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Industry Wage Survey:
Corrugated and Solid Fiber Boxes
March 1976
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1977
Bulletin 1 921




DOCUMENT COLLECTION
JUL2

1977

Dayton & Montgomery Co.
Public Library

Industry Wage Survey:
Corrugated and Solia Fiber Boxes
March 1976
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1977
Bulletin 1 921




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.O . 20402
Stock N o. 029-001-02024-4




Preface

This bulletin summarizes the results of a Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of wages
and supplementary benefits in the corrugated and solid f|ber box industry in March 1976.
Separate releases for eight metropolitan areas of industry concentration (Chicago,
Jersey City, Los Angeles-Long Beach, Milwaukee, Newark, New York, Philadelphia, and
St. Louis) were issued earlier. Copies are available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Washington, D.C. 20212, or any of its regional offices.
The study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of Wages and Industrial Relations.
Sandra L. King of the Division of Occupational Wage Structures prepared the analysis.
Field work for the survey was directed by the Bureau’s Assistant Regional Commissioners
for Operations.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program of industry wage studies, as well as
the addresses of the Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end of this bulletin.
Material in this publication is in the public domain and may be reproduced without the
permission of the Federal Government. Please credit the Bureau of Labor Statistics and
cite the name and number of the publication.




iii




Contents

Page
Summary ....................................................................................................................................................................................
Industry characteristics..............................................................................................................................................................
Employment and location.................................................................................................................................................
Products.............................................................................................................................................................................
Production processes.......................................................................................................................................................
Size of establishm ent.......................................................................................................................................................
Unionization ....................................................................................................................................................................
Sex of worker....................................................................................................................................................................
Method of wage paym ent................................................................................................................................................
Average hourly earnings ............................................................................................................................................................
Occupational earnings................................................................................................................................................................
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions ..............................................................................................
Scheduled weekly h o u rs...................................................................................................................................................
Shift differential provisions and practices ....................................................................................................................
Paid h o lid ay s....................................................................................................................................................................
Paid vacations ................................................................................................................................... * ............................
Health, insurance, and retirement p la n s.........................................................................................................................
Other selected benefits ...................................................................................................................................................
Text tables:
1. Regional wage levels for selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber box manufacturing
as a percent of national averages, March 1976 ...................................................................................................
2. Earnings distribution of bundlers-packers and flexographic printer operators, Chicago area,
March 1976 ................................................................................................................................................................
Reference tables:
1. Average hourly earnings by selected characteristics ..............................................................................................
2. Earnings distribution .................................................................................................................................................

1

1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2

3
4
4
4
4
4
4
5

4

6
7

Occupational averages:
3. All establishm ents....................................................................................................................................................... 8
4. By size of establishment ............................................................................................................................................ 14
5. By method of wage payment ................................................................................................................................... 17
6. By labor-management contract coverage.....................................................................................................................20
Occupational earnings:
7. Chicago, 111., ..................................................................................................................................................................23
8. Jersey City, N .J ..............................................................................................................................................................27
9. Los Angeles— Long Beach, C alif................................................................................................................................. 29
10. Milwaukee, W is .............................................................................................................................................................. 31
11. Newark, N.J ................................................................................................................................................................... 34
12. New York, N . Y .- N J ....................................................................................................................................................36
13. Philadelphia, P a.-N .J ................................................................................................................................................. 39
14. St. Louis, Mo.—Ill i..................................................................................................................................................... 41




v

Contents—Continued
Page

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
15. Method o f wage payment ..............................................
16. Scheduled weekly hours ................................................
17. Shift differential provisions............................................
18. Shift differential practices..............................................
19. Paid holidays .................................................................
20. Paid vacations................................................................
21. Health, insurance, and retirement plans ....................
22.,Other selected benefits ................................................
Appendixes:
A. Scope and method of survey........................................
B. Occupational descriptions............................................




44
45
45
46
48
49
51
52
53
56

Corrugated and Solid Fiber Boxes, March 1976

regions; about four-fifths in New England and the Great
Lakes region; and about three-fourths in the Southeast and
Middle West. The eight metropolitan areas studied separa­
tely accounted for one-fourth of the workers in the industry.

Summary

Straight-time hourly earnings of production and related
workers in the corrugated and solid fiber box industry
averaged $4.65 an hour in March 1976. 1 Among the
eight regions studied, 2 hourly earnings ranged from $4.15
in the Southeast to $5.62 in the Pacific region. Workers in
the two largest regions of industry employment— the
Great Lakes and Middle Atlantic regions— averaged about
$4.75 an hour.
Workers in occupations selected to represent the various
manufacturing operations and worker skills in the industry
made up two-thirds of its work force. 3 Nationwide,
average hourly earnings ranged from a low of $4.05 an hour
for hand strippers to a high of $5.78 for maintenance
electricians. Most of the occupations were predominantly
staffed by men, who averaged $4.73 an hour— 18 percent
more than women, who were usually employed in the less
skilled jobs.
All of the workers studied were in establishments pro­
viding paid holidays and paid vacations after qualifying
periods of service. Typical provisions included 10 paid
holidays annually and 1 week of vacation pay after 1 year
of service, 2 weeks after 3 years, 3 weeks after 10 years,
and 4 weeks after 15 years. Virtually all workers were in
plants providing all or part of the cost of life, hospitaliza­
tion, surgical, and basic medical insurance. Retirement
pension plans in addition to Federal social security applied
tp seven-eighths of the work force.

Products. The corrugated and solid fiber box industry
produces boxes from stock consisting of two or more plies
of paperboard. Important products include corrugated and
solid fiberboard boxes, pads, partitions, display items,
pallets, single-face products, and corrugated sheets. Virtu­
ally all production workers covered by the study were in
establishments which produced boxes from paperboard
stock that included one ply of corrugated paper; a few
were in plants making boxes from uncorrugated paper
(solid fiber). Both types of boxes are usually shipped flat
and require assembling by the customer.
Nearly 80 percent of the industry’s workers were in
either corrugated or solid fiber plants reporting no sec­
ondary products, while 15 percent were employed by such
establishments manufacturing other than paperboard con­
tainers or boxes as secondary products. A small number of
corrugated or solid fiber plants reported manufacturing
other types of boxes as secondary products, usually solid
fiber or folding boxes.
About two-thirds of the workers were in establishments
owned by companies also operating plants producing paper
or paperboard for sale to others; about 5 percent were in
box plants owned by companies manufacturing paper or
paperboard for use only within the company; and the rest
were in plants not owned by a paper manufacturing
company.

Industry characteristics

Production processes. Printing, forming, and finishing are
among the major production processes in the industry.

Em ploym ent and location. Corrugated and solid fiber box
plants within the scope of the Bureau’s study (those with
at least 30 workers) employed 61,912 production and
related workers in March 1976. 4 Production employment
ranged from 3,400 in the Border States and the Middle
West to 18,700 in the Great Lakes region. The Middle
Atlantic region employed 12,400 workers; the Southeast,
8,900. (See appendix table A-l.) Among eight areas of
industry concentration studied separately, production worker
employment ranged from less than 1,000 in Jersey City
and Newark to 4,600 in Chicago.
Slightly more than four-fifths of the industry’s produc­
tion work force was located in metropolitan areas. 5 Such
areas included over nine-tenths of the workers in the
Middle Atlantic, Border States, Southwest, and Pacific



1
See appendix A for scope and method of survey. Wage data in
this bulletin exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
For definition of regions, see appendix A, table A-l,
footnote 1.
See appendix B for job descriptions.
The Bureau 1970 survey of the industry also covered smaller
box plants— those with 20-29 workers. The 1970 and 1976 survey
results are, thus, not strictly comparable; however, the omission of
this size firm (employing about 4 percent of the industry's work
force) is unlikely to significantly affect overall trends. See Industry
Wage Survey: Paperboard Containers and Boxes, Part III, March 1970,

Bulletin 1719 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1971).
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined by the
U.S. Office of Management and Budget through February 8, 1974.
1

Ninety-four percent of the production and related workers
were in plants performing all printing required; another 4
percent were in shops doing more than half of the nec­
essary printing. Corrugated box plants generally perform
relatively simple printing operations, involving presses print­
ing 1 to 3 colors.
Corrugated and solid fiber boxes are most often formed
by cylinder or platen die presses which stamp out the
shape and crease it along the lines to be folded. Finishing
operations include stapling or stitching, folding, and gluing.

Average hourly earnings

Straight-time earnings of production and related workers
covered by the survey averaged $4.65 an hour in March
1976 (table l ) . 6Workers in the Middle Atlantic and Great
Lakes regions, together constituting one-half of the work
force, averaged $4.75 and $4.74 an hour, respectively.
Regional averages ranged from $4.15 in the Southeast to
$5.62 in the Pacific region.
Workers in metropolitan areas averaged $4.68 an hour,
4 percent more than the $4.50 recorded for those in non­
metropolitan areas. This same relationship held in the South­
east and Great Lakes regions, the only regions where such
comparisons could be made. Among the eight metropolitan
areas surveyed separately, average hourly earnings ranged
from $4.66 in Newark to $5.53 in Los Angeles-Long
Beach (tables 7-14). Average earnings in Chicago— the
largest area surveyed, with 4,600 workers— were $4.71
an hour, approximately the same as in Milwaukee and St.
Louis. Workers in Philadelphia averaged $5.03 an hour; in
Jersey City, $5.09; and in New York, $5.23.
Employee earnings in plants employing 100 workers or
more averaged $4.80 an hour— 13 percent more than the
$4.25 recorded for workers in plants with 30 to 99 workers.
This nationwide pattern held in each of the six regions
where comparisons were made. The advantage for workers
in larger plants ranged from 5 percent in the Middle West
to 16 percent in the Pacific region.
Production workers in plants having labor-management
contracts covering a majority of their workers averaged
$4.76, compared with $3.94 in plants with none or a
minority covered by such agreements. Among the three
regions permitting comparison, hourly rates for union
establishments exceeded those in nonunion plants by 19
to 23 percent.

Size o f establishm ent Plants with 100 to 249 workers
employed nearly two-thirds of the production work force;
those with 30 to 99 workers employed one-fourth; and
those with 250 workers or more employed one-tenth.
(Establishments with fewer than 30 workers were excluded
from the survey.) The proportion of workers in plants with
at least 100 workers varied somewhat among the regions,
ranging from three-fifths in the Middle West to nearly fourfifths in the Southeast, Southwest, and Great Lakes regions.
Unionization. Establishments operating under collective
bargaining agreements covering a majority of their workers
employed seven-eighths of the industry’s work force. The
proportion of workers in plants having such coverage varied
somewhat among the regions— from three-fourths in the
Southeast region to slightly more than nine-tenths in the
Great Lakes region and the Middle West.
The major union in the industry is the United Paperworkers International Union, formed by a 1972 merger of
the United Papermakers and Paperworkers, and the Inter­
national Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill
Workers. Some establishments in the industry also had con­
tracts with the International Printing Pressmen and Assist­
ants of North America and the International Brotherhood
of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, and Warehousemen of America
unions.

In March 1976, men averaged $4.73 an hour, compared
with $4.01 an hour for women. Among the regions, the
average wage advantage for men ranged from 9 percent in

Sex o f worker. Men made up nine-tenths of the production
work force, and constituted a majority of the workers in
virtually all of the production occupations selected for
separate study. Women were most often employed in the
cutting and creasing, and finishing departments.

6 Straight-time average hourly earnings of production workers
in this bulletin differ in concept from the gross average hourly
earnings ($5.01 in March 1976) published monthly in the Bureau
periodical Em ploym ent and Earnings. Unlike the latter, the estimate
presented here excludes premium pay for overtime and tor work
on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Average earnings are calcu­
lated by summing individual hourly earnings and dividing by the
number of individuals; in the monthly series, the sum of the hours
reported is divided into the reported payroll totals.
The estimate of the number of production workers within the
scope of the study is intended only as a general guide to the size
and composition of the labor force included in the survey, it
differs from those published in the monthly series (73,000 in
March 1976) in part because it excludes establishments employing
fewer than 30 workers. The advance planning necessary to make the
survey required the use of lists of establishments assembled con­
siderably in advance of data collection. Thus, establishments new
to the industry are omitted, as are establishments originally classi­
fied in the corrugated and solid fiber box industry, but found to be
in other industries at the time of the survey. Also omitted ere
corrugated and solid fiber box establishments classified incorrectly
in other industries at the time the lists were compiled.

M ethod o f wage payment. Three-fourths of the production
and related workers were paid time rates, usually under
formal plans providing single rates for specific occupations
(table 15). In New England, one-fifth of the workers were
covered by time-rate plans providing for determinations
based on an individual’s qualifications. Such plans covered
one-tenth of the workers in the Pacific region, and less than
5 percent in the others. The proportion of workers paid
under incentive systems— most commonly group bonus
plans— ranged from slightly more than one-third in the
Border States to less than one-tenth in the Pacific region,
among the eight regions reporting any incentive workers.



2

61,912 production and related workers within the scope
of the March 1976 survey. Among the jobs studied, aver­
age earnings ranged from $4.05 an hour for hand strippers
to $5.78 for maintenance electricians. Bundlers-packers,
the largest occupation surveyed separately, averaged $4.26
an hour. Printer-slotter-machine operators and their assist­
ants, together constituting one-tenth of the work force,
averaged $5 and $4.57 an hour respectively.
Occupational averages were by far the highest in the
Pacific region and generally lowest in the Southeast and
Border States, among the 28 occupations shown for all
eight regions. After eliminating the Pacific region from
comparisons, occupational averages generally were highest
in the Great Lakes and Middle Atlantic regions. Inter­
regional spreads for some numerically important occupa­
tions are presented in text table 1.
Occupational pay relationships within regions varied
across the country. For example, corrugator-combining
machine operators in the Southwest averaged 24 percent
more than folding- and gluing-machine operators, whereas
the corresponding spread in the Pacific region was 9 per­
cent. Similarly, the average wage advantage of corrugatorcombining machine operators over stitcher operators ranged
from 14 percent in the Middle West to 25 percent in the
Pacific.
Workers in plants with at least 100 workers typically
averaged between 6 and 12 percent more per hour than

the Border States ($4.30 compared with $3.93) to 31 per­
cent in New England ($4.39 and $3.35). Differences in pay
for men and women may result from several factors, in­
cluding variations in the distribution of the sexes among
jobs with disparate pay levels. For example, women were
most often employed in the comparatively low-wage cutting
and creasing or finishing departments and seldom in the
relatively high-wage maintenance or corrugating occupations.
The differences in averages between sexes in the same job
and location also may reflect minor variations in duties. Job
descriptions in wage surveys usually are more generalized
than those used in individual establishments.
Earnings of about 95 percent of the production workers
fell within a range of $3 to $7 an hour (table 2). Earnings of
the middle 50 percent of the workers were between $4.05
and $5.19 an hour. Six percent of all men and 27 percent of
all women earned less than $3.50 an hour. Above $5.50
an hour, the corresponding proportions were 17 and 3
percent. The proportion of workers at the lower and upper
ends of the earnings array also varied by region.
Occupational earnings

Occupations for which wage data are presented in table
3 were selected to represent the full spectrum of activities
performed by production workers in the industry. These
jobs accounted for slightly more than two-thirds of the

Text table 1. Regional wage levels for selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber box manufacturing as a percent
of national averages, March 1976
(U.S. average fo r each job cla ssifica tio n ^ 00)
A ll

New England ..............................
Middle A tla n tic ............................
Border States................................
Southeast ....................................
Southwest....................................
Great Lakes..................................
Middle West..................................
P a c ific .........................................

Corrugater

R o ll

p ro d u ctio n

kn ife
operators

w orkers

92
102
92
89
92
102
100
121

92
101
97
88
95
104
94
120

89
100
91
91
93
102
98
124
Bundlers-




M aintenance

packers

New England ................................
Middle Atlantic ............................
Border States ................................
Southeast.......................................
Southwest.....................................
Great Lakes....................................
Middle West....................................
P a cific...........................................

Printer-slotter m achine

su p p ly

w orkers

Region

electricians

96
108
88
87
90
100
100
122

92
97
87
91
106
98
93
134

3

Cuttingand
creasing

Operators

93
103
92
90
92
102
99
123
|AM| 4 a M
Ja iilio rs

91
102
97
87
95
102
103
124

Assistants

92
105
93
89
93
105
102
114
M aintenance
m echanics

88
94
85
91
94
97
95
135

press operators

89
103
94
88
92
100
95
126
i ru cK arivw s

105
117
79
76
74

108
92
123

those in plants with fewer than 100 workers (table 4). The
wage advantage in larger plants varied somewhat by region
and occupation. For example, in the Great Lakes region,
roll supply workers in larger plants averaged 5 percent an
hour more than their counterparts in smaller establishments;
the corresponding advantage for cutting- and creasing-press
operators was 17 percent. In the Middle Atlantic region,
corresponding differentials were 12 and 2 percent.
Nationwide, occupational averages were generally 10 to
20 percent higher for incentive-paid workers than for
time-rated workers in the same occupation (table 5). This
relationship generally held in the regions where earnings
of time- and incentive-rated workers were compared.
Job averages generally were higher in plants having
collective bargaining agreements covering a majority of
their production workers than in plants without such
coverage (table 6). Nationwide, union workers typically
averaged between 10 and 25 percent more per hour than
their nonunion counterparts. This nationwide pattern held
among the regions where such comparisons were made.
Earnings of individual workers varied somewhat within
the same job and geographic area (tables 7-14). Frequently,
hourly earnings of the highest paid workers exceeded those
of the lowest paid in the same job and area by $1.50 or
more. Thus, a number of workers in comparatively lowpaying jobs earned as much as or more than some workers in
jobs with significantly higher hourly averages. Text table 2
illustrates the overlap in earnings occurring betweenbundlerspackers and flexographic printer operators (who perform
both printing and fabricating operations) in Chicago.

Establishment practices and supplementary
wage provisions

For production workers, information also was obtained
on work schedules and shift differential provisions and
practices, and the incidence of selected supplementary
benefits including paid holidays and vacations; health,
insurance, and retirement plans; paid funeral and juryduty leave; and technological severance pay.
Scheduled weekly hours. Ninety-four percent of the pro­
duction workers had weekly schedules of 40 hours (table
16) . One-sixth of the workers in the New England and
Southeast regions, however, were scheduled to work more
than 40 hours.
S h ift differential provisions and practices. More than ninetenths of the production workers were in establishments
having formal pay provisions for late-shift work (table
17) . In March 1976, however, only three-tenths of the
workers were actually employed on second shifts and 5
percent on third shifts (table 18). All of these workers
received pay in addition to day-shift rates, commonly
10 cents an hour for second shifts and 15 cents for third
or other late shifts.
Paid holidays. All establishments visited provided paid
holidays, commonly 10 days annually, for production and
related workers (table 19). The number of paid holidays
per year varied somewhat among the regions. For ex­
ample, one-sixth of the workers in the Southeast and
Southwest regions received 8 days or fewer while nearly
three-fifths in the Pacific region and three-tenths in New
England received 12 days. An additional one-tenth of the
workers in New England were eligible for 13 or 14 days.

Text table 2. Earnings distribution of bundlers-packers and
flexographic printer operators, Chicago area, March 1976
N um ber o f w orkers

Paid vacations. All production workers covered by the sur­
vey received paid vacations after qualifying periods of
service (table 20). The most common pattern was 1 week
after 1 year of employment, 2 weeks after 3 years, 3 weeks
after 10 years, and 4 weeks after 15 years. A majority of
the workers in 5 regions were eligible for 5 weeks of vaca­
tion or more after 25 years of service. Vacation provisions
were generally more liberal in the Pacific than in the other
regions.

F le x o ­
H o u rly earnings

Bundlerspackers

graphic
printer
operators

Under $ 4 .1 0 ......................................
$4.10 and under $ 4 .3 0 .......................
$4.30 and under $ 4 .5 0 .......................
$4.50 and under $ 4 .7 0 .......................
$4.70 and under $ 4 .9 0 .......................
$4.90 and under $ 5 .1 0 .......................
$5.10 and under $ 5 .3 0 .......................
$5.30 and under $ 5 .5 0 .......................
$5.50 and under $ 5 .7 0 .......................
$5.70 and under $ 5 .9 0 .......................
$5.90 and under $ 6 .1 0 .......................
$6.10 and under $ 6 .3 0 .......................
$6.30 and under $ 6 .5 0 .......................

114
24
108
40
17
21
2

2

-

Total number of w orkers...............

330

133

$4.17

$5.34

Average hourly earnings



...............

-

2
-

-

4
15
24
30
4
28
23
2
3

Health, insurance, and retirement plans. Virtually all work­
ers were covered by basic life, hospitalization, surgical, and
medical insurance, and at least nine-tenths by accidental
death and dismemberment clauses and major medical in­
surance (table 21). Sickness and accident insurance applied
to four-fifths of the production workers nationwide while
formal sick leave plans applied to less than one-tenth. An
exception to this pattern occurred in the Pacific region
where three-tenths of the workers received sickness and
accident insurance and seven-tenths were eligible for full
4

or partial sick pay during absence from work due to illness.
Insurance plans usually were financed wholly by the em­
ployer rather then by joint employer-employee contribu­
tions. Ih e incidence of these plans varied somewhat by
region.
Retirement pension plans, in addition to Federal social
security, were available to seven-eighths of the production
workers. These plans were most often actuarially funded




5

rather than based on profits. Retirement severance plans
were not common in the industry.
Other selected benefits. Provisions for pay while serving
as a juror or while attending funerals of specified family
members were reported by establishments employing slightly
more than nine-tenths of the production workers (table
22). Technological severance pay, available to only 7 per­
cent of all production workers, was most often reported
in the Middle Atlantic, Southwest, and Middle West regions.

Table 1. Average hourly earnings by selected characteristics
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of production workers in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments. United States and selected regions, March 1976.)

United! tates2
S

New England

Middle Atlantic

Border States

Southeast

Southwest

Great Lakes

Middle W
est

Pacific

Number
of
workers

Average Number Average Number
hourly
hourly
of
of
earnings workers earnings workers

Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average Number Average
hourly
hourly
of
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
hourly
of
hourly
earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings workers earnings

ALL PBODOCTIOH HOBKEBS...........................
MEM.............................................................
IOH11 t ......................................................

61,912
55,527
5, 635

$4.65
4.73
4.01

3,741
3,422
319

$4.30 12,400
4.39 10,507
3.35

$4.75
4.91
“

3,435
3, 207
228

$4. 28
4.30
3.93

8,949
8,583
366

$4.15
4.17
3.73

4,238
3,929

SIZE OF COHHUHITI:
4
HETBOPOLITAE ABEAS ..........................
HOHMETBOPOLITAE A B S 1 S ,,,,,...........

52,374
9,538

4.68
4.50

3,118
“

4.37 12,063
-

4.77

3,307
-

4. 33
~

6,465
2,484

SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT:
30-99 HOBKBBS.......................................
100 HOBKEBS OB HOBE..........................

16,618
45,294

4.25
4.80

2,775

4.53

3,484
8, 916

4.42
4.87

1,215
2,220

4.00
4.43

54,124

4.76

3,000

4.43 10,843

4.84

3,033

4.35

7,788

3.94

1,557

4.07

Item

LABOB-HAEAGEBEET COETBACTS:
BSTABLISHHSBTS WITH-HAJOBITT OF HOBKEBS COVEBBD.••
EOEE OB HIEOBITT OF HOBKEBS
COVEBBD......................................... .. .

1Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
3Includes data from establishm
ents which were unable to provide separate data for m and women.
en
4Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the U. S. Office of M
anagem and Budget through February 1974.
ent
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.




'

$4. 74
4.83
4. 19

3, 181
2,790
391

$4.64
4.71
4.16

5,838
5,670
168

$5.62
5.66
4.37

4.20
4.02

3,845
-

4.18 15,010
3,901

4.79
4.55

2,426

4.54

5,425

5.60

2,042
6,907

3.59
4.31

3,319

4,253
4.42 14,658

4.27
4.88

1 ,238
1,943

4.51
4.73

1,783
4,055

5.07
5.87

6,832

4.34

3,826

4.34 17,583

4.80

2,949

4.67

5,124

5.80

2,117
'

IP*

$4.27 18,911
4.32 16,257
3.68 2,654

3.53

3.98

-

“

-,3 2 8

-

-

-

Table 2. Earnings distribution
(Percent distribution of production workers by average straight-time hourly earnings,1 United States and selected regions, March 1976.)
United States3

Average hourly earnings1

Middle

Border

Atlantic

New England

States

Southeast

Southwest

Great Lakes

Middle

Pacific

Total

Men

36 1 , 9 1 2
$ 6.65

5 5,527
$ 6.73

5 ,6 3 5
$6.01

3 ,7 6 1
$6.30

1 2,600
$ 6.75

3 ,6 35
$6.28

8 ,9 69
$6.15

6 ,2 38
$6.27

1 8,911
$6.76

3 ,1 8 1
$ 6.66

5 ,8 3 8
$5.62

T O T H ..............

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 00 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 00 .0

100 .0

1 00 .0

1 00 .0

1 00 .0

1 0 0 .0

UBDBB

$ 2 .5 0 ....

0 .5

0 .6

1 .9

2 .7

0 .3

-

1.1

0 .6

0 .2

S 2.50
$ 2.60
$ 2 .7 0
$ 2.80
$ 2.90

BBD
B ID
BBD
BBD
BBD

$ 2 . 6 0 .............................
$ 2 . 7 0 .............................
$ 2 . 8 0 .............................
$ 2 . 9 0 .............................
$ 3 . 0 0 .............................

.6

.3
.3

1 .0
.7
.7
.2
.2

.2
.2
.1
.6
.6

0 .2
1 .6
1 .2
.2
.8

1 .3
.9
1 .2
.8
1 .3

.3
.1
.8
.6

.1
(* )
.3
.1
.2

$ 3.00
$ 3 .1 0
$ 3.20
$ 3.30
$ 3 .0 0

BOBBER GP BO BKBBS...........................................
1V B B 1G B HOURLY B A B B I E G S ......................

Women

West

.3
.5

.6

.6
.6

.3
.3

.8
.6
1 .2
.6
1 .3

BBD UBDBB $ 3 . 1 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 3 . 2 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 3 . 3 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 3 . 6 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 3 . 5 0 .............................

.9
.8
1 .0
1 .8
1 .8

.7
.5
1 .2
1 .2
1 .0

1 .6
3 .1
2 .5
6 .9
9 .0

1 .3
.7
1 .7
1 .3
2 .5

.5
1 .6
.7
1 .9
2 .8

.7
.7
.5
.7
1 .3

1 .7
1 .0
3 .6
3 .7
2 .6

1 .9
2 .1
3 .0
1 .7
2 .5

.7
.6
1 .1
1 .1
1 .6

$ 3 .5 0
$3.60
$ 3 .7 0
$ 3.80
$ 3 .9 0

BBD UBDBB $ 3 . 6 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 3 . 7 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 3 . 8 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 3 . 9 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 6 . 0 0 .............................

2 .0
2 .6
3 .0
2 .9
3 .8

1 .8
2. 1
2 .7
2 .7
3 .6

3 .7
6 .9
5 .3
3 .9
5 .6

2 .7
2 .2
6 .9
6 .7
5 .2

1 .6
1 .6
1 .7
3 .6
2 .8

2 .1
3 .2
8 .1
3 .7
8 .7

3 .0
5 .2
5 .7
6 .9
5 .5

6 .0
7 .9
6 .9
5 .6
7 .9

$ 6 .0 0
$ 6 .1 0
$ 6 .2 0

6 .3
6 .0

$ 6 .3 0
$6.60

BBD UBDBB $ 6 . 1 0 ...............................
BBD UBDBB $ 6 . 2 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 6 . 3 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 6 . 6 0 .............................
UBDBB $ 6 . 5 0 .............................

6 .6

3 .9
3 .8
6 .6
6 .6
6 .6

6 .8
6 .1
6 .7
5 .7
6 .6

8 .9
6 .6
6 .8
5 .7
5 .8

3 .6
2 .6
3 .5
3 .0
3 .5

6 .8
8 .6
6 .8
6 .7
6 .6

5 .2
5 .6
6 .0
5 .2
6 .1

$ 6 .5 0
$ 6 .6 0
$ 6 .7 0
$ 6 .8 0
$ 6 .9 0

BBD
BBD
BBD
BBD
BBD

5 .6
6 .9
6 .5
3 .7
6 .0

5 .8
5 .1
6 .8
3 .9
6 .3

6 .2
3 .1
2 .5
1 .8
1 .6

3 .3
5 .2
2 .3
1 .8
3 .8

5 .6
5. 1
5 .9
6 .6
5 .3

3 .5
7 .5
6 .1
2 .2
2 .5

3 .9
3 .3
2 .7
2 .9

6 .2
6 .3
3 .6
3 .0
3 .2

1 .9
1 .6
.9
.3
.8

1 .9
1 .8
1 .8
1 .0
1 .8

6 .9
6 .3
3 .9
3 .0
2 .9

UBDBB
UBDBB
UBDBB
UBDBB
UBDBB

UBDBB
UBDBB
UBDBB
UBDBB
UBDBB

$ 6 . 6 0 .............................
$ 6 . 7 0 .............................
$ 6 . 8 0 .............................
$ 6 . 9 0 .............................
$ 5 . 0 0 .............................

$ 5 . 0 0 BBD UBDBB $ 5 . 1 0 .............................
$ 5 . 1 0 BBD UBDBB $ 5 . 2 0 .............................
$ 5 . 2 0 BBD UBDBB $ 5 . 3 0 .............................
$ 5 . 3 0 BBD UBDBB $ 5 . 6 0 .............................
$ 5 . 6 0 BBD UBDBB $ 5 . 5 0 .............................

6 .6

6 .5

6 .0

-

-

0 .7

_
0 .6
.3
.1
.1

.2
.3
.3
.5
.1

.3
.2
.3

.6
.2
.6
.2
.1

1 .6
1 .1
1 .8
1 .0
2 .2

1 .6
2 .3
2 .2
2.8
6 .8

1 .3
.1
.3
.9
.6

5 .1
5 .0
6 .5
5 .0
3 .5

3 .5
3 .6
5 .1
6 .1
5 .6

7 .1
5 .5
7 .5
6 .6
5 .2

1 .3
1 .0
.9
.7
.9

6 .8
5 .1
2 .8
2 .6
2 .1

5 .5
2 .6
2 .8
2 .9
2 .5

7 .1
6 .3
6 .3
6 .6
5 .6

5 .2
6 .2
5 .1
3 .5
5.1

.7
.6
1 .5
.3
1 .0

3 .2
2 .0
1 .6
1 .9
.7

1 .5
1 .5
2 .0
2 .3
2 .7

2 .3
1 .8
1 .2
1 .9
1 .6

5 .6
3 .8
3 .7
3 .5
2 .5

6 .0
3 .6
3.6
2 .0
3 .3

2 .0
12.1
5 .9
3 .6
8 .0

-

$ 5 .5 0
$5.60
$ 5 .7 0
$ 5.80
$ 5 .9 0

BBD UBDBB $ 5 . 6 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 5 . 7 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 5 . 8 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 5 . 9 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 6 . 0 0 .............................

2 .6
1.9
1 .3
1 .2
1 .1

2 .7
2 .1
1 .6
1 .3
1 .2

.6
.2
.2
.3
.2

.9
.7
.7
1 .1
.8

2 .0
1 .7
1 .7
1 .2
1 .6

.5
.5
1 .0
.3
.3

.9
.7
.5
.2
.6

1 .2
.8
.9
.7
1 .6

2 .6
1 .9
1 .2
1 .6
1 .2

1 .3
2 .6
1.2
1 .7
.5

8 .1
6 .6
3 .0
3 .2
1 .7

$6.00
$ 6 .2 0
$ 6.60
$ 6 .6 0
$6.80

BBD
BBD
BBD
BBD
BBD

$ 6 . 2 0 .............................
$ 6 . 6 0 .............................
$ 6 . 6 0 .............................
$ 6 . 8 0 .............................
$ 7 . 0 0 .............................

1 .5
1.0
1 .6
•9
.6

1 .7
1 .1
1 .6
1 .0
.5

•5
.6
.6
.2
.1

.9
.5
.9
.8
.1

2. C
1 .2
.7
.7
.3

.6
.3
.3
.1
.1

.6
.2
.3
(* )

.7
.6
.9
.5
.2

1 .8
1.0
.7
.6
.6

1.6
1.1
.5
.3
.2

2 .2
3 .5
7 .9
5 .9
2 .3

BBD UBDBB $ 7 . 6 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 7 . 6 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 7 . 8 0 .............................
BBD UBDBB $ 8 . 0 0 .............................

.7
.5
.2

.8
.5
.2

.8

$ 7 .2 0
$ 7 .6 0
$7.60
$7.80

.2
.1

.6

.6
.1

-

.1

.7
1 .8
1 .6
3 .6
.5

$ 8 .0 0

BBD

•2

.2

UBDBB
UBDBB
UBDBB
UBDBB
UBDBB

O Y B B ..

2 .5
.2

.3

_

.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

.2
.2

-

-

.1

.2
.1
.2

-

-

.1
(* )
<*>

.3
.9
.1
.1
.1

-

.1

.1

-

-

.1

.2

(* )
.1
-

-

1 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. These surveys,
based on a representative sample of establishments, are designed to measure the level of occupational
earnings at a particular time. Thus, comparisons made with previous studies may not reflect expected wage
movements because of change in the sample composition, and shifts in employment among establishments
with different pay levels. Such shifts, for example, could decrease an occupational average, even though most
establishments increased wages between periods being compared.
3 Includes data for Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.
3 Includes data for establishments for which information for men and women separately was unavailable.
* Less than 0.06 percent.




NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.

-

.2
-

.6

Ta ble 3. Occupational averages— all establishments
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments, United States and selected regions, March 1976.)

United States3
Occupation and sex3

Number
of
workers

Mean4

Median4

Middle Atlantic

New England

Hourly earnings1
Middle range4

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

Median4

Middle range4

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

Median4

Middle range4

5
COBBUG ATIVG :
COB BUG A T OB* K V I F B 0 P B B 1 T 0 B S ..................
COBBUGATOR*COBBIBXBG*BACBIVB
O F B B A T O B S ................................................................
D 0 U B 1 B - B A C K B B O F B B A T O B S ...........................
O F F * B S A S B B S (C O B B U G A T X 1 G C O B B I B I I G - B A C H I B B ) ......................................
B O H S U P P L Y 1 0 B K B B S ......................................
: 5
FLBZO GBAPHIC F B IB T B B OPBBATOBS
( F B 1 B T I B G O F B B A T I O B S O I L Y ) ...............
F L B Z O G B A F B IC F B I B T B B OFBBATOBS
( F B X B T I B G ABB F A B B I C A T I B G
O P B B A T I O B S 1 ................................ . ..............,
PB XBTB B*SLOTTSB*BA C BIBB
O F B B A T O B S ................................................................
S I B C L B - C O L O B F B I B T B B ..............................
T B O * C O L O B F B I B T B B ......................................
T B B B B * OB BOBB CO LO B F B I B T B B . . .
F B IB TB B -S LO TTB B *B A C B IB B
A S S I S T A N T S .............................................................
S IBG LB -C O LO B F B IB T B B .
T B O - C O L O B F B I B T B B ......................................
T B B B B * OB BOBB C O L O B F B I B T B B . . .

1 ,1 9 5

$5.20

$5.09

$ 8 .5 6 -

$5.75

78

$ 8.65

$8.88

$ 8 .3 2 -

$5.03

25 3

$ 5.21

$ 5.17

$ 8.8 8 -

$5.58

1 ,1 9 6
1 ,073

5 .8 0
5 .0 0

5 .2 8
8 .9 5

8 .8 8 *
8 .5 3 -

5 .9 3
5 .8 8

73
55

5 .1 0
8 .7 3

8 .9 8
8 .7 1

8 .9 0 8 .8 1 -

5 .8 3
5 .0 5

21 0
203

5 .3 5
5 .1 0

5 .2 9
5 .0 5

8 .9 7 8 .8 5 -

5 .7 8
5 .3 8

2 ,7 33
1 ,027

8 .6 7
8 .7 9

8 .6 5
8 .7 3

8 .1 9 8 .2 8 -

5 .1 7
5 .2 7

168
68

8 .8 2
8 .8 0

8 .8 3
8 .3 5

8 .0 6 8 .2 8 -

8 .6 8
8 .7 1

581
208

8 .6 3
8 .8 2

8 .7 6
8 .8 5

8 .3 7 8 .5 9 -

5 .0 7
5 .1 6

281

5 .1 9

5 .0 8

8 .5 9 -

5 .6 1

50

5 .3 5

5 .8 2

5 .2 3 -

5 .8 5

p h iit ib c

C U T T I N G ABU C B B A S I B G :
C U T T I B G * A BO C B B A S I B G - F B B S S
O F B B A T O B S 1 ....................................................... ... .
B B B ..................................................................
V O B B B .............................................................
C Y L I I B B B OB B O T A B Y ...................................
B B B ...................................................................
V O B B B .............................................................
F L A T B B ......................................................................
B B B ...................................................................
V O B B B .............................................................
C U T T I N G * . A B U C BB A S X B G * P B B S S
F B B D B B S * ..................................................................
B B B ...................................................................
V O B B B .............................................................
C Y L I V D B B OB B O T A B Y ...................................
B B B..........................................................
F L A T B B .....................................................................
B B B ...................................................................
V O B B B .............................................................
S T B I P P B B S *................................................................
B B B . . . . .......................................................
V O B B B .............................................................
A I B B A B B B B ....................................................... ...
B B B ...................................................................
B A V U ...........................................................................
B B B ...................................................................
V O B B B .............................................................
S L I T T B B O F B B A T O B S ............................................
B B B ...................................................................




See footnotes at end of table.

*
V518

5 ,1 7

5 .0 8

8 .6 8 -

5 .6 8

132

8 .8 7

8 .7 8

8 .5 1 -

8 .9 5

277

8 .8 9

5 .1 0

8 .5 0 -

5 .8 9

2 ,9 78
236
2 ,8 60
2 82

5 .0 0
8 .8 2
8 .9 8
5 .3 8

8 .9 7
8 .6 6
8 .9 3
5 .2 8

8
8
8
8

-

5 .5 0
5 .8 2
5 .8 8
5 .8 8

170
38
118
18

8 .6 6
8 .6 2
8 .5 8
5 .8 1

8 .6 1
8 .5 8
8 .6 0
“

8 .2 8 8 .2 8 8 .1 3 -

8 .9 8
8 .9 0
8 .9 0
*

568
27
888
53

5 .1 7
5 .5 3
5 .1 0
5 .6 8

5 .1 9
5 .5 7
5 .1 6
5 .7 6

8 .7 8 5 .2 2 8 .7 8 5 .2 5 -

5 .7 0
5 .9 8
5 .6 1
5 .9 8

3 ,0 6 6
219
2 ,5 18
33 3

8 .5 7
8 .3 2
8 .5 7
8 .7 8

8 .6 2
8 .2 8
8 .6 2
8 .9 3

8 .0 5 3 .7 9 8 .0 7 8 .1 8 -

5 .0 7
5 .0 6
5 .0 3
5 .2 1

159
31
115
13

8 .2 2
8 .1 2
8 .2 2
8 .8 5

8 .1 5
8 .0 8
8 .1 5

8 .0 5 8 .0 8 3 .8 8 -

8 .3 6
8 .2 3
8 .3 8

582
10
87 7
55

8 .7 8
5 .3 2
8 .7 8
5 .0 8

8 .9 0
8 .8 7
5 .0 8

8 .8 9 8 .8 3 8 .9 8 -

5 .1 2
5 .1 0
5 .8 2

1 ,8 52
1 ,7 21
112
8 80
819
51
868
798
61

8 .9 0
8 .9 6
8 .0 3
8 .9 0
8 .9 8
3 .8 3
8 .8 8
8 .9 8
8 .2 0

8 .8 8
8 .9 8
3 .9 1
8 .8 9
5 .0 0
3 .8 1
8 .8 1
8 .8 5
8 .2 6

8 .3 0 8. 3 6 3 .5 5 8 .2 9 8 .3 8 3 .8 5 8 .3 2 8 .3 7 3 .6 1 -

5 .8 1
5 .8 5
8 .3 9
5 .8 1
5 .8 3
8 .1 6
5 .8 5
5 .5 0
8 .6 0

92
88
35
27
-

8 .8 5
8 .5 8
8 .2 0
8 .6 3
8 . 58
8 .5 8
-

8 .0 8 8 .0 8 3 .8 0 8 .0 8 8 .3 2 8 .3 2 -

8 .6 6
8 .6 6
8 .6 6
5.1 1
8 .6 6
8 .6 6
-

396
358
208
19 8
187
119
-

5 .0 8
5 .1 2
5 .1 1
5 .1 6

5 .0 8
5 .1 1
5 .1 6
5 .3 1

8 .6 7 8 .8 0 -

57
57
-

8 .3 6
8 .8 9
8 .2 1
8 .5 6
8 .8 6
8 .8 6
-

8 .8 9
5 .0 1
-

5 .0 0
5 .0 2
-

8 .5 7 8 .8 3 -

5 .8 6
5 .5 1
5 .8 8
5 .8 9
5 .3 8
5 .8 8
-

939
856
78
51 5
8 85
352
301
85
780
87 7
280
78
69
583
383
217
1 ,5 65
1 ,8 1 3

8 .5 9
8 .6 8
8 .0 8
8 .6 3
8 .6 7
8 .5 0
8 .6 0
3 .9 2
8 .0 7
8 .1 7
3 .9 3
8 .0 8
8 .1 1
8 .0 5
8 .1 8
3 .9 9
8 .8 9
8 .5 3

8 .5 7
8 .6 5
8 .0 9
8 .6 9
8 .7 0
8 .5 3
8 .6 8
3 .9 9
8 .1 0
8 .1 9
3 .9 8
8 .1 5
8 .2 3
8 .0 6
8 .1 9
3 .9 8
8 .8 3
8 .8 5

8 .0 9 8 .1 7 3 .8 2 8 .1 6 8 .1 9 8 .0 1 8 .1 0 3 .8 0 3. 5 2 3 .6 5 3 .3 8 3 .5 1 3 .5 5 3 .5 3 3 .6 9 3 .5 8 8. 0 08 .0 8 -

5 .0 6
5 .1 3
8 .2 8
5 .0 6
5 .1 3
5 .0 8
5 .1 5
8 .3 3
8 .8 7
8 .5 9
8 .3 7
8 .5 5
8 .5 5
8 .8 6
8 .5 9
8 .3 9
8 .9 3
5 .0 1

38
32
12
12
26
20
68
26
82
68
26
82
100
98

8 .0 3
8 .1 7
8 .5 5
8 .5 5
3 .7 8
3 .9 8
3 .8 6
8 .3 0
3 .5 8
3 .8 6
8 .3 0
3 .5 8
8 .2 8
8 .3 3

8 .1 7
8 .1 7
8 .0 0
8 .0 8
3 .7 5
8 .3 5
3 .7 5
3 .7 5
8 .3 5
3 .7 5
8 .2 7
8 .2 7

3 .9 6 8 .0 0 3 .8 7 3 .9 9 3 .3 8 8 .1 9 3 .3 8 3 .3 8 8 .1 9 3 .3 8 8 .0 0 8 .1 3 -

8 .2 0
8 .8 5
8 .1 7
8 .1 8
8 .2 6
8 .3 6
3 .7 5
8 .2 6
8 .3 6
3 .7 5
8 .3 2
8 .8 0

17 2
157
98
91
57
85
187
118
27
27
183
-

8 .6 6
8 .7 3
8 .8 0
8 .8 5
8 .3 1
8 .3 7
8 .3 1
8 .6 5
8 .2 6
8 .2 6
8 .1 7
8 .6 8
8 .8 1

8 .7 8
8 .8 8
8 .9 3
8 .9 3
8 .2 6
8 .3 2
8 .8 7
8 .5 9
8 .8 8
8 .8 8
8 .3 6
-

8 .2 5 8 .8 0 8 .5 7 8 .5 7 3 .9 5 3 .9 5 3 .5 5 8 .8 7 3 .7 1 3 .7 1 3 .8 7 -'

8 .9 8
5 .0 8
5 .0 8
5 .0 8
8. 57
8 .6 8
8 .8 2
5 .0 0
8 .7 3
8 .7 3
8 .6 8
-

.8
.1
.8
.7

5
9
5
1

-

3 30
261

-

-

-

8 .7 6
8 .8 0

-

8 .6 7 8 .7 8 -

-

8 .0 1 8 .2 0 -

-

5 .1 1
5 .2 6

Table 3. Occupational averages— all establishments— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments, United States and selected regions, March 1976.)

United States3
Occupation and sex2

Number
of
workers

New England

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

Median4

Middle range4

Number
of
workers

Middle Atlantic

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

Median4

Middle range4

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

Median4

Middle range4

C U T T I I G A ID C B B A S X IG :— C O I T I I U Z D
S L O T T S B O P E B A T C B S ...........................................
H X V .................................................................
■ O H B I ............................................................

587
199
71

$ 8.58
8 .6 0
8 .2 1

$8.89
8 .5 5
8 .0 3

$ 3 .9 7 8 .0 8 3 .8 1 -

$ 8.97
5 .0 5
8 .5 7

88
88
•

$8.81
4 .8 1

$ 8.10
8 .1 0
-

$ 3 .9 7 3 .9 7 “

$8.29
8 .2 9
-

188
110
-

$4.58
8 .7 9
“

$8.68
8 .8 3
“

$ 3 .9 0 8 .3 0 -

$5.08
5 .1 7
-

FXIX S H XIG :
VOL D U G * A I D G L O I I G * H A C H I I B
O P S B A T O B S , A U T O M A T I C ................................
I B B ..................................................................
• O H B I ............................................................
S E T U P A I D O P Z B A T B .....................................
■ B l ..................................................................
■ O H B I ............................................................
VBBD O B I T ............................................................
■ B l ..................................................................
I O I B B ............................................................
S T I T C B B B O P S B A I O B S ........................................
■ B l ..................................................................
■ O H B I ............................................................
T A P I I G * H A C H X B B O P B I A T O B S .......................
■ B l ................................................. ................
■ O H B I . . . . ................................................

1 ,1 53
1,338
109
1 ,072
989
73
381
385
36
1,220
886
368
1,878
1 ,1 80
675

8 .7 5
8 .7 9
8 .3 5
8 .8 5
8 .8 8
8 .5 0
8 .8 7
8 .5 1
8 .0 7
8 .3 6
8 .8 0
8 .2 6
8 .2 9
8 .3 7
8 .1 6

8 .6 6
8 .6 8
8 .3 9
8 .7 0
8 .7 5
8 .8 2
8 .5 1
8 .5 3
8 .2 3
8 .3 6
8 .3 9
8 .3 5
8 .2 0
8 .3 5
8 .0 6

8 .2 3 8 .2 8 8 .0 0 8 .3 2 8 .3 2 8. 0 0 3 .8 9 3 .9 5 3 .6 2 3 .8 9 3 .8 8 3 .9 5 3 .7 5 3 .8 5 3 .6 7 -

5 .1 2
5 .1 7
8 .5 6
5 .2 3
5 .2 8
8 .6 6
8 .7 9
8 .8 6
8 .3 9
8 .8 1
8 .8 8
8 .6 0
8 .7 1
8 .8 8
8 .5 8

39
39

8 .3 8
8 .3 8
8 .3 7
8 .3 7
8 .0 3
8 .1 5
3 .7 1
8 .0 1
8 .1 8
3 .7 8

8 .3 2
8 .3 2
8 .8 7
8 .8 7
8 .0 8
8 .1 1
3 .8 0
8 .0 5
8 .1 6
3 .7 5

3 .9 9 3 .9 9 -

8 .6 2
8 .6 2
8 .6 5
8 .6 5
8 .2 0
8 .2 8
8 .1 5
8 .2 8
8.8 1
8 .0 1

311
278
-

8 .7 8
8 .8 7
8 .9 3
8 .9 7
8 .8 1
8 .5 8
3 .6 3
8 .6 1
4 .6 6
8 .5 8
8 .6 1
8 .7 8
8 .8 8

8 .8 6
8 .9 5
4 .9 9
5 .0 2
8 .6 3
8 .7 2
3 .6 1
8 .6 3
4 .7 8
8 .4 0
8 .6 3
8 .7 7
4 .2 8

8 .3 8 8 .5 1 8 .5 2 8 .5 8 -

5 .1 5
5 .2 0
5 .2 5
5 .2 6
8 .9 3
8 .9 5
3 .7 8
8 .9 0
4 .9 8
8 .8 1
5 .0 2
5 .1 0
8 .7 1

83
82
78
1 ,138
3,619
2,9 18
689
763
619
188
369
178
568
522

8 .6 2
8 .8 0
8 .8 8
8 .3 3
8 .2 6
8 .3 2
3 .9 8
8 .2 8
8 .3 1
3 .9 1
8 .9 9
5 .7 8
8 .1 8
8 .1 6

8 .5 2
8 .8 1
8 .2 7
8 .3 1
8 .2 2
8 .3 6
3 .9 9
8 .1 2
8 .2 0
8 .0 1
8 .8 8
5 .6 2
8 .1 9
8 .2 2

8 .2 5 3 .9 6 3 .9 9 3 .8 8 3 .7 0 3 .7 5 3. 3 9 3 .8 9 3 .9 8 3 .5 6 8 .8 5 5 .1 8 3 .7 9 3 .7 9 -

5 .2 0
8 .9 8
5 .1 2
8 .8 2
8 .7 3
8 .8 2
8 .3 5
8 .6 3
8 .7 7
8 .0 8
5 .3 6
6 .1 9
8 .5 2
8 .5 2

52
215
188
31
57
58
26
18
38
38

3 .9 3
8 .1 0
8 .1 9
3 .5 9
3 .8 2
3 .8 9
8 .6 2
5 .3 1
3 .7 7
3 .7 7

8 .0 1
3 .9 9
3 .9 9
3 .8 1
3 .9 1
3 .9 1
8 .5 8
3 .8 8
3 .8 8

3 .8 9 3 .8 5 3 .8 7 3 .0 6 3 .8 1 3 .8 1 8 .2 3 3 .6 5 3 .6 5 -

1,290
1,315
637
233
68
336
399
682
602
2,5 12
1 ,895
387
3,0 79

5 .1 1
5 .6 2
8 .8 3
8 .9 3
8 .6 2
8 .7 9
8 .6 7
8 .6 3
8 .6 5
5 .5 8
5 .6 6
8 .8 8
8 .6 6

5 .0 9
5 .8 7
8 .6 3
8 .7 2
8 .6 6
8 ,5 8
8 .6 3
8 .5 8
8 .5 6
5 .3 5
5 .5 0
8 .8 0
8 .6 1

8 .6 3 8 .9 3 8 .2 0 8 .2 5 8 .2 9 8 .1 9 8 .1 1 8 .1 9 8 .2 8 8 .8 2 8. 5 8 3 .7 9 8 .1 0 -

5 .5 1
5 .9 3
5 .8 1
5 .8 9
8 .9 7
5 .3 5
5 .1 2
5 .0 7
5 .1 0
7 .0 5
7 .1 3
5 .5 6
5 .0 7

82
62
87
12
10
25
35
27
27
21 6
2 02
18
1 88

8 .6 6
8 .9 5
8 .1 2
8 .0 8
8 .2 7
8 .0 9
8 .1 7
8 .0 8
8 .0 8
5 .7 9
5 .9 0
8 .1 2
8 .1 7

8 .6 0
8 .9 5
8 .1 1
8 .1 1
8 .1 8
8 .2 1
8 .2 1
5 .88
5 .9 6
8 .1 1

876

8 .6 2

8 .6 3

8 .1 5 -

5 .0 7

32

8 .1 7

8 .0 6

■ISCB1LAIBOO S :
,
A D J U S T B B S , H A C B X I B , C L A S S A 3 ............
A D J U S T B B S , B A C I I I S , C L A S S B ...............
I H ..................................................................
BA LBB S % ....................... ............................................
B U I D L B B S - P A C K B B S .............................................
■ B l ..................................................................
■ O H B I ............................................................
C A T C B B B S ....................................................................
■ B l ..................................................................
■ O H B I ...........................................................
D I B I A K X B S * . .........................................................
B L Z C T B I C I A H S , H A I I T B I A I C B 5..................
J A IX T O B S , POBTBBS, A ID C I B A I I B S . .
■ B l .................................................................
H A I I T B I A I C B IO BK ZBS,
G Z I B B A L U T I L I T Y 3 ...........................................
H S C B A I I C S , H A I I T B I A I C B S. ............ ..
S B IP P IIG A ID BB CZIYIIG C U B E S 5 . .
.
S B I P P I I G C L B B K S ...........................................
B B C B I Y I I G C L B B K S ................. « . ..................
S B I P P I I G A I D BBC B l V U G C L B B K S . .
S T A B C B H A K B B S 5. ....................................................
P A L L B T I Z B B O P B B A T O B .....................................
■ B l . • • • ......................................................
T B U C K D B I V B B S 51...................................................
S B H I - OB I B A I L B B ........................................
O T I B B T H A I S B H I - O B T B A I L B B . •••
T B U C K B B S , P O I B B , V O B K L I F T 5 ...............
.
TBU CK BBS * P O I B B , O T I B B T B A I
F O B K L I F T 5. ............................................................




See footnotes at end of table.

-

35
35
72
52
20
128
77
87

-

-

-

-

8 .0 2 8 .0 2 3 .9 2 8 .0 2 3 .8 5 3 .7 5 8 .0 5 3 .8 1 -

-

221
20 0
90
78
16
198
13 5
57
387
233
131

223
779
678
-

8 .5 1
8 .5 9
8 .6 6
-

8 .5 7
4 .6 3
8 .6 7
-

8 .0 0 8 .1 9 8 .3 6 -

8 .8 7
8 .9 8
5 .0 2
-

8 .3 9
8 .8 8
8 .9 5
5 .6 3
8 .2 1
8 .3 0

8 .1 6
8 .1 9
5 .0 8
5 .7 9
8 .2 5
8 .8 8

4 .0 0 8 .0 0 -

3 .9 8
3 .9 8

168
15 2
65
35
99
83

8 .2 5 5 .0 9 3 .8 9 3 .9 1 -

8 .7 7
8 .8 1
5 .8 1
6 .0 8
8 .5 5
8 .5 7

8 .3 8 8 .8 7 3 .8 6 8 .0 8 8 .0 0 3 .6 1 3 .6 1 5 .3 5 5 .3 6 3 .9 2 -

8 .9 5
5 .3 7
8 .8 4
8 .3 0
8 .8 3
8 .3 2
8 .3 2
6 .8 1
6 .41
4 .81

2 22
229
93
80
16
37
72
92
88
590
866
124
511

8 .9 0
5 .2 8
8 .6 8
8 .6 5
8 .8 7
8 .7 9
8 .7 0
8 . 58
8 .7 1
6 .8 9
6 . 57
6 .2 2
8 .7 1

5 .1 8
5 .3 8
8 .6 2
4 .6 9
4 .6 6
4 .2 0
8 .7 3
8 .5 2
8 .6 3
7 .1 3
7 .1 3
6 .8 9
8 .7 7

8 .2 3 8 .8 7 8 .0 5 3 .9 1 8 .0 2 8 .0 5 8 .1 3 8 .2 8 *
8 .3 8 5 .7 7 5 .8 8 5 .8 1 8 .8 2 -

5. 50
5 .6 6
8 .7 9
8 .7 8
8 .7 2
, 5 .2 5
4 .9 6
8 .9 2
4 .9 8
7 .1 5
7 .1 5
7 .0 7
8 .9 8

3 .8 0 -

8 .0 7

82

8 .5 3

8 .6 8

8 .1 5 -

8 .7 8

-

8 .1 5
8 .1 5
8 .2 1
8 .1 3
4 .0 8
8 .0 8
5 .0 0
-

-

3 .9 9 8 .3 2 3 .5 0 8 .3 8 8 .5 1 8 .2 8 8 .1 0 8 .5 0 3 .8 5 -

-

-

-

-

-

Table 3. Occupational averages— all establishments— Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments, United States and selected regions, March 1976.)

Border States
Occupation and sex2

COBBUG ATIBG: 5
COB B U G A T O B - K B I 7 1 O P B B A T O B S ..................
C O B B U G A TO B-C O B BIBIB G -H AC BIB Z
O P B B A T O B S ................................................................
D O U B L E - B A C K I B C P B B A T O B S ...........................
O FF-BBABSBS (C C B B U G A TI1 G C O H B I I I M G - H A C B I B E ) ......................................
B O L L S U P P L Y BOB KB B S ......................................
p b ib t ib g

Southeast

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

Median4

Middle range4

Number
of
workers

Southwest

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

Median4

Middle range4

Hourly earnings1

Number
of
workers

Mean4

Median4

Middle range4

92

$4.74

$4.67

$ 4 .1 8 -

$5.21

16 7

$4.72

$ 4.58

$ 4 .3 6 -

$5.01

87

$4.82

$4.52

$ 4.29 ^

$5.44

71
77

4 .8 7
4 .6 6

4 .9 9
4 .5 2

4 .3 5 4 .2 6 -

5 .5 2
5 .1 8

17 8
165

4 .9 0
4 .5 7

4 .7 4
4 .4 6

4 .4 9 4 .1 4 -

5 .2 8
5 .0 1

83
79

5 .0 2
4 .6 6

4 .61
4 .2 9

4 .4 7 4 .1 3 -

5 .9 5
5 .3 9

189
84

4 .3 8
4 .6 6

4 .2 4
4 .6 4

4 .0 6 4 .0 9 -

4 .6 4
5 .1 1

4 07
130

4 .2 7
4 .2 0

4 .1 6
4 .1 8

3 .8 1 3 .8 9 -

4 .6 8
4 .4 2

214
73

4 .4 3
4 .5 7

4 .1 9
4 .0 9

3 .7 4 3 .9 5 -

4 .9 6
5 .2 5

44

4 .4 3

4 .5 7

4 .0 6 -

4 .5 9

30

4 .6 3

4 .4 8

4 .2 4 -

4 .9 4

: 5

F L E X O G B A P B I C P B I I T E B OP B B A TO B S
( P B I B T I B G O P B B A T I O B S O B L Y ) ...............
F L B X O G B A P B I C P B I B T Z B O P B BA T OB S
( P B I B T I B G ABD P A B B I C A T I B G
O P B B A T I O B S ) ....................................................
P B IB TB B -S IO TTZ B -H A C B IB B
O P B B A T O B S ...............................................................
S I B G L B — C O L O B P B I B T B B .............................
T H O — C OL OB P B I B T B B ......................................
T B B B B - OB HOBB C OL OB P B I B T Z B . . .
P B IB TB B -S LCTTZB -H A C H IH B
A S S I S T A B T S S .......................................................
.
S I B G L B — C O L O B P B I B T B B .............................

THO—
COLOB PBIBTBB............................
CUTTIHG ABC CBZASIBG:
CUTTIBG- ABD CBBASIBG-PBZSS
OPBBATOBS 6 ...........................................
.
EBB..................................................
CYLIBDBB OB BOTABY..........................
HBB..................................................
PLATBB....................................................
HBB..................................................
CUTTIBG-.ABC CBBASIBG-PBZSS
FEEDERS*.................................................
HBB.................................................
CYLIBDBB CB FCTABI..........................
HBB.................................................
PLATEB....................................................
HBB..................................................
STBIPPEBS 6
...............................................
HEB..................................................
AIB HAHHBB...........................................
HBB..................................................
HABD........................................................
HBB..................................................
SLITTZB OPBBATOBS.................................
HBB.................................................
HCHBB.............................................
SLOTTZB OPBBATOBS.................................
HEB..................................................




Number
of
workers

See footnotes at end of table.

~

—

114

4 .7 2

4 .6 8

4 .4 1 -

5 .0 9

195

4 .7 9

4 .6 2

4 .4 4 -

5 .0 9

55

4 .8 5

4 .8 0

4 .3 7 -

5 .1 6

172
17
150

4 .5 8
4 .0 0
4 .6 3

4 .3 0
4 .2 9
4 .3 4

4 .1 4 4 .0 0 4. 1 5 -

5 .0 3
4 .2 9
5 .0 4

51 2
51
44 7

4 .5 1
3 .9 5
4 .5 5

4 .5 0
4 .0 0
4 .50

4 .1 4 3 .4 7 4 .1 9 -

4 .8 5
4 .1 9
4 .8 5

197

4 .6 1

4 .3 4

4 .1 9 -

4 .8 4

157
31

4 .6 4
4 .5 7

4 .3 5
4 .2 4

4 .1 9 4 .1 9 -

5 .3 8
4 .3 4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

192
17
170

4 .2 4
3 .4 2
4 .3 0

4 .1 0
4 .0 4
4 .1 0

3 .9 7 2 .7 0 3 .9 8 -

4 .6 4
4 .0 4
4 .6 4

532
55
475

4 .0 8
3 .5 2
4 .1 4

3 .9 7
3 .6 0
3 .9 8

3 .6 5 3 .0 8 3 .6 7 -

4 .5 0
3 .8 4
4 .5 0

255

4 .2 5

4 .0 2

3 .7 0 -

4 .8 1

199

4 .3 1

4 .11

3 .6 7 -

4 .8 7

95
91
46
45

4 .5 9
4 .5 9
4 .8 4
4 .8 3
4 .1 9
4 .1 8

4 .5 3
4 .5 3
4 .6 5
4 .5 7
4 .1 6
4 .1 3

4 .2 2 4 .2 2 4 .3 6 4 .3 4 4 .1 0 4 .0 8 -

4 .9 7
5 .0 0
5 .2 3
5 .2 4
4 .5 5
4 .5 9

231
227
1C9
109
111
1C7

4 .3 0
4 .3 1
4 .2 9
4 .2 9
4 .3 3
4 .3 5

4 .1 7
4 .1 8
4 .2 1
4 .2 1
4 .1 0
4 .1 4

3 .9 3 3 .9 6 3 .9 8 3 .9 8 3 .9 3 3 .9 4 -

4 .8 4
4 .8 4
4 .8 5
4 .8 5
4 .8 4
4 .8 4

113
107

34
28

4 .5 3
4 .5 7
4 .5 2
4 .5 2
4 .5 8
4 .7 3

4 .2 9
4 .2 9
4 .2 9
4 .2 9
4 .6 5
4 .7 2

3 .9 9 4 .0 1 3 .9 9 3 .9 9 4 .1 3 4 .1 4 -

4 .8 6
4 .9 5
4 .9 5
4 .9 5
4 .7 9
5 .5 0

4 .2 8
4 .1 9
4 .2 8
4 .4 1

3 .9 4 3 .9 4 3 .9 4 3 .9 4 -

4 .8 0
4 .8 3
4 .8 3
4 .8 3

94
92
46

23
23

4 .4 9
4 .5 0
4 .4 9
4.5 1
4 .0 9
4 .0 9
4 .1 2
4 .1 2

4 .0 4
4 .0 4

3 .9 5 3 .9 5 -

4 .2 5
4 .2 5

3 .9 4
3 .9 4
3 .8 4
3 .8 4
4 .7 8
4 .7 8
3 .2 7
3 .5 2

3 .8 4 3 .8 4 3 .8 0 3 .8 0 4 .3 1 4 .3 1 3 .2 7 3 .1 0 -

4 .5 3
4 .5 3
3 .9 4
3 .9 4
5 .3 0
5 .3 0
3 .5 2
3 .6 0

3.44

-

4 .2 2
4 .2 2
3 .9 7
3 .9 7
4 .8 1
4 .8 1
3 .2 9
3 .3 0

3 .9 5
3 .9 5
4 .0 4
4 .0 4

3 .7 2 3 .7 2 3 .9 5 3 .9 5 -

4 .2 5
4 .2 5
4 .3 5
4 .3 5

3 .7 7 3 .7 7 3 .8 9 3 .8 9 3 .6 0 3 .6 0 3 .2 9 3 .2 9 3 .2 2 3 .2 1 3 .7 4 3 .7 4 3 .4 7 3 .4 5 -

81
81
57
57
24
24
56
38

4 .1 1
4 .1 1
4 .0 8
4 .0 9

4 . 10
4 .1 0
4 .1 9
4 .1 9
3 .9 7
3 .9 7
3 .8 4
3 .8 0
3 .3 5
3 .3 5
3 .8 6
3 .8 6
3 .9 0
3 .8 8

4 .5 4
4 .3 1
4 .6 1
4.61
4 .1 9
4 .1 9
4 .0 6
4 .0 4
3 .6 4

15
15
98
97

4 .0 6
4 .0 6
4.2 1
4 .2 2

56
38
111
109

3 .2 9
3 .3 0
4 .1 4
4 .1 5

3 .2 7
3 .5 2
3 .8 9
3 .9 9

3 .2 7 3 .1 0 3 .6 4 3 .6 4 -

3 .5 2
3 .6 0
4. 42
4 .4 2

3 .9 9
3 .9 9

3 .9 2
3 .9 2

3 .8 1 3 .8 1 -

4 .0 6
4 .0 6

4 .0 3
4 .0 2
4 .1 4
4 .1 2
3 .9 1
3 .9 1
3 .6 2
3 .6 0
3 .3 7
3 .2 7
3 .7 1
3 .7 0
3 .9 1
3 .9 0
4 .0 3
4 .0 7
4 .0 7

4 .1 9
4 .1 9

3 .7 4 3 .7 4 -

54
52

4 .2 1
4 .2 0

3 .9 9

3 .8 9 3 .8 9 -

4 .5 6
4 .6 0

37
34
48
45

33
30

7
7
-

-

22
22

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

44
34
34
74
70
18
16

44
42
178
168
10
54
54

-

-

4 .4 9
4 .4 9

-

77
77

-

-

•-

-

-

-

-

3.99

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table 3. Occupational averages— all establishments— Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishm
ents. United States and selected regions, March 1976.)
Border States
Occupation and sex1

F IN IS H IN G :
F O L D IN G - AND G IU IN G -H A C H IN I
O P B B A T O B S , AUTOM ATIC..................................
HEN.......................................................................
NOHEN.................................................................
SETUP AND OP E R A TE ........................................
HEN.......................................................................
FEED O N LY.................................................................
HEN.......................................................................
S T IT C H E B O PE B A TO B S ...........................................
HEN.......................................................................
NOHEN................................................................
T A P IN G -M A C H IN E OPEBATOBS.........................
HEN.......................................................................
NOHZN................................................................
H IS C E L L A N B O U S :
5
A D J U S T E R S , H A C H IN E , C I A S S A .............
B ALE BS 5 . ..........................................................................
B U N D 1 E B S -P A C K E B S .................................................
HEN.......................................................................
NOHZN................................................................
C A T C H Z B S ..........................................................................




M I . . .................................................................
D IB H A K B B S .% ........................................ . ..................
E L E C T B I C IA N S , H A IN T B N A N C B 5...................
J A N I T O B S , P O B T E B S , A ID C L E A B I B S ..
■ I V ......................................................................
HAINTBNANCB N O S K B B S ,
G BNBBA1 U T I L I T T 5 . . . . . ............................
.
H B C H A N IC S , HAINTBNANCB K ............. .. .........
S H IP P IN G AND B B C B IF IN G C L B B I S 55. .
S N IP P IN G C I B B I S .
S N IP P IN G AND B B C B IV IN G C I B B I S . .
STABCNH AKBBS 5. ........................................................
F A L L B T IS S B OPBBATOB.........................................
H E N . . . . . . ....................................................
T B O C B D B IfB B S 5 I . .....................................................
S M I * OB T B A I 1 H ............................................
OTHBN THAN S S B 1 - OB T B A I 1 B B . . ••
T B 9 C IB B S # POBBB# F O B K L IP T K ................
T B O C B S B S # .B O N IS # O T B IB T H A I
F O B K L IP T 3 ....................................................................

Number
of
workers

82
55
27
71
52
-

52
50
-

123
81
42

-

Southeast

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

$4.44
4 .51
4 .3 0
4 .4 5
4 .5 2
-

4 .1 1
4 .0 7
-

4 .0 4
4 .1 0
3 .9 3

-

Median4

$ 4.37
4 .2 4
4 .3 9
4 .2 4
4 .3 C
-

4 .1 0
4 .0 5
-

4 .0 7
4 .1 4
3 .8 0

-

Middle range4

$4. 0 0 4 .0 6 4 .0 0 4 .0 0 4 .1 3 -

3 .8 2 3 .8 2 -

3 .7 1 3 .7 4 3 .7 1 -

-

3 .9 0 3 .4 7 3 .5 2 3 .4 0 3 .4 0 3 .0 2 4 .0 7 -

$4.64
4 .6 4
4 .3 9
4 .6 4
4 .6 4
-

4 .3 2
4 .3 2
-

4 .2 3
4 .6 4
4 .1 4

-

4 .5 5
4 .1 7
4 .2 4
3 .8 7
4 .1 2
4 .1 2
4 .8 9

72
189
156
33
33
31
16
11
26
24

4 .1 6
3 .7 7
3 .8 1
3 .5 9
3 .7 5
3 .6 8
4 .5 7
5 .0 0
4 .0 0
4 .0 1

4 .2 0
3 .8 7
3 .9 6
3 .6 6
3 .8 5
3 .8 4
4 .7 9
4 .0 1
4 .1 4

3 .7 7 3 .7 5 -

4 .2 0
4 .2 0

100
73
40

4 .4 8
4 .7 8
4 .1 1

4 .6 8
4 .9 8
4 .2 6

3 .9 5 4 .2 4 3 .8 3 -

4 .7 6
5 .3 5
4 .7 6

-

30
19
35
33
214
97
-

1 37

-

3 .9 0
4 .2 2
4 .1 6
4 . T9
4 .4 0
4 .9 2
-

4 .1 8

*

-

-

3 .9 1
4 .0 3
4 .0 9
4 .0 9
4 .0 0
4 .8 5
-

4 .1 9

-

-

-

-

3 .1 9 4 .0 0 3 .7 8 3 .7 8 3 .7 9 4 .2 1 -

4 .7 6
4 .2 0
4 .5 2
4 .5 2
4 .7 3
5 .1 6

3 .9 4 -

4 .4 4

-

-

Number
of
workers

219
211
-

Southwest

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

Median4

$4.22
4 .2 1

$4.32
4 .3 0

-

-

Middle range4

$ 3.8 6 3 .8 6 -

3 .9 8 3 .9 7 3 .7 3 3 .7 3 3 .3 5 3 .2 7 3 .8 9 3 .2 7 3 .2 7 3 .2 8 -

$4.67
4 .6 7
-

4 .62
4 .6 2
4 .6 8
4 .6 8
4.4 1
4 .3 8
4 .4 8
3 .9 3
3 .9 3
3 .7 8

Number
of
workers

117
117
-

163
155
56
56
264
23 3
31
319
270
49

4 .2 6
4 .2 5
4 .1 1
4 .1 1
3 .8 8
3 .8 5
4 .1 6
3 .7 2
3 .7 4
3 .6 0

4 .3 3
4 .3 3
3 .8 7
3 .8 7
3 .8 4
3 .7 5
4 .1 9
3 .6 2
3 .6 2
3 .3 5

8
140
6 07
53 4
73
119
119
42
18
78
76

4 .0 9
3 .8 6
3 .6 9
3 .7 0
3 .5 9
4 .1 8
4 .1 8
4 .6 3
5 .2 5
3 .6 2
3 .6 1

3 .9 0
3 .6 3
3 . 57
3 .6 9
3 .9 7
3 .9 7
4 .5 0
4 .8 8
3 .7 3
3 .7 1

3 .4 0 3 .3 3 3 .3 3 3 .2 1 3 .6 4 3 .6 4 4 .3 3 4 .8 8 3 .2 0 3 .1 5 -

4 .3 0
4 .1 4
4 .1 6
3 .9 2
5 .21
5.21
4 .8 5
5. 50
4 .0 7
4 .1 0

94
22 9
174

17 3
201
77
31
32
68
68
66
466
36 1
59
364

4 .6 8
5 .1 1
4 .1 9
3 .7 3
4 .3 4
4 .3 4
4 .4 2
4 .4 5
4 .2 0
4 .1 9
3 .9 0
4 .2 2

4 .6 5
5 .1 1
4 .2 9
3 .4 0
4 .2 9
4 .1 5
4 .3 2
4 .3 2
4 .3 8
4 . 35
4 .0 2
4 .1 0

4 .3 3 4 .5 7 3 .9 1 3 .2 3 4 .2 1 4 .0 1 3 .7 9 3 .8 5 3 .9 1 3 .9 1 3 .7 1 3 .7 1 -

£ .2 3
5 .4 7
4 .6 5
4 .3 0
4 .5 4
4 .8 6
5 .0 6
5 .0 6
4 . 56
4 .5 5
4 .6 1
4 .6 1

86

3 .9 2

4 .T 4

3 .3 4 -

Median4

$4.05
4 .0 5

$3.99
3 .S 9

-

-

Middle range4

$ 3 .7 5 3 .7 5 -

$4.24
4 .2 4
-

4 .3 5

-

-

-

69
69
48
48
95
70
25
122

68
54

-

4 .1 9
4 .1 9
3 .8 5
3 .8 5
3 .9 6
4 .0 3
3 .7 7
4 .0 0
4 .1 3
3 .8 3

-

4 .2 1
4 .2 1
3 .8 4
3 .8 4
3 .9 4
3 .9 9
3 .4 1
3 .9 4
4 .0 4
3 .6 7

-

3 .8 1 3 .8 1 3 .6 7 3 .6 7 3 .5 5 3 .6 9 3 .4 0 3 .5 5 3 .7 6 3 .4 1 -

-

4. 35
4 .3 5
4 .0 1
4 .0 1
4 .1 3
4. 11
4 .1 5
4 .1 5
4 .4 0
4 .0 0

-

35
29
27
17
43
43

3 .9 1
3 .8 4
3 .9 2
3 .6 1
3 .8 7
3 .9 7
4 .5 4
6 .1 0
3 .9 2
3 .9 2

3 .8 3
3 .6 9
3 .7 2
3 .5 2
3 .6 9
3 .8 9
4 .3 7
5 .4 6
3 .7 6
3 .7 6

3 .5 0 3 .4 5 3 .5 2 3 .4 1 3 .4 1 3 .4 1 4 .2 2 5 .2 0 3 .5 7 3 .5 7 -

4 .2 5
4 .3 7
4 .3 7
4 .1 0
3 .8 9
3 .9 8
4 .7 2
6 .5 7
4 .5 5
4 .5 5

53
107
20

5 .0 7
5 .2 7
4 .6 2

4 .9 9
4 .8 0
4 .1 9

4 .5 8 4 .5 9 4 .1 7 -

5 .4 8
6 .4 8
4 .8 0

55

-

17
32
55
55
162
116
27
254

"

See footnotes et end of table.

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

-

4 .5 8
4 .3 5
4 .4 0
4 .4 0
4 .0 9
4 .0 8
3 .8 0
4 .1 1

-

4 .1 7
4 .1 7
4 .3 5
4 .3 5
3 .9 7
3 .9 7
3 .6 3
3 .S 5

-

4 .1 7 3 .9 4 3 .9 7 3 .9 7 3 .6 7 3 .7 0 3 .1 0 3 .6 7 -

-

4 .4 6
4 .7 9
5 .0 5
5 .0 5
4 .5 3
4 .2 2
3 .6 7
4 .5 5

"

Table 3. Occupational averages— all establishments— Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishm
ents, United States and selected regions, March 1976.)
Great Lakes
Occupation and sex3

COBBOGATIHG:5
COBBUGATOB-KBXFE OPEBATOBS.............
COBBUGATOB-COHBXBIHG-HACHIBE
OPEBATOBS................................................
DOUBLE*BACKEB CPEBATOBS....................
OFF*EEABBBS (CCBBUGATIBGCOHBXHIBG-HACHIBE)............................
BOLL SUPPLY BOBKEBS............................
PBIBTIBG:5
FLEXOGBAPHIC PBIBTBB OPEBATOBS
(PBIBTIBG OPEEATIOBS O IL T )...........
FLEXOGBAPHIC PBIBTBB OPEBATOBS
(PBIBTIBG AID FABBICATIBG
OPEBATIOBS).......................................
PBXBTEB-SLOTTEB-HACHXBE
OPEBATOBS................................................
SIBGLE-COLCB PBIBTBB......................
TIO-COLOB PBIBTBB............................
THBEE- OB HOBE COLOB PBIBTXB...
PBIBTBB-SLOTTEB-HACHIBE
ASSISTAITS.............................................................
SIHGLE-COLOB PBIBTBB......................
THO-COLOB PBIBTBB............................
TBBZE- O BOBI CCLOB FBIBTEfi...
B
CUTTIBG ABD CBEASIBG:
CUTTIBG- ABD CBEASIBG-PBESS
OPEBATOBS * ............................................
HEB..................................................
BCHEB.............................................
CTLIBDEB OB BOTABY..........................
HEB..................................................
BCHEB.............................................
PLATEB....................................................
HEB..................................................
BOHEB.............................................
CUTTIBG- ABD CBEASIBG-PBESS
FEEDEBS 6 ................................................
.
HEB..................................................
BOHEB.............................................
CYLIBDBB OB BOTABY..........................
HEB..................................................
PLATEB....................................................
HEB..................................................
BCHEB.............................................
STBIPPSBS 6
................................................
HEB..................................................
BOHEB..............................................
BAUD........................................................
HEB..................................................
BCHEB..............................................




Number
of
workers

Mean4

Median4

Pacific

Middle W
est

Hourly earnings1
Middle range4

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

Median4

Middle range4

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings1
Mean4

Middle range4

302

$5.32

$ 5.21

$4. 8 7 -

$5.72

63

$5.12

$ 4.78

$ 4 .4 7 -

$5.66

129

$ 6.47

$6.51

$ 6 .3 3 -

$ 6.51

352
310

5 .4 7
5 .1 7

5 .4 0
5 .0 6

5 .0 3 4 .7 2 -

5 .7 5
5 .4 2

63
55

5 .3 2
4 .9 5

5 .4 4
5 .1 9

4 .8 8 4 .3 6 -

5 .6 4
5 .3 0

1 36
111

6 .6 1
5 .6 8

6 .6 0
5 .6 2

6 .5 6 5 .6 2 -

6 .6 2
5 .7 0

733
320

4 .9 2
4 .9 8

4 .7 7
4 .8 5

4 .5 1 4 .6 1 -

5 .2 7
5 .3 2

145
47

4 .6 9
4 .4 8

4 .9 5
4.41

4. 134 .1 0 -

5 .2 2
4 .7 8

235
77

5 .2 9
5 .7 5

5 .2 7
5 .8 0

5 .1 3 5 .7 1 -

5 .3 6
5 .8 0

77

5 .3 5

5 .2 8

5 .0 3 -

5 .7 8

-

39

6 .5 8

6 .6 0

6 .5 7 -

6 .6 0

461

5 .2 4

5 .2 0

4 .9 2 -

5 .5 3

80

5 .0 4

4 .8 7

4 .7 3 -

5 .4 9

177

€ .5 3

6 .6 0

6 .5 2 -

6 .6 0

902
41
756
105

5.1 1
4 .9 6
5 .1 0
5 .21

5 .0 1
5 .2 4
5 .0 0
5 .2 3

4 .7 2 4 .5 8 4 .7 2 4 .8 1 -

5 .4 2
5 .3 3
5 .4 1
5 .6 1

176

4 .9 5

4 .6 8

4 .4 5 -

5 .4 2

151

5 .0 1

249
45
167
37

6 .1 7
5 .6 4
6 .2 0
6 .4 6

6 .4 9
5 .82
6 .4 6
6 .5 9

5 .5 1 5 .4 5 5 .9 3 5 .9 1 -

6 .51
6 .5 1
6 .5 1
6 .9 3

961
55
767
139

4 .7 8
4 .8 3
4 .7 6
4 .8 7

4 .7 2
4 .9 6
4 .6 9
4 .9 4

4 .4 5 4 .6 8 4 .4 4 4 .5 3 -

5 .1 4
5 .1 7
5 .0 9
5 .3 4

162

4 .6 8
4 .7 8

-

~

623
55 9
64
279
242
37
311
264
27

4 .8 8
4 .9 9
3 .9 3
4 .8 2
4 .9 6
3 .8 8
4 .9 2
5 .01
3 .9 9

4 .8 5
4 .9 4
3 .8 4
4 .8 5
4 .9 7
3 .8 1
4 .8 4
4 .8 7
3 .8 4

4 .4 5 4 .5 6 3 .6 1 4 .3 4 4 .5 6 3 .6 1 4 .4 6 4 .5 8 3 .6 1 -

5 .3 3
5 .3 7
4 .2 6
5 .3 1
5 .3 7
4 .1 6
5 .3 6
5 .3 8
4 .3 7

86
85

4 .6 2
4 .6 1

29
28

4 .6 6
4 .6 4

50
50

4 .5 6
4 .5 6

322
293
29
172
160
125
110
15
259
136
123
231
126
105

4 .7 5
4 .8 2
4 .0 8
4 .7 9
4 .8 3
4 .6 7
4 .8 0
3 .7 8
4 .2 2
4 .2 7
4 .1 6
4 .3 1
4 .2 9
4 .3 3

4 .7 0
4 .7 5
4 .1 8
4 .7 2
4 .7 5
4 .7 0
4 .7 0
3 .9 8
4 .1 9
4 .1 9
4 .3 5
4 .3 1
4 .1 9
4 .3 7

4 .3 8 4 .4 7 3 .9 7 4 .3 8 4 .3 8 4 .3 3 4 .4 9 2 .7 0 3 .9 8 3 .9 9 3 .9 8 4 .0 2 4 .0 0 4 .1 2 -

5 .0 5
5 .1 4
4 .5 3
5 .0 2
5 .0 7
5 .0 5
5 .0 7
4 .4 3
4 .4 6
4 .7 0
4 .4 6
4 .4 7
4 .4 8
4 .4 6

-

-

-

137

-

-

36
28
8
10
9
24
17
7
26
19

-

-

4 .2 5
4 .3 1
4 .0 5
4 .2 5
4 .2 8
4 .2 8
4 .3 7
4 .0 6
3 .7 3
3 .7 3
3 .7 5
3 .6 2
3 .6 6

-

-

-

-

-

-

4 .7 4
-

4 .4 5 -

5 .4 4
-

4 .5 0
4 .61

4 .2 4 4 .2 5 -

5 .1 2
5 .1 5

210
34
133
43

5 .2 3
5 .1 5
5 .1 9
5 .4 4

5 .4 5
5 .4 5
5 .4 5
5 .5 7

5 .0 7 4 .7 5 4 .7 9 5 .0 7 -

5 .5 7
5 .4 5
5 .5 4
5 .7 2

4 .5 7
4 .5 5

4 .2 0 4 .2 0 -

5 .0 6
5 .0 6

189
187

6 .1 9
6 .1 9

6 .5 0
6 .5 0

5 .7 0 5 .7 0 -

6 .5 1
6. 51

76
76

6 .4 3
6 .4 3

6 .5 1
6.5 1

6 .4 1 6 .4 1 -

6 .5 1
6 .5 1

113
111

6 .0 2
6 .0 2

4 .5 9
4 .5 9

4 .4 0
4 .4 0

4 .2 7
4.31

4 .2 4
4 .2 7

3 .6 9
3 .6 9

7
19
15

-

4 .3 0 4 .3 0 -

4 .0 9 4 .0 9 -

4 .2 3 4 .2 4 -

4 .2 4 4 .2 4 -

3 .6 5 3 .6 5 -

-

-

4 .9 0
4 .8 3

5 .0 6
5 .0 6

4 .3 7
4 .4 5

4 .3 7
4 .3 7

3 .98
3 .8 6

-

-

-

128
114

-

-

5 .0 9
5 .1 9

-

75
72
51
40

5 .1 1
5 .1 5
5 .1 2
5 .3 4

45
45

4 .3 4
4 .3 4

-

-

3 .6 5
3 .6 5

3 .5 0 3 .5 8 -

3 .7 2
3 .6 9

-

-

'

See footnotes at end of table.

Median4

'

-

6 .2 7
6 .2 7

5 .2 4
5 .4 4

5 .1 9
5 .2 2
5 .4 5
5 .4 5

4 .2 3
4 .2 3

-

-

5 .5 2 5 .5 2 -

5 .1 3 5 .1 5 -

-

6 .5 1
6 .5 2

5 .4 5
5 .4 5

-

5 .1 3 5 .1 3 4 .9 0 5 .2 2 -

5 .4 5
5 .4 5
5 .4 9
5 .5 1

4 .2 0 4 .2 0 -

5 .0 0
5 .0 0

-

-

-

~
*

Ta ble 3. Occupational averages— all establishments— Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishm
ents. United States and selected regions, March 1976.)
Great Lakes
Occupation and sex1
2
3

Middle W
est

Hourly earnings1

Number
of
workers

Mean4

Median4

CUTTING AND CBEASING:— CONTINUED
SLITTEB OPEFATORS................................
HEN.................................................
NCHEN.............................................
SLOTTEB OPERATORS................................
HEN.................................................
NOHEN.............................................

523
466
57
167
132
35

$4.61
4 .6 5
4 .2 7
4 .6 9
4 .8 0
4 .2 8

$ 4.56
4 .5 9
4 .4 1
4.6 1
4 .6 7
4 .1 5

$ 4 .3 0 4 .3 5 3 .7 6 4 .3 5 4 .4 7 3 .8 1 -

FINISHING:
FOLDING*’ AND GLUING-*HACHINE
OPERATORS, AUTOHATIC........................
HEN.................................................
NOHEN.............................................
SETUP AND OPEBATB............................
HEN.................................................
NOHEN.............................................
FEED ONLY.............................................
HEN.................................................
NOHEN.............................................
STITCHEB OPEBATOBS..............................
HEN.................................................
NOHEN.............................................
1APING-HACHINE OPEBATOBS.................
HEN.................................................
NOHBN.............................................

427
389
38
289
263
26
13 8
126
12
388
192
196
5 70
28 6
284

4 .9 1
4 .9 4
4 .5 7
4 .9 3
4 .9 6
4 .6 3
4 .8 5
4 .8 9
4 .4 5
4 .5 4
4 .8 4
4 .2 5
4 .3 6
4 .5 2
4 .2 0

4 .7 5
4 .7 5
4 .4 3
4 .7 7
4 .8 0
4 .4 3
4 .6 5
4 .6 5

29
26
18
3 30
1 ,0 16
677
33 9
25 4
152
102
137

MISCELLANEOUS:
ADJUSTERS, HACHINE, CLASS A * . . . . .
ADJUSTERS, HACHINE, CLASS E...........
HEN..................................................................
BALEBS 5 ...................................................
.
6
BUNDLEBS-PACKS BS..................................
HEN.................................................
NOHBN............................................
CATCBEBS...................................................
HEN.................................................
NOHBN............................................
DIE HAKEBS.5 ...........................................
.
ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE 5.............
JANITORS, POB1BBS, AND CLEANERS..
HEN.................................................
MAINTENANCE NOBKEBS,
GENEBAL UTILITY 5 ..............................
.
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE5 .................
.
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS s . .
.
SNIPPING CLERKS................................
BECEIYING CLERKS..............................
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CIEBKS..
STABCHHAKEBS 5 ......................................
.
PALLETIZBB OPERATOR............................
HEN................. ...............................
NOHBN.............................................
TRUCKDBIYEBS 5 .G ..................................
.
SEMI- OB TRAILER..............................
CTHEB THAN SBHI- OR TR A ILER ....
TRUCKERS, PONEB, FORKLIFT...............
TRUCKERS,.PCNEE, OTHER THAI
FOBBIIFT5...............................................




New England

Hourly earnings'

Number
of
workers

Mean4

Median4

$4.93
4 .9 8
4 .6 5
4 .9 4
5 .1 3
4 .6 3

69
67

$ 4.54
4 .5 5

$4.35
4 .3 5

-

-

23
21
~

4 .3 5
4 .3 6

4 .5 3 4 .5 5 4 .3 6 4 .5 6 4 .6 0 4 .3 7 4 .4 5 4 .5 2 -

5 .1 2
5 .1 7
4 .7 0
5 .1 7
5 .1 8
4 .7 0
4 .9 4
4 .9 4

98
89
9
90
81
9

4 .7 0
4 .7 5
4 .2 2
4 .7 4
4 .8 0
4 .2 2

4 .4 7
4 .6 5
4 .3 9
4 .3 5
4 .4 4
4 .2 2

4 .2 3 4 .3 5 3 .7 5 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 3 .8 8 -

4 .8 5
5 .1 6
4 .5 2
4 .7 2
4 .8 1
4 .5 8

72
42
30
89
40
49

4 .6 6
4 .8 4
4 .4 1
4 .4 1
4 .4 6
4 .3 6

4 .6 6
4 .8 6
4 .5 6
4 .1 9
4 .2 2
4 .0 5

4 .0 9 4 .4 1 4 .0 6 3 .9 5 3 .9 5 3 .9 3 -

4 .7 2
4 .6 9
5 .1 1
4 .3 6
4 .2 7
4 .3 6
4 .0 9
4 .2 7
4 .4 8
3 .9 5
4 .9 3
5 .6 4
4 .2 1
4 .2 2

4 .5 8
4 .8 0
4 .9 8
4 .3 7
4 .3 1
4 .3 7
4 .0 8
4 .2 0
4 .3 9
4 .0 3
4 .8 7
5 .5 8
4 .2 3
4 .2 5

4 .2 5 4 .5 0 4 .8 0 4 .0 3 3 .9 2 3 .9 6 3 .3 9 4 .0 3 4 .2 0 3 .5 6 4 .6 3 5 .3 0 3 .9 8 3 .9 8 -

5 .2 2
4 .9 8
5 .4 3
4 .7 4
4 .6 1
4 .6 9
4 .3 7
4 .4 9
4 .6 5
4 .0 3
5 .1 3
5 .8 9
4 .4 1
4 .41

72
213
160
53
85
70

4 .1 4
4 .2 5
4 .3 0
4 .1 0
4 .4 5
4 .5 3

3 .9 0
4 .1 8
4 .1 8
3 .9 4
4 .3 5
4 .6 1

3 .8 0 3 .8 0 3 .8 3 3 .5 3 4 .0 4 4 .1 2 -

16
10
31
31

4 .9 1
5 .3 5
4 .2 8
4 .2 8

5 .2 6
5 .4 8
4 .6 2
4 .6 2
4 .5 1
4 .6 3
4 .7 7
4 .5 7
4 .5 7
4 .4 6

4 .7 8 5 .1 9 4 .4 2 4 .5 1 4 .3 2 4 .4 0 4 .5 2 4 .3 3 4 .3 4 4 .2 2 -

5 .5 3
5 .7 7
5 .2 9
5 .4 1
4 .9 7
5 .2 9
5 .0 7
5 .0 5
5 .0 8
4 .6 9

87
63
32

259
231
28

5 .2 2
5 .4 6
4 .8 1
4 .7 7
4 .5 5
4 .8 7
4 .8 3
4 .7 0
4 .7 0
4 .7 2

5 .1 5
5 .3 8
4 .7 5
5 .0 0
4 .7 3
4 .6 3
4 .6 8
4 .5 2
4 .5 2

46 6
423
21
1 ,0 4 1

6 .0 1
6 .0 6
4 .9 8
4 .7 0

6 .0 0
6 .0 0
4 .6 7
4 .6 4

5 .0 0 5 .0 3 4 .4 8 4 .3 4 -

7 .2 1
7 .2 1
4 .9 9
4 .9 3

81
56
15
179

5 .0 7
4 .9 5
4 .5 5
4 .5 9

4 .7 9
4 .7 9
4 .7 1
4 .3 9

4 .5 5 4 .5 5 4 .4 6 4 .0 9 -

5 .2 8
5 .2 8
4.8 1
5 .0 3

175

4 .7 8

4 .6 8

4 .4 5 -

5 .1 4

37

5 .1 6

5 .0 7

4 .8 5 -

5 .1 7

44
202
178
534
340
194

68
15
111

88

-

Middle range4

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
6
17
24
37
37

-

$ 4.2 4 4 .2 4 -

-

4 .1 1
4.1 1

3 .9 53 .9 5 -

-

-

-

Middle range4

-

-

-

4 .3 1 4 .3 2 -

-

-

4 .6 3
4 .6 9

4 .3 2 4 .3 6 -

-

-

-

4 .7 2

4 .4 6 -

-

4 .3 9
4 .3 9

4 .6 8
4 .7 4
4 .1 8
4 .1 8

-

4 .71
4.71

-

4 .5 2
4 .6 3

5 .1 8
5 .2 0
4 .6 8

$ 4.66
4 .6 6

5 .1 3
5 .1 3

5 . 13
5 .1 9

-

4 .8 6
5 .0 3
4 .6 5
4 .6 6
4 .9 5
4 .6 6

-

4 .3 8
4 .7 2
4 .7 8
4 .4 3
4 .9 3
4 .9 3

5 .4 0

-

3 .9 3 3 .9 3 I

4 .5 5
4 .5 5

4 .6 8 4 .9 8 4 .5 1 -

5 .4 5
5 .8 7
4 .7 6

4 .5 6 4 .2 3 3 .8 5 3 .8 5 -

4 .7 0
4 .9 2
5.01
5.0 1

-

-

-

-

Number
of
workers

Hourly earnings'
Mean4

Median4

134
131

$ 5.17
5 .1 7

$5.44
5 .4 4

48
44

5 .3 9
5 .3 8

5 .3 7
5 .3 7

-

~

-

-

-

Middle range4
$ 5 .1 9 5 .1 6 -

$5.52
5 .5 2

5 .3 4 5 .3 4 -

5 .4 4
5 .4 4

-

-

-

128
128

6 .0 9
6 .0 9

6 .5 0
6 .5 0

5 .8 2 5 .8 2 -

6 .6 0
6. 60

115
115

6 .2 0
6 .2 0

6 .5 0
6 .5 0

5 .9 2 5 .9 2 -

6 .6 0
6 .6 0

-

-

59
52
7
12 5
106
19

-

-

5 .3 0
5 .2 9
5 .3 9
5 .0 7
5 .0 6
5 .0 9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 .4 4
5 .4 4

5 .2 9 5 .2 9 -

5 .5 1
5 .5 8

5 .3 4
5 .3 4
5 .5 0

4 .4 9 4 .2 7 5 .1 9 -

5 .5 8
5 .5 6
5 .8 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 .2 8
5 .1 8
5 .1 8

5 .1 3 5 .1 3 5 .1 3 -

5 .4 4
5 .4 0
5 .4 0

6 .6 9
7 .7 5
5 .1 5
5 .1 5

6 .5 1
7 .6 9
5 .1 9
5 .1 9

6 .5 1 7 .5 7 5 .1 3 5 .1 3 -

6 .8 0
7 .7 1
5 .2 3
5 .2 3

69
190
11 2
53

7 .2 7
7 .5 6
6 .0 3
6 .4 0

7 .6 9
7 .6 9
5 .9 9
5 .9 9

7 .6 9 7 .5 9 5 .7 2 5 .9 6 -

7 .6 9
7 .6 9
6 .3 0
7 .5 1

56
49

5 .7 0

55
55
-

5 .4 5
5 .4 5

265
138
401

6 .7 9
7 .2 3
4 .9 8
5 .6 2

7 .3 9
7 .3 9
4 .6 1
5 .6 8

5 .6 6 6 .9 2 4 .1 9 5 .6 5 -

7 .4 4
7 .3 9
5 .2 5
5 .8 1

24

6 .01

6 .0 1

5 .8 5 -

6 .2 2

134
27 0
258

5 .0 2
5 .2 0
5 .2 0

10
10

4 .9 4
4 .9 4

35
18
39
39

-

-

-

22

-

-

5.55
-

-

5 .8 6
5 .4 7
5 .5 8
5 .5 8

-

1Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3Includesdata for establishm
entsfor which information for m and women separately w unavailable.
en
as
3Includes data for Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.
4See Appendix A for method used to compute m
eans, m
edians, and middle ranges of earnings. Medians and middle ranges are not provided for jobs with fewer than 15 workers in a region.
sAll or virtually all workers are m
en.
6Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data does not meet publication criteria.

-

5 .6 8 5 .2 8 5 .3 5 5 .3 5 -

-

-

6 .2 9
5 .7 8
5 .5 9
5 .5 9

-

Ta ble 4. Occupational averages— b y size of establishment
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 o f workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments by size o f establishment. United States and selected regions, March 1976.)

New England

United States3

Department and occupation

30-99
workers
Number
of
workers

COBBUGATXIG:
COBBUGATOB-KNIFE OPBBATOBS...........................................
COBBOGATOR-COHBIHIHG-HACBIHE
OFBBlf OHS. ........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .........................
DOUBLE-BACKBB OPBBATOBS..................................................
OFF-EIABBBS (COBBUGATXIGCOHBINING-HACBIHB)..........................................................
b o i l SUPPLY BOBKBBS..........................................................
PBXITIIG:
FLBXOGBAPHIC PBIHTBB OPBBATOBS
(PBIITIBG OFBBATIOHS O IL Y ).........................................
FLEXOGBAPBIC PBIHTBB OPIBATCES
(PBIITIBG AIL FABBICATIIG
OPEBATIOIS).....................................................................
PBXITEB-SLOTTBB-HACHXIB
OPBBATOBS.............................................................................
SIHGLE-COLOB PBIHTBB....................................................
TWO-COLOB PBIHTBB..........................................................
THBEE- OB HOBE COLOB PBIITEB..................................
PBIHTBB-SLOTIBB-HACHIHB
ASSISTANTS...........................................................................
SIHGLE-COLOB PBIITBB....................................................
THO-COLOB PBIITEB..........................................................
THBEE- OB HOBE COLOB FBI HUB..................................
CUTTIHG AID CBEASIIG:
CUTTIHG- AID CBEASIHG-PBESS
OPBBATOBS 3
...........................................................................
C1LIIDEB OB BOTABY........................................................
PLATE!.................................................................................
CUTTIHG- AID CBEASIHG-PBESS
FEEDEBS 3
...............................................................................
CYLIHDBB OB BOTABY........................................................
PLATE...............................................................................................................
STBIPPEBS 3
.......................................................................................................
AIB HAHHEB.................................................................................................

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

100
workers or more

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

1CK)
workers or more

30- 99
worl kers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

976

$5.28

71

$ 4.69

55

$ 4.67

198

$ 5.36

41

$4.49

51

$ 4.95

209
189

5 .1 4
4 .7 5

987
884

5 .4 5
5 .0 5

66
48

5 .1 4
4 .7 8

58
42

4 .9 6
4 .8 5

152
161

5 .5 0
5 .1 6

17
25

4 .3 7
4 .3 7

54
52

5 .0 2
4 .8 3

506
201

4 .2 7
4 .5 8

2 ,2 27
8 26

4 .7 6
4 .8 4

147
61

4 .4 8
4 .4 5

139
52

3 .9 0
4 .4 3

442
15 2

4 .8 6
4 .9 6

55
29

4 .1 7
4 .3 2

134
55

4 .4 6
4 .8 4

69

5 .1 3

21 2

5.21

“

32

5 .3 8

~

“

-

~

“

•

315

4 .7 1

1 ,2 0 3

5 .2 8

10 5

5 .0 1

83

3 .9 3

194

5 .3 0

31

4 .6 1

83

4 .7 6

948
120
790
38

4 .6 8
4 .9 0
4 .6 4
4 .8 3

2 ,0 3 0
116
1 ,6 70
244

5 .1 6
4 .7 4
5 .1 5
5 .4 2

118
20
84
14

4 .8 9
4 .4 5
4 .9 0
5.4 1

177
14
158
“

4 .9 5
5 .6 7
4 .8 5
-

3 87
13
326
48

5 .2 7
5 .3 8
5 .2 2
5 .5 9

66
58

4 .2 4

106
92
~

4 .8 0
4 .8 2

839
79
716
44

4 .1 7
4 .1 0
4 .1 7
4 .3 8

2 ,2 2 7
140
1 ,7 98
289

4 .7 2
4 .4 4
4 .7 2
4 .8 4

121
21
87
13

4 .3 5
4 .1 8
4 .3 7
4 .4 5

120
115
—

4 .4 2
4 .3 8
~

422
10
362
50

4 .8 9
5 .3 2
4 .8 5
5 .0 8

77

3 .8 8

115

4 .0 2

101

4 .4 8
4 .4 9

611
300
292

4 .5 5
4 .5 2
4 .5 5

1 ,2 41
580
572

5 .0 7
5 .1 0
5 .0 5

67
19
48

4 .6 3
4 . 76
4 .5 8

128
61
55

4 .9 8
5 .0 0
4 .81

268
147
92

5 .0 7
5 .1 5
4 .9 5

243
125
108
245

696
390
244
495
46
406
1 ,0 2 0
452

4 .7 2
4 .7 0
4 .7 1
4 .3 0
4 .3 6
4 .2 5
4 .6 9
4 .6 2

29
12
17
46
46
75
31

4 .3 2
4 .5 5
4 .1 5
4 .0 2
4 .0 2
4 .4 6
4 .71

33
21
12
49
36
118
35

4 .6 7
4 .8 3
4 .4 1
3 .8 7
3 .8 7
4 .3 8
4 .3 9

139
73
138
14
107
2 12
113

4 .6 6
4 .7 9
4 .2 9
4 .4 7
4 .6 0
4 .2 7
4 .7 9
4 .6 4

1 ,0 5 5
784
271
901
1 ,2 18

4 .8 7
4 .9 5
4 .6 5
4 .4 7
4 .4 6

32
30
58
89

4 .4 2
4 .4 3
4 .1 5
4 .2 3

4 .5 8
4 .8 5
3 .7 4
4.61
4 .5 4

224
155
69
129
2 76

4 .8 6
4 .9 7
4.6 1
4 .6 1
4 .6 4

177
545
135

FINISHING:
FOLDING- AND GLUING-HACHIHE
OPBBATOBS, AUTOMATIC........................................................................
SETUP AND OPEBATB.............................................................................
FEED ONLY....................................................................................................
STITCHER OPBBATOBS................................................................................
TAPING-HACHIHE OPBBATOBS...............................................................

398
288
110
• 319
660

4 .4 3
4 .5 9
4 .0 2
4 .0 5
3 .9 7




Average
hourly
earnings

30-99
workers

$4.86

SLITTER OPBBATOBS...................................................................................
SLOTTBB OPBBATOBS...................................................................................

See footnotes at end of table.

Number
of
workers

100
workers or more

219

4 .2 1
4 .4 1
4 .03
3 .5 9
3 .6 7
3 .6 2
4 .1 2
4 .2 7

hard ...................................................................................................................

100
workers or more

Border States

Middle Atlantic

32

87
66
21
69

111

45

4 .3 2

-

-

69
'

27
11
16

'

4.21
4 .8 1
3 .8 0

-

-

-

37

~
3 .8 3

26
24
14
42

4 .1 6
4 .2 0
3 .8 8
3 .6 9

"

—

68
35
21

4 .7 4
4 .8 5
4 .4 9

40
27
19
*
61
17

4 .5 8
4 .6 1
4 .2 5
4 .3 3
4 .2 4
4 .0 3

56
47
38
81

4 .5 7
4 .5 8
4 .1 9
4 .2 2

11

Ta ble 4. Occupational averages— by size of establishment— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments by size of establishment. United States and selected regions, March 1976.)

Southeast

Department and occupation

30-99
workers
Number
of
workers

C O B B U G A T IIG :
C O B B U G A T O B -K IX F E O P B B A TO B S ..................
C O B B U G A T O B -C C H B I I I I G - H A C H I B B
O P E B A T O B S ...............................................................
D O U B L E -B A C K E B O P E B A T O B S ..........................
0 F 7 -B E A B E B S (C O B B U G A T I I G C O H B I H I B G - H A C B X B E ).....................................
B O I L S U P P L Y V O B K E B S .....................................
P B IIT IIG :
F L E X O G B A P H IC P B X I T I B O P E B A TO B S
( P B I I T I I G O P E B A T I O I S O I L Y ) ...............
F L E X O G B A P H IC P B I I T E B O P E B A TO B S
( P B I I T I I G A ID F A B B IC A T IIG
O P E B A T I O I S ) ...................................................
P B IIT E B -S L O T T E E -H A C H IIE
O P E B A T O B S ...............................................................
S I I G L B - C O L O B P B I I T E B .............................
T I O - C O L O B P B I I T E B .....................................
T B B E E - O B BOBS C O L O B P B X I T Z B . . .
P B IIT E B -S L O T T B B -H A C H IIE
A S S I S T ! I T S ............................................................
S I I G L E —C O IO B P B I I T E B .............................
T I O - C O L O B P B I I T E B .....................................
T B B E E - OB IO B B C O L O B P B I I 1 I B . . .
C U T T I I G A ID C B I A S I I G :
C U T T I I G — A I D C B E A S X IG -P B Z S S
O P E B A T O B S 3 ............................................................
C Y L I I D B B OB B O T A B Y ..................................
P L A T E ! ....................................................................
C U T T I I G - A ID C B E A S IIG -P B E S S
F E E D E B S 3 ..................................................................
C Y L I I D B B OB B O T A B Y ..................................
P L A T E 1 .....................................................................
S T B IP P B B S 3 ...............................................................
A I B H A H H E B .........................................................
HA I D ..........................................................................
S L I T T I B O P E B A T O B S ...........................................
S L O T T E B O P E B A T O B S ...........................................

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

30-99
workers
Number
of
workers

10 0

workers or more

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

100

100

workers or more

workers or more

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

34

$ 4 .9 2

268

$ 5 .3 7

42

$ 5 .1 7

105

$ 6 .5 1

5 .0 4
4 .6 7

45
42

5 .1 8
4 .8 2

3 07
268

5 .5 1
5 .2 2

42
38

5 .3 4
4 .9 3

110

92

6 .6 3
5 .7 2

4 .4 4
4 .5 9

75
44

4 .5 2
4 .7 6

6 58
2 76

4 .9 7
5 .0 1

88

66

24

4 .7 3
4 .5 9

1 76
59

5 .4 0
5 .7 5

22

4 .5 9

-

56

5 .2 3

“

39

6 .5 8

4 .9 6
4 .6 3

-

-

-

-

363
1 23

4 .3 4
4 .2 2

“

-

201

“

44

4 .4 3

-

-

-

100

workers or more

$ 4 .8 5

$ 4 .7 9

162
1 49

-

Number
of
workers

Pacific

80

1 51

-

-

Average
hourly
earnings

30-99
workers

Middle West

78
72

~

-

-

-

1 60

4 .9 2

-

-

53

4 .8 5

51

5 .0 2

410

5 .2 7

57

5 .1 6

133

6 .5 7

161
26
1 35
-

$ 3 .9 7
3 .6 0
4 .0 5
-

3 51
25
312
-

4 .7 5
4 .3 2
4 .7 7
-

54
51
-

$ 4 .1 3
4 .1 5
-

1 43
1 06
31

4 .7 9
4 .8 8
4 .5 7

239
205
27

4 .6 7
4 .7 0
4 .5 4

663
34
551
78

5 .2 6
5 .1 0
5 .2 5
5 .4 5

110

4 .9 6
5 .0 6
-

1 44
-

15<t

378
33
343
-

4 .2 9
3 .7 3
4 .3 4
-

58
55
-

3 .8 7
3 .8 8
-

197
1 44
-

4 .3 6
4 .4 8
-

209
177
27

4 .2 9
4 .3 2
4 .1 7

752
50
590
112

4 .9 1
4 .9 4
4 .8 9
5 .0 4

88

132
-

3 .5 6
3 .2 1
3 .6 2
-

69
34
31

3 .8 6
3 .9 0
3 .7 9

162
75
80

4 .4 9
4 . 47
4 .5 4

34

3 .9 6
3 .9 6
3 .9 6

79
56

4 .7 8
4 .7 4
4 .9 7

198
1 07
88

4 .3 8
4 .2 7
4 .5 1

4 25
172
2 23

24
-

3 .6 0
•

70
44
20

17
-

3 .8 4
2 .9 7
2 .9 7
3 . 56
4 .C 7

4 .3 2
4 .9 4
3 .4 0
—
3 .4 0
4 .3 6
4 .2 6

70
46
24
79
—
63
1 69
26

4 .2 3
4 .4 9
3 .7 5
3 .5 5
—
3 .7 6
4 . 12
4 .3 4

2 52
126

3 .4 7
3 .1 1
3 .0 7
-

4 .1 8
4 .1 5
4 .2 2
3 .9 7
3 .6 1
4 .0 2
4 .0 4
4 .1 1

64
-

14
30

4 .1 6
4 .3 2
3 .9 8
4 .2 0
4 .1 2

106
71
35
70
192

4 .3 9
4 .4 6
4 .2 5
3 .9 1
3 .9 7

-

22

8

65
-

3 .6 7
-

33
17

3 .8 4
3 .9 1

62
132

H IS C E L L A IE O U S :
A D J U S T E B S , H A C H I I E , C L A S S A ...............
B A L E B S ................................ .........................................
B U ID L B B S -P A C K E B S ..............................................

38
190




100

workers or more

Great Lakes

-

F IIIS H IIG :
F O L D I I G - A ID G L U IIG -H A C H IIE
O P E B A T O B S , A U T O H A T I C ................................
S E T U P A I D O P Z B A T B .....................................
F E E D O I L Y ............................................................
S T X T C H B B O P E B A T O B S ........................................
T A P I I G - H A C H I I B O P E B A T O B S .......................

See footnotes at end of table.

Southwest

-

-

-

3 .4 4
3 .4 2

3 .2 7
3 .2 5

44
10

26
1 13
48

186
146
40
202

1 87

—
102

417

4 .2 9
4 .3 0
4 .2 5
4 .0 2
3 .9 4

—
4 .0 7
3 .8 9

21

13

14
14
31
14

39
27
12

29
36

—
31
39

3 .8 3
3 .9 9
3 .4 6
3 .4 3
3 .7 1

—
3 .3 7
3 .0 7

21

20

42
—
42
80
40

78
42
36
66
86

_

_

—

_

_

“

—

37

6 .4 0
6 .4 3
6 .4 6

67
-

4 .6 9
4 .9 3
~

142
92
43

5 .4 6
5 .5 3
5 .4 4

5 .1 2
5 .1 6
5 .0 8

41
17
17

4 .8 4
4 .8 4
4 .8 2

1 23
55
68

6 .3 9
6 .4 7
6 .3 3

11

180
—
168
354
141

4 .9 0
4 .9 0
4 .9 0
4 .5 2
—
4 .5 2
4 .8 4
4 .7 5

40
16

4 .1 3
4 .6 8
4 .4 5

85
54
31
24
—
83
38

5 .3 5
5 .3 1
5 .4 3
4 .5 9
—
5 .5 4
5 .4 8

321
218
103
318
378

5 .0 8
5 .0 9
5 .0 5
4 .6 8
4 .5 6

56
56
41
45

4 .8 5
4 .8 5
4 .5 9
4 .6 0

96

6 .3 0
6 .3 8
5 .4 5
5 .4 0

27
_

4 .6 8
—

_

_

_

_

~

—

~

*
■

-

“

101

89
-

-

102

88

49
76

Ta ble 4. Occupational averages— by size of establishment— Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments by size o f establishment. United States and selected regions, March 1976.)

New England

United States2
30-99

100

100

workers

Department and occupation

workers or more

workers or more

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

9
19
362
980
218
75
29
128

$ 4 .7 9
3 .9 8
3 .8 5
3 .8 5
3 .8 6
4 .8 6
5 .4 4
3 .9 0

34
63
776
2 ,6 3 9
545
294
145
440

$ 4 .5 7
4 .5 3
4 .5 5
4 .4 1
4 .3 8
5 .0 2
5 .8 4
4 .2 1

41
180
35
19

416
215
2 63

5 .0 5
5 .2 7
4 .7 7
4 .6 2
4 .6 7
4 .9 1
4 .3 9
4 .3 6
5 .2 5
5 .2 5
4 .8 9
4 .3 9

874

50
125
63
146
8 32
531
181
755

39
52
24
-

336
496
1 ,6 8 0
1 ,3 6 4
206
2 ,3 2 4

5 .1 4
5 .6 8
4 .8 6
5 .1 2
4 .4 6
4 .7 2
4 .7 2
4 .7 1
5 .6 8
5 .8 2
4 .7 9
4 .7 5

71

H X SC B LLA BB O U S:
A D J U S T E R S , B A C H X B B , C L A S S A ...................
A D J U S T B B S , H A C B X B B , C L A S S E ..................
B A L B B S ...............................................................................
B U B D L B B S -P A C R B B S ..................................................
C A T C B B B S .........................................................................
D I B B A K B B S ...................................................................
B L B C T B X C X A B S , B A I I T B 1 A I C I ........................
J A B X T O B S , P O B T B B S , ABD C L B A H B B S . . .
B A X IT B B A B C B B 0 1 K B B S ,
6 B IB B A L U T I L I T Y ..................................................
H B C H A B X C S , H A I I T B R A V C B .................................
S H I P P I B G A BD B B C B X Y IB G C L B B K S .............
S H X P P X B G C L B B K S ...............................................
B B C B I Y I B G C L B B K S ............................................
S H IP P IB G ABD B B C B IY IB G C L B B K S . . .
S T A B C H H A K E B S .............................................................
P A L L B T I Z B B O P B B A T O B .... ...................................
T B U C K D B IV B E S 3..........................................................
S E H I - OB T B A 1 L B B ............................................
O T H B B TH A B S B H I - OB T B A I 1 B B .............
T B U C K B B S , P O B B B , F O B K L I P T ........................
T B U C K B B S , P O K E S , O T B IB T H A I
7 0 B K L I P T ......................................................................

4 .1 4

405

4 .7 0

88

1 ,1 0 0

374
145
18
211

Number
of
workers

—

100

workers or more

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

—
_
-

—

—

-

-

_
-

25

$ 3 .1 6

-

-

_

18

2 .9 8

94
36
18
60

50
25
29
15
—
•

4 .5 0
4 .3 4
4 .2 7
3 .7 7
—

123
176
48
16
—

.
138
97
41
72

_
_
.

3 .9 1
4 .0 3
3 .6 3
3 .7 5

30-99
workers
Number
of
workers




Average
hourly
earnings

~
63
195
91
19
25

~
$ 4 .1 2
4 .3 4
4 .2 9
4 .4 7
4 .0 3

69
60
55
28
17
14
27
173
103
70
96

4 .8 5
5 .1 8
4 .8 6
4 .6 7
4 .5 0
5 .3 8
4 .0 8
4 .5 2

110

4 .6 6
5 .C 7
4 .0 7
4 .0 3
4 .2 2
4 .1 7
6 .1 7
6 .1 8
4 .3 1

32

4 .1 7

34

11

29

22

30
22

1 49
1 47
-

10

Average
hourly
earnings

—

$ 4 .4 5
4 .7 0
5 .2 5
3 .8 1

_
_
-

4 .7 6
5 .2 2
4 .1 5
3 .6 9
—

-

-

14
-

$ 5 .0 7
-

_

-

30
62
62
3 28
2 64
18
292

4 .3 7
4 .3 9
4 .5 1
4 .3 3
4 .2 4
4 .7 6
4 .3 3

72

_

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

12
6
20

58
65
417
363
54
415

4 .0 9

48

6 .0 1

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

—
63
190
30
24
14
36

—
$ 4 .1 7
4 .0 0
3 .9 8
4 .5 6
6 .2 9
3 .9 9

43
93
17
14
29
40
116

5 .0 0
5 .3 0
4 .6 5
-

30-99
workers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

—
101

226
52
22

40
1 36
44
60
16

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

~
~
31
94
~

4 .9 2
5 .3 2
4 .4 2
4 .6 0
4 .4 4
4 .3 0
4 .8 5
4 .6 1
6 .7 0
6 .7 7

153
169
38

5 .8 6
6 .2 3
4 .6 2

3 0 99
wor kers

$ 4 .6 6
4 .6 7
4 .5 1
5 .1 4
5 .6 6
4 .2 7

*
*
1 60
584
77
46
33
74

46
7

6 .2 1

4 .7 3

$ 3 .8 3
3 .5 5
4 .1 8
5 .2 2
3 .6 0
3 .6 0
3 .9 6
4 .8 0
5 .1 1
4 .0 6

21

21

11
68

48
36

-

80

3 .6 1
3 .9 5
-

3 .7 5

'

100

16
174

4 .6 0
4 .3 5
4 .6 9
4 .1 5
4 .1 4
4 .2 0
4 .2 7

11

33
12

45
1 34
1 16
10

219

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

41
95
16

$ 4 .4 2
3 .9 9
4 .5 7
5 .5 3
4 .0 5

6
22

54

4 .7 4
4 .7 3
4 .5 1
4 .1 7
4 .2 5
4 .2 2
4 .7 3
4 .2 2

66

27
14
24
1 46
49
101

“
Middle West

Pacific

100

100

100

workers or more

workers < r more
o

workers or more

Number
of
workers

20

$ 3 .8 5
3 .7 3
3 .7 3
4 .7 8
4 .1 3

2 29
790

5 .0 9
5 .3 0
4 .9 9
4 .7 9
4 . 64
5 .2 1
4 .8 7
4 .2 6
5 .5 1
5 .4 7
4 .9 7
4 .2 9

3 98
296
1 34
52
~
78
76
2 14
3 32
3 07

202

115
42
162

Average
hourly
earnings

$ 5 .0 5
4 .5 9
4 .4 2
4 .4 1
4 .9 6
5 .6 5
4 .2 3
5 .2 6
5 .4 9
4 .7 2
4 .7 6
—
4 . 72
4 .8 2
4 .7 9

Number
of
workers

~

33
112

74
9
*
18
31
51
12

Average
hourly
earnings

*
*
97
215
25
15
34

5 . 52
5 . 46
4 .7 3

31
1 74
74
43
—
31
44
39
137

~

~

6 .2 1

24
29

8 22

6 .2 9
~
4 .8 1

"
114

—
4 .7 5
4 .2 3
4 .8 5
4 .8 8
4 .5 4

4 . 79

22

5 .3 4

21

22

Number
of
workers

“
$ 4 .3 1
4 .2 5
4 .4 3
4 .8 4
~
4 .5 2

173

4 .0 0

15
46
-

-

100

workers or more

4 .8 3

Great Lakes
100

-

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data for the Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.
3 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.
1

Number
of
workers

100

workers or more

$ 4 .0 5
4 .2 3
4 .0 5
4 .6 7
5 .2 3
3 .9 2

workers or more

—

'

2

Average
hourly
earnings

30-99
workers

Southwest

Southeast
30-99
workers

H IS C E L L A B B O U S :
A D J U S T E R S , B A C B I B B , C L A S S E ...............
B A L B B S ................................ ........................... ..
B U H D L B B S -P A C K B B S ...............................................
C A T C B B B S ................................... .. ...............................
D I B B A K B B S ................................................................
B L B C T B I C I A B S , H A IB T B B A B C S ............... ...
J A B I T O B S , P O B T B B S , A BD C L B A B I B S . .
H A IIT E B A IC E BOBKBBS,
G B B B B A L U T I L I T Y ...............................................
B B C B A B IC S , B A I B T B B A B C B ..............................
S B I P P I B G A B E B Z C B IY X B G C L E E K S . •••
S H I P P I B G C L B B K S ............................................
B B C B IY IB G C L B B K S .........................................
S B I P P I B G ABD B B C E IV X B G C L B B K S . .
S T A B C H B A K B B S ..........................................................
P A L L B T IZ B B O P B B A T O B ......................................
T B U C K D B X Y B B S 3 .......................................................
S B H I - O B T B A X L B B .........................................
O TH B B T H A B S B H I - OB T B A I L I B . •••
T B U C K B B S , P O B B B , F O B K L I P T .....................
T B U C K B B S , P O B B B , 0 I B 1 R TH A B
F O E K L I F T ...................................................................

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Border States

Middle Atlantic

Average
hourly
earnings

$ 5 .3 5
5 .2 6
6 .7 5
7 .7 6
5 .1 9
7 .4 3
7 . 57
6 .2 7
6 .5 1

290

£ .9 4
5 .6 0
5 .5 2
7 .2 4
7 .1 6
5 .7 3

24

6 .0 1

102

Table 5. Occupational averages— by method o! wage payment
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments by method of wage payment, United States and selected regions, March 1976.)

United States1
Timework ers
Department and occupation
Number
of
workers

CO B B O G A TTB G :
C O B B O G A T O B -K B X P B O P B B A T O B S ..............................................................................................
C O B E U G A T O B -C O H B X B X B G -H A C H X B Z
O P B B 1 T O B S ............................................................................................................................................
D O U B L B -B A C K B B O P B B A T O B S .......................................................................................................
O P F -B B A 1 B B S (C C B B U G A T X B G C O H B X B X B G -flA C H X B B ) ................................ ... ............................................................................
B O IL S 0 P P L 1 B O B K B B S ..................................................................................................................
P B IIT IIG :
P L B X O G B A P H X C P B X B TB B O P B B A TO B S
(P B X B T I B G O P B B A T I O I S O B I T ) ...........................................................................................
P L B X O G B A P H IC P B IV T B B O P B B A TO B S
(P B X B T I B G A BD P A B B X C A TX B G
O P B B A T X O B S )................................................................................................................................
P B X B T B B -S L O T T B B -B A C B I B B
O P B B A T O B S ............................................................................................................................................
S X B G L B -C O L O B P B X B T B B ..........................................................................................................
T W O -C O L O B P B I B T B B ..................................................................................................................
T B B B B - OB IO B B C O L O B P B X B T B B ...................................................................................
P B IB T B B -S L O T T B B -B A C B IB B
A S S X S T A B T S .........................................................................................................................................
S X B G L B -C O L O B P B X B T B B .............................................................................. ..........................
T W O -C O L O B P B X B T B B ..................................................................................................................
T B B B B - OB BOB S C O L O B P B I B T B B . ................................................................................

Average
hourly
earnings

New England

I ncentive
workers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Timeworkers
Number
of
workers

Average Number
of
hourly
earnings workers

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Timeworkers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

I ncentive
workers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

770

$ 5 .0 5

425

$ 5 .4 8

58

$ 4 .5 2

20

$ 5 .0 1

142

$ 5 .0 0

111

$ 5 .4 7

60

$ 4 .6 0

32

$ 5 .0 2

5 .2 4
4 .8 1

434
419

5 .6 7
5 .3 1

49
35

4 .9 3
4 .5 4

24

5 .4 5
5 .0 7

1 19
106

5 .0 5
4 .8 2

91
97

5 .7 5
5 .4 0

38
44

4 .4 6
4 .4 7

33
33

5 .3 4
4 .9 6

1 ,7 0 7
669

4 .4 1
4 .6 1

1 ,0 2 6
358

5 .0 9
5 .1 2

122

4 .2 2
4 .3 3

5 .0 1
4 .7 3

323
115

4 .2 9
4 .5 7

258
89

5 .0 5
5 .1 5

1 07
51

4 .1 8
4 .3 6

82
33

4 .6 4
5 .1 2

213

5 .0 5

68

5 .6 1

-

40

5 .2 6

10

5 .6 8

-

1 ,0 4 7

5 .1 0

4 71

5 .3 0

106

4 .6 9

26

5 .5 9

174

4 .6 3

103

5 .3 2

73

44
38
-

5 .3 9
5 .2 6
-

374
14
328
32

4 .9 8
5 .1 7
4 .9 3
5 .4 6

190
13
1 56

5 .5 4
5 .9 2
5 .4 5
5 .9 1

56

-

20

42
12

-

-

-

-

-

4 .7 0

41

4 .7 5

89
73
-

4 .2 8
4 .3 5
-

83
77
-

4 .9 1
4 .9 0
-

2 ,0 5 2
198
1 ,6 7 1
183

4 .8 3
4 .7 0
4 .6 2
5 .1 0

926
38
789
99

5 .3 8
5 .4 7
5 .3 3
5 .7 8

126
38
80
8

4 .4 0
4 .6 2
4 .2 5
4 .8 1

2 ,0 5 9
1 76
1 ,6 5 8
225

4 .3 8
4 .1 2
4 .3 8
4 .5 7

1 ,0 0 7
856
1 08

4 .9 7
4 .9 3
5 .2 2

1 17
31
77
9

4 .0 8
4 .1 2
4 .0 2
4 .3 8

42
38
“

4 .6 2
4 .6 2
-

321
2 81
36

4 .5 8
4 .5 4
4 .8 5

221

1 96
19

5 .0 8
5 .0 2
5 .5 3

105
89
"

3 .9 3
4 .0 4

87
81
-

4 .6 1
4 .5 9

26
20

4 .8 6
4 .7 4

272
145
95

4 .9 5
4 .9 9
4 .8 3

124
63
52

5 .2 4
5 .3 7
5 .0 1

45
13
22

4 .3 2
4 .8 6
3 .9 5

50
33
15

4 .8 3
4 .8 3
4 .5 4

4 .5 6
4 .3 3
4 .3 3
4 .9 5
5 .5 6

109
64
36
96
90
213
98

4 .4 8
4 .7 0
4 .1 1
4 .0 6
4 .0 4
4 .3 4
4 .3 3

63
30

16
-

4 .1 8
3 .9 3
3 .9 6
4 .0 0

32
25
-

91
25
53
117
50

4 .9 7
5 .0 0
4 .6 6
4 .5 8
4 .2 2
4 .4 0
5 .1 9
5^09

11
-

4 .6 4
4 .6 0
4 .3 3
-

38
-

4 .2 8
-

4 .5 9
4 .6 6
4 .4 5
4 .6 1

160
121
39
155
242

4 .6 9
4 .7 6
4 .4 7
4 .5 2
4 .3 9

151
100
51
43
1 45

4 .8 8
5 .1 4
4 .3 6
4 .9 3
4 .9 7

59
49

23

16
28

5 .0 2
5 .0 1
4 .2 3
4 .2 4

54
-

4 .7 5
-

159
550
99
44
3£

4 .2 7
4 .3 9
4 .2 7
4 .6 8
5 .6 3

64
229
69

5 .1 1
5 .0 6
4 . 56
5 .5 0

1 ,2 4 6
596
5 70

4 .8 0
4 .8 3
4 .7 6

606
284
294

5 .1 1
5 .0 6
5 .1 3

66

29
37

4 .1 7
3 .9 9
4 .3 0

630
360
230
471
37
376
1 ,0 6 0
407

4 .4 4
4 .5 3
4 .3 2
3 .8 4
3 .9 2
3 .8 5
4 .2 7
4 .3 4

309
155
122
269
41
207
505
180

4 .8 9
4 .8 7
4 .8 5
4 .4 7
4 .2 2
4 .4 2
4 .9 5
4 .9 8

28
22
54
54
76
34

3 .8 3
3 .7 4
3 .7 4
3 .7 4
4 .0 7
3 .9 3

7 IB X S B X B G :
V O L D X B G - ABD G L U X B G -H A C H X B I
O P B B A T O B S , A U T O B A T X C .............................................................................................................
S X T U P A B D O P B B A T B ..................................................................................................................
P B B D C B L Y .........................................................................................................................................
S T I T C H B B O P B B A T O B S ......................................... ............................................................................
T A F I I G - H A C H I B B O P B B A T O B S ..................................................................... ...............................

957
6 93
264
750
1 ,2 5 4

4 .6 4
4 .7 4
4 .3 7
4 .2 0
4 .0 9

496
379
117
470
624

4 .9 6
5 .0 5
4 .6 7
4 .6 1
4 .6 9

25
23
56
96

4 .1 9
4 .2 2
3 .9 1
3 .8 3

B IS C B L L A B B O U S :
A D J U S T B B S , H A C B X B B , C L A S S A . . . ....................................................................................
A D J U S T B B S , H A C B X B B , C L A S S E ........................ ...................................................................
B A L B B S ........................................................................................................................................................
B U B D L B B S -P A C K B B S ...........................................................................................................................
C A T C H B B S ..................................................................................................................................................
D I B H A K B B S ...............................................................................................................................................
B L B C T B I C I A B S , H A X B T B B A B C B ..................................................................................................

37
60
859
2 ,8 0 9
526
289
1 69

4 .5 3
4 .1 1
4 .2 2
4 .1 1
4 .0 4
4 .9 4
5 .7 9

6

22
279
810
237
80

5 .1 5
5 .2 2
4 .6 5
4 .7 8
4 .6 8
5 .1 6

44
161
49
26
14

3 .9 3
3 .8 9
3 .7 6
4 .6 2
5 .3 1

'




Average
hourly
earnings

Timeworkers

Incentive
workers

762
654

C U T T X B G A BD C B Z A S I B G :
C O T T X B G - A BD C B B A S X B G -P B Z S S
O P B B A TO B S 3 ......................................................................................................................................
.
C 1 L X B D B B OB B O T A B Y ...............................................................................................................
P L A T B B ..................................................................................................................................................
C U T T X B G - A B D C B B A S X B G -P B B S S
F IB D B B S 3. ............................................................................................................................................
C Y L X B D B B OB B O T A B Y ................................................................................................................
P L A T B B ..................................................................................................................................................
S T B X P P B B S \ ........................................................................................................................................
A X B B A B B B B ............ .. ................................................................. ....................................................
B A B D ............ ..........................................................................................................................................
S L U T I B O P B B A T O B S ........................................................................................................................
S L O T T B B O P B B A T O B S ........................................................................................................................

See footnotes at end of table.

Border States

Middle Atlantic
I ncentive
workers

10

14
14
24
14

14
12

'

'

21

21

21

12
60
11

-

4 .2 1
4 .2 0
-

22
-

24
70

3 .9 7
3 .8 9

28
53

51
1 19
-

4 .0 0
3 .6 9
4 .7 6
5 .0 3

11

10

21

-

4 .5 5
-

Ta ble 5. Occupational averages— by method of wage payment— Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 o f workers in selected occupations in corrugated, and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments by method of wage payment. United States and selected regions, March 1976.)

Timeworkers
Department and occupation

Incentive
workers

Number
of
workers

c o b b o g a t ib g

Great Lakes

Southwest

Southeast

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

97

S 8 .5 7

70

Incentive
workers

Timeworkers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Timeworkers

P R IB T IIG :
P L B X O G B A P B IC P B I I T B B O P B B A TO B S
(P B X B T X B G O P B B A T X O IS O B L T ) ...............
P L B X O G B A P B IC P B X B TB B O P B B A TO B S
(P B I B T X B G A B B f A B B I C A T I B G
O P B B A T I O I S ) .....................................................
P B X B T B B -S L O IT B B -H A C H X B B
O P B B A T O B S ....................................................... ..
S IB G L B -C O L O B P B X B T B B ..............................
T W O -C O L O B P B X B T B B ......................................
T B B B B - OB BOBB C O LO B P B X B T B B . . .
P B X B T B B -S L O T T B C -H A C H I B B
A S S I S T A I T S .............................................................
S IB G L B — C O L O B P B I B T B B ..............................
TWO—C O L O B P B X B T B B ......................................
T B B B B - OB BOBB C O L O B P B X B T I B . ••
C O T T I B G ABO C B B A S IB G :
C U T T I B G - A B D C E B A S IB G -P B B S S
O P B B A T O B S 3 .............................................................
C Y L I B D I B O B B O T A B Y ...................................
P L A T B B .....................................................................
C O T T I B G - A BD C B B A S I B G -P B I S S
P E S D S B S 3 ...................................................................
C Y L IB D B B O B B O T A B Y ...................................
P L A T B B .....................................................................
S T B X P P E B S 3 ................................................................
A XB H A B H B B ..........................................................
HA I D ...........................................................................
S L X 1 T E B O P B B A T O B S ............................................
S L O T T B B O P B B A T O B S ............................................
P IB IS B X B G :
P O L D X B G - A BO G L O X B G -B A C H X B I
O P B B A T O B S , A O T O B A T IC ................................
S B T U P A BD O P B B A T B ......................................
f B B D C U T . . . . ..................................................
S T I T C H B B O P B B A T O B S .........................................
T A P I B G -B A C H I B B O P B B A T O B S ........................
H IS C B L L A B B O O S :
A D J U S T B B S , H A C B X B B , C L A S S A ...............
A O J O S T B B S , H A C B X B B , C L A S S B ...............
B A L B B S ...........................................................................
B O B D L B B S -P A C K B B S ...............................................
C A T C B B B S ......................................................................
D I B H A K B B S ................................................................
B L B C T B I C I A B S , H A IB IB B A B C B .....................

See footnotes at end o f table.




$ 8 .9 3

68

Timeworkers

Average Number
of
hourly
earnings workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

23

$ 5 .8 2

167

$ 8 .9 5

135

$ 5 .7 7

:

C O B B O G A T O B -K B X fB O P B B A T O B S ..................
C O B B O G A T O B -C O H B X B X B G -H A C B X B B
O P B B A T O B S ................................................................
D O U B L B -B A C K B B O P B B 1 T O B S ...........................
O f f -B B A B B B S (C O B B O G A T X B G C O H B I B X B G -H A C H I B E )......................................
B O I L S U P P L Y B O S K B B S ......................................

$ 8 .e o

Pac:ific

Middle(West
Incentive
workers

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$ 8 .6 7

38

I nee ntive
wor kers
Number
of
workers

I neentive
workers

Average Number
hourly
of
earnings workers

Average
hourly
earnings

38
32

5 .0 0
8 .6 0

25

803
192

8 .5 6

330
1 28

5 .3 7
5 .8 8

86

8 .2 9
8 .3 1

59

8 .6 8

88

5 .0 0

33

5 .8 3

-

$ 6 .3 9

-

-

6 .5 8
5 .6 0

-

-

5 .1 8
5 .7 5

-

-

32

5 .8 1

5 .9 0
5 .6 1

5 .1 9
5 .2 7

Number
of
workers

78

$ 5 .8 1

1 50
138

202

Average
hourly
earnings

25

5 .1 8
8 .8 2

5 .8 8
5 .2 9

Timewc>rkers

6 .5 9

-

-

120

126

80
76

62
56

8 .7 3
8 .8 0

21

8 .6 8

1 68
59

8 .5 7
8 .3 1

151
51

8 .1 1

63

8 .1 1

8 .2 7

22

38

8 .8 1

-

22

8 .5 2

-

108

8 .5 3

91

5 .1 0

37

8 .6 3

18

5 .2 9

288

5 .1 0

173

5 .8 9

61

8 .9 8

19

5 .3 8

177

6 .5 3

-

-

8 .3 1
3 .8 0
8 .3 6

169

8 .8 9
-

160
-

5 .5 5
5 .5 5
-

8 .8 6

55
50

6 .2 0

~
~

5 .0 6

5 .6 6
5 .6 8
~

238
85
167

56

8 .6 3
8 .6 7
~

-

886

5 .5 3
5 .5 6
5 .3 8

6 .1 2

8 .8 8

333
270
89

121

8 .8 9
-

37
37
-

569
27

161

8 .3 9
8 .3 6
8 .5 7

22

6 .1 0

~

~

605
29
500
76

8 .5 3
8 .5 3
8 .5 0
8 .7 0

356
267
63

5 .2 0
5 .2 3
5 .0 8

8 .3 1
8 .8 2

62
57

5 .2 7
~
5 .2 8

196
38
133
29

5 .2 0
5 .1 5
5 .1 9
5 .2 7

-

~

377
176
1 79

8 .6 6

2 86
103
1 32

5 .2 2
5 .0 0
5 .3 8

. 58
8 .5 9
8 .3 7

32
9

8 .7 6
8 .8 0
8 .8 2

1 71

6 .1 5
6 .8 3
5 .9 9

180
105
60
155
—

1 82
67
65
1 08
—
98

5 .0 8
5 .0 7
5 .0 8
8 .6 1
—

133
311
103

8 .5 0
8 .6 1
8 .2 8
3 .9 6
8 .0 7
8 .3 2
8 .8 0

212

5 .0 8
5 .1 6

86

18

8 .2 3
8 .3 8
8 . 16
3 .7 3
—
3 .5 7
8 .3 5
8 .2 3

23
9

8 .9 2
8 .5 3

288
191
97
199
359

8 .6 5
8 .6 9
8 .5 6
8 .1 8
8 .0 9

5 .8 8
5 .8 1
5 .5 2
8 .9 3
8 .8 2

60
56
38
58

8 .8 9
8 .5 2
8 .2 6
8 . 15

38
38

5 .0 8
5 .1 1

35

8 .8 0

8 .7 9

98
89

8 .8 8

239
71

383
85
286

8 .0 5

8

10

38
-

5 .0 7
-

8 .8 6

38

5 .0 7

80
36
80

8 .6 0
8 .3 7
8 .8 2

83
55
26

8 .3 1
8 .2 5

30
-

8 .8 6

8

5 .1 8
8 .9 7

23
18

8 .0 3
3 .9 1

65
57
_

3 .9 7

58
—

3 .2 7
-

151
73
71

8 .1 8
8 .2 5
8 .0 6

71
32
31
38
18
16
36

8 .0 3
8 .2 8
3 .8 8
3 .3 3
3 .3 9
3 .3 8
3 .7 8
3 .9 5

129
87
82
139
209

8 .3 6
8 .3 8
8 .3 0
3 .7 8
3 .8 7

105
528
73
29
18

$ 3 .8 8
3 .6 0
3 .6 8
8 .6 2
5 .2 5

31

8 .1 3
— .

179

-

120

-

217
-

3 .8 7
3 .8 0
3 .9 5

-

-

23

161
“

187
-

385
89
296

121

5 .0 2

36
_

8 .8 6

-

3 .9 3
_

28
57
18

3 .9 2
8 .2 6
8 .3 3

58
89

90
76
_

8 .0 8
8 .1 2

96
52

1 25
C

11

35
83
13

_

86

88

8 .0 0

67

8 .2 1

88

$ 3 .9 2
8 .2 3
8 .6 8

71
198
30
21

15

.
-

8 .0 1
-

3 .2 7
3 .8 5
8 .1 8

3 .9 0
3 .9 7
3 .8 3
3 .7 0
3 .8 2

$ 3 .6 7
3 .7 6
3 .6 8

8 .3 6
6 .2 3

_
-

_

-

-

—
22

-

5 .3 0

~

21

17
28
38

-

8 .7 8
8 .8 9
-

8 .5 9
8 .8 6

-

23
31

$ 8 .6 2
8 .3 9

-

-

6

5 .1 6

172

8 .7 5

8 .7 1
8 .5 7

86

126
51
10
10

68

139
98
81
1 89
211

:
$ 3 .9 9
3 .9 9
8 .8 2
8 .9 0
5 .3 5

26
87
38
-

8 .6 8

$ 8 .8 0
8 .6 2
8 .8 9
-

35

~
100

80

58
20

29
25
9
16
21

18

1 05
5 28
73
29
18

8

$ 3 .8 8
3 .6 0
3 .6 8
8 .6 2
5 .2 5

102

5 .2 8

-

-

101

—

-

21

35
83
13

-

$ 3 .9 2
8 . 23
8 .6 8

211

68

107
116
63
51
39
122

82

108
95
56
117

5 .8 8

5 .0 8
5 .1 0
5 .1 2
8 .2 3
5 .0 9
5 .3 3

5 .9 9

-

"

-

_
—

-

-

-

~

_

_

~
-

“

~
~

”
“
~

-

—
-

6 .1 0

5 .3 0
8 .9 8

130
258
10

33
18

$ 8 .9 9
5 .1 6
8 .9 8
6 .6 1
7 .7 5

Table 5. Occupational averages— by method of wage payment— Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments by method of wage payment. United States and selected regions, March 1976.)

New England

United States1
2
I ncentive
workers

Timeworkers
Department and occupation
Number
of
workers

MISCELLANEOUS
CONTINUED
JANITORS, PORTERS, AM CLE1HERS.............................................................
D
MAINTENANCE NOBKEBS,
GEHBRAI UTILITY............................................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE................................................................................
SHIPPING AID BBCBIYIIG CLERKS.................................................................
SHIPPING CLERKS..........................................................................................
RECEIVING CLBBKS........................................................................................
SHIPPING AND DECEIVING CLERKS.................................................................................
STARCHHAKERS.......................................................................................................................................
PALLBTIZEB OPERATOR...................................................................................................................
TRUCKDBIVEBS.3 .................................................................................................................................
.
SEMI- OB TRAILER........................................................................................
OTHER THAN SEMI- OB TBAILEB.................................................................
TRUCKERS, POSER, EORKLIFT.........................................................................
TRUCKERS, PONES, OTHEB THAI
FORKLIFT................................. ..........................................................................

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Middle Atlantic
I ncentive
workers

Timeworkers

Average Number
of
hourly
earnings workers

Average
hourly
earnings

543

$4.12

25

$4. 56

34

$3.77

-

-

1,199
1,285
546
186
57
303
322
471
2,397
1,836
363
2,508

5.10
5.64
4.71
4.75
4.52
4.72
4.62
4.45
5.55
5.66
4.83
4.55

91
91
47

5.31

42
62
47

-

33
77
171
115
59
24
571

5.48
4.85
5.12
5.42
5.93
4.88
5.16

14
128

4.66
4.95
4.12
4.08
4.27
4.09
4. 16
3.98
5.79
5.90
4.12
4.09

305

4.45

171

4.92

28

3.94

Southeast
Timeworkers
Number
of
workers
M IS C E L L A N E O U S :— C O N T IN U E D
J A N I T O R S , P O B T I B S , AND C I E A N E B S . .
M A IN T E N A N C E N O B K E B S ,
G B IS B A L U T I L I T Y ...............................................
M E C H A N IC S , M A IN T E N A N C E ..............................
S H IP P IN G AND R E C E I V I N G C L E R K S . . . .
S H IP P IN G C I E B K S ............................................
R E C E I V I N G C I E B K S ...............................
S H IP P IN G AND B B C E I V I N G C I E B K S , •
S T A R C H B A K E R S ............................................
P A L L B T I Z E R O P E B A T C B ......................................
T R U C K D B IV E B S 3 .........................................
S E M I - OB T B A I L E B ...............................
O TH E R * H A N S E M I - OB T B A I L E B . . . .
T R U C K E R S , P O H B B , F O R K L I F T ................
T B U C K E B S , F O R E S , O T H E R TH A N
F O R K L I F T ...................................... ............................

1 Excludes

Average
hourly
earnings

2 Includes




12
10

25
31
25
216
202

Southwest
I ncentive
workers

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Timeworkers
Number
of
workers

Average Number
of
hourly
earnings workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Timeworkers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

-

-

-

-

-

16

$4.87

Number
of
workers

-

-

43

$ 3 .9 2

-

-

25

$ 4 .1 6

-

-

-

65
59
28
7

4 . 99
5 .4 0
4 .6 3
4 .6 0

22

4 .3 4
4 .2 2
4*11
4 -1 5
4 .1 5
3 .9 8
4 .0 9

-

4 .9 6
5 .2 7
4 .6 2

32
50
38
434
3 49
59
293

ie

43
1 07

31

4 .6 3
5 .1 1
4 .0 6
3 .7 3

-

-

-

-

24

$ 4 .9 3

71

4 .7 5

33

5 .0 4

54

4 .1 5

32

3 .5 5

-

-

30

-

$ 4 .6 7
4 .8 1

-

20

17
26
47
1 38
1 06
23
221

4 .5 8
4 .2 4
4 .2 0
3 .9 5
3 .9 9
3 .5 5
3 .9 7

-

-

17
17
25
75
54

-

-

140

4 .6 3
4 .4 8
4 .2 5
5 .0 8
4 .9 5
4 .4 5
4 .4 1

39

7

4 .7 6

30

11

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

$4.45

19

$3.93

-

-

-

-

78
51
24
-

4.34
5.01
3.77
-

22

-

$4.19

222

407

4.90
5.28
4.56
4.72
4.47
4.44
4.57
4.27
6.55
6.59
6.38
4.57

104

4.74
5.23

4.30

22

229
85
36
16
33
52
57
558
446
112

-

20

35

5.04
5. 10
-

-

12

-

18
10

24
210

93
96

$ 5 .6 2

-

-

Average Number
of
hourly
earnings workers

Timeworkers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

-

4.33

-

-

41

4.17
'

I ncentive
workers
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

78

$ 3 .6 2

-

-

39

$ 5 .1 5

-

-

1 56

4 .6 3
5 .1 1
4 .0 6
3 .7 3

-

-

69
190
98
39

7 .2 7
7 .5 6
5 .8 1
5 .9 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

201
68

31

-

-

-

-

18
30

$ 4 .6 7
4 .8 1

5 .2 3

71

4 .7 5

377

5 .7 0
5 .5 5
5 .4 5
6 .7 6
7 .2 1
4 .9 8
5 .5 9

5 .2 5

54

4 .1 5

32

3 .5 5

18

5 .9 3

-

9

Pacific
I ncentive
workers

56
49
55
254
1 27

-

-

4.45
-

'

4 .3 4
4 .2 2
4 .1 1
4 .1 5
4 .1 5
3 .9 8
4 .0 9

-

$4.97

-

3.40
4.13
4.04
4.37
4.86
4.18

32
50
38
434
3 49
59
293

-

-

Number
of
workers

-

-

24
-

'

Timeworkers

Average
hourly
earnings

Average
hourly
earnings

5.15

8

Middle West

I ncentive
workers

$ 3 .6 2

68

Number
of
workers

'

78

201

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

91

Great Lakes
I ncentive
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

I ncentive
workers

Timeworkers

60

-

156

premium pay for overtime work and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data for the Mountain region in addition to those shown separately.
data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
N O T E : Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication criteria.

2

-

-

'

-

-

5.53
5.67

Number
of
workers

Border States

I ncentive
workers

Timeworkers

-

-

22

-




Table 6. Occupational averages: B y labor management contract status
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments by labor management contract coverage. United States
and selected regions, March 1976.)

New England

United States2

[
|| Middle Atlantic ]

Border States

Establishm
ents withDepartment and occupation

Majority covered

None or minority
covered

Majority covered

Majority covered

Majority covered

Number Average Number Average
hourly
hourly
of
of
workers earnings workers earnings

Number
of
workers
C O B R U G A T IB G :
C O B B U G A T O B -K B IF B O P E R A T O R S ..............................................................................................
C O B B U G A T O B -C O H E I B I I G -H A C B I I X
O P E R A T O R S ............................................................................................................................................
D O U B L E -E A C K E B O P E R A T O R S ......................................................................................................
O F F -B B A B B R S (C O B B U G A T IB G C O H B I B I I G - H A C H I I B ) ..................................................................................................................
B O L L S U P P L Y W ORK ERS..................................................................................................................
P R IB T IB G :
F L E X O G R A P H IC P B I B T E B O PE R A TO R S
( P B I V T I V G O E E R A T IO B S O B L I ) ...........................................................................................
F L E I O G B A P H I C P R I B T I R O P E R A TO R S
(P R IB T IB G A ID 7 1 B B IC 1 T IB G
O P E R A T I C B S ) .................................................................................................................................
P R IB T B B -S IO T IIB -H A C H IB E
O P E R A T O R S ............................................................................................................................................
S I B G L E -C O L O B P B I B T E B ..........................................................................................................
T W O -C O L O R P B I B T E B ..................................................................................................................
T H R E E - OB BORE C O L O B P B I B T E B ...................................................................................
P B I B T E B - S L C T T E B -H A C H IB E
A S S I S T A B T S .........................................................................................................................................
S IB G L E -C O L O B P B I B T E B ..........................................................................................................
T W O -C O L O B P B I B T E B ..................................................................................................................
T H R E E - OB BOB S C O L O R P B I B T E B ...................................................................................

Average Number Average Number Average
hourly
hourly
hourly
of
of
earnings workers earnings workers earnings

1 ,1 4 2

$ 5 .2 2

53

$ 4 .7 9

76

$ 4 .6 5

2 38

$ 5 .2 2

88

$ 4 .7 6

1 ,1 2 0

1 ,0 2 6

5 .4 2
5 .0 3

76
47

5 .0 6
4 .4 1

67
51

5 .0 6
4 .6 9

1 90
1 96

5 .3 9
5 .1 0

67
73

4 .8 8
4 .7 0

2 ,5 9 3
975

4 .6 9
4 .8 0

1 4C
52

4 .3 0
4 .5 4

1 54
64

4 .3 7
4 .3 8

533
192

4 .6 5
4 .8 0

183
80

4 .3 9
4 .6 9

242

5 .2 7

39

4 .6 6

~

50

5 .3 5

~

1 ,4 2 9

*

-

5 .2 0

89

4 .5 6

121

4 .8 5

251

4 .9 7

114

4 .7 2

2 ,5 4 4
168
2 ,0 9 7
2 79

5 .1 0
5 .1 0
5 .0 7
5 .3 4

434

1 23
23
14

4 .7 6
4 .4 5
4 .7 4
5 .4 1

501
27
421
53

5 .2 6
5 .5 3
5 .1 9
5 .6 4

1 36
-

363
-

4 .4 4
4 .1 2
4 .5 0
-

4 .6 9
4 .7 0
-

2 ,6 9 9
169

3 67
50
314
•

3 .8 4
3 .3 8
3 .9 1
~

1 36
24
99
13

4 . 24
4 .1 7
4 .2 3
4 .4 5

4 90
425
55

4 .8 4
5 .3 2
4 .8 0
5 .0 8

1 56
142
”

4 .3 8
4 .3 8

330

4 .6 7
4 .6 0
4 .6 6
4 .7 8

2 ,2 0 0

66

86

10

122

-

C U T T I I G A ID C B E A S IB G :
C U T T I B G - A I D C S E A S I I G -P R E S S
O P E R A TO R S 3 .........................................................................................................................................
C Y L I I D 2 B OB B O T A B Y ...............................................................................................................
P L A T E ! .................................................................................................................................................
C U T T I I G - A ID C R E A S IIG -P B E S S
F E E D E R S 3 ..............................................................................................................................................
C Y L IB D E B OB B O T A B Y ...............................................................................................................
P L A T E I ..................................................................................................................................................
S T R IP P E R S 3 .........................................................................................................................................
.
A I B H A H B E B ......................................................................................................................................
H A R D ........................................................................................................................................................
S L I T T E R O P E R A T O R S .......................................................................................................................
S L O T T E B O P E R A T O R S ........................................................................................................................

1 ,5 5 4
752
707

5 .0 2
5 .0 3
4 .9 9

298
1 28
157

4 .2 9
4 .1 4
4 .3 9

72
23
49

4 .4 7
4 . 44
4 .4 9

342
1 84
1 17

5 .1 4
5 .2 1
5 .0 0

77
46
25

4 .7 2
4 .8 4
4 .4 1

838
488
286
597
69
485
1 ,2 9 4
515

4 .6 9
4 .6 7
4 .7 1
4 .1 9
4 .1 7
4 .1 4
4 .6 1
4 .6 0

101

143
9
98
271
72

3 .7 0
3 .8 9
3 .6 2
3 .5 3
3 .3 4
3 .6 1
3 .9 3
4 .1 4

25
17
59
59
83
35

4 .2 1
4 .1 5
3 .8 4
3 .8 4
4 . 26
4 .5 8

148
92
35
1 54
27

48
33
7
19
-

258
126

4 .8 0
4 .8 1
4 .6 6
4 .3 7
4 .2 6
4 .2 1
4 .8 3
4 .6 9

4 .4 9
4 .4 9
4 .0 9
4 .2 5
4 .3 3
4 .1 4
3 .9 9

F IIX S H IIG :
F O L D X I G - A I D G L U X I G -B A C H X I 2
O P E R A T O R S , A U T O B A T I C .............................................................................................................
S E T U P A I D O P E R A T E ...................................................................................................................
F E E D O I L Y .........................................................................................................................................
S T I T C H E R O P E R A T O R S .....................................................................................................................
T A P I I G - B A C H I B E O P E R A T O R S ....................................................................................................

1 ,2 6 8
934
334
1 ,0 4 1
1 ,5 2 5

4 .8 5
4 .9 5
4 .5 6
4 .5 1
4 .4 4

1 85
138
47
1 79
353

4 .0 6
4 .1 6
3 .7 6
3 .4 9
3 .6 0

34
30
59
95

4 .3 2
4 .3 6
4 .1 1
4 .1 5

266
1 94
72
178
3 22

4 .9 2
5 .0 3
4 . 60
4 .6 9
4 .7 6

57
52
107

4 .5 2
4 .5 5
4 .1 1
4 .1 5

B IS C E L L A IE O U S :
A D J U S T E R S , H A C B IB E , C L A S S A ............................................................................................
A D J U S T E R S , B A C H I B E , C L A S S E ............................................................................................
B A L E B S ........................................................................................................................................................
E U I D L E R S -P A C K E B S ...........................................................................................................................
C A T C H E B S ..................................................................................................................................................
D I E H A K E B S ............................................................................................................................................
E L E C T B I C I A B S , H A X B T B IA W C E .................................................................................................

32
56
964
3 ,1 1 8
709
315
156

4 .6 2
4 .7 5
4 .4 7
4 .3 7
4 .2 9
5 .0 2
5 .8 9

11

26
1 74
5 01
54
54
18

4 .6 2
3 .6 5
3 .5 8
3 .5 6
3 .4 6
4 .8 3
4 .7 8

47
190
49
26

3 .9 9
4 . 14
3 .8 9
4 .6 2
5 .2 3

193
679
155
38
28

4 .6 2
4 .6 9
4 .4 2
5 .2 0
5 .7 8

60
145
33
14
1

4 .3 1
3 .9 5
3 .7 5
4 .6 4
5 .5 7

See footnotes at end of table.

27
66

11

110

11

78
22

68




Table 6. Occupational averages: B y labor management contract status— Continued
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishments by labor management contract coverage. United States
and selected regions, March 1976.)
Southwest

Southeast

Great Lakes

-------------------

1
|

Middle West

Pacific

Establishments w it h Department and occupation

Majority covered
Number
of
workers

C O R R U G A T IN G :
C O R R U G A TO R -’K N IF E O P E R A TO R S .................
C O B IU G A T O R -C O H B IN IN G -B A C H I N B
O F B R A T O B S ..............................................................
D O U B L E -B A C K E R O P E R A TO R S ..........................
0 7 F -E E A E E R S (C O R R U G A T IN G C O H B I N I N G - H A C H I N E ) .....................................
B O L L S U P P L Y N C F K IB S .....................................
P R IN T IN G :
F L E X O G R A P H IC P R IN T E R O PE R A TO R S
( P R I N T I N G O P E R A T IO N S O N L Y ) ...............
F L E X O G R A P H IC P B IN T E B O PER ATO R S
(P R I N T I N G AND F A B R IC A T I N G
O P E R A T I O N S ) ...................................................
P R I N T E R - S L O T T E B -B A C H I N E
O P E R A T O R S ..............................................................
S IN G L E -C O L C B P B I N T E B .............................
T N O -C O L O B P R IN T E R .....................................
T H R E E - OB BORE COLOR P R I N T E R . . .
P R IN T E R -S L C T T E R -B A C H IN E
A S S I S T A N T S ...........................................................
S IN G L E -C O L O R P R IN T E R .............................
TW O -C O L O R P R IN T B R .....................................
T B R E E - OB B O B ! COLOR P R I N T E R . . .

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Majority covered
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

None or minority
covered
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Majority covered
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Majority covered
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

S 4 .7 9

22

$ 4 .2 7

87

$ 4 .6 2

3 00

$ 5 .3 2

-

-

61

$ 5 .1 5

129

$ 6 .4 7

150
139

4 .9 9
4 .6 8

28
26

4 .3 8
4 .0 1

83
79

5 .C 2
4 .6 6

3 48
3 06

5 .4 7
5 .1 7

-

-

61
53

5 .3 3
4 .9 7

1 36
111

6 .6 1
5 .6 8

353

4 .3 3
4 .2 6

54
19

3 .8 5
3 .8 7

214
73

4 .4 3
4 .5 7

727
315

4 .9 2
4 .9 8

-

-

-

-

141
45

4 .7 2
4 .4 8

235
77

5 .2 9
5 .7 5

30

4 .6 3

74

5 .3 5

-

-

-

39

6 .5 8

111

-

-

-

-

80

5 .0 4

1 73

6 .5 6

50
-

4 .7 1
-

1 58
-

4 .9 6
-

47
-

4 .6 8
-

133
-

5 .0 2
-

206
34
135
37

6 .3 4
6 .4 6

46
-

4 .1 1
-

152
-

4 .6 9
-

43
-

4 .0 5

127
-

4 .8 0
-

178
29
106
43

5 .4 0
5 .1 9
5 .4 5
5 .4 4

4 .9 5
4 .9 0
4 .9 6

74
40
31

4 .4 2
4 .3 1
4 .5 3

76
27
42

4 .6 7
4 .6 8
4 .6 2

154
72
82

6 .4 0
6 .5 0
6 .3 1

17
-

3 .5 5
-

34

12

12

3 .2 9
3 .0 3
4 .1 1
4 .2 5

22

4 70
1 55

4 .8 2
4 .8 1
4 .8 2
4 .3 8
4 .3 9
4 .6 7
4 .7 3

4 .2 8
4 .2 5
4 .3 2
3 .8 9
3 .8 0
4 .5 6
4 .3 5

1 18
70
46
24
105
38

5 .1 6
5 . 20
5 .1 6
4 .5 9
5 .4 8
5 .4 8

4 04
273
131
3 62
515

4 .9 3
4 .9 6
4 .8 6
4 .6 1
4 .4 3

23
16
-

4 .4 7
4 .4 3
-

94

4 .7 0
4 .7 4

6

26
55

3 .5 9
3 .7 1

68

4 .6 4

77

4.44

1 17
104
54
97
~
119
270

~
5 .2 1
5 .2 0
4 .9 4
6 .5 9
7 .7 5

4 .8 9

27

4 .2 0

55

4 .8 5

440

5 .2 4

21

362
3 28
-

4 .6 7
4 .5 1
4 .6 6
-

150
31
119
-

4 .1 2
3 .5 9
4 .2 6
-

1 70
133
31

4 .6 7
4 .7 1
4 .5 7

8 52
41
709
102

5 .1 3
4 .9 6
5 .1 3
5 .2 1

3 91
28
361
“

4 .3 0
3 .9 0
4 .3 3
-

141
27
114
“

3 . 45
3 .1 3
3 .5 3
“

228
1 75
“

4 . 28
4 .3 6

915
55
724
1 36

4 .8 1
4 .8 3
4 .8 0
4 .8 7

163
72
84

4 .5 1
4 .5 3
4 .5 3

68

3 .8 0
3 .8 3
3 .7 2

94

4 .6 5
4 . 59
4 .6 7

5 49
239
280

68

26
-

3 .4 2
3 .4 2
3 .2 3
3 .3 4
3 .3 1
3 .7 2
~

72
52
50
50
97
43

4 .2 5
3 .9 8
4 .9 4
3 .3 5
3 .3 5
4 .2 3
4 .2 4

3 05
167
113
2 28
-

3 .2 7
3 .3 0

105
57
48
72
104

4 .0 4
4 .2 0
3 .8 5
4 .1 3
4 .0 4

78

4 .0 4
3 .9 5
3 .9 8
4 .5 4

20

41
9
24
1 18
50

F IN IS H IN G :
F O L D I N G - AND G IU I N G -H A C H IN E
O P E R A T O R S , A U T O B A T IC ................................
S E T U P AND O P E R A T E .....................................
F E E D O N L Y ...........................................................
S T I T C H E R O P E R A T O R S ........................................
T A P I N G - H A C H I N E O P E R A TO R S .......................

148
114
34
1 76
1 89

4 .4 8
4 .4 9
4 .4 3
4 .1 9
4 .0 1

40
22

1 05
435
102

32
16

37
27

12

33
9
20

60
-

88

130

-

-

-

35
172
17

4 .0 7
3 .8 9
4 .3 7
4 .7 5
5 .4 1

10
'

3 .2 0
3 .1 7
3 .0 4
4 .2 2

68

24

20

202

30
27
17

6 .1 0

-

$ 5 .1 9

1 68

4 .2 7
4 .3 2
4 .1 7
3 .9 4
3 .3 9
4 .0 4
4 .0 0
4 .1 4

See footnotes at end of table.

Average
hourly
earnings

Majority covered

1 45

C U T T I N G AND C R E A S IN G :
C U T T I N G - AND C R E A S IN G -P R S S S
O P E R A T O R S 9 ...........................................................
C Y L IN D E R OR R O TA R Y ..................................
P L A T E N ....................................................................
C U T T I N G - AND C R E A S IN G -P R E S S
F E E D E R S 9 .................................................................
C Y L IN D E R OB R O TA R Y ..................................
P L A T E N ....................................................................
S T R I P P E R S 9 ..............................................................
A I R H A H H E B ........................................................
H A N D ..........................................................................
S L I T T E R O P E R A T O R S ...........................................
S L O T T E R O P E R A TO R S ..........................................

H IS C B L L A N E O U S I
A D J U S T E R S , B A C B IN E , C L A S S A ...............
A D J U S T E R S , B A C B IN E , C L A S S B ...............
B A L E R S ..........................................................................
B U N D L E R S -P A C K E B S .............................................
C A T C B E R S ....................................................................
D I E B A K E R S ..............................................................
E L E C T R I C I A N S , B A IN T E N A N C E ....................

None or minority
covered

212

27
20

283
9 25
2 43
130
44

4 .6 8
5 .0 5
4 .5 0
4 .3 6
4 .3 0
4 .9 2
5 .6 4

31
53

47
91
7

10
20

13
63
23

86

-

3 .5 4
3 .3 5
-

64
207
85

5 . 17

12
8

'

4 .1 5
4 .2 4
4 .4 5
4 .8 5
5 .4 3

10

31
18

6 .3 2
6 .1 1

. 16
6 .2 8
5 .4 2
5 .3 7




Table 6. Occupational averages: By labor management contract status— Continued
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of workers in selected occupations in corrugated and solid fiber boxes manufacturing establishm
ents by labor management contract coverage, United States
and selected regions, March 1976.)
United States1
2

New England

Middle Atlantic

B order States

Establishments with—
Majority covered

Department and occupation

Number
of
workers

MISCELLANEOUS J— CONTINUED
JAMITOBS, PORTERS, AM CIEAMBBS.............................................................
D
MAINTENANCE NORKEBS,
GEMBBA1 U TILITY............................................................................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE...............................................................................
SHIPPING AM RECEIVING CLERKS.................................................................
D
SHIPPING CLERKS......................................................................................
RECEIVING CLERKS........................................................................................
SHIPPING AM RECEIVING CLEBKS.............................................................
D
STARCHMAKERS.....................................................................................................
PALLETIZER OPERATOR......................................................................................
TRUCKDRIVERS 3 ...................................................................................................
SEMI- OR TRAILER........................................................................................
OTHER THAN SEMI- OR TRAILER.................................................................
TRUCKERS, POSER, ..........................................................................................
TRUCKERS, POWER, OTHER THAI
FORKLIFT...........................................................................................................

Average
hourly
earnings

None or minority
covered
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Majority covered
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

509

$4.22

59

$3.51

29

5.19
5.64
4.97
5.20
4.61
4.87
4.69
4.65
5.74
5.83
5.08
4.71

155
74
131
50
29
52

4.55
5.16
4.28
3.97
4.63
4.39
4.18
4.14
4.57
4.60
4.17
4.01

40
58
31
25
33
24
173
171
131

4.65
4.91
4.09
4.09
4. 14
4.14
6.06
6.07
4.19

452

4.70

32

4. 17

22

23
427
253
104
237

Southwest

Number
of
workers

MISCELLANEOUS:--CONTINUED
JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS..
MAINTENANCE NOBKERS,
GENERAL UTILITY..................................
MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE.....................
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS....
SHIPPING CLEBKS................................
RECEIVING CLERKS.........................................
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS..
STARCHHAKERS.........................................................
PALLETIZER OPERATOR......................................
TRUCKDRIVERS 3 ......................................................
SEMI- O T R A IL E R . ........................................
R
OTHER THAN SEMI- O TR A ILER ....
R
TRUCKERS, PORER, FORKLIFT...............
TRUCKERS, PCNEE, OTHER THAN
FORKLIFT.................................................

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Majority covered
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

4.93
5.32
4.91
4.79
4.58
5.26
4.76
4.58
6.60
6 .6 6

479

6.38
4.75

80

22

72
73
40
22

17
25
194
89
123

Average
hourly
earnings

$ 4.05
4.63
4.78
4.36
4.28
4.25
4.27
4.43
5.00
4.19

4.54

112

|

None or minority
covered

$ 4.33

Majority covered
Number
of
workers

Middle West

Majority covered
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Pacific

Majority covered
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

63

$ 3 .8 0

15

$ 2 .8 5

38

$ 3 .9 8

191

$ 4 .2 3

11

$ 3 .8 8

31

$ 4 .2 8

39

$ 5 . 15

4 .9 3
5 .2 5
4 .4 0

53
27
37
25

4 .1 2
4 .2 2
3 .9 7
3 .5 0

47
107
20

4 .9 8
5 .2 7
4 .6 2
-

5 04
336
170
63
10
97
86
255
4 13
375
993

5 .2 3
5 .4 6
4 .8 2
4 .7 9
4 .5 7
4 .8 6
4 .8 2
4 .7 2
6 .0 3
6 .0 8
4 .7 2

30
24

4 .9 9

81
61

5 .1 7
5 .3 9
4 .6 1
4 .6 0

59
190
102
51
48
49
55
2 06
138

175

4 .7 8

-

-

32
62
68
307
2 35
26
3 08

4 .3 4
4 .4 1
4 .4 2
4 .4 7
4 .4 3
4 .4 9
4 .3 5

64

-

-

4 .2 1

6
1 59
126
33
56

3 .5 9
3 .7 0
3 .7 3
3 .5 8
3 .5 1

Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on w
eekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Includes data for Mountain region in addition to those show separately.
n
3 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those show separately.
n
NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m publication criteria.
eet
1

Number
of
workers

207
69
33
13
23
62
92
540
428

Average
hourly
earnings

120
174
40

'

2

Average
hourly
earnings

Majority covered

83
202

I

Great Lakes

Establishments with—
None or minority
covered

Number
of
workers

$3 .8 5

1,135
1,291
506
183
39
284
377
619
2,085
1,642
283
2,842

Southeast

Majority covered

Majority covered

17
32
55
141
1 16
16
213

4 .5 8
4 .3 5
4 . 40
4 .1 2
4 .0 8
4 . 20
4 . 14

53
48
48

4 . 74
5 .8 4
5 .9 6
4 .2 6

24
37
71
54
11
171

4 .5 8
4 .6 8
4 .5 2
5 .1 7
4 .9 5
4 .7 8
4 .5 7

376

7 .5 5
7 .5 6
6 .0 9
6 . 43
5 .7 6
5 .5 5
5 .4 5
7 .2 3
7 .2 3
5 .6 1
5 .7 0

37

5 .1 6

24

6 .0 1

20

7
9

-

7

Ta b le 7. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Chicago, III.1
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

IL L

a , 6 40
P R O D O C T IO B flO B K S B S ...................................
HE ■ ............ .. .............. ............................ .......................
4 ,0 5 0
HON 1 H __________________________. . . . 5 5 0.
. .
S IL IC T 1 E

C O B B O G A T IB G :

Aver3 .0 0 3 .1 0
age
ABD
hourly UHDEB
earn- 3 . 0 0 DBDBB
3 .1 0 3 . 2 0
ings1

ber
of
workers

Department and occupation

.

$ 4 .7 1
4 .7 7
. . .. 2 7
4 ..

14
14

110

11

110

11

3 .2 0

B U I EBB C
)? B0 1 iK B B S B f C E J [V IB G S TR A 3[ G H T - T I B E H O O E II: E A R N IN G S
3 . 3 0 3 .4 0 3 . 5 0 3 . 6 0 3 . 7 0 3 . 9 0 4 . 1 0 4 . 3 0 4 . 5 0 4 .7 C 4 . 9 0 5 7 1 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .9 0

4 .1 0

4 .3 0

4 .5 0

4 .7 0

4 .9 0

5 .1 0

5 .3 0

5 .5 0

5 .7 0

5 .9 0

85
67
18

26
26

94
30
64

121

53
41

1 03
58
45

1 47
1 03
44

337
2 97
40

580
434
146

759
6 71

4 41
427
14

490
4 79

376
361
15

206
190
16

222

1 56
1 56

(IN D OLLAR S) O F—
5770 3 7 W
S TfZ T

103
18

12

88

11

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ft
4

4
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221

6 .7 0

6 .1 0

6 .3 0

6

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24

5
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116

69
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...............

P B IB T IB G : 3
P L I I 0 6 B A P B I C F B X K 1 B O P B B A TC R S
( P B I B T I B G O P B B A T I O I S O B L I ) ...............

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34
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61

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61

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57

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5 .1 2

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70
15

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. . .. . . . . . . . .
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A S S I S T A B T S 4.. . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .0 . . . . .4 .7.2 .
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T H O — C O L O B P B 1 H T B B . .....................................
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See footnotes at end of table.

c
y
6

5.

1 33
/
16

4

3

4 .7 9
4 .6 9
c
3 .1 /
4 .9 2

42

11
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Dm ha

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F L B 1 0 G B A P B X C P B I B T I B O P B B A TO B S
( P B I B T I B G A BO P A B B I C A T I B G
O P B B A T I O B S )............... .. ..................................

4

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203
159
lift

BAT T ffff BBT V OAWVIIC

m

. 30 6 .5 0

O C C U P A T IO N S

3

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n

6

OVER

5 .1 1
5 .9 6

«

6 .1 0

18

22
1

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

“

~

~

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

~

_

_

T a b le 7. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings - - Chicago, ID.1 Continued
—
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings3 o f production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

BOII BBB ) F BOI1KBBS B B CB J Y I I G S TB 11E 6 H I-1 I B S B O O B L T B1B1IX IG S j m
ilO L L A B S ) Cl
3 . 3 0 3 .4 0 3 . 5 0 3 . 6 0 3 . 7 0 3 . 9 0 ¥ 7 W 4 7 3 $ " 4 7 5 i r ¥ 7 7 0 4 . 9 0 T T B " 3 f S ? T 3 7 5 ¥ 3 7 7 ¥ 3 7 W

110
hourly 01DB1
3 .0 0 [J i t IB
3 .1 0 3 . 2 0
ings3

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

Avor

Num
ber
of

3 .0 0

ers

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .9 0

4 .1 0

4 .3 0

4 .5 0

4 .7 0

4 .9 0

5 .1 0

5 .9 0

5 .3 0

5 .5 0

5 .7 0

15
15
-

14

17

6

2

10

10

6

-

4

7

-

2

6

8

2

6

6

8

2

6

-

9
9

6

15

2

8

-

-

-

4

7

6 .1 0

6 .1 0

6

.3 0

6 .5 0

6770

6 .3 0

6 .5 0

6 .7 0

6 .9 0

6^ T
1BD
OVER

S B L B C T B D O C C O F 1 T IO B S - - C O B T I B O B P
P B IB T IIG t ~CO 11XB 0B D
F B X B T B l - S L O T I S B -f l A C B X B B
1 S S X S TA B TS — C O B T IB 0 ID
T B B B B - OB B O B ! C O L O B P B I I T B B . . .
T X B B . •.......................................................
C O T T IB G 1 1 0 C S B A S X IG :
C O T T I B G - 1 I C C B 1 A 5 X IG -P B B S S
O P B B 1 T O B S 3. ............................. . .........................
T I H B .............................................................
X 8 C 1 1 T X Y B ................. ............................
C T L I B O B B OB B O f l B I * . . . . . . . . . . . .
T X B B .............................................................
X B C B I T X Y B ...............................................
P L 1 T S 1 ....................... .................................... ..
T X B B .............................................................
X B C B I T X Y B ...............................................
C O T T I I G - 1 1 0 C B B A S IB G -P B B S S
P B B D B B S 3 ................................................................
.
T X B B .............................................................
I B C B I T I Y B . ........................................ ...
C T L I B O B B OB B O T 1 B Y ....................................
T X B B .............................................................
P L 1 T B 1 ................................ .. ..................................
T X B B .............................................................
S T B IP P B B S * . ............................................................
T X B B ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B B 1 ......................................................................
T X B B . . ......................................................
B O B B B ........................................ ......................
B I B O ...........................................................................
T X B B . . ......................................................
B B B ....................................................... ..
T X B B .............................................................
B O B B B .............................................................
S L X T T B B O P B B lT O B S . • • ..................................
T X B B .............................................................
X B C B IT X Y B ...............................................
B B B ....................... .............................................
T X B B .............................................................
X B C B I T X Y B . . . . ..................................
BOB BB K ..........................................................
S L O T T B B C P B B 1 T O B S ............................................
T X B B .............................................................
I B C B I T I Y B . . . . . ..................
B B B .....................................................................
T X B B .............................................................
X B C B I T X Y B ...............................................
B O B BB *•..........................................................

23
19

$ 4 .7 0
4 .7 0

4
4

132

5 .0 3
4 .9 7
5 .2 3
5 .1 3
5 .2 0
4 .8 4
4 .9 7
4 .8 2
5 .3 8

15

100

32
17
38
9
85
62
23
51
38
13
29
21
22

17
71
59
44
39
27
69
57
42
37
27
1 45
121

24
1 29
105
24
16
40
32
8

30
22
8
10

4 .9 3
4 .7 6
5 .4 6
5 .1 3
4 .8 9
4 .6 7
4 .5 9
4 .2 6
4 .0 7
4 .0 3
3 .8 8
4 .6 3
4 .2 4
4 .0 4
3 .9 8
3 .8 2
4 .6 3
4 .5 2
4 .4 7
4 .7 8
4 .5 1
4 .4 5
4 .7 8
4 .6 1
4 .6 2
4 .5 0
5 .0 9
4 .6 6
4 .5 0
5 .0 9
4 .5 0

2

7
7
-

13
9
4

7
7
-

_
-

38
38
18
18
38
38
18
18

11

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2




15

3
3

7
3
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

3

-

5

-

-

-

7
7
7
7

-

-

-

-

-

7
7
7
7

-

-

3
-

10

-

10

10
10
10

-

-

-

-

2
2
2
2

3

20
10
10
10

2
2
2
2

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

11

11

2

4
4

3
3

-

2

11

16
16

26
2 C

16
16

20

6
11

14

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

-

4
4

2
2

-

4

2
2
2
-

2
2

2

15
13

2
2

14

4

23
1 S
4

6

8

4

4
4
15
15
-

5
-

12

11

2

*

See footnotes at end of table.

2

9
7
2

4
4
4
4
-

11

3
9
6

4
4
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

4
4

•

-

-

•
3
53
53

3
5

6

13

12

6

4
4

3
9

2

4
4
9

2

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

2

7
7
c
5

2

-

c

-

-

40
36
4
32
28
4

23
18

8

5
5
-

2

2

4
c

3

9

1

4

2

14

5
7

10

2

3
2

2

16
14

6

2

5
21

16
5

12

3

10

2

3
-

4

2

4
14

-

5
7

10

2

4

5

5
4

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

5
4
1

Ta b le 7. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Chicago, III.1 Continued
—
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

S ELEC TED

ber
of
workers

3 .0 0 3 . 1 0
age
AND
hourly U 1 D E I
earn- 3 . 0 0 UNDER
3 .1 0 3 .2 0
ings1

3 .2 0

NUlIB E fi )F HOI K ER S R EC E J[V IN G
3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 . 5 0 3 .6 0 3 . 7 0 3 . 9 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .9 0

5

4

5

4

S T R A ]C GHT-1’ I MB 10UELY E A R N IN G S
4 .1 0 4 .3 0 4 .5 0 4 .7 0 4 .9 0 5 .1 0

4 . 10 4 . 3 0

4 .5 0

4 .7 0

6

10

6 .3 0

6 .5 0

6 .3 0

6 .5 0

6 .7 0

5 .9 0

.

6 .7 0 "STTO
AND
OVER
6 .9 0

4 .9 0

5 .1 0

5 .3 0

5 .5 0

5 .7 0

23

10

2

2

1

2

-

2

-

-

10

8
6

10

22

-

2

1

2

2

-

2

2

-

-

~

2

-

2

*
-

~

1

2

1

2

-

2

-

-

6 .10

O C C U P A T IO N S — C O N T IN U E D

F IN IS H IN G :
F O L D I N G - AND G L U IN G -M A C H IN E
0 F 8 B A T C B S , A U T O M A T IC ................................
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................
H E N ......................................................................
T I M E .............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................

108
14
97
86
11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ 4 .8 1
4 72
5." 4 3
4 .8 0
4 .7 4
5 .2 4

.
-

-

_
-

-

-

5
5
-

4
4
-

-

5

4

5

-

4

5
5
-

-

30
26
4
26
22

4

4

S ETU P

(IN DOLLARS) O F —
5 .3 0 5 . 5 0 3 7 7 Z T T 7 5 0

AND O P E R A T E ......................................

ri^ tia iT v t
MW

•tH*
S A if f V
P E E D O N L I 6. .......................................................
H EN ......................................................................
S T I T C B B B O P E B A T C B S .........................................
T I M E .............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................
H E N ......................................................................
T I H E ............ .. .............................................
V O H B N ............................................................. ..
T I H E .............................................................
T A P I N G -H A C H l N B O P B B A T O B S ........................
T I H E .............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................
H E N .....................................................................
T I H E .............................................................

74
£A
Ov
in
65
cn
i1 1
i
Q
y
34
32
53
43
10

19
13
34
30
110

83

27
50
39
11
1 1

N O H B N ...............................................................
■ T MV
T iir t ia H iT V v
H IS C B L L A N B O U S :
B A L B B S 3 ......................................................................
.
T I M E ............... ......................................
I N C E N T I V E . . . ......................................
BU N D L B B S - P A C K E S S ............... .. ............................
T I H E .............................................................
H E N ................................................................. ...
T I H E .............................................................
VOHBN

60
16

94
61

33
3 30
275
2 46
196
86

i/ j
o

See footnotes at end o f table.




-

4^95
ft A t
■ • OH
f
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D • f JI
6 «9 6
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4 .5 1
4 .5 1
4 .4 0
4 .1 8
5 .3 6
4 .7 7
4 .3 0
4 .1 9
4 .1 2
4 .3 3
4 .1 9
4 .7 6
4 .4 2
4 .2 8
a 01
4 .2 5
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4 .3 2
4 .2 5
4 .4 4
4 .1 7
4 .0 8
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5
3
3
3
3
14
14

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5
4

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4
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13
13

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2

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9
9

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18

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108

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76
70
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102

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5

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15
15
-

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z

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15
15

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6

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2

10

-

10

1

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2

7
7

5
3
2

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22

9
9
-

-

8

9

6

-

10

4

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23

10

2

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6
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40
32
19
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O1
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1p
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17
9
17
9

6

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2

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6

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2

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2

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-

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1

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21

2

14
21

14

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“
_

Ta b le 7. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Chicago, IH.1 Continued
—
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings3 o f production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

N um ­
ber
of
work­
ers

Department and occupation

Aver3 .0 0 3 .1 0
age
A ID
hourly UBDXB
3 .0 0 OBDBB
earn­
3 .1 0 3 . 2 0
ings1
3
*

(IB
)O L L A IIS ) 01
5 .3 0 5 . 5 0 5 . 7 0 5 . 9 0

6 .1 0

6 .3 0

6 .5 0

6 .7 0

5 .3 0

5 .5 0

6 .1 0

6 .3 0

6 .5 0

6 .7 0

6 .9 0

q
w
q

2

-

-

3

-

u

11 *?
/

3 .2 0

HUE BBB ( )7 B O I KBBS B E C E I V IS G
3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .5 0 3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .9 0

S T B A I G H T -1 CIME I 0 U B I1 BAB1 IB G S
4 .1 0 4 . 3 0 4 . 5 0 4 . 7 0 4 . 9 0 5 . 1 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

4 .3 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .9 0

4 .1 0

4 .5 0

4 .7 0

4 .9 0

5 .1 0

5 .7 0

5 .9 0

6 .9 0
AND
OVEB

S E L B C T B D O C C U P A T IO B S — C O B T IB U S D
H IS C B L L A B B O U S :— C O B T IB O B D
riw m v B e

6

H
n r>

n

B

i n

e

3..........................

T I H E . • ...................
B 1 B C T H I C I A B S , H 1 I I T B 1 1 I C E 3 6. . .
J A N IT O B S , P O E T I B S , A ID C L B iiE B S
H A I1 T B 1 1 IC B HOBKBBS,
rv M W B IT

n W TTT * T3

59

4 .3 2

. .
35 67
.

6

H B C B 1 IIC S , H 1 IIT B 1 1 IC B
S H IP P IB G A B C B X C X IV IB G
9 T IIV

II 0 l
1 e 41
Jl <%£
H e70

-

-

3

-

-

6...........................
4.

CLBBKS3

I N C E N T I V E ...............................................
S H IP P IB G C I B B K S . . . * . . . . . . . . . . . .
S H IP P IB G A I D B B C I I f l l G C 1 I H K S . .
V TM V
_

129
69
55
14
14
53
47

5 .5 6
4 .8 4
4 . 61
5^75
5 .3 1
4 .7 4
4 .5 7
ii flfl
H • OO

c .iD r n a ir v D C 3

1Q
17

17
1 /

54

4 .8 1

|i£
HO

-

4

4

HE B 6. ........................................................................
n n n n D T in e
3 (
T B U C K E B S , P O B B B , 7 0 B K 1 I 7 T 3. .................
T I H B ................................. ...................................
I B C B B T I Y B .....................................................
T B U C K E B S , P O B B B , O TH B B T H A I
tr o r r t w

3

IHTMV

48

.
-

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-

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-

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-

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3

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12

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-

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-

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-

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-

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-

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-

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16
16

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4
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10
10
9
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200

48

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ft P O
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3




2

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22

20

28

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2
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2

-

2

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3
3

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3
5

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3
3

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a
0

0
z

0
4

9
4

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4
n
H

3

c

3
2
2
£

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

c
0

-

27

2

6
q

2

-

4

2
2

-

-

-

2

4

-

-

-

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4

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5
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n
H
2
-

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16
Ic
16

3

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s

14
14

10

96

34

23

8

95

20

20

36
32

2

1

14

3

4

2

3

e

11

0

4
0

_

2

_

_

_

_

2

_

_

-

_

_

_

3

12

_

4

_

_

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

4

4

-

f
.
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ii

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0

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2
2

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-

6

-

6

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H

14
10

J 1

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11 4
O

JU

Ii

The Chicago Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry, and W Counties.
ill
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays and late shifts. Approximately 84% of the production workers covered by the study were paid on a time b
asis.
All or virtually all workers are men.
4 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those show separately.
n
5 All workers were at $7.30 to $7.50.
6 All or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.
7W
orkers were distributed as follows: 3 at $6.90 to $7.10, and 63 at $7.10 to $7.30.
1

3

-

“1

2

22

10

8
Q

4

_

-

4D

u
H

_

9

g

*7 17

4 .8 3
4 .6 9
5 .4 3

_
16
1I O
£

.
-

4 .6 5

07

248

25

3

3

z

ll e O A
H 4U

O P I B A T C B ...........................................

9

O

n
M* #7

P A L IE T IZ B B

3

3

12

||
H
||

C 4J|
3e OH
3

'Z

16
16

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J4
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4 H
O
O

C A4
Je VO
6 .0 2

1
I
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1

5 • 19

12

n
/
7
§

$ 4 .2 8

9-a
43

.......................

74
60
s ii
27

H

11 4
0

14
10

3

3
9

Table & Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings -- Jersey City, N.J.1
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

ALL

P R O D U C T IO N W ORKERS..................................
H E N ................................................................................
W CHEN ..........................................................................
S ELEC TEE

T U r f l U *TT V P
c n t C T V DADTPSC
Tvrvm rTvv

P R IN T IN G : 3
F L E X O G R A P H IC P R IN T E R O PE R A TO R S
(P R I N T I N G AND F A B R IC A T I N G
O P E R A T I O N S ) .........................................................
I N C E N T I V E ...................................................
P B IB T E B -S L O T T IB -H A C H IN E
O P E R A TO R S 4...................................................................
I N C E N T I V E ...................................................
T H O -C O L O B P B I N T E B .....................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
P R I N T E R - S L O T T B R -f l A C H I N E
A S S I S T A N T S ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
TW O -C O L O R P R IN T E R .....................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
C U T T I N G AND C R E A S IN G : 3
C U T T I N G - AND C R E A S IN G -P B S S S
n c fs iv n s c 4




847
835

NUMBER OF WORKERS
Aver4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 40 4 . 6 0
age
AND
hourly UNDER
earn- 4 . 0 0 IN T E R
4 .2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0
ings2
$ 5 .0 9
5 .1 0
4 .6 1

19
19
-

10

5 .4 8
5 .4 9

-

18
13
18
14

5 .5 7
5 .6 1
5 .2 2
5 .2 1

50
36
16

12

6
6

5
5

137
1 29

124
120

8

S T R A ][ G H T -T ‘I H E E O U B L l
5 .2 0 5 . 4 0 5 . 6 0 5 . 8 C

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

128
1 28

154
154

85
85

52
52

41
41

€
18

16
16

-

4
4

1

4
-

1

4
4

3
3

6

EABlj IN G S
6 .0 0

6 .2 0

( I N D O H A ! IS) 01
6 .4 0 6 .6 0 6 . 8 0 7 . 0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6

2

6

-

-

-

3
3
-

-

9

2

1

3

2

-

1

1

1

1

6

.G C
1

6 .8 0

7 .2 0
AND
OVER

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

1

43
43

1

2

9
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

-

1

1

-

-

1
1

1

1

1

1

-

-

1

1

4

-

R E C E IV IN G
4 .8 0 5 . 0 0

O C C U P A TIO N S

C O R R U G A T IN G : 3
C O B R U G A T O R -K N IF E O P E R A TO G S .................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
C O B B U G A T O R -C O H B I N IN G -H A C H IIE
O P E R A T O R S ..............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
D O U B L E -E A C K E R O P E R A TO R S ..........................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
O F P -B E A B E R S (C O R R U G A T IN G C O H B I N I N G - H A C B I N E ) .....................................
©AT T

Number
of
workers

I N C E N T I V E * ••••••••••••••••
r r r T i n s n s s n tiD T
T * r,E F T T V E t
11T
C U T T I N G - AN D C B B A S IN G -P B E S S
FEEPN R ^t
t
C T T P P 1 P rD V V ftV A ftC
TV rfV P TfV
cr n m i n o i a i w t K

See footnotes at end of table.

14

12

21

13
30
24
27
21

39

33
39

33

34
28
26
20
5
12
11
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

5
5

4 .8 2
4 . 87
5 .0 5
4 .9 7

2

-

-

1

15
15

5 .8 5
5 .9 5

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 .5 2
5 .6 7
5 .5 3
5 .7 1
4 .8 7
5 .0 4
4 .8 7
5 .0 4

5 . 29
5^30
5 . 33
5 . 36

-

■
j

4 .8 3

c

(15

7

21

6

4
-

•

5
5

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

6

2

17
17
17
17

_

_

1

1

10

1

6

-

9
5

8

2

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

2
6

8

3
3

8
8

3
3

16

2

-

7
7

12
10

£
3
1

i

2

4

1
1

-

1
1

1
1

a
•
f
II
H

6

1

3
3
3
3

1

4

Q
If
£
O
£
O

7

f
.
o

4 .7 4
4 .8 3

1
1

1

n

2
1

3

2

-

2

-

1

3

2

-

3
3

2

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

9
9
9
9
1
1

1

g

3

6

3
•
a
3

£
o

7

6

5

o
©

1

i

3

1
1

2

1

-

1

Table & Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Jersey City, N.J.1 Continued
—

Department and occupation

)F HOBKBBS B E C E J lV IB G STRA3 G B T -1 :i h e
B0!!BBB C
Aver4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 7 6 F 4 . 8 6 r n n r 5 .2 0 5 . 4 0 5 . 6 0
age
hourly 0 BD BB
ABD
earn- 4 . 0 0 UNDER
ings2
4 .2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 .0 0 5 . 2 0 5 . 40 5 . 6 0 5 . 8 0

5 .8 0

6 .00

6 .2 0

(IN D O LLAR S ) O F—
6 .4 0 6 .6 0 6 .8 0 7 76 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

o
a

Number
of
workers

t-*

(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)
2
E A R N IN G S

7 .0 0

7 .2 0
AND
OVER

7 .2 0

S B L B C T B D O C C O P A T IO B S — C O N T IN U E D
F IIIS H I1 G :
F O L D I N G - A B C G L U X B G -H A C H X N E
O P E R A T O R S , A U T O M A T I C 3 4.......................
m rm w

I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
e «n i nn m v\ n n w B A W
■ T liV
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
T A P I N G - H A C B I N E O P E R A T O R S .......................
T I B B .............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
H E B .....................................................................

H IS C B L L A B B C U S :




BVf H

27
O
0
19
1f
I0
o
O
11

27
10

17
20

c
D
14
7

$ 4 .9 7
4 .8 2
5 .0 4
c m
4 .8 2
5*25
4 .5 5
4 .4 4
4 .6 1
4 .5 3
U . OH
H 311
4 .6 1
4 . 58

-

-

1

5

3

10

y

5

-

-

1

5

2
2

4
9

}

8

-

1

-

-

18

-

-

6

-

-

5 i9
i
1

-2
62

-

-

2
2

2

3

1

3

5

-

2
-

-

2

o
X

2

-

12

3

12
2

2

10
6

I2
®2

5
5
c
D

2
1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

-

1

1
1

-

-

1

1

-

-

2

-

2

O
4
2

34
6
5

T V r V iV T V V
V Q C « B A^ V V C
T B rilIR T V V

13
9
35
17
1/

D I B H A K B B S ..................................................................................
V T V r i P D T r T l BC
H lT M IB V V lH rV 7

6

J A N I T O R S , P O R T E R S , A BD C IB A B Z B S 7.
B B C B A N IC S , H A IN T E H A H C E 7..................................
V D n r x it B T v iB c 4 7
C « I I T _ n o * D 1 T T fD

7
13

T R U C K E R S , P 0 1 B R , 7 0 B K L I P T ..........................
T MrVMIRT W W

n

/

4 .8 5
4 .9 9
4 .8 2
II Q 3
5 .5 4
e

3

3

45
41
10

H fl1
•I* O 1

•
j

3

y

1

3
-

14

3
-

14

O
X

8

il

o
X

1

1

-

-

QO
«Fx

4 .0 8
5 .9 6
0 . 0 /
6 .9 0
4*85

a/
*f7

7
2

9
-

%2
-

3

-

-

1
-

1
-

3
X

-

2

-

-

-

Xo

5
7

X
2

-

7
-

-

1
■y

-

18
10

15

5

2

2

O
X

The Jersey City Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Hudson County.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approximately 54% of the production workers covered by the study were paid on a time basis.
All or virtually all workers are m
en.
4 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those show separately.
n
5 Includes 1 worker under $3.40.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 under $3.40, and 1 at $3.60 to $3.80.
7 All or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.
‘ All workers were under $3.40.
1

2
3

39
38

Ta b le 9l Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.1
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

Num­
ber
of
ers

ALL

P R O D U C T IO N W O R K IB S ..................................
H E N ................................................................................
H C H E N ...........................................................................

2 ,2 6 4
2 ,2 5 4
10

NUiIB E fi 3F HCRK EBS R E C E IV IN G
Aver3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0
age
AND
hourly UNDER
3 . 0 0 UNDER
3 . 2 0 3 . 4 0 3 . 6 0 3 . 8 C 4 . CO 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0
ings1
$ 5 .5 3
5 .5 3
5 .2 0

32
32
—

20
20

59
59
—

11
11

•

—

18
18
—

54
54
—

67
67
—

S T R A I G H T -7 I HE II0UBL1 E A R l IN G S ( I N E O L L A IIS ) O F —
4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0 5 7 4 0 “ 5 . 8 0 I 6 . 2 0 6 . 6 0 7 . 0 0

7 .4 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

4 .6 0

82
82
—

49
49
•

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

100

14
14

250
242

208
208
*

546
544

100

—

8

2

6 .2 0

148
148
—

6 .6 0

7 .0 0

242
242
—

164
1 64
—

82
82
—

94
94
—

3
3

_

7 .8 0
AND
OVER

24
24
—

_

S E L E C T E E O C C U P A T IO N S
C O R R U G A T IN G :

3
2

C O B B U G A T O R -C O H E IN IH G -M A C B IN E
hA
ftv
oft
JO

Z9
O F F -B E A B E R S (C O R R U G A T IN G P /M ICTIITIf r . If 1 PDT1lV\
T I H E ............................................................
B O L L S U P P L Y M O B K E B S .. . . . . . . . . . . . .

P R IN T IN G : 3
F L E X O G R A P H IC P B I N T I B O P E B A TC S S
(P B I H T I H G AND F A B R IC A T I N G
O P E R A T I O N S ) 6. .............................................
P B IN T IB -S IO T T IB -H A C H IN E
O P E R A T O R S . ............... .. ..........................................
M|) BBTHNIVB fi
TH ESE-

CB H C B E C O LO B P B I N T E B . . .

E B I N T E B -S L O I T E B -M A C H I N E
A S S I S T A N T S . ....................................................... ..
T I H E ............................................................
C TH rT
AD DPTBaUDP fi
TW O -C O L O B P B IN T E B * . ................................
T H R E E - OB BOBE C C L C B P B I N T E B . . .

103
79
TA
J1
0O
40

27

T I H E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C U T 1 D I R OB R O T A R Y _____ . . . . . . . . .
T I M E ............
. ....................................
.
.
P L A T E R __________ . . . . . . ....... .
. ....................

T I H E ............................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

ZD
a i
0 1

35

111

97
1A
lo
52
41
/

84
66

30
18
54
48

-

30
24

33
33

•

*

*

•

e
6

4
!|

7
7
s

z
o

5 .0 6
4 .9 6
a no
3 .U <
4 .8 0
5 .4 2
c
J. «

6 .0 4
5 .9 1
6 .3 0
6 .2 0

5 .8 9
5 .8 0

12

•

*
-

_

*

_

*

8

12

6

8

2

-

4
4

-

8

12

6

8

2

n
H
2

2

_

4

_

8

12

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

—

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

2
2

_

_

“

“

—

_
2
2

4
4

1

_
_

_

_
“

-

_
_

1
_
_
1

~

1

6

-

-

«•

—

—

—

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

28
9

-

_
_

-

16
16

_
_

4
4
4
4

_

4
4

10
2

15

_

_

_

—

_

2
2

49
41

6

6

10

a
.

8

6

8
_
2
2

_

—

f.
D

—

_

—

2

14

47
46

16
16

-

—
_
_

21

5
5
•
j

£

_

_

-

8

-

_

6

18
15

8

•

56

2

2

10

19
19

2

-

4

14
14

6 .4 5
6 .0 6

2

_

20

3

2

2

—

46

24

14
14
3

10

13
13

5 .8 7
ft •Oft
D ftA
ft Q 1
De7 1

&

C U T T I N G AND C B E A S I N G : 3
C U T T I N G - A N E C B E A S 1 N G -P B E S S
O P E R A T O R S . ....................... .. ........................... ..

12

-

6 .0 1

107

19

27
24

6 .3 0

122

22

12

i|
4

ft ^ 9
O •J 4
C oo
D •07
ft O /
D •ft*?
5* 39
5^14
ft /D
D •1 4
ft / O
7
D •* ft

12

2

_

-

_

24
17
g

_

6

-

-

-

22

4
4

41
29
26
14
15
15

6

—

22
_
22

~

-

22

_

4
4

_

_

_

_

_

—

—

_
_

6

_

_

_

.

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

—

“

Ta b le 9l Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.1 Continued
—
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings3 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

S B IB C T B D

ber
of
work­
ers

NUI!B E B (DP H O I EB B S BECE1 V IN G
Aver3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0
age
AND
hourly UNDBB
earn­ 3 . 0 0 IN D IB
3 .2 0 3 . 4 0 3 .6 0 3 . 8 0 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0
ings3

S T B A I G H T - T I H E i10UBL1 E A B N IN G S
4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0 5 . 4 0

( I N D O L L A R S ) OF
5 .8 0 6 . 2 0 6 .6 0 7 .0 0

F IN IS H IN G : 3
F O L D I N G - AND G L U IN G -H A C H IN B
O P B B A T O B S , A U T O H A T IC 7 .....................
.
T I H B .......................................................
S B T U P AND O P B B A T B ................................
T I H B .......................... .. .........................
S T I T C H B B O P X B A T C B S ...................................
H B N ................................ ..
T A P I N G - H A C H I N B O P B B A T O B S ..................
T I H B .......................................................
H B N ................................................. ...
T I H B .......................................................
H IS C Z L L A N B O U S : 3
B A L B B S .....................................................................
T I H B .......................................................
E U N D L B B S -P A C K Z B S .........................................

CATCBBBS 6 ................................................
.
DIE HAKEBS................................................
TIHB.............................................
JANITOBS, POBTBBS, AND CLEANEBS6
.
HAINTBNANCE HOBKBBS,
GENBBAL U T IL IT I . 6.................................
MECHANICS, HAINTBNANCE. 6....................
SHIPPING AND BECBIYING CUBES.7 . .
.
TIHB.............................................
SHIPPING CLEBKS.................................
TIHB..............................................
STABCHHAKEBS 6.........................................
TBUCKBBIVEBS 7.........................................
TIHB.............................................
SEMI- O TBAILEB...............................
B
TIHB..............................................
OTHBB THAN SEHI- O TBAIIBB6 . .
B
.
TBUCKEBS, PORES, FOBKLIfT................
TIHE..............................................

AND
OVEB
5 .8 0

6 .6 0

7 .0 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

-

-

-

26
18

-

4
4

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

4
-

-

-

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

-

20

-

6 .2 0

36
24
24
10

41
35
50
38
30
24

82
62
80
60
16
14
56
48
51
43

43
39
105
93
10
10
8

13
20

74
37
23
27
13
12

1 25
114
50
39
13
150
126

5 .1 0
5 .0 8
5 .1 6
5 .2 9
4 .2 7
4 .1 4
5 .2 7
5 .0 3
5 .4 1
5 .3 3

2

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

5
5

-

2
2

-

2
2

2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

8
8

-

-

-

6

2
2

c

-

2

-

10

4
-

-

-

10

20

-

5

2

2

-

14
14

6

4

-

10

16

4
4

-

14

10

12

8

.

.

-

-

-

2
2

2
2

“

2

V

4
4

1

-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

6

-

-

2

6

-

2

6

1

8

6

1

8

6

1

_

_

-

5

10

8

6

8

4
4

2

—

8
8

8

6

1

-

2

c

17
17
16
16

1 Th e

4
4

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

12

-

-

-

12

-

-

-

. -

67
67
-

C

15
13

11

8

6

8

6

8

6

11

42
22

42
22

-

4
-

-

1

~

“

~

8

6

6

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

2

4

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

2

6
6

-

-

7
7
7
7

-

4
4
4

-

2

4

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

4

8

-

€

8

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

4

8

-

6

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.99
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

4

-

7 .0 8

2

-

-

6

3
3

8

2
2

2

“

4
4

-

-

-

1

4
-

2

4
4

6

8

2

u

16

-

-

-

-

11
11

6
28
28
6
6
2
81
67

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

4
65
14
14

-

2

8

11

5

-

2
-

Los Angeles — Long Beach Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Los Angeles County.
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays and late shifts. Approximately 87% of the production workers covered by the study were paid on a time basis.
or virtually all workers are men.
4 Workers were distributed as follows: 4 at $7.80 to $8.20, and 2 at $8.20 to $8.60.
sWorkers were distributed as follows: 2 at $7.80 to $8.20, and 4 at $8.20 to $8.60.
6 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.
7 Includes data for workers in addition to those shown separately.
8 A ll workers were at $2.40 to $2.60.
9 A ll workers were at $7.80 to $8.20.

3 Excludes

2

'

-

-

2
2

2
-

2

_

8

8
8

“

_

-

-

10

-

3
-

6 .22

5 .2 7
5 .4 0
5 .2 7

-

14
14
14
14
-

10

c

6.00

5 .3 9

10

2
2

1

6 .2 6
7 .5 4
6 .4 2
5 .7 2
6 .8 2

6.11

5
5

-

8

1

-

2

5
5

-

-

2

-

5 .3 1
5 .3 2
4 .9 9
4 .7 7
4 .9 6
4 .7 2

4 .7 3
4 .5 7
5 .1 5
5 .0 2
4 .9 4
7 .3 1
7 .1 3
5 .2 3

2

6

6 .1 9
6 .0 5
6 .2 5
6 .1 2

-

'




7 .8 0

O C C U P A T IO N S — C O N T IN U E D

C U T T I N G AND C B B A S I N G :— C O N T IN U B D
C U T T I N G - AND C B E A S IN G -P B E S S
F E B D B B S 7.............................................................
T I M E .......................................................
C T L I N D E B OB B O T A B T . . . . . . . . . . . .
P L A T B N . 6.............................................................
S T B I P P B B S .............................................................
T IH B ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S L I T T B B O P B B A T O B S ................................... *
T I H B .......................................................
S LO TTB B O P B B A T O B S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
T I H B .......................................................

3 All

7 .4 0

-

10

59
48
44
33
3

92

-

Table 10. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Milwaukee, Wis.1
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

NU11BEE OF WOIiK E B S R E C E ][V IN G
3 .3 0 3 . 4 0 3 .5 0 3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 . 8 0 3 .9 0
age
UNDEI
AND
hourly
earn- 3 . 3 0 UNDER
3 .4 0 3 . 5 0 3 . 60 3 . 7 0 3 .8 0 3 . 9 0 4 . 0 0
ings2

Mum
ber
of
ers

P R O D U C T IO N W O R K ER S..................................
H EW ................................................................................
S E1EC TB D

C O R R U G A T IN G :

1 ,2 4 4
1 ,0 5 0

$ 4 .6 8
4 .8 6

15

ALL

S T B a : .G H T -1 C IN E i o u b l i ' E A R N IN G S
4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0
AND

: o l l a i iS ) 01}_ _
(IN
5 . 2 0 5 .4 0 5 . 6 0 5 .8 0

62

8

4

22

2

1

2

4
3

7
3

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

1 03
75

1 40
130

1 29

1 56
151

117
1 14

173
1 70

68

110

75
75

30
30

5

2

2
1

6

. 40

2

5 .4 1
5 .1 c

9
8

6.20

O V IB

5

69

6 .00

67

6 .00

6 .4 0

6 .20

40
38

19
19

14
14

15
15

O C C U P A T IO N S

3

TTW Et

_________ _________

8

2

3

C O R R U G A T O R -C O H E H IN G -B A C H U E
9
A
7

0
A

a

T li r P V V T I I V
D O U B L E -B A C K E R O P E R A TO R S ..........................
fPTMP
T V r V H IT T PV

Q
O
17
O
o
Q

O F F -B E A R E R S (C O B R U G A T IN G C O H B IN IN G — H A C B I N E ) .....................................
PTM P
TP rP P V TP P

43
itt
IH
90

R O L L S U P P L Y W O R K ER S.....................................
T I R E ...................................................................

18
9

▼ M rP P P TP P

P R IIT IW G : 3
F L E X O G R A P H IC P R IH T B R O PE R A TO R S
( P R I I T I W G A I D F A B R IC A T I N G
O P E R A T I O I S ) ..........................................................

g

5 . 75
5^27
4 .9 8
5 . 53
5 .0 0
4 .6 7
5 .1 7
4 *.8 3
4 .5 7
5 .0 9

36

c

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

_

_

3

3

_

2

-

-

-

2

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

10
1

6

-

3

1
1

2

2

1

9
A

9
A

-

-

1
1

-

1

-

5

6

5

5

A
O

5

5

2
2

q

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

1

-

1

o
a

1

3

3

2
1
i

-

1

4

i
1

U
•
f

St

9

a
w

2

f|

1 i1
1

c:

4

9
/

a
J

4

9
A
9t
S
2

4

4

1

4

4

2

4

4

2

9
A

4

2
-

1
i
1

10

15

0
0

55

5 . 32

-

-

2
2

C

1

-

|
|
ll
H

c

4
n

_

2

3

*7
9

5 . 26
c
5
3 . iI «
5 .3 2
5 . 26
5 . 32

aU

5

9
A

7

1
1

2

5

2

y

1
1

3

9
A

5 .2 6

OA
1C
ID

32
1A
1U

T trP IP T V P

a
w
a

y

■
3
O

9
A

1A
10

I

1

P R IN T E R — S 1 0 T T 1 R - H A C H I I E
A M B ie n s c 4
TVrVPVTPP
fBn.rnTnp dptpppd
T1TPIPTVP

P R IN T E R -S L O T T Z R -H A C H IN E
1 <Q TC <M I<PC 4
PTHP

TV rV M TV V
A P PP TM PPP
t

pp

C U T T I N G AND C R E A S IN G :
C U T T I N G - AND C R Z A S IN G -P R E S S
O P E R A TO R S 3 4. .............................
T I H E ..................................
TM rP V «T T PP

See footnotes at end of table.




99
90
40
22

27
10
17
19
9a
4J

19

36
22
•■
t

4

a
O

4 . 95
4 .8 6
.IA A
IU
4 .9 3
e aa
3 . UU

C
O

5 .0 6
4 .7 3
5 . 58

-J

ii
M
1r
1V
ll

1
1

3

O
a

7

1
1
i
1
i
1

7

ll

j

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

7
1

i

y

9
St
9t
S

9t
S

■
0a
H
M
|
|
M
|
•|
1

9
A
9
A
9
A

-

-

-

-

2

10

10

2

-

-

-

-

1
1

8
2

9

-

y

A

4

2

y

y

»

_

y
y

u
4
4

1
-

2

2
9
A

1
1

1
y

Ta b le 10. Corrugated and solid liber boxes: Occupational earnings — Milwaukee, W is.1 Continued
—
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

SELEC TED

Average
hourly
earn­
ings2

Num ­
ber
of
work­
ers

B0 H B E B OF WOBKEBS R E C E IV IN G
3 .3 0 3 . 40 3 . 5 0 3 7 6 0 3 . 1 0 3 . 8 0 3 . 9 0
0BD EB
AND
3 . 3 0 0BDEB
3 .4 0 3 . 5 0 3 . 6 0 3 . 7 0 3 . 8 0 3 . 9 0 4 . 0 0

S TBA 1 G H T -1 ' I H E H O U B L Y E A R N IN G S
4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 .8 0 5 . 0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

-

-

-

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

"

2

T I B S .............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................
C U T T I N G - ABD C B E A S IB G -P B E S S
I B C I B T I V E ...............................................
P L A T B B .......................... ..........................................
I B C E B T I V E ...............................................
S T B 2 P P E B S 4................................................................
T I H E .............................................................
R O H E B ................................................................
H A B D ...........................................................................
M9 M
FF
et TMiPVD A D V D 19/IIIC
T I H E .............................................................
I B C E B T I V E ...............................................
H E B .....................................................................
T I H E .............................................................
I B C E B T I V E ..............................................
F IB IS B IB G :
F C L D I B G - ABD G L U I N G -B A C H I B E
O P E B A TO B S t A O T O H A T I C 3..............................
T V A V IIH ITV T

13
11

9
12

14
17
13
27
17
14
13
20
12

a
o

i£
ID
10
6

14
8
6

32
m|
i i
21

a c v c a it a c c

t u r f ■IP Ttf V

H E B .....................................................................................
T A F I N G -H A C H I N E O P E B A T O B S .............................
T I H E ...........................................................................
T B A V B ITTVV

HFF
R O H E B ..............................................................................

See footnotes at end of table.




ll A A
*V«OC
4 .9 9
4 .8 5
4 .9 2
4 .2 6
4 .2 3
4 .2 4
4129
4 .2 9
4 .2 5
li 35
■ «<JJ
f
U fin
H •O V
4 .5 7
5 .1 8
4 .8 5
4 .6 0
5 .1 8

4 .8 5
H• 1
C Ml
A1

11

O OQ
J •03
li AO

8

<13

4 .5 4
4 .4 7
4 .4 9
a i i5
H . HO
4 .5 1

6

4^38

19
10
Q

y

-

-

4
4

~
-

4 .8 6
5 .5 6

26
7

u

I I

-

8
6

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

“

-

“

2

1

-

7
7
3

1

-

$ 4 .7 8
4 .6 0

li 70
H s GA
5 .0 4
4 .5 5

I

I B C E B T I V E ...............................................
F E E D O B L T .............................................................
r ovb

5 .4 0

6 .0 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .20

6 .4 0
AND
OV EB

6 .4 0

O C C U P A T IO N S — C O N T IN U E D

C U T T I I G A I D C B E A S I N G :— C O N T IN U E D
C U T T I N G - A B E C B E A S IB G -P B E S S
O P E B A T O B S — C O N T IN U E D
C T L I B D E B CB E O T A B Y ...................................
T I H E .............................................................

Mm m

( I B D O IL A B S ) O F —
5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0

2

1

4
4
4
4
1

•
-

3

4
2

1

4

3

13

3
3
3
5
4

1*1

2

9
13
g
4

3
5

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

-

-

-

1

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

7

1

-

2

1

“

1

2

1

-

-

-

-

7
-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

“

“

-

2

1

1

2

1

”
-

2

1

-

“

“
“
~

~

-

-

"

-

-

1
1
1

_
_

_
3

_
_

3
3

1
1
1

~

1

1

1

_

_
_

_
_

_

-

~
~

-

-

-

"

-

”

“

'

1

6

1

1

-

6

-

-

“

1

1

12

2

7
1

1
1

2
2

8

2

7

1

2

2

1

1

2

-

-

“

-

-

-

_

_

4

2
c

4

7

3

~
2

6

2

2

1

3

2

3

10

1

1

1

3

3

1

1

1

2

1

8

1

1

1

2

2

*

“

1
1

_

_

-

-

1

_
_

_
_

-

-

“

1

"

_

_

1

3

-

“

2

2

3

“

-

6

2

"

-

2

-

5 i'

1

-

2

-

2

-

2

-

1

1

7
5

-

1

-

1

-

“

2

1

2

-

~

2

1

1

2

3
3

8

2

1

~

_

Ta b le 10. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Milwaukee, Wte.1 Continued
—
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

ber
of
workers

age
hourly
earnings1
2

BUI1BEB (D HCf KEBS BECEJ VI M STB A.CGBT-1'IHE 900BI1 EABMIMGS (IN DOILABS) 01
P
G
3 .3 0 3 . 40 3 . 50 3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .8 0 3 .9 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 2 0 6 .4 0
AM
D
tJBEIB
AID
0 VEB
3 . 3 0 DNDEB
3 .4 0 3 .5 0 3 . 60 3 .7 0 3 . e o 3 . 9 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 . 8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 2 0 6 .4 0
V

SELECTED OCCUPATIO I S — CO IT I ID ID
HISCELLAMEOUS:
BALEfiS 34...............................................................
6
*
.

16
10

BUMDLEBS-PACKEBS..............................................
tM rv w rtv v

140
01k
4 -w
no

25
VOEEM:
TMrVKVTQf
E l l EAKEBS.........................................................
T IE S ......................................................
HE I ..............................................................
T I E ! ......................................................
JAMITOBS, POBTEBS, AID CLEAIEBS.7*
.
9
B A IIT IIA IC I BOEKEBS,
tlVTT TJM 3 7
T
M u ral l i r e
H iT iv v im ra 3
SHIPPIBG ABE B ICEIV I1G C1EERS 3 4.
^THF
SH IPPISG 11D R2CBIVIMG C IIB K S ..

fTM l
c v a sroM ir* D € 3
tIT T VEIT9 VB AfiVEI IPOD
liiTBIl
THrVMVTlV

T v rv v iP tiif
VDTiriritSTVfBG 3 4 7
S E H I- OB 1B A IIB B ....................................
THUCKEBS, P 0 I1 B , POBK IIPT 3...............

TVrVlVTVff

n

10

8
8
6

16
13
JO
19

22
17

20
15

o
1n
1H
0
0
12
0
28
18
61
49

1A
10

S 4 .5 S
4 .3 2
3 .8 5
4 .9 6
4 5C
4*. 33
ii • 07
■ flQ
9
5*12
4^74
4 .6 2
4 .8 2
4 .7 0
3 .9 3
4 .0 0

-

62 2

1
60

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
13

-

"2

-

-

-

2

-

-

2

-

2
2
1
1

-

1

1

4
II
iti
■

3

c

17
4
13

«
;

12
1

(1

1

-

3

6
6

2
2

3

2
3

2

-

2
2
1
1
1

J
9
5
3

2
0
4

-

5

o
4
4

-

1
1

-

5
5

5*56

-

-

7
•
9

1

2
2

-

-

-

-

3
3

-

-

1

1

2

-

9

2

2
2

-

-

_

■
j

1

1

7

6
g
6

4
4

2
3

2
c
3

9
9

1

1

-

1

-

-

4

1i

4
4

13
i1 J
3

-

4

1

5

1
1
1
1

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

z

93

*

4
1

1
1

2
2
2

23

-

1

4

1
1
3
2
-

1

3
3
3

1
9

4
1

24
1

-

1

-

4

-

1

1Milwaukee Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Washington, and Waukesha Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approximately 72% of the production workers covered by the study were paid on a time basis.
3A ll or virtually all workers are men.
4 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
* All workers were at $3.10 to $3.20.
6 Workers were distributed as follows: 14 at $3.10 to $3.20, and 8 at $3.20 to $3.30.
7All or virtually all workers were p«id on a time basis.
•Workers were distributed as follows: 1 under $3.00, and 1 at $3.20 to $3.30.
9Workers were distriubted as follows: 2 at $6.60 to $6.80, and 1 at $6.80 to $7.00.




-

1

2
2

*

4

-

3

3
1

3

a
J

1

5^70

1

1

3
2
o
4

*

3

1

-

a

5« 85
5 .4 0
5«85
5* 50

1

3

6

2

9

1

c.
c

2
2
2
2

9

4 /4
" «72
9
U•Q0
■ 74
9
c op
J •40
li j
• •oj
9

u *93
n*

-

•
a

3

4
1

19

3

2
2

4

2

1
1

c M9
j • Alt
*
C O
A
O • 4V
4 .6 8
4 . 67
4 .7 2

4*67

-

1

-

12

12
2
2

-

-

-

1

3

1

®3

Ta b le tL Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings - - Newark, N .J.1
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings3 of production workers in selected o c cu pa tion March 1976.)

Department and occupation

1 T.T.

PB O D U CTTO B HO BK SBS. . . . . . . . . . . . .
m i _____________. . . __________ ___________ _

ber
of
workers

BUIIB E fi C
)F HOItK IB S B I C E ] [V IB G
3 . 0 0 3 . 2 0 3 . 4 0 3 . 6 0 3 . 8 0 4 . 0 0 4 .2 0
age
ABB
hourly 0BDBB
earn- 3 . 0 0 JNDBB
3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0
ings3

100

13

SELEC TED
C O B B U G A T IIG :

4

$ 4 .6 6
4 .8 3
3 r 26

70

32
28
4

36
30

38
30

27

46
46

S T B A ][G H T -1 'I H E IOUBL1 E A B lIIN G S
4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0

32 6
3 44

52
24
28

8

8

21
8

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

52
52

78
78

121

99
99

39
39

45
45

27
27

||

2

J|

n
9

1

it

1

Q
y

U
U
H

2

119

28
28

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

17
17

29
29

2

_

6

_

_

2

2

O C C U P A T IO N S

5
2

C

o
o

18
O F F -B E A B E B S

J

(C O B B U G A T IIG -

BOLL

B O B K B BS.........................................

8

P B IIT IIG :
F L E X O G B A P H IC P E IN T B B O P E B A TO B S
( P B I I T I I G ABB F A B B IC A T IIG
A D S D ie rn a c t 4 5
P B IB T B B -S L O T T E E -H A C H IB E
n c tB iw A B e 5 6
VTIIV
fP D n .r m n o
P B IB T E B -S IO T T IB -H A C H IB E
A S S I S T A N T S 5 6 ......................... ..............................
ipjH V
P B I B T E B . . . . • .......................

C U T T IN G ABB C E E A S IB G :
C U T T I N G - A B C C B B A S IB G -P B Z S S
O P E B A T O B S 5 8 . ............................................... .
• •
t i m e ............................................... ...
C I L I B D I B OB B O T A B Y ...................................
t i m e .................................................................
P L A T B B .4. .............................................................
S T B IP P E B S A . ..............................................................
,
___
T
N ll^ ♦ . .
er t * * i b n n v D ><rni> c 5
• rjn v
F IB IS B IB G :
F O L D I N G - ABB G L U I N G -H A C B I B E
O P E B A T O B S , A U 1 0 H A T IC 6 . . . ..................
.
H U ................................... .........................
H E I . . . . . . . ............ .. .............................. ...




. 40 6 . 8 0

4 .8 0

20

T B O -C O L O B

7 .2 0

54
54

C O B B U G A T O B -C O H E IB IB G -H A C H IB E

SU PPLY

6 .8 0

4 .6 0

16
14

5 .3 2

908
8 08

)O L L A IIS ) 01
(IB
5 . 6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0

10

4 .9 7

1£
IO

_

I

I

_

c /v
3 . 7A

2

”

z

H
H

2

5 .5 4
5 .5 5
5 .5 1
C . 3C*)
3
4 .9 0
4 .9 5
4^88
4 . 94

*

38
36
25
23

5 .0 2
5 .0 1
4 .9 2
4 .8 8
5 .2 1
4 .2 3
4 . 62
4*39
4 .6 2
e. ) q
3
c nn
3.V1

_
_
_

O
z
0
*

1U
1A
£

46
42
45
41

j

i 1
1 1

1

4

44
40
no
Hw
OQ

Q

it
•f
£
0

y

u

•t

1w
13
1J
1^

y

13

c
y

_

_

«_

_

Q
Q
o
y

4

1

1
■

1
1

11

27
17
23
17
iO
ISr
15

14
12
10

O
o

See footnotes at end of table.

_

•j
/

4 .5 3
4 .5 4
5 .0 7
c 0
3 . 4 11

•

*

7

2

5

_

_
_

_
...

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

8

2

2
2

_

_
_

2

6
6
6

2
2

_
2

6

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

7
c
3

_
_
_
_
_

4
n

8
c.
«
8
£.
D

2

2

2

11
11
11

_

_

_
_

_

4
n

_
_
..

_
_
_

_

_
_

_

2

12

1

7
*»
/

2

10
10

1

1
4
a
H *
|i
||

2
2

4

8
p
c
o
o
p
o
p
c

_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_

_

12

2
1

_

Z

12

6
4
3

2
2

•j

10

1

_

1

10

1

_
_
_

12

2

/
7
/

_

7

2

1

i|

11

10

1

1

10

1

1

1

1

If
4
8

3
o
o

3
3
3
2
w

_
_
_
_
_
_

_

2
2

7

_
_
_

1
1

-j
1

_
_
_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

Ta b le t l Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Newark, N .J.1 Continued
—
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

Number
of
work­
ers

AverNUIHBEB OF HOIRKEBS R E C E IV IN G S TB A.[ G H T - T I M E HO UBLY E A B H IN G S
age
3 .0 0 3 . 2 0 3 . 4 0 3 . 60 3 .8 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 . 4 0
hourly UNDEE
ABO
earn­ 3 . 0 0 ONDEB
ings2
3 .2 0 3 . 4 0 3 . 60 3 . 80 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 40 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 . 40 5 . 6 0

( I N D O LLARS) O F —
5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

5 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

6 .00

6

. 40

6 .8 0

S E L E C T E D O C C U P A T IO N S — C O N T IN U E D
F I N I S H I N G : — C O N T IN U E D
F O L D I N G - A ID G L U IN G -M A C H IN E
O P E B A T O B S , A U T O M A T IC — C O N T IN U E D
S E T U P AHD O P E B A T E 5 .................................
___
. . . .
f
T A P IH G -M A C H IH E
ifT iV

O P B B A TO B S 5 ..................
.

M IS C E L L A N E O U S :
B A L E B S . 5.......................................................................
T I M E ............................................................
B U N D L E B S -P A C K E B S 4 5 ..................................
.
J A M I T O S S , P O B T E B S , A BO C LEA N E R S 5,
H A I H T E I A I C E W ORK ERS,
G E I E B A L U T I L I T Y . 4. ........................................
HEM .....................................................................
S H I P P I I G A I D R E C E IV IN G C L E S K S 4 5.
P A L L E T I Z E B O P E B A TO B 4 5 ..........................
.
T B U C K D B IY E B S 5 7 ..............................................
.
■ p ^ N lT _ _ T

12

$ 5 .0 7
5 . 21
4 .8 9
4 .9 4

17
15
34
7

4 .3 0
4 .3 8
4 .8 2
3 .S 4

-

-

-

4
4
4
4

-

19
17

4 .7 4
4 .8 6
5 .0 8
4 .3 5
6 .3 8
6 .6 7
6.’ 3 6
4 .8 6
4 .8 5

72

-

-

2

4

-

-

-

_

10

g
16

2

_

-

-

-

2

_

_

2

-

-

2

-

-

3

3
O
o

1
1

8

2

5
5
-

1

2

1

1

2

1

O
3
i

-

-

_
-

_

_

2

2

_
-

2

3
2

13

-

1

-

1

2

2

8

41
35
21

36
32

2

2

-

-

-

4
-

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

3

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

4
4

-

-

2

-

'

'

2
-

'

2

2

-

~

~

-

8

'

S E M I - OB T B A I L E B 4.....................................
T B U C K E B S , P C N B B , E O B K L I F T 5..................
T I M E ............................................................

10

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

6

_
_

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
-

6

1

2

2

_

2

1

1

2
o
4

5
O
J

_
-

3
_
-

2

3

_

_

_

_

_

S
17

6

-

1

-

-

-

6

—

1

1

'

‘ Th e Newark Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Essex, Morris and Union Counties.
2 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approximately 93% of the production workers covered by the study were paid on a time basis.
3Workers were distributed as follows: 2 at $2.60 to $2.80, and 42 at $2.80 to $3.00.
4 Insufficient data to warrant publication of separate data by method of wage payment, predominantly time workers
5A ll or virtually all workers are men.
6 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately
7A ll workers were at $2.80 to $3.00.




1

i1

8

3
3
a

2

2

o
A

6

27
4 /
13
-

_
-

“
‘

‘

Table 12. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — New York, N.Y.-N.J.1
(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

ILL PBODUCTXOM NOBKEBS..........................
HEM............................................................
NCBEN........................................................

Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

NUHBEB C NO!iKEBS BECE][VING STBA1:gbt- i flHE 30UBLY EAB1IIMGS (IN 30LLAIIS) OP—
IP
Aver3780 470?T 4725“ 4.40 4. 60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20
ag
e
AND
UNDEB AND
hourly
OVER
EEB
earn­ 3.80 [JN
4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.8C 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.2 0
ings2

2,021
1,959
62

S5.23
5.25
4.42

46

68
66
2

-

5.44

36
36
-

-

4
il
H

92
,72
320

111
103
8

125
123
2

145
139
6

85
85
-

21
21

194
192
2

240
230
10

218
216
2

166
166
-

119
115
4

151
145
6

72
72
-

82
82
-

40
40
-

43
43
-

13
13
-

6

9

2

5
O
£
3

6

2

2

-

4

-

-

-

6

2

2

-

4

-

-

-

3
3

4
4
6

-

4
4

5
5

4
4

1
1

-

2
2
2

-

SELECTEE OCCUPATIONS
COBBUGATING:4
COBBUGATOB-KNIPE OPEBATOBS.............
INCENTIVE..................................
COBBUGATOB-COHEIMIMG-HACBINB
OPEBATOBS................................................
TIHE.............................................
INCENTIVE..................................
DOUBLE-BACKEB OPEBATOBS....................
TIHB.............................................
INCENTIVE...................................
OPP-BEABBBS (COBBUGATINGCOHBINIMG-HACBINE)............................
INCENTIVE...................................
BOLL SUPPLY WOBKEBS...................
TTM
?
INCENTIVE.......................
FEINTING:
PLEXOGBAPBIC PBINT1B OPEBATCES
(FEINTING A D PABBICATING
M
CFEBATIONS) 4
........................
PRIMTEB-SLOTTIB-MACHINE
OPEBATOBS.4
..............................
TIHE ..............................
INCENTIVE.......................
SINGLE-COLOB PBIMTEB..............
TIHE ..............................
TBPlITTVl

TNO-COLOB PBIMTEB...................
TIHE ..............................................................................
INCENTIVE............................................................
THBEE- O HOBE COLOB PBIMTEB.. .
B
t t m v

Tiril>PTVf

FBINTBB-SLOTTEB-HACBINE
ASSISTANTS 4 5
...................................................................




-

-

-

6

-

_

-

_

6

5

2

4
4

-

-

-

-

6
2
4

3
3

-

-

6

-

-

-

2

-

-

4

-

30

5.'73

-

31
10
21
31
8
23

5.84
5.18
6.16
5.53
5.19
5.65

-

-

-

-

60
52
30
19

5.22
5.32
5.13
4 • 63
5*41

18

5.56

-

-

-

126
66
60
16
6
10
88
46
42

5.69
5.48
5.92
5.88
5.48

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

22
1 *t
O
o

-

-

5^56
5.37
5.78
6.04

4

4

2

-

8
2

4

12
12
7

2

-

4

-

4

5.22
il

5.47
5.13

TTMV

13
I3

45

5.35

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

4

2

4

7
7

2

11

-

-

2

11

2

-

-

-

-

3

2

-

-

-

-

2
2

6
6
2

6
6
4

-

2

2

-

-

-

-

5

4

-

-

6

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

10
10

-

4

10

11

10

3

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

10

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

2

2
-

25
14
11
4
1

6

-

23
13
10
3
3

20
20

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

_

10

_

8

20

4

7

6

-

-

-

-

10

1

-

3

-

-

-

10
-

18
18

9

-

2
-

-

-

2

8

10

-

8

4

4

-

-

2

6
4

-

-

-

O

||

4

2

i
i

£

6

-

2
*

12

4

-

6

25

6

13

-

-

21
4

6

13

-

_

7

4

12

-

4

4

12

-

-

-

17

-

_

4

-

6

-

8
2

1C

-

_

-

-

17
17

-

-

17

-

3
3

-

-

-

3

2

2

£

o
_

3

6

-

12

£

*?"7

-

o
o

2

He JO
H

INCENTIVE............................................................

-

-

-

n

-

-

-

-

4

-

_

4

-

-

c C
Je c cJ

56
58

2

2

-

-

O •J O

87

See footnotes at end of table.

-

6 .1 2

J 1

t t m v

INCENTIVE...................................
TNO-COLOB PBIMTEB.................................................

-

4

-

2

-

-

4

12

-

12

_

-

4
-

8

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

o
-

-

-

Ta ble 1Z Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings - - New York, N .Y .-N J .1 Continued
—
(Num ber and average straight-tim e h ourly earnings2 o f production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

ber
of
workers

NUM
BER OF W RKERS RECEIVING STRAIGHT-1lIME HOURLY EAR]HI NG (IN DOLLARS) OF—
O
S
3.80 4. 00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6 . 0 0 6 . 2 0 6.40 6 . 60 6 . 80 7.00 7.2 0
age
UNDER AND
AND
hourly
OVER
earn- 3.80 UNDER
4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6 . 0 0 6 . 2 0 6.40 6.60 6.80 7. 0 0 7.20
ings2

SELECTED OCCUPATIONS--CONTIMBED
PBINTING:--CONTINUED
PRINTEB-SLOTTEB-MACHIHE
ASSISTANTS--CONTIHUED
THBEB- OB HOfiE COLOB PRINTER...
INCENTIVE..................................
CUTTING AND CBEASING:
CUTTING- AND CBEASING-PBBSS
OPERATOBS 4 5.........................................
TINE.............................................
INCENTIVE..................................
CTLINDEB CB EOTAEY..........................
TINE.............................................
INCENTIVE..................................
PLATEN....................................................
TINE.............................................
INCENTIVE..................................
CUTTING- AND CBEASING-PBESS
FEEDERS 4 5.............................................
VTMV
INCENTIVE..................................
CTLINDEB O BOTABT..........................
B
TINE.............................................
PLATEN....................................................
STRIPPERS 4 5...........................................
INCENTIVE..................................
ft td n f t c
SLITTER OPEFATCRS 4 ..............................
TTNF
INCENTIVE..................................
SLOTTEB OPEBATCBS 4..............................
INCENTIVE..................................
FINISHING:
FOLDING- AND GLUING-HUCHINI
OPEBATCBS, AUTOMATIC 4 5.................
TTM
V
INCENTIVE..................................
SETUP AND OPEBATE............................
TIME.............................................
INCENTIVE..................................
STITCHER CPESATOBS:
INCENTIVE..................................
W
OMEN...............................................

See footnotes at end of table.




25
7

$5.29
5.88

*

•

“

-

93
65
28
44
34

5.54
5.45
5.74
5.45
5.33
5.88
5.52
5.53
5.51

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

2

4

-

-

4
4
-

-

-

_

10

33
19
14
47
22

25
29
18
14
25
23
Q
59
25
34
27
m
1U
17

42
18
24
36
14
22
10
10

5.08
4.85
si 28
4.96
4.78
5.08
5.32
5.36
It Tfl
5.16
4.87
si 37
5.13
U• f 11
s
H v
5.43

5.34
4.80
5.*75
5.50
5.03
5.80
5.26
5.26

_

-

_
-

-

-

6

6
6

-

2
2

8
0

-

8

_

2

2

-

18
~

2

1

2

1

9

14

24
24
13
13
-

1

12

8

2

3

8

1

8

2

-

6

6

11

4

11

-

6

2

9

8

0

3
9

8

_

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

12
0

18

9

0

1

2

6

12

8

2

6

6

2

6

8

6

5

5
5

-

3
c
3
6

-

2

_

-

2
2

8

8

0
£
.

-

-

n

2

8

-

•

-

-

-

_

4

6

-

4
4
4
4

2

_
4
a
H

-

-

-

2

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

_

3

4

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

5

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
3
3
3
-

-

-

-

4
4

-

-

2

-

-

4
4

-

4

-

-

1
1

8

-

8

5
c
I
5
c

-

8

3
5
c
3

8

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

4
5
3

-

4
4
3
3
-

-

-

3

-

4
4

25
18
7

4
4

-

3
3
3

3

-

4
-

-

n

-

3

2

_

4

*

3

8

2

3

-

6

3

-

-

-

-

3

2

_

6

2

_

_

5

2

3
3

6

3

-

-

-

-

2

3

-

6

3

-

-

-

-

2

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

_

2

2

Ta b le 12. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — New York, N .Y .-N .J.1 Continued
—
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings1 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

Number
of
workers

N 0 I1BEB O F HOitKERS
Aver3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0
age
UNDER
AND
hourly
earn- 3 .8 0 ORDER
4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0
ings1

R E C E ]CV ING
4 .6 0 4 . 8 0

s tb a

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

16
16

5 .0 0

:C GHT-1CIME 10URL1 E A R N IN G S
5 . 2 0 5 . 4 0 5 . 6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

(IN
6.20

D O LLAR S) OF—
6 .4 0 6 .6 0 6 . 8 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0
AND
O V ER

7 .2 0

S E L E C T E D O C C U P A T IO N S — C O N T IH O E D
F I N I S H I N G : — C O N T IN U E D
T A P I N G - M A C B I N E O P E R A T O R S ........................

85

I N C E N T I V E ...............................................
H E N .....................................................................
9TM V

51
70
on

I N C E N T I V E ...............................................

36

M IS C E L L A N E O U S : 1*
4
3
2
B A L E R S ........................................................................ *
T T *V r T r t . . i t r t i i T . r t t TT •
I N C E N T I V E ...............................................
B U N D L E R S -P A C K E R S . . ........................................
T I N E .............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ............................................................
C A T C H E R S .........................................................................................
T I N E ..............................................................................
D I E M A K E R S ................................................................
J A N I T O R S , P O R T E R S , AND C L E A N E R S ..
T I M E . ..........................................................
M A IN T E N A N C E W O R K ER S ,
csenepat

iit t it t v

6

M E C H A N IC S , M A IN TE N A N C E 6....................... T T T
S H IP P IN G AND R E C E IV IN G C I E f K S 6. . .
S T A P C H M IK E V S ___
, TT
______
TTM Jt T
T N C E N TTW ir
P A L L E T I Z E R O P E R A T O R .................................................
I N C E N T I V E ............................................................
T R U C K D R IV E R S 6. ...................................................................
S E N T - nR T P 1 T T . P P - C T H E B TH A N S E M I - OB T R A I L E E . . . .
f p p n rv v & c
d .^u i d
p r o if T t p <
t
T T M E ___ ___
T H C E W T T V E -T T T T T T T T t T

1 The

$ 5 .0 8
4 .7 9
5 .2 8
5 .1 1
II 70
He /?
5 .4 1

-

4

4

4

-

8

4
4

.
-

8

n

-

4
n
H

4
ia
H

4

-

2
2

-

2

7

-

7

8

6

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

8

6

_

_

2

-

-

8

6

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

10

7
7

o
4

3

7

8

6

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

6

-

2'

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

6

16

7
li
H
3
7

_

_

-

_

_

-

19
O
13

•
34
14
20

1 45
49
96
41
24
8

15
13
19
25
10

12
6
e
o

14
12
115
54
61
7J
/3
50
23

5 .0 6
4 .8 5
5 1 20
5 .0 1
4 .5 7
5 .2 4
5 .0 5
4 .7 3
5 .3 0
4 .7 6
4 .8 5
5 .7 8
5 .9 3
5 .7 5
5 .0 6
4 .9 4
5 .1 8
4 .9 1
4 .9 4
6 .8 5
7 .0 9
6 !e a
•y /
4 .8 5
5 .2 2

-

-

_

-

2
2

4

7

4
16

-

12

-

-

-

10

-

12
-

-

-

6
6
-

-

-

-

•

-

_

_

2

6

2

2

10
-

12

5
c
3

10
-

2
10

24
18
6

12

26
-

4

5
3

8

26

8

5

11

8

2
-

2
2

-

-

-

6
6

-

-

2

2
2

-

-

-

-

2
-

2
-

4

_

28

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

28

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

4

-

-

_

-

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

_

3
3

-

-

-

-

16

3
_

_

2

2

2

-

2

6
6

-

_

_

_

4
2
2

2

3
2

2

-

_

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

4

-

-

-

t

*
*

1A
IU
1V
I fi

_

Z

Z

4

-

3

Z

6
4

4
4

_

_

_

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

9

10

_

_

_

_

6
(L
o

1A
JO
19
U
|
|

1r
1V
£
D
li
H

i 9
1Z
19
1Z

a

9
£
c
7

4C
1z
li
H
o
o

2

New Yo rk Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Bronx, Kings, New York, Putnum, Queens, Richmond, Rockland, and Westchester Counties, N. Y .; and Bergen County, N. J.
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approximately 56% of the production workers covered by the study were paid on a time basis.
were distributed as follows: 16 under $3.20, and 4 at $3.20 to $3.40.
4 A ll or virtually all workers are men.
s Includes data for workers in addition to those shown separately.
6 All or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.
' U workers were at $7.20 to $7.40.
2 Excludes
3 Workers




-

-

78

8

an

9

30

78

Ta b le 13. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Philadelphia, P a .-N .J .1
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

il l

P R O D U C T IO N W O B K E B S .- . ..........................
________
■EN-r
+

S ELEC TED
C O R R U G A T IN G :

ber
of
workers
1 ,9 8 5
1 ,9 2 0

NU HBEB <
OF N CI1KEBS BECE1 F I NG S T R A I G H T -1 El ME
0 U B L 1 EARN I N G S
Aver3 .8 0 3 . 9 0 4 .0 0 4 . 10 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0 5 . 4 0 5 . 60 5 . 8 0
age
ABD
AMD
hourly UHDSE
0¥EB
earn- 3 . 8 0 31E EB
3 .9 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 10 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 .0 0 5 . 2 0 5 . 4 0 5 . 6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0
ings2
S 5 .0 3
5 .0 4

27
27

_

12

14
14

80

220

66

208
4O
u

4(1
1H

422
400
OO
66

495
478
1*7
19

155
155

fl
©
O
O

1j
i^
13
1 0.

12

204
204

25
25

9
9

3

120
120

45
45

52
52

(I N
6 .0 0

I1 0 IIA IilS) 0J }—
6 .6 0
6 . 2 0 6 .4 0

6 .20

6 .4 0

24
24

8
8

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0
55
55

7 .2 0

4
4

10

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

10

29
29

O C C U P A T IO N S

3

33

5 .1 8

4

i|

C O B B U G A T O R -C O B B I N I N G - H A C H I I E
37
D O U B L E -B A C X IR

C P E B A T C B S ..........................

O F F -B E A B E N S (C C B B U G A T IN G C O M B I N I N G -B A C B I N E ) .....................................
T I N E ....................... ....................................
d a tt
e n n iif v D n c r v n c

P R IN T IN G : 3
F L E X O G R A P H IC P S IN T B B O P E B A IO B S
(P R I N T I N G AND F A B R IC A T I N G
n B V ftftV Tn tc i 4
P R I B T E R -S L O T T E E -H A C B I N E
O P E R A TO R S 5. ..........................................................
T T IfE T
i t
TW O -C O L O R P R I N T E R . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TTffTf
T H R E E - OR BO R E C O LO R P B I B T 1 B . . .
P R I N T E R - S L O T T B R -H A C B I N E
ic e T v tk if c 5
flITfliV
T W O -C O L O R P R I N T E R . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
V T IV
C U T T I N G AND C R E A S IN G :
C U T T I N G - AND C R E A S IB G -P R E S S
n riB iv n a c 3 5
m m .
r v r TW nV D

FID

36
Ofl
•V

87
t a
33
oo
67

4 .9 3
4 .7 6
4 .9 3
o 06
• •oo
1

28
89
73
77
65
9

5 .2 6
5 .1 6
5 .'2 6
c <0
19
5 .5 7

Tfl
i©
ou
56

JU
oo
ZZ

See footnotes at end of table.




-

-

-

-

-

-

4 .5 3
4 .5 3
4 .*87
4 .7 6

77
77

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

.

-

-

-

_

3
•
a
o

||

-

-

12

_

4

_

12

10

*

3

-

23

51
51
51
31

17
15
12

i1 V
n

2

4
z

8
2

4

2

-

8

2

-

-

2

4
2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

o
A

P
o

o

2

8

6
O

JO
10
IJ
11

6
O

_

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

-

2

06
wO

OU

-

a
«

5
o
6

OU

56
C6

OO

■
a
3
-f *
1 1

H 06

30
30
41
35

O
©
P
©
(|

OQ
67
29

5 .1 4

1*7

V T>V

-

8

28
oo
60

c ni
j . v r
c ft a
j .U J

68

C U T T I N G - AND C R E A S I N G -P R I S S
S T R I P P E R S 3 f . . . . . . ..................... .................................
naan
n n s im a c 3

_

c AI
J > U1
4 .9 0
4 .9 6
a av
e . cn

64
C£
O

_

5e 25

111

j

B A O ftD ?

5 .1 0
H OO
*!• OO

_

3
O
3

e An
a«v /

n
/
.

_

_

_

_
■
a
3
O
3

-

06

P
©
£
o
p
O
£
o

6
O

il
H
-

30
30
c
o
c
o

25
a3
. e

_

o
A

£
O

o
Z

_

Ta b le 13. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — Philadelphia, Pa.- N .J.1 Continued
—
(Num ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

SELECTED

Num­
ber
of
work­
ers

NU HBEB OF HOIiK E B S R E C E IV IN G
Aver3 .8 0 3 . 9 0 4 .0 0 4 . 10 4 .2 0 4 . 4 0 4 .6 0
age
A ID
UNDEB
hourly
earn­ 3 . 8 0 UN C IB
3 .9 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 10 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0
ings3

S T R A I G H T -? C IN E EIO U B L I E A R N IN G S
4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

16

-

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

(IN
6 .0 0

6 .20

D O L L A R S ) OF
6 .2 0
6 . 40 6 . 6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

O C C U P A T IO N S — C O N T IN U E D

C U T T I N G AND C B E A S IN G s — C O N T IN U E D
S L C T T E B C P B B A T O N S ............................................
T I N E .............................................................
H E R .....................................................................
T I H E .............................................................

29
25
27
23

$ 4 . €€
4 .6 3
4 .6 5
4 .6 1

F IN IS B IN G :
F O L D I N G - AND G I U I N G - H A C H I N I
0 P E B 1 T 0 B S , A U T O M A T IC 3 ...........................
.
T I H E ................................ .. .........................
S E T U P AND O P E B A T E ......................................
T I H E ............................................................
F E E D O N L Y .............................................................
S T I T C B E B O P E B A T C B S .........................................
T I H E .................... .......................................
H E N ......................................................................
T I H E .................................. ..........................
■ O H E N . 4..............................................................................
T A F I N G -H A C H I N B O P E B A TO B S 4.....................
H E N ......................................................................
H O H E N .......................... .. ..................................

80
54
53
35
27
57
45
39
27
18
51
33
18

5 .1 1
5 .0 2
5 .2 1
5 .1 2
4 .9 0
4 .7 2
4 .6 0
4 .7 4
4 .5 3
4 .6 9
4 .5 2
4 .5 2
4 .5 3

37
25
1 66
7

4 .9 0
4 .7 4
4 .6 8

11

9

4 .5 4
4 .5 5

42

5 .6 4

B IS C E L L A N E O U S :3 4
E A 1 B B S ............................................................................
T I H E .............................................................
B U ID L E B S -P A C E B B S .............................................................
J A N I T O R S , P O B T E H S , AND C L E A N E B S ..
T I H E ...................................................................... ....
H A IN T E N A N C E N O B K E B S ,
G E N E R A L U T I L I T Y . . . . ..............................................

4 .9 0
4 .7 9
7 .2 5
/ #47
4 .8 0

TB U C K EB S ,

y /
119

F O R K L I F T .....................

~

-

-

3
3
3
3

~

4
4
4
4

19
15
17
13

-

-

-

-

3
3
-

-

2

30
26

20

-

10

12

2

10

16

16

10

10

12

-

-

-

4

-

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

•

■

4

“

“

13
13
9
9
4
37
27

4

6

3
3
3
3
~

4
-

-

3
4
4
-

20

6

-

“

-

-

6
6

-

6

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

”

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

8

-

-

•

“

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5
39

23
19
13
9

10

5

4

3
5
3

4
-

-

-

-

-

-

“

•

~

“
-

“
-

“
“

~
”

*
*

~
-

“
“

“
•

-

-

~

-

-

~

~

—

“

10

10

•

“

-

20

-

2

"
-

7
5

-

-

-

8

2

-

-

-

8

2

2

2

-

6
8

10

*

2

18

2

*

-

-

-

3
-

“

-

12

20

“

5

16

8

-

_

87

‘ Th e Philadelphia Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties. Pa.; and Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties, N.J.
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approximately 8 8 % of the production workers covered by the study were paid on a time basis.
3 A ll or virtually all workers are men.
4 A ll or virtually all workers were paid on a time basis.
s Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
6 A ll workers were at $7.80 to $8.00.
3 Excludes

—

"

2

2

7
5

6

-

~

10

6

“
~

20

1 14

E CC
d a D !)

12
102

PONBR,

3
3
3
3

e A7
!> • 7 /

3A
JU

S T A B C B H A K B B S ...........................................................................
T I H E ....................... .. ..................................
T B U C K D B IV E B S *. • •• • •• • ............ .• • • • • •




7 .2 0
AND
OVER

10
10

-

-

-

55
55

29®
29

Table 14. Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings -- St. Louis Mo.-lll.'




(Number and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

ALL

P B O D U C TIO N WORKERS..................................
HEM ................................................................................
N C H E N ..........................................................................
SELEC TEE

Num ­
ber
of
work­
ers

NU BE ER C>F NO!SKERS R E C E ] V IN G
Aver3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .6 0 4 .0 C 4 .2 0
age
AND
hourly UNDER
3 . 6 0 IN D EB
earn­
3 .7 0 3 . 8 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0
ings2
13

28
27

1

31
31
-

4 .9 2
4 .6 0
5 .4 7

-

5 . 11
4 .8 5

-

$ 4 .6 9
4 .7 3
4 .3 0

12

10

27
17

1,111
1,001
110

S TR A 3.G H T -1 HIR E E OUEL1 EAB1IIN G S
4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0 5 . 4 0

(IN
: o l l a i IS ) OF —
5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0 I 6 . 2

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

99
81
18

96
89
7

111

72
72
~

46
45

43
42

8

140
1 26
14

1

1

-

8

’

6

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

4
3

2

6

-

1

8

-

1

1

1

2

1

-

4
4

4
4

2

1

2

5

-

2

2
3

3
-

3
3

1

2

-

129
98
31

1 43
1 35

1

83
58
25

-

-

-

-

-

-

108
3

6 .0 0

35
35
“

6 .2 0

0

6 . 40
AND
OVER

6 .4 0
13
13
*

17
17
“

-

-

1

1

“
I

-

-

12
12

O C C U P A TIO N S

C O R R U G A T IN G : 3
C O R R D G A T O R -K N IF E O P E R A TO R S ..................
T I R E ...........................................................
I N C E N T I V E .............................................
C O B B O G A T O S -C O H B IN IN G -H A C H IK E
O P E R A T O R S ..............................................................
T I M E ............................................................

27
17

1

3
3

3

4 .8 8
4 .5 5
5 .3 2

-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

4
4
-

4
4
-

2

-

3
3

-

-

-

1

2

-

-

1

3
3

1

2

4 .4 8
4 .0 4
5 ! 07
4 .5 4
1 •OQ
1
H AJ

-

-

-

12

16
16

4

3

1

5

6

4

3

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

C
•

-

-

15

5 .0 9
4 .8 6
5 .4 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

57
38
19
50
34
Io

4 .8 8
4 .6 6
5 .3 2
4 .8 7
4 .6 7
5 .3 0

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

P R I N T E R - S L O T T E R -H A C H I N E
A S S I S T A N T S 4.........................................................
T I H E ..................................................
I N C E N T I V E .............................................
T N O -C O L O R P B IN T E B ...............................
T I M E ...................... ............................
I N C E N T I V E ......................................

61
42
19
54
38
16

4 .5 5
4 .3 5
4 .9 9
4 .5 5
4 .3 6
4 .9 8

C U T T I N G AND C R E A S IN G :
C U T T I N G - AMD C B E A S IM G -P B E S S
O P E R A TO R S 3............................................................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................

37
24
13

4 .6 8
4 .4 7
5 .0 6

D O U B L E -B A C K E R O P E R A TO R S ..........................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
O F E -B E A B E B S (C O R B U G A T IN G C C H B I H I N G - M A C H I N E ) .....................................

BOLL

I N C E N T I V E .............................................
S U P P L Y WORKERS ...............................

P R IN T IN G : 3
F L E X O G E A P H IC P B IN T E B O PER ATO R S
(P R I N T I N G AND F A B R IC A T I N G
O P E R A T I O N S ) ...........................................
T I H E ..................................................
I N C E N T I V E .......................................
P R I N T E R -S I O T T E R -M A C H IN E
O P E R A T O R S 4 ..................................................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
T H O -C O L O R P R IN T B R .....................................
T I H E ............................................................

23
13
10

56
24
23
yj

37
22

12

u
H

-

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

6

4
4
4
4

-

“

1

-

-

6
6

-

6

-

6
6

6

3
9

Q

16
16
14
14

-

13

6

1

6

4

3

2

-

3

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

1

6

21
21

-

17
17
-

7
7

1

10

5
5
10

5
5

5
4
1

'

"

5

c

6

12

-

-

-

-

1

1

1

5

5

-

10

7
7

2

4
4
3
-

9

-

10
8

6

2

8

-

2
-

f.
O

'

See footnotes at end of table.

8

a
0

3

*.

3

-

2

13
6

-

1

2

7

1

1

12

1

-

-

1

1

2
2

6

3
9
6

-a
J

-

1

1
1

-j

1
1

1

-

6

-

2

6

-

5

-

-

2

1

2

2

1

1

-

-

-

2

4
4

-

-

2

1

-

2

1

-

-

2

1

1

-

2

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

6

6

-

2
1

-

-

“




Ta b le 14 Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — St. Louis M o.-IIL1 Continued
—
(N um ber and average straight-time hourly earnings2 of production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

SELEC TED

Num ­
ber
of
work­
ers

NU HBER )F NO]jlKERS R E C E I: v i n g STRA1: g h t - i ■IH E GOURL1 E A R N IN G S
Aver3 . 6 0 3 . 7 0 3 .8 0 4 . 0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 .0 0 5 . 2 0 5 .4 0
age
AND
UNDER
hourly
earn­ 3 . 6 0 UNDER
3 .7 0 3 . 8 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 40 4 .6 0 4 . 8 0 5 . 0 0 5 .2 0 5 . 4 0 5 . 6 0
ings2

( I N D O L L A R S ) OF—
5 .6 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 0 0 6 . 2

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

6 .0 0

0

6 .4 0
AND
O V ER

6 .4 0

O C C U P A T IO M S — C O N T IN U E D

C U T T I N G AMD C R E A S I M G : ~ C O H T I N U E D
C U T T I N G - AMD C E E A S IN G -P B E S S
O P E R A TO R S — C C B T IH O B D
C Y L IN D E R OB B O T A R Y ..................................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
P L A T E N .....................................................................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
C U T T I N G - AND C R E A S IN G -P R E S S
F E E D E R S 4 ..................................................................
T I H E ............................................................
H E N .....................................................................
T I H E ............................................................
C Y L IN D E R OR R O TA R Y 3................................
s t r i p p e r s ! ...............................................................
T I H E ............................................................
B A N D ...........................................................................
S L I T T E R O P E R A TO R S 3 ......................................
.
T I H E ............................................................
S L C T T E R O P E R A T O R S ...........................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
H E N ....................................................................
F IN IS H IN G :
F O L D I N G - AND G L U IN G -H A C H IM E
O P E R A T O R S , A U T O M A T IC ................................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
H B N ....................................................................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E .............................................
S E T U P AND O P E R A T E .....................................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
H E N ....................................................................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
S T I T C H E R O P E R A T O R S ........................................
H E N .....................................................................
T A P I N G - H A C B I N E O P E R A T O R S .......................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
H E N .....................................................................
N O H E N ...............................................................
T I H E ............................................................
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................

See footnotes at end of table.

17
10

7
20

14
6
15
11
11

7
10
10

9
7
29
16
9
7
7

28
16
12

23
12
11

28
16
12

23
12
11
10
8

28
17
11
10

18
12

6

$ 4 .8 6
4 .6 3
5 .1 8
4 .5 2
4 .3 5
4 .9 1
4 .4 6
4 .3 3
4 .5 7
4 .4 3
4 .6 0
3 .9 5
3 .9 4
3 .8 8
4 .5 7
4 .3 1
5 .1 0
5 .3 6
5 .3 6

4 .5 0
4 .3 9
4 .6 5
4 .5 6
4 .5 0
4 .6 2
4 .5 0
4 .3 9
4 .6 5
4 .5 6
4 .5 0
4 .6 2
4 .4 4
4 .5 4
4 .3 7
4 .3 2
4 .4 6
4 .6 2
4 .2 4
4 .0 8
4 .5 5

-

1

51
1
1
51

-

~

2
2

-

-

-

4
4
4
-

“

“

-

-

2

2

2
2

2
2

2

2

62
71
1

71

-

1

1

6
6

2
2

3
~
3

~
~

~
“

2

1

3

1

2

-

2

-

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

-

-

1

3
3
~

~

1

-

1

1

1

3
3

6

-

-

1

1

1

~

”

■

-

-

-

1

1

1

-

-

“

“

“

-

-

1

1

1

"

~

~

~

~

2

2

-

-

1

1

-

3
“

2

-

-

-

1

1

•
-

“
~

1

~
-

“

2

2
2

5
5
-

4
4
1

-

-

“
~
-

“
“

-

~
-

”
—

1
1

6

-

6

1

2

2

16
16
-

~
~

6

4
3

~
~

2

-

6

2
2

1
1
1

-

1

1

5
4

1

2

6

1

-

-

1

1

2

3
3

-

1
2

1

1

-

3

-

1

1

1

3
3

6

1

5
4

2

6

2

6

6
6
6
6

4
4
4

1

2
1

5
4

1

1

2

4
4

2

2

6
5

-

1

1
1

1

1

4
4
-

2

1
1

2

2

6

-

4
4

1
1

3
3

6

2

5
4

2
2

1

3
3

1

-

1

2

-

-

1

2

6

1

3

-

3

1

3

1

6
3
3

-

1

2

1

1

2

1

2

2

2

-

5
4

-

2

1

2

4

2

-

1

2

1

1

1
1

-

1

1

1

1

-

1
1
1

-

•
“
~
“
-

~

~
~
”
"
“
*
"
-

~
“
~
"
“
”
~
~
~
~

-




Table 14 Corrugated and solid fiber boxes: Occupational earnings — St. Louis M o.-lll.1 Continued
—
(N umber and average straight-tim e hou rly earnings2 o f production workers in selected occupations, March 1976.)

Department and occupation

Num ­
ber
of
work­
ers

NUHEER C
)F WOI KEBS RECE1 V I KG
Aver3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .8 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 20
age
AND
hourly UNDER
earn­ 3 . 6 0 UNDER
3 .7 0 3 . 8 0 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0
ings2

S TR A J[G H T -1 DIME E OUBL1r E A R lIIN G S
4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 . 4 0

( I N I)0 IL A 1 iS ) 01
5 .6 0 5 .8 0 6 . 0 0

6 .20

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .8 0

6 .4 0

-

3

2

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

6 .00

6

.

6 .4 0
AND
OVER

20

S E L E C T E D 0 C C U P A T I 0 N S - -C 0 N T I B U E D
H IS C E L L 1 H E O U S :
B 1 L E B S .3. ....................................................................
•PTHV
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
B U N D L E B S -P A C K E R S ..............................................
fPTMP
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
H EN ....................................................................
TTM F .
_ _ 7 .......................... _ _
I N C E N T I V E ..............................................
H CHBN ...............................................................
C A T C H E R S ....................................................................
H B N ....................................................................
J A N I T O R S , P O R T E B S , AND C L E A N E F S 3 9
H A IN T E N A N C E R O B K E R S ,
G E N ER A L 0 T I L I T I 3...........................................
T I M E ............................................................
N T r n iiiT r c
« k T M iv m iri 3 9
S H IP P IN G AND R E C E IV IN G C L E R K S 3 9.
S TA R C H H A K E B S . 3.......................................................
t t m * _____t T - - T T .................
P A L L E T IZ E R O P E R A TO R . 3...................................
T I H E ............................................................
fB n rrn R Tv n c 3
«FTMV
TR U C K E R S , P O R E S , F O R K L I F T 3..................
T I M E .................... ................................... T
T R U C K E R S , P O R E B , O TH E R TH A N
E f is r T .T iM r J -

26
20
6

75

$ 4 .2 7
4 .0 6
4*95
4 .3 2
it ft A
HaUO

-

-

_

_
-

3

2
2

8

3

5

4

5

4

_

4 .5 3
4 .3 2
4 .1 1
4 ! 54
4 .3 2
4 .3 6
4 .3 8
4 .0 3

41
27

5 .2 2
5 .1 9

-

4^55
4 .6 1
4 .5 0
4 .*2 8
4 .4 3
6 •6 4
a . 71
0
/1
4 .7 2
4 .4 2

-

3
3

6

g

2
2

0
4

1

3

1

1

7
c
O

16

8

14
£.
O

1

1

-

_
-

2

2

10

_

12

10

40
56
29
27
19
33
30
17

11
1 ft
IU

_

16

1

1

10

8
5

8

5

13

1

1

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

5

1

1

6

5
3

7

2

1

-

2

1

12

4
4

6
6

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

6

1

1
1

4
4

2

-

-

2

8

2

18
4

3
3

8

8

c
D

2

2

8

-

-

-

_

a
7

5
-

1
1
1

2
2

_
-

4
3

-

83

10

-

1

6

-

5

-

2

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

72

_

-

-

_
-

-

2

0

2

14

1

44
8

7
g
15
11

ID
14
77

53

5 • 46

1

1
1
1

4
4

2
4
2
2

1

_

_

-

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

_
-

_
-

_
il

_
-

_
-

fl

2

jj
_

_

4

4

8
8

O

4

17
17

10
9

3

19
15

7

_

1

_

f
l

2

2

i1

‘ The St. Louis Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of St. Louis City, Franklin, Jefferson, St. Charles, and St. Louis Counties, Mo.; and Madison and St. Clair Counties, III.
premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Approximately 6 6 % of the workers were paid on a time basis.
or virtually all workers are men.
4 Includes data for workers in classifications in addition to those shown separately.
s Includes 1 worker at $3.40 to $3.50.
6 Includes 2 workers at $3.30 to $3.40.
7 Includes 1 worker at $3.30 to $3.40.
s A ll workers were under $3.00.
9
A ll workers were paid on a time basis.
10 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $6.60 to $6.80, and 6 at $7.60 and over.
11 All workers were at $7.60 and over.
12 Workers were distributed as follows: 1 at $6.80 to $7.00, and 1 at $7.00 to $7.20.
2 Excluded
3 A ll

3

_
107
11 a

1
122

Ta ble 15.

Method of wage paym ent

(PBfcent of production w aters in corrugated and solid fiber boa manufacturing establishments by method of wage payment,1 United States and selected regions, March 1976)

United
States1
*
3

England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle West

Pacific

All workers.........................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Time-rated workers..................................................
Formal plans.......................................................
Single rate.......................................................
Range of rates.................................................
Individual rates...................................................

75
70
61
9
5

84
62
58
4
22

72
68
61
7
4

65
61
56
5
4

73
69
49
20
3

77
75
71
5
2

70
67
58
9
3

71
69
54
15
2

97
88
84
4
9

incentive workers....................................................
Individual piecework............................................
Group piecework..................................................
Individual bonus..................................................
Group bonus ........................................................

25
3
3
8
12

35
11
16
4
4

27
3

23
10
5
1
7

30
2
2
15
12

29
5
9
1
14

Method of
wage payment

16

28

-

-

3
4
10

1
8
19

-

5
19

3
-

3

Areas
4
4

*
*

Chicago

Time-rated workers....
Formal plans.......
Single rate.......
Range of rates..
Individual rates...

Group piecework.
Individual bon
Group bonus.




100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

84
80
75
5
5

46
46
46

72
72
55
16
-

93
93
71
22
-

56
56
56

-

92
80
69
11
12

-

87
71
64
6
16

66
66
61
5
-

16
1

All

Jersey City

Los
AngelesLong Beach

54
-

8

28
5

7

-

-

44
-

13
-

2
13

3
51

8
16

7

-

-

5
39

13
~

34
(3)
C
2
26

1 For definition of method of wage payment see appendix A.
* Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
3 Less than 0.5 percent.
N TE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.
O

_

8

Milwaukee

Newark

New York

Philadelphia

St. Louis

-

Table 16.

Scheduled weekly hours

(focent of production workers in corrugated and solid fiber boa manufacturing establishments by scheduled weekly hours.1 United States and selected regions. March 1976)

1 Data relate to the predominant schedule for fuH-time day-shift workers in each establishment
* Includes data for regions in addition to those show separately.
n
* Less than 0.5 percent
N TE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.
O

Table 17.

Shift differential provisions

(Percent of production workers in corrugated and solid fiber boa manufacturing establishments by shift differential provisions.1 United States and selected regions. March 1976)
■Ct

CJ1

Shift differential

United
States*

England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

84.5
84.5
84.5
_
7.0
8.9
28.9
5.2
_
31.1
_
3.4
_
_
-

94.5
94.5
88.7
2.6
1.1
2.2
3.4
8.4
57.8
6.3
1.2
4.4
1.2
_
_
_
4.5

100.0
100.0
100.0
_
4.8
3.6
18.0
21.4
30.5
10.4
4.0
_
_
7.3
_
_
_
_

Southeast

Southwest

96.4
96.4
96.4
1.9
_
1.4
23.6
21.9
31.2
1.7
10.7
2.0
_
1.9
_
_
_
_
-

92.6
92.6
92.6
_
8.1
3.2
24.2
16.7
32.7
_
3.3
_
4.4
_

Great
Lakes

Middle West

Pacific

89.5
8&5
72.3

91.2
9L2
91.2

_
_
6.4
12.8
24.7
8.1
14.0
6.3
_

_
_
_

_
_
66.6
_

17.2
_
_
17.2

_
_
_
_
_

Second shift
Workers in establishments with
mcnnd-shift provisions ..........................
With shift differential..........................................
Uniform cents per hour....................................
5 cents.......................................................
6 cents.......................................................
7 cents.......................................................
8 cents.......................................................
9 cents.......................................................
10 cents......................................................
11 cents .....................................................
12 cents .....................................................
13 cents ......................................................
14 cents......................................................
15 cents ......................................................
16 cents......................................................
17 cents ......................................................
18 cents ......................................................
20 cents.....................................................
Uniform percentage..........................................
3 percent.....................................................
4 percent.....................................................
5 percent.....................................................
7 percent.....................................................
8.5 percent..................................................
10 percent...................................................
Other formal paid differential...........................
See footnotes at end of table.




94.7
94.7
92.1
1.9
1.7
2.5
9.4
10.7
33.6
10.5
10.8
2.3
.9
4.7
.4
2.1
.4
.2
2.4
.1
.3
.9
.4
.2
.4
.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.9
1.0
1.6
1.4

_
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

97.3
97.3
96.5
3.6
.9
4.6
7.7
7.6
33.4
9.6
21.3
4.4
1.6
1.4
_
_
_
.6
.8
.4
_
_
_
_
.3
-

_

_
_
_
_
_

_

_
1.2
3.4
1.9
13.6
4.5

_
_
_

_
_

-

-

Table 17.

Shift differential provisions— Continued

(Percent of production workers in corrugated and solid fiber box manufacturing establishments by shift differential provisions,1 United States and selected regions, March 1976)

Shift differential

United
States2

England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle West

Pacific

84.9
84.9
81.9
2.6
12.7
1.6
1.2
1.4
41.3
2.6
1.2
2.9
.14.4
-

92.9
92.9
92.9
4.8
17.8

73.7
73.7
73.7
1.4
-

76.2
76.2
76.2
9.3
3.8
10.9

88.3
88.3
88.3
1.7
2.6
8.0

75.2
75.2
52.8
1.4
4.0
11.9

86.3
86.3
86.3
1.7

Third or other late shift
W
brkers in establishments with thirdor other late shift provisions.................................
With shift differential..........................................
Uniform cents per hour.....................................
Under 10 cents............................................
10 cents ......................................................
11 cents ......................................................
12 cents ......................................................
12.5 cents...................................................
13 cents......................................................
14 cents......................................................
15 cents ......................................................
16 cents......................................................
17 cents ......................................................
17.5 cents...................................................
18 cents......................................................
19 cents ......................................................
20 cents......................................................
21 cents ......................................................
22 cents ......................................................
23 cents ......................................................
25 cents ......................................................
28 cents ......................................................
Uniform percentage...........................................
5 percent.....................................................
8.5 percent..................................................
15 percent...................................................

82.7
82.7
80.9
.9
2.2
.6
7.6
.3
7.1
5.7
19.3
5.5
4.4
.3
6.0
.6
9.8
1.6
7.1
.1
1.5
.4
.7
.4
.2
.1

Other formal paid differential...........................

1.1

70.4
70.4
70.4
5.2
-

4.9
7.0
7.7
7.4
11.9
4.5
15.1
-

-

3.6
25.4
15.9
5.9
-

4.0
15.4
-

-

21.2
11.5
18.4
1.9
7.6
5.6
6.1
-

-

24.4
5.3
2.3
9.7
4.4
6.1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4.4
5.0
18.9
8.5
6.1
14.3
1.9
11.9
4.3

-

6.7

-

-

.6

-

-

-

-

-

—

—

-

-

-

-

-

1.6
1.0
.7
1.4

-

-

-

—

5.5
_
14.4
12.8
2.7
-

7.1
7.1

-

—

-

-

15.3

-

_
_
_
_
-

1.7
10.0
61.8
1.2
5.4
4.5
-

—

1 Refers to policies of establishments currently operating late shifts or having provisions covering late shifts.
2 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
N TE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.
O

Table 18.

Shift differential practices

(Percent of production workers in corrugated and solid fiber box manufacturing establishments employed on late shifts by amount of pay differential, United States and selected regions, March
1976)

Shift differential

United
States1

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

29.7
29.7
29.1
.5
.5
.9
3.1
3.6

24.9
24.9
24.9

29.3
29.3
28.2
.7
.4
.7
1.3
2.9

30.5
30.5
30.5

Southeast

Southwest

30.6
30.6
30.6
.6
.7
7.0
7.0

32.2
32.2
32.2

Great
Lakes

Middle West

Pacific

26.5
26.5
20.9

28.5
28.5
28.5

Second shift
W
orkers employed on second shift............................
Receiving differential............................................
Uniform cents per hour.....................................
5 cents........................................................
6 cents........................................................
7 cents........................................................
8 cents............................. „.........................
9 cents........................................................
See footnotes at end of table.




-

3.2
-

3.0

-

2.0
1.3
5.5
6.2

-

1.4
1.4
10.1
6.8

30.6
30.6
30.6
.9
.2
1.8
2.5
2.7

-

-

_
1.9
3.9

_
-

Ta ble 18.

Shift differential practices— Continued

(Percent of production workers in corrugated and solid fiber box manufacturing establishments employed on late shifts by amount of pay differential, United States and selected regions March
1976)
’

Shift differential

United
States1

England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle West

Pacific

Second shift_Ceattnued
Workers employed on second shift - Continued
Receiving differential - Continued
Uniform cents per hour - Continued
10 cents.....................................................
11 cents .....................................................
12 cents .....................................................
13 cents .....................................................
14 cents.....................................................
15 cents .....................................................
16 cents .....................................................
17 cents .....................................................
18 cents .....................................................
20 cents .....................................................
Uniform percentage..........................................
3 percent.....................................................
4 percent....................................................
5 percent........................ ............................
7 percent....................................................
8.5 percent..................................................
10 percent...................................................
Other formal paid differential...........................

10.1
3.5
3.5
.7
.3
1.3
.1
.6
.1
.6
.1
.3
.1
(*)
.1

8.0
2.0
7.8
.8
-

17.9
2.4
.2
_
1.2
.4
_
.9
.6
.2
.3

9.2
3.7
1.2
1.4
_
-

9.6
.7
3.3
.9
_
.8
_
_
_
_
■-

10.1
.6
_
1.7
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

9.8
3.7
6.7
1.4
.5
.4
_
_
_
_
_
-

4.8
2.5
5.0
2.8
_
_
_
_
_
_
5.5
5.5
_
_
-

_
20.7
_
_
.5
1.0
.7
4.8
.7
_
_
_
_
_
_

5.2
5.2
5.1
.1
.1
(*)
.5
.4
1.1
.4
.4
.3
.1
.7
.1
.7
.1
-

3.6
3.6
3.6
.5
.4
.6
1.0
.4
.6
-

3.5
3.5
3.5
.5
.5
.1
1.7
.7
-

8.8
8.8
8.8
4.0
1.0
1.1
1.1
1.6
-

7.7
7.7
7.7
_
_
2.1
1.0
1.3
.3
2.1
_
.5
.4
_
-

3.4
3.4
3.4
_
_
_
_
_
2.1
.6
_
_
_
_
_
_
.8
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

5.6
5.6
5.6
.1
_
_
_
.2
.1
1.4
.8
.1
_
.6
.3
1.2
_
.6
_
.2
_
_
-

3.0
3.0
2.0
_
_
_
_
_
_

6.1
6.1
6.1
_
_
_
_

(*)

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.9

-

Third nr other late shift

4*

W
orkers employed on third
or other late sh ift................................................
Receiving differential...........................................
Uniform cents per hour....................................
Under 10 cents............................................
10 cents.....................................................
11 cents .....................................................
12 cents.....................................................
12.5 cents...................................................
13 cents.....................................................
14 cents.....................................................
15 cents .....................................................
16 cents .....................................................
17 cents .....................................................
17.5 cents...................................................
18 cents.....................................................
19 cents.....................................................
20 cent*.....................................................
21 cents .....................................................
22 cents .....................................................
23 cents .....................................................
25 cents....... ..............................................
28 cents.....................................................
Uniform percentage..........................................
5 percent.....................................................
8.5 percent..................................................
15 percent...................................................




Other formal paid differential...........................

' Includes data for regions in addition to those show separately.
n
* Less than 0.05 percent.
NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

_

1.1
.5
.4

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
.7
5.1

_
.4
_
_
_
_
-

Table 19. Paid holidays
(Percent of production workers in corrugated and solid fiber box manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid holidays. United States and selected regions, March 1976)

United
States1

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle W
est

Pacific

All workers.........................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

W
orkers in establishments
providing paid holidays..........................................
Under 6 days ......................................................
6 days ...............................................................
6 days plus 2 half days.....................................
7 days ................................................................
7 days plus 1 or 2 half days.............................
8 days ...............................................................
8 days plus 1 or 2 half days.............................
9 days ................................................................
9 days plus 1 or 2 half days.............................
10 days ..............................................................
10 days plus 1 or 2 half days............................
11 days ..............................................................
11 days plus 1 or 2 half days............................
12 days ..............................................................
12 days plus 1 half day.....................................
13 days ..............................................................
14 days ..............................................................

100
(*)
2
(2
)
1
1
3
1
19
(*)
41
(*)
16
1
12
<
2)
2
(*)

100
4
2
2
12

100
_
_

100
_
4

100
1
9

100
_
2

-

-

-

-

-

_
41

100
_
1
(2)
(2
)
(2)
2
1
10
(2)
55
(2)
28

100
_
_
2
5
27
1
60

100
_
1
_
1
5
_
10
2
7

Number of
paid holidays

4*

00




-

29
-

34
5
5
-

6
-

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
* Less than 0.5 percent.
N TE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.
O

1
3
2
13
(2)
26
1
13
2
28
1
9
1

3

3
3
9

3
35

33
-

-

-

55

48

51

_

_

_

_

_

_
-

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

2

_

5
_

17
_

57

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

Ta ble 20.

Paid vacations

(Percent of production workers in corrugated and solid fiber boa manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, United States and
selected regions, March 1976)

Vacation policy
All workers........................................................

United
States1

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle West

Pacific

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
57
43

100
65
35

100
63
37

(*)

-

-

100
34
66
-

100
59
40
2

100
75
25
-

100
35
65
-

100
80
20
-

100
93
6
1

89
7
4

100
_

86
14

91
9
-

95
2
3

97
3

92
5
3

95
5
-

50
50
_

71
5
19
4

92
5
3
-

65
8
27
-

87
9
3
-

89
3
8
-

88
12
-

76
7
17
-

83
_
17
-

3
3
46
48

4
1
85
8
3

6
5
89
-

5
1
80
1
13

6
84
9
-

9
1
87
3
-

3
_
97
-

1
2
92
5
-

2
_
98
_
-

_
_
49
51
_

1
1
85
9
3
3

2
4

_
80
2
5
13

3
3
85
9
3
-

7
7
90
3
_
-

_
100
_
-

92
6
2
-

_
_
100
_
_
-

_
_
44
51
5
-

3
80
2
14

13
77
9
-

7
13
74
5

13
87
-

_
2
1
92
5
-

_
4
_
93
3
_

_
1
_
51
48
_

7
12

-

2

13

27
_

16

_
_
39
_
57

_

5

3

53
_

M ethod of payment

W
orkers in establishments
providing paid vacations.......................................
Length-of-time payment.......................................
Percentage payment.............................................
Other ..................................................................
Am ount of vacation pay3
After 1 ye ar of service:

1 week...............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks.................................
2 weeks .............................................................
After 2 years o f service:

1 week...............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks.................................
2 weeks .............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.................................
After 3 years o f service:

4*
CD

1 week...............................................................
Over 1 and under 2 weeks.................................
2 weeks.............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.................................
3 weeks .............................................................
After S years of service:

1 week...............................................................
Under 2 weeks....................................................
2 weeks .............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.................................
3 weeks.............................................................
4 weeks.............................................................

%

_
-

After 10 years of service:

1 week...............................................................
2 weeks.............................................................
Over 2 and under 3 weeks.................................
3 weeks .............................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks.................................
4 or 5 weeks.....................................................
After 15 years of service:
1 week...............................................................
2 weeks .............................................................
3 weeks.............................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks.................................
4 weeks .............................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks.................................
5 weeks .............................................................
After 20 years of sendee:
1 week...............................................................
2 weeks ..
3 weeks ..
Over 3 and under 4 weeks.................................
4 weeks .............................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks.................................
5 weeks .............................................................
Over 5 and under 6 weeks.................................
See footnotes at end of table.




2
9

1
6
82
8
3

89
-

1

2

-

-

4
17
2
66

7

2
16
2

11
10

(*)

8
3

20
71
-

67

2

1
4
11
1

-

48

65

3

18
-

27

1

7
8

1

4
64

13

70
9
-

-

-

7
12
10
4
51
2

2

11

9
3

50
36
-

7
52
5

21
5

2
-

15
-

68

2
75

-

4

2

-

-

5
24

2
10
1

65

45

6

39

_

-

4
1

_
_
_

1

13

_

33

_

21

1
11

_

_

54
3
23

16
8

-

10

18

Table 20.
(Percent of

Paid vacations— Continued

production workers

in corrugated and solid fiber Ink manufacturing establishments with formal provisions for paid vacations after selected periods of service, United States and

Vacation policy

United
States1

Southwest

Great
Lakes

-

-

-

-

36

7
12
10
4
23
2
43
_
_

-

-

-

5
24
27
44

21
24
52
3
_
_
_
-

Border
States

Southeast

-

-

-

11
7
36
5
37
5

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

-

Middle Vfest

Pacific

Amount of vacation pay3—Continued
n years or service:—s e n e e i
6 weeks ..............................................................
After 25 years of service:
1 week................................................................
2 weeks ..............................................................
3 weeks ..............................................................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks..................................
4 weeks ..............................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks..................................
5 weeks ............................................................
Over 5 and under 6 weeks..................................
6 weeks
Over 6 and under 7 weeks ,,,
7 weeks
Over 7 weeks......................................................
After 30 years of sendee:4
1 week................................................................
2 weeks ..............................................................
3 iwwks
...........................
Over 3 and under 4 weeks..................................
4 weeks ..............................................................
Over 4 and under 5 weeks..................................
5 weeks ..............................................................
Over 5 and under 6 weeks..................................
6 weeks ........................................................
Over 6 and under 7 weeks..................................
7 weeks............................................... .............
Over 7 weeks......................................................
m in t

Ci
J

O

3
1
4
11
1
22
1
50
1
3
1
(*)
3
1
4
11
1
22
1
26
1
28
1
(*>
4

2
7
8

2
7
3
23
66

_

_

_
-

_
-

_
2
7
8
20
_
30

_

2
7
3
23

_

39

33

27

-

-

_

_

_
_

_

-

-

-

2
9
1
22
1
60
2
4
_
_
-

11
7
36
5
21
5
16

7
12
10
4
23
2
20

-

-

5
24
27

-

-

-

23
60

-

2
9
1
22
1
28
1
34
1
2

~

23

_

_
_

_

16
28
-

'

—
21
24

-

—

—

31
3
21

-

-

"

1 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.
* Less than 0.5 percent.
3 Vacation payments, such as percent of annual earnings, were converted to an equivalent time basis. Periods of service were chosen arbitrarily and do not necessarily reflect individual
establishment provisions for progression. For example, changes indicated at 10 years may include changes that occurred between 5 and 10 years.
4 Vacation provisions were virtually the same after longer periods of service.




N TE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.
O

1
11
—
8
11
_
22
12
3
32
1
11
8
7
26
7
3
37

Table 21.

Health, insurance, and retirement plans

(Percent of production workers in corrugated and solid fiber box manufacturing establishments with specified health, insurance, and retirement plans,1 United States and selected regions, March
1976)

Type of plan
All workers........................................................

United
States1
2

New
England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle West

Pacific

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
86

98
85

100
92

100
88

100
71

100
79

99
88

97
74

100
98

90
76

77
63

88
80

91
77

96
68

98
77

88
75

83
60

99
97

88
82
70

86
86
77

77
76
75

90
90
81

87
87
65

85
85
60

97
96
81

91
89
67

85
29
29

4

2

4

7

-

-

(4)

3

29

1
31
31
100
61
100
61
100
61
91
57
96
96
96
93
93
3
3
10
1
9

-

Workers in establishments providing:
Life insurance....................................................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Accidental death and
dismemberment insurance..................................
Noncontributory plans......................................
Sickness and accident insurance
or sick leave or both3 .......................................
Sickness and accident insurance......................
Noncontributory plans...................................
Sick leave (full pay.
no waiting period).........................................
Sick leave (partial pay
or waiting period)..........................................
Long-term disability insurance..............................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Hospitalization insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans......................................
Surgical insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans.......................................
Major medical insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans......................................
Retirement plans5 *..............................................
.
Pensions..........................................................
Noncontributory plans................................
Actuarial plans*...........................................
Noncontributory plans................................
Profit-sharing plans7 .....................................
Noncontributory plans................................
Severance pay.................................................
Actuarial plans*...........................................
Profit-sharing plans7 .....................................

1

5
10
9
99
79
99
79
99
78
93
74
90
88
84
83
80
5
4
8
6
2

-

18
16
100
74
100
74
100
74
98
72
88
81
81
61
61
21
21
10
3
6

-

5
5
100
93
100
93
100
93
85
79
94
94
94
93
93
1
1
20
20
-

9
9
100
67
100
67
97
64
92
59
88
86
81
79
75
6
6
3
-

3

7
24
16
100
76
100
76
100
76
92
67
87
82
74
74
66
8
8
6
6

-

6
5
100
76
100
76
100
76
97
78
88
87
81
83
78
3
3
6
4
2

-

_
_
97
61
97
61
97
61
91
59
90
84
68
76
60
9
7
5
5
-

_
_
_
_
-

Includes those plans for which the employer pays at least part of the cost and excludes legally required plans such as workers’ compensation and social security; however, plans required by

State temporary disability laws are included if the employer contributes more than is legally required or the employees receive benefits in excess of legal requirements. "Noncontributory plans"
include only those plans financed entirely by the employer




41
10
10
100
96
100
96
100
96
100
96
91
91
91
91
91

2

Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.

3

Unduplicated total of workers receiving sickness and accident insurance and sick leave shown separately.

4 Less than

0.5 percent.

5

Unduplicated total of workers covered by pension plans and severance pay shown separately.

*

Actuarial plans are those which are not based on profits.

7

Profit-sharing plans include those for which the employer purchases an annuity payable at retirement with funds accumulated to the employees’ credit at retirement.

NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals.

Table 22.

Other selected benefits

(Pncent of production workers in corrugated and solid fibor boa manufacturing establishments providing funeral leave pay, jury duty pay, and technological severance pay, 1 United States and
selected regions, March 1976)

Type of benefit

United
States*

England

Middle
Atlantic

Border
States

Southeast

Southwest

Great
Lakes

Middle West

Pacific

95
93
13

96
96
1

85
83
9

84
93
12

99
94
5

98
98
17

90
88
4

Workers in establishments
with provisions for:
Funeral leave...........................................................
Jury duty leave .....................................................
Technological severance pay.....................................

94
92
7

1 For definition of items, see appendix A.
* Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately.




92
89

Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey

Scope of survey

The survey included establishments engaged primarily
in manufacturing corrugated and solid fiber boxes from pur­
chased paperboard of fiber stock (SIC 2653 as defined in the
1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual, prepared by the U.S. Office of Management and
Budget). Separate auxiliary units such as central offices
were excluded.
Establishments studied were selected from those em­
ploying 30 workers or more at the time of reference of
the data used in compiling the universe lists. Table A-l
shows the number of establishments and workers esti­
mated to be within the scope of the survey, as well as
the number actually studied by the Bureau.

accuracy at a minimum cost, a greater proportion of
large than of small establishments was studied. In com­
bining the data, however, all establishments were given
an appropriate weight. All estimates are presented, there­
fore, as relating to all establishments in the industry, ex­
cluding only those below the minimum size at the time
of reference of the universe data.
Establishment definition

An establishment is defined for this study as a single
physical location where manufacturing operations are per­
formed. An establishment is not necessarily identical with
a company, which may consist of one establishment or
more.
Employment

Method of study

Estimates of the number of workers within the scope
of the study are intended as a general guide to the size and
composition of the industry’s labor force, rather than as
precise measures of employment.

Data were obtained by personal visits of the Bureau’s
field staff to a representative sample of establishments
within the scope of the survey. To obtain appropriate

Table A-1. Estimated number of establishments and employees within scope of survey
and number studied, corrugated and solid fiber box industry, March 1976
Workers in establishments

Number of establishments3
Region1 and area2

Within scope of
study

Within scope of study
Actually studied

Actually studied
Total4

Production workers

United States5 .............................................................................

828

381

85,625

61,912

46,335

New England..............................................................................
Middle Atlantic5 ...........................................................................
Jersey City, N.J........................................................................
Newark, N J.............................................................................
New York, N.Y-N.J....................................................................
Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J...............................................................
Border States..............................................................................
Southeast ...................................................................................
Southwest...................................................................................
Great Lakes5 ...............................................................................
Chicago, III.............................................................................
Milwaukee, Wis........................................................................
Middle West5 ..............................................................................
St. Louis, Mo.—
Ill.....................................................................
Pacific5 .......................................................................................
Los Angeles-Long Beach, C alif.......................................... ' .....

54
160
8
15
33
23
47
112
59
244
64
13
52
18
83
29

24
78
7
8
14
10
21
48
25
114
28
10
25
12
39
17

5,057
16,727
1,133
1,148
2,787
2,627
4,779
11,978
5,905
26,769
6,630
1,734
4,619
1,589
8,139
3,249

3,741
12,400
847
908
2,021
1,985
3,435
8,949
4,238
18,911
4,640
1,244
3,181
1,111
5,838
2,264

2,783
9,653
1,008
845
1,503
1,486
2,350
5,788
2,997
14,852
3,341
1,539
2,710
1,236
4,537
2,130

1 The regions used in this study include New E n g la n d — Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont; M id d le A tla n tic —N e w Jersey,
New York, and Pennsylvania; B o rd e r S ta te s — Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; Sot/fkMSf—Alablama, Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee; S o u th w e st— Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas; G reat lakes—Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota,
Ohio, and Wisconsin; M id d le West—Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota; and Pacific—California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.
2 See individual area tables 7-14 for definitions of selected areas.
3 Includes only those establishments with 20 workers or m at the time of reference of the universe data.
ore
4 Includes executive, professional, office, and other workers in addition to the production worker category shown separately.
3 Includes data for regions in addition to those shown separately. Alaska and Hawaii were not included in the study.
6 Includes data for areas in addition to those shown separately.
N TE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals*
O




53

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the
U.S. Office of Management and Budget through February
1974.
Except in New England, a Standard Metropolitan Statis­
tical Area is defined as a county or group of contiguous
counties which contains at least one city of 50,000 in­
habitants or more. Counties contiguous to the one con­
taining such a city are included in a Standard Metropolitan
Statistical Area if, according to certain criteria, they are
essentially metropolitan in character and are socially and
economically integrated with the central city. In New
England, where the city and town are administratively more
important than the county, they are the units used in
defining Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas.

Production workers

The terms “production workers” and “production and
related workers,” used interchangeably in this bulletin, in­
clude working supervisors and all nonsupervisory workers
engaged in nonoffice activities. Administrative, executive,
professional, and technical personnel, office clerical work­
ers, and force-account construction employees, who are
used as a separate work force on the firm’s own properties,
are excluded.
Occupations selected for study

Occupational classification was based on a uniform set
of job descriptions designed to take account of interestab­
lishment and interarea variations in duties within the same
job. (See appendix B for these descriptions.) The criteria
for selection of the occupations were: The number of
workers in the occupation; the usefulness of the data in
collective bargaining; and appropriate representation of
the production worker job scale in the industry. Work­
ing supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees,
and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary
workers were not reported in the data for selected occupa­
tions but were included in the data for all production
workers.

Labor-management agreements

Separate wage data are presented, where possible, for
establishments that had (1) a majority of the production
workers covered by labor-management contracts, and (2)
none or a minority of the production workers covered by
labor-management contracts.
Method o f wage payment

Wage data

Information on wages relates to straight-time hourly
earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Incentive
payments, such as those resulting from piecework or
production bonus systems, and cost-of-living bonuses were
included as part of the workers’ regular pay. Nonproduc­
tion bonus payments, such as Christmas or yearend bonuses,
were excluded.
Average (mean) hourly rates or earnings for each occupa­
tion or category of workers, such as production workers,
were calculated by weighting each rate (or hourly earn­
ings) by the number of workers receiving the rate, total­
ing, and dividing by the number of individuals. The hourly
earnings of salaried workers were obtained by dividing
straight-time salary by normal rather than actual hours.
The median designates position; that is, one-half of the
employees surveyed received more than this rate and onehalf received less. The middle range is defined by two rates
of pay such that one-fourth of the employees earned less
than the lower of these rates and one-fourth earned more
than the higher rate.

Tabulations by method of wage payment relate to the
number of workers paid under the various time and in­
centive wage systems. Formal rate structures for time­
rated workers provide single rates or a range of rates for
individual job categories. In the absence of a formal rate
structure, pay rates are determined primarily by the quali­
fications of the individual worker* A single rate structure is
one in which the same rate is paid to all experienced work­
ers in the same job classification. (Learners, apprentices, or
probationary workers may be paid according to rate
schedules which start below the single rate and permit the
workers to achieve the full job rate over a period of time.)
An experienced worker occasionally may be paid above or
below the single rate for special reasons, but such pay­
ments are exceptions. Range-of-rate plans are those in
which w
the minimum, maximum, or both of these rates
paid experienced workers for the same job are specified.
Specific rates of individual workers within the range may
be determined by merit, length of service, or a combina­
tion of these. Incentive workers are classified under piece­
work or bonus plans. Piecework is work for which a pre­
determined rate is paid for each unit of output. Produc­
tion bonuses are for production in excess of a quota or for
completion of a task in less than standard time.

Size of community

Scheduled weekly hours

Tabulations by size of community pertain to metro­
politan and nonmetropolitan areas. The term “metro­
politan areas,” as used in this bulletin, refers to the

Data on weekly hours refer to the predominant work
schedule for full-time production workers employed on the
day shift.




54

and New Jersey, where temporary disability insurance laws
require employer contributions,1 plans are included only
if the employer (1) contributes more than is legally re­
quired, or (2) provides the employees with benefits which
exceed the requirements of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to formal
plans which provide full pay or a proportion of the worker’s
pay during absence from work because of illness; informal
arrangements have been omitted. Separate tabulations are
provided for (1) plans which provide full pay and no wait­
ing period, and (2) plans providing either partial pay or a
waiting period.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for complete
or partial payment of doctors’ fees. Such plans may be
underwritten by a commercial insurance company or a
nonprofit organization, or they may be a form of selfinsurance.
Major medical insurance, sometimes referred to as ex­
tended medical or catastrophe insurance, includes plans
designed to cover employees for sickness or injury in­
volving an expense which exceeds the normal coverage
of hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations of retirement pensions are limited to plans
which provide regular payments for the remainder of the
retiree’s life. Data are presented separately for retirement
severance pay (one payment or several over a specified
period of time) made to employees on retirement. Estab­
lishments providing both retirement severance payments
and retirement pensions to employees were considered
as having both retirement pensions and retirement sev­
erance plans; however, establishments having optional plans
providing employees a choice of either retirement sev­
erance payments or pensions were considered as having
only retirement pension benefits.

Shift provisions and practices

Shift provisions relate to the policies of establishments
either currently operating late shifts or having formal pro­
visions covering late-shift work. Practices relate to workers
employed on late shifts at the time of the survey.

Supplementary benefits

Supplementary benefits in an establishment were con­
sidered applicable to all production workers if they applied
to half or more of such workers in the establishment.
Similarly, if fewer than half of the workers were covered,
the benefit was considered nonexistent in the establish­
ment. Because of length-of-service and other eligibility
requirements, the proportion of workers receiving the
benefits may be smaller than estimated.
Paid holidays. Paid holiday provisions relate to fullday and half-day holidays provided annually.
Paid vacations. The summaries of vacation plans are
limited to formal arrangements and exclude informal plans
whereby time off with pay is granted at the discretion of
the employer or supervisor. Payments not on a time basis
were converted; for example, a payment of 2 percent of
annual earnings was considered the equivalent of 1 week’s
pay. The periods of service for which data are presented
represent the most common practices, but they do not nec­
essarily reflect individual establishment provisions for pro­
gression. For example, changes in proportions indicated at
1 0 years of service may include changes which occurred
between 5 and 10 years.

Paid funeral and jury-duty leave. Data for paid funeral
and jury-duty leave relate to formal plans which provide
at least partial payment for time lost as a result of attend­
ing funerals of specified family members or serving as a
juror.

Health, insurance, and retirement plans. Data are pre­
sented for health, insurance, pension, and retirement sev­
erance plans for which the employer pays all or a part of
the cost, excluding programs required by law such as
workers’ compensation and social security. Among plans
included are those underwritten by a commercial in­
surance company and those paid directly by the employer
from his current operating funds or from a fund set aside
for this purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form of life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of
insurance under which predetermined cash payments are
made directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly
basis during illness or accident disability. Information is
presented for all such plans to which the employer con­
tributes at least a part of the cost. However, in New York




Technological severance pay. Data relate to formal
plans providing for payments to employees permanently
separated from the company because of a technological
change or plant closing.

1
The temporary disability insurance laws in California and
Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.

55

Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys
is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are
employed under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establish­
ment to establishment and from area to area. This permits the grouping of occupational
wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of this emphasis on inter­
establishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau’s job des­
criptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those
prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau’s field
staff is instructed to exclude working supervisors, apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees,
and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

Adjuster, machine

Sets up, regulates, and adjusts one or more of the various
production machines in the establishment. Work involves
m ost o f the following: Setting up and adjusting machines
for changes in production by installing required units or
tools, and setting guides, stops, or other controls to handle
the stock to be processed; operating machine until accurate
production has been achieved; examining machine to ascer­
tain reason for faulty production and making necessary
adjustment.
For wage survey purposes, workers in this occupation
are classified according to the type of machines they
adjust as follows:

Catcher

Removes processed paper stock or products, such as
paperboard boxes, tubes, etc., from the discharge end of
machines (e.g., cutting and creasing presses, spiral tube
winders, stitching machines, etc.). Exclude from this classi­
fication off-bearers at the corrugating machine as well as
workers who wrap, bundle, or pack products for shipment
in addition to their duties as catchers.
Corrugator-combining-machine operator

Class A
Complex machines and mechanisms, such as automatic
wrapping machines, automatic folding or gluing machines,
or quadruple stayers.
Class B
Simpler types of machines, such as, slitters, scorers,
cutters, or single stayers.
Baler

Operates baling machine to bale waste material according
to various grades and classifications. Prepares bales for ship­
ment. May assist in loading bales onto trucks or other means
of transportation.
Bundler-packer

Operates machine units which corrugate continuous
sheets of paperboard and glue one or more paperboard sheets (liners) to corrugated center (filler) to form
corrugated paperboard. Work involves m ost o f the follow ­
ing: Positioning rolls of paper on machine supports, thread­
ing paper through various rolls; keeping glue pans supplied
with glue, adjusting feeding guides, pressure, speed, and
temperature of rollers and temperature of glue; regulates
steam application and speed of machine as required to
obtain desired results.
Corrugator-knife operator

(Triplex operator)
Tends the cutting device at the end of the drying board
of the corrugating machine. Work involves m ost o f the
following: Adjusting knife that automatically cuts sheets
to desired length; notifying corrugator operator when desired
number of sheets has been cut; watching the quality of

(Bundler, boxes; packer, tubes)
Wraps, ties, or bundles finished paperboard products
and/or places them in containers for shipment. May seal



containers when full. Include in this occupation workers
who are performing duties as catchers or off-bearers in
addition to the duties described above.

56

board, reporting any defects to corrugator operator; and
assisting other members of crew as directed.

Making necessary adjustments to this section of machine;
threading end of “under” roll through rollers to position,
meeting the corrugated filler; and repairing breaks in the
paper. May assist corrugator-combining machine operator
as directed.

Cutting- and creasing-press feeder

(Die-press feeder)

Electrician, maintenance

Inserts sheets one at a time into the press or, in the case
of automatically fed presses, supplies the feeding mechanism
with sheets. Work involves m ost o f the following: Removing
faulty sheets and any foreign matter that might injure the
dies, and reporting any mechanical trouble to the press opera­
tors. In addition, may assist the press operators in preparing
press for operation.
For wage survey purposes, workers in this occupation
are to be classified according to type of press as follows:

Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as
the installation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the
generation, distribution, or utilization of electric energy
in an establishment. Work involves m ost o f the following:
Installing or repairing any of a variety of electrical equipment
such as generators, transformers, switchboards, controllers,
circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems,
or other transmission equipment; working from blueprints,
drawing, layout, or other specifications; locating and diag­
nosing trouble in the electrical system or equipment; work­
ing standard computations relating to load requirements or
wiring or electrical equipment; using a variety of electrician’s
handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In general
the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Cylinder or rotary
Platen
Other
Cutting- and creasing-press operator

(Die-press operator)
Operates one or more hand or automatically fed cutting
and creasing presses. Work involves m ost o f the following:
Preparing press for operating by positioning cutting and
creasing die on press and obtaining proper register; adjusting
feeding guides or mechanism; inspecting work to insure the
proper operation of the press; feeding and operating press;
and making necessary adjustments to meet specifications.
For wage survey purposes, workers in this occupation
are to be classified according to type of press as follows:

Flexographic printer operator

Sets up and operates one or more flexographic printing
presses which print subject matter on paperstock by means
of flexible rubber plates and rapid drying ink. Work involves
m ost o f the following: Preparing press for operating by
mounting rubber plates on cylinder and installing cylinder on
press; moving levers to engage rolls and adjusting position
of cylinder; tending press while in operation and inspecting
work for required specifications. May also be responsible for
certain fabricating operations (e.g., slotting, die cutting,
folding, gluing) which are performed in connection with the
printing operation.
For wage study purposes, flexographic printer operators
are to be classified by types of operation as follows:

Cylinder or rotary
Platen
Other
D ie m a k e r

(Die setter; die form builder)
Prepares or builds the dies used on the cutting and
creasing presses. Work involves m ost o f the following:
Cutting and bending rules (cutting and creasing metal strips)
to size and shape; assembling and setting rules in the die form
and securing them in place by means of metal or wood
furniture; locking die in the chase; and making an impression
of the die and checking it against the outlines.

Printing operations only
Printing and fabricating operations
Folding- and gluing-machine operator, automatic

(Automatic-folder operator; egg-carton-machine
operator, pail operator)

Double-backer operator

Sets up and operates one or more of the several varieties
of machines that automatically fold or fold and glue boxes
from prepared blanks or sheets cut to outline size. Work
involves m ost o f the following: Setting up and adjusting
the machine to meet the requirement of the type of box
run; supplying the machine with glue and keeping it at the
proper temperature and consistency; keeping the machine

(Double-face operator; combiner double backer;
first helper, corrugating machine)
Tends that section of a corrugator combining machine
at which the second or “under” outside liner is applied
to the corrugated filler. Work involves m ost o f the following:



57

supplied with box blanks or sheets; and examining the
product to see that the machine is functioning properly.
In addition, may make minor repairs on the machine. This
classification does not include workers with duties limited
to feeding the machine and/or removing the completed
product.
For wage study purposes, folding- and gluing machine
operators are to be classified as follows:

requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience. Excluded from this classification are workers
whose primary duties involve setting up or adjusting ma­
chines.
Off-bearer

(Corrugating- combining machine)
Set up and operate
Feed only

Removes processed sheets of corrugated paper from the
discharge end of the corrugating-conibining machine and
piles them on hand trucks, skids, or other conveying
devices.

Janitor

(Sweeper; porter; cleaner)
Palletizer operator

Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory work­
ing areas and washrooms, or premises of an office. .Duties in­
volve a combination o f the following: Sweeping, mopping
or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips, trash,
and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures;
polishing metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies
and minor maintenance services; cleaning lavatories, showers,
and restrooms. Workers who specialize in window washing
are excluded.

(Conveyor-line operator, automatic)
Operates console th a r controls automatic palletizing
equipment to sort, transfer, and stack containers of finished
boxes on pallets. Duties include the following: Reading
production and delivery schedules and stacking pattern
to determine sorting and transfer procedures, arrange­
ment of packages on pallet, and destination of loaded
pallet; identifying packages moving along conveyor and
detecting defective packaging; pressing console, buttons
to deflect packages to predetermined accumulator or reject
line; turning selector switch on palletizer to control stacking
arrangement on pallet and to transfer loaded pallet to storage
or delivery platform. May also supply loading equipment
with empty pallets, stop equipment to clean jams, and
keep record of production performance.

Maintenance worker, general utility

Keeps the machines, mechanical equipment and/or struc­
ture of an establishment (usually a small plant where special­
ization in maintenance work is impractical) in repair. Duties
involve the performance of operations and use of tools
and equipment of several trades, rather than specialization
in any one trade or one type of maintenance work only.
Work involves a combination o f the following: Planning
and laying-out of work relating to repair of buildings,
machines, mechanical and/or electrical equipment; repairing
electrical and/or mechanical equipment; installing, aligning
and balancing new equipment; and repairing buildings,
floors, stairs, as well as making and repairing bins, cribs,
and partitions.

Printer-slotter-machine assistant

(Feeder; printer-slotter first helper)
Assists in the set-up and operation of printer-slotter
machine. Work involves a combination o f the following:
Filling ink fountains of machine; making minor machine
adjustments; feeding paperboard into machine or filling
feeding mechanisms of automatically fed machines. May
also clean machine.
For wage survey purposes, workers in this occupation
are classified according to the color capacity of the printer
as follows:

Mechanic, maintenance

Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an esta­
blishment. Work involves m ost o f the following: Examining
machines and mechanical equipment to diagnose source
of trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling machines and
performing repairs that mainly involve the use of handtools
in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective
parts with items obtained from stock; ordering the produc­
tion of a replacement part by a machine shop or sending
of the machine to a machine shop for major repairs;
preparing written specifications for major repairs or for the
production of parts ordered from machine shop; reassembl­
ing machines; and making all necessary adjustments for
operation. In general, the work of a maintenance mechanic



Single-color printer
Two-color printer
Three-or-more-color printer
Printer-slotter-machine operator

Operates a machine that prints and cuts slots in corrugated
board. Work involves the following: Setting printing plates
or type in position; adjusting the slotting knives; and feeding
blank board into machine, or keeping the automatic feeding
58

device supplied with blank board. Workers who set-up
only are not included in this classification. Also exclude
workers who operate flexographic printers which print from
flexible rubber plates (see Flexographic printer operator).
For wage study purposes, workers in this occupation are
classified according to the color capacity of the printer as
follows:

Slotter operator

(Slotter-scorer operator)
Operates a slotting machine to cut out certain sections
of board. Work involves: Adjusting cutting knives; and
feeding sheets into the machine. This classification includes
operators of slotting machines that also score the sheets.

Single-color printer
Two-color printer
Three-or-more-color printer

Starch maker

(Glue mixer)
Measures, pours, and mixes various ingredients according
to specified formulas to obtain proper consistency of starch
(glue). Manipulates controls to start machine. May trans­
port mixture to corrugating machine.

Roll supply worker

(Roll handler)
Supplies rolls of paper stock to various machines. Work
involves most o f the following: Checking order to deter­
mine type of stock required; transporting rolls of paper from
storage using overhead crane, rail hoist, or other means of
conveyance; and positioning rolls on stands for machine
operator’s use. May also place shafts in rolls.
Shipping and

Stitcher operator

Operates a machine that fastens box parts together by
forcing short pieces of wire into the cardboard and crimps
them. Work involves the following: Folding box along
scored lines, inserting edges of box under stitching mecha­
nisms of machine; and stitching edges together by moving
box under the stitching mechanism.

receiving clerk

Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is
responsible for incoming shipments of merchandise or other
materials.
Shipping work involves:
A knowledge of
shipping procedures, practices, routes, available means of
transportation and rates; and preparing records of the goods
shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and
shipping charges, and keeping a file of shipping records.
May direct or assist in preparing the merchandise for
shipment. Receiving work involves: Verifying or directing
others in verifying the correctness of shipments against
bills of lading, invoices, or other records; checking for
shortages and rejecting damaged goods, routing merchandise
or materials to proper departments; maintaining necessary
records and files.
For wage survey purposes, workers are classified as
follows:

Stripper

(Breaker; folder; peeler; picker)
Removes excess material from stacks or piles of board
sheets that have been run on the cutting and creasing presses.
Work involves: Jogging or lining up the board sheets;
placing them in stacks or piles; and breaking the excess
material from stacks of “ died-out” blanks by hand or
air hammer or other appropriate tools.
In addition,
may smooth the stripped edges with sand paper or
brush.
For wage survey purposes, workers in this occupation are
to be classified as follows:
Stripper, air hammer
Stripper, hand
Stripper, other (including combination o f above)

Shipping clerk
Receiving clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk

Taping-machine operator

Slitter operator

Operates a taping machine that puts glued tape along
edges of container. Work involves the following: Adjust­
ing and setting machine according to the type of container
to be taped and feeding the folded containers into the ma­
chine.

(Creasing and slitting machine operator; slitter-scorer
operator)
Operates a slitting machine to cut paper or board to
desired widths. Work involves the following: Adjusting
cutting knives; and feeding sheets into the machine. This
classification includes operators of slitting machines that
also score the sheets and operators of roll-fed slitting
machines.



Truckdriver

thrives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport
materials, merchandise, equipment, or workers between var­
ious types of establishments such as: Manufacturing plants,
59

Trucker, power

freight depots, warehouses, wholesale and retail establish­
ments, or between retail establishments and customers’
houses or places of business. May also load or unload
truck with or without helpers, make minor mechanical
repairs, and keep truck in good working order. Driversalesworkers and over-the road drivers are excluded.
For wage survey purposes, truckdrivers are classified
by size of equipment as follows:

Operates ia manually controlled gasoline- or electricpowered truck or tractor to transport goods and materials
of all kinds about a warehouse, manufacturing plant, or
other establishment.
For wage survey purposes, workers are classified by
type of truck as follows:

Truckdriver, combination o f types
Truckdriver, other than semi- or trailer
Truckdriver, semi- or trailer




Trucker, power, fo rk lift
Trucker, power, other than fo rklift

60

Industry Wage Studies

The most recent reports providing occupational wage
data for industries included in the Bureau’s program of
industry wage surveys since 1960 are listed below. Copies
are for sale from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S.
Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or
from any of its regional sales offices, and from the regional
Manufacturing
Basic Iron and Steel, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1839
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1975. BLS
Bulletin 1939
Cigar Manufacturing, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1796
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1944
Corrugated and Solid Fiber Boxes, 1976. BLS
Bulletin 1921
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1935
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1763
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1972. BLS
Bulletin 1803
Fluid Milk Industry, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1871
Footwear, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1946
Hosiery, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1863
Industrial Chemicals, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1768
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1894
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1835
Machinery Manufacturing, 1974-75. BLS Bulletin 1929
Meat Products, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1896
Men’s and Boys’ Separate Trousers, 1974. BLS
Bulletin 1906
Men’s and Boys’ Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Night­
wear, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1901
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1843
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1914
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1973-74. BLS Bulletin 1912
Nonferrous Foundries, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1952
Paints and Varnishes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1739
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1719
Petroleum Refining, 1976. BLS Bulletin 1948
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1975. BLS
Bulletin 1923
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1844
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1969. BLS Bulletin
1694
Structural Clay Products, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1942
Synthetic Fibers, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1740



offices of the Bureau of Labor Statistics shown on the
inside back cover. Copies that are out of stock are available
for reference purposes at leading public, college, or univer­
sity libraries, or at the Bureau’s Washington or regional
offices.
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1757
Textiles, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1945
Wages and Demographic Characteristics in Work Clothing
Manufacturing, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1858
West Coast Sawmilling, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1704
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1970. BLS Bulletin
1728
Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1908
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1974.
BLS Bulletin 1930

Nonmanufacturing
Appliance Repair Shops, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1936
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1876
Banking, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1862
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1583
Communications, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1954
Contract Cleaning Services, 1974. BLS Bulletin 1916
Contract Construction, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1911
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1972. BLS
Bulletin 1797
Department Stores, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1869
Educational Institutions: Nonteaching Employees,
1968-69. BLS Bulletin 1671
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1834
Hospitals, 1975-76. BLS Bulletin 1949
Hotels and Motels, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1883
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 16451
Life Insurance, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1791
Metal Mining, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1820
Motion Picture Theaters, 1966. BLS Bulletin 15421
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1973. BLS
Bulletin 1855
Scheduled Airlines, 1975. BLS Bulletin 1951
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, 1970. BLS
Bulletin 1702
1 Bulletin out of stock.

Keep up to date with:

M AJO R
COLLECTIVE
R AR G AM N G
AGREEMENTS
The Bureau of Labor Statistics has published a series of 16 bulletins dealing with key
issues in collective bargaining. The bulletins are based on analysis of about 1800 major
agreements and show how negotiators in different industries handle specific problems.
The studies are complete with illustrative clauses identified by the company and union
signatories, and detailed tabulations on the prevalence of clauses.
ORDER FORM
Title (Check Publication Desired)

—

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Bulletin
Number

Date of
Publication

Major Collective Bargaining Agreements:
Grievance Procedures.......................................................................... 1425-1. .
Severance Pay and Layoff Benefit Plans................................................. 1425-2. .
Supplemental Unemployment Benefit Plans and
Wage-Employment Guarantees........................................................... 1425-3. .
Deferred Wage Increase and Escalator Clauses.................................... 1425-4. .
Management Rights and Union-Management Cooperation.................... 1425-5. .
Arbitration Procedures........................................................................... 1425-6. .
Training and Retraining Provisions......................................................... 1425-7. .
Subcontracting...................................................................................... 1425-8. .
Paid Vacation and Holiday Provisions..................................................... 1425-9. .
Plant Movement, Transfer, and Relocation Allowances........................... 1425-10
Seniority in Promotion and Transfer Provisions..................................... 1425-11
Administration of Negotiated Pension, Health, and
Insurance Plans.................................................................................. 1425-12
Layoff, Recall, and Worksharing Procedures.......................................... 1425-13
Administration of Seniority..................................................................... 1425-14
Hours, Overtime and Weekend Work.................................................... 1425-15
Safety and Health Provisions................................................................. 1425-16

1964.
1965.
1965.
1966.
1966.
1966.
1969.
1969.
1969.
1969.
1970.
1970.
1972.
1972.
1974.
1976.

Total for all 16 Bulletins

To order, check the bulletins wanted
above, and mail the list with payment, to
your nearest Bureau of Labor Statistics regional office.
M AKE C H E C K PAYAB LE TO
SUPERINTENDENT OF
DOCUMENTS.




Price
$ 1.45
1.80
1.80

MO
1.35
2.40
1.05
1.10

1.90
1.55
1.25
1.00
1.75
1.25
1.45
1.30
$23.50

Regional Office
Bureau of Labor Statistics
U.S. Department of Labor
1603 Federal Building, Boston, Mass. 02203
1515 Broadway, New York, N Y. 10036
3535 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
1371 Peachtree Street, N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 30309
230 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago, III. 60604
911 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106
555 Griffin Square Building, Dallas, Texas 75202
450 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 94102
☆

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1977

0 -2 4 1 -0 1 6

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
REGIONAL OFFICES

R e g io n I

R e g io n V

1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: (617)223-6761

9th Floor
Federal Office Building
230 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: (312)353-1880

R e g io n II
R e g io n VI

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: (212) 399-5405

Second Floor
555 Griffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: (214) 749-3516

R e g io n III

3535 Market Street
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: (215)596-1154

R e g io n s VII a n d VIII*

911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: (816)374-2481
R e g io n s IX a n d X * *

R e g io n IV

1371 Peachtree Street, NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: (404)881-4418




450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: (415)556-4678

Regions VII and VIII are serviced by Kansas City
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D C. 20212

Postage and Fees Paid
U S. Department of Labor
Third Class Mail

Official Business
Penalty for private use, $300




Lab-441


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102