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Industry
W age Survey

Life Insurance
December 1971

Dayton & Montgomery Co.
Public Library
NOV6

I973

Bulletin 1791
U.S. D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R
Bureau of Labo r Statistics




d o c u m en t collection

Industry
Wage Survey

Life Insurance
December 1971
Bulletin 1791

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Peter J. Brennan, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1973

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P re fa ce
This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of wages
and related benefits for employees in home offices and regional head offices of the life
insurance industry in December 1971. A similar study was conducted by the Bureau in
October-November 1966.
Separate releases for the following areas were issued earlier: Atlanta, Baltimore,
Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Des Moines, Hartford, Houston, Jacksonville, Los Angeles-Long
Beach and Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove, Minneapolis-St. Paul, New York and
Newark, New York City, and Philadelphia. Copies are available from the U.S. Department
of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D. C. 20212, or any of its regional
offices.
This study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of Wages and Industrial Relations.
Edward J. Caramela of the Division of Occupational Wage Structures prepared the
analysis in this bulletin. Field work for the survey was directed by the Assistant Regional
Directors for Operations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program of industry wage studies, as well as
the addresses of the Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end of this bulletin.




iii




C o n te n ts
Page

S u m m ary ................................................................................................................................................ . 1
Industry characteristics............................................................................................................................. 1
Occupational earnings .............................................................................................................. . . . . 2
Establishment practices and supplementary wage p ro v isio n s.............................................................. 5
Scheduled weekly hours and shift p ra c tic e s......................................................................................5
Paid holidays .......................................................................................................................................5
Paid v a c a tio n s ...................................................................................................................................... 5
Health, insurance, and retirement p l a n s ............................................................................................6
Other selected benefits ......................................................................................................................6
Chart ....................................................................................................................................................3
Tables:
1.

Average weekly earnings: Selected o c c u p a tio n s.................................................... 7

&&

Occupational earnings:
2.
Atlanta, Ga.............................................................................................................. 11
3.
Baltimore, Md............................................................................................................. 12
4.
Boston, Mass........................................................................................................... 13
5.
Chicago, 111...................................................................................................................14
6.
Dallas, Tex...................................................................................................................16
7.
Des Moines, Iowa ....................................................................................................17
8.
Hartford, Conn............................................................................................................18
9.
Houston, Tex.......................................................................................... ' . . . . 19
10.
Jacksonville, Fla..........................................................................................................20
11.
Los Angeles— Long Beach and Anaheim— Santa
Ana— Garden Grove, C a l i f . ...................................................................... 21
12.
Minneapolis— St. Paul, Minn..................................................................................22
13.
New York and Newark, N.Y.—
N.J............................................................................24
14.
New York City, N.Y.............................................
15. Philadelphia, Pa.— J .............................................
N.

Appendixes:
A.
Scope and method of survey..........................................
B.
Occupational descriptions...........................................




v

&^

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
16.
Scheduled weekly h o u r s ....................................
17.
Paid holidays .....................................................
18.
Paid v a c a tio n s .....................................................
19.
Health, insurance, and retirement plans . . . .
20.
Other selected b en e fits........................................




L ife In su ra n ce , D e c e m b e r 1971
Summary

increase of 13 percent since a similar study in 1966.5
Employment increases were noted in six of the eight
regions for which data are tabulated separately, ranging
from slightly less than 10 percent in the Border States
and Southwest to 55 percent in New England. In the
Middle Atlantic and Pacific regions, the numbers of
workers reported declined 3 and 7 percent, respectively,
over the 5-year period.
In the current study, two-thirds of the workers were
concentrated in three regions— Middle Atlantic (27
the
percent), New England (21 percent), and the Great
Lakes (18 percent). In each of the remaining five
regions, the proportions of workers amounted to about
10 percent or less.
Home offices and regional head offices of life
insurance companies are located almost exclusively in
metropolitan areas.6 The 13 areas studied separately in
December 1971 accounted for nearly two-thirds of the
total nonsupervisory office employment in such
establishments. Employment levels, however, varied sub­
stantially by area, as indicated in the following
tabulation:

Average weekly salaries of employees in 42 repre­
sentative occupations in life insurance offices ranged
from $427 for actuaries performing highly complex
statistical studies to $81.50 for routine file clerks in
December 1971.1 Men substantially outnumbered
women in most of the higher skilled and higher paying
occupations; women accounted for virtually all workers
in the office clerical jobs studied.
Occupational averages tended to be highest in the
Middle Atlantic and Pacific regions and lowest in the
Southeast and Middle West.1 In the 13 selected areas of
2
industry concentration studied separately, earnings were
usually highest in the New York and Newark area and
lowest in Jacksonville.3
Paid holidays and paid vacations were provided by all
establishments visited during the survey, and nearly all
employees were covered by various types of health,
insurance, and retirement plans paid for, at least in part,
by the employer. Offices typically provided from 9 to
12 paid holidays annually and from 2 to 4 weeks of
vacation pay after qualifying periods of service.

Selected area

Atlanta..................................................................... 1,193
Baltimore................................................................
609
Boston ................................................................... 7,660
Chicago................................................................... 6,450
Dallas ..................................................................... 2,851
Des M oines...................
2,195
H artfo rd .................................................................. 13,769
Houston ................................................................. 2,249
Jacksonville............................................................ 3,377
Los Angeles-Long Beach and AnaheimSanta Ana-Garden Grove................................. 3,853
Minneapolis-St. P a u l............................................. 3,280
New York and N ew ark.......................................... 28,789
New York C ity ...................................................22,559
Philadelphia .......................................................... 4,651

Industry characteristics

Home and regional head offices of life insurance
companies within scope of the survey employed 127,167
nonsupervisory officeworkers in December 1971 4—
an
1 See appendix A for scope and method of survey, and
appendix B for occupational descriptions. Wage data exclude
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays,
and late shifts.
2 For definition of regions, see footnote 1, appendix table
A-l.
3 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, tables 2 through
15. In addition to the New York-Newark combined area, data
are presented separately for the New York City portion (five
boroughs).

Home offices accounted for nearly nine-tenths of the
employees covered by the survey. The proportions of
workers in regional head offices amounted to two-thirds

4 The nonsupervisory officeworkers covered by this study
represent about one-third of the 557,200 workers estimated to
be employed in the industry in December 1971. (See Employ­
ment and Earnings Vol. 18, No. 9, March 1972.) Life insurance
companies have large numbers of sales personnel who are not
usually employed in home offices or regional head offices.




Nonsupervisory
office employees

5 See Industry Wage Survey: Life Insurance, OctoberNovember 1966 Bulletin 1569 (Bureau of Labor Statistics,
1967).
6 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined by the
U.S. Office of Management and Budget through January 1968.
1

of the total in the Pacific region, one-fourth in the
Southwest, nearly one-sixth in the Southeast and Great
Lakes, and less than one-tenth in the remaining regions.
Mutual companies—
those owned by policy holders—
employed 55 percent of the workers. Such companies
accounted for nearly nine-tenths of the employees in the
Middle Atlantic region and about three-fourths in the
Pacific. The reverse was true in the Border States,
Southeast and Southwest regions, where a large majority
of the nonsupervisory officeworkers were employed by
stock companies (those owned by stockholders). In the
New England, Great Lakes, and Middle West regions,
employment was about evenly divided between the two
types of companies.
Firms which handled other types of insurance (e.g.,
accident, hospitalization, fire) in addition to life insur­
ance, employed four-fifths of the officeworkers. Offices
of companies dealing exclusively in life insurance
accounted for about two-fifths of the work force in the
Border States, Great Lakes, and Middle West regions,
nearly one-fourth in the Southwest, and one-tenth or
less in the other regions.
Home and regional head offices of life insurance
companies in the survey varied greatly in employment
size. At the lower end of the establishment— size scale,
nearly one-third of the offices covered by the study
employed fewer than 100 workers; a similar proportion
employed between 100 and 250 workers, and nearly
one-sixth employed between 250 and 500. Together,
these three establishment-size groups accounted for
about four-fifths of the offices within scope of the
survey, but employed only slightly more than one-fourth
of the 127,167 nonsupervisory officeworkers. At the
upper end of the scale, one-tenth of the offices
employed 1,000 workers or more (including a few with
more than 5,000) and accounted for three-fifths of the
total work force in December 1971.

employed in clerical and related jobs, including secre­
taries, stenographers, typists, filing and general clerks,
and operators of bookkeeping and other kinds of office
machines. They perform much of the same kind of work
in insurance companies as their counterparts do in other
types of business enterprises. However, other workers in
insurance offices have jobs unique to the industry,
including correspondence clerks, policy evaluation
clerks, and premium acceptors. Some, such as claim
approvers and underwriters, are in positions of consider­
able responsibility which require extensive knowledge of
one or more phases of the life insurance business.
Professional workers account for relatively few of the
jobs in life insurance offices. One such profession (for
which data are provided in this report) is that of the
actuary. These workers make statistical studies relating
to various kinds of risks, to determine the premium
charge on each type of policy.
Insurance companies were among the first business
firms to use electronic data processing (EDP) equipment.
By the mid-1960’s, the overwhelming majority of life
insurance companies had installed EDP equipment and
applied it to various functions and operations. The
application of computers and related EDP equipment
has been directed to most of the large-volume record
keeping, sorting, and filing operations, which formerly
required numerous clerical employees. Employment
increases in occupations related to electronic data
processing have been accompanied by employment
declines in some clerical jobs.
This general pattern emerged in a comparison of 1971
occupational employment levels with the Bureau’s 1961
and 1966 surveys in the life insurance in d u stry . 7
Although the studies do not provide a precise measure of
the magnitude of such changes, some general observa­
tions on direction can be made. For example, the
number of computer operators, programers, and systems
analysts showed substantial gains since the 1961 study—
whereas the numbers of assemblers, file clerks,
premium-ledger-card clerks, and tabulating-machine
operators decreased. (See chart.)

Establishments with collective bargaining agreements
covering a majority of their nonsupervisory officeworkers were found in only four regions and employed
less than 5 percent of the industry’s office employment.
All workers covered by the survey were in offices
having time-rate systems of wage payment. Formal
systems, providing a range of rates for specified occupa­
tions, were the basis of wage payment for nine-tenths of
the workers. Informal systems, which based salaries on
the qualifications of individual workers, applied to all
remaining workers. This method of wage payment was
particularly significant in the Southeast and Southwest
regions, where it covered about one-fifth and threetenths of the workers, respectively.
A large majority of the personnel in home offices and
regional head offices of life insurance companies are




Occupational earnings

The 42 occupational classifications studied, account­
ing for about 42,000 employees, were selected to re­
present salary levels for the various types of activities per­
formed in home and regional head offices of insurance
companies. For the 28 occupations comparable to those
studied in the 1966 survey, increases in average weekly
7
Bulletin 1569. See also Industry Wage Survey: Life
Insurance, May-July 1961, Bulletin 1324 (Bureau of Labor
Statistics, 1962).

2

E m p loym e n t Changes in Selected Life Insurance O ccupations, 1961-71

Number of employees
5,000

4,500

4,000

3,500

3,000

■m

2,500

2,000

1,500

1,000

Computer
operators




Programers
and systems
analysts

Keypunch
operators

File
clerks

3

Tabulatingmachine
operators

Premium
ledger-card
clerks

Assemblers

Text table 1. Pay relatives of clerical and EDP related
employees in life insurance offices
[BLS area wage surveys ■ 100]

salaries ranged from 19 to 38 percent. The median of
these increases was 30 percent over the 5-year period,
i.e., one-half were higher than this figure, one-half were
lower.
Nationwide, average (mean) weekly salaries in
December 1971 ranged from a high of $427 for class A
actuaries to $81.50 for class C file clerks. (See table 1.)
Men were numerically predominant in most of the
highest paying jobs studied, including actuaries, under­
writers, systems analysts, programers, and computer
operators. Salaries for such jobs typically averaged above
$170 a week.
Women, on the other hand, accounted for virtually all
workers in the office clerical occupations studied.
Excluding secretaries, weekly salaries for most of these
jobs averaged less than $120. Secretaries, as a group,
averaged $135 a week, ranging from $172 for class A to
$118 for class D. The class A secretary works for a
chairman of the board or the president of a company
with 100 to 5,000 employees; the latter works for either
supervisors of organizational units with fewer than 30
employees or for nonsupervisory staff specialists.
Earnings of office clerical workers and EDP related
employees in the life insurance industry were usually
lower than the straight-time weekly averages for
corresponding jobs in the Bureau’s area wage surveys.8
Text table 1 presents pay relatives based on average
weekly salaries using the averages in the broader based
area wage surveys as 100.
Insurance employees in the 28 comparable job classi­
fications usually averaged between 5 and 14 percent less
than their counterparts in all industries combined.
However, when viewed on a somewhat more comparable
industry basis, i.e., using the finance, insurance, and real
estate industry sector of the area wage surveys as 100,
the pay relatives for 20 of the 28 occupational levels
were within 5 percent of the base.
Among the jobs for which data are presented in all
regions, average weekly earnings were usually highest in
the Middle Atlantic and Pacific States, and lowest in the
Southeast and Middle West. There were, however, some
notable exceptions to this pattern. In the New England
region, for example, averages for several jobs closely

Relative

Job classif ication

81-85

General stenographers

86-90

Class A and B accounting clerks, class
D secretaries, senior stenographers,
class A and B typists, class C systems
analysts, class A and B keypunch operators,
and Class A and B tabulating-machine
operators

91-95

Class A , B, and C file clerks, class B
and C secretaries; transcribing-machine
operators, class A computer operators;
class A programers, class A and B systems
analysts, and class C tabulating-machine
operators

96-100

Class B computer operators and class B
programers

101-105

Class A secretaries, class C computer operators
and class C programers

related to the insurance business exceeded those
recorded in the Pacific region, and in a number of
instances, job averages in the Southwest were lower than
those in the Southeast and Middle West, particularly for
clerical jobs. The spread in occupational averages
between the highest and lowest paying regions typically
ranged from 20 to 40 percent.
Among the 13 areas selected for separate study,
average earnings were usually highest in the New York
and Newark area and lowest in Jacksonville. (See tables
2-15.) Interarea differences in average earnings varied
substantially, however, by occupation. To illustrate,
class A systems analysts in Hartford averaged only 2
percent more than those in Jacksonville, while the
corresponding spread was 19 percent for class B typists.
Large differences in area pay levels were not limited
to the lesser skilled jobs. For example, the earnings
spread for actuaries, underwriters, and systems analysts
ranged from 26 percent for class C systems analysts to
42 percent for class A actuaries.
A number of the occupations selected for separate
study were staffed almost entirely by either men or
women. In those jobs in which both men and women
8
Area Wage Surveys, Metropolitan Areas, United States and
were employed, men’s earnings usually averaged more
Regional Summaries, 1970-71, Bulletin 1685-92, to be published
than women’s, even when comparisons were limited to
sometime in 1973. Data from Bulletin 1685-92 were adjusted to
the same area. Differences in average earnings for men
reflect a December 1971 payroll reference. The Bureau’s area
wage survey program covers establishments in the following
and women in the same area and job may be due to
broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transportation, com­
several factors, including variation in the distribution of
munications, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail
the sexes among establishments having different pay
trade; finance, insurance and real estate; and selected services.
levels, and possible minor differences in assigned duties.
Area wage surveys, conducted annually in 96 metropolitan areas
Also, as noted earlier, formal rate-range pay systems
throughout the country, are projected to represent all metro­
applied to 90 percent of the office workers in the study.
politan areas in the United States (excluding Alaska and Hawaii).




4

Text table 2.

Wage dispersions in selected job classifications in life insurance offices
Number of classifications w ith dispersion factors1 o f—

Occupational group

Total number
of job
classifications

All job classifications...........................

42

Insurance-related occupations . . . . ....................
General clerical occupations.................................
EDP and related occupations...............................

15
and under
20
percent
10

13
14
15

1Dispersion factor equals earnings range of middle 50 percent
of employees in classification as a percent of median earnings.

To the extent that individual pay is adjusted on the basis
of length of service, longer average service for one sex
can result in higher average pay when both sexes are
employed within the same rate range.
Individual earnings ranged widely within most occu­
pations studied. To illustrate, an examination of the
nationwide earnings distributions reveals that the middle
ranges of earnings produced dispersion factors of 20
percent or more for most of the 42 occupational
classifications studied. (See text table 2.)
Earning variations within occupations are more
clearly illustrated on an individual area basis. In a
number of instances, weekly earnings of the highest paid
employees exceeded those of the lowest paid in the same
job and area by 100 percent or more. This resulted in
considerable overlapping of individual salaries between
workers in occupations with widely disparate average pay
levels, as is shown in text table 3.

—

3
7

20
and under
25
percent
21

25
and under
30
percent
5

30
and under
35
percent
4

3
1
1

35
percent
and
over
2

2
2
-

6
8
7

2
-

—

For definitions of medians and middle ranges, see appendix A.

percent of straight-time earnings for evening schedules
and 10 or 15 percent when employed on night or other
late shifts.
Paid holidays. All establishments visited during the study
granted paid holidays to their nonsupervisory office
employees, typically 9 to 12 days annually. The number
of paid holidays provided, however, varied substantially
both among and within regions. (See table 17.) For
example, in the three major employment regions, the
most common provisions were 11 days in New England,
12 days in the Middle Atlantic and 8 or 9 in the Great
Lakes. In the two latter regions, however, provisions
ranged from 6 to 13 days or more. Provisions for half
holidays (in addition to full holidays) were available to
at least one-tenth of the officeworkers in nearly all
regions.

Establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions

Paid vacations. Paid vacations, after qualifying periods of
service, were provided to all nonsupervisory office
employees. (See table 18.) Typical provisions were 2
weeks of vacation pay after 1 year of service, 3 weeks
after 10 years, and 4 weeks after 20 years of service.

Data were also obtained on certain establishment
practices and supplementary wage benefits for nonsupervisory office employees, including work schedules, paid
holidays, paid vacations, and health, insurance, and
retirement plans.

Text table 3.
Weekly earnings distribution of class B
underwriters and systems analysts in the New York'
Newark area
Number o f workers
employed as—

Scheduled weekly hours and shift practices. Virtually all
establishments visited reported work schedules based on
a 5-day week. At the time of the study, weekly work
schedules of 37.5 hours or less were in effect in
establishments accounting for 84 percent of the nonsupervisory office employees. (See table 16.) Only in the
Southwest and Middle West regions were a majority of
such employees scheduled to work longer than 37.5
hours a week, usually 38.75 or 40 hours.
Less than 2 percent of the officeworkers were
employed on late shifts in December 1971. Practically
all were electronic data processing or related employees,
commonly receiving a shift premium amounting to 10



Weekly earnings
Under $ 1 8 0 ..........................................
$180 and under $ 1 9 0 ...........................
$190 and under $ 2 0 0 ...........................
$200 and under $ 2 2 0 ..........................
$220 and under $ 2 4 0 ...........................
$240 and under $ 2 6 0 ...........................
$260 and under $ 2 8 0 ..........................
$280 and under $300...........................
$300 and under $320...........................
$320 and o v e r......................................

Class B
underwriters
15
9
16
24
17
34
7
4
—

-

Class B
systems
analysts
—
—

1
30
82
46
47
13
25

Total number of workers . .

5

126

244

Average weekly earnings.....................

$221

$273

Regionally, the most liberal vacation policies were found
in New England, where for a majority of the workers
provisions were 3 weeks’ pay after 5 years, 4 weeks after
10 years, and 5 weeks after 25 years of service.

Health, insurance, and retirement plans. Virtually all
office employees covered by the survey were provided
life, hospitalization, surgical, medical, and major medical
insurance, for which employers paid at least part of the
cost. (See table 19.) Paid sick leave (usually at full pay
with no waiting period) was available to about seveneighths of the officeworkers, while sickness and accident
plans applied to three-fifths. Accidental death and
dismemberment insurance was available to seven-tenths of
the workers. For most of these benefits there was very
little regional variation in the proportions of workers
covered. A notable exception, however, was sickness and
accident insurance. Coverage of this benefit varied from
less than one-tenth of the workers in the Middle West,




where sick leave applied to seven-eighths of the workers,
to four-fifths in the New England region, where ninetenths of the employees were covered by sick leave
plans.
Retirement pension plans (other than social security),
providing regular payments for the remainder of the
retiree’s life, were available to nearly all workers in the
survey. Typically, these plans were paid for wholly by
the employer. Provisions for lump-sum payments
(severance pay) on retirement were virtually nonexistent
in the industry.
Other selected benefits. Nearly all workers were ifi
establishments having formal provisions for jury duty
pay and pay to attend funerals of specified relatives.
Nearly three-tenths of the workers were in offices
providing free lunches to their employees. This practice
was prevalent only in the Middle Atlantic and Pacific
regions, but it was reported by some establishments in
all regions except in the Middle West. (See table 20.)

T a b le 1. A v e ra g e w e e k ly earnings: S e le c te d o ccu p a tio n s
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s 1 of e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f fic e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f fic e s of l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s ,
U n ited S ta te s and s e le c t e d r e g io n s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
N ew E n g la n d

U n ite d S t a te s 2
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s

W e e k ly e a r n i n g s 1
M ean

M e d ia n

M id d le r a n g e

M id d le A tla n tic

W e e k ly e a r n in g i s
M ean

M e d ia n

1

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s

M id d le r a n g e

W e ek ly e a r n i n g s 1
M ean

M e d ia n

M id d le r a n g e

I n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s A (2 1 8 m e n a n d 11 w o m e n ) ------------229
333
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s B (3 0 9 m e n a n d 24 w o m e n ) ------------896
A s s e m b l e r s (8 8 8 w o m e n a n d 8 m e n ) --------------------------337
C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A ------------------------------------------162
M e n --------------------------------------------------------------------------556
C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B ------------------------------------------240
M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------- --------316
W o m e n --------------------------------------------------------------------684
C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s A ------------------------------568
W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------203
C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s B -----------------------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 1, 091
988
C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a t io n (9 4 5 w o m e n a n d 43 m en ) —
C l e r k s , p r e m i u m - l e d g e r - c a r d (5 5 3 w o m e n
556
a n d 3 m e n ) -----------------------------------------------------------------611
P r e m i u m a c c e p t o r s (6 0 6 w o m e n a n d 5 m e n ) ------------441
U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s A -----------------------------------------------M e n --------------------------------------------------------------------------364
598
U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B -----------------------------------------------426
172
W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------635
U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s C -----------------------------------------------329
306
G e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A --------------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B (2 , 143 w o m e n a n d
4 7 m e n ) ------------------------------------------------------- --------------C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s A (4 1 8 w o m e n a n d 6 m en ) ----------C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s B (1 , 2 8 5 w o m e n a n d 10 m e n ) -----C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s C (2 , 022 w o m e n a n d 39 m e n ) -----S e c r e t a r i e s 3 (6, 4 13 w o m e n a n d 5 m e n ) ----------------------S e c r e t a r i e s , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) ------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) -------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s , c l a s s C (2 , 2 7 5 w o m e n a n d 2 m en ) —
S e c r e t a r i e s , c l a s s D (2 , 01 5 w o m e n a n d 3 m en ) —
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n ) -------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r ( a l l w o m e n ) ---------------------------T r a n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e o p e ra to rs , g e n e ra l
(1 , 021 w o m e n a n d 2 m e n ) -----------------------------------------T y p i s t s , c l a s s A (2 , 156 w o m e n a n d 4 m en ) -------------T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) --------------------------------------

j

542
155
387

$427.
300.
90.
182.
218.
157.
184.
138.
144.
136.
116.
113.
106.

00
00
50
00
00
50
00
00
00
00
50
50
50

$422.
29 7 .
90.
182.
21 4 .
155.
178.
133.
134.
129.
111.
109.
104.

50
50
00
00
50
00
50
00
00
50
00
00
00

$383.
263.
81.
133.
181.
122.
154.
105.
119.
117.
96.
95.
92.

87.
98.
22 8 .
23 4 .
20 1 .
209.
182.
159.
171.
146.

50
00
00
00
00
00
50
00
50
00

85.
94.
224.
22 9 .
197.
201.
181.
160.
166.
145.

00
50
50
00
50
50
00
00
50
00

75.
85.
196.
20 5 .
177.
185.
164.
140.
156.
129.

122. 00
140. 00
120. 00
96.
106.
89.
81.
135.
172.
149.
133.
118.
97.
117.

1, 023
2, 160
3, 171

99. 00
101. 50
88. 50

97. 50
101. 00
88. 50

1504
,035

164.
146.
147.
130.
130.
216.
218.
21 1 .
191.
190.
192.

161.
142.
141.
128.
124.
20 9 .
21 1 .
20 7 .
191.
190.
193.

1
,

94.
104.
87.
81.
131.
168.
145.
131.
118.
97.
116.

50
50
50
00
00
50
50
00
00
50
50

2, 190
42 4
1, 295
2, 061
6, 418
419
672
2, 277
2, 018
286
1, 050

1
,

50
50
50
50
00
00
50
00
00
50
50

119. 00
138. 00
117. 50

518.
334.
104.
219.
226.
178.
171.
191.
161.
160.
124.
124.
120.

50
50
50
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
00

65
61
372
41
31
121
73
48
107
71
245
199
146

$456.
325.
93.
215.
215.
191.
204.
171.
187.
177.
147.
142.
117.

00
50
00
50
00
50
50
50
00
00
00
00
50

$451.
330.
91.
203.
208.
185.
220.
163.
198.
195.
151.
142.
118.

00
00
00
50
00
00
00
50
00
50
00
00
00

$413.
306.
87.
185.
186.
150.
169.
135.
150.
139.
117.
112.
102.

500050000050-

103.
96.
241.
245.
2 01.
204.

00
50
00
00
50
50

174. 50
175. 50
168. 00

55
90
62
55
155
114
41
110
61
49

93.
100.
253.
251.
218.
222.
209.
170.
181.
157.

50
50
50
50
50
00
00
50
00
00

95.
95.
249.
249.
215.
219.
206.
169.
181.
151.

00
00
50
50
50
50
50
00
50
50

81.
85.
230.
225.
193.
195.
181.
148.
162.
136.

140. 00
145. 00
138. 00

264
28
236

122. 50
145. 50
120. 00

00
00
00
00
00
50
00
00
00
50
50

222
120
217
564
1, 651
115
456
556
515
390
383

108. 00
106. 00
100. 00

139
705
883

115. 00
108. 50
93. 00

111. 00
108. 50
93. 00

96. 5 0 102. 0 0 88. 5 0 -

124. 00
115. 00
101. 00

177.
151.
152.
135.
136.
217.
2 22.
2 11.
201.
203.
200.

94
305
268
147
141
167
114
53
431
228
203

176.
166.
165.
149.
150.
254.
255.
252.
210.
209.
211.

170.
169.
166.
158.
159.
263.
264.
259.
208.
2 08.
207.

158.
140.
138.
125.
128.
234.
234.
240.
195.
195.
196.

185.
191.
191.
170.
171.
275.
277.
270.
227.
225.
230.

50
00
00
50
00
00
50
50
00
00
50
00
00

49
84
32
61
31
48
27
21
71
66
70
67
57

$453.
315.
89.
198.
20 9 .
162.
163.
160.
142.
140.
118.
118.
110.

50
00
50
00
50
00
00
50
50
50
00
00
50

$422.
300.
83.
201.
21 2 .
164.
163.
166.
143.
141.
115.
115.
106.

50
50
50
50
50
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$390.
27 4 .
77.
182.
192.
150.
153.
132.
124.
124.
106.
105.
99.

98.
106.
249.
254.
220.
23 0 .
203.
177.
182.
167.

50
50
50
50
50
50
50
00
00
50

47
88
90
65
88
68

98.
92.
219.
227.
191.
194.

00
50
50
50
00
50

98.
90.
221.
230.
187.
190.

00
00
00
50
50
00

88.
85.
199.
216.
178.
182.

71
45
26

163. 50
166. 00
158. 50

165. 00
169. 00
159. 50

154. 0 0 156. 5 0 144. 0 0 -

134. 00
156. 00
130. 50

159
28
131

126. 50
132. 00
125. 00

126. 00
136. 50
125. 00

113. 0 0 119. 5 0 112. 5 0 -

0000505050OO50005000-

106. 5 0 124. 5 0 106. 0 0 84.
93.
80.
73.
114.
144.
127.
115.
104.
87.
105.

5 0 -$
000000000050005050005000-

50—$ 4 8 9 .
5 0 - 33 4 .
0099.
50— 21 8 .
5 0 - 25 3 .
0 0 - 184.
0 0 - 216.
0 0 - 163.
0 0 - 161.
0 0 - 150.
5 0 - 130.
0 0 - 127.
0 0 - 120.

0 0 - 106.
5 0 - 116.
0098.
0088.
0 0 - 152.
0 0 - 201.
0 0 - 171.
5 0 - 150.
0 0 - 132.
5 0 - 107.
0 0 - 130.

87. 0 0 91. 0 0 79. 5 0 -

_

00
50
00
00
00
50
00
00
00
00
50

200
80
168
165
1, 106
71
176
442
41 7
63
80

108. 00
110. 50
96. 00

134
329
244

50
50
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
50

131
195
86
22 4
79
152
85
67
160
96
64

99.
101.
91.
85.
135.
171.
152.
139.
117.
106.
110.

50
00
00
50
00
00
00
00
50
50
00

98. 50
99. 50
92. 50

99.
100.
88.
83.
131.
169.
152.
137.
117.
105.
107.

50
00
00
50
00
00
50
50
00
00
00

96. 00
98. 00
90. 00

90.
95.
82.
80.
117.
152.
133.
126.
108.
93.
100.

0000000050500000000000-

89. 5 0 91. 0 0 85. 0 0 -

108.
106.
98.
91.
150.
182.
168.
153.
127.
118.
116.

98.
116.
97.
89.
156.
209.
177.
148.
134.
104.
129.

00
00
50
50
00
50
00
50
00
00
50

119. 00
143. 00
117. 00
100.
117.
100.
88.
151.
208.
182.
153.
135.
106.
130.

00
50
50
00
50
50
50
50
00
00
00

00—$50 4 .
0 0 - 355.
0 0 - 100.
0 0 - 269.
5 0 - 249.
5 0 - 240.
5 0 - 249.
5 0 - 207.
5 0 - 219.
5 0 - 210.
0 0 - 178.
0 0 - 174.
0 0 - 129.

50
00
00
00
50
00
50
50
50
00
00
50
50

00005050505050005000-

50
00
00
50
50
50
50
00
50
00

101.
116.
276.
273.
247.
249.
235.
190.
192.
171.

108. 0 0 125. 0 0 107. 0 0 -

132. 50
165. 50
130. 00

85.
104.
85.
84.
133.
201.
162.
131.
124.
97.
122.

no. 00

0050005000000000005000-

130.
111.
97.
176.
231.
194.
164.
145.
114.
139.

00
50
00
50
00
50
50
00
00
50

E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A (4 2 7 m e n a n d
77 w o m e n ) ------------------------------- ---------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B -----------------------M e n -------------------------------------------------------- ----C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C -----------------------M e n -------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s A —
M e n -------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s B —
M e n --------------------------------------------------------------

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




820
707
518
828
595
233
l f 301
807
494

50
50
00
00
50
50
50
00
00
00
00

00
00
50
00
50
50
00
00
00
00
00

149.
127.
126.
110.
108.
192.
192.
192.
170.
170.
171.

5000500000000000500050-

176.
160.
163.
143.
152.
240.
242.
232.
21 0 .
20 9 .
21 1 .

165.
141.
138.
128.
123.
209.
21 4 .
203.
192.
195.
189.

50
50
00
00
00
50
50
00
50
00
00

166.
142.
138.
131.
124.
20 6 .
210.
202.
188.
188.
189.

50
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
00
00
50

153.
135.
127.
124.
109.
198.
20 1 .
196.
180.
179.
181.

0000500000005000005000-

00
00
00
00
50
00
50
00
50
00
50

00
00
00
00
50
50
50
50
00
00
50

00
50
00
00
50
00
00
00
50
50
50

0000505000000050000000-

50
00
00
50
50
50
50
50
00
00
50

T a b le 1. A v e ra g e w eekly earnings: S ele cte d o ccupations—Continued
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s 1 of e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f fic e s of lif e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s ,
U n ited S ta te s and s e le c t e d r e g io n s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
N ew E n g la n d

U n ited S t a te s 2
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

e m p lo y e e s

M ean

M e d ia n

$ 1 7 1 . 50
174. 00
165. 00
274. 00
276. 00
2 3 4 .0 0
236. 00
227. 50

$ 1 7 0 .0 0
1 7 2 .5 0
164. 00
2 7 1 .0 0
2 7 1 .0 0
2 3 0 . 50
2 3 2 .0 0
2 2 6 . 50

M id d le r a n g e

e m p lo y e e s

M id d le A tla n tic
N um ber
q£
e m p lo y e e s

W e e k ly e a r n i n g s 1

N um ber

W e e k ly e a r n i n g s 1

N um ber

M ean

M e d ia n

$ 1 8 6 .0 0
1 8 8 .5 0
1 7 4 .5 0
2 5 9 .5 0
2 6 1 .0 0
2 2 7 . 00
2 3 0 . 00
2 1 3 .5 0

$ 1 8 6 . 00
188. 00
165. 00
2 6 1 . 00
2 6 3 . 00
2 3 0 . 50
2 3 0 . 50
2 2 2 ,0 0

M id d le r a n g e

W e e k ly e a r n i n g s 1
M ean

M e d ia n

M id d le r a n g e

E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s — C o n tin u e d
C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s C -----M e n -----------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s A M e n --------------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s B M e n --------------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s C
(2 8 7 m e n a n d 56 w o m e n ) ------------------------------------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A (1 , 3 3 4 w o m e n
a n d 5 m e n ) -----------------------------------------------------------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B (2 , 124 w o m e n
a n d 2 m e n ) -----------------------------------------------------------T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e ra to rs , c la s s A
(153 w o m e n a n d 152 m e n ) ----------------------------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ------------M en T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e ra to rs , c la s s C
(121 m e n a n d 104 w o m e n ) -----------------------T a p e l i b r a r i a n s ( 1 3 4 w o m e n a n d 59 m e n ) •

748
533
215
610
512
857
666
191

0 0 - $ 192. 00
0 0 - 195. 00
0 0 - 183. 00
5 0 - 2 9 3 . 50
0 0 - 2 9 4 . 50
0 0 - 2 5 1 .5 0
0 0 - 2 5 3 . 50
0 0 - 2 4 7 . 50

249
20 8
41
136
115
178
150
28

$ 1 6 8 . 00—$ 2 0 1 .
1 7 2 .5 0 - 2 0 4 .
1 6 1 .5 0 - 192.
2 4 4 . 0 0 - 2 78.
247. 5 0 - 278.
2 1 5 .0 0 - 242.
2 1 9 . 0 0 - 2 43.
1 9 2 .GO- 2 30.

50
00
00
00
50
00
00
50

203
140
63
182
155
266
201
65

$182.
182.
181.
3 13.
315.
268.
267.
2 69.

00
50
50
00
00
00
00
50

$ 1 7 7 .5 0
176. 00
1 7 8 .5 0
2 97. 50
2 9 7 . 50
2 59. 00
2 5 7 .5 0
2 64. 00

$ 1 6 5 . 00—$20 1 .
165. 0 0 - 202.
167. 0 0 - 199.
2 8 3 . 5 0 - 321.
283. 5 0 - 324.
2 4 3 . GO- 299.
243. GO- 299.
244. 0 0 - 299.

00
00
50
50
50
50
50
50

343

1 8 9 .5 0

184. 50

174. 0 0 - 2 0 1 . 50

194

187. 50

1 8 4 .5 0

174. 5 0 -

1 9 8 .5 0

22

2 1 8 .5 0

2 1 0 . 00

190. 0 0 - 246. 50

1 ,3 3 9

111. 00

1 1 0 .0 0

1 0 0 .0 0 -

1 2 1 .5 0

147

1 1 2 .0 0

112. 00

1 0 4 .0 0 -

1 2 0 .5 0

297

117. 50

120. 00

107. 5 0 -

1 2 5 .5 0

2, 126

97. 00

96. 00

86. 5 0 -

106. 50

291

9 6 .0 0

95. 00

8 9 .5 0 -

1 0 2 .0 0

4 89

105. 50

1 0 5 .5 0

96. 0 0 -

115. 00

305
350
186

1 4 0 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 1 .5 0

1 4 2 .5 0
120. 00
1 2 0 .0 0

1 3 0 .5 0 108. 0 0 106. 5 0 -

151. 00
129. 00
129. 00

48
52
35

138. 00
120. 00
117. 50

138. 00
116. 00
114. 50

128. 0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 110. 0 0 -

147. 00
126. 00
1 2 3 .5 0

176
140
76

139. 50
121. 00
1 2 1 .0 0

1 4 1 .0 0
1 2 4 .5 0
1 2 2 .0 0

1 3 2 .s o ­
n s . 001 1 6 .5 0 -

148. 00
1 3 0 .5 0
126. 50

225
193

1 0 3 .5 0
127. 50

1 0 5 .0 0
126. 50

9 5 .0 0 114. 0 0 -

111. 50
142. 50

49
41

1 0 2 .0 0
1 2 5 .5 0

101. 00
130. 00

9 3 .0 0 109. 0 0 -

1 0 9 .0 0
134. 00

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

I n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
A c tu a rie s , c la s s A
A c tu a rie s , c la s s B
A s s e m b l e r s ---------------------C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A
M en
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B ----------M e n -------------------------------------------W o m e n --------------------------------------C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c la s s A
W o m e n --------------------------------------C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c la s s B
W o m e n --------------------------------------C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a t io n -----------C le rk s , p r e m iu m - le d g e r - c a r d —
P r e m i u m a c c e p t o r s ----------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s A -----------------M e n -------------------------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B ----------------M e n -------------------------------------------W o m e n --------------------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s C -----------------M e n -------------------------------------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------

$153.
155.
146.
247.
24 9 .
211.
213.
200.

B o r d e r S t a te s
15
12
44
9
7
19

$ 4 0 6 .0 0
323. 50
8 8 .5 0
1 9 7 .5 0
2 2 1 .5 0
149. 00

$ 4 4 1 .5 0

16

1 3 5 .5 0

141. 00

_

_
_
_
_

68
46
46
8
7
37
29
8
18
8
10

_

_
_
_
_

1 0 0 .5 0
96. 50
104. 00
259. 00
2 7 1 .0 0
211. 00
230. 00
1 4 1 .5 0
179. 00
181. 50
177. 50

_

8 5 .5 0
_
_

1 5 4 .0 0
_
_
_
_
_

9 4 .0 0
9 2 . 00
1 0 8 .5 0
_
_

2 1 5 . 00
2 2 7 . 00
_

185. 00

S o u th w e s t

S o u th e a s t
$ 2 9 2 . 0 0 - $ 4 7 5 . 00
_

7 5 .0 0 _
_

8 8 .5 0 _

88. 0 0 -

-

100. 00
_
_

1 9 3 .0 0
_

180. 00

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

85. 5 0 - 112. 00
8 4 . GO- 105. 00
96. 0 0 - 111. 50
_
_

_
_

1 6 5 .0 0 - 2 4 6 . 00
20 6 . 0 0 - 2 6 5 . 00
_

_

1 5 8 .5 0 - 2 0 6 . 00

_

_

_

“

"

■

_

8
26
114
40
16
92
30
62
45
40
160
159
172
231
70
56
44
67
40
27
102
55
47

$ 4 1 6 .5 0
29 0 . 00
84. 00
1 4 5 .5 0
1 9 2 .5 0
1 3 1 .0 0
169. 00
1 1 2 .5 0
1 2 8 .5 0
1 2 3 .5 0
101. 50
101. 00
9 8 . 00
81. 00
92. 50
2 1 5 . 00
2 2 1 .5 0
179. 00
1 8 9 .5 0
164. 00
1 5 1 .0 0
1 6 5 .0 0
134. 00

$ 3 0 6 . 00
80. 50
130. 00
189. 00
116. 00
178. 50
101. 50
128. 50
118. 50
98. 50
98. 50
9 5 . 50
76. 00
93. 00
2 0 5 . 50
2 1 7 . 00
182. 00
186. 00
177. 50
1 5 2 .0 0
1 6 1 .0 0
1 3 4 .0 0

214
29
185
378
39
125
396
908
57
205
284

1 2 2 .0 0
142. 00
1 1 9 .0 0
9 2 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
7 5 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0
140. 50
127. 50
120. 00

123. 50
138. 00
1 1 9 .0 0
91. 00
100. 50
8 1 .5 0
74. 50
115. 00
134. 50
128. 00
118. 50

_

_

$ 2 4 7 . 5 0 - $ 3 3 3 . 00
7 6 .5 0 88. 50
1 0 5 .0 0 - 180. 50
178. 0 0 - 2 06. 00
9 3 . 5 0 - 173. 00
1 4 1 .0 0 - 198. 00
9 0 . 0 0 - 122. 00
1 1 3 . 0 0 - 145. 50
108. 0 0 - 140. 00
8 5 . 5 0 - 114. 50
8 5 . 5 0 - 1 1 4 .0 0
8 2 . 5 0 - 1 1 0 .0 0
70. 0 0 90. 00
8 3 . 0 0 - 1 0 1 .0 0
1 7 3 .0 0 - 2 44. 00
184. 5 0 - 2 5 6 . 00
158. 0 0 - 2 0 5 . 50
1 6 5 .0 0 - 2 1 5 .0 0
1 4 1 .GO- 1 8 7 .5 0
133. 5 0 - 164. 50
1 5 2 .GO- 1 7 5 .5 0
126. 5 0 - 149. 00

14
25
26
28
18
53
19
34
75
71
164
158
107
-

$ 4 1 7 . 50
2 8 4 . 00
87. 50
193. 00
2 19. 50
137. 00
164. 50
1 2 1 .5 0
121. 50
120. 00
101. 00
99. 50
1 0 1 .0 0
-

_

$ 2 7 2 .5 0
86. 50
1 8 2 .5 0
2 1 4 .5 0
1 3 2 .5 0
1 5 4 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0
1 1 9 .5 0
116. 00
99. 00
9 7 .5 0
98. 00
-

$ 2 4 2 . 00—
$29 3 . 50
8 0 .5 0 94. 00
1 7 2 .GO- 2 2 3 .5 0
178. 5 0 - 246. 50
108. 5 0 - 154. 00
148. 5 0 - 179. 50
1 0 3 .5 0 - 134. 00
105. 5 0 - 131. 00
1 0 3 .5 0 - 130. 00
86. 5 0 - 112. 00
86. 5 0 - 110. 00
86. 5 0 - n o . so
_

-

8 0 .5 0 178. 0 0 1 9 1 .0 0 174. 5 0 182. 0 0 -

69
42
36
34
21
13
65
23
42

93. 50
2 1 2 .5 0
2 1 8 .5 0
182. 00
193. 50
163. 00
137. 00
156. 50
126. 50

89. 50
2 1 0 .5 0
2 1 8 .5 0
1 8 0 .5 0
1 9 6 .5 0
138. 00
1 6 1 .0 0
130. 00

125. 5 0 147. 0 0 1 0 2 .5 0 -

161. 00
166. 50
146. 50

162
23
139
329
49
173
256
515
31
187
154

114. 50
138. 50
1 1 1 .0 0
85. 50
9 2 .0 0
83. 50
75. 00
121. 00
149. 50
128. 50
117. 00

1 1 0 .5 0
138. 00
1 0 9 .0 0
84. 00
89. 00
8 3 .0 0
75. 00
1 2 1 .0 0
146. 00
1 2 7 .0 0
1 1 5 .5 0

101.
125.
97.
75.
81.
78.
69.
104.
126.
115.
104.

126. 50
138. 00
122. 00
93. 00
98. 00
86. 50
79. 50
134. 50
1 6 7 .5 0
138. 50
129. 00

-

-

103.
240.
251.
201.
203.

50
50
00
00
50

-

G e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A ■
M e n ------------------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B
C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s A -----------C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s B ■
C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s C ■
S e c re ta rie s'
S e c re ta rie s , c la s s A
S e c re ta rie s , c la s s B
S e c re ta rie s , c la s s C
S e e f o o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




109

126. 00

98
176
14
64
64
294
17
99
112

128. 50
99. 50
108. 50
87. 50
78. 50
1 2 9 .0 0
159. 50
143. 50
1 2 3 .0 0

_

_

1 1 3 .5 0
_

1 1 5 .5 0
1 0 0 .5 0
_

8 9 .5 0
76. 00
1 3 0 .5 0
1 6 0 .0 0
1 5 0 .0 0
1 2 2 .5 0

1 0 2 .5 0 _

1 0 3 .5 0 92. 0 0 _

130. 50
_

133. 50
108. 50
_

80. 5 0 96. 00
7 1 .5 0 84. 00
108. 0 0 - 148. 0 0 '
150. 0 0 - 173. 00
1 3 2 .0 0 - 1 6 1 .5 0
108. 0 0 - 138. 00

106. 5 0 1 3 5 .0 0 1 0 4 .GO82. 0 0 9 3 .0 0 7 8 .5 0 7 0 .0 0 1 0 0 .GO125. 0 0 109. 5 0 1 0 7 .5 0 -

135. 50
150. 00
1 3 0 .0 0
100. 00
120. 50
87. 50
8 0 .0 0
130. 00
161. 00
144. 00
131. 50

0000GOOO50GO5050SO0050-

T a b le 1. A v e ra g e w e e k ly earnings: S e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s — C o n tin u e d
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s 1 of e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f fic e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f fic e s of lif e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s ,
U n ited S ta te s and s e le c t e d r e g io n s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
S o u th e a s t

B o r d e r S ta te s
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s

W e e k ly e a r n i n g s 1
M ean

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s

M id d le r a n g e

M e d ia n

S o u th w e s t

W e e k ly e a r n i n g s 1
M e d ia n

M ean

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s

M id d le r a n g e

W e ek ly e a r n i n g s 1
M e an

M e d ia n

M id d le r a n g e

G e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s — C o n tin u e d
S e c r e t a r i e s 3— C o n tin u e d
S e c r e t a r i e s , c l a s s D ----------------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ----------------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r -------------------------------------------------T r a n s c r i b i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , g e n e r a l ---------------T y p i s ts , c l a s s A ---------------------------------------------------------T y p i s ts , c l a s s B -----------------------------------------------------------

66
53
11
66
33
149

$108
96.
126.
99.
105
92

50
50
00
50
50
00

17
31
23
15
13
19
15
_
49
31
18
35
26
9

163
145
151
121
125
231
241

50
50
00
50
00
50
50

183
182.
183.
154
154
156.

00
50
00
50
00
00

$ 1 0 4 00
93 00

$95. 0 0 - $ 124. 50
85. 0 0 - 109. 00
87. 5 0 86. 0 0 81. 5 0 -

92 50
111 00
89 00

113. 50
116. 00
100. 00

362
189
105
115
91
475

$104.
90.
106.
88.
96.
82.

50
00
50
50
50
50

$105.
88.
103.
85.
95.
80.

00
50
50
00
00
50

$91.
84.
94.
80.
82.
74.

53
127
113
103
88
113
85
28
140
86
54
98
60
38
32
29
56
47
9
33
22 7
386
10
72
17
21
19

158.
131.
131.
107.
107.
199.
204.
186.
168.
169.
168.
141.
144.
137.
259.
262.
223.
226.
207.
191.
104.
89.
138.
114.
106.
95.
127.

00
00
00
50
00
50
00
50

152.
127.
126.
107.
107.
195.
199.
179.
163.
163.
163.
140.
143.
137.
252.
255.
215.
219.

00
50
00
00
50
50
00
50
50
50
50
00
00
50
00
50
50
50

177.
145.
144.
115.
114.
210.
213.
195.
177.
184.
173.
151.
154.
147.
275.
276.
238.
245.

184. 50
103. 50
87. 00

141. 5 0 118. 5 0 119. 0 0 100. 0 0 100. 0 0 177. 5 0 180. 5 0 167. 5 0 154. 0 0 155. 5 0 153. 0 0 131. 0 0 134. 5 0 126. 5 0 236. 0 0 240. 0 0 201. 5 0 204. 0 0 176. 5 0 96. 5 0 80. 0 0 -

115.
100.
92.
125.

101.
100.
85.
111.

50000000-

123.
103.
110.
135.

00—$117.
0096.
0 0 - 115.
0094.
5 0 - 111.
0088.

00
00
00
50
00
50

143
149
55
129
231
384

$10 9 .
96.
111.
97.
91.
79.

00
00
00
00
50
50
00
50
50
00
50
00
00
00
00
00
50
50

32
67
62
41
39
61
41
20
103
60
43
52
33
19
16
13
31
28
_
_
84
209
_
6
_

157.
132.
133.
112.
113.
209.
213.
203.
179.
183.
172.
154.
149.
164.
277.
276.
224.
224.

00
00
50
00
50
50

50
00
00
50
00
50

$93.
87.
106.
86.
85.
71.

50—$ 123.
5 0 - 103.
0 0 - 117.
5 0 - 108.
0096.
0086.

00
50
00
00
50
50

158. 50
127. 50
131. 00
113. 00
114. 00
207. 00
211. 00
201., 50
186. 00
186. 50
167. 00
156. 50
155. 50
168. 00
279. 50

139.
120.
121.
101.
101.
192.
195.
182.
161.
176.
145.
145.
139.
156.
267.

500050000050505000005000005000-

00
00
50
00
00
00
00
50
50
00
00
00
00
50
50

221. 00
221. 00

214. 5 0 - 236. 00
214. 5 0 - 235. 50

$109.
97.
108.
96.
92.
79.

E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A ------------------------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ------------------------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C ------------------------------------M e n --------------------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s A ---------------M en --------------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s B ---------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s C ---------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s , c la s s A ------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s , c la s s B ------M en --------------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , b u s i n e s s , c la s s C ------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A -------------------------------------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B -------------------------------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A -------------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B --------------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C --------------------T a p e l i b r a r i a n s -------------------------------------------------------------

C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A ------------------------------------------M en --------------------------------------------------------------------------C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B ------------------------------------------C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s A -----------------------------C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s B -----------------------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a l u a t i o n -------------------------------------------C l e r k s , p r e m i u m - l e d g e r - c a r d ---------------------------------P r e m i u m a c c e p t o r s ----------------------------------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s A -----------------------------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B -----------------------------------------------M en --------------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s C -----------------------------------------------M en --------------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------------------------------------S e e fo o tn o te s a t end of ta b le .




50
00
00
00

150.
131.
135.
107.

169.
156.
157.
128.

00
50
50
50

20 0 . 0 0 - 25 7 . 50
22 5 . 0 0 - 26 1 . 00

230 00
257 50
182
184
182
151
151

50500050-

50
00
50
00
00

167.
171.
158.
146.
147.

0050505050-

195.
190.
199.
163.
163.

00
00
00
00
00

-

26
25

233. 50
233. 00

222.. 50
222., 50

21 3 . 0 0 - 251. 00
2 1 1 . 0 0 - 253. 00

109. 00
99. 00

106.. 50
99., 00

99. 50— 112. 00
88. 5 0 - 109. 00

-

_
50
85
-

8
-

95. 50

5 i
0
o !
o1
o !
o1
50
50
50
50
00
00
50
00
00
00
50
00
50
50
00
00

G r e a t L ak e :S

I n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s A ------------------------------------------------------A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s B -------------------------------------------------------

157
140
144
114

41
68
208
86
30
108
44
64
163
136
261
249
287
94
104
96
82
121
85
36
157
71
86

$392.
281.
94.
161.
215.
153.
176.
137.
141.
136.
118.
118.
109.
93.
102.
214.
219.
199.
205.
187.
161.
173.
152.

00
50
50
00
50
00
00
00
50
00
50
00
50
00
00
00
00
50
00
00
50
00
00

$ 3 9 0 ., 00
282., 50
93., 00
147., 50
239., 00
150., 00
189., 50
133., 50
134., 50
132., 00
116., 50
116., 00
105.. 50
90., 00
97.. 50
213.,0 0
220., 50
197., 00
198., 00
181., 00
157,, 50
171., 50
150., 00

$321.
24 9 .
86.
116.
170.
125.
155.
119.
122.
121.
106.
106.
96.
82.
93.
188.
196.
183.
189.
165.
143.
156.
138.

I
1
!
1
1
;

S

i

00
00
50
00

199. 00
110. 50
98. 00
50
00
00
00

00
00
50
50
00
50
00
00
00
50
50
50
00
50
00
00
00
50 |

110. 00
94. 50

00
00
00
50
50
50
50
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
50
00
50
00
50
00
00

8
31
64
37
12
48
21
27
82
55
93
69
80
22
66
57
49
44
32
12
62
37
25

$3 7 1 .
265.
79.
165.
23 3 .
159.
185.
139.
144.
136.
114.
104.
96.
79.
91.
23 3 .
239.
181.
190.
158.
152.
168.
129.

00
50
00
50
50
50
50
50
00
00
00
00
00
50
50
00
50
50
50
50
00
00
00

$ 2 6 0 . 00
74. 50
135. 00
168.
180.
126.
141.
130.
116.
103.
88.
77.
92.
228.
238.
186.
192.

50
00
50
00
00
00
50
00
00
00
00
00
00
50

161. 00
170. 00
119. 50

98. 5 0 83. 0 0 -

119. 50
103. 50

117. 00

_

13

130. 00
P a c if i c

M id d le W e st
0 0 -$ 5 0 8 .
0 0 - 307.
5 0 - 100.
5 0 - 186.
0 0 - 25 4 .
oo- 183.
5 0 - 202.
5 0 - 152.
5 0 - 156.
0 0 - 146.
0 0 - 129.
0 0 - 129.
5 0 - 119.
0 0 - 100.
0 0 - 108.
5 0 - 234.
5 0 - 237.
5 0 - 214.
5 0 - 218.
5 0 - 204.
0 0 - 180.
5 0 - 183.
0 0 - 170.

108.,00
90. 50

172.
144.
144.
121.
121.
230.
230.
227.
192.
192.
197.
171.
161.
173.
293.

$ 2 4 3 . 50—$31 0 . 50
71. 5 0 79. 00
123. 0 0 - 192. 00
126.
170.
124.
122.
121.
89.
86.
81.
69.
85.
201.
20 9 .
156.
172.

0050005000505000000050000050-

139. 5 0 159. 0 0 98. 0 0 -

177.
184.
164.
161.
150.
131.
116.
107.
81.
94.
255.
257.
201.
209.

00
00
50
00
00
00
50
00
50
50
00
00
50
00

173. 00
175. 50
159. 50

19
18
18
33
17
58
23
35
53
46
81
70
58

$ 368.
286.
94.
216.
252.
165.
186.
151.
136.
127.
111.
108.
118.

50
50
00
50
50
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

$ 383.
277.
92.
193.
271.
159.
183.
144.
126.
122.
103.
103.
118.

50
50
50
50
50
00
00
00
50
50
50
50
00

$356.
255.
90.
174.
201.
138.
150.
136.
115.
115.
92.
89.
104.

123.
262.
269.
207.
214.
194.
177.
175.
181.

00
50
00
50
50
50
50
00
50

126.
245.
245.
205.
203.
209.
163.
163.

50
00
00
00
50
50
00
00

96.
221.
224.
178.
179.
179.
158.
158.

0 0 -$ 4 0 4 .
0 0 - 327.
0097.
0 0 - 271.
0 0 - 288.
0 0 - 183.
0 0 - 231.
5 0 - 169.
0 0 - 160.
0 0 - 133.
0 0 - 126.
5 0 - 125.
5 0 - 125.

00
00
00
50
00
50
00
00
00
50
50
00
50

5000500000505050-

00
50
50
00
50
50
00
50

_

38
27
23
43
28
15
38
25
13

146.
308.
318.
220.
257.
215.
181.
167.

T a b le 1. A v e r a g e w e e k ly earnings: S e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s — C o n tin u e d
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s 1 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f fic e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s ,
U n ited S ta te s and s e le c t e d r e g io n s , D e c e m b e r 1971)

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s

W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1
M ean

P a c if i c

M id d le W e s t

G reat L akes
N um ber
of
e m p lo y e e s

M e d ia n

M id d le r a n g e

$ 1 1 7 . 50

$108. 0 0 - : $130. 50

N um ber

W e e k ly e a r n i n g s 1
M ean

M e d ia n

M id d le r a n g e

e m p lo y e e s

W e e k ly e a r n i n g s 1
M e an

M e d ia n

M id d le r a n g e

$13 8 . 00
1 3 2 .5 0
129. 00

$119. 0 0 -!$157. 50

G e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A -----------------------------------M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B -----------------------------------C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s A ----------------------------------------------C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s B ----------------------------------------------C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s C ----------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s 1 ( 6 ,4 1 3 w o m e n a n d 5 m e n ) -----------------3
2
S e c r e t a r i e s , c l a s s A ------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s , c l a s s B ------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s , c l a s s C ------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s , c l a s s D ------------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ------------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r --------------------------------------------T r a n s c r i b i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , g e n e r a l -----------T y p i s t s , c l a s s A ------------------------------------------------------T y p i s t s , c l a s s B -------------------------------------------------------

374
14
360
502
82
250
376
1 ,2 5 6
76
349
466
365
298
255
256
453
688

$120.
147.
119.
100.
106.
92.
80.
131.
165.
143.
128.
116.
94.
109.
102.
102.
90.

50
00
50
50
50
00
50
00
00
50
00
00
50
50
00
00
50

110
202
178
76
64
205
165
40
244
161
83
82
52
30
157
132
223
163
60
69
307
376
25
45
34
42
33

156.
143.
144.
132.
131.
203.
202.
204.
179.
182.
175.
163.
162.
164.
255.
255.
21 3 .
21 6 .
203.
189.
112.
96.
144.
131.
134.
108.
125.

50
00
00
00
00
00
50
00
50
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
00
00
50
50
00
00
50
00
50
00
00

117.
9 6.
104.
90.
78.
128.
167.
141.
126.
115.
95.
110.
100.
101.
90.

50
50
00
00
50
00
50
50
50
00
00
00
00
00
00

107.
87.
94.
80.
71.
114.
146.
128.
115.
103.
85.
100.
92.
88.
81.

0 0 - 128. 00
5 0 - 108. 00
5 0 - 115. 00
5 0 - 101. 00
5087. 50
5 0 - 144. 00
5 0 - 179. 00
5 0 - 154. 00
5 0 - 139. 00
5 0 - 126. 50
0 0 - 102. 50
5 0 - 116. 00
0 0 - 108. 00
0 0 - 112. 00
0097. 00

157.
140.
140.
132.
130.
207.
202.
208.
180.
184.
176.
162.
162.
162.
257.
255.
215.
219.
213.
184.
112.
95.
149.
121.
123.
110.
126.

50
00
50
00
00
00
50
00
50
00
00
00
50
00
00
50
00
00
00
50
00
00
00
00
00
50
50

139.
126.
126.
120.
117.
182.
182.
196.
162.
165.
158.
140.
140.
146.
24 3 .
243.
20 1 .
20 2 .
183.
168.
100.
86.
120.
103.
104.
97.
115.

000050000000005000005000000050—
50—
50505000oo500050OO0000-

146
9
137
221
24
141
129
309
24
103
82
77
110
127
128
155
245

$1 1 7 .
163.
114.
88.
107.
83.
75.
124.
156.
133.
119.
112.
92.
111.
92.
91.
82.

00
00
00
00
00
50
50
00
50
00
00
50
50
50
00
50
50

39
67
61
53
50
72
57
15
80
66
14
20
12
8
24
23
50
34
16
12
144
114

163.
131.
130.
115.
115.
187.
189.
177.
173.
174.
170.
138.
138.
136.
25 8 .
25 9 .
204.
20 6 .
198.
178.
9 9.
83.

50
00
50
00
50
00
50
00
50
00
50
00
50
50
00
50
00
50
00
00
50
50

$114. 50

$103. 50—$125., 00

113.
85.
107.
81.
76.
122.
147.
132.
120.
110.
89.
no.
93.
90.
81.

00
00
00
50
00
00
50
50
00
50
50
00
50
00
50

103.
78.
99.
78.
71.
106.
130.
114.
101.
103.
84.
101.
80.
82.
75.

500000005000500050500000505000-

121., 00
93., 00
115., 50
88., 00
81., 00
138., 00
182., 00
148., 00
132., 00
122., 00
99., 00
122., 00
100.,0 0
102., 00
89., 00

161.
131.
131.
113.
114.
187.
188.
176.
172.
173.

00
50
00
00
00
00
50
50
50
50

145.
121.
117.
108.
108.
166.
178.
156.
159.
159.

0050500000—
0050000050-

184., 00
145., 00
145., 00
121,, 00
120., 50
207.,5 0
209., 50
192., 50
190,, 00
190.,0 0

94
13
81
127

$138.
151.
136.
126.

50
00
50
00

-

121. 0 0 109. 5 0 -

154. 00
142. 00

-

109
285
17
71
141
56
22
32
31
160
87

88.
141.
173.
155.
137.
124.
109.
123.
100.
102.
94.

00
50
00
50
00
50
00
00
00
00
00

8 7 .5 0
1 4 0 .5 0
167. 00
1 5 2 .0 0
138. 00
129. 00
1 0 1 .5 0
124. 00
102. 00
98. 00
94. 50

85.
120.
144.
136.
113.
113.
99.
115.
93.
96.
86.

oo92. 00
0 0 - 161. 00
o o - 192. 00
0 0 - 170. 00
0 0 - 159. 00
0 0 - 136. 00
0 0 - 115. 00
0 0 - 132. 00
5 0 - 107. 50
0 0 - 109. 00
0 0 - 100. 00

27
21
21
45
41
39
33
6
73
61
12

175.
157.
157.
168.
167.
255.
261.
223.
204.
202.
214.

00
50
50
50
00
50
50
00
00
00
50

173. 00
150. 50
150. 50
168. 50
1 6 7 .5 0
2 6 6 . 00
2 6 9 .5 0

148.
127.
127.
154.
153.
232.
242.

o o - 191. 50
0 0 - 179. 50
0 0 - 179. 50
0 0 - 179. 00
0 0 - 175. 50
0 0 - 278. 00
0 0 - 281. 50

238.
242.
218.
229.
200.

50
00
00
00
50

2 2 6 .5 0
2 2 6 . 50
2 1 1 .0 0

123. 50
108. 00

1 2 2 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0

E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A --------------------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B --------------------------------M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C --------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s A -----------M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s B -----------M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s C ----------M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s te m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s A —
M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s B —
M e n -------------------------------------------------- -------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s , c l a s s C —
K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A ---------------------------------K e y p u n c h o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ---------------------------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A ----------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ----------------M e n ----------------------------------------------------------------------T a b u l a t i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C ----------------T a p e l i b r a r i a n s ---------------------------------------------------------

166.
156.
158.
142.
140.
223.
223.
220.
197.
201.
192.
179.
179.
182.
276.
278.
23 0 .
230.
223.
196.
120.
104.
160.
145.
145.
111.
130.

00
50
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
50
00
50
00
50
50
00
00
50
00
50
50
00
00
00
50
00
50

135. 00
256.
257.
203.
205.
196.

50
50
00
50
00

125. 0 0 -

153., 50

-

5050000050-

272.,0 0
272., 00
225.,0 0
225.,5 0
219.,0 0

31
24
23
14
9

237.
238.
182.
180.
191.

-

100. 50
80. 00

88. 0 0 75. 0 0 -

109.,5 0
91., 00

-

13

105. 00

_
-

13

9 8. 50

1 E a r n in g s h a v e b e e n r o u n d e d to th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r , a n d r e l a t e to r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s t h a t a r e p a id f o r s ta n d a r d w o r k w e e k s .
m e d i a n s , a n d m id d le r a n g e s of e a r n i n g s .
M e d ia n s a n d m id d le r a n g e s a r e n o t p r o v id e d f o r e n t r i e s of f e w e r t h a n 15 w o r k e r s .
2 I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r th e M o u n ta in r e g i o n in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 I n c lu d e s w o r k e r s in c l a s s i f i c a t i o n i n a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
N O TE:

D a s h e s in d ic a te no d ata r e p o r te d o r d ata that do not m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r it e r ia .




66
144
-

9

-

2 0 1 .0 0
1 9 8 .5 0

186. 0 0 - 227. 00
183. 0 0 - 227. 00

-

215. 5 0 - 256. 00
221. 5 0 - 276. 00
190. 0 0 - 243. 00

-

116. 0 0 - 132. 50
99. 5 0 - 115. 50

-

137. 00

■

S e e a p p e n d ix A f o r m e th o d u s e d in c o m p u tin g m e a n s ,

T a b le 2. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: Atlanta, G a.1
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s and r e g io n a l h e a d o f fic e s o f lif e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

Number
of
workers

$75
Weekly
and
hours 2
under
(Standard) (Standard)
$80

$80

$85

$90

$9 5

$100

$105

$110

$115

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$19 0

$200

$210

$220

$230

$2 4 0

$8 5

$90

$9 5

$100

$105

$110

$115

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$20 0

$210

$220

$230

$240

over

and

S e le c te d i n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
7

38.5
38.5

$ 1 5 5 .5 0
146.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

3
1

2

1

2
2

-

2
1

1
-

1
-

-

"

-

-

-

38

37.5

106.50

-

2

5

3

5

5

5

4

2

2

3

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19
10

3 8 .0
3 9 .0

112.50
102.00

„

1
-

2
1

2

_

1
1

1
1

1

2

2
1

2

-

1
4

6

-

8
13
9

38 .5
38.5
3 8 .0

2 2 2 .5 0
164.50
169.50

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

1

_
"

_
3
3

_
_
-

_
3
2

-

_
3
2

_
-

32
_

-

1
-

1

-

_
_
-

1
-

-

1
1

_
1

"

_
_
-

_
_

-

16

38 .5

120.50

-

-

2

1

1

-

-

6

4

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

48
44
6
12
7
106
6
22
29
7
73

3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
38 .0
38 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0

125.00
122.50
108.50
9 1 .5 0
84.00
128.50
151.50
133.00
133.50
9 8 .0 0
9 6 .5 0

_
_
_
.
_
_
_
_
3

_
_
2
3

1
1
_
3

1
1
2
1

2
2
2
-

1
1
_
2

7
7
_

3
3
-

17
17
1

13
11
1

1
1

_

-

_

_
.
1
9

_
_
4
4
_
_
1
9

1
_
_
1
17

1
_
_
1
1
6

6
1
_
11

5
2
_
2
8

5
_
2
_
1
6

10
1
2
4

12

38 .5

117.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

3

6

C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s A -----------W o m en _______________________________
C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c la s s B
( a ll w o m e n )____________________ __________
C l e r k s , p o lic y e v a lu a tio n
(18 w o m e n , 1 m a n ) ----------------------------------P r e m i u m a c c e p t o r s (9 w o m e n , 1 m a n ) ---U n d e r w r ite r s , c la s s A
(6 m e n , 2 w o m e n ) ________________________
U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B_________________ _—
M en----------------------------------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s C:
W o m en ______________ _______________—

3 8 .0

2 0 6 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

38 .5

160.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

11

3 9 .0

125.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

-

3

1

3

38

3 8 .0

113.00

-

1

-

-

4

4

8

8

1

8

4

-

1

1

_
_

2
-

1

3
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

S e le c te d g e n e ra l c le r ic a l
o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A --------------------W om en_______________________________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s A ( a ll w o m e n ) ________
C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n ) -----------C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s C ( a l l w o m e n ) -----------S e c r e t a r i e s ( a l l w o m e n ) 4 _________________
C l a s s A__________________________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n ) _____
T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) _____________

1

28
_
5
2

25
_
4
9

2

1

I

_

_
_
_
.

.
_
_

.
_
_
_

_
_

1
1

!

_

i
-

11
1
6
4

4
4
_
-

_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

2

1

-

-

2

2

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

10
_
1
8

i
|
!

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C
(10 m e n , 2 w o m e n )_______________________
C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B:
C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s C (6 m e n , 3 w o m e n ) ______________
K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s A
( a ll w o m e n )_______________________________
K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s B
( a l l w o m e n )_______________________________ 1
4
3
2

6

1 T h e A t l a n t a S ta n d a r d M e tr o p o li t a n S t a ti s t i c a l A r e a c o n s is ts o f C la y to n , C obb, D eK alb , F u lto n , a n d G w in n e tt C o u n tie s .
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o rk w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d t h e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e ro u n d e d to
t h e n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s to th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 1 a t $ 2 5 0 to $ 2 6 0 ; a n d 1 a t $ 3 0 0 to $ 3 1 0 .
4 I n c lu d e s w o r k e r s in a d d itio n to t h o s e p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a te l y .




T a b le 3. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: B altim ore, M d.1
(N u m b e r an d a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s and r e g io n a l h e a d o f f i c e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNING8 OF

Avhaqs
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

Number
of
workers

$75

$80

"155“

$85

$90

$95

$ lo 0

$90

$105

$ 110

$115

$ 1 20

$125

$130

$135

$140

$145

$150

$155

$ l6 0

$165

$170

$175

$180

$105

$ 1 10

$115

$ 120

$125

$130

$135

$140

$145

$150

$155

$160

$165

$170

$175

$180

over

Weekly
and
hours 2
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r

$80

and
$100

S e l e c t e d g e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B
( a l l w o m e n ) - -----------------------------------------S te n o g ra p h e rs , s e n io r
( a l l w o m e n )--------------------------------------------T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) ----------------

4

11

3 7 .0

$ 9 4 .5 0

9

3 6 .5
3 7 .0

1 1 9 .5 0
8 3 .0 0

6

3 7 .0

1 2 7 .0 0

12

3 7 .0
3 7 .0

1 7 2 .5 0
1 7 9 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

7

3 6 .5

1 4 6 .0 0

-

-

-

-

1
1

3 7 .0

1 1 0 .0 0

12

2

1

2
2

1

3

4

“

"

.

.

.

2

..

1

1

_

l

.

1

2

_

_

-

-

1

-

2
2

34
4

3

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

1

_

2

-

1

-

-

1

1

2

-

1
1

_

_

_

_

1

1

.

4

S e l e c t e d E D F - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(5 w o m e n a n d 1 m a n ) --------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B -------------------------------------------------M e n - ---------------- --------------------— --- ----- C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s C (6 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n ) -------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s A
( a l l w o m e n )---------------------------------------------1
3
2

9

.

!

m

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

1 T h e B a l ti m o r e S t a n d a r d M e tr o p o li t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f t h e c ity of B a l ti m o r e a n d th e c o u n tie s o f A n n e A r u n d e l, B a l ti m o r e , C a r r o l l , H a r f o r d , a n d H o w a rd .
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d th e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e r o u n d e d
to th e n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s to th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s :
1 a t $ 1 .8 0 to $ 1. 85; 1 a t $ 1 .8 5 to $ 1 .9 0 ; a n d 2 a t $ 2 . 10 to $ 2 . 1 5 .




T a b le 4. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: B oston, M a ss.1
(N u m b e r an d a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s an d r e g io n a l h e a d o f f i c e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING 8TRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF
$160 $170 $ 1 8 0 $ 2 00 $ 2 2 0 $240 $ z 6 o
$130 $ 140 $150

A rnuoi
M__
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

ct

' workers

$280

$300

$320

'$330

$360

$280

$30 0

$320

$340

$360

over

$85

$90

$95

$ i 0o

$ 1 10

$120

$90

$95

$100

$ 1 10

$ 1 20

$130

_

$8o

_

WadUjr* and

and

aarninga u n d e r
(Standard) (Standard)

$85

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$ 200

$ 220

$240

$260

S e l e c t e d i n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s A ( a l l m e n ) - ----------------C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A - -------------- -----W o m e n ---------- ----- ------- --— --------- — — •
C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B — ------------ -----W o m e n --------------- ------------------ ----- ------C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s B -----—
W o m e n -------------- ------------ -— --------- -----P r e m i u m a c c e p t o r s ( a l l w o m e n )------------U n d e r w r ite r s , c la s s A:
M e n ------------------ ------- ---------------------- -----U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B ------------—
—
M e n ---------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r a , c l a s s C --------------------------M e n ----------—

3 7 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 6 .5

$ 4 2 6 .5 0
1 9 8 .5 0
1 8 7 .0 0
1 7 5 .0 0
1 7 7 .0 0
1 1 9 .0 0
1 1 9 .5 0
9 7 .0 0

3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .0

2 2 4 .0 0
1 8 9 .5 0
1 9 7 .5 0
1 6 0 .5 0
1 6 4 .0 0

1 2 3 .5 0
1 2 7 .5 0
1 0 7 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0
8 6 .5 0

114

3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

23

3 7 .0

38

3 7 .0

1 2 2 .0 0

64
28
36

3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

2 1 4 . 50
2 0 8 .0 0
2 1 9 .5 0

13
34
31
11
12

35
20

33
15

13
7
5
4

12

6

_
.

_
_

_

2

3
_

.

7
5
4

_

.

3 17
_
.

.

_

.

.

-

-

.

1

2

14

2
6
6

2
2
2

.
.

•
.

.

_
.
•

.
_

.

5

9
3
5
3

I

_

_

•

_
.

.

-

2

1 4 8 .5 0

19
42
22
22

_

_
_
_
_

_

„

1

2

_

1

-

l
5

1
1
8

_

_

2
2
1
1
6
6

_

7

_

_

-

1

12
10
2

_

_
-

_
*

2
2

„

2

2
1

3
3

_
3

_

1

1

3
3

1
1

I

3

11

1
11

5

12

_
_

3

2

-

“

4
_

“

1

"

13
3
7

15

6
2

11

5

8
1
1

5

“

S e l e c t e d g e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A — -------------- M e n ..........................................................................
C l e r k 8 , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B ------------------W o m e n ---------- — ----------------------------------C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B -----------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s (576 w o m e n a n d 4 m e n ) 4— -■
C l a s s C f l5 8 w o m e n a n d 2 m e n ) ------C l a s s D (292 w o m e n a n d 2 m e n ) -------T y p i s t s , c l a s s A (99 w o m e n a n d 1 m a n )T y p i s t 8, c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n ) -----------------

59
21

46
39
85
80
580
160
294
100

8 6 .0 0

_

4
4

49
47

16
15

10
10

_
_

_
_

13
29

25
29

15
16
15

.

.

-

-

_

_

1 3 3 .5 0
1 4 0 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0

9 9 .0 0
93.0 0

1
1

_
_
_

2

15

1

9
8

4
3
15

12

5
16
14
3
2

6

2
6
6

3
3
104

112

7

1
1

3
1

71
25
27

40

49

21

22
1

22
1

8

3

6

3

1

4

2

-

-

-

37

9

5

3

20

1
8

_

1
2

_
-

-

.

“

•

-

-

-

10
6

.

1

8

_

7

10

34
68

96
37
43

4

.

_

_

1

2

10

6

6

3

I

1

21

87
9
5

55
3
52
30

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(22 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n ) -------------------- -----C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C
( a l l m e n ) --------------- --------- ----------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s A ------------- -— — ----- --------- --------- -■
W o m e n ---------------- ----- ------------- ------ -----M e n ------------------ --------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B:
M en—
— — — — — ————
C o m p u te r s y s te m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s A ---------- ---------------------------------—
W o m e n ------------------------------------------------M e n --------------------------------- ---------------—
C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B --------------------------------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------------------------M en—
— — — — — — — — — ------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s A
( a l l w o m e n )--------------------------------------------T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s ,
c l a s s B ( a l l m e n ) ------------------------------------ 1

-

_
..

_

_

.

_

4

17

19

10

5

25

2 1 4 .0 0
2 0 7 .0 0
2 1 7 .0 0

35

3 7 .5

1 1 6 .5 0

-

-

-

-

7

14

3 7 .5

1 1 3 .0 0

-

-

“

2

6

11

5

-

-

-

-

-

4

_

4

1

_
-

-

-

5

2

3

-

-

-

-

9
3

13
3

3
.

„
•

_
.

.

_
-

_
-

_
-

6

10

3

-

“

-

-

14

25

6

2 5 1 .0 0
2 5 6 .0 0
2 4 8 .5 0

3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

-

6

1 9 5 .5 0

6
1

4

3 7 .5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

2
10
2
8

2

33
26
8

18
35
10

10

1

“

•

1 T h e B o s to n S t a n d a r d M e tr o p o li t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a c o n s i s t s o f S u ffo lk 'C o u n ty ,1 5 c o m m u n i ti e s i n E s s e x C o u n ty , 30 in M id d le s e x C o u n ty , 20 in N o r f o lk C o u n ty , a n d 9 in P ly m o u th C o u n ty .
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o rk w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d t h e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d t o t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e r o u n d e d
t o t h e n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s to t h e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 2 a t $ 3 6 0 to $ 3 8 0 ; 3 a t $ 3 8 0 to $ 4 0 0 ; 3 a t $ 4 0 0 to $ 4 2 0 ; 2 a t $ 4 2 0 to $ 4 4 0 ; 1 a t $ 4 4 0 to $ 4 6 0 ; 1 a t $ 4 6 0 t o $ 4 8 0 ; 3 a t $ 4 8 0 to $ 5 0 0 ; a n d 2 a t $ 5 2 0 to $ 5 . 4 0 .
4 I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in c la s s if i c a t io n in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .




T a b le 5. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: C h ic a g o , III.1
(N u m b e r an d a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f i c e s and r e g io n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Avnuoa

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$ 120

$130

$140

$150

$ 160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$210

$220

$230

$240

$260

$80

Number
of
workers

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$ 130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$210

$220

$230

$240

$260

$280

over

1
1

37
48

Weekly
and
bows*
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r

$280
and

S e l e c t e d i n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s B ( a l l m e n ) ------- -------------

9
71
19
14

3 7 .5 $ 4 9 9 .5 0
3 7 .5
9 6 .5 0
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
1 4 8 .0 0
1 4 0 .5 0
3 7 .5

7u
£A
3
3

_

2
2

1
1

1

2

12

4

0
V
7
2

^7

*5

Q
O
Q
O

0
3
3

C le rk s , c o rre sp o n d e n c e , c la s s A
35
C le rk s , c o rre sp o n d e n c e , c la s s B
(82 w o m e n a n d 1 m a n ) ----------------------------

3 7 .5

1 3 9 .0 0

83
51
44

3 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 7 .5

1 1 9 .0 0
1 1 3 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0
1 3 5 .0 0

45
43
ll
30
17
1£
18
31
14
17

3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .0
»7
J ( . 7e
3 7 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

106
104
117
114
35

3 7 .5
3 7 .5
37. 5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

1 IQ UU
Xio a AA

Q4
7’

3 7 .5
e

37 5
37 ! 0

9 6 .5 0
Ofi CA
OOa D U
1 3 8 .0 0
1 8 0 .5 0
1 5 5 .0 0
1 3 4 .0 0
1 1 9 .0 0
1 0 4 .0 0

47

3 7 .0

1 1 4 .0 0

O
L

189
246

3 7 .5
3 7 .5

1 1 4 .5 0
9 8 .5 0

g
31

C le rk s , p r e m iu m - le d g e r -c a r d
( a l l w o m e n )— — — *— — — — — —
W om en
U n d e r w r ite r s , c la s s A - - - - — - - - - - - - - - W AM _ ——

—MM —_

__r ^ —_ _ -M
l____t

U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B*
W om en — —

—

U n d e r w r ite r s , c la s s C
W om en
M en

c

8
6

3

1

1
1

9

2

3

3
1

2
2

1
2

1
1

O
6
2

g

2

3

9 7 . 00

2 2 5 .0 0
2 0 1 .5 0
m 1 no
1 0i . w
2 1 5 .0 0

7

5

1

5

5

1

1
1

1 5 3 .5 0
1 6 5 .0 0

1
1

_

_

3
3

3
2
1

_

_

7
2

1
1

160.00

_

_

”

_

_

_

_

3

4
4

7

1H
10

“

_
_

2

_

2
2

6
1
5

8
1
7

5
4
1
6
3
3

1
_

_

2
1
1
2
2

2
1
2
2

3

3
7
2
5

4

2
2

_

3

1

2

2

3

_

4
1

_

_

1
1
2

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

S e l e c t e d g e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A - - - - - - - - W om en • • • * “ • • * “ * •■ * * * ■ "* "•••* "* ■ *
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B - - - - - - - - - W om en — — — — — — — — — — — — — —
—————————————
C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) - - - - - C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s B (93 w o m e n a n d
_}~ n J a n )

.

.

C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s C ( a l l w o m e n ) - - - - S e c r e t a r i e s ( a ll w o m e n ) ———————————————
C la ss A r aSS
v ii A A A
n
vla o B

D
O
"
——“ —
r*
U "“* * " " " * * " * * * " * “ "“*"***"

S te n o g ra p h e rs , g e n e ra l (a ll w om en) — —
T ra n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e b p e r a to r s ,
g e n e r a l ( a ll w o m e n ) --------------------------------------------------------T y p i s t s , c l a s s A (1 8 8 w o m e n a n d
l m an)
T y p is ts , c la s s B (a ll w om en)

Of t

384
19
84
204
77
f f
15

37a 5
37! 0
3 7 .5
07

1A
10

7 ft
£0

16
L
O

25

22

6

21
e.
0

27

16
8

5
5

•f
W

2

11
1

9

7
1
6

4
4

1n
IV
10

10

4

58

35

34

3

4
20
8
2

1

1

A
y

y

4

3

30
1Q
19

14
Q
7

17

7

4

51

72

63

9

1V
X ft
8

2
1
5

1
-

"

4

1

15
1

-

_

1

32

j

e

1

1
1

1 1 7 .0 0
1 1X CA
XlOa 9 V
1 1 5 .5 0
1AO C A
1U£# Oil

2

-

2

15
17
7

5

9
70

42

12

27

45
17

45

16
38

8

4

25

10

cA
D4

2
1

8

3

4

3
5
5

8
3
2
3

1
1

1

3

1

3

8
8

5
5

1
1

3
1
1
1

4
1
3

1
1

2
2

_

_

2

2
1
1

1
_

1

_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

3

22

12

19

2

_

4

1 n
17

22
AO
4£

10

2
1
1

10
7
1
2

1

46
25

24
14

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A

- - - - - - - - - __ ———___ —____ _ ———_—_——
,

C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B — — — — —
—————

S e e fo o tn o te s a t en d o f t a b le .




1o
IV
16

50
46

37

g

3 8! 0
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

171 50
1 7 5 !5 0
1 4 9 .5 0
1 5 1 .5 0

8

8

6

6

.7
6

5
5

5

4

_

_

_
_

_

_

_

_
_
_

_

T a b le 5. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: C h ic a g o , III.1 ontinued
—C
(N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s and r e g io n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNING8 OF—

Occupation and sex

Number
of

$75
and
T S K * earnings
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r
$80

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$ 170

$180

$190

$200

$210

$220

$230

$240

$260

$280

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$210

$220

$230

$240

$260

$280

over

4

2

-

-

and

Selected E D P - related occupations—
Continued
Computer operators, class C-------- — ----Women— — — — — — — — — —
Men— ---- --------------— — ------— — ----Computer program ers, business,
class A — — ---- -------------------------- -— Men— — — — --------- — ------- -— - — Computer program ers, business,
class B -------- ---------- — — — - - — ------ —
W om en -— — --------- — ----- -— ------------M en -— — —
— --------------------------Computer program ers, business,
class C (5 men and 3 women)— ----------Computer systems analysts, business,
class A ----— — — — — — ------------------- —
Men---- ---------- ------— -----— — ------—
Computer systems analysts, business,
class B:
------— — - — — — - —
Men----- — —
Computer systems analysts, business,
class C — — — — — — — ------ ------------—
Men—
— — — — ------— ---------- — —
Keypunch operators, class A
(108 women and 1 m an)-----------------------Keypunch operators, class B
(a ll w om en )-------------------------------— - Tabulating-machine operators, class A Men---------------------------------------------------Tabulating-machine operators, class B
(15 men and 1 wom an)---- -------- ---------- Tabulating-machine operators, class C
(all men)----------— — --------- — — — — — Tape lib ra ria n s---------------------- — ------— Women— — ------------- -------- --------------- -1

25

33

3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

£ 1 4 0 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0
1 4 1 .5 0

35
23

3 8 .0
3 8 .0

2 2 3 .0 0
2 2 1 .5 0

57
29
28

3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .5

190 .5 0

1 8 3 .5 0
1 9 7 .5 0

8

3 7 .0

1 4 8 .0 0

60
44

3 7 .5
3 7 .5

2 6 4 .5 0
2 6 3 .0 0

64

3 7 .5

2 2 6 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

25
15

3 7 .5
3 8 .0

1 8 1 .5 0
1 7 9 .0 0

_

_

_

_

_

109

3 7 .5

120.00

-

-

5

16

37

79

3 8 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

1 0 6 .5 0
1 5 9 .0 0

5
-

10

15

19

17

8

12
8

-

1

6
1

5
3

5

2

1

5

5

7

2

4

4

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

„

_

3
2

4
3

5
3

6

-

1
1

10

-

5
4

4

5

1
1

2
2

9
3

7

4
3

8
1

3

5
3

3

-

4
4
"

6

1

7

3
_
3

_
_
“

_
.
-

6

1

1

3
3

27

15
7

5 15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

"

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

-

“

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

3 7 .0

1 3 7 .0 0

9

3 7 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

1 1 6 .5 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 2 6 .5 0

6
1

9
4
5

1
2

2

2
1

22

«

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

12

11

16

7

9

5

1

_

_

-

1

_

2
2

1

1

5

8

7

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

-

-

4

4

5

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

3
i

4
3

2
2

2

7

3

1
1

2
2

27

17

9

4
-

-

161.00

16

9
7

3

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

“

-

1

2

1.

1
-

1
1
1

1

3
1

3

6

2
2

7

1 T h e C h ic a g o S t a n d a r d M e tr o p o li t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f C ook, D u P a g e , K a n e , L a k e , M c H e n ry , a n d W ill C o u n tie s .
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d th e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e r o u n d e d
t o t h e n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s to t h e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 1 a t $ 3 6 0 t o $ 3 8 0 ; 1 a t $ 4 0 0 to $ 4 2 0 ; 1 a t $ 4 6 0 to $ 4 8 0 ; 3 a t $ 5 6 0 to $ 5 8 0 ; a n d 1 a t $ 7 6 0 to $ 7 8 0 .
4 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 2 a t $ 2 8 0 to $ 3 0 0 ; 4 a t $ 3 0 0 to $ 3 2 0 ; 1 a t $ 3 4 0 to $ 3 6 0 ;
a n d 1 a t $ 4 4 0 to $ 4 6 0 .
5 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 14 a t $ 2 8 0 to $ 3 0 0 a n d 1 a t $ 3 0 0 to $ 3 2 0 .




T a b le 6. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: D alla s, T e x .1
(N u m b e r an d a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s and r e g io n a l h e a d o f f i c e s o f lif e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER 07 WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS 07

A nu<a
O ccupation and sex

of
workers

Weekly
hours z earnings*
(Standard) (Standard)

$60
and

$65
-

$70
-

$75
-

$80
-

$85
-

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280
and

$65

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

over

.
.
.
.
.
.
-

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
-

-

.
-

.
.
4
4
.

_
3
3
.
.
-

.
.
5
4
4
4

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
1

2

1

-

-

1

1
1

2
2

1

-

1

6

1

4
-

4

-

1
1
1
1

-

-

-

S e le c te d in s u ra n c e o c c u p a tio n s
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s A— ------------------------ --------Men--------------- ------------------------------------------A ssem b lers----------------------------------------------------Women----------------------------------------------------—
Claim a p p ro v e r s , c l a s s A---------------- ------- —
Women- — - - - - - - - - — --------------------------------Claim a p p ro v e r s , c l a s s B---------------------------Women-- — ---------------------------------- ------- —
C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s A— -----------Women--------------- — —
C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s B-----------------— . . . . . . . — -----Women-- — --------- C le rk s , p o lic y e v a lu a t io n ( a l l women)------C le rk s , p rem iu m -le d g e r-c a rd ( a l l women)—
Premium a c c e p to rs ( a l l women)--------------------U n d e r w r ite r s , c l a s s A----------------------------------Men-----------------------------------------------------------U n d e r w r ite r s , c l a s s B (5 women and 2 men)U n d e rw rite rs , c l a s s C----------------------------------Women-— - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Men------------------------------------------------------------

9
8

16
15
13
8

23
19
37
33
75
71
49
10
8
21

17
7
19
12

7

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
39 .0

$437.50
443.50
92.50
92.00
164.50
133.50
124.00
119.00
115.50
111.00

103.00
101.50
102.50
101.00
111.00

192.00
198.00
171.50
140.00
139.00
142.50

-

1
1

-

1
1
2
2

4
4
7

2
2

2
2

3

3
.
.
-

.

12
12
1
2
2

.
.
.
-

_
.

2
2

.

.
.

2
1
2
2
2
2

2
2

2
2

.
.

.

.
.
.
4
4

6
6

4
4
7
7
5
4

13
13
17
16

2
2
8
8
8
8

2
1
1
1
6
6

4
.
-

.
.
_
.
-

-

.
9
9
3

_
.

.
-

*

.
.
2
2

1

.
.
_
-

1

10
10

.

7
-

2

1

1

.
-

.
-

.
-

2
2

2
2

1

1

-

-

-

3

1

1

12
11
1
2
2
1

9
4
5
.
.
.
39
4
18
17
.

12

1

.

4
3

2
2

2
1

4
4

2
1

3
3
3
-

-

1

1
1

-

•

-

2

3
-

3

3

2
1

1
2

8
6
2
2
2

3
3

1
2
1
1

■

-

1

1
1

39
8

-

3

2

-

1

-

-

2
2

2
2

■

'

S e le c te d g e n e ra l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C le rk s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A-----------------------Women------------------------------ ----------------------Men--------- ------- ------------------------ ---------------C le rk s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B-----------------------W o m e n - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - — - — -----C le rk s , f i l e , c l a s s A ( a l l women)-------------C le rk s , f i l e , c l a s s B ( a l l women)...................
C le rk s , f i l e , c l a s s i c ( a l l women)-------------S e c r e t a r i e s ( a l l women)-----------------------------C la s s A -------------------------------- ------------------C la s s B----------------------------------------------------C la s s C---------------------------------------- ----------C la s s D.......................................................................
T ra n sc rib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s
g e n e ra l ( a l l women)--------------------------------T y p i s ts , c la s s A ( a l l women)----------------------‘ y p is ts , c la s s B ( a l l women)------- --------------T

.
-

16
16
.
9
44

37

.
14
17

61
91
35

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

70
106
161

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

102.00

16

15

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

146.50
134.50
106.00
204.00
198.00
208.50
167.00
158.00
173.00

9
7
32
79

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

221.50
219.50
117.50
9 3 .00

1

7

8

8

14

9

6
6

3 9 .5
3 8 .5

117.00
137.50

"

-

*

.

.
•

_

.

•

•

■

58
48
10

143
141
14
81
134
199
12

120.00

117.50
131.00
87.00
86.50
9 6 .50
83.00
75.50
119.50
149.00
129.50
117.00
98.00
95 .5 0
83.00

1
1

.
1

19
.
.

.
.
19
19
.
1
6
1

11

21
21

2

2

6

.
.
.

.
.
-

.
.
-

-

1

2

2

1

5

-

2
1

1
1

-

2

2

1

26

13

15

3
26

23
23
1

38
7
5
.
5
7
15
49

3
3
.

3
3
-

12
12

21
20

8
8

21
20

.
5

4
9
.
.
5
4

5
.
.
27
.
5
18
4

10

8

20

15
16

40
9

23
5

2

16
.
2
10

4

2
2

-

30
.
6
21

3

.
.
30

2
2

.
.

.
-

3
3
-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

16

11

1

1

3

16

3

8

8

12

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
6

2

3
4
-

2

1

-

-

2
2

1
1

11

8

6

1

3
5
1

3
3
-

-

-

3

1
1

-

-

-

-

10
6
1

10

1

2

3
_
-

3

-

4
.

.
9
9

7
14

.
9
-

1
2

3

1

-

4

2

-

S e le c te d E D P -re la te d o c c u p a tio n s
Computer o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A ( a l l m e n )--—
Computer o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ( a l l m e n ) - -- - Computer o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C ( a l l m e n )--—
Computer p ro g ra m ers, b u s in e s s , c l a s s A-----W o m e n ---------------Men................................................................................
Computer p ro g ra m ers, b u s in e s s , c l a s s B-----Women-------------------------------------------------------Men................................................................................
Computer system s a n a l y s t s , b u s in e s s ,
c l a s s B-------------------------- ------------------------Men--------------------------------------------------------Keypunch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A ( a l l women)—
Keypunch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ( a l l women)—
T a b u latin g -m a ch in e o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(3 women and 3 m en)----- ------------------------ Tape l i b r a r i a n s ( a l l women)-----------------------

22
12

29
13
16
25
10

_
.
.
_

1

-

.
-

.
3
.
.
.
-

.
.

.

-

3
9

_

3
2
6

-

"

-

.

-

2
1
1

8

6

3

5
3

3
3

1
2

4
7
5
5

.

.

-

-

-

2
2

3
2

2

1

1

2

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

.

.

-

-

-

-

1
1

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

‘

'

2

.
.

1

.

.

1

-

1

-

2

1 T h e D a l la s S t a n d a r d M e tr o p o li t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f C o llin , D a lla s , D e n to n , a n d E l l i s C o u n tie s .
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d t h e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e ro u n d e d
t o t h e n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s t o th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
.
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s f o llo w s : 1 a t $ 3 4 0 to $ 3 6 0 ; 3 a t $ 3 8 0 to $ 4 0 0 ; l a t $ 4 4 0 to $ 4 6 0 ; 2 a t $ 4 6 0 to $ 4 8 0 ; a n d 2 a t $ 5 0 0 t o $ 5 2 0 .




T a b le 7. O ccupational earnings: D e s Moines, Iowa1
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u rs an a e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f fic e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f fic e s o f lif e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

A m ua
$66

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

of
workers

$65

$76

$75

$86

$85

T96

$95

$1 00

$1 10

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$186

$196

$206

$220

$240

$260

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

over

1

4

4

.

-

8
5

-

-

-

Weekly. Weekly 2 and
earnmga
hours
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r

$65

and

S e l e c t e d i n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s B ( a l l m e n ) -------------— A s s e m b l e r s ( a l l w o m e n ) -----------------------C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B -------------- --— W o m e n -------- -------- ---------------------------C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c la s s A
(13 w o m e n a n d 7 m e n ) -----------------------C le rk s , c o rre sp o n d e n ce , c la s s B
------------ — (16 w o m e n a n d 6 m e n )
C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n ( a ll w o m e n )—
U n d e r w r ite r s , c la s s A
(8 m e n a n d 2 w o m e n ) --------------------------U n d e r w r ite r s , c la s s B
(8 m e n a n d 3 w o m e n ) ---------------------------U n d e rw rite rs , c la s s C
(8 m e n a n d 7 w o m e n ) ------------ ---------------

4

10
13
23
8

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

128 9 .5 0
7 9 .0 0
1 7 5 .0 0
1 4 6 .0 0

-

_

_

_

_
_

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

.

2

I

_

6

3

_

-

1
1

.

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

1

1

3

3

5

1

1

2

-

2

1
4

2

6

6

_

„

1

*

_

_

_

-

-

-

36

2
-

2
2

20

3 8 .0

1 5 3 .5 0

22
21

3 8 .0
3 9 .0

1 1 7 .5 0
8 8 .5 0

-

-

3

1
1

4

6

1
2

10

3 8 .5

2 1 8 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

3

3

1

1

11

3 8 .0

1 7 0 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

3

1

-

-

4

-

1

1

-

-

15

3 9 .0

1 5 0 .5 0

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

-

2

“

2

2

2

3

“

"

-

“

-

26

3 8 .5

1 1 5 .0 0

.

.

.

.

12

3

3

47
9
62
41
77
7
31
50
49

3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

9 0 .5 0

2

5

5

3

23

17

2
10

_
_

2

8 3 .0 0
7 2 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 2 8 .0 0
8 8 .5 0
7 9 .5 0

6
1
6

21

6

2

.

_

_
_
.

_
_

-

1

_

S e l e c t e d g e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A
( a l l w o m e n )------------------- -----------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B
( a l l w o m e n ) - - - - - ------------------------------—
C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) --------C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) --------C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s C ( a l l w o m e n ) --------S e c r e t a r i e s ( a ll w o m e n ) 4 ------------ --------C l a s s A ----------------------------------------------C l a s s B ----------------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a ll w o m e n ) ----T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n ) ------------- -

1

1

6

14

8

7

[

110.00

_
_

_
_

4

8

_
_
_
_

_
_

_

"

3

2
8

_

2

.

2

12
2
8

6

1

3

_

_

6

1

2
1

_
_
_

_
.
_

_
_
_

4

6

10

15

8

12

_

2

1

3
19

15
13

13

7
5

5

4
3

2
1

6
1

“

_

_

1

3

_
_

_
_

_

1

3

_

_

1

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(8 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n ) -------— ------------ -■
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
(18 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n ) -------- ------------ -■
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C
(26 m e n a n d 2 w o m e n ) ------------------- —
C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s A (8 m e n a n d 1 w o m e n ) ------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B (28 m e n a n d 7 w o m e n ) ----------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s ,
b u s i n e s s , c l a s s B ( a l l m e n ) --------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s A
( a l l w o m e n )-------------------------------------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s B
( a ll w o m e n )------— -------- -— ----- ------------1

9

3 9 .0

1 6 8 .5 0

.

.

.

.

_

1

2

2

1

_

„

_

3

19

3 8 .5

1 3 2 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

3

3

6

1

3

1

-

-

-

-

-

28

3 9 .0

1 1 4 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

8

11

4

2
1

-

2

2

3

-

1

3

9

6

5

2

1

6

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

6

1

1

9

3 8 .5

2 1 5 .0 0

35

3 8 .5

1 7 1 .5 0

-

-

-

9

3 9 .0

2 3 1 .0 0

-

-

-

47

3 9 .0

1 0 1 .5 0

-

-

20

3 8 .5

8 5 .0 0

-

-

•

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

5

9

3

19

9

3

7

3

-

-

1

5

_

1

1 T h e D es M o in e s S t a n d a r d M e tr o p o lita n S t a ti s t i c a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f P o lk C o u n ty .
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o rk w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d t h e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e r o u n d e d
to n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s t o th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s: 4 a t $ 3 0 0 to $ 3 2 0 ; 1 a t $ 3 2 0 to $ 3 4 0 ; a n d 1 a t $ 3 4 0 to $ 3 6 0 .
4 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in c la s s if i c a t io n in a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .




T a b le 8. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: H artford, C o nn.1
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s and r e g io n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f lif e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
Ayeraok

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

of
workers

$70
Weekly2 Weekly
and
hours
eanuogs6
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r
$75

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$80

$85

$90

$95

$ 1 00

$ 1 10

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF
i9
$120
$110
$130 $14 0 $150 $ 1 60 $170 $ 1 80 $ 0 $20 6

$ 2 ■pr
2o

$260

$280

$3UU

$280

$300

over

and
$1 20

$130

$140

$ 150

$1 60

$170

$180

$190

$200

$ 2 20

$260

$240

S e le c te d i n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s A ( a l l m e n ) -----------------A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s B ( a ll m e n ) - ---------------A s s e m b l e r s ( a l l w o m e n )-------------------------C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B
(18 m e n a n d 4 w o m e n ) - - — -----------------C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c la s s A
( a l l w o m e n )------------------------------- -------------C le rk s , c o rre sp o n d e n ce , c la s s B
( a l l w o m e n ) - -------— ----------------------------- U n d e r w r ite r s , c la s s A
(32 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n )--------------------------U n d e r w r ite r s , c la s s B
(38 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n )---------------- -— - —
U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s C ---------------------------M e n ------------------------------------------------------

30
14

3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5

$ 5 2 6 .5 0
3 5 3 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0

-

-

-

1

2

2

22

3 7 .0

1 5 5 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

12

3

3 12
422

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

2

-

-

2

“

_
“

.
“

-

“

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

1

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

15

9
“

7

11
2

“

3
“

-

-

-

-

5

3

-

1

-

-

3

3

7

4

2

1

1

-

-

3

13

6

6

5

1

7

2

1

-

3

1

3

-

-

2

-

1

1

-

-

1

2

_

_
2
2

3
5
4

2

2
2

2
2
2

4
3

49

3 7 .0

1 4 0 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

3

2

30

3 7 .0

1 1 9 .5 0

-

-

-

2

2

-

10

6

33

3 7 .0

2 2 2 .0 0

.

1

39
28
25

3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

1 9 6 .5 0
1 6 8 .0 0
1 6 5 .0 0

-

50
47

3 6 .5
3 6 .5

1 3 1 .0 0
1 3 1 .0 0

-

77
58
37
339
44
21 9
57

3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 7 .0

1 0 4 .5 0
9 8 .0 0
8 7 .0 0
1 4 2 .0 0
1 5 8 .0 0
1 4 1 .0 0
1 1 9 .5 0

39
171
57

3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 6 .5

1 0 5 .5 0
9 8 .5 0
9 2 .5 0

40

3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 7 .0

2 6 9 .5 0
2 7 2 .5 0

_

2 0 6 .0 0
1 9 1 .5 0
1 9 5 .5 0

_

_
_

_
-

“

-

-

“

“

-

2
2

9

-

2
2

8

-

7

8

13
13

11
11

1

4
7

12
8
1

3

1

2

5

23

60
5
37
18

54

13
13

1
1

-

2

8

12
10
2

3

16

11
10
6
2

30

9

-

1
1

S e l e c t e d g e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A -----------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B
( a l l w o m e n )-------------------- ----------------------C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) --------C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s C ( a l l w o m e n ) --------S e c r e t a r i e s ( a l l w o m e n ) 5 -----------------------C l a s s B ----------------------------------------------C l a s s C ----------------------------------------------C l a s s D ----------------------------------------------T r a n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r s ,
g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n ) ----------------------------T y p i s t s , c l a s s A f a l l w o m e n ) ---------------T y p i s ts , c l a s s B ( a ll w o m e n ) ----------------

_
3

m

_

8

10

2

12

35
13

53
4

3
15

_

-

-

2

5

2

4

4
24

6

-

_

15

28
3
15

..
_

m

_

10
1

16

7
34
14

1

43
10

1

6

-

-

22

8

9

39

11

28
7
18

11
1

3

2
2

.

7
3
1

2

-

•

.
.

-

.

-

-

1

„

-

47

I

_

1

_

_

3

3

_

2

48
5
37
4

1

1

2

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c la s s A:
M e n ---------------- ----------------------------- -----C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B -------------------------------------------------M e n --------------- -------- ----- ----- --------- ------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s A ------ ------- --------- -— -------- -— ----M e n — - — ----------------------------- — - —
C o m p u te r s y s te m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B -------------------------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s A
( a l l w o m e n )-------------------------------------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s B
( a ll w o m e n )-------------------------------------------- 1
1 The

66

47
61

55
95
91

3 6 .5
3 7 .0

2 3 8 .0 0
2 3 8 .5 0

89

3 6 .5

1 0 9 .5 0

130

3 7 .0

9 5 .0 0

2

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

8
8

7

6

19

4

1

.

1

17
9

18

6
4

5
3

3
3

4
4

3
3

-

-

1
1

1

2

16

22

13

-

-

15

21

12

6
6

1

2

13
12

39
37

32
31

8
8

2
2

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

_

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

.
-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

14

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

10

34

24

-

7

37

30

22

27

-

7

H a r tf o r d S t a n d a r d M e tr o p o li t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f th e c it y o f H a r tf o r d a n d t h e to w n s o f A n d o v e r , A v o n , B lo o m fie ld , B o lto n , C a n to n , C o v e n try , C r o m w e ll, E a s t G ra n b y , E a s t
H a r tf o r d , E a s t W in d s o r , E llin g to n , E n f ie ld , F a r m in g to n , G la s to n b u ry , G ra n b y , M a n c h e s t e r , N e w in g to n , R o c k y H ill, S im s b u r y , S o u th W in d s o r, S u ffie ld , V e r n o n , W e st H a r tf o r d , W e th e r s f ie ld , W in d s o r ,
a n d W in d s o r L o c k s .
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d th e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e ro u n d e d
to t h e n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s to th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s f o llo w s : 1 a t $ 3 6 0 to $ 3 8 0 ; 1 a t $ 4 0 0 to $ 4 2 0 ; 2 a t $ 4 8 0 to $ 5 0 0 ; 2 a t $ 5 0 0 to $ 5 2 0 ; 1 a t $ 5 2 0 to $ 5 4 0 ; 1 a t $ 5 4 0 to $ 5 6 0 ; 3 a t $ 5 8 0 to $ 6 0 0 ; a n d 1 a t $ 6 8 0 to $ 7 0 0 .
4 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s f o llo w s : 5 a t $ 3 0 0 to $ 3 2 0 ; 6 a t $ 3 2 0 to $ 3 4 0 ; 2 a t $ 3 4 0 to $ 3 6 0 ; 1 a t $ 3 6 0 to $ 3 8 0 ; 1 a t $ 3 8 0 to $ 4 0 0 ; 1 a t $ 4 0 0 to $ 4 2 0 ; 2 a t $ 4 4 0 to $ 4 6 0 ; 1 a t $ 4 6 0 to
$480; a n d 3 a t $480 a n d o v e r.
5 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in c l a s s i f i c a t i o n in a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .




T a b le 9. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: Houston, T e x .1
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s a n d r e g i o n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f lif e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
O
Avis IA B
Number
of
workers

O ccupation and sex

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

$65
Weekly
Weekly
and
hours * earnings6
(Standard) (Standard) under
$70

$70

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$210

$220

$230

$240
and

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$210

$220

$230

$240

over

S e le c te d in s u ra n c e o c c u p a tio n s
12
6

37.5
37.5

$169.00
140.50

.
.

.
.

.
.

_
-

_
-

1
1

.
-

.
-

.
-

2
2

.
-

.
-

1
1

1
1

1
-

3
1

1
.

1
-

.
.

_
.

.
.

1
-

10
14
12
7
6
16
11
12

40.0
38.0
37.5
38 .0
38.0
38 .0
38 .0
38 .0

131.00
112.50
108.00
254.00
263.00
195.50
201.00
164.00

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
-

.
.
.
_
.
-

.
.

1
1
1
.
.
.
.
-

.
2
2
.
.
-

.
2
2
.
.
.
.
-

.
2
2
-

2
2
.
-

3
.
.
-

2
1

.
3
1
1

2
1
1
-

2
1
1
.
.
3

„
.
.
6
2
3

_
_
.
.
.
2

.
.
.
.
.
4
4
-

.

_
.
.
.
_
2
2
-

_

.
.
.
3
2
*

.
.
.
-

.
.
.
1
1
1
1
-

.
.
.
35
5
.
.

-

.
.
.
.
2

28
25
36
95
50
29
10

38 .0
38.0
39 .0
38.5
38 .5
39.0
39.0

117.00
116.00
92.50
130.50
137.00
97.00
114.00

_
_
2
.
.
.
_

_
_
2
.
.
_
-

1
1
4
.

6
2
5
1

10
9
5
12
2
6
4

6
6
3
25
8
3
2

5
5
1
15
10
3

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
.

1
1
6
.
.
9
.

4
2

.
.
.

.
_
6
.
_
.
1

17
13
-

10
7
-

5
3
-

2
2
-

3
3
-

1
1
-

2
1
-

-

-

-

1
-

-

12
18

37.5
38 .5

96.00
84.50

.
2

-

.
2

.
6

4
5

2
2

3
-

3
-

1

.
-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

15
14
9
6
19
8
11
13
9
27
42

Claim a p p ro v e rs , c l a s s B------------------------------Women---------------------------------------------------------C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s B
(8 women and 2 men)----------------------------------C le rk s , p o lic y e v a lu a t io n ------------------- ---------Women---------------------------------------------------------U n d e rw rite rs , c l a s s A................................................
Men-------------------------------------------------------------U n d e rw rite rs , c l a s s B----------------------------------Men-------------------------------------------------------------U n d e rw rite rs , c l a s s C (7 men and 5 women)- -

37.5
37.5
38.0
37.5
37 .5
38.5
3 7 .0
38.0
3 8 .0
38 .0
38 .0

133.00
134.00
218.50
223.50
193.50
199.50
189.00
159.50
157.00
108.00
96.50

_
-

.
-

.
.
.

.
.
.
-

.
.
-

.
.
.
.
.
.

.
_
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.
.
_

1
1
.
.
_
.

7
6
.
_
.

3
3
.
_
.
.

2
2
_
_
.

2
2
.
.
.
_

_
.
.
.
2
_
2
2
1

.
_
2
1
10
4
6

_
.
.
_
3
2
1

.
.
2
2
.
.

.
.
.
1
1

.
.
2
2
-

_
52
1
.
.

.
_
.

_
.
1
.
2
1
1
1
1

_

.

.

-

_
.
.
.

_
.
.
.

"

"

“

■

”

■

■

.
.
.
-

.

-

S e le c te d g e n e ra l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C le rk s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A-------------------------Women---------------------------------------------------------C le rk s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B ( a l l women)-----S e c r e t a r i e s ( a l l women)4 ---------------------------C la s s B------------------------------------------------------S te n o g ra p h e rs , g e n e ra l ( a l l women)...................
S te n o g ra p h e rs , s e n io r ( a l l women)---------------T ra n sc rib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a t o r s , g e n e ra l
( a l l women)-----------------------------------------------T y p i s ts , c l a s s B ( a l l women)------------------------

_
.
1

-

S e le c te d E D P -re la te d o c c u p a tio n s
Computer o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B-------------------------Men------------------------------------------------------------Computer p ro g ra m ers, b u s in e s s , c l a s s A..........
Men..................................................................................
Computer p ro g ra m ers, b u s in e s s , c l a s s B------Women---------------------------------------------------------Men..................................................................................
Computer p ro g ra m ers, b u s in e s s , c l a s s C------Men-------------------------------------------------------------Keypunch o p e r a t o r s , c la s s A ( a l l women)-----Keypunch o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ( a l l women)------

.

.

_

.
.
.

_

.
-

.
-

.

.

.

-

-

-

.

.

.
.

.
.

.
_

-

-

-

.

-

"

'

"

7

10

1
5

6
6

12
8

5
3

.

.
3

.
.

.

_

5
5

3
1

3
'

■

•

.

_

_
.
.

.
1
_
1
2
1

.

.

.
.

.
.
.

"

.
.
.

* T h e H o u s to n S ta n d a r d M e tr o p o lita n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f H a r r i s C o u n ty .
to th e n e a r e s t t u t o ' u r a
2

^

a

V

r

'

a

g

e

^

e

X

W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 2 a t $ 2 5 0 to $ 2 7 0 ; 2 a t $ 2 7 0 to $ 2 8 0 ; a n d 1 a t $ 2 8 0 to $ 290 .
I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in c la s s if i c a t io n in a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 1 a t $ 2 4 0 to $ 2 5 0 , a n d 1 a t $ 2 5 0 to $ 2 6 0 .




- >«*. .

*>» e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r , a r e ro u n d e d

T a b le 10. O ccu pa tion a l earnings: Jacksonville, F la .1
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s a n d r e g i o n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f l if e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)

N M E O W R E S R C IV GS R IG T IM W E LY E R IN S O —
U B R F O K R E E IN T A H -T E E K A N G F
$65
Weekly
Weekly 2 U n d e r
and
hours 2
under
(Standard) (Standard) $6 5
$7 0

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

$70

T t
T

$80

$90

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$75

$80

$90

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

£ 1 .6 0

$ .1 7Q

£ !8 0 _

$180

$190

$200

$240

$260

$280

im

$200

$ 2-20 I M P . -$2feO

$230

$300

$220

$300
and

S e l e c t e d i n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s

nz

C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A
(4 w o m e n , 2 m e n ) ________________________
C la im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B
(12 w o m e n , 3 m e n ) _______________________
C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c la s s B
( a l l w o m e n )_______________________________
C l e r k s , p o lic y e v a lu a tio n
(34 w o m e n , 1 m a n ) _______________________
C le rk s , p r e m iu m - le d g e r -c a r d
(21 w o m e n , 1 m a n ) ----------------------------------P r e m i u m a c c e p t o r s (23 w o m e n , 1 m a n ) - .
U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B ____________ ___ _____
M e n __________________________________

6

3 7 .0
37 .5

2

$ 1 62 .0 0

15

149.50

4

19

37 .0

101.50

35

37 .0

1 0 3.00

1

22
24
18
10

3 8 .0
37 .5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

8 3 .0 0
9 4 .0 0
180.00
18 3.50

73
69
60
125

86.00

-

8 5 .5 0
74 .0 0
1 1 7.00
1 3 7.50
12 8 .0 0
1 0 4.50
1 1 0.50
88.00
7 8 .0 0

3

54
43
22
41
98

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

48
44

3 7 .0
3 7 .0

130.50
12 9 .0 0

3 7 .5

2

3

2

6

4

12

8
6

1
10

4

1

1

1

1

2

2

4

9

5

3
1

102 .0 0

2

1

1
1

3
3

1

1

2

2

3

3

4

1

2

1

1

1

2

11

5

1
1

1
1

4

S e le c te d g e n e ra l c le r ic a l
o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B --------------------C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s C ( a l l w o m e n ) -----------S e c r e t a r i e s ( a l l w o m e n ) ----------------------------C l a s s A --------------------------------------------------C l a s s D__________________________________
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a ll w o m e n ) _____
T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) --------------------

6

-

2
2
18
2

2

-

18

8
8

8
8

19

4

6

3

1
1
1
3
27

36
35
11

6
6
5
20
2
4

5

11

23
25

10

1

3
14

3

8

10
8

3
2

22

19

18

10

6

6

7
5
3
4

7

7
5

6

1

10

2
2
1

1
1

2

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ------M e n _____________________ —___
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C
(10 m e n , 3 w om en)!________ ——__
C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c la s s A:
W o m e n ______________________
C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s ,
c l a s s A ( a l l m e n ) -----------------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s B
( a l l w o m e n )----------------------------------

3 6 .5

2 0 4 .5 0

11

3 6 .5

2 6 6 .0 0

75

3 7 .5

8 2 .5 0

18
18

29

1 T h e J a c k s o n v i ll e S t a n d a r d M e tr o p o li t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f D uval C o u n ty .
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d t h e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d t o t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e ro u n d e d
t o t h e n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s t o th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .




T a b le 11. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: Lo s A n g e le s —Long B ea ch and A n a h eim — S a n ta A n a — Garden Grove, C a lif.1
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f fic e s a n d r e g i o n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f lif e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)

N M E O W R E S R C IV GS R IG T IM W E LY E R IN S O —
U B R F O K R E E IN T A H -T E E K A N G F

Avbbaqb

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

Number
of
workers

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$210

$220

$230

$240

$250

$260

$270

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$210

$220

$230

$240

$250

$260

$270

$280

.
•

..
-

2
2

..
2

„

„

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

2

-

-

1

2

3
3

•
4
3

_

1

1
6

a.

«

•
„
.

-

_
-

11

•
-

5
5

$80
Weekly
an d
hours c
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r
$85

4
3

8
8

2
2

2
2

1

14
«.

5

13

13

2
1

2

1
6

11
1
8

2
2

11
2

5
5

1

S e l e c t e d i n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c la s s A
(24 w o m e n a n d 1 m a n ) --------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B - - ------ ----- ------------W o m e n -------------------------------------------------M e n --------------------------------------------------------

25
21
10
11

3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .5

$ 1 2 6 .5 0
1 9 6 .5 0
1 8 8 .5 0
2 0 4 .0 0

35
32

3 7 .0
3 7 .0

1 3 5 .0 0
1 3 3 .5 0

108

3 7 .0
3 6 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .0

1 5 2 .0 0
1 6 4 .0 0
1 5 1 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0

-

-

-

«

7
_

4
2
2

1
1

-

-

1

-

.
„
„
-

„

_

1

-

-

_

_

..

„

-

-

2
2

S e l e c t e d g e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
f lle rlrp ,
r l a s n A ____ ___ ___
W
_________________________________
S e c r e t a r i e s (107 w o m e n a n d
1 m a n ) 1 ---------------------------------------------------3
2
C l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n )----------------------------C l a s s C ( a l l w o m e n ) ----------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n ) -----T y p i s ts , c l a s s A - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

________________

T y p i s ts , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) - - - - - - - - - -

21

52
6
111
109

28

_
-

101.00

1 0 0 .5 0
8 6 .5 0

18

•
18
18
4

_
.
.
8
8

3

45
45

.
3
17
16

1

2

12

1
2
20
10
8

18
3

9
4
5

1

1

..
_

..
_

1

17
16

10

„

x

S e le c te d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
( a l l m e n ) -------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
( a l l m e n ) -------------------------------------------------K eypunch o p e r a to r s , c la s s A
(4 7 w o m e n a n d 1 m an ) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - K eypunch o p e r a to r s , c la s s B
(a ll w o m e n )- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

„
„

i

8

3 7 .0

2 0 2 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

7

3 8 .0

1 7 7 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

48

3 8 .0

1 2 4 .0 0

1

4

12

17

11

3

59

3 8 .0

1 0 3 .0 0

12

15

14

4

7

7

1

-

1

1

1

1

•

-

1

1

1

-

2 |!

1

1

.
•

1 T h e L o s A n g e l e s — o n g B e a c h a n d A n a h e im - S a n ta A n a— a rd e n G r o v e S t a n d a r d M e tr o p o lita n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a s c o n s is t o f L o s A n g e le s a n d O r a n g e C o u n tie s .
L
G
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o rk w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d t h e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e ro u n d e d
t o t h e n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s to th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s i n c l a s s if i c a t io n in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .




T a b le 12. O ccu p a tion a l earnings: M inneapolis—St. Paul, M inn.1
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s a n d r e g i o n a l h e a d o f fic e s o f l if e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

A nuoi

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

$70

Number

ot

workers

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$ 130

$ 140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$ 150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

$300

$300

Weekly 2 Weddy 2 a n d
earnings
boon
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r

$75

and
over

S e l e c t e d i n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s A ( a l l m e n ) -----------------A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s B ( a l l m e n ) -----------------C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A
(4 w o m e n a n d 4 m e n ) . . . . . . . . -------------C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B -----------------------W o m e n ----------------------. . . . . . . --------------M e n ........................................................................
C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s A ---------W o m e n --------------------------- ---------- ---------C le rk s , c o rre s p o n d e n c e , c la s s B
( a l l w o m e n ) --------------------------------------------C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a tio n
( a l l w o m e n ) -------------------------------------- . . .
U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s A (16 m e n a n d
1 w o m a n ) ------------------------------- . . . . . . . . .
U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B ----------------------------W o m e n -------------------------------------------------M e n ---------------------------------------. . . . --------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s C ------------------------. . .
W o m e n - -------------------------------------. . . . . .
M e n -------------------------------------------- ----------

9
15

3 8 .0
3 8 .0

$ 3 7 0 .0 0
2 6 3 .0 0

8
15
8
7
25
19

3 7 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5

2 0 1 .0 0
1 6 0 .5 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 8 5 .0 0
1 4 3 .0 0
1 3 1 .5 0

_

46

3 8 .0

1 1 2 .5 0

-

40

3 7 .5

1 1 2 .5 0

1

17
25
8
17
35
22
13

3 7 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .5

2 3 8 .0 0
2 0 2 .5 0
2 0 1 .0 0
2 0 3 .0 0
1 6 2 .5 0
1 5 3 .0 0
1 7 8 .5 0

_
.

39
-

“

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

"

“

“

3

4

2

6

.
-

.

.
.

•
1
1

2
2

1
1

_

•
1
1

2
.

1
2
2

_

_
.

5
5

5
5

6
6

_
_

2
2

_

1
.
_
.
_

.
.
_

_
„

1
1
_
1
_

.
_

.
„

.
4
1
3
4
•

_
.
•

•

1
3
.
3
2
1

2

_

-

1

4

3

12

12

3

-

1

1

6

_
.

_
_

•
.

_
_

1
1

_
.

6
7
5
2
5
1
4

5
3
_
3

3
1
.
1

•
_

8
2
6
„

.
_
.
-

.
.

3
.
3
3
2
1

•

_

-

-

-

1
1
.

1
..
1

“
.
-

»

9

10

7

1

2

.
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

.

.
_

3
3

_
•

_

.
«

_
.
.
_
.
.

2

_

1
_

-

5
5

10
5
5

2
•
2
4
4
-

5
2
3

-

m

1
1

2
_

1
_
.

-

S e l e c t e d g e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A
(56 w o m e n a n d 1 m a n ) --------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B
( a l l w o m e n ) --------------------------------------------C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) ---------C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) - - - - - C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s C ( a l l w o m e n ) ---------S e c r e t a r i e s ( a l l w o m e n ) 4 -----------------------C l a s s A .................................................................
C l a s s B .................................................................
C l a s s C -----------------------------------------------S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n ) -----S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r ( a l l w o m e n ) -------T ra n s c rib in g -m a c h in e o p e r a to r s ,
g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n ) ------------------------------T y p i s ts , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) -----------------T y p i s ts , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) ------------------

57

3 8 .0

1 1 7 .5 0

43
9
21
58
82
7
41
24
9
47

3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .5

9 4 .5 0
9 6 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
8 1 .0 0
1 3 3 .5 0
1 6 3 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 2 1 .5 0
9 9 .0 0
1 1 2 .5 0

1
3

-

-

“

33
65
32

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0

9 7 .5 0
9 0 .0 0
8 8 .0 0

-

2
3

4
23
7

13
42
7
35

3 6 .5
3 7 .5
3 6 .5
3 8 .0

1 5 5 .0 0
1 4 0 .5 0
1 2 7 .5 0
1 4 3 .0 0

.

_
.

39
8
31

3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .0

1 8 1 .0 0
1 7 0 .0 0
1 8 4 .0 0

-

1

7

3

11

14

3
1
4
15
_

6
_

10
1
3

9
1
7

4
3
2

1

1

„
2
3

«.
1
4
5

10
_
3
5
3
11

4
20
11

3
4
5

6
7
4

10
8
2

_

.
•

-

.
.
_
_

_

_

.

-

8
_
.
_

-

5
1
17
_
•
„
_

5
_
4
15
.
_
_
_

7

8

2

12
_
3
6

15
_
3
7

14
1
11
2

18
2
14
2

7
1
5
1

1
1
„

1

14

6

5

2

3
2

1
1

_
_
_

.
3
1
2

_
11
3
8

5
7
3
4

1
9

1
6

3
3

1
3

2

9

6

3

3

_

_

_

_

„

_

9
2
7

9
4
5

5

1
1

3
_

_
_

4

1

1
1

_
_

„
*

_

z
m

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(12 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n ) ---------------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B -----------------W o m e n ----------------------------- . . . . . . . ------M e n -------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B ---------------------------------------------------W o m e n -------------------------------------------------M e n --------------------------------------------------------

S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d o f ta b le ,




_
_

5

6
6

6
1
5

3
3

..

_
.

_

.
.
_

_

.
.

_
.
_

_
.

_
_

T a b le 12. O ccu pa tion a l earnings: M inneapolis— St. Paul, Minn.1 Continued
—
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f fic e s a n d r e g i o n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f lif e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
At h u o i

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

Number
of
workers

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF-

$70
Weekly 2 Weekly
and
hours
earnings
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r
$75

$75

$80

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

$85

$90

$95

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

$300

$300

$80

and
over

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s —
C o n tin u e d
C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s A ------------------------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B -------------------------------------------------M e n ------------ ---------------------- ----------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s A
( a l l w o m e n ) ------------------------------- -------K eypunch o p e r a to r s , c la s s B
( a l l w o m e n ) ---------- --------------------------------T a p e l i b r a r i a n s ( a l l w o m e n ) ----------------- 1
4
3
2

32
29

3 7 .5 $ 2 2 6 .0 0
2 2 7 .5 0
3 8 .0

51
33

3 7 .5
3 8 .0

197.00
20 8 .0 0

46

3 7 .5

102.00

33
6

3 8 .0
3 8 .0

89.50
123.50

_
-

_

1
1

_

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

9

20

4

2

4

6

!
3

1

4
1

5
2

4
2

..

11
10

3
2

5
5

4
4

2
2

7
5

16
13

7
5

5
5

_

..

-

-

-

2

1
-

7

13

-

2
-

6
5

_

-

-

1 T h e M in n e a p o l is - S t. P a u l S ta n d a r d M e tr o p o lita n S t a ti s t i c a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f A n o k a , D a k o ta , H e n n e p in , R a m s e y , a n d W a s h in g to n C o u n tie s .
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o rk w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d th e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e ro u n d e d
to t h e n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s to th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 1 a t $ 3 0 0 t o $ 3 2 0 ; 2 a t $ 3 2 0 to $ 3 4 0 ; 1 a t $ 3 4 0 to $ 3 6 0 ; 3 a t $ 3 8 0 to $ 4 0 0 ; a n d 2 a t $ 4 2 0 t o $ 4 4 0 .
4 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in c la s s if i c a t io n in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .




T a b le 13. O ccupational earnings: N ew Y ork and Newark, N .Y .— N .J.1
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s a n d r e g i o n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f lif e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Avebacm
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

Number
of
workers

$80
Weekly Weekly 2 a n d
earnings
hours
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r
$90

$90

$100 $110

$120 $ 130

$ 140 $ 150

$ 1 6 0 $ 170

$180 $190

$200 $220

$ 2 4 0 $260

$280 $300

$320 $340

$360 $380

$100

$110 $ 120

$ 1 3 0 $ 140

$ 150 $ 160

$ 170 $ 180

$ 1 9 0 $200

$220 $ 2 4 0

$260 $280

$300 $320

$340 $360

$380

and
over

S e l e c t e d i n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
62

M e n -----------------------------------------------------A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s B -------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s A ---------------------W o m e n ------------------------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s A -------W o m e n ----------- -----—----------———-----------M e n — -------- — -------- -——------ -—-------——
U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s A --------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------------ -— -——
M e n ----------—-----------------——------------ -----U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B --------------------------W o m e n ------- -— ---------------—— ——— — —
M e n -----------------------------------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s C --------------------------W o m e n ------------ ------------------ —— ----------M e n ------------------------------------------------------

59
51
48
21

7
14
85
52
33
22
6

16
126

36
90
84
38
46

36, 0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 5 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 5 .5
3 5 .5
3 5 .5

4 5 9 ,5 0
4 6 0 . 00
331. 50
334. 00
23 0 . 00
230. 50
230. 00
199. 50
1 9 1 .5 0
212 . 00
217. 50
2 6 3 .5 0
274. 50
221 . 00
2 0 8 . 00
226 . 00
176. 50
161. 50
189. 00

_

_

_

_

_

_

.
.
.

.
.
.

.
.
.
-

•
.
.
_
.

.
_
3
3
.

.
.
5
4

_
.

1

.

.
.
.
.
_

.
.
.

.
_
.
.
_
-

.
.
.
_

_
.
.

_
.
_
.

.
.
.
.

_

1
1

8
8

6
6

-

-

_
_

_
_

18
17

1

16

39
39

2
2

_

1
1

.
3
3
-

1

1

3
3
.

_
_
.
.
_
4
3
1

_
_

_
_
2
1
1

2
1
1
12
6
6

4
.
4

11

2

5

4
13
7

5

6

6

12
1
11

12
8

_
_
9
4
5

_
_
16
5
11
10
6

4

-

-

-

-

42
39
3
29
29

45
39

23

8

6

10

5

9

5

5
5

2

3

8
1

24
14

.

.

3

_

1

_

1
21
11
10
2
2

_
24

.
17

6

6
11
8

_
_
_
5

2
1

_
1

_

1

4
4

3 b e>
L•
7
7

«,
_
_
_

_
_
_

8
2
6

6
2

2
2

5

«,

_

_

8

-

-

-

-

_
„
_
-

_

_

_

„

10
10

9
9

59
3
3

_

12
11

4
4
_
4

_
_
„
_

_
_

..
_
_
_

_

4
34
5
29

_

8
2
6

_
5
5
7
3
4
_
_
_

_

18

l

16

6
1

5
23
16
7

_
4

7
2

_

_
_
_

_

_
„
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

-

-

-

m

_
_

_

_

l

20

_
1
1

.

_
_
.
.
7

.
_
3
_
3

_

S e l e c t e d g e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A ----------------W o m e n ------— —------------------------------- ——
M e n -----------------------------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B ----------------C l e r k s , f ile , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) ---------C l e r k s , f ile , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) ---------C l e r k s , f ile , c l a s s C -----------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------------------------M e n —------- — ------------- —------------ -— — —
S e c r e t a r i e s ( a l l w o m e n ) 5 ---------------------C la s s A — ------------------------------- —---------C l a s s B -----------------------------------------------C l a s s C — _________________________ -—
C l a s s D -----------------------------------------------S te n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n ) -----S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n io r ( a l l w o m e n ) -------T ra n s c rib in g -m a c h in e o p e ra to rs ,
g e n e r a l (1 0 1 w o m e n a n d 1 m ----------an)
T y p i s ts , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) -----------------

167
140
27
117
111
6
88

152
441
4 13
28
1, 398
96
374
45 8
461
285
352

3 6 .0 1 3 1 .0 0
3 5 .5 1 2 8 .0 0
3 6 .0 145. 00
3 5 .5 1 1 3 .0 0
3 5 . 5 112. 50
3 5 .5 125. 00
3 6 .0 1 2 3 .0 0
3 6 .0 106. 50
3 6 .0
9 2 . 50
3 5 .5
9 2 .5 0
3 6 .0
9 4 .5 0
3 6 .0 1 6 1 .5 0
3 6 .0 220. 00
3 6 .0 185. 50
3 6 .0 155. 50
3 6 .0 135. 50
3 6 .0 1 0 9 .0 0
3 6 .0 1 3 1 .0 0

_
1

5
188
4 178

14
2
6

.
1
3
-

36
156
147
9
4
_
4
48
2

10
1

1

6

18
17

3
3

5
3
5

3

2

1
6
6

25

3
4

_

1

9
47
87
80
7
5
.

50
8
6
2
68

2
2

-

no
-

4
103
14

15
53
88
35

30
79
40
113

1

1

198

4
40
146
3
97

.

•

-

175
14
53
107

181
18
116
47

158
35
108
13

138
4
59

126
2
110

68

7

14
.

80

4

_

_

_

7

2

.

_

_

_

66

4
51
11
.

109
33
74
2
.

39
34
5
_
.

17
15

_

•

_

_

_
_
_

2

3
2
1

_

«
*
_

_
.
_
_

.

.

_

_

_
_

_

„

.
_
„

.

m

_
_

102
658
636

3 6 .0
3 6 .0
3 6 .0

123. 00
109 . 6 0
98. 50

32
84

14
90
302

19
237
163

28
196
67

14
72
20

9
28

5
3

3

3

3

1

-

1

2

.

_

_

.

_

_

.

74
270
233
124
121

3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .0
3 6 .0

1 7 9 .0 0
1 7 0 .5 0
1 7 0 .5 0
1 5 5 .5 0
1 5 6 .5 0

"

13
11

3
3

5
5
1
1

17
15
4
4

29
‘8
2
4
4

3
30
24
15
15

18
22
19
15
14

15
19
13
31
31

13
24
18
12
12

6
44
38
20
20

5
38
34
6
6

5
39
36
.

7
3
3
-

2
.
_
.
-

•
.
.
.

_
_

.
_

_

.
_

.

-

-

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A
(6 5 m e n a n d 9 w o m e n ) --------------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B ---------------M e n ------—— ------- — —------------ ------- -—
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C ---------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------S e e f o o tn o te s a t e n d o f t a b le .




-

“

_
„

-

-

“

-

T a b le 13. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: New Y o rk and Newark, N .Y.— N.J.1 C ontinued
—
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s a n d r e g i o n a l h e a d o f f i c e s o f lif e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A nuoi

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

Number
of
workers

$90
$80
Weekly2 Weekly 2 a n d
hours
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r
$ 9 0 $100

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

$300

$320

$340

$360

$380
and

$110

$120

$130

$140 $150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

$300

$320

$340

$360

$380

over

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s —
C o n tin u e d
C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s A ---------------------------------------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B ---------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -------------------------------------------------M e n ------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s C ----------------------------------------------------W o m e n ------------------------------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c la s s A
-------------------------------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c la s s B
-------------------------------------------------------W o m e n -------------------------------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s C --------------------------------------------------------M en
---------------------------------------------------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s A
(272 w o m e n a n d 1 m a n ) ---------------------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s B
(a ll w om en)
-----------------------------------------------T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e ra to rs ,
c la s s A
--------------------------------------------------M en
----------------------------------------------------T a b u la tin g -m a c h in e o p e ra to rs ,
c l a s s B ----------------------------------------------------M en
-----------------------------------------------------1 T he N ew
2 S ta n d a rd
to t h e n e a r e s t h a lf
3 W o rk e rs
4 In c lu d e s
5 In c lu d e s
6 W o rk e rs

132
49

3 6 .0 $ 2 6 2 .5 0
3 6 .0
2 5 5 .0 0

397
191
206

3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5

187
56
131

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

7
5

14
5

25
15

20

9
3

17
9

29

6

8

13

61
28
33

153
72
81

70
35
35

56
27
29

37

18
3
15

20

39

25

-

_

-

_

_

_

_
_

>

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
-

_

_

_

-

_

-

212.00

-

-

-

-

2 1 2 .5 0
212.00

-

-

-

-

3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5

184.00
184.00
184.50

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

167
26
141

3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 6 .5

3 1 7 .0 0
3 0 3 .5 0
3 1 9 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

244
63
181

3 6 .5
3 6 .5
3 6 .5

2 7 3 .0 0
2 7 1 .5 0
2 7 3 .5 0

_
_

_
-

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

14

3 5 .5
3 5 .5

2 3 0 .0 0
2 3 1 .0 0

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_
_

-

_

10

-

-

_
>

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

_
_

_
-

_
_

-

-

_
-

_

1
1
_

2
1
1

19
5
14

10

12

27

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

37

16

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

.
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

66

37

15

1

5

*25

14
52

32

14

1

4

23

13
3

7

4

1
6

6
2

10 |

8
2
6

4

4

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

1
_
1

,
_
12
2
10

_

-

_

6

_

5

_
_
_

_
_
_

1
_
1

30

46

10
20

82
15
67

30

47
14
33

2
2

_
_

6

3

_
_

2
2

4
3

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17

56

52

113

15

15

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

85

100

102

48

19

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

172
71

3 6 .0
3 6 .5

13 9 .0 0
13 8 .5 0

_

4
_

2

6

50
25

57
18

9
7

_

_

_

_

_

5

21
10

23

_

134
74

3 6 .0
3 6 .0

1 2 4.00

-

5
3

6

20
16

57
36

29
9

7
5

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_
_
_

_

5

-

_
_

_
_

_

10

_

_

_
_

_

-

1 1 8.00

-

_

2
1
1

13
4
9

10 9 .0 0

_

_
_

11

3 6 .0

-

_
_

28

3 5 .5

5

_
_

9

364

122.00

_
_

_

11

273

6

_

27
4

59

16

5

Y o r k a n d N e w a rk S ta n d a r d M e tr o p o lita n S t a ti s t i c a l A r e a s c o n s i s t of N ew Y o r k C ity a n d N a s s a u , R o c k la n d , S u ffo lk , W e s t c h e s t e r C o u n tie s , N . Y. a n d E s s e x , M o r r i s a n d U nion C o u n tie s , N .J .
h o u r s r e f l e c t t h e w o rk w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d th e e a rn in g s c o r r e s p o n d t o t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s . A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e ro u n d e d
h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s to th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l l a r .
w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 20 a t $ 3 8 0 to $ 4 2 0 ; 14 a t $ 4 2 0 to $ 4 6 0 ; 11 a t $ 4 6 0 to $ 5 0 0 ; 14 a t $ 5 0 0 to $ 5 4 0 ; a n d 3 a t $ 5 4 0 to $ 5 8 0 .
12 w o r k e r s a t $ 7 0 to $ 8 0 .
d a ta f o r w o r k e r s in c la s s if i c a t io n in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s f o llo w s : 10 a t $ 3 8 0 to $ 4 2 0 ; 14 a t $ 4 2 0 to $ 4 6 0 ; a n d 1 a t $ 4 6 0 to $ 5 0 0 .




T a b le 14. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: N ew Y o rk City, N .Y .1
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f f ic e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

A vn u o i

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

Number
at
workers

$90

$100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

$300

$320

$340

$360

$380

$ 100

$110

$120

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

$300

$320

$340

$360

$380

over

-

_

_

-

-

-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_

”

$80
Weekly
Weekly
and
hours 2 earnings,4
(Standard) (Standard) tin d e r
$90

■

_
_
_
1
"

_
_
_
8
“

18
17
37
37
5
47
84
78
3

42
39
24
24
14
49
6
6
48

41
35
15
15
24
14
2
2
58

21
18
3
3
25
_

_

>

_

_

_

_

.

_

156

159

166

127

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

24
34
38
104

9
47
103

14
109
43

14
100
13

20
1

15
33
76
18

1
33
122
3
97

35
32
3

1
2
86
2

61
1
49
11

99
25
74

_
_

131
3
53
68
7

118

_
_

1

2

_

-

and

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s A (4 9 m e n a n d
A c t u a r i e s , c l a s s B --------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B --------------------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s C --------------------------M e n ------------------------------------------------------

51
40
37
114
32
82
66
32

35. 5 $ 4 6 0 . 00
3 5 .5 32 6 . 50
3 5 .5 3 2 9 .5 0
36. 0 22 0 . 00
36. 0 20 6 . 00
3 5 .5 225. 50
35. 0 174. 00
35. 0 188. 50

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_
6

_
_
6
5

3
_
3
7
4

12
8
4
12
5

9
4
5
6
5

16
5
11
10
4

20
4
16
4
3

12
4
8
6
6

1
1

1

1

_

3
3

-

_

_

-

-

3

-

_

1
1
31
5
26
-

4
2
7
2
5

■

_

-

9
8
_
_

-

5
5
4
_
4
_

■

~

-

-

-

_
_
-

-

“

■

~

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17
15
2

3
2
1

_
_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

“

“

"

“

~

~

~

~

39
36

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
1

6
3

23
13

59
20

27
4

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

56
27
29

2
1
1

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

7
7
-

7
7
_
-

3 51
1
1
_
_
-

6
6
_
_
_
“

S e l e c t e d g e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A -------------W o m e n --------------------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B -------------W o m e n ---------------------------------------------C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) ----C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) ----C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s C --------------------------W o m e n --------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s ( a l l w o m e n ) --------------------C l a s s A ------------------------------------------C l a s s B ------------------------------------------C l a s s C ------------------------------------------C l a s s D ------------------------------------------S te n o g ra p h e rs , g e n e ra l (a ll w om en) ~
S te n o g ra p h e rs , s e n io r (a ll w om en) —
T ra n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e o p e ra to rs ,
g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n ) --------------------------T y p i s ts , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) -----------T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) -------------

j

136
119
93
88
74
145
399
385
1, 181
78
324
422
357
223
313

35. 5
35. 5
3 5 .5
3 5 .5
35. 5
36. 0
35. 5
3 5 .5
36. 0
35. 5
3 5 .5
3 5 .5
36. 0
36. 0
35. 5

1 2 3 .5 0
1 2 2 .5 0
110. 00
1
109. 00
127. 00
107. 00
9 3. 00 4 155
93. 00 155
1 6 4 .5 0
2 2 5 . 50
188. 50
156. 00
_
138. 50
110. 50
133. 50

80

4

7

76
560
505

35. 5
3 6 .0
3 5 .5

129. 00
111. 50
100. 50

_
1
17

6
41
249

7
224
152

24
193
67

12
70
20

9
28
“

5
3
~

3

3

3

1

_

_

-

_

“

“

■

194
165

36. 0
3 6 .0

183. 50
1 8 4 .5 0

-

-

"

-

-

6
5

11
10

10
8

19
13

24
18

44
38

38
34

102

36. 0

166. 00

-

-

-

1

-

2

15

15

31

12

20

6

118
41

35. 5
3 5 .5

2 6 6 . 50
260. 50

247
123
124

36. 0
3 6. 0
36. 0

2 2 1 .0 0
22 0 . 50
22 1 . 00

84
13
71

3 5 .5
36. 0
3 5 .5

337. 00
3 1 3 .5 0
341. 50

122
37
85

3 5 .5
35. 5
3 5 .5

2 9 4 . 50
28 7 . 00
29 7 . 50

_

10
8
_

35
152
144
_

8
5
3
3

_

104
14

_

-

~

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B -------------M e n ---------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C
(101 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n ) ---------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s A ------------------------------------------------W o m e n ----------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B ------------------------------------------------W o m e n ----------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s A ------------------------------------------------W o m e n ----------------------------------------------M e n ---------------------------------------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B ------------------------------------------------W o m e n ----------------------------------------------M e n ---------------------------------------------------S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

3

_

6
6
-

25
12
13

81
40
41

68
34
34

_

6
3
3

_

_

_

_

3
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

~

-

1

-

-

-

1
_

2

8

2

6

24
6
18

9
1
8

10
1
9

1

5
1
4

5 25
2
23

15
5
10

10
7
3

47
14
33

13
3
10

8
2
6

7
1
6

6
2
4

4
_
4

2
1

11

1

8

3

T a b le 14. O ccupational earnings: N ew Y o rk City, N .Y .1 Continued
—
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 2 of e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f fic e s and r e g io n a l h e a d o f fic e s o f lif e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OP WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF—

$90
O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

and
(Standard) u n d e r
$90

$100

$110

$ 12 0

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$18

$190

$200

$22 0

$240

$260

$280

$30 0

$320

$340

$360

$3 8 0

$100

$110

$ 12 0

$130

$140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$2 6 0

$2 80

$300

$320

$340

$3 6 0

$380

over

a nd

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s —
C o n tin u e d
C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a ly s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s C --------------------------------------------------M e n ----------------------------------------------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s A
(191 w o m e n a n d 1 m a n ) -----------------------K eypunch o p e ra to rs , c la s s B
( a l l w o m e n ) -------------------------------------------

3 6 .0 $ 2 3 7 . 00
36. 0 2 4 2 .0 0
192

36. 0

326

3 5 .5

1 2 1 .5 0

35

110. 5Q

100

1 N e w Y o r k C ity ( th e 5 b o r o u g h s ) .
2 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t th e w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e d t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s a n d th e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
th e n e a r e s t h a lf h o u r a n d a v e r a g e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s to th e n e a r e s t h a lf d o l la r .
3 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 16 a t $ 3 8 0 to $ 4 2 0 ; 11 a t $ 4 2 0 to $ 4 6 0 ; 10 a t $ 4 6 0 to $ 5 0 0 ; 12 a t $ 5 0 0 to $ 5 4 0 ; a n d 2 a t $ 5 4 0 to $ 5 8 0 .
4 I n c lu d e s 12 w o r k e r s a t $ 7 0 to $ 8 0 .
5 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s fo llo w s : 10 a t $ 3 8 0 to $ 4 2 0 ; 14 a t $ 4 2 0 to $ 4 6 0 ; a n d 1 a t $ 4 6 0 to $ 5 0 0 .




A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s a r e r o u n d e d to

T a b le 15. O ccupational earnings: P hiladelphia, Pa.—N .J.1
( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s a n d e a r n i n g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s a n d r e g i o n a l h e a d o f f i c e s o f lif e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

A m in

O c c u p a tio n a n d s e x

Number
of
workers

$55
and
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r
$60

$60

$65

$70

$75

$80

$90

$100

$11 0

$120

$130

$ 140

$15 0

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

$65

$70

$75

$80

$90

$10 0

$110

$12 0

$13 0

$140

$150

$16 0

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

over

_
_
_

_
3
3

_
_
_

_
5
4

_
3
2

1
2
2

1
3
3

4
1
1

2
_
_

2
_
_

1
.
_

1
1
1

1
2
2

3
1
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
.
_

and

S e l e c t e d i n s u r a n c e o c c u p a tio n s
C l a im a p p r o v e r s , c l a s s B:
M e n ---- ------------- ------ ---------------------------C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s A -------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------C l e r k s , c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , c l a s s B (6 9
w o m e n a n d 1 m a n ) ---------- -------------------C l e r k s , p o l ic y e v a lu a t io n (25 w o m e n
a n d 1 m a n ) --------------------------------------------P r e m i u m a c c e p t o r s ( a l l w o m en )
U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s A (2 4 m e n a n d 1
w o m a n ) ----------------------------- ----- --------------U n d e r w r i t e r s , c l a s s B (21 m e n a n d 1
w o m a n ) -------- ----------------------------------------

16
21
18

3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

$ 1 7 6 .5 0
.1 3 9 .0 0
1 3 6 .0 0

_
_

_
_

.
.
.

_
_

_
_
_

70

3 7 .0

1 1 7 .5 0

_

_

.

_

_

11

18

15

8

3

11

3

1

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

26
45

3 7 .0
3 7 .0

1 0 5 .0 0
9 4 .5 0

.
.

_
3

1
1

2
22

8
7

8
2

4
5

2
3

_
1

1
1

_
_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

25

3 6 .5

2 4 8 .0 0

_

22

3 7 .0

1 9 7 .5 0

62
62
58
23

3 5 .5
3 4 .0
3 4 .5
3 6 .0

1 0 8 .5 0
7 3 .5 0
7 4 .0 0
8 5 .5 0

_

90
153
12
52
49
77
28

3 5 .5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0
3 6 .5
3 7 .0
3 4 .5
3 5 .0

7 7 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0
1 6 4 .0 0
1 4 2 .5 0
1 2 3 .0 0
8 9 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0

26

23
46
154

3 7 .5
3 6 .0
3 5 .5

9 7 .0 0
1 0 3 .0 0
8 2 .5 0

_

_

_

.

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

2

2

10

3

2

36

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

3

2

2

3

6

5

-

-

-

_
12
12
_

.
20
20
4

_
6
2
1

.
1
1
1

16
19
19
9

17
2
2
5

10
1
1
3

2
1
1
_

_
_
_
_

5
_
_
_

2
_
_

5
_
_
_

3
_
_
_

2
.
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
.
_
_

_
_
_
_

2
_
_
_
_
.

.
.
_
.
.
10
.

_
.
_
_
_
12
_

_
_
_
_
_
8
_

51
_
_
_
_
12
3

11
7
_
2
5
6
4

_
18
_
6
10
18
1

_
23
4
8
5
9

_
37
1
8
8
4
6

_
20
2
6
9
1
2

_
17
2
8
4
1
2

_
11
3
4
3
1

_
3
_
2
1
.
_

_
7
1
6
_
_
_

_
2
_
2
_
_

_
5
_
4
1
_

_
3
3
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
.
.
_

_
_
28

_
.
20

.
1
4

_
2
1

4
5
38

14
13
49

2
12
11

2
7
2

1
5
-

_
.
1

_
1
-

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

_
_
-

.
_

-

.
_
-

_
_

-

.
_
-

_
_

-

-

_
_
-

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

4

_

1

_

_

_

_

S e l e c t e d g e n e r a l c l e r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s
C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s A (61 w o m e n
a n d 1 m a n ) --------------------------------------------C l e r k s , a c c o u n tin g , c l a s s B -----------------W o m e n -----------------------------------------------C l e r k s , f il e , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) ------ C l e r k s , f i l e , c l a s s C (89 w o m e n a n d
1 m a n ) ---------------------------------------------------S e c r e t a r i e s 4( a l l w o m e n ) ----------------------C l a s s A .................................................................
C l a s s B -----------------------------------------------C l a s s C .................................................................
S t e n o g r a p h e r s , g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n ) ---S t e n o g r a p h e r s , s e n i o r ( a l l w o m e n ) -----T r a n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e o p e r a to r s ,
g e n e r a l ( a l l w o m e n ) __________________
T y p i s t s , c l a s s A ( a l l w o m e n ) ---------------T y p i s t s , c l a s s B ( a l l w o m e n ) ----------------

_
_

_
_
.
_

S e l e c t e d E D P - r e l a t e d o c c u p a tio n s
C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s A (1 6 m e n
a n d 1 w o m a n ) ----------------------------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s B
( a l l m e n ) --------------------------- -------------------C o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s , c l a s s C
( a l l m e n ) -----------------------------------------------C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s A --------------------------------------------------M e n ........................................................................
C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s B -------------------------------------------------M e n ........................................................................
C o m p u te r p r o g r a m e r s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s C -------------------------------------------------W o m e n --------------------------- ------------------C o m p u te r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s , b u s i n e s s ,
c l a s s A (11 m e n a n d 1 w o m a n ) ------------

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f t a b le .




17

3 7 .5

1 6 7 .5 0

21

3 7 .5

1 3 8 .0 0

_

1

3

2

2

4

7

1

4

3

3

2

1

16

3 8 .5

1 1 8 .5 0

_

_

_

1

_

_

3

2

8

2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

28
24

3 7 .0
3 6 .5

2 3 3 .0 0
2 3 4 .0 0

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
.

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
.

_
_

_
_

1
1

_
_

_
_

1
1

7
5

8
7

6
5

3
3

2
2

28
17

3 7 .5
3 7 .0

1 9 4 .0 0
1 8 6 .0 0

.

_
.

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
.

_
_

1
1

_
_

_
_

1
1

_
_

_
_

5
3

7
5

2
1

9
5

2
1

_
.

1
_

_
_

13
7

3 8 .0
3 7 .0

1 6 4 .5 0
1 6 1 .5 0

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

1
1

_
_

_
_

3
3

3
_

3
1

3
2

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

12

3 7 .0

2 7 9 .0 0

1

7

54

T a b le 15. O ccu p a tio n a l earnings: Philadelphia, P a.— N.J.1 Continued
—
(N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s 2 o f e m p lo y e e s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in h o m e o f f ic e s and r e g io n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME WEEKLY EARNINGS OF

Athuob
Number
of
worker*

$60

$65

$70

$75

$80

$90

$10 0

$110

$12 0

$13 0

$ 140

$150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

$60

Occupation-and sex

$65

$70

$75

$80

$90

$100

$110

$120

$130

$ 140

$ 150

$160

$170

$180

$190

$200

$220

$240

$260

$280

over

-

-

2
2

2
1

5
5

4
4

5
4

2
2

-

-

« — **

n- ^

$55
and
(Standard) (Standard) u n d e r

and

Selected E D P - related occupations—
Continued
Computer systems analysts, business,
class B - -------------------------------------------M e n -----------------------------------------------Keypunch operators, class A
(all wom en)--------------------------------------Keypunch operators, class B
(a ll w om e n )--------------------------- -----------

B u c k ,;
to

20
18

3 7 .0
3 7 .0

$209. 00
2 0 9 . 50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

21

3 6 .5

1 1 2 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

9

4

3

2

1

94

3 6 .5

98. 50

-

-

2

-

3

13

33

23

13

6

1

c s s s u ^ j . * 50""*1* * o< D eU w are “ d p u ii d e ip h i a c o u n tie s ’

their regU lir ,,rilg h * - tlme ,a U r i e ' and
W orkers were distributed as follows: 3 at $280 to $300; 1 at $300 to $320; and 2 at $320 to $340.
4 Includes data for workers in classification in addition to those shown separately.
5 W orkers were distributed as follows: 3 at $280 to $300 and 1 at $320 to $340.

3




earningS

•«

“ d c *m d-

—

hour.. Average weekly hour, are rounded

<* ■* . . «

T a b le 16. S c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u rs
( P e r c e n t o f n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f fic e e m p l o y e e s i n h o m e o f fic e s a n d r e g io n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f l if e i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s b y s c h e d u le d w e e k ly h o u r s , 1 U n ite d S t a te s , s e l e c t e d r e g i o n s a n d a r e a s , D e c e m b e r 1971)

W e e k ly h o u r s 1

R e g io n s

U n ite d
S t a te s 2

A ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f fic e e m p l o y e e s ------

N ew
E n g la n d

1

U n d e r 35 h o u r s

B o rd e r
S ta te s

100

100

M id d le
A tla n tic
100

100

4

--

I T l / V-----... .
O v e r 37 % a n d u n d e r 38 3/< h o u r s ----------------------

21
34
14
9
19

6
1
8

3 6 V4 h o u r s

9
10
12
12
40

"
"
2
15
29
54
“
“

■
■

S o u th ­
east

S o u th ­
w est

13
“
28
5
24
18
3
■
8

m ass
W est

P a c if i c

100

100

100

100

1
1
4

100

G reat
Lakes

11
8
59
2
12
9

8
5
21
4
32
31

4
2
56

16
3
15
15
34

38

3
14

22
11
21

8
30

S e le c te d a r e a s

A tla n ta

B a l ti m o r e

A ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f fic e e m p l o y e e s ------

100

100

U n d e r 35 h o u r s --------------------------------------------------35 h o u r s -------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 35 a n d u n d e r 36 % h o u r s ------------:-------------36 V4 h o u r s --------------------------- -----------------------------O v e r 3 6 V4 a n d u n d e r 37 V2 h o u r s ---------------------37 l k h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------O v e r 37 % a n d u n d e r 38 V4 h o u r s ----------------------3 8 % h o u r s ---------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 8 % a n d u n d e r 4 0 h o u r s ------------------------4 0 h o u r s —------—— ------------------------------------------------

.

B o s to n

C h ic a g o

D a l la s

D es
M o in e s

H a r tf o r d

100

100

100

H o u s to n

Jackson­
v ille

Los
A n g e le s L ong B each
and
A n a h e im ^
S a n ta A n a G a rd e n
G ro v e

M in n e ­
a p o lis —
S t. P a u l

N ew Yo•rk a n d
N ev / a r k

T o ta l

N ew
Y o rk
C ity

100

100

100

_

23
41
17
4

27
52

6

100

100

100

100

-

_

_

_

_

_

2

8

.

_

_
_

4

_

_

3

12

_
_

_
77

16

16

_

40

9

_
_

46
34

49

19
5
70

_
14
_
34
47

3
17
80
_
_
_

6
_
_

38
33

6

_

_
_
_

12

■

■

4

20

54

-

-

71
-

18

1 D a ta r e l a t e t o t h e p r e d o m i n a n t w o r k s c h e d u le f o r f u ll- tim e d a y - s h i f t e m p lo y e e s i n e a c h e s ta b l is h m e n t .
2 I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r t h e M o u n ta in r e g i o n i n a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .

NO TE : B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l i t e m s m a y n ot equal 100.




_

_
_
_

_

100

_

86

_

18
2

17

_

_

3

2

"

_

_
_
4
_
67
29
-

16

21

_
_

_

100
10
6

34
12

38
_

_

-

P h ila ­
d e lp h ia

_

-

-

T a b le 17. P a id h o lid a y s
( P e r c e n t o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y o f fic e e m p lo y e e s in h o m e o f fic e s and r e g io n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s w ith fo r m a l p r o v is io n s f o r p a id h o lid a y s , U n ited S t a te s ,
s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
N um b er of
p a id h o lid a y s
A ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f fic e e m p lo y e e s •

R e g io n s
B o rd er
S ta te s

100

100

100

100

100
(1
2)
1
( 2)
3
3
U
2
7
5
10
2
10
1
11
1
24
2
2

100

100
_

M id d le
W est

P a c if ic

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

100

_
_

G reat
Lakes

100

M id d le
A tla n tic

S o u th ­
w est

100

N ew
E n el and

-

S ta te s 1

E m p lo y e e s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id h o l i d a y s -----------------------------------------------4 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------5 days 5 d a y s p l u s 1 h a l f d a y ---------6 d a y s -----------------------------------6 d a y s p lu s 1 o r 2 h a l f d a y s
7 d a y s ----------------------------------7 d a y s p lu s 1 o r 2 h a l f d a y s
8 d a y s -----------------------------------8 d a y s p lu s 1 ,2 o r 3 h a l f d a y s ■
9 d a y s -------9 d a y s p lu s 1 o r 2 h a l f d a y s •
10 d a y 8 •
10 d a y s p lu s 1 h a l f d a y 11 d a y s -------------------------11 d a y s p lu s 1 h a l f d a y 12 d a y s -------------------------12 d a y s p lu s 1 h a l f d a y 13 d a y s -------------------------13 d a y s p lu s 1 h a l f d a y
14 d a y s --------------------------

_

19
15

_

”

-

-

-

-

14

12

_

1
1
62
7
6
13
(*)

5

-

1

_

45
2

10

_

5

_

6
6
1

-

1
2
1

25

-

_

_

"

"

-

( 2)

23

<*)

-

100
1
3
2
19
4
32
2
8
7

-

25
11
6

_

_
_

7
1
3
7
36
8
10

-

1

_
_

5

24

_

_

S o u th ­
east

-

"

3
10
11
1
14
19
14
2
8
6
6

-

-

42
4
21
12
16

-

7
11
8
9
-

-

3
-

6
■

3

-

-

-

-

-

63

-

"

S e le c te d a r e a s

A tla n ta

A ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f fic e e m p lo y e e s —
E m p lo y e e s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id h o l i d a y s ---------------------------------------— -----6
d a y s -------------------- ------------- -------— -------6 d a y s p lu s 1 o r 2 h a l f d a y s ----------------------7 d a y s ----------— -------------------------------- ------- —
7 d a y s p lu s 1 o r 2 h a l f d a y s ---------------------8 d a y s ---------------------------------------- -----------------8 d a y s p lu s 1 ,2 o r 3 h a l f d a y s -----------------9 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------9 d a y s p l u s 1 o r 2 h a l f d a y s ---------------------10 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------11 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------11 d a y s p lu s 1 h a l f d a y ------------------------------12 d a y s -------------------------------------------------- -----12 d a y s p lu s 1 h a l f d a y ------------------------------13 d a y s — ------------- -------------------------------------13 d a y s p lu s 1 h a l f d a y ----------------------------

B a l ti m o r e

B o s to n

D a lla s

D es
M o in e s

H a r tf o r d

H o u s to n

Jackson­
v i ll e

M in n e ­
a p o lis —
S t. P a u l

T o ta l

N ew
Y o rk
C ity

N ew Y o rk a n d
N e w a rk
P h ila ­
d e lp h ia

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

19
e
D
73

100
2

100

-

100
2

100

-

88

-

21

23

*

-

-

-

-

3

12

_

27

18
49

_
_

34
47

12

14

_
_
-

-

6

.
_

-

_
_

_

_

22

-

-

23
34

-

_
-

82

21

-

-

24
37

18

_
_

_
-

_
_

_
_

.
-

1 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r t h e M o u n ta in r e g io n i n a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
2 L e s s th a n 0. 5 p e rc e n t.

NO T E : B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , su m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y n o t eq u a l 100,




C h ic a g o

Los
A n g e le s L ong B each
and
A n a h e im —
S a n ta A n a G a rd e n
G ro v e

10

9

'

.
-

-

_
38

-

-

7

_

_

_

3
3

_

_
-

28

_

5

12

18

( 2)

-

-

-

-

-

8

3

3

-

-

-

-

1

-

49

60

69

_

_
_

1
1

72

89

-

44

1
6
16

17
43

3
•

_
-

_
-

12

2

10
21

6

"

T a b le 18. P a id v a ca tio n s
( P e r c e n t o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y o f fic e e m p lo y e e s in h o m e o f fic e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f f i c e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s w ith f o r m a l p r o v is io n s f o r p a id v a c a tio n s a f t e r s e le c t e d p e r io d s o f s e r v i c e ,
U n ited S t a te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , D e c e m b e r 1971)

V a c a tio n p o l ic y

A ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f fic e e m p l o y e e s -------

U n ite d
S ta te s 1

R e g io n s
N ew
E n g la n d

M id d le
A tla n tic

B o rd e r
S ta te s

S o u th ­
east

S o u th ­
w est

G re a t
L akes

M id d le
W est

P a c if i c

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
99
1

100
100
"

100
100
”

100
100
"

100
100
-

100
100
"

100
94
6

100
100
"

100
100
~

3
( 3)
92
1
5

_
_
78
_
22

( 3)
1
98
_
_

1
72
26
-

8
1
91
-

1
99
-

7
93
-

2
98
-

100
-

1
46
33
18
1

_
14
15
70
2

_
18
74
7
2

41
53
7
-

77
19
3
-

80
14
6
-

6
75
15
4
-

98
2
-

45
47
8
-

1
9
4
71
2
13

5
6
31
2
56

1
( 3)
92
5
2

22
24
54
-

22
2
75
1

34
13
50
•3

6
2
2
88
2
1

28
4
68
-

5
95
-

1
2
2
55
19
19
1

_
1
5
21
7
63
2

-

6
1
68
14
11
-

15
2
60
12
11
-

6
75
13
6
-

2
73
2
23
-

58
38

2

3
20
59
18
-

3
2
17
( 3)
71
1
5

1
5
17
_
57
2
18

1
94

3
18
15
6
58

6
42
52

10
2
33
-

3

-

-

2

-

-

6
18
2
74
-

2
25
71
2

7
93
-

2
2
10
56
14
16
1
( 3)

1
9
16
11
63

1
7 8.
16

3
18
11
60
8

6
23
56
14

6
5
72
12
5
-

2
21
62
13
2

7
57
36
-

M e th o d o f p a y m e n t
E m p lo y e e s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g
p a id v a c a t i o n s ---------------------------------------------------L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t --------------------------------P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t --------------------------------------A m o u n t o f v a c a tio n p a y 2
A fte r 1 y e a r of s e rv ic e :
1 w e e k --------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ------- ----------------------2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s -----------------------------3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------A fte r 5 y e a rs of s e rv ic e :
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ----------------------------2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s -----------------------------3 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ----------------------------A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s -----------------------------2 w e e k s -------------- ------- ---------------------------------. ---O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ----------------- — -------3 w e e k s — -------- -------------------- — —— ---------— —
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ----------------- -------- —
4 w e e k s ............................... .........................— -------- —
A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s -----------------------------2 w e e k s — ------------------- — --------------------- — ----O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ----------------------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------------------- --------------O v er 3 and u n d er 4 w eeks — —
...............................
4 w e e k s — ------------------------------- ------ — — ————
O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s ----------------------------A f t e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s -----------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------- ---------------—
------------------------O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s -----------------------------4 w e e k s --- -----------------------------------------------— ----O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s -----------------------------5 w e e k s ----- ---------------------------------------------- ------A f t e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------—--------------O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ----------- ----------------3 w e e k s -------- -------------------------- ------—------- —----4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s -----------------------------5 w e e k s ----------------- ---------------— -----------------------O v e r 5 a n d u n d e r 6 w e e k s ------- ---------------------6 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------S e e fo o tn o te s a t en d o f ta b le .




-

-

_
55
39

4

3

-

-

2
"

-

“

“

44
11
10
2
32

33
12
11
"

'

4
-

'

T a b le 18. P a id v a c a t io n s — Continued
( P e r c e n t o f non s u p e r v is o r y o f fic e e m p lo y e e s in h o m e o f fic e s and r e g io n a l h e a d o f f ic e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s w ith fo r m a l p r o v is io n s f o r p aid v a c a tio n s a f te r s e le c t e d p e r io d s o f s e r v i c e s ,
U n ited S t a te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
S e le c te d a r e a s

V a c a tio n p o l ic y

Los
A n g e le s Long B each
M in n e and
a p o lis —
A n a h e im —
S a n ta Anar— S t. P a u l
G a rd e n
G ro v e

A tla n ta

A ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f fic e e m p l o y e e s -------

B a ltim o r e

B o s to n

C h ic a g o

D a lla s

D es
M o in e s

H a r tf o r d

H o u s to n

Jack so n ­
v ille

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

12
88
-

6
94
-

100
-

100
-

100
-

8
92
-

58
42

100
-

91
_
9
-

100
-

2
18
80
-

65
32
2
-

92
8
-

94
6
-

8
89
4

69
_
22
_
9

13
87
-

2
37
61

6
6
80
6
2

20
19
61
-

70
12
18
-

69
31
-

6
7
50
_
36
-

3
18
78
-

71
21
9
-

15
85
-

69
31
-

13
87
-

1
99
-

38
6
57
-

29
71
_
-

13
87
_
-

1
3
18
78
-

_
_
_
-

6
94
"

1
3
97
■

N ew Y o rk a nd
N e w a rk
P h ila ­
d e lp h ia

T o ta l

N ew
Y o rk
C ity

100

100

100

100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

22
78
-

100
-

4
96
-

100
-

100
-

4
10
87
-

39
49
12
-

38
60
3
-

8
89
3
-

56
44
-

3
88
6
3

4
85
7
3

86
14
■

24
4
72

19
70
12

7
2
91
-

100
-

100
-

91
6
3

“
93
4
3

2
98
-

8
76
6
10
-

24
72
4

16
23
49
12
-

2
38
60
-

28
72
-

45
55
-

48
46
3
3

"
59
34
4
3

_
90
10
-

13
14
73
-

8
66
26
-

24
38
4
34

21
67
12

35
65
-

11
89
-

13
87
-

( 3)
94
4
3

97
3

~
100
-

7
56
21
17
-

13
9
78
-

8
54
28
10
-

16
8
76
-

21
18
49
12
-

35
5
60
-

11
20
69
-

13
44
44
-

( 3)
78
20
3

97
3

79
21

7
56
38
~

13
9
78
"

8.
54
28
10
"

-

21
18
61

35
5
60

11
20
69

13
44
44

( 3)
78
20
3

97
3

*
*
76
24

M e th o d o f p a y m e n t
E m p lo y e e s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t ------------------------------A m o u n t of v a c a tio n p a y 2
A fte r 1 y e a r of s e rv ic e :
1 w eek - O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ---------------------------2 w e e k s ------------------ ------- ------------------------------3 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------A fte r 5 y e a rs of s e rv ic e :
2 w e e k s --------------------- -----------------------------------O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ---------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ------------------- —
-----A f t e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s --------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ---------------------------4 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------A f t e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ---------------------------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ---------------------------4 w e e k s -------------------------------------- ----------O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s ---------------------------A f t e r 20 y e a r s of s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ------------------------------ —-------------------------O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s —---------------— — —
4 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s ---------------------------5 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------A fte r 2 5 y e a rs o f s e rv ic e :
2 w e e k s ----------------------------------- -------------- -------3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s ---------------------------5 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------- -----------O v e r 5 a n d u n d e r 6 w e e k s ---------------------------A f t e r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ---- -------------------------------- -----------------—
4 w e e k s -------------------------------- -------- -— -----------5 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------6 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------S e e fo o tn o t e s a t en d o f t a b le .




'

T a b le 18. P a id v a c a tio n s — C o n tin u e d
( P e r c e n t o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y o f fic e e m p lo y e e s in h o m e o f fic e s and r e g io n a l head o f f ic e s o f lif e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s w ith fo r m a l p r o v is io n s f o r p a id v a c a tio n s a f te r s e le c t e d p e r io d s o f s e r v i c e ,
U n ited S t a te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , D e c e m b e r 1971)

V a c a tio n p o l ic y

R e g io n s

U n ited
S ta te s 1

N ew
E n g la n d

B o rd e r
S ta te s -

M id d le
A tla n tic

S o u th ­
east

S o u th ­
w est

G re a t
Lakes

M id d le
W est

P a c if i c

10
2
32
33
_
24
_

6
5
72
_
16
_

2
_
21
62
_
13
2

_
7
57
36
_

10
2
32
33
_
11
_
12

6
5
72
_
5
_
12

2
_
5
78
_
13
2

A m o u n t o f v a c a t i o n p a y 1 C o n tin u e d
2—
A f t e r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e :
2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s -----------------------------3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s -----------------------------5 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------6 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------M a x im u m v a c a t i o n p a y a v a il a b le :
2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s -----------------------------3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s -----------------------------5 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------6 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 6 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------

1

2
2
10
56
2
28
1

1
77
_
20
2

-

2
2
9
46
1
28
1

1
9
16
4
64

1
1

3
18
9
62
8

-

-

9
166
68

5

-

-

-

3
18
9
55
8
7

-

1
44
_
40
2
13

-

6
23
56
_
14
6
_
23
56
-

_

-

-

•

14

-

-

-

_
7
31
26
_
36

S e le c te d a r e a s

A tla n ta

B a ltim o r e

B o s to n

C h ic a g o

D a l la s

D es
M o in e s

H a r tf o r d

H o u s to n

Los
A n g e le sLong B each
and
Jack so n ­
A n a h e im —
v i ll e
S a n ta A n a G a rd e n
G ro v e

N ew Y o rk and
N e w a rk
M in n e ­
a p o lis —
S t. P a u l

T o ta l

N ew
Y o rk
C ity

P h ila ­
d e lp h ia

A m o u n t o f v a c a t i o n p a y 2— C o n tin u e d
M a x im u m v a c a t i o n p a y a v a il a b le :
2 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------3 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------4 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------5 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------6 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------O v e r 6 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------

_

_

-

6
44
50

■

.

1
3
78

_

7
56
17

13
9
78

-

-

-

_

"

18

21

"

8

_
_

82
10
_

_
_
_

"

_
21
18
12
_

49

1 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r t h e M o u n ta in r e g i o n i n a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
2 P e r i o d s o f s e r v i c e w e r e a r b i t r a r i l y c h o o s e n a n d d o n o t n e c e s s a r i l y r e f l e c t th e in d iv id u a l e s ta b l is h m e n t p r o v is i o n s f o r p r o g r e s s i o n .
y e a r s o f s e r v i c e m a y i n c lu d e c h a n g e s i n p r o v is i o n s o c c u r r in g b e tw e e n 5 a n d 10 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e .
3 L e s s th a n 0. 5 p e rc e n t.
NO TE: B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not equal t o ta ls .




_

_

_

35
5

11
20

13
44

69

44

_
60

_
_

F o r e x a m p le ,

_
_

_

( 3)
37
44
3
16

_
45
52
3

_

_
76
24

_
-

t h e c h a n g e s i n p r o p o r t io n s in d ic a te d a t 10

T a b le 19. H ealth , in su ra n ce , and retirem ent p la n s
( P e r c e n t o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y o f fic e e m p lo y e e s in h o m e o f fic e s and r e g io n a l h ea d o f fic e s o f l if e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s w ith s p e c if ie d h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , and r e tir e m e n t p la n s,
U n ite d S t a te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
U n ited
S t a te s 2

M id d le
A tla n tic

100

100

100

99
50

100
43

100
60

84
27

92
58
32
69
17
99
37
99
37
99
37
99
36
98
98
84

100
80
37
71
20
100
37
100
37
100
37
100
37
99
99
90

R e g io n s
S o u th ­
east

B o rd e r
S t a te s

100

A ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f fic e e m p l o y e e s -------

N ew
E n g la n d

69
26

Type of p la n 1

E m p lo y e e s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L if e i n s u r a n c e -------------------------------------------------

S o u th ­
w est

G re a t
L akes

M id d le
W est

P a c if ic

100

100

100

100

100

100
57

98
35

100
43

99
59

100
65

100
23

58
27

63
19

72
24

68
38

76
24

60
29

65
14

96
66
29
50
34
99
52
99
52
99
52
98
50
99
99
98
( 5)

97
43
37
86

84
18
14
82

97
59
97
59
97
59
97
61
98
98
75

100
23
100
23
98
23
100
24
96
96
74

94
47
30
81
6
93
22
93
22
93
22
93
22
93
93
75
2

92
70
57
83
7
100
33
100
33
98
33
100
33
98
98
86
3

82
7
3
82
4
100
30
100
30
100
30
100
30
98
98
55

62
51
15
35
26
100
16
100
16
100
16
100
12
93
93
63

A c c i d e n t a l d e a th a n d d i s m e m b e r m e n t
S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e o r s ic k
S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e ------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s -------------------------S ic k l e a v e ( fu ll p a y o r w a itin g p e r i o d ) -----S ic k l e a v e ( p a r t i a l p a y o r w a itin g p e rio d ) —
H o s p i ta l iz a t io n i n s u r a n c e -----------------------------

N on c o n t r ib utory ^ p l a n °
R c t ir ^ m ^ V ^ p la n o 4^ ^ anS
N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p l a n s --------------------------

S e le c te d a r e a s

Jackson­
v ille

Los
A n g e le sLong B each
and
A n a h e im S a n ta A n a G a rd e n
G ro v e

N ew Y o rk a nd
N e w a rk
M in n e ­
a p o lis —
S t. P a u l

T o ta l

N ew
Y o rk
C ity

P h ila ­
d e lp h ia

A tla n ta

A ll n o n s u p e r v i s o r y o f fic e e m p l o y e e s -----E m p lo y e e s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id in g :
L i f e i n s u r a n c e -----------------------------------------------N o n c o n tr ib u to r y p l a n s ------------------------------A c c i d e n t a l d e a th a n d d i s m e m b e r m e n t
i n s u r a n c e ------------------------------ — ------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ------------------------------S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e o r s ic k
l e a v e o r b o th 3 ----------------------------------------------S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e ------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ------------------------S ic k l e a v e ( fu ll p a y , n o w a itin g p e rio d ) —
S ic k le a v e ( p a r t i a l p a y o r w a itin g p e rio d ) —
H o s p i ta l iz a t io n i n s u r a n c e ----------------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ------------------------------S u r g ic a l i n s u r a n c e ----------------------------------------N on c o n tr i b u to r y p l a n s ------------------------------M e d ic a l i n s u r a n c e --------------------------- — — ----N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ------------------------------M a jo r m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e ------------------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ------------------------------R e t i r e m e n t p la n s --------------------------------------------P e n s i o n s ---------------------------------------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s --------------------------

B a l ti ­
m o re

B o s to n

C h ic a g o

D a lla s

D es
M o in e s

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
60

100
94

100
82

100
45

100
60

100
24

100
24

100
17

98
32

100
14

96
44

100
57

100
66

100
73

100
100

53
47

82
63

91
17

65
63

64
8

92
16

84
33

92
26

89
3

49

58
28

46
29

48
13

100
21
21
100

100
53
47
53
100
81
100
81
100
81
94
94
100
100
94

100
82
82
82

100
88
84
100

84
4
4
64
19
81
14
81
14
81
14
81
14
93
93
93

46
10
8
46

100
100
24
55
37
100
24
100
24
100
24
100
24
100
100
84

100
76
61
100

100
12
12
93

31
18

96
58
53
84
4
100
24
100
24
100
24
100
24
100
100
100

100
76
32
46
41
100
52
100
52
100
52
100
52
99
99
99

100
95
40
31
52
99
62
99
62
' 99
62
100
62
99
99
99

78
9
7
75

100
78
100
78
100
78
100
78
100
100
60

-

100
65
100
65
100
65
100
65
99
99
99

-

100
8
100
8
100
8
100
8
100
100
92

-

100
27
100
27
100
27
100
27
100
100
32

H o u s to n

H a r tf o r d

i
!

-

100
17
100
17
100
17
100
17
93
93
93

-

100
7
100
7
91
7
100
7
92
92
86

-

31
-

100
6
100
6
100
6
100
6
89
89
89

-

-

100
46
100
46
100
46
90
36
100
100
96

1 I n c lu d e s o n ly t h o s e p l a n s f o r w h ic h th e e m p lo y e r p a y s a t l e a s t p a r t o f th e c o s t a n d e x c lu d e s l e g a l ly r e q u i r e d p l a n s s u c h a s w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n s a tio n a n d s o c ia l s e c u r i ty ; h o w e v e r, p la n s r e ­
q u i r e d b y S t a te t e m p o r a r y d i s a b i l i t y in s u r a n c e la w s a r e in c lu d e d i f t h e e m p l o y e r c o n tr i b u te s m o r e th a n i s le g a l ly r e q u i r e d o r th e e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v e b e n e f i ts e x c e e d in g l e g a l r e q u i r e m e n ts . N o n c o n trib ­
u t o r y p l a n s i n c lu d e o n ly t h o s e p l a n s f in a n c e d e n t i r e l y b y th e e m p l o y e r .
2 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r t h e M o u n ta in r e g io n in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 U n d u p lic a te d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v in g s ic k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
4 U n d u p lic a te d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s h a v in g p r o v is i o n s f o r p e n s io n s o r r e t i r e m e n t s e v e r a n c e p a y s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
5 L e s s th a n 0. 5 p e r c e n t .




, T a b le 20. O th er selected benefits
( P e r c e n t o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y o f fic e e m p lo y e e s in h o m e o f fic e s and r e g io n a l h ead o f fic e s o f lif e in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s p r o v id in g f r e e lu n c h e s , fu n e r a l le a v e p ay and ju r y
duty p a y , U n ited S t a te s , s e le c t e d r e g io n s and a r e a s , D e c e m b e r 1971)
R e g io n s

U n ited
S ta te s 2

Ite m 1

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith
p r o v is i o n s f o r :
F r e e l u n c h e s to e m p l o y e e s —
F u n e r a l le a v e p a y ----------------J u r y d u ty p a y -------------------------

5

28
96
99

B o rd er
S ta te s

M id d le
A tla n tic

N ew
E n g la n d

56
96
100

100
100

S o u th ­
e ast

S o u th ­
w est

14
88
99

7
97
94

■mddie

G re a t
L akes

P a c if ic

W e st

63
98
95

27

12
86
100

95
92

99
99

S e le c te d a r e a s

A tla n ta

W o r k e r s i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith
p r o v is i o n s f o r :
F r e e l u n c h e s to e m p lo y e e s —
F u n e r a l le a v e p a y —------------—
J u r y d u ty p a y —----------------------

100
100

B a l ti ­
m o re

47
94
100

B o sto n

C h ic a g o

18
100
100

F o r d e f in itio n o f f u n e r a l l e a v e a n d j u r y d u ty p a y s e e a p p e n d ix A .
I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r t h e M o u n ta in r e g i o n i n a d d itio n to t h o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y ,




21
100
100

D a lla s

85
100

D es
M o in e s

100
100

H a r tf o r d

100
100

H o u s to n

49
88
100

Jackson­
v i ll e

60
95
100

Los
A n g e le s —
L ong B each
M in n e ­
and
a p o lis —
A n a h ie m —
S t. P a u l
S a n ta A n a —
G a rd e n
G ro v e

69
97
97

56
96
100

NeW Yo r k a n d
N ev / a r k

T o ta l

N ew
Y o rk
C ity

P h ila ­
d e lp h ia

60
95
100

56
94
100

43
100
100

A p p e n d ix A . S co p e and M e th o d o f S u rve y
Scope of Survey

Nonsupervisory office employees

The study covered home offices and regional head
offices of life insurance companies (part o f industry
group 631, as defined in the 1967 edition o f the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual, prepared by
the U.S. Office o f Management and Budget).
The establishments studied were selected from those
employing 50 employees or more at the time of refer­
ence of the data used in compiling the universe lists.
The number o f establishments and employees studied
by the Bureau, as well as the number estimated to be
within scope o f the survey during the payroll period
studied, are shown in table A-l.

The term “nonsupervisory office employees,” as used
in this bulletin, includes all nonsupervisory employees of
the establishment, except those engaged in custodial,
maintenance, and related work. Administrative, execu­
tive, and professional employees were excluded.
Occupations selected for study

Occupational classification was based on a uniform
set o f job descriptions designed to take account of
interestablishment and interarea variations in duties
within the same job. (See appendix B for those
descriptions.) The occupations were chosen for their
numerical importance, and their representativeness of
the entire job scale in the industry. Working supervisors,
apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, and handi­
capped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers
were not reported in the selected occupations.

Method of study

Data were obtained by personal visits o f Bureau field
staff. The survey was contucted on a sample basis. To
obtain appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a greater
proportion of large rather than small establishments was
studied. In combining the data, however, all establish­
ments were given their appropriate weight. All estimates
are presented, therefore, as relating to all establishments
in the industry group studied, excluding only those
below the minimum size at the time o f reference o f the
universe data.

Wage data

Average weekly hours were rounded to the nearest
half hour and average weekly earnings to the nearest half
dollar. Standard hours reflect the workweek for which
employees receive their regular straight-time salaries;
earnings correspond to these weekly hours. Cost-of-living
allowances were included as part of the employee’s
regular salary, but nonproduction bonus payments, such
as Christmas or yearend bonuses, were excluded.
Average (mean) weekly earnings for each occupation
were calculated by weighting each rate (or weekly
earnings) by the number of workers receiving the rate,
totaling, and dividing by the number o f individuals. The
median designates position—
half of the employees
surveyed received more than the rate shown and half
received less than the rate shown. The middle range is
defined by two rates of pay; a fourth o f the employees
earned less than the lower o f these rates and a fourth
earned more than the higher rate.

Establishment definition

An establishment, for purposes o f this study, is defined
as all physical locations in an area where the operations of
the home office or a regional office are performed. A re­
gional head office is defined as one having all or nearly
all of the normal life insurance administrative functions,
including underwriting. An establishment is not neces­
sarily identical with the company, which may consist of
one or more establishments.
Employment

The estimates o f the number o f employees within
scope of the study are intended as a general guide to the
size and composition o f the labor force included in the
survey, rather than a precise measure o f employment.




Scheduled weekly hours

Data refer to the predominant work schedule for
37

Table A-1. Estimated number of establishments and employees within scope of survey and number
studied, life insurance industry, December 1971

Number of establishments 3

Within scope
of study

Within
scope of
study

Region 1 and area 2

Employees in establishments

Actually
studied

Actually
studied

Total 4

Nonsuper­
visory office
employees

Total

United States 5 ...........................

401

213

183.469

127.167

160.314

New England......................................
Boston ..........................................
Hartford ......................................
Middle A tla n tic ..................................
New York and N ew ark...................
New York City .........................
Philadelphia ..................................
Border States ....................................
Baltimore ....................................
Southeast ..........................................
Atlanta ........................................
Jacksonville ..................................
Southwest.........................................
D a lla s............................................
H ou sto n ........................................
Great Lakes ......................................
Chicago..........................................
Minneapolis-St. Paul ...................
Middle West ......................................
Des M oines....................................
P a cific ................................................
Los Angeles—Long Beach and
Anaheim—Santa Ana—Garden
G ro v e ..........................................

21
6
5
56
30
25
12
27
6
64
6
7
65
17

19
6
5
29
14
10
9
17
4
37
5
7
32
11

26,313
7,660
13,769
34,576
28,789
22,559
4,651
4,092
609
14,142
1,193
3,377
8,916
2,851
2,249
23,347
6,450
3,280
7,352
2,195
7,313

38,127
10,058
21,489
49,222
41,925
32,935
6,394
4,675
911
16,013
1,457
4,360
10,204
3,638
2,776
24,203
7,635
4,437
8,051
2,861
9,178

3,853

5,763

1

8

7

24

13

38,375
10,058
21,489
53,172
43,754
34,428
6,918
6,134
1,091
19,422
1,647
4,360
12,729
4,138
3,019
31,053
8,488
4,537
10,552
3,003
10,527

7

5

6,009

8

6

92
19
10
40

41
12
8

21

The regions used in this study include: New England— Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island,

and Vermont; M iddle A tla n tic— New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; Border States— Delaware, District of Columbia,
Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; Southeast— Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina, and Tennessee; Southw est— Arkansas,

Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas; Great Lakes— Illinois, Indiana, Michigan,

Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin; M iddle West— Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota; and P acific—
California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.
2 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSA), as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget through
January 1968, except New York and Newark and Los Angeles— Long Beach and Anaheim—Santa A n a —Garden Grove, which are
combinations of 2 SM SA's.
3 Includes only establishments with 50 employees or more at the time of reference of the universe data.
4

Includes executive, professional, and

5

Includes data for the Mountain region in addition to those shown separately. Alaska and Hawaii were not included in the

other employees excluded from the nonsupervisory office employee category.

study.




38

full-time nonsupervisory officeworkers employed on the
day shift.

Information is presented for all such plans to which the
employer contributes at least a part of the cost.
However, in New York and New Jersey, where tempo­
rary disability insurance laws require employer contribu­
tions, I plans are included only if the employer (1)
contributes more than is legally required or (2) provides
the employees with benefits which exceed the re­
quirements of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to
formal plans which provide full pay or a proportion of
the employee’s pay during absence from work because
of illness; informal arrangements have been omitted.
Separate tabulations are provided according to (1) plans
which provide full pay and no waiting period, and (2)
plans providing either partial pay or a waiting period.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for com­
plete or partial payment o f doctors’ fees. Such plans
may be underwritten by a commercial insurance com­
pany or a nonprofit organization, or they may be a form
of self-insurance.
Major medical insurance, sometimes referred to
as extended medical insurance, includes the plans
designed to cover employees in case o f sickness or injury
involving an expense which goes beyond the normal
coverage o f hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to
plans which provide regular payments for the remainder
of the retiree’s life. Data are presented separately for
retirement severance pay (one payment or several over a
specified period o f time) made to employees on retire­
ment. Establishments providing both retirement sever­
ance pay and retirement pensions* to employees were
considered as having both retirement pension and
retirement severance plans. Establishments having
optional plans providing employees a choice o f either
retirement severance pay or pensions were considered as
having only retirement pension benefits.

Supplementary wage provisions

Supplementary benefits were treated statistically on
the basis that if formal provisions were applicable to half
or more o f the nonsupervisory office employees in an
establishment, the benefits were considered applicable to
all such employees. Similarly, if fewer than half were
covered, the benefits were considered nonexistent in the
establishment. Because o f length-of-service and other
eligibility requirements, the proportion o f employees
receiving the benefits may be smaller than estimated.
Paid holidays. Paid holiday provisions relate to full-day

and half-day holidays provided annually.
Paid vacations. The summary o f vacation plans is limited

to formal arrangements, excluding informal plans where­
by time off with pay is granted at the discretion o f the
employer or the supervisor. The periods o f service for
which data are presented were selected as representative
of the most common practices, but they do not
necessarily reflect individual establishment provisions for
progression. For example, the changes in proportions
indicated at 10 years o f service include changes in
provisions which may have occurred between 5 and 10
years.
H ealth ,

insurance , and retirem ent plans. Data are
presented for health, insurance, and retirement plans for
which all or a part o f the cost is borne by the employer,
excluding programs required by law, such as workmen’s
compensation and social security. Among the plans
included are those underwritten by a commercial insur­
ance company, and those paid directly by the employer
from his current operating funds or from a fund set aside
for this purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form o f life
insurance. Sickness and accident insurance is limited to
that type o f insurance under which predetermined cash
payments are made directly to the insured on a weekly
or monthly basis during illness or accident disability.




Paid funeral and ju ry d u ty leave. Data for paid funeral

and jury duty leave are limited to formal plans which
provide at least partial payment for time lost as a result
of attending funerals o f specified family members or
serving as a juror.
1 The temporary disability insurance laws in California and
Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.

39

A p p e n d ix B. O ccu p atio n al D e scrip tio n s

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to assist its
field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of
payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to
area. This classification permits the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job
content. Because of the emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational
content, the Bureau’s job descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual
establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’s
field staff are instructed to exclude working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, and
handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

ACTUARY

CLAIM APPROVER

Performs life insurance actuarial studies and assign­
ments, applying actuarial theory and practice. Work
involves any or a combination o f the following: Deter­
mines actuarial bases for premium rates, dividends,
reserves and non-forfeiture benefits; conducts mortality,
statistical, underwriting, or expense allocation studies;
prepares gain and loss exhibits; and drafts and files
insurance and annuity contract forms. Do not include
company officers who have a significant corporate­
wide policy making role with regard to major company
activities. (See “NOTE” under Secretary definition, p. 45.)
For wage study purposes, actuaries are to be classified
as follows:

Reviews life insurance claims to determine the extent
of the company’s liability and approves or disapproves
claims in accordance with policy provisions; compares
data on application, death certificate, or physician’s
statement with policy file and other company records to
ascertain completeness and validity of claim.
For wage study pruposes, claim approvers are to be
classified as follows:

Class A —
Performs highly complex and specialized
actuarial studies, including the development of
new life insurance products. Provides technical
instruction and advice to lower level actuaries.
May lead a group of actuaries in accomplishing
actuarial projects. Position requires attainment of
Fellow in the Society of Actuaries.
Class B -Performs complex actuarial studies and
projects such as mortality investigations, competi­
tive comparisons, loading and expense studies, etc.
Provides technical assistance and advice to lower
level actuaries and clerks. Position requires attain­
ment of Associate in the Society of Actuaries.
ASSEMBLER
Assembles applications, forms, status information,
correspondence, and other necessary data to be used by
others.




40

Class ^-R eview s and approves death claims (other
than double indemnity) which normally do not
ex ceed $50,000; reviews and recommends
approval of claims above these limits; position
usually requires at least 2 years of life insurance
experience.
Class B —
Reviews and approves death claims (other
than double indemnity) which are clear cut and do
not exceed $25,000; may review death claims
above $25,000 and recommend approval by an
approver at a higher level.
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Performs one or more accounting clerical tasks such
as posting to registers and ledgers; reconciling bank
accounts; verifying the internal consistency, complete­
ness, and mathematical accuracy of accounting docu­
ments; assigning prescribed accounting distribution
codes; examining and verifying for clerical accuracy
various types of reports, lists, calculations, posting, etc.;
or preparing simple, or assisting in preparing more

complicated, journal vouchers. May work in either a
manual or automated accounting system.
The work requires a knowledge of clerical methods
and office practices and procedures which relates to the
clerical processing and recording of transactions and
accounting information. With experience, the worker
typically becomes familiar with the bookkeeping and
accounting terms and procedures used in the assigned
work, but is not required to have a knowledge of the
formal principles of bookkeeping and accounting.
For wage study purposes, accounting clerks are to be
classified as follows:

instructions regarding the completion of forms for
surrenders, loans, policy changes, reinstatements,
claims, and other related matters. Work requires
knowledge of standard company practices and
regulations regarding policy contracts that are
embodied in manuals or other written materials.
CLERK, FILE
Files, classifies, and retrieves material in an
established filing system. May perform clerical and
manual tasks required to maintain files.
For wage study purposes, file clerks are to be
classified as follows:

Class A —
Under general supervision, performs
accounting clerical operations which require the
application of experience and judgment, for
example, clerically processing complicated or nonrepetitive accounting transactions, selecting among
a substantial variety of prescribed accounting
codes and classifications, or tracing transactions
through previous accounting actions to determine
source of discrepancies. May be assisted by one or
more class B accounting clerks.

Class ^ —
Classifies and indexes file material such as
correspondence, reports, technical documents,
etc., in an established filing system containing a
number of varied subject matter files. May also file
this material. May keep records of various types in
conjunction with the files. May lead a small group
of lower level file clerks.
Class B —Sorts, codes, and files unclassified
material by simple (subject matter) headings or
partly classified material by finer subheadings.
Prepares simple related index and cross-reference
aids. As requested, locates clearly identified
material in files and forwards material. May
perform related clerical tasks required to maintain
and service files.

Class B —
Under close supervision, following
detailed instructions and standardized procedures,
performs one or more routine accounting clerical
operations, such as posting to ledgers, cards, or
work sheets where identification of items and
locations o f postings are clearly indicated; check­
ing accuracy and completeness of standardized and
repetitive records or accounting documents; cod­
ing documents using a few prescribed accounting
codes.

Class C—Performs routine filing of material that
has already been classified or which is easily
classified in a simple serial classification system
(e.g., alphabetical, chronological, or numerical). As
requested, locates readily available material in files
and forwards material; may fill out withdrawal
charge. May perform simple clerical and manual
tasks required to maintain and service files.

CLERK, CORRESPONDENCE
Composes and writes letters to policyholders, other
individuals, or other business establishments in reply to
correspondence received or to requests for information.
For wage study purposes, correspondence clerks are
to be classified as follows:

CLERK, POLICY EVALUATION

Class A —Conducts correspondence with policy­
holders, field representatives, lawyers, doctors, and
other individuals regarding complaints, inquiries
relating to various branches of the insurance
business, contractual provisions, and other related
matters. Work requires detailed knowledge of
policy contracts and interpretation of company
policy.

Calculates cash surrender and loan value of policies.
Work involves: Determining the kind of insurance and
record of payments made from card file; looking up rate
in book and making calculations; entering amount on a
special form. In addition, may handle reinsurance data.
CLERK, PREMIUM-LEDGER-CARD

Class B —
Conducts correspondence with policy­
h o ld e rs and field representatives regarding
inquiries of various kinds; quotes values and issues




Keeps card records or other records of all premium
transactions and changes in type of policy. Work
41

involves: Transcribing premium payments from daily
listings and keeping a check on the due date so as to put
through records of cancellation if premiums are not
paid. May check and send out premium payments.
General clerks are excluded.

the characteristics described for Class A. May assist
a higher level operator by independently perform­
ing less difficult tasks assigned, and performing
difficult tasks following detailed instructions and
with frequent review of operations performed.
Class C—
Works on routine programs under close
supervision. Is expected to develop working
knowledge of the computer equipment used and
ability to detect problems involved in running
routine programs. Usually has received some
formal training in computer operation. May assist
higher level operator on complex programs.

COMPUTER OPERATOR
Monitors and operates the control console of a digital
computer to process data according to operating instruc­
tions, usually prepared by a programer. Work includes
most o f the following: Studies instructions to determine
equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with
required items (tape reels, cards, etc.); switches neces­
sary auxiliary equipment into circuit, and starts and
operates computer; makes adjustments to computer to
correct operating problems and meet special conditions;
reviews errors made during operation and determines
cause or refers problem to supervisor or programer; and
maintains operating records. May test and assist in
correcting program.
For wage study purposes, computer operators are
classified as follows:

COMPUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS
(Digital computer programer)
Converts statements of business problems, typically
prepared by a systems analyst, into a sequence
of detailed instructions which are required to solve the
problems by automatic data processing equipment.
Working from charts or diagrams, the programer
develops the precise instructions which, when entered
into the computer system in coded language, cause the
manipulation of data to achieve desired results.
Work involves most o f the following: Applies knowledge
of computer capabilities, mathematics, logic employed
by computers, and particular subject matter involved to
analyze charts and diagrams of the problem to be
programed; develops sequence of program steps; writes
detailed flow charts to show order in which data will be
processed; converts these charts to coded instructions
for machine to follow; tests and corrects programs;
prepares instructions for operating personnel during
production run; analyzes, reviews and alters programs to
increase operating efficiency or adapt to new require­
ments; maintains records of program development and
revisions. (NOTE: Workers performing both systems
analysis and programing should be classified as systems
analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)
Does not include employees primarily responsible for
the management or supervision of other electronic data
processing employees, or programers primarily con­
cerned with scientific and/or engineering problems.
For wage study purposes, programers are classified as
follows:

Class A —Operates independently, or under only
general direction, a computer running programs
with most of the following characteristics: New
programs are frequently tested and introduced;
scheduling requirements are of critical importance
to minimize downtime; the programs are of
complex design so that identification of error
source often requires a working knowledge of the
total program, and alternate programs may not be
available. May give direction and guidance to lower
level operators.
Class 2?—
Operates independently or under only
general direction a computer running programs
with most of the following characteristics: Most of
the programs are established production runs,
typically run on a regularly recurring basis; there is
little or no testing of new programs required;
alternate programs are provided in case original
program needs major change or cannot be
corrected within a reasonable time. In common
error situations, diagnoses cause and takes correc­
tive action. This usually involves applying previ­
ously programed corrective steps, or using standard
correction techniques.

Class A —Works independently or under only
general direction on complex problems which
require competence in all phases of programing
concepts and practices. Working from diagrams and
charts which identify the nature of desired results,
major processing steps to be accomplished, and the

OR
Operates under direct supervision a computer
running programs or segments of programs with




42

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST, BUSINESS

relationships between various steps of the problem
solving routine, plans the full range of programing
actions needed to efficiently utilize the com­
puter system in achieving desired end products.

Analyzes business problems to formulate procedures
for solving them by use of electronic data processing
equipment. Develops a complete description of all
specifications needed to enable programers’ to prepare
required digital computer programs. Work involves most
o f the following: Analyzes subject-matter operations to
be automated and identifies conditions and criteria
required to achieve satisfactory results; specifies number
and types of records, files, and documents to be used;
outlines actions to be performed by personnel and
computers in sufficient detail for presentation to man­
agement and for programing (typically this involves
preparation of work and data flow charts); coordinates
the development of test problems and participates in
trial runs of new and revised systems; and recommends
equipment changes to obtain more effective overall
operations. (NOTE: Workers performing both systems
analysis and programing should be classified as systems
analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)
Does not include employees primarily responsible for
the management or supervision of other electronic data
processing employees, or systems analysts primarily
concerned with specific or engineering problems.
For wage study purposes, systems analysts are classi­
fied as follows:

At this level, programing is difficult because
computer equipment must be organized to
produce several interrelated but diverse products
from numerous and diverse data elements. A wide
variety and extensive number of internal process­
ing actions must occur. This requires such actions
as development of common operations which can
be reused, establishment of linkage points between
operations, adjustments to data when program
requirements exceed computer storage capacity,
and substantial manipulation and resequencing of
data elements to form a highly integrated program.
May provide functional direction to lower level
programers who are assigned to assist.
Class B —
Works independently or under only
general direction on relatively simple programs, or
on simple segments of complex programs. Pro­
grams (or segments) usually process information to
produce data in two or three varied sequences of
formats. Reports and listings are produced by
refining, adapting, arraying, or making minor
additions to or delections from input data which
are readily available. While numerous records may
be processed, the data have been refined in prior
actions so that the accuracy and sequencing of
data can be tested by using a few routine checks.
Typically, the program details with routine
record-keeping type operations.

Class A —
Works independently or under only
general direction on complex problems involving
all phases of systems analysis. Problems are com­
plex because of diverse sources of input data and
multi-use requirements of output data. (For
example, develops an integrated production
scheduling, inventory control, cost analysis, and
sales analysis record in which every item of each
type is automatically proceessed through the full
system of records and appropriate followup
actions are initiated by the computer.) Confers
with persons concerned to determine the data
processing problems and advises subject-matter
personnel on the implications of new or revised
systems of data processing operations. Makes
recommendations, if needed, for approval of major
systems installations or changes and for obtaining
equipment.

OR
Works on complex programs (as described for
Class A) under close direction of a higher level
programer or supervisor. May assist higher level
programer by independently performing less
difficult tasks assigned, and performing more
difficult tasks under fairly close direction.
May guide or instruct lower level programers.
Class C—
Makes practical applications of pro­
graming practices and concepts usually learned in
formal training courses. Assignments are designed
to develop competence in the application of
standard procedures to routine problems. Receives
close supervision on new aspects of assignments,
and work is reviewed to verify its accuracy and
conformance with required procedures.




May provide functional direction to lower level
systems analysts who are assigned to assist.
Class B —
Works independently or under only
general direction on problems that are relatively
uncomplicated to analyze, plan, program, and
operate. Problems are o f' limited complexity
because sources of input data are homogenous and
43

PREMIUM ACCEPTOR

the output data are closely related. (For example,
develops systems for maintaining depositor ac­
counts in a bank, maintaining accounts received
in a retail establishment, or maintaining inventory
accounts in a manufacturing or wholesale estab­
lishment.) Confers with persons concerned to de­
termine the data processing problems and advises
subject-matter personnel on the implications of the
data processing systems to be applied.

Accepts, records, and proves remittance received
from policyholders and the field offices in connection
with premiums, interest on policy loans or to cancel or
reduce policy loans. Endorses checks, issues receipts and
maintains records of remittances held pending adjust­
ments. May conduct correspondence with field offices
regarding such remittances.

OR
SECRETARY

Works on a segment of a complex data processing
scheme or system, as described for class A. Works
independently on routine assignments and receives
instruction and guidance on complex assignments.
Work is reviewed for accuracy of judgment,
compliance with instructions, and to insure proper
alignment with the overall system.

Assigned as personal secretary, normally to one
individual. Maintains a close and highly responsive
relationship to the day-to-day work of the supervisor.
Works fairly independently receiving a minimum of
detailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied
clerical and secretarial duties, usually including most of
the following:

Class C—
Works under immediate supervision,
carrying out analysis as assigned, usually of a single
activity. Assignments are designed to develop and
expand practical experience in the application of
procedures and skills required for systems analysis
work. For example, may assist a higher level
systems analyst by preparing the detailed specifica­
tions required by programers from information
developed by the higher level analyst.

a. Receives telephone calls, personal callers, and
incoming mail, answers routine inquiries, and
routes technical inquires to the proper persons;
b. Establishes, maintains, and revises the super­
visor’s files;
c. Maintains the supervisor’s calendar and makes
appointments as instructed;
d. Relays messages
ordinates;

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR

from

supervisor to sub­

Operates a keypunch machine to record or verify
alphabetic and/or numeric data on tabulating cards or on
type.
For wage study purposes, keypunch operators are to
be classified as follows:

e. Reviews correspondence, memoranda, and
reports prepared by others for the supervisor’s
signature to assure procedural and typographic
accuracy;

Class A —
Work requires the application of experi­
ence and judgment in selecting procedures to be
followed and in searching for, interpreting,
selecting, or coding items to be keypunched from
a variety of source documents. On occasion may
also perform some routine keypunch work. May
train inexperienced keypunch operators.

May also perform other clerical and secretarial tasks
of comparable nature and difficulty. The work typically
requires knowledge of office routine and understanding
of the organization, programs, and procedures related to
the work of the supervisor.

f. Performs stenographic and typing work.

Exclusions

Class B —
Work is routine and repetitive. Under
close supervision or following specific procedures
or instructions, works from various standardized
source documents which have been coded, follows
specified procedures which have been prescribed in
detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or
interpreting of data to be recorded. Refers to
supervisor problems arising from erroneous items
or codes or missing information.




Not all positions that are titled “secretary” possess
the above characteristics. Examples of positions which
are excluded from the definition are as follows:
a. Positions which do not meet the “personal”
secretary concept described above;
b. Stenographers not fully trained in secretarial
type duties;
44

c. Stenographers serving as office assistants to a
group of professional, technical, or managerial
persons;

officer level) over either a major corporate-wide
functional activity (e.g., marketing, research,
operations, industrial relations, etc.) or a major
geographic or organizational segment (e.g., a
regional headquarters; a major division) of a
company that employes, in all, over 5,000 but
fewer than 25,000 employees; or

d. Secretary positions in which the duties are
either substantially more routine or substantially
more complex and responsible than those
characterized in the definition;

4. Secretary to the head of an individual establish­
ment (or other equivalent level of official) that
employs, in all, over 5,000 persons; or

e. Assistant type positions which involve more
d iffic u lt or more responsible technical,
administrative, supervisory, or specialized
clerical duties which are not typical or secre­
tarial work.

5. Secretary to the head of a large and important
organizational segment (e.g., a middle manage­
ment supervisor of an organizational segment
often involves as many as several hundred
persons) of a company that employs, in all,
over 25,000 persons.

NOTE: The term “corporate officer,” used in the
level definitions following, refers to those officials
who have a significant corporate-wide policy­
making role with regard to major company
activities. The title “vice president,” through
normally indicative of this role, does not in all
cases identify such positions. Vice presidents
whose primary responsibility is to act personally
on individual cases or transactions (e.g., approve or
deny individual loan or credit actions; administer
individual trust accounts; directly supervise a
clerical staff) are not considered to be “corporate
officers” for purposes of applying the following
level definitions:

Class C
1. Secretary to an executive or managerial person
whose responsibility is not equivalent to one of
the specific level situations in the definition for
class B, but whose organizational unit normally
numbers at least several dozen employees and is
usually divided into organizational segments
which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In
some companies, this level includes a wide
range or organizational echelons; in others, only
one or two; or

Class A
1. Secretary to the chairman of the board or
president of a company that employs, in all,
over 100 but fewer than 5,000 persons; or

2. Secretary to the head of an individual establish­
ment (or other equivalent level of official) that
employs, in all, fewer than 5,000 persons.

2. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the
chairman of the board or president) of a
company that employes, in all, over 5,000 but
fewer than 25,000 persons; or

Class D
1. Secretary to the supervisor or head of a small
organizational unit (e.g., fewer than about 25
or 30 persons); or

3. Secretary to the head, immediately below the
corporate officer level, of a major segment or
subsidiary o f a compnay that employs, in all,
over 25,000 persons.

2. Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist,
professional employee, administrative officer,
or assitant, skilled technician or expert. (Note:
Many companies assign stenographers, rather
than secretaries as described above, to this level
of supervisory or nonsupervisory worker.)

Class B
1. Secretary to the chairman of the board or
president of a company that employs, in all,
fewer than 100 persons; or

(Special classification)

2. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than
chairman of the board or president) of a
company that employs, in all, over 100 but
fewer than 5,000 persons; or

Secretaries in positions with work characteristics
as described, and within the range of defined
levels, should be reported under this classification
when the information needed to classify secretaries
according to the level definitions is not available.

3. Secretary to the head (immediately below the




45

Class A —
Performs complete reporting and tabu­
lating assignments including devising difficult
control panel wiring under general supervision.
Assignments typically involve a variety of long and
complex reports which often are irregular or
nonrecurring, requiring some planning of the
nature and sequencing of operations, and the use
of a variety of machines. Is typically involved in
training new operators in machine operations or
training lower level operators in wiring from
diagrams and in the operating sequences of long
and complex reports. Does not include positions in
which wiring responsibility is limited to selection
and insertion of pre-wired boards.

STENOGRAPHER
Primary duty is to take dictation using shorthand,
and to transcribe the dictation. May also type from
written copy. May operate from a stenographic pool.
May occasionally transcribe from voice recordings (if
primary duty is transcribing from recordings, see Transcribing-Machine Operator, General).
NOTE: This job is distinugished from that of a secretary
in that a secretary normally works in a confidential
relationship with only one manager or executive and
performs more responsible and discretionary tasks as
described in the secretary job definition.

Class B—
Performs work according to established
procedures and under specific instructions. Assign­
ments typically involve complete but routine and
recurring reports or parts of larger and more
complex reports. Operates more difficult tabula­
ting or electrical accounting machines such as the
tabulator and calculator, in addition to the simpler
machines used by class C operators. May be
required to do some wiring from diagrams. May
train new employees in basic machine operations.

Stenographer, General
Dictation involves a normal routine vocabulary. May
maintain files, keep simple records or perform other
relatively routine clerical tasks.
Stenographer, Senior
Dictation involves a varied technical or specialized
vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific
research. May also set up an maintain files, keep records,
etc.

Class C—Under specific instructions, operates
simple tabulating or electrical accounting machines
such as the sorter, interpreter, reproducing punch,
collator, etc. Assignments typically involve
portions of a work unit, for example, individual
sorting or collating runs, or repetitive operations.
May perform simple wiring from diagrams and
some filing work.

OR
Performs stenographic duties regarding significantly
greater independence and responsibility than steno­
grapher, general, as evidenced by the following: Work
requires a high degree of stenographic speed and
accuracy; a thorough working knowledge of general
business and office procedure and of the specific
business operations, organization, policies, procedures,
files, workflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in performing
stenographic duties and responsible clerical tasks such as
maintaining followup files; assembling material for
reports, memorandums, and letters; composing simple
letters from general instructions; reading and routing
incoming mail; answering routine questions, etc.

TAPE LIBRARIAN

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (Electric
Accounting Machine Operator)
Operates one or a variety of machines such as the
tabulator, calculator, collator, interpreter, sorter,
reproducing punch, etc. Excluded from this definition
are working supervisors. Also excluded are operators of
electronic digital computers, even though they may also
operate EAM equipment.
F o r wage study purposes, tabulating-machine
operators are to be classified as follows:




46

Maintains library of reels of magnetic or punched
paper type used for automatic data-processing purposes.
Work consists of most of the following: Classifies and
catalogs reels of type in accordance with such factors as
content of data and type of routine; assigns code
conforming with standardized system; prepares record
for file reference; stores reels according to classification
and catalog designation; issues reels and maintains
charge-out records; inspects returned reels to determine
if tape needs replacing due to wear or damage. May
perform minor repair to damaged tape.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
Primary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a
normal routine vocabulary from transcribing-machine
records. May also type from written copy and do simple

clerical work. Workers transcribing dictation involving a
varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal
briefs or reports on scientific research are not included.
A worker who takes dictation in shorthand or by
Stenotype or similar machine is classified as a
stenographer.

decline, applications for new insurance, changes of plan
and reinstatement of benefits where no major medical
impairment is involved.
For wage study purposes, underwriters are classified
as follows:

Uses a typewriter to make copies of various materials
or to make out bills after calculations have been made
by another person. May include typing of stencils, mats,
or similar materials for use in duplicating processes. May
do clerical work involving little special training, such as
keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or
sorting and distributing incoming mail.
For wage study purposes, typists are classified as
follows:

Class A —Reviews and approves life insurance
applications which normally do not exceed $75,000
(other than double indemnity); reviews and re­
commends approval on applications above these
limits; recommends declination on applications
to $75,000 and concurs on lower level declinations.
Answers insurance inquiries from the field offices.
May determine extra premium rate for out of
ordinary applications. Position usually requires
at least 5 years life insurance experience and may
require successful completion of several insurance
courses given by HOLU or LOMA. May also direct
work of underwriters at lower classifications.

Class ^ —
Performs one or more o f the following:
Typing material in final form when it involves
combining material from several sources; or
responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication,
punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual words or
foreign language material; or planning layout and
typing of foreign language material; or planning
layout and typing of complicated statistical tables
to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing.
May tape routine form letters, varying details to
suit circumstances.

Class B —Reviews and approves life insurance appli­
cations which normally do not exceed $50,000
(other than double indemnity); reviews and recom­
mends approval on applications above these limits.
Declinations must be concurred in by another
underwriter. May determine extra premium rate
for out of ordinary applications. Postion usually
requires at least 2 years life insurance experience
and successful completion of at least 2 specialized
courses given by HOLU or LOMA.

TYPIST

Class B —
Performs one or more o f the following:
Copy typing from rough or clear drafts; or routine
typing of forms, insurance policies, etc.; or setting
up simple standard tabulations; or copying more
complex tables already set up and spaced properly.

Class C—Reviews and approves life insurance appli­
cations which are clear cut and do not exceed
$25,000 (other than double indemnity). May
review applications above $25,000 and recom­
mend approval. Declinations require concurrence
by an o th er u nderw riter, generally at a higher level.
Do not include trainees with less than 6 months
experience in underwriting.

UNDERWRITER
Reviews, evaluates, and takes action to approve, or




47




Industry W a g e Stu dies
The most recent reports for the other industries ineluded in the Bureau’s program of industry wage surveys
since January 1960 are listed below. Copies are available
from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government

Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or from any
of its regional sales offices, and from the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C. 20212, or from any
of its regional offices shown on the inside back cover.

I. Occupational Wage Studies
Manufacturing
Price
Basic Iron and Steel, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1602 .............................................................................................................$0.55
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1732 .............................................................................. 45
Cigar Manufacturing, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1796 ............................................................................................................. (*)
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1748 ............................................................................................................30
Cotton and Man-Made Fiber Textiles, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1637 ............................................................................... 1.00
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1695 ..................................................................................................... 50
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1763 ............................................................................................................75
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1576 .................................................................................... 25
Fluid Milk Industry, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1464 .................................................................................................................. 30
Footwear, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1792 ............................................................................................................................. (*)
Hosiery, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1743 ...................................................................................................................................... 75
Industrial Chemicals, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1768 .................................................................................................................. 80
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1626 ................................................................................................... 1.00
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1618 .........................................................................................
55
Machinery Manufacturing, 1970-71. BLS Bulletin 1754 ............................................................................................ 1.00
Meat Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1677 ....................................................................................................................... 1.00
Men’s and Boys’ Separate Trousers, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1752 ........................................................................................ 60
Men’s and Boys’ Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1971. BLS Bulletin 179 4 ........................................... (*)
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 6 ............................................................................... 1.00
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1960 ...............................................................................................60
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1679 ........................................................................................................ 75
Nonferrous Foundries, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1726 ............................................................................................................... 50
Paints and Varnishes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1739 .................................................................................................................. 60
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 9 ......................................................................................1.25
Petroleum Refining, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1741 ............................................................................................................... 50
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 3 .....................................................................................50
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1608 ........................................................................................... 60
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1694 .....................................................................................50
Structural Clay Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1697 ............................................................................................................65
Synthetic Fibers, 1970, BLS Bulletin 1740 .........................................................................................................................40
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1757 ..................................................................................................70
See footnote at end of table.



I. Occupational W age Studies—Continued
Manufacturing-Continued
West Coast Sawmilling, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1704 ......................................................................................................... $0.45
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1728 .....................................................................................35
Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1783 ............................................................................................ (*)
Wood Household Furniture, Excepted Upholstered 1971. BLS Bulletin 1793 ........................................................ (*)
Wool Textiles, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1551 ........................................................................................................................45
Work Clothing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1624 ........................................................................................................................... 50
Nonmanufacturing
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1689 ........................................................................................................ 50
Banking, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1703 . . . ............................................................................................................................ 65
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1583 ............................................................................................................50
Communications, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 5 1 .........................................................................................................................30
Contract Cleaning Services, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1778 ................................................................................................... (*)
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1566 ........................................................................30
Educational Institutions: Nonteaching Employees, 1968-69. BLS Bulletin 1 6 7 1 .......................................................... 50
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1614 ........................................................................................................ 70
Hospitals, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1668 ................................................................................................................................. 1.00
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1968.BLS Bulletin 1645 .................................................................................................. 75
Life Insurance, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1569 ............................................................................................................................ 30
Motion Picture Theaters, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1542 ............................................................................................................35
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1967-68. BLS Bulletin 1638 .............................................................................. 75
Scheduled Airlines, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1734........................................................................................................................45
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 2 .............................................................................. 60

II. Other Industry Wage Studies
Employee Earnings and Hours in Nonmetropolitan Area of the South and North Central Regions,
1965. BLS Bulletin 1552 ................................................................................................................................................... 50
Employee Earnings and Hours in Eight Metropolitan Areas of the South, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1553 ......................... 40
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail Trade, June 1966Retail Trade (Overall Summary). BLS Bulletin 1584 ............................................................................................ 1.00
Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm Equipment Dealers. BLS Bulletin 1584-1 .................................................30
General Merchandise Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-2 .........................................................................................................55
Food Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-3 ............................................................................................................................. .60
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Stations. BLS Bulletin 1584-4 ................................................................. 50
Apparel and Accessory Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-5 ..................................................................................................... 55
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household Appliance Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-6 ............................................. 50
Miscellaneous Retail Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-7 .........................................................................................................65


1 Price not yet available.


☆ u . S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1973 O - 543-756 (12)

BU REAU OF LA BO R S T A T IS T IC S
REGIO N AL O FFIC ES

P U ER TO RICO

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)

Region II
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region VI
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Region III
P. O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)

Regions V II and V III *
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St., NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Regions IX and X * *
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)




Regions VII and V III are serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

THIRD CLASS M AIL

BUREAU OF LABO R STATISTICS
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20212

POSTAGE AND FEES PAID

U.S. D EPARTM ENT OF LABOR
O FFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE, $300

• .-i




. L A B -441


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102