents).
^Processed Waste, 1957. BLS Report 124.
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard M ills, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1341 (40 cents).
Radio, Television, and Related Products, 1951. Series 2, No. 84.
Railroad Cars, 1952. Series 2, No. 86.
*Raw Sugar, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Southern Sawmills and Planing M ills, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1519 (30 cents).
Structural Clay Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1459 (45 cents).
Synthetic F ibers, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1540 (30 cents).
Synthetic Textiles, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1509 (40 cents).
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1965—
66. BLS Bulletin 1527 (45 cents).
*

Studies of the effects of the $1 minimum wage.




I. Occupational Wage Studies--- Continued
Manufacturing— Continued
^Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1957. BLS Report 136.
West Coast Sawmilling, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1455 (30 cents).
Women's and M is s e s ' Coats and Suits, 1965. BBS Bulletin 1508 (25 cents).
Women's and M is s e s ' D resses, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1538 (30 cents).
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1496
(40 cents).
^Wooden Containers, 1957. BLS Report 126.
Wool Textiles, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1551 (45 cents).
Work Clothing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1440 (35 cents).
Nonmanufacturing
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1452 (30 cents).
Banking, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1466 (30 cents).
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1383 (45 cents).
Communications, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1521 (20 cents).
Contract Cleaning Services, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1507 (30 cents).
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, I960. BLS Report 181.
Department and Women's Ready-to-W ear Stores, 1950. Series 2, No. 78.
Eating and Drinking Places, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1400 (40 cents).
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1374 (50 cents).
Hospitals, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1553 (70 cents).
Hotels and M otels, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1406 (40 cents).
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1544 (60 cents).
Life Insurance, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1324 (30 cents).
Motion Picture Theaters, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1542 (35 cents).
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1492 (45 cents).

II.

Earnings Distributions Studies

Factory W orkers' Earnings— Distribution by Straight-Time Hourly
Earnings, 1958. BLS Bulletin 1252 (40 cents).
Factory Workers* Earnings— Selected Manufacturing Industries, 1959.
BLS Bulletin 1275 (35 cents).
Employees Earnings and Hours, June 1965—
Retail Trade. BLS Bulletin 1501 (50 cents).
Building M aterials, Hardware, and Farm Equipment Dealers.
BLS Bulletin 1501-1 (25 cents).
General Merchandise Stores. BLS Bulletin 1501-2 (40 cents).
Food Stores. BLS Bulletin 1501-3 (30 cents).
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Stations.
BLS Bulletin 1501-4 (40 cents).
Apparel and A ccessory Stores. BLS Bulletin 1501-5 (45 cents).
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household Appliance Stores.
BLS Bulletin 1501-6 (40 cents).
Miscellaneous Stores. BLS Bulletin 1501-7 (30 cents).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the South and
North Central Regions, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1552 (50 cents).
Employee Earnings and Hours in Eight Metropolitan Areas of the South, 1965.
BLS Bulletin 1533 (40 cents).
* Studies of the effects of the $1 minimum wage.




* U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1967 0 -2 8 0 -2 7 2

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES

REGION I— NEW ENGLAND

John F . K en n edy F e d e r a l B u ild in g
G o v e r n m e n t C e n t e r , R o o m 1 6 0 3 -B
B o s to n , M a s s , 02203
T e l . : 2 2 3 -6 7 6 2

REGION II— MID-ATLANTIC

341 Ninth A v en u e
N ew Y o r k , N. Y . 10001
T e l . : 9 7 1 -5 4 0 5




REGION III— SO UTHERN

1371 P e a c h t r e e S tr e e t, N E .
A tla n ta , G a . 30309
T e l . : 5 2 6 -5 4 1 8

REGION IV— NORTH CENTRAL

219 South D e a r b o r n S tre e t
C h ic a g o , 111. 60604
T e l . : 3 5 3 -7 2 3 0

REGION V — WESTERN

450 G o ld e n G ate A v en u e
B o x 36017
San F r a n c i s c o , C a lif. 9 4102
T e l . : 5 5 6 -4 6 7 8

REGION VI— MOUNTAIN-PLAINS

F e d e r a l O ffic e B u ild in g , T h ir d F lo o r
911 W alnut S tre e t
K a n s a s C ity , M o . 64106
T e l . : 3 7 4 -2 4 8 1


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102