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L <3.3137 :  Industry Wage Survey: Department Stores, August 1986 U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics August 1988 Bulletin 2311   \ https://fraser.stlouisfed.org \ Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  • MSJJ. UBRAft U.S. DEPOSETGRy  NOV 15 1988  Industry Wage Survey: Department Stores, August 1986 U.S. Department of Labor Ann McLaughlin, Secretary Bureau of Labor Statistics Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner August 1988 Bulletin 2311   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402  Preface  This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of wages and related benefits of department store employees in August 1986. A similar study was conducted in June 1981. Separate reports were issued earlier for 19 of the 20 metropolitan areas included in the study. Copies of these releases are available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics or any of its regional offices. (See table A-l for a list of the areas surveyed.) Although no separate release was issued for Houston, data for that area are presented in this bulletin. The study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of Compensation and Working Conditions. Norma W. Carlson   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  in the Division of Occupational Pay and Employee Benefit Levels reviewed and analyzed the survey data and prepared this bulletin. The Bureau’s field representatives obtained the data through personal visits to a probability-based sample of establishments within the scope of the survey. Fieldwork for the survey was directed by the Bureau’s Assistant Regional Commissioners for Operations. Other industry wage survey studies are listed at the end of this bulletin along with information on how to obtain them. Material in this publication is in the public domain and, with appropriate credit, may be reproduced without permission.  iii   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Contents  Page Earnings and benefits................................................................................................................................. Regular stores................................................................................................................................................ Discount stores............................................................................................................................................. Industry characteristics ...................................................................................................................................  1 1 3 3  Tables: Occupational earnings—hourly averages: 1. Regular stores............................................................................................................................ 5 2. Discount stores .......................................................................................................................... 11 Occupational hourly earnings, regular stores: 3. Atlanta, GA ................................................................................................................................ 4. Baltimore, MD............................................................................................................................ 5. Boston, MA ................................................................................................................................ 6. Buffalo, NY ................ 7. Chicago, IL ................................................................................................................................ 8. Cleveland, OH............................................................................................................................ 9. Dallas, TX.................................................................................................................................. 10. Detroit, MI............................................ 11. Fort Worth-Arlington, TX ...................................................................................................... 12. Houston, TX................................................................................................................................ 13. Kansas City, MO-KS........................................................... 14. Miami-Hialeah, FL ................................................................................................................... 15. Nassau-Suffolk, NY................................................................................................................... 16. New York, NY ......................................................................................................................... 17. Oakland, CA................................................................................................................................ 18. Philadelphia, PA-NJ................................................................................................................... 19. Phoenix, AZ................................................................................................................................ 20. St. Louis, MO-IL ..................................................................................................................... 21. San Francisco, CA..................................................................................................................... 22. Washington, DC-MD-VA........................................................................................................  13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 45 46 48  Occupational hourly earnings, discount stores: 23. Kansas City, MO-KS................................................................................................................. 24. New York, NY ......................................................................................................................... 25. Philadelphia, PA-NY................................................................................................................. 26. St. Louis, MO-IL .....................................................................................................................  50 50 51 52  Occupational hours and earnings—weekly averages: 27. Regular stores............................................................................................................................... 53 Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions: Full-time nonsupervisory workers: 28. Method of wage payment: Regularstores................................................................................ 61 29. Scheduled weekly hours:Regular stores................................................................................. 62   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  IV  Contents—Continued Page Full-time nonsupervisory workers—Continued 30. Paid holidays: Regular stores.................................................................. ................................ 31. Paid vacations: Regular stores................................................................................................ 32. Health, insurance, and retirement plans: Regular stores................................................... 33. Other selected benefits: Regular stores................................................................................. 34. Discount privileges: Regular stores....................................................................................... 35. Method of wage payment: Discount stores........................................................................... 36. Scheduled weekly hours: Discount stores............................................................................. 37. Paid holidays: Discount stores ................................................................................................ 38. Paid vacations: Discount stores .............................................................................................. 39. Health, insurance, and retirement plans: Discount stores ................................................. 40. Other selected benefits: Discount stores ............................................................................... 41. Discount privileges: Discount stores ..................................................................................... Part-time nonsupervisory employees: 42. Selected benefits for part-time workers: Regular stores..................................................... 43. Selected benefits for part-time workers: Discount stores...................................................  63 64 67 68 69 70  71 72  73 75 77 78 79 80  Appendixes: A. Scope and method of survey............................................................................................................. 82 B. Occupational descriptions................................................................................................................... 87   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  V  Department Stores, August 1986  Earnings and benefits Occupational pay levels in department stores spanned a broad range in the metropolitan areas surveyed in August 1986. Several factors contributed to this spread, including variable commissions earned by salespersons, the variety of skills represented by the jobs studied, and the widespread use of range-of-rate pay systems for nonsales workers. Earnings information was developed for full- and part-time workers in selected occupations, and for regular and discount department stores, wherever possible.1  Regular stores In regular department stores, which generally have sales personnel specializing in specific types of merchandise, 21 occupations were selected for study.2 They included 12 selling and 9 nonselling jobs. Of the selling jobs, earnings were highest for salespersons working in the “big-ticket” departments of floor coverings, furniture and bedding, and major household appliances.3 By area, earnings commonly averaged between $10 and $15 an hour for such jobs (table 1 and text table 1). In most of the 20 areas surveyed, onehalf or more of these salesworkers were paid either straight commissions or a combination of salaries plus commissions. In the 12 areas where comparisons were possible, employees 1 The survey was designed to study regular and discount department stores separately in 22 metropolitan areas. After collection, it was determined that the data for regular department stores met bls publication criteria in 20 of the areas; for discount department stores, in 4 of the areas. (See table A-l, appendix A, for a list of the areas for which data were published for both regular and discount stores. Definitions of the areas surveyed are given in footnote 1.) Detailed wage and employee benefit information for regular stores is presented in this bulletin for 20 separate areas. For discount stores, information is shown separately for 4 areas, and the data for the remaining 18 areas are grouped into four geographic clusters. For the other areas, data were either insufficient for separate publication or they may have revealed individual establishment rates, which the Bureau pledges to keep confidential. See appendix A for the scope and method of the survey and definitions of terms used in this report. 2 See appendix B for occupational descriptions. 3 Earnings data exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts, as well as prize (push) money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store, and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers. For all workers studied, salary data relate to a mid-August payroll reference period; for workers partly or wholly paid on a commission basis, commission earnings were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 31, 1986.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  selling furniture or major appliances had average earnings at least 20 percent more than those selling floor coverings. Somewhat lower averages were reported for the other sales jobs studied, even though earnings often included commissions (text table 1). Salespersons of men’s clothing, for example, commonly averaged from $7.50 to $9.50 an hour among the areas; and those selling women’s clothing, about $5.50 to $6.50. General salespersons, the most populous selling occupation in many areas and among the lowest paid, commonly averaged between $4.75 and $5.25. Few workers in this occupation, however, received commissions. Of the nine nonselling jobs studied in regular department stores, alteration tailors usually were the highest paid, averaging between $7.50 and $8.50 an hour in at least half of the areas. Stock and inventory workers, usually the most populous nonselling job in an area and among the lowest paid, commonly averaged from $4.75 to $5.75. Information on average weekly hours and weekly earnings for full-time incumbents in these jobs is shown in table 27. Some occupational averages in regular department stores could be compared with those reported in a similar survey conducted in June 1981.4 For comparable jobs, average hourly earnings had typically increased between 20 and 40 percent between 1981 and 1986, or between approximately 4 and 7 percent on an average annual basis. This compares with an average annual change of 4.4 percent in wages, salaries, and commissions of all retail trade workers between the second quarters of 1981 and 1986, according to the Bureau’s Employment Cost Index. Reflecting the impact of commissions on salespersons’ earnings, increases over the 5-year period were greater for selling than for nonselling jobs. Area earnings of individual workers in regular department stores were widely dispersed in August 1986, particularly for salespersons (tables 3 through 22). Pay often peaked at $20 or more an hour, while the Federal minimum of $3.35 marked the other extreme. Typically, within the same job and area, salespersons with the highest pay earned three to six times more than those with the lowest pay. Factors contributing to these wide differences include variations in the demand for product lines and in the percentages of commissions, if any, paid to individual workers. 4 For information on the 1981 survey, see Industry Wage Survey: Department Stores, June 1981, Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 2147 (1982).  1  In comparison, pay levels in nonselling store occupations were relatively compressed, ranging from $3.35 to about $10 an hour. Typically, the highest paid earned two to three times more than the lowest paid in the same job and area. Pay ranges for nonsales workers reflected, to a large extent, the common practice of paying nonsales workers under rangeof-rate systems or under individual determination based on each worker’s qualifications. No single area consistently paid the highest or lowest average hourly earnings for the jobs studied (text table 1). Most commonly, however, average hourly earnings were lowest in Buffalo and highest in San Francisco. Two areas, New York and Nassau-Suffolk, further illustrate the inconsistencies among the rankings. Each reported one top and one bottom average among the selling jobs compared. Comparing average weekly earnings did not materially change area pay rankings. Hourly pay of full-time employees nearly always averaged more than that of part-time workers in the same job and area. The pay advantage of full-time salespersons usually ranged between 15 and 35 percent, while that of full-time nonsales workers usually was between 10 and 30 percent above the averages of part-timers. All full-time nonsupervisory workers in regular department stores received paid holidays, commonly 7 to 9 days annually, depending on the area (table 30). Areas outside this range included Oakland and San Francisco, where nearly seven-eighths of the workers received 10 days. In Boston, nearly half received 11 holidays, but in Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. the majority of workers received 6 paid holidays.  Paid vacations were available to all full-time employees of regular department stores. Typical provisions were 2 weeks after 2 years of service, 3 weeks after 5 years, and 4 weeks after 15 years (table 31). In nine of the areas, a majority of the workers had provisions for 5 weeks of vacation pay after 25 years of service; and in Oakland, slightly over two-thirds had provisions for 6 weeks after 30 years of service. All full-time employees in regular stores were provided hospitalization, surgical, and medical plans (table 32). Life insurance, and sickness and accident insurance or paid sick leave, or both, applied to all workers in 19 of the 20 areas. Dental insurance also was widespread, whereas accidental death and dismemberment insurance applied to half or more of the workers in five areas, and long-term disability insurance was provided to a majority of workers in two areas. The various health plans and life and long-term disability insurance usually were jointly financed by employee and employer. The cost of accidental death and dismemberment and sickness and accident insurance was often wholly paid for by the employer. Retirement pension plans, other than Federal Social Security, covered 95 percent or more of the full-time employees in 18 of the 20 areas (table 32). In Fort WorthArlington and Philadelphia, the coverage in regular department stores was approximately 85 percent. With a few exceptions—Buffalo, Philadelphia, and Houston—pension plans were nearly always financed entirely by the employer. Virtually all full-time employees in regular department stores were provided paid leave to attend funerals of specified relatives and to meet jury-duty obligations (table 33). In 16  Text table 1. Pay ranges for selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 areas, August 1986 Average hourly earnings Occupation  Lowest paying— Area  Highest paying— Rate  Area  Rate  Midrange of area pay levels’  Number of areas compared  Selling  Floor coverings.......................................... Furniture and bedding................................ Housewares ............................................... Major household appliances....................... Men's clothing ............................... Women’s clothinq....................................... Footwear............................................... Sporting goods ........................................... General goods.......................................  Miami-Hialeah Nassau-Suffolk Buffalo New York Miami-Hialeah Phoenix  $6.70 8.08 4.12 10.79 6.78  San Francisco Boston Oakland San Francisco Houston  4.76 4.30  Nassau-Suffolk Dallas  $14.85 18.01 6.56 18.07 11.62  $9.78 11.22 4.68 12.92 7.38  9.18  5.91  _  $11.42 14.72 6.16 15.19 9.59 6.87  12 18 15 10 16 12 18 10  Nonselling  Alteration tailors.............................. Cleaners ................................................... Display assistants...................................... Receivers.................................................... Cleveland Stock and inventory workers......................  R ftQ 4 R9  17  4.94 4.25  St. Louis San Francisco  7.21  6.04  5.00  San Francisco  7.46  5.16  6.56  10  6.45 5.99  11 12  Office clerical  Office cashiers...................................... Switchboard operators................................ Baltimore  1 Among the areas analyzed, one-fourth reported occupational aver­ ages the same as or more than the higher rate shown, and one-fourth re-   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  ported averages the same as or less than the lower rate. Midranges are shown only for jobs with at least 10 comparable areas.  2  of the 20 areas, a majority of workers could receive “technological” severance pay in the event of a department store closing or reduction in staff. Formal plans providing free meals, or at least part of their cost, to employees working overtime or beyond their regular hours were rare. Such plans were found in eight areas, but covered a majority of workers in only two—Baltimore and Washington (table 33). A premium over regular rates for working on Sunday— typically time and one-half—was provided to half or more of the employees in' 15 areas (table 33). Regular department stores offered discount privileges to all full-time employees in all areas except Buffalo; there, the proportion was about four-fifths (table 34). The discount rate varied, ranging from 15 to 20 percent for apparel in most areas, and 10 and 20 percent for nonwearable items. Generally, discount privileges took effect immediately upon employment. Part-time employees of regular department stores received paid holiday and vacation benefits, typically prorated to the provisions for full-time workers in the same establishment (table 42). Health, insurance, and pension plans usually applied to much smaller proportions of part-time workers than full-time workers. Of the plans available to part-timers, life insurance, paid sick leave, and retirement pension plans were the most widespread.  Discount stores Survey data for discount stores met the Bureau’s publication guidelines for individual areas in only four locations—Kansas City, New York, Philadelphia, and St. Louis (tables 23-26). The data for the other areas are combined into four geographic regions—Northeast, South, Midwest, and West—and presented in table 2 with the four publishable areas shown separately.5 In discount department stores, which typically sell inexpensive or moderately priced goods and place less emphasis on sales service to the public, eight occupations were selected for study—one selling and seven nonselling. Hourly earnings of general salespersons—the only selling job studied—averaged from $4.30 an hour for the five northeastern areas combined to $4.56 for the western locations. Wages of general salespersons varied by the method of pay, full- or part-time status, and whether the worker performed other functions in addition to selling, such as stockroom or cashier duties (table 2). Checkout cashiers, who accounted for half of the workers in the seven nonselling jobs studied, averaged from $3.88 an hour in the nbrtheastern areas to $4.60 in the Midwest. Earnings of stock and inventory workers, the next most populous nonselling job, averaged $4.04 in the northeastern areas, $4.30 in the South, and $5.01 in the Midwest.  All full-time employees of discount department stores covered by the survey received paid holidays, usually 7 days annually (table 37). In New York, two-thirds of the workers received 10 days, and three-tenths received 11 days. All full-time employees in discount stores also were provided paid vacations after qualifying periods of service (table 38). Typical provisions were 2 weeks of pay after 1 year of service, 3 weeks after 5 years, 4 weeks after 15 years, and 5 weeks after 25 years. The 5-week provisions were most common in the areas outside the Northeast. Virtually all full-time employees in discount stores had life insurance and hospitalization, surgical, and medical plans paid for at least in part by their employers (table 39). Sickness and accident insurance, sick leave, and accidental death and dismemberment insurance also applied to a large majority of the workers. Retirement pension plans, in addition to Federal Social Security, were provided (and wholly paid for) by discount stores employing over nine-tenths of the employees surveyed (table 39). Other benefits studied applying to full-time employees of discount stores and the proportion of workers covered included: Funeral and jury-duty leave (all full-time employees), premium pay for Sunday work (seven-eighths), discount privileges (nearly half), technological severance pay (three-tenths), and meal provisions during overtime work (nearly one-fifth). (See tables 40 and 41.) A majority of part-time workers in discount stores were covered by paid leave plans (holidays, vacations, and sick leave). These plans were nearly always prorated to the provisions for full-time workers (table 43). Health and insurance plans covered no more than two-fifths of the parttimers; but, when available, the provisions usually were the same as those applying to full-time employees. Retirement pension plans, other than Federal Social Security were also prorated from full-time worker benefits.  Industry characteristics The 259 department stores within the scope of the survey employed 458,900 workers in August 1986 (table A-l).6 Approximately seven-tenths of these workers, or 327,000, were estimated to be in regular stores, while the remainder were employed by discount stores. Full- and part-time salespersons together accounted for approximately one-half of the total employment in regular department stores and about two-fifths of the total in discount stores within the scope of the survey. Both types of stores relied extensively on part-time sales staff. In regular stores, part-timers made up nearly three-fifths of the total sales workers; in discount stores, seven-tenths. The largest sales category studied in regular department stores was general sales clerk, which accounted for 6 The discussion on industry characteristics is based on information collected for the 22 areas covered by the survey, except where specifically noted.  5 These combined data are unweighted aggregations of the separate area data and should not be interpreted as representing the wage and benefit patterns for an entire geographic region or regions.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3  approximately one-fourth of the total sales force. Other sales categories with large numbers of workers included floor coverings, furniture and bedding, housewares, and men’s and women’s apparel and footwear. Of the nonselling jobs, stock and inventory workers, office cashiers, and cleaners were numerically the most important. General salespersons, including those who combined selling with the duties of checkout cashier and stockroom worker, accounted for over four-fifths of the total sales force in discount department stores. General salespersons who had only selling responsibilities made up two-fifths of the total sales force. Of the nonselling jobs, checkout cashier and stock and inventory workers were numerically the most important in discount stores—together accounting for nearly half of the nonsales workers. Workers in regular stores paid wholly or partially on a commission basis typically accounted for 20 to 50 percent of the sales force in the 20 areas for which data could be published (table 28). These workers were generally paid on   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4  a salary-plus-commission basis. In addition, several of the areas studied in the South and West reported straight commissions applying to substantial proportions of the sales workers. Workers in nonselling jobs typically were paid under range-of-rate systems. In discount stores, less than one-tenth of the sales workers received commissions (table 35). The pay of sales and nonsales workers was typically determined on an individual time-rated basis. Forty-hour work schedules were predominant in both regular and discount stores for sales and nonsales staff (tables 29 and 36). The next most frequent schedule in regular stores was 37 1/2 hours a week; in discount stores, 35 hours. Regular department stores and discount stores operating under collective bargaining agreements accounted for about one-seventh of their respective work forces in the survey. The major union in the industry was the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, an affiliate of the AFL-cio.  Table 1. Occupational earnings—hourly averages: Regular stores (Number of workers and average straight-time hourly earnings’ in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,” August 1986) South  Northeast  Department and occupation  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings......  Nassau-Suffolk  Buffalo  Boston  413 165  $8.26 12.80 _ _  _ _  248 237  5.24 5.01  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  _ _ _ _  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  _  -  8.08 9.07  _  _ _  _  7.01 6.26  162 132  _  _ _  304 75 75 229 229  4.21 4.02  171 166 -  15 7  $7.98 8.89 5.99  _  _  _  333 171 102  _  _  74 59  $5.20 7.43 4.52  247 76 42  _  _ _ _  18.01 20.41  32  -  10.18  176 101  _  -  -  -  .  -  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  8.58 5.53  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _ _  _  5.17 5.83 5.83 4.96 4.96  _  -  -  -  6.48 7.14 7.14  _ _  _ _  _ _  _   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  10.79 13.66  -  _ _ _  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  .  _  -  -  .  -  _  _  _  -  269 236 181  -  $7.52 9.46  116  13.73  242 195  6.07 5.32  339 271  5.93 4.60  69 46 23  10.59 11.25 -  52 34 _ “ —  10.12 10.30  142 113 -  13.99 15.14 “  163 111  13.67 14.68  88  14.76  52  11.51  10.61 11.68 5.99 12.27 12.80 “ 11.39  Hous ton  _  9.28 ~  “  _  _ _  -  -  83 22  _  -  -  -  61  -  10.30 12.33 -  9.57  -  8.47 -  5.34 5.64 5.42 5.04 4.81 -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  77 -  -  -  -  -  314 212 28 61 102 69  $9.00 10.29  240 154 30 85  $7.74 9.02 4.62 11.04  6.34  86 68  5.43 4.33  101 93  11.50 11.54  81  11.24  53 53 68 68  4.46 4.62 4.62 4.33 4.33  123 90  11.51 12.89  33  7.73  _  _  " 134 125  -  “  458 233 185 225 207  616 277  656 414 295  -  33  $7.68 8.63 6.00 ~  $7.47 8.98 5.46 11.23 5.27 4.80  -  _  -  1,119 665 241 235 454 375 106 86 20  29 -  9.52 “  _  -  318 139 136 179 -  189 166 “  5.47 5.78 5.79 5.23  394 —  4.68  119  “  5o  66 50  6.30  ”  264 264  4.59 4.59  16.28 17.43  228 180  13.01 13.76 "  -  48 112 80 32  10.21 14.31 15.65 10.96  “ -  -  -  116 100  11.76 12.24  -  -  16  8.70  “  -  _  -  23  7.92  -  -  -  -  ~  “  Electric and electronic  See footnotes at end of table.  303 133  _  -  -  "  -  $8.54 11.53 7.52 14.82 6.22 5.43 9.10 11.42 14.64 16.28 7.56 6.50 7.99 14.87 17.15 11.69 15.49 20.67 8.83 4.96 12.18 6.16 7.09 6.39 5.76 5.53  120 54 54 -  -  _  1,231 536 249 60 695 543 150 110 60 35 50 12 36 252 183 47 43 93 69 32 37 578 175 127 403 373  4.12 4.42 4.42 4.06 4.06  172 30 30 142 142  Salespersons, major appliances,  Part-time workers.......................  Fort W orthArlinrjton  Dal as  Baltimore  Atlanta  Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Number age 'lumber age Number Number age Number age Number age Number age age • Number age dumber age 'lumber age hourly Of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of workers workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings  _  Kitchen and laundry appliances ....  Philadelphia  New York  -  -  11.06  -  “  —  -  -  — -  -  -  -  -  -  46 28  8.57 10.57  -  -  18  5.46  Table 1. Occupational earnings—hourly averages: Regular stores—Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time hourly earnings1 in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) Northeast Boston  Buffalo  South  NassaiJ-Suffolk  New York  Philadelphia  Atlanta  Baltimore  Fort WorthArlington  Dallas  Houston  Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Numbe Aver­ age Numbe age Numbe age Numbe age Numbe age Numbe age Numbe age Numbe age Numbe Of hourly age Numbe of hourly age of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers hourly earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers ings ings earnings ings ings ings ings ings ings Store occupations, selling— Continued  Salespersons, apparel and footwear....................... Full-time workers ............... Straight salary.......................... Straight commission............. Salary plus commission ........ Part-time workers............ Straight salary......................... Straight commission ................ Salary plus commission ........... Men’s clothing ................ Full-time workers ............. Straight salary ...................... Straight commission................. Salary plus commission ........... Part-time workers............... Straight salary ................ Straight commission................. Salary plus commission ........... Women’s clothing............. Full-time workers ........ Straight salary...................... Straight commission........... Salary plus commission ........... Part-time workers.................. Straight salary................... Straight commission................ Footwear............. Full-time workers ................ Straight salary....... Straight commission............... Salary plus commission ........... Part-time workers............... Straight salary .................... Straight commission................. Salary plus commission ........... Salespersons, miscellaneous ..... Full-time workers ............ Straight salary ................. Salary plus commission ......... Part-time workers............ Straight salary ................ See footnotes at end of table.  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1,273  $6.55  956 84 51  940 819 352  5.88 5.38 7.15  5.22  172 95 48 25  vfr u 158 6.81  $6.24 7.70 7.19 5.74 5.43 7.95 9.67  3,186 986 473 61  $6.85 9.07 6.31 9.87  2,200 1,779  5.86 5.24  407 558  8.55 8.10 “ ~  ~ 241 218 715 153 153  5.69 5.13 5.43 5.93 5.93  6.68  154 42 35  119 104  5.64 6.49 6.12  315 233 82 2,004 341 _  562 562 204  135  5.29 5.29 9.46  8.66  112 93  476 6.44  203  146  5.42 5.33 6.67 7.88 ” " 6.20 “ “ — ~  1,425 1,298 “ 608 161 33 94 447 235 201 92 18 “ ” ~  ~  6.17 5.08 9.27 6.36  1,952 992 167  $6.48 7.43 5.91  532 960 324 “ 381 245 25 145 75 136 38  7.36 5.49 4.36  _  8.50 9.51 5.75 10.55 8.76 6.67 4.39  1,039 505 135 298 534 264 ~ 526 242  5.43 6.11 5.99 5.94 4.78 4.36 7.08 8.07  10.41 6.59 5.16  159 284  9.36 6.24 -  8.29 7.82 9.69 “ “ ~  “ 142 98 32 66  6.41 “ “ 5.58 5.30 ~ 7.40 9.64 6.05  ^.10 8.19 9.24 7.68 -  1,934 915 ~ 180 1,019 106 -  $6.14 6.71 9.86 5.62 8.29 -  45 31 ~ 1,043 489 391 554 505 49 437 201 37 236 26 25 11 11 -  -  -  -  -  -  780 ~ -  1,597 -  $9.79 _  -  -  -  -  _  528 _ 275 189  _  $5.16 -  _ 8.66 _  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  7.64  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  _  _  -  6.42 8.25 5.75 6.24 6.24  376  -  -  -  -  _  _  238 96  7.03 8.15  -  -  -  -  -  142  -  6.27  249 183 -  171 -  66  8.64  8.87 _  9.64 10.43 _  10.60 _  7.45  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  _  5.69  _  -  _ _  20  $9.18 10.49  137  8.21  104  11.02  181  8.36  135  7.94  144  8.75 24 12  11.62 13.61  64  7.99  _  _  10.47 11.30  -  -  262 127  _  9.98  5.81 6.34 5.52 5.35 5.02 8.73 7.06 7.81 10.40  $7.81 7.25  _  -  86  363 182  66 42 _ _ _ _ _ _  189 87  7.38 5.95 _ _ ■  8.01 7.45  _ _ _ _  108 _ _ _  7.71 _  55  7.46  30  8.36  _ _ _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  -  51  5.21  _  '  -  -  -  _  _  _  Table 1. Occupational earnings—hourly averages: Regular stores—Continued South  Northeast  Department and occupation  Nassau-Suffolk  Buffalo  Boston  Philad€ Iphia  New York  Fort WorthArlington  Dallas  Baltimore  Atlanta  Houston  Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Number age Number age Number age Number age age hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly workers earn­ earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ ings ings ings ings ings  AverAverAverAverAverage N Number age Number age Number age Number age Number hourly of of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of workers earnv, workers workers earnearnworkers earnworkers earnings ings ings ings ings  Store occupations, sellingcontinued  Salary plus commission ....... Sporting goods .......................... Full-time workers .................... Straight salary ...................... Part-time workers............. -..... Straight salary ...................... Salespersons, general................. Full-time workers .................... Straight salary ...................... Part-time workers.................... Straight salary.....................  -  “ 20  -  -  -  -  _ ”  “  $6.29  _  _ _  -  -  -  -  Store occupations, nonselling  Alterations tailors.......................... Full-time workers..................... Part-time workers..................... Cleaners (porters) ......................... Full-time workers ..................... Part-time workers..................... Display assistants.......................... Full-time workers ..................... Part-time workers..................... Gift-wrap persons.......................... Full-time workers ..................... Part-time workers..................... Receivers..................................... Full-time workers.................... Part-time workers.................... Stock and inventory workers....... Full-time workers .................... Part-time workers.................... ..  18  21  6.78  61 41  7.95 8.94  70 28 42 17  See footnotes at end of table.  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  _ 4.52 4.60 4.46 5.80 _  22  6.03  16 16  _ 5.49 5.49  184 88 96  4.25 4.26 4.23  37  4.80  15 85  4.99 4.31  $9.18  75  $6.85  66  $5.91  51  8.27  65  6.87  50  6.40  1,357 _  5.06 -  6.05 6.43 5.81 5.97 5.54  5,369 2,871 2,820 2,498 2,456  4.80 4.88 4.88 4.70 4.69  2,354 1,053 873 1,301 1,186  $5.28 5.44 5.40 5.15 5.06  144 89 55 337 211 126 132 109 “ 512 342 170  8.32 9.28 6.77 5.47 5.94 4.68 6.81 7.25  32 27  7.42 7.63  113 50 63 106 92  4.78 4.81 4.76 7.74 7.95  203 62 141 225 92  5.44 5.93 5.22 5.11 6.08  115 76  5.82 5.60  _  _  1,144 1,144  4.88 4.88  810 145 117 665 603  66 43 23 108 _ 57 37 _  8.38 8.85 7.50 5.88 6.51 7.44 _ _ _ 5.06 4.91  143 119 24 425 196 229 157 122 35 162 61 101 101 75 26 626 360 “  9.02 9.11 8.54 6.75 7.55 6.06 7.87 8.43 5.91 6.95 8.27 6.16 6.20 6.80 4.48 6.52 7.01  6.42 _ 8.90 _ 7.15  108 51 57 251 52 199 51 17 34  6.86 7.46 6.32 6.11 7.93 5.64 6.17 7.32 5.59  _ _ _  _  327  5.11  213  4.70  Office clerical occupations  Cashiers, office........................... Full-time workers ................... Part-time workers................... Service desk workers................. Full-time workers................... Part-time workers................... Switchboard operators ............... Full-time workers ................... Part-time workers.................. ...  $5.89  64  174  4.92  _  _  195 142  13 _ _  34 _  -  -  -  -  15 “  '  19 52 50  $5.67 5.26 5.22  1,418 1,390  1,286  $6.23  749  $4.66  4.68 4.60  722 544  5.65 5.22  530 509  4.41 4.23  32 18 14 245  7.91 8.36 7.33 5.00  144 125 19 82 67  8.26 8.30  15  9.33  5.65 5.82  73 40  145 83  4.86 5.63  106 83  7.21 7.52  37  68  $8.00  60  8.16  5.46 5.16  313  5.13  5.97 6.90  58 39  6.79 7.54  19  6.02  103 70  6.56 6.80  131  5.68  376  5.65 6.41  8.00  20  “  141 130  4.85 4.91 4.74  470 333 137  11  6.79 6.90 5.50 5.62 6.10  4.45  262 109 153  5.17 5.26 5.11  6.45 5.36 158  5.66 5.54 5.00 5.55 4.88  50  5.27  129 65  48  5.26  53  12  46 43  6.12  257 206 51  5.88 5.96 5.56  206 63  5.91 6.84  6.19  5.76 6.64 20  5.99 5.89 6.09  5.91  112  25 12  5.58 6.19  Table 1. Occupational earnings—hourly averages: Regular stores—Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time hourly earnings1 in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) Midwest Miami-Hialeah  Department and occupation  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings . Full-time workers .................. Straight salary..................... Straight commission............ Salary plus commission....... Part-time workers................... Straight salary ..................... Salary plus commission ...... Floor coverings......................... Full-time workers ................... Straight commission............ Salary plus commission ...... Part-time workers................... Straight salary..................... Salary plus commission ...... Furniture and bedding............... Full-time workers.................... Straight salary ................... Straight commission............ . Salary plus commission ....... Part-time workers..................... Straight salary ...................... Salary plus commission ....... Housewares.............................. Full-time workers .................... Straight salary ...................... Part-time workers.................... Straight salary ...................... Salespersons, major appliances, household ................................... Full-time workers .................... Straight salary....................... Straight commission.............. Part-time workers.................... . Kitchen and laundry appliances .. Full-time workers..................... Part-time workers..................... Electric and electronic appliances................................. Full-time workers..................... Straight salary....................... Part-time workers..................... See footnotes at end of table.  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Washington  Chicago  Cleveland  West  Detroit  Kansas City St. Louis Oakland Phoenix San Francisco Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Number age Number age Number age Number Aver­ age Number age Number age Number age Number age Number of hourly age Number age of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers hourly earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers ings earn­ workers earn­ ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings 183 144 51  $6.73 7.04 4.80  39 31  5.57 4.74  21  6.70 6.81  19  80 74  8.73 8.64  991 550  4.78 4.80 4.80 4.74 4.74  82 62  13.75 14.43  12.29 5.67  101  10.85  31 9  11.05  $8.10  454 396  5.61 4.87  49 32  100  9.78 10.29  52 40  10.28 5.25 11.51  236 $11.38 187 12.82 32 5.34 121 14.74  757 534  271 144  233  $8.49 9.82 5.75 13.20  5.87 4.61  223 137  5.30 4.65  127 98  5.85 4.65  10.75 11.62  66  10.28 11.09  29  8.48 9.24  10.10  102  50  15  7.58  11  5.71  290 249  15.22 15.74  338 292  12.36 12.43  111  15.32 15.60  266 244  13.63 14.02  16.05  219  12.03  89  15.76  199  13.58  46  11.93  22  9.36  535 138 117 397 396  5.08 5.68 5.25 4.88 4.87  360 271  12.92 14.08  353 279  15.10 15.97  200  116  64 32 32 32 32  4.98 5.34 5.34 4.61 4.61  22  141 105  96  $8.45 10.74  11.22  11.97  4.59  14.13  89  9.38  167 117  11.77 12.79  50  9.38  320 174  146  118 99  $7.75 9.51  5.64  10.78  536 294 98  $9.10 10.21  442 266  9.22  112  $7.54 8.87 4.93  242 196  7.75 7.35  176 136  5.53 4.49  53 41  11.51 11.61  249  10.97  11.10  154 122  11.60 12.05  65  10.62  32  9.90  234  6.56  248  4.69 4.93 4.93 4.49 4.49  112  125  4.67  157  15.17  105 76  12.15 13.01  112  323 $11.45 172 13.48 78  17.16  61 48  14.85 14.53  19  18.11  112  83  14.72 15.30  49 29  17.92 13.08  80 80  4.48 4.48  165 165  6.37 6.37  150 95  13.10 14.75  159 125 22  15.19 16.02 14.68  159 129  18.07 18.57  34  12.15  30  15.95  75 50  13.15 13.75 14.68 11.95  84 62  19.38 19.92  22  17.83  14.43  11.63  12.76  974 520 117 278  89 47  190 20  11.07  123 441  179  82 51 51 31 31  $8.66  56  9.75  22  27  8.68  25  136 136  Table 1. Occupational earnings—hourly averages: Regular stores—Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time hourly earnings1 in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,* August 1986) West  Midwest Miami-Hialeah Department and occupation  767 571 _  219 _  _  9 500 367 281 _  133 115  $6.08 -  _  -  -  7.12  -  -  _  _  -  _  _  2,461 -  5.54 4.54 7.38 6.75 6.78 6.64  14  1,410  5.17  -  -  _  -  _  489  -  7.44  -  -  _  -  -  6.53  _  -  _  -  -  7.57 _ _  262 205  5.61 4.35 -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  446 166 80 63  _  _  -  -  5.03 4.55  -  -  -  -  280 146  _  _  -  -  _  -  -  60  5.91  _  -  _  -  -  _  _ _ -  -  -  7.88  6.32  209  6.01  $7.31 8.34 6.07 9.10 8.98 6.61 5.76 6.56 8.84 10.01 10.72 10.15 7.48  -  -  -  46 21  90 27 126  _  -  _  -  8.76 5.89 6.20 5.50  455  _  -  272 146  -  7.31 7.70  49  1,273 512 125 307 80 761 246 356  _  176 127  _   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $6.32 6.59  196 117 33 46 91 77 73  See footnotes at end of table.  San Francisco  Phoe nix  Oakl and  St. L DUiS  Kansas City  Detroit  Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Number age Number age Number age Number Number age Number age Number age age Number age Number age Number age hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly hourly of of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of workers earn­ workers earn­ workers workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings  Store occupations, selling— Continued Salespersons, apparel and  Straight salary.........................  Cleveland  Chicago  Washington  -  555 200 -  154 30 355 -  6.35 7.44 5.75 8.74 5.71 5.55 7.32 7.88 8.31 7.33 7.01 6.88 -  _  -  -  _  -  -  _  -  -  8.27 7.33  _  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  200 -  135 _  6.46  392 202 69 128 190 83 79 95 51 37 44 17 133 59 55 56 164 92 87 72 44 -  $6.94 7.70 5.44 8.79  1,976 “ 343  6.13 4.66 7.31 7.06 7.86 9.09  879 301 373 205 464 336 “ 130 “ 128  ~ ~  6.14 8.54 5.67 5./3 5.65 4.81 7.90 8.88 8.74 6.65 6.50 '  $7.14  291  $6.28  6.06 “ “ 6.33 4.44 7.40 7.17 8.15 8.46 12.07  22  5.89  219 “  6.10  58 —  8.28  7.33 “ “  “ 34 —  221 “ 493 239 “ 401 143 “ 102 258  •  161  .“ “  “  134 33  6.54  9.57  —  6.16 6.07 8.22 10.13 “ /.35  94  15 15  101 “  505  $7.15  28  6.38  28  5.98  $9.21 _  54 657  10.70 5.67  141 51 85 57  6.73 9.38 9.79 10.27  6.35  9.59  291  8.63 _  _ _  28  34  8.82 _ _  19  —  “ 6.16 4.44 “ 7.03 8.61  -  125  688  $6.11 6.78  " 7.87 “  5.83 5.83 “ "  _  220 182 57  84  6.76 6.39  1,086 429  $6.39  ”  -  1,111  1,102  5.90  61 31 31  11.22  5.98 6.21 6.21  _ _ _ _  *.  30 30  —  5.74 5.74  _ _  295 25  197 73  7.76 8.21  51  8.39  124  7.50  84  7.63  9.17  208  9.94 _  _  _ _  6.77 ~  —  “ “ “ “  “ “ "  157 81  5.92 4.23  166  124  8.97 _  _  _ _ _ _  20 71  10.93 6.64  Table 1. Occupational earnings—hourly averages: Regular stores—Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time hourly earnings1 in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) South— Continued Miami- Hialeah  Midwest  Wash ington  Chi cago  Cleveland  West  Detroit  Kansas City  St. Louis Oakland Phoenix San Francisco Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Aver­ Number age Number age Number age Number age Number age Number age Number age Number age Number age Number age of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ workers earn­ ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings ings  Department and occupation  Store occupations, SellingContinued  Salary plus commission......... Sporting goods ........................... Full-time workers ...................... Straight salary ........................ Part-time workers...................... Straight salary ........................ Salespersons, general................... Full-time workers ...................... Straight salary ........................ Part-time workers...................... Straight salary ........................  .  35  $7.34  98 ~  $6.50 “  127 “  $6.33  .  19 1,184 322 311 862 855  78 ~ —  6.65 — —  94 “ 1,462  6.25  . . . . .  8.21 ~ 4.30 4.60 4.50 4.19 4.18  -  -  1,314 1,314  7.53 7.71 5.42 “ 4.40 6.49 6.89  80 55 25 426 203 144  8.43 8.82 7.57 4.93 4.65 5.84  159  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  4.53 4.53  -  -  -  -  8.49  57 35  4.62  -  -  102 16  $6.85 7.82  129  86  6.67  103 79 635  —  -  4.99 4.21 4.57  4,816 1,590 1,158 3,226 3,154  4.89 5.83 6.09 4.43 4.40  53 27  7.90 8.02  _  _  _  _  _  -  _  _  _  _  569 568  -  $5.10 -  -  _  _  50 :  $6.87 -  63  $4.76  21 -  45  4.85  44  $8.54 _  6.78  _  -  -  “  -  -  -  575  5.02  -  -  -  -  441 441  4.69 4.69  -  -  9.98  37  7.02  _  4.48 4.46  Store occupations, nonselling  Alterations tailors .......................... Full-time workers ...................... Part-time workers...................... Cleaners (porters) .......................... Full-time workers ...................... Part-time workers...................... Display assistants........................... Full-time workers ...................... Part-time workers...................... Gift-wrap persons........................... Full-time workers...................... Part-time workers...................... Receivers....................................... Full-time workers...................... Part-time workers...................... Stock and inventory workers......... Full-time workers...................... Part-time workers......................  60 54 105 18 62  51  _  -  79  123 73 50  5.04 5.28 4.70  109 45 64 108 39  5.70 6.31 5.27 4.93 5.58  4.71  -  -  51 314 132 182 165 91  7.89 5.21 5.63 4.90 6.51 7.48  242 165 77 662 290 372  6.20 6.73 5.08 5.11 5.41 4.88  146 47  5.73 6.28  $8.50 9.42  -  143 64 79 54 38  86 72 14 93 56  -  5.00 5.32 4.75 6.67 7.47  4.94 5.06 4.36 4.62 4.47  _  298 103 195 162 126  139 107 _  4.86 5.24 4.66 6.45 6.86  6.52 6.55 _  927 614 313  5.09 5.55 4.18  _  _  -  -  -  -  28 22  6.04 6.39  79  $7.58  31  6.50  9 _  _  100  6.32  -  -  50 41  7.21 7.36  208 85  4.78 5.32  109 30  5.10 6.21  71 67  9.40 9.50  173  4.82  145 64 40  A 7Q  6.03 6.84  77 60  9 98 10.25  “ -  -  -  -  _  49  5.00  15  5.80  13  5.63  -  -  196 42 154 307 63  7.92 8.68 7.71 6.43 7.88  282 98 184  4.64 5.14 4.38  163 92 71  7.97 9.19 6.38  16  5.44  31  7.65  ~  149 29 120  6.65 7.66 6.41  -  10  8.55  Office clerical occupations  Cashiers, office............................ Full-time workers................... Part-time workers................... Service desk workers.................. Full-time workers ................... Part-time workers................... Switchboard operators ................ Full-time workers ................... Part-time workers...................  44 27  5.25 5.48  -  -  225  4.65  194 105 24 81  4.50 5.17 5.47 5.09  188  6.26  97 19  5.08 6.21  _  j  57 16  _  .  .  -  -  5.16 5.92  eludes prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers. Earnings for workers paid on a straight-salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period  ending as close as possible to July 1986. https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  79 38 41  5.59 6.23 4.99  _  17  — -  6.07 -  -  2 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria. Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 2. Occupational earnings—hourly averages: Discount stores  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, general merchandise.... Full-time workers......................... Straight salary........................... Salary plus commission ............ Part-time workers......................... Straight salary ........................... Salary plus commission ............ Salespersons, floor only................ Full-time workers ......................... Straight salary .......................... Salary plus commission ............ Part-time workers........................ Straight salary.......................... Salary plus commission ........... Salespersons, floor and cashier, checkout....................................... Full-time workers........................ Straight salary .......................... Part-time workers........................ Straight salary............................ Salespersons, floor and stockroom Full-time workers ........................ Straight salary .......................... . Part-time workers........................ . Straight salary .......................... .  39,192 12,108 11,772 336 27,084 26,614 470 1 ft 386 5 595 5,260 335 1? 791 12,321 470  $4.44 5.29 5.26 6.21 4.06 4.03 5.58 4.49 5.34 5.28 6.21 4.12 4.07 5.58  10,632 3,176 3,144 32 7,456 7,348  $4.30 4.85 4.83 7.46 4.06 4.04  3,038 1,129 1,097 32 1,909 1,801  4.52 4.87 4.79 7.46 4.32 4.26  3,492 1,596 1,596 1,896 1,896 4,451 1,176 1,175 3,275 3,275  4.96 5.74 5.74 4.30 4.30 4.05 4.54 4.54 3.87 3.87  1,446 514 514 4,384 1,133 1,133 3,251 3,251  4.77 5.60 5.60 4.04 4.54 4.54 3.87 3.87  . 20,200 . 2,054 . 18,146 . 1,465 669 . 796 . 1,844 . 1,160 . 684 . 11,311 ? 605 .. 8,706  4.25 4.91 4.18 4.95 5.62 4.39 4.70 5.01 4.16 4.41 5.21 4.17  6,763  3.88  5,800 429 183 246 1,454 847 607 4,813 1,048  3.83 4.38 4.43 4.34 4.40 4.71 3.97 4.04 4.39   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1,835 681 675  $4.24 4.48 4.45  -  1,154 1,133  4.10 4.07  _  -  1,102 444 438  4.28 4.37 4.33  -  -  658 637  4.21 4.16  -  ~  -  Store occupations, nonselling  See footnotes at end of table.  Four western areas*  S x midwestern areas  St. L Duis Total8 Kansa City Philadelphia New York Total5 — Number Average Number hourly Number Average Number Average Number Average of Average Number Average Number Average Number hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly of hourly workers earnings of hourly of hourly of workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings  Department and occupation  Cashiers, checkout.......................... Full-time workers.......................... Part-time workers ......................... Cleaners......................................... Full-time workers.......................... Part-time workers......................... Receivers ....................................... Full-time workers.......................... Part-time workers......................... Stock and inventory workers.......... Full-time workers.......................... Part-time workers ........................  Seven southern areas3  Five northeastern areas  Total, 22 areas  -  -  -  -  _  ~  ~ “ “  “ “  ~  ~ ~ ~  9,798 3,494 3,344 150 6,304 6,162 142 4,788 1,826 1,677 149 2,962 2,820 142  $4.44 5.11 5.08 5.85 4.08 4.05 5.06 4.52 5.11 5.04 5.86 4.17 4.12 5.06  16,137 4,590 4,476 114 11,547 11,372 175 9,209 2,148 2,034 114 7,061 6,886 175  $4.51 5.70 5.69 6.13 4.04 4.01 6.19 4.44 6.78 5.76 6.13 4.04 3.98 6.19  “ “  -  -  -  895  $4.35  261  4.88  616 607  4.09 4.06  2,893  $4.87  1,626 1,617  4.22 4.21  -  -  ” _  _  -  -  -  -  -  “  “  “___  Average hourly earnings  of  2,625 848 808 40 1,777 1,732 45 1,351 492 452 40 859 814 45  $4.56 5.41 5.34 6.77 4.16 4.12 5.48 4.65 5.33 5.20 6.77 4.26 4.19 5.48  922 83 839 104 84 20  4.25 5.20 4.16 6.29 6.62 4.88  95  5.26  _ _  ~  -  -  “  -  “ “  “  ~  — 2,131  $3.68  1,356 1,302  50 320  4.38 -  3.77  _  64 64 201 ~  3.82 3.80 5.79 5.79 4.60  4,162 414 3,748 146 118 28 “  4.15 4.34 4.13 5.80 6.22 4.04 "  8,353 594 7,759 786 284 502  4.30 4.90 4.14  3,590 949 2,641  36  4.99  816 248  4.55 5.82  ”  —  “  _ 2,515 513 2,002  4.60 6.46 4.46 4.93 5.83 4.42  5.01 6.28 4.55  -  -  Table 2. Occupational earnings—hourly averages: Discount stores—Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time hourly earnings' in discount department stores, selected metropolitan i Total, 2 2 areas Department and occupation  Seven southern areas3 *  Five northeastern areas  Four western areas4  Six midwestern areas  To al5 New York Philadelphia Total6 Kansas City St. Louis Number Average Number Average Number Average of hourly Number Average Number Average Number Average of hourly Number Average Number Average Number Average of hourly workers earnings of hourly of hourly of hourly workers earnings of hourly of hourly of hourly workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings  Office clerical occupations  Cashiers, office.............. Full-time workers.......................... Part-time workers................... Service desk workers .............. Full-time workers............. Part-time workers .................... Switchboard operators................. Part-time workers ......................  3,171 2,084 1,087 2,070 746 1,324 508 470  $5.70 6.24 4.68 4.93 5.57 4.56 4.57 4.54  584 395 189 693 196 497 193 159  5.65 4.80 4.65 4.88 4.57 4.50 4.43  “ T  $4.41  txciuoes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excludes prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers Earnings for workers paid on a straight-salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible tq July 1986. 2 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. 3 Includes data for the Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Fort Worth-Arlington, Houston, Miami-Hialeah and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  75 35 40  $4.52 4.74 4.34 “  993 745 248 520 249 271  —  $5.87 6.25 4.71 4.93 5.54 4.38 ”  1,344 787 557 708 237 471 90 86  $5.73 6.49 4.66 5.06 5.95 4.61 4.50 4.44  83 ~  $5.74  -  -  -  “  -  -  ,  -  -  -  -  -  -  250 157  $5.69 6.40  149 64 85  5.55 6.44 4.88  -  -  lul ukjiivbi, uaruano, rnoemx, and san l-rancisco metropolitan areas. Includes data for Boston, Buffalo, and Nassau-Suffolk in addition to the New York and Philadel­ phia metropolitan areas shown separately. 6 Includes data for Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and Minneapolis-St. Paul in addition to the Kansas City and St. Louis metropolitan areas shown separately. NOTE. Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria Data for an overall occupation may inciude data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 3. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Atlanta, GA’ (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  7.00  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  15.00  17.00  21.00  5.50  6.50  20.00  5.00  6.00  19.00  4.75  18.00  4.50  16.00  4.25  14.00  3.75  4.00  13.00  3.50  7.00  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  16.00  17.00  21.00  6.00  6.50  20.00  5.00  5.50  19.00  4.75  18.00  over  4.50  15.00  4.00  4.25  14.00  3.75  8  11  5  10  6  7  4  7  4  3  3  3  1  11  2  1  3  1  12  5  11  4  10  4  7  3  7  6  3  4  4  5  3  1  1 1  16  6  15  6  12  5  9  3  9  5  2  9  14  11  7  8  11  9  6  3  10  17  14  8  9  12  11  7  6  7  10  4  9  Store occupations, sehing Salespersons, home furnishings ....  656  $7.68  414  8.63  295  6.00  242  6.07  195  5.32  69  10.59  46  11.25  23  9.28  142  13.99  113  15.14  29  9.52  318  5.47  139  5.78  1 ft _  2  1 _  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  17  12  -  1  10  2  9  14  9  4  _  -  _  -  17 1  _  -  _  -  2  136  5.79  179  5.23  139  16.28  2  166  17.43  2  23  7.92  1,934  6.14  915  6.71  2  _  -  9  6  9  2  9  13  4  2  2 10  10  7  9  4  10  -  8  8  8  10  3  4  8  9  8  10  3  11  10  6  ” 10  11  9  6  16  8  16  8  4  8  11  10  9  8  11  11  6  6  4  3  3  3  3  _  13  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  13  -  9  -  Salespersons, apparel and  3  6  1  16  12  9  4  9  5  6  7  10  5  1  15  9  7  3  12  5  6  7  10  6  1  1  1  2  1  11  6  6  4  9  13 4  180  9.86  1  5.62  6  1  2  17  15  10  5  6  5  6  6  10  106  8.29  8  3  3  5  4  1  3  8  12  8  6  7  45  9.98  2  7  4  9  _  3 4  1 9  7  7  1  4 18  5  1  22  14  8  8  6  2  6  8  5  2  3  2  3  4  4  5  3  4  5 30  5  4  4  34  9 ■  1  1,019  2  -  22  1  4 ft  7  p)  -  9  -  4  p>  10  10  3  9  p)  1  13  13  3  15  2  p>  1  13  19  p>  1  9  1  14  2  15  1  10  1  1  1 14  9  13  11  1  1  6  7  2  1 (3)  pf  3  -  Salespersons, major appliances,  .  and  4  6  2  1  1  p)7  10  1  p)4  p)  p)  p)  p>  p)  p)  p)  1  ft  ft  ft  ft  p)  1  2  1  4 ft  ft  ft  ft  1  1  1  2  1  1  pf  1 8  (3)  5  Men’s clothing: Full-time workers: 7  2  Part-time workers:  Salespersons, miscellaneous............  Straight salary......................................  Full-time workers...................................  31  7.64  3  1,043  5.81  4  489  6.34  391  5.52  554  5.35  _ _ 7  13  6  6  13  3  8  6  6  8  9  3  3  3  1  2  16  16  1  1  13  12  8  3  12  1  1  16  15  10  3  1  3  19  19  8  6  21  9  6  _  .  4  8  9  10  15  5  7  10  10  3  4  5  5  7  8  3  4  5  5  7  9  3  5.02  7  1  3  49  8.73  10  6  4  2  6  2  6  2  8  12  4  4  7.06  1  3  1  1  2  14  5  12  8  8  6  16  201  7.81  2  6  3  18  7  6  5  41  3  3  3  8  8  7  9  10  7  17  7  15  4  20  4  1  <3>  -  3  37  10.40  3  6.42  1  26  8.25  25  5.75  11  6.24  18  11  6.24  18  2,354  5.28  1  3  3  16  16  8  7  8  11  10  6  7  1,053  5.44  1  3  1  12  13  7  9  8  14  11  8  9  6  8  7  14  11  8  9  8  4  8  -  1  1 20  12 :  1 16  21  6  15  -  -  27  -  -  -  -  24  :  55  _  2  11  3  3  P>  1 p>  2  2  p)  1 1  p)1  5  ft  4  1  1  7  2  -  -  -  -  pi  p)  p>  p>  p)  P)  p)  p)  1 p>  1  p)  p>  ()  10 p)  ft  1  8  9  ft  1  ft  p)  1  9  1  pi  3 ~  ft  p)  p>  (3)  2  8  11  1 8  4  8  1  1  ~ 8 18  -  -  -  -  p)  p>  p>  ( ) ft  ()  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  pi  9  55  873  5.40  1  3  1  14  1,301  5.15  1  4  4  18  19  8  6  9  9  8  5  6  Part-time workers..................................  5.06  1  4  4  20  19  8  6  8  9  9  5  6  Straight salary .......................................  1,186   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  16  8  236  _  23  5  7  437  <3>  13  4  6  13  See footnotes at end of table.  -  21  505  2  22  2  1  p)  1  P> p)  3  ft  1  P>  p) p>  -  p>  -  -  p>  p)  -  p>  p)  p>  -  _  Table 3. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Atlanta, GA'—Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Number Department and occupation  of workers  Average (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  8.00  9.00  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  21.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  21.00  over  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  :  :  ~  “  ”  ~  _  -  ~  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  .  .  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  ~  ~  ~  -  “  -  “  -  -  and  11.00  Store occupations, nonselling Alterations tailors............................................  32  $7.42  Full-time workers.....................................  27  7.63  3  Cleaners (porters)...........................................  113  4.78  11  Full-time workers....................................  50  4.81  12  Part-time workers...................................  63  4.76  Display assistants...........................................  106  7.74  -  3 4  10  4  _ 13  6  6.79  1  6.90  2  11  5.50  1 -  -  Stock and inventory workers .............  470  Full-time workers....................................  333  6.10  1  Part-time workers...................................  137  4.45  6  5.62  3  -  -  p)  1  3  37  4  4  3  8  10  17  3  3  5  6  2  1  4  8  9  8  25  21  10  4  5  4  3  11  9  26  22  11  4  5  7  10  7  4  8  9  23  1  8  10  5  4  8  8  25  1  9  27  9  9  _ 18  2  _ 2  6 5  _ 27  9  _ _ _ _  _  2  _  2  -  -  -  13  9  7  8  3  12  4  7  1  12  1  14  12  5  5  10  4  15  6  9  2  17  2  30  16  19  12  4  1  5  1  1  31  22  3  20  9  22  4  11  _ 18  130  20  9 11  19  -  Part-time workers...................................  11  30  -  Full-time workers....................................  23  4  -  7.95  7  13  _  14  -  92  7  8  -  141  6  6  -  Full-time workers....................................  9 11  11  -  Receivers.................................................................  _  10  -  2  4  _  1  -  4  Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office.................................................  37  6.45  Full-time workers....................................  13  5.36  Switchboard operators..............................  50  5.27  Part-time workers...................................  1  48  5.26  6 6  -  -  -  -  ”  11 31 6 6  4 4  3  3  16  12  17  13  8  14  23  23  15  10  10  12  8  10  11  13  The Atlanta metropolitan area consists of Barrow, Butts, Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, De Kalb, Douglas,  Fayette, Forsyth, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry, Newton, Paulding, Rockdale, Spalding, and Walton Counties. 2  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes prize  or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such pay­ ments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers paid on a straight-  8  3  16  10  6  6  19  3  3 8  _ 8  6  6  2 -  -  2  '  -  cent at $23 and under $24; 2 percent at $24 and under $25; 3 percent at $25 and under $26; 2 percent at $26 and under $27; and 4 percent at $27 and over. 5 Workers were distributed as follows: 2 percent at $21 and under $22; 5 percent at $22 and under $23; 3 per­ cent at $23 and under $24; 5 percent at $24 and under $25; 3 percent at $25 and under $26; 1 percent at $26 and under $27; and 11 percent at $27 and over.  salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were aver­ aged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986. 3  Less than 0.5 percent.  4  Workers were distributed as follows: 2 percent at $21 and under $22; 2 percent at $22 and under $23; 2 per­   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  NOTE: ported.  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 4. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Baltimore, MD1 (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  18.00  3.75  17.00  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  over  and  Store occupations, telling Salespersons, home furnishings....  10  9  10  5  3  8  4  5  2  3  3  3  4  3  4  1  3  1  2  4  2  6  3  $7.52  3  616  3  5  8  7  4  9  4  4  2  3  3  2  5  6  3  1  5  2  3  8  1  3  5  9.46  7  277  13.73  2  4  5  2  10  13  12  6  1  6  10  116  12  12  2  2  1  14  15  339  5.93  4  7  17  271  4.60  5  9  20  52  10.12  34  10.30  163  13.67  111  14.68  88  14.76  _  _  2  2  8  4  6  1  3  3  5  3  10  5  7  1  3  2  4  4  8  8  “ 15  3  12  9  6  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  _  _  _  -  _  _  _  _  -  _  _  _  _  -  3 2 3 3  -  2  2  -  -  -  -  -  2  4  6  13  5  12  8  1  2  4  2  10  5  14  5  1  2  3  2  13  6  14  3  “  -  ”  —  ~  -  “  -  “  ~  2  2  3  4  7  10  6  9  11  7  1  2  2  3  6  7  6  9  13  8  8  4  6  4  10  21  8  10  1  2  1  3  4  9  9  6  7  4  8 6  228  13.01  180  13.76  -  -  -  -  48  10.21  _  -  -  -  -  112  14.31  -  -  -  -  “  _  -  -  -  .  _  -  -  <4)  _  “  -  2  2  _  -  2  2  5  3  ~  3  5  15  10.96  ~  1  <4)  1  2 “  1  1 3  -  -  3  -  3  1  4  8  3  13  22  13  13  Electric and electronic 116  11.76*  100  12.24  16  8.70  780  5.16  238  7.03  -  _  _  _  -  4  3  15  14  32  13  “  1  14  21  15.65  12  "  1  21  9  80  15  “  4  7  9  5  1  10  ■  19  7  5  4.59  -  2 2  3  5  4  9  11  3  12  15  8  1  2  3  4  9  10  4  13  17  8  6  19  6  19  6  6  19  6  “  20  8  ~ ~  -  7  8 14  7  4  6  9  6  8  30  5  3  6  5  7 24  9 8  3  1 -  8  12  “  5  4.59  264  -  -  10  5 13  12  14  5  264  2  2  10  12  _  10  10  4  -  6 6  -  1  8  1  —  ~  —  13  15  -  12  2  _ 13  _  8  12  1  Salespersons, major appliances,  Kitchen and laundry appliances ..  10  29  4  _ 16  _  23  6  2  9  _  8  <4> -  2  4  -  -  -  2  4.68  -  -  1  4 "  7  11.51  _  -  4  6  52 394  _  -  -  4  -  _ _  _  3  -  -  11  4  6  6  ~  Salespersons, apparel and footwear 2  10  13  10  12  2  5  2  3  1  6  3  8  3  1  c>  96  8.15  142  6.27  20  5.69  5  5  5  5  51  5.21  31  16  10  10  19  5.67  52  5.26  _ 1  -  8 C)  1  12  13  5  3  3  2  2  2  1  2  16  6  9  8  10  11  8  4  8  1  1  3  10  16  20  13  8  15  3  26  10  13  7  6  5  5  1  4  10  40  10  2  8  4  11  42  2  8  8 4  -  1  <4>  2 2  3  4  “  -  ~ 4  -  ~  “  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  “  “  -  "  -  -  -  _  ”  "  “  Salespersons, miscellaneous: Full-time workers:  5  15  Part-time workers: 4  2  _  2  _  -  -  12  Sporting goods: Full-time workers:  _ _  5  5  5  5  31  15  10  8  4  -  5  16  5  2  -  2  2  -  2  50  5.22  32  16  10  8  4  2  8  1,418  4.68  2  11  24  12  12  8  2  8  10  3  1  3  2  <4>  1,390  4.60  2  11  24  12  12  8  2  9  10  3  1  2  2  <4)  -  -  -  Salespersons, general:  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  . -  “  -  -  (4>  (*)  -  (4>  _  12 12  1 <4)  —  -  “  (*)  -  Table 4. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Baltimore, MD'—Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) ofNumber Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  over  _ _  and  Store occupations, nonselling  Alterations tailors.........................................  32  $7.91  Full-time workers....................................  18  8.36  Part-time workers...................................  14  7.33  Display assistants........................................... Stock and inventory workers.............  19  245  5.00  4  17  13  18  145  4.86  8  25  15  12  83  5.63  262 109 153  19 33  2  4  2  3  13  5.17  3  5.26  3  9  6  5.11  1  13  11  43  ~  12  7  -  -  6  22  “  -  22  39  -  -  14  21  21  3  1  2  5  12  9  1  3  1  3  6  1  23  17  12  6  1  2  2  4  (34)  5  2  -  4  5  7  1  13  15  9  3  16  7  8  4  1  15  13  9  4  22  6  12  2  1  5  6  1  1  12  17  13  12  31  12  3  -  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  -  _  _  -  -•  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  6  -  <-) 1  -  -  Office clerical occupations  Service desk workers.................................  158  5.66  18  129  5.54  20  65  5.00  12 53  '  5.55 4.88  5  2  14 -  50  ~ 6  19  21  2 Carroll  17  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes  prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  4  4  4  11  13  3  5  5  8  11  3  3  17  8  -  6  4  2  -  6  3  17  8  4  2  1 -  4 5  -  Har­  ford, Howard, and Queen Annes Counties. 2  2 2  14  17  The Baltimore metropolitan area consists of Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore  3  Earnings for workers  paid on a straight-salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid P^8^*a^ ^as's were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July  4  Less than 0.5 percent.  5  Workers were distributed as follows: 2 percent at $18 and under $20; 2 percent at $20 and under $22  4 percent at $22 and under $23; 1 percent at $23 and under $24; and 4 percent at $24 and over Workers were distributed as follows: 4 percent at $18 and under $19; 5 percent at $19 and under $20 1 percent at $21 and under $22; 2 percent at $22 and under $24; and 2 percent at $24 and over Workers were distributed as follows: 8 percent at $18 and under $19; 5 percent at $19 and under $20 3 percent at $21 and under $22; 4 percent at $22 and under $24; and 4 percent at $24 and over.  3  Workers were distributed as follows: 3 percent at $19 and under $20; 2 percent at $20 and under $21­  6 percent at $21 and under $23; 2 percent at $23 and under $24; and 6 percent at $24 and over.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  NOTE:  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data  were reported.  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 5. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Boston, MA1 (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986)  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.50  hourly  and  earnings  under 4.00  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  over  and 4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings....  413  $8.26  9  21  16  10  2  2  3  5  4  2  1  1  Full-time workers....................................  165  12.80  5  5  6  12  1  2  2  4  2  2  1  2  Part-time workers...................................  248  5.24  12  31  23  9  2  3  3  5  5  2  Straight salary.......................................  237  5.01  13  33  23  9  3  3  3  5  5  2  Furniture and bedding...........................  74  18.01  Full-time workers....................................  59  20.41  Part-time workers...................................  15  8.58  27  5  Straight salary.......................................  7  5.53  57  Housewares......................................................  304  5.17  11  42  -  -  -  -  -  -  29  21  13  13 29 2  -  -  _  --  --  _  4  6  1  _ _  _ 7  -  3  1 _  p)  -  1  p>  1  _  1  p>  7  -  2  1  1  1  1  3  1  2  1  2  2  1  1  8  2  2  5  4  4  4  4  4  2  3  ‘20  1  1  7  5 41  p> -■ 4  _  7  -  5  p>  " p>  5  1  4  3  2  5  11  13  25  1  4  5  9  5  4  5.83  11  12  13  25  1  4  5  9  5  4  3  11  34  24  10  2  3  3  5  5  2  Straight salary.......................................  229  4.96  11  34  24  10  2  3  3  5  5  2  footwear..................................................................  1,273  6.55  2  24  16  11  5  5  7  7  4  3  2  2  1  2  Part-time workers...................................  940  5.88  3  29  18  11  6  8  6  4  3  2  1  1  1  p)  “  -  7 8  "  -  7  5 7  -  -  -  5  -  3 3  -  8  51  -  -  1  5.83  -  4  ft  5  3  4.96  4  -  13  75  4  -  -  2  229  ft  -  -  13  Straight salary.......................................  12  -  -  7  Part-time workers...................................  75  -  3  3  Full-time workers....................................  1  -  -  3  -  -  p) p>  “  Salespersons, apparel and  819  5.38  3  33  20  12  Men’s clothing................................................  352  7.15  2  28  16  12  4 45  Part-time workers...................................  241  5.69  3  36  19  12  3  Straight salary.......................................  218  5.13  3  40  21  13  Women’s clothing......................................  715  5.43  3  27  20  Full-time workers....................................  153  5.93  3  10  20  Straight salary.......................................  153  5.93  3  10  Part-time workers...................................  562  5.29  3  32  20  17  20  12  4  204  12  4  3 3  23  Straight salary.......................................  Straight salary.......................................  562  5.29  3  32  Footwear.............................................................  204  9.46  1  5  Part-time workers...................................  135  8.66  1  6  6  20  6.29  20  30  10  5  8  6  3  2  1  4  6  4  2  1  4  7  5  2  1  3  4  7  6  13  5  8  03  1  1  17  8  6 77  p>4  13  7  3  2  4  13  7  3  2  4  6  4  3  1  pi  p>5  8  6 65 7  6 69  8  2  p)1  p>1  p)2  1  1  1  2  -  -  6  4  3  1  4  7  7  7  5  5  10  9  8  7  4  5  5  10  5  9  -  pi  p>  p)1  -  2  1  2  1  1  1  ft 1  p)1  -  -  -  -  1 p)  ft  -  21 -  1  p) ft  1  -  pi 1  1  p) P)  -  ft  1 -  p)  ft  1  1  1 p) p)2  p) «4  pi ft  ft  ft  ft  ft  -  -  p)  ft  pi  -  pi  1  2  1  -  p) p) 22  9  8  5  7  4  3  1  1  1  6  7  7  2  1  2  1  1  1  1  ~  Salespersons, general: Full-time workers....................................  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  ~  5  -  -  -  5  5  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Table 5. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Boston, MA'—Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.50  hourly  and  earnings  under 4.00  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  over  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  and  Store occupations, nonselling Cleaners (porters): Full-time workers....................................  Full-time workers....................................  21  $6.78  61  7.95  41  8.94  Receivers: Full-time workers....................................  14  24  2  13  -  10 3  -  5  5  14  10  13  8  5  8  7  7  7  3  11  11  2  12  10  2  10  10  7  10  5  15  17  2  9  5  5 •1  ■  _  ”  “  “  -  14  27  18  14  9  11  14  12  6  2  2  2  1  3  10  11  8  3  1  2  1  1  1  22  6.03  Stock and inventory workers .............  327  5.11  4  41  Part-time workers...................................  213  4.70  4  57  _  19  1  1  “  (3) pi -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Office clerical occupations Service desk workers: 174  4.92  7  21  34  22  5  2  3  2  .lie ousiun meirupoinan area consists or surtoik uounty, 3 communities in Bristol County, 4 in Essex County, 44 in Middlesex County, 26 in Norfolk County, 16 in Plymouth County, and 9 in Worcester County. 2  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes  prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers  paid on a straight-salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid  2  4  Workers were distributed as follows: 2 percent at $20 and under $21; 5 percent at $21 and under $22­  4 percent at $22 and under $23; 2 percent at $23 and under $25; 2 percent at $25 and under $26- and 5 percent at $26 and over. s  Workers were distributed as follows: 4 percent at $20 and under $21;  11  percent at  $21  and under $22­  8 percent at $22 and under $23; 4 percent at $23 and under $25; 3 percent at $25 and under $26- and 11 percent at $26 and over.  on that basis were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986 1986. 3  Less than 0.5 percent.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  NOTE:  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data  were reported.  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table 6. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Buffalo, NY (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,; August 1986) of—  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnin Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings....  247  $5.20  14  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.50  4.25  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  5.00  20  11  12  9  9  9  76  17  5  12  17  10  12  16  9  9  4  166  4.02  17  28  13  17  10  9  32  10.18  6  13  6  .  9  10  5  172  4.12  15  _ 26  13  _ 15  30  4.42  20  10  17  7  10  10  30  4.42  20  10  17  7  10  10  142  4.06  See footnotes at end of table.  5.68  84  6.27  2  2  1  5  5  4  ~  17  8  11  8  11  4  10  30  12  9  11  6  5  6  5  7  4  13  8  12  6  22  24  6  11  8  172  14  5  6  2  8  15  95  4.20  23  25  7  9  4  12  6  48  7.78  8  6  25  6.81  12  8  16  154  14  16  4.76  6  7  8  12  10  5.52  19  5  -  21  10  42  4.96  26  23  6  11  35  4.48  4  10  12  6  112  20  93  4.14  24  4  12  6  8  4  26  54  6.44  4  -  6  21  6  10  26  8  10  "  4  9.00  over  2  1 3  -  and  8  _ 3  -  24 1  _ 6  -  4 50  -  1  1  _ _  1  1  14  5  10.00  10.00  1  5.40  11  9.50  9.50  2  6  -  ”  5.22  10  1  1  51  18  1  1  9.00  10  12  14  6  1  8.50  10  4  17  -  1  12  7  256  6.50  3  27  Salespersons, apparel and  6.00  8.50  2  16  4.06  8.00  8.00  8  14  30  7.50  7.50  2  4.21  14  7.00  . 7.00  9  4.52  6  6.50  9  42  142  Footwear............................................................  5.50  171  Furniture and bedding:  6.00  5.50  5.00  5  2  7  5  6  4  8  12  4  -  5  2  7 6  6 6  1  3  3  10  5 25  _  6  8  6  6  24 “  3  8  Ll  10 9  7  9 2  _ _ _ _  _ 19  11  4  _  Table 6. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Buffalo, NY1—Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) ofNumber Department and occupation  Average (mean)  of workers  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00 and  10.00  over  Store occupations, nonselling Alterations tailors...........................................  N) O   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  18  $5.89  Cleaners (porters).........................................  70  Full-time workers...................................  28  4.60  Part-time workers..................................  42  4.46  Display assistants..........................................  17  5.80  Receivers................................................................ Full-time workers.................................... Stock and inventory workers ............ Full-time workers................................... Part-time workers..................................  4.52  16  5.49  16  5.49  184  4.25  88  4.26  96  4.23  Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office............................................  37  4.80  Part-time workers................................  15  4.99  Service desk workers..............................  85  4.31  1  24  13  6  The Buffalo metropolitan area consists of Erie County,  i *12 3 ^fludes Premium Pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part  of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers paid on  a straight-salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month  percent at $13 and over. 4 Workers were distributed as follows: 9 percent at $10.50 and under $11- 10 percent at $11.50 and under $12.50; and 31 percent at $13 and over. Workers were distributed as follows: 10 percent at $10 and under $10 50- 6 percent at $10.50 and under $11; 6 percent at $12.50 and under $13; and 3 per­ cent at $13 and over.  K  penod ending as close as possible to July 1986. 3  Workers were distributed as follows: 4 percent at $10.50 and under $113  percent at $11 and under $11.50; 4 percent at $11.50 and under $12.50; and13  NOTE:  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100  Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Data for an overall occupation may  include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 7. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Chicago, IL’ (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourty earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  10.50  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  14.50  16.00  17.00  5.00  15.00  4.50  14.00  4.00  13.50  3.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  10.50  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  13.50  14.00  14.50  17.00  5.00  5.50  16.00  4.50  15.00  4.00  over  and  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings....  5  4  4  3  . 2  4  3  3  3  2  2  3  3  2  4  1  2  1  4  13  6  2  11  1  4  3  $8.10  2  974  5  3  3  3  3  4  4  3  6  3  4  4  5  4  6  2  3  4  2  6  4  3  3  1  3  5  10.28  3  520 117  5.25  4  19  15  10  18  10  6  1  5  5  2  1  3  1  9  8  278  11.51  454  5.61  7  _ 19  396  Straight commission........................  _ 8  4.87  100  9.78  89  10.29  47  10.10  11  5.71  338  12.36  22 1  _  p)  pi  p) 25 28  6  11  _  -  -  -  -  18  9  -  -  _  _  _  -  _  _ 24  _ 11  10  11.93  535  5.08  7  _ 20  138  5.68  4  16  13  9  117  5.25  4  19  15  10  12.92  271  14.08  89  9.38  -  -  8  22  4  6  27  27  2  _  46  360  6  _  12.03  4.87  8  _  219  396  3  8 p)  5  4 1  p>  1  p>  11.77  117  12.79  2  4  4  4  10  4  6  2  7  6  5  5  4  2  4  11  4  7  2  8  7  6  6  4  4  4  13  6  4  50  9.38  2  1,273  7.31  512  8.34  125  6.07  307  9.10  _  2  6  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  2  3  1  3  4  5  7  5  4  5  7  5  1  3  1  3  3  4  7  4  5  4  7  4  4  1  4  2  5  9  4  5  5  8  5  4  2  7  13  4  9  7  7  2  -  -  6  4  3  2  5  2  2  1  1  16  9  7  2  6  5  2  2  2  1  18  10  6  1  5  5  2  1  3  1  4  1  5  2  2  •  9  “ 1  1 1  i3)  1  -  ”  28  2  1  2  2  2  2  3  2  4  4  1  4  3  3  4  1  2  1  1  1  1  3  3  1  3  4  3  3  4  2  6  4  6  4  9  9  2  6  2  2  7  -  2  4  2  2  2  4  6  6  1  4  1  1  1  3  4  5 8  1  5 6  -  .  -  4  2  5  5  2  4  5  4  2  7  3  5  4  2  3  2  1  7  4  3  3  3  3  6  2  1  2  1  1  3  4  8  4  5  5  3  2  5  3  8  5  6  4  1  3  1  5  4  3  3  3  1  2  1  6  10  4  7  7  8  6  11  7  5  6  5  4  5  2  3  8  4  10  8  4  5  6  4  22  4  6  12  7  10  8  2  3  5  2  2  2  2  4  12  8  5  5  7  1  11  1  6  8  11  7  7  7  “  4  10  _ 11  246  5.76  4  11  19  9  9  15  6  5  6  3  2  2  2  2  1  2  5  13  9  8  9  11  6  4  5  5  4  3  4  4  1  1.  1  6.56  2  356  1  4  7  6  5  6  8  4  5  5  3  3  6  6  3  6  3  4  8.84  1  272 146  10.01  4  2  2  3  8  1  90  10.72  6  1  _ _  4  1  2  -  _  3  4  8  4  5  8  3  9  1  2  11  3  8  10  4  4  4  7  4  7  7  4  4  1  3  2  2  2  2  1  2  1  3  3  2  1  1  6  6  3  2  1  1  27  7.48  1  4  13  _ 10  9  8  8  6  5  2  3  1  2  9  6.35  9  12  8  9  5  16  5  5  5  3  3  3  4  2  166  7.44  14  2  1  11  6  15  9  3  3  2  2  2  7  2  80  5.75  11  8  11  6  4  3  63  8.74  6  25  16  3  5  280  5.71  5  16  3  6  6  30  6  1  4  _  _  _  18  _  13  9  -  -  -  4 4  1  1  10  3  2  2  5  3  3  3  2  1  P) 1 -  2 p>  1  ” “  “  146  5.55  1  10  23  7  8  22  4  8  8  3  2  2  1  1  7.32  3  4  7  8  8  9  9  7  8  6  5  4  5  4  2  2  2  1  555  10  5  10  9  6  7  8  6  5  8  5  3  1  2  2  6  12  9  6  8  5  6  8  5  3  10  13  7  10  3  10  3  2  2  2  1  2  2  200  7.88  154  8.31  30  7.33  2  2  5 3  1  _ _  4 30  355  7.01  3  5  8  7  10  200  6.88  1  4  13  10  15  _  _  7 -  8  9  7  9  6  5  3  4  3  10  9  4  5  5  5  4  4  3  “  1  4  8  4  4 17  2  1  1  1  ~  1  1  p)  2 3 1  1  “ 1  1  p>  1  5 1  p)  p>  ()  O  1  1  1  9  8  4  4  1  p)1  “  p)  1 1 1  •3 -  2 p>  p>  1  (*)  1  1  2 “  “  “  — p>  2  1 1  4  1  “ -  p)  9 s 12  2  -  _  1  3  3  -  -  7  4  “  1  -  3  4  5  8  4  126  1  5  -  5  446  _  e)  1  -  6  1  1 0  22  10.15  8  1  1  8.98  o  4  1  6.61  1  5  2  80  -  3  ”  761  8  4  8  4  6  5  8 8  4  p)  “  ~  6  6  4  p)  ~  6  2  2  -  ” p)  2  4  ** p>  ”  p)  4  4  2 2  (*)  4  2  6 9  “  -  2  23  1 4  2  -  5  -  1  1  10  “  1  1  1  1  5  ”  3  1  pi  1 f3)  10  -  4  3  “  9  ~  5  2  p>  -  1  -  5  _  0  8  (*)  ~  1  1 p)  ft  <*)  7  1  p)  18  -  Salespersons, apparel and  Straight commission.......................  6  7  _  1  6  1  p)  5 p> "  “  pi  2  _ _  -  12  1  _  “  12  2  1  1  2  Electric and electronic 167  4  1  28  _  _  8  1  4  1  1  5  5  -  ”  ”  1  3  Salespersons, major appliances, P)  "  ~  pi  -  -  12.43  22  5  2  6  _  8  4  4  3  _  4.88  4  2  2  _ _ _  292  397  2  3  2  2  -  4  4 4  7  _  2  5  12  _  1 5  1  -  1  p>  1  pi  1  Table 7. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Chicago, IL'—Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986)  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  10.50  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  13.50  14.00  14.50  15.00  16.00  17.00  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  10.50  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  13.50  14.00  14.50  15.00  16.00  17.00  over  and  Store occupations, selling— Continued Salespersons, miscellaneous: Part-time workers...............................  135  $6.46  12  19  4  6  Sporting goods...........................................  3  7  4  3  5  5  127  5  6.33  7  12  18  1  4  6  4  2  7  Part-time workers................................  5  8  6  2  4  6  94  6.25  5  16  6  2  19  3  6  3  6  2  3  6  5  2  4  5  6  7  1  4  2  5  2  3  1  1  6  Salespersons, general ...........................  1,462  Part-time workers.................................  1,314  4.53  14  29  25  8  7  Straight salary.....................................  4  2  4  3  3  1,314  1  4.53  14  29  25  8  7  4  2  4  3  3  1  4.62  14  28  23  9  8  4  3  p)  p>  1  p>  pi  1  p)  p>  i3)  _  p)  -  p>  "  4  _ _ _ _  _  -  -  1  2  1  2  1  ft  ft  ft  -  Store occupations, nonselling Alterations tailors..........................................  159  8.49  Part-time workers..................................  51  7.89  Cleaners (porters).........................................  314  5.21  N> K>  Full-time workers...................................  132  5.63  Part-time workers..................................  182  4.90  Display assistants.........................................  165  6.51  Full-time workers...................................  91  7.48  Receivers............................................................... Full-time workers................................... Part-time workers Stock and inventory workers ,  242  6.20  165  6.73  77  5.08  662  -  290  5.41  Part-time workers.......................  372  4.88  _  _  17  32  13  8  25  2  23  36  -  -  -  -  -  21 1 7  -  17  3  6  8  9  6  9  8  20  12  4  12  8  3  4  7  3  7  6  13  8  8  4  7  15  5  13  6  4  2  1  1  1  3  4  12  14  14  4  p>  5  8  1  1 -  7  5  2  2  _  4  _  6  5  10  9  12  11  4  2  1  3  9  9  15  10  20  18  4  4  1  4  10  8  5  5  6  9  8  5  4  1  2  8  8  12  10  7  5  2  2  1  3  3  3  3  3  3  1  1  2  10  9  12  8  3  31  16  6  8  8  21  22  19  9  6  6  4  11  16  20  14  10  8  6  4  3  28  27  17  4  3  5  3  2  2  2 “  3  1 2  -  3  2  2  2  2  3  5  5  18  -  6  9  2  6 -  11  -  5.11  Full-time workers........................  _ 1  -  _ _ _  1 2 1 2  1  _ -  _  ft 1  _  _  _ _  _  _ -  -  -  -  2  3  -  Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office............................................ . Full-time workers.................................  146  5.73  3  14  11  9  9  12  9  11  6  9  3  47  6.28  1  2  2  6  1  11  4  17  9  11  4  2  15  6  4  6  2  1  5  7  14  13  8  11  11  6  8  5  2  6  4  28  10  1  7  10  10  11  8  2  2  1  2  1  5  21  21  5  Service desk workers: Full-time workers.................................  188  6.26  Switchboard operators...........................  97  5.08  Full-time workers.................................  19  6.21  16  _£[  ~  cxciuaes premium pay tor overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excludes prize or pijsh money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers paid on a straight-salary basis  relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where teasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986. 3 Less than 0.5 percent. 4  Workers were distributed as follows: 4 percent at $17 and under $18; 3 percent at $18 and under $19; 3 percent   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  '  5|  11  _  3  _  1  1  _  a^$19 and under $20; 3 percent at $20 and under $21; 2 percent at $21 and under $23; and 2 percent at $23 and  TSreeont?U,6d “ 2 perCent at S17 and under $18' 3 P«^nt at $18 and under $19; 3 percent at $19 and under $20; 2 percent at $20 and under $21; and 2 percent at $21 and over.  ”°TEi, Berause of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­ ported.  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 8. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Cleveland, OH (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,* August 1986) (in dollars) of—  Average Number of  Department and occupation  workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under  7.50  7.00  6.00  5.50  5.00  4.50  4.00  3.50  7.50  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  5  7  3  6  3  7  1  5  1  5  2  5  19  9  13  8.00  8.00 8.50  8.50  9.00  9.00  9.50  9.50  10.00  12.00  11.50  11.00  11.50  12.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  13.50  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  13.00  _ 13.50  . 14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  over  and  3.50  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings.  236  $11.38  Full-time workers................................  187  12.82  Straight salary...................................  32  5.34  _  Straight commission...................  121  14.74  _  Part-time workers..............................  49  5.87  Straight salary...................................  32  4.61  Floor coverings........................................  52  10.75  _ _ _  3  31  6  22  12  12  34  19  16  13  6  13  2  2  12  -  6  -  8  3  8  Full-time workers................................  40  11.62  -  -  -  -  Furniture and bedding ......................  116  15.32  -  -  -  -  Full-time workers................................  111  15.60  Straight commission...................  89  15.76  14  1  “  1  -  11  16  8  13  3  31  6  19  9  13  3  31  6  19  9  13  34  19  16  13  6  13  34  19  16  13  6  13  12  10  3  10  7  7  7  9  7  7  6  _ _  Straight salary..................................  5.34  _  Part-time workers.............................  32  4.61  _  Straight salary..................................  32  4.61  -  392  6.94  Salespersons, apparel and 1  4  7  13  17  9  16  7  13  3  5  7  5  8  20  13  4  11  6  6  8  8  11  5  4  2  15  9  8  10 11  69  5.44 8.79  Part-time workers................  6.13  Straight salary.....................  83  4.66  _  Straight commission....  79  7.31  _  Men’s clothing.............................  95  7.06  _  Full-time workers..................  51  7.86  _  Straight commission ....  37  9.09  _  -  2  39  25  8  5  13  15  -  -  4  6  4  8  10  -  18  20  14  20  14  -  Straight commission...  .  87  Part-time workers..............  .  72  6.65  Straight commission ...  .  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  44  6.50  _ _ -  11 14  6 9  “  5  3  3  8  8  3  8  8  9  10  5 31  3  6  3  4  1  3  3  4  5  4  5  1  4  3  9  11  32  4  7  3  1  4  3  8  9  34  -  3  12  2  5  -  (3)  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  ”  -  p)  1  i3)  1  4  o  2  t3)  1  1  7  -  1  1  10  -  -  _  -  -  -  1  _  _  2  _  4  _  5  _  8  5  15  8  25  11  6 7  3  3  1  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1 • 1  2 3  2  -  -  6  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  1  -  -  -  _  1  -  -  " “  “  2 6 "  -  1  6 5  2  _  4  4  2  -  5 7 7 7 7 5  8  2  _  6  1 1  _  7  1  1  1  -  -  -  -  -  p>  1  _ -  -  1  3  11  -  2  1  -  -  _ 1  3  (3> -  -  -  -  _  _  _  1  3  14  “  _  -  _  _  _  11  2  4  2  3  14  21  -  6  15  -  5  _  4  "  39  8.74  6  7  4  16  8.88  6  4  11  92  2  3  10  13  .  6  2  6  12  Full-time workers................  -  -  4  15  8 9  2  -  2  14  5  3  Footwear.........................................  2 -  12  7  2  5.73  -  -  6  5.67  59  _  -  15  133  Full-time workers.................  _  -  13  Women’s clothing...................  7.90  _  _  _  4.81  _  _  8.54  56  -  24  17  164  -  10  Straight commission ....  Straight salary...................  -  12  _  Part-time workers:  -  _  6.14  5.65  _  9  7  5  5  2  1  3  5  21 27  -•  -  -  -  _  _  5 12  56  44  55  8  14  -  Part-time workers................  Straight salary...................  8  -  1  190  6  6  -  3  128  5  3  _  7.70  Straight commission ....  3  4  -  3  Straight salary.....................  3  1  3  25  5.34  1  3  _  19  4.98  3  3  2  -  1  3  4  7  -  32  202  5  4  -  32  Full-time workers..................  1  8  -  64  footwear.................................................  3  3  5  4 17  4  . „  -  Full-time workers................................  Housewares.................................................  to u>  -  <*>  -  5  1  2  8  1  3  1  1  2  2  3  1  8 -  -  -  —  -  1  _  1  -  2  -  1 2  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  _  1  " -  Table 8. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Cleveland, OH'—Continued  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Number Department and occupation  of workers  Average (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under  0.00  3.50  0.50  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  12.00  13.50  14.00  5.00  Store occupations, nonselling Alterations tailors.......................................... Full-time workers................................... Cleaners (porters)......................................... Full-time workers................................... Part-time workers................................. N) 4^  Display assistants......................................... Full-time workers................................... Receivers............................................................... Full-time workers................................... Part-time workers.................................. Stock and inventory workers ............ Part-time workers..................................  Office clerical occupations Switchboard operators............................. Full-time workers...................................  '  Cleveland metropolitan area consists of Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, and Medina Counties. Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes prize  menu ^"a* 3 rS9U'au V recurrin9 Part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payhesU ,Vi S; fa9^ 9 a"d appliance manufacturers. Earnings for workers paid on a straFghb .  'll1  Aufl  anS’oJer19 **' Und6r $“i 2 PerCen' * $2° s  , 986; commiss,on eamirigs for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were aver­  aged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986 3  Less than 0.5 percent.  4  Workers were distributed as follows: 3 percent at $17 and under $18; 2 percent at $18 and under $19; 2 per-   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  '  U"der $21; 3 perCen' a’ $Z1 and  ** ®d 5 percent at $23  Workers were distributed as follows: 7 percent at $17 and under $18; 3 percent at $18 and under $19- 3 oer  sxssxssi ssxr  - -*■«•  ‘.us  Table 9. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Dallas, TX' (Percent distribution ot workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings.2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of  4.00  (mean)  and  hourly  workers  earnings  Under 4.00  4.50  under 4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  8.00  9.00  10.00  314 212  $9.00  5  -  C3)  10.29  28  6.16  61  10.07  102  6.34  69  5.26  134  11.93  125  12.07  119  6.30  53  6.86  24  6.05  _ _ _ _  _  _  66  5.85  50  5.27  1,597  9.79  528  8.66  275  10.47  189  11.30  _  86  8.64  _  _ _  11.00  7  15  5  7  7  6  6  3  1  1  1  5  1  8  13  5  9  10  9  8  4  1  1  1  7  2  11  18  25  14  7  21  4  5  8  8  7  8  10  10  7  8  19  5  2  1  3  “ 12  ~ 11  13  10  “  7  1  1  1  2  1  9  3  4  9  15  1  1  1  2  1  10  3  3  10  16  12  8  16  13  8  7  29  4  1  1  6  11  17  11  9  34  8  2  2  13  21  25  13  8  17  4  -  -  -  1  ~  -  “  ~  “  28  14  26  12  8  4  8  2  5  8  7  6  5  10  7  9  9  7  2  9  13  7  3  9  12  8  7  12  5  2  5  7  6  4  15  5  11  8  11  2  4  2  3  4  16  3  10  8  12  1  7  16  13  2  13  9  12  6  9  7  6  15  4  3  1  8  5  4  4  -  183  10.43  2  -  171  10.60  2  _  66  7.45  1,286  6.23  5  _ 23  722  5.65  7  37  544  5.22  9  44  2  “ -  “  -  p)  p)  1  p)  p>  2  5  4  3  3  1  1  1  3  2  1  1  2  1 1  1  p>  2  (*)  1  4 6 “  10  12  5  3  10  3  5  14  6  7  11  8  6  3  1  15  7  4  7  8  6  9  6  5  3  1  15  6  3  6  8  6  9  6  5  8  5  2  3  17  12  6  14  23  6  9  12  9  8  6  12  6  3  3  1  2  9  9  6  5  3  10  5  2  3  1  2 2  11  9  6  5  1  8  3  2  1  —  “  ”  10  /  -  —  5  1  over  —  6  p>  21.00  1  11  -  20.00  4  20  -  22.00  22.00  "  “ “  -  -  ”  11  2  21.00  8 ”  _ 21  24  20.00  7  4  2  19.00  5  6  -  18.00  5  14  1  17.00  7  28  9.64  16.00  8  20  8.87  15.00  4  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  14.00  9  Women’s clothing:  Straight salary........................................  13.00  2  Salespersons, apparel and  _  12.00  6  -  19.00  and 10.00  20  249  18.00  9.00  6  376  17.00  8.00  11  _  16.00  7.00  20  p>  15.00  6.50  4  -  _  14.00  6.00  15  _  13.00  5.50  _ 14  _  12.00  5.00  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings ....  11.00  I  3  2  p>  1  1  1  1  -  3  6  "1 (*)  (*)  p)  a  p)  pi I_________  p>  Table 9. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Dallas, TX —Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of Number Department and occupation  of workers  Average (mean)  4.00  hourly earnings  and Under 4.00  11.00  15.00  16.00  16.00  17.00  under  17.00  20.00 21.00 22.00 and  4.50  13.00  22.00  over  Store occupations, nonselling Alterations tailors ... Full-time workers Part-time workers Cleaners (porters)... Full-time workers Display assistants N> o\  Full-time workers Receivers Full-time workers Stock and inventory workers Full-time workers Part-time workers  Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office Full-time workers Switchboard operators Full-time workers Part-time workers  ties The Da"aS me,r0pli,an 3,03 consists °< Collin. Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Kaufman, and Rockwall Counpossible to July 1986. 2  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts  «  Also ex-  3  Less than 0.5 percent.  Pi!Sh m0n3y th3‘ 'S n°’ 3 re9ular|y fecdmng part of employee compensation paid by the l  I°  a'LSUHCh Payn£n,SJ>> i,ndividual vendors' e-9- bedding and appliance manufacturers  Earnings  PH d "L . *3l?W'Salary bas,s rela,e ,0 Aus>us' 1986I commission earnings for workers partly  or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as dose as   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  NOTE:  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no  sedately rBP°  Sd'  3,3 ,or an 0v3ra" occuPatio" may include data for subclassifications not shown  e hourly earnings (in dollars) of—  Average (mean) Department and occupation  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  19.00  10.50  18.00  10.00  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  10.50  over  and  hourly earnings  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings...  (*)  1  2  2  3  2  5  4  2  4  2  1  3  1  2  2  2  4  2  7  5  3  6  3  1  4  1  11  7  1  6  2  2  Full-time workers................................... 1  Straight commission......................  2  5  4  4  Straight salary......................................  -  -  -  6  6  12  1  1  -  3  9  —  —  -  -  Part-time workers................................. Straight salary......................................  3  6  3  3  3  3  9  6  2  3  2  4  4  2  12  8  2  4  2  8  4  2  4  2  Floor coverings ..........................................  8  Full-time workers...................................  2  2  9  12  5  7  4  4  5  11  6  3  7  3  8 7  Furniture and bedding........................  1  2  4  5  7  5  14  10  6  11  1  3  4  5  7  6  13  10  3  12  8  1  Full-time workers.................................. Straight commission.....................  18  9  9  4  4 20  -  "  ~  Part-time workers................................ Housewares: Part-time workers................................  4.67  31  23  Salespersons, major appliances, household: Full-time workers.................................. Electric and electronic appliances.................................................... Full-time workers.................................  3  6  5  3  5  4  11  8  6  7  8  7  4  7  7  10  2  8  2  6  4  7  5  7  8  8  3  9  8  13  3  8  3  7  5  5  5  3  2  2  2  1  1  2  2  2  2  15.17  12.15 13.01  Salespersons, apparel and  p)  p)  -  -  1  1  -  footwear............................................................. . 5  Full-time workers: Straight salary...................................  1  3  p>  1  1  3  1  1  1  1  3  2  _  o  1  1  p>  -  p)  p>  Salary plus commission..........  2  2  4  3  2  2  5  3  1  2  2  2  3  4  2  3  7  4  1  3  3  Men’s clothing........................................... Full-time workers................................  2  1  1  8  2  5  15  7  2  7  8  -  Straight commission...................  2  7  2  1  1  2  1  1  1  1  ~  4  1  1  1  1  1  3  19  p)  p)  “  p)  2  Part-time workers..............................  3  -  -  -  -  -  p)  1  I  ■  Straight commission...................  -  -  _ p>  _  p)  p)  Part-time workers.............................. Straight salary...................................  2  2  p)  1  3  “  2 5 5  *  Women’s clothing................................. Full-time workers:  8  Straight salary...................................  1  3  _  -  -  -  -  -  _  p>  p)  p)  p)  1  2  1  1  1  -  -  -  -  ”  ■  -  :  Part-time workers.............................. Straight salary..................................  p> 1  Footwear....................................................... Full-time workers . Straight commission.............  1  3  3  2  8  1  5  12  1  4  4  -  ~  -  ~  7  2  6  6  -  ~  ”  -  -  Full-time workers . Part-time workers .  7  2  9  4  2  2  7  5  6  6  8  6  3  6  13  Salespersons, miscellaneous .  9  6  _ 4  5  7  1  1 -  5  -  3  1  ~  -  12  5  4  -  “  ~  -  —  1  -  -  ”  6  “  “  —  -  -  ~  -  -  —  -  _  “  -  -  “  _  _  2  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Part-time workers .  p)  p>  p)  p)  p)  p>  p>  Salespersons, general  p)  p)  p)  p)  p>  p)  p>  p)  p)  p>  p)  o  Part-time workers . Straight salary .  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  1 p) p)  p>  p)  p>  p>  p)  pi  p>  p)  p>  P>  p>  p)  p>  p)  1 2  “  1  p>  Straight salary .  3  -  4  _ 2  p>  Full-time workers .  1 -  ~  2  6  Straight commission............  Full-time workers .  -  5  3  Part-time workers.......................  Sporting goods .  -  -  7  1 4  -  -  p>  2  1  -  p> p>  -  ~  '  —  Table 10. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Detroit, Ml—Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) ofAverage Number Department and occupation  of  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  workers  3.50  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  10.50  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  10.50  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  over  ~  ~  “  ”  -  “  “  earnings 3.50  and  Store occupations, nonselling Alterations tailors.........................................  53  $7.90  6  _  15  21  8  6  11  11  3  2  2  28  4  33  Full-time workers.................................  27  Cleaners (porters)........................................  8.02 4.86  8  9  ~ 16  ~ 28  12  14  30  298  6  3  103  5.24  6  5  14  14  12  29  9  6  7  195  4.66  9  11  17  36  12  6  5  2  1  3  162  6.45  2  14  7  19  6  11  10  7  1  10  1  20  8  13  13  7  1  1  5  12  14  9  9  7  9  4  1  6  7  11  11  12  12  5  10  5  2  2  6  27  21  7  7  7  9  4  5  5  2  • 1  1  7  2  Full-time workers................................. Part-time workers................................. Display assistants......................................... Full-time workers..................................  126  Receivers...............................................................  6.86  139  6.52  Full-time workers................................... Stock and inventory workers ...........  107  6.55  927  5.09  -  ~  4  -  Full-time workers........................*........  614  5.55  2  10  24  8  9  9  Part-time workers.................................  12  5  7  313  4.18  7  61  13  4  3  2  4  3  1  _  i3)  _  2  9  4 — -  1  6  7  3  2  7  9  3  3  6  4  1  4  2  2  -  2  5  (3)  2  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  ~  “ 6  -  7  (3)  79  5.59  Full-time workers...................................  38  6.23  Part-time workers.................................  41  4.99  4  20 11  5  7  29  12  -  9  11  6  6  11  4  9  18  1  8  3  11  18  8  11  24  3  15  to  2  5  7  12  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes prize or  push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  —  -  “  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  4 percam at $19 and under $20: 4 Peroent at $20 a"d at $21 and under $22; 4 percent at $22 and under $25; and 4 percent at $25 and over.  *21: 4 percent  Earnings for workers paid on a straight-salary basis  relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where fea­ sible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  -  “  Less than 0.5 percent.  Counties.  by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  -  -  -  Office clerical occupations Switchboard operators.............................  ~  ~  -  (3)  1  O’)  “  -  N°TEn **?use of rou"din9- sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­ ported.  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 11. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Fort Worth-Arlington, TX' (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourty earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  10.50  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  13.50  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  10.00  10.50  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  13.50  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  over  and 4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  13  17  12  11  1  2  2  3  2  5  9  14  10  2  2  5  2  13  19  38  26  5  2  2  8.50  9.00  9.50  3  4  1  1  2  2  1  9  3  1  4  5  1  1  3  1  1  14  3  2  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings....  Straight commission......................  240  $7.74  154  9.02  53  4.62  85  11.04  86  -  _ -  5.43  68  4.33  101  11.50  93  11.54  _  _ _  81  11.24  121  4.46  53  4.62  _ _  53  4.62  _ •  68  4.33  68  4.33  123  11.51  90  12.89  _ _  28  30  7  13  35  38  6  15  4  2  2  4  2  2  _  _ _  -  4  2  2  3  3 2  _  2  _  2  5  2  2  26  30  20  20  13  19  38  26  13  19  38  26  35  38  6  15  3  3  35  38  6  15  3  3  9  2  7  1  1  9  1  _ 2 _  _  _  9  -  1  1  -  9  5  4  2  -  1  -  5  1  1  25  :  2  -  5  1  2  (3) 1  2  3  1  3  1  2  5  1  5  2  -  -  -  1  2  2  5  _ 33  _  _  6  4  6  3  7  _  2  1  5  9  3  2  4  3  1  22  6  3  1  2  7  3  7  3  4  9  2  2  4  2  1  23  5  3  1  2  8  2  8  3  1  5  2  9  2  _  4  -  5  -  10  5  1  1  1  26  -  2  5  -  2 4 4  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  6  3  3  8  3  4 13  3  6  3  6  6  7  2  3  6  1  2  7  4  7  12  3  1  2  1  4  3  2  9  3  3  15  4  2  7  4  4  4  11  28  10.57  18  1,46  363  7.81  2  13  12  6  7  6  5  6  3  6  5  1  2  5  182  7.25  4  23  12  4  4  3  4  2  2  9  8  1  3  3  137  8.21  7  15  6  6  4  4  2  1  12  10  1  4  4  181  8.36  4  12  7  10  8  6  10  4  4  2  2  1  6  -  8  3  2  3  -  10  7  1  4  8.57  _  2  4  3  7.73  _  6  2  2  46  _  7  5  9  1  33  _  -  -  3  -  -  -  Electric and electronic  Full-time workers....................................  -  -  _  _  24  4  61  11  29  -  4  -  6  —  —  2  2  17  ~  -  “  1 _  _  2  1  Salespersons, major appliances,  _  8  1  1  -  2  _  -  -  1  4  0  —  -  -  6  —  -  -  2  4  2  4  7  4  _ -  4  2  4  7  4  7  ~  -  -  2  2  4  4  “ 7  "  11  —  —  Salespersons, apparel and  144  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  8.75  66  7.38  42  5.95  189  8.01  87  7.45  108  7.71  55  7.46  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _  4 5  23  7  36  _ _  _  _  3  13  22  6  21  23  _ _ _  9 2  7  15  1  _ _  1  12  5  14  19  5  14  4  1  12  _ 15  _  7  8  5 _  _ 2  6  8  5  5  13  5  9  29  7  33  5  5  3  3  2  30  8.36 4.66  10  26  34  7  530  4.41  15  31  35  3  4  1  2  3  3  509  4.23  15  31  36  3  4  1  3  2  2  _  _  1 -  1  1  3 9 14  _ 7  _ _  _  3  6  749  _  3  8  3  2 -  -  7  3  11  7  -  6  3  9  3  5  5  4  2  7  7  2  1  1  1  2 1  0  3 -  10  -  1  -  -  -  -  -  -  3  7  4  2  3 -  1  7  2  7  4 -  2 -  4 7 13  -  4  3  2  2  3  3  1  1  2  3  1  3  4  4  1  1  3  1  2  2  5  4  2  1  1  6  3  1  1  1  -  -  -  5  7  a  3  2  2  4  a  2  1  -  -  -  1  -  -  2  1 2  4 4  -  7  -  aa  a -  3  6  3  3  3  5  -  -  -  3  -  -  -  “  ”  -  2  -  3  ~  3  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  ~  “  2  2  5  5  3  2  2  2  5  2  2  2  2  4  3  2  1  1 “  -  "  -  -  -  “  ~  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  -  -  -  a a  f3)  a  4  2  7  3  aa  1  1 ~  -  -  O5)  -  -  Table 11. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Fort Worth-Arlington, TX1—Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  13  13  9.50  10.00  10.00  10.50  10.50  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  13.50  14.00  16.00  18.00  11.00  11.50  12.00  12.50  13.00  13.50  14.00  15.00  17.00  over  and  Store occupations, nonselling Alterations tailors...........................................  15  $9.33  Cleaners (porters)........................................  73  5.46  Full-time workers...................................  40  5.16  Display assistants..........................................  37  5.97  Full-time workers...................................  20  6.90  O  13  Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office............................................ Full-time workers.................................  90  5.76  23  6.64  Service desk workers: Full-time workers.................................  15  1  The Fort Worth-Arlington metropolitan area consists of Johnson, Parker, and Tarrant Counties.  2  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes prize or  3  Less than 0.5 percent.  .l™0rkers were dis,ributed as ,ollows: 2 percem at $18 and under $19; 3 percent at $19 and under $20; 6 percent push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers paid on a straight-salary basis  relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where fea­ sible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  at $20 and under $21; and 2 percent at $21 and over.  NOTE: ported.  Secause of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 12. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Houston, TX1 (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) ofAverage Number Department and occupation  (mean)  of workers  3.50 and  earnings  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  under 4.00  10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 and _• . . . 10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00 22.00 over 9.50  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, apparel and 262  $9.18  3  5  3  5  6  10  13  8  4  4  4  127  10.49  2  7  2  5  1  5  11  5  2  3  6  104  11.02  3  9  3  6  9  4  2  2  4  7.94  4  2  4  6  10  3  135  14  14  11  7  4  2  8  4  13  4  4  8  8  8  13  6  24  11.62  12  13.61  64  7.99  68  8.00  60  8.16  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  Footwear  Store occupations, nonselling 313  5.13  58  6.79  39  7.54  19  6.02  103  6.56  70  6.80  Office clerical occupations  Full-time workers.....................................  9  -  8  -  3  5  9  16  10  17  12 13  3 3  5  1  16  7  7  12  3  2  12  8  12  5  22  5  _ 27  11  13  10  7  4  2  24  5  12  5  7  2  9  5  18  8  8  3  8  15  26  16  26  32  16  16  5  -  “  3 _  _  -  _  -  _  _  _  -  _  -  5 10  14  19  14  10  9  11  10  19  9  20  _  3  1  9  3 34  34  4  25  11  11  11  10  10  5  5.65  4  16  25  10  8  8  13  2  6  112  6.41  5  11  9  12  14  25  12  25  5.58  20  20  12  12  12  8  34  12  6.19  8  17  17  25  17  _ -  -  ”  1  The Houston metropolitan area consists of Fort Bend, Harris, Liberty, Montgomery, and Waller Counties. Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  4 8  Also excludes prize  or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such pay­ ments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers paid on a straight-  salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were aver­ aged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986.  5 8 _  6  5.68  _  17  12  2  131  _  a  3  376  4 8 9 1 13 17  6  3  14  2   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  5  .  4 6 5 2 8  O  -  ‘  3 4  4 6 7 3 _  4 8 10 1 _  -  -  4 5 6 4 17 8  2 4 4 1 8 17  3  2  5  3  2 5 6 -  6  1 1 1 1  2 2 3 1 -  2  -  -  a 1 1 -  a -  1  1 2 2 -  -  -  -  ~  -  -  -  " -  ~ -  --  4 8  3 4 5 2 8 4 17 -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  “ -  -  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  _ _ _  _  _  -  -  _ _  _  -  _  -  -  -  -  '  '  -  -  1 1  3 4  a 1 4 8  a 1  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  -  -  -  -  -  “ -  “ “  “ “ “ “  •” -  Less than 0.5 percent. ^ x ^ Workers were distributed as follows: 8 percent at $23 and under $24; and 8 percent at $24 and over.  NOTE: ported.  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 13. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Kansas City, MO-KS' (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Pert>ent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of-— Average Number Department and occupation  of  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under  workers  3.50  3.50  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  over  and  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings....  271  $8.45  Full-time workers....................................  144  10.74  Part-time workers...................................  127  5.85  Straight salary........................................  Furniture and bedding...........................  17  7  32  11  2  4  11  9  17  4.65  29  8.48  14  9.24  9  141  11.22 11.97  96  4.59  1 1  98  105  2  1 42  3  11  1  Part-time workers...................................  80  4.48  49  Straight salary.......................................  80  4.48  49  3  ” 17 “  7 9  4  26 14 11  24  3  “  u> K>  150  13.10  95  14.75  56  9.75  27  8.68  -  “  11  Salespersons, apparel and 6.28 Full-time workers....................................  6  72  6.84  Straight salary.......................................  22  5.89  23  6.10  19  Men’s clothing...............................................  58  Part-time workers...................................  34  11  17  7.87  5 -  9  14 4  8.28 9  6  2  6  ~ 13  “ 7  12  Women's clothing: Full-time workers....................................  15  Straight salary........................................  Full-time workers.................................  134  6.54  33  5.83 6.77  -  27  " 13  24  9  1  9  Salespersons, miscellaneous:  Straight salary........................................  Part-time workers...................................  Salespersons, general .............................. Part-time workers................................   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  14  -  157  5.92  30  9  81  4.23  53  10  Sporting goods..............................................  5.10 4.99  42  79  4.21  54  635  4.57  16  50  6  -  -  18  18  7 6 -  "  ~ 1  2 -  -  -  4  5  1  7  3  2  2  -  7  13  8  12 -  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  .  18  -  2  8  -  15  -  13 17  6  10 -  -  4  -  18  -  -  —  9  3 2  4  4  11  7  7  T5  11  7  8  _  ~ 11  “  9  21  "  6  24  -  1  4 1  -  7  7  “  2  5 5  _  _  _  _  _  -  18 2  7  7  12  *  27  “  “ 24  ~ 15  24  6  6  24  18  7  4  6  6  4  5  9  “  ~  -  “  -  “ 7  “  27  3  5 3  -  -  -  -  3 4  2  311  -  4  15  4  8  13  11  4  2  4  2  17  -  7  11  4  7  11  7  7  7  7  ~ 1  2  6  4  1  .  -7  -  2  -  6  3  2 3  -  -  "  9  -  -  -  -  -  -  2  -  3  p>  1  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  -  1  -  2  2  1  -  1  2  _ _  1  -  _  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  _  —  —  —  -  —  p)  -  _  _  _  -  _  _  1  __  1  _ _  3 6  -  _ _ _ 1  _ _  -  ()  _  -  ■ _  _  2  -  -  p)  -  12  2  4  -  5  -  2  ~  7  -  4  ‘  _ 3  6  1  _ 3  -  () 0  1  2  -  3  2  -  8  2  1  8  11  2  4  6  _ _  11  3  ■ 7  1 3  4  5  6  3 6  13  1 -  _  5  11  5  _  _ _ _  7 8  _  —  -  4  5  ~  -  5  7  7  11  7 4  10  8  8  3  18  4  ~  11  “  6  8 13  14  4  -  -  8 15  7  4  ~  ~  6 19  5  14  8  50 1  2  14  ~  6  8 6  47  4.48 4.46  5 ~  8  103  569  12  10  14  5.83 5.83  -  8  -  ”  5  Electric and electronic appliances .......................................................  -  5  10  ”  24  Salespersons, major appliances, household..........................................  2  -  2  “ ”  6 3  “  3  ”  21  1 45  4  _  _ _ _  _ _  —  _  _  p) -  Table 13. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Kansas City, MO-KS'—Continued Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  Store occupations, nonselling 28  $6.04  22  6.39  49  5.00  15  5.88  13  5.63  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  13.00  17.00  19.00  20.00  6.00  6.50  18.00  5.50  16.00  5.00  15.00  4.50  14.00  4.00  12.00  3.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  12.00  14.00  20.00  7.50  19.00  7.00  18.00  6.50  17.00  over  5.50  6.00  16.00  5.00  15.00  4.50  13.00  4.00  21  18  7  14  7  18  14  9  9  9  -  -  18  8  6  4  6  _  _  and  18 -  23  “  Stock and inventory workers: u>  8  31  8  "  7  7  9  9  _  6  -  Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office: -  27  -  -  “  ~  —  47  _  13  —  13  Service desk workers: Full-time workers....................................  1  -  15  23  _  46  The Kansas City metropolitan area consists of Cass, Clay, Jackson, Lafayette, Platte, and Ray Counties,  percent at $23 and under $24; and 3 percent at $24 and over.  MO; and Johnson, Leavenworth, Miami, and Wyandotte Counties, KS. 2  Workers were distributed as follows: 1 percent at $20 and under $21; 4 percent at $21 and under $22; 3  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes  prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers paid on  a straight-salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  4  Less than 0.5 percent.  NOTE: reported.  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 14. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Miaml-Hlaleah, FL' (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of Average (mean)  Department and occupation  of workers  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  21.00  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  21.00  over  and  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings....  183  $6.73  1  3  7  5  4  16  8  20  8  8  10  6  13  8  8  10 13 24  14  26  11  7.04 Straight salary........................................  4.80  39  5.57  5  5  5  31  4.74  6  6  6  -  21 19  6.81  80  8.73  1  74  Housewares....................................................  82  4.78  7  15  Full-time workers.....................................  51  4.80  8  20  Straight salary........................................  51  4.80  8  20  8  Part-time workers...................................  31  4 74  6  6  16  31  4.74  6  6  16  10  82  13.75  62  14.43  20  11.63  .  8  9  1  3  2  4  1  3  3  5  8  5  1  3  1  4  1  2  3  6  16  16  4  4  10  10  8  10  13  8 64  1 2  6  11 8  5  11  “ 5  4  9  10  8  10  8  10  10  10 10  13  17  6  9  13  15  5  6  16  16  6  16  16  13  10  13  10  13  15  12.76  u> -F-  10  33  -  -  -  -  -  -  10  ”  4  4  8  3  6  6  9  3  3  7  1  4  7  9  4  4  2  4  4  2  5  -  1  3  1  1  1  1  -  -  1  _ _  1  5  5  11  -  -  -  -  5  -  5  _  4  1  5  4  1  -  5  -  _  _  _  _  _  1  -  1  1  -  -  _  4 5  1 -  “  2  -  3  “ 5  “ 6  “  _  3  -  2 3  —  5  3  2  3  3  —  10  3  “  10  11.05  3  5  2  “ 31  3  2  6  ~  Electric and electronic appliances .......................................................  5  “  20  Salespersons, major appliances,  Part-time workers...................................  -  2 -  2  14  "  19  Full-time workers.....................................  Straight salary........................................  15 16  51  10 ~  -  -  “  -  6 -  4  -  2  6  -  3  2  -  5  5  25  3  13  6  -  11  -  44  -  1 5  4  3  5  -  -  -  -  -  -  2  3  -  -  -  _  5  9  4  3 23  _  5  10  5  27  -  5  5  _  3  10  3  4 16  -  -  10  11  -  Salespersons, apparel and footwear..................................................................  6.32 6.59 7.12  8 1 (5)  1  Part-time workers...................................  196  5.54  9  8  Straight salary........................................  117  4.54  15  11  Straight commission........................  Men’s clothing................................................ Full-time workers.....................................  33  7.38  46  6.75  91  6.78  77  6.64  73  6.53  9  8.76  t3  10  8  11  5  4  1  14  7  2  3  10  9  11  6  3  1  15  6  9  2  4  o  15  11  11  9  4  1  5  11  8  4  5  <=)  11  9  2  10  2  3  3  15  8  9  13  6  6  30  9  23  15  10  12  13  7 27 29  18 19  12 10  Women's clothing......................................  Part-time workers................................... Straight salary.......................................  Full-time workers....................................  500  5.89  367  6.20  281  5.50  133 115  5.03  7.31  127  7.70  60  5.91  Part-time workers...................................  49  6.32  Salespersons, miscellaneous.............  46  8.27  Salespersons, general .............................. Full-time workers..................................... Straight salary........................................  ” 10 6 6  4.55  176  21  ~ 9  13  8  15  10  '  8  14  4  10  9  9  7  -  7.34  11  19  8.21  21  20  24  322  4.60  18  13  3  3  4  ~  5  4  ~  29  33  33  5  2  5  4  5  3  7  7  11  11  5  2  “  11  5  3  2  15  6  6  12  2  1  16  1  3  8  8  11  2  2  1  2  3  1  23  5  15  1  16  8  9  3  6  15  13 1 1  8  13  20  2  9  2  4  4  2  10  5  3  -  21  “  4  t5)  ts)  <5)  t6)  (s)  5  -  -  -  -  4  -  1  o  1  <5)  2  3 2  2  -  10  11  9  5  5  3  2  1  3  6  1  <5) 1  1  7  9  11  16  21  2  14  5  -  -  5 -  <si 1  311  4.50  19  14  3  6  1  <5)  862  4.19  20  28  8  6  3  1  1  (s>  w  4.18  20  28  8  6  3  1  1  (5)  <5)  1  -  -  11 <s>  2  -  3 -  _  _  -  _  _  -  _  -  _  -  -  _  _  -  _  _  <5) 1 <5> -  -  -  -  5  7  -  -  5  10  -  6  -  11  -  -  3  _  1  _ _ _  -  _ _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  1  _  _  1  1 1 2  _  _  -  -  -  -  _  -  _  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  _  _  -  _  _  _  -  -  <*)  _  t5)  _ _  2  -  _  (=> <s)  _  _  -  -  1  _  -  2  _  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _  1  -  7  _  -  1  (5)  _  _  1  (5)  _  -  1 (5>  -  -  2  7  (s»  i5)  3 2  P)  1  -  -  -  -  13  6  9  -  -  (5>  1  -  2  <s>  -  -  7  6  <6> -  4  2  855   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  <5)  1  3  -  2  -  6  4  5  6  Straight salary........................................  13  1  1  3  3  Part-time workers...................................  8  1  1  -  -  2  9  5  12  4  3  “ 29  5  -  -  2  4 5  “  6  -  19  4  3  “  8 8  2  28  1  1  -  2  1  -  3  10  t8  10  2  5  8  5  4.30  12  9  4  9  6  1,184  6  7  9  7.33  35  3  8  21  9  13 8  12 33  8  6  5  8  3  12  7.57  6 4  5  12  1  1  “  ”  5  _  _  -  Table 14. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Miami-Hialeah, FL —Continued Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  Store occupations, nonselling Alterations tailors.........................................  60  $7.53  Full-time workers.................................  54  7.71  Cleaners (porters)........................................  105  5.42  Part-time workers................................  18  4.40  Display assistants........................................  62  6.49  Full-time workers.................................  51  6.89  Stock and inventory workers..........  123  5.04  Full-time workers.................................  73  5.28  Part-time workers................................  50  4.70  Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office.............................................  109  5.70  Full-time workers.................................  45  6.31  Part-time workers...............................  64  5.27  Service desk workers..............................  108  4.93  Full-time workers................................  39  5.58  Switchboard operators.........................  44  5.25  Part-time workers..............................  27  5.48  3.75  21.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  .00  6.50  7.00  8.00  10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00  20.00  4.00  9.00  19.00  3.75  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  .50  7.00  8.00  over  4.50  10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00  21.00  4.25  9.00  20.00  4.00  2 2 11 _ 16 16 7 8 4  12 13  33 33 9  8 9 2  _  _ 21 25 6 5 6  13  -  15 18 3 5 -  11 14 ”  7  13 15 -  -  _  14 22 8 5 5 9 11  6 11 3 1 3 5 7  11 9 13 4 8 9 4  5 6 5  5 6  2 2  2 2  -  -  ' “  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -.  “ “ “  _ “ -  -  -  “  -  “  “  -  ~  -  -  ~  “  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  “  “  -  -  -  -  “  “  “  -  -  -  -  “  "  -  -  -  -  -  ”  ~  —  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  -  -  ”  3 8  2 4  “ “  -  11 5 5 10  -  and  -  -  cent at $23 and under $24; 1 percent at $24 and under $25; 2 percent at $25 and under $26; 2 percent at $26 and 1 2  The Miami-Hialeah metropolitan area consists of Dade County. Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes pnze  under $27; and 4 percent at $27 and over. 4 Workers were distributed as follows: 6 percent at $21 and under $22; and 10 percent at $22 and over.  or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such pay­ ments by individual vendors, e.g„ bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers paid °n ^ sfragh*-  salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were aver­ aged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986 3 Workers were distributed as follows: 6 percent at $21 and under $22; 4 percent at $22 and under $23, 4 per   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  5  Less than 0.5 percent.  NOTE: ported.  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 15. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Nassau-Suffolk, NY' (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of Number Department and occupation  of workers  Average (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  over  and  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings....  Straight salary........................................ Part-time workers................................... Straight salary........................................  Full-time workers..................................... Straight salary.......................................  333  $7.98  171  8.89  18  9  102  5.99  29  15  162  14  7.01  6  9  132  6.26  11  176  8.08  26  101  9.07  30  120  6.48  54  7.14  54  7.14  8  3  1  8  3  t3  9 9  9  6  6  12  4  2  4  2  3  2  1  4  3  2  4  5  2  9  2  13  4  1  7  4  3  1  6  1  6  6  4  9  3  12  3  9  2  13  1  5  2  11  11  2  16  —  "  9  1  “  15  -  9  “ “  10 6  "  2 3  ~ 10  -  8  8  8  11  17  6  6  11  Salespersons, major appliances,  -  -  11  10 6  5  “ -  -  17  6  10  11  11  -  15  15  11  22 22  8  6  17  6  17  -  -  -  3 -  -  3 -  1 -  6  1  _  7  3  11  5  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  _  _  3  _  2  _  3  5  _  3  1  2  2  3  2  1  3  5  2  1  5  4  _ .  _  household: Electric and electronic 10.30 Full-time workers....................................  22  12.33  61  9.57  “  5  -  14  “  2  “  8  5  “ 11  14 2  7  7  8  10  10  11  2  14 9  9  3  16  5  -  6  8  7  5  4  6  1  1  11  9  9  14  14  5  5  7  3  3  _  Salespersons, apparel and footwear...............................................................  956  6.24  6 6  243  7.70  Straight salary.......................................  166  7.19  Part-time workers...................................  713  5.74  Straight salary........................................  575  5.43  Full-time workers....................................  158  7.95  67  9.67  8  “  g  6  11  7  7  7  7  4  6  11  17  1  4  7  2  2  5  33  3 9  ' 8  * 9  1  9  9  10 8  Straight salary........................................  595  9  5.64  119  6.49  104  6.12  11  5.42  11  458  5.33  11  Footwear.............................................................  203  6.67  Full-time workers....................................  57  7.88  146  6.20  Part-time workers...................................  12  5  13  Part-time workers................................... Salespersons, general ..............................   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  5  4  11  14  7  6  9  6  “ 10  4  4  13  7  5  6  1  4  3  3  12  28  9  57  14  8  5  5  7  8  4  3  9  “  5  7  3  3  3  30  -  6  8  5  7  7  -  9  4  3  29  3  3  7  5  6  8  4  3  3  12  10  16  8  6  7  8  6  5  7  11  4  5  11  12  19  7  9  8  9  4  2  5  9  5  11  13  -  1  4  3  P)  9  4  32 10  1  — -  p>  4 9  2  -  1  1 3  1 1  1 -  1  —  -  _ _  _ _  _ _  —  —  _  _  _  -  _  -  _  -  _  _  _ _ _ _ _ _  -  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  _  _ _ _ _  -  _  _  -  _  _ _  -  -  6  1  -  21  5  8  3  5  8  4  6  _  p)  (*)  p)  2  _ (*)  2  1  3  1  6  1  _  _ _ _  64  9.18  ■ _  51  8.27  6  6  9  9  6  12  2  8  11  5  1,357  5.06  p>  1,144  4.88  o  4  13  28  11  3  4  8  12  P)  4  13  28  11  3  4  8  12  1,144  See footnotes at end of table.  ~  6  Salespersons, miscellaneous: Sporting goods..........................................  -  7  6  6 15 17  7  ~ 10  3 ~  476  7  6  6.68 Women’s clothing......................................  9  40  1 -  11  10  12  6  14  16  5  5  4  2  1  5  4  4  3  1  5  4  4  3  1  -  -  _  2 2  2  _  3  3  3  2  -  Table 15. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Nassau-Suffolk, NY  Continued  (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) ofAverage Number of  Department and occupation  workers  7.00  9.00  11.00  14.00  17.00  18.00  6.50  16.00  5.50  6.00  15.00  5.00  13.00  4.50  4.75  12.00  4.25  10.00  4.00  8.00  3.75  7.50  3.50  7.50  9.00  12.00  18.00  6.50  7.00  17.00  6.00  16.00  5.50  15.00  5.00  14.00  over  4.75  13.00  4.50  11.00  4.25  10.00  4.00  8.00  3.75  9  11  14  6  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  _  -  -  -  -  14  38  13  _  _ _ _  _  _  _ _  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  Store occupations, nonselllng  '  Stock and inventory workers.............  66  $8.38  43  8.85  23  7.50  108  5.88  57  6.51  37  7.44  195  5.06  142  4.91  13  6.42  34  8.90  14  5  3  _ -  -  -  -  -  7 3  2  -  -  14  12  16  4  7  13 8  26  2  35  2  3  2  47  2  5  2  13  17 8  6  4  32  7  5  11  3  5  3  8  3  5  33  8  5  8  5  4  17  8  1  4  37  6  4  8  6  4  19  7  23  8  23  38  -  and  _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  _  _  -  2  Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office:  Service desk workers: _  _  _  _  -  Switchboard operators: Full-time workers.....................................  i *  15  7.15  -  -  -  -  -  -  The Nassau-Suffolk metropolitan area consists of Nassau and Suffolk Counties. Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  -  20  Earnings for worker  paid on a straight-salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly pad on that basis were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  20  20  -  -  24  7  -  9  13  _ 62  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  i '  “  ~  '  3  20  1986. Wso excludes  prize or push money that is not a regulariy recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  3  -  8  3  Less than 0.5 percent.  NOTE-  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data  were reported.  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 16. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: New York, NY' (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving Average Department and occupation  (mean) of  3.50  hourly  and  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 12.00 13.00 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00 18.00 19.00 20.00 21.00  Under 3.50  4.00  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings. .  1,231  $8.54  Full-time workers................................ .  536  11.53  Straight salary................................... . Straight commission................... .  249  7.52  60  14.82  Part-time workers...............................  695  6.22  Straight salary...................................  543  5.43  Salary plus commission..........  150  9.10  Floor coverings ......................................  110  11.42  Full-time workers................................  60  14.64  Salary plus commission..........  35  16.28  Part-time workers........................... Straight salary...................................  7.56  12  6.50  36  Furniture and bedding........................  252  14.87  Full-time workers.................................  183  17.15  Straight salary....................................  oo  50  Salary plus commission..........  47  7.99  11.69  Straight commission....................  43  15.49  Salary plus commission...........  93  20.67  Part-time workers................................  69  8.83  Straight salary....................................  32  4.96  Salary plus commission...........  37  12.18  Housewares...................................................  578  6.16  Full-time workers.................................  175  7.09  Straight salary.....................................  127  6.39  Part-time workers............................... Straight salary.....................................  403  5.76  373  5.53  303  10.79  Salespersons, major appliances, household........................................................... Full-time workers.................................  133  13.66  Electric and electronic  6  18  7  8  4  4  4  5  4  5  7  2  7  5  4  4  2  3  5  4  4  6  7  4  5  5  14  9  5  7  5  6  5  5  7  10  8  3  2  8  2  1  5  7  3  -  9  27  9  11  4  5  5  3  5  1 2  7  -  34  10  1  3  11 1  4  2  5  2  -  3  -  -  -  -  10  4  6  8  11  2  3  11  3  8  3  -  -  -  -  4  10  8  33  4 8  14  _ _  -  3  3  3  _ 17  -  1  10  2  2  4  1  13  4  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  5  -  4  23  -  9  47  -  -  3  -  -  _ _ _  2  3  4 4  4  2  5  7  7  2  4  7  5  7  3  2  _ _  _ _ 4  _ 6  2  2  3  1  9 2  _  -  _  1  1  8  5  6  1  2  4  3  13  4  3  4  10 10  6  6  8  8  6  8  8  17  _  5  6  9  17  2  10  -  6  8  3  8  3  2  1  2  4  3  14 6  2  1  2  5  1  5  _ _ _ _  4 7  2  6  1  4  9  6  3  9  16 3  3  _  6  7  1  3  2  2  4  2  1  3  1  4  3 5  3  3  -  -  7  21  11  12  5  6  5  4  5  10  -  2  11  11  7  5  6  10  6  8 2  6  6  10  15  13  8  6  4  -  3  8  8  7  7  6  12  -  ~  -  _  _ 6  10  25  11  13  5  5  3  5  4  4  9  10  27  12  14  5  6  3  5  3  5  10  3  6  2  3  6  2  4  2  4  4  3  1  2  1  2  1  2  5  1  5  1  3  1  3  1  3  8  7  3  4 4  -  -  5 5 6  -  2  ft ft 6 2  11  1 1  -  Full-time workers.................................  77  11.06  -  -  -  8  -  footwear....................................................  3,186  6.85  Full-time workers......................  986  9.07  Straight salary..........................  473  6.31  Straight commission..........  61  9.87  P)  12  20  1  6  1  12  Part-time workers.....................  2,200  5.86  a  Straight salary..........................  1,779  5.24  a  407  8.55  558  8.10  Part-time workers.....................  315  6.17  Straight salary.........................  233  5.08  Salary plus commission . Men’s clothing.................................  Salary plus commission .  82  9.27  Women’s clothing........................  2,004  6.36  341  6.41  1,425  5.58  1,298  5.30  1 -  9  8  6  5  4  10  8  4  6  5  5  8  5  16  8  4  4  6  7  13  5  5  7  2  10  7  3  3  5  7  7  8  Part-time workers...................... Straight salary...........................  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6  14  25  10  10  6  5  4  6  2  3  4  17  30  11  10  7  5  3  6  2  3  3  2  3  3  8  6  6  8  8  6  4  7  12  18  9  8  4  4  4  5  2  4  4  15  25  8  10  5  3  3  6  2  4  4  20  33  11  10  6  2  2  7  2  3  2  13  22  1  7  1  10  8  2  10  15  7  6  5  4  7  14  16  27  10  10  6  5  4  17  29  11  10  6  5  3  -  _ 6  6  9  4  4  9  10  5  4  7  3  4  5  6  5  7  7  2  4  4  6  2  4  3  Full-time workers: Straight salary..........................  5  p) p>  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  2 3 3  -  -  -  1 2  -  -  -  _  _  -  _  _  -  1 2 2 2  •  1 a 2 1 2 1 3 __ a _ _ _ 2 __ 3 3 _ 5 3 6 3 _ 2 _ _ 3 _ 2 4 2 3 4 3 9 6 2 2 3 2 3 _  _ _  -  4 5 6 5 4  p> 1 1 a 1 -  _  -  -  -  _  _  1 a 2 1 -  -  2 3 6 2 1 3  1 1 3  5  4 17  2 9 17 23  2 3 5 3  _  _  4  -  -  _  -  -  _ _  _  _  -  -  -  6 6  6 6  2 2  3 5  3 6  3 7  4 8  10  9  6  1  6  4  4  1  -  2 2 1 1 5 3 2 2 1 a a 8 11 - 3 7 1 1 a a p> 6 5 2 1 3 3 1 1 3 2 2 10 6 7 _ 1 1 a a 1 a 1 a a p>  a 1 2 a a 1 a 1 a  a 1  a a 1 1 2 3 a a _  a p>  -  -  a a a  -  p)  -  a  a  a  a  _  _  -  -  -  _  a a a -  23 4 19 34 4  5  _  _  -  ’ 18  _  8  -  and over  a 10 1 1 3 ft  9  appliances:  Salespersons, apparel and  -  -  -  -  1 a 3 1 1 5 3 -  -  -  11  6  5  3  4 3 2 6 6 4 3 4 1 3 7 10 3 1 1 -15 a4 4 8 7 5 8 12 8 6 9 11 8 2 8 11 10 8 7 8 9 8 9 9 6 5 7 12 9 11 8 14 3 3 27 5 5 1 1 a 2 2 p) a2 a  21.00  -  -  -  3 7  2 5 1 a a  _ _ _ _  _  ft ft1 6  ft ft  ft  Table 16. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: New York, NY1—Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986)____________ Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) ofAverage Number Department and occupation  of  3.50  (mean)  earnings  Under 3.50  Store occupations, selling— Continued  Salespersons, miscellaneous.............  under 4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  2  4  4  3  2  2  9  1  6  10  7  6  4  161  9.64  3  33  6.05  6  9  15  15  12  6  27  10.41  2  1  2  10  94 447  6.59  7  6  6  4  235  5.16  201  8.29  92  7.82  18  9.69  75  6.85  65  6.87  810  6.05  145  6.43  117  5.81  _ -  -  4  3  10  10  9  34  14  12  8  8  4  4  8  9  7  8  11  12  5  2  5  1  17  6  15  7  13  C5)  4  6  2  15  12  6  3  6  2  1  9  29  11  9  2  3  4  5  2  9  12  17  8  7  1  8  10  3  11  14  19  10  665  5.97  1  9  33  10  9  1  4  4  4  603  5.54  1  10  35  10  9  1  4  4  4  143  9.02  1  1  4  3  Alterations tailors............................................  9.11  2  1  4  3  Full-time workers.................................  119  Store occupations, nonselling Part-time workers...................................  Office clerical occupations  Part-time workers..................................  -  8  2  2  12  3  p)  2  3  7  5  5  1  7  1  3  6  1  5  2  6  8  1  2  1  1  1  8  1  3  1  3  1  _  _  9  2  1  6  8  1  2  3  6  8  4  6  13  10  22  13  10  8  3  4  5  11  11  23  11  13  10  3  ft  0  p> P>  -  4  4  4  13  25  8  17  25  8  6  3  4  4  9  6  8  18  3  2  2  2  20  10  2  5  5  6  4  p>1  5  3  4  3  3  33  10  3  3  3  3  7  3  6  1  7  _  10  3  3  4  11  8  11  6  10  14  1  -  5  2  2  6.06 7.87  2  122  8.43  2  35  5.91  162  6.95  -  1  61  8.27 6.16  101  6.20  -  6.80  -  4.48  626  6.52  360  7.01  108  6.86  51  7.46  57  6.32  251  6.11  -  9  26  3  11  3  6  20  3  2  7  7  6  3  4  10  5  13  27  3 3  5  9  8  9  2  -  25  12  5  11  13  15  3  3 3  5  2  3  3  3  3  4  4  ”  3  4  8  8  4  4  9  11  5  11  19  8  9  3  4  3  13  8  9  3  5  3  6  14  8  8  6  6  8  12  14  8  8  4  2  12  4  2  12  12  18  14  _  0  52  7.93  199  5.64  51  6.17  17  7.32  _  -  34  5.59  -  -  _ 1  _ -  3 4  3  5  23  14  5  9  9  5  12  11  11  8  8  11  5  3  4  9  2  2  6  8  10  8  4  6  33  13  9  9  11  5  3  3  14  6  6  41  18  6  8  18  6  “  -  9  4 6  1  16.00  over  p>  p)  p>  3  3  5 -  _  12  12  12  18  6  6  6  6  9  -  -  -  “  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  p)  p>1  -  p)  p)  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  p) p)  -  p>  "  p) p)  -  _  _  -  ■-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  p)  -  “  _  _  1  1  1  -  1  -  -  “  -  ~  1  4  1  -  -  1  5  1  “  ~ ~  -  -  -  “  —  -  -  -  ~  ”  ~  -  -  “  ~  “  ~  -  ~  ~  -  ~  “  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  "  ~  “  -  1  -  -  -  pi  pi  ~  ~  -  “  -  '  .  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  “  -  -  “  -  -  -  2  -  -  -  -  -  8  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  "  -  -  -  -  1  12  “  -  -  2  8  -  -  4  8  -  -  2  8  ~  -  -  3  1  4  -  -  1  “  1  _  -  -  1  2  -  -  1  2  -  -  2  -  1  _  p)  -  -  6  -  1  -  -  3  -  -  ' -  3  1  -  -  2  1  -  p>  1  1  _  6  p)  -  2  <3>  1  1  4 -  1  -  27  2  p)  1  “  -  -  -  1  1  -  28  _  -  -  2  p>  _  1  -  p)  -  1 2  2  3 -  1 3 -  -  p>  -  -  1  2  p)  -  -  -  30  _  _  -  -  26  29  14  5  4  -  2  13  12  3 3  6  2  4  -  16  3 9  58  -  6  15  3 3  _  5  4  7  “  (13)2  (*) 3  15  -  _  4  12  6  _  -  17  12  7  3  2  _  11  10  9  -  _  7  3  29  -  _  101  26  -  21.00  21.00  -  1  5  157  20.00  20.00  -  _  _ 1  11 -  -  -  -  6.75  196  6  17  8.54  229  1  14  10  19.00  19.00  2  3  13  _  _  24  7.55  18.00  18.00  -  _  _ p)  11  4  11  1  6  1  17.00  17.00  4  9  6  17  14  4  1  3  425  75  Stock and inventory workers.............  _  10  2 (3)  11  5  1  7  2  4  1  6  6 3  10  8  2  1  1  2  16.00  -  -  -  _  _ 13  _  5  7  5  _  15.00  5  5  4  4  14.00  3  7  5  19  13.00  5  7  2  7  12.00  7  8  6  1  11.00  9.00  9  15.00  and 10.00  9.50  8.50  5  _  14.00  8.00  16  -  13.00  7.50  2  -  12.00  7.00  6 -  11.00  6.50  $7.40  608  10.00  9.50  9.00  8.50  8.00  7.50  7.00  6.50  6.00  5.50  5.00  4.50  4.00  and  hourly  workers  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -•  -  “  -  “  "  -  -  _ -  -  -  -  “  “  -  ~  “  -  ~  “  -  Workers were distributed as follows: 2 percent at $22 and under $23; 2 percent at $24 and under $25; and 13  The New York metropolitan area consists of New York City (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond  Counties), and Putnam, Rockland, and Westchester Counties. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  . Also excludes pnze  '^Workers were distributed as follows: 2 percent at $21 and under $22; 1 percent at $22 and under $23; 1 per­ cent at $23 and under $24; 1 percent at $24 and under $25; 1 percent at $25 and under $27; and 13 percent at  or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such pay­ ments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers paid on a straight-  salary basis relate to August 19B6; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were aver­ aged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1966. 3  Less than 0.5 percent.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  $27 and over. NOTE: ported.  .  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 17. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Oakland, CA1 (Percant distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— s (in dollars) o1  Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  8.00  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  8.00  9.00  9.00  10.00 11.00 12.00  10.00 11.00 12.00  13.00  13.00  0  15.00  16.0C  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  21.00  22.00  23.00  24.00  14.00  0  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  21.00  22.00  23.00  24.00  over  p>  p)  and  Store occupations, soiling Salespersons, home furnishings.  536  $9.10  Full-time workers................................  294  Straight salary...................................  10.21  98  Part-time workers..............................  9.22  242  7.75  Straight salary...................................  196  7.35  Floor coverings .......................................  53  11.51  Full-time workers................................  41  11.61  Furniture and bedding.......................  249  10.97  Part-time workers.............................. Housewares..................................................  65  10.62  234  6.56  Part-time workers..............................  165  6.37  Straight salary....................................  165  6.37  Salespersons, major appliances, household..........................................................  159  15.19  Full-time workers.................................  125  16.02  22  14.68  34  12.15  appliances....................................................  75  13.15  Full-time workers.................................  50  Straight salary....................................  £  Part-time workers................................  ft1  12  9  2  4  2  1  18  3  1  12  5  3  1  3  6  4  8  2  4 5  ft  Straight salary....................................  4  20 20  1  -  1  9  4  6  2  10  5  5  2  12 12  8  3  11  -  ~  4  -  4  8  6  13.75  22  14.68  6  11.95  1 2  -  -  :  ~  -  _  _  _ p)  1  -  -  _  _  “  -  -  -  9  4  4  6  5  14  6  6  3  5  9  12  12  16 14  4  4  28  -  _  -  -  3.  3  4  3  1  5 6  5 -  3  4  _  _  -  -  6  _  5  -  p>  2  -  10  14  p)  -  8  8  _  _  -  8  14  1  -  14  .  1  _  p)  -  _  _  6  24  25  1 2  _  -  14  4  12  -  ft  -  1  -  1  32  p) p)  1  p>  30  4  Electric and electronic  Part-time workers................................  ft  -  -  5  2  22  2  3  9  19  ft  5  p)  1 1 2  3  1  . _ _  3 2 5  4  Salespersons, apparel and  4  footwear: Full-time workers: Straight salary......................  84  7.15  94  6.35  Part-time workers: Straight salary...................... Men’s clothing:  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  —  —  ■  -  -  -  -  -  Full-time workers: Straight salary......................  -  6.38  Part-time workers: Straight salary...................... Women’s clothing .  28  5.98  61  5.98  Full-time workers.........................  31  Straight salary............................  6.21  31  Part-time workers........................  6.21  30  5.74  Straight salary.............................  30  5.74  25  9.17  “  _ ”  ~  ~  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _ _ _  Footwear: • -  Full-time workers: Straight salary.............................  24  Salespersons, miscellaneous: Sporting goods...................................  50  6.87  10  8 I  20  16 -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  Table 17. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Oakland, CA1—Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986)__________ Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  Store occupations, nonseiling 9  $9.98  Display assistants...........................................  71  9.40  Full-time workers.....................................  67  9.50  Cashiers, office..................................................  196  7.92  Full-time workers.....................................  42  8.68  Part-time workers...................................  154  7.71  Service desk workers..................................  387  6.43  Office clerical occupations  63  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  16.00  21.00  23.00  24.00  8.00  22.00  7.00  20.00  6.00  6.50  19.00  5.50  18.00  5.00  17.00  4.50  15.00  4.00  14.00  3.50  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  17.00  22.00  23.00  24.00  8.00  21.00  over  6.00  7.00  20.00  5.50  6.50  19.00  5.00  18.00  4.50  16.00  4.00  44  44  3  23  11  17  38  8  -  -  -  -  -  -  ”  "  ”  ~  24  10  16  40  9  ”  '  5  28  38  15  1  7  2  26  52  5  -*  -  -  -  “  _  -  -  “  (*)  7.88  and  5  5  35  42  7  11  12  9  2  6  13  16  25  14  -  .  -  _ -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  ‘  “  “  -  -  ~  aged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986. 1 2  The Oakland metropolitan area consists of Alameda and Contra Costa Counties. Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes pnze  or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such pay­ ments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers paid on a straight-  salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were aver­   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  3  Less than 0.5 percent.  NOTE: ported.  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 18. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Philadelphia, PA-NJ' (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of Average Department and occupation  (mean) of workers  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  4.00  4.50  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  over  p) a a  a a  _  _  and  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings....  1,119  $7.47  0  665  8.98  O’)  241  5.46  235  7  19  10  454  5.27  11  36  Straight salary.......................................  375  4.80  13  43  86  11.68 5 99  269  12 27  236  12.80  Furniture and bedding...........................  Straight commission........................  Full-time workers....................................  7  5  5  1  6  2  5  1  2  13 11  3 2  8  2  9 ~ 1  11 39  33  8.47  12  458  5.34  10  233  5.64  8  13  20  185  5.42  10  15  21 16  1  6  1  15  11  12  8  11  12  225  5.04  11  34  4.81  12  36  footwear..................................................................  1,952  6.48  6  Full-time workers....................................  992  7.43  Straight salary........................................  167  5 91  532  7.36  960  5.49  13  8  6  6  6  1  3 3  3 3  6  6  6  1 5  2 -  3 3  -  1  -  3  4 20  4  -  3  -  11  2  ~  (?)  207  1  9  2  “ 1  10  6  1  5  8  7 3  1 ~  9  1  2 -  3  22 27  1  1 -  5  30  181  -  2  6  1  2  12  6  10.61  20  19  1  Part-time workers...................................  Part-time workers...................................  8  9  9  8  11.23  Full-time workers.....................................  8  8  -  5  1 1  -  2  -  4  -  -  3  -  8  p>  2  -  3  5  p)  4  -  -  -  -  -  7  2  3  5  3  8  1  1  8  2  3  6  3  10  1  1  4  1  7  _  _ 10 _ _ 8  _  9  _  _ * 14  p>  3  12  6  9  7  4  5  4  1  2  p)  3  11  7  10  6  4  6  5  1  2  16  3  14  7  10  5  4  4  4  1  1  10  “  3  15  3  -  12  3  -  -  1  p)  ■  -  -  -  4  1  -  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  _  1  _  _ _  6  ' Salespersons, apparel and  Salary plus commission...............  1  2  _  Straight salary........................................  324  4.36  10  26  381  8.50  2  3  245  9.51  1  25  5.75  145  10.55  Straight commission........................ Salary plus commission..............  Women's clothing......................................  Straight salary........................................  75  8.76  136  6.67  38  4.39  12  15  14  9  14  15  10  33 14  16  _ 9 11  32  17  5.99  298  5.94  3  534  4.78  12  Straight salary........................................  264  4.36  11  21  35  5  9  526  7.08  242  8 07  Salary plus commission..............  159  9 36  Part-time workers...................................  284  6.24  1  6  13  Salary plus commission...............  142  6.10  3  6  20  6  12  18  9  13  3  1  1  1  1  1  3  3  2  2  1  1  3  2  2  1  1  1  3  2  4  4  20  11  1  1  5  8 15  8  9 14  13  8  3  8  15  12  2  3  2  6  3  2  3  2  5  1  2  2  3  2  4  5  3  1  2  8  1  2  10  10  10  3  3  4  7  8  6  1  4  12  1  1  1  1  1  2  2  1  9  1  98  8.19  8  32  9 24  25  66  7.68  15 3  1  4  2  10  4  1  2  2 1  7 9  12  6.40  7  10 11  5  6  3  -  27  8  14 —  4.80  1  21  27  2,871  4.88  1  22  19  2,820  4.88  22  19  2,498  4.70  1  20  36  4.69  1  20  36  12  2  9  J? 10  -  ~  “  3  2  4  3  1  1  3  1  2  “ 1  8 8 9  1  9  1  1  1  1  1  C3)  a  1 1  3  — 6  1  1  3  3  4  4  3  7  3  5  3  5  10  1  2  2  2  2  “  —  1 2  2 3  4  p> a a —  3 4  5 ft  -  1  a -  1  6  -  _  _  _  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  _  3  5  8  3  2  3  2  2  2  6  8  4  2  4  2  2  2  -  a ap>  1  _  3  -  2  -  5  -  1  -  3  -  a a —  1  -  _  9  -  —  -  . -  8  -  -  — 1  -  5  p) p) p)  -  -  _  6  -  1  _  -  5  -  -  -  3  a  -  a a  -  “  3  3  p) p>  —  ~ -  4  -  —  4  13  -  —  3  3  p> p) p>  _  3  3  p>  8  _  2  3  p) p) p> p) p)  7  -  : 1  3  p) p) p> p>  1  -  2  1  _  ” “  ~  p) a  8  -  ~  36  -  4  2  —  1 -  2  —  -  6 3  14  5,369  6  1 2  2  4 9  1  19 27  —  2 -  7  3  13  9  -  10  8  21  6  -  4  8 9  -  1  2  36  8  10  a  1  1  6  11 in  p>  ft  7  1  6  p>  2  a p) a  4  10  23  2  2  8  Full-time workers.....................................  See footnotes at end of table.  3  8  1  3  4  1  23  Full-time workers....................................  2,456  4  15  Salary plus commission...............  Part-time workers...................................  4  16  29  50  8 6  8  2  4  1  6 1  8  2  4  10  8  8  5.43  5.91  11  4  12  3  17  13  21  6.11  66  10  25  505  Part-time workers...................................  Sporting goods..............................................  9  8  1  1,039  135  8  9 20  _  Salespersons, miscellaneous.............   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  12  8  10  Men’s clothing................................................  Straight salary.......................................  *9  4 6  -  3 9  -  2 6  _  -  _ _  _  Table 18. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Philadelphia, PA-NJ1—Continued 2 Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  3.50  4.00  4.50  4.50  5.00  6.00  5.50  5.00  5.50  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  over  .  _  -  "  ”  ”  “  “  “  _  -  —  “  and 10.00  11.00  12.00  9.00  9.50  2  8  21  8  13  5  1  1  12  26  13  20  8  2  7  4  2  13  5  7  2  1  1  6  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  10  8  4  9  4  7  7  1  2  22 2  3.50  Store occupations, nonselling Alterations tailors...........................................  144  $8.32  Full-time workers...................................  89  9.28  Part-time workers..................................  55  6.77  Cleaners (porters).........................................  337  5.47  9  _ 16  Full-time workers...................................  211  5.94  11  Part-time workers.................................  126  4.68  Display assistants.........................................  132  6.81  Full-time workers..................................  109  Stock and inventory workers ...........  25  11  9  6  5  _  2  -  24  12  6  4  1  11  3  2  2  6 71  2  2  6  6  4  4  7  7  12  10  14  12  6  6  5  4  5  8  6  12  11  16  15  7  7  6  5  7.25 4.85  10  13  12  7  1  2  2  1  o  512  4.91  16  15  1  1  2  342  6  Full-time workers..................................  13  o  170  4.74  4  6  7  9  1  5  4  Part-time workers................................  203  5.44  10  12  15  11  6  9  2  Cashiers, office.............................................  5.93  10  15  16  19  5  21  Full-time workers................................  62  Office clerical occupations  O  1  —  -  -  -  “  -  -  -  -  -  ~  141  5.22  1  10  11  14  7  7  4  3  Part-time workers...............................  5.11  2  4  8  12  12  6  4  3  225 92  6.08  2  12  24  20  14  5  5  Full-time workers................................  115  5.82  13  3  17  10  7  12  15  Switchboard operators..........................  76  5.60  16  3  16  5  3  5  21  Part-time workers..............................  2  "  ~ "  “  _  _  '  -  4  -  3  Service desk workers.............................  2  4  1 -  _ i3) 1  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  *  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  "  “  -  “  L_  1986. 1 The Philadelphia metropolitan area consist ui duum, phia Counties, PA; and Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, NJ. 2  »------------  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and iate shifts.  — Also excludes  3 4  Less than 0.5 percent. x Workers were distributed as follows: 2 percent at $19 and under $20; 4 percent at $20 and under $21,  2 percent at $21 and under $22; 2 percent at $22 and under $24; and 4 percent at $24 and over.  prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers  paid on a straight-salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  NOTE:  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data  were reported.  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 19. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Phoenix, AZ1 (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Number Department and occupation  of workers  of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of-  Average (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  unde 3.50  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  9.00  10.00 11.00  )0  13.0C  14.0C  15.0C  16.0C  17.0C  18.0C  19.00  20.00  10.00 11.00 12.00  )0  14.0C  15.0C  16.0C  17.0C  18.0C  19.0C  20.00  over  and  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings..  442  $7.54  Full-time workers........................  266  8.87  112  4.93  176  5.53  136  4.49  Straight salary........................... Part-time workers....................... Straight salary........................... Furniture and bedding............... Full-time workers........................  154 122  11.60  32  Housewares.........................................  248  4J  112 112  4.93  Straight salary........................... Part-time workers....................... Straight salary............................  14  3  8  4  5  7  5  5  2  2  6  2  “  2  8  3  3  6  3  4  2  3  2  ~  14  4  18  7  8  12  8  9  5  6  1  26  5  5  9  5  9  7  6  1  34  4  12  5  11  10  8  “  12.05  Part-time workers.......................  Full-time workers........................  P)  -  ”  -  -  1  ~  ~  -  -  1  9.90 p>  25  8 1  -  1 -  5  2  -  2 1  _  -  -  3  0  2  _ ,  3  10  10  8  8  3  4  4  18  7  8  12  8  9  5  6  5  4  18  7  8  12  8  9  5  6  5  136  4.49  1  34  4  12  5  11  10  8  8  4.49  1  2  1  34  2  4  12  5  11  10  8  8  1  2  2  Full-time workers....................... Salary plus commission .  1,086  6.78  5.67  2  7  7  6.73  2  4  13  51 85  9.79  57  10.27  28  8.82  19  11.22  197  7.76  Full-time workers........................  73  Straight commission...........  8.21  51  8.39  Straight commission...........  124  C3)  1  2  ~  ”  “  Part-time workers........................ Salespersons, general ................... Part-time workers........................ Straight salary.............................  7  14  7  9  2  -  7.50  -  6  -  18  11  “  2  “  1 4  2  18  14 4  9  8  8  7  10  7  2  4  11  4  6  9  -  ”  ~  ”  ~  2  -  -  1  2  -  2  4  -  3  “  2  1  1 -  4  -  -  2  5  7  4  2  7  84  7.63  4.76  5  14  24  10  10  45  4.85  7  13  20  13  13  ~  5  _  -  7  10  9  4  4  2  2  6  2  6  2  1  13  4  4 6  4  8  10  12  10  1  4  6  2  1  . -  5  7  4  10  2 -  14  7  4  5  11  5  6  11  5  5  26  8  3  4  6  35  12  12  7  5  16  5  12  6  2  19  6  14  5  7  Alterations tailors...........................................  Part-time workers.................................. Display assistants.......................................... Full-time workers................................... Stock and inventory workers ............ Full-time workers................................... Part-time workers..................................  -  _  -  -  -  5  2  3  6  1  4  1  _  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  ~  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  '  “  “  -  -  -  _  _  1  1  1  1  1  2  9  4  1  1  p>  2  4  7  6  5  9  4  7 11  -  7  -  11 3  -  -  -  -  4  -  5  2  _  _  _  _  _  -  "  _  _ 1  _ _  2  _ _  _ _  _  _  _  -  p)  -  -  4  7  p>  P)  3  _ _  -  -  -  _ _  -  _  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  _  _  _  6 -  9  1  23  21  10  5  2  4  6  4  -  -  -  _  1  29  5  -  4.69  4  -  441  -  27  _  11  4  1  4  2  5  -  -  -  _  1  2  -  4.69  1  -  441  29  _  27  11  4  1  4  2  5  1  2  -  -  575  5.02  3  4  Store occupations, nonselling Cleaners (porters).........................................  _  -  -  -  12  4  _  -  -  -  3  2  5  2  5  _  11  -  5  5  p>  -  -  -  3  -  6  8  -  2  63  Salespersons, miscellaneous: Sporting goods..................................  11  9.38  Full-time workers........................  Part-time workers.......................  7  10.70  Men’s clothing...................................  Salary plus commission ..  5  54  141  Footwear.................................................  2  429  Straight commission...........  Part-time workers......................  1  657  Part-time workers......................  Salary plus commission ..  6.11  p>  2  -  1  Salespersons, apparel and footwear....................................................  1  4  -  4  136  2 1  -  11  3  6  0  9  _  15  14  -  1  7  "  4  14  4.93  7  1  37  7.02  173  4.82  145  4.79  64  6.03  40  6.84  282  4.64  98  5.14  184  -  8  11  5  30  8  8  3  12  6  6  2  2  6  3  12  5  5  3  2  3  6  6  16  23  6  3  5  20  33  10  10  8  7  5  2  2  1  17  11  5  6  2  1  1  19  14  15  8  6  -  21  11  18  9  -  ~  “  14  6  ” 9  ~ 29  15  5  8  5  9  3  15  11  2  7  4  17  36  16  7  8  5  5  2  _  -  4.38  2  11  _  -  _  -  _  -  -  -  -  _  “  -  -  -  -  _  11  4  6  5  -  _  -  -  -  _ -  -  -  —  -  -  -  _  -  -  _  _  2 3  _  .  _  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  "  -  -  -  -  _  2  Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office: Full-time workers..........................  16  -  *  .  -  6  19  13  -  25  13  6  -  19  -  -  - for----— maiibupa iiy. Excludes premium ■pay overtime and for work onwui weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  mpntr h mphey that IS not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such pay­ ments by individual vendors, e.g„ bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Less than 0.5 percent.  Earnings for workers paid on a straioht  salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were aver-   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  .  Also excludes Dri™  Dort2irE'n^rfnrSflen0Il0ondin9, ported.  °f indivic!ual items may not  100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 20. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: St. Louis, MO-IL (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1966) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings....  320  $7.75  174  9.51  146  3  5  5.64  118  10.78  99  11.10  8.50  9.00  10.00  16.00  19.00  8.00  18.00  7.50  17.00  7.00  15.00  6.00  6.50  14.00  5.50  13.00  5.00  12.00  4.50  11.00  4.00  9.50  3.50  8.50  9.00  9.50  10.00  16.00  19.00  8.00  18.00  7.50  17.00  7.00  15.00  over  6.00  6.50  14.00  5.50  13.00  5.00  12.00  4.50  11.00  4.00  3  2  5  8  3  2  1  4  1  3  1  8  1  6  3  3  8  3  6  3  6  3  14  6  1  5  6  4  2  1  5  1  6  2  1  7  4  12  6  5  5  2  12  2  5  1  11  1  3  5  10  3  2  2  4  8  2  1  9  1  1  3  6  2  1  1  3  9  9  2  1  1  2  1  31  11  _  -  -  _  -  -  -  Salespersons, apparel and 1,102  2  6.39  414  7.92  307  8.83  688  5.47  213  7.13  161  9.59  127  9.97  124  9.92  14  7  11  9  7  4  6  4  4  3  6  5  12  10  11  4  6  4  9  1  1  1  7  10  10  5  7  5  11  22  19  8  10  9  5  4  6  2  5  3  17  9  12  6  12  2  1  10  11  2  2  7  _ 3 _ _ _  -  2  -  _  -  -  -  2  -  1  2  9  13  6  1  2  10  6  Office clerical occupations  ■  2  5  1  11  11  8  20  2  15  12  16  6  19  20  9  6  8  10  48  10  3  6  12  13  17  10  12  “5  4  18  12  12  12  12  12  10  10  t5  100  6.32  _  50  7.21  -  41  7.36  -  208  4.78  <3>  85  5.32  109  5.10  30  6.21  17  6.07  2  4 -  -  2  22  10  15  7  11  15  11  6  28  16  6  34  15  12  7  11  20  28  16  11  11  6  10  7  13  13  41  24  -  -  -  -  -  6  12  13  7  3  10  10  6  6  6  3  1  1  6  ,  -  1 1  6  1  -  ft  p)  1  8  5  13  6  4  37  3  29  15  5  1  -  3  3  -  -  6  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ”  2  _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ 2 3 3 _  -  -  _  _  _  -  -  _ _  _ _  _  _  _  _  _  _  -  -  -  1  -  1  6  _  5  1  3  1  1  _  "  The St. Louis metropolitan area consists of St. Louis City, Franklin, Jefferson, St. Charles, and St. Louis 1986.  Counties, MO; and Clinton, Jersey, Madison, Monroe, and St Clair Counties, IL. *  5  5  1  _  2  5  2  O’)  O’) O’)  O’) O’)  4  13  -  0  8  1  _  1  8  3  -  2  12  2  10  2  12  7.42  6.50  2  2  158  7.58  1  2  295  31  2  5  2  79  1  4  16  2  1  2  13  6  1  O  2  29  3  1  1  4  9  -  1  1  3  18  Switchboard operators: Full-time workers...................................  1  7  9  12  -  1  8  10  14  6.67  3  1  2  6  6  166  4  8  8  10  5.90 -  9  8  6  -  19  3  8  8.16  3  2  8  6  34  3  4  2  2  9  Store occupations, nonselling  Stock and inventory workers .............  8  19  1  13  Women’s clothing:  1  1  15  _  and  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  Also excludes  prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers  paid on a straight-salary basis relate to August 19B6; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE-  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data  rere reported.  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 21. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: San Francisco, CA' (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  5.00  hourly earnings  Under 5.00  and  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  8.50  9.00  9.00  10.00 11.00 12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00 21.00 22.00  under 5.50  10.00 11.00 12.00  13.00  20.00 21.00 22.00  24.00  26.00  25.00  over  and 23.00  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings .  323  $11.45  Full-time workers................................  13.48  78  17.16  3  Floor coverings ........................................  61  14.85  8  Full-time workers................................  48  14.53  3  Salary plus commission..........  19  18.11  4  112  14.72  '11  83  15.30  4  Salary plus commission...........  49  17.92  5  Part-time workers................................  29  13.08  8  household..........................................................  159  18.07  Full-time workers.................................  129  18.57  ‘ 16  Part-time workers................................  30  15.95  17  appliances....................................................  84  19.38  Full-time workers..................................  62  19.92  5 26  Part-time workers................................  22  17.83  31  Furniture and bedding........................ Full-time workers.................................  ■P* Os  2  172  Salary plus commission..........  Salespersons, major appliances,  Electric and electronic  10  14 Salespersons, apparel and footwear.......................................................  505  9.21  Part-time workers........................  291  8.63  Footwear..................................................  208  9.94  Part-time workers........................  124  8.97  (°)  Salespersons, miscellaneous: Full-time workers: Salary plus commission ...  20  10.93  Part-time workers........................  71  6.64  Salary plus commission ...  21  8.54  Sporting goods: Part-time workers........................  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6.78  13  16  <•>  Table 21. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: San Francisco, CA  Continued  (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,* August 1986) Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  5.00  (mean) hourly earnings  5.50 Under 5.00  Store occupations, nonselling Display assistants.........................................  77  under 5.50  6.00  6.50  1  3  3  $9.98  Full-time workers...................................  60  10.25  Stock and inventory workers...........  163  7.97  19  Full-time workers..................................  92  9.19  7  Part-time workers.................................  71  6.38  35  6.00  6.50  7.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  18.00  22.00  25.00  26.00  13.00  24.00  12.00  23.00  11.00  21.00  8.50  10.00  20.00  8.00  9.00  19.00  7.50  17.00  7.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  26.00  over  7.50  14.00  25.00  13.00  24.00  12.00  23.00  11.00  22.00  10.00  21.00  9.00  20.00  8.50  19.00  8.00  .  .  _  _  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  -  -  -  “  -  “  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  “  *  -  -  -  _  _  _  1  17  8  38  30  2  20  3  42  33  9  4  1  _ 10  25  3  3  2  4  39  15  4  17  6  10  13  23  5  5  3  _ 5 1 11  -  -  6  7  3  12  9  7  4  22  3  7  1  and  "  -  -  -p* <1  Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office: Full-time workers.............................. Service desk workers...........................  26  Full-time workers .  10  Part-time workers .  29  Switchboard operators . Full-time workers....... ■ .  18  10  _  -  3  7  23  -  -  19  11  19  24  3  45  7  2  5  2  3  23  3  3  10  55  10  90  4  -  13  1  5  28 -  23 6  -  -  -  The San Francisco metropolitan area consists of Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties. Excludes premium* payfor'overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excludes prize or  ”  -  “r -  ”  _  -  "  -  “  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  - '  -  ■  at $29 and under $30; 2 percent at $30 and under $31; and 4 percent at $32 and over. 5 Workers were distributed as follows: 7 percent at $26 and under $27; 5 percent at $27 and under $28, 4 percent at $29 and under $30; 4 percent at $30 and under $31; and 6 percent at $32 and over.  push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by Mvidual vendors, e.g„ bidding and appliance manufacturers.  Earnings for workers paid on a straight-salaqr baas  relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where fea­ sible :  over a 12-month period ending as dose as possible to July 1986. CtETiriSSd - "/percent a, $26 and under $27; 3 percent at $27 and under $29; 3 percent   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  6  Less than 0.5 percent.  NOTE: ported.  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 22. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Washington, DC-MD-VA' (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Number Department and occupation  of workers  Average (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  21.00  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  12.00  13.00  14.00  15.00  16.00  17.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  21.00  over  1  4  2  13  8  7  8  7  6  3  2  2  4  3  3  2  3  2  3  3  3  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  5  3  4  7  6  6  4  2  2  4  4  5  3  4  4  4  5  6  3  3  3  1  8  22  15  5  8  7  2  4  3  3  7  2  5  3  7  5  3  2  3  2  2  411  and  Store occupations, selling Salespersons, home furnishings....  991  $8.66  Full-time workers....................................  550  11.07  Salary plus commission..............  123  12.29  Part-time workers...................................  441  5.67  Floor coverings .............................................  101  10.85  Part-time workers...................................  15  7.58  Furniture and bedding...........................  290  15.22  Full-time workers....................................  249  15.74  179  16.05  household..............................................................  353  15.10  Full-time workers....................................  279  15.97  Straight commission........................  1 0 1 -  2 -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  -  -  7  4  2  1  7  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  10  9  8  7  2  2  1  1  3  3  3  7  7  7  7  1  1  1  1  2  1  ft o  1  -  ft  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  1  1  5 ft  9 ft  ft  4  2  1  1  2  1  5  13  14  15  7  3  8  3  7  7  27  13  13  1  2  2  6  5  5  5  8  6  8  1  2  2  4  3  5  4  7  6  8  1  1  1  2  3  5  4  7  6  6  10  1  3  -  1  1  -  ft  -  5  2  8  9  7  6  9  10  6  7  13  8  8  4  ft  -  2  -  4  1  2  5  1  b 14  6  2  16  7  1  16  Salespersons, major appliances, ft  190  14.43  200  14.13  footwear...................................................................  2,461  6.08  2  7  4  Part-time workers...................................  1,410  5.17  2  9  5  Men’s clothing................................................  489  7.44  2  12  5  1  19  Part-time workers...................................  262  5.61  4  14  6  2  23  Straight salary........................................  205  4.35  5  18  6  2  29  22  Footwear..............................................................  455  7.88  2  S  7  1  2  2  Part-time workers...................................  209  6.01  4  11  13  2  2  3  Sporting goods..............................................  98  6.50  2  15  9  5  Part-time workers...................................  78  6.65  1  17  9  5  Straight commission........................  -  -  -  -  '  -  1 ft ■  1 1  1  2  1  1  ft  1  3  7  6  6  9  8  8  7  7  5  4  5  3  6 14  1  1  2  6  6  6  8  8  6  8  7  7  4  6  4  17  1  2  1  3  8  8  8  12  8  7  9  5  6  1  5  2  12  1  3  2  4  7  7  8  12  10  9  8  6  5  4  4  1  7 n  1  1  ft  -  -  -  -  -  "  -  -  -  1  20  17  5  9  7  6  3  2  2  5  2  2  1  25  19  5  9  8  5  3  2  2  3  1  1  13  3  7  6  1  1  1  5  2  1  17  4  6  8  1  1  1  5  1  1  5  6  7  2  5  4  5  7  7  5  12  10  8  8  2  8  4  9  13  10  6  6  5  1  2  5  2  7  5  4  4  3  10  10  7  6  2  1  3  1  5  6  3  4  3  13  13  6  8  3  1  -  Electric and electronic appliances .......................................................  1  -  Salespersons, apparel and  3 1 ft  ft  2 ft  1 ft  1 ft  ft  1 -  1  2  3  2  2  2  2  ft  ft ft  1 -  1 ft  -  ft  ft  -  1  -  -  -  -  -  -  1 -  1  1 ft  ft 5  3 ft  2  4  -  ft  ft  -  ft  Salespersons, miscellaneous:  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  -  1  -  -  -  -  -  Table 22. Occupational hourly earnings: Regular stores: Washington, DC-MD-VA'—Continued (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Average Number Department and occupation  of workers  (mean)  3.35  hourly  and  earnings  under 3.50  4^  $8.43  55  8.82  • 4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  4.25  4.50  4.75  1  3  _ _  -  5.00  5.50  6.00  6.50  7.00  7.50  8.00  9.00  9.00  10.00  11.00  1  4  3  3  10  31  24  5  4  4  4  2  7  25  31  5  5  4  16  44  8  4  1  1  1  1  6  3  -  -  4  8  22  10  T10  12  11  2  13  26  9  7  12  10  2  1  1  1  10  8  5  3  14  15  15  11  4  5  13  14  18  15  10  6  9  6  1  3  2  5  3  34  16  12  5  6  3  8  3  1  3  5  4  37  18  13  4  5  2  6  2  1  1  29  7  3  2  11  23  10  7  2  3  13  33  4  17  2  11  20  12  4  1  7  203  4.65  3  144  5..84  1  79  4.71  225  4.65  194  4.50  105  5.17  24  5.47  81  5.09  12.00  2  7  4.93  11.00  7  _ _  8  7.57  10.00  8  3  _  _  25 426  _  8.00  12.00  13.00  18  4 4  1  2  -  -  -  -  -  4  _ _  _  _ _ _  5  29 28  -  9  -  4  -  The Washington metropolitan area consists of the District of Columbia; Calvert, Charles, Frederick, Montgomery,  and Prince Georges Counties, MD; and Alexandria, Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas, and Manassas Park cities, and  Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.  18.00  19.00  20.00  21.00  16.00  18.00  19.00  20.00  21.00  14.00  15.00  over  "  “  -  “  ~  1 2  “  ”  ”  “  1  -  -  “  ~  by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers.  2  4  -  2  2  over. 5 Workers were distributed as follows: 5 percent at $21 and under $23; 3 percent at $23 and under $24; 2 percent at $24 and under $25; 3 percent at $25 and under $27; and 1 percent at $27 and over.  Also excludes prize or  push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments Earnings for workers paid on a straight-salary basis  relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where fea­ sible, over a 12-month period ending as close as possible to July 1986. Less than 0.5 percent. . Workers were distributed as follows: 2 percent at $21 and under $22; 2 percent at $22 and under $23; 2 percent  at $23 and under $24; 2 percent at $24 and under $25; 1 percent at $25 and under $26; and 2 percent at $27 and   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  17.00  17.00  _  Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, and Stafford Counties, VA.  3 4  16.00  •  Office clerical occupations  2  15.00  4  -  1  13.00  Receivers:  1  14.00  and 4.00  3.75  Store occupations, nonselling 80  3.75  3.50  8  Workers were distributed as follows: 3 percent at $21 and under $22; 3 percent at $22 and under $23; 2 percent  at $23 and under $24; 1 percent at $24 and under $25; 2 percent at $25 and under $27; and 3 percent at $27 and over. , 7 Workers were distributed as follows: 3 percent at $21 and under $22; 4 percent at $22 and under $23; 2 percent at $23 and under $25; and 2 percent at $25 and under $27. NOTE: ported.  Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate that no data were re­  Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table 23. Occupational hourly earnings: Discount stores: Kansas City, MO-KS1 (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986)  Department and occupation  Number of workers  Average (mean) hourly earnings  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of3.35 and under 3.50  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.25  5.50  5.75  6.00  6.25  6.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.25  5.50  5.75  6.00  6.25  6.50  6.75  6.75 and over  3  3  2  2  2  4  ?  2  3  3 1  10 1  6  1  3 ■)  1  1  - ■  1  8  5  1  4 31  Store occupations, selling  Salespersons, general merchandise.......................... Full-time workers: Straight salary.................... Part-time workers................. Straight salary....................  895  $4.35  1  24  28  14  4  6  261 616 607  4.88 4.09 4.06  0 1 1  8 31 32  24 30 31  16 14 14  5 4 4  8 4 4  _  4 4  4 3 3  3 1 1  2 2 2  83  5.74  “  5  1  8  5  6  13  8  5  4  Store occupations, nonselling  Cashiers, office........................  1 The Kansas City metropolitan area consists of Cass, Clay, Jackson, Lafayette, Platte, and Ray Counties, MO; and Johnson, Leavenworth, Miami, and Wyandotte Counties, KS. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excludes prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by indi­ vidual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers. 3 Less than 0.5 percent.  -  4 Workers were distributed as follows: 6 percent were at $6.75 and under $7; 12 percent were at $7 and under $7.25; 4 percent were at $8 and under $8.25; and 9 percent were at $8.25 and over. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate no data. Data for an overall occupation may include data for sub­ classifications not shown separately.  Table 24. Occupational hourly earnings: Discount stores: New York, NY' (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Department and occupation  Number of workers  Average (mean) hourly earnings  3.35 and under 3.50  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.25  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.25  5.50  6  1  1  2  8  3  5.50 and over  Store occupations, non selling  Cashiers, checkout................. Cleaners: Part-time workers................. Stock and inventory workers: Full-time workers.................. Cashiers, office: Part-time workers.................  2,131  $3.68  58  20  50  4.38  36  8  320  3.77  58  17  3  2  3  6  3  2  50  4.41  12  10  14  10  8  4  20  16  1 The New York metropolitan area consists of New York City (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Coun­ ties!, and Putnam, Rockland, and Westchester Counties. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excludes prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee  6  12  (3)  1  36  2 6  6  compensation paid by the store and all such payments by indi­ vidual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers. 3 Less than Q.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate no data.  Table 25. Occupational hourly earnings: Discount stores: Philadelphia, PA-NJ' (Percent distribution of workers in selected occupations by straight-time hourly earnings,2 August 1986) Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of— Department and occupation  Number of workers  Average (mean) hourly earnings  3.35 and under 3.50  3.50 3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.25  17 11 11 21 21 14 11 12 16 17  23 23 23 23 24 28 29 29 28 29  9 8 8 10 10 11 9 9 12 13  9 8 8 10 10 11 8 8 13 14  6 5 5 7 7 7 6 6  7 11 11 5 4 10 14 14 7 6  9 9  6 6  2 2 8 8  2 2  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.25  5.50  5.75  6.00  6.25  6.50  6.75  7.00  7.25  „  _  6.25  -  -  -  -  5.75  6.00  -  5.50  .  6.75  7.00  7.25  7.50  6 10 10 4 3 7 8 8 6 5  3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1  2 2 2 2 2 2 0  2 3 3 1 1 1 2 2 ft  2 4 4  1 1  O  O (3)  ft  ft  I3) -1  ft ft ft ft  ft ft ft  ft  (3) 1 1  1 1 ft  1 1 6 6  1 1  6.50  7.50 and over  Store occupations, selling  Salespersons, general merchandise.......................... Full-time workers................... Straight salary.................... Part-time workers.................. Straight salary.................... Salespersons, floor only.......... Full-time workers.................. Straight salary.................... Part-time workers.................. Straight salary.....................  1,835 681 675 1,154 1,133 1,102 444 438 658 637  $4.24 4.48 4.45 4.10 4.07 4.28 4.37 4.33 4.21 4.16  11  1,356 1,302 64 64  3.82 3.80 5.79 5.79  9 9 16 16  40 41  31 30  -  -  -  -  201 75 35 40  4.60 4.52 4.74 4.34  6 9 11 8  3 4  8 15 20 10  29 9  11 20 9 30  7  7 13 13 5 6 6 4 4  Store occupations, nonselling  Cashiers, checkout.................. Part-time workers.................. Receivers ................................ Full-time workers.................. Stock and inventory workers: Full-time workers.................. Service desk workers.............. Full-time workers.................. Part-time workers..................  _  8  _  18  ’ The Philadelphia metropolitan area consists of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties, PA; and Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, NJ. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excludes prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compen­ sation paid by the store and all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appli­ ance manufacturers.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  8  8  6 5 11 “  _ 7  12 11 13  13 7 14 ”  (3)  2 2  5  5 -  4  4  -  8  (3)  -  8 8  20 20  5 5  13 13  10  2 4 9  1 3 6  1 4 9  -  1  ft  6 6 -  2 2 -  ft ft  2 ft ft  1  -  -  1  -  “  ft  ft  -  -  -  8  -  1 1 ft  I3)  -  -  1 2 2  0  -  -  _  _  -  1 1  1  .  _  -  “  5 5 -  -  _  8 8 3  -  “  ”  '  3 Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate no data. Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately.  Table 26. Occupational hourly earnings: Discount stores: St. Louis, MO-IL'  Department and occupation  Number of workers  Average (mean) hourly earnings  Percent of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings (in dollars) of_ 3.35 and under 3.50  3.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.25  5.50  5.75  6.00  6.25  6.50  3.75  4.00  4.25  4.50  4.75  5.00  5.25  5.50  5.75  6.00  6.25  6.50  6.75  9 13 14  21  8  31 32  10  12  11  4 4  1  6.75 and over  Store occupations, selling  to   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Salespersons, general merchandise...................... Part-time workers................. Straight salary................  2,893 1,626 1,617  $4.87 4.22 4.21  6 11 11  36 816 248  4.99 4.55 5.82  24  10  1  Store occupations, nonselling  Cleaners: Full-time workers............ Stock and inventory workers .... Full-time workers.................  25 11  11  2  ------------------------ui ou i-uuts oily, rranwin, jenerson,  St. Charles, and St. Louis Counties, MO; and Clinton, Jersey, Madison, Monroe and St. Clair Counties, IL. 2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Also excludes prize or push money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store and all such payments by indi­  17 2  25 5  2  8  8 6 12  4  8  12  25  vidual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100. Dashes indicate no data. Data for an overall occupation may include data for sub­ classifications not shown separately.  Table 27. Occupational hours and earnings—weekly averages: Regular stores (Number of workers and average straight-time weekly earnings1 in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) Northeast  Department and occupation Number of workers Store occupations, selling 165 _  _ _ _ _ _  59 ' _ _  75 75  Boston  Buffalo  Average weekly hours  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  38.5 _ _ _ _ _ _ 39.0 _ _ _ 38.5 38.5  $495.00 _ 788.50 223.00 223.00  76 42 -  32  -  30 30  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings $263.00 157.00 -  35.0 35.0 35.0 34.5 34.5  361.50 -  _ _  Electric and electronic  Salespersons, apparel and footwear......  _   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  . -  -  _  _  -  -  _  -  -  -  -  _ _ _  _ _ _  -  _ _  _ _ _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  153 153  See footnotes at end of table.  _ -  _ -  _  _  _  Salary plus commission....................  _ _  38.5 38.5  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _  -  -  84 51  35.0 35.0  -  -  -  -  25  -  _  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  _  -  -  “  -  190.50 174.00 -  39.0  -  37.0 37.5  284.00 267.00  67  37.5  360.50  ~  “ -  37.0 37.0  38.0 38.5 38.5 37.5 38.5 38.0 38.0  613.50 649.00 447.50 577.50 784.00 265.50  39.0  536.00  ” “  665 241  417.00 209.50 200.50  233 1 03 -  -  -  -  -  37.5 37.0  276.00 217.00  —  “ 425.00  -  986 473 61 “  38.0 38.0 37.0  340.00 237.00 363.50  992 167  ~  “  ~  ” “  ~  "  38.0 38.0 37.5  “  240.50  \ oo  38.0 38.0  362.00  242  38.0  390.50  1 35J  341 “  38.0  37.0  292.00 “  161 33 94  $336.50 202.50 413.50  478.00  38.5 —  ~  Average weekly earnings  448.00  77 “  38.0 37.5 O / .3  277.50 354.50 214.50 390.50 331.00 226.00 219.00  “  ~  57 -  '  237.50 225.50 ”  -  -  550.50  481.00  243 166  -  38.0  133  -  '  60  -  ~  119 104  $434.50 284.00 553.00  -  -  22  38.0 38.0 38.0  264.50 264.50  347.50 -  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  536 249 60  37.5 37.5  -  236.00 -  34.5 35.0  -  218.00 183.00  54 54  $339.00 221.50  35 183 47 43 93 175 127  -  34.5  -  101  38.0 37.5 38.0  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  -  -  42 35  228.00 228.00  -  -“ 153.00 153.00  Salespersons, major appliances, . -  171 102  Philadelphia  New York  Nassau-Suffolk  “  37.5  224.00 300.50 352.00  Table 27. Occupational hours and earnings—weekly averages: Regular stores—Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time weekly earnings1 in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) Northeast Boston  Buffalo  Number Average of workers weekly hours  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  Department and occupation  Nassau-Suffolk Average Number Average weekly weekly earnings of workers hours  New York  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  Philadelphia Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  Average weekly earnings  $380.00  $359.00  Store occupations, selling— Continued  Salespersons, miscellaneous................. Straight salary................................. Salespersons, miscellaneous: Salary plus commission..................... Sporting goods............. Straight salary................................ Salespersons, general.................... Straight salary..........................  ~  18  “  39.0  32 “  “ 20  39.0  $245.00  21 41  40.0 39.0  270.00 348.50  22  39.0  234.50  “  “ “  “ “ “ "  ~ “  38.0  $336.00  “ “ 145 117  38.0 38.0  241.00 218.00  —  119 196 122 61 75 360  38.0 38.0 38.5 38.0 38.0 38.0  343.50 283.50 319.50 310.50 254.50 264.00  232.50 338.00 271.00  51 52 17  38.0 38.0 38.0  281.00 300.00 277.00  37.0 “ -  -  -  -  2,871 2,820  37.0 37.0  179.00 179.00  89 211 109  38.5 37.5 38.5  355.00 219.50 279.50  Store occupations, nonselling  Alterations tailors............................... Cleaners (porters)................................ Display assistants............................. Gift-wrap persons................ ..... Receivers............................... Stock and inventory workers...........  43 $170.00  ~  37 88  35.5  209.50 151.50  ” “ "  38.5 ” “  285.50  -  -  _  342  -  -  37.5  182.50  62 92  37.5 38.0  220.50 228.50 —  Office clerical occupations  Cashiers, office............... Service desk workers....................... Switchboard operators.................. See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  “  13 34 15  36.0 38.5 38.0  Table 27. Occupational hours and earnings—weekly averages: Regular stores—Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time weekly earnings1 in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) South  Department and occupation Number of workers Store occupations, selling 414 295 _ _  46 _  _ 113 _  •  _ _  139 136 Salespersons, major appliances,  166 _ _ _  Electric and electronic  39.0 _ _ _ 38.0 38.0  $332.00 228.00 442.50 - ’ _ 590.50 _ 216.50 217.00  277 116 34 111 88 - . -  37.5 38.5 39.5 39.0 38.5 -  39.5 _ _ _  692.50 _ -  180 80  39.0 39.0  38.5 38.0 _ _ 39.5 _ _  100 -  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings $360.00 529.00 405.00 568.00 566.00 -  212 28 61 125 “ 53 24  537.50 609.00 •  _ -  37  37.5  -  175.00 175.00  90  39.0 “ —  499.50  28  ~  “ ■  “ “ “  -  -  -  409.00  -  -  -  127  39.0  $410.00  39.0  430.00  “  39.0 “ “  442.50 “  137 “ 42 -  37.0  304.50  38.5  227.50  189 -  _  38.0 38.0  272.50  -  96  53 53  37.5  39.0 “  _  420.00  182  -  38.0  37.5  ~  :  382.00 382.50 241.00 207.00 298.00 400.00  201  81  r  ~  468.00 “ “ “ 251.50 226.50  -  38.5  _  436.00  -  “  180  _ _  38.0  -  “  -  38.0 38.0 _  93  321.00 '  -  38.5 38.5  -  533.00  “  —  87 “  183 171  Average weekly earnings  -  -  -  489 391  ~  38.0 38.0 37.5 —  _ -  -  _  -  391.00 “  $341.50 175.00 412.50 “  154 53 85 “ “ “  480.50 -  -  38.5  37.0 37.5  $395.00 230.50  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  39.5 -  255.50  _ _ _  38.5 3/.5 38.5 39.0  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  39.0 —  _  45   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  38.0  _  See footnotes at end of table.  Average weekly hours  Houston  Fort Worth-Arlin gton  Dallas  915 _ _ _  Salary plus commission....................  Baltimore  -  _  Salespersons, apparel and footwear......  Atlanta  404.00 “ 411.00  _  37.5 — — “ ~ ~ ~  277.00  ~  305.50  Table 27. Occupational hours and earnings—weekly averages: Regular stores—Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time weekly earnings' in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) 1 "iwuupwmaii aicas, nuyubl 1 iJOO) South Atlanta  Baltimore  Number Average of workers weekly hours  Average Number Average weekly weekly earnings of workers hours  Department and occupation  C\  Store occupations, selling— Continued Salespersons, miscellaneous.... Straight salary................. Salespersons, miscellaneous: Salary plus commission............ Sporting goods....................... Straight salary................... Salespersons, general............ Straight salary................ Store occupations, nonselling Alterations tailors.... Cleaners (porters)............... Display assistants................... Gift-wrap persons ............... Receivers.................... * Stock and inventory workers .... Office clerical occupations Cashiers, office........... Service desk workers.......... Switchboard operators....... See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  11 11  36.0 36.0  $228.00 20  37.0  Dallas Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  “ $209.00  — 1,053 873  38.0 38.0  27 50 92  39.5 39.5  333  19  18 d I u.ou  39.0  237.50  “  37.0  36.0 — — “  ~ “ 208.50 “  303.50 “ “ _  109  35.5  186.50  12  — ~ 37.0  207.50  13  -  '  -  Fort Worth-Arlington Average Number Average weekly weekly earnings of workers hours  ~  -  “  -  - . _  _ _ _ _ —  125 67 83 ~ 43 206  40.0 40.0 40.0 39.5 39.5  $330.00 233.00 299.00 245.00 236.00  63  40.0 40.0  272.00  27  -  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  39.5 40.0  -  -  -  $322.50  60  39.5  39  39.5  70  39.0  264.00  112 12  39.0 39.5  250.00 244.00  _  _ _  _  40.0 37.5  264.50 223.00  23 20  -  $202.50 276.00  -  '  -  _  _  -  Average weekly  _  _  40 20  -  234.50  Houston  Table 27. Occupational hours and earnings—weekly averages: Regular stores—Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time weekly earnings’ in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) Midwest  South—Continued  Number of workers Store occupations, selling  51 51  37.0 37.0  62  39.0 _ _ _  571.50 _ -  19  _  74  _  _  _ _  Electric and electronic  _  _  38.0 39.0 38.5 38.5  279 190 -  271  39.0  564.00 -  -  _  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings 38.5 38.5  Average weekly earnings $374.00  $389.50 190.50 430.50 ” 397.50 376.50  187 32 121  38.0 37.0 37.5  $483.50 196.00 549.50  534 102  40  38.5 —  443.00 ”  50  408.50  472.00  111  38.0  588.50  244  531.00  449.50 ~ 207.50 190.50  89  37.5  586.00  —  32 32  37.0 37.0  196.00 196.00  —  “ “ —  -  157  38.5  586.00  ”  -  76  37.5  486.00  38.5  233.50  548.50 ~  489.50  507.00  -  _ -  117 “  39.0 “  494.00 “  —  -  -  -  37.0 36.0 37.0 38.5 37.0  307.00 218.00 334.00 342.50 370.50 391.00 399.00 269.50 204.50 320.00 _ 292.00 “ 306.50 280.50  202 69 128  37.5 37.5 37.0  285.50 200.50 325.00  343  -  512 125 307 80 146 90 27 166 80 63  51  37.0  288.50  336  37  36.5  332.50  59 55  37.0 37.0 “  210.00 207.50  92  37.5  332.50  38.0  329.50  87  37.5  325.50  38.0  366.00  37.5 _ 36.0  -  292  Detroit  -  -  60  38.0 37.0 37.5  630.00  -  _  478.50 611.00  520 117 278 89 47  39.5 39.0 -  262.50  _  $425.50 -  138 117  -  37.0 _ 38.0 _ 38.0 _ 36.5 36.5 _  _ 127  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  219  219 _ 77  _  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  623.50 -  244.00  367 281  Cleveland  39.0 38.0 ~ 38.0 “ 37.5 “ 37.0 37.0  37.0  73   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  -  550 123 249 - ' 179 -  571  _  See footnotes at end of table.  38.5 _ _  _  Salary plus commission.....................  38.5 _  _ _  Salespersons, apparel and footwear......  38.0 37.0 _ _  _  Salespersons, major appliances.  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings $267.50 176.50 264.00 331.00 176.50 176.50  144 51  _ _  Average weekly hours  Chicago  Washington  Miami-Hialeah Department and occupation  -  -  -  248.50  -  -  -  -  -  244.00  -  -  _  -  -  227.00 201.00  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  291.00 _ 213.50  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  ~  “  -  200 154 30  37.0 39.0 36.5 36.0 36.5 37.5 37.0 38.5  ~  319.50 37.0  443.50 245.50  Table 27. Occupational hours and earnings—weekly averages: Regular stores—Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time weekly earnings’ in selected occupations in regular department stores. 20 metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) South—Continued kiliami-Hiale ah  Department and occupation  Number Average of workers weekly hours  Washingto  Chicago  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  Cleveland Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  Store occupations, sellingcontinued  Salespersons, miscellaneous........... Straight salary............................. Salespersons, miscellaneous: Salary plus commission............... Sporting goods.............................. Straight salary............................. Salespersons, general...................... Straight salary.............................  21  322 311  37.5 ”  $280.50 “  -  -  35.5 35.5  163.50 159.50  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  “  54  38.0  296.00  51  39.5  272.00  73  39.5  209.00  45 39  39.0 38.0  247.00 212.50  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  -  “ 55  79  36.5  $323.00  -  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  24  38.0  $387.00  36.0  286.00  37.0 36.0  215.50 219.50  “  -  -  132 91  38.5 38.5  $215.50 286.50  35 64 38  40.0 39.0 39.0  $376.50 206.50 289.50  27 103 126  36.5 39.5 39.0  292 00 206.00 270.00  72  38.5  193.00  107 614  40.0 37.0  261.00 202.50  -  -  38.0  221.50  -  _  -  -  38.0  177.00  165 290  38.5 37.5  258.00 201.50  -■  -  37.0  199.00  47 188 19  37.5 37.5 38.0  235.50 232.00 236.00  Office clerical occupations  Cashiers, office............................... Service desk workers...................... Switchboard operators....................  57  ~ '  ~  _ _  Average weekly earnings  16 1,590 1,158  -  Store occupations, nonselling  Alterations tailors.............................. Cleaners (porters)............................. Display assistants............................. Gift-wrap persons ............................. Receivers.......................................... Stock and inventory workers.............  Detroit  16  -  38  38.5  _  241.00  Table 27. Occupational hours and eamings-weekly averages: Regular stores-Continued (Number of workers and average straight-time weekly earnings1 in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) Midwest—Continued St. Louis  Oakland  Phoenix  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  Kansas City Department and occupation Number of workers  Average weekly hours  Store occupations, selling  VO  Salespersons, home furnishings.... Straight salary........................... Straight commission.................. Salary plus commission............ Floor coverings............................ Straight commission.................. Salary plus commission............ Furniture and bedding................ Straight salary........................... Straight commission.................. Salary plus commission............ Housewares................................ Straight salary.......................... Salespersons, major appliances, household.................................... Straight salary.......................... Straight commission................. Kitchen and laundry appliances Electric and electronic appliances..............................-■■■ Straight salary.......................... Salespersons, apparel and footwear Straight salary.............................. Straight commission.................... Salary plus commission............... Men's clothing............................... Straight salary.............................. Straight commission.................... Salary plus commission............... Women’s clothing.......................... Straight salary.............................. Straight commission.................... Salary plus commission............... Footwear....................................... Straight salary............................. Straight commission.................... Salary plus commission............... See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  144  22  105  95  37.5  39.0 37.0  38.5  $398.50  174  38.0  $362.50  358.50 442.00  99  39.0  294 98  39.5 40.0  $403.00 367.50  41  39.5  456.00  429.00  22  35.5 35.5  242.00 208.00  15 15  34.5 34.5  202.50 202.50  33  36.0  210.00  414  37.5  294.00  307  37.0  326.50  127  37.5  371.00  124  37.5  368.50  158  37.5  219.00  38.0 37.0  $337.50 180.50  122  38.5  463.50  112 112  37.0 37.0  180.50 180.50  Average weekly earnings  172  39.5  $530.50  78 48  40.0 39.0  684.50 570.00  19 83  40.0 39.0  724.50 600.50  49  40.0  713.50  629.00 587.00  129  39.0  723.00  39.0 40.0  538.50 587.00  62  39.0  782.50  22  84  40.0  285.00  22  50  72  112  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly hours earnings  39.0 40.0  125  572.00  266  San Francisco  28  40.0  255.50  31 31  40.0 40.0  248.50 248.50  25  39.5  363.50  429  37.5  251.50  54 57  36.5 37.5  392.00 382.00  73  37.5  305.50  51  38.5  318.00  Table 27. Occupational hours and earnings—weekly averages: Regular stores-Contlnued (Number of workers and average straight-time weekly earning^ in selected occupations in regular department stores, 20 metropolitan areas,* August 1986) Midwest—Continued Department and occupation  Kansas City Number Average of workers weekly hours  St. Louis  Oakland  Phoenix  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  Average Number Average weekly of workers weekly earnings hours  Store occupations, selling— Continued  Os  o  San Francisco Average Number Average weekly weekly earnings of workers hours  Salespersons, miscellaneous Straight salary Salespersons, miscellaneous: Salary plus commission Sporting goods Straight salary Salespersons, general Straight salary  Average weekly earnings  $429.00  Store occupations, nonselling  Alterations tailors Cleaners (porters) Display assistants Gift-wrap persons Receivers Stock1 and inventory workers  $380.00 $244.50  $282.00 202.50  Offic.' clerical occupations  Cashiers, office Service desk workers Switchboard operators  230.00 215.00  241.50  346.00 311.50  $266.50  410.00  191.00  365.00  207.50 303.00 299.50 233.50 342.00 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts Also exweekly hours are rounded to the nearest half hour and average weekly earnings to the nearest half thedstSnr«anH0LiPUS hm0ney “?a1J** regularl'' recurring part of employee compensation paid by th®J?°r® and a" ,such Payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers. 2 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. Earnings for workers paid on a straight-salary basis relate to August 1986; commission earnings for workers partly or wholly paid on that basis were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data did not meet publication criteria thed s?andflCrdSwnrk POS!lb, e ,0HUl^ 1986,- Earnin9s correspond to average weekly hours which reflect Data for an overall occupation may include data for subclassifications not shown separately. ' the standard workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries. Average   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table 28. Method of wage payment: Regular stores (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory  workers in regular department stores by method of wage payment,' 20 selected metropolitan areas, August 1986) Northeast  Method  NassauBoston Buffalo Suffolk  Midwest  South  Fort Kansas Cleve­ Phila Atlanta Balti Dallas Worth- Houston Miami- Wash­ Chicago land Detroit City Hialeah ington delphia more Artington  St Louis  Oakland Phoenix  Selling  All sales workers Time-rated workers Formal plans Range of rates Length of service Merit Combination Single rate Individual determination Incentive workers Straight commission Salary plus commission  All nonsales workers Time-rated workers Formal plans Range of rates Length of service Merit Combination Single rate Individual determination NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that For definition of method of wage payment, see appendix A. For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A Less than 0.5 percent.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  no data were reported.  Table 29. Scheduled weekly hours: Regular stores (Percent of nonsupervisory workers in regular department stores by scheduled weekly hours,’ 20 selected metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) Northeas t Work schedule  South  Boston Buffalo Nassau- New Suffolk York  Midwest  West  Fort Phila­ Balti­ Miami- Wash­ Cleve­ Kansas delphia Atlanta more Dallas Worth- Houston Hialeah ington Chicago land Detroit City Arlington  St. Louis  Oakland Phoenix  San Fran­ cisco  Selling  35 hours ...................................... Over 35 and under 37.5 hours........ 37.5 hours................................... 38 hours..................................... 40 hours..................................  100  100  3  58  46 34 17  100  100  100  100  100  100  0  57 42  100  43  3 83  73  6  11  10 37 53  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  ~  23 6 6  61  “  1  18  4  “  22  “ 65 35  27  100  100  1 “ 20  85 15  87 13  65  17  -  72  20  -  ~  100  100  100  -  -  -  9  16 60  18  61  26 70  60 40  100  100  100  0 25  24 76  3 38 -  -  _ _  91  _  _  24  82  100  100  100  100  48 -  13 -  _ 65  24  87  35  Nonselling  All nonsales workers............... 100 35 hours.......................... Over 35 and under 37.5 hours........ 37.5 hours............................... 38 hours ..................................... 38.75 hours............................. 40 hours..............................  6 34 25 10 25  100  100  62  38  100  100  1  0  64  90  36  9  100  100  100   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  100 16 " ” “ 84  “  77  11  13  46 “  89  87  54  Data relate to the predominant schedule for full-time day-shift workers in each establishment. For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. 3 Less than 0.5 percent. 2  100  79  74  -  59  -  52  -  _ _  _ _ _ _  76  NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 30. Paid holidays: Regular stores (Percent o, full-time nonsupetvisory workers in regular department stores with forma, provisions for paid hoiidays, 20 selected metropolitan areas,-August 1986)  . Number of paid holidays  NassauBoston Buffalo Suffolk  Midwest  South  Northeast  Fort Kansas Cleve­ Phila­ Atlanta Balti­ Dallas Worth- Houston Miami- Wash­ Chicago land Detroit Hialeah ington delphia more Arlington  Oakland Phoenix  All workers Workers in establishments providing paid holidays................................. 2 days ....................................... 4 days ........................................ 5 days ....................................... 6 days ....................................... 7 days ........................................ 8 days ........................................ 9 days ........................................ 10 days ...................................... 11 days ...................................... Average paid holidays' NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that ; of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. percent. of computing average holidays, 2 half days were considered   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  no data were reported. full day.  Table 31. Paid vacations: Regular stores (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in regular department stores with formal  provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, 20 selected metropolitan  areas,1 August 1986)  Midwest vacation policy  All workers Method of payment  Workers in establishments providing paid vacations Length-of-time payment Amount of vacation pay2  After 6 months of service: Under 1 week 1 week Over 1 and under 2 weeks After 1 year of service: Under 1 week 1 week Over 1 and under 2 weeks 2 weeks Os  After 2 years of service: 1 week Over 1 and under 2 weeks 2 weeks........................... Over 2 and under 3 weeks 3 weeks After 3 years of service: 1 week 2 weeks Over 2 and under 3 weeks 3 weeks After 4 years of service: 1 week 2 weeks Over 2 and under 3 weeks 3 weeks............................. Over 3 and under 4 weeks 4 weeks ............................ After 5 years of service: Over 1 and under 2 weeks 2 weeks ............................. Over 2 and under 3 weeks 3 weeks ............................ Over 3 and under 4 weeks 4 weeks See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Boston Buffalo NassauSuffolk  Fort Phila­ Balti­ Miami Wash­ delphia Atlanta more Dallas Worth- Houston Hialeah ington Chicago Arlington  Detroit Kansas City  Oakland Phoenix  Table 31. Paid vacations: Regular stores—Continued (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in regular department stores with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, 20 selected metropolitan areas,1 August 1986)  Vacation policy  Nassau- New Boston Buffalo Suffolk York  West  Midwest  South  Northeast  Fort Phila­ Atlanta Balti­ Dallas Worth- Houston Miami- Wash­ Chicago Cleve­ Detroit Kansas City land Hialeah ington delphia more Arlington  St. Louis  Oakland Phoenix  San Fran­ cisco  Amount of vacation pay2—Continued  After 8 years of service  Over 3 and under 4 weeks........ After 10 years of service: Over 1 and under 2 weeks........  _  _  100 -  72  -  -  37  72  63  28  Over 3 and under 4 weeks........ After 12 years of service: Over 1 and under 2 weeks........  82 18  100  _  _  .  -  _  _  _ 100  4 96  • 2 98  f) 100  -  44 56  _ 1 99  -  35 65 ”  100  100  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  14  -  -  -  100 -  67 11 7  100  100  100 :  _  _  -  -  71 29  -  -  -  14  -  -  -  20  72  82 18  38 62  90 10  100  28  94 4 2  95 5  80  67 11 7  -  -  _  _  Over 3 and under 4 weeks........ 100   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  - '  14 2 84  -  After 15 years of service: Over 1 and under 2 weeks........  See footnotes at end of table.  100  28  Over 3 and under 4 weeks........  5 weeks ......................................  _ 82 18  71 29  100  -  -  -  14  27 33 40  26 64 10  4 10 87 “  22 11 52  ~  -  6 94  _  1 99  -  -  100  99  100  100  87  100  -  -  1  -  -  13  -  -  -  100  97  100  87  100  -  94 5 1  3  -  13  -  -  -  1 99 :  _  73 5 22  -  -  -  59  39  2  44  —  41  93  61  4 5 90  95 3  56  100  1  18  7 55  82 -  -  -  7  -  95  18 82  -  -  -  18  7  6  -  -  82 -  -  -  18  7 1 97  91  -  45  82  Table 31. Paid vacations: Regular stores—Continued (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in regular department stores with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, 20 selected metropolitan areas,1 August 1986) Northeast Vacation policy  O' O'  South  Boston Buffalo Nassau- New Suffolk York  Amount of vacation pay2—Continued After 20 years of service: 2 weeks ...................................... Over 2 and under 3 weeks........ 3 weeks...................................... 4 weeks...................................... 100 Over 4 and under 5 weeks........ 5 weeks..................................... After 25 years of service: 2 weeks ...................................... Over 2 and under 3 weeks........ 3 weeks...................................... 4 weeks...................................... 80 Over 4 and under 5 weeks........ 5 weeks...................................... 20 After 30 years of service:4 2 weeks ...................................... Over 2 and under 3 weeks........ 3 weeks ...................................... 4 weeks...................................... 80 Over 4 and under 5 weeks........ 5 weeks...................................... 20 6 weeks ......................................  -  100 -  20 80 -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  17 83 ■ -  -  -  82 18  57 43  23 77  82 18  57 43  23 77  “  ~  -  West  Fort Phila­ Balti­ Cleve­ Miami- Wash­ Kansas delphia Atlanta more Dallas Worth- Houston Hialeah ington Chicago land Detroit City Arlington  0 100 -  14 3 71 11 -  49 51  _ 100 -  t3) 14 86  14 3 45 11 26  28 72  _ 84 _ 16  -  14 86  14 3 45 11 26  _ _ 28 72  _ 84 16  “  ”  “  0  1 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. 2 Vacation payments, such as percent of annual earnings, were converted to an equivalent time basis. Periods of service were chosen arbitrarily and do not necessarily reflect individual establish­ ment provisions for progression. For example, changes indicated at 8 years may include changes that occurred between 5 and 8 years.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Midwest  _ _ 15 85 _ * _ _ 15 68 _ 17  1 _ 99 _ -  _ _ 9 91 _ _  _ _ _ 39 _ 61  _ _ _ 97 _ 3  _  _  _ 100 _ _  _ 57 _ 43  1 _ 51 _ 48  _ _ 9 83 _ 8  _ ._ _ 16 _ 84  _ _ _ 30 _ 70  _ _ _ 90 _ 10  _ _ _ 18 _ 82  _ _ 15  1 _ 51 _ 48  _ _ 9 83 _ 8  _ _ _ 16 _ 84  _ _ _ 30 _ 70  _ _ _ 90 _ 10  _  -  -  68  _ 17  -  _ 18 _ 82  St. Louis  Oakland Phoenix  7  San Fran­ cisco  18  5 95  _ 100  _  _  5 41  _ 90  1  1 70  54  10  91  28  82  5 41  _ 90  9  1 70  18  54  10  23 68  28  34 48  1  91  1 99  7  82  18  3 Less than 0.5 percent. 4 Vacation provisions were virtually the same after longer periods of service. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 32. Health, Insurance, and retirement plans: Regular stores (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in regular department stores with specified health, insurance, and retirement plans,1 20 selected metropolitan areas.2 August 1986)  Type of plan  Nassau- New Boston Buffalo Suffolk York  Fort Phila­ Atlanta Balti­ Dallas Worth- Houston Miami- Wash­ Chicago Cleve­ Detroit Kansas City land Hialeah ington delphia more Arlington  St. Oakland Phoenix Louis  San Fran­ cisco  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100 44  100 82  100 93  100 80  100 55  100 93  100 11  100 35  100 31  100 78  100 85  100 43  100 45  100 73  100 69  100 32  100 87  60 52  100 86  63 13  22 22  44 44  10 1  39 39  20 20  8  26 11  42 30  9  19 14  56 11  44  51 37  29 24  “  87 87  36 36  86 86  100  100  71  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  50 28  27 27  60 60  62 62  30 30  20 20  73 73  70 54  75 30  30 5  13 13  13 13  44  69 55  29 24  3 3  79 79  20 20  68 68  56  78  68  23  7  14  14  6  13  17  19  11  10  56  29  10  13  9  14  44 6 ~  22 25 “  2 17 2  14 10  64 6 “  73 65 58  14 8  24 6  57 12  53 8  72 72 62  75 11  45 10  36 32  41 34 4  87 10  9 13  70 8  18 14  Hospitalization insurance ........... 100 Noncontributory plans......... Surgical insurance...................... 100 Noncontributory plans......... Medical insurance........... .......... 100 Noncontributory plans......... Major medical insurance............ 100 Noncontributory plans......... Dental insurance............. ........... 12 Noncontributory plans......... 12  100  100 6 100 6 100 6 100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100 6 100 6 93 71  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  99  98  100  89  79 11  81 30  58  86 70  38 8  57  100 4 100 4 100 4 100 4 74 28  100 7 100 7 100 7 100 7 87 18  100  100  100 29 100 29 100 29 100 29 44 8  100  100  100 2 100 2 100  46 6  100 16 100 16 100 16 100 16 27  100  60  100 41 100 41 100 41 100 33 73 41  51 20  100 18 100 18 100 18 100 18 86 38  Retirement plans4............. .......... 100 Pensions.............................. 100 Noncontributory plans.... 100 Severance pay.................... 20  100 100 78 6  100 100 100 18  100 100 100 7  84 84 74 10  97 97 97 6  100 100 100 21  100 100 95 8  85 85 85 17  100 99 54 43  100 100 100 8  100 99 94 19  98 98 98 20  100 100 100 10  100 100 100 22  95 95 95 50  100 100 100 10  100 99 99 25  99 99 99 68  100 100 100 34  All workers.............................. 100  Os  West  Midwest  South  Northeast  Workers in establishments providing: Life insurance............................. 100 Noncontributory plans......... 80 Accidental death and dismemberment insurance...... 17 Noncontributory plans......... 17 Sickness and accident insurance or sick leave or both3.............. 100 Sickness and accident insurance.......................... 80 Noncontributory plans.... 47 Sick leave (full pay, no waiting period) .................. 33 Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) .................. Long-term disability insurance.... 20 Noncontributory plans.........  100 100 100  —  100 66  ' Includes those plans for which the employer pays at least part of the cost and excludes legally required plans such as workers’ compensation and Social Security; however, plans required by State temporary disability insurance laws are included if the employer contributes more than is legally re­ quired or workers receive benefits over legal requirements. “Noncontributory plans include only those plans financed entirely by the employer. 2 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  100 100  100 100 100 35  100 100 100  3 Unduplicated total of workers receiving sickness and accident insurance and sick leave shown separately. 4 Unduplicated total of workers covered by pension plans and severance pay shown separately. NOTE: Dashes indicate no data.  Table 33. Other selected benefits: Regular stores (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in regular department stores with formal provisions for selected benefits,1 20 selected metropolitan areas,2 August 1986) Northeast Benefit  South  Boston Buffalo Nassau- New Suffolk York  All workers.............................. 100  Midwest  West  Fort Phila­ Balti­ Atlanta Dallas Worth- Houston Miami- Wash­ Chicago Cleve­ Detroit Kansas delphia Hialeah ington land City more Arlington  St. Louis  Oakland Phoenix  San Fran­ cisco  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100 100 78  100 100 100  100 100 100  100 100 80  100 100 68  100 100 100  100 100 60  100 100 85  100 100 93  100 100 61  100 100 96  100 100 35  100 100 100  100 100 68  100 100 96  100 100 97  100 99 23  99 99 45  100 100 34  -  -  -  -  20 6  17 1 10  49 "  24  58  _ -  _ -  _ -  _ _ -  _ _ 61  2 _ -  _ _ -  _ 18 -  _ _  _ _  _  -  -  -  _ -  -  82 64 64 18  70 63 63 8  54 44 44 10  100 94 94 6  87 73 73 14  65 57 57 8  30 24 24 6  70 58 58 12  41 24 24 17  91 81 81 9  92 80 80 11  23 13 13 10  63 49 49 14  71 45 45 26  100 90 90 10  20 7 7 13  26 18 18 8  80 66 66 14  Workers in establishments providing: Funeral leave................................... 100 Jury-duty leave ................................ 100 Technological severance pay.......... 83 Meal allowances: Free meals .................................... Meals at reduced cost.................. Money in lieu of meals.................  -  Sunday-work premiums................... 100 Percent over regular pay............... 80 Time and one-half........................ 80 Other premiums3........................... 20  87 82 82 6  1 For definition of items, see appendix A. 2 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. 3 Includes cents per hour addition to first shift rates as well as other premiums paid per day for Sunday work.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  _  NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 34. Discount privileges: Regular stores (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in regular department stores with formal provisions for discount privileges on merchandise. 20 selected metropolitan areas,1 August 1986)  Discount provision  Nassau- New Boston Buffalo Suffolk York  West  Midwest  South  Northeast  Fort Phila­ Atlanta Balti­ Dallas Worth- Houston Miami- Wash­ Chicago Cleve­ Detroit Kansas City land Hialeah ington delphia more Arlington  St. Louis  Oakland Phoenix  San Fran­ cisco  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  78  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  6 41  18 60  20 66  9 38  -  -  -  _  _  -  -  -  -  17 44 -  _ 42 7 45 6  _ 8 44 25 ~  28 14 “ ”  34  _  14 37 -  1 24 66  _  38 58 2  6 21 51  _  20 43 33 _  31 _  22  2 -  14 ft  26 27  22 -  11 38  24 15  -  19 4  10  _  6 _ 41  34 38 6  9 79 10  10 56 20  6 3 38  6 21 51  8 5 37  . 17 44  57 30 13  31  22 _  14 ft  24 26 3  22  11 38  24 15  Workers in establishments granting Wearable merchandise Immediately upon employment:  O'  'O  After a waiting period: 4  _  -  -  -  20 51 “  11 77 -  22 32 29 -  55  10  23 ”  ~  55 “  12  18  41 4  32 3  68 8  16 41  48 18  10 55  23 “ ”  28 14  34 ” ~  16 41  18 48 _  16 14  ~  "  Nonwearable merchandise Immediately upon employment: 20 76 After a waiting period: _ 4  2 2 _  -  ' For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. 2 Provisions for discounts to employees' families were virtually the same as employee discounts in all areas except Boston, New York, Atlanta, and Baltimore, where family discounts applied to 96, 98, 73, and 94 percent of employees, respectively.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  _  -  _ 42 25 9  19 5  _  _  _  -  -  18 6 66  25 46  10 O 77  22 61  50 5 “  10  16 14  12 -  18 -  „ 41 4  32 3  7 68 1  3 Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 35. Method of wage payment: Discount stores (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in discount department stores by method of wage payment,' selected metropolitan areas,2 August 1986)  Method  Total, 22 areas  Five northeastern areas Total5  New York  Philadelphia  Seven southern areas3  Six midwestern areas Total6  Kansas City  St. Louis  Four western areas"  Selling  o  All sales workers................................  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  rime-rated workers.................................... Formal plans......................................... Range of rates............................... Length of service...................... Merit......................................... Combination ............................. Single rate ..................................... Individual determination.........................  91 25 25 12 10 3 0 67  93 35 35  97 41 41  93 35 35  89 8 8  94 46 46  -  -  _  41  _  _  7 0  46  _  35  99 76 76 66 10  88 1  25 9  93 34 34 29 5 1 58  48  22  1 87  ncentive workers....................................... Straight commission.............................. Salary plus commission........................  9 0 6  6  1  12  -  _  58  56  58  81  7 1 6  3 2 1  7  11  7  _  _  _  7  11  7  6  1  12  Nonselling All nonsales workers .........................  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  'ime-rated workers.................................... Formal plans......................................... Range of rates............................... Length of service...................... Merit......................................... Combination ............................. Single rate ..................................... Individual determination........................  100 45 45 9 11 26 0 55  100 27 27  100 22 22  100 60 60  100 51 51 24 6 20  100 45 45  100 80 80 17 29 34  100 31 31  20  69  -  -  -  15 12  22  -  -  60  100 56 56 1 14 41  -  _  73  _  _  78  _  40  44  49  ' For definition of method of wage payment, see appendix A. 2 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. 3 Includes data for the Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Fort Worth-Arlington, Houston, Miami-Hialeah, and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas. ‘ Includes data for the Denver, Oakland, Phoenix, and San Francisco metropolitan areas. 5 Includes data for Boston, Buffalo, and Nassau-Suffolk in addition to the New   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  _  45 55  31  C)  York and Philadelphia metropolitan areas shown separately. 6 Includes data for Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and Minneapolis-St. Paul in addi­ tion to the Kansas City and St. Louis metropolitan areas shown separately. 7 Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 36. Scheduled weekly hours: Discount stores (Percent of nonsupervisory workers in discount department stores by scheduled weekly hours,1 selected metropolitan areas, August 1986)  Work schedule  Total, 22 areas  Five northeastern areas Total6  New York  Philadelphia  Seven southern areas3  Six midwestern areas Total6  Kansas City  St. Louis  Four western areas4  Selling  All sales workers................... ............  100  100  Linder 35 hours........................................... 35 hours ..................................................... Over 35 and under 37.5 hours................... 37.5 hours .................................................. 40 hours ..............-......................................  2 8 3 1 86  2 25 11 5 57  100 53 47  100  100  -  -  -8  — —  2 "  100  100  100  100  -  8 —  3 0  92  97  92  30 “ 5 65  •  ~ 100  — 98  100  100  100  -  — ~ ~ 100  1  Nonselling  All nonsales workers .........................  100  100  100  100  100  100  Under 35 hours........................................... 35 hours..................................................... Over 35 and under 37.5 hours................... 37.5 hours.................................................. 40 hours.....................................................  1 15 2 7 76  38 6 25 31  75  49  14  2  10 40  -1 85  -  25  1 Data relate to the predominant schedule for full-time day-shift workers in each establishment. 2 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. 3 Includes data for the Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Fort Worth-Arlington, Houston, Miami-Hialeah, and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas. 4 Includes data for the Denver, Oakland, Phoenix, and San Francisco metropolitan 3™a*ncludes data for Boston, Buffalo, and Nassau-Suffolk in addition to the New   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  “ 98  •  “ “ 100  99  York and Philadelphia metropolitan areas shown separately. 6 Includes data for Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and Minneapolis-St. Paul in addi­ tion to the Kansas City and St. Louis metropolitan areas shown separately. 7 Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 37. Paid holidays: Discount stores (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in discount department stores with formal provisions for paid holidays, selected metropolitan i Number of paid holidays  K>  Total, 22 areas  Five northeastern areas Total4  Six midwestern areas  Four western areas3  New York  Philadelphia  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100 1 f) 14 56 3 9 7 9  100 3 _  100  100 14  100  100  100  100  98  27 9 2 25 34  4 61  13 70  16 82  _ 67 29  14 67 3 15  7.7  9.2  10.2  All workers .........................................  100  Workers in establishments providing paid holidays........................................... 4 days plus 4 half days......................... 5 days ................................................... 6 days .......................................... 7 days ........................................ 8 days ................................................... 9 days ................................................... 10 days................................................. 11 days ................................................. Average paid holidays7...............................  -  _  0 26 62  _  -  -  4  1 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. 2 Includes data for the Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Fort Worth-Arlington, Houston, Miami-Hialeah, and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas. 3 Includes data for the Denver, Oakland, Phoenix, and San Francisco metropolitan areas. ' 4 Includes data for Boston, Buffalo, and Nassau-Suffolk in addition to the New York and Philadelphia metropolitan areas shown separately. 5 Includes data for Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and Minneapolis-St. Paul in addi-   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Seven southern areas12  39 48 _  11 1  _  Total5  2  -  7.3  7.1 iwiiooe  7.3 emu wi. uwuio  Kansas City  35  St. Louis  17  • -  7.7 11 icii upuiucii i  7.3  ateet;> siiuwn separately.  6.9  6 Less than 0.5 percent. 7 For purposes of computing average holidays, 2 half days were considered as 1 full day. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 38. Paid vacations: Discount stores (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in discount department stores with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, selected metropolitan  areas,1 August 1986) Total, 22 areas  Vacation policy  Five northeastern areas Total'  New York  Philadelphia  Seven southern areas2  Six midwestern area Total5  Kansas City  St. Louis  Four western areas3  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100 100  100 100  100 100  100 100  100 100  100 100  100 100  100 100  100  6 24  25 23  67 -  -  27  24  35  30  24 76  51 49  96 4  61 39  12 88  19 81  11 89  48 52  2 98  1 99  100  100  100  5 95  11 89  100  0 99 1  _  _  -  97 3  100  86 14  100 -  0 100 -  6 94  0 99 1  97 3  100  100 -  (7) 100 -  6 94  -  86 14  20 80  52 48  96 4  40 60  1 99  18 82  11 89  48 52  2  11 88 1  27 71 3  29 71  40 46 14  <7) 100 -  12 88 -  11  48 52 “  2  89  1  86 14  (7) 88 11  97 2  86 14  (7) 88 11  83 16  0 100  13 86  Method of payment  Workers in establishments providing paid  Amount of vacation pay8  After 6 months of service: After 1 year of service:  After 2 years of service: After 3 years of service:  After 4 years of service:  After 5 years of service:  After 8 years of service:  After 10 years of service:  After 12 years of service:  After 15 years of service:  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  y  0 91 9  82 18  (7) 86 14  82 18  0 6 94  3 97  -  -  . 100 -  100 -  _  _  _  -  -  100  100  1  1  “  “  —  100 **  100 “  2  6 94 “  100  6 59 35  83  6 4 89  1  2  52  Table 38. Paid vacations: Discount stores—Continued (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in discount department stores with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, selected metropolitan areas,1 August 1986)  Vacation policy  Total, 22 areas  Five northeastern Total4  New York  Philadelphia  Seven southern areas2  Six midwestern areas Total8  Kansas City  St. Louis  Four western areas3  Amount of vacation pay6—Continued  After 20 years of service: 2 weeks.............................................. 3 weeks.............................................. 4 weeks.......................................... 5 weeks .............................................. After 25 years of service:8 2 weeks............................................... 3 weeks............................................... 4 weeks............................................... 5 weeks .............................  0  5 93  0  3 97  100  2  ’ For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. ... deludes data for the Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Fort Worth-Arlington, Houston Miami-Hialeah, and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas. areas'101^88 dat3 f°r thS Denver' °akland. Phoenix, and San Francisco metropolitan 4 includes data for Boston, Buffalo, and Nassau-Suffolk in addition to the New and Philadelphia metropolitan areas shown separately. Includes data for Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and Minneapolis-St. Paul in addi­ tion to the Kansas City and St. Louis metropolitan areas shown separately. Vacation payments, such as percent of annual earnings, were converted to an tojk   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  100  100  1 11 83 5  6 4 89 -  48 52 -  1 11 20 68  6 4 35 54  48 17 35  100  2 98  were cnosen and do neces­ sarily reflect individual establishment provisions for arbitrarily progression. Fornotexample years9SS lnd,Cated at 8 years may include changes that occurred between 5 and 8 7 Less than 0.5 percent. 8 Vacation provisions were virtually the same after longer periods of service. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 39. Health, insurance, and retirement plans: Discount stores (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in discount department stores with specified health, insurance, and retirement plans.1 selected metropolitan areas,2 August 1986)  Type of plan  Total, 22 areas  Five northeastern areas Total5  Kansas City  St. Louis  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  99 90  97 78  100 71  86 86  100 88  100 97  100 100  100 100  99 98  80 80  61 61  71 71  78 78  89 88  83 82  59 59  83 83  99 98  99 84 81  100 75 67  100 71 71  100 86 46  100 88 88  98 83 82  100 54 54  100 83 83  100 98 98  73  81  100  92  74  63  61  22  83  19 6 6  2 25 25  .  _  39  30 “  17  -  26 -  24  67 67  100 1 100 1 100 1 100 1 26 1  99 4 99 4 99 4 99 4 42 4  100 ” 100 100 100 “ 78 “  100 1 100 1 100 1 100 1 17 1  Sickness and accident insurance or sick  Sick leave (full pay, no waiting Sick leave (partial pay or waiting  100 15 100 15 100 15 99 15 31 7   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Total6  Four western areas4  100  Accidental death and dismemberment  See footnotes at end of table.  Philadelphia  Six midwestern areas  100 Workers in establishments providing:  Sickness and accident insurance ....  New York  Seven southern areas3  100 53 100 53 100 53 97 53 25 19  100 96 100 96 100 96 100 96 29 29  -  100 48 100 48 100 48 86 48 14 -  —  “  -  100 6 100 6 100 6 100 6 35 -  I  Table 39. Health, Insurance, and retirement plans: Discount stores—Continued (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in discount department stores with specified health, insurance, and retirement plans,’ selected metropolitan areas,2 August 1986)  Type of plan  Total, 22 areas  Five northeastern areas Total5  New York  Philadelphia  Seven southern areas13 2  Six midwestern areas Total6  Kansas City  St. Louis  90 89 89  89 89 89  52 52 52  Four western areas4  Workers in establishments providing:  ON   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Retirement plans6....................... Pensions ............................. Noncontributory plans.... Severance pay .....................  95 94 94 1  96 93 93 3  100 100  100  1 Includes those plans for which the employer pays at least part of the cost and excludes legally required plans such as workers' compensation and Social Security; however, plans required by State temporary disability insurance laws are included if the employer contributes more than is legally required or workers receive benefits over legal requirements. “Noncontributory plans” include only those plans financed entirely by the employer. 2 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. 3 Includes data for the Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Fort Worth-Arlington, Houston, Miami-Hialeah, and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas. Includes data for the Denver, Oakland, Phoenix, and San Francisco metropolitan  78 78 78  100 100 100 1  100 100 100  Includes data for Boston, Buffalo, and Nassau-Suffolk in addition to the New York and Philadelphia metropolitan areas shown separately. 6 Includes data for Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and Minneapolis-St. Paul in addi­ tion to the Kansas City and St. Louis metropolitan areas shown separately. 7 Unduplicated total of workers receiving sickness and accident insurance and sick leave shown separately. 6 Unduplicated total of workers covered by pension plans and severance pay shown separately. NOTE: Dashes indicate no data.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Table 40. Other selected benefits: Discount stores (Percent of full-time nonsupervisory workers in discount department stores with formal provisions for selected benefits,’ selected metropolitan areas,2 August 1986)  Benefit  Total, 22 areas  Five northeastern areas Total5  New York  Philadelphia  Seven southern areas13 2  Six midwestern areas Total6  Kansas City  St. Louis  Four western areas4  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  Funeral leave.............................................. Jury-duty leave............................................ Technological severance pay.....................  100 100 29  100 99 34  100 100 29  100 100 ”  100 100 32  99 99 26  94 100 39  100 100 30  98 100 16  Meal allowances: Meals at reduced cost............................. Money in lieu of meals............................  13 5  19  29  26 “  9  13  16  -  Sunday-work premiums .............................. Percent over regular pay......................... Time and one-half.................................  87 87 87  72 72 72  33 33 33  86 86 86  100 100 100  83 83 83  83 83 83  100 100 100  All workers ......................................... Workers in establishments providing:  1 For definition of items, see appendix A. 2 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. 3 Includes data for the Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Fort Worth-Arlington, Houston, Miami-Hialeah, and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas. 4 Includes data for the Denver, Oakland, Phoenix, and San Francisco metropolitan areas. 5 Includes data for Boston, Buffalo, and Nassau-Suffolk in addition to the New  — 61 61 61  York and Philadelphia metropolitan areas shown separately. 6 Includes data for Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and Minneapolis-St. Paul in addi­ tion to the Kansas City and St. Louis metropolitan areas shown separately. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 41. Discount privileges: Discount stores rrerceni  1986)  Discount provision  All workers . Workers in establishments granting discount privileges6 ......................  Total, 22 areas 100  Five northeastern Total4 100  New York 100  Philadelphia 100  Seven southern areas12  Six midwestern areas Total5  Kansas City  St. Louis  Four western areas3 4 5  100  100  100  100  100  39  78  17  60  16  46  75  96  61  38  39  Immediately upon employment: 10 percent.................................. 15 percent.................................. 20 percent.................................. .  24 0 4  30  67  14  26  20  After a waiting period: 10 percent............... 20 percent...............  18 <7)  28  29  1  3 27 15  67  Wearable merchandise  oo  1  16  8  40  11  20  26  20  35  17  Nonwearable merchandise  Immediately upon employment: 5 percent ....................................... 10 percent..................................... 15 percent...................................... 20 percent...................................... After a waiting period: 10 percent............... 20 percent...............  23 4  (')  18 0  14  1  28  16  8  29  1 Pot definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A. Includes data for the Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Fort Worth-Arlington, Houston, Miami-Hialeah, and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas. 3 Includes data for the Denver, Oakland, Phoenix, and San Francisco metropolitan areas. 4 Includes data for Boston, Buffalo, and Nassau-Suffolk in addition to the New York and Philadelphia metropolitan areas shown separately. 5 Includes data for Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and Minneapolis-St. Paul in addi-   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  60  1  40  11  19 1  35  17  tion to the Kansas City and St. Louis metropolitan areas shown separately. 6 Provisions for discounts to employees’ families were virtually the same as em­ ployee discounts except in New York and Philadelphia, where family discounts ap­ plied to 29 and 48 percent of employees, respectively. 7 Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 42. Selected benefits—part-time workers: Regular stores (Percent of part-time workers in regular department stores with formal provisions for selected benefits as compared with full-time workers, 20 selected metropolitan areas,1 August 1986)  Benefit  Nassau- New Boston Buffalo Suffolk York  St. Louis  Oakland Phoenix  San Fran­ cisco  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  100  too 100  100 100  100 100  100 97 3  100 100 61 61 _ 60 60 -  96 96 97 97 64 39 25 -  64 57 7 100 93 7 42 35 7 -  100 97 3 97 97 46 46 -  100 100 100 100 44 35 8 -  100 61 39 97 61 36 66 30 36  100 100  51 51 94 94  82 55 “ 28 58 58  77 77  100 100  100 100  100 100  100 100 “  100 100 “  77 77 77 75 2 “  100 100 56 56 -  98 98 97 97 73 73 -  99 99  100 100 “  100 100 -  36 32 4  40 40 "  75 42 33  49 49 -  73 73 -  12 12 14 14 -  4 4 “ -  _ -  -  — -  -  29 29  39 39  7 3 4 7 3 4 7 3 4  35 35 8 5 3 8 5 3 8 5 3  7 3 4 7 3 4 40 4 36  8 5 3 5 5 68 28 40  38 5 33 3 3 44 44  _ 100 100  _  _ _  100 100  87 87  _  _ 79 79  _ _  _ _  100 100  87 87  _  _  _ _  99 96 3 _ 85 81 4 _  79 48 31  86 86  87 72 15  84 63 21  62 48 14  97 64 33  42 42 -  66 61 5  44 44 -  66 65 1  68 68  25 4 21 20 4 16  11 1 10 5 5  7 7 7 7 -  5 5 21 21 -  .  _  34 34 _  -  36 36  39 22 17 66 50 16 66 50 16 66 50 16  41 41  52 52  37 37  35 35  29 29  -  -  -  -  19 6 13 19 6 13 19 6 13  70 70  13 13  31 26 5 31 26 5 31 26 5  14 14  66 50 16 61 45 16 85 62 22  19 6 13 15 6 8 60 14 46  31 26 5 31 26 5 100 8 92  14 14  Accidental death and _ 49 18 31  50 50  16 1 15 1 1  _  _  30 30  10 10  49 31 18 49 31 18 49 31 18  75 75  39 38 1 49 49  49 31 18  75 75  49 49  57 57  35 35  _  _  _ _  100 70 30  _  _  75 75  49 49  _  _  75 75  49 49 _  _  _  _  86  87 44 44  _  86  1 For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Fort Phila­ Atlanta Balti­ Dallas Worth- Houston Miami- Wash­ Chicago Cleve­ Detroit Kansas City land Hialeah ington delphia more Arlington  100 Workers in establishments providing:  Sickness and accident insurance....  West  Midwest  South  Northeast  _  -  70 70  13 13  -  -  70 70  13 13  -  -  70 70  13 13  _  -  37 37  13 13  -  -  97 33 64  42 -  42  -  100 100 86 86 -  -  -  14 14  36 36  22 22 27 27 27 27 27 27  -  -  -  -  29 29 36 36  -  -  14 14  36 36  36 36  27 27  -  -  -  6 6  36 36 33 4 29  2 2 ~ 88 88  -  74 -  74  36 36  40 40 -  -  “ -  38 5 33 38 5 33 38 5 33  36 36 “ 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 81 23 57  -  100 100 -  99 99 -  100 100 “ 48 48  ~  75 41  -  62 62 — “  ~  34  100 100 -  48 48 “  41 26 14  62 62  24 24 ~ “  14  47 47 “  -  1 1 “  58 58 “ 15 15 ~ 15 15 T5 15 -  27 27 73 16 57 73 16 57 73 16 57  24 24  22 22  15 15  24 24 ~ 24 24 — 24 24 —  53 53 “ 53 53  47 47  53 53 “  47 47  15 15 15 15 75  73 16 57 16 16  24 24 “ 24 24  53 53  47 47  19 19  47 47  100 “ 100  48 ~ 48  75 14 61  62  -  -  75  14 —  ~  _  ~  47 47  _  62  — _____ NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Table 43. Selected benefits—part-time workers: Discount stores 1986>ent °f part'time workers in discount department stores with formal provisions for selected benefits as compared with full-time workers, selected metropolitan areas,1 August  Benefit  Total, 22 areas  Five northeastern areas Total4  New York  All workers ........................................  100  100  100  Workers in establishments providing: Paid vacations .......................................... Prorated to full-time.............................. Less than full-time................................. Paid holidays...................................... Prorated to full-time.............................. Less than full-time................ Paid sick leave............................... Prorated to full-time............................. Less than full-time.................................  79 77 1 79 79 0 72 71 0  100 95 5 100 99 1 79 79  100 100  Life insurance ................................... Same as full-time.............................. Less than full-time............................. Accidental death and dismemberment insurance................................... Same as full-time .................................. Less than full-time................................. Sickness and accident insurance................ Same as full-time.......................... Less than full-time.....................  32 22 10  51 33 18  23  7 1 7 14 5 9  8 1 7 37 20 17  23  23  Long-term disability insurance................ Same as full-time .................................. Less than full-time................................. Hospitalization insurance............................ Same as full-time .................................. Less than full-time................................. Surgical insurance................................... Same as full-time............................ Less than full-time................................. Medical insurance ..................................... Same as full-time.................................. Less than full-time........................  23 21 2 38 22 15 38 22 15 38 22 15  7  23  74 35 38 74 35 38 74 35 38  23 95 72 23 95 72 23 95 72 23  See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Philadelphia  100  100 100 100 100  Seven southern areas2  61 61 100  60 1  Total5  Kansas City  100  80 80  99 99 “ 100 99 1 99 99  71 71 “ 71 71 56 56  66 66 66 66  42 42  80 80 0 75 75  1 1  12 12 12  “ “ ” ”  12  ~  —  “ “  40 26 13 40 26 13 40 26 13  63 63  ” 11 10 1 11 10 1 11 10 1  areas3  100  63 63  “  St. Louis  100  40 26 13  48  Four  100  11  23  23 23  Six midwestern areas  66 66  —  63 63 63 63 "  “  -  “  ~ -  -  ~ “ 42 42 ~ 42 42 ~ 42 42 "  -  Table 43. Selected benefits—part-time workers: Discount stores—Continued (Percent of part-time workers in discount department stores with formal provisions for selected benefits as compared with full-time workers, selected metropolitan areas,' August 1986)_____________________________________________________________________  Benefit  Total, 22 areas  Five northeastern areas Total*  New York  Philadelphia  Seven southern areas2  Six midwestern areas Total5  Kansas City  St. Louis  40 26 13 40 26 13 75 48 26  63 63  42 42  63 63 99 36 63  42 42 “ 56 14 42  Four western areas3  Workers in establishments providing: Major medical insurance............................ Same as full-time .................................. Less than full-time................................. Dental insurance......................................... Same as full-time .................................. Less than full-time................................. Retirement pensions................................... Prorated to full-time .............................. Same as full-time..................................  37 22 15 26 20 6 76 59 17  73 35 37 37 35 1 99 71 28  95 72 23 72 72 ~ 100 77 23  ' For definitions of areas, see footnote 1, table A-1, appendix A, 2 Includes data for the Atlanta, Baltimore, Dallas, Fort Worth-Arlington, Houston, Miami-Hialeah, and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas. 3 Includes data for the Denver, Oakland, Phoenix, and San Francisco metropolitan areas. 4 Includes data for Boston, Buffalo, and Nassau-Suffolk in addition to the New York and Philadelphia metropolitan areas shown separately.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  48 48 6 “ 6 94 94  11 10 1 “ 61 61  —  “ “ 66  5 Includes data for Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and Minneapolis-St. Paul in addi­ tion to the Kansas City and St. Louis metropolitan areas shown separately. 6 Less than 0.5 percent. NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Dashes indicate that no data were reported.  Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey  Scope of survey  outlets of a company operating under the same name and in the same industry within a metropolitan area.  The survey included retail stores primarily engaged in selling general lines of merchandise, which included clothing, home furnishings, and housewares, in separate sections or departments, which are integrated under a single management (industry 5311 as defined in the 1972 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual prepared by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget). Retail outlets of mail-order houses meeting the survey’s employment-size requirement, as specified below, also were included, but separate auxiliary units such as central offices and warehouses, were excluded. Also excluded were variety stores; stores selling general lines of merchandise but normally having fewer than 25 employees; and general stores. Establishments were classified as either regular or discount department stores. Discount stores were defined as those stores emphasizing discount pricing policies and placing less emphasis on sales service to the public; all other stores were considered regular stores. Establishments studied were selected from regular store establishments employing at least 100 workers and discount store establishments employing 25 workers or more at the time of reference of the data used in compiling the universe lists. Table A-l shows the number of establishments and workers estimated to be within the scope of the survey, as well as the number actually studied by the Bureau. The areas covered by the survey are Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget through June 1983. See table A-1, appendix A, footnote 1, for definitions of the individual areas.  Employment Estimates of the number of workers within the scope of the study are intended as a general guide to the size and composition of the industry’s labor force, rather than as precise measures of employment.  Occupational classification Occupational classification was based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to take account of interestablish­ ment and interarea variations in duties within the same job. (See appendix B for these descriptions.) The criteria for selection of the occupations were: The number of workers in the occupation; the usefulness of the data in wage determination; and appropriate representation of the entire job scale in the industry. Working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, and handicapped, temporary, and probationary workers were not reported in the data for selected occupations.  Full- and part-time employees Data are reported separately, where possible, for regular full- and part-time employees. Regular part-time employees normally are hired to work fewer weekly hours than the establishment’s full-time employees in the same general type Of work. The determination was based on the employer’s distinction between the two groups, which took into account not only differences in work schedules, but also differences in pay and benefits.  Method of study Data were obtained by personal visits of the Bureau’s field representatives to a probability-based sample of establishments within the scope of the survey. To obtain appropriate accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large than of small establishments was studied. In combining the data, each establishment was given an appropriate weight. All estimates are presented, therefore, as relating to all establishments in the industry, excluding only those below the minimum size at the time of reference of the universe data.  Wage data Information on wages relates to straight-time hourly or weekly earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Average weekly earnings relate to salaries that are paid for standard work schedules and are rounded to the nearest half dollar. Cost-of-living pay increases (but not bonuses) were included as part of the workers’ regular pay, but excluded are performance bonuses and lump-sum payments of the type negotiated in the auto and aerospace industries, as well as  Establishment definition An establishment (or store) is defined for this study as all  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  82  profit-sharing payments, attendance bonuses, Christmas or yearend bonuses, and other nonproduction bonuses. Also excluded from earnings was prize (push) money that is not a regularly recurring part of employee compensation paid by the store, as well as all such payments by individual vendors, e.g., bedding and appliance manufacturers. Also excluded were guaranteed minimum earnings (whether or not legally required) which were later deducted from commission earnings, also known as a “draw.” For all workers studied, salary data relate to a mid-August 1986 payroll reference period; for workers partly or wholly paid on a commissiom basis, commissions were averaged, where feasible, over a 12-month period ending as near as possible to July 1986. Average (mean) rates or earnings for each occupation were calculated by weighting each rate (or hourly earnings) by the number of workers receiving the rate, totaling, and dividing by the number of individuals. The hourly earnings of salaried workers were obtained by dividing straight-time salary by normal (or standard) hours to which the salary corresponds.  job are specified. Specific rates of individual workers within the range may be determined by merit, length of service, or a combination of these. Incentive workers in department stores were virtually always classified under either straight-commission or salaryplus-commission plans. Employees covered by plans guaranteeing minimum earnings which are later deducted from commission earnings (“draw”) were considered as receiving straight commissions. If such workers did not earn commissions equal to or greater than the guaranteed minimum, they were considered as receiving straight commissions.  Scheduled weekly hours Data on weekly hours refer to the predominant work schedule for full-time nonsupervisory workers employed on the day shift.  Premium pay for Sunday work Provisions relate to formal compensation policies of establishments for employees working on Sundays.  Type of area The term “metropolitan areas,” as used in this bulletin, refers to the Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA’s) as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget through June 1983. In general, an MSA is defined as a county or group of contiguous counties which contains at least one central city of at least 50,000 inhabitants or a central urbanized area of at least 100,000. Counties contiguous to the one containing such a city or area are included in an msa if, according to certain criteria, they are essentially metropolitan in character and are socially and economically integrated with the central city. In New England, where the city and town are administratively more important than the county, they are the units used in defining MSA’s.  Establishment practices and employee benefits Supplementary benefits in an establishment were considered applicable to all full-time or part-time nonsupervisory employees if they applied to half or more of such workers in the establishment. Similarly, if fewer than half of the workers were covered, the benefit was considered nonexistent in the establishment. Because of length-of-service and other eligibility requirements, the proportion of workers receiving the benefits may be smaller than estimated. Paid holidays. Paid holiday provisions relate to full-day and  half-day holidays provided annually.  Method of wage payment Paid vacations. The summaries of vacation plans are limited  to formal arrangements and exclude informal plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the discretion of the employer or supervisor. Payments not on a time basis were converted; for example, a payment of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered the equivalent of 1 week’s pay. The periods of service for which data are presented represent the most common practices, but they do not necessarily reflect individual establishment provisions for progression. For example, changes in proportions indicated at 10 years of service may include changes which occurred between 8 and 10 years.  Tabulations by method of wage payment relate to the number of workers paid under the various time-rated wage systems. Formal rate structures for time-rated workers provide single rates or a range of rates for individual job categories. In the absence of a formal rate structure, pay rates are determined primarily by the qualifications of the individual worker. A single-rate structure is one in which the same rate is paid to all experienced workers in the same job classification. Learners, apprentices, or probationary workers may be paid according to rate schedules which start below the single rate and permit the workers to achieve the full job rate over a period of time. An experienced worker occasionally may be paid above or below the single rate for special reasons, but such payments are exceptions. Rangeof-rate plans are those in which the minimum, maximum, or both of these rates paid experienced workers for the same  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Health, insurance, and retirement plans. Data are presented  for health, insurance, pension, and retirement severance plans for which the employer pays all or a part of the cost, excluding programs required by law such as workers’ 83  compensation and Social Security.1 Among plans included are those underwritten by a commercial insurance company and those paid directly by the employer from current operating funds or from a fund set aside for this purpose. Death benefits are included as a form of life insurance. Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of insurance under which predetermined cash payments are made directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly basis during illness or accident disability. Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to formal plans2 which provide full pay or a proportion of the worker’s pay during absence from work because of illness; informal arrangements have been omitted. Separate tabulations are provided for (1) plans which provide full pay and no waiting period, and (2) plans providing either partial pay or a waiting period. Long-term disability insurance plans provide payments to totally disabled employees upon the expiration of sick leave, sickness and accident insurance, or both, or after a specified period of disability (typically 6 months). Payments are made until the end of disability, a maximum age, or eligibility for retirement benefits. Payments may be full or partial, but are almost always reduced by Social Security, workers’ compensation, and private pension benefits payable to the disabled employee. Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete or partial payment of doctors’ fees. Such plans may be underwritten by a commercial insurance company or a nonprofit organization, or they may be a form of self­ insurance. 1 Temporary disability insurance which provides benefits to covered workers disabled by injury or illness which is not work-connected is mandatory under State laws in California, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island. Establishment plans which meet only the legal requirements are excluded from these data, but those under which (1) employers contribute more than is legally required, or (2) benefits exceed those specified in the State law are included. In Rhode Island, benefits are paid out of a State fund to which only employees contribute. In each of the other three States, benefits are paid either from a State fund or through a private plan. State fundfinancing: In California, only employees contribute to the State fund; in New Jersey, employees and employers contribute; in New York, employees contribute up to a specified maximum and employers pay the difference between the employees’ share and the total contribution required. Private plan financing: In California and New Jersey, employees cannot be required to contribute more than they would if they were covered by the State fund; in New York, employees can agree to contribute more if the State rules that the additional contribution is commensurate with the benefit provided. 2 An establishment is considered as having a formal plan if it specifies at least the minimum number of days of sick leave available to each employee. Such a plan need not be written, but informal sick leave allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Major medical insurance includes plans designed to cover employees for services which go beyond those covered under hospitalization, medical, or surgical insurance. Major medical plans typically have deductibles and require copayments, and frequently have maximum benefits. Comprehensive plans, which cover all expenses with neither deductibles or copayments, are considered not to include major medical insurance. Dental insurance, for purposes of this survey, covers routine dental work such as fillings, extractions, and X-rays. Excluded are plans which cover only oral surgery or accidental injury. Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to plans which provide regular payments for the remainder of the retiree’s life. Data are presented separately for retirement severance pay (one payment or several over a specified period of time) made to employees on retirement. Establishments providing both severance pay and pensions were included in data for each, but establishments having optional plans providing employees a choice of either retirement severance payments or pensions were considered as having only retirement pension benefits. Paidfuneral and jury-duty leave.3 Data for paid funeral and jury-duty leave relate to formal plans which provide at least partial payment for time lost as a result of attending funerals of specified family members or serving as a juror. Severance pay. Data relate to formal plans providing for payments to employees permanently separated from the company because of a technological change or store closing. Employee discount privileges. Data relate to the incidence of formal provisions for such policies for full-time nonsupervisory employees and their immediate families. Meal allowances. Data refer to formal plans by the store to provide a majority of its full-time nonsupervisory employees who work overtime and/or beyond a specified time of day with one or more free meals, meals at a reduced cost, or money payments in lieu of meals. 3 When paid jury-duty leave is required by law, as it is in Alabama, Nebraska, Tennessee, and parts of Massachusetts, plans are included only if the employer provides the employees with benefits exceeding the legal requirement.  84  Table A-1. Estimated number of establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied, regular and discount department stores, August 1986 ____________________________ Number of establishments2  Workers in establishments Within scope of study  Area1  Within scope of study  Actually studied  Nonsupervisory Total4  Selling 22 areas5.................................................... Regular department stores........................ Discount department stores.................... .  Total actually studied3  Part time  Full time Nonselling  Selling  Nonselling  259 171 88  181 125 56  458,900 327,042 131,858  85,478 71,285 14,193  60,638 42,123 18,515  130,686 97,732 32,954  96,722 49,913 46,809  363,875 272,267 91,608  159  118  301,674  64,422  38,455  90,671  45,406  252,837  8 5 12 9 13  5 4 6 9 8  12,445 5,866 15,030 30,526 29,441  1,771 1,114 2,245 3,862 6,001  1,075 485 1,510 6,014 3,742  4,783 2,718 5,208 7,693 5,133  2,057 498 2,453 6,418 3,717  11,158 5,272 11,990 30,526 21,025  9 8 7 7 8 6 11  8 5 6 5 6 6 8  19,343 12,294 11,356 7,058 13,701 9,083 22,889  4,028 3,465 3,943 1,553 3,581 2,122 5,036  2,815 1,129 1,708 1,058 1,738 1,044 2,976  3,852 3,949 2,828 2,056 4,900 3,711 6,742  2,368 1,821 1,452 1,012 1,822 1,253 3,613  19,116 8,377 9,788 4,643 10,951 9,083 16,267  9 5 7 7 5  7 5 6 5 4  30,061 10,029 18,148 6,074 13,140  6,231 2,506 4,948 1,116 3,593  4,683 1,495 1,964 533 1,032  9,270 2,342 6,259 2,248 4,801  5,518 1,383 2,921 1,310 1,846  29,701 10,029 16,558 4,061 11,541  9 8 6  6 5 4  15,621 11,266 8,303  2,776 2,896 1,635  1,478 1,189 787  4,705 4,319 3,154  1,357 1,552 1,035  7,805 7,661 7,285  Regular department stores  20 publishable areas............................ Northeast:  Boston.................................................. Buffalo.................................................. Nassau-Suffolk.................................... New York............................................. Philadelphia......................................... South:  Atlanta.................................................. Baltimore.............................................. Dallas ................................................... Fort Worth-Arlington ............................ Houston................................................ Miami-Hialeah...................................... Washington........................................... Midwest:  Chicago................................................ Cleveland............................................. Detroit................................................... Kansas City .......................................... St. Louis............................................... West:  Oakland............................................... San Francisco..................................... See footnotes at end of table.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  85  Table A-1. Estimated number of establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied, regular and discount department stores, August 1986—Continued Num ber of establis hments2  Workers in establishments Within scope of study  Area'  Within scope of study  Actually studied  Nonsupervisory Total"  Full time Selling  Total actually studied3  Part time  Nonselling  Selling  Nonselling  Discount department stores  4 publishable areas.............................  25  15  30,054  3,644  3,800  6,688  9,921  23,542  5 9  3 4  10,739 7,828  1,178 750  1,895 757  2,922 1,325  2,958 2,592  7,873 6!463  5 6  4 4  3,225 8,262  314 1,402  288 860  689 1,752  1,092 3,279  2,228 6,978  Northeast;  New York.................................. Philadelphia............................... Midwest:  Kansas City......................................... St. Louis............................................  1 The areas are defined as follows: NORTHEAST: Boston—Suffolk County, 3 communities in Bristol County, 4 in Essex County, 44 in Mid­ dlesex County, 26 in Norfolk County, 16 in Plymouth County, and 9 in Worcester County; Buffalo—Erie County; Nassau-Suffolk— Nassau and Suffolk Counties; New York—New York City (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Counties), and Putnam, Rockland, and Westchester Counties; Philadelphia— Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Mont­ gomery, and Philadelphia Counties, Pa.; and Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, N.J. SOUTH: Atlanta—Barrow, Butts, Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, De Kalb, Douglas, Fayette, Forsyth, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry, Newton, Paulding, Rockdale, Spalding, and Walton Counties; Baltimore—Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Car­ roll, Harford, Howard, and Queen Annes Counties; Dallas—Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Kaufman, and Rockwall Counties; Fort Worth-Arlington— Johnson, Parker, and Tarrant Counties; Houston—Fort Bend, Harris, Lib­ erty, Montgomery, and Waller Counties; Miami-Hialeah— Dade County; Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va.—the District of Columbia; Calvert, Charles, Frederick, Montgomery, and Prince Georges Counties, Md.; and Alexan­ dria, Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas, and Manassas Park Cities and Ar­ lington, Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince William, and Stafford Counties, Va. MID­ WEST: Chicago—Cook, Du Page, and McHenry Counties; Cleveland— Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, and Medina Counties; Detroit— Lapeer,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  86  Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, and Wayne Counties; Cass, Clay, Jackson, Lafayette, Platte, and Ray Counties! Mo.; and Johnson, Leavenworth, Miami, and Wyandotte Counties, Kans.; Minneapolis-St. Paul—Anoka, Carver, Chisago, Dakota, Hennepin, Isanti! Ramsey, Scott, Washington, and Wright Counties, Minn.; and St. Croix County, Wise.; and St. Louis—St. Louis City; Franklin, Jefferson, St. Charles, and St. Louis Counties, Mo.; and Clinton, Jersey, Madison, Monroe, and St. Clair Counties, III. WEST: Denver—Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, Douglas, and Jefferson Counties, Colo.; Oakland—Alameda and Contra Costa Counties; Phoenix— Maricopa County; and San Francisco— Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo Counties. 2 Establishments studied were selected from regular department stores employing at least 100 workers, and from discount department stores employing 25 workers or more. 3 Data relate to total employment in establishments actually visited. " Includes executive, professional, and other workers in addition to the nonsupervisory worker categories shown separately. 5 The survey was designed to study regular and discount department stores separately in 22 metropolitan areas. After collection, it was deter­ mined that the data for regular department stores met the Bureau of La­ bor Statistics publication criteria in 20 of the areas; for discount stores, in 4 of the areas. Kansas City—  Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions  The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to assist its field representatives in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area. This permits the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau’s job descriptions may differ significantly from those used in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’s field representatives were instructed to exclude apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees and handicapped, temporary, and probationary workers. The titles and the numerical codes below the job titles in this appendix were taken from the 1980 edition of the Standard Occupational Classification Manual (SOC), issued by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards. In general, the Bureau of Labor Statistics occupational descriptions are much more specific than those found in the SOC manual. To illustrate, the Bureau considered salespersons of floor coverings, furniture and bedding, and housewares as three separate occupations, but those jobs were all classified under one SOC code (4348). Thus, in comparing the results of this survey with other sources, differences in occupational definitions should be taken into consideration.  lists and accurate price signs; moving, packing, and unpacking stock for reserve; arranging for delivery, installation, and service of merchandise; and writing salescheck and receiving payment for each sale or directing customer to cashier. May build prospect lists and customer files, and may assist in making on-site measurements and preparing layout of customer’s room and preparing material and cost estimates.  Furniture and bedding (4348: Salesperson; furniture and home furnishings) Sells furniture, beds, and mattresses, which requires a working knowledge of method of construction, type of material used, and a broad knowledge of such merchandise as upholstered and case goods, bedding, and home furnishings accessories. Duties involve most of the following: Initiating customer contact on selling floor; answering customer questions and advising customers as to quality, style, fabric, etc.; arranging for delivery, installation, and service of merchandise; and writing salescheck and receiving payment for each sale or directing customer to cashier. May also build prospect lists and customer files.  Housewares (4348: Salesperson; furniture and home furnishings) Sells housewares, such as kitchen and other household utensils, which requires a limited knowledge of the merchandise. Duties involve: Providing limited services to customers, such as locating, explaining, or suggesting merchandise; writing salescheck and receiving payment for each sale or directing customer to cashier; and replenishing supply of merchandise on display and maintaining presentation standards. Includes salespersons who sell china, glassware, and lamps.  Store Occupations, Selling (Unless otherwise indicated, sales occupations refer to regular department stores only.)  Salespersons, home furnishings Floor coverings (4348: Salesperson; furniture and home furnishings)  Home furnishings, combination  Displays and sells floor coverings, such as carpets, rugs, and linoleum, explaining various qualities of merchandise, such as composition, method of fabrication, and wearing qualities. Duties involve a combination of any of the following: Requisitioning and maintaining adequate stock of merchandise in categories assigned; maintaining model stock  https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (4348: Salesperson; furniture and home furnishings) Workers in positions described above within the defined departments were reported under this classification when duties were regularly split between two or more departments listed. 87  Major appliances, household (4352: Salesperson; radio, television, high fidelity, and household appliances) Sells and demonstrates major kitchen and laundry appliances, including washers, ranges, dryers, refrigerators, freezers, and garbage disposals; and/or major electric and electronic appliances such as radios, televisons, stereo sets, video cassette recorders and computer equipment for home use. Duties involve: Answering customer questions relating to features, quality, and prices of competitive brands; arranging for delivery, installation, and service of merchandise; and writing salescheck and receiving payment or directing customer to cashier. May also build prospect lists and customer files. Excluded were workers primarily selling toasters, blenders, food processors, and other minor appliances. As a general rule, the distinction between major and small kitchen and laundry appliances (“white goods”) is that the former require installation while the latter do not. For wage study purposes, salespersons were classified by merchandise as follows: Kitchen and laundry appliances Electric and electronic appliances Major appliances, combination Workers were reported under “Major appliances, combination” when duties within the defined department were regularly split between the merchandise listed above.  Salesperson, apparel and footwear Men’s clothing (4346: Salesperson; garments and textile products) Sells any of a variety of men’s clothing, including suits, coats, slacks, raincoats, formal wear, etc. Duties involve: Assisting in the selection of clothing best suited to customer’s need and preference; suggesting necessary changes or alterations to clothing and recording alterations recommended by fitter or tailor; and writing salescheck and receiving payment for each sales transaction or directing customer to cashier. May wrap merchandise; assist in stocking, displaying, and inventorying merchandise; and may help to train new salespersons. Workers whose major activity is selling men’s furnishings, such as shirts, ties, belts, and hats were excluded.  formal wear, and raincoats and other outerwear. Duties involve: Suggesting and assisting in selection of clothing best suited to customer’s need and preference; suggesting necessary alterations to clothing and recording alterations recommended by tailor or fitter; and writing salescheck and receiving payment for each sales transaction or directing customer to cashier. May also wrap merchandise; assist in stocking, inventorying, and displaying merchandise; and may help to train new salespersons. Excluded were workers whose major activity is selling women’s accessories and specialties, such as belts, gloves, handbags, hosiery, jewelry, lingerie, underwear, and uniforms.  Footwear (4351: Salesperson, shoes) Sells men’s and/or women’s shoes, boots, and other footwear, which requires specialized knowledge of fit, styles, and construction. Duties involve: Ascertaining customer’s shoe size or measuring customer’s foot; assisting customer in selection of specified style, color, and size from stock; and writing salescheck and receiving payment for each sale or directing customer to cashier. May build prospect lists and customer files. Includes salesperson who sells athletic shoes.  Apparel and footwear, combination (4346: Salesperson; garments and textile products) (4351: Salesperson; shoes) Workers in positions with work characteristics as described above and within the range of defined departments were reported under this classification when duties are regularly split between two or more departments listed.  Salesperson, miscellaneous Automotive accessories (4342: Salesperson; motor vehicles, mobile homes, and supplies) Displays and sells automobile and light truck accessories and supplies. Ascertains make, type, and quality of merchandise desired by customer. May read catalog or computer for stock number of items. Prepares sales transaction or warranty. Receives payment, obtains credit authorization, or directs customer to cashier. Places new merchandise on display and prepares inventory of stock. May requisition merchandise from stockroom.  Women’s clothing Lawn and garden equipment (4346: Salesperson; garments and textile products) (4353: Salesperson; hardware) Sells any of a variety of women’s ready-to-wear clothing, including dresses, suits, coats, blouses, skirts, casual wear,   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Sells lawn and garden plants, supplies, and equipment.  Duties involve: Advising customer on methods of planting and cultivating plants and use of gardening tools and equipment; suggesting suitable trees, shrubbery, and flowers for planting in various soils and climates; watering and trimming growing plants on sales floor; giving horticultural advice to customer; and preparing sales transactions and receiving payment, or directing customer to cashier.  distinguished from the stockworker by the fact that the latter does not assist customers. Included utility staff and flying squad salespersons who regularly work in any assigned department of sales floor, performing duties as listed. Workers typically are experienced in selling merchandise in many departments and are assigned to particular departments depending on store need. Excluded were contingent or relief salespersons.  Sporting goods  General merchandise (discount stores only)  (4345: Salesperson; sporting goods) Sells a wide variety of sporting goods, athletic equipment, and associated accessories and apparel, which requires specialized knowledge of operation, use, and construction. Duties involve: Advising customers on type and size of equipment geared to his or her specific needs, e.g., weight of bowling ball or size of grip on tennis racket; explaining use and care of equipment; and writing salescheck and receiving payment for each sale or directing customer to cashier. May also sell luggage or other items in departments located near the sporting goods area. May build prospect lists and customer files, and also make minor repairs on sporting goods. Excluded were salespersons who sell only athletic shoes.  Miscellaneous, combination (4359: Salesperson; not elsewhere classified)  (4359: Salesperson; not elsewhere classified) Displays, describes, and sells any of a variety of merchandise, utilizing general knowledge of the characteristics, quality, and merit of items sold. Duties involve: Describing selling points of merchandise on sale floor; ascertaining make, type, and quality of merchandise desired by customer; displaying merchandise and suggesting selection to customer; and keeping shelves stocked with merchandise. May receive payment or obtain credit authorization or direct customer to cashier. May regularly perform nonselling duties such as cashiering or working in the stockroom. Included were utility staff and flying squad salespersons who regularly work in any assigned department of sales floor, performing duties as listed. Workers typically are experienced in selling merchandise in many departments and are assigned to particular departments depending on store need. Excluded were contingent or relief salespersons. For wage study purposes, workers were classified by department duties and store areas as follows:  Workers in positions described above within the defined departments were reported under this classification when duties were regularly split between two or more of the departments listed.  Salesperson, floor only Salesperson, floor and cashier, checkout Salesperson, floor and stockroom Salesperson, not classifiable by department (Salespersons in the position described above were reported under this classification when the information needed to classify them according to department was not available.)  Sales, general General (4362: Sales clerk)  Store Occupations, Nonselling  Assists customers in selling area of a store and provides service by directing customer to merchandise. Maintains presentation standards, fills in stock, straightens merchandise, and performs cashiering duties, including bagging and wrapping. Also included were workers whose primary duties involve cashiering but who, as a regular part of their job, assist customers in obtaining merchandise. Workers in this category normally do not engage in the same degree of personal contact with customers as salespersons in home furnishing or major appliances; i.e., limited knowledge of merchandise is required. They do not build prospect lists and customer files or provide detailed explanations of merchandise. The general salesperson is   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Alterations tailor (regular stores only) (6852: Tailor and dressmaker) Makes difficult alterations on garments. Work includes most of the following: Using sewing machine, scissors, needle, and thread, follows markings of fitter; remodels shoulders and necklines; resets sleeves and collars; takes in side seams; fells; and bastes new seams or resews seams. May press garments. Excluded were workers performing only minor alterations, such as shortening sleeves. 89  Cashier, checkout (discount stores only)  Receiver (regular and discount stores)  (4364: Cashier)  (4753: Traffic, shipping and receiving clerk)  Bags purchases and receives payment from customer. Work involves most of the following: Receiving payment, merchandise, and salescheck from salesperson or customer; reviewing salescheck for correct computation, recording amount of sale on cash register, and handling cash or charge transactions; inspecting merchandise prior to wrapping to check on condition and to verify price tags against salescheck; wrapping packages for carryout merchandise, and attaching address label if merchandise is to be delivered. Workers primarily engaged in gift wrapping were classified as giftwrap persons. (See below.)  Cleaner (porter) (regular and discount stores)  Receives shipments of incoming merchandise to store receiving area. Work involves most of the following: Counting cartons against freight bill; inspecting cartons for damages; checking carton seals for security; preparing receiving documents; moving merchandise to marking area; routing incoming merchandise to proper departments; and maintaining security, neatness, and operating efficiency of receiving platform.  Stock and inventory worker (regular and discount stores) (4754: Stock and inventory clerk)  (5244: Janitor and cleaner) Cleans and keeps in orderly condition sales areas, offices, and other assigned areas. Duties involve most of the following: Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing trash and other refuse; dusting equipment, merchandise, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor maintenance service; and cleaning lavatories, restaurant, and locker rooms. Workers who specialize in window cleaning were excluded.  Display assistant (regular stores only)  Performs a variety of merchandise checking, marking, and stock handling tasks while assigned to one or more departments of a store. Work involves most of the following: Checking and signing for quantities of merchandise received into a department; inspecting merchandise for damages; distributing merchandise to unpacking area and storing stock or distributing merchandise to floor; and rearranging stock and samples. Fills shipping or transfer orders for goods from stored merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips or customers’ orders, requisitions additional stock or reports short supplies to supervisor, and performs other related duties. Workers who assist customers were classified as general salespersons.  (449: Sales occupation, other; not elsewhere classified)  Office Clerical Occupations  Assists in preparing, prefabricating, and setting up window and interior display properties. Work involves most of the following: Moving window and interior display properties, as instructed; displaying merchandise according to prearranged plan of decorator or other supervisor; placing prices and descriptive signs on backdrops, fixtures, or floors; assisting in construction of decorative properties; and making minor repairs to promotional materials, display properties, and fixtures. May also assist in dressing mannequins for use in displays. Included were workers who have the same “display technique” skills as a display manager, but who do not have the responsibility for either supervising workers or organizing the display in the display department.  Cashier, office (regular and discount stores) (4364: Cashier) Controls central cash disbursement and collection and maintains and verifies records of various money documents used in the store. Work involves most of the following: Preparing, issuing, receiving, and verifying till bags; balancing daily receipts and preparing itemized reports and bank deposits; and reconciling bank statements. May assist in investigating severe register shortages or overages, and also assist in some payroll functions. Excluded were cashiers who have extensive customer contact, or those who work in the selling area. (See Cashier, checkout.)  Gift-wrap person (regular stores only) (449: Sales occupation, other; not elsewhere classified)  Service desk worker (regular and discount stores)  Wraps merchandise with special gift-wrapping paper selected by customer from stock. Knowledge of wrapping techniques is required. May also take payment from customer and/or verily purchase of the item from the store by checking customer’s receipt. May assist in layaway, credit, or customer service departments.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  (Adjuster, complaint clerk, investigator, service-desk clerk) (4758: Expediter) Investigates customer complaints about unsatisfactory service, damaged or incorrect merchandise, or incorrect 90  billing of accounts. Duties involve one or more of the following: Reading written complaints or discussing complaint with customer; checking out complaint by examining files or billing statements; conferring with other persons about service; or examining merchandise to determine condition. May accept payment for balances due or issue credit vouchers; order exchange of merchandise or repair; and trace and adjust errors made in credit allowances. May authorize check approvals or verify information for such approvals.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Switchboard operator (regular and discount stores) (4732: Telephone operators) Operates a single- or multiple-position telephone switchboard. Duties involve handling incoming, outgoing, intrastore, or office calls. May record toll calls and take messages; and give information to persons who call in. Switchboard operator-receptionists were excluded.  91  Industry Wage Survey Bulletins  The most recent reports providing occupational wage data for industries currently included in the Bureau’s program of industry wage surveys are listed below. Bulletins still in print are for sale from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, or from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Publications Sales Center, P.O. Box 2145, Chicago, IL 60690. Order by title and GPO Stock Number. Bulletins marked with an asterisk (*) are available only from the Chicago address. Bulletins that are out of print are available for reference at leading public, college, or university libraries or at the Bureau’s Washington or regional offices. Manufacturing  Basic Iron and Steel, 1983. BLS Bulletin 2221. $2.25* Cigarette Manufacturing, 1986. bls Bulletin 2276. $1.25 GPO Stock No. 029-001-02928-4 Corrugated and Solid Fiber Boxes, 1981. bls Bulletin 2138. Out of print. Grain Mill Products, 1982. BLS Bulletin 2207. $3* Hosiery Manufacturing, 1981. BLS Bulletin 2151. Out of print. Industrial Chemicals, 1986. bls Bulletin 2287. $2.50 GPO Stock No. 029-001-02934-9 Iron and Steel Foundries, 1986. BLS Bulletin 2292. $5.50. GPO Stock No. 029-001-02963-2 Machinery Manufacturing, 1983. bls Bulletin 2229. $3.50* Meat Products, 1984. BLS Bulletin 2247. $6* Men’s and Boys’ Shirts and Nightwear, 1987. bls Bulletin 2304. $3.25 gpo Stock No. 029-001-02973-0 Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1984. BLS Bulletin 2230. $2.25* Men’s and Women’s Footwear, 1986. bls Bulletin 2291. $3.50* Millwork, 1984. BLS Bulletin 2244. $2* Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1979. bls Bulletin 2103. Out of print. Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1983. BLS Bulletin 2223. $4.75* Petroleum Refining, 1985. BLS Bulletin 2255. $2.25*   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1986. bls Bulletin 2286. $3.* Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1982. BLS Bulletin 2180. Out of print. Shipbuilding and Repairing, 1986. BLS Bulletin 2295. $2. gpo Stock No. 029-001-02965-9 Structural Clay Products, 1986. BLS Bulletin 2288. $3.25* Synthetic Fibers, 1985. BLS Bulletin 2268. $1.50 GPO Stock No. 029-001-02904-7 Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1985. BLS Bulletin 2260. $3.25* Textile Mills, 1985, BLS Bulletin 2265. $5.50 GPO Stock No. 029-001-02920-9 Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1982. bls Bulletin 2187. Out of print. Wood Household Furniture, 1986. BLS Bulletin 2283. $5.50 GPO Stock No. 029-001-02931-4 Nonmanufacturing  Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1982. bls Bulletin 2198. $2.25* Banking, 1985. BLS Bulletin 2269. $4 GPO Stock No. 029-001-02913-6 Bituminous Coal Mining, 1982. bls Bulletin 2185. Out of print. Certificated Air Carriers, 1984. bls Bulletin 2241. $2* Computer and Data Processing Services, 1982. BLS Bulletin 2184. $2* Contract Cleaning Services, 1986. bls Bulletin 2299. $3. GPO Stock No. 029-001-02970-5 Department Stores, 1986. BLS Bulletin 2311. Electric and Gas Utilities, 1982. bls Bulletin 2218. $4.75* Hospitals, 1985. bls Bulletin 2273. $12 GPO Stock No. 029-001-02919-5 Hotels and Motels, 1983. BLS Bulletin 2227. $3.25* Life and Health Insurance Carriers, 1986. bls Bulletin 2293. $5. gpo Stock No. 029-001-02939-0 Nursing and Personal Care Facilities, 1985. bls Bulletin 2275. $5 GPO Stock No. 029-001-02921-7 Oil and Gas Extraction, 1982. BLS Bulletin 2193. $3*  Employee Benefits in Medium and Large Firms, 1986  Employee Benefits in Medium and Large Firms, 1986 U S Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics June 1987 Bulletin 2281  U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin 2281  The Bureau of Labor Statistics issues its 1986 bulletin on employee benefits in medium and large firms. This survey is the eighth in the series.  Data available • Incidence and detailed characteristics of 14 private sector employee benefits paid for at least in part by the employer: Lunch and rest periods; holidays, vacations, and personal, funeral, jury-duty, military, and sick leave; sickness and accident, long-term disability, health, and life insurance; and private retirement/capital accumulation plans. Included in the retirement data is information on defined benefit plans, such as benefit formulas and pension replacement rates, and on defined contribution plans, such as salary reduction or 401 (k) plans. • Incidence and provisions of flexible benefits plans and reimbursement accounts are included for the first time in 1986.  • Major benefits in medium and large firms, nationwide. • Minimum employment in establishments covered is generally 100 or 250 employees, depending on the industry.   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Source of data • Sample of about 1,500 establishments in a cross-section of the Nation’s private industries; primarily by personal interview.  Uses  Coverage  Publications are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Publications Sales Center P.O. Box 2145 Chicago, Jll. 60690  pmtm.  i  • Union contract negotiations. • Conciliation and arbitration in public and private sectors. • Development of legislation affecting the welfare of workers.  1  Order form Please send  ________________  copies of Employee Benefits in Medium and Large Firms, 1986,  Bulletin 2281, Stock No. 029-001-02927-6, at $5 each, for a total of $---------------------------- --------- • □ Enclosed is a check or money order payable to Superintendent of Documents. □ Charge to GPO Deposit Account No ------------------------ ------------ Order No. -----□ Credit Card Orders—MasterCardD or Visa □ Total charges $_______  Credit Card No.---------------------------Expiration Date Month/Year  ,  Name Address City, State, Zip Code  J  Bureau of Labor Statistics Regional Offices  REGION VIII REGION VII REGION II  REGION VI  Region I Kennedy Federal Building Suite 1603 Boston, MA 02203 Phone: (617) 565-2327  Region II Room 808 201 Varick Street New York, NY 10014 Phone: (212) 337-2400  Region III 3535 Market Street P.O. Box 13309 Philadelphia, PA 19101  Phone: (215) 596-1154 https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Region IV 1371 Peachtree Street, N.E. Atlanta, GA 30367 Phone: (404) 347-4416  Region V 9th Floor Federal Office Building 230 S. Dearborn Street Chicago, IL 60604 Phone: (312) 353-1880  Region VI Federal Building 525 Griffin Street, Room 221 Dallas, TX 75202 Phone: (214) 767-6970  Regions VII and VIII 911 Walnut Street Kansas City, MO 64106 Phone: (816) 426-2481  Regions IX and X 71 Stevenson Street P.O. Box 3766 San Francisco, CA 94119 Phone: (415) 995-5605  U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics Washington, D.C. 20212  Postage and Fees Paid U.S. Department of Labor Third Class Mail  Official Business Penalty for Private Use, $300   https://fraser.stlouisfed.org Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis  Lab-441  United States Department oI Labor  Years of Working for Americas  /o  ruiure
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