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L
Industry
W a g e S u rv e y

, 3

n(*3

Fertilizer
March-April 1971

Dayton & Montgomery. CsL
Public Library

B u lletin 1763
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics

J A N 2 51973

1972




DOCUMENT COLLECTION




Industry
Wage Survey

Fertilizer
March-April 1971
Bulletin 1763
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
1972

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402-Price 75 cents.
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Make checks payable to NTIS.






Preface
This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of wages
and related benefits in the fertilizer manufacturing industry in March—
April 1971. A
similar survey was conducted in March—
April 1966 (BLS Bulletin No. 1531).
Separate releases were issued during October or November 1971 for the following
States: Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, North Carolina,
Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. Copies of these releases are available from
the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C. 20212, or
any of its regional offices.
This study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of Wages and Industrial Relations.
Donald S. Ridzon of the Division of Occupational Wage Structures prepared the analysis
in this bulletin. Field work for the survey was directed by the Assistant Regional
Directors for Operations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program of industry wage studies, as well as
the addresses of the Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end of this bulletin.




Hi




Contents
Summary .........................................................................................................................................................................
Industry characteristics...................................................................................................................................................
Type of p la n t................................................................................................................................................................
Type of market ............................................................................................................................................................
Location .......................................................................................................................................................................
Size of establishm ent...................................................................................................................................................
Union contract coverage ............................................................................................................................................
Method of wage payment ..........................................................................................................................................
Occupational staffing .................................................................................................................................................
Average hourly earnings .................................................................................................................................................
Occupational earnings ...................................................................................................................................................
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions......................................................................................
Scheduled weekly h o u rs..............................................................................................................................................
Shift practices ..............................................................................................................................................................
Paid h o lid ay s................................................................................................................................................................
Paid vacations ..............................................................................................................................................................
Health, insurance, and retirement p la n s....................................................................................................................
Other selected benefits ..............................................................................................................................................

Page
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
5
5
5
5
5
6
6

Tables:
Average hourly earnings:
1. By selected characteristics ...............................................................................................................................

7

Earnings distributions:
2. All establishments ............................................................................................................................................
3. All establishments by type of m ark e t..............................................................................................................
4. By type of establishm ent.................................................................................................................................

8
9
10

Occupational averages:
5. All establishments ............................................................................................................................................
6. All establishments by type of m ark e t..............................................................................................................
7. Complete (integrated) establishments by size of com m unity.....................................................................
8. Complete (integrated) establishments by size of establishment .................................................................
9. Superphosphate establishments by size of com m unity.................................................................................
10. Superphosphate establishments by size of establishm ent.............................................................................
11. Mixing establishments ......................................................................................................................................
12. Mixing establishments by size of com m unity.................................................................................................
13. Mixing establishments by size of establishment ............................................................................................

11
12
13
14
14
15
15
16
17

Occupational earnings:
14. A labam a..............................................................................................................................................................
15. C alifornia............................................................................................................................................................
16. F lo rid a ................................................................................................................................................................

18
18
19




v

Contents—Continued
Page
Tables—
Continued
Occupational eamings-Continued
17. Georgia.................................................................................................................................................................
18. Illinois .................................................................................................................................................................
19. In d ian a.................................................................................................................................................................
20. Maryland .............................................................................................................................................................
21. North C arolina....................................................................................................................................................
22. O h io .....................................................................................................................................................................
23. South C arolina....................................................................................................................................................
24. Tennessee.............................................................................................................................................................
25. Virginia.................................................................................................................................................................

20
21
21
22
22
23
23
24
24

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
26. Method of wage payment: All establishm ents...............................................................................................
27. Scheduled weekly hours: All establishm ents.................................................................................................
28. Shift differential practices: All establishments .............................................................................................
29. Paid holidays: All establishments ...................................................................................................................
30. Paid holidays: By type of establishm ent........................................................................................................
31. Paid vacations: All establishments .................................................................................................................
32. Paid vacations: By type of establishment ......................................................................................................
33. Health, insurance, and retirement plans: All establishments .......................................................................
34. Health, insurance, and retirement plans: By type of establishm ent............................................................

25
25
26
27
27
28
30
32
33

Appendixes:
A. Scope and method of survey ................................................................................................................................
B. Occupational descriptions ....................................................................................................................................

34
38




Fertilizer Manufacturing, March-April 1971
25,484 workers were recorded. 3 During the preceding
10 years (April 1956—1966), the decline had been only
10 percent.
Employment dropped in all but one region since the
1966 survey. The declines ranged from 13 percent in
the Southeast to 47 percent in the Middle West; in the
Southwest, employment increased 25 percent.
Employment in the industry is highly seasonal. The
peak occurs before the spring planting season and the
low point is reached during the summer.4 At the time
of the 1971 survey, 28 percent of the industry’s workers
were classified as seasonal— those hired to work fewer
than 11 months a year.
Another indication of the industry’s seasonality is
shown in the following tabulation, which presents the
percent of workers employed in fertilizer plants that
operate less than year-round:

Summary

Straight-time earnings of production workers in the
Nation’s mixed fertilizer manufacturing industry aver­
aged $2.67 an hour in March-April 1971. Over ninetenths of the 19,302 workers covered by the study 1
(nearly all men and paid time rates) earned between
$1.60 and $4 an hour; earnings of the middle half of
the workers in the array ranged from $2.02 to $3.23.
Workers in the Southeast, 43 percent of the industry’s
labor force, averaged $2.43 an hour— 9 cents more than
in the Border States, but nearly $1 an hour less than in
the Pacific region. In the four other regions for which
separate data are reported, averages ranged from $2.76
an hour in the Great Lakes States to $3.10 in the
Southwest. 2
Earnings of production workers varied considerably
by type of operation. Workers in complete (integrated)
plants averaged $3.14 an hour, compared with those in
mixing plants and superphosphate plants who averaged
$2.39 and $2.32, respectively. Differences in occupa­
tional staffing accounted for part of this variation in
wage levels.
Control-room men, who monitor the equipment
producing granulated fertilizer, averaged $3.81 an hour
and were the highest paid among the jobs studied
separately. Truckdrivers and watchmen at $2.14 an
hour were the lowest paid. Material-handling laborers,
numerically the largest occupation studied, averaged
$2.24 an hour.
Paid holidays and paid vacations after qualifying
periods of service were provided for nearly all yearround workers. At least part of the cost of retirement
pension plans and life, hospitalization, surgical, basic
and major medical insurance plans were provided for
seven-tenths or more of the year-round workers. Ten
percent or less of seasonal employees were covered by
similar benefits.

Type of plant
All plan ts...........

82

11

5

Complete (integrated)...................
Superphosphate . . .
Mixing o n ly .............

88
78
79

10
17
10

2
3
7

3

-

2
5

NOTE:
Because of rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal 100.

T ype o f plant . The industry is composed of three types
of plants, each producing mixed fertilizers as the finished
product: (1) Complete (integrated) plants manufacture
their own acids for treating phosphate rock to make
1 See appendix A for scope and method of survey. Earnings
data in this report exclude premium pay for overtime and for
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 For definitions of the regions used in this survey, see
footnote 1, table A-l in appendix A.
3 Three previous surveys are mentioned in this report. See
Industry Wage Survey: Fertilizer Manufacturing, March-April
1966 (BLS Bulletin 1531); Industry Wage Survey: Fertilizer
Manufacturing, April 1962 (BLS Bulletin 1362); and Wage
Structure: Fertilizer Manufacturing, April 1956 (BLS Report
No. 111).
4 See Employment and Earnings, United States, 1909-71
(BLS Bulletin 1312-8).

Industry characteristics

Fertilizer manufacturing plants within scope of the
survey employed 19,302 production and related workers
in March—
April 1971— a reduction of nearly 25 percent
since a previous study in March-April 1966, when



Less
11 or
9 but
6 but
than
more
less than less than
months 11 months 9 months 6 months

1

In 1971, nearly two-thirds of the industry’s 19,302
workers were employed in 12 States. (See tables 14—
25.)
Of these, Florida with 3,172 workers had the highest
employment— approximately double the number em­
ployed in North Carolina (the second highest) and three
times the number in Georgia and Ohio.
Slightly more than one-half of the production workers
were employed in metropolitan areas. 5 Regionally,
the proportions in metropolitan areas ranged from 14
percent in the Middle West to 94 percent in the Pacific
States. Three-fifths of the workers in mixing plants were
in metropolitan areas, whereas employment in both
superphosphate and complete plants was divided nearly
equally between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan
areas.

superphosphate, which is then combined with other
fertilizer materials to make a finished product; (2) super­
phosphate plants purchase the acids used to make super­
phosphate for their mixed fertilizer; and (3) mixing
plants purchase all the ingredients needed to manufacture
their fertilizer product.
In March-April 1971, mixing plants employed nearly
one-half of the workers covered by the study; complete
plants, about two-fifths; and superphosphate plants,
slightly more than one-tenth. Over the years, mixing
plants have increased their share of the industry’s
labor force as superphosphate plants declined in impor­
tance. Complete plants employed a relatively constant
proportion or about three-eighths of the labor force
when the four surveys were made:
April
1956

April
1962

March— March—
April
April
1966
1971

All p la n ts.............

100

100

100

Complete (inte­
grated) .....................
Superphosphate.........
Mixing o n ly ...............

37
30
33

35
27
37

35
20
45

Type of plant

Size o f establishment. Fertilizer plants employing 8 to

49 workers accounted for 35 percent of the industry’s
labor force; those with 50 to 99 workers, 24 percent;
and those with 100 workers or more accounted for 41
percent.
Among the regions, the distribution of workers by
size of plant varied. In the Great Lakes region, for
example, 42 percent of the labor force were in plants
employing 8 to 49 workers, and 22 percent were in
plants of 100 or more. On the other hand, 29 percent of
the workers in the Southeast were in plants employing
8 to 49, and 47 percent were in plants employing 100
or more.
Mixing plants generally employ fewer than 50 workers;
complete (integrated) plants usually employ 100 or
more. In superphosphate plants, nearly one-half of the
workers were in establishments employing from 50 to
99 workers.

100

38
13
49

NOTE:
Because of rounding, sums of individual items may
not equal 100.

T ype o f market. Plants engaged in interstate commerce
employed nearly four-fifths of the workers covered by
the survey. Regionally, the proportions ranged from
three-fifths in the Pacific States to seven-eighths or more
in the Middle Atlantic and Border States. Mixing plants,
mostly those in the Southeast and Great Lakes States,
employed four-fifths of the workers in establishments
engaged only in intrastate commerce.
Location . Despite substantial changes in employment,

Union con tract coverage. Establishments which had
collective bargaining agreements covering a majority of
their year-round production workers employed slightly
more than one-half of the industry’s labor force. The
proportions were three-fourths in complete or integrated
plants, three-fifths in superphosphate plants, and twofifths in mixing establishments. Among the regions, the
proportions of the industry’s workers in union establish­
ments were two-fifths in the Middle West, one-half in
the Great Lakes, about three-fifths in the Southeast,
Southwest, and Pacific regions, and approximately twothirds in the Middle Atlantic and Border States. The Oil,
Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union (AFL*
CIO) and the International Chemical Workers Union
(AFL-CIO) are the major unions in the industry.

the Southeast remains the major region and accounted
for about two-fifths of the industry’s work force in
March—
April 1971. The Great Lakes States employed
about one-sixth, and the Border States and Southwest,
about one-tenth each. According to surveys conducted
since 1956, the percent of the industry’s labor force
in each region has remained relatively stable:
March— March—
April
April
1971
1966

April
1956

April
1962

All workers . . . ,

100

100

100

100

Middle Atlantic . . . ,
Border States........
Southeast...............
Southwest.............,
Great Lakes...........
Middle West............
P a cific...................

7
12
44
6
22
4
2

6
12
39
6
19
8
4

6
11
37
7
22
8
5

5
10
43
11
17
6
5




5
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined by the
U.S. Office of Management and Budget through January 1968.

2

ranged from $2.76 an hour in the Great Lakes States to
$3.10 in the Southwest.
Interregional pay differences are due to many factors,
but can be explained partly by the predominant type
of plants found in each region. In the three regions with
the highest averages (the Southwest, Middle West, and
Pacific) the majority of workers were employed in
higher paying complete (integrated) plants. In the lower
paying regions a minority of workers were in complete
plants.
Information also was developed separately for 12
States of industry concentration. (See tables 14-25.)
Averages higher than the national level of $2.67 were
recorded in five— California ($3.42), Florida ($2.75),
Illinois ($3.21), Maryland ($2.71), and Ohio ($2.77).
In the other seven States, averages ranged from 68 cents
below the nationwide average in Georgia to 19 cents
below in Tennessee.
Nationwide, workers in complete (integrated) plants
averaged $3.14 an hour, compared with $2.32 in super­
phosphate plants and $2.39 in mixing establishments.
In both the Southeast and Southwest, the only regions
where comparisons among all three types o f establish­
ments were possible, workers averaged considerably
more in complete plants than in superphosphate or
mixing plants— about 35 percent more in the Southeast
and roughly 75 percent more in the Southwest. Differ­
ences in occupational staffing, noted previously, ac­
counted for part of the variation in wage levels by type
of plant.
Workers in plants engaged in interstate commerce
(78 percent of the labor force) averaged 22 percent more
than those in plants limited to intrastate commerce—
$2.78 compared with $2.27. In the four regions per­
mitting such comparisons, wages in plants engaged in
interstate commerce averaged approximately 20 to 35

Virtually all production
workers were paid on a time-rate basis. (See table 26.)
Formal rate structures providing single rates for specific
occupations applied to two-thirds of the workers, and
plans consisting of ranges of rates covered about oneeighth. Rates determined by the individual’s qualifi­
cations under informal plans applied to about one-fifth
of the workers and were most common in mixing
plants. Single-rate plans were predominant in both
complete and superphosphate plants and in each region.

M eth od o f wage p a y m e n t

Occupational staffing,. Approximately one-half of the
work force (virtually all men) were employed as baggers,
bag sewers, batch weighers, material-handling laborers,
mixers, power truckers, or truckdrivers. Of these, the
3,575 material-handling laborers were numerically most
important and accounted for one-fourth of the produc­
tion workers in superphosphate plants, one-fifth in
mixing plants, and one-tenth in integrated plants. On
the other hand, the relative importance of other occupa­
tions, such as control-room men, who monitor the equip­
ment producing granulated fertilizer, and maintenance
men was substantially greater in integrated plants than
in superphosphate and mixing plants. Such differences
in occupational staffing account for part of the variation
in wage levels among the three types of plants discussed
later in this report.
Average hourly earnings

According to the March-April 1971 survey, straighttime earnings of the industry’s 19,302 production
workers averaged $2.67 an h o u r6— nearly 41 percent
more than in a similar study 5 years earlier. Partly con­
tributing to this increase was the 28 percent rise in the
Federal minimum wage from $1.25 in 1966 to $1.60 in
1968. Another contributing factor was the decline in the
industry of seasonal workers— from nearly two-fifths of
the plant work force in 1966 to slightly more than onefourth in March—
April 1971. Because seasonal em­
ployees are usually less skilled and low paid, their
reduced share of the work force at the time o f the 1971
survey would have increased the industry’s wage level
even without a change in wage rates.
Among the regions, increases in average hourly
earnings between the two surveys ranged from about
25 percent in the Middle Atlantic and Pacific States to
55 percent in the Southeast, where two-fifths of the
labor force was employed in March—
April 1971.
In the Southeast, workers averaged $2.43 an hour in
March—
April 1971— 9 cents more than workers in
the Border States, but nearly $1 an hour less than those
in the Pacific region. (See table 1.) In the four other
regions for which separate data were tabulated, averages



6
The straight-time average hourly earnings in this bulletin
differ in concept from the gross average hourly earnings pub­
lished in the Bureau’s monthly hours and earnings series
($3 in April 1971). Unlike the latter, estimates here exclude
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays,
and late shifts. Average earnings were calculated by summing
individual hourly earnings and dividing by the number of in­
dividuals; in the monthly series, the sum of the man-hour totals
reported by establishments in the industry was divided into the
reported payroll totals.
Estimates of the number of production workers within scope
of the study are intended only as a general guide to the size and
composition of the labor force in the survey. They differ from
those in the monthly series (26,900 in March and 29,800 in
April 1971) by the exclusion of establishments employing fewer
than 8 workers. Planning for the survey required the assembling
of lists of establishments considerably in advance of data
collection. Thus, establishments new to the industry are omitted,
as are establishments originally classified in the fertilizer manu­
facturing industry, but found in other industries at the time of
the survey.

3

percent higher than those in other plants. These wage ad­
vantages reflect, in part, a heavier concentration of lower
paying mixing establishments among those limited to
intrastate commerce. Mixing plants, for example, em­
ployed four-fifths of the workers in establishments en­
gaged only in intrastate commerce, compared with twofifths in establishments engaged in interstate commerce.
Nationwide, workers in metropolitan areas averaged
2 cents an hour less than those in smaller communities
($2.66 compared with $2.68), but this difference
amounted to 42 cents an hour ($2.91 compared with
$3.33) in the Southwest, one of the three regions per­
mitting such comparisons. This unusual relationship can
be explained largely by the location of the higher paying
complete plants. For example, in nonmetropolitan areas
of the Southwest, nearly three-fourths of the workers
were in complete plants; in metropolitan areas, the
proportion was two-fifths. In the Southeast and Great
Lakes regions, where complete plants were relatively
more important in metropolitan areas, workers averaged
4 and 15 cents an hour more, respectively, in metro­
politan areas than in nonmetropolitan areas.
Earnings data for production workers also were
tabulated according to size of establishment and labormanagement contract coverage. Nationwide, earnings
in plants employing 100 workers or more averaged
$3.10 an hour— 21 percent more than in plants em­
ploying 5 0 -9 9 ($2.56), and 38 percent more than in
establishments with 8 -4 9 employees ($2.24). Workers
in plants with a majority of their year-round employees
covered by labor-management contracts averaged 10
percent an hour more than those in plants where none
or a minority were covered ($2.78 compared with
$2.53). These general relationships held in most regions
where comparisons were possible.
Earnings of the 19,302 production workers were
distributed over a comparatively wide range; the middle
half earned from $2.02 to $3.23 an hour. (See table 2.)
Almost one-tenth of the industry’s labor force earned
more than $4 an hour, while nearly one-fourth earned
less than $2. The following tabulation indicates the
percent of workers earning less than specified amounts,

Occupational earnings

Seventeen occupations, accounting for nearly 60 per­
cent of the work force, were selected to represent the
various skills and wage levels of production workers in
the industry. (See table 5.) Average earnings in these
jobs ranged from $2.14 an hour for truckdrivers and
watchmen to $3.81 for control-room men. Material
handling laborers, about 20 percent of the labor force
and the largest group studied separately, averaged $2.24
an hour. Power truckers (other than forklift operators),
baggers, and maintenance mechanics— each accounting
for about 5 percent of the production workers— averaged
$2.36, $2.47, and $3.55, respectively.
Occupational averages were generally highest in the
Pacific region and lowest in the Southeast. In the Pacific
States, averages for all but one occupation shown were
higher than the corresponding nationwide averages; in
the Southeast, all were lower. (See table 5.) The fol­
lowing tabulation presents regional averages for three
occupations as a percent of their nationwide levels and
illustrates wide differences among the regions:

Truckdrivers
United States . .
Middle Atlantic . . .
Border States.........
Southeast .............
Southwest.............
Great Lakes...........
Middle W est...........
P a cific................... .

Under
$2.00

Under
$2.20

10

23

36

3
26
37
19
9

5
41
54
30
18
28
2

United States...........
Middle A tla n tic ___
Border States...........
Southeast ...............
Southwest...............
Great Lakes.............
Middle West.............
P a cific.....................
1

_

.

8
16
11
4
5

?

(M

Less than 0.5 percent.




Maintenance
mechanics

100

100

100

140
94
91
99
112
91
147

118
97
86
102
116
113
122

93
87
94
117
96
99
122

Truckdrivers in the Pacific States averaged 62 percent
more than their Southeastern counterparts. For material
handling laborers and maintenance mechanics, the dif­
ferences in wage levels between the same two regions
were 41 percent and 30 percent, respectively.
Occupational earnings in virtually all jobs studied
were higher in complete (integrated) plants than in
superphosphate or mixing plants. (See tables 7, 9, and
11.) However, in smaller fertilizer plants job speciali­
zation may be lacking and precise occupational classifi­
cation is not always possible. A laborer, for example,
may be assigned to bag sewing, batch weighing, or other
low-skilled tasks during the same day or week.
Occupational earnings also were tabulated by type of
market, size of community, and size of establishment.
With few exceptions, occupational averages were higher
in plants engaged in interstate commerce than in those
engaged only in intrastate commerce. (See table 6.)
When tabulated by size of community, earnings of
workers in complete plants were usually higher in non­
metropolitan than metropolitan areas; in superphosphate

nationw ide and regionally, a t the tim e o f the survey:
Under
$1.80

Material
handling
laborers

4

round and seasonal workers in all cases, except for
shift practices, which were expected to apply uniformly
to both groups.

and mixing establishments, the opposite was true. (See
tables 7, 9, and 12.) Workers in large plants averaged
more than those in smaller establishments. In complete
plants, for example, material handling laborers earned
$2.59 in establishments employing 100 workers or more
compared to $2.18 in plants with 50 to 99 employees.
Maintenance mechanics remained among the highest
paid workers in the industry; truckdrivers and material
handling laborers, the most populous group studied,
stayed among the lowest. Both maintenance mechanics
and truckdrivers have more than doubled their share of
the work force since 1956; the proportion of material
handling laborers dropped by nearly one-half. Pay levels
for these and the 11 other occupations studied since
1956 7 are shown in the following tabulation as a per­
cent of the industry’s overall pay level at the time of
each study:

Baggers............... ..
Bag sewers, machine. .
Batch weighers...........
Chambermen.............
Conveyor tenders___
Laborers, material
handling...................
Mechanics, mainte­
nance .......................
M illers.......................
Mixers,dry m ixing .. .
Mixers, super­
phosphate ...............
Truckdrivers .............
Truckers, power
(fo rk lift).................

a week were in effect in establishments employing
nearly two-thirds of the year-round workers at the time
of the survey. (See table 27.) Another one-tenth of the
year-round workers were scheduled for 50 to 60 hours
a week. Work schedules of seasonal workers were
generally longer; slightly less than one-half were sched­
uled for 40 hours and nearly one-third for 50 to 60
hours a week.
Weekly work schedules of 50 hours or more were in
effect for about one-fifth of the year-round employees
in the Southeast and Great Lakes regions and for threetenths in the Middle Atlantic and Border States. In the
Southwest, Middle West, and Pacific States, more than
nine-tenths of all year-round workers were on schedules
ranging from 40 to 48 hours a week.

March— March—
April
April
1966
1971

April
1956
All production
workers...............

Scheduled w eek ly hours. Work schedules of 40 hours

April
1962

100

100

100

100

99
87
103
110
101

99
90
95
113
95

96
91
94
112
93

93
85
88
97
97

91

92

87

84

137
110
99

137
113
96

136
112
99

133
114
90

112
90

112
86

110
89

94
80

102

108

106

100

98
87

96
89

92
84

88
80

Shift practices. About 22 percent of the workers were

employed on late shifts at the time of the survey, and
nearly all received a cents-per-hour differential above
day-shift rates. (See table 28.) Second-shift workers
accounted for 14 percent of the work force and usually
received a differential ranging from 5 to 10 cents an
hour above day-shift rates. For third or other late shift
work, differentials most commonly ranged from 14 to
30 cents. Regionally, the proportions of workers em­
ployed on late shifts ranged from slightly under 15
percent in the Border States to 27 percent in the South­
west. Differentials for late shift work were generally
greater in the Southwest, Middle West, and Pacific States
than in the other four regions.

Truckers, power

(other than fork­
lift) .........................
Watchmen.................

Paid holidays. Paid holidays— most commonly 7, 8, or

9 days annually— were provided to nearly all year-round
workers. (See table 29.) In each region, more than ninetenths of the year-round workers had paid holiday
provisions, but the number of days granted varied. Onefourth of the seasonal workers had provisions for paid
holidays, usually fewer than 5 days annually.

As indicated, average earnings generally increased
faster for the industry as a whole than for the occupa­
tions listed. Although some jobs showed higher rates of
increase between intervening surveys, average earnings in
only one (millers) outpaced the industrywide level
between April 1956 and March-April 1971.

Paid vacations. Paid vacations after qualifying periods

of service were provided to virtually all year-round

Establishment practices and supplementary
wage provisions

7
As the industry changes, the jobs selected for separate
study reflect shifts in the importance of occupations. For
example, the three jobs added to the survey in 1971 (controlroom men, contact-acid-plant operators, and granulator opera­
tors) resulted from increased use of more advanced equipment.
On the other hand, maintenance carpenters and bag printers
were dropped because of their declining importance.

Data also were obtained on work schedules, shift
practices, and selected supplementary wage benefits,
such as paid holidays, vacation, and health, insurance,
and retirement plans. The information contained in the
following paragraphs is presented separately for year-




5

workers but to less than one-tenth of the seasonal em­
ployees. (See table 31.) Vacation payments for nearly
all eligible workers (seasonal and year-round) were
determined on the basis of the employee’s regular pay
for a specified period of time (e.g., 1 week, 2 weeks, etc.).
Nationwide, typical vacation provisions for eligible sea­
sonal and year-round employees were 1 week’s pay after
1 year of service, 2 weeks’ after 2 years, and at least 3
weeks’ pay after 10 years. One-half of the workers were
in establishments providing 4 or 5 weeks’ vacation pay
after 20 years.
Vacation provisions were substantially less liberal in
the Border States than in the other 6 regions. For
example, provisions for at least 3 weeks’ pay after 10
years of service applied to 24 percent of the eligible
year-round workers in the Border States, whereas the
proportions elsewhere ranged from 57 percent in the
Southeast to 82 percent in the Pacific.

Regionally, the proportions of year-round workers in
establishments providing health and insurance benefits
varied. For example, over nine-tenths of the year-round
workers in the Southwest and Middle West regions were
in establishments providing for life insurance, compared
with about seven-tenths in the Border States and Pacific
regions.
Retirement pension plans, in addition to Federal
social security, were provided for 76 percent of the yearround workers and for 6 percent of the seasonal workers.
In all regions but the Middle West, these plans were
usually financed entirely by employers. Retirement
severance pay was virtually nonexistent in the industry.
Other selected benefits.

Cost-of-living pay adjustments,
common only in the Middle Atlantic States, applied to
4 percent of both year-round and seasonal workers.
Technological severance pay to employees perma­
nently separated from the company through no fault of
their own was provided by establishments employing
7 percent of the year-round workers and 2 percent of
the seasonal workers. Only in the Middle Atlantic region,
where 43 percent of the year-round workers had pro­
visions for technological severance pay, were such plans
common.

Health, insurance, and retirem ent plans.

Life, hospitali­
zation, and surgical insurance plans for which employers
paid at least part of the cost were available to approxi­
mately nine-tenths of the year-round workers. (See table
33.) Proportions of year-round workers provided other
benefits were basic medical insurance, eight-tenths; major
medical insurance, about three-fourths; accidental death
and dismemberment insurance, two-thirds; and sickness
and accident insurance plans, about one-half. Selected
health and insurance benefits typically applied to onetenth or less of the seasonal workers.




The incidence of supplemental unemployment bene­
fits in the industry also was studied, but no establishment
visited had this provision for a majority of its production
workers.

6

T a b le 1. A v e r a g e hourly earnings: B y sele cted c h a r a c te r is tic s
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts b y s e l e c t e d c h a r a c t e r is t i c s , U n ited S ta tes and s e le c t e d r e g io n s , Ma.,
M a r c h — p r i l 1971)
A
U nited States 2
Item

N u m ber
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
ea rn in g s

M id d le A tla n tic
N um ber
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s 3 --------

19, 302

$2. 67

930

T y p e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t:
C o m p le t e o r in te g r a t e d ---------------S u p e r p h o s p h a t e ----------------------------M ix in g o n l y ------------------------------------

7, 378
2, 524
9, 400

3. 14
2. 32
2. 39

785

2 .8 0

T ype o f m a rk et:
I n t e r s t a t e ---------------------------------------I n tr a s ta te ----------------------------------------

15, 030
4, 272

2. 78
2 .2 7

817
-

S iz e o f c o m m u n ity :
M e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s 4 -------------------N o n m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s ----------------

10, 493
8 ,8 0 9

2. 66
2. 68

S iz e o f e s t a b lis h m e n t :
8 -4 9 w o r k e r s --------------------------------5 0 -9 9 w o r k e r s ---------------------------------------------100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e —

6, 729
4, 700
7, 873

L ab or— an agem en t co n tr a c ts:
m
E s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith m a jo r it y o f
y e a r -r o u n d w o r k e r s c o v e r e d —
E s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith n on e o r a
m in o r it y o f y e a r -r o u n d
w o r k e r s c o v e r e d ------------------------

2
3
4

E x c lu d e s
In clu d e s
V ir t u a lly
Sta n da rd

N o te :




A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

S ou th ea st
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

S ou th w est
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A v era ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

G r e a t L a k es
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

M id d le W est
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A vera ge
h ou rly
ea rn in gs

P a c ifi c
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A v e ra g e
h ou rly
ea rn in gs

2, 023

$2. 34

8, 258

$2. 43

2, 104

$3. 10

3, 231

$2. 76

1, 140

$ 2 .8 3

984

$ 3 .4 1

536

2. 60
2. 26

3, 887
1, 127
3, 244

2. 83
2. 10
2. 06

1, 165
379
560

3 .8 5
2. 24
2. 13

_
471
2, 551

_
2 .6 0
2. 76

632
_
416

3. 28
_
2. 28

549
_
397

3. 77
_

1, 298

2 .8 4

1, 867
-

2. 37
"

6, 334
1, 924

2. 58
1 .9 3

1, 623
-

3. 12
-

2, 4 44
787

2. 88
2 .3 9

806
334

3. 06
2. 27

596
388

3 .7 6
2 .8 7

737

2 .8 0
-

1, 732
-

2. 40
-

4, 175
4, 083

2. 45
2. 41

1, 125
979

2 .9 1
3. 33

1, 570
1 ,6 6 1

2 .8 4
2. 69

_
975

_
2 .9 1

924
-

3. 37
-

2. 24
2. 56
3. 10

593
192

2. 78
2 .8 8

880
560
583

2. 06
2. 64
2. 47

2, 392
1 ,9 9 5
3, 871

1. 90
2. 06
2 .9 5

703
413
988

2. 16
3. 12
3. 77

1, 367
1, 152
712

2. 51
2. 98
2. 88

269
233
638

2. 43
2. 71
3. 04

376
155
453

3. 15
3. 35
3. 64

1 0 ,8 5 8

2. 78

608

2 .9 9

1, 389

2. 51

4 , 603

2. 45

1, 215

3. 37

1, 588

2 .9 3

447

3. 09

590

3. 31

8, 444

2. 53

322

2. 47

634

1 .9 7

3, 655

2. 40

889

2. 74

1, 643

2. 60

693

2. 65

394

3. 55

-

$ 2 .8 1

B o r d e r S tates
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

-

-

p r e m iu m pa y fo r o v e r t im e and f o r w ork on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
data f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
a ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e r e m en .
M e t r o p o lit a n S ta tistica l A r e a s a s d efin ed b y the U. S. O ffic e o f M a n a g em en t and B u d get th rou g h J a n u a ry 1968.

D a s h e s in d ic a te no data re p o r t e d o r data that d o not m e e t p u b lica tio n c r it e r ia .

2 .9 9




T a b le 2. E a r n in g s

distribution: A ll esta b lish m e n ts

(P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s b y s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , 1 U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s ,
M a rc h - A p r il 1971)
H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1

U nited States 2

M id d le A tlan tic

B o r d e r S tates

_

_

-

-

3. 3
.3
2. 6

S ou th ea st

G rea t L ak es

S ou th w est

M id d le W e st

0 .6
9. 3
1. 3
2 .9

_
6. 7
. 5
1. 3

_
0. 7

_

. 7

1. 5
. 7
.6
2 .2
1 .9
. 3
1 .4
.6

P a c if i c
.
-

U n der
$ 1 .6 0
$ 1 .6 5
$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 . 6 0 ------------------------------------and u n d er $ 1 . 6 5 ___________
and u n d er $ 1. 7 0 ___________
and u n d e r $ 1 . 7 5 ___________

0. 3
5. 3
.7
1 .8

$ 1 .7 5
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .8 5
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1 .9 5

and
and
and
and
an d

under
u n d er
under
u n d er
u n d er

$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .8 5
________
$ 1 . 9 0 ___________
$ 1 . 9 5 ___________
$ 2 . 0 0 ___________

2 .0
3. 1
2. 6
4. 5
3. 0

0 .2
1. 1
1 .6

1 .4
7 .9
.6
7. 7
2. 5

2. 3
3 .9
5. 1
6 .9
5. 1

2. 0
2. 1
1. 0
3 .6
1 .4

2 .9
1 .4
. 3
1. 1
1 .4

$ 2 .0 0
$ 2 . 10
$ 2 .2 0
$ 2 .3 0
$ 2 .4 0

and
an d
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
under
under
u n d er

$ 2 . 1 0 ___________
$ 2 . 20
_ _
$ 2 . 3 0 ___________
$ 2 . 4 0 ___________
$ 2 . 5 0 ___________

9. 1
3 .9
5. 7
3. 9
3 .4

.3
1.7
9 .0
3 .0
3. 7

1 1 .6
3. 1
1 3 .4
9 .2
5. 1

11. 3
5 .6
3. 5
3. 8
3 .0

6 .8
4. 1
5 .4
•9
2. 8

6. 3
3. 0
9 .4
5. 1
2. 6

16.
2.
1.
1.
5.

7
5
9
1
3

.8
.6
1 .8
1 .0
7. 0

$ 2 .5 0
$ 2 .6 0
$ 2 .7 0
$ 2 .8 0
$ 2 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
under
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 2 . 6 0 ----------------$ 2 . 7 0 ----------------$ 2 . 8 0 ----------------$ 2 . 9 0 ----------------$ 3 . 0 0 -----------------

4 .6
3. 3
3 .8
3 .8
3. 1

2 .5
8 .9
9 .0
14. 7
1 0.8

2 .7
3. 2
7. 0
2. 9
3 .8

4. 3
2 .5
1 .7
1 .7
1. 7

2 .9
3 .6
.7
1. 7
.5

8. 7
4 .4
8. 3
5. 3
5 .7

6. 0
1 .8
1 .7
12. 2
4 .6

4 .4
4 .9
6 .6
4 .4
4 .6

$ 3 .0 0
$ 3 . 10
$ 3 .2 0
$ 3 .3 0
$ 3 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
under
u n d er
under

$ 3 . 1 0 ----------------$ 3 . 2 0 ----------------$ 3 . 3 0 ----------------$ 3 . 4 0 ----------------$ 3 . 5 0 -----------------

3. 7
2 .4
3 .4
1 .6
2. 7

9 .8
8 .7
7. 3
2 .6
2 .2

3. 6
2. 3
1 .0
1. 3
1. 1

2. 2
1. 3
2 .4
.3
2. 5

2. 2
1. 1
1 .0
1 .4
3. 3

4. 0
4 .2
6. 7
3 .4
2. 2

2. 1
1 .8
3 .4
5. 6
1 .8

4. 1
3. 3
8 .9
.5
7. 3

$ 3 .5 0
$ 3 .6 0
$ 3 .7 0
$ 3 .8 0
$ 3 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
under
u n d er
u n d er

$ 3 . 6 0 . ---------------$ 3 . 7 0 ----------------$ 3 . 8 0 ----------------$ 3 . 9 0 ----------------$ 4 . 0 0 -----------------

1. 3
2. 2
2. 3
2 .4
1 .4

2 .2
.2
.2
.4
. 1

.7
.8
. 3
.3
.3

1. 0
2. 5
3. 6
2. 5
1 .2

.
2.
3.
5.
1.

1.
3.
.
1.
1.

4. 9
2. 3

1. 0
3. 5
4 .9
2. 7
3. 0

$ 4 .0 0
$ 4 . 10
$ 4 . 20
$ 4 .3 0
$ 4 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
under

$ 4 . 1 0 ----------------$ 4 . 2 0 ----------------$ 4 . 3 0 ----------------$ 4 . 4 0 ----------------$ 4 . 5 0 -----------------

2. 7
2 .0
.5
1 .4
.5

_

.3

-

-

6. 5
10. 1
.8
10. 0
.5

.9
1 .4
1. 2
.4
.2

3. 0
1 .5
1. 0

( 3)
-

2 .4
.4
(3)
. 1
.8

1 .9

•1

$ 4 . 50 and o v e r --------------------------------

1. 3

_

_

2. 9

1. 1

. 1

11. 2
100. 0

-

3
1
3
5
1

-

0
1
9
0
1

-

3. 2
4. 3

-

-

_
-

0. 1

2. 7
4 .2
2. 2
4. 2

T o t a l __________________________

1 0 0 .0

100 .0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s ------------------------

1 9 ,3 0 2

930

2 ,0 2 3

8 ,2 5 8

2, 104

3 ,2 3 1

1, 140

984

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 . . . -------

$ 2 .6 7

$ 2 .8 1

$ 2 . 34

$ 2 .4 3

$ 3 . 10

$ 2 . 76

$ 2 .8 3

$ 3 .4 1

3 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s ,
2 In c lu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition t o t h o se show n s e p a r a te ly .
3 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
N ote:

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,

stuns o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot eq u a l 100.

and la te sh ifts .

T a b le 3. E a rn in g s distribution: A ll e sta b lish m en ts by type o f m arket
(P e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in f e r t il iz e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s b y s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , 1 b y type o f m a r k e t (in te r s ta te o r in tr a s ta te c o m m e r c e ),
U n ited S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , M a r c h -A p r i l 1971)
United S ta tes
H o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1

In te r­
state

U n d er
$ 1. 60
$ 1 .6 5
$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .6 0
_____
and u n d er $ 1. 65
and u n d er $ 1 . 7 0 ------------------------- ------------and u n d er $ 1 .7 5 — — _____________- ______

$ 1 .7 5
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .8 5
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1 .9 5

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .8 5
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1 .9 5
$ 2 .0 0

-----------------------— ___ ___
-------------------------------------_____ _____________ — ----------------------------- — ---------------------------------------------____

$ 2 . 0 0 and u n d er $ 2 . 1 0 .
.
$ 2 . 1 0 and u n d e r $ 2 . 2 0 — —
$ 2 . 2 0 and u n d er $ 2 .3 0 .
$ 2 . 4 0 and u n d e r $ 2 . 5 0

__

—

2.6

.5
1. 1
1 .9
2.8
2.8

4 .7
3. 3

2

In tra ­
sta te

M id d le
A tla n tic
I n te r­
state

B order
Sta tes
In ter­
sta te

_

1.8
. 2
1.8

4.7

1. 3
8 .5
.4

2. 3
3 .0
5 .7
7 .2
5 .9

1. 2
1 4 .9
1. 3
4 .6

.
_
_
1.8

2.2

.
. 1
8. 3
3. 3

3 .7

2.0

4 .7
3 .0
4. 1
4. 1
3 .5

4 .4
4. 2
2 .7

2. 2

4. 3
2 .5
4. 2

1 6 .7
5 .9
6 .7

8.0
2. 0
10.8

2 .7
1 3 .8
10.0

5 .4

-----—

$ 2 . 9 0 and u n d er $ 3 . 0 0 .

$ 3 .0 0
$ 3 .1 0
$ 3. 20
$ 3 .3 0
$ 3 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 3 .1 0
$ 3 .2 0
$ 3. 3 0
$ 3 .4 0
$ 3 .5 0

—

2.6

_

------------------------------------------------------- ----------- ---------------------------------------------

9 .7
9 .4
16. 2
12. 1

3. 2
7 .6
3. 1
4. 1

11.0

1.8

1 .9
1 .9
.5
.7

2 .9

1.8

2 .4

3 .9
2 .5
1. 1
1 .4
1. 2

1.6

$ 2 . 7 0 and u n d e r $ 2 .8 0 —

.4
.5

1 .5
.2

2.6

1 .9

$ 3 . 6 0 and u n d er $ 3 .7 0
$ 3 . 7 0 and u n d er $ 3 . 8 0 ----------------------------—_____

2 .7
3 .0
2 .4

$4

1.8

•

$ 4 .0 0
$ 4 .1 0
$ 4 .2 0
$ 4 .3 0

$ 4 . 10 —
_
_
$ 4 . 2 0 ______—_________________
$ 4 .3 0
$ 4 .4 0 —

3 .4
2. 2
.7

9 .8
7 .8
2.0

2.6

$ 3 . 9 0 and u n d er

.4
1. 3
(3)

and
and
and
and

u n d er
under
under
u n d er

00 -

I n tra ­
sta te

South­
w est
In ter­
sta te

G reat L akes

P a c ifi c

M id d le W e st

In ter­
sta te

In tra ­
sta te

In ter­
sta te

0. 2

Z. 3
_

1*6
.2

In tra ­
state

I n te r­
state

In tra ­
state

-

-

-

0. 3

2.8

2 .5
4. 1
1 .7
3 .7
1 .9

7 .0
3 .4
5 .5
4 .4
3. 3

S ou th ea st
I n te r­
sta te

(3)

_

1

•

1

_
_
_
_

1.8

.8
.9
. 3
. 3

-

.9
1. 2

2 4 .7
2 .5
8 .4

i.l
1 .7

.8

.6

•1

2 .7

1 .7

3 .4
1. 2
.2
.9
1. 3

1. 3
1 .9

.4
_
.4
.4

.6

6.8

2.8

3. 1
5 .8

1. 2
4 .5

2.6

1.8

9 .4
4 .5
3 .5
4. 3
3 .8

1 7 .4
9 .0
3 .6
2. 2
.5

8. 1

5. 3
2. 3
2. 2

1. 2
2 .9
. 1

3 .8
1 .7
.9

2.0
2. 2

.6
. 1

1.6

2.8

.4

1 .5
3 .0
.4
3. 2

.8

2 .5
1 .5
1. 2
.9
4. 3

1. 2

3. 3
4 .7
3 .2
1 .5

. 3
. 1
. 3
.4
. 1
. 1
_

.8

2. 3

.7

.4
1.8

-

4. 3
.9
1. 5

.8

8 .4

. 3
_
_
. 1

3 .0
(3 )
.2

_
_
_

-

.6

5. 3
3 .7

_

.6

1. 7
1. 7

1. 3
2 .9
8. 3
6. 2
2 .7

21.6

6.0

17. 3
5 .6
6. 1

4 .0
9 .0
4 .9
6 .5

3 .8
4. 5

3 .0
13. 1
1. 7
2 .4

6.6

3. 3

4. 6
3 .6
1. 1

10. 2
1.0
1. 1
.6

4 .0
7 .9
2. 1
1 .9
17. 2
4. 3

1.6

4 .5
2 .9

1 .4
4 .8
7 .9
. 1

1 .4
4. 1
1. 2
1. 3
1 .4

6 .9
3. 2
_
3 .8
6. 1

8.6

10.0
1.0

1. 2
1.8
1.6

1 2 .9
.7

.5
.3

4. 2
2. 1
1 .4
_
2 .7

1 .7

1 .5

1 ~2
1.8
1.8
6.6
6.6

3? 9
2. 1
32. 3

2. 1
1. 5
4 .6

6.0

3 .9
2 .4
8 .4

2.6
1*8

14. 9

1. 2
1. 2
1. 2

_
5 .4

5 .2
4 .5
1 .7
1 .7
1 .7

3. 1
5 .4
14. 2
8 .5
9 .0

3. 3
3. 0
_

3 .5
.7
1 4 .4

67o

3 .0

4 .9
7. 2
.5
1. 3
1 3 .9

_
_
1. 8

1. 3
4 .9
8. 1
4 .5
4. 2

-

#!

_
_
_

.5
1. 3
_
1. 3

4. 5
6.0

3 .5
6 .9

1. 3
. 3
_
. 3

.7

(3)

-

-

1.0

1 .4

.9

.

.

.

1 7 .8

1.0

__

100.0

100.0

100. 0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Number of workers
...
__
Average hourly earnings1 — --- -------------------------

15,030
$2.78

4,272
$2.27

817
$ 2.84

1,867
$2. 37

6,334
$2.58

1, 924
$ 1.93

1,623
$3. 12

2,444
$ 2.88

787
$ 2 .3 9

806
$3.06

334
$2. 27

596
$3.76

388
$2.87

$ 4 . 5 0 and o v e r
T otal

------

—
-

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w ork on w e e k e n d s ,
2 In clu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o se shown s e p a r a t e ly .
3 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:




B e c a u s e o f rou n d in g ,

h o lid a y s ,

su m s o f in d iv id u a l item s m a y not eq u al 100.

and la te s h ift s .

-

T a b le 4. E a r n in g s distribution: B y type o f esta b lish m en t
( P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts by s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , 1 b y type o f e st a b lis h m e n t , U nited Sta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s ,
M a r c h r -A p r il 1971)
S u p erp h osp h a te plants

C o m p le te (in teg ra ted ) pla n ts
H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1

U n ited
Sta tes 1
2

B order
States

South­
ea st

South­
w est

M id d le
W e st

0 .5
.4
. 3

_
_

0 .9
.6
.5

_
_
-

_
0 .9
.2

.7
. 1
6 .0
3 .8
5. 3

_
_
0. 7
-

6.
3.
2.
6.
3.

1.
1.
3.
.
1.

U n ited
Sta tes 2

South­
east

7. 0
1 .0
1 .9

9? 3
2 .0
1 .6

16? 4
_

-

1. 1
4 .6
1. 2
7. 1
4 .8

1 .5
_
1. 1
_
4 .6

P a c if i c

South­
w est

M ix in g plants
G re a t
L a k es

IT W$1A0
m
$ 1 . 6 0 and u n d er $ 1 . 6 5 ---------------------------$ 1 . 6 5 and u n d er $ 1 . 7 0 ----------------------------

-

.5
_
.
.2
.5

_
_
_
_
_
.

U n ited
M id d le
S tates 2 A tla n tic

B order
S tates

South­
east

South­
w est

G re a t
L akes

M id d le
W est

1 .6
1 9 .5
1 .8
6. 3

14? 3
1 .8
4 .8

0 .7
_
. 3

4? 1
.5
1 .4

_
_

P a c ifi c

0 .6
8 .7
.8
3 .0

_
_

“

1. 3
_
3 .4

-

4? 9
. 3
2 .9

.9
7 .7
2 .0
12. 3
8. 3

3 .7
_
_
9 .5
2 .4

_
5. 3
_
.8
1 .7

3 .6
5. 1
2 .5
5 .6
2 .6

_
_
0. 3
1. 3
1 .9

2. 2
1 2 .0
.4
1 1 .9
2 .9

4 .9
7. 1
5 .0
8 .7
3 .9

5 .0
8 .0
3 .6
5 .5
3 .6

3 .6
.7
.4
1. 2
1 .5

4. 3
5. 3
.7
3 .6
1 .0

_
_
_
0. 3

16. 3
6 .2
1 0 .8
3. 2
5. 0

1 7 .8
8. 1
8 .5
2 .2
7 .9

1 9 .0
1 0 .0
1 2 .4
1. 1
3 .7

5. 1
_
1 3 .6
9 .8
3. 2

11. 3
4 .8
6 .7
3 .0
3 .0

.4
2 .0
1 0 .7
3 .6
4. 3

1 1 .9
3 .0
1 0 .5
3 .5
3 .0

1 5 .0
7. 2
3 .6
1. 3
1 .0

1 0 .7
6. 3
5 .0
2 .7
5. 4

6 .9
3 .8
9 .4
4 .7
2 .7

3 0 .0
6 .7
4 .8
1 .9
7 .7

.
_
2 .5
1 0 .6

----------------------------

.4
. 1
3. 2
2. 1
2 .8

-

------------------------------------------------------_
---------------------------—
-

4. 0
2. 1
2 .8
5. 2
3 .4

4 .9
.4
1 5 .9
2 5 .4
1 0 .8

$ 2. 50 and u n d e r $ 2. 6 0 ---------------------------$ 2 . 6 0 and u n d er $ 2 . 7 0 ------$ 2 . 7 0 and u n d e r $ 2 . 8 0 ---------------------------$ 2 .9 0 and u n d e r $ 3 . 0 0 ------------- — ----------

5. 0
2. 1
2 .9
4. 3
2 .7

2 .6
2 .4
7. 1
4. 1
6. 3

7 .4
3 .0
3. 2
2 .5
2 .7

1 .5
.7
.2
1. 7
.2

3 .8
2 .7
1. 1
20. 1
4 .6

.
.
4.
1.
2.

2
2
2
3
2

5 .4
2 .9
4 .6
2 .7
1 .9

2 .9
1 .5
.7
2 .0
2. 3

6. 3
2 .6
2 .9
.8
. 3

1 1 .9
1. 1
9 .3
3. 2
3. 2

4. 1
4. 3
4. 3
3 .6
3 .9

2 .9
5 .7
5 .5
1 4 .0
1 2 .7

2 .9
3 .9
8 .0
2 .8
3. 1

1. 1
2. 2
. 3
.7
.2

3 .8
10. 2
.4
2. 1
1 .4

7 .9
5. 3
8 .0
4 .4
6 .0

5. 8
1 .0
1 .9
2 .9
5. 8

10. 1
11. 3
8 .6
9. 1
7. 3

$ 3 .0 0
$ 3 .1 0
$ 3 .2 0
$ 3 .3 0
$ 3. 40

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
under
u n d er
u n d er
under

$ 3 .1 0
$ 3 .2 0
$ 3 .3 0
$ 3. 4 0
$ 3. 50

... .
----- ------------------ -----------------------------------— ________________

4 .7
2 .7
4. 7
2 .0
4. 4

2 .8
5 .6
3 .0
2 .8
3 .5

3 .6
2 .3
4 .5
.6
5. 1

2. 8
2. 1
1. 3
1.5
5. 7

2 .5
1 .7
6. 2
10. 1
. 2

1 .8
3. 1
15. 1
_
2 .0

2. 1
2. 1
1 .5
1. 3
.6

.9
.4
_
. 1
.4

_
.
1. 3

3 .8
6. 2
7. 2
4. 2
2. 3

3 .5
2. 3
2 .8
1. 3
1 .8

9 .0
7 .9
8 .7
3. 1
2 .5

4 .4
1. 2
.4
.7
.3

1. 1
.5
.6
. 1
. 1

2 .5
_
_
2. 1
.5

4 .0
3 .6
6 .5
2 .9
2. 3

1 .9
2. 4
_
_
4 .8

7 .6
3 .8
1. 3
.8
1 5 .4

$ 3 .5 0
$ 3. 60
$ 3 .7 0
$ 3 .8 0
$ 3 .9 0

and
and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
under
under
under

$ 3. 6 0
$ 3. 7 0
$ 3 .8 0
$ 3 .9 0
$ 4 .0 0

_____ ___ _______—
---------------------------- —
—

1 .9
4. 1
5 .5
5 .4
3. 1

1. 3
.2
.2
.7
-

1 .6
5 .4
7 .5
5. 2
2 .5

.4
3 .7
5. 7
9 .9
1 .5

8 .9
4. 1
_
4 .9
7 .8

.7
4 .0
8 .4
4 .7
3 .8

1. 3
.4
. 1
1 .9
. 2

. 3
_
_
_

.2
1 .7
_
1 .5

.9
1. 3
.5
.2
.4

2 .5
.3
_
.5
. 1

.6
1. 1
.4
.2

.6
_
. 3
_

.4
.
_
_

1. 2
3 .6
1 .0
.2
1. 3

_
_
1. 4

-

_
.5
.8
_
1 .6

1 .5
3 .0
.5
.3
2. 3

$ 4. 00
$ 4 . 10
$ 4 .2 0
$ 4 .3 0
$ 4 .4 0

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 4 . 10
$ 4 .2 0
$ 4 .3 0
$ 4 .4 0
$ 4 .5 0

- __ _________ _____
------------------------------------------------------___

5 .6
4. 2
.9
3 .4
.4

.
_
_
_

2 .8
.8
. 1
. 1

_
.6
. 1
-

_
_
_
-

_
4. 2
.5
-

_
_
_
-

.5
_
_
. 1

“

-

-

“

-

1. 2
.6
.4
.2
.8

_
_
_

-

5 .4
2 .7
1 .7
_
3 .5

4 .9
6 .6
3 .8
7 .5

-

1 1.7
1 6 .8
1. 2
1 8 .0
.9

-

o v e r ----------------------------------------

2 .7

5. 2

. 2

1 8 .4

_

_

_

.5

_

$ 1 .7 5
$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .8 5
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1 .9 5

and
and
and
and
and

under
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er
u n d er

$ 1 .8 0
$ 1 .8 5
$ 1 .9 0
$ 1 .9 5
$ 2 .0 0

— —
-------------------------------------------------------

$ 2 .0 0
$ 2 .1 0
$ 2. 20
$ 2. 30
$ 2. 40

and
and
and
and
and

u n d er
under
under
u n d er
u n d er

$ 2 .1 0
$ 2 .2 0
$ 2. 30
$ 2 .4 0
$ 2. 50

$ 4 .5 0 and

T o t a l __________________________________

_
_
.

3
5
1
3
3

0
1
3
3

.5
.
_
.8
4 .4

-

-

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100. 0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s —
_ _ _
7 ,3 7 8
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 ___ - ______ ___ _ $ 3 .1 4

536
$ 2 .6 0

3 ,8 8 7
$ 2 .8 3

1, 165
$ 3 .8 5

632
$ 3 .2 8

549
$ 3 .7 7

2 ,5 2 4
$ 2 . 32

1, 127
$ 2 . 10

379
$ 2 . 24

471
$ 2 .6 0

9, 400
$ 2 . 39

785
$ 2 .8 0

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s ,
2 In clu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d itio n to th o se show n s e p a r a te ly .
3 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:




B e c a u s e o f rou n d in g ,

s u m s o f in d iv id u a l ite m s m a y not eq u al 100.

and la te s h ift s .

-

-

_
_
_

-

2 .9
.2
( 3)
.2
1 .9

_

_

1 0 0 .0
1, 298
$ 2 . 26

_

.4
1. 8
1 .5
.5
.3
1 .4

_

_

1. 3
.3
_
.3
2. 3

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

3, 244
$ 2 .0 6

560
$ 2 . 13

2 ,5 5 1
$ 2 .7 6

416
$ 2 . 28

397
$ 2 .9 9

T a b le 5. O c c u p a tio n a l averages: A ll e s ta b lish m e n ts
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , U n ited Sta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , M a r c h -A p r il 1971)
United States 2
O cc u p a tio n

B a g g e r s ---------------------------------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h in e ---------------------------B a tch w e i g h e r s --------------------------------------C h a m b e r m e n —----------- ----------------------------

Contact-acid-plant operators—-------—
Control-room m e n ----------------------------C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s — ----------------------------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a te r ia l h a n d lin g -------------M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n c e — ----------------M i l l e r s ---------------------------------------------------M ix e r s , d r y m ix in g --------------------------------M ix e r s , su p e rp h o s p h a te ------------------------T r u c k d r i v e r s ----------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) -----------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o t h e r than fo r k lift )'
W a t c h m e n ------------------------------------------------

N um be r
of
w ork ers
855
499
492
85
211
381
240
323
3, 575
1, 151
101
424
191
1 ,0 7 5
342
1 ,3 3 3
141

,

H o u r ly e a rn in g s 1
M id d le
ra n g e 3

M e a n 1 M ed ia n 3
3
2
$ 2 .4 7
2. 27
2 .3 5
2 .6 0
3 .4 8
3. 81
2 .5 8
3 .0 4
2 .2 4
3 .5 5
3 .0 4
2 .4 1
2 .5 2
2. 14
2 .6 8
2. 36
2. 14

$2. 33
2 .0 9
2. 20
2. 19
3. 62
3 .9 6
2. 27
3 .0 0
2 .0 9
2 .6 8
3. 12
2. 12
2 .2 9
2 .0 0
2. 81
2 .2 2
1 .9 0

$ 1 .9 7 —$2. 98
1 .9 0 - 2 .5 8
1 .9 4 - 2 .7 2
1 . 9 7 - 3 .2 0
2 . 8 0 - 4 .0 6
3 . 4 7 - 4 .1 8
1 . 90l- 3 .3 3
2 . 2 4 - 3 .8 6
1 .8 5 — 2 .6 5
2 . 9 2 - 4 .0 1
3 . 3 5 - 3 .6 0
1 . 9 0 - 2 .8 9
2 . 0 4 - 2 .7 5
1 . 8 0 - 2 .2 6
2 . 10— 3 .2 1
1 . 9 5 - 2 .6 8
1 . 80l_ 2 .4 5

N u m be r
of
w ork ers
37
25
33

M id d le A tla n tic

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
_
_
2 .7 5
3 .4 3
_
2 .8 2

-

-

71
53
89
-

-

2. 64
3 .3 0
_
2. 86
-

95
31
51

$2. 38
2. 24
2. 27

$ 2 .3 0
2. 17
2. 10

38
137
52
70
247
141

3 .9 4
4 .2 9
3. 35
3. 70
2. 28
4. 17

4 . 13
4 .2 6
3 .6 9
4 . 18
2 .1 9
4 . 17

_

13
-

88
39
117

-

2. 26
-

2. 12
2. 90
2 .4 0

_
_
_

2 .0 0
3 .0 7
2 .4 2
“

_

2 .9 9
2 .7 9
2. 72

3 .2 0
2. 83
2 .8 3




-

$ 2 .2 8
2 .2 4
2 .2 4
_
_
_
_
2. 36
2 .0 9
3 .0 5
2. 35
1 .9 7
2 .3 1
1 .9 5
2 .0 2
2 .2 6
1 .8 6

-

_
2 . 3 0 - 2 .8 5
3. 1 4 - 3 .4 5
2. 65— 2 .9 7
_

2 . 6 0 - 3 .2 6
2 . 7 3 - 2 .9 2
2 . 6 0 - 2 .9 2

_
45
442
65
18
40
20
136
45
191
24

H o u r ly e a rn in g s 1

_
_

-

2 .6 1
2. 18
3 .0 9
2 .6 3
2 .2 2
2 .3 6
2 .0 1
2 . 19
2. 37
1 .8 9

G re a t L a k e s
$2. 00—$2. 89
1 . 6 8 - 2 .6 5
1 .8 9 — 2 .6 0
3 .5 5 4 .1 8 2. 65—
3 . O S1 .8 0 3 .3 3 -

4 .3 5
4 .3 4
3 .8 9
4 . 18
2 .4 8
4 .3 6

_
_
_

1 . 7 2 - 2 .3 3
2 . 2 0 - 3 .6 8
2 . 0 1 - 2 .6 5
“

230
96
93

$2. 83
2 .9 9
2 .8 9

I
35
31
41
796
196
21
132
25
113
73
215
21

3 .3 0
3. 25
3 .2 3
2 .5 9
3 .4 1
3. 18
2 .5 4
2 .6 0
2 .3 9
3 .0 9
2 .8 7
2 .7 0

_

$ 2 .9 9
2 .8 9
2. 80
I
3. 12
3 .6 0
3 .3 0
2 .4 0
3 .2 7
3 .3 6
2 .3 7
2 .7 5
2 .4 0
3 .2 1
2 .7 7
2 .8 4

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w ork on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n clu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a ddition to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
3 S ee a p p e n d ix A f o r m eth od u se d to com p u te m e a n s, m e d ia n s , and m id d le ra n g e s o f e a r n in g s .
NOTE:

$ 2 .3 8
2. 18
2 .3 0
3. 31

$2. 60—$2. 83
2 . 2 0 - 2 .6 0
2 . 3 0 - 3 .0 4

“

Southw e st
B a g g e r s ---------------------------------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h in e --------—- --------------B a tch w e i g h e r s --------------------------------------C h a m b e r m e n ------------------------------------------C o n t a c t -a c id - p la n t o p e r a t o r s ------------C o n t r o l- r o o m m e n ----------- -------------------C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ------ -— ----------------------G r a n u la t o r o p e r a t o r s ------- ----------- ------L a b o r e r s , m a te r ia l h a n d lin g -------------M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n ce ----------------------M i l l e r s ------------------------- -----—— ------------M i x e r s , d r y m ix i n g ------------------------------M i x e r s , s u p e r p h o s p h a t e ---------------------T r u c k d r i v e r s --------------------------------—----T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) -----------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o t h e r than fo r k lift).
W a t c h m e n ------------------------ ------------—---------

112
49
81
12

D a s h e s in d ic a t e no data re p o r t e d o r data that d o not m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r it e r ia .

S outheast

M e d ia n 3

-

$ 2 .7 9
2 .5 0
2 .9 8

M ean3

M id d le
ra n g e 3

M e d ia n 3

$2. 74
2 .4 6
2 .7 9

N u m be r
of
w ork ers

.
.

M ean3

-

226
36
27

B o r d e r S ta tes

H o u r ly e a rn in g s 1

M id d le
ra n g e 3
$2. 11—$2. 84
2 . 0 0 - 2 .3 5
1 . 9 0 - 2 .3 8
_
_
_
_
2 . 2 9 - 3 .0 0
1 . 8 3 - 2 .6 4
2 . 5 7 - 3 .5 0
2 . 3 1 - 3 .0 4
1 . 9 0 - 2 .3 5
2 . 0 8 - 2 .4 1
1 . 8 0 - 2 .1 8
1 .9 0 l- 2 .2 4
2 . 2 4 - 2 .4 2
1 . 6 0 - 1 .9 9

N u m be r
of
w ork ers
293
269
206
57
111
158
129
115
1 ,5 1 1
526
41
157
123
586
70
665
80

H o u r ly ea rn in g s 1

$ 2.0 1
1 .9 9
2 .0 2
2 .0 9
3 .2 5
3 .6 2
1 .9 9
2 .4 5
1 .9 3
3 .3 4
2. 73
2 .0 1
2 .4 0
1 .9 5
2 .0 6
2 .0 8
1 .9 6

M id d le W est
$2. 49L 3 . 14
-$
2 . 7 3 - 2 .3 9
2 . 5 0 - 3. 14

I

_

3 . 06—
2. 7 4 2 .8 0 2. 24—
3 .0 3 2. 6 4 2 .0 0 2.1 2 -

2 .0 0 2 .8 9 2 .4 6 2 .4 0 -

18
9
8

3 .7 1
3 .6 0
3 .4 1
2 .8 2
3 .7 7
3 .6 0
2 .9 9
2 .7 5
2 .6 5
3 .3 1
3 .2 0
2 .9 1

-

10
-

188
32
_
_

24
19
15
"

$ 2 .9 4
2 .9 9
2 .3 6

$2. 85

$2. 80—$3. 33

_

_

-

-

I

I

-

_

_

_

2 .5 3
3 .5 2

_
_

2. 87
3 .3 6

I

_

_

2 . 0 0 - 2 .8 7
3 . 2 5 - 4 .0 8

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

1 .9 5
3. 15
3 .0 4
-

_

2 .0 0
3 .3 3
2. 83

$ 1 .9 8
1 .9 9
2 .0 0
2 .0 4
2 .4 9
3 .7 5
1 .9 4
2. 16
1 .8 8
3. 68
2. 64
1 .91
2. 14
1 .9 9
2 .0 0
2 .0 0
1 .8 5

$ 1 . 8 0 -$ 2 . 11
1 .8 0 l 2 .0 9
_
1. 8 7 - 2 .1 0
1 .9 7 - 2. 19
2 . 5 9 - 3 .7 4
3 . 4 3 - 4 .0 0
1 .8 5 - 2 .0 8
1 .9 9 - 2 .6 4
1 .7 0 - 2 .0 2
3 . 8 3 - 3 .8 7
2 . 0 6 - 3 .2 8
1. 80— 2 .0 6
2 . 0 0 - 2 .5 7
1 .7 5 - 2. 10
1 .9 1 - 2. 15
1 .9 0 - 2. 15
1 .7 4 - 1 .9 8

P a c ifi c

I
3 .5 3

M idd le
ra nge 3

M e a n 3 M e d ia n 3

1 . 9 1 - 2 .0 4
3 . 2 1 - 3 .3 3
2 . 8 3 - 3 .3 3
-

55
8
18

$ 3 .3 5
3 .2 2
3. 14

$ 3 .2 9
3 .0 0

2 . 9 6 - 3 .2 6

27
23

3 .7 5
3 .3 7

4 . 19
2. 70

2 . 7 0 - 4 .2 9
2. 7 0 - 4 .0 3

29
98
72

3 .9 1
2 .7 3
4 .3 3

3 .8 6
2 .6 3
4 .4 4

3 . 7 9 - 3 .9 9
2 . 5 0 - 3 .2 9
4 . 3 5 - 4 .6 6

3 .6 8
3 .9 2
2. 15
3 .0 0
3. 10

3 .7 9

_
_

36
7
45
40
33
"

_

_

_

_
_
_

3. 14
2 .8 8
2 .8 8
“

$2. 90—$3. 54
_

_
_

3 . 2 3 - 4 .0 3
_

2 . 7 0 - 3 .4 0
2 . 7 0 - 3 .6 0
2 . 6 8 - 3 .6 0

-

M ed ia n s and m id d le ra n g e s a r e not p r o v id e d f o r jo b s w ith fe w e r than 15 w o r k e r s in a re g io n .

T a b le 6. O c c u p a tio n a l a v e ra g e s: A ll e sta b lish m e n ts by ty p e o f m arket
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 o£ men in selected occupations in fertilizer manufacturing establishments by type of market (interstate or intrastate
commerce), United States and selected regions, March—
April 1971)
U nited S ta tes1
2
O cc u p a tio n

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

In tersta te

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

685
364
384
77
199
332
180
285
2 , 823
1, 017
101
270
158
472
280

$ 2 . 57
2. 35
2 .4 3
2 .6 4
3. 49
3. 86
2 .6 3
3. 12
2. 32
3. 54
3. 04
2. 57
2. 54
2 .2 0
2. 77

170
134
107
.
.
49
60
37
751
134
.
154
33
603
62

$ 2 . 03
2. 07
2. 08
.
.
3. 53
2 .4 2
2 .4 6
1. 94
3 .5 9
.
2. 11
2 .4 3
2. 09
2 .2 4

35
21
33
.
.
219
34
_
25
.
43
53

$ 2 . 74
2 .4 9
2. 79
.
2. 65
3. 33
.
2. 87
.
2. 99
2 .7 9

98
42
76
12
.
45
397
59
18
28
14
110
40

$ 2 .4 5
2. 18
2. 32
3. 31
.
2. 61
3. 24
3. 17
2. 63
2. 33
2. 50
1. 99
2. 23

1, 070
118

2. 41
2 .2 2

254
23

2. 11
1 .7 5

83

2. 74

189
21

2. 38
1 .9 3

B a g g e r s -------------------------------------------B ag s e w e r s , m a ch in e ______________ ________ ______ ___________
B a tch w e ig h e r s -------------- --------- ----C h a m b e r m e n . -------------------------- ._
C o n t a c t -a c id - p la n t o p e r a t o r s --------------------- ---------________. . _
____ ______
C o n t r o l- r o o m m e n
__ _ —
C o n v e y o r te n d e r s —--------- ------- --------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s --------------------_ ______
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l ha n dlin g — .
M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e ---------- ---------------------------- ___________
M i ll e r s ---------------------------- -------- —
___________
M i x e r s , d r y m ix in g -----------------------M i x e r s , s u p e rp h o sp h a te --------—----T ru e k d r i v e r s ------- — —----- —
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (f o r k l if t ) -----------__________________________
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o th e r than
fo r k l if t ) — ____________________.____ ____________________ ______
W a tch m e n _. --------- ------- ---------- —




A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

A v era g e
h ou rly
ea rn in gs

-

-

S outhw est

______

G r e a t L a k es

_
109
30
60
164
99
_
11
.
61
33

$ 2 .4 6
2. 09
2. 32
4. 33
3 .4 0
3 .7 7
2. 37
3. 73
_
2. 35
.
2 .2 5
2. 98

86

2 .4 2

76
19
36
-

’

-

217
72
76
_
31
30
39
686
173
21
90
13
45
669

$ 2 . 85
3. 08
2 .9 5
.
3. 33
3. 27
3. 27
2. 61
3. 48
3. 18
2. 71
2. 39
2. 53
3. 11

185
21

2. 91
2. 70

-

D a s h e s in d ic a te no da ta r e p o r t e d o r data that do not m e e t p u b lica tion c r i t e r i a .

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

In tra sta te

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

192
181
141
49
111
154
95
89
1, 070
485
41
80
111
204
44

$ 2 . 08
2. 06
2. 06
2. 06
3 .2 5
3. 66
2. 02
2. 54
1 .9 9
3. 38
2. 73
2. 06
2 .4 2
2. 03
2. 15

101
88
64
_
_
_
34
25
4 40
41
_
77
12
382
26

$ 1 . 88
1. 84
1. 94
.
_
_
1. 89
2. 14
1 .7 9
2. 87
_
1 .9 6
2. 15
1. 91
1. 92

499
60

2. 13
2. 02

166
20

1. 93
1. 77

M id d le W e st
Intras.tate

In te rsta te

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE:

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

In tersta te

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

In tersta te

Sou th ea st

B o r d e r S ta tes

In te rsta te

A verage
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N u m b er
of
w ork ers
n^
rm ____________________________
B a g s e w e r s , m a ch in e . . . --------- . . . . .
B a tch w e ig h e r s ------------------------------C ham b e r m e n . . . . --------- - . — —
C o n t a c t -a c id - p la n t o p e r a t o r s -----C o n t r o l- r o o m m e n ---------------------—
C o n v e y o r te n d e r s --------. . . . — . . ----G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s -------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l ha n dlin g -----M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e --------- ----M i ll e r s ------------------------------------- ——
M i x e r s , d r y m ix in g --------------- -— M i x e r s , s u p e r p h o s p h a t e -------------T r u c k d r i v e r s ___ . . . __________ _____
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) -----------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o t h e r than
f o r k lif t) ____________ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
W a t c h m e n ----------------------------------------

M id d le A ta n tic

Intra sta te

In te rsta te

13
_
17
.
.
_
.
-

P a c if i c

In tersta te

23
.
42
.
68
_

_
_
.
2 .4 6
2. 85
_
2. 17
.
2. 30
_

18
9
.
.
_
10
_
168
32
_
_
.
_
19

$ 2 . 94
2. 99
.
_
.
3 .5 3
_
2. 61
3. 52
_
_
_
_
3. 15

43
8
.
.
_
_
_
29
75
59
.
_
_
_
22

$ 3 .4 8
3. 22
_
_
_
_
_
3. 91
2. 81
4. 52
_
.
_
_
3. 31

30

2. 64

15

3. 04

20

3. 39

no

-

$ 2 . 51
_
2. 62

In tersta te

-

-

-

-

“

T a b le 7. O c c u p a tio n a l averag es: C o m p le te (integrated) e s ta b lis h m e n ts by s iz e o f co m m u n ity
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f m e n in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in c o m p le t e
s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , M a r c h — p r i l 1971)
A

(in te g ra te d ) f e r t i l i z e r e s ta b lis h m e n ts b y s iz e o f co m m u n ity , U n ited S ta tes and

United S ta te s1
2
A ll a re a s

O cc u p a tio n

M e tr o p o lita n a re a s

B o r d e r States
N o n m e tr o p o lita n
a rea s
N u m b er
A vera g e
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

N u m b er
of
w ork ers
B a g g e r s ------------------------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h i n e ------------------ B a tch w e ig h e r s ___________________ C h a m be r m e n _______. ______________
C o n t a c t -a c id - p la n t o p e r a t o r s — ._
C o n t r o l - r o o m m e n ________________
C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s . . . . . . ------ ---------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s -------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g -------M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e ---------- _
M i ll e r s --------------------- ---------------------M i x e r s , s u p e rp h o sp h a te -------------T r u c k d r iv e r s ----------------- --------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) ------ -—
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o th e r than
f o r k l i f t ) __________________________
W a tch m e n ----------------------------------------

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

177
102
107
85
211
325
123
153
853
664
63
88
69
106

$ 2 . 68
2. 37
2. 45
2. 60
3. 48
3. 82
2. 80
3 .4 7
2 .4 8
3. 84
3. 14
2. 63
2 .4 8
2. 88

94
59
76
32
135
137
27
87
381
263
33
56
37
45

$ 2 .6 1
2. 28
2. 32
2. 82
3. 34
3. 74
2 .4 0
3. 35
2. 23
3. 72
2. 84
2. 63
2 .5 9
2 .6 4

83
43
31
53
76
188
96
66
472
401
30
32
32
61

$ 2 . 76
2 .4 9
2. 76
2. 47
3. 72
3. 88
2. 91
3. 63
2 .6 9
3. 92
3. 46
2. 63
2. 36
3. 05

382
45

2. 41
2. 33

214
8

2 .4 4
2 .2 3

168
37

2. 37
2. 35

N um ber
of
w orkers

A verage
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

Southeast— C ontinued

B a g g e r s ------------------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h i n e _________
B a tch w e ig h e r s ------------------------C h a m be rm e n __________________
C o n t a c t -a c id - p la n t o p e r a t o r s .
C o n t r o l- r o o m m e n -----------------C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ----G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l ha n dlin g
M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n ce _____
M i ll e r s
M i x e r s , s u p e rp h o sp h a te ------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) ----T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o th e r than
f o r k li ft ) _______________________
W a tch m e n --------------------------------




32
31
10
41
45
71
47
19
167
227
17
31
19

$ 2 . 27
2. 20
2. 07
2. 10
3. 55
3. 63
2. 08
3. 06
2. 38
3 .6 6
3 .2 8
2. 61
2. 21
-

127
25

2. 16
2. 20

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

19
.
23
12

$ 2 .6 9
_
2. 64
3. 31

_
15
67
21
13
12
_
.

2. 74
2. 45
3. 16
2. 58
2. 53
_

55

2. 49

_

-

_
_
_

_

-

.
.
.
38
130
35
44
87
94

_

.

_

_
$ 3 . 94
4. 29
3. 84
4. 21
2. 88
4. 71

_
_
26
27
-

D a s h e s in d ic a te n o data r e p o r t e d o r data that do not m e e t p u b lica tio n c r i t e r i a .

N u m b er
of
w ork ers
80
76
54
57
111
128
70
50
425
353
31
70
39
27

_
_
_

$2.
2.
2.
2.
3.
3.
2.
2.
2.
3.
2.
2.
2.
2.

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

25
20
00
09
25
56
09
82
16
53
88
52
25
30

48
45
44
16
66
57
23
31
258
126
14
39
20
13

2. 23
2. 20

.

_
_
_

80
31

_

79
50

_

_
_
_

_
$ 4 . 27
3. 82
_
2. 97
5. 21
_

_
_
10

$ 3 . 11
_
_
_
_

_

3. 20

-

-

2. 99

.
“

_
28
_
_
_
15

3. 53
_
_
3. 63
_
_
_
3. 30
3. 10

_

-

23
20
98
07
04
48
11
67
03
28
39
44
28
13

2. 30
2. 23

A ll a r e a s

12

_
_

-

_
_
_

$2.
2.
1.
2.
3.
3.
2.
2.
2
3
2.
2.
2.
2.

P a c if i c

A ll a r e a s
11

A vera g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

136
8

M id d le W est

_
.

-

M e t r o p o lit a n a re a s

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

263
33

N o n m e tr o p o lita n
a rea s

A l l a re a s

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and fo r w o r k on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 In clu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th ose show n s e p a r a te ly .
NOTE:

A ll a r e a s

S outhw est

N o n m etrop olita n
area s

Sou th ea st

A ll a rea s

-

29
_

$ 3 . 33

_
27
_
_
29
_
67

4~

_
18

3. 23

19

3. 22

-

3. 75

3? 91
33

T a b le 8. O c cu p a tio n a l averages: C o m p le te (integrated) e s ta b lis h m e n ts by s iz e of esta b lish m e n t
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly ea rn in g s 1 o f m e n in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in c o m p le t e (in te g ra te d ) f e r t i l i z e r e s ta b lis h m e n ts
b y s i z e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t, U nited S tates and s e le c t e d r e g io n s , M a rc h — p r i l 1971)
A
S ou th ea st

U n ited S t a t e s 2

Sou th w est

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith—
O cc u p a tio n

5 0 -9 9 w o r k e r s
N u m ber
of
w ork ers

B a g g e r s ---------------------------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h i n e ---------------------B a tch w e i g h e r s --------------------------------C h a m b e r m e n ________________________
C o n t a c t -a c id - p la n t o p e r a t o r s ------C o n t r o l- r o o m m e n _________________
C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ----------------------------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ______________
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g --------M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n ce __________
M i ll e r s _______________________________
M i x e r s , su p e rp h o sp h a te ----------------T r u c k d r i v e r s ________________________
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (fo r k lift ) _______
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o t h e r than
fo r k li ft ) _____________________________
W a t c h m e n __ _________________________

63
38
38
39
32
44
48
26
189
100

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

2. 18
2 .2 1
3 .0 1

149
"

2. 09

_

$ 2 .7 9
2 .5 0
2. 33
3. 19
3 .4 7
3. 77
3. 08
3 .6 7
2 .5 9
3 .9 4
3. 23
2 .9 8
2 .7 0
2 .8 2
2 .6 4
2. 68

125
■

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s ,
2 In c lu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to t h o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .
N ote:

A v era ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

15
127
43
23
12
-

227
26

-

-

100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e

5 0 -9 9 w o r k e r s
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

104
67
65
32
157
281
71
123
634
550
55
53
41
72

$ 2 .5 9
2. 19
2 .6 2
2. 30
3. 10
4. 15
2 .4 7
2. 59
2. 18
3. 39

29
14
34

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

26
29
14
31
12

$ 2 .0 5
2 .0 1
2. 12
2. 10
2 .5 1

-

-

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

.

_

48
45
40
12
99
124
32
35
282
298
30
41
19
17

1. 98
■

98
27
44
69
71
10

$ 4 . 24
3. 11
4 .2 1
3. 04
5. 01
_
_
2. 93

132
14

2. 18
1 .9 4
2 .8 1
- 2. 11
2 .0 4
■

$ 2 .4 3
2. 35
1 .9 5
2 .0 3
3. 34
3. 60
2. 28
3. 09
2. 30
3 .6 6
2 .9 1
2 .8 7
2. 28
2 .4 0
2 .4 8
2. 68

25
“

3. 07

-

-

-

-

-

-

and la te s h ifts.

D a s h e s in d ic a te n o data r e p o r t e d or data that d o not m e e t p u b lica tio n c r it e r ia .

T a b le 9. O c c u p a tio n a l a ve ra g e s: S u p e rp h o sp h a te e s ta b lish m e n ts by s iz e o f co m m u n ity
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 o f m en in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in s u p e rp h o sp h a te e s t a b lis h m e n t s b y s i z e o f co m m u n ity , U nited Sta tes and s e le c t e d r e g io n s ,
M a rc h —A p r il 1971)
U nited S t a te s 2

O cc u p a tio n

B a g g e r s -----------------------------------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h i n e __________________
B a tch w e i g h e r s __________________________
C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ____________
G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ___________________
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n dlin g __ .
M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n ce _______________
M i x e r s , d r y m ix in g ____________________
M i x e r s , su p e rp h o sp h a te _______________
T r u c k d r i v e r s _____________________________
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o t h e r than
fo r k lift ) _________________________________
W a tch m en ------------------------------ ----------------- -

S ou th ea st
Sou th w est
G rea t L a k es
M etro­
N o n m e tr o ­
M etro­
N o n m e tr o ­
M etro­
p olitan
polita n
A ll a re a s
p olita n
polita n
A ll a rea s
A ll a rea s
p olita n
a rea s
a rea s
a rea s
a rea s
a rea s
N u m ber A v e r a g e N u m b er A v e r a g e N u m b er A v e r a g e N u m b er A v e r a g e N u m b er A v e r a g e N u m b er A v e r a g e N u m b er A v e r a g e N u m b er A v e r a g e N u m ber A v e r a g e
of
h o u r ly
of
h ou rly
of
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
of
h o u r ly
w o r k e r s e a rn in g s w o r k e r s ea rnings w o r k e r s e a rn in g s w o r k e r s e a r n in g s w o r k e r s e a rn in g s w o r k e r s ea rn in g s w o r k e r s e a rn in g s w o r k e r s e a rn in g s w o r k e r s ea rn in g s
A ll a rea s

128
77
89
37
66
631
132
34
83
94

$ 2 .2 9
2. 17
2. 31
2 .2 5
2 .6 0
2. 14
2 .9 7
2 .2 1
2. 39
2. 08

68
38
50
8
29
366
82
13
42
38

$ 2. 47
2. 31
2 .4 4
2. 66
2. 27
2. 23
2. 96
2. 58
2. 53
2. 34

60
39
39
29
37
265
50
21
41
56

$ 2 .0 9
2 .0 3
2. 13
2. 13
2 .8 7
2. 02
2. 98
1 .9 9
2 .2 5
1 .9 0

50
51
50
24
34
257
67
15
46
36

$ 2 .0 6
2. 05
2. 18
1 .9 1
2. 14
1 .9 5
2. 76
1 .9 5
2. 24
1 .9 9

23
21
22
_
_
116
41
_
_
_

$ 2 . 16
2. 13
2 .2 7

202
39

2. 19
1. 86

119
10

2. 32
2. 04

83
29

2 .0 1
1 .7 9

93
26

2 .0 7
1. 74

45
-

2. 16

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s,
2 In c lu d e s data f o r r e g i o n s in a d d itio n t o th o s e show n s e p a r a te ly .
N ote:




h o lid a y s ,

and la te sh ifts .

D a s h e s in d ic a t e n o data r e p o r t e d o r data that d o not m e e t p u b lica tio n c r it e r ia .

-

2 .0 5
2. 74
-

_
-

-

27
30
28
23
20
141
26
_
24
27

$ 1 . 97
1 .9 9
2. 11
1. 90
2. 20
1. 87
2. 78
_
2. 04
1 .9 3

15
10
15
_
16
45
12
_
_
31

$ 2 . 00
2. 23
2. 10
. _
2 .8 5
1. 88
3 .5 9

38
8
13
10
_
194
39

_
2. 17

13
_

48
24

1. 98
1. 73

43

2. 00

32
-

$ 2 .6 5
2. 60
2. 97
2 .8 7

23

$ 2 . 83
_

11

2. 94

2 .4 0
3 .2 4
_
2. 39

127
27

_
2. 38
3. 29

2. 54

28

-

_
_
_
_

_

_
.
2. 63

T a b le 10. O c c u p a tio n a l averages: S u p e rp h o s p h a te e s ta b lish m e n ts by s iz e o f e s ta b lish m e n t
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly ea rn in g s 1 o f m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in s u p e rp h o sp h a te e s ta b lis h m e n ts b y s i z e o f e st a b lis h m e n t , U nited S ta tes and s e le c t e d
r e g io n s , M a r c h -A p r i l 1971)
U nited S t a t e s 2

S ou th ea st

G r e a t L ak es

E s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith—
O cc u p a tio n

8 -4 9 w o r k e r s
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

B a g g e r s ---------------------------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h i n e ---------------------B a tch w e ig h e r s -------- --------------- —----C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s -------------------- ------G r a n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ---------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h andling --------M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e ------ — -----M i x e r s , d r y m i x i n g ------------------------M i x e r s , s u p e rp h o sp h a te ----------------T r u c k d r i v e r s ----------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o t h e r than
fo r k li ft )
W a t c h m e n ------------------------------------------

40
14
11
9

5 0 -9 9 w o r k e r s

A vera ge
h o u r ly
ea rn in g s
$ 2 . 14
1 .9 6
1. 83
2. 30

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

138
18
10
15
39

2. 12
2. 76
2. 13
2. 17
1 .9 0

59
44
58
28
46
332
83
17
31
32

49
14

2. 00
1 .6 7

110
22

-

-

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s
$ 2 . 35
2. 16
2 . 31
2 .2 3
2 .5 0
2. 10
3. 02
2. 06
2. 25
2. 11
2. 17
1. 96

100 w o r k e r s o r m o r e
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

29
19
20
_

15
161
31
_

37
_

43

8 -4 9 w o r k e r s
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

$ 2 . 38
2 . 36
2 . 56

5 0 -9 9 w o r k e r s

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

8
8

$ 2 . 01
2. 06

_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

3. 07
2 .2 5
2 . 94
_

2. 60

7

_

_

2 .4 5

15
11

-

2 . 09
_

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

32
33
34
19
25
171
38
15
19
21

$ 2 .0 0
2. 00
2. 05
1. 90
2 . 08
1 .9 1
2. 65
1 .9 5
2. 06
2. 05

66
15

2. 02
1. 77

1. 94
1 .6 9

5 0 -9 9 w o r k e r s
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
ea rn in g s

16

$ 3 . 00

13

2. 97

_
_

101
29

_
2 .4 3
3. 35

_
_

20

2. 67

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o rk on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n clu d e s data f o r re g io n s in a d d ition to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

D a s h e s in d ic a te no data re p o r t e d o r data that do n ot m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r i t e r i a .

T a b le 11. O c c u p a tio n a l averages: M ixing estab lis h m en ts
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f m en in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in f e r t i l i z e r m ix in g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , U nited S tates and s e le c t e d r e g io n s , M a rch — p r il 1971)
A
U nited S tates 2
O c c u p a tio n

N um be r
of
w o rk e r s

B a g g e r s -------------------------------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h in e -----------------------B a tch w eig h e r s — -------------------------------C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s -------------------------------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d l i n g -----------M e c h a n ic s , m a i n t e n a n c e -----------------M i x e r s , d r y m i x i n g ---------------------- ----T r u c k d r i v e r s --------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) --------- -------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o t h e r than
'f o r k l i f t ) ----------------------------------------------W a tch m en

550
319
295
80
103
2, 090
355
345
912
216

$ 2 .4 4
2 .2 6
2. 33
2 .4 0
2 .6 8
2. 18
3 .2 2
2 .3 0
2. 12
2 .6 2

749
57

2. 37
2. 19

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

M idd le A tla n tic
N u m b er
of
w ork ers
33
21
30

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

B o r d e r S tates
N u m b er
of
w ork ers




S ou th ea st
N u m be r
of
w ork ers

Sou th w est

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

188
34
23
71
53

$ 2 . 73
2 .4 0
2 .7 9
_
2. 64
3. 31
2. 88
2. 99
2 .7 9

78
34
52
_
28
326
36
31
119
30

$ 2 . 36
2 . 09
2. 18
_
2 .5 6
2. 15
3. 19
2. 17
2 . 00
2. 11

163
142
101
35
30
828
106
129
511
34

$ 1 . 89
1. 85
1 .9 5
1. 82
2 .2 1
1. 80
3. 11
1 .9 4
1 .9 2
1. 88

56
17
28
14
10
115
35
52
10

81

2 .7 1

112
17

2. 33
1 .9 7

309
21

1 .9 5
1. 85

47
-

-

•

*

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o rk on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 .In clu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th ose show n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

D a s h e s in d ic a te no data r e p o r t e d o r data that do not m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r i t e r i a .

P a c ifi c

G reat L akes

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
ea rn in g s
$ 2 . 24
2. 10
2. 12
2 .2 2
2 .7 7
1 .9 9
2. 92

N um be r
of
w ork ers

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

182
88
68

$ 2 . 86
3. 02
2. 85

1. 92
2 .2 5

31
537
128
128
105
64

3. 24
2 .6 3
3 .4 1
2. 53
2. 35
3. 12

2 .4 2
-

177
15

2. 93
2 .7 3

_

N u m b er
of
w ork ers
26
_
_
_

A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s
$ 3 . 38

_

61

_
_
_
2 .5 6

11
32
22

3. 05
3. 29
2. 82

14

2. 94




T a b le 12. O c c u p a tio n a l averages: M ixin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts by s iz e o f c o m m u n ity
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 of m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in f e r t i l i z e r m ix in g e s t a b lis h m e n t s b y s iz e o f co m m u n ity , U nited
S ta tes and s e l e c t e d r e g io n s , M a r c h -A p r i l 1971)

------------------------------ —-----B aggers
Bag s e w e r s , m a c h i n e -------------------B a tch w e ig h e r s
--------------------------C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ---------------------------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g — __
M e c h a n ic s m a in t e n a n c e —-------------M i x e r s , d r y m ix in g ---------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s --------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (fo r k lift ) ______
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o th e r than
f o r k lif t ) — — — — — —
—
W a tch m en ---------------------------------------

Sou th ea st

M id d le A tla n tic

U nited S ta te s1
2
M e tr o p o lita n
a re a s
N u m ber
A v era g e
h ou rly
of
ea rn in gs
w ork ers

N o n m e tr o p o lita n
a re a s
N u m b er
A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
of
e a rn in g s
w ork ers

M e t r o p o lit a n
area s
N u m b er
A vera ge
h o u r ly
of
e a rn in g s
w ork ers

373
161
181
29
74
1, 364
256
181
446
127

$ 2 .5 9
2 .3 7
2. 38
2. 30
2 .6 6
2 .2 7
3. 34
2 .4 6
2 .2 8
2 .7 1

177
158
114
51
29
727
99
164
266
89

$ 2 . 12
2. 16
2. 25
2 .4 5
2. 76
2. 00
2. 92
2. 11
1 .9 6
2. 49

26
14
13
_
.
146
27
23
60
43

$ 2 . 83
2. 40
2. 46

527
31

2 .4 7
2. 18

222
26

2. 15
2. 20

57

2 .6 4

-

_
2. 67
3. 28
2. 88
3. 00
2. 79

-

-

M e t r o p o lit a n
a rea s
N u m b er
A vera ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s
84
58
51
7
26
454
78
58
171
17

$ 2 . 03
1 .9 8
2. 08
1 .9 8
2. 27
1. 87
3. 26
2. 08
2. 01
1. 91

79
84
50
28
374
28
71
340
17

$ 1 .7 9
1. 76
1. 82
1. 78
.
1. 72
2. 68
1. 83
1. 88
1. 84

188
6

2. 03
1 .9 5

121
15

1. 82
1. 81

S ou th w est
B a g g e r s -----------------------------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h i n e _______ ______
B a tch w e ig h e r s --------- --------- ---------C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ------------------------------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s _______ _____
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l ha n dlin g ---------M e c h a n ic s m a in te n a n ce — — ------M i x e r s , d r y m ix in g -------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s . — _____________ — .
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (f o r k lif t ) — ___ —
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o th e r than
fo r k li f t ) ---------- -------------- - — ------W a tch m en ------------------------- — - - .

52
13
24
-

NOTE:

G re a t L ak es

$ 2 . 88
2. 20
2. 18
-

116
41
36
-

.
104
34
42
_

_
2. 01
2. 95
1 .9 8
_

_

43

2 .4 8

119
6

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
2 I n clu d e s data f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th ose show n s e p a r a t e ly .
D a s h e s in d ic a te n o data r e p o r t e d o r data that do not m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r it e r ia .

N o n m e tr o p o lita n
a re a s
N u m b er
A vera ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s

-

13
342
83
53
.

3 .4 0
2 .6 9
3. 53
2. 73
_
-

18
195
45
75
73
47

$ 2 .6 1
2. 94
2 .6 4
3. 12
2. 52
3. 17
2. 38
2. 23
2. 81

3. 10
2 .4 7

58

2. 58

$ 3 . 00
3. 12
3. 03
-

66
47
32
-

•

-

T a b le 13. O c c u p a t io n a l a verag es: M ixin g e s ta b lis h m e n ts by s iz e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t
(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in f e r t i l i z e r m ix in g e s t a b lis h m e n t s by s iz e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t,
M a r c h — p r i l 1971)
A
U n ited S tates

M id d le A tla n tic

U n ited S tates and s e le c t e d r e g io n s ,

B o r d e r S ta tes

S ou th ea st

E s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith —
O cc u p a tio n

8 -4 9 w o r k e r s

5 0 -9 9 w o r k e r s

N u m b er
of
w ork ers
B aggers

— —— — ——— —— — — ——

C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ------------------------- —
G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s — —— ———
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d l in g ---------

pn m er (fo r k lift)
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r (o t h e r than
fo r k li ft )
_

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

388
186
201
57
38
1, 222
171
277
790
107

$ 2 . 31
1 .9 8
2. 22
2. 07
2. 49
2 .0 2
3 .0 3
2. 18
2 .0 9
2. 38

108
92
72
6
45
687
115
53
65
63

$ 2 .7 1
2 .6 6
2. 64
2. 10
2 .8 0
2 .4 1
3. 28
2 .5 7
2. 25
2 .9 2

418

2. 21

255

2. 62

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A vera g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

100 w o r k e r s
o r m ore
N u m b er
A vera ge
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s
54
41
22

2 .7 9
2. 36
3. 58

57

Z. 37

76

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

8 -4 9 w o r k e r s
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

8 -4 9 w o r k e r s
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

N u m b er
of
w ork ers

A verage
h ou rly
e a rn in g s

120
104
71
30

$ 1 .8 4
1 .7 9
1 .9 1
1 .7 9

28
24
19

$ 1 .9 9
1 .9 9
1 .9 9

$ 2 .6 4
2. 37
2 .8 3

44
27
37

$ 2 . 12
2 .0 6
2. 10

144
26
17
53
45

2? 61
3 .4 0
2 .8 0
3. 10
2 .7 9

14
197
21
26
95
15

Z. 33
1 .8 8
3 .0 5
1 .9 9
1 .9 7
2. 06

510
34
105
448
17

1 .7 6
2 .8 5
1 .9 4
1. 90
1 .8 2

10
252
29
24
36
12

2^01
1 .8 5
2 .6 8
1 .9 5
2 .0 5
1 .9 5

67

2 .6 8

64

2 .2 0

180

1 .9 0

96

2 .0 2

119

$ 2 .6 6

36
52
35

2. 45

54
15
26
14

m a c h i n e ----- — — —

C on veyor ten d ers — — — —
— —
G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s
— —— —— —
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g — —
M e c h a n ic s , m a i n t e n a n c e -----M i x e r s , d r y m ix in g — — — — —

104
34
_

50
T ru ck ers,
T ru ck ers,

25
12
13
22

_

25
.

_

2 .5 3
_
-

_

-

2 .0 1
2. 95
_

1. 92

-

195
43
102
90

2.
3.
2.
2.

37
13
32
22

p o w e r ( f o r k l i f t ) ------------p o w e r (o th e r than

fo r k li f t }

45

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o rk o n w e e k e n d s,
2 I n clu d e s da ta f o r r e g io n s in a d d ition to th o se show n s e p a r a t e ly .
NOTE:




$2.
2.
2.
2.

$ 3 . 18
3 .0 6
3. 12
_

h o lid a y s ,

and la te s h ift s .

D a s h e s in d ic a t e no data r e p o r t e d o r data that do n ot m e e t p u b lic a tio n c r it e r ia .

2. 44

47

2 .3 9

19
271
61
13

3 .3 1
2 .8 2
3 .5 2
3 .0 9

26

-

100 w o r k e r s
o r m ore
A v e ra g e
N u m b er
of
h o u r ly
w ork ers
e a rn in g s
14
11

$ 2 .0 3
2. 16

66
43

l ” 96
3. 60

33

2 .0 5

26

$ 3 .0 8

G re a t L a k es

Sou th w est

B ag s e w e r s ,

5 0 -9 9 w o r k e r s

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a rn in g s

22
15
26

$ 2 .7 9
2 .6 9
2. 34

20
181
69

8 -4 9 w o r k e r s
N u m b er
of
w ork ers

3 .5 0

103

3. 19

.
_

10
71
24

_
_

3. 24
2 .6 3
3 .6 1

_

_

_

_

T a b le 14. O c c u p a tio n a l e a rn in g s: A la b a m a

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNING!i OF—

O cc u p a tio n

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s 2------------

Number
of
worker*

$3.00 $3. 10 $3. 20 $3.40 $3. 60 1 0 5
$1.50 11755 $1.60 1 0 5 $1.70 $1.75 $1.80 $1. $5 1 0 5 1 0 5 l O o izrro $2.20 $2. 30 $2.40 $2.50 $2. 60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90

Average
hourly
earning* 1

“
$2.80 $2. 90 $3.00 $3. 10 $3.20 $3.40 $3.60 $3.80 $4.00
$1. 55 $1.60 $1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1. 80 $1.85 $1.90 $1.95 $2.00 $2. 10 $2.20 $2. 30 $2. 40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70

968

$2.20

55
50
22
16
27
195
44
13
19
81
76
72
13

1.92
1.96
1.84
2.01
2.53
1.89
3.03
1.77
1. 89
2.07
1.93
1.93
1.72

3
_
3
_
_
6
•
_

173

3 15

21

59

11
11
.
2
1
65
.
3

6
1
4
.
1
6
_
2
2

3
5
1
2
4
1
2
.
4
4
7

31

90

62

96

63

6
4
4
22
1
4
.
12
6
4
1

1
2
30
4
14
2

15
14
5
3
10
2
3
4
1
30
30

4
5
2
2
33
4

18

10

4

4

3

30

21

13

16

2

41

-

•
-

"
“

”
"

“
—

“
"

*
*
*

”
3

6
"
"

"
“
"

“
”
“

*
"
"

-

2

1

”
■

"

“
1

“
1

21
5

“

•
*

”

”
*

"
"

2
7
7

•
3
-

•
10
-

4
-

•

“

~
“

“

4
"

“
“
“

"
”

74

20

16

2
4

-

7
13
3
5
7
12
12

10

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
B a g g e r s ------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h in e —
B a tch w e ig h e r s C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ----------------------------------------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g -----------------M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n ce -------------------------M ix e r s , d r y m ix in g ---------------------------------M ix e r s , s u p e r p h o s p h a t e ------------------------- T r u c k d r i v e r s ---------------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r 4 ------------------------------------O th er than f o r k l i f t ------------------------------W a tc h m e n ----------------------------------------------------

1
2
3
4

_
.
.
.
.
.

_
-

-

6
8
8
3

3
-

1
2
.
10
3
3

-

2
-

10

"
•

~
2
2

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and la te sn iic s. a h p r o u u c u o i
V ir t u a lly a ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e r e m e n ; data f o r s e le c t e d o cc u p a tio n s w e r e lim it e d to m e n w o r k e r s .
I n c lu d e s 3 w o r k e r s at $ 1 . 25 t o $ 1 . 30.
I n c lu d e s data f o r w o r k e r s in c l a s s i f ic a t i o n in a d d ition to th o se show n s e p a r a te ly .

T a b le 15. O c c u p a tio n a l earnings: C a lifo rn ia
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o cc u p a tio n s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A p r i l 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O c c u p a tio n

Number
of
worker*

$4.0 0 $ 4.20 $4.4 0 $ 4.60 $4.80 $5.00
$ 2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.4 0 $ 2.50 $2.6 0 $ 2.70 $ 2.8 0 $2.9 0 $3.0 0 $ 3.10 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .3 0 $3.4 0 $3.5 0 $ 3.6 0 $3.7 0 $3.8 0 $3.9 0
hourly
and
earning* 1 and
u n d er
$4.80 $5.00 o v e r
$2.7 0 $ 2.80 $2.9 0 $ 3.0 0 $3.1 0 $ 3.2 0 $ 3 .3 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .5 0 $ 3 .6 0 $ 3 .7 0 $ 3.8 0 $ 3.90 $4.0 0 $ 4.2 0 $ 4.40 $ 4 .6 0
$2.1 0 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $ 2.50 $ 2.60
Average

$ 3 .4 2

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s

39

6

18

10

69

48

60

43

2

13

7

20

27

76

1

35

5

5

2

32

29

36

27

30

8

6

.

.

2
4

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
B a g g e r s -----------------------------------------C o n t a c t -a c id - p la n t o p e r a t o r s ---C o n t r o l- r o o m m e n ----------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e -------M i x e r s , d r y m i x i n g ---------------M i x e r s , su p e rp h o sp h a te -------T r u c k d r i v e r s ---------------------- -—
T ru c k e r s , p o w e r ---------- -— -—
F o r k l i f t --------------------------------O th er than fo r k li ft -

46
27
23
69
69
36
7
44
69
38
31

3

3 .4 1
3 .7 5
3 .3 7
2 . 78
4 . 32
3 .6 8
3 .9 2
3 .1 3
3 .0 0
2 .9 6
3 .0 5

_

_

_

_

_

„
..

6
6

_
_

-

-

-

8
_

_

_
_

_
_

8

_

4

14

.

_

12
10
_

-

_

_

_
_
8
8
1
7

-

-

2

-

6
2
3

1
2
>
-

.

10
6
4

4
1
1

2
18
10
8

-

-

1
-

4
4

12

57

_

63

„

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

4
5

9

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

25

-

3

-

7

6
-

”

8

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

~
"
~

4

-

-

-

-

12

-

-

-

2
10
3
7

-

2
12
7
5

-

"
-

"
■
■
"

on a tim e b a s is .




4

20

2

_

2

"

_

11
5

I
A ll p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s w e r e m e n .
In c lu d e s 1 w o r k e r a t $ 1 .9 5 to $ 2 .

65

“
-

31
3
4

2

25
-

‘

*
*
•

•
* ’
*
*
“
~

“
“
“
"
”

T a b le 16. O c c u p a t io n a l ea rn in g s:

F lo r id a

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A p r i l 1971)
NUMBER OP WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O cc u p a tio n

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s 1
2-----------------------------

Number
of
worker*

3, 172

$1.60 $1.70 $1.8 0 $ 1 .9 0 $ 2 .0 0 $ 2 .1 0 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .5 0 $2.^ 0 $ 2.7 0 $2.8 0 $ 2 .9 0 $ 3 .0 0 $3.1 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .3 0 $3.4 0 $ 3.5 0 $ 3.6 0 $3.70 $3.80 $ 3.90 $4.0 0 $4.10
Average
hourly .
and
and
earning*1
under
$1.7 0 $1.80 $ 1.9 0 $ 2 .0 0 $ 2.1 0 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .7 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 2 .9 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3.1 0 $3.2 0 $ 3 .3 0 $ 3.4 0 $ 3.5 0 $ 3 .6 0 $3.7 0 $3.80 $ 3.90 $4.0 0 $4.1 0 o v e r

$2.75

54

126

243

207

318

96

59

206

93

242

97

71

53

60

108

79

188

9

112

44

180

238

39

70

100

80

2.08
2.03
2.02
3.61
3.65
2.02
3.06
2.13
3.70
3.02
2.24
3.18
1.99
2.15
1.91
2.16
1.96

_
-

7
7
-

16
10
15

5
8
9

18
30
16

1
1
1

8
4
2

14
3

-

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

20
4
4
6

25
48
10

14
39
4
33
54

10
50
4
18
4
82
28

2
7
16
46
6

19
16

2
-

4
13
2
-

7
13
4
19

-

-

-

-

-

4

8
7

-

20
45

4
-

8
-

28
44

-

4
8

28

-

25
1
4
5
-

16
-

10
4
4
14

5
1
-

6
1
4

-

4
12
10
8
8
5
15

-

4
3
3
-

3
2
-

36
4
-

4
95
4
2

33
-

35
8
-

-

24
-

6

10

17
62
9
18
53
5
48
19

54

22
3

6

16

-

4

19

-

-

14

-

4

-

15

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
Ppiggoi-e
B a g s e w e r s , m a c h in e ---------------------------------B a tch w e i g h e r s ------------------ ------- ----- ------------C o n t a c t -a c i d - p l a n t o p e r a t o r s --------------------C o n t r o l- r o o m m e n ------------- -------------------------C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ---------- -----------------------------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g --------------------M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e — ------------------------M ille r s
t--- , ,., m -a
--1
M i x e r s , d r y m i x i n g ------------------ -----------------M i x e r s , s u p e r p h o s p h a t e ----------------------------T ru ck d r i v e r s ------------ -----------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r -----------------------------------------r orK l lit
O th er than f o r k l i f t -------------- ----------------W a t c h m e n -------------------------------------------- ----------

1
2

68
74
50
72
138
52
22
294
266
20
47
28
256
227
11
216
26

-

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r tim e a n d f o r w o rk o n w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , an d la te s h if ts . V ir tu a lly a ll o f th e p ro d u c tio n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by th e s tu d y w e r e p a id o n a tim e b a s is .
V ir tu a lly a l l p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s w e re m e n ; d a ta f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s w e r e lim ite d to m e n w o r k e r s .




T a b le 17. O c c u p a tio n a l earnings: G e o r g ia
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A p r i l 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Number
of
worker!

O cc u p a tio n

Average $1.50 $1.55 $1 .6 0 $1.65 $1.70 $ 1 .75 $1 .8 0 $1.85 $ 1 .90 $1 .9 5 $ 2 .0 0 $ 2 .1 0 $ 2 .2 0 $2.3 0 $2.40 $2.50 $2.6 0 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20
hourly , and
and
earning*
under

$1.55 $ 1 .60 $ 1 .65 $1.70 $1.75 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1 .85 $1 .9 0 $ 1 .95 $ 2 .0 0 $ 2 .1 0 $2 .2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $2.40 $2.5 0 $2.60 $2.7 0 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 o v e r
A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s 1
2---------------------- ------

1 ,0 8 2

$1.99

49
41
46
20
30
24
181
66
9
27
28
127
129

1.90
1.85
1.96
2.24
1.90
2.15
1.85
2.79
2.04
1.91
2.12
1.85
2.00
2.06
2.00
1.90

260

13

16
12
7

1
1

-

-

10

-

-

-

5

-

45

-

-

-

5

-

7

35

.

.

_

2

26

9

26

50

123

3
2
3
3

3
4
6
4
9
5
24
1
4

202

148

8

17
9
6

38

37

24

19

8

12

13

10

15

3

9

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
B aggers—

— —

—

— —

— —

— — — ——
—

B a tch w e ig h e r s ------------------ --------------------------------------------C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ---------------------------------------------------------G r a n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------------— L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g -----------------------------M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e -----------------------------------------M i l l e r s _______________________________________ _________________
M i x e r , d r y m ix in g . --------- --------------------------------------------M i x e r s , s u p e rp n o s p n a te — — — —— — — —
T r u ck d r iv e r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ _ _ _ _ . . . . . — . . . . . . .
T r u c k e r s , p o w e r --------------- -------- -------------- -------------------TTsM’ I r l i f f

O th er than f o r k l i f t --------- ------- ---------- ---------- --------W a tch m e n -------------- ------- ---------—--------------------




1
2

o

120
12

5

15

-

5

-

5

.

47
15
15
2

-

_

.

_

-

-

-

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

2

11

2
3

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
2
9

2

24

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

.

_

_

1

_

2

1

9

15
13
4
9
2

7

10
4
8
5
56
1

1
-

3
2
2

4
2

4

-

2

1
4
2
3

9

6

6

7

10

10

2

3

6

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

7

-

4

6
17
36

6
16
46

1
8
1

2

3

34
5

43

-

2
5

-

4

3

10

-

4

4

4

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , a n d l a t e s h i f t s . A ll p r o d u c ti o n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y t h e s t u d y w e r e p a i d o n a t i m e b a s i s .
V ir tu a lly a l l p ro d u c tio n w o r k e r s w e re m e n ; d a ta f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n s w e r e lim ite d to m e n w o r k e r s .

T a b le 18.

O c c u p a tio n a l e a rn in g s:

Illinois

(N u m b er and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A p r i l 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
Number
of

O c c u p a tio n

A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s 1 ---------------------- —
23

$2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2 .5 0 $ 2 .60 $ 2 .70 $ 2 .8 0 $2 .9 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .10 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .3 0 $3 .40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.10 $4.20 $4.30 $4.40
Average
hourly i
and
earning! Under and
$2.00 under
$2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $ 2 .80 $2 .9 0 $3 .0 0 $3.10 $3.20 $ 3 .3 0 $ 3 .40 $ 3 .50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.10 $4.20 $4.30 $4.40 o v e r

829

$ 3 .2 1

44
36
38
29
21
256
87
40
100
29
71

3 .3 9
3 .3 5
3 .2 8
3 .2 3
3 .4 9
3 .0 2
3 .7 2
2 .5 9
3. 55
3 .5 3
3 .5 6
2 .5 2

41

2

-

1

12

40

26

20

32

38

6

16

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

10
10
6
-

-

-

-

-

28
-

14

6
-

-

-

34
4 10

38
12
26

-

-

8

25

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

4
7

46

61

47

22

99

151

47

19

15

2

8

17

4
8
6
8

4
8
2

2

1
1
5
9
43
10
1

13
9
11
1
35
14

6
-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

11

7

4

2
2

35

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
B a g g e r s ___ _______________________ ___ ___
B a g s e w e r s , m a c h in e ---------- --------------------B a tch w e ig h e r s --------------------------------------C o n t r o l- r o o m m e n ---------------------------------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d l in g ----------------M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e -----------------------T r u c k d r i v e r s ------------------------------ -----------i r u c k e r s , p o w e r —— — — — — — —— ——
F o r k lif t
______
O th er than f o r k l i f t -------------------------------W a tch m e n —— — — — — — — —— — — ——

6

4

-

2
4
4
-

-

-

11

-

-

-

8

29

16

32

20

8

-

7

-

-

-

4

8

10

4

-

8
2
6

12

1

2

8
4
2

1

4

-

-

9
20
2

3
8

5

1

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o rk on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s . A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by the stu d y w e r e p a id on a t im e b a s is
2 V ir t u a lly a ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e r e m en ; data f o r s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s w e r e lim it e d to m e n w o r k e r s .
3 A ll w o r k e r s w e r e at $ 4 . 40 t o $ 4 . 50.
4 A ll w o r k e r s w e r e at $ 4 . 90 to $ 5 .




T a b le 19. O c c u p a tio n a l earnings: Ind ian a
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A p r i l 1971)
I
Number

O cc u p a tio n

of
worker*

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

Average $1.80 $1.85 $ 1 .90 $1.95 j>2.00 $2.10 $2 .2 0 $2.30 $2 .4 0 $ 2 ^ 0 $ 2 .60 $ 2 .70 $2.80 $2 .9 0 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40
hourly i and
earning*
under

$1.85 $1.90 $1t95 $2.00 &2.10 $2.20 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .40 $ 2 .50 $2 .6 0 $ 2 .70 $2,80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50
A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s 2 -----------------------

456

$ 2 .4 6

30
18
13
214
30
12
43
39

2 .5 4
2 .4 4
2 .5 8
2 .2 9
3. 05
2 .6 8
2 .5 8
2 .6 0

36

2

5

-

2

_
-

.
-

.
-

.
-

5

34

14

9

111

61

14

59

10

68

22

13

23

4
4

2

2
7
5
24

8
-

_
-

7
7
6

.
-

6

.

1

S e le c t e d o cc u p a tio n s
B a g g e r s -------------------------------------------------B ag s e w e r s , m a c h i n e - - ---------------------B a tch w e ig h e r s ------------ ------- ---------------- L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h andling------------------M i x e r s , d r y m i x i n g -------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r 4 ------------------------------------O th er than f o r k l i f t -------------------------------

1
.

_

2

.
_

-

-

.

.

.

-

24

6

9

109

_

_

3

-

.

-

_
.

_

1
26

-

.

.

3
2

15

7

-

1
8

-

-

-

4

”

”

'
1
b a s is .
2
3
4

8

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s,

h o lid a y s ,

‘
and la te s h ift s .

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e r e m en .
I n clu d e s 2 w o r k e r s at $ 1 .6 0 to $ 1 .6 5 .
I n clu d e s data f o r w o r k e r s in c la s s ific a t io n in a d d ition to th o s e sh ow n s e p a r a t e ly .

13
10

.
'

-

6

30

4

-

„

11
10

.
-

19
19

-

2
.
-

-

'

A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by th e study w e r e p a id on a tim e

T a b le 20.

O c c u p a t io n a l e a rn in g s :

M a ryla n d

(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A p r il 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O cc u p a tio n

of
workers

hourly .
earnings

$1 .7 0 $1.75 $1.80 $1.85 $1 .9 0 $1.95 $2.00 $ 2 .10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40 $2 .5 0 $ 2 .60 $2.70 $ 2 .80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 $3.50 $3.60 $3.70 $3.80
and

&3.3.Q $ L i P ■&L50 -$2J>0 -&L7.Q $3.80 $3.90

$1.75 $1-80 $1.85 $ 1 .90 $ 1 .95 $2.00 $ 2 ,10 $2 ,2 0 $ 2 .30 $2.40 $ 2 .50 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .70 $ 2 .^0 $ 2 .90 $3 M
A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s 2---------------------------

$3.J O

37

57

65

46

20

2
3

6
1

8

11

6

-

2

5

2

2

3
3

2

1

6

3
3

2

_

4

-

25

8

7

.

-

-

.
-

3

-

78

63 4

$ 2 .7 1

39
24

3

143

be.

-

-

-

_

-

22

2 .8 3
2 .6 6
2 .9 1

-

3

6

24

15

3

13

36

111

23

13

-

-

/
o

•
"

3
•
”

23

15

6

6

-

"

•

*
*

"

5

5

•
"

“

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
B a g g e r s -------------------------------------------------------B a tch w e ig h e r s — ---------------------------------------G r a n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ----------------- -------------L a b o r e r s , m a te r ia l h a n d lin g ------------------M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n ce ------------------------M i ll e r s - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - M i x e r s , d r y m i x i n g - - ----------------- -------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ---------------------------------------r o r k liit - — —
—-—-—-— -— O th er than fo r k li ft — --------------------------

22
g

16
70
12
58

3. 03
2 .5 1
2 .6 7
2 . 76
2 .6 5

O1
cI

“

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

3

2

-

3

-

-

"

17

-

4
33

7

59
3

.

-

-

-

5

-

3
6

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

13

2
8
2
6

-

3
■

6

”

3

*
*

10

"

8
2
6

-

-

20

8
3
5

2

18

3

_
"
*

4

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pa y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s . A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by th e study w e r e p a id on a tim e b a s is .
2 V ir t u a lly a ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e r e m en ; data f o r s e le c t e d o cc u p a tio n s w e r e lim it e d t o m e n w o r k e r s .

T a b le 21. O cc u p atio n al earnings: N orth C aro lin a
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A p r il 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNING8 OF—
O cc u p a tio n

A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s 2 _________

Number
of
workers

$ 2 . 8 0 $ 2 . 9 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .1 0 $ 3 .2 0 $3.3 0 $3.4 0 $ 3 .5 0
$ 1 .6 0 $1.65 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .7 5 $ 1 .8 0 ? L 8 5 T L 9 0 f L 9 5 $ 2 .0 0 $ 2 .1 0 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .7 0
Average
hourly .
and
earnings 1 and
u nd er
$ 1 .6 5 $1.70 $ 1 .7 5 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1 .8 5 $ 1 .9 0 $ 1 .9 5 $ 2 .0 0 $ 2 .1 0 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .5 0 $ 2 .6 0 $ 2 .7 0 $ 2 .8 0 $ 2 .9 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3 .1 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3 .3 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3 .5 0 o v e r
32

16

60

162

202

65

118

94

83

34

10

5

1
1
3

13
12
7
2
8
45

8
6
5
2

6
8
6

3
6
7
1
1
21

8
5
3

7
5
-

-

_

3

8

8

1
1

_

_

_

-

_

10

11

2

61

103

4

_

13

4

2
8

40

.

1 ,5 4 3

$ 2 .1 7

227

45

47

91

60
57
48
7
20
517
63
34
14
86
156
28
128
14

1.98
1.96
1.96
1.88
2 .14
1.79
2.85
1.88
2.15
1..87
1.98
1.95
1.99
1.75

5
6
6
2

_

4
3
7

5

-

_

_
_

-

-

_

_

45

2
18

_

125

77

34

93

16

•

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
B a g g e r s ----------------------------------------------------------B ag s e w e r s , m a c h in e ---------------------------------B a tch w e i g h e r s _____________________________
C o n v e y o r t e n d e r s ----------------------------------------G r a n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ______________________
L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g --------------------M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n c e ----------------------------M i x e r s , d r y m ix i n g ------------------------------------M i x e r s , s u p e r p h o s p h a t e ----------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s ------------------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r ------------------------------------------F o r k l i f t -----------------------------------------------------O ther than f o r k l i f t _______________________
W a tc h m e n -------------------------------------------------------




_
_

-

-

-

-

11

40
2

4
-

18
11
5
6
9

_
-

-

4
8
2
6

-

8
-

_

7

18

-

3

-

-

4
6
5

-

4
10

18
8

-

-

10

8

12
42
7
35

4
1

5
18
2
16

7
2
5
5
23
2
21

4
3
31
6
25

3

-

7

8

1

-

_

_

_

_

5

1

1

_

_

_

_

_

10

2
'

E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w o r k on w eek en d s,
V ir t u a lly a ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e r e m en .

h o lid a y s ,

and la te s h ift s .

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by th e study w e r e pa id on a tim e b a s is

_

2

_
_

_
_

_

5

_

_

_
_

T a b le 22. O c c u p a tio n a l earnings: O h io
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A p r il 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
O cc u p a tio n

A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s 2 --------------------------

Number

of
worker*

Avenge

hourly ,
earning!

1, 160

2 .7 6
2 .9 5
2 .5 3
3 .0 8
2 .4 3
3 .2 2
2 . 82
2 .7 9
2 .5 5
2 .6 9
2 .5 1

26

75

146

53

98

119

68

40

31

67

21

76

11

3

1

10

-

-

6

-

“

-

-

-

.

3

1

-

-

38

-

12

-

-

-

-

“

45

32

12
8

13

35

3

57

2
2

$ 2 .7 7

63
29
22
14
236
62
39
18
25
114
84

£2.10 £2 .2 0 $2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2 .6 0 $ 2.70 $2.8 0 $2.90 $3.0 0 $3.1 0 $ 3.20 $3.3 0 $ 3 .4 0 $ 3.5 0 $ 3.60 $3.7 0 $3.80 $3.90 $4.00 $4.10 $4.20
and
and
u n d er
over
£2 .1 0 £2 .2 0 £2.30 $2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.8 0 $2 .9 0 $3.0 0 $ 3.1 0 $ 3 .2 0 $ 3.3 0 $3.4 0 $ 3.5 0 $3.6 0 $ 3.70 $ 3.8 0 $3.90 $4.00 $4.10 $4.20
£2 .0 0

5
5

S e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s
B a g g e r s _____________________________________
B a g s e w e r s , m a c h in e -------------------------------B a tch w e ig h e r s ----------------------------------------G ra n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d l in g ---------------M e c h a n ic s , m a in t e n a n c e -----------------------M i x e r s , d r y m i x i n g ------------------------------M i x e r s , s u p e rp h o sp h a te -----------------------T r u c k d r i v e r s -----------------------------------------T r u c k e r s , p o w e r 4 ---------------------------------O th er than f o r k l i f t -----------------------------

-

8

16
5

-

“

“

2
1

19

7

1
1

6

6

1 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t im e and f o r w ork o n w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s . A ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d b y th e study w e r e p a id on a t im e b a s is .
2 V ir t u a lly a ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e r e m e n ; data f o r s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s w e r e lim it e d to m e n w o r k e r s .
3 A l l w o r k e r s w e r e at $ 4 . 50 to $ 4 . 60.
4 I n clu d e s data f o r w o r k e r s in c l a s s i fic a t i o n in a d d ition t o t h o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .

T a b le 2 3 . O cc u p atio n al earnings: South C a ro lin a
(N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s 1 o f w o r k e r s in s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s in f e r t i l i z e r m a n u fa ctu rin g e s t a b lis h m e n t s , A p r il 1971)

O c c u p a tio n

Number
of
worker*

Avenge
hourly .
earnings

$ 1 .6 0 $1 .6 5

$ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .7 5

NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNINGS OF—
$ 1 .9 0 $ 1 .9 5 $ 2 .0 0 $ 2 .1 0 $ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 T Z 3 o “$ 2 .6 0 T2T70 T O o " T T M - $3.0 0

$3.10

$ 2 .6 0 $ 2 ,7 0 $ 2 .8 0 $2.9 0 $3.00 $3.10

over

$ 1 .8 0 $ 1 .8 5

and
un d er

and

$ 1 .6 5 $ 1 .7 0 $ 1 .7 5 $ 1 .8 0 $ 1 .8 5 $ 1.90_ $ 1 .9 5

$ 2 .0 0 $ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .2 0 $ 2 .3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $ 2 .5 0

507

$ 2 .1 0

3 18

25

12

16

6

34

42

24

140

80

27

25

3

11

8

6

3

8

7

12

B a g g e r s ---------------------------------------------------------------------B a g s e w e r s , m a c h in e ---------------------------------------------G r a n u la to r o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s , m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g -------------------------------M e c h a n ic s , m a in te n a n ce ---------------------------------------M i x e r s , d r y m ix i n g ------------------------------------------------M i x e r s , s u p e r p h o s p h a t e ----------------------------------------

22
16
7
171
20

2
2

-

-

-

3

33

-

6
-

8
10

3

-

4

62

-

1

28

6
4
3
10

-

5
-

3
-

3
-

-

3
-

4
-

-

T r u c k e r s , p o w e r 4--------------------------------------------------O th er than f o r k l i f t ----------------------------------------------

59
49

2.02
2.01
2.0 9
1.92
2.79
1.89
2.1 4
1.83
2 .0 7
2.06

_

_

_
'

_
'

_

_

~

“

_
-

A l l p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s 1 ---------------------------------------23
S e le c t e d o cc u p a tio n s

1
2
3
4




E x c lu d e s
V ir t u a lly
In clu d e s
In clu d e s

9

10
16

38

10

13

-

-

-

1

2

2

-

-

3

-

2

1

7
3

-

3
3

-

6
6

1
18

-

-

-

1
2
-

-

2
-

2
4

3

p r e m iu m pay f o r o v e r t im e and fo r w o r k on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s , and la te s h ift s .
a ll p r o d u c t io n w o r k e r s w e r e m en.
3 w o r k e r s at $ 1 .2 5 t o $ 1 . 3 0 .
da ta f o r w o r k e r s in c l a s s i fic a t i o n in a d d ition to t h o s e show n s e p a r a t e ly .

32
31

9

A ll p r o d u c tio n w o r k e r s c o v e r e d by the study w e r e pa id on a tim e b a s is .

1
_

T a b le 24. O c c u p a tio n a l earnings: T e n n e s s e e
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in fertilizer manufacturing establishments, April 1971)
NUM BER OF W ORKERS RECEIVING STR AIGH T-TIM E HOURLY EARNINGS OF—

O ccupation

production wArV^ri6 ^

- . . . . r__ . . . . . . . . . .

hourly
earning*

.

$1.90 $2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30
and
-

$2.40 $2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 |$3.40 $3.50 $3.60
and

$2.00 $2.10 $2.20 $2.30 $2.40

of
worker*

$2.50 $2.60 $2.70 $2.80 $2.90 $3.00 $3.10 $3.20 $3.30 $3.40 1$3.50 $3.60

$2.48

3 18

43

15

2.45
2.38
2.51
2.58
2.23
2.95

.
.
.
12
_

2
2
3
_
9
_

2
2
1
4
_

39

2.43

6
4
6
-

4
2
2
-

12

9

15

12

-

-

-

“

“

4

19

9

4

-

■
~
2

_

8

33

-

4
3
12
11
6
-

2

2

2

“

“

"

“

■
-

“
”
2

“
2

"
~
“

-

-

-

-

2

6

64

_
-

_
2
52
_

38

62

18
11
18
13
91
42

87

_

401

.

-

-

-

-

over

Selected occupations
B agger s---- -— —------------- ------------------------—
■
____ ________
g£^£rs
Bcitch w eighers
L a b orers msitcri&l hdjidling— — — — — —— —
—
——
M echanics mciintAP^^^^
—. . . . . . .
T ru c k e r s , pow er (other than
fo rk lift)
................

10

1 Excludes prem iu m pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 A ll production w ork ers w ere men.
3 Includes 6 w o rk e rs at $1. 60 to $ 1. 70.

A ll production w ork ers co v e re d by the study w ere paid on a tim e basis

T a b le 25. O c c u p a tio n a l earnings: V irg in ia
(Number and average straigh t-tim e hourly e a rn in gs1 of w orkers in selected occupations in fe rtiliz e r manufacturing establishm ents, A p ril 1971)
NUMBER OF WORKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-TIME HOURLY EARNING8 OF—

O ccupation

N ber
um
of
worker*

$2.40 $ 2.50 $2.6 0 $ 2.7 0 $ 2.8 0 $2.9 0 $ 3 .0 0 $ 3.10 $3.2 0
Average $1.60 $1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.8 0 $1.8 5 $1.9 0 $1.95 $2.00 $ 2.10 $2.2 0 $ 2 .3 0
hourly . and
and
earning*

under

$1.65 $1.70 $1.75 $1.8 0 $1.85 $1.9 0 $1.95 $ 2.0 0 $ 2.10 $ 2.20 $ 2.3 0 $ 2 .4 0 $2.5 0 $ 2.6 0 $ 2 .7 0 $ 2.80 $2.9 0 $ 3 ,0 0 $3.1 0 $3,2 0

A ll production w o rk e rs 2 ------------------------

over

-

14

$ 2 .2 4

61

4

4

4

18

7

67

10

147

50

227

157

91

35

24

22

11

19

7

45
33
31
19
199

2 . 18
2 .2 2
2 .2 5
2 .3 2
2 .0 3

3

2

2

2

6

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

“
-

"
“

“
"

“
“

"
“

“

1

-

12
14
12

2
2

-

14
6
14

-

1

6
3
1

-

4
-

4
7

-

-

"
“

24

-

74

3

5

2

4

10

2 .3 1
2 .0 0

4
2

2

-

-

-

4

2

-

-

979

Selected occupations
Baggers ---------------------------------------------------Bag se w e rs, m achine ----------------------------Batch w eighers --------------------------------------Granulator o p erators ----------------------------L a b o re rs, m aterial handling ----------------M echanics, maintenance ------------- ----------M ille rs ___________________________________
M ix e rs, dry m ix in g --------------------------------M ix e rs, superphosphate -----------------------T ru ckd rivers ------------------------------------------T ru ck ers, p o w e r 4 ----------------------------------Other than fo rk lift ----------------------------Watchmen ------------------------------------------------




7
11
69
137
115
16

29

2

2 .0 8

6

2.22

4

2 .2 6
1 .8 1

2
4

2

2
-

2
-

-

4

-

-

-

4

2
2
2

11
1
1

2

1

-

7

7

3

10

13

20

17

8

-

2
-

6

7
2
2

1
18
71
62

1

3 10
,«
”
“

3

14
15

1
30
30

-

-

"

12
12

1 Excludes prem iu m pay fo r overtim e and fo r work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. A ll production w ork ers covered by the study w ere paid on a tim e basis.
2 V irtually all production w ork ers w ere men; data fo r selected occupations w ere lim ited to men w ork ers.
3 W orkers w ere distributed as fo llo w s : 1 at $3. 20 to $3. 30; 2 at $3. 30 to $3. 40; 6 at $4 to $4. 10, and 1 at $4. 30 to $4. 40.
4

I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w o r k e r s in c l a s s i f i c a t i o n in a d d i t io n t o t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .

T a b le 2 6 .

M eth od o f w a g e

paym en t:

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts

(P ercent of production w ork ers in fe rtiliz e r m anufacturing establishm ents by m ethod of wage payment,
United States and selected re gio n s, M arch— p ril 1971)
A
united
States 2
1

Method o f wage paym ent1

M iddle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

(Jreat
Lakes

Southwest

Middle
West

P a cific

A ll w ork ers ______________ _

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

T im e-rated w o r k e r s _____________
F orm al plans __________ ____
Single r a t e _________________
Range o f rates ------------------Individual rates ______________

99
78
66
12
22

100
76
69
7
24

100
69
64
5
31

99
81
71
10
19

100
80
61
19
20

100
79
50
29
21

100
68
68

97
75
75

-

-

32

22

Incentive w ork ers _______________

(3)

-

-

-

-

-

3

( 3)

1 F o r definition of m ethod of wage payment, see appendix A.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 L ess than 0. 5 percent.
Note:

T a b le 2 7 .

Because of rounding, sums o f individual item s m ay not equal totals.

S c h e d u le d w e e k ly hours: A ll e s ta b lish m e n ts

(P ercen t o f ye a r-ro u n d and seasonal production w orkers in fe rtiliz e r m anufacturing establishm ents by scheduled w eekly hours,
United States and selected region s, March— p ril 1971)
A
United S tates2
Weekly hours 1

Y e a rround

A ll w ork ers _______________

100

Under 40 hours _________________
40 hours _________________________
Over 40 and under 44 hours ___
44 hours _________________________
44V2 h o u r s _______________________
45 h o u r s __________ ______________
Over 45 and under 48 hours ___
48 hours _________________________
O ver 48 and under 50 hours ___
50 hours _________________________
O ver 50 and under 55 hours ___
55 hours _________________________
O ver 55 and under 60 hours ___
60 hours _________________________
O ver 60 h o u r s ___________________

.
64
4
4
_
3
4
4
1
4
3
2
2
2
2

Seasonal
100
(3)
45
(3)
7
1
4
2
5
1
7
4
8
2
11
3

Middle Atlantic
Y ea rround

Seasonal

B order States
Y e a rround

Seasonal

100

100

100

100

.
58
_
_
_
10
_
5
4
_
6

4
46
.
_
_
18
_
_
.
_
_
7

_

_

18
“

25

_
25
_
10
_
9
2
19
3
15
3
3
4
6
1

23
_
12
_
9
6
10
2
16
2
3
3
12
2

-

Southeast
Y e a rround
100
70
6
2
_
1
1
2
(3)
3
6
4
2
1
4

Southwest

Seasonal

Y e a rround

Great Lakes

Seasonal




Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.

Middle West

Seasonal

Y e a rround

P a cific

Seasonal

Y ea rround

Seasonal

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

47
_
3
1
3
2
5
_
5
4
12
2
12
5

87
1
1
_
4
_
5
2
1
_

86
3
1
_
6
_
1
3
.
_

42
5
3
_
2
21
6

47
1
8

53
_
32

33
_
35

77
4
4

100
_

2

_
3
5
6

7
4
2
4
3
2

8
6
11
2
6
3

2
_
8
_
1
_
_
_

_

2
1

25
3

_
_
_

_
_
_

-

1 Data relate to predominant w ork schedules o f day-shift year-rou n d and seasonal w ork ers, resp e ctiv e ly , in each establishm ent.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 L e s s than 0. 5 percent.

Note:

Y e a rround

_

3
_
6
_

_

_
3

_

_
_
_

_

_
_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_




T a b le 2 8 .

S h if t d iffe re n tia l p ra ctice s:

AM e s ta b lis h m e n ts

(P ercen t o f production w ork ers em ployed on late shifts in fe r tiliz e r m anufacturing establishm ents by amount of shift differential, United States and
s e le cte d region s, M archr-April 1971)
Shift d iffe r e n tia l1

United States 1 — m a a is —
2
Atlantic

B order
States

Southeast

Southwest

G reat Lakes

M iddle W est

P a cific

15.7
13.7
13.7
_
_
1. 1
3.7
1.0
.5
.9
4 .4

17.0
12. 3
12.3
_
_
_
_
2.8
_
1. 1
2.8
1.8
_

12. 1
11.5
9 .2
_
_
1.6
_
_
_

_

4. 1

3.9

3. 3

Second shift
W orkers em ployed on second shift
R eceivin g shift d ifferential — —
U niform cents per h o u r-------3 cents —- -------- --------------4 cents —
5 cents -■i -------- . —
6 cents
7 cents 8 cents _
9 cents ---------------- ----------10 c e n ts .
11 cents
.,— -------. — —
12 c e n t s -----, --------------------14 cents
—
15 c e n t s .
Other fo rm a l paid
diff e r e n tia l------------ ----- -------

14.5
13.0
12.6
.1
.4
1.3
.8
2 .4
2. 1
.4
2 .9
.1
.4
.4
1. 3

17. 2
17. 2
17.2
_
_
1.3
2. 0
_
1 .2
_
12.8
_
.
.
-

9 .3
8. 3
8. 3
_
1. 1
3. 3
_
_
.4
1.7
1.8
.
.
_
-

13.8
12.8
12.8
.2
.8
1 .4
.3
4 .6
4 .0
.1
1. 1
_
.2
_
-

17. 2
15. 1
12. 1
_
_
_
_
.8
.7
_
5 .9
_
.4

_

4 .2

_

_
2. 2
-

_

(3)

_

.4

-

-

-

3.0

-

-

2. 3

1.4

-

1.0

1. 1

2. 1

2.0

4 .7

.6

2.6
2.6
2 .6

4. 1
4. 1
4. 1

10.0
9.8
9.8
.3
.3
.4
.2
.7
.2
. 1

9.7
9.7
8 .2

3.7
3. 3
3.0

7. 1
7. 1
7. 1

9.5
9 .5
7. 1

8 cents — -------9 cents -----10 c e n t s .
.
11 c e n t s . .
_ -12 cents
13 cents
14 cents
15 cents
16 cents
20 cents
______________
22 cents
24 c e n t s -------------------- --- ----30 cents _

7 .9
7 .8
7 .4
.1
.1
.4
.3
.3
.1
.3
(3)
.4
.1
1.6
.2
1.4
.8
(3)
.2
1. 2

12 percent ________________

.1
.1

R eceivin g no shift differential —
Third o r other late shift
W orkers em ployed on third o r other
late shift
Receiving shift differential
U niform cents per hour . . . . . . .
4 cents ------------------------ —
5 cents ----------------------------6 cents .

_
_
_
_
_
_
.7

2.0

_
_

.9
1.4

_
_
.3
.7
.3

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
.5
_
_
_
_

-

-

_

.5
.l
3.7

_

3. 1
.4

_
_
_
.4
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
2.7
_
.5
_

.5
_

_

_
1. 1
_
.1
-

.2

_
_

3.5
(3)

1.2
_

-

4.2

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1.5

_

_
3 .9

_
_
_
_
_

_
1.6
_

_
_
_
_

_
(3)
3 .1

2. 2

_

.

-

-

-

-

2. 3

.4

-

-

.3
.3

Other fo rm a l paid
.3
R eceivin g no shift differential _

-

-

-

.1

-

-

. 1

1 Data relate to all year-rou n d and seasonal production w ork ers em ployed on extra shifts.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 L e ss than 0 .0 5 percent.

NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

-

T a b le 2 9 .

P a id h o lid a y s :

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts

(Percent of year-round and seasonal production workers in fertilizer manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid holidays,
United States and selected regions, March—
April 1971)
Number o f paid holidays

United States1
Y e a rSeasonal
round
100

M iddle Atlantic
Y ea rround

Seasonal

B order States
Y e a rSeasonal
round

Southeast
Y e a rSeasonal
round

Southwest
Y e a rSeasonal
round

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

27
10
3
1
3

100

100

45
34
_

24
6
2
1
7
_
1
_
.
7
_
_

99
_
_
1
4
6
7
_
_
_
52
_
29
.
_

9
_
_
_
_
_
_

3

W orkers in establishm ents p r o ­
viding paid holidays ____________
1 day ----------------- --------------------2 days _________________________
3 days _________________________
4 days ___________________ ______
5 days _________________________
6 days _________________________
6 days plus 2 half d a y s ______
7 d a y s _________ _______________ _
7 days plus 1 half d a y _______
7 days plus 2 half d a y s --------8 days _________________________
8 days plus 2 half d a y s ______
9 days _________________________
9 days plus 1 half day ----------10 days ________________________
W orkers in establishm ents p r o ­
viding no paid h o lid a y s ________

100

97
1
(2)
1
2
5
9
(2)
15
(2)
1
36
(2)
24
(2)
1

A ll w ork ers ________________

73

76

-

50
12

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

2

7
5
39
26
15
4
5

_
_
9
_

-

55

7

-

18
20
_

-

5
12
11
1
9
_
44
16
_

93
3
1
1
1
7
5
18
_
_
42
_
15
_
_

50

-

2
-

6
2
(2)

-

-

_
2
-

100

P a cific

M iddle West
Y e a rSeasonal
round

Y ea rround

Seasonal

91

100

100

100

100

22
6
8
_
_
_
2
_
_
4
_
_
1

100
_
_

41
3
_
2
_
_
18
_
_

100
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

100

100
_
_
1
_
2
16
19
_
(2)
34
2
21
1
3

_
.
_
9
_
_
_

1

G reat Lakes
Y e a rSeasonal
round

78

_
_
21
_
8
_
_
17
_
54
_

_
_
_
16
_
20
5

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
13
_
5
_

59

_

_
10
_
49
_
_
-

100

Middle
West

P a cific

_

-

1 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
2 L e s s than 0 .5 percent.
Note:

T a b le 3 0 .

B ecause o f rounding, sums o f individual item s m ay not equal totals.

P a id h o lid a y s:

B y ty p e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t

(P ercen t of y e a r-ro u n d production w ork ers in fe rtiliz e r m anufacturing establishm ents with fo rm a l provisions fo r paid holidays by type of establishm ent,
United States and selected region s, March— p ril 1971)
A
Num ber of paid holidays

Complete (integrated) establishm ents
United Border South­
South­ Middle
P a cific
States 1 State s
east
west
West

Superphosphate establishm ents
United
South­
South­ Great
States 1 east
w est
Lakes

Mixing establishm ents
United M iddle B order
States1 Atlantic State s

South­
east

South­
west

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

96

100

100

100

-

-

-

9
21
19
2
11
_
_
18
_
19

78
8
2
2
3
17
12
_
17
_
_
6
_
12

7
18
28
14
_
_
_
_
29
_

1
_
2
19

_

_

_
_

“

"

-

5

-

22

4

-

A ll w ork e rs _____________________

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid h o lid a y s _________________________

100

100

100

100

100

100

99

100

97

100

"

-

"

-

-

-

-

2
2
2
9
_
24
_
_
47
_
14
1
“

5
3
4
8
_
24
_
_
49
_
8

92
3
1
2
4
11
17
1
19
1
3
17
1
11

3 days _______________________________
4 days _______________________________
5 days _______________________________
6 days _______________________________
6 days plus 2 half d a y s ___________
7 d a y s _____________________________ _
7 days plus 1 half day ____________
7 days plus 2 half d a y s ___________
8 days _______________________________
8 days plus 2 half d a y s ___________
9 days -----------------------------------------------9 days plus 1 half day ____________
10 days _____________________________
W orkers in establishm ents providing
no paid holidays _____________________

“
-

-

2

-

-

9
50
38

84
16

17
62
19

55
45

15
83

17
_
_
83

-

-

-

-

_

_

(2)
2

-

1
1

-

-

-

■

-

-

-

"
-

1 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
2 L ess than 0.5 percent.

Note:




Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

( 2)

_

"

-

-

_
_
12
_
32
_
_
14
_
36
6
-

_
25
_
_
_
72
_
_
_

3

"

_
8
6
45
_
31
1
_
5

_

_

2

5

8

Great
Lakes

18

_

(2)
35
3
16

_

_

_
75
_
_
_

_

_
_

16

43
14

_

_
_
_
_

-

-

_
21
_
4

27

T a b le 31.

P a id v a c a tio n s :

A ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts

(Percent of year-round and seasonal production workers in fertilizer manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, United States and
selected regions, March—
April 1971)
United States 1
Vacation p o licy

A ll w ork ers ---- ---------------------------------------

Y e a rround

Seasonal

Middle Atlantic
Y ea rround

Seasonal

B o rd e r States
Y e a rround

Seasonal

Southeast
Y e a rround

Southwest

Seasonal

Y e a rround

Great Lakes

Seasonal

Y ea rround

M iddle W est

Seasonal

Y ea rround

P a cific

Seasonal

Y ea r- 2
round

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

98
97
(?)
(3)

9
8
2
-

99
99
-

22
22
-

100
100
-

9
9
-

95
95
-

8
8
-

99
99
-

6
6
-

100
98
2
-

13
7
6
-

100
100
-

3
3
-

99
95
_
4

2

91

1

78

-

91

5

92

1

94

-

87

-

97

1

(3)
62
5
29

1
6
2
1

64
36
-

20
_
-

4
89
7

4
5
-

68
_
26

8
_
-

26
72

_
_
6

58
19
24

5
6
2

_
40
15
45

3
_
-

63
4
28

34
1
57
5

1
5
2
2
-

33
_
31
35

_
_
20

76
3
22

4
5
_
_

8
_
_

-

-

-

41
_
54
-

-

10
_
89
-

_
_
_
6
_

36
7
40
17

3
6
4
-

_
18
_
66
16

3
_
_
-

8
4
87
-

_
9
(3)
82
6

1
1
_
6
2

_
16
_
48
35

_
_
_
20
-

_
16
3
81
-

4
_
_
5
-

_
12
_
80
3

_
2
_
6
_

_
2
_
96
_

_
_
6
_

_
3
_
78
19

_
_
_
7
6

_
_
_
84
16

_
3
_
_
_

3
_
92
4

4
(3)
64
7
21

1
1
5
2
1

7
_
57
35
_

_
20
_
_

14
3
82
2

4
_
_
_
5

_
5
_
67
3
19

2
_
6
_
_

2
_
55
_
41

_
_
_
6
_
-

_
2
_
63
24
10

_
_
_
7
6
_

_
_
_
44
15
41

_
3
_
_
_
-

.
_
47
4
49

_
4
30
1
41
2
18

1
1
1
_
4
2
1

_
7
14
_
43
35
_

_
_
_
_
20
_
-

_
14
60
3
22
_
2

4
_
_
_
_
_
5

_
5
33
1
41
_
16

_
2
3
_
3
_
_

_
2
26
_
30
_
41

_
_
_
_
6
_
_

_
1
25
_
71
2
2

_
_
_
_
7
6
_

_
_
22
15
25
_
38

_
3
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
18
_
29
4
49

1
1
_
5
2
1

-

-

-

_
_
_
20
_
-

14
24
3
58
2

4
_
_
_
_
5

-

7
14
_
43
35
-

5
24
5
30
31

2
_
_
6
_
_

2
21
35
_
41

_
_
_
6
_
_

1
22
_
71
2
5

_
_
_
_
7
6
_

_
_
9
15
39
_
38

3
_
_
_
.

_
.
18
_
29

_
7
3
_
54
35

_
_
_
20

_
14
8
3
74

_
5
16
_
40

_
2
_
_
6

_
2
18
_
33

_
_
_
6

_
1
12
_
71

_

_
_
7

_
3
.
_

_
_

_

_

_

5

34

_
_

_

2

46

_
_

*

-

-

-

-

Method o f payment
W orkers in establishm ents providing paid
vacations ■
—... — -------- --- -------------------------— L en gth -of-tim e p a y m e n t ---------- — ------------O t h e r ----------------------------------------------------------W orkers in establishm ents providing no paid
v a c a t i o n s ----------------------------------------------------- —
Amount of vacation pav 4
A fter 1 yea r o f s e r v ic e :
1 week --------- -----—---- ---------------------------------2 w eeks —
----------------------------------------------------A fter 2 years o f s e rv ice :
Under 1 week ------------------ —-----------------------1 w e e k ----------------------------- —
—-------------- ---- —
O ver 1 and under 2 w eeks --------—..... .........
2 w eeks - ------ ---------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ----------------------- —
A fter 3 yea rs o f s e rv ice :
Under 1 w e e k ------------- --------- ----------------— —
O ver 1 and under 2 weeks - ----------------------—
2 weeks — — —----------- -------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ----------------------- —
A fter 5 years o f s e rv ice :
Under 1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------1 w e e k --------------------------------- -----------------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ----------------- -------2 w e e k s ----------------------- ---- —-----------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks -------- —
--------------3 w eeks —
------- ---------------------------------------A fter 10 years o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 week -------- ------------------ -------—---- ----1 week ---------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s -------------------- ------- ---------O ver 2 and under 3 weeks — —--------- ----- —
3 weeks ------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 weeks ------------------------4 weeks — ------------------- ---- ---------------— -------A fter 12 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 we ek — ---- — ------------ ---------------------1 week — -------------- — -----—.............■-.......— —
2 weeks — — — ---- —
------------ ---------------------—
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -------------------------3 weeks — ---- ------------------------ ---- — ------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s ------------------------4 weeks — ---- — ------------------ -------------------- —
A fter 15 y ea rs o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 w e e k ------- -------------- ------— ----- ----—

-

4
21
3
41
2
26
_
4

14
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -------------------------

( 3)
44

O ver 3 and under 4 weeks ------—-----—------—
4 weeks — ----------------- -------- ------------------------O ver 4 and under 5 weeks —-------------- ----------

3
33

See footnotes at end o f table,




( 3)

1
1
_
5
_

1
2

-

_

4

_
_
_

-

_

15
2

_
_

_

4

49
_
_

_
_

9
_
28
10
54

_
.
_

13
_
33
4
50

6

-

-

-

T a b le 31. P a id v a c a tio n s :

A ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s — C o n tin u e d

(Percent of year-round and seasonal production workers in fertilizer manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, United States and
selected regions, March-April 1971)
United States 1
Vacation p o licy

Y ea rround

Seasonal

Middle Atlantic
Y e a rround

Seasonal

B ord er States
Y e a rround

Seasonal

Southwest

Southeast
Y e a rround

Seasonal

Y ea rround

Y ea rround

P a cific

Middle West

G reat Lakes

Seasonal

Seasonal

Y ea rround

Seasonal

Y ea rround 1
2

Am ount o f vacation p a y 4— Continued
A fter 20 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 w e e k ----------------------------------- ---- ---1 w e e k -------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------- —--------- —
---O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks — —
------------------O ver 3 and under 4 weeks --------- --------------4 w e e k s ---- — ------------- — — ---- ------— -------O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s ------------------------5 w e e k s -------- — -----------------------------------------A fter 25 y ears o f s e r v ic e :5
Under 1 w e e k --------------------------------------------1 w e e k ---------------------------------- --------------------2 w e e k s ------------------ -------------------------- --------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ----- ----- ------------3 w e e k s ----------------------- --------------------- --------O ver 3 and under 4 weeks — --------- --------4 w e e k s ------- -------- -------------------------------------O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s ------------------------5 weeks ------------- --------- -------------------------- -—

4
14
(3
)
25
3
36
2
13

1
1
1
4
3

7
3
27
27
35
-

20
-

14
8
3
51
22
2

4
5

5
16
27
1
37
9

2
3
3
-

2
18
9
37
33

6
-

1
12
22
17
38
9

7
6

9
23
10
15
44

_
4
14
(3)
16
1
38
4
21

1
1
( 3)

7

_
20
■

14
8

4
5

5
16
16
34
24

2
1
5
~

2
18
6

6
~

1
12
15
41
17
13

5
8

9
23
10
15
44

4
3

3

27
22
35
5

3

17
52
7

-

39
33

3
-

13
33
44
10

-

13
-

3

-

33

44
10

‘

1 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
2 Seasonal w ork ers w ere not provided vacation benefits by any o f the establishm ents visited.
3 L ess than 0.5 p ercent.
4 Vacation payments such as a percent of annual earnings w ere converted to an equivalent tim e b asis. P e rio d s of s e rv ice w ere a rb itra rily chosen and do not n eces s a rily reflect individual establish­
ment p rovision s fo r p r o g re s s io n . F or exam ple, the changes in proportions indicated at 10 years m ay include changes in provision s o ccu rrin g between 5 and 10 years.
* Vacation p rovision s w ere the same after longer periods o f s e rv ice .

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




T a b le 3 2 .

P a id v a c a t io n s :

B y ty p e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t

(Percent of year-round production workers in fertilizer manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, by type of establishment,
United States and selected regions, Marchr-April 1971)

Vacation p o licy

A ll w o r k e r s -----------------------------------

Complete (integrated) establishm ents
South­
Middle
United B order South­
P a cific
east
West
west
States 1 States

M ixing establishm ents
Superphosphate establishm ents •
South­
United South­
United Middle B order South­
South­
Ureat
Great
w est
States 1 east
States 1 Atlantic States
east
west
Lakes
Lakes

Middle
West

P a cific

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
100
-

100
100
-

100
100

100
100

100
100

_

100
100
_

100
100
_

97
97
_

100
100
_
_

94
93
1
1

99
99
_
_

100
100
_

85
85
_
_

96
96
_
_

100
97
3
_

100
100
-

97
87
_
10

-

-

-

3

-

6

1

-

15

4

-

-

3

_
53
2
44

100
_
_

_
65
_
34

_
4
_
96

_
56
25
19

87
_
13

_
63
10
11

21
1
75
2

100
_
-

27
73
-

1
_
94
4

_
100
_

(2)
57
6
36

_
_
100
_
_

(2)
16
2
49
_
34

Method o f paym ent
W orkers in establishm ents providing
paid vacations —--------------------------------------L en gth -of-tim e p a y m e n t --------------------P ercentage p a y m e n t --------------------------O t h e r ---------------------------------------------------W orkers in establishm ents providing no
paid v a ca tio n s------------------------------------------

-

-

_

_

99
99
_

-

-

(2)

_
15
23
62

_
60
_
40

_
84
_
15

_
93
_
7

_
56
_
41

_
67
_
33

1
65
11
16

_
58
42
-

7
81
_
12

_
64
21

_
75
_
21

_
100
_

15
_
62
23

_
_
100
-

46
_
54
_

65
_
35
_

_
97
_

56
_
44
_

45
2
38
10

39
_
19
42

64
5
31
_

54
_
31
_

48
_
48
_

36
2
39
23

_
_
96
4

22
10
66
_

3
_
92
5

_
_
100
_

_
_
77
23

_
_
100
_

9
_
90
_

18
_
82
_

_
_
97
_

7
_
93
_

17
1
66
11

18
_
39
42

27
5
68
_

26
_
59
_

11
_
85
_

2
_
72
25

_
_
96
4

9
_
79
10

1
68
6
25

_
_
41
_
59

_
_
17
23
60

_
_
17
_
83

5
_
89
_
6

8
_
85
_
7

_
_
80
_
17

7
_
93
_
_

9
1
64
11
9

8
_
50
42
_

24
5
68
_
3

11
_
60
_
14

11
_
81
_
4

1
_
61
25
13

_
_
90
10

_
_
87
10
_

75
_
25
_
_

1
19
_
59
_
21

_
6
_
36
_
59

_
2
23
15
_
60

_
_
_
17
_
83

4
57
_
37
_
3

8
64
_
27
_
_

_
56
_
24
_
17

_
36
_
64
_
_

9
38
1
34
6
6

8
16
_
34
42
_

24
45
5
23
_
3

11
42
2
16
_
14

11
65
_
16
_
4

1
26
_
69
2
2

_
41
_
59
_
_

_
38
_
50
10
_

(2)
5
6
41
_
47

9
_
91
_
_

1
7
9
37
_
47

_
6
_
36
_
59

_
2
23
15
_
60

_
_
_
17
_
83

4
43
_
47
_
6

8
60
_
25
_
7

_
25
_
55
_
17

_
36
_
64
_
_

9
32
1
39
6
7

8
16
_
34
42
_

24
26
5
43
_
3

11
39
2
20
_
14

11
65
_
16
_
4

1
22

_
21

_
38

_

_

_

70
2
5

79
_
_

50
10
_

_
3
_
39
1
57

_
_
_
100
_

_
4
_
44
_
52
-

_
6
_
36
_
59
-

_
2
_
_
16
82
-

_
_
_
17
_
83

4
19
_
59
_
19
-

8
20
_
65
_
7
-

_
25
_
31
_
41

_
18
_
52
_
29
-

9
24
1
45
5
9
(2)

8
3
_
47
42

24
13
5
55
_
3
-

11
35
_
25
_
14
"

11
52
_
24

1
12
_
72

_
21
75

_
23
_
61
10
3
-

-

Amount o f vacation pay 3
A fter 1 year o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 w eek -------------------------------------1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s -----------------2 weeks -----------------------------------------------A fter 2 years o f se r v ic e :
1 w e e k -------------- — —
—— -------------- ------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s -----------------2 weeks -----------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------A fter 3 years of s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ------------------------ — --------------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ------- ----------2 weeks ------------- ------------------ — -----------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------A fter 5 years o f se r v ic e :
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s -----------------2 w eeks -----------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------A fter 10 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------—-----------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -------- -------—
3 w e e k s ----------------------------------- —— -----O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -----------------4 weeks -----------------------------------------------A fter 12 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k -------- —--------------------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------3 w e e k s ------------- — -----------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s ----------------4 w e e k s -------------------------------------— ------A fter 15 yea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------3 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -----------------4 weeks -----------------------------------------------O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s -----------------See footnotes at end o f table.




_

-

_

-

_

_

_

9
-

12
2

4
-

T a b le 3 2 .

P a id v a c a t io n s :

B y ty p e o f e s t a b lis h m e n t — C o n t in u e d

(P ercen t o f yea r-ro u n d production w orkers in fe rtiliz e r manufacturing establishm ents with fo rm a l provision s fo r paid vacations after selected periods o f s e rv ice by type o f establishm ent,
United States and s elected regions, M arch -A pril 1971)
Complete (integrated) establishm ents
Vacation p o licy

United B order
States 1 States

South­
east

South­
west

Middle
West

Superphosphate establishm ents

P a cific

United South­
States 1 east

South­
west

Great
Lakes

M ixing establishm ents
United
Middle B order
States 1 Atlantic State s

Southeast

South­
w est

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

P a cific

Amount of vacation pav 1 Continued
3—
2
A fter 20 y ea rs o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------------2 weeks -----------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------3 weeks ---------------------------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -----------------4 weeks -----------------------------------------------O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s -----------------5 weeks ---------------------------------------------After 25 y ears o f s e r v ic e 4
1 week -----------------------------------------------2 weeks -----------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------3 weeks -----------------------------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -----------------4 weeks -----------------------------------------------O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s -----------------5 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------

-

3
_
27
1
46
-

23
_
3
_
13
1
45
-

38

-

75
_
25
_
-

_
84
_
16

-

-

-

4
39
42
15

6
_
_
_
47
48

2
_
_
16
15
68

-

17
_
73
10

4
19
_
25
_
44
_
9

8
20
15
_
50
7

-

_
6
_
_
_
47
_
48

_
2
_
_
16
15
_
68

_
_
17
_
73
_
10

4
19
_
18
_
46
_
13

8
20
_
12
_
47
_
13

-

4
_
21
_
34
_
41

25
_
31
_
24
_
17

_
18
17
_
45
_
19

9
24
1
24
6
23
5
3

8
3
_
32
_
14
42
_

24
13
5
30
_
25
_
3

11
35
_
13
2
23
1

11
52
_
19
15
_
_

1
12
_
22
23
33
_
9

_
25
_
31
_
24

_
18
_
_
_
52

9
24
1
19

8
3
_
32

24
13
5
19

11
35
_
10

11
52

1
12

_

_

21

23

_

_

_

_

54

61

_

_

17

29

-

_

5

15

_
21
_
54

_
23
.
61

_

_

21
_
4

3
_
10

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

27
10
5

9
42
5

36

28

28

21

3

_

_

_

_

_

3

1

-

36
23
12

4

10

1 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
2 L ess than 0. 5 p ercen t.
3 Vacation payments such as a percent o f annual earnings were converted to an equivalent tim e b asis. P eriod s o f s e rv ice w ere a rb itra rily chosen and do not n e c e s s a r ily reflect individual establish­
ment p rovision s fo r p ro g re s s io n . F or exam ple, the changes in proportion s indicated at 10 years may include changes in provision s o ccu rrin g between 5 and 10 y ea rs.
4 Vacation p rovision s w ere the same after longer periods of s e rv ice .

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.




T a b le 33.

H e a lth , in s u r a n c e , a n d re tire m e n t p la n s:

A ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s

(P ercen t o f yea r-rou n d and seasonal production w ork ers in fe rtiliz e r manufacturing establishm ents with sp ecified health, insurance, and retirem ent plans, United States and selected regions,
M arch— p ril 1971)
A
Southeast

Middle Atlantic

Y e a r-

Seasonal

Y ea r-

Seasonal

Y e a rround

Seasonal

Y e a rround

Seasonal

Y e a rround

Seasonal

Y e a rround

Seasonal

Y e a rround

Seasonal

Y e a rround

Seasonal

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Great Lakes

P a cific

-

W orkers in establishm ents
providing:
N oncontributory p la n s -------- —
A ccidental death and d is m e m berm ent in s u r a n c e ---- -------- ----N oncontributory p la n s ---- — —
Sickness and accident insurance

B order States

Southwe st

Middle West

United States 13
2
Type o f plan 1

87
39

11
7

89
60

27
7

68
25

7
5

90
37

13
9

94
42

3
3

84
44

11
9

93
35

13
-

73
61

-

67
30

6
3

42
14

27
7

44
17

5
5

66
26

7
4

77
32

3
3

68
34

1
-

93
48

13
-

69
61

-

75

8

88

27

53

5

70

5

76

3

89

13

80

3

88

_

52
20

7
4

50
21

27
7

40
8

5
5

55
18

5
3

50
34

_
-

65
27

10
8

51
38

3
-

17
10

-

19

( 8)

12

-

-

-

9

-

46

3

13

-

39

-

46

-

18
94
34
94
34
81
28
73
24
77
76
59
(4)
5

4
10
6
10
6
8
5
5
2
6
6
6
88

35
99
31

27
7
27
7
27
7
27
7
_

14
90
19
90
19
63
16
47
73
73
57
10

7
7
7
7
7
7
_
5
5
5
90

15
92
20
92
20
79
16
77
15
73
73
59
6

3
9
4

93
41
93
41
85

3
3

42
96
63
96
63
74
41
62

9
13

24
98
57
98
57
98
57
85
45
87
87
28
-

3
-

32
96
74
96
74
96
74
92
71
75
75
55
”

-

Sickness and accident
N oncontributory p la n s -----Sick leave (full pay, no
waiting pe riod) —----------------—
Sick leave (partial pay o r
N oncontributory plans —------—
N oncontributory p la n s -------- —
N oncontributory p la n s -------- —
N oncontributory p la n s ----------R etirem ent plans 5 —-------- ---------P ension p la n s -----------------------N oncontributory plans-----No plans

- ........ .......—
------------

99

32
91
28
82
19
65
65
65
1

_

73

9

4
5
1
4
5
5
5
87

33

62
35
85
85
64
6

3
3
3
3
3
3

3
3
3
97

33

80
79
59
2
4

9

13
9

13
9

8
6
13
13
13
87

3

3

3

87

-

100

1 "N oncontributory plan s" include only those plans financed entirely by the em ployer.
L ega lly required plans such as w ork m en 's com pensation and s o c ia l secu rity are excluded; however,
plans required by State tem p orary disability insurance laws are included if the em ployer contributes m ore than is legally required o r the em ployees receive benefits in ex cess of legal requirem ents.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 Unduplicated total o f w ork ers receivin g sick leave o r sickness and accident insurance shown separately.
4 L ess than 0. 5 percent.
5

U n d u p lic a t e d




to ta l o f w o r k e r s

c o v e r e d b y p e n sio n s

or

r e t ir e m e n t s e v e r a n c e p a y

sh ow n

s e p a ra te ly .

T a b l e 34 .

H e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , a nd retir e m e n t pla n s:

B y type of esta b lish m en t

(P e r c e n t of ye a r-ro u n d production w ork ers in fe rtiliz e r manufacturing establishm ents with specified health, insurance, and retirem ent plans by type of establishm ent, United States and selected
regions, M arch— p ril 1971)
A

Type o f plan1

Complete (integrated) establishm ents
United Border South South­ M iddle
P a cific
States2 States
W est
east
west

Superphosphate establishm ents
United South­
South­ Great
States2
w est
Lakes
east

Mixing establishm ents
United M iddle
States2 Atlantic

B order
States

South­
east

South­
w est

Great
Lakes

Middle
West

P a cific

100
W orkers in establishm ents providing:
L ife insurance ---- -----------------------------N oncontributory p la n s ------------- —
---A ccidental death and dism em b erment i n s u r a n c e -------------- — ■
------ ------N oncontributory p l a n s -----------------Sickness and accid ent insurance
Sickness and accid ent insurance —
Non contribu tory plans — ---- ------Sick leave (fu ll pay, no waiting
p e r io d )------- ----------------------------------Sick leave (partial pay or
waiting period) -------- ----------- ------Surgical in s u r a n c e ------------------- _________
N oncontributory p l a n s -----------------M edical i n s u r a n c e ----------— — — ------—
N oncontributory plans —— — — —
N oncontributory plans — --------------P ension plans ---------------- ----—--------Severance p a y ------------- —

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

93
42

41
-

96
47

100
37

100
40

83
76

97
43

96
40

97
66

100
31

77
36

87
7

78
38

77
19

71
42

79
47

82
3

54
44

81
37

25

77
38

96
33

100
60

83
76

66
26

69
24

73
42

30
-

52
22

33
16

56
29

49
8

20
20

72
41

82
3

44
44

88
60
19

50
41
-

86
66
15

91
58
34

100
57
40

100
10
10

79
72
30

75
65
35

66
49
49

100
100
31

59
38
19

86
42
25

46
29
9

42
35
15

38
24
24

85
53
24

62
57
48

68
18
10

26

-

11

54

60

57

16

10

41

7

11

15

-

6

25

14

4

32

17
98
30
98
30
88
24
84
26
93
93
72

9
100

18
97
21
97
21
87
15
84
13
89
89
72
2

100
37
100
37
89
26
66
77
100
100
73
“

38
100
40
100
40
100
40
100
40
100
100
37
“

43
100
70
100
70
100
70
100
70
83
83
49

17
99
34
99
34
91
35
81
28
76
76
60

25
100
28
100
28
84
31
79
28
88
88
72

97
41
97
41
97
41
97
41
97
97
72

39
100
59
100
59
100
59
78
38
87
87
70

21
87
39
87
39
71
30
57
20
58
58
44

42
99
37
99
37
89
32
79
22
76
76
76
1

20
83
27
83
27
63
23
34
64
64
44

6
82
16
82
16
65
12
63
12
42
42
34

66
55
66
55
60
49
24
24
29
29
29

48
95
59
95
59
70
34
54
23
76
74
51
2
5

_
100
90
100
90
100
90
52
41
82
82
9

18
89
89
89
89
89
89
79
79
70
70
70

-

1

-

-

100
50
75
_
100
100
100
-

-

-

-

-

-

“

(*)

“

3

“

11

-

_

-

17

15

29

_

_

“

“

1 "N on con tributory plans" include only those plans financed entirely by the em ployer.
L egally required plans such as w orkm en 's com pensation and socia l security are excluded; however,
plans required by State tem porary disability insurance laws are included if the em ployer contributes m o re than is legally required o r the em ployees r e ceiv e benefits in excess of legal requ ire­
m ents.
2 Includes data fo r regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 Unduplicated total of w ork ers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately.
4 Unduplicated total o f w ork ers covered by pensions o r retirem ent severance pay shown separately.
5 L ess than 0. 5 percent.




Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Scope o f survey

Interstate and intrastate establishments

The survey included establishments primarily engaged
in manufacturing mixed fertilizer from one or more fer­
tilizer materials produced in the same establishment, or
in mixing fertilizers from purchased fertilizer materials
(Industries 2871 and 2872 as defined in the 1967 edition
of the Standard Industrial Qassification Manual prepared
by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget). Estab­
lishments primarily engaged in selling liquid fertilizer
produced by mixing water with purchased fertilizer were
excluded from the survey. Separate auxiliary units, such
as central offices and mining operations, were also ex­
cluded. Establishments selected for study were drawn
from units employing 8 workers or more at the time of
reference of the data used in compiling the universe
lists.
The number of establishments and workers studied
by the Bureau, as well as the number estimated to be
within the scope of the survey during the payroll period
studied, are shown in table A -l.

An establishment was classified as interstate if any of
its product was sold outside the State. Other establish­
ments were classified as intrastate.

M ethod o f study

Data were obtained by personal visits of the Bureau’s
field staff. The survey was conducted on a sample basis.
To obtain appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a
greater proportion of large than of small establishments
was studied. In combining the data, however, all estab­
lishments were given their appropriate weight. All
estimates are presented, therefore, as relating to all estab­
lishments in the industry, excluding only those below
the minimum size at the time of reference of the universe
data.

Establishm ent d efin itio n

An establishment, for purposes of this study, is defined
as a single physical location where industrial operations
are performed. An establsihment is not necessarily iden­
tical with the company, which may consist of one or
more establishments.




3 4

T y p e o f establishm ent

Establishments were classified according to scope of
manufacturing process. Each of the three types of plants
mixes fertilizer ingredients to make a finished fertilizer.
Complete (integrated) plants manufacture the acids from
which superphosphate is then made. Superphosphate
plants make superphosphate from purchased acids. Mix­
ing establishments purchase all ingredients.

E m p lo ym e n t

The estimates of the number of workers within scope
of the study are intended as ageneral guide to the size and
composition of the labor force included in the survey. The
advance planning necessary to make a wage survey re­
quires the use of lists of establishments assembled con­
siderably in advance of the payroll period studied.

P roduction w orkers

The term “ production workers,” as used in this
bulletin, includes working foremen and all nonsupervisory
workers engaged in nonoffice functions. “ Year-round
production workers” are hired with the intention that
they will be kept on the payroll for 11 months or more,
and “ seasonal workers” are hired for less than 11 months
annually. Administrative, executive, professional, and
technical personnel, and force-account construction
employees, who were utilized as a separate work force
on the firm’s own properties, were excluded.
O ccupations selected fo r study

The occupational classification was based on a uniform
set of job descriptions designed to take account of inter­
establishment and interarea variations in duties within the

Table A -1. Estim ated num ber o f establishments and em ployees w ithin scope o f survey and num ber studied.
M arch—A p r il 1971
Number of
2
establishments

Workers in establishments

Within
scope of
study

Actually
studied

United States5 ..............................................

571

Middle A tla n tic ..............................................................
Border States6 .................................................................
M a ry la n d ...................................................................
Virginia .....................................................................
Southeast6 ........................................................................
Alabama ...................................................................
F lo rid a ........................................................................
Georgia .....................................................................
North C aro lin a.........................................................
South C aro lina.........................................................
Tennessee...................................................................
S o uthw est........................................................................
Great Lakes6 ...................................................................
Illin o is ........................................................................
Ind iana........................................................................
O h io ............................................................................
Middle W est.....................................................................
Pacific6 ............................................................................
C a lifo rn ia ...................................................................

43
64
16
28
207
32
57
48
37
15

Region1 and state

Within scope of study

Actually
studied

T o ta l3

Production workers
T otal4
Seasonal

Total

280

26.66a

19.302

20.219

18
33
10
16
110
17
23
23
24
11

1,380
2,711
824
1,296
11,057
1,210
4,568
1,484
1,970
623
513
2,860
4,581
1,129
567
1,841
1,635
1,488
1,233

930
2,023
634
979
8,258
968
3,172
1,082
1,543
507
401
2,104
3,231
829
456
1,160
1,140
984
809

8

6

54
120
26
19
41
31
38
27

25
53
13
10
18
16
18
15

... 5 .3 9 8 .
199
805
349
294
2,011
313
79
400
729
188
168
363
1,535
355
241
396
357
55
6

734
2,041

688
1,097
8,778
874
3,598
1,098
1,682
590
373
2,117
3,218
867
433
1,349
1,378
1,133
1,022

The regions used in this study include: Middle Atlantic— New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania; Border States— Delaware,
District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; Southeast— Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North
Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee; Southwest— Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas; Great Lakes— Illinois, Indiana,
Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin; Middle West— Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota; and
Pacific— California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.
2 Includes only establishments with 8 workers or more at the time of reference of the universe data.
3 Includes executive, professional, and other workers excluded from the production worker category shown separately.
4 Includes year-round workers in addition to seasonal workers shown separately.
5 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. Alaska and Hawaii were not included in the study.
6 Includes data for states in addition to those shown separately.

included as part of the workers’ regular pay; but non­
production bonus payments, such as Christmas or yearend bonuses, were excluded.
Average (mean) hourly rates or earnings for each
occupation or other group of workers, such as produc­
tion workers, were calculated by weighting each rate (or
hourly earnings), by the number of workers receiving the
rate, totaling, and dividing by the number of individuals.
The hourly earnings of salaried workers were obtained by
dividing straight-time salary by normal rather than actual
hours.
The median designates position; that is, one-half of
the employees surveyed received more than this rate and
one-half received less. The middle range is defined by two
irates of pay; one-fourth of the employees earned less than
the lower of these rates and one-fourth earned more than
the higher rate.

same job. (See appendix B for these descriptions.) The
occupations were chosen for their numerical importance,
their usefulness in collective bargaining, or their repre­
sentativeness of the entire job scale in the industry. Work­
ing supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees,
and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary
workers were not reported in the data for selected occu­
pations, but were included in the data for all production
workers.
Wage data

Information on wages relates to straight-time hourly
earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Incentive
payments, such as those resulting from piecework or pro­
duction bonus systems and cost-of-living bonuses, were




35

excess of a quota or for completion of a task in less than
standard time.

Size o f co m m u n ity

Tabulations by size of community pertain to metro­
politan and nonmetropolitan areas. The term “metropoli­
tan areas,” as used in this bulletin, refers to the Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the U.S.
Office of Management and Budget through January 1968.
Except in New England, a Standard Metropolitan Sta­
tistical Area is defined as a county or group of contiguous
counties which contains at least 1 city of 50,000 inhab­
itants or more. Counties contiguous to the one contain­
ing such a city are included in the Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Area if, according to certain criteria, they are
essentially metropolitan in character and are socially and
economically integrated with the central city. In New
England, the city and town are administratively more
important than the county and they are the units used
in defining Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas.

Scheduled w eekly hours

Data on weekly hours refer to the predominant work
schedules for full-time year-round (or seasonal) pro­
duction workers employed on the day shift, regardless
of sex.
S h ift practices

Shift practices relate to workers employed on late
shifts at the time of the survey.

Supplem entary wage provisions

Supplementary benefits were treated statistically. If
formal provisions were applicable to half or more of the
year-round production workers (or seasonal workers) in
an establishment, the benefits were considered applicable
to all such workers. Similarly, if fewer than one-half of
the workers were covered, the benefit was considered non­
existent in the establishment. Because of length-of-service
and other eligibility requirements, the proportion of
workers receiving the benefits may be smaller than esti­
mated.

Labor-management agreements

Separate wage data are presented where possible for
establishments with (1) a majority of the production
workers covered by labor-management contracts, and
(2) none or a minority of the production workers cov­
ered by labor-management contracts.

Paid holiday provisions relate to full-day
and half-day holidays provided annually.

M ethod o f wage paym ent

Paid holidays.

Tabulations by method of wage payment relate to the
number of workers paid under the various time and incen­
tive wage systems. Formal rate structures for time-rated
workers provide single rates or a range of rates for indi­
vidual job categories. In the absence of a formal rate
structure, pay rates are determined primarily by the quali­
fications of the individual worker. A single rate structure
is one in which the same rate is paid to all experienced
workers in the same job classification. Learners, appren­
tices, or probationary workers may be paid according to
rate schedules which start below the single rate and per­
mit the workers to achieve the full job rate over a period
of time. Individual experienced workers occasionally
may be paid above or below the single rate for special
reasons, but such payments are regarded as exceptions.
Range of rate plans are those in which the minimum
and/or maximum rates paid experienced workers for the
the same job are specified. Specific rates of individual
workers within the range may be determined by merit,
length of service, or a combination o f various concepts of
merit and length of service. Incentive workers are class­
ified under piecework or bonus plans. Piecework is work
for which a predetermined rate is paid for each unit of
output. Production bonuses are based on production in




The summaries of vacation plans are
limited to formal arrangements, excluding informal
plans, whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or the supervisor. Payments
not on a time basis were converted; for example, a pay­
ment of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered the
equivalent of 1 week’s pay. The periods of service for
which data are presented were selected as representative
of the most common practices, but they do not neces­
sarily reflect individual establishment provisions for pro­
gression. For example, the changes in proportions indi­
cated at 10 years of service may include changes which
occurred between 5 and 10 years.

Paid vacations.

Health , insurance, and retirement plans.

Data are pre­
sented for health, insurance, pension and retirement
severance plans for which all or a part of the cost is
borne by the employer, excluding only programs re­
quired by law, such as workmen’s compensation and
social security. Among the plans included are those
underwritten by a commerical insurance company and
those paid directly by the employer from his current
operating funds or from a fund set aside for this purpose.

3 6

Death benefits are included as a form of life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of
insurance under which predetermined cash payments are
made directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly
basis during illness or accident disability. Information is
presented for all such plans to which the employer contri­
butes at least part of the cost. However, in New York and
New Jersey where temporary disability insurance laws
require employer contributions1 plans are included only
if the employer (1) contributes more than is legally re­
quired, or (2) provides the employees with benefits
which exceed the requirements of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to
formal plans which provide full pay or a proportion of
the worker’s pay during absence from work because of
illness; informal arrangements have been omitted. Separate
tabulations are provided according to (1) plans which
provide full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans
providing either partial pay or a waiting period.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for com­
plete or partial payment of doctors’ fees. These plans
may be underwritten by a commerical insurance com­
pany or a nonprofit organization, or they may be a
form of self-insurance.
Major medical insurance, sometimes referred to as
extended medical insurance, includes the plans designed
to cover employees for sickness or injury involving an ex­
pense which exceeds the normal coverage of hospital­
ization, medical, and surgical plans.




37

Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to plans
which provide, upon retirement, regular payments for
the remainder of the retiree’s life. Data are presented
separately for retirement severance pay (one payment or
a specified number over a period of time) made to em­
ployees upon retirement. Establishments providing retire­
ment severance payments and pensions to employees
upon retirement were considered as having both retire­
ment pension and retirement severance pay. Establish­
ments having optional plans which provide employees a
choice of either retirement severance payments or pen­
sions were considered as having only retirement pension
benefits.
Technological severance pay.

Data relate to formal plans
providing for payment to employees permanently separ­
ated from the company through no fault of their own.
Supplemental unem ploym ent benefits.

Data relate to
benefits in addition to those provided under State unem­
ployment systems.

Cost-of-living adjustments.

Provisions for cost-of-living
adjustments relate to formal plans whereby wage rates
are changed periodically in keeping with changes in the
Consumer Price Index or on some other basis.

1
The temporary disability insurance laws in California and
Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.

Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to
assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed
under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to
establishment and from area to area. This permits the grouping of occupational wage
rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment
and ihterarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau’s job descriptions may
differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for
other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’s field economists are
instructed to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees;
handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

Weighs the quantities of the fertilizer ingredients to be
mixed according to desired formula: Ingredients may be
brought onto platform of scale in carts, trucks, or wheel­
barrows according to weigher’s instructions, or ingredients
may be stored in overhead bin from which the weigher
releases the necessary quantity onto the scale; after weigh­
ing is completed, dumps material onto conveyor belt lead­
ing to mixing machine or supervises removal in carts or
other vehicles.

Bagger

(Sack packer)

Tends a machine that sacks and weighs finished pro­
ducts or materials: Places empty sack or bag over dis­
charge nozzle or spout of packing machine; starts flow
of product or material into sack; shuts off or stops flow of
product or material when specified weight or amount has
entered the sack (machine may do this automatically).
May seal or close sacks by hand or machine. May make
adjustments and minor repairs.

Cham berm an

Controls process of making sulfuric acid from sulfur
dioxide gas resulting from the roasting of sulfur: Period­
ically reads and reports the temperatures of the acid
chambers and other processing equipment, and the spec­
ific gravity of the acid during various stages of process­
ing; regulates flow of steam, nitrogen compounds, air, and
sulfur oxides into the chamber. May collect and send
samples of sulfuric acid to laboratory for analysis. May
control the draft fan or shutters on the sulfur burner or
direct the burnermen in their work. May operate acid
pumps supplying acid to acidulating department or to
tank cars for shipment.

Bag sewer, m achine

(Bag-closing machine operator; bag-sewing machine oper­
ator; sack-sewing machine operator)

Sews shut open ends of burlap, muslin, and paper sacks
containing the product, using an electrically powered
sewing machine: Matches the open edges of filled sack
or bag, places edges under presser foot of sewing machine;
starts sewing action, and as edges of container are drawn
under needle, guides them to insure that line of stitching
across top of container is straight. May sew descriptive
tags into top seam. May weigh sacks or bags.

Contact-acid-plant operator
Batch weigher

(Regeneration operator; sulfuric-acid-plant operator)

(Hopper-scale weigher; ingredient weigher; raw materials

Tends equipment that produces sulfuric acid by the
contact process. Work involves: Manipulating valves and

weigher; scaleman)




3 8

and levers to start or stop flow of liquids and gases
through converters, heat exchangers, absorbers, coolers,
and related equipment; monitoring gages and recording
instruments to determine that temperature, steampressure, and flow of materials through system conform to
established standards. May record gage readings at spec­
ified intervals and collect samples of product for analysis.

A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing
plant or other establishment whose duties involve one or
m ore o f the follow ing: Loading and unloading various
materials and merchandise on or from freight cars, trucks
or other transporting devices; unpacking,* shelving, or
placing materials or merchandise in proper storage lo­
cation; transporting materials or merchandise by hand
truck, car, or wheelbarrow. Longshoremen who load and

Control-room man

unload ships are excluded.

Controls and monitors processing equipment (by
means of a control board) that conveys, mixes, granulates,
dries, and cools materials to produce granulated fertilizer.
Work involves m ost o f the follow ing: Adjusting controls
according to type of fertilizer to be produced; activating
equipment by means of switches on control board; and
observing gages and recording instruments to ensure that
fertilizer is being properly mixed and proper temperature
is maintained, and to determine when equipment should
be shut off. May also make tests of fertilizer being pro­
cessed to determine temperature and moisture content.

M echanic, maintenance

Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an
establishment. Work involves m ost o f the follow ing:
Examining machines and mechanical equipment to diag­
nose source of trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling
machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the
use of hand tools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing
broken or defective parts with items obtained from stock;
ordering the production of a replacement part by a
machine shop or sending of the machine to a machine
shop for major repairs; preparing written specifications
for major repairs or for the production of parts ordered
from machine shop; reassembling machines, and making
all necessary adjustments for operation. In general, the
work of a maintenance mechanic requires rounded train­
ing and experience usually acquired through a formal ap­
prenticeship or equivalent training and experience. Ex­
cluded from this classification are workers whose primary
duties involve setting-up or adjusting machines.

Conveyor tender

Operates or observes the operation of conveyors trans­
ferring materials or products from one place or machine
to another in order to store or process these materials.
Work involves one or m ore o f the follow ing: Watching
operation of conveyor, and if trouble develops, stopping
conveyor and notifying superior; directing or regulating
the flow of material to proper storage bins or places
according to type or grade; assisting others in making
minor repairs to equipment; and oiling or greasing
bearings on conveyor. May load materials or products
onto conveyor or remove them from conveyor.

M iller

(Crusher operator; grinder; pulverizer operator)
G ranulator operator

Tends one or more units of equipment to crush, grind,
or pulverize materials to specifications. The more common
types of equipment employed in such operations are:
Ball mills, buhrstone mills, cage mills, chasers, colloid
mills, disk crushers, gyratories, jaw crushers,ring-roll mills,
and tube mills. May also be required to operate screening
equipment. Operator performs or supervises others in such
duties as loading and unloading of the materials into the
apparatus and cleaning such apparatus and working areas.

Tends rotary drum unit of fertilizer mixing and pro­
cessing equipment that granulates fertilizer. Work involves
m ost o f the follow ing: Opening valves to admit steam
and water into reservoir of drum; observing tumbling
action that causes fertilizer to form granules due to the
interaction of heat, moisture, and acid in fertilizer;
checking inside of drum to detect caking and build-up of
fertilizer; and cleaning drum. Workers monitoring or con­
trolling mixing and processing equipment to produce
granulated fertilizer (see CONTROL-ROOM MAN) are
excluded from this classification.

M ixer

(Batchmaker; com pounder)
Laborer, material handling

Responsible for the proper mixing of component parts
(liquids or solids) in controlled amounts to produce a
semi-processed or final product. Supervises or performs
the task of bringing together the ingredients, the weighing,

(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver;
trucker; stockman or stock helper; warehouseman or
warehouse helper)




3 9

and the pouring or inserting of the materials into a powerdriven mixing machine. Attends machine and determines
when mixture is ready to be withdrawn.
For wage study purposes, workers are to be classified
by type of mixing, as follows:
Mixer, dry mixing
Mixer, superphosphate
Tru ckd river

Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to trans­
port materials, merchandise, equipment, or men between
various types of establishments such as: Manufacturing
plants, freight depots, warehouses, wholesale and retail
establishments, or between retail establishments and cus­
tomers’ houses or places of business. May also load or
unload truck with or without helpers, making minor




40

mechanical repairs, and keep truck in good working order.
Driver-salesman and over-the-road drivers are excluded.
T ru cker, power

Operates a manually-controlled gasoline- or electricpowered truck or tractor to transport goods and materials
of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant or
other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by
type of truck, as follows:
Forklift
Other than forklift
W atchman

Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting
property against fire, theft, and illegal entry.

Industry W a g e S tu d ie s

The most recent reports for industries included in the
Bureau’s program of industry wage surveys since January
1960 are listed below. Copies are available from the
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Print-

I.

ing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or from any of its
regional sales offices, and from the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, Washington, D.C. 20212, or from any of its
regional offices shown on the inside back cover.

O ccupational Wage Studies

Manufacturing

Price
Basic Iron and Steel, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1602............................................................................................. $0.55
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1732 .................................................................. 45
Cigar Manufacturing, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1581 ...................................................................................................25
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1748 .............................................................................................. 30
1.00
Cotton and Man-Made Fiber Textiles, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1637 .................................................................
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1695 ..........................................................................................50
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1531.............................................................................................. 30
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1576 ..........................................................................25
Fluid Milk Industry, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1464 ................................................................................................... 30
Footwear, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1634 ................................................................................................................... 75
Hosiery, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1743 ........................................................................................................................ 75
Industrial Chemicals, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1529 ................................................................................................... 40
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1626 ....................................................................................
1.00
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1 6 1 8 ...................................................................................55
Machinery Manufacturing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1664 ............................................................................................ 65
Meat Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1677 ....................................................................................................
1.00
Men’s and Boys’ Separate Trousers, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1752 ............................................................................ 60
Men’s and Boys’ Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1659 .................................... 65
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1716........................................................................
1.00
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1690 ...................................................................................60
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1679 ............................................................................................ 75
Nonferrous Foundries, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1726 .................................................................................................50
Paints and Varnishes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1739 ...................................................................................................60
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 9 ......................................................................
1.25
Petroleum Refining, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1741..................................................................................................... 50
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1713 ...................................................................... 50
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1608 .............................................................................. 60
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1694 ..........................................................................50
Structural Clay Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1697 ............................................................................................ 65
Synthetic Fibers, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1740 .......................................................................................................... 40
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1757 ..................................................................................... 70



I.

O ccupational Wage Studies— C o n tin u ed

Manufacturing— Continued

West Coast Sawmilling, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1704 ...................................................................................... $0.45
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1728 ....................................................................... 35
Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1649 ..................................................................................... 45
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1 6 5 1 ....................................................... 60
Wool Textiles, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1551......................................................................................................
.45
Work Clothing 1968. BLS Bulletin 1624 ............................................................................................................ 50
Nonmanufacturing

Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1689 ..........................................................................................50
Banking, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1703........................................................................................................................65
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1583 .............................................................................................. 50
Communications, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1751..........................................................................................................30
Contract Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1644 ..........................................................................................55
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1566 ........................................................... 30
Educational Institutions: Nonteaching Employees, 1968— BLS Bulletin 1671................................................50
69.
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1 6 1 4 ............................................................................................ 70
Hospitals, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1688 .............................................................................................................
1.00
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1645 ...................................................................................75
Life Insurance, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1569 ............................................................................................................ 30
Motion Picture Theaters, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1542 ............................................................................................ 35
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1967— BLS Bulletin 1638 ................................................................ 75
68.
Scheduled Airlines, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1734 ..................................................................................................... 45
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1712 ................................................................ 60
II. Other Industry Wage Studies
Employee Earnings and Hours in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the South and North Central Regions,
1965. BLS Bulletin 1552 .................................................................................................................................50
Employee Earnings and Hours in Eight Metropolitan Areas o f the South, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1533..................40
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail Trade, June 1966Retail Trade (Overall Summary). BLS Bulletin 1584 .............................................................................
1.00
Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm Equipment Dealers. BLS Bulletin 1584-1 ......................................... 30
General Merchandise Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-2 ..........................................................................................55
Food Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-3 ....................................................................................................................60
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Stations. BLS Bulletin 1584-4 .......................................................... 50
Apparel and Accessory Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-5 ..........................................................................................55
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household Appliance Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-6 ...................................... 50
Miscellaneous Retail Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-7 ..............................................................................................65

☆ U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1972 O - 512-377 (24)




BU REAU OF LABOR STATIS TIC S
REGIONAL OFFICES

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)

Region II
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region VI
1100 Commerce St., Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Region IN
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region VII and V III
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)




* *

Regions V II and V III are serviced by Kansas City.
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

THIRD CLASS M A IL

B U R EAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20212
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
O FFICIAL BUSINESS

U.S. D EPAR TM EN T O F LABO R

PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE, $300




LAB-441